Citation
Dominica herald

Material Information

Title:
Dominica herald
Creator:
Allfrey, P. Shand ( Phyllis Shand Allfrey )
Place of Publication:
Roseau, Dominica
Publisher:
Dominica Herald
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 42 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Dominica -- Newspapers ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Dominica

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1955? Cf. caption.
General Note:
Editor, <1963-1964>: Phyllis Shand Allfrey.
General Note:
"For the General Welfare of the People of Dominica, the further advancement of the West Indies and the Caribbean Area as a whole."
General Note:
Description based on: Jan. 12, 1963; title from caption.
General Note:
Last issue consulted: December 31, 1964.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. This item may be protected by copyright but is made available here under a claim of fair use (17 U.S.C. §107) for non-profit research and educational purposes. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
82144654 ( OCLC )
2007229365 ( LCCN )

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Caribbean Newspapers, dLOC
University of Florida

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
LIBRARY
RESEARCH INSTITUTE
‘OR THE STUDY OF MAN
162 EAST 78 STREET
NEW YORK 2°

~Nerecemenme

= ma wd eg pee



ESTABLISHED 1955

BRO!





VN SUGAR

(For the General Welfare of the People of Dominica, the further -dvancement of

_







PEN



lY

Five Bakers Make Statement A Prince is Bore

TWO items of the people’s

staple diet in Dominica have

either temporarily vanished or are about to vanish from

the shelves and trays of small retailers.

Ever since an offi-

cial reminder that the price of brown sugar is controlled at
17 cents a lb. (the astronomical zise in world sugar prices
having brought the imported white-sugat price to nearly
double that of brown) -- brown sugar is seldom to be

seen.

Tt has been suggested to
the HERALD by small retail-
ers who have no surplus
stores that stocks of brown
sugar are being “held up”
by some merchants jn the
expectation that the controll-
ed price will be upgraded
scon. We are unable to
verify these suggestions before
going to press, but it is clear
that some shops have insti-

tuied an informal rationing
Mie stich as “one or 2 Ibs.

of brown sugar only to a
customer”. We also know
that those who cannot pay
thirty cents cr more per Lb.
for white sugar cannot
sweeten their coffee or tea,
having been unable to get
sufficient brown sugar.

Meanwhile the penny
bread, a national “filler”? for
over a century, is threatened
because of rising costs of
flour, etc. The following
release signed by bakers
James O. Paul, Alva A.
Lafoud, James Burton, John
LaRonde and Addison
Anthony tells the tale:—

“We Bakers of Dominica,
members of the steering com-
mittee of the proposed Bakers
Union (discussed in Maich
1963) have decided to the mounting cost of a bag
of flour, the penny bread
should be replaced by a 34
oz. dough bread for ¢ cents.
There is now no way a baker
can make even a small prcfit
otherwise, with $12.50 or
$12.90 for a bag of flour.
Imagine a town baker’s ex-
penses! He who rents an
overt at $1.00 per day also
pays out: Head Baker $2.00
per bag of four; Roller, 75
cents, Busher 50 cents (and
that “bush system” should be
abolished by town penny-



PETER BELLOT—ISLAND SCHOLAR
As forecast by the HERALD, Peter

Bellot has b:en awarded the 1964
Government Scholarship.

On Tuesday Queen Elizabeth JI
gave birth to a third son, her funrth
child, who is now third in line for
the throne of England.

Congratulations poured in from
all over the world and even Grenada
fired a twenty-one gun salute.

This followed the birth of a son
last week to Princess Alexandra and
the Hon. Anges Ogilvie. Prince
Philip, on Thursday, dashed off to
the funeral in Athens of his first
cousin King Paul of Gneece — a
funeral also attended by Archbishop
Makarios, President of Cyprus.

"HAM, QUEEN ELIZABETH THE QUEEN MOTHER





CAS

=-To visit Dominica by royal yacht Britannia on March

22nd, while on a convalescence cruise following her recent

operation for appendicitis.

W elcome !



bread bakers); wood $2.00
at least; keresene 12 cents,
bush 50 cents, electric light
2§ Cents, yeast 30 cenis, salt
I§ cents, transport 25 cents
and Bread Carrier 75 cents.
All these expenses amount to
$8.57 plus $12.90 flour cost
per bag.

“Any baker in the town
of Roseau who does not
reach $22.00 after selling the
baked products of a bag of
flour suffers a total loss.
Other expenses which are
not included are: commis-
ston of 60 cents on every
$5.00 bread sold; bakery
maintenance so cents daily
(cleaners etc.); licence $4.80
yearly and medical certificate

$2.00 yearly. In conclusion,
it is impossible to make a
profit on the penny bread,
therefore we bakers have now
agreed to bake 34 oz. dough
for $ cents in order to make
a living.”

The Bakers steering com-
mittee saw the Minister of
Trade and Production before
his trip to Canada last year,
and were told by him (says
our informart) that bread
ptices cannot be controlled: it
is up to the bakers to fix a
profitable price. The signa-
tories to the above release feel
that their move will gain the
support of the majority of
bakers in Dominica.



aoe

SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 1964



re 5 >

BREAD







‘the West Indies and the Caribhean Area as a whole)

Tov

PRICE

PROI





Power Restored

D. E. S. Appeals

A°

LEMS

For Economy

1 # x x 1. *
the last copies of last week's number of the HERALD
came off the press at seven o’clock last Friday, a huge

boulder detached itself from the top

of the curved cliffside

above the Trafalgar power station, and smashed sideways
against the middle portioa of the twin twelve-inch pipeline
feeding water to the three turbines below.

Throughout the island, the
lights dimmed and faded as
the water was reduced to a
trickle. Craching into the
first pipe the beulders’ force
was muffled by the acéumu-
lation of trees and branches
it had brought down the
mountainside, but part
jumped aiid scattered five 25’
lengiks cf the second pipe
like matchsticks whilst
huge piece over 8’ in diame-

me: galled ol 0

pipes as ifthey were rails for

150’, before halting at an

abutment.

Essential Services

Frantic work by a gang of
twenty to thirty on the follow-
ing days (much of it in mud
and potring rain) restored
one pipeline by using a few
spare lengths and “bortow~
ing” from the other pipe.
In the meanwhile the stanaby
diesel generators were used to
supply essential services, but
could not be brought into full
service until a pipe from a
smali stream up the mountain
had been installed to supply
cooling-water (which had
before been taken from the
turbine tatlwater).

During Saturday, Sunday,
Monday, and Tuesday there
was intermittent load-shedd-
ing but most areas were sup-
plied with a mininum of five
hours current during the day
in order that home refrigera-

one:

tonshould not suffer,
Now, the three Pelton-wheel
turbines are turning at less
than full power and, with the
two 260 kilowatt diesels,
Dom 1nic a is precariously
balanced with about - 1350
ky something like 90’/;
of our full load requirements
and -withcut reserves. The
Dominica Elestricity. Ser-
vices appeals to all consumers
of electrics pr
cal, especially during © the
peak-load evening hour—so,
do your cooking on the
electric stove during the day,
ane use only those lights that
are absolutely necessary at
night.
= - Wesectts s
PEOPLE IN THE NEWS

Princess Alice Chancellor of
UW] arrived Wednesday on MV
Federal Palm for brief official visit”
BASIL Blackman of CCL flew in
Monday arranging small islands
seminar — met by DTU Sec. R.P.
Joseph * pukE & Duchess of
Rutland paid quick visit Thursday
for swim at Castaways, lunch at
Springfield * srar Lestrade return-
ed from Puerto Rico after 3-day
seminar On Municipal Administra-
tion * AVIATION vies E.A,. Hay-
ward, Fire Officer U.K., and E,
Fleming, W.I. Dir. Civil Aviation,
spent three days on critical appraisal
of rescue and fire-fighting facilities
at Melville Hall * unrrep Nations
Special Fund Mission of consultant
engineers F.D. Leeburger and
Phillipe Bertrand coming next week
concerning electric power pote itial
and giid network possibilities in
Caribbean.





6 SS OR eS 6S PE 9 6 OS Pe 6 Oe 6 fe 6 oe 8 Po eS ft

as had heen arranged.

6 9a 6 9S $ pte 6 9 6 8 a 8

May.
| Mar. 14~ +21

] ey

ANNOUNCEMENT

The Harcourt Carter Optical Co. Ltd. wishes to inform
all persons with appointments for March 9th to 11th
that due to illness they are unable to pay their visit

Persons with appointments
will be notified for the next visit which will
Please disregard notice on page 9.

(
he i

Qe 1 ae pt



PAGE TWO

ee



People’s Post

Correspondents are asked tc submit their ‘ull names and ac‘dressess as ; 3 ‘ |
a guarentee of good faith, but not necessarily for pubsication. Letters should \telligent potential Carib mechanics ,

be as short as passible

Grenada’s Views |Government’s

Sry

We heard here about your
Star Party, but’ will is be
given the support it deserves?
We feel tha: no matter how
hard you try to better the loc
of the Dominicans, you are
not of the correct complexion.
You see West Indians now
are vely prejudiced and they
only want to be tuled by
those of dark skin. No mat-
ter how good a fair man may
be, even if he was a second
Churchill, he would not get
a chance because of the
colour of his skin. A white
Barbadian Doctor told me
twelve years ago that if he
was a young man and
wanted to get on in lite he
would dye his skin a dark
chocolate colour. Yes, before
long you will hear about
discrimination by the
coloured nations and I won-
der if any of them would
allow the whiie peoples to
live and work in their coun-
tries like England has done
~ver many years! I doubt it,
but I may be wrong,



Has Dominica got maay

beaches or will it build
hotels in the mountains
where people can ‘riverbathe
and hunt? What about
a hotel built near the sea but
with ro beach, with a pool
where seawater washes in and
out? Shorelands Hotel in
Trinidad was built like that.
Yours sincerely,
SPICEISLANDER, Grenada.
NOTE. The facilities of the
Fort Young Hotel will include a
freshwater Swimming-pool —Ed.

Anchovies




In Oil

Coniroversiai politica: lettes will not oe pub-
lished anonymously. Views expressed in People’s Post do not necessarily |
yeflect the policy of the Ed tor or the Proprietor.

Help Needed

Dear Editor,—! would
like you to publish in your
newspaper something about
a mew road we are making
in the village of Dubique.
It was ounce a very smail
road, not a dozrkey could
pass on it before. I, Johnass
Anselm of Dubique found
that small road was not good
for the village, so I called for
a meeting in January for the
people of the village to help
us to make a road. We
started on the 13th of January
and we have reached a far
distance already, so I am
asking the Government to
have a look over the tread
because ii is a very important
road.

We have started the road
without the help of Gevern-
ment so I would like the
Government to take part in
it now.

Yours faithfully,
Jounass ANSELM,





Give The Garibs
Jobs

Sir,

A couple commercial business
gentlemen have stressfully remarked
that in as much as_ the hard-work-
ing pleasant Caribs have distressfully
suffered from the efforts of a severe
financial depression for more than
half a century, — the governmental
authority should sympathetically have
specific instructions timely be issued
that the mechanical operations, and
the manual work of the proposed
new highway from Hatton Garden

DOMINICA HERALD

to Salybia should definitely be done
solely by the Caribs.
There are, undoubtedly, a few in-

who are quite capable of operating
the earth-moving equipment with
conspicuous efficiency.

Likewise the new roadways from
there via Castle Bruce, Good Hore,
Sar Sauveur, and Perite Soufriere to
Rosalie should be carried out by the
manual labouring residents of the
respective areas, who have undergone
a tough period of economic pressure.

Is it mot unsatisfactory to have
workman transferred from the West-
ern Zone to the Eastern Seaboard,
resulting in the estimated expendi+
ture being exceeded?

RevieEWER, Roseau.

rs

The Faith
Defended

Dear Madam,

It ought to come as a
rather rude shock to the Ban-Reli-
gion protagonists of Dominica (re
belated reporton Dawbiney Club
debate), to read an article like
“Taking Sex Seriously” (Time,
March 6. p. 21). Sweden. for alt
we know, is certainly nota priest-
ridden couutry. Itis one of the
most advanced in the world. It
has “highest rates” for many things,
even. suicide. And there now a
team of Doctors, after an assessment
of sex-laxity, declare. .. ’ Young
people in Sweden are not happy.
They lack the Ten’ Command-
ments in their upbringing”. .









‘As for Superstition... It is true
that. our canoer awe 2
uneducated, tind you, are: disturbed

once and. again bya stray spirit
(without much encouragement from
the clergy as they wl readily



Barclays Bank
Directors —

Barclays Bank has recently
appointed two Local
Directors.

Mr. E.C.A. Roberts has
been appointed a Lacal
Director of Barclays Bank
D.C.O. in the West Indies.
He succeeds Mr. Henry Dales
who is retiring shortly. Mr.
Roberts was pteviously Local
Director of Barclays Bank
D.C.O. in Israel.

Also appointed one of the
Bank’s Local Directors in
the West Indies is Mr. G.C.
J. Self. Mr. Self has been
with the Bank’s Local Head
Office in the West Indies as
a Local Directors’ Assistant
since it was opened eleven
years ago. Mr. Self has
visited Dominica on _ three
occasions, the last of which
was only a few days ago.

ea

G. J. Clement Potter

G. J. Clement Petter, long
a member of the Montreal
St. James Literary Society
and on iis executive commit-
tee since 1955, died in Mon-
treal on February 4th at: the
age of 66. He was the

Born in Dominica, Mr.
Potter graduated ftom

admit), and this after 400 years of McGill University in 1922

Christianity.

One of the few places o7 earth
where Christianity has not been able
to mess up things is New Guinea.
There the aborigines still favour
dried skulls of the enemy as mantle-
pieces or local jewelry for belles and
beaux. Whena civillsed tourist
scoffed at the Bible of a Christian
Papoua he was tald. “If { had no
Bible, you wou!d have no head...”

Yours respectfully,

FR. FRANCIS C. SS. R,

The Presbytery, Goodwill,

with a BSc. degree in
Chemistry. Soon afterwards



a Mt, fe fires oe mens 5
Minister Rev. Philip: Potter.

SATURDAY, MARCH tra. 1964



papers from many parts of
the world.

He had long been accepted
as an authority in technical
reference services and had
written several papers on
documentation for library
organizations.

Mr. Potter reured last yea:
but was retained by the Issti-
tute on a consulting basis.
He also worked as an editor
for the Pulp aad Paper
Asscciation.

During his youth Mr.
Potter was a cricket player
and was a noted fast bowier
for the Montreal West Indiana
team.

He joined the St. Jaraes
Literary Society 15 years ago
ard is remembered for the
breadths of his interests,
which ranged from Omar
Khayyam to William Blake,
and for the help he gave to
new members in preparauon
of papers.

He prepared a bibliogra-
ghy of titles, subjects and
authors of all papers present-
to the group from 1899 to
1955. He was named an
honoraty member of the
society rhis year. Mr. Potter
is survived by a° sister in
Trinidad.— (adapted from The
Montreal. Star, 7.2.64)

ee arene i -
Trip To
Martinique

The Editor of the HERALD
thenks all those correspon



he joined the forerunner of dents who have sent messages

the Pulp and Paper Research
Institute of Canada as a ie-
search assistant, and_ co-
authored several papers on
research projects.

Fer some years he had
been the Institute’s technical
research specialist gatheriag
information from _ scientific

of friendship for delivery to
the Martinique pecple, and
also those who added the
suggestion that President de
Gaulle be invited to visit
Dominica. Such an invita,
tion, of course, would have
to be made officially and not
informally. — Ed.



~ FROM THE “PHOENIX” --

A.C.S, & CO.

@ for RASTER @



IMPORTED EGGS - - - $1.35 Dozen

20¢ — CAVIAR

Hot Dog & Hamburger Relish

Table Prunes

1-lb

pkt.

Tennents Mait Extract & Milk Stout
Sparkling Red Burgundy

Mount Gay Rum.

Mount Gay & Cockade Rum.

Gallon Jugs
Bot.

Greme D’Argent Dry Gin
Tuborg Beer $8.60 — HEINEKIN

Mar. 14—21

(

70¢ — Frankfurt Skinless Sausage
a ane jar — Danish Red Ball Cheese 44 Ib each

39

$13.90 —

$2.75 — Trinidad Rum. Vat. 1

31

Red Claret
Dry & Sweet White $1.20
9 & Old Oak. Bot.

lb Tin $4.20

$4.50

Gouda Cheese $1.00 Ib.—Blue Cheese 77¢ pki.
$8.90 — Le Rubis (French) Vin Rouge Red
$3.50 — French Table Wines.

$1.70
$1.20

$2.90

$2.80 — Carlings Beer $8.70 — Tennents Beer $8.70 cs

$8.75 — Guinness Stout
Boneless Corned Beef Brisket 3 to 5-lb. pieces'at $1.50 Ib. —

33

48-1,
24-4

a

Nips
pts.

3

$13 00
$8.80

A. €. Shillingford & Co. Ltd.





SATURDAY, MARGH 14, 1954

a ey



The following Editorial from “Venture”, monthly macazine of the:
Commonwealth Bureau of the Fabian Society, puts the recent and present
troubies in newly independent countries into a proper perspective

Gommonwealth in Grisis?

The disturbances and bloodshed in Bengal, Cyprus,
Zanztoar and East Africa and the increasing evidence that
Ghana 1s turning into a totalitarian state have encovraged
a mood of dis.llusion with the uew Commonwealth.
Zanzibar in particular has provided fuel for: Tory Canutes
like Sir Cyril Osborne and Lord Colyton. Aud more
contemporary figures, so-called realists, are anxious to see
Britzin shed her remaining responsibilities in the develop-
ing werld. Impatience with Afro-Astan tactics in the
United Nations, the theme of Lord Home’s Berwick
speech, is expressed in usally progressive quarters (even in
the New Statesman).

Critics of zhe nev’ states of Aftica and Asia frequently
argue as if these countries attzined independence complete
with balanced societies, trained élites, and no serious pro-
biems that cannot be put right with a littl: technical assis-
tance and tne generous donation of conscience-appeasing
food surpluses. It is no slight te the emergent countries to
s'tess the tremendcus problems they inherit with ind pen-
dence. Those who paint out the real achievements of
enlightened British colonial administration, forget that it
was not until the war years that the Whitehall establish
ment thought seriously about ‘“‘preparing” colonies fer

independence.

Once independence was recognised as an

eventual aim, there was still a tendency to cencentrate on
constitutional advence and neglect structural and economic

problems.

Personal Problem

th a

ye EWA anges
For Worid
HE Citizens’ Advice Bureau in
Britain, originaily promoted to
meet a-war-time need, this yeaz cele-
brates its silver jubilee — 25 years of
experience.

Its success has attracted wide in-
terest throughout the world. A
number of countries have established
offices on the lines of Citizens’ Ad-
vice Bureaux in Byttain.

The bureaux are now a ferma-
ment part of the life of the commu-
nity in Britain — 428 of them set
up throughout the country are con-
sulted Fy more than one millio.
people cvery year.

The bureaux are centres cf free
information aad advice on all kinds
cf problems, for example; questions
about house purchase, social :nsur-
ance, legal aid, consumer problems;
and requests for advice on all kinds
of family and personal problems,
matrimonial disputes, differences
with landlord, tenant or neighbour,
and the many other difficulties which
beset the individual.

Asa result of experience in Britain,
similar bureaux have bnen set up in
Australia, India, Israel, British Guia-
na and Southern Rhodesia.

Ta the past 12 months visitors have
come from many countries to look
into the service in Britain, and there
have also been many letters of inquiry.

The vast majority of staff at the
British bureaux are volunteers but in
some places, notably the Central
London Bureaux, there is a paid
professional soc.al worker as super-
vison.



(Cont. on p. 5)



a a an Rn io

specialists in their own fields.
_ The taining of bureaux workcrs
is a continuous proce ats
essential for them to keep up to date
with new legislation aud trends in
social though:. c

The arrival in Britain in recent
years of large numbers of people from
other parts cf the Commoawealih
has increased the amount of work of
the bureaux. Many such immigrants
have deen helped to settle’ down to
their new life as a result of help
reeeived.

Most bureaux in Britain are largely
sipported by gran:s from their locel
authority, supplemented by voluntary
contributions. The headquarters
service 1s financed partly by the
National Council of Social Service
from its voluntary funds, and partly
by grants fom Government
Departments





$=.

University Of The
West Indies

PPLICATIONS are invited
from medically qualified gra-
duates for a post as Demonstrator
in the Department of Anatomy.
The appointment is for one year in
the first instance and the successful
applicant will be expected to assume
duties on Ist August, 1964, or as
soon as possible thereafter.
Salary £1,150 pet annum with
a housing allowance of £250 per
annum if married or £200 per ane
num if single.
Applications giving age, details

DOMINICA HERALD

ee +



Financial Help
For Garibbean

| CARIBO Sec. Gen. Goes

On Tour

Mr. C. F. Beauregard,
Secretary-General of the
Caribbean O-ganization, in-
formed the press recently that
he will ce visiting Washing-
ton, Londoa, The Hague
and Paris during the first two
weeks of March for talks
with government officials.
The main purpose of his
visit is to discuss the ways
and means by which the
countries. served by
the Caribbean Organization
migkt derive additional fin-
ancial and technical assist-
ance from the French, Neth-
erlands, United Kingdom
and United States Govern,
ments under the Caribbean
Plan.

