Citation
Commerce Way

Material Information

Title:
Commerce Way an urban revitalization
Creator:
Wood, Adam
Place of Publication:
Gainesville FL
Publisher:
University of Florida
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
57 p. : ill. ;

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Architectural design ( jstor )
Area development ( jstor )
Cities ( jstor )
City centers ( jstor )
Commerce ( jstor )
Intersections ( jstor )
Land development ( jstor )
Towns ( jstor )
Traffic congestion ( jstor )
Urban design ( jstor )
City of Orlando ( local )
Genre:
non-fiction ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
Advisor(s): Terry Schnadelbach, Tina Gurucharri, Kay Williams.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Adam Wood. Permission granted to the University of Florida to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
004241986 ( AlephBibNum )
1055597801 ( OCLC )

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text









COMMERCE WAY
An Urban Revitalization



















Adam B. Wood, Student ASLA
Senior Capstone Project Spring 2008
Department of Landscape Architecture
College of Design, Construction and Planning
University of Florida


















ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS


Thank you to the City of Clovis employees who met with me to
discuss this project, provided me with the information I re-
quested, and supported my desire to address issues occurring in
my hometown.

The development of this book would not have been possible with-
out the support of the faculty in the Department of Landscape Ar-
chitecture, University of Florida.

I will be forever grateful for all of the knowledge and wisdom
that has been passed along to me during this chapter of my life.

Attending the University of Florida would not have been possible
without the never-ending support from my family. I will never be
able to fully show how thankful and appreciative I am for their
support and guidance.

Finally, special thanks to Terry Schnadelbach for the inspiration
he gave me to complete this project. This project would not have
yielded such successful results without his wisdom and guidance.

An additional thanks to Tina Gurucharri and Kay Williams. These
two faculty members assisted me through the final stages of this
capstone project and went out of their way to make sure I suc-
cessfully completed the requirements to fulfill the Bachelor of
Landscape Architecture degree.


COMMERCE WAY: AN URBAN REVITALIZATION


















INDEX


Chapter I


Project Introduction


Chapter V


Synthesis


Project Overview 3
Site Location 4
Site Boundaries 5
Goals and Objectives 6

Chapter II Case Studies 7

Jersey City, New Jersey 9
Orlando, Florida 10
Lakewood, Colorado 11

Chapter III Program Development 13

Program 15

Chapter IV Inventory and Analysis 17


Topography, Floodplain, and Soils
Sewage and Utilities
Points of Interest
Inventory/Zoning Map
Analysis Map
Existing Conditions


19
20
21
22
23
24-25


Synthesis Map 29

Chapter VI Strategy Development 31

Forward 33
Conceptual Strategies 34-36

Chapter VII Design Development 37

Forward 39
Final Strategy 40
Details 41-44
Proposed Sections 45-47

Chapter VIII Design Guidelines 49


Forward
Landscape Material Guidelines
Architectural and Elemental Guidelines


Sources Cited


Sources


COMMERCE WAY: AN URBAN REVITALIZATION















CHAPTER I
Project Introduction





















1


LUMMEKLE WAY: An URBAN REVITALIZE N









PROJECT INTRODUCTION


Project Overview

Clovis, the county seat of Curry County, is a small town located in
central-eastern New Mexico. It was established in the early 1900s as the
eastern terminal of the Belen Cutoff for the Santa Fe Railroad. Since its
early days, economic growth has been closely tied to three main factors:
the railroad, agriculture, and retail trade. Cannon Air Force Base, located
a few miles west of the city, is also instrumental in providing Clovis
businesses with commerce and an increased economic base and work-
force.
The Main Street and downtown areas of Clovis have been in recession
for the last few decades, and an effort to revitalize the downtown has be-
come a priority. With fuel prices rising and the sustainability movement
growing, it is becoming apparent that cities must stop providing for urban
sprawl and start redeveloping the strong inner cores that were evident of
the early- to mid-1900s.
Commerce Way, a collector road in central Clovis, New Mexico, is
slowly turning into an untraveled, unsightly, and unkempt thoroughfare.
Once a vital connection to Main Street and the downtown area, the Com-
merce Way corridor has seen a loss of business, residence, and traffic
with the continuation of Prince Street to the main highway on the south-
ern edge of town many years ago.
This independent senior capstone project was conducted in order to
offer suggestions to the City of Clovis on how to redevelop the city's in-
ner core, alleviate traffic congestion at the Prince Street and 21st Street
intersection, and how to provide a sense of place within a new town cen-
ter. The study hopes to provide additional insight on ways to revitalize
and repopulate the historic downtown community as well.
The independent senior capstone project is required in order to fulfill
all obligations for the Bachelor of Landscape Architecture (BLA) degree.
Sufficient understanding of landscape architecture and practices must be
exhibited in order to successfully fulfill this requirement.



3


LUMMEKLE WAY: An URBAN REVITALIZE N






CHAPTER I


Site Location





AB C E F





r i .. i , < j vr , ].j --


I L I I i -H =
fil- r _ -. , - 2 --
UT















NTS
. Clovs, New Mexico







- City Limits

Commerce Way Corridor






PROJECT INTRODUCTION


Site Boundaries


The corridor boundaries for the purposes of this study include the transparent green areas along Commerce Way. The dumbbell appearance of
the boundary creates larger nodes at each end of Commerce Way. This will create the opportunity to enhance those nodal areas and provide desir-
able destinations in-between in order to pull users through the site.


COMMERCE WAY: AN URBAN REVITALIZATION






CHAPTER I


Project Goals and Objectives
A. Provide for the health, safety, and welfare of users
1. Provide for a comfortable microclimate and enhanced aes-
thetic quality
2. Minimize vehicular and pedestrian conflicts
3. Increase traffic flow while decreasing congestion
4. Provide opportunities for all users: Elderly, Middle-aged,
and Children
5. Provide open spaces for walkability and active living

B. Provide for a sense of place
1. Respect the character and ecology of the region
2. Create an identity for the site
3. Provide activities to draw people into the area
4. Build upon existing strengths

C. Boost economic viability
1. Provide commercial areas in the center of town
2. Take advantage of urban infill opportunities
2. Draw business into the rehabilitating downtown


Personal Goals and Objectives
A. Provide a cohesive plan for the City of Clovis to use for future
planning

B. Offer suggestions to help beautify and redevelop Clovis

C. Develop a thorough plan based upon urban design principles

D. Fulfill the requirements for a Bachelor of Landscape Architecture
degree













CHAPTER II
Case Studies

























17


LUMMEKLE WAY: An URBAN REVITALIZE N









CASE STUDIES


Case Studies

It is important to provide case studies in order to exhibit proven examples from successful projects. This not only builds rapport between a de-
signer and his or her clients, but also provides additional research to enhance the designers final product. The following three case studies provide
examples to help aid the results of this project. Specific examples from each case study are portrayed within the final design strategy and these case
studies are also provided for the City of Clovis to consider the possibility of expanding this project to provide successful results.


Case Study 1: Martin Luther King Drive, Jersey City, New Jersey
The City of Jersey City, in its multiple attempts to revitalize the area around Martin Luther
King Drive for over 25 years, learned firsthand the importance of community involvement and
support to achieve redevelopment success.
Martin Luther King Drive, formerly known as Jackson Avenue, was once the premier shop-
ping venue in the southern half of the city. Over time, the district and adjacent residential areas
began to deteriorate, stores began to close and buildings erode. In an effort to combat the de-
cline, the Municipal Council enacted a series of ordinances and redevelopment plans aimed at
improving portions of the 26 block district.
Despite consensus around the need to redevelop the area, there was considerable debate as to
the form for that redevelopment. The Jersey City planning department drafted three plans, and
each of them was rejected by the community at various Planning Board meetings. In order to
avoid more lengthy and heated meetings, the Planning Board directed the staff to work with the
community to create an acceptable plan.
The Martin Luther King Drive Redevelopment Plan was officially adopted in December
1993. At the core of the plan was the creation of a hub, or village center, to include 100,000
square foot shopping center, restaurants, a Village Green, a new US Post Office, and a new sta-
tion for the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail Transit System.
The Martin Luther King Drive Redevelopment Plan has been a success, thanks to the coop-
erative effort between the City and the MLK Neighborhood Development Organization. The
Plan itself has received national and statewide awards and recognition for its innovative use of '
community outreach and implementation. The first phase of the project, the creation of the hub,
is complete and the City and MLK NDC are actively pursuing the rest of the redevelopment plan
as a team.


