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Backayard magazine

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Title:
Backayard magazine
Place of Publication:
Kingston, Jamaica
Publisher:
Backayard Publishing, Inc.
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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Copyright Backayard Publishing, Inc.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
0799-1797 ( ISSN )

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Full Text
IiDDiE DANCEIALL CULTURE


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Digicel


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With Digicel, your credit lasts LONGER.

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Chief Editor Amilcar Lewis
Creative/Art Director Noel-Andrew Bennett

Managing Editor Madeleine Moulton (US)


Production Managers Clayton James (US)
Noel Sutherland

Contributing Editors Jim Sewastynowicz (US)
Phillip Lobban

3G Editor Matt Sarrel

Designer/Photo Advisor Andre Morgan (JA)

Fashion Editor Cheridah Ashley (JA)
Assistant Fashion Editor Serchen Morris
Stylist Judy Bennett

Florida Correspondents Sanjay Scott
Leroy Whilby, Noel Sutherland

Contributing Photographers Tone, Andre Morgan, Pam Fraser


Contributing Writers MusicPhill, Headline Entertainment,
Jim Sewastynowicz, Matt Sarrel

Caribbean Ad Sales Audrey Lewis
US Ad Sales EL
US Promotions Anna Sumilat
Madsol-Desar

Distribution Novelty Manufacturing
OJ36 Records, LMH Ltd.

PR Director Audrey Lewis (JA)

Online Sean Bennett (Webmaster)
ja@backayard.com
usa@backayard.com





JAMAICA
9C, 67 Constant Spring Rd. Kingston 10, Jamaica WI.
(876)384-4078;(876)364-1398;fax(876)960-6445
email: ja@backayard.com

UNITED STATES
Brooklyn, NY, 11236, USA
e-mail: usa@backayard.com


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It seems that every time our country makes one positive step forward, we take a million
negative steps backward (and for a country with about three million people living in it,
that's a lot of steps we are all taking). International media and the millions of eyes around
the world don't care if it's just that one bad apple. We are all being judged by the actions
of a handful of individuals, whether it's the politician trying to hide his/her indiscretions,
to the hustler that harasses the visitors to our shores. It all affects our future.

How do we go from owning, and celebrating our country, people and culture, to
destroying our land we love, then murdering and robbing these same people that make
us proud? Whenever someone works hard to better themselves or situation, there is
always some one lurking in the shadows at your gate in a corolla who wants to see you
fail! Why is that? How did we get to this place?

We have lost so many artistes to senseless 'crab in a barrel' violence. In 1976 we almost
lost Bob Marley -- rumored to be for political reasons. In 1987 we did lose arguably one
of the greatest musicians next to Bob, Mr. Peter Tosh a three-man gang demanding his
hard earned money, and when the demands were not met shot him twice in the head.
The list goes on; Nitty Gritty shot in Brooklyn, New York, Pan Head shot after
leaving a dance in Spanish Town, Daddygon shot at a bar, which later turned out to be
a supposed case of mistaken identity, and if the deaths of our natives were not enough,
South African reggae-musician Lucky Dube, was gunned down in what appeared to be
an attempted hijacking, in Rosettenville, south of Johannesburg. Now O'Neil Edwards
from Voicemail, shot several times while entering his home.

What is the common thread with all these senseless deaths? Reggae is one. Being
famous seems to be the other. Here's an idea, let's ban music all-together, live under
oppressive military militia and have equal wages for everyone who wants to work, have
the mischievous, thieves and killers punished by immediate death or limb-loss.
That regime seems to work in other places, maybe it will work here since we have
nothing else to lose. EL















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THE REGGAE MARATHON (Negi)


Ahh, Jamaica...land of wood and water, sweet
reggae music and track & field. Track and field?
Yes, track and field. Jamaicans have been
world-class in that particular sporting field for
several decades now. Long before the
phenomenon known as Usain Bolt laced up his
first pair of cleats, we had athletes such as
Arthur Wint, Donald Quarrie, Herb McKenley and
countless others flying the black, gold and green
flag high. However, even with that success,
Jamaicans are known mostly as a sprint
factory with not much attention being paid to
long distance running.

Alfred 'Frano' Francis has been working hard to
change that. Born in the mid-fifties in the misty
parish of Portland, Frano developed a love for
running while attending track powerhouse KC
(Kingston College), attended KC during an era
when they dominated Boys Champs. After
leaving school Frano worked at Air Jamaica
for 15 years, during that period he felt the need
to get involved with some physical activity. He
started running at the Police Officers' Club. He
then, on the advice of a friend, began running at
the Mona Dam. "I went up there in the early 90's
and met up with some friends with similar


interests and the Jamdammers running club
was formed." After forming the club, the
members began entering events overseas
representing the country of Jamaica and the
Jamdammers at varying locales across the
globe. However, the club did not receive much
press locally until they organized and executed
the Reggae Marathon.

The concept of the marathon came from the
members in the club who were generally
disappointed with the Jamaican International
Marathon which was held after the
Cement Company's marathon was
discontinued for lack of sponsorship.
So in 2000, Frano and the rest of the
Jamdammers went to the Rock & Roll Mara-
thon in San Diego. This marathon is noted for
having at least 40 bands enroute to the finish.
As a group they felt Jamaica had the music,
the athleticism, an exotic enough location
(Negril) and much more -- the country itself
needed a first class marathon.

The group worked on it and held the first event
in 2001 with a lot of support from the Jamai-
ca Tourist Board. "Frances Yeo, who was the


events manager at the time, was very helpful.
The American Heart/Stroke Association,
brought about 500 people for the first one, the
ratio was more foreigners than locals at that
time. "For that marathon we brought down nine
Kenyan runners and got a call from St. Vincent
from Pamenos Ballantyne saying that he was
coming to the race and he actually came and
won." Frano added. From its inception the
Jamdammers running club has always been
aware of what a runner goes through during a
marathon, and that awareness led to its first
class runner-care on the course.

Dr. Ducasse and her team from the Ministry of
Health and the Sports Medicine Association
was a big help to the running of the marathon
over the years, and also reflects on the level of
support that the government has given the race.
"That first year they were fixing the Negril road
when we went down there it was all marl after
you pass the hotel strip. I must compliment
Bobby Pickersgill who I think was the minister
responsible at the time for transport and works.
They laid a strip of asphalt by the morning of the
race -- that showed us that they connected with
what we were doing." As mentioned before the


BACKAYARD8


























































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?ceive mney From

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"A lot of people in Jamaica view any road race as a marathon." Frano
explains. "A marathon is exactly 42 kilometers or 26.2 miles, in addition to
the main marathon we also have a half-marathon and now a 10 kilometer
run that help to bring in a wider audience." The Negril community has
embraced the race wholeheartedly as on race day. The marathon uses
over 300 volunteers, and the majority of volunteers are from the
community. This type of volunteerism is, in the wider perspective, the
reason behind the whole success of the Jamaican track and field
association. It has been because of volunteerism that the 2010 version
of the Jamaica High School National Championships (as the Boys
Champs now combined with Girls version are now called) had 400 and
more volunteers all working for free for four days. Economically, the
Reggae Marathon has had a huge impact on the Negril community. Last
year people from 18 different countries came to Jamaica to not only to run
the marathon but they also vacationed here. "We have gotten maximum
support from the Negril chapter of the Jamaica Hotel & Tourism
Association (JHTA) from people like Carolyn Wright and Evelyn Smith to
Mr Issa himself. I remember the first day of the marathon, he checked on
all his hotels to see if they were filled and it was positive. From that day to
today he has given us the use of Couples free of cost." This locale
provides a beautiful platform for the planners to operate. The setting up
of the race is a three day affair, you have registration for the event and an
expo where people are invited to come see Jamaican craft and experience
our food. When the visitors register and they get a complimentary T-shirt
and they can then buy Jamaican cultural artifacts. Frano adds. "We also
host the 'World's Greatest Pasta Party' rated by ourselves because we
have traveled the world and a pasta party is a normally a pre-marathon
celebration but it is nothing like what we do. We benefit from having
Sandals, Riu and Super Clubs competing to the best job making pasta.

Our staging area is the Long Bay Beach Park which we transformed from
a football field into a 'finish' area. When people finish the race they get a
medal, coconut water, a Red Stripe beer and several other local gifts.
The participants have the option to get massages right there on the beach
or for those who fancy a swim to cool off."

One of the things that have come out of the event, is the use of it (the event)

their grand prix series or as what they call it Road to the Reggae
Marathon series which has a lot of schools who train no matter what
distance they specialize in. "They utilize the 5k and the 10k as background
training and strength training. We have had significant runners come out
of it such as Wainard Talbert and now Kemoy Campbell and Latoya Gold
who have made a name for themselves both regional and internationally."

Wisely the Reggae Marathon officials do not charge an entry fee because
they have expressed that they don't want to only have runners that enter
from a competitive stand point but for persons also interested in
maintaining a healthy lifestyle through running. This year will be the 10th
edition of the marathon and the organizers are determined to make it even
better than past editions. Reggae Marathon is held on the first Saturday
in December every year and the marketing campaign for each event begins
13 months in advance. The expo in New York is normally when the first
campaign is done. After that it is Boston, San Diego, Atlanta, Miami and
L.A. -- while PUMA international markets the event in Europe.
Reggae Marathon got rated as one of the top ten marathons in the world
by the London Paper based on runner-care and execution. They use
championship timing since inception similar to ones used in London and
A lot of people in Jamaica view any Boston. This is handled by the well respected timing company
to f p pe i Jma maat Sports Management Associates from the United States.
road race as a marathon.
A marathon is exactly 42 kilometers Major sponsors over the years have been: Jamaica Tourist Board, Burger
King, PUMA, Digicel, Jamaica Macaroni Company, Pepsi, Gatorade,
or 26.2 miles! Jamaica Amateur Athletics Association (JAAA), Sport Development
Fund (SDF), Air Jamaica, Coldfield Manufacturing, Island Dairies
initial staging of the race had mostly foreigners participating, however, in among others. A truly unique event, the Reggae Marathon is a perfect
the nine years since the ratio has changed significantly as they have had mix of what Jamaica has to offer. Perfect weather conditions, wonderful
a lot more Jamaicans running the marathon. This is because the settings and images, mixed with reggae music, sets the tone for both
Jamdammers have been building not only the Reggae Marathon but a visitors to the island and local on-lookers and participants to fully enjoy the
calendar of road races leading up to it. spectacle. Come out on the 4th of December and see for yourself why its
race's tagline is "Come for the run, stay for the fun."







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REGGAE ON THE HILL(Barbados)
Words: Leigh-Ann Worrell

The heat from the sun's rays were no match for that
coming from the stage at the sixth edition of Digicel Reggae
on the Hill, held in Barbados.
By all accounts, the crowd of just about 15,000 people that
packed the Farley Hill National Park fully enjoyed the all-day
show.
Local acts like Prosperity, Twin Man and Oracle got the
event off to a great start with a steady stream of their own
reggae offerings. Another local artiste, Easy B was another
crowd pleaser, and set the stage for other well-known
homegrown reggae artistes like Brimstone, Albert Olton,
LRG, Daniel and Hotta Flames.
Skillfully rounding off the local talent was Buggy Nakhente,
whose set was just as popular and anticipated as any
Jamaican performer on the Hill's lineup.
He inspired the crowd powerful renderings of The Way it
Is and /See Dem among others. He was closely followed by
Lisa Howell who brought it home for the Barbadian reggae
artistes with a selection of covers and originals from her
latest project.
Guyanese starlet Timeka Marshall was the first foreign
act for the day. Backed by Barbadian band Masala with lead
singer Philip 7, she appeared after 1 p.m., and by this time
the hill was filled with reggae lovers, many of them armed
with picnic baskets and coolers. Marshall also sang originals
like Feel Fah and a cover of Jah Cure's Call on Me with
Phillip 7, which the audience seemed to like.
Winner of the 2007 Digicel Rising Stars Romain Virgo
pleased the ladies with songs Can't Sleep and Love Doctor
as well as ghetto anthem Who Feels it Knows It.
Etana blessed with the stage with positive vibes including I
am NotAfraidand Warrior Love.
As the sun dipped in the horizon, a heated day got even
hotter. The veteran artiste Maxi Priest belted out hits like
JustA Little Bit Longer and Close to Youto name a few.
"Jah's messenger" Luciano kept the vibes going with
Messenger Give Praise and Jah Live from 2008's Jah is
My Navigator He was followed by emerging artiste Hezron,
whom the crowd seemed quite impatient with.
Richie Spice was also a hit with the crowd.
Although a very calm performer, he lived up to his name on
Sunday evening with skillful renditions of More Life, Earth a
Run Red, Grooving my Girl and together with soca queen
Alison Hinds, King and Queen.
Then it got oh so busy! Reanno 'Busy Signal' Gordon gave
the crowd a repertoire of energetic dancehall songs like Step
Out and Mek She Stamma as well as slower reggae songs
One More Night and Night Shift, which the crowd practically
sang verbatim.
'Mr. Singy Singy' Tarrus Riley brought the house down as
lovers rocked steady to songs like Love's Contagious,
Superman, Human Nature and Stay With You.
He also reminded men to treasure what they have with Getty
Gettyand StartAnew.
Konshens guest appeared for an unforgettable rendition of
Good Girl Gone Bad.


photos: Headline Entertdnmentl


BACKYARD 12


UL\








ANUNA (Jamaca)
By Tami Chynn & Lubica
photos by: P Fraser






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Anuna: Elegant, sophisticated, cultured, chic and trendy.
Now this wasn't a just a regular old jaunt through a
beat-up thesaurus to describe any old mundane thin,
these were actually the first words that came to I,.
mind when I saw the anutna fashion line up close for the
first time. Being a veteran of several different fashion
shows and events, I am definitely not a stranger to see-
ing beautiful women adorn themselves with sexy cloth-
ing however this is the first time I actually saw outfits
that I feel that any woman would be comfortable in.
The women responsible for anna are Jamaica's very
own diva Tami Chynn and Slovakian born but
Canadian bred Lubica, who was already well known in
her adoptive home island of Jamaica for her
stunning swimwear and seductive dresses. The anuLna .
line is available at the retail store
Kerry manwomanhome and online at www.lubica.com
Big up to Guest Editor Pamela Fraser,
Sheldon Brown, Mattson Cuthbert, Matthew Walt and
Kimberlee (make-up artist).


DEATH BEFORE DISHONOR 10
The Final War


Death Before Dishonor Th-e rI- r.h -,.j \ -,:F.: .-.-:.:- I,,-i :~ir ... .:.I I .:h -,,.
Chins Death Belore Dishonor; aptly dubbed The Final war, was held at Its
now infamous venue Pier I, in Montego Bay. Black Kat won this year In a
surprising turn-around victory over Sentinel from Germany.
For more on the various sound system clashes around the world, visit
irishandchin.com and backayard.com






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ALL JUICED UP FOR

TRU-JUICE st. Catherine r
Naturally for anyone to properly K
speak about nature, they would have
to experience it first-hand. As
readers of BACKAYARD know very
well, we are very much about the
promotion of natural / healthy living,
and what could be a more integral
part of healthy living than what one
puts in his or her body?

This is why we took it upon ourselves 'i
to investigate the components of one
of Jamaica's more popular 'natural'
brands Tru-Juice. As you may or
may not know, the Tru- Juice brand
is a part of the wider
Trade Winds Citrus conglomerate
which is also responsible for the
Freshhh Fruit, Juice Drinks and
Wakefield Juices.

Trade Wind Citrus, based in the
community of Bog Walk,
St. Catherine arguably the largest
parish in Jamaica. Acres upon acres
of citrus groves, a nursery for
budding plants (where it is equipped
with a mist house where seeds are
germinated and an insect-proof
green house where the mother trees
are produced), a juice plant and a
packing house on its complex.

Based on our observation the real
key to the whole operation is the
care and respect that each plant
seems to receive. From the budding,
where only the plants proven to be
resistant to certain viruses are used,
the harvesting (where all plants are
hand-picked) to the washing & selection and finally the juice
extraction.

Each process is done with a personal touch, to ensure each fruit is
up to standard. Being the 'nature buffs' we are, we spent most of
our time in the field literally.

It was quite interesting observing the picking process of the 'prized'
orange crop (which is used for export). These gems are acquired by
omitting the hundreds of early fruit that have fallen early fruit fall
reduces tree strain and limb load leaving the remaining fruit
healthier and larger than their fallen brethren.

The picked fruit is then packed into cartons, put into trucks and
then carried to the packing houses. Did we mention how large the
complex is? Stay tuned for the next part in this series where I
explain among other things: the orange's attachment to Jamaican
culture, the importance of the Tru-Juice brand to the Jamaican
Diaspora and (of course) the many health benefits of orange and
its extracts.


