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Characterization of the Human Cyt19 Gene Product: An Arsenic Methyltransferase

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Title:
Characterization of the Human Cyt19 Gene Product: An Arsenic Methyltransferase
Copyright Date:
2008

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Arsenic ( jstor )
Arsenic compounds ( jstor )
Arsenites ( jstor )
Liver ( jstor )
Messenger RNA ( jstor )
Methylation ( jstor )
Money market accounts ( jstor )
Polymerase chain reaction ( jstor )
Small interfering RNA ( jstor )
Toxicity ( jstor )

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University of Florida
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7/24/2006

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CHARACTERIZATION OF THE HUMAN CYT19 GENE PRODUCT: AN ARSENIC
METHYLTRANSFERASE















By

ALEX J. MCNALLY


A THESIS PRESENTED TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT
OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF
MASTER OF SCIENCE

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


2006

































Copyright 2006

by

Alex J. McNally















ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I would like to thank my mentor, Dr. David S. Barber, for all his help, guidance,

and knowledge he has given me. I would also like to thank my committee members, Dr.

Nancy Denslow, Dr. Lena Ma, and Dr. Steve Roberts, for their suggestions and advise. I

thank my fiance and my parents for their support and encouragement throughout my

graduate studies.
















TABLE OF CONTENTS

page

A C K N O W L E D G M E N T S ......... .............. .................................................................... iii

L IS T O F T A B L E S .................. ........ .............................................................. v i

LIST OF FIGURE S ......... ..................................... ........... vii

ABSTRACT ........ .............. ............. ...... ...................... ix

CHAPTER


1 IN TR OD U CTION ............................................... .. ......................... ..

Sources of A rsenic .................. ............................. .. ...... ................... .
N atu ral S ou rces ............................................................... 1
A nthropogenic Sources ................................................................................... 1
Exposure and H health Effects ............................................................................ 2
E x p o su re ................................................................................. 2
H health E effects ....................................................... 3
M echanism s of Toxicity ......................................................... ...............
A rsenic B iotransform ation................................................... ............................. 6
Reduction of Pentavalent Arsenicals ............... .............................................6
M ethylation of Trivalent Arsenicals................................... ....................... 7
V ariation in A rsenic M ethylation ....................................................... .... ........... 8
Role of M ethylation in Arsenic Toxicity ............... ............................................ 10
Specific A im s of R esearch......................................................................................... 11

2 MOLECULAR CLONING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF HUMAN CYT19,
AN S-ADENOSYL-L-METHIONINE:AS-METHYLTRANSFERASE FROM
H E P G 2 C E L L S .............................................. .............................................. .. 13

Introduction ............... ........... ........................ ............................13
M materials and M methods ....................................................................... .................. 14
M molecular Cloning ................................ .... ........ ...... .. ................. 14
RACE PCR .................. ....... ....... ...............15
Expression of Recombinant cytl9 ....... ......... ................... .................15
Characterization ........ ............ ........ ... ..................... 16
Confirmation of Methylated Arsenicals .................. ....... ..................17









R results and D iscu ssion ................... .................................................. .............. 18

3 IDENTIFICATION OF A SPLICE VARIANT OF HUMAN CYT19 ARSENIC
M ETH YLTRAN SFERA SE............................................... ............................. 33

Introduction .............. ... .... ............. .......... .......... ............ 33
M materials and M methods ..................................................................... ....................34
Molecular Cloning of cytl9 Splice Variants.............. .... ..................34
H um an L iv er Sam ples ..............................................................................35
qPCR of cytl9 Splice Variants............................ ..................................... 35
R results .............. ......... ............ .... ............................................36
Discussion ............ .............................................. ....... ... ...... .. 37

4 GENERAL CONCLUSIONS............................ .................................. 45


APPENDIX


ROLE OF CYT19 IN ACUTE ARSENIC TOXICITY. IS CYT19 THE ONLY
HUMAN ARSENIC METHYLTRANSFERASE?.............. ...............49

M materials and M methods ....................................................................... ..................49
R results and D iscu ssion ..................................................................... ................ .. 50
cytl9 mRNA Knockdown by siRNA.....................................................50
Antibody Specificity and Purification............... ................................................51
F uture E xperim ents ......................... ...................... .. .. ...... .......... 5 1

L IST O F R EFER EN CE S ........................................................................... ...............57

B IO G R A PH IC A L SK E TCH ..................................................................... ..................67
















LIST OF TABLES


Table pge

2-1. Primers used in the PCR amplification ofcytl9 .................................................23

2-2. Kinetic analysis of the methylation activity of cytl9-WT and cytl9S81R..............23

3-1. The individual information and Shapiro's score of cytl9 exon 2 and exon 3. ........44

3-2. The amount of cytl9 and cytl9AE2 in different human liver samples and HepG2
c e lls ........................................................................... 4 4

A-1. Sequence of double stranded siRNA ............................ ........ ............. .................. 53
















LIST OF FIGURES


Figure pge

2-1. Sequence alignment of cytl9t and Genbank sequence (accession AF226730) ......24

2-2. Sequence alignment of cytl9S81R and Genbank sequence (accession
A K 057833) ....................................................................... 25

2-3. Sequence alignment of cytl9-W T and cytl9t .....................................................26

2-4. Sequence alignments of the 5' & 3'RACE-PCR products and the Genbank
sequences (accession AK057833 and AF226730)..................... .................27

2-5. Purification of recombinant human cytl9.................................... .................... 28

2-6. The effects of As"' & MINAV concentrations ..................................................29

2-7. The effect of pH on activity ...................................... ............... 30

2-8. The effects of reductants on methylation activity ..............................................30

2-9. The effect of SAM concentration on activity ............................... .....................31

2-10. Arsenical metabolites formed after incubation with [3H]SAM and cytl9 for 30
m in at 3 7 C ........................................................................... 3 2

3-1. The hypothesized scheme of iAs methylation proposed by Cullen, McBride et
al. 1984 ....................................................................40

3-2. PCR products of cytl9 amplification................................. ...............40

3-3. Alignment of the reference cytl9 nucleotide sequence and cytl9AE2 ..................41

3-4. cytl9 isoforms ......... ......... .......... ...............42

3-5. Alignment of the reference cytl9 amino acid sequence and product of cytl9AE2
u O R F ...............................................................................4 3

A-1. Determination of the most efficient siRNA in the knockdown of cytl9 mRNA
levels assayed by qP C R ............................................................................. .... .... 54

A-2. The siRNA pool knockdown of cytl9 mRNA relative to control............................54









A-3. Determination of cell viability after siRNA knockdown by the XTT assay............55

A-4. Western blot of the specificity of the crude antisera to the antigen, purified cytl9
p ro te in ...................................... ................................................... 5 5

A-5. Western blot of the specificity of the crude antisera to cytl9 in human liver
cytosolic preparations.................. ......................... .. ......55

A-6. Western blot of the specificity of the purified antibody to the antigen, purified
cy tl9 p rotein ........................................................................................... 5 6

A-7. Western blot of the specificity of the crude antisera to cytl9 in human liver
cytosolic preparations.................. ......................... .. ......56















Abstract of Thesis Presented to the Graduate School
of the University of Florida in Partial Fulfillment of the
Requirements for the Degree of Master of Science

CHARACTERIZATION OF THE HUMAN CYT19 GENE PRODUCT: AN ARSENIC
METHLTRANSFERASE

By

Alex J. McNally

May 2006

Chair: David S. Barber
Major Department: Veterinary Medicine

Chronic arsenic exposure poses a threat to millions of people throughout the world

due to arsenic in drinking water; however the mechanisms underlying arsenic

carcinogenicity and individual susceptibility are unknown. Methylation has been

considered the primary detoxification pathway of inorganic arsenic in many species but

there is evidence that methylation may increase arsenic toxicity. It has been shown that

methylated arsenicals that contain As"' are more cytotoxic and genotoxic than either

arsenate or arsenite. Rat liver S-adenosyl-L-methionine: arsenic"'-methyltransferase has

been identified and is homologous to human cytl9, but there are species specific

differences in arsenic biotransformation and toxicity. Additionally, there is considerable

variation among humans in the rate of methylation of inorganic arsenic leading to

measurable differences in toxicity. Therefore, it is important to better understand the

enzymes that catalyze the methylation of arsenic in humans. In this study, we PCR

amplified and cloned cytl9, a putative arsenic methyltransferase from human HepG2









hepatoma cells. The PCR product was ligated into an E. coli pET expression vector with

a polyhistidine tag at the amino-terminal residue. The recombinant human cytl9 was

successfully expressed in BL21 (DE3) and purified using a nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid

metal-affinity chromatography. The recombinant protein catalyzes the methylation of

arsenite as well as monomethylarsonic acid (MMA). The specific activity of arsenite

methylation was 597 pmol/mg protein/min in a reaction mixture containing 5mM GSH, 1

mM DTT, 1 mM MgC12, 100 iM S-adenosyl-L-methionine, 50M sodium m-arsenite,

and 5 .g of S-adenosyl-L-methionine: arsenic methyltransferase in 100mM tris/100mM

sodium phosphate buffer pH 7.4 at 37 C for 30 minutes. The results suggest that the

human cytl9 gene, in fact, is translated to an S-adenosyl-L-methionine: arsenic

methyltransferase which methylates both arsenite and MMA.

Studies have shown that humans exposed to arsenic excrete variable amounts of

methylated arsenicals in the urine which may be due to differences in arsenic

methyltransferase activity. While polymorphisms in the coding region of cytl9 may

account for some of the observed variation in arsenic methylation, other mechanisms are

likely to be involved. In this study we identified an alternative splice variant of the

human cytl9 (cytl9AE2), in which exon 2 is removed creating a bicistronic transcript

that is unlikely to produce an active protein. This variant was expressed in 7 out of 7

male Caucasian human liver samples tested and in HepG2 cells. The human cytl9

appears to be alternatively spliced in many individuals and may play a role in the

observed variation in arsenic methylation seen in individuals.














CHAPTER 1
INTRODUCTION

Sources of Arsenic

Natural Sources

Arsenic (As) is a member of the nitrogen group in the periodic table and is

classified as a metalloid. This metalloid is a naturally occurring element and is the 20th

most abundant element in the earth's crust [1]. Arsenic is found in the environment as

sulfides, and complex sulfides of iron, nickel, and cobalt. The natural weathering of

rocks and soils containing various forms of arsenic contribute to its levels in the

environment. Arsenic is present in the atmosphere, aquatic environments, soils &

sediments, and in organisms. This metalloid is found naturally in rocks, geothermal

wells, minerals, and metal ores such as copper and lead. Arsenic is present in the

environment in both organic and inorganic forms and exists in four valence states, -3, 0

(elemental), +3 (trivalent), and +5 pentavalentt arsenic), however it exists mainly in the

latter two valence states. Many marine plant and animal species have naturally high

levels of As, but in organic forms that appear to cause little toxicity. The main species of

arsenic in marine animals is the arsenosugar, arsenobetaine [2]. In general, organic forms

of arsenic are less toxic than inorganic forms of arsenic and the pentavalent inorganic

forms are less toxic than trivalent inorganic arsenic compounds.

Anthropogenic Sources

Anthropogenic sources of arsenic stem from its use in pesticides and wood

preservatives as well as mining and smelting wastes. In the U.S., 2,200 tons of arsenic









was produced in 1985 [3]. Since 1985, the domestic production of arsenic in the US has

ceased. However, arsenic is still used domestically and therefore is imported from

countries such as China, Japan and Mexico. In 2003, the United States was world's

largest consumer of arsenic, demanding 21,600 metric tons [4] Arsenic has also been

used in the production of dessicants and as growth stimulants for plants and animals.

Organoarsenicals have been shown to have both therapeutic and growth promoting

properties in poultry and swine. Arsanilic acid and its sodium salts, such as 4-

nitrophenylarsonic acid are added to pet feed [5]. Most of this arsenic passes through

the animal and becomes part of the waste stream resulting from animal production. In

addition, arsenic has been used for therapeutic purposes and of course as a poison.

Arsenic has been used to treat syphilis, tropical diseases such as trypanosomiasis (African

sleeping sickness), yaws, amoebic dysentery and recently as an anticancer. Paul Ehrlich

developed an organic arsenical, arsphenamine, also known as Salvarsan, which was used

to treat syphilis [6]. Arsphenamine was also believed to be effective in treating

trypanosomiasis [6]. Arsenic trioxide has been shown to be highly effective in the

treatment of various cancers especially of acute promyelocytic leukaemia [7].

Exposure and Health Effects

Exposure

Arsenic is present throughout our environment, in the air we breathe, the water we

drink, and the food we eat. Water contributes more to iAs exposure than food or air. On

average Americans are exposed to 50 .g per day of arsenic of which 10 .g is in the

inorganic form [8]. People are exposed to higher than average arsenic due to living or

working around higher exposure sources. For example living or working near a

hazardous waste site can lead to exposure via the air, ingestion, or the food chain.









Arsenic is present in 47% of all sites on the National Priorities List (NPL) sites or

Superfund sites making it second only to lead as the most common contaminant of

concern [9]. Occupational settings such as workers who use or produce arsenic

compounds: vineyards, ceramics, glass-making, smelting, pharmaceuticals, refining of

metallic ores, pesticide manufacturing & application, wood preservation, or

semiconductor manufacturing, have the potential to be exposed to higher than average

arsenic levels [1].

Currently, people in Taiwan, Mexico, western United States, western South

America, China, West Bengal and Bangladesh are exposed to high levels of arsenic due

to anthropogenic and/or natural contamination of potable water. It has been estimated

that 200 million people worldwide are at risk from health effects associated with this

exposure [10]. The two most affected areas in the world are Bangladesh and West

Bengal, India; it has been estimated that around 122 million people in these areas are

exposed to groundwater arsenic concentrations above the World Health Organization

maximum permissible limit of 50g/L [11]. The study showed that in West Bengal,

26.4% (n=10,991 tube wells) of the water samples had arsenic ranging in 100-299 [g/L.

In the U.S. the arsenic maximum contaminant level (MCL) was decreased to 10g/L by

the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in January 2001. Frost et al. [12]

identified 33 counties in 11 states in the western United States with mean arsenic

concentrations of 10g/L or greater. In addition, from 1950-1990 there were over 60

million people in the US exposed to arsenic contaminated water exceeding 10g/L [12].

Health Effects

Ingestion of arsenic is a widespread human health problem. There are different

symptoms associated with acute and chronic arsenic exposure. Acute exposure to arsenic









can result in acute paralytic syndrome, acute GI syndrome, and even death. Oral

exposure above 60 ppm in food or water can result in death [3]. Chronic arsenic

exposure can result in skin disorders such as hyper and hypo pigmentation, and

hyperkeratosis [3]. It was found that even at 0.005-0.01mg/L of arsenic in water there is

an increase in the prevalence of skin lesions [13]. In addition, chronic iAs exposure can

affect the circulatory and nervous systems leading to diseases such as Blackfoot disease.

Major organs such as the liver, kidneys, lung, bladder, and heart can be affected as a

result of arsenic cytotoxicity. There is an increase of cancer, death from cancer, and

diabetes mellitus associated with chronic arsenic exposure. Epidemiological studies

show that there is dose-response relationship between exposure to iAs and skin cancer

[14]. A study in Taiwan[15] and Japan[16] demonstrated a significant association

between long-term arsenic exposure in drinking water with lung and bladder cancer. In

northern Chile an increase in mortality from bladder, lung, kidney, and skin cancer is

associated with As exposure; bladder and lung cancer showing highest increase in

mortality [17]. A follow up study in Taiwan compared the incidence of diabetes mellitus

in an arsenic exposed population to two control areas showed an association between As

exposure and diabetes mellitus [18].

Mechanisms of Toxicity

The mechanism of arsenic toxicity is dependent on oxidation state. Trivalent

arsenicals, including methylated arsenicals produce toxicity by enzyme inhibition by

interactions with sulfhydryl groups in proteins [19] and the generation of reactive oxygen

species (ROS). For example, in vitro studies have shown that MMA111 and arsenite are

capable of inhibiting pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity in hamster kidney and

purified porcine heart PDH resulting in the subsequent blockage of adeonosine









triphosphate (ATP) production because of the disruption of the citric acid due to the

depletion of cellular citrate [20]. Inorganic arsenicals, arsenite and arsenate, have been

shown to induce ROS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) which result in DNA and

protein oxidative damage [21]. Another study demonstrated that MMA"' and DMA"'

induced ROS result in DNA damage [22]. Arsenate has been shown to interfere with

ATP production by substituting for phosphate leading to production of an unstable ADP-

arsenate complex which spontaneously hydrolyzes [23]. This process leads to a depletion

of cellular energy due to this futile cycle.

Although there is strong evidence of the carcinogenicity of arsenic in humans, the

mechanism by which tumors are produced is unknown. Studies of arsenic carcinogenesis

have been hampered because there are very few animal models in which arsenic induces

carcinogenesis [3]. DMA concentrations of 50 and 200 ppm have been shown to be

carcinogenic in F344 rats urinary bladder [24]. Recent work has demonstrated the

promotion effects of inorganic arsenicals and methylated arsenicals. Inorganic arsenic

(42.5 and 85 ppm)has been shown to be a transplacental carcinogen in mice [25].

Organic arsenicals, such as MMA, DMA, and TMAO have been shown to act as

promoters in carcinogenesis of several rat organs [26]. However, some of these studies

have received much criticism due to the high arsenical exposure levels used ranging from

about 50 to 400 ppm and the use of several initiators such as diethylnitrosamine, N-butyl-

N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine, N-methyl-N-nitrosourea, dihydroxy-di-N-

propylnitrosamine and N-N'-dimethylhydrazine, prior to arsenic exposure.

Several possibilities for mechanisms of arsenic induced malignancies have been

hypothesized such as chromosomal abnormality, oxidative stress, and the promotion of









tumorigenesis. Zhao et al. [27], have shown that chronic low level arsenic (0-0.5[iM)

exposure will result in the malignant transformation of epithelial cells associated with

DNA hypomethylation due to depletion of SAM and aberrant gene expression. An in

vivo long-term arsenic exposure study to mice demonstrated that arsenic in potable water

can induce aberrant gene expression, global DNA hypomethylation, and hypomethylation

of the gene for the estrogen receptor-a resulting in enhanced transcription, which

cumulatively could lead to arsenic hepatocarcinogenesis [28]. Arsenate was shown to

have a dose-dependent transcriptional induction of several different signal transduction

pathways, including the dose-response induction of several promoters and/or response

elements responsive to oxidative damage and DNA damage [29] which may help

understand the mechanisms of carcinogenicity for arsenic. Binet et al. [30] has shown

that arsenic induced apoptosis via reactive oxygen species (ROS) production occurs but,

the ROS is not produced from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate

dehydrogenase activation. Trivalent methylated arsenicals have been shown to indirectly

cause DNA damage by ROS. One study showed that DMA"' promotes tumorigenesis

and gentoxicity via dimethylated arsenic peroxides [31]

Arsenic Biotransformation

Reduction of Pentavalent Arsenicals

The biotransformation of iAs alternates between the reduction of arsenate (iAsV) to

arsenite (iAs"') followed by oxidative methylation. The hypothesized scheme of iAs

methylation involves oxidative methylation and reduction[32]:

AsVO43- + 2e As"133- + CH3 CH3As 032- + 2e CH3As"122- + CH3+

(CH3)2AsVO2- + 2e (CH3)2As"'O









Arsenic reduction must occur first before it can be methylated. Several enzymes

have been shown capable to reduce arsenic. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) has

the ability to reduce iAsV to iAs"' in the presence of a dithiol and a purine nucleoside

guanosinee or inosine) in vitro [33, 34]. However, studies performed by Nemeti et al.

2003 showed that PNP does not play a role in iAsv reduction in vivo [35].

Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) in the presence of glutathione

(GSH) and NAD has the ability to reduce iAsV to iAs"' in human red blood cells and rat

liver cytosol [36, 37]. A human arsenate reductase was discovered capable of reducing

arsenate but not methylarsonic acid (MMAV) [38]. Zakharyan et al 1999 presented an

enzyme from rabbit liver capable of reducing MMAV, arsenate, and dimethylarsinic acid

(DMAv) in the presence of GSH; this enzyme was also present in human liver [39].

MMAV reductase was sequenced and 92% of the sequences were identical to human

glutathione-S-transferase Omega class (hGSTO-1) [40]. This hGSTO-1 catalyzes the

reduction of iAsV, MMAV, and DMAv [39, 41]. There is evidence that pentavalent

arsenicals can be reduced nonenzymatically. Glutathione (GSH) has been shown to

reduce pentavalent arsenicals [42, 43].

Methylation of Trivalent Arsenicals

Following the first reduction step, arsenite is enzymatically oxidatively methylated

to MMAV. In this reaction, a high energy methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methione

(SAM) is transferred to a trivalent arsenical in an oxidative process that produces a

pentavalent methylated arsenical. The resulting monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) can be

reduced a second time and methylated again to form dimethylarsinic acid (DMA). In

West Bengal, MMA1" and DMA1" were detected in the urine of exposed humans in 48%

and 72% respectively out of the 428 subjects [44]. In some animals, including humans, a









third methylation can occur resulting in formation of trimethylarsine oxide (TMAO). It

was shown that a single dose of arsenic trioxide in hamsters resulted in a very small

amount of TMAO production in the liver[45]. Yoshida et al 1997 demonstrated that rats

excrete TMAO in their urine after a single oral administration of DMA [46]. Urine

excretion of TMAO in man has been observed after ingestion of an arsenosugar and

DMA [47, 48].

Arsenic methyltransferases (AS3MT) have been isolated from many mammalian

species. An AS3MT has been purified 2000-fold from rabbit liver by DEAE

chromatography to a single band [49]. The rabbit liver AS3MT was capable of

performing both methylation steps. The Golden Syrian hamster liver was used to purify

AS3MT and was shown to have similar activities as the rabbit AS3MT [50]. Rat liver S-

adenosyl-L-methionine:arsenic"'-methyltransferase has been identified and is

homologous to human cytl9 [51]. The rat arsenic methyltransferase has been shown to

perform both mono and dimethylation of arsenic. Arsenic methyltransferase activity has

been determined in mice and primates, including humans [52-55].

Variation in Arsenic Methylation

There is significant variation in the arsenic methylation rate and arsenic metabolite

production among mammalian species. The variability of arsenic methylation is apparent

in the amounts of methylated arsenic metabolites seen in the urine of exposed mammals

such as the rat, rabbit, hamster, dog, and mouse. For example, mice quickly excrete

about 90% of the dose in two days of which 80% is DMA [56]. The rat efficiently

methylates arsenic, but it accumulates DMA in red blood cells resulting in subsequent

lower DMA excretion levels making it a poor model for human metabolic studies [57].

Healy et al. [58], purified arsenic methyltransferases from livers of rabbit, hamster, and









rhesus monkey and found different rates of methylation which may affect arsenic

elimination and toxicity.