Mr. Beauregard said that
a special committee of the
Organization will meet in
St. Thomas, March 16 to
18, to discuss the matter of
financial and technical assist-
ance for the area, in the Light
of the report prepared last
September by two Stanford
last August, which conclud-
ed that a Caribbean develop
ment bank is not feasible at
present. “It is a well recog,
nized fact”, Mr. Beauregard
said, “hat if the countries of
this area are to develop, they
need assistance from both
government and __ private
sources. For this reason, the
St. Thomas meeting will also
consider 2 proposal to sei up
a private invesiment company
to supplement any assistance
which imay come from gov
ernmei.ts.””

The meeting will be
attended by Caribbean O1-
ganization countries and the
four Powers concerned. It
is expected that the Carib
bean countries will be repre-
sented at policy-making level.

SS

Application For
Liquor Licence

To the Magistrate Dist. “G” &
Chief of Polize,

I AtixrorD PaRILLON now tev
siding at Culihaut Parish of St.-
Peter do hereby give you rotice that
it is my intention to apply at the
Magistrate‘s Court to be held at
Porsmouth on Saturday, the 4th

of qualifications, and the names of day of April 1964, ensving for a

three referees should be forwarded to
the Registrar, University of the West

There is also normaily a panel of Indies, Kingston 7, Jamsica, W.I.

consultants (local probation officer, a
Jawyer, moral welfare worker) who
support the work of the bureaux and
are available to give guidance as

not later than March 31, 1964,
Further particulars may be obtained
similarly.
March 14

tetail Liquor LicENCE in respect
of my premises at Colihaut Parish
of St Peter.
Dated the 28th day of January
1964,
: ALIXFoRD PsRILLON
Feb. 29.—Mar. 14




PAGE THREE

+ te

0’Loughlin Report Commended



The report on the proposed Eas- {der-Secretary of States for the Colo-

tern Caribbean Federation prepared | nies, said:- “The British Govern-
by Dr. Carleen O° Loughlin, Sen- | ment accepts. Dr, ©” Loughlin’s re
jor Lectursr in the Department of | port as a useful examination of what
Economics of the University of the | these territories might need to make
West Indies, who is in charge ofthe |them self-suppoiting,
Institure of Social and Eccnomic | “We hope shortly co be in a po-
Research’s branch in Barbados, was ited to discuss with the Govern-
mentioned in the House of Commons eyes concerned how far the British
on Feb:uary rr. In reply to a ques» |Governments may be able to help
ton pnt to him by Mv. Donald | them if they wish to implement che
Chapman, Mr. Nigel Fisher, Un- | findings of the survey.”

—fa-—_.









<>

Notice To Banana Growers
La Plaine Buying Station

GROWERS in the La Plaine District are informed that
the Association will operate a Buying Station at La Plaine
28 from the Banana Reception in the week commencing
tsth March, 1964.

The hours of reception at that station will be 8 a. m.
to § pm. on the FIRST DAY of the Reception aad’ the
price payable will be the cusrent Southern District Buying
Point Price— at present 4.6¢ per 1b. — with an additional

-25¢ per Ib. for fruit qualifying for the Company’s Incen-
tive Bonus.

A.D. BOYD
DOMINICA BANANA GROWERS: General Manager.
ASSOCIATION a
sth Match, 1954.
Mar.14








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‘20





PACE FOUR

eee

$78,500 Grant By
Ford Foundation

In a press notice released
iecenily, the University of the
West indies announced a
grant from the Ford Founda-
tion of $78,000 (U. S.) pay,
able over a period of three
years to cnable the University
to undertake a programme of
staff development. The
gram will permit the second-
mentto the U. W.I. of
specialists in various fields
and allow fora member of
the University staff to assisé
the Planning Committee in
drawing up long-term plans.

Other generous grants
made by the Foid Founda-
tion to the University of the
West Indies within the past
three years have raade possible
the establishment of an Engi-
neering Faculty at St. Au-
gusting, an nstitute of
Education. at Mona, and a
branch at the Institute of
Secial and Economic Re-
search in Barbados.

‘This most recent evidence
of the Foundation’s continued
support, like all previous
ones, will promote the Uni-

-versitv’s development in_ its
mest fundamental

Ford Gets Citation

The Institute of Interna-
tional Education (IIE) has
awarded Ford Motor Com-
paay a citation for “distin-
guished service in interna-
tional education by a
corporation.”

Arjay Miller, ' Ford presi-
dent, accepted the citation
from Mrs. Maurice T. Moore,
chairman of the IIE executive
committee, at an awards
dinner in Washington D. C.
last week.

PH.D. To U. W. 1. Graduate

Woodville K Marshall,
recently appointed as Assis
tant Lecturer in the Depart-
ment of History of the Uni-
versity of the West Indies,
Mona, and who ts a graduate
of the University College of
the West Indies, has been
awarded the degree of Ph. D.
by the University of Cam-
bridge for his thesis ‘The
Social and Economic Deve-
lopment of the Windward
Islands, 1838—1865”.

Dr. Marshall was a mem-
ber of the 1958 graduating
class at Mona when he
obtained First Class Honours
in History. In October,
1962, after doing research at
Cambridge University, he



aspects. Our reporters: vegan Thay

VOMINICA

el A, Somer

was appointed an Assistant
Lecturer at the University of
Ibadan leaving that post to
come to the University of the
West Indies at the end of
1963.

Fred Phillips Honoured

Mr. Fred. A. Phillis,
Senior Assistant Registrar in
the College of Arts and
Science of the University of
the West Indies in Barbados
has been elected a member of
the American Society of
International Law with
effect from January I, 1964.
Mr. Phillips, who used to be
Secretsry to the Cabinet of
the Federal Government of
the West Indies, has con-
tinued to do reseatca in the
field of international law
siice taking up administra’
tive duties with the Univer-
sity.

D. G. S. Variety
Talent Cavalcade

We were forced through
the disability of last-minute
car repairs to dekgate the
reporting of this variety show
to two young gitl reporters.
Their account delighted us,
being the impact of youthful
talent on young observers.

writing that the hall was

people — high class, “second
class, low class aad school-
children! (We would not
ourselves dare to be so blunt).
The show, they said, started
bang with the 1964 sreel band
Champs, playing two fine
tunes: “Around the
World” and “Mocdy
River”; then Mrs. Marie
Davis Pierre and her
“enlightened the vast crowd
with some well-sung songs”,
receiving great applause.
M. C. Lieut. Earl Johason
“had a very nice voice in
announcing.”

Close on the first success
came the 1964 Calpso King
with his fireymystery hit
“Sinna”’, followed by “You
can't stop me loving you”.
He got a tremendous. recep-
tion, and other talented calyp-
sonians receieved their share
afterwards.

Our girl reporters revelled

D.G.S. “ragged
which (in their

in the
squad”

words) “showed how to run §
2 batallion with no discipline, |
Al
though the young observers
regretted that they were too
shoulders
many

>>

and was too funny.

short to see over
and make notes of the



~ keep

chorus

ESRALD

they'd ever enjoyed, and
hoped a lct of money was
made.

Not overlooked were Bare
bara Bully’. lovely songs (she
was pari of popular Reo:eveli
Richard’s trouge), the giace-
ful Renaissance dancers, an
avalanche of other enter-
tainers (too many to list) and
the skit “A Night 1 Camp,”
which hela the young
reporters to their seats uncil
midnight approached.

PAY ‘YOUR DUES

y
R. P. JOSEPH
(Gen. Sec. D.T.U.)

Some workers arc very
neglectful in paying Union
Dues, and some do not like
to pay at all.

In this situation, the up-
of the Union is left to
the faithful few, who make
regular payments.

This problem has led to














o

V.I. P.s present, they de-

the

clared it was

best and
‘most well attended show



SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 1964





the Check-Off System of
dues ceduction, which is
slowly but surely becoming
the standard method of dues
collection in the Caribbean
Area.

There is, however, a vast
number of workers who do
not pay dues by this system,
because there is no agreement
to do so, We make a
special appeal to this group,
to Jive up the responsibiliues
of maintainiug a strong
Trade Union Movement.

The Union, a; an Organi’
sation, must pay rent, lease
or taxes. It must pay staft
to Jo the work in the office,
without which, the Union
cannot survive. Field Siaff
must be provided, negotia-
tions for wages and just con-
ditions of work must be con-
ducted in the prover way,
which sometimes entails em-
ployment of Technical Pe--
sonnel. Iriternational affilia-
tons which are teday very

L.A. BDUPIGNY Esq.,
J. W. EDWARDS

SIL PAINT

GENERAL PURPOSE



important aspects of Trade
Union activities, musi be
maintained.

All these involve expendi-
ture. If, thererore, a worker
fecis that a Union ts necess-
ary for protecting him and
acvancing his interest, then
surely, he must be prepared
to contribute financially to
the maincainance of Union
activitics.

Some workrs know the.
Union only when they are
in trouble. This is the
wrong attitude, becat se, if
somcone did not pay to keep
tle Union alive, there would
be no organisation. on which
to fall back when the evil
days ccme along.

Let us then, consider this
seriously, and carefully. The
Union needs the financial
aid of its members. Dues
must be reguleriy, paid, if
the movement is to survive.

Thank you for valuable
space.

READY MIXED



RUSSET



CARIBBEAN) LIMITED.

AVAILABLE AY 1HE FOLLGWING HARDWARE STORES

G.G. PHILLIP & COMPANY

T. D.SHILLINGFORD






SATURDAY. MARCH 14, 1564

~:



Commonwealth In Crisis?
(Continued from page 3)

In some instances Britain has been directly responsible
fcr creating the conditions a one-party stace is designed to
cure. If nation-building seems to most African leaders a
dominant priority this is because Britain failed so create
nations in the colenies she administered. Tribaiism was
perpetuated and the tribes simply linked by authoritarian
government at the centre. This tradition has been perpe-
tuated even in Kenya. And if che one party state is a pest-
colonial developmenr, preventive detention measures are
not — they were a common instrument of colonial govern’
ments.

In the piocess of decolonisation more stress has been
laid on the trappings of democracy than on its essence.
In particular the last phase of British decolonisation has
been marked by a pre-occupztion with elaborate constitu-
tional structures designed 'to contain temporary political
divisions or allay minority fears rather than to tackle long
term social and economic problems. A baffling system of
checks and balances like that presented to Northern Rho-
desia in x96x is not likely to encourage respect fer paalia-
mentary democracy. Noor is it strange to find Zenzibaris
little attached to a system ‘which allows the party which
democraticaly secured 54 per cent of the voies at the pre-
independence election to remain in opposition with only
13 seats out of an assembly of 31
Under colonialism education development was neg’
lected until very late and economic develo;>ment geared to
the needs of the colonial power. Now rapid educational
advance creates new problems. Zanzibar is ususnal in
having a large number of secondary school leavers with no
jobs and no prosrects. But the prcblem of unemployment
"among primary school leavers is universal in Attica.
Zanzibar’s economy is dependent on a. precarious market
for two products, cloves and coconut produce — which
together account for 95 per cent of her totalexpoits. These
ons are likely to lead to s cial untest
instability.

Recognition of these factors should not prevent
Socialist from deploring the arbitrary injustice which is
developing in Ghana. Injustice anywhere is our legitimate
concern, and its impact in this case is felt all the more
Lecause of personal and professional links with a fellow
Commonwealth countiy. Developments in Ghana make
the task of those in the West who are pressing for the end-
ing of colonialism in Southern Rhodesia and the Portu-
guese territories more difficult.

Yet Ghana’s self-reliance is a model for the develop-
ing world. Her achievement in putting the vital areas of
her economic and social life under Aftican con:rol hes
been impressive. Tanganyika’s troubles under-line the
danger of delaying Afticazisation. Now Ghana’s achieve-
ment is threatened by the botding up to legitimate criticism
which can only encourage violenze and increase the secut-
ity thre t Ghana’s chief strength has been the size and qual-
ity of her administrative élite. Civil service morale is al-
ready low, and if the administration is weakened by further
purges, Ghana’s surge forward will be checked.

Writing about the spread of authoritarian rule in
Aftica Professor Bauer has suggested confining aid “to
governments willing to address themselves to che essential
functions of government ....” This, he argues implausi-
bly, would reduce political tension in Africa. In fact
such action would limit the power of independent states to
plan a mixed economy along socialist lines and drive them
to rely exclusively onaid fromthe East. This would
hardly make for stability, nor would it achieve Bauer’s
libertarian objective. America’s economic boycott of
Cuba has net made for stabllity in Latin America, or
has it diminished Castro’s appeal. The only criterion for
the giving of aid should be whether it is being efficieatly
used by the recipient government in the overall interests of
its people,

It would be disastrous if Britain and the West were
to tarn their backs on Left-wing authoritarian regimes in
Aftica. If we are really concerned about Communist






DOMINICA HERALD

PAGE FIVE

penetrat‘on (whether from Moscow, Peking, cr Havana) Natice To Banana

we shali involve ourselves as we can. To isclate a com
munisant regime in Africa when the Communist world is
no longer a monolithic bloc would be misguided. The
West must learii co adjust itself to polycentrism and accept
that the old simplifications of the heyday of the Cold War
no longer apply

Thre is grave danger in ostracising developing, coun-
tries which unhappily turn authoritarian. Given its own
recent past the West has no right to play the Pharisee. If
Socialists criticise, let their criticism be related to the inheri-
tance of colonialism and the challenge of development.
The problem of world hunger and the gap between North
and South transcends political theory. Wester. social
democracy must not appear to place fieedom to siarve
among the fundamental freedoms.

Advertisers are asked to submit copy -
by noon on Wednesdays:





SPECIAL DRAW
(UPSTAIRS)
PRESCRIPTIONS ARE CAREFULLY

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Training For Olympics

Growers

Hours Of Recextion: Soufriere
Buying Stations

Growers selling their bananas at
Soufriere Buying Station are notified
that as fromthe Banana Reception
in the week commencing 15th March,
1964 the hours of reception a: that
statian will be from 7 a.m to 2 p.m
on the FIRST DAY of the Reception,

A.D. Boyd
General Manager
Dominica Banana Growers Assuci~-
tion
6th Merch, 1964.
Dfar. 14



DEPARTMENT,

LOOKED AFTER.
1964 PLACE YOUR

ee ASE ee



ete te Sie eda

Louis Martin of Jamaica practising for the only award he does not hold — the weight- ifiing



PAG SIX

SO

DOMINICA HERALD

DOMINIGA HERALD

AN INDEPENDENT WEEKLY

31 New Street,

Editor — mrs.

*

Roseau. Tel. 307
Published by 1. MARGARTSON CHARLES, Propri-tor
PHYLLIS SHAND ALLFREY

U.K. & European Representative — Colin Turner (London) Ltd.

*

122, Shaftesbury Ave , London W. 1

Amual Subscripticns :

Town $5.00 Country $6.00

Overseas (Suzface Mail) $7. 50



SATURDAY,

MARCH _



NOBLE LADIES

F this brief editorial reas like a Court
citcular, it is because most of the
recent news from outside has been studded
with noble ladies’ names. He: Majesty
Queen Elizabeth HI has produced a fourth
child (third son, and third in succession
to the throne); her niece Princess Alexan-
dra gave birth to a boy a few days earlier;
her great-aunt, the Princess Alice (Chan-
cellor of the University of the West Indies)
has just stepped on and off these shores
while on an educational tour; and Queen
Elizabeth the Queen Mother is recuperat-
ing in the Caribbean aboard the Royal
yacht Britannia, pausing in jamaica and
Barbados and (we hope) elsewhere.

Next week, to extend the saga of illus-
trious ladies, Lady Olave Baden-Powell
will be with us, to the joy of Guides and
Brownies; and the British Prime Minis
ter’s. glamorous daughter Meriel has

become engaged to a handsome econo-
is) z

- Since Her Majesty ‘the Que Queen is not

only a monarch but an example of happy

motherhood to the weuG. we ma a

rejoice with her and with her husband
Prince Philip on the aew baby’s birth.
“A perfect woman, nobly planned... To warn,
to comfort, to command.”

There is no douoct that most West In-
dians love big names and better still royal
names. They don’t even mind standing
like outside children at the foot of the
greathouse drive while the VIPs of the
day brush fingers with the more permanent
notabilities of other climes. We met a
woman compattiot who was genuinely
dazzled at the mere thought that the
Duchess ef Westminster had looked at
Dominican birds, and usually level-headed
persons quiver at the sight of a film star.

And why not? If you are not celebra-
ted yourself, or if your life is rather unex-
citing, staring at the great or the royal
from afar or ancar is a very innocent form
of pleasure; no novelist has bette: described
the vicarious nature of enjoying celebrities
than Jane Austen.
~The Gomiionwealtn-rovesix
royal personages, and if these “islands have
a special affection for Princess Alice it is





SE

The British Prime Ministers’s daughter with her fiancé Mr. Adrian

Darby,
will marry this month.

tutor in economics at Oxford University:

Both ‘are 24 and

SATURDAY, MARCH 1 14,

1964
because she is the Chancellor of our own University and
is not only gracious but hardworking. The royal Chan-
cellor has always brought goodness and learning to the
West Indian peoples; she really cares about “her” Univer-
sity, and deserves a most happy cruise.

——

NETURE’S BREA KDOWN

AR we spoilt by taking some of the amenities of civilisa-

tion for granted? We denot know how much the
acts of nature which caused destruciion of electricity pipe-
lines and plunged Dominica into darkness on and cff since
Friday March 6, has cost in interruption of services, busi-
ness and producticn; but doubtless the C. D. C. will soon
be able to add up the financial extent of their damage. It
was fortunate for us that they had spare pipelines in stock.
It may be some while befor: the rest of us can estimate on
paper the ameunt of inconvenience caused by untimely
stoppage of electric power, goods deterioiated or labour lost.
Nevertheless the community has as usual accepted the blow
with reasonable stoicism.

We appreciate the efforts which have been made by
Dominica Electricity Setvices and the C. D. C. to stagger
electricity supplies so that domestic food storage was largely
safeguarded. They have also kent the populace quickly
informed of load-shedding hours and resumption of power,
also of the progress of repairs — for which we are thankful,
although the enforced silence of WIBS at intervals left
many pecple still in ignorance of the day-tozday vosition.
At least the cold storage plant and Princess Margaret Hos-
pial have not been without mains power for any harmful
period, and Dominica's chief pakery has becn able to
keep going.

The task of reparation has been a hard one: for the
engineers and workmen concerned with this power break-
down; they have had to work long hours in pouring rain
with mud underfoot. It is fair to say that they spared no
~eo syinie the-artificial-licht.. refrige-
‘tation, radio and other aids to comfortable living which an
Hetessipg number of our citizens now regard as indispen-
sable.





re> « #

Mr. Justice F.0.0| semperit TyRES
Harris and

TUBES IN STOCK

A Correction 750 x 20 825 x 20

P 650 x 16 520 x 13

Readers who gained the impress- 600 x 16 20 x 14

ion thrcugh these columns that Mr. 750 x 16 590 x 14

Justice Harris had returned to 700 x 20 500 x 15

Dominica to reside are hereby in- 640 x 13 260 x 15

formed that Judge Harris is really 670 x 15 HON yx 15

here on leave with his family. and
wlll be going back te Cameroon in
about two months’ time to resume
his duties as Judge of the Supreine
Court There.

<

University Of The West Indies

A\PL'CATIONS are invited for the post of Lecturer in Obstetrics

‘and Gynaecology. Duties tobezssumed on Octo bert, 1964,
or as soon as possible thereafter. Postgraduate qualificaion in the speciality
is essential. The post carries Honoriry Vonsu!tant, or Junior Consult
ant status in the University Hospicat.

Salary scale, £1,750 x 120 — £2,590 x 60 -~ £2,650. Child allowance
(limited to thee children) £50 for the first chitd, £1co for the second
child, £50 for the third child. F.S. S. U. Housing allowance
ot 10% of salary, or if available, unfurnished accommodation will be
let by the University at 10%, of salary. Up to five full passages on ap-
eae cn normal termination and on study leave (once every three
years

Applica tions, (10 copies) giving full particulars of qualifica-
tions and experience, date of birth and the names of three referees should be
sent by Apiil 14, 1964, by persons living in the A merieis and the Carib-
bean area to te Registrar, University of the West Indies, Kingston 7,
Jamaica, W.I. and by all other persons to the Secretary to the Senate
Cemmittee on Colleges Overseas in Special Relation, University of
London, Senate Hcuse, London, W.C. 1. Further particulars may
be obtained simularly.

March .1 14

Very Attractive Prices..

