Citation
Dominica herald

Material Information

Title:
Dominica herald
Creator:
Allfrey, P. Shand ( Phyllis Shand ) ( Phyllis Shand Allfrey )
Place of Publication:
Roseau, Dominica
Publisher:
Dominica Herald
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 42 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Dominica -- Newspapers ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Dominica

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1955? Cf. caption.
General Note:
Editor, <1963-1964>: Phyllis Shand Allfrey.
General Note:
"For the General Welfare of the People of Dominica, the further advancement of the West Indies and the Caribbean Area as a whole."
General Note:
Description based on: Jan. 12, 1963; title from caption.
General Note:
Last issue consulted: December 31, 1964.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. This item may be protected by copyright but is made available here under a claim of fair use (17 U.S.C. §107) for non-profit research and educational purposes. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
82144654 ( OCLC )
2007229365 ( LCCN )
UF00102878_00029 ( sobekcm )

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Caribbean Newspapers, dLOC
University of Florida

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Full Text
RESEARCH INSTITUTE
FOR THE STUDY OF MAN

162 EAST 78 STREET

NEW YORK, 21,- N. Yemen. --



shea

a Fiat, .

(For the General Wolfure of the People of Dominica, the further advancement of the West Indies



ESTABLI>.1u0 Lyss

‘Sustitia

SATURDAY, JULY 27, 1963

“BIG FOUR” CONFERENCE

Jamaica, Trinidad, B.G. & Barbados | Nuclear Test Ban
Agree Gustoms Union

EADS or state of the four economically-strongest
British West Indian Territories -— Trinidad and To-
ago, Jamaica, British Guiana aud Barbados — met in
Trinidad this week and agreed on the thorny problem
which, above all, bedevilled the Federation —- Customs

Jnioar. la agreement with
the statement made before the
she conference by Sir Alex-
ander Bustamante, Prime
Minister of Jamaica, 1¢ was
clearly stated that no political
union such as the old Fed-
eration was contemplated.
Agreement was reached on
many of the Common Ser-
vices and a date in January
set for furthez talks.

Weill Conference

. The four-day. Conference of
Heads of West Indian , Govern
ments: whici z
day till Thursday in Port-of-Spain
this week was notable for the a
declarations of attitudes by the four
governments concerned.

Prime Minister Eric Williams
had, from his previous single mect-
ings earlier in the year with Premiers
Barrow of Barbados and Jagan of
British Guaina and Prime Minister
Bustamante of Jamaica, prepared a
well-planned Agenda in which each

Planned

Government produced a paper on a’

specific subject — a tue teacher’s
seminar! the real interest came in
the discussions afterwards.

Federal Shipping

Monday was given over to sub-
jects relating to Trade and Com-
munications and was marked by a
wrangle over the Canadian gift ships
Federal Maple and Federal
Paim The suggestion that the
ships be sold and replaced by more
economical vessels was rejected (the
service is heavily subsidised) ana the
question of costs was referred back
to the West Indian Shipping Com-
pany for further examination. Pre-
micr Jagan, whose government
hitherto refused to join im the shipp-
ing services, raised the question of
Cuban shipping to be brought into
any joint arrangements, British
Guiana is at present imvolved in
two-way trading arrangements with
Cuba, but Trinidad and Tobago
have resisted Cuban overtures along
these lines, and the suggestion horri~
fied Jamaica.

B. W. I. A. Accepted By Three

The Trinidad-owned — British
West Indian Airways was agreed on
asthe common carrier by Jamaica

Services

and Barbados but British Gutana
refused to accept the offer of partici-
pation in joint ownership.
Tuesday’s discussions centred on
Economie and Technical Aid and,

in keeping with Dr Williams’
declared preference for United
Nations Aid without _ political

strings, the representative of UNTAB
(United Nations Technical tance Board) was present during the
seminar. Noticeable absentees from
the Confereace were observer
representatives from the Caribbean
Organisation (caRIBO), from Gren-
ada (which is still. waiting to be in-
corpotated into a unitary
state, wih Trinidad and
Tobago) and. the remain-

Leewards. Earlier the C.M. of An-
tigua, Mr. Vere Bird, had remarked
caus.ically ‘chat the — smaller
territories were better out of it”.

Full Representation

Trinidad and Tobago was tepre-
sented by the Prime Minister Dr.
Eric Williams, The Minister of
Finance, two Ministers without
Purttolio and the Economic Advis-
er and personal representative of the
Prime Minister, Mr. J. O’Neil
Lewis: Jamaican representation in.
cluded, beside Sir Alexander Bus-
tamante, two other ministers and four
top civil servants: from B.G. came
Premier Jagan, Mrs, Jagan and Hon,
E,M. Wilson with five civil ser-
vants. Barbados had a team of
twelve headed by Premier Barrow,
Ministers Crawford and Ferguson
and four civil servants for the full
session; for special sessions Hon. E.
R.L, Ward (previously Federal
House of Representatives Speaker)
now Barbados Minister without
Portfolio and a Senator, Minister of
Education Cameron Tudor and two
additional civil servants.

Interesting Agenda

The following was the Agenda
(initials after each item denote coun-
uy presenting the relevant paper ):—

Monpay, JuLy 22 Section I —
Trade: Preparation for the 1964
World Trade Conference (J).. The
Canada- West Indies Agreement (B),
Customs Union (B.G). The 30%
Venezuelan Surtax (T&T). Section
I —Communications: (1) By sea
within che region (B), (ii) By air wit-

(Cont, on page I0)

Accord

Quickest Three-Power
Gonference

After only eleven days of talks a
Nuclear Test Ban agreement has
been reached by the three nuclear
powers, Great Britain, the United
States of America and the Soviet
Union. Lord Hailsham, Britain’s
Minister of Science, America’s
Averill Harriman, Undersecretary of
State and Mr. Gromyko conferred
ina spirit of amity from the — start,
with Mr. Krushchev — setting the
tone with an opening remark; ‘why
do we not just sign it straight

”
away”.

France will Press On

In the course of the next few days
Britain’s Foreign Secretary Lord
Home and U. S. Secretary of State
Dean Rusk will be fying co Moscow

tos ‘*treaty now being pre-
par ‘ations will be. invited
_tes Tee avrvect ad “ate
d edia.el, However,
Fr usigent’ General de
G: _uas already intimated his

determination that his country will
carry on with the proposed
manufacturing of their own ‘ nuclear
deterrent” and ic is not expected
that Communist China wih file
eagerly up to the table to append a
signature. It is, in fact, believed by
many political commentators that
the exacerbation of the ideo‘og:cal
split between the two creat Com-

munist countries had smoothed the
path for the agreement.
Only A Start
Acthe conclusion of the confe-

rence, Mr. Krushchev is reported to
have said that this was only a
beginaing of a serics of treaties
which he hoped could be signed to
relieve world tension and provide a
basis for ‘‘co-existence.”? These
sentiments will surely be echoed by
all the people of the world.
Stephen Haweis’
Birthday

Tuesday July 23 was the bitth-
day of the well-known artist and
noted contributor to the local press
Mr. Stephen Haweis. A special
birthday party was held in his hon-
our at Government House, at which
were present His Honour the Ad-
min. and Mrs. Lovelace, the Bis-
hop of Roseau, the Chief Minister
and the Minister of Labour and
Social Services. Mr. Haweis mark-
ed the occasion by presenting to the
people of Dominica, through the
Hon. W S. Stevens, his painting cf
the Boiling Lake which he made
some thirty years ago The Herald
wishes ‘S.H.” health and happiness,

IN TRINIDAD

U.W.I. Students Build Wail



The Bice Soil

and the Caribbean Area as a whule)

PRICE Io0¢



Voluntary ‘‘Hard Labour”

A new wall is being built around the Dominica Infirmary and the
lavou for tle work isa free gift from students of the University of the West
Indies, Fourteen in all of the U.W.I. Work Camp Group arrived on
Wednesday on the ‘Federal Palm” and set to work the next day to dig

the foundations for the wall. Their

leader is Dominican DGS old-boy

Franklin Watty who is also Chairman of the Commission for External
Affairs at U.W.I. He is a second-year B.Sc, Economics student.

Martinique
Students
Bid Farewell

A happy, healthy group
of Martinique students ac-
companied by their teachers
and Prefessor Pierre Lucette
re-embarked on Wednesday
morning from Portsmouth
on the ‘it “My Destiny”
after nderful week ‘in
Yo ea

Tay =
On Saturday they visited . Julian Johnson’ (see. p.3 “U,;W.1.

Scotts Head where they first
had a sulphur bath at Souf-
riere, followed by a sea-bath
and hospitality from Mr.
C.G. Phillip. On Sunday
morning they were enters
tained by the Cercle Fran-
ca'is at Rockaway. On
Monday they went over to
the Carib quarter where Mr.
Lucette introduced them to
his friends of a previous visit.
From there they went to
Portsmouth seving all the
sights on the way.

At Portsmouth they were
met by Miss Mation Peter,
member of the Cercle, who
was able to make them feel
at home in their own lan-
guage.

In company with the boys
from the Government School
and escorted by the head-
master Mr. Barry they visited
all the points of interest in
the district including the
Long House Banana Recep-
tion Station.

To all the many people
who were so kind to them
in Dominica the Martinique
boys, their teachers and Prof.
Lucette wish to give through
the HERALD their most gra-
cious thanks for a wonderful
trip round our beautiful is-
land.

Among the party are two girl
graduates who heard only yesterday
that they have been. awarded their
B,Sc. General degrees, One is
Miss Shirley Thomas, sister of

' Teacher Joy Thomas who will soon

with her friend and fellow teacher
at the Wesley High, Miss-: Elliott,
be returning to, Jamaica to enter the
University to read for a degree in
Natural Sciences: the other graduate
is Miss Rose Coats. v

_ The wall-rebuilding. project was
visited by Mrs. Lovelace, Hon. W.S.

‘Stevens and Ag. P.S. Mr G.-A.

Maynard. They were pleased °to see
that. students ftom DGS: andSMA
were helping, among: them being.
Paro _oitay Cine IN

Students on WI. Writers’’). It is
hoped that more DGS: pupils will
join the group. ce

The UWI students, who are
staying for two weeks, are-being giv-
en hospitality in private homes.

PEOPLE IN THE NEWS

ANGELO BELLOT, former Federal
M.P., turned artist, back home in
Soufriere to fish and farm * REV.
Atherton Didier Chairman and
General Superimendent of the
Methodist Leeward Island District
back home on a_ visit ,, WESLEY
High School Government Body
Member, Gustavus Timothy M B.E.,
J.P. in Roseau for School Speech
Day * recistrar J.A. Marcano,
doubling also as magistrate Ports-
mouth whilst A.B. Marie takes
leave * yuLius Nyerere, President
of Tanganyika sees Macmillan after
talks with JFK and Canadian PjM.
Lester Pearson * FRANK Watty
elected 2nd Vice President of UWI
Guild of Undergraduates * JupGE
St. Bernard left Sunday for St.
Vincent -~ Assizes postponed *
CYRILLE Adoula Congo Prime
Minister paid official visit Britain
this week * BETTY Miller first
solo woman flyer across Pacific
decorated by U.S. President *
POINTE MICHEL FIRE DEATH

The postvoned inquiry into the
cause of the death of Mrs. Rosalind
Balson was adjourned sine die on
Friday 26th.

The reason given by the Coroner
was that since the first adjournment
the Police had instituted charges of
murder against Harold Joseph,
Ralph Isaac and Gertrude Isaac.
These charges relate to the same
inquiry.



- use in our ¢aily lives must come through Customs.”

PaGE TWO

—.-— ee oe

“$0 THEY SAY”--

BY BOB & RAY

Have you noticed the amount of concern with Dominica’s progress
lately? whowe and more people are taik ug about “development”, ‘-impro-
vement” and) “mudermisauon”, Some folks talk of “expansion” and
“bettermen” while che general tone is progressive. ‘This is a good sign
for before things can improve, people must first be (1) dissatistied
with their present lot, and (2) must plin and discuss the needed improve -
ment.



If you visit the people in LaPlaine they alk of when their bananas
stait to bear, when their out go turns into income — and all the while they
are planting more and more bananas and spending — more and more for
fertilizer and crop cultwation. If you visit Castle Bruce the same feeling
is overwhelmingly present Souttiere 1s the same and wherever you go,
on all sides people talk of doing more -- or are doing moxe.

At the same time we hear the dissatisfactions voiced with those
operations on the island that are not modern'sed, not improved and not
keeping pace with the economic advancement. Usually the finger is
pointed at government. Some voice their disapproval of the telephone
system: how antiquated it is... and this sounds sirange when the very
people who utter the grumbling have never used any other telephone
system... but they “just know” theur telephone system is noc improved.
thers are displeased with the roads, completely unmindful thar there are
more and better roads on Dominica now than at any ume in history.
Others say the school system is slack and grumble about the number of
pre-teenagers who are allowed to drop-out. Two men on opposite ends
of the island said almost the same thing: that there 1s a law requiring
chi'dren to attend school until they are 16. The is not regarded by the
authorities, they say.

But by far the largest number of dissatistied people we talked with
aim their abuses at Customs. One chap said; “fits the lifeline of the
place, man, let Customs close down for 30 days we'd all be out-of-busi-
ness” And as another fellow puts it: “Customs takes the place of our
industry. We have no factories making goads so every siugle item we
Perhaps these men
exaggerate as surely dasheen, tannia, local rum and handcrafis do not
bother with Customs. However, outside of these and a few other items,

virtually every article in'every shop and store comes across the jetty and

--ition} Customs?
the ttouble to check say that Dominica's Customs dutie’
ate higher than any other island in the West Indies! Tha :

—aney-co-i; -oayy*trTHil

this means Customs too.

What are the people saying about the most vital government fund-
Some of the businessmen in the town who. have take
the main,
dtems “like men’s shirts, carry twice the Customs duryi. _

7 rmifdaey 16 ninica ~ Cistoms thrarges’ a duty on life-
saving drugs ilke penicilin which comes in duty-ftee to Barbados citizens.
And, we learn that dozens of other articles that are taxed 10% in Auti-
gua, for exampie are slapped with 20% here, Whea one asks these men
why do they suppose Dominica changes mucn more Custams duties than
other British West Indies island, they give varied answers but more often
than not they say “Dominica needs the money to run the government, the
sahools, the police, Agriculture Department and (since there is no land
tax) Dominica must get this money from the people in the form of Cus-
toms duties.”

So we are face once more with that old complaint. Only now it
has become acute. Sonner ot later, we are told, Dominica must face the
facts that every modern nationtaxes Jand value. To ease the Customs
duties thereby creating more local cash, wall mean a higher standard of
living for the people but in order to cut these duties there would
have to be substituted a land tax to raise the necessary funds to operate
government. People who own thousands of acres on Dominica now
can hold this land “‘free”’ but if they had to pay a tax on these acres every
year, they would see to it that the land produced sufficient income to cov-
ver those taxes, This alone would create jobs for more people who in
turn would have a spendable income adding more to the gross income of
the island. But as one man said! ‘*Why bother to tell you all the advan-
tages ofa land tax. Ifit weren’t the sensible thing to do why do all the
other places have it?”

But the chief target of most of these people’s grumbling is
Customs itself — not the higher duties — bit the time-wasting, idiotic
forms that are required to be filled out, It was explained that these
warrants were designed by the new Federation so that much valuable
statistical information could be gathered on the imports to various 1s-
lands in the Federation. However, it was pointed out, there is no
need for such detailed information no w since there is no longer a
Federation. What we need now, it was said, is a thorough clean-up
of the expensive Customs procedures so that a third as many Cus-
toms clerks are employed to collect the Customs duties.

One shop-owner in Mahaut said: ‘If I employed as many clerks
in my shop to do duplicate tasks that Customs does, well, I’d have to
charge 30¢ for a pound of sugar and 9u¢ for a pound of salt fish, just to
break even. Its costing Dominica thousands of dollars a year to employ
dozens of clerks to tabulate and check on those warrants that don’t inean
a thing to anybody!” In fact, he said, he has stopped importing
things direct any more, preferring to avoid the aggravation caused at Customs
by buying everything in his shop at wholesale, ‘‘Let the other fellow spend
his time filling out warrants aad running all over town to get the items
checked and cleaced,”’_ he said,

As we finished drinking our tin of cold Domfiuit juice and prepared
to leave, our Mahaut friend'said: Its my guess that not one member of

DOMINICA HERALD





the Legislative Council has ever tried to import anything here as if they

SATURDAY, JULY 27, 1963



had, they’d change the stupid system tomorrow

oe

British Guiana :
By London
“Times”

Under the ude “One Mere
Chance’ the Limes’? commented
on Thursday 18th July.

‘Mr. Sandys said about all chat ™poraty
could be expected of bim when he come a new

reported to the Commons yesterday
on ius visit to British Guiana.

“There had been little hope that
he would conjure a solution out of
the present conflict. and he would
have been unwise to outline at this
stage any long-ierm recommendations
that he may have worked out him-
self. It is only right that the
Guianese leaders should be given
another chance to sort out their own
affairs,

“The first step, as Mr. Sandys
said, should be a coalition gover-
niment,as an emergency measure,
for there can be no rational dis -
cussion of constitutional
or any other issues unul fail public
order is restored. Dr. Jagan objects
on the grounds that to be effective a
coalition could have to agree on
wider political and economic issues.
This would be valid only if the
coalition, were to havea long life,
and thete 1s nu reason why it should
ifit applies atseif to immediate pro-
blems with sufficient dispatch.

“Beyond this. it 1s difficult to see

clearly, “The acral. and pe'irical

tensions have etched the: so
Some deeply into, the: cour 0 are
cate tht slancct +! speed

ffiany diffic... ies as ae

solution, favoured by «.. ns,

would be to suspend the cous.. a-
tion and return to full colonial rule.
The plan would then be to pump
“in American investments
until the Indian rural population
were gradually weaned from Dr.
Jegan’, party. The danger is that
the opposite might happen. Dr.
Jagan, having made hay in opposi-
tion, could then sweep back with a
large: majority. Britain would
meanwhile suffer ail the opprobru m
due toa colonial recidivist, as she
has done before.

“There is something in the idea at a
referendum on the proposal to intro-
duce proportional representation.
There is no guarantee
that the proposal would
be accepted, but if it were it would
probably cause Dr. Jagan to be re.
placed by a coalition of Mr. Burn.
ham’s and Mr. D’Aguiar’s cpposi-
ticn partie, Thiswould be a
slightly dubious operation, and the
the result would he unstable and
temporary, but it might gain a use-
ful breathing space. There remains
the temptation to throw the whole

~ LITTLE MOE



1" So they say.
————— io

problem into the lap of the United
Nations. As a gesture of despair this
would be futile. Buc it is possible
that a limited rele for the Unned
Nations could prove useful.

“An ultimate selution, if there
1s one, may have to contain elements
from more than one of these ideas,
Atthe moment the main need is for a
coalition. Then must

attempt to work out a
system that respects the rights of the
different racia! groups. Finally,
there must be effective policing of
the arrangement that are made, both
as regards internal and external af-
fairs’”.

i

Commotion Over
Gaymans

U.S. Students Visit
Castro

Recent cables have indicated that
Cuban planes carrying ‘‘potential
subversive agents’ besides other
passengers from Cuba have been
landing for transhipment at Grand



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RES Y

uly 20, 27

; |
Th 6 a 6 ae 8 be 6 8 8 6 9 5 8 8 eS i a 6, +S i 6 6 6 pn 6 9 a Sp et

|



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THE PURITY FLOUR

contest Is Here

TWO BEAUTIFUL SETS OF
GALAXY GOPPERTOXE ALUMI-
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WILL BE GIVEN FREE,
two Lucky Customers, 15th Aug. 1963.

It is so easy to win: —

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PURITY HOUSEHOLD FLOUR
WRAPPER
and send to the

PHOENIX

Sets on Display in our Showcase

A. €. SHILLINGFORD & GO. LTD.





Cayinan island, a British territory
North West of Jamaica. The
charge was made by the American
Government, and Britain has ad-
mitted the possibiliry and promised
to invesiiaate.

The U. S. charges were denied
by Castro, and meanwhile Cayman
I standers demonstrated, refusing to
allow some Latin American techni-
cians from Cuba to disembark from
an Ilyushin airliner and preventing
the takeof of a BW,ILA,
aiccraft for Jamaica unui they were
satisfied that it catried no possibl:
subversive agents! however th. wife
of the Cuban Consul in Kingston
and snother Cuban women living in
Jamaica were allowed ta continue.

These steps according to USIS,
are part of United States efforts to
attain maximum isolation ef Com-
munist Cuba. Some of the flights
in question were made by a Cana-
dian Company known as Woarld-
Wide Airways.

Meanwhile some American _ stu-
dents who accepted an invitation to
visit Cuba as guests of the Havana
regime are Feing criticised in their
own country and urged to talk back
to Castro and to see and interview
Castro’s political prisoners.



—

PRS I

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By Rideo



(Courtesy United States Information Service)



SATURDAY, JULY 27, 1963

International Unions In Struggle

By A. Frederick Joseph
Gen. Sec. T. €. &. & W Union.

On July 20, under the above headline, the Dominica
HERALD frontpaged an accusation by ORIT (Inter-
American Regional Organization of Workezs) to the effect
that the International Federation of Christian Trade
Unions (IFCTU) was “caus ng coatusion in the ranks of
Latin American and West Indian trade unionism, not
only by the sim larity of is initials to these of the great
world-wide ICFTU, but (it is suggested) by accepting
Communist aid in their struggle to dominate the T. U.
neld in the Latin American countries.”