However, these mammals with arsenic methylation capacity have something in

common which distinguishes them from humans. On average, humans exposed to

arsenic excrete more MMA in the urine than other mammals, specifically 10-30% iAs,

10-20% MMA, and 60-80% DMA [59]. This suggests that non-human mammals are

more efficient at catalyzing the second methylation step which produces MMA. This

may relate to their lower susceptibility to iAs carcinogenesis following exposure versus

man. Additionally, there is significant variation in human susceptibility to As induced

toxicity, which may be related to differences in arsenic biotransformation between

individuals. Epidemiological studies have shown differences in the amount of MMA and

DMA excreted in the urine of exposed populations which may be associated with

differences in arsenic methyltransferase activity. Several studies on the urinary excretion

of arsenic metabolites in native Andean people and mixed ethnicities in northeastern

Argentina exposed to arsenic in potable water revealed low excretion of MMA [60-63].

One study revealed higher than normal MMA in urine, on average 27%, in people

exposed to arsenic in drinking water on the northeast coast of Taiwan [64].

Only a few polymorphisms have been found in the coding region of cytl9 to date.

The Met287Thr mutation has been reported on three different occasions [65-67]. In two

of these studies, the methylation activity of this allozyme was determined and showed to

have a higher methylation capacity than the wild-type [65, 67]. However, the activity of

this allozyme was determined either from a cytosol preparation or by analysis of cells and

culture media of exposed human hepatocytes. This type of analysis does not take into









account the possible different expression levels of the arsenic methyltransferase. In fact

one study shows that the allozyme Met287Thr was expressed at higher levels than the

wild-type arsenic methyltransferase [67], making unclear as to whether the increase in

activity results from the mutation or the increased expression levels. There are

differences in arsenic methylation capacities among individuals, which cannot be

supported alone by polymorphisms within the cytl9 coding region. All of the single

nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in cytl9 available as seen in the NCBI SNP database

on January 12, 2006 are within the intron or untranslated region (UTR). In addition, two

separate studies which examined the frequency of polymorphisms within cytl9 found one

nonsynonymous SNPs (nsSNPs) out of 58 SNPs [66] and the other study found 3

nsSPNPs out of 26 SNPs [67], the remainder of the SNPs occurring in introns or UTRs.

There is another mechanism which may help explain the differences seen in

arsenic methylation, alternative splicing. Alternative splicing is frequently used to

regulate gene expression and to generate tissue-specific mRNA and protein isoforms [68,

69]. Introns contain sequence elements in which splicesome assembly occurs [70].

Mutations within these sequence elements could alter the constitutive splicing of a gene

which may affect the methylation capacity within and among different population groups.

Role of Methylation in Arsenic Toxicity

Arsenic methylation has traditionally been thought to be a detoxification pathway.

Pentavalent methylated arsenic metabolites are less reactive and are readily excreted in

the urine compared to iAs [56]. Pentavalent methylated arsenicals have also been shown

to be less cytotoxic and genotoxic compared to arsenite [71]. Mure et al. [72],

demonstrated that arsenite induces delayed mutagenesis and transformation in human

osteosarcoma cells but MMA1" showed no significant increase in mutagenesis or









transformation. While As methylation has been viewed as a detoxification pathway,

recent studies have shown monomethylarsonous acid (MMA"') and dimethylarsinous

acid (DMA"') to be more toxic than inorganic arsenicals. In vitro and in vivo studies

have shown that MMA1" is more cytotoxic than As"'. Petrick et al [20], revealed that the

order of toxicity in Chang human hepatocytes is as follows: MMA11 "> arsenite > arsenate

> MMAV = DMAv. In vivo studies performed in hamsters demonstrated that MMA"11 is

more lethal than arsenite [73]. In addition, Hirano et al. [74], has shown that

monomethylarsonous acid diglutathione is more acutely toxic than other arsenicals. It is

important to point out that not all mammals methylate arsenic such as the marmoset

monkey, tamarin, chimpanzee, and the guinea pig [57, 75-78]. These mammals have not

been shown to be more susceptible to acute arsenic intoxication. One study showed no

correlation between the induction of micronuclei and the ability to methylate arsenic in

the leukocytes of four mammalian species, humans, mice, rats, and guinea pigs [79].

Another factor that questions the role of methylation is the fact that arsenic is a known

human carcinogen, but very few animals exist in which arsenic initiates carcinogenesis.

The debate over whether As methylation is a detoxification or bioactivation pathway

leads to confusion over the role of methylation in toxicity.

Specific Aims of Research

The proposed study will address the role of arsenic methylation in human toxicity

by better understanding the kinetics of the human arsenic methyltransferase. The overall

hypothesis is the following: Human arsenic methyltransferase, cytl9, activity is the

determining factor in the rate of arsenic methylation and toxicity. To test this hypothesis,

I examined two specific aims: 1) clone and characterize the human arsenic

methyltransferase (cytl9) and 2) determine cytl9s role in toxicity and arsenic









methylation variability. Specific aim one was addressed by determining rate of arsenic

methylation by an in vitro assay. The optimum conditions required for human cytl9

activity were determined such as pH optimum, substrate specificity and concentration,

and thiol requirements. Specific aim two was addressed by examining the role of

polymorphisms and splice variants on arsenic methylation variability. The determination

of cytl9s role in toxicity was addressed by As toxicity in the presence and absence of

methylation activity. In order to determine if cytl9 is the only arsenic methyltransferase

in humans, the mRNA levels, protein concentration, and activity, in the presence and

absence of siRNA knockdown was determined.














CHAPTER 2
MOLECULAR CLONING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF HUMAN CYT19, AN S-
ADENOSYL-L-METHIONINE:AS-METHYLTRANSFERASE FROM HEPG2 CELLS

Introduction

Chronic arsenic exposure is a threat to millions of people throughout the world.

Exposure to arsenic has been linked to various types of cancers such as skin cancer, lung

cancer, and cancer of other internal organs [71]. Methylation has been considered the

major route of biotransformation and excretion of inorganic arsenic (iAs) in many species

including humans. The hypothesized scheme of iAs methylation involves reduction

followed by oxidative methylation [80]:

AsVO43- + 2e -> As"33- + CH3+ CH3As 032- + 2e CH3As"O22- + CH3+

(CH3)2Asv02- + 2e > (CH3)2As"IO

While traditionally thought to be a detoxification pathway, recent studies have

shown monomethylarsonous acid (MMA1") and dimethylarsonous acid (DMA"') to be

more toxic than inorganic arsenicals [73]. In addition, Hirano et al.[74], has shown that

monomethylarsonous acid diglutathione is more acutely toxic than other arsenicals. The

debate over whether As methylation is a detoxification or bioactivation pathway leads to

confusion over the role of methylation in toxicity. Rat liver S-adenosyl-L-

methionine:arsenic"'-methyltransferase has been identified and is homologous to human

cytl9 [51]. While this enzyme can be used as a model for human arsenic

biotransformation, the rat is considered a poor model for metabolic studies due to its

accumulation in red blood cells and subsequent lower DMA excretion levels [57]. There









are also other species specific differences in arsenic biotransformation and toxicity.

Healy et al. (1999) [58], purified arsenic methyltransferases from livers of rabbit,

hamster, and rhesus monkey and found different rates of methylation which may affect

arsenic elimination and toxicity. Humans excrete greater amounts of monomethylarsonic

acid (MMAV) compared to most other mammals [81]. Additionally, there is considerable

variation among humans in the rate of methylation of inorganic arsenic possibly leading

to measurable differences in toxicity [82]. Therefore it is important to better understand

the arsenic methylation capacity in human. To date, human cytl9 has been expressed,

but it has not been fully characterized [52]. In this study, we cloned, expressed, and

characterized cytl9, an arsenic methyltransferase from human HepG2 hepatoma cells.

Materials and Methods

Molecular Cloning

Two separate sequences available from Genbank (accession number AK057833

and AF226730) were used to design primers to amplify the open reading frame (ORF) of

cytl9, an arsenic methyltransferase (Table 1). Total RNA was isolated from HepG2 cells

using Trizol reagent (Invitrogen, Carlsbad, USA)). Total RNA was treated with DNAase

(DNA-free kit, Ambion, Austin, USA), and reverse transcribed (RETROscript for RT-

PCR, Ambion) using 2 tg of RNA. HepG2 cDNA was polymerase chain reaction

(PCR)-amplified, the PCR product was ligated in pET100/D-TOPO (Invitrogen) and

transformed into chemically competent Escherichia coli One Shot TOP 10 chemically

competent cells (Invitrogen). The PCR reaction consisted of 2.5 U of Pfu DNA

polymerase, 0.4 pM each primer, 5tl of the RT reaction, 0.2 mM dNTP mix, 5Pl of 10X

PCR Buffer, and nuclease-free water to 50pl. The PCR conditions were as follows: an

initial denaturation at 940C for 2min, followed by 35 cycles of denaturation at 940C for









Imin, annealing at 600C for Imin, extension for 720C for 2min 30s and a final extension

at 720C for 7min. The PCR products, the complete open reading frame of cytl9 (cytl9-

WT), the mutated cytl9 (cytl9S81R), and the truncated cytl9 (cytl9t) were then ligated

and transformed. Ampicillin resistant colonies were analyzed by PCR and visualized by

agarose gel electrophoresis. Once a correct clone was identified it was sent for

sequencing to the DNA Sequencing Core Laboratory at the University of Florida. Each

clone was sequenced several times and the consensus sequence determined.

RACE PCR

Rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) was performed to determine which of

the two separate sequences available in Genbank was actually expressed in HepG2 cells.

The RACE-PCR was performed using the FirstChoice RLM-RACE kit from Ambion.

Primers were designed (Table 1) according to the instruction manual and the PCR

reaction consisted of 1.25 U of Taq DNA polymerase, 0.4 VM each primer, 1 l of the RT

reaction, 0.2 mM dNTP mix, 5pl of 10X PCR Buffer, and nuclease-free water to 50al.

The PCR conditions were as follows: an initial denaturation at 940C for 3min, followed

by 35 cycles of denaturation at 940C for 30s, annealing at 600C for 30s, extension for

720C for Imin and a final extension at 720C for 7min. The PCR product was ligated in

pGEM-T Easy Vector (Promega) and transformed into chemically competent

Escherichia coli JM109 chemically competent cells (Promega).

Expression of Recombinant cytl9

The pET100/D-TOPO constructs (cytl9-WT, cytl9S81R, and cytl9t) were

transformed into BL21 Star (DE3) E. coli strain for expression (Invitrogen). First, 10ml

of Luria-Bertani (LB) broth containing ampicillin (100[tg/ml) and 1% glucose were

inoculated with the transformed bacteria and the cultures were grown overnight. The









next day, 5ml of the overnight culture was used to inoculate 250ml of LB broth

containing ampicillin and 1% glucose and grown to an OD600 of 0.5. Expression was

induced by the addition of ImM isopropyl-1-thio-P-D-galactoside. The culture was

allowed to grow for one hour.The pET100/D-TOPO construct was then transformed into

BL21 Star (DE3) E. coli strain for expression (Invitrogen).

The cells were harvested by centrifugation at 5,000g for 15 minutes at 40C. The

pellet was resuspended in binding buffer (50mM NaH2PO4, 300mM NaC1, 10mM

imidazole, pH 8.0). The cells were lysed by addition oflysozyme to a final concentration

of lmg/ml and incubated on ice for 30 minutes followed by further incubation for 10

minutes at 40C on a rocking platform. Triton X-100 was added to a final concentration of

1% and the incubation continued for another 10 minutes at 40C with rocking. The

cellular debris was removed by centrifugation of the lysate at 3000g for 30 minutes at

4C The recombinant 6xHis-tagged protein was purified using a nickel-nitrilotriacetic

acid (Ni-NTA) metal-affinity chromatography according to the manufacturer's

instructions (QIAGEN, Valencia, USA).

Characterization

Activity of the expressed proteins was determined by the rate of arsenic

methylation. All incubations were carried out at 370C for 30 minutes in a final volume of

250 il, unless otherwise noted. The reaction mixtures contained 5mM glutathione

(GSH), 1 mM dithiothreitol (DTT), 1 mM MgC12, 100 [M S-adenosyl-L-methionine

(SAM), 13pM (3H-methyl)-SAM (S.A.), 50KM sodium m-arsenite, and 5 pg of S-

adenosyl-L-methionine: arsenic methyltransferase in 100mM tris/100mM sodium

phosphate buffer pH 7.4. The pH optimum was determined using the above conditions









but at different pHs (6.0 11). The substrate specificity and optimum substrate

concentrations were also determined by addition of various concentrations of sodium m-

arsenite or MMA, ranging from 1 iM to 200 iM or 10 iM to 1000 iM respectively. The

requirements of SAM and reductants by cytl9 were determined by addition of various

concentrations of SAM, and the reductants GSH and tris(2-carboxyethyl)-phosphine

(TCEP). The methylation reactions were stopped by placing on ice. The standard

extraction procedure described by Zakharyan et al. [49] was used to separate radioactive

SAM from radioactive MMA and DMA. Briefly, the reaction mixture (250 il) was

treated with 10 il of 40% KI, 20 [l of 1.5% potassium dichromate, 750 [l of

concentrated HC1 and 750 pl of chloroform. The mixture was then mixed on a vortex for

3 min followed by centrifugation at 1500g for 3 min. The upper aqueous phase contained

SAM and was discarded. The lower organic phase was washed twice with 250 pl of

water, 5 il of 40% KI, and 750 pl of concentrated HC1. The mixture was mixed on a

vortex and centrifuged and the upper aqueous phase was discarded each time. The

methylated arsenicals contained in the organic phase were back extracted with 1 mL of

water, vortexed for 3min and centrifuged at 1500g for 5 min. Half a milliliter from the

final aqueous phase after back extraction was counted in a liquid scintillation counter.

The activity was calculated from the dpm 3H transferred from SAM to arsenic.

Confirmation of Methylated Arsenicals

Methylated arsenicals were separated from each other and contaminating species

using the ion exchange method described previously by Zakharyan et al. (1995) [49]. A

10 mL glass pipette was filled to 2 mL with Bio-Rad AG 50W-X4 cation exchange resin

(100-200 iM mesh). The column was equilibrated by addition of 0.5N HC1 (30 mL),

followed by water until the pH of the effluent was 5.5, 0.5N NaOH (30 mL), water until









the pH of the effluent was 5.5, 0.5N HC1 (30 mL), and 0.05N HC1 (50 mL). After

equilibrating the column, 0.5 mL of the final aqueous phase extract from above was

applied to the column. The columns were eluted by 6 mL of 0.05M HC1 to obtain MMA

and 10 mL of 0.5M NaOH for DMA elution. One milliliter of the these fractions were

counted in a liquid scintillation counter.

Results and Discussion

Both cytl9 and cytl9t transcripts were amplified by PCR from HepG2 cells and

human liver samples. The sequencing results of cytl9t showed 4 point mutations, 3

transverions and 1 transition, (Figure 2-1A) resulting in 3 missense mutations (Figure 2-

1B) compared to the Genbank sequence (accession AF226730). The wild-type cytl9 was

also amplified, cloned, and sequenced from two different populations of HepG2 cells.

One of the clones, designated cytl9-WT, was aligned to the Genbank sequence,

accession AK057833, and showed a 100% homology (data not shown). The other clone

designated cytl9S81R contained a nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphism

(nsSNPs) when compared to the Genbank sequence, accession AK057833 (Figure 2-2A),

which results in a change from serine to arginine at residue 81 in the peptide sequence

(Figure 2-2B). This change occurs in the SAM-binding site, however SAM-dependent

methyltransferases have poor conservation of SAM-binding residues. SAM-dependent

methyltransferases contain 3 regions of sequence similarity (motif I, II, and III) which are

thought to be important in SAM binding. The only highly conserved residues in the

SAM-binding N-terminal region appear to be the glycine-rich sequence E/DXGXGXG

found at residues 76 to 82 [83]. Therefore, the amino acid change may not have a

significant effect on the activity of the recombinant protein.









The cytl9t clone and the cytl9-WT clone are identical except for the deletion of a

nucleotide at position 997 resulting in a premature stop codon (Figure 2-3A). Further

analysis of the protein sequences revealed 6 missense mutations including a cysteine to

valine mutation and deletions of the final 37 amino acids from the C-terminus including 4

cysteines due to the deletion in the nucleotide sequence (Figure 2-3B). In other SAM-

dependent methyltransferases, the C-terminus is important in substrate binding [83]. The

cytl9t protein showed no arsenic methylation activity. This indicates that the cysteine

rich C-terminus is important for As binding and critical for activity.

RACE-PCR was performed on both the 5' and 3' ends. The sequencing results

revealed that the 5'end of the cDNA was identical to the ORF of both sequences

available in Genbank (accession AK057833 and AF226730). The 5'-untranslated region

(UTR) is different from the Genbank sequences containing 18 mutations (Figure 2-4A).

The 3'RACE-PCR revealed that HepG2 cells expressed mRNA identical to the 3'end of

the Genbank sequence, accession AK057833. In particular, the sequencing showed that

HepG2 cells cytl9 mRNA does not have a nucleotide deletion resulting in a premature

stop codon (Figure 2-4B).

The recombinant human cytl9s (cytl9-WT, cytl9t, and cytl9S81R) were

successfully expressed in BL21 (DE3) and purified to homogeneity using a nickel-

nitrilotriacetic acid metal-affinity chromatography (Figure 5). The recombinant proteins,

cytl9S81R and cytl9-WT, catalyze the transfer of a methyl group from SAM to As"' as

well as MMA1", which is consistent with previous studies (Figure 2-6) [51, 52].

However, the different arsenite methyltransferase activity profiles between cytl9-WT and

cytl9S81R are apparent. Arsenite concentrations above 50 uiM appears to have an









inhibitory effect on cytl9S81R activity, which is similar to what is seen in the rabbit [49].

This inhibitory effect is not seen in the cytl9-WT arsenite methylation activity. The

apparent Km and Vmax of cytl9 As"' methyltransferase (AS3MT) activity for cytl9-WT

and cytl9S81R are 251.6 riM, 3505 pmole/mg/min, 6.176 riM, and 804.9 pmole/mg/min

respectively (Table 2). The Km and Vmax values of cytl9-WT MMA methylation is 164.6

IM and 926.8 pmole/mg/min (Table 2). The MMA methylation profile is very similar to

that seen in the rabbit. These enzymes seem to saturate at MMA concentrations of 1000

IM [49].

The Km values can be used to interpret the affinity of an enzyme for its substrate (a

larger Km implies a weak affinity). Other kinetic analysis of the human arsenic

methyltransferase had very low Km [67, 84] values compared to cytl9-WT but, the Km

value of cytl9S81R was very similar to the other kinetic analysis. However, these other

studies did not use purified enzymes which may explain the difference, especially the

difference seen with cytl9-WT. The kinetic analysis suggests that the cytl9S81R has a

higher affinity for arsenite than cytl9-WT. However, cytl9-WT has a considerably

higher Vmax value compared to cytl9S81R. The Vmax values of both cytl9-WT and

cytl9S81R are considerably higher than that seen among other mammals such as the

hamster, rabbit, and rhesus monkey [50]. Kinetic analysis of MMA methylation

demonstrates that the Vmsx and Km values for cytl9-WT are much higher than the values

seen in the hamster, rabbit, and rhesus monkey. The higher Vmax values of arsenite

methyltransferase compared to MMA methyltransferase in cytl9-WT may explain the

higher MMA urine excretion levels seen in humans compared to other mammals. The

rabbit, which excretes higher amounts of MMA than most other mammals, has a higher









MMA than arsenite methyltransferase Km [50]. Possibly, arsenite is converted very

quickly to MMA, allowing it to accumulate before the dimethylation resulting in the

higher excretion of MMA seen in humans.

The optimum pH of As"' methylation for cytl9-WT and cytl9S81R was found to

be about 8 and about 9 respectively (Figure 2-7). This is similar to previous results

which show that at basic pHs, methylation activity of rat cytl9, and As"'

methyltransferase & MMA1" methyltransferase activity from rabbit liver increase [49,

51]. This may be due to the deprotonation of cysteines at higher pHs, which increases the

rate of binding between arsenic and cysteines in the substrate binding domain. The

reductant requirements were examined and it was determined that GSH is not required

for cytl9-WT to methylate arsenic (Figure 2-8). In addition, it was determined that

cytl9S81R does not require GSH. Previous study suggests that the substrates for cytl9

are arsenic triglutathione and monomethylarsonic glutathione [52]. Our results

demonstrate that only a strong reductant such as TCEP is necessary for methylation of

arsenic by cytl9, however, the addition of GSH appears to increase the activity above the

reductant alone. Finally, the effect that different SAM concentrations would have on

activity was determined. It was found that above 500 riM, SAM began to have an

inhibitory effect (Figure 2-9). This differs from what is seen in rat, where SAM

concentrations above 50 |iM have an inhibitory effect [51].

The ion exchange method confirmed that cytl9 indeed produces MMA when

arsenite is the substrate (Figure 2-10A). When MMAV is used as the substrate, both

MMA and DMA are seen as products (Figure 2-10B). However, DMA is the major









metabolite. The MMAV used as a substrate is not 100% pure and likely contains some

iAs as contaminants. It is possible that the contaminating iAs is methylated to MMA.

In conclusion, we have shown that cytl9 is in fact an arsenic methyltransferase

methylating both arsenite and MMA. Examination of the cytl9t activity, indicates that

the cysteine rich C-terminus is important for As binding and critical for activity. The

data suggests that a mutation within the SAM-binding site of cytl9 can drastically change

the methylation capacity of the enzyme. The characterization and kinetic analysis may

explain the higher MMA urine excretion levels and increased susceptibility seen in

humans compared to other mammals. It appears that arsenite is converted very quickly to

MMA, allowing it to accumulate before the dimethylation resulting in the higher

excretion of MMA seen in humans. The apparently deficient dimethylation activity in

humans compared to other mammals is supported by the kinetic analysis and suggests

that methylation may actually be a detoxification pathway.









