Citation
City of South Bay community development plan

Material Information

Title:
City of South Bay community development plan
Creator:
West, Stephen J.
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publisher:
College of Design, Construction and Planning
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2005
Language:
English
Physical Description:
125 p. : ill.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Landscape architecture
City of South Bay ( local )
City centers ( jstor )
Highways ( jstor )
Retirement communities ( jstor )
Genre:
non-fiction ( marcgt )
bibliography ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- South Bay

Notes

Abstract:
South Bay is a small, rural community located in the heart of South Florida. Rich soils and Lake Okeechobee's vast waters make South Bay a have for agriculture and recreation. With these amenities and a strong interest in economic development, the City of South Bay has the potential to become a wonderful place to live as well as an ideal tourist destination. However, before the city can achieve these aspirations,t here are a number of challenging issues to overcome. South Bay and its closest neighbors, Belle Glade and Pahokee, have some of the highest unemployment and poverty levels in Palm Beach County. the area is facing issues concerning poverty, high unemployment and vacant land throughout. There is little to know affordable housing, seasonal employment, and a large unskilled labor force. many necessary services, including shopping, schools, and health care are located in Belle Glad, labeling South Bay as a bedroom community of Belle Glade. The intent of this project is to create a community redevelopment plan which focuses on the needs and priorities of the city. Economic development is a major priority and design should enhance the overall quality of life in South Bay. The project will develop a community master plan, goals to work toward and ultimately a program with implementation strategies, creating a comprehensive redevelopment plan for the City of South Bay.
General Note:
Landscape Architecture capstone project.
General Note:
"A senior capstone project prepared for: City of South Bay, Florida".
General Note:
Advisor(s): Fred Halback.
General Note:
Includes bibliographic references (125).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
003828997 ( AlephBibNum )
1055597794 ( OCLC )

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Full Text









CITY OF SOUTH BAY
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN


STEPHEN J. WEST
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE
SPRING 2005








CITY OF SOUTH BAY, FLORIDA


City of South Bay Community Redevelopment Plan

A senior capstone project prepared for:
City of South Bay, Florida
335 SW 2nd Avenue
South Bay, Florida 33493

Glatting Jackson Kercher Anglin Lopez Rinehart, Inc.
222 Clematis Street, Suite 200
West Palm Beach, Florida 33401


Prepared by:
Stephen J. West
University of Florida
Department of Landscape Architecture
Spring 2005








ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS





ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS:

I would like to acknowledge the many people who helped make this project successful and
those who contributed to my education, which enabled me to accomplish so much here at the
University ofFlorida. I would like to give a special thanks to:

The entire faculty of the Department ofLandscape Architecture at the University ofFlorida for
five years of hard work and guidance through an intense undergraduate program. I extend my
thanks to Robert Grist, Glenn Acomb, Margaret Carr, Maria Gurucharri, Lester Linscott, R.
Terry Schnadelbach, Gary Purdum, Sara K. Williams and Cindy Barton.

Fred Halback, adjunct professor and primary advisor, for giving constant feedback, guidance
and support throughout the duration of this project.

David Barth, of Glatting Jackson, not only for providing me the opportunity to work on such a
rewarding project and giving helpful support and assistance along the way, but for also giving
me valuable real-world work experience working with Glatting Jackson.

Mayor Clarence Anthony, Mayor of South Bay, for your time and effort in giving me the
opportunity to present at the 2005 annual State of the City meeting and giving helpful criticism
along the way to make this project successful.

Tony Smith, City Manager of South Bay, for your constant help, guidance, support and
information throughout the course of the project.




DEDICATION:

I dedicate this book to my family:
To my mother andfather for giving me a lifetime of love and support.
To my brothers, Chris and Dave, the two people I idolize and look up to
for inspiration as I pursue my dreams. I admire all of your hard work and dedication,
and I would like to thank you all, for I could not have done it without you.


ii










TABLE OF CONTENTS


INTRODUCTION
Abstract & Introduction
Project Location
City Goal Statement
Goals & Objectives
Background Information
Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail
Site Context
Aerial Photograph

USER ANALYSIS & PROGRAM
City Demographics
User Analysis & Program
Needs & Priorities

INVENTORY & ANALYSIS
Site Soils
Development Restrictions
Topography
Existing Land Use
Future Land Use
Planning Areas
Circulation
Existing Street Sections
Parks & Open Space
Gateways

SITE SYNTHESIS
Introduction
Development Opportunities
Opportunities & Constraints
Site Synthesis


CONCEPTUAL DESIGN
Introduction
Conceptual Master Plan 'A'
Conceptual Master Plan 'B'
Final Master Plan


DESIGN DEVELOPMENT
Detail Site Plan (By Others)
Waterfront Recreation Area
Downtown Redevelopment Plan
Design Guidelines
Streetscape Design
Lake Okeechobee Waterfront
Gateway Features
Architectural Icon

IMPLEMENTATION & CONCLUSION
Implementation & Phasing
Federal & State Funding
Community Involvement
FFA & Special Interest
Conclusion


WORKS CITED
Works Cited


iii






CIhadteI


INTRODUCTION
INTRODUCTION







CHAPTER 1
PROJECT INTRODUCTION

ABSTRACT

South Bay is a small, rural community located in the heart of South Florida. Rich soils and Lake
Okeechobee's vast waters make South Bay a haven for agriculture and recreation. With these
amenities and a strong interest in economic development, the City of South Bay has the potential to
become a wonderful place to live as well as an ideal tourist destination. However, before the city can
achieve these aspirations, there are a number of challenging issues to overcome. South Bay and its
closest neighbors, Belle Glade and Pahokee, have some of the highest unemployment and poverty
levels in Palm Beach County. The area is facing issues concerning poverty, high unemployment and
vacant land throughout. There is little to no affordable housing, seasonal employment and a large
unskilled labor force. Many necessary services, including shopping, schools and health care are
located in Belle Glade, labeling South Bay as a bedroom community of Belle Glade.

The intent of this project is to create a community redevelopment plan which focuses on the needs
and priorities of the city. Economic development is a major priority and design should enhance the
overall quality of life in South Bay. The project will develop a community master plan, goals to
work toward and ultimately a program with implementation strategies, creating a comprehensive
redevelopment plan for the City of South Bay.

INTRODUCTION

As is common among many small town communities, South Bay is facing economic problems with
high unemployment and a lack of job diversity. Strategic planning efforts and sustainable design
solutions are needed as the city begins to grow. With a strong vision and a tangible redevelopment
plan, the city can begin to meet its economic goals while creating a city that residents are proud of
and love to call home.

South Bay has been termed the "Crossroads of South Florida" where two major roadways intersect in
the city's core. These thoroughfares pose problems with major thru traffic but can also be utilized as
a major opportunity for future development. It is easily accessible from nearby urbanized areas such
as West Palm Beach, Ft. Lauderdale, Miami and Ft. Myers where urbanites can retreat to South Bay
as a rural, countryside vacation destination.

The city has maintained its small town appeal in one of the nation's fastest growing areas. With
critical planning, the city can remain a small town community without succumbing to urban sprawl.
It should capitalize on its valuable location and strong cultural heritage to allure tourism and
businesses to the area. Utilizing the suggestions of this redevelopment plan, South Bay can begin
to stimulate economic development and become a charming small town community in the heart of
south Florida.


2







CITY OF SOUTH BAY
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN


PROJECT LOCATION

The City of South Bay is located in western Palm Beach County, Florida, on the southern tip of Lake
Okeechobee, in the region known as the "Glades." The city is approximately 1.75 square miles and
borders the second largest freshwater lake in the contiguous United States.

Nearby cities:
* Belle Glade, 4.5 miles
* Pahokee, 11 miles
* Clewiston, 16 miles
* West Palm Beach, 48 miles
* Ft. Lauderdale, 63 miles
* Ft. Myers, 78 miles
* Miami, 80 miles

FIGURE 1.1: PROJECT LOCATION



















\'*.. W Palin Buil

Lake Okeechobee Fi Lderird.l

- /Mlnlllll
'h ,i ,. .
R., It 11 C/


3







CHAPTER 1
PROJECT INTRODUCTION

CITY GOAL STATEMENT

"To ensure that the rural character of South Bay is maintained and improved where necessary, while
allowing remaining vacant parcels to be developed in a manner consistent with present residential
neighborhoods and commercial areas. Further, ensure that the city remains a diversified community
offering:

* A full range of municipal services
* A range and mixture of housing alternatives consistent with the needs of
the current and future residential population
* Commercial and industrial development opportunities compatible with
established locational and intensity factors; and
* A variety of recreational activities and community facilities oriented to
serving the needs of city residents.

Various land use activities, consistent with these municipal character parameters, will be located to
maximize the potential for economic benefit and the enjoyment of natural and man-made resources
by residents and property owners, while minimizing potential threats to health, safety and welfare
posed by hazards, nuisances, incompatible land uses and environmental degradation."

Source: South Bay Comprehensive Plan of 1989


4







CITY OF SOUTH BAY
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN

GOALS & OBJECTIVES

A. Enhance economic development
* Promote infill of businesses and commercial development
* Lower unemployment and increase job diversity
* Generate a more secure tax base
* Ensure sufficient affordable housing

B. Attract businesses & commercial industries
* Create a downtown district which combines commercial, civic, cultural and recreational uses
* Integrate a proposed industrial park into the city master plan

C. Improve resident quality of life
* Integrate housing, retail, work places, schools, parks and civic facilities
* Create a unique sense of place and enhance the city's natural culture and heritage
* Beautify streetscapes to create a physically and visually pleasing atmosphere
* Provide educational and recreational activities for residents of all ages


5







CHAPTER 1
PROJECT INTRODUCTION

BACKGROUND INFORMATION

In the early 1900's, the state of Florida began to grow with new cities beginning to develop along the
southeast coast of the state. Tourism flourished, bringing new visitors to the area and a population
that began to inflate. The economy in Florida was booming and land values were on the rise.
Agriculture quickly became an important industry and the
Florida Everglades was being drained for rich agricultural
lands. Although environmentalists didn't approve of the
draining, many people did not know the harmful effects this
could have, and by the mid-1920's, approximately 50,000
S. . L- c , acres had been farmed. The area of present day South Bay
&p BeUe Glade PI
_c. 9M developed as a migrant farming community among the vast
agricultural fields of south Florida.
Source: National Weather Service, available: http://www.srh.noaa. ...I ,,,il 11. 1',''L Okeechobee.htm

The economic boom of the 1920's had peaked and started to ..........
decline when real estate values began to collapse, businesses ..... 0M ..>uo..ao
failedandmillionairessoonbecamebroke. Justbeforetheheight
of the great depression, the state of Florida was devastated by
two hurricanes causing catastrophic destruction throughout.
The Hurricane of 1926 reeked havoc in Ft. Lauderdale,
Hollywood, Dania
Beach and especially
Miami. Then, two years later, the stronger of the two storms
S. , , *. hit. The Hurricane of 1928 hit Lake Okeechobee, with
destructive winds and
Seven worse, deadly
- flooding. The category
..---, . . . 4 hurricane was the
second-deadliest
natural disaster to hit Li.-L
the United States, with estimates reaching as high as 2,500
fatalities. Flooding had reached 11-12' in some areas and
a major levee around Lake Okeechobee was constructed in
the 1930's to prevent future flooding disasters in the areas
surrounding Lake Okeechobee.

Source: "Hurricane of 1928"




Photos courtesy of the National Weather Service.
Available: http://www.srh.noaa... I,,l 111L .'1'L Okeechobee.htm
6







CITY OF SOUTH BAY
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN




Now located in one of the fastest growing counties in the United States, the City of South Bay has
maintained it's small town appeal with a population just over 4,000 people. Incorporated in 1963,
the city is essentially a rural residential and agricultural community with scattered commercial and
industrial areas developed around US Highway 27 and State Road 80. "The area is surrounded by
vast openness and a sea of green sugar cane fields. The seasonal economy is based on the production
of sugar cane, winter leafy vegetables, sweet corn, green
beans, carrots and rice from November to April. Nearly
70% of the residents in the Glades area are employed
Only during these months. Commercial and industrial
land is limited, given that most of the land is owned
by large agricultural corporations. While the sugar
industry has been the reason for the existence of the city,
increasing mechanization of agriculture has resulted in
loss of jobs."
Source: City of South Bay Case Study

One of the cities biggest amenities and greatest potential for economic development is its close
proximity to Lake Okeechobee and the Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail. After major flooding caused
by hurricanes in the early 1900's, the United States Army Corps of Engineers drafted plans which
provided for the construction of floodway channels, control gates, and major levees along Lake
Okeechobee's shores. A long term system was designed for
the purpose of flood control, water conservation, prevention
of saltwater intrusion, and preservation of fish and wildlife
populations. The Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail began as the
Okeechobee Segment of the 1,400 mile Florida Trail. The
110 mile trail encircles the entire lake and was designated . ...
as part of the Florida National Scenic Trail in 1993, one of
only eight National Scenic Trails in the United States.

Source: "Florida National Scenic Trail"


7







CHAPTER 1
PROJECT INTRODUCTION

LAKE OKEECHOBEE SCENIC TRAIL

The trail itself is located atop the 35' Herbert Hoover Dike which surrounds the lake providing flood
protection for nearby communities as well as scenic views of the lake and working agricultural
landscapes. The trail takes users through areas with a rich history of inhabitants dating back to the
Creek and Seminole Indians of the 18th and 19th centuries and through the core of Florida's modem
day agricultural industry. The area offers excellent opportunities for hikers, bikers and horseback
riders to enjoy excellent viewing of wildlife, particularly in the fall and winter, when birds such
as herons, egrets, and a variety of waterfowl are abundant. With 730 square miles of fresh water
accessible by both land and water, (via the cross-state Okeechobee Waterway) Lake Okeechobee
offers endless fishing opportunities.

With 13 designated camping grounds and major recreation areas accessible from the trail at Clewiston,
Lake Harbor, South Bay, Pahokee and on Torrey Island west of Belle Glade, the trail can be utilized
for short day hikes or the 9 day, 110 mile Big "O" Hike put on by the Loxahatchee Chapter of the
Florida Trail Association. The trial was completely unpaved, typically double-track gravel until
the mid-1990's when the Florida Department of Transportation began discussing opportunities for
surface improvement that would be suitable for all recreational users. Under construction since 2002,
62 miles of the trail is now paved and maintained by the United States Army Corps of Engineers
which uses the trail as a service road. The new paved trail runs 26 miles between Port Mayaca and
Okeetantee Park at the Kissimmee River, and another 36 miles from Alvin Ward Park to City Park
in Pahokee.

The trail is open year round for a variety of uses including hiking, biking and horseback riding as
well as other uses such as bird watching and photography. Equestrian riders can access the trail
from numerous locations including Port Mayaca, Chancy Bay, Harney Pond, Moore Haven and
Clewiston Park. Signs along the trail direct users to environmentally and culturally significant points
of interest. Hikers heading north from .�
the Big Cypress National Preserve
reach the Lake Okeechobee Scenic
Trail in Clewiston and are met with a Bay ..
decision to hike the east or west side
of the lake. There are certain portions
of the trail that force users off of the
dike where there are water control
structures managed by the South
Florida Water Management District.
Users can obtain Florida National
Scenic Trail maps which reroute users
around these structures via public
roads and back onto the dike. View of Wetlands from the Lake Okeechobee
Scenic Trail in South Bay
Source: "Florida Trail" and "Florida National Scenic Trail"
8







CITY OF SOUTH BAY
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN

LAKE OKEECHOBEE SCENIC TRAIL

The Florida Trail is indicated in figure 1.2 by the solid green line as it navigates throughout the state
of Florida and around Lake Okeechobee. The detail map shows the major recreation areas found
along the Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail and their relation to the City of South Bay. The map also
illustrates the different amenities found at each location.


FIGURE 1.2: LAKE OKEECHOBEE SCENIC TRAIL


Source: Florida Department of Environmental Protection


9







CHAPTER 1
PROJECT INTRODUCTION

FIGURE 1.3: SITE CONTEXT MAP
LEGEND
---- City of South Bay
Urban and Built Lands
Agriculture
Rangeland
Upland Forest
SBeWater
1 i dWetlands
SBarren Lands
S- Transportation
- - .-l Communication
and Utilities


/ Palin Beach
Couniv

i ., n







N
5 2.5 0 5 10 Miles


SITE CONTEXT ANALYSIS

The city is surrounded by vast agricultural lands. To the east is the City of Belle Glade, where
residents travel for supermarkets, schools, local hospital and other daily necessities. Completing the
incorporated cities of the Glades community is the City of Pahokee to the northeast on the coast of
Lake Okeechobee. Although not shown on the map, the City of Clewiston is located on the southwest
coast of the lake in Hendry County, just west of Palm Beach County. The shear distance of the city
from urbanized areas indicates the need for South Bay to become a self-sustaining community and
not rely on its surrounding neighbors.


10







CITY OF SOUTH BAY
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN


FIGURE 1.4: AERIAL PHOTOGRAPH


1 0.5 0 1 Miles +


DESCRIPTION OF AERIAL PHOTOGRAPH

The infrared aerial photograph portrays surfaces based on the reflectivity of light. The grids of
pink and black areas indicate areas of vegetation, in this case, primarily agriculture. The pink areas
are suggestive of sugar cane fields where the darker areas indicate areas of moist soils where land
clearing or plowing has recently occurred. The light colored, highly reflective areas are urban and
built up lands. This shows a clear delineation of urban land located around the intersection of US
Highway 27 and SR 80 whereas the area to the north adjacent to the lake is natural lands.


11









Cha ter 2


USER ANALYSIS & PROGRAM
USER ANALYSIS & PROGRAM







CHAPTER 2
USER ANALYSIS & PROGRAM

DEMOGRAPHICS, YEAR 2000

Population: 3,859 (Current estimates at 4,000+) Housing in South Bay
Males: 63.3% Median Home Value: $65,600
Females: 36.7% Number of houses: 947
Median Resident Age: 32.2 years Owner Occupied: 479 (50.6%)
Median Household Income: $23,558 Renter Occupied: 336 (35.5%)
Per Capita Income: $9,126 Vacant: 132 (13.9%)
Unemployment: +/- 30%
Population below poverty level: +/- 20% Education, residents 25 years and over
High School or higher: 55.3%
Races in South Bay Bachelor's degree or higher: 7.3%
Black: 66.9% Graduate or Professional degree: 2.0%
Hispanic: 19.6%
White Non-Hispanic: 12.5%
Other: 5.8%
Two or more races: 2.4%
American Indian: 0.5%
(Note: Total can be greater than 100% because Hispanics may be counted in other races.)


Industries providing employment in South Bay:
24.0% Educational, health and social services
13.5% Manufacturing
12.3% Agriculture, forestry, fishing, hunting and mining
10.3% Retail Trade
10.3% Professional, scientific, management & administrative


14







CITY OF SOUTH BAY
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN



Facilities in South Bay
Rosenwald Elementary School (455 Students, Grades PK-05)
Hattie Fields Head Start Facility (Pre-School, day care, & after school program)
Clarence E. Anthony Branch Library (PBC Public Library)

Facilities Serving South Bay
Glades General Hospital (Belle Glade, Approx. 5 miles)
Hendry Regional Medical Center (Clewiston, Approx. 20 miles)
Palms West Hospital (Loxahatchee, Approx. 30 miles)
Palm Beach International Airport (WPB, Approx. 44 miles)
Fort Lauderdale/Hollywood International Airport (Ft. Lauderdale, Approx. 57 miles)
Miami International Airport (Miami, Approx 68 miles)
Belle Glade State Municipal Airport (Belle Glade, Approx. 6 miles)
Palm Beach County Glades Airport (Pahokee, Approx. 9 miles)
Air Glades (Clewiston, Approx. 23 miles)

Government
Mayor-Council from of government

Source: U.S. Census Bureau and City-Data.com

Demographic characteristics of the city as compared to Palm Beach County and the state of Florida
as a whole are exhibited in Figures 2.1 - 2.3 on the following page.


15









CHAPTER 2

USER ANALYSIS & PROGRAM



DEMOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS & COMPARISON TABLES


Figure 2.1

90.00% -
80.00%
70.00% -
60.0000
50.00%
40.00% -
30.00% -
20.00% -
10.00%
0.00%
Black Hispanic White, Non- Two or More American Indian Other
Hispanic Races


Figure 2.2

$160,000 -
$140,000
$120,000
$100,000 - -
$80,000 --
$60,000
$40,000
$20,000
$0


Median Home Value


7Z


Median Household Income


Figure 2.3

90.00%
80.00%
70.00%
60.00% - -
50.00% - -
40.00% -
30.00% - -
20.00%
10.00%
0.00%
High School Degree Bachelor's Degree Home Ownership


Unemployed Below Poverty


E3h:l -,l
I.;:� ,
U--
0D :,!


a-


Per Capita Income


16







CITY OF SOUTH BAY
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN

DEMOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS

The City of South Bay is predominantly a minority community with black and Hispanic races making
up almost 87% of the population. The black race, making up 67% of the population, is substantially
higher than that of Palm Beach County and the state of Florida as a whole. The Hispanic race,
making up approximately 20% of the total population, is slightly higher than that of the county
and state numbers of 12.4% and 16.8% respectively. White, non-Hispanics make up approximately
12.5% of the population in South Bay.

South Bay's median home value of $65,600, median household income of $23,558 and per capital
income of $9,126 are each below the county and state averages. In 2000, the city's median household
income was just 52% of the county median of $45,062.

For residents age 25 years or older, there is 24.8% unemployment in South Bay with nearly 20% of
the population living below the poverty level in 2000. Unemployment is significantly higher than
the county and state averages, reinforcing the importance and need for economic development and
jobs in the city. Only 7.3% of the population has received a bachelor's degree as compared to 27.7%
for Palm Beach County and 22.3% for the state of Florida. This shows that much of the industry in
South Bay is more trade oriented rather than college degree oriented.


17







CHAPTER 2
USER ANALYSIS & PROGRAM

USER ANALYSIS & PROGRAM

The city is interested in recommendations regarding the development of a planned industrial or
commercial park in hopes to attract jobs and link the city to regional economic development. The
parcel is on 130 acres of city-owned property located at the northwestern edge of the city, near a
county-owned RV park. Palm Beach County has given the city $500,000 to fund infrastructure
improvements on the proposed site and paid for site planning which was done by Land Design South
in 1997. Other site improvements have been made but county estimates show that completion would
cost an additional $2 million to complete the infrastructure improvements.

According to Glatting Jackson, the three key aspects of livable, sustainable communities is a balance
between economics, the physical environment and social issues. While many programs and initiatives
have been implemented to help South Bay, the city still struggles with improving the overall quality
of life. Rather than focusing on the proposed industrial site, the city should be addressed as a whole,
developing a community-wide master plan which utilizes the city's amenities and improving the
overall quality of life in South Bay.

The Glades Community Development Corporation (GCDC) is a non-profit organization which serves
as a facilitator and advocate for the diverse population residing in the Glades Communities of Belle
Glade, Pahokee and South Bay. The organization works as a facilitator between community leaders
and residents to obtain community input and articulate their needs and priorities.

In January of 2002, the GCDC held Town Hall meetings initiated by the Palm Beach County
Government to assist it in setting program and budget priorities for the Glades communities. The
county wanted to acquire information on needs, concerns and priorities from a variety of sources.
Among these sources included the local government, prior community visioning and strategic planning
projects and various technical studies. In terms of ethnicity, age groups and gender, there was a very
diverse group of 72 residents of South Bay present at the Town Hall meeting. The project utilized a
qualitative/quantitative data analysis method that facilitated identification of past accomplishments
and personal priorities followed by a series of group prioritization and discussion activities.

To begin, voting on recommendations from prior workshops was held to initially identify community
priorities. The following chart represents the community's needs and priorities as determined by the
Town Hall meeting and public workshop.


Community Center 15 0 0
Street Improvements 12 2 0
Commercial/Industrial along US 27 11 0 0
Water Treatment Improvements 7 0 0
Wastewater Treatment Improvements 6 0 0
Infrastructure for New Housing 5 0 1
Water & Sewer Line Rehab/Repair 5 0 0
Construct New Housing (114 Units) 4 2 1
Housing Repair/Rehab 1 2 0


Source: Broadbent


18







CITY OF SOUTH BAY
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN


COMMUNITY NEEDS & PRIORITIES

The residents were then divided into 7 groups. Using multi-voting procedures or group consensus,
each work group generated their top 5 priorities. Many of the priorities listed had common themes
of economic development, job creation, family housing, a multi-purpose/community center with
pool, water/wastewater treatment facilities and improvement of educational facilities and programs.
The priorities of each group were then combined into a master list and perspectives were shared on
the importance of each item. Once the list was completed and residents shared their ideas for the
community, a final vote was taken to determine the priority rank of the master list. In this session, a
multi-voting technique was used where each eligible person had a total of five votes; therefore, vot-
ing totals represent more votes than persons present.