Without prejudice to what the IFCTU has to say on
the matter, the Technical, Clerical and Commercial
Workers’ Uuion offers the following — the other side of
the coin — that readers may judge tor themselves:

If similarity of initials cause confusion, surely ORIT
should know whe caused it. In 1920, 43 years ago, the
constitutive Congress of the IFCTU was held at the Ha-
gue, Protestant unions forming the majority ot delegates
present. The ICFTU had its constitutive Congress in
London in 1949 after the break-away from the influence of
the World Federation of Trade Unions WFTU which
was and still is, communist-dominated. The Christian
International is therefore 43 years in existence -vhile the
ICFTU is only 14. Who caused and is causing confu-

sion in initials?
Against Communism

The IFCTU declared in its “Economic World
Programme of 1922” that it “is based on Christian princi-
ples and ethic, which are the foundation on which the
whole economic and social organization should rest,” and
than once wise enough to say no, when it was invited to
join the WFTU at a time when it promised to elicit a
“wave” of solidarity all over the world. The WFTU
lured the members of the International Federation of Trade
Unions but not the IFCTU.

Can that be interpreted as accepting anything that
has to do with Communism? It would be interesting,
however, if ORIT could say who assisted communist-
dominated unions in Chile sometime last year with
Alliance For Progress Funds. The State Department
knows.

Accepting Communist aid indeed! In South Viet-
nam today, the Christian International’s affiliate, the CVTC
led by its President Tran Quoc Buu, is a veritable bul-
wark against the communists; in 1956 the IFCTU turned
town an invitation from the WFTU to start a common
action in favour of the 40-hour week, thereby being true
to its General Council Vienna Conference Resolution
(1951) stating reasons why the Christian International
could not co operate with the Communist International
‘WFETU)): “there are just nc common principles wherever
between both organisations, between Christian social con-
cepts and materialistic Communism.” The position was
further stated in these words “because of the misery of the
workers in the Communist countries, because of the blood
which was shed in repressing their discontent although all
they did was to claim those very rights solemnly pledged
them by the WFTU itself, there can be no question —
now less than ever —— of co-operation between the IFC TU
and the WFTU”. (Labor, December 1956)

The ICFTU responded to that attitude when in its
Information Bulletin of January 1957 it took the Chris-
tian International’s Secretary General to task for refusing to
take part in any action (re the Hungarian Revolt) with
which the WFTU might be associated, while neglecting to
say that there was a suggestion calling for “a oommon
statement by the Secretaries General of the ICFTU and the
IFCTU, saying that they were willing to go to Budapest.”

In June 1961, Emilio Maspero, Executive Secretary
of the (CLASC), the Latin American Confederation of
Christian Trade Unionists (IFCTU), made the following

DOMINICA HERALD

PAGE THREE

NOTICE

Vacancy In Post OF
District Community
Development Oiticer



reply to the question ‘Is the ICFTU capable of preventing
Marxist infiltration by a neutral ideology?”’: “The ICFTU,
through its regional organization the ORIT, is a neutral
orgamzation without idcology or mysucism in a continent
where Communism has deeply and definitly planted the
ideological struggle with an ¢xtra-ordinary hope and mys-
ticism which 1s ready to conquer all Latin America. The
ORIT is too confident in the United States policy which
has none nothing but corrupt officials and the healthy trade
union movement all over Laun America... . due to lack
of possitive ideology, foiled in their action by the efficiency
of communism, the L[FCTU and the ORIT were obliged
on more than one occasion, to be a party ot to practise ap-
peasement towards such dictators as Batista in Cuba or
Stroesner ni Paraguay... . (they) are incapable of control-
ling Communist penetration and up to a_ certain point
have encouraged it by their negative anti-communist policy
which has finally played into tne hands of capitalist react
ion and of Communism itself... . (they) do not believe
in a third trade union torce. For them, the alternative 1s
either capitalism or communism! The Christian trade
unionists believe in a new democratic revolutionary alterna-
tive, distinct from Capitalism and communism. This
means a new ideolegy, determined adherents; a mystic and
more efficient organiziion, must be thrown into the struggle
against Communism.”

No one can deny the postive force thai the CLASC has become
in Latin America tuday. While at has succeeded in organizing peasants’
and farmers’ Federations (a form of cv-operative) 1t has also succeeded,
in some areas, in having governmen’s introduce Land Reform programmes,
A perfect example 1s Venezuela where hitherto, the peasants sheltered
the communist guerrillas, Today, thanks to the Christian orientation of
CLASC action, they are no more the friends of the so-called “Army
ef Liberation” - - the communist rebels,

The records show np the Democratic Socialists when they allowed
the Christain International to be conspicuous in its opposition to the “ peo-
ples‘ “sts” which today under Communist domincvon are called’

Applications are invited for a
post of District Community Develop-
ment officer.

2. The salary of the post is
52,796 in the scale $2,796 x 144—
$3,516 per annum. The appoint-
ment is pensionable and is subject
to medical fitness and, unless the
appointee is already in a pension-
able post, 2 years prohation in the
first instance.

3. The officer will be required to
undertake community development
work generally, i.e. the promotion
of local government and the train-
ing of local leaders, the encourage-
ment of recreational and other
cultural aspects, the promotion of
self help effort and give assistance
and guidance to voluntary associa-
tions and groups. The officer will
be required to work in close associ-
tion with the Education Department -
in its adult education pro;ramme, the
extension service of the Agricultur-
al Department and the field officers
of the Health Department. The
officer will be requried to live in
the district assigned to him or her.

4, Quarters ‘are. not provided-
Leave will.be granted in accord:
ance with local General Orders.

5. The person selected. (unless
he or she be already in a pension-

pop ~sacies” (sic’. Proofcan be found in the case. of the Bela ; :
Kh yin Hur -y, che Spartakus revolt in Germany, Berlin, ab le post) may he rout ired fo at
~~ “P07 ince 1549, however, these Democratic Socia isis who 4 few months until the expected
form ICFTU, have changed but as A. Vaniscendael of 3
: , : : vacancy occurs.
the( an International asked in 1962, “the question is whether to

6. -Applications . for. the. post
shorld be addressed to the Chief
Secretary, Administrator’s “Office,
and should reach him not later than
15th August, 1963.

G O. 27 July 27.

rej... Communism is enough and whether to propagate freedom and
democracy is a strong enough antidote against communist penetrat-on.””
Another question is why are certain stooges of the Batista regime still used
(up to 1962 for certain) as propagating agents of the free trade
union movement and why ORIT had nothing to say when in February
the Dominican Republic tried to impose a Central Trade Union Move-
ment by force of law (it will be recalled that che TCCWU sent cables of
protest to the President of the State and Legislature, the U.N. and I.L,O.).

Vanistendael admits that ‘‘it is not pleasant to recall all this’, but teels
that the public is entitled to know all the facts, past and present, so chat
it should be able to decide what exactly is the position, and which are its
alliances in the fight for fteedom, democracy and human dignity.

To be concluded next week
—————$_—_—~—___ Pa gS

“oe 6 PS Pe © Pa 6 Be 6 See «SS pe fe pe CBee 6 A 6 Pe 6 Pe SP pe BS

C.G. PHILLIP & Go. Ltd

/

A Travel Ageney has been opened by us at!

29 King George V Street, Roseau, called

PHILLIP’S TRAVEL AGENCY.

All assistance and information concerning

j air travel will be available at this agency and

ie shall book and procure any passages re-

quired by air.

Phone No. 67 (2 rings).

———e—__

QUOTE OF THE
WEEK

The business of Government in a
modern world is to prescribe and en-
force the law and not to act as censors
of morals or guardians of zhe public
taste,

The responsibility is thus thrown
= back on the individual. But the
individual can act collectively by vo-
luntary effort as well as individually.
He should use whatever position he
holds — as an editor, as a teacher,
i as a judge, as a Member of Parlia-
% ment, as a writer, asa parent, as a
i member ofa Church, to uphold ad-
equate standards, —

Lord Hailsham in a recent

Sp 6 9 6 5 6 pat pe

j July 13 — 27

CTO Pe PR 8 PR 8 PES Oe PS 9S a SO SP Oe NS PS Os es Oy



a age et broadcast.
' TRAFALGAR FARMERS GLUB {| ——~

DANCE! DANGE !! DANCE

t

|!

At Trafalgar on the evening Gatholics For
!

(

Moscow
Pope Paul VI_ recently

e
5 Dee §Lak Ras oe

of Monday 5th August 1968,
Music: Pointe Michel Orchestra
Fee: $1.00

] Oh, the romantic Full Moon!! { assigned two Roman Cath-
iis Take her along!!! | lic representatives to go to
uly 20, 27, Aug. 3, tne Soviet Union to attend

een 6 Pa 6 BS nS PaaS a4 OG PaaS fa G PS BA Pd Pp BT Oh



ADVERTISE IN THE HERALD

the Golden Jubilee of Patri.
arch Alexis of Moscow, CP



SATURDAY, JULY 27, 1963

———ee,

DOMINICA HERALD

2 ATTUNED



IN THE CABINET

By PhyHis Shand Allfrey
From Chapter VIII



ee reer ee ED

“PaGE FOUR

a ee

DOMINIGA HERALD

AN INDEPENDENT WEEKLY

Ct



31 New Street, Roseau. Tel. 307
Published by 1. MARGARTSON CHARLES, Propri: tor

Editor — MRS.

U.K & European Represen‘ative

122, Shaftesbury Ave
Town $5.00 Country $6.00
Overseas (Surface Mail) $7.50

SATURDAY, JULY 27,

Annual Subscriptions :

PHYLLIS SHAND
—- Colin Turner (London) Ltd.

ALLEREY

London W. |

19M3

WEIGHTS AND MEASURES

OC, toc. roc... “Who's there?”

—. "The Inspector of Weights and
Measures.” “Oh, come right in — we
have been expecting you.”

Of course the shopkeeper has been
looking for the Inspector of Weights aad
Measures, because his imminent arrival
has been well-advertised in the press and
over the radio. Everything is ready, and
no doubt everything is in order. There
is absolutely no element of surprise in the
official visitation.

How different is the procedure in Great
Britain and other Commonwealth coun-
tries! Picking up newspapers from those
lands, one reads of cases of defective mea-
suring apparatus ot short-weight sales
which are discovered by the sudden ap-
pearance of a neatly-dressed lady ot gen-
tleman with official credentials. Those
who offend against the code of giving just
and good measure are punished under the
law.

Weights «
book sound like noughts and crosses or
needlés and pins. But some of the people
in this island are-so poor, that even a few
grains of sugar cr a teaspoonful of flour or
one pin omitted from their little purchase

La eraasemiiy: hese my en 7 eee
ts and measures bas a nice copy-

measures in Dominica consisted of the
two words “gill” and ‘“Chopine” two
containers which it is difficult to tinker
with. We have lately watched the people
line up in various stores to buy a single
three-cent roll, a single aspirin, a single
cigarette. Those objects are of fixed
dimensions; but even in bread there 1s
no overall standardization, and surely the
whole object of inspecting weights and
measures is not only an insistence on
honesty but on equal standards, amount-
ing to equal value for money.
Who was responsible for the local law
by which Inspectors of Weights and
Measures have to give notice of intention
to visit? Wedonot know, but it is
another old anachronism, and itis time
this practice was reviewed. We are well
aware that there are shopkeepers who
throw in the extra sweet or biscuit for a

People who fall in love with other human beings
sometimes become disenchanted or indifferent. This can-
not be said of people who fall in love with islands: their
obsession is usually life long. Never in all my days have
[ known of an island which inspires such strong feelings of
infatuation and partisanship as the island of Dominica, al-
though some of the other West Indian Islands are close
rivals and I understand this passion well, as in my case it
was prenatal. Those who love Dominica may be called
true lovers, as they recognise and expect the faults and fail-
ing of their beloved. Some of these people are natural-
born Dominican; others come fiom outside and fall under
the spell. All are victims of possessive and obsessive pass-
icn, and even the outside-born soon talk as if the island
belongs to them personally, which is a source of both pride
and ifritation to us locals.

The legend that thete is something sinister and broed-
ing in the beauty has been called by various names, such
as “the curse of the Caribs” —those hard-pressed fierce dent-
zens of pre-Colonial days, who were so tough to winkle
out and exterminate. ‘There is a tale that a tourist-lady,
recommended to come ashore in Dominica for a short holt-
day, suddenly panicked as the en-hor cha’ns rattled and the
row-boat bobbed in Roseau harbour, declared she “‘felt
something sinister,” aad went on to the unmysterious pan-
cake candour of Barbados.

During my Federal exile I was entided officially to
‘visit Dominica at least three times a year, and it was _al-
ways an exultant experience to, see the hugeness of the land

‘loom up ina brightness of green and sapphire, like the

hungry child, and take the greates* > ] S oF
give al aire nies goo’ weir j flashes in a hummingbirds’ crest, It was surprising to first-
‘down and running toget ner. y mune : ae Hae a

human beings, are liable to be u- 5;
and even a chopine has an occasio...’.
dent. But in our view, to warn shop-
keepers that the Inspector is about to call
is somewhat ridiculous, and defeats the

makes a difference, especially if it happens whole purpose of the operation. Softly,
frequently. Our earliest knowledge of softly, catchee monkey.
> > ~~

People’s Post

Correspondents are asked t¢ submit their Jull names and addresses as

a guarentee of good faith, but not necessarily for publication. Letters should
Coniroversial political letters will not ve pub-

ished anonymously. Views expressed in People’s Post do not necessarily

be as shoit as possible.

reflect the policy ot the Editor or the Proprietor.



Looking
Backwards

Dear Editor,

Slavery At
The Store

store — thinking it would have
been a bed of roses; but roses or no
roses, please note that I have since
been eating no more than 3¢ bread
with as much water as I can drink
for tea, breakfast, and dianer, A
neighbour steals to give me a little
— | breakfast before her husband arrives
—thank God, that is what prob-
ably keeps me alive till now, though
from this little plate five others have
to get, Nobody gets a square deal
at Super market — from the other
peity store clerks I have left behind,
right down to the labourers. But

Dear Mrs. Editor, — It is quite a
while you have heard from me. I
observe our people, are on the verge
of drifting into a useless. dream,
which I pray our leaders will in time
realise; the sooner the Ministerial sys-
tem is removed completely from our
Government the more advanced our
country will be under Crown Colo-
ny. If we are neither Federated nor
Independent and a change for im-
provement becomes mere doubrful
every heur, why hold any further
conference to talk of what will ne-
ver. happen? Everyone in,our
midst: :is fast becoming more and
even more disgusted at what is
happening today,

Youts truly,
NEwTown . WATCHER.

Slavery, we thought
was abolished hundreds of years ago,
but in my view _ that’s one great
thought wa ted — for slavery ina
certain sense of the word still exists at
a certain large score.

I have been an employee of this
company for some time and, was
quite recently ‘kicked out’. I say
kicked out not because I like the term
or because of my poor education, but
because this is often the expression
heard and used at the department
store by the one in authority. I shall
not mention here why I was kicked
out, but what I must tell you is that
there was no justified reason.

Like many others who went be-
fore me, I neglected other good op-
portunities for employment at this

that is not my business, let the dead
bury its own dead.

If you work in any of the depatt-
ments there and should take ill for
Just a day or two, cross your fingers
and get down on your knees tomor-
row when you return for work, be-
cause you are sure to find somebody
else in your place — a medical cer-
tificate is not good enough. You
just mus? not get sick.

In the interest of this Company, I
treated the business as though it was
mine — encouraging people to be-
come regular buyers and in a special
tactful way I encouraged my co-
workers to attract customers. The
authorities there knew it, but the
whol: body of management there is
like this: You do enough, they are

could be so large. Landingythe plane would lose a little
speed as if drawing back from the enormous mountains
festooned with glittering leaves, and then, like a hummer
darting ia to attack, it seemed to plunge into the cleft of a
valley, squeeze between looming hills, and gently come to
earth. The excitement of the landing would mingle with
a feeling of pure joy in me and I invariable stepped out of
the plane bemused by lines of poetry, .uch as ‘earth hath not
anything to show more fair’ and ‘aland where it is always
afternoon!

Sometimes on the long, tiring, delectable drive from
the airport to my home I would try to analyse the suffocat-
ingly strong emotion I felc about this small but hugk—
crisscross mountain range, boiling under its multigreen
apparel, which had been my earliest and dearest landscape.
The emotion was unanalysable: O frabjous joy, calloo
callay. Unlike the sententious poet who said ‘where every
prospect pleases, and only man is vile’, the faces and smiles
and even the sullen occasional looks of fellow citizens were
part of the landscape, part of the attachment, part of the
mysterious affection.

After the Federal crack-up when I came home for
good, | received in due course an account for a visit to
Dominica which I had made at the request of the Prime
Minister, but which was considered non-official by the
Inierim Commission. I did not struggle against the
assessment, for the trip had been worth every dollary but I
did, however, strongly query a deduction of twenty-five
cents for a worn-out tea strainer which had served four years,
a rubbish bin which I had renewed and left beside the
back door, and other well-used objects including some rags
of cloth euphemistically described as a luncheon set. . I
wrapped up the latter and sent them back to an_ officiat
for examination.

%
week I sometimes had to work sev-
the same as if you did nothing -- [eral hours extra— till night of
they are very unappreciative. Think | ccurse, without one cent for overtime
of this, with my wages of $12 a |work; but theday you make an

(Cont. on page 7)

not satisfied; you do tco much, it’s





ena tee A ipo ea ane re /: Paes
SATURDSY, JULY 9+, 196° DOMINICA HERALD PLE TLE

—





a ne SN, ST FA FS tN es me ea eer art

An . Secondly it offers the most massive Christian front. . eo
Africa On Road To Rome? to the sire! of Islam by reasons of its virtues and also The Morals Of

s s
its vices. The Roman Church manages somehow to be Public Life



Comment by Cecil Northcott— “colour blind” and_ is far less inhibited about race and by Norman St. John—Stevas
From “British Weekly” racism than churches within the Protestant traditions. It (from “The Obs ver")
has also has the advantage, in former British colonial
Papal policy in Africa during the last forty years has Africa, of never being officially associated with the govern- Sympathy with Mr. Profumo’s
paid off in handsome dividends. The famous missionary ng colonial power. personal p ight should not be allowed
encyclicals of Pope Joan’s predecessors, Pius XI and’ XII, Rome may well appear to be “establithed” in the — te obscure the fact that is raises in
directed the attention of the fatthfnl to Africa. Men, wo- ceclesiastical and catholic sense but never in the “secular? — acute and fascinat ng form the

ie : : : uestion of what exactly are the
2 oy have rc eC . srder to. and “state” pattern— < 212 ass the new Africa. 4
men and money have poured into the continent 1n ¢ rdetr tO p er an tinmense assct 1n & ¢ moral standards which the British

ensure that, with North America, the Roman Church As a church she has not to live down her imperial past. ie aple can expect Howistuelesleades
should have secured foundations in the two key continents There are those who see Aftica’s Christian future as a in public life. The question is
of the world. Roman one. The style and pageantry of her worship, her particularly difficult to answer

The instruments of this Papal policy in Africa are the capacity to be aware of the ““Afican presence,” her readi- ee the eo people themselves
great missionary orders, and in particular the White Fathers _ ness to exalt quite ordinary men to the hierarchy and her oe pears er oath
who have been ab c t> dr.w on devout Cuiho'is communi- _ belief in the coming empire of the black man, all suggest ee

: ) : : > 4 : others are guided by convention,
ties such as the Irish for massive and continuous replenish- that the way of Africa will lead towards Rome. If it hap- — others rely on instistct.



ments of their ranks, The main target areas are the East pened once in the eight century, and again in the sixteenth When it comes to public moral
and Central African countnes, and in the West a special why not in the twenty-first century of the Christian era? standards the county is foreed to
drive on Eastern Nigeria. The total result of this policy 1s That must be the long view of the in-coming Pope fall back on Christian standards
that, South of the Sahara, out of some 52 million Christ- and his advisers. Aarau ie Pee eco
ians a good 30 millions are Roman Catholic. | reane all of Cb aacd ee cea a

Pope John’s reign was, of course, too short to make Se imposed by the community: only

crtain of the morte basic ones.
One is that Ministers and Members
are expected to'tell the truth: espe-
cially on occasions when official
Ministerial statements lend a certain
solemnity and significance to the
proceedings.

any changes in the Africa policy but the Vatican Coun- prime meme etn

cil.was probably uxder greater pressure ftom Africa than is a
usually recognised. There is only one Aftican Cardinal, J Uj ST BR EC FIV EC N
Laurian Ruganbwa, of Tanganyika, but his presence was Des
a reminder of the immense, potential significance of Africa.
This appeared in the discussions on the liturgy and the de- A LIMITED PA IRAGE OF
“SUIRE SCORE” | mstscurwic\atdleates
: ; sae by a complete'forfeit ‘of his”
. D po: tical career. ik Na ee ee
POO TMA enti a ate

mand fot it it to be expressed -vith other languages than
l j
Latin.
* accept bribes. In 1949, the Sydney
CALL IN EARLY AND SECURE YOURS

ee Ne te

Expected to be honest -

There is universal agreement .:that
by lying on'such an dccasion, Mr.
Profimo committed'a. grave moral. -.

ne 6 9a 5 9 Rae 8 Be 8 9 4 os 0 SD Sf
9S 9 re 6 9s PM. SD




Pope Paul will have to reckon with the surge of ex-
pectancy that Aftica will be allowed to be African in its
worship.
‘Accompanying this hope is the eagerness of Catholic
Africa to be in the “lay apostolate’? movement of the
—Ch i i he layman his acknowledged place
in the church affairs. “The Rorian ‘Church has been wise
. enough in Aftica to encourage this movement, and also to
see to it that its young priests are in touch with the rising Stanley scandal rocked the Labour
side of Africa’s nationalistic intelligensia. © They have been Government John Belcher, a
taught to “think back” and to avoid being caught, like Labour Junior Minister, who had
other European directed churches, with the stigma of “white gone a few cheap presents _ from
ydney Stanley, was forced to
resign. - Jim Thomas had to quit
the National Government in. 1936
after a Budget leak which was sus-
pected of benefiting certain indivi-
duals. T he eighteenth century
system of patronage and pourboires
is definitely out.

3

6 pea 6 pe 8 pe pe 8 oe te,

man’s religion.”