Table 2-1. Primers used in the PCR amplification of cytl9


Primer Sequence
cytl9 Forward:
CACCATGGCTGCACTTCGTGACGCTGAGATACAG
Reverse:
TTAGCAGCTTTTCTTTGTGCCACAGCAGCCTCC
cytl9t Forward:
CACCATGGCTGCACTTCGTGACGCTGAGATACAG
Reverse:
TTAACTCCAAAGCAGAACAGCTCCAGATGT
5'RACE Outer: TTTCAGCCACTTCCACCTGGCCTT
Inner: CAGGGATCACCAGACCACAGCCAT
3'RACE Outer: AGGACCAACCAAGAGATGCCAA
Inner: GCCAGAAGAAATCAGGACACACAA

Figure 2-2. Kinetic analysis of the methylation activity of cytl9-WT and cytl9S81R.

cytl9-WT cytl9S81R
Arsenite
methyltransferase Km (FM) 83.010.9 6.20.9
activity
Vmax
vm. 1585142 804.933.4
(pmole/mg/min)
MMA
methyltransferae Km (FiM) 164.641.2 43.713.3
activity
Vmax
a. 926.875.4 365.125.7
(pmole/mg/min)














301
AF226730 ATAGACATGA
cytl9t ATAGACATGA

351
AF226730 TCACATGGAA
cytl9t TCACATGGAA

401
AF226730 GCAACATTGA
cytl9t GCTACATTGA

451
AF226730 ATTGTTGTAT
cytl9t ATTGTTGTAT


350
CCAAAGGCCA GGTGGAAGTG GCTGAAAAGT ATCTTGACTA
CCAAAGGCCA GGTGGAAGTG GCTGAAAAGT ATCTTGACTA


AAATATGGCT TCCAGGCATC TAATGTGACT
AAATATGGCT TCCAGGCATC TAATGTGACT


GAAGTTGGCA GAGGCTGGAA TCAAGAATGA
GAAGTTGGGA GAGGCTGGAA TCAAGAATGA


400
TTTTTCCATG
TTTATTCATG

450
GAGCCATGAT
GAGCCATGAT


500
CAAACTGTGT TATTAACCTT GTGCCTGATA AACAACAAGT
CAAACTGTGT TATTAACCTT GTGCCTGATA AACAACAAGT


AF226730 MAALRDAEIQ KDVQTYYGQV LKRSADLQTN GCVTTARPVP
cytl9t MAALRDAEIQ KDVQTYYGQV LKRSADLQTN GCVTTARPVP


51
AF226730 HEEVALRYYG
cytl9t HEEVALRYYG

101
AF226730 IDMTKGQVEV
cytl9t IDMTKGQVEV

151
AF226730 IWSNCVINL
cytl9t IWSNCVINL


CGLVIPEHLE NCWILDLGSG SGRDCYVLSQ
CGLVIPEHLE NCWILDLGSG SGRDCYVLSQ


AEKYLDYHME KYGFQASNVT FFHGNIEKLA
AEKYLDYHME KYGFQASNVT FIHGYIEKLG


VPDKQQVLQE AYRVLKHGGE LYFSDVYTSL
VPDKQQVLQE AYRVLKHGGE LYFSDVYTSL


50
KHIREALQNV
KHIREALQNV

100
LVGEKGHVTG
LVGEKGHVTG

150
EAGIKNESHD
EAGIKNESHD

200
ELPEEIRTHK
ELPEEIRTHK


Figure 2-1. Sequence alignment of cytl9t and Genbank sequence (accession AF226730).
(A) Nucleotide alignment of cytl9t and Genbank sequence. The four point
mutation are in red. (B) Alignment of the deduced cytl9t amino acid sequence
and Genbank sequence. The 3 resulting missense mutations are in red.











A.

AK057833
cytl9S81R


AK057833
cytl9S81R


AK057833
cytl9S81R


151
CACGAAGAAG
CACGAAGAAG

201
GCATCTAGAA
GCATCTAGAA

251
ATTGCTATGT
ATTGCTATGT


TAGCCCTAAG ATATTATGGC TGTGGTCTGG
TAGCCCTAAG ATATTATGGC TGTGGTCTGG


AACTGCTGGA TTTTGGATCT GGGTAGTGGA
AACTGCTGGA TTTTGGATCT GGGTAGTGGA


ACTTAGCCAG CTGGTTGGTG AAAAAGGACA
ACTTAGCCAG CTGGTTGGTG AAAAAGGACA


200
TGATCCCTGA
TGATCCCTGA

250
AGTGGCAGAG
CGTGGCAGAG

300
CGTGACTGGA
CGTGACTGGA


AK057833 MAALRDAEIQ KDVQTYYGQV LKRSADLQTN GCVTTARPVP KHIREALQNV
cytl9S81R MAALRDAEIQ KDVQTYYGQV LKRSADLQTN GCVTTARPVP KHIREALQNV


51
AK057833 HEEVALRYYG CGLVIPEHLE NCWILDLGSG SGRDCYVLSQ
cytl9S81R HEEVALRYYG CGLVIPEHLE NCWILDLGSG RGRDCYVLSQ

101
AK057833 IDMTKGQVEV AEKYLDYHME KYGFQASNVT FIHGYIEKLG
cytl9S81R IDMTKGQVEV AEKYLDYHME KYGFQASNVT FIHGYIEKLG


100
LVGEKGHVTG
LVGEKGHVTG

150
EAGIKNESHD
EAGIKNESHD


Figure 2-2. Sequence alignment of cytl9S81R and Genbank sequence (accession
AK057833). (A) Nucleotide alignment of cytl9S81R and Genbank sequence.
The tranversion is in red. (B) Alignment of deduced cytl9S81R amino acid
sequence and Genbank sequence. The resulting nsSNP is in red. The SAM-
binding N-terminal region site is underlined.












A.
951
cytl9-WT AGATTTTCTG
cytl9t AGATTTTCTG

1001
cytl9-WT GTTCTGCTTT
cytl9t GTTCTGCTTT


cytl9-WT
cytl9t



cytl9-WT
cytl9t


1051
GAAGAGTCTG
----------


1101
CTGCTGTGGC


ATCAGACCAA TTGGAGAGAA GTTGCCAACA
ATCAGACCAA TTGGAGAGAA GTTGCCAACA


GGAGTTAAAG
GGAGTTAA--


GATATAATCA CAGATCCATT


ACAGTATGAA GTCCAGATGT GTCCCTGATG


1000
TCTGGAGGCT
TCTGGA.GCT

1050
TAAGCTTGCA
----------


1100
CTGCTGGAGG


1128
ACAAAGAAAA GCTGCTAA


201
cytl9-WT VLWGECLGGA
cytl9t VLWGECLGGA

251
cytl9-WT RFVSATFRLF
cytl9t RFVSATFRLF

301
cytl9-WT EVDEETAAIL
cytl9t EVDEETAAIL


LYWKELAVLA QKIGFCPPRL VTANLITIQN
LYWKELAVLA QKIGFCPPRL VTANLITIQN


250
KELERVIGDC
KELERVIGDC


300
KHSKTGPTKR CQVIYNGGIT GHEKELMFDA NFTFKEGEIV
KHSKTGPTKR CQVIYNGGIT GHEKELMFDA NFTFKEGEIV


KNSRFAQDFL IRPIGEKLPT SGGCSALELK
KNSRFAQDFL IRPIGEKLPT SGAVLLWS*-


350
DIITDPFKLA


351
EESDSMKSRC


376
VPDAAGGCCG TKKSC*


Figure 2-3. Sequence alignment of cytl9-WT and cytl9t. (A) Nucleotide alignment of
cytl9-WT and cytl9t sequence. The missense mutations are in red. The 5
cysteine residues which are not included in the cytl9t are highlighted in the
cytl9-WT sequence.


cytl9-WT
cytl9t















ACAGGAGCTG GCTGCGGGAG CCCGCCGTCC TGAGTCGCAG GCCGAGGAGA


A.

5'RACE
AK057833
AF226730



5'RACE
AK057833
AF226730



5'RACE
AK057833
AF226730



5'RACE
AK057833
AF226730


101
CCTGAGTCGC
CCTGAGTCGC
CCTGAGTCGC

151
CGAGGAGACA
CGAGGAGACA
CGAGGAGACA



1151
CTGGAGGCTG
CTGGAGGCTG
CTGGA.GCTG

1201
AAGCTTGCAG
AAGCTTGCAG
AAGCTTGCAG

1251
TGCTGGAGGC
TGCTGGAGGC


AGGCCGAGGA
AGGCCGAGGA
AGGCCGAGGA



TGGCTGCACT
TGGCTGCACT
TGGCTGCACT




TTCTGCTTTG
TTCTGCTTTG
TTCTGCTTTG



AAGAGTCTGA
AAGAGTCTGA
AAGAGTCTGA


--ACAGGAGC
TCGCAGGCCG


GACAGTGAGT
GACAGTGAGT
GACAGTGAGT



TCGTGACGCT
TCGTGACGCT
TCGTGACGCT




GAGTTAAAGG
GAGTTAAAGG
GAGTTAAAGG



CAGTATGAAG
CAGTATGAAG
CAGTATGAAG


TGGCTGCGGG
AGGAGACAGT
--GAGACAGT



GCGCGCCCTG
GCGCGCCCTG
GCGCGCCCTG



GAGATACAGA
GAGATACAGA
GAGATACAGA




ATATAATCAC
ATATAATCAC
ATATAATCAC



TCCAGATGTG
TCCAGATGTG
TCCAGATGTG


TGCTGTGGCA CAAAGAAAAG CTGCTAAATC
TGCTGTGGCA CAAAGAAAAG CTGCTAAATC


100
AGCCCGCCGT
GAGTGCGCGC
GAGTGCGCGC

150
AGTCGCAGGC
AGTCGCAGGC
AGTCGCAGGC

200
AGGACGTGCA
AGGACGTGCA
AGGACGTGCA



1200
AGATCCATTT
AGATCCATTT
AGATCCATTT

1250
TCCCTGATGC
TCCCTGATGC
TCCCTGATGC

1300
TATAGCCAAC
TATAGCCAAC


TGCTGGAGGC TGCTGTGGCA CAAAGAAAAG CTGCTAAATC TATAGCCAAC


1301
CAGGGGACCA
CAGGGGACCA
CAGGGGACCA


CAGTAGTGGG
CAGTAGTGGG
CAGTAGTGGG


CAAGAGTGAT
CAAGAGTGAT
CAAGAGTGAT


CTGCATGTTT
CTGCATGTTT
CTGCATGTTT


1350
TTTAACCTGC
TTTAACCTGC
TTTAACCTGC


Figure 2-4. Sequence alignments of the 5' & 3'RACE-PCR products and the Genbank
sequences (accession AK057833 and AF226730). (A) Sequence alignment of
the 5'RACE-PCR product against the Genbank sequences. The mutations in
the 5'RACE product are in red. The start codon for all three sequences are
highlighted. (B) Sequence alignment of the 3'RACE-PCR product and the
Genbank sequences. The nucleotide deletion in the Genbank sequence,
accession AF226730, is highlighted. The stop sites for the Genbank
sequences are in red.


CAGTGAGTGC GCGCCCTGAG


3'RACE
AK057833
AF226730



3'RACE
AK057833
AF226730



3'RACE
AK057833
AF226730



3'RACE
AK057833
AF226730











1 2 3

215k k


120 k .

84 k



60 k




39.2 k A.


28 k

18.3 k ,


5 6


ikvM-H.-id:

0iccC


4W.F.U if .: IBMlf


Figure 2-5. Purification of recombinant human cytl9. Fractions were electrophoresed on
a 10% polyacrylamide gel and stained. Lanel, molecular weight markers;
Lane2, cell lysate; Lane3, flowthrough, Lane4, Washl, LaneS, Wash2, Lane6,
Wash3. Lane7. Elution


-- I~..
















-- cyti9-WT
-u-cytl9R81S


0 50 100 150 200 250
Aslll (uM)


- cyt19-WT
-- cytl9R81S


0 200


600
MMAV (uM)


1000 1200


Figure 2-6. The effects of As" & MMAV concentrations. All incubations were carried
out at 370C for 30 min. in a final volume of 250 [il. A) Reaction mixtures
contained 5 mM GSH, 1 mM DTT, 1 mM MgCl2, 13 pM [3H]SAM, 0.1 mM
SAM, various [As"'], and 5 tg of cytl9, in 100 mM Tris/100 mM Na
phosphate, pH 7.4 B) Same as B but with various [MMAV].


1800
S1600
E 1400
6 1200
. 1000
800
600
400
. 200
0


1000
900
800
700
600
500
400
300
200
100
0














E 600
E
S500
o
. 400

5 300

200

' 100
U)


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
pH


Figure 2-7. The effect of pH on activity. All incubations were carried out at 370C for 30
min. in a final volume of 250 gl. Reaction mixtures contained 5 mM GSH, 1
mM DTT, 1 mM MgC12, 13 pM [3H]SAM, 50 gM AsIII, and 5 gg of cytl9, in
100 mM Tris/100 mM Na phosphate of the appropriate pH.


1000
900
800
700
600
500
400
300
200
100
0 -


5mM GSH


5mM
GSH+lmM
DTT-


1mM TCEP 1mM
TCEP+1mM
GSH
Reductants


a cytl9-WT
o cytl9R81S


1mM
TCEP+5mM
GSH


Figure 2-8. The effects of reductants on methylation activity. All incubations were
carried out at 370C for 30 min. in a final volume of 250 gl. Reaction mixtures
contained 1 mM MgC12, 13 pM [3H]SAM, 0.1 mM SAM, 50 gM AsIII, and 5
gg of cytl9-WT, in 100 mM Tris/100 mM Na phosphate, pH 7.4, with
different reductants. The activity of cytl9R81S was not determined for 1 mM
TCEP + 1 mM GSH.












400 -

S350

E 300

o 250

200

150

100

50

0
0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200
SAM (uM)


Figure 2-9. The effect of SAM concentration on activity. All incubations were carried
out at 370C for 30 min. in a final volume of 250 pil. Reaction mixtures
contained 5 mM GSH, 1 mM DTT, 1 mM MgCl2, 13 pM [3H]SAM, 50 ipM
AsIII, and 5 pg of cytl9-WT, in 100 mM Tris/100 mM Na phosphate pH 7.4.
with various [SAM].











A.

Aslll

2500

2000

1500
Q.
1000 -

500 -


0 5 10 15 20 25
Fraction Number



B.

MMAV

700
600
500
5 400
o 300
200
100
0 .
0 5 10 15 20 25
Fraction Number



Figure 2-10. Arsenical metabolites formed after incubation with [3H]SAM and cytl9 for
30 min at 37C. (A) Formation of MMA and DMA using As"' as a substrate.
(B) Formation of MMA and DMA using MMAV as the substrate.














CHAPTER 3
IDENTIFICATION OF A SPLICE VARIANT OF HUMAN CYT19 ARSENIC
METHYLTRANSFERASE

Introduction

Arsenic (As) is a naturally occurring element and ranks 20th in abundance in the

earth's crust [85]. Arsenic is present in the environment in both organic and inorganic

forms and exists mainly in three valence states, -3, +3, and +5. Generally, inorganic

arsenic (iAs) is the more toxic form and people are exposed to iAs primarily through food

and potable water. In Taiwan, Mexico, western United States, western South America,

China, and Bangladesh, people are exposed to high levels of arsenic due to anthropogenic

and/or natural contamination of potable water [12, 62, 86]. In these areas, chronic

exposure to arsenic is associated with various tumors occurring in skin, liver, lung,

urinary bladder, and prostate [8, 87].

Once in the body, many mammals, including humans, methylate iAs to

monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) [49, 51, 54]. The

biotransformation of iAs alternates between the reduction of arsenate (iAsV) to arsenite

(iAs"') followed by oxidative methylation (Figure 1) [88, 89]. Because pentavalent

methylated arsenicals are less toxic than inorganic arsenic, methylation has been

considered a detoxification mechanism. Recent studies indicate that trivalent methylated

arsenicals may be more acutely toxic and genotoxic than iAs suggesting that methylation

may actually be a bioactivation of iAs [20, 73, 74, 90]. For this reason the role of

methylation in acute and chronic arsenic toxicity remains unclear. There is significant









variation in human susceptibility to As induced toxicity, which may be related to

differences in arsenic biotransformation between individuals [82]. Epidemiological

studies have shown differences in the amount of MMA and DMA excreted in the urine of

exposed populations which may be associated with genetic polymorphisms [62]. Cytl9

has been identified as a human S-adenosyl-L-methionine:arsenic methyltransferase [52,

55] however, only a few coding region polymorphisms have been detected which may

alter the iAs methylation rate [65, 67]. In this study we identified an alternative splice

variant of human cytl9, which contains an upstream open reading frame (uORF)

followed by an internal start codon (AUG). This variant was expressed in 7 out of 7

human livers and represents another possible mechanism for regulating As methylation.

Materials and Methods

Molecular Cloning of cytl9 Splice Variants

Total RNA was isolated from HepG2 cells and human liver samples using Trizol

reagent according to the manufacturer's instruction (Invitrogen, Carlsbad, USA). Total

RNA was treated with DNase I using the DNA-freeTM kit from Ambion (Austin, TX) and

cDNA was made using the RETROscriptTM Kit for RT-PCR and 2 ig of RNA as

template (Ambion). HepG2 cDNA was polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified

using the following primers: forward primer (5'-

CACCATGGCTGCACTTCGTGACGCTGAGATACAG-3') and the reverse primer (5'-

TTAACTCCAAAGCAGAACAGCTCCAGATGT-3'). The PCR reaction consisted of

2.5 U ofPfu DNA polymerase, 0.4 tM each primer, 5[l of the RT reaction, 0.2 mM

dNTP mix, 5[l of 10X PCR Buffer, and nuclease-free water to 50al. The PCR

conditions were as follows: an initial denaturation at 940C for 2min, followed by 35

cycles of denaturation at 940C for Imin, annealing at 600C for Imin, extension for 72C









for 2min 30s and a final extension at 720C for 7min. The PCR products, designated

cytl9 and cytl9AE2, were ligated into the pET100/D-TOPO vector (Invitrogen) and

transformed into competent Escherichia coli (E. coli) One Shot TOP 10 chemically

competent cells (Invitrogen). Ampicillin resistant colonies were analyzed by PCR and

visualized by agarose gel electrophoresis. Several clones containing inserts were

sequenced by the DNA Sequencing Core Laboratory at the University of Florida.

Human Liver Samples

Human liver samples were obtained from Vitron (Tucson, AZ). All the tissues

were from Caucasian males between the ages of 24 and 46. The tissues were preserved

in Viaspan after death. The tissue samples were stored at -800C until use. All procedures

using human samples were approved by the Institutional Review Board at the University

of Florida and all identifying information has been removed.

qPCR of cytl9 Splice Variants

Total RNA was isolated and cDNA synthesized as described above. Real-time

quantitative PCR (qPCR) was carried out using a Bio-Rad iCycler with the following

primers: cytl9 forward primer: (5'-TTCGTGACGCTGAGATACAGAAG-3'); reverse

primer: (5'-TGGAGGTCTGCCGATCTCTT-3'); cytl9AE2 forward primer: (5'-

GATACAGAAGGACGTGCAGATATTATG-3'); reverse primer: (5'-

CCAGATCCAAAATCCAGCAGTT-3'). Each PCR reaction consisted of 12.5 [l iTaq

SYBR Green Supermix with ROX (Bio-rad), 0.4 tM each primer, 5[l of the RT reaction,

and RNase/DNase-free water to 25 al. The PCR cycling conditions included an initial

denaturation of 95C for 3 min followed by cycling at 950C for 15s, 600C for 45s for 45

cycles. The constructs, pET100-cytl9 and pET100-cytl9AE2 were used to generate









calibration curves for quantification of cytl9 and cytl9AE2. A melting curve analysis

was performed after every run to determine product uniformity.

Results

When the full open reading frame of cytl9 was amplified using the primers

described in Molecular Cloning of cytl9 splice variants under Materials & Methods, two

products were generated, 1132 bp (cytl9) and 1005 bp (cytl9AE2) products (Figure 3-2).

Sequencing of these two products revealed that the 1132 bp product is the reference cytl9

while the 1005 bp product is a splice variant (Figure 3-3). The reference cytl9 mRNA is

composed of 10 exons (Figure 3-4A) which encode a 375 amino acid protein with a

theoretical molecular weight of 41.747 kDa (Figure 3-5). The product, cytl9AE2, is

missing 128 bp due to a deletion of exon 2 which could result in a protein that is about

102 amino acids shorter and the creation of a short 24 amino acid peptide as a product

from an upstream open reading frame (uORF) (Figure 3-3 & Figure 3-4B). This variant

may encode a 273 amino acid polypeptide chain that is identical to the reference cytl9

but lacks the first 102 amino acids present in the reference (Figure 3-5). Analysis of the

sequences surrounding the splice revealed that the splice occurs at conserved acceptor

and donor sites (Figure 3-4C). The individual information (Ri) technique and Shapiro's

method were used to compare the splice-sites strength of exon 3 and exon 2 of cytl9

[91]. Exon3, a constitutive exon has a stronger splice site compared to exon2, the

alternative exon (Table 3-1).

The steady state mRNA levels of each transcript were determined in 7 human liver

samples as well as in HepG2 cells by qPCR (Table 3-2). Expression of cytl9 mRNA in

the human liver samples ranged from 7.04 x 104 to 1.26 x 106 copies per microgram of









RNA. The cytl9AE2 splice variant was detected in all 7 human liver samples tested.

(Table 3-2). The amount of cytl9AE2 mRNA was much lower than cytl9 mRNA

ranging from 1.89 x 103 through 4.33 x 103 copies per microgram of RNA. The HepG2

cells had an average of 5.14 x106 copies/Gg RNA and 8.55 x104 copies/Gg RNA of cytl9

and cytl9AE2 mRNA, respectively.

Discussion

In this study, we identified an alternative splice variant of cytl9, which contains an

uORF. The variant mRNA contains a short ORF followed by an internal AUG codon

beginning 106bp downstream from the uORF (Figure 3-3). While this alternative variant

may encode a 273 amino acid protein it is unlikely that expression of the cytl9AE2 splice

variant will result in production of an active protein. Studies have shown that SAM

dependent methyltransferases share 3 regions of sequence similarity (motif I, II, and III)

[92]. These motifs are found in the same order on the polypeptide chain and separated by

similar intervals [92]. It has been suggested that these conserved regions are important in

SAM binding [92]. Mutations of a conserved amino acid in rat guanidinoacetate

methyltransferase near motif I have resulted in an inactive enzyme. In addition,

mutations of motif II lead to reduced Kcat/Km values for substrates [93]. It is unlikely

that the protein translated from cytl9AE2 would result in an active protein due to the

removal of motif I (Figure 3-5).

Whether the mRNA actually is translated into protein is not clear because the

internal AUG codon contains a relatively weak Kozak sequence suggesting that

translation may not reinitiate at the internal start codon. The sequence

(GCCA/GCCATGG) is a consensus Kozak sequence for the initiation of translation in









vertebrates [94, 95]. Deviation from the consensus sequence at position -3 and +4 would

be considered a weak initiator codon. The cytl9AE2 transcript deviates from the

consensus sequence at position +4; the variant contains an A instead of a G (Figure 3-3).

It is also possible that cytl9AE2 will not be translated but that this variant is a

substrate for the nonsense mediated decay (NMD) pathway due to the premature stop

codon. NMD is a pathway that recognizes and quickly degrades mRNAs containing

premature translation termination codons (PTC) in eukaryotes [96]. While cytl9AE2

does contain a PTC, Zhang et al. identified a sequence motif which when present 3' of a

nonsense codon promotes rapid decay of the mRNA transcript by the NMD pathway

[97]. This sequence motif (TGYYGATGYYYYY) is not found in the cytl9AE2 mRNA

transcript and it remains unclear if this variant will undergo degradation by the NMD

pathway.

The cytl9AE2 variant was present in all seven human liver samples tested,

suggesting that cytl9 mRNA exists both in the full length and alternatively spliced form

in most individuals. The cytl9AE2 variant mRNA comprised 0.2 to 3.8% of the total

cytl9 transcript. The liver samples had lower copy numbers per microgram of RNA of

both reference and cytl9AE2 variants compared to HepG2 cells. It is possible that some

degradation of cytl9 message occurred during collection and storage of the livers which

reduced apparent copy number.

