Citation
Mcintosh, FL

Material Information

Title:
Mcintosh, FL a study on the preservation of genius loci
Creator:
Wensell, Jack W
Place of Publication:
Gainesville FL
Publisher:
University of Florida
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
Pagination : ill. ;

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Agricultural land ( jstor )
Area development ( jstor )
Civics ( jstor )
Commercial centers ( jstor )
Housing ( jstor )
Lakes ( jstor )
Land development ( jstor )
Rail trails ( jstor )
Roofs ( jstor )
Towns ( jstor )
City of Dunedin ( local )
Genre:
non-fiction ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
Advisor(s): Gary Purdum.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Jack W. Wensell. Permission granted to the University of Florida to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
003829262 ( AlephBibNum )
1055597793 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

wensellj_capstone_06.pdf

wensell_Page_120.txt

wensell_Page_046.txt

wensell_Page_055.txt

wensell_Page_092.txt

wensell_Page_118.txt

wensell_Page_082.txt

wensell_Page_076.txt

wensell_Page_068.txt

wensell_Page_031.txt

wensell_Page_022.txt

wensell_Page_125.txt

wensell_Page_023.txt

wensell_Page_081.txt

wensell_Page_052.txt

wensell_Page_066.txt

wensell_Page_007.txt

wensell_Page_027.txt

wensell_Page_062.txt

wensell_Page_086.txt

wensell_Page_121.txt

wensell_Page_059.txt

wensell_Page_058.txt

wensell_Page_099.txt

wensell_Page_057.txt

wensell_Page_004.txt

wensell_Page_033.txt

wensell_Page_074.txt

wensell_Page_015.txt

wensell_Page_101.txt

wensell_Page_065.txt

wensell_Page_102.txt

wensell_Page_100.txt

wensell_Page_030.txt

wensell_Page_071.txt

wensell_Page_008.txt

wensell_Page_103.txt

wensell_Page_096.txt

wensell_Page_122.txt

wensell_Page_128.txt

wensell_Page_003.txt

wensell_Page_063.txt

wensell_Page_020.txt

wensell_Page_039.txt

wensell_Page_019.txt

wensell_Page_069.txt

wensell_Page_037.txt

wensell_Page_028.txt

wensell_Page_084.txt

wensell_Page_054.txt

wensell_Page_051.txt

wensell_Page_117.txt

wensell_Page_047.txt

wensell_Page_045.txt

wensell_Page_112.txt

wensell_Page_017.txt

wensell_Page_093.txt

wensell_Page_014.txt

wensell_Page_002.txt

wensell_Page_001.txt

wensell_Page_108.txt

wensell_Page_049.txt

wensell_Page_088.txt

wensell_Page_127.txt

wensell_Page_098.txt

wensell_Page_080.txt

wensell_Page_064.txt

wensell_Page_043.txt

wensell_Page_129.txt

wensell_Page_106.txt

wensell_Page_025.txt

wensell_Page_083.txt

wensell_Page_077.txt

wensell_Page_116.txt

wensell_Page_053.txt

wensell_Page_044.txt

wensell_Page_114.txt

EN6BICEG6_TO51V3_xml.txt

wensell_Page_060.txt

wensell_Page_013.txt

wensell_Page_041.txt

wensell_Page_026.txt

wensell_Page_094.txt

wensell_Page_110.txt

wensell_Page_024.txt

wensell_Page_111.txt

wensell_Page_005.txt

wensell_Page_006.txt

wensell_Page_073.txt

wensell_Page_029.txt

wensell_Page_109.txt

wensell_Page_050.txt

wensell_Page_124.txt

wensell_Page_034.txt

wensell_Page_018.txt

wensell_Page_123.txt

wensell_Page_119.txt

wensell_Page_097.txt

wensell_Page_104.txt

wensell_Page_016.txt

wensell_Page_011.txt

wensell_Page_126.txt

wensell_Page_070.txt

wensell_Page_038.txt

wensell_Page_036.txt

wensell_Page_087.txt

wensell_Page_021.txt

wensell_Page_090.txt

wensell_Page_009.txt

wensell_Page_012.txt

wensell_Page_048.txt

wensell_Page_032.txt

wensell_Page_010.txt

wensell_Page_085.txt

wensell_Page_105.txt

wensell_Page_113.txt

wensell_Page_072.txt

wensell_Page_075.txt

wensell_Page_061.txt

wensell_Page_067.txt

wensellj_capstone_06_pdf.txt

wensell_Page_091.txt

wensell_Page_035.txt

wensell_Page_040.txt

wensell_Page_107.txt

wensell_Page_042.txt

wensell_Page_056.txt

wensell_Page_078.txt

wensell_Page_089.txt

wensell_Page_095.txt

wensell_Page_079.txt

wensell_Page_115.txt


Full Text





CFfI


MCINTOSH, FL:

A STUDY ON THE

PRESERVATION

OF GENIUS LOCI

L )CIphaInt f ack a\\ L \\ichlcll
1)part'm1 nt ,tf L ndusc.p I\tchitx.ctut.


4' ;


;;.;;;
ii"'


"' " ': "- "". :'\ '7
� . -. -' I � 'T -- - -


s--
















McIntosh, FL:

A Study On the Preservation of Genius Loci

Jack W. Wensell
Senior Capstone Project
Spring 2006
Department of Landscape Architecture
University of Florida















Acknowledgements


I would like to thank

-J.o ce Putnam. for the constant moti\ action and support along the \\a\. especially the big
kick to get started \\ ith it all You iha e al\\a\ s been there for me. in good times and bail

-David and Cheryl Roach, for the faith that you have carried in me, as well as your major
financial contributions to my education.

-Wayne Wensell, for turning me on to the great outdoors and nuturing my love of plants.

-University of Florida Landscape Architecture Professor Terry Schnadelbach, for the
incredible semester in Paris, not to mention all the great memories I will have forever.

-University of Florida Landscape Architecture Professor Gary Purdum, for the wealth of
computer knowledge and the excellent guidance that you have provided through this
massive undertaking of a project. You possess a keen ability to help organize a
creative mind.

-Lastly and especially, my fiance, Molly Putnam, who has supported me in every way
possible from the start to the finish of my education at the University of Florida. I could
not have done any of this without you by my side.

Best wishes to all,

Jack Wensell












Table Of Contents


P rfl )icct In tr )C1ucti, in .................................... .9
Ab stract cII
Project Desciiption 1
Project Location 1
To\\n Description 13
Project Goals 14
li oV1w I list ,rv\ .................. ........................... 1
History Of Mlclnctosh IS
Uscr \ lsis .............................................23
User Analysis ............................ ................. 24
Natural System Analysis...........................27
Generalized Soils .................................. ........ 28
Tree C anopy ......... ..... .......... ............ .................. 29
Wildlife Diversity ................................ .............. 30
H ydrology ........ ...... ...... .............. ...... ............ 31
Natural Systems Composite................ ............. .... 33
Natural Systems Synthesis............... .............. 34
Built Form Analysis .................................. 37
Built Form Introduction............................. ................. 38
Regional Road Networks & Building Footprints.......... 39
Local Building Footprints & Streets.............................40
Existing L and-U ses ................................ ....... .... ... 41
Surrounding Land-U ses ........................................... 41
McIntosh's Land-Use Plan........................................ 42
Town Gateways/ Entries ............................. ............. 43
Urban Transects .............. ......... ......................... 47
H housing D ensity................................... .................... 52


McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Prese


C\ ic ldentit\ Elements 53
Open Space In\ entoi 54
Ke\ in L\ nch Theori on Leuibilit 55
Built Form S\ nthess 2
Ra.ils- li - 1' rails (. as Sttudl .................. 5
Piinellas Tirail. Pinella's CoInt\. Floriida
Steam Boat Trace Tril. Lincoln. Nebrasika
GallopiiLn Goose Trail Telluiirde. Colorado10
Conclusions onI
Community Master Planning ................. 83
Conceptual Master Plan 1 Analysis: ....................... 84
Conceptual Master Plan 2 Analysis: ................................88
Conceptual Master Plan 3 Analysis: ........................ 92
D evelopable L ands....................................................... 97
Final M aster Plan: ................................. .. ........ 98
Before Master Plan .............................................. 100
A after M aster Plan ..................................... ................. 101
Design Development..............................103
U S H W Y 44 1 ............................................................... 104
Infill Housing Opportunities ......................................... 109
Conservation Subdivision ............................................ 120
R ail-to-Trails Proposal .............................................. . 126
Conclusion ............... . ........ .................. ............ .. 127
Bibliography ................. ................ ... ............. .. 129





ervation Of Genius Loci






















"Prese\ nation is not to arrest time but to mediate
sensiti\ elI \\ ith the forces of change It is to
understand the present as a product of the past
and a modifier of the future."

- J.W. Lawerence


Some residents of the town of McIntosh enjoying the 'Old Florida' way of life.


*Above photo and all other photos and graphics herein are produced by the
author, unless expressly noted otherwise.


McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci


1

Project Introduction


:�:;�
















Abstract:

\[.:]nr.. _ - , - im I. h -r.. n ., r.. -- in X .. rh!. .. -_n r I l . r I'..' --I-!rl , p.. ul Ir n.. . t 1._ -- th I-
^ ii ' _. .!.I _. 1r I- r. h , r. .- -- - ,uI 'I '_r ! t . ,_; .I 't ---! rlh p i.I,_ -_- ! . It!. - - 11_. I'_-- '_ ti h '. .- 1 ,11 W , : !| . d..I -r _

n -i. .*- * i-m _, i ,-i i ,i- .I '. ,,.,r . . W, , ' A.:.. .1 1,.. ..I ._. ' --. - r- . rh ,_ r. .-- -1 h ,- .. .;.,_n rl ,_n ,,- I r, .I I I i., I .l i '- '
I.'." Ir. WI . .' ,.l,_t" r. . t ', - ir- ir:i--r _' p r.!r-i| ' _. l _. - ! - n p 1 - n d , d...I,_ - l d ,.I..!!i-_' . .. rh ,_
i.' - n.. ,l,_ . Th..p , r.. - , -- - p-, l,! inn -i ,.l,.,;i- ..1 - rh itr - -- , ., .' rh ,_ , . t 't _ r r. - !1- tu r. r!..1- - t!-i,_|
quality of life are preserved.
Yet, a major problem that McIntosh and many similar small towns face is the sheer lack of
revenue to facilitate such proper planning procedures for future development. The purpose of
this senior project is to assist the town of McIntosh, Fl.... in preserving its' existing functions
and quality of life by ultimately forming a future town vision for the residents. By providing the
town with new development ideas and recommendations needed to combat sprawl, this project
attempts to address the need for growth, while preserving the sense of place or 'Genus Loci', of
the town of McIntosh, Florida.















SIclntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci








Project Description


orth entry sign into the town seen trom US


patterns. With emphasis on securing the






original patterns of land-use and also
protecting the natural lands, three
conceptual town master plans propose







growth that both extends and enhances the
current land use pattern.
,'-i fi ! n I ' ,_,.I W ! -I- . , ,I " ,.l . !I_'_'

'l'h ,_, ,_,: '.-; . ' - _, ,n ,.l-. d.i, I - 1'. 1 , , .["1 r i,_

, ,r,.l.._r r. h , i_ p l ,., rr ,r. rh. , -;. rr,_ n r I 1 1,..I -1,.,.,




patterns. Withe best emphasis on scenario, a set
original patterns of land-use and also
protecting the natural lands, three
conceptual town master plans propose
growth that both extends and enhances the
current land-use pattern.
Based on the best design scenario, a set
of detailed conceptual plans, sections and
character sketches were produced. These
explore civic relocation, a new Hwy 441/
'Main Street', residential growth, green ways
and open space, Orange Lake restoration
and redevelopment and a new school/
educational facility. Through this process,
a future vision is created for the town of
McIntosh and its residents.




^1-~


vy 441


Chapter 1 Project Introduction









Project Location

\,[.: n .r.. I - I. . d:r,. l Il. n. _ 1. 1- -- 44 1 i
rh _. \ ..trh _..Tn[ .._n..l . ,[ , . ',.,n i ...n r . --hi.:h


* .!- .! i . . I ' i . r II i. n I I



* I i . r . ! !. . I' m!!I - il
*F. , r 1\\ hill-r . I' .1 14 , 1 n - i
*\\ illi-r. .n . I'1 i l , I m i,_- ,
*6 iii' n .--ilk., I'L Ir,.'. / -i .
*Ocala, FL (19.1 miles)
*Archer, FL (21.3 miles)

Nearest city with pop. 200,000+:
*Jacksonville, FL (71.4 miles)


N Iclnosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci






























Town

Description
McIntosh, Florida
is a small town relatively speaking. The
town area is less than one square mile
with the main feature being its' quaint
historical district. The town has deep
roots in the agrarian culture, as seen in
the namely "Orange" Lake, which abuts
the town to the east and has been a hit
amongst fresh water anglers for years.
During the 1990's the town
experienced a 10% growth in its'
population. However, with the median
age of the residents being 53 years old


and the population of McIntosh
numbering only 463 residents currently, the
town is eagerly hoping to attract newcomers
from outside the community to relocate to
the area and help revitalize the aging town.
The median income of McIntosh's
residents is $36,000, which is much higher
than the average of nearby Gainesville's
residents at $28,000 annually. The average
home value of $95,000 is also considerably
higher than Gainesville's at $86,300. The
unemployment level in McIntosh is quite


low at 4.7%. Yet, most of the town's
employed residents commute to work in
neighboring cities such as Ocala or
Gainesville, with an average commute time
of thirty minutes one-way. This illustrates
the recent trend of people moving to smaller,
rural towns to live, while maintaining a job in
larger, more urban cities.
McIntosh's residents are currently faced
with the challenge of redeveloping the town
to take advantage of this trend, while also
maintaining the town's character and charm.


Chapter 1 Project Introduction











Project Goals












*1'r.. p..-' .. - I i-hL ,l t. L 11 -I.., 441 tha -t -inpLr -. .. - the I e t, ..f th. t. n �_ . tLr .i n ,-1.. I. lllin
traffic and encouraging new sustainable commercial activity.

*Put lands that are environmentally sensitive into conservation to protect for future generations.

*Locate and propose new residential infill possibilities that blend into and enhance the existing
fabric of the community.

*Explore concepts of urban design at the small town scale.

*Provide new recreational opportunities for the residents of the town that will also attract users
from outside the community, thereby helping to support new development.

*Understand the existing town functions and land-use patterns that aid in the design development
process.

*Perform an informal user analysis to garner an understanding of what the members of the
community of McIntosh desire for their town's future.




SIclntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci






















S- .j" :- ., -----BL.B.,
'' "^a " L. ' .
r


The 'Old Swimming Hole' of McIntosh (1897)
Photo property of the McIntosh Seedling Garden Club


McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius


N clntosh's \ictoiian Ea residences aind
en\ iionment iemaiiin intact TIhe\ epitomize the
ambiance of Odl Floi-ida' The to\\ n Ilha tril\
been blessed through the years, with residents
who have treasured and protected its wonderful
heritage.

-Excerpt from the McIntosh Seedling Garden
Club brochure















LocI


2

Town History








History Of NMcIntosh




---h~ h l I .l ._' I, ---!rh rh,_ ht' .r "!" ,r ,.hl

rHi._ 'I . - li., r. .n .i..r ir. r ir
H IP- ..! . ._ .. , IAr..- 11 I.
Il.. r . . 1 j.- . . - h.,




---irli i , n- r n, t r ,i. rr,_,_. Ihi i-- ,.


production.
During the Second Seminole War
that took place from 1835-1840, the
original town was destroyed. Then
in 1849, the land McIntosh had
acquired ended up on the auction
block in Micanopy. With lush
vegetation and most of the land
already cleared, the area was prime
for development.
Nehmiah Brush purchased the
land and developed it into building
lots and 10-acre parcels for citrus
farming. The original plat map,
dated April 20, 1885 and shown at
right, denotes the lot layout - with
the citrus parcels to the west. This map
also illustrates the fact that the town was
originally a planned community, that as of


Brushes' Planned Commluntl\


Pr'-l-.n 'o- '1" - -�� '4 ' ""*" ' "
^-*J^r 4b II H l




.* A ';
CLJ L.L-1 P. 9 I


Si I i Ii
- N
F "*"!r L r -" ^ r z!1 411 7





t _gd - 1 1 . A


(i iArr� ~t i . ; I L |
Ei2I Iclr- -A.S- e r
tt �I I � i { *��-T 'J . ,
'-LU-~ *"-J&i_�* * � ^ fi �-"'"


MP. . (V rI. w 1S

A TOWH ON THE FLOR1OA SOUTHERN RAILWAY.
COMBas0.WE4SC616N sEa'efltfrVye rx-SLE..
MARION CO. *ir
Sfrr r f "ntr 73eA
urrusP~crxfft~zrvss H,� Ee-Py>losteORsi ;-


I


SIclntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci


(p
7


--- -- ~












































Tlus nip \\as published in IN82 b\ C \\
& C B Collon Compian The solid red
line denoles the comipleied ril Iine :tl the
liie Nclniosh is not 0 ei oil ilhe mip btil
tlie icn Ilial \\tonild Inler become the to\\ n
is noted x illi [lie led anio\x ' I I Ldii 11i
I ih .ln 1 .I (.,il. . - I rg.'. r Is .lr .Inld ' lip di. . i i.n


In INSs lihe Florida Soutllhei Ranil\\a\ Co
published lhis niip Thie julroad depol \\as
bull b\ [lie comipa. in 11s3. \\lule the
lo\\ n piit \\as completed in .lsl5 NMcln-
loshl \\s 1no\\ :n official 10o\\ . lllililliled
b llihe red jrrom\ ' .ip( rii[ lih, p.i1.l
(- . *llu l- I )e[ rtmni i lt. I |]r cr il .'1 1.ulli I l ii.
l ,),I i-.il. -.n ,r., JriL F. li. I , .irl -, ,, ( , lm ,r


|' itt c,.

,;, ,r' '!_. t Ihc .;h c1',. - h, - I'! I ,-I ,,,, _. I







the railroad company to have r a depot .
uilt. Aaintr . n..l after many disputes, bth le
r.and otherwise,.. the railroad company finally

,ollow . -thro gh, I t, I r-i . p . .rlo e of a..

!, ,c . . "t d i ,' , h .- r , - ., _- !' - , ' . - ,r I !'I






rail depot, which was completed in 1883.
Tr.- phe.!-, aI-l . in Ibecoming proero... h wII
n- ,,.,_. ir - --, thr. u. h rt , . . I , h r.t . th.

its citrus farming, which - its beg.... innings
transportation interests, a local land rich
family named Van Ness struck a deal with
the railroad company to have a depot
constructed within the community by
donating the land for which it was to be
built. Again, afteran many disputes, both legal
and otherwise, the railroad company finally
followed through with their promise of a
rail depot, which was completed in 1883.
The area was becoming prosperous with
its citrus farming, which had its beginnings
with the Spaniards giving orange seeds to
the Natives upon their arrival in the 1600s.
The wild orange trees in the area were so
thick and numerous that in the process of
land owners clearing them to build, enough
trees were removed to set up large groves
within McIntosh, Micanopy and many other
towns in the surrounding region.
The citrus farming went strong for a


Chapter 2 Town History









It .i _ -I _ I -. . I .. '. 1 . . . " , | . 1 1 , .. ,-


h . ;!. . ,. ; .. " Ilv; . _. |-'i
H . IP *c..; .; . ,.;.;,_ t..




JI!,_ t,,-T --.
pickin . h .- ,',, -- tu !


I'd..' -I I * t , i r I l. . -


.... .. ..:. , -a .. ...
Also with the advent
of rail travel to the
area, people started
vacationing within
the region for the
excellent fishing and
hunting opportunities
offered by the natural
surroundings.
Overall, by 1885 .B
the town was very
prosperous, having ..r
all the basic needs ..
of the community :, -___'.
met. McIntosh had
many things to offer both visitors and
residents alike - including a doctor, Western
Union, school, drugstore, ice house, hotel,
grocery store, hardware store and numerous
recreational opportunities.


Abo\ c A group of folks recieCiir! on
Or):inie Lake iii l9 1' Left Historic: l
Old \\ ic Road iLiS H\\\ 4-111 i'ii,.t,.
Pr.,i ,,I, K ' U- ,1 nl..' -li Im _I k i d hnrJ ii C II,


a


. .11t..p1p _,_1 i , I ,i




u. 1" '53.
Many families lost everything, as mature
citrus trees froze and died in the cold.
Some residents stayed and replanted, while
others switched to vegetable farming
with limited success. A majority of the


\ � - 'I ' l, r. . ,' . . ,. . ,'_ , _ - -- ',.! r ,i - , .i '
S\ -I . | 1 1 ." ' . r . .l * .- , ' . .t" 1 ,:l , t ..- i i - I - . r
S,, ',,. ',, ,,,r.! ' - th.- r . + , l\[ , -. I ,_v ,rt . ..it'

,. .-r..,, ..t ---h ,r i r .. :,_ - --- . \i -,.I - .. ,.... r
,.l,. i.-r,_cr..,. i- c,._ ,. , ,, I ' r , iln . . r l| .. r-
1 , e_' -. ,:, , l, _t,_ . , . .l.I ---h t - , . , _tt ..t th .,
,_ !tt'. 'n . -!rr,. * - i-" . - -h ! ',_ ! 1 .' , rr'.i .-
t i' l, L l_ r tr rI r h r,, I-, , r... tI il'nl l'_'
Another major change in the town's
dynamic occurred in 1925, when the historical
'Old Wire Road' was paved and Us Hwy
441 was created. As this happened, many
of the businesses of the town were quick to


SIclntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci








































relocate along the newly paved highway in hopes of attracting the
attention of its travelers. Much to their dismay, the advent of the
paved highway allowed travelers to whizz right through the small
town without stopping to patronize the local buisnesses, which
have, as a whole, been declining in their visibility and success ever
since. In an attempt to preserve and enhance the remaining built
symbols of the once prosperous town, the McIntosh Historic
District was set up in 1983. It encompasses 38 blocks, which
contain over 60 residential, civic and commercial sites.


l h-i 1. i . 1111. u -rir ik.-J i r Ih. I-I ' 1r. rh .



,., ri i n ._, r..:h - , .i,.. - ,_rani !,. . .. I i- rh ,
,_ ir,_'! . i -,!, , ',_,_ ' . ., , I d , I. I'll.'h , - .. r.' :r .... 1" -











.!u!1i, - panis l rh, \iiun and l Vi citul i a - "'ll
of which help lend to the "charm" that
many people have associated with the town.
Today, McIntosh as a community faces a
new set of challenges which are related to
the town's pending growth and development
issues. The population of the town has
remained relatively unchanged over the past
hundred years, seeing only a 10% increase
throughout the 1990s. The residents of
McIntosh have yet to extend development
out of the town's original platting but are
now facing a big push from many sides
to revive the town through re- and new
development, that will accommodate the
recent trend of rural relocation. The
current residents of McIntosh desire a
plan for smart future growth of the town
that will protect and enhance their living
conditions for future generations to enjoy
S1-~


Chapter 2 Town History


Historic Sites

Residential
Civic
0 Commercial
* Fruit Packing House

W | Mcintosh Historical
District















User Analysis


\Velcome to NMclntosh \ou \\ill iprobablI
\\ant to inurci i \\1ule so \ouI don't miss the
naciLousness of the of '(Old Florida' folks and
their easy way of life....
-Excerpt from the McIntosh Seedling Garden
Club brochure.