Located below are the results of the final town vote of the master priority list developed by the Town
Hall meeting and resident workshop.

Note: Although economic development is of major concern, it was not counted in the final vote as
residents and officials believe that it is ultimately the top priority. Also, youth participants were also
asked to identify their priorities which are reported on a separate list.

40 -


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N 0 P Q

Community/multi purpose center J Establishing of colleges and universities
Environmental safety/water treatment plant K Health care facility/regional hospital
Improvement of streets and sidewalks L Pest control
Sufficient single family housing M Growth and adoption of annexation are;
More activities for youth N Career development
Shopping center/grocery/retail O More nursing homes
Movie theater P More local teachers
Clean and beautification of Lake Okeechobee Q Sports center
Improve schools


Youth priorities included a movie theater, youth career jobs, youth activities, a teen club and a Glades
TV news reporter.
Source: Broadbent


19


s


a









CIhadte3


INVENTORY & ANALYSIS
INVENTORY & ANALYSIS







CHAPTER 3
INVENTORY & ANALYSIS

FIGURE 3.1: SITE SOILS


LEGEND

AX
Da
Pa
Pf
QAB
Tc
Tr
UD
Ur


Arents Organic Sub.
Dania Muck
Pahokee Muck
Pits
Quartzipsamments
Terra Ceia
Torry Muck
Udorthents
Urban Land


1 0.5 0 1 Miles +


SOILS ANALYSIS

Majority of the natural soils underlying the city are organic with drainage characteristics ranging
from poor to very poor. The natural soil formations within the city have been significantly modified
by urban development. In some areas, the impact of urban development has been minimal consisting
of the deposition of several inches of fill over natural soils. Other areas, specifically along major
roadways such as U.S. Highway 27, drastic alterations to the soils have been made as a result of
construction activities. Although the natural soils are not favorable for urban development, water
management systems and deposition of urban fill have augmented the native soils, allowing for the
safe construction of buildings and roads. The use of fertilizers have also led to the development of
an active agricultural industry within and around the city.

Source: U.S. Soil Conservation Service, Soil Survey of Palm Beach County, 1978.

22







CITY OF SOUTH BAY
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN

SOIL DESCRIPTIONS

Note: Listed here are soils only found within the corporate city limits.

Arents Organic Substratum - This complex consists of nearly level, somewhat poorly drained, sandy
soils and urban land overlying organic soils. The areas were formerly organic marshes and swamps
that were filled for urban use. This complex is approximately 50% - 75% Arents and 25% - 50%
Urban Land. Arents consist of lawns, vacant lots, undeveloped areas and other open land. Urban
Land consists of areas covered by street, sidewalks, driveways, houses and other structures.

Dania Muck - This complex consists of nearly level, very poorly drained, shallow, organic soil that
rests upon limestone. This soil is in broad marsh areas on the fringes of the Everglades. It is formed
in thin deposits ofhydrophytic plant remains. In some areas, the organic material is peaty muck.

Pahokee Muck - This complex consists of level, very poorly drained organic soils that rest upon
limestone at a depth of 36 - 51 inches. It is in broad, freshwater marshes. Under natural conditions,
this soil is covered by water, or the water table is within 10" of the surface 6-12 months during the
year. The soil is not suited to cultivation in its natural state. If water control is established, it is well
suited for a wide variety of vegetables and sugarcane. The soil is not suitable to growth of citrus.

Quartzipsamments - This complex consists of nearly level to gently, well drained, deep, sandy soils
in areas where natural soils have been altered by cutting down ridges and spreading the soil material
over adjacent lower soils. The sandy material may also be hauled from a distant source.

Torry Muck - This complex consists of nearly level, very poorly drained, deep organic soils in broad,
freshwater marshes. This soil formed in well-decomposed remains ofhydrophytic plants mixed with
a high content of fine textured mineral material. There are no areas of this soil in native vegetation.
Most areas are used for sugarcane. Other areas are used for cultivated crops or improved pasture
or are developed for urban use. This soil is not suited to cultivation of crops unless a water control
system is established.

Urban Land - This complex consists of areas where more than 60% -75% is covered with streets,
buildings, parking lots, shopping centers, industrial parks, airports and related facilities. Former soils
cannot be easily recognized.

Source: U.S. Soil Conservation Service, Soil Survey of Palm Beach County, 1978.


23







CHAPTER 3
INVENTORY & ANALYSIS

FIGURE 3.2: DEVELOPMENT RESTRICTION ANALYSIS


LEGEND

Low Restriction
Moderate Restriction
SHigh Restriction
Water Bodies


1 0.5 0


I Miles


DEVELOPMENT RESTRICTION ANALYSIS

The water table restriction analysis reflects how feasible construction is on a specific soil type based
on the soil's average water table height. High restrictions were placed on soils where the average
water table was within 6" of the soil surface for 6-12 months of the year. Moderate restrictions were
placed on soils where the average water table was between 6"- 3' of the soil surface for 6-12 months
of the year and low restrictions were placed on any soil with an average water table height beyond
3'-0" below the soil surface. This analysis was based upon native soil characteristics and is not an
accurate depiction of true water table heights in the South Bay area. As described earlier, the soils in
the urban areas of South Bay have been altered by the deposition of fill to allow for safe construction
of buildings and roads. Water control has been established and maintained though a system of canals,
dikes and pumps to regulate water in agricultural areas. Back-filling and de-mucking of soils will
most likely be needed before construction on sites where there is no present construction.


Source: U.S. Soil Conservation Service, Soil Survey of Palm Beach County, 1978.


I


24







CITY OF SOUTH BAY
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN


FIGURE 3.3: TOPOGRAPHIC MAP


TOPOGRAPHY ANALYSIS


The city is situated within the Everglades area of Palm Beach County. Elevations throughout the
city generally range between 10 and 14 feet above man sea level (msl), although elevations of up
to 21 feet occur along the crests of major roadways and even 30 feet along some portions of the
Herbert Hoover Dike. The contours shown are in 5' increments and reflect the deposition of fill for
construction of major roadways and urban areas with the exception of the levee which is not shown.


25






CHAPTER 3
INVENTORY & ANALYSIS

FIGURE 3.4: EXISTING LAND USE ANALYSIS


0.25 0 0.25 0.5 Miles


LEGEND
Commercial
W Residential
Institutional
I Parks & Recreation


Industrial
Utilities
I- Vacant
W Agriculture


26







CITY OF SOUTH BAY
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN

EXISTING LAND USE ANALYSIS

The existing land use patterns in South Bay depict vast amounts of vacant and agricultural land
uses which create the opportunity for new development projects, especially along the corridor of
US Highway 27. Much of the existing commercial and civic land uses are near the intersection of
US Highway 27 and State Road 80, which provides opportunity for the redevelopment of the area,
to create a city center or downtown district. Existing recreational land uses are located in the major
residential hubs and at the waterfront edge. This provides opportunity for expansion of the park
to produce a larger community park creating an enhanced waterfront recreation area. Most of the
residential land uses have adjacent vacant parcels which provide opportunity for future neighborhood
expansion.

The existing utility land uses to the north, the water and wastewater treatment plants provide bad
views and is a constraint to development adjacent to these utilities. The South Bay Correctional
Facility in the southern agricultural fields is also a constraint for development as it may deter potential
development in adjacent vacant parcels.


27







CHAPTER 3
INVENTORY & ANALYSIS

FIGURE 3.5: FUTURE LAND USE PLAN


0.25 0 0.25


LEGEND
Commercial
I I Residential, Low Density
SResidential, Medium Density
SResidential, High Density
Industrial


Institutional
Public Grounds/Buildings
Recreation and Open Space
[ " Agriculture


0.5 Miles


28


1� NNNNEMN







CITY OF SOUTH BAY
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN

FUTURE LAND USE ANALYSIS

The City of South Bay's future land use plan designates areas of high, medium and low density
residential, commercial, industrial, recreation/open space, public buildings/grounds, other public
facilities and agriculture. The city has future hopes to annex the area just east of the North New
River Canal and north of the Florida East Coast Railroad. For planning purposes, the city is divided
into eight planning areas, each determined by existing land use characteristics. These planning areas
are analyzed in detail on the following pages.

Planning Area 1: Crossroads Corridor
Planning Area 2: Central Residential Area
Planning Area 3: Northeast Agricultural Area
Planning Area 4: Southeast Residential Area
Planning Area 5: South Agricultural Area
Planning Area 6: West Residential Area
Planning Area 7: Villa Lago Area
Planning Area 8: North Agricultural Area

Planning Area 1: Crossroads Corridor (158.1 acres)
This area is an important corridor when looking at the future development of the city as it is the main
junction and has the greatest potential for commercial development. Commercial and industrial are
the predominant existing land use patterns in this area but much is undeveloped. Industrial land uses
are thriving in this area but commercial areas have begun to depreciate and some have been abandon.
This area has excellent opportunity for commercial infill and redevelopment projects along the highly
visible corridor of US Highway 27 and SR 80. This planning area has two extremely important
intersections: the intersection of US Highway 27 with SR 80 and the intersection of US Highway
27 and the Florida East Coast Railroad, providing opportunities for a truck/railroad transfer point.
Future development of this area should be coordinated to determine appropriate land use patterns and
regulations implemented to improve the quality of the area.
Source: City of South Bay Comprehensive Plan, 1989

The numbers on the map indicate the location of corresponding images on the following pages.


29







CHAPTER 3
INVENTORY & ANALYSIS

FIGURE 3.6: PLANNING AREA 1


0.25 0 0.25
1 6 I i


0.5 Miles
N
0.5 Miles


30






CITY OF SOUTH BAY
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN


I, .


1. Valero Gas Station


2. U.S. Highway 27, Northbound


3. Abandon Industrial Site


5. U.S. Post Office 6. City Hall


7. Public Library


8. U.S. Sugar Corporation


9. Tanner Park & Community Ctr.


1:l.3,


10. Mobil Home Park


11. Okeechobee Inn


12. Local Shop


4. Strip Mall


Lil


31






CHAPTER 3
INVENTORY & ANALYSIS

FIGURE 3.7: PLANNING AREA 2


I~


0 0.25
EL-


0.5 Miles
W T


0.25


32







CITY OF SOUTH BAY
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN


Planning Area 2: Central Residential Area (25.3 acres)

Comprised almost entirely of single family residential units, this is the smallest of all planning areas.
The area is completely contained within other designated planning areas and therefore future devel-
opment is limited to infill and infrastructure improvements. Quality of housing is the major concern
of this area as many of the housing units are dilapidated and should be considered in any program
providing for improvements. Opportunities for this area include rehabilitation of housing in conjunc-
tion with a new downtown district to develop a small mixed-use environment.
Source: City of South Bay Comprehensive Plan, 1989

The numbers on the map indicate the location of the corresponding image below.


1. Residential Street


2. Single Family Housing


3. Deteriorated Pavement


4. NW 1st Avenue / North New River Canal


33






CHAPTER 3
INVENTORY & ANALYSIS

FIGURE 3.8: PLANNING AREA 3


0.25 0 0.25


34


0.5 Miles +







CITY OF SOUTH BAY
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN


Planning Area 3: Northeast Agricultural Area (72.1 acres)

Planning area three is currently agriculture fields consisting of primarily sugar cane, contributing
minimal amounts to the city's tax base. The 35 acre parcel to the south has excellent opportunity for
development because of its prime location as an important city gateway from Belle Glade and eastern
Palm Beach County on SR 80. It is also bound by the Florida East Coast Railroad to the north, the
North New River Canal to the west, SR 80 to the south and the city limits to the east. The Existing
soil conditions are a constraint to development because expensive de-mucking and backfilling of the
property may be needed prior to development due to existing soil conditions.
Source: City of South Bay Comprehensive Plan, 1989

The numbers on the map indicate the location of the corresponding image below.









SOUTH BAY





1. Water Control Canal 2. "Crossroads" & Sugar Cane





ML--


3. LOST Signage & Sugar Cane


4. SK 6U


35






CHAPTER 3
INVENTORY & ANALYSIS

FIGURE 3.9: PLANNING AREA 4


0.25 0 0.25 0.5 Miles


36






CITY OF SOUTH BAY
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN

Planning Area 4: Southeast Residential Area (61.9 acres)

This area is comprised almost entirely of single family residential units, but character of the neigh-
borhood is divided by the North New River Canal. Housing to the west are smaller lots creating a
higher density environment and the neighborhood to the east is characterized by larger lots creating a
more suburban environment. Opportunities for the area include expansion to the south along with a
linear park or greenway along the canal to create a network of green space within the city.
Source: City of South Bay Comprehensive Plan, 1989

The numbers on the map indicate the location of the corresponding image below.





tI - Li


1. Multi-Family Housing


3. Single Family Housing


4. Single Family Housing


37






CHAPTER 3
INVENTORY & ANALYSIS

FIGURE 3.10: PLANNING AREA 5


0.25


38


0.25


0.5 Miles
23 w


I ' 5 �







CITY OF SOUTH BAY
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN


Planning Area 5: South Agricultural Area (310.5 acres)

As the largest planning area, this is the second of two primarily agricultural planning areas. It for-
merly held 71.6% of all the agricultural land in South Bay prior to the development of South Bay
Correctional Facility, established in 1997 in the northern portion of the site. This planning area can
benefit from its location as the gateway to the city from the south and opportunities for the area in-
clude commercial development along US Highway 27. The major constraint of this area is the cor-
rectional facility and bad views from the highway.
Source: City of South Bay Comprehensive Plan, 1989

The numbers on the map indicate the location of the corresponding image below.


1. South Bay Correctional Facility Entry


2. �,outn tiay torrectionai racinty Entry


4. Agriculture


39






CHAPTER 3
INVENTORY & ANALYSIS

FIGURE 3.11: PLANNING AREA 6


0.25 0 0.25 0.5 Miles


40







CITY OF SOUTH BAY
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN


Planning Area 6: West Residential Area (235.3 acres)
This area is comprised predominantly of single family residential with a sporadic mixture of other
land uses. This area also contains much of the multi-family housing in South Bay as well as Cox
Park, a neighborhood park serving the area. Opportunities for the area include proximity to Rosen-
wald Elementary School and Cox Neighborhood Park. The mixture of commercial land uses among
the neighborhood also give residents a nearby store within easy walking distance for quick groceries.
Vacant land and buildings are scattered throughout the area along with a large portion of agricultural
land in the northern portion of the planning area. Such areas can potentially be common places for
illegal activities but also provide opportunity for residential or commercial infill projects to help raise
property values.
Source: City of South Bay Comprehensive Plan, 1989

The numbers on the map indicate the location of corresponding images on the following page.
+ " . :" " .A


1. Neighborhood Street MLK Blvd.


3. Neighborhood Market


5. Vacant Residential Buildings


i.A. Single Family Housing
N/A. Single Family Housing


lglc raillny fnuumIIg
41


I


N/A. Single Family Housing






CHAPTER 3
INVENTORY & ANALYSIS

FIGURE 3.12: PLANNING AREA 7


0.25


42


0.25


0.5 Miles


I ' I I







CITY OF SOUTH BAY
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN


Planning Area 7: Villa Lago Area (36.6 acres)

This planning area consists of the Villa Lago duplex residential development and the South Bay
sewage treatment plant. The Villa Lago development, constructed in 1976, holds 200 duplex units
and was used by South Bay Growers, Inc. as housing for agricultural employees. Many of the units
are currently vacant but the city is redeveloping 101 units, providing refurbished homes for low-
income households and first time home buyers. The area is adjacent to the proposed industrial park
creating providing opportunities for important residential-commercial connections. On the contrary
there is no neighborhood park serving this area and there are no visual connections to the downtown
district or waterfront.
Source: City of South Bay Comprehensive Plan, 1989

The numbers on the map indicate the location of the corresponding image below.


1. Villa Lago Duplex (Vacant)


3. Villa Lago Streetscape


2. villa Lago Duplex (vacant)


4. Unurcn


43






CHAPTER 3
INVENTORY & ANALYSIS

FIGURE 3.13: PLANNING AREA 8


/~_
J� ./ l
<" I
N-- ^ ,


0.25 0


0.25


44


0.5 Miles


I I � �


44







CITY OF SOUTH BAY
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN


Planning Area 8: North Agricultural Area (223.65 acres)

This area is predominantly agriculture and open land with the exception of the South Bay RV Park,
South Bay Nature Park and the city's water treatment plant. The existing RV Park and Campground
should capitalize on its location as an excellent opportunity to promote nature-based tourism and
create connections to the Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail. This planning area is also the proposed lo-
cation for 102 new single family homes adjacent to the RV Park; however, the cities comprehensive
plan designates this land for industrial use, not residential use. This planning area is also the location
for the proposed industrial park, which will be incorporated into the city master plan.
Source: City of South Bay Comprehensive Plan, 1989

The numbers on the map indicate the location of the corresponding image below.


1. South Bay RV Park


z. water ireatment ktac~grounu)


3. South Bay Nature Park


45







CHAPTER 3
INVENTORY & ANALYSIS


FIGURE 3.14: CIRCULATION MAP


Si


- 1
I m.





0.25 0 0.25 0.5 Miles


CIRCULATION MAP LEGEND


SM E E


E


Rural Principal Arterial
Florida East Coast Railroad
Palm Tran Bus Route
Rural Local Road
Trails


46


I-
I
L-l







CITY OF SOUTH BAY
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN

CIRCULATION ANALYSIS

The major circulation routes in South Bay are US Highway 27 and SR 80 which intersect in the core
of the city. These roads are classified by the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) as rural
principal arterial highways. These roads are part of an integrated network of inter-county highways
providing rural areas with easy access to major arterial roadways. They provide easy accessibility
to South Bay from the larger, more urban areas of Florida which can be beneficial for tourism. The
Florida East Coast Railroad intersecting US Highway 27 also poses opportunities for businesses such
as distribution centers located in the heart of south Florida. The remaining roads in South Bay are
classified as rural local roads, providing basic connections to residential neighborhoods, commercial
properties and other higher order highways. These local roads in South Bay create a well-defined
network of streets which should be continued and enhanced with future development to promote an
interconnected streetscape infrastructure.

South Bay is served by the Palm Tran bus route which creates important connections to Belle Glade
and eastern Palm Beach County. Extension of the existing route should be considered as an opportu-
nity to create connections to the waterfront recreation area via public transportation.


47








CHAPTER 3
INVENTORY & ANALYSIS


FIGURE 3.15: EXISTING STREET SECTIONS


? US HIGHWAY 27


FOUR LAE DMDEDHIGHWAY


.. . 0 j


US HIGHWAY 27
FOUR LNEDMDEDHIGHWAY SCALE NTS.


Location Map


48


nc*CC3 ""R A 11~ -~----


.. U IGWY2


I


SMEN.1








CITY OF SOUTH BAY
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN


FIGURE 3.16: EXISTING STREET SECTIONS


ESTATE ROAD 80
FOUR LANEDMDEDHIGHWAY


SW . --ST AVENUE
/~ SW 1 ST AVENUE


TWO ANE O E LOCAL ROAD SCALE N.T.S


IL i
Location Map


Location Map 49


SLE: NTS.


49








CHAPTER 3

INVENTORY & ANALYSIS


FIGURE 3.17: EXISTING STREET SECTIONS


MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. BOULEVARD
" TWO LANE DIVIDED ROAD WITH SIDEWALKS


MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. BOULE
FOUR LANE DIVIDED ROAD WITH SIDEWALKS


Location Map
Location Map


50


CLE: N.T.8.


S�: EN.T.S.








CITY OF SOUTH BAY
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN


FIGURE 3.18: EXISTING STREET SECTIONS


RESIDENTIAL STREET
CURB & GUTER, ON4SEET PARKNG SCALE:-. F
WITH SIDEWALKS


B) cuRB.LR ER WITHONSTREEPRKIN S-a1 .


Location Map 51


21 .O







CHAPTER 3
INVENTORY & ANALYSIS

FIGURE 3.19: PARKS AND OPEN SPACE ANALYSIS


LEGEND

-I Existing Park/Recreation
I '"' 1/4 Mile Service Area
SN
,.., for Neighborhood Parks


County-Owned Parks
1. South Bay R.V. Park
and Campground
2. South Bay Boat Ramp

City-Owned Parks
3. Tanner Park
4. Cox Park
5. South Bay Nature Park


There are two community parks serving South Bay with numerous sporting fields, walking trails,
fishing access, children's playgrounds and picnic pavilions. John Stretch Park is a 56.2 acre park
located approximately 6 miles west of South Bay with 3,580 feet of waterfront on Lake Okeechobee
which is accessible via US Highway 27. Glades Pioneer Park is a 64.2 acre community park located
approximately 2 miles east of South Bay in Belle Glade.


52







CITY OF SOUTH BAY
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN

SOUTH BAY R.V. PARK AND CAMPGROUND

The South Bay R.V. Park is located at the northeast tip of the city, with excellent proximity to the South
Bay Boat Ramp and the Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail. The proximity to the lake creates steady
lakeside breezes along with beautiful views of the nearby lake and wetlands. With the addition of a
proposed marina and connections to the Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail via a trailhead in South Bay,
these amenities provide for enhanced tourism opportunities. The county owned R.V. Park is filled
to capacity during the winter tourist season but suffers from lack of use during the off season (See
Appendix B for park occupancy figures). Expansion of the RV Park may be a potential for increasing
nature-based and/or culture-based tourism in South Bay as a means of economic development.
Considerations to use this site as a green market during the off season could help draw residents and
visitors to the waterfront and also create much needed jobs.

Park Amenities:
* 35 acres
* Freshwater fishing
* 72 campsites with cable TV hookups (ADA Accessible)
* 2 comfort stations (ADA Accessible)
* Children's play area
* 2 Horseshoe pits
* 2 Group fire pits
* Dump station (ADAAccessible)
* Recreation hall/group picnic pavilion
* Laundry facilities
* Internet access in recreation hall
* Access to concrete city boat ramp









OEM l L "


53







CHAPTER 3
INVENTORY & ANALYSIS

SOUTH BAY BOAT RAMP

The South Bay Boat Ramp is a 4.67 acre park located at the northwest edge of the city, just outside
of the city corporate limits. It is accessible off of US 27 where Levee Road climbs up and over
the steep dike. Parking is available to accommodate 20 full length boat trailers, which is often full
during peak fishing and boating times. Impressive views of the nearby wetlands can be enjoyed
from the waterfront or from the Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail atop the levee. The lake can also be
accessed from remote locations via the cross-state Okeechobee Waterway. A proposed marina could
be the perfect amenity to draw outdoor enthusiasts to the area, providing opportunities for a lakefront
restaurant or an expanded waterfront park.

Park Amenities:
* 2 boat ramps with concrete docks
* Trailer parking: 20 spaces
* 6 Picnic Benches
* 2 Benches
* Information kiosk


54







CITY OF SOUTH BAY
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN


TANNER PARK

Tanner Park is a 2.3 acre neighborhood park located off of SR 80 near the southeast residential
neighborhood. The park is maintained by the city and also has a community center with a number
of activities for all ages. There are numerous senior activity programs as well summer evening
recreation activities for youth. With the proposal of a new community center in the city, there is
potential for this site to be redeveloped, as it is a valuable parcel located on SR 80 within the city's
core.

Park Amenities:
* Community Center
* Restrooms
* 2 lighted basketball courts
* 2 lighted handball/racquetball courts
* 1 lighted tennis court
* 1 children's playground
* Open space


55







CHAPTER 3
INVENTORY & ANALYSIS

COX PARK

Cox Park is a small, 1.2 acre neighborhood park located in the heart of the west residential neighbor-
hood. The residents of this area are well served by this park according to the 0.25 mile neighborhood
park service area. The park is maintained by the city broken or missing sporting equipment along
with shattered glass in the parking lot, restrooms and pavilion area are some examples of areas which
are need of improvements.

Park Amenities:
* 2 lighted basketball courts
* Restrooms
* 1 covered pavilion, no seating
* 1 children's playground
* Open space





Valk:


56







CITY OF SOUTH BAY
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN

SOUTH BAY NATURE PARK

South Bay Nature Park is located in the northwest potion of the city, to the east of the RV Park and
campground. The park is also accessible from Levee Road via US 27 but is not easily visible from
the roadway and there is lack of signage. Although the park is located directly adjacent to the R.V.
Park, there is no real connection between the two parks or the boat ramp. These parks could be com-
bined and further developed to create a unified community park in South Bay. The park has been
maintained but a deteriorating asphalt walkway is in need of repaving and connections to the Lake
Okeechobee Scenic Trail are feasible. The park is primarily used during the summer and fall months
for youth and adult flag football leagues.