Many mammalian species methylate arsenic through an enzymatic reaction that is

performed by cytl9. There are significant variations in the arsenic methylation capacity

between species and within species including humans [58, 59, 62, 81]. The reason for

this variation is unclear but has been attributed to cytl9 polymorphisms. However, only









a few polymorphisms have been found in the coding region of cytl9 to date [65, 67],

while the vast majority of mutations are found within the introns and the 5' and 3'

untranslated region (UTR). Introns contain the acceptor site, branchpoint,

polypyrimidine tract, and the donor site, which are conserved sequences in which

splicesome assembly occurs [70]. While mutations within these sequence elements could

alter the constitutive splicing of a gene [98-100], there are differences in arsenic

methylation capacities among individuals, which are unlikely to be supported solely by

polymorphisms within the cytl9 coding region.

Alternative splicing is frequently used to regulate gene expression and to generate

tissue-specific mRNA and protein isoforms [68, 69]. Thirty-five to 60% of human genes

produce transcripts that are alternatively spliced, in addition 70-90% of these variants

alter the resulting protein products [101, 102]. Further studies should analyze the mRNA

expression levels of cytl9 splice variants in a larger number of fresh liver samples or

primary hepatocytes and correlate it to arsenic methylation activity. In addition, work to

determine if this transcript is a substrate for the NMD pathway or if a variant protein is

expressed will help clarify the role of cytl9AE2 in human arsenic metabolism. Even

though the splice variant comprises a relatively small fraction of the total cytl9 transcript

in the livers tested it is possible that different population groups have varying amounts of

the cytl9 splice variant. It is also likely that the level of cytl9AE2 in an individual will

change over time as alternative splice selection can be controlled by many variables

including developmental stage and xenobiotics [103, 104]. In conclusion, cytl9 appears

to be alternatively spliced in many individuals and may play a role in the observed

variation in arsenic methylation seen in individuals.










As043- + 2e- As"033- + CH3+ CH3ASV032-+ 2e-


2 1
CH3As' 022-+ CH3+ (CH3)2As'2 + 2e --


(CH3)2AsI'O


1 Reduction step of As biotransformation
2 Oxidative methvlation steD of As biotransformation

Figure 3-1. The hypothesized scheme of iAs methylation proposed by Cullen, McBride et
al. 1984.

100 bp
Ladder cytl9 cytl9AE2




34






Figure 3-2. PCR products of cytl9 amplification. 1% Agarose DNA gel of cytl9 and
cytl9AE2.

















I $
cytl9AE2 ATGGCTGCAC
cytl9 ATGGCTGCAC


Exon 1


TTCGTGACGC TGAGATACAG AAGGACGTGC
TTCGTGACGC TGAGATACAG AAGGACGTGC


Exon 2


AG----~~~~
AGACCTACTA 50


cytl9AE2
cytl9


cyt19AE2
cytl9




cytl9AE2
cytl9


cytl9AE2
cytl9


---------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ----------
CGGGCAGGTG CTGAAGAGAT CGGCAGACCT CCAGACCAAC GGCTGTGTCA



CCACAGCCAG GCCGGTCCCC AAGCACATCC GGGAAGCCTT GCAAAATGTA
Exon 3


---- -- ATATTATGGC TGTGGTCTGG TGATCCCTGA
CACGAAGAAG TAGCCCTAAG ATATTATGGC TGTGGTCTGG TGATCCCTGA


GCATCTAGAA AACTGCTGGA TTTTGGATCT GGGTAGTGGA AGTGGCAGAG
GCATCTAGAA AACTGCTGGA TTTTGGATCT GGGTAGTGGA CGTGGCAGAG


cytl9AE2 ATTGCTATGT ACTTAGCCAG CTGGTTGGTG AAAAAGGACA CGTGACTGGA
cytl9 ATTGCTATGT ACTTAGCCAG CTGGTTGGTG AAAAAGGACA CGTGACTGGA 300
Exon 4

+
cytl9AE2 ATAGACATGA CCAAAGGCCA GGTGGAAGTG GCTGAAAAGT ATCTTGACTA
cytl9 ATAGACATGA CCAAAGGCCA GGTGGAAGTG GCTGAAAAGT ATCTTGACTA 350


Figure 3-3. Alignment of the reference cytl9 nucleotide sequence and cytl9AE2. $
Represents the initial start codon. *Represents the putative PTC which results
due to the removal of exon 2. + Represents the putative downstream start site.
The kozak sequence is underlined. The deviation from the kozak sequence at
position +4 is highlighted in grey.










A.

Cytgl9oen e
2 3 5 6 7 8 9




/42bp 1 i2bp 1jl 1bp
1 2 3 mRNA Splicing
7 3 V ibp 7,2 2?bp

B.
Reference 2 3




Exon 2 1 3





C.
Exo 1 EMon 3
GCAGgt aTATATIA Exon 2A


Eam 1 ErLon 2
GCAGgt agACCTAC Reference


Figure 3-4. cytl9 isoforms. (A) Diagram representing the exonic regions of the wild-type
cytl9 mRNA. The region in which the alternative splicing occurs is
demonstrated in greater detail. (B) Schematic representation of the two
alternative splice variants, the reference or wild-type sequence, and the
deletion of exon 2. The shaded box represents the cassette exon. (C) The
donor and acceptor site of the two alternative splice variants. The exonic
nucleotides are capitalized while the acceptor and donor sites are in lower case
letters.












1
MAALRDAEIQ KDVQTYYGQV LKRSADLQTN GCVTTARPVP


51
HEEVALRYYG


101
cytl9 IDMTKGQVEV
cytl9AE2 --MTKGQVEV

151
cytl9 IVVSNCVINL
cytl9AE2 IVVSNCVINL

201
cytl9 VLWGECLGGA
cytl9AE2 VLWGECLGGA

251
cytl9 RFVSATFRLF
cytl9AE2 RFVSATFRLF

301
cytl9 EVDEETAAIL
cytl9AE2 EVDEETAAIL

351
cytl9 EESDSMKSRC
cytl9AE2 EESDSMKSRC


cytl9
cytl9AE2



cytl9
cytl9AE2


50
KHIREALQNV
----------


100
LVGEKGHVTG
----------


150
EAGIKNESHD
EAGIKNESHD

200
ELPEEIRTHK
ELPEEIRTHK

250
KELERVIGDC
KELERVIGDC

300
NFTFKEGEIV
NFTFKEGEIV

350
DIITDPFKLA
DIITDPFKLA


VPDAAGGCCG TKKSC*
VPDAAGGCCG TKKSC*


Figure 3-5. Alignment of the reference cytl9 amino acid sequence and product of
cytl9AE2 uORF. Consensus Motif I for SAM dependent methyltransferases
is underlined.


CGLVIPEHLE NCWILDLGSG SGRDCYVLSQ



AEKYLDYHME KYGFQASNVT FIHGYIEKLG
AEKYLDYHME KYGFQASNVT FIHGYIEKLG



VPDKQQVLQE AYRVLKHGGE LYFSDVYTSL
VPDKQQVLQE AYRVLKHGGE LYFSDVYTSL



LYWKELAVLA QKIGFCPPRL VTANLITIQN
LYWKELAVLA QKIGFCPPRL VTANLITIQN



KHSKTGPTKR CQVIYNGGIT GHEKELMFDA
KHSKTGPTKR CQVIYNGGIT GHEKELMFDA



KNSRFAQDFL IRPIGEKLPT SGGCSALELK
KNSRFAQDFL IRPIGEKLPT SGGCSALELK
KNSREAQDFL IRPIGEKLPT SGGCSALELK









Table 3-1. The individual information and Shapiro's score of cytl9 exon 2 and exon 3.

SSequence Splice site Shapiro's method Ri, bits
Exon 2 GACGCTGGGTCAGA Acceptor (-13 to +1) 61.5 -1.9
AAGGTAGAGT Donor (-3 to +7) 72.0 5.5
Exon 3 TTCCATTTCCCAGA Acceptor (-13 to +1) 84.8 9.5
CAGGTGAGGC Donor (-3 to +7) 88.1 7.4
a. Exon 2 is the alternative exon of cytl9 and exon 3 is the constitutive exon.

Table 3-2. The amount of cytl9 and cytl9AE2 in different human liver samples and
HepG2 cells. The percentage of cyl9 AE2 in each sample.

Samples cytl9 cytl9AE2 %cyt 9AE2a
(copies/tg RNA) (copies/tg RNA)
HL-541 1.21x106 0.49x106 3.25x103 1.14x103 0.27
HL-546 1.22x105 0.35x105 3.55x103 +0.89x103 2.83
HL-611 7.04x104 +3.91x104 1.89x103 +1.45x103 2.61
HL-612 7.89x105 +1.78x105 3.63x103 +2.70x103 0.46
HL-656 1.09x105 +0.44x105 4.33x103 +0.69x103 3.84
HL-710 8.40x105 +2.64x105 3.95x103 +1.06 103 0.47
HL-714 1.26x106 +0.42x106 3.22x103 +1.23x103 0.26
HepG2 cells 5.14 x106 1.08x106 8.55x104 + 6.42 x104 1.64
a. The percentage of cytl9AE2 is calculated by dividing the copies/Gg of RNA for each
sample by the total copies of both transcripts for each sample (cytl9AE2/(cytl9 +
cytl9AE2)*100).














CHAPTER 4
GENERAL CONCLUSIONS

The first study showed that cytl9 is an arsenic methyltransferase. In addition, we

have demonstrated that this enzyme does both methylation steps involved in arsenic

biotransformation seen in humans. We also showed that the C-terminus is critical in the

activity of the protein. In other SAM-dependent methyltransferases, the C-terminus is

important in substrate binding. This indicates that the cysteine rich C-terminus is

important for As binding and critical for activity. Others have shown that mutations can

change the methylation capacity of the protein. Here, we demonstrated that a single

mutation can drastically change the activity of the protein even though we believed that

the amino acid change would not have a significant effect on the activity of the

recombinant protein. This change occurs in motif I of the SAM-binding site which might

inhibit its ability to bind SAM therefore decreasing its activity. The mutation appears to

cause a change in the substrate affinity of the proteins as well as cause different

methylation profiles specifically for arsenite. However, the Vmax values of both cytl9-

WT and cytl9R81S are considerably higher than that seen among other mammals such as

the hamster, rabbit, and rhesus monkey. The kinetic analysis of these proteins may

explain the high levels of MMA excreted in human urine. Possibly, arsenite is converted

very quickly to MMA, allowing it to accumulate before the dimethylation step resulting

in the higher excretion of MMA seen in humans. The human arsenic methyltransferase

did have some similarities with the other mammalian arsenic methyltransferases. These

arsenic methyltransferases have been shown to increase in activity at basic pHs which









may be due to the deprotonation of cysteines at higher pHs, which increases the rate of

binding between arsenic and cysteines in the substrate binding domain. Our results

demonstrate that only a strong reductant is necessary for methylation of arsenic by cytl9,

however, the addition of GSH appears to increase the activity above the reductant alone.

The second study introduced another possible explanation for the variability in

arsenic methylation capacities among individuals, alternative splicing. Alternative

splicing is frequently used to regulate gene expression and to generate tissue-specific

mRNA and protein isoforms. Thirty-five to 60% of human genes produce transcripts that

are alternatively spliced, in addition 70-90% of these variants alter the resulting protein

products. In this study we identified an alternative splice variant of the human cytl9

(cytl9AE2), in which exon 2 is removed creating a bicistronic transcript. The cytl9AE2

variant was present in all seven human liver samples tested, suggesting that cytl9 mRNA

exists both in the full length and in alternatively spliced forms in most individuals. It is

unlikely that this variant would result in expression of an active protein. Studies have

shown that SAM dependent methyltransferases share 3 regions of sequence similarity

(motif I, II, and III). It has been suggested that these conserved regions are important in

SAM binding. Therefore, it is unlikely that the protein translated from cytl9AE2 would

result in an active protein due to the removal of exon 2 which contains motif I. Whether

the mRNA actually is translated into protein has not been determined. The majority of

mutations discovered within the cytl9 gene occur within the intron or untranslated

regions [66, 67]. In fact, only 4 mutations have been found within the coding region.

Introns contain sequence elements in which splicesome assembly occurs [66, 67].

Mutations within these elements could alter the constitutive splicing of a gene.









Future studies should focus on isolating the human AS3MT from human livers.

To this date, preparations from human livers, cytosolic or homogenates have shown no

activity in arsenic methylation. Reasons for this may be due to inhibitory factors present

in the liver preparation or the process of making the preparations may render the protein

inactive. Yet another explanation may be due to the possibility that cytl9 is an inducible

protein. Perhaps the average daily exposure does not cause high levels of expression of

the protein, making it difficult to purify from liver samples. It may be beneficial to

attempt protein purification from known higher than normal arsenic exposed populations.

Perhaps populations exposed to higher than normal levels have reached a threshold of

exposure resulting in higher expression levels of cytl9. Another possibility for

purification of cytl9 from normally exposed populations may be by immunoprecipitation

from human liver preparations using an antibody which is highly selective for cytl9.

Further studies should analyze the mRNA expression levels of cytl9 splice

variants in a larger number of fresh liver samples or primary hepatocytes and correlate it

to arsenic methylation activity. In addition, work to determine if this transcript is a

substrate for the NMD pathway or if a variant protein is expressed will help clarify the

role of cytl9AE2 in human arsenic metabolism. In addition, more investigations should

look at mutations within the intron of cytl9 and determine if these alter splicing events.

Another important study would be to establish a method to test exposed populations at

both the mRNA and protein levels of cytl9. This study would help determine vulnerable

individuals in high arsenic exposed populations. Finally, the ultimate question which still

remains unanswered: is arsenic methylation a bioactivation or detoxification mechanism.






48


If time and funding were not a factor, I would enjoy working on solving these different

unanswered questions which may help identifying possible vulnerable populations.














APPENDIX
ROLE OF CYT19 IN ACUTE ARSENIC TOXICITY. IS CYT19 THE ONLY HUMAN
ARSENIC METHYLTRANSFERASE?

While my work has clearly demonstrated that cytl9 is a human arsenic

methyltransferase, it is not clear that it is the only arsenic methyltransferase in humans.

In order to address this question, it is necessary to: 1) alter the expression of cytl9 and 2)

have the ability to measure cytl9 protein levels. The first challenge was addressed by the

use of small interfering RNA (siRNA) to reduce the expression of cytl9. The second

challenge was addressed by developing an antibody specific for human cytl9.

Small RNAs can theoretically be used to reduce the expression of any target gene.

There are two main categories of small RNA, microRNA (miRNA) and siRNA. These

small RNA have natural functions such as defense from viral and transposon invasion as

well as gene regulation. Scientists have used this new technology for several reasons

such as determination of gene function, validating drug targets, and treatment of diseases.

Small RNAs have two mechanisms by which protein translation is inhibited. If the small

RNA is 100% homologous to its mRNA target it results in degradation of the mRNA.

However, if the small RNA is not 100% identical to its mRNA target it results in

inhibition of translation without mRNA degradation [105].

Materials and Methods

Multiple siRNAs were designed and synthesized according to the SilencerTM

siRNA Construction Kit (Ambion). Forty-five thousand HepG2 cells were plated on a 24

well plate in normal growth media overnight and transfected in duplicates with the









appropriate siRNA according to SilencerTM siRNA Trasnfection Kit. Total RNA was

isolated 2 days after transfection. The most efficient siRNA was assessed by measuring

the mRNA levels of cytl9 normalized to RNA polymerase II (RPII) by quantitative PCR

(qPCR). Once the most efficient siRNA is determined, further optimization steps can be

taken such as cell plating density, transfection agent, and siRNA amount. The siRNA

pool was further optimized in a 96-well plate using 16,000 cells per well and assayed.

The mRNA levels were measured by qPCR as above, and the viability was determined by

the XTT assay. GAPDH was used as negative control.

An antibody to cytl9 was developed in rabbits by sending purified recombinant

cytl9 to Cocalico. The antibody specificity was determined from western blots of

purified protein and HepG2 cell extracts. To increase the specificity of the antibody, it

was affinity purified using the AminoLink Kit (Pierce) according the manufacturer's

instructions. Briefly, the purified cytl9 protein was coupled to the gel followed by

affinity purification.

Results and Discussion

cytl9 mRNA Knockdown by siRNA

Three different siRNAs were designed (Table 1). The efficiency of all three

siRNAs as well as a pool of the three siRNAs was determined (Figure 1). The data

demonstrates that the knockdown was successful with the pool of siRNAs, however

further optimization is still required. It appears that the first three siRNAs had no effect

on the cytl9 mRNA levels. The pool of all three siRNAs appears to knockdown cytl9

mRNA levels by about 26%, relative to control. The second attempt at cytl9 mRNA

knockdown demonstrated that 16,000 cells per well in a 96-well plate resulted in a

greater knockdown of cytl9 mRNA of about 40% compared to 45,000 cells used in the









first attempt (Figure 2). It appears that cytl9 mRNA levels might have been slightly

reduced in the negative control. In addition, the siRNA transfection did not result in a

decrease of viability relative to control (Figure 3). The data demonstrates that the

optimal cell density and the transfection agent are important to optimize. Taken together

the results suggest that the concentration of the siRNA requires further optimization or

perhaps new siRNAs can be designed and tested.

Antibody Specificity and Purification

Crude antiserum was shown to be able to detect the antigen up to about 25 ng

(Figure 4). The antibody was not able to detect cytl9 in any of the human liver cytosol

preparations tested. In addition, the antibody appears not to be very specific (Figure 5).

Once purified, the antibody was characterized and found to be able to detect the antigen

up to about 40 ng (Figure 6). The specificity of the antibody was increased dramatically

and is able to detect cytl9 in all tested human liver samples and in HepG2 cytosol tested

(Figure 7). In order to determine if the antibody is in fact recognizing cytl9 in these

cytosol preparations, the protein must be immunoprecipitated and sequenced.

Future Experiments

Further studies are needed in order to better understand the role of arsenic

methylation in acute human arsenic exposures. However, two very important steps in

answering this question have been addressed, knockdown of cytl9 and the ability to

measure cytl9 protein levels through antibody specificity. We have to determine the

correlation between mRNA levels and protein levels. It may be possible to knockdown

the mRNA levels without affecting the protein levels if the protein has a long half-life.

The opposite may be true as well, we may not see much affect in the mRNA levels but

the siRNA may be able to suppress protein expression thereby reducing methylation.






52


Once we prove the protein levels are down, we can determine the effects of As exposure

as well as determine if cytl9 is the only arsenic methyltransferase in humans.






53


Table A-1. Sequence of double stranded siRNA


siRNA 1: 5'-CAU UGA GAA GUU GGC AGA GUU-3'
3'-UU GUA ACU CUU CAA CCG UCU C-5'
siRNA 2: 5'-UGU GAC UUU UUU CCA UGG CUU-3'
3'-UU ACA CUC AAA AAA GGU ACC G-5'
siRNA3: 5'-GUU GGC AGA GGC UGG AAU CUU-3'
3'-UU CAA CCG UCU CCG ACC UUA G-5'







54



cytl9 mRNA Knockdown


1.8
1.6
1.4
1.2
1
0.8
0.6
0.4
0.2
0


siRNA1


siRNA2


siRNA3


siRNAp


Figure A-1. Determination of the most efficient siRNA in the knockdown of cytl9
mRNA levels assayed by qPCR.




cytl9 mRNA Knockdown


* 1.2
u,
S1
1

S0.8
E
0.6

S0.4

0.2

0


GAPDH-


siRNA pool


Figure A-2. The siRNA pool knockdown of cytl9 mRNA relative to control.










Cytotoxic Assay


CONTROL


GAPDH-


cytl9p


Figure A-3. Determination of cell viability after siRNA knockdown by the XTT assay.


25ng 50ng 100ng 200ng 300ng


A"


Figure A-4. Western blot of the specificity of the crude antisera to the antigen, purified
cytl9 protein.


1 2 3 4 5

a


a"


-OOMM "Row


Figure A-5. Western blot of the specificity of the crude antisera to cytl9 in human liver
cytosolic preparations. 1) HL-93-F6; 2) HL-93-F7; 3) HL-94-F4; 4) HL-97-
21; 5) purified cytl9.


z 100
> 80

g 60
-4-
'5 40


I I I I I I


t








40ng 60ng 125ng 250ng 500ng


Figure A-6. Western blot of the specificity of the purified antibody to the antigen,
purified cytl9 protein.


1 2 3 4 5 6


-


Figure A-7. Western blot of the specificity of the crude antisera to cytl9 in human liver
cytosolic preparations. 1) HL-97-21; 2) HL-H-F6; 3) HL-93-F7; 4) HL-94-
F4; 5) HL-714 6) HeG2 cytosol 7) purified cytl9.
















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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH

Alex J. McNally is the youngest son of Eduaurdo and Ligia McNally, who

immigrated from Managua, Nicaragua. He was born on April 6, 1980, in Miami, FL. He

was raised in Hialeah, FL, where he attended North Miami Senior High and graduated

with honors on May 1998. He then attended the University of Florida where he dualed

major in animal science and microbiology and cell science. He further enhanced his

undergraduate experience working as a student lab assistant at the University of Florida

microbiology and cell science building. He worked with cloning arogenate

dehydrogenase from Arabidopsis thaliana under the guidance of Dr. Carol Bonner and

Dr. Nemat Keyhani. After earning his Bachelor of Science, on August 2003, Alex

continued his graduate studies at the University of Florida, pursuing a Master of Science

specializing in toxicology in May of 2004. He emphasized his graduate research on the

characterization of cytl9, an arsenic methyltransferase, under the guidance of Dr. David

S. Barber. He now plans to pursue a career in a research laboratory where he can

enhance his knowledge and practical experience.




Full Text

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CHARACTERIZATION OF THE HUMAN CYT19 GENE PRODUCT: AN ARSENIC METHYLTRANSFERASE By ALEX J. MCNALLY A THESIS PRESENTED TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLOR IDA IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF SCIENCE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 2006

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Copyright 2006 by Alex J. McNally

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iii ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I would like to thank my mentor, Dr. Davi d S. Barber, for all his help, guidance, and knowledge he has given me. I would also like to thank my committee members, Dr. Nancy Denslow, Dr. Lena Ma, and Dr. Steve Ro berts, for their suggestions and advise. I thank my fianc and my parents for thei r support and encouragement throughout my graduate studies.

