Citation
Randolf District

Material Information

Title:
Randolf District a vibrant corridor...Jacksonville, Florida
Creator:
O'Reilly, Timothy
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
62 p. : ill. ;

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Architectural design ( jstor )
Buildings ( jstor )
Cities ( jstor )
City centers ( jstor )
Corridors ( jstor )
Design analysis ( jstor )
Drug design ( jstor )
Land use ( jstor )
Pedestrian traffic ( jstor )
Urban design ( jstor )
City of Jacksonville ( local )
Genre:
non-fiction ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
Advisor(s): Terry Schnadelbach.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
004819045 ( AlephBibNum )
1056493829 ( OCLC )

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Full Text

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the randolph


district: a vibrant corridor...
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Senior Capstone Project
by
Timothy David O'Reilly
University of Florida
Department of Landscape Architecture


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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor


acknowledgements...


dedication...
This book is dedicated to my family and friends
who have always supported me through the
toughest times. Thank you for your love and
support.

a special thanks to...
My sister Colleen for introducing me to the art of
Landscape Architecture.

Mom and Dad for always being there for me and
supporting me in everything I have ever done.

Heather for being by my side through the thick
and thin and supporting me every step of the way.

My Uncle John for all the interesting newspaper
articles and financial contributions that have
helped me along the way.

Richard and Lesia Stewart for always having a
spot for me at Mulch Masters, when I needed
some extra cash, and your financial contributions
that have helped me along the way.

The UF Department of Landscape Architecture
faculty for pushing me to become a successful
student and young professional.

Terry Schnadelbach for your guidance in this
project and helping me along the way.

Shawn Bliss and everyone at Prosser Hallock
for introducing me to this project. Also, thank you
for the knowledge and experience you gave me
during my internships. It was a great experience
and an essential part of my education process.

ASLA for recognizing my hard work and
dedication during my student years.

To all of my classmates. It has been quite the
expereince spending the past four years with all
of you.


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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor


table of contents...


7.......introduction...
8......... mission statement
10....... goals and objectives
11....... project site and location
13....... design program
13....... user groups
14....... current issues
14....... the corridor
15....... history

17.....research...
18.......surrounding projects
21.......existing design guidelines
22.......case studies
28....... smart growth
29....... form based code

1 .....inventory, analysis, and synthesis...
32....... open space & social services
33....... civic identity elements
34....... housing
35....... structure, ecology & physiography
36....... urban transects
36........land use transect
37........public use transect
38....... site synthesis - fixed free diagram
39....... opportunities & constraints

4.....conceptual design...
42....... concept development

S..... masterplan and design details...
48....... master plan
53....... town square enlargement
55....... transit oriented design (tod) enlargement
57....... a. philip randolph park redesign
60....... conclusion
61....... references


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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
INTRODUCTION


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Ihe randolph disiricl: a vibrant corridor
IrJ TFiC',L.u- T,'lJ


introduction...


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mission statement and intent...

The intent of the proposed project is the into a vibrant

revitalization and infill of the A. Philip Randolph district that w

Corridor that lies within the East Jacksonville enhance futL

Neighborhood District. This neighborhood is a Jacksonville

historical gem that is located in the urban core dilapidated a

of a downtown Jacksonville, Florida community revitalization

that is in dire need of revitalization. Although in decline, ar

Jacksonville is the largest city in the state of negative imp

Florida in terms of area, it is currently lacking bring. There

a true downtown "Main Street" entertainment along the cor

district, use. This are

The A. Philip Randolph Corridor thriving busir

provides a very unique opportunity to create a a busy thoroi

neighborhood "Main Street" and turn the corridor of the reside


the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
INTRODUCTION


, busy, commercial entertainment

iill sustain this community and

ire economic growth. This East

Neighborhood is, in some cases,

nd needs revitalization. The

of the corridor will help a community

id it will aim to minimize any

acts that future development could

is a lot of vacant land and buildings

rridor that would allow for great future

a has many historical buildings,

iesses, and vacant parcels. It is also

ughfare that is a destination for many

nts within the community.


w


-.4 taken,,., ----
Phli Bole .o d
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A.Philip o Bo le -r :
A. Philip Randolp Boulevard - Florida VS. Georgia weekend Picture taken from existing overpass 8




the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
INTRODUCTION


ii


Jacksonville Veterans Memorial Arena & Baseball Grounds of Jacksonville.


The main focus of this project is to direct
economic development throughout the corridor
by providing mixed use retail and residential with
a commercial node that will attract residents and
visitors while maintaining the historic integrity of
the downtown core. The theme for this project
would be defined by two districts: a destination
district characterized by entertainment, shopping,
restaurants, residential, and offices and a
neighborhood district intended to support and
promote the needs and vision of the surrounding
neighborhoods. For example, just north of the
Arlington Expressway overpass would be a great
place to link uses and have a commercial hotel/
restaurant/retail zone that would be noticed by
drivers and pedestrians. This commercial node
would provide linkages from the sports district to
the residential community, and it would help


establish new economic growth and development
in the area. In addition, a trolley hub would
strengthen the image of the corridor and promote
more foot traffic in the area. The A. Philip
Randolph corridor has the opportunity to become
a retail center for residents and a destination for
visitors.
The master plan will be developed
through a rigorous design process that will
include: research, case studies, site observations,
compilation of necessary data, inventory and
analysis of existing conditions, synthesis of
existing conditions, development of a detailed
program through conceptual explorations,
conceptual design, schematic design, final master
plan, and complimenting sections, elevations,
and perspectives to help envision the proposed
design.


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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
INTRODUCTION
goals and objectives...


1. Provide health, safety, and welfare for all users of the A. Philip Randolph Corridor and the

East Jacksonville Neighborhood.

* Direct vehicular, pedestrian, and bicycle circulation to avoid conflict by introducing traffic calming

techniques such as: roundabouts, pedestrian cross walks, bulb outs, and landscaped medians.

* Ensure safety through CPTED (Crime Prevention through Environmental Design) techniques.

* Provide safe and universal access to all areas and amenities of the site to meet ADA requirements.

* Provide a satellite police and emergency station (Comfort to residents and visitors while discrediting

the hood.)

2. To improve the experience of the user and meet there needs and comfort.

* Provide public and open space to link existing and proposed amenities.

* Use microclimate in design using both natural and built amenities.

* Enhance the streetscape and make it more walkable with the addition of landscape, hardscape,

seating, street furniture, lighting, shade, etc.

3. Protection and preservation of natural, cultural, and historic resources.

SSet up design guidelines related to preservation and restoration.

* Recognize and preserve historic homes, buildings, and other structures.

* Capitalize on the distinct geographical identity of the area by creating one that is unique and

promotes the history of the area through interpretation and signage.

4. To create an aesthetically pleasing, sustainable, and inviting downtown entertainment district

that will direct future economic growth and development while maintaining the historical and

cultural integrity of the site.

* Develop a distinct theme that is reflected throughout the area, one which could be included in the

facade improvements and architectural details.

* Improve the visual appearance of the streets.

* Establish "Gateways" for the community's identity.

S Create strategic architectural infill.

* Create cluster areas of like businesses.

SCreate linkages to community centers, parks and recreation, churches, schools, and neighborhoods

through widened sidewalks, bike lanes, trails, etc.


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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
INTRODUCTION
* Recognize alternative transit opportunities through the creation of transit hubs, trolley lines,

improved bus stops and shelters.

* Solar panel every roof in hidden form- city parking garages, arena, and existing structures.

5. Provide creative financing to build.

* Involve the historical society to refurbish and claim all existing historical landmarks.

* City to obtain matching state grants/bond money for urban development.

* City to have an art jury to keep overall design theme.




project site and location...


a southern section by Arlington Expressway.

The northern section of the roadway is

predominately residential in land use, while
the southern section is predominately

commercial. The adjacent roadways in the

northern section are Spearing St. to the west

and Van Buren St. to the East. The corridor

terminates into the shipyards parcel to the

south and into 1st street to the north.

The southern portion of A. Philip

- Randolph is already established as the

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Duval_County_Florida_lncorporated_and sports district. In this section, there is the
Unincorporated_areas_Jacksonville_Highlighted.svg
Jacksonville Veterans Memorial Arena and
A. Philip Randolph Boulevard is located
the Baseball Grounds of Jacksonville, while
in the urban core of downtown Jacksonville. The
Alltel Stadium is only 2 blocks to the east of the
urban core includes the south & north banks of
Baseball Grounds. There is a parking garage
the St. Johns River, east from the Fuller Warren
adjacent to the Veterans Memorial Arena.
Bridge, extending roughly 4 miles north and east.

The corridor is located about 2 1/2 miles east

of the Fuller Warren Bridge. A. Philip Randolph

Boulevard is bisected into a northern section and
11







project site and location...


The A. Philip Randolph corridor is a 2

lane street that is 1 mile long with some historical
buildings, existing businesses, parks, and vacant

buildings and lots. This
boulevard terminates at
the river on the south

end and 1st Street on

the north end. Although
the roadway is only two

lanes, there is on-street

parking along the west
side of the road,
and the sidewalks


the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
INTRODUCTION


are 10 to 12 feet wide with planted trees along

them. This corridor is very close to downtown and
is within walking distance to Alltel Stadium.


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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
INTRODUCTION


The sidewalks are in need of repair, there

is a lack of seating and other street furniture,

the roadway needs repaving, and it needs more

street lighting. The power lines dominate the view

down the corridor and the pay phones promote

crime.

The project site will include the existing

main street, the existing expressway, the

immediate adjacent parcels and streets, and the

riverfront parcel.


design program...

These rough program elements have

come from local users, business owners,

planners, landscape architects, and architects.

This program will play into my conceptual

explorations and a detailed program will be

defined through these explorations.