The local grocery store and deli - one of the few
social and commercial hubs for McIntosh residents.


A5


McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci








User Analysis


1 .. -. n ,1,,.- rh _. p r, ., ..,- , , . , r - !h- ,. -
ii- . in-i I ri. ., '. . - - I- r r. h --- t. 4 rh.,
!,. ,.I,_n. ,i : rh ,_ r, - ---n . .i [, Jn r-r
t',_'_. ,t',.l i r _j [:,.in-.1 ',_ ._ t', .,- --rh ,n ,.I .I,_--,_ 1. T |- _n r.



p'. Ii n ..I ..,, . ..- .I . - - r ' I I h .. r .. I


l , , l . ,- - .. ,.I. . . - - , r. , , r. ... .. I . . .I , . _


of the residents of the town regarding any
proposed future growth and development
of McIntosh and its' main thoroughfare,
US Highway 441:
* Us Hwy 441- Wants- Sidewalks, traffic
calming, blinking lights at crosswalks, 2 lane
traffic only, landscaping along main cor-
ridor, antique look to street lighting and
furniture, on-street parking, better handicap
ramps, signs along Main Street to denote
businesses located further down side streets
and notable entryway and exit signs to
distinguish the town.
* Residential Development- Wants- Keep
all old growth trees and existing tree canopy,
limit mobile home allowances, formalize a
town approval process for all new
residential building, allow neighborhoods to
retain original character and keep


J&4:)0


'small town' feel by limiting sprawl and
buffering the existing historic area, increase
housing density in an environmentally
sensitive manner.
* Commercial/Civic Development- Wants-
A new elementary/middle school that
encourages younger families with small
children to become residents of the area, a
recreational park located within walking
distance to the new school, a new
central area that utilizes existing historical


buildings to create a town center offering
a grocery store, family doctor, post office,
public library and other centrally located civic
offices such as the town hall and lastly,
adequate parking along both US Hwy 441
and within new commercial areas.
* Orange Lake/ Town Recreation- Wants- A
new fishing pier and kayak launch with
parking to encourage outside day recreation
to the town, a boardwalk that encourages
passive recreation such as walking and


N Ilntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci










Some scenes from McIntosh on a Saturda\y
eft- 4"busv" day on Hw\v 441. \xith outside
traffic from the town's only annual recreational
event-the 1890's Festival. showv-n in the bottom
hoto.









of the existing railway with a hub park that
could encompass possible small commercial
interests such as a caf6 or bike shop.
* Drainage Problems- Wants- Address and
improve existing drainage problems along the
town's roads that effect proposed and
existing development.
While the wants the residents of the town
expressed were all valid in terms of their
scope, the town of McIntosh as a whole
does not always share a common vision for
their future and heated disputes were ..
common among the residents attending the .
town meetings. McIntosh's governing body,
the town council, is also suspected by some
residents to have a "hidden agenda"
regarding future plans for development in
the town and in light of this, the
community tends to fall strongly to one side
or the another regarding development issues.

Chapter 3 User Analysis


















A^^



























View trom the vista overlooking the infamous Orange 1


McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius


"The beauit\ of lakes. blue and ureen. fiee or
encuimbered. sluninu, s.parkl inu. calm as stairs
No\\lhere \\II i\ou see the majestic operations of
Nature more clearly revealed in these most gentle
and peaceful things"

-John Muir
















LocI


4

Natural System

Analysis








Generalized Soils


I h.- r . ,t ,, Inr . .-h - r,...I . rh._

rhIP t..l!..---in ._, rhr'_1_ ._.,- ,_,', r I .. 0. -..I. r p .. ""











sandy surface layers more than 40 inches
deep.
Brighton-Placid-
Marshlands with deep organic soils
\ i ,.' ,.I.. r p,.I. .- , ,. , , . ; - / .,I ,,_ n-








interspersed with areas of very poorly .

drained soils having a rich black surface.
layer. These areas are dominated by nearly




level soils having the ground water table
normally surface layers more thin 15 inches of these
deep.
Brighton-Placid-
Marshlands with deep organic soils
interspersed with areas of very poorly
drained soils having a rich black surface
layer. These areas are dominated by nearly
level soils having the ground water table
normally located within 15 inches of the
surface. The ground water table frequently
rises above the surface with this soil type
and assists in the creation of its thick,
organic surface layers.
Blichton-Kendrick-
Broad low ridges of gray sandy soils
which have mottled, slowly permeable,
strongly acidic, phosphate rich, loamy
subsoil. These areas are interspersed with
small pockets of similar soils containing


= - FF I
I.B30 2.440


Generalized Soil
Legend
* Arredondo-Kendrick-Zuber

* Brighton-Placid
Blichton-Kendrick

clay subsoil as well as other areas with
sandy surface layers more than 30 inches
thick.. These areas are dominated by nearly
level soils in which the ground water table


fluctuates between 30 to 60 inches below the
surface, with sandy surface layers less than 40
inches thick.
The high water table of the Brighton-
Placid soil areas, which comprise much of
the developed and potentially developable
land within McIntosh is a major limitation,
due to the inherent nature of these areas to
have problems with flooding and drainage.
These soils are mainly located to the east of
the old rail line and extend to the lake.


N Ilntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci







U


'V ; �


I^JB� .^~f ." "-^tr T *
;E



-Ji r'


^^^1Fi~


u


I' U


IsA *~ Pt


* - - t
t.4.


S i '-'


. .!..1 -r,,p,- - _',_ h ',l , _n.1 .,._'h r. . h i - ,_ ,.
-,_..... .I *.;'. - rh \ - , . -._.. | . I..-r '_ tr u c

! !-i - h - 'i ,_|- '.. ' lt',!! . - r, , . ,-1.1'"_ ,_ .-r rl ,_!. " i ._._
1 h ,_ !-,,',_.I. ..l. n- ,, ii r ,_'_,.. .. . , [,; ]I -ir. .-h .
,_* *n l', , *I , ' ,_l :,_t' ',_.Ir . . r, , , - -h ,,..l,_ r '_,. . .. . ,_ir.
Hll I'r ,_ h - , ,, I. - ,I i l I,_ ' ,_~r '; I. -!I"2!!ir ! r I ' i i , 1. -, ,!.i !,_
h --,,v _,-r r,_'.,,.-,.!.'. . -i - ' - 'l..l,_ ,- , [,f.,!! - ,_ r '. ,,:ii ;!'.:


I L lIII 'IL"C Lt ILI III lIUIIL Li I
iadssi\ e liv e oak tree trunllk


Tree Canopy

When considering future development
within the town of McIntosh, the
preservation of tree cover is a must in the
eyes of the residents. The dense tree canopy
of the town, highlighted with green in the
above graphic, is one of the more important
natural resources of the area. Also notable,
the general consensus of the residents of
McIntosh is that trees are one of the intregal


elements to the preservation of their town
and its character.
Historically, in early Florida settlements
such as McIntosh, trees were a major
resource for construction. Early settlers
were pioneers without lumberyards, so they
had to find ways to create their own building
materials using the natural resources of the
land. Although many native trees were cut
down to produce some of the buildings
still seen today in the town, most of the


Chapter 4 Natural Systems Analysis


Some other common tree species native to
McIntosh are:
* Cypress Tree, Taxodium distichum
* Long leaf Pine, Pinus palustris
* Laurel Oak, Quercus hemisphaerica
* Magnolia, Magnolia,
* Persimmon, Diospyros virginana
* Dogwood, Cornus -,
* Hickory, Caryaglabra
* Sweet Gum, Liquidambar


at�~


w" cI~Y ''"'


- i -


vas~� I


.' V�


" "I"I


-v


mm


_ I


. . . - . - . I- - I L


.. a , .. ..- * .


nm...-.


I.


�'


..�:.: V�F'.

'� -. �r
II. '.-' . ' :
ip"-







T'.f-^^ p^;^~~E~
" ; " 'a :



�,

E " � .~.
..s, ..
r;;Y~~A� 1









1 1 n. *i . -. n V . nr. .1 -n .Iiiri It. -
In- i i i .'_ _ . i , ,Ini . ..h ii,_ i.. n- . .
Srh . i . i. 1 1 r -' . _ , i.. .. . li -! I . n







the large tree canopy and- n th i..r vdual.
historical trees within the town r is a major
issue that must be addressed when planning







for any future development.


Wildlife Diversity
McIntosh is an area rich with wildlife, as
r,. ' I '[ ' _. h-r , i , r ' . r . , rh r, ,- - .









illustrated in the graphic to the right, which

and compiled by the Florida Fish andh
-.,_i-iri ,n-i.. n r Ihl - , lu ,_ rh ,r rh ,_ - -,. l.I, r_. ..t









Wildlife Conservation rrCommission to aid
in the protection of Florid-a's Ecosystems.
r-i.- r. .-- -i . k i . 1 _ !'uI- ] . ., ! \ [ in 'i-!r , in i - '_









This data he treelps to illustrate the biologicvidual
historical trees within the town of McIntosh a major
and its surroundings be areas and was creatednning
for any future development.dictive habitat
Wildlife Diversity

McIntosh is an area rich with wildlife, as
illustrated in the graphic to the right, which
denotes wildlife "hot spots" as analyzed
and compiled by the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commission to aid
in the protection of Florida's Ecosystems.
This data helps to illustrate the biological
diversity within the town of McIntosh
and its surrounding areas and was created
through an f_.._._. *!-, of predictive habitat
maps for wading birds and 44 other focal
animal species.


The Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation
Commission closely tracked these numerous
key species to help quantify the average
amount of wildlife within given areas, mainly
for the purposes of educating the public as
to what areas needed special attention when
considering any type of development or
redevelopment.
The author's graphic above simplifies the
Commission's analysis into two categories.
The orange areas contain seven or more


known wildlife species and the brown areas
contain non-specified higher amounts
of species diversity, referred to by the
Commission as "Special Occurrence Zones".
These special zones with high numbers of
wildlife species diversity obviously need
protection to preserve the unique ecosystem
of the area. By changing these areas to
conservation land and maintaining buffer
zones around the areas of the highest
diversity, development can safely occur.


SIclntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci






































Hydrology

A thorough analysis of hydrology
patterns is another important aspect
in planning the development and
redevelopment of any land located in such
close proximity to a lake as McIntosh is to
Orange Lake. Historically, Orange Lake has
played a major role in McIntosh, serving as
a port for shipping goods up through the
St. John's River to Jacksonville in the years


preceding the rail road and as a fishing mecca
in the later years. Views to the lake used to
be very prevalent throughout McIntosh, but
today with the maturing oak trees, glimpses
of the lake are very limited. Now, there are
only two views of the lake, atop of the big
hill or 'vista' to the south of town and to the
east of the old rail bed.
Orange Lake's water level fluctuates, as it
is connected into the ground water system.
Therefore, smart water management needs


Chapter 4 Natural Systems Analysis


Legend r.. I- p :r,,.: l
rht' ,i.ru.h .ur
Erodabilit, Rating
;- rv; Mjdclet ale
SH . igh
Streams
in I.-. rh ii ._..
l,/eila nd5
J---ars . r . .r r.! .
II Surfacer I 4 ae. \ Ir
Surface iWaier Buffer



120rr,
120mn- rh ,it _ ri.
Irlermejiaie CoricOurs
hi-_ hr i.;r. .
I--- Index Contours r, ,:.-i.
* High Poris -GOcd '.,e*s hydrology.
*L !.hjar .V aIi FIo^ This causes
M.nor al,?r Fl,:,.. a myriad of
S- - Ridqeline Flow Direcicor, problems for

the lake, a lot
of which are related to stormwater runoff
coming from US Hwy 441.
The surface water and wetlands of
McIntosh, which comprise much of the
main visual water element of the town,
should be treated in the same way for
the reasons of town preservation. Strict
regulations must be implemented to not
only remove the existing contaminants
of the water within the town, but also to
protect its' future quality by managing its
flow patterns, which are shown in the chart
to the left. Damaging these resources
or building too close and blocking views
could lead to the deterioration of the

U11>~








r. ,- !h .- , _i 1 It, _. r i - - - r 11- I .. - - !.. . ii- . .1- ih


S r . . . -.i i-..- .. .. tn ri ._. , p _ . ..






! ' -' ... - --I.r r..- l-- . . ! ! ..r.. . in_ ! - r .. . .._i-






or boating.
On the other hand, when runoff does
reach the lake, it needs to and should be
free of contaminants like motor oils and
fertilizers that can harm the lake's fragile
ecosystem. The riparian corridors of
McIntosh will need mitigation to ensure
that only clean and safe water is coming
into the lake. These corridors also
offer opportunities for safe passage and
protection of wildlife to and from the
lake. If properly planned and managed,
they can offer opportunities to enhance
the quality of life within McIntosh by
adding open green spaces to the town for
linear recreation such as walking paths with
chances for wildlife viewing.
Soil stability and high points of the town
ecosystem. The riparian corridors of















of McIntosh are also illustrated within
into the hydrology patterns graphic located
the hydroqualtogy of lifpatterns graphic locatedosh by

of Mclntosh are also illustrated within



1001


on the preceding page. They are helpful
to consider when analyzing the preexisting
patterns of development, as most of the
areas left previously undeveloped contain
both unfavorable slopes and unstable soil
conditions, some directly linked to their
closeness to the existing water table.
To prevent excess sediment from
moving towards the lake, extra care must be
employed when planning for development
within these areas, and they should not be


sh camps.. crowded \\ ith boats belonging to
oth residents and \acationing anglers alike
a primary choice when assessing land to be
developed within the town. Access should
remain mostly open and unencumbered to
these high points, as they offer unique views
of both McIntosh and Orange Lake found
nowhere else. If these areas do become
slated for development, consideration should
be given to creation of a public space within.


SIclntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci








Natural Systems Composite




1-ii-', W ".i" . .. H.- . '.' _ h , , i-



C'. .i i . I. ..I



hi , ,r..i-,. r ,:I , r i , . ,. ,1 ,r , ,r ,_i... p.i - ,_I , _ .


* Attempts need to be made to link fragmented
wildlife patches with high diversity.

* Perennial water corridors, along with the
tree canopy, provide opportunities to link
fragmented wildlife patches.

* Storm water runoff needs to be slowed or
diverted in order for filtering to occur and
remove contaminants potentially harmful to
the ecosystem.

* There is a need for areas adjacent to the
town to be put into conservation to protect
them from future development.

* Protecting Orange Lake and its' water
quality are crucial elements to preserving
McIntosh's character and genus loci.

31-~


Chapter 4 Natural Systems Analysis


Natural Systems
Inventory
i$J Tree Canopy

Runoff Accumulation
MWt Perennial Water Courses
Wildlife Hotspots








Natural Systems Synthesis

1 h *!! , i._: , '! l : r, , rh,_ 'r! ._.h r *---,. ,::',_ ,r ,_. I I


. -k r ,n ..1 - . .in t- ,_.._ r I- , -i t. . .t - ,..r,. ,- ir
,.I,_--,_.. ,_n- -r 1i . -,l . .-. I n. _. rh ,_








negative impact on the overall health of the
ecosystems of the area if developed. These
ares mainly need protection and they
present great opportunities for possible
conservation land.
With the areas of high limitation slated
for conservation land, the areas of low
limitations can then serve as buffers in some
places or act as vital links in others.
Overall, it needs to be understood that
these systems work together and therefore
should be read together. At a more detailed
development scale these elements would
need to be considered in light of their
individual functions.
The town of McIntosh has some very
good opportunities at this point in their
current development to really capture and
preserve their environment as a whole


J&::)0


Low Limitations
Free From Limitations

before future unplanned development
begins to fragment these systems that have
been maintained thus far.


* The town of McIntosh and its residents are
currently presented with a great challenge to
both develop and preserve their unique
environment and its numerous natural
resources.
* Land-uses and planned future
development should be sensitive to these
environmental limitations when attempting
to maintain McIntosh's sense of place and
inherent quality of life.


SIclntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci


Environmental Limitation
Ranking
* High Limitations
* Moderate Limitations

































3) model produced in ArcScene showing buildings with standard land-use
coding applied: Yellow- Residential, Red- Commercial, Lavender- Institutional


McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius


"Like a piece of architecture. the cit\ is a
construction in Space. but one of\ ast scale
C'it\ design is therefore a temriporal an
Nothing is experienced by itself, but always in
relation to its surroundings.."

-Kevin Lynch
















LocI


5

Built Form

Analysis








Built Form

Introduction

I h ,. H _ ._ ., ,W . , rhii . ,:h -I r,_t. 1 In . r, ., -


[, ] r. .-- '1 I ,I ,.- ,;' r . . .I l, IP ,,.
, il.I - .; ,I ..... I - .. . i | t r, ' r. r h , .

", , ,_ ii. I . *h, n un t i- - .- - r ,.l , --,_,





the land currently being used.
This chapter will also analyze the
town of McIntosh through the
theories of legibility explained by
Kevin Lynch in his book titled "The
Image of the City". This analysis
on legibility will uncover key ways
in which the residents of McIntosh
understand their town.
Lastly, this chapter will contain an
architectural inventory of the districts that
will be defined in the Legibility Analysis.
This analysis will serve to guide in the infill
process, in efforts to retain and enhance the
look of the current surrounding structures.
The map above right, shows the urban
context of McIntosh in relation to other
surrounding urban area.


Summations on major roadways as they relate to McIntosh:


*Mclntosh is directly connected to US Highway 441, which serves as the town's 'Main Street'.

*I-75 is just a few miles to the west of the town, although there is no direct access to McIntosh.

*US Highway 301 is located a few miles to the east of town.

*McIntosh has excellent overall connections to the highway system and inherent potential for
ease of travel within and to and from the town.


SIclntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci














































Chapter 5 Built Form Analysis


Regional Road
Networks & Building
Footprints

\r rhI . . h. rh. , I . " ip- hi. it i-r .. r pur. I




t',_'_'! ,!i.i - -In.i ,, .l i , -J _ \,[. r ,- h


* \ l[ , l ,[ rl _ .,_ ,_;, ,!! !!! !,.1!!! r!,_.. ---!- r. - !'-_r I II


*Boardman, the community to the north of
the town, poses more of a threat of
blending together with McIntosh than the
southern neighboring community of
Orange Lake

*There should be pastoral land between
these communities to prevent sprawl.

*All three communities could be easily and
and non-imposingly connected through a
rail-trail.








a11>~








Building Footprints &
Streets

e i-I rhii.. * ,i -'hi.-. b- ,r I .l. . r . f rhi _



* lh ,_ , ,r ,_ ,ir. ir-_., ._ - - i u rh ., r. .. .. r, --. .rl.







*Structure sizes near the lake generally make
up a smaller footprint.

*Historic homes generally have smaller
footprints than the newer built homes, due
to their multiple floors.

*Clustered larger buildings illustrate the
current commercial areas.

*There is a trend of undeveloped street
patterns by the lake.


c Ilntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci








Existiin Land-ULses

I l , . " p h ," , rl , I , -,

"r I..h ,-. Rl.i " \\ ,r, , \,[ 1r-, r,.., in,_ c-r I )i.ri.',r











within the medium density residential area,
yet most homes are currently single family
with the exception of a few.
*White areas illustrate the large undeveloped
regions of the town.

Surrounding Land-Uses

*Some residential areas extend out of town
to both the north and the west.
*Crop fields and pastures adjacent to the
edge of town need to remain intact to
maintain buffering from neighboring
communities and to preserve the rural feel
between these small towns.
*A possible method for the community of
McIntosh to protect these outlying areas
would be to purchase the development
rights to the land and therefore, have total
control over its future use.


Chapter 5 Built Form Analysis









Mclntosh's Land-Use Plan







I I..r I. .. h *n..... - i r .. I r.. - . r .





r. rhi I In '.. i . in, _. h . . rii i' . .tt

* l hi , -r. 1 - II . p ,i. l,I ,,:,:,_-- r... . ,_ i r . it ,_ I .'- ,_

without a fee.


*All residential housing to the east of the
railroad track is a commercial mobile home
park.


*There is a lack of both recreational and
open land use designations.


*The town is lacking in outdoor amenities
other then agriculture.


*The commercial district starts at CR. 320
and extends northwards to the edge of
town.


LE r;N D

. ,.,., ~ani .,
'INW rAtiY MiSr

COmwURCUL. uOBn ROMEB PARs
OMB C RCUL UIRONT
CGXMRRCUL RBTAB.


A nsOoC iffIKwr


* :


~T -


U f S lfld. M I
mi -~ na. ~s nflr


- --":- __ E *-


:::::::: ::::: 1 B





L JB, Mi _-
u--- E3:


Existing Land Use
Plan


SIclntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci





















































Chapter 5 Built Form Analysis


Tow\n Gate\\w as Entries








I p, * t' I r t ,- n , f .. .. r. " l --r ,- - pi, i . . _
I h . - , r ,r p--hl :h. ..1.1 p h - 1_" II I r,_t"
Hi r, ,- rn ,,,I di- - rii l '' ,.| !' . ! , Fi. ll',_- I i, !-

... ... I . . l .. . .I .. i . I: .- I r' _ , , _ . h' r !, ',_rl . .- . . . .-



*M '. r .. :-, I I . r, .. I,: - r, -., ... ..p . -- r . . .




entry into town seen in the graphic at left.
Two of these occur along US Hwy 441.
CR. 320 makes the third entry into town

*These three entry points will all need to
be modified to enhance important
cultural features of the town and to
improve negative aspects of the entries.

* The goal and desire of these entries will be
to act as an inviting greeting into town from
the community of McIntosh.










n1t








North High\\a\ 441 Entry


rh .. nI P r- h , r... i- n .l i i ,- .i .. - I I
441 1 h!i - In T - - .n -.. r.. in,_ mn . t rh.
r. - 4- . . i i ' .. ,'.Ir. n . .1 rh ..... . r - ,.l_. ._i: 4 4 I.
bi-h ,h I,. .l..,,- \ [ l. [ I -r. ..Ih r.. rhi _ i..i tr 1..
rh ._ - - ,. ..tr 4 4 1 h I- - - . .....r. I,_,.I- I . !id ..I








structure. To the east is a vacant lot with
the town welcome sign, followed by an an-
tique store that is also an historic structure.

Features and Issues:
Trailer park is an eyesore.








*Entry sign looks "shabby".
.Boardman remnants need clean up.
, I..,,n,:!! J,.,.r ,.,! rh ,_ h ! i - rh... r,,., ,0 !,. r. T T "- "
Sr..r..,_.---!rh I .l .|-,!, rh ,r I. , , , _.. i-rl hin d.l_ r,-
rh ,_ -- ,_--- .. rht ,. l,_,_ I . ., .-I - . k , I lk, . . I h1!,r.. , _
structure. To the east is a vacant lot with
the town welcome sign, followed by an an-
tique store that is also an historic structure.

Features and Issues:

-Trailer park is an eyesore.

-Entry sign looks "shabby".

-Boardman remnants need clean up.

*Two historic structures on opposite
sides of Hwy 441 need to be visually
enhanced.

*Wooded lot is a positive visual aspect.




&4:t)0


N Ilntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci


0 --47 5 35 T25 L.m



















































Chapter 5 Built Form Analysis


South High\\a\ 441 Entr


FIN r-


o iea s no t


Irh, ,,._ ,i, ,, r I. u r. pi h d. ,44 1,.





ti . . f * . 1 .p . . i I I. l II . Ii







commercial buildings.

Features and Issues:

Strong agraria n look helps define town as
a rural community.

*Endangered by development pressure
to the south.

*Sign designating the Historic District is in
disrepair.

