Citation
Ventian Bay Town and Country Club

Material Information

Title:
Ventian Bay Town and Country Club New Smyrna Beach, Florida
Creator:
Lee, Judd
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publisher:
College of Design, Construction and Planning
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2004
Language:
English
Physical Description:
75 leaves : ill.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Constructed wetlands ( jstor )
Planting ( jstor )
Recycling ( jstor )
Retirement communities ( jstor )
Roads ( jstor )
Soils ( jstor )
Stormwater ( jstor )
Surface runoff ( jstor )
Watersheds ( jstor )
Wetlands ( jstor )
Landscape architecture
Venetian Bay ( local )
Genre:
bibliography ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Venetian Bay

Notes

Abstract:
As each season passes in Florida, more people move towards the countryside. the fields and forests are changed into neighborhoods, roads, shopping malls, and other development. These developments are often times negligent of the well being of the environment in an effort to be efficient and timely in their construction. The truth is, development must take place in order to support the ever-growing population. Venetian Bay is a project that showcases environmentally friendly development. a style of development that does not compromise the integrity of the environment to make a quick buck. This style of development involves creating more open space by introducing alternative housing types. This style of development involves cleansing stormwater runoff before it reaches adjacent water bodies through the introduction of treatment wetlands. this style of development encourages homeowners to be ecologically smart with their homes by using waterwise landscaping and other "green techniques". Venetian Bay embraces the environment in which it resides and strives to improve its quality.
General Note:
Advisor(s): Not listed.
General Note:
Landscape Architecture capstone project.
General Note:
"This project was prepared for: Zev Cohen and Associates..."
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographic references (75).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
003172261 ( AlephBibNum )
905902109 ( OCLC )

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Full Text



VENETIAN BAY TOWN AND COUNTRY CLUB


. / *


Judd Lee


University of Florida
Department of Landscape Architecture
Senior Capstone Project
Spring 2004










This project was prepared for:

Zev Cohen and Associates
55 Seton Trail
Ormond Beach, FL 32176

Paul Momberger, Director of
Planning and Landscape Architecture


This project was prepared by:

Judd Lee
Department of Landscape Architecture
College of Design, Construction, and Planning
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida 32611


Spring 2004














Acknowledgements









Thanks to all my family and friends over the years, for always
believing in me; to the good friends I've had and the good friends
I've lost along the way; to Bob Lee for many thought provoking
conversations; to Martha Winder for contributing to my creativity;
to my faculty for pushing me to heights I didn't know I could reach;
to my studio family for helping me to be the best I could be; and
most of all, my Lord Jesus Christ for always showing me the way.




"In this bright future, you can't forget your past."
- Bob Marley












TABLE OF CONTENTS PG.

1. INTRODUCTION
SCOPE OF PROJECT 1
LIMITATIONS, DELIMITATIONS, AND ASSUMPTIONS 2
PROJECT INTRODUCTION 3
SITE LOCATION 4
GOALS AND OBJECTIVES 5-6
PROGRAM ELEMENTS 7
PRECEDENTS 8

II. INVENTORY ANALYSIS
POST DESIGN EVALUATION 9-10
HISTORICAL
REGIONAL 11-12
CONTEXT
LANDUSE/ ZONING 13
SURROUNDING LAND USES 14
EXISTING/ PROPOSED CIRCULATION 15
ENVIRONMENTAL
VEGETATION 16-17
SOILS 18-20
TOPOGRAPHY 21
HYDROLOGY (FLOW) 22
USER ANALYSIS 23

III. SYNTHESIS
ANALYSIS SYNTHESIS 24

IV. CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT
CONCEPT INTRODUCTION 25
ECOLOGICAL CONCEPT PLAN 26
NEIGHBORHOOD CONCEPT PLAN 27
FINAL CONCEPT 28

V. ARCHITECTURE 29-32

VI. CONCEPTUAL STORMWATER MANAGEMENT PLAN
STORMWATER PLAN 33
INTRODUCTION, CALCULATIONS, AND DETAILS 34-47

VII. MASTER PLAN
SITE MASTER PLAN 48
ILLUSTRATIVE ENLARGEMENTS AND SECTIONS 49-53
DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 53-64

VIII. STORMWATER WETLAND MANAGEMENT AND DESIGN GUIDELINES 65-68

IX. MANAGEMENT AND PLANTING
CONCEPTUAL WETLANDS MANAGEMENT PLAN 69
LIST OF APPROVED PLANTS 70-71
WETLAND AND BUFFER SECTIONS 72-73

X. CONCLUSION 74

XI. REFERENCES 75

APPENDIX A 76-87


APPENDIX B





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SCOPE OF PROJECT


Included here is the scope of work to be addressed in this capstone project regarding Venetian Bay
Town and Country Club.

* Residential Design and Layout
* Conceptual Roadway Design and Layout
* Conceptual Stormwater Management Plan
* Architecture
* Conceptual Planting Plans
- Wetlands
- Typical Housing Units
* Site Trail System


Not included in the scope of this project is the golf course design and development, as well as the
Village Center design and development.









LIMITATIONS, DELIMITATIONS, AND ASSUMPTIONS


Limitations:

*The main site road that cuts through the site has already been installed, therefore, it placement and
alignment cannot be altered.

Delimitations:

*This project will not address the golf course design and layout. There will be an area reserved for the
golf course on the plan, but there will be no design development at this time.

* The Village Center has been designed and developed previously by Zev Cohen and Associates, this
design will be accepted and used as is.

Assumptions:

It is assumed that the current proposed plan has been designed without taking into consideration the
site's capabilities. Traditional development techniques will not be adequate for this sensitive site.










PROJECT INTRODUCTION


As each season passes in Florida,
more people move towards the
countryside. The fields and forests
are changed into neighborhoods,
roads, shopping malls, and other
development. These developments
are often times negilgent of the
well being of the environment in
an effort to be efficient and timely
in their construction. The truth is,
development must take place in
order to support the ever-growing
population. Venetian Bay is a
project that showcases environ-
mentally friendly development. A
style of development that does not
compromise the integrity of the
environment to make a quick buck.
This style of development involves
creating more open space by
introducing alternative housing
types. This style of development
involves cleansing stormwater
runoff before it reaches adjacent
water bodies through the introduc-
tion of treatment wetlands. This
style of development encourages
homeowners to be ecologically
smart with their homes by using
waterwise landscaping and other
"green techniques." Venetian Bay
embraces the environment in
which it resides and strives to
improve its quality.











SITE LOCATION


Ajj
� : I


VENETIAN BAY TOWN AND COUNTRY CLUB IS LOCATED
IN NEW SMYRNA BEACH, FLORIDA. NEW SMYRNA
BEACH IS FOUND IN EASTERN VOLUSIA COUNTY. 1-95
RUNS JUST EAST OF THE SITE AND SR 44 BORDERS
THE SITE TO THE SOUTH.


L 0











GOALS AND OBJECTIVES


OPEN SPACE

PROVIDE ADEQUATE BUFFERS BETWEEN RESIDENTIAL AREAS AND ROADWAYS.

ALLOW FOR STORMWATER MANAGEMENT TO BE A MAJOR FACTOR IN THE DESIGN OF
SPACE.

FORM A STRONG CONNECTION BETWEEN THE ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS CORRIDOR
AND THE OPEN SPACE PROVIDED.

PROVIDE OPEN SPACE THAT CAN BE USED FOR RECREATION AS WELL AS IMPROVE
TH E ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ON SITE.



TRANSPORTATION

PROVIDE FUTURE CONNECTIONS TO ADJACENT PARCELS THAT ARE PLANNED FOR
DEVELOPMENT.

PROVIDE SAFE, PEDESTRIAN ACCESS ROUTES TO OPEN SPACE AND PROPOSED
FACILITIES.

PROVIDE PEDESTRIAN ORIENTED STREETS.



RESIDENTIAL/COMMERCIAL

CREATE A WALKABLE COMMUNITY BY LOCATING RESIDENTIAL ADJACENT TO OPEN
SPACE.

PROVIDE COMMERCIAL ACTIVITIES SUCH AS A SMALL GROCERY STORE AND A GARDEN
CENTER.


VISITOR APPEAL

EDUCATE TO SHOWCASE THE SUCCESS OF THE STORMWATER MANAGEMENT ON SITE
AS WELL AS PROVIDING ACCESS TO THE ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS CORRIDOR.



ECONOMICS

PROVIDE A DEVELOPMENT PLAN THAT IS ECONOMICALLY EQUAL TO OR BETTER THAN
THE CURRENT PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT PLAN CONSIDERING THE COST/BENEFIT RATIO.











GOALS AND OBJECTIVES (CONT.)


ECOLOGY

IMPROVE THE WATER QUALITY OF THE SPRUCE CREEK RIVER THROUGH EFFECTIVE
STORMWATER MANAGEMENT.

UTILIZE WATERWISE LANDSCAPING PRINCIPLES IN RESIDENTIAL AREAS.

PROVIDE DIVERSE HABITAT TO ENRICH THE ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND INTEGRITY
OF THE SITE.

REDUCE THE AMOUNTS OF PLANT MAINTENANCE REQUIRED, AS WELL AS PESTICIDES
AND FERTILIZERS USED ON SITE.

REDUCE IMPERVIOUS SURFACES AND STORMWATER RUNOFF BY PROMOTING INFILTRATION
AND RETENTION.










PROGRAM


Venetian Bay Town and Country Club is proposed to include an 18 hole golf course, residential
housing, a new urbanist town center with commercial and multi family housing, and two neighbor-
hood parks. This site has been chosen by the developers due to the projected growth of the city of
New Smyrna Beach and the city of Port Orange.




Initial Program:

-Ecology-
* System of stormwater treatment wetlands that enhance water quality.
* Diverse habitat to enrich and enhance environmental quality and integrity of the site.
* Waterwise landscaping throughout the site.
* Site plantings are to be primarily only native plant types.
* Allow hydrology to naturally run its course on site.

-Housing-
* Housing types that increase density in order to provide more open space. Densities ranging from
6-10 units per acre.
* Intimate and personal neighborhoods to promote interaction and territoriality.
* Safe walkable streets through the use of buffers and an adequate trail system

-Transportation-
* Neighborhood streets that have low traffic volume.
* Safe and Adequate pedestrian and bike trail system throughout the site.
* Pedestrian oriented streets
* Connect trail system to existing regional trail on site
* Street connections to adjacent future development sites.
* Well organized neighborhood layout for ease of wayfinding
* Adequate buffers between roadways and residential

-Amenities-
* Recreational trail system
* Community native plant garden center
* Small commercial opportunities (i.e. small grocery store)
* Individual neighborhood parks and playgrounds
* Community open space










PRECEDENTS


Prairie Crossing- NW of Chicago, illinois


Prairie Crossing is an ecologically conscious housing
development that is beginning to mature just west of
Chicago. Its workings include farmland preservation,
prairie and wetland restoration, an organic farm, on site
stormwater treatment, and a plan for mixed use, transit
oriented development.


Prairie Crossing's conservation approach includes front yards
planted with flowers and grasses native to the Illinois prairie.
The site plan uses extensive open space to knit together the
various parts of the community. The paths throughout
Prairie Crossing, part of a regional trail system, link residents
to lakes, prairies, and meadows and to Liberty Prairie
Preserve.


"IT


Each house at Prairie Crossing borders open space.
Some houses border wetlands that filter runoff before
it goes into Lake Aldo Leopold and to the adjoining
ponds. Smaller front yard setbacks and houses with
smaller footprints as well as alley access to garages
characterize the compact 103 house Station Village.




8


Source: Landscape Architecture magazine








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INVENTORY ANALYSIS

POST DESIGN EVALUATION



1. Soils:
There is a high percentage of the proposed residential development planned to be placed on Scoggin sand
which has standing water during the rainy season and is found in swamps. This soil has a low potential for community
development. These residential sites need to be moved to a more suitable soil.


2. Stormwater:
The proposed stormwater basins lack aesthetic quality or ecologically functionality. Currently, the retention
basins are the typical engineered basins. The basins are very inorganic in shape, with the standard uniform bank slope.
Proposed basins do not promote plant growth and are not going to be capable of cleansing the water adequately before
it enters the Spruce Creek River. The locations and types of stormwater basins are ill suited for this site. The fact that
Venetian Bay is adjacent to an environmental systems corridor and contributes to the headwaters of the Spruce Creek
River make it imperative that an active approach be taken in regards to stormwater. This can be accomplished through
treatment wetlands with proper placement with respect to the site's natural hydrology.


3. Surface Water Flow:
Natural hydrology and water flow on site is from east to west. This presents a problem in that all development
on site is on the eastern side, while the environmental systems corridor is on the western side. The problem would be
that all stormwater runs into the environmental systems corridor with no opportunity to be cleansed first with treatment
wetlands. A series of strategic treatment wetlands could adequately serve as a buffer.


4. Access to Mixed Use/ Circulation
Venetian Bay claims to be a New Urbanist community with mixed use town center. There are some flaws in
the proposed concepts in regards to New Urbanist concepts. In order for a resident to access the mixed use town
center they must use their vehicle due to lack of a pedestrian and bicycle friendly sidewalk and trail system. This can
present a major problem because it creates a ripple effect in that it requires more land to be devoted to parking, consum-
ing potential open space.


5. Architecture/ Density:
The site consists of single family residential homesites. The homes are to be the typical concrete block. Lot
size varies depending upon which area of the development the home is in. The lots range from 50' x 120' to 100' x
130'. There are a total of 563 lots in the study area of this project. The proposed density ranges from 2.8 to 0.8. There
is an opportunity to propose some varied housing types and increase density to free up land for open space and
wetlands.



*See Following Graphic for proposed Site Plan.










INVENTORY ANALYSIS

POST DESIGN EVALUATION


Proposed Site Plan- Zev Cohen and Associates


WETLAND/ HYDRIC SOILS


D SOILS CAPABLE OF SUPPORTING DEVELOPMENT IN
THEIR CURRENT STATE
E SOILS UNSUITABLE FOR DEVELOPMENT WITHOUT
INTRODUCING ALTERNATIVE FOUNDATIONS, SUITABLE
FOR OPEN SPACE










INVENTORY ANALYSIS

REGIONAL HISTORY










The site for this project forms the headwaters of the Spruce Creek River. This river is one of the most important
rivers for preservation in the State of Florida due to it's natural and cultural value.
Physically, Spruce Creek is a unique, natural blackwater stream that courses through the Spruce Creek Basin. There
are few examples of this type of river left undisturbed in Florida. The term "blackwater" refers to the tannic acid
staining caused by the swampy vegetation in the low-lying upper reaches of the creek.. The navigable portion of the
river itself begins as a shallow cypress swamp some 10 miles upstream from its' confluence with the Halifax river.
This swamp gives way to a narrow stream that very gradually broadens downstream into Strickland Bay. As the river
courses towards the coast, the associated aquatic habitats gradually change from typical freshwater hardwood
swamp to freshwater marsh to saltwater marsh and mangrove swamp in a classic estaurine ecosystem. Spruce Creek
enjoys a Class III water quality rating, and Outstanding Florida Waters designation due to its relatively undisturbed
condition, and is also designated as an official State Canoe trail.

The river is host to a variety of endangered species and special wildlife areas, including: crab/shrimp nursery areas,
diverse fish and invertibrate breeding and nursery areas, nesting areas for birds such as the American Oyster
Catcher, the Yellow-Crowned Night Heron, the Florida Sandhill Crane, a variety of raptors, Red-Cockaded
Woodpeckers, and the endangered wood stork. The rare Atlantic salt marsh snake has been observed, and of course,
many Alligators. It is this diversity in aquatic habitat, flora and fauna that makes this river such a unique natural
resource, and an excellent candidate for a public park setting. The biological diversity and contrast between
upstream and downstream areas in the Spruce Creek watershed make this river an extremely unique, natural area
that is ideal for many types of Public park related recreational uses such as boating, fishing, birdwatching, canoeing,
camping, and hiking. Additionally, this natural area lends itself well to environmentally related research and
educational activities.










INVENTORY ANALYSIS
REGIONAL HISTORY


When European explorers touched the shores of the New World in the late 15th century, - as documented by the
drawings of the French artist Jacques le Moyne in 1564 - - what we now call Volusia County had been inhabited for
thousands of years by indigenous peoples who were then called the Timucua. They were highly sophisticated,
organized into complex social systems, towns and cities, who utilized a calendar, and whose knowledge of
astronomy and medical practices were equal or superior to existing European. One of their larger habitations was
believed to be nestled around the Spruce Creek basin, as evidenced by the wealth of archaeological sites and
resources, many of which are still unknown to us, its present occupants. Among these resources are some of the
largest and most extensive prehistoric shell mounds in the nation, many so high that they were used as major
navigational landmarks during early colonial times. One of the largest prehistoric earthenworks in Florida, the
Spruce Creek Mound, is located on the Creek on a high bluff. The site functioned as a major ceremonial and
political center for the Timucuans, and lesser mounds are scattered throughout the surrounding areas. The colorful
Timucuans left us a wealth of cultural remains, artifacts and sites.
Source: Friends of the Spruce Creek Preserve


The Venetian Bay site was formerly used for agriculture. The agricultural productions included vast sod farming
operations. Other operations included pasturelands and cattle ranching. Some of areas of the site were forestry
reserves and preservation areas.


A small portion of the site was used as residential sites for small ranch style homesteads.

















INVENTORY ANALYSIS


LAND USES/ ZONING


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RESiDENTIAL



CONSERVATION


AGRICULTURE




- FORESTFi' RESERVE


No DATA


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INVENTORY ANALYSIS
SURROUNDING LAND USES


Jontes Farms


Vegetable Farm


Sod Farms


Primary Surrounding Land Uses:


Agriculture
Single Family Residential
Forestry Reserve
Conservation Lands


Forestry Reserve









INVENTORY ANALYSIS
CIRCULATION


Major Roads:

Pioneer Trail
S.R. 44
1-95


Pioneer Trail- View 1
Pioneer Trail- View 1


Pioneer Trail: This is a two lane roadway that runs along the north side of the site. Pioneer Trail will
accommodate most of the projected traffic.

S.R. 44: A four lane roadway which runs along the southern side of the site. This will provide access to
the Venetian Bay golf course.

1-95: Interstate 95 is located approximately 1 mile east of the site. There is an existing interchange located
where S.R. 44 intersects 1-95. A proposed interchange is located at Pioneer Trail and 1-95.


?










INVENTORY ANALYSIS


VEGETATION














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IF






Pnmr ,rrs incld ...


TuesdInrn ascrvircns







Wetland Hardwood Hammock


The vegetation present on site is a good indicator of the soils and their capabilities. This type of
vegetation is found on wet/ hydric soils. This helps to understand that certain measures must be taken to
develop on site. The majority of open space and community area plantings will use plants that are native
to the site, or plants suited to these conditions. The inventory completed here indicates that we will use
slash pines, cabbage palm, cypress, palmettos, wax myrtles, and other plants adapted to these conditions.


aifr











INVENTORY ANALYSIS

VEGETATION


Slash Pine Stand


Cabbage Palm Grove


'we � .... - . .- -, j., i.
Cypres Dome- .

Cypress Dome


Cypress Dome


Major Plant Species on Site


Pinus elliotii- Slash Pine
Taxodium ascendens- Pond Cypress
Sabal palmetto- Cabbage Palm
Myrica cerifera- Wax Myrtle


environmental systems Cormdor











INVENTORY ANALYSIS

SOILS




There are a variety of soils found on the Venetian Bay site. Over 20 soils have been
located on site. The majority of soils have a low potential for community development
due to poor drainage and high water table. These soils can be built upon using
alternative foundations, such as stilts or pillars. The soils on site must not be altered with
cut and fill because of the resulting degradation to the adjacent Spruce Creek River.

Wetland/ Hydric Soils:

* Soils have a water table within 40 inches of the surface
and is often above the surface in the wet season.
* Soils that in its natural state provide wetland habitat.
* Soils that can naturally store floodwater.

Buildable Soils:

* Soils that are nearly level.
* Soils with rapid to moderate permeability.
* Soils with low water capacity.
* Soils that can support a drainage system.
* Soils have a water table greater than 40 inches deep








INVENTORY ANALYSIS
SOILS


HYDRIC SOILS


t


SOILS FOR OPEN SPACE


F










INVENTORY ANALYSIS

BUILDABLE/HYDRIC SOILS


HYDRIC SOILS


SSOILS CAPABLE OF SUPPORTING DEVELOPMENT IN
THEIR CURRENT STATE
E SOILS UNSUITABLE FOR DEVELOPMENT WITHOUT
INTRODUCING ALTERNATIVE FOUNDATIONS, SUITABLE
FOR OPEN SPACE


-1










INVENTORY ANALYSIS


TOPO LINE ELEVATION

=5-7
- I I-, I
-'7

=33-37
38-42
43-47
=48-54





(-:




Due to this site's flat topography, drainage is a major issue. Flat topography combined with poorly
drained soils, create many areas with standing water during the wet season. The identification of these
areas helps to locate appropriate areas where stormwater treatment wetlands could be located. These
areas need to be identified in the field. They are not identified in this topography analysis because this
analysis was created to give an overall view of the site's topography.









INVENTORY ANALYSIS
HYDROLOGY


INCREASING
FLOW AND
ACCUMULATION


I-I


All runoff and water flow on site flows in a north west direction. There is accumulation in the
northern and western segment of the site. Development on site needs to accommodate this flow
direction and accumulation areas. The blue areas shown above represent areas where there is
accumulation or ponding occurring. The blue lines above represent the direction of the water
movement.










INVENTORY ANALYSIS

USER ANALYSIS

The user groups identified here are those which are projected to be in the market for this development. There may be other
user groups that become generated from the proposed program and development. Those user groups will not be addressed
here. This user analysis addresses the target market for Venetian Bay.






User Group 1

This user group consists of retired senior citizens in their 50's and 60's. They are generally considered
active retirees. Financially they are considered upper middle class. This group is primarily originally from
northern states. Some of the qualities they find desirable are outlined here.

* Prefer typical 'postcard' resort style development
* Prefer little to no yard maintenance
* Need good wayfinding and easy access
* Prefer tropical plants as well as plants from their original states









User Group 2

This user group consists of young families with children under 17 years of age. They can be considered
working professionals not only from New Smyrna Beach and Port Orange, but also from Orlando.
Financially they are in the upper middle class. Generally they can be considered ecologically conscious and
open minded to new housing and community design concepts. This can be deducted from the fact that
there is a new trend occurring that includes being more "Earth smart" directed towards children and their
families. Some of the qualities they find desirable are outlined here.

* Require community open space (i.e. parks, playgrounds, trail system, etc.)
* Prefer safe walkable communities
* Require calmed or reduced residential traffic
* Prefer intimate and friendly neighborhoods








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ANALYSIS SYNTHESIS


Legend:

F-


Watershed A

Watershed B

Watershed C


Soils suitable for open space

A . Buildable Soils

S Wetland/Hydric Soils
mI Surrounding Vehicular Circulation
J. Hydrology- Flow Direction
* Site Access


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This analysis synthesis identifies three soil classes on site: Wetland/ Hydric soils, Buildable Soils, and Soils suitable for open
space. The wetland/hydric soils and the open space soils on site can be developed with the introduction of alternative
foundations, such as pillars. The buildable soils can be developed with little modification, making these soils an ideal place for
intensive development, such as condominiums.