BACKYARD I


PHOTOS BY: EL












Fresh Juice only comes from
Freshly squeezed Jamaican Oranges


Support Jamaica... Buy Jamaican!!


Tru-Juice

Proudly produced to Jraicam























































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Chevaughn

You didn't see him

Com ing. PHOTO BY EL WORDS BY AR

ost people have a hard time trying to wear two hats at a time. Whether trying to balance their family life, with
their professional life, or attempting to drive and text at the same time. It is generally very difficult for people to
perfectly split their attention equally between varying endeavours. Can you imagine trying to tackle three equally
different tasks within the same competitive industry? Difficult, right? Not if you were born Chevaughn Clayton -
lead singer of C Sharp, 1/7 of the Notice production team and more recently acclaimed solo act.


Chevaughn (as he is popularly known) decided that music
was what he wanted to do in life, and he figured this out while
leaving primary school at the tenderoni age of nine.
"I actually grew up around alot of women so initially I
wanted to be a gynecologist (Strange, huh) due to the fact that
I wanted to take care of the many women who were important
to me." Chevaughn explained.

Chevaughn started singing at JCDC festivals from primary
school through to high school. When he did the
Tastee Talent Competition in 1997, that was when he
seriously started to respect his purpose in art. While in high
school, Chevaughn saved all his competition money in
order to go to Edna Manley (school of art and music) which
to him was very important. "There were so many different
things to learn there. My first vocal teacher was
June Lawson after doing two years with her; I did a year with
Michael Harris." He says. "After a while I was learning from
Maurice Gordon, Ibo Cooper (from Third World) and
several other teachers who were teaching about Western
music, popular American and European music. Learn to
respect all genres as well as build on your creativity so when
it is time to write for yourself you can use the different genres
to assist you."

He graduated from Edna Manley in 2006, in that same year
was asked to become a member of C Sharp. He was also a
part of the Further Notice band (which eventually became
Notice Production) from his days on campus. Chevaughn has
been touring with C Sharp from 2006 (his final year at Edna
Manley) and although he is most clearly the link between the
two entities. Notice, to date, has never produced a project for
the C Sharp band. "The keyboardist in C Sharp has a
recording company called 'Barb Wire Music', so he normally
does the production for C Sharp and everything is a link
between 'Barb Wire' and C Sharp." Chevaughn explains. That
creative energy was displayed on tracks like 'No More' -
widely regarded as the group's breakout hit, 'Don't Come
Searching' and 'What Is the Matter with the World'. 2006 was
the same year that Further Notice band decided to start
producing tracks for artistes aside from themselves.
Chevaughn's work with Notice Production began with the


'Nyabinghi' riddim and has continued with several other
riddims released mostly geared towards the overseas market.
Dancehall fans would know Notice's more recent releases
such as 'Gallis' riddim with songs such as Ding Dong's 'Man
A Gallis', Serani's 'My Empress', Ras Penco's 'Player Haters'
and Bugle's 'Dem Too Fass'. However by far Chevaughn's
biggest stamp on Jamaican music scene so far has to be the
Notice produced 'Holiday' which he did in collaboration with
Ding Dong. "It was a day looking like how today looks (partly
-cloudy with a chance of rain), was driving on the road and I
came here (Notice Studio) and Unga was playing a track. As
he played it, I started singing about a sunny day and bunch of
different things. Then Unga said something about a
holiday and it started from there." Chevaughn and Notice
actually fashioned that song to be similar to how American
hip hop producer DJ Khaled does his songs, with a barrage of
different artiste on one track. However once Ding Dong heard
the track with the recorded melody and chorus he
immediately vibed with the song and it was eventually
decided to have him as the only guest on the song. The
'Holiday' song and video became a staple for the summer of
2009 on the cable stations, radio and party scene a like and
might even be 'resurrected' somewhat for the atmosphere of
this upcoming summer party series.


Even though it might not seem like it, Chevaughn is not quite
ready to be known exclusively as a solo artiste. He sees
himself as just exploring options and recording songs that
C Sharp probably would not do. C Sharp as group has just
been 'adopted' by the Bank of Nova Scotia in Jamaica for a
year in order to assist the band and their music. In terms of
working with the production label, they have just released
Chevaughn's video for 'Tables' which features former Digicel
Rising Star winner Chris Martin, Ding Dong, and Craig from
the dancehall group Voicemail. That along with several other
soon to be released singles both as a solo artiste and with
C Sharp add to that the many different new productions to
come from the Notice label, Chevaughn has a supremely busy
time in front of him and if it's one thing this man has proven
so far, is that he is more than capable of 'juggling' several jobs
at once, which is critical in this present day music market. B








































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I went to New York and I bought a little tape and had the
rddim, the "House Call" riddii. and me and Brian Gold and
Maxi Priest sit down inna hotel and write di song. Same night
we went to the studio, this was while the record label going
crazy because things are not done like that in America. y-ou
first submit a demo. people listen to it and then dem sell
alright we a cut di single. It tek a while it is a process.
\\e were doing it the Jamaican way. w\e sell ok \e a gull
studio tonight so we ago write the song inna di day.
She i(Vivian Scott) was jus freaking out, but w\e knew \ e had
a hit. So I did the track in New York and forgot all about it
because back in Jamaica I was busy bus\-. I got likkle buzz and
everybody. want a song. so a 'hol lot of phone calls coming
in. So I got a call from her one night "'Oh. you are my savior."
and this and that. She started talking about howr her boss dem
love it and it going to be di lead single and how dem a go get
David Morales to do di remix. It still never hit mi at that time.
we ajus some likkle island boy. I had no idea of w hat it means
to hate a hit in America. People come off of tour and tell mi
I have biggest tune inna America. Then mI life jus change'

Again! (Everybody Laughs)
Yeah. it really change nowt (Lmiglis) So vou telling the
people around you. vuh know -uh girlfriend and ting. ever\ -
day that tings will get better. Then it got better The one thing
\\id America, once \-ou get a hit and your name associated wid
di ting everybody want a piece of that.
I had a manager in England and she would send mi a monthly
schedule wid two days off. I was in Netw '\rk for a \ear in
total. At the time I was working wid a lot of young American
groups because most people wanted to try- the reggae
dancehall ting, so alot of work was being passed around.
Another reason, was that while we were charging US $1').000)
on a project. our American counterparts were charging
$100.0(00. So we were making a lot of mistakes and I think
that affected the Jamaican music for a w while Because those
of us who were being asked to do remixes. kinda moved away\
from di core of di Jamaican ting. \\'e \ere trying to second
guess the American market. so even \when \we w ere making
di songs. \\e were making it thinking that we w ere tr\ ing to
get to that market but that market is a market \we don't know
You have to respect people like Steelie who were being true to
what dem know as dem hardcore audience \Vhen Steelhe mek
a dancehall song he was hearing it playing on Sil\erha\ k to
that Silverhawk audience, he remained true to that audience
and it work fi him. \\'hen -ou think about this crossover ting,
crossover is like yuh nuh think 'bout nobody\ else, is a kinda
cop out. \\'hen people nuh like it, you can seh "\\ell is a
crossover ting," meaning you wasn't really supposed to like it.

Like the saying it 'wasn't made for you.
Exactly. when American dem hear it. the\ are like "Ok." the\
might think it's nice. But they are not going to use it So I
think we wasted a lot of time like that, butt it wa a wonderful
time. I got to work wid a lot of people w\ho become \er\
powerful. I turn my TV and see people I hung out wid it is
kinda surreal. I spent some time wid Nlaxi Priest on the road
and you go to one of these T' stations. u h see e\ eirone \\ho
had a hit song there.

So \that do you think of nowadays artistes?
A lot of youngsters in Jamaica are drawn to thie \ hole
Holl'iwood lights and di Boys II Men vibe. \\e have lost a lot of


wonderful voices to that American wannabe culture.
Dem never contribute dem voices to reggae. and in a \wa I
blame di whole fraternity including media A lot youngsters
never sawt themselves as having a chance here. Soimetimnes it
look like you haffi be crude or \uh haffi come from di ghetto
or \'uh haffi be a certain \wa\ to inek it \uh nuhll To be
acceptable. The ghetto 'ting represents around 3",. of the
whole county yet it is almost as if we saying if \ou not from
the ghetto yuh caan mek it! It is just so ridiculous because
most of us are not from the ghetto But nobody nuh tell people
that.

Them try to play it up?
Yeah, \uh play up the 'ghetto' when it convenient and -uh
ha\-e people w\ho are not from the ghetto it id talent either
tr ing to hide how\ educated the\ are orl the fact the\ have an
infrastructure where people can help dem do tings.
Something the\- should be proud of. Your parents probably
work hard to get you there, send vou to good school.

Even in Jamaica here, Sean Paul represents a hol' heap of
Jamaicans. so does Nicky B. so does Konshens, so does Buju.
so does Kartel. But everybody want to represent themselves
as di lkkle 3".. and lea e out et er bod\ else But then the rest
of us now because w e nuh have nobody catering for us. \ e
have to jus tek \ hat w\e can get.

\\1iat happen recently is that \with the intention of cable.
people are saying I don't have to go nuh lteh for NMTV or BET
and they are catering to me. A lot of \you ng people are saying
ok I see where I belong. Hip-hop is such a big thing in
Jamaica. hip-hop has probably replaced one-drop or lovers
rock inna di party. People might wonder w h'y? This is di cable
generation. Di society is not only physical it is also cb-er. we
have virtual communiti- now. That is di challenge facing
producers and songwriters like mi self How do I remain
relevant? NMy relevance is that I know\ how% to make music to
my age group.

Do you have .\An final thoughts?
Right nowt. \ve are in a net' era That Is I\ fatvoull'rite topic at
the nmomnent, the paradigm has shifted in terms of thle Imsic
business The music comlpan\ of thle present and thle fuituire
is a management ciompanv cause w e losIt the main source of
income Vwhich was record sales A.s \we speak less and less
CDs are being sold For the past fi\e \ears I ha\e been of the
belief that people have been gi\-ing a\\ a\ CDs like the\ w\ouild
business cards. So it is going to come back to performance

\\]ien \ouL inest in an artiste now\. it is abl)out management
and securing a part of their earnings in the futurtle So \o
ha\e to feed them. clothe them. and put them uip if \ ou are
taking the youngg ones without t record sales to fill that gap.
Vou are recording just because \(ou need to put music iout
Later on \olu miight have an albuin and possible) break e\en.
but if you'ree making records no\t to make a profit then \ou
are not going about it the right \'a\ It not happening again.
not anv more B


























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BAY : OFF THE RECORD


Freddie McGregor


Fredrick Alphanso McGregor, 'Freddie,' or 'the Captain' as he
is affectionately referenced, has had an illustrious and
legend-worthy career, everything from touring the North and
South of America, to Europe, Japan and back again. But
before all of that, the Hayes Top Hill, Clarendon native, was
not always known as 'the Captain,' of Big Ship acclaim.
'Likkle Freddie' as he was known in the community, had been
singing and performing since the impressionable age of
seven, and even had arguably his biggest hit to date
"Roll Dumpling Roll."

It wasn't until a fated musical union between his older friends
Ernest Wilson and Peter Austin, better known as
The Clarendonians, which ushered Freddie into honing, is
talent, and finding his calling as one of Jamaica's premier
artistes. "We tek di bus from Clarendon to Kingston and she
(Ernie's mother Miss Ethelyn) reminded us that when we
see the cemetery, yuh know seh yuh reach a town and fi ask
di driver to put yuh on the patty pan bus, and when yuh come
off di patty pan bus yuh reach a Mr. Dodd's studio."

Before becoming a recording artiste, Freddie earned his
stripes as being the resident 'store runner,' earning a small
keep for his errands and garnering respect from his 'elder'
artistes but the biggest respect of all, came from one
Mr. Coxsone Dodd. "We live wid him and him family a
Pembroke Hall fi years. Basically a deal wid di music from
dem time deh, from home to studio, to school to studio, and
that jus gradually kept on happening over time and didn't
stop."

Freddie started recording with Studio One between the years
1963 to 1979, but it wasn't until an 'outside' recording with
a producer that went by the name 'Niney the Observer' at
Channel One that lead to him having the biggest hit of his
career (outside of "Roll Dumpling Roll") with another
producer named Linval Thompson. Linval and Freddie went
on to produce the Big Ship album, which propelled
Mr. McGregor into 'the Captain's' position, that we know him
by today.

So what happened after 'Big Ship'?
It never stop, jus hit tune after hit tune after hit tune until 1986
I became signed to Polydor, I was signed to RAS Records
prior to that in 1983. We had successful songs such as 'Push
Come to Shove,' 'Across The Border,' 'All In The Same Boat,'
jus to name a few. That went on for three years at the end of
that deal I became signed to Polydor, toured the UK, toured
Europe, made a live album, things could not be greater at that
time. I made the single 'Just Don't Want to be Lonely' which
entered the British national chart and stayed there at num


ber nine for a long time. That was followed up by 'That Girl
(Groovy Situation)' which entered at 46 and then we had 'So I
Will Wait For You,' we had a great time in the UK during those
times. It went on until mi start mi own label in1989.

How was the process of starting your own label?
It was a challenging move. To start a label is one thing,
making it successful is another. It tek alot of hard work but
yuh haffi start someday, yuh haffi start somewhere, and my
thing was to make the start. So mi jus brave up myself and
mek di start. As is evidence today, Big Ship I would seh is
di leading label here over many years courtesy of Stephen,
Chino, and all the artistes wah work wid Big Ship.
We continuing to make great music and trying to see how best
we can keep our music intact. Try and change the way the
people in our country live as a result of the type of music we
produce here.

This is a question I always wanted to ask. What if Stephen
didn't start producing?
(Everybody Laughs) It would work, if it wasn't him it would
be somebody else cause Noel Brownie and Dalton Brownie
are two people who are instrumental wid Big Ship. In fact
Noel Brownie was di one who took on the actual building of
the studio, one of the greatest engineers and musicians around
us. Him is really Steven's mentor as well, Noel taught Steven
alot when he was younger. God have a way of doing tings so
if it wasn't Stephen it would have been somebody maybe it
would have been Chino, maybe it would have been Micah we
nuh know. We pray for di right tings to happen and through
prayer it happen and for me this was how it was meant to be.

Speak about the pride you feel with your sons taking such
an active role in the industry.
Well yeah, the pride is mainly to live to see dem actually do di
ting and a do it well and being successful at it. Because music
is supp'im weh have no guarantee. Yuh never know wah a
go happen yuh never know how it a go turn out. Yuh never
know which song a go be a hit song as much as you think this
song might be a hit song by the time it come out, the mode of
di country might change and a different song fit di mode. So
sometimes yuh never know you jus haffi keep your fingers
crossed go for it and give it your best shot. That is basically
how I see it.

Where do you see the future of your label?
Well as it stands now is wherever the music goes that's where
we go. I am saying that in terms of the di business. If you
notice over di years, at least in my generation, we saw 2-tracks,
we saw 4-tracks, 8-tracks, 16-tracks, 24-tracks, cassette then
we have CD. Who knows what it will move to inna couple
of years. Everything has gone digital basically and we don't
know what formats are going to come through or what is
going to happen. So we have to jus prepare ourselves and
keep the marketplace lively and keep our heads above water.
We breaking grounds we work wid alot of interesting artistes
such as Bramma, Singing Sweet, Laden, T-Thunda. As yuh see
Mavado deh yah everyday wid we, Elephant deh yah too. So
we have a team of people weh we work wid so we try to keep
it within our structure and when we see talent outside of
Big Ship that is worthy we try to incorporate it and continue
to build that way. B






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BAY : OFF THE RECORD


J Stephen MCGregor

The last time we caught up with the then 17 year old
Stephen McGregor was in the summer of 2007 -- he was barely
'Di Genius' we know him as today. We caught up with him
recently to see how a couple years have shaped his career.

How would you say your music career has progressed?
From 2007 ..... Wow! It has progressed alot. I think the whole
sound has matured, both on my side with the production,
mixing and recording, and even with the artistes involved. I think
I understanding what I am doing better now too. Every day I
learn more about it -- I mean that was what three years ago.

Yeah.
Well that is a hol' heap a room for my career to progress.

Listening to your music it sounds like you are clearly
influenced by hip-hop music. How would you describe your
sound to other people?
I just try to keep it different just out of the box, yuh nuh. I am a
musician I am not a dancehall keyboardist or a reggae drummer
or supp'im like that. I am a musician so clearly I am influenced
by, and listen to, alot of different genres of music, and so I am
going to use dem in what I do on a daily basis which is dancehall.

All of those influences fuse into my sound. So you will hear some
riddim which might have a rock and rollvibe, some of dem might
have some things you only hear in jazz or supp'im like that. We
grow up on listening to hip-hop and those things, in the 90s.
Jamaica on a whole was influenced by hip hop. I remember when
DMX and Cash Money dem jus' come out it come in like dem
man deh did run Jamaica more than even di dancehall artiste
dem. All of the dancehall artistes dem used to flip and sing over
all a fi dem song 'cause that was the influence at the time.
That was what most of these younger artistes grew up listening
to as well.

