Citation
Hydroscope Newsletter

Material Information

Title:
Hydroscope Newsletter
Publisher:
SWFWMD
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Law -- Florida ( LCSH )
Lawyers -- Florida ( LCSH )
City of Tampa ( local )
City of Brooksville ( local )
River basins ( jstor )
Canals ( jstor )
Floods ( jstor )
Spatial Coverage:
North America -- United States of America -- Florida

Notes

Abstract:
Volume 6, No. 3, March 1975
General Note:
Box 6, Folder 1 ( Hydroscope - 1970-1985 ), Item 54
Funding:
Digitized by the Legal Technology Institute in the Levin College of Law at the University of Florida.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text








Southwest Florida
Water Maiagenrent District


P.O. Box 457


Brooksville, Florida 33512


VOLUME 6, NO. 3


March 1975


Consumptive Use

Permit Applications

Now Available
Applications for consumptive use permits
for large water wells are now available from
the District.
Under the new Rules and Regulations on
the Consumptive Use of W ter, al persons
who own wells six inches p diameter or
that produce large quantities of water are
required to obtain a consumptive use permit
from the water management district. Large
quantity is defined as an average production
of 100,000 gallons per day or a capability of
producing 1 million gallons per day.
The requirement applies to all such wells
jin the jurisdiction of the District except
those within the Oklawaha and Wacasassa
Basins, which are scheduled for transfer to
other water management districts July 1.
The applications are available from Bob
Evans, Permits Department, Southwest
Florida Water Management District, P. O.
Box 457, Broksville, $3512.
The new regulations were adopted to
protect the water resources of the area from
overpumping and, thus, from lowering of
lake levels and a drawdown of the aquifer.

GS Releases Map
On Monitor Wells
The U.S. Geological Survey operates and
maintains 1,211 observation wells in Florida
to monitor changes, both quantitative and
qualitative, in the aquifers, according to a
recendy released report published by the
Department of Natural Resources.
More dbon one-fourth of all the wells in
te state are located within the counties
included in this District.
Many of these wells were constructed
under the District's Cooperative Agreement
with the U.S. Geoloical Survey. The Dis
Sand its 11 subbasins share the cost
the Survey on a 50-50 basis. Data is
collected (rom these wells under this agre-
ment also.
The repot, tied "The Obiervation-Well
Network of the U.S. Geological Survey in


FORD PUTS $5.8 MILLION

FOR FRB IN 1976 BUDGET
President Ford's proposed budget for Fiscal Year 1976 contains $5.885 million in
Four River Basins funds, $3.8 million less than the amount requested for the massive
multi-purpose project covering a 15-county area of West Central Florida, Derrill S.
McAteer, Chairman of the District's Governing Board, has announced.
According to Don Feaster, District Executive Director, included in the proposed
federal budget is $5.47 million for construction and $415,000 for a Water Resources
Management study of the Four River Basins area.


Florida," also provides data by individual
counties on groundwater withdrawals for
industrial, municipal and agricultural uses.
Data obtained from these wells is used
to determine hydrologc characteristics of
the aquier, the cause and effect relations
of fluctuations, and the trends of water
levels in the aquifr.
The study, identified as Map Series 65, is
availae free of charge from the District,
Post Office Box 457, BrooksviBe, 33512
as long as the supply lasts.


The funds are to cover a 15-mmnab
period that includes a transitional quarter
that will put the Federal Government into
a different fiscal year ending each Septeu-
ber 30.
The District had requested a total of
$9.7 million for the project from the Fed-
eral government next year.
"Certainly President Ford's proposal is
a vast improvement over the fiscal recom-
mendatiom of the Present's budget in
Fiscal Year 1975, thanks to the hard work
and concerted effort of Florida's Congre-
sional delegation, but it falls far short of
meeting he flood control needs of this
area," Feaster explained. He specificaly
cited Seator Lawton Chies and Congress-
men Sam GCibos, Bob Sikes, Bill Chappd
and BaI Young for their individual efforts
in getting an increase in White House bud-
getary recommendations.
We desperately need the funds requested
in order to connect the Tampa ByPass Canal
to the Hilsborough River and to make it
functional. Until that connection is made,
until we can divert flood waters into the
canal, the cities of Tampa and Temptl
Terrace le completely exposed to the haz-
ard of flooding. If a major storm causes
the Hillsborough River to flood before the
ByPass Caal is functional, it's not incon-
ceivable that it could cause damages equal
to the entire cost of the project.
"Certainly it seems far wiser to provide
the funds now, to complete the project as
soon as possible than to delay and be
forced to provide emergency relief later,"
Feaer said.
(continued on page 6)