Three watersheds have been located: Watershed A, Watershed B, and Watershed C. Stormwater runoff must be addressed for
each of these watersheds individually and collectively.

The Village Center and the Golf Course have been located in their appropriate locations. The design and development of
these areas is not in the scope of this project.

There is to be no development in the Environmental Systems Corridor.





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IV.










CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT

CONCEPT INTRODUCTION


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Each concept explored in this chapter has assumed that the site access points, located on the figure
above, are to be located as shown. The main site road has been installed, as shown above, and must
remain intact. The soils that can be built upon without any special consideration are labeled above as,
buildable soils. Wetland and Hydric soils must be developed using alternative foundations. The
environmental systems corridor must not be developed. The bahia grass fields in the eastern part of the
site has been designated as the golf course location. Each of the concepts recognize these factors, in
addition to the previously discussed site inventory and analysis in previous chapters.


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CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT

ECOLOGICAL CONCEPT


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The ecological concept focuses on the environmental quality of the site. All stormwater is treated on site through the use of
a stormwater treatment wetland corridor on site. Single family lot sizes are reduced to increase density on site. Density
ranges from 3.5 to 4.5 units per acre. Impervious areas are reduced through the introduction of varied housing types, such as
homes on stilts or pillars. All streets are bordered by a vegetated swale system to direct runoff to the wetland corridor
system, while cleansing the water partially before ever reaching the treatment wetlands.


Advantages:


Disadvantages:


* Environmental quality of the site is upheld and
enhanced.
* Good aesthetic quality and views for residents into
open space and wetlands.
* Opportunity for educational programs on
wetlands.
* Provides equal access to community open space.
* Allows for natural hydrology to take place.
* Protects the Environmental Systems Corridor by
buffering with wetland corridor.


* Provides little sense of community.
* Ease of wayfinding and access is limited.
* Does not form a strong connection between the
Environmental Systems Corridor and open space.
* Does not provide pedestrian oriented streets.
* Isolates Village Center from other areas.












CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT


NEIGHBORHOOD CONCEPT


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The neighborhood concept focuses on creating a sense of place and community. It seeks to connect its' residents with their
surrounding environment through direct access to open space. Single family lots are clustered in groups of six. This was
done to increase the amount of open space by increasing density. All residential areas are buffered from the main site road
with native vegetation buffer, which provides an enjoyable trail system throughout the site. Densities range from 6-8 units per
acre. This high density is balanced with access to community opne space directly adjacent to home clusters.


Advantages:


Disadvantages:


* Creates a sense of community.
* Creates more community and open space.
* Provides a safe and adequate trail system.
* Ease of access and wayfnding.
* Provides pedestrian oriented streets.
* Begins to form a connection between the Village
Center and the surrounding community.


* Does not take into consideration the site's natural
hydrology.
* Does not provide good views for residents into
open space.
SProvides no opportunity for education.
SDoes not provide a strong buffer between
development and the Environmental Systems
Corridor.


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CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT


FINAL CONCEPT



















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The final concept focuses on creating a sense of place and community, while still upholding the environmental integrity of
the site. It connects residents with the environment and each other through corridors and conservation easements. Single
family lots are clustered in groups of six. All residential areas are buffered from the main site road with a native vegetation
buffer, in which is a community trail system forming connections to neighborhoods, open space, and other areas of the
community. Densities range from 6-8 units per acre in the built areas. This density is proposed to increase value added in the
form of more community open space, wetland corridors, and conservation areas.


SEnvironmental quality of the site is upheld and enhanced.
SGood aesthetic quality and views for residents into open
space and wetlands.
* Opportunity for educational programs on wetlands.
* Provides equal access to community open space.
* Allows for natural hydrology to take place.
* Protects the Environmental Systems Corridor by buffering
with wetland corridor.


* Creates a sense of community.
* Creates more community and open space.
* Provides a safe and adequate trail system.
* Ease of access and wayfinding.
* Provides pedestrian oriented streets.
* Begins to form a connection between the Village
Center and the surrounding community.


I Ja " W.1ST .






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V.









ARCHITECTURE
OVERALL CHARACTER


Green Architecture


Venetian Bay Town and Country Club will utilize "green building" techniques in all construction on
site. Green Buildings are really resource efficient buildings and are very energy efficient, utilize
construction materials wisely - including recycled, renewable, and reused resources to the maximum
extent practical - are designed, constructed and commissioned to ensure they are healthy for their
occupants, are typically more comfortable and easier to live with due to lower operating and owning
costs, and are good for the planet. Some green techniques include the use of rain cisterns, rain gardens,
local materials, solar heat panels, proper building orientation, etc. These are some guidelines used in the
implementation of green buildings.


1. Emphasize the four "R's" via sound design, construction and building commissioning without compromising
structural durability, indoor pollutant levels, ventilation, building code requirements, or marketability, including:

a. Reduce - lower quantities of building materials, resources, and embodied energy are used

b. Reuse - construction materials are reused where practical and structurally sound

c. Recycle - recycled materials are used, and home is designed for recycle-ability

d. Renewable - energy from natural sources and renewable building materials are emphasized.

2. Use Energy, Water and Resource Efficient design, specification and construction methods

3. Healthy indoor air quality (IAQ) (meets or exceeds US EPA voluntary criteria)

4. Development creates a sense of well being in its neighborhood structure providing a sense of
community..

5. Building remains reasonably affordable and cost effective



Source: Smart Communities Network, www.sustainable.doe.gov









ARCHITECTURE
TIDEWATER RETREAT


Architect: Carson Looney
Source: CoastalLiving,, Jan-Feb 2004

4 Bedrooms, 3 Baths
Conditioned Area: 1,597 square feet
Porches and Decks: 545 square feet
Width and Depth: 32'4" by 47'
Foundation: Pilings


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Housing Type 1: Tidewater Retreat
Locations: Hydric soils, adjacent to wetlands
Theme:
SRustic, Natural exterior with simple
materials
SSophisticated, modern interior


On the first floor, an open family room and
dining rom share a wall of windows for an
uninterrupted view of wetlands, community
open space, and streets.

The master suite and a bunk room occupy
the second floor. From this level, a private
stair leads to a viewing loft, which provides a
270 degree vista.

To accommodate areas where waters
ocassionally rise, steel-reinforced concrete
pillars elevate the structure. On the lower
level, storage is provided. Parking also
occurs in this zone.

Source: Kristen Payne, Coastal giving


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ARCHITECTURE
INLET RETREAT


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Architect: Allison Ramsey Architects
Source: mww.. .. . . .com, Mar. 2004

3 Bedrooms, 3 Baths
Conditioned Area: 2,188 square feet
Porches and Decks: 359 square feet
Width and Depth: 52' by 37'
Foundation: Pilings






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Housing Type 2: Inlet Retreat
Locations: Soils with water table depth of
42" or less,
Theme:
SRustic, Natural exterior with simple
materials
* Sophisticated, modern interior


This 2 story residence provides 3 bedrooms,
3 baths, kitchen, living/dining area, as well
as screened and covered porches.

The front porch offers great views into
community open space, natural systems, and
eyes on the street.

To accommodate areas where waters
ocassionally rise, steel-reinforced concrete
pillars elevate the structure approximately
18-24" above the surface. An optional ramp
system will be provided for accessibility
purposes upon request. Parking will be
provided in the rear of the house.

Source: Coastal Living
www.coastalliving.com Feb. 2004










ARCHITECTURE
CREEK CONDOMINIUMS


Architect: Jaque Robertson
Source: www.watercolorflorida.com, Feb 2004

3 homes per structure
2 bedroom, 2 Bath homes
Width and Depth: 90' by 60'
Foundation: concrete


Housing Type 3: Creek Condominums
Locations: Soils with a water table depth
greater than 42" most of the year.
Theme:
* Loft-like residences
* Sophisticated, modern interior

Oversized shutters on the exterior hint at
the relaxed luxury inside. The interior
spaces feature soaring ceilings and wide
plank teak floors. These homes define a
timeless, durable place for family and friends
to enjoy week after week, year after year.

Condominums offer very impressive views
into the community and natural systems.

Source: Water Color Private Residential Club
www.watercolorflorida.com Feb. 2004





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VI.









STORMWATER MANAGEMENT PLAN





Shown in this plan, is the conceptual stormwater management for
the site. Arrows represent flow direction in the swale network. All
arrows lead to either wet or dry retention. The longest, or worst
case scenario swales, have a 1% slope to ensure water movement.
The remaining swales have a 1-3% slope. The streets act as ridges
with all water moving away from them into the swale network.





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I *'. ..-r,.d or Wetlands


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STORMWATER MANAGEMENT

INTRODUCTION


Most stormwater systems are man made ponds that are designed to control flooding and to enhance or
improve water quality. These ponds temporarily store stormwater runoff as well as capture pollutants
that would otherwise make their way into wetlands and waterways. These pollutants include fertilizers,
pesticides, motor oil and heavy metals that wash off lawns, sidewalks, roads, and parking lots. These
ponds collect these materials, therefore reducing the amount of pollutants entering the waterways.

Quick Facts

* Untreated stormwater runoff is now considered the state's leading source of water pollution.

* The uncontrolled growth of algae in waterways is often the result of poorly managed stormwater.

* Storm water contributes approximately 80-95 percent of the heavy metals (lead, copper, cadmium) that
enter Florida waters.

The amount of nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorous) in stormwater runoff are comparable to those in
treated sewage.


Source: Neighborhood Guide to Stormwater Systems, St. John's Water Management District









STORMWATER MANAGEMENT

REQUIREMENTS


This chapter discusses the stormwater management requirements for Venetian Bay Town and Country
Club required by the St.John's River Water Management District, as well as how this project will meet
and exceed these requirements. The requirements are outlined in the Regulation of Stormwater
Management Systems, Chapter 40C-42, F.A.C.

Requirements for Systems which discharge into Class III receiving water bodies:

Swales
* Treatment Volume: Swales should be designed to percolate 801"', of the runoff from the 3 year, 1 hour
storm. The remaining 2 "' , of the runoff from the 3 year, 1 hour storm event may be discharged offsite
by the swale system.

* Dimensional Requirements: Swales must have a top width to depth ratio of the cross-section equal to
or greater than 6:1 or side slopes equal to or greater than 3:1 (horizontal to vertical).

Wetlands
STreatment Volume: Treatment of runoff from the greater of the following:
a) First one inch of runoff, or
b) 2.5 inches times the impervious area









STORMWATER MANAGEMENT

ENLARGEMENT- WATERSHED A/WATERSHED B (PART 1)































This enlargement shows the drainage patterns of Watershed A and part 1 of Watershed B. Arrows
denote flow direction. Green areas represent retention areas (Wetland or Forested).









STORMWATER MANAGEMENT

ENLARGEMENT- WATERSHED B (PART 2)


SO E M


This enlargement shows the drainage patterns of part 2 of Watershed B. Arrows denote flow direction.
Green areas represent retention areas (Wetland or Forested).









STORMWATER MANAGEMENT

ENLARGEMENT- WATERSHED C


A


This enlargement shows the drainage patterns of Watershed C. Arrows denote flow direction. Green
areas represent retention areas (Wetland or Forested).









STORMWATER MANAGEMENT

STORMWATER MANAGEMENT ENLARGEMENT-CLUSTER








4'








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'1










This is a typical cluster and its' stormwater management. All clusters drain in a similar way. The
clusters drain towards the adjacent retention areas. These areas could consist of wetlands or
forested retention areas. All swales have a minimum 1% slope. The lowest elevation of the main
retention areas are to be at an elevation of 22.5' or above to ensure that the water table is a
minimum of 12" below the surface. The water table averages about 40" below the surface, with
the exception of a few pockets of 12"-18" below the surface. These areas are located in areas
designated as interior wetlands in the wetland corridor system.









STORMWATER MANAGEMENT

SITE DATA


Total Site Area: 1250 acres, 54,450,000 S.F
Golf Course( not included in calculations): 15,210,000 S.F
Village Center( not included in calculations): 2,102,500 S.F
Environmental Systems Corridor( not included in calculations): 13,322,500 S.F

Total Impacted Area: 546 acres, 23,815,000 S.F

Impervious: 53 acres, 2,321,662 S.F

Roadways: 11.45 ac, 499,000 S.F
Access Roads: 9.06 ac, 395, 064 S.F
Sidewalks: 4.13 ac, 180,286 S.F
Roofs: 26.56 ac, 1,157,072 S.F
Parking: 2.07 ac, 90,240 S.F

Pervious: 493 acres, 21,493,338 S.F

Open Space/Grass: 74.1 ac, 3,227,799 S.F
Forest/Buffers: 150.5 ac, 6,558,750 S.F
Residential Cluster Swales: 9.6 ac, 418,947 S.F
Wetlands: 253.8 ac, 11,055,000 S.F
Shared Unit Paver Driveways: 5.34 ac, 232,842 S.F


Watershed A- 5,290,000 S.E- 121 acres

Watershed B- 14,322,500 S.E- 328.6 acres

Watershed C- 4,202,500 S.E- 96.4 acres








STORMWATER MANAGEMENT
WATERSHED LOCATIONS


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These are the watersheds on site, calculations have been done for each watershed and their
runoff volumes. Calculations have also been done for the total site runoff.










STORMWATER MANAGEMENT

WATERSHED DATA

Watershed A- 5,290,000 S.E (121 acres)

Impervious: 140,462 S.F. (3.22 acres)
Roadways: 34,000 S.F (.78 acres)
Access Roads: 33,984 S.F (.78 acres)
Sidewalks: 9,310 S.F (.21 acres)
Roofs: 63,168 S.F (1.45 acres)

Pervious: 5,149,538 S.F (118.2 acres)
Open Space/Grass: 441,321 S.F (10.1 acres)
Forest/ Buffers: 1,679,687 S.F (38.5 acres)
Residential Cluster Swales: 28,861 S.F (.66 acres)
Wetlands: 1,322,500 S.E (30.3 acres)
Shared Unit Paver Driveway: 21,637 S.F (.49 acres)



Watershed B- 14,322,500 S.E (328.6 acres)

Impervious: 1,419,942 S.F (32.59 acres)
Roadways: 349,000 S.F (8 acres)
Access Roads: 271,872 (6.24 acres)
Sidewalks: 109,462 S.E (2.51 acres)
Roofs: 689,608 S.F (15.8 acres)

Pervious: 12,893,760 S.F (296 acres)
Open Space: 1,427,881 S.F (32.7 acres)
Forest/Buffers: 1,466,934 S.F (33.6 acres)
Residential Cluster Swales: 295,971 S.F (6.79 acres)
Wetlands: 9,572,500 S.F (219.7 acres)
Shared Unit Paver Driveway: 130,474 S.F (2.99 acres)


Watershed C- 4,202,500 S.E (96.4 acres)


Impervious: 761,258 S.F (17.4 acres)
Roadways: 116,00 S.F (2.66 acres)
Access Roads: 89,208 S.F (2.04 acres)
Sidewalks: 61,514 S.F (1.41 acres)
Roofs: 404,296 S.F (9.28 acres)
Parking: 90,240 S.F (2.07 acres)

Pervious: 3,678,862 S.F (84.4 acres)
Open Space/Grass: 1,358,597 S.F (31.2 acres)
Forest/ Buffers: 1,985,419 S.F (45.5 acres)
Residential Cluster Swales: 94,115 S.F (2.16 acres)
Wetlands: 520,000 S.F (11.93 acres)
Shared Unit Paver Driveway: 80,731 S.F (1.85 acres)









STORMWATER MANAGEMENT

RUNOFF VOLUMES-TOTAL


Total Runoff Volume: 1,343,124 cubic feet
Total Runoff Treatment Required (81" '= 1,074,499 cubic feet
=24.66 ac,ft

Impervious: 527,400 cubic feet

Roadways: 117,360 cu.bic feet
Access Roads: 92,880 cubic feet
Sidewalks: 37,800 cubic feet
Roofs: 258,120 cubic feet
Parking: 21,240 cubic feet

Pervious: 815,724 cubic feet

Open Space/Grass: 24(0,84 cubic feet
Forest/Buffers: 499,608 cubic feet
Residential Cluster Swales: 41,472 cubic feet
Wetlands: 0 cubic feet (no runoff)
Shared Unit Paver Driveways: 34,560 cubic feet










STORMWATER MANAGEMENT

RUNOFF VOLUMES-WATERSHEDS

Watershed A- 195,517 cubic feet (4.48 acre feet)

Impervious: 32,027 cubic feet
Roadways: 8,002 cu.ft.
Access Roads: 8,002 cu.ft.
Sidewalks: 1,927 cu.ft.
Roofs: 14,094 cu.ft.

Pervious: 163,490 cubic feet
Open Space/Grass: 32,724 cu.ft.
Forest/ Buffers: 124,740 cu.ft.
Residential Cluster Swales: 2,851 cu.ft.
Wetlands: 0 cu.ft.
Shared Unit Paver Driveway: 3,175 cu.ft.



Watershed B- 586,238 cubic feet (13.5 acre feet)

Impervious: 322,719 cubic feet
Roadways: 82,080 cu.ft.
Access Roads: 64,022 cu.ft.
Sidewalks: 23,041 cu.ft.
Roofs: 153,576 cu.ft.

Pervious: 263,519 cubic feet
Open Space: 105,948 cu.ft.
Forest/Buffers: 108,864 cu.ft.
Residential Cluster Swales: 29,332 cu.ft.
Wetlands: 0 cu.ft.
Shared Unit Paver Driveway: 19,375 cu.ft.


Watershed C- 441,312 cubic feet (10.13 acre feet)


Impervious: 171,485 cubic feet
Roadways: 27,291 cu.ft.
Access Roads: 20,930 cu.ft.
Sidewalks: 12,943 cu.ft.
Roofs: 90,201 cu.ft.
Parking: 20,120 cu.ft.

Pervious: 269,827 cubic feet
Open Space/Grass: 101,088 cu.ft.
Forest/ Buffers: 147,420 cu.ft.
Residential Cluster Swales: 9,331 cu.ft.
Wetlands: 0 cu.ft.
Shared Unit Paver Driveway: 11,988 cu.ft.









STORMWATER MANAGEMENT

RUNOFF TREATMENT- REQUIRED VS. PROVIDED



Watershed A

Required Treatment: 3.59 acre feet
Provided: 30.3 acre feet





Watershed B

Required Treatment: 10.76 acre feet
Provided: 219.7 acre feet




Watershed C

Required Treatment: 8.10 acre feet
Provided: 11.93 acre feet









STORMWATER MANAGEMENT

SAMPLE CALCULATIONS


Q= CIA

Q= peak runoff rate, cubic feet per second
C= Coefficient of runoff (0-1)
I= rainfall intensity, inches per hour
A= Area of drainage area(ac)

Q x (sec/hr)= Volume of runoff(cubic feet)

Impervious: 527,400 cubic feet

Roadways: (.95)(3)(11.45) =32.6(3600)= 117,360 cubic feet
Access Roads: (.95)(3)(9.06 ac)=25.8(3600)= 92,880 cubic feet
Sidewalks: (.85)(3)(4.13)=10.5(3600)=37,800 cubic feet
Roofs: (.90)(3)(26.56)=71.7(3600)=258,120 cubic feet
Parking: (.95)(3)(2.07)=5.9(3600)=21,240 cubic feet

Pervious: 815,724 cubic feet

Open Space/Grass: (.30)(3)(74.1)=66.69(3600)=24(0,184 cubic feet
Forest/Buffers: (.30)(3)(154.2)=138.78(3600)=499,608 cubic feet
Residential Cluster Swales: (.40)(3)(9.6)=11.52(3600)=41,472 cubic feet
Wetlands: 0 cubic feet (no runoff)
Shared Unit Paver Driveways:(.6)(3)(5.34)=9.6(3600)= 34,560 cubic feet











STORMWATER MANAGEMENT

DETAILS


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Wet Detention/ Pond Detail- N.T.S.


6:1 Width to
Depth Ratio


SIMin I'

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ubk elevuriun


Swale Detail- N.T.S.


a1 Vlume






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VII.







SITE MASTER PLAN


Shown here is the Site Master Plan. Please refer to enlargements for
more detailed study of the master plan.


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Prnposcd Golf
Course


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Village Center


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Systems Corridor


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MASTER PLAN

ILLUSTRATIVE MASTER PLAN ENLARGEMENT-WATERSHED A








Proposed Wetland
Corridor























Access Road


Single Family Cluster










MASTER PLAN

ILLUSTRATIVE MASTER PLAN ENLARGEMENT-WATERSHED B


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-" in- .- !I , I . . . l. . .I o t s


Wetland Corridor


Vilg~C Een~~r










MASTER PLAN

ILLUSTRATIVE MASTER PLAN ENLARGEMENT-WATERSHED C


Condominiums


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MASTER PLAN

ILLUSTRATIVE ENLARGEMENTS- CLUSTER GREEN SPACE


0f 25' 511' [II


J










MASTER PLAN

ILLUSTRATIVE SECTION- SINGLE FAMILY CLUSTER


SINGLE FAMILY LOT CLUSTER GREEN SPACE SINGLE FAMILY LOT


SHOWN HERE IS A CROSS SECTION OF A SINGLE FAMILY CLUSTER. THE GREEN SPACE SERVES AS
OPEN SPACE FOR ALL RESIDENTS TO ACCESS.






MASTER PLAN
DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS- LOTS


Single
Family
Lot:


6,000 S.F.










MASTER PLAN

DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS-TIDEWATER RETREAT-CLUSTER


II : j i ifII1


Tidewater Retreat Footprint: 32' x 47': 25% Lot coverage
16,000 S.F Community green open space
All homes will have a 12'-15' Built-to-Line from the R.O.W
Tidewater Retreat Cluster: 74.8% Pervious Surface, 25.2% Impervious Surface
Impervious Surface: 14,602 S.F
Access Road: 4,248 S.F
Roof: 9,024 S.F
Sidewalk: 1,330 S.F
Pervious Surface: 43,461 S.F
Grass/Open Space: 34,692 S.F
Swale: 4,123 S.F
Shared Unit Paver Driveways: 3,431 S.F
Gravel Guest Parking: 1,215 S.F









MASTER PLAN

DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS-INLET RETREAT-CLUSTER


Inlet Retreat Footprint: 52' x 37': 32% Lot coverage
16,000 S.F Community green open space
All homes will have a 10'-15' Built-to-Line from the R.O.W
Tidewater Retreat Cluster: 69.5 % Pervious Surface, 30.5% Impervious Surface
Impervious Surface: 17,122 S.F
Access Road: 4,248 S.F
Roof: 11,544 S.F
Sidewalk: 1,330 S.F
Pervious Surface: 39,125 S.F
Grass/Open Space: 30,696 S.F
Swale: 4,123 S.F
Shared Unit Paver Driveways: 3,091 S.F
Gravel Guest Parking: 1,215 S.F









MASTER PLAN
DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS-TIDEWATER RETREAT-SINGLE LOADED









Lot A Lot B
























SAll homes will have a 12'-15' Built-to-Line from the R.O.W
* Tidewater Retreat Single : 74.3% Pervious Surface, 25.7 % Impervious Surface
Impervious Surface: 1,862 S.F
Roof: 1,504 S.F
Sidewalk: 358 S.F
Pervious Surface: 5,387 S.F
Grass/Open Space: 3,721S.F.
Swale: 269 S.F
Shared Unit Paver Driveways: 1,397 S.F









MASTER PLAN

DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS-INLET RETREAT-SINGLE LOADED







Lot A Lot B




0 . -. .



















