Citation
Hydroscope Newsletter

Material Information

Title:
Hydroscope Newsletter
Publisher:
SWFWMD
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Law -- Florida ( LCSH )
Lawyers -- Florida ( LCSH )
Pinellas County ( local )
Pasco County ( local )
Spatial Coverage:
North America -- United States of America -- Florida

Notes

Abstract:
Volume 5, No. 7, November 1974
General Note:
Box 6, Folder 1 ( Hydroscope - 1970-1985 ), Item 50
Funding:
Digitized by the Legal Technology Institute in the Levin College of Law at the University of Florida.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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Full Text







Sr Southwest Florida

tWater Wanagement District


P.O. Box 457


Brooksville, Florida 33512


VOLUME 5, NO. 7


November 1974


District Acts To

Find Source Of

Well Slimes
The District Governing Board approved
the awarding of a $12,000 contract at its
October 9 meeting for a series of core
borings in the Bartow area to determine the
source of slimes detected in wells there this
summer.
The project was initiated by the Peace
River Basin Board headed by N. Brooks
Johns of Lakeland.
The contract for 15 core borings (five
borings at each of three sites) was awarded
to Mixon Foundation and Drilling. The
bore holes are also to be cased to provide
District with 15 badly-needed monitor
in the area, according to Barbara
Boatwright, District geologist.
The core borings will be tested for the
direction and speed with which water flows
through the soil. Once those factors are
determined by laboratory analyses for each
of the boring sites, the District should have
a reasonably good idea of the source of the
slimes as well as a stratigraphic section of
the Bartow area, Boatwright said.
The core borings --- which will average
120 feet in depth --- will be taken on and
near an imaginary line running through
Bartow on a northwesterly southeasterly
course. The Florida Citrus Cooperative is
located at the southeastern terminal of the
line; U. S. Steel Agrichem Division properties
are at the northwestern terminal. The line
will cross through the area of wells previously
affected by slimes in south central Bartow.
By the year 2010, according to the
Bureau of Economic and Business Research
at the University of Florida, the population
of the 15 counties that, in whole or in part,
c titute the District will be nearly 5
en.
By 2010, more than 1 million persons
will live in Hillsborough County, another
1.2 million in Pinellas County, more than
1/2 million in Polk County, another 1/2
million in Pasco County.


Board Turns Focus


ToAquifer Levels

The District Governing Board acted October 9 to adopt unconditionally
pumping regulations at Pinellas County's Eldridge Wilde Wellfield on the basis
of regulatory levels in the Floridan Aquifer.
The wellfield had been previously regulated on the basis of the quantity of
water pumped from the area rather than upon artesian water levels. At its Sep-
tember meeting, the Board had voted to conditionally adopt, until its October
meeting, aquiferian regulatory levels.


Acting as the Governing Board of the
Regulatory Water Management District, the
Board adopted Stipulation 74-1 which re-
quires Pinellas County to construct two
monitor wells by May 1, 1975 and prohibits
Pinellas County from pumping at a rate that
would lower aquifer levels below regulatory
levels established by the Board. Aquifer
levels will be measured at four existing
regulatory wells within the wellfield.
The two new monitor wells, to be con-
structed by Pinellas County at its expense,
will be used to measure drawdown of aquifer
levels outside the wellfield. Data collected
from these wells will be used in the future
to modify District regulatory decisions if
found necessary by the Governing Board.
Stipulation 74-1 also requires that Pinellas
County limit its pumping at the wellfield
so that aquifer levels there --- measured
at the four existing regulatory wells --- do
not drop below regulatory levels set at 4, 5,
9, and 16 feet above mean sea level at the
four wells.
The following two provisions were written
into the Stipulation:
(1) Regulatory levels will be based upon
potentiometric surfaces (the height above
mean sea level to which water in the artesian
aquifer will rise in a well under its own
pressure);
(2) In determining whether or not Pinellas
County has drawn down the aquifer below the
regulatory levels at each regulatory well, a
cumulative weekly average of aquifer levels
(high and low points each day) will be used.