Park Amenities:
* 1 lighted, multi-purpose filed, with sideline benches
* 1 covered pavilion with 2 picnic tables
* Bike racks


57







CHAPTER 3
INVENTORY & ANALYSIS


FIGURE 3.20: EXISTING GATEWAYS

The City of South Bay is a major thoroughfare for motorists, many passing through without ever
stopping. A gateway into a city is our first impression of what a certain place is about. These ini-
tial impressions can ultimately intrigue a passerby, to make an individual want to stop and shop or
even explore a fascinating new area. At the "Crossroads of South Florida," South Bay has amazing
potential to capture motorists' attention, and create the impression which promotes South Bay as an
intriguing, quaint little town on the beautiful shores of Lake Okeechobee.

South Bay has three main gateways into the city:
1. US Highway 27, northbound
2. US Highway 27, southbound
3. SR 80, Westbound



01











-- - i


I,




I- --8 I


" I
i i f
I " SR 80








I -- -


0.25 0 0.25


0.5 Miles


58


I I


I







CITY OF SOUTH BAY
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN

EXISTING GATEWAYS ANALYSIS

These existing gateways to South Bay should be enhanced with signage, street trees and plant material
to create a comfortable and pleasing entry, notifying motorists that they are entering city limits. Not
only can this have a positive effect on traffic calming, this may also create interest in motorists to stop
and see more of what South Bay has to offer.

1. US Highway 27, Northbound
Entering the city from the south, motorists arrive into the
city among agricultural fields. Amongst the fields to the
west is the South Bay Correctional Facility. As the road
approaches the city center, civic buildings, commercial areas
and vacant lots are scattered around US Highway 27. This
gateway is in need of improvements to help define the cities
edge. This gateway, along with the redevelopment of the
city, can create a sense of place and create a new destination
for urbanites to retreat for rural, countryside get-a-ways on , .-- .
Lake Okeechobee.

2. US Highway 27, Southbound
As southbound US Highway 27 enters the City of South Bay,
motorists are among some of the cities greatest amenities.
The Lake Okeechobee waterfront with boat ramp and the
South Bay RV Park and campground are among the first
facilities encountered. These amenities should be capitalized
upon to create a gateway which signifies recreation and
captures the interest of motorists.

3. SR 80, Westbound
Traveling westbound on SR 80 from Belle Glade, motorists
enter the city of South Bay in an area with the most potential
for gateway development. This is an important gateway as
visitors from Belle Glade and eastern Palm Beach County
enter directly into the city's core just after crossing the North
New River Canal. To the south are residential developments
and Tanner Park, while to the north are open fields of sugar
cane. Rezoning of the agriculture fields could create the
potential for development, balancing the neighborhoods
to the south of the road. Narrowing streets and bringing
buildings closer to the roadway can help to slow traffic
down. New shops, cafes and other commercial uses among
a new community center and important civic buildings
would be the foundation for developing a downtown district
in South Bay. 59








C D terd 4


SITE SYNTHESIS







CHAPTER 4
SITE SYNTHESIS

INTRODUCTION

With strategic planning and a focused vision for the future of South Bay, a citywide master plan can
be developed to help the city to meets it's economic and future development goals. One of the issues
South Bay is struggling with includes vacant land and buildings scattered throughout the city. There
are a number of isolated vacant parcels and buildings where residential and commercial infill projects
should be considered. As these parcels are effectively developed or redeveloped, development of the
larger, vacant parcels should then be considered.

By analyzing the existing land uses and their potential for future development or redevelopment, the
map to the right indicates opportunities for existing land uses to change.


62






CITY OF SOUTH BAY
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN

FIGURE 4.1: OPPORTUNITY FOR DEVELOPMENT/ REDEVELOPMENT


LEGEND


/ N


ISZ2


Low Opportunity


Moderate Opportunity

R High Opportunity


0.25 0 0.25 0.5 Miles _


63







CHAPTER 4
SITE SYNTHESIS

OPPORTUNITIES AND CONSTRAINTS

Analysis of the existing elements within the city pose a number of opportunities and constraints to
developing a community-wide master plan which promotes economic development and creates an
overall better quality of life in South Bay.

Opportunities
* The city has great interest in economic development and advantages such as available
workforce, cheap land and prime location can bring businesses to the area. The area is also
an ideal location for a distribution center.
* The potential for economic development through nature/culture-based tourism is enhanced
by the city's crossroads location in south Florida with 10 million people living within 125
miles of South Bay.
* Existing zoning designates much of the land within South Bay as commercial and industrial
land uses, especially along US Highway 27 and SR 80.
* The city already has plans for the proposed industrial park which should be incorporated into
the community master plan.
* Existing location of civic buildings promote the idea of a downtown district and the city has
a strong cultural heritage which can be capitalized upon when developing the downtown.
* The city is rather small and relatively walkable, creating an appealing, small town atmosphere.
* Amenities such as Lake Okeechobee, the R.V. Park, boat ramps and the Lake Okeechobee
Scenic Trail should be integrated to create a unified recreational area.
* The recreational waterfront has great potential to create a trailhead with connections to the
Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail.
* Many of the major roads have existing, grassed medians, promoting the development of green
streetscapes.

Constraints
* The depressed economy of South Bay will deter potential businesses from coming to the area.
The existing economic situation will also make city improvements difficult with lack of funds
for potential redevelopment projects.
* The city is considered a bedroom community of Belle Glade where many of their daily neces-
sities such as school, shopping and health care located.
* The city's population of 4,000 residents cannot support a supermarket and also deters
franchises from developing within the city.
* High traffic volumes and excessive numbers of semi-truck tractor trailers on US Highway 27
and SR 80 make the streets uninviting and unsafe for pedestrians.
* Lack of finances for implementation of the master plan and maintenance of city streets, parks
and civic areas will mandate, sustainable design solutions and a strict implementation
program.


64






CITY OF SOUTH BAY
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN


FIGURE 4.2: SITE SYNTHESIS


+~�.


Important Intersection


City Gateway

Major Roadway

Green Connections

FL East Coast Railroad

North New River Canal
Prime Redevelopment/
Downtown District
Prime Development

Future Development

Park Expansion


L -


65


LEGEND


Good Views


121


21
~- . -t�


t---------
i " I~I







CHAPTER 4
SITE SYNTHESIS

SITE SYNTHESIS

Planning Area 1: Crossroads Corridor
1. Vacant buildings should be rehabilitated and commercial/industrial infill should occur to
create a unified commercial district and prevent sprawl
2. Existing roadways have grassed/planted medians which should be enhanced. Streetscapes
should be designed to promote pedestrian use with street trees, pedestrian lighting and
furniture, creating connections between the downtown and the waterfront.
3. With the addition of a proposed community center, the existing Tanner Park Community
Center site could be redeveloped into an urban civic core.
4. A proposed truck stop would be ideal on US 27 as an estimated 10,000-16,000 semi-truck
pass through the city limits everyday.

Planning Area 2: Central Residential Area
1. Dilapidated and vacant housing should be rehabilitated through special funding programs
such as habitat for humanities.
2. All other development will be limited to residential infill due to the small size of this area.
3. Road improvements are needed, and addition of sidewalks and street trees will enhance
pedestrian comfort as well as help to beautify the area.

Planning Area 3: Northeast Agricultural Area
1. Currently sugarcane fields, this area has great potential to be developed as it is also located
at one of the city's important gateways. Development will balance the neighborhoods on
the south side of SR 80, creating a clearly defined city gateway.
2. Potential annexation of the area to the north will allow neighborhood expansion.

Planning Area 4: Southeast Residential Area
1. The atmosphere in this area is nice with some larger lots and some modern housing.
The area should be expanded to the south and enhanced with sidewalks and street trees.
2. Expansion of the neighborhood would require the addition of a neighborhood park to serve
the new residents.


66







CITY OF SOUTH BAY
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN

SITE SYNTHESIS CONTINUED

Planning Area 5: South Agricultural Area
1. Potential area for the creation of a gateway, helping to slow traffic as it enters the city.
2. Commercial or multi-family development along the west side of US Highway 27 will help
balance the potential residential development to the east as well as help define the city's
gateway.
3. This planning area is also an ideal location for a future middle or high school in South Bay.
4. Screening of the South Bay Correctional Facility to the west is needed by use of street trees
or proposed development along US Highway 27.

Planning Area 6: West Residential Area
1. Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, which leads to Rosenwald Elementary School, has
existing sidewalks and street trees which can be enhanced to help beautify the area and
promote pedestrian use.
2. Neighborhood could be enhanced with proposed sidewalks and street trees branching form
MLK Jr. Boulevard throughout residential areas.
3. Existing, scattered commercial buildings should be preserved as they can be important
shopping and gathering areas to residents of the neighborhood.
4. Dilapidated or vacant housing and multi-family units should be rehabilitated through special
funding programs such as habitat for humanities.

Planning Area 7: Villa Lago Area
1. While many of the duplex's are being rehabilitated and sold, street trees are needed to
greatly enhance the existing hot and uninviting streetscape atmosphere.
2. A neighborhood park is needed to serve this area, especially if they property to the east is
annexed and future residential neighborhoods are proposed.
3. Needs a stronger visual and physical connection to the waterfront recreation area as well as
the downtown district.

Planning Area 8: North Agricultural Area
1. The city-proposed industrial park should be incorporated into the city master plan.
2. The city-proposed residential neighborhood should be designed within the context of the
area, creating connections to the waterfront recreation area and to the proposed industrial
park.
3. R.V. Park, boat ramp and nature park should be integrated to create an enhance waterfront
recreational park.
4. A marina or waterfront restaurant should be considered to help promote tourism and
economic development.


67








CIhadte5


CONCEPTUAL DESIGN







CHAPTER 5
CONCEPTUAL DESIGN

CONCEPTUAL DESIGN INTRODUCTION

The following chapter will look at two alternatives to the conceptual master plan for South Bay,
taking into consideration previously collected and synthesized data. The master plan for the city
will look at the existing conditions and potential areas for improvements. The main intent of the
master plan is to help the city achieve its goals of economic development, attracting businesses and
commercial industries and improving the resident quality of life in South Bay. These goals will
be achieved through a combination of recommendations on future development and redevelopment
areas, beautification projects and enhanced recreation facilities within the city.

In an effort to accomplish these goals, major elements of focus during conceptual design included
key development/redevelopment areas, the Lake Okeechobee waterfront and recreation area, the
proposed downtown district and the city's green infrastructure of parks, trails and streetscapes.

Key Development/Redevelopment Elements
1. Create/Designate downtown district which combines commercial, civic, cultural and
recreational uses
2. Integrate proposed industrial park into community master plan
3. Planning area 3, the northeast agricultural area, is prime location of developable land
4. Designate areas for future residential development
5. Commercial redevelopment and infill projects on US Highway 27 and SR 80
6. Incorporate a truck stop on US Highway 27

Lake Okeechobee Waterfront and Recreation Area
1. Expansion of existing R.V. Park
2. Integration of R.V. Park, boat ramp and nature park to create a unified recreation area
3. Proposed marina on Lake Okeechobee for recreational/educational purposes
4. Create a trailhead for the Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail

Green Infrastructure
1. Create pedestrian friendly streets and beautify roadways
2. Utilize existing greenways and open land for green infrastructure connections
3. Note locations where future neighborhood parks will be needed with the expansion of
residential development


70







CITY OF SOUTH BAY
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN

CONCEPTUAL DESIGN

There are five key program elements which have been integrated into both conceptual master plans.
Three of these elements, the proposed industrial park, truck stop and a ninety-eight unit residential
neighborhood, have had previous site planning work completed. The fourth and fifth elements found
in both concepts are the expansion of the existing South Bay R.V. Park and the proposed marina
on Lake Okeechobee. During the seasonal months of January and February 2005, the R.V. Park
occupancy rates have exceeded 99% of its total capacity (See Appendix B for RV Park Occupancy
Statistics). The park has had to accommodate patrons with overflow sites during some of the busiest
weeks of the year. These overflow sites do not receive the benefit of electricity, water and cable
hook-ups, but still pay the same full price as regular customers who receive full utility service at their
individual R.V. site. The proposed marina, also integrated into both conceptual master plans, can
enhance tourism opportunities and function as an educational facility as well. These five program
elements have been integrated into both concept plans because of their importance to the overall
master plan.

In both concepts, the proposed residential land uses are generally expansions of existing neighborhoods.
These neighborhoods will be low density, single-family residential units with encouragement of home
ownership. Multi-family residential units will be encouraged along US HW 27, providing the option
of single or multi-family units to home buyers. All existing residential neighborhoods should first
focus on infill and rehabilitation projects to reduce vacant lots and potential sprawling.

City officials have discussed the possibility of expansion of the correctional facility within South
Bay. If expansion of this facility does occur, it should be limited only to the west.

Pedestrian connections are important for the positive growth of the city. All streets within the city
should have sidewalks and provide shade with street trees, creating a comfortable environment for
pedestrian and bicycle use. The US Highway 27 and SR 80 corridor are most important as these are
the major corridors connecting amenities of the city. The North New River Canal and Rock Road
corridors should become enhanced greenway connections to create a network of contiguous green
infrastructure. Also, the existing Palm Tran bus route should be extended to create connections to
Lake Okeechobee. This modification can connect residents to the recreational waterfront as well as
provide patrons of the R.V. Park with transportation to the city core.


71







CHAPTER 5
CONCEPTUAL DESIGN

CONCEPT 'A' DESCRIPTION

This concept focuses on the development and growth of the proposed downtown district creating a
downtown core which extends to the city's current eastern limit. The concept begins to give form
to the downtown district, a recreational waterfront park and pedestrian friendly connections between
the two. US Highway 27, SR 80, and MLK Jr.. Boulevard are the major traffic corridors for vehicular
and pedestrian circulation. These three roadways create a network which connects the major civic,
commercial and recreational facilities within the city which should be enhanced to accommodate the
use by pedestrians and bicycles. This will help to increase commercial development and reduce the
high traffic volumes on the major roadways.

Redevelopment and infill projects at the intersection of US Highway 27 and SR 80 will begin to define
the city's downtown district. This city core will include office space, residential, commercial, civic,
and recreational uses. As development and growth continues within the city, the downtown district
can expand eastward creating a downtown corridor which serves as a gateway to the city from Belle
Glade and eastern Palm Beach County. Tanner Park and Community Center will be refurbished and
the addition of a community pool will serve as the downtown cultural and recreational hub. Active
recreation facilities will be located at the waterfront recreation park, adjacent to the existing R.V.
Park. This area contains the existing South Bay Nature Park which can be expanded to incorporate
the needed sporting facilities and amenities which can serve as a community park for the city as well
as a neighborhood park for the adjacent residential neighborhood.

The US Highway 27 corridor will be designated for commercial and industrial land uses. This will
be beneficial for the infill of businesses and commercial industries which can receive maximum
exposure and easy accessibility from the major road corridors. The larger commercial parcels to the
southeast of US Highway 27 can function as a gateway from the south. Of these three commercial
parcels, the northernmost parcel has the most potential for development of a supermarket because of
its size and location adjacent to the residential core of South Bay. A large commercial district along
this corridor will also serve as a screen of the South Bay Correctional Facility from the roadway. The
other commercial parcels along US Highway 27 can function as future development of restaurants,
retail and other commercial businesses as the population of the city begins to grow. These businesses
will also help economic development and growth within the city as well as provide a range of jobs,
shopping and leisure activities for residents.

The industrial parcels are designated to the northeast of US Highway 27. This is the location of the
existing South Bay Packaging Facility and the proposed site for the industrial park. Located on the
US Highway 27 corridor, and adjacent to the Florida East Coast Railroad, this site has tremendous
opportunity for industries such as a distribution center.


72












Proposed Community Park


Proposed Marina


Expanded R.V. Park


Proposed Neighborhood

Proposed Truck Stop


Proposed Commercial
* Restaurants
* Retail I
* Offices
Future Industrial
Neighborhood Expansion
* Low Density Residential I
* Addition of Neighborhood Park
Neighborhood Revitalization


* Streetscape Beautification
* Integrate with Proposed Downtown District
Neighborhood Revitalization
* Streetscape Beautification
* Residential / Commercial Infill
Proposed Commercial District
* Supermarket
* Retail
Prison Expansion


'"
.:r
~IZ
�.J
..
~


* Offices
* Warehousing
* Light Industrial or Commercial


4
Lyl
,I 1


IL


1i
Correctional
Facility
-II


Neighborhood Expansion


* Low Density Residential
* Addition of Neighborhood Park


1-- -


.---4


Downtown Expansion


* Commercial
* Offices
* Plazas
* Retail

Downtown Revitalization
* Cafes
* Retail
* Civic Buildings
* Plazas
* Rehab / Expand Tanner Park
Neighborhood Revitalization
* Streetscape Beautification
* Residential Infill
* Trail / Greenway along Canal
Neighborhood Expansion
* Low Density Residential
* Addition of Neighborhood Park


CONCEPTUAL MASTER PLAN 'A'

CITY OF SOUTH BAY
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN Y o Y4Mile NORTH


S--- L Wastewater Treatment Plant



I Neighborhood Revitalization
a Medium Density Residential
a Addition of Neighborhood Park
,J_ Proposed Industrial Park


i


LEGEND

SParks and Open Space

W Residential

W Industrial

Commercial

SDowntown Redevelopment

SECivic

W Existing Land Use


Irt







CITY OF SOUTH BAY
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN

Concept 'A' Positive Design Elements

* The eastward expansion of the downtown district creates a city gateway which encompasses
the North New River Canal. This linear gateway will create a downtown corridor with
multiple land uses and also serve as a traffic calming device.
* All industrial land uses are combined and integrated with US Highway 27 and the Florida
East Coast Railroad.
* The major commercial, recreational, civic and residential districts are integrated with the
downtown district creating a multi-use city center.
* The location of the future supermarket is adjacent to the existing residential core and central
to future residential developments.

Concept 'A' Negative Design Elements

* Expanding the downtown across the North New River Canal may create a district which is
too large to be supported and maintain functionality in South Bay.
* Moving the active recreation facilities to the waterfront creates a separation from the major
core of residents and the community center.
* The location of the future supermarket is located on the segment of US Highway 27 which
has nearly half the number of traffic counts as the segment north of SR 80.


75







CHAPTER 5
CONCEPTUAL DESIGN

CONCEPT 'B' DESCRIPTION

This concept begins to focus on the redevelopment of the downtown district, relocating and
integrating civic facilities, commercial businesses and the proposed community center with the
existing residential core. The downtown district is concentrated at the intersection of US HW 27
and SR 80. As the city further develops and outgrows their current civic facilities including city hall,
the public library, post office and fire station, they can be relocated to the parcel where Tanner Park
is currently located. These facilities can be situated around a public open space, creating an urban
plaza located on the North New River Canal. US Highway 27, SR 80, and MLK Jr. Boulevard are
the major traffic corridors for vehicular and pedestrian circulation. These three roadways create a
network which connects the major civic, commercial and recreational facilities within the city which
should be enhanced to accommodate the use by pedestrians and bicycles. This will help to increase
commercial development and reduce the high traffic volumes on the major roadways.

As with Concept 'A,' redevelopment and infill projects at the intersection of US Highway 27 and
SR 80 will begin to define the city's downtown district. This city core will include office space,
residential, commercial, civic, and recreational uses. The new 25 acre community center and park
will be located at the eastern gateway to the city on SR 80 between the North New River Canal
and the city limits. This new facility will serve as a gateway from Belle Glade and contain the
community center, community pool, and all active recreation facilities. This location is adjacent to
the proposed downtown district and within comfortable walking distance from most of the residential
neighborhoods in South Bay.

The waterfront recreation park will serve as a community facility as well as a small neighborhood
park for the proposed residential neighborhood adjacent to the east of the park. Open space, trails
and exercise stations can be focused toward serving the patrons of the R.V. Park while court facilities,
a children's playground and a multi-purpose open space can service the residents of the adjacent
neighborhood. Connections to the South Bay Boat Ramp and the Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail will
also help to enhance the infrastructure of the city, creating connections to its regional context.

The US Highway 27 corridor will be designated for commercial and industrial land uses. This will
be beneficial for the infill of businesses and commercial industries which can receive maximum
exposure and easy accessibility from the major road corridors. The commercial parcel immediately
south of the proposed industrial park is the location for a future supermarket. The parcel is located on
the segment of US Highway 27 which has double the number of traffic counts as the segment south
of SR 80. This would give the supermarket the most exposure to the greatest number of people. The
remaining commercial parcels along US Highway 27 can serve as future restaurants, retail and other
commercial industries once the population can support these businesses. The development of these
industries will help with economic growth within the city as well as provide a range ofjobs, shopping
and leisure activities for residents.


76













Expanded RV Park


Proposed Marina
Proposed Passive Park


Proposed Neighborhood


Proposed Truck Stop

Future Commercial

Future Commercial District
* Supermarket
Neighborhood Expansion
* Low Density Residential
* Addition of Neighborhood Park , wf


Neighborhood Revitalization
* Streetscape Beautification
* Residential / Commercial Infill
Future Commercial District


* Retail


Future Prison Expansion

Neighborhood Expansion


* Low Density Residential
* Addition of Neighborhood Park


..4 L.


45


1


,,,1- .1 ..


1�


Correctional
Facility


4+-1


I


.1- - .- -1


-_--


Wastewater Treatment Plant


Neighborhood Revitalization
* Medium Density Residential
* Addition of Neighborhood Park
Proposed Industrial Park
f * Offices
* Warehousing
* Light Industrial or Commercial


S Proposed Neighborhood
S * Low Density Residential
Proposed Community Park
* Gateway Feature
S Proposed Civic/Urban Plaza


* Civic Facilities
Downtown Revitalization


* Commercial
* Retail
* Cafes
Neighborhood Revitalization
* Streetscape Beautification
* Residential Infill
* Trail / Greenway along Canal
Neighborhood Expansion


i - - -W - - . - - - - - - I -


* Low Density Residential
* Addition of Neighborhood Park


CONCEPTUAL MASTER PLAN 'B'

CITY OF SOUTH BAY
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN y Y o Y4Mile NORTH


LEGEND

Parks and Open Space

W Residential

W Industrial

Commercial

- Downtown Redevelopment

- Civic

W Existing Land Use


i i 6,i


i


- -- - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - --- - - - -- - - - m i


C41


I







CITY OF SOUTH BAY
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN

Concept 'B' Positive Design Elements

* The proposed downtown district is composed in a concentrated, three block region. This
will help prevent overdevelopment of the downtown which cannot be supported by the
relatively small population.
* The relocation of the civic facilities to the existing location of Tanner Park will locate all
civic facilities within in single block which is central to the residential neighborhoods.
* The proposed urban plaza within the downtown district on the North New River Canal
can serve as a gathering/seating space during the week or a larger gathering space for
weekend markets, festivals and other special uses.
* The proposed community center is adjacent to the downtown district. This creates a
recreational center within the downtown core, which is fairly accessible to pedestrians and
bicyclists. The new center can also function as a gateway from Belle Glade and eastern
Palm Beach County and is also located on the Palm Tran bus route.
* The proposed supermarket location is on the north segment of the US Highway 27 corridor
which receives the greatest exposure to the maximum number of vehicles and residents.
* The industrial land uses border the Florida East Coast Railroad, providing more rail
frontage.

Concept 'B' Negative Design Elements

* The industrial land uses are divided by the proposed supermarket location and commercial
districts are divided by the Florida East Coast Railroad and other industrial land uses.


79







CHAPTER 5
CONCEPTUAL DESIGN

FINAL MASTER PLAN


The final master plan looks to combine the positive elements of each concept plan where possible.
The master plan focuses on creating a multi-use downtown district with a large recreation area at the
waterfront in conjunction with Lake Okeechobee and the existing R.V. Park.

The multi-use downtown district includes commercial, residential, civic and recreational land uses.
The juncture of the community center, the proposed civic core/urban plaza and the crossing of the
North New River Canal creates an important space, defining a distinct entry into the downtown
district. All industrial land uses are integrated to the northeast of US Highway 27 and the Florida
East Coast Railroad with the existing South Bay Packing Facility and the proposed industrial park.
Commercial land uses are focused along the US Highway 27 and SR 80 corridor for easy visibility
and accessibility from the major roads.