S. P. MUSSON SON

& CO. LTD.
Tel. 360








SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 1364

“$9 THEY SAY”--

. BY BOR & RAY
so posed a question *o us the other day as

follows: “AI( our bananas were b’o.vn cov n in the
hurrican: last Autuma. We scceived our insurance cheq:ie
based on previous binana sales Now, if it will take a
year (approximately) for our ban-na cultivetion to begin to
vield again, that will tring tke tim: around to Hurricane
Seison once more. Suppose w- suffer enother hurticine
then before we can establish banana vield with the Associa-
tion. How can they pay us another insurance claim on
the new figs that are destrcyed since there is no “‘previcus
sales records” for che prececding montis 2”

Off hand we'd say this grower is just better off to raise
some other crop. . dzsheen, perhaps !

The Federal boass are supposed to “benefit che small
West Indian islands” bue we wonder who it is that benefirs
since the small grower of ground provisions finds the boa‘s
too expensive to ship the dasheen, tznnias, pumpkiss, ete.
on to Barbados, St. Kitts and elsewhere in the Caribbean.
The Federal boais have drained off just enough local cargo
to hur: the local schooner owners and have made these
skippers extremely non-regular in their trips to and from
neighbouring islands,

Mercharts tell us they cannot order a few cases of eggs
or bags of fertilizer or animal feeds t» come via Federal
boat as the minimum shipping costs ate too high. A few
weeks ago there was several hundied cases of grapefruit
routing in their boxes awaiting shipment to Buarbidos.
The Federal boats* rates were too high and no schooner
was available. The grower told us it is absolutely impossi-
bie for anyone to learn what schooner is going to Barbados
(or Antigua or Trinidad) from the agents as they don’t
have definite word from their shippzrs.

When we inquired why the schooner people aren’t
more teliable and on definite schedules, we were told the
Federal boats have spoiled their business by taking just

e
indehnite loads. Hence, shey said, the island is left with
(1) inadequate schooner service aad, (2) high (and mighty)
Federal Boat rates.

On top of this situation we learn the Federal Boats
Cannot Operate at a profit. .. that their miszrable service is
losing money! Upon checking up on this, we find there
is a “plan to louse money” on the Federal Boats. For exam-
ple, when the Federal Boats are in harbour at Bridgetown,
Barbados, the bars and dining rooms are closed! When
it is time for visitors to ‘go ashore” — the bar opens!
The hours of operating their public facilities are ~ craftily
atranged to be inconvenient to their pass.ngers. As one
recent visitor to Yominica told us: *The Federal Boats
are really doing yeu.a favour to sell you anything!”

One way to lose money in »perating 1 public setvice
is to have a “‘ublic bo damned” attitude. Anotner way
to chase business away is to close your doors to business
(admission of cargo) three days before departure (as in ihe
case at Barbados)... and to have non-competitive rates.

The experienced shipper elso tells us the Federal boats
have more personnel than is necessary to operate their ships
(in spite of the poor sérvice that is reudered) and that any
business with too high an overhead is bound to lose money.

Perhaps all these facts are known to the directors of
FSS and they will soon use the non-profit theme as excuse
to withdraw the boats. But several merchants have told
us: the sooner and Fed. boats leave us alone, the better, as
the schooner people will then become better organised and
will have regularly scheduled voyages once again... so
they say. es

ee >

Oa 6 > 6 9a 5 9a 6 9 6 a 6 P= 8 9 6 8

6 Sa 6 9 pe

SUBSCRIBERS NOTICE j;

Subscribers are kindly requested to report areata
)





ae 9:

12 noon on Saturday if their papers have not been
delivered. We may be sold out by that time.
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L



chaps she had been beaten to death.

‘ing, until I reached the bank of the

DOMINICA HERALD

PAGE SFVEN



The Great Fight Of My Dreams

hy Paula Bellot

THE SUN was shining brightly, The day was hot and everyone kep:

themselves very busy down in the markecplice in order to get out of
the scorching sun, Some of the people carried big baskers on their heads,
othyrs were aprons around the waist with their heads tied like old maids.

There was a litle fiish in the firse stall and everyone wanted to be
served, so they kept on squeezing onz another; I stood at che extreme eid
watching the crowd as they engaged themselve, in such stupid behavicur.

A boy, named Hurston, who was dressed in a pol:c:man’s tire came
marching towards th2 crowd vith a piece of stick swinging in bis hand,
He was not impress‘ve at all and noone stoppzd to look at him Suddenty
I felt > push and the next thing I knew I was hit hard on the head with
the same stick, Never had I experienced such a dexdly blow as this one.
Blood flowed dow:. my cheeks lik: 2 running stream, I closed my eyes
for I dared net watch it and move blindly up and aown so that someone
would come to help.

Two peop e then held me by the haad uatil they could hurry me to
the hospiial. So much of my blood had been lest already that, as I sat
down in Casuaity, I fainted. Funny things were placed in my mouth and
nose ull I recovered.

Docior Holmes inspected the wound after and then ordered Nurse

James to dress it.
An kour later I was sent home and there I remained three days in
bed. On the third day my friend Dora came to take me for a walk. As
we walked down the main street we saw a gang of fellows approaching us:
who was the leader but this bad boy. Believe me I got so frightened at
the moment that I could hardly speak or look to see tiie others’ faces.
They passed us one by one and tecause Hurston liad his fece turned to
the opposite side Z pointed my finger at him and whispered to her ‘that is
the man who hit me”. ;

Secredy we followed them but soon lost si ght of them after we had
passed the big mahogaiy building, close to the sea-side, and so we decided
to go no further.

Now on waiting there for some minu es we saw him returning alone.
Fortunate chaps are we, I said to myself to nave him come back our way.
My friendtook the first step and eventually I followed her while we walked
up to him. Dora collared the man saying “what did Elsa ‘do you”?
“Leave me or I will hurt you, young gil”, said Hurston. “You can’t es-
cape from danger now, paddy, don’t you know it’s our turn to take re-
venge,” On hearing these words he just smiled, pulled a whistle from his
pocket and blew it. Immediately we saw six men coming towatds us with
bortles and stones in their hands. There I knew w 3
its. I tied to run, but, alas I could not for we were properly surrounded.

We were struck mostly on the :
head and wait but they only waited
to strike whenever we would wiru.
I could not staud any mote. blows
and soI fell on the ground as if
dead. How could Dora stand the
blows I dare no: tell: all 1 knew
about her is that her whole body
was blood. Soon‘after I regained
strengt':, got up gradually and then
ran into Mrs, Ivy’s building when
I quickly closed the doors and
windows, After my departure I
could give no account of the fight
again. I dared not give my mind
a single thought about Dora. Per-




{to hide under the mattress, The
owner asked me “what happened”,
but all I could say was, “oh wo-
man, nothing”.

Then we heard the boy speaking
in an abrupt way outside, and-so
she peered outto sce the speaker.
As she placed her band on the
window sill the boy held it tighily
in order to scare her. “‘\here is
the girl who came in here? ‘1ei! me.
I want to kill her”. he said. The
old woman got so frightened, that
she answered in a muttering wey,
“she went over.” In a rouglish
tone he replied. “Ran where? tell
me or I shall kill you slso.” The
poor woman started shouting, “Lord
save rae. What have I done this
wrech!”* Before she had finished, he
burst open the door and_ started
looking up and down in the room.

Turning over everything and

PEI CIRFIRI WS

They had traced my footsteps and
so they came directly to che buildiag
in which Iwas hiding and they
continued throwing stones on the
roof until it was completely gone.
Whea I saw this I operied the back
door and ran wildly all through the
bushes like a mad chap.

Perhaps after I had left the house
they entered and found that I was
not there, for a quarter of ap. hour
later I heard the sound of footsteps
behind me and this time I ran so
fast that I almost thought I was Ay-



Swanny River. To sit down for a
second would be a _ great ease to my
breathlessness, bnt I could not risk
the chance. All I did was dive
down into the muddy water. Hur-
ston was not worried by the dirty
water, though the others tried to pre-
vented him from following me. He
did not listen to-them and I scon
saw him dive into the water and he
swan so fast as I did.

On reaching the shore I ran and
ran till I reached an opened house,
where I jumped through a window
end made my- way to the bedroom

$1.35



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March 14—21

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throwing away the parcels under the
bed,

Then he took a big jump on tke
bed while he tossed and turned
himself on it with great force. I
suffered much, for his weight was
notas light as mine. I tried to
scream but Iecuid not. He was
Lot satisfied as yet snd to he pulled
up the mattcess halfway in such a
desperate -age, (why he did ‘not see
me, only heaven knows) as if he
Meant fo tear it in two, My bair
was out and I thought there was
nothing left for me ‘to do again but
to surrender, but ‘he paid no mind
to the bed again and headed for the
doorway where twe policemen were
awaiting him. Each of them took
him by the hand and brought him
to the jail,

T was safe once more but knew
one thing chat this fight could hap-
pen only in my dreams.

rs —

Young energetic man to. handle the
sales of Phillips’ Radios,. Stoves,
and all Phillips ~-products. Some
practical knowledge of Radios,

Appliances, etc. is’ beneficial.
Suitable person might ‘HE: required



4,

to take special studies abroad.
. Apply in writing to: ~~
J. ASTAPHAN & CO, LTO.
2 bets
A capable person -to handle: our
Must
have . good~ .knowlédg3:--of-:School
Books,. Magazines, ~ a nd. all: other
Types, of Books, etc. for-sale to
the public. Also some knowledge
of popula i aaa
ultablé person might. he required
to take special studies abroad.
Apply in writing to:
J. ASTAPHAN & CO. ‘LTD.
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A young man with some practical
knowledge of work done ina
Work ‘Shop, such as Pipe Fitting,
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to work as. an assistant in our
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We are willing to give suitable
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Apply in writing to: .
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Seb, 29— March 28
March 7.



Advertise la
The HERALD



6 ee

PPu SF *

Doz.

PHOBNIN








PAGE EIGHT



gi.
ualy
bas a
vast Indies
Applications are invited for the
Fost. ectuger or Assistant Lectur-
er in Ciacsics, The person appoint-
ed will be sequired to teach Ancient
History for the B, A. General and
Special Honours Degrees; Livy and
Greek Prose Composition for
Speciai Honours; and_ prescribed
Latin historical text for General
Honours and to help with the class-
ical side of the Survey of Civilisa-
uon Course for Arts Students.
Salary seales, Lecturer £1,450 x
60 — £1,810 x 80 — £2'290;
Assistant Lecturer £1,200 x 50 —
£1,350 Child allowance (limited
to three children) £150 for first
child, £100 for second child, £50
for thicd child. F, S. S, U. Housing
allowance of 10% of salary or, if
available, unfurnished accomodation
wiil be fet by the University at 10%,
of salary. Up to five full passages
on appoimtment, on normal termin-
ation, and on study leave (once
every three years,
Application (six copies) giving
full particulars of qualifications and
experience; date of birth and the
namss of three referees should be
sent by April 15, 1964, by persons
living inthe Americas and the
Caribbean area to th e Registrar,
. University of the West Indies, King-
ston 7; Jamaica, and by all ober
persobs to the Secretaty, Inter-
University Council for Higher
Education Overseas, 29 Woburn
Square. London, W.C, 1. Further
particulars may be ob‘ained similar-



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AA

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Sn
. ‘I

orsity Of The University Of The

West Indies

Applicatiors are invited
for the posts of (a) Senior
Lecturer: (b) Lecturer or
Assistant Lecturer in Modern
European History since 1300
or North American History,
in the College of Arts and
Science Trinidad.

Salary Sealesé “Senior
Lecturer £1,95u x 90 --
£2,940: Lecturer £1,450
x60 -- £1,810 x 8 —
£2,290: Assistant Lecturer
£1,200 x $0 — £1,350.
Child allowance (limited to
three children) £150 for first
child, £00 for second child,
£50 for third child. F-s.s.u.
Housing allowance of 10%
of salary, or if; avatlable un-
furnished accomodation will
be let by the University at
10% of salary. Up _ to five
full passages on appointment
on normal termination and
on study leave (once every
three years).

Detailed application (six
copies) giving particulars of
quatifications and experience,
date of birth and the names
of three referees should be
sent by April 15, 1964, by
eomsons livine in the Ameri
cas and the Caribbean, area,
to the Registrar, University

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DOMINICA HERALD

——_———~«

SATURDAY, MARCH 14 1964



of the West Indies, Kingston
7, Jamaica, W. I. and by all
other persons to the Secre-
tary, Inter-University Coun-
cil for Higher Education
Overseas, 29 Woburn
Square, London, W. C. I.
Further particulars may be
obtained similarly.

Mar. 14

Applications For
Liquor Licences

To the Magistrate Dist E’’ and the
Chief of Police.

I Coxon L’HOMME now re-
siding at Pond Casse Parish of St.
Paul do hereby give you rotice
that it is my intention to at the Ma-
gistrate’s Court to be held at Roseau
on Thursday the and day of Apu |
1964, ensuing for a retail Liquor
LICENCE in respect of my premises
at Pond Casse Parish of St Pauls.

Dated the 7th day of March 1964.

Coxon L’HoMME.

Mar.,24—28
To the Magistrate Dist. “EB” &
Chiet of Police,

I, DARLING SHILLINGFORD now
residing at Roseau Parish
of St. George do hereby give you
notice that it 1s my intention to apply
at the Magistrate’s Court to be held
at Roseau on Thursday, the 2nd
day of April 1964, ensuing for



a
a



retail LIQUOR LICENCE in respect of
my premises at No. « Virgin Lane
Parish of St. George.
Dated the 2nd day of Math 1964.
DARLING ‘SHILLINGFORD
93
Mar. 7, 14, 21.








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Victoria St. to No. 1 Virgin Lane.











To the Magistrate Dist “F” & the! my premises at Castle Bruce Parish
Chief of Police. of St. David.

1, Victoria LocKART now re- Dated the 9th day of March 1964
siding at Castle Bruce Parish of VICSORIA LOCKHART
St, — do hereby give you no- Se
tice that it is my intention to apply y
at the Magistrate’s Court to be held WenTn at i 6 = ses
at Castle Bruce on Monday tke 6th ard. &. y
day of April 1964 ensuing for a re- Supermarket in King
tail Liquor Licence in respect o. George V Street!

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j¢ef ali kinds, Paints & Varnish.
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Roseau 29 645 331
Portsmouth 34,764 370
Coast 4 463 a 51
68,872 752
Exports Ist Jan'to 20th Feb., 1964 200,438 2,165





Total Exports to 4th March, 1964 269,3 is

Decrease 1964 compared with 1963 253,041



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SATURDAY, MACH 14, 1964



“Parents Blame

Yourselves’’

by D J. Etienne
(School Atiendance
Officer)

Vhe world as our immediate en-
vironment is presenting a challenge
‘to both teachers and parents alike.
The manner in which this
challenge is accepted, will largely
deter“nine the success of the child,
parents and teachers.

Parents, apart from being male
and female, may be placed into three
main groups:—Good, Bad and In-
different.

There are umes when one mzy
wenuder whether parents are really
fit and proper persons to have the
charge and czreof young children.
If it were possible to test the suita-
biliy cf parenthood, there
would asurdly be an ex-
tremely high rate of failure. There
are plenty more bad parents than
good anes.

The paren:s who are of most use
to us in scnools are not necessarily
those who are in constant agreement
with us over details, but those that
areon our side over larger issues.

They are those who appreciate
that Education is tot sumething
which can be placed into isolated



compartments, but something in
which home, school and child are
partners.

Good parents may grnmble to
themselves, or may even complain,
bat that we know, there: is mutnal
understanding petween teachers and
parents: and the child’s welfare
comes first.

be ad
Declaration cf Human Rights, states
that Education shall be free and
compulsory at least in the elementary
stages.”

A. slow decay is noticed in the
good relationship which formerly
existed between schcol and home.
My impression about this is that
mary parents nowadays are antagon-
istic towards 2uthority and are re-
sentful whenever it is applied and
inconveniences them,

There is no doubt that there is
too much villainy about our you:h
today, for us to be fully complacent
with their behavior.

Immorality and juvenile delin-
quency Alourish despite the efforts of
law-enforcing agencies.

There may, or may not bea
connection between delinquent
children and working parents, but
this problem of delinbuency in
Dominica, is caused in most cases,
by parents whose attitude is either
that of ‘disinterestedness’ or ‘negli-
gence’.

Parents who set very poor exam-
ples to children cannot expect them
- to grow up" to respec? good moral
standards.

These parents regard immorality
and vagrancy as the accepted way
of life.

Children are not educated as they
. are not sentto school and parents
complaint on excuse is that of
poverty, want of food, clothes.
government gives no help.

A mother said to me that she
was far better tempered when she
was at work or when the children
were on the street.

It is easier to have a neated clash
than a cool discussion with parents
of this type. Therefore, it must be
remembered that in deallng with
bad parents, officers ate to exercise




great patience as not to upset the n,:
or else, it is like putting a fline
to fuel which is reacy for lighting,
Indifferent parents use the school
as a recreation park in which they
can leave thier children while they
go to work or shopping. They
take no more care thin feeding,
clothing and keeping them warm.
Their approach te the job of parent-
hood is a negative one and more
often then not escapes notice. ‘This
attitude produces a fac ees child
who never does anything outstand-
ing in life.
. “The full force of the Law|
should be exercised against delin-
qnent parents.”’

U.N. and CYPRUS

The United Nations
security Couticil acceped
unanimously last week
the pronosal for U.N. Forces
to supervis: Cyorus security.
Meanwhile the ‘itueton in
Cyprus hed been getting
mote violent and dangerous.
Among the powers who will
“patrol” Cyprus are: Cana-
da, Sweden, Ireland, Finland
and Brazil. Great Britain
will continue her protective
military interest in the island.



Advertisers Are
Asked To Submit
Copy By Noon
On Wednesdays

$$ ——

DON’T DEPEND ON YOUR
NEIGHBOUR’S -— BUY
YOUR OWN DOMINICA
HERALD! !!!

University Of The West Indies

APPLICATIONS are invited fer the post of Lecturer or Assistant

Lecturer in Anatomy. Duties of the pest will include lectur-
ing in Human Anatomy, and assistance ia the practical courses of
Histology to students working for the medical degrees of the
University of the West Indies. Applicant must possess a registrable
medical gnalification.



Salary scales: Assistant Lecturer — £1,350 x 50 — £1,500;
Lecturer £1,650 x 105 —- £1,965 x 120 — £2,450. Child allowance
(limited to thtee children) £150 for the first chiid, £1co for the second
chill, £50 for the third child, pec annum. F.S.S,U. Housing allow-
ance of 10% of salary, or if available, unfurnished accommodation will be
let by the University at 10% of salary. Up to five full passages on ap-
pointment, cn normal termination and on study leave (once every three
years). .
Detailed applications (10 copies} giving full particulars of qualifica-

DOMINICA HERALD

PAGE NINE

en ee ee



ooo

NOTICE
bentral Housing And Planning Authority

T is notified fer general infermation that the Administrator-in- Council

has, under the provis ons of Section 6 of the Town and ‘Country
Planning Ordina:.ce Ne. 4 of 1946 approved of the Glanvillia Village
and Extension Scheme.

7.

A copy of the Scheme, the plans and other particulars pertaining
thereto may be inspected at the office of the Central Authority.

Sed, Huserr N. Josepu
Ag, Secretary & Executive Officer
Centr:! Housing & Planning Authority,
GO. 25, March 7 -— 14

Se mm ames a te pe 6 ee om en ee 6p ees, ee ee

DOMINICA
DONKEY RACES —-

GRAND EASTER FAIR: .

Windsor Park -- March 30th
SPECTATERS 25¢
STANOS $1.09
SPECIAL GAR PARK ENGLOSURE — $1.00

Feb, 29, Mar, 14, 28

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oT CARTER



experience, date o birth and the names of three retereess

sent by Apiil 6, 1964, by persons living in the Americis and the Carib-
bean area to the Registrar, University of the West Indies, Kingston 7,
Jamaica, and by all other persons to the Secretary to the Senate Commit-
tee on Colleges Overseas in Special Relation, University of London, Se-
nate House, London, W.C 1, Further particulars may te obtained
stmalarly.

March 14



oe —_——<— + —
Dominica Banana Growers Association
Annual General Meeting 1964

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section
7 of the Banara Ordinance No.6 of 1959, that the Annual
General Meetirig of the Aszociation will be held at the
Carib Cinema, Roseau, commencing at II.00 a.m. on
Monday, 27th April, 1964.

Members of the Association arc invited to attend but
oaly the members of the Board of Management and the
Delegates of the District Branches shall take part in_ the

deliberations and be eligible to vote on any question arising ;

at the Meeting.
It should also be noted that only the Delegates of the
District Branches shall be eligible to elect members to the

Board.
AGENDA

- 1, .To confirm the Minutes of the General Meeting held
on 29th April and 13th August, 1963.
a. To receive and approve the Report of the Board.
3. To receive and adopt Audited Axcounts for the
year ended 31st December, 1963.
To elecs six members to serve on the Board of
Management for the ensuing period of twelve
months.
5. Any other business of which due notice shall have
been given.
A. D, BOYD
General Manager.
March 14.

O62! wes peed

OPTICAL GO. LTD.