* Inlet Retreat Footprint: 52' x 37': 32% Lot coverage
All homes will have a 10'-15' Built-to-Line from the R.O.W
STidewater Retreat Single : 68.5%0 Pervious Surface, 31.5 % Impervious Surface
Impervious Surface: 2,282 S.E
Roof: 1,924 S.E
Sidewalk: 358 S.E
Pervious Surface: 4,967 S.E
Grass/Open Space: 3,301S.E
Swale: 269 S.F
Shared Unit Paver Driveways: 1,397 S.E










MASTER PLAN

DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS- CREEK CONDOMINIUMS


Lake


Unit 1 f-W

i I.8 I-


C! ii B


"w'. � it- "'-T


Creek Condominium Unit Footprint: 90' x 60'
Creek Condominiums: 58.5% Pervious, 41.5% Impervious
Impervious Surface: 11,090 S.F
Roof: 5,400 S.F
Sidewalk: 1,178 S.F
Parking: 4,512 S.F
Pervious Surface: 15,626 S.F
Grass/Open Space: 12,900 S.F
Swale: 1,935 S.F
Shared Unit Paver Driveway: 791 S.F


al ____________rr~r

* 'JikIIrT~r









MASTER PLAN

DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS- ROADWAY SECTIONS


FTesian Snle Tw-ne G l Sinue mestnin/
1icclirTrail Roadway Parkin .NBrrvcTral


Scale: 1"=10'


Roadway Section: Single Loaded Neighborhood Roadway

* 20' Aphalt Roadway
* Pedestrian/ Bicycle Trails: 6' width
* Swales: 5' native vegetation, primarily native grasses
* Gravel Parking: 10' permeable parking strip
* No curb and gutter
*Cross-slope: 1%








MASTER PLAN

DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS- ROADWAY SECTIONS


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Trail


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Vegcuted
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Scale: 1"=10'


Aphalt
Roadway


Roadway Section: Clusters and Condominiums Neighborhood Roadway

* 20' Asphalt Roadway
* Pedestrian/ Bicycle Trails: 6' width
* Swales: 15', planted with native vegetation
* Cross Slope: 1%


1^-~"









MASTER PLAN

DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS- ROADWAY SECTIONS


W' f4,




-I L


VcgcCasTcd Asphalt
Swak Roadv-ay


Scale: 1"=10'


Roadway Section: Cluster Access Roads

* 18' Asphalt Roadway
* Swales: 20', planted with native vegetation
* Cross Slope: 1%










MASTER PLAN

DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS- ROADWAY DETAIL











--- I 1/2" Asphalt Stirface Coaur


'1 *- -.L , Ii- . I;T .i , 1,'I "

-, ' . 'J 2

-. " �- I I . . . . " . 1
"'",- .' , ' T --I


2 1/2"' Asphlr Base Court

6" ,:."cgdrLc Bais

6" .\kgLrrrarr Subbaic


Prqi'lUcd Su1.'yTadc


Roadway Detail:

* 1 1/2" Asphalt Surface Course
* 2 1/2" Asphalt Base Course
* Cross Slope: 1%
* 6" Aggregate Base
* 6" Aggregate Subbase
* Prepared Subgrade- compacted to 95% at optimum moisture.








MASTER PLAN

DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS- SIDEWALK DETAIL


Sidewalk Detail:

* Brushed Surface Finish
* 4" Concrete Slab
* 4" Sand Aggregate Base


Brushed Surface Finish

4" Concrete Slab


4" Sand Aggregate Base

Prepared Subgradc








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VIII.










STORMWATER WETLAND DESIGN GUIDELINES

SOURCE: WETLANDS, 3RD EDITION


General Principles

1. Design the system for minimum maintenance. The system of plants, animals, microbes, substrate, and water flows should be
developed for self-maintenance and self-design.

2. Design the system with the hydrologic and ecological landscape and climate. Floods, droughts, and storms are expected
disturbances and should not be feared.

3. Design the system to fulfill multiple goals, but identify at least one major objective and several secondary objectives.

4. Design the ecosystem as an ecotone. This may require a buffer strip around the wetland site, but it also means that the
wetland site itself will be a buffer system between upland and aquatic systems.

5. Give the system time. Wetlands do not become functional overnight. Several years may pass before plant establishment,
nutrient retention, and wildlife enhancement can become optimal. Strategies that try to short circuit ecological succession or
overmanage it are doomed to failure.

6. Design the system for function, not form. If initial plantings and animal introductions fail but the overall function of the
wetland, based on the fulfillment of initial objectives, is being carried out, then the wetland has not failed. The outbreak of
plant diseases and the invasion of alien species are often symptomatic of other stresses and may indicate false expectations
rather than ecosystem failure.

7. Do not overengineer wetland design with rectangular basins, rigid structures and channels, and regular morphology Natural
systems should be mimicked to accommodate biological systems.



Defining Goals


The design of an appropriate wetland or series of wetlands, whether for the control of nonpoint source pollution, for a wildlife
habitat, or for wastewater treatment, should start with the formulation of the overall objectives of the wetland. The most
important aspect of designing a wetland is to define the goal of the wetland project. Among the possible goals for wetland
construction are the following:

1. Flood control
2. Wastewater treatment
3. Stormwater or nonpoint source pollution control
4. Ambient water quality improvement
5. Coastal restoration
6. Wildlife enhancement
7. Fisheries enhancement
8. Replacement of similar habitat
9. Research wetland

The goal, or a series of goals, should be determined before a specific site is chosen or a wetland is designed. If several goals
are identified, one must be chosen as primary.










STORMWATER WETLAND DESIGN GUIDELINES


Site Selection


Several important factors ultimately determine site selection. When the objective is defined, the appropriate site should allow
for the maximum probability that the objective can be met, that construction can be done at a reasonable cost, that the system
will perform in a generally predictable way, and that the long term maintenance costs of the system are not excessive.

1. Wetland restoration is. . - more feasible than wetland creation: Find a site where wetlands previously existed or where nearby
wetlands still exist. In these areas, the soil will probably be suitable, seed sources may be on site or nearby, and the appropriate
hydrologic conditions may exist.

2. Take into account the surrounding land use and the future plans for the land: Future land use plans such as abandoning agricultural
fields to become old field ecosystems may be obviate the need for a wetland to control nonpoint runoff.

3. Undertake a detailed hydrologic study of the site, including a determination of thepotential interaction of groundwater with theproposed wetland:
Without flooding or saturated soils for at least part of the growing season, a wetland will not develop. For coastal wetlands, the
tidal cycle and stages are important.

4. Find a site where naturalinundation isfrequent: Sites should be inspected during flood season and heavy rains, and the annual and
extreme event flooding history of the site should be determined as closely as possible.

5. Inspect and characterie the soils in some detail to determine '. '. - . '" . texture, and stratigraph: Highly permeable soils are not
likely to support a wetland unless water inflow rates are excessive.

6. Determine the chemistry of the soils, groundwater, surface flows, i;,,,J' streams and rivers, and tides that may influence the site water quality.

7. Evaluate on site and nearby seed banks to determine their viability and response to bydrologic conditions.

8. Determine the ownership of the land and theprice: These are often major considerations. Additional lands may need to be pur-
chased in the future to provide a buffer zone and room for expansion.

9. Determine the availability of necessary fill material, seed, andplant stocks and access to infrastructure.

10. Assess site access: Public access will eventually need to be controlled to avoid vandalism and personal injury. A remote site that
offers possibilities of fewer mosquito complaints, lower property costs, and less drastic social impact is often preferable to an
urban one. Urban wetlands, however, offer more possibilities to for programs on wetland education and school groups and the
public.

11. Ensure that an adequate amount of land is available to meet the objectives.

12. Evaluate the position of the proposed wetland in the landscape.










STORMWATER WETLAND DESIGN GUIDELINES


Vegetation

The species of vegetation types to be introduced to created and restored wetlands depend upon the type of wetland desired,
the region, and the climate as well as the design characteristics described previously.

Natural succession versus horticulture

An important general consideration of wetland design is whether plant material is going to be allowed to develop
naturally from some initial seeding and planting or whether continuous horticultural selection for desired plants will be im-
posed. To develop a wetland that will ultimately be low maintenance, natural succession processes need to be allowed to take
place. This may mean some initial period of invasion by undesirable species, but if proper hydrologic conditions are imposed,
these invasions will be temporary. The best strategy is to introduce, by seeding and planting, as many choices as possible to
allow natural processes to sort out the species and communities in a timely fashion. Wetlands created or restored by this
approach are called . - . . wetlands. A different approach, designer wetlands, occurs when specified plant species are introduced
and the success or failure of those plants are used as indicators of success or failure of that wetland.

Planting techniques

Plants can be introduced to a wetland by transplanting roots, rhizomes, tubers, seedlings, or mature plants; by broad-
casting seeds obtained commercially or from other sites, by importing substrate and its seed bank from nearby wetlands; or by
relying on the seed bank of the original and surrounding site. If planting stocks are used, it is more desirable to choose plants
from wild stock rather than nurseries because wild stock is better adapted to the environmental conditions they will face in
constructed wetlands. The plants should come from nearby if possible and should be planted within 36 hours of collection.
These wetlands need to be planted at densities to ensure rapid colonization, adequate seed source and effective competition.
This could mean introducing 2,000 to 5,000 plants/ha.
For emergent plants, the use of planting material with at least 20 to 30 cm stems is recommended; whole plants,
rhizomes, or tubers rather than seeds have been most successful.
Spring plantings are generally more successful. This minimizes the destructive grazing of plants in the winter by
migratory animals and to avoid the uprooting of new plants by ice.
Transplanting plugs or cores from existing wetlands is successful. It brings seeds, shoots, and roots of a variety of
wetland plants to the new wetland.




Designing for Success

The three factors that lead to failure in a project are:

1. Little understanding of wetland function by those constructing the wetlands
2. Insufficient time for the wetlands to develop
3. Lack of recognition or underestimation of the self design capacity of nature.









STORMWATER WETLAND DESIGN GUIDELINES


Summary Recommendations

1. Wetland restoration and creation proposals must be viewed with great care, particularly when promises
are made to restore or recreate a natural system in exchange for a permit.

2. Multidisciplinary expertise in planning and careful project supervision at all project levels is needed.

3. Clear, site-specific measurable goals should be established.

4. A relatively detailed plan concerning all phases of the project should be prepared in advance to help
evaluate the probability of success.

5. Site-specific studies should be carried out in the original system prior to wetland alteration if wetlands
are being lost in the project.

6. Careful attention to wetland hydrology is needed in design.

7. Wetlands should, in general, be designed to be self-sustaining systems and persistent features of the
landscape.

8. Wetland design should consider relationships of the wetland to the watershed, water sources, other
wetlands in the watershed, and adjacent upland and deepwater habitat.

9. Buffers, barriers, and other protective measures are often needed.

10. Restoration should be favored over creation.

11. The capability for monitoring and mid-course corrections is needed.

12. The capability for long term management is needed for some types of systems.

13. Risks inherent in restoration and creation, and the probability of success for restoring or creating
particular wetland types and functions, should be reflected in standards and criteria for projects and
project design.

14. Restoration for artificial or already altered systems requires special treatment.

15. Emphasis on ecological restoration of watersheds and landscape ecosystem management requires
advanced planning.






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MANAGEMENT AND PLANTING

WETLANDS MANAGEMENT PLAN

In order to ensure that the wetlands on site will be low maintenance, natural succession processes will be allowed to take
place. All wetlands will be considered, I, ,.,' wetlands. This strategy of planting and management involves introducing as
many different plant species as possible, in a random pattern. This allows the site to form its own plant communities over
time, in their appropriate place by introducing a multitude of species. The main objective is to restore the site to its natural
ecosystem.


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4-


Planting:


4,000 plants per 2.47 acres(1 ha)
All plantings should be done in the spring.
Emergents
- Plugs or cores
- 1 gal.-7gal. sizes
- Transplants to be harvested from local wetlands.
Seeds
- Commercial stock
- Broadcast randomly


12~ ~


^










MANAGEMENT AND PLANTING

LIST OF APPROVED PLANTS-WETLANDS


In order to protect, preserve and enhance the environmental integrity of the site all vegetation planted in
wetland spaces will be from the following list. The plants listed below are common native plants that
would be found on site under natural conditions.


Wetlands

Trees
" Loblolly Bay
" Red Maple
" Water Oak
" Sweet Gum
" Bald Cypress
" Pond Cypress

Emergent
" Sweet flag
" Sawgrass
" Sedges
" Spike Rush
" MannaGrass
" Rose mallow
" Yellow iris
" Smartweed

Submerged

" Coontail
" Waterweed
" Milfoil
" Sago pondweed
" Tape grass

Grasses

" Longleaf uniola
" Low panicum


Source: Waternise, F .' Landscapes










MANAGEMENT AND PLANTING

LIST OF APPROVED PLANTS


In order to protect, preserve and enhance the environmental integrity of the site all vegetation planted in
community, residential, and preservation spaces will be from the following list. The plants listed below
are common native plants that would be found on site under natural conditions.


Buffers and Plantings

Trees
SAmerican Holly
* Dahoon Holly
SCabbage Palm
" Fringe Tree
* Live Oak
" Loblolly Bay
* Red Maple
" Loblolly Pine
" Longleaf Pine
" Hawthorns Typical Forested Retention
* Southern Magnolia Source: Waterwise, F.:, . Landscapes
" Red Cedar
" Water Oak
" Slash Pine
* Swamp Chestnut Oak
* Sweet Gum


Shrubs
* American Beautyberry
* Shining Sumac
* Yaupon Holly
* Saw Palmetto
* Wax Myrtle
* Witch Hazel


Herbaceous

* Aster
* Blackeyed Susan
* Cone flower
* Day flower
* Rose mallow
* Meadowbeauty
* Sunflower

Grasses

* Longleaf uniola
* Low panicum


as a ram1( nLLeOs
Source: Waterwise, F. 'Landscapes
.1pe


Typical Residential Planting
Source: Coastal iing, March 2004









MANAGEMENT AND PLANTING

WETLANDS SECTION






All wetlands proposed on site will be self-designed wetlands. Planting is done in a random pattern
allowing the site to dictate which plants colonize individual areas. Please refer to the list of approved
wetland plants discussed earlier in this chapter.























Scale: 1"=5'








MANAGEMENT AND PLANTING
FORESTED BUFFER/ RETENTION SECTION




The forested buffers and forested retention areasare to be planted in a random pattern as well. When
not being used as retention during intense storms, these areas will serve as valuable wildlife habitat,
recreation areas, and natural preservation spaces. Please refer to the list of approved plants discussed
earlier in this chapter.


-.F.r -~
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;.,, ~.-r.., .
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It-Ic


Scale: 1"=5'






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CONCLUSION I


The development approach of Venetian Bay investigated in this project embraces the
environment in which it resides and str-ies to improve its quahbt. whilee providing an enlyoable
place for residents to live and interact with their conmmunmr and nature in their own backyard.


Venetian Bay Town and (-ountry C(lub


Advantages:

* Provides 573 single famdl 1 ,rts
* Reduces asphalt roadwa\ by .3 - miles
* Meet and exceed St. John's Water Management lDitrict stormw- after requirements by treating
100% of runoff from a 111 \ear storm.
* Provides 253.8 acres of potennral retention areas. Required to provide 24.66 acres.
* Provides 488 acres of open space, preservation, wetlands, and buffers.
* Buffers the entire Environmental Sytsems Corridor with a wetland system to protect from
runoff.
* Allows natural hydrological patterns to take place on site.


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XI.




,-, ,'.


REFERENCES


BASMAA, 1999.Start at the Source. 1999 Edition

Fuston, K.A., 2004. CoastalLiving. Vol. 8, Issue 2. P 82-.')

Marsh, WM., 1998. Landscape Planning: Environfe'rta/. -ipr.,aitm.. Iohn \\ ie\ .nd Sons, Inc New York.

Mitsch, WJ., 2000. Wetlands. Third Edition. John \de\ and Son-. Inc . Nec York.

Payne, Kristen. 2004. CoastalLiving. Vol. 8, Issue I . P 30

St. John's Water Management District, 2002. N,\ /ho,,rhoo,, (-,ut. :. \irirunu',r I,/ .r

St.John's Water Management District, 2001. R,?.iirtn .' .,rnral.r C.\ln.ermenti 3 i., (hapter 41-1(- -42. 1- .(-

St. John's Water Management District, 2001. I a,,,rru.-,:c F.,rjL ,I Iu,.t .,..

Strom, Steven, 1998. Site Engineengfor Landsc.,.-r ir../,.,.. Third Ldtuon Johln \\dei and Son.. Inc , Ncv Y'iork


-I


Websites

Arvida, Inc., http://www.arvida.com/watercolor

Friends of the Spruce Creek Preserve, http://volusia.com/sprucecreek


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( A Green Communities



B mrn.' Self-Certification Checklist

Check items you will be including in this project to qualify for a BUILT GREENT star rating.


Requirements to Qualify at I-Star Level
(All * items plus orientation and commitment to Built
GreenTM Home Builder Program for all homes in the
community at the I-Star Level)
* Program Orientation (one time only)
* Earn 100 points total from Sections 1 through
3, any items, with at least 15 points each
section
* A percentage of new home starts in the
development must meet the Built GreenTM 1-
Star Level requirements (Action Item 1-60)
* Orient & Promote Built GreenTM to Builders in
the Development (Action Item 1-61)
* Do Not Dispose of Topsoil in Lowlands or
Wetlands (Action Item 3-10)
* Optimally Maintain all Temporary Erosion
Control Practices (Action Item 3-21)
* Properly Dispose of Hazardous Wastes
(Action Item 3-25)


Requirements to Qualify at 2-Star Level
* Meet 1-Star requirements, plus
* Earn 200 points total (100 additional points)
from Sections 1 through 3, with at least 20
points from each Section, plus
* Attend a BUILT GREENTM approved workshop
within past 12 months prior to certification

Requirements to Qualify at 3-Star Level
* Meet 2-Star requirements, plus
* Earn 350 points total (150 additional points)


Section One: Site Selection & Design


(10-45)
(10)


SELECTION
Redevelop and restore existing sites
Locate to reduce dependence on automobiles


o (10) 1-3. Prepare site analysis and inventory for all
potential sites
O (5) 1-4. Choose site with no environmentally-sensitive
areas


DESIGN


Land Use

o (30)


Site Water Management
Create a Low Impact Development


o (5) 1-6. Design to avoid impact on sensitive areas
Infiltration
o (15) 1-7 Design to achieve no more than 10% effective
impervious surface areas
O (4-8) 1-8. Use filter strips to separate impervious
surfaces
O (5) 1-9. Design site water management system that
allows groundwater to recharge
o (I each) 1-10. Use infiltration system for surface water runoff


BUILT GREENTM Green C. ',nii,,,niml, Self-Certification Checklist
September 2002









Treatment
O (1-3) 1-11. Meet treatment standards using nature-based
methods or exceed treatment standards
o (2) 1-12. Provide stormwater treatment for parking
lots/traffic island runoff using bioretention
areas, filter strips, or other practice
O (I) 1-13. Clearly label all storm sewer inlets with
stenciling to inform residents about proper
stormwater protection
Flow Control and Conveyance
o (3) 1-14 Use natural drainage for surface water runoff
o (I) 1-15. Use infiltration basins for flow control
Storage and Detention
O (8) 1-16. Use constructed wetlands for stormwater
storage and detention
o (I) 1-17. Use detention ponds for surface water runoff
Wastewater Treatment
o (25) 1-18. On-site wastewater treatment
Density
o (6) 1-19. Design for maximum population density
allowable under Growth Management Act
o (5) 1-20. Plan for variable lot sizes to encourage higher
density
O (4) 1-21. Cluster homes on site
Open Space Planning
O (3-6) 1-22. Preserve usable open spaces
O (6) 1-23. Provide and preserve wildlife corridor
o (2-4) 1-24. Provide attached parks or pocket parks within
buildable area
Vegetation
o (3-10) 1-25. Preserve a percent of lowlands and areas with
mature vegetated soils
o (4-10) 1-26. Preserve percentage of existing native
vegetation and soils
O (10) 1-27. Clear only areas needed to install roadways,
parking areas, and common area buildings
Paved Surface Design


o (2)


Design streets to conform to natural terrain


O (5) 1-29. Where permitted, design no street curbs or
gutters
O (6-10) 1-30. Minimize pavement in street design
O (I each) 1-31. If design calls for cul-de-sacs, hammerheads,
or other dead-ends, connect ends with paths
O (2) 1-32. Install traffic-calming devices, such as curb
bulbs
O (5-10) 1-33. Design parking areas and pathways to
minimize impact of surface water runoff and
reduce impervious surface area


O (10) 1-34. Use porous paving options for light-traffic
areas
O (4) 1-35. Use recycled-content materials for paving
O (5) 1-36. Eliminate blacktop, use new coats or integral
colorants to achieve light-colored surfaces
O (15) 1-37. Provide alleys for rear garage access
Community Enhancement
O (5-15+) 1-38. Create a mixed-use (residential/commercial)
development


O (6)
O (2-15)


1-39. Provide mix of housing types
1-40. Provide community facilities


Landscaping - Common Areas
Trees and Shrubs
O (15) 1-41. Participate and qualify for the Nationa Arbor
Day Foundation's "Building With Trees"
Recognition Program
O (10) 1-42. Create 65% canopy in completed development
O (8) 1-43. Plant appropriate trees and shrubs to provide
shade (within 5 years) on at least 30% of
impervious surfaces on site
Plant Selection
O (3-5) 1-44. Landscape common areas with plants that will
not need supplemental watering once
established (appropriate for site topography,
soil types, and sun exposure)
O (5) 1-45. Properly install a grass type requiring less
irrigation and minimal maintenance for
common areas
Plant Establishment
O (15) 1-46. Amend disturbed soil to a depth of 8 to 10
inches to restore soil environmental functions
O (5) 1-47. Mulch landscape beds in common areas with
2 inches of organic material
O (3) 1-48. If choosing to use fertilizers, use natural
organic or slow-release fertilizers to establish
vegetation in common areas
Outdoor Amenities
O (3) 1-49. Specify non-toxic or low-toxic outdoor
landscaping lumber
O (4-8) 1-50. Use recycled-content or resource-efficient site
accessories
Efficient Irrigation
O (3-8) 1-51. Install high-efficiency irrigation system where
on-going irrigation is needed
O (3-5) 1-52. Install irrigation system using
recycled/reclaimed water
O (8) 1-53. Install no permanent irrigation system