*Photo Source: JCEDC, www.jcedc.org/new/hubatmartinlutherkingdriveos.html 9
COMMERCE WAY: AN URBAN REVITALIZATION






CHAPTER II


Case Study 2: Baldwin Park Naval Base Redevelopment Project, Orlando, Florida
When the U.S. Navy announced in 1993 that it would close the Orlando Naval Training Cen-
ter, the city of Orlando saw an opportunity to build a vibrant, mixed-use neighborhood that
would make the base property once again part of the community. The city's Base Reuse Com-
mission organized to plan the property's future, engaging citizens in hundreds of meetings over
two years to help devise and refine a plan to redevelop the base. At visioning workshops, citi-
zens described what they wanted: a variety of housing types, a vibrant main street, public access
to lakes, and linkages with existing neighborhoods.
Before rebuilding could begin, 256 buildings, 200 miles of underground utilities, and 25
miles of road had to be dismantled and recycled. Asbestos and lead paint in the buildings and
arsenic and petroleum in the soil needed to be cleaned up. This demolition and clean-up took
more than a year.
The new development was named Baldwin Park. Since the first model opened in 2003, Bald-
win Park has sold lots and houses faster than any comparable project in the area. When construc-
tion ends in 2008, Baldwin Park will have 10,000 residents living in 4,100 homes, ranging from
rental apartments to custom homes, built in architectural styles traditional to the area. In addi-
tion, 6,000 people will work in offices throughout the neighborhood and in shops in the Village
Center. Everyone can enjoy over 450 acres of lakes and parks, including over two miles of lake-
front property reserved for public use. With public schools near and in Baldwin Park, local chil-
dren can walk to school.
Baldwin Park's residents, workers, visitors, and neighbors have many choices in how they get
around. There are 50 miles of trails and sidewalks on an interconnected street grid for walking
and biking. Traffic, once blocked by the former base's security fence, can now flow through 32
new intersections that connect Baldwin Park streets to surrounding neighborhoods, reducing
congestion.
The community created 16 extra acres of parkland by using innovative underground storm-
water management systems. Audubon of Florida helped plan parks and wetlands restoration pro-
jects, recreating ecosystems that were lost years ago. Since it is an infill redevelopment project,
Baldwin Park can take advantage of existing power plants and water and wastewater treatment
facilities. At the same time, the city will gain an additional $30 million in annual property tax
revenues.
The redevelopment of this former naval base gives the citizens of Orlando what they wanted
and planned for: a thriving new community and a legacy for future generations to enjoy.


*Photo Source: New Broad Street Companies, www.newbroadstreet.com/images/photos/BP_pizza2.jpg






CASE STUDIES


Case Study 3: Belmar's Walkable Downtown, Lakewood, Colorado
In communities across the country, aging shopping centers are losing business to larger and
newer competitors. As these retail centers, known as "greyfields," cease to be viable as shopping
malls, they can often provide opportunities for redevelopment that meet other community needs.
One good example can be found in Lakewood, Colorado. Facing the decline of its Villa Italia
shopping mall, the city worked with citizens, civic groups, and a local developer to transform the
property into Belmar-the real, walkable downtown that this Denver inner suburb had lacked.
Belmar's traditional grid of narrow streets and small blocks replaces the footprint of the old
mall. At build-out in 2007, these new, pedestrian-friendly blocks will have one million square
feet of shops, restaurants, and other services. The development will also include 1,300 new
homes, including townhouses, loft apartments, and live-work units. Belmar will have 700,000
square feet of the first new Class-A office space built in the area in over a decade. Nine acres of
parks and plazas will give people a place to get together, relax, and enjoy festivals, markets, and
other entertainment. Belmar also offers galleries and studio spaces to artists to make the devel-
opment an arts hub.
Putting time and effort into a high-quality redevelopment has been a great investment for
Lakewood. Belmar brings a new sense of vibrancy and prosperity to the area. The redevelop-
ment would not have been possible without a strong partnership between the city and the devel-
oper. The inclusive process transformed citizens' concerns about losing the mall into civic pride
for their new downtown.
Belmar's first phase has been a success. Its retail income is comparable to higher-end malls.
Belmar's office space is fully leased, and rental and for-sale housing are outperforming the local
market. Upon Belmar's completion, the city estimates it will add $952 million to the local econ-
omy and will directly create over 7,000 permanent jobs.
Belmar illustrates how the loss of a community resource like a shopping mall can become an
asset. With creative, inclusive planning, Lakewood turned this underused site into a vibrant
downtown with new home choices, shopping options, and civic spaces for its citizens.








*Photo Sources: Cool Town Studios, www.cooltownstudios.com/mt/archives/week 2005 11 13.html
COMMERCE WAY: AN URBAN REVITALIZATION















CHAPTER III
Program Development




















13


LUMMEKLE WAY: An URBAN REVITALIZE N









PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT


Program

As this study was conducted solely as an exhibition for the City of Clovis to suggest ways in which Commerce Way may be redeveloped and
how to alleviate traffic congestion along Prince Street, no specific program was given to aid in the results of this project. The demographics shown
below were collected from the 2000 Decennial Census and solely provide statistical data for presentation.
All of the results for this project come from surrounding and existing land uses and suggest ways to enhance those areas. For example, located
either within the corridor or located within extremely close proximity to the site are recreational fields, a public park, two public schools, and a pro-
posed senior living development. Several religious facilities are located throughout the corridor and within close proximity to the site. Professional
offices including medical practices, law offices, and accounting firms are located not only throughout, but also surrounding the corridor as well.
It is for these reasons that the final strategy plan stresses the importance that the community facilities placed upon the site provide opportunities
for users of all backgrounds and ages. It is also advised that any commercial and/or residential development be aimed toward a wide range of users
and not specifically targeting one user group. By doing so, this area can truly become a mixed-use, mixed-demographic area.

Demographics
As of the census of 2000, there were 32,667 people, 12,458 households, and 8,596 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,458.9 people per
square mile (563.3/km2). There were 14,269 housing units at an average density of 637.3/sq mi (246.1/km2).

Race and Ethnicity
The racial makeup of the city was 37.86% White, 7.32% African American, 1.02% Native American, 1.62% Asian, 0.13% Pacific Islander, 14.98% from other
races, and 3.63% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino were 33.44% of the population. Much of the Hispanic/Latin population knows Spanish, with code-
switching also common. To some extent, the community is divided between "Anglos" (non-Hispanic Caucasians) and Hispanics/Latinos, though much social in-
teraction does occur.

Household Size and Marriage
There were 12,458 households out of which 36.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.8% were married couples living together, 14.9% had a
female householder with no husband present, and 31.0% were non-families. 26.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.3% had someone living
alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.57 and the average family size was 3.12.

Age and Gender Structure
30.0% are under the age of 18 - the largest segment; 9.4% are from 18 to 24; 28.1% are from 25 to 44; 19.5% from 45 to 64; and 13.0% are 65 or older. The me-
dian age is 33 years. Gender ratio is somewhat titled toward female population with an overall ratio of 100:92.5 females to males. For the adult population (18
and over), it is even more strongly titled at 100:88.1 females to males.

Income
The median income for a household in the city was $28,878, and the median income for a family was $33,622. Males had a median income of $26,586 versus
$20,375 for females. The per capital income for the city was $15,561. About 17.2% of families and 21.0% of the population were below the poverty line, includ-
ing 28.2% of those under age 18 and 14.6% of those age 65 or over.
1S















CHAPTER IV
Inventory and Analysis





















. . .. . .. .. .. . . . ...1 7


LUMMEKLE WAY: An URBAN REVITALIZE N









INVENTORY AND ANALYSIS

Inventory and Analysis

By taking an inventory of the site, including (but not limited to) topography, soils, utilities, traffic loads, and important nodes, certain parameters
start to develop that will provide either opportunities or constraints for the conceptual and design development phases. These parameters are then
outlined in an analysis and become an essential building block for the rest of the design process.


