Citation
Dominica herald

Material Information

Title:
Dominica herald
Creator:
Allfrey, P. Shand ( Phyllis Shand Allfrey )
Place of Publication:
Roseau, Dominica
Publisher:
Dominica Herald
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 42 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Dominica -- Newspapers ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Dominica

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1955? Cf. caption.
General Note:
Editor, <1963-1964>: Phyllis Shand Allfrey.
General Note:
"For the General Welfare of the People of Dominica, the further advancement of the West Indies and the Caribbean Area as a whole."
General Note:
Description based on: Jan. 12, 1963; title from caption.
General Note:
Last issue consulted: December 31, 1964.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. This item may be protected by copyright but is made available here under a claim of fair use (17 U.S.C. §107) for non-profit research and educational purposes. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
82144654 ( OCLC )
2007229365 ( LCCN )

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Caribbean Newspapers, dLOC
University of Florida

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Full Text
LIBRARY

RESEARCH INSTITUTE
FOR THE STUDY OF MAN

162 EAST 78

NEW YORK 216

ST. LUCIA, ST. VINCENT

Plenty Of Ups And Downs

: Naw a (OT.

ESTABLISHED 1955





\WHEN stumps were drawn last night, St. Lucia had

overhauled St. Vincent’s first innings score vi 186,

but with the loss of three second inning’s wickets.

The

nightwatchmen, Jouct and skipper Mindu Phillip, were
batting confidently at 28 and 30 respectively, alchough, just
before stumps, Philip was missed at first slip by Duncan.
St. Vincent’s fielding was however brilliant, particularly

Duncan’s gully catch of Hypolite.

was 84 runs for three wickets.

The close of play score

A “respect2ble attendance” (commentator description)
saw plenty of action, several sixes and some nice stroke
play. Renaud Joseph was bit by a rising bali from Wil-

liams before he could score arun and retired hurt. He

says that



he will resume tomorrow.
—See “Sportlight” cn back page for details.

a

Mass-Murde: And | PEOPLEIN THE NEWS

Suicide

CONCORD, CALIFORNIA,
s Boy.

ret



a bli shed that a
passenger



awry >

have est
heavily insured

. shot the pilot of an airliner

cruising at 5,000 feet on a

~flght from Reno to San

Francisco. just before it
crashed seat Concord on

_ Thursday last week killing

all 44° aboard. The man’s
name and the beneficiary of
the newly-purchased po
licy of WI $273,000 were
not disclosed.

Train Robbers
Get Up To 50 |
Years =
Vast Gash Loot Still Missing

A Biitish Judge recently sentenced
twelve men to prison for terms rang-
ing up to thirty years for taking part
in the £2,600,000 “Great Train
Robbery’ the greatest haul of cash-
loot in modern times

Atthe trial, which lasted fifty
seven days, seven men got th'ety

_ years, two got twenty-five years and
one twenty-four. Still another was
awarded twenty years and one got a
three-year sentence.

“The robbery took place on
August 8,°1963 when about fifteen
inen stopped the London-Glasgow
rail train with a false red signal.

“Se far the police have recovered
only £300,000 and believe the rest
is cashed away by three or so of the
uncaught men who | master-minded
the job.

. Bruce Stewart leaves for
UK tomorrow for long leave

** HECTORIDE Seraphin _ of |
TD.





africre leit by banana boat
for UK Thursday * FATHER
F. Huysmans appointed
Provineial Superior in Brus-
sels — Fr. J. Scandaert suc
ceeds h'm as Vice-Provincial
and Fr. Francis becomes
Dean of Roseau Cathedral *
FaTHER Felix, Edward
Eiwin and Philip Francis all
graduated from Coady Insti
tute, Artigonish tiis week *
CarLos Hilburg, WHO
zone engineer here this week
for water suppiv talks with
Curtis Knight and Govt.
officials * Jo HN Profumo
(ex-war Minister involved
with prostitutes) has new job
as unpaid social worker at
Toynbee Hall, East London
* PrincE Philip, Duxe of
Edinburgh will head Bri-
tain’s new Council for
Volunteers Overseas* TRADE
& Production Minister
Ducreay returned from Par-
liameritary Course i2 N. Ire-
land * AvocaTE Sports
Reporter. ©’Donnell Nor-
ville heze to repext cricket *
SISTER Alicia now visiting
U.S). AS*

Record Twins

A US mare has beaten 10,000 to Big
odds by giving birth to twin colts,
The mare is between fifteen and
twenty years old. (CP)

In






=
‘Justitia
(For the General Welfuie of the People of Dominica, the further cd: ancement of the West Indies and the Caribbean Area

SATURDAY, MAY 16, 1964

oy

se








Se eee tees Sera ns

lhemoriam
HORAZE GILLETTE 0.B.E.

Doctor, Feéeralist, Botanist,
Diplomat

When a great Civil Ser-
vant dies, it is only fitting
that one who had been his
Minister should pay him tri-
bute. Whena great Dec-
tor dies all his patients mourn.
Tmrough the death of Dr,
Horace Gillette at his home
in Trinidad, we are all the
pocrer. His devotion to
medicine, reseatch. and wider
nationhood is recugnis:d from
his birthplace—Batsh Gui-
ana— «¢ London, Washing-
ton and even farthrr afield.

Dr. Gillette, Caribbean
citizen of Chinese. descent,
aisplay ¢c bis gen.us for erae
dicating disease and his un
failiag horhomiz net cnly

during his brilliant career in -

medicine but when he served
as Medical Adviser to the
W.I. Federal Gevrnment.
Many WHO conferences
were enhanced by his coun-
sel. He attacked the once
prevalent scourge of malatia
in Trinidad (of whose Medi-
cal Board ke was President
7949-50); later he led an
anti-yellow-fever campaign,
fought the danger of rabies,
and became Vice-President
of the Association for pre-
venting Tuberculosiss.
Horace Gillette was a
spottsman tco, promoting
healthy exercise — patitcular-
ly cycling-- and he was a
renowned horticulturist.
Everyone interested in rare
orchids knew of his wonder-
ful garden at St. Augusitne.
Recently he wrote to the
Editor of the HERALD, his
otie-time Minister, of how
much he was enjoying a
quiet retirement, . although
still broken-hearted by the
smash-up of the Federation
to which he had given his

‘loyalty and his hope. A big

man and a_ great Doctor:
never to be forgotten by the
several territories which he
served —P.S.A.

Seer eee

IN EXCITING





The Richest oo a

as awholey-



PRICE Io¢g

STRUGGLE

Short Legco. Meeting

Loblack Removed From Housing Committee

HORTLY

after

nominated membe«

Hoa;. EC:

Lonlack initisted a motion on social security, he was
expelled fiom the Dominica Labour Paity. Last Wed-
nesday just after he put a question demanding a report on
the last Regional Council of Ministers. observers at the
Legislative Council meeting learned that Loblack’s name
had been removed from the Housing Committee. Never-
theless, the Hon. Chief Minister gave a report as requested
-— the first report on a Regional Council meeting he has:

_ ever presented to our elected assembly. Most of the news

in it had already filsered through pess reports from other

islands,

Federal Ships — No
Clarification

Of the proposed coiitro-
veisial sale of Federal ships,
nothing was said, the C.M. declared ‘The

As 7

proposals concerning the
Regional Shipping Service.
The Conference was of the
unanimous opinion that the
maintenance of A Regional
Shipping Service is esseatial to
the trade and development of
the islands and that it should
be continued for a further
two years.’ No member
pressed home a supplemen-
tary to discover what kind o
future shipping service was
envisaged.

Noises Off

The thin cloth partitions
marking off the : Registrar’s
office on the balcony occa-
sionally filtered voices from
above more andible than
those of the legislators, some
of whom are not noted for
their diction.

Six bills were passed, two
of antique origin, which
drew criticism from Opposi-
tion Leader E. B. Henry
“why have these bills (sup-
plementary — appropriation)
been brought before this
House only iow for
approval?” The Chief
Minister rose to explain that
in urgent cases monies were
approved and the auditor
gave his report afterwards.
“Sometimes in dealing with
the Crown Agents there were
delays...” The Attotney
General intervened with:

“this is not question time”.
A. slight... argument: ensued
between the-A.G:-and Mr.'
Henry on this point of order.
(Cont. on page 12)

fel Se

ascusea tie WUrKMEH S—

Compensation
According toa reléase from the
T.C/C.W. Union, in teply to a re-
quest that the Workmen's Comper-.
sation Ordinance b: revised, the
Mntnistry of Tabour and. Social Ser-
vices have stated that they... would
keew the General “Secretary .of the
union advised of any furthér-develop-
ments to amend the Ordinance.

—— —

LABOUR GAINS ONE SEAT

Out of four by-elections held in
Britain this week, Labour won one
(Rutherglen, Scotland) and the Con-
servatives held three. At Devizes
the swing: to Labour was only 3%
out in the other constituencies (Win-
hester, Bury St. Edmunds, and Ruth-
erglen the swing to Labour was
20 per cent. °°

_ . B.G. TERROR

British troops are. now patrolling
a sugar estate outside of Geoigetown
where terrorists shot and killed two
policemen this week, Cver two
hundred people have. been wounded
upto the rath week of the sugar
strike, and 12 persons have been

killed.

Etaa Erupts
Again

Catania Itaty, May 11 CP! A
new lava flow poured down the-west
slope of Mount Etna -in Sicily today
in a resumption of. the. eruption
which started three days) ago but
stopped on Sunday.

CRIGKETING SHORT .
STORY as
The. Man Who
pages 3 & 5



" Pitched ° Bottles —



Exploring Radio Education

AT a meeting held at the D. G. S. under the Chairmanship of the
Honourable W. S. Stevens, Minister for Labour‘and Social Services, on
April 30 for the purpose of discussion educational broadcasting with
Mt. John Cordeaux Head of Sound Broadca.ung of the Thompson
Foundation in the U.K., it was decided to appoint a committee to thrash
out the matter.
The Committee has since been appointed with the following terms
cf reference: —
@ To examine the vecd for Educational Broadcasts in Domi-
nica including Adult Education,
@ To make recoumendations regarding:-—
(a) the type of programmes to be provided;
(b) the most suitable time for these broadcasts;
(c) the incorporation of any existing Educational Broadcast; into
(4)



PAGE TWO ie



the new proposals;

sources of iaterial {to what extent should use be made
of material from outside sources e.g. the B.B.C. and local
sources); ’

what sort of programmes should be used for a start;

the availability of Voluntary Educational Assistants whe will
be engaged in relaying the programrne and other contingent
duties,

The Committee consists of the fs liowiag members! —

Mr, O. #. Walker, Educatioa Officer, (ex-Officio) Chairman;
Mi. Ronald Clarke, M.A., Headmoster, D.u.S. (ex-officio),
Mr. C. S. Gregoire; Mz. S. Boya; Mr. JA. Laz: rre;

Mr. John Cordeaux will return to the territory as soon’as possible*sfter
definite proposals have been submitted to him Following upon the report
of the Committee.

Tt wil be recalled that Mz. Cordeaux reveiled that, should circum
stances permit, the Thompson Fourdation would ve willing to set up a
training school in Dominica for ane year witin the best facilities available
for training a cadre of teachers in the preparation of radio educational
programmes, provided that a nucleus of voluiteers could be found to make

(¢)
(f)



a start.

Roy Thompson, the Canadian born multimillionaire Director of the
Foundation from whom its name is derived, is devoied among other things,
tas underdeveloped countries to exploit to the fullest possible extent

P P P

Radio Broadcasting as a. medium of



education. (GIS)



Impressions. of




Dominica
By a.Field Officer of the

British Red Society-—Jenny T.
Scott (Scottish Branch)

Many people stil ask:
why 1s ihe Red Cross active
in times of peace — What
do they do? Let me answer
this by telling you of the
work done in this island by
the Dominican Branch of the
Biitish Ked Cross Society.

Soon af:ez my arrival in
Dominica on Friday May 8,
I attended an enrolment Cere-
mory of Junior Red Cross
members at Government
House, when almost s0 new
Lela repeated their pledge

“join with others all over
fhe world to help the’ sick
and suffering”. Their motto
“Serve One Another” speaks
tor itself, and this ideal of i
Service — Voluntary Service
— is also carried out by the
Senior Voluntary Aid de-
tachments. May -8 was a
most appropriate date for
such a ceremony, since it is
the birthday of Henri
Dumant, the Swiss Banker
who founded the Red Cross
first over 100 years ago.

It is-greatly to the credit of
Dominica that it has so many
interested and keen members
eager and willing to uphold
the Red ‘Cross ideals of sere

.

~ Tunior detachments

‘yice to others and the Relief
of suffering everywhere.

a Meet? YOU DAVE:
two groups of Junior mem-
bers, three active, well-irained
and a
members’ group. The first
two (Juniors & Seniors) give
voluntary service at the hespi-
tal, in many capacities; while
the members Group ass‘sts
there also, at the Casualty
dep:, with the clerical work
necessary -- with making of
swabs and in the Children’s
work,

The trained members will
readily turn oui in any emer-
gency, and will provide First
Aid posts at public gather-
ings, while the reliable
Ambulance Service on the
island is provided by che
Red Cross. On a visit
which I paid to the hospital,
Matron stressed the excellent
work done by male members
in wansvorting patients, not
only from hospital to home
ard vice-versa but lso to
the airport for jovg-eys to
other islands. Anany hour
of the day or night they are
on call and turn out most
willingly.

The First Aid training is
invaluable in an. emergency
and may well be the means
of saving lives as it has done
in the past.

The Junior training places
special emphasis on “Health”
Aid “Hygiene” and is cer-



DOMINICA HERALD

— —'



tainly a help towards build- training in First Aid and
ing better citizens: of the Nursing, proof surely that the

future.

“Group” members are
those who do not wish oz
have no time to train but
they pay their own part ip
Red Cross by inelpirg pre-
pare for disasvers such as
hurricanes, iires, floods snd
so on, by turning out in such
am emergency and he:ping to
distribute clothes. and
blz ankets, to operate “feeding
centres” if necessary and of

a

°.

course to raise fuads with
which to carry on the Red
C.oss work.

nadditior, to this, the

local Red Cross have pro-
vided First Aid Boxes in
school; have set up Medical
Loan centres where things
such as crutches — rubber
sheets — blan k et s — bed-
fans andi other sickroom
equipment may be botrowed
temporarily. They provide
parcels for che needy at times;
some ef the Juniors read to
the blind when xequested.
They have given the hospical
litle “extras” from time to

time and ate always ready to
help provide anything v.hich
will assist in the “‘promonon

of health and the prevention
éf disease”

to quote from

Ia the East »de of the
island are three more Jurior
Groups ard in -ihe North
one Senior detachmerit, and
Souftiere and Scotts Head
have each a Junior Link.

Because of the distance
and travelling — difficulties
these groups may well feel
they are cut-off aiid not tak-
ing partinthe main work
but they are very essential
indeed. Should disaster
strike the islands, roads may
weil be blocked and com-
mutuications impessible ac
first, so there is much which
the isolated Red Cross grou,
can do to fire “immediate
help” which is one of the
functions of Red Cross
everywhere.

From other Red Cross
Societies help would come
pouring in, it is the duty of
Red Cross locally to distri-
bute these supplies impartially
to all who need assistance.

Dominica may not have
been in the “Hurricane area
recently” -- neither was
Tobago until “Flora” Struck.
I have recently come from
there and wittuessed first hand
the desolation and destructicn
—S0 it is well to be prepared.
There was no Red Cross i in
Tobago before “Flora”
now it is over 400 strong, all



an

© aS 5 eae 6 pa 6 os 9m |< 9 et a Ste te 6 eS Ot 6 p> 6 Be 8 ee 8 a PR SS te oe pee tf

SATURDAY, MAY 16, 1964

M——"’"![_

and Britain will
always be iadebted <> the
Branch officials here who.
have given such invaluable

es
assistance in the past, and are
the futute.

people there hav: reahsed
wh23t Red Cross can do --
and will do — for those in
need, striving sull for « better and
more powerful Red Cross tn

Domninica should
be proud of you all.

When Red Cress began
over 700 years ago, 16 coun
tries formed Red Cioss Socie-
tles, Gow 102 countries have
established Socicties “which
excelleat foundation of the have over 178,000,000 Senior

Red Cross in the islz

CG i . ue ee Tl members and more than
am greatly impressed by ine] 65,009 ,000 Juniors throughout the
wish of all members to give world,

I have been meetiny; as
many Red Cross personnel
in Dominica a3 is possible —
I have run a Leader Course
— because leadership is so
cseanal to every organisation an
—and I'am certain of the

e
q
|
|

Rt AE Ree ee ne Be Ss pS oS oe, b

- CHICKEN AT ITS BEST!

Raised high in the mountains of cen-
tral Dominica, SYLVANIA- FRESH

hicken has that ‘certain something’
eople
avour !

Cc
p love...., mouth-watering



Graded ! Washed ! Dated !

And priced right for full value.
SYLVANIA-FRESH BROWN EGGS
are making new friends everyday !
You can always get them at.

ELI’S GROCERY (or,

SYLVANIA POULTRY FARMS
imperial Road —Roseau. Tel: 224-5 Rings

2a 8 a St pa BG BS pe At 66 BS PCS 9A SS SOE

~ Land-speed Record Attempt

; Z
i << 41S wel ee ee wet e—=ees Rens peace 8 ed te 6 Bs St ame 6 8 6 Re tf a ee FP 8 ee I ee

69h +6 om Se Spe S|

Se eS



Another attempt on the werld land-speed record
(394. 19 m.p. h.), on Lake Eyre, South Australia
is likely to be made next week by British driver

Donald Campbell. A tial run on Thursday
reached 295 m.p.h. on the 19 miles long and
400 yards wide specially-prepared track.

Last year’s attempts on the record at Lake Eyre
were washed out by unusually heavy rainfalls.

—(IS)



SATURDAY, MAY 16, 1964

The Man Who Pitched Bottles
Ry Phyllis Shand Allfrey

When Hon. Mr. Denipierre was awakened <1 early
in th Be morring by that telephone bell in his Savannah
Fol Ledroom, he responded disagreeably io the flat, cweet
big-island voice.

“Pardch me, ate you the Honourable fo Do
you kiow aman by rame Ignatius St. Medoc?* (She
pronounced it Sammydock.)

Mr. Dampierre was a Smider M. P. at present com-
bining two happy occupations: attending a comference on
a genero ’s subsistence allowance and watching a memor-
able cricket match. Forthose, who do not know what

. Smider means, it is an abbreviation of small-islander and was

often’ used’ in Mr. Dampieire’s tine to describe emi-.

grants from underdeveloped Caribbean lands to other more
fopulous centres, or even unfortunates who were popped
into police vans aad later deported to heme baces.

The engrossing cream from which Mr. Dampierre was
so rudely aroused had just reached the point when the
whole savannah swarmed with gladiators shouting ‘Sinlal
doan out!” and fading light flashed and = shattered with
shocking glass bottles. He, Dampierre, veople‘s. tepte-
sentative, had leapt in dream-fantasy to frotect the host
Premier instead of the Governor (the real hero), and he
caught a huge rum bottle ‘ust betcre it crashed on the
Premier’s skull. Everyone on tne field went crezy with
admiration. Dampicire received so many thumps on_ the

back and so many coxgratulatory drinks afterwards that

his whole physique was impaired by the dreams: he could
hardly hold up tae telephone receiver.

_ “A young man by name sere Sammydock? Says
he headed bananas for you . . Says you and he are
ftietsds.. . Justa minute. i + says you know him by th
title of Tesy.”

t

“a eoones on ik 9



oe .
U.W.L.

The Polio Research Fund
announced in London recent-
ly that it 1s financing, a chair
in EE Ot napaccscs: ia the Uni-

V “O ; West ndaiecs

Depicts of Surgery.

Mr. John SR: Golding,
reader in orthopaedic surgery
at the Universtiy, since 1963,
has been appointed to the
chair. Princess Alice,
Chancellor of the Un-versiy,

Ae 6 Ba 6 pes ba 6 PG BO SP Pa B+ a BO Oy i (



< THE MATHEMATICS OF ;
' ° GOOD HEALTH! =
CONCENTRATED EXTRACT CF
PRIME BEEF i
plus :
FERROUS SUCCINATE
plus
HIGH QUALITY SHERRY W:NE
plus
VITAMIN B 1
-equals |

Green's Beef, fron & Wine

A really fine tonic for: the treatment
of nutritional anaemia, iron-deficiency
anaemia, nervous exhaustion, eenehal
debility.

THE DOMINICA DISPENSARY CO, LTD.

2 te 8S fetta) pel | Ee 884 Beet bee 8 ee 5 pc 6 8 6 8 Pe eS a ee,
els . qs -

‘ s : ?
8 6 8s Bs 8 8 hs pe 8 9 5 8 St PO 6

a er ee

: aap 6 9a 8 PO 6 8 6 9s pe ses pes pes pte 6 §
DOMINIC.

HERALD PAGE THREE

re rcs

NOTICE TO BANANA GROWERS

BANANA PRICES

Cae ERS are notified that consequent ubon Gel Ive
lercase cf the Green Boat Price Ly £3. io. 0. to £70. 115.
/per ten ‘effective 11th May, 1964 the price _ payable for
[bananas until furzher netice will be as follows;





mon one



bes agreed that it should be
called “The Princess Alice}
Chair in Tropical Ortho-
paedics and Rehabilitation.”
Moscow Glasing
“Time ””

Deploring the Soviet cles-

5 8¢. per Ib,

ing of TIME magazine Mos- At Reception Statiow
cow burean, a S ate Depart.) At Buying. Points S. D. $-2¢ sy 5
ment spokesman tcday said At Buying Pcints N. D. $O8P 4. Ss

the United Sta.es would like}
to have reciprocal news cover- Growers who gaalify for Incentive Bonus will
age expanded, not centracted, jan additional .25¢ ver Ib. |

in both countries. | —

The Sovie.s announce |

yesterday that the TIME
correspondent had been told
two leave tne U.S.S.R. fer
what was described as aj
“slanderour” story abcu t|
Lenin. No deadline was |
se. for his depacture. (USIS) |



ceive

AL D. BOYD,
General Mea er

| DOMINI A BANS NA. GROWERS ASSN,
oth May, 1964.

May 16.





ADVERTISE IN. THE HER. ALD



~ Sierra Leone Gift for Queen. Why Don't We Do Likewise ? 2







The Governrrent of Sierra Leone has presented 2 hand-made volume centain-
ing the country’s new postage stamps to Queen Elizabeth II. The album,
was handed to the Duke of Edinburgh at Buckingham Palace, London, by
Sierra Leone’s Minister of Communications, Mr, C.B. Rogers. Wright.

The new stamps are uvique in two ways—they are shaped as the outline map.
of Sierra Leone ard they are self-adhesive. A similar book for Queen Eliga/
Feth the Qreen Moiher was also handed to the Duke at the ceremony.

- Britain Beats Finland At Wembley







British hurdlers Michael Parker and Latte Taitt (second and fourth 1 aber):
streak away to defeat two Finnish athelets—BIS ° ; 3 -

fy



PAGE FOUR

A STRING OF AID ina White Paper
(From:— “Venture’’, Fabian International And
Commonwealth Burea Publicaticn)





HEN a Labour Government comes to power in Bri-
tain it will endeavour to increase considerably the
aid given directly by Britain, and also internationally, to the
newly develeping countries. A Labour Government will
almost cettainiy carry cut aa carly reorganisation to esta-
blish a better co-ordination cf the granting and _ receiving
of that aid. There is, indeed, a case for re-examining. the
present too separated mechanisms for making free grants, fcr
naking repayable, interest bearing loans 2nd for making
technical assistance available to the new countries. Greater
harmonising of these different kinds of help would be all
to the good.

Meanwhile it is as well to take stock of somes of the
assistance Britain has given and is giving to the developing
countries, for they indicate the level of aid that has’ to
raised. Considerable data on present aad past help can
be found, and deserves to be studied, in the recently issued
United Kingdom White Paper. Aid to Developing Coun-
tries (Cmd. 2147, price 3s., published by the Stationery
Office, London). This White Paper was presented to
Parliament by the Chief Secretary to the United Kingdom
Treasury, presumably one of the surveyors, if not the co-
ordinator, of overseas aid-giving by Britain. The docu-
ment also contains a nymber of thoughts on the theory and
praetice of aid te new countries. This cult too deserves
careful and: critical study; -

Upward Trend ‘

The’ Treasury finds it useful to regard overseas aid as
part of Britain’s total overseas expenditure. From the



spending, and this includes repayment of borrowiligs—by
the United Kingdom, maintenance of large forces overseas
(estimated at about £30 million for the current - financial
year), diplomatic expenditure and subscriptions to ' overseas
otganisations including the United Nations. Thus
Britain’s disbursements overseas, including aid and the
other expenditures amounts to about £500 million yearly,
of which aid accounts for almost one third. The total
amount isan important sum in Britain’s balance, or
attempted balance of payments.

To set against these payments outwards, there are
some comparatively small payments inwards. Since the
end of the war and up till the current year Britain has
provided aid totalling £1,367 million. During the same



period Britain has received about £110 million in repay-

ment of

pee on account of overseas loans and about
£50 milli

on in interest.
Aid Is Expenditure

Britain’s aid to overseas countries has increased almost
every year since the end of the last war. The trend is
shown in Table 1.