Needs

SGateways to the corridor

SGrocery Store (No big box)

* Drug Store/Pharmacy

* Fuel Station (Petrol, diesel, electric, propane,

and hydrogen with car wash. State of the art

that is near the transportation hub)

* Hardware Store

* Civic/Government Services (IE: Post office,

Bank, Town Hall Cultural/Historic Center)

* Health Center

* Connection to Public Transportation (Mass

Transit/Trolley Hub)

* Affordable Housing


* Retirement

* Public Plaza

* Gardens and Parks

* A Community Educational Learning Facility

* Traffic Calming

Wants

* Open Air/Farmers Market

* City Icon (IE: St. Louis Arch, Eiffel Tower)

* Entertainment District (Sports Bar, Jazz Club,

Night Club, Coffee Shops, Eateries & Outdoor

Cafes, Bars)

* Interval Based Entertainment

* Aquarium

* Brewery



user groups...

This downtown corridor is the one

location that has major potential for outsider use.

The types of users would be broad. They include:

local users, city wide users, regional users, and

even super regional users at a national level.

The East Jacksonville Neighborhood has

consisted of ninety five percent African-Americans

for the past ten years. Existing users consist of

residents in the northern section of the boulevard

while the southern end is predominately used

by visitors for events at Jacksonville Veterans

Memorial Arena and the Baseball Grounds of

Jacksonville. This area also sees commuters for

places of work in the area.


I -







current issues...
* City has no money
* Crime the cc
* Physical barrier that bisects the neighborhood
* Lack of connectivity
* Streetscape needs improvements
* Traffic from events & transportation causes
issues
* Certain areas considered to be brownfields
* Property title issues
* Lack of viable mixed use
* No unity among property owners


the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
INTRODUCTION


rridor...


. ..-1-4





the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
INTRODUCTION


history...


co






110.1


Aerial view of Jacksonville in 1893


More than 6,000 years ago, the area

was occupied by the Timucuan Indians. In 1562,

the first European expedition was carried out by

French Huguenot explorer Jean Ribalt along the

St Johns River. Three years later, in 1565, the

Spanish arrived. In the 1800's, Florida became

a winter escape for wealthy northerners, and by

1860, there were weekly steamboat trips between

Savannah, Charleston, and Jacksonville. At

the time indigo, sugar, and citrus crops were

produced on drained marshlands (Jacksonville,

Florida).

The county was named in 1822 for the

first territorial governor of Florida, William Pope

Duval, and the city was named after the future

7th U.S. President, Andrew Jackson. The Civil

War and the Spanish-American War of 1898

brought destruction to the area, and changed

owners several times; however, the arrival of the

railroad in 1895 brought a great economic boom

(Jacksonville, Florida).


The "Great Fire of 1901" devastated the

city of Jacksonville and destroyed the business

district. "It was one of the worst disasters in

Florida history and the largest urban fire in the






CY
______ _-- o








Jacksonville in 1909


Southeast" (Jacksonville, Florida). Within a

span of the next 11 years, over 13,000 buildings

were constructed. East Jacksonville and

Fairfield experienced a building surge during the

reconstruction of the City after the "Great Fire of

1901". Florida Avenue, in particular, received new

businesses and a new church. A. Philip Randolph

Boulevard, formerly known as Florida Avenue

prior to the race riot in 1969, was a downtown

strip for local residents (Jacksonville, Florida).

Asa Philip Randolph grew up in

Jacksonville, and he became one of the most

important figures of the Civil Rights Movement

in the 1950's and 1960's. He was also the first

African-American attorney and union leader in the

city of Jacksonville (A.Philip Randolph).


I -




the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
RESEARCH


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Ihe randolph disiricl: a vibrant corridor
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research...


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surrounding projects...


Jacksonville is a growing city and the

downtown has plans to expand and improve

many areas, one of which is in my project


the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
RESEARCH



activity and capitalize by using it as a catalyst

towards redevelopment for their current state

of living. A Neighborhood Action Plan has been

developed to create a vision for the corridor.


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The Jacksonville Economic Development Commission has developed a
map to show projects completed from 2000-2008 and pending projects in
2008. The dashed line shows the DRI (Development of Regional Impact)
boundary.


boundaries. The proposed

Shipyards project along the

river will have a major impact

on the neighborhood that I

am planning to revitalize. With

these other planned projects

the neighborhood has the

opportunity to take advantage

of the surrounding development


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FH.SAE * FLaEl S'�" Wi~In 4
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I Graphic provided by Prosser Hallock Planners and Engineers 18


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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
RESEARCH
-6-
The City of wE+
(0 CN
Jacksonville's Planning

Department has completed E O
(0 0-)
a study on the East 0 x 'a

Jacksonville Neighborhood +-

Action Plan. This study - ,

includes a section on the A.

Philip Randolph Corridor, z ol

which is the main focus of 0 i

my project. b E2i f t

The study is i

comprised of a background This map delineates the urban redevelopment area of downtown Jacksonville.
The East Jacksonville/Oakland area is highlighted in blue and has a Neighbor-
section, the economic base that speaks about hood Action Plan in the works.

the employment data and the unmet demand, In the effort to achieve this vision, the strategy for

the retail market forAPR, a model block A. Philip Randolph will focus on three areas:
beCreating a retail and commercial node for
approach, zoning for mixed use, infrastructure Creating a retail and commercial node for
the community that will offer employment
improvements, and recommendations for the the community that will offer employment

corridor. This study plays into my project by opportunities for the residents through a

providing me with basic background information model block approach (Planning).

and recommendations in terms of a vision for the * Providing the regulatory environment that

APR corridor. will facilitate mixed-use development, with

The Citizens Advisory Committee has ground floor retail and second floor office or
residential space (Planning).
created a vision for the Corridor, which includes residential space (Planning).

the following: * Outlining the appropriate infrastructure needs

*A. Philip Randolph Boulevard should that will enhance the visual appearance of the

be a major commercial center for the Corridor (Planning).

neighborhood, with mixed uses that will allow

the preservation of the historical development

patterns, including commercial retail on the

ground floor of the buildings, and residential

uses on the additional floors (Planning).

19





the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
RESEARCH
surrounding projects...
corridor to existing and proposed parks. Also
Below, an open space and pedestrian
the Bay Street Trolley has a stop along A.
map provides me with information in terms of
Philip Randolph Blvd. Proposed stops are to be
proposed and existing parks, pedestrian links,
considered in the design phase.
and views. This map helps me determine where

to propose linkages and connections from the

S-Pedestrian Links
Proposed Park
11 L[ \iIing Park






















"The Emerald Necklace connects neighborhoods to the river through a variety of pocket parks, boardwalks, creek-
SI spaces."





















-trolley service is a free
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.alt av th increases
-0 your travel options in the



S.. .downtown area. The trolley
Skyway system for greater mobility
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side trails, and streetscape inviting pedestrians and bicyclists to explore downtown Monday through a seridayes of green

Shttp A //www.jtafla.com/Graphics/Schedules/Trolley will pass a stop approximatelyp.pdf












The Bay Street Trolley has a route that runs on A. Philip Randolph Blvd.
-- I
,-, service s a free

'your travel options in the
6:20 m to 7p.m.
I-Z1 ... .. A trolley will pass a stop approximately










"" every 10-15 minutes.


The Bay Street Trolley has a route that runs on A Philip Randolph Blvd.
20







existing design guideline

URBAN DESIGN GUIDELINES

Guidelines for Public Spaces

Intent: To clearly define gateways into downtown.

* Identify gateways with landscaping and

special features.

SSupport public investment in Jacksonville's

gateways by identifying and promoting

commercial uses nearby (JEDC).

Intent: To encourage enticing views of the river

from as many places in downtown as possible.

* Encourage the creation of views from

buildings to the river, through buildings, and

across the river to buildings (JEDC).

Guidelines for Connections to

Downtown

Intent: To provide connections that maximize the

asset of the St. Johns River.

* Provide a continuous public walkway along

the north bank of the St. Johns River from

Metro Park to Memorial Park (JEDC).

Intent: To create a series of downtown

connections to open space (JEDC).

* Provide connections to Hogan's Creek along

Ashley, Church, Liberty, Main and Ocean St.

STREETSCAPE DESIGN

GUIDELINES

Intent: To make sidewalks interesting, safe, and

comfortable places to walk. To unify the sidewalk

and provide a clear, direct and safe path for

pedestrians (JEDC).


the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
RESEARCH


* Require developers of new projects to build

sidewalks and install the streetscape that is

designated for the area and to provide on

going maintenance (JEDC).

* Remove all utility poles, lights, and meters

from the pedestrian zone and relocate them in

the amenity zone; install underground utilities

whenever possible (JEDC).

* Use historic interlocking paving, or replicas,

in those residential districts where they

originated (JEDC).

* Change the paving material at crosswalks

in areas where pedestrian traffic is high and

vehicular traffic needs calming (JEDC).

Intent: To create a unified sense of place

throughout Downtown Jacksonville.

* Plant regularly spaced trees in straight rows;

the number and spacing of trees should be

based on the need to allow adequate room for

root and branch growth while still providing a

continuous canopy; trees should be centered

in the width of the amenity zone (JEDC).

* Use the same type of tree on each side of the

street (JEDC).

* Put trees in lawns or ground cover wherever

possible (JEDC).

Intent: To create a sense of security and safety

for pedestrians.

* Street light fixtures should be no more than

14' tall to provide adequate lighting at a

pedestrian scale (JEDC).


I -







case studies...Peabody Place

Case Study Information


Project Name: Peabody Place

Project Location: Memphis, Tennessee

Project Designer: Developer: Belz Enterprises

Case Study Description: A downtown

redevelopment project that mixes new and

historic buildings and includes hotel, office,

residential and retail.


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Site plan.