Topography:
The topography trough the site corridor
gently slopes toward the middle of the site.
No severe slopes exist within the site provid-
ing for ease of redevelopment.


Floodplain:
The transparent red color represents the 100
year floodplain. A large drainage system has
been installed along this path in order to prevent
severe flooding during such an event.


COMMERCE WAY: AN URBAN REVITALIZATION


NTS
Soils:
The soils within the corridor are comprised
of Amarillo soils. These soils are developable,
as currently utilized, and also provide an ideal
medium for agricultural purposes.

19






CHAPTER IV


Sewage System:
The sewage system (as shown) is laid out
in a manner such that redevelopment of the
area will require only minor sewage system
changes.






Utilities:
The utilities (not shown) throughout the
site are located within the alleys and have a
north/south orientation. Redevelopment of
the area will require only minor utility sys-
tem changes.


NTSF
NTS






INVENTORY AND ANALYSIS


Parks/Open Space CLOVIS
Educational Facilities
Civic/Points of Interest
Commerce Way Corridor


POTS of INTEREST 9 O9 Lycum TaiM c. r a J ' 0Biy Eternewy Schfl C3 PARKS & REC. AREAS
1 Cannon Ai Force B A4 10 Sna Fe Razroad epot C4 19 L CasEa Elemenay 84 28 Colon, Park Gol Coure D1
2 City Ha DeptI VFW C4 SCHOOLS 3 UrLotinJado5nEmenUtay Soo B4 1: ,:-, -:.-. -, .I - ; ,. D
3 Cis Ca Lbray C3 11 Bany tenerary School C2 :; Lodwo Bemeray Sdchol DS : I ,.., r . 3 .-, D3
4 CoV High Plains Hospial A2 12 Bella Vsa Eenry Schol A3 2 Marshal Junor Hh SHoo C3 Gof Couse
5 Cntl Courthuse C3 13 Cameo ,enetay Schdoo 83 :3 Mesa EMnty S El SoIan Compinc
6 Curry CountyJai C3 14 Ca�v CommCe Cege E4 P - idelern~y Sco 03
SFe S-.Stjatons (3) A3.QC.D3 15 ICtloirKh Sdool 3 15 SaiE1l em1ctay Sdcol 52
6 Noman Pely p Recoyig 84,04 16 GanIJs Jr ig. o Bo 3 ;6 Ywa Juni H'gh, Sc O t 03
Studos (2) 17 ighland Dmenly Schoo C2 ;7 Ta enta0y S1~ld3 02


COMMERCE WAY: AN UR N


Points of Interest Map:
The Commerce Way corridor, being centrally
located, is in close proximity to parks, recreational
fields, and green space, is surrounded by educa-
tional facilities, and also has a number of civic
buildings and points of interest to the south.



















1N'F
NTS

21





CHAPTER IV


A ' ' -Bl


AeA


Commercial Zoning Churches Nodes
Residential Zoning Schools


Urban Development Zoning
Park / Green Space


- Underground Storm Drainage
- Underground Sewage Utilities


Vehicular Connections






INVENTORY AND ANALYSIS


%^0% Need Visual Buffer

S Focal Point

Desirable Views


> Undesirable Views

S Project Boundary


COMMERCE WAY: AN URBAN REVITALIZATION


1. Marshall Junior High: Beautiful historic
building, established landscape. Nice views
into building from corridor.

2. Citizens Bank of Clovis: Drive-thru bank-
ing facility. Unique character provides for
interesting views from corridor.

3. Green Acres Lake: A playa lake that has
served the community since it was estab-
lished. Used mainly for drainage, however,
many people fish in this lake as well. Loca-
tion of the July 4th festivities.

4. Trailer Park: Sub-par/dilapidated housing
conditions directly to the east of an elemen-
tary school.

5. Twin Cronies: Local drive-in restaurant.
Not pretty to look at, but a local hot-spot.

6. New Mexico Bank and Trust: Unique
building provides a nice view from corridor.

7. Strip Mall: Contains a Hobby Lobby, Al-
bertsons, IHOP, gas station, Hastings, two
pizza restaurants, and other various com-
mercial businesses. Needs visual buffer.

8. Marshall Junior High Football Field and
Track




23






CHAPTER IV

Exisitng Corridor Conditions


Vacant Buildings


Uilapidated Housing


LaCK OT AesInenc uuallty


unrnenaly to Ieaestnans





INVENTORY AND ANALYSIS
Exisitng Corridor Conditions, cont.


Ullapidated/Vacant Structures


Ullapidated/Vacant Structures


iiP T
..


unutiiizea spanse oT IarKing LOT vacant tuilaings
COMMERCE WAY: AN URBAN REVITALIZATION















CHAPTER V
Synthesis




















27


LUMMEKLE WAY: An URBAN REVITALIZE N









SYNTHESIS


Synthesis

The synthesis is the combination of
the inventory and analysis research.
By compiling all of this material
within the formation of one plan, the
opportunities and constraints can be
easily visualized to aid in the different
stages of conceptual design.


Redevelopable Sites:
Sites deemed redevelopable include areas
of expansive and unused parking lots, dilapi-
dated and/or vacant structures, unaesthetic
buildings, barns/sheds, and empty lots.


Sites of Potential Value:
Sites that may add value based on their
unique character (i.e.: banks), local popularity
(i.e.: drive-in restaurant), and established eco-
nomic value (i.e.: small retail center).


COMMERCE WAY: AN URBAN REVITALIZATION


Protected Sites:
Protected sites include those sites that
will be retained within the final plans. These
sites are mainly educational and religious
facilities, but also include viable businesses.

29















CHAPTER VI
Strategy Development





















. . .. . .. .. .. . . . ...3 1


LUMMEKLE WAY: An URBAN REVITALIZE N









STRATEGY DEVELOPMENT


Strategy Development

Since an architect was not involved throughout the development
of this project, a number of different strategies were conceptually de-
veloped that do not address issues such as architectural building de-
sign. Rather, these strategies should be used as a zoning guide that
depict where the appropriate placement of different types of develop-
ment should occur.
Although each of the strategy plans share their own strengths and
weaknesses, they all provide opportunities for green/park space, park-
ing, civic development, commercial development, mixed-use devel-
opment, multifamily development, and the preservation of existing
infrastructure/businesses. The development of a town center begins to
emerge within the different strategies to provide a sense of place for
this area.





33


LUMMEKLE WAY: AIN UKHAN REVITALIZATION






CHAPTER VI


Strategy 1

The first conceptual strategy begins
to address the development of a town
center by utilizing the largely unused
parking lot in front of the grocery store
and strip mall. Additionally, with the
creation of park space and mixed-use
development, a more personalized
sense of place begins to emerge. The
entrance to downtown Main Street
takes on a more typical downtown set-
ting, with mixed-use development on
each corer.
Multifamily housing largely links
the two major nodes together while
several existing businesses are pre-
served within the filling of the voids.


Strategy 1 Plan






STRATEGY DEVELOPMENT


Strategy 2

The second conceptual strategy ex-
pands upon the first strategy but starts
to examine how the traffic congestion
at Prince and 21st Streets can be alle-
viated.
By realigning Commerce Way, its
intersection with Prince Street is
moved farther to the south giving traf-
fic more room to travel on Prince be-
fore having to make another stop.
Other changes include losing some
established businesses in lieu of addi-
tional park space, the addition of sin- Strategy Le
gle-family housing, a multifamily (.r.. n ,p.c
housing square, and additional com- I
mercial and mixed-use development to i ........
tie Commerce Way into Main Street. 1,id-tI J

Reildennal
i tnlrlln






Strategy 2 Plan





35
COMMERCE WAY: AN URBAN REVITALIZATION






CHAPTER VI


Strategy 3

The third conceptual strategy even
further expands upon strategies one
and two, but creates more of a focus
upon creating a town center where the
new alignment of Commerce Way in-
tersects Prince Street. A roundabout is
also placed at this intersection to slow
traffic and to keep it moving.
Commercial and mixed-use devel-
opment start to alternate back and
forth down Commerce Way, providing
for a more dense central thoroughfare.
A community center and recreational
park are also provided at the entrance
to Main Street, along with traditional
mixed-use development.
The creation of a large park north
of the realigned Commerce Way and
Prince Street intersection allows for
the bank and drive-in restaurant to be
preserved and helps to create a
stronger sense of place for this central
node. The multifamily housing block
creates for a nice transition from open
park to dense single-family housing.