BUILT GREENTM Green C. 'in,,io,,,il Self-Certification Checklist
September 2002









Transportation
o (20) 1-54. Develop Integrated Mobility Center
o (15) 1-55. Develop Transportation Management Plan
o (4-6+) 1-56. Provide pedestrian-friendly access routes
beyond code
O (5+) 1-57. Provide commuter lot near arterials and
collector streets
O (3 each) 1-58. Provide on-site transportation shelters
o (3) 1-59. Provide connectivity with surrounding street
network

Integration & Innovation
o (*) 1-60. Require a percentage of new home starts in
the development to meet Built GreenTM
Home Builder I-Star level requirements
o (*) 1-61. Orient & promote Built GreenTM to builders
in the development
O (2-20) 1-62 Require homes in development to meet Built
GreenTM Home Builder 2-star level or more
requirements
O (5-15) 1-63. Orient lots for passive solar
O (10) 1-64. Use alternative heat and energy sources
O (8) 1-65. Design street and other exterior lighting to
reduce light pollution and trespass
O (8) 1-66. Design and construct common area buildings
to meet the 2-star level of the Built GreenTM
Home Builders Program
O (5) 1-67. Provide for public space recycling collection
O (1-10) 1-68. Extra Credit for innovation


Section Two: Planning & Education

COVENANTS & BUILDER GUIDEUNES
Pedestrian Friendly Design
o (3-10) 2-1. Require shared parking for mixed use
developments
O (5) 2-2. Use minimum parking standards as maximums
for on-street and off-street parking
o (5) 2-3. Require pedestrian-friendly design amenities
Other Covenants
o (5) 2-4. Require Built GreenTM qualifying exterior
materials and finishes
o (5) 2-5. Require protection of trees and open spaces
o (3) 2-6. Require builders to provide
homeowners/residents with recycling storage
and collection system
o (3) 2-7. Prepare builders' guidelines on exterior
lighting to reduce light pollution and trespass

EDUCATION
o (30) 2-8. Conduct design and planning Charette
o (2) 2-9. Use Built GreenTM common area buildings to
educate residents
o (4) 2-10. Prepare a homeowners' handbook for living in
a green community
o (4) 2-11. Provide a builders' field guide of best
management practices
o (2) 2-12. Provide interpretive signs highlighting key
environmental and other features
o (2) 2-13. Encourage builders in your development to
build lots with smaller overall footprint and to
reduce impervious surfaces
o (I each) 2-14. Provide educational events, including tours or
seminars, to promote your green development

OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE
o (10) 2-15. Prepare a landscape operations and
maintenance plan
o (10) 2-16. Prepare an operations and maintenance plan
for common area facilities


BUILT GREENTM Green C. ',in,,iiml, Self-Certification Checklist
September 2002









Section Three: Construction Operations

EROSION & SEDIMENTATION CONTROL
o (5) 3-1. Preserve and protect wetlands, shoreline,
bluffs, and other critical areas during
development
o (I) 3-2. Allow for steeper natural slopes
o (10) 3-3. Phase grading so that no more than 40% of
the site is disturbed at one time
o (I) 3-4. Protect adjacent, upstream, and downstream
properties from adverse effects of increased
runoff
o (5) 3-5. No clearing or grading during winter months
O (4) 3-6. Mark clearing limits
O (4) 3-7. Construct stormwater detention facilities as a
first step in grading
o (10) 3-8. Balance cut and fill while maintaining original
topography
o (4) 3-9. Retain all native topsoil on site and protect
stockpiles from erosion
o (*) 3-10. Do not dispose of topsoil in lowlands or
wetlands
o (3) 3-11. Use compost to stabilize disturbed slopes
o (3) 3-12. Limit heavy equipment use zone to limit soil
compaction
o (I) 3-13. Establish a single stabilized construction
entrance (quarry spall or crushed rock)
o (I) 3-14. Establish a tire wash
o (I) 3-15. Clean roads thoroughly at the end of each
day to prevent sedimentation
o (I) 3-16. Protect storm drain inlets during construction
o (5) 3-17. Use compost filter berms, tubes, and socks in
place of silt fences
o (3) 3-18. Supplement permanent flow-control measures
with necessary temporary controls
O (3) 3-19. Protect permanent stormwater facilities from
siltation during construction
o (4) 3-20. Install supplemental erosion control BMPs as
back up
o (*) 3-21. Optimally maintain all temporary erosion
control practices


VEGETATION MANAGEMENT
O (2) 3-22. Grind landclearing wood and stumps for reuse
on site
O (3) 3-23. Replant or donate removed vegetation for
immediate reuse

POLLUTION PREVENTION
o (I) 3-24. Recycle anti-freeze, oil, and oil filters at
appropriate outlets
o (*) 3-25. Properly dispose of all hazardous wastes
o (I) 3-26. Cover and protect all hazardous materials and
store them properly during construction
o (I) 3-27. Maintain heavy equipment so as to protect
ground and stormwater
O (I) 3-28. Prevent or treat contamination of storm water

INNOVATIVE BUILDER ASSISTANCE
O (3-10) 3-29. Provide assistance to builders in development


BUILT GREENTM Green C. ',nii,,,n,,,l Self-Certification Checklist
September 2002


Total Points for Project

Program Level Obtained:
LI 1-Star L 2-Star * L 3-Star **

By my signature, I certify that I have performed all
Action Items checked above:

(Developer Signature and Date)










( - HOME BUILDER



BNrk.a n Self-Certification Checklist


Check items you will be including in this project to qualify for a BUILT GREENTM star rating.


Requirements to Qualify at I-Star Level
(All * items plus orientation)
* Program Orientation (one time only)
* Section 1: Build to "Green" Codes & Regulations
* Earn 25 points from Sections 2 through 6, any items
* Prepare/post ajobsite recycling plan
(Action Item 5-19)
* Provide an Operations & Maintenance Kit (Action
Item 6-1)


Section One: Build to Green Codes/Regulations

(*) I-I. Meet Washington State Wtr Use Effcy Stds
(*) 1-2. Meet Stormwater/Site Development Stds
(*) 1-3. Meet Washington State Energy Code
(*) 1-4. Meet Washington State Ventilation/IAQ Code

Section Two: Site and Water

SITE PROTECTION
Overall
(3) 2-1. Build on an infill lot to take advantage of existing
infrastructure and reduce development of virgin sites
(10) 2-2. Build in a BUILT GREENTM development
Protect Site's Natural Features
(3) 2-3. Limit heavy equipment use zone to limit soil
compaction
(3) 2-4. Preserve existing native vegetation as landscaping
(3) 2-5. Take extra precautions to protect trees during
construction


How TO USE THE CHECKLIST
0 (2) 2-33. Constru


AA A


ict tire wash


- Action item to be implemented
(* items are required)


I - _ _ Order action item appears in Section (numerical)
Section where action item description appears
Point value of action item (when range of
points, refer to Part I narrative.)
Check (V) when completed


Requirements to Qualify at 2-Star Level (100 points minimum)
* Meet 1-Star requirements
* Earn 75 additional points from Sections 2 through 6,
with at least 6 points from each Section
* Attend a BUILT GREENTM approved workshop
within past 12 months prior to certification

Requirements to Qualify at 3-Star Level (180 points minimum)
* Meet 2-Star requirements plus 105 additional points


(3) 2-6. Preserve and protect wetlands, shorelines, bluffs, and
other critical areas during construction
(5-10) 2-7. Set aside percentage of site to be left undisturbed
Protect Natural Processes On-Site
(2) 2-8. Install temporary erosion control devices and
optimally maintain them
(3) 2-9. Use compost to stabilize disturbed slopes
(2) 2-10. Protect topsoil with mulch or plastic
(3) 2-11. Balance cut and fill, while maintaining original
topography
(3) 2-12. Limit grading to 20 ft outside building footprint
(4) 2-13. Amend disturbed soil to a depth of 8 to 10 inches
to restore soil environmental functions
(3) 2-14. Replant or donate removed vegetation for immediate
reuse
(3) 2-15. Grind landclearing wood and stumps for reuse
(5) 2-16. Use a water management system that allows
groundwater to recharge
(5) 2-17. Design to achieve effective impervious surface
equivalent to 0% for 5 acres and above;
<10% for less than 5 acres
(5) 2-18. Use pervious materials for at least one-third of total
area for driveways, walkways, patios
(10) 2-19. Bonus Points: Install vegetated roof system
(e.g. eco-roof) to reduce impervious surface
(10) 2-20. Bonus Points: Construct no impervious surfaces
outside house footprint
Eliminate Water Pollutants
(I) 2-21. Take extra care to establish and maintain a single
stabilized construction entrance (quarry spall or
crushed rock)
(I) 2-22. Take extra precautions to install and maintain
sediment traps


BUILT GREENTM Handbook-HOME BUILDERS Self-Certification Checklist
2003 Version


Part I-iii


Version 2003










(I) 2-23. Establish and post clean up protocol for tire wash
(I) 2-24. Take extra precautions to not dispose of topsoil in
lowlands or wetlands
(I) 2-25. Wash out concrete trucks in slab or pavement
subbase areas
(I) 2-26. Prohibit burying construction waste
(I) 2-27. When construction is complete, leave no part of the
disturbed site uncovered or unstabilized
(I) 2-28. Recycle antifreeze, oil, and oil filters at appropriate
outlets
(I) 2-29. Dispose of non-recyclable hazardous waste at legally
permitted facilities
(I) 2-30. Establish and post clean up procedures for spills to
prevent illegal discharges
(1) 2-31. Reduce hazardous waste through good jobsite
housekeeping
(2) 2-32. Provide an infiltration system for rooftop runoff
(2) 2-33. Construct tire wash
(2) 2-34. Use slow-release organic fertilizers to establish
vegetation
(2) 2-35. Use less toxic form releases
(3) 2-36. Use non-toxic or low-toxic outdoor lumber for
landscaping (e.g. plastic, least-toxic treated wood)
(4) 2-37. Phase construction so that no more than 60% of
site is disturbed at a time and to prevent adverse
impacts on adjoining properties or critical areas
(5) 2-38. No clearing or grading during winter months
(2) 2-39. No zinc galvanized ridge caps, copper flashing or
copper wires for moss prevention

DESIGN ALTERNATIVES
(4) 2-40. Bonus Points: Provide an accessory dwelling unit or
accessory living quarters
(5) 2-41. Bonus Points: Build north area of the lot first,
retaining south area for outdoor activities
(5) 2-42. Bonus Points: Provide a front porch
(5) 2-43. Bonus Points: Position garage so it is not in front
of house
(2-5) 2-44. Bonus Points: Minimize garage size

Subtotal for Section Two


Section Three: Energy Efficiency

ENVELOPE
Thermal Performance
(10-40) 3-1. Document envelope improvements beyond code
(component performance approach)
(1-55) 3-2. Document envelope improvements beyond code
(prescriptive approach)
(5) 3-3. Bonus Points: Participate in a program that provides
third-party plan review and inspection
(e.g., ENERGY STAR, BUILT SMART)


Air Sealing
(I)


3-4. House wrapped with an exterior air infiltration
barrier to manufacturer's specifications


(3) 3-5. Airtight Drywall Approach for framed structures
(3) 3-6. Use airtight building method, such as SIP or ICF
(5) 3-7. Blower door test
Reduce Thermal Bridging
(2) 3-8. Use insulated headers
(2) 3-9. Fully insulate corners (requires 2-stud instead of
3-stud corners)
(2) 3-10. Fully insulate at interior/exterior wall intersection
(1) 3-11. Use energy heels of 6 in. or more on trusses to
allow added insulation over top plate
(2) 3-12. Use structural insulated panels
(2) 3-13. Use insulated exterior sheathing
(3) 3-14. Use advanced wall framing-24-in OC, w/double top
plate
Solar Design Features
(2) 3-15. Provide south shading-install properly sized
overhangs on south facing glazing
(2) 3-16. Orient windows to make the best use of
passive solar
(2) 3-17. Provide east and west shading-use glazing with
solar heat gain coefficient less than 0.40 or provide
natural shading with landscaping
(1-4) 3-18. Demonstrate a reduction in space conditioning
energy, using approved energy modeling software

HEATING/COOLING
Distribution
(1) 3-19. Centrally locate heating / cooling system to reduce
the size of the distribution system
(I) 3-20. Two properly supported ceiling fan pre-wires
(I) 3-21. Use advanced sealing of ducts using low toxic mastic
(5) 3-22. Performance test duct for air leakage meets third-
party review and certification
(5) 3-23. Locate heating / cooling equipment and the
distribution system inside the heated space


BUILT GREENTM Handbook-HOME BUILDERS Self-Certification Checklist
2003 Version


Part I-iv










Controls
(1) 3-24. Install thermostat with on-switch for furnace fan to
circulate air
(2) 3-25. Install 60-minute timers or humidistat for bathroom
and laundry room fans
(2) 3-26. Install programmable thermostats
Heat Recovery
(3) 3-27. Install a heat recovery ventilator
WATER HEATING
Distribution
(2) 3-28. Locate water heater within 20 pipe feet of highest
use
(I) 3-29. Insulate hot and cold water pipes within 3 feet of
the hot water heater
Drainwater Heat Recovery
(3) 3-30. Drainwater heat recovery system (DHR)

LIGHTING
Natural Light
(1) 3-31. Light-colored interior finishes
(2) 3-32. Use clerestory for natural lighting
(2) 3-33. Use light tubes for natural lighting and to reduce
electric lighting
Solar Powered Lighting
(1) 3-34. Solar-powered walkway or outdoor area lighting

EFFICIENT DESIGN
(2) 3-35. Use building and landscaping plans that reduce
heating/cooling loads naturally


ALTERNATIVE SYSTEMS (Bonus Points)
3-36. Bonus Points: Solar water heating system
3-37. Bonus Points: More than 2% of house powered by
photovoltaic


Subtotal for Section Three


Section Four: Health and Indoor Air Quality

OVERALL
(5) 4-1. Assist homeowners with chemical sensitivities to
identify preferred IAQ measures and finishes
(5) 4-2. Bonus Points: Builder certified to have taken
American Lung Association (ALA) of Washington
"Healthy House Professional Training" course
(15) 4-3. Bonus Points: Certify house under ALA Health House
Program

JOB-SITE OPERATIONS
(I) 4-4. Use less-toxic cleaners
(1) 4-5. Require workers to use VOC-safe masks
(2) 4-6. Take measures during construction operations to
avoid moisture problems later
(2) 4-7. Take measures to avoid problems due to
construction dust
(3) 4-8. Ventilate with fans after each new finish is applied
(2) 4-9. No use of unvented heaters during construction
(2) 4-10. Clean duct and furnace thoroughly just before owners
move in
(4) 4-11. Involve subs in implementing a healthy building job-
site plan for the project

LAYOUT AND MATERIAL SELECTION
(2) 4-12. If using carpet, specify CRI IAQ label
(2) 4-13. Install low pile or less allergen-attracting carpet
and pad
(3) 4-14. Limit use of carpet to one-third of home's square
footage
(3) 4-15. Optimize air quality in family bedrooms
(2) 4-16. If using carpet, install by tacking (no glue)
(5) 4-17. Detached or no garage OR garage air-sealed from
house with automatic exhaust fan
(3) 4-18. Use formaldehyde-free fiberglass insulation
(3) 4-19. Use low-VOC, low-toxic, water-based, solvent-free
sealers, grouts, mortars, caulks and adhesives inside
the house
(3) 4-20. Use plywood and composites of exterior grade or
formaldehyde-free (for interior use)
(3) 4-21. Install cabinets made with formaldehyde-free board
and low-toxic finish
(3) 4-22. Use ceramic tile for flooring
(3) 4-23. Use polyethylene piping for plumbing (no PVC)
(3) 4-24. Install natural fiber carpet (e.g. jute, sisal, wool)
(3) 4-25. Use low-VOC /low-toxic interior paints and finishes
for large surface areas
(10) 4-26. Bonus Points: No carpet

MOISTURE CONTROL
(I) 4-27. Grade to drain away from buildings


BUILT GREENTM Handbook-HOME BUILDERS Self-Certification Checklist
2003 Version


Part I-v










(I) 4-28. Seal at doors, windows, plumbing and electrical
penetrations against moisture and air leaks
(I) 4-29. If slab is used, install poly barrier properly; if no
slab, bottom of floor is sufficient height above
backfilled dirt
(I) 4-30. Vent attic over code requirements to reduce moisture
buildup
(I) 4-31. Use roof gutters to drain out onto splash blocks or
approved system to drain water away from building
(I) 4-32. Roofs are pitched and flashed properly
(1) 4-33. Design wall system to allow water to drain out in
the event of possible water penetration
(2) 4-34. Install "radon" type vent system to eliminate
potential moisture problems

AIR DISTRIBUTION AND FILTRATION
(1) 4-35. Prohibit use of electronic filter
(2) 4-36. Install return-air ducts in every bedroom
(I) 4-37. Install ducting/damper for fresh air intake
(3) 4-38. Use medium-efficiency pleated filter or better
(3) 4-39. Balance airflow system based on filter being used
(3) 4-40. Install furnace and/or duct-mounted air cleaner or
high efficiency air filter (non-electronic)
(3) 4-41. Install central vacuum, exhausted to outside
(2) 4-42. Provide for cross ventilation using operable windows
(3) 4-43. Install CO detector

HVAC EQUIPMENT
(I) 4-44. Install and test bath, laundry, pool, hot tub, and
kitchen exhaust fans (if range top and/or oven are
gas fired), vented to outside
(1) 4-45. Install crank timer switches for bath exhaust fans
(2) 4-46. Install bath fan with smooth ducting, minimum 4 in.
(2) 4-47. Install exhaust fans in rooms where office equipment
is used
(3) 4-48. Install sealed combustion heating and hot water
equipment
(3) 4-49. Install power venting for combustion furnaces and
water heating equipment
(3) 4-50. Install exhaust fan in attached garage on timer or
wired to door opener
(2) 4-51. Install whole house fan
(2) 4-52. Bonus Points: Provide balanced or slightly positive
indoor pressure using controlled ventilation
(10) 4-53. Bonus Points: Install a ductless heating system

Subtotal for Section Four


Section Five: Mateiials Efficiency

OVERALL
(5) 5-1. OMITTED per 2002 Revisions
(10) 5-2. Enroll project in King County ConstructionWorks
Program OR in Snohomish County, meets equivalent
criteria
(5-25) 5-3. Limit project size


Reduce
(I)

(I)
(2)

(2)
(2)

Reuse


JOBSITE OPERATIONS

5-4. Use suppliers who offer reusable or recyclable
packaging
5-5. Provide weather protection for stored materials
5-6. Create detailed take-off and provide as cut list to
framer
5-7. Use central cutting area or cut packs
5-8. Require subcontractors to participate in waste
reduction efforts


(I) 5-9. Reuse building materials
(I) 5-10. Reuse dimensional lumber
(I) 5-11. Use reusable supplies for operations, such as
construction fences, tarps, refillable propane tanks
(I) 5-12. Move leftover materials to next job or provide to
owner
(I) 5-13. Reuse spent solvent for cleaning
(I) 5-14. Sell or give away wood scraps
(I) 5-15. Sell or donate reusable items
(1) 5-16. Use reusable forms
(2) 5-17. Purchase used building materials for your job
(2) 5-18. Save and reuse site topsoil


Recycle
(*)
(2)

(I)
(2)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(5)
(5)


Overall
(I)
(I)


5-19. Prepare jobsite recycling plan and post on site
5-20. Require subcontractors to participate in recycling
efforts
5-21. Recycle cardboard
5-22. Recycle metal scraps
5-23. Recycle wood scrap and broken pallets
5-24. Recycle packaging
5-25. Recycle drywall
5-26. Recycle concrete/asphalt rubble, rock, and brick
5-27. Recycle paint
5-28. Recycle asphalt roofing
5-29. Recycle carpet/carpet padding and upholstery foam
5-30. Recycle fluorescent lights and ballasts
5-31. Recycle landclearing and yard waste, soil and sod

DESIGN AND MATERIAL SELECTION

5-32. Use standard dimensions in design of structure
5-33. Install materials with longer life cycles


BUILT GREENTM Handbook-HOME BUILDERS Self-Certification Checklist
2003 Version


Part I-vi
















Fran


FouI





Sub-

Doo




Finis







Inte



Exte


Windows
(I)
(I)
Cabinetry and
(2)
(2)


5-59. Use recycled-content sheathing
5-60. Use siding with reclaimed or recycled material
5-61. Use 50-year siding product
5-62. Use salvaged masonry brick or block
5-63. Use locally-produced stone or brick

5-64. Use wood/composite windows
5-65. Use finger-jointed wood windows
Trim
5-66. If using hardwood trim, use domestic products
5-67. Use finger-jointed trim


(5) 5-68. Use tropical hardwood trim or cabinets only if FSC
certified or equal as "sustainable"
(3) 5-69. Use domestic hardwood trim that is FSC certified
or equal
ROOF


(2) 5-34. Install locally produced materials
(3) 5-35. Use re-milled salvaged lumber
(3) 5-36. Use wood products certified by FSC or other
recognized agency as "sustainable"

ming
(1) 5-37. Use stacked floor plans
(2) 5-38. Use engineered structural products
(2) 5-39. Use structural insulated panels
(3) 5-40. Use cementitious foam-formed walls with flyash
concrete
(3) 5-41. Use finger-jointed framing material (e.g. plates
and studs)
(3) 5-42. Use (R-19) 2x6 intermediate framing
(6) 5-43. At least 50% of dimensional lumber is certified
sustainable wood (FSC or equal)
(10) 5-44. At least 90% of dimensional lumber and 50% of
sheathing is certified sustainable wood (FSC or equal)
nation
(I) 5-45. Use regionally produced block
(1) 5-46. Use flyash in concrete
(2) 5-47. Use recycled concrete, asphalt, or glass cullet for
base or fill
Floor
(1) 5-48. Use recycled-content underlayment
rs
(I) 5-49. Use reconstituted or recycled-content doors
(1) 5-50. No luan doors
(2) 5-51. Use domestically-grown wood interior doors
ih Floor
(I) 5-52. If using vinyl flooring, use product with recycled
content
(I) 5-53. Use recycled-content carpet pad
(3) 5-54. Use recycled-content or renewed carpet
(3) 5-55. Use recycled-content ceramic tile
(3) 5-56. Use linoleum, cork, or bamboo flooring
rior Walls
(I) 5-57. Use drywall with recycled-content gypsum
(I) 5-58. Use recycled or "reworked" paint and finishes


5-70. Use recycled-content roofing material
5-71. Use 30-year roofing material
5-72. Use 40-year roof material

