Citation
Dominica herald

Material Information

Title:
Dominica herald
Creator:
Allfrey, P. Shand ( Phyllis Shand ) ( Phyllis Shand Allfrey )
Place of Publication:
Roseau, Dominica
Publisher:
Dominica Herald
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 42 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Dominica -- Newspapers ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Dominica

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1955? Cf. caption.
General Note:
Editor, <1963-1964>: Phyllis Shand Allfrey.
General Note:
"For the General Welfare of the People of Dominica, the further advancement of the West Indies and the Caribbean Area as a whole."
General Note:
Description based on: Jan. 12, 1963; title from caption.
General Note:
Last issue consulted: December 31, 1964.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. This item may be protected by copyright but is made available here under a claim of fair use (17 U.S.C. §107) for non-profit research and educational purposes. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
82144654 ( OCLC )
2007229365 ( LCCN )
UF00102878_00027 ( sobekcm )

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Caribbean Newspapers, dLOC
University of Florida

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Full Text
FOR THE
sea EAST 78 STREEY
NEW






fl AEA
The Finest People

(For the General Wefatre of



A pereneny

ganica

2 Fiat) . Justitia,

the People of Den inica, t'e farther advancement of the West Indies and the Caribbean Areaas a



ESTABLISHED 1955

oo

SATURDAY, JULY 13, 1963



nic 2 *..

a.



The Richest Soit



PRICE Log



- GEORGE THOMSON M.P.



ASKS QUESTION ON PRESMONT

A Message From Calypsonian |
Sparrow

|

NE of the most brilliant younger Labour M.P.s in Bric-|
tain has questioned the reasons for John Presmont’s
deportation from Dominica and asked the Sectetary of
State for ‘he Colonies for a written reply. This means
that the question will not have to go ona waiting-list for
oral reply. Of late, we are informed, “colonial questions
seem to be reached very rarely”. As soon as we receive

a copy of Mr. Sandys’ answer, it will be published for
the.information of our readers.



Polio In Barbados

Over 50 cases of polimye-
listis were treated in Barbad-
os between June and July.
The Barbadian Minister of
Social Services had been crit-
icised for aot previously
conducting an immunization
campaign as has been done
in Trinidad and Jamaica.

Meanwhile Grenada has

Mr. Thomson is greatly visiting your island when he gone ahead with sapid-fire

interested in Dominica, and
many will recall his visit

returns home, and he would
like to assure you of his full

immunization of all young
children through the new or-

here after he touched down support towards your pro- 4) vaccine, administered by

in Trinidad on a Parlia-
mentary tour. In Trinidad
he held talks. with Mrs.
Allfrey. While in ‘this. 1s-
inde
the market place at a meet-
ing sponsored by the Lab-
our Party, of which she was
then President. He was
taken to see Vieille Case
and other points of interest
by Mr. LeBlanc. _
Thomson, born in Scots
land, was formerly editor
of a Socialist weekly journ-
al, and has travelled widely,
having made a_ coast-to-
coast tour of the United
States.

Supports Youth

“Sparrow”
Scheme

In the meantime, John
Presmont flies out of Dom-
inica towards U.S. shores
as these wordsare being
read. He was emotional
about his fate, and asked
the HERALD to thank all the
many people who had given
him kindness, understanding
and hospitality. Before
leaving, he had received a
letter from “S parrow”
(Calypso) Francisco’s Trini-
dad agent, part of which
read as follows:—

“Mr. Francisco has
asked me to convey through
this medium his sincere
thanks and appreciation f or
your efforts towards the for-
mation of a “Sparrow’s Vil-
lage.” He will be leaving
shortly on tour, but he will be

he -made*a speech. in

ject.”

’ The future of Sparrow Vil-
lage, as well as that of about
a dozen young Americans,
some'from Harvard “Uni
sity, who came to Dominica
through the instigation of
Mr. Presmont, is still an im-,
ponderable.

There is no confirmation
of the rumour that Church
and State combined to expel
Mr. Presmont because of his
convictions an d utterances.
The deportation _letter
written by the Ad-
ministration to the deported
American is printed belo-w.

“Governmert Office
John P. Presmont Esq.
Sir,
Tnave the honour to
refer to my letter A. 13-12
(II) of 24th October, 1962
enclosing a permit authoris-
ing you, your wife and
daughter to reside in the Co-
lony. Iam directed by His
Honour the Administrator
to inform you that the permit
is revoked as from Saturday
13th July, 1963.
I have the honour, to be Sir,
Your obedient servant,
L.A. ROBERTS
87/63 Chief Secretary

Expulsion Order

Besides the withdrawal of
Mr, Presmont’s permit an Expulsion
Order No. S.R.O 17 of 1963 was
gazetted on the eight of July 1963.
Citing the Undesirable Persons Ex~
pulsion Act (Cap. 79) as modified
by section 21 of the Deportation of
(British Subjects) Ordinance, 1941
(No. 6 of 1941), the Order states,
Cont. foot next of col.

mouth in the form of sweets.

Fire At The Fair

Great excitement (and there was
plenty around already) occurred on
Wednesday night when the bright
lights of the Fair in Lindo Park
were momentarily obscured by
smoke and flames from the gasoline

engine running the imposing
“Fertig Wheel” which dominates
the scene.

In answer to a call made by
Scout Commissioner Roy Royer
(that Scout was ‘prepared’), the
Fire Brigade were quickly on the
scene and put out the petrol fire
started by a battery’ spark — with.
water. The Fertis Wheel is
working again with a new — engine.

Socialists Elec-—
tion Successes

In two recent byelections the
British Labour Party showed its
increasing strength At West Brom-
wich the Socialist candidate was
returned with a greatly increased
majority despite a smaller overall vote.
At Deptford (the late Sir Leslie
Plummer’s former seat) the Party a-
gain increased its majority and the
Tory candidate took third place,

————
inter alia:

“2, EXPULSION. John Peltz

Presmont a person not born in

the Colony and a citizen of the

United States of America, at pre-

sent residing at Campbell in the

Parish of St. Paul, in the Colony

of Dominica, is hereby ordered to

leave the Colony on or before the
3th day of July, 1963, and there-
after to remain out of the said

Colony.

Made by che Administrator

this 8th day of July, 1963.

ADMINISTRATOR”

- Loan For Dominica _
Expensive Money

The Colonial Office announced in London on July
8 that underwriting in proceeding for loans of £435,000
(WI $2,088,00U); £405,000 (WI $1, 944,000), and
£315,000 (WI $1,512,000) being raised in London by
the Crown Agents on behalf of the governments of Dom-
‘M Sch ckan inica, St. Christopher-Nevis-
U.N. Secretar y Anguilla, and . St... Vincent
respectively, ‘for -financing
various development projects
in those territories...

General Sees
Pope :

His Holiness. Pope Paul .The loans > bei ng
this week received in aud- raised by the of “6 per.
ience Mr. U Thant, Sec.- ce tit. stor’ 1296, ata

Gen. of the United Nations: price of ”

(See U Thant’s . message to cent:

the Pope, p..9). We regret and c!
a t7. of the i, 5 .




AY UAW. a ‘

NOTE— a. financial’ cor=:
respondent writes’ “the terms
for the loan.are typical of
the exorbitant charges which
colonial territories. have to
pay — even for such a short
term loan. Similar loa ns
for English municipalities
would carry less than 4%%
interest rate of (instead 6$ %);
Io years instead of two and
would be discounted on
issue at 2% (at most) rather
than 5%.”

“Paul” and “Pope” in our vertised
publication of the message
$$

Secretary Of
State Sees For
Himself
- Trouble Continues
Mr. Duncan Sandys, Colonial
Secretary of State, now in British
Guiana to see for himself "and
listen,” will find a very much
exacerbated condition compared to
that of only a few short veeks ago

when his Undersecrtary, Mr. Nigel
Fisher, visited and reported.

U.S. Loan Refused

Since that time, the strike has
ended, yes -— partly duc to the
breath of sanity injected into the
affair by members of the British
T. U.C., particularly Mr. Robert
Willis, but many other events have
served to make the position more
difficult. Inthe first place, Pre
mier Jagan’s request for several
millions of dollars of U. S, aid has
been turned down ina letter from
President Kennedy delivered to
Chedd' Jagan on July 3,

A week ago, rioting in George-
town caused the Coldstream Guards
to fire into the crowds, kulling two
East Indians and wounding two
— six persons died that week, 25¢
were wounded and more than 50
arrested. The strike is reckoned to
have cost the country over seven
million dollars (WI),

Cuban Commerce
A. broadcast reported ftom Cuba
has stated that British Guiana have
signed a commercial agreement with

(Cont. on page 10)

———

PEOPLE IN THE NEWS

REGIONAL Director ILO ED-
WwarD Thompson paid Dominica a
two day official visi** pHitrp Sher-
lock, for many years Vice-Principal
of U.C.W.I. has been appointed
Vice-Chancellor of the U,W.I. in
succession to Prof Sir Arthur
Lewis* woo Public Health Ad-
ministration Doctor Phililp Boyd left
Wednesday after a three-day official
visit to his birth-place* HECTOR
Wynter, High Commissioner for
Jamaica took up his post in Trinti-
dad last week* yuLius Nyerere
President of Republic of Tangany.
ika will be guest: of President Ken»
nedy Monday* PRESIDENTIAL Mee
dals of Freedom given by Kennedy
to UN-man Ralph Bunche, singer
Marian Anderson, writer _Thotn-
ton Wilder, French statesman. Jeats
Monnet and cellist Pablo Casals—
among others*



a
Mi. PAGE TWO
i SI eens

LONDON LETTER
hy Graham. Norton
“A Change Of
Command?”

“Who? Who?” ync? croi-
ked the aged Wuke of Well-
ington when told the hst of
unknown nen who had been
selected to make upa Tory
ministry in the early years of
Queen Victoria’s reign. Lon-
don has been asking the
same question all week. But
it has not been for the same
cause. Immediately Mr.
Macmillan had been se vec—
only by sixty-nine — in the
Commons, a babble of pub-
lic discussion broke out as
to who was to succeed him.

‘} he candidates are already
Known to readers. They are
Mr. Reginald Maudling.
bern i917, an M. P. since
1645. He first became a full
M nister in 1955. His offices
hz\e been mainly Economic,
save fot nine months with
the Colonies. Mr. R.A, But-
ler, born 1902, entered. the

5
ww

Commer in 1929. Since
-becomi, Wnder-Secretary
for ind: 32 he has held
a wide of offices
incladir ' Home
Secreta! r of the

JExche¢ “er of
“the House o:-Commons.
Losd Hailsham was, as
Quentin Hogg, an M.P_ be-
tween 1938 and. 1950. A
minister in 1955, he has had

little departmental responsi.

bility, mostly holding the
offices of Lord Privy Seal
and President of the Coun-
cil

Mr. Heath, whose stock
was high earlier this year,
and Mr. Macleod are not
for the moment in the run-
ning, in spite of their experi-
ence aud ability, The news-
papers, feeling that their
enemy the Prime Minister
had now received the knock
out blow — the press acting
as a kind of collective Cass-
ius Clay — gleefully discuss-
ed the chances of the three
successors, and in just how
many days one of them
would be installed in the
Prime Méinister’s office.
There is however a sporting
chance that Mr. Macmillan
has saved himself on the
count of nine. The referees

have not yet made _ up their -

minds. Let us weigh up the
chances before we place our
sets.

When Mr. Macmillan left the

Zommon’s Chamber on the fateful ,
» fonday after the Profumo debate he ,

spked a shartered man. The next
_. ‘aye some of those Tories .who had
Bstained in’ the debate gave their
“tagons why they thought the Prime
Sinister must go Others, who had

” oted:. with'the government also,
. hen interviewed, said that the Pre-

ere pearance ee enter tert Nr n= =

patty, particularly the leader of this

not be used to throw Mr. Macmil-

DOMINICA HERALD

Besides, the difficulty of chosing
between the rwvals: for the leadership
made the M.P.s draw hack, Lord
Hailsham was in the Lords, and
hence not yet available. They also
recalled that his is a. strange, erratic
personality, more at home in the
eighteenth century than ourown,
There had beed a strong tide in
favour of Mr, Maudling, But was
this because he was the least known,
and about him could be whispered
the magic word ‘youth?’ His ex-
pe ence of office was also limitcd.
This could _ not be said of Mr
Builer, whose appetite for office is
uncqualled. It is rare for him to
hold a single portfolio — he is a
pluralist who thrives on overwork.
And he has hovered on the brink
of the Premiership for almost a de-
cade. Yet he is not liked. The
party wish for the Prem er’s early
retirement, strong after the debate,
has how subsided into a vague wish
which is being further undermined
by a great wave of sympathy for
hom inthe covntry. And, until
there is widespread agreement on
his successor, Mr. Macmillan will
remain. But, if he does go, of the
three considered in the running,
your correspondent would place his
money on Mr Buttler.

Non-Whites |
‘Should be
Co-opied’

By Guardian Reporter
(Britain)

Leadets of the non-white
eeintive wicrwscit Tait aretre

England should be co-opted to

mier should give way to a younger
man.

But Mr. Macmillan was already
out and about, He spoke crisply
and amusingly at the meeting organ.
ized by the Campaign for Educa-
tion, and then presided at a lunch-
econ at Admiralty House for a num=
ber of his back-bench M.P.s. This
had ben arranged some months
before— it now inchided men who
the previous night had refused to
vote for him. Meanwhile wo fig-
ures in the Conservative Party re-
vealed themselves as towers of
strength for the Prime Minister. The
first was the party’s joint chairman,
Lord Poole. A man in the deepest
confidence of the rank and file o
the Conservative Party, Lord
Poole’s speeches after the loss o
Parliamentary support kept Conserv-
ative supporters in good heart.

Next there rose up Major John
Morrison Chairman of what is
known as the 1922 Committee, to
which all Conservative M P.s. be-
long. Founded in 1922, it could
have an omnious ring fora Prime
Minister, for the first meeting of
what was to becoms today’s Com-
mittee toppled a Prime Minister and
the Conservtive Party leadership of
the time. But Major Morrison held
the line. Those who demanded
immediate resignation were gently
argued into moderation, Sir Derek
Walker-Smith, one of Mr, Macmil-
lan’s chief opponents on Common
Market policy spoke up for the
Premier. He warned the assembled
back-benchers that if Mr, Macmil-
lan were to resign immediately then,
in the event : of the Tory Party being
unable to agree on his successor thie
Queen might call on Mr. Wilron
to forma government. He would
undoubtedly . advise after a bri
interval, that Parliament be dissotv-
ed anda General Election would
follow, And so, slowly, in the
week that followed the debate, tem-
pers cooled.

Meanwhile, is was ‘‘business as
usual” at Admiralty House, and
the Prime Minister made it plain
that there were moore important
things than the love-life of a lady of
eisy virtue, He would be having
talks with President Kennedy on the
future nuclear defence policy of the
West. He had high hopes that the
forthcoming talks on nuclear-test ban
treaty in Moscow would meet with
success.

The great gusts of feeling inside
the parliamentary party began to be
modified in face to face contact with
the P. M., with Mr. Macleod and
Mr Redmayne and the others in the
drama. The newspapers, which had
been the sole (and_ sensationalist)
source of news for the M.P.s scattered
over the country and abroad for the
Whitsun recess were now replaced by
something more sober and reliable.

The Tory Party also began to re-
alise that its method of choosing its
leader — not, by a direct vote, but
rather waiting until one on whom the





the city council, suggests an

the “Journal,” the monthly
publication of the Birming-
ham Trades Council.

The author of the articles
Mr. John Darragh, points
out that the coloured com-
munities do not have a sin-
gle direct representative on
any of the c1y coun:il com-
‘mittees, “despite the fact
that many decisions have to
be taken in committees
which affect them vitally in
their daily lives.”

The non-white pep lation
had been blamed for almost
every social problem and ev.l
In the fields of housing
health, education, and wel-
fare, they have been discuss-
ed, dissected and dismember-
ed, ie said.

“Yet it does not seem to
have occurred to anyone that
one way of getting them to
adapt themselves to our way
of life would be to recognise
their presence here officially,
by co-opting some of their
leaders to the most important
council committees.”

In committee, their views
could;be heard and.they in

party, can rest its confidence Js
“evolved! — was one which could

fan over so quickly. For what, n-
deed, had the P.M. done to deserve
such a drastic dethronement? Ie
would indeed be an act of base in-
gratitude to the man who saved the
party from the wreck of Suez to say
this-government was over-thrown
on the word of a prostitute.

what problems they could
help to overcome.

ee te a nt tela at rt

the principal committees of

atticle in the 200th issue of

return could learn exactly

-and the: pro!

SATURDAY, JULY 13, 1963

Partial Deafness

A Handicap To Learning (By Evelyn Khan)

_BECAUSE. hearing plays’ such a vital role in Com-
munication with our fellows its social and economic im-
portance can well be realised. Aristotle held that all
learning occurs through hearing. For this reason, there-
fore, it was believed that the deaf were uneducatable. We
have come a long way since then and the education of the
deaf forms part ofthe educational system of nearly all
countries to a greater or lesser extent. Ifa deaf child fails
to acquire speech by reason of his handicap, the need for
special educational procedures are fairly well known and
schools for the deaf have expanded and increased accord-
ingly in many lands, though they are still insufficient.
What is not yet realised is the problem of the vast numbers
of partially deaf children, who are midway between the
normal and the profoundiy deaf, and have been relegated
into an obscure background on which very little light has
yet been thrown. Such children have varying degrees of
acoustic handicap. In most cases this loss is either not
noticed by the parent or, teacher or even if it is, the results
and effé¢ts are not known and the child continues to
suffer. At home and at school, because of his inability
to hear all sounds of speech at normal levels, he is very
often considered obstinate or stupid. Such a child often
repeats grades and generally falls behind others in all
achievements requiring hearing. It is little known that
even mild forms of deafness:affect the life of the individ-
ual. Usually such a child shows symptons of maladjust-
ment. He, developsian inferiority complex or be co mes
either introverted or.an aggressive bully. Often the child
does not know he is’ deaf and thinks he is stupid. A
boy of this type mentioned thatthe other. children in
school called im “mad.” It is a constant struggle for
him to hold his own in. conversation. Often it becomes
too great a strain andthe child gives up and becomes
miserable, loses all enthusiasm .and has feelings. of depress-_
ion, isolation and persecution. “At eminent psychologist
has said:—

‘No physical calamity, other than the obviously fatal
disease, provokes more despair, hoplessness, and. depression
than defective hearing. The sense of helplessness, due to
loss of power to communicate with others, causes actual
mental suffering, which added to the resulting isolation,
brings about depression that the psychiatrist recognises as
dangerous.”

The degree of defzctive hearing is not a constant
factor which might he'p in some sort of adjustment. It
fluctuates with the weather and condition of nose and
throat. This causes the fatigue, due to the strain of trying
to hear, which is common with such a child and has
nothing to do with any physical effort he puts forth, On
damp and cloudy days hearing acuity lessens resulting in
lack of interest or attention and gives rise toa great deal
of mental fatigue caused by the strain to hear at such
times. This creates a vicious circle leading to irritability,
restlessness and disintegration of personality. It is most
necessary, therefore, to know if a child hasa_ hearing loss.
however slight and to recognise these behaviour tendencies

as the results of an acoustic impairment.

Impaired hearing produces certain signs and symptoms which should
never be ignored or treated lightly. Some of these are listless and weary .
expression and frequent request for repetition. According to the degree
and onset there is sometimes mispronunciation of voice with words and
speech pecularities. Suspicion of such condition should be arcused if
there is continual failures in school, a tendercy to inattention, failure to
respond when questioned and desire to avoid people which leads to tru-
ancy. "It is also necessary to realise that slight deafness can be, and often
is, progressive leading to greater and greater loss of social and, perhaps,
economic efficiency.

It may be surpr'sing to learn that im America, Germany and ‘Russia
ithas been found that about 20 per cent of children in normal schools
have defective hearing not enough «o be obvious and warrant them going
to a school for the deaf but sufficient to cause failure of adjustunent, A

statement made by U.S, Public Health Service mentions that about 15

pet cent, or one in every six or.seven children, has some impairment of

heating. Ifa deaf child fails to aquire speech by reason of his handi-

cap, the need for'special educational procedures are fairly well-known and

schools for the deaf have expanded. - What is not yet realised - is the pro-

blem of the partially deaf children, who ‘are tnidway between the normal
foundly- deaf, Fram Social Welfare, India.



SATURDAY, JULY 13,

To Students —

The Borough Polytec-
hniz offers ‘courses to
sixth form leavers in Sci-
ence and technology n
the foou industry.