The Roman Church has many clear advantages in
the new Aftica, which a new Pope may well and legiti-
mately, deploy. The first of them is its universality. lt
could march with the Addis Ababa front of a united
Africa, and offer its mantle of catholicity toa movement
which must have religion at its heart if it is to make a gen-
uine appeal to Africa.

WHILE THEY LAST



June 13—-


t
!
!
)
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i

(Cont. on p. 9)

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PaGE SIX

TRADE UNION NEWS

Confusion In
Latin America

The history of Trade Un-
ionism in Latin America 1s
a chequered one and reflects
very mach the politcal un-
certainties in the area during
the last 50 years. Before the
splitting in two of the World
Trade) Union movement,
which prior to World War
IH had only one central or-
xanisation, the World Feder-
auon of Trade Unions
(WETU), things were sim-
plified ini that Latin A mert.
can unions, it they were
affiliated to any world or-
ganisation ac ail, could belong
only to the one.

With the secession of
large parts ot Europe to Com-
munism,and the fact that
the WFTU was thus dom-
inated by trade unions which
were de facra Communist.
government institudons, the
Western World w.th the Un
ited States an’ Briush Union
Congfesse; ak ng a leading

part set-up t.. «4 own Interna-

tional ‘Gontederation of Free
Trade Unions (icrTu) With
the merger of the U.S. ‘rival
“Congresses — the American
Federation of Labour (a basi-
cally craft or “vertical” union)
and the Congress of -[ndus-
trial Organisations (a horizon-
tal or industrial congress) —
these with the British T.U.C.
and. the French CGT, be-
came the leading groups in
the ICFTU.

Enter CLASC

Several of the unions in
the British West Indies held
back for some time, before
transferring their allegiance to
the ICFTU, and most of the
Latin American Unions, not
helped by the Peronista_set-
up in the Argentine, found
themselves in a confused
state, and neither joined the
ICFTU nor kept up their
membership in the WFTU.
Into the confusion stepped a
minor “International” the
IFCTU (the International
Federation of Christian Trade
Unions) with its regional
counterpart CLASC to

complicate the issue.

ORIT & COL

The regional organization for
theA mericas of the ICFTU has its
headquarters in Mexico. and is
knov-n as ORIT. The affiliated sub-
organisation for the Caribbean Area
is the. Caribbean Congress of La-
bour, with its offices. in Port-of-
Spain Trinidad. CLASC has re~
cently been attacking ORIT, and
the tenor of some of these attacks
can be measured by the tone of some

resolutions passed by the CLASC
Congress held receatly in Caracas,
Venezela. One starts off:

“WHEREAS: the Dominica
Republic his formed a pseudo-con-
gress provoked by mercenary agents
at the service of oligarchies, plucoc-
racies and impecialism which oppress
our people, and said pseudo-congress
sponsored ty ORIT,”

Marxist Terminology

The resolution thet. proceeds to d.n-
ounce orIT in further verhiage more
suitable to Moscow or Peiping. At
the same conference there was a
resolution on the Alliance for Pro-
gress ‘‘deptoring the formation of
an advisory Labor Committee’.

One wayor another it appears
that CLASC is playing the Com-
munise gaine, whether- intentionally
ornot — It has parported to cooperate
with ORIT, promised support for
certain lines of action etc, and then
done the opposite.

The publication of our front
page account of this unionist struggle
is bound to spark off conflicting
viewpoints We publish this week
a statement by Mr. Anthony Joseph
President of the Dominica Techni-
cal, Clerical and Commercial
Workers Union (affiliated to
IFCTU). We have also written
to ask for the views of the General
Secretary of the Caribbean Congress
of Labour and of a spokesman for
the British T.U,C, which will
be published when received.

Education Conference
September

The. Caribbean Congress _ of
~abour, which is holding its _ first
triennial ‘Congress in Kingston,
Jamaica in September now advises
that arrangements have been , made
for a Labour Education Conference
to be held immediately after the
Congress, that is from September
12—14 at the U. W. 1, Mona,
Dominica will be allocated one
official delegate and the CCL will
be responsible for the cost of accom-
dation during the conference.

The first day will be given over
to lectuzes, mataly. on Labour Educa-
tion. On the Friday there will be a
talk by Mr. B,B. Blackman on
the work of the CCL and another
on the work of the UWI in the
field of Labour, The afternoon
will be given over to discussion
groups and there will be a summing
up on the Saturday morning.

“We'll Beat Our
Own Drum’

Neither the pattern of Western
societies nor that of Communist
countries 1s exactly suited to Africa,
declared Uganda Prime Minister
Milton Obote in America recently.

“In any case, as the peoples of
Africa belatedly march forth into
the sunlight of freedom, we would
have it known that it is to the beat
of our own drum that we intend to
march”’.

——————————<

Advertisers Are
Asked To Submit
Copy . By Noon
On Wednesdays



DOMINICA HERALD |,



Market Analyst
Here

Firse fruits of Dominica’s Asso-
ciatesip with CARIBO were evin-
ced when the Organisation’s Mar-
ket Analyse, Dr. Carel de Boer ar-
rived on Monday and consulted with
the Administrator, the Minister of
TVrade and Production and leading
exporters. Mr. de Boers was mostly
imerested in fruits and vegetables
which are valuable for intr: Car:b-
beam Trade to take the place of
imports from outside the area and
draw the Caribbean together econo-
mically, Besides the market for
perishable primary preducis, he was
also interested in the marketing of
processed food-products such as
grapefruit segments and fruit jusces.

The CARiBO expert’s report
will be part of a full survey of the
whole area of those countries within
the Caribbean Organisation.



Nuclear Testban
Talks Going Well

moscow CP:—British
and United States delegations
met with Soviet Foreign
Minister Andrei Gromyko
this week amid signs of
increasing optimism for
agreement ona formula to
outlaw all nuclear weapon
tests except undergror-

Tet imeentime

and Soviet delegates

yet another recess in tu.
Peace Talks, as Moscow and
Peking accused each other of
trying to break up the Com-
munist world: neither side
turned up at the meeting
place; apparently trying to
force each other to break off
the stalemated talks.

-— a —

Applications For
Liquor Licences

To the Magistrate District *G’
& the Super ntendent of Police
I, Aubrey S. Mc Quilkin now re-
siding at Portsmouth Parish of St.
John do hereby give you notice
that it is my intention to apply at
the Magistrate’s Court to be held ai
Portsmouth on Wednesday, the 2nd
day of October 1963 ensuing fora
wholesale LIQUUR LICENCE
in respect of my premises at Bay
Street Parish of St. John. Dated
the sth day of July 1963

A.S. MC QUILKIN

————

To the Magistrate District “G’’, &
the Chief of Police.

I, Fontinel Valentine, of Guillet,
in the Parish of St. John, do hereby
give you notice that it is my intention
to apply at the Magistrate’s Court,
to be held at Portsmouth, on Wed-
nesday, the 2nd day of October 1963,
ensuing fora RETAIL LIQUOR LI-~
CENCE, in respect of my premises,
situated at Guillet, Parish of St, John.

Dated the 26th day of June, 1963.

FoNTINEL VALENTINE
July 20—Aug. 3.



SATURDAY, JULY 27, 1963

Dominica Banana Growers Association
Banana Shipment of 19th July, 1963:













STEMS TONS

Roscau 27,455 ay $1
Portsmouth 29,787 372
Coast 2,687 32
$9,929 755

Exports Jan. 1-—july, 12 1,485,953 18,793
Total Exports to date G5$45,332 19,548
” Ex. to rath July, 1962 1,394,453 16,262
Increase 257,420 3,285,





OR 6 bea 6 8 6 9a 6 Rt 9 6 OPE Pee S BS Os Fe 6 OS be 6 9 6

THE ““VARIETY’’ STOR
C. G, PHILLIP & CO. LTD.

LATEST ARRIVALS:—

Refrigerators (all sizes and ai special!
prices), Household Deep Freezers a-d!
Ice Cream Freezers; Face Basins, Kitch-
en Sinks and Bath Room Fittings; Bahy;
Gribs and Door Mats; Glass (Plain andj
Frosted); Coffin furniture and Handles,

etc. etc. ; aha

emai ReneS Dan AS faa S Ee fA Pn S 9
6 Pe 3) Rae 5 De Fo ty 8 eS

+p

) tee 6 5 “ae-5 3:

aes:

mt 9 aS ee 5 6 6 6


Stocky Mickey Stewart, Surrey, was one of England’s
two new opening bats against the West Indies at Old
Trafford and the one English success.

. After blunting the pace of fast bowlers Hall and

Griffith, Stewart continued to score steadily. At 87, he
fell to the spin of Lance Gibbs and the ‘spectacular catch-
ing of wicketkeeper Murray.



SATURDAY, JULY 27, 1963



People’s Post Continued from page 4

excuse, regardless of how solid it ts, so
long as you failed to comp'y with the
order, next day you arc out of a job. Is
this not slavery? Mrs. Editor, I do
not want your reply. There might be
other workers who might be poorer
than me — all I want to see is that
they are protected, that they are se-
cuted in their jobs. May be it is
God who has turned the red light on
me so that, through this medium,
I could help those I left behind

Anyway, Iam out pow. While
I was in, I was never told anyching
about an emp'oyee’s union in Roszan,
A friend of mine. whom I spoke to
lately told nee of the union, and I re-
gret I did not know of it before, as
IT am of the opinion that it’s too late
tor me now to be defended.

You'll be surprised to kuow how
they can make you a member if you
don’t have the ready Membership
ee. Iam also assured that by he-
ing a member of the unton I would
have been better respected by even
the King on the job, and I would
have been able to work without any
fear of being k:cked out at any mo-
ment for no reason. So the union
becomes the right hand of the
emp.oyee and stands for his right
always. For the time being, just let
it be your personal affair.

Sincerely yours,
Ex EMPLOYEE

Coney Island

Madam,

May I-be‘allowed to say
that itis indeed disappointing to see
that the Government of Dominica
have been, much too . loosein’ their

“financial arrangements — witht the
Coney Island, in that no: attange-
ment were made: for Inland. Rev-
enue Inspectors or what have. you
to. witness'the checking of nightly
takes.

All that this government hopes
to collect is Income Tax and for
that purpose they will be bound to

‘accept whatever figures the Coney
Islanders” ‘give.

Rather than the Ministee of Fin:
ance wanting to throw his weight
around by ciimbing the Bingo Stand
to ‘protect the peoples’ money’
as he said, just to be curned down
in shame and humiliation before a
big crowd, he had better be more
ingenious in securing the tetritory’s
just share of revenue from the Coney
Island sweep. |

All-in-all I think they should
now be asked to show cause why
they should not leave Dominica



immediately, For cannot history be
repeated?

STAR LESTRADE,
18:7:63! Goodwill
Dear Sir,

As Sponsors of Bartley
Bros. Coney Island in Dominica,
I would like to comment on an
article by Sisserou and a letter each
by Star S. Lestrade and A. Freder-
ick Joseph in the local press.
SISSEROU : has perched on the
wrong tree and his or her allegation
of expulsion of Bartley Bros. Coney
Island from St. Vincent is incorrect
as this group has never been to St.
Vincentg
Bartley Bros. Corey Island has
been in the Cairbbean for the past
three years and has never experienced
any trouble with any Government
or its Tax Department, They have
played in Curagoa, Aruba, Trini-
dad (three times in seven different
locations,) Tobago, Barbados, Gren-

ada, St. Lucia, Martinique, Guade-
loupe. The Government of each
of these territories has expressed satis:
faction with Bartley Bros. shows
and extended a welcome to return
any time chey desire.

LESTRADE: It is shameful that from
a small and unimportant incident
that occured in the Bingo and in
the end was satisfactorily settled by a'l
concerned to no one’s embarrassment
that this writer should try to use it
as a pretext for his own personal
peliuical end.

The Chief Minister was never
turned down in shame and humili-
ation, as stated by Mr. Lestrade. In
fact Dominicans should feel proud
that a responsible member of the
Government as the C.M. during a
period of rest and relaxation should
show interest in our general welfare,

After Mr. Lestrade’s letter (prin-
ted above—Ed ) it was surprising to
most of the 1400. or
more persons present at
Coney Island on Saturday night
2oth instant (the night of the same
day of publication by the Chronicie
of his letter) he should be seen taking
part in the games which he had so
strongly condemned. So much for
His Worship.

MR. JOSEPH! With reference to his
statement regarding the lot of the
wotkers in Dominica Bottling
Plant I hardly believe that better
conditions. exist between Manage -
ment and Employees in any busi-
ness concern in this Island.

He knows fully well that Dom-
inica Bottling’ Plant: is enjoying
Pioneer Status which exempts them



Mr. Joseph seems to be unaware

that. Bartley Bros. Coney Island |

was sponsored in Barbados — by the
Jaycees with the same shows which
we are now enjoying in Dominica.

In summing up I would like to
say that in addition to the obvious
advertising advantages Coney Island
has meant to Dominica Bottling
Plant, there are three reasons why I
was instrumental in getting them in
Dominica:—

(1) The Jaycees would bene-

fit financially.

(2) The Dominica Cadet
Corps which was sorely in
need of funds all ot which

jGovernment could not
con:ribute for it. trip to
camp in Barbados would
benefit over and above
the amount required. It
is estimated that they
will enrich their funds
by well over $1,500.00.
Bartley Bros. committed
themselves to me before
they came to Dominica
fora Free ENTERTAIN.
MENT SHow for under
priviledged children
which will be financed
jointly between them and
Domin‘ca Bottling Plant.
Since Bartley Bros, Coney Island
has been in this Island, the manage-
ment has never ceased to express their
feelings of the wonderful reception
they are receiving here and it is
unfortunate that a few discontented
and misinformed people should try
to create unpleasantness for all during
their stay.

(3)

Thanking you for space,
GEORGE GABRIEL, Roseau,

Three hundred underprivileged

Children will be entertained this

afternoon free — Ed,
Cont, Page 9

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DOMINICA HERALD

PLAYERS et Rist AES Ws
1. Ten numbers will be called over Radio Caribbean

Unique Store, Fair-Deal, T. D. Shillingford’s Store, P. H, Williams & Co., Ursula Dominique (New
Town) Miss Marie Karam (Old Street), Bata Shoe Store,
James Bros. & Sons, Mrs. Vera Elie, (Pottersville) Mrs. Olive Cuffy, Rockaway and at other busi-
ness places to be announced over the local Station.

July 27, Aug. 3

a8 9 ab ae 6 9 Mie 6 Pee bp tS fh PP a SP PP PPP ARG owed PRS Seth eae SAS fs PS

‘Bing. Cards will be on sale at 25¢ tach in the fol-
lowing areas : Roseau, Massacre, Mahaut, St:Jo-

PAGE SEVEN

' THE DOMINICA JUNIOR CHAMBER OF COMMERCE |

takes pleasure in announcing its

RADIO BINGO

(Kindly sponsored by Messrs. Coca Cola International
and the Local Bottling Agents, Messrs. Jos. Gabriel)

STARTING 29th JULY, 1963

Proceeds towards 1) extending our Scholarship Programme

for the youth of the Island;
2) any other urgent or charitable cause |
for the welfare of the community and
island: and

3) operating the Chamber.

CONDITIONS AND RULES OF THE GAME

each afternoon at 5.30 and these will be posted'up at
the various selling points around the’ island for the~
benefit of players who may not have listenedin. ©”





seph, Layou, Salisbury, Coulibistrie, Colihaut, the
Northern district, Loubiere, Pointe Michel, Sou- °
friere, Grand Bay. These cards may be purchased
between Saturday and Wednesday following, and
ONE CARD CAN BE USED FOR ONE GAME ONLY.
The game will run from Monday to Friday, and
NO CARDS WILL BE SOLD AFTER WEDNESDAY
OF ANY WEEK.

Winners are asked to return their cards to the sell-
ers who will have them forwarded to us immedi-
ately for checking, or they may be handed in to
Mr. Carlton Peters, c-o. Dominica Dispensary Co.
Ltd., or Mr. Clifford Lewis, c-o. Dominica Electri-
city Services, Roseau.

Prizes will be awarded to the first four persons with
Bingo in the order of call. The Judges’ decision in
this connection is final.

We are hoping that with high participation, prizes
will become substantial. In the first instance, how-
ever, we are offering as follows : 1st, ..$10.00 and
1 case Coca-Cola, 2nd. ..$5.00 and 1 case Coca-Cola,
3rd. . . 2 cases Coca-Cola, 4th. .....1 case Coca-Cola.

Tickets can be obtained at the follawing: The Red Store, People’s Store, Fancy Store,

Coipel’s Palour, Marie Dechausay,

Lets all play Bingo -- play every game
Until we have fulfilled our aim !



—_

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woh pet ES



PaGE EIGHT





Advice‘ to the Public on Hurricane
Precautions
(from the Official Gazette)

BEFORE THE HURRIGANE SEASON:—

Make yourself acquaimed with the following system of warnings:—

The following signals will be made from Fort Young, in the case of
Roseau, and ftom tke Police Station, in the case of Portsmonth, in the
event of the probable approach of a hurricane or severe gales: -—-

CAUTIONARY SIGNAL

(when news is ceceived of an approaching hurricane )
ne gun or rocket will be tired at any time of the day or night, and
a ted flag having a black centre will be hoisted on the signal staff by day
and a red lantern by night.

DANGER SIGNAL

(warning to take cover)
Two guns or rockets will be fired in succession and two red flags
with black centres will be hoisted by day and two red lanterns by night.
When the signal is given, steps should at once be taken to secure
premises on shore and vessels in port against impending danger,

GANCELLING SIGNAL

On improvement of weather conditions after either the cautionary or
danger signals have been miade, and it is considered that the hurricane
has passed Dominica, a blue flag will be hoisted.

With regard to the rurai districts, the Police will be informed by
Headquartets and they in turn will promulgate the news throughout their
respective districts.

AFTER THE CAUTIONARY WARNING:—

Take cover in-as secure a shelter as possible.
in chutches, schools,‘and public buildings will be opened for

thosé“withing to, shelter in them.

| AF you go to shelter in any of these buildings take some food with was not interested in c 2
you.’ nd ey ed ‘ ; ___ing personal images, 1.
— heker:intavines + low lyimg areas that arelikely to flood." W i> “dialog ie wit!

~; Ifyou livein low lying cc tal areas shelter on higher ground further
inland, »» Thete will probably be very high seas.
»\ Dovnot leave:the shelter if there.is a. sudden lull; this may be the
centre of the hurricane and the wind will start up again very violently

from the opposite direction.
All fishing boats should be drawn up well above high water mark.

—_—_—

Hurricane Warnings And
Weather Reports

The following radio-stations heard in Dominica carry Hurricane
Warnings and Weather Reports as stated: —
WIBS, roSEAU, 1530 Kes.: on receipt and every hour on the half-hour.
WIBS, GRENADA, 9, 60 and 49 metre bands: on receipt, every hour on
the half-hour and in news.
WIVI, st. CROIX, 970 Kes : daily weather reports at 6.30 a.m., I..6/p.m
; 6.30 psm. and special emergency broadcasts.
Rapto TRINIDAD, 730 Kes.: hurricane warnings preceding news bulletins;
7, 8, tam. 12N, 2 p.m.
Rapio GuarpIAN, 610 Kes.: hurricane warnings preceding news bullet-
tins; 6, 7, 10, t2N, 2, 4.10, 6, 7, 9.15 and II p.m.



ec —_ ee

B.H. Talk -- Fair Results

The constitutional talks for the | (Hurricane Hattie, 1961), and he

advancement of the territory of |also said that the Minister should be -



British Honduras began in London
this month at the Colonial Office.
Attending were the leading politi-
cians of the now ruling party, the
People’s - United Party and two
invitees of the opposing patty (The
National Independence Party),

The Chairman at the talks was
The Under-Secretary of State for
the Colonie, Mr Nigel Fisher,
who opened the proceedings by
extending a very cordial welcome
to the delegates from B. H. In his
speech he paid tribute to the way
in which the country had risen
above its recent hurricane disaster,

proud of the way in which the
constitution had worked during the
the last three years.

According to a BIS release the
discussion of the proposals put for-
ward by the B. H. delegations for
constitutional amendments has pro-
gressed satisfactorily. Subjects of
discussion have been external affairs,

defence, the judiciary and a court of

appeal.

It has been agreed in Britain that
British Honduras will be granted
full internal self Government in
February 1964.

DOMINICA HERALD

U.W.I. Students

On W.I. Writers

“There is nothing common in
the work of West Indian Writers
except probably thar backgrceund,
they are all individualistic” stated
U.W.L. undergraduate Mz. Selwyn
Smith —- Vice-Presideut of the
U.W.]. Literary Society addressing
a meetung of the Dawbiney Lier-
ary Club on Thursday July r8th
“The Changing Mood of West In-
dian Literature.”

West Indian Literature he said,
“includes all novels or poems writ-
teh by West Indians wiether abour
the W.I. or not. Before J, Lam-
ming, E Mitelholzer, S. Selvon
and others there were writers trom
the West Indies bu these were eith-
ec Englishmen or men from other
nationaliues whose language and
style were not West-Indian-like.”

After stating that W.1. writers,
like politicians, were able to help in
the social upheavals of che ume, that
the W.1. novel has two functions to
perform namely to dramatize and to
give readers an eye to evaluate them-
selves, he said that the authors write
particularly of the peasant class and
are interested in colour.

He then read extracts from ‘‘Far
Cry from Africa’ (a poem) to
show the attitude language, and style
of cont.mporary posts.

Naipaul & Lamming

Commenting on the works of
some individuals he said Na |

throughout sume of his t
however, he is loosing WI. w.
and is laying claim to something in
style which cannot be cailed West
Indian. Mautclholzer has used sex
to make his novels marketable There
is a superabundance of sex in the
novels of George Lamming.

“"Who are the new names that
will carry on the work when the
present flock of writers has left the
scene? Before calling onthe media
of communication-Press, radio, to
Publicize the works of West In-
dian authors for there is nothing in
the books of these writers which the
children are not already aware of.”

The following poms were
brought forward in answer to ques-
tio. ftom Dawbin cs.