Peabody Place Site Plan
Case study goals/What I hope to learn

* Research and review the Land Use and

Building information for Peabody Place to find

specific infrastructure guidelines that can be

applied to my project.

SUnderstand how the designer integrated the

restoration of historic buildings with the new

buildings and their architecture.

SUnderstand why there are linkages to

important points of interest.


the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
RESEARCH

SUnderstand how the designer/planner was

able to integrate a theme directly related to

the history of the area.

Summary of Peabody Place:

Peabody Place occupies an eight-

block area in downtown Memphis on the city's

west side, a few blocks from the Mississippi

River and Beale Street. Peabody Place is in the

heart of downtown Memphis and is one of the

largest mixed-use developments in the country.

The total project area covers

about 2 million square feet
Union A-.f-
and includes space for retail,

commercial, office, residential,

G Anu.e and entertainment, as well

as, four parking garages with

3,300 spaces. The site is
SPelbod, Plre Arnue
anchored to the east by the

historic Peabody Hotel, to
Beale 1re,.
the south by Beale Street, to

the east by Peabody Place

Entertainment and Retail Center, and to the

west by the corporate headquarters of AutoZone

(Schwanke).


SPeabody Place Entertainment and Retail. 22





the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
RESEARCH


The redevelopment of the urban

area to create Peabody Place has included

the restoration of several historic buildings and

construction of modern office towers, apartments,








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Peabody Place Entertainment and Retail from a different
angle at night.

retail and entertainment, restaurants, and

gathering places. The heritage of Memphis

music and the legacy of the grand movie palaces

were used for

the theme of the

Peabody Place

Entertainment and

Retail Center.

The

Peabody Place

Entertainment

and Retail Center

covers more

than 300,000

square feet in

a streetscape environment. The three-story

retail/entertainment center's varied and smaller

streetscape is organized along a multilevel

atrium/courtyard.


The first floor retail space faces both the street

and the courtyard, while the movie theatre

occupies the top floor (Schwanke).

Aspects learned by this case study and

how it applies to my project:

The most important aspects

I learned from this case study that

apply to my capstone project are how

the designer was able to integrate the

preservation and redevelopment of

historic structures while integrating new

buildings/architecture into the project.


Peabody Place multilevel atrium courtyard.


I -







case studies...Addison Circle

Case Study Information

Project Name: Addison Circle

Project Location: Addison, Texas

Project Designer: Developer: Post Properties, Inc.

Architect and Master Planner: RTKL Associates

Engineering and Landscape Architecture: Huit-

Zollars

Case Study Description:

An Urban village organized around a circle

and streets, including

apartments, office, and

retail uses.

Case study goals/What I

hope to learn

SResearch and

review the Land

Use and Building

information for

Addison Circle

to find specific -
Addison Circle provides a 4
infrastructure

guidelines that can be applied to my project.

* Understand how Addison Circle has created

a physical focal point and stronger population

base to support and anchor the communities

commercial/retail uses.

* Understand how the development has

brought density, and most importantly, a

sense of community to a classic city.

* Research and review the design and

development standards of the project.


the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
RESEARCH

SUnderstand how the streets, and open space

are very important elements that make

Addison Circle so appealing to different users.

Summary of Addison Circle:

Addison Circle is a mixed use urban

village built around a circle and a grid street

system, with apartments and office space as the

primary use. Addison Circle has established two

sub-areas: a residential neighborhood of mid-rise

housing with supporting retail uses,


story mixed use building with retail on the bottom and residen-
tial on the floors above.

parks and other amenities, and a higher-density

office and commercial district. The sidewalks

and crosswalks are paved in brick with mature

shade trees planted at 25-foot intervals. In some

cases, larger specimen trees were specified to

provide an instant streetscape. Decorative metal

tree guards define the edges of the trees while

bike racks, benches, trash receptacles, and other

street furniture is provided for function as well as

aesthetic value (Schwanke).


-a





the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
RESEARCH


Design development standards included items

such as density, lot coverage, exterior building

materials, setbacks, and streetscape standards.

A wide range of residential dwelling unit

types is provided at Addison Circle, ranging from

570-square-foot units that rent for as little as

$645 per month to 3,200-square-foot lofts that

rent for $4,000 a month. Although 45% of the

units are one bedroom models, the planned mix

also includes two and three bedroom units, town

houses, and live/work units (Schwanke).

Retail and other commercial uses are

located at the street level in most buildings,

with approximately 50 small retail and service

businesses occupying 110,000 square feet

of ground floor space in Addison Circle. The

businesses range from convenience retail and

11 � �!!M 'ARPMERWe


personal services to restaurants and art galleries

(Schwanke).

Aspects learned by this case study and how it

applies to my project:

The most important aspects I learned

from this case study that apply to my capstone

Ai * -ww -._snh


Addison Circle Site Plan


y * Ad'.'i ' iii^ !

i t� ia. ,-i.-fp.E.~i. 1 .,dce
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(Schwanke 299)


Addison Circle Residential Lofts


(Schwanke 294)


project are different design development

standards, land use and building density

information and how important the streetscape

and open space is. The experience gained is

that urban mixed-use development is rewarding,

frequently resulting in distinctive properties and

settings that can command higher rents and

create higher property values. The outcome is

a sustainable, integrated mixed-use residential

development that serves as a vibrant life force for

the community and a blueprint for future projects.


I -







case studies...CityPlace

Case Study Information

Project Name: CityPlace

Project Location: West Palm Beach, Florida

Project Designer: Developer: Palladium

Company; Urban Design Firm: Duanny Plater-

Zyberk Other: Elkus/Manfredi Architects

Case Study Description:

An urban town center featuring a main street with

retail, entertainment, cultural and residential uses,

and additional office and hotel uses planned.
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CityPlace Site Plan
Case study goals/What I hope to learn

* Research and review the Land Use and

Building information for CityPlace to find

specific infrastructure guidelines that can be

applied to my project.

* Understand how the shaping of the streets,

public spaces, and buildings are welcoming

for both pedestrians and businesses.

* Research and review the design and

development standards of the project.


the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
RESEARCH

SUnderstand how the designer introduced

individual design features in the buildings,

walkways, and landscaping.

Summary of CityPlace:

CityPlace is located on a 72 acre site in the

heart of West Palm Beach, near the intersection

of 1-95 and Okeechobee Boulevard (Schwanke).

CityPlace is a mixed-use town center that

currently brings together residences, cultural

facilities, restaurants, and national and regional

specialty retailers in a European

style village setting. CityPlace

offers open-air shopping plazas,

E tree-lines esplanades, and inviting

streets that lead to sidewalk dining

establishments, entertainment

venues, and family friendly

Activities, such as free concerts

and dancing fountains.

..- : The plaza is the center

�,ta,"m' - of gravity for the development by
(Schwanke 308) providing a grand public room

that draws visitors from various areas of West

Palm Beach and Florida's Coast. In this central

plaza, the fountain and urban landscaping create

a sense of enclosure and European atmosphere.

The designer introduced various column types

and different combinations of stone, brick and

tile for walkways, crosswalks, and plazas. Also,

individual plantings were selected to match

the architecture rather than following a uniform

pattern of the same trees. 26


-a


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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
RESEARCH


By doing so, the design creates highly textured

streetscapes and a variety of building scales.

CityPlace currently has 600,000 square

feet of retail space and nearly 600 residential

units, including condominiums, townhouses,

live/work units and

rental apartments.

There are three

office towers totaling

750,000 square

feet that round out

the mix along with

a 400 room hotel

and the Palm Beach

Convention Center

(Schwanke).
Cit


Aspects learned by this case study and how it

applies to my project:

The most important aspect I learned from this

case study that applies to my capstone project

is how the designer introduced individual design

features in the

buildings,

i� walkways, and

. landscaping

C throughout

: CityPlace.


yPlace


Palladium Plaza Fountains in CityPlace (Schwanke 304) The Cheesecake Factory (Schwanke 307)


The Harriet Himmel Gilman Theater
for Cultural and Performing Arts


(Schwanke 304)


Residential lofts and apartments
above retail shops at CityPlace


(Schwanke 307)


I -







smart growth...

"Smart Growth" The buzz word is

everywhere, front and center, in conferences,

newspapers, books, local plans, and zoning

ordinances. It stirs up strong emotions, both

pro and con, and everyone has a unique

perspective on what it means, where it comes

from, where we need it, and how to implement it.

In communities across the country, there is great

concern that current development patterns, also


A cartoon on the web about Smart Growth that I found intel

known as "sprawl," is no longer the long term

interest of our inner city communities, suburbs,

rural communities, small towns, or conservation

areas. Although there is no template to solve

this "sprawl," the Smart Growth Network has

developed a set of ten basic principles that can

be applied in various combinations to create

smart, non sprawling communities.


the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
RESEARCH


"The goals of smart growth are to achieve a

unique sense of place; expand the range of

transportation, employment, and housing choices;

preserve and enhance natural and cultural

resources and promote public health" (Anderson

17). These goals are achieved by implementing

Smart Growth Principles such as; Create a Range

of Housing Opportunities and Choices, Create

Walkable Neighborhoods, Encourage Community

and Stakeholder Collaboration,
oon)Rs " Foster Distinctive, Attractive

SCommunities with a Strong
0
Sense of Place, Create Mix Land

Use, Preserve Open Space,

SFarmland, Natural Beauty

Sand Critical Environmental

M Areas, and Provide a Variety of

STransportation Choices

S (Arigoni 2).

Smart growth is going to

be a key component in making
resting. the A. Philip Randolph Corridor

a success. Also, for this to be successful in

implementing smart growth, it must be accepted

by public and most importantly private entities.

form based code...