Food Science and Tec-
hnology is a_ relatively
new academic subject in
England Scientific con-
trol has becorne very im-
portant in food produc-
tion. The food industry
demands the knowledge
of the following scientific



subjects:— Chemist y,
Biochemistry, Botany,
Biol gy, Bacteriology,

Physics, Engineering, and
Statistics, in order to pro-
cess and preserve food.
Three department’s of
the Polytechic are con-
cerned with food; namely
the Division of Food
Scierce and Technology,
the Department of Cater-
ing and Hotel. Manage-
ment, and the Depart-
ment of Baker y and
Conft ctionery.
The Higher National
Diploma Course will. in-
terest ‘students: who ob-
lain one or two Advanc-

ed. Level subjects, but



‘fail to” gain “University
places... tink

There are full-time and
part-time courses of
study ‘available.

Anyone interested. in
these courses may get in
touch directly with the

The Secretary,
Division of Food
Science and

Technology,
Borough Polytec-
hnic.

Borough Road;
London S.E I,
ENGLAND.

POETS GORNER

Intellectual disgrace
Stares from every human
face.

WILLIAM BLAKE



\

oa C9
Se

190,

Fine Job, No Ott

Under the management’ and
supervision of Mr. E. Wyke a team
of P W.D. workers have transform=
edthe Tete Morne Road into a
veritible modern highway, as if by
magic. Wuhin en days the liege
trees which proudly over-hang the
road and the huge stone that stood
like unchallengeadie sentinels on the
roadside were hurled into the ravine
below The rough rgged surface
had melted into a smooth almost
level one and the steep inclines have
given way to gent ¢ rsings that offer
No more resistance to vehieles mov-
ing up-hill.

The natrow track that was the
place to a wide
Roseau
signifi-

old road has given
new road that make the
Grand Bay road sinks into
cance.

What is causing concern ‘s that

the villagers understand that there is
no likelhood that the road will be
oiled in’ a hurry. This road runs
down-h Il in.an area of hewy rain.
Can tarrish do the job ihat only
pitch will do? Can the taxpayers
and the Government aftord the
waste of allowing tarish to be wash-
ed away.
Let it be hope that a few thousand
dollars will be placed at the dispo-
sal of the road ‘builders to oil this
road. Then all will be well.

The Rain's Game and It.
Happened

_Finding the Alood- gates of heaven
widéiopen the rains came down
last week Wednesday in torrential
‘showers and carried away more than
half the tarrish that was cast‘on the
Tete Morne Road. The road sur-
face was tipped open at several
places and slides biocked the ' road
here and there. There is mud,
mud. mud!

This week saw a repetion of such
action hy heavy rain. The small
team of worker are busy trying to
construct drains in order to save the
road surface from virtual destruction.
The traxcavator which was away
all the while has only now returned
and everything possible is being done
to dump as much tarrish on the
road before too much damage is
done,

If only this road could be
“pitched”! How economical this
would be! We earnestly hope the
means will be found—and not only
Tete Morne but the whole island
will smile in relief
VILLAGER, Tete Morne



oe

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VURAL

Tete Morne Road Children’s (Factual Test) Corner Sale Of Fishing Launch

To whom much is given
Much is expected .

Dear Girls and Boys —- A few weeks ago I attended a_ variety
concert given by the young Christian Students at the St. Gerards Fall,
It was a very delight! concert which [enjoyed very much. but my
pleasure was mitred that evening by the bad behaviour of some young
boys who ho att:nded ths concert. The young lady is charze. I could
see, she was very much wort ed. At one stage, she appealec to their good
nature to behave themselves and to allow the show to continue so Chat
others could enjoy ‘t.

The surprising thing was that these boys were supposed to have come
from decent homes and had the advantage of secondary and
education,

The same kind of conduct was again exhibited by the simz type of
young people when His Honour the Administrator attended the Com-
monwealth Youth Sunday concert.

Very few grown-ups veniuie to attend a Cinema matinee show

Now girls and boys, let me assure you that we grown-ups were
children too, You will tell us that we are old fashioned and that you are
modern. Good decent behaviour can never be old-fashioned or modern.
Bad behaviour is bad behaviour at any ume or age.

rel g ovs

Now, I must be frank and put the blame on the parents, Maybe,
they are too modern and vour behaviour is the sesult.
To whom much is given, much 1s expected. It is your bounden

duty, to set a good example to those who have been less fortunate than
you.

I think the stress today is too much on academic resu'ts and not
enough on character training.

May be too, your parents can Jook around and see where they have
fai'ed you, A large comfortable home, good food. lots of pretty clothes
parties — these are not enough. There is the duty to implant good moral
traming The parent who neglects to do so will hive to account to God

ne day for this. omission,

Now, I hope that those guilty young people. will read this and
decide to correct their ways. Am I my brother's keeper?

expected to give others through your good example, the benefit of your’
advantage in education and social’ standing.

n President Entertains The Queen



The Queen, wearing a coral satin evening gown, stands w
of India, Prince Philip and Mr. Mohammedali Curcim Chagla,

in London, when the Royal couple were entertained to dinner
Commnissioner’s London residence. (BIS)

On Display at P.H. WILLIAMS & Co

en

CPR eS Rea BE fh 9a 9d Be S PN Bas PS pM Bia 8d pees PD Ps Pes PS

}

Yes, you - are’

At Lond




PAGE THREE



Applications are invited by the
Government of Dominica from
interested persons for the purchase,
either outright er on hire- purchase
terms, of the repossessed Fishery
Launch ‘ TUNA”,

The launch. bu Jc in 1960, is 22
f by rr ft., has a draught of 2h ft,
and is fitted with a Petter 10 Horse
pow 'r engine.

The launch may be inspected by
appointmeat wrh the — Fisheries
Offcer at the Marketing Depot.

Further particulars of the sale may
ke obtained fiom the Ministry of
Trade aad Production.

|. O 68 July 73.

POLICE NOTICE

Applications are invited for
entry in the Dominica Fire Service
as Volunteer Firemen. All appli-
cations should be addressed to the
Deputy Chief Fire Officer, Fire
Brigade Station, Roseau, and should
reach him not later than 22nd July,
1963.

Applicants should be between
21 and 28 years of age. They will
be requ‘red to satisfactorily pass med-
ical and educational examinations
and must produce testimony of good

_ character. ee,
60.69. tulv 13.;
K.I.M: FRANCIS ,:
. Ag. Caief of

Officer. ‘






ith President Radhakrishnan
Indian High Commissioner

by the President at the High

ORRIS 1100

s — head for the backwoods



i wefemse

Police & Chief Fire”



on Dinner,

(
i
|

ttn 8 Pal §


PAGE FOUR



31 New Street,
Published by 1. MARGARTSON CHARLES, Proprietor
PHYLLIS SHAND ALLFREY

Editor — Mrs.

U.K. & European Represen‘ative — Colin Turner (London) Ltd.
122, Shaftesbury Ave London W. 1,

Town $5.00 Country $6.00

\ Overseas (Surface Mail) $7.50

- ee SATURDAY, JULY 13, 1963

WHAT DO THEY STAND FOR?

Zeya

Annual Subscriptions :

HE witch-hunt is now over, and the
talkative American is on his way
out. That leaves us with a number of
unanswered questions, including the one
to be put in the House of Commons.
Omissions are, however, most revealing,

and zemind us of the famous lines:
Things that your paper never
prints:

It only mentions them in hints.

We would extend that, to —
Things that your radio never
States
Since it is subject to dictates. |

One of the questions remaining in the
forefront of our minds is, what does the
Domitiica Labour Party stand for? We
know what it was designed to stand for,
since the draftsman ‘of its aims and
objects is our editor. We also know
that’ the name Labour is used to cover a

ultitude ofatts tain and _ retain
power, asthis title is popular in the
Caribbean area. ;

We now declare that the Government
Party in this island is not a true Labour
Party at all in the British sense. Let us
give some reasons. The Ministers and
their. group are supposed to secure for
workers by hand or by brain the full
fruits of their industry, and they are not de-
ing so. We should like to have actual un-
employment and underemployment figures.
They favour monopoly rather than the “best

POOR BRITISH GUIANA

Our sympathy goes out to the people
of British Guiana who are racked by
internal dissensions almost amounting to
civil war. What began as an industrial
dispute has now become a national poli-
tical struggle. The saddest thing of all
is that two groups of people, most of
them very poor, who had survived as
fellow citizens the days of slavery and in-
dentured labour, are engaged in fratrici-
dal strife. Once again it has taken Bri-
tish troops to restore ord:r.

How different is this situation from the
great I. L. O. sessions in Geneva, when
delegates of Aftican and of Indian des-
cent join hands as friends and brothers to
oppose industrial and racial injustices!

We know what the root cause of the



Quote Of The Week

“You don’t have to go to Mars or Venus in search of adventure.
I’d rather die under palm-trees than on the planets.“ —
Sir Mortimer Wheeler, famous archaelogist.

DOMINIGA HERALD

INDEPENDENT WEEKLY

Roseau.



DOMINICA HEKALD S



be as sho.t as possible.

307 ished anonymously Views expressed

Tel.

Direct To Chron-
icle, Please

(The following remarks were
probably in:ended for — the
readership of the DOMIN-
ICA CHRONICLE.)

obtainable system of popular administra- re has been
tion or control.” They are pletged tO drawn to the Chronicle re-
unite the forces of labour within the terti- port of July 3rd ona meet-
tory, and what have they done about the ing of the Labour Party at
most important labour force —t ra de Potteisville, with particular
unionism? They are supposed to secure reference to the following
the return of Labour Party representa- taken from its quotations by
tives to local Government bodies, and the Chief Minister:—

what did they do just before the Town (a) ie Dominica ae
Council election? — Threw away their Go dr eater tara ae Be
chance by “expelling” a leader whom the (b) The “Roseau oa ss
people trusted. They are supposed to Gouncil was collecting $120,
subscribe wholeheartedly to the U.N. 000.00 yearly from City
Universal Declaration of Human Rights; dwellers which sum entitled
but they are a tight clique of local nation= them to a cleaner city with:
alists. Moreover, they are absolutely better roads”. __
committed to promoting skilled work- On poiat (a) whilst there
marship in all its forms and to stand for is enough to be said as t>
the encouragement of the creative arts and constitute a subject by itself,
of free and original thought and _ express- libata a y asl the
ion, yet they behave like repressive and disses © AQuOW IDR
unimaginative little men, ig of the fy On whose authiohity'ia
very word. Original Free

thought, however, has not yet become a js ominica to political Inde-
crime in’ Dominica. pendence? ‘

What happens when a political con- (2) When was the question
stitution is abused or used as a blanket to Of Independence ever a pub-
cover entirely different ee on pet eee ae oe en
tions? We think the honest thing for 2 ’
this Government to do would be é re- na recerve such a man-
write the aims and objects ofa party (3) ‘What has brought
constitution which is being debased, and about his sudden rejection
to call themselves by some other name. of the famous White Paper
Labour in this case is a misnomet. which he tried to bully the
people of this country to
accept and in consequence
of which attitude, his Gov-
ernment has incurred com-
munity-wide indignation !
struggle is: Premier Jagan is pro-Com- On point (b) I must point
munist and the Opposition is doing Out tbat Ministers of Gor
everything possible to unscat him. The eeae today, re much
presence in B. G. not only of Mr. Dun- cae ea a
can Sandys but of three great Union speech se 4 can.
leaders (including our old friend Walter “* oO, is seally Forced xo contesure
Hood of the T. U.C.) may h e 1 p to over the urgent necessity for the
cool down the enraged feelings of both Chief Minister to mature; because
sides. Itis our earnest hope that a ithe face ofall that the public
worthy compromise me be achieved in ee a ee
which the exacerbated hatred stirred up hice aris Roseau ea Council
between Negroes and East Indians may from the raising of funds to the wil-
gradually simmer down to tolerance, ful damage of the streets by their
Although we well understand she sei ope ia ape
ons, it is deeply sad to see people who ee ,
have had such a battle for bare existence puke ee oe
engaged in the shocking and brutal his government, irrespective of cir-
wastefulness of internecine war. cumstances or condition. criticises

amy aspect of the Town Council’s
ee ee activities.

For one more matter under (b)
since tbe Chief Minister is also the
Minister of ‘Finance, from which
latter knowledge he seems to expects
a thorough job to be done of bota
Sanitation and. Street Maintenance

reflect the policy of the Ed.tor or the Proprietor.

he committing the people of

ATURD ++, JULY 13, 1963



People’s Post

Correspondents are asked tc submit their full names and addresses a
a guarentee of good faith, but not necessarily for publication, Letters should
Controversial political letters will not ve pub-

in People’s Post do not. necessarily

from $120,000 per annum; now I in-
vite him to tell the responsible pub-
lic what sum of money wonld be
sufficient according to his ‘know-
ledge and experience in finance,’ to °
maintain the streets only, let alone
the Sanitation of Roseau, when as
this fact is so well knuwn that as
often as a patch is put in the streets
government bulldozers drive indis-
crimately to and fro, ripping the
whole of the streets surface again,
and thus causing high priced !abour
and materials to be gutted down the
destructive ‘gutters Labour.’

Finally I am also advised to
make two more observations from
the 2aid report.

(1) That the CHRONICLE teport-
ed the Thief Minister’s speech on
that occasion, (so late in his _pollti-
cal career) as having been his best,
can on'y be taken as its ardent long- *
ing, if not its total frustration, (and
here I am sympathetic) over not
having heard a good speech from
him.

(24 Unless the CHRONICLE has
included a colossal estimate of home
listencts in its attendance figure of
400, then that obvious misprint was
gtossly overstated; because several
observers estimates have placed the
‘attendance figure at a very maxi-
mum of too persous excluding plate
formites: and “that was during the
Ch ef Minicter’s address, which all
ageved was tlic \prak—of de -ancini= —
ance. :

It-has become very noticable too,
what ever the reason for this may
be, that. with the introduction of
the Minister For Social - Services at
any public meeting, the attendance
¢windles instantly and considerably,

STAR S, LESTRADE,



American
Solidarity

Madam,

I want to know how the
other Americans in Domin-
ica are feeling towards this
Presmont deporting. Do
they regard the man as their
brother or is he not in their
set?

If J met any Dominican in
the U.S. where I hope to go
someday. I would help him
lo anyway. First of a!l IL
would sreak up for bim. So
far we do not hear of any
American here speaking up
for John Presmont, bad or
good. Even the American
lady who writes for the Chro-
nicle keeps silent.

The British are not like
that. They make noise when
a brother, or even a prodi-
gal son is attacked. I am
glad to be British, while at
the same time feeling that
the treatment of Presmont
is not British Justice-

Yours respectfully
(Miss) A. JNo. BAPTISTE,
Virgin Lane
. (Cont. on page 6)

$y



PAGE FIVE
Le eeeesasiietsi: cocmpettOteeeraeeeemmememmeneaaaneiiat

PURE :

Superstitions tn Qur Midst by GORDON Part Il; (Cont. From last issue)
“Among the days, Christmas does not: escape blemish. When one man
said he saw all animals fall upon their knees in adoration another (in
quest of truth), went to the pen, disappeared tn the night, and was seen

no mote!
Although Shakespeare died early in the
unequalled works and his name remain immortal. Perhaps not least of

his glimpses are superstitions that dominated so many of his plays and
appealed so much to the Elizabethan court. One will recall how much
“love potions? help to develop the theme in “A Midsummer Nights
Dream.” Not long ago | heard of a compelling powder.
That versatile ever mysterious powder, placed near a morse! of food given
to the individual with whom one is in love, will cause the vict'm to dote
in profound and urcontrolable love and adoration for the giver whom he
or she may have hated before. One youngster tried it on a lady; bue it
wes the lady’s s'ster who ate the food. The result, was, we ee
guess whats... vothing! Ora lady would be charmed also, should
the man who loves her simply wipe her cheeks with his handkerchief, in
an end of which the head of a humming bird has been secretly tied.

It is seldom that an eclipse is observed in this country. When
one is neticeable, or even when the moon 1s encircled in a golden ring
effects of light and rays or the rotation of the earth cannot, will not enter
the minds of the majority. They sign themselves, making remark chat the
stin and moon are at war. It is believed that the sun always has won ta
the past; but some unfortunate day; which will be “da fin du monde’ the
moan shall win! Scentific proofs have no place in the minds of these folks.

A shooting star, gliding overhead, commands the Sign of the Cross
from all observers. It heralds the passing away of some -zesponsible
member of the commanity. My neighbour his an innocent child who
once pointed... “Look mummy!” full of upbraidings the mother
sculded the child, impressing on her the idea that she would be .alkative

seventeenth century, h's



DOMINICA HERALD









Travelling inland some time ago, the middle-aged
man who guided me stopped abrupuy when we nad
reached a certain plantation. He pointed out to me the
tall stem of a coconut palra. The top is gone and noth-
ing but the tail dry stem is left to tell the tale that once it
wasa plant. My guide told me an exiraordinary tale of
an old man who by obvah © asunted” his hand in szarch
of another who molested him. The time cam2 when he
should be dismounted, or he would die. He had not
sen his opponent. To save his own life the sole alterna
tive was to rush towards the nearest tree, 1n a manner no
less ruthless, no less relentless than if he had found
his enemy. With a roar he crashed his fist into the tree.
The coconut tree eventually died; but its stem remains to
outlive its murderer! I have been told, should miduight
ever catch me out of doors, I should leave the middle of
the road and walk on one side. Tne devils pass on their
missions. The king of night once stretch, one of his huse
legs on Fort Young, and the other he placed over the
Anglican Church. He crushed within his gianc heels
any unfortunate soul that went by during the periods of
the night he happered to be present.

Those men and women who lived and died in evil
aze supposed to return after death in the forms off ‘*zom-
bie” and “la jablesse”’ respectively. They appeat to
someone as a true and well-known friend: deceiving, Aogg=
ing, misleading, or maddening. Sometimes they appear
in any form. Thus a certain gentleman, it is related,

SATURUsA, Jub, 13, 1463

Livingstone Scores Brilliant
Century

Antigua born Danny Livingstone
hit a brilliant 51 for Hampshire
aga‘nst the Weot Indies on Wednes-
day.

Batting first on a rain affected
wicket, Hampshire started badly
losing 2 wickets for $s runs but
Livingstone and Horton (55) put on
a partnership of 16f in 166
minutes Livir.gstone’s innings was
the highest to date against the tourists
and included 2 sixes and 14 fours.
The latest score: --- Hampshire 329
and 22 for 4, West Indies 182.

Livingstone never played for
Antigua,, He mvgrated to Eng'and
immediately upon leaving school and
joined the Hampshire staff. This
fine yong batsman would almost
certainly be unheard of toduy had he
decided to stay in Antigua. There
are dozens of Livingstones in the.
small Islands now, who will never
be hea d of. Sad, but true.

Read
The HERALD .



{.r the vest of her exsistence.

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READY MIXED
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found himself struggling home, and fell unconscious on
he floor as he hauled the door open. He had a habit of
alking with his fiancee who lived over a mile away, for

Jlong hours every night. That night, it was raining and

ie hurried under a veranda for shelter. At the same time
little dog, wet and shivering with cold, also ran there
‘or shelter. The man glanced down and. saw the creature
vatching him fixedly in the face. The sharp ‘gaze\con-
inued and th: man, overwhelmed with fear, thought he
nust speak, or he must dit of fright. Heasked, ~Why
he’ devil are you looking at me so much?” The dog
eplied, ‘And why the devil are you yourself looking at »
aeso much?” 4
A certain Mahaut dweller is fond of drinking whenever he
‘as to quarrel. The liquor seems to give him power. to, blast.out
verything he has borne in his\mind for any’ period. One dark
ght towards the erd of ‘as year he was getting hom: in‘oxicated and
ursing; at was late and ali doors were shut. I heard him for somes
me Lut scoa fell asleep; an hour or’so later I was awakened by his

ry, ‘Let me go. let me go!’ Then Haily Mary full of grace
Laily Mary full of grace!”
Though he lives five miles from town, his story revealed’ in the

norning that a ‘‘la jablesse’” was rolling him down St. Aroment’s Cliff
ato the Roseau river. He prayed and prayed, for he soon was certain
hat someone wa: selling him to the cevil. Ac last after much struggling
ie found himself in the chick bushes that grow below his house, all
ruised weary and panting.

One recent Sunday a St. Joseph lad expressed grave doubts about
tie manner ty which Grenadian umpires arrived at their decisions,
especially in matches between visiting teams and their home team, and

eclared aloud, ‘ Should I ever represent the island”’ (note, he had never
eda bat before) *‘matters would be so arranged that when [ knock the
yall, Grenadian fieldsmen would see it falling upon them hke an
elephant!”