' Table 1.
BRITAIN’S OVERSEAS AID

Year

ZL, million
I95I- §2 ee an 62
19$6-—$7 “ “ a
1960-——61 ae i I§1
1961— 62 ve 160
1962 —63 Las 148

The White Paper explains that the drop in aid given
in 1962—63 was-due to overseas governments not beirg
able, for one reason or another, to take up the finance made
available to them. ‘This applied particularly to that part
of our aid programme that is made up of loans: grants are
generally disbursed promptly.” ,

The White Paper has some interesting things to sav
about tied and united aid.

se Sa lec cian nino Sareea ta is

‘of the Export Credits Guarantee Department.
ran to wt: wee . d ?

DOMINICA, HERALD





IN THEIR OWN HANDS

However massive the scalz on which aid is
given, it can fulfil no more than a marginal role in
the eccnomic progress of the developing courtries.
The main effort is coming, and must continue to
come, from the peoples of those lands. It is in their
own hands that their facture must lie, now and in
the generations that are yet to come.

—-from Aid to Develcping Countries,
September, 1963.



About half of Britain’s capital aid to overseai_ countries
is not tied, and most of this maney is not spent directly by
the receiving country on paying for imports, but goes to
help meet their budgetary deficits or the local cost of deve-
lopment projects. Recently, however, the British Govern-

to finance imports from Britain’s industrial competitors,
unless Britala cannot supply the required goods or services.
on competitive terms. Britain’s aid given mulkilaterally —
through international ins:itutions — is not tied.

About one sixth of money provided for aid is for
technical assistance, and only a part of this is a direct charge
against the United Kingdom’s balance of payments.

The amount of aid that is formally tied to the purc'1ase
of United Kingdom goods and services represents about
one quarter of Britain’s annual overseasaid. Last
year, for example the tied aid would
have amounted to about £37 million. This
tied aid consists of loans to independent countries both
within the Commonwealth and outside it, under the Ex-
port Guarantees Act, 1949, as amended in 1957. These

- Treasury point of view how much expenditure on aid _ it Joans are not to be confused with export credit insurance

. tf
orise has to be measured against. other overseas

Under the
eG “s + ; us He_sng in he United
Kingdom ‘over a wide range cf commodities agreed upon —
with the reeeiving country. (This is an arrangement that
seems to have annoyed Dr. Eric Williams, Prime Ministe:
of Trinidad, not a little, about a year ago.)

41

Table 2
EXAMPLES OF AID RECEIVED FROM
BRITAIN IN _ 1962-63
£,000

Country Grant ‘Loan *
Tosbya.---is “ach 3,250 —
Bechuanaland {,898 225
Kenya 7,622 4,495
Ghana 158 743
Nyasaland 1,$11 325
Trinidad 155 -——
Brazil ey, — 1,300
British Guiana 723 1,749

India 4 434 2315

- The White Paper makes the point thas if Britaia has
surplus industrial capacity then aid which has to be spent
on the purchase of British goods and services imposes less
of a burden om Briain’s baiance of payments than does aid
which the recipient country is free to spend where it pleases.
The British Governmen: claims tat it has taken steps
intended to match British surplus industrial capacity with
the needs of the developing nations and last year-the Gov-
ernment announced that it would increase aid along these
lines. Under this arrangement India has bought from
Britain steel plates, Pakistan sugar machinery, Ghana cargo
boats, Nigeria steel rails, and the East African Common
Setvice Organisation diesel locomotives and waggon ferries.
These transactions were all financed by tied loans,

These things notwithstanding, the British Government
has declared that is it prepared to take part in a genuine
international move towards untying aid.

(Cont. on page 9)

SATURDAY, MAY 16, 1964



A Shert Story

Gout. releases nowadays take on more
and more the aspects of short stories.
We publish a recent felicitous example.
(No. 123-64) — Ed.

“Never never let your chiidren
down by not: sending tiem to
schocl every days This is your
supseme duty. Education is t:o
imporrant a thing for us to negiect
it.”

These words, addressed by the
Honourable W. S. Stevens, Minister
for Labonr and Social Services, at
the village of Wotton Waven on
24th April toa crowd ct almost
Too residents, about half of them
scheol children, must have been
heard by them many times before
and might weli nave continued to
sound meanivgless, especially in the

be ment has taken steps to see that suck monies are not spent context of the awful weather condi-

tions of the last few cays but fer che
new school brought it long last
to their doorsteps by Government to
eliminate the five-mile journey to
Roseau undertaken in all but frohi.
bitive weather i:s the past.

Mr, Decius Bedneau, Manager of
the Wotton Waven Estate for the
last 19 years and himself a facher of
ten children, obviously deeply moved

y the occasion, voicing the senti-
ments of gratitude and - satisfaction
on behalf of the villagers. referred to
the school: as the long-awaited an-
swer to their prayers. ‘““We- have
always been longing and praying
and hoping for a_little school in the
village, hovever,” continued. Mr.
Bedneau, “by the grace of Almighty
God and the keen foresight ot the
Honourable Chief ‘Minister and
with his very. wise and noble deci
achieving this wonderful institution.”

In weather. as perfect as could be,
which bore a stiking contrast to the
week-long showers to which the
night before was no exceptioa, Mr,

| OVA. Walker, the Educaticn

Officer, who presided at the func-
lion, extending a hevrty’ welcome to
all and especfally the guests from
Roseau who inciuded His Honour
the Administrator, Colonel Alec
Lovelace, the Honourable Chief
Minister, Mr. E.C. Leclanc and
Mrs. LeBlanc, the Honourable W.
S. Stevens, Minister fcr ‘labour and
Social Services and Mrs. Stevens,
the Henourable R P St. Luce,
Minister without Portfoilio, Mr, and
Mrs. Ronald Clarke, Mrs. and Mrs.
L.A. Brand, Mr‘and Mars‘ J.
Law,ence, and the Principa! Secre-
tatis, Mrs C A Sothdinde (and
Mrs. Sorhaindo), Mc. C.A. Lege
moret and Mr. C.A, Mayaard.

The but‘ding was formally open-
ed by Mrs. LeBlanc who was pre-
sented a bouquet by attractive Miss
Mavis Xavier of the village. The
ptincipal speakers were the Minister
for Labour and Social Services, the
Administrator and the Chiet Minis-
ter. ‘Tne vote of thanks was suitably
moved by ' Miss Fliza George, the.
newly appointed School Tezcher’
Her icference to the Minster’ for
Labour and Social Services a3. “a
bulmark behind anything that per
tains to education” was greeted with
long and loud appiause.

With — refreshments served, a
function that obvionsly gave great
delight co all concerned was brought
to a happy ciose.

SUPPORT THE
HERALD



| SATURDAY, MAZ 16, 1964



The Man Who Pitched Bcitles

(A Short Story)
Cont. from page 3

Igev. The bell in his brain rang at last. “What
does he want, Miss?” Dampierte bit back a groan.

“He ask you ta bring over a tray of bieakfast to the
police station, he is hungry. This is Policewsman Gemma
Kangadoo.”

“Well, hell!” exclaimed Mr. Dampierre. ‘Excuse
me, Miss. What trouble is Iggy in 2”

_ “Picching bottles at the Oval,” said the sweet flat
voice, sounding enigmatically sympathetic. Then she
‘hung up. -

Hon, Mr. Dampierre breakfasted with two early-rising
colleagues who were churchward-bound: it was Sundav.
They, too, had slept tensely (they said) after the ferocious
cricket match, but they had not dreamed of heroism, neither
had they been asked to take a tray of breakfast to the poiice

station. One of them advised Mr. Dampierre: ‘Damn
sauce. Leave him lie’? But the second, a loval Smider

M. P., said cautiously, “Isn’t he your constituent 2”

“My best banana-heeder,” said Mr. Dampierre gloomi-
ly. So before leaving the dinirg-room he comproraised by
signalling a waiter and ordering a package of thick assorted
sandwiches. When the taxi deposited him at the policz
station, he saw Iggy at once, and the ceunter between them
served as.a breakfast table. Iggy looked a liule roughed-
up, but was smiling confidently, like a man who has faith
in his legislator. ‘iclling the tale (while he munched) of
how he arrived very, late at ‘yesterday’s cricket-match and

didn’t even see Sinlal run out, he, described how he heard.

a big comesse just like carnival and saw hundreds of people
. pitching botles. They jrmped up and yelled “Sinlal not
out! ~ Sinlal doan out!” — naturally ‘he jumped up and
shouted too !. i: As Mera ke =
“And you pitched bottles too,’ said Mr. Damoierre
f° i
iggy denied this absolutely. ‘An’ me holin’ my rew
bicycle lamp im my one:han’ and my new bicycle p:mp in
the other 2 Is late I was late because I chain-up the bike
hard to the railing.’ Is only jump up I jump up. When
people run I run. Police ketch me because I laughin’ too
much, I tell them, is only me alone you-all goin hole ?
That véx them.” | Iggy took a fine bite out of a beef sand-
wich.

For many days from that fatal morning, Mr. Dam-
pierre’s main pre-occupation was the case of Iggy. He
made submissions to conference in short order and attended
the Magistrate’s Court, accompanied by an observer Q. C.,
and later he attended H. M. Gaol, for despite early hopes

_ Iggy was severely sentenced. It would cost two hundred
and forty dollars to pay his fine and extricate him. Worse,
Mr, Dampicrte was given the charge of Iggy’s bicycle. It
was the bicycle wlach had first convinced our worthy legis-

‘lator of Iggy’s innocence. He knew when tke - prosecutor

barked “But you had a glass object in your haid — the .
‘officer saw it fash — «nd a stick in the other — didn’t you

pitch?’ That Iggy would never have thrown his new
lamp and pump at anybody. But poor Iggy was worse
than unconvincing as a witness. He never even mentioned
his lamp and pump! When he was given a grand oppor-
wunity by the question, “did you yourself believe Sinlal was
run out or did you not?” Iggy did not even hesitate or
reply truthfully that he never thought at all or (with greater
cunning) “he was cut.’? He simply torned on his confi-
dent smile and said in an echo of that exciting last moment,
“he doan out.” .
Meaawhile the community and the press had decided
that the bottle-pitching was the work of wicked Smiders,
worthy only of deportation. Radio voices quivered with
national indignation at such unsporting behaviour. How-
ever even Mr. Dampierre’s sceptical Smider colleagues had
swung ronnd to the belief that Iggy was a harmless scape-
goat, suffering for the sins of all Smiders and covering up
for local malefactors. Reluctantly but nobly, Hon. Mr.
Dampierre paid thé fine and the legal expenses, moving
into a boarding-house to conserve his subsistence allowance.

DOMINICA HERALD







——n,

‘Peter OQgden’s Day
The Grand United Order
of Odd Fellows and House-

. PAGE FIVE

Iggy was taken from the prison and deported in a schoone!
to his home island. He left his bicycle behind, and Mr.
Dampierre elecied to travel back by ship to accompany it.
Such are the trials of ho:iourable members. i
If Mr. Dampierre had subcensciously expected a, oe O, t a Bate eeetrated
thankful Iggy to return to heading bananzs for hi:n, he was | a i ey a on May
misiaken. The hero of botile-pitching speedily accepted 2 i a =o i. ue . t ne
labourer’s job in the public works department. ee ns oe ae ne a
Nevertheless Iggy’s gratitude was genuine; he appeared by Rev ra re
en Sundays and made a flowzr-bed in front of Mr. Dam-! ° The. vaeeiciaral agian ae
pierre’s house, to which every year in office added both tf, finee:™ played By
superstructure and amenities. On public holidays he} their band were to the strains
accompaaied his legislator on a tour of the constituercy,| 6S. Barin Gould’s
wh'ch included Iggy’s natal village. There Iggy made his uOneard Christen Cal,
first political speech, graphically describing the prison break-| giers”. Afeer the service
fast and other details. This was sensationally well received, | men bee teesied to hae
although other villages became slightly disenchanted with Lodge for acai ‘
tke history. Mr. Damgierre finally made Iggy chairman DY Cua
of his rural meetings in order to curb his oratory. But bn
everyone knows that Smider chairmen have te opportunity aie te oe
to make not just one, but at least six speeches on public NOTICE a

occasions.
Iggy now wore jacket-style shirts with pleats down the, BOTANIGAL GAROENS
ATTENTION MOTORISTS !!!



front, had a new hairstyle, and won a prize at the Cinema
Talent Show for singing Dan is the Man in the Wan with
yreat feeling and humour. He was popular; he had








several girl-friends, and Mz. Dampierre thought it his duty During the 1964
to worn him against dubious associations and to remind Windward Islands
him of the soundness of a healthy. agricultural career. Goodwill Cricket

Tournament onl v
limited parking
space will .be..avail-
able inside: the: Gar-
-dens, around: :the
ficus tree South West.
of the cricket pitch. ~
" arriving -
late will.-be..request- —
ed to.park.their cars
| outside. nF a
This will help to
prevent deteriora-
tion of the lawns.
Your kind co-opera-
tion will be greatly
appreciated.
‘STANLEY O. PRINGLE
Acting. Agricultural
Superintendent.
———_-————

SEMPERIT TYRES

several weeks. srctiass!
One week-day when Mr. Dampierre had received the
overdue appointment of Minister without Portfolio after the
incumbent Minister had fallen off a donkey into a ravine,
Iggy strolled into nis office. He had sucha liberated
whute-collar look that the new Minister asked at _once,
+ eee serene Tome eft the public works long,
tume,” Iggy replied, laughing. He went on to explain
that he had gone back to the land like Mr. Dampierre had
advised him. A lady had given him to manage hee
property, not so far from Mr. Dampierre’s cwn small estate.
The new Minister was duly impressed, and also. to a
cettain extent proud. He really felt that what he had done
for Iggy had been a good human investment, Certainly
the young man had never looked back since he had been
rescued from the gaol. “‘How’s your bicycle?” asked -. Mr.
Dampierre fondly, remembering that dismal Sunday when|_
he had unchained Iggy’s bike from the Oval railings and
tethered it in front of the boarding-house to depreciate his.
own sccial status. !

“I got a motorbike now,” said Iggy. “And later,
is a jeep Tl trade it for.”

After this litle lecture, fzgy was not seen around for









ana

“Your new employer must have money!” exclaimed TUBES IN STOCK

Mr. Dampierre. 150 x 20 825 x 20
“Not money — but plenty land. She and me goin oe We. aun
: : ; : 600 x 16 . 620 x 14
to martied— is because she modern. Not like the girls 750 x 16 590 x. 14
you spoke against. She tole me her manager can sleep by 700 x:20 500 x 15
her at her mother house, but no man sleepin there v-ithout 640 x 13 860 x 15
the Church, the ring and the paper. Is comeI come to 670 x 15 590 x 15

Very Attractive Prices.
S. P. MUSSON SON
- & CO. LTD.

ask you to the weddin, because you brought me my break- |
fast in prison and...” His confident voice enumerated
Mr. Dampierre’s good deeds, like an obituary notice.

Hon. Mr. Dampierre (who was still an unmarried
father) was visibly moved by such during allicd to senti-
ment. ‘Oh! Ofcourse, of course, Iggy! I'll be
delizhted!”

“Now take it light and doan ride no donkeys,” ” said

Iggy in an exact reproduction of Mr. Dampierre’s admoni-
tory tone. “Still for all, God dispose,'so if you meet UP |-not contact -D. J. B. Bruney (popu-
with any: accident, is a modern married man the people is| larly known as- Brother Bruns),
looking for. Be certain sure, Honourable, Iggy will never | 48 Steber Street, Pottersville for
let you down.” ; top quality workmanship.

Moderate Prices.

For reference contact Dominica

Cooperative Bank or Mr. Ted Honey-

church, =
. Signed D. J. B. BRUNEY.

Mar. 21, Apr. 4, 18, May 2, 16, 30

Tel. 360



7 ee

Contractor’s Services

When you want to build, be it a
business place, a dwelling house or
renovation in. or out of town you
need a Builder Contractor. Why

~ Advertisers are asked to submit copy
by noon on Wednesdays

—_—_—_—_————>



PAGE SIX

ery we





DOMINIGA WERALD

DOMINICA HERALD





— =

AN INDEPENDENT WEEKLY

31 New Street, Roszau.
Published by 1. MARGARTSON CHARLES, Proprictor
PHYL? IS SHAND ALLFREY
U.K & European Representative — Colin Turner (London) Led.

Editor — rs.

*

307

Tei.

*

122, Shaftesbury Ave , London W. 1

Annual Subscripticns ¢
Overseas

Town $5.00 Country $6.00
(" arface Mail) $7.50

ET SATURDAY, MAY 16, 1964

T is interesting to note that the followisg
| lines from the well-known hymn All
Things Bright And Beautiful have been de-
leted from some modern hymn books:

Tha rich man in bis castle, the poor
man at bis gate,

God ‘made them, bigh or lowly,
and ordered their estate.

The permanence of hereditary poverty
as of hereditary wealth is not a popular
concept nowadays, when equal opportuni-
ty for all is the cry.

A recent Government telease
(No. 7264) informed the public thai the
‘Secretary of State had approved a C.D. &
W. grant of $360,000 for the construction
of five and a half miles of feeder roads —
Rosalie-Grand Fond and Bagatelle-Petite
Savanne. Arithmetic tells us that this

works out at $65,000 pet mails, and Stace
3 C [ SSRs eet (4
ate shown. as feeder roads on the Ordin-
ance Survey) the cost of grading and
widening these new highways to admit
~ larger vehicles seems excessive.




Other figures released give $14,000 fox
two and a half miles of Warner Road,
and $8,000 for Neba-Attlee — named as
feeder roads too. What is the reason for
such a fantastic difference in cost? Of
the last two ccads mentioned, we under-
stand that some peasants are loyally wa‘v-
ing compensation claims, giving free
labour and even contributing cash, as they
have been doing elsewhere in Dominica.

a

People’s Post

i ir j ; Idressess as

Correspondents are asked to submit their. full names and ad
a uananee OF goud faith. but not necessarily for pubsication. Letters should
Coniroversiai politicai lette+s will not ve pub-
* do not necessarily

be as short as possible

lished anonymously. Views expressed in People’s Po

reflect the policy of the Editor or the Proprietor.



—_—_————_—3 >

“HIGH ROADS AND LOW ROADS ~

_ From an unofficial source. we learn that
of the sum allocated for the two roads
mentioned in our second paragraph, ap-
proximately ene-third is set aside for com
pensation of landowners along the trail; if
this is correet, $120,000 of Colonial De-
velopment and Welfare money is beiag
handed out to the very estate owners or
proprietors who will benefit most by hav-
ing their roadlinks put into conditioyi.
We have heard that the iowly contribute
— but do the high exact their pound of
flesh 2

There may be other good explanations,
which Government has not yet seen fit to
release, for this discrepancy in costs of
road-building; but for the sake of the
public and particularly of those “small
landowners who have come forward to
make their humble contribution, surely it
would be pertinent to know the break-
down of these costs. Let Government
put its cards on the table quickly, and

Togress, as
fine

We applaud the spirit of co-operation
which causes farmers tc contribute to im-
proving their roads and agree that it may
be (to quete the same release) “regarded
as a revGlutionary change in the attitude
of the people towards Government.”
Now we look forward to a revolutionary
change in the attitude of Government
towards the people: why not treat, them
like adults and tell them all the facts, and
abov: all treat them alike, whatever the

order of their estate 2





well as those planned for the





——-—___—_

Guiana. This will include
over a 100,000 tons of fice
for the several islands, thus
eliminating not having a
supply of rice regularly as
happened here for the past



The Federal Ships

Sir-Madam,

Articles appearing in the
Dominica Chronicle and the
DominicA HERALD state
that it is suggesed to sell
these ships). This may
emanate from a well inten
tioned mind, but an old
adage says “A bird in the
hand is worth more than two
in a bush.”

We know the operational
cost for the two vessels and
can plan to reduce this
further. As stated, the ships
cost $2.5 million to operate

or $.79 per capita, taking the

| population a8 3,126,637.
(This can, mean a heavy
expenditure on some of the
islands; but when the oppor-
tunities and benefits that can
be derived are taken into
consideration, is it not worth
a further trial?

It therefore remains that a
co-cperative effort should
investigate allavailable
sources where contracts can
be made with the several
islands arouad including
French, Dutch, and Ameri-
can for passengers and freight.

few weeks. Im pozts of
cement etc., can also be con-
sidered. I understand it is
the duty of the islands to
provide transportation for
their rice. “Then why not
use the Federal ships?

It is imperative that the
vessels be utilized fully so as
to reduce the burden on _ the
islands. Hence, instead of
being kept as semi-luxury
vessels, the set up can easily
be changed. The back por-
tion of the First Class can be
made for Second Class

Again we have freight and | passengers thereby eliminating

passengers begging for regular | having practically e¢ m pt y

transportation from British!cabins most of the time. It
/ f : 3 ;

can be considezed also ic
curtail the useless «vaiting at
some of the ports.

The question of crews must
also be carefully considered
as now there are only two
crew units (probably this can
be reduced in number; if the
suggestion of fcur smaller
ships is accepted, then there
will will be four crew units
instead of two, and as is
known further complications
and implications will arise.

My suggestion is to keep
the birds in hand and try for
more income.

Yours,
Temprary Guest, Goodwill
(from B. G.)

oo
The Ganadian
Gift Ships

Sir,

It is alleged (though not
confirmed) that some of the
political leaders of British
Honduras are quite keen
upon having the two beauti-
ful Federal Ships acquired
for their somewhat isolated
country; although it is fully
visualized that their annsal
maintainance would be a ire-
mendous financial loss to the





aa

men have broadly realized
that in the interest of nacional
pride and trade, etc., the ac-
quisition will definitely be
beneficial from all angles of
socialism and tourism.
NEWS-REVIEWER, Roseau
(Other letters on this subject
will appear next week. —Ed.)

$$

A Threat & An Eyesore

Madam Editor, -.- Are the eyes of
those concerned “Dim” that they
cannot see, or, are they waiting for
an “Incident?”

Right at the entrance of the Cas-
‘Je Bruce village lies an old Wooden
Bridge in the most deplorable candi-
tion, w‘th ciacked seals and iails off

‘completely on boih sides, supported

by two dry stakes.
Those who most often face this
and other detrimental features are

(x) Children of all ages and sizes off ~

to school who use this bridge
daily, even in the flood,

(2) Visitors from all parts of the Is-
land on public Holidays all day
long and overnight.

(3) Banana Growers with their hea-
vy loads’on banana days, risk-
ing their lives.

What a disgrace to the Community!
We all recall not long ago 4 similar
public Irresponsibility resulted in the
death and injury of villagers at the

Castle Bruce Spring bridges.

We are disgusted at such public
irresponsibility.
OLIvER AG. SANDERSON,
Castle Bruce
7. 5. 64

SATURDAY, MAY 16, 1964

rect, those sagacious states _

ee

| Improved Tele-

phone Service?

Dear Ed ‘tor,

The terters of telephon>
throughout the Noithern
District and all the inhabitant
ate glad indeed for the report
in the issue cf your paper fo:
Saturday the 2nd of Mr,
F.H, Reynolds. Area
Telephone Engineer of Cable
and Wireless who secently
visiced this Colony and
made a general survey of our
Tequiremenss so far as our
telephone system in this
Colony are concerned

As we have during recents
months contended, and are
still contending with many
inconveniences due to the un-
sausfactory condition of our
telephone department, which
we are bearing with patience;
we hope the time’ shall not
be too long when Mc. F. H.
Reynold’s visit shall bear
fruit to the modern insiala-
tion system fot an improved
telephone department ‘for this
colony and for which the
inhabitants of the entire
North shall be thankful. -

A NORTHERN TELEPHONE
RENTER



industry
Madam,

Having- kept | very
silent over Mr. Pat Pie.re’s
suggestion of a Sugar Fac-
tory for Dominica, I am in-
clined to say 2 few words on
this difficult undertaking.

‘Some years ago, I would

never advise avy company to
undertake such a project here,
due to labour, lack wf roads,
and world market. But
today v.ich improvement of |
toads, modern machinery and
the sugar situation in Cuba
which I call a ‘wash out’
and possibly may remain so,
as long as this wlcked Castro
is in power, I thick it is a
wise move, especially, if we.
can obtain foreign investors
to come in. Such a project
may cost 3 to 5 million del
lars, and the site may be
more suitable-in one of the
following estates: Canefield, '
Check H-ll or Grand Sav-
annah. All estate owners
over the island should be
called upon to co-operate.
Many thanks.
_ HUGH LAWRENCE
(Cont. on pa,e 7)

DON’T DEPEND ON YOUR
NEIGHBOUR’S — BUY
YOUR OWN DOMINICA
HERALD!!!)



SATURDAY, M/.% ‘16,



1964



CERGLE FRANGAIS

Chaque mardi aprésmidi, de 5.30 h. a 6 h., chez la
Présidente 'R. Issa, King George V St.. les membres du
Cercle Francais auront Poccasion d’emprunter les livres et

magazines offert par |’ Altiance Francaise.

Pour le moment

la petite bibliotheque du Cercle Francais eraport les livres

suivant:— °
Renée Massip
B. de Kerraoul
Le Clesio
J. Chardonne
J. Guehenno
E. Peisson
R. de Luppe
R. Dorgeles

P. Moinot
H. Bosco

P. Elanger
P. Molaine
C. Audry
Frison-Rache
M. Genevoix



SHOWPIECE

The Man Who
Knew Too Much

Directed by Alfred J.
Hithchcook -

By Our Film Reported “CHRIS.”

James Stewart playing his part of
a Dector, with lovely: Dons Day (as
his wife) and their kid were just
newcomers to the: ccuntry, how did
they become involved in’ a murder

, alta .cS . ty
with a population of 230,000, third
chief town of Morocco”, to take
place in London?