Strategy 3 Plan












CHAPTER VII
Design Development





















. ... ... .... .. . ...3 7


LUMMEKLE WAY: An URBAN REVITALIZE N









DESIGN DEVELOPMENT


Design Development

A final strategy plan was developed that proposes a number of
changes to the Commerce Way corridor. Traffic congestion has been
alleviated, economic viability has been increased, many aesthetic im-
provements have been suggested, pedestrian use and safety has been
increased, and desirable destinations are abundant.
Once again, the final strategy plan and the design details should be
used strictly as a zoning guide that depict where the appropriate
placement of different types of development should occur.
The plan and details suggest different planting zones, but mainly
depict areas of building placement, minimum sidewalk widths, plant-
ing and buffer zones, and zones for parking. It is important to once
again understand that buildings and parking lots do not have to com-
pletely fill the zones in which they are suggested, but merely be
placed within these zones. Parking lots and their entry/egress areas
should not fill the areas in which they are zoned, but should be placed
within these areas and should contain tree islands to enhance the mi-
croclimate comfort.
Design guidelines (Chapter 8) should be referenced in order to un-
derstand suggested architectural styles and the suggested types of
planting material that should be incorporated.

39


LUMMEKLE WAY: AIN UKHAN REVITALIZATION






CHAPTER VII


Final Strategy

The final strategy combines differ-
ent aspects from all three of the con-
ceptual strategy plans. A large park,
mixed-use and commercial develop-
ment, and existing development make
up and provide for the identity of a
town center where Commerce Way in-
tersects Prince Street. Commercial and
mixed-use development alternate along
Commerce Way while multifamily
housing is provided to increase the den-
sity along the corridor. A community
center and mixed-use development are
provided at the entrance to Main Street.
Additionally, all parking areas have
been moved to the rear of the buildings
for enhanced aesthetic quality. A series
of plazas have been strategically placed
throughout the site to provide desirable
destinations and to serve as lush pocket
parks to relieve users of the intense sun
and weather conditions.
Finally, a roundabout has been
placed at the intersection of Commerce
Way and Prince Street to calm traffic
while keeping it moving to alleviate
congestion at the intersection. On-street
parking, oversized sidewalks, and
streetscape additions provide for user
comfort and safety while creating the
appearance of a successful boulevard.






DESIGN DEVELOPMENT


Commercial
Mixed-Use Detail
Commercial
Mitd-Uls
m Existing
Sidewalks

Parking I Roadway
- Parking Enry Egress
1 Formal Streiscape
SStylized Landscaplng
SStormwaer Ietention
SAreas ofVisual Impacl
SSmll Street e
SLarge Boulevard Tree


Town Center Detail

The development of a town center
provides a sense of place for this impor-
tant node. Commercial development
placed within the existing unutilized
parking area of the grocery store and strip
mall, as well as a mixed-use development
across the street, increase the density of
the area.
The existing drive-in restaurant and
bank are enveloped within a new park
that serves as an opportunity to start pro-
viding desirable public destinations
throughout the city. Plaza spaces provide
the opportunity to provide retreats from
the intense sun and other weather condi-
tions, while also providing areas in which
signage for businesses may be placed.
Vegetation has been added to medi-
ans, parking lots, the roundabout, and
green spaces. Buildings surrounding the
roundabout should address the round-
about to truly enhance the idea of having
a town center.








41


"tllJ
�W


COMMERCE WAY: AN URBAN REVITALIZATION






CHAPTER VII


Multifamily Block Detail

The multifamily block provides a nice transition from the open
public space to the more private single-family residential spaces.
Parallel parking begins along Commerce Way at the multifamily
block and continues all the way down to the proposed Community
Center. Each multifamily unit along the side streets should be pro-
vided with off-street parking consisting of driveways and garages.
By placing the units closer to the street than typical, an urban
streetscape begins to form and a semi-private central area for resi-
dents is formed behind the buildings. This area can serve multiple
purposes such as stormwater detention, locations for various recrea-
tional activities, and as open green space.
It is important to note in this detail that the orange color details
where multiple buildings should be located and does not suggest
that the entire block be developed as one-multifamily building with
several units.
Additionally, smaller street trees should be placed in the median
to create a more personalized boulevard along the area between the
community center and town center as opposed to the larger street
trees that create a grand boulevard indicative of the nodal areas.


M








sw �
I IIF


ultifamily Detail
MutUiramil
Sidesalk.
Parklne I Roadway
Driveway Entr Eg
Formal SIr escape
Stylind Landscaping
Stormwater Dttenlitn
Small Sirecl Tree
Large Boulevard Tree






DESIGN DEVELOPMENT


D__ mm


Commercial
Mixed-Use Detail
Commercial

SidE-klll
i/ Plata
SParkindglRod�=

SF.rmal SCretsc.pe
l Stylild Lndclipiipg
- StormwaIler Detenion
SSmall Stret Tre
SLarge Bouleard Tree


Typical Mixed-Use and Commercial Detail

By alternating mixed-use development and com-
mercial development throughout the Commerce
Way corridor, housing and desirable destinations
can be intertwined. By increasing the density within
these areas of the corridor, the practicality of being
able to live in a walkable community becomes
more realistic.
Parking for these developments should be acces-
sible via the side streets, and buffers between the
parking lots and the existing residential areas
should be placed. All streetscape plantings should
be designed to have a more formal feel, whereas
parking lots and the rear and sides of the buildings,
as well as the buffers, may be much more stylized
and individualistic.













N43
N


COMMERCE WAY: AN URBAN REVITALIZATION







CHAPTER VII


Community Center Detail


By placing a community center within the middle of the
city, it is easily accessible to residents of the area who will
walk or ride their bikes to take advantage of its facilities.
The community center is also central to many schools, a
proposed senior living development, and multiple religious
institutions. It should provide both passive and active recrea-
tional facilities, and should be able to provide services for
individuals of all ages.
Finally, the center serves as a terminus to pedestrian and
vehicular traffic travelling from the northeast end of the site.
It should address the alignment of Commerce Way to
achieve such a result.


0 500_


a'


Community
Center Detail
Community Center
Side.wks
Parking/ Roadway
~-- Parking Entry / Egress
1 Formal SIreecape
- Stylied Landscapina
SPark / Rcreational Aram
- Stormwater Drettacil
SAres or Visual Impact
SSmall Street Tree
SLarge Boule.ard Tree


I I i I


i I


500






DESIGN DEVELOPMENT


Proposed Streetscape

The addition of a continuous streetscape allows not only for en-
hanced aesthetic quality, but also allows for safer and more comfort-
able pedestrian conditions by providing a designated area for the pe-
destrian to use. A landscaped median also adds to the aesthetic qual-
ity of the corridor and will cause vehicular travel to progress through
the site much more cautiously and at a slower rate.


Existing Conditions


Proposed Section


4
COMMERCE WAY: AN URBAN REVITALIZATION


�






CHAPTER VII


Proposed Roundabout

The addition of a landscaped roundabout allows not only for en-
hanced aesthetic quality, but will also keep traffic moving at a steady
rate through the Commerce Way and Prince Street intersection.
Mixed-use and commercial development will truly make this area
lively and provide for the feeling of a town center.


Existing Conditions


Proposed Section


L C L r






DESIGN DEVELOPMENT


Proposed Plaza

Proposed Plazas

ti The addition of plazas throughout the site allows not only for en-
hanced aesthetic quality, but also allows for desirable destinations
and attractive off-street entrances to new development.


Existing Conditions


4
COMMERCE WAY: AN URBAN REVITALIZATION


kf�L















CHAPTER VIII
Design Guidelines





















.... ... .... ... ...4 9


LUMMEKLE WAY: An URBAN REVITALIZE N









DESIGN GUIDELINES


Design Guidelines

Design guidelines have been established in order to suggest plant-
ing material and architectural styles for the Commerce Way corridor.
Planting material should consist largely of native plants and local suc-
cesses, while the architectural and elemental details should mimic the
territoriality typical of New Mexico. By adhering to a few basic
guidelines, a sense of place is developed as opposed to the creation of
Anywhere, USA.
It is important to note that the following examples are typical
plants of the region, and the plant palette is much more extensive than
shown. Other planting materials may be used, however, the plants in
the guidelines only suggest the types of plants to be used. Architec-
tural and elemental examples are also only used for suggestive pur-
poses and actual building and site furnishing styles should be based
upon specific architectural designs.




