Citation
Social Network Sites, Commerce, and Perceptions of Personal Information Online

Material Information

Title:
Social Network Sites, Commerce, and Perceptions of Personal Information Online
Creator:
Cain, Jason A
Place of Publication:
[Gainesville, Fla.]
Florida
Publisher:
University of Florida
Publication Date:
Language:
english
Physical Description:
1 online resource (171 p.)

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Doctorate ( Ph.D.)
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Degree Disciplines:
Mass Communication
Journalism and Communications
Committee Chair:
ARMSTRONG,CORY L
Committee Co-Chair:
CALVERT,CLAY
Committee Members:
WANTA,WAYNE M
STOILKOVA,MARIA MILKOVA
Graduation Date:
8/9/2014

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Gratification ( jstor )
Information economics ( jstor )
Information sharing ( jstor )
Internet ( jstor )
Online social networking ( jstor )
Personal information ( jstor )
Social capital ( jstor )
Social interaction ( jstor )
Social media ( jstor )
Social networking ( jstor )
Journalism and Communications -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
capital -- communication -- digital -- expectancy -- gratifications -- information -- internet -- media -- networks -- personal -- social -- theory -- uses -- value
Genre:
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent) ( marcgt )
born-digital ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation
Mass Communication thesis, Ph.D.

Notes

Abstract:
This dissertation examines user perceptions of what constitutes a social network site (SNS) and personal information in an effort to better understand motivations for sharing personal information. Additionally, it establishes a link between exchanging personal information in order to attain goods and services in some instances. This exchange supports reconceptualizing social networks and social media as information marketplaces where personal information constitutes the capital exchanged between users and social media companies. Uses and gratifications theory and Expectancy-Value (E-V) theory comprised much of the theoretical basis for this study. A survey method with online questionnaire was employed to collect responses from 618 students at the University of Florida in order to conduct this research. Analysis indicated that connectivity between users still comprised the most important feature of a SNS but that the ability to share user created media has become important as well. Respondents often found information traditionally considered public information, such as street addresses or telephone numbers, to be of a personal nature, perhaps illustrating a respect for the Internet's enhanced ability to aggregate information and identify the persons attached to it. Support for increased social capital in some areas among respondents who frequented social network sites was found as well as an association between increased social capital online and frequency of sharing personal information in order to obtain goods and services. Respondents who perceived their personal information as having value also exhibited a greater likelihood of sharing that information for goods and services. Additionally, those seeking to manage friendships or entertainment on social networks who found this need served by them were found to also spend more time on social networks, find them more important, and to be more willing to share personal information in order to attain goods and services. ( en )
General Note:
In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note:
Includes vita.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Thesis:
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2014.
Local:
Adviser: ARMSTRONG,CORY L.
Local:
Co-adviser: CALVERT,CLAY.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Jason A Cain.

Record Information

Source Institution:
UFRGP
Rights Management:
Copyright Cain, Jason A. Permission granted to the University of Florida to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
968786192 ( OCLC )
Classification:
LD1780 2014 ( lcc )

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Full Text

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10 Abstract of Dissertation Pr esented to the Graduate School of the University of Florida in Partial Fulf illment of the Requirements for t he Degree of Doctor of Philosophy SOCIAL NETWORK SITES, COMMERCE, AND PERCEPTIONS OF PERSONAL INFORMATION ONLINE By Jason Anthony Cain August 2014 Chair: Cory Armstrong Major: Mass Communication This dissertation examines user perceptions of what constitutes a social network site (SNS) and personal information in an effort to better understand motivations for sharing personal information. Additionally, it establishes a link between exchanging personal information in order to attain goods and services in some instances. This exchange supports reconceptualizing social networks and social media as information marketplaces where personal information constitutes the capital exchanged between users and social media companies. Uses and gratifications theory and ExpectancyValue (E-V) theory comprised much of t he theoretical basis for this study. A survey method with online questionnaire was employed to collect responses from 618 students at the University of Flor ida in order to conduct this research. Analysis indicated that connectivity between users still comprised the most important feature of a SNS but that t he ability to share user created media has become important as well. Respondents often found info rmation traditionally considered public information, such as street addresses or telephone numbers, to be of a personal nature, perhaps illustrating a respect for the Internet’s enhanced ability to aggregate information and identify the persons attached to it.