In the past three years what would you say was your most
memorable international collaboration?
The ones I can talk about are the ones that happen already but I
look on all of them equally. I put the same equal effort in all of my
work. You have the Sean Paul stuff for his album, I have a couple
tracks on the Matisyahu album, I did something with
Collie Buddz and Krazyie Bone and I caan remember all of dem
right now. But as I said before I don't really have a special stand
out ting because I look on all the work equally.

Have you ever worked with anybody that you were
star-struck around?
I won't say star-struck, you work with different musicians who
you jus' admire dem for their work.


For instance Sean Paul is somebody who works completely
different from alot of the other artiste that I voice. The whole
process of how him put together his songs and how him voice
him ting different. Mavado voice different from Ele dem so what
you do you jus' observe dem and you too learn different
techniques. I mean when I go abroad and I see how di different
acts record it influence me so when I come back here I can try
certain techniques wah I see wid even my artistes and it
help our ting.

Why did you start to record yourself on your productions?
It is experimenting really, for the most part, experimenting and
expression. Di first song "Caan Friend Again," clearly it was
expression, but it really wasn't supp'im mi could a write and gi
somebody else to sing. It really wasn't relevant to anybody else.
Usually that is the case, I normally come up wid alot of ideas and
melodies and give dem to other artistes.

Alot of songs that I have produced that is how dem come about. I
put down di ground work and link di artistes wid di chorus or di
skeleton of di song and dem jus finish it off. But a case like that
I couldn't really give a man that song to sing cause it wouldn't
mek sense.

Are you actually looking into becoming a recording artiste like
your brother or your father?
As I seh is jus' experimenting, I mean we have di talent and we
can do music so its just doing music and trying to do different
stuff. Di people dem appreciate it so far and our job as musicians
and producers is working for di people so we have to continue
doing that.

With the work-load that you have what do you do not to get
overwhelmed by the situation?
It is jus' a frame of mind. I jus know seh di work have to be done
so I haffi always be in that frame of mind. When I wake up I
know that I have alot of things to complete so I can't really be
procrastinating about anything. It is jus' a frame of mind I have
to keep myself in knowing I have this to do or I have that to do.
I don't really look on it like "Jah know, I have bere work fi do!"
and stress out and dem ting deh. It is more exciting to get more
stuff out there.

You seem to be real into technology as well. What can you say
is the latest gadget that you use in the studio?
Well, I have a new mic... (Laughs)...day to day gadget would be
like a phone but equipment-wise would be di mic. Deh so my ting
deh from di oddah day crazy new mic experiment.

Finally what are new projects we expect from 'Di Genius'?
This riddim (the one he was working on while we interviewed
him) which is currently untitled will be out in di near near future
like inna week time. A next riddim built by me but produced by
Zj Chrome, 'Smokin' 8' him call it that coming out di same time
too. I have alot of other singles, I have couple more one-drop side
projects coming out a little bit after di summer.
Like I said before jus' some different ting experimenting and
pushing di envelope. B













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BAY : OFF THE RECORD


Daniel MCGregor

From ever since I have been involved in music but I never saw
myself doing it as a profession basically because of my
personality, I don't like too much attention. I didn't really see
myself on a stage performing in front of a hol' heap a people. But
the genuine love of the music started when I was at
Vaz Prep in the choir. I didn't take it as anything serious, I just
did it because I could do it. As I grew up the love grew and we
always had the in-home studio where I could observe the artistes,
musicians and producers, and watch the whole
recording process. From time to time I would cut from school
to go on the road with my father on tour. So I got that touring
experience and studio recording experience from early. While
at Wolmer's High, a couple of friends and family started a sound
called Omega Disco and I was the main selector. Later down, I
think when I was in 5th form, I started recorded professionally
as a rapper., and got my first hit single in '99 while I still was at
Wolmer's.

Yeah I remember that one....
Yeah man, a thing called "Leggo Di Bwoy" wid Kiprich. Rapping
was my comfort zone at the time, yuh nuh, still searching to find
my own niche. I was always and still am a lover of hip-hop music.

So how did the name Chino come about?
The original name was Cappuccino which somebody gave to me
for, what I assume, was my cool demeanor -- but you know as
time go on we shorten it and simplify it. Most people know mi as
Chino now anyway.

How did hip-hop affect your music?
I was always good at writing because I paid attention to the lyrics
of rap, you understand. So after di success of "Leggo Di Bwoy,"
I was in Florida working wid Slip 'N' Slide for like a year. You
know dem have artist like Trick Daddy, Rick Ross and Trina dem,
and I did some recording wid dem. That experience was a good
experience but short-lived, we were not on the same page
musically. Their music was more catered to the South, yuh nuh --
quick punch type a ting, but my ting more deeply lyrical. So that
didn't work out so I came back to Jamaica. At that time Stephen
was full-time seriously into production, so we said we going to
start this whole ting. People always seh mi have a deep voice why
don't I Dj? I seh "Dj? Nah sah mi caan dj."
Get a riddim from Stone Cold Records, di same people who do
"Leggo Di Bwoy," song, and do a song called "Been There Done
That," where I was actually dj-ing and rapping on it. That was
di first track I actually tested dj-ing on and I was like, "Yeah mi
sound good." From there now I run wid it and experiment with
that side of it.


Which song would you say buss you in Jamaica?
I recorded a ting fi Kurt Riley called 'Fi Di Girl Dem Straight.'
That song to me is what mek people seh "Yes dah yute yah, to
how him a spit pon a one-drop riddim like this, mek we watch
him." That song kick off di whole Chino vibe locally. After that
Stephen just a spit out di riddim dem. We had on di 'Breaking
News' riddim 'Do So Fah' and vibe jus kept building. After that I
was on the 'Stick Up' and all of these riddims. The big one 'Red
Bull & Guinness,' -- funny enough I had that song three years
prior to recording it. I was in the studio trying to create a vibe,
Stephen a build di beat, Delly Ranx inna di studio. He heard di
beat and wanted di beat from Steven, and Steven gave him di
beat to produce. He heard mi Dj-ing di song and wanted to be
a part of it, so hence, that whole 'Red Bull & Guinness' vibe and
that was a hit.

What can you say your father (Freddie McGregor) has taught
you in terms of being a professional artiste?
He is not a man that teach us vocally like "Boy, do this..." For the
most part we learn from experience and observing throughout
the years, his professionalism. We learnt from him that you have
to be totally professional. We also learnt that humility is the key,
and strive to make solid songs that will last. As I said in
'Protected,' "mi nuh inna music fi nuh hype nor nuh fast fame.
" -- yuh understand. I toured with him alot and he is a man that
would tour fi bout three months and for every single night him
do three hours. For his three hour set, everybody in that venue
singing out every single line for every single song. That clearly
indicates that he has some solid songs that won't die and him in
di game for over 40 odd years. So that is where my
meditation and focus is so hence you hear me make the type of
music I make.

Any current plans for an album?
Alright, I have one album out so far in the Japanese territory,
because we have a relationship with a Japanese distributer, the
first album for dem was out in '07 -- a ting name 'Unstoppable.'
This July now, the sophomore album will be out it will be called
'Never Change'. Japan is really excited about that album because
'From Mawnin' is huge over there, I mean like really huge so on
the album I will have a full length Japanese version of it.

Anything you want to leave for fans?
Just look out for greatness. New singles out and yuh done know
di 2010 vibe ma,d because di vibe in '09 great, got a lot of awards
and nominations, so 2010 is a spill-over from '09. The newest
song is out 'Tell Dem Before Dem Gone', it's getting a whole lot
of love so that look like it is going to get real big.
'Throw Di Money Roun' featuring myself, Steven and
Ricky Blaze on di 'Mad Collab' riddim doing well.
'Sound Execution' produced by Shane Brown on di
Jukeboxx label on the 'Staglag' riddim a guh hard.
'Haffi Get a Girl Tonight' for Demarco's StarKutt label and
'Gallis Fi Real' on Ward 21's 'Costra Nostra' riddim a guh be hot
fi di summer. Look out for videos and Chino deh pon particularly
every major show this season, yuh done know we book like a
library. (Laughs) B

































































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BAY: REVIEWS


STUDIOO Ma4e


BAD PEOPLE RIDDIM
STEPHE EDI GE r IUS' I 1 GREG'.R
Rating: IIII
Released earlier in the year to much fanfare, 'Bad People' could be honestly referred to
as Stephen 'Di Genius' McGregor's marker for the rest of the year. A really good juggling
riddim which invokes memories of older riddims emulating from 90's lore with the
rhythmic cadence of the beat however distinguishes itself with certain riffs more
commonly associated with hip hop. The artiste line-up is a literal who's who in the
dancehall circuit with even Cham (formerly Baby Cham) chipping in with not only one but
two well received efforts 'Cause' and 'Take it Outside'. All of the songs I have heard so far
can be enjoyed by dancehall fans however my personal favourites are:
'Have Mi Want'- Flexxx, 'We Nah Stray'- Kari Jess, 'Can Yuh Manage It'- Laden,
'Gal A Mad Ova'- Mavado, 'Good Like Gold'- T.O.K, 'Run Mi Down'- Beenie Man,
'Cause'- Cham, 'Bigger Heads'- Busy Signal and 'Bad People'- Aidonia.
-AR


Rating





REGGAE/DANCE HALL
CLASSIC


I III
RAISED THE BAR


W
AIGHT

I I
NOT SPECIAL



POP DOWN


INFANTRY RIDDIM

Rating: III '111 i
Yet another great accomplishment from the FIRST BORN RIDDIM
Equiknoxx team, not only have they made a riddim --
which is getting good rotation, with hopefully more
to come, but they also have featured a lot of new '
artistes on the rididm. Infantry Riddim has a party Rating: III
vibe sure to get club rotation and along with the new Let me start this review by first congratulating the selector duo Razz & Biggy on their first
voices on the riddim like Navino with "Put it on" and serious venture into the production arena. The question I would have for either of them
Massika with "Anno Sometime". Also Tuff Enuf with is what took them so long. The industry needs new ideas in terms of music in order to
"Gal Pree" is a personal favourite and I think that evolve and as selectors, they should know firsthand to what I am referring to. While not
Equiknoxx had the right recipe with this riddim. This a technically outstanding beat, it does have catchy phrases which several artistes on the
creative group of producers have been rising through track utilizes to good effect. Strangely, or not so strangely depending how you look on it,
the ranks of producers and have a bright future, my favourite song on the riddim was done by the duo themselves, 'How We Stay'. Which
especially with a few of these new artistes on the rise is quite a feat considering the type of artistes who have also voiced on this riddim. 'Come
as well. 2 Scoops Nuh'- Laden and 'Love Mi a Deal Wid'- Bugle are the other songs I would recommend
from this juggling. 'First Born' was a valiant first effort which should be a good
springboard for better offerings from the duo in the near future. -AR






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JIM SCREECHIE
Sweeping through the airwaves, Jim Screechie is
taking over from Joe Grind, but then again
Joe never had a riddim made for him. Featuring
the likes of Aidonia "Jackhammer", Beenie Man -
"Beat dem bad", Akane (from across the waters in
Japan) feat Timberlee "Move!" ,T.O.K. -
"Everybody Clap" just to name a few. Coming off
from the Infantry Riddim Equiknoxx kept the
creative talents going into this riddim and put out
another banger. Not to mention Equiknoxx's
artistes on the riddim (Shanz, J.O.E. and Kemikal)
putting out tune after tune trying to lay their own
mark on the dancehall scene. 2 Scoops




COSA NOSTRA
Ward 21 came real strong with its Cosa Nostra
Riddim, and having an all-star lineup of artistes with
hits from the likes of Agent Sasco (Assassin)
going for his own with the tune "Me A Go Fi Mine",
Mr Lexx "Dem A Pree" Wayne Marshall asking
the Lord to help us "Survive the Times" and Ward
21 "Pretty Gal". Not to be out done by the men of
dancehall, 'The General' of the hot gyal army
Timberlee graced the riddim, along with Tifa
moving right along with "Reject" and Natalie Storm
not taking anything back with with "Nuh Teki Back".
The riddim also features tracks from Point O as well
as Professor. Cosa Nostra is a well done hit from
Ward 21 with great musical components and
mixing. 2 Scoops

MY LIFE
My Life Riddim has the elements to be a great
riddim, rhythmically it's a strong riddim and having
a lineup of talented artistes doesn't hurt as well.
With hit after hit coming off this riddim like
I-Octane's "My Life", Tarrus Riley and
Agent Sasco "Why You Do Me So" as well as
G Whizz -"Nah Give Up" just to name a few.
This riddim is littered with talent and is a must listen,
it's a welcomed relief from the constant violence we
listen to in our songs and definitely a showcase of
some talented artistes out there. 2 Scoops

MAD COLLAB
Without a doubt, definitely one of the most listened
and played riddim of the year so far. This is all due
in large part to the hit song "Clarkes" by Vybz Kartel
feat Popcaan and Gaza Slim. Even with that being
said, the riddim produced by Dj Chrome (Cr203
records) had one of the maddest collaborations,
Elephant Man and Bounty Killer with the song "How
we do it" a collaboration which although was long
overdue an enjoyed one never-the-less. The riddim
also features collaborations by Charly Black,
Chi Ching and Ding Dong with the track
"Cleanliness" as well as Mavado, Chase Cross,
Flex and Kibarki with their collab "Straight" with a
host of other collaborations. Overall Dj Chrome has
a hit that's going to continue getting airplay for a
long time to come. 2 Scoops


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BAY: WWW


WWW?
WHERE.WHEN.WHO
Certified Divas video launch (Quad Night Club, Jamaica)


Death Before Dishonor 10 (Pier 1, Jamaica)


BACKYARD 52




















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WHERE.WHEN.WHO
Kamera Trick Riddim launch (Village Cafe, Jamaica)


Drake Find Your Love video shoot (Kingston, Jamaica) photos by: Pam Fraser


Various (Kingston, Jamaica)


BACKYARD 54







Pito[oo. HOW

PArOXIS 11%"'
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ureV


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ylid t see it dlip; yn uindrrnd nt (?)


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ori n sls i. words.
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raS, I'ni llastnir an, lisitiariail


der tnd nrua d (?)