During the past Production Year (October
1 September 30) actual pumpage at the
wellfield had averaged 33.47 million gallons
per day (MGD).
Prior to the District's action to limit
pumping at Eldridge Wilde, pumpage rates
there had shown steady and dramatic annual
increases. During its first full calendar year
of operation in 1957, the wellfield pumped
only 7.6 MGD.
By 1960 Eldridge Wilde was pumping
11.4 MGD.
By 1965 pumpage had soared to 16.1 MGD
By 1970 pumpage was up to 26.5 MGD
By 1972 Eldridge Wilde was pumping at
35.5 MGD.
In December of that year, the District
Governing Board determined, in Order 72-4
that it had the authority and responsibility
"to determine the extent and manner in
which ground water may be withdrawn with-
out being detrimental to the water resources
of the State of Florida". The Board also
determined that the wellfield "is approach-
ing, or has reached, a state of over-develop-
ment and that there now exists the necessity
of regulating the withdrawal of water" from
the wellfield.
The Board then ordered Pinellas County
to construct several monitoring wells so that
the District could "complete a proper eval-
uation" of the wellfield in order to regulate
withdrawals.
In November 1973 the District Board
ordered a staggered cutback in pumpage from
(Continued on page 6)








ALAFIA BASIN

TO BUY RIGS
The Alafia River Basin Board authorized
the purchase of two drilling rigs at a total
cost of approximately $195,000 at its Sep-
tember meeting.
The Basin Board, headed by Robert E.
Vaughn of Brandon, directed Barbara Boat-
wright, District geologist, to invite bids on
the two rigs which will be used in the
regional Monitor Well Program.
Both rigs are to be of rotary design. The
larger rig will be able to drill to 1,500 feet
utilizing mud and reverse air. The smaller rig
will be for augering, core boring, and drilling
shallow wells.
The Monitor Well Program, both in the
Alafia River and other basins of the District,
is a long-term project designed to collect
data on salt water intrusion and changes in
water levels in the Floridan, Hawthorn, and
surficial aquifers.

-HYDROSCOPE--
This document is produced at an annual
printing and postage cost of $3,147.00
to provide public officials and private citi-
zens a current source of information about
the Southwest Florida Water Management
District and its programs.

BOARD OF GOVERNORS of the South-
west Florida Water Management District:

Derrill S. McAteer, Chairman
Robert E. Vaughn, Vice Chairman
J. R. Graw, Treasurer
Joe E. Hill, Asst. Treasurer
Thomas M. Van Der Veer, Secretary
N. Brooks Johns, Asst. Secretary
John A. Anderson, Member
Herman Beville, Member
S. C. Bexley, Jr., Member
Donald R. Feaster, Executive Director
Mygnon Evans, Editor
Donna K. Parkin, Asst. Editor

Mr. Albert David Baillie, charter member
of the Pinellas-Anclote Basin Board and a
pioneer of West Pasco County, died in
September at the age of 83.
Mr. Baillie was born in West Elfers in
1893. A life-long resident of Pasco County,
he was a charter member of the Board of
Trustees of West Pasco Hospital and a
member of the Florida Cattlemen's Asso-
ciation.


County Building

Pleasant Grove

Regional Park
The District's Pleasant Grove Reservoir --- already functioning as a flood
control and water conservation area --- is now becoming a large regional
recreation area as well.
The Hillsborough County Parks and Recreation Department is constructing
facilities at the 1,200 acre site west of Brandon that will provide visitors
with opportunities for camping, boating, fishing, swimming, and picnicking.
Horse stables and trails for horseback riding will be added later.


The entire project is the result of a
cooperative effort by the District's Alafia
River Basin Board, American Cyanamid
Company, Hillsborough County, and the
state Department of Natural Resources.
American Cyanamid gave most of the
land (all but 95 acres) to the District in
1969. At the District's request, the company
had mined the land (1) to provide maximum
water storage capabilities and (2) to form
variations in depths (for various species of
fish) for the reservoir.
The Basin Board the provided $400.000


Since the District began its aerial mapp-
ing program of flood-prone areas in 1970,
the District has mapped nearly 1,000 square
miles and is in the process of mapping an
additional 198 square miles.
Total cost of aerial mapping projects
completed and in-progress is $1,494.00.
Most of the maps are on a scale of
1 inch to 200 feet and show contours at
one-foot intervals.


for a water control structure at the reservoir,
enabling the District to maintain desirable
water levels.
-- Hillsborough-Coumnty-s now budgeted
$257,000 augmented by $50,000 from
the Department of Natural Resources and
$50,000 from the District for construction
of recreational facilities and road improve-
ments at Pleasant Grove.
The main lake on the property sprawls
over 770 acres and has a shoreline of 10%
miles. Smaller lakes dot another 64 acres and
dry land within the park covers 435 acres.