51


LUMMEKLE WAY: AIN UKHAN REVITALIZATION






CHAPTER VIII


Large Trees
Red Oak
Austrian Pine
Honey Locust
Elm Varieties
Ash Varieties


Small Trees
Desert Willow
New Mexico Olive
New Mexico Privet
Wild Plum
Bradford Pear


Shrubs
Creosote Bush
Agave
Dogwood
Sage Varieties
Yuccas


Flowers
Yarrow
Columbine Varieties
Coreopsis
Coneflowers
Mexican Hat


Grasses
Blue Grama Grass
Buffalo Grass
Bermuda Grass


mllluw


New Mexico Privet


rarry Agave
'I_ -� m LICNe


LolumoDne


*Photo Source: Plants of the Southwest, www.plantsofthesouthwest.com






DESIGN GUIDELINES


Architectural and Elemental Guidelines

The architecture and elements of the site should be indicative of
the territorial southwest. Some properties of this style include many
vivid colors, earthen building elements, and diverse building designs.


LOIOT0IU 1 Ie WOrK


Typical Building Details Unique Building Design
*Photo Sources: Dan Heller, www.danheller.com (bottom left); Ken Rockwell, www.kenrockwell.com (remaining)
COMMERCE WAY: AN URBAN REVITALIZATION


LVAlullil -LIld-ayu
















SOURCES CITED
























. ... ... .... .. . ...5 5


LUMMEKLE WAY: An URBAN REVITALIZE N









SOURCES CITED

History Information:
McAlavy, Don, and Harold Kilmer. Curry County High Plains Historical Foundation, Curry County, New Mexico. Dallas, TX: Taylor
Publishing Company, 1978.

Case Studies:
1: Smart Growth Online. "Smart Growth In Action: Belmar's Walkable Downtown, Lakewood, Colorado." 2008. Retrieved 3 March 2008.

Cool Town Studios. "Pedestrian malls - good or bad?" 2005. Retrieved 3 March 2008.

2: Smart Growth Gateway. "Case Studies in Smart Growth." 2008. Retrieved 6 March 2008.

JCEDC. "The Hub At Martin Luther King Drive." 2008. Retrieved 6 March 2008.

3: Smart Growth Online. " Smart Growth In Action: Baldwin Park Naval Base Redevelopment Project, Orlando, Florida." 2008. Retrieved 3
March 2008.
New Broad Street Companies. "Baldwin Park." 2008. Retrieved 3 March 2008.


Demographic Data:
Wikipedia. "Clovis, New Mexico." 2008. Retrieved 2 February 2008.


Inventory/Analysis Information:
All inventory and analysis information is public record information obtained either from the Public Works Department, Clovis, New Mexico, or
the Clovis Carver Library.

Design Guidelines:
Photo Credits: Plants of the Southwest,
Dan Heller,
Ken Rockwell,

Books of Interest:
Cumberlidge, Claire, and Lucy Musgrave. Design and Landscape for People: New Approaches to Renewal. New York, NY: Thames & Hudson
Ltd., 2007.
Hardwick, M. Jeffrey. Mall Maker Victor Gruen, Architect of an American Dream. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: University of Pennsylvania
Press, 2003.
COMMERCE WAY: AN URBAN REVITALIZATION57
COMMERCE WAY: AN URBAN REVITALIZATION







Full Text

PAGE 1

An Urban Revitalization Adam B. Wood, Student ASLA Senior Capstone Project Spring 2008 Department of Landscape Architecture College of Design, Cons truction and Planning University of Florida

PAGE 3

Thank you to the City of Clovis employees who met with me to discuss this project, provided me with the information I requested, and supported my desire to address issues occurring in my hometown. The development of this book woul d not have been possible without the support of the faculty in the Department of Landscape Architecture, University of Florida. I will be forever grateful for all of the knowledge and wisdom that has been passed along to me during this chapter of my life. Attending the University of Florid a would not have been possible without the never-ending support fro m my family. I will never be able to fully show how thankful and appreciative I am for their support and guidance. Finally, special thanks to Terry Schnadelbach for the inspiration he gave me to complete this proj ect. This project would not have yielded such successful results wi thout his wisdom and guidance. An additional thanks to Tina Gurucharri and Kay Williams. These two faculty members assisted me through the final stages of this capstone project and went out of their way to make sure I successfully completed the requirements to fulfill the Bachelor of Landscape Architecture degree. COMMERCE WAY: AN URBAN REVITALIZATION

PAGE 5

Project Overview Site Location Site Boundaries Goals and Objectives Jersey City, New Jersey Orlando, Florida Lakewood, Colorado Program Topography, Floodplain, and Soils Sewage and Utilities Points of Interest Inventory/Zoning Map Analysis Map Existing Conditions COMMERCE WAY: AN URBAN REVITALIZATION Synthesis Map Forward Conceptual Strategies Forward Final Strategy Details Proposed Sections Sources 3 4 5 6 9 10 11 15 19 20 21 22 23 24-25 29 33 34-36 39 40 41-44 45-47 51 52 53 57 Forward Landscape Material Guidelines Architectural and Elemental Guidelines

PAGE 7

COMMERCE WAY: AN URBAN REVITALIZATION Project Introduction 1

PAGE 9

PROJECT INTRODUCTION COMMERCE WAY: AN URBAN REVITALIZATION 3 Clovis, the county seat of Curry C ounty, is a small town located in central-eastern New Mexico. It was es tablished in the early 1900s as the eastern terminal of the Belen Cutoff for the Santa Fe Railroad. Since its early days, economic growth has been cl osely tied to thre e main factors: the railroad, agriculture, and retail trade. Cannon Air Force Base, located a few miles west of the city, is al so instrumental in providing Clovis businesses with commerce and an in creased economic base and workforce. The Main Street and downtown areas of Clovis have been in recession for the last few decades, and an effort to revitalize the downtown has become a priority. With fuel prices ri sing and the sustainability movement growing, it is becoming apparent that cities must stop providing for urban sprawl and start redeveloping the stro ng inner cores that were evident of the early– to mid-1900s. Commerce Way, a collector road in central Clovis, New Mexico, is slowly turning into an untravele d, unsightly, and unkempt thoroughfare. Once a vital connection to Main Street and the downtown area, the Commerce Way corridor has seen a loss of business, residence, and traffic with the continuation of Prince Street to the main highway on the southern edge of town many years ago. This independent senior caps tone project was conducted in order to offer suggestions to the City of Clov is on how to redeve lop the city’s inner core, alleviate traffic congestion at the Prince Street and 21st Street intersection, and how to provide a sense of place within a new town center. The study hopes to provide additional insight on ways to revitalize and repopulate the historic downtown community as well. The independent senior capstone project is required in order to fulfill all obligations for the Bachelor of Landscape Architecture (BLA) degree. Sufficient understanding of landscape ar chitecture and practices must be exhibited in order to successfully fulfill this requirement.