Most W.I. autuors write in Lon-
don because the W. Indian public
does not read their works because
the W.I. audicnce ts not critical of
their works to enable chem to better
their style-

Since many a W.I author de-
pends on his writing for his liveli-
hood he must introduce the set ele-
ment to give his work a popular
appeal,

A vote of thanks by A. Lazare
ended the meeting chaired by Club
Presidsnt W.A. Lawrence,

D.G.S, Present

Though it is popular opinion
that the Dominica Grammar School
is going through a crisis— staffing
problems, no books, no headmaster
and Minister Steven’s more often
than not unwarranted interference in
school activities-— ‘t was gratifying
to see that the D G.S. was the only
Secondary School represented at all
the lectures given by the U,W.I.
Students during the course of last
week.

iN

SATURDAY, JULY 27, 1963:

Criticism India Sends
Some of the iectures for example R. “White Tigers”

Cheltemliam’s ‘Cabinet System of
Govt. James Croal’s “Meaning |
Evo'tion’’ and Norma Francis **Fi- |
nancing of Economic Development”

Television and film cameras
whirred as two of the worlds rarest
animals artived at the zoological
gardens in Bristol. recently. The zoo
now clam to be the only one in the
world with a pair of white tigers.

They were bought from the Ma-
harajah of Rewa tor £7,0co (WI
$33,600) and flown to London from
India. They travelled by road to
Bristol -— just over 100 miles,

It is hoped that the tigers Cham-
pa and Chemeli, will produce cubs
in the next two years. (BIS)

~~ EDUCATIONAL NOTICE

General Certificate Of Education Of The Univer-
sity Of London, January 1964,
Applications to sit the January 1964 Examintion for the
General Certificate of Education (G.C.E.) of London Univer-
sity should reach the Educaticn Department not lazer than
7th. September, 19¢3. ;
2, Application should be accompanied by a Receipt for the
fees paid into the Treasury, as well as a Birth or Baptismal
Certificate,
3, Applicants who do not possess either a School Certi-
cate or a General Certificate of Education will be required
to take not fewer than four subjects of which English
Language must be one.
The fees are:
Advanced Level: (Entrance and Local fee included)
1 Subject $15.12
2 Subjects 23.52 ; ‘
Level: (Entrance and Local fee inc.uded)

were quite good while others such
as, R. Harris ‘‘Social revolution
after the Revolution” & S Smith’s
“Value of Literature” were not par-
ticularly impressive. However the
U.W IL. students did being the
University closer to the Dominican
public: The ten undergraduates left
Dominica on Saturday last.



Ordinary
1 Subject $10.08 .
~ ——2—Subjects ~~ 13.44
3 e 16,80 \
4 . 20.16
- 23.52

5
0. A. WALKER, Education Officer.
GO 74, July 27 .
[$4.00 $1.00 $1.00 $1.09 $1.00 $1.00 $1.00 $1.00/
ls THIS CERTIFICATE WORTH $]



i$ ONE DOLLAR $7
-§ WHEN USED TO PURCHASE ANY OF THE $:
(§ FOLLOWING:

$
$1.00 $1.00 $1.00 $1.00 $1.00 $1.00 $1.00 $)

100-bs Reps 8



Starter Pig grower
Grower Porkmaker
Layer Rabbit or Goat Petlets

Turkey Starter Cattle Feed

Intermediate scratch or Redular Scratch Grains
Ten All-Purpose Breed (US) Week-Old Chicks
Eight Kimber Leghorn week-old Pullet Chicks
Eiyht Harco Sex-Link week-old Pullet Chicks
Three Sylvania-Bred three-months-old Pullets
(All the above are debeaked disease-free)
Six Sylvania-Bred 3-week-old Ducklings
Four sylvania-Bred month-old Ducklings
Two Sylvania-Bred three-months old Hen Ducks.
(Ducklings debeaked. All Hardy, Healthy Stock.)
One fat, wormed, weaned six-week-old PIGLET.
FREE Ball-Point Pen to the First 100 Customers
Cashing in their Certificates. Free Pamphlet on |
Chick Feeding Program. Free Weight-Estimate Tapes
to all Piglet customers. Ask for your’s!
The above cash coupon good for one week from date
and must he presented at time of purchase, —

SYLVANIA POULTRY FARMS |
Imperial Road — Roseau -- tele: 224-5 rings
ac

j

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SATURDAY, JULY 27, 1963

The Morals Of
Public Life

by Norman St. John-Stevas
tfrom “The Observer”)
Cont. from page 5

What of sexual standards of
morality? Higbly clevated standards
have never been imposed on British
public figures: it should not be
forgotten that % was Gladstone who
svid that he had known 13 Prime
M uisters and of these rt had been
adulterers. Yoday when Christan
standards in she com nunity have
been so deep'y eroded they can no
longer be imposed on men in public
life.

The most obvious symbol of

change is divorce. In the nine-
teenth century involvement in a
divorce action did = mean_ total
exclusion from Government. Par-

nell lost the leadership of the Irish
Party after being named as cosres-
pondent by Captrin O'Shea, even
though the O’Sheas had long been
separated. It was the divorce
which ruined him, not the adultery,
which had long been known to
Gladstone and others. Gladstone
had even sent messages to Parnell
co... Mrs. O'Shea.

Divorce

Today divorce has lost its stigma.
It continues to be condemned by
both'the Established and, Roman
Catholic Churches but: their view
has hecome a minority: one, the
majority of the country regarding



ot public. These ate only of legiti-
mate interest to the public when
they are connected with some other
matter of general interest, such as
security ‘nthe Profumo case, and
in these circumstances they can al-
ways be raised in Parliament under
the shisld of privilege. The Press is
then free under the same shield to
report the whole incident. To ex-
pect more ftom the Press would
expose sections of it to too great a
temotation. These matters can be
adequately and responsibly raised in
Parhament where an Opposition
party will always be on the look out
for any conduct prejudicial to the
State,

Have public standards of morality

suffered through the Profumo case?
‘There is no evidence that they have.
Indeed to some extent they have
been upheld by the instaat — resigna~
tion of Mr, Profumo after his con-
fession instead of attempting to
chng to office.
The morale of the Tory party has
sunk but that is not the same thing.
Being a non-doctrinaire party, Lores
expect more ftom their leaders: be-
ing the traditional governing party,
the pubsic expect a higher standard
from them than ftom their oppon-
ents. Mr. Macmuillan’s position 1s
unhappy but by no means desperate:
indecd he may come in for a certain
sympathy as the good man taken
in by a schemer.

In the country asa whole th:
Profumo revelatious have been grevt-
ed with more cynicism than indig-
nauon, Government popularity has
declined but there 1s little sign of
any desire fora root and. braach
moral reformation in English , hfe.



itas a regrettable necesity, Britain
has had a divorced Prime Minister
and divorced Ministers continue to
2 hold office. It 1s true that Sir

‘Anthony Eden’ was the ‘innocent —

party in his divorce suit but it
seem; probable that even if a
Minister were a guilty party he
would noc be automaiically debarred
from office. All would depend on
the circumstances of the case. A
campaign might be mounted against
him bute that would be a different
matter.

The ctwentieth-centuty public is
not unsympathetic to sexual weak-
ness which it recognises as universal
but it does expect its Ministers and
Members to sieer clear of the worst
sexual offences.

Press And Parliament

The next question is whether
adequate machinery exists to keep
politicians on the strait and narrow
path. In the present case the whole
matter was raised not by the Press
but in the Commons by _ three
Opposition members, Mr. Wigg,
Mr. Crossnzan and Mrs. Barbara
Castle, On March 22 came the
denial by Mr. Profumo and_ this
was followed by a successful libel
action against Paris Match on
April 4 and against Tempo Illus-
tratoon April to. The British
Press, aware of the power of the
iibel laws, played a comparatively
minor part in the affair.

Should these laws be relaxed in
order to enable the Press to act as
public watchdogs and hound delin-
quent public figures? The answet
* must surely be negative since it 1s no
part of the duty of the Press to spend
its time ferreting out the sexual
weaknesses of individuals, _ private

the absence of any very defined
moral views, outside of certain min-
ority groups, inthe county as a
whole.

Mr, Profumo's head has rolled
and (aftec he smut and sensat‘on of
Dr. Ward's trail bas died away)
interest in the whole case will rapidly
decline. I can see no evidence that
the Profumo incident will bea
turning-point in the moral life of
the nauon.

This would ‘hard y be possible in

$$$ $i —<_—__—_—_—
People’s Post from p. 7

Tax Junk Gars

Sir,
A beneficent government claims the

right to forbid anybody to park his &

car in the wrong place ‘or even to
do so overlong in any one place
which others may want to use,
Any infraction of the parking rules
is visited by a policeman with a uc-
ket. The ticket entitles the owner
to pay tax for prolonged and im-
moderate use of space in excess 0
a reasonable right,
only to young and active cars in the

full possession of their wheels and ;

other faculties; old and totally use-

less cars are privileged to be parked §f

anywhere without offenc: for an un
limited period.
ple raise a feeble pipe that automo~
biles in the last stages of decay ar¢
unsightly, but nobody takes much
notice if the patrivtic public regards
the entire island as a rubbish heap.
They are free—which means free to
be as disagreeable and offensive as
they choose to anybody alive.

I suggest that every abandoned
cat isentitled to a ticket requiring
the owner to pay a parking. fee of

But this refers

Occassionally peo-





a dollar per week. After a month
the fee might well increase autom-.
atically. We all own a share in every
landscape, road and beach — and
every wave upon it whether we have
personal use for itor net. 1 oping
that it isthe province of our Gov.
ernment to protect this right on be-
half of all.

There is no excuse whatever for
the slowly augmenting pest of dead
automobiles: ic is the owners’ business
to see that they are buried, or trea-
sured as heirlooms inthe family, In
short, ita simple matter to tax the
nvisance out of existence. 1
counted sixteen of hese indestruct'ble
mummies upon five miles of one of
our best roads which would pro-
bably owe at least fifty dollars each
under more vigilant legislation.

S.H.

———$ $$

Outlaw Sex
Parties!

Lonpon CP: English Member of
Parliament (labour) Arthur
Lewis said recently thar
he will press for legis'ation to out-
law promis:uous sex perties which
he says are a security tisk.



te

a

DOMINICA HERALD

Te
THEM ALL

RITISH PAINTS (CARIBBEAN) LIMITED
AVAILABLE AT THE FOLLOWING HARDWARE S)ORES.

PAGE NINE

SUNDAY SERVICES
AT ST. GEORGE’S CHURCH.
(Anglican) Roseau

7.00 a.m. Morning praycr (said)
7.30 a. m. Holy Communion
9.30 2. m. Solemn Mass and Sermon: Sunday
school in schoolroora
6.00 p. m. Bible Class
7.1§ p.m. Solemn Evensong, Sermon and
Devotions
Except on the second Sunday in the month
when the services are;—
g. 30 a.m. Morning prayer
7.15 p.m. Evening prayer
T... Hi. AICKS
Acting Rector





2 pane 6 pee 6 pa 6 Bare 6 BS BS BS PS PE Be 8 opt YE

ROSEAU CREDIT UNION
MOVED

To their own office building at 33 Gt. Marlborough
Street, on Ist July, 1963.
Business Hours as usual, Secure Yourself and

(family the Credit Union Way,
dJunes2 July 27

eae 6 9S 9 eS 9 tes PPS 9 Te 8 £9 Et $< £8 £6 fe 8 8 8

ea 5 9 StS pee Spe SE
See 9M 6 “Ray ) Pe 6 9S Pe ie





Nae
aS

a

READY MIXED
OIL PAINT

GENERAL PURPOSE
RUSSET

ONt Galton wine MEASURE

i i. :
R



L. A. DUPIGNY Esq.,

J. W. EDWARDS

CG. G. PHILLIP & COMPANY
T. D. SHILLINGFORD



PaaGE TEN

es





alone

Children’s (Factual Test) Corner

Dear Boys and Girls,— A story is told of a ship sail-
ing off the mouth of the Amazon River which sent a
signal to a passing ship for help — she had run short of
water. Back came the reply “Drop your own buckets.”
The thirsty sailors were puzzled and wondered if their request was unacr-
steod. Back came the same reply “Drop your own buckets.” Uhey
did as they were told and to their amazement found that, though far out
at sea, they were actually sailing on fresh water brought down by the huge
Amazon River. |

We in Domynica are like the thirsty sailors, there are so many fruits
and vegetables around that we could make use of — either like the sailors
we do not realize it or else we prefer to spend money on less nutr.tious
foods.

Let us take one of our fruits ~- the pawpaw, You
Iearnt at school the value of fresh fruits --- some supply us wath mineral
salts, others with vitamins etc. (By the way some vitamins are sometimes
destroyed by overboiling.)

I shall tell you of a very delicious drink that can be made from the
pawpaw. Takea ripe pawpaw, peei it, remove seeds, add two cups of
water and crush. Strain, add more water to thin out, then add a un of
evaporated milk; sweeten to taste and serve with crushed ice. This juice
will not keep in the fridge for a long time as it thickens, so its best to use
it right away. A slice of a large pawpaw can give about six glasses of
pawpaw squash. Very small pawpaws which are not too good for eating
can be used for a squash too. Grown ups who do not care for the drink
made with milk, can use a squeeze of lime juice instead = With the lime
juice it is avery cooling drink on a hot day.

The pawpaw is also eaten green as a vegetable; a delicious candy 1
also made from the green ones.

Now try the drink especially on a hot day during the holidays when
you are very thirsty.

must have

Cherio till next _week. e fron
7 QUESTIONS :—-

Love from Auntie Fran.

(1) Where and what is the Amazon? ———-----—.-———

(2) Fruits belonging to the citrys family supply the body with
Vitamin C, which prevents scurvy and keeps the skin in a healthy con-

dition.. Name four grown locally?

(3) Drinks can be made from many cther local fruits —— name

three of them? (Do not





ist. Prizewiriner:
2nd pe
Consolation Prizes:

LAST: WEEK’S RESULTS
Rowena Roberts, W.H.S:
Augustus Lawrence, Roseau Senior Boys.

William Beilot, D.G.S,, Luke Prevost, Tech,

include citrus fruits) ——-——-- -—-—-—

Wing, and Jennifer Nicholas, St. Martin’s School (no third prize).

ANSWERS:
oats, codfish, potatoes, etc.

oo

--SPOR

1. Ottawa 2, Mr. Lester Pearson.

TLI

3. Flour, app les, cheese,



GHT--

BY EDDIE ROBINSON

At Las Vegas on Monday. Son-
ny Liston retained his World
Heavyweight Title when he knock-
ed out the Challenger Floyd Patter-
son in the first. round. It took Lis-
ton just 130 seconds to finish his
opponent. It was almost a carbon
copy of their fight last September.
Last week, I predicted that if Pat-
terson could keep out of trouble in
the early rounds, he had a chanee.
He decided to trade punches with
Liston in the first round and imme.
diately got nto trouble. Patterson
was floored twice for mandatory
counts of eight, but could not get
up a third time.

After the fight, Patterson told
reporters that he has no intention of
retiring from the ring,

§ Meanwhile, Cassius Clay has named
September 30 as the date on which
he would like to meet Liston. Lis-
ton has no objections so long as the
price is right, and there are no In-
come Tax. problems. Liston’s Man-
ager, however, would like a warm-
up fight before meeting Clay, which
means that we might have to wait



PRINTED AND PUBLISHED BY J, MAKGARTSON CHARLES, THE HERALD’S PRINTBRY, 31 NEW STREBT, ROSEAU, DOMINICA,

until next year to know if Liston
will ‘fall in eight’.

Good Start For W., I.
In Fourth Test

Sobers Scores Century

Both teams made one change
for the 4th Test which stated at
Headingley, Leeds on Thursday.
Bolus replaced Richardson for En-
gland, and McMorris replaced Carew
for West Indies. The West Indies
were off to a brisk start after winning
the toss. The wicket gave the bows
lers some assistance carly on, and
McMorris was lucky when he was
twice dropped in the slips by Barring-
ton, With the score at 28, McMor-
ris edged Shackleton and this time
Barrington made no mistake. McMor-
ris was out for 11. Kanhai joined
Hunte, but at 42, Hunte was
caught behind off Trueman for 22.
A brisk pactnership of 29 between
Kaphai and Butcher ended when
Butcher was caught behind off
Dexter for 23 and West Indies were

DOMINICA HBRALD



up against it with the score at 71
for 3, Aclunch they were 95 for 3
with Sobers and Kanhai together.
These «wo proceeded to consolidate
their team’s position and were — still
together at tea, Soon after the inter-
val, Kanhai was bowled by Lock
when he was just 3 short of his
cenzury. His partnership with Sobers
had put on 143 runs and put West
Indies back in the game. Solomon
and Sobers were then a:sociated ina
partnership of 73, Soon after reach-
ing his century, Sobers was caught
and bowled by Lock for 102. This
was his goth century in first class cric-
ket and the 1c7th ‘Test centu-y by
a West Indian. Murray joined Solo-
mon and at close of play the score
was, West Indies 294 for 5. Solo-
mon 39 not out, Murray 0 not out.

When Hunute had reached 20
earlier on, he became the first member
of the touring team to seach 1000
runs.

At close of play on Friday, the
score was West Indies all out 397.
and England 169 for 8: they need
z9 more runs to avoid the follow
on.



Guatemala
Breaks With
Britain
Guatemala on. Wedneeday broke
off diplomatic relations with Bri:-
ain “tin. protest. ‘at the ‘preposed
granting of full interna! self govern.
ment to British Honduras”. Guate-
mala has long claimed British Hin-
duras (which would al)- em
a Carribbean port) ar
lodged a claire wh!
said she would disc
H. constitutional conferem

Maid

Classified Advt.
SEMPERIT TYRES

an
TUBES IN STOCK
750 x 20
700 x 20
650 x 16
600 x 16
640 x 13
Very attractive prices
S.P. MUSSON, SON
& CO. LTD.
Corner Queen Mary &
King Geo. V Street
Roseau
July 27—

FOR SALE

One Ballahou Net
Good condition, No reason-

able Offer refused
Apply: :
Mrs. Perry Nicholas

Scotts Head,
July 27 Aug 3— 17

GALVANIZE! GALVANIZE!
GALVANIZE
Yes it is a Bargain
A very Good Bargain
Second hand Galvanize for sale

y
Thelma Lestrade
26 Rose St. Goodwill

Phone No 63,
July 27

AGENDA

(Continued from page 1)

hin and outside the region (T&T),
(iii) By sea outside the segton (B.G.),
(1v)Cost of handling mail.
Turspay, Juty 23 Sectlon IU
— LKeonomic and TechnicalAid:
The general question of Economic
and Technical Aid (1) United Na-
tions, (11) United Nations Survey of
the Caribbean, (i) Aid from U.K,,
U.S,A. and other sources,
WEDNESDAY, JULY 24 Section

LV — Immigration: (1) — The
Commonwealth {mmigration Bill

(J). (it) The establishment of Legal
Aid Service for West Indian Imm-
igrants (B), (iii) The admission of
Guianese and West Indians of Asi-
an origin into the United Staies of
America. (B.G), Secsion V --
Co-ord nation of efforis: Co-
ordination of efforts in the field of
external representation, (a) The field
of tourist promotion (T &T), (b)
Overseas publicity generally (BG).
University of the West Indies(T&1)

Tuurspay, Juty 25 Section V1
— Foreign Questions: United
Kingdom taxation and its effect on
investment in the West Indies (B).
Extra-territorial claims within the

SATURDAY, JULY 27, 1963

the region (B.G). Section VII
Other Matters including: Con-
tinuing arcangements for hitherto
unified currency laws (T&T). Fed-
eral Loan and Guarantee Fund.
Establishment of'a Caribbean Branch
of the Commonwealth Parliamentary
Asiociztion. The position of the
Civil Service in the Age of Indepen-

dence; (1) Leave (ii) Training.
The Conference of Heads of
Governments; Proposals for the

Future,



PORTUGAL EXPELLED FROM UNECA

By a heavy vote, largely
from the Afro-Asian bloc,
Portugal was on Wednesday
expelled from the United
Nations Economic Commis-
sion for Affica. Portugal,
under heavy fire for ‘‘colo-
nialism’ in its African
colonies of Guinea, Angola
and Mozambique has offercd
to allow three heads of Afri-
can States the privilege of
“on site inspection” so that
they may see for themselves
“that all races have equal

* for first child, £100 for second, £50 for third.

treatment in their African
Colonies.” :
a . L a
University Of The Wesi Indies

Applications are invited for the post of Publications Officer at the
newly established Institute of Education. . Applicants should be gradua-
tes of a recognized University. Duties will include supervising the pub-
lishing of text books and a journal, and, in the initial stages, an informa-
tion service and a library service. Duties to be assumed by October 1,
1963.

Salary scale equivalenr to thas..of —Leatnears—ore 35 >
£1,660 x 80 —£2,100, Ghild allowance (limited to three children) £150
F,S.S. U. Housing
allowance of 10% of salary, or, if available, unfurnished accommodation
will be let by the University at 10% of salary. Up to five full passages
on appointment, on normal termination’ and on study leave (once every
three years).

Detailed applications (six copies) giving full particulars of qualifica-
tions and experience, date of birth, and the nimes of three referees should
be sent by August 19, 1963 to the Registrar, University of the West
Indies, Kingston 7, Jamaica, from whom further particulars my be
obtained.

ee

University Of The West Indies

Applications are invited for the post of Administrative Assistant in
the newly established Institute of Education, A graduate ot a recognized
University will be preferred but consideration will be given to applications
from non-graduates. Duties to be assumed as soon as possible

Salary scales; Craduate — £750 x 50 — £1,050: Non-graduate
— £600 x $0 — £900,

Applications (6 copies) giving full particulsrs of qualifications and
experience, date of birth, and the names of three referees should be send by
August 19, 1963 to the Registrar, University of the West [ndies, Kingston
7, Jamaica, ftom whom further particulars may be obtained.

cee Seren acre ac

0 ae 6 pte 6 fe 6 Pe 6 Pe 6 Pa PS Bl 6 Bs PS AS a 6 PS PE SS BSB

NOTICE TO BANANA GROWERS
BANANA PRICES

Growers are informed that Geest Industries
have decided to maintain the Green Boat Price at
ie 5. O for a further week commencing 29th July,

The banana price will therefore remain un-
changed until further notice.