Areas covered include major portions of
the following: Northwest Hillsborough Coun-
ty; the Anclote River; the Peace River;
Lakes Griffin and Yale and the Oklawaha
River; the Hillsborough River; the Pi a-
chascotee River; Lake Tarpon; the .
River; and the Withlacoochee River.
The maps are available from the District
at a cost of $10 per sheet.









SOUTHWEST FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DIsTIlCT7/IWAE LEVEL D0AT
IN FEET AHVE MEAN SEA LEVEL 4(ECEPT *A NOTED) um

MIN.-MAX. PERIOD THRU
A 9 3 13 16 20 23 27 30 DESIRaLE 1972
Ma FRI MON FkI I"4 FRI *ON FRI MON CHAN"6EI ELEVATION HIGH LOW


ALIIA410 VEHR 4bIN

PLEASANT Gtuivr

lSm."i%LUG. Aid.* hASIN

4L4ACKIrFM Cl6EK0 731.41
CYp0vt Cr CEK 24.60
HILLS 41VIR AT RICHLANO 77.54
- -.,LV R ChYbITAL SPRINGS
- 0T SILLb ST 4T PARK

- AT F4JWLz. AV 6NIZ
AT CITY *AM UPPE6 21.10
A- AT CITY JAM LOWCE 1O90

N4 '. tILL llRT A b.A4 IN
N. A. ILLS. 37ER BASIN


%91.66


.12 60.00 60.44 b6.80


71.71 73.86 72.22 73.46 72.06 71.74 72.18 72.18
28.70 28.V8 29.35 29.68 29.3S 28.95 2*.75 28.65
77.b5 77.49 77.50 76.70 78.44 78.18 77.86 77.76

34.5 35.56 35.0a 36.14 35.52 35.00 35.16 35.10
27.74 26.90 26.97 26.64


21.34 20.42 20.02 20.03 20.11
3.J2 3.31 4.0t 3J65 4.68
.. b7 .'


66.70
62.64
46.42
94 *74
62.62
62,670
47.49
62.60
57.50
62.74
96.55
-7.43
36.94
36.85
40.03
'34.66
B3.46
71.40
60.24


( 46 1., 1 r .K VAT-ft-.4' I

4'''.. !.4 0. 0


L..A 04.4 3.458


LA: H 50N 54.30
LAK. J l4alTY

( 7 :CT.N0ATE.-0,454Y LOS W5i
L5t: CA-44Ll 3J.n47



LAK-, 9, 63
LA4< 4460kALA'
.t'H) i.nr ICI* 54.60

A4' 5 ftir3 L7-' (Cl
'>T1

4 V-4 4) IU 4b.56

L.uf- L' 4 -14- 44.37
eArf. ti j3 ., 24.40
VA04 4Y7 0oA6 s 66.*e


('3-.LATIUR
to... I3

J44.4 11
**
UWLA 4144 RIVER iASlI


A".(l 4 : LAUCL.CANAL UP
A40) *A ItA~CL. CANAL LOW
4G444*4.Y LIAF UO."L4
CL.l Y 04A4 LO4 r
LAKi DIMA
LAK fUT[
LAK (S.IIFFIN
MA1 4 CIFEK UPPER
HAI1 V. C.4CFK LOWER
LAKI MA4045
LA.K MINNrHA4M
OKIAWA7H R AT SASS a UPl
OSS ULUFF LUlWRF
AT 3.R. 40
AT SILV-' SPRINGS
PALATLAKAHA 4 AT V.C. UP
AT VILLA CITY LOWER
4AT -1 UPPER'
LAKi YALE

WIT3ILACDCHCO 0IVY. uASIN

15 u.4kr LAL
LIrTLE .IT0 AT TA4qYTrlWN
AT 4EROCLL
LAKE PAOASOFFKEE
L. TSALA APUPKA / FLORAL
AT INVERNESS
AT HtLNANFtO
IMHLAC"UCHLE RIV 4T 6VA
AT CVUP4ESS4 O
AT JAOE CITY
AT T4ILUY
AT CROOM
AT TRAILS NDN
AT SONG DAM UPPER
7T wYSONG OAM LOWER
AT NOLDt*
S- AT ONNELLON
AT JNCLIs UPP'R
AT I. lIS LUOER