The recreational waterfront includes the South Bay boat ramp, proposed marina/trailhead with
connections to the Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail, expanded RV Park and a proposed community/
neighborhood park. Complementing the community center adjacent to the downtown, this combination
of recreation facilities utilizes Lake Okeechobee as an amenity to attract residents and tourists to the
area. With multiple facilities serving a broad array of users, this recreation area is capable of catering
to outdoor enthusiasts with activities ranging from water sports to active and passive recreation, to
camping and lodging. The proposed marina will also function as an educational facility and even be
used in conjunction with a trailhead for the Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail.

Multi-family residential is located along the US Highway 27 corridor with single-family residential
neighborhoods focused around the perimeter of the city, usually stemming as expansions of existing
neighborhoods. Each proposed neighborhood should also include a 1-2 acre neighborhood park to
serve the residents within a 1/4 mile service area.


80














Expanded RV Park


Proposed Marina ,
Proposed Recreation Park


Head Start Facility (Pre-School)
Existing Mobil Home Park

Multi-Family Residential
Neighborhood Expansion
* Low Density Residential
* Addition of Neighborhood Park
Existing IndustrialE
* Expand North to Industrial Park
Future Commercial District
* Supermarket

Rosenwald Elementary School


Neighborhood Revitalization
* Streetscape Beautification
* Residential / Commercial Infill
Future Prison Expansion

Multi-Family Residential
* Addition of Neighborhood Park


Wastewater Treatment Plant


Proposed Low Den. Residential


Neighborhood Revitalization
* Addition of Neighborhood Park
Proposed Truck Stop

Proposed Industrial Park
* Offices
* Warehousing
* Light Industrial or Commercial
Proposed Neighborhood
S* Low Density Residential
_ Proposed Community Park
* Gateway Feature
emmQNfei.g Proposed Civic/Urban Plaza
JUL. * Civic Facilities
S"InnC, Downtown Revitalization
L * Commercial
I " * RRetail
UJg * Cafes
SNeighborhood Revitalization
OM * Streelscape Beautification
* Residential Infill
, M M * Trail / Greenway along Canal
Neighborhood Expansion


* Low Density Residential
* Addition of Neighborhood Park





FINAL MASTER PLAN

CITY OF SOUTH BAY m
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN YX Y Mile NORTH


LEGEND

SParks and Open Space

Residential

SMulti-Family Residential

-Commercial

SDowntown Redevelopment

Institutional

Industrial

Civic

W Utilities





IhIa 9er


DESIGN DEVELOPMENT







CHAPTER 6
DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

Based upon the proposed master plan, design development drawings will establish and describe the
character of the master plan to help convey the overall design intent in detail. To show more detail at
a site planning scale. Details will show proposed site plans of the waterfront recreation area and the
proposed downtown district. Sections, elevations and detail drawings will show the character and
spatial relationships of the proposed streetscape improvements, neighborhood revitalization projects,
and other design elements such as gateway features and architectural character within the city.

The following detail drawings will look at key areas within the city at a closer detail. These drawings
are intended to show planning of the industrial park, downtown district and recreational waterfront
in more detail.


84







CITY OF SOUTH BAY
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN


FIGURE 6.1: PROPOSED DETAIL PLAN (BY OTHERS)

Shown below is the proposed site plan for the industrial park (by others) and low density residential
neighborhood (by others). This detail site plan was integrated into the final master plan.

SITE DATA:
Total Site Area: 119.93 acres
Industrial Site Area: 94.24 acres
Commercial Site Area: 5.58 acres
IXC Site Area: 3.00 acres
Lake Area: 17.11 acres


SProposed Low Density Residential
Y Proposed Industrial Park
E Existing Hattie Fields Head Start Facility (Pre-School)


Y8 Y6 0 a Mile NORTH


85







CHAPTER 6
DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

WATERFRONT RECREATION AREA

The waterfront recreation area consists of the existing boat ramps and R.V. Park with the addition
of a marina, community recreation park and expansion of the R.V. Park. With the addition of picnic
pavilions and grills near the proposed marina, a trailhead for the Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail will
also be integrated into the recreation area master plan.

Program elements of the new park will include two multi-purpose open spaces, two basketball courts,
a children's playground, picnic pavilions and a multi-purpose nature trail with connections to the
adjacent neighborhood, the R.V. Park and the Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail. The R.V. Park will
double in size, providing 144 available R.V. sites with full use of amenities such as water, cable and
electricity. With most of its use during the seasonal months, the R.V. Park does not receive full use
during the summer. Other uses such as green markets, festivals, and gatherings could occur to utilize
the park in these non peak months.

The marina will function as an educational facility for the South Florida Water Management District
as well as typical recreation and retail uses. A restaurant in the marina could provide beautiful
lakeside sunset views for diners as well. Fishing tournaments, nature tours and/or other special uses
could be strategically timed during the off season to help bring people to the RV Park, especially
during the low-use summer months.


86








CITY OF SOUTH BAY
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN


FIGURE 6.2: WATERFRONT REDEVELOPMENT PLAN


-- LI5K OkEEChooDE Scen.c Tral
- Ex.,l.r.g Fire P.L
- Ex.alr.g Mkll.-Purpoaa Pav.lOnr. arn
Recfeal-on Ares
- Propoea GazeDo ania aler Felbare
p- roposea R V Par Expans-on
P


Nt.




2w


-- Mulb.Purpose Trail
- P.cn-c Area
- Cr.illrer, Playground
- BasKelcDja Courts (2)


:pMulln-Pupose
Open Spidce (2i.


SignageArcr.itecrural icor /
Pri-poed Marr..a
Boal Rarr.oiIP.cn.c Area
I-IIsior.c H-ome Ga. .dr.


400' 200' 0' 400' NORTH


87







CHAPTER 6
DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

DOWNTOWN REDEVELOPMENT PLAN

The major commercial land uses will be located along US Highway 27 and SR 80. This commercial
lining the streets becomes multi-family units further from the intersection of US Highway 27 and
SR 80. All existing residential neighborhoods will remain with rehabilitation and infill projects
suggested to create cohesive neighborhoods in conjunction with the downtown district. With the
addition of the new 25 acre community center and park, the existing site of the Tanner Park and
community center becomes a valuable parcel of public land located in the downtown. This parcel
becomes the city center, as the city begins to outgrow its current civic and government buildings, new
facilities should be designed around an urban plaza. Located on SR 80, this site is easily accessible
and is connected to the proposed greenway along the North New River Canal.


88











































PUBLIC R.O.W. & PARKING

DOWNTOWN REDEVELOPMENT PLAN

CITY OF SOUTH BAY
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN 0 2
0' 250' 500' 1,000' NORTH


�-�.







CITY OF SOUTH BAY
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN

DESIGN GUIDELINES

Design guidelines will be very important to create a uniform design standard for public and private
entities within the city. These guidelines will help create a sense of place in South Bay, creating a
city where people want to live. With many of the residents of South Bay of Caribbean descent, a
Caribbean architectural style should be implemented. "In the towns and throughout the countryside,
the Caribbean offers a changing and varied architectural landscape. Brightly painted fences,
decorative balconies, half-open shutters and ornately gabled roofs are elements that both contrast
with and complement the luxuriant vegetation" (Slesin). This Caribbean village will be unique to
the Glades area, offering the experience of an island getaway on Lake Okeechobee for residents and
visitors of South Bay.


91







CHAPTER 6
DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

GENERAL DESIGN GUIDELINES

CURBS

Multiple types of curbs may be used within the urban areas of the city. Curbs will be replaced by
grass swales in the rural areas of the city.
* Curbs along the US Highway 27 and SR 80 corridor of the downtown district shall be type
'F' curb and gutter, generally 18"-24" in width.
* Type 'D' curbs, generally 6"-8" in width, may be used in parking lots, tight locations, side
streets and residential neighborhoods.

CROSSWALKS

Crosswalks should be installed where any pedestrian walk intersects a roadway in the downtown
district, by schools or near park entrances.
* Crosswalks found in the downtown district shall be designated by brick pavers set on a 1"
sand cement bed over an 8" thick concrete slab. The paving shall be in a herringbone
pattern, is indicated in Figure 6.4.
* All other crosswalks shall be designated by the FDOT standard white thermoplastic
pavement markings (12" wide strips placed 24" apart)

LIGHTING

Sufficient street lighting shall illuminate all roads within the city limits. Pedestrian scale lighting
shall supplement street lights within the downtown district and replace lighting fixtures in
residential neighborhoods
* Existing FDOT street lights should be replaced with decorative light fixtures in the
downtown city center
* Small scale pedestrian lighting should also accompany the lighting fixtures in the downtown
city center and residential neighborhoods


Source: "City ofKissimmee" Herbert - Halback, Inc.


I


92







CITY OF SOUTH BAY
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN


FIGURE 6.4: TYPICAL CROSSWALK DETAILS


SCALE: 1"=50'-0"


F-t-


El


-- - TRAFFIC ARM (WHERE NECESSARY)


- -BRICK CROSSWALK, HERRINGBONE PATTERN


--- '-0" WIDE CONCRETE BAND


- HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE RAMP (TYP.)


SCALE: 1"=10'-0"
93


/
/


Source: "City ofKissimmee " Herbert - Halback, Inc.


I


............


- - I- -







CHAPTER 6
DESIGN DEVELOPMENT


PARKING

Parking shall be a combination of on-street parking with public or private surface lots located to the
side or rear of buildings.
* Number of parking spaces shall conform to Palm Beach County code of 1 space per 200
square feet of 'general retail'
* On-street, parallel parking shall be provided within the downtown city center and in
residential neighborhoods
* Surface parking shall be provided along the sides or rear of buildings within the commercial
district of the downtown city center

FIGURE 6.5: TYPICAL REAR PARKING DETAIL


SCALE: 1"=40'-0"


Source: "City ofKissimmee" Herbert - Halback, Inc.


I


94







CITY OF SOUTH BAY
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN


PAVING

All roadway and sidewalk paving within the city shall be asphaltic concrete or standard grey
Portland cement concrete unless otherwise noted
* Sidewalks within the downtown district shall consist of a decorative paving pattern which
complements the character of the architecture and the Caribbean theme established within
the downtown city center.
* The paving shall consist of grey concrete with a heavy rock salt finish, as well as stone
accents as indicated in Figure 6.6


FIGURE 6.6: TYPICAL PAVING/SEATING AREA


GREY CONCRETE SIDEWALK
WITH HEAVY ROCK SALT FINISH

8" x 8" STONE EDGING

TRASH RECEPTACLE

PLANTER

SHADE TREE

6'-0" BENCH

14' x 8' GREY CONCRETE PAD

CONCRETE CURB AND GUTTER


SCALE: 1"=10'-0"


Source: "City of Kissimmee "Herbert Halback, Inc. 95


95


Source: "City ofKissimmee " Herbert - Halback, Inc.







CHAPTER 6
DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

PLANTING DETAIL

The planting details shown below illustrate proposed planting designs for typical bulb-outs on US
Highway 27 and SR 80. Figure 6.7 represents a typical planting detail while figure 6.8 represents a
typical planting detail located within FDOT sight triangles. Crossandra, a flowering groundcover and
accent plant material along with croton, a small, tropical shrub with very colorful leaves are suggested
because of their tropical character and moderate tolerance to drought. The proposed benches were
placed facing each other, approximately 11'-0" on center. This will encourage interaction between
individuals among a comfortable, public atmosphere. Sweetshrub, a larger shrub was used directly
behind the benches to provide a sense of comfort and protection from the rear of the bench. The
proposed plant material is listed below with images on the corresponding page.


CF-
CH
CI-
CV
SM
TR-


-Calycantuhs floridus (Sweetshrub)
Chrysobalanus icaco 'Dwarf' (Dwarf Cocoplum)
Crossandra infundibuliformis (Crossandra)
-Codiaeum variegatum (Croton)
- Swietenia mahagoni (Mahogany)
-Thrinax Radiata (Thatch Palm)


FIGURE 6.7: TYPICAL PLANTING DETAIL


FIGURE 6.8: TYPICAL PLANTING
DETAIL WITHIN SIGHT TRIANGLE


ci
6


96SCLE 11O-


SCALE: 1"=10'-0"


e ci5


SCALE: 1"=10'-O"


96


Cv
9







CITY OF SOUTH BAY
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN


FIGURE 6.9: IMAGES OF PROPOSED PLANT MATERIAL


CF - Sweetshrub


AMON>


CI - Crossandra


CH - Cocoplum


CV - Croton


SM - Mahogany TR - Thatch Palm


SM -Mahogany


TR - Thatch Palm







CHAPTER 6
DESIGN DEVELOPMENT


URBAN STREET FURNITURE

Street furniture, such as benches and trash receptacles, shall be located within the downtown
district, city parks and proposed trails and greenways.
* Benches shall be located within the green spaces of the streetscape, providing shade
and comfort for the pedestrians within the downtown district. Seating areas shall be spaced
approximately 100' apart
* Bench style and colors are indicated in Figure 6.10
* Trash receptacles should be placed periodically along the streetscape in conjunction with
proposed seating areas within the downtown district
* Receptacle style and colors are indicated in Figure 6.11
* All street furniture shall be secured per manufacturers specifications


FIGURE 6.10: TYPICAL BENCH FIGURE 6.11: TRASH RECEPTACLE
Manufacturer: DuMor, Inc. 800-598-4018 Manufacturer: DuMor, Inc. 800-598-4018
Model: 143-60 (6'long, 210 lbs.) Model: 42-22PL (155 lbs.)
Finish: Recycledplastic w/ cast iron supports Finish: Recycledplastic w/ 3/16" steel frame
Color: Black cast iron w/green recycled plastic Color: Black steel w/green recycled plastic


Source: "City ofKissimmee" Herbert - Halback, Inc.


I


98







CITY OF SOUTH BAY
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN


SITE FURNISHINGS

Site furnishings should be located in strategic areas where residents and visitors will gather such as
neighborhood parks, the South Bay boat ramp and other multi-purpose recreation areas within the
city.
* Bike racks shall be located nearest to accessible bicycle paths but not to obstruct pedestrian
walkways. All bike racks shall be secured by embedment, per manufacturer's
specifications.
* Bike rack style and colors are indicated in Figure 6.12
* Grills shall be located at all parks within the city to encourage outdoor parks and recreation
use. All grills shall be secured by embedment, per manufacturer's specifications.
* Grill style and colors are indicated in Figure 6.13


















FIGURE 6.12: TYPICAL BIKE RACK FIGURE 6.13: TYPICAL PARK GRILL
Manufacturer: DuMor, Inc. 800-598-4018 Manufacturer: DuMor, Inc. 800-598-4018
Model: 125-30 (holds 7 bikes, 139 lbs.) Model: 21-00 (84 lbs.)
Finish: Powder coated schedule 40 steel Finish: Heat-resistnat black enamel
Color: Black Color: Black

UTILITIES

Existing utilities within the city which are currently above ground can cause obstruction of views,
street trees and pedestrians. Alternate methods of locating existing utilities should be considered
where possible.
* All above ground utilities should be buried underground whenever possible
* When burial is not possible, utilities should be located at the rear of buildings, out of sight
from the main roadway and pedestrian sidewalks


Soure: Cit of issmme "Heber Haback In. 9


99


Source: "City ofliissimmee " Herbert - Halback, Inc.







CHAPTER 6
DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

PRIVATE PROPERTY DESIGN GUIDELINES

SETBACKS

Building facades within typical downtown districts are predominantly located on the property line
or public right of way. This creates an urban character which will promote the use by pedestrians
and also serve as a method of calming traffic.
* In the downtown district, there should be little or no building setback from the property line
* Multi-family units located within the downtown district shall follow the setback of the
existing and proposed commercial buildings

BUILDING SPACING

Buildings are encouraged to be constructed to create a continuous facade of store frontage. This
method will reduce the amount of unused space between buildings and create a close, comfortable
walking atmosphere for shoppers
* Building spacing should be adjacent to existing and proposed structures to create a
continuous facade of store frontage where possible

LANDSCAPING

Lush, colorful landscaping is encouraged within the downtown. Native plant material is suggested
to reduce maintenance costs but Caribbean or tropical plant material shall be permitted.
* All private landscaping should continue the theme proposed in the adjacent public ROW
* All maintenance of plantings on private property shall be the responsibility of the private
land owner


Source: "City ofKissimmee" Herbert - Halback, Inc.


I


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CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLANSTEPHEN J. WEST UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE SPRING 2005

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City of South Bay Community Redevelopment PlanA senior capstone project prepared for: City of South Bay, Florida 335 SW 2nd Avenue South Bay, Florida 33493 Glatting Jackson Kercher Anglin Lopez Rinehart, Inc. 222 Clematis Street, Suite 200 West Palm Beach, Florida 33401iPrepared by: Stephen J. West University of Florida Department of Landscape Architecture Spring 2005CITY OF SOUTH BAY, FLORIDA

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: I would like to acknowledge the many people who helped make this project successful and those who contributed to my education, which enabled me to accomplish so much here at the University of Florida. I would like to give a special thanks to: The entire faculty of the Department of Landscape Architecture at the University of Florida for “ ve years of hard work and guidance through an intense undergraduate program. I extend my thanks to Robert Grist, Glenn Acomb, Margaret Carr, Maria Gurucharri, Lester Linscott, R. Terry Schnadelbach, Gary Purdum, Sara K. Williams and Cindy Barton. Fred Halback, adjunct professor and primary advisor, for giving constant feedback, guidance and support throughout the duration of this project. David Barth, of Glatting Jackson, not only for providing me the opportunity to work on such a rewarding project and giving helpful support and assistance along the way, but for also giving me valuable real-world work experience working with Glatting Jackson. Mayor Clarence Anthony, Mayor of South Bay, for your time and effort in giving me the opportunity to present at the 2005 annual State of the City meeting and giving helpful criticism along the way to make this project successful. Tony Smith, City Manager of South Bay, for your constant help, guidance, support and information throughout the course of the project. DEDICATION: I dedicate this book to my family: To my mother and father for giving me a lifetime of love and support. To my brothers, Chris and Dave, the two people I idolize and look up to for inspiration as I pursue my dreams. I admire all of your hard work and dedication, and I would like to thank you all, for I could not have done it without you.iiACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

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INTRODUCTION 1 Abstract & Introduction 2 Project Location 3 City Goal Statement 4 Goals & Objectives 5 Background Information 6 Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail 8 Site Context 10 Aerial Photograph 11 USER ANALYSIS & PROGRAM 13 City Demographics 14 User Analysis & Program 18 Needs & Priorities 19 INVENTORY & ANALYSIS 21 Site Soils 22 Development Restrictions 24 Topography 25 Existing Land Use 26 Future Land Use 28 Planning Areas 29 Circulation 46 Existing Street Sections 48 Parks & Open Space 52 Gateways 58 SITE SYNTHESIS 61 Introduction 62 Development Opportunities 63 Opportunities & Constraints 64 Site Synthesis 65TABLE OF CONTENTSiii CONCEPTUAL DESIGN 69 Introduction 70 Conceptual Master Plan A 72 Conceptual Master Plan B 76 Final Master Plan 80 DESIGN DEVELOPMENT 83 Detail Site Plan (By Others) 85 Waterfront Recreation Area 86 Downtown Redevelopment Plan 88 Design Guidelines 91 Streetscape Design 104 Lake Okeechobee Waterfront 111 Gateway Features 112 Architectural Icon 113 IMPLEMENTATION & CONCLUSION 115 Implementation & Phasing 116 Federal & State Funding 117 Community Involvement 118 FFA & Special Interest 119 Conclusion 121 WORKS CITED 123 Works Cited 125

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2ABSTRACT South Bay is a small, rural community located in the heart of South Florida. Rich soils and Lake Okeechobees vast waters make South Bay a haven for agriculture and recreation. With these amenities and a strong interest in economic development, the City of South Bay has the potential to become a wonderful place to live as well as an ideal tourist destination. However, before the city can achieve these aspirations, there are a number of challenging issues to overcome. South Bay and its closest neighbors, Belle Glade and Pahokee, have some of the highest unemployment and poverty levels in Palm Beach County. The area is facing issues concerning poverty, high unemployment and vacant land throughout. There is little to no affordable housing, seasonal employment and a large unskilled labor force. Many necessary services, including shopping, schools and health care are located in Belle Glade, labeling South Bay as a bedroom community of Belle Glade. The intent of this project is to create a community redevelopment plan which focuses on the needs and priorities of the city. Economic development is a major priority and design should enhance the overall quality of life in South Bay. The project will develop a community master plan, goals to work toward and ultimately a program with implementation strategies, creating a comprehensive redevelopment plan for the City of South Bay. INTRODUCTION As is common among many small town communities, South Bay is facing economic problems with high unemployment and a lack of job diversity. Strategic planning efforts and sustainable design solutions are needed as the city begins to grow. With a strong vision and a tangible redevelopment plan, the city can begin to meet its economic goals while creating a city that residents are proud of and love to call home. South Bay has been termed the Crossroads of South FloridaŽ where two major roadways intersect in the citys core. These thoroughfares pose problems with major thru traf“ c but can also be utilized as a major opportunity for future development. It is easily accessible from nearby urbanized areas such as West Palm Beach, Ft. Lauderdale, Miami and Ft. Myers where urbanites can retreat to South Bay as a rural, countryside vacation destination. The city has maintained its small town appeal in one of the nations fastest growing areas. With critical planning, the city can remain a small town community without succumbing to urban sprawl. It should capitalize on its valuable location and strong cultural heritage to allure tourism and businesses to the area. Utilizing the suggestions of this redevelopment plan, South Bay can begin to stimulate economic development and become a charming small town community in the heart of south Florida.CHAPTER 1 PROJECT INTRODUCTION

PAGE 11

3CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN PROJECT LOCATION The City of South Bay is located in western Palm Beach County, Florida, on the southern tip of Lake Okeechobee, in the region known as the Glades.Ž The city is approximately 1.75 square miles and borders the second largest freshwater lake in the contiguous United States. Nearby cities: € Belle Glade, 4.5 miles € Pahokee, 11 miles € Clewiston, 16 miles € West Palm Beach, 48 miles € Ft. Lauderdale, 63 miles € Ft. Myers, 78 miles € Miami, 80 miles FIGURE 1.1: PROJECT LOCATION South BayBelle Glade Pahokee Clewiston Lake Okeechobee

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4CITY GOAL STATEMENT To ensure that the rural character of South Bay is maintained and improved where necessary, while allowing remaining vacant parcels to be developed in a manner consistent with present residential neighborhoods and commercial areas. Further, ensure that the city remains a diversi“ ed community offering: € A full range of municipal services € A range and mixture of housing alternatives consistent with the needs of the current and future residential population € Commercial and industrial development opportunities compatible with established locational and intensity factors; and € A variety of recreational activities and community facilities oriented to serving the needs of city residents. Various land use activities, consistent with these municipal character parameters, will be located to maximize the potential for economic bene“ t and the enjoyment of natural and man-made resources by residents and property owners, while minimizing potential threats to health, safety and welfare posed by hazards, nuisances, incompatible land uses and environmental degradation.ŽSource: South Bay Comprehensive Plan of 1989CHAPTER 1 PROJECT INTRODUCTION

PAGE 13

5CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLANGOALS & OBJECTIVES A. Enhance economic development € Promote in“ ll of businesses and commercial development € Lower unemployment and increase job diversity € Generate a more secure tax base € Ensure suf“ cient affordable housing B. Attract businesses & commercial industries € Create a downtown district which combines commercial, civic, cultural and recreational uses € Integrate a proposed industrial park into the city master plan C. Improve resident quality of life € Integrate housing, retail, work places, schools, parks and civic facilities € Create a unique sense of place and enhance the citys natural culture and heritage € Beautify streetscapes to create a physically and visually pleasing atmosphere € Provide educational and recreational activities for residents of all ages

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6BACKGROUND INFORMATION In the early 1900s, the state of Florida began to grow with new cities beginning to develop along the southeast coast of the state. Tourism ” ourished, bringing new visitors to the area and a population that began to in” ate. The economy in Florida was booming and land values were on the rise. Agriculture quickly became an important industry and the Florida Everglades was being drained for rich agricultural lands. Although environmentalists didnt approve of the draining, many people did not know the harmful effects this could have, and by the mid-1920s, approximately 50,000 acres had been farmed. The area of present day South Bay developed as a migrant farming community among the vast agricultural “ elds of south Florida.Source: National Weather Service, available: http://www.srh.noaa.gov/m” /newpage/Okeechobee.htmThe economic boom of the 1920s had peaked and started to decline when real estate values began to collapse, businesses failed and millionaires soon became broke. Just before the height of the great depression, the state of Florida was devastated by two hurricanes causing catastrophic destruction throughout. The Hurricane of 1926 reeked havoc in Ft. Lauderdale, Hollywood, Dania Beach and especially Miami. Then, two years later, the stronger of the two storms hit. The Hurricane of 1928 hit Lake Okeechobee, with destructive winds and even worse, deadly ” ooding. The category 4 hurricane was the second-deadliest natural disaster to hit the United States, with estimates reaching as high as 2,500 fatalities. Flooding had reached 11-12 in some areas and a major levee around Lake Okeechobee was constructed in the 1930s to prevent future ” ooding disasters in the areas surrounding Lake Okeechobee.Source: Hurricane of 1928Ž CHAPTER 1 PROJECT INTRODUCTION Photos courtesy of the National Weather Service. Available: http://www.srh.noaa.gov/m” /newpage/Okeechobee.htm