. ‘The incident occurred - on a bus
leaving Casablana “740,000 inhabit-

_ants of all classes, aad creeds’* en

- route to Marrakesh. Suddenly their
son pulled off a veil covering a wo-
man’s face -— the traditional cus-
tom, — causing a small quarrel.

Not knowing the language, a cer-
tain unknown gentleman named
“Bella” gained friendship with the
Doctot and_ his family, later inviting
them {0 ciuner; Fut they declined,
having metin the hetel another
Amencan family involved in the
plot who had been stationed in
Marrakesh for along time: they
dined at the hotel.

Towing Marrik:sh with their new
American friends was great fun; sight
—seeinz-acrocats, snake charmers
story-tellers; and they saw the famous
Domed Containers and Icng-neckad
veses shaped from creamy white clay,
exquisite Mosaics andhammer
polished brass implements.

In one intense moment the whole
scene changed. The police were
chasing two an identified men. In
their efforts to escape, one man was

exhausted and was stabbed by his

other friend in order to keep secrets
untold.

Faintly staggering to the Doctor,
the stabbed man was identified (after
a mud-covered face was_ wiped off)
as Bella. In agony he gave the
Doctnr a message. From there the

Doc was called by the police to be’

questioned, but (through his fear) he
Kept the secret. He was amazed to
be contacted by telephone by a cer-
tain man and. threatened to keep his

mouth shut or something might hap-,

pen to his kidnapped sor.

. . L’Epervier

... La Béte Quarternaire
... Une Si Juste Mort
..« Le Proces-Verbal
. . Demi-Jour
. Ce que Je Crois
. Le Caval‘er Nu
. . Camus
- Au Beau Temps
de la Butte
. Le Sable Viv

. Aventnriers et Favorites
. Jai Révé de Lumiere
. Derriere la Baignoire
. Le Raft
. . Derriére les Collines.

In his effort to save his son's life,
the Doc and his wife _ lett for Ion-
don — where more dangers awaited.

The American covple, new citi-
zens of Marrakesh, hed already fled
to England, and to che Dec’s
amazement this man was a parson,
‘ais daughter a pianist and his wife a
money-ccllector in a Church. Doc
goes through many tribulations, in a
struggle with these incredible people.
While his wife made a vital effort to
contact the police, the church con-
gtegation was dismissed, and violent-
ly the Doctor fought, but ‘was out-
numbered and knocked off. He

cr

passing through the belfry...

Ip the Palladium where | a great
orchestra wes to perform in the pre-
sence of the Ambassador, (who
was to be murdered at a clash of
cymbals), the timing for the murder
was well-planned, Fortunately, the
Doc arrived io tme and the
Ambassador’s life was saved,

In her efforts to rescue their son,
Doc’s wife “Doris Day” gave an
honorary performance of hex classi-
fied hit-song “What will be, will
be,” Her httle son identifying her
voice, was amazed and telieved!
Hearing his whistle, his father broke
through a door in the top floor and
found his son. Returning to his
wife, they were captured but Doc —
“Western fighter with a lot of stunts”,
disarmed his oppenent, and with
one punch set him rclling down the
stairs. Then came the joyful mom-
ent of having their son restored to
the parents.

ee

People’s Post from p. 6
Pen Pals Wanted

Pte. Bushay C. 4,,
23977024 “A” Coy,
1st. BN Worc’s Regiment,
B.F, P. O. 29,
Germany.
Dear Madam,

I would like to have
correspondents (ages 1% — 30)
from your island, which I hope to
visit in the near future.





| Editor's Replies: Ta “A Member”

Portsmouth. We are unable. to
pzblish your letter or legal reasons,
To Anthony F. Joseph of 1 CCWU:
we cannot promise to publish any
material until we Have read and con-
siderep it Ts “Housewife’’; Grand-
bay, also “‘Synspathiser” and school
corresponts, Pichelin} we regret that
Jetters cannot be printed this week,
for space reasons.



i

Commenwealth
Youth -- Roseau

With a considerable atten-
dance of — school-children
and group members, Com-
menwealth youth Sunday
celebration -in the botanic
gatdens, Roseau, was quite
successful. Deputising for
His Honour the administra-
was the Attorney Genetzl
Hon. D. K. Macintyre.

Commencing at 4.00
p-m., the National Anthem,
was played by the Music
Lovers Government Band;
afterwards, the Queen’s
message was read. Next on
the programme was the
reading of the Administra-
tor’s letter. .

“When the knights were

still in spurs? and “I. vow :

to thee, my Country”

were
be ucif

“ accompaniment of the Band.

--And Colihaut

CoLtinsuT observed
Youth Sunday with a gather-
ingof school chiidren
teachers and P-c Bedminister,
with Scout H. Edwards
Y. C. W’s and other mem-
bers of the functions all in
uniform also many villagers
attending. The ccremony
started with Mass, sung’ by
the Revd. Fr. Boghaert and
choir members ef Colihaut.

The message from Her

DOMINICA HERALD

| the Parish Priest, as well as
the days gospel as real by a
layman of the Church (Mr.
. R, Lecointe) se vera!
canticles znd the National
Anthem were sung in the
Church. At the end of the
Mass there was a village
parade conducted by the
Head, Teacher Mr. ing,
and supported by the village
orchestra, after which a
second assembly was held ar
Colihaut cricket ground.
Mr. King then delivered
the Commonwealth message
from the Rt. Hon. De La
ware G.B.E; this was
followed by an address by
Mr. F.R. Lecointe. A
few more songs were then
sung, photographs were
taken aud the function was
brought toa close. --(Contrib)

Commonwealth
Youth Sunday
Gelebrations At
Soufriere

COMMONWEALTH Youth
Sunday was observed with
gteat pomp and eclat in the
Village of Soufriere this year.

His Honour’s presence at
the Ceremony added gran-



4

sion. At 3 p.m. a special

_ mass. was celebrated by the

Parish ‘Priest.. Duzing this
service a Choir of: teachers
and pupils led the:singing of
hymns with Mr. ‘Guiste at
the orga. The Common-
wealth Youth Sunday prayer
was said and everycne was
treated to a touching patriotic
address by the ‘Parish Priest.
The service ended with the
National Anthem.

On the Church grounds
a programme of 14 items
was yone through without a
hitch. His Honour arrived
punctually at 4 p.m. when



Majesty the Queen having Joy bells gave the signal of
been read and explained by bis arrival. Met at the

Visit Of H.R.H. The Duke Of Edinburgh

Tue following is text of a Buckingham Palace release contained in
an announcement addressed to His Honour the Administrator and received
by telegram from the Secretary of State fo: Commonwealth Relations aad
the Colonies: —

“His Royal Highness the Duke of Edinburgh will visit Mexico, the
Galapagos Islands (Ecuador), Paaama and a number of the islands of the
West Indies during the Autumn of this year. His Rcyal Highness’s plan-
ned itinerary is: <

Nassau brief overnight stop on October 2oth. Mexico 21st—Ocio-
ber 29th. Galapagos Islands 2nd—Nov, 4th. Panama 7th—Nov. oth.
Trinidad and Tobago 9th.—Nov. 11th. Grenada r1th ~- Nov. 12th.
St. Vincent 12th.—-Nov. 13th. Barbados 13th—Nov. 14th. St. Lucia



Tama Negro, 5’ 9” tall, of November 15th. Dominica Nov. 16th. St. Kitts and Montserrat Nov-

brown complexion, black _ hair,
brown eyes~ and weighing about
18516. Iwas, born on ts June
1943, in America, and my mother
was a Trinidadian. I am a private
soldier stationed in Germany.
Yours faithfully,
C.A. Bushay.

ember 17th. Antigua Nov. 18th, His Royal Highness will travel in the
Royal Yacth Britannia and an AVRO 748, Aircraft of the Queen’s flight
arriving back in the United Kingdom from Antigua on November roth
by scheduled air line flight.

Because of His Royal Highness’ other commitments it has not been
found possible to include Jamaica in this tour but His Royal Highness hopes
very much that-he will visit the island in 1966 in his capacity as President
of the British Empire and Commonwealth Games,” (GIS)

PAGE SEVEN
threshold of the Church
grounds by the Hon’ble Pem-
berton and the Head Teach-
er of Soufriere. His Honour,
accompanied by his. wife,
walked to the saluting base.

His Honour addressed the
gathering explaining the
meaning of the Common-
wealth. He dilated on the
importance of Youth and
showed how the future de-
pends oa them. He exhort-
ed them to self dedication
anc Service to equip. them-
selves for. the challenging
times ahead.

The Soufriere and Scotts
Head Schools each rendered
a patriotic soug under the
direction of Mr. Guiste and
with che accompaniment of
the hand-organ ably — played
by Henrison james, aged 11.
a\ special original oehorus-
was presented by school «girls
dressed in native costumes:
and each carrying a basket of
local products,

Mrs. Simon, Head Teacher
of the Scotts Head School
moved an appropriate vote.
of thanks. The March past
was beautiful — Scouts,
Guides, Ked Gross-and pu-
pils all dressed in uniform

“presented a fine spectacle.
Asse James x. TT and ~
her two sons supplied music

during this item. .

The Programme. ended
with the singing of ‘the and
verse of the National Authem
followed by an entertainment
at the Church Hall. -

The Head Teachers of
both the Souftiere and
Scotts Head Schools, beg to
place on record their thanks
to first of all His Honour
whose presence enhanced the
occasion, The Soutriere
Development Committee for
their cooperation, the Parish
Priest for. placing the Church
Grounds at our disposal and
for all his other contribution,
the Police for - training our
pupils for that great show
and the last but not least the
parents who did their best to
fit their children. for. the
occasion and also for their
presence at the Celebrations.
(Contrib)

Training For
High Jumping

The first priority in training for
this event is the devolopment of
muscular strength particularly in the
legs. A good take-off is the factor
which ‘events most in jumping de-
heights and for this strong and mo-
bile legs are essential. Jumping
itself will develop these features but
more specific attention is needed,

‘Cont, om page 11





PAGE EIGHT |





The Failures Of W.I. Leadership

Talk by Sir Arthur
Lewis |
(formerly Principal of U.W.I.)

A report in the Guardian of April
25 ona talk by Sie Arthur Lewis,
noicd West Indian economist, to a
New York audience receutly, should
be read and studied by West Indians
everywhere, Sir Artiuc made some
telling and forthright c:1 1.isms on
West Indian pelitics and Jead rsh‘p
" Among other things, he said
that West Indians were extremely
difficult people to negetiate with,
All West Indians -— and this -n-
cludes you and = me — suffer from
an inferiority complex which results
in a very aggressive personality.

“The favourite occupation cf West
Indian politicians is calling people
names and prejudicing their good
faith and to do business with them

_is most wuapleasant.””

Sir Arthdy gaid. chat the normal
diplomatic courtesies are not known
to our people. ‘Therefore, anyone
who has to do business with West
Indian poliiicians shrinks from the
thought.”

Much Involved

Sir Agthur sa‘d his lecture was
a “brief history of negotiations for

the establishment of the Little Eight -

now known as the Little Seven”,
and that-it as written in ‘the first
person ‘singular 'bec: use he wes “very
-mach involved in the negotiations ””
_A fier: amaican referendum - --
p= Septem rors
1961. — he was a $1-a-year adviser
to Sir Grantley Adams with \ the
special task of travelling through-
out the West Indies to . find out
wheth:r, any of the other islands
wanted to continue in the Feaera-
tion in spite of Jamaica’s departure.
Tt was quite clear then that the
Governments of the, Windward and
Leeward Islands were willing to
continue in a Federation with Tri-
nidad — but not as a w aitary state.
None was willing to do so.

The Reason

The basic reason for that attitude
was because the islands had achieved
a new lease on life with the creation
of Ministries, Ministers wece tak:ng
an active part in local progress, and
the people were unwilling to see the
present powers handed over to some
distant power — whether it was
London .cr :T.ranided. They
thought the. transfer might result in
neglect.

Mr. Reginald 9 Maudling came to
Trinidad on Saturday, Januayy 73,
1962 to wind upthe talks. The
Executive Committee of the PNM
met the following day and passed a
Resolution, recommending that Tri-
nidad and Tobago should become
independent, but willing to take in
other islands as unitary states.

Maudling Hostile
On January 15, the representatives
of the Windward Islands met with
Dr. Eric Williams and decided to
tell the Seczetary of State that they
wanted the Little Eight Federation
instead of 2 ulmitary-state agreement
with Trinidad and Tobago. He, Sir
Arthur, was the one who took the
decision to Mr.. Maudling and Mr.
_Maudling was completely astonished

and hostile,
Maudling’s ‘stand reflected the
attitude of the








Colonial Cffice,.

which was in favour of th? unitary
state. But, said Sir Arthur, in
.terms of sheer cost, this did not
make atiy seuise.

The — British
wrong or the issue of cost.
the unitary state, civil
throughout the area would have to
be paid the same salarivs. Lut
Government salaries in Trinidad
were 30 per cent higher than taose
in the Windward and Leeward
{s'aads.

A Remarkable Chaige

However a most remarkable phe-
nomenon occurred. Mr. Maudling
changed his mind after the first week
in Trinidad. And, on the Friday
before he let, he said in a speech to
the Chamber of Commerce that
cederaticn of the Little Eight was che
besi solution

“T can’t tell you why Mr. Maud-
ling changed bis mind” Sir Arthur
said, “but it was a very good reason.
He told me,.. (he paused, looked
a.ound, saw the writer and said...
“but if I tell you, you will tell the
West Indian papers — and this will!
cause trouble.’’)

(There was much applause at
this statement about the tronble
which could be caused by the West
Indian newspapers.)

However, it took Mr, Maudling
more than three months to convince
the British Government that the
Little !sight idea was the ‘best’ solu-

Government was
Under
servatlis

tion, _ The ‘attitude. of the British
Government towa‘ds the West-Indies
t that time was a mixture.of.disoust..



and contempt. This is perfect
understandable since it is also the
attitude of a large proportion of the
people of the West ; Indies towards
their leaders.

Disgust And Contempt

’ In addition, West Indians felt
hu niliated by their teadets. And
that feeling of disgust and contempt
was also the attitude of most West
Indian politicians towards each other
at that times In mid-6r, towards
the end of the Lancaster Confer-
ence in England, the principal West
Indian politicians were literally not
speaking to each other.

Sir Arthur said that he served as
an instrumert of communication
among people who couldn't other -
wise communicate. And _ British
ettitude was understandable when
you revizw what had happenec

“The contempt and disgust which
the British Government had for
West Indian politicians were echoed
by West Indian politicians them-
selves, ‘they had similar feelings
about each other.”

A Wanton Act

Sir Arthur told the audience that
the first Federation meeting vas held
in 1947. West Indian _ politicians

‘talked about it for rz years. It came

into being in 1958. In 1967 they
destroyed it. But between 1958 and
1961 the objective situation had not
changed. It was a wanton act in
the eyes of the outside world, and in
a large part of the West Indies.

The British had therefore been re-
luctant to enter once more into a
whole new set of negotiations for an-
other federation. The Colonial
Office had been fed up with the
West Indies for a very long time,
and‘had already advised’ the politi-
cians tat from Federation cnwards
the West Indies must forget Britain



Y ute it was even too late to exploit

DOMINIC.4. HERALD



and look towards Canada and the

United States, :
Look To U.S., Canada

They had said specifically that from
the first day of Independence they
would pall out every Briti.h soldier
from the zrea, and the West Indies
must make arrangement. for their de-
fence with the United States. Any-
time any monetary discussions were
raised with the British ‘overnment
they would say “alright, we will talk
to U.S. and Canada to see what they
have to say,”

Ail that came to pass becouse the
British Government was taking the
line that the West Indics was now
part of the Western H-misphere, an
independent councry in the U,S. and
Canadian sphere of influence, and po
Ienger a matter of concern to the
British pcople. Maudling: had to
put up a prolonged struggle in the
British Cabinet before the Govern-
ment decided to start new negotia-
tions. The Islands couldn’t be kept
as colonies indefinitely, **because che
objective of the Briish Government
is to cid theiuselves of all colonies so
that it may join with the anti-colon-
jalist group at the United Nations.”

Another Alternative

Sic Arthur pointed out that it was
extremely difficult to have good gov-
ernment in islands which have only
$0,000 people. The only other al-
ternative for the little islands would
be for them to become absorbed in
the United Kingdom as counties.
From the Islands’point of view that
would be economically good, what
with free migration and access to the
British Trezssry.But. atthe lect_min-

that alternative.

The French West Inidies nad suc-
ceeded in becoming independent
while. hitching themselves to the
French Treasury. The American
West Indies had succeeded in be-
coming independent while hitching
themselves te the American Tieasu-
ty. The Netherlands West Indies
had succeeded in becoming indepen-
dent whilé hicching themselves to the
Dutch Treasury, ‘and the Cuban
W.I, had succeeded in becoming in-
dependent while hitching themselves
to the Russiax Treasury. ~

It was only the british West Indies
that had not succeeded in hitching
themselves to the British Treasury,
Quite reluctantly, th: British Gov-
ernment agreed to the Little Eight
formula.

No Defence Burden

Sir Arthur said that actually the
Littie Eight would have done more
for the Windward and Leeward Is-
lands while costing them Jess than
the original Federation of 1958. For
one they would not be saddled with
a very large defence burden.

With the original Federation, it
had been agreed that a relatively large
military force should be stationed in
Jamaica, not because the other islands
had to be protected “‘but because of
Cuba and all that”.

Unfair

It was unfair to the Windward
and Leeward Islands because they
were saddled with 15 per cent ef the
national budget although they only
had ro per cent of the population
within their borders, Therefore they
had been paying an unfair share of
Federal burden. ,

—FROM THE BARBADOS
BEACON
(To be continued)



SATURDAY, MAY 16, 1964

M—_—_—_

COLONY OF DOMINICA

TITLE BY REGISTRATION ACT
REGISTRY OF TITLES ISLAND OF DOMINICA
Schedule of Application for Ceruticae of Title and Notings
thereon and Caveats for the week ending the Yh div cf Mav. 1964.

Nature of ‘Request: whether
tor Certificate of Title
Notings thereon or Caveat.

‘Request for the issue of a first

\Ceruficate of Title (with plan

/ Michel Monique jattached) in respect of a pot-

4h May, 1964 | Gabriel tion of land situats in- the

1 Lown of Roseau, in zoe Parsi

Presented : by his Solicitor of St. George, in the Cvuloay

\ lof Dominica, containing 1974

Cilma A.M. Dupigny |square feet and «.ounded as

tollows;—On the North-East

by land of Ociavia Baron; On

the North-West by Cork Street; On tbe South by land of Hamilton

Rolle; and on the South West by land of Helen aad Susan Lockaart.

Registrat’s Office, / (Sgd) J. V. JEAN i IEKRE

Roseau, 5th May, 1964. Registrar of Titles,

NotTe:—Any person who desires to object to the issuing of a

Certificate cf ‘fitle on the above application may enter a Caveat at

the above office within six weeks from the date of the first appear~

ance of the above Schedule in the DomINnICA Har \LD « news-

Paper published in this Island or from the date whe. th: potce

prescribed by law was last served on any owner or occupier of
adjoining iand in respect of which tbe application is mad.

May 9—16 :

Date of Request Person Presenting

|



Requcst dated

Sth May, 1964
at 11.15 am.





COLONY OF DOMINICA

TITLE BY REGISTRATION. ACT
REGISTRY OF TIILES ISLAND Gk DOMINICA

Schedule or Applications for Certificates of Title and Notings
t.ereon and Caveats tor the week ending the 9th day of May, 1964



| Nature of Request whether. for
Date of Request;Person Presenting|Certificate of little or Noting
16th ____ {thereon or Caveat

Request for :he issue of a First er-
tificate of Title in respect of a
portion of land situate in the Town
of Roseau in the Parish ‘St. George
in the Colony of. Dominica, | « n-

Requect dated} Loftus Royer

29.h Aprli, 1964] by his Solicitor

\ Presented | Vanya Dupigny |raining 958 square feet and bound-
4th May, 1964 ed as followsi—On'Norih-West by
at'3.50 p.m. |by land of Theresa John, On the

North.East by and of Margaret
‘Peters, On the South-East by Great Marlborough Street and on the



Registrar’s Office, (Sed) J. V. JEAN PIERRE
Roseau,—4th May ' Registrar of Titles
NOTE:—Any person who desires to object to the issuing of a Certi-
ficate of Litle on the above appiication may enter a Caveat ii the above
Office within six weeks from the date of the first ippearance of the
above Schedule in the Dominica HERALD newspaper published: in this
Island or from the aate when the notice prescribed by law was last served
on any owner or c¢cupier of adjoining iand in respect of which the appli-
cations made.
May 9-16
Sareea





Banana Shipment of 7th MAY, 1964:

STEMS TONS

Roscau 23,199 268
Portsmouth 21,601 (236
Coast 2,331 25
; 47,131 529

Exports rst jan. to 30th April, 1964 $83,322 6,309

pene ee See, /

Total exports to 7th May, 1964 630,453 6,838
Total exports to 7th May, 1963 941,016 11,963
Decrease 1964 compared with 1963 310,563 $0125





OO Oe 8 8 PTS Oe 6 9 8 6 ee 8 ee 8 6 Pe 8 8 C96 oss 8—e

THE JAYGEES INVITE

ONE AND ALL TO THEIR

GRAND DANCE

TO BE HELD AT THE
OLD D. G. S. BUILDING
ON MONDAY 18TH MAY FROM 9.00 P.M.
ADMISSION: $1.50
MUSIC BY THE POPULAR

SWINGING STARS ORCHESTRA
(COME AND HAVE A GOOD TIME!

ba 9, 16

9a PS 8 FPS 8 Hf RS pe PSP AZ,

Oa 6 oA 6 Ee Cg 6 pa I ae a 8 9 “ee eee

!
!
|!
t
t
1
i
4



SATURDAY, MA.

A String



16, 1964

(Continued from page 4)

These various considerations set out in ihe White
Paper form part of the present international thinking on the
whele question of how best to grart aid. These are sub-
jects on which the recipient countries are thinking hardly
less than the donor nations. The application of Lzbour
policy to aid-giving would have to take account of these

‘current thoughts and current endeavours in this new realm
of bi-lateral and multi-lateral transactions.

AAEEE URONIC pte, OS

THE WIDENING GAP

During the last three years the need for aid has be-
come no less. The difference between the standards of
living in the industrialised and in the developing nations
has not diminished — on the contrary it has increased.

The developing couniries of the world must necessati-
ly depend largely on theit own exertions; but the de-
veloped nations recognise a responsibility to help them,
both by giviag financial aid and. by providing advice
and training facilities. The world-wide desire for a de-
termined and co-operative effort s1as been recognised in
the United Nation’ designation of the 1960s as.the De-
velopment Decade, and the need of the developing
nations is a challenge to those countries whose lot 1s
easier. It is a challenge that we in Britain must con-
tinue to accept.

—from. Aid to Developing Couniries,
September, 1963.

Aid in the balance
-. Hot upon the appearance. of. the ‘United Kingdom
White Paper on Aid to Developing Countries comes the pub-
lication of the first in the Overseas Developmort Insutue
ae ritishh to overseas
countries. The bookict, Survey and Comment (price 3s. 6d.)
tepresents the various statistics o.1 the subject and inakes a
critical survey of the problems of giving hrlp. The extract
below is taken from the pamphlet. »
.... i the short run at least, an inctease in aid sends
to worsen the balance of payments... . .
There are innuracrable reasons ... for seeking to
‘improve’ the balance cf payments of Britain. But
the problem is a rich countries problem. If the
balance of payments is adversely affected and Britain
loses gold . . . this is a loss to another rich country... .
Britain is a rich couuatry with a gross national pro-
duct of {£25,0com. for 50 million people, buying
£5,600m. worth of goods and services from abroad.
It gave and lent £1s5om. in overseas aid in 1962.
Poor countries .. ... are justified in asking in amaze-
ment whether ic is possible that a country like this can
still be deterred from increasing aid to say £250m., by
the risk of transfer of gold from itself to another rich
country? Surely the priorities are badly wrong ?
Surely rich conutries can manage their aftairs better
than this ?
From British Aid: Survey and Comment.
Overseas Development Institute, London.

FOR SALE
FORD Prefect No. 899
licensed and taxed: trial run anytime
Any reasonable offer accepted

Contact ; M. Durand
Herald Printery











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SUBSCRIBERS NOTICE
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12 noon on Saturday if their papers have not been
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Of Aid in a White Paper (Scholarships And
\Bursaries




DOMINICA HERALD |

Five schelarships have been offered
to the Windward Islands for entrance
to the College of the Virgin Islands,
St Thomas, May 14th was the latest
date for submission of applications.

Seven teachers have been awarded
Commonwealth Teacher Training
Bursaries for 1964-65 Messrs B. Jnc.
Baptiste, F. Severin, P. E. George,
Miss R. G. Hurtau't and Miss O,
Brand B A. and Mrs. C. A, Robin-
son and E. M. James. The courses
are for one year at British College
and Universities.