Form-based code "is a method of

regulating development to achieve a specific

urban form. Form-based codes create a

predictable public realm primarily by controlling

physical form, with a lesser focus on land use,


-a







through city or county regulations (Form

Based)."This method is a very good approach to

create pedestrian-oriented streets and focus on

walkability, which are two very important elements

that must be considered while making key design

decisions. Form-based codes concentrate on

the appearance and size of buildings in relation

to one another, the correlation between building

facades and the public domain, and the scale and

types of streets and blocks.

The standards and regulations of form-

based codes are presented in both diagrams and


the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
RESEARCH
* Public Space Standards: Specifications for the

elements within the public realm (e.g., sidewalks,

travel lanes, on-street parking, street trees, street

furniture, etc.).

* Building Form Standards: Regulations controlling

the configuration, features, and functions of

buildings that define and shape the public realm.

* Administration: A clearly defined application and

project review process.

* Definitions: A glossary to ensure the precise use of

technical terms (Form Based).


I FORM-BASED CODE


-::" : " owill * B -O-MP A

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Iistrative Plan Regulating Plan Buling Form Standards PubBo Space Standards

Form Based Code Typical Components http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/6/67/FBC_TypicalComponents.jpg


words and are referred to as a regulation plan

that delineates the appropriate form and scale

of the development. The strict codes are not to

be confused with design guidelines or general

statements; form-based codes are regulatory, not

optional (Form Based).

Form-based codes commonly include the

following elements:

SRegulating Plan: A plan or map of the regulated

area designating the locations where different

building form standards apply, based on clear

community intentions regarding the physical

character of the area being code.


Form-based codes also sometimes include the

following elements:

* Architectural Standards: Regulations controlling

external architectural materials and quality.

* Landscaping Standards: Regulations controlling

landscape design and plant materials on

private property as they impact public spaces

(e.g. regulations about parking lot screening

and shading, maintaining sight lines, insuring

unobstructed pedestrian movements, etc.).

* Signage Standards: Regulations controlling

allowable signage sizes, materials, illumination,

and placement (Form Based).


I -


I URBAN DESIG




the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
INVENTORY ANALYSIS, & SYNTHESIS


-S


i *4




Ihe randolph disiricl: a vibranI corridor
Ulj\ EIJTC',F i -4J-i L I '. IJ THE'.'..


inventory, analysis,

& synthesis...


I -





the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
INVENTORY ANALYSIS, & SYNTHESIS
analysis...o pen Space and Social Services (OSSS)

OSSS is an analysis of all public and private, developed and undeveloped open space and

social services. The corridor explores many of these different uses including public open space,

recreation open space, vant lands and buildings, and social serving businesses.


OPEN SPACE
LEGEND








SOCIALLY SERVICES
R E P 1RE !N



SO CI A L S :E P ,VIC E S

r ., ,. , lj , . IJ. T E, .,


LEGEND

P .I r . , l , I I F. ,,-r , .
RECREATION

SOIL SEP ES



I A. T I -.


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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
INVENTORY ANALYSIS, & SYNTHESIS
analysis...Civic Identity Elements (CIEs)
CIEs are elements that contribute to a city's identity. They usually consist of visually important
landmarks, architecturally distinguished buildings, civic, religious and social centers of significance, and
urban spaces.
CIVIC IDENTITY ELEMENTS
LEGEND
EI O"" V Ali-., SE P%'::"-


BU5E1T T ,S


I -


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Abrl�w IN I


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---





the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
INVENTORY ANALYSIS, & SYNTHESIS
analysis...Housing

The majority of homes in this area are shotgun style with a minimal amount of bungalow style

homes. The redevelopment initiative should incorporate these architectural types into this development

to retain the character of the neighborhhod and ensure quality living.


-a


*i~.





the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
INVENTORY ANALYSIS, & SYNTHESIS

analysis...Structure Ecology and Physiography (SEPs)

The connectivity and cohesion of a city is affected by dead end streets, misaligned

intersections and discontiuous street elements. These conditions currently affect curb appeal and

neighborhood formation.

STRUCTURE. ECOLOGy &
PHYSIOGRAPHY LEGEND








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SOIURBANL SU FABRC



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URBAN TISSL)EIFASRIC
LEGEND












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URBAN TSSUEDFABRC 10m E,'
F M,.l�.?.: i, ; . 7.,,. :,'::... - i. .,"
, ' , I , ,


I -





the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
INVENTORY ANALYSIS, & SYNTHESIS
analysis...Urban Transects - Land Usage

A transect is a slice through the city along a continuous corridor from end to end. These

commonly include analyzing the uses, character, architecture, and identifying elements. This map sets

out to delineate the land use designation along the main corridor and two important bisecting corridors.


I


U


-a


W�-




the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
INVENTORY ANALYSIS, & SYNTHESIS
analysis...Urban Transects - Public Usage
These transect methodologies were developed to reveal the specific identity of a street of
urban area. This map sets out to delineate the amount of land use along the main corridor and two
important bisecting corridors.


="1


I -





the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
INVENTORY ANALYSIS, & SYNTHESIS
synthesis...Fixed-Free Diagram
All of the informational analysis layers in the previous pages were combined to create this final

fixed-free sysnthesis diagram. Each analysis component was taken into consideration and transformed

into this map which delineates the developable and undevelopable lands.

A form of synthesis and analysis combined, that identifies sites and buildings that cannot be

subjected to change versus those which are vacant lands or derelict and substandard were combined

to create this diagram.
5'vrJTHEb SS LEGEND
Fai, ,EC, FA ,E _IE9 " This was a useful step in

S , T,,mul ,.,AlC ,, i - this large and complex

,PR ,.lO ,v ..LLE r p , "..... revitalization/urban infill

project, as it groups
- ,cluster areas where

change is to be avoided

and/or where change can

readily occur.

This diagram

' . - incorporates historic

,-- .sites, Civic Identity

Elements, Open Space

and Social Services,

4. -and other private sites

of good condition. Also

this diagram includes
elements or areas of

a site that are exempt

from change or are to be

preserved.


-a





the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
INVENTORY ANALYSIS, & SYNTHESIS
opportunities & constraints

Opportunities:

1. Viable open space

2. Existing sidewalks (availability, streetscape, &

condition)

3. Available land

4. Development opportunity

5. Historical buildings with renovation potential

6. Walking distance to services and recreation

7. Accessibility to water

8. Accessibility to sports and entertainment

9. Access to city services

10. Affordability

11. Community is involved and willing to change

12. Strong sense of community based future

projects

13. Transit

Constraints:

1. Expressway/8th street

6. Lack of defined neighborhood center

7. Property title issues

8. Lack of viable mixed use

9. Building conditions are sub-standard and

delapitated


I -




the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
CONCEPTUAL DESIGN


_I I


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Ihe randolph disiricl: a vibranI corridor
- CN.-IJEPTUL L C'E ;i.,1':


conceptual design...


I -






concept development...concept One


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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
CONCEPTUAL DESIGN


Concept one focuses
on elements such as mixed use
development and infill along the corridor,
a cultural and civic node, circulation,
connectivity and linkages to existing
parks and amenities, and a proposed
riverfront park aquarium park.


if 4

F~ I�~kirbt 42
~ws0fr







concept development...concept two


the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
CONCEPTUAL DESIGN



Concept two focuses on

elements such as a gateway for

the neighborhood, mixed use

development and infill along

the corridor, a cultural and civic

node, circulation, connectivity

and linkages to existing parks

and amenities, and a proposed

riverfront park. This concept also

focuses on street trees being a

key element in the design phase to

improve neighborhood walkability

and connectivity.


I -





the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
CONCEPTUAL DESIGN
concept development...concept Three
Concept three focuses elements

such as a gateway to the

*- " --- neighborhood, affordable housing,
S FF | IP multi-family housing, and mixed

I I use development to include

entertainment, leisure areas,

- -- I outdoor eateries, jazz clubs, and
- -- miscellaneous retail shops, a

w |irmr neighborhood needs node that
JW 6 Oft would include a drug store, a

W, w, . -- grocery store, a hardware store, a
S health clinic, a police sub station,

'-s*entn land a learning center. This concept
'" also focuses on taking the existing

Homes and moving them to create a
-o ,. i o -_ .- , . historic district.


I





the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
CONCEPTUAL DESIGN
concept development...Final Concept

The final concept or masterplan is a culmination of the three previous concepts. From the first

concept it uses the aquarium park as an anchor for the whole project. The aquarium park with its proposed

iconic fish sculpture will provide this district with something to be noticed from a distance.

From the second concept the mixed use development and infill along the corridor was utilized and

expanded on to create a more urban feel. Also, connectivity played a major role in the over design.

From the third concept the town square and plaza ideas were used to create more of a pedestrian

scale. It also takes the proposed designated land uses for the historic district, affordable housing, and

multi-family housing.


I -




the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
CONCEPTUAL DESIGN


I m F I I I


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-S




Ihe randolph disiricl: a vibranI corridor
- CN.-IJEPTUL L C'E ;i.,1':


masterplan &

design details...


I -





the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
MASTERPLAN & DESIGN DETAILS


0 100 200 400 600 800


-a-


masterplan...


II


1,000 1,200
- ^Fet F







masterplan...


Proposed Historic District
Homes affected by develop-
ment would be moved into this
proposed historic district. Also,
similar architecture


Existing Surface
Parking


the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
46b MASTERPLAN & DESIGN DETAILS
�?*,.',CCC. 6 /^H " _ i 1^ 6 , ,



t i" " .. 1 "
ap


* S ,- p" ",* ,� r , ,

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S Proposed Multi-family"
ebhb.s^^^be. 6fliving and Affordable

o bLED. 4b&bS*
- '4bbt. Iiinand�L* tr*tS*a aa


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0 100 200 400 600 800 1,000 1,200 49





the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
MASTERPLAN & DESIGN DETAILS
masterplan...