A. D BOYD
General Manager
DOMINICA BANANA GROWERS ASSOCIATION
25th July, 1963.

July 27
. co Ata 9a 9A a PS PS OAs OS AA PE Pa San 9S OR Pd
SATURDAY JULY 27, 1963

region (B G). Foreign Bases within

meres oS





l

!

|! t
7
l

j (
i



Full Text
RESEARCH INSTITUTE
FOR THE STUDY OF MAN

162 EAST 78 STREET

NEW YORK, 21,- N. Yemen. --



shea

a Fiat, .

(For the General Wolfure of the People of Dominica, the further advancement of the West Indies



ESTABLI>.1u0 Lyss

‘Sustitia

SATURDAY, JULY 27, 1963

“BIG FOUR” CONFERENCE

Jamaica, Trinidad, B.G. & Barbados | Nuclear Test Ban
Agree Gustoms Union

EADS or state of the four economically-strongest
British West Indian Territories -— Trinidad and To-
ago, Jamaica, British Guiana aud Barbados — met in
Trinidad this week and agreed on the thorny problem
which, above all, bedevilled the Federation —- Customs

Jnioar. la agreement with
the statement made before the
she conference by Sir Alex-
ander Bustamante, Prime
Minister of Jamaica, 1¢ was
clearly stated that no political
union such as the old Fed-
eration was contemplated.
Agreement was reached on
many of the Common Ser-
vices and a date in January
set for furthez talks.

Weill Conference

. The four-day. Conference of
Heads of West Indian , Govern
ments: whici z
day till Thursday in Port-of-Spain
this week was notable for the a
declarations of attitudes by the four
governments concerned.

Prime Minister Eric Williams
had, from his previous single mect-
ings earlier in the year with Premiers
Barrow of Barbados and Jagan of
British Guaina and Prime Minister
Bustamante of Jamaica, prepared a
well-planned Agenda in which each

Planned

Government produced a paper on a’

specific subject — a tue teacher’s
seminar! the real interest came in
the discussions afterwards.

Federal Shipping

Monday was given over to sub-
jects relating to Trade and Com-
munications and was marked by a
wrangle over the Canadian gift ships
Federal Maple and Federal
Paim The suggestion that the
ships be sold and replaced by more
economical vessels was rejected (the
service is heavily subsidised) ana the
question of costs was referred back
to the West Indian Shipping Com-
pany for further examination. Pre-
micr Jagan, whose government
hitherto refused to join im the shipp-
ing services, raised the question of
Cuban shipping to be brought into
any joint arrangements, British
Guiana is at present imvolved in
two-way trading arrangements with
Cuba, but Trinidad and Tobago
have resisted Cuban overtures along
these lines, and the suggestion horri~
fied Jamaica.

B. W. I. A. Accepted By Three

The Trinidad-owned — British
West Indian Airways was agreed on
asthe common carrier by Jamaica

Services

and Barbados but British Gutana
refused to accept the offer of partici-
pation in joint ownership.
Tuesday’s discussions centred on
Economie and Technical Aid and,

in keeping with Dr Williams’
declared preference for United
Nations Aid without _ political

strings, the representative of UNTAB
(United Nations Technical tance Board) was present during the
seminar. Noticeable absentees from
the Confereace were observer
representatives from the Caribbean
Organisation (caRIBO), from Gren-
ada (which is still. waiting to be in-
corpotated into a unitary
state, wih Trinidad and
Tobago) and. the remain-

Leewards. Earlier the C.M. of An-
tigua, Mr. Vere Bird, had remarked
caus.ically ‘chat the — smaller
territories were better out of it”.

Full Representation

Trinidad and Tobago was tepre-
sented by the Prime Minister Dr.
Eric Williams, The Minister of
Finance, two Ministers without
Purttolio and the Economic Advis-
er and personal representative of the
Prime Minister, Mr. J. O’Neil
Lewis: Jamaican representation in.
cluded, beside Sir Alexander Bus-
tamante, two other ministers and four
top civil servants: from B.G. came
Premier Jagan, Mrs, Jagan and Hon,
E,M. Wilson with five civil ser-
vants. Barbados had a team of
twelve headed by Premier Barrow,
Ministers Crawford and Ferguson
and four civil servants for the full
session; for special sessions Hon. E.
R.L, Ward (previously Federal
House of Representatives Speaker)
now Barbados Minister without
Portfolio and a Senator, Minister of
Education Cameron Tudor and two
additional civil servants.

Interesting Agenda

The following was the Agenda
(initials after each item denote coun-
uy presenting the relevant paper ):—

Monpay, JuLy 22 Section I —
Trade: Preparation for the 1964
World Trade Conference (J).. The
Canada- West Indies Agreement (B),
Customs Union (B.G). The 30%
Venezuelan Surtax (T&T). Section
I —Communications: (1) By sea
within che region (B), (ii) By air wit-

(Cont, on page I0)

Accord

Quickest Three-Power
Gonference

After only eleven days of talks a
Nuclear Test Ban agreement has
been reached by the three nuclear
powers, Great Britain, the United
States of America and the Soviet
Union. Lord Hailsham, Britain’s
Minister of Science, America’s
Averill Harriman, Undersecretary of
State and Mr. Gromyko conferred
ina spirit of amity from the — start,
with Mr. Krushchev — setting the
tone with an opening remark; ‘why
do we not just sign it straight

”
away”.

France will Press On

In the course of the next few days
Britain’s Foreign Secretary Lord
Home and U. S. Secretary of State
Dean Rusk will be fying co Moscow

tos ‘*treaty now being pre-
par ‘ations will be. invited
_tes Tee avrvect ad “ate
d edia.el, However,
Fr usigent’ General de
G: _uas already intimated his

determination that his country will
carry on with the proposed
manufacturing of their own ‘ nuclear
deterrent” and ic is not expected
that Communist China wih file
eagerly up to the table to append a
signature. It is, in fact, believed by
many political commentators that
the exacerbation of the ideo‘og:cal
split between the two creat Com-

munist countries had smoothed the
path for the agreement.
Only A Start
Acthe conclusion of the confe-

rence, Mr. Krushchev is reported to
have said that this was only a
beginaing of a serics of treaties
which he hoped could be signed to
relieve world tension and provide a
basis for ‘‘co-existence.”? These
sentiments will surely be echoed by
all the people of the world.
Stephen Haweis’
Birthday

Tuesday July 23 was the bitth-
day of the well-known artist and
noted contributor to the local press
Mr. Stephen Haweis. A special
birthday party was held in his hon-
our at Government House, at which
were present His Honour the Ad-
min. and Mrs. Lovelace, the Bis-
hop of Roseau, the Chief Minister
and the Minister of Labour and
Social Services. Mr. Haweis mark-
ed the occasion by presenting to the
people of Dominica, through the
Hon. W S. Stevens, his painting cf
the Boiling Lake which he made
some thirty years ago The Herald
wishes ‘S.H.” health and happiness,

IN TRINIDAD

U.W.I. Students Build Wail



The Bice Soil

and the Caribbean Area as a whule)

PRICE Io0¢



Voluntary ‘‘Hard Labour”

A new wall is being built around the Dominica Infirmary and the
lavou for tle work isa free gift from students of the University of the West
Indies, Fourteen in all of the U.W.I. Work Camp Group arrived on
Wednesday on the ‘Federal Palm” and set to work the next day to dig

the foundations for the wall. Their

leader is Dominican DGS old-boy

Franklin Watty who is also Chairman of the Commission for External
Affairs at U.W.I. He is a second-year B.Sc, Economics student.

Martinique
Students
Bid Farewell

A happy, healthy group
of Martinique students ac-
companied by their teachers
and Prefessor Pierre Lucette
re-embarked on Wednesday
morning from Portsmouth
on the ‘it “My Destiny”
after nderful week ‘in
Yo ea

Tay =
On Saturday they visited . Julian Johnson’ (see. p.3 “U,;W.1.

Scotts Head where they first
had a sulphur bath at Souf-
riere, followed by a sea-bath
and hospitality from Mr.
C.G. Phillip. On Sunday
morning they were enters
tained by the Cercle Fran-
ca'is at Rockaway. On
Monday they went over to
the Carib quarter where Mr.
Lucette introduced them to
his friends of a previous visit.
From there they went to
Portsmouth seving all the
sights on the way.

At Portsmouth they were
met by Miss Mation Peter,
member of the Cercle, who
was able to make them feel
at home in their own lan-
guage.

In company with the boys
from the Government School
and escorted by the head-
master Mr. Barry they visited
all the points of interest in
the district including the
Long House Banana Recep-
tion Station.

To all the many people
who were so kind to them
in Dominica the Martinique
boys, their teachers and Prof.
Lucette wish to give through
the HERALD their most gra-
cious thanks for a wonderful
trip round our beautiful is-
land.

Among the party are two girl
graduates who heard only yesterday
that they have been. awarded their
B,Sc. General degrees, One is
Miss Shirley Thomas, sister of

' Teacher Joy Thomas who will soon

with her friend and fellow teacher
at the Wesley High, Miss-: Elliott,
be returning to, Jamaica to enter the
University to read for a degree in
Natural Sciences: the other graduate
is Miss Rose Coats. v

_ The wall-rebuilding. project was
visited by Mrs. Lovelace, Hon. W.S.

‘Stevens and Ag. P.S. Mr G.-A.

Maynard. They were pleased °to see
that. students ftom DGS: andSMA
were helping, among: them being.
Paro _oitay Cine IN

Students on WI. Writers’’). It is
hoped that more DGS: pupils will
join the group. ce

The UWI students, who are
staying for two weeks, are-being giv-
en hospitality in private homes.

PEOPLE IN THE NEWS

ANGELO BELLOT, former Federal
M.P., turned artist, back home in
Soufriere to fish and farm * REV.
Atherton Didier Chairman and
General Superimendent of the
Methodist Leeward Island District
back home on a_ visit ,, WESLEY
High School Government Body
Member, Gustavus Timothy M B.E.,
J.P. in Roseau for School Speech
Day * recistrar J.A. Marcano,
doubling also as magistrate Ports-
mouth whilst A.B. Marie takes
leave * yuLius Nyerere, President
of Tanganyika sees Macmillan after
talks with JFK and Canadian PjM.
Lester Pearson * FRANK Watty
elected 2nd Vice President of UWI
Guild of Undergraduates * JupGE
St. Bernard left Sunday for St.
Vincent -~ Assizes postponed *
CYRILLE Adoula Congo Prime
Minister paid official visit Britain
this week * BETTY Miller first
solo woman flyer across Pacific
decorated by U.S. President *
POINTE MICHEL FIRE DEATH

The postvoned inquiry into the
cause of the death of Mrs. Rosalind
Balson was adjourned sine die on
Friday 26th.

The reason given by the Coroner
was that since the first adjournment
the Police had instituted charges of
murder against Harold Joseph,
Ralph Isaac and Gertrude Isaac.
These charges relate to the same
inquiry.
- use in our ¢aily lives must come through Customs.”

PaGE TWO

—.-— ee oe

“$0 THEY SAY”--

BY BOB & RAY

Have you noticed the amount of concern with Dominica’s progress
lately? whowe and more people are taik ug about “development”, ‘-impro-
vement” and) “mudermisauon”, Some folks talk of “expansion” and
“bettermen” while che general tone is progressive. ‘This is a good sign
for before things can improve, people must first be (1) dissatistied
with their present lot, and (2) must plin and discuss the needed improve -
ment.



If you visit the people in LaPlaine they alk of when their bananas
stait to bear, when their out go turns into income — and all the while they
are planting more and more bananas and spending — more and more for
fertilizer and crop cultwation. If you visit Castle Bruce the same feeling
is overwhelmingly present Souttiere 1s the same and wherever you go,
on all sides people talk of doing more -- or are doing moxe.

At the same time we hear the dissatisfactions voiced with those
operations on the island that are not modern'sed, not improved and not
keeping pace with the economic advancement. Usually the finger is
pointed at government. Some voice their disapproval of the telephone
system: how antiquated it is... and this sounds sirange when the very
people who utter the grumbling have never used any other telephone
system... but they “just know” theur telephone system is noc improved.
thers are displeased with the roads, completely unmindful thar there are
more and better roads on Dominica now than at any ume in history.
Others say the school system is slack and grumble about the number of
pre-teenagers who are allowed to drop-out. Two men on opposite ends
of the island said almost the same thing: that there 1s a law requiring
chi'dren to attend school until they are 16. The is not regarded by the
authorities, they say.

But by far the largest number of dissatistied people we talked with
aim their abuses at Customs. One chap said; “fits the lifeline of the
place, man, let Customs close down for 30 days we'd all be out-of-busi-
ness” And as another fellow puts it: “Customs takes the place of our
industry. We have no factories making goads so every siugle item we
Perhaps these men
exaggerate as surely dasheen, tannia, local rum and handcrafis do not
bother with Customs. However, outside of these and a few other items,

virtually every article in'every shop and store comes across the jetty and

--ition} Customs?
the ttouble to check say that Dominica's Customs dutie’
ate higher than any other island in the West Indies! Tha :

—aney-co-i; -oayy*trTHil

this means Customs too.

What are the people saying about the most vital government fund-
Some of the businessmen in the town who. have take
the main,
dtems “like men’s shirts, carry twice the Customs duryi. _

7 rmifdaey 16 ninica ~ Cistoms thrarges’ a duty on life-
saving drugs ilke penicilin which comes in duty-ftee to Barbados citizens.
And, we learn that dozens of other articles that are taxed 10% in Auti-
gua, for exampie are slapped with 20% here, Whea one asks these men
why do they suppose Dominica changes mucn more Custams duties than
other British West Indies island, they give varied answers but more often
than not they say “Dominica needs the money to run the government, the
sahools, the police, Agriculture Department and (since there is no land
tax) Dominica must get this money from the people in the form of Cus-
toms duties.”

So we are face once more with that old complaint. Only now it
has become acute. Sonner ot later, we are told, Dominica must face the
facts that every modern nationtaxes Jand value. To ease the Customs
duties thereby creating more local cash, wall mean a higher standard of
living for the people but in order to cut these duties there would
have to be substituted a land tax to raise the necessary funds to operate
government. People who own thousands of acres on Dominica now
can hold this land “‘free”’ but if they had to pay a tax on these acres every
year, they would see to it that the land produced sufficient income to cov-
ver those taxes, This alone would create jobs for more people who in
turn would have a spendable income adding more to the gross income of
the island. But as one man said! ‘*Why bother to tell you all the advan-
tages ofa land tax. Ifit weren’t the sensible thing to do why do all the
other places have it?”

But the chief target of most of these people’s grumbling is
Customs itself — not the higher duties — bit the time-wasting, idiotic
forms that are required to be filled out, It was explained that these
warrants were designed by the new Federation so that much valuable
statistical information could be gathered on the imports to various 1s-
lands in the Federation. However, it was pointed out, there is no
need for such detailed information no w since there is no longer a
Federation. What we need now, it was said, is a thorough clean-up
of the expensive Customs procedures so that a third as many Cus-
toms clerks are employed to collect the Customs duties.

One shop-owner in Mahaut said: ‘If I employed as many clerks
in my shop to do duplicate tasks that Customs does, well, I’d have to
charge 30¢ for a pound of sugar and 9u¢ for a pound of salt fish, just to
break even. Its costing Dominica thousands of dollars a year to employ
dozens of clerks to tabulate and check on those warrants that don’t inean
a thing to anybody!” In fact, he said, he has stopped importing
things direct any more, preferring to avoid the aggravation caused at Customs
by buying everything in his shop at wholesale, ‘‘Let the other fellow spend
his time filling out warrants aad running all over town to get the items
checked and cleaced,”’_ he said,

As we finished drinking our tin of cold Domfiuit juice and prepared
to leave, our Mahaut friend'said: Its my guess that not one member of

DOMINICA HERALD





the Legislative Council has ever tried to import anything here as if they

SATURDAY, JULY 27, 1963



had, they’d change the stupid system tomorrow

oe

British Guiana :
By London
“Times”

Under the ude “One Mere
Chance’ the Limes’? commented
on Thursday 18th July.

‘Mr. Sandys said about all chat ™poraty
could be expected of bim when he come a new

reported to the Commons yesterday
on ius visit to British Guiana.

“There had been little hope that
he would conjure a solution out of
the present conflict. and he would
have been unwise to outline at this
stage any long-ierm recommendations
that he may have worked out him-
self. It is only right that the
Guianese leaders should be given
another chance to sort out their own
affairs,

“The first step, as Mr. Sandys
said, should be a coalition gover-
niment,as an emergency measure,
for there can be no rational dis -
cussion of constitutional
or any other issues unul fail public
order is restored. Dr. Jagan objects
on the grounds that to be effective a
coalition could have to agree on
wider political and economic issues.
This would be valid only if the
coalition, were to havea long life,
and thete 1s nu reason why it should
ifit applies atseif to immediate pro-
blems with sufficient dispatch.

“Beyond this. it 1s difficult to see

clearly, “The acral. and pe'irical

tensions have etched the: so
Some deeply into, the: cour 0 are
cate tht slancct +! speed

ffiany diffic... ies as ae

solution, favoured by «.. ns,

would be to suspend the cous.. a-
tion and return to full colonial rule.
The plan would then be to pump
“in American investments
until the Indian rural population
were gradually weaned from Dr.
Jegan’, party. The danger is that
the opposite might happen. Dr.
Jagan, having made hay in opposi-
tion, could then sweep back with a
large: majority. Britain would
meanwhile suffer ail the opprobru m
due toa colonial recidivist, as she
has done before.

“There is something in the idea at a
referendum on the proposal to intro-
duce proportional representation.
There is no guarantee
that the proposal would
be accepted, but if it were it would
probably cause Dr. Jagan to be re.
placed by a coalition of Mr. Burn.
ham’s and Mr. D’Aguiar’s cpposi-
ticn partie, Thiswould be a
slightly dubious operation, and the
the result would he unstable and
temporary, but it might gain a use-
ful breathing space. There remains
the temptation to throw the whole

~ LITTLE MOE



1" So they say.
————— io

problem into the lap of the United
Nations. As a gesture of despair this
would be futile. Buc it is possible
that a limited rele for the Unned
Nations could prove useful.

“An ultimate selution, if there
1s one, may have to contain elements
from more than one of these ideas,
Atthe moment the main need is for a
coalition. Then must

attempt to work out a
system that respects the rights of the
different racia! groups. Finally,
there must be effective policing of
the arrangement that are made, both
as regards internal and external af-
fairs’”.

i

Commotion Over
Gaymans

U.S. Students Visit
Castro

Recent cables have indicated that
Cuban planes carrying ‘‘potential
subversive agents’ besides other
passengers from Cuba have been
landing for transhipment at Grand



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Cayinan island, a British territory
North West of Jamaica. The
charge was made by the American
Government, and Britain has ad-
mitted the possibiliry and promised
to invesiiaate.

The U. S. charges were denied
by Castro, and meanwhile Cayman
I standers demonstrated, refusing to
allow some Latin American techni-
cians from Cuba to disembark from
an Ilyushin airliner and preventing
the takeof of a BW,ILA,
aiccraft for Jamaica unui they were
satisfied that it catried no possibl:
subversive agents! however th. wife
of the Cuban Consul in Kingston
and snother Cuban women living in
Jamaica were allowed ta continue.

These steps according to USIS,
are part of United States efforts to
attain maximum isolation ef Com-
munist Cuba. Some of the flights
in question were made by a Cana-
dian Company known as Woarld-
Wide Airways.

Meanwhile some American _ stu-
dents who accepted an invitation to
visit Cuba as guests of the Havana
regime are Feing criticised in their
own country and urged to talk back
to Castro and to see and interview
Castro’s political prisoners.



—

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By Rideo



(Courtesy United States Information Service)
SATURDAY, JULY 27, 1963

International Unions In Struggle

By A. Frederick Joseph
Gen. Sec. T. €. &. & W Union.

On July 20, under the above headline, the Dominica
HERALD frontpaged an accusation by ORIT (Inter-
American Regional Organization of Workezs) to the effect
that the International Federation of Christian Trade
Unions (IFCTU) was “caus ng coatusion in the ranks of
Latin American and West Indian trade unionism, not
only by the sim larity of is initials to these of the great
world-wide ICFTU, but (it is suggested) by accepting
Communist aid in their struggle to dominate the T. U.
neld in the Latin American countries.”

Without prejudice to what the IFCTU has to say on
the matter, the Technical, Clerical and Commercial
Workers’ Uuion offers the following — the other side of
the coin — that readers may judge tor themselves:

If similarity of initials cause confusion, surely ORIT
should know whe caused it. In 1920, 43 years ago, the
constitutive Congress of the IFCTU was held at the Ha-
gue, Protestant unions forming the majority ot delegates
present. The ICFTU had its constitutive Congress in
London in 1949 after the break-away from the influence of
the World Federation of Trade Unions WFTU which
was and still is, communist-dominated. The Christian
International is therefore 43 years in existence -vhile the
ICFTU is only 14. Who caused and is causing confu-

sion in initials?
Against Communism

The IFCTU declared in its “Economic World
Programme of 1922” that it “is based on Christian princi-
ples and ethic, which are the foundation on which the
whole economic and social organization should rest,” and
than once wise enough to say no, when it was invited to
join the WFTU at a time when it promised to elicit a
“wave” of solidarity all over the world. The WFTU
lured the members of the International Federation of Trade
Unions but not the IFCTU.

Can that be interpreted as accepting anything that
has to do with Communism? It would be interesting,
however, if ORIT could say who assisted communist-
dominated unions in Chile sometime last year with
Alliance For Progress Funds. The State Department
knows.