S. Airica--
Danger Ahead

Sic Hugh Foot, former British
Governor of Jamaica and Cyprus,
warned on May 3 (as a member of a
five-man panel advising U Thant
about South Africa) that waz might
break out soon there. He made this
statement on “elevisicn, adding ‘Prit-
ain and the United States should put
on cConousic pressure for a better deal
for Negroes”. (CP,

—_—O 8

DRUGGED BY SOVIETS

Four Foreign Service Attachés
(one British and three American)
were drugged in a hotel on their. way
to the Black Sea port of Odessa,
Russia, recently, They were brought
back to Mescow and found to-be suf

5 i “O6Ses oO arbiturate,
Apparently no papers were removed

while they were drugged, and there |

were no signs of search, © Both coun-
tries have protested tothe U,S.S,R.

oS SS

34-Year-Old Car,
20,000 Miles

A 34-yeareold Austin motor car
has just returned to Britain afte- be-
ing driven more than 20,000 miles
across Africa to Cape Town and
back. It is believed to be the first
time that a car of this age. has come
pieted the two-wey trip,

Still In The Dark

In the House of Commons
yesterday (April 28) Miss
Joan Vickers asked the Secre-
tary of State for Common-
wealth Relations and for the
Colonies whether he would
make a statement on the pro-
gress of discussions on the
proposed federation cf Barba-
des with seven other islands
of the Caribbean group.

Mr. Fisher replied: “The
Regional Council of Minis-
cers met in Barbades from
sth to 18th April. The
Council decided to meet
again before agreeing to a
date for a London conference.
The Ministers ‘will inform the
chairman when they wish
him to convene this further
necting,” —(BIS)





Women In U.S
World

ability and intellizenee of women
more now ian ever before. says

Mrs Lyndon B Johnson, wife of Soviet Union this

the U.S President. Mrs. Johnson
noted that 93 wcmen_ had been ap-
pointed to high ranking jobs in the
Federal Government since January.

We have long passed the time in
the United States when men alone
could be summoned to great duties
she said. “In almost every sphere,
the influence of women is constant
ly growing’ .

Women in all parts ofthe world
are achicving higher status and great-
ef opportunities to work for the
welfare of their homelands Mrs. Joh-
nson said. She noted that 95 out of
the 113 member nations of the U-
nited Natious have ‘granted full and
equal political rights to women.

Oil deposits have been found in
four areas in Ghana, The Ghanaian
Times reported recently.(CP)

G.C6.L. Cables
|Harold Wilson

The United States is using the ,

PAGE NINE



The Biitish Labour Party
Lealer, who is to visit the
month,
received the following cable
from Caribbean. Congress of
Labour Gen. Sec. Mr.
Osmond Dyce recently —
“CCL strongly — supports
proportional representation in
B.G. Present system encour-
ages racialism, violence and
hatez”

a
Village Councils
During March and April thr.e

new Dominica village councils were
constituted and held elections. These

~~ | were Woodf.rd Hill, Atkinson, and

the combiried council of PaixBouche,
Moore Park and selle- Manicre Co-
libaut which had already established
a village council’ préviously, held
elections on Aprilo.



~ Prince Philip At Maharajah’s Well



Prince Philip was present at a recent ceremony (o



9

commemorate the gift 100 years ago,of a, well to the .
people of Stoke Row, Oxfordshire, by Ishree, Ma-
harajah of Benares. After landing in his helicop- |
ter on the village green he was accompanied to the
well by Mr. B.P.N. Sahi, the personal representa-

tive in England of the

ptesent Maharajah. He |

watched as a flask of Ganges water—specially flown
from India for the occasion—was mixed with water .
he had drawn from the weil. *
The picture shows Prince Philip walking from the °
well to the parish chnrch, preceded by Janet Martin -
(13) and Barry Carter (4), carrying the.yurn of

“blended”? water.



\

PAGE TEN

Extracts From An Article By
Anthony Wedgwood Benn, MP

Guardian, Britain.

T= yeat 1964 promises to be a big

yeat for mass communications.
Mass communication is without
doubt the single most important feat-
ure of the medern world. Ic 1s the
real infrastructure of our global sozie-
ty. Icilluminates what used to be
dark and it “lubricates tbe precess of
change. If feeds back information so
that we cam correct mistakes, and it
suengthens the new-found common
interest we Lave in survival and co-
Operation, cementing us — toge her
througa a new tealism. We must all
be ‘interested in how this power
is exercised.

Once communication had deve-
loped beyond the point of perscnal
conversativy and individual letter-

“writing and began to depend upon
mechanical processes, it inevitcbly Sell
into the hands of professional com-
municators: editors and publishers.
The editor “controls his newspaper,
his magazine or his radio or TV pro-
gramme. He has a framework full
of slots that must be filled with sews
items, features and comment. When
he goes.to others he sees himself as a
repeseptative of his audience with a
duty to question on theiz behalf and
then to interpret the answers he gets.
The publisher, on the other hand,
sees his réle very differently. He tries
to-find someone with © something to
say and then provides him with the
technical faciiities for saying it} print-
- ingeaad:.binding"and selling —™
books; or arranging to: broadcast his
opioions, od ot ote .
What is wrong with mass com-
munication today is that there is far
too much editing -and far too’ little
publishing. The package newspe per



and TV programme may be brillant-

examples uf skilful editing but they
deny to readers and viewers that most
vivid experience of all: a res] cunfron-
tation with thé published ideas and.
opinions of people who have gct
something to say.

First, we want much more haid
news. Without ic the whole com-
munity will fall furher and further
behind events, Esp-cial y we need
more news about scientific and tech-
nical developments. The major ones
wili revolutionise our iives arid it is as
well that we should know about
them. Jt will help conect the neg-
tect of science in our education and
Ibridge the gulf betweea ourselves and
the scientists. It will also, subtly
change our social values by reporting
us to ourelvcs more as producers
than as consumers, The excitement
of new product.ve, processes is far
greater than the dreary cult of person-
allity in the gossip columns, _

We also want the whole ‘concep-

tion of international . coverage. to. be.

revolutionised. If there is ‘a crisis in
Cyptus, we must know what the main
protagonisis on ¢ither side think’
about it themselves: I don’t: want
the Greek or Turkish views explained
tome. I want both Greeks and
Turks to be helped to put the full
strength of their whole case to us all,
and to hear first-hand what Russia
and America think about it, too.
The “exper” diplomatic correspon-
dent is at worst a biased prepagan-
dist and at best a messy smudge
actoss a page of contemporary histo-
ry. Foryears the BBC refused to



r

Editors Vv. Publishers)



.DOMINICA HERALD

—

transmit TV progracames made: by
the UN because they were rot orien-
tated for British viewers.
just why we ought to see the n.
Martin Buber has sad that the
struggle for the control of communi-
cations is a struggle between educa-
tion and propaganda. We is abso-
lutely right. We can realise ther full
potential only if we are tough enough
to permit them to confront us with
the new knowledge of our generation
and the strength of the arguments
of all sides in contro
versy. Ifthat 1s done ovr highest
hopes for an educa ed world could
be made a reality within the lifetime
of us all. :

—_— = —- —<@———-

Nominees

Success Beaten By
Telephone

In a Domino match play-
ed at Beach Clud on Sun-
day last between the Tele-
pkone Dept. Demino Club
and the Success Domino
Club the Success Clu b
were beates by a margin of
270 pts. The scores being as

follows: Telephone 3,ats pts

Success 2,745 pte.

To scorers were: P,
Ferdinand and A. Warring.
ton for Telephone with 1052
pts and J. Augustine and P.

Seraphine for Success with |

1335 pts. :

be Telephone Club was
Captained by A. Warring-
tor; the Success by Perry
Seraphine. (Contr.)



Under The Workmen’s
Compensation Act, 1937
In The Estate Of Ciifford
Hodge, Deceased.

It is hereby notified ihat ihe
Commissioner for Wovsmen’s Com-
pensation will hold a court at the
Magistrate’s Court, Roseau, on
Tuesday the 26th day of May, 1964,
at 2,00 o’clock in tke atteinoon
for tha aurpose of consideracing
the claims of the dependants or
the above deceased toa sum de-
posited w!th the Registrar under the
provisions of the Workmen’s Com-
pensation Act 1937, -

Interested persons may attend

sel.
JOSEPH V. JEAN PIERRE
~ REGISTRAR -
Registrar’s Office
ROSEAU
rg 4th May, 1964
May.16, 23” \

SAE
USED, SECOND HAND

Two Electriclly Vihrated
Block Machines
$ rf Operated
Concrete Mixers
1000—4” Steel Pallets
1000—8” “ as

1000-6” * "t
_ J, ASTAPHAN & CO. LTD.
May ‘9-—30



Yee that js!

personally or by solicitor or coun- °

SATURDAY, MAY 16, 1964

—_—_—_—————— er?

leep Transported By Helicopter |

ey ee









A Wessex HC Mk. 2 turbo-jet helicopter lifts a. jeep during a .dem-
onstraticn of the British Royal Air Force’s \ first nelicopter squardron °°
=at- Odi neland.... sng Boe Ya 2.

\

po ( u naar



. : Pe tis a : . Sa,
The new helicopter has. a maxinsum speed of 120 miles per hour ind

a.range cf 345 miles at 115. miles per hour.





Monsieur Kene Maneu, chiet ot UNESCO (to whict the “litde
seven” W.I. islands will be jointly subscriber-members) visits Sir Alec
Douglas Home in London. Centre is the British Minister of Edu-
cation, Sir Edward Boyle.



'

The HERALD Is The People’s Own Paper



SATURDAY, MAS 16, 1964



Training For
High Jumping
(Cont from page 7)

This wou-d involve exercises to in-
crease Jez extension (splits) eg. high

|

leg kicking, endto ‘enethen ham-
stings, e.3, touching tres wn
straight knees. Weight Training

wilt build up the muscular strength
of the legs and circuit training will
develop all round stamina.

Success can be achieved in high
jum-ing by convincing ore.elf that
one is capable o° jumping highe..
Many athletes in Training put.the
bar up 3 to 4 inches higher than
their best height whilst they are in
the vicinity of che jumping area but
not actually jumping, They become
accustomed to seeing the new height
znd when they eventually came to
jump it, st does not seem so formid-
able. Others chalk 2 mark on
their bed:oom door at the height they
ave aiming to reach and in becuming

_us:d to it they break down th> psy-
chological barricrs that always
accompany new heights.

Fielpful though the exercises and
training aids can be however, im-
prevement only comes with practis-
‘ng the actual event; but practice
must be purpo.eful and det-rmined.
Find your faults with the help of an
informed partner and eliminate: them
with his telp sn serious practice.
Start jumping at a height which de-
mands a definite spring upwards bu
which can be cleared - consistently.
Do not anticipate the lay-out on
take-off, as ‘this limits the efficiency
of the take-off and avoid ‘the com-
mon and serious mistake of diving

over the bar in the Straddle,
Wks 2h

o

aan : s jumping
with a technical soundness he should
“experiment with the speed of his
approache this should be as fast as
can be handled efficiently at take-off.
He must also practice under a variety
of conditions, jumping on grass and
cinder and landing op sawdus, sand
or foam rubber. He must work in
wind and when there is no wind,
on a wet surface and on a dry sur-
face.

Training should reveal progression
in intensity as the season aprroaches
and in technical development. Dur-
ing the off-season basket ball aad
volley ball are excellent activities and
as the season approaches low-hurd-
ling and interval running should

‘feature more in training, In season,
2 to 3 days concentration on jump-
ing is sufficient, and out of season,
only 1 to 2 days is needed.



- of

The high jumper should aoe

up gradually, and work regularly
and patiently to develop the tech-
nique and the other essential factors
of power, Alexibilty, confideuce and
ex perience.

Gemmenwealth
scholarship For
Bominicar

The British Council, Pore. of
Spain have announced the award of
a Commonwealth Schelarship for
studies in Britain to Dominican
Nicholas Joseph Orville Liverpcol;
for reseatch in law for the degree of
Ph.D. at the University of Sheffield
fOctoFer 1964-July 1965).

Mr. Liverpool is at present study-
ing law at the University of Sheffield,
(BIS)

\

French Gonsul
On Tour

Monsicur HeENry Dupont,
_French Consul General for this re-
gion (resident in Puerto Rico) is at
present on a familiarisation tuut of
the small islands, where ie is meet-
ing various persons .interested in

French affairs and culture.
3 : os

P.M, Ordered —
Bombing

DUNNS, SCOTLAND, May
11, CP: Prime Minister Sir
ATec . Dougias-Home _ said
here today that it was his
personal decision to use air
power against the rebels in

the South Arabian Federa-
tion so that there would be

the minimum number of
casualties among “our

ground troops’. It was re-
ported on Saturday that Bri-
tish planes had dropped
tourteen 1000f6 bombs on
dissident tribesmen’s positions
in the Radfan area pzeceding
a weekend when a number
persons were xeported
killed.
SSE EESaIEnenteenmmnen=2 “camememmemmmeememmneeat

* FOLLOW THE STAR®









Feel the comforting warmth penetrate
right down to. the core of the pain as
you rub on Radian-B! Enjoy the
wonderful relief that Radian-B gives
you—relief from those ageing pains
of rheumatism, lumbago, sciatica,

fibrositis, sprains and bruises.
Radian-B contains pain-killing aspirin
for fast relief. Get a bottle from your /
chemist or drug store today!





— ieee
ASPIRIN. «Il sen
spiRit el
LINIMENT




Buy

DOMINICA HERALD

PAGE ELEVEN



William Shakespeare Again !





For serious studenis of Shakespeare, the open‘ug of the new Shakespeare Centre
at Stratford-zpon-Avon on 22nd April was one of the mest significant events
commemorating the 4ooth anniversazy of the poet's birth.

The entrance exhi’xitton hall has a life-size bronxe figure of William Shake-

speare. The face of the figure is turned towards the birchplace garden —— but.
it 1s an eyeless face. This is a deliberate act by the sculptor who intends the

visitor to imagine for himself the sort of eyes Shakespeare had. The double
dcot in the far wall lead to the Stratford Room lecture theatre.

TROPICAL

1OusE PAINT



pats

AbAILABLE AT

OWING

THE FOLL
L.A. DUPIGNY Esq., | 4
J. W. EDWARDS

G.G. PHILLIP & COMPANY |
T.D.SHILLINGFORD



PAGE TWELVE

eet,

LOGAL SP



ORTLIGHT

CRICKET

St. Vincent Poised For ist

Tue 1964 Goodwill series com-
menzed on Thursday at the Botani-
cal Gardens with St. Lucia playing
St. Vincent, At the end of the fi-se
day’s play the scores we e St. Lucia
125. St. Vinceut 80 for 1.

The .day belong:d decidedly“ to
St. Viacent. Skipper Samuel won
the toss and sent St Lucia into bee.
a gamble which paid off in the end,
but which local pundits must have
viewed with a certain degree of spec-
ulation since che wicket was hard and
true apparently fi.il cf runs. But
Samuel knew his guns and took the
chance.

Early Break Through

By lunch, four of the best batsmen
on the St. Lucia side were back ~ in
the ‘pavilion and just before tea
the whole lineup had
succumoed fora meagre 125.
This low score is by no means attri-
butable to the state of the wicket. It
played true, perhaps on the fast side,
especially earlier in the day, and en-
couraged strokeplay of all varieties.
The Sc. Lucia side batted as if they
regarded this as a one day match and
apartfrom skipper Phillips’ intelligent
30, Dubois’ 24 and Vidal’s 20, there
was little responsibility in the rest of
the batting,- The St. Vincent bowling
swasistesdy and penetvative but erratic
in parts Tbs fielding, however was
» of a very fair standard.

“Run Of Play

. Hunte-and Hippolyte~cpe
innings and the Jatter displayed no
hesitancy in going for his strokes.
He believes in attack. Hunte on the
other hand showed’ a: pretty straight
bat until he was deceived aad played
on to K. Williams for 6.

_ Jouet joined Hippclyt- and those
two,seemed to Le setting in when
the latter offered a catchto N.
Dougan who accepted. Two balls
‘Jater R. Joseph was bowled fora
duck and St. Lucia were 30 for ?.
Fortunes wese partially recovered
when Skipper Mindu Philip and
Jouet started stroking the [tall well,
but just before lunch Jouet played a
lille early and turned Williams, hard
but uppishly and straight to R.
Dongan at square leg who made no
mistake; He made 12 and so they
went in to lunch 60 for 4.

Post Lunch Gollapse

After the interval Phillips and
Dubois were bent on survival and
brought somecharacter to the batr-
ing. However, as is so natural,
Phillips couldn’t be contained too
long and launched anoff drive at
Williams without getting to the
pitch of the ball and Sardine took it
easily enough at deep mid off. He
contributed 30,

If St. Vincent theught that this
was a break through, incoming bats-
men Vidal and a composed DuBois
had other ideas. . They put on 42
useful runs, Vidal hitting a glorious
six, a vicious heok to the long
Seg boundary. Fortune favouis the
brave, but not all che while, and
when these two left in quick success-
ion Dubois deceived by a slower
one from Duncan and Vidal mis-
timing a sweep off Sardine the wnt-
ing was on the wall. Sardine pol-
ished off the tail to end with the re-

Innings Lead

markable analysis of 3 for 1 in 2
overs. K. Wiliams iailed success-
fully for 3 for 40, while D. Dougan
and Duncan got 2 wickets apiece.

Sound Start

Samuel and U. Ajexander gave
Sc. Vincent a very sound start against
“Atherly and Cranpum. Atherly is
decidedly the fastest paceman on
e.ther side, but was not very inclined
at making the batsman play. He
concentrated all to often at keeping
the ball outside the off stump. He
was ‘unfortunate, however, not to
have had Alexander’s wicket, Joseph
muffing a sitter at first slip. Alex-
ander playec beautifully off his legs
to amass 24, while Samuels was the
essence of correctness.

On the formei’s departure ‘N,-
Dougra took the crease and has.
followed his natural inclination to

get on with it. He has chanced his
arm fortuitously and succeeded. He
hit a beautiful six to midwicket off
Vidal which was a delight to watch
for sheer timing. At the close he
was still there with 23 while Samuel
contained himself nicely for 20.

Mirdu Philliv has soâ„¢ far tried
five vowlers of whom young Mave
cette, the off spinner has been the
most impressive. He beat every bats-
man to whom he ‘bowled and was
unlucky to have had two catches
dropped off him. The «battle conti
Nues. tomorrow, and its my guess.
that St. Vincent, after this initial ad-
vantage will press it_home and win
easily by 7 or 8 wickets probably

~after lunch on Saturday.

At Lunch ©

a

..

Samuel and Dougan continued
the St. Vincent innings from 80 for
1, facing the bowlirg of Atherley
from the North atid Mauricete fom
the South end, While Samuels
continued in his cali confident
fashion, Dougan’s batting registered
an element of impatience—p:obab-
ly a Cesire to get on with things.

__ We saw Atherly extracting some

life from the wicket ard altogether
bowled well. He twice hit Samuel
in comfo:table positions; but skipper
Samuel is as tough as they come and
he stood it well.



With the score at 95, Dougan
played across one from Atherly whu
had beaten him twice previously and
was bowled for 28.

Joffte Sardine joined _ his skipper
and without undue hesitation went
for his strokes, He was beaten first
ball by Mauricette as he played in-
quirirgly outside the off stump, but
in the same over dispatched a short
one with consummate easeto the

" square leg boundary,

But he didn’t last long, as soon as
Skipper Philip's came on he had
him playing back and: out L.B.W.
and then St. Lucia really struck.
‘Two wickets fell for t ran, including
the resolute Samuel: He tell for 26.
Mindu Phillip had made a useful
change. Crvickshank and Findley
took the score to 124 before Cruick-
shank was caught piumb in front
from a Philip’s yorker, Trimming-

ham 4 and Findley 2 survived a run .

out appeal, a near thing and at

lunch the score was 129 for 6.



7~-housing. The C.

DOMINICA HERALD

Short Legco. Meeting

(Cont. from p. 1)
The bills included an

amendment of the Windward
Is. Banana Insurance Ordin-
ance (to protect growers
suffering ftom winds:orm
and other damage}, also
amendment cf the Public
Piers and Wharfage Ordin-
ance to provide for importa

tion cf banana-wrapping
material free of vwharfage
dues. Earlier two pumice

mining papers were laid >y
Hon. N. A. N. Durreay,
Minister for Trade and Pro-
duetion, and one paper rev
lattng to Shakespeare Cen--
tenary. stamps by Hon. Mr.
Stevens. Ananendment of
the Crown Proceedings Or-
dinance, introduced by the
Attorney General, was pass-
ed. ;

It was a subdued meeting
save for some sprightliness
over the Housing Committee
nomination. Mr. Henry
stated that in view of the
Mayox’s responsibility for cer-
tain housing developments
and contrel in the tows of.
Roseau, he ought to be on
that committee, and he ques-
uoned whether Mrs. Mable
James had any special know-
ledge or qualitications. on




that Committee—the S.M.O.
and the Director ot. Works—
and that Mrs. James’ ability
“to meet her fellow men at
any time and under any cir-

cumstances” was sufhicient
qualification. The A. G,
asked the Speaker: ‘“‘Is this

debave out of order 2” and the
Speaker replied: “It is”. A
coumer-motion moved by the
Oppesition that Mr. N.A.N.
Ducreay, Mr. L. C. Didier
and Mr. E. C. Loblack serve
on the Housing Committee
was defeatea by the origizal
motion that Mr. Ducreay,
Mr. A. C. Active and Mrs.
james be named as its mem-
bers.

An adult audience of t vo
duzen (including two
women) followed the pro-
ceedings, which were also
attentively listened to by
twenty-two girls from the
Fifth and Sixth forms of
Wesley High School, some
of whom are students of
West Indian history.

WANTED

ACCOUNTANT

Ability And Experience ‘more
Essential than Qualiiica ions,

Salary Commensurate with
ability And Experience.

J. ASTAPHAN & CO. LTD

~ ROSEAU

May 16} 23, 30, June 6



With Ganada

-— Says Andrew-Rose
Winnipeg, Canada, Ma
12, (CP) — The West In-
dies would not accept politi
cil union With Canzda but
some form cf closer relation-
ship should be established,
Andrew Rose, High Com-
missioner in Canada for
Trinidad and Tobago said
on Monday. He said people
of the West Indies would be
against political union be-
cause they could net see their
nation “giving up its
independence to become part
of another nation”. He said
the West Indies would favour
increased trade with Canada
but Economic Union as sug,
gested by Canadian politi-

SATURDAY, MAY 16, 1964



cians may not be the answer.

ce

[No Political Union| Kenyans For

Guba?

NarrosBi, Kenya, May ar. CP;
Cuban Government offici-ls have
promised to award scholars!.ips to
Kenya students wishing to study in
Cuba in the near future, a National
Assembly member said today.

=< ee

FOR SALE

By adjacent portions of
land One sontaining about
4 acres and the ether contain-
ing about 33 acres with sub-
Stantial buildings and cultiva-
tion thereon situate at Cas-
seau (on moterable raad to
Wotton Waven) about. 23
miles from Roseau.

Apply to
CLIFTON A. 4. DUPIGNY

Chambers, Roseau.
May 16, 23, 30





"Brownie Golden Jubilee

May 1914 — May 1964
MOTTO: “LEND A. HAND”

Tuts year marks the soth. Anniversary of the Junior Branch in
the Guide Movement known teday as ‘‘Brownies”’. ;

This movement is for girls within the age of 74/—— 11 years.

It is

really the stepping scone towards the Guide and later to the Ranger Branch.
The Iitttle @ 2es are.thought the principles of honesty, fidelity helpfulness in
the home, as well as so ne of the fundamentals which should make them

worthy. citizens of the community in

Besides working for and attaining =
other as is displayed in the Annual.Pack Holiday (one

ill-have-to-play.-theit=parteo=--ee--sm

which in the future as women they



‘badges, th oti
week)...

_ In Dominica, May 17 — 25 has been selected as Jubilee Week, and
in accordance with this, the :follov.ing programme has been arranged:

Sunday May 17

Monday May 18 Fun and Frolic
Admission only
Tuesday May 19

Wednesday May 20
Thursday May 21

Church Parade (all Brownies are to attend service in
their respective churches).
At 11.15 a.m. Opening ceremony at

St. Joseph.
in Goverament House Grounds.
tog. Refreshments on sale, |

All childrea are invited. \
Brownie Revel to which all parents, guardians and
well-wishers are invited,
Park Party, Brownies only.

Film show at the Imray School-oom at $.3¢ p.m.

Refreshments on sale.

Silver collection.

Friday May 22--25 Pack Heliday.

Ii i: hoped that this week’s activities will be a source of refreshment
to all the participants and a blessing to the Movement which throngh. its
founder, has brought much inspiration to many of us who passed through
the Movement either as Brownies, Guides or Rangers.



COLONY OF DOMINICA
TITLE 8Y REGISTRATION ACT

REGISTRY OF TITLES

Schedule or Applications for Certificates

ISLAND OF DOMINICA
cf Title and Notings

tuereon and Caveats for the week ending the 16th day of May, 1964



| 3
Date of Request, Person Presenting

Nature of Request whether for
Certificate _ of Title . or. ‘Noting
thereon or Caveat



Request dated]. Isaac Newton
Shillingford
7th May, 1964| by his Solicitor

Presented
13th May, 1964
at 3.15 p.m. .

Vanya Dupigny

Request for the issue of a First Cer-
tificate of Tithe in espect of a
portion of land situate in the Village
of St Joseph, in the Parish St. Joseph
in the Colony of Dominica, ccn-
taining 8,550 square feet and bound-
ed as follows: —On the Norh by
lands of Janie John Baptiste, On the
Public Road to





South East by
Mero, On the South-West by Coubarie Road and on the South by
Public Road. s
Registrar’s Office, (Sed) J. V. JEAN PIERRE

Roseau,—13th May 1964

Registrar of Titles.