5-73. Use recycled-content insulation
5-74. Use environmentally friendly foam building products
(formaldehyde-free, CFC-free, HCFC-free)


OTHER EXTERIOR
(2) 5-75. Use reclaimed or salvaged material for landscaping
walls
(3) 5-76. Use recycled-content plastic or wood polymer lumber
for decks and porches
(5) 5-77. Bonus points: Use least toxic pressure treatment for
pressure-treated wood (no CCA)


Subtotal for Section Five


Section Six: Piomote Environmentally Friendly
Homeowner O&M

HOMEOWNER'S KIT
(*) 6-1. Provide owner with operations & maintenance kit

WATER PROTECTION


Out


door


Conservation


(2) 6-2. Mulch landscape beds with 2 in. organic mulch
(I) 6-3. Use grass type requiring less irrigation and minimal
maintenance
(3) 6-4. Use compost soil amendments to establish turf and
other vegetation with less irrigation
(3) 6-5. Limit use of turf grass to 25% of landscaped area
(3) 6-6. Landscape with plants appropriate for site
topography and soil types, emphasizing use of plants
with low watering requirements
(4) 6-7. Plumb for greywater irrigation
(5) 6-8. Install rainwater collection system (cistern) for reuse
(10) 6-9. Bonus Points: Install irrigation system using recycled
water
(10) 6-10. Bonus points: No turf grass


BUILT GREENTM Handbook-HOME BUILDERS Self-Certification Checklist
2003 Version


(2)
(2)
(3)
INSULATION
(2)
(3)


rior Walls
(I)
(I)
(2)
(2)
(2)


Part I-vii




Full Text

PAGE 1

Venetian Bay Town and Country Club Judd Lee University of FloridaDepartment of Landscape ArchitectureSenior Capstone Project Spring 2004

PAGE 2

This project was prepared for: Zev Cohen and Associates 55 Seton Trail Ormond Beach, FL 32176 Paul Momberger, Director of Planning and Landscape Architecture This project was prepared by: Judd Lee Department of Landscape Architecture College of Design, Construction, and Planning University of Florida Gainesville, Florida 32611 Spring 2004

PAGE 3

AcknowledgementsThanks to all my family and friends over the years, for always believing in me; to the good friends I’ve had and the good friends I’ve lost along the way; to Bob Lee for many thought provoking conversations; to Martha Winder for contributing to my creativity; to my faculty for pushing me to heights I didn’t know I could reach; to my studio family for helping me to be the best I could be; and most of all, my Lord Jesus Christ for always showing me the way. “In this bright future, you can’t forget your past.” Bob Marley

PAGE 4

Table of Contentspg.I. Introduction Scope of Project 1 Limitations, Delimitations, And Assumptions 2 Project Introduction 3 Site Location 4 Goals and Objectives 5-6 Program Elements 7 Precedents 8 II. Inventory Analysis Post Design Evaluation 9-10 Historical Regional 11-12 Context Landuse/ Zoning 13 Surrounding Land Uses 14 Existing/ Proposed Circulation 15 Environmental Vegetation 16-17 Soils 18-20 Topography 21 Hydrology (Flow) 22 User Analysis 23 III. Synthesis Analysis Synthesis 24 IV. Concept Development Concept Introduction 25 Ecological Concept Plan 26 Neighborhood Concept Plan 27 Final Concept 28 V. Architecture 29-32 VI. Conceptual Stormwater Management Plan Stormwater Plan 33 Introduction, Calculations, and Details 34-47 VII. Master Plan Site Master Plan 48 Illustrative Enlargements and Sections 49-53 Development Standards 53-64 VIII. Stormwater Wetland Management And Design Guidelines 65-68 IX. Management and Planting Conceptual Wetlands Management Plan 69 List of Approved Plants 70-71 Wetland and Buffer Sections 72-73 X. Conclusion 74 XI. References 75 Appendix A 76-87 Appendix B 88

PAGE 5

i n t r o d u c t i o nI.

PAGE 6

1 Scope of ProjectIncluded here is the scope of work to be addressed in this capstone project regarding Venetian Bay Town and Country Club. * Residential Design and Layout * Conceptual Roadway Design and Layout * Conceptual Stormwater Management Plan * Architecture * Conceptual Planting Plans Wetlands Typical Housing Units * Site Trail System Not included in the scope of this project is the golf course design and development, as well as the Village Center design and development.

PAGE 7

2 Limitations, Delimitations, and Assumptions Limitations:*The main site road that cuts through the site has already been installed, therefore, it placement and alignment cannot be altered. Delimitations:*This project will not address the golf course design and layout. There will be an area reserved for the golf course on the plan, but there will be no design development at this time. * The Village Center has been designed and developed previously by Zev Cohen and Associates, this design will be accepted and used as is. Assumptions:It is assumed that the current proposed plan has been designed without taking into consideration the siteÂ’s capabilities. Traditional development techniques will not be adequate for this sensitive site.

PAGE 8

3 Project IntroductionAs each season passes in Florida, more people move towards the countryside. The fields and forests are changed into neighborhoods, roads, shopping malls, and other development. These developments are often times negilgent of the well being of the environment in an effort to be efficient and timely in their construction. The truth is, development must take place in order to support the ever-growing population. Venetian Bay is a project that showcases environmentally friendly development. A style of development that does not compromise the integrity of the environment to make a quick buck. This style of development involves creating more open space by introducing alternative housing types. This style of development involves cleansing stormwater runoff before it reaches adjacent water bodies through the introduction of treatment wetlands. This style of development encourages homeowners to be ecologically smart with their homes by using waterwise landscaping and other “green techniques.” Venetian Bay embraces the environment in which it resides and strives to improve its quality.

PAGE 9

4 Site Location Venetian Bay Town and Country Club is located in New Smyrna Beach, Florida. New Smyrna Beach is found in Eastern Volusia County. I-95 runs just east of the site and SR 44 borders the site to the south.

PAGE 10

5Goals And Objectives Open Space Provide adequate buffers between residential areas and roadways. Allow for stormwater management to be a major factor in the design of space. Form a strong connection between the Environmental Systems Corridor and the open space provided. Provide open space that can be used for recreation as well as improve th e environmental quality on site. T r anspor t ation Provide future connections to adjacent parcels that are planned for development. Provide safe, pedestrian access routes to open space and proposed facilities. Provide pedestrian oriented streets. R esidential/commer cial Create a walkable community by locating residential adjacent to open space. Provide commercial activities such as a small grocery store and a garden center. V isit or Appeal Educate to showcase the success of the stormwater management on site as well as providing access to the Environmental Systems Corridor. Economics Provide a development plan that is economically equal to or better than the current proposed development plan considering the cost/benefit ratio.

PAGE 11

6Goals And Objectives (cont.) Ecology Improve the water quality of the Spruce Creek River through effective stormwater management. Utilize waterwise landscaping principles in residential areas. Provide diverse habitat to enrich the environmental quality and integrity of the site. Reduce the amounts of plant maintenance required, as well as pesticides and fertilizers used on site. Reduce impervious surfaces and stormwater runoff by promoting infiltration and retention.

PAGE 12

7Program Venetian Bay Town and Country Club is proposed to include an 18 hole golf course, residential housing, a new urbanist town center with commercial and multi family housing, and two neighborhood parks. This site has been chosen by the developers due to the projected growth of the city of New Smyrna Beach and the city of Port Orange. Initial Pr o g r am: -Ecology* System of stormwater treatment wetlands that enhance water quality. * Diverse habitat to enrich and enhance environmental quality and integrity of the site. * Waterwise landscaping throughout the site. * Site plantings are to be primarily only native plant types. * Allow hydrology to naturally run its course on site. -Housing* Housing types that increase density in order to provide more open space. Densities ranging from 6-10 units per acre. * Intimate and personal neighborhoods to promote interaction and territoriality. * Safe walkable streets through the use of buffers and an adequate trail system -Transportation* Neighborhood streets that have low traffic volume. * Safe and Adequate pedestrian and bike trail system throughout the site. * Pedestrian oriented streets * Connect trail system to existing regional trail on site * Street connections to adjacent future development sites. * Well organized neighborhood layout for ease of wayfinding * Adequate buffers between roadways and residential -Amenities* Recreational trail system * Community native plant garden center * Small commercial opportunities (i.e. small grocery store) * Individual neighborhood parks and playgrounds * Community open space

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8Precedents Source: Landscape Architecture magazinePrairie CrossingNW of Chicago, IllinoisPrairie Crossing is an ecologically conscious housing development that is beginning to mature just west of Chicago. Its workings include farmland preservation, prairie and wetland restoration, an organic farm, on site stormwater treatment, and a plan for mixed use, transit oriented development. Prairie CrossingÂ’s conservation approach includes front yards planted with flowers and grasses native to the Illinois prairie. The site plan uses extensive open space to knit together the various parts of the community. The paths throughout Prairie Crossing , part of a regional trail system, link residents to lakes, prairies, and meadows and to Liberty Prairie Preserve. Each house at Prairie Crossing borders open space. Some houses border wetlands that filter runoff before it goes into Lake Aldo Leopold and to the adjoining ponds. Smaller front yard setbacks and houses with smaller footprints as well as alley access to garages characterize the compact 103 house Station Village.

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I n v e n t o r y / a n a l y s i sII.

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9Post Design Evaluation 1. Soils:There is a high percentage of the proposed residential development planned to be placed on Scoggin sand which has standing water during the rainy season and is found in swamps. This soil has a low potential for community development. These residential sites need to be moved to a more suitable soil.2. Stor mw a ter :The proposed stormwater basins lack aesthetic quality or ecologically functionality. Currently, the retention basins are the typical engineered basins. The basins are very inorganic in shape, with the standard uniform bank slope. Proposed basins do not promote plant growth and are not going to be capable of cleansing the water adequately before it enters the Spruce Creek River. The locations and types of stormwater basins are ill suited for this site. The fact that Venetian Bay is adjacent to an environmental systems corridor and contributes to the headwaters of the Spruce Creek River make it imperative that an active approach be taken in regards to stormwater. This can be accomplished through treatment wetlands with proper placement with respect to the siteÂ’s natural hydrology.3. Surf ace W a ter F lo w:Natural hydrology and water flow on site is from east to west. This presents a problem in that all development on site is on the eastern side, while the environmental systems corridor is on the western side. The problem would be that all stormwater runs into the environmental systems corridor with no opportunity to be cleansed first with treatment wetlands. A series of strategic treatment wetlands could adequately serve as a buffer.4. Access to Mix ed Use/ Cir cula tionVenetian Bay claims to be a New Urbanist community with mixed use town center. There are some flaws in the proposed concepts in regards to New Urbanist concepts. In order for a resident to access the mixed use town center they must use their vehicle due to lack of a pedestrian and bicycle friendly sidewalk and trail system. This can present a major problem because it creates a ripple effect in that it requires more land to be devoted to parking, consuming potential open space.5. Ar c hitectur e/ Density:The site consists of single family residential homesites. The homes are to be the typical concrete block. Lot size varies depending upon which area of the development the home is in. The lots range from 50Â’ x 120Â’ to 100Â’ x 130Â’. There are a total of 563 lots in the study area of this project. The proposed density ranges from 2.8 to 0.8. There is an opportunity to propose some varied housing types and increase density to free up land for open space and wetlands.*See Following Graphic for proposed Site Plan.Inventory Analysis

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10 Proposed Site PlanZev Cohen and Associates Wetland/ Hydric Soils Soils capable of supporting development in their current state Soils unsuitable for development without introducing alternative foundations, suitable for open spacePost Design Evaluation Inventory Analysis Post Design Evaluation Inventory Analysis

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11Inventory Analysis Regional HistoryThe site for this project forms the headwaters of the Spruce Creek River. This river is one of the most important rivers for preservation in the State of Florida due to it’s natural and cultural value. Physically, Spruce Creek is a unique, natural blackwater stream that courses through the Spruce Creek Basin. There are few examples of this type of river left undisturbed in Florida. The term “blackwater” refers to the tannic acid staining caused by the swampy vegetation in the low-lying upper reaches of the creek.. The navigable portion of the river itself begins as a shallow cypress swamp some 10 miles upstream from its’ confluence with the Halifax river. This swamp gives way to a narrow stream that very gradually broadens downstream into Strickland Bay. As the river courses towards the coast, the associated aquatic habitats gradually change from typical freshwater hardwood swamp to freshwater marsh to saltwater marsh and mangrove swamp in a classic estaurine ecosystem. Spruce Creek enjoys a Class III water quality rating, and Outstanding Florida Waters designation due to its relatively undisturbed condition, and is also designated as an official State Canoe trail. The river is host to a variety of endangered species and special wildlife areas, including: crab/shrimp nursery areas, diverse fish and invertibrate breeding and nursery areas, nesting areas for birds such as the American Oyster Catcher, the Yellow-Crowned Night Heron, the Florida Sandhill Crane, a variety of raptors, Red-Cockaded Woodpeckers, and the endangered wood stork. The rare Atlantic salt marsh snake has been observed, and of course, many Alligators. It is this diversity in aquatic habitat, flora and fauna that makes this river such a unique natural resource, and an excellent candidate for a public park setting. The biological diversity and contrast between upstream and downstream areas in the Spruce Creek watershed make this river an extremely unique, natural area that is ideal for many types of Public park related recreational uses such as boating, fishing, birdwatching, canoeing, camping, and hiking. Additionally, this natural area lends itself well to environmentally related research and educational activities.

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12Inventory Analysis Regional HistoryWhen European explorers touched the shores of the New World in the late 15th century, as documented by the drawings of the French artist Jacques le Moyne in 1564 what we now call Volusia County had been inhabited for thousands of years by indigenous peoples who were then called the Timucua. They were highly sophisticated, organized into complex social systems, towns and cities, who utilized a calendar, and whose knowledge of astronomy and medical practices were equal or superior to existing European. One of their larger habitations was believed to be nestled around the Spruce Creek basin, as evidenced by the wealth of archaeological sites and resources, many of which are still unknown to us, its present occupants. Among these resources are some of the largest and most extensive prehistoric shell mounds in the nation, many so high that they were used as major navigational landmarks during early colonial times. One of the largest prehistoric earthenworks in Florida, the Spruce Creek Mound, is located on the Creek on a high bluff. The site functioned as a major ceremonial and political center for the Timucuans, and lesser mounds are scattered throughout the surrounding areas. The colorful Timucuans left us a wealth of cultural remains, artifacts and sites. Source: Friends of the Spruce Creek Preserve The Venetian Bay site was formerly used for agriculture. The agricultural productions included vast sod farming operations. Other operations included pasturelands and cattle ranching. Some of areas of the site were forestry reserves and preservation areas. A small portion of the site was used as residential sites for small ranch style homesteads.

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13Inventory Analysis Land Uses/ Zoning SITE

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14Inventory Analysis Surrounding Land Uses Primar y Sur r ounding Land Uses:Agriculture Single Family Residential Forestry Reserve Conservation Lands Jontes Farms Vegetable Farm Single Family Residential Sod Farms Forestry Reserve

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15Inventory Analysis Circulation Major R oads:Pioneer Trail S.R. 44 I-95 Pioneer TrailView 2 Pioneer TrailView 1 Pioneer T rail: This is a two lane roadway that runs along the north side of the site. Pioneer Trail will accomodate most of the projected traffic. S.R. 44: A four lane roadway which runs along the southern side of the site. This will provide access to the Venetian Bay golf course. I-95: Interstate 95 is located approximately 1 mile east of the site. There is an existing interchange located where S.R. 44 intersects I-95. A proposed interchange is located at Pioneer Trail and I-95.

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16 Vegetation W etland Har d w ood Hammoc kThe vegetation present on site is a good indicator of the soils and their capabilities. This type of vegetation is found on wet/ hydric soils. This helps to understand that certain measures must be taken to develop on site. The majority of open space and community area plantings will use plants that are native to the site, or plants suited to these conditions. The inventory completed here indicates that we will use slash pines, cabbage palm, cypress, palmettos, wax myrtles, and other plants adapted to these conditions. Inventory Analysis

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17Vegetation Major Plant Species on SitePinus elliotiiSlash Pine Taxodium ascendensPond Cypress Sabal palmettoCabbage Palm Myrica ceriferaWax Myrtle Cabbage Palm Grove Slash Pine Stand Cypress Dome Cypress Dome Environmental Systems CorridorInventory Analysis

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18Inventory Analysis Soils There are a variety of soils found on the Venetian Bay site. Over 20 soils have been located on site. The majority of soils have a low potential for community development due to poor drainage and high water table. These soils can be built upon using alternative foundations, such as stilts or pillars. The soils on site must not be altered with cut and fill because of the resulting degradation to the adjacent Spruce Creek River. Wetland/ Hydric Soils: * Soils have a water table within 40 inches of the surface and is often above the surface in the wet season. * Soils that in its natural state provide wetland habitat. * Soils that can naturally store floodwater. Buildable Soils: * Soils that are nearly level. * Soils with rapid to moderate permeability. * Soils with low water capacity. * Soils that can support a drainage system. * Soils have a water table greater than 40 inches deep

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19Hydric Soils Soils for Open Space Soils Inventory Analysis

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20 Inventory Analysis Buildable/Hydric Soils Hydric Soils Soils capable of supporting development in their current state Soils unsuitable for development without introducing alternative foundations, suitable for open space

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21 Inventory Analysis TOPO LINESITE 25 25 20 ELEVATION 5-7 8-14 15-21 22-27 28-32 33-37 38-42 43-47 48-54Due to this siteÂ’s flat topography, drainage is a major issue. Flat topography combined with poorly drained soils, create many areas with standing water during the wet season. The identification of these areas helps to locate appropriate areas where stormwater treatment wetlands could be located. These areas need to be identified in the field. They are not identified in this topography analysis because this analysis was created to give an overall view of the siteÂ’s topography.

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22 Inventory Analysis Hydrology INCREASING FL O W AND A CCUMULA TION SITEAll runoff and water flow on site flows in a north west direction. There is accumulation in the northern and western segment of the site. Development on site needs to accommodate this flow direction and accumulation areas. The blue areas shown above represent areas where there is accumulation or ponding occurring. The blue lines above represent the direction of the water movement.

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23Inventory Analysis User Analysis User Group 1 This user group consists of retired senior citizens in their 50’s and 60’s. They are generally considered active retirees. Financially they are considered upper middle class. This group is primarily originally from northern states. Some of the qualities they find desirable are outlined here. * Prefer typical ‘postcard’ resort style development * Prefer little to no yard maintenance * Need good wayfinding and easy access * Prefer tropical plants as well as plants from their original statesThe user groups identified here are those which are projected to be in the market for this development. There may be other user groups that become generated from the proposed program and development. Those user groups will not be addressed here. This user analysis addresses the target market for Venetian Bay. User Group 2 This user group consists of young families with children under 17 years of age. They can be considered working professionals not only from New Smyrna Beach and Port Orange, but also from Orlando. Financially they are in the upper middle class. Generally they can be considered ecologically conscious and open minded to new housing and community design concepts. This can be deducted from the fact that there is a new trend occurring that includes being more “Earth smart” directed towards children and their families. Some of the qualities they find desirable are outlined here. * Require community open space (i.e. parks, playgrounds, trail system, etc.) * Prefer safe walkable communities * Require calmed or reduced residential traffic * Prefer intimate and friendly neighborhoods

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s y n t h e s i sIII.

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24 Analysis Synthesis Le g end:Watershed A Watershed B Watershed C Soils suitable for open space Buildable Soils Wetland/Hydric Soils Surrounding Vehicular Circulation HydrologyFlow Direction Site Access This analysis synthesis identifies three soil classes on site: Wetland/ Hydric soils, Buildable Soils, and Soils suitable for o pen space. The wetland/hydric soils and the open space soils on site can be developed with the introduction of alternative foundations, such as pillars. The buildable soils can be developed with little modification, making these soils an ideal place for intensive development, such as condominiums. Three watersheds have been located: Watershed A, Watershed B, and Watershed C. Stormwater runoff must be addressed for each of these watersheds individually and collectively. The Village Center and the Golf Course have been located in their appropriate locations. The design and development of these areas is not in the scope of this project. There is to be no development in the Environmental Systems Corridor.

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c o n c e p t d e v e l o p m e n tIV.

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25Concept Introduction Concept Development Each concept explored in this chapter has assumed that the site access points, located on the figure above, are to be located as shown. The main site road has been installed, as shown above, and must remain intact. The soils that can be built upon without any special consideration are labeled above as, buildable soils. Wetland and Hydric soils must be developed using alternative foundations. The environmental systems corridor must not be developed. The bahia grass fields in the eastern part of the site has been designated as the golf course location. Each of the concepts recognize these factors, in addition to the previously discussed site inventory and analysis in previous chapters. 3200Â’

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26Ecological Concept Concept Development The ecological concept focuses on the environmental quality of the site. All stormwater is treated on site through the use of a stormwater treatment wetland corridor on site. Single family lot sizes are reduced to increase density on site. Density ranges from 3.5 to 4.5 units per acre. Impervious areas are reduced through the introduction of varied housing types, such as homes on stilts or pillars. All streets are bordered by a vegetated swale system to direct runoff to the wetland corridor system, while cleansing the water partially before ever reaching the treatment wetlands. Ad v anta g es:* Environmental quality of the site is upheld and enhanced. * Good aesthetic quality and views for residents into open space and wetlands. * Opportunity for educational programs on wetlands. * Provides equal access to community open space. * Allows for natural hydrology to take place. * Protects the Environmental Systems Corridor by buffering with wetland corridor. Disad v anta g es:* Provides little sense of community. * Ease of wayfinding and access is limited. * Does not form a strong connection between the Environmental Systems Corridor and open space. * Does not provide pedestrian oriented streets. * Isolates Village Center from other areas. 3200Â’

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27Neighborhood Concept Concept Development The neighborhood concept focuses on creating a sense of place and community. It seeks to connect itsÂ’ residents with their surrounding environment through direct access to open space. Single family lots are clustered in groups of six. This was done to increase the amount of open space by increasing density. All residential areas are buffered from the main site road with native vegetation buffer, which provides an enjoyable trail system throughout the site. Densities range from 6-8 units pe r acre. This high density is balanced with access to community opne space directly adjacent to home clusters. Ad v anta g es:* Creates a sense of community. * Creates more community and open space. * Provides a safe and adequate trail system. * Ease of access and wayfinding. * Provides pedestrian oriented streets. * Begins to form a connection between the Village Center and the surrounding community. Disad v anta g es:* Does not take into consideration the siteÂ’s natural hydrology. * Does not provide good views for residents into open space. * Provides no opportunity for education. * Does not provide a strong buffer between development and the Environmental Systems Corridor. 3200Â’

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28Final Concept Concept Development The final concept focuses on creating a sense of place and community, while still upholding the environmental integrity of the site. It connects residents with the environment and each other through corridors and conservation easements. Single family lots are clustered in groups of six. All residential areas are buffered from the main site road with a native vegetatio n buffer, in which is a community trail system forming connections to neighborhoods, open space, and other areas of the community. Densities range from 6-8 units per acre in the built areas. This density is proposed to increase value added in th e form of more community open space, wetland corridors, and conservation areas. * Creates a sense of community. * Creates more community and open space. * Provides a safe and adequate trail system. * Ease of access and wayfinding. * Provides pedestrian oriented streets. * Begins to form a connection between the Village Center and the surrounding community. * Environmental quality of the site is upheld and enhanced. * Good aesthetic quality and views for residents into open space and wetlands. * Opportunity for educational programs on wetlands. * Provides equal access to community open space. * Allows for natural hydrology to take place. * Protects the Environmental Systems Corridor by buffering with wetland corridor. 3200Â’

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A R C H I T E C T U R EV.