PAGE 15

7CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLANNow located in one of the fastest growing counties in the United States, the City of South Bay has maintained its small town appeal with a population just over 4,000 people. Incorporated in 1963, the city is essentially a rural residential and agricultural community with scattered commercial and industrial areas developed around US Highway 27 and State Road 80. The area is surrounded by vast openness and a sea of green sugar cane “ elds. The seasonal economy is based on the production of sugar cane, winter leafy vegetables, sweet corn, green beans, carrots and rice from November to April. Nearly 70% of the residents in the Glades area are employed only during these months. Commercial and industrial land is limited, given that most of the land is owned by large agricultural corporations. While the sugar industry has been the reason for the existence of the city, increasing mechanization of agriculture has resulted in loss of jobs.ŽSource: City of South Bay Case StudyOne of the cities biggest amenities and greatest potential for economic development is its close proximity to Lake Okeechobee and the Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail. After major ” ooding caused by hurricanes in the early 1900s, the United States Army Corps of Engineers drafted plans which provided for the construction of ” oodway channels, control gates, and major levees along Lake Okeechobees shores. A long term system was designed for the purpose of ” ood control, water conservation, prevention of saltwater intrusion, and preservation of “ sh and wildlife populations. The Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail began as the Okeechobee Segment of the 1,400 mile Florida Trail. The 110 mile trail encircles the entire lake and was designated as part of the Florida National Scenic Trail in 1993, one of only eight National Scenic Trails in the United States.Source: Florida National Scenic TrailŽ

PAGE 16

8LAKE OKEECHOBEE SCENIC TRAIL The trail itself is located atop the 35 Herbert Hoover Dike which surrounds the lake providing ” ood protection for nearby communities as well as scenic views of the lake and working agricultural landscapes. The trail takes users through areas with a rich history of inhabitants dating back to the Creek and Seminole Indians of the 18th and 19th centuries and through the core of Floridas modern day agricultural industry. The area offers excellent opportunities for hikers, bikers and horseback riders to enjoy excellent viewing of wildlife, particularly in the fall and winter, when birds such as herons, egrets, and a variety of waterfowl are abundant. With 730 square miles of fresh water accessible by both land and water, (via the cross-state Okeechobee Waterway) Lake Okeechobee offers endless “ shing opportunities. With 13 designated camping grounds and major recreation areas accessible from the trail at Clewiston, Lake Harbor, South Bay, Pahokee and on Torrey Island west of Belle Glade, the trail can be utilized for short day hikes or the 9 day, 110 mile Big OŽ Hike put on by the Loxahatchee Chapter of the Florida Trail Association. The trial was completely unpaved, typically double-track gravel until the mid-1990s when the Florida Department of Transportation began discussing opportunities for surface improvement that would be suitable for all recreational users. Under construction since 2002, 62 miles of the trail is now paved and maintained by the United States Army Corps of Engineers which uses the trail as a service road. The new paved trail runs 26 miles between Port Mayaca and Okeetantee Park at the Kissimmee River, and another 36 miles from Alvin Ward Park to City Park in Pahokee. The trail is open year round for a variety of uses including hiking, biking and horseback riding as well as other uses such as bird watching and photography. Equestrian riders can access the trail from numerous locations including Port Mayaca, Chancy Bay, Harney Pond, Moore Haven and Clewiston Park. Signs along the trail direct users to environmentally and culturally signi“ cant points of interest. Hikers heading north from the Big Cypress National Preserve reach the Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail in Clewiston and are met with a decision to hike the east or west side of the lake. There are certain portions of the trail that force users off of the dike where there are water control structures managed by the South Florida Water Management District. Users can obtain Florida National Scenic Trail maps which reroute users around these structures via public roads and back onto the dike.Source: Florida TrailŽ and Florida National Scenic TrailŽ View of Wetlands from the Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail in South BayCHAPTER 1 PROJECT INTRODUCTION

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9CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN LAKE OKEECHOBEE SCENIC TRAIL The Florida Trail is indicated in “ gure 1.2 by the solid green line as it navigates throughout the state of Florida and around Lake Okeechobee. The detail map shows the major recreation areas found along the Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail and their relation to the City of South Bay. The map also illustrates the different amenities found at each location.Source: Florida Department of Environmental ProtectionFIGURE 1.2: LAKE OKEECHOBEE SCENIC TRAIL

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10 5 0 5 10 Miles 2.5Lake OkeechobeePalm Beach County Urban and Built Lands Agriculture Rangeland Upland Forest Water Wetlands Barren Lands Transportation Communication and Utilities LEGEND FIGURE 1.3: SITE CONTEXT MAP SITE CONTEXT ANALYSIS The city is surrounded by vast agricultural lands. To the east is the City of Belle Glade, where residents travel for supermarkets, schools, local hospital and other daily necessities. Completing the incorporated cities of the Glades community is the City of Pahokee to the northeast on the coast of Lake Okeechobee. Although not shown on the map, the City of Clewiston is located on the southwest coast of the lake in Hendry County, just west of Palm Beach County. The shear distance of the city from urbanized areas indicates the need for South Bay to become a self-sustaining community and not rely on its surrounding neighbors.CHAPTER 1 PROJECT INTRODUCTIONCity of South BayPahokee Belle Glade

PAGE 19

11CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN 1 0.5 0 Miles 1FIGURE 1.4: AERIAL PHOTOGRAPH DESCRIPTION OF AERIAL PHOTOGRAPH The infrared aerial photograph portrays surfaces based on the re” ectivity of light. The grids of pink and black areas indicate areas of vegetation, in this case, primarily agriculture. The pink areas are suggestive of sugar cane “ elds where the darker areas indicate areas of moist soils where land clearing or plowing has recently occurred. The light colored, highly re” ective areas are urban and built up lands. This shows a clear delineation of urban land located around the intersection of US Highway 27 and SR 80 whereas the area to the north adjacent to the lake is natural lands.US HW 27SR 80FL EAST COAST RRN. NEW RIVER CANAL

PAGE 22

14DEMOGRAPHICS, YEAR 2000 Population: 3,859 (Current estimates at 4,000+) Males: 63.3% Females: 36.7% Median Resident Age: 32.2 years Median Household Income: $23,558 Per Capita Income: $9,126 Unemployment: +/30% Population below poverty level: +/20% Races in South Bay Black: 66.9% Hispanic: 19.6% White Non-Hispanic: 12.5% Other: 5.8% Two or more races: 2.4% American Indian: 0.5%(Note: Total can be greater than 100% because Hispanics may be counted in other races.)CHAPTER 2 USER ANALYSIS & PROGRAMHousing in South Bay Median Home Value: $65,600 Number of houses: 947 Owner Occupied: 479 (50.6%) Renter Occupied: 336 (35.5%) Vacant: 132 (13.9%) Education, residents 25 years and over High School or higher: 55.3% Bachelors degree or higher: 7.3% Graduate or Professional degree: 2.0% Industries providing employment in South Bay: 24.0% Educational, health and social services 13.5% Manufacturing 12.3% Agriculture, forestry, “ shing, hunting and mining 10.3% Retail Trade 10.3% Professional, scienti“ c, management & administrative

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15CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLANFacilities in South Bay Rosenwald Elementary School (455 Students, Grades PK-05) Hattie Fields Head Start Facility (Pre-School, day care, & after school program) Clarence E. Anthony Branch Library (PBC Public Library) Facilities Serving South Bay Glades General Hospital (Belle Glade, Approx. 5 miles) Hendry Regional Medical Center (Clewiston, Approx. 20 miles) Palms West Hospital (Loxahatchee, Approx. 30 miles) Palm Beach International Airport (WPB, Approx. 44 miles) Fort Lauderdale/Hollywood International Airport (Ft. Lauderdale, Approx. 57 miles) Miami International Airport (Miami, Approx 68 miles) Belle Glade State Municipal Airport (Belle Glade, Approx. 6 miles) Palm Beach County Glades Airport (Pahokee, Approx. 9 miles) Air Glades (Clewiston, Approx. 23 miles) Government Mayor-Council from of governmentSource: U.S. Census Bureau and City-Data.comDemographic characteristics of the city as compared to Palm Beach County and the state of Florida as a whole are exhibited in Figures 2.1 2.3 on the following page.

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16 Figure 2.1 Figure 2.2 Figure 2.3 DEMOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS & COMPARISON TABLESCHAPTER 2 USER ANALYSIS & PROGRAM

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17CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLANDEMOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS The City of South Bay is predominantly a minority community with black and Hispanic races making up almost 87% of the population. The black race, making up 67% of the population, is substantially higher than that of Palm Beach County and the state of Florida as a whole. The Hispanic race, making up approximately 20% of the total population, is slightly higher than that of the county and state numbers of 12.4% and 16.8% respectively. White, non-Hispanics make up approximately 12.5% of the population in South Bay. South Bays median home value of $65,600, median household income of $23,558 and per capita income of $9,126 are each below the county and state averages. In 2000, the citys median household income was just 52% of the county median of $45,062. For residents age 25 years or older, there is 24.8% unemployment in South Bay with nearly 20% of the population living below the poverty level in 2000. Unemployment is signi“ cantly higher than the county and state averages, reinforcing the importance and need for economic development and jobs in the city. Only 7.3% of the population has received a bachelors degree as compared to 27.7% for Palm Beach County and 22.3% for the state of Florida. This shows that much of the industry in South Bay is more trade oriented rather than college degree oriented.

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18USER ANALYSIS & PROGRAM The city is interested in recommendations regarding the development of a planned industrial or commercial park in hopes to attract jobs and link the city to regional economic development. The parcel is on 130 acres of city-owned property located at the northwestern edge of the city, near a county-owned RV park. Palm Beach County has given the city $500,000 to fund infrastructure improvements on the proposed site and paid for site planning which was done by Land Design South in 1997. Other site improvements have been made but county estimates show that completion would cost an additional $2 million to complete the infrastructure improvements. According to Glatting Jackson, the three key aspects of livable, sustainable communities is a balance between economics, the physical environment and social issues. While many programs and initiatives have been implemented to help South Bay, the city still struggles with improving the overall quality of life. Rather than focusing on the proposed industrial site, the city should be addressed as a whole, developing a community-wide master plan which utilizes the citys amenities and improving the overall quality of life in South Bay. The Glades Community Development Corporation (GCDC) is a non-pro“ t organization which serves as a facilitator and advocate for the diverse population residing in the Glades Communities of Belle Glade, Pahokee and South Bay. The organization works as a facilitator between community leaders and residents to obtain community input and articulate their needs and priorities. In January of 2002, the GCDC held Town Hall meetings initiated by the Palm Beach County Government to assist it in setting program and budget priorities for the Glades communities. The county wanted to acquire information on needs, concerns and priorities from a variety of sources. Among these sources included the local government, prior community visioning and strategic planning projects and various technical studies. In terms of ethnicity, age groups and gender, there was a very diverse group of 72 residents of South Bay present at the Town Hall meeting. The project utilized a qualitative/quantitative data analysis method that facilitated identi“ cation of past accomplishments and personal priorities followed by a series of group prioritization and discussion activities. To begin, voting on recommendations from prior workshops was held to initially identify community priorities. The following chart represents the communitys needs and priorities as determined by the Town Hall meeting and public workshop. Prior Recommendations from the City of South Bay Very Important SemiImportant Important, But Can Wait Community Center 15 0 0 Street Improvements 12 2 0 Commercial/Industrial along US 27 11 0 0 Water Treatment Improvements 7 0 0 Wastewater Treatment Improvements 6 0 0 Infrastructure for New Housing 5 0 1 Water & Sewer Line Rehab/Repair 5 0 0 Construct New Housing (114 Units) 4 2 1 Housing Repair/Rehab 1 2 0 CHAPTER 2 USER ANALYSIS & PROGRAMSource: Broadbent

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19CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLANYouth priorities included a movie theater, youth career jobs, youth activities, a teen club and a Glades TV news reporter. COMMUNITY NEEDS & PRIORITIES The residents were then divided into 7 groups. Using multi-voting procedures or group concensus, each work group generated their top 5 priorities. Many of the priorities listed had common themes of economic development, job creation, family housing, a multi-purpose/community center with pool, water/wastewater treatment facilities and improvement of educational facilities and programs. The priorities of each group were then combined into a master list and perspectives were shared on the importance of each item. Once the list was completed and residents shared their ideas for the community, a “ nal vote was taken to determine the priority rank of the master list. In this session, a multi-voting technique was used where each eligible person had a total of “ ve votes; therefore, voting totals represent more votes than persons present. Located below are the results of the “ nal town vote of the master priority list developed by the Town Hall meeting and resident workshop. Note: Although economic development is of major concern, it was not counted in the “ nal vote as residents and of“ cials believe that it is ultimately the top priority. Also, youth participants were also asked to identify their priorities which are reported on a separate list.A Community/multi purpose center B Environmental safety/water treatment plant C Improvement of streets and sidewalks D Suf“ cient single family housing E More activities for youth F Shopping center/grocery/retail G Movie theater H Clean and beauti“ cation of Lake Okeechobee I Improve schools J Establishing of colleges and universities K Health care facility/regional hospital L Pest control M Growth and adoption of annexation area N Career development O More nursing homes P More local teachers Q Sports centerNumber of Votes 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQSource: Broadbent

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22SOILS ANALYSIS Majority of the natural soils underlying the city are organic with drainage characteristics ranging from poor to very poor. The natural soil formations within the city have been signi“ cantly modi“ ed by urban development. In some areas, the impact of urban development has been minimal consisting of the deposition of several inches of “ ll over natural soils. Other areas, speci“ cally along major roadways such as U.S. Highway 27, drastic alterations to the soils have been made as a result of construction activities. Although the natural soils are not favorable for urban development, water management systems and deposition of urban “ ll have augmented the native soils, allowing for the safe construction of buildings and roads. The use of fertilizers have also led to the development of an active agricultural industry within and around the city.Source: U.S. Soil Conservation Service, Soil Survey of Palm Beach County, 1978. Lake OkeechobeeTr Pa Tc Tc Tc Tc Tr Tr Pa Pa Pa Pa Pa Pa Tr QAB Ur Da Tr UD UD Tc Tc Pa1 0.5 0 Miles 1Pa QABAX Arents Organic Sub. FIGURE 3.1: SITE SOILS LEGEND UD Udorthents Tr Torry Muck Tc Terra Ceia QAB Quartzipsamments Pa Pahokee Muck Da Dania Muck Pf Pits Ur Urban LandCHAPTER 3 INVENTORY & ANALYSIS

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23CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLANSOIL DESCRIPTIONS Note: Listed here are soils only found within the corporate city limits. Arents Organic Substratum … This complex consists of nearly level, somewhat poorly drained, sandy soils and urban land overlying organic soils. The areas were formerly organic marshes and swamps that were “ lled for urban use. This complex is approximately 50% 75% Arents and 25% 50% Urban Land. Arents consist of lawns, vacant lots, undeveloped areas and other open land. Urban Land consists of areas covered by street, sidewalks, driveways, houses and other structures. Dania Muck … This complex consists of nearly level, very poorly drained, shallow, organic soil that rests upon limestone. This soil is in broad marsh areas on the fringes of the Everglades. It is formed in thin deposits of hydrophytic plant remains. In some areas, the organic material is peaty muck. Pahokee Muck … This complex consists of level, very poorly drained organic soils that rest upon limestone at a depth of 36 … 51 inches. It is in broad, freshwater marshes. Under natural conditions, this soil is covered by water, or the water table is within 10Ž of the surface 6-12 months during the year. The soil is not suited to cultivation in its natural state. If water control is established, it is well suited for a wide variety of vegetables and sugarcane. The soil is not suitable to growth of citrus. Quartzipsamments … This complex consists of nearly level to gently, well drained, deep, sandy soils in areas where natural soils have been altered by cutting down ridges and spreading the soil material over adjacent lower soils. The sandy material may also be hauled from a distant source. Torry Muck … This complex consists of nearly level, very poorly drained, deep organic soils in broad, freshwater marshes. This soil formed in well-decomposed remains of hydrophytic plants mixed with a high content of “ ne textured mineral material. There are no areas of this soil in native vegetation. Most areas are used for sugarcane. Other areas are used for cultivated crops or improved pasture or are developed for urban use. This soil is not suited to cultivation of crops unless a water control system is established. Urban Land … This complex consists of areas where more than 60% -75% is covered with streets, buildings, parking lots, shopping centers, industrial parks, airports and related facilities. Former soils cannot be easily recognized.Source: U.S. Soil Conservation Service, Soil Survey of Palm Beach County, 1978.

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24FIGURE 3.2: DEVELOPMENT RESTRICTION ANALYSIS Lake Okeechobee 1 0.5 0 Miles 1 Low Restriction LEGEND High Restriction Moderate Restriction Water Bodies DEVELOPMENT RESTRICTION ANALYSIS The water table restriction analysis re” ects how feasible construction is on a speci“ c soil type based on the soils average water table height. High restrictions were placed on soils where the average water table was within 6Ž of the soil surface for 6-12 months of the year. Moderate restrictions were placed on soils where the average water table was between 6Ž3 of the soil surface for 6-12 months of the year and low restrictions were placed on any soil with an average water table height beyond 3-0Ž below the soil surface. This analysis was based upon native soil characteristics and is not an accurate depiction of true water table heights in the South Bay area. As described earlier, the soils in the urban areas of South Bay have been altered by the deposition of “ ll to allow for safe construction of buildings and roads. Water control has been established and maintained though a system of canals, dikes and pumps to regulate water in agricultural areas. Back-“ lling and de-mucking of soils will most likely be needed before construction on sites where there is no present construction. Source: U.S. Soil Conservation Service, Soil Survey of Palm Beach County, 1978.CHAPTER 3 INVENTORY & ANALYSIS

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25CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLANTOPOGRAPHY ANALYSIS The city is situated within the Everglades area of Palm Beach County. Elevations throughout the city generally range between 10 and 14 feet above man sea level (msl), although elevations of up to 21 feet occur along the crests of major roadways and even 30 feet along some portions of the Herbert Hoover Dike. The contours shown are in 5 increments and re” ect the deposition of “ ll for construction of major roadways and urban areas with the exception of the levee which is not shown. 1 0.5 0 Miles 1 Lake OkeechobeeFIGURE 3.3: TOPOGRAPHIC MAP

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26CHAPTER 3 INVENTORY & ANALYSISFIGURE 3.4: EXISTING LAND USE ANALYSIS Commercial Residential Institutional Parks & Recreation Industrial Utilities Vacant Agriculture LEGEND FLORIDA EAST COAST RAIL ROADN.ORTH NEW R IVER C ANAL N.ORTH NEW R IVER C ANAL

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27CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLANEXISTING LAND USE ANALYSIS The existing land use patterns in South Bay depict vast amounts of vacant and agricultural land uses which create the opportunity for new development projects, especially along the corridor of US Highway 27. Much of the existing commercial and civic land uses are near the intersection of US Highway 27 and State Road 80, which provides opportunity for the redevelopment of the area, to create a city center or downtown district. Existing recreational land uses are located in the major residential hubs and at the waterfront edge. This provides opportunity for expansion of the park to produce a larger community park creating an enhanced waterfront recreation area. Most of the residential land uses have adjacent vacant parcels which provide opportunity for future neighborhood expansion. The existing utility land uses to the north, the water and wastewater treatment plants provide bad views and is a constraint to development adjacent to these utilities. The South Bay Correctional Facility in the southern agricultural “ elds is also a constraint for development as it may deter potential development in adjacent vacant parcels.

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28CHAPTER 3 INVENTORY & ANALYSISFIGURE 3.5: FUTURE LAND USE PLAN Commercial Residential, Low Density Residential, Medium Density Residential, High Density Industrial Institutional Public Grounds/Buildings Recreation and Open Space Agriculture LEGEND FLORIDA EAST CO AST RAIL ROADN.ORTH NEW R IVER C ANA L N .ORTH NEW R IVER C ANAL

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29CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLANFUTURE LAND USE ANALYSIS The City of South Bays future land use plan designates areas of high, medium and low density residential, commercial, industrial, recreation/open space, public buildings/grounds, other public facilities and agriculture. The city has future hopes to annex the area just east of the North New River Canal and north of the Florida East Coast Railroad. For planning purposes, the city is divided into eight planning areas, each determined by existing land use characteristics. These planning areas are analyzed in detail on the following pages. Planning Area 1: Crossroads Corridor Planning Area 2: Central Residential Area Planning Area 3: Northeast Agricultural Area Planning Area 4: Southeast Residential Area Planning Area 5: South Agricultural Area Planning Area 6: West Residential Area Planning Area 7: Villa Lago Area Planning Area 8: North Agricultural Area Planning Area 1: Crossroads Corridor (158.1 acres) This area is an important corridor when looking at the future development of the city as it is the main junction and has the greatest potential for commercial development. Commercial and industrial are the predominant existing land use patterns in this area but much is undeveloped. Industrial land uses are thriving in this area but commercial areas have begun to depreciate and some have been abandon. This area has excellent opportunity for commercial in“ ll and redevelopment projects along the highly visible corridor of US Highway 27 and SR 80. This planning area has two extremely important intersections: the intersection of US Highway 27 with SR 80 and the intersection of US Highway 27 and the Florida East Coast Railroad, providing opportunities for a truck/railroad transfer point. Future development of this area should be coordinated to determine appropriate land use patterns and regulations implemented to improve the quality of the area.Source: City of South Bay Comprehensive Plan, 1989The numbers on the map indicate the location of corresponding images on the following pages.