*Unique buildings visually add to the
town's character.

Vacant commercial buildings need to be
less of an eyesore.


ne-t


" 771








Count\ Road 320 Entry

1 ! h.. .. t " !t_ i *- rj l Ir ^ 1 1 I !- '+[.|i r !,
I ... n t-..- i .i -- rh ir-. _',- .. C;.iA - -, - i .J h ill-
h1 - r. . . l. ., - il , l ".. L II _-- i 44 1. - , -l ..- -











can be passed by with still no indication as
to what town this is or where you are.







Features and Issues:
H I[.- _ - r, h _l",t' -. t . h i r,,; , .. - -I" . I .

r ,_ r t" ,- , .. .. I-I . .. -.. r,_t',_. l r h ., r , I - ,I
C I [W;i] , I - [ !. [ .I r ,.in l t- .iit , r,_[ . rh t ',_ . - i.


can be passed by with still no indication as
to what town this is or where you are.


Features and Issues:

*Beautiful views of pastures and peaceful
green spaces.

*Views of wetlands characteristic of the
town and surrounding areas.

*No major indicator that the traveler has
entered the town of McIntosh.

*Residential street that lacks an entry sign.






M.


SIclntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci


0 o 540W W








Urban Transects


Sr ' i- . - II. . i i I .1 . I
,i- i I. ,., .,:! . h 1'._ ,' ,,: .. " I . !, I !.l , -r _ - ,. - . ," n ,i ] r I -

- - . -I , -I - . .!-, I rh,_ ---- r rI ,.: . .-I I, , II.
rh . rr.. r I. i . -.l. I n rlv. . rih _ . rri- r I.

,I rh . .,. II ,: rh-. , r. . . r p. .... _ I -n th .,
. 1r pi . , r I. t r. th . r. r Ir 1...: lI '. tr..n r h.
r. ,,,,.| i rt,_- th ,_ -.- ,., I ,.|u i ,,_l ir t . r .. - I r," . "
,i.,.n dr, ,n , H ,_ r. - ,.I

,,,* -,_ - ' l 1 1-- 1- r..-. t' , rrt' r ,:. . rh ,_ p r. :, _ .
that this rating is based on:

*Architectural style
*Cleanliness of appearance
*How much parcel visually adds to the
quality of the area.
*How the landscape appears

The second rating box is simply a listing
of the parcels land-use code.

The third box, (behind the curtain) is
a rating based on the functioning quality
of the parcel. For example, an empty
parcel is obviously not functioning well and
therefore, receives a low rating. While a
functioning, currently used parcel is rated
higher.


:milA


Chapter 5 Built Form Analysis










i :; I I: 'T 1 . T I 1
U^F-Ef.'.N rF. N5blC
T1-41 "CU:-4-I Mr-tINTC5- FL


E.E 11 IC T"E
IUJRT �-- INCTI
LEGENCD 5 E
/-l -4-E
�E141111-7 TE I .1RT I
'ALkJE jRjj~ C 0 ; :

U - U-L T -7 '


III '' I I
L..NC:-iSE -CODE

E E R_ ujE' B

VISUAL QUALrTT
(VALUE RATING)
LH�!LllHI1
ffopi ff~_ i-:?


T-CTJLL'r.4


QUALITY


- EE L iraC. W T E
UR T ,I1


3 7.
�� . "* �


This first transect shows US Hwy 441
from South to North.


Key Features of US Hwy 441:
*Commercial areas centrally located.
*Most buildings are visually pleasing.
*Good mix of building uses.
*Many building vacancies.


*The right-of-way is completely filled.
*Lacks adequate buffer between the road and
the sidewalk
*Currently a huge path of continuous
paving from one end of town to the other.


SIclntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci


NOR1
INT
















^N


UiS H\\\ 441 Roadl\\.\ Section


j w'WW


a -~~-t


* This is a typical section along US Hwy
441 'Main Street'. It illustrates the 60' ROW
(right-of-way). This is a smaller ROW than
along Avenue G (CR. 320).


*There is a sidewalk located along both sides
of the road with no buffering whatsoever.
All the current features along the road are
contained within the right-of-way.


*In order to add anything to the current
composition, private land use and
acquisition will be necessary.

:milA


Chapter 5 Built Form Analysis


//
1I
/


^


iY









.C- :. *- '... . / C .3
L.-E.-N TRf-N'ECT
IN'"f, r1c', NT C'�-It-; F,


*w .


EQ QUALITY
ITT LNEND-USE
4,G) CODE
- | BEH4IND T4E
CURTAIN
LIZ� I 5|'� �


Avenue G (CR. 320) from US Hwy 441 to
Orange Lake is shown in this second urban
transect.






41


Key Features of Avenue G:
*Mostly residential.
*Commercial area has both tourist (hotel)
and civic uses( post office) mixed in.
*Visual quality is high.


*Commercial area is mostly vacant.
*Two parks are found along this road. -Over-
sized right-of-way.
*Only a 20' wide road way.
*Huge live oak canopy provides shade.


SIclntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci


....................
.4D TIE RTIN ""
JE RATIW� *
L 117 E J_
-Er
















--\ elle G CR 320 Secton i '"
'iie' KY


*This section shows a typical roadway along
Avenue G. There is a wider ROW (right-of-
way) here than along US Hwy 441.


*Avenue G's larger ROW stems from its
history as the town's 'main street', which con
trained McIntosh's original commercial area,
near the railroad depot, pre-Hwy 441.


* After the completion of US Hwy 441 and
the relocation of many commercial
interests, this area has been struggling to
maintain ever since..
31-~


Chapter 5 Built Form Analysis


P_ * w


i 2


rivate 201 Ro3
. |Property 7








Housing 2 Density Es a




-.k n , I r! . h I . In r.' - IhI ._I-I thI
, .1 y,_ W - .. , _;' -_ I P 1 , l r , ' _ |











Intosh o s

Most of the historical district within
McIntosh is located within medium
density housing areas. Historically, orange
pickers used the homes located within the
historical district as boarding houses before
heavy freezing moved the citrus industry
south.

The areas of low-density housing are
mostly newer homes. Most of these
houses are single-family, and are situated on
much smaller lots than the medium density
home areas.

The graphic showcases some photos of
typical residences within McIntosh's low and
medium density housing areas.


N Iclnrosh, FI: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci


2. 1 I'�











ShBSS


Chapter 5 Built Form Analysis


* 1 l.. tr ph i. r. . rh.. I F..- r hi: l. th . ..:h .... .

I th . . ir I . r.. it - - ith ir lin t ..-h r . . -n







* \\ hll . i. n . .i th . ' . . .irt , i .. ' I r . i. ...

along Avenue G (CR. 320), they are also
widely scattered throughout the town.

*Most of McIntosh's Civic Identity
Elements well kept up, as seen in these
photos















31-~


Ci\-ic Identit Elements







Open Space Inventori


I'._Ahr Ih r i ih.r . r h.. Irh i ,n .I rh ! ..p 1. r..
p . .l' .h . ., .u .. ,.| : ,- !. .rl - r . r - h ... . .,. n ,.l -
Ir I ... . II.n , , , I .... J ,r th .
,., .l ,_-i -,\\_ r.. . h , [ i i t '.. .. '-[r 1 rhi .


* . ' ,,_ i] .I ,.I- .i i,.I ,1.. .,.l, - 11 . .t rh _. '- I I I. I


*Range Lands (land code- all of the 3000s)
*Tree Plantations (code- 4400)
* Barren Lands (land code- all of the
7000s)
Also shown on this map are the shaded
open streets of the historic district. These
streets provide comfort and a sense of place
for the pedestrian, thereby increasing walk-
ability.

Open Space Features:
*Large tracts of uninterrupted land
near the edges of town.

*Many scattered vacant parcels
throughout town.

*Shaded walkable streets in Historic
District.

&4: 0


N Ilntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci


atiil


LL. ~








Kevin L\nch Theory on

Legibility


l- h I.._ .. I, , - _'i-n t .: . , n ,i, l..,,r . _ - ,: . ,_n
l I T..r.. ,'.. i n H ,., . :,_.. . .n r!h i. in ,.- _.._ .I h r .

h ,-,_ n,,I,_ n n ._.,n 1I,,. t trI ' . 1 ,_r. - h
|t'. ,| .. t ,.,_! ._. n . . n -h - ,. .i l,.M I ... . . ... I, ,r



r :r..' - irh in, . . h - & '.. .. . ln . n r !!


*Paths
*Edges
*Districts
*Nodes
*Landmarks

Using these five elements, the city of
McIntosh can be better understood when
planning for development and future
growth, while also striving to maintain its
genus loci, defined by and illustrated within
these oftentimes overlapping elements.









Chapter 5 Built Form Analysis








Paths


p Irh ..f [, I r.. ,.-, p Irh -


,l i l 4-,
\[,I nr. - i- i , I_ h'- I -- i rh ,r
.H-'ir. rhi r.. I_ h-' h- i 441 -

r .. I r.. - i . -- r... I.. .I..- i- . r hn
i. I , 'h - - , t. . h ,- - n. _ . .1 . ' - - , .1 . *t hi -i r h ,



traffic and street crossing difficult.
To further compound the crossing
problem, US Highway 441 has no
crosswalks.
The old railline used to be the
main route of travel out of
McIntosh to the north and south
but has long since been shut down
due to the coming of US Hwy 441.
Now, there is only a small piece of
the train track leftover near the
depot as a memory. Today, this corridor is
used as an informal driveway in parts.
The major roads shown on this diagram
bring in travelers from the west of town and
link them directly to US Hwy 441. Collec-
tor roads, most of which are east of US
Hwy 441 serve the town by delivering
commuting residents to US Hwy 441.


M&


The residential streets within the town
have minimal traffic, with less than 500
residents combined. Ample shade is
provided on most of these streets by mature
oak trees and the amount of 'eyes on the
street' make them extremely walkable and
safe. These streets are very informal in many
parts, leaving sometimes broken paths that


have fragmented some neighborhoods of the
town.
Access to Orange Lake is currently
located within the fish camps. Unfortunately,
these fish camps are privately owned, along
with most of the shoreline of the lake, so
access at these points is limited and comes
with a small fee.


N Ilntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci



















































Chapter 5 Built Form Analysis


Edges





Edge [. Irt..h' .. I. .I- , .... .i. l "










are also natural drainage courses.
These edges move through town
towards the lake in a west to east
fashion. Again, McIntosh had US
Hwy 441 show up and create an
unplanned edge that divided the
e town. The old rail line also forms
Than edge, used as a housing type
demarcation line. To the east of
this edge, buildings are limited to
mobile homes. The street pattern
edge is formed by a shift of the east to west
streets forming a wall, forcing to decide
which way to turn. The lake edge fluctuates,
as the lake is directly linked to the ground
water table. This edge is also known in a
social context to produce excessive amounts
of noise from the airboats which are at
times quite plentiful.

a-








Nodes





SI - 1.;h i*r .l. r . i r r .;. b ri-b..


i n ii.P h . .* ii i-in.h . i. , n i , .- i
p hI I - 1 1 -.. 1 , . J.. -i' . ..I' .. t -.. |- [!T,_




rl-,h i r i-.. . : ,:' ,r.. ,-i . r '_ ,_r :li. r. . rw II. ,




churches.
The historic district in itself is a
node, with frequent visitors coming
to enjoy the area and its buildings.
There are several commercial nodes
along US Hwy 441, these include
the grocery store and deli. The
recreational fish camps located
along the lake serve as nodes for
resident and vacationing anglers
alike.

Landmarks


Most people have an idea of what is
considered a landmark, but for definitive
purposes, Lynch defines them as "a physical
object: store, building, sign or mountain".
Landmarks are another way to help people
understand where they are and give


them a sense of perspective within the town.
Again, as seen in the pattern of the nodes
within the town, the majority of McIntosh's
landmarks are located within the historical
district. Important civic landmarks within
McIntosh are highlighted in the above


graphic by a violet asterix. These civic
landmarks denoted are mainly made up of
town elements such as the Post Office, City
Hall and the railroad depot.


SIclntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci








Districts

l. )i , ri r r .. .. I i, ,.I I,
t i- h rh ir r lh. _ .1 ,- ._-r
,_. , _[r.. r -1- . I,_ , , ] rh ,_ r, ,-1--




ir, lir- c rr I r I.-
1 h. d. I -: r i, . .1-, - rh ,_ .,_
,.l -. i,_r. I ,.n rlh .._ r ir,_ -r ri'i_ r 'r I.-
--- ! t, ,!!, f . --- ._' . l l ,_r.I. d.. r iI
t-, , 1, ,I- 'r_' rh . .._.l . ! h r . , r. ..!, ,
I r . i-ir nip. .rr Inr r.. rh.
people of McIntosh that any new
houses or change in general to
these districts go unnoticed.
Infill housing will allow for
opportunities to fill in the gaps
within existing neighborhoods.
Using the existing architecture as a
guide to the planned infill
housing will ensure a maintained
similarity within the districts.












^11->~


Chapter 5 Built Form Analysis









Architectural Style: District 1

. i i:
2




1 II - : I .r_ .--- Irh . ur. r I,..u . i\: K h.. ,.







i , _ .- * IT.. .. *I . ri . t ri I. i ', . - in. rhi.
district, ranii~1ni tr'1llm un;iiald-Iv tu 111umll
homes. The materials used on the outside
of the homes vary almost as much as the
architectural styles.


( iii. k R ,. lv\ 'l- "in.I .. -r.." .
1 ..- ! r,:h ,_,. I -h ._' _.,.| r...._f.



r. . - r - . h. .. I i - .





.1t' ,_,_ Ir . ' ' *_!* 1,_ . . . t'', _l * , ,i _

|- ,' ,lI:h . 1 - r, .n ,.ul. -- ..... I






Bungalow- Single story,
Shingled roof gables facing
street, Small add-on tin front
porch overhang, Painted
concrete block construction,
Symmetrical windows w/
highlighted molding


Mission Style- Single story,
Flat tiled roof with extending
columns on main area and
low pitched red tile on entry,
Natural stucco finish covered
in creeping fig, Windows evenly
spaced


SIclntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci


--A









NM 'bill ( I anp~.- 1K.-I rh

k ,. H, it, . i i int


M BI l I , I I n I - 1) ...i ,lI -'I i..l...

,i n. l r, . . l.. - 1_, n - -lr ,.I .._






Mobile Home- Single wide,
Aluminum roof gables facing
street, Shutters on widows, Tri-
colored paint job, Front door
does not face the road


Mobile Home- Single wide,
Low pitched roof, Screen room
add-on w/corrugated plastic
roofing, Two toned aluminum
siding


Chapter 5 Built Form Analysis


A5


Architectural Style: District 2













lh,_ d - -,1fall tu .tluCtUiLt in t11h art a i, th l_
fact that they are using septic systems, which
are harmful to the lake due to the proximity.
Prior to further development in this zone,
the town's sewer system must be extended to
pipe out the increase of sewage.








Architectural Style: District 3


a


r -,_ _.h r I,. '. , -,.- ( ,.s ., . ir, . n i I ,'., -








tfict af- * i-tllt fr.ctuLcd ul in thle. pCL33;r. -ut
restoration. A large oak tree canopy helps
to frame the large multi-story homes while
helping the single story homes blend in.
This district is just a showcase of the histori-
cal splendor of Old Florida.
cal splendor of Old Florida.


\ icl t'm n - 1n e . Ir. In. p o






1 h ac- S,.I * i r._ ..H |-'. . h. _.l , ,',i h.
S o. " r d. - w i...I . . i 'i .. ,



rii. , i ,n ,, p hI

Shutters on the windows,
Front porch gable faces road,
Columns on the front porch
Gothic Revival/ Cracker
Shack- Single story, High
pitched aluminum roof, Smaller
home, Shutters on windows,
Single colored wood siding and
trim, Filled-in screen porch
faces the road


Bungalow- Single story, Low
pitched roof w/ gables facing
road, Covered screen porch,
Ornate gables w/ flared base
posts on porch, Solid colored
wood siding w/ white trim,
Symmetrical windows w/
shutters


N Ilntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci










pa'lnlh (.1 'inIIal R1 i-v .l-
T ",, . . r '.i.. I I. h r.:hi ..l
1 - ,'. r!l. i t. \ i - -i.. r,'n il





( laissiC RI1 al- 1 --
.t ,.' r. I I .:h n-'i r, . l-h r. |..,.|
t', ,, , . 1 ' n t,_.. .p -i .. .. .I -i..l - .-I
\I ',, -i m- _ rt .-'l, ii - " ,, ..: ,
1 ),_. ,,,' rit_.I . h, ., rr ,'. , ,,n hi.._

windows, Front porch gable
faces road, Arch with columns
on the front porch
Victorian- Three Story,
High pitched aluminum roof,
Asymmetrical with odd pieces,
Single colored wood siding and
trim, Filled in screen porch
faces the road with balcony on
top


Ranch Style- Single story,
Large building footprint, Split
floor plan, Low pitched roof
w/ gables facing road, Front
porch, Garage does not face
the road, Multi-colored red
brick w/ wood trim, Shutters
on windows


Chapter 5 Built Form Analysis


netB


Architectural Style: District 4





d.


F ,i. n -[ ,, I' h i i - 1-i.* 1 -i i-i th' .. -.. *- rl-i i .
.lr h u rr. . nrl \ .in -.. I I. Ind .






pathJ. I'llh-r ar main'i piut)ntial huicm- .itJ-
on Avenue H, but as this area falls into the
historic building district, strict development
guidelines for any new homes in this area
exist. The open space should be protected
and prohibited from development, possibly
introducing a green way.








Architectural Style: District 5


a





lh ,.r . .... . .- " t r i.i. - ,.. h i .. - ,rhui
I or . l.r . - h ..-II - - in - .rw .. I I .. r... r-

I nd..l ri. I. .r r &.- u p I- r! .. In l.. d -. . t ..l i -rit .;r.




- cit'rc. Ali L� c ;;c ii ptvi tuliv t i JLtc nI tll
lots to the lake side, which are much bigger
because they extend to the lake. These lots
also feature septic systems. Prior to further
development in this zone, the town's sewer
system must be extended to pipe out the in-
crease of sewage.


M l- ' ipr I , II. . -i i. inI I. ...I..
] * *, 'ir. .. ..l i" ' \1-111 !.11 1 * *. *. .! .

.. -i l.h . IJ' ,1.,' .1 -1..n ,_ . I '. lr! v _..







IIh _,. !- . I I 1 I.
, i n br h. I I , .- ,.,,i n ,.2 --,..

I i* *.I in . I ,.| ... .







Mobile Home- Double wide,
High pitched shingled roof,
Asymmetrical with odd pieces,
Single colored vinyl siding
and trim, Accent window
under roof detail, Shutters on
windows


Mobile Home- Double wide
w/ extensions, Bay window to
the road, Low pitched roof w/
gables facing road, Carport,
Wood siding and trim, Shutters
on windows


c Ilntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci


&4: 0









---U--,


( il--k R vIVal- "Ir,._I.-,
st..t ., , 1. .. . m n - | r . .. . ' .:- ',:..h.
. . . ,_ , I .- I

-I-II .. I I p p .- Ir II n c-i



l)itch ( ' n tl- 1- ...-. .-.

1' i n r.. d. - n ! I . .lIi-._.. \ n ,. --

S1. . i. . 1 \ . . l'. , . ,.'i . . .11 rl
road


Irl ~rs I


Bungalow- Low pitched
shingle roof, Symmetrical
appearance, Wood siding and
trim, Screened front porch






Vernacular- Low pitched
shingle roof, Wood siding and
trim, Low pitched roof w/
gables facing road


Chapter 5 Built Form Analysis


n1-t


Architectural Style: District 6






Thi
h ! ._! t'11% -11 T [1t_' ! _. W!rt _..h . -. _ h rt l. _.*
d it - I -ct .. _ . n i th .. ... L t th i , -- I
-[. - .. l .n - [. - -r.. . . . t h . H .n -. - . . .
th i.. .. I i .t r , _r.. . . , ,rr.. -n tl .-: :. , !, .I |' . th _..r..l.
r.._ ,- -. th , I" . . . . l. li, r ..t i i- !! l h .



dIIto l4 t n1 Ido tv bi . ' v;,irllli ted tv tilh to vi l
of McIntosh in a way to make it feel less
fragmented.








Architectural Style: District 7



J!











Cut, thi3r rict. C.u.rI . i . Iltld fC�re . i .. .. J i la'c'
h ,,M. . .,-, r ,:'uP - .. .. In._', r , t. h ,_ r ,-,.i-,






\\ arh r.' 'I . .'r Ir,_ -- ii.i,. - rh ir ,' r . . h rth.,
ft'4, th[i diotf'ct currt'tll . uffk[r' U11.) l, I ';k
plots of land, which is the reason behind its
ability to hold up a crisp edge. This district
is one area of town that can readily accept
new residential development because of the
topography of the area. It is situated on a
plateau which is mainly under-utilized land.


\ itnacult \ (I ' tlhic
I in t - 1 ). .,l.I,!,_ -r. . ' . r..r ,_ _




- . .1.. ,I hn . ..1) I .n '.... .
Rla\ ..... -!.l .. pi-.! i. H i..







Screened-in porch, Shutters on
the windows.



Georgian- High pitched
shingle roof, Symmetrical
appearance, Red Brick w/ white
wood trim, Columns on porch,
Pediment dormers on roof


Vernacular- Two story,
Recessed front porch, High
pitched shingled roof w/ gables
facing road, Red brick chimney,
Painted wood shingle siding,
Shutters on windows


SIclntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci










\ -nc.- - lltl l--. i. . .


�.,iI,_ .. h ,.,tt _ - '- . -- .,I. ,-. I . rl




R .- l . 1 vl c�- 1 - . -r . . . . l l r.'ll









Ranch Style- Single story,

Symmetrical appearance,
Pediment windows, Paladin
Windows, Vinyl siding, Lacking
association with the road


Ranch Style- Single story,
Recessed front porch, Low
pitched shingled roof w/ gables
facing road, Red brick and
wood, Shutters on windows,
Lacking association with the
road


Chapter 5 Built Form Analysis


Architectural Style: District 8





empty parcels in this district that can serve as













infill lots. This area already has utilities and
sewers established, making- infill viable . The r
olhitt tc, m tl^ CXIJtu]iii pittcrn aniId bc, m,.
dead-ends. The home materials seen vary
greatly from house to house. There are many
empty parcels in this district that can serve as
infill lots. This area already has utilities and
sewers established, making infill viable. The
ranch style home seems to dominate the new
construction in this area, with its desirable
ability to accommodate an automobile.


:�:B









,Architcctural Style: District 9


1 !..|' .. 't 1 1''. 1 11' '_I \
orii W. . !' ..


Rinik-
. . . . .l . .

I **


I -..lll tl .tr n . um ing11 - Ih-.-._
I ! [i .,ri . . 1 I 1. ---. . . .. d... I n r. l n ._.
S[, 11r;-, * ... .I, .!', ,._I 111. h,.,


L w i r.nl'- h . .11 - r _' rhi . .d i .r _n.r . C. _ _ t'. .. rh . . r
inl |' P . .,r i r i .I _. , I I .-_ r. . - - . -. n1.! r. r

!nl. , i r _. . .Il ! r ,l .. I ,.l . . rr . .. t rhl i .. I i ,.l i .
rt .._ l. I, rh .. .., n--r... 1 hi- m n.. , .- r .hr-,
!. , d- i -r . ..t - . . rIl..n r I i',h .r , :ru " i I .1l ,r ., b u r

,.:. r,_!" n-i-r. .- _ r - rh in rhi . ,..i-rr .r ---0!
L 11111LJd t, thLii_ uj n d uriJ 1ii1pruVeniiknit,
made will need guidelines in order to uphold
the character of the district with its special
uses.