The sttperstitious mind is ruthless and unflagging in its treatment of
everyone and everything. So after you have langhed, or after you have
Firgiven anything in the subject which may have caused ycu annoyance,

ponder and judge, Farewell!
a

Students Tour
Coca Cola Firm

Essay Competition

On Monday 1st July at This entertainment of
9330 am. the Dominica school children forms part
Bottling Plant, (Coca Cola), of the Company’s advertis-
was visited by the girls of ing programme; every pupil
C.H.S. The girls of in the various schools will
W.H.S. visited on the be encouraged to take part in
oth. The visiting dates for an Essay Competition after-
the D. G. S. and S. M.A. (Cont. on page 6)

a
have not yet been arranged,
since these wl take place
after the summer holidays.
The Students will be enter-
tained while touring the
plant.



SOUR Mee ke tes





(Cont. from page 5) best essay in each school
wtll get yr0.00 worth of
books, a free case of Coca
Cola and novelties. Teach-
bers as well as pupils vil be
invited to the prizegivias.

wards on ‘My Visit to the
Dominica Bottling Plant.”
Winner of the best essay
in every class of the various
schools will get a free care
of Coca Cola; winner of the

wa wsebtty a

NMED ’ Shi



enriched with
vitamins A and D

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DOM I ibs



People’ s Post
(Contunued from page 4)

Co respondents are asked tc submit their full names and addresses a
a guarentee of rood faith, but nar nece svar ily for pubheation Letters should
be as short as poss‘ble Controversial political letters will not be pub-
ished avonymously Views expressed in’ People’s Post do not necessarily
leflect che policy of the dito or the Proprietor.

GONP RE) Pe anne Consideration is also ay pirently -
Hit headkine being given to what may be describ-

ed as partial payment, which would

Madan Eduer tend to give ihe pensioners further

Twas uckled with profound increase on a percentage vasis, i.e.

amusement after Faving read the front relating te salery his counterpart is at

page headline of the HERALD on the present in receipt of with bis cwn
6th instant; and I wish to assure retiring salary as a pensioner.

you that whenever I comemplate on I am,

it dur‘ng my leisure moments I Yours,

gleefully enjey at to my heart’s Atva A. Laronp, Roseau.
content.

: ? —_———
Well, well done! Like old man ~*

PAGE SIX

-Doctrove And.
_ Andre, Course at
xford

Mr. M.C. Doctrove, Statistical
Officer and Mr. F.E. André Act-
ing Public Relations Officer have
been selected to do 1963--64 Over
seas Service Course at Oxford Unie
veitity starting in September.

This is to be a new course which
replaces the “A’ and *B’ Courses
held in fermer years, and covers
many fields including Government,
Nicaral resources. and Economics.
CIS



r

i

Churchill, I daresay, the HERALD A Caution

can certain y take a and there ty no

m stake about it What cayest thou, To Foreign Visitors

fellow citizens? Can you beat that? If ae Speech is free and

i bviously, the Venerable Min's Don't discuss our Labour
ter cf Government is terribly wer-
ried over the fearless attitude of the

HERALD rowacéays, — because he If invited to a feast,

hearty,
Party;

Brush up on your catechism
And refrain from criticism,

. 7 > i ec !
realises the powerful impact of the aera eee Ge yee van Geest!
1 , ,
Press born at home and abroad. de d K€ a visitor who Hatters
Fe let TF can say on the matter nd ignores more serious matters:

is that an indenendent pr ss in the
Weth Deg’ of every country.

Even an interest in astronomy
Might harm cur delicate economy—

Eastcir (Disuice . Baton. All those wicked space—ships Hoating

Note 30 Extra copies were
ordered by another enthusiast in
Eastern District- -Ed.

Might influence the people's voting.
Some wouldn't mind your death at all
By burning in our carnival,

But helping homeless youngsters is

en A cause which might disturb the peace.
Come to our island fair and sunny

Kennedy Favou rs But shut your mouth and

bring big monet

Check- Off . If Ministers don’t like your. face

They have a law to meet the case:
Yet please don’t feel annoyed or thwarted
“President Kennedy has approved i --Only heroes get deported,

Arro'd S. Zander and GFSCME,
—atUnion dees cieck-of system farm, Sr

oe
President Kennedy late ie
month issued a directive’ to the U. N.. Sec S$ i t
Civil Sercive Commission fermitt- CG. oailites

ing federal’ agencies to withhold
Union dues from paychecks of Pope

employees who request it. The | ee
plan goes into effect on January tst. The following is the text

The CSC is preparing regulations ofa cable sent by Secretary
authorising the withholdings. It General U Thant to His

is meeting this month with repre- Holiness Pope Paul VI at
sentatives from the American the Vatican:

Federation sovernment - .

ederation cf Government Em- Oy the occasion of your
ployees and Government Agencies ae fe. ial :
to fee our labour management ¢levailon to the highest post-

sentiment. tion of the Roman Catho-

After the commission has heard lic Church, I wish to con-
all sides, it will settle down to vey to Your Holiness, in the
drafting the first set of proposed ¢ place, my respectful and

regulations authorising the system

Zander has personally urged top Most sincere congratulations.
Government officials to adopt the May I also add my fer-
system and AFSCME staff members vent hopes that during the
have participated in negotiations that term, of Your Holiness, the

led to the current presidential nable ideals ae Aida a

directive. di d
Thanking you for your valuable ignity, of peace an inter-

space, national understanding, so
Yours faithfully, eloquently stated by your

iF JOSE eminent predecessor in his

fe SER TDS oes Historical encyclical, Pacem
! in Terris, should find ful-

Wake Up, Domin- panic
ican Pensioners! ,

Sir, -— Of significant interest to the
pensioners of this country is the vety
heartening news from the Pension-

long last Her Majesty’s Government
(as a result of persistent representa-
tions) has accepted autematic res-
ponsibility for ir ceasing pensions as

Street, on 1st July, 1963,

amily the Credit Union Way.
Junei2 July 27°

HERALD Would be happy 10 prift’ this verse in “eit
ee of phases for oficial distrilsstion to. tourists ond
S. oN

swe S|
he



CCRCLE FRANCAIS

All members are
invited to 10 Cork
Street For Celebration
Of 14 July, 11 a.m. A



New Israel:
President --

Jerusalem (ANP)— _ Russian-
born Zalman Shazar |(73) one of
Israel’s pioneering settlers, 2 noted

writer and scholar, has been elected
the nation’s third president. Israel’s
firrt president was the late Dr.

Chaim Weizmann.
= _—: ideneay =



Advertise In
Tae HERALD

5 pratan 6 pena é eae 6 9 “Sea 6 eS pS pt S 9 ee 6 OE OS AS oe pS

“ROSEAU CREDIT UNION
MOVING

t
Y
Business Hours as usual. Seeure Yourself. “|

t

|
as Assoviation of London, that at To their own office building at 33 Gt. Marlborough

l

li

i

prescribed by} Act of 1962.

em 6 Bete 65 ae 6 fata 8 Sa 8 nS 8 a fA SS SSeS HF lS PALF eB tt 8 Pe



Hos

' i.e 7
yo 1,

_ IN THE CABINET

TOA?



HERALD

PEOPLE’S POST

(Continued from page 6)

By Phyllis Stand Allfrey

Game, Saw And
From Chapter II

Conquered,

Dear Mme. Editor,
So our English acting visi-
tors have come and gone,

On the evening after my clevation to Ministerial
status I came down in the hotel lift (those were the days
before Sese and her sewing machine arrived.) In the
outer lobby I met the Prime Minister. Straightaway I leaving everyone fecl!ng sa t-
noticed that he was wearing a new pair of shoes -~ a0 jgfied who was present at
easy observation, since we had in common a tendency to (he showing of Macbeth in
look shabby. _ Camera and many perhaps,

“Are you considering walking?” asked the Prime with a longing to be trained
Minister. actors themselves.

“Yes, Sir — I am considering it.” We can safely call the

“Then take a walk with me round the Savannah.” attenoance at St. Gerard's

r : ~ Hall last Saturday night the

It was an affectionate command. We fell into step down FechGe ite’ Wade AwaT vetace

the stone steps. At night the savannah looked as big as Se oe RP aE

i iebt c dals. The “? Yee

my natal island. I had on light black sanda schbolieachers anid: students

Prime Minister’s new shoes squeaked. .- tromcealbover ihe island there

All around the savannah people loitered, leaning jg the likelihood of repeats
against trees, sitting in couples on benchcs cating feiit’ and: in (hisedueational visit from

nuts. Now andthen someone stood to attention and Edgland.
called out to Sir Grantley. “Good night, my Lord.’ With this opportunity we
“They begin to recognise us,” he said modestly. have got nearer to. our

Etruscan or country gen- French neighbours who re-
tlefnan, would have been recognisable, whatever the colour ce've regular (yearly) visits
of the skin stretched over the excellent lines. But it was oy ee stage cee
when he spoke that the indifferent bystanders came to _ life ae Chesane 7 ee pea
with salutations. His accent was West Indian Wessex Livas-luckyte pare Pornte.
-Bajan. a-Pitre an open-air perfor-

_” We taiked of how the gentle people of the world mance ofa romantic play
ep themselves in literary murders, of English schoolboys, by these Euopean actors.
~the had been a student in England but I, despite my pale In the moonlitt recreation park,
skin, had never been a British schoolgirl) of cricket, “And Place La Victoire, a huge crowd
had I known vou despised cricket I’4 never have made you oe together while in the enclosure

“a Ministers Ab, ‘but my clectorate ensured that, Sir.” children and their téachers were, seat-
Then he came to the coconut vendors with their carts ed, a stage with premises had been
loaded with immense green nuts, We stopped, and an built ia the park; and the many ac-
Indian citizen of our new land hacked off the tip of the ‘ors and actresses who in ancient dress
coconut so that I might drink stra‘ght ftom the large green bas aoe oe ' sd
nut, not quite adroitly pouring che juice from a height into wivaciy: icine sed hel she ends
my month. “Not at this time of night, for me,” said the ience with eye and car.
Prim? Minister. The play had begua with a due

The route was long, circular, fascinating. Contains between two rival men -— a father
ed within its green acres was the race course and it grand- a es See
stand, the gamblers’ paradise, immense source of revenue 200) wos the bond beaver et
to government and lucky citizens. It was only as We the crowd — although in an open
approached the bright lights of the Hotel thet I noticed space. .
how the Prime Minister lagged, almost limping. I did not — Perhaps, in future, we here may
then realise how my leader had literal feet of clay, real clay, e Spas 2 aan the i
human flesh, liable to pain and trouble. We crossed to cravéllings Beiish ee dae
the vestibule. He took my hand at the lift. ah doube. theanl by these. Enelish

“Goodnight, my child.” gentlemen has been a conquest.
“Goodnight, Sir.” May CurisTIan, Morne Prosper.
He held the lift with a gesture to the attendant.
“Don’t call me Sir age , :
“T can’t help it. You are the only man I’ve really
enjoyed calling Sir.” improvem ents

He smiled his wily foxy smile and_ lifted a brown Jn North
hand in a deprecatory gesture. The lift doors squeezed
together. There were some American and Canadian
tourists in the hotel lobby. They had turned away their
eyes as we came up the steps, when we approached the
lift I heard a middle-aged lady murmur “disgusting”.

She looked disappointed when the lift swallowed up a
solitary bowec figure.

Baie ee

In any country his features,

a A

by Gustavus Timothy, J.P.
Safer Roads

I would like you once more to
allow mea little space in the col-
umns of your interesting, educative
informative and widely read newspa-
per inthis colony and also abroad; to



~~" ROSEAU CREDIT UNION.‘
MOVING |

To their own office building at 33 Gt. Marlborough j
Street, on 1st July, 1963,
Business Hours as usual.
jfamily the Credit Union Way.
Junez2 July 27

a ea 6 Fe 6 Pa 8 8 a8 Pa Ba 6 9

is at prescnt reinoved since the
bridge across the Hodges River has
or repaired and made safe for re-
gular transport by day as well as by
fight, especially during the weekly
cutting of our bananas to Long-
House-Porismouth, —

o> 6S “a t pet Ses pe ¢

Secure Yourself and!

let the Government know that the
great fear that was in the thoughts
for all motor drivers in che Northern
District of this Colony and around

The widening of the dangerous
angle near Mr. Azouz and an Mrs,
Etheline Josep’’s shop in Marigot
has brought gladness to the drivers
also; as it was a corner they were
continually in dread of and pas:eng-
ers they bad with them.

The population of the Northern
District and of the island as a whole
would like to ex'end their apprecia-
tion co Mr. V.H, Shillingford,
Director of Works, and his staff for
thinking of the protection and lives
of their fellowmen by the reecnt im-
provements they have dore
to the bridge and the above
mentioned cotner; and as Rome
was not built in a day; the works
has been done gives us the be-
lief that our Director of Works as
soon as funds are available shall
continue to widen more of the dan-
gerous corners of main roads in the
island which is calling for immed-
jate attention.

New Postal Agencies

Now my ‘Dear Editor’ I must
make reference to some of the gen-
eral improvements which are rapidly
spreading in various ways — the
mo:t important ‘one for time-being
is our Post Office department which
is under the efficient supervision of
our Colonial Post Master, Mr. N.
W. Royer who for the last ‘wo or
three years has established at least
twenty-one postal agencies in the is-
land which is a boon to the natives

ber-of-school who fromtime to time have had to

travel several miles in all weather to
post and also to receive their. mails.
I refer for the moment to the village
of Dos d’Ane where the last post
office has been recently established,
which is very good indeed! This
shows that Mr. Royer is not thinking
only of his people in Roseau but all
over the island for whom he is made
responsible so far as our mails are
concerned. We thank Mr, Royer
for the possibility in obtaining our
mails regularly.

Thanks To Officials

In concluding this article it gives
me great pleasure to say we who can
appreciate what is being done for
the improvement of this colony by
other officials who are serving in all
the offices very quietly, patiently ef-
ficiently, trustworthily and otherwise
are not forgotten by us, we are tak-
ing knowledge of your faithfulness
and your devotions to your duties and
in the future references to your share
of good works too.

Thanks to you Madam for the
space allowed to me.

a ne

l

PAGE SEVEN



MAGAZINE REVIEW
““DAWNLIT” -

Journal Of The Bawbiney
literary Club

We are very grateful to receive a
review copy of this interesting maga-
zine. It contains over 60 pages of
debatable and philcsovhic matter
and some verses as well as a short
story. We must be pardoned for
saying it is a socio-political forum
and not a literary journal at all in
our sense of the term.

Upon receiving it, we surned the
pages eagerly looking for treasures.
First we searched for a poetic flash
of genius: but the verses are Alat, and
ouly noteable for their conventional
harmlessness The gentleman who
‘“ouyed”’ modern poetry can never
have read Auden and Dylan Tho-
mas at their peak. His stuff is far
more cabbagey than theirs.

Next we looked for wit—but wit
and sauze are prokably too risqué for
a magazine of this sort: The. jokes
were all borrowed Lastly we look-
ed for style; but style, debating and
polemics do not go together.

On the other hand the. reporting
of debates in Dawalit is ofa high
standard, it is revealing—. about. ors
the characters of the contribut
and the kirid of subjects they are
interested in. Capitalism, Co-oper-
tives, Cuba; Democracy in under-
developed countries, local superstiv
tion and (from a _ prejudiced outside
contributor) an anti-A merican tirade,
maladjusted youth, the limited rol~

swoman—(who-ate-scen as typing
out literature and letters’ dictated ‘by
men); a moralistic Dialogue, Sefeney,.
the U.W.L aud Drink.

Mr, Lazare must be congratulat-
ed on the only _ piece of fiction in
the collection, and the editor on ex
ceilent general presentation. It is.a
good $1.00 worth of debatable
material, especially if you carry on
the debates at home where the pro-
tagonists left off. P.S.A.

Se

FOR SALE

Ford Consul No. 42
No reasonable offer refused

Apply:
DELSOL’S GROCERY
Jun? 29 July 6 20

|

One Vauxhall Car -- No. 1042
(In good running condition)
Price reasonable.
Apply: Campbell Phillip, Church
Street :
or Simeon Benjamin, Goodwill



>

Te EP SAS A FAR A A ae 6 Ee AG OT 6 Ae S Pa 6 a SS A

C.G. PHILLIP & Go. Ltd j

A Travel Ageney has been opened by us at!

PHILLIP’S TRAVEL AGENCY.

29 King George V Street, Roseau, ot

air travel will be available at this agency an
qwe shall book and procure any passages re-

| All assistance and information czenoy aa

quired by air.

| pouly 13 — 27

Phone No. 67 (2 rings).

OPS Daa SP ae 8 PR 8 Pe 8 Pa 8 Ftd BRS PS Oa SSE OE nn 6 Ped “et Ola



SATURGHs, JULY

13, 1963

PAGE EIGHT

i

English Actors Fascinate Audience

By our Drama Reporter

DOMINICA HEKALD |

- ec cera ———



On eee

POLICE NOTICE

The Inspector of Weights and Measures will attend at the ‘various District Police
Stations on the dates and time stated hereunder for the purpose of verifying all weights

measures, and weighing machines used in trade in each district of the Colony. .
’ ging To anvon e‘attending “Macbeth in Camera’ 145¢.

Saturday night, on? fact would have stood out clearly»

1963, from 9.00 a.m. to 1.00 p.m.
even before the preformers actually appeared on the stag®

porrsmoura Wednesday 24th) July
2,00 p.m. to 4.co p.m. each day

Thursday 25th) aad

VIELLE CASE Friday 26th July 1963, from 9.00 a.m. to 1.00 p.m. and that was, the spirit of appreciation displayed by the
CALIBISHIE. Saturday 27th "7? *”_—9,00 ara. f0 1.00 p.m. huge audience which filled. the St. Gerard’s Hall. Ther¢
MARIGOT Monday 29th)” — "9.00 a.m, to 1.00 p.m. can be absolutely no doubt after this attendance, that out




Tuesday 30th) and 2.co p.m, to 4.00 p.m. each day.
Wednesday 31st July 1963, from 9.00 a.m. to 12 noon

SALYBIA
to 12 noon and

CASTLE BRUCE Thursday tst Aug. 1963, from 9.00 a.m.
2.00 p.m. tO 4.00 p.m.

Friday 2nd Aug. 1963, from 9.00 a.m. to I2 noon and 2.09 p.m.

GRAND BAY
to 4.00 p.m.
LA PLAINE Tuesday 6th Aug. 1963, from 9.00 a.m. fo T.00 p.m.
DELICES Wednesday 7th ” -
ROSEAU Monday r2th)” “i 9,00 a.m, to 12 noon
Tuesday 13th) and 1.00 p.m. to 4.00 p.m. each day.
Wednesday 14th)
Thursday Isth)
SOUFRIERE Friday 16th Aug. 1963, from 9.00 a.m. to 1.00 p.m.
PTE. MICHEL Monday 19th ” ‘ : S 4
MAHAUT Tuesday 20th . . ‘ : :

ST. JOSEPH Wednesday 21st
SALISBURY / Friday 23rd
coLiHAuT Saturday 24th ”

ote: A suitable place in Lieu o
“ by the Inspector in charge prior to ot on the date and time fixed above.
K. I. M. FRANCIS

AG. CHIEF OF POLICE



f a police station will be selected at Castle Bruce people do indeed appreciate what is cultural and uplifting.,

Adults ranging from late teens to the near’ eighties
and scores of upper formers from both Primary and
Secondary Schools, began taking. their seats as. soon as the
doors were opened at 7.30 p.m. All eyes were glued on
the stage which, contrary to our local custom, had its
curtains drawn back; and'every member cf the audience
took a deep breath of pleased anticipation, when, after the

i) Sess

GO 70. July 13

See eaitnemerterstgt emanate prce Ponte we Duncan Sandys in
G@raNnt DUCK SALE j B. G. : or I \bour and .