Accepting Communist aid indeed! In South Viet-
nam today, the Christian International’s affiliate, the CVTC
led by its President Tran Quoc Buu, is a veritable bul-
wark against the communists; in 1956 the IFCTU turned
town an invitation from the WFTU to start a common
action in favour of the 40-hour week, thereby being true
to its General Council Vienna Conference Resolution
(1951) stating reasons why the Christian International
could not co operate with the Communist International
‘WFETU)): “there are just nc common principles wherever
between both organisations, between Christian social con-
cepts and materialistic Communism.” The position was
further stated in these words “because of the misery of the
workers in the Communist countries, because of the blood
which was shed in repressing their discontent although all
they did was to claim those very rights solemnly pledged
them by the WFTU itself, there can be no question —
now less than ever —— of co-operation between the IFC TU
and the WFTU”. (Labor, December 1956)

The ICFTU responded to that attitude when in its
Information Bulletin of January 1957 it took the Chris-
tian International’s Secretary General to task for refusing to
take part in any action (re the Hungarian Revolt) with
which the WFTU might be associated, while neglecting to
say that there was a suggestion calling for “a oommon
statement by the Secretaries General of the ICFTU and the
IFCTU, saying that they were willing to go to Budapest.”

In June 1961, Emilio Maspero, Executive Secretary
of the (CLASC), the Latin American Confederation of
Christian Trade Unionists (IFCTU), made the following

DOMINICA HERALD

PAGE THREE

NOTICE

Vacancy In Post OF
District Community
Development Oiticer



reply to the question ‘Is the ICFTU capable of preventing
Marxist infiltration by a neutral ideology?”’: “The ICFTU,
through its regional organization the ORIT, is a neutral
orgamzation without idcology or mysucism in a continent
where Communism has deeply and definitly planted the
ideological struggle with an ¢xtra-ordinary hope and mys-
ticism which 1s ready to conquer all Latin America. The
ORIT is too confident in the United States policy which
has none nothing but corrupt officials and the healthy trade
union movement all over Laun America... . due to lack
of possitive ideology, foiled in their action by the efficiency
of communism, the L[FCTU and the ORIT were obliged
on more than one occasion, to be a party ot to practise ap-
peasement towards such dictators as Batista in Cuba or
Stroesner ni Paraguay... . (they) are incapable of control-
ling Communist penetration and up to a_ certain point
have encouraged it by their negative anti-communist policy
which has finally played into tne hands of capitalist react
ion and of Communism itself... . (they) do not believe
in a third trade union torce. For them, the alternative 1s
either capitalism or communism! The Christian trade
unionists believe in a new democratic revolutionary alterna-
tive, distinct from Capitalism and communism. This
means a new ideolegy, determined adherents; a mystic and
more efficient organiziion, must be thrown into the struggle
against Communism.”

No one can deny the postive force thai the CLASC has become
in Latin America tuday. While at has succeeded in organizing peasants’
and farmers’ Federations (a form of cv-operative) 1t has also succeeded,
in some areas, in having governmen’s introduce Land Reform programmes,
A perfect example 1s Venezuela where hitherto, the peasants sheltered
the communist guerrillas, Today, thanks to the Christian orientation of
CLASC action, they are no more the friends of the so-called “Army
ef Liberation” - - the communist rebels,

The records show np the Democratic Socialists when they allowed
the Christain International to be conspicuous in its opposition to the “ peo-
ples‘ “sts” which today under Communist domincvon are called’

Applications are invited for a
post of District Community Develop-
ment officer.

2. The salary of the post is
52,796 in the scale $2,796 x 144—
$3,516 per annum. The appoint-
ment is pensionable and is subject
to medical fitness and, unless the
appointee is already in a pension-
able post, 2 years prohation in the
first instance.

3. The officer will be required to
undertake community development
work generally, i.e. the promotion
of local government and the train-
ing of local leaders, the encourage-
ment of recreational and other
cultural aspects, the promotion of
self help effort and give assistance
and guidance to voluntary associa-
tions and groups. The officer will
be required to work in close associ-
tion with the Education Department -
in its adult education pro;ramme, the
extension service of the Agricultur-
al Department and the field officers
of the Health Department. The
officer will be requried to live in
the district assigned to him or her.

4, Quarters ‘are. not provided-
Leave will.be granted in accord:
ance with local General Orders.

5. The person selected. (unless
he or she be already in a pension-

pop ~sacies” (sic’. Proofcan be found in the case. of the Bela ; :
Kh yin Hur -y, che Spartakus revolt in Germany, Berlin, ab le post) may he rout ired fo at
~~ “P07 ince 1549, however, these Democratic Socia isis who 4 few months until the expected
form ICFTU, have changed but as A. Vaniscendael of 3
: , : : vacancy occurs.
the( an International asked in 1962, “the question is whether to

6. -Applications . for. the. post
shorld be addressed to the Chief
Secretary, Administrator’s “Office,
and should reach him not later than
15th August, 1963.

G O. 27 July 27.

rej... Communism is enough and whether to propagate freedom and
democracy is a strong enough antidote against communist penetrat-on.””
Another question is why are certain stooges of the Batista regime still used
(up to 1962 for certain) as propagating agents of the free trade
union movement and why ORIT had nothing to say when in February
the Dominican Republic tried to impose a Central Trade Union Move-
ment by force of law (it will be recalled that che TCCWU sent cables of
protest to the President of the State and Legislature, the U.N. and I.L,O.).

Vanistendael admits that ‘‘it is not pleasant to recall all this’, but teels
that the public is entitled to know all the facts, past and present, so chat
it should be able to decide what exactly is the position, and which are its
alliances in the fight for fteedom, democracy and human dignity.

To be concluded next week
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All assistance and information concerning

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ie shall book and procure any passages re-

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Phone No. 67 (2 rings).

———e—__

QUOTE OF THE
WEEK

The business of Government in a
modern world is to prescribe and en-
force the law and not to act as censors
of morals or guardians of zhe public
taste,

The responsibility is thus thrown
= back on the individual. But the
individual can act collectively by vo-
luntary effort as well as individually.
He should use whatever position he
holds — as an editor, as a teacher,
i as a judge, as a Member of Parlia-
% ment, as a writer, asa parent, as a
i member ofa Church, to uphold ad-
equate standards, —

Lord Hailsham in a recent

Sp 6 9 6 5 6 pat pe

j July 13 — 27

CTO Pe PR 8 PR 8 PES Oe PS 9S a SO SP Oe NS PS Os es Oy



a age et broadcast.
' TRAFALGAR FARMERS GLUB {| ——~

DANCE! DANGE !! DANCE

t

|!

At Trafalgar on the evening Gatholics For
!

(

Moscow
Pope Paul VI_ recently

e
5 Dee §Lak Ras oe

of Monday 5th August 1968,
Music: Pointe Michel Orchestra
Fee: $1.00

] Oh, the romantic Full Moon!! { assigned two Roman Cath-
iis Take her along!!! | lic representatives to go to
uly 20, 27, Aug. 3, tne Soviet Union to attend

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ADVERTISE IN THE HERALD

the Golden Jubilee of Patri.
arch Alexis of Moscow, CP
SATURDAY, JULY 27, 1963

———ee,

DOMINICA HERALD

2 ATTUNED



IN THE CABINET

By PhyHis Shand Allfrey
From Chapter VIII



ee reer ee ED

“PaGE FOUR

a ee

DOMINIGA HERALD

AN INDEPENDENT WEEKLY

Ct



31 New Street, Roseau. Tel. 307
Published by 1. MARGARTSON CHARLES, Propri: tor

Editor — MRS.

U.K & European Represen‘ative

122, Shaftesbury Ave
Town $5.00 Country $6.00
Overseas (Surface Mail) $7.50

SATURDAY, JULY 27,

Annual Subscriptions :

PHYLLIS SHAND
—- Colin Turner (London) Ltd.

ALLEREY

London W. |

19M3

WEIGHTS AND MEASURES

OC, toc. roc... “Who's there?”

—. "The Inspector of Weights and
Measures.” “Oh, come right in — we
have been expecting you.”

Of course the shopkeeper has been
looking for the Inspector of Weights aad
Measures, because his imminent arrival
has been well-advertised in the press and
over the radio. Everything is ready, and
no doubt everything is in order. There
is absolutely no element of surprise in the
official visitation.

How different is the procedure in Great
Britain and other Commonwealth coun-
tries! Picking up newspapers from those
lands, one reads of cases of defective mea-
suring apparatus ot short-weight sales
which are discovered by the sudden ap-
pearance of a neatly-dressed lady ot gen-
tleman with official credentials. Those
who offend against the code of giving just
and good measure are punished under the
law.

Weights «
book sound like noughts and crosses or
needlés and pins. But some of the people
in this island are-so poor, that even a few
grains of sugar cr a teaspoonful of flour or
one pin omitted from their little purchase

La eraasemiiy: hese my en 7 eee
ts and measures bas a nice copy-

measures in Dominica consisted of the
two words “gill” and ‘“Chopine” two
containers which it is difficult to tinker
with. We have lately watched the people
line up in various stores to buy a single
three-cent roll, a single aspirin, a single
cigarette. Those objects are of fixed
dimensions; but even in bread there 1s
no overall standardization, and surely the
whole object of inspecting weights and
measures is not only an insistence on
honesty but on equal standards, amount-
ing to equal value for money.
Who was responsible for the local law
by which Inspectors of Weights and
Measures have to give notice of intention
to visit? Wedonot know, but it is
another old anachronism, and itis time
this practice was reviewed. We are well
aware that there are shopkeepers who
throw in the extra sweet or biscuit for a

People who fall in love with other human beings
sometimes become disenchanted or indifferent. This can-
not be said of people who fall in love with islands: their
obsession is usually life long. Never in all my days have
[ known of an island which inspires such strong feelings of
infatuation and partisanship as the island of Dominica, al-
though some of the other West Indian Islands are close
rivals and I understand this passion well, as in my case it
was prenatal. Those who love Dominica may be called
true lovers, as they recognise and expect the faults and fail-
ing of their beloved. Some of these people are natural-
born Dominican; others come fiom outside and fall under
the spell. All are victims of possessive and obsessive pass-
icn, and even the outside-born soon talk as if the island
belongs to them personally, which is a source of both pride
and ifritation to us locals.

The legend that thete is something sinister and broed-
ing in the beauty has been called by various names, such
as “the curse of the Caribs” —those hard-pressed fierce dent-
zens of pre-Colonial days, who were so tough to winkle
out and exterminate. ‘There is a tale that a tourist-lady,
recommended to come ashore in Dominica for a short holt-
day, suddenly panicked as the en-hor cha’ns rattled and the
row-boat bobbed in Roseau harbour, declared she “‘felt
something sinister,” aad went on to the unmysterious pan-
cake candour of Barbados.

During my Federal exile I was entided officially to
‘visit Dominica at least three times a year, and it was _al-
ways an exultant experience to, see the hugeness of the land

‘loom up ina brightness of green and sapphire, like the

hungry child, and take the greates* > ] S oF
give al aire nies goo’ weir j flashes in a hummingbirds’ crest, It was surprising to first-
‘down and running toget ner. y mune : ae Hae a

human beings, are liable to be u- 5;
and even a chopine has an occasio...’.
dent. But in our view, to warn shop-
keepers that the Inspector is about to call
is somewhat ridiculous, and defeats the

makes a difference, especially if it happens whole purpose of the operation. Softly,
frequently. Our earliest knowledge of softly, catchee monkey.
> > ~~

People’s Post

Correspondents are asked t¢ submit their Jull names and addresses as

a guarentee of good faith, but not necessarily for publication. Letters should
Coniroversial political letters will not ve pub-

ished anonymously. Views expressed in People’s Post do not necessarily

be as shoit as possible.

reflect the policy ot the Editor or the Proprietor.



Looking
Backwards

Dear Editor,

Slavery At
The Store

store — thinking it would have
been a bed of roses; but roses or no
roses, please note that I have since
been eating no more than 3¢ bread
with as much water as I can drink
for tea, breakfast, and dianer, A
neighbour steals to give me a little
— | breakfast before her husband arrives
—thank God, that is what prob-
ably keeps me alive till now, though
from this little plate five others have
to get, Nobody gets a square deal
at Super market — from the other
peity store clerks I have left behind,
right down to the labourers. But

Dear Mrs. Editor, — It is quite a
while you have heard from me. I
observe our people, are on the verge
of drifting into a useless. dream,
which I pray our leaders will in time
realise; the sooner the Ministerial sys-
tem is removed completely from our
Government the more advanced our
country will be under Crown Colo-
ny. If we are neither Federated nor
Independent and a change for im-
provement becomes mere doubrful
every heur, why hold any further
conference to talk of what will ne-
ver. happen? Everyone in,our
midst: :is fast becoming more and
even more disgusted at what is
happening today,

Youts truly,
NEwTown . WATCHER.

Slavery, we thought
was abolished hundreds of years ago,
but in my view _ that’s one great
thought wa ted — for slavery ina
certain sense of the word still exists at
a certain large score.

I have been an employee of this
company for some time and, was
quite recently ‘kicked out’. I say
kicked out not because I like the term
or because of my poor education, but
because this is often the expression
heard and used at the department
store by the one in authority. I shall
not mention here why I was kicked
out, but what I must tell you is that
there was no justified reason.

Like many others who went be-
fore me, I neglected other good op-
portunities for employment at this

that is not my business, let the dead
bury its own dead.

If you work in any of the depatt-
ments there and should take ill for
Just a day or two, cross your fingers
and get down on your knees tomor-
row when you return for work, be-
cause you are sure to find somebody
else in your place — a medical cer-
tificate is not good enough. You
just mus? not get sick.

In the interest of this Company, I
treated the business as though it was
mine — encouraging people to be-
come regular buyers and in a special
tactful way I encouraged my co-
workers to attract customers. The
authorities there knew it, but the
whol: body of management there is
like this: You do enough, they are

could be so large. Landingythe plane would lose a little
speed as if drawing back from the enormous mountains
festooned with glittering leaves, and then, like a hummer
darting ia to attack, it seemed to plunge into the cleft of a
valley, squeeze between looming hills, and gently come to
earth. The excitement of the landing would mingle with
a feeling of pure joy in me and I invariable stepped out of
the plane bemused by lines of poetry, .uch as ‘earth hath not
anything to show more fair’ and ‘aland where it is always
afternoon!

Sometimes on the long, tiring, delectable drive from
the airport to my home I would try to analyse the suffocat-
ingly strong emotion I felc about this small but hugk—
crisscross mountain range, boiling under its multigreen
apparel, which had been my earliest and dearest landscape.
The emotion was unanalysable: O frabjous joy, calloo
callay. Unlike the sententious poet who said ‘where every
prospect pleases, and only man is vile’, the faces and smiles
and even the sullen occasional looks of fellow citizens were
part of the landscape, part of the attachment, part of the
mysterious affection.

After the Federal crack-up when I came home for
good, | received in due course an account for a visit to
Dominica which I had made at the request of the Prime
Minister, but which was considered non-official by the
Inierim Commission. I did not struggle against the
assessment, for the trip had been worth every dollary but I
did, however, strongly query a deduction of twenty-five
cents for a worn-out tea strainer which had served four years,
a rubbish bin which I had renewed and left beside the
back door, and other well-used objects including some rags
of cloth euphemistically described as a luncheon set. . I
wrapped up the latter and sent them back to an_ officiat
for examination.

%
week I sometimes had to work sev-
the same as if you did nothing -- [eral hours extra— till night of
they are very unappreciative. Think | ccurse, without one cent for overtime
of this, with my wages of $12 a |work; but theday you make an

(Cont. on page 7)

not satisfied; you do tco much, it’s


ena tee A ipo ea ane re /: Paes
SATURDSY, JULY 9+, 196° DOMINICA HERALD PLE TLE

—





a ne SN, ST FA FS tN es me ea eer art

An . Secondly it offers the most massive Christian front. . eo
Africa On Road To Rome? to the sire! of Islam by reasons of its virtues and also The Morals Of

s s
its vices. The Roman Church manages somehow to be Public Life



Comment by Cecil Northcott— “colour blind” and_ is far less inhibited about race and by Norman St. John—Stevas
From “British Weekly” racism than churches within the Protestant traditions. It (from “The Obs ver")
has also has the advantage, in former British colonial
Papal policy in Africa during the last forty years has Africa, of never being officially associated with the govern- Sympathy with Mr. Profumo’s
paid off in handsome dividends. The famous missionary ng colonial power. personal p ight should not be allowed
encyclicals of Pope Joan’s predecessors, Pius XI and’ XII, Rome may well appear to be “establithed” in the — te obscure the fact that is raises in
directed the attention of the fatthfnl to Africa. Men, wo- ceclesiastical and catholic sense but never in the “secular? — acute and fascinat ng form the

ie : : : uestion of what exactly are the
2 oy have rc eC . srder to. and “state” pattern— < 212 ass the new Africa. 4
men and money have poured into the continent 1n ¢ rdetr tO p er an tinmense assct 1n & ¢ moral standards which the British

ensure that, with North America, the Roman Church As a church she has not to live down her imperial past. ie aple can expect Howistuelesleades
should have secured foundations in the two key continents There are those who see Aftica’s Christian future as a in public life. The question is
of the world. Roman one. The style and pageantry of her worship, her particularly difficult to answer

The instruments of this Papal policy in Africa are the capacity to be aware of the ““Afican presence,” her readi- ee the eo people themselves
great missionary orders, and in particular the White Fathers _ ness to exalt quite ordinary men to the hierarchy and her oe pears er oath
who have been ab c t> dr.w on devout Cuiho'is communi- _ belief in the coming empire of the black man, all suggest ee

: ) : : > 4 : others are guided by convention,
ties such as the Irish for massive and continuous replenish- that the way of Africa will lead towards Rome. If it hap- — others rely on instistct.



ments of their ranks, The main target areas are the East pened once in the eight century, and again in the sixteenth When it comes to public moral
and Central African countnes, and in the West a special why not in the twenty-first century of the Christian era? standards the county is foreed to
drive on Eastern Nigeria. The total result of this policy 1s That must be the long view of the in-coming Pope fall back on Christian standards
that, South of the Sahara, out of some 52 million Christ- and his advisers. Aarau ie Pee eco
ians a good 30 millions are Roman Catholic. | reane all of Cb aacd ee cea a

Pope John’s reign was, of course, too short to make Se imposed by the community: only

crtain of the morte basic ones.
One is that Ministers and Members
are expected to'tell the truth: espe-
cially on occasions when official
Ministerial statements lend a certain
solemnity and significance to the
proceedings.

any changes in the Africa policy but the Vatican Coun- prime meme etn

cil.was probably uxder greater pressure ftom Africa than is a
usually recognised. There is only one Aftican Cardinal, J Uj ST BR EC FIV EC N
Laurian Ruganbwa, of Tanganyika, but his presence was Des
a reminder of the immense, potential significance of Africa.
This appeared in the discussions on the liturgy and the de- A LIMITED PA IRAGE OF
“SUIRE SCORE” | mstscurwic\atdleates
: ; sae by a complete'forfeit ‘of his”
. D po: tical career. ik Na ee ee
POO TMA enti a ate

mand fot it it to be expressed -vith other languages than
l j
Latin.
* accept bribes. In 1949, the Sydney
CALL IN EARLY AND SECURE YOURS

ee Ne te

Expected to be honest -

There is universal agreement .:that
by lying on'such an dccasion, Mr.
Profimo committed'a. grave moral. -.

ne 6 9a 5 9 Rae 8 Be 8 9 4 os 0 SD Sf
9S 9 re 6 9s PM. SD




Pope Paul will have to reckon with the surge of ex-
pectancy that Aftica will be allowed to be African in its
worship.
‘Accompanying this hope is the eagerness of Catholic
Africa to be in the “lay apostolate’? movement of the
—Ch i i he layman his acknowledged place
in the church affairs. “The Rorian ‘Church has been wise
. enough in Aftica to encourage this movement, and also to
see to it that its young priests are in touch with the rising Stanley scandal rocked the Labour
side of Africa’s nationalistic intelligensia. © They have been Government John Belcher, a
taught to “think back” and to avoid being caught, like Labour Junior Minister, who had
other European directed churches, with the stigma of “white gone a few cheap presents _ from
ydney Stanley, was forced to
resign. - Jim Thomas had to quit
the National Government in. 1936
after a Budget leak which was sus-
pected of benefiting certain indivi-
duals. T he eighteenth century
system of patronage and pourboires
is definitely out.

3

6 pea 6 pe 8 pe pe 8 oe te,

man’s religion.”

The Roman Church has many clear advantages in
the new Aftica, which a new Pope may well and legiti-
mately, deploy. The first of them is its universality. lt
could march with the Addis Ababa front of a united
Africa, and offer its mantle of catholicity toa movement
which must have religion at its heart if it is to make a gen-
uine appeal to Africa.

WHILE THEY LAST



June 13—-


t
!
!
)
|
|!
|!
!
i

(Cont. on p. 9)

SS SSS ——_—__.»——— |









.
:

%

acres ‘

$$$

ONDENSED Pik

LL CREAM SWEETENE





AMNION Tyee NETHERLANDS KY Z7/ |
}

ror an
PRopucts uimiven NAssAU MAM

— -
— 7

Nestle’s, a name you’ve learned to trust, make
sure that every tin of Nestle’s Condensed Milk
contains only the finest ingredients available in
the world- richest full cream milk, purest sugar,
and to this famous milk, Nestle’s have added
three extra vitamins.

NESTLE’S
CONDENSED
MILK


PaGE SIX

TRADE UNION NEWS

Confusion In
Latin America

The history of Trade Un-
ionism in Latin America 1s
a chequered one and reflects
very mach the politcal un-
certainties in the area during
the last 50 years. Before the
splitting in two of the World
Trade) Union movement,
which prior to World War
IH had only one central or-
xanisation, the World Feder-
auon of Trade Unions
(WETU), things were sim-
plified ini that Latin A mert.
can unions, it they were
affiliated to any world or-
ganisation ac ail, could belong
only to the one.

