Social and Economic Dimensions of the Bushmeat Trade in Cross River State Nigeria

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Material Information

Title:
Social and Economic Dimensions of the Bushmeat Trade in Cross River State Nigeria An Ethno-Biological Appraoch to Conservation
Physical Description:
1 online resource (92 p.)
Language:
english
Creator:
Vath, Carrie L
Publisher:
University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Doctorate ( Ph.D.)
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Degree Disciplines:
Interdisciplinary Ecology
Committee Chair:
ROBINSON,SCOTT K
Committee Co-Chair:
MONROE,MARTHA CARRIE
Committee Members:
PONCIANO CASTELLANOS,JOSE MIGUEL
GOLDMAN,ABRAHAM C

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
africa -- bushmeat -- conservation -- nigeria
Interdisciplinary Ecology -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre:
Interdisciplinary Ecology thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract:
Two important concepts for understanding sustainability are the social and economic dimensions of a system. These concepts are of great utility in assessing the effects of human disturbance on biodiversity, natural resource management and developing environmental policies. Cross River State, Nigeria, considered one of Africas biodiversity hotspots, is an ideal location to study the social and economic dimensions of the bushmeat trade because it has high population densities and high rates of deforestation, which can influence local sustainability. This study aims to answer the following questions: (1) How do declines in wildlife influence rural bushmeat trade and hunters livelihoods? (2) What do local community members think about wildlife and resource conservation? and (3) Is a local NGO meeting its conservation objectives and goals? Using standardized interviews and questionnaires of 798 individuals, self-reported hunter off-take and bushmeat processing shed censuses, informal interviews, and participant observation this study found that hunters livelihoods are threatened by declining wildlife trends; community members are aware of faunal declines but show no desire to change their current consumption of wildlife. The NGO has been successful in cultivating support for certain aspects of wildlife and resource conservation, but not in others. Wildlife harvest was unevenly distributed within the catchment areas in the community forests; hunters avoided traveling farther than they had to as long as game was encountered, and that an absence of large game indicates faunal declines within the community forests. Biomass and consumer preference strongly influenced selling price .Participation with a non-governmental organization (NGO) through contact and participation with livelihood projects increased support for conservation and improved some pro-environment behaviors. This study provides one of the first in-depth examinations of the rural bushmeat trade in this area and it can be used as a model for other research.
General Note:
In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note:
Includes vita.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Carrie L Vath.
Thesis:
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2014.
Local:
Adviser: ROBINSON,SCOTT K.
Local:
Co-adviser: MONROE,MARTHA CARRIE.
Electronic Access:
RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2015-05-31

Record Information

Source Institution:
UFRGP
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Classification:
lcc - LD1780 2014
System ID:
UFE0046440:00001