Riverfront Parcel Development
* This three story Aquarium planned on the St.
Johns River features ground level retail shops
and restaurants with a number of exhibits on

the 2nd and 3rd levels, this Aquarium totals
111,000 square feet. The Farmers Market

serves the community, supports local growers,

their products, and the agricultural community.
This Market in one level and totals 37,500

square feet. There are 320 parking spaces
that serve these facilities.

Transit-Oriented Development (TOD)

* This transit-oriented design is for live, work

and play. It features 35,350 square feet of
retail, 110,500 square feet of office, 322,350

square feet multi-family living, a 6,400 square

foot Bus and Trolley Transit station, and a
parking garage and surface parking that totals

1405 spaces.

Mixed use Development
* This development totals 416,770 square

feet. It is comprised of a 2 story movie theatre,

a 12 story hotel, two restaurants, two bars/
restaurants, four 3 level mixed use buildings

with retail, office, and residential, four 2 story

mixed use buildings - two with retail and
office and two with retail and residential, and

two parking garages and surface parking that

total 825 spaces.


Town Square Development
* This development surrounds the user as

the shape of the buildings encloses the

space and provides a public plaza. This
development totals 216,580 square feet. It

includes three 2 story mixed use buildings

with retail on the ground level and office
above, a 3 story Town Hall or civic building

and 335 total parking spaces.

Mixed use Development/Infill North of
Town Square

* This development includes 2 story mixed

use buildings that total 151,050 square feet. It
includes retail with residential above, a Police

Sub-Station planned at the north end with an

underground parking structure, a health clinic,
a drug store, grocery store and a hardware
store.


-a





the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
MASTERPLAN & DESIGN DETAILS


I -





the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
MASTERPLAN & DESIGN DETAILS


-a





the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
MASTERPLAN & DESIGN DETAILS


I -





the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
MASTERPLAN & DESIGN DETAILS


-a





the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
MASTERPLAN & DESIGN DETAILS


I -





the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
MASTERPLAN & DESIGN DETAILS


-a





the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
MASTERPLAN & DESIGN DETAILS


I -





the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
MASTERPLAN & DESIGN DETAILS


-a




the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
MASTERPLAN & DESIGN DETAILS


masterplan...



_- _C *

Mb~d .


-- ' --- H ' --- ,----9 ' ! i

Above is an existing section of A Philip Randolph Boulevard. The boulevard is lacking bike
lanes, parking and a sense of place.
Below a concept for the streets that intersect with A. Philip Randolph Boulevard. This concept
will have a 24' travel lane with bicylce lanes on both side of the road, a vegetation buffer and wider
sidewalks.
rA -^si
6'��^^


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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
MASTERPLAN & DESIGN DETAILS
masterplan...


design conclusions
As a student and a future Landscape Architect, I feel that the East Jacksonville Neighborhood and

specifically A. Philip Randolph Boulevard have an enormous amount of potential. The area has a unique

historical character and seems to be a meeting place for the residents. Although, there are many vacant

lots and buildings, the businesses along the corridor have a strong commercial base that could be a

catalyst for future economic development.

I feel that this project was great for me because I grew up in Jacksonville and want to be a part

of the changes to better the downtown urban core. I also plan on moving back to Jacksonville to start my

career. This project has helped me in understanding the design and management of public spaces, while

allowing me to focus on the physical improvement of the public environment. By taking on this project, I

learned more about public spaces and how they are used on a day to day basis. I also learned about urban

design, connectivity, transit, and how it can affect the downtown core.

This downtown corridor is the one location that has major potential for outsider use, now lets make

it happen...


-a





the randolph district: a vibrant corridor
MASTERPLAN & DESIGN DETAILS


references

Anderson, Geoff. Why Smart Growth: A Primer. Washington, DC: ICMA-Smart Growth Network, 1998.

Arigoni, D., A. Levofsky, E.S. Richards, et. al. Getting to Smart Growth-100 Policies for Implementation.
Washington, DC: ICMA-Smart Growth Network, 2002.

Asa Philip Randolph. Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. 24 February, 2009.Wikimedia Foundation Inc.


Basile, Ralph J. Downtown Development Handbook. ULI-The Urban Land Institute, 1980.

Bohl, Charles C. Place Making: Developing Town Centers, Main Streets, and Urban Villages. ULI-The
Urban Land Institute, 2002.

Definition of a Form Based Code. Form Based Codes Institute. 29 January, 2008.
< http://www.formbasedcodes.org/definition.html>

Fleming, Ronald Lee. The Art of Placemaking: Interpreting Community through Public Art and Urban
Design. Merrill, 2007.

Gindroz, Ray. The Urban Design Handbook: Techniques and Working Methods. Urban Design Associates,
2003.

Houston Jr., Lawrence O. BIDs: Business Improvement District. ULI-The Urban Land Institute, 1997.

Jacksonville, Florida, Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. 24 February, 2009.Wikimedia Foundation Inc. <
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacksonville,_Florida>

JEDC, Jacksonville Economic Development Commission. Downtown Master Plan. COJ.net 2003.
Downtown+ Development/Downtown+Maste. htm>

Planning and development. Neighborhhod Action Plans, Corridor Studies, and Land Use and Zoning
Studies. COJ.net 2003. < http://www.coj.net/Departments/Planning+and+Development/
Community+Planning/Neighborhood+Action+Plans,+Corridor+Studies+and+Land+Use+and+Zonin
g+Studies.htm>

Schwanke, Dean. Mixed Use Development Handbook. ULI-The Urban Land Institute, 2003.

Sucher, David. City Comforts: How to build an Urban Village. David Sucher, 2003.

Whyte, William H. City: Rediscovering the Center. Doubleday, 1988.






NOTE: ALL BASE MAPAERIALS WERE PROVIDED BY "PROSSER HALLOCK"

NOTE: ALL DRAWINGS, SKETCHES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND DIAGRAMS THROUGHOUT THIS DOCUMENT
THAT ARE NOT REFERENCED WERE EITHER DRAWN, TAKEN, OR PRODUCED BY THE AUTHOR.
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PAGE 1

Senior Capstone Project by Timothy David O’Reilly University of Florida Department of Landscape Architecture the randolph district: a vibrant corridor... Jacksonville, Florida

PAGE 3

the randolph district: a vibrant corridor acknowledgements...dedication...This book is dedicated to my family and friends who have always supported me through the toughest times. Thank you for your love and support.a special thanks to...My sister Colleen for introducing me to the art of Landscape Architecture. Mom and Dad for always being there for me and supporting me in everything I have ever done. Heather for being by my side through the thick and thin and supporting me every step of the way. My Uncle John for all the interesting newspaper helped me along the way. Richard and Lesia Stewart for always having a spot for me at Mulch Masters, when I needed that have helped me along the way. The UF Department of Landscape Architecture faculty for pushing me to become a sucessful student and young professional. Terry Schnadelbach for your guidance in this project and helping me along the way. Shawn Bliss and everyone at Prosser Hallock for introducing me to this project. Also, thank you for the knowledge and experience you gave me during my internships. It was a great experience and an essential part of my education process. ASLA for recognizing my hard work and dedication during my student years. To all of my classmates. It has been quite the expereince spending the past four years with all of you.

PAGE 5

the randolph district: a vibrant corridor table of contents... 7 .......þ introduction... þ 8......... þ mission statement þ 10....... þ goals and objectives þ 11....... þ project site and location þ 13....... þ design program þ 13....... þ user groups þ 14....... þ current issues þ 14....... þ the corridor þ 15....... þ history 17..... þ research... þ 18....... surrounding projects þ 21....... existing design guidelines þ 22....... case studies þ 28....... þ smart growth þ 29....... þ form based code 31..... þ inventory, analysis, and synthesis... þ 32....... þ open space & social services þ 33....... þ civic identity elements þ 34....... þ housing þ 35....... þ structure, ecology & physiography þ 36....... þ urban transects þ 36........ land use transect þ 37........ public use transect þ 38....... þ þ 39....... þ opportunites & constraints 41..... þ conceptual design... þ 42....... þ concept development 47..... þ masterplan and design details... þ 48....... þ master plan þ 53....... þ town square enlargement þ 55....... þ transit oriented design (tod) enlargement þ 57....... þ a. philip randolph park redesign þ 60....... þ conclusion þ 61....... þ references

PAGE 6

the randolph district: a vibrant corridor INTRODUCTION introduction... T he R andolph D istrict

PAGE 7

the randolph district: a vibrant corridor INTRODUCTION introduction... T he R andolph D istrict

PAGE 8

the randolph district: a vibrant corridor INTRODUCTION þ The intent of the proposed project is the Corridor that lies within the East Jacksonville Neighborhood District. This neighborhood is a historical gem that is located in the urban core of a downtown Jacksonville, Florida community that is in dire need of revitalization. Although Jacksonville is the largest city in the state of Florida in terms of area, it is currently lacking a true downtown “Main Street” entertainment district. þ The A. Philip Randolph Corridor provides a very unique opportunity to create a neighborhood “Main Street” and turn the corridor into a vibrant, busy, commercial entertainment district that will sustain this community and enhance future economic growth. This East Jacksonville Neighborhood is, in some cases, dilapidated and needs revitalization. The revitalization of the corridor will help a community in decline, and it will aim to minimize any negative impacts that future development could bring. There is a lot of vacant land and buildings along the corridor that would allow for great future use. This area has many historical buildings, thriving businesses, and vacant parcels. It is also a busy thoroughfare that is a destination for many of the residents within the community.mission statement and intent... A. Philip Randolp Boulevard Florida VS. Georgia weekend. Picture taken from existing overpass.