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iv TABLE OF CONTENTS page ACKNOWLEDGMENTS.................................................................................................iii LIST OF TABLES.............................................................................................................vi LIST OF FIGURES..........................................................................................................vii ABSTRACT....................................................................................................................... ix CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION........................................................................................................1 Sources of Arsenic........................................................................................................1 Natural Sources.....................................................................................................1 Anthropogenic Sources.........................................................................................1 Exposure and Health Effects........................................................................................2 Exposure................................................................................................................2 Health Effects........................................................................................................3 Mechanisms of Toxicity........................................................................................4 Arsenic Biotransformation............................................................................................6 Reduction of Pentavalent Arsenicals.....................................................................6 Methylation of Trivalent Arsenicals......................................................................7 Variation in Arsenic Methylation.................................................................................8 Role of Methylation in Arsenic Toxicity....................................................................10 Specific Aims of Research..........................................................................................11 2 MOLECULAR CLONING AND CHARACTERIZATI ON OF HUMAN CYT19, AN S-ADENOSYL-L-METHIONINE:AS-METHYLTRANSFERASE FROM HEPG2 CELLS...........................................................................................................13 Introduction.................................................................................................................13 Materials and Methods...............................................................................................14 Molecular Cloning...............................................................................................14 RACE PCR..........................................................................................................15 Expression of Recombinant cyt19.......................................................................15 Characterization...................................................................................................16 Confirmation of Methylated Arsenicals..............................................................17

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v Results and Discussion...............................................................................................18 3 IDENTIFICATION OF A SPLICE VAR IANT OF HUMAN CYT19 ARSENIC METHYLTRANSFERASE........................................................................................33 Introduction.................................................................................................................33 Materials and Methods...............................................................................................34 Molecular Cloning of cyt19 Splice Variants.......................................................34 Human Liver Samples.........................................................................................35 qPCR of cyt19 Splice Variants............................................................................35 Results........................................................................................................................ .36 Discussion...................................................................................................................37 4 GENERAL CONCLUSIONS.....................................................................................45 APPENDIX ROLE OF CYT19 IN ACUTE ARSENI C TOXICITY. IS CYT19 THE ONLY HUMAN ARSENIC METHYLTRANSFERASE?....................................................49 Materials and Methods...............................................................................................49 Results and Discussion...............................................................................................50 cyt19 mRNA Knockdown by siRNA..................................................................50 Antibody Specificity and Purification.................................................................51 Future Experiments.............................................................................................51 LIST OF REFERENCES...................................................................................................57 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH.............................................................................................67

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vi LIST OF TABLES Table page 2-1. Primers used in the PCR amplification of cyt19......................................................23 2-2. Kinetic analysis of the methylati on activity of cyt19-WT and cyt19S81R..............23 3-1. The individual information and Shap iroÂ’s score of cyt19 exon 2 and exon 3.........44 3-2. The amount of cyt19 and cyt19 E2 in different human liver samples and HepG2 cells.......................................................................................................................... .44 A-1. Sequence of double stranded siRNA........................................................................53

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vii LIST OF FIGURES Figure page 2-1. Sequence alignment of cyt19t and Genbank sequence (accession AF226730) ......24 2-2. Sequence alignment of cyt19S81R and Genbank sequence (accession AK057833)...............................................................................................................25 2-3. Sequence alignment of cyt19-WT and cyt19t..........................................................26 2-4. Sequence alignments of the 5Â’ & 3Â’RACE-PCR products and the Genbank sequences (accession AK057833 and AF226730)...................................................27 2-5. Purification of recombinant human cyt19................................................................28 2-6. The effects of AsIII & MMAV concentrations..........................................................29 2-7. The effect of pH on activity.....................................................................................30 2-8. The effects of reductants on methylation activity....................................................30 2-9. The effect of SAM concentration on activity...........................................................31 2-10. Arsenical metabolites formed after incubation with [3H]SAM and cyt19 for 30 min at 37C................................................................................................................32 3-1. The hypothesized scheme of iAs met hylation proposed by Cullen, McBride et al. 1984.....................................................................................................................40 3-2. PCR products of cyt19 amplification.......................................................................40 3-3. Alignment of the reference cy t19 nucleotide sequence and cyt19 E2....................41 3-4. cyt19 isoforms..........................................................................................................42 3-5. Alignment of the reference cyt19 am ino acid sequence and product of cyt19 E2 uORF........................................................................................................................43 A-1. Determination of the most effici ent siRNA in the knockdown of cyt19 mRNA levels assayed by qPCR............................................................................................54 A-2. The siRNA pool knockdown of cy t19 mRNA relative to control............................54

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viii A-3. Determination of cell viability after siRNA knockdown by the XTT assay............55 A-4. Western blot of the specificity of the crude antisera to the antigen, purified cyt19 protein.......................................................................................................................5 5 A-5. Western blot of the specificity of th e crude antisera to cyt19 in human liver cytosolic preparations...............................................................................................55 A-6. Western blot of the specificity of th e purified antibody to th e antigen, purified cyt19 protein.............................................................................................................56 A-7. Western blot of the specificity of th e crude antisera to cyt19 in human liver cytosolic preparations...............................................................................................56

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ix Abstract of Thesis Presen ted to the Graduate School of the University of Florida in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Science CHARACTERIZATION OF THE HUMAN CYT19 GENE PRODUCT: AN ARSENIC METHLTRANSFERASE By Alex J. McNally May 2006 Chair: David S. Barber Major Department: Veterinary Medicine Chronic arsenic exposure poses a threat to millions of people throughout the world due to arsenic in drinking water; how ever the mechanisms underlying arsenic carcinogenicity and individual susceptibil ity are unknown. Methylation has been considered the primary detoxification pathway of inorganic arsenic in many species but there is evidence that methylation may increase arsenic toxicity. It has been shown that methylated arsenicals that contain AsIII are more cytotoxic and genotoxic than either arsenate or arsenite. Rat liver S -adenosylL -methionine: arsenicIII-methyltransferase has been identified and is homologous to huma n cyt19, but there are species specific differences in arsenic biotransformation and t oxicity. Additionally, th ere is considerable variation among humans in the rate of met hylation of inorganic arsenic leading to measurable differences in toxicity. Therefor e, it is important to better understand the enzymes that catalyze the methylation of ar senic in humans. In this study, we PCR amplified and cloned cyt19, a putative arsenic methyltran sferase from human HepG2

PAGE 10

x hepatoma cells. The PCR product was ligated into an E. coli pET expression vector with a polyhistidine tag at the amino-terminal residue. The recombinant human cyt19 was successfully expressed in BL21 (DE3) and purif ied using a nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid metal-affinity chromatography. The recombin ant protein catalyzes the methylation of arsenite as well as monomethylarsonic acid (MMA). The specific activity of arsenite methylation was 597 pmol/mg protein/min in a reaction mixture containing 5mM GSH, 1 mM DTT, 1 mM MgCl2, 100 M S -adenosylL -methionine, 50M sodium m-arsenite, and 5 g of S -adenosylL -methionine: arsenic methyltransferase in 100mM tris/100mM sodium phosphate buffer pH 7.4 at 37 C for 30 minutes. The result s suggest that the human cyt19 gene, in fact, is translated to an S -adenosylL -methionine: arsenic methyltransferase which methylates both arsenite and MMA. Studies have shown that humans exposed to arsenic excrete variable amounts of methylated arsenicals in the urine which may be due to differences in arsenic methyltransferase activity. While polymor phisms in the coding region of cyt19 may account for some of the observed variation in arsenic methylation, other mechanisms are likely to be involved. In this study we iden tified an alternative splice variant of the human cyt19 (cyt19 E2), in which exon 2 is removed creating a bicistronic transcript that is unlikely to produce an active protein. This variant was expressed in 7 out of 7 male Caucasian human liver samples tested and in HepG2 cells. The human cyt19 appears to be alternatively spliced in ma ny individuals and may play a role in the observed variation in arsenic met hylation seen in individuals.

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1 CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION Sources of Arsenic Natural Sources Arsenic (As) is a member of the nitrogen group in the periodic table and is classified as a metalloid. This metalloid is a naturally occurring element and is the 20th most abundant element in the earthÂ’s crust [1 ]. Arsenic is found in the environment as sulfides, and complex sulfides of iron, nick el, and cobalt. The natural weathering of rocks and soils containing various forms of arsenic contribute to its levels in the environment. Arsenic is present in the atmosphere, aquatic environments, soils & sediments, and in organisms. This metall oid is found naturally in rocks, geothermal wells, minerals, and metal ores such as c opper and lead. Arsenic is present in the environment in both organic and inorganic form s and exists in four valence states, -3, 0 (elemental), +3 (trivalent), and +5 (pentavale nt arsenic), however it exists mainly in the latter two valence states. Many marine pl ant and animal species have naturally high levels of As, but in organic forms that appear to cause little toxicity. The main species of arsenic in marine animals is the arsenosugar, arsenobetaine [2]. In general, organic forms of arsenic are less toxic than inorganic forms of arsenic and the pentavalent inorganic forms are less toxic than trivalent inorganic arsenic compounds. Anthropogenic Sources Anthropogenic sources of arsenic stem from its use in pesticides and wood preservatives as well as mining and smelting wastes. In the U.S., 2,200 tons of arsenic

PAGE 12

2 was produced in 1985 [3]. Since 1985, the domes tic production of arsenic in the US has ceased. However, arsenic is still used do mestically and therefore is imported from countries such as China, Japan and Mexi co. In 2003, the United States was worldÂ’s largest consumer of arsenic, demanding 21,600 me tric tons [4] Arsenic has also been used in the production of dessicants and as gr owth stimulants for plants and animals. Organoarsenicals have been shown to have both therapeutic and growth promoting properties in poultry and swin e. Arsanilic acid and its sodium salts, such as 4nitrophenylarsonic acid are added to pet feed [5]. Most of this arseni c passes through the animal and becomes part of the waste st ream resulting from animal production. In addition, arsenic has been used for therapeu tic purposes and of course as a poison. Arsenic has been used to treat syphilis, tropical diseases such as trypanosomiasis (African sleeping sickness), yaws, amoebic dysentery and recently as an anticancer. Paul Ehrlich developed an organic arsenical, arsphenami ne, also known as Salvarsan, which was used to treat syphilis [6]. Arsphenamine was also believed to be effective in treating trypanosomiasis [6]. Arsenic trioxide has been shown to be highly effective in the treatment of various cancer s especially of acute promyelocytic leukaemia [7]. Exposure and Health Effects Exposure Arsenic is present throughout our environm ent, in the air we breathe, the water we drink, and the food we eat. Water contributes mo re to iAs exposure than food or air. On average Americans are exposed to 50 g per day of arseni c of which 10 g is in the inorganic form [8]. People are exposed to hi gher than average arsenic due to living or working around higher exposure sources. For example living or working near a hazardous waste site can lead to exposure via the air, ingestion, or the food chain.

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3 Arsenic is present in 47% of all sites on the National Prio rities List (NPL) sites or Superfund sites making it second only to l ead as the most common contaminant of concern [9]. Occupational settings such as workers who use or produce arsenic compounds: vineyards, ceramics, glass-ma king, smelting, pharmaceuticals, refining of metallic ores, pesticide manufacturing & application, wood preservation, or semiconductor manufacturing, have the potential to be exposed to higher than average arsenic levels [1]. Currently, people in Taiwan, Mexico, western United States, western South America, China, West Bengal and Bangladesh are exposed to high levels of arsenic due to anthropogenic and/or natura l contamination of potable water. It has been estimated that 200 million people worldwide are at risk from health effects as sociated with this exposure [10]. The two most affected ar eas in the world are Bangladesh and West Bengal, India; it has been estimated that around 122 million people in these areas are exposed to groundwater arsenic concentrati ons above the World Health Organization maximum permissible limit of 50g/L [11]. The study showed that in West Bengal, 26.4% (n=10,991 tube wells) of the water samp les had arsenic ranging in 100-299 g/L. In the U.S. the arsenic maximum contaminant level (MCL) was decreased to 10g/L by the US Environmental Protection Agency (E PA) in January 2001. Frost et al. [12] identified 33 counties in 11 states in th e western United States with mean arsenic concentrations of 10g/L or greater. In addition, fr om 1950-1990 there were over 60 million people in the US exposed to arsenic contaminated water exceeding 10g/L [12]. Health Effects Ingestion of arsenic is a widespread human health pr oblem. There are different symptoms associated with acute and chronic ar senic exposure. Acute exposure to arsenic

PAGE 14

4 can result in acute pa ralytic syndrome, acute GI syndr ome, and even death. Oral exposure above 60 ppm in food or water can result in death [3]. Chronic arsenic exposure can result in skin disorders such as hyper and hypo pigmentation, and hyperkeratosis [3]. It was found that even at 0.005-0.01mg/L of arsenic in water there is an increase in the prevalence of skin lesions [13]. In addi tion, chronic iAs exposure can affect the circulatory and nervous systems leadin g to diseases such as Blackfoot disease. Major organs such as the liver, kidneys, lung, bladder, and heart can be affected as a result of arsenic cytotoxicity. There is an increase of cancer, death from cancer, and diabetes mellitus associated with chronic ar senic exposure. Epidemiological studies show that there is dose-res ponse relationship between exposur e to iAs and skin cancer [14]. A study in Taiwan[15] and Japan[16] demonstrated a significant association between long-term arsenic exposure in drinking water with lung and bladder cancer. In northern Chile an increase in mortality from bladder, lung, kidney, and skin cancer is associated with As exposure; bladder a nd lung cancer showing highest increase in mortality [17]. A follow up study in Taiwan compared the incidence of diabetes mellitus in an arsenic exposed population to two cont rol areas showed an association between As exposure and diabetes mellitus [18]. Mechanisms of Toxicity The mechanism of arsenic toxicity is de pendent on oxidation state. Trivalent arsenicals, including methylated arsenicals produce toxicity by enzyme inhibition by interactions with sulfhydryl gr oups in proteins [19] and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). For example, in vitro studies have shown that MMAIII and arsenite are capable of inhibiting pyruvate dehydrogena se (PDH) activity in hamster kidney and purified porcine heart PDH resulting in the subsequent blockage of adeonosine

PAGE 15

5 triphosphate (ATP) production be cause of the disruption of the citric acid due to the depletion of cellular citrate [ 20]. Inorganic arsenicals, arse nite and arsenate, have been shown to induce ROS and r eactive nitrogen species (R NS) which result in DNA and protein oxidative damage [21]. A nother study demonstrated that MMAIII and DMAIII induced ROS result in DNA damage [22]. Arse nate has been shown to interfere with ATP production by substituting for phosphate le ading to production of an unstable ADParsenate complex which spontaneo usly hydrolyzes [23]. This process leads to a depletion of cellular energy due to this futile cycle. Although there is strong evidence of the ca rcinogenicity of arsenic in humans, the mechanism by which tumors are produced is unknown. Studies of arsenic carcinogenesis have been hampered because there are very few animal models in which arsenic induces carcinogenesis [3]. DMA concentrations of 50 and 200 ppm have been shown to be carcinogenic in F344 rats urinary bladder [ 24]. Recent work has demonstrated the promotion effects of inorgani c arsenicals and methylated ar senicals. Inorganic arsenic (42.5 and 85 ppm)has been shown to be a transplacental carcin ogen in mice [25]. Organic arsenicals, such as MMA, DMA, and TMAO have been shown to act as promoters in carcinogenesis of se veral rat organs [26]. Howe ver, some of these studies have received much criticism due to the hi gh arsenical exposure le vels used ranging from about 50 to 400 ppm and the use of several initiators such as diethylnitrosamine, NbutylN(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine, NmethylNnitrosourea, dihydroxy-diN propylnitrosamine and N-NÂ’dimethylhydrazine, prior to arsenic exposure. Several possibilities for mechanisms of arsenic induced malignancies have been hypothesized such as chromosomal abnormality, oxidative stress, and the promotion of

PAGE 16

6 tumorigenesis. Zhao et al. [27], have s hown that chronic low le vel arsenic (0-0.5M) exposure will result in the malignant transfor mation of epithelial ce lls associated with DNA hypomethylation due to depletion of SAM and aberrant gene expression. An in vivo long-term arsenic exposure study to mice de monstrated that arse nic in potable water can induce aberrant gene expression, globa l DNA hypomethylation, and hypomethylation of the gene for the estrogen receptorresulting in enhanced transcription, which cumulatively could lead to arsenic hepatocarc inogenesis [28]. Arsenate was shown to have a dose-dependent transcri ptional induction of several different signal transduction pathways, including the dose-re sponse induction of several promoters and/or response elements responsive to oxidative damage and DNA damage [29] which may help understand the mechanisms of carcinogenicity fo r arsenic. Binet et al. [30] has shown that arsenic induced apoptosis via reactive oxygen species (ROS) production occurs but, the ROS is not produced from nicotin amide adenine dinucleotide phosphate dehydrogenase activation. Trivalent methylated arsenicals have been shown to indirectly cause DNA damage by ROS. One study showed that DMAIII promotes tumorigenesis and gentoxicity via dimethylat ed arsenic peroxides [31] Arsenic Biotransformation Reduction of Pentavalent Arsenicals The biotransformation of iAs alternates between the reduction of arsenate (iAsV) to arsenite (iAsIII) followed by oxidative methylation. The hypothesized scheme of iAs methylation involves oxidative methylation and reduction[32]: AsvO4 3+ 2e AsIIIO3 3+ CH3 + CH3Asv O3 2+ 2e CH3AsIIIO2 2+ CH3 + (CH3)2AsvO2 + 2e (CH3)2AsIIIO

PAGE 17

7 Arsenic reduction must occur first before it can be methylated. Several enzymes have been shown capable to reduce arsenic. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) has the ability to reduce iAsV to iAsIII in the presence of a dith iol and a purine nucleoside (guanosine or inosine) in v itro [33, 34]. However, studie s performed by Nmeti et al. 2003 showed that PNP does not play a role in iAsV reduction in vivo [35]. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) in the pres ence of glutathione (GSH) and NAD has the ability to reduce iAsV to iAsIII in human red blood cells and rat liver cytosol [36, 37]. A human arsenate re ductase was discovered capable of reducing arsenate but not methylarsonic acid (MMAV) [38]. Zakharyan et al 1999 presented an enzyme from rabbit liver capable of reducing MMAV, arsenate, and di methylarsinic acid (DMAV) in the presence of GSH; this enzyme was also present in human liver [39]. MMAV reductase was sequenced and 92% of the sequences were identical to human glutathione-S-transferase Omega class (hGS TO-1) [40]. This hG STO-1 catalyzes the reduction of iAsV, MMAV, and DMAV [39, 41]. There is ev idence that pentavalent arsenicals can be reduced nonenzymatically. Glutathione (GSH) has been shown to reduce pentavalent arsenicals [42, 43]. Methylation of Trivalent Arsenicals Following the first reduction step, arsenite is enzymatically oxidatively methylated to MMAV. In this reaction, a high energy met hyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methione (SAM) is transferred to a trivalent arsenica l in an oxidative process that produces a pentavalent methylated arsenical. The resu lting monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) can be reduced a second time and methylated again to form dimethylarsinic acid (DMA). In West Bengal, MMAIII and DMAIII were detected in the urine of exposed humans in 48% and 72% respectively out of th e 428 subjects [44]. In some animals, including humans, a

PAGE 18

8 third methylation can occur resulting in form ation of trimethylarsine oxide (TMAO). It was shown that a single dose of arsenic trioxi de in hamsters resulted in a very small amount of TMAO production in the liver[45]. Yoshida et al 1997 demonstrated that rats excrete TMAO in their urine after a single oral administration of DMA [46]. Urine excretion of TMAO in man has been observe d after ingestion of an arsenosugar and DMA [47, 48]. Arsenic methyltransferases (AS3MT) ha ve been isolated from many mammalian species. An AS3MT has been purified 2000-fold from rabbit liver by DEAE chromatography to a single band [49]. The rabbit liver AS3MT was capable of performing both methylation steps. The Golden Syrian hamster liver was used to purify AS3MT and was shown to have similar activit ies as the rabbit AS3MT [50]. Rat liver Sadenosyl-L-methionine:arsenicIII-methyltransferase has been identified and is homologous to human cyt19 [51]. The rat ar senic methyltransferase has been shown to perform both mono and dimethylation of arseni c. Arsenic methyltransferase activity has been determined in mice and prim ates, including humans [52-55]. Variation in Arsenic Methylation There is significant variation in the arse nic methylation rate and arsenic metabolite production among mammalian species. The variabil ity of arsenic methylation is apparent in the amounts of methylated arsenic metabolites seen in the urine of exposed mammals such as the rat, rabbit, hamster, dog, and mouse. For example, mice quickly excrete about 90% of the dose in two days of whic h 80% is DMA [56]. The rat efficiently methylates arsenic, but it accumulates DMA in red blood cells resul ting in subsequent lower DMA excretion levels making it a poor model for human metabolic studies [57]. Healy et al. [58], purified arse nic methyltransferases from livers of rabbit, hamster, and

PAGE 19

9 rhesus monkey and found different rates of methylation which may affect arsenic elimination and toxicity. However, these mammals with arsenic methylation capacity have something in common which distinguishes them from huma ns. On average, humans exposed to arsenic excrete more MMA in the urine than other mammals specifically 10-30% iAs, 10-20% MMA, and 60-80% DMA [59]. This suggests that non-human mammals are more efficient at catalyzing the second me thylation step which produces MMA. This may relate to their lower susceptibility to iAs carcinogenesis following exposure versus man. Additionally, there is si gnificant variation in human susceptibility to As induced toxicity, which may be related to differenc es in arsenic biotransformation between individuals. Epidemiological studies have shown differen ces in the amount of MMA and DMA excreted in the urine of exposed populations which may be associated with differences in arsenic methyltransferase activ ity. Several studies on the urinary excretion of arsenic metabolites in nativ e Andean people and mixed et hnicities in northeastern Argentina exposed to arsenic in potable wate r revealed low excret ion of MMA [60-63]. One study revealed higher than normal MMA in urine, on average 27%, in people exposed to arsenic in drinking water on the northeast coast of Taiwan [64]. Only a few polymorphisms have been found in the coding region of cyt19 to date. The Met287Thr mutation has been reported on th ree different occasions [65-67]. In two of these studies, the methylat ion activity of this allozyme was determined and showed to have a higher methylation capacity than the w ild-type [65, 67]. Howe ver, the activity of this allozyme was determined either from a cy tosol preparation or by analysis of cells and culture media of exposed human hepatocytes. This type of analysis does not take into

PAGE 20

10 account the possible different expr ession levels of the arsenic me thyltransferase. In fact one study shows that the allozyme Met287Thr was expressed at higher levels than the wild-type arsenic methyltransf erase [67], making unclear as to whether the increase in activity results from the mutation or the increased expression levels. There are differences in arsenic methylation capaci ties among individuals, which cannot be supported alone by polymorphisms within the cyt19 coding region. All of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in cyt19 avai lable as seen in the NCBI SNP database on January 12, 2006 are within th e intron or untranslated regi on (UTR). In addition, two separate studies which examined the frequency of polymorphisms within cyt19 found one nonsynonymous SNPs (nsSNPs) out of 58 SN Ps [66] and the other study found 3 nsSPNPs out of 26 SNPs [67], the remainder of the SNPs occurring in introns or UTRs. There is another mechanism which may help explain the differences seen in arsenic methylation, alternativ e splicing. Alternative splici ng is frequently used to regulate gene expression and to generate tissue-specific mRNA and protein isoforms [68, 69]. Introns contain sequence elements in which splicesome assembly occurs [70]. Mutations within these sequence elements c ould alter the constitutive splicing of a gene which may affect the methylation capacity wi thin and among different population groups. Role of Methylation in Arsenic Toxicity Arsenic methylation has traditionally been thought to be a detoxification pathway. Pentavalent methylated arsenic metabolites ar e less reactive and are readily excreted in the urine compared to iAs [56] Pentavalent methylated arse nicals have also been shown to be less cytotoxic and genot oxic compared to arsenite [71]. Mure et al. [72], demonstrated that arsenite induces delaye d mutagenesis and transformation in human osteosarcoma cells but MMAIII showed no significant increase in mutagenesis or

PAGE 21

11 transformation. While As methylation has been viewed as a detoxification pathway, recent studies have shown monomethylarsonous acid (MMAIII) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMAIII) to be more toxic than inorganic arse nicals. In vitro and in vivo studies have shown that MMAIII is more cytotoxic than AsIII. Petrick et al [20], revealed that the order of toxicity in Chang huma n hepatocytes is as follows: MMAIII > arsenite > arsenate > MMAV = DMAV. In vivo studies performed in hamsters demonstrated that MMAIII is more lethal than arsenite [73]. In addition, Hirano et al. [74], has shown that monomethylarsonous acid diglutathione is more acutely toxic than othe r arsenicals. It is important to point out that not all mammals methylate arsenic such as the marmoset monkey, tamarin, chimpanzee, and the guinea pig [57, 75-78]. These mammals have not been shown to be more susceptible to acu te arsenic intoxication. One study showed no correlation between the induction of micronuclei and the ability to methylate arsenic in the leukocytes of four mamma lian species, humans, mice, rats, and guinea pigs [79]. Another factor that questions the role of methylation is th e fact that arsenic is a known human carcinogen, but very few animals exist in which arsenic initiates carcinogenesis. The debate over whether As methylation is a detoxification or bioactivation pathway leads to confusion over the role of methylation in toxicity. Specific Aims of Research The proposed study will addre ss the role of arsenic met hylation in human toxicity by better understanding the kine tics of the human arsenic met hyltransferase. The overall hypothesis is the following: Human arsenic me thyltransferase, cyt19, activity is the determining factor in the rate of arsenic methylation and toxic ity. To test this hypothesis, I examined two specific aims: 1) clon e and characterize the human arsenic methyltransferase (cyt19) a nd 2) determine cyt19s role in toxicity and arsenic

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12 methylation variability. Speci fic aim one was addressed by determining rate of arsenic methylation by an in vitro assay. The op timum conditions required for human cyt19 activity were determined such as pH optim um, substrate specificity and concentration, and thiol requirements. Specific aim two was addressed by examining the role of polymorphisms and splice variants on arsenic methylation variability. The determination of cyt19s role in toxicity was addressed by As toxicity in the presence and absence of methylation activity. In order to determine if cyt19 is the only arsenic methyltransferase in humans, the mRNA levels, protein concen tration, and activity, in the presence and absence of siRNA knockdown was determined.