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29Architecture Overall Character Gr een Ar c hitectur eVenetian Bay Town and Country Club will utilize “green building” techniques in all construction on site. Green Buildings are really resource efficient buildings and are very energy efficient, utilize construction materials wisely — including recycled, renewable, and reused resources to the maximum extent practical — are designed, constructed and commissioned to ensure they are healthy for their occupants, are typically more comfortable and easier to live with due to lower operating and owning costs, and are good for the planet. Some green techniques include the use of rain cisterns, rain gardens, local materials, solar heat panels, proper building orientation, etc. These are some guidelines used in the implementation of green buildings. 1. Emphasize the four “R’s” via sound design, construction and building commissioning without compromising structural durability, indoor pollutant levels, ventilation, building code requirements, or marketability, including:a. Reduce — lower quantities of building materials, resources, and embodied energy are usedb. Reuse — construction materials are reused wher e practical and structurally soundc. Recycle — recycled materials are used, and home is designed for recycle-abilityd. Renewable — energy from natural sources and r enewable building materials are emphasized.2. Use Energy, Water and Resource Efficient design, specification and construction methods3. Healthy indoor air quality (IAQ) (meets or exceeds US EPA voluntary criteria)4. Development creates a sense of well being in its neighborhood structure providing a sense of community..5. Building remains reasonably affordable and cost effectiveSource: Smart Communities Network, www.sustainable.doe.gov

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30Architecture Tidewater Retreat 4 Bedrooms, 3 Baths Conditioned Area: 1,597 square feet Porches and Decks: 545 square feet Width and Depth: 32’4” by 47’ Foundation: Pilings Architect: Carson Looney Source: Coastal Living,, Jan-Feb 2004 Housing Type 1: Tidewater Retreat Locations: Hydric soils, adjacent to wetlands T heme: * Rustic, Natural exterior with simple materials * Sophisticated, modern interior On the first floor, an open family room and dining rom share a wall of windows for an uninterrupted view of wetlands, community open space, and streets. The master suite and a bunk room occupy the second floor. From this level, a private stair leads to a viewing loft, which provides a 270 degree vista. To accomodate areas where waters ocassionally rise, steel-reinforced concrete pillars elevate the structure. On the lower level, storage is provided. Parking also occurs in this zone. Source: Kristen Payne, Coastal Living

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31Architecture Inlet Retreat 3 Bedrooms, 3 Baths Conditioned Area: 2,188 square feet Porches and Decks: 359 square feet Width and Depth: 52’ by 37’ Foundation: Pilings Architect: Allison Ramsey Architects Source: www.coastalliving.com, Mar. 2004 Housing Type 2: Inlet Retreat Locations: Soils with water table depth of 42” or less, T heme: * Rustic, Natural exterior with simple materials * Sophisticated, modern interior This 2 story residence provides 3 bedrooms, 3 baths, kitchen, living/dining area, as well as screened and covered porches. The front porch offers great views into community open space, natural systems, and eyes on the street. To accomodate areas where waters ocassionally rise, steel-reinforced concrete pillars elevate the structure approximately 18-24” above the surface. An optional ramp system will be provided for accessability purposes upon request. Parking will be provided in the rear of the house. Source: Coastal Living www.coastalliving.com Feb. 2004

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32Architecture Creek Condominiums 3 homes per structure 2 bedroom, 2 Bath homes Width and Depth: 90’ by 60’ Foundation: concrete Architect: Jaque Robertson Source: www.watercolorflorida.com, Feb 2004 Housing Type 3: Creek Condominums Locations: Soils with a water table depth greater than 42” most of the year. T heme: * Loft-like residences * Sophisticated, modern interior Oversized shutters on the exterior hint at the relaxed luxury inside. The interior spaces feature soaring ceilings and wide plank teak floors. These homes define a timeless, durable place for family and friends to enjoy week after week, year after year. Condominums offer very impressive views into the community and natural systems. Source: Water Color Private Residential Club www.watercolorflorida.com Feb. 2004

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s t o r m w a t e r m a n a g e m e n tVI.

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33 Stormwater Management PlanStormwater Management PlanWet Retention Pond Retention Areas, Forested or Wetlands Shown in this plan, is the conceptual stormwater management for the site. Arrows represent flow direction in the swale network. All arrows lead to either wet or dry retention. The longest, or worst case scenario swales, have a 1% slope to ensure water movement. The remaining swales have a 1-3% slope. The streets act as ridges with all water moving away from them into the swale network. 1200Â’ 600Â’ 0Â’ 2400Â’

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34Stormwater Management Introduction Most stormwater systems are man made ponds that are designed to control flooding and to enhance or improve water quality. These ponds temporarily store stormwater runoff as well as capture pollutants that would otherwise make their way into wetlands and waterways. These pollutants include fertilizers, pesticides, motor oil and heavy metals that wash off lawns, sidewalks, roads, and parking lots. These ponds collect these materials, therefore reducing the amount of pollutants entering the waterways. Quick Facts * Untreated stormwater runoff is now considered the stateÂ’s leading source of water pollution. * The uncontrolled growth of algae in waterways is often the result of poorly managed stormwater. * Storm water contributes approximately 80-95 percent of the heavy metals (lead, copper, cadmium) that enter Florida waters. * The amount of nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorous) in stormwater runoff are comparable to those in treated sewage. Source: Neighborhood Guide to Stormwater Systems , St. JohnÂ’s Water Management District

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35Stormwater Management Requirements This chapter discusses the stormwater management requirements for Venetian Bay Town and Country Club required by the St.JohnÂ’s River Water Management District, as well as how this project will meet and exceed these requirements. The requirements are outlined in the Regulation of Stormwater Management Systems, Chapter 40C-42, F.A.C. R equir ements f or Systems w hic h disc har g e into Class III r ecei ving w a ter bodies: Swales* T r ea tment V olume: Swales should be designed to percolate 80% of the runoff from the 3 year, 1 hour storm. The remaining 20% of the runoff from the 3 year, 1 hour storm event may be discharged offsite by the swale system. * Dimensional R equir ements: Swales must have a top width to depth ratio of the cross-section equal to or greater than 6:1 or side slopes equal to or greater than 3:1 (horizontal to vertical).Wetlands* T r ea tment V olume: Treatment of runoff from the greater of the following: a) First one inch of runoff, or b) 2.5 inches times the impervious area

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36Stormwater Management EnlargementWatershed A/Watershed B (part 1) This enlargement shows the drainage patterns of Watershed A and part 1 of Watershed B. Arrows denote flow direction. Green areas represent retention areas (Wetland or Forested).

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37Stormwater Management EnlargementWatershed B (part 2) This enlargement shows the drainage patterns of part 2 of Watershed B. Arrows denote flow direction. Green areas represent retention areas (Wetland or Forested).

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38Stormwater Management EnlargementWatershed C This enlargement shows the drainage patterns of Watershed C. Arrows denote flow direction. Green areas represent retention areas (Wetland or Forested).

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39Stormwater Management Stormwater Management Enlargement-Cluster 23’ 24’ 25’ 25’25’ 25’ 1.3% 1% 1.3% 1% 25’ 25’ 25’ 24’ 2% 25’ 26.2’ 26’ 25’ 25’ 25’ 25’ 24’ 25’ 25’ 23’ 23’ 24’ 24’ 2% 24’ 24’ 24’ This is a typical cluster and its’ stormwater management. All clusters drain in a similar way. The clusters drain towards the adjacent retention areas. These areas could consist of wetlands or forested retention areas. All swales have a minimum 1% slope. The lowest elevation of the main retention areas are to be at an elevation of 22.5’ or above to ensure that the water table is a minimum of 12” below the surface. The water table averages about 40” below the surface, with the exception of a few pockets of 12”-18” below the surface. These areas are located in areas designated as interior wetlands in the wetland corridor system.

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40Stormwater Management Site Data Total Site Area: 1250 acres, 54,450,000 S.F. Golf Course( not included in calculations): 15,210,000 S.F. Village Center( not included in calculations): 2,102,500 S.F. Environmental Systems Corridor( not included in calculations): 13,322,500 S.F. Total Impacted Area: 546 acres, 23,815,000 S.F. Imper vious: 53 acres, 2,321,662 S.F. Roadways: 11.45 ac, 499,000 S.F. Access Roads: 9.06 ac, 395, 064 S.F. Sidewalks: 4.13 ac, 180,286 S.F. Roofs: 26.56 ac, 1,157,072 S.F. Parking: 2.07 ac, 90,240 S.F. P er vious: 493 acres, 21,493,338 S.F. Open Space/Grass: 74.1 ac, 3,227,799 S.F. Forest/Buffers: 150.5 ac, 6,558,750 S.F. Residential Cluster Swales: 9.6 ac, 418,947 S.F. Wetlands: 253.8 ac, 11,055,000 S.F. Shared Unit Paver Driveways: 5.34 ac, 232,842 S.F. Watershed A5,290,000 S.F.121 acres Watershed B14,322,500 S.F.328.6 acres Watershed C4,202,500 S.F.96.4 acres

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41Stormwater Management Watershed Locations Watershed A Watershed B Watershed CThese are the watersheds on site, calculations have been done for each watershed and their runoff volumes. Calculations have also been done for the total site runoff.

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42Stormwater Management Watershed Data Watershed A5,290,000 S.F. (121 acres) Imper vious: 140,462 S .F . (3.22 acr es) Roadways: 34,000 S.F. (.78 acres) Access Roads: 33,984 S.F. (.78 acres) Sidewalks: 9,310 S.F. (.21 acres) Roofs: 63,168 S.F. (1.45 acres) P er vious: 5,149,538 S .F . (118.2 acr es) Open Space/Grass: 441,321 S.F. (10.1 acres) Forest/ Buffers: 1,679,687 S.F. (38.5 acres) Residential Cluster Swales: 28,861 S.F. (.66 acres) Wetlands: 1,322,500 S.F. (30.3 acres) Shared Unit Paver Driveway: 21,637 S.F. (.49 acres)Watershed B14,322,500 S.F. (328.6 acres) Imper vious: 1,419,942 S .F . (32.59 acr es) Roadways: 349,000 S.F. (8 acres) Access Roads: 271,872 (6.24 acres) Sidewalks: 109,462 S.F. (2.51 acres) Roofs: 689,608 S.F. (15.8 acres) P er vious: 12,893,760 S .F . (296 acr es) Open Space: 1,427,881 S.F. (32.7 acres) Forest/Buffers: 1,466,934 S.F. (33.6 acres) Residential Cluster Swales: 295,971 S.F. (6.79 acres) Wetlands: 9,572,500 S.F. (219.7 acres) Shared Unit Paver Driveway: 130,474 S.F. (2.99 acres)Watershed C4,202,500 S.F. (96.4 acres) Imper vious: 761,258 S .F . (17.4 acr es) Roadways: 116,00 S.F. (2.66 acres) Access Roads: 89,208 S.F. (2.04 acres) Sidewalks: 61,514 S.F. (1.41 acres) Roofs: 404,296 S.F. (9.28 acres) Parking: 90,240 S.F. (2.07 acres) P er vious: 3,678,862 S .F . (84.4 acr es) Open Space/Grass: 1,358,597 S.F. (31.2 acres) Forest/ Buffers: 1,985,419 S.F. (45.5 acres) Residential Cluster Swales: 94,115 S.F. (2.16 acres) Wetlands: 520,000 S.F. (11.93 acres) Shared Unit Paver Driveway: 80,731 S.F. (1.85 acres)

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43Stormwater Management Runoff Volumes-Total Total Runoff Volume: 1,343,124 cubic feet Total Runoff Treatment Required (80%)= 1,074,499 cubic feet =24.66 ac,ft Imper vious: 527,400 cubic feet Roadways: 117,360 cu.bic feet Access Roads: 92,880 cubic feet Sidewalks: 37,800 cubic feet Roofs: 258,120 cubic feet Parking: 21,240 cubic feet P er vious: 815,724 cubic feet Open Space/Grass: 240,084 cubic feet Forest/Buffers: 499,608 cubic feet Residential Cluster Swales: 41,472 cubic feet Wetlands: 0 cubic feet (no runoff) Shared Unit Paver Driveways: 34,560 cubic feet

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44Stormwater Management Runoff Volumes-Watersheds Watershed A195,517 cubic feet (4.48 acre feet) Imper vious: 32,027 cubic f eet Roadways: 8,002 cu.ft. Access Roads: 8,002 cu.ft. Sidewalks: 1,927 cu.ft. Roofs: 14,094 cu.ft. P er vious: 163,490 cubic f eet Open Space/Grass: 32,724 cu.ft. Forest/ Buffers: 124,740 cu.ft. Residential Cluster Swales: 2,851 cu.ft. Wetlands: 0 cu.ft. Shared Unit Paver Driveway: 3,175 cu.ft.Watershed B586,238 cubic feet (13.5 acre feet) Imper vious: 322,719 cubic f eet Roadways: 82,080 cu.ft. Access Roads: 64,022 cu.ft. Sidewalks: 23,041 cu.ft. Roofs: 153,576 cu.ft. P er vious: 263,519 cubic f eet Open Space: 105,948 cu.ft. Forest/Buffers: 108,864 cu.ft. Residential Cluster Swales: 29,332 cu.ft. Wetlands: 0 cu.ft. Shared Unit Paver Driveway: 19,375 cu.ft.Watershed C441,312 cubic feet (10.13 acre feet) Imper vious: 171,485 cubic f eet Roadways: 27,291 cu.ft. Access Roads: 20,930 cu.ft. Sidewalks: 12,943 cu.ft. Roofs: 90,201 cu.ft. Parking: 20,120 cu.ft. P er vious: 269,827 cubic f eet Open Space/Grass: 101,088 cu.ft. Forest/ Buffers: 147,420 cu.ft. Residential Cluster Swales: 9,331 cu.ft. Wetlands: 0 cu.ft. Shared Unit Paver Driveway: 11,988 cu.ft.

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45Stormwater Management Runoff TreatmentRequired Vs. Provided Watershed A Required Treatment: 3.59 acre feet Pr o vided: 30.3 acr e f eet Watershed B Required Treatment: 10.76 acre feet Pr o vided: 219.7 acr e f eet Watershed C Required Treatment: 8.10 acre feet Pr o vided: 11.93 acr e f eet

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46Stormwater Management Sample Calculations Q= CIA Q= peak runoff rate, cubic feet per second C= Coefficient of runoff (0-1) I= rainfall intensity, inches per hour A= Area of drainage area(ac) Q x (sec/hr)= Volume of runoff(cubic feet) Imper vious: 527,400 cubic feet Roadways: (.95)(3)(11.45)=32.6(3600)= 117,360 cubic feet Access Roads: (.95)(3)(9.06 ac)=25.8(3600)= 92,880 cubic feet Sidewalks: (.85)(3)(4.13)=10.5(3600)=37,800 cubic feet Roofs: (.90)(3)(26.56)=71.7(3600)=258,120 cubic feet Parking: (.95)(3)(2.07)=5.9(3600)=21,240 cubic feet P er vious: 815,724 cubic feet Open Space/Grass: (.30)(3)(74.1)=66.69(3600)=240,084 cubic feet Forest/Buffers: (.30)(3)(154.2)=138.78(3600)=499,608 cubic feet Residential Cluster Swales: (.40)(3)(9.6)=11.52(3600)=41,472 cubic feet Wetlands: 0 cubic feet (no runoff) Shared Unit Paver Driveways:(.6)(3)(5.34)=9.6(3600)= 34,560 cubic feet

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47Stormwater Management Details Wet Detention/ Pond DetailN.T.S. Swale DetailN.T.S.W D 6:1 Width to Depth Ratio

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m a s t e r p l a n VII.

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48 Site Master PlanSite Master Plan 2000Â’ 1000Â’ 500Â’ 0Â’Shown here is the Site Master Plan. Please refer to enlargements for more detailed study of the master plan.

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49Illustrative Master Plan Enlargement-Watershed A Master Plan Proposed Wetland Corridor Main Site Road Single Family Cluster Access Road

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50Illustrative Master Plan Enlargement-Watershed B Master Plan Garden Center/ Wetland Science Center Wetland Corridor Single Loaded Lots See Appendix B

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51Illustrative Master Plan Enlargement-Watershed C Master Plan Condominiums Community Recreation Fields See Appendix B

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52Illustrative EnlargementsCluster Green Space Master Plan

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53Illustrative SectionSingle Family Cluster Master Plan Single Family Lot Cluster Green Space Single Family Lot Shown here is a cross section of a single family cluster. The green space serves as open space for all residents to access.

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54Development StandardsLots Master Plan Single Family Lot: 6,000 S.F.

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55Development Standards-Tidewater Retreat-Cluster Master Plan * Tide w a ter R etr ea t F ootprint: 32Â’ x 47Â’: 25% Lot co v er a g e * 16,000 S.F. Community green open space * All homes will have a 12Â’-15Â’ Built-to-Line from the R.O.W. * Tidewater Retreat Cluster: 74.8% Pervious Surface, 25.2% Impervious Surface Impervious Surface: 14,602 S.F. Access Road: 4,248 S.F. Roof: 9,024 S.F. Sidewalk: 1,330 S.F. Pervious Surface: 43,461 S.F. Grass/Open Space: 34,692 S.F. Swale: 4,123 S.F. Shared Unit Paver Driveways: 3,431 S.F. Gravel Guest Parking: 1,215 S.F.Swale Swale

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56Development Standards-Inlet Retreat-Cluster * Inlet R etr ea t F ootprint: 52Â’ x 37Â’: 32% Lot co v er a g e * 16,000 S.F. Community green open space * All homes will have a 10Â’-15Â’ Built-to-Line from the R.O.W. * Tidewater Retreat Cluster: 69.5 % Pervious Surface, 30.5% Impervious Surface Impervious Surface: 17,122 S.F. Access Road: 4,248 S.F. Roof: 11,544 S.F. Sidewalk: 1,330 S.F. Pervious Surface: 39,125 S.F. Grass/Open Space: 30,696 S.F. Swale: 4,123 S.F. Shared Unit Paver Driveways: 3,091 S.F. Gravel Guest Parking: 1,215 S.F. Master Plan

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57Development Standards-Tidewater Retreat-Single Loaded Master Plan * Tide w a ter R etr ea t F ootprint: 32Â’ x 47Â’: 25% Lot co v er a g e * All homes will have a 12Â’-15Â’ Built-to-Line from the R.O.W. * Tidewater Retreat Single : 74.3% Pervious Surface, 25.7 % Impervious Surface Impervious Surface: 1,862 S.F. Roof: 1,504 S.F. Sidewalk: 358 S.F. Pervious Surface: 5,387 S.F. Grass/Open Space: 3,721S.F. Swale: 269 S.F. Shared Unit Paver Driveways: 1,397 S.F. Lot A Lot B

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58Development Standards-Inlet Retreat-Single Loaded Master Plan * Inlet R etr ea t F ootprint: 52Â’ x 37Â’: 32% Lot co v er a g e * All homes will have a 10Â’-15Â’ Built-to-Line from the R.O.W. * Tidewater Retreat Single : 68.5% Pervious Surface, 31.5 % Impervious Surface Impervious Surface: 2,282 S.F. Roof: 1,924 S.F. Sidewalk: 358 S.F. Pervious Surface: 4,967 S.F. Grass/Open Space: 3,301S.F. Swale: 269 S.F. Shared Unit Paver Driveways: 1,397 S.F. Lot A Lot B

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59 Development StandardsCreek Condominiums Master Plan * Cr eek Condominium Unit F ootprint: 90Â’ x 60Â’ * Creek Condominiums: 58.5% Pervious, 41.5% Impervious Impervious Surface: 11,090 S.F. Roof: 5,400 S.F. Sidewalk: 1,178 S.F. Parking: 4,512 S.F. Pervious Surface: 15,626 S.F. Grass/Open Space: 12,900 S.F. Swale: 1,935 S.F. Shared Unit Paver Driveway: 791 S.F. Unit 1 Unit 2

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60Development StandardsRoadway Sections * R oad w a y Section: Sing le Loaded Neighborhood R oad w a y * 20’ Aphalt Roadway * Pedestrian/ Bicycle Trails: 6’ width * Swales: 5’ native vegetation, primarily native grasses * Gravel Parking: 10’ permeable parking strip * No curb and gutter * Cross-slope: 1% Master Plan Scale: 1”=10’

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61Development StandardsRoadway Sections * R oad w a y Section: Cluster s and Condominiums Neighborhood R oad w a y * 20’ Asphalt Roadway * Pedestrian/ Bicycle Trails: 6’ width * Swales: 15’, planted with native vegetation * Cross Slope: 1% Master Plan Scale: 1”=10’

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62Development StandardsRoadway Sections * R oad w a y Section: Cluster Access R oads * 18’ Asphalt Roadway * Swales: 20’, planted with native vegetation * Cross Slope: 1% Master Plan Scale: 1”=10’

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63Development StandardsRoadway Detail * R oad w a y Detail: * 1 1/2” Asphalt Surface Course * 2 1/2” Asphalt Base Course * Cross Slope: 1% * 6” Aggregate Base * 6” Aggregate Subbase * Prepared Subgradecompacted to 95% at optimum moisture. Master Plan

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64Development StandardsSidewalk Detail * Side w alk Detail: * Brushed Surface Finish * 4” Concrete Slab * 4” Sand Aggregate Base Master Plan

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w e t l a n d d e s i g n g u i d e l i n e sVIII.