Commonwealth Secte'ary Duncan Social Services the Shakespearean experts cameon
Sandys Aew to British’ Guiana on stage and began to demonstrate how they themselves had
Wednesday where 25,000 workers set about understanding and interpreting some of the most
went back to’wark on. Monday a difficult passages of Macbeth.
ee

Teal ck all Sandie ick a: Some members of the audience had suffered some-
make a fall assessment of the situation What ofa jolt on learning that they would vot see the

during his weeklong stay, meeting tragedy itself performed, but that the entertainment would

Premiec Cheddi Jagan, Governor take the shape of a ‘“‘dramatized lecture.” Mr. Harold

ot een ed a ee ect Lang and his colleagues were so vivid, so articulate and

leaders. Meanwhile about 70% o' :

die ealony’e worker. cearaed'te the 5° utterly witty that we were more than compensated for
that earlier feeling of disappointment.

jobs: bauxite workers and employees
of somecommercial firms are due The sixth of July will remain a Hallam wore modern sportwear yet
back within a week. However, the red-letter day for those who were they captured the imagination of
tensions bred of four months of fortunate enough to secure tickets their audience to such an extent,
bloody clashes between East Indians for that unforgettable performance. that while each new portrayal and
and coloured or African persons re- The audience was held spellbound each new rendering there came to the
mained high, particularly in Berbice by Mr, Lang’s masterful interpre- mind’s eye vision of those same act-
and the West Demerara regions. tstion of King Lear’s soliloquoy, ors dressed in the rich velvet and
Community leaders and newspapers and all over the hall could be heard satin garb of the characters being
have appealed for the ending of ra- gasps of surprise and admiration interpreted. ;
cial tensions and religicus leaders are when that same gentlemen “became” —_‘It was only fitting that we thank
organizing a campaign under which indeed and in truth Lady Macbeth the British Council for allowing us
moderates wear armbands bearing the herself! The two ‘‘assistants” gave this splendid opportunity, while
word “star” for “standing together usa clearer understanding of Mac- hoping this will be the first of
above race”. beth’s “inner duel”, and of the many similar opportunities for the
cultural advancement of our people.

W. L. Youth Trust 2o°pccgtics tn the Pogland
ind SS SS

two protagonists in the England
Fund Applications For

scene. Last but not least, Mr. Geo-
fftey Keir’s performance of a stiff
The D. T. U. collesting- j j
box amounting to $2. 17 is Liquor Licences
To the Magistrate District *G’

». Buy a pair= Get one Free
Low Low Prices
Three weeks old — $4.00 the bal
Six weeks old — $7.50 the pair
Ten weeks old — $10.00 the pair
For Limit d Time oly
Each pair you buy gets you Another
of the same age, absolutely Free
Get your's Now!

Once a year Sylvania makes you this
offer to reduce our stock, make room
for more ducks, Come and look over
the hundreds of ducklings we have to
choose from. Come early for the best

Or Hatch Your Own
Duck Hatching Eggs from our larger white-
feathered Muscovy ducks $2.00 per doz.

SYLVANIA POULTRY FARMS

Imperial Road — Roseau —- 224—5 Rings

69am 5 9a 6 9S oP et wh PCa 6 9 ta 6 fn 8S 9S PS mm 6 9a 6 9



oes 9- mete

verre iz:

Ran 6 Bae SFR Aa 8 pe 6 pe 6 pS pt 8 eo a pS pS

e

‘DOMINIGA” BANANA GROWERS ASSOCIATION
POST OF LEAF SPOT INSPECTOR

Applications are invited for the post of Leaf Spot ¢
Inspector:—- j
Salary: $960 per annum. *
Duties: Primarily, the supervision of spraying of!

OS 6 i 5 9 6 9 6 9 ee 9 ee 1

ips

English literature was a masterpiece
af charac er-acting.

necked, hidebound _ professor of
gratefully acknowledged by

Several other points left their im-

banana cultivations in the district tof

which the Inspector is assigned and the}

keeping of the prescribed records of;

_ Such spraying. l
Applications should he addressed to the General)
Manager, Dominica Banana Growers’ Association, Roseau,
ard. should reach this office by 12 noon on Saturday,
20th, July 1963, l
eet A.D. BOYD

General Manager

aS 9a 6 9a 5 9S 6 “Se 8 9S 5 pS 9 8 9 |

(uly 13

dt el a a i le i dc a Re

Read. |

& the Superintendent of Police
I, Aubrey S. Mc Quilkin now re-
siding at Portsmouth Parish of St.
John do hereby give you notice
that it is my intention to apply at
the Magistrate’s Court to be held ac
Portsmouth on Wednesday, the 2nd
day of October 1963 ensuing fora
wholesale LIQUWUR LICENCE
in respect of my premises at Bay
Street Paiish of St. John. Dated
the sth day of July 1963

A S, MC QUILKIN

ae a

the Fu:.d, and contributors
are thanked for their gift.
The AMATEUR RADIO
CLUB, Secretary Addison
Colaire, handed in a Youth
Trust Fund tin with collec-
tion from members amount-
ing to $4.13. This sum is
gratefully acknowledged.

pact on the audience and one was
the visible bond between the actors
at every moment of the performance.
Four actors each with his own part
cular style, his own peculiar way of
moving, and his own special tone
of voice and mode of speech all
showed a common love of careful
diction, precise action and above
all, complete dictatation to their
profession. Proof: of their expert
performance lies in the fact, that
while Messrs Lang, Amer and

The HERALD



SATURDAY, JULY 13, 1903 ©

Leader Of Opposition In Kenya
Government,



Mr. Ronald Ngala



Mr. Ronald Ngala, president ‘of the Kenya African Democratic
Union leads the Opposition in the Kenya Government, following the
defeat of his party in the recent elections, (BIS)

“$0 THEY SAY”-

BY BOB & RAY

One of our more respected citizens was saying the
ather day tht Dominicans are being held back hecanse of
two old laws: the tax of ircome law and the Customs
duty law. He said people are. chiding themselves for not
planting crops as profitably as they should, not moderniz-
ing the banana cultivations, for not having, more and bet-
ter roads, etc. etc, But these things, he say, are minor
when one compares the,arbitrary old income tax law and
the stiff Customs duty laws imrosed on the citizens of the
island. These two stupid laws, he claims, will continue
to hold back the island even if and when we double ban-
ana production, if and when we have broad highwavs all
about and if and when we plan cro.s cf rd beans, Irish po-
tatoes and other fuodstufis thal are now largely imported.

Citing as an example, he continued, that when a man
paints his shop or place of business to protect the wood
and metal surfaces from rot and rust, he is not allowed by
the silly old income tax law to charge the paint and labor
off to his cost doing business. No, this is a “capital im-
provement” and, under this out-dited law, no capital
improvement can be listed as an expense. If a man buys
a new fridge to put in his shop, this is paid for out of his
income, but still, tbe cost of the fridge (an improvement)
cannot be deducted as part of the cost of doing business.
Or jet the estate owner build a new road, for say $6,000-
on his place — no! this cannot be deducted from the in,
come of the estate. Letssay this same estate earns, profits
from the sale of bananas, $4,000. And the owner or
owners put in the road for $6,000. On the balance sheef
for his estate, then, there is a loss for the year of $2,000:
But not from he :tandpoint of the income tax law. Jt say.
the estate made $4,000.

Now here’s the point: if every time a man spends
hard-earned cash to better his business, make it bigger,
make it pay more, make it emp'oy more pecple .e.
every time he does this he cannot deduct this expense from
his overall income, well then, he cannot, will not, improve
or enlarge or expand. And THIS is what is holding
Dominica back!

If we take the case of Mr I. Will Work of Mahaut who earns
$10,000 a year from his banana cultivation, This man pays 50% o# the
income as tax. Now he has{$s,000 remaining. Suppose the follow buys
a Bedford truck for $5 000 (on which the government makes a cool



‘per year income tax!

DOMINICA PLURALD

$5,000 to government for income tax and he paid $4 000 for the truck
and $1,000 customs dity on it... $0 he’s broke! How.she yoing to
feed his family for a whole year? Well, the truth is, he can’t -— so he
doesn't buy the truck and government docsn’t get their - $1,000 | customs
duty .aor the duty on. ail the gosoline the truck will burn over the next
five years e'ther!) The island loses, the Dominican, Mr. Work, loses --
Mahant loses another truck (and a lot of people don’t get a free Vep to
town!). Loss, Loss, Loss! On account of a stupid, cut-dated, near-
sighted tax law. So sad our respected friend,

We looked around at other islands, other countries that seem to te
going ahead. What do they do about capital improvements? Well,
dear reader the governments of those prosperous places allow Jiberal tax
credits for improvements for, and its very simple, when a businessman
spends money to improve his business he’s going to do MORE _ business
and (nless he continues to expand forever) someday he'll pay a tax on a
much larger income. Dominican tax laws are a true case of killing the
goose before she can lay the golden egg. Should we modernize our
methods of ra'sing bananas? Certainly, But at the same time, we
should modernize our income tax laws—to encourage, not penalize the
man who is making capital improvements to this island...to himself
of course, but lets not be foolish e iouzh to think tat a dollar spent here
benefits only a few -— it benefits everyone, directly and indirectly. -

Deprecia.ion on a building in Roseau? Plenty of it. But unless it
“houses machiney” the income tax law does not allow a depreciation
allowance. Penalty for the man who owns the building, Why must we
penalize ourselves, hold onrselves back? We fight the mountainous
terrain, we fight the weather, we fight competition for our products from
other islands — so why fight each other, why hold ourselves back?

A certain employce in a certain bank said that if he lived in Gren-
ada and had the same income as he has here, he would pay $800 less
Our taxes are high, they are unjust, they don’t
make sense, they tax the source of all income, incentive.

A hotel owner from Martinique visited Dominica a short while ago.
He said he would have to pay an income tax last year of $128,000 .
think of it! Tax of $128,0co on his income. But, the chap said, his
Government will forgive any amount of this tax that is “ploughed back
in Martinique” so he spent, yes you guessed it, $128,000 improvement on
his business. He put in a new modern dining ronm, a-completely new
kitchen, bought six new cars to rent to his hotel guests and added ‘air
conditioning to all his publ:c rooms! The result will be MOREhusiness

. on wnich he will have to pay an even greater tax next year (unless
be spends it in improvements) but you get the point. The islands to the
south of us have leaped ahead year-after year and of course. the people
beuefit from the expenditures and then they, the-people pay more: taxes.

If the hotel!’ man had earned enough income in order to pay
$128 ono in trxes_on Dominica, hewould have been obliged 10 pay whe
full $128,000, “What then could he have done to improve his hote!?
Nothing. Precisely. The tax Jaw stagnates conditions. We don’t go
ahead, we go backward. But we need an income to pay government
salaries, they say, And more and more’ people ask: what about.a land
tax? Let a fair and just tax be placed on productive, tertile yet idle land.
This will raise the needed funds'to operate government—-- without hold-
ing back anyone— for if any person objects to paying a land tax, let
that person raise one stem of figs per acre and this would automatically
pay the tax! So they say.

Dominica Banana Growers Association
Banana Shipment of 5th Juiy, 1953:





STEMS TONS
Roseau 27,768 350
Portsmouth 31,889 396
Coast __ 3,036 37
62,693 783
Exports Jan. 1-—June, 28 1,365,152 17,291
Total Exports to date —,427,845 18,074
” Ex, to 21st June, 1962 1,283,876 14,990
Increase 143,969 | 3,084



Ford Foundation Grant ‘own, British Guiana, will te-
For U.W.I. ceive the 1963 Mergenthaler Award

The Ford Foundation’ ‘bas ane" recognition of meritorious pub-
nounced the grant of $230,000 to
the West Indics University’s Institute
of Social and Economic Researh.

This is partof a block grant
totalling $2,790,750 which the
Foundation has made for various
development programs in Latin
America, including projects in Ar-
gentina, Brazil, Chile, the Domini-
can Republic, Mexico, Venezuela
and the: West Indies. (USIS)

the Presy and fighting editorialt
against muzzling of the Press” at
the Inter-American Press Associa-
tion’s (IAPA) general meeting to
be held in Miami, Florida, Novem-
20—22, (USIS)



Hovertrucks

. Millbank, London — says:

lic service in behalf of freedom of

Crop-Spraying By




tractor operations — difficule.
* Built around anormal Land
Rover, the” hovettrnck” can carty
200 gallons of fertiliser and can op-
erate on seeded land until planes
are nine inches high. The spray is
a single boom at the rear and covers
a 30 fout path.

The air cushion on this British
product is provided by wo 25-inch
diameter fans, one mounted on each
side ot the vehicle which are pow-
ered by a three-litre Rover petrol
engine installed behind the cab.

The air cushion is contained
with'n a Aexible 10-inch rubber skirt
and lifts a one ton pay-load of liquid
fertiliser. me et a

The principle is that the air lift
takes three-quarters of load strain of
the entire vehicle, with ‘the driver
using normal steering wheel contre] —
to guide the machine lightly on its
toaa wheels down the crop rows at
about 10 miles an hour.

A to-acre field can be ‘sprayed
inone hour. The machine never
fully clears the ground as its road
wheels are used to guide it between
the rows. Crop damage is estimated
at less than o.1 per cent.

A statement by the manufactur-
ers — Vickers Armstrongs Ltd., of
“The
hovertrnck provides farmers, survey:
ots, civil engineers, building contrac-,
tors, military authorities and other.
vehicle operators . with improved. _
mobility over rough country, especit”
ally over wet and: water-logzed-
ground’. (BIS) at

Paul Pope To |
Continue Pope
John’s Lead
Pope Paul VI is reported
to have guaranteed the con-
tinuation of Christian unity
aims supported by Pope John
XXUL The Secretariat
for Christian unity. is headed.
by Augustin, Cardinal Bea..
When Cardinal Bea’ was:
approached during the init-
ial homage paid by Cardi-
nals to tke New Pope, it is
reported that Pope Paul said
the Secretariat’s work pleased



“him and he wanted, it con-

tinued. -Such endorsement
1s known inthe Vatican as
Papal Placei, (“it is pleas-
ing”) and isthe o ficial
stamp of approval. The
Secretariat is the Vatican’s
liason with other Christian
Churches.

No Interference In Politics

Pope Paul VI in his first
official audience told the
world that he would do
everything possible to con-
tribute to international peace
founded on truth, justice,
love and freedom. He
spoke to the nations’ leaders
and Governments at an aud-
ience inthe -Consistorial
Hall for Diplomatic Corps
accredited to the Vatican.
He pledged that. the Vatican

$1,000 Customs duty), Mr. Work cannot deduct the cost of his tuck Ppess Freedom Aweérd | cro “spraying hovertrucks have will not interfere in. ‘affairs

}

from his income, although his income purchased the teuckg But Mr
‘Work. buys the truck and is now broke, broke, broke... be paid

Henry Harper, Editor of the worked successfully over the past
DAILY CHRONICLE, George Six months in terrain which makes

ot interests deriving from
temporal powets.’aeCP.



_ .PAGE.TEN —



we SPORTLIGHT--
BY EDDIE ROBINSON

Trueman Hum-
bles Windies

Last Day Collapse

The West Indies Team is beyond
any doubt the most fascinating tn
the cricket world, They are always
ina burry. They hurry to victory,
they hurry to defeat When True-
man broke thtongh the powerful
West Indies batting on Tuesday, I
couldn’t help thinking of a similar
incident a few weeks ago: Iam
referring to the Dominica Team's
performance in Grenada recently,
The two performances are so similar
that I am forced to conclude that all
West Indies batsmen are helpless
‘against the swinging ball.

Head Down, Tail Up

Replying to England’s Ist innings

total of 216, West Indies were off It was his highest score in Test

1 a modest start, Hunte was bow!l-
ed by Trueman with the score at 42.
Kanhai stared quietly, but Carew
lived dangerously... He was out for
42 when ~ he: decided to hook,
changed his mind, and hit the ball
straight at the bowler. From then
on, there was a collapse which was
only pattially checked by Murray
and Hall. In Jess than an hour,
Kanhai (32) Butcher (ts) Solomon
(0) Sobers , (#9), and Worrell (1)

cool their heels in the:

pavilion, and the scorebuard “read 91 miserable runs~-Only~ Kanhai’s-

"130 for Ze NF ee ee
isa and Hall then. proceed-
ed to show their more famed _coll-
eagues how it should be done. They
put on 48 valaable runs before Halt
was caught off Dexter for 28. Mur-
ray ran’ short. of . partnership when
his score stood at 20, and West In-
dies were all out for 186. For
England Trueman captured § for 75
and Dexter 4 for 38.

England’s Bright Start

Batting a second time, England
started as though they meant busi-
ness. ‘The opening batsmen, Stew-
art and Richardson put op 30 in as
many munutes, but Richardson
was caught behind off Griffith for
14 and Barrington was bowled by
Sobers for 1. Close failed to repeat
his first innings performance. He
was caught off Griffith for 13.
Stewart was then caught behind for
27 and England were up against it
with the score at 69 for 4; and how
well Sharpe and Dexter stood up
against it! Dexter did the attacking,
while Sharpe defended well, but
never missing a scoring chance
when the loose ball came along.
Their partnership put up tor. This
was vintage cricket, and Dexter dis-
played all his strokes in front of the
wicket. He was out for a well p'ay-
ed 57... Murray bringing off a fine
piece of stumping on the leg side
off Gibbs.

- ‘Dexter Great?
At this: « stage, I would like

to relect'on Dexter the batsman,
With due respects to English critic,
tt



DOMINICA “HBRALD

RR TREES

Secretary Of
Siate

Cont. from paze |

Cuba in which B. G. supplies
45M tons of rice and 500,000
railway sleepers. It is not stated
what B. G will get in payment.

These points were mostly con-
tained in a statement in the House

of Commons made by Mr. Nigel

I say that Dexter is not a great
batsman. A. great batsman may
lose form and have a string of low
score, but he does no’ consistestly
pass fifty and ge: out. This has be.n
evinced in the last two. series that
Dexter has played. He failed to get
a century against Australia on the
last tour. In this present series, his Fisher this week in reply to a
scores show that he is in form, butis request by Mr Fenner Brockway,

ing c ation j en he
ee: cone oh Malaysia Federation
The new Federation of Malaysia
Lock, Bowler-Batsman will come into being on August
There was a collapse after Dexter’s 31 thisyear. The agreement was
dismissal From 170 for 5 they signed in London hast Monday by
slumped to 189 for 8. Parks (5) the Governmenis of Malaya, Singa-
Titmus (0) and Trueman (1) were pore, Sarawak and North Borneo,
all dismissed cheaply Lock then Brunei did not sign but it is hoped
joined Sharpe, and these two took that they will eventually join in
command. Worrell tried all his with the reset of the federal territorirs.
bowlers, failed to move the batsmen.
The 200 came up, then 250, When
at last Gibbs bowled Wock, the score
had reached 278, and Dexter de.
clared. Lock scored a chanceless 56.

French Studezts
Visits

A party of over a dozen students
from Martiniquan Lycees will visit
Dominica, accompanied by teachers,
on July17. They will be accomo-
dated in St. Mary’s Academy hostel,
and have expressed a wish to visit
the Mayor, the Botanical Gardens,
Rockaway, Soutriere and perhaps
the Fresh Water Lake and Carib
Reserve, showing slides of +Martini-
que to our students and, remaining in
Dominica for about. a week.
Leader of the party is Professor
Pierre Lucette, founder-president of
the now flourishing Caribbean
Friendship Club,

The visitors will travel by sp ecial
beat.

se es t 5
Minister’s Father
Dies

Mr. N.A.N. Thomas, father
of Mr, N.A.N. Ducreay, Hon
Minister of Trade and Production,
was taken seriously ill in Mahauc
and died on Friday last week. Mr.
Ducreay had renounced his father’s
surname some years ago.

NOTICE

Vacancy In Post Of
Housekeeper. Princess
Margaret Hospital.

Cricket and his partnershlp with
Sharpe put on 89 forthe 9th wick-
et. Sharpe showed that he has the
right temperament for the big game»
and was undefeated with 85.

For West Indies, Gibbs got 4 for
49, Griffith 3 for $5, and: Sobers
2 for 80.

Pathetic Windies

Set to get. 309 in 278 minutes,
the West Indies gave a pathetic dis-
play. They were brusked aside for

38 deserves any mention. Trueman
finished with 7 for 44 and match
figures of 12 for 119, the best. per-
formance of his career. Trneman has
now taken 275 wickets in Test Cric-
ket and now looks certain to reach
the target of 300. A great fast bow-
ler is Fred Trueman

England’s victory by 217 runs
has leveiled the series with two more
matches to be played.

The final scores: — England 216,
Close 55, Sobers 5. for 60 and 278
for 9 declared. Dexter $7, Sharpe
85 not out, Lock 56, Gibbs 4 for
49, Griffith 3 for 55. West Indies
186; Trueman 5 for 75, Dexter 4
for 38 and 91, Trueman 7 for 44.

Wesley vs. Calibishie

On Wednesday roth July 1963

a cricket match was played on the

Calibishie Govt. School ground

between Wesley and Calibishie

Schoolboys. They each took one ¢7 506.60 p.a. inthe scale $1,506

innings; Wesley made tos and y69 — $1,626 x 72 — $1,842.

Calibishhie 68, runs. At the end of The appointment is pensionable and

play they were served with tea and jg subject to Medical fitness and 2

then the visitors left for Wesley. years probation in the first
ag instance

3. The officer shall perform her

FOR SALE duties eile otis general super-

vision of the Matron.