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13 CHAPTER 2 MOLECULAR CLONING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF HUMAN CYT19, AN SADENOSYL-L-METHIONINE:AS-METHYLTRANSFERASE FROM HEPG2 CELLS Introduction Chronic arsenic exposure is a threat to millions of people throughout the world. Exposure to arsenic has been linked to various types of cancers such as skin cancer, lung cancer, and cancer of other inte rnal organs [71]. Methyla tion has been considered the major route of biotransformation and excreti on of inorganic arsenic (iAs) in many species including humans. The hypothe sized scheme of iAs met hylation involves reduction followed by oxidative methylation [80]: AsvO4 3+ 2e AsIIIO3 3+ CH3 + CH3Asv O3 2+ 2e CH3AsIIIO2 2+ CH3 + (CH3)2AsvO2 + 2e (CH3)2AsIIIO While traditionally thought to be a detoxification path way, recent studies have shown monomethylarsonous acid (MMAIII) and dimethylarsonous acid (DMAIII) to be more toxic than inorganic arse nicals [73]. In addition, Hira no et al.[74], has shown that monomethylarsonous acid diglutathione is more acutely toxic than ot her arsenicals. The debate over whether As methylation is a det oxification or bioactivation pathway leads to confusion over the role of methylation in toxicity. Rat liver S-adenosyl-Lmethionine:arsenicIII-methyltransferase has been iden tified and is homologous to human cyt19 [51]. While this enzyme can be used as a model for human arsenic biotransformation, the rat is considered a poor model for metabolic studies due to its accumulation in red blood cells and subsequent lower DMA excretion levels [57]. There

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14 are also other species specific differences in arsenic biotransformation and toxicity. Healy et al. (1999) [58], pur ified arsenic methyltransfer ases from livers of rabbit, hamster, and rhesus monkey and found differe nt rates of methylation which may affect arsenic elimination and toxicity. Humans excrete greater amounts of monomethylarsonic acid (MMAV) compared to most other mammals [81] Additionally, there is considerable variation among humans in the rate of methyl ation of inorganic arsenic possibly leading to measurable differences in toxicity [82]. Therefore it is importan t to better understand the arsenic methylation capacity in human. To date, human cyt19 has been expressed, but it has not been fully char acterized [52]. In this study, we cloned, expressed, and characterized cyt19, an arsenic methyltran sferase from human HepG2 hepatoma cells. Materials and Methods Molecular Cloning Two separate sequences available from Genbank (accession number AK057833 and AF226730) were used to design primers to amplify the open read ing frame (ORF) of cyt19, an arsenic methyltransferase (Table 1) Total RNA was isolated from HepG2 cells using Trizol reagent (Invitrog en, Carlsbad, USA)). Total RNA was treated with DNAase (DNA-free kit, Ambion, Austin, USA), and reverse transcribed (RETROscript for RTPCR, Ambion) using 2 g of RNA. HepG2 cDNA was polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified, the PCR product was ligat ed in pET100/D-TOPO (Invitrogen) and transformed into chemically competent Escherichia coli One Shot TOP10 chemically competent cells (Invitrogen). The P CR reaction consisted of 2.5 U of Pfu DNA polymerase, 0.4 M each primer, 5 l of the RT reaction, 0.2 mM dNTP mix, 5 l of 10X PCR Buffer, and nuclease-free water to 50 l. The PCR conditions were as follows: an initial denaturation at 94C for 2min, follo wed by 35 cycles of denaturation at 94C for

PAGE 25

15 1min, annealing at 60C for 1min, extension fo r 72C for 2min 30s and a final extension at 72C for 7min. The PCR products, the comp lete open reading frame of cyt19 (cyt19WT), the mutated cyt19 (cyt19S81R), and the truncated cyt19 (cyt19t) were then ligated and transformed. Ampicillin resistant coloni es were analyzed by PCR and visualized by agarose gel electrophoresis. Once a correct clone was identified it was sent for sequencing to the DNA Sequencing Core Laboratory at the Univer sity of Florida. Each clone was sequenced several times a nd the consensus sequence determined. RACE PCR Rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) was performed to determine which of the two separate sequences av ailable in Genbank was actually expressed in HepG2 cells. The RACE-PCR was performed using the FirstChoice RLM-RACE kit from Ambion. Primers were designed (Table 1) accordi ng to the instruction manual and the PCR reaction consisted of 1.25 U of Taq DNA polymerase, 0.4 M each primer, 1 l of the RT reaction, 0.2 mM dNTP mix, 5 l of 10X PCR Buffer, and nuclease-free water to 50 l. The PCR conditions were as follows: an ini tial denaturation at 94C for 3min, followed by 35 cycles of denaturation at 94C for 30s annealing at 60C for 30s, extension for 72C for 1min and a final extension at 72C for 7min. The PCR product was ligated in pGEM-T Easy Vector (Promega) and tran sformed into chemically competent Escherichia coli JM109 chemically competent cells (Promega). Expression of Recombinant cyt19 The pET100/D-TOPO constructs (cyt19-WT, cyt19S81R, and cyt19t) were transformed into BL21 Star (DE3) E. coli strain for expression (I nvitrogen). First, 10ml of Luria-Bertani (LB) broth containing ampicillin (100 g/ml) and 1% glucose were inoculated with the transfor med bacteria and the cultures were grown overnight. The

PAGE 26

16 next day, 5ml of the overnight culture wa s used to inoculate 250ml of LB broth containing ampicillin and 1% glucose and grown to an OD600 of 0.5. Expression was induced by the addition of 1mM isopropyl-1-thio-D-galactoside. The culture was allowed to grow for one hour.The pET100/D-TO PO construct was then transformed into BL21 Star (DE3) E. coli strain for expre ssion (Invitrogen). The cells were harvested by centrif ugation at 5,000g for 15 minutes at 4 C. The pellet was resuspended in binding buffer (50mM NaH2PO4, 300mM NaCl, 10mM imidazole, pH 8.0). The cells were lysed by a ddition of lysozyme to a final concentration of 1mg/ml and incubated on ice for 30 mi nutes followed by further incubation for 10 minutes at 4C on a rocking platform. Triton X-100 was added to a final concentration of 1% and the incubation continued for anothe r 10 minutes at 4C with rocking. The cellular debris was removed by centrifugation of the lysate at 3000g for 30 minutes at 4C The recombinant 6xHis-ta gged protein was purified usin g a nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid (Ni-NTA) metal-affinity chromat ography according to th e manufacturerÂ’s instructions (QIAGEN, Valencia, USA). Characterization Activity of the expressed proteins wa s determined by the rate of arsenic methylation. All incubations were carried ou t at 37C for 30 minutes in a final volume of 250 l, unless otherwise noted. The reacti on mixtures contained 5mM glutathione (GSH), 1 mM dithiothreitol (DTT), 1 mM MgCl2, 100 M S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM), 13pM (3H-methyl)-SAM (S.A.), 50M sodi um m-arsenite, and 5 g of S adenosylL -methionine: arsenic methyltransf erase in 100mM tris/100mM sodium phosphate buffer pH 7.4. The pH optimum wa s determined using the above conditions

PAGE 27

17 but at different pHs (6.0 – 11). The s ubstrate specificity and optimum substrate concentrations were also determined by addi tion of various concentrations of sodium marsenite or MMA, ranging from 1M to 200 M or 10 M to 1000 M respectively. The requirements of SAM and reductants by cyt19 were determined by addition of various concentrations of SAM, a nd the reductants GSH and tris(2-carboxyethyl)-phosphine (TCEP). The methylation reactions were stopped by placing on ice. The standard extraction procedure described by Zakharyan et al. [49] was used to separate radioactive SAM from radioactive MMA and DMA. Br iefly, the reaction mixture (250 l) was treated with 10 l of 40% KI, 20 l of 1.5% potassium dichromate, 750 l of concentrated HCl and 750 l of chloroform. The mixture was then mixed on a vortex for 3 min followed by centrifugation at 1500g for 3 min. The upper aqueous phase contained SAM and was discarded. The lower organi c phase was washed tw ice with 250 l of water, 5 l of 40% KI, and 750 l of con centrated HCl. The mixture was mixed on a vortex and centrifuged and the upper aqueous phase was discarded each time. The methylated arsenicals contained in the organi c phase were back extracted with 1 mL of water, vortexed for 3min and centrifuged at 1500g for 5 min. Half a milliliter from the final aqueous phase after back extraction wa s counted in a liquid scintillation counter. The activity was calculated from the dpm 3H transferred from SAM to arsenic. Confirmation of Methylated Arsenicals Methylated arsenicals were separated from each other and contaminating species using the ion exchange method described prev iously by Zakharyan et al. (1995) [49]. A 10 mL glass pipette was filled to 2 mL with Bio-Rad AG 50W-X4 cation exchange resin (100-200 M mesh). The column was equili brated by addition of 0.5N HCl (30 mL), followed by water until the pH of the effl uent was 5.5, 0.5N NaOH (30 mL), water until

PAGE 28

18 the pH of the effluent was 5.5, 0.5N HCl (30 mL), and 0.05N HCl (50 mL). After equilibrating the column, 0.5 mL of the fi nal aqueous phase extract from above was applied to the column. The columns were eluted by 6 mL of 0.05M HCl to obtain MMA and 10 mL of 0.5M NaOH for DMA elution. One milliliter of the these fractions were counted in a liquid sc intillation counter. Results and Discussion Both cyt19 and cyt19t transcripts were amplified by PCR from HepG2 cells and human liver samples. The sequencing results of cyt19t showed 4 point mutations, 3 transverions and 1 transition, (Figure 2-1A) resulting in 3 missense mutations (Figure 21B) compared to the Genbank sequence (ac cession AF226730). The wild-type cyt19 was also amplified, cloned, and sequenced from tw o different populations of HepG2 cells. One of the clones, designated cyt19-WT was aligned to the Genbank sequence, accession AK057833, and showed a 100% homology (data not shown). The other clone designated cyt19S81R contained a nonsynonym ous single nucleotide polymorphism (nsSNPs) when compared to the Genba nk sequence, accession AK057833 (Figure 2-2A), which results in a change from serine to ar ginine at residue 81 in the peptide sequence (Figure 2-2B). This change occurs in the SAM-binding site, however SAM-dependent methyltransferases have poor conservation of SAM-binding residue s. SAM-dependent methyltransferases contain 3 re gions of sequence similarity (m otif I, II, and III) which are thought to be important in SAM binding. Th e only highly conserved residues in the SAM-binding N-terminal region appear to be the glycine-rich sequence E/DXGXGXG found at residues 76 to 82 [83]. Therefore, the amino acid change may not have a significant effect on the activity of the recombinant protein.

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19 The cyt19t clone and the cyt19-WT clone are id entical except for the deletion of a nucleotide at position 997 resulting in a pr emature stop codon (Figure 2-3A). Further analysis of the protein sequences revealed 6 missense mutations including a cysteine to valine mutation and deletions of the final 37 am ino acids from the C-terminus including 4 cysteines due to the deletion in the nucleoti de sequence (Figure 2-3B). In other SAMdependent methyltransferases, the C-terminus is important in substrate binding [83]. The cyt19t protein showed no arsenic methylation activ ity. This indicates that the cysteine rich C-terminus is important for As binding and critical for activity. RACE-PCR was performed on both the 5Â’ and 3Â’ ends. The sequencing results revealed that the 5Â’end of the cDNA was identical to the ORF of both sequences available in Genbank (accession AK057833 a nd AF226730). The 5Â’-untranslated region (UTR) is different from the Genbank sequences containing 18 mutati ons (Figure 2-4A). The 3Â’RACE-PCR revealed that HepG2 cells expressed mRNA identical to the 3Â’end of the Genbank sequence, accession AK057833. In particular, the seque ncing showed that HepG2 cells cyt19 mRNA does not have a nucle otide deletion resul ting in a premature stop codon (Figure 2-4B). The recombinant human cyt19s (cyt19-WT, cyt19t, and cyt19S81R) were successfully expressed in BL21 (DE3) and purified to homogeneity using a nickelnitrilotriacetic acid metal-affinity chromatography (Figure 5). The recombinant proteins, cyt19S81R and cyt19-WT, catalyze the tran sfer of a methyl group from SAM to AsIII as well as MMAIII, which is consistent with previo us studies (Figure 2-6) [51, 52]. However, the different arsenite methyltransf erase activity profiles between cyt19-WT and cyt19S81R are apparent. Arsenite concentr ations above 50 M appears to have an

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20 inhibitory effect on cyt19S81R ac tivity, which is similar to what is seen in the rabbit [49]. This inhibitory effect is not seen in the cyt19-WT arseni te methylation activity. The apparent Km and Vmax of cyt19 AsIII methyltransferase (AS3MT ) activity for cyt19-WT and cyt19S81R are 251.6 M, 3505 pmole/mg/min, 6.176 M, and 804.9 pmole/mg/min respectively (Table 2). The Km and Vmax values of cyt19-WT MMA methylation is 164.6 M and 926.8 pmole/mg/min (Table 2). The MM A methylation profile is very similar to that seen in the rabbit. These enzymes seem to saturate at MMA concentrations of 1000 M [49]. The Km values can be used to interpret the affi nity of an enzyme for its substrate (a larger Km implies a weak affinity). Other ki netic analysis of the human arsenic methyltransferase had very low Km [67, 84] values compared to cyt19-WT but, the Km value of cyt19S81R was very similar to the ot her kinetic analysis. However, these other studies did not use purified enzymes which ma y explain the differenc e, especially the difference seen with cyt19-WT. The kinetic analysis suggests that the cyt19S81R has a higher affinity for arsenite than cyt19-WT However, cyt19-WT has a considerably higher Vmax value compared to cyt19S81R. The Vmax values of both cyt19-WT and cyt19S81R are considerably higher than th at seen among other mammals such as the hamster, rabbit, and rhesus monkey [50]. Kinetic analysis of MMA methylation demonstrates that the Vmsx and Km values for cyt19-WT are mu ch higher than the values seen in the hamster, rabbit, and rhesus monkey. The higher Vmax values of arsenite methyltransferase compared to MMA methy ltransferase in cyt19-WT may explain the higher MMA urine excretion levels seen in humans compared to other mammals. The rabbit, which excretes higher amounts of MMA than most other mammals, has a higher

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21 MMA than arsenite methyltransferase Km [50]. Possibly, arsenite is converted very quickly to MMA, allowing it to accumulate before the dimethyla tion resulting in the higher excretion of MM A seen in humans. The optimum pH of AsIII methylation for cyt19-WT and cyt19S81R was found to be about 8 and about 9 respectively (Figure 27). This is similar to previous results which show that at basic pHs, met hylation activity of rat cyt19, and AsIII methyltransferase & MMAIII methyltransferase activity fr om rabbit liver increase [49, 51]. This may be due to the deprotonation of cysteines at higher pHs, which increases the rate of binding between arse nic and cysteines in the s ubstrate binding domain. The reductant requirements were examined and it was determined that GSH is not required for cyt19-WT to methylate arsenic (Figure 28). In addition, it was determined that cyt19S81R does not require GSH. Previous st udy suggests that the substrates for cyt19 are arsenic triglutathione and monomethyl arsonic glutathione [52]. Our results demonstrate that only a strong reductant such as TCEP is necessary for methylation of arsenic by cyt19, however, the addition of GSH appears to increase the activity above the reductant alone. Finally, the effect that different SAM concentrations would have on activity was determined. It was found th at above 500 M, SAM began to have an inhibitory effect (Figure 2-9). This diffe rs from what is seen in rat, where SAM concentrations above 50 M have an inhibitory effect [51]. The ion exchange method confirmed th at cyt19 indeed produces MMA when arsenite is the substrate (Figure 2-10A). When MMAV is used as the substrate, both MMA and DMA are seen as products (Figure 2-10B). However, DMA is the major

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22 metabolite. The MMAV used as a substrate is not 100% pure and likely contains some iAs as contaminants. It is possible that th e contaminating iAs is methylated to MMA. In conclusion, we have shown that cyt19 is in fact an arsenic methyltransferase methylating both arsenite and MMA Examination of the cyt19t activity, indicates that the cysteine rich C-terminus is important for As binding and critical for activity. The data suggests that a mutation within the SAM-bi nding site of cyt19 can drastically change the methylation capacity of the enzyme. Th e characterization and kinetic analysis may explain the higher MMA urine ex cretion levels and increased susceptibility seen in humans compared to other mammals. It appears that arsenite is conve rted very quickly to MMA, allowing it to accumulate before th e dimethylation resu lting in the higher excretion of MMA seen in humans. The appa rently deficient dimethylation activity in humans compared to other mammals is s upported by the kinetic analysis and suggests that methylation may actually be a detoxification pathway.

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23 Table 2-1. Primers used in the PCR amplification of cyt19 Primer Sequence cyt19 Forward: CACCATGGCTGCACTTCGT GACGCTGAGATACAG Reverse: TTAGCAGCTTTTCTTTGTG CCACAGCAGCCTCC cyt19t Forward: CACCATGGCTGCACTTCGT GACGCTGAGATACAG Reverse: TTAACTCCAAAGCAGAACAGCTCCAGATGT 5Â’RACE Outer: TTTCA GCCACTTCCACCTGGCCTT Inner: CAGGGATCA CCAGACCACAGCCAT 3Â’RACE Outer: AGGACCAACCAAGAGATGCCAA Inner: GCCAGAAGAAATCAGGACACACAA Figure 2-2. Kinetic analysis of the methyl ation activity of cyt19-WT and cyt19S81R. cyt19-WT cyt19S81R Arsenite methyltransferase activity Km (M) 83.010.9 6.20.9 Vmax (pmole/mg/min) 1585142 804.933.4 MMA methyltransferae activity Km (M) 164.641.2 43.713.3 Vmax (pmole/mg/min) 926.875.4 365.125.7

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24 A. 301 350 AF226730 ATAGACATGA CCAAAGGCCA GGTGGAAGTG GCTGAAAAGT ATCTTGACTA cyt19t ATAGACATGA CCAAAGGCCA GGTGGAAGTG GCTGAAAAGT ATCTTGACTA 351 400 AF226730 TCACATGGAA AAATATGGCT TCCAGGCATC TAATGTGACT TTT T T C CATG cyt19t TCACATGGAA AAATATGGCT TCCAGGCATC TAATGTGACT TTT A T T CATG 401 450 AF226730 GC A ACATTGA GAAGTTGG C A GAGGCTGGAA TCAAGAATGA GAGCCATGAT cyt19t GC T ACATTGA GAAGTTGG G A GAGGCTGGAA TCAAGAATGA GAGCCATGAT 451 500 AF226730 ATTGTTGTAT CAAACTGTGT TATTAACCTT GTGCCTGATA AACAACAAGT cyt19t ATTGTTGTAT CAAACTGTGT TATTAACCTT GTGCCTGATA AACAACAAGT B. 1 50 AF226730 MAALRDAEIQ KDVQTYYGQV LKRSADLQTN GCVTTARPVP KHIREALQNV cyt19t MAALRDAEIQ KDVQTYYGQV LKRSADLQTN GCVTTARPVP KHIREALQNV 51 100 AF226730 HEEVALRYYG CGLVIPEHLE NCWILDLGSG SGRDCYVLSQ LVGEKGHVTG cyt19t HEEVALRYYG CGLVIPEHLE NCWILDLGSG SGRDCYVLSQ LVGEKGHVTG 101 150 AF226730 IDMTKGQVEV AEKYLDYHME KYGFQASNVT F F HG N IEKL A EAGIKNESHD cyt19t IDMTKGQVEV AEKYLDYHME KYGFQASNVT F I HG Y IEKL G EAGIKNESHD 151 200 AF226730 IVVSNCVINL VPDKQQVLQE AYRVLKHGGE LYFSDVYTSL ELPEEIRTHK cyt19t IVVSNCVINL VPDKQQVLQE AYRVLKHGGE LYFSDVYTSL ELPEEIRTHK Figure 2-1. Sequence alignment of cyt19t and Genbank sequence (accession AF226730). (A) Nucleotide alignment of cyt19t and Genbank sequence. The four point mutation are in red. (B) Alignment of the deduced cyt19t amino acid sequence and Genbank sequence. The 3 resulti ng missense mutations are in red.