NOTE:—Any person who desires to object to the issuing of a Certi-
ficate of Title on the above application may enter a Czveat in the above
office within six weeks from the date of the first uppearance of the
above Schedule in the Dommuca HERALD newspaper published in this
Island or from the date when the notice prescribed by law was last served
on any owner or cccupier of adjoining land in respect of which the. appli-

cation is made.
May 16-—23

“PRINTED AND PUBLIHED BY J, MARGARTSON CHARLES, THE HERALD'S PRINTERY, 31 NEW STREET, ROSEAU, DOMINICA, SATURDAY, MAY 16, 1964



Full Text
LIBRARY

RESEARCH INSTITUTE
FOR THE STUDY OF MAN

162 EAST 78

NEW YORK 216

ST. LUCIA, ST. VINCENT

Plenty Of Ups And Downs

: Naw a (OT.

ESTABLISHED 1955





\WHEN stumps were drawn last night, St. Lucia had

overhauled St. Vincent’s first innings score vi 186,

but with the loss of three second inning’s wickets.

The

nightwatchmen, Jouct and skipper Mindu Phillip, were
batting confidently at 28 and 30 respectively, alchough, just
before stumps, Philip was missed at first slip by Duncan.
St. Vincent’s fielding was however brilliant, particularly

Duncan’s gully catch of Hypolite.

was 84 runs for three wickets.

The close of play score

A “respect2ble attendance” (commentator description)
saw plenty of action, several sixes and some nice stroke
play. Renaud Joseph was bit by a rising bali from Wil-

liams before he could score arun and retired hurt. He

says that



he will resume tomorrow.
—See “Sportlight” cn back page for details.

a

Mass-Murde: And | PEOPLEIN THE NEWS

Suicide

CONCORD, CALIFORNIA,
s Boy.

ret



a bli shed that a
passenger



awry >

have est
heavily insured

. shot the pilot of an airliner

cruising at 5,000 feet on a

~flght from Reno to San

Francisco. just before it
crashed seat Concord on

_ Thursday last week killing

all 44° aboard. The man’s
name and the beneficiary of
the newly-purchased po
licy of WI $273,000 were
not disclosed.

Train Robbers
Get Up To 50 |
Years =
Vast Gash Loot Still Missing

A Biitish Judge recently sentenced
twelve men to prison for terms rang-
ing up to thirty years for taking part
in the £2,600,000 “Great Train
Robbery’ the greatest haul of cash-
loot in modern times

Atthe trial, which lasted fifty
seven days, seven men got th'ety

_ years, two got twenty-five years and
one twenty-four. Still another was
awarded twenty years and one got a
three-year sentence.

“The robbery took place on
August 8,°1963 when about fifteen
inen stopped the London-Glasgow
rail train with a false red signal.

“Se far the police have recovered
only £300,000 and believe the rest
is cashed away by three or so of the
uncaught men who | master-minded
the job.

. Bruce Stewart leaves for
UK tomorrow for long leave

** HECTORIDE Seraphin _ of |
TD.





africre leit by banana boat
for UK Thursday * FATHER
F. Huysmans appointed
Provineial Superior in Brus-
sels — Fr. J. Scandaert suc
ceeds h'm as Vice-Provincial
and Fr. Francis becomes
Dean of Roseau Cathedral *
FaTHER Felix, Edward
Eiwin and Philip Francis all
graduated from Coady Insti
tute, Artigonish tiis week *
CarLos Hilburg, WHO
zone engineer here this week
for water suppiv talks with
Curtis Knight and Govt.
officials * Jo HN Profumo
(ex-war Minister involved
with prostitutes) has new job
as unpaid social worker at
Toynbee Hall, East London
* PrincE Philip, Duxe of
Edinburgh will head Bri-
tain’s new Council for
Volunteers Overseas* TRADE
& Production Minister
Ducreay returned from Par-
liameritary Course i2 N. Ire-
land * AvocaTE Sports
Reporter. ©’Donnell Nor-
ville heze to repext cricket *
SISTER Alicia now visiting
U.S). AS*

Record Twins

A US mare has beaten 10,000 to Big
odds by giving birth to twin colts,
The mare is between fifteen and
twenty years old. (CP)

In






=
‘Justitia
(For the General Welfuie of the People of Dominica, the further cd: ancement of the West Indies and the Caribbean Area

SATURDAY, MAY 16, 1964

oy

se








Se eee tees Sera ns

lhemoriam
HORAZE GILLETTE 0.B.E.

Doctor, Feéeralist, Botanist,
Diplomat

When a great Civil Ser-
vant dies, it is only fitting
that one who had been his
Minister should pay him tri-
bute. Whena great Dec-
tor dies all his patients mourn.
Tmrough the death of Dr,
Horace Gillette at his home
in Trinidad, we are all the
pocrer. His devotion to
medicine, reseatch. and wider
nationhood is recugnis:d from
his birthplace—Batsh Gui-
ana— «¢ London, Washing-
ton and even farthrr afield.

Dr. Gillette, Caribbean
citizen of Chinese. descent,
aisplay ¢c bis gen.us for erae
dicating disease and his un
failiag horhomiz net cnly

during his brilliant career in -

medicine but when he served
as Medical Adviser to the
W.I. Federal Gevrnment.
Many WHO conferences
were enhanced by his coun-
sel. He attacked the once
prevalent scourge of malatia
in Trinidad (of whose Medi-
cal Board ke was President
7949-50); later he led an
anti-yellow-fever campaign,
fought the danger of rabies,
and became Vice-President
of the Association for pre-
venting Tuberculosiss.
Horace Gillette was a
spottsman tco, promoting
healthy exercise — patitcular-
ly cycling-- and he was a
renowned horticulturist.
Everyone interested in rare
orchids knew of his wonder-
ful garden at St. Augusitne.
Recently he wrote to the
Editor of the HERALD, his
otie-time Minister, of how
much he was enjoying a
quiet retirement, . although
still broken-hearted by the
smash-up of the Federation
to which he had given his

‘loyalty and his hope. A big

man and a_ great Doctor:
never to be forgotten by the
several territories which he
served —P.S.A.

Seer eee

IN EXCITING





The Richest oo a

as awholey-



PRICE Io¢g

STRUGGLE

Short Legco. Meeting

Loblack Removed From Housing Committee

HORTLY

after

nominated membe«

Hoa;. EC:

Lonlack initisted a motion on social security, he was
expelled fiom the Dominica Labour Paity. Last Wed-
nesday just after he put a question demanding a report on
the last Regional Council of Ministers. observers at the
Legislative Council meeting learned that Loblack’s name
had been removed from the Housing Committee. Never-
theless, the Hon. Chief Minister gave a report as requested
-— the first report on a Regional Council meeting he has:

_ ever presented to our elected assembly. Most of the news

in it had already filsered through pess reports from other

islands,

Federal Ships — No
Clarification

Of the proposed coiitro-
veisial sale of Federal ships,
nothing was said, the C.M. declared ‘The

As 7

proposals concerning the
Regional Shipping Service.
The Conference was of the
unanimous opinion that the
maintenance of A Regional
Shipping Service is esseatial to
the trade and development of
the islands and that it should
be continued for a further
two years.’ No member
pressed home a supplemen-
tary to discover what kind o
future shipping service was
envisaged.

Noises Off

The thin cloth partitions
marking off the : Registrar’s
office on the balcony occa-
sionally filtered voices from
above more andible than
those of the legislators, some
of whom are not noted for
their diction.

Six bills were passed, two
of antique origin, which
drew criticism from Opposi-
tion Leader E. B. Henry
“why have these bills (sup-
plementary — appropriation)
been brought before this
House only iow for
approval?” The Chief
Minister rose to explain that
in urgent cases monies were
approved and the auditor
gave his report afterwards.
“Sometimes in dealing with
the Crown Agents there were
delays...” The Attotney
General intervened with:

“this is not question time”.
A. slight... argument: ensued
between the-A.G:-and Mr.'
Henry on this point of order.
(Cont. on page 12)

fel Se

ascusea tie WUrKMEH S—

Compensation
According toa reléase from the
T.C/C.W. Union, in teply to a re-
quest that the Workmen's Comper-.
sation Ordinance b: revised, the
Mntnistry of Tabour and. Social Ser-
vices have stated that they... would
keew the General “Secretary .of the
union advised of any furthér-develop-
ments to amend the Ordinance.

—— —

LABOUR GAINS ONE SEAT

Out of four by-elections held in
Britain this week, Labour won one
(Rutherglen, Scotland) and the Con-
servatives held three. At Devizes
the swing: to Labour was only 3%
out in the other constituencies (Win-
hester, Bury St. Edmunds, and Ruth-
erglen the swing to Labour was
20 per cent. °°

_ . B.G. TERROR

British troops are. now patrolling
a sugar estate outside of Geoigetown
where terrorists shot and killed two
policemen this week, Cver two
hundred people have. been wounded
upto the rath week of the sugar
strike, and 12 persons have been

killed.

Etaa Erupts
Again

Catania Itaty, May 11 CP! A
new lava flow poured down the-west
slope of Mount Etna -in Sicily today
in a resumption of. the. eruption
which started three days) ago but
stopped on Sunday.

CRIGKETING SHORT .
STORY as
The. Man Who
pages 3 & 5



" Pitched ° Bottles —
Exploring Radio Education

AT a meeting held at the D. G. S. under the Chairmanship of the
Honourable W. S. Stevens, Minister for Labour‘and Social Services, on
April 30 for the purpose of discussion educational broadcasting with
Mt. John Cordeaux Head of Sound Broadca.ung of the Thompson
Foundation in the U.K., it was decided to appoint a committee to thrash
out the matter.
The Committee has since been appointed with the following terms
cf reference: —
@ To examine the vecd for Educational Broadcasts in Domi-
nica including Adult Education,
@ To make recoumendations regarding:-—
(a) the type of programmes to be provided;
(b) the most suitable time for these broadcasts;
(c) the incorporation of any existing Educational Broadcast; into
(4)



PAGE TWO ie



the new proposals;

sources of iaterial {to what extent should use be made
of material from outside sources e.g. the B.B.C. and local
sources); ’

what sort of programmes should be used for a start;

the availability of Voluntary Educational Assistants whe will
be engaged in relaying the programrne and other contingent
duties,

The Committee consists of the fs liowiag members! —

Mr, O. #. Walker, Educatioa Officer, (ex-Officio) Chairman;
Mi. Ronald Clarke, M.A., Headmoster, D.u.S. (ex-officio),
Mr. C. S. Gregoire; Mz. S. Boya; Mr. JA. Laz: rre;

Mr. John Cordeaux will return to the territory as soon’as possible*sfter
definite proposals have been submitted to him Following upon the report
of the Committee.

Tt wil be recalled that Mz. Cordeaux reveiled that, should circum
stances permit, the Thompson Fourdation would ve willing to set up a
training school in Dominica for ane year witin the best facilities available
for training a cadre of teachers in the preparation of radio educational
programmes, provided that a nucleus of voluiteers could be found to make

(¢)
(f)



a start.

Roy Thompson, the Canadian born multimillionaire Director of the
Foundation from whom its name is derived, is devoied among other things,
tas underdeveloped countries to exploit to the fullest possible extent

P P P

Radio Broadcasting as a. medium of



education. (GIS)



Impressions. of




Dominica
By a.Field Officer of the

British Red Society-—Jenny T.
Scott (Scottish Branch)

Many people stil ask:
why 1s ihe Red Cross active
in times of peace — What
do they do? Let me answer
this by telling you of the
work done in this island by
the Dominican Branch of the
Biitish Ked Cross Society.

Soon af:ez my arrival in
Dominica on Friday May 8,
I attended an enrolment Cere-
mory of Junior Red Cross
members at Government
House, when almost s0 new
Lela repeated their pledge

“join with others all over
fhe world to help the’ sick
and suffering”. Their motto
“Serve One Another” speaks
tor itself, and this ideal of i
Service — Voluntary Service
— is also carried out by the
Senior Voluntary Aid de-
tachments. May -8 was a
most appropriate date for
such a ceremony, since it is
the birthday of Henri
Dumant, the Swiss Banker
who founded the Red Cross
first over 100 years ago.

It is-greatly to the credit of
Dominica that it has so many
interested and keen members
eager and willing to uphold
the Red ‘Cross ideals of sere

.

~ Tunior detachments

‘yice to others and the Relief
of suffering everywhere.

a Meet? YOU DAVE:
two groups of Junior mem-
bers, three active, well-irained
and a
members’ group. The first
two (Juniors & Seniors) give
voluntary service at the hespi-
tal, in many capacities; while
the members Group ass‘sts
there also, at the Casualty
dep:, with the clerical work
necessary -- with making of
swabs and in the Children’s
work,

The trained members will
readily turn oui in any emer-
gency, and will provide First
Aid posts at public gather-
ings, while the reliable
Ambulance Service on the
island is provided by che
Red Cross. On a visit
which I paid to the hospital,
Matron stressed the excellent
work done by male members
in wansvorting patients, not
only from hospital to home
ard vice-versa but lso to
the airport for jovg-eys to
other islands. Anany hour
of the day or night they are
on call and turn out most
willingly.

The First Aid training is
invaluable in an. emergency
and may well be the means
of saving lives as it has done
in the past.

The Junior training places
special emphasis on “Health”
Aid “Hygiene” and is cer-



DOMINICA HERALD

— —'



tainly a help towards build- training in First Aid and
ing better citizens: of the Nursing, proof surely that the

future.

“Group” members are
those who do not wish oz
have no time to train but
they pay their own part ip
Red Cross by inelpirg pre-
pare for disasvers such as
hurricanes, iires, floods snd
so on, by turning out in such
am emergency and he:ping to
distribute clothes. and
blz ankets, to operate “feeding
centres” if necessary and of

a

°.

course to raise fuads with
which to carry on the Red
C.oss work.

nadditior, to this, the

local Red Cross have pro-
vided First Aid Boxes in
school; have set up Medical
Loan centres where things
such as crutches — rubber
sheets — blan k et s — bed-
fans andi other sickroom
equipment may be botrowed
temporarily. They provide
parcels for che needy at times;
some ef the Juniors read to
the blind when xequested.
They have given the hospical
litle “extras” from time to

time and ate always ready to
help provide anything v.hich
will assist in the “‘promonon

of health and the prevention
éf disease”

to quote from

Ia the East »de of the
island are three more Jurior
Groups ard in -ihe North
one Senior detachmerit, and
Souftiere and Scotts Head
have each a Junior Link.

Because of the distance
and travelling — difficulties
these groups may well feel
they are cut-off aiid not tak-
ing partinthe main work
but they are very essential
indeed. Should disaster
strike the islands, roads may
weil be blocked and com-
mutuications impessible ac
first, so there is much which
the isolated Red Cross grou,
can do to fire “immediate
help” which is one of the
functions of Red Cross
everywhere.

From other Red Cross
Societies help would come
pouring in, it is the duty of
Red Cross locally to distri-
bute these supplies impartially
to all who need assistance.

Dominica may not have
been in the “Hurricane area
recently” -- neither was
Tobago until “Flora” Struck.
I have recently come from
there and wittuessed first hand
the desolation and destructicn
—S0 it is well to be prepared.
There was no Red Cross i in
Tobago before “Flora”
now it is over 400 strong, all



an

© aS 5 eae 6 pa 6 os 9m |< 9 et a Ste te 6 eS Ot 6 p> 6 Be 8 ee 8 a PR SS te oe pee tf

SATURDAY, MAY 16, 1964

M——"’"![_

and Britain will
always be iadebted <> the
Branch officials here who.
have given such invaluable

es
assistance in the past, and are
the futute.

people there hav: reahsed
wh23t Red Cross can do --
and will do — for those in
need, striving sull for « better and
more powerful Red Cross tn

Domninica should
be proud of you all.

When Red Cress began
over 700 years ago, 16 coun
tries formed Red Cioss Socie-
tles, Gow 102 countries have
established Socicties “which
excelleat foundation of the have over 178,000,000 Senior

Red Cross in the islz

CG i . ue ee Tl members and more than
am greatly impressed by ine] 65,009 ,000 Juniors throughout the
wish of all members to give world,

I have been meetiny; as
many Red Cross personnel
in Dominica a3 is possible —
I have run a Leader Course
— because leadership is so
cseanal to every organisation an
—and I'am certain of the

e
q
|
|

Rt AE Ree ee ne Be Ss pS oS oe, b

- CHICKEN AT ITS BEST!

Raised high in the mountains of cen-
tral Dominica, SYLVANIA- FRESH

hicken has that ‘certain something’
eople
avour !

Cc
p love...., mouth-watering



Graded ! Washed ! Dated !

And priced right for full value.
SYLVANIA-FRESH BROWN EGGS
are making new friends everyday !
You can always get them at.

ELI’S GROCERY (or,

SYLVANIA POULTRY FARMS
imperial Road —Roseau. Tel: 224-5 Rings

2a 8 a St pa BG BS pe At 66 BS PCS 9A SS SOE

~ Land-speed Record Attempt

; Z
i << 41S wel ee ee wet e—=ees Rens peace 8 ed te 6 Bs St ame 6 8 6 Re tf a ee FP 8 ee I ee

69h +6 om Se Spe S|

Se eS



Another attempt on the werld land-speed record
(394. 19 m.p. h.), on Lake Eyre, South Australia
is likely to be made next week by British driver

Donald Campbell. A tial run on Thursday
reached 295 m.p.h. on the 19 miles long and
400 yards wide specially-prepared track.

Last year’s attempts on the record at Lake Eyre
were washed out by unusually heavy rainfalls.

—(IS)
SATURDAY, MAY 16, 1964

The Man Who Pitched Bottles
Ry Phyllis Shand Allfrey

When Hon. Mr. Denipierre was awakened <1 early
in th Be morring by that telephone bell in his Savannah
Fol Ledroom, he responded disagreeably io the flat, cweet
big-island voice.

“Pardch me, ate you the Honourable fo Do
you kiow aman by rame Ignatius St. Medoc?* (She
pronounced it Sammydock.)

Mr. Dampierre was a Smider M. P. at present com-
bining two happy occupations: attending a comference on
a genero ’s subsistence allowance and watching a memor-
able cricket match. Forthose, who do not know what

. Smider means, it is an abbreviation of small-islander and was

often’ used’ in Mr. Dampieire’s tine to describe emi-.

grants from underdeveloped Caribbean lands to other more
fopulous centres, or even unfortunates who were popped
into police vans aad later deported to heme baces.

The engrossing cream from which Mr. Dampierre was
so rudely aroused had just reached the point when the
whole savannah swarmed with gladiators shouting ‘Sinlal
doan out!” and fading light flashed and = shattered with
shocking glass bottles. He, Dampierre, veople‘s. tepte-
sentative, had leapt in dream-fantasy to frotect the host
Premier instead of the Governor (the real hero), and he
caught a huge rum bottle ‘ust betcre it crashed on the
Premier’s skull. Everyone on tne field went crezy with
admiration. Dampicire received so many thumps on_ the

back and so many coxgratulatory drinks afterwards that

his whole physique was impaired by the dreams: he could
hardly hold up tae telephone receiver.

_ “A young man by name sere Sammydock? Says
he headed bananas for you . . Says you and he are
ftietsds.. . Justa minute. i + says you know him by th
title of Tesy.”

t

“a eoones on ik 9



oe .
U.W.L.

The Polio Research Fund
announced in London recent-
ly that it 1s financing, a chair
in EE Ot napaccscs: ia the Uni-

V “O ; West ndaiecs

Depicts of Surgery.

Mr. John SR: Golding,
reader in orthopaedic surgery
at the Universtiy, since 1963,
has been appointed to the
chair. Princess Alice,
Chancellor of the Un-versiy,

Ae 6 Ba 6 pes ba 6 PG BO SP Pa B+ a BO Oy i (



< THE MATHEMATICS OF ;
' ° GOOD HEALTH! =
CONCENTRATED EXTRACT CF
PRIME BEEF i
plus :
FERROUS SUCCINATE
plus
HIGH QUALITY SHERRY W:NE
plus
VITAMIN B 1
-equals |

Green's Beef, fron & Wine

A really fine tonic for: the treatment
of nutritional anaemia, iron-deficiency
anaemia, nervous exhaustion, eenehal
debility.

THE DOMINICA DISPENSARY CO, LTD.

2 te 8S fetta) pel | Ee 884 Beet bee 8 ee 5 pc 6 8 6 8 Pe eS a ee,
els . qs -

‘ s : ?
8 6 8s Bs 8 8 hs pe 8 9 5 8 St PO 6

a er ee

: aap 6 9a 8 PO 6 8 6 9s pe ses pes pes pte 6 §
DOMINIC.

HERALD PAGE THREE

re rcs

NOTICE TO BANANA GROWERS

BANANA PRICES

Cae ERS are notified that consequent ubon Gel Ive
lercase cf the Green Boat Price Ly £3. io. 0. to £70. 115.
/per ten ‘effective 11th May, 1964 the price _ payable for
[bananas until furzher netice will be as follows;





mon one



bes agreed that it should be
called “The Princess Alice}
Chair in Tropical Ortho-
paedics and Rehabilitation.”
Moscow Glasing
“Time ””

Deploring the Soviet cles-

5 8¢. per Ib,

ing of TIME magazine Mos- At Reception Statiow
cow burean, a S ate Depart.) At Buying. Points S. D. $-2¢ sy 5
ment spokesman tcday said At Buying Pcints N. D. $O8P 4. Ss

the United Sta.es would like}
to have reciprocal news cover- Growers who gaalify for Incentive Bonus will
age expanded, not centracted, jan additional .25¢ ver Ib. |

in both countries. | —

The Sovie.s announce |

yesterday that the TIME
correspondent had been told
two leave tne U.S.S.R. fer
what was described as aj
“slanderour” story abcu t|
Lenin. No deadline was |
se. for his depacture. (USIS) |



ceive

AL D. BOYD,
General Mea er

| DOMINI A BANS NA. GROWERS ASSN,
oth May, 1964.

May 16.





ADVERTISE IN. THE HER. ALD



~ Sierra Leone Gift for Queen. Why Don't We Do Likewise ? 2







The Governrrent of Sierra Leone has presented 2 hand-made volume centain-
ing the country’s new postage stamps to Queen Elizabeth II. The album,
was handed to the Duke of Edinburgh at Buckingham Palace, London, by
Sierra Leone’s Minister of Communications, Mr, C.B. Rogers. Wright.

The new stamps are uvique in two ways—they are shaped as the outline map.
of Sierra Leone ard they are self-adhesive. A similar book for Queen Eliga/
Feth the Qreen Moiher was also handed to the Duke at the ceremony.

- Britain Beats Finland At Wembley







British hurdlers Michael Parker and Latte Taitt (second and fourth 1 aber):
streak away to defeat two Finnish athelets—BIS ° ; 3 -

fy
PAGE FOUR

A STRING OF AID ina White Paper
(From:— “Venture’’, Fabian International And
Commonwealth Burea Publicaticn)





HEN a Labour Government comes to power in Bri-
tain it will endeavour to increase considerably the
aid given directly by Britain, and also internationally, to the
newly develeping countries. A Labour Government will
almost cettainiy carry cut aa carly reorganisation to esta-
blish a better co-ordination cf the granting and _ receiving
of that aid. There is, indeed, a case for re-examining. the
present too separated mechanisms for making free grants, fcr
naking repayable, interest bearing loans 2nd for making
technical assistance available to the new countries. Greater
harmonising of these different kinds of help would be all
to the good.

Meanwhile it is as well to take stock of somes of the
assistance Britain has given and is giving to the developing
countries, for they indicate the level of aid that has’ to
raised. Considerable data on present aad past help can
be found, and deserves to be studied, in the recently issued
United Kingdom White Paper. Aid to Developing Coun-
tries (Cmd. 2147, price 3s., published by the Stationery
Office, London). This White Paper was presented to
Parliament by the Chief Secretary to the United Kingdom
Treasury, presumably one of the surveyors, if not the co-
ordinator, of overseas aid-giving by Britain. The docu-
ment also contains a nymber of thoughts on the theory and
praetice of aid te new countries. This cult too deserves
careful and: critical study; -

Upward Trend ‘

The’ Treasury finds it useful to regard overseas aid as
part of Britain’s total overseas expenditure. From the



spending, and this includes repayment of borrowiligs—by
the United Kingdom, maintenance of large forces overseas
(estimated at about £30 million for the current - financial
year), diplomatic expenditure and subscriptions to ' overseas
otganisations including the United Nations. Thus
Britain’s disbursements overseas, including aid and the
other expenditures amounts to about £500 million yearly,
of which aid accounts for almost one third. The total
amount isan important sum in Britain’s balance, or
attempted balance of payments.

To set against these payments outwards, there are
some comparatively small payments inwards. Since the
end of the war and up till the current year Britain has
provided aid totalling £1,367 million. During the same



period Britain has received about £110 million in repay-

ment of

pee on account of overseas loans and about
£50 milli

on in interest.
Aid Is Expenditure

Britain’s aid to overseas countries has increased almost
every year since the end of the last war. The trend is
shown in Table 1.

' Table 1.
BRITAIN’S OVERSEAS AID

Year

ZL, million
I95I- §2 ee an 62
19$6-—$7 “ “ a
1960-——61 ae i I§1
1961— 62 ve 160
1962 —63 Las 148

The White Paper explains that the drop in aid given
in 1962—63 was-due to overseas governments not beirg
able, for one reason or another, to take up the finance made
available to them. ‘This applied particularly to that part
of our aid programme that is made up of loans: grants are
generally disbursed promptly.” ,

The White Paper has some interesting things to sav
about tied and united aid.

se Sa lec cian nino Sareea ta is

‘of the Export Credits Guarantee Department.
ran to wt: wee . d ?