_ __ __


.. I








CONTRACT
AWARDED ON
SECTION 3B OF
BY PASS CANAL

A $4.8 million contract for construc-
tion of the next phase of the Tampa ByPass
Canal has been awarded, the Southwest
Florida Water Management District an-
nounced today.
The contract, awarded to Ticon, Inc. of
Plantation, Fla. by the Corps of Engineers,
was $1,148.784 below the government's
estimated cost. It provides for construction
of Section 3B of the canal (from Buffalo
Avenue northward to a point about 1%
miles southeast of Temple Terrace).
The Harney Cutoff Canal, probably to be
begun in mid-summer, will connect the By-
Pass Canal to the Hillsborough River near
Temple Terrace. During times of potential
flooding, water from the river will be di-
verted into the canal, around the city and
into McKay Bay.
"The contract for Section 3B of the
Canal will have a beneficial effect upon
the economy of the Tampa area," Don
Feaster, Executive Director of the Water
Management District, said.
During the peak work period on Section
3B, the contractor will have approximately
27 employees at work with a payroll of
about $32,500 per month. An additional
$12,900 per month will be pumped into the
economy for purchases of construction sup-
plies, Feaster said.
Other contracts, to be awarded later, for
work on the ByPass Canal, the Harney Canal
and associated structures, could represent
an additional 129 jobs, monthly payrolls of
about $135,450, and purchases approxi-
mating $160,000 monthly.
The Tampa ByPass Canal is a major com-
ponent of the Four River Basins project, a
large water control project affecting much
of west central Florida. It is funded by
federal, state and local sources.
The U. S. Army Corps of Engineers is
the design and construction agency for
the project. The water management district
purchases rights-of-way, coordinates plans
and design and is responsible for operation
and maintenance of the project's facilities.




During the Pleiocene Epoch, about two
million years ago, almost all of Peninsular
Florida was covered by warm tropical seas.
Only a few isolated islands near present-day
Lakeland, Haines City and the Green Swamp
escaped inundation.


MR. VAN DER VEER TO CHAIR BOARD


Thomas M. Van der Veer of Yankeetown
has been named Chairman Ex Officio of the
Withlacoochee River Basin Board. He suc-
ceeds Herman Beville of Bushnell in that
position.
The Withlacoochee Basin represents one
of 11 sub-basins of the water management
district. Mr. Van der Veer's appointment was
announced by Derrill S. McAteer of Brooks-
ville, Chairman of the District's Governing
Board.
Van der Veer has served on the District
Governing Board since 1971 and is Secretary
of the Board. He is also Chairman of the
Waccasassa Basin Board.


Report Completed On

Peace, Alafia Water

Withdrawals

A Report on Ground-Water Withdrawals
in the Upper Peace and Upper Alafia River
Basins has been submitted to the Bureau of
Geology for publication as a map series.
The report was prepared by the U.S.
Geological Survey in cooperation with the
Peace and Alafia River Basin Boards of the
District.
The Peace Board is headed by N. Brooks
Johns of Lakeland and the Alafia Board is
headed by Robert E. Vaughn of Brandon.
The report, prepared by Alton F. Robert-
son and Luther R. Mills, is also to be
published later as an information circular.
The study covers total pumpage and
monthly fluctuations in pumpage for
industrial, municipal, and agricultural pur-
poses, establishes correlations between quan-
tity of water required per unit of production;
and includes trends in population and pro-
duction.
The Upper Peace River Basin has suffered
a substantial drawdown of aquifer levels for
more than a decade. Recent evidence suggests
a significant reduction in aquifer levels in the
Alafia Basin.
The now-completed investigation by the
Geological Survey will aid the District in
determining the total quantity of water
being withdrawn from the aquifer in the
Peace and Alafia Basins, the uses to which
the water is being put, the economic value
of the water in production, and the antici-
pated future demand for water by industry,
agriculture, and the general public.


BOARD MOVES ON

CHANNEL A SALINITY

BARRIER
The Northwest Hillsborough River Basin
Board at its February meeting authorized its
legal counsel to take necessary act"to
acquire land required for construction a
salinity barrier on Channel A.
The District and the Basin Board plan to
construct two salt water barriers in the area,
one on Channel A and another on Channel
G, to counter the movement of salt water up
the canals from Old Tampa Bay.
Salt water in these canals also moves
laterally through the soil to contaminate
nearby groundwater resources, District sci-
entists explain. The proposed barriers on
Channels A and G will not only keep the
salt water downstream of the structures;
they will also, by increasing the depth of
the fresh-water zones upstream, induce in-
creased recharge to the aquifer and, thus,
help to flush salty groundwater from the
area over a period of several years.
Construction cost of the salinity barrier
on Channel A is estimated at $600 thousand.
Diaz, Seckinger and Associates is the
consulting engineering firm for design of
both barriers.




Scientists believe that we live in a /"r
inter-gacial period. Ice sheets still Jer
about ten percent -of the Earth's surface.
A decline of only 50 centigrade, it is
calculated, would return Planet Earth to
the Ice Age.


IIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIII11111111111111111111














SOUTHWEST FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT/WATER LEVEL DATA
IN FEET ABCVE MEAN SEA LEVEL (EXCEPT AS NOTED) JANUARY 1975
PIN.-VAX.
3 6 10 13 17 20 24 27 31 DESI.RALE
FaI 0OC FRI Ck FRI I CN PRI MON FRI CHANGEIA) ELEVATICk


PLEASANT GROVE

HILLSaGRCUIA RIVER 4ASIN

LACK AFTER CREEK
CYPRESS CREEK
HILLS RIVER AT RICHLANO
- -ASOVE CRVSTAL SPRINGS
- AT HILLS STATE PARK
- AT oRalS RI0GEO
- AT FOLER AVENUE
T CITY AM UPPER
- AT CITY CAM LOWER
LAKE THCOOTOSASSA

N. W. HILLS. RIVER BASIN


59.68


59.64


59.74 .10 60.00 60.68 53.90


71.49
27.30
76.78
51.94
34. 6
24.94
2264S
22.48
1.50
34.76


IBRCCKER CREEK WATERSMED )
LAKE CALM (C) 491.0 49.00 48.96 4.96 *20-
CHURCH LAKE 34. 34.40 34.40 34.36 34.34 34*34 .14-
ISLAND FORD LAKE 39*56 39.52 39.57 39.50 3950 39.44 39.52 39.46 .16-
LAKE KEYSTONE 40.31 4029 40.2 40190.2.26 40.33 40.32 .0o-
LAKE TARPON 2.94 2.97 2.96 3.09 3.03 3.*0 3.06 3.20 3.21 .246 I.C/3.00

ROCKY CREEK WATERSHEO )
LAKE 0USSON 52.36 52.30 52.20 52.26 52.24 52.20 52.22 S2.30 52.30 .10-
LAKE PRETTY 42.82 .10

ISWEETUATER-BORUSHY COK .I)
LAKE CARROLL 34.90 34.94 34.90 34.67 34.e4 34.82 34. 5 34.62 34.79 .24-
LAKE CHARLES (C) $2.91 93.03 52.62 .04
LAKE CRENSHA 53.176 53.72 53.68 53.62 53.54 53.56 53.50 53.54 53.50 .32-
LAKE MANNA 60.32 60.E2 60*23 60.22 .60.20 60*25 *1-
LAKE HODBS 60.92 61.A e01913 *0S-
LAKE MAGOALE* E 48.05 46*06 4.09 46.12 4.12 46. 12 46.10 46.20 48.14 .04
ROUNO LAKE (C) 53*.2 63.47 53.32 53.42 53.3 53.36 33.306 3.30 53.40 .10
SADOLEeACK LAKE IC) 53.6 53.66 03.82 63.70 53.60 53.70 a53.0 53.612 S3.7 .10
STARVATICN LAKE (C)

(OBSERVATION WELLS I
BERGER RO 0 43.07 42.46 42.74 43.64 43.43 43.31 43.69 44.74 42.2s I.04-
HILLS t33 49.25 48.06 48.96 46.92 49.00 .49-
LUTZ- LAKE FERN RO 44.56 4146 41.30 41.27 4.20 41..34 41.40 42.10 41.00 .44-
PATTERSON RD 20420 20.36 20.55 20.63 20.64 20.75 21.35 20.70 20.*1 *14-
VAN DYKE ROAD 54.00 54.09 4.04 4.00 53.96 53. 93 53.47 53.85 $3.84 .31-

S(REGULATCOY ELLS (D) 1
CALM 33A 30.96 30.99 2917 29137 30.47 .50- 24.0 ()
HILLS 130 31.46 37.91 36.22 38.05 36.97.. .41- 33.0 (EL
JACKSON 26A 30.63 38.03 36.40 30*35 34.95 *42- 34.0 I(
JANES 1 30.77 30.72 31.31 31*86 30*06 1.92- 25.0 ()
GRACE IIINT E100 24.6 25.10 25.99 25.64 25.36 .49- 20.0 ()