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25 A. 151 200 AK057833 CACGAAGAAG TAGCCCTAAG ATATTATGGC TGTGGTCTGG TGATCCCTGA cyt19S81R CACGAAGAAG TAGCCCTAAG ATATTATGGC TGTGGTCTGG TGATCCCTGA 201 250 AK057833 GCATCTAGAA AACTGCTGGA TTTTGGATCT GGGTAGTGGA A GTGGCAGAG cyt19S81R GCATCTAGAA AACTGCTGGA TTTTGGATCT GGGTAGTGGA C GTGGCAGAG 251 300 AK057833 ATTGCTATGT ACTTAGCCAG CTGGTTGGTG AAAAAGGACA CGTGACTGGA cyt19S81R ATTGCTATGT ACTTAGCCAG CTGGTTGGTG AAAAAGGACA CGTGACTGGA B. 1 50 AK057833 MAALRDAEIQ KDVQTYYGQV LKRSADLQTN GCVTTARPVP KHIREALQNV cyt19S81R MAALRDAEIQ KDVQTYYGQV LKRSADLQTN GCVTTARPVP KHIREALQNV 51 100 AK057833 HEEVALRYYG CGLVIPEHLE NCWILDLGSG S G RDCYVLSQ LVGEKGHVTG cyt19S81R HEEVALRYYG CGLVIPEHLE NCWILDLGSG R G RDCYVLSQ LVGEKGHVTG 101 150 AK057833 IDMTKGQVEV AEKYLDYHME KYGFQASNVT FIHGYIEKLG EAGIKNESHD cyt19S81R IDMTKGQVEV AEKYLDYHME KYGFQASNVT FIHGYIEKLG EAGIKNESHD Figure 2-2. Sequence alignment of cy t19S81R and Genbank sequence (accession AK057833). (A) Nucleotide alignment of cyt19S81R and Genbank sequence. The tranversion is in red. (B) Alignment of deduced cyt19S81R amino acid sequence and Genbank sequence. The resulting nsSNP is in red. The SAMbinding N-terminal region site is underlined.

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26 A. 951 1000 cyt19-WT AGATTTTCTG ATCAGACCAA TTGGAGAGAA GTTGCCAACA TCTGGAGGCT cyt19t AGATTTTCTG ATCAGACCAA TTGGAGAGAA GTTGCCAACA TCTGGA.GCT 1001 1050 cyt19-WT GTTCTGCTTT GGAGTTAAAG GATATAATCA CAGATCCATT TAAGCTTGCA cyt19t GTTCTGCTTT GGAGT TAA ~~ ~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~ 1051 1100 cyt19-WT GAAGAGTCTG ACAGTATGAA GTCCAGATGT GTCCCTGATG CTGCTGGAGG cyt19t ~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~ 1101 1128 cyt19-WT CTGCTGTGGC ACAAAGAAAA GCTGCTAA cyt19t ~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~ B. 201 250 cyt19-WT VLWGECLGGA LYWKELAVLA QKIGFCPPRL VTANLITIQN KELERVIGDC cyt19t VLWGECLGGA LYWKELAVLA QKIGFCPPRL VTANLITIQN KELERVIGDC 251 300 cyt19-WT RFVSATFRLF KHSKTGPTKR CQVIYNGGIT GHEKELMFDA NFTFKEGEIV cyt19t RFVSATFRLF KHSKTGPTKR CQVIYNGGIT GHEKELMFDA NFTFKEGEIV 301 350 cyt19-WT EVDEETAAIL KNSRFAQDFL IRPIGEKLPT SGGCSALELK DIITDPFKLA cyt19t EVDEETAAIL KNSRFAQDFL IRPIGEKLPT SG AVLLWS *~ ~~~~~~~~~~ 351 376 cyt19-WT EESDSMKSRC VPDAAGGCCG TKKSC* cyt19t ~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~ Figure 2-3. Sequence alignment of cyt19-WT and cyt19t. (A) Nucleotide alignment of cyt19-WT and cyt19t sequence. The missense mutations are in red. The 5 cysteine residues which are not included in the cyt19t are highlighted in the cyt19-WT sequence.

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27 A. 1 50 5Â’RACE ~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~ AK057833 ACAGGAGCTG GCTGCGGGAG CCCGCCGTCC TGAGTCGCAG GCCGAGGAGA AF226730 ~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~ 51 100 5Â’RACE ~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~ ~~ A CAGG AGC T GG CTG C G G G AGCCCGC CG T AK057833 CAGTGAGTGC GCGCCCTGAG TCGCAGGCCG AGGAGACAGT GAGTGCGCGC AF226730 ~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~ ~~GAGACAGT GAGTGCGCGC 101 150 5Â’RACE CCTGAGTCGC AGGCCGAGGA GACAGTGAGT GCGCGCCCTG AGTCGCAGGC AK057833 CCTGAGTCGC AGGCCGAGGA GACAGTGAGT GCGCGCCCTG AGTCGCAGGC AF226730 CCTGAGTCGC AGGCCGAGGA GACAGTGAGT GCGCGCCCTG AGTCGCAGGC 151 200 5Â’RACE CGAGGAGACA TGGCTGCACT TCGTGACGCT GAGATACAGA AGGACGTGCA AK057833 CGAGGAGACA TGGCTGCACT TCGTGACGCT GAGATACAGA AGGACGTGCA AF226730 CGAGGAGACA TGGCTGCACT TCGTGACGCT GAGATACAGA AGGACGTGCA B. 1151 1200 3Â’RACE CTGGAGGCTG TTCTGCTTTG GAGTTAAAGG ATATAATCAC AGATCCATTT AK057833 CTGGAGGCTG TTCTGCTTTG GAGTTAAAGG ATATAATCAC AGATCCATTT AF226730 CTGGA.GCTG TTCTGCTTTG GAGT TAA AGG ATATAATCAC AGATCCATTT 1201 1250 3Â’RACE AAGCTTGCAG AAGAGTCTGA CAGTATGAAG TCCAGATGTG TCCCTGATGC AK057833 AAGCTTGCAG AAGAGTCTGA CAGTATGAAG TCCAGATGTG TCCCTGATGC AF226730 AAGCTTGCAG AAGAGTCTGA CAGTATGAAG TCCAGATGTG TCCCTGATGC 1251 1300 3Â’RACE TGCTGGAGGC TGCTGTGGCA CAAAGAAAAG CTGCTAAATC TATAGCCAAC AK057833 TGCTGGAGGC TGCTGTGGCA CAAAGAAAAG CTGC TAA ATC TATAGCCAAC AF226730 TGCTGGAGGC TGCTGTGGCA CAAAGAAAAG CTGCTAAATC TATAGCCAAC 1301 1350 3Â’RACE CAGGGGACCA CAGTAGTGGG CAAGAGTGAT CTGCATGTTT TTTAACCTGC AK057833 CAGGGGACCA CAGTAGTGGG CAAGAGTGAT CTGCATGTTT TTTAACCTGC AF226730 CAGGGGACCA CAGTAGTGGG CAAGAGTGAT CTGCATGTTT TTTAACCTGC Figure 2-4. Sequence alignments of the 5Â’ & 3Â’RACE-PCR products and the Genbank sequences (accession AK057833 and AF226730) (A) Sequence alignment of the 5Â’RACE-PCR product against the Genbank sequences. The mutations in the 5Â’RACE product are in red. The st art codon for all three sequences are highlighted. (B) Sequence alignment of the 3Â’RACE-PCR product and the Genbank sequences. The nucleotide deletion in the Genbank sequence, accession AF226730, is highlighted. The stop sites for the Genbank sequences are in red.

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28 Figure 2-5. Purification of r ecombinant human cyt19. Fractio ns were electrophoresed on a 10% polyacrylamide gel and stained. Lane1, molecular weight markers; Lane2, cell lysate; Lane3, flowthr ough, Lane4, Wash1, Lane5, Wash2, Lane6, Wash3, Lane7, Elution 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 215 k 120 k 84 k 60 k 39.2 k 28 k 18.3 k

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29 A. 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 1600 1800 050100150200250 AsIII (uM)Specific Activity (pmole/mg/min) cyt19-WT cyt19R81S B. 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 020040060080010001200 MMAV (uM)Specific Activity (pmole/mg/min) cyt19-WT cyt19R81S Figure 2-6. The effects of AsIII & MMAV concentrations. All in cubations were carried out at 37C for 30 min. in a final volum e of 250 l. A) Reaction mixtures contained 5 mM GSH, 1 mM DTT, 1 mM MgCl2, 13 pM [3H]SAM, 0.1 mM SAM, various [AsIII], and 5 g of cyt19, in 100 mM Tris/100 mM Na phosphate, pH 7.4 B) Same as B but with various [MMAv].

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30 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 56789101112 pHSpecific Activity (fmole/mg/min) cyt19-WT cyt19R81S Figure 2-7. The effect of pH on activity. All incubations were carried out at 37C for 30 min. in a final volume of 250 l. Reac tion mixtures contained 5 mM GSH, 1 mM DTT, 1 mM MgCl2, 13 pM [3H]SAM, 50 M AsIII, and 5 g of cyt19, in 100 mM Tris/100 mM Na phosphate of the appropriate pH. 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 5mM GSH5mM GSH+1mM DTT 1mM TCEP1mM TCEP+1mM GSH 1mM TCEP+5mM GSH ReductantsSpecific Activity (pmole/mg/min) cyt19-WT cyt19R81S N.D. Figure 2-8. The effects of reductants on met hylation activity. All incubations were carried out at 37C for 30 min. in a fina l volume of 250 l. Reaction mixtures contained 1 mM MgCl2, 13 pM [3H]SAM, 0.1 mM SAM, 50 M AsIII, and 5 g of cyt19-WT, in 100 mM Tris/1 00 mM Na phosphate, pH 7.4, with different reductants. The activity of cyt19R81S was not determined for 1 mM TCEP + 1 mM GSH.

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31 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 020040060080010001200 SAM (uM)Specific Activity (pmole/mg/min) Figure 2-9. The effect of SAM concentration on activity. All incuba tions were carried out at 37C for 30 min. in a final vol ume of 250 l. Reaction mixtures contained 5 mM GSH, 1 mM DTT, 1 mM MgCl2, 13 pM [3H]SAM, 50 M AsIII, and 5 g of cyt19-WT, in 100 mM Tris/100 mM Na phosphate pH 7.4. with various [SAM].

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32 A. AsIII0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 0510152025 Fraction NumberDPM B. MMAV0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 0510152025 Fraction NumberDPM Figure 2-10. Arsenical metabolites formed after incubation with [3H]SAM and cyt19 for 30 min at 37C. (A) Formation of MMA and DMA using AsIII as a substrate. (B) Formation of MMA and DMA using MMAV as the substrate.

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33 CHAPTER 3 IDENTIFICATION OF A SPLICE VARIA NT OF HUMAN CYT19 ARSENIC METHYLTRANSFERASE Introduction Arsenic (As) is a naturally occurring element and ranks 20th in abundance in the earthÂ’s crust [85]. Arsenic is present in the environment in both organic and inorganic forms and exists mainly in three valence st ates, -3, +3, and +5. Generally, inorganic arsenic (iAs) is the more toxic form and pe ople are exposed to iAs primarily through food and potable water. In Taiwan, Mexico, we stern United States, western South America, China, and Bangladesh, people are exposed to high levels of arsenic due to anthropogenic and/or natural contamination of potable wa ter [12, 62, 86]. In these areas, chronic exposure to arsenic is associ ated with various tumors o ccurring in skin, liver, lung, urinary bladder, and prostate [8, 87]. Once in the body, many mammals, incl uding humans, methylate iAs to monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimet hylarsinic acid (DMA) [49, 51, 54]. The biotransformation of iAs alternates between the reduction of arsenate (iAsV) to arsenite (iAsIII) followed by oxidative methylation (Figur e 1) [88, 89]. Because pentavalent methylated arsenicals are less toxic than inorganic arsenic, methylation has been considered a detoxification mechanism. Recen t studies indicate that trivalent methylated arsenicals may be more acutely toxic and genot oxic than iAs suggesting that methylation may actually be a bioactivation of iAs [ 20, 73, 74, 90]. For this reason the role of methylation in acute and chronic arsenic to xicity remains unclear. There is significant

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34 variation in human susceptibility to As i nduced toxicity, which may be related to differences in arsenic biotransformation be tween individuals [82]. Epidemiological studies have shown differences in the amount of MMA and DMA excreted in the urine of exposed populations which may be associated with genetic polymorphisms [62]. Cyt19 has been identified as a human S-adenosyl-L -methionine:arsenic methyltransferase [52, 55] however, only a few coding region polymor phisms have been detected which may alter the iAs methylation rate [ 65, 67]. In this study we iden tified an alternative splice variant of human cyt19, which contains an upstream open reading frame (uORF) followed by an internal start codon (AUG). Th is variant was expre ssed in 7 out of 7 human livers and represents another possibl e mechanism for regulating As methylation. Materials and Methods Molecular Cloning of cyt19 Splice Variants Total RNA was isolated from HepG2 cells and human liver samples using Trizol reagent according to the manufacturer’s inst ruction (Invitrogen, Carlsbad, USA). Total RNA was treated with DNase I using the DNAfree ™ kit from Ambion (Austin, TX) and cDNA was made using the RETROscript™ Kit for RT-PCR and 2 g of RNA as template (Ambion). HepG2 cDNA was pol ymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified using the following primers: forward primer (5’CACCATGGCTGCACTTCGTGACGCTGAGATACAG3’) and the reverse primer (5’TTAACTCCAAAGCAGAACAGCTCCAGATGT-3’). The PCR reaction consisted of 2.5 U of Pfu DNA polymerase, 0.4 M each primer, 5 l of the RT reaction, 0.2 mM dNTP mix, 5 l of 10X PCR Buffer, and nuclease-free water to 50 l. The PCR conditions were as follows: an initial denaturation at 94C for 2min, followed by 35 cycles of denaturation at 94C for 1min, annealing at 60C for 1min, extension for 72C

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35 for 2min 30s and a final extension at 72 C for 7min. The PCR products, designated cyt19 and cyt19 E2, were ligated into the pET100/ D-TOPO vector (Invitrogen) and transformed into competent Escherichia coli ( E. coli ) One Shot TOP10 chemically competent cells (Invitrogen). Ampicillin re sistant colonies were analyzed by PCR and visualized by agarose gel electrophoresis. Several clones cont aining inserts were sequenced by the DNA Sequencing Core Labor atory at the University of Florida. Human Liver Samples Human liver samples were obtained from Vitron (Tucson, AZ). All the tissues were from Caucasian males between the ages of 24 and 46. The tissues were preserved in Viaspan after death. The tissue samples were stored at -80C until use. All procedures using human samples were approved by the Inst itutional Review Board at the University of Florida and all identifying information has been removed. qPCR of cyt19 Splice Variants Total RNA was isolated and cDNA synthe sized as described above. Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) was carried out us ing a Bio-Rad iCycler with the following primers: cyt19 forward primer: (5Â’TTCGTGACGCTGAGATACAGAAG-3Â’); reverse primer: (5Â’-TGGAGGTCTGCCGATCTCTT-3Â’); cyt19 E2 forward primer: (5Â’GATACAGAAGGACGTGCAGATATTATG-3 Â’); reverse primer: (5Â’CCAGATCCAAAATCCAGCA GTT-3Â’). Each PCR reaction consisted of 12.5 l iTaq SYBR Green Supermix w ith ROX (Bio-rad), 0.4 M each primer, 5 l of the RT reaction, and RNase/DNase-free water to 25 l. The PCR cycling conditions included an initial denaturation of 95C for 3 min followed by cy cling at 95C for 15s, 60C for 45s for 45 cycles. The constructs, p ET100-cyt19 and pET100-cyt19 E2 were used to generate

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36 calibration curves for quantif ication of cyt19 and cyt19 E2. A melting curve analysis was performed after every run to determine product uniformity. Results When the full open reading frame of cyt19 was amplified using the primers described in Molecular Cloning of cyt19 splice variants under Materials & Methods, two products were generated, 1132 bp (cyt19) and 1005 bp (cyt19 E2) products (Figure 3-2). Sequencing of these two products revealed th at the 1132 bp product is the reference cyt19 while the 1005 bp product is a sp lice variant (Figure 3-3). The reference cyt19 mRNA is composed of 10 exons (Figure 3-4A) which encode a 375 amino acid protein with a theoretical molecular wei ght of 41.747 kDa (Figure 35). The product, cyt19 E2, is missing 128 bp due to a deletion of exon 2 which could result in a protein that is about 102 amino acids shorter and the creation of a short 24 amino acid peptide as a product from an upstream open reading frame (uORF) (Figure 3-3 & Figure 3-4B). This variant may encode a 273 amino acid polypeptide chain th at is identical to the reference cyt19 but lacks the first 102 amino acids present in th e reference (Figure 3-5). Analysis of the sequences surrounding the splice revealed that the splice occurs at conserved acceptor and donor sites (Figure 3-4C). The individua l information (Ri) technique and ShapiroÂ’s method were used to compare the splice-si tes strength of exon 3 and exon 2 of cyt19 [91]. Exon3, a constitutive exon has a str onger splice site comp ared to exon2, the alternative exon (Table 3-1). The steady state mRNA levels of each transc ript were determined in 7 human liver samples as well as in HepG2 cells by qPCR (T able 3-2). Expression of cyt19 mRNA in the human liver samples ranged from 410 04 7 to 610 26 1 copies per microgram of

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37 RNA. The cyt19 E2 splice variant was detected in all 7 human liver samples tested. (Table 3-2). The amount of cyt19 E2 mRNA was much lower than cyt19 mRNA ranging from 310 89 1 through 310 33 4 copies per microgram of RNA. The HepG2 cells had an average of 610 14 5 copies/g RNA and 410 55 8 copies/g RNA of cyt19 and cyt19 E2 mRNA, respectively. Discussion In this study, we identified an alternative splice variant of cyt19, which contains an uORF. The variant mRNA contains a shor t ORF followed by an internal AUG codon beginning 106bp downstream from the uORF (Figur e 3-3). While this alternative variant may encode a 273 amino acid protein it is unlikely that expression of the cyt19 E2 splice variant will result in produc tion of an active protein. Studies have shown that SAM dependent methyltransferases share 3 regions of sequence similarity (m otif I, II, and III) [92]. These motifs are found in the same or der on the polypeptide chain and separated by similar intervals [92]. It has been suggested that thes e conserved regions are important in SAM binding [92]. Mutations of a cons erved amino acid in rat guanidinoacetate methyltransferase near motif I have result ed in an inactive enzyme. In addition, mutations of motif II lead to reduced Kcat/Km values for substrates [93]. It is unlikely that the protein translated from cyt19 E2 would result in an active protein due to the removal of motif I (Figure 3-5). Whether the mRNA actually is translated into protein is not clear because the internal AUG codon contains a relatively weak Kozak sequence suggesting that translation may not reinitiate at the internal start codon. The sequence (GCCA/GCCATG G) is a consensus Kozak sequence fo r the initiation of translation in

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38 vertebrates [94, 95]. Deviation from the c onsensus sequence at position -3 and +4 would be considered a weak initiator codon. The cyt19 E2 transcript deviates from the consensus sequence at position +4; the variant contains an A instead of a G (Figure 3-3). It is also possible that cyt19 E2 will not be translated but that this variant is a substrate for the nonsense mediated decay (NMD) pathway due to the premature stop codon. NMD is a pathway that recognizes and quickly degrad es mRNAs containing premature translation termination codons (P TC) in eukaryotes [96]. While cyt19 E2 does contain a PTC, Zhang et al. identified a sequence motif which when present 3Â’ of a nonsense codon promotes rapid decay of the mRNA transcript by the NMD pathway [97]. This sequence motif (TGYYGA TGYYYYY) is not found in the cyt19 E2 mRNA transcript and it remains unclear if this variant will undergo degradation by the NMD pathway. The cyt19 E2 variant was present in all seven human liver samples tested, suggesting that cyt19 mRNA exists both in th e full length and alternatively spliced form in most individuals. The cyt19 E2 variant mRNA comprised 0.2 to 3.8% of the total cyt19 transcript. The liver samples had lo wer copy numbers per microgram of RNA of both reference and cyt19 E2 variants compared to HepG2 cells. It is possible that some degradation of cyt19 message occurred during collection and storage of the livers which reduced apparent copy number. Many mammalian species methylate arsenic through an enzymatic reaction that is performed by cyt19. There are significant va riations in the arsenic methylation capacity between species and within species including humans [58, 59, 62, 81]. The reason for this variation is uncl ear but has been attributed to cy t19 polymorphisms. However, only

PAGE 49

39 a few polymorphisms have been found in the coding region of cyt19 to date [65, 67], while the vast majority of mutations are found within the introns and the 5Â’ and 3Â’ untranslated region (UTR). Introns c ontain the acceptor site, branchpoint, polypyrimidine tract, and the donor site, wh ich are conserved se quences in which splicesome assembly occurs [70]. While muta tions within these sequence elements could alter the constitutive splicing of a gene [ 98-100], there are differences in arsenic methylation capacities among individuals, which are unlikely to be supported solely by polymorphisms within the cyt19 coding region. Alternative splicing is frequently used to regulate gene expres sion and to generate tissue-specific mRNA and protein isoforms [68, 69]. Thirty-five to 60% of human genes produce transcripts that are alternatively spli ced, in addition 70-90% of these variants alter the resulting protein products [101, 102] Further studies s hould analyze the mRNA expression levels of cyt19 splice variants in a larger number of fresh liver samples or primary hepatocytes and correlate it to arsenic methylation activity. In addition, work to determine if this transcript is a substrate for the NMD pathway or if a variant protein is expressed will help clarify the role of cyt19 E2 in human arsenic metabolism. Even though the splice variant comprises a relatively sm all fraction of the total cyt19 transcript in the livers tested it is possible that differe nt population groups have varying amounts of the cyt19 splice variant. It is al so likely that the level of cyt19 E2 in an individual will change over time as alternativ e splice selection can be controlled by many variables including developmental stage and xenobiotics [103, 104]. In conclusion, cyt19 appears to be alternatively spliced in many indivi duals and may play a role in the observed variation in arsenic methyl ation seen in individuals.