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65Source: Wetlands, 3rd EditionStormwater Wetland Design Guidelines General Principles1. Design the system for minimum maintenance. The system of plants, animals, microbes, substrate, and water flows should be developed for self-maintenance and self-design. 2. Design the system with the hydrologic and ecological landscape and climate. Floods, droughts, and storms are expected disturbances and should not be feared. 3. Design the system to fulfill multiple goals, but identify at least one major objective and several secondary objectives. 4. Design the ecosystem as an ecotone. This may require a buffer strip around the wetland site, but it also means that the wetland site itself will be a buffer system between upland and aquatic systems. 5. Give the system time. Wetlands do not become functional overnight. Several years may pass before plant establishment, nutrient retention, and wildlife enhancement can become optimal. Strategies that try to short circuit ecological succession or overmanage it are doomed to failure. 6. Design the system for function, not form. If initial plantings and animal introductions fail but the overall function of th e wetland, based on the fulfillment of initial objectives, is being carried out, then the wetland has not failed. The outbreak o f plant diseases and the invasion of alien species are often symptomatic of other stresses and may indicate false expectations rather than ecosystem failure. 7. Do not overengineer wetland design with rectangular basins, rigid structures and channels, and regular morphology. Natural systems should be mimicked to accommodate biological systems. Defining GoalsThe design of an appropriate wetland or series of wetlands, whether for the control of nonpoint source pollution, for a wildlif e habitat, or for wastewater treatment, should start with the formulation of the overall objectives of the wetland. The most important aspect of designing a wetland is to define the goal of the wetland project. Among the possible goals for wetland construction are the following: 1. Flood control 2. Wastewater treatment 3. Stormwater or nonpoint source pollution control 4. Ambient water quality improvement 5. Coastal restoration 6. Wildlife enhancement 7. Fisheries enhancement 8. Replacement of similar habitat 9. Research wetland The goal, or a series of goals, should be determined before a specific site is chosen or a wetland is designed. If several goa ls are identified, one must be chosen as primary.

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66Stormwater Wetland Design Guidelines Site SelectionSeveral important factors ultimately determine site selection. When the objective is defined, the appropriate site should allo w for the maximum probability that the objective can be met, that construction can be done at a reasonable cost, that the system will perform in a generally predictable way, and that the long term maintenance costs of the system are not excessive. 1. Wetland restoration is generally more feasible than wetland creation: Find a site where wetlands previously existed or where nearby wetlands still exist. In these areas, the soil will probably be suitable, seed sources may be on site or nearby, and the appro priate hydrologic conditions may exist. 2. Take into account the surrounding land use and the future plans for the land: Future land use plans such as abandoning agricultural fields to become old field ecosystems may be obviate the need for a wetland to control nonpoint runoff. 3. Undertake a detailed hydrologic study of the site, including a determination of the potential interaction of groundwater with t he proposed wetland: Without flooding or saturated soils for at least part of the growing season, a wetland will not develop. For coastal wetlands, the tidal cycle and stages are important. 4. Find a site where natural inundation is frequent: Sites should be inspected during flood season and heavy rains, and the annual and extreme event flooding history of the site should be determined as closely as possible. 5. Inspect and characterize the soils in some detail to determine their permeability, texture, and stratigraphy: Highly permeable soils are not likely to support a wetland unless water inflow rates are excessive. 6. Determine the chemistry of the soils, groundwater, surface flows, flooding streams and rivers, and tides that may influence the site water quality. 7. Evaluate on site and nearby seed banks to determine their viability and response to hydrologic conditions. 8. Determine the ownership of the land and the price: These are often major considerations. Additional lands may need to be purchased in the future to provide a buffer zone and room for expansion. 9. Determine the availability of necessary fill material, seed, and plant stocks and access to infrastructure. 10. Assess site access: Public access will eventually need to be controlled to avoid vandalism and personal injury. A remote site that offers possibilities of fewer mosquito complaints, lower property costs, and less drastic social impact is often preferable to an urban one. Urban wetlands, however, offer more possibilities to for programs on wetland education and school groups and the public. 11. Ensure that an adequate amount of land is available to meet the objectives. 12. Evaluate the position of the proposed wetland in the landscape.

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67 V e g eta tionThe species of vegetation types to be introduced to created and restored wetlands depend upon the type of wetland desired, the region, and the climate as well as the design characteristics described previously. Na tur al succession v er sus hor ticultur e An important general consideration of wetland design is whether plant material is going to be allowed to develop naturally from some initial seeding and planting or whether continuous horticultural selection for desired plants will be imposed. To develop a wetland that will ultimately be low maintenance, natural succession processes need to be allowed to take place. This may mean some initial period of invasion by undesirable species, but if proper hydrologic conditions are imposed, these invasions will be temporary. The best strategy is to introduce, by seeding and planting, as many choices as possible to allow natural processes to sort out the species and communities in a timely fashion. Wetlands created or restored by this approach are called self-design wetlands. A different approach, designer wetlands , occurs when specified plant species are introduced and the success or failure of those plants are used as indicators of success or failure of that wetland. Planting tec hniques Plants can be introduced to a wetland by transplanting roots, rhizomes, tubers, seedlings, or mature plants; by broadcasting seeds obtained commercially or from other sites, by importing substrate and its seed bank from nearby wetlands; or by relying on the seed bank of the original and surrounding site. If planting stocks are used, it is more desirable to choose pla nts from wild stock rather than nurseries because wild stock is better adapted to the environmental conditions they will face in constructed wetlands. The plants should come from nearby if possible and should be planted within 36 hours of collection. These wetlands need to be planted at densities to ensure rapid colonization, adequate seed source and effective competition. This could mean introducing 2,000 to 5,000 plants/ha. For emergent plants, the use of planting material with at least 20 to 30 cm stems is recommended; whole plants, rhizomes, or tubers rather than seeds have been most successful. Spring plantings are generally more successful. This minimizes the destructive grazing of plants in the winter by migratory animals and to avoid the uprooting of new plants by ice. Transplanting plugs or cores from existing wetlands is successful. It brings seeds, shoots, and roots of a variety of wetland plants to the new wetland. Designing f or SuccessThe three factors that lead to failure in a project are: 1. Little understanding of wetland function by those constructing the wetlands 2. Insufficient time for the wetlands to develop 3. Lack of recognition or underestimation of the self design capacity of nature.Stormwater Wetland Design Guidelines

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68 Summar y R ecommenda tions 1. Wetland restoration and creation proposals must be viewed with great care, particularly when promises are made to restore or recreate a natural system in exchange for a permit. 2. Multidisciplinary expertise in planning and careful project supervision at all project levels is needed. 3. Clear, site-specific measurable goals should be established. 4. A relatively detailed plan concerning all phases of the project should be prepared in advance to help evaluate the probability of success. 5. Site-specific studies should be carried out in the original system prior to wetland alteration if wetlands are being lost in the project. 6. Careful attention to wetland hydrology is needed in design. 7. Wetlands should, in general, be designed to be self-sustaining systems and persistent features of the landscape. 8. Wetland design should consider relationships of the wetland to the watershed, water sources, other wetlands in the watershed, and adjacent upland and deepwater habitat. 9. Buffers, barriers, and other protective measures are often needed. 10. Restoration should be favored over creation. 11. The capability for monitoring and mid-course corrections is needed. 12. The capability for long term management is needed for some types of systems. 13. Risks inherent in restoration and creation, and the probability of success for restoring or creating particular wetland types and functions, should be reflected in standards and criteria for projects and project design. 14. Restoration for artificial or already altered systems requires special treatment. 15. Emphasis on ecological restoration of watersheds and landscape ecosystem management requires advanced planning. Stormwater Wetland Design Guidelines

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m a n a g e m e n t & p l a n t i n gIX.

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69Management and Planting Wetlands Management PlanIn order to ensure that the wetlands on site will be low maintenance, natural succession processes will be allowed to take place. All wetlands will be considered self-design wetlands. This strategy of planting and management involves introducing as many different plant species as possible, in a random pattern. This allows the site to form its own plant communities over time, in their appropriate place by introducing a multitude of species. The main objective is to restore the site to its natur al ecosystem. Planting:* 4,000 plants per 2.47 acres(1 ha) * All plantings should be done in the spring. * Emer g ents Plugs or cores 1 gal.-7gal. sizes Transplants to be harvested from local wetlands. * Seeds Commercial stock Broadcast randomly

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70Management and Planting List of Approved Plants-Wetlands In order to protect, preserve and enhance the environmental integrity of the site all vegetation planted in wetland spaces will be from the following list. The plants listed below are common native plants that would be found on site under natural conditions. W etlands T r ees * Loblolly Bay * Red Maple * Water Oak * Sweet Gum * Bald Cypress * Pond Cypress Emer g ent * Sweet flag * Sawgrass * Sedges * Spike Rush * MannaGrass * Rose mallow * Yellow iris * Smartweed Submer g ed * Coontail * Waterweed * Milfoil * Sago pondweed * Tape grass Grasses * Longleaf uniola * Low panicum Source: Waterwise, Florida Landscapes

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71Management and Planting List of Approved Plants In order to protect, preserve and enhance the environmental integrity of the site all vegetation planted in community, residential, and preservation spaces will be from the following list. The plants listed below are common native plants that would be found on site under natural conditions. Buffers and Plantings T r ees * American Holly * Dahoon Holly * Cabbage Palm * Fringe Tree * Live Oak * Loblolly Bay * Red Maple * Loblolly Pine * Longleaf Pine * Hawthorns * Southern Magnolia * Red Cedar * Water Oak * Slash Pine * Swamp Chestnut Oak * Sweet Gum Shr ubs * American Beautyberry * Shining Sumac * Yaupon Holly * Saw Palmetto * Wax Myrtle * Witch Hazel Herbaceous * Aster * Blackeyed Susan * Cone flower * Day flower * Rose mallow * Meadowbeauty * Sunflower Grasses * Longleaf uniola * Low panicum Typical Forested Retention Oaks and Palmettos Typical Residential PlantingSource: Waterwise, Florida Landscapes Source: Waterwise, Florida Landscapes Source: Coastal Living, March 2004

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72Management and Planting All wetlands proposed on site will be self-designed wetlands. Planting is done in a random pattern allowing the site to dictate which plants colonize individual areas. Please refer to the list of approved wetland plants discussed earlier in this chapter. Wetlands Section Scale: 1”=5’

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73Management and Planting Forested Buffer/ Retention Section The forested buffers and forested retention areasare to be planted in a random pattern as well. When not being used as retention during intense storms, these areas will serve as valuable wildlife habitat, recreation areas, and natural preservation spaces. Please refer to the list of approved plants discussed earlier in this chapter.Scale: 1”=5’

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c o n c l u s i o n X.

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r e f e r e n c e s XI.

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a p p e n d i x a

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B UILT G REEN Green Communities Self-Certification Checklist xi September 2002 Green Communities Self-Certification Checklist Check items you will be including in this project to qualify for a B UILT G REEN star rating. Requirements to Qualify at 1-Star Level (All items plus orientation and commitment to Built Green Home Builder Program for all homes in the community at the 1-Star Level) Program Orientation (one time only) Earn 100 points total from Sections 1 through 3, any items, with at least 15 points each section A percentage of new home starts in the development must meet the Built Green 1Star Level requirements (Action Item 1-60) Orient & Promote Built Green to Builders in the Development (Action Item 1-61) Do Not Dispose of Topsoil in Lowlands or Wetlands (Action Item 3 -10) Optimally Maintain all Temporary Erosion Control Practices (Action Item 3-21) Properly Dispose of Hazardous Wastes (Action Item 3-25) Requirements to Qualify at 2-Star Level Meet 1-Star requirements, plus Earn 200 points total (100 additional points) from Sections 1 through 3, with at least 20 points from each Section, plus Attend a B UILT G REEN approved workshop within past 12 months prior to certification Requirements to Qualify at 3-Star Level Meet 2-Star requirements, plus Earn 350 points total (150 additional points) Section One: Site Selection & Design SELECTION o (10-45) 1-1. Redevelop and restore existing sites o (10) 1-2. Locate to reduce dependence on automobiles o (10) 1-3. Prepare site analysis and inventory for all potential sites o (5) 1-4. Choose site with no environmentally-sensitive areas DESIGN Land Use Site Water Management o (30) 1-5. Create a Low Impact Development o (5) 1-6. Design to avoid impact on sensitive areas Infiltration o (15) 1-7 Design to achieve no more than 10% effective impervious surface areas o (4-8) 1-8. Use filter strips to separate impervious surfaces o (5) 1-9. Design site water management system that allows groundwater to recharge o (1 each) 1-10. Use infiltration system for surface water runoff

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B UILT G REEN Green Communities Self-Certification Checklist ii September 2002 Treatment o (1-3) 1-11. Meet treatment standards using nature-based methods or exceed treatment standards o (2) 1-12. Provide stormwater treatment for parking lots/traffic island runoff using bioretention areas, filter strips, or other practice o (1) 1-13. Clearly label all storm sewer inlets with stenciling to inform residents about proper stormwater protection Flow Control and Conveyance o (3) 1-14 Use natural drainage for surface water runoff o (1) 1-15. Use infiltration basins for flow control Storage and Detention o (8) 1-16. Use constructed wetlands for stormwater storage and detention o (1) 1-17. Use detent ion ponds for surface water runoff Wastewater Treatment o (25) 1-18. On-site wastewater treatment Density o (6) 1-19. Design for maximum population density allowable under Growth Management Act o (5) 1-20. Plan for variable lot sizes to encourage higher density o (4) 1-21. Cluster homes on site Open Space Planning o (3-6) 1-22. Preserve usable open spaces o (6) 1-23. Provide and preserve wildlife corridor o (2-4) 1-24. Provide attached parks or pocket parks within buildable area Vegetation o (3-10) 1-25. Preserve a percent of lowlands and areas with mature vegetated soils o (4-10) 1-26. Preserve percentage of existing native vegetation and soils o (10) 1-27. Clear only areas needed to install roadways, parking areas, and common area buildings Paved Surface Design o (2) 1-28. Design streets to conform to natural terrain o (5) 1-29. Where permitted, design no street curbs or gutters o (6-10) 1-30. Minimize pavement in street design o (1 each) 1-31. If design calls for cul-de-sacs, hammerheads, or other dead-ends, connect ends with paths o (2) 1-32. Install traffic-calming devices, such as curb bulbs o (5-10) 1-33. Design parking areas and pathways to minimize impact of surface water runoff and reduce impervious surface area o (10) 1-34. Use porous paving opt ions for light-traffic areas o (4) 1-35. Use recycled-content materials for paving o (5) 1-36. Eliminate blacktop , use new coats or integral colorants to achieve light-colored surfaces o (15) 1-37. Provide alleys for rear garage access Community Enhancement o (5-15+) 1-38. Create a mixed-use (residential/commercial) development o (6) 1-39. Provide mix of housing types o (2-15) 1-40. Provide community facilities Landscaping – Common Areas Trees and Shrubs o (15) 1-41. Participate and qualify for the Nationa l Arbor Day Foundation’s “Building With Trees” Recognition Program o (10) 1-42. Create 65% canopy in completed development o (8) 1-43. Plant appropriate trees and shrubs to provide shade (within 5 years) on at least 30% of impervious surfaces on site Plant Selection o (3-5) 1-44. Landscape common areas with plants that will not need supplemental watering once established (appropriate for site topography, soil types, and sun exposure) o (5) 1-45. Properly install a grass type requiring less irrigation and minimal maintenance for common areas Plant Establishment o (15) 1-46. Amend disturbed soil to a depth of 8 to 10 inches to restore soil environmental functions o (5) 1-47. Mulch landscape beds in common areas with 2 inches of organic material o (3) 1-48. If choosing to use fertilizers, use natural organic or slow-release fertilizers to establish vegetation in common areas Outdoor Amenities o (3) 1-49. Specify non-toxic or low-toxic outdoor landscaping lumber o (4-8) 1-50. Use recycled-content or resourceefficient site accessories Efficient Irrigation o (3-8) 1-51. Install high-efficiency irrigation system where on-going irrigation is needed o (3-5) 1-52. Install irrigation system using recycled/reclaimed water o (8) 1-53. Install no permanent irrigation system

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B UILT G REEN Green Communities Self-Certification Checklist iii September 2002 Transportation o (20) 1-54. Develop Integrated Mobility Center o (15) 1-55. Develop Transportation Management Plan o (4-6+) 1-56. Provide pedestrian-friendly access routes beyond code o (5+) 1-57. Provide commuter lot near arterials and collector streets o (3 each) 1-58. Provide on-site transportation shelters o (3) 1-59. Provide connectivity with surrounding street network Integration & Innovation o ( ) 1-60. Require a percentage of new home starts in the development to meet Built Green Home Builder 1-Star level requirements o ( ) 1-61. Orient & promote Built Green to builders in the development o ( 2-20) 1-62 Require homes in development to meet Built Green Home Builder 2-star level or more requirements o (5-15) 1-63. Orient lots for passive sola r o (10) 1-64. Use alternative heat and energy sources o (8) 1-65. Design street and other exterior lighting to reduce light pollution and trespass o (8) 1-66. Design and construct common area buildings to meet the 2-star level of the Built Green Home Builders Program o (5) 1-67. Provide for public space recycling collection o (1-10) 1-68. Extra Credit for innovation Section Two: Planning & Education COVENANTS & BUILDER GUIDELINES Pedestrian Friendly Design o (3-10) 2-1. Require shared parking for mixed use developments o (5) 2-2. Use minimum parking standards as maximums for on-street and off-street parking o (5) 2-3. Require pedestrian-friendly design amenities Other Covenants o (5) 2-4. Require Built Green qualifying exterior materials and finishes o (5) 2-5. Require protection of trees and open spaces o (3) 2-6. Require builders to provide homeowners/residents with recycling storage and collection system o (3) 2-7. Prepare builders’ guidelines on exterior lighting to reduce light pollution and trespass EDUCATION o (30) 2-8. Conduct design and planning Charette o (2) 2-9. Use Built Green common area buildings to educate residents o (4) 2-10. Prepare a homeowners’ handbook for living in a green community o (4) 2-11. Provide a builders’ field guide of b est management practices o (2) 2-12. Provide interpretive signs highlighting key environmental and other features o (2) 2-13. Encourage builders in your development to build lots with smaller overall footprint and to reduce impervious surfaces o (1 each) 2 -14. Provide educational events, including tours or seminars, to promote your green development OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE o (10) 2-15. Prepare a landscape operations and maintenance plan o (10) 2-16. Prepare an operations and maintenance plan for common area facilities

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B UILT G REEN Green Communities Self-Certification Checklist iv September 2002 Section Three: Construction Operations EROSION & SEDIMENTATION CONTROL o (5) 3-1. Preserve and protect wetlands, shoreline, bluffs, and other critical areas during development o (1) 3-2. Allow for steeper natural slopes o (10) 3-3. Phase gra ding so that no more than 40% of the site is disturbed at one time o (1) 3-4. Protect adjacent, upstream, and downstream properties from adverse effects of increased runoff o (5) 3-5. No clearing or grading during winter months o (4) 3-6. Mark clearing lim its o (4) 3-7. Construct stormwater detention facilities as a first step in grading o (10) 3-8. Balance cut and fill while maintaining original topography o (4) 3-9. Retain all native topsoil on site and protect stockpiles from erosion o ( ) 3-10. Do not dispose of topsoil in lowlands or wetlands o (3) 3-11. Use compost to stabilize disturbed slopes o (3) 3-12. Limit heavy equipment use zone to limit soil compaction o (1) 3-13. Establish a single stabilized construction entrance (quarry spall or crushed rock) o (1) 3-14. Establish a tire wash o (1) 3-15. Clean roads thoroughly at the end of each day to prevent sedimentation o (1) 3-16. Protect storm drain inlets during construction o (5) 3-17. Use compost filter berms, tubes, and socks in place of silt fences o (3) 3-18. Supplement permanent flow-control measures with necessary temporary controls o (3) 3-19. Protect permanent stormwater facilities from siltation during construction o (4) 3-20. Install supplemental erosion control BMPs as back up o ( ) 3-21. Optimally maintain all temporary erosion control practices VEGETATION MANAGEMENT o (2) 3-22. Grind landclearing wood and stumps for reuse on site o (3) 3-23. Replant or donate removed vegetation for immediate reuse POLLUTION PREVENTION o (1) 3-24. Recycle anti-freeze, oil, and oil filters at appropriate outlets o ( ) 3-25. Properly dispose of all hazardous wastes o (1) 3-26. Cover and protect all hazardous materials and store them properly during construction o (1) 3-27. Maintain heavy equipment so as to protect ground and stormwater o (1) 3-28. Preve nt or treat contamination of storm water INNOVATIVE BUILDER ASSISTANCE o (3-10) 3-29. Provide assistance to builders in development ___________ Total Points for Project Program Level Obtained: q 1-Star q 2-Star q 3-Star By my signature, I certify that I have performed all Action Items checked above: ________________________________ ________ (Developer Signature and Date)

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BUILT GREEN™ Handbook—HOME BUILDERS Self-Certification ChecklistPart I-iii 2003 Version HOME BUILDER HOME BUILDER HOME BUILDER HOME BUILDER Self-Certification Checklist Self-Certification Checklist Self-Certification Checklist Self-Certification Checklist Check items you will be including in this project to qualify for a BUILT GREEN™ star rating.Version 2003Requirements to Qualify at 1-Star Level (All ! items plus orientation) Program Orientation (one time only) Section 1: Build to “Green” Codes & Regulations Earn 25 points from Sections 2 through 6, any items Prepare/post a jobsite recycling plan (Action Item 5-19) Provide an Operations & Maintenance Kit (Action Item 6-1)Requirements to Qualify at 2-Star Level (100 points minimum) Meet 1-Star requirements Earn 75 additional points from Sections 2 through 6, with at least 6 points from each Section Attend a BUILT GREEN™ approved workshop within past 12 months prior to certificationRequirements to Qualify at 3-Star Level (180 points minimum) Meet 2-Star requirements plus 105 additional points Section One: Build to Green Codes/Regulations ( ! )1-1.Meet Washington State Wtr Use Effcy Stds ( ! )1-2.Meet Stormwater/Site Development Stds ( ! )1-3.Meet Washington State Energy Code ( ! )1-4.Meet Washington State Ventilation/IAQ Code Section Two: Site and Water SITE PROTECTION SITE PROTECTION SITE PROTECTION SITE PROTECTION Overall Overall Overall Overall (3)2-1.Build on an infill lot to take advantage of existing infrastructure and reduce development of virgin sites (10)2-2.Build in a BUILT GREEN™ development Protect Site’s Natural Features Protect Site’s Natural Features Protect Site’s Natural Features Protect Site’s Natural Features (3)2-3.Limit heavy equipment use zone to limit soil compaction (3)2-4.Preserve existing native vegetation as landscaping (3)2-5.Take extra precautions to protect trees during construction (3)2-6.Preserve and protect wetlands, shorelines, bluffs, and other critical areas during construction (5-10)2-7.Set aside percentage of site to be left undisturbed Protect Natural Processes On-Site Protect Natural Processes On-Site Protect Natural Processes On-Site Protect Natural Processes On-Site (2)2-8.Install temporary erosion control devices and optimally maintain them (3)2-9.Use compost to stabilize disturbed slopes (2)2-10.Protect topsoil with mulch or plastic (3)2-11.Balance cut and fill, while maintaining original topography (3)2-12.Limit grading to 20 ft outside building footprint (4)2-13.Amend disturbed soil to a depth of 8 to 10 inches to restore soil environmental functions (3)2-14.Replant or donate removed vegetation for immediate reuse (3)2-15.Grind landclearing wood and stumps for reuse (5)2-16.Use a water management system that allows groundwater to recharge (5)2-17.Design to achieve effective impervious surface equivalent to 0% for 5 acres and above; <10% for less than 5 acres (5)2-18.Use pervious materials for at least one-third of total area for driveways, walkways, patios (10)2-19.Bonus Points: Install vegetated roof system (e.g. eco-roof) to reduce impervious surface (10)2-20.Bonus Points: Construct no impervious surfaces outside house footprint Eliminate Water Pollutants Eliminate Water Pollutants Eliminate Water Pollutants Eliminate Water Pollutants (1)2-21.Take extra care to establish and maintain a single stabilized construction entrance (quarry spall or crushed rock) (1)2-22.Take extra precautions to install and maintain sediment trapsH H H HOW TO OW TO OW TO OW TO U U U USE THE SE THE SE THE SE THE C C C CHECKLIST HECKLIST HECKLIST HECKLIST! (2) 2—33. 2—33. 2—33. 2—33.Construct tire wash Construct tire wash Construct tire wash Construct tire wash Action item to be implemented (! items are required) Order action item appears in Section (numerical) Section where action item description appears Point value of action item (when range of points, refer to Part I narrative.) Check ( " ) when completed