PEALC- 4IVER HASIN

LAKE A4I7TIA
BANANA LAKI
LAK F1'rIF
LAKi 4 IJSON
LAKE H41LTONH
LAKE MA4 COCK
LAKL H-nzRY
LAY: LF 4A
LAKO A4K0FH
PACE 'IIVE, AT 40 4Tr4l
A FLIRT SFA)AE
AT ZOLFO SPRINGS
AT ACADI
LAK- SAL)er
LAKO 7ISTL4 E


o0.31 's.26 50.22 50s.2 .40
15.26 35.60 3,.6.f 35.7P J5.66 35*64 5J.66 35.64 .*b
4411.63 4 4 444 41.24 41*20 41.10 41.00 *41-
41*3. 41.8z 41.54 41.a9 *.1-
1.79 2.6 3.36 4.46 2.88 2.98 3.07 3.17 .24- 1.00/3.60


54.30 54.40 54.50 54.36 54.00 53*90 53*92 *92
44.14 43.94 43.70 41.86 43.77 .29


54.LLC 44.0
,5.eo 5..'6o
3 .54
62.6b 62.77

54.72 64.64


50.60 43.30
47.2d 29.96
40.70 J(6.
43.60 37.80
7.06 .73


55.06 46.77


36.00

5t.41 55.72 55.65 5655S 5a.58
61.46 61.40
62.78 62.78 62.75 62.80 62.86
49.62 49.44 49.30
5.57 54.50 54.34 54.26 54.18
~5~.97 64.00 54.01


46.55 47.25 45.34 4b.30 44*00 47.51 46.69 47.79
52,63 52.01 51.79 51.75
46.20 4i.5: 4.(04 46.07 45.05 45.21 44.92 45.22
24.72 24.(u 2*.42 24.13 20.56 23.35 23.50 23*01
56.82 56.3b 56.a8 56.65 S6.86 56.85 56.86 55.79


33.95
42.67
43.07
33.37
28.79


64.68
62.69
96.96
96 480
62.66
62,.2
57.60
62.65
5*7.69
62.86
96.65
57.69
17.61
37.29
40.13
94.72
59.0*

60.J4


95.00
64.68
41.00 41.38
40.94 41.38
39.74 39.60
38.40 38.44

81.05
72.24 72.20
55.46 56.23
45.21 45.16
42.14 42.00
39.*0 39.80


5.6,7
66.40

96.S5
44.82

62.00
62..0
57.50
62.69
57.59
62.82
,7.00

39.14
J7.*96
40.45
94. 4
89.00
71.40
60.36


76.07, 76.02
S4.90
63.97
41.04 40.98
41.50 41.66
39.86 39.78
31.32 38.14

05.00
71.88 72.40
57.17 56.48
46.25 46.92
42.06 4..06
39*.79 J4.6


34.33 35*46 34*44 34.08 33e82
28.45 78.51 28.46 24.3J 28.15
26.34 26.4 76.40
4.65 4.27 3.55



13V9.0 139.54

121.45 121.*7
141.93 14?.91
119.19
9R.44 98.40
123.79


4 .33


139.7*
105.20
122.16
142.*7

98.26
124.32


94.53


66.93
66.90
62.44
96.62
95.36
62.80
62.86
57.46
62.73
57.45
62.86
96.95
57.39
37.11
36.99
40.07
94.90
90.60
71.50
60.20


66.99 66*4 i 664.93 67.00
66.90 66.84 67.00' 66.90
62.80 62.80 62.74 62.82
96.56 96.52 96.48 96.52
95.36 95.34 95.36 95.32
62.78 62.74 62.72 62.80
62.86 62.80 42.88 62.86
57.47 57.46 57.46 57.52
62.73 62 62.65 62.70 62.73
57.45 57.42 57.48 57*45
62.84 62.82 62.82 62.86
96.85 96.85 96.85 96.85
57.38 57.36 57.47 57.38
36.85 36.72 36.58 366.48
36.83 36.68 36.60 36.49
40.03 40.94 40.92 40.85
04.88 94.84 94.90 95.00
90.82 90.96 90.98 91.00
71.50 71.80 71.90 71.90
60.18 60.16 60.4I 60814