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40 Figure 3-1. The hypothesized scheme of iAs me thylation proposed by Cullen, McBride et al. 1984. Figure 3-2. PCR products of cyt19 amplifi cation. 1% Agarose DNA gel of cyt19 and cyt19 E2. 1 – Reduction step of As biotransformation 2 – O xidative meth y lation ste p of As biotransformation CH 3 AsIIIO2 2+ CH 3 + ( CH 3 ) 2AsvO2 -+ 2e( CH 3 ) 2AsIIIO2 1AsvO4 3+ 2eAsIIIO 3 3-+ CH 3 + CH 3 Asv O 3 2+ 2e1 2 1 cyt19 cyt19 E2 100 bp Ladder

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41 A. $ cyt19 E2 ATGGCTGCAC TTCGTGACGC TGAGATACAG AAGGACGTGC AG~~~~~~~~ cyt19 ATGGCTGCAC TTCGTGACGC TGAGATACAG AAGGACGTGC AGACCTACTA 50 cyt19 E2 ~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~ cyt19 CGGGCAGGTG CTGAAGAGAT CGGCAGACCT CCAGACCAAC GGCTGTGTCA 100 cyt19 E2 ~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~ cyt19 CCACAGCCAG GCCGGTCCCC AAGCACATCC GGGAAGCCTT GCAAAATGTA 150 cyt19 E2 ~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~ ATATTATGGC TGTGGTCTGG TGATCCCTGA cyt19 CACGAAGAAG TAGCCCTAAG ATATTATGGC TGTGGTCTGG TGATCCCTGA 200 cyt19 E2 GCATCTAGAA AACTGCTGGA TTTTGGATCT GGGTAGTGGA AGTGGCAGAG cyt19 GCATCTAGAA AACTGCTGGA TTTTGGATCT GGGTAGTGGA CGTGGCAGAG 250 cyt19 E2 ATTGCTATGT ACTTAGCCAG CTGGTTGGTG AAAAAGGACA CGTGACTGGA cyt19 ATTGCTATGT ACTTAGCCAG CTGGTTGGTG AAAAAGGACA CGTGACTGGA 300 + cyt19 E2 ATAGACATGA CCAAAGGCCA GGTGGAAGTG GCTGAAAAGT ATCTTGACTA cyt19 ATAGACATGA CCAAAGGCCA GGTGGAAGTG GCTGAAAAGT ATCTTGACTA 350 Figure 3-3. Alignment of the referen ce cyt19 nucleotide sequence and cyt19 E2. $ Represents the initial start codon. *R epresents the putative PTC which results due to the removal of exon 2. + Represen ts the putative downstream start site. The kozak sequence is underlined. The deviation from the kozak sequence at position +4 is highlighted in grey. Exon1 Exon2 Exon 3 Exon4

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42 Figure 3-4. cyt19 isoforms. (A) Diagram repr esenting the exonic regi ons of the wild-type cyt19 mRNA. The region in which th e alternative splicing occurs is demonstrated in greater detail. (B) Schematic representation of the two alternative splice variants, the refere nce or wild-type sequence, and the deletion of exon 2. The shaded box re presents the cassette exon. (C) The donor and acceptor site of the two alternative spli ce variants. The exonic nucleotides are capitalized while the accep tor and donor sites are in lower case letters.

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43 1 50 cyt19 MAALRDAEIQ KDVQTYYGQV LKRSADLQTN GCVTTARPVP KHIREALQNV cyt19 E2 ~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~ 51 100 cyt19 HEEVALRYYG CGLVIPEHLE NCWILDLGSG SG RDCYVLSQ LVGEKGHVTG cyt19 E2 ~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~ 101 150 cyt19 IDMTKGQVEV AEKYLDYHME KYGFQASNVT FIHGYIEKLG EAGIKNESHD cyt19 E2 ~~MTKGQVEV AEKYLDYHME KYGFQASNVT FIHGYIEKLG EAGIKNESHD 151 200 cyt19 IVVSNCVINL VPDKQQVLQE AYRVLKHGGE LYFSDVYTSL ELPEEIRTHK cyt19 E2 IVVSNCVINL VPDKQQVLQE AYRVLKHGGE LYFSDVYTSL ELPEEIRTHK 201 250 cyt19 VLWGECLGGA LYWKELAVLA QKIGFCPPRL VTANLITIQN KELERVIGDC cyt19 E2 VLWGECLGGA LYWKELAVLA QKIGFCPPRL VTANLITIQN KELERVIGDC 251 300 cyt19 RFVSATFRLF KHSKTGPTKR CQVIYNGGIT GHEKELMFDA NFTFKEGEIV cyt19 E2 RFVSATFRLF KHSKTGPTKR CQVIYNGGIT GHEKELMFDA NFTFKEGEIV 301 350 cyt19 EVDEETAAIL KNSRFAQDFL IRPIGEKLPT SGGCSALELK DIITDPFKLA cyt19 E2 EVDEETAAIL KNSRFAQDFL IRPIGEKLPT SGGCSALELK DIITDPFKLA 351 376 cyt19 EESDSMKSRC VPDAAGGCCG TKKSC* cyt19 E2 EESDSMKSRC VPDAAGGCCG TKKSC* Figure 3-5. Alignment of the reference cyt19 amino acid sequence and product of cyt19 E2 uORF. Consensus Motif I for SAM dependent methyltransferases is underlined.

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44 Table 3-1. The individual information and Sh apiroÂ’s score of cyt19 exon 2 and exon 3. Sequence Splice site ShapiroÂ’s method Ri, bits Exon 2a GACGCTGGGTCAGAAcceptor (-13 to +1)61.5 -1.9 AAGGTAGAGT Donor (-3 to +7) 72.0 5.5 Exon 3 TTCCATTTCCCAGA Acceptor (-13 to +1)84.8 9.5 CAGGTGAGGC Donor (-3 to +7) 88.1 7.4 a. Exon 2 is the alternative exon of cy t19 and exon 3 is the constitutive exon. Table 3-2. The amount of cyt19 and cyt19 E2 in different human liver samples and HepG2 cells. The percentage of cy19 E2 in each sample. Samples cyt19 (copies/g RNA) cyt19 E2 (copies/g RNA) %cyt19 E2a HL-541 6 610 49 0 10 21 1 3 310 14 1 10 25 3 0.27 HL-546 5 510 35 0 10 22 1 3 310 89 0 10 55 3 2.83 HL-611 4 410 91 3 10 04 7 3 310 45 1 10 89 1 2.61 HL-612 5 510 78 1 10 89 7 3 310 70 2 10 63 3 0.46 HL-656 5 510 44 0 10 09 1 3 310 69 0 10 33 4 3.84 HL-710 5 510 64 2 10 40 8 3 310 06 1 10 95 3 0.47 HL-714 6 610 42 0 10 26 1 3 310 23 1 10 22 3 0.26 HepG2 cells 6 610 08 1 10 14 5 4 410 42 6 10 55 8 1.64 a. The percentage of cyt19 E2 is calculated by dividing the copies/g of RNA for each sample by the total copies of both transcripts for each sample (cyt19 E2/(cyt19 + cyt19 E2)*100).

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45 CHAPTER 4 GENERAL CONCLUSIONS The first study showed that cyt19 is an ar senic methyltransferase. In addition, we have demonstrated that this enzyme does both methylation steps involved in arsenic biotransformation seen in humans. We also s howed that the C-terminus is critical in the activity of the protein. In other SAM-dependent methyltransferases, the C-terminus is important in substrate binding. This indicates that the cysteine rich C-terminus is important for As binding and critical for activ ity. Others have shown that mutations can change the methylation capacity of the protei n. Here, we demons trated that a single mutation can drastically change the activity of the protein even though we believed that the amino acid change would not have a si gnificant effect on the activity of the recombinant protein. This change occurs in motif I of the SAM-binding site which might inhibit its ability to bind SAM therefore decr easing its activity. The mutation appears to cause a change in the substrate affinity of the proteins as well as cause different methylation profiles specifically for arsenite. However, the Vmax values of both cyt19WT and cyt19R81S are considerably higher th an that seen among other mammals such as the hamster, rabbit, and rhesus monkey. Th e kinetic analysis of these proteins may explain the high levels of MMA excreted in human urine. Po ssibly, arsenite is converted very quickly to MMA, allowing it to accumulate before the dimethylation step resulting in the higher excretion of MMA seen in human s. The human arsenic methyltransferase did have some similarities with the other ma mmalian arsenic methyltransferases. These arsenic methyltransferases have been shown to increase in activity at basic pHs which

PAGE 56

46 may be due to the deprotonation of cysteines at higher pHs, which in creases the rate of binding between arsenic and cysteines in th e substrate binding domain. Our results demonstrate that only a strong reductant is n ecessary for methylation of arsenic by cyt19, however, the addition of GSH appears to incr ease the activity above the reductant alone. The second study introduced another possi ble explanation for the variability in arsenic methylation capacities among individu als, alternative splic ing. Alternative splicing is frequently used to regulate gene expression and to gene rate tissue-specific mRNA and protein isoforms. Thirty-five to 60% of human genes produce transcripts that are alternatively spliced, in addition 70-90% of these variants alter the resulting protein products. In this study we identified an al ternative splice varian t of the human cyt19 (cyt19 E2), in which exon 2 is removed creating a bicistronic transcript. The cyt19 E2 variant was present in all seven human liver samples tested, suggesting that cyt19 mRNA exists both in the full length and in alternatively spliced forms in most individuals. It is unlikely that this variant woul d result in expression of an active protein. Studies have shown that SAM dependent met hyltransferases share 3 regions of sequence similarity (motif I, II, and III). It has been suggeste d that these conserved re gions are important in SAM binding. Therefore, it is unlikely that the protei n translated from cyt19 E2 would result in an active protein due to the removal of exon 2 which cotains motif I. Whether the mRNA actually is translated into protein has not been determined. The majority of mutations discovered within the cyt19 gene occur within the intron or untranslated regions [66, 67]. In fact, only 4 mutations have been found within the coding region. Introns contain sequence elements in whic h splicesome assembly occurs [66, 67]. Mutations within these elements could alter the constitutive splicing of a gene.

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47 Future studies should focus on isolating the human AS3MT from human livers. To this date, preparations from human liver s, cytosolic or homogenates have shown no activity in arsenic methylation. Reasons for th is may be due to inhi bitory factors present in the liver preparation or the process of ma king the preparations may render the protein inactive. Yet another explanation may be due to the possibility that cyt19 is an inducible protein. Perhaps the average daily exposure does not cause high leve ls of expression of the protein, making it difficult to purify from liver samples. It may be beneficial to attempt protein purification from known highe r than normal arsenic exposed populations. Perhaps populations exposed to higher than normal levels have reached a threshold of exposure resulting in higher expression leve ls of cyt19. Another possibility for purification of cyt19 from normally exposed populations may be by immunoprecipitation from human liver preparations using an an tibody which is highly selective for cyt19. Further studies should analyze the mR NA expression levels of cyt19 splice variants in a larger number of fresh liver sa mples or primary hepatocytes and correlate it to arsenic methylation activity. In addition, work to determine if this transcript is a substrate for the NMD pathway or if a variant protein is expressed will help clarify the role of cyt19 E2 in human arsenic metabolism. In addition, more investigations should look at mutations within the in tron of cyt19 and determine if these alter splic ing events. Another important study would be to establis h a method to test exposed populations at both the mRNA and protein levels of cyt19. This study would help determine vulnerable individuals in high arsenic exposed populations Finally, the ultimat e question which still remains unanswered: is arsenic methylation a bioactivation or detoxi fication mechanism.

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48 If time and funding were not a factor, I woul d enjoy working on solving these different unanswered questions which may help iden tifying possible vulnerable populations.

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49 APPENDIX ROLE OF CYT19 IN ACUTE ARSENIC TO XICITY. IS CYT19 THE ONLY HUMAN ARSENIC METHYLTRANSFERASE? While my work has clearly demonstr ated that cyt19 is a human arsenic methyltransferase, it is not clear that it is th e only arsenic methyltransferase in humans. In order to address this question, it is necessa ry to: 1) alter the expr ession of cyt19 and 2) have the ability to measure cyt19 protein leve ls. The first challenge was addressed by the use of small interfering RNA (siRNA) to reduce the expression of cyt19. The second challenge was addressed by developing an antibody specific for human cyt19. Small RNAs can theoretically be used to reduce the expression of any target gene. There are two main categories of small R NA, microRNA (miRNA) and siRNA. These small RNA have natural functions such as de fense from viral and transposon invasion as well as gene regulation. Scientists have used this new technology for several reasons such as determination of gene function, valida ting drug targets, and treatment of diseases. Small RNAs have two mechanisms by which protei n translation is inhibited. If the small RNA is 100% homologous to its mRNA target it results in degrada tion of the mRNA. However, if the small RNA is not 100% iden tical to its mRNA target it results in inhibition of translation w ithout mRNA degradation [105]. Materials and Methods Multiple siRNAs were designed and synthesized according to the Silencer™ siRNA Construction Kit (Ambion) Forty-five thousand HepG 2 cells were plated on a 24 well plate in normal growth media overnight and transfected in duplicates with the

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50 appropriate siRNA according to Silencer™ siRNA Trasnfection Kit. Total RNA was isolated 2 days after transf ection. The most efficient siRNA was assessed by measuring the mRNA levels of cyt19 normalized to RNA polymerase II (RPII) by quantitative PCR (qPCR). Once the most efficient siRNA is de termined, further optimization steps can be taken such as cell plating density, transf ection agent, and siRNA amount. The siRNA pool was further optimized in a 96-well plate using 16,000 cells per well and assayed. The mRNA levels were measured by qPCR as above, and the viability was determined by the XTT assay. GAPDH was used as negative control. An antibody to cyt19 was developed in rabbits by sending purified recombinant cyt19 to Cocalico. The antibody specificity was determined from western blots of purified protein and HepG2 cell extracts. To increase the specificity of the antibody, it was affinity purified using the AminoLink Kit (Pierce) according the manufacturer’s instructions. Briefly, the purified cyt19 protein was coupled to the gel followed by affinity purification. Results and Discussion cyt19 mRNA Knockdown by siRNA Three different siRNAs were designed (T able 1). The efficiency of all three siRNAs as well as a pool of the three siR NAs was determined (Figure 1). The data demonstrates that the knockdown was succe ssful with the pool of siRNAs, however further optimization is still required. It appe ars that the first three siRNAs had no effect on the cyt19 mRNA levels. The pool of a ll three siRNAs appear s to knockdown cyt19 mRNA levels by about 26%, relative to c ontrol. The second attempt at cyt19 mRNA knockdown demonstrated that 16,000 cells pe r well in a 96-well plate resulted in a greater knockdown of cyt19 mRNA of about 40% compared to 45,000 cells used in the

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51 first attempt (Figure 2). It appears that cyt19 mRNA levels might have been slightly reduced in the negative control. In additi on, the siRNA transfection did not result in a decrease of viability relative to control (F igure 3). The data demonstrates that the optimal cell density and the tran sfection agent are important to optimize. Taken together the results suggest that the concentration of the siRNA requires further optimization or perhaps new siRNAs can be designed and tested. Antibody Specificity and Purification Crude antiserum was shown to be able to detect the antigen up to about 25 ng (Figure 4). The antibody was not able to detect cyt19 in any of the human liver cytosol preparations tested. In add ition, the antibody appears not to be very specific (Figure 5). Once purified, the antibody was characterized and found to be able to detect the antigen up to about 40 ng (Figure 6). The specificity of the antibody was increased dramatically and is able to detect cyt19 in all tested human liver samples and in HepG2 cytosol tested (Figure 7). In order to determine if the antibody is in fact reco gnizing cyt19 in these cytosol preparations, the protein must be immunoprecipita ted and sequenced. Future Experiments Further studies are needed in order to better understand th e role of arsenic methylation in acute human arsenic exposures However, two very important steps in answering this question have been addresse d, knockdown of cyt19 and the ability to measure cyt19 protein levels through antibody specificity. We have to determine the correlation between mRNA levels and protein levels. It may be possible to knockdown the mRNA levels without affecting the protein levels if the protein has a long half-life. The opposite may be true as well, we may not see much affect in the mRNA levels but the siRNA may be able to suppress protein expression thereby reduc ing methylation.

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52 Once we prove the protein levels are down, we can determine the effects of As exposure as well as determine if cyt19 is the only arsenic methyltransferase in humans.

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53 Table A-1. Sequence of double stranded siRNA siRNA 1: 5Â’-CAU U GA GAA GUU GGC AGA GUU-3Â’ 3Â’-UU GUA ACU CUU CAA CCG UCU C-5Â’ siRNA 2: 5Â’-UGU GA C UUU UUU CC A UGG CUU-3Â’ 3Â’-UU AC A CUC AAA AAA GGU ACC G-5Â’ siRNA3: 5Â’-GUU GG C AGA GGC UGG AAU CUU-3Â’ 3Â’-UU CAA CCG UCU CCG ACC UUA G-5Â’

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54 cyt19 mRNA Knockdown0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 siRNA1siRNA2siRNA3siRNApRelative cyt19 mRNA L evels Figure A-1. Determination of the most efficient siRNA in the knockdown of cyt19 mRNA levels assayed by qPCR. cyt19 mRNA Knockdown0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 1.2 1.4 GAPDH-siRNA poolRelative cyt19 mRNA Levels Figure A-2. The siRNA pool knockdown of cyt19 mRNA relative to control.

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55 Cytotoxic Assay 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 CONTROLGAPDH-cyt19p% of Control Viabilit y Figure A-3. Determination of cell viabil ity after siRNA knockdown by the XTT assay. Figure A-4. Western blot of the specificity of the crude antisera to the antigen, purified cyt19 protein. Figure A-5. Western blot of th e specificity of the crude antisera to cyt19 in human liver cytosolic preparations. 1) HL-93-F6; 2) HL-93-F7; 3) HL-94-F4; 4) HL-9721; 5) purified cyt19. 1 4 5 3 2 25ng 50ng 100ng 200ng300ng

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56 Figure A-6. Western blot of the specific ity of the purified an tibody to the antigen, purified cyt19 protein. Figure A-7. Western blot of th e specificity of the crude antisera to cyt19 in human liver cytosolic preparations. 1) HL-97-21; 2) HL-H-F6; 3) HL-93-F7; 4) HL-94F4; 5) HL-714 6) HeG2 cytosol 7) purified cyt19. 40ng 125ng 60ng 250ng500ng1 3 2 4 5 7 6

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57 LIST OF REFERENCES 1. NAS, Arsenic: Medical and Biologic Effe cts of Environmental Pollutants. 1977, Washington, D.C. 2. Maher, WA, The Presence of Arsenobetaine in Marine Animals. Comp Biochem Physiol C, 1985. 80(1): p. 199-201. 3. ATSDR, Toxicological Profile for Arseni c (Draft for Public Comment). 2005, Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Hea lth and Human Services, Public Health Service. 4. Brooks, WE. Arsenic. U.S. Geological Survey, Mineral Commodity Studies. 2005 [accessed 2006 April]; Available from: http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/commodity/arsenic/arsenmcs05.pdf 5. Jelinek, CF and Corneliussen, PE, Levels of Arsenic in the United States Food Supply. Environ Health Perspect, 1977. 19: p. 83-7. 6. Aronson, SM, Arsenic and Old Myths. R I Med, 1994. 77(7): p. 233-4. 7. Miller, WH, Jr., Schipper, HM, L ee, JS, Singer, J, and Waxman, S, Mechanisms of Action of Arsenic Trioxide. Cancer Res, 2002. 62(14): p. 3893-903. 8. Abernathy, CO, Thomas, DJ, and Calderon, RL, Health Effects and Risk Assessment of Arsenic. J Nutr, 2003. 133(5 Suppl 1): p. 1536S-8S. 9. EPA. Arsenic Treatment Technologies for Soil, Waste, and Water. 2002 [cited 2006 March 2]. 10. NRC, Arsenic in Drinking Water. 2001, Washington, DC: National Academy Press. 11. Chowdhury, UK, Biswas, BK, Chowdhury, TR, Samanta, G, Mandal, BK, Basu, GC, Chanda, CR, Lodh, D, Saha, KC, Mukherjee, SK, Roy, S, Kabir, S, Quamruzzaman, Q, and Chakraborti, D, Groundwater Arsenic Contamination in Bangladesh and West Bengal, India. Environ Health Perspect, 2000. 108(5): p. 393-7.

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59 23. Ray, BD, Moore, JM, and Rao, BD, 31p Nmr Studies of Enzyme-Bound Substrate Complexes of Yeast 3-Phosphoglycerate Kinase: Iii. Two Adp Binding Sites and Their Mg(Ii) Affinity; Effects of Vanadate and Arsenate on Enzymic Complexes with Adp and 3-P-Glycerate. J Inorg Biochem, 1990. 40(1): p. 47-57. 24. Wei, M, Wanibuchi, H, Morimura, K, Iwai, S, Yoshida, K, Endo, G, Nakae, D, and Fukushima, S, Carcinogenicity of Dimethylarsi nic Acid in Male F344 Rats and Genetic Alterations in I nduced Urinary Bladder Tumors. Carcinogenesis, 2002. 23(8): p. 1387-97. 25. Waalkes, MP, Ward, JM, Liu, J, and Diwan, BA, Transplacental Carcinogenicity of Inorganic Arsenic in the Drinking Wa ter: Induction of Hepatic, Ovarian, Pulmonary, and Adrenal Tumors in Mice. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol, 2003. 186(1): p. 7-17. 26. Wanibuchi, H, Salim, EI, Kinoshita, A, Shen, J, Wei, M, Morimura, K, Yoshida, K, Kuroda, K, Endo, G, and Fukushima, S, Understanding Arsenic Carcinogenicity by the Use of Animal Models. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol, 2004. 198(3): p. 366-76. 27. Zhao, CQ, Young, MR, Diwan, BA Coogan, TP, and Waalkes, MP, Association of Arsenic-Induced Malignant Transfo rmation with DNA Hypomethylation and Aberrant Gene Expression. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, 1997. 94(20): p. 10907-12. 28. Chen, H, Li, S, Liu, J, Diwan, BA, Barrett, JC, and Waalkes, MP, Chronic Inorganic Arsenic Exposure Induces Hepatic Global and Individual Gene Hypomethylation: Implications fo r Arsenic Hepatocarcinogenesis. Carcinogenesis, 2004. 25(9): p. 1779-86. 29. Tully, DB, Collins, BJ, Overstreet, JD, Smith, CS, Dinse, GE, Mumtaz, MM, and Chapin, RE, Effects of Arsenic, Cadmium, Chromium, and Lead on Gene Expression Regulated by a Battery of 13 Different Promoters in Recombinant Hepg2 Cells. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol, 2000. 168(2): p. 79-90. 30. Binet, F, Cavalli, H, Moisan, E, and Girard, D, Arsenic Trioxide (at) Is a Novel Human Neutrophil Pro-Apoptotic Agent: Effects of Catalase on at-Induced Apoptosis, Degradation of Cytoskeletal Pr oteins and De Novo Protein Synthesis. Br J Haematol, 2006. 132(3): p. 349-58. 31. Yamanaka, K, Kato, K, Mizoi, M, An, Y, Takabayashi, F, Nakano, M, Hoshino, M, and Okada, S, The Role of Active Arsenic Species Produced by Metabolic Reduction of Dimethylarsinic Acid in Genotoxicity and Tumorigenesis. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol, 2004. 198(3): p. 385-93. 32. Cullen, WR, McBride, BC, and Reglinski, J, The Reduction of Trimethylarsine Oxide to Trimethylarsine by Thiols: A Mechanistic Model for the Biological Reduction of Arsenicals. Journal of Inorganic Biochemistry, 1984. 21(1): p. 45.

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67 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH Alex J. McNally is the youngest so n of Eduaurdo and Ligia McNally, who immigrated from Managua, Nicaragua. He wa s born on April 6, 1980, in Miami, FL. He was raised in Hialeah, FL, where he attend ed North Miami Senior High and graduated with honors on May 1998. He then attended th e University of Florida where he dualed major in animal science and microbiology and cell science. He further enhanced his undergraduate experience working as a student lab assistant at the Un iversity of Florida microbiology and cell science building. He worked with cloning arogenate dehydrogenase from Arabidopsis thaliana under the guidanc e of Dr. Carol Bonner and Dr. Nemat Keyhani. After earning his Bach elor of Science, on August 2003, Alex continued his graduate studies at the Universi ty of Florida, pursui ng a Master of Science specializing in toxicology in May of 2004. He emphasized his graduate research on the characterization of cyt19, an arsenic methy ltransferase, under the guidance of Dr. David S. Barber. He now plans to pursue a caree r in a research laboratory where he can enhance his knowledge and practical experience.