JUST RECEIVED PITCH 4. Meals will be provided.

PINE BOARD Free quarters will be provided in

1X 6x 8-20 FT. TONGUED the Nurses Hostel. No allowance

& GROOVED ml Nea in iy t a

. Leave will be granted in

Tie i et AP HAN & GO. LTD. ita alone with General Orders of

6. Applic*tions for the post

DON’T DEPEND ON YOUR should be addressed to the Chief

NEIGHBOUR’S — BUY Secretary, Administrator's Office and

YOUR OWN DOMINICA should reach him not later than

2nd 4ugust, 1963.
HERALD! ! 1! GO 72 July 13, 20.

Applications are invited for the
post of Housekeeper, Princess
Margaret Hospital.

2. The salary of the post is





‘



Children’s Corner (Questions)
t
Trade passed in Parliamentz——-— ——- --—-——

SATURDAY, JULY 13, 1963
ee “res

(a) What year was the Bill for the abolition of the slave

(b) In August—— ——~— the bill for the Emancipation of

Slavery became Law;
2

You sometimes piay in Peebles Park. Who was th

3,
Peebles after whom the park was nimed? ———— -—————-—--

NAME — -—— —— — —— — — —
SCHOOL

LAST WEEK’S RESULTS

How many Bank Holidays do we have in Dominica?

is

Only Two children qualified for prizes in last week’s contest. They
are: — 1st Leona Shillingford, C.H.S; and 2nd Neville Nicholas, D,G-S.



————$______-

THE “‘VARIETY” STORE

C. G. PHILLIP & CO, LTD.
LATEST ARRIVALS:—



|
]

R
p

5 9» 6 8 Ce 6 ps6 6S 8 6 $e 8 9 8 pg

Q

C

Frosted); Coffin furniture and Handles,
etc. etc.

POP y 1 Oe 6 9 tate 6 OS Oe 6 ONS 9“ 6 OMe $e 5 8“ 6 §“Nne 6 ST 6 Of Pa i eS

ROSEAU CREDIT UNION

~~ peminds—-—
- ALL MEMBER about the 12th
ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING
to be held at St. Gerard’s Hall on
MONDAY NiGNT, 2znd July (this month)
beginning at 8 o’clock.
CASH PRIZES will be offered, and may be won

only by MEMBERS WHO ATTEND.
July 13, 20





Temp meet ee ees, emis

ae 6 9a 6 Be 6 eS 9 6 Pe 6 9 6 9 6 oe 6 9 6 9 6 et 9 6 8 oe ie

JUST RECEIVED
A LIMITED PAIRAGE OF
COW INEIN TA
“SURE SCORE”
FOOUBANV EL
BOOS

GALL IN EARLY AND SECURE YOURS

WHILE THEY LAST
i? eee —






a 6 9a 6 9 6 $5 fa 6 nS PS 9S 8 Se SSS Ye 6 Se eof Se 4 $a se i pe pt



on
Done 13-—

» n
Se 6 0 pt fae 8 tb 9d Pt 8 fo Be 6 9 Vb S OR eS Ot

|. PRINTED AND PUBLISHED BY J, MAGARTSON CHARLES, THE HERALD’S PRINFEBRY, 31 NEW STREBT, ROSBAU, DOMINICA, SATURDAY JULY 13, 1963

J).

|
!

6 Se 1 Re 6 9s

efrigerators (all sizes and at special!

rices), Household Deep Freezers a-d!
lce Cream Freezers: Face Basins, Kitch-;
n Sinks and Bath Room Fittings; Baby;
ribs and Door Mats; Glass (Plain andj

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Full Text


FOR THE
sea EAST 78 STREEY
NEW






fl AEA
The Finest People

(For the General Wefatre of



A pereneny

ganica

2 Fiat) . Justitia,

the People of Den inica, t'e farther advancement of the West Indies and the Caribbean Areaas a



ESTABLISHED 1955

oo

SATURDAY, JULY 13, 1963



nic 2 *..

a.



The Richest Soit



PRICE Log



- GEORGE THOMSON M.P.



ASKS QUESTION ON PRESMONT

A Message From Calypsonian |
Sparrow

|

NE of the most brilliant younger Labour M.P.s in Bric-|
tain has questioned the reasons for John Presmont’s
deportation from Dominica and asked the Sectetary of
State for ‘he Colonies for a written reply. This means
that the question will not have to go ona waiting-list for
oral reply. Of late, we are informed, “colonial questions
seem to be reached very rarely”. As soon as we receive

a copy of Mr. Sandys’ answer, it will be published for
the.information of our readers.



Polio In Barbados

Over 50 cases of polimye-
listis were treated in Barbad-
os between June and July.
The Barbadian Minister of
Social Services had been crit-
icised for aot previously
conducting an immunization
campaign as has been done
in Trinidad and Jamaica.

Meanwhile Grenada has

Mr. Thomson is greatly visiting your island when he gone ahead with sapid-fire

interested in Dominica, and
many will recall his visit

returns home, and he would
like to assure you of his full

immunization of all young
children through the new or-

here after he touched down support towards your pro- 4) vaccine, administered by

in Trinidad on a Parlia-
mentary tour. In Trinidad
he held talks. with Mrs.
Allfrey. While in ‘this. 1s-
inde
the market place at a meet-
ing sponsored by the Lab-
our Party, of which she was
then President. He was
taken to see Vieille Case
and other points of interest
by Mr. LeBlanc. _
Thomson, born in Scots
land, was formerly editor
of a Socialist weekly journ-
al, and has travelled widely,
having made a_ coast-to-
coast tour of the United
States.

Supports Youth

“Sparrow”
Scheme

In the meantime, John
Presmont flies out of Dom-
inica towards U.S. shores
as these wordsare being
read. He was emotional
about his fate, and asked
the HERALD to thank all the
many people who had given
him kindness, understanding
and hospitality. Before
leaving, he had received a
letter from “S parrow”
(Calypso) Francisco’s Trini-
dad agent, part of which
read as follows:—

“Mr. Francisco has
asked me to convey through
this medium his sincere
thanks and appreciation f or
your efforts towards the for-
mation of a “Sparrow’s Vil-
lage.” He will be leaving
shortly on tour, but he will be

he -made*a speech. in

ject.”

’ The future of Sparrow Vil-
lage, as well as that of about
a dozen young Americans,
some'from Harvard “Uni
sity, who came to Dominica
through the instigation of
Mr. Presmont, is still an im-,
ponderable.

There is no confirmation
of the rumour that Church
and State combined to expel
Mr. Presmont because of his
convictions an d utterances.
The deportation _letter
written by the Ad-
ministration to the deported
American is printed belo-w.

“Governmert Office
John P. Presmont Esq.
Sir,
Tnave the honour to
refer to my letter A. 13-12
(II) of 24th October, 1962
enclosing a permit authoris-
ing you, your wife and
daughter to reside in the Co-
lony. Iam directed by His
Honour the Administrator
to inform you that the permit
is revoked as from Saturday
13th July, 1963.
I have the honour, to be Sir,
Your obedient servant,
L.A. ROBERTS
87/63 Chief Secretary

Expulsion Order

Besides the withdrawal of
Mr, Presmont’s permit an Expulsion
Order No. S.R.O 17 of 1963 was
gazetted on the eight of July 1963.
Citing the Undesirable Persons Ex~
pulsion Act (Cap. 79) as modified
by section 21 of the Deportation of
(British Subjects) Ordinance, 1941
(No. 6 of 1941), the Order states,
Cont. foot next of col.

mouth in the form of sweets.

Fire At The Fair

Great excitement (and there was
plenty around already) occurred on
Wednesday night when the bright
lights of the Fair in Lindo Park
were momentarily obscured by
smoke and flames from the gasoline

engine running the imposing
“Fertig Wheel” which dominates
the scene.

In answer to a call made by
Scout Commissioner Roy Royer
(that Scout was ‘prepared’), the
Fire Brigade were quickly on the
scene and put out the petrol fire
started by a battery’ spark — with.
water. The Fertis Wheel is
working again with a new — engine.

Socialists Elec-—
tion Successes

In two recent byelections the
British Labour Party showed its
increasing strength At West Brom-
wich the Socialist candidate was
returned with a greatly increased
majority despite a smaller overall vote.
At Deptford (the late Sir Leslie
Plummer’s former seat) the Party a-
gain increased its majority and the
Tory candidate took third place,

————
inter alia:

“2, EXPULSION. John Peltz

Presmont a person not born in

the Colony and a citizen of the

United States of America, at pre-

sent residing at Campbell in the

Parish of St. Paul, in the Colony

of Dominica, is hereby ordered to

leave the Colony on or before the
3th day of July, 1963, and there-
after to remain out of the said

Colony.

Made by che Administrator

this 8th day of July, 1963.

ADMINISTRATOR”

- Loan For Dominica _
Expensive Money

The Colonial Office announced in London on July
8 that underwriting in proceeding for loans of £435,000
(WI $2,088,00U); £405,000 (WI $1, 944,000), and
£315,000 (WI $1,512,000) being raised in London by
the Crown Agents on behalf of the governments of Dom-
‘M Sch ckan inica, St. Christopher-Nevis-
U.N. Secretar y Anguilla, and . St... Vincent
respectively, ‘for -financing
various development projects
in those territories...

General Sees
Pope :

His Holiness. Pope Paul .The loans > bei ng
this week received in aud- raised by the of “6 per.
ience Mr. U Thant, Sec.- ce tit. stor’ 1296, ata

Gen. of the United Nations: price of ”

(See U Thant’s . message to cent:

the Pope, p..9). We regret and c!
a t7. of the i, 5 .




AY UAW. a ‘

NOTE— a. financial’ cor=:
respondent writes’ “the terms
for the loan.are typical of
the exorbitant charges which
colonial territories. have to
pay — even for such a short
term loan. Similar loa ns
for English municipalities
would carry less than 4%%
interest rate of (instead 6$ %);
Io years instead of two and
would be discounted on
issue at 2% (at most) rather
than 5%.”

“Paul” and “Pope” in our vertised
publication of the message
$$

Secretary Of
State Sees For
Himself
- Trouble Continues
Mr. Duncan Sandys, Colonial
Secretary of State, now in British
Guiana to see for himself "and
listen,” will find a very much
exacerbated condition compared to
that of only a few short veeks ago

when his Undersecrtary, Mr. Nigel
Fisher, visited and reported.

U.S. Loan Refused

Since that time, the strike has
ended, yes -— partly duc to the
breath of sanity injected into the
affair by members of the British
T. U.C., particularly Mr. Robert
Willis, but many other events have
served to make the position more
difficult. Inthe first place, Pre
mier Jagan’s request for several
millions of dollars of U. S, aid has
been turned down ina letter from
President Kennedy delivered to
Chedd' Jagan on July 3,

A week ago, rioting in George-
town caused the Coldstream Guards
to fire into the crowds, kulling two
East Indians and wounding two
— six persons died that week, 25¢
were wounded and more than 50
arrested. The strike is reckoned to
have cost the country over seven
million dollars (WI),

Cuban Commerce
A. broadcast reported ftom Cuba
has stated that British Guiana have
signed a commercial agreement with

(Cont. on page 10)

———

PEOPLE IN THE NEWS

REGIONAL Director ILO ED-
WwarD Thompson paid Dominica a
two day official visi** pHitrp Sher-
lock, for many years Vice-Principal
of U.C.W.I. has been appointed
Vice-Chancellor of the U,W.I. in
succession to Prof Sir Arthur
Lewis* woo Public Health Ad-
ministration Doctor Phililp Boyd left
Wednesday after a three-day official
visit to his birth-place* HECTOR
Wynter, High Commissioner for
Jamaica took up his post in Trinti-
dad last week* yuLius Nyerere
President of Republic of Tangany.
ika will be guest: of President Ken»
nedy Monday* PRESIDENTIAL Mee
dals of Freedom given by Kennedy
to UN-man Ralph Bunche, singer
Marian Anderson, writer _Thotn-
ton Wilder, French statesman. Jeats
Monnet and cellist Pablo Casals—
among others*
a
Mi. PAGE TWO
i SI eens

LONDON LETTER
hy Graham. Norton
“A Change Of
Command?”

“Who? Who?” ync? croi-
ked the aged Wuke of Well-
ington when told the hst of
unknown nen who had been
selected to make upa Tory
ministry in the early years of
Queen Victoria’s reign. Lon-
don has been asking the
same question all week. But
it has not been for the same
cause. Immediately Mr.
Macmillan had been se vec—
only by sixty-nine — in the
Commons, a babble of pub-
lic discussion broke out as
to who was to succeed him.

‘} he candidates are already
Known to readers. They are
Mr. Reginald Maudling.
bern i917, an M. P. since
1645. He first became a full
M nister in 1955. His offices
hz\e been mainly Economic,
save fot nine months with
the Colonies. Mr. R.A, But-
ler, born 1902, entered. the

5
ww

Commer in 1929. Since
-becomi, Wnder-Secretary
for ind: 32 he has held
a wide of offices
incladir ' Home
Secreta! r of the

JExche¢ “er of
“the House o:-Commons.
Losd Hailsham was, as
Quentin Hogg, an M.P_ be-
tween 1938 and. 1950. A
minister in 1955, he has had

little departmental responsi.

bility, mostly holding the
offices of Lord Privy Seal
and President of the Coun-
cil

Mr. Heath, whose stock
was high earlier this year,
and Mr. Macleod are not
for the moment in the run-
ning, in spite of their experi-
ence aud ability, The news-
papers, feeling that their
enemy the Prime Minister
had now received the knock
out blow — the press acting
as a kind of collective Cass-
ius Clay — gleefully discuss-
ed the chances of the three
successors, and in just how
many days one of them
would be installed in the
Prime Méinister’s office.
There is however a sporting
chance that Mr. Macmillan
has saved himself on the
count of nine. The referees

have not yet made _ up their -

minds. Let us weigh up the
chances before we place our
sets.

When Mr. Macmillan left the

Zommon’s Chamber on the fateful ,
» fonday after the Profumo debate he ,

spked a shartered man. The next
_. ‘aye some of those Tories .who had
Bstained in’ the debate gave their
“tagons why they thought the Prime
Sinister must go Others, who had

” oted:. with'the government also,
. hen interviewed, said that the Pre-

ere pearance ee enter tert Nr n= =

patty, particularly the leader of this

not be used to throw Mr. Macmil-

DOMINICA HERALD

Besides, the difficulty of chosing
between the rwvals: for the leadership
made the M.P.s draw hack, Lord
Hailsham was in the Lords, and
hence not yet available. They also
recalled that his is a. strange, erratic
personality, more at home in the
eighteenth century than ourown,
There had beed a strong tide in
favour of Mr, Maudling, But was
this because he was the least known,
and about him could be whispered
the magic word ‘youth?’ His ex-
pe ence of office was also limitcd.
This could _ not be said of Mr
Builer, whose appetite for office is
uncqualled. It is rare for him to
hold a single portfolio — he is a
pluralist who thrives on overwork.
And he has hovered on the brink
of the Premiership for almost a de-
cade. Yet he is not liked. The
party wish for the Prem er’s early
retirement, strong after the debate,
has how subsided into a vague wish
which is being further undermined
by a great wave of sympathy for
hom inthe covntry. And, until
there is widespread agreement on
his successor, Mr. Macmillan will
remain. But, if he does go, of the
three considered in the running,
your correspondent would place his
money on Mr Buttler.

Non-Whites |
‘Should be
Co-opied’

By Guardian Reporter
(Britain)

Leadets of the non-white
eeintive wicrwscit Tait aretre

England should be co-opted to

mier should give way to a younger
man.

But Mr. Macmillan was already
out and about, He spoke crisply
and amusingly at the meeting organ.
ized by the Campaign for Educa-
tion, and then presided at a lunch-
econ at Admiralty House for a num=
ber of his back-bench M.P.s. This
had ben arranged some months
before— it now inchided men who
the previous night had refused to
vote for him. Meanwhile wo fig-
ures in the Conservative Party re-
vealed themselves as towers of
strength for the Prime Minister. The
first was the party’s joint chairman,
Lord Poole. A man in the deepest
confidence of the rank and file o
the Conservative Party, Lord
Poole’s speeches after the loss o
Parliamentary support kept Conserv-
ative supporters in good heart.

Next there rose up Major John
Morrison Chairman of what is
known as the 1922 Committee, to
which all Conservative M P.s. be-
long. Founded in 1922, it could
have an omnious ring fora Prime
Minister, for the first meeting of
what was to becoms today’s Com-
mittee toppled a Prime Minister and
the Conservtive Party leadership of
the time. But Major Morrison held
the line. Those who demanded
immediate resignation were gently
argued into moderation, Sir Derek
Walker-Smith, one of Mr, Macmil-
lan’s chief opponents on Common
Market policy spoke up for the
Premier. He warned the assembled
back-benchers that if Mr, Macmil-
lan were to resign immediately then,
in the event : of the Tory Party being
unable to agree on his successor thie
Queen might call on Mr. Wilron
to forma government. He would
undoubtedly . advise after a bri
interval, that Parliament be dissotv-
ed anda General Election would
follow, And so, slowly, in the
week that followed the debate, tem-
pers cooled.

Meanwhile, is was ‘‘business as
usual” at Admiralty House, and
the Prime Minister made it plain
that there were moore important
things than the love-life of a lady of
eisy virtue, He would be having
talks with President Kennedy on the
future nuclear defence policy of the
West. He had high hopes that the
forthcoming talks on nuclear-test ban
treaty in Moscow would meet with
success.

The great gusts of feeling inside
the parliamentary party began to be
modified in face to face contact with
the P. M., with Mr. Macleod and
Mr Redmayne and the others in the
drama. The newspapers, which had
been the sole (and_ sensationalist)
source of news for the M.P.s scattered
over the country and abroad for the
Whitsun recess were now replaced by
something more sober and reliable.

The Tory Party also began to re-
alise that its method of choosing its
leader — not, by a direct vote, but
rather waiting until one on whom the





the city council, suggests an

the “Journal,” the monthly
publication of the Birming-
ham Trades Council.

The author of the articles
Mr. John Darragh, points
out that the coloured com-
munities do not have a sin-
gle direct representative on
any of the c1y coun:il com-
‘mittees, “despite the fact
that many decisions have to
be taken in committees
which affect them vitally in
their daily lives.”

The non-white pep lation
had been blamed for almost
every social problem and ev.l
In the fields of housing
health, education, and wel-
fare, they have been discuss-
ed, dissected and dismember-
ed, ie said.

“Yet it does not seem to
have occurred to anyone that
one way of getting them to
adapt themselves to our way
of life would be to recognise
their presence here officially,
by co-opting some of their
leaders to the most important
council committees.”

In committee, their views
could;be heard and.they in

party, can rest its confidence Js
“evolved! — was one which could

fan over so quickly. For what, n-
deed, had the P.M. done to deserve
such a drastic dethronement? Ie
would indeed be an act of base in-
gratitude to the man who saved the
party from the wreck of Suez to say
this-government was over-thrown
on the word of a prostitute.

what problems they could
help to overcome.

ee te a nt tela at rt

the principal committees of

atticle in the 200th issue of

return could learn exactly

-and the: pro!

SATURDAY, JULY 13, 1963

Partial Deafness

A Handicap To Learning (By Evelyn Khan)

_BECAUSE. hearing plays’ such a vital role in Com-
munication with our fellows its social and economic im-
portance can well be realised. Aristotle held that all
learning occurs through hearing. For this reason, there-
fore, it was believed that the deaf were uneducatable. We
have come a long way since then and the education of the
deaf forms part ofthe educational system of nearly all
countries to a greater or lesser extent. Ifa deaf child fails
to acquire speech by reason of his handicap, the need for
special educational procedures are fairly well known and
schools for the deaf have expanded and increased accord-
ingly in many lands, though they are still insufficient.
What is not yet realised is the problem of the vast numbers
of partially deaf children, who are midway between the
normal and the profoundiy deaf, and have been relegated
into an obscure background on which very little light has
yet been thrown. Such children have varying degrees of
acoustic handicap. In most cases this loss is either not
noticed by the parent or, teacher or even if it is, the results
and effé¢ts are not known and the child continues to
suffer. At home and at school, because of his inability
to hear all sounds of speech at normal levels, he is very
often considered obstinate or stupid. Such a child often
repeats grades and generally falls behind others in all
achievements requiring hearing. It is little known that
even mild forms of deafness:affect the life of the individ-
ual. Usually such a child shows symptons of maladjust-
ment. He, developsian inferiority complex or be co mes
either introverted or.an aggressive bully. Often the child
does not know he is’ deaf and thinks he is stupid. A
boy of this type mentioned thatthe other. children in
school called im “mad.” It is a constant struggle for
him to hold his own in. conversation. Often it becomes
too great a strain andthe child gives up and becomes
miserable, loses all enthusiasm .and has feelings. of depress-_
ion, isolation and persecution. “At eminent psychologist
has said:—

‘No physical calamity, other than the obviously fatal
disease, provokes more despair, hoplessness, and. depression
than defective hearing. The sense of helplessness, due to
loss of power to communicate with others, causes actual
mental suffering, which added to the resulting isolation,
brings about depression that the psychiatrist recognises as
dangerous.”