32. i
44.72

59.44
61.68
44.19
43*06
46 .6*
40.35


1.39
.19-
.04-
.26-
1.03-*


2.44-0
1.01 *
,69
3.02-*
1.47 4



.21
.11
.13
.08
.58
.16
.006
.04-
.10
*08-
.30
.10-

56-
*46*
.75
*32
2.44
.60
.16-


75.98 75.92
84.85 84.92
63.37 63.32
40.88 40.86 40.84 40.76 40*54
41.70 '4169 41.67 41.60 41*62
39.72 39.64 39.58 39.50 39.54
38.09 38.26 38.38 38.48
110.18 309.96 109.74 109.55 109.58
64.60 8 3.24
74.68 73.70 73.28 72.78 72.56
56.85 56.60 57.03 50.91 56.41
45.51 45.46 45.64 45.69 45.67
41.96 41.79 41.76 41.77 43.76
39.64 39.28 39.18 39.20 39.20


33.21 32.95 32.68 32.64 2.00-
28.26 28.56 28.44 28.36 .20-
27.53 27.50 1.05
1.67 2.42 2.48-


139.41 139.86.139,82
105.30 105.54 105.54
132.15 122.16 122.12
142.01 142.09 142.23
119.56 119*53
98.26 98.38 98.06
124.41

130.90
94.91


139.78 139.82
105.48
122.12 122.27
142.39 142.51
19*.63
97.96 97.84
124.41


94.26


36.90 38.60 37.26 39.30 40.10 38.20 371.0 36.25
10.14 12.48 12.6 11. 13.04 11*34 10.24 9.56
177.40 1'7.55 127.65 127.. 3 127.81 127.77 127.77 127.98
136.76 136.90 137.06 137*10 137.06 137.03 136.97 137.05


24.0 (3)
33.0 t,)
34.0 (3)
25.0 (El
20.0 ld)


484.5 33.92
52?.9 35.50
47.61 36.80
27.70 15.40
58.05 50.17


39.57 21.07
50.90 24.70
44.57 24.69
J8.8J 21.66


66.50/67.50 69.JO 64.04
68.48 64*41
65.93 60.59
98.15 92.58
97.73 90.65
62.00/64.00 65.70 60.59
62.00/63.50 66.10 56.82
a5800/59*50 60.74 56.6F
65.30 58.54
61.48 b6665
62.00/63.50 64.81 56.87
96.00/97.25 99.04 92.72
59,e0 52.09
50.71 34.90
40.93 34.50
44*46 37.97
96.66 91.68
92.93 87.50
74.18 67.10
59.00/61.00 61.29 57.23



75.80/76.50 75.84 75.06
85.19
71.34 60.12
40.00/41.50 44.28 37.65
40.25/42.25 44.22 35*24
38.25/40*25 42.94 32.30
36.75/38.75 41.74 30.92
111.80 106.55
87.37
78.57 66.40
69.08 80.05
52.72 40.67
45.24 38.08
43.06 35.20
40.80 26.69
33.00 23.20
27.98 22.70


139.94 .40 142.00/144.00 142.54 139.22
105*43 .23 103475/105.50 105*60 104.75
122.30 .41 124.00/125.50 124.96 120.95
142.51 .54 141.50/143.00 145.10 141.40
.42 119.00/121.40 124.34 116.95
97.76 *6- 95.00/98.60 101.88 93.98
124.68 .60 126.00/126.60 127.17 123.30
135.00/136.75 136.62 134.12
.00 128.20/131.60 131.8( 127.92
93.93 1.00- 90.57 90.59
77.20 69.90
36.30 1.05- 55*25 34.16
9*22 1.70- 26.60 7.23
128,01 .57 128.00/126.75 126.15 125.94
137.03 .13 135.00/136.75 136.82 134.82


(4) AMOUNT OF CHANGE 1I FEET FROM LAST IEA01DN. UF PREVIOUS REPORT.
(0) AIitAGE EL OVATION COMOUTEO F04 PERIOD AND REPRESENTS MEAN MONTH-END ELEVATION.
(C) 41IIIICALLY AUGMENTED U0Y GU)UNUWATrA POMPAGEt
(U) .:4 sL 14 4WI F(GULATUIY COSEtVATInN WELLS REPRESENT AVERAGE VALUES FOR THAT WEEK.
(I) .L:I_.VTIuN FlSTALISHEI FOR WtLL FIELD REGULATION.