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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor INTRODUCTION þ The main focus of this project is to direct economic development throughout the corridor by providing mixed use retail and residential with a commercial node that will attract residents and visitors while maintaining the historic integrity of the downtown core. The theme for this project district characterized by entertainment, shopping, neighborhood district intended to support and promote the needs and vision of the surrounding neighborhoods. For example, just north of the Arlington Expressway overpass would be a great place to link uses and have a commercial hotel/ restaurant/retail zone that would be noticed by drivers and pedestrians. This commercial node would provide linkages from the sports district to the residential community, and it would help establish new economic growth and development in the area. In addition, a trolley hub would strengthen the image of the corridor and promote Randolph corridor has the opportunity to become a retail center for residents and a destination for visitors. þ The master plan will be developed through a rigorous design process that will include: research, case studies, site observations, compilation of necessary data, inventory and analysis of existing conditions, synthesis of existing conditions, development of a detailed program through conceptual explorations, plan, and complimenting sections, elevations, and perspectives to help envision the proposed design. Jacksonville Veterans Memorial Arena & Baseball Grounds of Jacksonville.

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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor INTRODUCTION1. Provide health, safety, and welfare for all users of the A. Philip Randolph Corridor and the East Jacksonville Neighborhood. þ techniques such as: roundabouts, pedestrian cross walks, bulb outs, and landscaped medians. Ensure safety through CPTED (Crime Prevention through Environmental Design) techniques. þ Provide safe and universal access to all areas and amenities of the site to meet ADA requirements. þ Provide a satellite police and emergency station (Comfort to residents and visitors while discrediting þ the hood.) 2. To improve the experience of the user and meet there needs and comfort. Provide public and open space to link existing and proposed amenities. þ Use microclimate in design using both natural and built amenities. þ Enhance the streetscape and make it more walkable with the addition of landscape, hardscape, þ seating, street furniture, lighting, shade, etc. 3. Protection and preservation of natural, cultural, and historic resources. Set up design guidelines related to preservation and restoration. þ Recognize and preserve historic homes, buildings, and other structures. þ Capitalize on the distinct geographical identity of the area by creating one that is unique and þ promotes the history of the area through interpretation and signage. 4. To create an aesthetically pleasing, sustainable, and inviting downtown entertainment district that will direct future economic growth and development while maintaining the historical and cultural integrity of the site. þ facade improvements and architectural details. Improve the visual appearance of the streets. þ Establish “Gateways” for the community’s identity. þ þ Create cluster areas of like businesses. þ Create linkages to community centers, parks and recreation, churches, schools, and neighborhoods þ through widened sidewalks, bike lanes, trails, etc.goals and objectives...

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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor INTRODUCTIONRecognize alternative transit opportunities through the creation of transit hubs, trolley lines, þ improved bus stops and shelters. Solar panel every roof in hidden formcity parking garages, arena, and existing structures. þ Involve the historical society to refurbish and claim all existing historical landmarks. þ City to obtain matching state grants/bond money for urban development. þ City to have an art jury to keep overall design theme. þ project site and location... þ A . Philip Randolph Boulevard is located in the urban core of downtown Jacksonville. The urban core includes the south & north banks of the St. Johns River, east from the Fuller Warren of the Fuller Warren Bridge. A. Philip Randolph Boulevard is bisected into a northern section and a southern section by Arlington Expressway. The northern section of the roadway is predominately residential in land use, while the southern section is predominately commercial. The adjacent roadways in the northern section are Spearing St. to the west and Van Buren St. to the East. The corridor terminates into the shipyards parcel to the þ The southern portion of A. Philip Randolph is already established as the sports district. In this section, there is the Jacksonville Veterans Memorial Arena and the Baseball Grounds of Jacksonville, while Baseball Grounds. There is a parking garage adjacent to the Veterans Memorial Arena.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Duval_County_Florida_Incorporated_and_ Unincorporated_areas_Jacksonville_Highlighted.svg

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þ The buildings, existing businesses, parks, and vacant buildings and lots. This boulevard terminates at the river on the south the north end. Although the roadway is only two lanes, there is on-street parking along the west side of the road, and the sidewalks the randolph district: a vibrant corridorINTRODUCTION project site and location... them. This corridor is very close to downtown and is within walking distance to Alltel Stadium.

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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor INTRODUCTIONdesign program... user groups... þ The sidewalks are in need of repair, there is a lack of seating and other street furniture, the roadway needs repaving, and it needs more street lighting. The power lines dominate the view down the corridor and the pay phones promote crime. þ The project site will include the existing main street, the existing expressway, the immediate adjacent parcels and streets, and the riverfront parcel. þ This downtown corridor is the one location that has major potential for outsider use. The types of users would be broad. They include: local users, city wide users, regional users, and even super regional users at a national level. þ The East Jacksonville Neighborhood has for the past ten years. Existing users consist of residents in the northern section of the boulevard while the southern end is predominately used by visitors for events at Jacksonville Veterans Memorial Arena and the Baseball Grounds of Jacksonville. This area also sees commuters for places of work in the area. þ These rough program elements have come from local users, business owners, planners, landscape architects, and architects. This program will play into my conceptual explorations and a detailed program will be NeedsGateways to the corridor þ Grocery Store (No big box) þ Drug Store/Pharmacy þ Fuel Station (Petrol, diesel, electric, propane, þ and hydrogen with car wash. State of the art that is near the transportation hub) Hardware Store þ þ Bank, Town Hall Cultural/Historic Center) Health Center þ Connection to Public Transportation (Mass þ Transit/Trolley Hub) Affordable Housing þ Retirement þ Public Plaza þ Gardens and Parks þ A Community Educational Learning Facility þ þ WantsOpen Air/Farmers Market þ City Icon (IE: St. Louis Arch, Eiffel Tower) þ Entertainment District (Sports Bar, Jazz Club, þ Night Club, Coffee Shops, Eateries & Outdoor Cafes, Bars) Interval Based Entertainment þ Aquarium þ Brewery þ

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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor INTRODUCTIONcurrent issues... the corridor...City has no money þ Crime þ Physical barrier that bisects the neighborhood þ Lack of connectivity þ Streetscape needs improvements þ þ issues þ Property title issues þ Lack of viable mixed use þ No unity among property owners þ

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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor INTRODUCTIONhistory... þ More French Huguenot explorer Jean Ribalt along the a winter escape for wealthy northerners, and by Savannah, Charleston, and Jacksonville. At the time indigo, sugar, and citrus crops were produced on drained marshlands (Jacksonville, Florida). þ The Duval, and the city was named after the future brought destruction to the area, and changed owners several times; however, the arrival of the (Jacksonville, Florida). þ The city of Jacksonville and destroyed the business district. “It was one of the worst disasters in Southeast” (Jacksonville, Florida). Within a were constructed. East Jacksonville and reconstruction of the City after the “Great Fire of businesses and a new church. A. Philip Randolph Boulevard, formerly known as Florida Avenue strip for local residents (Jacksonville, Florida). þ Asa Philip Randolph grew up in Jacksonville, and he became one of the most African-American attorney and union leader in the city of Jacksonville (A.Philip Randolph). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/

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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor RESEARCH research... T he R andolph D istrict

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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor RESEARCH research... T he R andolph D istrict

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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor RESEARCHsurrounding projects... Graphic provided by Prosser Hallock Planners and EngineersThe Jacksonville Economic Development Commission has developed a boundary. þ Jacksonville is a growing city and the downtown has plans to expand and improve many areas, one of which is in my project boundaries. The proposed Shipyards project along the river will have a major impact on the neighborhood that I am planning to revitalize. With these other planned projects the neighborhood has the opportunity to take advantage of the surrounding development activity and capitalize by using it as a catalyst towards redevelopment for their current state of living. A Neighborhood Action Plan has been developed to create a vision for the corridor.

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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor RESEARCH This map delineates the urban redevelopment area of downtown Jacksonville. The East Jacksonville/Oakland area is highlighted in blue and has a Neighbor hood Action Plan in the works. þ The City of Jacksonville’s Planning Department has completed a study on the East Jacksonville Neighborhood Action Plan. This study includes a section on the A. Philip Randolph Corridor, which is the main focus of my project. þ The study is comprised of a background section, the economic base that speaks about the employment data and the unmet demand, the retail market for APR, a model block approach, zoning for mixed use, infrastructure improvements, and recommendations for the corridor. This study plays into my project by providing me with basic background information and recommendations in terms of a vision for the APR corridor. þ The Citizens Advisory Committee has created a vision for the Corridor, which includes the following: A. Philip Randolph Boulevard should þ be a major commercial center for the neighborhood, with mixed uses that will allow the preservation of the historical development patterns, including commercial retail on the In the effort to achieve this vision, the strategy for A. Philip Randolph will focus on three areas: Creating a retail and commercial node for þ the community that will offer employment opportunities for the residents through a model block approach (Planning). Providing the regulatory environment that þ will facilitate mixed-use development, with residential space (Planning). Outlining the appropriate infrastructure needs þ that will enhance the visual appearance of the Corridor (Planning).

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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor RESEARCH The Bay Street Trolley has a route that runs on A. Philip Randolph Blvd. “The Emerald Necklace connects neighborhoods to the river through a variety of pocket parks, boardwalks, creekside trails, and streetscape inviting pedestrians and bicyclists to explore downtown through a series of green spaces.” surrounding projects... þ Below, an open space and pedestrian map provides me with information in terms of proposed and existing parks, pedestrian links, and views. This map helps me determine where to propose linkages and connections from the corridor to existing and proposed parks. Also the Bay Street Trolley has a stop along A. Philip Randolph Blvd. Proposed stops are to be considered in the design phase.