WILL BE PAYING A VISIT
FROM MARCH oTH TO mTH
FOR THE PURPOSES OF SIGHT TESTING
AND FURNISHING OF SPECTACLES.
ALL PERSONS INTERESTED PLEASE
MAKE APPOINTMENTS AT THE DOM |
INICA DISPENSARY CO. LTD., KING

GEORGE V STREET, ROSEAU.
Fib. 8- -Mar. 14

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ADVERTISE IN THE HERALD



go 8 pte 6) Sees ar me

\



PAGE TEN VOMINIGA HERALD

—— EEE AES BSE ek ee Ee

BA \TURDAY, MARGH 14, 1966

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SATURDAY, MARCH

Impressions Of
Guadeloupe
Banana Tour

17th to 21st Feb., 1964

The Government of France paid
for trarsporting tne delegates around
Guadeloupe during the tour. Also
present for the benefit of delegates
were 29 steff members from various
French Agricultural bodies, such as;
I.F, A.C. (Insitute Francais de
Recherches Fiuitieres Outr:-Mer$;
C.A.T.A. G. (Cooperative Agni-
cole de Traitments Anntiparasitaines
de la Guadeloupe): 1.R.A.T.
(Institute de Recherches d‘A.grono-
mic Tropicale), and I, F.C. C.
(Institute Francais du Cafe et du
Cacao).

These experts were the people
who conducted demenstrations and
answered questions. They had
come from Paris, the Ivory Coast.
Ecuador, French Guiana, and
Martinique, to join their colleagues
in Guadeloupe, so as to help make
the tour the success 1¢ was.

The Caribbean Organisation,
under the able management of Mr.
Hugh Miller and his assistants,
planned the time-table, accommoda-
tion and feeding of deiegates when
away from their hotels; this included
coping with unexpected arrivals of
many interested parties from the two
French Departments of Guadeloupe
and Martinique.

On Monday 17th, all the dele-
gates were assembled at the Fort
Royal Hotel, built. on the point of
Guadeloupe nearest Montserrat.

Just as the convoy of cars and buses .



3 5
Participant arrived in the hotel
gtounds by helicopter. ;

Addresses delivered at this, the
opening function, afforded the dele-
gates the opportunity of learning
the importance that France attaches
to Agriculture in her Island Depart-
ments, €.g. § Agronomists in
Guadeloupe, 4 more in Martinque,
as compared to one for our 4 Wind-
ward Islands.

After a lavish lunch presented by
the Chamber of Commerce of Basse
Terre, the delegates were taken to
Bellevue Estate, owned by M.H.
Callard, for their first practical
demonstration.

With only 80 inches of rain a
year, one mile inland from the Lee-
ward coast, and 750 feet above sea
level, it is difficult to see why M.
Callard decided to grow bananas on
land very similar to the Hartford-
St. Joseph-Salisbury area. He reap-
ed 14 tons per acre, unt! he started
ittigating with overhead sprayers
similiar to those used at Woodford
Hall, when his production increased

14, 1964

from a field long before it was over-
grazed. The trucks which took us
from our cars for the mile from the
coast to the Estate travelled on two
concrete strips of roadway, up grades
and around nazrow bends, the like
of which can only be found on the
road to Ponte Mulatre. The French
Governmest paid 80°%, of the cost
of this road which is used by M. Cal-
lard alone, for bringing out sce ton-
of bananas, and taking in 70 tons of
fertilizer,

Neufchateau

Neufchateau Experimental Station
was the site for two days of our inv
structions and demonstrations. The
Station is run by IL F. A, C. and
being 750 fect above sea level with
150 inches of rain, it is surpusing
that of all their citrus (and they had
a very large variety) the only wees

that appeared to be doing well were ~

the Smooth Lemon.

Ee.ause of the large number of
delegates, I. F. A, C. Ag:nts were
stationed at various points of inter-
est, viz. pineapple field, pineapple
packing, citrus (for diseases), bana-
na:— rep! nting, root system, fertili-
zer experiments, dissecting plants from
roots to leaf, ripening room, etc.
The delegates went to any point
where the subject was most interest-
ing to them, aud followed the dem-
onstration in progress.

(To be concluded.)

=

WINBAN Meeting
in Barbados

of the Windward Islands
Banana Association to decide
on the details of the new
Marketing Contract with
Geest Industries Ltd. to ree
place the old one which
expires in June this year,
started on Monday and end-
ed on Thursday in Barbados.

From Dominica went
D.B.G.A. Chairman G.A.
Winston, Vice-Chairman
Stafford Shillingford and
Manager Alec Boyd. Also
going along as legal advirer
is Keith Alleyne Q. C. and
they will meet there Vivian
Grell who will come from
Si. Lucia in his new capacity
as WINBAN | Secretary-
Accountant.

Managing Director Mt.
John van Geest and Chair
man Sir Garnet Gordon

DOMINICA HERALD

NURSING NEWS

st. Groix for
Caribbean Nurses
Gonference

The Fourth Cenference of
the Caribbean Nurses Or-
genisation wiil be held in St.
Croix, Virgin Islands from
August 8th to rsth, 1964, it
has just been annonnced.
The last and very successful
conference, it wil! be remem-

bered, was held in 1963 in
Dominica.
The theme of the Fourth

Conference will be “Human
Relationships” and will
include the subjects of Nurs-
ing Administrtion, Auxiliary
Nursing Personnel, Mental
Health and Psychiatric
Nursing, and Nurses’ Assc-
clations aad Organizations
Constitutions and Byclaws.

All communications res’
pecting the Conference should
be addressed to the General
Secretary — Mrs. M. M. Har-
ney Brown, P. O. Box 229,
St. John’s, Antigua, W. I.

Three Clinics For Roseau

Previously there was onl
one clinic ran by the Health

the Old Hospital compound. »

any persons complained
that to come from Newtown
or Pottersville was too far for
a sick pezson or mother with
asick baby. We were
pleased to find out that the
Health Visitors have, on their
own initiative, started up
clinics, one at the old Roseau
Boys School for Newtown
and one in the Poitersville
School by the Church.
Both clinics operate on Mon-
day afternooas after the schools
nave been vacated —- from
3.30 p. m.

A young Mothers Club
has also been started by the
Health Visitors at the Old
Hospital Clinic. The half
dozen Health visitors should
be warmly congratulated on
the work they are doing to

to 18 tons. He sprays most of his joined the meeting on Tues Improve the health of the

bananas one day a week for 6

months of the year.
As in most fields seen during the

tour there was a conspicuous lack of

contour and general soil conserva-
tion practices; This was a great
contrast to the high standerd of all
athe: forms of scientific research be-
ing carried out.

day.
Vieille Gase Girl
Succeeds

Miss Keturah Royer of Vieille
Case (daughter of Mr. & Mrs. C.

The most unusual as pect of Royer) passed an examination in

M. Callard’s cultivation was his run-

teleprinting in, six weeks. The

community.

New Nursing Consultant
Appointed

The World Health Or-
ganization announced last
month the appointment of
Miss Martie Alice Matthews

to assist in training personnel

ning sheep under his bananas. There ysyal period of the course is eight for the nursing services of

was evidence of their eating the large
leaves of the water suckers, but nei-
ther the sword sucker nor the bunch-
es were touched, M. Callrrd was

weeks. Miss Royer is employed at
Croydon Airport, near London,

ee ee

Barbados, D 0 minica, St.
Lucia and Montserrat in cov

’ operation with the islands’

very, very careful to remove thesheep 9 FOLLOW THE STAR 4 public health administrations.

Nurse Matthews was

ree
cenily in the California pu-
blic health service, holds a

certificate in Public Health
Nuvsing and is an Master of
Scrence in Health Education.

A

taribo Fellowships

We now have the official
release on the CARIBO
Fellowships which we an-
nounced on our front page
last week and are vleascd to
be able t@ add the name of
another Dominican iccipient
of an awatd -~ Mr. Oliver
Thomas Georges, who will
study Engineering for a B.Sc.
degree at UWI. Gifford
Shillingford will be going to
Howard University(U.S.A.)
and Earl Johason and Col-
lin Bully will go to U.W.L.
All five Deminicans will
study for B.Sc. degrees.

Administrator
Back From Leave
H. H. the Administrator,
Colonel Ales Lovelace,
C. M. G., M. B. E., M. C.

and Mrs. Lovelace returned



: to the territory on Monday

after 24 months leave in the



PAGE ELEVEN

Registrar’s Office,
AOSEAU,

Sth March, 1964,

Under the Workmen's Cone

pensation Act, 1937. In the

Estate of Peer Wiltshire, de-
ceased.

IT 1S HEREBY NOTIFIED

that the Commissioner for

Wirkmea's Compensation will
hold a court at the Magis-
trate’s Court, Roseau, on Tues-
day 24th March, 1964, at
2,00 o’ciock in the afternoon
for the purpose of considering
the claims of the dependants
of the atove deceased to a
sum deposited with the Regis-
trar under the provisions of
fhe Workmen’s Compensation.
Act 1937,

Interested persons may
attend persenally or by soii-
citor or counsel,

JOSEPH V. JEAN PIERRE
Mar. 14, 21 Registrar.

NEW LANDING GHARGES

“Effective ftom ihe 20th
of Match, 1964 the following
tates of Landing Charges to
West Indian destinations
will apply: _ ;
Trinidad (W.I. Product) $ 6.80

Trinidad (General Imports) 13, 20
Trinidad (Heavy Lifts) 14.82

U.K. , Antigua 9.12

; . 3 aii 14

rewell Ol Y Montserrat 9.00

Ag. Administrator Dominica: 6.96

A gift of $50 to the Chief Minis- St. Lucia 4.08

ter’s Fire Relief Fund was made by St. Vincent 9.60

Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Borrowes be Grenada 4.80
fore they left the island. L. ROSE & CO. LTD.,

pg Mar. 14 Shipping Depariment.

- CSN See te ee ae

wr

IT’S YOUR ASSURANCE OF QUALITY.

Thoughtful care goes into the rearing

of every Sylvani

serves the superior
TASTE the differen

THE PHOENIX,

at ELI’S GR

s gens Hy 5 pce 6 9a 6 pa 8 pt 6 9 6 8 8 fe 6 8 6 6 BS PS Pe 8 PF Pe 6 PF 9 6 pS 6 SESS <=meé 5

LOOK FOR THIS SYMBOL

Strict sanita.ion during processing
guards your health but it also pre-

shopper can get theirs at:—BARON’S,
SERVICE or (by placing your order)

Fw. Peube”

to deliver your’s!

a” 69a 6 8 ea 6 8a 6 p< PS 8 Et fe | Pb P- p p E



a-Fresh Chicken:
flavour. You can
ce! Theearly-bird
CHARLES SELF-

OCERY or ask

8 Se 8 FG pS PM Be

tp et 5 Se sy



PAGE TWELVE

LOCAL SP



Warwicks

LACKBURN suffered a major up-
set on Saturday and Sunday last
when they were defeated by War-
wicks by runs. It was a fine win
for lowly Watwicks but a disappoint-
display by the Blackburn batting.
Warwicks won the toss and_ elected
to bat, but 2 hrs later were back in
the pavilion totalling o nly 94 of
which Thomas made 57, and Einst-
ein Shillingford bagged 6 for t9.
Blackburn replied wich an almost
unbelievable 50, as they had ta ans-
wer to fastmen Thomas 5 for 19
and Roberts 4 for 2t on che poor
Windsor Park turf. Notwithstanding
the state of the wicket the batting
lacked purpose.

Clem John with 3 wickets, Cools-
Larcigue with 3 and E-nstein Shil-
lingford with 4 including the hat
wick easily routed Warwicks for 52
in their second turn at the crease.
But set to score a mere 95 to win,
Blackburn after a promising start
slumped from 75 for 4 to 83 all out
and many who saw it couldn’t
believe it.

Police On 1st Innings

Av THE Botanical , Gardens
things were very different. , to begin
with the match began almost an
hour late, but Police, batting first
made up for this with a’ quick 170,
Jules 36, Blackman 24, Prosper 25
while C. Casimir took 5 for so.

Spartan in reply were 68 for 2 at
the close on Saturday but on Sun-
—day_the rainzaffected wicket was live-_

“ier and they fell for 137. Pierre 4 for
4r-and Prosper 4 for 56 reaped a
rich harvest, M..Charles made 20
runs. Police hit their way into a res-
pectable lead with 106 in the second
innings, Prosper contributed 47 of
these while Blackman supported with
20, but set to score 136 im a mere
87 minutes, time ran out on Spar-
tans and at the close they had polished
off 118 for the loss of 6 wickets.
Wicket-keeper Jno Baptiste made a
fine, controlled 36.

D.G.S. Athletics Meet

The Annual D.G.S. inter-house
athletic competition took place at
the schonl grounds on Thursday,
and though it didn’t produce spect-
acular record-breaking events, the
meet was a thoroughly entertaining
one. Benedict Joseph House
emerged champions with 141
points, followed by Dawhbiney and
Skinner in that order.

One record was broken and
another equalled, both feats being
performed by J. Timothy of Daw-
biney who was the eventual Victor
Ludorum with 20 points. This
lad is very promising and should be
encouraged. Despite a very un-
orthodox start, he combined limb-
muscle, speed and momentum to
considerable advantage to equal the
To sec. 100 yds record set by C.A.
Bellot in 1925 and perpetuated by L.
W. Edwards 1934 and_ later V.
‘ Julien 1950 and to smash the 220
yds record of 24 secs by clocking the
impressive time of 23.6 secs,

Outstanding performances were
given in Div 11 by Robert Peters
and in Div. 111 by Magloire, both
youngsters are very keen and richly
deserved their rewards. In Div x

me

Upset

ORTLIGHT
Blackburn

V. Mouse displayed a fluent style to
win the 440 yds and 880 yds re-
spectfully, while Paul exhibited the
combination of stamina and judge-
ment in winning the mile race.
Some sterling performances were
rendered by Alleyne, in the sprinis,
Welker with the discus, Cuffy with
the Shot, Roberts with the cricket
ball, and the versatile Doctrove
placing six times 3rd in a variety of
events. Skinners men of might
ran away with the Tug of Waz and
of course a beautiful cake from
Erics.

All told the meet proved that
our youngsters decidedly do possess
the potential to be good athletes.
It is only lamentabie, however that
so little athletics is continued after
school stage. Wre all hope inaz the
Jaycees will again o:ganise a meet
in August or thereabouts and it
would be a good thing if our youth
begin to train from now, There is
talk of a forthcoming athletic mect
between the Grammar School and
the St. Mary’s Academy. This
should be encouraged for it is cer-
tain that more talent would be on
display and all would benefit from
the Sports. :

OVERSEAS SPORTLIGHT
GRICKET

The Regional series is nearing
completion and B. G. look as the
likely champions for yet another year.

lost: to Barbados on first innings
(2 pts) and lost to Trinidad and
B.G. outright a total of 2 pts, Bar-
bados beat BG,, Jamaica and, Ttini-
dad en first innings to give them a
total of 18 points i.e. six from each
match. Trinidad beat J/ca outright
(12 pts) lost to Barbados on first
innings (2 pts)—total 14 pts. B.G.
beat J-ca outright (12 pis) lost to
B-dos on first inning (2 pts) total
14 pts,

The winner of the current B. G.
vs. T-dad encounter will be adjud-
ged winner of the series.


MESSAGE FOR
MARTINIQUANS

To Be Delivered By Mrs. Allfrey

A Poccasion de la visite 4 la Mar-
tinique de votre Président Le Gén-
éral de Gaulle, nous nous empres-
sons d’envoyer aux membres du
Caribbean Friends Club nos saluta-
tion les plus cordiales. Nous espé-
tons que votre illustre Président em-
portera de son sejour 4 votre si jolie
ile, un souvenir de joie et de déente.

Nous avons été tres heureux,
l'année passée, d’apprendre la fon-
dation de votre club 4 la Martinique,
et notre plus chér désir est que
Vamitié existant entre nos deux
clubs sera un moyen d’enricher
notre amour mutuelle pour la langue
et la litérature frangaises. Au méme
temps nous espérons que les relations
entre nos deux iles deviendront
encore plus profondes qu’auparavent.
—Signed by the President, Vice-Presi-
dent, Secretary, two members of Coun-
cil, and other members of the Cercle

Francais of Dominica.

DOMINICA HERALD

D. G. S. Literary
Society Holds —
Elections

By Herald Literary Club Reporter

T THE first meeting last week of
the Dominica Gra:nmar School’s
Literary arid Debating Societv for
this term it vras agreed Ly majority
vote that Membership to the Scciety
will be opened to Third Formers.

After an inspiring introductory
address by the Master in Chargz,
elections were held: J. Johnson,
President; E., Walker, Vice-Presi
dent; C. Harris, Secretary. Treasury;
and L, Didier Vice-Secretary-Treas-
ury were elected Officers of the So-
ciety for the Term.

A. very interesting and Lumecrous
discuss'on followed the elections and
some twenty bcys present expressed
their ardent desires to work for the
improvement of the Soc:ety which
was founded over fourteen years ago,

Cyprus -- Uneasy
Truce -- U. N.
Force Soon

Unhappy Cyprus, with
the eyes of the world unon it,

calmed slightly this week as |
the United Nations Security’

Council wrestled with the
problem of the cosi of sup-
plying a Peace-keeping Force
to replace the” sorely-tried



This ceiandi ones es OR ee rg ee a eed eee
Enesianding-isacfollewsijamaica—pritigh “in t he strife-torm

island.
p.9)

With $2,000,000 (US)
guaranteed by the U.S. A,
and one million by Britain

(see U.N. & Cyprus

{

CS 6 $< 6 5 6 5“ 9 6 p< 5 p< fs 6 Sb pd EP me op es

(prices of GGCA-COLA

|
|
|

KING SIZE COCA--COLA
REGULAR GOCA--COLA
FANTA BEVERAGES

( EANTA SODA WATER (Unchanged)... $1.44 per case,

; DEPOSIT ON GASES AND BOTTLES... . $1.50 per case
... . a05¢ per bottle ©

pe! ON BOTTLES .
DEPOSIT ON SHELLS.

6 Oa 6 98 Pte 6 9 <8 9B a 6 1 6 9 nF O69 SE PS,

Owing to the continual rise in the price f
in other INCIDENTALS we are regretfully forced to increase the

towards the cost of the force,
prospecis of a six-nation force
moving into Cyprus in the
very near future were good,
stated U.N. Secretary
U Thane on Thursday,
Britain had earlier in the
week siated categorically that
she could not hold the fort
much longer.

As young Greek Cypriots
screamed for union with
Greece, and Turkish
Cypriots were hardpressed in
embattled Ktina by small
arms «and mortar-fize, the
Turkish Navy cruised mean-
ingfully off Cyprus and ‘Pre
sident Mfakarios ordered that
several hundred Turkish
Cypriot hostages be released
and that a general cease-fire
take place. British troops
had been rushed from place
to place totry and stop the
fighting. An uneasy truce
now prevails.

—— a - ——

SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 1964



rire Disaster
Inquiry
“Cause Unknown”
“The Cause of the fire is

unknown” vas tke verdict of
the jury sitting at the Coro
ner’s Inquest on the Great
George Street fire on Samedi
Gras. Full Zetails next week.

— 2

Appiication For
Liquor Licence

Teo tre Magistrate Dist “G" &
Chief of Police
I, Nellie Baptiste now residing at
Vieille Case Parish of St. Andrew
do hereby give you notice that 1¢ is
niy intention to apply at the Magis-
trate’s Court to be held at Ports-
mouth on Saturday, the 4th day of
April 1954, ensuing for a retail
LIQUOR LICENCE in respect to my
premises at Vieille Case Parish of
St. Andrew
Dated the
1964
NELLIE BAPTISTE

t2th day of March

+ 60a 6 pee 6 BC 6 BS 9 On |” tS PS BB BS SO

Photographer

99a SS

TAVERNIER, Photographer of Soufriere, informs allj
the country that he is a professional photographer.
‘different sizes of prints can be made, includ.ng colour:
je asks you all to write to him for your wed

\|
sete. |
nd christening.»

(

2°

made,

} March 14

6 6A CO os pd pe Or 8 Be 6 An 8 PSS BE Pe ae 6 9a 6 Pe 6 9“ 6 PS fe oe

ANNOUNCEMENT
DOMINICA BOTTLING PLANT

AUTHORIZED BOTTLERS

OF

COCK - COLA

AND

FANTA BEVERAGES

of SUGAR and increased cost

and FANTA BEVERAGES.

Effective as from 16th March prices will be as follows:—
RETAIL

RETAIL...
RETAIL ...
RETAIL ....

.-. + $1.92 per case.
. $1.68 per case.
... . $1.92 per ease.

... . . «0 per shell

ICTULES > TOK. ~
jPassport photoyraphs carefully do
Best satisfaction for reasonable charges.