UKLjWAHA RIVER BASIN

- 3..A4--48PA ---- -68.0--e -64.22-- *4--.46e4.56.*-443* 5 -*#-.:-0 -483- -.*--6 I--6w
APOPKA BEAUCL*CAkAL LP 66.29 6s.25 66.37 65.90 66.23 66.42 <6.30 66421 e 6.26 .02
APOPKA OEAUCL. CANAL LOW 62.33 62.368 6237 62.49 62*48 62.44 46246 62*.7 62*55 .12
CHIERY LAKE IPPER 90.76 95.7 9 95.70 95e6 5.2 9 2 9 0 74 9g5.6 .12-
CHERRY LAKE 3OWER 94.68 95.74 94.76 94.90 94.76 94.0 94.40 94. 04 9.L84 .4
LAKS DORA 62.2 62.0 62.34 62.46 62*.4 62.46 62.46 6250 62.0 2*0 62.00/44.00
LAKE EUSTIS 62.40 62.46 62*.4 62*0 620 64 2.4 0 62.56 .2.4 62.70 .30 62.00/63400
LAKE GRIFFIN 59.03 58.04 59.06 59.06 7.96 57.92 57.91 57.96 57.96 .04- SO.00/ O.50
MAINES CIREK UPPER 622*9 6217 6231 62*40 62*34 62.41 62.431 6246 62.4 .*23
MA I S CKR E LOWER ee 4.0 54.0 56.07 5.09 5 .94 54.02 7. 94 57.946 5790 .06
LAKE ARRIE 62.13 6 240 602.40 62..0 62.60 62.50 62*60 62.60 62.60 *24 62.00/63.:0
LAKE M INNE HAA 95 90 95.0 95.75 9 .75 95.45 95.0 5 95.40 95.00 95.*8 *O 9.0E/9.R 2
OKLANATA R AT MOSS 8 UP 57.97 96.00 56.04 57.66 57.8* 59.04 57.91 57.92 57.95 .03-
AT Ml S 4UFF LORER 30.32 31.42 35.31 37.11 35.39 35.24 3.20 3S.19 35.11 .2-
AT SR. 40 35 .37 35.41 36.52 35 4 35.29 3.2 35 323 35*20 14-
.- -AT SILVR SPRINGS 39.03 39.00 38.97 39.23 39.94 39.90 39.4 39.8 39.76 .7
PALATLAKAHA T AT V .C. UP 94.60 94.60 94*62 94*70 94.70 9*472 94.72 94.74 94.7-6 .2
- AT VILLA CITY LOWER 40.10 4.312 e9O 86.20 6O 38.18 6.20 4.*16 36 62 12 46 .32
AT M-1 UPPER 7t.40 71.30 7130 71.30 71.30 71.30 7.30 71.36 71335 *O-
LAKE YALE 9.40 59*.56 S9.$6 59.66 59*62 59.66 S9.64 90.66 59.66 .1 5S9.00/61.00

WITHLACOOCHEE RIV. ASITA

BIG GANT LAKE 75*60 75.50 75.59 75.56 75.S6 765.5 75.68 7?5*6 .*2- 75.e0/16.50
LITTLE WITH AT TARRYTOWN 63.10 3.11 2 3.22 43.30 83.41 1.2
AT RERDELL 61.47 61.48 61.52 61.52 61.2 .0-
LAK PA NAOPKE 3T054 34.54 34..6 3..60 36.42 3.*60 34.62 30.64 30*.98 .02 4.0/43.40
L. TSALA APOPKA / FLORAL 39.40 39.67 39454 39.3 31.0 39.49 39.46 39.145. 342 .lr 40.2./42.2
AT I RNSS 3922 39 3 390 39 9 39.20 39.16 39.18 39.12 .14- 3l.5/40 .2
AT HERNANDO 37.96 37*.4 37.90 37.9 37.92 37.92 37.90 37.0 379.16 .1- 3.75/3 .7
WITILACOOCHEE RIV AT EVA 107.6 o7.59 3107.66 107.69 107.68 107.464 07.77 1077l1 .36
AT CUMPRESSCO 80.43 80.40 80.S5 0.70 2 27
AT DADE CITY 69.46 69.48 69.44 69.52 69.54 69*50 69.46 69.70 69.54 .04
AT TRILY $1.24 1.27 5.te 51.31 51.30 53.e 5lt.? $13.46 61.31 .01
AT CRNOO 43.72 41.76 431.6 43*8 41.64 I43.7 41.64 41.76 41.65 .04-

-AT MRYSOO OA UPPE 37.30 37.36 37.36 37.40 37.47 37.46 37.48 37.80 37*.0 *20
AT 3SDN0 OAR LO9ER
AT HOLD. 29.313 29.31 29.3* 29.33 29.14 29.34 29,20 29,20 29.05 ,23-
AT OUNELLON 27.73 27.74 27.76 27.96 27.74 27.e6 27.77 27.77 27.67 *09-
AT INGLIS UPPER 27.48 27.42 27*62 27.42 .06-
AT INGLIS LOWER 1*65 1.2 *3 t1.95 *35