Town Cemetery- Red brick
base w/wrought iron arch,
Singular oak trees








Vista- View from the cemetery
to the equestrian arena


N Iclnosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci


---~L-,.





I I'.r_. i- i..r , i bu kff i


Landscape is unmaintained.











Many trailers are vacant.


Chapter 5 Built Form Analysis


TI r I ,- ! -. r . ,i l,,


Architectural Style: District 10



.1


.L ,, .. .. : n t..-h ,! - ,it ,- t h , ,.t I I '"

\ I. '1.1 - rri.r *. r i . I 4.4 ". . .- 1i -i
, .__ m , ,I- i.'1. ,, I,!!i �r._ i-l.rht I, h , ..---n ,l ; I l... ,.. I-



III\ I ,n,. . -u . 1- , l. i ._., . -,, , .. * t ..t" l hi . ,.lP I . r ,
u- thit land ac a f utuftc. vCilllii;ni puift intu
town.


:�:B








Architectural Style: Commercial Zone 1





T ih l- h ,._ 11 **1t" . *,, *,, t ,, *, - -.. r,.i l *. _ r l, -
T l i n .._nr, r -,. , i .. . I- r ...r $ ..l. . . I. _
I-- 44 1 \[. r . t rlh! ,\-I: r. l r, I-..-
," ,r,_,.l ---irh i rh _.. hl .r.r .n ,: ..l .-rri, r. ,. rth ,_ , ..
-h ,,---- , , - ,, , _-, ,, ' rh ,_ t ,,_" . I..l,_ - i " ,, , ,, rh_.F
.ri* ri. ,rii . . . i. * - ,*_. ,, -l - , I_'. .',. - rh ., l l . I i l -

p..r i .. i i..- i 1 - 44 1 . i r. rh. ,. .i.. h.
---1h _.. rh , - r .. - !.. , I .- I ,r- ' ! 1 ..1 ! : I , . . r
J11vruill). IIh, Iriull 1iouL v-ciithi thii diIticlt
are vacancies, rundown building appearances,
excess speeding, lack of parking, sidewalks
too close to the highway and just a general
lack of maintenance.


, 1 ,1 i 11- !! i-r_' , .. -. ." . I'! ,r r l _. Il
,.. ,* * . I.r, ,n-r i-, .',:h , , --,_,h n. _. --* I
-,. . h r ip. .'.. h i-. il. . .1


'front porch overhang, r. . Wood
I----





frame construction, Horizontal ,
- r i~ ,_,_, , ,_..:; r,_. '!, ...





Vernacular- Two story, Metal
roof gables facing street, Large
front porch overhang, Wood
frame construction, Horizontal
wood siding, Single color




Vernacular- Two Story, Low
pitched roof w/gable facing the
road, Horizontal wood siding,
Windows evenly spaced giving
symmetrical appearance, Multi-
use building w/ apartments
above and below the store
level


SIclntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci








.rchitcctural Style: Commercial Zone 2


I I nc.il ( I' '11 ' - 1' -' i .r1 .



\\ , ,. - ,. I. _. - . l I.'. * . .i-
II it i*.n - 1. - - . 1 . I I




Sict ' r. ... 11. *Fi i- i . 1in -


[_,- !,.1 _.. \\ ,..... .I . n,.1! n._ . l r,,.I t


hI1 - - i'.. I. f p - I .ii - .lI . _ i .. t.i h. _ hi . r. -i .



,. .t ,r ,r." t M , r.... . .. -. p - h , in t. . r ,_ _' l I
,_,,m, _ ,n- rh _, .i ._,h ,n -..| -., .r i.-1" rh . ... I,_. -,..r
\lrlh . .,.. hj ,:.;i _'',-_ rl - -r , , r. rh . , , h ,-
._. ,,0.. r p." .r !_..-r r .. 1.. --,.. '"1. . -i r. . i r rh I 1' -- .



a pu )t uthic and l utdl. A\ t A\ ld packing
warehouses are located in this zone that
could be retrofitted for new uses.


Vernacular- Two Story,
Very steep shingled roof
w/ false height, Large front
porch overhang, Wood frame
construction, Wood siding and
trim, Designated parking



Prairie Style- Single Story,
Flat roof, Red brick facade,
Shallow aluminum overhang,
Solid glass windows


Chapter 5 Built Form Analysis


:�:;7








Built Form Synthesis






d[ I I.. II . -. - r1.. -. . . . - i
i,'_ ] in . ,r. n n nh i . i r.





* [l. . r i n ..! - h l ... . .. ...I- . .I . r i . .l.. . .t rIh . r. .--n -
nm , I I .r., , , . rn .: I -.. l..._n n ._.- ,,:r....l


* _\ ,r,.u r ,l I.u tt._r. r.. r! _.. n..r!h , i,..I h ._ ...u rl
of the Historic District are already in
existence.

*Slowing traffic movement along US Hwy
441 would afford the traveler greater views
of the town and its existing elements.

*Preserving views of Orange Lake is
important to preserving the town's sense of
place or 'genus loci'.

*The old railway through town could easily
be converted into a rail-to-trail recreational
opportunity.

* Creating a rail-to-trail would serve as a
linking element to currently fragmented
neighborhoods within the town.


*There is an excess of open land, with a high
potential for development.

*US Hwy 441 currently divides the town, and
is in need of more pedestrian friendly
elements.

*The original town grid within the Historic
District has great connectivity, with walkable
pedestrian friendly streets.


NIclntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci


























S. RuSidseid -.
,, .. .


Historical tommu ty -
' Spli" B> HW 441 Z.


:-- ------ - *l-
S 5an Ne, ,
P ark r ,-

<~a -- m e^ .l~ Nnrr


Chapter 5 Built Form Analysis


Residential
Lacking Unity


�*�lr~-r ~W
~ .�


" rir~Elaity L~B~


~d!�.


:�:;7









































McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius


"The simple paths. the networks of Ihalbtual or
potential lines of moo\ ement through the urb1,an
complex . are the most otet pot means bI \ I\\chl the
whole can be ordered".

- Kevin Lynch
















LocI


6

Rails-To-Trails

Case Study








Rails-to-Trails Case Study

















quality and value these one time eye sores
Once th e old train tracks were . . removed,
I, ,- Iir. .-* l !* ! 11 .!! --- . . I


the qualities of these spaces- r.. . as recreational

I | n. --- rh. r. . n 1.1d c r








Sthat formed linea -- r habitats for many--
S In. . . r.. I I I - I,-l i 1_ -,

,_ * 1 ..-, t .- . 11 . . _ d.up . , -p . I rh I Wl . r..-




could add to their communities at a national
level.
Once the old train tracks were removed,
the qualities of these spaces as recreational
opportunities began to show through.
Most railways had a seemingly endless
connection of trees and other vegetation
that formed linear habitats for many
species of wildlife, including song birds.
These long passages through often
extremely rural areas also offered chances
to view wildlife at a speed much slower than
by car.
These railway corridors which have been
converted to trails also offer other
recreational activities. For those people with
accessibility limitations, rail-trails offer level



M.


.' . Id -, - . .I . - r I. - l,. - . - , " rh , . -- I . .
I n i.l I I I' I . I. Ill. rh ._ p r. - .- , I. n . .
,.t! '!!i !' !'[.. i '',r,. I .. , !'*!. ,l ,l , ,' '!,* . I, ,' - r . . . ... ! I ,.
:, 'i * * r iI . 1 ,I- _ " ik rr Iii -I " ._
1clud. : ' ..inil I. .- rl- Pellas County, FL,






i,[, '. ,_ rh n - It" iil-r " il. i . .. I .. h.
,.I,_ -r i n . .1 . . --..,_ l. I II -,,I . .I ..l. . ' r " i--r ' .


,:, Ir.-, ',_ - r .- , CC.l I - ,t' i-i r r I Il - rr I I
including: Pinellas Trail- Pinellas County, FL,
-r,. - , 1,i I ..,r It ' Ir Id ,I .1 dn,,, -. X I.. ,,,..
I i-ii.i i" 2 M ,. "r iil-rr I .II rh.. iri. -.i- .
�. i II. . *i '' i -r . .. . -.. _ r" ,I l- l,_ l ,.,;'r ,..l... i '.


SIclntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci








Pinellas Trail

Pinellas County. Florida













the rall-trail made its way through the town
of Dunedin. It served as a catalyst. . th rhat
inspired Dunedin's commu h ni.ty







redevelopment agency to revitalize the
downtown area. They came through with







$1.2 million in improvements to their main
streets, with many other improvements
1 I r I- ," rr Idll p I ..... .- rh ,. !" p ' 1.. I , . .: .. r I
,,',_ ,.. ,',_ . r.I,_r , ! - , h lI r. h . ..... | , I. i n r. .

\; i p .., ,t ,_:1 r:... r I ..r h -i .- -,







along the rail-trail being fundeway through federal town
of Dunedin. It served as a catalyst that
inspired Dunedin's community
redevelopment agency to revitalize the
downtown area. They came through with
$1.2 million in improvements to their main
streets, with many other improvements
along the trail being funded with federal
dollars from the Congestion Mitigation and
Air Quality Improvement program.

One of the more notable improvements
made included the 4 million dollar,
pedestrian friendly, Cross Bayou Bridge,
which allows the trail to pass safely over
Tampa Bay. Because of this bridge, trail
users can now easily take in never before
available sights of dolphin, manatee, and
waterfowl.

^11 >~


Chapter 6 Rails to Trails Case Study


kbove: Beautiful foliage seen
;rowing along a rail-trail.
6ight: A mother teaches her
:hild how to ride a bike while
)n a rail-trail. Photo credits:
www.railtrails.org/find/totm/archieves








Steam Boat Trace Trail.

Lincoln. Nebraska

l lh. r 11. , l -i .. ,r t I. i i ri ii l! 1 ,. 2 1 i rii
r',l-I T i ll rht r ',in- . ,l..n._. rhi _ n ,[t .[ ....1.1 it c t".. t



rh,_ _'. d.. . _..,hri " -I .:! r . k .. ---!rl h
,. . I ,- -n -l.,


Ini -\ I. ._ -l . r.! , !. rh ,. Id ... I ..n I ...,_ ir-


nothing more than a large parking area. Yet,
the entire rail-trail has been infused with
history dating back to the 17th century
Spanish Explorers. The trail head show-
cases a progression through the history of
power, starting out in Nebraska City with a
coal power plant and ending in Brownsville
at a nuclear power plant.

At the Peru trail head, there is the
option for the user to exit the rail-trail and
grab a bite to eat in the historic downtown
or visit the historical Peru State College.
Traveling on to Brownsville on the rail-trail,
distinct landmarks indicate the arrival of the
Brownsville State Recreation Area where the
option of fishing presents itself to the user
and is another example of the wonderful
sometimes surprising recreational
opportunities that a rail-trail can present.


Nlclntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci


Abo\ e serIs \\al k alonu the trail
LiLtiny a silnimer afternoon.

Right: A scenic picnic spot along
the Peru trail head.

(Photo Credits: Nemaha Natural Re-
sources District)

















































Chapter 6 Rails to Trails Case Study


Galloping Goose Trail
Telluride. Colorado

\ .I ! I . .i . .. .. I tr I1 ! I r 'i il-r " Ill



1 I 1, 1 , I, W * r "l , , I i . ,, it. .n - , .. . T. - _ h ,r





is primarily dirt featuring awesome vistas,
wildlife, bridges, and historical landmarks.
Many mountain bikers include this into the
well known Mountain Bike Trail referred to
as 'Telluride', as the trail contains a higher
level of difficulty.

Overall, this rail-trail is based on active
recreational uses and makes no apparent
effort to connect towns or communities
although the trail is rich in history.


Abo\ e Those \\ 10 \l sit the trail
in the summer enjoy bright blue
skies and warm temperatures.

Right: A cyclist hits the trail just
west of the town of Telluride.
(Photos credit: San Miguel County Open
Space & Recreation Department)








Rails to Trails Case Study

Conclusions

In I-i hr . r rhii..l c . rib. r. [
T i[,:n -. '-I . r'i..'i,.l i, l,. I,. n hr t ..im ,






| nu- !i. t., n . I- ---i .. , r . , .4 . . i .. r. . I. . ,_ in .



* upportunines for recreation within the
town are currently limited, and a rail-trail
could create a new recreational opportunity
for users of all ages.

*With new recreational opportunities, the
town could better sustain a commercial
node that benefitted the residents and
recreational users alike.

*Opportunities would arise to highlight
McIntosh's historic points of interest along
the trail corridor such as the rail depot, the
packing house and the numerous historical
residences.

*McIntosh is part of a string of small, rural
towns and a rail-trail could serve as a
common tie between these communities.


*Chances to enhance the existing recreational
fishing opportunities within the town could
easily be achieved by linking the rail-trail to
lake access.

*Current trails exist within proximity of
McIntosh that could serve as linking
opportunities, such as the Hawthorne Trail to
the north and the Green way Trail due south.


*Possibilities for further town improvements
could be spurred by the rail-trail conversion,
with the town's potential to apply for federal
funding to support these improvements.

*Proper marketing and advertisement of a
new rail-trail could provide McIntosh with a
much needed increase in tourist commerce
and better establish the town as a destination.


SIclntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci









































McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius


"On the \\hole. planned connmmunities tend to
hnv e nmuchl greater reuuila lli\ tIn tldose tliat
sim|pl e\ o ed o\ el time
- Randell Arendt















LocI 't


7
Community lMaster
Planning








Conceptual Master Plan 1

Analysis:

I n i . .-.._ 'ri. I \ [ , r. ri I i' 1 1 I. rhi _












traverses from Orange Lake to the other
side of town, with anchoring recreational






parks at the end of two primary
conservation areas. This proposed
I _.. . r.l. - I I.. : I n : r.., h . w ro ..', . . r .. r, _.-

i, I,,. rhl ,. _,' ,_ 1,,.I! . - - - k , I ,I- _ !,. I ,.- . ! .1 ,. i.h . ..l -





aster plan is a green way would create new connections forthat
traverses from Orange Lake to the other
side of town, with anchoring recreational
parks at the end of two primary
conservation areas. This proposed
green way would create new connections for
both humans and wildlife alike.

Along this new corridor, plentiful open
spaces would further extend connectivity
and would be placed to terminate views
from the automobile, leaving drivers with a
rural feeling of vastness. These open spaces
would also stand to reinforce the agrarian
culture that McIntosh was founded upon.

With McIntosh being located in such
close proximity to Orange Lake, this plan
will protect the quality of both the water
and the wildlife in and around the lake. A

J&::)0


local residents, featunng a park -hke setting
that mirrors an adjacent park terminating at
Orange Lake.

This plan also proposes the relocation of
both the civic elements and the educational
r n ,- - r. . . . r .! , . " . . -,, i , ir ii ! ). I r!. - I !-,.l pr. -,.-k,..l_
,,: ..- I I ii ir n . .r n r h. - !,!.: , . I . . 1 , r r , rh _..










facilities of the town, to the north of the
1 !h ,_ :.. * n ,_. ',: ,l **i. . ,_- --- ..,.,M I,.- p. h r w ar..








commercial zone on US Hwy 441. A town
park that forms a connection with these civic
,_:.: .r-_. ,,,_ , -,_ . ," r h ,_ - .. MI r I, ,.-I, p .. r rh ir
--- .. l,.M -,_,--,_ . rh I ... l. , , .l . ,.I-,_ r. ,n d.I I ... . . r. T '
, . .i-._. rh ,_ ,' , !-r,' ,i l h1 ,_ ,I.d I,_ .,:!. i , , , II
I, ,,:, r,_f .-I I . r h-. ..... .-,. .r ---i ! I ... I_ r.., ,.I r. . - - I r,.I.





and educational elementsng a park-the setting
that mirrors an adjacent park terminating at
Orange Lake.





Thisgreen way system also reinforces the relocation of
both the civil eleml. Residential growth is limiteducational
faciltes of this plan due to the amount of land
commercial zone on US Hwy 441. A town



proposed that forms a conservation with these civic
and educational elements to the new
green way system also reinforces the small
town feel. Residential growth is limited
greatly in this plan due to the amount of land
proposed for conservation.

By incorporating McIntosh's surrounding
lands into these conservation areas, the
existing boundaries of the town would
maintain a crisp edge, thereby preventing
unwanted sprawl.


Pros:

* ',... r-, . rh i_ , . r. I ri r . n I- - .rit i.u,.ii'


* I[ ,. i ri ,. ii n - i III , , ' 1 - -- . r.ii n I _,
, . .i -Ir, I ,d -r," ,I


I r , _ r . , . .... !- - !. . . . . . 1! ,_1 i - 1 1.., ... . . ..I - .










Cons:

*Necessary relocation of businesses.
*The school and civic areas would blend with
proposed retail along Hwy 441.
*Retail area separated from the main
intersection of the town.
*Voluntary restrictions placed on landowners
within new conservation corridors.
*Offers limited residential development.
*Does not slow traffic effectively.
*Makes no attempt to reconnect currently
fragmented neighborhoods within the town.


SIclntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci












Recreation
Passive



� .. :..1..
;ISc I ;


Historic
Residential


� � i"" ': .. i";
Infill


!'! � ... .

PaPa&


Parkt:; M::
Recreation ~ u~~t l
Active





C 7i r n
low
Chapter 7 C~ommnt MsePann








Detailed Plan Description


I -r , . - ..- - I ', - ir i i ,;. . , ,r-... ,. h . -


r r. [, n r .h . ! - r.. i)- ..-- -I rh rh ,_ , , - ,. -r
h ! r. rhI. ., rh -.. . .. r ,t r. "-1 i | ' ' . .....I
n- - r - h , - iri . * - - I - -
h ill ,.P! !,! , -- ... h r..- .. - - .-
I n- - ,- II - .- - - -


,1. . ,.I,- ,,,.I !,! i . - I _. :..r , rh ,_ ' |-'| .-'r..' .
. *..-_- l,.I rh i.- W I, r. ! - i l I . :..n .. ,_r.

as a whole is the stated primary objective.

This concept proposes that the two
primary and two secondary riparian
corridors of the town (illustrated previously
in the hydrology plan), be brought into a
voluntary conservation/green way system.
This process would have to be a joint effort
between the town and the current property
owners. The town's responsibility would be
locating, purchasing and maintaining the
vacant parcels within the newly created
conservation zones, while the current
property owners would have to subscribe to
a voluntary set of guidelines to protect their
lands.

These purchased lands could serve a
variety of uses and could have designated



JM


, -I r, , I ,,_ . ,_n.. | -[ .I ,_-1, - T ,_..1.| . ,_._' - ,r,_ "

*....r ,i , .,tr i, ici Wi -. Cr. in, , '' I 1 44 1. - i l
ip I 'r. ---irh ...i. r ._ . i.- . -I r . . 11 , , i- - - -
I ..,. I - .. rh -r .. Ii ri . it-. . .; ; .i 1.

. 11-n n. i r . 1 I in 1. .-. .-.. r l. . .--- . .u l hl
',. ,n' r,, pT ' ,r.._, r , ,. l r .I,. - , . I. T n , "r I i
, -)..I , . ,. I W - ,!, ._ . ; ,ll . . - , ! ,i.. I, I
ri.l " ! l . ! - ,_ - r , " i , ! i , i - *- ! * h


, i * | . . , .I


On the pnvate land owners' end, the
obligation could only be a voluntary act of
the individual, due mainly to the current
desires of the town's residents not to be
"government controlled". The affected
landowners could be informed about the
necessary steps needed to be taken to
conserve the special qualities of their land
and at the same time educated on possible
ways to enhance and protect the value of
their property. Some suggestion given to
the property owners could be ideas on water
conservation, minimal use of fertilizers,
creating landscape plantings that promote
wildlife and ways to limit impermeable
surfaces on their property.

This master plan proposes two large
parcels, very different in their appearances,
to be used for recreational activities. One


. .t rh ,_. . . ' ,;, ! - - . .,; ,r . l.I 1- rh . .. -, , .'r h - - r

. i i ...l , r ..- 1 i-i , .l rt-i .. .. r t - 1 r. ..


1 1 _ ,- ,*r h --_ .-r ! ',;,_ . I ,iii-1 H i t ---irh


I ' , .. .. l... I . . r -. . i n . - h ! -.. . -r .


n- nI i - -' r . r.- . It!..1 l ..:r .. - .)h rh.



S I . p , n, 'r il n t ,h . r _ t . -- .. n .:.tr...

highest in the town. A site such as this one,
with dramatic topography, calls for a higher
level of activity and movement to enable us-
ers to access the awesome view. The site also
has many areas with major slopes that will
contribute to the appeal of active
recreation, such as hiking and/or mountain
biking. This area will be buffered by open
space to lend views from off the property. It
will also connect to a small park maintained
by the town and tie into the southernmost
finger of the proposed green way system.

The rail-trail proposed will form a linear
recreational corridor that connects not only
all four branches of the green way system
but also the new commercial area proposed
around the old depot as well as the historic
district to other neighboring communities.


SIclntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci









il i ,c. I. - I i 'i .I ,'.. ii c'in i n . r,.i - id .. I n ,







I-' IrI, I h i i I-r
r rr. . _ r i 'r . !i , , , r !1- .I - 11 - r Ii ! '! !!'! '_ rI ,_ ,I I '-Ir! ! _



p r- - ' -i 1 - 1


1 h l ... .. .or l, .h ,_,.I ,:..l,_,-i 'i.. . i , '_l Jr. . n ._. I _ " ,
Hwy 441 has recently been the driving force
behind the proposed creation of McIntosh's
first Community Redevelopment Board. Their
primary goal, if created, would be improving
the existing infrastructure of the town,
(sidewalks, crosswalks, street signs, and
buildings) to attract new business to the area,
restore the buildings and fill the vacant store
fronts along US Hwy 441.

Street improvement along Avenue G (CR.
320) would start at Orange Lake and extend
past US Hwy 441. They would attempt to
connect Orange Lake, the lake side park and
retail area, Van Ness park, US Hwy 441
commercial establishments and the residential
areas to the west of US Hwy 441 with a park
like setting.


A p proposed park would connect the civic









square and commercial zone to the new
green way system and would continue to
strengthen the new civic identity of the town.
This park would provide a green space for the
new downtown and would present ample r










opportunities to inform the users of the
unique cultural history and environment
f , f i[,: ,-r 1 1 1-- 'l ,, |-', '" .... . . r,, l. ,,: I I,















of McIntosh and the surrounding regions
I- ,l' -._' - rhI .. - I. ,_ m .. .-. - I I,.I- r. I I_,_,:, r. rw._ ._ ,I,
u d- d ti _r' i , Ir , --- r, ,- - . -,.| i , r h , ,: , 1 _ - I 1 '.


iri -,_ ,_ ! * - " t . -- - -Id














through kiosks and other informational
A proposed park would connect the civic












stations.
Oncquare and commercial zone to the newthis first
green way system Pland would continue to
strengthen the new civic identity of the town.
This park would provide a green space for the
new downtown and would present ample





opportbuildable landnities withinform the conservation the
unique cultural history and environment





boundaries, into areas that ge w orth and
meaninthrough kiosks and o to there informational
stations.

Once again, the overriding goal of this first
Conceptual Master Plan is converting
buildable lands within the conservation
boundaries, into areas that give worth and
meaning back to the community.