5. TAVERNIER, Soufriere,
St. Mark. Domini¢a

. oD ad pa 0 eS Be SB OS 9S Pa 9S BS BOS PS BS ey v

Of The South —

a

ae 6 B—any-S oe

All

ding!
riva ointments.)
ne; fine enlaraements



€
a
s

¢

498 pat 9

eet, “Tt pat

Stays bie 6 6S $<

. 11¢ per hottle
. 10¢ per bottle;
. 11¢ per bottle:
G8¢ per bottle;

~ g-tone SS Rt 6 $< $9 19s

OR 4A SS SSIS" OSES Viren 6 9 6 PS 8S oe i Se SPQ



ee

‘ PRINTED AND PUBLI',AED BY J,

,

MARGARTSON CHARLES, THB HERALD’S PRINTERY, 31 NEW STREET, ROSEAU, DOMINICA, SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 1964






Full Text


LIBRARY
RESEARCH INSTITUTE
‘OR THE STUDY OF MAN
162 EAST 78 STREET
NEW YORK 2°

~Nerecemenme

= ma wd eg pee



ESTABLISHED 1955

BRO!





VN SUGAR

(For the General Welfare of the People of Dominica, the further -dvancement of

_







PEN



lY

Five Bakers Make Statement A Prince is Bore

TWO items of the people’s

staple diet in Dominica have

either temporarily vanished or are about to vanish from

the shelves and trays of small retailers.

Ever since an offi-

cial reminder that the price of brown sugar is controlled at
17 cents a lb. (the astronomical zise in world sugar prices
having brought the imported white-sugat price to nearly
double that of brown) -- brown sugar is seldom to be

seen.

Tt has been suggested to
the HERALD by small retail-
ers who have no surplus
stores that stocks of brown
sugar are being “held up”
by some merchants jn the
expectation that the controll-
ed price will be upgraded
scon. We are unable to
verify these suggestions before
going to press, but it is clear
that some shops have insti-

tuied an informal rationing
Mie stich as “one or 2 Ibs.

of brown sugar only to a
customer”. We also know
that those who cannot pay
thirty cents cr more per Lb.
for white sugar cannot
sweeten their coffee or tea,
having been unable to get
sufficient brown sugar.

Meanwhile the penny
bread, a national “filler”? for
over a century, is threatened
because of rising costs of
flour, etc. The following
release signed by bakers
James O. Paul, Alva A.
Lafoud, James Burton, John
LaRonde and Addison
Anthony tells the tale:—

“We Bakers of Dominica,
members of the steering com-
mittee of the proposed Bakers
Union (discussed in Maich
1963) have decided to the mounting cost of a bag
of flour, the penny bread
should be replaced by a 34
oz. dough bread for ¢ cents.
There is now no way a baker
can make even a small prcfit
otherwise, with $12.50 or
$12.90 for a bag of flour.
Imagine a town baker’s ex-
penses! He who rents an
overt at $1.00 per day also
pays out: Head Baker $2.00
per bag of four; Roller, 75
cents, Busher 50 cents (and
that “bush system” should be
abolished by town penny-



PETER BELLOT—ISLAND SCHOLAR
As forecast by the HERALD, Peter

Bellot has b:en awarded the 1964
Government Scholarship.

On Tuesday Queen Elizabeth JI
gave birth to a third son, her funrth
child, who is now third in line for
the throne of England.

Congratulations poured in from
all over the world and even Grenada
fired a twenty-one gun salute.

This followed the birth of a son
last week to Princess Alexandra and
the Hon. Anges Ogilvie. Prince
Philip, on Thursday, dashed off to
the funeral in Athens of his first
cousin King Paul of Gneece — a
funeral also attended by Archbishop
Makarios, President of Cyprus.

"HAM, QUEEN ELIZABETH THE QUEEN MOTHER





CAS

=-To visit Dominica by royal yacht Britannia on March

22nd, while on a convalescence cruise following her recent

operation for appendicitis.

W elcome !



bread bakers); wood $2.00
at least; keresene 12 cents,
bush 50 cents, electric light
2§ Cents, yeast 30 cenis, salt
I§ cents, transport 25 cents
and Bread Carrier 75 cents.
All these expenses amount to
$8.57 plus $12.90 flour cost
per bag.

“Any baker in the town
of Roseau who does not
reach $22.00 after selling the
baked products of a bag of
flour suffers a total loss.
Other expenses which are
not included are: commis-
ston of 60 cents on every
$5.00 bread sold; bakery
maintenance so cents daily
(cleaners etc.); licence $4.80
yearly and medical certificate

$2.00 yearly. In conclusion,
it is impossible to make a
profit on the penny bread,
therefore we bakers have now
agreed to bake 34 oz. dough
for $ cents in order to make
a living.”

The Bakers steering com-
mittee saw the Minister of
Trade and Production before
his trip to Canada last year,
and were told by him (says
our informart) that bread
ptices cannot be controlled: it
is up to the bakers to fix a
profitable price. The signa-
tories to the above release feel
that their move will gain the
support of the majority of
bakers in Dominica.



aoe

SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 1964



re 5 >

BREAD







‘the West Indies and the Caribhean Area as a whole)

Tov

PRICE

PROI





Power Restored

D. E. S. Appeals

A°

LEMS

For Economy

1 # x x 1. *
the last copies of last week's number of the HERALD
came off the press at seven o’clock last Friday, a huge

boulder detached itself from the top

of the curved cliffside

above the Trafalgar power station, and smashed sideways
against the middle portioa of the twin twelve-inch pipeline
feeding water to the three turbines below.

Throughout the island, the
lights dimmed and faded as
the water was reduced to a
trickle. Craching into the
first pipe the beulders’ force
was muffled by the acéumu-
lation of trees and branches
it had brought down the
mountainside, but part
jumped aiid scattered five 25’
lengiks cf the second pipe
like matchsticks whilst
huge piece over 8’ in diame-

me: galled ol 0

pipes as ifthey were rails for

150’, before halting at an

abutment.

Essential Services

Frantic work by a gang of
twenty to thirty on the follow-
ing days (much of it in mud
and potring rain) restored
one pipeline by using a few
spare lengths and “bortow~
ing” from the other pipe.
In the meanwhile the stanaby
diesel generators were used to
supply essential services, but
could not be brought into full
service until a pipe from a
smali stream up the mountain
had been installed to supply
cooling-water (which had
before been taken from the
turbine tatlwater).

During Saturday, Sunday,
Monday, and Tuesday there
was intermittent load-shedd-
ing but most areas were sup-
plied with a mininum of five
hours current during the day
in order that home refrigera-

one:

tonshould not suffer,
Now, the three Pelton-wheel
turbines are turning at less
than full power and, with the
two 260 kilowatt diesels,
Dom 1nic a is precariously
balanced with about - 1350
ky something like 90’/;
of our full load requirements
and -withcut reserves. The
Dominica Elestricity. Ser-
vices appeals to all consumers
of electrics pr
cal, especially during © the
peak-load evening hour—so,
do your cooking on the
electric stove during the day,
ane use only those lights that
are absolutely necessary at
night.
= - Wesectts s
PEOPLE IN THE NEWS

Princess Alice Chancellor of
UW] arrived Wednesday on MV
Federal Palm for brief official visit”
BASIL Blackman of CCL flew in
Monday arranging small islands
seminar — met by DTU Sec. R.P.
Joseph * pukE & Duchess of
Rutland paid quick visit Thursday
for swim at Castaways, lunch at
Springfield * srar Lestrade return-
ed from Puerto Rico after 3-day
seminar On Municipal Administra-
tion * AVIATION vies E.A,. Hay-
ward, Fire Officer U.K., and E,
Fleming, W.I. Dir. Civil Aviation,
spent three days on critical appraisal
of rescue and fire-fighting facilities
at Melville Hall * unrrep Nations
Special Fund Mission of consultant
engineers F.D. Leeburger and
Phillipe Bertrand coming next week
concerning electric power pote itial
and giid network possibilities in
Caribbean.





6 SS OR eS 6S PE 9 6 OS Pe 6 Oe 6 fe 6 oe 8 Po eS ft

as had heen arranged.

6 9a 6 9S $ pte 6 9 6 8 a 8

May.
| Mar. 14~ +21

] ey

ANNOUNCEMENT

The Harcourt Carter Optical Co. Ltd. wishes to inform
all persons with appointments for March 9th to 11th
that due to illness they are unable to pay their visit

Persons with appointments
will be notified for the next visit which will
Please disregard notice on page 9.

(
he i

Qe 1 ae pt
PAGE TWO

ee



People’s Post

Correspondents are asked tc submit their ‘ull names and ac‘dressess as ; 3 ‘ |
a guarentee of good faith, but not necessarily for pubsication. Letters should \telligent potential Carib mechanics ,

be as short as passible

Grenada’s Views |Government’s

Sry

We heard here about your
Star Party, but’ will is be
given the support it deserves?
We feel tha: no matter how
hard you try to better the loc
of the Dominicans, you are
not of the correct complexion.
You see West Indians now
are vely prejudiced and they
only want to be tuled by
those of dark skin. No mat-
ter how good a fair man may
be, even if he was a second
Churchill, he would not get
a chance because of the
colour of his skin. A white
Barbadian Doctor told me
twelve years ago that if he
was a young man and
wanted to get on in lite he
would dye his skin a dark
chocolate colour. Yes, before
long you will hear about
discrimination by the
coloured nations and I won-
der if any of them would
allow the whiie peoples to
live and work in their coun-
tries like England has done
~ver many years! I doubt it,
but I may be wrong,



Has Dominica got maay

beaches or will it build
hotels in the mountains
where people can ‘riverbathe
and hunt? What about
a hotel built near the sea but
with ro beach, with a pool
where seawater washes in and
out? Shorelands Hotel in
Trinidad was built like that.
Yours sincerely,
SPICEISLANDER, Grenada.
NOTE. The facilities of the
Fort Young Hotel will include a
freshwater Swimming-pool —Ed.

Anchovies




In Oil

Coniroversiai politica: lettes will not oe pub-
lished anonymously. Views expressed in People’s Post do not necessarily |
yeflect the policy of the Ed tor or the Proprietor.

Help Needed

Dear Editor,—! would
like you to publish in your
newspaper something about
a mew road we are making
in the village of Dubique.
It was ounce a very smail
road, not a dozrkey could
pass on it before. I, Johnass
Anselm of Dubique found
that small road was not good
for the village, so I called for
a meeting in January for the
people of the village to help
us to make a road. We
started on the 13th of January
and we have reached a far
distance already, so I am
asking the Government to
have a look over the tread
because ii is a very important
road.

We have started the road
without the help of Gevern-
ment so I would like the
Government to take part in
it now.

Yours faithfully,
Jounass ANSELM,





Give The Garibs
Jobs

Sir,

A couple commercial business
gentlemen have stressfully remarked
that in as much as_ the hard-work-
ing pleasant Caribs have distressfully
suffered from the efforts of a severe
financial depression for more than
half a century, — the governmental
authority should sympathetically have
specific instructions timely be issued
that the mechanical operations, and
the manual work of the proposed
new highway from Hatton Garden

DOMINICA HERALD

to Salybia should definitely be done
solely by the Caribs.
There are, undoubtedly, a few in-

who are quite capable of operating
the earth-moving equipment with
conspicuous efficiency.

Likewise the new roadways from
there via Castle Bruce, Good Hore,
Sar Sauveur, and Perite Soufriere to
Rosalie should be carried out by the
manual labouring residents of the
respective areas, who have undergone
a tough period of economic pressure.

Is it mot unsatisfactory to have
workman transferred from the West-
ern Zone to the Eastern Seaboard,
resulting in the estimated expendi+
ture being exceeded?

RevieEWER, Roseau.

rs

The Faith
Defended

Dear Madam,

It ought to come as a
rather rude shock to the Ban-Reli-
gion protagonists of Dominica (re
belated reporton Dawbiney Club
debate), to read an article like
“Taking Sex Seriously” (Time,
March 6. p. 21). Sweden. for alt
we know, is certainly nota priest-
ridden couutry. Itis one of the
most advanced in the world. It
has “highest rates” for many things,
even. suicide. And there now a
team of Doctors, after an assessment
of sex-laxity, declare. .. ’ Young
people in Sweden are not happy.
They lack the Ten’ Command-
ments in their upbringing”. .









‘As for Superstition... It is true
that. our canoer awe 2
uneducated, tind you, are: disturbed

once and. again bya stray spirit
(without much encouragement from
the clergy as they wl readily



Barclays Bank
Directors —

Barclays Bank has recently
appointed two Local
Directors.

Mr. E.C.A. Roberts has
been appointed a Lacal
Director of Barclays Bank
D.C.O. in the West Indies.
He succeeds Mr. Henry Dales
who is retiring shortly. Mr.
Roberts was pteviously Local
Director of Barclays Bank
D.C.O. in Israel.

Also appointed one of the
Bank’s Local Directors in
the West Indies is Mr. G.C.
J. Self. Mr. Self has been
with the Bank’s Local Head
Office in the West Indies as
a Local Directors’ Assistant
since it was opened eleven
years ago. Mr. Self has
visited Dominica on _ three
occasions, the last of which
was only a few days ago.

ea

G. J. Clement Potter

G. J. Clement Petter, long
a member of the Montreal
St. James Literary Society
and on iis executive commit-
tee since 1955, died in Mon-
treal on February 4th at: the
age of 66. He was the

Born in Dominica, Mr.
Potter graduated ftom

admit), and this after 400 years of McGill University in 1922

Christianity.

One of the few places o7 earth
where Christianity has not been able
to mess up things is New Guinea.
There the aborigines still favour
dried skulls of the enemy as mantle-
pieces or local jewelry for belles and
beaux. Whena civillsed tourist
scoffed at the Bible of a Christian
Papoua he was tald. “If { had no
Bible, you wou!d have no head...”

Yours respectfully,

FR. FRANCIS C. SS. R,

The Presbytery, Goodwill,

with a BSc. degree in
Chemistry. Soon afterwards



a Mt, fe fires oe mens 5
Minister Rev. Philip: Potter.

SATURDAY, MARCH tra. 1964



papers from many parts of
the world.

He had long been accepted
as an authority in technical
reference services and had
written several papers on
documentation for library
organizations.

Mr. Potter reured last yea:
but was retained by the Issti-
tute on a consulting basis.
He also worked as an editor
for the Pulp aad Paper
Asscciation.

During his youth Mr.
Potter was a cricket player
and was a noted fast bowier
for the Montreal West Indiana
team.

He joined the St. Jaraes
Literary Society 15 years ago
ard is remembered for the
breadths of his interests,
which ranged from Omar
Khayyam to William Blake,
and for the help he gave to
new members in preparauon
of papers.

He prepared a bibliogra-
ghy of titles, subjects and
authors of all papers present-
to the group from 1899 to
1955. He was named an
honoraty member of the
society rhis year. Mr. Potter
is survived by a° sister in
Trinidad.— (adapted from The
Montreal. Star, 7.2.64)

ee arene i -
Trip To
Martinique

The Editor of the HERALD
thenks all those correspon



he joined the forerunner of dents who have sent messages

the Pulp and Paper Research
Institute of Canada as a ie-
search assistant, and_ co-
authored several papers on
research projects.

Fer some years he had
been the Institute’s technical
research specialist gatheriag
information from _ scientific

of friendship for delivery to
the Martinique pecple, and
also those who added the
suggestion that President de
Gaulle be invited to visit
Dominica. Such an invita,
tion, of course, would have
to be made officially and not
informally. — Ed.



~ FROM THE “PHOENIX” --

A.C.S, & CO.

@ for RASTER @



IMPORTED EGGS - - - $1.35 Dozen

20¢ — CAVIAR

Hot Dog & Hamburger Relish

Table Prunes

1-lb

pkt.

Tennents Mait Extract & Milk Stout
Sparkling Red Burgundy

Mount Gay Rum.

Mount Gay & Cockade Rum.

Gallon Jugs
Bot.

Greme D’Argent Dry Gin
Tuborg Beer $8.60 — HEINEKIN

Mar. 14—21

(

70¢ — Frankfurt Skinless Sausage
a ane jar — Danish Red Ball Cheese 44 Ib each

39

$13.90 —

$2.75 — Trinidad Rum. Vat. 1

31

Red Claret
Dry & Sweet White $1.20
9 & Old Oak. Bot.

lb Tin $4.20

$4.50

Gouda Cheese $1.00 Ib.—Blue Cheese 77¢ pki.
$8.90 — Le Rubis (French) Vin Rouge Red
$3.50 — French Table Wines.

$1.70
$1.20

$2.90

$2.80 — Carlings Beer $8.70 — Tennents Beer $8.70 cs

$8.75 — Guinness Stout
Boneless Corned Beef Brisket 3 to 5-lb. pieces'at $1.50 Ib. —

33

48-1,
24-4

a

Nips
pts.

3

$13 00
$8.80

A. €. Shillingford & Co. Ltd.


SATURDAY, MARGH 14, 1954

a ey



The following Editorial from “Venture”, monthly macazine of the:
Commonwealth Bureau of the Fabian Society, puts the recent and present
troubies in newly independent countries into a proper perspective

Gommonwealth in Grisis?

The disturbances and bloodshed in Bengal, Cyprus,
Zanztoar and East Africa and the increasing evidence that
Ghana 1s turning into a totalitarian state have encovraged
a mood of dis.llusion with the uew Commonwealth.
Zanzibar in particular has provided fuel for: Tory Canutes
like Sir Cyril Osborne and Lord Colyton. Aud more
contemporary figures, so-called realists, are anxious to see
Britzin shed her remaining responsibilities in the develop-
ing werld. Impatience with Afro-Astan tactics in the
United Nations, the theme of Lord Home’s Berwick
speech, is expressed in usally progressive quarters (even in
the New Statesman).

Critics of zhe nev’ states of Aftica and Asia frequently
argue as if these countries attzined independence complete
with balanced societies, trained élites, and no serious pro-
biems that cannot be put right with a littl: technical assis-
tance and tne generous donation of conscience-appeasing
food surpluses. It is no slight te the emergent countries to
s'tess the tremendcus problems they inherit with ind pen-
dence. Those who paint out the real achievements of
enlightened British colonial administration, forget that it
was not until the war years that the Whitehall establish
ment thought seriously about ‘“‘preparing” colonies fer

independence.

Once independence was recognised as an

eventual aim, there was still a tendency to cencentrate on
constitutional advence and neglect structural and economic

problems.

Personal Problem

th a

ye EWA anges
For Worid
HE Citizens’ Advice Bureau in
Britain, originaily promoted to
meet a-war-time need, this yeaz cele-
brates its silver jubilee — 25 years of
experience.

Its success has attracted wide in-
terest throughout the world. A
number of countries have established
offices on the lines of Citizens’ Ad-
vice Bureaux in Byttain.

The bureaux are now a ferma-
ment part of the life of the commu-
nity in Britain — 428 of them set
up throughout the country are con-
sulted Fy more than one millio.
people cvery year.

The bureaux are centres cf free
information aad advice on all kinds
cf problems, for example; questions
about house purchase, social :nsur-
ance, legal aid, consumer problems;
and requests for advice on all kinds
of family and personal problems,
matrimonial disputes, differences
with landlord, tenant or neighbour,
and the many other difficulties which
beset the individual.

Asa result of experience in Britain,
similar bureaux have bnen set up in
Australia, India, Israel, British Guia-
na and Southern Rhodesia.

Ta the past 12 months visitors have
come from many countries to look
into the service in Britain, and there
have also been many letters of inquiry.

The vast majority of staff at the
British bureaux are volunteers but in
some places, notably the Central
London Bureaux, there is a paid
professional soc.al worker as super-
vison.



(Cont. on p. 5)



a a an Rn io

specialists in their own fields.
_ The taining of bureaux workcrs
is a continuous proce ats
essential for them to keep up to date
with new legislation aud trends in
social though:. c

The arrival in Britain in recent
years of large numbers of people from
other parts cf the Commoawealih
has increased the amount of work of
the bureaux. Many such immigrants
have deen helped to settle’ down to
their new life as a result of help
reeeived.

Most bureaux in Britain are largely
sipported by gran:s from their locel
authority, supplemented by voluntary
contributions. The headquarters
service 1s financed partly by the
National Council of Social Service
from its voluntary funds, and partly
by grants fom Government
Departments





$=.

University Of The
West Indies

PPLICATIONS are invited
from medically qualified gra-
duates for a post as Demonstrator
in the Department of Anatomy.
The appointment is for one year in
the first instance and the successful
applicant will be expected to assume
duties on Ist August, 1964, or as
soon as possible thereafter.
Salary £1,150 pet annum with
a housing allowance of £250 per
annum if married or £200 per ane
num if single.
Applications giving age, details

DOMINICA HERALD

ee +



Financial Help
For Garibbean

| CARIBO Sec. Gen. Goes

On Tour

Mr. C. F. Beauregard,
Secretary-General of the
Caribbean O-ganization, in-
formed the press recently that
he will ce visiting Washing-
ton, Londoa, The Hague
and Paris during the first two
weeks of March for talks
with government officials.
The main purpose of his
visit is to discuss the ways
and means by which the
countries. served by
the Caribbean Organization
migkt derive additional fin-
ancial and technical assist-
ance from the French, Neth-
erlands, United Kingdom
and United States Govern,
ments under the Caribbean
Plan.