PAGE 10

CHAPTER I

PAGE 11

PROJECT INTRODUCTION COMMERCE WAY: AN URBAN REVITALIZATION The corridor boundaries for the purposes of this study incl ude the transparent green areas along Commerce Wa y. The dumbbel l appearance of the boundary creates larger nodes at each end of Commerce Way. Th is will create the opportunity to enhance those nodal areas an d provide desirable destinations in-between in or der to pull users through the site. 5

PAGE 12

CHAPTER I A. Provide for the health, sa fety, and welfare of users 1. Provide for a comfortable microclimate and enhanced aesthetic quality 2. Minimize vehicular and pedestrian conflicts 3. Increase traffic flow while decreasing congestion 4. Provide opportunities for all users: Elderly, Middle-aged, and Children 5. Provide open spaces for walkability and active living B. Provide for a sense of place 1. Respect the character and ecology of the region 2. Create an identity for the site 3. Provide activities to draw people into the area 4. Build upon existing strengths C. Boost economic viability 1. Provide commercial areas in the center of town 2. Take advantage of urban infill opportunities 2. Draw business into th e rehabilitating downtown A. Provide a cohesive plan for the City of Clovis to use for future planning B. Offer suggestions to help beautify and redevelop Clovis C. Develop a thorough plan base d upon urban design principles D. Fulfill the requirements for a Bachelor of Landscape Architecture degree

PAGE 13

COMMERCE WAY: AN URBAN REVITALIZATION Case Studies 7

PAGE 15

CASE STUDIES It is important to provide case studies in order to e xhibit proven examples from successful projects. This not only builds rapport between a designer and his or her clients, but also provides additional res earch to enhance the designers final product. The following thre e case studies provide examples to help aid the results of this project. Specific exam ples from each case study are portrayed within the final design strategy and these case studies are also provided for the City of Clovis to consider th e possibility of expanding this project to provide successful re sults. The City of Jersey City, in its multiple attempts to revitalize the area around Martin Luther King Drive for over 25 years, le arned firsthand the importance of community involvement and support to achieve redevelopment success. Martin Luther King Drive, formerly known as Jackson Avenue, was once the premier shopping venue in the southern half of the city. Over time, the district and adjacent residential areas began to deteriorate, stores began to close and bu ildings erode. In an effort to combat the decline, the Municipal Council enacted a series of ordinances and redevelopment plans aimed at improving portions of th e 26 block district. Despite consensus around the need to redevel op the area, there was cons iderable debate as to the form for that redevelopment. The Jersey City planning department dr afted three plans, and each of them was rejected by the community at various Planning Board m eetings. In order to avoid more lengthy and heated meetings, the Planni ng Board directed the staff to work with the community to create an acceptable plan. The Martin Luther King Drive Redevelo pment Plan was officially adopted in December 1993. At the core of the plan was the creation of a hub, or village center, to include 100,000 square foot shopping center, restaurants, a Vill age Green, a new US Post Office, and a new station for the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail Transit System. The Martin Luther King Drive Redevelopm ent Plan has been a success, thanks to the cooperative effort between the City and the MLK Neighborhood Development Organization. The Plan itself has received nationa l and statewide awards and rec ognition for its innovative use of community outreach and implementation. The first pha se of the project, th e creation of the hub, is complete and the City and MLK NDC are activel y pursuing the rest of the redevelopment plan as a team. *Photo Source: JCEDC, www.jcedc.org/new/hubatmartinlutherkingdriveos.html 9 COMMERCE WAY: AN URBAN REVITALIZATION

PAGE 16

CHAPTER II When the U.S. Navy announced in 1993 that it would close the Orla ndo Naval Training Center, the city of Orlando saw an opportunity to build a vibrant, mixed-use neighborhood that would make the base property once again part of the community. The city's Base Reuse Commission organized to plan the property's future, engaging citizens in hun dreds of meetings over two years to help devise and refine a plan to redevelop the base. At visioning workshops, citizens described what they wanted: a variety of hous ing types, a vibrant main street, public access to lakes, and linkages with existing neighborhoods. Before rebuilding could begin, 256 build ings, 200 miles of underground utilities, and 25 miles of road had to be dismantled and recycle d. Asbestos and lead paint in the buildings and arsenic and petroleum in the soil needed to be cleaned up. This demolition and clean-up took more than a year. The new development was named Baldwin Park. Since the first model opened in 2003, Baldwin Park has sold lots and houses faster than an y comparable project in the area. When construction ends in 2008, Baldwin Park will have 10,000 residents living in 4,100 homes, ranging from rental apartments to custom homes, built in archite ctural styles traditional to the area. In addition, 6,000 people will work in offices throughout the neighborhood and in shops in the Village Center. Everyone can enjoy over 450 acres of lakes and parks, including over two miles of lakefront property reserved for public use. With publ ic schools near and in Baldwin Park, local children can walk to school. Baldwin Park's residents, workers, visito rs, and neighbors have many choices in how they get around. There are 50 miles of trails and sidewalks on an interconnect ed street grid for walking and biking. Traffic, once blocked by the former ba se's security fence, can now flow through 32 new intersections that connect Baldwin Park streets to surrounding neighborhoods, reducing congestion. The community created 16 extra acres of parkland by using innovative underground stormwater management systems. Audubon of Florida he lped plan parks and we tlands restoration projects, recreating ecosystems that were lost year s ago. Since it is an infill redevelopment project, Baldwin Park can take advantage of existing po wer plants and water and wastewater treatment facilities. At the same time, the city will ga in an additional $30 million in annual property tax revenues. The redevelopment of this former naval base gives the citizens of Orlando what they wanted and planned for: a thriving ne w community and a legacy for future generations to enjoy. *Photo Source: New Broad Street Companies, ww w.newbroadstreet.com/images/photos/BP_pizza2.jpg

PAGE 17

CASE STUDIES In communities across the country, aging shopping centers are losing business to larger and newer competitors. As these retail centers, known as ''greyfields,'' cease to be viable as shopping malls, they can often provide opportunities for re development that meet other community needs. One good example can be found in Lakewood, Colora do. Facing the decline of its Villa Italia shopping mall, the city worked with citizens, civic groups, and a lo cal developer to transform the property into Belmar-the real, walkable downt own that this Denver i nner suburb had lacked. Belmar's traditional grid of narrow streets and small blocks replaces the footprint of the old mall. At build-out in 2007, these new, pedestrian -friendly blocks will have one million square feet of shops, restaurants, and other serv ices. The development will also include 1,300 new homes, including townhouses, loft apartments, and live-work units. Belmar will have 700,000 square feet of the first new Class-A office space bu ilt in the area in over a decade. Nine acres of parks and plazas will give people a place to get t ogether, relax, and enjoy festivals, markets, and other entertainment. Belmar also offers gallerie s and studio spaces to artists to make the development an arts hub. Putting time and effort into a high-qual ity redevelopment has been a great investment for Lakewood. Belmar brings a new sense of vibrancy and prosperity to the area. The redevelopment would not have been possible without a st rong partnership between the city and the developer. The inclusive process transformed citizens' concerns about losing the mall into civic pride for their new downtown. Belmar's first phase has been a success. It s retail income is comparable to higher-end malls. Belmar's office space is fully leased, and rent al and for-sale housing ar e outperforming the local market. Upon Belmar's completion, the city esti mates it will add $952 million to the local economy and will directly create over 7,000 permanent jobs. Belmar illustrates how the loss of a commu nity resource like a shopping mall can become an asset. With creative, inclusive planning, Lakew ood turned this underused site into a vibrant downtown with new home choices, shopping opti ons, and civic spaces for its citizens. *Photo Sources: Cool Town Studios, www.cooltownstudios.com/mt/archives/week_2005_11_13.html 11 COMMERCE WAY: AN URBAN REVITALIZATION