DOMINICA, HERALD





IN THEIR OWN HANDS

However massive the scalz on which aid is
given, it can fulfil no more than a marginal role in
the eccnomic progress of the developing courtries.
The main effort is coming, and must continue to
come, from the peoples of those lands. It is in their
own hands that their facture must lie, now and in
the generations that are yet to come.

—-from Aid to Develcping Countries,
September, 1963.



About half of Britain’s capital aid to overseai_ countries
is not tied, and most of this maney is not spent directly by
the receiving country on paying for imports, but goes to
help meet their budgetary deficits or the local cost of deve-
lopment projects. Recently, however, the British Govern-

to finance imports from Britain’s industrial competitors,
unless Britala cannot supply the required goods or services.
on competitive terms. Britain’s aid given mulkilaterally —
through international ins:itutions — is not tied.

About one sixth of money provided for aid is for
technical assistance, and only a part of this is a direct charge
against the United Kingdom’s balance of payments.

The amount of aid that is formally tied to the purc'1ase
of United Kingdom goods and services represents about
one quarter of Britain’s annual overseasaid. Last
year, for example the tied aid would
have amounted to about £37 million. This
tied aid consists of loans to independent countries both
within the Commonwealth and outside it, under the Ex-
port Guarantees Act, 1949, as amended in 1957. These

- Treasury point of view how much expenditure on aid _ it Joans are not to be confused with export credit insurance

. tf
orise has to be measured against. other overseas

Under the
eG “s + ; us He_sng in he United
Kingdom ‘over a wide range cf commodities agreed upon —
with the reeeiving country. (This is an arrangement that
seems to have annoyed Dr. Eric Williams, Prime Ministe:
of Trinidad, not a little, about a year ago.)

41

Table 2
EXAMPLES OF AID RECEIVED FROM
BRITAIN IN _ 1962-63
£,000

Country Grant ‘Loan *
Tosbya.---is “ach 3,250 —
Bechuanaland {,898 225
Kenya 7,622 4,495
Ghana 158 743
Nyasaland 1,$11 325
Trinidad 155 -——
Brazil ey, — 1,300
British Guiana 723 1,749

India 4 434 2315

- The White Paper makes the point thas if Britaia has
surplus industrial capacity then aid which has to be spent
on the purchase of British goods and services imposes less
of a burden om Briain’s baiance of payments than does aid
which the recipient country is free to spend where it pleases.
The British Governmen: claims tat it has taken steps
intended to match British surplus industrial capacity with
the needs of the developing nations and last year-the Gov-
ernment announced that it would increase aid along these
lines. Under this arrangement India has bought from
Britain steel plates, Pakistan sugar machinery, Ghana cargo
boats, Nigeria steel rails, and the East African Common
Setvice Organisation diesel locomotives and waggon ferries.
These transactions were all financed by tied loans,

These things notwithstanding, the British Government
has declared that is it prepared to take part in a genuine
international move towards untying aid.

(Cont. on page 9)

SATURDAY, MAY 16, 1964



A Shert Story

Gout. releases nowadays take on more
and more the aspects of short stories.
We publish a recent felicitous example.
(No. 123-64) — Ed.

“Never never let your chiidren
down by not: sending tiem to
schocl every days This is your
supseme duty. Education is t:o
imporrant a thing for us to negiect
it.”

These words, addressed by the
Honourable W. S. Stevens, Minister
for Labonr and Social Services, at
the village of Wotton Waven on
24th April toa crowd ct almost
Too residents, about half of them
scheol children, must have been
heard by them many times before
and might weli nave continued to
sound meanivgless, especially in the

be ment has taken steps to see that suck monies are not spent context of the awful weather condi-

tions of the last few cays but fer che
new school brought it long last
to their doorsteps by Government to
eliminate the five-mile journey to
Roseau undertaken in all but frohi.
bitive weather i:s the past.

Mr, Decius Bedneau, Manager of
the Wotton Waven Estate for the
last 19 years and himself a facher of
ten children, obviously deeply moved

y the occasion, voicing the senti-
ments of gratitude and - satisfaction
on behalf of the villagers. referred to
the school: as the long-awaited an-
swer to their prayers. ‘““We- have
always been longing and praying
and hoping for a_little school in the
village, hovever,” continued. Mr.
Bedneau, “by the grace of Almighty
God and the keen foresight ot the
Honourable Chief ‘Minister and
with his very. wise and noble deci
achieving this wonderful institution.”

In weather. as perfect as could be,
which bore a stiking contrast to the
week-long showers to which the
night before was no exceptioa, Mr,

| OVA. Walker, the Educaticn

Officer, who presided at the func-
lion, extending a hevrty’ welcome to
all and especfally the guests from
Roseau who inciuded His Honour
the Administrator, Colonel Alec
Lovelace, the Honourable Chief
Minister, Mr. E.C. Leclanc and
Mrs. LeBlanc, the Honourable W.
S. Stevens, Minister fcr ‘labour and
Social Services and Mrs. Stevens,
the Henourable R P St. Luce,
Minister without Portfoilio, Mr, and
Mrs. Ronald Clarke, Mrs. and Mrs.
L.A. Brand, Mr‘and Mars‘ J.
Law,ence, and the Principa! Secre-
tatis, Mrs C A Sothdinde (and
Mrs. Sorhaindo), Mc. C.A. Lege
moret and Mr. C.A, Mayaard.

The but‘ding was formally open-
ed by Mrs. LeBlanc who was pre-
sented a bouquet by attractive Miss
Mavis Xavier of the village. The
ptincipal speakers were the Minister
for Labour and Social Services, the
Administrator and the Chiet Minis-
ter. ‘Tne vote of thanks was suitably
moved by ' Miss Fliza George, the.
newly appointed School Tezcher’
Her icference to the Minster’ for
Labour and Social Services a3. “a
bulmark behind anything that per
tains to education” was greeted with
long and loud appiause.

With — refreshments served, a
function that obvionsly gave great
delight co all concerned was brought
to a happy ciose.

SUPPORT THE
HERALD
| SATURDAY, MAZ 16, 1964



The Man Who Pitched Bcitles

(A Short Story)
Cont. from page 3

Igev. The bell in his brain rang at last. “What
does he want, Miss?” Dampierte bit back a groan.

“He ask you ta bring over a tray of bieakfast to the
police station, he is hungry. This is Policewsman Gemma
Kangadoo.”

“Well, hell!” exclaimed Mr. Dampierre. ‘Excuse
me, Miss. What trouble is Iggy in 2”

_ “Picching bottles at the Oval,” said the sweet flat
voice, sounding enigmatically sympathetic. Then she
‘hung up. -

Hon, Mr. Dampierre breakfasted with two early-rising
colleagues who were churchward-bound: it was Sundav.
They, too, had slept tensely (they said) after the ferocious
cricket match, but they had not dreamed of heroism, neither
had they been asked to take a tray of breakfast to the poiice

station. One of them advised Mr. Dampierre: ‘Damn
sauce. Leave him lie’? But the second, a loval Smider

M. P., said cautiously, “Isn’t he your constituent 2”

“My best banana-heeder,” said Mr. Dampierre gloomi-
ly. So before leaving the dinirg-room he comproraised by
signalling a waiter and ordering a package of thick assorted
sandwiches. When the taxi deposited him at the policz
station, he saw Iggy at once, and the ceunter between them
served as.a breakfast table. Iggy looked a liule roughed-
up, but was smiling confidently, like a man who has faith
in his legislator. ‘iclling the tale (while he munched) of
how he arrived very, late at ‘yesterday’s cricket-match and

didn’t even see Sinlal run out, he, described how he heard.

a big comesse just like carnival and saw hundreds of people
. pitching botles. They jrmped up and yelled “Sinlal not
out! ~ Sinlal doan out!” — naturally ‘he jumped up and
shouted too !. i: As Mera ke =
“And you pitched bottles too,’ said Mr. Damoierre
f° i
iggy denied this absolutely. ‘An’ me holin’ my rew
bicycle lamp im my one:han’ and my new bicycle p:mp in
the other 2 Is late I was late because I chain-up the bike
hard to the railing.’ Is only jump up I jump up. When
people run I run. Police ketch me because I laughin’ too
much, I tell them, is only me alone you-all goin hole ?
That véx them.” | Iggy took a fine bite out of a beef sand-
wich.

For many days from that fatal morning, Mr. Dam-
pierre’s main pre-occupation was the case of Iggy. He
made submissions to conference in short order and attended
the Magistrate’s Court, accompanied by an observer Q. C.,
and later he attended H. M. Gaol, for despite early hopes

_ Iggy was severely sentenced. It would cost two hundred
and forty dollars to pay his fine and extricate him. Worse,
Mr, Dampicrte was given the charge of Iggy’s bicycle. It
was the bicycle wlach had first convinced our worthy legis-

‘lator of Iggy’s innocence. He knew when tke - prosecutor

barked “But you had a glass object in your haid — the .
‘officer saw it fash — «nd a stick in the other — didn’t you

pitch?’ That Iggy would never have thrown his new
lamp and pump at anybody. But poor Iggy was worse
than unconvincing as a witness. He never even mentioned
his lamp and pump! When he was given a grand oppor-
wunity by the question, “did you yourself believe Sinlal was
run out or did you not?” Iggy did not even hesitate or
reply truthfully that he never thought at all or (with greater
cunning) “he was cut.’? He simply torned on his confi-
dent smile and said in an echo of that exciting last moment,
“he doan out.” .
Meaawhile the community and the press had decided
that the bottle-pitching was the work of wicked Smiders,
worthy only of deportation. Radio voices quivered with
national indignation at such unsporting behaviour. How-
ever even Mr. Dampierre’s sceptical Smider colleagues had
swung ronnd to the belief that Iggy was a harmless scape-
goat, suffering for the sins of all Smiders and covering up
for local malefactors. Reluctantly but nobly, Hon. Mr.
Dampierre paid thé fine and the legal expenses, moving
into a boarding-house to conserve his subsistence allowance.

DOMINICA HERALD







——n,

‘Peter OQgden’s Day
The Grand United Order
of Odd Fellows and House-

. PAGE FIVE

Iggy was taken from the prison and deported in a schoone!
to his home island. He left his bicycle behind, and Mr.
Dampierre elecied to travel back by ship to accompany it.
Such are the trials of ho:iourable members. i
If Mr. Dampierre had subcensciously expected a, oe O, t a Bate eeetrated
thankful Iggy to return to heading bananzs for hi:n, he was | a i ey a on May
misiaken. The hero of botile-pitching speedily accepted 2 i a =o i. ue . t ne
labourer’s job in the public works department. ee ns oe ae ne a
Nevertheless Iggy’s gratitude was genuine; he appeared by Rev ra re
en Sundays and made a flowzr-bed in front of Mr. Dam-! ° The. vaeeiciaral agian ae
pierre’s house, to which every year in office added both tf, finee:™ played By
superstructure and amenities. On public holidays he} their band were to the strains
accompaaied his legislator on a tour of the constituercy,| 6S. Barin Gould’s
wh'ch included Iggy’s natal village. There Iggy made his uOneard Christen Cal,
first political speech, graphically describing the prison break-| giers”. Afeer the service
fast and other details. This was sensationally well received, | men bee teesied to hae
although other villages became slightly disenchanted with Lodge for acai ‘
tke history. Mr. Damgierre finally made Iggy chairman DY Cua
of his rural meetings in order to curb his oratory. But bn
everyone knows that Smider chairmen have te opportunity aie te oe
to make not just one, but at least six speeches on public NOTICE a

occasions.
Iggy now wore jacket-style shirts with pleats down the, BOTANIGAL GAROENS
ATTENTION MOTORISTS !!!



front, had a new hairstyle, and won a prize at the Cinema
Talent Show for singing Dan is the Man in the Wan with
yreat feeling and humour. He was popular; he had








several girl-friends, and Mz. Dampierre thought it his duty During the 1964
to worn him against dubious associations and to remind Windward Islands
him of the soundness of a healthy. agricultural career. Goodwill Cricket

Tournament onl v
limited parking
space will .be..avail-
able inside: the: Gar-
-dens, around: :the
ficus tree South West.
of the cricket pitch. ~
" arriving -
late will.-be..request- —
ed to.park.their cars
| outside. nF a
This will help to
prevent deteriora-
tion of the lawns.
Your kind co-opera-
tion will be greatly
appreciated.
‘STANLEY O. PRINGLE
Acting. Agricultural
Superintendent.
———_-————

SEMPERIT TYRES

several weeks. srctiass!
One week-day when Mr. Dampierre had received the
overdue appointment of Minister without Portfolio after the
incumbent Minister had fallen off a donkey into a ravine,
Iggy strolled into nis office. He had sucha liberated
whute-collar look that the new Minister asked at _once,
+ eee serene Tome eft the public works long,
tume,” Iggy replied, laughing. He went on to explain
that he had gone back to the land like Mr. Dampierre had
advised him. A lady had given him to manage hee
property, not so far from Mr. Dampierre’s cwn small estate.
The new Minister was duly impressed, and also. to a
cettain extent proud. He really felt that what he had done
for Iggy had been a good human investment, Certainly
the young man had never looked back since he had been
rescued from the gaol. “‘How’s your bicycle?” asked -. Mr.
Dampierre fondly, remembering that dismal Sunday when|_
he had unchained Iggy’s bike from the Oval railings and
tethered it in front of the boarding-house to depreciate his.
own sccial status. !

“I got a motorbike now,” said Iggy. “And later,
is a jeep Tl trade it for.”

After this litle lecture, fzgy was not seen around for









ana

“Your new employer must have money!” exclaimed TUBES IN STOCK

Mr. Dampierre. 150 x 20 825 x 20
“Not money — but plenty land. She and me goin oe We. aun
: : ; : 600 x 16 . 620 x 14
to martied— is because she modern. Not like the girls 750 x 16 590 x. 14
you spoke against. She tole me her manager can sleep by 700 x:20 500 x 15
her at her mother house, but no man sleepin there v-ithout 640 x 13 860 x 15
the Church, the ring and the paper. Is comeI come to 670 x 15 590 x 15

Very Attractive Prices.
S. P. MUSSON SON
- & CO. LTD.

ask you to the weddin, because you brought me my break- |
fast in prison and...” His confident voice enumerated
Mr. Dampierre’s good deeds, like an obituary notice.

Hon. Mr. Dampierre (who was still an unmarried
father) was visibly moved by such during allicd to senti-
ment. ‘Oh! Ofcourse, of course, Iggy! I'll be
delizhted!”

“Now take it light and doan ride no donkeys,” ” said

Iggy in an exact reproduction of Mr. Dampierre’s admoni-
tory tone. “Still for all, God dispose,'so if you meet UP |-not contact -D. J. B. Bruney (popu-
with any: accident, is a modern married man the people is| larly known as- Brother Bruns),
looking for. Be certain sure, Honourable, Iggy will never | 48 Steber Street, Pottersville for
let you down.” ; top quality workmanship.

Moderate Prices.

For reference contact Dominica

Cooperative Bank or Mr. Ted Honey-

church, =
. Signed D. J. B. BRUNEY.

Mar. 21, Apr. 4, 18, May 2, 16, 30

Tel. 360



7 ee

Contractor’s Services

When you want to build, be it a
business place, a dwelling house or
renovation in. or out of town you
need a Builder Contractor. Why

~ Advertisers are asked to submit copy
by noon on Wednesdays

—_—_—_—_————>
PAGE SIX

ery we





DOMINIGA WERALD

DOMINICA HERALD





— =

AN INDEPENDENT WEEKLY

31 New Street, Roszau.
Published by 1. MARGARTSON CHARLES, Proprictor
PHYL? IS SHAND ALLFREY
U.K & European Representative — Colin Turner (London) Led.

Editor — rs.

*

307

Tei.

*

122, Shaftesbury Ave , London W. 1

Annual Subscripticns ¢
Overseas

Town $5.00 Country $6.00
(" arface Mail) $7.50

ET SATURDAY, MAY 16, 1964

T is interesting to note that the followisg
| lines from the well-known hymn All
Things Bright And Beautiful have been de-
leted from some modern hymn books:

Tha rich man in bis castle, the poor
man at bis gate,

God ‘made them, bigh or lowly,
and ordered their estate.

The permanence of hereditary poverty
as of hereditary wealth is not a popular
concept nowadays, when equal opportuni-
ty for all is the cry.

A recent Government telease
(No. 7264) informed the public thai the
‘Secretary of State had approved a C.D. &
W. grant of $360,000 for the construction
of five and a half miles of feeder roads —
Rosalie-Grand Fond and Bagatelle-Petite
Savanne. Arithmetic tells us that this

works out at $65,000 pet mails, and Stace
3 C [ SSRs eet (4
ate shown. as feeder roads on the Ordin-
ance Survey) the cost of grading and
widening these new highways to admit
~ larger vehicles seems excessive.




Other figures released give $14,000 fox
two and a half miles of Warner Road,
and $8,000 for Neba-Attlee — named as
feeder roads too. What is the reason for
such a fantastic difference in cost? Of
the last two ccads mentioned, we under-
stand that some peasants are loyally wa‘v-
ing compensation claims, giving free
labour and even contributing cash, as they
have been doing elsewhere in Dominica.

a

People’s Post

i ir j ; Idressess as

Correspondents are asked to submit their. full names and ad
a uananee OF goud faith. but not necessarily for pubsication. Letters should
Coniroversiai politicai lette+s will not ve pub-
* do not necessarily

be as short as possible

lished anonymously. Views expressed in People’s Po

reflect the policy of the Editor or the Proprietor.



—_—_————_—3 >

“HIGH ROADS AND LOW ROADS ~

_ From an unofficial source. we learn that
of the sum allocated for the two roads
mentioned in our second paragraph, ap-
proximately ene-third is set aside for com
pensation of landowners along the trail; if
this is correet, $120,000 of Colonial De-
velopment and Welfare money is beiag
handed out to the very estate owners or
proprietors who will benefit most by hav-
ing their roadlinks put into conditioyi.
We have heard that the iowly contribute
— but do the high exact their pound of
flesh 2

There may be other good explanations,
which Government has not yet seen fit to
release, for this discrepancy in costs of
road-building; but for the sake of the
public and particularly of those “small
landowners who have come forward to
make their humble contribution, surely it
would be pertinent to know the break-
down of these costs. Let Government
put its cards on the table quickly, and

Togress, as
fine

We applaud the spirit of co-operation
which causes farmers tc contribute to im-
proving their roads and agree that it may
be (to quete the same release) “regarded
as a revGlutionary change in the attitude
of the people towards Government.”
Now we look forward to a revolutionary
change in the attitude of Government
towards the people: why not treat, them
like adults and tell them all the facts, and
abov: all treat them alike, whatever the

order of their estate 2





well as those planned for the





——-—___—_

Guiana. This will include
over a 100,000 tons of fice
for the several islands, thus
eliminating not having a
supply of rice regularly as
happened here for the past



The Federal Ships

Sir-Madam,

Articles appearing in the
Dominica Chronicle and the
DominicA HERALD state
that it is suggesed to sell
these ships). This may
emanate from a well inten
tioned mind, but an old
adage says “A bird in the
hand is worth more than two
in a bush.”

We know the operational
cost for the two vessels and
can plan to reduce this
further. As stated, the ships
cost $2.5 million to operate

or $.79 per capita, taking the

| population a8 3,126,637.
(This can, mean a heavy
expenditure on some of the
islands; but when the oppor-
tunities and benefits that can
be derived are taken into
consideration, is it not worth
a further trial?

It therefore remains that a
co-cperative effort should
investigate allavailable
sources where contracts can
be made with the several
islands arouad including
French, Dutch, and Ameri-
can for passengers and freight.

few weeks. Im pozts of
cement etc., can also be con-
sidered. I understand it is
the duty of the islands to
provide transportation for
their rice. “Then why not
use the Federal ships?

It is imperative that the
vessels be utilized fully so as
to reduce the burden on _ the
islands. Hence, instead of
being kept as semi-luxury
vessels, the set up can easily
be changed. The back por-
tion of the First Class can be
made for Second Class

Again we have freight and | passengers thereby eliminating

passengers begging for regular | having practically e¢ m pt y

transportation from British!cabins most of the time. It
/ f : 3 ;

can be considezed also ic
curtail the useless «vaiting at
some of the ports.

The question of crews must
also be carefully considered
as now there are only two
crew units (probably this can
be reduced in number; if the
suggestion of fcur smaller
ships is accepted, then there
will will be four crew units
instead of two, and as is
known further complications
and implications will arise.

My suggestion is to keep
the birds in hand and try for
more income.

Yours,
Temprary Guest, Goodwill
(from B. G.)

oo
The Ganadian
Gift Ships

Sir,

It is alleged (though not
confirmed) that some of the
political leaders of British
Honduras are quite keen
upon having the two beauti-
ful Federal Ships acquired
for their somewhat isolated
country; although it is fully
visualized that their annsal
maintainance would be a ire-
mendous financial loss to the





aa

men have broadly realized
that in the interest of nacional
pride and trade, etc., the ac-
quisition will definitely be
beneficial from all angles of
socialism and tourism.
NEWS-REVIEWER, Roseau
(Other letters on this subject
will appear next week. —Ed.)

$$

A Threat & An Eyesore

Madam Editor, -.- Are the eyes of
those concerned “Dim” that they
cannot see, or, are they waiting for
an “Incident?”

Right at the entrance of the Cas-
‘Je Bruce village lies an old Wooden
Bridge in the most deplorable candi-
tion, w‘th ciacked seals and iails off

‘completely on boih sides, supported

by two dry stakes.
Those who most often face this
and other detrimental features are

(x) Children of all ages and sizes off ~

to school who use this bridge
daily, even in the flood,

(2) Visitors from all parts of the Is-
land on public Holidays all day
long and overnight.

(3) Banana Growers with their hea-
vy loads’on banana days, risk-
ing their lives.

What a disgrace to the Community!
We all recall not long ago 4 similar
public Irresponsibility resulted in the
death and injury of villagers at the

Castle Bruce Spring bridges.

We are disgusted at such public
irresponsibility.
OLIvER AG. SANDERSON,
Castle Bruce
7. 5. 64

SATURDAY, MAY 16, 1964

rect, those sagacious states _

ee

| Improved Tele-

phone Service?

Dear Ed ‘tor,

The terters of telephon>
throughout the Noithern
District and all the inhabitant
ate glad indeed for the report
in the issue cf your paper fo:
Saturday the 2nd of Mr,
F.H, Reynolds. Area
Telephone Engineer of Cable
and Wireless who secently
visiced this Colony and
made a general survey of our
Tequiremenss so far as our
telephone system in this
Colony are concerned

As we have during recents
months contended, and are
still contending with many
inconveniences due to the un-
sausfactory condition of our
telephone department, which
we are bearing with patience;
we hope the time’ shall not
be too long when Mc. F. H.
Reynold’s visit shall bear
fruit to the modern insiala-
tion system fot an improved
telephone department ‘for this
colony and for which the
inhabitants of the entire
North shall be thankful. -

A NORTHERN TELEPHONE
RENTER



industry
Madam,

Having- kept | very
silent over Mr. Pat Pie.re’s
suggestion of a Sugar Fac-
tory for Dominica, I am in-
clined to say 2 few words on
this difficult undertaking.

‘Some years ago, I would

never advise avy company to
undertake such a project here,
due to labour, lack wf roads,
and world market. But
today v.ich improvement of |
toads, modern machinery and
the sugar situation in Cuba
which I call a ‘wash out’
and possibly may remain so,
as long as this wlcked Castro
is in power, I thick it is a
wise move, especially, if we.
can obtain foreign investors
to come in. Such a project
may cost 3 to 5 million del
lars, and the site may be
more suitable-in one of the
following estates: Canefield, '
Check H-ll or Grand Sav-
annah. All estate owners
over the island should be
called upon to co-operate.
Many thanks.
_ HUGH LAWRENCE
(Cont. on pa,e 7)

DON’T DEPEND ON YOUR
NEIGHBOUR’S — BUY
YOUR OWN DOMINICA
HERALD!!!)
SATURDAY, M/.% ‘16,



1964



CERGLE FRANGAIS

Chaque mardi aprésmidi, de 5.30 h. a 6 h., chez la
Présidente 'R. Issa, King George V St.. les membres du
Cercle Francais auront Poccasion d’emprunter les livres et

magazines offert par |’ Altiance Francaise.

Pour le moment

la petite bibliotheque du Cercle Francais eraport les livres

suivant:— °
Renée Massip
B. de Kerraoul
Le Clesio
J. Chardonne
J. Guehenno
E. Peisson
R. de Luppe
R. Dorgeles

P. Moinot
H. Bosco

P. Elanger
P. Molaine
C. Audry
Frison-Rache
M. Genevoix



SHOWPIECE

The Man Who
Knew Too Much

Directed by Alfred J.
Hithchcook -

By Our Film Reported “CHRIS.”

James Stewart playing his part of
a Dector, with lovely: Dons Day (as
his wife) and their kid were just
newcomers to the: ccuntry, how did
they become involved in’ a murder

, alta .cS . ty
with a population of 230,000, third
chief town of Morocco”, to take
place in London?

. ‘The incident occurred - on a bus
leaving Casablana “740,000 inhabit-

_ants of all classes, aad creeds’* en

- route to Marrakesh. Suddenly their
son pulled off a veil covering a wo-
man’s face -— the traditional cus-
tom, — causing a small quarrel.

Not knowing the language, a cer-
tain unknown gentleman named
“Bella” gained friendship with the
Doctot and_ his family, later inviting
them {0 ciuner; Fut they declined,
having metin the hetel another
Amencan family involved in the
plot who had been stationed in
Marrakesh for along time: they
dined at the hotel.