Full Text

PAGE 4

BACKAYARD DEEM TEaMChief Editor Creative/Art Director Managing Editor Production Managers Contributing Editors 3G Editor Designer/Photo Advisor Fashion Editor Assistant Fashion Editor Stylist Florida Correspondents Contributing Photographers Contributing Writers Caribbean Ad Sales US Ad Sales US Promotions Distribution PR Director Online Amilcar Lewis Noel-Andrew Bennett Madeleine Moulton (US) Clayton James (US) Noel Sutherland Jim Sewastynowicz (US) Phillip Lobban Matt Sarrel Andre Morgan (JA) Cheridah Ashley (JA) Serchen Morris Judy Bennett Sanjay Scott Leroy Whilby, Noel Sutherland Tone, Andre Morgan, Pam Fraser MusicPhill, Headline Entertainment, Jim Sewastynowicz, Matt Sarrel Audrey Lewis EL Anna Sumilat Madsol-Desar Novelty Manufacturing OJ36 Records, LMH Ltd. Audrey Lewis (JA) Sean Bennett (Webmaster) ja@backayard.com usa@backayard.comJAMAICA9C, 67 Constant Spring Rd. Kingston 10, Jamaica W.I. (876)384-4078;(876)364-1398;fax(876)960-6445 email: ja@backayard.comUNITED STATESBrooklyn, NY, 11236, USA e-mail: usa@backayard.com

PAGE 6

YEAHI SAID IT It seems that every time our country makes one positive step forward, we take a million negative steps backward (and for a country with about three million people living in it, that's a lot of steps we are all taking). International media and the millions of eyes around the world don't care if it's just that one bad apple. We are all being judged by the actions of a handful of individuals, whether it's the politician trying to hide his/her indiscretions, to the hustler that harasses the visitors to our shores. It all affects our future. How do we go from owning, and celebrating our country, people and culture, to destroying our land we love, then murdering and robbing these same people that make us proud? Whenever someone works hard to better themselves or situation, there is always some one lurking in the shadows at your gate in a corolla who wants to see you fail! Why is that? How did we get to this place? We have lost so many artistes to senseless 'crab in a barrel' violence. In 1976 we almost lost Bob Marley -rumored to be for political reasons. In 1987 we did lose arguably one of the greatest musicians next to Bob, Mr. Peter Tosh a three-man gang demanding his hard earned money, and when the demands were not met shot him twice in the head. The list goes on; Nitty Gritty shot in Brooklyn, New York, Pan Head shot after leaving a dance in Spanish Town, Daddygon shot at a bar, which later turned out to be a supposed case of mistaken identity, and if the deaths of our natives were not enough, South African reggae-musician Lucky Dube, was gunned down in what appeared to be an attempted hijacking, in Rosettenville, south of Johannesburg. Now O'Neil Edwards from Voicemail, shot several times while entering his home. What is the common thread with all these senseless deaths? Reggae is one. Being famous seems to be the other. Here's an idea, let's ban music all-together, live under oppressive military militia and have equal wages for everyone who wants to work, have the mischievous, thieves and killers punished by immediate death or limb-loss. That regime seems to work in other places, maybe it will work here since we have nothing else to lose. ELLOST AND FOUND

PAGE 7

1. Beats by Dr. Dre For the true guerilla producer at-heart, he or she knows you can make music, anytime, anywhere -and you won't be able to carry your studio sound monitors, tucked away in your bag-pack. Legendary producer and artiste Dr. Dre, teamed up with audio peripheral giant Monster Cable to release a soundjunkie's dream headphone. It's like if Patti Labelle and Luther Vandross had a love-child, we would expect the offspring to have some serious singing pipes. That's no exception here. Check them out if you have a spare $400 laying around in the couch somewhere. 2. Bebot Robot Synth Unless you have been living as an ubber naturist or have just alienated yourself from technology, there is this device they call iPhone -or as some like to call it the jesus phone. More recently the iPad was released (no relation) which is like a big iPhone. For these devices there are these mini-softwares that work on them called apps. Normalware is one of the developers of these apps. and they have released a digital synthesiser app. called Bebot Robot Synth -a feature-packed, polyphonic musical synthesizer with a unique multi touch control method. The relevance of this dear budding producer -it gives you the ability to load and discover new synth sounds to help you build more quirky sound patterns for your beats, and it works on your phone or portable device (Apple products please). Get yours today for only $1.99 at your favourite iTunes store. 3. MPC 2000 XL Flash USB Drives Introducing the worlds rst USB ash memory drive shaped like the Akai MPC 2000XL, one of Hip Hop’s most classic drum machines / samplers. This is the long time favorite Sampler of producers such as Dr. Dre, Pete Rock, Just Blaze, Lil Jon and more! Akai’s powerhouse drum machine has been immortalized as a 4 GB USB ash memory drive. Every nuance of the Akai MPC 2000XL has been captured in extreme detail! These unique devices are perfect for Hip-Hop beat makers, producers, and enthusiast on the go. This is the only portable data storage solution that screams “Hip Hop”. via: mpc2000xashdrive.com 4. Audi Grand Piano Live instruments are super-critical to delivering superb sound quality (there is yet to be a digital synthesiser to reproduce that). But we are sure no one saw that coming from German automotive manufacturer, Audi. The Audi Design Studio Team in Munich, decided to turn its attention to the most beloved musical instrument since the voice-box -the Grand Piano. “Generous surface areas ensure formal clarity; there are no decorative applications, the edges and lines are sharply drawn, the joints logically positioned. All these are important aspects of the Audi design,” says Designer Philip Schlesinger, who i mplemented the project at the Concept Design Studio in Munich. "When viewed from above, the lid is seen to be recessed into the main case, and in the side view, the curve of the treble side is not interrupted by a joint line. Besides, the keyboard has no wings at the ends, the cast frame is in gray instead of the usual bronze color, and the felt damper strips in natural white instead of wine red." Price: $139,867.00 5. Akai MPC500 Midi Production System Make beats! That's all you want to do. As you already know, there are a plethora of options out there, from step sequencers to drum machines to computer-based programs. All you need is an MPC. The MPC Midi production system has been around since the dawn of Hip-Hop and sample-based music. The MPC, or Music Production Center, brilliantly combines real-time audio sampling, the ease of drum machine programming, and the sophistication of a multi-track studio in a one-stop groove shop. And for producers on the go, the Akai MPC500 is the most portable MPC ever made.Via: zzsounds.com6. Sure SM57 Microphone Can there be a better snare drum microphone? Perfect for hundreds of uses in the pro or home recording studio the Sure Sm57 is a classic and is ideal out on the road for live recording too. Maybe this is the one mic that you would choose if you could only have one as it's so versatile and cheap! The SM57 is a cardiod (unidirectional) dynamic microphone with a contoured frequency response of 40 to 15,000 Hz, perfect for clean reproduction of vocals and instruments. But the SM57 is most renowned in the music industry as the standard microphone of choice for snare drums and guitar ampliers. Go to any stage or studio and you're likely to nd SM57s pointing at the amps and snare. SM57 LC, without Cable $100via: www.zzsounds.com7. Neumann U87 Microphone Welcome to the big leagues boy and girls. In celebration of their Anniversary Neumann introduced a special limited edition U87 Anniversary Mic Set in aspecial brilliant Nickle nish. The set comes complete with the U87 Microphone, Shockmount, Windscreen, Bag and a special gift box. The Neumann U87 is probably the best known and most widely used Neumann studio microphone. It is equipped with a large dual-diaphragm capsule with three directional patterns: omnidirectional, c ardioid and gure-8. These are selectable with a switch below the head grille. A 10 dB attenuation switch is located on the rear. It enables the microphone to handle sound pressure levels up to 127 dB without distortion. Furthermore, the low frequency response can be reduced to compensate for proximity effect.Price: 3,429.00via: zzsounds.com 8. Yamaha NP30 Portable Grand Piano You want to learn the piano, right? You need a keyboard that lets you get right to the music, not some complicated "composer" or "workstation" where you have to read the manual just to turn it on. The Yamaha NP30 Portable Grand Digital Piano offers great sound, great feel, and a great price, without all the needless extras. You'll start mastering piano right away, and have a blast in the process!Price: $270.00via: zzsounds.com 10. Blackberry Bold 9700 For all of you that haven’t held the new Blackberry Bold (Bold 2) in your hands, you’re lucky we have. If you were looking forward to those nger hugging buttons and ample backside and leather back on the new Bold? Well, you’ll just have to settle for two out of three. Though the new Bold is faster, has more memory and higher screen resolution, It also comes equipped with a highly responsive trackpad, on-board ash memory of 256MB, plus Micro SD port for expandable memory, and a 3.2 mega pixel camera for video recording and higher res pictures for those life moments. The Bold 9700 should hit stores by November in the U.S. but should be available early next year. But If you’re like me and prefer all three, especially the ample backside, then you may be interested in the new Blackberry Tour (Tour 2) code named Essex, coming soon. 11. Bolt Browser For you Blackberry users who thought you could browse the internet freely and watch video during your lunch break and were saddened when you realised you couldn’t, here comes the new Bolt Browser 1.6 to the rescue. It comes with the ability to be set as the default Blackberry browser. BOLT has some great advantages over the stock browser, including its fast speed, full page rendering, ability to stream videos, upload large les and more. via: crackberry.com12. Louis Sneakers So we all know that life is unfair, the world is in a nancial depression, and that Santa Claus isn’t real. But French luxury shoemaker Christian Louboutin seems not to be affected by such trivial pursuits. These high-end Louis sneakers debut in Fall/Winter and are available in black or white leather, for a retail price of around $1200 USD a pair. I say we get a pair of dessert Clarks, get some studs and sell them for half price.via: highsnobiety.comThink you’re 1 Drop Worthy?ja@backayard.com 11 12 10 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 8BACKAYARD 6 DROP1ONEPLUGS & RELEASES www.courtscaribbean.com Furniture | Appliances | Electronics IRISH MOSS IRISH MOSS IRISH MOSSDrink Drink Drink Manage Di Work! Manage Di Work! Available Flavours PRODUCER'SGUIDEEDITION

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BACKAYARD 8BAY : quick plugs mytqTHE REGGAE MARATHON (Negril)Alfred FrancisAhh, Jamaica...land of wood and water, sweet reggae music and track & eld. Track and eld? Yes, track and eld. Jamaicans have been world-class in that particular sporting eld for several decades now. Long before the phenomenon known as Usain Bolt laced up his rst pair of cleats, we had athletes such as Arthur Wint, Donald Quarrie, Herb McKenley and countless others ying the black, gold and green ag high. However, even with that success, Jamaicans are known mostly as a sprint factory with not much attention being paid to long distance runnng. Alfred ‘Frano’ Francis has been working hard to change that. Born in the mid-fties in the misty parish of Portland, Frano developed a love for running while attending track powerhouse KC (Kingston College), attended KC during an era when they dominated Boys Champs. After leaving school Frano worked at Air Jamaica for 15 years, during that period he felt the need to get involved with some physical activity. He started running at the Police Ofcers’ Club. He then, on the advice of a friend, began running at the Mona Dam. “I went up there in the early 90’s and met up with some friends with similar interests and the Jamdammers running club was formed.” After forming the club, the members began entering events overseas representing the country of Jamaica and the Jamdammers at varying locales across the globe. However, the club did not receive much press locally until they organized and executed the Reggae Marathon. The concept of the marathon came from the members in the club who were generally disappointed with the Jamaican International Marathon which was held after the Cement Company’s marathon was discontinued for lack of sponsorship. So in 2000, Frano and the rest of the Jamdammers went to the Rock & Roll Marathon in San Diego. This marathon is noted for having at least 40 bands enroute to the nish. As a group they felt Jamaica had the music, the athleticism, an exotic enough location (Negril) and much more -the country itself needed a rst class marathon. The group worked on it and held the rst event in 2001 with a lot of support from the Jamaica Tourist Board. “Frances Yeo, who was the events manager at the time, was very helpful. The American Heart/Stroke Association, brought about 500 people for the rst one, the ratio was more foreigners than locals at that time. “For that marathon we brought down nine Kenyan runners and got a call from St. Vincent from Pamenos Ballantyne saying that he was coming to the race and he actually came and won.” Frano added. From its inception the Jamdammers running club has always been aware of what a runner goes through during a marathon, and that awareness led to its rst class runner-care on the course. Dr. Ducasse and her team from the Ministry of Health and the Sports Medicine Association was a big help to the running of the marathon over the years, and also reects on the level of support that the government has given the race. “That rst year they were xing the Negril road when we went down there it was all marl after you pass the hotel strip. I must compliment Bobby Pickersgill who I think was the minister responsible at the time for transport and works. They laid a strip of asphalt by the morning of the race -that showed us that they connected with what we were doing.” As mentioned before the

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initial staging of the race had mostly foreigners participating, however, in the nine years since the ratio has changed signicantly as they have had a lot more Jamaicans running the marathon. This is because the Jamdammers have been building not only the Reggae Marathon but a calendar of road races leading up to it. “A lot of people in Jamaica view any road race as a marathon.” Frano explains. “A marathon is exactly 42 kilometers or 26.2 miles, in addition to the main marathon we also have a half-marathon and now a 10 kilometer run that help to bring in a wider audience.” The Negril community has embraced the race wholeheartedly as on race day. The marathon uses over 300 volunteers, and the majority of volunteers are from the community. This type of volunteerism is, in the wider perspective, the reason behind the whole success of the Jamaican track and eld association. It has been because of volunteerism that the 2010 version of the Jamaica High School National Championships (as the Boys Champs now combined with Girls version are now called) had 400 and more volunteers all working for free for four days. Economically, the Reggae Marathon has had a huge impact on the Negril community. Last year people from 18 different countries came to Jamaica to not only to run the marathon but they also vacationed here. “We have gotten maximum support from the Negril chapter of the Jamaica Hotel & Tourism Association (JHTA) from people like Carolyn Wright and Evelyn Smith to Mr Issa himself. I remember the rst day of the marathon, he checked on all his hotels to see if they were lled and it was positive. From that day to today he has given us the use of Couples free of cost.” This locale provides a beautiful platform for the planners to operate. The setting up of the race is a three day affair, you have registration for the event and an expo where people are invited to come see Jamaican craft and experience our food. When the visitors register and they get a complimentary T-shirt and they can then buy Jamaican cultural artifacts. Frano adds. “We also host the ‘World’s Greatest Pasta Party’ rated by ourselves because we have traveled the world and a pasta party is a normally a pre-marathon celebration but it is nothing like what we do. We benet from having Sandals, Riu and Super Clubs competing to the best job making pasta. Our staging area is the Long Bay Beach Park which we transformed from a football eld into a ‘nish’ area. When people nish the race they get a medal, coconut water, a Red Stripe beer and several other local gifts. The participants have the option to get massages right there on the beach or for those who fancy a swim to cool off.” One of the things that have come out of the event, is the use of it (the event) by not just distance runners but also sprinters. September brings about their grand prix series or as what they call it Road to the Reggae Marathon series which has a lot of schools who train no matter what distance they specialize in. “They utilize the 5k and the 10k as background training and strength training. We have had signicant runners come out of it such as Wainard Talbert and now Kemoy Campbell and Latoya Gold who have made a name for themselves both regional and internationally.” Wisely the Reggae Marathon ofcials do not charge an entry fee because they have expressed that they don’t want to only have runners that enter from a competitive stand point but for persons also interested in maintaining a healthy lifestyle through running. This year will be the 10th edition of the marathon and the organisers are determined to make it even better than past editions. Reggae Marathon is held on the rst Saturday in December every year and the marketing campaign for each event begins 13 months in advance. The expo in New York is normally when the rst campaign is done. After that it is Boston, San Diego, Atlanta, Miami and L.A. -while PUMA international markets the event in Europe. Reggae Marathon got rated as one of the top ten marathons in the world by the London Paper based on runner-care and execution. They use championship timing since inception similar to ones used in London and Boston. This is handled by the well respected timing company Sports Management Associates from the United States. Major sponsers over the years have been: Jamaica Tourist Board, Burger King, PUMA, Digicel, Jamaica Macaroni Company, Pepsi, Gatorade, Jamaica Amateur Athletics Association (JAAA), Sport Development Fund (SDF), Air Jamaica, Coldeld Manufacturing, Island Dairies among others. A truly unique event, the Reggae Marathon is a perfect mix of what Jamaica has to offer. Perfect weather conditions, wonderful settings and images, mixed with reggae music, sets the tone for both visitors to the island and local on-lookers and participants to fully enjoy the spectacle. Come out on the 4th of December and see for yourself why its race’s tagline is “Come for the run, stay for the fun.” A lot of people in Jamaica view any road race as a marathon. A marathon is exactly 42 kilometers or 26.2 miles!

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BAY : quick plugsBACKAYARD 12REGGAE ON THE HILL (Barbados)ANUNA (Jamaica)DEATH BEFORE DISHONOR 10 (Jamaica) Anuna: Elegant, sophisticated, cultured, chic and trendy. Now this wasn’t a just a regular old jaunt through a beat-up thesaurus to describe any old mundane thing, mind when I saw the anna fashion line up close for the that I feel that any woman would be comfortable in. Kerry manwomanhome and online at www.lubica.com Big up to Guest Editor Pamela Fraser, Death Before Dishonor: Black Kat won this year In a Sentinel from Germany. irishandchin.com and backayard.comBy Tami Chynn & Lubica The Final War The heat from the sun’s rays were no match for that coming from the stage at the sixth edition of Digicel Reggae on the Hill, held in Barbados. By all accounts, the crowd of just about 15,000 people that packed the Farley Hill National Park fully enjoyed the all-day show. Local acts like Prosperity, Twin Man and Oracle got the event off to a great start with a steady stream of their own reggae offerings. Another local artiste, Easy B was another crowd pleaser, and set the stage for other well-known homegrown reggae artistes like Brimstone, Albert Olton, LRG, Daniel and Hotta Flames. Skillfully rounding off the local talent was Buggy Nakhente, whose set was just as popular and anticipated as any Jamaican performer on the Hill’s lineup. He inspired the crowd powerful renderings of The Way it Is and I See Dem among others. He was closely followed by Lisa Howell who brought it home for the Barbadian reggae artistes with a selection of covers and originals from her latest project. Guyanese starlet Timeka Marshall was the rst foreign act for the day. Backed by Barbadian band Masala with lead singer Philip 7, she appeared after 1 p.m., and by this time the hill was lled with reggae lovers, many of them armed with picnic baskets and coolers. Marshall also sang originals like Feel Fah and a cover of Jah Cure’s Call on Me with Phillip 7, which the audience seemed to like. Winner of the 2007 Digicel Rising Stars Romain Virgo pleased the ladies with songs Can’t Sleep and Love Doctor as well as ghetto anthem Who Feels it Knows It. Etana blessed with the stage with positive vibes including I am Not Afraid and Warrior Love. As the sun dipped in the horizon, a heated day got even hotter. The veteran artiste Maxi Priest belted out hits like Just A Little Bit Longer and Close to You to name a few. “Jah’s messenger” Luciano kept the vibes going with Messenger, Give Praise and Jah Live from 2008’s Jah is My Navigator. He was followed by emerging artiste Hezron, whom the crowd seemed quite impatient with. Richie Spice was also a hit with the crowd. Although a very calm performer, he lived up to his name on Sunday evening with skillful renditions of More Life, Earth a Run Red, Grooving my Girl and together with soca queen Alison Hinds, King and Queen. Then it got oh so busy! Reanno ‘Busy Signal’ Gordon gave the crowd a repertoire of energetic dancehall songs like Step Out and Mek She Stamma as well as slower reggae songs One More Night and Night Shift, which the crowd practically sang verbatim. ‘Mr. Singy Singy’ Tarrus Riley brought the house down as lovers rocked steady to songs like Love’s Contagious, Superman, Human Nature and Stay With You. He also reminded men to treasure what they have with Getty Getty and Start Anew. Konshens guest appeared for an unforgettable rendition of Good Girl Gone Bad. Words: Leigh-Ann Worrell photos: Headline Entertainmentlphotos by: P. Fraser'