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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor RESEARCHexisting design guidelines...URBAN DESIGN GUIDELINES Guidelines for Public Spaces Identify gateways with landscaping and þ special features. Support public investment in Jacksonville’s þ gateways by identifying and promoting commercial uses nearby (JEDC). Intent: To encourage enticing views of the river from as many places in downtown as possible. Encourage the creation of views from þ buildings to the river, through buildings, and across the river to buildings (JEDC).Guidelines for Connections to DowntownIntent: To provide connections that maximize the asset of the St. Johns River. Provide a continuous public walkway along þ the north bank of the St. Johns River from Metro Park to Memorial Park (JEDC). Intent: To create a series of downtown connections to open space (JEDC). Provide connections to Hogan’s Creek along þ Ashley, Church, Liberty, Main and Ocean St.STREETSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINESIntent: To make sidewalks interesting, safe, and comfortable places to walk. To unify the sidewalk and provide a clear, direct and safe path for pedestrians (JEDC). Require developers of new projects to build þ sidewalks and install the streetscape that is designated for the area and to provide on going maintenance (JEDC). Remove all utility poles, lights, and meters þ from the pedestrian zone and relocate them in the amenity zone; install underground utilities whenever possible (JEDC). Use historic interlocking paving, or replicas, þ in those residential districts where they originated (JEDC). Change the paving material at crosswalks þ throughout Downtown Jacksonville. Plant regularly spaced trees in straight rows; þ the number and spacing of trees should be based on the need to allow adequate room for root and branch growth while still providing a continuous canopy; trees should be centered in the width of the amenity zone (JEDC). Use the same type of tree on each side of the þ street (JEDC). Put trees in lawns or ground cover wherever þ possible (JEDC). Intent: To create a sense of security and safety for pedestrians. þ pedestrian scale (JEDC).

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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor RESEARCHCase Study InformationProject Name : Peabody Place Project Location : Memphis, Tennessee Project Designer : Developer: Belz Enterprises Case Study Description : A downtown redevelopment project that mixes new and residential and retail. Case study goals/What I hope to learn Research and review the Land Use and þ applied to my project. Understand how the designer integrated the þ restoration of historic buildings with the new buildings and their architecture. Understand why there are linkages to þ important points of interest. Understand how the designer/planner was þ able to integrate a theme directly related to the history of the area. Summary of Peabody Place : þ Peabody Place occupies an eightblock area in downtown Memphis on the city’s west side, a few blocks from the Mississippi River and Beale Street. Peabody Place is in the heart of downtown Memphis and is one of the largest mixed-use developments in the country. The total project area covers and includes space for retail, and entertainment, as well as, four parking garages with anchored to the east by the historic Peabody Hotel, to the south by Beale Street, to the east by Peabody Place Entertainment and Retail Center, and to the west by the corporate headquarters of AutoZone (Schwanke) .case studies...Peabody Place Peabody Place Site Plan Peabody Place Entertainment and Retail.

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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor RESEARCH þ The redevelopment of the urban area to create Peabody Place has included the restoration of several historic buildings and retail and entertainment, restaurants, and gathering places. The heritage of Memphis music and the legacy of the grand movie palaces were used for the theme of the Peabody Place Entertainment and Retail Center. þ The Peabody Place Entertainment and Retail Center covers more square feet in a streetscape environment. The three-story retail/entertainment center’s varied and smaller streetscape is organized along a multilevel atrium/courtyard. and the courtyard, while the movie theatre Schwanke) . Aspects learned by this case study and how it applies to my project : þ The most important aspects I learned from this case study that apply to my capstone project are how the designer was able to integrate the preservation and redevelopment of historic structures while integrating new buildings/architecture into the project. Peabody Place multilevel atrium courtyard. Peabody Place Entertainment and Retail from a different angle at night.

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case studies... Addison Circlethe randolph district: a vibrant corridorRESEARCH Case Study Information Project Name : Addison Circle Project Location : Addison, Texas Project Designer : Developer: Post Properties, Inc. Architect and Master Planner: RTKL Associates Engineering and Landscape Architecture: HuitZollars Case Study Description : An Urban village organized around a circle and streets, including retail uses. Case study goals/What I hope to learn Research and þ review the Land Use and Building information for Addison Circle infrastructure guidelines that can be applied to my project. Understand how Addison Circle has created þ a physical focal point and stronger population base to support and anchor the communities commercial/retail uses. Understand how the development has þ brought density, and most importantly, a sense of community to a classic city. Research and review the design and þ development standards of the project. Understand how the streets, and open space þ are very important elements that make Addison Circle so appealing to different users. Summary of Addison Circle : þ Addison Circle is a mixed use urban village built around a circle and a grid street primary use. Addison Circle has established two sub-areas: a residential neighborhood of mid-rise housing with supporting retail uses, parks and other amenities, and a higher-density and crosswalks are paved in brick with mature provide an instant streetscape. Decorative metal bike racks, benches, trash receptacles, and other street furniture is provided for function as well as aesthetic value ( Schwanke) .

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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor RESEARCHDesign development standards included items such as density, lot coverage, exterior building materials, setbacks, and streetscape standards. þ A wide range of residential dwelling unit types is provided at Addison Circle, ranging from units are one bedroom models, the planned mix also includes two and three bedroom units, town houses, and live/work units ( Schwanke) . þ Retail and other commercial uses are located at the street level in most buildings, businesses range from convenience retail and personal services to restaurants and art galleries (Schwanke) . Aspects learned by this case study and how it applies to my project : þ The most important aspects I learned from this case study that apply to my capstone project are different design development standards, land use and building density information and how important the streetscape and open space is. The experience gained is that urban mixed-use development is rewarding, frequently resulting in distinctive properties and settings that can command higher rents and create higher property values. The outcome is a sustainable, integrated mixed-use residential development that serves as a vibrant life force for the community and a blueprint for future projects. Addison Circle Site Plan Addison Circle Residential Lofts

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case studies... CityPlacethe randolph district: a vibrant corridorRESEARCHCase Study InformationProject Name : CityPlace Project Location : West Palm Beach, Florida Project Designer : Developer: Palladium Company; Urban Design Firm: Duanny PlaterZyberk Other: Elkus/Manfredi Architects Case Study Description : An urban town center featuring a main street with retail, entertainment, cultural and residential uses, Case study goals/What I hope to learn Research and review the Land Use and þ applied to my project. Understand how the shaping of the streets, þ public spaces, and buildings are welcoming for both pedestrians and businesses. Research and review the design and þ development standards of the project. Understand how the designer introduced þ individual design features in the buildings, walkways, and landscaping. Summary of CityPlace :þ CityPlace heart of West Palm Beach, near the intersection Schwanke) . CityPlace is a mixed-use town center that currently brings together residences, cultural facilities, restaurants, and national and regional specialty retailers in a European style village setting. CityPlace offers open-air shopping plazas, tree-lines esplanades, and inviting streets that lead to sidewalk dining establishments, entertainment venues, and family friendly activities, such as free concerts and dancing fountains. þ The plaza is the center of gravity for the development by providing a grand public room that draws visitors from various areas of West Palm Beach and Florida’s Coast. In this central plaza, the fountain and urban landscaping create a sense of enclosure and European atmosphere. The designer introduced various column types and different combinations of stone, brick and tile for walkways, crosswalks, and plazas. Also, individual plantings were selected to match the architecture rather than following a uniform pattern of the same trees. CityPlace Site Plan

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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor RESEARCHBy doing so, the design creates highly textured streetscapes and a variety of building scales. þ CityPlace units, including condominiums, townhouses, live/work units and rental apartments. There are three feet that round out the mix along with and the Palm Beach Convention Center (Schwanke) . Aspects learned by this case study and how it applies to my project : The most important aspect I learned from this case study that applies to my capstone project is how the designer introduced individual design features in the buildings, walkways, and landscaping throughout CityPlace.http://barbosaphoto.com/Cityscapes/cityplace.jpg Palladium Plaza Fountains in CityPlace The Cheesecake Factory CityPlace The Harriet Himmel Gilman Theater for Cultural and Performing Arts Residential lofts and apartments above retail shops at CityPlace

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smart growth... form based code...the randolph district: a vibrant corridorRESEARCH þ “Smart Growth” The buzz word is everywhere, front and center, in conferences, newspapers, books, local plans, and zoning ordinances. It stirs up strong emotions, both pro and con, and everyone has a unique perspective on what it means, where it comes from, where we need it, and how to implement it. In communities across the country, there is great concern that current development patterns, also known as “sprawl,” is no longer the long term interest of our inner city communities, suburbs, rural communities, small towns, or conservation areas. Although there is no template to solve this “sprawl,” the Smart Growth Network has developed a set of ten basic principles that can be applied in various combinations to create smart, non sprawling communities. þ Form-based code “is a method of urban form. Form-based codes create a predictable public realm primarily by controlling physical form, with a lesser focus on land use, “The goals of smart growth are to achieve a unique sense of place; expand the range of transportation, employment, and housing choices; preserve and enhance natural and cultural resources and promote public health” (Anderson Smart Growth Principles such as; Create a Range of Housing Opportunities and Choices, Create Walkable Neighborhoods, Encourage Community and Stakeholder Collaboration, Foster Distinctive, Attractive Communities with a Strong Sense of Place, Create Mix Land Use, Preserve Open Space, Farmland, Natural Beauty and Critical Environmental Areas, and Provide a Variety of Transportation Choicesþ þ Smart growth is going to be a key component in making the A. Philip Randolph Corridor a success. Also, for this to be successful in implementing smart growth, it must be accepted by public and most importantly private entities. http://www.growsmartmaine.org/images/parkinglottoon.jpg A cartoon on the web about Smart Growth that I found interesting.