I h .- --lt I ... i, , --,. rI h r. .__ .., ii . - - -I

wou- l d! . a-.l.s. f_.I p 1 ,r..n i l the wn .I i

,cI,; n. i I. - rl .t i s p i r I t r. f . i r e


\i rh . 1 . -... 1_ ,-1-,1r.. - h-: . n r l-,.. r h . n..n
0: I, -l-, i 1 , ,.I r.i " !, ! I r, - . ,-.-- .',', r l h i ir rh ,
I ff i. .,. |-r - .r I-- [i. p I , -1 1 1 n - I , l, - r .h ' r.. I- .


t,_ _!.._.. ,,,i- j i - .I --- , , , *t- ! it,_ rh- , r rh , l _'_... r I ,_l .i n r .

, ,. t 'iT !-) rl -r ' .-- . ,, h I ,.-I r. . - W I in r I I n I r
would also finally provide the town of
McIntosh with a smart vision for the future.


Chapter 7 Community Master Planning


:�:8








Conceptual Master Plan 2

Analysis:




I - .: n ..-r I . - I - r.,p .. r n-u I ... ..t






,H I . , - .., _ , . ', , I ,, ' ,. p . . i. . -.1 .I ,I

along US Hwy 441.

In this plan, areas with the highest
conservation priority are set-aside for the
community to use as open space, with
adequate buffers put in place near the most
vulnerable areas. The rail-to-trail is limited
to the old rail bed with connections at each
block for access into the neighborhoods and
to Orange Lake.

The civic elements are relocated within
the commercial area along US Hwy 441 in
order to share the benefits from the street
improvements. The school would stay in the
current location, expanding onto some
adjacent parcels to acquire the land needed
for the educational activities.


Pros:


lh,_. b ,- r. .. l rhW- -W .- ,_h. . .. d. .l. .-_ - rh ,!!
. *.rh ,_ " - ,,: , ir ! , -,.I . .... ,r. ,..l,_ . .Ht rh ,


,'A T - ,_I ''--,rn. .n , i'- wr, , -- . r hli ,_ri i!r I ' - -r k..


c Ilntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci


* _-'. . - [.._ - ,. l, -!- t. .t" , rrt',. :r . _.. n .I-.

,;* *, d i 'hw-.. , '! ! l l - . ,_'r,-






*Introduces a rail-trail into the community.


Cons:

*Large areas of environmentally sensitive
land are left out of protection areas.

* Impervious surface areas are increased.

*Lacks creation of recreational opportunities.

*Streetscaping is the only planned
improvement to US Hwy 441.

*More retail is created than the community
can currently support.

*Doesn't address entry points into the town























New
irculation




'"ii.. - Historic k
�.' �� i �Residential
Infill



Op Keepq_
ii... : � .











C r m ye i













Chapter 7 Community Master Planning








Detailed Plan Description

IThe plan ditoe no-t adr..es a1 rh. tn-









limits and therefore leaves the existing town

edge vulnerable to the pressures of outside
dr.v. rh. : rnt.. he border o .... .. t ra . -e
. .t ' n[, -,r..-h . ---h h. ,h .. r- ..-- i,.I,. -
1i. 1-r _ , i- ., - - - - --- . .. .... I P- : I


o .r If th.n are - roposd... r .open s e ii.
ord,,_ r to limit.. ...develo -.. . r the lakeshore..


-,.,,: , *- , - ri . _ t" . I ,, . , h _t'. . _i'-. I r 11) l . . i ' . 1.,.


produce market.

The plan does not address any of the
rural lands located outside of the town's
limits and therefore leaves the existing town
edge vulnerable to the pressures of outside
development. The border of Orange Lake
is addressed and the associated lands located
out of town are proposed for open space in
order to limit development at the lakeshore.

The entry points into the town along
US Hwy 441 are to be reconfigured slightly,
but this plan does not address the entry
points directly. The US Hwy 441 entry
to the north will have a proposed new
streetscape element, but the main changes
will be seen the uniformed look of the
residential housing redevelopment on


, ! r h .. r -! ..I , , ,t r h .. r , . i... I . .. . ... . . .... . -... . . . . .
!,. r i d p r. '. .. - - I rh itr - Il l I -.- !. i, . t -' - rh.,
r, th . rh ni in r I . rh . Ir - i-n . n t rh
I, ,_ 1 . .,., .... -!! . ,:! . -! ! ,|- . . I ... .. ,ci -n .'m - . .,1-

I . .rl .!,lI. .I , - . ' rh _ .rt r 1 ... .. ii. !..-_ I_ "
II- 441 r.. rh, .i. .rh I I - .. I -, rh i ,. -




\I ..i th.. n ri ,I II.- h h -t . I ..
,.I,_ i'i r, ,_ .I .| h . ,I-. - _ . r h, _ ' h ._.h ,_-.r |-' .ri.t' r t .r

- I- ." . I , . . ,- , , - ,, , 1 , -,_ I ,r . - -- ,.I
- . . - ,_ i- . H.. ,_ -ir._ - 1- 11 i n - - !t'. * ,I ! II .!! t, 1i 1i!-,.l
will remain formally undeveloped. These
spaces could be used for a myriad of
activities such as picnicking, exploring the
ecosystem, or simply walking. Some of these
sites that contain surface water would need
buffering from new developments to
maintain the water quality for recharge to
Orange Lake.

Recreation areas will be limited to the
open spaces throughout and two proposed
parks that the town will maintain. Van Ness
park and the "Small park" will remain in use
for the residents east of Hwy 441. Although
the meeting hall location will be moved from
Van Ness park, the existing building will
remain to act as a recreation center for the
community. It could house activities such as
bingo, after-school tutoring, weddings and/
or other social and community events.


1.. rh . --- . . I I--- 4 4 1. , -r. p .. ..I



along t rail - trl .. .sy . TII- 44 rh.ail w

Sli k to oth . I r.as i r rthe area sh as the--
S* n-i ,_ I'- , I I I i-.. I . * -r i. . I' I rh I r - - A -, i !-i|-'
* * *. . r,_t |-'.,I , ,_" *.. .i r 'I - i-r 1 . . .-, . . .. r rri n-._



,. .t't' -.I.l . * 1 - .._ r, ,i! - ,l -.. I p . ' , i,,..!'I




trails within Paynes Prairie to the north and
the Cross Flori.da Green way to the soth.. .-.
":':'- "". , |"..' . r. . I .. rh rh ,_ h . r.., ,_ ,.lH.IrP IrI ,', rr I ..l
to Orange Lake, creating destination places
along the rail-trail system. The rail-trail will
link to other trails in the area such as the
trails within Paynes Prairie to the north and
the Cross Florida Green way to the south.

There is a strong need for the town to
improve the current conditions along their
'Main Street', US Hwy 441. This plan
proposes new crosswalks to be constructed
with flashing pedestrian crossing signs,
slower speed limits along Hwy 441 and new
street furniture such as trash receptacles,
benches, bollards and street lamps. There are
also new decorative signs used to designate
and identify businesses not located directly
along Hwy 441. Finally, there will be new
landscaping along Hwy 441 that fits within
the existing historical palette.


SIclntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci








1 i . - ,* * , r, I , p r .p .... .I in

















Also included within these new
commercial propositions is a lakefront area
with more shopping, but these stores will
mostly cater to the local residents' needs,










such as hardware. There are planned
, , . I' irl -, ,1 ",_ *I . 1 .111 r 1 !!'I- 1 I'! l rh ..!,! - r. I



















dining facilities near the lake as well, having a
general emphasis on native Florida foods and
showcasing lake viewing opportunities.
. The planned residential r r redevelopment












will fall into three use types and will stay true
to the architectural styles of the
districts that they are proposed within. First,
the historic area has a few vacant lots that
will be open for infill projects. Because these













projects would have such strict guidelines for
new construction to occur, and in terms of
, ...,M I ,_ I,,'|.| . ..... .I.., ,, ,,u p - irh ,,- ,,.|i.i .. . -r. . r..
i, .t' rh,_t" ,.I,_ - i _' ,r. rh _.. I!'-- I I" I -T -, n, r - p. . -
























keeping up the historical look of the town,
Also included within these new











commercial propositions Instead of displaying run down, vaca a lakefront area
parcels th more shopping, but these storage trees in
mostly cater to the local residents' needs,
such as hardware. There are planned
dining facilities near the lake as well, having a
general emphasis on native Florida foods and
showcasing lake viewing opportunities.

The planned residential redevelopment
will fall into three use types and will stay true
to the architectural styles of the
districts that they are proposed within. First,
the historic area has a few vacant lots that
will be open for infill projects. Because these
projects would have such strict guidelines for
new construction to occur, and in terms of
keeping up the historical look of the town,
Instead of displaying run down, vacant
parcels the town should plant orange trees in


, i , pt.. i-, - -i lli .t . i .i , rhI .t ti-i i_. r _ . i' .
**. . i-.ii .Ii , . . i u rh _ .. h . r..ti_" I ,.l,.rt'.,_r rh ,r i .I











be in the same character as the district into
which they are inserted.

The last category of residential
development takes place on land that
includes current uses defined by the St..
Johns Water Management District as 'Open
Lands' (land code-all of the 1900s), 'Agri-
cultural Lands' (land code-all of the 2000s),
'Range Lands' (land code all of the 3000s),
'Tree Plantations' (code- 4400), and Barren
Lands (land code- all of the 7000s). These
areas will be developed with new, single-fami-
ly residential housing built along an extension
of the existing road pattern to ensure the
connectivity of these areas and to prevent
fragmentation of the proposed
developments. The architectural styles of
the surrounding areas will bleed into the ar-
eas of new development, lending to a design


Chapter 7 Community Master Planning


r l , -, i I, I ,


r, - ' i. . " rh , - ,. - ll ,. ,. ir - , r nl
|-l "'. '- !,.ll!-'l' l -* i _ l ll,_ - - i-[" l - lrl. .! l . Ir - I ' _. . rI h..





iII ! t!n
1 1h, ,-'l-l," ,,.I,_ ,r r . . Ic th,( ] , r..-h int rh '.











The plan for the school would start with
the town's purchase of the current parcel in
order to establish the basis for a
permanent building grant. Sidewalks to and
from the school will be provided through
the US Hwy 441 improvements.

In summary, this plan relies heavily upon
developing the residential and commercial
aspects of McIntosh, leaving behind very
little land for the environment. If
implemented, this plan could effect the
population of McIntosh in a drastic way in
its potential to draw new residents into the
town with its heightened commercial and
housing opportunities..




^11->~








Conceptual Master Plan 3

Analysis:


t'....r , � rh,_*. t'.1-1 ,; . I _ .!. i . rh ,_ r ..-l - i- . .











suggestions made to improve drainage and
water quality for Orange Lake. This plan
sets aside both a green way and open spaces
inside the town limits, while at the same
time making an attempt to preserve the
town edge through new conservation areas.

In subsequently addressing the entry
points into the town, this plan welcomes
the traveler coming from the north with
proposed commercial establishments, while
travelers coming from the south entry get to
come through the new green way corridor.

Again, the existing rail bed would be
converted to a rail-trail that would house
activity in vacant parcels adjacent the
rail-trail. The proposed rail-trail would also
provide a link to the green way and include
a variety of activities.


Pros:


I h . .* _ .. - --- . - ---!!! , : r .. ,. t .. rh
Ik ,_ r. , rh ., ,- - - r, _ r, ,ri, r, I , r- r , - I ,I





\1.,*-r_' L_ I I1 - 4 4 1. .rr,_,_r .-i|-r, ,- -,_ .,_ -ir.
. ., r , ' ... - i . r .- -!! l l-. . I .. . '!, ,. r. .


the historic district. There is a small amount
of commercial redevelopment proposed for
existing areas in this plan, with the focus on
sustainable growth for the commerce
currently within the community.

There are both new multi-family and
single-family residential developments,
placed in the areas previously designated as
free from environmental issues. The existing
civic spaces are pulled together into a central-
ized location along US Hwy 441.

To the southeast corner of the historic
district, a new visitor center would greet
those interested in touring the historic part
of town. The school relocates to a parcel
that can be purchased by the town, which is
adjacent to a large parcel that will be utilized
for overflow recreational activities.


I.I I, -r.)i_ - I i III r. . i










*Reconnects the town to range Lake.

*Introduces new Multi, and Single-family
housing.


Cons.

*Loses some of the environmentally
sensitive lands to existing land uses.

*Some town elements require relocation.

*Road improvements may be prohibitive due
to their associated costs.

*Substantial amounts of proposed residential
development could threaten existing
'small-town' feel of McIntosh.


NIclntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci
















Recreation
Passive


^I
-11

Historic
Residential
Infill


Historic
UQ- f Residential I1


A* A * "


New


Recreation Tied Into
Greenway & School


lo�
Sinae
I,
.I
i.
li~F'~
; I


Town
Park


Chapter 7 Community Master Planning


M-I


iA


'I:
Y;i�...~ ~
�*i
+ 'I;


r:Ldt'.








Detailed Plan Description
















conservation to preserve the town edge with
a cisp visual quality between the country- r
- 1 , - - . . I - * i -i il rh . p n - - 1. - .










side and the town. These areas are outlined
in the master plan in brown and include
wetlands, forested land and the large vista
to the southeast of town. This hill or vista
has major importance, as mentioned earlier,
in preserving the views not only into town
but the major view over Orange Lake to the
east.

The points of entry into town are
addressed in this plan, along with US Hwy
441, as part of the proposed street
improvements featuring new landscape
plantings. To the north, there is a new
commercial development that is proposed
and placed at the town entry point. This
idea may need some revising to make sure


J&::)0


crh r in. Ir..th ma p k, whic. h . l r i ,,be --



the east. s menItioned in . . o t - #h,. 1,


gr r.een w unitary. I- h. ni p irk. ,,r
r I,. , . ,r .I. I. t. - rh .. l c u rrl , . i' ! r r. t'r. !ir!i.I .















would have to be created through a joint
,_n-[r,_," rh ,_ r..- 1-- rh ,'.... _.h rh _.. p -'.. p . 1






effort of both the town and the residents.

connected back to the green way system runs along some
othe exst. As mentioned in conceprridors. It # 1, includes
green way/voluntary conservation area,
would have to be created through a joint
effort of both the town and the residents.

The green way system runs along some
of the existing riparian corridors. It includes
the two primary riparian corridors and the
proposed rail-trail system. The little branch
in the middle was a secondary riparian
corridor kept to serve as a buffer to the
historic district. While the two corridors
coming from US Hwy 441 have the main
goal of water reclamation, all corridors will
serve as a set of green way trails. They will
be connected to numerous outdoor activi-
ties that will take place along the green way.
The proposed rail-trail will also be within the


for recreath..onal uses, both of which r. are large


. s r.. lo ateh in their I .....n rn h ,ed s of n..r
T... a. r s w. l .. .. r d inati s rh r h .
, ,' . 1- - , .. I ,, -,_ r..,.l ..n - .I- p , . . -' n r In
n.J,, -i'_ r - . rh..... - W,_ Wi. t r I' - , ...i r._ -r. r...
r. . r .._ cr n1 - I ri ,- ,_ ... . r,_ i I , i d..l --- i l -,_ r, .
,.,.I h I rirt.' i .. rh .. . -_ in i , -,l!I!r


for recreational uses, both of which are large
areas located in the western edges of town.
These areas will be destinations for
recreation enthusiasts, and will tie seamlessly
into the Green way system. The recreation
area in the southwest corner will be
connected directly to the school in order to
promote use by the school children both dur-
ing and after school. While the area to the
north will be set more towards passive rec-
reational activities, due to the fact that there
is a wetland on the site and the presence of
wildlife is much more likely.

Street improvements seen in this concept
do an excellent job of forming a unified
sense of place. The entire Hwy 441 cor-
ridor is dressed up to give the town a much
needed face lift. This is done through the
use of new sidewalks, street furniture, traffic


NIclntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci










i_. I, t. _' . . ... - IIn-I. . i i hrit . - ni ' . ! . I'i. .

* t-!... p. i .- r.. r.h . .n h s i . h. i. . I i
1 -'. . -, !, . 1,, ," t, . I .. rh - , rr. .. _- rill ',,r i i


From-- e.rl , i - i... rh,_ r..!--- the




,.l I [ I",_ ' -, -r r ,1 _ . - , , I , , it -. r. . i i 1 1.1 -, - \, - , .1
,_, ,r,_," - , [,: ] -,r. . - , . ' .. -, rI _. -1. .., r h . r r ._ ' - - - ll
be more industrial type commercial stores,
for example, the existing truck topper store.
This area would also be revitalized through
existing commercial storefront restoration
and by moving existing buildings to create
both parking and new shopping spaces.

From here, the plan addresses the
abandoned retail location by the rail depot.
The activities located here will be primarily
for the residents of the town and the users
of the rail-trail, with featured stores such as
a grocery and general goods store. This area
might also include a small-scale delicatessen
serving lunch and dinner several days a week.
The fish camps located along the lake
remain, but would receive better signage
along Hwy 441. There would also be an
effort on the owners' part to improve the
lodging at these fish camps to attract tourists.


I 1 ,_ ',_. , ,.l,_r. r, I l h . .. , 1 - . i . ' .p . . ... .I I , rhI
|-'l I r ,!. Io- |-' I,;,_ i , - I_-, I' -- I I ,', - 1l ,_ r ,. r








town. These areas are capable of . r.
p |-'" i " h' 11 - 'p"ri'. .!-1 I . rh ... - _ ---h .. |-'., r,' h I...














supporting new dwelling units in aI
responsible way . I Some of the proposed
rh.,_ _r ,- h !. I" ri d ,.l f i Ii , r I :: 1-,_ - _:; , - rh .i' - r w .t',_
h '.n ,_-, rl - ! - I _ 'l,_W ip -h, _.. I . rh t ',, --. I .I h ...... I






housing even includes a few small, multi
I, ,!. .I T - ,._ I ,I rl I - ,-I r . I -,-I r I, ,_ - ,-) r-[ ' r.. .-I I -.









family town homes placed in strategic

structure or function of the currently
existing neighborhoods.
The last new elements of the residential
plan are single-family neighborhoods that
pull from on the existing street patterns to
extend and connect these new areas. These
new residences will have smaller lot sizes
than the typical lots of the historic area and
be will be developed with open space and
conservation lands leading their layouts. This
will keep the existing feel of McIntosh in
place, even in the new neighbor hoods.
The civic relocation plan in this
concept moves the main location to a central


Chapter 7 Community Master Planning


. r, I .. . y,'. . I I I- 44 1 lr.- !.., r. .11 1, - 1.-. .M
4 4 1;!,.,,. in , ,_ - hI l , i " r . ,.I.. .. '.. _rrt ,,;,_ ,,,.I rh ,_
r u ,-!*i- l -,_,_rl!-r_2 h II I . .._.- --rh rh... r. .--.,















The school will move to a larger site
directly to the northwest of its existing
location. It would then be adjacent to the
active recreational area that can be utilized
for school activities.

This plan does a good overall job at
preserving the town of McIntosh while
enhancing both the cultural and the natural
features. Development, as it is proposed
in this plan would ensure a viable town for
years to come, without a lot of the
drastic changes that the residents of the
town currently fear. One of the major
lacking elements of this plan is the lack of
entry recognition. With a little
modification and planning, these entries will
be included in the Final Master Plan.


n1-t










I h . rh ,.. . 1- 1 , r.r I-,! I -I , - .. i ,. - -, , ..-..I in,
..l. r Id --- h, i ,lt ,;h i1 I I. I h I -- ._ ! -.- ri r


\\ i.. . . r. . pn '. - . 1 ,.I














Reasons the matrix is helpful:
* Quickly visually identifies overlapping
positive traits of each plan.

* Identifies the plan that most closely
achieves the program elements with positive








traits.
,_!,_ m ,_ -r- . . _ , h ! -I , , ', I ,_ - - , I , ,_r . i t,, ,








SIs a way finder t- o the direction needed for
Reasons the matrix is helpful:
* Quickly visually identifies overlapping





positive final conceptual master plan
* Identifies the plan that most closely
achieves the program elements with positive
traits.

* Is a way finder to the direction needed for
the final conceptual master plan

Which program elements received the
most positive recognition from the three
proposed concepts?
1. Green ways and Open Space (top)
2. Preserving Town Character
3. HWY 441 Improvements/ Orange
Lake Redevelopment/Residential
Growth Plan (tied)

.r"l-


Conceptual Master Plan # 1
accomplished the most of our original
program elements in a positive manner.

This information is better evaluated
when combined along with the data in the
Developable Land Map on the following
page.


All of the information will be used to
design a Conceptual Master Plan that fits
within the parameters of the developable
lands to ensure that the process of
development will not displace current
residents within the town of McIntosh.


Iclntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci


MASTER PLAN/ ORIGINAL CONGEPTUAL MASTER CONCEPTUAL MASTER GONGEPTUAL MASTER
PROGRAM LAN 1 PLAN 2 PLAN 3

N kLer Plan Element Thai
C= 1. _ _






( C r1' n R e kI~anO a H


Conceprual P I
Greenad & Open Space
dS __ ___ Conceprual PLat
i New Sclhootil Educanonsai
2 _ Facilitie_
Orange Lake Redevelopment &
Restoration Conceptual Plan
US Hwy 441 Corrido |
mn Improvement
Preserve the Character
of the Tow|
CiElc Reloc amm
coaceptrai Pla
Reqjenfi s Z i - I Z o% E



US Hwy 441 Corridorc
linproveme nts. 5f5 u~ u13~I v ~e
Prseve h Caace
ofteo wn



































Developable Lands
The map above illustrates land parcels that
are currently vacant, based upon data from the
Marion County Tax Collectors Office. Also
shown here are the developable vacant lands
defined by current land-uses. These land-uses
are based on the current uses defined by the
St.. Johns Water Management District as
'Open Lands' (land code-all of the 1900s),
'Agricultural Lands' (land code- all of the
2000s), 'Range Lands' (land code- all of the


3000s), 'Tree Plantations' (code- 4400), and
Barren Lands (land code- all of the 7000s).
According to the town residents, many
of these "vacant" land parcels have deceased
owners, with no descendents to inherit their
property. Therefore, making use of these
currently vacant parcels is much preferred to
using new land. Once these areas are gone,
the other undeveloped lands can easily begin
to be targeted for future development.


Chapter 7 Community Master Planning


Opportunities of Vacant

Lands:


* ] t--_',._r -* ,_ in r p it.,.',_ - -* rl 1 -'-1h

1, .,r" rh _ I , i . , ' . - r ,I I' , ,i- ,_ I.. .
t' . _,' t' i _ , ,1 I i * i,_ r - - i_. * -

* V .I,; , Ir i' "; - l..,; i , _r. I I..l . ,- i.._ rh ,_ r I I -- - i




* Vacant home sites present infill
possibilities once restored. If restoration
is impractical, these home sites could be
cleared and rebuilt with a new home.

* Vacant lands outside of the Historic
district represent opportunities for parks,
conservation lands, open space, or, if free
from environmental limitations, some could
serve as infill lots.

* Vacant lots within the Historic district
are small and can avoid conflicting with the
existing architectural patterns by becoming
informal orange orchards, adding charm and
historical flair to the area.




:mil:8







Final laster Plan:


*( 1 illll nt"1. .n111 CCLll .Itl I n ,n i It II..





th.a Inc, ip', 'iatt" "..t\-il nt I\X
1".l.II, dt ll I \\.11 1 1 111 - p\\111111[0. .11 1
pi liICinU nIt\ lI 'I t" 1 \X ithin t t' i\ n
I If M4cl.nt. ."h

*Vacant land parcels located along the
new green way have been converted
into conservation land.