Mr. Beauregard said that
a special committee of the
Organization will meet in
St. Thomas, March 16 to
18, to discuss the matter of
financial and technical assist-
ance for the area, in the Light
of the report prepared last
September by two Stanford
last August, which conclud-
ed that a Caribbean develop
ment bank is not feasible at
present. “It is a well recog,
nized fact”, Mr. Beauregard
said, “hat if the countries of
this area are to develop, they
need assistance from both
government and __ private
sources. For this reason, the
St. Thomas meeting will also
consider 2 proposal to sei up
a private invesiment company
to supplement any assistance
which imay come from gov
ernmei.ts.””

The meeting will be
attended by Caribbean O1-
ganization countries and the
four Powers concerned. It
is expected that the Carib
bean countries will be repre-
sented at policy-making level.

SS

Application For
Liquor Licence

To the Magistrate Dist. “G” &
Chief of Polize,

I AtixrorD PaRILLON now tev
siding at Culihaut Parish of St.-
Peter do hereby give you rotice that
it is my intention to apply at the
Magistrate‘s Court to be held at
Porsmouth on Saturday, the 4th

of qualifications, and the names of day of April 1964, ensving for a

three referees should be forwarded to
the Registrar, University of the West

There is also normaily a panel of Indies, Kingston 7, Jamsica, W.I.

consultants (local probation officer, a
Jawyer, moral welfare worker) who
support the work of the bureaux and
are available to give guidance as

not later than March 31, 1964,
Further particulars may be obtained
similarly.
March 14

tetail Liquor LicENCE in respect
of my premises at Colihaut Parish
of St Peter.
Dated the 28th day of January
1964,
: ALIXFoRD PsRILLON
Feb. 29.—Mar. 14




PAGE THREE

+ te

0’Loughlin Report Commended



The report on the proposed Eas- {der-Secretary of States for the Colo-

tern Caribbean Federation prepared | nies, said:- “The British Govern-
by Dr. Carleen O° Loughlin, Sen- | ment accepts. Dr, ©” Loughlin’s re
jor Lectursr in the Department of | port as a useful examination of what
Economics of the University of the | these territories might need to make
West Indies, who is in charge ofthe |them self-suppoiting,
Institure of Social and Eccnomic | “We hope shortly co be in a po-
Research’s branch in Barbados, was ited to discuss with the Govern-
mentioned in the House of Commons eyes concerned how far the British
on Feb:uary rr. In reply to a ques» |Governments may be able to help
ton pnt to him by Mv. Donald | them if they wish to implement che
Chapman, Mr. Nigel Fisher, Un- | findings of the survey.”

—fa-—_.









<>

Notice To Banana Growers
La Plaine Buying Station

GROWERS in the La Plaine District are informed that
the Association will operate a Buying Station at La Plaine
28 from the Banana Reception in the week commencing
tsth March, 1964.

The hours of reception at that station will be 8 a. m.
to § pm. on the FIRST DAY of the Reception aad’ the
price payable will be the cusrent Southern District Buying
Point Price— at present 4.6¢ per 1b. — with an additional

-25¢ per Ib. for fruit qualifying for the Company’s Incen-
tive Bonus.

A.D. BOYD
DOMINICA BANANA GROWERS: General Manager.
ASSOCIATION a
sth Match, 1954.
Mar.14








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a 6 9S 9TH 6 > 6 9 6 PP f aise? Chee ah ' te :

a
{
‘20


PACE FOUR

eee

$78,500 Grant By
Ford Foundation

In a press notice released
iecenily, the University of the
West indies announced a
grant from the Ford Founda-
tion of $78,000 (U. S.) pay,
able over a period of three
years to cnable the University
to undertake a programme of
staff development. The
gram will permit the second-
mentto the U. W.I. of
specialists in various fields
and allow fora member of
the University staff to assisé
the Planning Committee in
drawing up long-term plans.

Other generous grants
made by the Foid Founda-
tion to the University of the
West Indies within the past
three years have raade possible
the establishment of an Engi-
neering Faculty at St. Au-
gusting, an nstitute of
Education. at Mona, and a
branch at the Institute of
Secial and Economic Re-
search in Barbados.

‘This most recent evidence
of the Foundation’s continued
support, like all previous
ones, will promote the Uni-

-versitv’s development in_ its
mest fundamental

Ford Gets Citation

The Institute of Interna-
tional Education (IIE) has
awarded Ford Motor Com-
paay a citation for “distin-
guished service in interna-
tional education by a
corporation.”

Arjay Miller, ' Ford presi-
dent, accepted the citation
from Mrs. Maurice T. Moore,
chairman of the IIE executive
committee, at an awards
dinner in Washington D. C.
last week.

PH.D. To U. W. 1. Graduate

Woodville K Marshall,
recently appointed as Assis
tant Lecturer in the Depart-
ment of History of the Uni-
versity of the West Indies,
Mona, and who ts a graduate
of the University College of
the West Indies, has been
awarded the degree of Ph. D.
by the University of Cam-
bridge for his thesis ‘The
Social and Economic Deve-
lopment of the Windward
Islands, 1838—1865”.

Dr. Marshall was a mem-
ber of the 1958 graduating
class at Mona when he
obtained First Class Honours
in History. In October,
1962, after doing research at
Cambridge University, he



aspects. Our reporters: vegan Thay

VOMINICA

el A, Somer

was appointed an Assistant
Lecturer at the University of
Ibadan leaving that post to
come to the University of the
West Indies at the end of
1963.

Fred Phillips Honoured

Mr. Fred. A. Phillis,
Senior Assistant Registrar in
the College of Arts and
Science of the University of
the West Indies in Barbados
has been elected a member of
the American Society of
International Law with
effect from January I, 1964.
Mr. Phillips, who used to be
Secretsry to the Cabinet of
the Federal Government of
the West Indies, has con-
tinued to do reseatca in the
field of international law
siice taking up administra’
tive duties with the Univer-
sity.

D. G. S. Variety
Talent Cavalcade

We were forced through
the disability of last-minute
car repairs to dekgate the
reporting of this variety show
to two young gitl reporters.
Their account delighted us,
being the impact of youthful
talent on young observers.

writing that the hall was

people — high class, “second
class, low class aad school-
children! (We would not
ourselves dare to be so blunt).
The show, they said, started
bang with the 1964 sreel band
Champs, playing two fine
tunes: “Around the
World” and “Mocdy
River”; then Mrs. Marie
Davis Pierre and her
“enlightened the vast crowd
with some well-sung songs”,
receiving great applause.
M. C. Lieut. Earl Johason
“had a very nice voice in
announcing.”

Close on the first success
came the 1964 Calpso King
with his fireymystery hit
“Sinna”’, followed by “You
can't stop me loving you”.
He got a tremendous. recep-
tion, and other talented calyp-
sonians receieved their share
afterwards.

Our girl reporters revelled

D.G.S. “ragged
which (in their

in the
squad”

words) “showed how to run §
2 batallion with no discipline, |
Al
though the young observers
regretted that they were too
shoulders
many

>>

and was too funny.

short to see over
and make notes of the



~ keep

chorus

ESRALD

they'd ever enjoyed, and
hoped a lct of money was
made.

Not overlooked were Bare
bara Bully’. lovely songs (she
was pari of popular Reo:eveli
Richard’s trouge), the giace-
ful Renaissance dancers, an
avalanche of other enter-
tainers (too many to list) and
the skit “A Night 1 Camp,”
which hela the young
reporters to their seats uncil
midnight approached.

PAY ‘YOUR DUES

y
R. P. JOSEPH
(Gen. Sec. D.T.U.)

Some workers arc very
neglectful in paying Union
Dues, and some do not like
to pay at all.

In this situation, the up-
of the Union is left to
the faithful few, who make
regular payments.

This problem has led to














o

V.I. P.s present, they de-

the

clared it was

best and
‘most well attended show



SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 1964





the Check-Off System of
dues ceduction, which is
slowly but surely becoming
the standard method of dues
collection in the Caribbean
Area.

There is, however, a vast
number of workers who do
not pay dues by this system,
because there is no agreement
to do so, We make a
special appeal to this group,
to Jive up the responsibiliues
of maintainiug a strong
Trade Union Movement.

The Union, a; an Organi’
sation, must pay rent, lease
or taxes. It must pay staft
to Jo the work in the office,
without which, the Union
cannot survive. Field Siaff
must be provided, negotia-
tions for wages and just con-
ditions of work must be con-
ducted in the prover way,
which sometimes entails em-
ployment of Technical Pe--
sonnel. Iriternational affilia-
tons which are teday very

L.A. BDUPIGNY Esq.,
J. W. EDWARDS

SIL PAINT

GENERAL PURPOSE



important aspects of Trade
Union activities, musi be
maintained.

All these involve expendi-
ture. If, thererore, a worker
fecis that a Union ts necess-
ary for protecting him and
acvancing his interest, then
surely, he must be prepared
to contribute financially to
the maincainance of Union
activitics.

Some workrs know the.
Union only when they are
in trouble. This is the
wrong attitude, becat se, if
somcone did not pay to keep
tle Union alive, there would
be no organisation. on which
to fall back when the evil
days ccme along.

Let us then, consider this
seriously, and carefully. The
Union needs the financial
aid of its members. Dues
must be reguleriy, paid, if
the movement is to survive.

Thank you for valuable
space.

READY MIXED



RUSSET



CARIBBEAN) LIMITED.

AVAILABLE AY 1HE FOLLGWING HARDWARE STORES

G.G. PHILLIP & COMPANY

T. D.SHILLINGFORD



SATURDAY. MARCH 14, 1564

~:



Commonwealth In Crisis?
(Continued from page 3)

In some instances Britain has been directly responsible
fcr creating the conditions a one-party stace is designed to
cure. If nation-building seems to most African leaders a
dominant priority this is because Britain failed so create
nations in the colenies she administered. Tribaiism was
perpetuated and the tribes simply linked by authoritarian
government at the centre. This tradition has been perpe-
tuated even in Kenya. And if che one party state is a pest-
colonial developmenr, preventive detention measures are
not — they were a common instrument of colonial govern’
ments.

In the piocess of decolonisation more stress has been
laid on the trappings of democracy than on its essence.
In particular the last phase of British decolonisation has
been marked by a pre-occupztion with elaborate constitu-
tional structures designed 'to contain temporary political
divisions or allay minority fears rather than to tackle long
term social and economic problems. A baffling system of
checks and balances like that presented to Northern Rho-
desia in x96x is not likely to encourage respect fer paalia-
mentary democracy. Noor is it strange to find Zenzibaris
little attached to a system ‘which allows the party which
democraticaly secured 54 per cent of the voies at the pre-
independence election to remain in opposition with only
13 seats out of an assembly of 31
Under colonialism education development was neg’
lected until very late and economic develo;>ment geared to
the needs of the colonial power. Now rapid educational
advance creates new problems. Zanzibar is ususnal in
having a large number of secondary school leavers with no
jobs and no prosrects. But the prcblem of unemployment
"among primary school leavers is universal in Attica.
Zanzibar’s economy is dependent on a. precarious market
for two products, cloves and coconut produce — which
together account for 95 per cent of her totalexpoits. These
ons are likely to lead to s cial untest
instability.

Recognition of these factors should not prevent
Socialist from deploring the arbitrary injustice which is
developing in Ghana. Injustice anywhere is our legitimate
concern, and its impact in this case is felt all the more
Lecause of personal and professional links with a fellow
Commonwealth countiy. Developments in Ghana make
the task of those in the West who are pressing for the end-
ing of colonialism in Southern Rhodesia and the Portu-
guese territories more difficult.

Yet Ghana’s self-reliance is a model for the develop-
ing world. Her achievement in putting the vital areas of
her economic and social life under Aftican con:rol hes
been impressive. Tanganyika’s troubles under-line the
danger of delaying Afticazisation. Now Ghana’s achieve-
ment is threatened by the botding up to legitimate criticism
which can only encourage violenze and increase the secut-
ity thre t Ghana’s chief strength has been the size and qual-
ity of her administrative élite. Civil service morale is al-
ready low, and if the administration is weakened by further
purges, Ghana’s surge forward will be checked.

Writing about the spread of authoritarian rule in
Aftica Professor Bauer has suggested confining aid “to
governments willing to address themselves to che essential
functions of government ....” This, he argues implausi-
bly, would reduce political tension in Africa. In fact
such action would limit the power of independent states to
plan a mixed economy along socialist lines and drive them
to rely exclusively onaid fromthe East. This would
hardly make for stability, nor would it achieve Bauer’s
libertarian objective. America’s economic boycott of
Cuba has net made for stabllity in Latin America, or
has it diminished Castro’s appeal. The only criterion for
the giving of aid should be whether it is being efficieatly
used by the recipient government in the overall interests of
its people,

It would be disastrous if Britain and the West were
to tarn their backs on Left-wing authoritarian regimes in
Aftica. If we are really concerned about Communist






DOMINICA HERALD

PAGE FIVE

penetrat‘on (whether from Moscow, Peking, cr Havana) Natice To Banana

we shali involve ourselves as we can. To isclate a com
munisant regime in Africa when the Communist world is
no longer a monolithic bloc would be misguided. The
West must learii co adjust itself to polycentrism and accept
that the old simplifications of the heyday of the Cold War
no longer apply

Thre is grave danger in ostracising developing, coun-
tries which unhappily turn authoritarian. Given its own
recent past the West has no right to play the Pharisee. If
Socialists criticise, let their criticism be related to the inheri-
tance of colonialism and the challenge of development.
The problem of world hunger and the gap between North
and South transcends political theory. Wester. social
democracy must not appear to place fieedom to siarve
among the fundamental freedoms.

Advertisers are asked to submit copy -
by noon on Wednesdays:





SPECIAL DRAW
(UPSTAIRS)
PRESCRIPTIONS ARE CAREFULLY

IN OUR

STARTING MARGH 16TH TILL 30TH MAY, ,
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NEAR THE DRUGS DEPT. MARK CLEARLY YOUR NAME AND
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WIN $125.00 IN PRIZES



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— $3.00 IN YOUR CCLECTION OF GOCDS FROM DRUCS DEPT.

Training For Olympics

Growers

Hours Of Recextion: Soufriere
Buying Stations

Growers selling their bananas at
Soufriere Buying Station are notified
that as fromthe Banana Reception
in the week commencing 15th March,
1964 the hours of reception a: that
statian will be from 7 a.m to 2 p.m
on the FIRST DAY of the Reception,

A.D. Boyd
General Manager
Dominica Banana Growers Assuci~-
tion
6th Merch, 1964.
Dfar. 14



DEPARTMENT,

LOOKED AFTER.
1964 PLACE YOUR

ee ASE ee



ete te Sie eda

Louis Martin of Jamaica practising for the only award he does not hold — the weight- ifiing
PAG SIX

SO

DOMINICA HERALD

DOMINIGA HERALD

AN INDEPENDENT WEEKLY

31 New Street,

Editor — mrs.

*

Roseau. Tel. 307
Published by 1. MARGARTSON CHARLES, Propri-tor
PHYLLIS SHAND ALLFREY

U.K. & European Representative — Colin Turner (London) Ltd.

*

122, Shaftesbury Ave , London W. 1

Amual Subscripticns :

Town $5.00 Country $6.00

Overseas (Suzface Mail) $7. 50



SATURDAY,

MARCH _



NOBLE LADIES

F this brief editorial reas like a Court
citcular, it is because most of the
recent news from outside has been studded
with noble ladies’ names. He: Majesty
Queen Elizabeth HI has produced a fourth
child (third son, and third in succession
to the throne); her niece Princess Alexan-
dra gave birth to a boy a few days earlier;
her great-aunt, the Princess Alice (Chan-
cellor of the University of the West Indies)
has just stepped on and off these shores
while on an educational tour; and Queen
Elizabeth the Queen Mother is recuperat-
ing in the Caribbean aboard the Royal
yacht Britannia, pausing in jamaica and
Barbados and (we hope) elsewhere.

Next week, to extend the saga of illus-
trious ladies, Lady Olave Baden-Powell
will be with us, to the joy of Guides and
Brownies; and the British Prime Minis
ter’s. glamorous daughter Meriel has

become engaged to a handsome econo-
is) z

- Since Her Majesty ‘the Que Queen is not

only a monarch but an example of happy

motherhood to the weuG. we ma a

rejoice with her and with her husband
Prince Philip on the aew baby’s birth.
“A perfect woman, nobly planned... To warn,
to comfort, to command.”

There is no douoct that most West In-
dians love big names and better still royal
names. They don’t even mind standing
like outside children at the foot of the
greathouse drive while the VIPs of the
day brush fingers with the more permanent
notabilities of other climes. We met a
woman compattiot who was genuinely
dazzled at the mere thought that the
Duchess ef Westminster had looked at
Dominican birds, and usually level-headed
persons quiver at the sight of a film star.

And why not? If you are not celebra-
ted yourself, or if your life is rather unex-
citing, staring at the great or the royal
from afar or ancar is a very innocent form
of pleasure; no novelist has bette: described
the vicarious nature of enjoying celebrities
than Jane Austen.
~The Gomiionwealtn-rovesix
royal personages, and if these “islands have
a special affection for Princess Alice it is





SE

The British Prime Ministers’s daughter with her fiancé Mr. Adrian

Darby,
will marry this month.

tutor in economics at Oxford University:

Both ‘are 24 and

SATURDAY, MARCH 1 14,

1964
because she is the Chancellor of our own University and
is not only gracious but hardworking. The royal Chan-
cellor has always brought goodness and learning to the
West Indian peoples; she really cares about “her” Univer-
sity, and deserves a most happy cruise.

——

NETURE’S BREA KDOWN

AR we spoilt by taking some of the amenities of civilisa-

tion for granted? We denot know how much the
acts of nature which caused destruciion of electricity pipe-
lines and plunged Dominica into darkness on and cff since
Friday March 6, has cost in interruption of services, busi-
ness and producticn; but doubtless the C. D. C. will soon
be able to add up the financial extent of their damage. It
was fortunate for us that they had spare pipelines in stock.
It may be some while befor: the rest of us can estimate on
paper the ameunt of inconvenience caused by untimely
stoppage of electric power, goods deterioiated or labour lost.
Nevertheless the community has as usual accepted the blow
with reasonable stoicism.

We appreciate the efforts which have been made by
Dominica Electricity Setvices and the C. D. C. to stagger
electricity supplies so that domestic food storage was largely
safeguarded. They have also kent the populace quickly
informed of load-shedding hours and resumption of power,
also of the progress of repairs — for which we are thankful,
although the enforced silence of WIBS at intervals left
many pecple still in ignorance of the day-tozday vosition.
At least the cold storage plant and Princess Margaret Hos-
pial have not been without mains power for any harmful
period, and Dominica's chief pakery has becn able to
keep going.

The task of reparation has been a hard one: for the
engineers and workmen concerned with this power break-
down; they have had to work long hours in pouring rain
with mud underfoot. It is fair to say that they spared no
~eo syinie the-artificial-licht.. refrige-
‘tation, radio and other aids to comfortable living which an
Hetessipg number of our citizens now regard as indispen-
sable.





re> « #

Mr. Justice F.0.0| semperit TyRES
Harris and

TUBES IN STOCK

A Correction 750 x 20 825 x 20

P 650 x 16 520 x 13

Readers who gained the impress- 600 x 16 20 x 14

ion thrcugh these columns that Mr. 750 x 16 590 x 14

Justice Harris had returned to 700 x 20 500 x 15

Dominica to reside are hereby in- 640 x 13 260 x 15

formed that Judge Harris is really 670 x 15 HON yx 15

here on leave with his family. and
wlll be going back te Cameroon in
about two months’ time to resume
his duties as Judge of the Supreine
Court There.

<

University Of The West Indies

A\PL'CATIONS are invited for the post of Lecturer in Obstetrics

‘and Gynaecology. Duties tobezssumed on Octo bert, 1964,
or as soon as possible thereafter. Postgraduate qualificaion in the speciality
is essential. The post carries Honoriry Vonsu!tant, or Junior Consult
ant status in the University Hospicat.

Salary scale, £1,750 x 120 — £2,590 x 60 -~ £2,650. Child allowance
(limited to thee children) £50 for the first chitd, £1co for the second
child, £50 for the third child. F.S. S. U. Housing allowance
ot 10% of salary, or if available, unfurnished accommodation will be
let by the University at 10%, of salary. Up to five full passages on ap-
eae cn normal termination and on study leave (once every three
years

Applica tions, (10 copies) giving full particulars of qualifica-
tions and experience, date of birth and the names of three referees should be
sent by Apiil 14, 1964, by persons living in the A merieis and the Carib-
bean area to te Registrar, University of the West Indies, Kingston 7,
Jamaica, W.I. and by all other persons to the Secretary to the Senate
Cemmittee on Colleges Overseas in Special Relation, University of
London, Senate Hcuse, London, W.C. 1. Further particulars may
be obtained simularly.

March .1 14

Very Attractive Prices..