S*


20.10 21.72 21.67 .22
2*63 3.03 1.90 .60-*
S' '32 .34-4


80.26
32.15
79.70
55.84
48.61
32.22
34.67
25.06

3I --5


--

















RAINFALL (INCHES)
CoRTEMBER 1974 H
PD I
P a O H L

oA I L
PB L L
p s L

N B R

E P A V N
A A 0 L E P
u R U A N C A
C K G N O
L H O 5 A I
CA S T N
A E a a P p L
0 0 0 1 L B R S L
E A 0 B C A R N L A L I A A
A K U L T 0 V A N U C A A
C a u S E S s K T I N 4 U
A C A A V* N a 0 N L F L
N A R N P A N L C A p
A T L F A L K E A I D N L O U
L 0 0 L L I E S N T A D E 8 L
0 A B L T K S 5 S D Y M O T A
0ATd

S .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .32 .00 .00 00 .00 .00 .00 .00
2 00 00 00 00 .00 00 .00 .0 00 .00 .00 .00 .OO .00 1.69 .00 .00
** 00000 :00 :00 :00 .00
3 .00 .00 .06 .00 .00 .35 .60 T .05 .30 .00 .00 .*1 T .00
4 .00 .,0 T .00 1.34 .0 .00 0 .12 .57 T .19 .04 .00 .00 T .17
o5 08 *.9 .47 .2e *.3 .20 *10U *.1 *1 *.44 .4*1 .64 .31 3 .72
..------------...-------- -. ---------------- -.------------------
6 .32 :.42 0.3 4.40 .42 2.00 .10 3.25 2.22 .03 .82 1.95 1410 2. 7 .74 .80
7 20 .00 .75 2.0 *20 .00 2.75 .00 .25 .06 .00 .4 .19 .69 T .00
8 .26 .00 00 .1J .37 .00 .00 .* 05 30 .00 .13 .02 .06 .09 .0L
9 .20 .*A *76 .01 .00 e 00 .00 .00 .21 1.63 .00 02 .01 T T .00
,0 .05 .*, T .00 .2 .00 .00 *.0 .2 .004 .0 .00 .00 .01
---------------------- - - - - --------
II .00 .u 0 0 .o .0oo 00 00 .00 .00 .0 .00 00 .00 .00 .00 .00
S .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .0 .00 .00 .00 .0 00 00 .00
13 .0S *0 1.63 .00 .00 .300 .0 .52 g.0 .30 .00 .00 .00 .73 .00 .2
42 oo .00 .20 .00 .00 .90 .00 .08 .00 1.30 .3 .00 .11 .00 T .72


"24 *)07 *O0 *00 cOO DO *00 ,O *03 *OD 000 *a00 1GO *16 o .1
5 .2o0 *00 00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 1.40 .00 .01 .00 *0 .00
------------------------------ ---------------------
16 .00 .00' .00 .16 .10 .00 .00 00 .19 .00 .00 .06 4.86 .00 .13
? .46 .214 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 1.23 .00 .00 .00 .00
8 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .60 .00 .03 .0.00 .00 .00 .00 .01 .22 .22
49 :00 .00 T .00 .00 .00 1.00 .30 .00 .00 .00 .00 .11 .01 .00 .00
20 .00 .00 .00 .11 .00 .64 .00 .00 .00 .09 .00 .00 .00 .38 .15 .00
-------------------------------- ----------------------------------------- -
24 .00 .~00 ~ .0 .O .00 .15 NA .03 .00 .00 .00 .00 .07 .00 .00 .00
12 .00 .01 .00 .9 .00 .00 .N .00 .. .00 .00 .00 .21 0 .0 00 .00
23 01 .00 .22 .00 .0 .0 N2 6.00 .00 1 62 00 5.56 4 L .85 4 T .0

05 .39 .00 .05 .00 .41 .16 NA .20 .00 .02 .12 .50 .13 .30 T .00
-- ------------------------------ ------ ------------------I -
2N 47.16 49. 00 0 .40 .25 .409 N .00 .00 .30 . 0 .0 .47 .07 .18
27 .00 .02 .00 .03 .38 .0 NA .64 .00 .40 .7 .00 .86 .9 .28 .13
28 00 .48 .34 .00 NA .00 .16 .04 .006 00 .6 .65 .00 .00
29 A .A 00 .0 .3R 03 2B.67 NA .0 .00 .00 .00 .00 I.2 .09 03 .00
30 .40 .00 T .00 .00 .00 NA .04 .I4 .00 .00 05 .01 .00 .00 .82