PAGE 19

COMMERCE WAY: AN URBAN REVITALIZATION Program Development 13

PAGE 21

PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT As this study was conducted solely as an exhibition for th e City of Clovis to suggest ways in which Commerce Way may be re developed and how to alleviate traffic conges tion along Prince Street, no specific program was given to aid in th e results of this project. T he demographics shown below were collected from the 2000 Decennial Census a nd solely provide statistica l data for presentation. All of the results for this projec t come from surrounding and existing land uses and suggest ways to enhance those areas. For example, located either within the corridor or lo cated within extremely close proximity to the site are recreational fi elds, a public park, two public schools, and a proposed senior living development. Several religious facilities are loca ted throughout the corridor and within close proximity to the site. Professional offices including medical practices, law offices, and accounting firms are located not only thr oughout, but also surrounding th e corridor as well. It is for these reasons that the final strategy plan stresses the importance that the co mmunity facilities placed upon the site provide opportunities for users of all backgrounds and ages. It is also advised that any commercial and/or residential development be aimed toward a wide range of users and not specifically targeting one user group. By doing so, this area can truly b ecome a mixed-use, mixed-demographic area. As of the census of 2000, there were 32,667 people, 12,458 hou seholds, and 8,596 families residi ng in the city. The population density was 1,458.9 people per square mile (563.3/km²). There were 14,269 housing units at an average density of 637.3/sq mi (246.1/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 37.86% White, 7.32% African Am erican, 1.02% Native American, 1.62% Asian, 0.13% Pacific Islan der, 14.98% from other races, and 3.63% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino were 33.44% of the populati on. Much of the Hispanic/Latin populatio n knows Spanish, with codeswitching also common. To some extent, the community is divide d between "Anglos" (non-Hispanic Caucasians) and Hispanics/Latino s, though much social interaction does occur. There were 12,458 households out of which 36.3% had children unde r the age of 18 living with them, 49.8% were married couples l iving together, 14.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.0% were non-families. 26.8% of all households were made up of individuals an d 10.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average hou sehold size was 2.57 and the average family size was 3.12. 30.0% are under the age of 18 the largest segment; 9.4% are fro m 18 to 24; 28.1% are from 25 to 44; 19.5% from 45 to 64; and 13.0% are 65 or older. The median age is 33 years. Gender ratio is somewhat titled toward fe male population with an overall ra tio of 100:92.5 females to mal es. For the adult population (18 and over), it is even more strongly titled at 100:88.1 females to males. The median income for a household in the city was $28,878, and the median income for a family was $33,622. Males had a median i ncome of $26,586 versus $20,375 for females. The per capita income fo r the city was $15,561. About 17.2% of fa milies and 21.0% of the population were b elow the poverty line, including 28.2% of those under age 18 and 14.6% of those age 65 or over. 15

PAGE 23

Inventory and Analysis COMMERCE WAY: AN URBAN REVITALIZATION 17

PAGE 25

INVENTORY AND ANALYSIS COMMERCE WAY: AN URBAN REVITALIZATION : The topography trough the site corridor gently slopes toward the middle of the site. No severe slopes exist within the site providing for ease of redevelopment. : The transparent red color represents the 100 year floodplain. A large drainage system has been installed along this pa th in order to prevent severe flooding during such an event. : The soils within the corridor are comprised of Amarillo soils. These soils are developable, as currently utilized, an d also provide an ideal medium for agricultural purposes. By taking an inventor y of the site, including ( but not limited to) topog raphy, soils, utilities, tr affic loads, and import ant nodes, certain parameters start to develop that will provide either opportunities or co nstraints for the conceptual and design development phases. These parameters are then outlined in an analysis and become an essential building block for the rest of the design process. 19

PAGE 26

CHAPTER IV : The sewage system (as shown) is laid out in a manner such that redevelopment of the area will require only minor sewage system changes. : The utilities (not shown) throughout the site are located within the alleys and have a north/south orientation. Redevelopment of the area will require only minor utility system changes.

PAGE 27

COMMERCE WAY: AN URBAN REVITALIZATION INVENTORY AND ANALYSIS : The Commerce Way corridor, being centrally located, is in close proximity to parks, recreational fields, and green space, is surrounded by educational facilities, and also has a number of civic buildings and points of in terest to the south. 21

PAGE 28

CHAPTER IV

PAGE 29

COMMERCE WAY: AN URBAN REVITALIZATION INVENTORY AND ANALYSIS 1. Marshall Junior High: Beautiful historic building, established landscape. Nice views into building from corridor. 2. Citizens Bank of Clovis: Drive-thru banking facility. Unique character provides for interesting views from corridor. 3. Green Acres Lake: A playa lake that has served the community since it was established. Used mainly for drainage, however, many people fish in this lake as well. Location of the July 4th festivities. 4. Trailer Park: Subpar/dilapidated housing conditions directly to the east of an elementary school. 5. Twin Cronies: Local drive-in restaurant. Not pretty to look at, but a local hot-spot. 6. New Mexico Bank and Trust: Unique building provides a nice view from corridor. 7. Strip Mall: Contains a Hobby Lobby, Albertsons, IHOP, gas station, Hastings, two pizza restaurants, and other various commercial businesses. Needs visual buffer. 8. Marshall Junior High Football Field and Track 23

PAGE 30

CHAPTER IV

PAGE 31

COMMERCE WAY: AN URBAN REVITALIZATION INVENTORY AND ANALYSIS 25

PAGE 33

COMMERCE WAY: AN URBAN REVITALIZATION Synthesis 27

PAGE 35

SYNTHESIS COMMERCE WAY: AN URBAN REVITALIZATION : Sites deemed redevelopable include areas of expansive and unused parking lots, dilapidated and/or vacant structures, unaesthetic buildings, barns/sheds, and empty lots. : Sites that may add value based on their unique character (i.e.: banks), local popularity (i.e.: drive-in restaura nt), and established economic value (i.e.: small retail center). : Protected sites include those sites that will be retained within the final plans. These sites are mainly educational and religious facilities, but also incl ude viable businesses. The synthesis is the combination of the inventory and analysis research. By compiling all of this material within the formation of one plan, the opportunities and constraints can be easily visualized to aid in the different stages of conceptual design. 29

PAGE 37

COMMERCE WAY: AN URBAN REVITALIZATION Strategy Development 31

PAGE 39

STRATEGY DEVELOPMENT COMMERCE WAY: AN URBAN REVITALIZATION Since an architect was not involved throughout the development of this project, a number of different strategies were conceptually developed that do not address issues such as architectural building design. Rather, these strategies should be used as a zoning guide that depict where the appropriate placem ent of different types of development should occur. Although each of the strategy plans share their own strengths and weaknesses, they all provide opportun ities for green/pa rk space, parking, civic development, commercial development, mixed-use development, multifamily development, and the preservation of existing infrastructure/businesses. The development of a town center begins to emerge within the different strategi es to provide a sense of place for this area. 33

PAGE 40

CHAPTER VI The first conceptual strategy begins to address the development of a town center by utilizing the largely unused parking lot in front of the grocery store and strip mall. Additionally, with the creation of park space and mixed-use development, a more personalized sense of place begins to emerge. The entrance to downtown Main Street takes on a more typical downtown setting, with mixed-use development on each corner. Multifamily housing largely links the two major nodes together while several existing bus inesses are preserved within the f illing of the voids.

PAGE 41

STRATEGY DEVELOPMENT COMMERCE WAY: AN URBAN REVITALIZATION The second con ceptual strategy expands upon the first strategy but starts to examine how the traffic congestion at Prince and 21st Streets can be alleviated. By realigning Commerce Way, its intersection with Prince Street is moved farther to th e south giving traffic more room to travel on Prince before having to make another stop. Other changes include losing some established businesses in lieu of additional park space, the addition of single-family housing, a multifamily housing square, and additional commercial and mixed-use development to tie Commerce Way into Main Street. 35

PAGE 42

The third conceptual strategy even further expands upon strategies one and two, but creates more of a focus upon creating a town center where the new alignment of Commerce Way intersects Prince Street. A roundabout is also placed at this intersection to slow traffic and to keep it moving. Commercial and mixed-use development start to alternate back and forth down Commer ce Way, providing for a more dense central thoroughfare. A community center and recreational park are also provided at the entrance to Main Street, al ong with traditional mixed-use development. The creation of a large park north of the realigned Commerce Way and Prince Street intersection allows for the bank and drive-in restaurant to be preserved and helps to create a stronger sense of place for this central node. The multifamily housing block creates for a nice transition from open park to dense single-family housing. CHAPTER VI

PAGE 43

COMMERCE WAY: AN URBAN REVITALIZATION Design Development 37

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DESIGN DEVELOPMENT COMMERCE WAY: AN URBAN REVITALIZATION A final strategy plan was develo ped that proposes a number of changes to the Commerce Way corri dor. Traffic congestion has been alleviated, economic viability has been increased, many aesthetic improvements have been suggested, pedestrian use and safety has been increased, and desirable de stinations are abundant. Once again, the final strategy plan and the design details should be used strictly as a zoning guide that depict where the appropriate placement of different types of development should occur. The plan and details suggest different planting zones, but mainly depict areas of building placement, minimum sidewalk widths, planting and buffer zones, and zones for parking. It is important to once again understand that buildings and parking lots do not have to completely fill the zones in which th ey are suggested, but merely be placed within these zones. Parking lots and their entry/egress areas should not fill the areas in which they are zoned, but should be placed within these areas and should contain tree islands to enhance the microclimate comfort. Design guidelines (Chapter 8) should be referenced in order to understand suggested architectural st yles and the suggested types of planting material that sh ould be incorporated. 39

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CHAPTER VII The final strategy combines different aspects from a ll three of the conceptual strategy plans. A large park, mixed-use and commercial development, and existing development make up and provide for the identity of a town center where Commerce Way intersects Prince Street. Commercial and mixed-use development alternate along Commerce Way while multifamily housing is provided to increase the density along the corridor. A community center and mixed-use development are provided at the entrance to Main Street. Additionally, all parking areas have been moved to the rear of the buildings for enhanced aesthetic quality. A series of plazas have been strategically placed throughout the site to provide desirable destinations and to serve as lush pocket parks to relieve user s of the intense sun and weather conditions. Finally, a roundabout has been placed at the intersection of Commerce Way and Prince Street to calm traffic while keeping it moving to alleviate congestion at the intersection. On-street parking, oversized sidewalks, and streetscape additions provide for user comfort and safety while creating the appearance of a successful boulevard.