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BAY : WORLDBEAT

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BACKAYARD 16 PHOTOS BY: ELNaturally for anyone to properly speak about nature, they would have to experience it rst-hand. As readers of BACKAYARD know very well, we are very much about the promotion of natural / healthy living, and what could be a more integral part of healthy living than what one puts in his or her body? This is why we took it upon ourselves to investigate the components of one of Jamaica’s more popular ‘natural’ brands Tru-Juice. As you may or may not know, the TruJuice brand is a part of the wider Trade Winds Citrus conglomerate which is also responsible for the Freshhh Fruit, Juice Drinks and Wakeeld Juices. Trade Wind Citrus, based in the community of Bog Walk, St. Catherine arguably the largest parish in Jamaica. Acres upon acres of citrus groves, a nursery for budding plants (where it is equipped with a mist house where seeds are germinated and an insect-proof green house where the mother trees are produced), a juice plant and a packing house on its complex. Based on our observation the real key to the whole operation is the care and respect that each plant seems to receive. From the budding, where only the plants proven to be resistant to certain viruses are used, the harvesting (where all plants are hand-picked) to the washing & selection and nally the juice extraction. Each process is done with a personal touch, to ensure each fruit is up to standard. Being the ‘nature buffs’ we are, we spent most of our time in the eld literally. It was quite interesting observing the picking process of the ‘prized’ orange crop (which is used for export). These gems are acquired by omitting the hundreds of early fruit that have fallen early fruit fall reduces tree strain and limb load leaving the remaining fruit healthier and larger than their fallen brethren. The picked fruit is then packed into cartons, put into trucks and then carried to the packing houses. Did we mention how large the complex is? Stay tuned for the next part in this series where I explain among other things: the orange’s attachment to Jamaican culture, the importance of the Tru-Juice brand to the Jamaican Diaspora and (of course) the many health benets of orange and its extracts. BAY : quick plugsALL JUICED UP FOR TRU-JUICE St. Catherine (Jamaica)

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Raine Seville | Words AR | Photos ELBAY : eARLY ACCESSEARLYACCESS BACKAYARD 18 did and B

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EARLYACCESS Young VeteransBAY : eARLY ACCESS new album B BACKAYARD 20

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You didn’t see him coming. Chevaughn (as he is popularly known) decided that music was what he wanted to do in life, and he figured this out while leaving primary school at the tenderoni age of nine. “I actually grew up around alot of women so initially I wanted to be a gynecologist (Strange, huh) due to the fact that I wanted to take care of the many women who were important to me.” Chevaughn explained. Chevaughn started singing at JCDC festivals from primary school through to high school. When he did the Tastee Talent Competition in 1997, that was when he seriously started to respect his purpose in art. While in high school, Chevaughn saved all his competition money in order to go to Edna Manley (school of art and music) which to him was very important. “There were so many different things to learn there. My first vocal teacher was June Lawson after doing two years with her; I did a year with Michael Harris.” He says. “After a while I was learning from Maurice Gordon, Ibo Cooper (from Third World) and several other teachers who were teaching about Western music, popular American and European music. Learn to respect all genres as well as build on your creativity so when it is time to write for yourself you can use the different genres to assist you.” He graduated from Edna Manley in 2006, in that same year was asked to become a member of C Sharp. He was also a part of the Further Notice band (which eventually became Notice Production) from his days on campus. Chevaughn has been touring with C Sharp from 2006 (his final year at Edna Manley) and although he is most clearly the link between the two entities. Notice, to date, has never produced a project for the C Sharp band. “The keyboardist in C Sharp has a recording company called ‘Barb Wire Music’, so he normally does the production for C Sharp and everything is a link between ‘Barb Wire’ and C Sharp.” Chevaughn explains. That creative energy was displayed on tracks like ‘No More’ widely regarded as the group’s breakout hit, ‘Don’t Come Searching’ and ‘What Is the Matter with the World’. 2006 was the same year that Further Notice band decided to start producing tracks for artistes aside from themselves. Chevaughn’s work with Notice Production began with the ‘Nyabinghi’ riddim and has continued with several other riddims released mostly geared towards the overseas market. Dancehall fans would know Notice’s more recent releases such as ‘Gallis’ riddim with songs such as Ding Dong’s ‘Man A Gallis’, Serani’s ‘My Empress’, Ras Penco’s ‘Player Haters’ and Bugle’s ‘Dem Too Fass’. However by far Chevaughn’s biggest stamp on Jamaican music scene so far has to be the Notice produced ‘Holiday’ which he did in collaboration with Ding Dong. “It was a day looking like how today looks (partly -cloudy with a chance of rain), was driving on the road and I came here (Notice Studio) and Unga was playing a track. As he played it, I started singing about a sunny day and bunch of different things. Then Unga said something about a holiday and it started from there.” Chevaughn and Notice actually fashioned that song to be similar to how American hip hop producer DJ Khaled does his songs, with a barrage of different artiste on one track. However once Ding Dong heard the track with the recorded melody and chorus he immediately vibed with the song and it was eventually decided to have him as the only guest on the song. The ‘Holiday’ song and video became a staple for the summer of 2009 on the cable stations, radio and party scene a like and might even be ‘resurrected’ somewhat for the atmosphere of this upcoming summer party series. Even though it might not seem like it, Chevaughn is not quite ready to be known exclusively as a solo artiste. He sees himself as just exploring options and recording songs that C Sharp probably would not do. C Sharp as group has just been ‘adopted’ by the Bank of Nova Scotia in Jamaica for a year in order to assist the band and their music. In terms of working with the production label, they have just released Chevaughn’s video for ‘Tables’ which features former Digicel Rising Star winner Chris Martin, Ding Dong, and Craig from the dancehall group Voicemail. That along with several other soon to be released singles both as a solo artiste and with C Sharp add to that the many different new productions to come from the Notice label, Chevaughn has a supremely busy time in front of him and if it’s one thing this man has proven so far, is that he is more than capable of ‘juggling’ several jobs at once, which is critical in this present day music market. BPHOTO BY EL WORDS BY ARBACKAYARD 22Chevaughnost people have a hard time trying to wear two hats at a time. Whether trying to balance their family life, with their professional life, or attempting to drive and text at the same time. It is generally very difcult for people to perfectly split their attention equally between varying endeavours. Can you imagine trying to tackle three equally different tasks within the same competitive industry? Difcult, right? Not if you were born Chevaughn Clayton lead singer of C Sharp, 1/7 of the Notice production team and more recently acclaimed solo act.m

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BAY : off the recordBACKAYARD 24

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Living Without aNo matter what you pursue in life, it is paramount to maintain the right level of focus in order to achieve anything. This is especially true in the music business a fact that Garfield Spence knows all too well. Konshens as he is more popularly known, actually lived the first stages of his life at the rigid headquarters of the Jamaica Defence Force, Up Park Camp. However it was only after he and his family moved to Sherlock Crescent, that Konshens and his older brother Delus formed a group called Sojah and started doing demos at Cash Flow studios. Konshens experienced early success with ‘Pon Di Corner’ Sojah’s first official release which actually went to the top of the Japanese charts. From that success, people started requesting dub plates and then a one month tour of select cities within Japan in 2005. Unfortunately after the tour the Jamaican public was still not aware of Sojah and what further compounded the problem was that only a few DJs played their songs. DJs such as Digital Chris gave them a chance, Konshens mentions. “It never feel right fi we deh di otherside of the world and a get di love and nah get the home court support.” It was from then that they realized it was really hard to make it as a duo, so they decided to branch off in three different entities: Sojah the duo and the solo careers of both Konshens and Delus. haffi out deh a try look it, so thats really why, dah song deh hit home.” After “Winner,” Konshens has been steadily churning out thought provoking songs for most of the major production houses in Jamaica. Songs such as “Good Girl Gone Bad” with Tarrus Riley, “She’s Happy” featuring Delus, “This Means Mon ey” and “The Realest Song,” have made a space for themselves within the hearts of the average dancehall fan. He has performed in several different locales both within the Caribbean and around Europe, quite impressive for a relatively young artiste. He attributes the main reason for this, as the type of music he began his career with. “Most of di songs I had at the time were one-drop and one-drop basically dead at the time (in Jamaica). But it work out in a good way inna sense, where Europe and di Caribbean develop a keen interest in mi career. When di Jamaican doors close di the international doors dem open at the same time.” Konshens has also created his own label Sub Konshus Music, and is responsible for Nitty Kutchie and I Octane’s current hit “Can’t Suffa.” Konshens himself lets us know what to expect from his music in the future “Badman song, girl song, weed song and dancing song, but yuh can’t have all dem song with a topic, so a dehso mi ting deh mi bring tings wid reasoning.” After that in early 2008 Konshens released “Winner” to national acclaim. Produced by Cash Flow, the lyrics to that song were inspired by the birth of his daughter.“Yuh know when you have a yute is like yuh reborn. So mi start think fi she now and know seh yuh caan laid back. Yuh haffi get aggressive and out deh.” Konshens also referenced the global recession as a reason why Jamaicans gravitated to the song. “People generally feel seh dem PHOTO BY EL WORDS BY AR ““

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Mu t a Mutabaruka is the Last King of Kingston “We are either kings or pawns of men.” said Napoleon Bonaparte. Is that statement less true because it was quoted from a short, fascist dictator who wanted nothing more than to wage war and rule Europe? Or perhaps these are words to live by without the fascism? Poet, is one vocation Mutabaruka is known by, and depending on which hemisphere you live on, he might be seen as a radical or activist. But when we sat with brother Muta, he was a realist and gave us insight into the mind of a King.qPHOTOS BY EL | WORDS AR

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BAY : off the record How did you get the name Mutabaruka? Inna school said way everything happen inna school. Mutabaruka comes from a Rwandan poet, I was reading an anthology of poems and dis poet in deh name Jean Baptiste Mutaburuka. And a poem in deh di sound similar to one I did write and mi seh wah and jus tek di name Mutaburuka. Is years after when we start to travel and we go a university inna Paris, some Rwandan students thought that I was a Rwandan. Dem come and a talk to mi and dem a seh how a Jamaican come by that name, mi tell dem seh mi love Jean Baptiste Mutaburuka and dem seh it means “one who is always victorious.” Is a name weh when warriors go to war and come back dem see it as victorious so the name Mutaburuka mean “one who is always victorious.” So we have that name from school days until now and that is name most people know mi by. When did you start writing poems? From school, yuh nuh, I was in class and the teacher seh we mus write a poem. When wi done everybody get up and seh di poem in front of di class. And she gimme a tick which mean seh it right. So you never get a star? Well you know dem deh day deh, we never have nuh star, is either an X or a tick. So the poem get a nice likkle vibes from the teacher, I guess after that mi start to write poetry but di poetry start to tek on a more political and social tone. I was just about to ask you, when did you start thinking along those lines? Said time! Yuh nuh, school days because Marcus Garvey Junior used to teach at the school and inna dem day deh you have di black power movement. Hol’ heap a teacher dem was into the black power movement. So we got influenced by that, my first acceptance of Malcolm X was through a teacher, Loxley Comrie. Him expose mi to Malcolm X and him book dem. Dem days deh dem book deh did ban, if police catch yuh wid dem yuh gone a jail, yuh nuh. But we used to read dem and it help to shape mi consciousness. So out of that consciousness the poems flow inna that direction deh. When did you start performing poetry? Well, we start performing poems still at school, I also write poems send it to di newspaper dem send it to magazines and dem publish it. And any likkle function, we used find ourselves at political gatherings, underground style, and we used to recite the poems there, ‘til eventually the poems get published inna likkle book. My first actual performance wid music was wid a band called Larry McDonald and Truth, we performed at the Little Theatre. It was really supp’im else we had Patsy Ricketts which was one of the big dancer dem at the time and she danced to the poems. When would you say you had your big break? The real wah people woulda call ‘buss’ happen when Jimmy Cliff who come from Somerton, St James had a big concert down there. Mi recite mi poem down a Zinc Fence, weh Third World used to control, an elder bredrin name Mortimer Planno hear mi a seh a poem name “Everytime I Hear The Sound” and him suggest seh mi fi go pon dah show deh. So a man name Earl ‘Chinna’ Smith, who was the lead guitarist for the Junket band arrange up a riddim behind it. We went to di Somerton concert and do it and it was immediately accepted by the crowd. So we come a town and Chinna record “Everytime I Hear The Sound” and is the first poem weh hit the pop charts inna Jamaica. So that propel we as a recording artist, because before we used to write the poems in books, we used have the poems in a literary form rather than a oral form, yuh nuh. Because of the success of that poem we continue recording until we have an album called “Check It.” Which had poems weh never have nuh music, ironically out of all mi album dem is di one dem dat nah nuh music is di one dem weh really hit. Like a poem name “Siddung Pon Di Wall A Watch Dem A Watch Me,” in the early days a hol’ lot of people know that poem and it never have any music. So “Check It” is the album weh start mi movement as a reggae artist. Mi have a poem in it weh name “It Nuh Good To Stay Inna White Man Country Too Long,” and when that reach a England everybody was wondering who is this bredda a sing this ting. The first time I left Jamaica and go America is to a place called UCLA for a big two day festival and mi guh deh and do di poem. It was like nuh body never hear nutten like that yet. When was this? This was the early 80’s and that show alone started we fi tour. When mi done di poem, every newspaper and every whatsoever dem have in Los Angeles a try fi find out what happen. Because what really happen is we guh up deh without any shirt and shoes and we locks a fly and chain pon we hand. Nobody never really see that coming out of Jamaica before, no artist ever come up inna short pants and without any shirt on stage in front of thousands of white people and tell dem that it nuh good fi stay inna fi dem country too long. That start we out, the first big tour weh mi go on was like a six week tour, sold out every major city in America. Never mek nuh money but it buss we. Until the next time a bigger tour come around every show sold out and this was when dub poetry a tek life inna America. You did have a bredrin called Linton Kwesi Johnson weh big inna England, him start record before mi and get big inna Europe. What we did now is crossover now and go into the American market wid poetry and spread it round as a musical genre of Jamaican music. So people start to call it dub poetry.“no artist ever come up inna short pants and without any shirt on stage in front of thousands of white people and tell dem that it nuh good stay inna dem country too long.”