*New street plantings within the
Historic district create a 'Village' feel
to the area.


* 1 . ltI " .1 A 11 \\ t' i\\AX I l I C b 1 .1I ld
CI ntia111I 1' C.attd Cl i\c 11a.1

*1 .IiIV p int" in I t I tI, I ,\\I 1 . t..lll n ICt-d
\\-ithI laiudlcapu plant,,a ,

01 iu ii1., a 1 i '1tuntain b1ik trial i, 'prLi
il .11-ti 1-tr. 111 acti\\ I C ntlt i that linlk
\\-~ lh tltu n \\ \ I atc d ltc. tti 1- \\. 1\

*Creates new commercial lakefront


area and lake side


park facility.


L( II. .UI I I L I-E '\ 11 .1 i t 1. 1 1i. 1 11. I .lllt
"1itt",





1( LiItn.n 1II.I tt 1ii ACti\it1111 lii 1lxtI
/, ,l1t t, ,t Ctirtnt pt, 'pt\tx , ,\\- Intrt



to the town's 'Main Street', US Hwy
441, that serve to visually beautify the


SIclntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci


Master Plan
Legend
1 Conservation Land
3 Riparian Conservation Buffer
SExisting Residence in Buffer
E Street Trees Denote Village Area
U Proposed Rail-Trail Corridor
" Open Land
SI Proposed Residential Lots
l Proposed Residential Lots w/ Conservation Deed
I Existing Residential on Subdivided Lots
Proposed Commercial Redevelopment Zones
I Proposed Civic Elements













D


Proposed
Civic Area /-

_ _-I-./ J K !


(II


L.J
w~


0 305 610


1220


1.830


Feet
2.440


Proposed..
Equestrian
Area


- Proposed


Final Conceptual Master Plan Proposal
Chapter 7 Community Master Planning


I I


-B2


) A|l b6_ A.ZQ.M*-
:Jiza�' .









I C-

r- -- ....""r. E3 ,

-J r 0 . o � \
_- _ _ B-- a _ " o ci _ '
, 6' 7 - --o-o [] --- \
.0 ma
n o i .........o b 'E,.
- o -I I o5t o - - , _ - - n '- ...
10 0 o1 0,o , - 3 - --'
I ' --" . . . . , 0 , a " I nl- la , A I
-- - I- o - - - U 7 n - , - _ , '. ... . ,�D

oC 0 W, ' - o a
0 1o I |n o �0 I3 no3 o o� E3 J
So 'd z0 ; o 3-300 Ig ' 3\
03 a-- . ..




, 0 13,+, 0 & \3
13 0




13 0 0 O 1





Before Master Plan


The pre-master plan map of McIntosh pictured � Problems exist related to land boundaries.
above serves to visually illustrate the existing street * The streets use private property to navigate the
patterns and parcels located within the town and their town.
subsequent building footprints. � Current black top applications lack unity.


pN IMclnrosh, FI: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci




Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EN6BICEG6_TO51V3 INGEST_TIME 2011-07-19T18:12:57Z PACKAGE UF00103428_00001
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES



PAGE 1

Jack W. Wensell Department of Landscape Architecture

PAGE 3

McIntosh, FL: A Study On the Preservation of Genius Loci Ja ck W. Wensell Senior Capstone Project Spring 2006 Department of Landscape Architecture University of Florida

PAGE 5

Acknowledgements I would like to thank: -Joyce Putnam, for the constant motivation and support along the way, especially the big kick to get started with it all. You have always been there for me, in good times and bad. -David and Cheryl Roach, for the faith that you have carried in me, as well as your major -Wayne Wensell, for turning me on to the great outdoors and nuturing my love of plants. -University of Florida Landscape Architecture Professor Terry Schnadelbach, for the incredible semester in Paris, not to mention all the great memories I will have forever. -University of Florida Landscape Architecture Professor Gary Purdum, for the wealth of computer knowledge and the excellent guidance that you have provided through this massive undertaking of a project. You possess a keen ability to help organize a creative mind. not have done any of this without you by my side. Best wishes to all, Jack Wensell

PAGE 7

McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci Table Of Contents Project Introduction .................................... 9 Abstract: ......................................................................... 1 0 Project Description ......................................................... 1 1 Project Location ............................................................. 1 2 Town Description ........................................................... 1 3 Project Goals ................................................................. 1 4 Town History .............................................. 1 7 History Of McIntosh ...................................................... 1 8 User Analysis .............................................. 2 3 User Analysis ................................................................. 2 4 Natural Syste m Analysis ............................ 2 7 Generalized Soils .......................................................... 2 8 Tree Canopy .................................................................. 2 9 Wildlife Diversity .......................................................... 3 0 Hydrology ...................................................................... 3 1 Natural Systems Composite ........................................... 3 3 Natural Systems Synthesis ............................................. 3 4 Built Form Analysis ................................... 3 7 Built Form Introduction ................................................. 3 8 Regional Roa d Networks & Building Footprints .......... 3 9 Local Building Footprints & Streets .............................. 4 0 Existing Land-Uses ....................................................... 4 1 Surrounding Land-Uses ................................................. 4 1 McIntosh’s Land-Use Plan ............................................. 4 2 Town Gateways/ Entries ................................................ 4 3 Urban Transects ............................................................. 4 7 Housing Density ............................................................. 5 2 Civic Identity Elements .................................................. 5 3 Open Space Inventory .................................................... 5 4 Kevin Lynch Theory on Legibility ................................. 5 5 Built Form Synthesis ...................................................... 7 2 Rails-To-Trail s Case Study ........................ 7 5 Pinellas Trai l , Pinellas County, Florida .......................... 7 7 Steam Boat Trace Trail, Lincoln, Nebraska ................... 7 8 Galloping Goose Trai l Telluride, Colorado .................... 7 9 Conclusions ............................................................................. 8 0 Community Maste r Planning ................... 8 3 Conceptual Master Plan 1 Analysis: .............................. 8 4 Conceptual Master Plan 2 Analysis: .................................. 8 8 Conceptual Master Plan 3 Analysis: .............................. 9 2 Developable Lands ......................................................... 9 7 Final Master Plan: .......................................................... 9 8 Before Master Plan ...................................................... 10 0 After Master Plan ......................................................... 10 1 Design Development ............................... 10 3 US HWY 441 ............................................................... 10 4 ........................................... 10 9 Conservation Subdivision ............................................ 12 0 Rail-to-Trails Proposal ................................................. 12 6 Conclusion ................................................................... 12 7 Bibliography ................................................................ 129

PAGE 9

“Preservation is not to arrest time but to mediate sensitively with the forces of change. It is to understand the present as a product of the past J.W. Lawerence 1 Project Introduction Some residents of the town of McIntosh enjoying the ‘Old Florida’ way of life. *Above photo and all other photos and graphics herein are produced by the author, unless expressly noted otherwise. McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 10

10 Abstract: McIntosh is a small, historic town in North Central Florida with a population of less than 500 residents. The town is currently faced with development pressure from an exploding moratorium in order to review its’ existing comprehensive plan and codes. By doing so, the residents hope to make wise planning decisions that will ensure the current town functions and quality of life are preserved. revenue to facilitate such proper planning procedures for future development. The purpose of this senior project is to assist the town of McIntosh, Fl.... in preserving its’ existing functions attempts to address the need for growth, while preserving the sense of place or ‘Genus Loci’, of the town of McIntosh, Florida. McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 11

Project Description This project is a case study on small town growth. It will highlight the preservation of town character, while planning for future development. The Florida and focuses on understanding the summarized into a set of design guidelines. The existing land-use patterns of the town were researched and diagrammed in order to help illustrate the current land-use patterns. With emphasis on securing the original patterns of land-use and also protecting the natural lands, three conceptual town master plans propose current land-use pattern. of detailed conceptual plans, sections and character sketches were produced. These explore civic relocation, a new Hwy 441/ ‘Main Street’, residential growth, green ways and open space, Orange Lake restoration and redevelopment and a new school/ educational facility. Through this process, a future vision is created for the town of McIntosh and its residents. 11 North entry sign into the town seen from US Hwy 441 Chapter 1 Project Introduction

PAGE 12

Project Location McIntosh is located along US Hwy 441 in the Northern end of Marion County, which is located in North Central Florida. Nearest cities to McIntosh include: •Reddick, FL (5.6 miles ) •Micanopy, FL (5.8 miles ) •Hawthorne, FL (13.5 miles ) •East Williston, FL (14.3 miles ) •Williston, FL (16.1 miles ) •Gainesville, FL (16.9 miles ) •Ocala, FL (19.1 miles ) •Archer, FL (21.3 miles ) Nearest city with pop. 200,000+: •Jacksonville, FL (71.4 miles) 12 McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 13

13 and the population of McIntosh town is eagerly hoping to attract newcomers from outside the community to relocate to the area and help revitalize the aging town. The median income of McIntosh’s residents is $36,000, which is much higher residents at $28,000 annually. The average higher than Gainesville’s at $86,300. The unemployment level in McIntosh is quite Town Description McIntosh, Florida is a small town relatively speaking. The town area is less than one square mile historical district. The town has deep roots in the agrarian culture, as seen in amongst fresh water anglers for years. During the 1990’s the town experienced a 10% growth in its’ population. However, with the median low at 4.7%. Yet, most of the town’s employed residents commute to work in Gainesville, with an average commute time of thirty minutes one-way. This illustrates the recent trend of people moving to smaller, McIntosh’s residents are currently faced with the challenge of redeveloping the town to take advantage of this trend, while also maintaining the town’s character and charm. Chapter 1 Project Introduction

PAGE 14

Project Goals •Provide a vision and framework for future growth within the town of McIntosh, Florida. •Preserve and enhance the existing elements that provide McIntosh with its ‘Genus Loci’. •Protect the natural resources of McIntosh and the surrounding lands. •Capture the uniqueness of McIntosh in a conceptual Master Plan that enhances its’ historical sense of place. •Propose changes to US Hwy 441 that improve the safety of the town’s pedestrians, while calming •Put lands that are environmentally sensitive into conservation to protect for future generations. •Provide new recreational opportunities for the residents of the town that will also attract users •Understand the existing town functions and land-use patterns that aid in the design development process. community of McIntosh desire for their town’s future. 14 McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 17

McIntosh’s Victorian Era residences and environment remain intact. They epitomize the ambiance of ‘Old Florida’. The town has truly been blessed through the years, with residents who have treasured and protected its wonderful heritage. -Excerpt from the McIntosh Seedling Garden Club brochure 2 Town History The ‘Old Swimming Hole’ of McIntosh (1897) Photo property of the McIntosh Seedling Garden Club McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 18

18 History Of McIntosh The town of McIntosh has deep roots in the agrarian culture settlements and carried through the 1980’s. The town got its start when Colonel John H. McIntosh, the town’s namesake, secured a large plot of land on Orange Lake in the early 1800s. The area was said with a majority of the trees having production. During the Second Seminole War that took place from 1835-1840, the original town was destroyed. Then in 1849, the land McIntosh had acquired ended up on the auction vegetation and most of the land already cleared, the area was prime for development. Nehmiah Brush purchased the lots and 10-acre parcels for citrus farming. The original plat map, dated April 20, 1885 and shown at right, denotes the lot layout with the citrus parcels to the west. This map also illustrates the fact that the town was originally a planned community, that as of Brushes’ Planned Community McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 19

19 today, has never developed past its original platting. With high hopes of the railroad soon coming through Brushes Planned were they could easily link up with a rail line. After many disputes over cost and made its way through town, much to the delight of the land owners and residents. transportation interests, a local land rich family named Van Ness struck a deal with the railroad company to have a depot followed through with their promise of a rail depot, which was completed in 1883. with the Spaniards giving orange seeds to the Natives upon their arrival in the 1600s. The wild orange trees in the area were so thick and numerous that in the process of trees were removed to set up large groves within McIntosh, Micanopy and many other towns in the surrounding region. The citrus farming went strong for a This map was published in 1882 by G.W. & C.B. Colton Company. The solid red line denotes the completed rail line at the time. McIntosh is not yet on the map, but the area that would later become the town is noted with the red arrow. Map Credit: The Library of Congress, Geography and Map division. In 1888 the Florida Southern Railway Co. published this map. The railroad depot was built by the company in 1883, while the town plat was completed in 1885. McIn by the red arrow. Map Credit: The Special Collections Department, University of South Florida. Digitization provided by the USF Libraries Center. Chapter 2 Town History

PAGE 20

20 far away as Kentucky. “Picking oranges is like picking gold nuggets,” reads a quote out of a historical McIntosh The town was now rich with a successful citrus industry and a railroad that facilitated exporting the local goods with ease. Also with the advent of rail travel to the area, people started vacationing within the region for the hunting opportunities surroundings. the town was very prosperous, having of the community met. McIntosh had residents alike including a doctor, Western Union, school, drugstore, ice house, hotel, grocery store, hardware store and numerous recreational opportunities. Unfortunately, all of this prosperity was stopped dead in its tracks with the great freeze of 1895. Many families lost everything, as mature citrus trees froze and died in the cold. Some residents stayed and replanted, while with limited success. A majority of the residents simply packed up and left town, leaving McIntosh struggling for years to regaining its once successful stature. As of 1913, the town of McIntosh was incorporated with only 300 residents, a mere disasterous freeze in 1990, almost 100 years later, completely ended what was left of the citrus industry, with the remaining citrus farmers left to switch to livestock farming. Another major change in the town’s dynamic occured in 1925, when the historical ‘Old Wire Road’ was paved and Us Hwy 441 was created. As this happened, many Above: A group of folks recreating on Orange Lake in 1907. Left: Historical ‘Old Wire Road’ (US Hwy 441). Photos property of the McIntosh Seedling Garden Club McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 21

21 relocate along the newly paved highway in hopes of attracting the attention of its travelers. Much to their dismay, the advent of the paved highway allowed travelers to whizz right through the small contain over 60 residential, civic and commercial sites. This area, illustrated in the map to the left, is known for its varying and interesting architecture, most of which was constructed early pioneers of Florida. The structures within the Historic District were generally engineered and constructed relative to the show off the local materials of the area Several different types of ornamentation and architectural styles are seen in the including the Bungalow style, Queen Ann, Gothic, Spanish Mission and Victorian all of which help lend to the “charm” that many people have associated with the town. Today, McIntosh as a community faces a new set of challenges which are related to the town’s pending growth and development issues. The population of the town has remained relatively unchanged over the past hundred years, seeing only a 10% increase throughout the 1990s. The residents of McIntosh have yet to extend development to revive the town through reand new development. that will accommodate the recent trend of rural relocation. The current residents of McIntosh desire a plan for smart future growth of the town that will protect and enhance their living conditions for future generations to enjoy Chapter 2 Town History

PAGE 23

Welcome to McIntosh...you will probably want to linger awhile so you don’t miss the graciousness of the of ‘Old Florida’ folks and their easy way of life.... -Excerpt from the McIntosh Seedling Garden Club brochure. 3 User Analysis The local grocery store and deli one of the few social and commercial hubs for McIntosh residents. McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 24

24 User Analysis information relevant to the wants of the residents of the town of McIntosh regarding future growth and development, 2006. These meetings were open to the of the month at the Town Hall within Van Ness Park.. During the time period these following ideas were expressed as desires of the residents of the town regarding any proposed future growth and development of McIntosh and its’ main thoroughfare, US Highway 441: ridor, antique look to street lighting and ramps, signs along Main Street to denote distinguish the town. • Residential DevelopmentWantsKeep all old growth trees and existing tree canopy, town approval process for all new retain original character and keep housing density in an environmentally sensitive manner. • Commercial/Civic DevelopmentWantsA new elementary/middle school that encourages younger families with small recreational park located within walking distance to the new school, a new central area that utilizes existing historical and within new commercial areas. • Orange Lake/ Town RecreationWantsA parking to encourage outside day recreation passive recreation such as walking and A current hot stop for anglers, a place for locals to socialize. McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 25

25 town’s roads that effect proposed and existing development. While the wants the residents of the town expressed were all valid in terms of their scope, the town of McIntosh as a whole does not always share a common vision for their future and heated disputes were common among the residents attending the residents to have a “hidden agenda” regarding future plans for development in the town and in light of this, the community tends to fall strongly to one side or the another regarding development issues. Some scenes from McIntosh on a Saturday: event-the 1890’s Festival, shown in the bottom photo. Chapter 3 User Analysis

PAGE 27

“The beauty of lakes, blue and green, free or encumbered, shining, sparkling, calm as stars... Nowhere will you see the majestic operations of Nature more clearly revealed in these most gentle -John Muir 4 Natural System Analysis View from the vista overlooking the infamous Orange Lake. McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 28

sandy surface layers more than 30 inches surface, with sandy surface layers less than 40 inches thick. Placid soil areas, which comprise much of land within McIntosh is a major limitation, due to the inherent nature of these areas to These soils are mainly located to the east of the old rail line and extend to the lake. 28 Generalized Soils The town of McIntosh and the surrounding area is mainly composed of the following three generalized soil types, denoted visually in the map at right. Broad low hills of low to medium acidity, interspersed with small areas of similar soils, 30 inches deep. These areas are dominated sandy surface layers more than 40 inches deep. Brighton-PlacidMarshlands with deep organic soils interspersed with areas of very poorly normally located within 15 inches of the and assists in the creation of its thick, organic surface layers. Blichton-KendrickBroad low ridges of gray sandy soils strongly acidic, phosphate rich, loamy small pockets of similar soils containing McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 29

29 Tree Canopy When considering future development within the town of McIntosh, the preservation of tree cover is a must in the eyes of the residents. The dense tree canopy of the town, highlighted with green in the the general consensus of the residents of McIntosh is that trees are one of the intregal elements to the preservation of their town and its character. Historically, in early Florida settlements such as McIntosh, trees were a major resource for construction. Early settlers materials using the natural resources of the land. Although many native trees were cut still seen today in the town, most of the old stumps were hardy enough to have a second growth. Amazingly, most are full grown again, with only their twisted and misshapen trunks to suggest their age. The predominant trees of McIntosh, commonly referred to as ‘shade trees’, are huge live oaks ( Quercus virginana ), some having trunks as wide as a full size truck.. Some other common tree species native to McIntosh are: • Cypress Tree, Taxodium distichum • Long leaf Pine, Pinus palustris • Laurel Oak, Quercus hemisphaerica • Magnolia, • Persimmon, Diospyros virginana • Dogwood, • Hickory, Carya glabra • Sweet Gum, A full size truck in front of a massive live oak tree trunk. Chapter 4 Natural Systems Analysis

PAGE 30

30 The Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission closely tracked these numerous key species to help quantify the average amount of wildlife within given areas, mainly to what areas needed special attention when considering any type of development or redevelopment. Commission’s analysis into two categories. The orange areas contain seven or more Commission as “Special Occurrence Zones”. protection to preserve the unique ecosystem of the area. By changing these areas to zones around the areas of the highest diversity, development can safely occur. The trees of McIntosh also play a major role in controlling the climate of the area. They provide cooling shade in the summers and an added layer of frost protection through the winter months. This tree canopy, has helped to maintain the remaining historical citrus trees of the town, and in a sense, the town’s heritage as well. With this said, it is clear that the sentimental value that the residents of practical and intregal in helping to preserve the town’s Genus Loci. Maintaining the large tree canopy and the individual historical trees within the town is a major for any future development. Wildlife Diversity McIntosh is an area rich with wildlife, as illustrated in the graphic to the right, which denotes wildlife “hot spots” as analyzed Wildlife Conservation Commission to aid in the protection of Florida’s Ecosystems. diversity within the town of McIntosh and its surrounding areas and was created animal species. McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 31

throughout the area to ensure proper lake levels. To make things worse for the lake, McIntosh has a major highway, US Hwy 441 that cuts right across the existing hydrology. This causes a myriad of the lake, a lot of which are related to stormwater runoff coming from US Hwy 441. The surface water and wetlands of McIntosh, which comprise much of the main visual water element of the town, the reasons of town preservation. Strict only remove the existing contaminants to the left . Damaging these resources could lead to the deterioration of the 31 Hydrology A thorough analysis of hydrology patterns is another important aspect in planning the development and redevelopment of any land located in such close proximity to a lake as McIntosh is to Orange Lake. Historically, Orange Lake has played a major role in McIntosh, serving as a port for shipping goods up through the St. John’s River to Jacksonville in the years in the later years. Views to the lake used to today with the maturing oak trees, glimpses of the lake are very limited. Now, there are hill or ‘vista’ to the south of town and to the is connected into the ground water system. Therefore, smart water management needs Chapter 4 Natural Systems Analysis

PAGE 32

32 town’s current assets and recreational opportunities. The current hydrology patterns of the town, shown in the graphic on the preceding page, illustrate how most of Orange Lake. In terms of town preservation and its’ sense of place, the major amenity of McIntosh. Without a camps would lose their main function, with On the other hand, when runoff does free of contaminants like motor oils and fertilizers that can harm the lake’s fragile ecosystem. The riparian corridors of McIntosh will need mitigation to ensure that only clean and safe water is coming into the lake. These corridors also offer opportunities for safe passage and protection of wildlife to and from the lake. If properly planned and managed, they can offer opportunities to enhance adding open green spaces to the town for linear recreation such as walking paths with chances for wildlife viewing. of McIntosh are also illustrated within the hydrology patterns graphic located on the preceding page. They are helpful to consider when analyzing the preexisting patterns of development, as most of the areas left previously undeveloped contain conditions, some directly linked to their To prevent excess sediment from employed when planning for development developed within the town. Access should these high points, as they offer unique views slated for development, consideration should A view of Orange Lake and one of its several both residents and vacationing anglers alike. McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 33

33 Natural Systems Composite • The area contains an extensive tree canopy. It is especially dense along perennial water courses, with ridge lines containing much less tree cover. • Perennial water courses lead directly to Orange Lake. • Areas around the lake are rich with wildlife “hotspot” containing 7 or more species. wildlife patches with high diversity. • Perennial water corridors, along with the tree canopy, provide opportunities to link fragmented wildlife patches. remove contaminants potentially harmful to the ecosystem. • There is a need for areas adjacent to the them from future development. • Protecting Orange Lake and its’ water quality are crucial elements to preserving McIntosh’s character and genus loci. Chapter 4 Natural Systems Analysis

PAGE 34

34 Natural Systems Synthesis The graphic to the right was created using an overlay method. It serves to visually illustrate the environmental limitations of certain areas of potential development. By simply overlaying the these areas with limitations appear and are denoting the areas with the highest amount of limitations. limitations could have a potentially negative impact on the overall health of the ecosystems of the area if developed. These ares mainly need protection and they conservation land. With the areas of high limitation slated for conservation land, the areas of low places or act as vital links in others. these systems work together and therefore development scale these elements would individual functions. The town of McIntosh has some very good opportunities at this point in their current development to really capture and preserve their environment as a whole f • The town of McIntosh and its residents are currently presented with a great challenge to environment and its numerous natural resources. • Land-uses and planned future environmental limitations when attempting to maintain McIntosh’s sense of place and inherent quality of life. McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 37

“Like a piece of architecture, the city is a construction in space, but one of vast scale... City design is therefore a temporal art. Nothing is experienced by itself, but always in -Kevin Lynch 5 Built Form Analysis coding applied: YellowResidential, RedCommercial, LavenderInstitutional McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 38