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DESIGN DEVELOPMENT COMMERCE WAY: AN URBAN REVITALIZATION The development of a town center provides a sense of place for this important node. Commercial development placed within the existing unutilized parking area of the gr ocery store and strip mall, as well as a mixed-use development across the street, incr ease the density of the area. The existing drive-in restaurant and bank are enveloped within a new park that serves as an opportunity to start providing desirable public destinations throughout the city. Plaza spaces provide the opportunity to prov ide retreats from the intense sun and other weather conditions, while also provi ding areas in which signage for businesses may be placed. Vegetation has been added to medians, parking lots, the roundabout, and green spaces. Buildings surrounding the roundabout should address the roundabout to truly enhance the idea of having a town center. 41

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CHAPTER VII The multifamily block provides a nice transition from the open public space to the more private single-family residential spaces. Parallel parking begins along Co mmerce Way at the multifamily block and continues all the way down to the proposed Community Center. Each multifamily unit along the side streets should be provided with off-street parking cons isting of driveways and garages. By placing the units closer to the street than typical, an urban streetscape begins to form and a semi-private central area for residents is formed behind the buildings. This area can serve multiple purposes such as stormwater detent ion, locations for various recreational activities, and as open green space. It is important to note in this detail that the orange color details where multiple buildings should be located and doe s not suggest that the entire block be develope d as one-multifamily building with several units. Additionally, smaller street trees should be placed in the median to create a more personalized boul evard along the area between the community center and town center as opposed to the larger street trees that create a grand boulevar d indicative of the nodal areas.

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DESIGN DEVELOPMENT COMMERCE WAY: AN URBAN REVITALIZATION By alternating mixed-use development and commercial development throughout the Commerce Way corridor, housing and desirable destinations can be intertwined. By increasing the density within these areas of the corridor, the practicality of being able to live in a walkable community becomes more realistic. Parking for these developments should be accessible via the side streets, and buffers between the parking lots and the existing residential areas should be placed. All stre etscape plantings should be designed to have a mo re formal feel, whereas parking lots and the rear and sides of the buildings, as well as the buffers, may be much more stylized and individualistic. 43

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CHAPTER VII By placing a community center within the middle of the city, it is easily accessible to residents of the area who will walk or ride their bikes to take advantage of its facilities. The community center is also central to many schools, a proposed senior living developm ent, and multiple religious institutions. It should provide both passive and active recreational facilities, and should be able to provide services for individuals of all ages. Finally, the center serves as a terminus to pedestrian and vehicular traffic travelling from the northeast end of the site. It should address the ali gnment of Commerce Way to achieve such a result.

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DESIGN DEVELOPMENT COMMERCE WAY: AN URBAN REVITALIZATION The addition of a continuous streetscape allows not only for enhanced aesthetic quality, but also allows for safer and more comfortable pedestrian conditions by providing a designated area for the pedestrian to use. A landscaped median also adds to the aesthetic quality of the corridor and will cause ve hicular travel to progress through the site much more cautiously and at a slower rate. 45

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CHAPTER VII The addition of a landscaped roundabout allows not only for enhanced aesthetic quality, but will al so keep traffic moving at a steady rate through the Commerce Way and Prince Street intersection. Mixed-use and commercial development will truly make this area lively and provide for the feeling of a town center.

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DESIGN DEVELOPMENT COMMERCE WAY: AN URBAN REVITALIZATION The addition of plazas througho ut the site allows not only for enhanced aesthetic quality, but also allows for desirable destinations and attractive off-street entrances to new development. 47

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COMMERCE WAY: AN URBAN REVITALIZATION Design Guidelines 49

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DESIGN GUIDELINES COMMERCE WAY: AN URBAN REVITALIZATION Design guidelines have been estab lished in order to suggest planting material and architectural styl es for the Commerce Way corridor. Planting material should consist larg ely of native plants and local successes, while the architectural and elemental details should mimic the territoriality typical of New Mexi co. By adhering to a few basic guidelines, a sense of place is developed as opposed to the creation of Anywhere, USA. It is important to note th at the following examples are typical plants of the region, and the plant palette is much more extensive than shown. Other planting materials may be used, however, the plants in the guidelines only suggest the types of plants to be used. Architectural and elemental examples are also only used for suggestive purposes and actual building and site furnishing styles should be based upon specific architectural designs. 51

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CHAPTER VIII Red Oak Austrian Pine Honey Locust Elm Varieties Ash Varieties Desert Willow New Mexico Olive New Mexico Privet Wild Plum Bradford Pear Creosote Bush Agave Dogwood Sage Varieties Yuccas Yarrow Columbine Varieties Coreopsis Coneflowers Mexican Hat Blue Grama Grass Buffalo Grass Bermuda Grass New Mexico Privet Desert Willow Honey Locust Wild Plum Dogwood Sand Sage Blue Grama Grass Parry Agave Coneflower Columbine Mexican Hat Flower Plains Coreopsis *Photo Source: Plants of the Southw est, www.plantsofthesouthwest.com

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The architecture and elements of the site should be indicative of the territorial southwest. Some prop erties of this style include many vivid colors, earthen building elemen ts, and diverse building designs. DESIGN GUIDELINES Colorful Signage Colorful Tile Work Unique Building Design Typical Building Details *Photo Sources: Dan Heller, www.danhe ller.com (bottom left); Ken Rockwell, www.kenrockwell.com (remaining) COMMERCE WAY: AN URBAN REVITALIZATION 53

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COMMERCE WAY: AN URBAN REVITALIZATION 55

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SOURCES CITED COMMERCE WAY: AN URBAN REVITALIZATION 57 : McAlavy, Don, and Harold Kilmer. Curry County High Plains Historical Founda tion, Curry County, New Mexico . Dallas, TX: Taylor Publishing Company, 1978. 1: Smart Growth Online. “Smart Growth In Action: Be lmar's Walkable Downtown, Lakew ood, Colorado.” 2008. Retrieved 3 March 2008. Cool Town Studios. “Pedestrian malls good or bad?” 2005. Retrieved 3 March 2008. 2: Smart Growth Gateway. “Case Studi es in Smart Growth.” 2008. Retrieved 6 March 2008. JCEDC. “The Hub At Martin Luther King Drive.” 2008. Retrieved 6 March 2008. 3: Smart Growth Online. “ Smart Growth In Action: Ba ldwin Park Naval Base Redevelopm ent Project, Orlando, Florida.” 2008. Retrieved 3 March 2008. New Broad Street Companies. “Baldwin Park.” 2008. Retrieved 3 March 2008. Wikipedia. “Clovis, New Me xico.” 2008. Retrieved 2 February 2008. All inventory and analysis informa tion is public record information obtained eith er from the Public Works Department, Clov is, New Mexico, or the Clovis Carver Library. Photo Credits: Plants of the S outhwest, Dan Heller, Ken Rockwell, Cumberlidge, Claire, and Lucy Musgrave. Desi gn and Landscape for People: New Approaches to Renewal . New York, NY: Thames & Hudson Ltd., 2007. Hardwick, M. Jeffrey. Mall Maker Vict or Gruen, Architect of an American Dream . Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2003.


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