Towing Marrik:sh with their new
American friends was great fun; sight
—seeinz-acrocats, snake charmers
story-tellers; and they saw the famous
Domed Containers and Icng-neckad
veses shaped from creamy white clay,
exquisite Mosaics andhammer
polished brass implements.

In one intense moment the whole
scene changed. The police were
chasing two an identified men. In
their efforts to escape, one man was

exhausted and was stabbed by his

other friend in order to keep secrets
untold.

Faintly staggering to the Doctor,
the stabbed man was identified (after
a mud-covered face was_ wiped off)
as Bella. In agony he gave the
Doctnr a message. From there the

Doc was called by the police to be’

questioned, but (through his fear) he
Kept the secret. He was amazed to
be contacted by telephone by a cer-
tain man and. threatened to keep his

mouth shut or something might hap-,

pen to his kidnapped sor.

. . L’Epervier

... La Béte Quarternaire
... Une Si Juste Mort
..« Le Proces-Verbal
. . Demi-Jour
. Ce que Je Crois
. Le Caval‘er Nu
. . Camus
- Au Beau Temps
de la Butte
. Le Sable Viv

. Aventnriers et Favorites
. Jai Révé de Lumiere
. Derriere la Baignoire
. Le Raft
. . Derriére les Collines.

In his effort to save his son's life,
the Doc and his wife _ lett for Ion-
don — where more dangers awaited.

The American covple, new citi-
zens of Marrakesh, hed already fled
to England, and to che Dec’s
amazement this man was a parson,
‘ais daughter a pianist and his wife a
money-ccllector in a Church. Doc
goes through many tribulations, in a
struggle with these incredible people.
While his wife made a vital effort to
contact the police, the church con-
gtegation was dismissed, and violent-
ly the Doctor fought, but ‘was out-
numbered and knocked off. He

cr

passing through the belfry...

Ip the Palladium where | a great
orchestra wes to perform in the pre-
sence of the Ambassador, (who
was to be murdered at a clash of
cymbals), the timing for the murder
was well-planned, Fortunately, the
Doc arrived io tme and the
Ambassador’s life was saved,

In her efforts to rescue their son,
Doc’s wife “Doris Day” gave an
honorary performance of hex classi-
fied hit-song “What will be, will
be,” Her httle son identifying her
voice, was amazed and telieved!
Hearing his whistle, his father broke
through a door in the top floor and
found his son. Returning to his
wife, they were captured but Doc —
“Western fighter with a lot of stunts”,
disarmed his oppenent, and with
one punch set him rclling down the
stairs. Then came the joyful mom-
ent of having their son restored to
the parents.

ee

People’s Post from p. 6
Pen Pals Wanted

Pte. Bushay C. 4,,
23977024 “A” Coy,
1st. BN Worc’s Regiment,
B.F, P. O. 29,
Germany.
Dear Madam,

I would like to have
correspondents (ages 1% — 30)
from your island, which I hope to
visit in the near future.





| Editor's Replies: Ta “A Member”

Portsmouth. We are unable. to
pzblish your letter or legal reasons,
To Anthony F. Joseph of 1 CCWU:
we cannot promise to publish any
material until we Have read and con-
siderep it Ts “Housewife’’; Grand-
bay, also “‘Synspathiser” and school
corresponts, Pichelin} we regret that
Jetters cannot be printed this week,
for space reasons.



i

Commenwealth
Youth -- Roseau

With a considerable atten-
dance of — school-children
and group members, Com-
menwealth youth Sunday
celebration -in the botanic
gatdens, Roseau, was quite
successful. Deputising for
His Honour the administra-
was the Attorney Genetzl
Hon. D. K. Macintyre.

Commencing at 4.00
p-m., the National Anthem,
was played by the Music
Lovers Government Band;
afterwards, the Queen’s
message was read. Next on
the programme was the
reading of the Administra-
tor’s letter. .

“When the knights were

still in spurs? and “I. vow :

to thee, my Country”

were
be ucif

“ accompaniment of the Band.

--And Colihaut

CoLtinsuT observed
Youth Sunday with a gather-
ingof school chiidren
teachers and P-c Bedminister,
with Scout H. Edwards
Y. C. W’s and other mem-
bers of the functions all in
uniform also many villagers
attending. The ccremony
started with Mass, sung’ by
the Revd. Fr. Boghaert and
choir members ef Colihaut.

The message from Her

DOMINICA HERALD

| the Parish Priest, as well as
the days gospel as real by a
layman of the Church (Mr.
. R, Lecointe) se vera!
canticles znd the National
Anthem were sung in the
Church. At the end of the
Mass there was a village
parade conducted by the
Head, Teacher Mr. ing,
and supported by the village
orchestra, after which a
second assembly was held ar
Colihaut cricket ground.
Mr. King then delivered
the Commonwealth message
from the Rt. Hon. De La
ware G.B.E; this was
followed by an address by
Mr. F.R. Lecointe. A
few more songs were then
sung, photographs were
taken aud the function was
brought toa close. --(Contrib)

Commonwealth
Youth Sunday
Gelebrations At
Soufriere

COMMONWEALTH Youth
Sunday was observed with
gteat pomp and eclat in the
Village of Soufriere this year.

His Honour’s presence at
the Ceremony added gran-



4

sion. At 3 p.m. a special

_ mass. was celebrated by the

Parish ‘Priest.. Duzing this
service a Choir of: teachers
and pupils led the:singing of
hymns with Mr. ‘Guiste at
the orga. The Common-
wealth Youth Sunday prayer
was said and everycne was
treated to a touching patriotic
address by the ‘Parish Priest.
The service ended with the
National Anthem.

On the Church grounds
a programme of 14 items
was yone through without a
hitch. His Honour arrived
punctually at 4 p.m. when



Majesty the Queen having Joy bells gave the signal of
been read and explained by bis arrival. Met at the

Visit Of H.R.H. The Duke Of Edinburgh

Tue following is text of a Buckingham Palace release contained in
an announcement addressed to His Honour the Administrator and received
by telegram from the Secretary of State fo: Commonwealth Relations aad
the Colonies: —

“His Royal Highness the Duke of Edinburgh will visit Mexico, the
Galapagos Islands (Ecuador), Paaama and a number of the islands of the
West Indies during the Autumn of this year. His Rcyal Highness’s plan-
ned itinerary is: <

Nassau brief overnight stop on October 2oth. Mexico 21st—Ocio-
ber 29th. Galapagos Islands 2nd—Nov, 4th. Panama 7th—Nov. oth.
Trinidad and Tobago 9th.—Nov. 11th. Grenada r1th ~- Nov. 12th.
St. Vincent 12th.—-Nov. 13th. Barbados 13th—Nov. 14th. St. Lucia



Tama Negro, 5’ 9” tall, of November 15th. Dominica Nov. 16th. St. Kitts and Montserrat Nov-

brown complexion, black _ hair,
brown eyes~ and weighing about
18516. Iwas, born on ts June
1943, in America, and my mother
was a Trinidadian. I am a private
soldier stationed in Germany.
Yours faithfully,
C.A. Bushay.

ember 17th. Antigua Nov. 18th, His Royal Highness will travel in the
Royal Yacth Britannia and an AVRO 748, Aircraft of the Queen’s flight
arriving back in the United Kingdom from Antigua on November roth
by scheduled air line flight.

Because of His Royal Highness’ other commitments it has not been
found possible to include Jamaica in this tour but His Royal Highness hopes
very much that-he will visit the island in 1966 in his capacity as President
of the British Empire and Commonwealth Games,” (GIS)

PAGE SEVEN
threshold of the Church
grounds by the Hon’ble Pem-
berton and the Head Teach-
er of Soufriere. His Honour,
accompanied by his. wife,
walked to the saluting base.

His Honour addressed the
gathering explaining the
meaning of the Common-
wealth. He dilated on the
importance of Youth and
showed how the future de-
pends oa them. He exhort-
ed them to self dedication
anc Service to equip. them-
selves for. the challenging
times ahead.

The Soufriere and Scotts
Head Schools each rendered
a patriotic soug under the
direction of Mr. Guiste and
with che accompaniment of
the hand-organ ably — played
by Henrison james, aged 11.
a\ special original oehorus-
was presented by school «girls
dressed in native costumes:
and each carrying a basket of
local products,

Mrs. Simon, Head Teacher
of the Scotts Head School
moved an appropriate vote.
of thanks. The March past
was beautiful — Scouts,
Guides, Ked Gross-and pu-
pils all dressed in uniform

“presented a fine spectacle.
Asse James x. TT and ~
her two sons supplied music

during this item. .

The Programme. ended
with the singing of ‘the and
verse of the National Authem
followed by an entertainment
at the Church Hall. -

The Head Teachers of
both the Souftiere and
Scotts Head Schools, beg to
place on record their thanks
to first of all His Honour
whose presence enhanced the
occasion, The Soutriere
Development Committee for
their cooperation, the Parish
Priest for. placing the Church
Grounds at our disposal and
for all his other contribution,
the Police for - training our
pupils for that great show
and the last but not least the
parents who did their best to
fit their children. for. the
occasion and also for their
presence at the Celebrations.
(Contrib)

Training For
High Jumping

The first priority in training for
this event is the devolopment of
muscular strength particularly in the
legs. A good take-off is the factor
which ‘events most in jumping de-
heights and for this strong and mo-
bile legs are essential. Jumping
itself will develop these features but
more specific attention is needed,

‘Cont, om page 11


PAGE EIGHT |





The Failures Of W.I. Leadership

Talk by Sir Arthur
Lewis |
(formerly Principal of U.W.I.)

A report in the Guardian of April
25 ona talk by Sie Arthur Lewis,
noicd West Indian economist, to a
New York audience receutly, should
be read and studied by West Indians
everywhere, Sir Artiuc made some
telling and forthright c:1 1.isms on
West Indian pelitics and Jead rsh‘p
" Among other things, he said
that West Indians were extremely
difficult people to negetiate with,
All West Indians -— and this -n-
cludes you and = me — suffer from
an inferiority complex which results
in a very aggressive personality.

“The favourite occupation cf West
Indian politicians is calling people
names and prejudicing their good
faith and to do business with them

_is most wuapleasant.””

Sir Arthdy gaid. chat the normal
diplomatic courtesies are not known
to our people. ‘Therefore, anyone
who has to do business with West
Indian poliiicians shrinks from the
thought.”

Much Involved

Sir Agthur sa‘d his lecture was
a “brief history of negotiations for

the establishment of the Little Eight -

now known as the Little Seven”,
and that-it as written in ‘the first
person ‘singular 'bec: use he wes “very
-mach involved in the negotiations ””
_A fier: amaican referendum - --
p= Septem rors
1961. — he was a $1-a-year adviser
to Sir Grantley Adams with \ the
special task of travelling through-
out the West Indies to . find out
wheth:r, any of the other islands
wanted to continue in the Feaera-
tion in spite of Jamaica’s departure.
Tt was quite clear then that the
Governments of the, Windward and
Leeward Islands were willing to
continue in a Federation with Tri-
nidad — but not as a w aitary state.
None was willing to do so.

The Reason

The basic reason for that attitude
was because the islands had achieved
a new lease on life with the creation
of Ministries, Ministers wece tak:ng
an active part in local progress, and
the people were unwilling to see the
present powers handed over to some
distant power — whether it was
London .cr :T.ranided. They
thought the. transfer might result in
neglect.

Mr. Reginald 9 Maudling came to
Trinidad on Saturday, Januayy 73,
1962 to wind upthe talks. The
Executive Committee of the PNM
met the following day and passed a
Resolution, recommending that Tri-
nidad and Tobago should become
independent, but willing to take in
other islands as unitary states.

Maudling Hostile
On January 15, the representatives
of the Windward Islands met with
Dr. Eric Williams and decided to
tell the Seczetary of State that they
wanted the Little Eight Federation
instead of 2 ulmitary-state agreement
with Trinidad and Tobago. He, Sir
Arthur, was the one who took the
decision to Mr.. Maudling and Mr.
_Maudling was completely astonished

and hostile,
Maudling’s ‘stand reflected the
attitude of the








Colonial Cffice,.

which was in favour of th? unitary
state. But, said Sir Arthur, in
.terms of sheer cost, this did not
make atiy seuise.

The — British
wrong or the issue of cost.
the unitary state, civil
throughout the area would have to
be paid the same salarivs. Lut
Government salaries in Trinidad
were 30 per cent higher than taose
in the Windward and Leeward
{s'aads.

A Remarkable Chaige

However a most remarkable phe-
nomenon occurred. Mr. Maudling
changed his mind after the first week
in Trinidad. And, on the Friday
before he let, he said in a speech to
the Chamber of Commerce that
cederaticn of the Little Eight was che
besi solution

“T can’t tell you why Mr. Maud-
ling changed bis mind” Sir Arthur
said, “but it was a very good reason.
He told me,.. (he paused, looked
a.ound, saw the writer and said...
“but if I tell you, you will tell the
West Indian papers — and this will!
cause trouble.’’)

(There was much applause at
this statement about the tronble
which could be caused by the West
Indian newspapers.)

However, it took Mr, Maudling
more than three months to convince
the British Government that the
Little !sight idea was the ‘best’ solu-

Government was
Under
servatlis

tion, _ The ‘attitude. of the British
Government towa‘ds the West-Indies
t that time was a mixture.of.disoust..



and contempt. This is perfect
understandable since it is also the
attitude of a large proportion of the
people of the West ; Indies towards
their leaders.

Disgust And Contempt

’ In addition, West Indians felt
hu niliated by their teadets. And
that feeling of disgust and contempt
was also the attitude of most West
Indian politicians towards each other
at that times In mid-6r, towards
the end of the Lancaster Confer-
ence in England, the principal West
Indian politicians were literally not
speaking to each other.

Sir Arthur said that he served as
an instrumert of communication
among people who couldn't other -
wise communicate. And _ British
ettitude was understandable when
you revizw what had happenec

“The contempt and disgust which
the British Government had for
West Indian politicians were echoed
by West Indian politicians them-
selves, ‘they had similar feelings
about each other.”

A Wanton Act

Sir Arthur told the audience that
the first Federation meeting vas held
in 1947. West Indian _ politicians

‘talked about it for rz years. It came

into being in 1958. In 1967 they
destroyed it. But between 1958 and
1961 the objective situation had not
changed. It was a wanton act in
the eyes of the outside world, and in
a large part of the West Indies.

The British had therefore been re-
luctant to enter once more into a
whole new set of negotiations for an-
other federation. The Colonial
Office had been fed up with the
West Indies for a very long time,
and‘had already advised’ the politi-
cians tat from Federation cnwards
the West Indies must forget Britain



Y ute it was even too late to exploit

DOMINIC.4. HERALD



and look towards Canada and the

United States, :
Look To U.S., Canada

They had said specifically that from
the first day of Independence they
would pall out every Briti.h soldier
from the zrea, and the West Indies
must make arrangement. for their de-
fence with the United States. Any-
time any monetary discussions were
raised with the British ‘overnment
they would say “alright, we will talk
to U.S. and Canada to see what they
have to say,”

Ail that came to pass becouse the
British Government was taking the
line that the West Indics was now
part of the Western H-misphere, an
independent councry in the U,S. and
Canadian sphere of influence, and po
Ienger a matter of concern to the
British pcople. Maudling: had to
put up a prolonged struggle in the
British Cabinet before the Govern-
ment decided to start new negotia-
tions. The Islands couldn’t be kept
as colonies indefinitely, **because che
objective of the Briish Government
is to cid theiuselves of all colonies so
that it may join with the anti-colon-
jalist group at the United Nations.”

Another Alternative

Sic Arthur pointed out that it was
extremely difficult to have good gov-
ernment in islands which have only
$0,000 people. The only other al-
ternative for the little islands would
be for them to become absorbed in
the United Kingdom as counties.
From the Islands’point of view that
would be economically good, what
with free migration and access to the
British Trezssry.But. atthe lect_min-

that alternative.

The French West Inidies nad suc-
ceeded in becoming independent
while. hitching themselves to the
French Treasury. The American
West Indies had succeeded in be-
coming independent while hitching
themselves te the American Tieasu-
ty. The Netherlands West Indies
had succeeded in becoming indepen-
dent whilé hicching themselves to the
Dutch Treasury, ‘and the Cuban
W.I, had succeeded in becoming in-
dependent while hitching themselves
to the Russiax Treasury. ~

It was only the british West Indies
that had not succeeded in hitching
themselves to the British Treasury,
Quite reluctantly, th: British Gov-
ernment agreed to the Little Eight
formula.

No Defence Burden

Sir Arthur said that actually the
Littie Eight would have done more
for the Windward and Leeward Is-
lands while costing them Jess than
the original Federation of 1958. For
one they would not be saddled with
a very large defence burden.

With the original Federation, it
had been agreed that a relatively large
military force should be stationed in
Jamaica, not because the other islands
had to be protected “‘but because of
Cuba and all that”.

Unfair

It was unfair to the Windward
and Leeward Islands because they
were saddled with 15 per cent ef the
national budget although they only
had ro per cent of the population
within their borders, Therefore they
had been paying an unfair share of
Federal burden. ,

—FROM THE BARBADOS
BEACON
(To be continued)



SATURDAY, MAY 16, 1964

M—_—_—_

COLONY OF DOMINICA

TITLE BY REGISTRATION ACT
REGISTRY OF TITLES ISLAND OF DOMINICA
Schedule of Application for Ceruticae of Title and Notings
thereon and Caveats for the week ending the Yh div cf Mav. 1964.

Nature of ‘Request: whether
tor Certificate of Title
Notings thereon or Caveat.

‘Request for the issue of a first

\Ceruficate of Title (with plan

/ Michel Monique jattached) in respect of a pot-

4h May, 1964 | Gabriel tion of land situats in- the

1 Lown of Roseau, in zoe Parsi

Presented : by his Solicitor of St. George, in the Cvuloay

\ lof Dominica, containing 1974

Cilma A.M. Dupigny |square feet and «.ounded as

tollows;—On the North-East

by land of Ociavia Baron; On

the North-West by Cork Street; On tbe South by land of Hamilton

Rolle; and on the South West by land of Helen aad Susan Lockaart.

Registrat’s Office, / (Sgd) J. V. JEAN i IEKRE

Roseau, 5th May, 1964. Registrar of Titles,

NotTe:—Any person who desires to object to the issuing of a

Certificate cf ‘fitle on the above application may enter a Caveat at

the above office within six weeks from the date of the first appear~

ance of the above Schedule in the DomINnICA Har \LD « news-

Paper published in this Island or from the date whe. th: potce

prescribed by law was last served on any owner or occupier of
adjoining iand in respect of which tbe application is mad.

May 9—16 :

Date of Request Person Presenting

|



Requcst dated

Sth May, 1964
at 11.15 am.





COLONY OF DOMINICA

TITLE BY REGISTRATION. ACT
REGISTRY OF TIILES ISLAND Gk DOMINICA

Schedule or Applications for Certificates of Title and Notings
t.ereon and Caveats tor the week ending the 9th day of May, 1964



| Nature of Request whether. for
Date of Request;Person Presenting|Certificate of little or Noting
16th ____ {thereon or Caveat

Request for :he issue of a First er-
tificate of Title in respect of a
portion of land situate in the Town
of Roseau in the Parish ‘St. George
in the Colony of. Dominica, | « n-

Requect dated} Loftus Royer

29.h Aprli, 1964] by his Solicitor

\ Presented | Vanya Dupigny |raining 958 square feet and bound-
4th May, 1964 ed as followsi—On'Norih-West by
at'3.50 p.m. |by land of Theresa John, On the

North.East by and of Margaret
‘Peters, On the South-East by Great Marlborough Street and on the



Registrar’s Office, (Sed) J. V. JEAN PIERRE
Roseau,—4th May ' Registrar of Titles
NOTE:—Any person who desires to object to the issuing of a Certi-
ficate of Litle on the above appiication may enter a Caveat ii the above
Office within six weeks from the date of the first ippearance of the
above Schedule in the Dominica HERALD newspaper published: in this
Island or from the aate when the notice prescribed by law was last served
on any owner or c¢cupier of adjoining iand in respect of which the appli-
cations made.
May 9-16
Sareea





Banana Shipment of 7th MAY, 1964:

STEMS TONS

Roscau 23,199 268
Portsmouth 21,601 (236
Coast 2,331 25
; 47,131 529

Exports rst jan. to 30th April, 1964 $83,322 6,309

pene ee See, /

Total exports to 7th May, 1964 630,453 6,838
Total exports to 7th May, 1963 941,016 11,963
Decrease 1964 compared with 1963 310,563 $0125





OO Oe 8 8 PTS Oe 6 9 8 6 ee 8 ee 8 6 Pe 8 8 C96 oss 8—e

THE JAYGEES INVITE

ONE AND ALL TO THEIR

GRAND DANCE

TO BE HELD AT THE
OLD D. G. S. BUILDING
ON MONDAY 18TH MAY FROM 9.00 P.M.
ADMISSION: $1.50
MUSIC BY THE POPULAR

SWINGING STARS ORCHESTRA
(COME AND HAVE A GOOD TIME!

ba 9, 16

9a PS 8 FPS 8 Hf RS pe PSP AZ,

Oa 6 oA 6 Ee Cg 6 pa I ae a 8 9 “ee eee

!
!
|!
t
t
1
i
4
SATURDAY, MA.

A String



16, 1964

(Continued from page 4)

These various considerations set out in ihe White
Paper form part of the present international thinking on the
whele question of how best to grart aid. These are sub-
jects on which the recipient countries are thinking hardly
less than the donor nations. The application of Lzbour
policy to aid-giving would have to take account of these

‘current thoughts and current endeavours in this new realm
of bi-lateral and multi-lateral transactions.

AAEEE URONIC pte, OS

THE WIDENING GAP

During the last three years the need for aid has be-
come no less. The difference between the standards of
living in the industrialised and in the developing nations
has not diminished — on the contrary it has increased.

The developing couniries of the world must necessati-
ly depend largely on theit own exertions; but the de-
veloped nations recognise a responsibility to help them,
both by giviag financial aid and. by providing advice
and training facilities. The world-wide desire for a de-
termined and co-operative effort s1as been recognised in
the United Nation’ designation of the 1960s as.the De-
velopment Decade, and the need of the developing
nations is a challenge to those countries whose lot 1s
easier. It is a challenge that we in Britain must con-
tinue to accept.

—from. Aid to Developing Couniries,
September, 1963.

Aid in the balance
-. Hot upon the appearance. of. the ‘United Kingdom
White Paper on Aid to Developing Countries comes the pub-
lication of the first in the Overseas Developmort Insutue
ae ritishh to overseas
countries. The bookict, Survey and Comment (price 3s. 6d.)
tepresents the various statistics o.1 the subject and inakes a
critical survey of the problems of giving hrlp. The extract
below is taken from the pamphlet. »
.... i the short run at least, an inctease in aid sends
to worsen the balance of payments... . .
There are innuracrable reasons ... for seeking to
‘improve’ the balance cf payments of Britain. But
the problem is a rich countries problem. If the
balance of payments is adversely affected and Britain
loses gold . . . this is a loss to another rich country... .
Britain is a rich couuatry with a gross national pro-
duct of {£25,0com. for 50 million people, buying
£5,600m. worth of goods and services from abroad.
It gave and lent £1s5om. in overseas aid in 1962.
Poor countries .. ... are justified in asking in amaze-
ment whether ic is possible that a country like this can
still be deterred from increasing aid to say £250m., by
the risk of transfer of gold from itself to another rich
country? Surely the priorities are badly wrong ?
Surely rich conutries can manage their aftairs better
than this ?
From British Aid: Survey and Comment.
Overseas Development Institute, London.

FOR SALE
FORD Prefect No. 899
licensed and taxed: trial run anytime
Any reasonable offer accepted

Contact ; M. Durand
Herald Printery











qm tyme pmeee 9 ote 5 Oi 6 5 6 9 8 9ay 6 8 9 eS 9a 8 oa S oe 6 ots

SUBSCRIBERS NOTICE
Subscribers are kindly requested to report before
12 noon on Saturday if their papers have not been
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Of Aid in a White Paper (Scholarships And
\Bursaries




DOMINICA HERALD |

Five schelarships have been offered
to the Windward Islands for entrance
to the College of the Virgin Islands,
St Thomas, May 14th was the latest
date for submission of applications.

Seven teachers have been awarded
Commonwealth Teacher Training
Bursaries for 1964-65 Messrs B. Jnc.
Baptiste, F. Severin, P. E. George,
Miss R. G. Hurtau't and Miss O,
Brand B A. and Mrs. C. A, Robin-
son and E. M. James. The courses
are for one year at British College
and Universities.

S. Airica--
Danger Ahead

Sic Hugh Foot, former British
Governor of Jamaica and Cyprus,
warned on May 3 (as a member of a
five-man panel advising U Thant
about South Africa) that waz might
break out soon there. He made this
statement on “elevisicn, adding ‘Prit-
ain and the United States should put
on cConousic pressure for a better deal
for Negroes”. (CP,

—_—O 8

DRUGGED BY SOVIETS

Four Foreign Service Attachés
(one British and three American)
were drugged in a hotel on their. way
to the Black Sea port of Odessa,
Russia, recently, They were brought
back to Mescow and found to-be suf

5 i “O6Ses oO arbiturate,
Apparently no papers were removed

while they were drugged, and there |

were no signs of search, © Both coun-
tries have protested tothe U,S.S,R.

oS SS

34-Year-Old Car,
20,000 Miles

A 34-yeareold Austin motor car
has just returned to Britain afte- be-
ing driven more than 20,000 miles
across Africa to Cape Town and
back. It is believed to be the first
time that a car of this age. has come
pieted the two-wey trip,

Still In The Dark

In the House of Commons
yesterday (April 28) Miss
Joan Vickers asked the Secre-
tary of State for Common-
wealth Relations and for the
Colonies whether he would
make a statement on the pro-
gress of discussions on the
proposed federation cf Barba-
des with seven other islands
of the Caribbean group.