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BUILT GREEN™ Handbook—HOME BUILDERS Self-Certification ChecklistPart I-iv 2003 Version (1)2-23.Establish and post clean up protocol for tire wash (1) 2-24.Take extra precautions to not dispose of topsoil in lowlands or wetlands (1)2-25.Wash out concrete trucks in slab or pavement subbase areas (1)2-26.Prohibit burying construction waste (1)2-27.When construction is complete, leave no part of the disturbed site uncovered or unstabilized (1)2-28.Recycle antifreeze, oil, and oil filters at appropriate outlets (1)2-29.Dispose of non-recyclable hazardous waste at legally permitted facilities (1)2-30.Establish and post clean up procedures for spills to prevent illegal discharges (1)2-31.Reduce hazardous waste through good jobsite housekeeping (2)2-32.Provide an infiltration system for rooftop runoff (2)2-33.Construct tire wash (2)2-34.Use slow-release organic fertilizers to establish vegetation (2)2-35.Use less toxic form releasers (3)2-36.Use non-toxic or low-toxic outdoor lumber for landscaping (e.g. plastic, least-toxic treated wood) (4)2-37.Phase construction so that no more than 60% of site is disturbed at a time and to prevent adverse impacts on adjoining properties or critical areas (5)2-38.No clearing or grading during winter months (2)2-39.No zinc galvanized ridge caps, copper flashing or copper wires for moss prevention DESIGN ALTERNATIVES DESIGN ALTERNATIVES DESIGN ALTERNATIVES DESIGN ALTERNATIVES (4)2-40.Bonus Points: Provide an accessory dwelling unit or accessory living quarters (5)2-41.Bonus Points: Build north area of the lot first, retaining south area for outdoor activities (5)2-42.Bonus Points: Provide a front porch (5)2-43.Bonus Points: Position garage so it is not in front of house (2-5)2-44.Bonus Points: Minimize garage size_______ Subtotal for Section Two Section Three: Energy Efficiency ENVELOPE ENVELOPE ENVELOPE ENVELOPE Thermal Performance Thermal Performance Thermal Performance Thermal Performance (10-40)3-1.Document envelope improvements beyond code (component performance approach) (1-55)3-2.Document envelope improvements beyond code (prescriptive approach) (5)3-3.Bonus Points: Participate in a program that provides third-party plan review and inspection (e.g., ENERGY STAR®, BUILT SMART) Air Sealing Air Sealing Air Sealing Air Sealing (1)3-4.House wrapped with an exterior air infiltration barrier to manufacturer’s specifications (3)3-5.Airtight Drywall Approach for framed structures (3)3-6.Use airtight building method, such as SIP or ICF (5)3-7.Blower door test Reduce Thermal Bridging Reduce Thermal Bridging Reduce Thermal Bridging Reduce Thermal Bridging (2)3-8.Use insulated headers (2)3-9.Fully insulate corners (requires 2-stud instead of 3-stud corners) (2)3-10.Fully insulate at interior/exterior wall intersection (1)3-11.Use energy heels of 6 in. or more on trusses to allow added insulation over top plate (2)3-12.Use structural insulated panels (2)3-13.Use insulated exterior sheathing (3)3-14.Use advanced wall framing—24-in OC, w/double top plate Solar Design Features Solar Design Features Solar Design Features Solar Design Features (2)3-15.Provide south shading—install properly sized overhangs on south facing glazing (2)3-16.Orient windows to make the best use of passive solar (2)3-17.Provide east and west shading—use glazing with solar heat gain coefficient less than 0.40 or provide natural shading with landscaping (1-4)3-18.Demonstrate a reduction in space conditioning energy, using approved energy modeling software HEATING/COOLING HEATING/COOLING HEATING/COOLING HEATING/COOLING Distribution Distribution Distribution Distribution (1)3-19.Centrally locate heating / cooling system to reduce the size of the distribution system (1)3-20.Two properly supported ceiling fan pre-wires (1)3-21.Use advanced sealing of ducts using low toxic mastic (5)3-22.Performance test duct for air leakage meets thirdparty review and certification (5)3-23.Locate heating / cooling equipment and the distribution system inside the heated space

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BUILT GREEN™ Handbook—HOME BUILDERS Self-Certification ChecklistPart I-v 2003 Version Controls Controls Controls Controls (1)3-24.Install thermostat with on-switch for furnace fan to circulate air (2)3-25.Install 60-minute timers or humidistat for bathroom and laundry room fans (2)3-26.Install programmable thermostats Heat Recovery Heat Recovery Heat Recovery Heat Recovery (3)3-27.Install a heat recovery ventilator WATER HEATING WATER HEATING WATER HEATING WATER HEATING Distribution Distribution Distribution Distribution (2)3-28.Locate water heater within 20 pipe feet of highest use (1)3-29.Insulate hot and cold water pipes within 3 feet of the hot water heater Drainwater Heat Recovery Drainwater Heat Recovery Drainwater Heat Recovery Drainwater Heat Recovery (3)3-30.Drainwater heat recovery system (DHR) LIGHTING LIGHTING LIGHTING LIGHTING Natural Light Natural Light Natural Light Natural Light (1)3-31.Light-colored interior finishes (2)3-32.Use clerestory for natural lighting (2)3-33.Use light tubes for natural lighting and to reduce electric lighting Solar Powered Lighting Solar Powered Lighting Solar Powered Lighting Solar Powered Lighting (1)3-34.Solar-powered walkway or outdoor area lighting EFFICIENT DESIGN EFFICIENT DESIGN EFFICIENT DESIGN EFFICIENT DESIGN (2)3-35.Use building and landscaping plans that reduce heating/cooling loads naturally ALTERNATIVE SYSTEMS (Bonus Points) ALTERNATIVE SYSTEMS (Bonus Points) ALTERNATIVE SYSTEMS (Bonus Points) ALTERNATIVE SYSTEMS (Bonus Points) (5)3-36.Bonus Points: Solar water heating system (10)3-37.Bonus Points: More than 2% of house powered by photovoltaic_______ Subtotal for Section Three Section Four: Health and Indoor Air Quality OVERALL OVERALL OVERALL OVERALL (5)4-1.Assist homeowners with chemical sensitivities to identify preferred IAQ measures and finishes (5)4-2.Bonus Points: Builder certified to have taken American Lung Association (ALA) of Washington “Healthy House Professional Training” course (15)4-3.Bonus Points: Certify house under ALA Health House Program JOB-SITE OPERATIONS JOB-SITE OPERATIONS JOB-SITE OPERATIONS JOB-SITE OPERATIONS (1)4-4.Use less-toxic cleaners (1)4-5.Require workers to use VOC-safe masks (2)4-6.Take measures during construction operations to avoid moisture problems later (2)4-7.Take measures to avoid problems due to construction dust (3)4-8.Ventilate with fans after each new finish is applied (2)4-9.No use of unvented heaters during construction (2)4-10.Clean duct and furnace thoroughly just before owners move in (4)4-11.Involve subs in implementing a healthy building jobsite plan for the project LAYOUT AND MATERIAL SELECTION LAYOUT AND MATERIAL SELECTION LAYOUT AND MATERIAL SELECTION LAYOUT AND MATERIAL SELECTION (2)4-12.If using carpet, specify CRI IAQ label (2)4-13.Install low pile or less allergen-attracting carpet and pad (3)4-14.Limit use of carpet to one-third of home’s square footage (3)4-15.Optimize air quality in family bedrooms (2)4-16.If using carpet, install by tacking (no glue) (5)4-17.Detached or no garage OR garage air-sealed from house with automatic exhaust fan (3)4-18.Use formaldehyde-free fiberglass insulation (3)4-19.Use low-VOC, low-toxic, water-based, solvent-free sealers, grouts, mortars, caulks and adhesives inside the house (3)4-20.Use plywood and composites of exterior grade or formaldehyde-free (for interior use) (3)4-21.Install cabinets made with formaldehyde-free board and low-toxic finish (3)4-22.Use ceramic tile for flooring (3)4-23.Use polyethylene piping for plumbing (no PVC) (3)4-24.Install natural fiber carpet (e.g. jute, sisal, wool) (3)4-25.Use low-VOC /low-toxic interior paints and finishes for large surface areas (10)4-26.Bonus Points: No carpet MOISTURE CONTROL MOISTURE CONTROL MOISTURE CONTROL MOISTURE CONTROL (1)4-27.Grade to drain away from buildings

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BUILT GREEN™ Handbook—HOME BUILDERS Self-Certification ChecklistPart I-vi 2003 Version (1)4-28.Seal at doors, windows, plumbing and electrical penetrations against moisture and air leaks (1)4-29.If slab is used, install poly barrier properly; if no slab, bottom of floor is sufficient height above backfilled dirt (1)4-30.Vent attic over code requirements to reduce moisture buildup (1)4-31.Use roof gutters to drain out onto splash blocks or approved system to drain water away from building (1)4-32.Roofs are pitched and flashed properly (1)4-33.Design wall system to allow water to drain out in the event of possible water penetration (2)4-34.Install “radon” type vent system to eliminate potential moisture problems AIR DISTRIBUTION AND FILTRATION AIR DISTRIBUTION AND FILTRATION AIR DISTRIBUTION AND FILTRATION AIR DISTRIBUTION AND FILTRATION (1)4-35.Prohibit use of electronic filter (2)4-36.Install return-air ducts in every bedroom (1)4-37.Install ducting/damper for fresh air intake (3)4-38.Use medium-efficiency pleated filter or better (3)4-39.Balance airflow system based on filter being used (3)4-40.Install furnace and/or duct-mounted air cleaner or high efficiency air filter (non-electronic) (3)4-41.Install central vacuum, exhausted to outside (2)4-42.Provide for cross ventilation using operable windows (3)4-43.Install CO detector HVAC EQUIPMENT HVAC EQUIPMENT HVAC EQUIPMENT HVAC EQUIPMENT (1)4-44.Install and test bath, laundry, pool, hot tub, and kitchen exhaust fans (if range top and/or oven are gas fired), vented to outside (1)4-45.Install crank timer switches for bath exhaust fans (2)4-46.Install bath fan with smooth ducting, minimum 4 in. (2)4-47.Install exhaust fans in rooms where office equipment is used (3)4-48.Install sealed combustion heating and hot water equipment (3)4-49.Install power venting for combustion furnaces and water heating equipment (3)4-50.Install exhaust fan in attached garage on timer or wired to door opener (2)4-51.Install whole house fan (2)4-52.Bonus Points: Provide balanced or slightly positive indoor pressure using controlled ventilation (10)4-53.Bonus Points: Install a ductless heating system_______ Subtotal for Section Four Section Five: Materials Efficiency OVERALL OVERALL OVERALL OVERALL (5)5-1.OMITTED per 2002 Revisions (10)5-2.Enroll project in King County ConstructionWorksProgram OR in Snohomish County, meets equivalent criteria (5-25)5-3.Limit project size JOBSITE OPERATIONS JOBSITE OPERATIONS JOBSITE OPERATIONS JOBSITE OPERATIONS Reduce Reduce Reduce Reduce (1)5-4.Use suppliers who offer reusable or recyclable packaging (1)5-5.Provide weather protection for stored materials (2)5-6.Create detailed take-off and provide as cut list to framer (2)5-7.Use central cutting area or cut packs (2)5-8.Require subcontractors to participate in waste reduction efforts Reuse Reuse Reuse Reuse (1)5-9.Reuse building materials (1)5-10.Reuse dimensional lumber (1)5-11.Use reusable supplies for operations, such as construction fences, tarps, refillable propane tanks (1)5-12.Move leftover materials to next job or provide to owner (1)5-13.Reuse spent solvent for cleaning (1)5-14.Sell or give away wood scraps (1)5-15.Sell or donate reusable items (1)5-16.Use reusable forms (2)5-17.Purchase used building materials for your job (2)5-18.Save and reuse site topsoil Recycle Recycle Recycle Recycle (!)5-19.Prepare jobsite recycling plan and post on site (2)5-20.Require subcontractors to participate in recycling efforts (1)5-21.Recycle cardboard (2)5-22.Recycle metal scraps (3)5-23.Recycle wood scrap and broken pallets (3)5-24.Recycle packaging (3)5-25.Recycle drywall (3)5-26.Recycle concrete/asphalt rubble, rock, and brick (3)5-27.Recycle paint (4)5-28.Recycle asphalt roofing (5)5-29.Recycle carpet/carpet padding and upholstery foam (5)5-30.Recycle fluorescent lights and ballasts (5)5-31.Recycle landclearing and yard waste, soil and sod DESIGN AND MATERIAL SELECTION DESIGN AND MATERIAL SELECTION DESIGN AND MATERIAL SELECTION DESIGN AND MATERIAL SELECTION Overall Overall Overall Overall (1)5-32.Use standard dimensions in design of structure (1)5-33.Install materials with longer life cycles

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BUILT GREEN™ Handbook—HOME BUILDERS Self-Certification ChecklistPart I-vii 2003 Version (2)5-34.Install locally produced materials (3)5-35.Use re-milled salvaged lumber (3)5-36.Use wood products certified by FSC or other recognized agency as “sustainable” Framing Framing Framing Framing (1)5-37.Use stacked floor plans (2)5-38.Use engineered structural products (2)5-39.Use structural insulated panels (3)5-40.Use cementitious foam-formed walls with flyash concrete (3)5-41.Use finger-jointed framing material (e.g. plates and studs) (3)5-42.Use (R-19) 2x6 intermediate framing (6)5-43.At least 50% of dimensional lumber is certified sustainable wood (FSC or equal) (10)5-44.At least 90% of dimensional lumber and 50% of sheathing is certified sustainable wood (FSC or equal) Foundation Foundation Foundation Foundation (1)5-45.Use regionally produced block (1)5-46.Use flyash in concrete (2)5-47.Use recycled concrete, asphalt, or glass cullet for base or fill Sub-Floor Sub-Floor Sub-Floor Sub-Floor (1)5-48.Use recycled-content underlayment Doors Doors Doors Doors (1)5-49.Use reconstituted or recycled-content doors (1)5-50.No luan doors (2)5-51.Use domestically-grown wood interior doors Finish Floor Finish Floor Finish Floor Finish Floor (1)5-52.If using vinyl flooring, use product with recycled content (1)5-53.Use recycled-content carpet pad (3)5-54.Use recycled-content or renewed carpet (3)5-55.Use recycled-content ceramic tile (3)5-56.Use linoleum, cork, or bamboo flooring Interior Walls Interior Walls Interior Walls Interior Walls (1)5-57.Use drywall with recycled-content gypsum (1)5-58.Use recycled or “reworked” paint and finishes Exterior Walls Exterior Walls Exterior Walls Exterior Walls (1)5-59.Use recycled-content sheathing (1)5-60.Use siding with reclaimed or recycled material (2)5-61.Use 50-year siding product (2)5-62.Use salvaged masonry brick or block (2)5-63.Use locally-produced stone or brick Windows Windows Windows Windows (1)5-64.Use wood/composite windows (1)5-65.Use finger-jointed wood windows Cabinetry and Trim Cabinetry and Trim Cabinetry and Trim Cabinetry and Trim (2)5-66.If using hardwood trim, use domestic products (2)5-67.Use finger-jointed trim (5)5-68.Use tropical hardwood trim or cabinets only if FSC certified or equal as “sustainable” (3)5-69.Use domestic hardwood trim that is FSC certified or equal ROOF ROOF ROOF ROOF (2)5-70.Use recycled-content roofing material (2)5-71.Use 30-year roofing material (3)5-72.Use 40-year roof material INSULATION INSULATION INSULATION INSULATION (2)5-73.Use recycled-content insulation (3)5-74.Use environmentally friendly foam building products (formaldehyde-free, CFC-free, HCFC-free) OTHER EXTERIOR OTHER EXTERIOR OTHER EXTERIOR OTHER EXTERIOR (2)5-75.Use reclaimed or salvaged material for landscaping walls (3)5-76.Use recycled-content plastic or wood polymer lumber for decks and porches (5)5-77.Bonus points: Use least toxic pressure treatment for pressure-treated wood (no CCA)_______ Subtotal for Section Five Section Six: Promote Environmentally Friendly Homeowner O&M HOMEOWNER’S KIT HOMEOWNER’S KIT HOMEOWNER’S KIT HOMEOWNER’S KIT ( ! )6-1.Provide owner with operations & maintenance kit WATER PROTECTION WATER PROTECTION WATER PROTECTION WATER PROTECTION Outdoor Conservation Outdoor Conservation Outdoor Conservation Outdoor Conservation (2)6-2.Mulch landscape beds with 2 in. organic mulch (1)6-3.Use grass type requiring less irrigation and minimal maintenance (3)6-4.Use compost soil amendments to establish turf and other vegetation with less irrigation (3)6-5.Limit use of turf grass to 25% of landscaped area (3)6-6.Landscape with plants appropriate for site topography and soil types, emphasizing use of plants with low watering requirements (4)6-7.Plumb for greywater irrigation (5)6-8.Install rainwater collection system (cistern) for reuse (10)6-9.Bonus Points: Install irrigation system using recycled water (10)6-10.Bonus points: No turf grass

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BUILT GREEN™ Handbook—HOME BUILDERS Self-Certification ChecklistPart I-viii 2003 Version Indoor Conservation Indoor Conservation Indoor Conservation Indoor Conservation (1)6-11.Select bathroom faucets with GPM less than code (1)6-12.Select kitchen faucets with GPM less than code (1)6-13.Select toilets that meet code, work with the first flush (3)6-14.Install (tankless) instant hot water systems (where appropriate) (5)6-15.Bonus points: Stub-in plumbing to use greywater water for toilet flushing (10)6-16.Bonus points: Use greywater water for toilet flushing (10)6-17.Bonus points: Install composting toilets Eliminate Water Pollutants Eliminate Water Pollutants Eliminate Water Pollutants Eliminate Water Pollutants (1)6-18.Educate homeowners about fish-friendly moss control (4)6-19.Provide food waste chutes and compost or worm bins instead of a food garbage disposal ENERGY ENERGY ENERGY ENERGY Heating/Cooling Heating/Cooling Heating/Cooling Heating/Cooling (3)6-20.Select ENERGY STAR® heating / cooling equipment (2)6-21.No gas fireplaces, use direct vent gas or propane hearth product (AFUE rating) (2)6-22.No fireplaces or only high efficiency units (Rumsford or Russian fireplace, masonry heater) (2)6-23.No air conditioner Water Heating Water Heating Water Heating Water Heating (2)6-24.Passive or on-demand hot water delivery system installed at farthest location from water heater (3)6-25.Upgrade electric water heater efficiency from EF of .88 to .93 (3)6-26.Upgrade gas or propane water heater efficiency from EF of .55 to .60 (4)6-27.Install the water heater inside the heated space (electric, direct vent, or sealed venting only) (4)6-28.Upgrade electric water heater to exhaust air heat pump water heater or de-superheater: EF 1.9 (4)6-29.Upgrade gas or propane water heater from EF of .55 to .83 Appliances Appliances Appliances Appliances (1)6-30.Provide an outdoor clothesline (1)6-31.Install gas clothes dryer (3)6-32.Install a horizontal-axis or ENERGY STAR® washing machine (1)6-33.Install an extra-efficient dishwasher (ENERGY STAR®) (1)6-34.Install ENERGY STAR® refrigerator Efficient Lighting Efficient Lighting Efficient Lighting Efficient Lighting (1)6-35.Furnish four compact fluorescent light bulbs to owners (req’d if installing screw-in compacts, See Action Item 6-38) (1)6-36.Halogen lighting substituted for incandescent downlights (2)6-37.Install ltg dimmer, timers, and/or motion detectors (2-5)6-38.Use compact fluorescent bulbs, ballast, or fixtures in three high-use locations (kitchen, porch/outdoors, and one other location) Health and Indoor Air Quality Health and Indoor Air Quality Health and Indoor Air Quality Health and Indoor Air Quality (1)6-39.Build a lockable storage closet for hazardous cleaning & maint. products, separate from occupied space (1)6-40.If installing water filter at sink, select one with biodegradable carbon filter (1)6-41.Install showerhead filter Recycling Recycling Recycling Recycling (2)6-42.Provide garage sorting bins for recyclable materials (2)6-43.Provide built-in kitchen or utility room recycling ctr_______ Subtotal for Section Six EXTRA CREDIT (1-10)A-1.Extra credit for innovation ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________Total Points for Project Total Points for Project Total Points for Project Total Points for Project Program Level Obtained: Program Level Obtained: Program Level Obtained: Program Level Obtained: 1-Star ! 2-Star !! 3-Star !!! By my signature, I certify that I have performed all Action Items checked above: __________________________________________ (Home Builder Signature and Date) 2002 Revision Note 2002 Revision Note 2002 Revision Note 2002 Revision NoteThe point values on this checklist have been revised effective January 1, 2002. Because Parts I and II have not yet been revised, the point values as they appear in the narrative of Parts I and II may differ from the checklist. Use this checklist for the correct point assignments.

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BUILT GREEN™ Handbook—HOME BUILDERS Appendix AA-1 2003 Version Appendix A Appendix A Appendix A Appendix A200 200 200 2003 Revisions 3 Revisions 3 Revisions 3 RevisionsA-1Extra Credit for Innovation1-10 Points This Action Item recognizes builders for using innovation and emerging technologies, practices, and products that fulfill the intentions of the program, but are not called out in the checklist. Builders can earn up to 10 points by submitting a short written justification for the extra credit points to the Built Green™ Executive Committee for review, approval, and award of points. Builders are encouraged to recommend point values (up to 10) for their submittals in line with the Home Builder Program. The Executive Committee will evaluate the submittal and recommended points, then they will determine final point awards. For instance, an innovative educational poster for the Model may be valued at 2 points, while creating a full-scale low-watering, lowmaintenance demonstration landscape at the model may be valued at ten points. Other ideas include a program to donate usable building materialsand incorporating emerging energy efficiency technologies.A-1Extra Credit for Innovation (Resources) See Built Green™ Resource Library.

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a p p e n d i x b

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appendix bVenetian Bay Town Center


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FILES