PEACR RIVER BASIN

LAKE ARIETTA 139.00 139.00 139.96 1386.94 33.90 130.90 130.94 S33.94 :.1 7 42*00/144*.
BANANA LAKE 106*37 100.40 305.40 305.41 1030.42 30.43 30E.e 103 .346 .94 .03.7lIOe.
LAKE FANNIE 121.49 121.45 121.49 121.48 121*47 211.46 12.45 3213.44 121.42 .B6- 124.00/IS2.
LAKE GIBSON 14*1.3 141*87 .18- 141.50/143.
LAKE HAMILTON 1l8*49 131686 131.89 118*84 118.81 .14- 119.00/121.
LAKE HANCOCK 97.14 97*12 97.12 97.12 97.112 912 97.12 97.14 97.14 *02- 95.00/90.60
LAKE HENRY 123.90 123.94 123*.6 123*88 *07- 186.00/126.1
LAKE LENA *6- 13*0 0/13*.
LAKE PARKER 129960 12*970 129*69 .17- 128*20/13'1.
PEACE RIVER AT 8ARTO 91.62 91.47 91.49 91*71 .43
AT PORT rEADE
AT ZOLFO SPRINGS 35e68 3.62 3*62 36 3 18 3 5.7 35.65 35.13 35.60 35.62 .19--
AT A.CADIA 8.02 7.08 7.4 7.76 .10 7.92 7..86 8.04 7*.8 *.14-
LAKE SMART 127.Te 127.31 127.24 127.24 127.22 127.22 1271.24 27.23 0 27.22 .00 126.00/124.
LAKE WHISTLER 136.20 136.1 136.316 136.16 136.16 136.14 136.16 136.16 136.16 .05- 135.00/136.


1AL AMOUNT OF CHANGE IN FEET FROW LAST READING OF PREVIOUS REPORT.
(6) AVERAGE ELEVATION COMPUTED FOR PERIOD 9AN REPRESENTS WEAN RONTH-END ELEVATION.
(C) PERIODICALLY AUGMENTED BY GRCUhOWATER PUMPAGE.
D) READINGS FOR REGULATORY OBSERVATIOh WELLS REPRESENT AVERAGE VALUES FOR THAT WEEK.
t4) R6EADIQNGSFRA IU 4OR OB-6EFREkTO-4 AWN.- ------------ ---- -


50.60 43.80
37.28 29.48
41.98 38.18
43.60 37.86
7.08 .70


56.14 48.77


48.85 32.31
52.*9 32.31
47.61 33.49
27.70 15.36
S.685 48.26


39.57 20.*5
50.90 24.*79
44.*7 21369
38683 21.66
29.87 23.680



----3- -4* 4---
66,4 644.41
65.93 60*.9
94.35 92.50
97.73 90.65
65.70 60.59
66.10 98.*2
60.74 56*67
65.30 5.854
61.48 86.65
64.81 98.87
99.04 92.72
54*80 52.09
50.71 34.90
40.93 34.50
44.46 37.97
96.46 91.68
92.93 87.50
74.. 67.10
61.29 97.23



76.50 73.90
85*4 682.30
713.4 60.12
44.28 37.64
9*422 39.24
42.94 32.30
41.74 30.92
111.80 106.S5
86.15 80*03
78.57 66*40

52.74 40.67
46.24 31*60
43.08 36.20

34.54 2*3.O20
29.10 21.70





00 14*2.4 138.08
30 109.79 104.79
10 125.*6 120 8t
G0 345.10 141.15
40 124.34 116.94
101.e 93.984
60 127.17 1I2293
75 136.62 134.08
60 131*.1 1327*9
90.57 90.89
77.*0 69.90
9*0.2 34.16
26*60 7.23
75 129.32 185.94
75 137.42 134.82


PERIOD THRU
1974
HIGH LCo













RAINFALL (INCHES)
JANUAtY 1975


B C
U L
S F
N P
H 0
N N
E C
L N
L T


1 .00
2 .00
3 *00
4 .00
5 .22

6 .35
7 .00
O *00
9 .00
10 *00

II .00
12 3.18
13 *04
33 .04
I4 .2o




18 *00
19 *00
20 .20

21 *01
22 .00
23 *00
24 .00
25 .00

26 *37
27 .02
28 *02
329 00
30 .00


.00 .00 .00 o00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00
00C o00 .00 .02 .00 .00 .00 .00 ,00

.00 .00 .00 .05 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00
.00 .16 .OP .12 .28 .14 .00 .10 ,20

00 .00 .00o .25 .42 .00 .20 .0I .00
.00 .00 .00 .00 000 .00 00 .00 .00
.00 .00 .00 .00 .00 7 .00 .00 .00
.00 :.00 00 .00 00O T00 .00 :00 *D0
.00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .o00

.00 .00 02e .46 .00 I.l6 .00 000 .00
.00 .00 :03 :0I :60 :.0 :.00 2.00 .40
:20 .00 *00 *27 .06 .22 *0 *IO *.38
I32 .25 *20 T I9 *00 .43 .I0 .00
.00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00

00 *00 .00 .00 *00 .00 00 *00 *00
.00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 *00 .00 .00
00 .0 0 .00 .00 *00 *00 .00 *.00 00
.00 .00 .00 T00 *00 .00 *00 .00 .00
.2e .00 .00 .27 .15 .1 .00 .90 .22
------------ ----------- ---- ----I----

.00 .00 .00 00 00 000 .00 .00 *O1
.00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00
.00 .00 *00 .00 *00 *00 *00 *00 00
.00 .00 .32 .35 .00 .s8 .00 .00 .00

.00 .45 .03 .00 :47 .00 1.33 1.20 3.04
.00 .00 .03 .03 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00
.00 .00 .00 1 .00 .00 .00 00 .00
.00 i00 .00 .00 .00 .00 00 :00 .000
..00 00 .00 .00 00 .00 .00 .00 0 00

-so- -0o, -.0*Q--- --- DO 06 --w- -.