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30 FIGURE 3.6: PLANNING AREA 110CHAPTER 3 INVENTORY & ANALYSIS 8 11 3 2 1 12 4 5 9 6 7

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31CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN 1. Valero Gas Station 2. U.S. Highway 27, Northbound3. Abandon Industrial Site 4. Strip Mall 5. U.S. Post Of“ ce6. City Hall 7. Public Library8. U.S. Sugar Corporation 9. Tanner Park & Community Ctr. 10. Mobil Home Park11. Okeechobee Inn12. Local Shop

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32CHAPTER 3 INVENTORY & ANALYSIS FIGURE 3.7: PLANNING AREA 21 2 3 4

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33CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLANPlanning Area 2: Central Residential Area (25.3 acres) Comprised almost entirely of single family residential units, this is the smallest of all planning areas. The area is completely contained within other designated planning areas and therefore future development is limited to in“ ll and infrastructure improvements. Quality of housing is the major concern of this area as many of the housing units are dilapidated and should be considered in any program providing for improvements. Opportunities for this area include rehabilitation of housing in conjunction with a new downtown district to develop a small mixed-use environment.Source: City of South Bay Comprehensive Plan, 1989The numbers on the map indicate the location of the corresponding image below. 3. Deteriorated Pavement 1. Residential Street2. Single Family Housing 4. NW 1st Avenue / North New River Canal

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34FIGURE 3.8: PLANNING AREA 3 CHAPTER 3 INVENTORY & ANALYSIS1 2 3 4

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35CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLANPlanning Area 3: Northeast Agricultural Area (72.1 acres) Planning area three is currently agriculture “ elds consisting of primarily sugar cane, contributing minimal amounts to the citys tax base. The 35 acre parcel to the south has excellent opportunity for development because of its prime location as an important city gateway from Belle Glade and eastern Palm Beach County on SR 80. It is also bound by the Florida East Coast Railroad to the north, the North New River Canal to the west, SR 80 to the south and the city limits to the east. The Existing soil conditions are a constraint to development because expensive de-mucking and back“ lling of the property may be needed prior to development due to existing soil conditions.Source: City of South Bay Comprehensive Plan, 1989The numbers on the map indicate the location of the corresponding image below. 1. Water Control Canal2. CrossroadsŽ & Sugar Cane 3. LOST Signage & Sugar Cane4. SR 80

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36 FIGURE 3.9: PLANNING AREA 4CHAPTER 3 INVENTORY & ANALYSIS 1 2 3 4

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37CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLANPlanning Area 4: Southeast Residential Area (61.9 acres) This area is comprised almost entirely of single family residential units, but character of the neighborhood is divided by the North New River Canal. Housing to the west are smaller lots creating a higher density environment and the neighborhood to the east is characterized by larger lots creating a more suburban environment. Opportunities for the area include expansion to the south along with a linear park or greenway along the canal to create a network of green space within the city.Source: City of South Bay Comprehensive Plan, 1989The numbers on the map indicate the location of the corresponding image below. 1. Multi-Family Housing 2. Mobil Homes 3. Single Family Housing 4. Single Family Housing

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38FIGURE 3.10: PLANNING AREA 5 CHAPTER 3 INVENTORY & ANALYSIS1 4 2 3

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39CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLANPlanning Area 5: South Agricultural Area (310.5 acres) As the largest planning area, this is the second of two primarily agricultural planning areas. It formerly held 71.6% of all the agricultural land in South Bay prior to the development of South Bay Correctional Facility, established in 1997 in the northern portion of the site. This planning area can bene“ t from its location as the gateway to the city from the south and opportunities for the area include commercial development along US Highway 27. The major constraint of this area is the correctional facility and bad views from the highway.Source: City of South Bay Comprehensive Plan, 1989The numbers on the map indicate the location of the corresponding image below. 1. South Bay Correctional Facility Entry 2. South Bay Correctional Facility Entry 3. Northbound US Highway 27 4. Agriculture

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40 FIGURE 3.11: PLANNING AREA 6CHAPTER 3 INVENTORY & ANALYSIS 1 2 3 4 5

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41CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN 1. Neighborhood Street MLK Blvd. 2. Cox Neighborhood Park 3. Neighborhood Market 4. Rosenwald Elementary School 5. Vacant Residential Buildings N/A. Multi-Family Housing N/A. Single Family Housing N/A. Single Family Housing N/A. Single Family HousingPlanning Area 6: West Residential Area (235.3 acres) This area is comprised predominantly of single family residential with a sporadic mixture of other land uses. This area also contains much of the multi-family housing in South Bay as well as Cox Park, a neighborhood park serving the area. Opportunities for the area include proximity to Rosenwald Elementary School and Cox Neighborhood Park. The mixture of commercial land uses among the neighborhood also give residents a nearby store within easy walking distance for quick groceries. Vacant land and buildings are scattered throughout the area along with a large portion of agricultural land in the northern portion of the planning area. Such areas can potentially be common places for illegal activities but also provide opportunity for residential or commercial in“ ll projects to help raise property values.Source: City of South Bay Comprehensive Plan, 1989The numbers on the map indicate the location of corresponding images on the following page.

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42 FIGURE 3.12: PLANNING AREA 7CHAPTER 3 INVENTORY & ANALYSIS 1 2 3 4

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43CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLANPlanning Area 7: Villa Lago Area (36.6 acres) This planning area consists of the Villa Lago duplex residential development and the South Bay sewage treatment plant. The Villa Lago development, constructed in 1976, holds 200 duplex units and was used by South Bay Growers, Inc. as housing for agricultural employees. Many of the units are currently vacant but the city is redeveloping 101 units, providing refurbished homes for lowincome households and “ rst time home buyers. The area is adjacent to the proposed industrial park creating providing opportunities for important residential-commercial connections. On the contrary there is no neighborhood park serving this area and there are no visual connections to the downtown district or waterfront.Source: City of South Bay Comprehensive Plan, 1989The numbers on the map indicate the location of the corresponding image below. 1. Villa Lago Duplex (Vacant) 2. Villa Lago Duplex (Vacant) 3. Villa Lago Streetscape 4. Church

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44CHAPTER 3 INVENTORY & ANALYSISFIGURE 3.13: PLANNING AREA 8 1 2 3 4

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45CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLANPlanning Area 8: North Agricultural Area (223.65 acres) This area is predominantly agriculture and open land with the exception of the South Bay RV Park, South Bay Nature Park and the citys water treatment plant. The existing RV Park and Campground should capitalize on its location as an excellent opportunity to promote nature-based tourism and create connections to the Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail. This planning area is also the proposed location for 102 new single family homes adjacent to the RV Park; however, the cities comprehensive plan designates this land for industrial use, not residential use. This planning area is also the location for the proposed industrial park, which will be incorporated into the city master plan.Source: City of South Bay Comprehensive Plan, 1989The numbers on the map indicate the location of the corresponding image below. 1. South Bay RV Park 2. Water Treatment (Background) 3. South Bay Nature Park 4. Hattie Fields Heard Start Facility

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46CHAPTER 3 INVENTORY & ANALYSISFIGURE 3.14: CIRCULATION MAP Rural Principal Arterial Florida East Coast Railroad Palm Tran Bus Route Rural Local Road Trails CIRCULATION MAP LEGEND

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47CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLANCIRCULATION ANALYSIS The major circulation routes in South Bay are US Highway 27 and SR 80 which intersect in the core of the city. These roads are classi“ ed by the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) as rural principal arterial highways . These roads are part of an integrated network of inter-county highways providing rural areas with easy access to major arterial roadways. They provide easy accessibility to South Bay from the larger, more urban areas of Florida which can be bene“ cial for tourism. The Florida East Coast Railroad intersecting US Highway 27 also poses opportunities for businesses such as distribution centers located in the heart of south Florida. The remaining roads in South Bay are classi“ ed as rural local roads, providing basic connections to residential neighborhoods, commercial properties and other higher order highways. These local roads in South Bay create a well-de“ ned network of streets which should be continued and enhanced with future development to promote an interconnected streetscape infrastructure. South Bay is served by the Palm Tran bus route which creates important connections to Belle Glade and eastern Palm Beach County. Extension of the existing route should be considered as an opportunity to create connections to the waterfront recreation area via public transportation.

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48CHAPTER 3 INVENTORY & ANALYSISFIGURE 3.15: EXISTING STREET SECTIONS Location Map

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49CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLANFIGURE 3.16: EXISTING STREET SECTIONS Location Map

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50FIGURE 3.17: EXISTING STREET SECTIONS Location MapCHAPTER 3 INVENTORY & ANALYSIS

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51CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLANFIGURE 3.18: EXISTING STREET SECTIONS Location Map

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52 There are two community parks serving South Bay with numerous sporting “ elds, walking trails, “ shing access, childrens playgrounds and picnic pavilions. John Stretch Park is a 56.2 acre park located approximately 6 miles west of South Bay with 3,580 feet of waterfront on Lake Okeechobee which is accessible via US Highway 27. Glades Pioneer Park is a 64.2 acre community park located approximately 2 miles east of South Bay in Belle Glade. Existing Park/Recreation 1/4 Mile Service Area for Neighborhood Parks LEGENDCHAPTER 3 INVENTORY & ANALYSISCounty-Owned Parks 1. South Bay R.V. Park and Campground 2. South Bay Boat Ramp City-Owned Parks 3. Tanner Park 4. Cox Park 5. South Bay Nature Park FIGURE 3.19: PARKS AND OPEN SPACE ANALYSIS1 2 3 4 5

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53CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLANSOUTH BAY R.V. PARK AND CAMPGROUND The South Bay R.V. Park is located at the northeast tip of the city, with excellent proximity to the South Bay Boat Ramp and the Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail. The proximity to the lake creates steady lakeside breezes along with beautiful views of the nearby lake and wetlands. With the addition of a proposed marina and connections to the Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail via a trailhead in South Bay, these amenities provide for enhanced tourism opportunities. The county owned R.V. Park is “ lled to capacity during the winter tourist season but suffers from lack of use during the off season (See Appendix B for park occupancy “ gures). Expansion of the RV Park may be a potential for increasing nature-based and/or culture-based tourism in South Bay as a means of economic development. Considerations to use this site as a green market during the off season could help draw residents and visitors to the waterfront and also create much needed jobs. Park Amenities: € 35 acres € Freshwater “ shing € 72 campsites with cable TV hookups (ADA Accessible) € 2 comfort stations (ADA Accessible) € Childrens play area € 2 Horseshoe pits € 2 Group “ re pits € Dump station (ADA Accessible) € Recreation hall/group picnic pavilion € Laundry facilities € Internet access in recreation hall € Access to concrete city boat ramp

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54SOUTH BAY BOAT RAMP The South Bay Boat Ramp is a 4.67 acre park located at the northwest edge of the city, just outside of the city corporate limits. It is accessible off of US 27 where Levee Road climbs up and over the steep dike. Parking is available to accommodate 20 full length boat trailers, which is often full during peak “ shing and boating times. Impressive views of the nearby wetlands can be enjoyed from the waterfront or from the Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail atop the levee. The lake can also be accessed from remote locations via the cross-state Okeechobee Waterway. A proposed marina could be the perfect amenity to draw outdoor enthusiasts to the area, providing opportunities for a lakefront restaurant or an expanded waterfront park. Park Amenities: € 2 boat ramps with concrete docks € Trailer parking: 20 spaces € 6 Picnic Benches € 2 Benches € Information kiosk CHAPTER 3 INVENTORY & ANALYSIS

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55CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLANTANNER PARK Tanner Park is a 2.3 acre neighborhood park located off of SR 80 near the southeast residential neighborhood. The park is maintained by the city and also has a community center with a number of activities for all ages. There are numerous senior activity programs as well summer evening recreation activities for youth. With the proposal of a new community center in the city, there is potential for this site to be redeveloped, as it is a valuable parcel located on SR 80 within the citys core. Park Amenities: € Community Center € Restrooms € 2 lighted basketball courts € 2 lighted handball/racquetball courts € 1 lighted tennis court € 1 childrens playground € Open space

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56CHAPTER 3 INVENTORY & ANALYSISCOX PARK Cox Park is a small, 1.2 acre neighborhood park located in the heart of the west residential neighborhood. The residents of this area are well served by this park according to the 0.25 mile neighborhood park service area. The park is maintained by the city broken or missing sporting equipment along with shattered glass in the parking lot, restrooms and pavilion area are some examples of areas which are need of improvements. Park Amenities: € 2 lighted basketball courts € Restrooms € 1 covered pavilion, no seating € 1 childrens playground € Open space

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57CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLANSOUTH BAY NATURE PARK South Bay Nature Park is located in the northwest potion of the city, to the east of the RV Park and campground. The park is also accessible from Levee Road via US 27 but is not easily visible from the roadway and there is lack of signage. Although the park is located directly adjacent to the R.V. Park, there is no real connection between the two parks or the boat ramp. These parks could be combined and further developed to create a uni“ ed community park in South Bay. The park has been maintained but a deteriorating asphalt walkway is in need of repaving and connections to the Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail are feasible. The park is primarily used during the summer and fall months for youth and adult ” ag football leagues. Park Amenities: € 1 lighted, multi-purpose “ led, with sideline benches € 1 covered pavilion with 2 picnic tables € Bike racks

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58 CHAPTER 3 INVENTORY & ANALYSISFIGURE 3.20: EXISTING GATEWAYS The City of South Bay is a major thoroughfare for motorists, many passing through without ever stopping. A gateway into a city is our “ rst impression of what a certain place is about. These initial impressions can ultimately intrigue a passerby, to make an individual want to stop and shop or even explore a fascinating new area. At the Crossroads of South Florida,Ž South Bay has amazing potential to capture motorists attention, and create the impression which promotes South Bay as an intriguing, quaint little town on the beautiful shores of Lake Okeechobee. South Bay has three main gateways into the city: 1. US Highway 27, northbound 2. US Highway 27, southbound 3. SR 80, Westbound 1 2 3

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59CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN1. US Highway 27, Northbound Entering the city from the south, motorists arrive into the city among agricultural “ elds. Amongst the “ elds to the west is the South Bay Correctional Facility. As the road approaches the city center, civic buildings, commercial areas and vacant lots are scattered around US Highway 27. This gateway is in need of improvements to help de“ ne the cities edge. This gateway, along with the redevelopment of the city, can create a sense of place and create a new destination for urbanites to retreat for rural, countryside get-a-ways on Lake Okeechobee. 2. US Highway 27, Southbound As southbound US Highway 27 enters the City of South Bay, motorists are among some of the cities greatest amenities. The Lake Okeechobee waterfront with boat ramp and the South Bay RV Park and campground are among the “ rst facilities encountered. These amenities should be capitalized upon to create a gateway which signi“ es recreation and captures the interest of motorists. 3. SR 80, Westbound Traveling westbound on SR 80 from Belle Glade, motorists enter the city of South Bay in an area with the most potential for gateway development. This is an important gateway as visitors from Belle Glade and eastern Palm Beach County enter directly into the citys core just after crossing the North New River Canal. To the south are residential developments and Tanner Park, while to the north are open “ elds of sugar cane. Rezoning of the agriculture “ elds could create the potential for development, balancing the neighborhoods to the south of the road. Narrowing streets and bringing buildings closer to the roadway can help to slow traf“ c down. New shops, cafes and other commercial uses among a new community center and important civic buildings would be the foundation for developing a downtown district in South Bay. EXISTING GATEWAYS ANALYSIS These existing gateways to South Bay should be enhanced with signage, street trees and plant material to create a comfortable and pleasing entry, notifying motorists that they are entering city limits. Not only can this have a positive effect on traf“ c calming, this may also create interest in motorists to stop and see more of what South Bay has to offer.

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62INTRODUCTION With strategic planning and a focused vision for the future of South Bay, a citywide master plan can be developed to help the city to meets its economic and future development goals. One of the issues South Bay is struggling with includes vacant land and buildings scattered throughout the city. There are a number of isolated vacant parcels and buildings where residential and commercial in“ ll projects should be considered. As these parcels are effectively developed or redeveloped, development of the larger, vacant parcels should then be considered. By analyzing the existing land uses and their potential for future development or redevelopment, the map to the right indicates opportunities for existing land uses to change. CHAPTER 4 SITE SYNTHESIS

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63CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN Low Opportunity Moderate Opportunity High Opportunity FIGURE 4.1: OPPORTUNITY FOR DEVELOPMENT/ REDEVELOPMENT LEGEND

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64CHAPTER 4 SITE SYNTHESISOPPORTUNITIES AND CONSTRAINTS Analysis of the existing elements within the city pose a number of opportunities and constraints to developing a community-wide master plan which promotes economic development and creates an overall better quality of life in South Bay. Opportunities € The city has great interest in economic development and advantages such as available workforce, cheap land and prime location can bring businesses to the area. The area is also an ideal location for a distribution center. € The potential for economic development through nature/culture-based tourism is enhanced by the citys crossroads location in south Florida with 10 million people living within 125 miles of South Bay. € Existing zoning designates much of the land within South Bay as commercial and industrial land uses, especially along US Highway 27 and SR 80. € The city already has plans for the proposed industrial park which should be incorporated into the community master plan. € Existing location of civic buildings promote the idea of a downtown district and the city has a strong cultural heritage which can be capitalized upon when developing the downtown. € The city is rather small and relatively walkable, creating an appealing, small town atmosphere. € Amenities such as Lake Okeechobee, the R.V. Park, boat ramps and the Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail should be integrated to create a uni“ ed recreational area. € The recreational waterfront has great potential to create a trailhead with connections to the Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail. € Many of the major roads have existing, grassed medians, promoting the development of green streetscapes. Constraints € The depressed economy of South Bay will deter potential businesses from coming to the area. The existing economic situation will also make city improvements dif“ cult with lack of funds for potential redevelopment projects. € The city is considered a bedroom community of Belle Glade where many of their daily necessities such as school, shopping and health care located. € The citys population of 4,000 residents cannot support a supermarket and also deters franchises from developing within the city. € High traf“ c volumes and excessive numbers of semi-truck tractor trailers on US Highway 27 and SR 80 make the streets uninviting and unsafe for pedestrians. € Lack of “ nances for implementation of the master plan and maintenance of city streets, parks and civic areas will mandate, sustainable design solutions and a strict implementation program.

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65CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN FIGURE 4.2: SITE SYNTHESIS

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66CHAPTER 4 SITE SYNTHESISSITE SYNTHESIS Planning Area 1: Crossroads Corridor 1. Vacant buildings should be rehabilitated and commercial/industrial in“ ll should occur to create a uni“ ed commercial district and prevent sprawl 2. Existing roadways have grassed/planted medians which should be enhanced. Streetscapes should be designed to promote pedestrian use with street trees, pedestrian lighting and furniture, creating connections between the downtown and the waterfront. 3. With the addition of a proposed community center, the existing Tanner Park Community Center site could be redeveloped into an urban civic core. 4. A proposed truck stop would be ideal on US 27 as an estimated 10,000-16,000 semi-truck pass through the city limits everyday. Planning Area 2: Central Residential Area 1. Dilapidated and vacant housing should be rehabilitated through special funding programs such as habitat for humanities. 2. All other development will be limited to residential in“ ll due to the small size of this area. 3. Road improvements are needed, and addition of sidewalks and street trees will enhance pedestrian comfort as well as help to beautify the area. Planning Area 3: Northeast Agricultural Area 1. Currently sugarcane “ elds, this area has great potential to be developed as it is also located at one of the citys important gateways. Development will balance the neighborhoods on the south side of SR 80, creating a clearly de“ ned city gateway. 2. Potential annexation of the area to the north will allow neighborhood expansion. Planning Area 4: Southeast Residential Area 1. The atmosphere in this area is nice with some larger lots and some modern housing. The area should be expanded to the south and enhanced with sidewalks and street trees. 2. Expansion of the neighborhood would require the addition of a neighborhood park to serve the new residents.

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67CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLANSITE SYNTHESIS CONTINUED Planning Area 5: South Agricultural Area 1. Potential area for the creation of a gateway, helping to slow traf“ c as it enters the city. 2. Commercial or multi-family development along the west side of US Highway 27 will help balance the potential residential development to the east as well as help de“ ne the citys gateway. 3. This planning area is also an ideal location for a future middle or high school in South Bay. 4. Screening of the South Bay Correctional Facility to the west is needed by use of street trees or proposed development along US Highway 27. Planning Area 6: West Residential Area 1. Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, which leads to Rosenwald Elementary School, has existing sidewalks and street trees which can be enhanced to help beautify the area and promote pedestrian use. 2. Neighborhood could be enhanced with proposed sidewalks and street trees branching form MLK Jr. Boulevard throughout residential areas. 3. Existing, scattered commercial buildings should be preserved as they can be important shopping and gathering areas to residents of the neighborhood. 4. Dilapidated or vacant housing and multi-family units should be rehabilitated through special funding programs such as habitat for humanities. Planning Area 7: Villa Lago Area 1. While many of the duplexs are being rehabilitated and sold, street trees are needed to greatly enhance the existing hot and uninviting streetscape atmosphere. 2. A neighborhood park is needed to serve this area, especially if they property to the east is annexed and future residential neighborhoods are proposed. 3. Needs a stronger visual and physical connection to the waterfront recreation area as well as the downtown district. Planning Area 8: North Agricultural Area 1. The city-proposed industrial park should be incorporated into the city master plan. 2. The city-proposed residential neighborhood should be designed within the context of the area, creating connections to the waterfront recreation area and to the proposed industrial park. 3. R.V. Park, boat ramp and nature park should be integrated to create an enhance waterfront recreational park. 4. A marina or waterfront restaurant should be considered to help promote tourism and economic development.

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70CHAPTER 5 CONCEPTUAL DESIGNCONCEPTUAL DESIGN INTRODUCTION The following chapter will look at two alternatives to the conceptual master plan for South Bay, taking into consideration previously collected and synthesized data. The master plan for the city will look at the existing conditions and potential areas for improvements. The main intent of the master plan is to help the city achieve its goals of economic development, attracting businesses and commercial industries and improving the resident quality of life in South Bay. These goals will be achieved through a combination of recommendations on future development and redevelopment areas, beauti“ cation projects and enhanced recreation facilities within the city. In an effort to accomplish these goals, major elements of focus during conceptual design included key development/redevelopment areas, the Lake Okeechobee waterfront and recreation area, the proposed downtown district and the citys green infrastructure of parks, trails and streetscapes. Key Development/Redevelopment Elements 1. Create/Designate downtown district which combines commercial, civic, cultural and recreational uses 2. Integrate proposed industrial park into community master plan 3. Planning area 3, the northeast agricultural area, is prime location of developable land 4. Designate areas for future residential development 5. Commercial redevelopment and in“ ll projects on US Highway 27 and SR 80 6. Incorporate a truck stop on US Highway 27 Lake Okeechobee Waterfront and Recreation Area 1. Expansion of existing R.V. Park 2. Integration of R.V. Park, boat ramp and nature park to create a uni“ ed recreation area 3. Proposed marina on Lake Okeechobee for recreational/educational purposes 4. Create a trailhead for the Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail Green Infrastructure 1. Create pedestrian friendly streets and beautify roadways 2. Utilize existing greenways and open land for green infrastructure connections 3. Note locations where future neighborhood parks will be needed with the expansion of residential development

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71CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLANCONCEPTUAL DESIGN There are “ ve key program elements which have been integrated into both conceptual master plans. Three of these elements, the proposed industrial park, truck stop and a ninety-eight unit residential neighborhood, have had previous site planning work completed. The fourth and “ fth elements found in both concepts are the expansion of the existing South Bay R.V. Park and the proposed marina on Lake Okeechobee. During the seasonal months of January and February 2005, the R.V. Park occupancy rates have exceeded 99% of its total capacity (See Appendix B for RV Park Occupancy Statistics). The park has had to accommodate patrons with over” ow sites during some of the busiest weeks of the year. These over” ow sites do not receive the bene“ t of electricity, water and cable hook-ups, but still pay the same full price as regular customers who receive full utility service at their individual R.V. site. The proposed marina, also integrated into both conceptual master plans, can enhance tourism opportunities and function as an educational facility as well. These “ ve program elements have been integrated into both concept plans because of their importance to the overall master plan. In both concepts, the proposed residential land uses are generally expansions of existing neighborhoods. These neighborhoods will be low density, single-family residential units with encouragement of home ownership. Multi-family residential units will be encouraged along US HW 27, providing the option of single or multi-family units to home buyers. All existing residential neighborhoods should “ rst focus on in“ ll and rehabilitation projects to reduce vacant lots and potential sprawling. City of“ cials have discussed the possibility of expansion of the correctional facility within South Bay. If expansion of this facility does occur, it should be limited only to the west. Pedestrian connections are important for the positive growth of the city. All streets within the city should have sidewalks and provide shade with street trees, creating a comfortable environment for pedestrian and bicycle use. The US Highway 27 and SR 80 corridor are most important as these are the major corridors connecting amenities of the city. The North New River Canal and Rock Road corridors should become enhanced greenway connections to create a network of contiguous green infrastructure. Also, the existing Palm Tran bus route should be extended to create connections to Lake Okeechobee. This modi“ cation can connect residents to the recreational waterfront as well as provide patrons of the R.V. Park with transportation to the city core.

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72CHAPTER 5 CONCEPTUAL DESIGNCONCEPT A DESCRIPTION This concept focuses on the development and growth of the proposed downtown district creating a downtown core which extends to the citys current eastern limit. The concept begins to give form to the downtown district, a recreational waterfront park and pedestrian friendly connections between the two. US Highway 27, SR 80, and MLK Jr.. Boulevard are the major traf“ c corridors for vehicular and pedestrian circulation. These three roadways create a network which connects the major civic, commercial and recreational facilities within the city which should be enhanced to accommodate the use by pedestrians and bicycles. This will help to increase commercial development and reduce the high traf“ c volumes on the major roadways. Redevelopment and in“ ll projects at the intersection of US Highway 27 and SR 80 will begin to de“ ne the citys downtown district. This city core will include of“ ce space, residential, commercial, civic, and recreational uses. As development and growth continues within the city, the downtown district can expand eastward creating a downtown corridor which serves as a gateway to the city from Belle Glade and eastern Palm Beach County. Tanner Park and Community Center will be refurbished and the addition of a community pool will serve as the downtown cultural and recreational hub. Active recreation facilities will be located at the waterfront recreation park, adjacent to the existing R.V. Park. This area contains the existing South Bay Nature Park which can be expanded to incorporate the needed sporting facilities and amenities which can serve as a community park for the city as well as a neighborhood park for the adjacent residential neighborhood. The US Highway 27 corridor will be designated for commercial and industrial land uses. This will be bene“ cial for the in“ ll of businesses and commercial industries which can receive maximum exposure and easy accessibility from the major road corridors. The larger commercial parcels to the southeast of US Highway 27 can function as a gateway from the south. Of these three commercial parcels, the northernmost parcel has the most potential for development of a supermarket because of its size and location adjacent to the residential core of South Bay. A large commercial district along this corridor will also serve as a screen of the South Bay Correctional Facility from the roadway. The other commercial parcels along US Highway 27 can function as future development of restaurants, retail and other commercial businesses as the population of the city begins to grow. These businesses will also help economic development and growth within the city as well as provide a range of jobs, shopping and leisure activities for residents. The industrial parcels are designated to the northeast of US Highway 27. This is the location of the existing South Bay Packaging Facility and the proposed site for the industrial park. Located on the US Highway 27 corridor, and adjacent to the Florida East Coast Railroad, this site has tremendous opportunity for industries such as a distribution center.