-APO---A -AUCLARE 23 CFS LAKE KEYSTONE -- OPEN----
TOTALS u- b-.PTENNO 5.O- 305.41 8.09 5.83 7.26 7.72 L6.0 4.R 5.01 462 5L.56 4.2T E 08 00 3A59
OAlAL SPTiaW 6.37 r.31 .7 0. 6.49 8. 6.3BASIN LAK .6 71 7.40 6.) .29
E TO TE 3.52 447 S7. 9.3IG0 2.9GA3 45.3 74.9O3 45.47 42.10 50.89 39.65 56.67 30.6E
NO *AL I 0 Tn 07T 4SO7.16 4. DEFLA.6J T7.40 44.55TD 79 43.05 Ny.34 4P.97 49.40 50.-0 45.44 CL.29

*GS IO E S E lN ON LE NUEST FLORIDA NWTER MANAGEFNT pISTICT. ALL OTHER GAGES MAINTAINED 8Y NATIONAL WEATD E SERVICE.
AVGOL EOUS ALL LOS PN 191-LN 60.

Br4tANT F *AER COHSTOL STRUCTURES ONH 3 E) APTEMETE O974


DKLANAHA RIVER BASIN M HlILLS. A RVER BASIN

TAPOKA ABEACLAIRE 23 CFS LAKE KEYSTONE OPEN

BUNGELL 30 CFS LAKE PRETTY C LOG OUT EDA 8AY

OSS BLUFF 0 CFS PEACE RIOER A E (AI

BITHLACOOCHEE RIVER BASIN LAKE LENA (P-1) CLOSED

016 GANT LAKE ALL LOGS IN PLACE LAKE ARIETTA (P-31 CLOSED

FE V G DEFLATED LAKE HERY (P-51 CLOSED

LESLIE EIFNE OPN LAKE SMAT IP6 CLOSED

ORANGE STATE OPEN LAKE FANNIE (P-4 CLOSED

GOLF COURSE ALL LOGS IN PLACE LAKE HAMILTON (P-S) C*SED

BRYANT SLOUGH CLOSED LAKE HANCOCK IP-14) GATE OPEN 14 DEG.

BROODEN BRIDGE I FT OPEN LAKE GIBSON CLOSED

VAN NESS OPEN LAKE PARKER CLOSED

TSALA APOPKA OUTFALL 0 CFS BANANA LAKE I GATE OPEN

INOLIS BYPASS 1520 CFS SCOTT LAKE- CLOSED

INGLIS 650 CFS LOSERT HATTIE (POLK CITY HAINES CITY ROAD)
WEST CLOSED

CENTER CLOSED


EAST -


CLOSED









( here Is tAe lag;c of C;Ai ood


2C;tlout thAe flagc ofQla ture ?
If you're 12 years old and
.... you've never seen a possum, a deer, or a gator
.... you've never taken a boat out on a lake or river
.... you've never had a chance to run through the woods
then Nature's Classroom represents a very special experience.
For many of the 12,000 sixth graders in the Hillsborough County School
System, who spend one school week at Nature's Classroom each year, this out-
door education project is a mind-blowing experience.


Many of the youngsters who spend a
week at the 360 acre site beside the
Hillsborough River come from the Inner
City, "the Asphalt Jungle" says Henry
Verges, principal of the project.
If a child never has any contact with
Nature, it is just impossible for him or her to
have any appreciation of Nature or any
concept of the need for conserving our
natural resources, he explains.
"We do not teach conservation as a
subject", says the former football coach
and dean of boys who originally conceived
the unique educational project and who now
C nages it. "Conservation is a common
ead that runs through everything we do
here".
Nature's Classroom opened six years ago
after the District provided the land 360
acres in the Lower Hillsborough Flood
Detention Area -- to the Hillsborough County
School System.
Since then the project has achieved a
national reputation. Delegations of educators
from various states have visited the site with
the aim of establishing similar programs, and
the Federal Office of Education has featured
Nature's Classroom in a special documentary
film on outdoor education.
"The real impact of the program is a long-
term cumulative effect", Verges points out.
After six years, Hillsborough County now
has more than 60,000 teenagers who have a
greater appreciation for the wonders of
Nature and a deeper understanding of the
need for conservation as a result of their
experience at Nature's Classroom.
A new program has more recently been
inagurated at the rustic woodlands site.
Fifteen "pre-delinquent" youngsters mostly
C Ised and/or neglected children nine years
age or older-reside in special dormitories
at Nature's Classroom. (Other youngsters
stay only during school hours).
The program is too new to draw firm
conclusions yet, says Verges, but results so


far have been very encouraging.
At Nature's Classroomr these boys and
girls are given the kind of environment that
helps them to adjust and. to learn. They are
closely supervised, given proper medical care,
shown adult concern and affection rather
than anger and hostility.
For some of them the effect is quickly
noticeable. One boy in the program for only
a few weeks has improved his reading
ability by a three-year level.
This program requires a substantial staff
effort, Verges points out, "but if we can save
just one child it will be worth it."