With the secession of
large parts ot Europe to Com-
munism,and the fact that
the WFTU was thus dom-
inated by trade unions which
were de facra Communist.
government institudons, the
Western World w.th the Un
ited States an’ Briush Union
Congfesse; ak ng a leading

part set-up t.. «4 own Interna-

tional ‘Gontederation of Free
Trade Unions (icrTu) With
the merger of the U.S. ‘rival
“Congresses — the American
Federation of Labour (a basi-
cally craft or “vertical” union)
and the Congress of -[ndus-
trial Organisations (a horizon-
tal or industrial congress) —
these with the British T.U.C.
and. the French CGT, be-
came the leading groups in
the ICFTU.

Enter CLASC

Several of the unions in
the British West Indies held
back for some time, before
transferring their allegiance to
the ICFTU, and most of the
Latin American Unions, not
helped by the Peronista_set-
up in the Argentine, found
themselves in a confused
state, and neither joined the
ICFTU nor kept up their
membership in the WFTU.
Into the confusion stepped a
minor “International” the
IFCTU (the International
Federation of Christian Trade
Unions) with its regional
counterpart CLASC to

complicate the issue.

ORIT & COL

The regional organization for
theA mericas of the ICFTU has its
headquarters in Mexico. and is
knov-n as ORIT. The affiliated sub-
organisation for the Caribbean Area
is the. Caribbean Congress of La-
bour, with its offices. in Port-of-
Spain Trinidad. CLASC has re~
cently been attacking ORIT, and
the tenor of some of these attacks
can be measured by the tone of some

resolutions passed by the CLASC
Congress held receatly in Caracas,
Venezela. One starts off:

“WHEREAS: the Dominica
Republic his formed a pseudo-con-
gress provoked by mercenary agents
at the service of oligarchies, plucoc-
racies and impecialism which oppress
our people, and said pseudo-congress
sponsored ty ORIT,”

Marxist Terminology

The resolution thet. proceeds to d.n-
ounce orIT in further verhiage more
suitable to Moscow or Peiping. At
the same conference there was a
resolution on the Alliance for Pro-
gress ‘‘deptoring the formation of
an advisory Labor Committee’.

One wayor another it appears
that CLASC is playing the Com-
munise gaine, whether- intentionally
ornot — It has parported to cooperate
with ORIT, promised support for
certain lines of action etc, and then
done the opposite.

The publication of our front
page account of this unionist struggle
is bound to spark off conflicting
viewpoints We publish this week
a statement by Mr. Anthony Joseph
President of the Dominica Techni-
cal, Clerical and Commercial
Workers Union (affiliated to
IFCTU). We have also written
to ask for the views of the General
Secretary of the Caribbean Congress
of Labour and of a spokesman for
the British T.U,C, which will
be published when received.

Education Conference
September

The. Caribbean Congress _ of
~abour, which is holding its _ first
triennial ‘Congress in Kingston,
Jamaica in September now advises
that arrangements have been , made
for a Labour Education Conference
to be held immediately after the
Congress, that is from September
12—14 at the U. W. 1, Mona,
Dominica will be allocated one
official delegate and the CCL will
be responsible for the cost of accom-
dation during the conference.

The first day will be given over
to lectuzes, mataly. on Labour Educa-
tion. On the Friday there will be a
talk by Mr. B,B. Blackman on
the work of the CCL and another
on the work of the UWI in the
field of Labour, The afternoon
will be given over to discussion
groups and there will be a summing
up on the Saturday morning.

“We'll Beat Our
Own Drum’

Neither the pattern of Western
societies nor that of Communist
countries 1s exactly suited to Africa,
declared Uganda Prime Minister
Milton Obote in America recently.

“In any case, as the peoples of
Africa belatedly march forth into
the sunlight of freedom, we would
have it known that it is to the beat
of our own drum that we intend to
march”’.

——————————<

Advertisers Are
Asked To Submit
Copy . By Noon
On Wednesdays



DOMINICA HERALD |,



Market Analyst
Here

Firse fruits of Dominica’s Asso-
ciatesip with CARIBO were evin-
ced when the Organisation’s Mar-
ket Analyse, Dr. Carel de Boer ar-
rived on Monday and consulted with
the Administrator, the Minister of
TVrade and Production and leading
exporters. Mr. de Boers was mostly
imerested in fruits and vegetables
which are valuable for intr: Car:b-
beam Trade to take the place of
imports from outside the area and
draw the Caribbean together econo-
mically, Besides the market for
perishable primary preducis, he was
also interested in the marketing of
processed food-products such as
grapefruit segments and fruit jusces.

The CARiBO expert’s report
will be part of a full survey of the
whole area of those countries within
the Caribbean Organisation.



Nuclear Testban
Talks Going Well

moscow CP:—British
and United States delegations
met with Soviet Foreign
Minister Andrei Gromyko
this week amid signs of
increasing optimism for
agreement ona formula to
outlaw all nuclear weapon
tests except undergror-

Tet imeentime

and Soviet delegates

yet another recess in tu.
Peace Talks, as Moscow and
Peking accused each other of
trying to break up the Com-
munist world: neither side
turned up at the meeting
place; apparently trying to
force each other to break off
the stalemated talks.

-— a —

Applications For
Liquor Licences

To the Magistrate District *G’
& the Super ntendent of Police
I, Aubrey S. Mc Quilkin now re-
siding at Portsmouth Parish of St.
John do hereby give you notice
that it is my intention to apply at
the Magistrate’s Court to be held ai
Portsmouth on Wednesday, the 2nd
day of October 1963 ensuing fora
wholesale LIQUUR LICENCE
in respect of my premises at Bay
Street Parish of St. John. Dated
the sth day of July 1963

A.S. MC QUILKIN

————

To the Magistrate District “G’’, &
the Chief of Police.

I, Fontinel Valentine, of Guillet,
in the Parish of St. John, do hereby
give you notice that it is my intention
to apply at the Magistrate’s Court,
to be held at Portsmouth, on Wed-
nesday, the 2nd day of October 1963,
ensuing fora RETAIL LIQUOR LI-~
CENCE, in respect of my premises,
situated at Guillet, Parish of St, John.

Dated the 26th day of June, 1963.

FoNTINEL VALENTINE
July 20—Aug. 3.



SATURDAY, JULY 27, 1963

Dominica Banana Growers Association
Banana Shipment of 19th July, 1963:













STEMS TONS

Roscau 27,455 ay $1
Portsmouth 29,787 372
Coast 2,687 32
$9,929 755

Exports Jan. 1-—july, 12 1,485,953 18,793
Total Exports to date G5$45,332 19,548
” Ex. to rath July, 1962 1,394,453 16,262
Increase 257,420 3,285,





OR 6 bea 6 8 6 9a 6 Rt 9 6 OPE Pee S BS Os Fe 6 OS be 6 9 6

THE ““VARIETY’’ STOR
C. G, PHILLIP & CO. LTD.

LATEST ARRIVALS:—

Refrigerators (all sizes and ai special!
prices), Household Deep Freezers a-d!
Ice Cream Freezers; Face Basins, Kitch-
en Sinks and Bath Room Fittings; Bahy;
Gribs and Door Mats; Glass (Plain andj
Frosted); Coffin furniture and Handles,

etc. etc. ; aha

emai ReneS Dan AS faa S Ee fA Pn S 9
6 Pe 3) Rae 5 De Fo ty 8 eS

+p

) tee 6 5 “ae-5 3:

aes:

mt 9 aS ee 5 6 6 6


Stocky Mickey Stewart, Surrey, was one of England’s
two new opening bats against the West Indies at Old
Trafford and the one English success.

. After blunting the pace of fast bowlers Hall and

Griffith, Stewart continued to score steadily. At 87, he
fell to the spin of Lance Gibbs and the ‘spectacular catch-
ing of wicketkeeper Murray.
SATURDAY, JULY 27, 1963



People’s Post Continued from page 4

excuse, regardless of how solid it ts, so
long as you failed to comp'y with the
order, next day you arc out of a job. Is
this not slavery? Mrs. Editor, I do
not want your reply. There might be
other workers who might be poorer
than me — all I want to see is that
they are protected, that they are se-
cuted in their jobs. May be it is
God who has turned the red light on
me so that, through this medium,
I could help those I left behind

Anyway, Iam out pow. While
I was in, I was never told anyching
about an emp'oyee’s union in Roszan,
A friend of mine. whom I spoke to
lately told nee of the union, and I re-
gret I did not know of it before, as
IT am of the opinion that it’s too late
tor me now to be defended.

You'll be surprised to kuow how
they can make you a member if you
don’t have the ready Membership
ee. Iam also assured that by he-
ing a member of the unton I would
have been better respected by even
the King on the job, and I would
have been able to work without any
fear of being k:cked out at any mo-
ment for no reason. So the union
becomes the right hand of the
emp.oyee and stands for his right
always. For the time being, just let
it be your personal affair.

Sincerely yours,
Ex EMPLOYEE

Coney Island

Madam,

May I-be‘allowed to say
that itis indeed disappointing to see
that the Government of Dominica
have been, much too . loosein’ their

“financial arrangements — witht the
Coney Island, in that no: attange-
ment were made: for Inland. Rev-
enue Inspectors or what have. you
to. witness'the checking of nightly
takes.

All that this government hopes
to collect is Income Tax and for
that purpose they will be bound to

‘accept whatever figures the Coney
Islanders” ‘give.

Rather than the Ministee of Fin:
ance wanting to throw his weight
around by ciimbing the Bingo Stand
to ‘protect the peoples’ money’
as he said, just to be curned down
in shame and humiliation before a
big crowd, he had better be more
ingenious in securing the tetritory’s
just share of revenue from the Coney
Island sweep. |

All-in-all I think they should
now be asked to show cause why
they should not leave Dominica



immediately, For cannot history be
repeated?

STAR LESTRADE,
18:7:63! Goodwill
Dear Sir,

As Sponsors of Bartley
Bros. Coney Island in Dominica,
I would like to comment on an
article by Sisserou and a letter each
by Star S. Lestrade and A. Freder-
ick Joseph in the local press.
SISSEROU : has perched on the
wrong tree and his or her allegation
of expulsion of Bartley Bros. Coney
Island from St. Vincent is incorrect
as this group has never been to St.
Vincentg
Bartley Bros. Corey Island has
been in the Cairbbean for the past
three years and has never experienced
any trouble with any Government
or its Tax Department, They have
played in Curagoa, Aruba, Trini-
dad (three times in seven different
locations,) Tobago, Barbados, Gren-

ada, St. Lucia, Martinique, Guade-
loupe. The Government of each
of these territories has expressed satis:
faction with Bartley Bros. shows
and extended a welcome to return
any time chey desire.

LESTRADE: It is shameful that from
a small and unimportant incident
that occured in the Bingo and in
the end was satisfactorily settled by a'l
concerned to no one’s embarrassment
that this writer should try to use it
as a pretext for his own personal
peliuical end.

The Chief Minister was never
turned down in shame and humili-
ation, as stated by Mr. Lestrade. In
fact Dominicans should feel proud
that a responsible member of the
Government as the C.M. during a
period of rest and relaxation should
show interest in our general welfare,

After Mr. Lestrade’s letter (prin-
ted above—Ed ) it was surprising to
most of the 1400. or
more persons present at
Coney Island on Saturday night
2oth instant (the night of the same
day of publication by the Chronicie
of his letter) he should be seen taking
part in the games which he had so
strongly condemned. So much for
His Worship.

MR. JOSEPH! With reference to his
statement regarding the lot of the
wotkers in Dominica Bottling
Plant I hardly believe that better
conditions. exist between Manage -
ment and Employees in any busi-
ness concern in this Island.

He knows fully well that Dom-
inica Bottling’ Plant: is enjoying
Pioneer Status which exempts them



Mr. Joseph seems to be unaware

that. Bartley Bros. Coney Island |

was sponsored in Barbados — by the
Jaycees with the same shows which
we are now enjoying in Dominica.

In summing up I would like to
say that in addition to the obvious
advertising advantages Coney Island
has meant to Dominica Bottling
Plant, there are three reasons why I
was instrumental in getting them in
Dominica:—

(1) The Jaycees would bene-

fit financially.

(2) The Dominica Cadet
Corps which was sorely in
need of funds all ot which

jGovernment could not
con:ribute for it. trip to
camp in Barbados would
benefit over and above
the amount required. It
is estimated that they
will enrich their funds
by well over $1,500.00.
Bartley Bros. committed
themselves to me before
they came to Dominica
fora Free ENTERTAIN.
MENT SHow for under
priviledged children
which will be financed
jointly between them and
Domin‘ca Bottling Plant.
Since Bartley Bros, Coney Island
has been in this Island, the manage-
ment has never ceased to express their
feelings of the wonderful reception
they are receiving here and it is
unfortunate that a few discontented
and misinformed people should try
to create unpleasantness for all during
their stay.

(3)

Thanking you for space,
GEORGE GABRIEL, Roseau,

Three hundred underprivileged

Children will be entertained this

afternoon free — Ed,
Cont, Page 9

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DOMINICA HERALD

PLAYERS et Rist AES Ws
1. Ten numbers will be called over Radio Caribbean

Unique Store, Fair-Deal, T. D. Shillingford’s Store, P. H, Williams & Co., Ursula Dominique (New
Town) Miss Marie Karam (Old Street), Bata Shoe Store,
James Bros. & Sons, Mrs. Vera Elie, (Pottersville) Mrs. Olive Cuffy, Rockaway and at other busi-
ness places to be announced over the local Station.

July 27, Aug. 3

a8 9 ab ae 6 9 Mie 6 Pee bp tS fh PP a SP PP PPP ARG owed PRS Seth eae SAS fs PS

‘Bing. Cards will be on sale at 25¢ tach in the fol-
lowing areas : Roseau, Massacre, Mahaut, St:Jo-

PAGE SEVEN

' THE DOMINICA JUNIOR CHAMBER OF COMMERCE |

takes pleasure in announcing its

RADIO BINGO

(Kindly sponsored by Messrs. Coca Cola International
and the Local Bottling Agents, Messrs. Jos. Gabriel)

STARTING 29th JULY, 1963

Proceeds towards 1) extending our Scholarship Programme

for the youth of the Island;
2) any other urgent or charitable cause |
for the welfare of the community and
island: and

3) operating the Chamber.

CONDITIONS AND RULES OF THE GAME

each afternoon at 5.30 and these will be posted'up at
the various selling points around the’ island for the~
benefit of players who may not have listenedin. ©”





seph, Layou, Salisbury, Coulibistrie, Colihaut, the
Northern district, Loubiere, Pointe Michel, Sou- °
friere, Grand Bay. These cards may be purchased
between Saturday and Wednesday following, and
ONE CARD CAN BE USED FOR ONE GAME ONLY.
The game will run from Monday to Friday, and
NO CARDS WILL BE SOLD AFTER WEDNESDAY
OF ANY WEEK.

Winners are asked to return their cards to the sell-
ers who will have them forwarded to us immedi-
ately for checking, or they may be handed in to
Mr. Carlton Peters, c-o. Dominica Dispensary Co.
Ltd., or Mr. Clifford Lewis, c-o. Dominica Electri-
city Services, Roseau.

Prizes will be awarded to the first four persons with
Bingo in the order of call. The Judges’ decision in
this connection is final.

We are hoping that with high participation, prizes
will become substantial. In the first instance, how-
ever, we are offering as follows : 1st, ..$10.00 and
1 case Coca-Cola, 2nd. ..$5.00 and 1 case Coca-Cola,
3rd. . . 2 cases Coca-Cola, 4th. .....1 case Coca-Cola.

Tickets can be obtained at the follawing: The Red Store, People’s Store, Fancy Store,

Coipel’s Palour, Marie Dechausay,

Lets all play Bingo -- play every game
Until we have fulfilled our aim !



—_

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woh pet ES
PaGE EIGHT





Advice‘ to the Public on Hurricane
Precautions
(from the Official Gazette)

BEFORE THE HURRIGANE SEASON:—

Make yourself acquaimed with the following system of warnings:—

The following signals will be made from Fort Young, in the case of
Roseau, and ftom tke Police Station, in the case of Portsmonth, in the
event of the probable approach of a hurricane or severe gales: -—-

CAUTIONARY SIGNAL

(when news is ceceived of an approaching hurricane )
ne gun or rocket will be tired at any time of the day or night, and
a ted flag having a black centre will be hoisted on the signal staff by day
and a red lantern by night.

DANGER SIGNAL

(warning to take cover)
Two guns or rockets will be fired in succession and two red flags
with black centres will be hoisted by day and two red lanterns by night.
When the signal is given, steps should at once be taken to secure
premises on shore and vessels in port against impending danger,

GANCELLING SIGNAL

On improvement of weather conditions after either the cautionary or
danger signals have been miade, and it is considered that the hurricane
has passed Dominica, a blue flag will be hoisted.

With regard to the rurai districts, the Police will be informed by
Headquartets and they in turn will promulgate the news throughout their
respective districts.

AFTER THE CAUTIONARY WARNING:—

Take cover in-as secure a shelter as possible.
in chutches, schools,‘and public buildings will be opened for

thosé“withing to, shelter in them.

| AF you go to shelter in any of these buildings take some food with was not interested in c 2
you.’ nd ey ed ‘ ; ___ing personal images, 1.
— heker:intavines + low lyimg areas that arelikely to flood." W i> “dialog ie wit!

~; Ifyou livein low lying cc tal areas shelter on higher ground further
inland, »» Thete will probably be very high seas.
»\ Dovnot leave:the shelter if there.is a. sudden lull; this may be the
centre of the hurricane and the wind will start up again very violently

from the opposite direction.
All fishing boats should be drawn up well above high water mark.

—_—_—

Hurricane Warnings And
Weather Reports

The following radio-stations heard in Dominica carry Hurricane
Warnings and Weather Reports as stated: —
WIBS, roSEAU, 1530 Kes.: on receipt and every hour on the half-hour.
WIBS, GRENADA, 9, 60 and 49 metre bands: on receipt, every hour on
the half-hour and in news.
WIVI, st. CROIX, 970 Kes : daily weather reports at 6.30 a.m., I..6/p.m
; 6.30 psm. and special emergency broadcasts.
Rapto TRINIDAD, 730 Kes.: hurricane warnings preceding news bulletins;
7, 8, tam. 12N, 2 p.m.
Rapio GuarpIAN, 610 Kes.: hurricane warnings preceding news bullet-
tins; 6, 7, 10, t2N, 2, 4.10, 6, 7, 9.15 and II p.m.



ec —_ ee

B.H. Talk -- Fair Results

The constitutional talks for the | (Hurricane Hattie, 1961), and he

advancement of the territory of |also said that the Minister should be -



British Honduras began in London
this month at the Colonial Office.
Attending were the leading politi-
cians of the now ruling party, the
People’s - United Party and two
invitees of the opposing patty (The
National Independence Party),

The Chairman at the talks was
The Under-Secretary of State for
the Colonie, Mr Nigel Fisher,
who opened the proceedings by
extending a very cordial welcome
to the delegates from B. H. In his
speech he paid tribute to the way
in which the country had risen
above its recent hurricane disaster,

proud of the way in which the
constitution had worked during the
the last three years.

According to a BIS release the
discussion of the proposals put for-
ward by the B. H. delegations for
constitutional amendments has pro-
gressed satisfactorily. Subjects of
discussion have been external affairs,

defence, the judiciary and a court of

appeal.

It has been agreed in Britain that
British Honduras will be granted
full internal self Government in
February 1964.

DOMINICA HERALD

U.W.I. Students

On W.I. Writers

“There is nothing common in
the work of West Indian Writers
except probably thar backgrceund,
they are all individualistic” stated
U.W.L. undergraduate Mz. Selwyn
Smith —- Vice-Presideut of the
U.W.]. Literary Society addressing
a meetung of the Dawbiney Lier-
ary Club on Thursday July r8th
“The Changing Mood of West In-
dian Literature.”

West Indian Literature he said,
“includes all novels or poems writ-
teh by West Indians wiether abour
the W.I. or not. Before J, Lam-
ming, E Mitelholzer, S. Selvon
and others there were writers trom
the West Indies bu these were eith-
ec Englishmen or men from other
nationaliues whose language and
style were not West-Indian-like.”

After stating that W.1. writers,
like politicians, were able to help in
the social upheavals of che ume, that
the W.1. novel has two functions to
perform namely to dramatize and to
give readers an eye to evaluate them-
selves, he said that the authors write
particularly of the peasant class and
are interested in colour.

He then read extracts from ‘‘Far
Cry from Africa’ (a poem) to
show the attitude language, and style
of cont.mporary posts.

Naipaul & Lamming

Commenting on the works of
some individuals he said Na |

throughout sume of his t
however, he is loosing WI. w.
and is laying claim to something in
style which cannot be cailed West
Indian. Mautclholzer has used sex
to make his novels marketable There
is a superabundance of sex in the
novels of George Lamming.

“"Who are the new names that
will carry on the work when the
present flock of writers has left the
scene? Before calling onthe media
of communication-Press, radio, to
Publicize the works of West In-
dian authors for there is nothing in
the books of these writers which the
children are not already aware of.”

The following poms were
brought forward in answer to ques-
tio. ftom Dawbin cs.

Most W.I. autuors write in Lon-
don because the W. Indian public
does not read their works because
the W.I. audicnce ts not critical of
their works to enable chem to better
their style-

Since many a W.I author de-
pends on his writing for his liveli-
hood he must introduce the set ele-
ment to give his work a popular
appeal,

A vote of thanks by A. Lazare
ended the meeting chaired by Club
Presidsnt W.A. Lawrence,

D.G.S, Present

Though it is popular opinion
that the Dominica Grammar School
is going through a crisis— staffing
problems, no books, no headmaster
and Minister Steven’s more often
than not unwarranted interference in
school activities-— ‘t was gratifying
to see that the D G.S. was the only
Secondary School represented at all
the lectures given by the U,W.I.
Students during the course of last
week.

iN

SATURDAY, JULY 27, 1963:

Criticism India Sends
Some of the iectures for example R. “White Tigers”

Cheltemliam’s ‘Cabinet System of
Govt. James Croal’s “Meaning |
Evo'tion’’ and Norma Francis **Fi- |
nancing of Economic Development”

Television and film cameras
whirred as two of the worlds rarest
animals artived at the zoological
gardens in Bristol. recently. The zoo
now clam to be the only one in the
world with a pair of white tigers.