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CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN CONCEPTUAL MASTER PLAN A Parks and Open Space Residential Industrial Commercial Downtown Redevelopment Civic Existing Land UseLEGEND

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75CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLANConcept A Positive Design Elements € The eastward expansion of the downtown district creates a city gateway which encompasses the North New River Canal. This linear gateway will create a downtown corridor with multiple land uses and also serve as a traf“ c calming device. € All industrial land uses are combined and integrated with US Highway 27 and the Florida East Coast Railroad. € The major commercial, recreational, civic and residential districts are integrated with the downtown district creating a multi-use city center. € The location of the future supermarket is adjacent to the existing residential core and central to future residential developments. Concept A Negative Design Elements € Expanding the downtown across the North New River Canal may create a district which is too large to be supported and maintain functionality in South Bay. € Moving the active recreation facilities to the waterfront creates a separation from the major core of residents and the community center. € The location of the future supermarket is located on the segment of US Highway 27 which has nearly half the number of traf“ c counts as the segment north of SR 80.

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76CHAPTER 5 CONCEPTUAL DESIGNCONCEPT B DESCRIPTION This concept begins to focus on the redevelopment of the downtown district, relocating and integrating civic facilities, commercial businesses and the proposed community center with the existing residential core. The downtown district is concentrated at the intersection of US HW 27 and SR 80. As the city further develops and outgrows their current civic facilities including city hall, the public library, post of“ ce and “ re station, they can be relocated to the parcel where Tanner Park is currently located. These facilities can be situated around a public open space, creating an urban plaza located on the North New River Canal. US Highway 27, SR 80, and MLK Jr. Boulevard are the major traf“ c corridors for vehicular and pedestrian circulation. These three roadways create a network which connects the major civic, commercial and recreational facilities within the city which should be enhanced to accommodate the use by pedestrians and bicycles. This will help to increase commercial development and reduce the high traf“ c volumes on the major roadways. As with Concept A, redevelopment and in“ ll projects at the intersection of US Highway 27 and SR 80 will begin to de“ ne the citys downtown district. This city core will include of“ ce space, residential, commercial, civic, and recreational uses. The new 25 acre community center and park will be located at the eastern gateway to the city on SR 80 between the North New River Canal and the city limits. This new facility will serve as a gateway from Belle Glade and contain the community center, community pool, and all active recreation facilities. This location is adjacent to the proposed downtown district and within comfortable walking distance from most of the residential neighborhoods in South Bay. The waterfront recreation park will serve as a community facility as well as a small neighborhood park for the proposed residential neighborhood adjacent to the east of the park. Open space, trails and exercise stations can be focused toward serving the patrons of the R.V. Park while court facilities, a childrens playground and a multi-purpose open space can service the residents of the adjacent neighborhood. Connections to the South Bay Boat Ramp and the Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail will also help to enhance the infrastructure of the city, creating connections to its regional context. The US Highway 27 corridor will be designated for commercial and industrial land uses. This will be bene“ cial for the in“ ll of businesses and commercial industries which can receive maximum exposure and easy accessibility from the major road corridors. The commercial parcel immediately south of the proposed industrial park is the location for a future supermarket. The parcel is located on the segment of US Highway 27 which has double the number of traf“ c counts as the segment south of SR 80. This would give the supermarket the most exposure to the greatest number of people. The remaining commercial parcels along US Highway 27 can serve as future restaurants, retail and other commercial industries once the population can support these businesses. The development of these industries will help with economic growth within the city as well as provide a range of jobs, shopping and leisure activities for residents.

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CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN CONCEPTUAL MASTER PLAN B Parks and Open Space Residential Industrial Commercial Downtown Redevelopment Civic Existing Land UseLEGEND

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79CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLANConcept B Positive Design Elements € The proposed downtown district is composed in a concentrated, three block region. This will help prevent overdevelopment of the downtown which cannot be supported by the relatively small population. € The relocation of the civic facilities to the existing location of Tanner Park will locate all civic facilities within in single block which is central to the residential neighborhoods. € The proposed urban plaza within the downtown district on the North New River Canal can serve as a gathering/seating space during the week or a larger gathering space for weekend markets, festivals and other special uses. € The proposed community center is adjacent to the downtown district. This creates a recreational center within the downtown core, which is fairly accessible to pedestrians and bicyclists. The new center can also function as a gateway from Belle Glade and eastern Palm Beach County and is also located on the Palm Tran bus route. € The proposed supermarket location is on the north segment of the US Highway 27 corridor which receives the greatest exposure to the maximum number of vehicles and residents. € The industrial land uses border the Florida East Coast Railroad, providing more rail frontage. Concept B Negative Design Elements € The industrial land uses are divided by the proposed supermarket location and commercial districts are divided by the Florida East Coast Railroad and other industrial land uses.

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80CHAPTER 5 CONCEPTUAL DESIGNFINAL MASTER PLAN The “ nal master plan looks to combine the positive elements of each concept plan where possible. The master plan focuses on creating a multi-use downtown district with a large recreation area at the waterfront in conjunction with Lake Okeechobee and the existing R.V. Park. The multi-use downtown district includes commercial, residential, civic and recreational land uses. The juncture of the community center, the proposed civic core/urban plaza and the crossing of the North New River Canal creates an important space, de“ ning a distinct entry into the downtown district. All industrial land uses are integrated to the northeast of US Highway 27 and the Florida East Coast Railroad with the existing South Bay Packing Facility and the proposed industrial park. Commercial land uses are focused along the US Highway 27 and SR 80 corridor for easy visibility and accessibility from the major roads. The recreational waterfront includes the South Bay boat ramp, proposed marina/trailhead with connections to the Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail, expanded RV Park and a proposed community/ neighborhood park. Complementing the community center adjacent to the downtown, this combination of recreation facilities utilizes Lake Okeechobee as an amenity to attract residents and tourists to the area. With multiple facilities serving a broad array of users, this recreation area is capable of catering to outdoor enthusiasts with activities ranging from water sports to active and passive recreation, to camping and lodging. The proposed marina will also function as an educational facility and even be used in conjunction with a trailhead for the Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail. Multi-family residential is located along the US Highway 27 corridor with single-family residential neighborhoods focused around the perimeter of the city, usually stemming as expansions of existing neighborhoods. Each proposed neighborhood should also include a 1-2 acre neighborhood park to serve the residents within a 1/4 mile service area.

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CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN FINAL MASTER PLAN Parks and Open Space Residential Multi-Family Residential Commercial Downtown Redevelopment Institutional Industrial Civic UtilitiesLEGEND

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84CHAPTER 6 DESIGN DEVELOPMENTDESIGN DEVELOPMENT Based upon the proposed master plan, design development drawings will establish and describe the character of the master plan to help convey the overall design intent in detail. To show more detail at a site planning scale. Details will show proposed site plans of the waterfront recreation area and the proposed downtown district. Sections, elevations and detail drawings will show the character and spatial relationships of the proposed streetscape improvements, neighborhood revitalization projects, and other design elements such as gateway features and architectural character within the city. The following detail drawings will look at key areas within the city at a closer detail. These drawings are intended to show planning of the industrial park, downtown district and recreational waterfront in more detail.

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85CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN FIGURE 6.1: PROPOSED DETAIL PLAN (BY OTHERS) Shown below is the proposed site plan for the industrial park (by others) and low density residential neighborhood (by others). This detail site plan was integrated into the “ nal master plan. SITE DATA: Total Site Area: 119.93 acres Industrial Site Area: 94.24 acres Commercial Site Area: 5.58 acres IXC Site Area: 3.00 acres Lake Area: 17.11 acres

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86CHAPTER 6 DESIGN DEVELOPMENTWATERFRONT RECREATION AREA The waterfront recreation area consists of the existing boat ramps and R.V. Park with the addition of a marina, community recreation park and expansion of the R.V. Park. With the addition of picnic pavilions and grills near the proposed marina, a trailhead for the Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail will also be integrated into the recreation area master plan. Program elements of the new park will include two multi-purpose open spaces, two basketball courts, a childrens playground, picnic pavilions and a multi-purpose nature trail with connections to the adjacent neighborhood, the R.V. Park and the Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail. The R.V. Park will double in size, providing 144 available R.V. sites with full use of amenities such as water, cable and electricity. With most of its use during the seasonal months, the R.V. Park does not receive full use during the summer. Other uses such as green markets, festivals, and gatherings could occur to utilize the park in these non peak months. The marina will function as an educational facility for the South Florida Water Management District as well as typical recreation and retail uses. A restaurant in the marina could provide beautiful lakeside sunset views for diners as well. Fishing tournaments, nature tours and/or other special uses could be strategically timed during the off season to help bring people to the RV Park, especially during the low-use summer months.

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87CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN FIGURE 6.2: WATERFRONT REDEVELOPMENT PLAN

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88CHAPTER 6 DESIGN DEVELOPMENTDOWNTOWN REDEVELOPMENT PLAN The major commercial land uses will be located along US Highway 27 and SR 80. This commercial lining the streets becomes multi-family units further from the intersection of US Highway 27 and SR 80. All existing residential neighborhoods will remain with rehabilitation and in“ ll projects suggested to create cohesive neighborhoods in conjunction with the downtown district. With the addition of the new 25 acre community center and park, the existing site of the Tanner Park and community center becomes a valuable parcel of public land located in the downtown. This parcel becomes the city center, as the city begins to outgrow its current civic and government buildings, new facilities should be designed around an urban plaza. Located on SR 80, this site is easily accessible and is connected to the proposed greenway along the North New River Canal.

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CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN DOWNTOWN REDEVELOPMENT PLAN Site LocationLEGENDCOMMERCIAL SINGLE-FAMILY RES. MULTI-FAMILY RES. CIVIC/PUBLIC FACILITY PARKS & OPEN SPACE PUBLIC R.O.W. & PARKING US HIGHWAY 27SR 80 FLORIDA EAST COAST RAILROADNORTH NEW RIVER CANALWEST PALM BEACH RD./MLK JR. BLVD.

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91CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLANDESIGN GUIDELINES Design guidelines will be very important to create a uniform design standard for public and private entities within the city. These guidelines will help create a sense of place in South Bay, creating a city where people want to live. With many of the residents of South Bay of Caribbean descent, a Caribbean architectural style should be implemented. In the towns and throughout the countryside, the Caribbean offers a changing and varied architectural landscape. Brightly painted fences, decorative balconies, half-open shutters and ornately gabled roofs are elements that both contrast with and complement the luxuriant vegetationŽ (Slesin). This Caribbean village will be unique to the Glades area, offering the experience of an island getaway on Lake Okeechobee for residents and visitors of South Bay.

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92CHAPTER 6 DESIGN DEVELOPMENTGENERAL DESIGN GUIDELINES CURBS Multiple types of curbs may be used within the urban areas of the city. Curbs will be replaced by grass swales in the rural areas of the city. € Curbs along the US Highway 27 and SR 80 corridor of the downtown district shall be type F curb and gutter, generally 18Ž-24Ž in width. € Type D curbs, generally 6Ž-8Ž in width, may be used in parking lots, tight locations, side streets and residential neighborhoods. CROSSWALKS Crosswalks should be installed where any pedestrian walk intersects a roadway in the downtown district, by schools or near park entrances. € Crosswalks found in the downtown district shall be designated by brick pavers set on a 1Ž sand cement bed over an 8Ž thick concrete slab. The paving shall be in a herringbone pattern, is indicated in Figure 6.4. € All other crosswalks shall be designated by the FDOT standard white thermoplastic pavement markings (12Ž wide strips placed 24Ž apart) LIGHTING Suf“ cient street lighting shall illuminate all roads within the city limits. Pedestrian scale lighting shall supplement street lights within the downtown district and replace lighting “ xtures in residential neighborhoods € Existing FDOT street lights should be replaced with decorative light “ xtures in the downtown city center € Small scale pedestrian lighting should also accompany the lighting “ xtures in the downtown city center and residential neighborhoodsSource: City of KissimmeeŽ Herbert Halback, Inc.

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93CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLANFIGURE 6.4: TYPICAL CROSSWALK DETAILSSource: City of KissimmeeŽ Herbert Halback, Inc.

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94CHAPTER 6 DESIGN DEVELOPMENTPARKING Parking shall be a combination of on-street parking with public or private surface lots located to the side or rear of buildings. € Number of parking spaces shall conform to Palm Beach County code of 1 space per 200 square feet of general retail € On-street, parallel parking shall be provided within the downtown city center and in residential neighborhoods € Surface parking shall be provided along the sides or rear of buildings within the commercial district of the downtown city center FIGURE 6.5: TYPICAL REAR PARKING DETAILSource: City of KissimmeeŽ Herbert Halback, Inc.

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95CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLANPAVING All roadway and sidewalk paving within the city shall be asphaltic concrete or standard grey Portland cement concrete unless otherwise noted € Sidewalks within the downtown district shall consist of a decorative paving pattern which complements the character of the architecture and the Caribbean theme established within the downtown city center. € The paving shall consist of grey concrete with a heavy rock salt “ nish, as well as stone accents as indicated in Figure 6.6 FIGURE 6.6: TYPICAL PAVING/SEATING AREASource: City of KissimmeeŽ Herbert Halback, Inc.

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96CHAPTER 6 DESIGN DEVELOPMENTPLANTING DETAIL The planting details shown below illustrate proposed planting designs for typical bulb-outs on US Highway 27 and SR 80. Figure 6.7 represents a typical planting detail while “ gure 6.8 represents a typical planting detail located within FDOT sight triangles. Crossandra, a ” owering groundcover and accent plant material along with croton, a small, tropical shrub with very colorful leaves are suggested because of their tropical character and moderate tolerance to drought. The proposed benches were placed facing each other, approximately 11-0Ž on center. This will encourage interaction between individuals among a comfortable, public atmosphere. Sweetshrub, a larger shrub was used directly behind the benches to provide a sense of comfort and protection from the rear of the bench. The proposed plant material is listed below with images on the corresponding page. CF … Calycantuhs ” oridus (Sweetshrub) CH … Chrysobalanus icaco Dwarf (Dwarf Cocoplum) CI … Crossandra infundibuliformis (Crossandra) CV … Codiaeum variegatum (Croton) SM … Swietenia mahagoni (Mahogany) TR … Thrinax Radiata (Thatch Palm) FIGURE 6.7: TYPICAL PLANTING DETAIL FIGURE 6.8: TYPICAL PLANTING DETAIL WITHIN SIGHT TRIANGLE

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97CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLANFIGURE 6.9: IMAGES OF PROPOSED PLANT MATERIAL CF Sweetshrub CH Cocoplum CI Crossandra CV Croton SM Mahogany TR Thatch Palm

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98URBAN STREET FURNITURE Street furniture, such as benches and trash receptacles, shall be located within the downtown district, city parks and proposed trails and greenways. € Benches shall be located within the green spaces of the streetscape, providing shade and comfort for the pedestrians within the downtown district. Seating areas shall be spaced approximately 100 apart € Bench style and colors are indicated in Figure 6.10 € Trash receptacles should be placed periodically along the streetscape in conjunction with proposed seating areas within the downtown district € Receptacle style and colors are indicated in Figure 6.11 € All street furniture shall be secured per manufacturers speci“ cations FIGURE 6.10: TYPICAL BENCH Manufacturer: DuMor, Inc. 800-598-4018 Model: 143-60 (6 long, 210 lbs.) Finish: Recycled plastic w/ cast iron supports Color: Black cast iron w/ green recycled plastic FIGURE 6.11: TRASH RECEPTACLE Manufacturer: DuMor, Inc. 800-598-4018 Model: 42-22PL (155 lbs.) Finish: Recycled plastic w/ 3/16Ž steel frame Color: Black steel w/ green recycled plasticCHAPTER 6 DESIGN DEVELOPMENTSource: City of KissimmeeŽ Herbert Halback, Inc.

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99CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLANUTILITIES Existing utilities within the city which are currently above ground can cause obstruction of views, street trees and pedestrians. Alternate methods of locating existing utilities should be considered where possible. € All above ground utilities should be buried underground whenever possible € When burial is not possible, utilities should be located at the rear of buildings, out of sight from the main roadway and pedestrian sidewalks SITE FURNISHINGS Site furnishings should be located in strategic areas where residents and visitors will gather such as neighborhood parks, the South Bay boat ramp and other multi-purpose recreation areas within the city. € Bike racks shall be located nearest to accessible bicycle paths but not to obstruct pedestrian walkways. All bike racks shall be secured by embedment, per manufacturers speci“ cations. € Bike rack style and colors are indicated in Figure 6.12 € Grills shall be located at all parks within the city to encourage outdoor parks and recreation use. All grills shall be secured by embedment, per manufacturers speci“ cations. € Grill style and colors are indicated in Figure 6.13 FIGURE 6.12: TYPICAL BIKE RACK Manufacturer: DuMor, Inc. 800-598-4018 Model: 125-30 (holds 7 bikes, 139 lbs.) Finish: Powder coated schedule 40 steel Color: Black FIGURE 6.13: TYPICAL PARK GRILL Manufacturer: DuMor, Inc. 800-598-4018 Model: 21-00 (84 lbs.) Finish: Heat-resistnat black enamel Color: Black Source: City of KissimmeeŽ Herbert Halback, Inc.

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100CHAPTER 6 DESIGN DEVELOPMENTPRIVATE PROPERTY DESIGN GUIDELINES SETBACKS Building facades within typical downtown districts are predominantly located on the property line or public right of way. This creates an urban character which will promote the use by pedestrians and also serve as a method of calming traf“ c. € In the downtown district, there should be little or no building setback from the property line € Multi-family units located within the downtown district shall follow the setback of the existing and proposed commercial buildings BUILDING SPACING Buildings are encouraged to be constructed to create a continuous facade of store frontage. This method will reduce the amount of unused space between buildings and create a close, comfortable walking atmosphere for shoppers € Building spacing should be adjacent to existing and proposed structures to create a continuous facade of store frontage where possible LANDSCAPING Lush, colorful landscaping is encouraged within the downtown. Native plant material is suggested to reduce maintenance costs but Caribbean or tropical plant material shall be permitted. € All private landscaping should continue the theme proposed in the adjacent public ROW € All maintenance of plantings on private property shall be the responsibility of the private land ownerSource: City of KissimmeeŽ Herbert Halback, Inc.

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101CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLANPRIVATE BUILDING APPEARANCE DESIGN GUIDELINES ARCHITECTURAL DETAIL Architectural detailing is important within native Caribbean design. Decorative trim “ lters the bright sunlight, yet still allows air to pass through to intricately cut trim. This detailing also produces unique features that create a distinct and unique character from adjacent units. € Architectural detail and decorative trim is encourage on building facades € Wood and cast iron are suggested materials for railings and other ornate architectural detail CANOPIES and BALCONIES Canopies and balconies can create intimately private or public gathering spaces which allow for interaction between residents. They also create outdoor, open air spaces which provide protection from the sun. € Canopies and balconies are encourage to create a continuous overhead shelter along the pedestrian corridors within the downtown € Canopies and awnings should be constructed of permanent materials such as V5 metal, corrugated iron or wood shinglesFIGURE 6.14: ARCHITECTURAL DETAIL, CANOPIES & BALCONIES Photos: Caribbean StyleŽ Source: City of KissimmeeŽ Herbert Halback, Inc.

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102CHAPTER 6 DESIGN DEVELOPMENTCOLOR Vibrant color schemes within the Caribbean culture re” ect the natural Caribbean surroundings of the intense blue sky, red and yellow croton leaves, vibrant sunsets and colorful plant material. € Color schemes of private building should use a minimum of three (3) colors € Vibrant color combinations are encouraged for new or rehabilitated building facades € Color schemes should be unique and not replicate adjacent structures, leading to overlyuniform color schemes MATERIALS Wood is the most important building material of the Caribbean islands. € New construction should be indicative of Caribbean architecture, predominantly wood or approved equal € Combinations of wood, brick, corrugated steel and cement are suggested building materials Photos: Caribbean StyleŽ Source: City of KissimmeeŽ Herbert Halback, Inc. FIGURE 6.15: COLOR AND MATERIALS

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103CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLANROOFS Many of the existing roofs in South Bay are ” at roofs, obscure from pedestrian view. Ornately gable roofs are characteristic of Caribbean architecture and should be encouraged into new architectural buildings within the residential and downtown districts. € Ornately gabled and peaked roofs are encouraged throughout new and/or rehabilitated houses and commercial buildings € Standard roo“ ng material should be V5 metal, but corrugated iron, thatch and/or woodshingled roofs are also suitable WINDOWS AND STOREFRONT Storefront porches and open shutters are characteristic of Caribbean style architecture and should be integrated into new and rehabilitated architecture within the residential and downtown districts € Storefront porches with decorative railings, columns, potted plants and architectural detail is encouraged to promote the distinct character of Caribbean architecture € Open windows with movable shutters are also encouraged which can be open during business hours but locked during non-business hours Photos: Caribbean StyleŽ Source: City of KissimmeeŽ Herbert Halback, Inc. FIGURE 6.16: ROOFS, WINDOWS & STOREFRONTS

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104CHAPTER 6 DESIGN DEVELOPMENTSTREETSCAPE DESIGN Streetscape revitalization projects can directly and/or indirectly help the city to achieve its main goals: to enhance economic development, attract new businesses and commercial industries and improve the resident quality of life in South Bay. One of the main objectives of streetscape revitalization projects is to create a comfortable atmosphere for the pedestrian. At only 1.75 square miles, South Bay is a relatively small city, with many of the important civic, commercial and recreational facilities within walking distance of the residential neighborhoods. With this close proximity, streetscape revitalization projects can help to enhance the experience of the pedestrian or bicycle. This can indirectly have a positive effect on businesses as more residents utilize the streets and become drawn to the downtown district. STREETSCAPE PROGRAM ELEMENT MATRIX Streetscape revitalization projects may include repaving of the streets, addition of or repaving sidewalks, addition of lighting, benches, trash receptacles, street trees or median plantings. The chart below shows which streets can bene“ t the most from the potential elements proposed in the various streetscapes in South Bay.