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Purpose of Study

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Theories

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Social Network Sites

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Commerce and the Web

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Personal vs. Private Information

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Methods

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Personal Information and Privacy What is Privacy?

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Griswold v. Connecticut

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Griswold v. Connecticut Griswold v. Connecticut

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Griswold Personal Information and Privacy Online Griswold v. Connect icut

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Personally Identifiable Information

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New York Times

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Griswold collection unauthorized secondary use external unauthorized secondary use errors improper access

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History of Social Network Sites Differences and Definition

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42 Table 2-1. Selected SNS Features Facebook Twitter Google+ Instagram Pintrest Foursquare Yelp Tumblr Visible Friend Networks Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes General SNS (Media, Connections, Location, and Status all stressed) Yes Yes Yes No No No No No Review Centered (Restaurants, Service, etc.) Yes No Yes No No Yes Yes No Location Centered Yes No Yes No No Yes Yes No User Created Media Centered (Pictures or Movies) Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No No Yes These are but the top three of a myriad of different soci al network sites (Wortham & Perlroth, 2012; Friedlander, 2012), and some relatively big differences have been described. Facebook plays the role of a user generated content aggregator, generator and distributor across a broad range of media fo r its individual members, while Twitter provides a place for users to create and share quick, concise messages. Finally, Pinterest acts as a virtual pinboard wher e users can collect and share images they enjoyed from around the web. However, des pite appearing to serve very different functions, the social connections provide a common denominator that forms the basis of all social network sites. The meaning, visi bility, and function of these social connections have come to define the parameters of what social networks are. Several scholars have offered definitions of social network sites. Boyd and

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43 Ellison define social network sites as: web-based services that allow individu als to (1) construct a public or semipublic profile within a b ounded system, (2) articulate a list of other users with whom they share a connection, and (3) view and traverse their list of connections and those made by other s within the system. The nature and nomenclature of these connections may va ry from site to site”(2007, p. 211). Boyd (2010) added the concept of “networked publics” to her definition of social network sites in later work. “Networked pu blics are publics that are restructured by networked technologies” (boyd, 2010, p.39). Networked publics are the publics created by social network sites and made possible through technology. Additionally, boyd adds characteristics of space and a collective in describing social netwo rks, explaining that both arise as a product of social networks. This explanation of a social network presents a place on the web t hat continually expands a nd adds more information as new people come online, connect, and begin s haring who they are, what they make, and what interests them. Boyd and Ellison (2007) also explain thei r preference for “network” instead of the more commonly used “networking” when di scussing social networks, adding “While networking is possible on these sites, it is not the primary practice on many of them, nor is it what differentiates t hem from other form s of computer-mediated communication” (p. 18). They explain that the most important feature of social network sites is their ability to map and share a user’s social connection s, not that they act as a venue whose primary mission is building relationships with new people, as using “networking” might connote. While it is not uncommon for SNS users to meet new people from their activities on such sites, th is remains only a secondary resu lt to the goal of having an online, fleshed out social network.

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Development of Social Networks on the Internet i

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)

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Web 2.0

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)

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Current Environment

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Capital

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bridging bonding

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unique information functions

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Media Theory Uses and Gratifications

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Uses and Gratifications and E V Theory

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A iei b e

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The Present S tudy

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RQ 1:

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RQ 2 : H1:

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H3:

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Survey Sample & Data Collection

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Description of Sample Population N n n n n n n n

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Survey Variables Dependent Variables M SD

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M SD

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M SD Independent Variables M = SD M SD

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M SD

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M SD

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M SD M SD

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M SD = M SD

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M SD M SD

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Descriptive Statistics n n n n n n n n n n SD M SD = M = , SD = M SD

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M SD Research Question Results

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Hypotheses Test Results Hypothesis 1 R2 r n p p

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p R2 p r n p p p p R2 p R2 p

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H ypothesis 2 R2 p p p R2 p r n p

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r n p p p p R2 p H ypothesis 3 , r n p r n p

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r n p r n p r n p r n p

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SNS Necessities from a User Perspective

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corpus . User Defined Personal Information

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Bridging Social Capital Online and Offline

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Social Capital, Information Valuation , and Information Exchange

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User Expectations and Sharing

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Limitations and Future Research

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Conclusion

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: Proceedings of the fourth international conference on Communities and technologies