S. P. MUSSON SON

& CO. LTD.
Tel. 360





SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 1364

“$9 THEY SAY”--

. BY BOR & RAY
so posed a question *o us the other day as

follows: “AI( our bananas were b’o.vn cov n in the
hurrican: last Autuma. We scceived our insurance cheq:ie
based on previous binana sales Now, if it will take a
year (approximately) for our ban-na cultivetion to begin to
vield again, that will tring tke tim: around to Hurricane
Seison once more. Suppose w- suffer enother hurticine
then before we can establish banana vield with the Associa-
tion. How can they pay us another insurance claim on
the new figs that are destrcyed since there is no “‘previcus
sales records” for che prececding montis 2”

Off hand we'd say this grower is just better off to raise
some other crop. . dzsheen, perhaps !

The Federal boass are supposed to “benefit che small
West Indian islands” bue we wonder who it is that benefirs
since the small grower of ground provisions finds the boa‘s
too expensive to ship the dasheen, tznnias, pumpkiss, ete.
on to Barbados, St. Kitts and elsewhere in the Caribbean.
The Federal boais have drained off just enough local cargo
to hur: the local schooner owners and have made these
skippers extremely non-regular in their trips to and from
neighbouring islands,

Mercharts tell us they cannot order a few cases of eggs
or bags of fertilizer or animal feeds t» come via Federal
boat as the minimum shipping costs ate too high. A few
weeks ago there was several hundied cases of grapefruit
routing in their boxes awaiting shipment to Buarbidos.
The Federal boats* rates were too high and no schooner
was available. The grower told us it is absolutely impossi-
bie for anyone to learn what schooner is going to Barbados
(or Antigua or Trinidad) from the agents as they don’t
have definite word from their shippzrs.

When we inquired why the schooner people aren’t
more teliable and on definite schedules, we were told the
Federal boats have spoiled their business by taking just

e
indehnite loads. Hence, shey said, the island is left with
(1) inadequate schooner service aad, (2) high (and mighty)
Federal Boat rates.

On top of this situation we learn the Federal Boats
Cannot Operate at a profit. .. that their miszrable service is
losing money! Upon checking up on this, we find there
is a “plan to louse money” on the Federal Boats. For exam-
ple, when the Federal Boats are in harbour at Bridgetown,
Barbados, the bars and dining rooms are closed! When
it is time for visitors to ‘go ashore” — the bar opens!
The hours of operating their public facilities are ~ craftily
atranged to be inconvenient to their pass.ngers. As one
recent visitor to Yominica told us: *The Federal Boats
are really doing yeu.a favour to sell you anything!”

One way to lose money in »perating 1 public setvice
is to have a “‘ublic bo damned” attitude. Anotner way
to chase business away is to close your doors to business
(admission of cargo) three days before departure (as in ihe
case at Barbados)... and to have non-competitive rates.

The experienced shipper elso tells us the Federal boats
have more personnel than is necessary to operate their ships
(in spite of the poor sérvice that is reudered) and that any
business with too high an overhead is bound to lose money.

Perhaps all these facts are known to the directors of
FSS and they will soon use the non-profit theme as excuse
to withdraw the boats. But several merchants have told
us: the sooner and Fed. boats leave us alone, the better, as
the schooner people will then become better organised and
will have regularly scheduled voyages once again... so
they say. es

ee >

Oa 6 > 6 9a 5 9a 6 9 6 a 6 P= 8 9 6 8

6 Sa 6 9 pe

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Subscribers are kindly requested to report areata
)





ae 9:

12 noon on Saturday if their papers have not been
delivered. We may be sold out by that time.
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|!
!
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L



chaps she had been beaten to death.

‘ing, until I reached the bank of the

DOMINICA HERALD

PAGE SFVEN



The Great Fight Of My Dreams

hy Paula Bellot

THE SUN was shining brightly, The day was hot and everyone kep:

themselves very busy down in the markecplice in order to get out of
the scorching sun, Some of the people carried big baskers on their heads,
othyrs were aprons around the waist with their heads tied like old maids.

There was a litle fiish in the firse stall and everyone wanted to be
served, so they kept on squeezing onz another; I stood at che extreme eid
watching the crowd as they engaged themselve, in such stupid behavicur.

A boy, named Hurston, who was dressed in a pol:c:man’s tire came
marching towards th2 crowd vith a piece of stick swinging in bis hand,
He was not impress‘ve at all and noone stoppzd to look at him Suddenty
I felt > push and the next thing I knew I was hit hard on the head with
the same stick, Never had I experienced such a dexdly blow as this one.
Blood flowed dow:. my cheeks lik: 2 running stream, I closed my eyes
for I dared net watch it and move blindly up and aown so that someone
would come to help.

Two peop e then held me by the haad uatil they could hurry me to
the hospiial. So much of my blood had been lest already that, as I sat
down in Casuaity, I fainted. Funny things were placed in my mouth and
nose ull I recovered.

Docior Holmes inspected the wound after and then ordered Nurse

James to dress it.
An kour later I was sent home and there I remained three days in
bed. On the third day my friend Dora came to take me for a walk. As
we walked down the main street we saw a gang of fellows approaching us:
who was the leader but this bad boy. Believe me I got so frightened at
the moment that I could hardly speak or look to see tiie others’ faces.
They passed us one by one and tecause Hurston liad his fece turned to
the opposite side Z pointed my finger at him and whispered to her ‘that is
the man who hit me”. ;

Secredy we followed them but soon lost si ght of them after we had
passed the big mahogaiy building, close to the sea-side, and so we decided
to go no further.

Now on waiting there for some minu es we saw him returning alone.
Fortunate chaps are we, I said to myself to nave him come back our way.
My friendtook the first step and eventually I followed her while we walked
up to him. Dora collared the man saying “what did Elsa ‘do you”?
“Leave me or I will hurt you, young gil”, said Hurston. “You can’t es-
cape from danger now, paddy, don’t you know it’s our turn to take re-
venge,” On hearing these words he just smiled, pulled a whistle from his
pocket and blew it. Immediately we saw six men coming towatds us with
bortles and stones in their hands. There I knew w 3
its. I tied to run, but, alas I could not for we were properly surrounded.

We were struck mostly on the :
head and wait but they only waited
to strike whenever we would wiru.
I could not staud any mote. blows
and soI fell on the ground as if
dead. How could Dora stand the
blows I dare no: tell: all 1 knew
about her is that her whole body
was blood. Soon‘after I regained
strengt':, got up gradually and then
ran into Mrs, Ivy’s building when
I quickly closed the doors and
windows, After my departure I
could give no account of the fight
again. I dared not give my mind
a single thought about Dora. Per-




{to hide under the mattress, The
owner asked me “what happened”,
but all I could say was, “oh wo-
man, nothing”.

Then we heard the boy speaking
in an abrupt way outside, and-so
she peered outto sce the speaker.
As she placed her band on the
window sill the boy held it tighily
in order to scare her. “‘\here is
the girl who came in here? ‘1ei! me.
I want to kill her”. he said. The
old woman got so frightened, that
she answered in a muttering wey,
“she went over.” In a rouglish
tone he replied. “Ran where? tell
me or I shall kill you slso.” The
poor woman started shouting, “Lord
save rae. What have I done this
wrech!”* Before she had finished, he
burst open the door and_ started
looking up and down in the room.

Turning over everything and

PEI CIRFIRI WS

They had traced my footsteps and
so they came directly to che buildiag
in which Iwas hiding and they
continued throwing stones on the
roof until it was completely gone.
Whea I saw this I operied the back
door and ran wildly all through the
bushes like a mad chap.

Perhaps after I had left the house
they entered and found that I was
not there, for a quarter of ap. hour
later I heard the sound of footsteps
behind me and this time I ran so
fast that I almost thought I was Ay-



Swanny River. To sit down for a
second would be a _ great ease to my
breathlessness, bnt I could not risk
the chance. All I did was dive
down into the muddy water. Hur-
ston was not worried by the dirty
water, though the others tried to pre-
vented him from following me. He
did not listen to-them and I scon
saw him dive into the water and he
swan so fast as I did.

On reaching the shore I ran and
ran till I reached an opened house,
where I jumped through a window
end made my- way to the bedroom

$1.35



Mp

March 14—21

NR

-proposed..New Books? bept.



IMPORTED
EGGS

throwing away the parcels under the
bed,

Then he took a big jump on tke
bed while he tossed and turned
himself on it with great force. I
suffered much, for his weight was
notas light as mine. I tried to
scream but Iecuid not. He was
Lot satisfied as yet snd to he pulled
up the mattcess halfway in such a
desperate -age, (why he did ‘not see
me, only heaven knows) as if he
Meant fo tear it in two, My bair
was out and I thought there was
nothing left for me ‘to do again but
to surrender, but ‘he paid no mind
to the bed again and headed for the
doorway where twe policemen were
awaiting him. Each of them took
him by the hand and brought him
to the jail,

T was safe once more but knew
one thing chat this fight could hap-
pen only in my dreams.

rs —

Young energetic man to. handle the
sales of Phillips’ Radios,. Stoves,
and all Phillips ~-products. Some
practical knowledge of Radios,

Appliances, etc. is’ beneficial.
Suitable person might ‘HE: required



4,

to take special studies abroad.
. Apply in writing to: ~~
J. ASTAPHAN & CO, LTO.
2 bets
A capable person -to handle: our
Must
have . good~ .knowlédg3:--of-:School
Books,. Magazines, ~ a nd. all: other
Types, of Books, etc. for-sale to
the public. Also some knowledge
of popula i aaa
ultablé person might. he required
to take special studies abroad.
Apply in writing to:
J. ASTAPHAN & CO. ‘LTD.
3 ee
A young man with some practical
knowledge of work done ina
Work ‘Shop, such as Pipe Fitting,
Elecirical Repairs, Iron Work; etc.
to work as. an assistant in our
New Refrigeration and Electrical
Repairs Werk Shop.
We are willing to give suitable
person further training here and if
necessary abroad.
Apply in writing to: .
J. ASTAPHAN & CO. LTD.
Seb, 29— March 28
March 7.



Advertise la
The HERALD



6 ee

PPu SF *

Doz.

PHOBNIN





PAGE EIGHT



gi.
ualy
bas a
vast Indies
Applications are invited for the
Fost. ectuger or Assistant Lectur-
er in Ciacsics, The person appoint-
ed will be sequired to teach Ancient
History for the B, A. General and
Special Honours Degrees; Livy and
Greek Prose Composition for
Speciai Honours; and_ prescribed
Latin historical text for General
Honours and to help with the class-
ical side of the Survey of Civilisa-
uon Course for Arts Students.
Salary seales, Lecturer £1,450 x
60 — £1,810 x 80 — £2'290;
Assistant Lecturer £1,200 x 50 —
£1,350 Child allowance (limited
to three children) £150 for first
child, £100 for second child, £50
for thicd child. F, S. S, U. Housing
allowance of 10% of salary or, if
available, unfurnished accomodation
wiil be fet by the University at 10%,
of salary. Up to five full passages
on appoimtment, on normal termin-
ation, and on study leave (once
every three years,
Application (six copies) giving
full particulars of qualifications and
experience; date of birth and the
namss of three referees should be
sent by April 15, 1964, by persons
living inthe Americas and the
Caribbean area to th e Registrar,
. University of the West Indies, King-
ston 7; Jamaica, and by all ober
persobs to the Secretaty, Inter-
University Council for Higher
Education Overseas, 29 Woburn
Square. London, W.C, 1. Further
particulars may be ob‘ained similar-



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orsity Of The University Of The

West Indies

Applicatiors are invited
for the posts of (a) Senior
Lecturer: (b) Lecturer or
Assistant Lecturer in Modern
European History since 1300
or North American History,
in the College of Arts and
Science Trinidad.

Salary Sealesé “Senior
Lecturer £1,95u x 90 --
£2,940: Lecturer £1,450
x60 -- £1,810 x 8 —
£2,290: Assistant Lecturer
£1,200 x $0 — £1,350.
Child allowance (limited to
three children) £150 for first
child, £00 for second child,
£50 for third child. F-s.s.u.
Housing allowance of 10%
of salary, or if; avatlable un-
furnished accomodation will
be let by the University at
10% of salary. Up _ to five
full passages on appointment
on normal termination and
on study leave (once every
three years).

Detailed application (six
copies) giving particulars of
quatifications and experience,
date of birth and the names
of three referees should be
sent by April 15, 1964, by
eomsons livine in the Ameri
cas and the Caribbean, area,
to the Registrar, University

Aboxof GdUMAURIER
carries beautifully packed
quality filter tip cigarettes made

from the finest Virginia tobacco
that money can buy

oo

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OMA ap,
: Fee egs

WN \\\

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WA NY UN

Go AN
MAL

DOMINICA HERALD

——_———~«

SATURDAY, MARCH 14 1964



of the West Indies, Kingston
7, Jamaica, W. I. and by all
other persons to the Secre-
tary, Inter-University Coun-
cil for Higher Education
Overseas, 29 Woburn
Square, London, W. C. I.
Further particulars may be
obtained similarly.

Mar. 14

Applications For
Liquor Licences

To the Magistrate Dist E’’ and the
Chief of Police.

I Coxon L’HOMME now re-
siding at Pond Casse Parish of St.
Paul do hereby give you rotice
that it is my intention to at the Ma-
gistrate’s Court to be held at Roseau
on Thursday the and day of Apu |
1964, ensuing for a retail Liquor
LICENCE in respect of my premises
at Pond Casse Parish of St Pauls.

Dated the 7th day of March 1964.

Coxon L’HoMME.

Mar.,24—28
To the Magistrate Dist. “EB” &
Chiet of Police,

I, DARLING SHILLINGFORD now
residing at Roseau Parish
of St. George do hereby give you
notice that it 1s my intention to apply
at the Magistrate’s Court to be held
at Roseau on Thursday, the 2nd
day of April 1964, ensuing for



a
a



retail LIQUOR LICENCE in respect of
my premises at No. « Virgin Lane
Parish of St. George.
Dated the 2nd day of Math 1964.
DARLING ‘SHILLINGFORD
93
Mar. 7, 14, 21.








NN
NY

NN)

AAA)











Victoria St. to No. 1 Virgin Lane.











To the Magistrate Dist “F” & the! my premises at Castle Bruce Parish
Chief of Police. of St. David.

1, Victoria LocKART now re- Dated the 9th day of March 1964
siding at Castle Bruce Parish of VICSORIA LOCKHART
St, — do hereby give you no- Se
tice that it is my intention to apply y
at the Magistrate’s Court to be held WenTn at i 6 = ses
at Castle Bruce on Monday tke 6th ard. &. y
day of April 1964 ensuing for a re- Supermarket in King
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STEMS TONS
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Portsmouth 34,764 370
Coast 4 463 a 51
68,872 752
Exports Ist Jan'to 20th Feb., 1964 200,438 2,165





Total Exports to 4th March, 1964 269,3 is

Decrease 1964 compared with 1963 253,041



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SATURDAY, MACH 14, 1964



“Parents Blame

Yourselves’’

by D J. Etienne
(School Atiendance
Officer)

Vhe world as our immediate en-
vironment is presenting a challenge
‘to both teachers and parents alike.
The manner in which this
challenge is accepted, will largely
deter“nine the success of the child,
parents and teachers.

Parents, apart from being male
and female, may be placed into three
main groups:—Good, Bad and In-
different.

There are umes when one mzy
wenuder whether parents are really
fit and proper persons to have the
charge and czreof young children.
If it were possible to test the suita-
biliy cf parenthood, there
would asurdly be an ex-
tremely high rate of failure. There
are plenty more bad parents than
good anes.

The paren:s who are of most use
to us in scnools are not necessarily
those who are in constant agreement
with us over details, but those that
areon our side over larger issues.

They are those who appreciate
that Education is tot sumething
which can be placed into isolated



compartments, but something in
which home, school and child are
partners.

Good parents may grnmble to
themselves, or may even complain,
bat that we know, there: is mutnal
understanding petween teachers and
parents: and the child’s welfare
comes first.

be ad
Declaration cf Human Rights, states
that Education shall be free and
compulsory at least in the elementary
stages.”

A. slow decay is noticed in the
good relationship which formerly
existed between schcol and home.
My impression about this is that
mary parents nowadays are antagon-
istic towards 2uthority and are re-
sentful whenever it is applied and
inconveniences them,

There is no doubt that there is
too much villainy about our you:h
today, for us to be fully complacent
with their behavior.

Immorality and juvenile delin-
quency Alourish despite the efforts of
law-enforcing agencies.

There may, or may not bea
connection between delinquent
children and working parents, but
this problem of delinbuency in
Dominica, is caused in most cases,
by parents whose attitude is either
that of ‘disinterestedness’ or ‘negli-
gence’.

Parents who set very poor exam-
ples to children cannot expect them
- to grow up" to respec? good moral
standards.

These parents regard immorality
and vagrancy as the accepted way
of life.

Children are not educated as they
. are not sentto school and parents
complaint on excuse is that of
poverty, want of food, clothes.
government gives no help.

A mother said to me that she
was far better tempered when she
was at work or when the children
were on the street.

It is easier to have a neated clash
than a cool discussion with parents
of this type. Therefore, it must be
remembered that in deallng with
bad parents, officers ate to exercise




great patience as not to upset the n,:
or else, it is like putting a fline
to fuel which is reacy for lighting,
Indifferent parents use the school
as a recreation park in which they
can leave thier children while they
go to work or shopping. They
take no more care thin feeding,
clothing and keeping them warm.
Their approach te the job of parent-
hood is a negative one and more
often then not escapes notice. ‘This
attitude produces a fac ees child
who never does anything outstand-
ing in life.
. “The full force of the Law|
should be exercised against delin-
qnent parents.”’

U.N. and CYPRUS

The United Nations
security Couticil acceped
unanimously last week
the pronosal for U.N. Forces
to supervis: Cyorus security.
Meanwhile the ‘itueton in
Cyprus hed been getting
mote violent and dangerous.
Among the powers who will
“patrol” Cyprus are: Cana-
da, Sweden, Ireland, Finland
and Brazil. Great Britain
will continue her protective
military interest in the island.



Advertisers Are
Asked To Submit
Copy By Noon
On Wednesdays

$$ ——

DON’T DEPEND ON YOUR
NEIGHBOUR’S -— BUY
YOUR OWN DOMINICA
HERALD! !!!

University Of The West Indies

APPLICATIONS are invited fer the post of Lecturer or Assistant

Lecturer in Anatomy. Duties of the pest will include lectur-
ing in Human Anatomy, and assistance ia the practical courses of
Histology to students working for the medical degrees of the
University of the West Indies. Applicant must possess a registrable
medical gnalification.



Salary scales: Assistant Lecturer — £1,350 x 50 — £1,500;
Lecturer £1,650 x 105 —- £1,965 x 120 — £2,450. Child allowance
(limited to thtee children) £150 for the first chiid, £1co for the second
chill, £50 for the third child, pec annum. F.S.S,U. Housing allow-
ance of 10% of salary, or if available, unfurnished accommodation will be
let by the University at 10% of salary. Up to five full passages on ap-
pointment, cn normal termination and on study leave (once every three
years). .
Detailed applications (10 copies} giving full particulars of qualifica-

DOMINICA HERALD

PAGE NINE

en ee ee



ooo

NOTICE
bentral Housing And Planning Authority

T is notified fer general infermation that the Administrator-in- Council

has, under the provis ons of Section 6 of the Town and ‘Country
Planning Ordina:.ce Ne. 4 of 1946 approved of the Glanvillia Village
and Extension Scheme.

7.

A copy of the Scheme, the plans and other particulars pertaining
thereto may be inspected at the office of the Central Authority.

Sed, Huserr N. Josepu
Ag, Secretary & Executive Officer
Centr:! Housing & Planning Authority,
GO. 25, March 7 -— 14

Se mm ames a te pe 6 ee om en ee 6p ees, ee ee

DOMINICA
DONKEY RACES —-

GRAND EASTER FAIR: .

Windsor Park -- March 30th
SPECTATERS 25¢
STANOS $1.09
SPECIAL GAR PARK ENGLOSURE — $1.00

Feb, 29, Mar, 14, 28

a 6 ee 0 8
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Cat Dae 8 Pf Pt Pt
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oT CARTER



experience, date o birth and the names of three retereess

sent by Apiil 6, 1964, by persons living in the Americis and the Carib-
bean area to the Registrar, University of the West Indies, Kingston 7,
Jamaica, and by all other persons to the Secretary to the Senate Commit-
tee on Colleges Overseas in Special Relation, University of London, Se-
nate House, London, W.C 1, Further particulars may te obtained
stmalarly.

March 14



oe —_——<— + —
Dominica Banana Growers Association
Annual General Meeting 1964

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section
7 of the Banara Ordinance No.6 of 1959, that the Annual
General Meetirig of the Aszociation will be held at the
Carib Cinema, Roseau, commencing at II.00 a.m. on
Monday, 27th April, 1964.