.00 .00
.00 .00
.oo .00
.00 .0o
.08 .09

.19 .01
.00 .00
.00 .00
.00 .00
.00 .00

T .44
.72 *00
*19 .14
.08 .00
.00 .00

.00 .00
*00 .00
.00 .00
T D00
.25 .06

.02 .00
.00 .00
*01 .00
.00 .00
*.0 .33

S00 .00
*00 .00
.00 o00
.00 .00
.00 .00

-,- ---,*


*00 .00 .00
.00 .00 .00
.00 .00 .00
.00 .00 .00
*18 .22 .5IS

.04 .30 *06
.00 .00 .00
.00 .00 ,00
.00 .00 .00
.00 0OO 0oo

.23 .00 .00
.00 .68 .32

.00 .24 138
.00 .00 .00
- ---------------
.00 .00 *0o
.00 .00 .00
.00 ,DO .00
.D00 .00 .00
.00 .15 .43

.00 .03 .02
.00 .00 .00
00 .00 .00
*oo ,oo *0O



.00 .00 .00
.00 .0 0 .00
*0oo *O *oo
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*00 .00 -00


.00 .00
.00 .00
00oo *o
r .16
T T10
*30 .o0

.*e *oi





.*3 T
.00 .00
.31 .37

.00 .00

.00 .00
*D0O 00
.00o 00

.34 .iS

"00 .00,
.00 .01
.00 .00
.00 .00
1.22 .25

.07 .00
.00 .00
:00 .08
.00 .00
.00 .00

- 8D -.-D-


.00

.00
.00
.00
.00




.on
.00


,


TOTALS FOR JANUARY 2.63 0.65 0.86 0.85 1.92 2,17 2.SB 2.96 4.60 2.25 2.09 1.13 1.00 2.11 13.9 2.85 0.91 0.00
NORMAL FOR JANUARY *0 2.13 2.31 2.69 2.46 2.34 2.36 2.64 2.32 2.50 2.05 2.33 0.70
YEAR TO DATE 2.63 0.65 0.86 0.85 1.92 2.17 2.58 2.96 4.60 2.25 2.09 1:13 1305 2.11 1.98 2.5 0 .9 0 .0
NOAMAL YEAR TO DATE* 2161 2.6 2.3 29 2.46 2.34 2.36 2 .6 2.32 2 50 2:.5 2.33 2 20

:04AES MAITAINED BY SOUTHWEST FLCRIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT. ALL OTHER GAGES MAINTAINED BY NATIONAL WEATHER S..VICE.
AVERAGE FOR PERIOD 3943-3970.


STATUS OF MATER CONTROL STRUCTURES ON 31 JANUARY 197S


OKLAMAHA RIVER BASIN

APOPKA BEAUCLAIRE 23 CFS

BURRELL 0 CPS

MOSS BLUFF 0 CFS

WITNLACOOCHEE RIVER BASIN

BIG GANT LAKE ALL LOGS IN PLACE

RUFE WYSONG ODELATED

LESLIE HEIFNER CLOSED

ORANGE STATE CLOSED

GOLF COURSE CLOSED

BRYANT SLOUGH CLOSED

BROGDEN BRIDGE CLOSED

VAh NESS CLOSED

TSALA APOPKA OUTFALL 0 CPS

INGLIS BYPASS 900 CFS

INGLIS O CFS


NW HILLS. RIVER BASIN

LAKE KEYSTONE CLOSED

LAKE PRETTY | LOG OUT EACH BAY

PEACE RIVER BASIN

LAKE LENA IP--) CLOSED

LAKE ARIETTA (P-3) CLOSED

LAKE HENRY (P-5) CLOSED

LAKE SMART (P-6) CLOSED

LAKE FANNIE (P-7) CLOSED

LAKE HAMILTON (P-8) CLOSED

LAKE HANCOCK (P-ll) CLOSED

LAKE GIBSON CLOSED

LAKE PARKER CLOSED

BANANA LAKE CLOSED

SCOTT LAKE- CLOSED

LOWERY MATTIE (POLK CITY HAINES CITY ROAD)

WEST CLOSED

CENTER CLOSED

EAST CLOSED


m_








Governor Askew Names

Lambert To District

Board

Governor Reubin Askew has appointed
Ronald B. Lambert of Wauchula to the
District's Governing Board. Mr. Lambert was
sworn into office at the Board's meeting on
Feb. 5.
Mr. Lambert, a native of Hardee County,
replaces Herman Beville of Bushnell on the
nine-member board.
A graduate of Hardee High School, Mr.
Lambert is a nurseryman and landscaper by
profession. He is a member of the Florida
Nurserymen and Growers Association and
Director of its Lake Region Chapter. He is
also a member of the New Hope Baptist
Church of Wauchula.
He and his wife, the former Margaret
Dean, have five children: three boys and
two girls.