The degree of defzctive hearing is not a constant
factor which might he'p in some sort of adjustment. It
fluctuates with the weather and condition of nose and
throat. This causes the fatigue, due to the strain of trying
to hear, which is common with such a child and has
nothing to do with any physical effort he puts forth, On
damp and cloudy days hearing acuity lessens resulting in
lack of interest or attention and gives rise toa great deal
of mental fatigue caused by the strain to hear at such
times. This creates a vicious circle leading to irritability,
restlessness and disintegration of personality. It is most
necessary, therefore, to know if a child hasa_ hearing loss.
however slight and to recognise these behaviour tendencies

as the results of an acoustic impairment.

Impaired hearing produces certain signs and symptoms which should
never be ignored or treated lightly. Some of these are listless and weary .
expression and frequent request for repetition. According to the degree
and onset there is sometimes mispronunciation of voice with words and
speech pecularities. Suspicion of such condition should be arcused if
there is continual failures in school, a tendercy to inattention, failure to
respond when questioned and desire to avoid people which leads to tru-
ancy. "It is also necessary to realise that slight deafness can be, and often
is, progressive leading to greater and greater loss of social and, perhaps,
economic efficiency.

It may be surpr'sing to learn that im America, Germany and ‘Russia
ithas been found that about 20 per cent of children in normal schools
have defective hearing not enough «o be obvious and warrant them going
to a school for the deaf but sufficient to cause failure of adjustunent, A

statement made by U.S, Public Health Service mentions that about 15

pet cent, or one in every six or.seven children, has some impairment of

heating. Ifa deaf child fails to aquire speech by reason of his handi-

cap, the need for'special educational procedures are fairly well-known and

schools for the deaf have expanded. - What is not yet realised - is the pro-

blem of the partially deaf children, who ‘are tnidway between the normal
foundly- deaf, Fram Social Welfare, India.
SATURDAY, JULY 13,

To Students —

The Borough Polytec-
hniz offers ‘courses to
sixth form leavers in Sci-
ence and technology n
the foou industry.

Food Science and Tec-
hnology is a_ relatively
new academic subject in
England Scientific con-
trol has becorne very im-
portant in food produc-
tion. The food industry
demands the knowledge
of the following scientific



subjects:— Chemist y,
Biochemistry, Botany,
Biol gy, Bacteriology,

Physics, Engineering, and
Statistics, in order to pro-
cess and preserve food.
Three department’s of
the Polytechic are con-
cerned with food; namely
the Division of Food
Scierce and Technology,
the Department of Cater-
ing and Hotel. Manage-
ment, and the Depart-
ment of Baker y and
Conft ctionery.
The Higher National
Diploma Course will. in-
terest ‘students: who ob-
lain one or two Advanc-

ed. Level subjects, but



‘fail to” gain “University
places... tink

There are full-time and
part-time courses of
study ‘available.

Anyone interested. in
these courses may get in
touch directly with the

The Secretary,
Division of Food
Science and

Technology,
Borough Polytec-
hnic.

Borough Road;
London S.E I,
ENGLAND.

POETS GORNER

Intellectual disgrace
Stares from every human
face.

WILLIAM BLAKE



\

oa C9
Se

190,

Fine Job, No Ott

Under the management’ and
supervision of Mr. E. Wyke a team
of P W.D. workers have transform=
edthe Tete Morne Road into a
veritible modern highway, as if by
magic. Wuhin en days the liege
trees which proudly over-hang the
road and the huge stone that stood
like unchallengeadie sentinels on the
roadside were hurled into the ravine
below The rough rgged surface
had melted into a smooth almost
level one and the steep inclines have
given way to gent ¢ rsings that offer
No more resistance to vehieles mov-
ing up-hill.

The natrow track that was the
place to a wide
Roseau
signifi-

old road has given
new road that make the
Grand Bay road sinks into
cance.

What is causing concern ‘s that

the villagers understand that there is
no likelhood that the road will be
oiled in’ a hurry. This road runs
down-h Il in.an area of hewy rain.
Can tarrish do the job ihat only
pitch will do? Can the taxpayers
and the Government aftord the
waste of allowing tarish to be wash-
ed away.
Let it be hope that a few thousand
dollars will be placed at the dispo-
sal of the road ‘builders to oil this
road. Then all will be well.

The Rain's Game and It.
Happened

_Finding the Alood- gates of heaven
widéiopen the rains came down
last week Wednesday in torrential
‘showers and carried away more than
half the tarrish that was cast‘on the
Tete Morne Road. The road sur-
face was tipped open at several
places and slides biocked the ' road
here and there. There is mud,
mud. mud!

This week saw a repetion of such
action hy heavy rain. The small
team of worker are busy trying to
construct drains in order to save the
road surface from virtual destruction.
The traxcavator which was away
all the while has only now returned
and everything possible is being done
to dump as much tarrish on the
road before too much damage is
done,

If only this road could be
“pitched”! How economical this
would be! We earnestly hope the
means will be found—and not only
Tete Morne but the whole island
will smile in relief
VILLAGER, Tete Morne



oe

EVERY ROAD IS MOTOR-WAY SMOOTH IN THE M

Suddenly ... miraculcusly ... there are no bad roads —,no by-ways you'd rather dodge. Swing over the cobble
— the going is motorway-smooth in the new Morris 1100! With the most-advanced fluid suspension in the world, the Morris 1100

introduces an entirely new concept of smooth, level, and controlled riding .. . and it is reasonably priced.

Hae REESE
Peden |

VURAL

Tete Morne Road Children’s (Factual Test) Corner Sale Of Fishing Launch

To whom much is given
Much is expected .

Dear Girls and Boys —- A few weeks ago I attended a_ variety
concert given by the young Christian Students at the St. Gerards Fall,
It was a very delight! concert which [enjoyed very much. but my
pleasure was mitred that evening by the bad behaviour of some young
boys who ho att:nded ths concert. The young lady is charze. I could
see, she was very much wort ed. At one stage, she appealec to their good
nature to behave themselves and to allow the show to continue so Chat
others could enjoy ‘t.

The surprising thing was that these boys were supposed to have come
from decent homes and had the advantage of secondary and
education,

The same kind of conduct was again exhibited by the simz type of
young people when His Honour the Administrator attended the Com-
monwealth Youth Sunday concert.

Very few grown-ups veniuie to attend a Cinema matinee show

Now girls and boys, let me assure you that we grown-ups were
children too, You will tell us that we are old fashioned and that you are
modern. Good decent behaviour can never be old-fashioned or modern.
Bad behaviour is bad behaviour at any ume or age.

rel g ovs

Now, I must be frank and put the blame on the parents, Maybe,
they are too modern and vour behaviour is the sesult.
To whom much is given, much 1s expected. It is your bounden

duty, to set a good example to those who have been less fortunate than
you.

I think the stress today is too much on academic resu'ts and not
enough on character training.

May be too, your parents can Jook around and see where they have
fai'ed you, A large comfortable home, good food. lots of pretty clothes
parties — these are not enough. There is the duty to implant good moral
traming The parent who neglects to do so will hive to account to God

ne day for this. omission,

Now, I hope that those guilty young people. will read this and
decide to correct their ways. Am I my brother's keeper?

expected to give others through your good example, the benefit of your’
advantage in education and social’ standing.

n President Entertains The Queen



The Queen, wearing a coral satin evening gown, stands w
of India, Prince Philip and Mr. Mohammedali Curcim Chagla,

in London, when the Royal couple were entertained to dinner
Commnissioner’s London residence. (BIS)

On Display at P.H. WILLIAMS & Co

en

CPR eS Rea BE fh 9a 9d Be S PN Bas PS pM Bia 8d pees PD Ps Pes PS

}

Yes, you - are’

At Lond




PAGE THREE



Applications are invited by the
Government of Dominica from
interested persons for the purchase,
either outright er on hire- purchase
terms, of the repossessed Fishery
Launch ‘ TUNA”,

The launch. bu Jc in 1960, is 22
f by rr ft., has a draught of 2h ft,
and is fitted with a Petter 10 Horse
pow 'r engine.

The launch may be inspected by
appointmeat wrh the — Fisheries
Offcer at the Marketing Depot.

Further particulars of the sale may
ke obtained fiom the Ministry of
Trade aad Production.

|. O 68 July 73.

POLICE NOTICE

Applications are invited for
entry in the Dominica Fire Service
as Volunteer Firemen. All appli-
cations should be addressed to the
Deputy Chief Fire Officer, Fire
Brigade Station, Roseau, and should
reach him not later than 22nd July,
1963.

Applicants should be between
21 and 28 years of age. They will
be requ‘red to satisfactorily pass med-
ical and educational examinations
and must produce testimony of good

_ character. ee,
60.69. tulv 13.;
K.I.M: FRANCIS ,:
. Ag. Caief of

Officer. ‘






ith President Radhakrishnan
Indian High Commissioner

by the President at the High

ORRIS 1100

s — head for the backwoods



i wefemse

Police & Chief Fire”



on Dinner,

(
i
|

ttn 8 Pal § PAGE FOUR



31 New Street,
Published by 1. MARGARTSON CHARLES, Proprietor
PHYLLIS SHAND ALLFREY

Editor — Mrs.

U.K. & European Represen‘ative — Colin Turner (London) Ltd.
122, Shaftesbury Ave London W. 1,

Town $5.00 Country $6.00

\ Overseas (Surface Mail) $7.50

- ee SATURDAY, JULY 13, 1963

WHAT DO THEY STAND FOR?

Zeya

Annual Subscriptions :

HE witch-hunt is now over, and the
talkative American is on his way
out. That leaves us with a number of
unanswered questions, including the one
to be put in the House of Commons.
Omissions are, however, most revealing,

and zemind us of the famous lines:
Things that your paper never
prints:

It only mentions them in hints.

We would extend that, to —
Things that your radio never
States
Since it is subject to dictates. |

One of the questions remaining in the
forefront of our minds is, what does the
Domitiica Labour Party stand for? We
know what it was designed to stand for,
since the draftsman ‘of its aims and
objects is our editor. We also know
that’ the name Labour is used to cover a

ultitude ofatts tain and _ retain
power, asthis title is popular in the
Caribbean area. ;

We now declare that the Government
Party in this island is not a true Labour
Party at all in the British sense. Let us
give some reasons. The Ministers and
their. group are supposed to secure for
workers by hand or by brain the full
fruits of their industry, and they are not de-
ing so. We should like to have actual un-
employment and underemployment figures.
They favour monopoly rather than the “best

POOR BRITISH GUIANA

Our sympathy goes out to the people
of British Guiana who are racked by
internal dissensions almost amounting to
civil war. What began as an industrial
dispute has now become a national poli-
tical struggle. The saddest thing of all
is that two groups of people, most of
them very poor, who had survived as
fellow citizens the days of slavery and in-
dentured labour, are engaged in fratrici-
dal strife. Once again it has taken Bri-
tish troops to restore ord:r.

How different is this situation from the
great I. L. O. sessions in Geneva, when
delegates of Aftican and of Indian des-
cent join hands as friends and brothers to
oppose industrial and racial injustices!

We know what the root cause of the



Quote Of The Week

“You don’t have to go to Mars or Venus in search of adventure.
I’d rather die under palm-trees than on the planets.“ —
Sir Mortimer Wheeler, famous archaelogist.

DOMINIGA HERALD

INDEPENDENT WEEKLY

Roseau.



DOMINICA HEKALD S



be as sho.t as possible.

307 ished anonymously Views expressed

Tel.

Direct To Chron-
icle, Please

(The following remarks were
probably in:ended for — the
readership of the DOMIN-
ICA CHRONICLE.)

obtainable system of popular administra- re has been
tion or control.” They are pletged tO drawn to the Chronicle re-
unite the forces of labour within the terti- port of July 3rd ona meet-
tory, and what have they done about the ing of the Labour Party at
most important labour force —t ra de Potteisville, with particular
unionism? They are supposed to secure reference to the following
the return of Labour Party representa- taken from its quotations by
tives to local Government bodies, and the Chief Minister:—

what did they do just before the Town (a) ie Dominica ae
Council election? — Threw away their Go dr eater tara ae Be
chance by “expelling” a leader whom the (b) The “Roseau oa ss
people trusted. They are supposed to Gouncil was collecting $120,
subscribe wholeheartedly to the U.N. 000.00 yearly from City
Universal Declaration of Human Rights; dwellers which sum entitled
but they are a tight clique of local nation= them to a cleaner city with:
alists. Moreover, they are absolutely better roads”. __
committed to promoting skilled work- On poiat (a) whilst there
marship in all its forms and to stand for is enough to be said as t>
the encouragement of the creative arts and constitute a subject by itself,
of free and original thought and _ express- libata a y asl the
ion, yet they behave like repressive and disses © AQuOW IDR
unimaginative little men, ig of the fy On whose authiohity'ia
very word. Original Free

thought, however, has not yet become a js ominica to political Inde-
crime in’ Dominica. pendence? ‘

What happens when a political con- (2) When was the question
stitution is abused or used as a blanket to Of Independence ever a pub-
cover entirely different ee on pet eee ae oe en
tions? We think the honest thing for 2 ’
this Government to do would be é re- na recerve such a man-
write the aims and objects ofa party (3) ‘What has brought
constitution which is being debased, and about his sudden rejection
to call themselves by some other name. of the famous White Paper
Labour in this case is a misnomet. which he tried to bully the
people of this country to
accept and in consequence
of which attitude, his Gov-
ernment has incurred com-
munity-wide indignation !
struggle is: Premier Jagan is pro-Com- On point (b) I must point
munist and the Opposition is doing Out tbat Ministers of Gor
everything possible to unscat him. The eeae today, re much
presence in B. G. not only of Mr. Dun- cae ea a
can Sandys but of three great Union speech se 4 can.
leaders (including our old friend Walter “* oO, is seally Forced xo contesure
Hood of the T. U.C.) may h e 1 p to over the urgent necessity for the
cool down the enraged feelings of both Chief Minister to mature; because
sides. Itis our earnest hope that a ithe face ofall that the public
worthy compromise me be achieved in ee a ee
which the exacerbated hatred stirred up hice aris Roseau ea Council
between Negroes and East Indians may from the raising of funds to the wil-
gradually simmer down to tolerance, ful damage of the streets by their
Although we well understand she sei ope ia ape
ons, it is deeply sad to see people who ee ,
have had such a battle for bare existence puke ee oe
engaged in the shocking and brutal his government, irrespective of cir-
wastefulness of internecine war. cumstances or condition. criticises

amy aspect of the Town Council’s
ee ee activities.

For one more matter under (b)
since tbe Chief Minister is also the
Minister of ‘Finance, from which
latter knowledge he seems to expects
a thorough job to be done of bota
Sanitation and. Street Maintenance

reflect the policy of the Ed.tor or the Proprietor.

he committing the people of

ATURD ++, JULY 13, 1963



People’s Post

Correspondents are asked tc submit their full names and addresses a
a guarentee of good faith, but not necessarily for publication, Letters should
Controversial political letters will not ve pub-

in People’s Post do not. necessarily

from $120,000 per annum; now I in-
vite him to tell the responsible pub-
lic what sum of money wonld be
sufficient according to his ‘know-
ledge and experience in finance,’ to °
maintain the streets only, let alone
the Sanitation of Roseau, when as
this fact is so well knuwn that as
often as a patch is put in the streets
government bulldozers drive indis-
crimately to and fro, ripping the
whole of the streets surface again,
and thus causing high priced !abour
and materials to be gutted down the
destructive ‘gutters Labour.’

Finally I am also advised to
make two more observations from
the 2aid report.

(1) That the CHRONICLE teport-
ed the Thief Minister’s speech on
that occasion, (so late in his _pollti-
cal career) as having been his best,
can on'y be taken as its ardent long- *
ing, if not its total frustration, (and
here I am sympathetic) over not
having heard a good speech from
him.

(24 Unless the CHRONICLE has
included a colossal estimate of home
listencts in its attendance figure of
400, then that obvious misprint was
gtossly overstated; because several
observers estimates have placed the
‘attendance figure at a very maxi-
mum of too persous excluding plate
formites: and “that was during the
Ch ef Minicter’s address, which all
ageved was tlic \prak—of de -ancini= —
ance. :

It-has become very noticable too,
what ever the reason for this may
be, that. with the introduction of
the Minister For Social - Services at
any public meeting, the attendance
¢windles instantly and considerably,

STAR S, LESTRADE,



American
Solidarity

Madam,

I want to know how the
other Americans in Domin-
ica are feeling towards this
Presmont deporting. Do
they regard the man as their
brother or is he not in their
set?

If J met any Dominican in
the U.S. where I hope to go
someday. I would help him
lo anyway. First of a!l IL
would sreak up for bim. So
far we do not hear of any
American here speaking up
for John Presmont, bad or
good. Even the American
lady who writes for the Chro-
nicle keeps silent.

The British are not like
that. They make noise when
a brother, or even a prodi-
gal son is attacked. I am
glad to be British, while at
the same time feeling that
the treatment of Presmont
is not British Justice-

Yours respectfully
(Miss) A. JNo. BAPTISTE,
Virgin Lane
. (Cont. on page 6)

$y
PAGE FIVE
Le eeeesasiietsi: cocmpettOteeeraeeeemmememmeneaaaneiiat

PURE :

Superstitions tn Qur Midst by GORDON Part Il; (Cont. From last issue)
“Among the days, Christmas does not: escape blemish. When one man
said he saw all animals fall upon their knees in adoration another (in
quest of truth), went to the pen, disappeared tn the night, and was seen

no mote!
Although Shakespeare died early in the
unequalled works and his name remain immortal. Perhaps not least of

his glimpses are superstitions that dominated so many of his plays and
appealed so much to the Elizabethan court. One will recall how much
“love potions? help to develop the theme in “A Midsummer Nights
Dream.” Not long ago | heard of a compelling powder.
That versatile ever mysterious powder, placed near a morse! of food given
to the individual with whom one is in love, will cause the vict'm to dote
in profound and urcontrolable love and adoration for the giver whom he
or she may have hated before. One youngster tried it on a lady; bue it
wes the lady’s s'ster who ate the food. The result, was, we ee
guess whats... vothing! Ora lady would be charmed also, should
the man who loves her simply wipe her cheeks with his handkerchief, in
an end of which the head of a humming bird has been secretly tied.

It is seldom that an eclipse is observed in this country. When
one is neticeable, or even when the moon 1s encircled in a golden ring
effects of light and rays or the rotation of the earth cannot, will not enter
the minds of the majority. They sign themselves, making remark chat the
stin and moon are at war. It is believed that the sun always has won ta
the past; but some unfortunate day; which will be “da fin du monde’ the
moan shall win! Scentific proofs have no place in the minds of these folks.

A shooting star, gliding overhead, commands the Sign of the Cross
from all observers. It heralds the passing away of some -zesponsible
member of the commanity. My neighbour his an innocent child who
once pointed... “Look mummy!” full of upbraidings the mother
sculded the child, impressing on her the idea that she would be .alkative

seventeenth century, h's



DOMINICA HERALD









Travelling inland some time ago, the middle-aged
man who guided me stopped abrupuy when we nad
reached a certain plantation. He pointed out to me the
tall stem of a coconut palra. The top is gone and noth-
ing but the tail dry stem is left to tell the tale that once it
wasa plant. My guide told me an exiraordinary tale of
an old man who by obvah © asunted” his hand in szarch
of another who molested him. The time cam2 when he
should be dismounted, or he would die. He had not
sen his opponent. To save his own life the sole alterna
tive was to rush towards the nearest tree, 1n a manner no
less ruthless, no less relentless than if he had found
his enemy. With a roar he crashed his fist into the tree.
The coconut tree eventually died; but its stem remains to
outlive its murderer! I have been told, should miduight
ever catch me out of doors, I should leave the middle of
the road and walk on one side. Tne devils pass on their
missions. The king of night once stretch, one of his huse
legs on Fort Young, and the other he placed over the
Anglican Church. He crushed within his gianc heels
any unfortunate soul that went by during the periods of
the night he happered to be present.