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Is that where that term comes from? Dub Poetry? Well Linton seh him come up wid the term. It really come from listening to Djs such as Uroy and Big Youth. Inna dem days deh man used to talk on the flipside of music so you have a 45 and dem talk on the verison. So it became a genre and then the poets dem come now and create another genre and call it dub poetry or poetry to dub. Now we transcend even the dub poetry ‘cause we use the poems dem pon any music that come to we consciousness. We not stuck into the terminology of dub poetry that is why we call it poetry yuh know spoken word. Fi years we did a tour wid a band and now fi the past four years we a tour wid we self, without music or anything jus me one stand up pon stage wid a microphone fi bout two hours jus’ a read poetry and jus a comment and that is what we have been doing from dem time deh. Do you perform your poetry locally? We do the poetry said way but you know how it go. Artistes will always tell you seh when you go out a road that is weh the fame, honour and the glory and the money deh. So like inna dem days we end up a Europe three times a year and deh America every minute a perform and we guh anywhere reggae carry we. Ironically we did deh pon every major festival as a dub poet and now we are known as a spoken poet. What we were able to do was break a genre into pop culture. People never used to stand up and listen to poems, I caan stand up and listen to poems, it boring! But what the dub poet was doing was performing dem poems on the stage so you not only hear wah dem a seh you see wah dem a seh. When a Jamaican poet deh pon stage yuh feel the emotion. How did you get involved with radio? Inna 1992, Irie FM did a try launch a program and we used to have a sound system. We did have the first sound system weh play CD inna Jamaica it did name Black Music. When we create this sound system it was to expose African music to a big set, yuh nuh, ‘caus nobody did a play African pon a big sound system. When Irie come in as a reggae station now, dem did want a “reggae from round di world” show. Mi tell dem seh mi caan siddung and play reggae music for four hours because there are so many different forms of music from around the world. So mi caan limit myself to jus a play bere reggae music, yuh have African music weh nuh have nutten fi do wid reggae that Jamaican people need to get exposed to. Jus like how everybody else exposed to reggae we should be exposed not only to Billboard music but to other genres of music that more c ompatible wid we, but yet still not connected to Billboard. So we start to inch in a hol’ heap a different music and we start to talk and I think that is what explode di whole ting now. Di talking eventually become more important than the music and true is a reggae station dem did a seh dem never waan nuh talk. But my talk mek it seem like it was a reggae talk so it become more talk than music and we a do that from 1992 ‘til now. 18 years we deh pon the radio and it is still the number one program inna it time pon the radio. We did start out pon a Monday now it deh pon a Wednesday 10pm to 2am. Because of the advent of science and technology man used to tape the program and send it gone a England. So is so now people know of that program The Cutting Edge inna England. We actually got an award inna England when no radio station did a carry it but it was so influential wid the black youths dem that we win. Now you can hear it live pon the computer but back inna dem days deh you never have nuh computer a run di ting. Now Cutting Edge available all over the world and we haffi give thanks. So do you still write poems? Yeah man! Every time mi left yah is poem mi go do. Mi have couple poem inna mi head weh mi nuh write down pon paper yet. How many books have you published? The first book mi do is one called Out Cry. The second book mi do, this time wid a sister called Sun & Moon and mi do a next one called The First Poems. More recently mi have a collection out called The Next Poems. The First Poems is di ones we used to write before we start to record poetry. Wah we do, we tek the poems outta di book and record dem. When we start to record poems we end up not writing any inna book so what we had to do now is tek the poems from the CD dem and put it in a next book, so we call that one The Next Poems. So we put di two book dem together and because the first book we write before we record and Next Poems inna di same book is di poem we record weh we never used to write inna nuh book, so you see we mek a full circle and now putting the poems into a book. When we start out we never put dem inna book because we woulda seh black people nuh love read. A yute nuh go inna book store and buy poetry book but him would listen it. So the idea of putting it on record or CD was the idea of the poet wanting to be heard. So him put it on a medium that more people can hear it. But then when we realize everybody hear it now, we seh alright now mek we see if di yute dem would read it now. We reverse di ting and put it inna book and di book sell like the record said way. What do you attribute that success to? Is di artist, yuh nuh, and how him project himself as if he is a brand. Yuh can mek yourself into a brand yuh nuh. That brand mean seh yuh have a certain uniqueness about you that people gravitate towards and when you seh supp’im, people know seh that breddah deh a so him stay like yuh stand up in front of bere white people and seh why you a kill off the black people dem so. Any black person there would feel nervous because him surrounded by white people and white people would say this guy is a racist man. But we nuh care you understand, cause it’s the truth. Inna the apartheid era we stand up in front of white people and seh “free up di land white man.” Then we go a Af rica and hear Winnie Mandela and dem one deh a seh, a we help fi mek dem stand up inna dem time deh. It motivate you, yuh nuh it mek yuh feel good. Yuh go a Africa and see how the African dem react to yuh poem dem and yuh never even know seh yuh poem dem reach deh so. Which country you have visited made the most impact on you? Mi love South Africa, yuh nuh. Jus di vibes of the people dem, whether wid di band or without di band mi always get a good response. Mi realize seh you have a certain artistic vibes inna South Africa weh is more than most countries inna Africa. So as a poet yuh can go deh go tour the big cities like how you see how musicians tour. You see true dem come out of the apartheid system and dem did a struggle. These folks write poems of resistance so when dem hear you a come from where you a come from and a write about and for dem, it really strike dem. Mi love South Africa. For the un-edited continuation of Mutabaruka’s interview log on to www.backayard.comBACKAYARD 30

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Yuh can mek yourself into a brand yuh nuh. That ‘brand’ mean seh yuh have a certain uniqueness about you that people gravitate towards .

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Mik e y Be nnet t your favourite producers favourite producer.Everyone would like to leave an indelible and unquestionable mark in history or at the very least have someone to carry out their legacy. Whether it’s by leaving a business to their off-spring(s) or showing up an hour earlier to work – thus changing the course of someone else’s future and consequent history. We all do this in our own little way day to day. But in the big picture of it all, history, or the recording of it, habitually finds itself skewed or distorted. We never do get the events as they actually occurred, and in most cases the story ends up lost to time because it was never told or even had the chance of get skewed to second hand story-telling. We’re going to tell the story today though – the story of a living legend that has shaped and molded the reggae music industry for over 25 years. Matter of fact, we’ll let him tell it.PHOTOS BY EL | WORDS AR

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When did you start doing music? Well, I grew up in the Adventist church, and is one ting about the Adventist church there is a serious legacy of music. The standard of music in there is extremely high, and you find that the average church have about six groups at any one time the quartets, double quartets, the junior choir and several other choirs, and I was always in a choir or group. While at Kingston College High School, I was a part of the Kingston College Chapel Choir . Before I went to KC (Kinston College) my aunty carried mi to see the Kingston College Chapel Choir and I was quite impressed by the sound. The sound was almost surreal because these guys had this big sound. So I joined the choir from 1st form and I stayed with the choir for about four years. While still at KC, one of my real good friends brothers’ were musicians: the Chung brothers Mikey and Geoffrey. Their brother Charlie and I was in di same form, so we used to travel together and I used to stop at dem house and got involved in music. They taught me how to play guitar, but because I was an Adventist, I couldn’t take part in certain things. I couldn’t join a band or anything even though I wanted to, but I kept real close to them. When I left college and was back in Kingston, I started writing a lot of songs. I would tek dem over to Mikey Chung or Geoffrey so they could help wid di arrangement -yuh nuh, chords and stuff. They were aware of my song writing ability, and I used to follow dem to di studios all di while. That first introduction to the studio kinda stayed with mi over di years. Mikey Chung -who was working wid a group called Home T-4, who had jus lost a member, told mi that there was a song I had that he think di group could do. So I took di song and taught dem di song. In di process of teaching dem di song, because I could play a likkle piano, I was asked to join the group and I was wid dem for a couple of years. Got di opportunity to start writing songs and having some stuff that I had written recorded. There is no greater thrill to a writer than to be in a studio (and I don’t think you will ever forget hearing your first song being recorded). Around what time period was this? This was around or when I did my first recording. I was an executive by day and recording music at night. I was at Commodity Trading as a personnel manager, I was torn between music and that 9-to-5 work, everyday. I used to spend every possible hour in the studio. I used to leave work and head straight to Joe Gibbs studio and jus hang out until 10-11pm. I see guys doing it now, because I have the studio, and I see guys coming up here leaving right after work and know exactly what they are going through. Home T-4 used to rehearse at nights and we had a hit called “Mek di Christmas Catch You inna Good Mood.” That was my first hit song, we had songs like “Stop Children” and “Dedication,” minor hits -I mean we were known for our performance because we rehearsed alot and had this fancy choreography. I guess because we weren’t doing for money, it was more like a hobby to be honest, we just spent a lot of time at it. In 1985, I had to tek some leave, where I worked, if yuh don’t tek leave then yuh lose it. The first Sunday night into the leave, I was at a studio at about 1 or 2 o’clock in the morning and I think somebody said “Wait you not going work tomorrow?” For a minute I was in a panic cause I had never taken leave before and then I remembered that I was on leave and mi seh “Nah man, I am on leave.” At that moment I knew I couldn’t go back to 9-to-5 work. I felt this freedom of not having to leave the studio because I had to go to work the next day. I started making mental plans how to go into music full-time. Fortunately or unfortunately, I was separated at the time and I think if I wasn’t separated, I probably wouldn’t have the guts to do it. But I was separated so I was kinda on my own, I move back home to my mother, so mi seh I can do it -all I need to find is X amount per month for the child support. I was living at home so I didn’t need to pay any rent, I had a nice car and couple other tings. I said listen I am going to sell all dem tings so I sold the car and di other tings and give my mother the money and seh “This can take care of two years worth of child support.” Dem time deh $100 was kinda ok, so I put myself on a $100 a day budget. Home T-4 and I were by Rae Town one night ‘caus that was our likkle reference point: On a Sunday evening we used to go down to Rae Town. Dem used have this section were them play the “now” stuff. Jammys did have this riddim called ‘Catwalk’ and this guy had done over this Maurice White. I couldn’t believe that they got that song to fit on that riddim in such a skillful way. When I did some investigation, we realized it was the time the riddim ting was really tekking on and di whole Jammys ‘ting was happening. So we reach out to Jammys and we got some riddims and decided to write some songs. Jammys sent us round five or six riddims. We wrote some songs for it. Got a day to take the songs down there. When I got to Jammys, I was arranging di harmonies and di vocals and Jammys seh “well yuh look like you good pon dem kinda ting,” and mi seh yeah, that is really my specialty still. So him ask mi if mi want a job at Jammys -and mi seh yeah, and that was di beginning of my real Jamaican experience . I was around hitmakers, people were making hits everyday. I used to be fooling around and hanging out at Joe Gibbs and I got to know a lot of people and I was writing some stuff. I have written some stuff for JC Lodge and an album for Home T-4. David Rodigan in England heard it and told Gussie, who was one of my friends, to get me to write some songs for Dennis Brown. So is like everything is happening at the same time, now that I wasn’t in a 9-to-5 and now I was a full time musician. Is a totally different ting when you depending on your musical skills or creative skills to feed yourself and to plot your future. I had two kids, Nicholas and Kimala, I didn’t have a car so I was starting from scratch. I felt this freedom of not having to leave the studio because I had to go to work the next day. I started making mental plans how to go into music full-time.BACKAYARD 34

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Is a totally different ting when you depending on your musical skills or creative skills to feed yourself and to plot your future. I had two kids, Nicholas and Kimala, I didn’t have a car so I was starting from scratch. I was back on the buses which to me was the greatest place to get feedback, because as a group you don’t have anobody to seh do this or do that. We were kinda in control of our records creatively but our records weren’t resonating with the street, and I didn’t know why. When yuh went on a bus, and the buses had the latest songs, you got an idea of what is hot on the street. I would sit down on the bus and watch di people dem and watch who and who was reacting to the songs. I realized that everybody was into Frankie Paul and the Pinchers and the Admiral Bailey. Then I started to follow Stone Love because Rory and I became really close friends so every thursday night I would go Stone Love . I was at the place where most of the hits were being made, also where most of the dubs where being cut. Stone Love on thursday night was the testing, after you work on a song. Nuh care how many songs you do, you know there is still that likkle apprehension, that feeling of - “I wonder if this one going to work too.” That experience is one you never get tired of, all you want as an artist is acknowledgement seh yeah I did it again. Because only ting harder than di first hit is di second one, and then the third one. The trick is to be able to deal wid di fact when dem don’t like it. Whether yuh cuss dem off and figure seh dem don’t know it or yuh seh wheel and come again let mi see what ingredient missing from this ting. Was it the right market? Was it the right voice? But the first ting yuh haffi come to terms wid is maybe di song wasn’t as good as you think it is or maybe you getting over-confident and figure seh bwoy everything I do yuh must like. So as a songwriter as a producer I have been through all dem mental processes. Indeed, so what happened after Jammys? Getting back to that period at Jammys, I was working wid Steelie and Clevie making riddims, Bobby Digital was there as engineer and I was there as a kinda songwriter, co-producer, vocal arranger all of dem. I was right in middle of the biggest boom time for dancehall in 1985. I was getting a lot of kudos for my songwriting, I was working with Jammys and I was working wid Musicworks that is Gussie Clarke. But Gussie was the old way of doing things with planning and that sort a ‘ting while at Jammys, things jus happen. At that time I was trying to get them to be more like each other. I remember when “Rumors Riddim” came out, I wrote about six songs on that riddim including “Telephone Love” and “Nuff Respect.” After that I was working some 16 hour days but I was loving every minute of it. I remember when I told my mother two years. After the first year tings were kinda slow -I would go home and see she leave the ad section of the newspaper open up and she circle a job. I would lock it and laugh and go hug her up. Just before the two years up, I was at Jammys and they got mi a keyboard and I started overdubbing and I could literally write my own salary. In other words, as much as I wanted to work there, there was work to be done. I was between Jammys and Gussie, I was singing harmonies at Gussie, I was arranging and writing at Gussie while at Jammys I was overdubbing and stuff. My friend Patrick, who I met at Jammys , suggested we form a label, I at di time had no idea what he meant. Him seh “di same ting that you doing for Gussie and Jammys, jus do it for yourself.” Brian and Tony Gold, I still haven’t heard anybody harmonize as well as them was di first act we recorded. When things stepped up was when I was doing the vocals for Dennis Brown on one of Gussie’s albums. After one session, Dennis Brown seh “Yuh nuh have yuh own likkle tape man mek mi do a song fi yuh.” and mi seh “Yeah,” so I call my partner and tell him that Dennis Brown waan do a song for wi. Dennis asked mi if I had a song for him and I said “yeah” because there was no way I wasn’t going to have a song for Dennis Brown by the next time I see him. So I went home and Berlin Wall was falling and the song just came to me “No More Walls.” I wrote the song that night and next morning went up to the studio did the song sent it off to England (Greensleeves) dem love it. Dennis seh him waan do a album so we do ‘bout four songs before him go back to England. Then after that I happened to be going to England after that, and I took up some tapes and up there we did some more songs. We did the album over a period of about a year, we had songs like “If You Want Me,” which was the big hit off that album. So that was my introduction into the whole producing ting. My real big break came when A nuff big break you get so far! Nah man di real big break come when I did an album wid Shabba. We were very close to Shabba, the first hit song Shabba had I wrote. Home T was doing di song ‘darling why do I get butterflies,’ or something like that. Diego who was lead singer of Home T was singing it but he jus was not getting it. Coco Tea was in the studio at time and him seh “listen a nuh so yuh fi sing the song.” So everybody agree same time that dem fi do it as a duet. But it sounded weird having two man singing that song, it needed supp’im fi break tha’ vibe deh. Shabba was there and we sit down and we work it that we have two guys talking about who the girl really love, and then Shabba come in with “which one a dem she love.” That song was di biggest biggest song fi di year, it fly straight to number one on di English reggae charts. It actually come off and then went back to number one again. It was di first number one for Coco Tea, Shabba and Home T. Right after that I was working for Gussie, everybody from England was saying that this was the hottest trio in reggae at that time so we did “Pirate’s Anthem,” among others. I had a wonderful relationship wid Shabba - “Pirate’s Anthem,” was a massive massive hit in Europe because it was around the time of pirate stations in England. You haffi understand that they would setup one station at one location and have another one somewhere near on standby. So as they (the authorities) close down one, another station would be up and running again in a half hour. So di music had this excitement about it. Shabba then got signed to an international label. Towards the end of Shabba’s album they still were not comfortable that they had a cross over hit. So I got a call one night saying they need a hit for Shabba, I had jus done some riddim tracks wid Sly. So ‘Specialist’ (Clifton Dillon) came cross and heard two tracks and we sent dem to America. A week after that I got a call telling me I need to come to New York and Maxi Priest was going to be there so we were trying to get a song done.