TAKE

ANOTHER LOOK...

S editor's Note: Last month's HYDROSCOPE
printed, as a filler, a statistic taken from a
U.S. Government publication on the quan-
tity of water consumptively used by thermo-
electric plants. Several District staff members
noticed the item and provided us with up-
dated figures which changed the picture so
much we thought we'd do well to pass it on.)
Thermoelectric plants within the bound-
aries of this District consumptively use
approximately 325 million gallons of fresh
and salt water per day, according to Garald
G. Parker, senior scientist and chief hydrol-
ogist for the District.
Electric plants within the District produce
4,525 megawatts; approximately 600,000
gallons of water per day are required to
produce one megawatt, Parker says. There-
fore, a total of 2,712 million gallons of
water is needed for cooling these plants.
Even in a closed recirculation cooling
system, 12% of the water is lost to evapora-
tion, Parker notes, so a total of about 325
million gallons is lost daily to evaporation.
"Fortunately, some of these powerplants
are located on or near coastal areas and are
able to use salt water rather than fresh
O ter for cooling purposes. There's no short-
p of salt water in this area, but with
some 4,000 more megawatts being produced
in the state yearly the growing demand for
fresh water for this purpose is causing us
considerable concern."


PEACE BASIN BOARD HEARS

STATUS REPORT ON QWIP

Project QWIP is now ready to move from a largely experimental project to a fully
operational one.
That is the message John Darling and Walt Wetterhall of the District staff gave to
the Peace River Basin Board at its last meeting in a status report on the Basin's well-
plugging project (Quality Water Improvement Program) in Charlotte County.
The project---designed to plug hundreds of deep artesian wells that are contami-
nating the upper aquifers with salty and sulfurous water from deep aquifers---faces,
however, long-term financial problems.


Aquifer Level Fall

With a few exceptions, aquifer levels
throughout the District continued to decline
during the last quarter, according to a report
from the U. S. Geological Survey.
Several record lows were recorded in
eastern Hillsborough, Polk, Hardee, and De-
Soto Counties.
"Most wells were far below average with
a decline of 4.2 feet at Plant City, 6.6 feet
at Lakeland, 11.2 feet at Ft. Meade, 11.6
feet at Wauchula, 8.7 feet at Gardner, and
8.7 feet at Arcadia," the report stated.
The report also noted that water levels
at Ruskin were 3.7 feet below average and
at Lutz-Lake Fern, .9 feet below average.
In both the coastal and interior sections
of Citrus and Hernando Counties, however,
water levels in the Floridan Aquifer contin-
ued to rise. Wells at Crystal River were 1
foot above average and at Brooksville, 2.9
above average.


Plugging the 465 inventoried wells that
are contaminating the county's upper aqui-
fers could cost $500,000 or more, the Board
learned.
"This Board doesn't have the funds to
carry this project alone. We couldn't do it
all in 20 years." N. Brooks Johns of Lake-
land, Board Chairman, stated. "However,
let's do what we can within our budgetary
limitations and see what kind of funds might
be available from federal or state sources."
The District QWIP staff has now plugged
three wells and is in the process of plugging
a fourth well, John Darling, District hydro-
logist for the Peace River Basin, told the
Board. He stressed that the process of
plugging a well-as opposed to capping-does
not stop the flow of better quality water
from the aquifers.
So far the project has focused upon
establishing an efficient and economical
method for plugging these wells, Wetterhall
said. Now that the basic research phase is
nearing completion, Darling explained, a
decision must be made on the best way to
put the project on a full production basis.
Purchase of the necessary heavy equip-
ment would cost $15-20 thousand, he re-
ported.
On the other hand, preliminary estimates
from private drillers range from $900 to
$1,500 per-well.
The Board directed the staff to negotiate
a contract with a private driller for plugging
one well, for less than $1,000, in order to
determine the feasibility of having the work
under contract in the future.
It also authorized the staff to advertise
for bids for reaming (cleaning out) up to 10
wells prior to plugging. The.Board placed a
$2,500 cap on that particular contract.