Those men and women who lived and died in evil
aze supposed to return after death in the forms off ‘*zom-
bie” and “la jablesse”’ respectively. They appeat to
someone as a true and well-known friend: deceiving, Aogg=
ing, misleading, or maddening. Sometimes they appear
in any form. Thus a certain gentleman, it is related,

SATURUsA, Jub, 13, 1463

Livingstone Scores Brilliant
Century

Antigua born Danny Livingstone
hit a brilliant 51 for Hampshire
aga‘nst the Weot Indies on Wednes-
day.

Batting first on a rain affected
wicket, Hampshire started badly
losing 2 wickets for $s runs but
Livingstone and Horton (55) put on
a partnership of 16f in 166
minutes Livir.gstone’s innings was
the highest to date against the tourists
and included 2 sixes and 14 fours.
The latest score: --- Hampshire 329
and 22 for 4, West Indies 182.

Livingstone never played for
Antigua,, He mvgrated to Eng'and
immediately upon leaving school and
joined the Hampshire staff. This
fine yong batsman would almost
certainly be unheard of toduy had he
decided to stay in Antigua. There
are dozens of Livingstones in the.
small Islands now, who will never
be hea d of. Sad, but true.

Read
The HERALD .



{.r the vest of her exsistence.

C4 Pe cal
CANDY PINE
ot are} Taas

READY MIXED
OIL PAINT

-GENERAL PURPOSE
RUSSET

SLAY TRY (hae

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AVAILABLE AT THE FOLLOWING HARDWARE STORES

i tea . L. A. DUPIGNY Esq.,
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. T. D. SHILLINGFORD
Ey Sa cer oO

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eae
aes



found himself struggling home, and fell unconscious on
he floor as he hauled the door open. He had a habit of
alking with his fiancee who lived over a mile away, for

Jlong hours every night. That night, it was raining and

ie hurried under a veranda for shelter. At the same time
little dog, wet and shivering with cold, also ran there
‘or shelter. The man glanced down and. saw the creature
vatching him fixedly in the face. The sharp ‘gaze\con-
inued and th: man, overwhelmed with fear, thought he
nust speak, or he must dit of fright. Heasked, ~Why
he’ devil are you looking at me so much?” The dog
eplied, ‘And why the devil are you yourself looking at »
aeso much?” 4
A certain Mahaut dweller is fond of drinking whenever he
‘as to quarrel. The liquor seems to give him power. to, blast.out
verything he has borne in his\mind for any’ period. One dark
ght towards the erd of ‘as year he was getting hom: in‘oxicated and
ursing; at was late and ali doors were shut. I heard him for somes
me Lut scoa fell asleep; an hour or’so later I was awakened by his

ry, ‘Let me go. let me go!’ Then Haily Mary full of grace
Laily Mary full of grace!”
Though he lives five miles from town, his story revealed’ in the

norning that a ‘‘la jablesse’” was rolling him down St. Aroment’s Cliff
ato the Roseau river. He prayed and prayed, for he soon was certain
hat someone wa: selling him to the cevil. Ac last after much struggling
ie found himself in the chick bushes that grow below his house, all
ruised weary and panting.

One recent Sunday a St. Joseph lad expressed grave doubts about
tie manner ty which Grenadian umpires arrived at their decisions,
especially in matches between visiting teams and their home team, and

eclared aloud, ‘ Should I ever represent the island”’ (note, he had never
eda bat before) *‘matters would be so arranged that when [ knock the
yall, Grenadian fieldsmen would see it falling upon them hke an
elephant!”

The sttperstitious mind is ruthless and unflagging in its treatment of
everyone and everything. So after you have langhed, or after you have
Firgiven anything in the subject which may have caused ycu annoyance,

ponder and judge, Farewell!
a

Students Tour
Coca Cola Firm

Essay Competition

On Monday 1st July at This entertainment of
9330 am. the Dominica school children forms part
Bottling Plant, (Coca Cola), of the Company’s advertis-
was visited by the girls of ing programme; every pupil
C.H.S. The girls of in the various schools will
W.H.S. visited on the be encouraged to take part in
oth. The visiting dates for an Essay Competition after-
the D. G. S. and S. M.A. (Cont. on page 6)

a
have not yet been arranged,
since these wl take place
after the summer holidays.
The Students will be enter-
tained while touring the
plant.
SOUR Mee ke tes





(Cont. from page 5) best essay in each school
wtll get yr0.00 worth of
books, a free case of Coca
Cola and novelties. Teach-
bers as well as pupils vil be
invited to the prizegivias.

wards on ‘My Visit to the
Dominica Bottling Plant.”
Winner of the best essay
in every class of the various
schools will get a free care
of Coca Cola; winner of the

wa wsebtty a

NMED ’ Shi



enriched with
vitamins A and D

mn —

ii




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DOM I ibs



People’ s Post
(Contunued from page 4)

Co respondents are asked tc submit their full names and addresses a
a guarentee of rood faith, but nar nece svar ily for pubheation Letters should
be as short as poss‘ble Controversial political letters will not be pub-
ished avonymously Views expressed in’ People’s Post do not necessarily
leflect che policy of the dito or the Proprietor.

GONP RE) Pe anne Consideration is also ay pirently -
Hit headkine being given to what may be describ-

ed as partial payment, which would

Madan Eduer tend to give ihe pensioners further

Twas uckled with profound increase on a percentage vasis, i.e.

amusement after Faving read the front relating te salery his counterpart is at

page headline of the HERALD on the present in receipt of with bis cwn
6th instant; and I wish to assure retiring salary as a pensioner.

you that whenever I comemplate on I am,

it dur‘ng my leisure moments I Yours,

gleefully enjey at to my heart’s Atva A. Laronp, Roseau.
content.

: ? —_———
Well, well done! Like old man ~*

PAGE SIX

-Doctrove And.
_ Andre, Course at
xford

Mr. M.C. Doctrove, Statistical
Officer and Mr. F.E. André Act-
ing Public Relations Officer have
been selected to do 1963--64 Over
seas Service Course at Oxford Unie
veitity starting in September.

This is to be a new course which
replaces the “A’ and *B’ Courses
held in fermer years, and covers
many fields including Government,
Nicaral resources. and Economics.
CIS



r

i

Churchill, I daresay, the HERALD A Caution

can certain y take a and there ty no

m stake about it What cayest thou, To Foreign Visitors

fellow citizens? Can you beat that? If ae Speech is free and

i bviously, the Venerable Min's Don't discuss our Labour
ter cf Government is terribly wer-
ried over the fearless attitude of the

HERALD rowacéays, — because he If invited to a feast,

hearty,
Party;

Brush up on your catechism
And refrain from criticism,

. 7 > i ec !
realises the powerful impact of the aera eee Ge yee van Geest!
1 , ,
Press born at home and abroad. de d K€ a visitor who Hatters
Fe let TF can say on the matter nd ignores more serious matters:

is that an indenendent pr ss in the
Weth Deg’ of every country.

Even an interest in astronomy
Might harm cur delicate economy—

Eastcir (Disuice . Baton. All those wicked space—ships Hoating

Note 30 Extra copies were
ordered by another enthusiast in
Eastern District- -Ed.

Might influence the people's voting.
Some wouldn't mind your death at all
By burning in our carnival,

But helping homeless youngsters is

en A cause which might disturb the peace.
Come to our island fair and sunny

Kennedy Favou rs But shut your mouth and

bring big monet

Check- Off . If Ministers don’t like your. face

They have a law to meet the case:
Yet please don’t feel annoyed or thwarted
“President Kennedy has approved i --Only heroes get deported,

Arro'd S. Zander and GFSCME,
—atUnion dees cieck-of system farm, Sr

oe
President Kennedy late ie
month issued a directive’ to the U. N.. Sec S$ i t
Civil Sercive Commission fermitt- CG. oailites

ing federal’ agencies to withhold
Union dues from paychecks of Pope

employees who request it. The | ee
plan goes into effect on January tst. The following is the text

The CSC is preparing regulations ofa cable sent by Secretary
authorising the withholdings. It General U Thant to His

is meeting this month with repre- Holiness Pope Paul VI at
sentatives from the American the Vatican:

Federation sovernment - .

ederation cf Government Em- Oy the occasion of your
ployees and Government Agencies ae fe. ial :
to fee our labour management ¢levailon to the highest post-

sentiment. tion of the Roman Catho-

After the commission has heard lic Church, I wish to con-
all sides, it will settle down to vey to Your Holiness, in the
drafting the first set of proposed ¢ place, my respectful and

regulations authorising the system

Zander has personally urged top Most sincere congratulations.
Government officials to adopt the May I also add my fer-
system and AFSCME staff members vent hopes that during the
have participated in negotiations that term, of Your Holiness, the

led to the current presidential nable ideals ae Aida a

directive. di d
Thanking you for your valuable ignity, of peace an inter-

space, national understanding, so
Yours faithfully, eloquently stated by your

iF JOSE eminent predecessor in his

fe SER TDS oes Historical encyclical, Pacem
! in Terris, should find ful-

Wake Up, Domin- panic
ican Pensioners! ,

Sir, -— Of significant interest to the
pensioners of this country is the vety
heartening news from the Pension-

long last Her Majesty’s Government
(as a result of persistent representa-
tions) has accepted autematic res-
ponsibility for ir ceasing pensions as

Street, on 1st July, 1963,

amily the Credit Union Way.
Junei2 July 27°

HERALD Would be happy 10 prift’ this verse in “eit
ee of phases for oficial distrilsstion to. tourists ond
S. oN

swe S|
he



CCRCLE FRANCAIS

All members are
invited to 10 Cork
Street For Celebration
Of 14 July, 11 a.m. A



New Israel:
President --

Jerusalem (ANP)— _ Russian-
born Zalman Shazar |(73) one of
Israel’s pioneering settlers, 2 noted

writer and scholar, has been elected
the nation’s third president. Israel’s
firrt president was the late Dr.

Chaim Weizmann.
= _—: ideneay =



Advertise In
Tae HERALD

5 pratan 6 pena é eae 6 9 “Sea 6 eS pS pt S 9 ee 6 OE OS AS oe pS

“ROSEAU CREDIT UNION
MOVING

t
Y
Business Hours as usual. Seeure Yourself. “|

t

|
as Assoviation of London, that at To their own office building at 33 Gt. Marlborough

l

li

i

prescribed by} Act of 1962.

em 6 Bete 65 ae 6 fata 8 Sa 8 nS 8 a fA SS SSeS HF lS PALF eB tt 8 Pe
Hos

' i.e 7
yo 1,

_ IN THE CABINET

TOA?



HERALD

PEOPLE’S POST

(Continued from page 6)

By Phyllis Stand Allfrey

Game, Saw And
From Chapter II

Conquered,

Dear Mme. Editor,
So our English acting visi-
tors have come and gone,

On the evening after my clevation to Ministerial
status I came down in the hotel lift (those were the days
before Sese and her sewing machine arrived.) In the
outer lobby I met the Prime Minister. Straightaway I leaving everyone fecl!ng sa t-
noticed that he was wearing a new pair of shoes -~ a0 jgfied who was present at
easy observation, since we had in common a tendency to (he showing of Macbeth in
look shabby. _ Camera and many perhaps,

“Are you considering walking?” asked the Prime with a longing to be trained
Minister. actors themselves.

“Yes, Sir — I am considering it.” We can safely call the

“Then take a walk with me round the Savannah.” attenoance at St. Gerard's

r : ~ Hall last Saturday night the

It was an affectionate command. We fell into step down FechGe ite’ Wade AwaT vetace

the stone steps. At night the savannah looked as big as Se oe RP aE

i iebt c dals. The “? Yee

my natal island. I had on light black sanda schbolieachers anid: students

Prime Minister’s new shoes squeaked. .- tromcealbover ihe island there

All around the savannah people loitered, leaning jg the likelihood of repeats
against trees, sitting in couples on benchcs cating feiit’ and: in (hisedueational visit from

nuts. Now andthen someone stood to attention and Edgland.
called out to Sir Grantley. “Good night, my Lord.’ With this opportunity we
“They begin to recognise us,” he said modestly. have got nearer to. our

Etruscan or country gen- French neighbours who re-
tlefnan, would have been recognisable, whatever the colour ce've regular (yearly) visits
of the skin stretched over the excellent lines. But it was oy ee stage cee
when he spoke that the indifferent bystanders came to _ life ae Chesane 7 ee pea
with salutations. His accent was West Indian Wessex Livas-luckyte pare Pornte.
-Bajan. a-Pitre an open-air perfor-

_” We taiked of how the gentle people of the world mance ofa romantic play
ep themselves in literary murders, of English schoolboys, by these Euopean actors.
~the had been a student in England but I, despite my pale In the moonlitt recreation park,
skin, had never been a British schoolgirl) of cricket, “And Place La Victoire, a huge crowd
had I known vou despised cricket I’4 never have made you oe together while in the enclosure

“a Ministers Ab, ‘but my clectorate ensured that, Sir.” children and their téachers were, seat-
Then he came to the coconut vendors with their carts ed, a stage with premises had been
loaded with immense green nuts, We stopped, and an built ia the park; and the many ac-
Indian citizen of our new land hacked off the tip of the ‘ors and actresses who in ancient dress
coconut so that I might drink stra‘ght ftom the large green bas aoe oe ' sd
nut, not quite adroitly pouring che juice from a height into wivaciy: icine sed hel she ends
my month. “Not at this time of night, for me,” said the ience with eye and car.
Prim? Minister. The play had begua with a due

The route was long, circular, fascinating. Contains between two rival men -— a father
ed within its green acres was the race course and it grand- a es See
stand, the gamblers’ paradise, immense source of revenue 200) wos the bond beaver et
to government and lucky citizens. It was only as We the crowd — although in an open
approached the bright lights of the Hotel thet I noticed space. .
how the Prime Minister lagged, almost limping. I did not — Perhaps, in future, we here may
then realise how my leader had literal feet of clay, real clay, e Spas 2 aan the i
human flesh, liable to pain and trouble. We crossed to cravéllings Beiish ee dae
the vestibule. He took my hand at the lift. ah doube. theanl by these. Enelish

“Goodnight, my child.” gentlemen has been a conquest.
“Goodnight, Sir.” May CurisTIan, Morne Prosper.
He held the lift with a gesture to the attendant.
“Don’t call me Sir age , :
“T can’t help it. You are the only man I’ve really
enjoyed calling Sir.” improvem ents

He smiled his wily foxy smile and_ lifted a brown Jn North
hand in a deprecatory gesture. The lift doors squeezed
together. There were some American and Canadian
tourists in the hotel lobby. They had turned away their
eyes as we came up the steps, when we approached the
lift I heard a middle-aged lady murmur “disgusting”.

She looked disappointed when the lift swallowed up a
solitary bowec figure.

Baie ee

In any country his features,

a A

by Gustavus Timothy, J.P.
Safer Roads

I would like you once more to
allow mea little space in the col-
umns of your interesting, educative
informative and widely read newspa-
per inthis colony and also abroad; to



~~" ROSEAU CREDIT UNION.‘
MOVING |

To their own office building at 33 Gt. Marlborough j
Street, on 1st July, 1963,
Business Hours as usual.
jfamily the Credit Union Way.
Junez2 July 27

a ea 6 Fe 6 Pa 8 8 a8 Pa Ba 6 9

is at prescnt reinoved since the
bridge across the Hodges River has
or repaired and made safe for re-
gular transport by day as well as by
fight, especially during the weekly
cutting of our bananas to Long-
House-Porismouth, —

o> 6S “a t pet Ses pe ¢

Secure Yourself and!

let the Government know that the
great fear that was in the thoughts
for all motor drivers in che Northern
District of this Colony and around

The widening of the dangerous
angle near Mr. Azouz and an Mrs,
Etheline Josep’’s shop in Marigot
has brought gladness to the drivers
also; as it was a corner they were
continually in dread of and pas:eng-
ers they bad with them.

The population of the Northern
District and of the island as a whole
would like to ex'end their apprecia-
tion co Mr. V.H, Shillingford,
Director of Works, and his staff for
thinking of the protection and lives
of their fellowmen by the reecnt im-
provements they have dore
to the bridge and the above
mentioned cotner; and as Rome
was not built in a day; the works
has been done gives us the be-
lief that our Director of Works as
soon as funds are available shall
continue to widen more of the dan-
gerous corners of main roads in the
island which is calling for immed-
jate attention.

New Postal Agencies

Now my ‘Dear Editor’ I must
make reference to some of the gen-
eral improvements which are rapidly
spreading in various ways — the
mo:t important ‘one for time-being
is our Post Office department which
is under the efficient supervision of
our Colonial Post Master, Mr. N.
W. Royer who for the last ‘wo or
three years has established at least
twenty-one postal agencies in the is-
land which is a boon to the natives

ber-of-school who fromtime to time have had to

travel several miles in all weather to
post and also to receive their. mails.
I refer for the moment to the village
of Dos d’Ane where the last post
office has been recently established,
which is very good indeed! This
shows that Mr. Royer is not thinking
only of his people in Roseau but all
over the island for whom he is made
responsible so far as our mails are
concerned. We thank Mr, Royer
for the possibility in obtaining our
mails regularly.

Thanks To Officials

In concluding this article it gives
me great pleasure to say we who can
appreciate what is being done for
the improvement of this colony by
other officials who are serving in all
the offices very quietly, patiently ef-
ficiently, trustworthily and otherwise
are not forgotten by us, we are tak-
ing knowledge of your faithfulness
and your devotions to your duties and
in the future references to your share
of good works too.

Thanks to you Madam for the
space allowed to me.

a ne

l

PAGE SEVEN



MAGAZINE REVIEW
““DAWNLIT” -

Journal Of The Bawbiney
literary Club

We are very grateful to receive a
review copy of this interesting maga-
zine. It contains over 60 pages of
debatable and philcsovhic matter
and some verses as well as a short
story. We must be pardoned for
saying it is a socio-political forum
and not a literary journal at all in
our sense of the term.

Upon receiving it, we surned the
pages eagerly looking for treasures.
First we searched for a poetic flash
of genius: but the verses are Alat, and
ouly noteable for their conventional
harmlessness The gentleman who
‘“ouyed”’ modern poetry can never
have read Auden and Dylan Tho-
mas at their peak. His stuff is far
more cabbagey than theirs.

Next we looked for wit—but wit
and sauze are prokably too risqué for
a magazine of this sort: The. jokes
were all borrowed Lastly we look-
ed for style; but style, debating and
polemics do not go together.

On the other hand the. reporting
of debates in Dawalit is ofa high
standard, it is revealing—. about. ors
the characters of the contribut
and the kirid of subjects they are
interested in. Capitalism, Co-oper-
tives, Cuba; Democracy in under-
developed countries, local superstiv
tion and (from a _ prejudiced outside
contributor) an anti-A merican tirade,
maladjusted youth, the limited rol~

swoman—(who-ate-scen as typing
out literature and letters’ dictated ‘by
men); a moralistic Dialogue, Sefeney,.
the U.W.L aud Drink.

Mr, Lazare must be congratulat-
ed on the only _ piece of fiction in
the collection, and the editor on ex
ceilent general presentation. It is.a
good $1.00 worth of debatable
material, especially if you carry on
the debates at home where the pro-
tagonists left off. P.S.A.

Se

FOR SALE

Ford Consul No. 42
No reasonable offer refused

Apply:
DELSOL’S GROCERY
Jun? 29 July 6 20

|

One Vauxhall Car -- No. 1042
(In good running condition)
Price reasonable.
Apply: Campbell Phillip, Church
Street :
or Simeon Benjamin, Goodwill



>

Te EP SAS A FAR A A ae 6 Ee AG OT 6 Ae S Pa 6 a SS A

C.G. PHILLIP & Go. Ltd j

A Travel Ageney has been opened by us at!

PHILLIP’S TRAVEL AGENCY.

29 King George V Street, Roseau, ot

air travel will be available at this agency an
qwe shall book and procure any passages re-

| All assistance and information czenoy aa

quired by air.

| pouly 13 — 27

Phone No. 67 (2 rings).

OPS Daa SP ae 8 PR 8 Pe 8 Pa 8 Ftd BRS PS Oa SSE OE nn 6 Ped “et Ola
SATURGHs, JULY

13, 1963

PAGE EIGHT

i

English Actors Fascinate Audience

By our Drama Reporter

DOMINICA HEKALD |

- ec cera ———



On eee

POLICE NOTICE

The Inspector of Weights and Measures will attend at the ‘various District Police
Stations on the dates and time stated hereunder for the purpose of verifying all weights

measures, and weighing machines used in trade in each district of the Colony. .
’ ging To anvon e‘attending “Macbeth in Camera’ 145¢.