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105CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLANDOWNTOWN CITY CENTER US HIGHWAY 27 & SR 80 The US Highway 27 and SR 80 corridors are important streets to look at during design development because these roads comprise of the three city gateways which lead into downtown South Bay. The SR 80 corridor will be the Downtown South Bay Gateway,Ž focusing on a Caribbean style atmosphere with tropical plant material and brightly colored architecture. Decorative street lighting, pedestrian lighting and street furniture such as benches and trash receptacles will also be important design elements within the downtown district. Figure 6.17 and 6.18 provide two options for US Highway 27 and SR 80 within the downtown district. Combinations or adjustments of the two options are also possible Figure 6.17: Option A, Royal palms with decorative street lighting and Mahogany shade trees Figure 6.18: Option B, Thatch palms with existing FDOT light “ xtures and Mahogany shade trees

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106CHAPTER 6 DESIGN DEVELOPMENT FIGURE 6.19: DOWNTOWN CITY CENTER US HIGHWAY 27 & SR 80 PLAN VIEW

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107CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLANDOWNTOWN CITY CENTER US HIGHWAY 27 & SR 80 CHARACTER Figure 6.19 illustrates option B in plan view. With an existing speed limit of 35 mph on US Highway 27 and SR 80, FDOT has speci“ c requirements for the spacing of street trees which are located within sight triangles. Mahogany trees provide shade for pedestrians while Thatch Palms are spaced at 270Ž on center when located within sight triangles. The alternative option uses Florida Royal Palms which are spaced at 108-0Ž on center due to FDOT sight triangle regulations. This option will not be most suitable to create the visual and physical statement because of the distance between specimens. Light “ xtures should be spaced evenly between the proposed shade trees as to not obstruct the light “ xture or growth of the shade trees. Florida native plant material is suggested to reduce the cost of long-term maintenance and encourage water conservation efforts. The photos below show the character of the different specimens suggested. Swietenia mahagoni Mahogany Roystonea elata Florida Royal Palm Thrinax radiata Thatch Palm

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108CHAPTER 6 DESIGN DEVELOPMENTRESIDENTIAL STREETS The residential streets in South Bay should all include sidewalks, shade trees and pedestrian lighting to create a safe and comfortable atmosphere for pedestrians and bicyclists. Most of the existing residential streets in South Bay provide for on-street parking. This on-street parking should continue with the addition of sidewalks where existing walks are lacking. Shade trees and pedestrian lighting is also proposed to create and enhance the pedestrian friendly atmosphere. Figure 6.20: Typical Residential Street Section Figure 6.21: Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard Section

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109CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN SW/NW 1st AVENUE SE and SW 1st Avenue runs north-south, adjacent to the North New River Canal. This corridor poses an excellent opportunity for a greenway and trail system within and around South Bay. This greenway will create connections from existing and proposed neighborhoods to the downtown district, urban city center, the waterfront recreation area and surrounding communities such as Belle Glade and Pahokee via the Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail. The greenway should include a multi-purpose trail with periodic benches and trash receptacles located on the trail. Figure 6.22: SE/SW 1st Avenue Section Figure 6.23: SE/SW 1st Avenue Plan

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110CHAPTER 6 DESIGN DEVELOPMENTSUGGESTED PLANT MATERIAL Florida native plant material is suggested to help reduce long-term maintenance costs and enhance water conservation and sustainable design efforts. Mahogany is an excellent, fairly drought tolerant shade tree which is native to south Florida and the Caribbean. The Florida Royal Palm and Thatch Palm are each excellent native palm trees which are suggested for median plantings. Palm trees are speci“ cally proposed in the medians to reduce the chance of damage by large semi-truck tractor trailers passing by on US Highway 27 and SR 80. As described earlier, South Bay has three major gateways. The westbound SR 80 corridor, the Downtown South Bay Gateway,Ž northbound US Highway 27, the Florida Everglades GatewayŽ and southbound US Highway 27, the Lake Okeechobee Recreation Gateway.Ž Each of these gateways will comprise of a plant palette which is native or indicative of the character of the themed gateways. Examples of suggested plant material are listed below. Downtown South Bay GatewayŽ € Royal Palms (Roystonea elata) € Thatch Palms (Thrinax radiata) € Coconut Palms (Cocos nucifera) € Mahogany (Swietenia mahagoni) € Sweet Shrub (Calycanthus ” oridus) € Croton (Codiaeum variegatum) Everglades GatewayŽ € Cabbage Palm (Sabal palmetto) € Bald Cypress (Taxodium distichum) € Live Oaks (Quercus virginiana) € Parotis Palm (Acoelorrhaphe wrightii) € Dwarf Palmetto (Sabal minor) € Dwarf Fakahatchee (Tripsacum ” oridanum) € Coontie (Zamia ” oridana) Lake Okeechobee Recreation GatewayŽ € Cabbage Palm (Sabal palmetto) € Coconut Palms (Cocos nucifera) € Slash Pine (Pinus elliottii) € Dwarf Palmetto (Sabal minor) € Boston Fern (Nephrolepsis exaltata Bostoniensis) € Coontie (Zamia ” oridana)

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111CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN LAKE OKEECHOBEE WATERFRONT / PROPOSED MARINA SECTION With the junction of Lake Okeechobee, the R.V. Park and the Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail, the proposed marina poses major potential because of its signi“ cant location. It can serve a multifunctional facility, providing recreational, commercial and educational services to various user groups. The marina can include commercial services, a waterfront restaurant, serve as a trailhead and help to facilitate “ shing tournaments, duck hunting competitions and other special uses. Schools can utilize the marina as an educational facility and the South Florida Water Management District can also use the marina for operations in the Lake Okeechobee/Everglades region. The image below shows potential character of the marina with an outdoor restaurant, balconies and boat docking with views of the setting sun. Figure 6.24: Waterfront / Marina Section

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112CHAPTER 6 DESIGN DEVELOPMENTGATEWAY FEATURE AND ENTRY SIGNAGE A highly visible and pleasing entry feature will grab motorists attention and notify them that they have reached a certain destination. This can serve as a traf“ c calming device by alerting drivers that they have reached the citys limits and even entice them to stop once they have reached the urban core. This will promote economic development and attract businesses to the area with more use of the commercial district. FIGURE 6.25: GATEWAY FEATURE AND ENTRY SIGNAGE

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113CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN ARCHITECTURAL ICON Along with the entry signage and gateway features, an architectural tower can become a city icon. A highly visible and easily recognizable architectural element on the water will help to associate people with the city of South Bay and Lake Okeechobee. Caribbean style architecture, colors, materials and plantings will also help to enhance the citys natural culture and heritage. A wood structure with decorative detail and vibrant colors should be used to correlate with the design guidelines of architecture throughout the city. The city seal and/or name should be easily visible to give recognition and correlation to South Bay. FIGURE 6.26: ARCHITECTURAL ICON

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116CHAPTER 7 IMPLEMENTATION & CONCLUSIONIMPLEMENTATION This project has begun to look at the City of South Bay at varying scales ranging from community planning to detailed streetscape planting design and paving patterns. The goal of the project is to create a community redevelopment plan for the city as the demand for growth in South Florida begins to push inland. A community redevelopment plan is composed of a variety of different projects that can be very extensive and time consuming. Beginning a redevelopment plan in any small city is a challenging task to undertake because funding is not readily available to begin such a large-scale project. The purpose of the implementation program is to develop strategies, phasing opportunities and methods of “ nancing the various projects that have been proposed to ef“ ciently and effectively implement the plan. To begin to develop implementation strategies that effectively achieve the goals of the redevelopment plan, we must “ rst review the speci“ c need and priorities of the community. Picking a large project that will have the most effective change on the community may not always be the best idea in phasing a community redevelopment plan. The “ rst projects should get the community involved and allow the people to quickly see the results. These projects should be relatively small, short-termed projects where the community sees the results quickly and becomes interested in the redevelopment plan. Once the citizens become interested, they will more likely get involved and volunteer their time to help implement the projects. It is recommended that streetscape landscaping be one of the “ rst projects to be implemented. This is a relatively inexpensive project which can utilize volunteers to help with the installation of plant material. This is a very short-term project which can create immediate change to the atmosphere of South Bay, grabbing the attention and interest of the citizens. Although landscaping will not create the monetary return that is needed, this project will begin to show people that South Bay is on its way to becoming a wonderful place to live. Implementing projects that have monetary return to the city would be the next step. The industrial park and marina are two projects which can have the prosperous return that South Bay is looking for. These projects should be targeted as a priority to the city in order to begin bringing in money to carry out the other projects of the redevelopment plan. Phasing of the downtown redevelopment project can be very important. The city should “ rst fully redevelop one block of the downtown district in order to do a number of things. This allows people to see the character of the proposed project and businesses to slowly start gaining interest in development within South Bay. This will also allow the city or landscape architect to make adjustments and revisions to the plan after review of the “ rst initial block to ensure that the proposed plan promotes the health, safety and welfare of the public. The city can also receive comments from the citizens to gain their input on the test block to ensure that it is ef“ cient, functional and aesthetically pleasing. Redeveloping just one block will also create a small amount of commercial which can be supported by the city. If the city were to redevelop the downtown too quickly, the area will become too large too fast and be unused. Once this new block has been implemented and utilized to its full extent, the city can begin to redevelop adjacent blocks until the downtown district is complete.

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117CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLANFEDERAL AND STATE FUNDING SOURCES Many of the proposed projects will take time to execute, but with different sources of “ nancing and community involvement, the city can be on its way to economic and community development. There are a number of different opportunities to receive state and federal funding, as well as varying community involvement projects for South Bay to explore. Listed below are some of the proposed community redevelopment projects with potential federal and state funding sources. Many of the grant programs listed below can be used several times over a 2-3 year period. Community Center and Park (20-30 Acres): Includes community center and related facilities, swimming pool, various sport “ elds and courts as well as parks, open spaces, playgrounds, pavilions, etc. Funding Sources: Designation Max. Amount € FL Communities Trust (Land Acquisition) State $6,600,000 € FL Recreation Development Assistance Program State $400,000 € Land and Water Conservation Fund Federal $200,000 € Cultural Facilities State $500,000 Streetscape Revitalization Projects: Includes repaving of streets, addition of sidewalks, streetscape and pedestrian lighting, street furniture, street trees and planting. Funding Sources: Designation Max. Amount € Transportation Enhancement Program State $500,000 € Highway Beauti“ cation State $300,000 € Keep Palm Beach County Beautiful State/Local $400,000 Parks, Recreation, Trails and Greenways: Includes neighborhood parks, trails and greenways, Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail trailhead and marina on Lake Okeechobee. Funding Sources: Designation Max. Amount € Recreational Trails Program Federal $100,000 € FL Recreation Development Assistance Program State $400,000 € Land and Water Conservation Fund Federal $200,000 € Florida Inland Navigation District Federal $300,000 € Cultural Facilities State $500,000 € South Florida Water Management District State $500,000 € Urban and Community Forestry Federal $50,000Source: RMPK Funding, 1010 Clemons Street, Suite 406 Jupiter, Florida 33477 Phone: 561.745.2401 Fax: 561.746.3380

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118CHAPTER 7 IMPLEMENTATION & CONCLUSIONCOMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT Community involvement can be very important in small-town revitalization projects because of economic conditions. There are a number of civic organizations, church/school groups and youth organizations in South Bay that could be utilized to help implement some of the projects that would be more feasible to carry out through volunteering. Volunteers could be utilized in conjunction with habitat for humanities to rehabilitate the residential neighborhoods in South Bay. Home owners can participate by using city funded supplies to re-paint houses in accordance with the private property design guidelines suggested. Citizens could also help the program by volunteering to help install and maintain many of the proposed streetscape plantings, neighborhood park facilities and waste management along the public right of way. Some examples of volunteering opportunities that have been explored in other community redevelopment projects include: € Adopt-A-Road and Adopt-A-Highway programs € Community Service Scholarships to state colleges € Donation of vacant property € Historic building preservation € Mitigation of economic decline through business recruitment € Monthly sidewalk sales € Promotion of Downtown as a ClassroomŽ program in local schools € Promotional calendars € Sale of personalized bricks in downtown city centerSource: Russell, Donna: Small Town Revitalization: A Case Study of Florala, AlabamaŽ

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119CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLANFUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA The Future Farmers of America (FFA) is an organization which can also be bene“ cial to the implementation process of many of the projects listed. The FFA is part of the vocational agriculture/ agribusiness instruction program preparing students for careers in the industry of agriculture and agribusiness. The organization has begun a program called Building Our American Communities (BOAC) which is designed to help FFA members become knowledgeable community leaders through constructive community development with local people. This study-action program involves systematic classroom discussion and FFA chapter community action projects. The program is especially timely because of the national emphasis being placed on rural development through creation of job opportunities, community services, a better quality of living, and improved social and physical environments in small cities, towns, villages and farm communities of America.Ž The objectives of the program are to increase member involvement in one or several of the following areas of community development: 1. Education (land labs, safety, demonstration, etc.) 2. Recreation (parks, wildlife improvement, athletic facilities, etc.) 3. Jobs (employment opportunities, new industry, skill development etc.) 4. Environment (nature trails, stream restoration, tree days, etc.) 5. Housing (landscaping, home improvement, clean-up, etc.) 6. Farming (demonstration plots, soil conservation practices, marketing, etc.) Source: BOAC, http://www.canr.msu.edu/ffa/TAB3/BOACGRNT.htmlSPECIAL INTEREST PROGRAMS Along with Building Our American Communities, many other special interest programs, festivals and gatherings are also possible opportunities that can serve to the speci“ c local market of South Bay, to help build community interest and funding for the redevelopment plan. Fishing tournaments and duck hunting competitions on Lake Okeechobee can bring tourists and outdoor enthusiasts to South Bay during peak hunting seasons. Weekly or monthly markets with vendors, fruits and vegetables, knick knacks, food, drinks and music could be initiated by the city to bring residents and visitors into the downtown district or to the recreational waterfront area. The celebration of Junkanoo is another opportunity for local festivities in South Bay. Junkanoo, a national festival held in The Bahamas, is an annual celebration with African dance, music, food and costumes. Dating back to the 16th and 17th centuries, the festival began when slaves were given a special holiday at Christmas time, when they could leave the plantations to be with their family. Held from December 26 … January 1, this week long festival could be brought to South Bay, hosting parties, parades, costumes, music and food. This would be a great opportunity to involve the residents in the community while organizing such events.

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CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLANCONCLUSION South Florida is among the fastest growing urban areas in the United States. Cities are growing and the coastal areas have been fully developed as the growth trend pushes north and west. These coastal communities are bounded by the blue waters of the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico, but also by the green sea of agriculture “ elds in south central Florida. As this coastal development begins to meet capacity in the near future, the movement will be inland to Palm Beach Countys west coast … Lake Okeechobee. South Bay is on the verge of this growth and development, and on the brink of becoming a wonderful small-town city. South Bay is facing current economic problems and is need of a community redevelopment that utilizes strategic planning and sustainable design solutions as the city begins to grow. My original intent of the project was to revitalize streetscapes, create community parks with connections to Lake Okeechobee and establish a downtown where citizens can ful“ ll many of their daily needs in the city center. With extensive research and analysis, the project began to transform into a community redevelopment plan that would involve a much wider scope of work than “ rst anticipated. As the project evolved, I began to become familiar with the city, its people and the character that de“ nes what South Bay is. Community revitalization projects are important in todays society as sustainable design solutions have become more and more necessary to protect our future. As this book has demonstrated, the City of South Bay has tremendous potential to capitalize on many opportunities to achieve the citys desired goals. This project was particularly rewarding to work on, focusing on a city which was in dire need of a community redevelopment plan to aid in the proper growth and development of the city. This is only a small step in a long, extensive process of redevelopment, but by all means it was signi“ cant step, as the City of South Bay is now in progress of becoming that wonderful city which that residents love to call home. 121

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CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLANWORKS CITED Broadbent, David. Town Hall Meetings Project.Ž Glades Community of Palm Beach County Final Report. Glades Community Development Corporation Meeting Minutes. January 30, 2002. City of Kissimmee Private Property appearance GuidelinesŽ and City of Kissimmee Design & Technical Standards Outline.Ž Herbert Halback, Inc. July 20, 1994. City of South Bay Case StudyŽ, City of South Bay, Florida. City of South Bay Design Institute Report.Ž Florida Atlantic University Center for Urban and Regional Problems. May 2004. Comprehensive Plan for the City of South Bay, Florida, 1989 Florida Trail.Ž United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service. Brochure. September 2003. On-line. Available: http://www.” orida-trail.org/FNST_Brochure_Final.pdf Francis, Mark. Land and Community Design Case Study Series.Ž Village Homes: A Community by Design. 1991. Future Farmers of America, Building Our American Communities (BOAC). On-line. Available: http://www.faa.org and http://www.canr.msu.edu/ffa/TAB3/BOACGRNT.html Hester, Jr., Randolph T. Economic Progress within Community Preservation.Ž The Case of Manteo, North Carolina, U.S.A., 1996. Hester, Jr., Randolph T. Planning Neighborhood Space with People,Ž Second Edition. Van Nostrand Reinhold Company, Inc. 1984. Hurricane of 1928.Ž Memorial Web Page. National Weather Service. Weather Forecast Of“ ce, Miami, Florida. July 9, 2003. On-line. Available: http://www.srh.noaa.gov/m” /newpage/Okeechobee.htm Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail.Ž United States Army Corps of Engineers. South Florida Operations Of“ ce. Brochure. Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail, South Region.Ž Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Of“ ce of Greenways and Trails. 2004. On-line. Available: http://www.dep.state.” .us/gwt/guide/ regions/south/trails/6_lake_okeechobee_scenictra.htm Russell, Donna S. Small-Town Revitalization: A Case Study of Florala, Alabama. Senior Independent Project. University of Florida. 2004. Slesin, Suzanne & Cliff, Stafford et. al. Caribbean Style. Clarkson N. Potter, Inc. 1985125

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APPENDIX AGLADES COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION MEETING MINUTES PURPOSE The project was initiated by Palm Beach County Government to assist it in setting program and budget priorities for the Glades communities of the County. In seeking to better serve Glades residents and citizens, the County has sought information on needs, concerns and priorities from a variety of sources. Among these resources have been the three local governments serving the area, prior community visioning and strategic planning projects and various technical studies. To supplement and update these sources, the County contracted with the Glades Community Development Corporation to conduct three Town Hall meetings for the speci“ c purpose of identifying and prioritizing community needs and concerns. PARTICIPANTS A total of 72 residents from the City of South Bay participated in the project. The project was very diverse in terms of ethnic participation and age group participation, as well as a good gender mix. PROJECT METHODOLOGY The project utilized a qualitative/quantitative data analysis method that facilitated identi“ cation of past accomplishments and personal priorities followed by a series of group prioritization and discussion activities. The goal of the method was threefold: € To encourage creative, out of the boxŽ thinking about the needs of the Glades € Enhancement of community analysis capacity € Identi“ cation of those ideas of widest interest and highest priority to the community The same procedures were followed, with minor technical modi“ cations, in each community. They ensured internal reliability. The use of three communities provided a triangulation of data that heightens the validity of cross community conclusions.i

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CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLANiiThe six steps of this analysis included: € Pre-session voting on recommendations from prior workshops to initially identify community priorities. € Participants were asked to engage in a word association exercise by sharing the “ rst word that came to mind when the facilitator stated the respective municipality name. € Individual identi“ cation of three personal priorities for the community. In work groups, participants shared their three personal priorities for their community. € Work group priorities. Using consensus or multi-voting procedures, each work group generated their top 5 priorities. € Plenary Master Priority List and Discussion. In plenary session the reports of each work group were combined into a master list and perspectives shared on the importance of each item. € Town Vote. In each community the participants voted, using a multi-voting technique, to determine their ranking of the master list. Participants were encouraged to use their vote wisely by placing their emphasis on items that County Government could either take direct action or in” uence in some manner. Those items under the participants own control could be acted upon without County Government assistance, as well as those items that required private sector actions were ones where action would occur in some other form. The results therefore emphasize those actions that the participants believe the County Government should take an active leadership role. NOTE: In voting, participants were instructed to assume that existing county services would continue. They did not assume for this vote that they were choosing between current and new services. These recommendations represent additional services they believe to be a priority. KEY VISION WORDS € Great City € Unity € Kids € Lake Okeechobee € Growth and Tourism € Excellent Schools € Water Park € Beautiful City € Jobs € Recreation € Diverse Community € A Vision € Eco-Tourism € Highway 27 € Crossroads € A place to sit down and eat € Supermarket € Great Place to Live € Safe Place to Live € Growth and Development € Abundant € Resourceful € Youth Center € Multi-Age Center € More Housing € Environmentally Safe/Sensitive € Expanding Boundaries € Quality Leadership

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iiiINDIVIDUAL & WORK GROUP RECOMMENDATIONS Group 1 Priorities 1. Housing a. Higher standards and better quality b. Rehabilitation c. Landscape beauti“ cation 2. Economic Development/Employment a. Capitalize on Lake Okeechobee b. Shopping center c. Develop US Highway 27 with businesses 3. Social Services a. Health care b. Youth/Elder day care c. Recreation d. Rehabilitate current facilities 4. Environmental Safety a. New water & wastewater treatment facilities b. Pest control c. Lake Okeechobee cleaning 5. Road, Street, City Infrastructure a. Add/Improve sidewalks b. Level streets c. Speed bumps d. Clean vacant lots Group 2 Priorities 1. Growth and Adoption of Annexation Area a. As far as Okeechobee Center and to the south … schools 2. Affordable Middle Class Housing a. Less apartments and more home ownership 3. Business and Job Opportunities a. Truck stop b. Tourism c. Shopping Center d. Creating a downtown e. Healthcare facility/services f. Amenities 4. Utilities … Road Improvements a. Accommodate potential growth 5. Community Youth Center a. With pool and facilities for learning activitiesAPPENDIX A

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CITY OF SOUTH BAY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLANivINDIVIDUAL & WORK GROUP RECOMMENDATIONS CONTINUED Group 3 Priorities 1. Economic Development … Jobs 2. Suf“ cient Family Housing 3. Community Center with Auditorium, Gymnasium and Pool 4. Water/Wastewater Infrastructure 5. Educational Training Center Group 4 Priorities 1. Housing Development … Home Ownership 2. Tourism 3. Multi-Purpose Centers … Establishing Colleges and Universities 4. One Stop Health and Human Services 5. Improvement of Schools Group 5 Priorities 1. Job matching program for the skills residents are acquiring 2. More people in the community in leadership positions at Palm Beach Community College 3. More equity in Palm Beach Community College … Resources and Facilities 4. More local teachers in local schools 5. Improve water quality Group 6 Priorities 1. Community Center 2. Water Improvements 3. Commercial/Industrial on US Highway 27 4. Single Family Housing 5. Education and Vocational Training Youth Report 1. Jobs for Youth … Working with Computers or Of“ ce Jobs 2. Activities for Youth a. Fun days b. Fund raisers c. Dancing d. Help with community events 3. Skating Rink, Theater or Sports Complex 4. Reporter for the Glades … Nightly Glades report on TV 5. Youth Council … Advisory to local government Source: Glades Community Development Corporation

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viSOUTH BAY R.V. PARK & CAMPGROUND OCCUPANCY PERCENTAGE REPORT The South Bay R.V. Park has a total of 72 sites available with complete access to full amenities including water, electricity and cable hookups. The number of days in each particular month is multiplied by 72 sites to achieve the total nights available for occupancy for any given month. The number of nights that all sites are used per month is then divided by the total available to achieve the percent of occupancy for each particular month.February 2005 Total Rentals: 2013 Monthly Available: 2016 Percent Occupancy: 99.9% January 2005 Total Rentals: 2209 Monthly Available: 2232 Percent Occupancy: 99.0% December 2004 Total Rentals: 1173 Monthly Available: 2232 Percent Occupancy: 52.6% November 2004 Total Rentals: 890 Monthly Available: 2160 Percent Occupancy: 41.2% October 2004 Total Rentals: 575 Monthly Available: 2232 Percent Occupancy: 25.8% September 2004 Total Rentals: 289 Monthly Available: 2160 Percent Occupancy: 13.4% August 2004 Total Rentals: 369 Monthly Available: 2232 Percent Occupancy: 16.5% July 2004 Total Rentals: 243 Monthly Available: 2232 Percent Occupancy: 10.9% June 2004 Total Rentals: 201 Monthly Available: 2160 Percent Occupancy: 9.3% May 2004 Total Rentals: 295 Monthly Available: 2232 Percent Occupancy: 13.2% April 2004 Total Rentals: 403 Monthly Available: 2160 Percent Occupancy: 18.7% March 2004 Total Rentals: 1392 Monthly Available: 2232 Percent Occupancy: 62.4% February 2004 Total Rentals: 2108 Monthly Available: 2088 Percent Occupancy: 101.0% January 2004 Total Rentals: 1949 Monthly Available: 2232 Percent Occupancy: 87.3% December 2003 Total Rentals: 740 Monthly Available: 2232 Percent Occupancy: 33.2% November 2003 Total Rentals: 424 Monthly Available: 2160 Percent Occupancy: 19.6% October 2003 Total Rentals: 206 Monthly Available: 2232 Percent Occupancy: 9.2% September 2003 Total Rentals: 216 Monthly Available: 2160 Percent Occupancy: 10.0% August 2003 Total Rentals: 156 Monthly Available: 2232 Percent Occupancy: 7.0% July 2003 Total Rentals: 182 Monthly Available: 2232 Percent Occupancy: 8.2% June 2003 Total Rentals: 237 Monthly Available: 2160 Percent Occupancy: 11.0% May 2003 Total Rentals: 291 Monthly Available: 2232 Percent Occupancy: 13.0% April 2003 Total Rentals: 493 Monthly Available: 2160 Percent Occupancy: 22.8% March 2003 Total Rentals: 1159 Monthly Available: 2232 Percent Occupancy: 51.9% February 2003 Total Rentals: 1952 Monthly Available: 2016 Percent Occupancy: 96.8% January 2003 Total Rentals: 1807 Monthly Available: 2232 Percent Occupancy: 81.0% December 2002 Total Rentals: 645 Monthly Available: 2232 Percent Occupancy: 28.9% November 2002 Total Rentals: 353 Monthly Available: 2160 Percent Occupancy: 16.3% October 2002 Total Rentals: 141 Monthly Available: 2232 Percent Occupancy: 6.3%Source: City of South Bay R.V. Park and CampgroundAPPENDIX B