Basin Board Tours Lake Panasoffkee
The District's Peace River Basin Board, residents of the area.
headed by Thomas M. Van der Veer, toured The Board will meet March 14 to consider
Lake Panasoflkee on March 1 for a first-hand various alternatives with refernece to the Rule
look at conditions on the lake. Wysong Dam on the Withlacoochee River.
The tour was in response to requests from


C~ _~~~__ __ __ __








Bulk Rate
U. S. Postage
6.1 c Paid
Brooksville, FL 33512
Permit No. 14


P. O. Box 457 Brooksville, Florida 33512

RETURN POSTAGE GUARANTEED


BOARD AWARDS CONTRACT

TO FINISH PEACE MAPPIN(
SPeace River Basin Board has ap a contract that will complete a
j mew ppiing projects along the entire Peace River.
S contract approved at the January Bai Board meeting and the February
fn Board meeting is for mappmu 61% square miles along the river from t
wCh outte County line to the US 41 Br at Charlotte Harbor. It will a
mapping on both side of Shell Crek a Praire Creek.
The when completed, will be on a scale of one inch to 200 feet an
show one-foot contour intervals.


The contours on these maps, when com-
L ed with flood profiles computed by
o: gam engineers on die District staff,
SFshow the areas that will be inundated
Rt Boods of varying frequencies.
Whe maps and flood profiles are com-
iatd, explains Dan Jenkins, district Staff
:e"mer, a person will be able to tell from
-d maps whether or not a specific piece of
-~aty will be inundated by a 5-year flood
(Se that occurs on an average of every five
yrs), a 25-year flood, or a 5-year flood.
The Peae River Basin Boa, headed by
Brooks Johns of Lakelamu i awarded the
tract for the final pha. of Peace River
mspping to the Murray-McCormick Environ-
ental Group. The contract amount, the
west of four proposal, i for $89,902.
buimated contract time is 234 days.
Shares 1 and 11 of the Peace River map-
,' -g project covering 86.5 square miles
alng the river have been completed and
mpted by the Peace Basin Boad, a sub-
A of the Southwest Florida Water Man-




County to the Chariotte DeSoto
.; QM line.
District hyd ic engineers are now
pWarin flood pro~e for the completed
ps. They estimate that profiles are now
juepared for 25% of the ares mapped. They


also estimate that 40% of the ne
computations have been made for
maining mapped areas.
When the maps are complete wit
profiles, the District will send co
appropriate local government agency
aid to effective enforcement of flo
zoning laws.
The maps are also available to
citizens at $10 per sheet. Each she
tied by section, township and range
one square mile.

FRB Budget
(continued from
In addition to the project's const
funds, $415,000 is proposed for th
River Basins Water Resources Mana
Study, a project authorized but vi
unfunded since 1970. The purpose
study is to determine how Four JRer
can be adapted to a total water r
related problems caused by the rapid
of West central Florida.
"We me already using Four River
projects for reasons apart from flo
trol, suchas the Tampa Welield in t
er Hulsborough Flood Detention Ar
the multi-government wellfield in t
press Creek Flood Detention Area,"
said. "However, these are only st
measures. We need an overall, coon
planning effort for the entire area."


ADDRESS CORRECTIONS REQUESTED


r -HYDROSCOPE-
This document is produced monthly at an
S annual printing and postage cost of $3,597.00
series to provide public officials and private citi-
zens a current source of information about
Gov- the Southwest Florida Water Management
ie De- District and its programs.
Iso in- BOARD OF GOVERNORS of the South-
west Florida Water Management District
d will (P. O. Box 457, Brooksville, Florida 332)

Derrill S. McAteer, Chairman
tcessar Robert E. Vaughn, Vice Chairman
J. R. Graw, Treasurer
h flood Joe E. Hill, Asst Treasurer
Ipis to Thomas M. Van Der Veer, Secretary
Sas an N. Brooks Johns, Asst. Secretary
odplain John A. Anderson, Member
Ronald B. Lambert, Member
private S. C Bexley, Jr., Member
t, iden- Donald R. Feaster, Executive Director
, ovde Mygnon Evans, Editor
c r' Donna K. Parkin, Asst. Editor

Application to mail at second-class postage
rates is pending at Brooksville, Florida.


page 1)
auction
e Four
cement
virtually
of the
Basins
source
growth

Basins
d con-
e Low-
es and
he Cy-
Feaster
DP gap
ilnated


According to the Water Resources Re-
search Center at the University of Florida,
water hyacinth and hydrila can be con-
verted to agriculturally useful products. The
plants' 9095% moisture content can be
premed to eliminate 75% of the water
with a modest expenditure of energy, and
the premed plants can be ensiled wih slit-
able additions to mak. animal feed. The
plants also, says the Research Center, can
be composted to make an organi material
for potig plant.


Neary 73% of all the rain that falls on
the District is lost to the atmosphere through
evaporation and plant transpiration.


I.r~- ----- ---- ---l-----r-~l-~~-- c~*1ICclCC*mn~*----~n~