Members of the Association arc invited to attend but
oaly the members of the Board of Management and the
Delegates of the District Branches shall take part in_ the

deliberations and be eligible to vote on any question arising ;

at the Meeting.
It should also be noted that only the Delegates of the
District Branches shall be eligible to elect members to the

Board.
AGENDA

- 1, .To confirm the Minutes of the General Meeting held
on 29th April and 13th August, 1963.
a. To receive and approve the Report of the Board.
3. To receive and adopt Audited Axcounts for the
year ended 31st December, 1963.
To elecs six members to serve on the Board of
Management for the ensuing period of twelve
months.
5. Any other business of which due notice shall have
been given.
A. D, BOYD
General Manager.
March 14.

O62! wes peed

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ALL PERSONS INTERESTED PLEASE
MAKE APPOINTMENTS AT THE DOM |
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GEORGE V STREET, ROSEAU.
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PAGE TEN VOMINIGA HERALD

—— EEE AES BSE ek ee Ee

BA \TURDAY, MARGH 14, 1966

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SERVES THE CARIBBEAN BEST
SATURDAY, MARCH

Impressions Of
Guadeloupe
Banana Tour

17th to 21st Feb., 1964

The Government of France paid
for trarsporting tne delegates around
Guadeloupe during the tour. Also
present for the benefit of delegates
were 29 steff members from various
French Agricultural bodies, such as;
I.F, A.C. (Insitute Francais de
Recherches Fiuitieres Outr:-Mer$;
C.A.T.A. G. (Cooperative Agni-
cole de Traitments Anntiparasitaines
de la Guadeloupe): 1.R.A.T.
(Institute de Recherches d‘A.grono-
mic Tropicale), and I, F.C. C.
(Institute Francais du Cafe et du
Cacao).

These experts were the people
who conducted demenstrations and
answered questions. They had
come from Paris, the Ivory Coast.
Ecuador, French Guiana, and
Martinique, to join their colleagues
in Guadeloupe, so as to help make
the tour the success 1¢ was.

The Caribbean Organisation,
under the able management of Mr.
Hugh Miller and his assistants,
planned the time-table, accommoda-
tion and feeding of deiegates when
away from their hotels; this included
coping with unexpected arrivals of
many interested parties from the two
French Departments of Guadeloupe
and Martinique.

On Monday 17th, all the dele-
gates were assembled at the Fort
Royal Hotel, built. on the point of
Guadeloupe nearest Montserrat.

Just as the convoy of cars and buses .



3 5
Participant arrived in the hotel
gtounds by helicopter. ;

Addresses delivered at this, the
opening function, afforded the dele-
gates the opportunity of learning
the importance that France attaches
to Agriculture in her Island Depart-
ments, €.g. § Agronomists in
Guadeloupe, 4 more in Martinque,
as compared to one for our 4 Wind-
ward Islands.

After a lavish lunch presented by
the Chamber of Commerce of Basse
Terre, the delegates were taken to
Bellevue Estate, owned by M.H.
Callard, for their first practical
demonstration.

With only 80 inches of rain a
year, one mile inland from the Lee-
ward coast, and 750 feet above sea
level, it is difficult to see why M.
Callard decided to grow bananas on
land very similar to the Hartford-
St. Joseph-Salisbury area. He reap-
ed 14 tons per acre, unt! he started
ittigating with overhead sprayers
similiar to those used at Woodford
Hall, when his production increased

14, 1964

from a field long before it was over-
grazed. The trucks which took us
from our cars for the mile from the
coast to the Estate travelled on two
concrete strips of roadway, up grades
and around nazrow bends, the like
of which can only be found on the
road to Ponte Mulatre. The French
Governmest paid 80°%, of the cost
of this road which is used by M. Cal-
lard alone, for bringing out sce ton-
of bananas, and taking in 70 tons of
fertilizer,

Neufchateau

Neufchateau Experimental Station
was the site for two days of our inv
structions and demonstrations. The
Station is run by IL F. A, C. and
being 750 fect above sea level with
150 inches of rain, it is surpusing
that of all their citrus (and they had
a very large variety) the only wees

that appeared to be doing well were ~

the Smooth Lemon.

Ee.ause of the large number of
delegates, I. F. A, C. Ag:nts were
stationed at various points of inter-
est, viz. pineapple field, pineapple
packing, citrus (for diseases), bana-
na:— rep! nting, root system, fertili-
zer experiments, dissecting plants from
roots to leaf, ripening room, etc.
The delegates went to any point
where the subject was most interest-
ing to them, aud followed the dem-
onstration in progress.

(To be concluded.)

=

WINBAN Meeting
in Barbados

of the Windward Islands
Banana Association to decide
on the details of the new
Marketing Contract with
Geest Industries Ltd. to ree
place the old one which
expires in June this year,
started on Monday and end-
ed on Thursday in Barbados.

From Dominica went
D.B.G.A. Chairman G.A.
Winston, Vice-Chairman
Stafford Shillingford and
Manager Alec Boyd. Also
going along as legal advirer
is Keith Alleyne Q. C. and
they will meet there Vivian
Grell who will come from
Si. Lucia in his new capacity
as WINBAN | Secretary-
Accountant.

Managing Director Mt.
John van Geest and Chair
man Sir Garnet Gordon

DOMINICA HERALD

NURSING NEWS

st. Groix for
Caribbean Nurses
Gonference

The Fourth Cenference of
the Caribbean Nurses Or-
genisation wiil be held in St.
Croix, Virgin Islands from
August 8th to rsth, 1964, it
has just been annonnced.
The last and very successful
conference, it wil! be remem-

bered, was held in 1963 in
Dominica.
The theme of the Fourth

Conference will be “Human
Relationships” and will
include the subjects of Nurs-
ing Administrtion, Auxiliary
Nursing Personnel, Mental
Health and Psychiatric
Nursing, and Nurses’ Assc-
clations aad Organizations
Constitutions and Byclaws.

All communications res’
pecting the Conference should
be addressed to the General
Secretary — Mrs. M. M. Har-
ney Brown, P. O. Box 229,
St. John’s, Antigua, W. I.

Three Clinics For Roseau

Previously there was onl
one clinic ran by the Health

the Old Hospital compound. »

any persons complained
that to come from Newtown
or Pottersville was too far for
a sick pezson or mother with
asick baby. We were
pleased to find out that the
Health Visitors have, on their
own initiative, started up
clinics, one at the old Roseau
Boys School for Newtown
and one in the Poitersville
School by the Church.
Both clinics operate on Mon-
day afternooas after the schools
nave been vacated —- from
3.30 p. m.

A young Mothers Club
has also been started by the
Health Visitors at the Old
Hospital Clinic. The half
dozen Health visitors should
be warmly congratulated on
the work they are doing to

to 18 tons. He sprays most of his joined the meeting on Tues Improve the health of the

bananas one day a week for 6

months of the year.
As in most fields seen during the

tour there was a conspicuous lack of

contour and general soil conserva-
tion practices; This was a great
contrast to the high standerd of all
athe: forms of scientific research be-
ing carried out.

day.
Vieille Gase Girl
Succeeds

Miss Keturah Royer of Vieille
Case (daughter of Mr. & Mrs. C.

The most unusual as pect of Royer) passed an examination in

M. Callard’s cultivation was his run-

teleprinting in, six weeks. The

community.

New Nursing Consultant
Appointed

The World Health Or-
ganization announced last
month the appointment of
Miss Martie Alice Matthews

to assist in training personnel

ning sheep under his bananas. There ysyal period of the course is eight for the nursing services of

was evidence of their eating the large
leaves of the water suckers, but nei-
ther the sword sucker nor the bunch-
es were touched, M. Callrrd was

weeks. Miss Royer is employed at
Croydon Airport, near London,

ee ee

Barbados, D 0 minica, St.
Lucia and Montserrat in cov

’ operation with the islands’

very, very careful to remove thesheep 9 FOLLOW THE STAR 4 public health administrations.

Nurse Matthews was

ree
cenily in the California pu-
blic health service, holds a

certificate in Public Health
Nuvsing and is an Master of
Scrence in Health Education.

A

taribo Fellowships

We now have the official
release on the CARIBO
Fellowships which we an-
nounced on our front page
last week and are vleascd to
be able t@ add the name of
another Dominican iccipient
of an awatd -~ Mr. Oliver
Thomas Georges, who will
study Engineering for a B.Sc.
degree at UWI. Gifford
Shillingford will be going to
Howard University(U.S.A.)
and Earl Johason and Col-
lin Bully will go to U.W.L.
All five Deminicans will
study for B.Sc. degrees.

Administrator
Back From Leave
H. H. the Administrator,
Colonel Ales Lovelace,
C. M. G., M. B. E., M. C.

and Mrs. Lovelace returned



: to the territory on Monday

after 24 months leave in the



PAGE ELEVEN

Registrar’s Office,
AOSEAU,

Sth March, 1964,

Under the Workmen's Cone

pensation Act, 1937. In the

Estate of Peer Wiltshire, de-
ceased.

IT 1S HEREBY NOTIFIED

that the Commissioner for

Wirkmea's Compensation will
hold a court at the Magis-
trate’s Court, Roseau, on Tues-
day 24th March, 1964, at
2,00 o’ciock in the afternoon
for the purpose of considering
the claims of the dependants
of the atove deceased to a
sum deposited with the Regis-
trar under the provisions of
fhe Workmen’s Compensation.
Act 1937,

Interested persons may
attend persenally or by soii-
citor or counsel,

JOSEPH V. JEAN PIERRE
Mar. 14, 21 Registrar.

NEW LANDING GHARGES

“Effective ftom ihe 20th
of Match, 1964 the following
tates of Landing Charges to
West Indian destinations
will apply: _ ;
Trinidad (W.I. Product) $ 6.80

Trinidad (General Imports) 13, 20
Trinidad (Heavy Lifts) 14.82

U.K. , Antigua 9.12

; . 3 aii 14

rewell Ol Y Montserrat 9.00

Ag. Administrator Dominica: 6.96

A gift of $50 to the Chief Minis- St. Lucia 4.08

ter’s Fire Relief Fund was made by St. Vincent 9.60

Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Borrowes be Grenada 4.80
fore they left the island. L. ROSE & CO. LTD.,

pg Mar. 14 Shipping Depariment.

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PAGE TWELVE

LOCAL SP



Warwicks

LACKBURN suffered a major up-
set on Saturday and Sunday last
when they were defeated by War-
wicks by runs. It was a fine win
for lowly Watwicks but a disappoint-
display by the Blackburn batting.
Warwicks won the toss and_ elected
to bat, but 2 hrs later were back in
the pavilion totalling o nly 94 of
which Thomas made 57, and Einst-
ein Shillingford bagged 6 for t9.
Blackburn replied wich an almost
unbelievable 50, as they had ta ans-
wer to fastmen Thomas 5 for 19
and Roberts 4 for 2t on che poor
Windsor Park turf. Notwithstanding
the state of the wicket the batting
lacked purpose.

Clem John with 3 wickets, Cools-
Larcigue with 3 and E-nstein Shil-
lingford with 4 including the hat
wick easily routed Warwicks for 52
in their second turn at the crease.
But set to score a mere 95 to win,
Blackburn after a promising start
slumped from 75 for 4 to 83 all out
and many who saw it couldn’t
believe it.

Police On 1st Innings

Av THE Botanical , Gardens
things were very different. , to begin
with the match began almost an
hour late, but Police, batting first
made up for this with a’ quick 170,
Jules 36, Blackman 24, Prosper 25
while C. Casimir took 5 for so.

Spartan in reply were 68 for 2 at
the close on Saturday but on Sun-
—day_the rainzaffected wicket was live-_

“ier and they fell for 137. Pierre 4 for
4r-and Prosper 4 for 56 reaped a
rich harvest, M..Charles made 20
runs. Police hit their way into a res-
pectable lead with 106 in the second
innings, Prosper contributed 47 of
these while Blackman supported with
20, but set to score 136 im a mere
87 minutes, time ran out on Spar-
tans and at the close they had polished
off 118 for the loss of 6 wickets.
Wicket-keeper Jno Baptiste made a
fine, controlled 36.

D.G.S. Athletics Meet

The Annual D.G.S. inter-house
athletic competition took place at
the schonl grounds on Thursday,
and though it didn’t produce spect-
acular record-breaking events, the
meet was a thoroughly entertaining
one. Benedict Joseph House
emerged champions with 141
points, followed by Dawhbiney and
Skinner in that order.

One record was broken and
another equalled, both feats being
performed by J. Timothy of Daw-
biney who was the eventual Victor
Ludorum with 20 points. This
lad is very promising and should be
encouraged. Despite a very un-
orthodox start, he combined limb-
muscle, speed and momentum to
considerable advantage to equal the
To sec. 100 yds record set by C.A.
Bellot in 1925 and perpetuated by L.
W. Edwards 1934 and_ later V.
‘ Julien 1950 and to smash the 220
yds record of 24 secs by clocking the
impressive time of 23.6 secs,

Outstanding performances were
given in Div 11 by Robert Peters
and in Div. 111 by Magloire, both
youngsters are very keen and richly
deserved their rewards. In Div x

me

Upset

ORTLIGHT
Blackburn

V. Mouse displayed a fluent style to
win the 440 yds and 880 yds re-
spectfully, while Paul exhibited the
combination of stamina and judge-
ment in winning the mile race.
Some sterling performances were
rendered by Alleyne, in the sprinis,
Welker with the discus, Cuffy with
the Shot, Roberts with the cricket
ball, and the versatile Doctrove
placing six times 3rd in a variety of
events. Skinners men of might
ran away with the Tug of Waz and
of course a beautiful cake from
Erics.

All told the meet proved that
our youngsters decidedly do possess
the potential to be good athletes.
It is only lamentabie, however that
so little athletics is continued after
school stage. Wre all hope inaz the
Jaycees will again o:ganise a meet
in August or thereabouts and it
would be a good thing if our youth
begin to train from now, There is
talk of a forthcoming athletic mect
between the Grammar School and
the St. Mary’s Academy. This
should be encouraged for it is cer-
tain that more talent would be on
display and all would benefit from
the Sports. :

OVERSEAS SPORTLIGHT
GRICKET

The Regional series is nearing
completion and B. G. look as the
likely champions for yet another year.

lost: to Barbados on first innings
(2 pts) and lost to Trinidad and
B.G. outright a total of 2 pts, Bar-
bados beat BG,, Jamaica and, Ttini-
dad en first innings to give them a
total of 18 points i.e. six from each
match. Trinidad beat J/ca outright
(12 pts) lost to Barbados on first
innings (2 pts)—total 14 pts. B.G.
beat J-ca outright (12 pis) lost to
B-dos on first inning (2 pts) total
14 pts,

The winner of the current B. G.
vs. T-dad encounter will be adjud-
ged winner of the series.


MESSAGE FOR
MARTINIQUANS

To Be Delivered By Mrs. Allfrey

A Poccasion de la visite 4 la Mar-
tinique de votre Président Le Gén-
éral de Gaulle, nous nous empres-
sons d’envoyer aux membres du
Caribbean Friends Club nos saluta-
tion les plus cordiales. Nous espé-
tons que votre illustre Président em-
portera de son sejour 4 votre si jolie
ile, un souvenir de joie et de déente.

Nous avons été tres heureux,
l'année passée, d’apprendre la fon-
dation de votre club 4 la Martinique,
et notre plus chér désir est que
Vamitié existant entre nos deux
clubs sera un moyen d’enricher
notre amour mutuelle pour la langue
et la litérature frangaises. Au méme
temps nous espérons que les relations
entre nos deux iles deviendront
encore plus profondes qu’auparavent.
—Signed by the President, Vice-Presi-
dent, Secretary, two members of Coun-
cil, and other members of the Cercle

Francais of Dominica.

DOMINICA HERALD

D. G. S. Literary
Society Holds —
Elections

By Herald Literary Club Reporter

T THE first meeting last week of
the Dominica Gra:nmar School’s
Literary arid Debating Societv for
this term it vras agreed Ly majority
vote that Membership to the Scciety
will be opened to Third Formers.

After an inspiring introductory
address by the Master in Chargz,
elections were held: J. Johnson,
President; E., Walker, Vice-Presi
dent; C. Harris, Secretary. Treasury;
and L, Didier Vice-Secretary-Treas-
ury were elected Officers of the So-
ciety for the Term.

A. very interesting and Lumecrous
discuss'on followed the elections and
some twenty bcys present expressed
their ardent desires to work for the
improvement of the Soc:ety which
was founded over fourteen years ago,

Cyprus -- Uneasy
Truce -- U. N.
Force Soon

Unhappy Cyprus, with
the eyes of the world unon it,

calmed slightly this week as |
the United Nations Security’

Council wrestled with the
problem of the cosi of sup-
plying a Peace-keeping Force
to replace the” sorely-tried



This ceiandi ones es OR ee rg ee a eed eee
Enesianding-isacfollewsijamaica—pritigh “in t he strife-torm

island.
p.9)

With $2,000,000 (US)
guaranteed by the U.S. A,
and one million by Britain

(see U.N. & Cyprus

{

CS 6 $< 6 5 6 5“ 9 6 p< 5 p< fs 6 Sb pd EP me op es

(prices of GGCA-COLA

|
|
|

KING SIZE COCA--COLA
REGULAR GOCA--COLA
FANTA BEVERAGES

( EANTA SODA WATER (Unchanged)... $1.44 per case,

; DEPOSIT ON GASES AND BOTTLES... . $1.50 per case
... . a05¢ per bottle ©

pe! ON BOTTLES .
DEPOSIT ON SHELLS.

6 Oa 6 98 Pte 6 9 <8 9B a 6 1 6 9 nF O69 SE PS,

Owing to the continual rise in the price f
in other INCIDENTALS we are regretfully forced to increase the

towards the cost of the force,
prospecis of a six-nation force
moving into Cyprus in the
very near future were good,
stated U.N. Secretary
U Thane on Thursday,
Britain had earlier in the
week siated categorically that
she could not hold the fort
much longer.

As young Greek Cypriots
screamed for union with
Greece, and Turkish
Cypriots were hardpressed in
embattled Ktina by small
arms «and mortar-fize, the
Turkish Navy cruised mean-
ingfully off Cyprus and ‘Pre
sident Mfakarios ordered that
several hundred Turkish
Cypriot hostages be released
and that a general cease-fire
take place. British troops
had been rushed from place
to place totry and stop the
fighting. An uneasy truce
now prevails.

—— a - ——

SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 1964



rire Disaster
Inquiry
“Cause Unknown”
“The Cause of the fire is

unknown” vas tke verdict of
the jury sitting at the Coro
ner’s Inquest on the Great
George Street fire on Samedi
Gras. Full Zetails next week.

— 2

Appiication For
Liquor Licence

Teo tre Magistrate Dist “G" &
Chief of Police
I, Nellie Baptiste now residing at
Vieille Case Parish of St. Andrew
do hereby give you notice that 1¢ is
niy intention to apply at the Magis-
trate’s Court to be held at Ports-
mouth on Saturday, the 4th day of
April 1954, ensuing for a retail
LIQUOR LICENCE in respect to my
premises at Vieille Case Parish of
St. Andrew
Dated the
1964
NELLIE BAPTISTE

t2th day of March

+ 60a 6 pee 6 BC 6 BS 9 On |” tS PS BB BS SO

Photographer

99a SS

TAVERNIER, Photographer of Soufriere, informs allj
the country that he is a professional photographer.
‘different sizes of prints can be made, includ.ng colour:
je asks you all to write to him for your wed

\|
sete. |
nd christening.»

(

2°

made,

} March 14

6 6A CO os pd pe Or 8 Be 6 An 8 PSS BE Pe ae 6 9a 6 Pe 6 9“ 6 PS fe oe

ANNOUNCEMENT
DOMINICA BOTTLING PLANT

AUTHORIZED BOTTLERS

OF

COCK - COLA

AND

FANTA BEVERAGES

of SUGAR and increased cost

and FANTA BEVERAGES.

Effective as from 16th March prices will be as follows:—
RETAIL

RETAIL...
RETAIL ...
RETAIL ....

.-. + $1.92 per case.
. $1.68 per case.
... . $1.92 per ease.

... . . «0 per shell

ICTULES > TOK. ~
jPassport photoyraphs carefully do
Best satisfaction for reasonable charges.

5. TAVERNIER, Soufriere,
St. Mark. Domini¢a

. oD ad pa 0 eS Be SB OS 9S Pa 9S BS BOS PS BS ey v

Of The South —

a

ae 6 B—any-S oe

All

ding!
riva ointments.)
ne; fine enlaraements



€
a
s

¢

498 pat 9

eet, “Tt pat

Stays bie 6 6S $<

. 11¢ per hottle
. 10¢ per bottle;
. 11¢ per bottle:
G8¢ per bottle;

~ g-tone SS Rt 6 $< $9 19s

OR 4A SS SSIS" OSES Viren 6 9 6 PS 8S oe i Se SPQ



ee

‘ PRINTED AND PUBLI',AED BY J,

,

MARGARTSON CHARLES, THB HERALD’S PRINTERY, 31 NEW STREET, ROSEAU, DOMINICA, SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 1964