They were bought from the Ma-
harajah of Rewa tor £7,0co (WI
$33,600) and flown to London from
India. They travelled by road to
Bristol -— just over 100 miles,

It is hoped that the tigers Cham-
pa and Chemeli, will produce cubs
in the next two years. (BIS)

~~ EDUCATIONAL NOTICE

General Certificate Of Education Of The Univer-
sity Of London, January 1964,
Applications to sit the January 1964 Examintion for the
General Certificate of Education (G.C.E.) of London Univer-
sity should reach the Educaticn Department not lazer than
7th. September, 19¢3. ;
2, Application should be accompanied by a Receipt for the
fees paid into the Treasury, as well as a Birth or Baptismal
Certificate,
3, Applicants who do not possess either a School Certi-
cate or a General Certificate of Education will be required
to take not fewer than four subjects of which English
Language must be one.
The fees are:
Advanced Level: (Entrance and Local fee included)
1 Subject $15.12
2 Subjects 23.52 ; ‘
Level: (Entrance and Local fee inc.uded)

were quite good while others such
as, R. Harris ‘‘Social revolution
after the Revolution” & S Smith’s
“Value of Literature” were not par-
ticularly impressive. However the
U.W IL. students did being the
University closer to the Dominican
public: The ten undergraduates left
Dominica on Saturday last.



Ordinary
1 Subject $10.08 .
~ ——2—Subjects ~~ 13.44
3 e 16,80 \
4 . 20.16
- 23.52

5
0. A. WALKER, Education Officer.
GO 74, July 27 .
[$4.00 $1.00 $1.00 $1.09 $1.00 $1.00 $1.00 $1.00/
ls THIS CERTIFICATE WORTH $]



i$ ONE DOLLAR $7
-§ WHEN USED TO PURCHASE ANY OF THE $:
(§ FOLLOWING:

$
$1.00 $1.00 $1.00 $1.00 $1.00 $1.00 $1.00 $)

100-bs Reps 8



Starter Pig grower
Grower Porkmaker
Layer Rabbit or Goat Petlets

Turkey Starter Cattle Feed

Intermediate scratch or Redular Scratch Grains
Ten All-Purpose Breed (US) Week-Old Chicks
Eight Kimber Leghorn week-old Pullet Chicks
Eiyht Harco Sex-Link week-old Pullet Chicks
Three Sylvania-Bred three-months-old Pullets
(All the above are debeaked disease-free)
Six Sylvania-Bred 3-week-old Ducklings
Four sylvania-Bred month-old Ducklings
Two Sylvania-Bred three-months old Hen Ducks.
(Ducklings debeaked. All Hardy, Healthy Stock.)
One fat, wormed, weaned six-week-old PIGLET.
FREE Ball-Point Pen to the First 100 Customers
Cashing in their Certificates. Free Pamphlet on |
Chick Feeding Program. Free Weight-Estimate Tapes
to all Piglet customers. Ask for your’s!
The above cash coupon good for one week from date
and must he presented at time of purchase, —

SYLVANIA POULTRY FARMS |
Imperial Road — Roseau -- tele: 224-5 rings
ac

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at Dart 9S 98 a 3 6 A 9a fa S 9S 9 ae 6 SaaS BS fa 8 8 lac 9S 5 ae $ 9 Ataf pe 9 8



{
I
(
(
(
|
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oA p-tine-0 beet 9 ot
SATURDAY, JULY 27, 1963

The Morals Of
Public Life

by Norman St. John-Stevas
tfrom “The Observer”)
Cont. from page 5

What of sexual standards of
morality? Higbly clevated standards
have never been imposed on British
public figures: it should not be
forgotten that % was Gladstone who
svid that he had known 13 Prime
M uisters and of these rt had been
adulterers. Yoday when Christan
standards in she com nunity have
been so deep'y eroded they can no
longer be imposed on men in public
life.

The most obvious symbol of

change is divorce. In the nine-
teenth century involvement in a
divorce action did = mean_ total
exclusion from Government. Par-

nell lost the leadership of the Irish
Party after being named as cosres-
pondent by Captrin O'Shea, even
though the O’Sheas had long been
separated. It was the divorce
which ruined him, not the adultery,
which had long been known to
Gladstone and others. Gladstone
had even sent messages to Parnell
co... Mrs. O'Shea.

Divorce

Today divorce has lost its stigma.
It continues to be condemned by
both'the Established and, Roman
Catholic Churches but: their view
has hecome a minority: one, the
majority of the country regarding



ot public. These ate only of legiti-
mate interest to the public when
they are connected with some other
matter of general interest, such as
security ‘nthe Profumo case, and
in these circumstances they can al-
ways be raised in Parliament under
the shisld of privilege. The Press is
then free under the same shield to
report the whole incident. To ex-
pect more ftom the Press would
expose sections of it to too great a
temotation. These matters can be
adequately and responsibly raised in
Parhament where an Opposition
party will always be on the look out
for any conduct prejudicial to the
State,

Have public standards of morality

suffered through the Profumo case?
‘There is no evidence that they have.
Indeed to some extent they have
been upheld by the instaat — resigna~
tion of Mr, Profumo after his con-
fession instead of attempting to
chng to office.
The morale of the Tory party has
sunk but that is not the same thing.
Being a non-doctrinaire party, Lores
expect more ftom their leaders: be-
ing the traditional governing party,
the pubsic expect a higher standard
from them than ftom their oppon-
ents. Mr. Macmuillan’s position 1s
unhappy but by no means desperate:
indecd he may come in for a certain
sympathy as the good man taken
in by a schemer.

In the country asa whole th:
Profumo revelatious have been grevt-
ed with more cynicism than indig-
nauon, Government popularity has
declined but there 1s little sign of
any desire fora root and. braach
moral reformation in English , hfe.



itas a regrettable necesity, Britain
has had a divorced Prime Minister
and divorced Ministers continue to
2 hold office. It 1s true that Sir

‘Anthony Eden’ was the ‘innocent —

party in his divorce suit but it
seem; probable that even if a
Minister were a guilty party he
would noc be automaiically debarred
from office. All would depend on
the circumstances of the case. A
campaign might be mounted against
him bute that would be a different
matter.

The ctwentieth-centuty public is
not unsympathetic to sexual weak-
ness which it recognises as universal
but it does expect its Ministers and
Members to sieer clear of the worst
sexual offences.

Press And Parliament

The next question is whether
adequate machinery exists to keep
politicians on the strait and narrow
path. In the present case the whole
matter was raised not by the Press
but in the Commons by _ three
Opposition members, Mr. Wigg,
Mr. Crossnzan and Mrs. Barbara
Castle, On March 22 came the
denial by Mr. Profumo and_ this
was followed by a successful libel
action against Paris Match on
April 4 and against Tempo Illus-
tratoon April to. The British
Press, aware of the power of the
iibel laws, played a comparatively
minor part in the affair.

Should these laws be relaxed in
order to enable the Press to act as
public watchdogs and hound delin-
quent public figures? The answet
* must surely be negative since it 1s no
part of the duty of the Press to spend
its time ferreting out the sexual
weaknesses of individuals, _ private

the absence of any very defined
moral views, outside of certain min-
ority groups, inthe county as a
whole.

Mr, Profumo's head has rolled
and (aftec he smut and sensat‘on of
Dr. Ward's trail bas died away)
interest in the whole case will rapidly
decline. I can see no evidence that
the Profumo incident will bea
turning-point in the moral life of
the nauon.

This would ‘hard y be possible in

$$$ $i —<_—__—_—_—
People’s Post from p. 7

Tax Junk Gars

Sir,
A beneficent government claims the

right to forbid anybody to park his &

car in the wrong place ‘or even to
do so overlong in any one place
which others may want to use,
Any infraction of the parking rules
is visited by a policeman with a uc-
ket. The ticket entitles the owner
to pay tax for prolonged and im-
moderate use of space in excess 0
a reasonable right,
only to young and active cars in the

full possession of their wheels and ;

other faculties; old and totally use-

less cars are privileged to be parked §f

anywhere without offenc: for an un
limited period.
ple raise a feeble pipe that automo~
biles in the last stages of decay ar¢
unsightly, but nobody takes much
notice if the patrivtic public regards
the entire island as a rubbish heap.
They are free—which means free to
be as disagreeable and offensive as
they choose to anybody alive.

I suggest that every abandoned
cat isentitled to a ticket requiring
the owner to pay a parking. fee of

But this refers

Occassionally peo-





a dollar per week. After a month
the fee might well increase autom-.
atically. We all own a share in every
landscape, road and beach — and
every wave upon it whether we have
personal use for itor net. 1 oping
that it isthe province of our Gov.
ernment to protect this right on be-
half of all.

There is no excuse whatever for
the slowly augmenting pest of dead
automobiles: ic is the owners’ business
to see that they are buried, or trea-
sured as heirlooms inthe family, In
short, ita simple matter to tax the
nvisance out of existence. 1
counted sixteen of hese indestruct'ble
mummies upon five miles of one of
our best roads which would pro-
bably owe at least fifty dollars each
under more vigilant legislation.

S.H.

———$ $$

Outlaw Sex
Parties!

Lonpon CP: English Member of
Parliament (labour) Arthur
Lewis said recently thar
he will press for legis'ation to out-
law promis:uous sex perties which
he says are a security tisk.



te

a

DOMINICA HERALD

Te
THEM ALL

RITISH PAINTS (CARIBBEAN) LIMITED
AVAILABLE AT THE FOLLOWING HARDWARE S)ORES.

PAGE NINE

SUNDAY SERVICES
AT ST. GEORGE’S CHURCH.
(Anglican) Roseau

7.00 a.m. Morning praycr (said)
7.30 a. m. Holy Communion
9.30 2. m. Solemn Mass and Sermon: Sunday
school in schoolroora
6.00 p. m. Bible Class
7.1§ p.m. Solemn Evensong, Sermon and
Devotions
Except on the second Sunday in the month
when the services are;—
g. 30 a.m. Morning prayer
7.15 p.m. Evening prayer
T... Hi. AICKS
Acting Rector





2 pane 6 pee 6 pa 6 Bare 6 BS BS BS PS PE Be 8 opt YE

ROSEAU CREDIT UNION
MOVED

To their own office building at 33 Gt. Marlborough
Street, on Ist July, 1963.
Business Hours as usual, Secure Yourself and

(family the Credit Union Way,
dJunes2 July 27

eae 6 9S 9 eS 9 tes PPS 9 Te 8 £9 Et $< £8 £6 fe 8 8 8

ea 5 9 StS pee Spe SE
See 9M 6 “Ray ) Pe 6 9S Pe ie





Nae
aS

a

READY MIXED
OIL PAINT

GENERAL PURPOSE
RUSSET

ONt Galton wine MEASURE

i i. :
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L. A. DUPIGNY Esq.,

J. W. EDWARDS

CG. G. PHILLIP & COMPANY
T. D. SHILLINGFORD
PaaGE TEN

es





alone

Children’s (Factual Test) Corner

Dear Boys and Girls,— A story is told of a ship sail-
ing off the mouth of the Amazon River which sent a
signal to a passing ship for help — she had run short of
water. Back came the reply “Drop your own buckets.”
The thirsty sailors were puzzled and wondered if their request was unacr-
steod. Back came the same reply “Drop your own buckets.” Uhey
did as they were told and to their amazement found that, though far out
at sea, they were actually sailing on fresh water brought down by the huge
Amazon River. |

We in Domynica are like the thirsty sailors, there are so many fruits
and vegetables around that we could make use of — either like the sailors
we do not realize it or else we prefer to spend money on less nutr.tious
foods.

Let us take one of our fruits ~- the pawpaw, You
Iearnt at school the value of fresh fruits --- some supply us wath mineral
salts, others with vitamins etc. (By the way some vitamins are sometimes
destroyed by overboiling.)

I shall tell you of a very delicious drink that can be made from the
pawpaw. Takea ripe pawpaw, peei it, remove seeds, add two cups of
water and crush. Strain, add more water to thin out, then add a un of
evaporated milk; sweeten to taste and serve with crushed ice. This juice
will not keep in the fridge for a long time as it thickens, so its best to use
it right away. A slice of a large pawpaw can give about six glasses of
pawpaw squash. Very small pawpaws which are not too good for eating
can be used for a squash too. Grown ups who do not care for the drink
made with milk, can use a squeeze of lime juice instead = With the lime
juice it is avery cooling drink on a hot day.

The pawpaw is also eaten green as a vegetable; a delicious candy 1
also made from the green ones.

Now try the drink especially on a hot day during the holidays when
you are very thirsty.

must have

Cherio till next _week. e fron
7 QUESTIONS :—-

Love from Auntie Fran.

(1) Where and what is the Amazon? ———-----—.-———

(2) Fruits belonging to the citrys family supply the body with
Vitamin C, which prevents scurvy and keeps the skin in a healthy con-

dition.. Name four grown locally?

(3) Drinks can be made from many cther local fruits —— name

three of them? (Do not





ist. Prizewiriner:
2nd pe
Consolation Prizes:

LAST: WEEK’S RESULTS
Rowena Roberts, W.H.S:
Augustus Lawrence, Roseau Senior Boys.

William Beilot, D.G.S,, Luke Prevost, Tech,

include citrus fruits) ——-——-- -—-—-—

Wing, and Jennifer Nicholas, St. Martin’s School (no third prize).

ANSWERS:
oats, codfish, potatoes, etc.

oo

--SPOR

1. Ottawa 2, Mr. Lester Pearson.

TLI

3. Flour, app les, cheese,



GHT--

BY EDDIE ROBINSON

At Las Vegas on Monday. Son-
ny Liston retained his World
Heavyweight Title when he knock-
ed out the Challenger Floyd Patter-
son in the first. round. It took Lis-
ton just 130 seconds to finish his
opponent. It was almost a carbon
copy of their fight last September.
Last week, I predicted that if Pat-
terson could keep out of trouble in
the early rounds, he had a chanee.
He decided to trade punches with
Liston in the first round and imme.
diately got nto trouble. Patterson
was floored twice for mandatory
counts of eight, but could not get
up a third time.

After the fight, Patterson told
reporters that he has no intention of
retiring from the ring,

§ Meanwhile, Cassius Clay has named
September 30 as the date on which
he would like to meet Liston. Lis-
ton has no objections so long as the
price is right, and there are no In-
come Tax. problems. Liston’s Man-
ager, however, would like a warm-
up fight before meeting Clay, which
means that we might have to wait



PRINTED AND PUBLISHED BY J, MAKGARTSON CHARLES, THE HERALD’S PRINTBRY, 31 NEW STREBT, ROSEAU, DOMINICA,

until next year to know if Liston
will ‘fall in eight’.

Good Start For W., I.
In Fourth Test

Sobers Scores Century

Both teams made one change
for the 4th Test which stated at
Headingley, Leeds on Thursday.
Bolus replaced Richardson for En-
gland, and McMorris replaced Carew
for West Indies. The West Indies
were off to a brisk start after winning
the toss. The wicket gave the bows
lers some assistance carly on, and
McMorris was lucky when he was
twice dropped in the slips by Barring-
ton, With the score at 28, McMor-
ris edged Shackleton and this time
Barrington made no mistake. McMor-
ris was out for 11. Kanhai joined
Hunte, but at 42, Hunte was
caught behind off Trueman for 22.
A brisk pactnership of 29 between
Kaphai and Butcher ended when
Butcher was caught behind off
Dexter for 23 and West Indies were

DOMINICA HBRALD



up against it with the score at 71
for 3, Aclunch they were 95 for 3
with Sobers and Kanhai together.
These «wo proceeded to consolidate
their team’s position and were — still
together at tea, Soon after the inter-
val, Kanhai was bowled by Lock
when he was just 3 short of his
cenzury. His partnership with Sobers
had put on 143 runs and put West
Indies back in the game. Solomon
and Sobers were then a:sociated ina
partnership of 73, Soon after reach-
ing his century, Sobers was caught
and bowled by Lock for 102. This
was his goth century in first class cric-
ket and the 1c7th ‘Test centu-y by
a West Indian. Murray joined Solo-
mon and at close of play the score
was, West Indies 294 for 5. Solo-
mon 39 not out, Murray 0 not out.

When Hunute had reached 20
earlier on, he became the first member
of the touring team to seach 1000
runs.

At close of play on Friday, the
score was West Indies all out 397.
and England 169 for 8: they need
z9 more runs to avoid the follow
on.



Guatemala
Breaks With
Britain
Guatemala on. Wedneeday broke
off diplomatic relations with Bri:-
ain “tin. protest. ‘at the ‘preposed
granting of full interna! self govern.
ment to British Honduras”. Guate-
mala has long claimed British Hin-
duras (which would al)- em
a Carribbean port) ar
lodged a claire wh!
said she would disc
H. constitutional conferem

Maid

Classified Advt.
SEMPERIT TYRES

an
TUBES IN STOCK
750 x 20
700 x 20
650 x 16
600 x 16
640 x 13
Very attractive prices
S.P. MUSSON, SON
& CO. LTD.
Corner Queen Mary &
King Geo. V Street
Roseau
July 27—

FOR SALE

One Ballahou Net
Good condition, No reason-

able Offer refused
Apply: :
Mrs. Perry Nicholas

Scotts Head,
July 27 Aug 3— 17

GALVANIZE! GALVANIZE!
GALVANIZE
Yes it is a Bargain
A very Good Bargain
Second hand Galvanize for sale

y
Thelma Lestrade
26 Rose St. Goodwill

Phone No 63,
July 27

AGENDA

(Continued from page 1)

hin and outside the region (T&T),
(iii) By sea outside the segton (B.G.),
(1v)Cost of handling mail.
Turspay, Juty 23 Sectlon IU
— LKeonomic and TechnicalAid:
The general question of Economic
and Technical Aid (1) United Na-
tions, (11) United Nations Survey of
the Caribbean, (i) Aid from U.K,,
U.S,A. and other sources,
WEDNESDAY, JULY 24 Section

LV — Immigration: (1) — The
Commonwealth {mmigration Bill

(J). (it) The establishment of Legal
Aid Service for West Indian Imm-
igrants (B), (iii) The admission of
Guianese and West Indians of Asi-
an origin into the United Staies of
America. (B.G), Secsion V --
Co-ord nation of efforis: Co-
ordination of efforts in the field of
external representation, (a) The field
of tourist promotion (T &T), (b)
Overseas publicity generally (BG).
University of the West Indies(T&1)

Tuurspay, Juty 25 Section V1
— Foreign Questions: United
Kingdom taxation and its effect on
investment in the West Indies (B).
Extra-territorial claims within the

SATURDAY, JULY 27, 1963

the region (B.G). Section VII
Other Matters including: Con-
tinuing arcangements for hitherto
unified currency laws (T&T). Fed-
eral Loan and Guarantee Fund.
Establishment of'a Caribbean Branch
of the Commonwealth Parliamentary
Asiociztion. The position of the
Civil Service in the Age of Indepen-

dence; (1) Leave (ii) Training.
The Conference of Heads of
Governments; Proposals for the

Future,



PORTUGAL EXPELLED FROM UNECA

By a heavy vote, largely
from the Afro-Asian bloc,
Portugal was on Wednesday
expelled from the United
Nations Economic Commis-
sion for Affica. Portugal,
under heavy fire for ‘‘colo-
nialism’ in its African
colonies of Guinea, Angola
and Mozambique has offercd
to allow three heads of Afri-
can States the privilege of
“on site inspection” so that
they may see for themselves
“that all races have equal

* for first child, £100 for second, £50 for third.

treatment in their African
Colonies.” :
a . L a
University Of The Wesi Indies

Applications are invited for the post of Publications Officer at the
newly established Institute of Education. . Applicants should be gradua-
tes of a recognized University. Duties will include supervising the pub-
lishing of text books and a journal, and, in the initial stages, an informa-
tion service and a library service. Duties to be assumed by October 1,
1963.

Salary scale equivalenr to thas..of —Leatnears—ore 35 >
£1,660 x 80 —£2,100, Ghild allowance (limited to three children) £150
F,S.S. U. Housing
allowance of 10% of salary, or, if available, unfurnished accommodation
will be let by the University at 10% of salary. Up to five full passages
on appointment, on normal termination’ and on study leave (once every
three years).

Detailed applications (six copies) giving full particulars of qualifica-
tions and experience, date of birth, and the nimes of three referees should
be sent by August 19, 1963 to the Registrar, University of the West
Indies, Kingston 7, Jamaica, from whom further particulars my be
obtained.

ee

University Of The West Indies

Applications are invited for the post of Administrative Assistant in
the newly established Institute of Education, A graduate ot a recognized
University will be preferred but consideration will be given to applications
from non-graduates. Duties to be assumed as soon as possible

Salary scales; Craduate — £750 x 50 — £1,050: Non-graduate
— £600 x $0 — £900,

Applications (6 copies) giving full particulsrs of qualifications and
experience, date of birth, and the names of three referees should be send by
August 19, 1963 to the Registrar, University of the West [ndies, Kingston
7, Jamaica, ftom whom further particulars may be obtained.

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NOTICE TO BANANA GROWERS
BANANA PRICES

Growers are informed that Geest Industries
have decided to maintain the Green Boat Price at
ie 5. O for a further week commencing 29th July,

The banana price will therefore remain un-
changed until further notice.

A. D BOYD
General Manager
DOMINICA BANANA GROWERS ASSOCIATION
25th July, 1963.

July 27
. co Ata 9a 9A a PS PS OAs OS AA PE Pa San 9S OR Pd
SATURDAY JULY 27, 1963

region (B G). Foreign Bases within

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