Mr. Fisher replied: “The
Regional Council of Minis-
cers met in Barbades from
sth to 18th April. The
Council decided to meet
again before agreeing to a
date for a London conference.
The Ministers ‘will inform the
chairman when they wish
him to convene this further
necting,” —(BIS)





Women In U.S
World

ability and intellizenee of women
more now ian ever before. says

Mrs Lyndon B Johnson, wife of Soviet Union this

the U.S President. Mrs. Johnson
noted that 93 wcmen_ had been ap-
pointed to high ranking jobs in the
Federal Government since January.

We have long passed the time in
the United States when men alone
could be summoned to great duties
she said. “In almost every sphere,
the influence of women is constant
ly growing’ .

Women in all parts ofthe world
are achicving higher status and great-
ef opportunities to work for the
welfare of their homelands Mrs. Joh-
nson said. She noted that 95 out of
the 113 member nations of the U-
nited Natious have ‘granted full and
equal political rights to women.

Oil deposits have been found in
four areas in Ghana, The Ghanaian
Times reported recently.(CP)

G.C6.L. Cables
|Harold Wilson

The United States is using the ,

PAGE NINE



The Biitish Labour Party
Lealer, who is to visit the
month,
received the following cable
from Caribbean. Congress of
Labour Gen. Sec. Mr.
Osmond Dyce recently —
“CCL strongly — supports
proportional representation in
B.G. Present system encour-
ages racialism, violence and
hatez”

a
Village Councils
During March and April thr.e

new Dominica village councils were
constituted and held elections. These

~~ | were Woodf.rd Hill, Atkinson, and

the combiried council of PaixBouche,
Moore Park and selle- Manicre Co-
libaut which had already established
a village council’ préviously, held
elections on Aprilo.



~ Prince Philip At Maharajah’s Well



Prince Philip was present at a recent ceremony (o



9

commemorate the gift 100 years ago,of a, well to the .
people of Stoke Row, Oxfordshire, by Ishree, Ma-
harajah of Benares. After landing in his helicop- |
ter on the village green he was accompanied to the
well by Mr. B.P.N. Sahi, the personal representa-

tive in England of the

ptesent Maharajah. He |

watched as a flask of Ganges water—specially flown
from India for the occasion—was mixed with water .
he had drawn from the weil. *
The picture shows Prince Philip walking from the °
well to the parish chnrch, preceded by Janet Martin -
(13) and Barry Carter (4), carrying the.yurn of

“blended”? water.
\

PAGE TEN

Extracts From An Article By
Anthony Wedgwood Benn, MP

Guardian, Britain.

T= yeat 1964 promises to be a big

yeat for mass communications.
Mass communication is without
doubt the single most important feat-
ure of the medern world. Ic 1s the
real infrastructure of our global sozie-
ty. Icilluminates what used to be
dark and it “lubricates tbe precess of
change. If feeds back information so
that we cam correct mistakes, and it
suengthens the new-found common
interest we Lave in survival and co-
Operation, cementing us — toge her
througa a new tealism. We must all
be ‘interested in how this power
is exercised.

Once communication had deve-
loped beyond the point of perscnal
conversativy and individual letter-

“writing and began to depend upon
mechanical processes, it inevitcbly Sell
into the hands of professional com-
municators: editors and publishers.
The editor “controls his newspaper,
his magazine or his radio or TV pro-
gramme. He has a framework full
of slots that must be filled with sews
items, features and comment. When
he goes.to others he sees himself as a
repeseptative of his audience with a
duty to question on theiz behalf and
then to interpret the answers he gets.
The publisher, on the other hand,
sees his réle very differently. He tries
to-find someone with © something to
say and then provides him with the
technical faciiities for saying it} print-
- ingeaad:.binding"and selling —™
books; or arranging to: broadcast his
opioions, od ot ote .
What is wrong with mass com-
munication today is that there is far
too much editing -and far too’ little
publishing. The package newspe per



and TV programme may be brillant-

examples uf skilful editing but they
deny to readers and viewers that most
vivid experience of all: a res] cunfron-
tation with thé published ideas and.
opinions of people who have gct
something to say.

First, we want much more haid
news. Without ic the whole com-
munity will fall furher and further
behind events, Esp-cial y we need
more news about scientific and tech-
nical developments. The major ones
wili revolutionise our iives arid it is as
well that we should know about
them. Jt will help conect the neg-
tect of science in our education and
Ibridge the gulf betweea ourselves and
the scientists. It will also, subtly
change our social values by reporting
us to ourelvcs more as producers
than as consumers, The excitement
of new product.ve, processes is far
greater than the dreary cult of person-
allity in the gossip columns, _

We also want the whole ‘concep-

tion of international . coverage. to. be.

revolutionised. If there is ‘a crisis in
Cyptus, we must know what the main
protagonisis on ¢ither side think’
about it themselves: I don’t: want
the Greek or Turkish views explained
tome. I want both Greeks and
Turks to be helped to put the full
strength of their whole case to us all,
and to hear first-hand what Russia
and America think about it, too.
The “exper” diplomatic correspon-
dent is at worst a biased prepagan-
dist and at best a messy smudge
actoss a page of contemporary histo-
ry. Foryears the BBC refused to



r

Editors Vv. Publishers)



.DOMINICA HERALD

—

transmit TV progracames made: by
the UN because they were rot orien-
tated for British viewers.
just why we ought to see the n.
Martin Buber has sad that the
struggle for the control of communi-
cations is a struggle between educa-
tion and propaganda. We is abso-
lutely right. We can realise ther full
potential only if we are tough enough
to permit them to confront us with
the new knowledge of our generation
and the strength of the arguments
of all sides in contro
versy. Ifthat 1s done ovr highest
hopes for an educa ed world could
be made a reality within the lifetime
of us all. :

—_— = —- —<@———-

Nominees

Success Beaten By
Telephone

In a Domino match play-
ed at Beach Clud on Sun-
day last between the Tele-
pkone Dept. Demino Club
and the Success Domino
Club the Success Clu b
were beates by a margin of
270 pts. The scores being as

follows: Telephone 3,ats pts

Success 2,745 pte.

To scorers were: P,
Ferdinand and A. Warring.
ton for Telephone with 1052
pts and J. Augustine and P.

Seraphine for Success with |

1335 pts. :

be Telephone Club was
Captained by A. Warring-
tor; the Success by Perry
Seraphine. (Contr.)



Under The Workmen’s
Compensation Act, 1937
In The Estate Of Ciifford
Hodge, Deceased.

It is hereby notified ihat ihe
Commissioner for Wovsmen’s Com-
pensation will hold a court at the
Magistrate’s Court, Roseau, on
Tuesday the 26th day of May, 1964,
at 2,00 o’clock in tke atteinoon
for tha aurpose of consideracing
the claims of the dependants or
the above deceased toa sum de-
posited w!th the Registrar under the
provisions of the Workmen’s Com-
pensation Act 1937, -

Interested persons may attend

sel.
JOSEPH V. JEAN PIERRE
~ REGISTRAR -
Registrar’s Office
ROSEAU
rg 4th May, 1964
May.16, 23” \

SAE
USED, SECOND HAND

Two Electriclly Vihrated
Block Machines
$ rf Operated
Concrete Mixers
1000—4” Steel Pallets
1000—8” “ as

1000-6” * "t
_ J, ASTAPHAN & CO. LTD.
May ‘9-—30



Yee that js!

personally or by solicitor or coun- °

SATURDAY, MAY 16, 1964

—_—_—_—————— er?

leep Transported By Helicopter |

ey ee









A Wessex HC Mk. 2 turbo-jet helicopter lifts a. jeep during a .dem-
onstraticn of the British Royal Air Force’s \ first nelicopter squardron °°
=at- Odi neland.... sng Boe Ya 2.

\

po ( u naar



. : Pe tis a : . Sa,
The new helicopter has. a maxinsum speed of 120 miles per hour ind

a.range cf 345 miles at 115. miles per hour.





Monsieur Kene Maneu, chiet ot UNESCO (to whict the “litde
seven” W.I. islands will be jointly subscriber-members) visits Sir Alec
Douglas Home in London. Centre is the British Minister of Edu-
cation, Sir Edward Boyle.



'

The HERALD Is The People’s Own Paper
SATURDAY, MAS 16, 1964



Training For
High Jumping
(Cont from page 7)

This wou-d involve exercises to in-
crease Jez extension (splits) eg. high

|

leg kicking, endto ‘enethen ham-
stings, e.3, touching tres wn
straight knees. Weight Training

wilt build up the muscular strength
of the legs and circuit training will
develop all round stamina.

Success can be achieved in high
jum-ing by convincing ore.elf that
one is capable o° jumping highe..
Many athletes in Training put.the
bar up 3 to 4 inches higher than
their best height whilst they are in
the vicinity of che jumping area but
not actually jumping, They become
accustomed to seeing the new height
znd when they eventually came to
jump it, st does not seem so formid-
able. Others chalk 2 mark on
their bed:oom door at the height they
ave aiming to reach and in becuming

_us:d to it they break down th> psy-
chological barricrs that always
accompany new heights.

Fielpful though the exercises and
training aids can be however, im-
prevement only comes with practis-
‘ng the actual event; but practice
must be purpo.eful and det-rmined.
Find your faults with the help of an
informed partner and eliminate: them
with his telp sn serious practice.
Start jumping at a height which de-
mands a definite spring upwards bu
which can be cleared - consistently.
Do not anticipate the lay-out on
take-off, as ‘this limits the efficiency
of the take-off and avoid ‘the com-
mon and serious mistake of diving

over the bar in the Straddle,
Wks 2h

o

aan : s jumping
with a technical soundness he should
“experiment with the speed of his
approache this should be as fast as
can be handled efficiently at take-off.
He must also practice under a variety
of conditions, jumping on grass and
cinder and landing op sawdus, sand
or foam rubber. He must work in
wind and when there is no wind,
on a wet surface and on a dry sur-
face.

Training should reveal progression
in intensity as the season aprroaches
and in technical development. Dur-
ing the off-season basket ball aad
volley ball are excellent activities and
as the season approaches low-hurd-
ling and interval running should

‘feature more in training, In season,
2 to 3 days concentration on jump-
ing is sufficient, and out of season,
only 1 to 2 days is needed.



- of

The high jumper should aoe

up gradually, and work regularly
and patiently to develop the tech-
nique and the other essential factors
of power, Alexibilty, confideuce and
ex perience.

Gemmenwealth
scholarship For
Bominicar

The British Council, Pore. of
Spain have announced the award of
a Commonwealth Schelarship for
studies in Britain to Dominican
Nicholas Joseph Orville Liverpcol;
for reseatch in law for the degree of
Ph.D. at the University of Sheffield
fOctoFer 1964-July 1965).

Mr. Liverpool is at present study-
ing law at the University of Sheffield,
(BIS)

\

French Gonsul
On Tour

Monsicur HeENry Dupont,
_French Consul General for this re-
gion (resident in Puerto Rico) is at
present on a familiarisation tuut of
the small islands, where ie is meet-
ing various persons .interested in

French affairs and culture.
3 : os

P.M, Ordered —
Bombing

DUNNS, SCOTLAND, May
11, CP: Prime Minister Sir
ATec . Dougias-Home _ said
here today that it was his
personal decision to use air
power against the rebels in

the South Arabian Federa-
tion so that there would be

the minimum number of
casualties among “our

ground troops’. It was re-
ported on Saturday that Bri-
tish planes had dropped
tourteen 1000f6 bombs on
dissident tribesmen’s positions
in the Radfan area pzeceding
a weekend when a number
persons were xeported
killed.
SSE EESaIEnenteenmmnen=2 “camememmemmmeememmneeat

* FOLLOW THE STAR®









Feel the comforting warmth penetrate
right down to. the core of the pain as
you rub on Radian-B! Enjoy the
wonderful relief that Radian-B gives
you—relief from those ageing pains
of rheumatism, lumbago, sciatica,

fibrositis, sprains and bruises.
Radian-B contains pain-killing aspirin
for fast relief. Get a bottle from your /
chemist or drug store today!





— ieee
ASPIRIN. «Il sen
spiRit el
LINIMENT




Buy

DOMINICA HERALD

PAGE ELEVEN



William Shakespeare Again !





For serious studenis of Shakespeare, the open‘ug of the new Shakespeare Centre
at Stratford-zpon-Avon on 22nd April was one of the mest significant events
commemorating the 4ooth anniversazy of the poet's birth.

The entrance exhi’xitton hall has a life-size bronxe figure of William Shake-

speare. The face of the figure is turned towards the birchplace garden —— but.
it 1s an eyeless face. This is a deliberate act by the sculptor who intends the

visitor to imagine for himself the sort of eyes Shakespeare had. The double
dcot in the far wall lead to the Stratford Room lecture theatre.

TROPICAL

1OusE PAINT



pats

AbAILABLE AT

OWING

THE FOLL
L.A. DUPIGNY Esq., | 4
J. W. EDWARDS

G.G. PHILLIP & COMPANY |
T.D.SHILLINGFORD
PAGE TWELVE

eet,

LOGAL SP



ORTLIGHT

CRICKET

St. Vincent Poised For ist

Tue 1964 Goodwill series com-
menzed on Thursday at the Botani-
cal Gardens with St. Lucia playing
St. Vincent, At the end of the fi-se
day’s play the scores we e St. Lucia
125. St. Vinceut 80 for 1.

The .day belong:d decidedly“ to
St. Viacent. Skipper Samuel won
the toss and sent St Lucia into bee.
a gamble which paid off in the end,
but which local pundits must have
viewed with a certain degree of spec-
ulation since che wicket was hard and
true apparently fi.il cf runs. But
Samuel knew his guns and took the
chance.

Early Break Through

By lunch, four of the best batsmen
on the St. Lucia side were back ~ in
the ‘pavilion and just before tea
the whole lineup had
succumoed fora meagre 125.
This low score is by no means attri-
butable to the state of the wicket. It
played true, perhaps on the fast side,
especially earlier in the day, and en-
couraged strokeplay of all varieties.
The Sc. Lucia side batted as if they
regarded this as a one day match and
apartfrom skipper Phillips’ intelligent
30, Dubois’ 24 and Vidal’s 20, there
was little responsibility in the rest of
the batting,- The St. Vincent bowling
swasistesdy and penetvative but erratic
in parts Tbs fielding, however was
» of a very fair standard.

“Run Of Play

. Hunte-and Hippolyte~cpe
innings and the Jatter displayed no
hesitancy in going for his strokes.
He believes in attack. Hunte on the
other hand showed’ a: pretty straight
bat until he was deceived aad played
on to K. Williams for 6.

_ Jouet joined Hippclyt- and those
two,seemed to Le setting in when
the latter offered a catchto N.
Dougan who accepted. Two balls
‘Jater R. Joseph was bowled fora
duck and St. Lucia were 30 for ?.
Fortunes wese partially recovered
when Skipper Mindu Philip and
Jouet started stroking the [tall well,
but just before lunch Jouet played a
lille early and turned Williams, hard
but uppishly and straight to R.
Dongan at square leg who made no
mistake; He made 12 and so they
went in to lunch 60 for 4.

Post Lunch Gollapse

After the interval Phillips and
Dubois were bent on survival and
brought somecharacter to the batr-
ing. However, as is so natural,
Phillips couldn’t be contained too
long and launched anoff drive at
Williams without getting to the
pitch of the ball and Sardine took it
easily enough at deep mid off. He
contributed 30,

If St. Vincent theught that this
was a break through, incoming bats-
men Vidal and a composed DuBois
had other ideas. . They put on 42
useful runs, Vidal hitting a glorious
six, a vicious heok to the long
Seg boundary. Fortune favouis the
brave, but not all che while, and
when these two left in quick success-
ion Dubois deceived by a slower
one from Duncan and Vidal mis-
timing a sweep off Sardine the wnt-
ing was on the wall. Sardine pol-
ished off the tail to end with the re-

Innings Lead

markable analysis of 3 for 1 in 2
overs. K. Wiliams iailed success-
fully for 3 for 40, while D. Dougan
and Duncan got 2 wickets apiece.

Sound Start

Samuel and U. Ajexander gave
Sc. Vincent a very sound start against
“Atherly and Cranpum. Atherly is
decidedly the fastest paceman on
e.ther side, but was not very inclined
at making the batsman play. He
concentrated all to often at keeping
the ball outside the off stump. He
was ‘unfortunate, however, not to
have had Alexander’s wicket, Joseph
muffing a sitter at first slip. Alex-
ander playec beautifully off his legs
to amass 24, while Samuels was the
essence of correctness.

On the formei’s departure ‘N,-
Dougra took the crease and has.
followed his natural inclination to

get on with it. He has chanced his
arm fortuitously and succeeded. He
hit a beautiful six to midwicket off
Vidal which was a delight to watch
for sheer timing. At the close he
was still there with 23 while Samuel
contained himself nicely for 20.

Mirdu Philliv has soâ„¢ far tried
five vowlers of whom young Mave
cette, the off spinner has been the
most impressive. He beat every bats-
man to whom he ‘bowled and was
unlucky to have had two catches
dropped off him. The «battle conti
Nues. tomorrow, and its my guess.
that St. Vincent, after this initial ad-
vantage will press it_home and win
easily by 7 or 8 wickets probably

~after lunch on Saturday.

At Lunch ©

a

..

Samuel and Dougan continued
the St. Vincent innings from 80 for
1, facing the bowlirg of Atherley
from the North atid Mauricete fom
the South end, While Samuels
continued in his cali confident
fashion, Dougan’s batting registered
an element of impatience—p:obab-
ly a Cesire to get on with things.

__ We saw Atherly extracting some

life from the wicket ard altogether
bowled well. He twice hit Samuel
in comfo:table positions; but skipper
Samuel is as tough as they come and
he stood it well.



With the score at 95, Dougan
played across one from Atherly whu
had beaten him twice previously and
was bowled for 28.

Joffte Sardine joined _ his skipper
and without undue hesitation went
for his strokes, He was beaten first
ball by Mauricette as he played in-
quirirgly outside the off stump, but
in the same over dispatched a short
one with consummate easeto the

" square leg boundary,

But he didn’t last long, as soon as
Skipper Philip's came on he had
him playing back and: out L.B.W.
and then St. Lucia really struck.
‘Two wickets fell for t ran, including
the resolute Samuel: He tell for 26.
Mindu Phillip had made a useful
change. Crvickshank and Findley
took the score to 124 before Cruick-
shank was caught piumb in front
from a Philip’s yorker, Trimming-

ham 4 and Findley 2 survived a run .

out appeal, a near thing and at

lunch the score was 129 for 6.



7~-housing. The C.

DOMINICA HERALD

Short Legco. Meeting

(Cont. from p. 1)
The bills included an

amendment of the Windward
Is. Banana Insurance Ordin-
ance (to protect growers
suffering ftom winds:orm
and other damage}, also
amendment cf the Public
Piers and Wharfage Ordin-
ance to provide for importa

tion cf banana-wrapping
material free of vwharfage
dues. Earlier two pumice

mining papers were laid >y
Hon. N. A. N. Durreay,
Minister for Trade and Pro-
duetion, and one paper rev
lattng to Shakespeare Cen--
tenary. stamps by Hon. Mr.
Stevens. Ananendment of
the Crown Proceedings Or-
dinance, introduced by the
Attorney General, was pass-
ed. ;

It was a subdued meeting
save for some sprightliness
over the Housing Committee
nomination. Mr. Henry
stated that in view of the
Mayox’s responsibility for cer-
tain housing developments
and contrel in the tows of.
Roseau, he ought to be on
that committee, and he ques-
uoned whether Mrs. Mable
James had any special know-
ledge or qualitications. on




that Committee—the S.M.O.
and the Director ot. Works—
and that Mrs. James’ ability
“to meet her fellow men at
any time and under any cir-

cumstances” was sufhicient
qualification. The A. G,
asked the Speaker: ‘“‘Is this

debave out of order 2” and the
Speaker replied: “It is”. A
coumer-motion moved by the
Oppesition that Mr. N.A.N.
Ducreay, Mr. L. C. Didier
and Mr. E. C. Loblack serve
on the Housing Committee
was defeatea by the origizal
motion that Mr. Ducreay,
Mr. A. C. Active and Mrs.
james be named as its mem-
bers.

An adult audience of t vo
duzen (including two
women) followed the pro-
ceedings, which were also
attentively listened to by
twenty-two girls from the
Fifth and Sixth forms of
Wesley High School, some
of whom are students of
West Indian history.

WANTED

ACCOUNTANT

Ability And Experience ‘more
Essential than Qualiiica ions,

Salary Commensurate with
ability And Experience.

J. ASTAPHAN & CO. LTD

~ ROSEAU

May 16} 23, 30, June 6



With Ganada

-— Says Andrew-Rose
Winnipeg, Canada, Ma
12, (CP) — The West In-
dies would not accept politi
cil union With Canzda but
some form cf closer relation-
ship should be established,
Andrew Rose, High Com-
missioner in Canada for
Trinidad and Tobago said
on Monday. He said people
of the West Indies would be
against political union be-
cause they could net see their
nation “giving up its
independence to become part
of another nation”. He said
the West Indies would favour
increased trade with Canada
but Economic Union as sug,
gested by Canadian politi-

SATURDAY, MAY 16, 1964



cians may not be the answer.

ce

[No Political Union| Kenyans For

Guba?

NarrosBi, Kenya, May ar. CP;
Cuban Government offici-ls have
promised to award scholars!.ips to
Kenya students wishing to study in
Cuba in the near future, a National
Assembly member said today.

=< ee

FOR SALE

By adjacent portions of
land One sontaining about
4 acres and the ether contain-
ing about 33 acres with sub-
Stantial buildings and cultiva-
tion thereon situate at Cas-
seau (on moterable raad to
Wotton Waven) about. 23
miles from Roseau.

Apply to
CLIFTON A. 4. DUPIGNY

Chambers, Roseau.
May 16, 23, 30





"Brownie Golden Jubilee

May 1914 — May 1964
MOTTO: “LEND A. HAND”

Tuts year marks the soth. Anniversary of the Junior Branch in
the Guide Movement known teday as ‘‘Brownies”’. ;

This movement is for girls within the age of 74/—— 11 years.

It is

really the stepping scone towards the Guide and later to the Ranger Branch.
The Iitttle @ 2es are.thought the principles of honesty, fidelity helpfulness in
the home, as well as so ne of the fundamentals which should make them

worthy. citizens of the community in

Besides working for and attaining =
other as is displayed in the Annual.Pack Holiday (one

ill-have-to-play.-theit=parteo=--ee--sm

which in the future as women they



‘badges, th oti
week)...

_ In Dominica, May 17 — 25 has been selected as Jubilee Week, and
in accordance with this, the :follov.ing programme has been arranged:

Sunday May 17

Monday May 18 Fun and Frolic
Admission only
Tuesday May 19

Wednesday May 20
Thursday May 21

Church Parade (all Brownies are to attend service in
their respective churches).
At 11.15 a.m. Opening ceremony at

St. Joseph.
in Goverament House Grounds.
tog. Refreshments on sale, |

All childrea are invited. \
Brownie Revel to which all parents, guardians and
well-wishers are invited,
Park Party, Brownies only.

Film show at the Imray School-oom at $.3¢ p.m.

Refreshments on sale.

Silver collection.

Friday May 22--25 Pack Heliday.

Ii i: hoped that this week’s activities will be a source of refreshment
to all the participants and a blessing to the Movement which throngh. its
founder, has brought much inspiration to many of us who passed through
the Movement either as Brownies, Guides or Rangers.



COLONY OF DOMINICA
TITLE 8Y REGISTRATION ACT

REGISTRY OF TITLES

Schedule or Applications for Certificates

ISLAND OF DOMINICA
cf Title and Notings

tuereon and Caveats for the week ending the 16th day of May, 1964



| 3
Date of Request, Person Presenting

Nature of Request whether for
Certificate _ of Title . or. ‘Noting
thereon or Caveat



Request dated]. Isaac Newton
Shillingford
7th May, 1964| by his Solicitor

Presented
13th May, 1964
at 3.15 p.m. .

Vanya Dupigny

Request for the issue of a First Cer-
tificate of Tithe in espect of a
portion of land situate in the Village
of St Joseph, in the Parish St. Joseph
in the Colony of Dominica, ccn-
taining 8,550 square feet and bound-
ed as follows: —On the Norh by
lands of Janie John Baptiste, On the
Public Road to





South East by
Mero, On the South-West by Coubarie Road and on the South by
Public Road. s
Registrar’s Office, (Sed) J. V. JEAN PIERRE

Roseau,—13th May 1964

Registrar of Titles.

NOTE:—Any person who desires to object to the issuing of a Certi-
ficate of Title on the above application may enter a Czveat in the above
office within six weeks from the date of the first uppearance of the
above Schedule in the Dommuca HERALD newspaper published in this
Island or from the date when the notice prescribed by law was last served
on any owner or cccupier of adjoining land in respect of which the. appli-

cation is made.
May 16-—23

“PRINTED AND PUBLIHED BY J, MARGARTSON CHARLES, THE HERALD'S PRINTERY, 31 NEW STREET, ROSEAU, DOMINICA, SATURDAY, MAY 16, 1964