Citation
Population Dynamics in Ancient Greek Civil Wars, Insurgencies, and Revolts

Material Information

Title:
Population Dynamics in Ancient Greek Civil Wars, Insurgencies, and Revolts a Systems Approach to Stasis
Creator:
Yeakel, Jeffrey Paul
Place of Publication:
[Gainesville, Fla.]
Florida
Publisher:
University of Florida
Publication Date:
Language:
english
Physical Description:
1 online resource (224 p.)

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Doctorate ( Ph.D.)
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Degree Disciplines:
Classical Studies
Classics
Committee Chair:
WOLPERT,ANDREW OXMAN
Committee Co-Chair:
PAGAN-WOLPERT,VICTORIA EMMA
Committee Members:
KAPPARIS,KONSTANTINOS
THIELE,LESLIE PAUL
Graduation Date:
8/9/2014

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Cities ( jstor )
City states ( jstor )
Civil wars ( jstor )
Hell ( jstor )
Human resources ( jstor )
Insurgency ( jstor )
Slavery ( jstor )
Violence ( jstor )
War ( jstor )
Warfare ( jstor )
Classics -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
ancient -- civil-war -- greece -- insurgency -- polis -- revolt -- stasis -- systems -- thrasybulus -- war
Genre:
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent) ( marcgt )
born-digital ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation
Classical Studies thesis, Ph.D.

Notes

Abstract:
Previous comprehensive studies of stasis have either reduced the internal struggles of ancient Greek city-states to a single, linear cause (Ruschenbusch 1978, De Ste Croix 1981) or provided diachronic narratives (Lintott 1982) and catalogs (Gehrke 1985, Berger 1992) with limited explanatory power. My dissertation takes a new approach to the problem of Greek civil war that can help explain its most explosive and unpredictable aspects. I use systems modeling to map the behavioral dynamics of the internal and external participants. A unique explanatory insight gained by systems theory comes from its focus on feedback loops. When the output of an element also functions as its own input, a nonlinear feedback loop forms that can induce either exponential (reinforcing) or homeostatic (balancing) behaviors. The presence of feedback mechanisms helps to explain why civil wars could cause such unanticipated and devastating outcomes, yet prove so ineradicable for poleis infected with them. In Chapter 2, I argue that population support was both a significant and dynamic quantifiable variable. Factional support was not dictated by any single factor and could change over the course of a conflict. Chapter 3 focuses on the informational channels that connected groups of people during an internal war: messages, assemblies, and public inscriptions. I argue that information was frequently disrupted and manipulated by whichever group controlled the geographic territory through which it had to pass. In Chapter 4, I create textual and visual models for the most commonly attested examples of nonlinear, feedback-induced behaviors, such as the surprising outbreak of civil strife, the intensity of non-military violence, and the decisive importance of pitched battles. Chapter 5 is a case study of the Athenian civil war in 404/3 BCE. I explain how and why the army of Thrasybulus achieved such dramatic and exponential growth. The complex interaction between elements like territorial control, civilian massacres, the size of the factions, and the Greek cultural importance of battles meant that the insurgency found little support under its initial conditions, but as some variables activated feedback loops, the entire system adapted and caused an explosion of popular support. ( en )
General Note:
In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note:
Includes vita.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Thesis:
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2014.
Local:
Adviser: WOLPERT,ANDREW OXMAN.
Local:
Co-adviser: PAGAN-WOLPERT,VICTORIA EMMA.
Electronic Access:
RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2015-02-28
Statement of Responsibility:
by Jeffrey Paul Yeakel.

Record Information

Source Institution:
UFRGP
Rights Management:
Copyright Yeakel, Jeffrey Paul. Permission granted to the University of Florida to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Embargo Date:
2/28/2015
Resource Identifier:
968786106 ( OCLC )
Classification:
LD1780 2014 ( lcc )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text