38 Built Form Introduction The goal of this chapter is to environment within the town of Some of the analysis will discover what patterns of development have previously taken place, how the town parcels are laid out and how is This chapter will also analyze the town of McIntosh through the Image of the City”. This analysis in which the residents of McIntosh understand their town. Lastly, this chapter will contain an architectural inventory of the districts that process, in efforts to retain and enhance the look of the current surrounding structures. context of McIntosh in relation to other Summations on major roadways as they relate to McIntosh: •McIntosh is directly connected to US Highway 441, which serves as the town’s ‘Main Street’. •I-75 is just a few miles to the west of the town, although there is no direct access to McIntosh. •US Highway 301 is located a few miles to the east of town. •McIntosh has excellent overall connections to the highway system and inherent potential for ease of travel within and to and from the town. McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 39

39 Regional Road Networks & Building Footprints At this scale, the graphic at left puts a visual perspective to the location of the smaller communities of Orange Lake and Boardman. It also shows the current development patterns of the immediate regions surrounding McIntosh. •All of these communities wish to retain •Boardman, the community to the north of the town, poses more of a threat of Orange Lake these communities to prevent sprawl. and non-imposingly connected through a rail-trail. Chapter 5 Built Form Analysis

PAGE 40

40 Building Footprints & Streets •In this graphic, what is left of the historical Brushes’ grid design within •There are large gaps in the road networks. •Organized core development currently exists in the town •Most streets dead-end into Orange Lake. •Structure sizes near the lake generally make up a smaller footprint. •Historic homes generally have smaller current commercial areas. •There is a trend of undeveloped street McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 41

41 Landuses Existing Land-Uses St.. John’s River Water Management District It shows the current land uses within the into 5 areas. •Residential areas make up the main land use within the town. •Four commercial zones currently exist, with one in close proximity to Orange Lake. •Most of the historic district is located within the medium density residential area, yet most homes are currently single family with the exception of a few. •White areas illustrate the large undeveloped regions of the town. Surrounding Land-Uses •Some residential areas extend out of town edge of town need to remain intact to communities and to preserve the rural feel McIntosh to protect these outlying areas rights to the land and therefore, have total control over its future use. Chapter 5 Built Form Analysis

PAGE 42

42 McIntosh’s Land-Use Plan This is the current land-use map created lakefront commercial; currently mostly •A small agricultural plot is currently located to the lake from fertilizer runoff. without a fee. •All residential housing to the east of the park. open land use designations. •The town is lacking in outdoor amenities other then agriculture. •The commercial district starts at CR. 320 and extends northwards to the edge of town. McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 43

43 Town Gateways/ Entries First impressions are clearly very important in forming our view of a place. The point at which you physically enter Negative features can often go overlooked the community. •McIntosh currently has three points of entry into town seen in the graphic at left. Two of these occur along US Hwy 441. CR. 320 makes the third entry into town •These three entry points will all need to cultural features of the town and to improve negative aspects of the entries. to act as an inviting greeting into town from the community of McIntosh. Chapter 5 Built Form Analysis

PAGE 44

44 North Highway 441 Entry the northern town limits along US Hwy 441. This entry has some remnants of the town of Boardman on the east side of 441, the west of 441 lies a wooded lot of land and a positive visual aspect at entry. South of this wooded lot is a trailer park that has council. Just up the hill is the truck topper store, with a display that currently hinders the view of the Ice House Gallery, a historic structure. To the east is a vacant lot with tique store that is also an historic structure. Features and Issues: •Trailer park is an eyesore. •Boardman remnants need clean up. •Two historic structures on opposite enhanced. •Wooded lot is a positive visual aspect. McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 45

45 South Highway 441 Entry The southern entry along US Hwy 441 is in great condition overall. A high point of the region takes place here and gives it a strong feel of a rural agrarian com ment to the south. There are a few scat entry that add character with their unique ness, although there are also many vacant Features and Issues: a rural community. to the south. •Sign designating the Historic District is in disrepair. town’s character. less of an eyesore. Chapter 5 Built Form Analysis

PAGE 46

46 County Road 320 Entry The entry along CR. 320 is quite This road, unlike US Highway 441, is a slow, two lane county road that creeps into the town. On it, the entry into McIntosh maintains a characteristically agrarian appearance with views of livestock farms. Once across 65th street, the traveler has entered the town of to what town this is or where you are. Features and Issues: •Beautiful views of pastures and peaceful green spaces. •Views of wetlands characteristic of the town and surrounding areas. •No major indicator that the traveler has entered the town of McIntosh. •Residential street that lacks an entry sign. McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 47

47 Urban Transects made up of a three-way rating system that the street as a whole. Seeing the street as a whole is a good way to understand the area through which the street passes. In the road rates the visual quality of the parcel as seen from the road. Some visual characteristics of the parcels •Architectural style •Cleanliness of appearance •How much parcel visually adds to the quality of the area. •How the landscape appears of the parcels land-use code. of the parcel. For example, an empty therefore, receives a low rating. While a functioning, currently used parcel is rated higher. Chapter 5 Built Form Analysis

PAGE 48

48 from South to North. Key Features of US Hwy 441: •Commercial areas centrally located. the sidewalk •Currently a huge path of continuous paving from one end of town to the other. McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 49

49 • This is a typical section along US Hwy 441 ‘Main Street’. It illustrates the 60’ ROW (right-of-way). This is a smaller ROW than along Avenue G (CR. 320). All the current features along the road are contained within the right-of-way. •In order to add anything to the current composition, private land use and US Hwy 441 Roadway Section Chapter 5 Built Form Analysis

PAGE 50

50 Avenue G (CR. 320) from US Hwy 441 to transect. Key Features of Avenue G: •Mostly residential. •Visual quality is high. •Commercial area is mostly vacant. •Two parks are found along this road. •Over sized right-of-way. •Only a 20’ wide road way. •Huge live oak canopy provides shade. McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 51

51 •This section shows a typical roadway along Avenue G. There is a wider ROW (right-ofway) here than along US Hwy 441. •Avenue G’s larger ROW stems from its history as the town’s ‘main street’, which con tained McIntosh’s original commercial area, near the railroad depot, pre-Hwy 441. • After the completion of US Hwy 441 and the relocation of many commercial maintain ever since. . Avenue G / CR. 320 Section Chapter 5 Built Form Analysis

PAGE 52

52 Housing Density The graphic at right and the map it contains, serves to illustrate the existing residential uses and housing John’s River Water Management District. Low density residential, which is less than 2 dwelling units per acre and Medium Density Residential, which is 2-5 dwelling housing currently seen in the town of Mc Intosh. Most of the historical district within McIntosh is located within medium density housing areas. Historically, orange pickers used the homes located within the heavy freezing moved the citrus industry south. The areas of low-density housing are mostly newer homes. Most of these houses are single-family, and are situated on much smaller lots than the medium density home areas. The graphic showcases some photos of typical residences within McIntosh’s low and medium density housing areas. McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 53

53 Civic Identity Elements • The graphic to the left highlights some of the Civic Identity Elements of McIntosh and their location within the town. • These Civic Identity Elements include places such as: Orange Lake, churches, the cemetery and the McIntosh town • While many of these sites are located along Avenue G (CR. 320), they are also widely scattered throughout the town. • Most of McIntosh’s Civic Identity Elements well kept up, as seen in these photos Chapter 5 Built Form Analysis

PAGE 54

54 Open Space Inventory The inventory of open space within McIntosh is illustrated in the graphic on the right. It highlights the land that is open to It also contains a look at the undeveloped lands that occur within the Johns Water Management District as: •Open Lands (land code -all of the 1900s) •Agricultural Lands (land codeall of the 2000s) •Range Lands (land codeall of the 3000s) •Tree Plantations (code4400) • Barren Lands (land codeall of the 7000s) Also shown on this map are the shaded open streets of the historic district. These streets provide comfort and a sense of place Open Space Features: •Large tracts of uninterrupted land near the edges of town. •Many scattered vacant parcels throughout town. District. McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 55

55 Kevin Lynch Theory on Legibility such as social and historical meaning, which reinforce meaning, not negate it. Contents •Paths •Edges •Districts •Nodes •Landmarks planning for development and future growth, while also striving to maintain its these oftentimes overlapping elements. Chapter 5 Built Form Analysis

PAGE 56

56 Paths This diagram shows the existing “paths” of McIntosh. These paths transit lines, canals or railroads” (Lynch 47). McIntosh has a US highway that splits the town. US highway 441 is a great alternative route to I-75 for those who wish to slow down their ‘main street’ within the town of McIntosh makes pedestrian foot To further compound the crossing crosswalks. main route of travel out of McIntosh to the north and south due to the coming of US Hwy 441. Now, there is only a small piece of the train track leftover near the depot as a memory. Today, this corridor is used as an informal driveway in parts. The major roads shown on this diagram link them directly to US Hwy 441. Collec tor roads, most of which are east of US commuting residents to US Hwy 441. The residential streets within the town oak trees and the amount of ‘eyes on the safe. These streets are very informal in many town. Access to Orange Lake is currently with most of the shoreline of the lake, so access at these points is limited and comes with a small fee. McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 57

57 Edges edges as “shores, railroad cuts, edges of developments or walls”. McIntosh’s edges are clearly residents of McIntosh knew, understood and agreed upon. There are natural edges within the town of dense vegetation that are also natural drainage courses. These edges move through town towards the lake in a west to east fashion. Again, McIntosh had US Hwy 441 show up and create an unplanned edge that divided the town. The old rail line also forms an edge, used as a housing type demarcation line. To the east of streets forming a wall, forcing to decide as the lake is directly linked to the ground social context to produce excessive amounts times quite plentiful. Chapter 5 Built Form Analysis

PAGE 58

58 Nodes areas of concentrations, “which the condensation of some use or physical character, a street corner hangout or an enclosed square”. Most of the nodes of the town of McIntosh as shown on the map at right, occur within the historical district. These nodes are places that people tend to gather, such as the park and the several historic churches. The historic district in itself is a node, with frequent visitors coming There are several commercial nodes along US Hwy 441, these include the grocery store and deli. The along the lake serve as nodes for resident and vacationing anglers alike. Landmarks Most people have an idea of what is Landmarks are another way to help people understand where they are and give them a sense of perspective within the town. Again, as seen in the pattern of the nodes within the town, the majority of McIntosh’s landmarks are located within the historical district. Important civic landmarks within landmarks denoted are mainly made up of Hall and the railroad depot. McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 59

59 Districts enters inside of”. In the town of McIntosh they are the areas having a distinct character and architectural style. The description of these districts and their architectural style will follow in greater detail It is very important to the people of McIntosh that any new houses or change in general to these districts go unnoticed. Using the existing architecture as a housing will ensure a maintained similarity within the districts. Chapter 5 Built Form Analysis

PAGE 60

T in this district are single-family homes that previous page’s graphic as a fragmented piece of the historical district (district 2). There is a wide array of architectural styles in this homes. The materials used on the outside of the homes vary almost as much as the architectural styles. 60 Architectural Style: District 1 1 Greek RevivalSingle story, Low pitched shingled roof, Front porch overhang, Red windows w/ shutters BungalowSingle story, street, Screened covered front porch, Two toned wood siding BungalowSingle story, street, Small add-on tin front porch overhang, Painted Symmetrical windows w/ highlighted molding Mission StyleSingle story, Flat tiled roof with extending columns on main area and low pitched red tile on entry, spaced Architectural Style: District 1 1 McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 61

61 Architectural Style: District 2 2 Architectural Style: District 2 2 Rent the Four wheeled, Flat aluminum roof, Two toned aluminum siding Low pitched shingled roof, Aluminum siding, Screened porch entry, Shutters on the windows, Newer model Single wide, street, Shutters on widows, Tridoes not face the road Single wide, Low pitched roof, Screen room add-on w/corrugated plastic siding T he Lakefront district implies something more than the reality of this district. The to the east of the old rail line. This is set up Lake. Although there is good explanation, leaves the area looking like a trailer park. The downfall to structures in this area is the fact that they are using septic systems, which are harmful to the lake due to the proximity. Prior to further development in this zone, pipe out the increase of sewage. Chapter 5 Built Form Analysis

PAGE 62

H istory takes place in this district. Thir wonderful historic district that is McIntosh’s most cherished element. A great collection of architectural styles adds to the charm of the district. Walking the streets of this dis trict, one will marvel at the size of some of these homes. Many of the homes in this dis trict are either restored or in the process of restoration. A large oak tree canopy helps to frame the large multi-story homes while This district is just a showcase of the histori cal splendor of Old Florida. 62 Architectural Style: District 3 3 VictorianTwo story w/ full attic, High pitched wooden shingled roof, Asymmetrical appearance, Painted wood siding, Encircling porch, Shutters on windows, Decorated pendant, Ornate eve on porch Greek RevivalTwo story, Low pitched shingled roof, Painted wood siding, Symmetrical appearance, Shutters on the windows, Columns on the front porch Gothic Revival/ Cracker ShackSingle story, High pitched aluminum roof, Smaller home, Shutters on windows, Single colored wood siding and trim, Filled-in screen porch faces the road BungalowSingle story, Low road, Covered screen porch, posts on porch, Solid colored wood siding w/ white trim, Symmetrical windows w/ shutters McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 63

O pen space is the main theme of this district. Currently homes in this district are clustered along Avenue H, leaving the majority of land to the south of these homes as open space. This open space is a views of the natural environment and the paths. There are many potential home sites guidelines for any new homes in this area introducing a green way. 63 Architectural Style: District 4 4 Spanish Colonial RevivalTwo stories, High pitched Barrel tile roof, Asymmetrical the exterior, Screened covered arcade front porch, Second Classic RevivalTwo story, High pitched shingled roof, Painted wood siding, Asymmetrical appearance, Decorated shutters on the faces road, Arch with columns on the front porch VictorianThree Story, High pitched aluminum roof, Asymmetrical with odd pieces, Single colored wood siding and trim, Filled in screen porch top Ranch StyleSingle story, porch, Garage does not face the road, Multi-colored red on windows Chapter 5 Built Form Analysis

PAGE 64

64 Architectural Style: District 5 5 Single wide, Low pitched aluminum roof, Carport overhang, Vinyl siding Quad wide, High pitched shingled roof, Painted vinyl siding, Wrap around porch, Vinyl skirting, Larger Lot near lake High pitched shingled roof, Asymmetrical with odd pieces, Single colored vinyl siding and trim, Accent window under roof detail, Shutters on windows w/ extensions, Bay window to the road, Low pitched roof w/ Wood siding and trim, Shutters on windows L ike the Lakefront district, this district also lies to the east of the old rail line and has land the lots take up. In the lake front district, this district have their own .25-acre lots on average. An exception to this is seen in the also feature septic systems. Prior to further development in this zone, the town’s sewer crease of sewage. McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 65

65 Architectural Style: District 6 6 Greek RevivalSingle story, Low pitched shingled stucco, Columns on porch, Symmetrical appearance Dutch ColonialTwo story, High pitched shingled roof, Painted vinyl siding, Windows roof line, Newest home on the road BungalowLow pitched shingle roof, Symmetrical appearance, Wood siding and trim, Screened front porch VernacularLow pitched shingle roof, Wood siding and trim, Low pitched roof w/ T his district is a fragmented, yet charming area located near the school with several newer homes. Most of the home sites of district has one street that links the area to US Hwy 441. Even though it is within walking distance to the school, the area within this of McIntosh in a way to make it feel less fragmented. Chapter 5 Built Form Analysis

PAGE 66

66 Architectural Style: District 7 7 Vernacular w/ Gothic Flarepitched shingled roof, Wood siding, Columns on Ornamentation in the eve of Ranch StyleSingle story, Low pitched shingled roof w/side Screened-in porch, Shutters on the windows. GeorgianHigh pitched shingle roof, Symmetrical appearance, Red Brick w/ white wood trim, Columns on porch, Pediment dormers on roof VernacularTwo story, Recessed front porch, High Painted wood shingle siding, Shutters on windows C holding up a crisp edge to the town. The four homes shown in the photographs are the only homes within the district. There is a huge plot of land, currently used as pine plantation, that makes up most of the area. All of the homes in this area are newer homes. With real estate values that are through the roof, this district currently offers only large is one area of town that can readily accept topography of the area. It is situated on a plateau which is mainly under-utilized land. McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 67

67 Architectural Style: District 8 8 VernacularSingle story, Steep pitched shingled roof, Cedar siding, Screened porch, sides, Shutters on windows Ranch StyleTwo story, High pitched metal roof w/shed roof over front porch, Vinyl siding, Columns on porch, Pediment dormer on roof, New home construction Ranch StyleSingle story, High pitched shingle roof, Symmetrical appearance, Pediment windows, Paladin Windows, Vinyl siding, Lacking association with the road Ranch StyleSingle story, Recessed front porch, Low wood, Shutters on windows, Lacking association with the road D istrict 8 is an area to the west of the historical district and is mainly The area has lot sizes ranging from .25-arces, to larger 5-arce lots. Most homes in this district have garage doors facing the street. dead-ends. The home materials seen vary greatly from house to house. There are many empty parcels in this district that can serve as ranch style home seems to dominate the new Chapter 5 Built Form Analysis

PAGE 68

68 Architectural Style: District 9 9 L acking housing, this district offers other important uses. The town’s cemetery located in this district. Most of the land is does not imply the area has a lack of char acter. Improvement within this district will made will need guidelines in order to uphold the character of the district with its special uses. Equestrian Show RinkEquestrian JumpingThree Multi-colored jumping hurdles Town CemeterySingular oak trees VistaView from the cemetery to the equestrian arena McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 69

69 Architectural Style: District 10 10 Trailers are old. There is not any . Landscape is unmaintained. Many trailers are vacant. T his district is very important to the town seen when traveling south and the last when headed north on US Hwy 441. Serving as A land-use change is necessary for this district in the near future. The town should look to use this land as a future welcoming point into town. Chapter 5 Built Form Analysis

PAGE 70

70 Architectural Style: Commercial Zone 1 Zone 1 MissionSingle story, Flat tiled roof, Front porch overhang w/ wrought iron handrail, Two tone stucco exterior, Covered porch facing the road MissionSingle story, Flat tiled roof, Sun shades over doors and windows, Natural stucco exterior VernacularTwo story, Metal front porch overhang, Wood frame construction, Horizontal wood siding, Single color VernacularTwo Story, Low road, Horizontal wood siding, Windows evenly spaced giving symmetrical appearance, Multilevel T Hwy 441. Most of this architecture is lo cated within the historic district, as the age shows on some of the facades. Some of the structures were moved from the old rail de pot area when US Hwy 441 came through, while others took on a strip mall look. (Not shown). The main issues within this district excess speeding, lack of parking, sidewalks too close to the highway and just a general lack of maintenance. McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 71

71 Architectural Style: Commercial Zone 2 Zone 2 French ColonialTwo story, Low pitch wooden shingled wall producing an encircling Wood siding, Shutters on windows VictorianTwo story, High railing, Wood siding and trim VernacularTwo Story, Very steep shingled roof w/ false height, Large front porch overhang, Wood frame construction, Wood siding and trim, Designated parking Prairie StyleSingle Story, Shallow aluminum overhang, Solid glass windows T his zone is unique to the historic district came into use when the railroad came through and set up the depot. Although currently vacant, this area has great potential to develop into a thriving community commercial center once again. warehouses are located in this zone that Chapter 5 Built Form Analysis

PAGE 72

72 Built Form Synthesis The diagram shown on the following page serves to visually conclude the previous evaluation of the elements currently in existence within the town of McIntosh. Main Conclusions: of the Historic District are already in existence. 441 would afford the traveler greater views of the town and its existing elements. •Preserving views of Orange Lake is important to preserving the town’s sense of place or ‘genus loci’. •The old railway through town could easily opportunity. • Creating a rail-to-trail would serve as a linking element to currently fragmented •There is an excess of open land, with a high potential for development. •US Hwy 441 currently divides the town, and is in need of more pedestrian friendly elements. •The original town grid within the Historic pedestrian friendly streets. McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 73

73 Chapter 5 Built Form Analysis

PAGE 75

“The simple paths, the networks of habitual or potential lines of movement through the urban complex, are the most potent means by which the Kevin Lynch 6 Rails-To-Trails Case Study McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 76

76 Rails-to-Trails Case Study In the United States the use of the train and the interstate system have proven much some current trains in use today, smarter paths have left many miles of tracks without a purpose or use. In the late 1980’s and early 1990’s new pop-up around the country. Residents and conservation groups, especially the Rails-toquality and value these one time eye sores could add to their communities at a national level. Once the old train tracks were removed, the qualities of these spaces as recreational Most railways had a seemingly endless connection of trees and other vegetation These long passages through often extremely rural areas also offered chances to view wildlife at a speed much slower than converted to trails also offer other recreational activities. For those people with and runner alike, they provide long, uninterrupted scenic corridors to socialize, Bicyclers simply love the rail-trails; this is across the United States (www.railtrails.org). destinations. Overall, people utilize rail-trails in a myriad of ways to promote healthy, To further understand the different types and uses of rail-trails this case study compares three different rail-trails including: Pinellas TrailPinellas County, FL, Steam Boat Trace Trail, Lincoln, NE and January 2006’s rail-trail of the month, Galloping Goose Trail-Telluride, CO. McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 77

77 Pinellas Trail Pinellas County, Florida The Pinellas Trail, considered the third most popular rail-trail in the United States, containing many different trail elements. This rail-trail passes through parks, coastal A great example of this was seen when the rail-trail made its way through the town of Dunedin. It served as a catalyst that inspired Dunedin’s community redevelopment agency to revitalize the downtown area. They came through with $1.2 million in improvements to their main streets, with many other improvements dollars from the Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement program. made included the 4 million dollar, pedestrian friendly, Cross Bayou Bridge, which allows the trail to pass safely over waterfowl. Above: Beautiful foliage seen growing along a rail-trail. Right: A mother teaches her child how to ride a bike while on a rail-trail. Photo credits: Chapter 6 Rails to Trails Case Study

PAGE 78

78 Steam Boat Trace Trail, Lincoln, Nebraska The Steam Boat Trace Trail is a 21 mile rail-trail that runs along the Missouri River amenities along this rail-trail can entertain the cross country skier, with and Brownville. ed on the local power company’s land and is nothing more than a large parking area. Yet, Spanish Explorers. The trail head show cases a progression through the history of coal power plant and ending in Brownsville at a nuclear power plant. At the Peru trail head, there is the option for the user to exit the rail-trail and or visit the historical Peru State College. Traveling on to Brownsville on the rail-trail, distinct landmarks indicate the arrival of the Brownsville State Recreation Area where the and is another example of the wonderful sometimes surprising recreational opportunities that a rail-trail can present. Above: Users walk along the trail during a summer afternoon. Right: A scenic picnic spot along the Peru trail head. (Photo Credits: Nemaha Natural Re sources District) McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 79

79 Galloping Goose Trail Telluride, Colorado The Galloping Goose Trail is a rail-trail that is designed for a more active user, due to many of the steep inclines and descents. The name of the trail came from somewhat maneuver the steep slopes of the Rocky Mountains. The trail is 15 miles long and the surface is primarily dirt featuring awesome vistas, well known Mountain Bike Trail referred to as ‘Telluride’, as the trail contains a higher recreational uses and makes no apparent effort to connect towns or communities although the trail is rich in history. Above: Those who visit the trail in the summer enjoy bright blue skies and warm temperatures. Right: A cyclist hits the trail just west of the town of Telluride. (Photos credit: San Miguel County Open Space & Recreation Department) Chapter 6 Rails to Trails Case Study