i~ie~s~
------ --r







BOARD PRODS CORPS

ON J.D. YOUNG CANAL
The District Governing Board moved
October 9 to provide funds to the Corps of
Engineers for work on the re-excavation of
the J. D. Young Canal and to urge the Corps
to expedite its work there.
The Board voted to have $2,900 trans-
ferred from the State's Water Resources
Development Account as matching funds
for the Corps' construction activity at the
canal.
Joe E. Hill of Leesburg, member of the
District Board, directed the staff to prod the
Corps to act promptly to reopen the canal.
Pointing out that the canal has been closed
for several years because of construction
activities and shoaling, Hill told the- District's
staff "to do whatever is necessary to expe-
dite" the reopening of the canal.
The Corps' work on the canal had been
the subject of sharp words at the most recent
meeting of the Oklawaha Basin Board, co-
chaired by Hill.
At that meeting Thomas W. Needham,
Basin Board member from Ocala, stated that
the Marion County Commission and Marion
County taxpayers are "fed up" with not
being able to use the river and urged the
Corps to expedite work there on an emer-
gency basis.


GS REPORT STUDIES

NW HILLSBOROUGH
When the Floridan Aquifer in Northwest
Hillsborough County drops below normal,
would it be feasible to recharge the Aquifer
by artificial means?
The answer is a qualified yes, according
to a just-released report from the U.S.
Geological Survey, the Southwest Florida
Water Management District, and the
Florida Department of Natural Resources.
A layer of dense clay, averaging four
feet in thickness separates the surficial
sands and clays in the area from the
limestone below, according to the report,
"Hydrological Characteristics of the Surf-
ical Aquifer in Northwest Hillsborough
County."
This confining layer of clay prevents, in
large part, the downward movement of
--water from-the~-sads into the -aquifer,
explains William C. Sinclair, author of the
report.
However, geologic logs of 59 test holes
indicate specific areas where the confining
layer of clay is either thin or absent. These
areas are prime sites for artificially
augmenting recharge to the aquifer.
Laboratory tests of samples of sedi-
ments of the surgical aquifer and confining
beds were used to calculate values of
permeability, storage and leakage. When
the water table in the sands and clays is ten
feet above the water level in the Aquifer
leakage into the Floridan Aquifer is
estimated to be 140,000 gallons per day per
square mile.
The report, identified as Bureau of
Geology Information Circular 86, may be
examined at the Southwest Florida Water
Management District at Brooksville or the
U.S. Geological Survey Office, Tampa, or
purchased from the Florida Bureau of
Geology, Department of Natural Resources,
903 W. Tennessee, Tallahassee, Florida
32304.


Permits

Show


Applications

Major Decline


The volume of applications for "N
permits has declined substantially in rea-.,.
months, according to a report from the
District Permits Department.
Applications for permits totalled 624
this September, a 33% decline from the 942
permit applications received in September
of last year.
The slump during August was an even
greater 40%: 717 applications this August
compared with 1,208 last August.
For the first nine months of 1974, a
total of 7,278 permit applications have been
received, says Bob Evans, District permits
_chief.Juringthe samin e-ridl sear,
total of 11,515 permit applications had
been received. This represents a decrease of
36%.
Total ground water use in the U. S.
represents only 20% of our total water
supply. Nevertheless, ground water provides
almost 80% of the water used in rural areas
for homes and livestock.
(Water Well Journal)
ELDRIDGE WILDE
the wellfield. At the end of the
Eldridge Wilde pumpage had not only leveled
off but had shown a slight decline back to
35.4 MGD, the first decrease in pumpage
since 1959.
During the first nine months of the
current calender year, Eldridge Wilde has
pumped an average of 33.1 MGD. If that
average is maintained for the remainder of
the year the wellfield will register a 15%
decline in pumpage over 1973.


Bulk Rate
U. S. Postage
6.1 c Paid
Brooksville, FL 33512
Permit No. 14


IR L. N. Blt.At
YU. .2 L U1 BOULEVARD
TA Yik, ?LJRLDA 33606


P. O. Box 457 Brooksville, Florida 33512

RETURN POSTAGE GUARANTEED


ADDRESS CORRECTIONS REQUESTED