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I went to New York and I bought a little tape and had the riddim, the “House Call” riddim, and me and Brian Gold and Maxi Priest sit down inna hotel and write di song. Same night we went to the studio, this was while the record label going crazy because things are not done like that in America, you first submit a demo, people listen to it and then dem seh alright we a cut di single. It tek a while it is a process. We were doing it the Jamaican way, we seh ok we a guh studio tonight so we ago write the song inna di day. She (Vivian Scott) was jus freaking out, but we knew we had a hit. So I did the track in New York and forgot all about it because back in Jamaica I was busy busy. I got likkle buzz and everybody want a song, so a ‘hol lot of phone calls coming in. So I got a call from her one night “Oh, you are my savior,” and this and that. She started talking about how her boss dem love it and it going to be di lead single and how dem a go get David Morales to do di remix. It still never hit mi at that time, we a jus some likkle island boy. I had no idea of what it means to have a hit in America. People come off of tour and tell mi I have biggest tune inna America. Then my life jus change! Again! (Everybody Laughs) Yeah, it really change now (Laughs) So you telling the people around you, yuh know yuh girlfriend and ting, every day that tings will get better. Then it got better. The one thing wid America, once you get a hit and your name associated wid di ting everybody want a piece of that. I had a manager in England and she would send mi a monthly schedule wid two days off. I was in New York for a year in total. At the time I was working wid a lot of young American groups because most people wanted to try the reggae dancehall ting, so alot of work was being passed around. Another reason, was that while we were charging US $10,000 on a project, our American counterparts were charging $100,000. So we were making a lot of mistakes and I think that affected the Jamaican music for a while. Because those of us who were being asked to do remixes, kinda moved away from di core of di Jamaican ting. We were trying to second guess the American market, so even when we were making di songs. We were making it thinking that we were trying to get to that market but that market is a market we don’t know. You have to respect people like Steelie who were being true to what dem know as dem hardcore audience. When Steelie mek a dancehall song he was hearing it playing on Silverhawk to that Silverhawk audience, he remained true to that audience and it work fi him. When you think about this crossover ting, crossover is like yuh nuh think ‘bout nobody else, is a kinda cop out. When people nuh like it, you can seh “Well is a crossover ting,” meaning you wasn’t really supposed to like it. Like the saying it wasn’t made for you. Exactly, when American dem hear it, they are like “Ok,” they might think it’s nice. But they are not going to use it. So I think we wasted a lot of time like that, but it was a wonderful time. I got to work wid a lot of people who become very powerful. I turn my TV and see people I hung out wid it is kinda surreal. I spent some time wid Maxi Priest on the road and you go to one of these TV stations, yuh see everyone who had a hit song there. So what do you think of nowadays artistes? A lot of youngsters in Jamaica are drawn to the whole Hollywood lights and di Boys II Men vibe. We have lost a lot of wonderful voices to that American wannabe culture. Dem never contribute dem voices to reggae, and in a way I blame di whole fraternity including media. A lot youngsters never saw themselves as having a chance here. Sometimes it look like you haffi be crude or yuh haffi come from di ghetto or yuh haffi be a certain way to mek it yuh nuh? To be acceptable. The ghetto ‘ting represents around 3% of the whole country yet it is almost as if we saying if you not from the ghetto yuh caan mek it! It is just so ridiculous because most of us are not from the ghetto. But nobody nuh tell people that. Them try to play it up? Yeah, yuh play up the ‘ghetto’ when it convenient and yuh have people who are not from the ghetto wid talent either trying to hide how educated they are or the fact they have an infrastructure where people can help dem do tings. Something they should be proud of. Your parents probably work hard to get you there, send you to good school. Even in Jamaica here, Sean Paul represents a hol’ heap of Jamaicans, so does Nicky B, so does Konshens, so does Buju, so does Kartel. But everybody want to represent themselves as di likkle 3% and leave out everybody else. But then the rest of us now because we nuh have nobody catering for us, we have to jus tek what we can get. What happen recently is that with the invention of cable, people are saying I don’t have to go nuh weh for MTV or BET and they are catering to me. A lot of young people are saying ok I see where I belong. Hip-hop is such a big thing in Jamaica, hip-hop has probably replaced one-drop or lovers rock inna di party. People might wonder why? This is di cable generation. Di society is not only physical it is also cbyer, we have virtual community now. That is di challenge facing producers and songwriters like myself. How do I remain relevant? My relevance is that I know how to make music to my age group. Do you have Any final thoughts? Right now, we are in a new era. That is my favourite topic at the moment; the paradigm has shifted in terms of the music business. The music company of the present and the future is a management company cause we lost the main source of income which was record sales. As we speak less and less CDs are being sold. For the past five years I have been of the belief that people have been giving away CDs like they would business cards. So it is going to come back to performance. When you invest in an artiste now, it is about management and securing a part of their earnings in the future. So you have to feed them, clothe them, and put them up if you are taking the young ones. Without record sales to fill that gap, you are recording just because you need to put music out. Later on you might have an album and possibly break even, but if you’re making records now to make a profit then you are not going about it the right way. It not happening again, not any more. B

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PHOTOS BY EL | WORDS AR

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PHOTOS BY Andre Morgan WORDS AR STYLING Melissa BAY : off the recordAt BACKAYARD we are not ones to say “we told you so!” but seeing the acclaim that Tarrus Riley has received from and since the release of his sophomore album Parables, we can’t help but remind you, that in issue six, (you know the Buju Banton cover), we proclaimed that Tarrus was an artiste to watch and that his album Parables was a collector’s item for anyone who loves reggae music. Well with that being said, Tarrus has used the success of that album and other subsequent single releases to propel himself into the Jamaican consciousness. So much so, that Tarrus is now scene as the ‘bar’ for quality reggae music, by most of the Jamaican public. It is with that knowledge, we decided to catch up with Tarrus and discuss his life and where he sees himself now as an artiste. Without further ado BACKAYARD is pleased to reintroduce to you the man loving called by his peers ‘Singy Singy’. Fredrick Alphanso McGregor, ‘Freddie,’ or ‘the Captain’ as he is affectionately referenced, has had an illustrious and legend-worthy career, everything from touring the North and South of America, to Europe, Japan and back again. But before all of that, the Hayes Top Hill, Clarendon native, was not always known as ‘the Captain,’ of Big Ship acclaim. ‘Likkle Freddie’ as he was known in the community, had been singing and performing since the impressionable age of seven, and even had arguably his biggest hit to date “Roll Dumpling Roll.” It wasn’t until a fated musical union between his older friends Ernest Wilson and Peter Austin, better known as The Clarendonians, which ushered Freddie into honing, is talent, and finding his calling as one of Jamaica’s premier artistes. “We tek di bus from Clarendon to Kingston and she (Ernie’s mother Miss Ethelyn) reminded us that when we see the cemetery, yuh know seh yuh reach a town and fi ask di driver to put yuh on the patty pan bus, and when yuh come off di patty pan bus yuh reach a Mr. Dodd’s studio.” Before becoming a recording artiste, Freddie earned his stripes as being the resident ‘store runner,’ earning a small keep for his errands and garnering respect from his ‘elder’ artistes but the biggest respect of all, came from one Mr. Coxsone Dodd. “We live wid him and him family a Pembroke Hall fi years. Basically a deal wid di music from dem time deh, from home to studio, to school to studio, and that jus gradually kept on happening over time and didn’t stop.” Freddie started recording with Studio One between the years 1963 to 1979, but it wasn’t until an ‘outside’ recording with a producer that went by the name ‘Niney the Observer’ at Channel One that lead to him having the biggest hit of his career (outside of “Roll Dumpling Roll”) with another producer named Linval Thompson. Linval and Freddie went on to produce the Big Ship album, which propelled Mr. McGregor into ‘the Captain’s’ position, that we know him by today. So what happened after ‘Big Ship’? It never stop, jus hit tune after hit tune after hit tune until 1986 I became signed to Polydor, I was signed to RAS Records prior to that in 1983. We had successful songs such as ‘Push Come to Shove,’ ‘Across The Border,’ ‘All In The Same Boat,’ jus to name a few. That went on for three years at the end of that deal I became signed to Polydor, toured the UK, toured Europe, made a live album, things could not be greater at that time. I made the single ‘Just Don’t Want to be Lonely’ which entered the British national chart and stayed there at num ber nine for a long time. That was followed up by ‘That Girl (Groovy Situation)’ which entered at 46 and then we had ‘So I Will Wait For You,’ we had a great time in the UK during those times. It went on until mi start mi own label in1989. How was the process of starting your own label? It was a challenging move. To start a label is one thing, making it successful is another. It tek alot of hard work but yuh haffi start someday, yuh haffi start somewhere, and my thing was to make the start. So mi jus brave up myself and mek di start. As is evidence today, Big Ship I would seh is di leading label here over many years courtesy of Stephen, Chino, and all the artistes wah work wid Big Ship. We continuing to make great music and trying to see how best we can keep our music intact. Try and change the way the people in our country live as a result of the type of music we produce here. This is a question I always wanted to ask. What if Stephen didn’t start producing? (Everybody Laughs) It woulda work, if it wasn’t him it woulda be somebody else cause Noel Brownie and Dalton Brownie are two people who are instrumental wid Big Ship. In fact Noel Brownie was di one who took on the actual building of the studio, one of the greatest engineers and musicians around us. Him is really Steven’s mentor as well, Noel taught Steven alot when he was younger. God have a way of doing tings so if it wasn’t Stephen it would have been somebody maybe it would have been Chino, maybe it would have been Micah we nuh know. We pray for di right tings to happen and through prayer it happen and for me this was how it was meant to be. Speak about the pride you feel with your sons taking such an active role in the industry. Well yeah, the pride is mainly to live to see dem actually do di ting and a do it well and being successful at it. Because music is supp’im weh have no guarantee. Yuh never know wah a go happen yuh never know how it a go turn out. Yuh never know which song a go be a hit song as much as you think this song might be a hit song by the time it come out, the mode of di country might change and a different song fit di mode. So sometimes yuh never know you jus haffi keep your fingers crossed go for it and give it your best shot. That is basically how I see it. Where do you see the future of your label? Well as it stands now is wherever the music goes that’s where we go. I am saying that in terms of the di business. If you notice over di years, at least in my generation, we saw 2-tracks, we saw 4-tracks, 8-tracks, 16-tracks, 24-tracks, cassette then we have CD. Who knows what it will move to inna couple of years. Everything has gone digital basically and we don’t know what formats are going to come through or what is going to happen. So we have to jus prepare ourselves and keep the marketplace lively and keep our heads above water. We breaking grounds we work wid alot of interesting artistes such as Bramma, Singing Sweet, Laden, T-Thunda. As yuh see Mavado deh yah everyday wid we, Elephant deh yah too. So we have a team of people weh we work wid so we try to keep it within our structure and when we see talent outside of Big Ship that is worthy we try to incorporate it and continue to build that way. BCaptaintheFreddie McGregor

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BAY : off the recordThe last time we caught up with the then 17 year old Stephen McGregor was in the summer of 2007 -he was barely ‘Di Genius’ we know him as today. We caught up with him recently to see how a couple years have shaped his career. How would you say your music career has progressed? From 2007 .. Wow! It has progressed alot. I think the whole sound has matured, both on my side with the production, mixing and recording, and even with the artistes involved. I think I understanding what I am doing better now too. Every day I learn more about it -I mean that was what three years ago. Yeah. Well that is a hol’ heap a room for my career to progress. Listening to your music it sounds like you are clearly influenced by hip-hop music. How would you describe your sound to other people? I just try to keep it different just out of the box, yuh nuh. I am a musician I am not a dancehall keyboardist or a reggae drummer or supp’im like that. I am a musician so clearly I am influenced by, and listen to, alot of different genres of music, and so I am going to use dem in what I do on a daily basis which is dancehall. All of those influences fuse into my sound. So you will hear some riddim which might have a rock and roll vibe, some of dem might have some things you only hear in jazz or supp’im like that. We grow up on listening to hip-hop and those things, in the 90s. Jamaica on a whole was influenced by hip hop. I remember when DMX and Cash Money dem jus’ come out it come in like dem man deh did run Jamaica more than even di dancehall artiste dem. All of the dancehall artistes dem used to flip and sing over all a fi dem song ‘cause that was the influence at the time. That was what most of these younger artistes grew up listening to as well. In the past three years what would you say was your most memorable international collaboration? The ones I can talk about are the ones that happen already but I look on all of them equally. I put the same equal effort in all of my work. You have the Sean Paul stuff for his album, I have a couple tracks on the Matisyahu album, I did something with Collie Buddz and Krazyie Bone and I caan remember all of dem right now. But as I said before I don’t really have a special stand out ting because I look on all the work equally. Have you ever worked with anybody that you were star-struck around? I won’t say star-struck, you work with different musicians who you jus’ admire dem for their work. For instance Sean Paul is somebody who works completely different from alot of the other artiste that I voice. The whole process of how him put together his songs and how him voice him ting different. Mavado voice different from Ele dem so what you do you jus’ observe dem and you too learn different techniques. I mean when I go abroad and I see how di different acts record it influence me so when I come back here I can try certain techniques wah I see wid even my artistes and it help our ting. Why did you start to record yourself on your productions? It is experimenting really, for the most part, experimenting and expression. Di first song “Caan Friend Again,” clearly it was expression, but it really wasn’t supp’im mi could a write and gi somebody else to sing. It really wasn’t relevant to anybody else. Usually that is the case, I normally come up wid alot of ideas and melodies and give dem to other artistes. Alot of songs that I have produced that is how dem come about. I put down di ground work and link di artistes wid di chorus or di skeleton of di song and dem jus finish it off. But a case like that I couldn’t really give a man that song to sing cause it wouldn’t mek sense. Are you actually looking into becoming a recording artiste like your brother or your father? As I seh is jus’ experimenting, I mean we have di talent and we can do music so its just doing music and trying to do different stuff. Di people dem appreciate it so far and our job as musicians and producers is working for di people so we have to continue doing that. With the work-load that you have what do you do not to get overwhelmed by the situation? It is jus’ a frame of mind. I jus know seh di work have to be done so I haffi always be in that frame of mind. When I wake up I know that I have alot of things to complete so I can’t really be procrastinating about anything. It is jus’ a frame of mind I have to keep myself in knowing I have this to do or I have that to do. I don’t really look on it like “Jah know, I have bere work fi do!” and stress out and dem ting deh. It is more exciting to get more stuff out there. You seem to be real into technology as well. What can you say is the latest gadget that you use in the studio? Well, I have a new mic (Laughs)day to day gadget would be like a phone but equipment-wise would be di mic. Deh so my ting deh from di oddah day crazy new mic experiment. Finally what are new projects we expect from ‘Di Genius’? This riddim (the one he was working on while we interviewed him) which is currently untitled will be out in di near near future like inna week time. A next riddim built by me but produced by Zj Chrome, ‘Smokin’ 8’ him call it that coming out di same time too. I have alot of other singles, I have couple more one-drop side projects coming out a little bit after di summer. Like I said before jus’ some different ting experimenting and pushing di envelope. BGeniusDiStephen McGregor

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BAY : off the recordFrom ever since I have been involved in music but I never saw myself doing it as a profession basically because of my personality, I don’t like too much attention. I didn’t really see myself on a stage performing in front of a hol’ heap a people. But the genuine love of the music started when I was at Vaz Prep in the choir. I didn’t take it as anything serious, I just did it because I could do it. As I grew up the love grew and we always had the in-home studio where I could observe the artistes, musicians and producers, and watch the whole recording process. From time to time I would cut from school to go on the road with my father on tour. So I got that touring experience and studio recording experience from early. While at Wolmer’s High, a couple of friends and family started a sound called Omega Disco and I was the main selector. Later down, I think when I was in 5th form, I started recorded professionally as a rapper., and got my first hit single in while I still was at Wolmer’s. Yeah I remember that one. Yeah man, a thing called “Leggo Di Bwoy” wid Kiprich. Rapping was my comfort zone at the time, yuh nuh, still searching to find my own niche. I was always and still am a lover of hip-hop music. So how did the name Chino come about? The original name was Cappuccino which somebody gave to me for, what I assume, was my cool demeanor -but you know as time go on we shorten it and simplify it. Most people know mi as Chino now anyway. How did hip-hop affect your music? I was always good at writing because I paid attention to the lyrics of rap, you understand. So after di success of “Leggo Di Bwoy,” I was in Florida working wid Slip ‘N’ Slide for like a year. You know dem have artist like Trick Daddy, Rick Ross and Trina dem, and I did some recording wid dem. That experience was a good experience but short-lived, we were not on the same page musically. Their music was more catered to the South, yuh nuh -quick punch type a ting, but my ting more deeply lyrical. So that didn’t work out so I came back to Jamaica. At that time Stephen was full-time seriously into production, so we said we going to start this whole ting. People always seh mi have a deep voice why don’t I Dj? I seh “Dj? Nah sah mi caan dj.” Get a riddim from Stone Cold Records, di same people who do “Leggo Di Bwoy,” song, and do a song called “Been There Done That,” where I was actually dj-ing and rapping on it. That was di first track I actually tested dj-ing on and I was like, “Yeah mi sound good.” From there now I run wid it and experiment with that side of it. Which song would you say buss you in Jamaica? I recorded a ting fi Kurt Riley called ‘Fi Di Girl Dem Straight.’ That song to me is what mek people seh “Yes dah yute yah, to how him a spit pon a one-drop riddim like this, mek we watch him.” That song kick off di whole Chino vibe locally. After that Stephen just a spit out di riddim dem. We had on di ‘Breaking News’ riddim ‘Do So Fah’ and vibe jus kept building. After that I was on the ‘Stick Up’ and all of these riddims. The big one ‘Red Bull & Guinness,’ -funny enough I had that song three years prior to recording it. I was in the studio trying to create a vibe, Stephen a build di beat, Delly Ranx inna di studio. He heard di beat and wanted di beat from Steven, and Steven gave him di beat to produce. He heard mi Dj-ing di song and wanted to be a part of it, so hence, that whole ‘Red Bull & Guinness’ vibe and that was a hit. What can you say your father (Freddie McGregor) has taught you in terms of being a professional artiste? He is not a man that teach us vocally like “Boy, do this...” For the most part we learn from experience and observing throughout the years, his professionalism. We learnt from him that you have to be totally professional. We also learnt that humility is the key, and strive to make solid songs that will last. As I said in ‘Protected,’ “mi nuh inna music fi nuh hype nor nuh fast fame. ” -yuh understand. I toured with him alot and he is a man that would tour fi bout three months and for every single night him do three hours. For his three hour set, everybody in that venue singing out every single line for every single song. That clearly indicates that he has some solid songs that won’t die and him in di game for over 40 odd years. So that is where my meditation and focus is so hence you hear me make the type of music I make. Any current plans for an album? Alright, I have one album out so far in the Japanese territory, because we have a relationship with a Japanese distributer, the first album for dem was out in -a ting name ‘Unstoppable.’ This July now, the sophomore album will be out it will be called ‘Never Change’. Japan is really excited about that album because ‘From Mawnin’ is huge over there, I mean like really huge so on the album I will have a full length Japanese version of it. Anything you want to leave for fans? Just look out for greatness. New singles out and yuh done know di 2010 vibe ma,d because di vibe in great, got a lot of awards and nominations, so 2010 is a spill-over from . The newest song is out ‘Tell Dem Before Dem Gone’, it’s getting a whole lot of love so that look like it is going to get real big. ‘Throw Di Money Roun’ featuring myself, Steven and Ricky Blaze on di ‘Mad Collab’ riddim doing well. ‘Sound Execution’ produced by Shane Brown on di Jukeboxx label on the ‘Staglag’ riddim a guh hard. ‘Haffi Get a Girl Tonight’ for Demarco’s StarKutt label and ‘Gallis Fi Real’ on Ward 21’s ‘Costra Nostra’ riddim a guh be hot fi di summer. Look out for videos and Chino deh pon particularly every major show this season, yuh done know we book like a library. (Laughs) BChinoDaniel McGregor