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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor RESEARCHthrough city or county regulations (Form Based).”This method is a very good approach to create pedestrian-oriented streets and focus on walkability, which are two very important elements that must be considered while making key design decisions. Form-based codes concentrate on the appearance and size of buildings in relation to one another, the correlation between building facades and the public domain, and the scale and types of streets and blocks. þ The standards and regulations of formbased codes are presented in both diagrams and words and are referred to as a regulation plan that delineates the appropriate form and scale of the development. The strict codes are not to be confused with design guidelines or general statements; form-based codes are regulatory, not optional (Form Based).Form-based codes commonly include the following elements :Regulating Plan: A plan or map of the regulated þ area designating the locations where different building form standards apply, based on clear community intentions regarding the physical character of the area being code. þ elements within the public realm (e.g., sidewalks, travel lanes, on-street parking, street trees, street furniture, etc.). Building Form Standards: Regulations controlling þ þ project review process. þ technical terms (Form Based).Form-based codes also sometimes include the following elements : Architectural Standards: Regulations controlling þ external architectural materials and quality. Landscaping Standards: Regulations controlling þ landscape design and plant materials on private property as they impact public spaces (e.g. regulations about parking lot screening and shading, maintaining sight lines, insuring unobstructed pedestrian movements, etc.). Signage Standards: Regulations controlling þ allowable signage sizes, materials, illumination, and placement (Form Based). Form Based Code Typical Components

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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor INVENTORY, ANALYSIS, & SYNTHESIS inventory, analysis, & synthesis... T he R andolph D istrict

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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor INVENTORY, ANALYSIS, & SYNTHESIS inventory, analysis, & synthesis... T he R andolph D istrict

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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor INVENTORY, ANALYSIS, & SYNTHESISanalysis...Open Space and Social Services (OSSS) þ OSSS is an analysis of all public and private, developed and undeveloped open space and social services. The corridor explores many of these different uses including public open space, recreation open space, vant lands and buildings, and social serving businesses.

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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor INVENTORY, ANALYSIS, & SYNTHESISanalysis...Civic Identity Elements (CIEs) þ CIEs are elements that contribute to a city’s identity. They usually consist of visually important urban spaces.

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analysis... Housing the randolph district: a vibrant corridor INVENTORY, ANALYSIS, & SYNTHESIS þ The majority of homes in this area are shotgun style with a minimal amount of bungalow style homes. The redevelopment initiative should incorporate these architectural types into this development to retain the character of the neighborhhod and ensure quality living.

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analysis... Structure Ecology and Physiography (SEPs) the randolph district: a vibrant corridor INVENTORY, ANALYSIS, & SYNTHESIS þ The connectivity and cohesion of a city is affected by dead end streets, misaligned intersections and discontiuous street elements. These conditions currently affect curb appeal and neighborhood formation.

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analysis... Urban Transects Land Usage the randolph district: a vibrant corridor INVENTORY, ANALYSIS, & SYNTHESIS þ A transect is a slice through the city along a continuous corridor from end to end. These commonly include analyzing the uses, character, architecture, and identifying elements. This map sets out to delineate the land use designation along the main corridor and two important bisecting corridors.

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analysis... Urban Transects Public Usage the randolph district: a vibrant corridor INVENTORY, ANALYSIS, & SYNTHESIS þ These urban area. This map sets out to delineate the amount of land use along the main corridor and two important bisecting corridors.

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synthesis... Fixed-Free Diagramthe randolph district: a vibrant corridorINVENTORY, ANALYSIS, & SYNTHESIS þ All into this map which delineates the developable and undevelopable lands. þ A subjected to change versus those which are vacant lands or derelict and substandard were combined to create this diagram. This was a useful step in this large and complex project, as it groups cluster areas where change is to be avoided and/or where change can readily occur. þ This diagram incorporates historic sites, Civic Identity Elements, Open Space and Social Services, and other private sites of good condition. Also this diagram includes elements or areas of a site that are exempt from change or are to be preserved.

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opportunites & constraints the randolph district: a vibrant corridorINVENTORY, ANALYSIS, & SYNTHESISOpportunities: condition) projects Constraints: delapitated

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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor CONCEPTUAL DESIGN conceptual design... T he R andolph D istrict

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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor CONCEPTUAL DESIGN conceptual design... T he R andolph D istrict

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concept development... Concept Onethe randolph district: a vibrant corridorCONCEPTUAL DESIGN þ Concept one focuses on elements such as mixed use a cultural and civic node, circulation, connectivity and linkages to existing parks and amenities, and a proposed riverfront park aquarium park.

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concept development... Concept twothe randolph district: a vibrant corridorCONCEPTUAL DESIGN þ Concept two focuses on elements such as a gateway for the neighborhood, mixed use the corridor, a cultural and civic node, circulation, connectivity and linkages to existing parks and amenities, and a proposed riverfront park. This concept also focuses on street trees being a key element in the design phase to improve neighborhood walkability and connectivity.

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concept development... Concept Threethe randolph district: a vibrant corridorCONCEPTUAL DESIGN Concept three focuses elements such as a gateway to the neighborhood, affordable housing, multi-family housing, and mixed use development to include entertainment, leisure areas, outdoor eateries, jazz clubs, and miscellaneous retail shops, a neighborhood needs node that would include a drug store, a grocery store, a hardware store, a health clinic, a police sub station, and a learning center. This concept also focuses on taking the existing homes and moving them to create a historic district.

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concept development... Final Conceptthe randolph district: a vibrant corridorCONCEPTUAL DESIGN þ concept it uses the aquarium park as an anchor for the whole project. The aquarium park with its proposed þ expanded on to create a more urban feel. Also, connectivity played a major role in the over design. þ From the third concept the town square and plaza ideas were used to create more of a pedestrian scale. It also takes the proposed designated land uses for the historic district, affordable housing, and multi-family housing.

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masterplan & design details... T he R andolph D istrictthe randolph district: a vibrant corridorCONCEPTUAL DESIGN

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masterplan & design details... T he R andolph D istrictthe randolph district: a vibrant corridorCONCEPTUAL DESIGN

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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor MASTERPLAN & DESIGN DETAILS masterplan...

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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor MASTERPLAN & DESIGN DETAILSmasterplan... Proposed Historic DistrictHomes affected by development would be moved into this proposed historic district. Also, similar architecture Existing Surface Parking Proposed Multi-family living and A ff ordable Housing

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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor MASTERPLAN & DESIGN DETAILSTown Square Development This þ development surrounds the user as the shape of the buildings encloses the space and provides a public plaza. This Town Square This þ includes retail with residential above, a Police Sub-Station planned at the north end with an underground parking structure, a health clinic, a drug store, grocery store and a hardware store. Riverfront Parcel Development This þ three story Aquarium planned on the St. Johns River features ground level retail shops and restaurants with a number of exhibits on serves the community, supports local growers, their products, and the agricultural community. that serve these facilities.þ Transit-Oriented Development (TOD) This þ transit-oriented design is for live, work foot Bus and Trolley Transit station, and a parking garage and surface parking that totals Mixed use Development This þ mixed use buildings two with retail and two parking garages and surface parking that masterplan...

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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor MASTERPLAN & DESIGN DETAILS

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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor MASTERPLAN & DESIGN DETAILS

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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor MASTERPLAN & DESIGN DETAILS

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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor MASTERPLAN & DESIGN DETAILS

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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor MASTERPLAN & DESIGN DETAILS

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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor MASTERPLAN & DESIGN DETAILS

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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor MASTERPLAN & DESIGN DETAILS

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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor MASTERPLAN & DESIGN DETAILS

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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor MASTERPLAN & DESIGN DETAILS masterplan... þ Above is an existing section of A Philip Randolph Boulevard. The boulevard is lacking bike lanes, parking and a sense of place. þ Below a concept for the streets that intersect with A. Philip Randolph Boulevard. This concept sidewalks.

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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor MASTERPLAN & DESIGN DETAILS þ As a student and a future Landscape Architect, I feel that the East Jacksonville Neighborhood and historical character and seems to be a meeting place for the residents. Although, there are many vacant lots and buildings, the businesses along the corridor have a strong commercial base that could be a catalyst for future economic development. þ I feel that this project was great for me because I grew up in Jacksonville and want to be a part of the changes to better the downtown urban core. I also plan on moving back to Jacksonville to start my career. This project has helped me in understanding the design and management of public spaces, while allowing me to focus on the physical improvement of the public environment. By taking on this project, I learned more about public spaces and how they are used on a day to day basis. I also learned about urban design, connectivity, transit, and how it can affect the downtown core. þ This downtown corridor is the one location that has major potential for outsider use, now lets make it happen... þ masterplan...design conclusions

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the randolph district: a vibrant corridor MASTERPLAN & DESIGN DETAILSAnderson, Geoff. Why Smart Growth: A Primer. Arigoni, D., A. Levofsky, E.S. Richards, et. al. Getting to Smart Growth Policies for Implementation. þ þ Asa Philip Randolph. Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. þ þ Basile, Ralph J. Downtown Development Handbook. Bohl, Charles C. Place Making: Developing Town Centers, Main Streets, and Urban Villages. ULI-The þ þ Form Based Codes Institute. þ Fleming, Ronald Lee. The Art of Placemaking: Interpreting Community through Public Art and Urban þ þ Design. Gindroz, Ray. The Urban Design Handbook: Techniques and Working Methods. Urban Design Associates, þ þ Houston Jr., Lawrence O. BIDs: Business Improvement District Jacksonville, Florida, Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. þ þ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacksonville,_Florida> JEDC, Jacksonville Economic Development Commission. Downtown Master Plan. COJ.net þ þ þ Planning and development. Neighborhhod Action Plans, Corridor Studies, and Land Use and Zoning þ þ Studies. COJ.net þ þ þ þ Schwanke, Dean. Mixed Use Development Handbook. Sucher, David. City Comforts: How to build an Urban Village. Whyte, William H. City: Rediscovering the Center. NOTE: ALL BASE MAP AERIALS WERE PROVIDED BY “PROSSER HALLOCK” NOTE: ALL DRAWINGS, SKETCHES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND DIAGRAMS THROUGHOUT THIS DOCUMENT THAT ARE NOT REFERENCED WERE EITHER DRAWN, TAKEN, OR PRODUCED BY THE AUTHOR.references