PAGE 80

80 Rails to Trails Case Study Conclusions In light of this case study, the town of rails-to-trails conversion for the following reasons: prepare the site for conversion. • Opportunities for recreation within the town are currently limited, and a rail-trail could create a new recreational opportunity for users of all ages. •With new recreational opportunities, the recreational users alike. •Opportunities would arise to highlight McIntosh’s historic points of interest along the trail corridor such as the rail depot, the packing house and the numerous historical residences. •McIntosh is part of a string of small, rural towns and a rail-trail could serve as a • Chances to enhance the existing recreational lake access. •Current trails exist within proximity of McIntosh that could serve as linking opportunities, such as the Hawthorne Trail to the north and the Green way Trail due south. with the town’s potential to apply for federal funding to support these improvements. •Proper marketing and advertisement of a new rail-trail could provide McIntosh with a much needed increase in tourist commerce McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 83

“On the whole, planned communities tend to have much greater regularity than those that Randell Arendt 7 Community Master Planning McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 84

84 Conceptual Master Plan 1 Analysis: In Conceptual Master Plan # 1, the main focus is placed on acquiring conservation lands within the town of McIntosh. As noted earlier in the User Analysis, some of the most cherished amenities of McIntosh, according to the residents, are Orange Lake, the tree cover The main feature of this conceptual master plan is a green way system that traverses from Orange Lake to the other side of town, with anchoring recreational parks at the end of two primary conservation areas. This proposed green way would create new connections for Along this new corridor, plentiful open spaces would further extend connectivity rural feeling of vastness. These open spaces would also stand to reinforce the agrarian culture that McIntosh was founded upon. close proximity to Orange Lake, this plan and the wildlife in and around the lake. A rails-to-trails conversion could link up the town to other communities and provide commercial areas and the historical district as well. two main areas, one along US Hwy 441 for highway frontage and the other in the existing area near the old rail depot that along the rail-trail. The commercial zone local residents, featuring a park-like setting that mirrors an adjacent park terminating at Orange Lake. This plan also proposes the relocation of facilities of the town, to the north of the commercial zone on US Hwy 441. A town park that forms a connection with these civic and educational elements to the new green way system also reinforces the small town feel. Residential growth is limited greatly in this plan due to the amount of land proposed for conservation. By incorporating McIntosh’s surrounding lands into these conservation areas, the unwanted sprawl. Pros: •Preserves the existing town structure. •Introduces conservation lands. •Introduces a green way system and connected rail-trail. •Features ample open space. •Creates new recreational opportunities. Orange Lake. Cons: proposed retail along Hwy 441. •Retail area separated from the main intersection of the town. •Voluntary restrictions placed on landowners within new conservation corridors. •Offers limited residential development. •Makes no attempt to reconnect currently McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 85

85 Chapter 7 Community Master Planning

PAGE 86

86 Detailed Plan Description To preserve the appearance of the views from in-town looking out and from out-oftown looking in, the forested lands adjacent to McIntosh’s limits, along with the open hill to the south-east of town are proposed for voluntary annexation in the preceding master plan. This would give the town’s codes and planning committee the opportu nity to preserve or change (only to conservation land uses) the existing land uses. In this master plan concept, protecting the natural systems of McIntosh This concept proposes that the two primary and two secondary riparian corridors of the town (illustrated previously voluntary conservation/green way system. locating, purchasing and maintaining the vacant parcels within the newly created conservation zones, while the current a voluntary set of guidelines to protect their lands. These purchased lands could serve a variety of uses and could have designated out contaminants from US Hwy 441, small parks with seating designated for passive on Orange Lake. The overall goal would remain to protect and limit development in turning them into conservation areas with connected trails and multiple points of enjoyed. On the private land owners’ end, the the individual, due mainly to the current “government controlled”. The affected conserve the special qualities of their land ways to enhance and protect the value of their property. Some suggestion given to conservation, minimal use of fertilizers, creating landscape plantings that promote surfaces on their property. This master plan proposes two large parcels, very different in their appearances, of these parcels is located in the northwest corner of the town and the other in the southwest corner of town. a slight slope to the south, were it runs into the proposed green way system. This parcel is also near the cemetery and will consist of mainly passive recreational actives, with the exception of an existing equestrian element. The parcel in the southwest town corner is comprised of a hill that is one of the highest in the town. A site such as this one, with dramatic topography, calls for a higher ers to access the awesome view. The site also has many areas with major slopes that will recreation, such as hiking and/or mountain space to lend views from off the property. It will also connect to a small park maintained The rail-trail proposed will form a linear recreational corridor that connects not only around the old depot as well as the historic McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 87

87 There is limited commercial and residential development seen within this master plan due planning. Most of the commercial development owners. the existing infrastructure of the town, (sidewalks, crosswalks, street signs, and fronts along US Hwy 441. Street improvement along Avenue G (CR. 320) would start at Orange Lake and extend past US Hwy 441. They would attempt to connect Orange Lake, the lake side park and retail area, Van Ness park, US Hwy 441 areas to the west of US Hwy 441 with a park like setting. The point was made earlier that there is a current lack of civic identity within the town of McIntosh. This plan proposes to relocate to the northern end of the ‘Main Street’ commercial zone to act as an anchoring will form a new town square with a clear link green way system. A proposed park would connect the civic square and commercial zone to the new green way system and would continue to strengthen the new civic identity of the town. This park would provide a green space for the new downtown and would present ample opportunities to inform the users of the unique cultural history and environment of McIntosh and the surrounding regions through kiosks and other informational stations. Conceptual Master Plan is converting proposed recreational uses and activities, new commercial interests and relocation of currently disparate civic Although the approach taken in this con ceptual master plan would greatly limit the would preserve McIntosh’s small-town feeling and way of life that the residents currently strive so hard to maintain. It McIntosh with a smart vision for the future. Chapter 7 Community Master Planning

PAGE 88

88 Conceptual Master Plan 2 Analysis: In conceptual master plan #2, residential development is the main focus. It strives to increase the population of commercial areas geared toward specialty foods, tourism and antiques. along US Hwy 441. In this plan, areas with the highest conservation priority are set-aside for the community to use as open space, with to Orange Lake. The civic elements are relocated within the commercial area along US Hwy 441 in improvements. The school would stay in the current location, expanding onto some adjacent parcels to acquire the land needed for the educational activities. The area around the school, along with all other vacant lands outside of the surrounding district’s architectural style. Pros: •Keeps and extends existing street patterns •Maximizes new housing opportunities •Introduces a rail-trail into the community. Cons: •Large areas of environmentally sensitive land are left out of protection areas. • Impervious surface areas are increased. •Lacks creation of recreational opportunities. •Streetscaping is the only planned improvement to US Hwy 441. •More retail is created than the community can currently support. •Doesn’t address entry points into the town McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 89

89 Chapter 7 Community Master Planning

PAGE 90

90 Detailed Plan Description In conceptual master plan #2, the main of McIntosh, which also provides specialty food shops for the residents of McIntosh and its visitors alike. The grocery store concept is thrown out in lieu of promoting individual, more unique stores produce market. The plan does not address any of the rural lands located outside of the town’s limits and therefore leaves the existing town is addressed and the associated lands located out of town are proposed for open space in order to limit development at the lakeshore. The entry points into the town along points directly. The US Hwy 441 entry to the north will have a proposed new residential housing redevelopments on top of the main vista of the town, near the Hwy 441 to the south will also have the new streetscape element and will come through one of the proposed open spaces. showcase the site’s native environment and will remain formally undeveloped. These activities such as picnicking, exploring the ecosystem, or simply walking. Some of these sites that contain surface water would need maintain the water quality for recharge to Orange Lake. open spaces throughout and two proposed parks that the town will maintain. Van Ness park and the “Small park” will remain in use for the residents east of Hwy 441. Although remain to act as a recreation center for the community. It could house activities such as or other social and community events. To the west of Hwy 441, a proposed tennis and hopscotch. Along Hwy 441 there commercial and civic area that will simply corridor. The trail will also form and historical district. The corridor will provide to Orange Lake, creating destination places along the rail-trail system. The rail-trail will link to other trails in the area such as the trails within Paynes Prairie to the north and the Cross Florida Green way to the south. There is a strong need for the town to improve the current conditions along their ‘Main Street’, US Hwy 441. This plan slower speed limits along Hwy 441 and new street furniture such as trash receptacles, also new decorative signs used to designate the existing historical palette. McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 91

91 The new commercial areas proposed in the second conceptual master plan may contain more that the community can future successful area. One theme proposed, community. These specialty food shops further designate the area as a quaint shop ping destination. Also included within these new commercial propositions is a lakefront area mostly cater to the local residents’ needs, such as hardware. There are planned dining facilities near the lake as well, having a general emphasis on native Florida foods and showcasing lake viewing opportunities. The planned residential redevelopment will fall into three use types and will stay true to the architectural styles of the districts that they are proposed within. First, the historic area has a few vacant lots that projects would have such strict guidelines for new construction to occur, and in terms of keeping up the historical look of the town, Instead of displaying run down, vacant parcels the town should plant orange trees in these areas. The second type of residential development will include the existing areas outside of the historical district that already areas are mostly lacking in identity and fragmented. The plan is proposing that these character, while also adding new connecting elements such as new streets, unifying streetscape elements and even structures. The proposed dwellings will also which they are inserted. The last category of residential development takes place on land that Johns Water Management District as ‘Open Lands’ (land code-all of the 1900s), ‘Agri cultural Lands’ (land code-all of the 2000s), ‘Range Lands’ (land codeall of the 3000s), ‘Tree Plantations’ (code4400), and Barren Lands (land codeall of the 7000s). These of the existing road pattern to ensure the connectivity of these areas and to prevent fragmentation of the proposed developments. The architectural styles of eas of new development, lending to a design template for the new dwelling units and The civic identity of McIntosh in this within the commercial zone. This site commercial zone would give the town an opportunity to set up a small visitor center with a small museum to catch the interest of shoppers not familiar with the area. The plan for the school would start with the town’s purchase of the current parcel in the US Hwy 441 improvements. In summary, this plan relies heavily upon developing the residential and commercial little land for the environment. If implemented, this plan could effect the population of McIntosh in a drastic way in its potential to draw new residents into the town with its heightened commercial and housing opportunities.. Chapter 7 Community Master Planning

PAGE 92

92 Conceptual Master Plan 3 Analysis: roots in the residents of the town of want improvements done to enhance the community. To most residents this also means taking the necessary steps to prevent future uncontrolled development or sprawl. First, this proposal addresses the existing hydrology of the town, with suggestions made to improve drainage and water quality for Orange Lake. This plan inside the town limits, while at the same time making an attempt to preserve the town edge through new conservation areas. points into the town, this plan welcomes the traveler coming from the north with travelers coming from the south entry get to come through the new green way corridor. converted to a rail-trail that would house activity in vacant parcels adjacent the rail-trail. The proposed rail-trail would also provide a link to the green way and include a variety of activities. The green way system will extend from the lake to the new recreational activity areas on the west side of town. Numerous new parks are placed into each residential zone to pro Along US Hwy 441, street improvements the historic district. There is a small amount of commercial redevelopment proposed for existing areas in this plan, with the focus on currently within the community. single-family residential developments, placed in the areas previously designated as free from environmental issues. The existing civic spaces are pulled together into a central ized location along US Hwy 441. To the southeast corner of the historic district, a new visitor center would greet those interested in touring the historic part of town. The school relocates to a parcel Pros: •Spreads out the commercial zones and their uses. •New green way provides great opportunities to recreate, educate and connect the town. “Historic walking tour”. •Reconnects the town to Orange Lake. •Introduces new Multi, and Single-family housing. Cons. •Loses some of the environmentally sensitive lands to existing land uses. •Some town elements require relocation. to their associated costs. development could threaten existing ‘small-town’ feel of McIntosh. McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 93

93 Chapter 7 Community Master Planning

PAGE 94

sion to travelers. Currently, this area is home relocated, as they are all currently renting their spaces. Changing this area’s land use to new owners. At the southern entrance, the traveler will enter the town through the proposed visitor center to the west and a pecan grove the east. As mentioned in concept # 1, the green way/voluntary conservation area, The green way system runs along some of the existing riparian corridors. It includes the two primary riparian corridors and the in the middle was a secondary riparian historic district. While the two corridors coming from US Hwy 441 have the main goal of water reclamation, all corridors will serve as a set of green way trails. They will ties that will take place along the green way. green way’s context and will extend out into vacant parcels along its passage. The other areas of mild to slight environmental concern are dedicated to open space. Some of these areas will have homes to their native ecosystem and will serve to add charm to the community. areas located in the western edges of town. recreation enthusiasts, and will tie seamlessly into the Green way system. The recreation connected directly to the school in order to ing and after school. While the area to the reational activities, due to the fact that there is a wetland on the site and the presence of wildlife is much more likely. Street improvements seen in this concept sense of place. The entire Hwy 441 cor ridor is dressed up to give the town a much needed face lift. This is done through the 94 Detailed Plan Description In conceptual master plan #3, the primary goal is mainly to preserve the town in its current state. The idea of growth is pursued in more of a moderate, long-term way and focuses on cleaning up the existing vacant parcels. Finally, this plan strives to ensure and provide the future generations of McIntosh the same quality of life the residents enjoy today. Located just outside of McIntosh are conservation to preserve the town edge with side and the town. These areas are outlined wetlands, forested land and the large vista to the southeast of town. This hill or vista has major importance, as mentioned earlier, in preserving the views not only into town east. The points of entry into town are addressed in this plan, along with US Hwy 441, as part of the proposed street improvements featuring new landscape plantings. To the north, there is a new commercial development that is proposed and placed at the town entry point. This idea may need some revising to make sure McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 95

95 calming, crosswalks, new street signs and landscape plantings. Avenue G (CR. 320)also receives the same treatment from the new proposed park to the existing commercial the relocated civic area and extend through the historic walking tour. This will ensure a The commercial areas of this plan are laid out in a more complicated pattern to ensure different zones of commercial uses. As you enter McIntosh from the north, there will for example, the existing truck topper store. existing commercial storefront restoration From here, the plan addresses the for the residents of the town and the users of the rail-trail, with featured stores such as a grocery and general goods store. This area might also include a small-scale delicatessen serving lunch and dinner several days a week. effort on the owners’ part to improve the The residential housing proposed in this area, located within the historic district, is set improvements are required to stay within the fashion and manner as existing historic homes, this is accomplished through deed restrictions. The next area of housing takes place in lacking in unity. In these areas, new incorporate these fragments into the rest of supporting new dwelling units in a housing even includes a few small, multifamily town homes placed in strategic locations as to not interfere with the structure or function of the currently The last new elements of the residential pull from on the existing street patterns to extend and connect these new areas. These new residences will have smaller lot sizes than the typical lots of the historic area and conservation lands leading their layouts. This will keep the existing feel of McIntosh in The civic relocation plan in this concept moves the main location to a central site along Hwy 441. This location would town’s meeting hall, along with the town 441 gives a civic presence to the town, and would eliminate the deserted feeling along the corridor. This area will also have access to and from the green way system and the rail-trail. Further south, to the west of Hwy and used as a visitor center. This center grove park across the street, which will also serve as a crossing for the school children. The school will move to a larger site directly to the northwest of its existing for school activities. preserving the town of McIntosh while features. Development, as it is proposed years to come, without a lot of the drastic changes that the residents of the town currently fear. One of the major lacking elements of this plan is the lack of entry recognitions. With a little Chapter 7 Community Master Planning

PAGE 96

96 The three master plans discussed in detail within this chapter all have merit. While a summary of the pros and cons of each plan is helpful, a further understanding of the plans’ overall systematical way. By extracting the positive traits of each plan into a matrix shown at right and adding the original set of program Reasons the matrix is helpful: positive traits of each plan. achieves the program elements with positive traits. Which program elements received the most positive recognition from the three proposed concepts? 1. Green ways and Open Space (top) 2. Preserving Town Character 3. HWY 441 Improvements/ Orange Lake Redevelopment/Residential Growth Plan (tied) Conceptual Master Plan # 1 accomplished the most of our original program elements in a positive manner. page. lands to ensure that the process of development will not displace current residents within the town of McIntosh . McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 97

97 Developable Lands St.. Johns Water Management District as ‘Open Lands’ (land code-all of the 1900s), ‘Agricultural Lands’ (land codeall of the 2000s), ‘Range Lands’ (land codeall of the 3000s), ‘Tree Plantations’ (code4400), and Barren Lands (land codeall of the 7000s). According to the town residents, many of these “vacant” land parcels have deceased owners, with no descendents to inherit their property. Therefore, making use of these currently vacant parcels is much preferred to using new land. Once these areas are gone, Opportunities of Vacant Lands: • Larger vacant parcels with high limitation ratings are prime opportunities recreational activities. • Vacant parcels located along the railway are opportunities for spurred activity sites • Vacant lands outside of the Historic district represent opportunities for parks, conservation lands, open space, or, if free from environmental limitations, some could • Vacant lots within the Historic district informal orange orchards, adding charm and Chapter 7 Community Master Planning

PAGE 98

98 Final Master Plan: used and discussed in the previous 3 conceptual master plans. •Features rails-to-trails conversion that incorporates several new recreational opportunities, while also producing new nodes within the town of McIntosh. •Vacant land parcels located along the into conservation land. •New street plantings within the Historic district create a ‘Village’ feel to the area. •Features a new town school and centrally located civic area. •Entry points into town are enhanced with landscape plantings. rails-to-trails activity center) that links with the newly created green way. •Creates new commercial lakefront area and lake side park facility. •Creates 73 new residential home sites. •Current equestrian activity linked with proposed trail and open space. •Delineates voluntary conservation zone for current property owners. •Features major street improvements to the town’s ‘Main Street’, US Hwy McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 99

99 Final Conceptual Master Plan Proposal Chapter 7 Community Master Planning

PAGE 100

100 The pre-master plan map of McIntosh pictured patterns and parcels located within the town and their • The streets use private property to navigate the town. Before Master Plan McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 101

101 • Improved street patterns realign with the parcels. • Denotes proposed street extensions and removals. • Graphic illustrates only existing homes Master Plan. • Preexisting hydrology patterns, along After Master Plan Chapter 7 Community Master Planning

PAGE 103

“I seek not to arbitrarily impose design, but to use to the fullest, the potentialities and with them, necessarily, the restrictive conditions that nature -Ian McHarg 8 Design Development McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 104

104 US HWY 441 To start the design process along US Hwy 441, two more key pieces of examined. along a major ROW (rightof way) in relation to its stopping distances. There are currently too along US Hwy 441 and without adequate stopping distances, any development a master plan proposed to sustain. A simple solution to the current limitations of US Hwy 441 is to somehow lower the speed at which drivers visual cues. These cues could include and pedestrian crosswalks and McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 105

105 There are some elements that put the pedestrian at ease with these elements serve as street furniture, walls and landscaping. To create these elements, land is necessary. In light of this, examined prior to design for the current structures along US Hwy 441. A typical section along US Hwy 441 shows a 60’ ROW. This is a smaller right-of-way than Avenue G (CR. 320). There is a of the road without any contained within the rightof-way. In order to add anything to the current composition, private land Chapter 8 Design Development

PAGE 106

106 US Hwy 441 to improve its current limitations. McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 107

107 Chapter 8 Design Development

PAGE 108

108 McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 109

109 strives to preserve the genus loci of McIntosh, while providing the town with much needed new Cracker Style Home • Extended 360 degree veranda porch • Raised foundation allows air circulation under the house Ranch Style House • Large enclosed screen porch Shotgun/ Bungalow • Florida room to the front of the house • Over sized columns Florida Vernacular • Smallest footprint due to multiple stories • High pitched roof w/ornamentation *All home styles are lacking an attached garage while many existing homes have detached garages, therefore these homes favor the pedestrian. Chapter 8 Design Development

PAGE 110

110 McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 111

111 Chapter 8 Design Development

PAGE 112

112 McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 113

113 Chapter 8 Design Development

PAGE 114

114 McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 115

115 Chapter 8 Design Development

PAGE 116

116 McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 117

117 Chapter 8 Design Development

PAGE 118

118 McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 119

119 Chapter 8 Design Development

PAGE 120

120 Conservation Subdivision This graphic illustrates new lots produced McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 121

121 residential development help to maintain a crisp edge to the town. The proposed conservation envelope, with the remainder of the 1-4 acre parcel put into permanent conservation. e Chapter 8 Design Development

PAGE 122

122 Some sites within this will lend to excellent vistas and allow the architecture to speak not only of the surrounding area topography compositions, adding elements such as stilts, overlooks, and retaining walls. Housing is added to the layout in a clustered development. This diagram illustrates the overall composition with out the trees, just to see the topography. Also are clustered where-ever McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 123

123 These graphics illustrate the difference conceptual master plan, which serves to No Trees Trees Chapter 8 Design Development

PAGE 124

124 High Point ParkA neighbor hood park located on the highest point of the development keep ing the location open to public access. Rural AppearanceThis il lustrates the view heading west on the street to the south of the development. This development method maintains a rural feeling. Native LandscapeThese lots could further contribute to the local conservation efforts by using native plants with similar watering requirements. Bird’s-eye ViewLooking to the Northeast. Extending Existing InfrastructureLooking up the new Ave. J extension. Clustering HomesThe use of the building envelopes and clustered houses produces vast amounts of what appears to be open land. McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 125

125 •Roof tops are hidden within a sea of trees. •Land is placed into permanent protection through developed conservation areas. Chapter 8 Design Development

PAGE 126

126 Rail-to-Trails Proposal The proposed rail-to-trail conversion is a great opportunity for the town of McIntosh to link and incorporate existing historical structures into newly planned recreational areas. Along with these proposed recreation areas, the town of McIntosh smart growth within the town. Proposed Orchard Site MTB Park Connection McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 127

127 Conclusion new infrastructure within the town of McIntosh that serve to main tain the town’s current sense of place or genus loci. ments, recreational opportunities and commercial development. commercial space.... Chapter 8 Design Development

PAGE 128

128 McIntosh, Fl: A Study On The Preservation Of Genius Loci

PAGE 129

References Arendt, Randall G., Conservation Design For Subdivisions: A Practical Guild to Creating Open Space Networks , (Washington D.C., Island Press, 1996) Arendt, Randall G., Crossroads, Hamlets, Villages, Towns: Design Characteristics of Traditional Neighborhoods , (Washington D.C., Island Press, 1996) Blumenson, John J. -G., Identifying American Architecture: A Pictorial Guide to Styles and Terms, 1600-1945, 2nd edition , (New York, W.W. Norton & Company, 1981) Garnham, H.L., 1985. Maintaining The Spirit Of Place: A Process for the preservation of Town Character 158pages. Kim, Dohyung, “The Evolution of The Image if the City Since Kevin Lynch”, (2003) McHarg, Ian l., Design With Nature, (New York, Natural History Press, 1969.) Simonds, John, Landscape Architecture: A Manual of Site Planning And Design (New York: McGraw-Hill, 1998). Town of McIntosh (employees) Wiedegreen, Eric A., “An Appraisal: McIntosh”, (1975) Web Sites http://user.gru.net/domz/duany.htm http://www.china.org.cn http://www.city-data.com/city/McIntosh-Florida.html http://www.goodgator.com/territory/1890fest/1890fest.htm http://www.ncsmartgrowth.org/archiev/smalltown.html http://www.news8austin.com/content/news_8_explores/ruralvalue Bibliography