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Hands down Distant Relatives, is one of the most needed collaborations of this generation, and at the right time too. After seeing and hearing a lot of authentic collaborations -not to be confused with those remixed mashed-up albums, we can honestly say that Distant Relatives is a familiar yet substantial LP. The fusion of Hip-Hop, Dancehall and Reggae is not new, matter of fact all those genres of music are distant relatives of each other. So when Nas and Damian decided to get together and do this album it was all but easy, and made perfect musical sense. The music is an immediate dose of reality that may prove too raw for some people’s taste, but the truth never comes in mild doses. As Nas and Damian interchange the lead on the heavy African-Hip-Hop reggae infused baselines, on thing becomes blatantly clear -this album has a message, and the message is freedom. Freedom from tyranny, poverty, and the mental slavery. The 13-track album has artistes, K’naan, Stephen Marley, Dennis Brown, Joss Stone and Lil’ Wayne helping to spread the ever omnipresent message. EL NAS & DAMIAN MARLEY DISTANT RELATIVES Universal Republic / Def Jam RecordingsRating:BACKAYARD 53

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JAH MELODY ‘ITHIOPIA’ ‘LOVE CRAZY’ RICHIE SPICE ‘LET’S GO’ 77 KLASH ‘BROOKLYN ANTHEM’ ‘CODE FOR THE STREETS’ LUCIANO ‘WISH YOU WERE MINE’ RatingREGGAE/DANCEHALL CLASSIC RAISED THE BAR AIGHT NOT SPECIAL POP DOWN sBAY : REVIEWS BAD PEOPLE RIDDIMSTEPHEN ‘DI GENIUS’ MCGREGORRating: Released earlier in the year to much fanfare, ‘Bad People’ could be honestly referred to as Stephen ‘Di Genius’ McGregor’s marker for the rest of the year. A really good juggling riddim which invokes memories of older riddims emulating from 90’s lore with the rhythmic cadence of the beat however distinguishes itself with certain riffs more commonly associated with hip hop. The artiste line-up is a literal who’s who in the dancehall circuit with even Cham (formerly Baby Cham) chipping in with not only one but two well received efforts ‘Cause’ and ‘Take it Outside’. All of the songs I have heard so far can be enjoyed by dancehall fans however my personal favourites are: ‘Have Mi Want’Flexxx, ‘We Nah Stray’Kari Jess, ‘Can Yuh Manage It’Laden, ‘Gal A Mad Ova’Mavado, ‘Good Like Gold’T.O.K, ‘Run Mi Down’Beenie Man, ‘Cause’Cham, ‘Bigger Heads’Busy Signal and ‘Bad People’Aidonia. ARRating: FIRST BORN RIDDIMRAZZ & BIGGYLet me start this review by rst congratulating the selector duo Razz & Biggy on their rst serious venture into the production arena. The question I would have for either of them is what took them so long. The industry needs new ideas in terms of music in order to evolve and as selectors, they should know rsthand to what I am referring to. While not a technically outstanding beat, it does have catchy phrases which several artistes on the track utilizes to good effect. Strangely, or not so strangely depending how you look on it, my favourite song on the riddim was done by the duo themselves, ‘How We Stay’. Which is quite a feat considering the type of artistes who have also voiced on this riddim. ‘Come Nuh’Laden and ‘Love Mi a Deal Wid’Bugle are the other songs I would recommend from this juggling. ‘First Born’ was a valiant rst effort which should be a good springboard for better offerings from the duo in the near future. ARINFANTRY RIDDIMEQUIKNOXXRating: Yet another great accomplishment from the Equiknoxx team, not only have they made a riddim which is getting good rotation, with hopefully more to come, but they also have featured a lot of new artistes on the rididm. Infantry Riddim has a party vibe sure to get club rotation and along with the new voices on the riddim like Navino with “Put it on” and Massika with “Anno Sometime”. Also Tuff Enuf with “Gal Pree” is a personal favourite and I think that Equiknoxx had the right recipe with this riddim. This creative group of producers have been rising through the ranks of producers and have a bright future, especially with a few of these new artistes on the rise as well. 2 Scoops BACKAYARD 46 YOU THINK YOUR ALBUM OR RIDDIM IS WORTHY TO GO UNDER THE GUILLOTINE? E-MAIL IT TO US: JA@BACKAYARD.COM

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Big homie 77 Klash (pronounced two seven Klash) is denitely an innovator, style guru and mad artiste. His mix tape ‘Code For The Streets’ is the result of an independent effort blending with mutual interests. The production denitely carves its own mold and showcases a universal appeal. Coupled with Two Seven’s raw dancehall delivery, ‘Code for the Streets’ offers a sound that might be just a tad unfamiliar to the regular dancehall / reggae massive. While this EP mix tape is not for the regular one-style, ‘missionary’ massive, you gotta give it up: if the great Johnny Osbourne can make a guest appearance on a track called ‘Mad Again,’ then who are we to deny ingenuity? Familiar tracks on this album include collaborations with Jahdan Blakkamoore like the ode to Crooklyn, ‘Brooklyn Anthem’ and ‘Fight.’ Overall this EP is a look into the world of producer and artiste 77Klash. To peep his riddim sty-lee, hit up his MySpace and watch out for the video for ‘Mad Again.’ Shot in Manhattan’s Red Bull Loft in Soho with all of NYC’s nest dancers, it’s debut will be arriving hot and fresh early 2009. myspace.com/2sevenklash EL 77 KLASHCODE FOR THE STREETS (MIXTAPE)Klash City Records | Rating: JOE GIBBS:SCORCHERS FROM THE MIGHTY TWOVP Records | Rating: piece of historyLUCIANOJAH IS MY NAVIGATORVP Records | Rating:‘Jah Is My Navigator,’ produced by Dean ‘Cannon’ Fraser, is by far one of the best albums (hands down!) from Luciano in about a decade. Every track on the album is skillfully arranged and produced by musicians with serious skills. Based on the quality of the music, no effort was spared. What is really blatant about this album, is the message it portrayed, as it addresses all aspects of life as expressed in tracks; ‘For I,’ ‘Jah is my Navigator,’ ‘I’m the Tuffest,’ ‘Jah Live,’ ‘Sweet Jamaica,’ ‘Never Give Up,’ and ballads; ‘Wish You Were Mine’ and ‘Paradise Lost.’ Perfect from start to nish! Musicphill Every business has its challenges, competition, hardships and situations that have to be overcome in order to be successful. Dj Rush and the Code Red family are here to explore the circumstances that make the dancehall and reggae entertainment industry what it is. One of the key things different about all entertainment-related businesses is the hidden but denitely NOT subtle element of EGO. If you have dealt with anyone related to entertainment, then you know people in the business have god syndrome. (Me included? Nahhhh. Never!). But, yes, it’s there and extremely pertinent to understanding how to get along in this biz. To approach anyone in this ‘star’ business remember: “deal with said ‘star’ like you are dealing with the almighty, and you will get along rather well.” Forget that rule and you will fail in your endeavor, and some gun man might just come to shoot you. Trust and heed the teachings of Dj Rush ‘The Buddha’ and you will do well ;) Dj Rush (Code Red) It is indeed an honor for me to review this album and, as I once worked for these two icons, it’s also tting. Joel Gibson (Joe Gibbs) and Errol Thompson (“ ET”) have produced a compilation that was magnicently put together. These tunes, through the passage of time, have carved out a piece of history in the landscape of reggae music in Jamaica and inuenced the rest of the world from the 1960s to the present day. ‘The Mighty Two,’ as they were affectionately known, were responsible for a slew of hits and the exposure of artistes such as Dennis Brown, Culture, Jacob Miller, Sylford Walker, George Nooks ( Prince Mohammed), Cornel Campbell, Althea & Donna, J.C. Lodge just to name a few. For those of you who need to know more about the history of Jamaican music this is one of the ultimate music collections you must have. From ‘Two Sevens Clash’ by Culture, to the controversial ‘Someone Loves You Honey’ by J.C. Lodge, get educated and revisit the foundation. Salute to the ‘Mighty Two’ for their invaluable contribution to the upliftment of reggae music and basically every genre of music in the 21st century. Their memories live on through their music forever. Musicphill

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COSA NOSTRAJIM SCREECHIEMY LIFE MAD COLLAB INSIDE DI RIDDIMWithout a doubt, denitely one of the most listened and played riddim of the year so far. This is all due in large part to the hit song “Clarkes” by Vybz Kartel feat Popcaan and Gaza Slim. Even with that being said, the riddim produced by Dj Chrome (Cr2O3 records) had one of the maddest collaborations, Elephant Man and Bounty Killer with the song “How we do it” a collaboration which although was long overdue an enjoyed one never-the-less. The riddim also features collaborations by Charly Black, Chi Ching and Ding Dong with the track “Cleanliness” as well as Mavado, Chase Cross, Flex and Kibarki with their collab “Straight” with a host of other collaborations. Overall Dj Chrome has a hit that’s going to continue getting airplay for a long time to come. 2 Scoops Sweeping through the airwaves, Jim Screechie is taking over from Joe Grind, but then again Joe never had a riddim made for him. Featuring the likes of Aidonia – “Jackhammer”, Beenie Man – “Beat dem bad”, Akane (from across the waters in Japan) feat Timberlee – “Move!” ,T.O.K. – “Everybody Clap” just to name a few. Coming off from the Infantry Riddim Equiknoxx kept the creative talents going into this riddim and put out another banger. Not to mention Equiknoxx’s artistes on the riddim (Shanz, J.O.E. and Kemikal) putting out tune after tune trying to lay their own mark on the dancehall scene. 2 Scoops My Life Riddim has the elements to be a great riddim, rhythmically it’s a strong riddim and having a lineup of talented artistes doesn’t hurt as well. With hit after hit coming off this riddim like I-Octane’s – “My Life”, Tarrus Riley and Agent Sasco – “Why You Do Me So” as well as G Whizz –“Nah Give Up” just to name a few. This riddim is littered with talent and is a must listen, it’s a welcomed relief from the constant violence we listen to in our songs and denitely a showcase of some talented artistes out there. 2 Scoops Ward 21 came real strong with its Cosa Nostra Riddim, and having an all-star lineup of artistes with hits from the likes of Agent Sasco (Assassin) going for his own with the tune “Me A Go Fi Mine”, Mr Lexx - “Dem A Pree” , Wayne Marshall asking the Lord to help us “Survive the Times” and Ward 21 – “Pretty Gal”. Not to be out done by the men of dancehall, ‘The General’ of the hot gyal army Timberlee graced the riddim, along with Tifa moving right along with “Reject” and Natalie Storm not taking anything back with with “Nuh Teki Back”. The riddim also features tracks from Point O as well as Professor. Cosa Nostra is a well done hit from Ward 21 with great musical components and mixing. 2 Scoops

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SEARCHING LOSE A FREIND SALT OF THE EARTH UNCONDITIONAL LOVE MY HEART GANGSTA LIFE ONLY THE FATHER DADDY YOU GONE RISE AGAIN GOOD MORNING JA FREE EARS HARD THANK YOU JAH FOR ONE NIGHT LOVE IS WHERE CLARKS MY CUP HOLD YUH PUT YOUR HANDS UP GAL A MAD OVER ME CLARKS Prt.2 HOW WE DO IT PURE LOVE COME INTO MY ROOM BEG YOU A TOUCH MI WOMAN A CALL ME ROOF TOP WANNA BE BALLAZ CERTIFIED DIVA GAL OVA GUN PETER LLOYD I-OCTANE RICHIE STEPHENS JAH CURE / PHYLLISIA WAYNE MARSHALL JUNIOR X ANTHONY CRUZ KHAGGO SHAGGY & FRIENDS LYMMIE MURRAY ETANA VYBRANT VYBZ KARTEL GRAMPS WILLIE LINDO CHANGE CANDLE IN THE WIND LET PEACE REIGN CHANGE GONNA COME MY PROMISE NAH SELL OUT SUPPIM’ A GO HAPPEN JEANS AND FITTED GALLIS FI DEM MOOD FOR LOVE MAVADO TAZ BUSY SIGNAL RICHIE STEPHENS ANDY LIVINGSTON KHAGGO BOUNTY/BUSY SIGNAL VYBZ KARTEL FLEX PETER LLOYD Di Genius Ricky G Records Juke Boxx Pot of Gold Black Dutch Records Seanizzle Records Juke Boxx Russian Romeich Records Inna Mi House VYBZ /POPCORN/GAZASLIM RICHIE LOOPS GYPTIAN ASSASSIN MAVADO VYBZ KARTEL ELEPHANT MAN/BOUNTY KILLERVYBZ KARTEL MAVADO/STACIOUS VYBZ KARTEL BEENIE MAN MAVADO ASSASSIN TAMI CYNN & TIFA MAVADO Black Light Records Truck Back Records Boot Camp SOBE/Danger Zone Baby G Revolutionary Ent. John John Flava Birchill The Streets No Doubt Major Links Adidjahiem / NotNice Dada Son Pot of Gold NotNice/CR203 Records Big Yard VP Records Di Genius Di Genius Head Concussion NotNice/CR203 Records Adidjaheim/NotNice Di Genius Adidjaheim/NotNice Sankofa Production Rose Gold Ent. SankofaWashroom Entertainment Armz House Production1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 MUSIC PHILL CHART [ summer] REGGAE CHART DANCEHALL CHART BUBBLERS (REGGAE) BUBBLERS (DANCEHALL)THE INFORMATION PROVIDED IN THIS CHART IS BASED ON WAH GWAN IN THE STREETS AND ON THE RADIO. NO BIAS, JUS DI REAL TING!

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Di Genius Ricky G Records Juke Boxx Pot of Gold Black Dutch Records Seanizzle Records Juke Boxx Russian Romeich Records Inna Mi House

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BAY : WWW WWW?WHERE.WHEN.WHO (Quad Night Club, Jamaica) (Pier 1, Jamaica)BACKAYARD 52

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NEVER A BAD TIME TO READ BACKAYARD MAGAZINE ODESSA AND ‘ISLAND’ FRIENDS HARDROCK JAMAICA IF IT WASN’T OFFICIAL BEFORE IT’S OFFICIAL NOW, JAMAICA IS THE HOTTEST DESTINATION SPOT IN THE REGION. HARD ROCK CAFE OCHO RIOS IS LOCATED IN THE HEART OF THE OCHO RIOS SHOPPING DISTRICT IN THE FAMED TAJ MAHAL SHOPPING PLAZA. EQUIPED WITH A 180-SEAT RESTAURANT, A LIVE MUSIC STAGE, AND A ROCK SHOP OFFERING COLLECTIBLE ITEMS THAT OCCUPY THE ENTIRE FIRST FLOOR. RARE MEMORABILIA ADORNS THE WALLS INCLUDING PHOTOS OF PRINCE AND THE ORIGINAL LYRICS FOR ‘JAMMIN’ HANDWRITTEN BY BOB MARLEY, ADDED TO THE MIX ARE PRICELESS ITEMS FROM ROCK LEGENDS LED ZEPPELIN AND GEORGE CLINTON’S FUNK BAND, PAR LIAMENT.WWW.HARDROCK.COM

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BAY : WWW WWW?WHERE.WHEN.WHO Photos by: Pam Fraser BACKAYARD 54 (Village Cafe, Jamaica) Find Your Love (Kingston, Jamaica) Pam Fraser (Kingston, Jamaica)