Saturday night, on? fact would have stood out clearly»

1963, from 9.00 a.m. to 1.00 p.m.
even before the preformers actually appeared on the stag®

porrsmoura Wednesday 24th) July
2,00 p.m. to 4.co p.m. each day

Thursday 25th) aad

VIELLE CASE Friday 26th July 1963, from 9.00 a.m. to 1.00 p.m. and that was, the spirit of appreciation displayed by the
CALIBISHIE. Saturday 27th "7? *”_—9,00 ara. f0 1.00 p.m. huge audience which filled. the St. Gerard’s Hall. Ther¢
MARIGOT Monday 29th)” — "9.00 a.m, to 1.00 p.m. can be absolutely no doubt after this attendance, that out




Tuesday 30th) and 2.co p.m, to 4.00 p.m. each day.
Wednesday 31st July 1963, from 9.00 a.m. to 12 noon

SALYBIA
to 12 noon and

CASTLE BRUCE Thursday tst Aug. 1963, from 9.00 a.m.
2.00 p.m. tO 4.00 p.m.

Friday 2nd Aug. 1963, from 9.00 a.m. to I2 noon and 2.09 p.m.

GRAND BAY
to 4.00 p.m.
LA PLAINE Tuesday 6th Aug. 1963, from 9.00 a.m. fo T.00 p.m.
DELICES Wednesday 7th ” -
ROSEAU Monday r2th)” “i 9,00 a.m, to 12 noon
Tuesday 13th) and 1.00 p.m. to 4.00 p.m. each day.
Wednesday 14th)
Thursday Isth)
SOUFRIERE Friday 16th Aug. 1963, from 9.00 a.m. to 1.00 p.m.
PTE. MICHEL Monday 19th ” ‘ : S 4
MAHAUT Tuesday 20th . . ‘ : :

ST. JOSEPH Wednesday 21st
SALISBURY / Friday 23rd
coLiHAuT Saturday 24th ”

ote: A suitable place in Lieu o
“ by the Inspector in charge prior to ot on the date and time fixed above.
K. I. M. FRANCIS

AG. CHIEF OF POLICE



f a police station will be selected at Castle Bruce people do indeed appreciate what is cultural and uplifting.,

Adults ranging from late teens to the near’ eighties
and scores of upper formers from both Primary and
Secondary Schools, began taking. their seats as. soon as the
doors were opened at 7.30 p.m. All eyes were glued on
the stage which, contrary to our local custom, had its
curtains drawn back; and'every member cf the audience
took a deep breath of pleased anticipation, when, after the

i) Sess

GO 70. July 13

See eaitnemerterstgt emanate prce Ponte we Duncan Sandys in
G@raNnt DUCK SALE j B. G. : or I \bour and .

Commonwealth Secte'ary Duncan Social Services the Shakespearean experts cameon
Sandys Aew to British’ Guiana on stage and began to demonstrate how they themselves had
Wednesday where 25,000 workers set about understanding and interpreting some of the most
went back to’wark on. Monday a difficult passages of Macbeth.
ee

Teal ck all Sandie ick a: Some members of the audience had suffered some-
make a fall assessment of the situation What ofa jolt on learning that they would vot see the

during his weeklong stay, meeting tragedy itself performed, but that the entertainment would

Premiec Cheddi Jagan, Governor take the shape of a ‘“‘dramatized lecture.” Mr. Harold

ot een ed a ee ect Lang and his colleagues were so vivid, so articulate and

leaders. Meanwhile about 70% o' :

die ealony’e worker. cearaed'te the 5° utterly witty that we were more than compensated for
that earlier feeling of disappointment.

jobs: bauxite workers and employees
of somecommercial firms are due The sixth of July will remain a Hallam wore modern sportwear yet
back within a week. However, the red-letter day for those who were they captured the imagination of
tensions bred of four months of fortunate enough to secure tickets their audience to such an extent,
bloody clashes between East Indians for that unforgettable performance. that while each new portrayal and
and coloured or African persons re- The audience was held spellbound each new rendering there came to the
mained high, particularly in Berbice by Mr, Lang’s masterful interpre- mind’s eye vision of those same act-
and the West Demerara regions. tstion of King Lear’s soliloquoy, ors dressed in the rich velvet and
Community leaders and newspapers and all over the hall could be heard satin garb of the characters being
have appealed for the ending of ra- gasps of surprise and admiration interpreted. ;
cial tensions and religicus leaders are when that same gentlemen “became” —_‘It was only fitting that we thank
organizing a campaign under which indeed and in truth Lady Macbeth the British Council for allowing us
moderates wear armbands bearing the herself! The two ‘‘assistants” gave this splendid opportunity, while
word “star” for “standing together usa clearer understanding of Mac- hoping this will be the first of
above race”. beth’s “inner duel”, and of the many similar opportunities for the
cultural advancement of our people.

W. L. Youth Trust 2o°pccgtics tn the Pogland
ind SS SS

two protagonists in the England
Fund Applications For

scene. Last but not least, Mr. Geo-
fftey Keir’s performance of a stiff
The D. T. U. collesting- j j
box amounting to $2. 17 is Liquor Licences
To the Magistrate District *G’

». Buy a pair= Get one Free
Low Low Prices
Three weeks old — $4.00 the bal
Six weeks old — $7.50 the pair
Ten weeks old — $10.00 the pair
For Limit d Time oly
Each pair you buy gets you Another
of the same age, absolutely Free
Get your's Now!

Once a year Sylvania makes you this
offer to reduce our stock, make room
for more ducks, Come and look over
the hundreds of ducklings we have to
choose from. Come early for the best

Or Hatch Your Own
Duck Hatching Eggs from our larger white-
feathered Muscovy ducks $2.00 per doz.

SYLVANIA POULTRY FARMS

Imperial Road — Roseau —- 224—5 Rings

69am 5 9a 6 9S oP et wh PCa 6 9 ta 6 fn 8S 9S PS mm 6 9a 6 9



oes 9- mete

verre iz:

Ran 6 Bae SFR Aa 8 pe 6 pe 6 pS pt 8 eo a pS pS

e

‘DOMINIGA” BANANA GROWERS ASSOCIATION
POST OF LEAF SPOT INSPECTOR

Applications are invited for the post of Leaf Spot ¢
Inspector:—- j
Salary: $960 per annum. *
Duties: Primarily, the supervision of spraying of!

OS 6 i 5 9 6 9 6 9 ee 9 ee 1

ips

English literature was a masterpiece
af charac er-acting.

necked, hidebound _ professor of
gratefully acknowledged by

Several other points left their im-

banana cultivations in the district tof

which the Inspector is assigned and the}

keeping of the prescribed records of;

_ Such spraying. l
Applications should he addressed to the General)
Manager, Dominica Banana Growers’ Association, Roseau,
ard. should reach this office by 12 noon on Saturday,
20th, July 1963, l
eet A.D. BOYD

General Manager

aS 9a 6 9a 5 9S 6 “Se 8 9S 5 pS 9 8 9 |

(uly 13

dt el a a i le i dc a Re

Read. |

& the Superintendent of Police
I, Aubrey S. Mc Quilkin now re-
siding at Portsmouth Parish of St.
John do hereby give you notice
that it is my intention to apply at
the Magistrate’s Court to be held ac
Portsmouth on Wednesday, the 2nd
day of October 1963 ensuing fora
wholesale LIQUWUR LICENCE
in respect of my premises at Bay
Street Paiish of St. John. Dated
the sth day of July 1963

A S, MC QUILKIN

ae a

the Fu:.d, and contributors
are thanked for their gift.
The AMATEUR RADIO
CLUB, Secretary Addison
Colaire, handed in a Youth
Trust Fund tin with collec-
tion from members amount-
ing to $4.13. This sum is
gratefully acknowledged.

pact on the audience and one was
the visible bond between the actors
at every moment of the performance.
Four actors each with his own part
cular style, his own peculiar way of
moving, and his own special tone
of voice and mode of speech all
showed a common love of careful
diction, precise action and above
all, complete dictatation to their
profession. Proof: of their expert
performance lies in the fact, that
while Messrs Lang, Amer and

The HERALD
SATURDAY, JULY 13, 1903 ©

Leader Of Opposition In Kenya
Government,



Mr. Ronald Ngala



Mr. Ronald Ngala, president ‘of the Kenya African Democratic
Union leads the Opposition in the Kenya Government, following the
defeat of his party in the recent elections, (BIS)

“$0 THEY SAY”-

BY BOB & RAY

One of our more respected citizens was saying the
ather day tht Dominicans are being held back hecanse of
two old laws: the tax of ircome law and the Customs
duty law. He said people are. chiding themselves for not
planting crops as profitably as they should, not moderniz-
ing the banana cultivations, for not having, more and bet-
ter roads, etc. etc, But these things, he say, are minor
when one compares the,arbitrary old income tax law and
the stiff Customs duty laws imrosed on the citizens of the
island. These two stupid laws, he claims, will continue
to hold back the island even if and when we double ban-
ana production, if and when we have broad highwavs all
about and if and when we plan cro.s cf rd beans, Irish po-
tatoes and other fuodstufis thal are now largely imported.

Citing as an example, he continued, that when a man
paints his shop or place of business to protect the wood
and metal surfaces from rot and rust, he is not allowed by
the silly old income tax law to charge the paint and labor
off to his cost doing business. No, this is a “capital im-
provement” and, under this out-dited law, no capital
improvement can be listed as an expense. If a man buys
a new fridge to put in his shop, this is paid for out of his
income, but still, tbe cost of the fridge (an improvement)
cannot be deducted as part of the cost of doing business.
Or jet the estate owner build a new road, for say $6,000-
on his place — no! this cannot be deducted from the in,
come of the estate. Letssay this same estate earns, profits
from the sale of bananas, $4,000. And the owner or
owners put in the road for $6,000. On the balance sheef
for his estate, then, there is a loss for the year of $2,000:
But not from he :tandpoint of the income tax law. Jt say.
the estate made $4,000.

Now here’s the point: if every time a man spends
hard-earned cash to better his business, make it bigger,
make it pay more, make it emp'oy more pecple .e.
every time he does this he cannot deduct this expense from
his overall income, well then, he cannot, will not, improve
or enlarge or expand. And THIS is what is holding
Dominica back!

If we take the case of Mr I. Will Work of Mahaut who earns
$10,000 a year from his banana cultivation, This man pays 50% o# the
income as tax. Now he has{$s,000 remaining. Suppose the follow buys
a Bedford truck for $5 000 (on which the government makes a cool



‘per year income tax!

DOMINICA PLURALD

$5,000 to government for income tax and he paid $4 000 for the truck
and $1,000 customs dity on it... $0 he’s broke! How.she yoing to
feed his family for a whole year? Well, the truth is, he can’t -— so he
doesn't buy the truck and government docsn’t get their - $1,000 | customs
duty .aor the duty on. ail the gosoline the truck will burn over the next
five years e'ther!) The island loses, the Dominican, Mr. Work, loses --
Mahant loses another truck (and a lot of people don’t get a free Vep to
town!). Loss, Loss, Loss! On account of a stupid, cut-dated, near-
sighted tax law. So sad our respected friend,

We looked around at other islands, other countries that seem to te
going ahead. What do they do about capital improvements? Well,
dear reader the governments of those prosperous places allow Jiberal tax
credits for improvements for, and its very simple, when a businessman
spends money to improve his business he’s going to do MORE _ business
and (nless he continues to expand forever) someday he'll pay a tax on a
much larger income. Dominican tax laws are a true case of killing the
goose before she can lay the golden egg. Should we modernize our
methods of ra'sing bananas? Certainly, But at the same time, we
should modernize our income tax laws—to encourage, not penalize the
man who is making capital improvements to this island...to himself
of course, but lets not be foolish e iouzh to think tat a dollar spent here
benefits only a few -— it benefits everyone, directly and indirectly. -

Deprecia.ion on a building in Roseau? Plenty of it. But unless it
“houses machiney” the income tax law does not allow a depreciation
allowance. Penalty for the man who owns the building, Why must we
penalize ourselves, hold onrselves back? We fight the mountainous
terrain, we fight the weather, we fight competition for our products from
other islands — so why fight each other, why hold ourselves back?

A certain employce in a certain bank said that if he lived in Gren-
ada and had the same income as he has here, he would pay $800 less
Our taxes are high, they are unjust, they don’t
make sense, they tax the source of all income, incentive.

A hotel owner from Martinique visited Dominica a short while ago.
He said he would have to pay an income tax last year of $128,000 .
think of it! Tax of $128,0co on his income. But, the chap said, his
Government will forgive any amount of this tax that is “ploughed back
in Martinique” so he spent, yes you guessed it, $128,000 improvement on
his business. He put in a new modern dining ronm, a-completely new
kitchen, bought six new cars to rent to his hotel guests and added ‘air
conditioning to all his publ:c rooms! The result will be MOREhusiness

. on wnich he will have to pay an even greater tax next year (unless
be spends it in improvements) but you get the point. The islands to the
south of us have leaped ahead year-after year and of course. the people
beuefit from the expenditures and then they, the-people pay more: taxes.

If the hotel!’ man had earned enough income in order to pay
$128 ono in trxes_on Dominica, hewould have been obliged 10 pay whe
full $128,000, “What then could he have done to improve his hote!?
Nothing. Precisely. The tax Jaw stagnates conditions. We don’t go
ahead, we go backward. But we need an income to pay government
salaries, they say, And more and more’ people ask: what about.a land
tax? Let a fair and just tax be placed on productive, tertile yet idle land.
This will raise the needed funds'to operate government—-- without hold-
ing back anyone— for if any person objects to paying a land tax, let
that person raise one stem of figs per acre and this would automatically
pay the tax! So they say.

Dominica Banana Growers Association
Banana Shipment of 5th Juiy, 1953:





STEMS TONS
Roseau 27,768 350
Portsmouth 31,889 396
Coast __ 3,036 37
62,693 783
Exports Jan. 1-—June, 28 1,365,152 17,291
Total Exports to date —,427,845 18,074
” Ex, to 21st June, 1962 1,283,876 14,990
Increase 143,969 | 3,084



Ford Foundation Grant ‘own, British Guiana, will te-
For U.W.I. ceive the 1963 Mergenthaler Award

The Ford Foundation’ ‘bas ane" recognition of meritorious pub-
nounced the grant of $230,000 to
the West Indics University’s Institute
of Social and Economic Researh.

This is partof a block grant
totalling $2,790,750 which the
Foundation has made for various
development programs in Latin
America, including projects in Ar-
gentina, Brazil, Chile, the Domini-
can Republic, Mexico, Venezuela
and the: West Indies. (USIS)

the Presy and fighting editorialt
against muzzling of the Press” at
the Inter-American Press Associa-
tion’s (IAPA) general meeting to
be held in Miami, Florida, Novem-
20—22, (USIS)



Hovertrucks

. Millbank, London — says:

lic service in behalf of freedom of

Crop-Spraying By




tractor operations — difficule.
* Built around anormal Land
Rover, the” hovettrnck” can carty
200 gallons of fertiliser and can op-
erate on seeded land until planes
are nine inches high. The spray is
a single boom at the rear and covers
a 30 fout path.

The air cushion on this British
product is provided by wo 25-inch
diameter fans, one mounted on each
side ot the vehicle which are pow-
ered by a three-litre Rover petrol
engine installed behind the cab.

The air cushion is contained
with'n a Aexible 10-inch rubber skirt
and lifts a one ton pay-load of liquid
fertiliser. me et a

The principle is that the air lift
takes three-quarters of load strain of
the entire vehicle, with ‘the driver
using normal steering wheel contre] —
to guide the machine lightly on its
toaa wheels down the crop rows at
about 10 miles an hour.

A to-acre field can be ‘sprayed
inone hour. The machine never
fully clears the ground as its road
wheels are used to guide it between
the rows. Crop damage is estimated
at less than o.1 per cent.

A statement by the manufactur-
ers — Vickers Armstrongs Ltd., of
“The
hovertrnck provides farmers, survey:
ots, civil engineers, building contrac-,
tors, military authorities and other.
vehicle operators . with improved. _
mobility over rough country, especit”
ally over wet and: water-logzed-
ground’. (BIS) at

Paul Pope To |
Continue Pope
John’s Lead
Pope Paul VI is reported
to have guaranteed the con-
tinuation of Christian unity
aims supported by Pope John
XXUL The Secretariat
for Christian unity. is headed.
by Augustin, Cardinal Bea..
When Cardinal Bea’ was:
approached during the init-
ial homage paid by Cardi-
nals to tke New Pope, it is
reported that Pope Paul said
the Secretariat’s work pleased



“him and he wanted, it con-

tinued. -Such endorsement
1s known inthe Vatican as
Papal Placei, (“it is pleas-
ing”) and isthe o ficial
stamp of approval. The
Secretariat is the Vatican’s
liason with other Christian
Churches.

No Interference In Politics

Pope Paul VI in his first
official audience told the
world that he would do
everything possible to con-
tribute to international peace
founded on truth, justice,
love and freedom. He
spoke to the nations’ leaders
and Governments at an aud-
ience inthe -Consistorial
Hall for Diplomatic Corps
accredited to the Vatican.
He pledged that. the Vatican

$1,000 Customs duty), Mr. Work cannot deduct the cost of his tuck Ppess Freedom Aweérd | cro “spraying hovertrucks have will not interfere in. ‘affairs

}

from his income, although his income purchased the teuckg But Mr
‘Work. buys the truck and is now broke, broke, broke... be paid

Henry Harper, Editor of the worked successfully over the past
DAILY CHRONICLE, George Six months in terrain which makes

ot interests deriving from
temporal powets.’aeCP.
_ .PAGE.TEN —



we SPORTLIGHT--
BY EDDIE ROBINSON

Trueman Hum-
bles Windies

Last Day Collapse

The West Indies Team is beyond
any doubt the most fascinating tn
the cricket world, They are always
ina burry. They hurry to victory,
they hurry to defeat When True-
man broke thtongh the powerful
West Indies batting on Tuesday, I
couldn’t help thinking of a similar
incident a few weeks ago: Iam
referring to the Dominica Team's
performance in Grenada recently,
The two performances are so similar
that I am forced to conclude that all
West Indies batsmen are helpless
‘against the swinging ball.

Head Down, Tail Up

Replying to England’s Ist innings

total of 216, West Indies were off It was his highest score in Test

1 a modest start, Hunte was bow!l-
ed by Trueman with the score at 42.
Kanhai stared quietly, but Carew
lived dangerously... He was out for
42 when ~ he: decided to hook,
changed his mind, and hit the ball
straight at the bowler. From then
on, there was a collapse which was
only pattially checked by Murray
and Hall. In Jess than an hour,
Kanhai (32) Butcher (ts) Solomon
(0) Sobers , (#9), and Worrell (1)

cool their heels in the:

pavilion, and the scorebuard “read 91 miserable runs~-Only~ Kanhai’s-

"130 for Ze NF ee ee
isa and Hall then. proceed-
ed to show their more famed _coll-
eagues how it should be done. They
put on 48 valaable runs before Halt
was caught off Dexter for 28. Mur-
ray ran’ short. of . partnership when
his score stood at 20, and West In-
dies were all out for 186. For
England Trueman captured § for 75
and Dexter 4 for 38.

England’s Bright Start

Batting a second time, England
started as though they meant busi-
ness. ‘The opening batsmen, Stew-
art and Richardson put op 30 in as
many munutes, but Richardson
was caught behind off Griffith for
14 and Barrington was bowled by
Sobers for 1. Close failed to repeat
his first innings performance. He
was caught off Griffith for 13.
Stewart was then caught behind for
27 and England were up against it
with the score at 69 for 4; and how
well Sharpe and Dexter stood up
against it! Dexter did the attacking,
while Sharpe defended well, but
never missing a scoring chance
when the loose ball came along.
Their partnership put up tor. This
was vintage cricket, and Dexter dis-
played all his strokes in front of the
wicket. He was out for a well p'ay-
ed 57... Murray bringing off a fine
piece of stumping on the leg side
off Gibbs.

- ‘Dexter Great?
At this: « stage, I would like

to relect'on Dexter the batsman,
With due respects to English critic,
tt



DOMINICA “HBRALD

RR TREES

Secretary Of
Siate

Cont. from paze |

Cuba in which B. G. supplies
45M tons of rice and 500,000
railway sleepers. It is not stated
what B. G will get in payment.

These points were mostly con-
tained in a statement in the House

of Commons made by Mr. Nigel

I say that Dexter is not a great
batsman. A. great batsman may
lose form and have a string of low
score, but he does no’ consistestly
pass fifty and ge: out. This has be.n
evinced in the last two. series that
Dexter has played. He failed to get
a century against Australia on the
last tour. In this present series, his Fisher this week in reply to a
scores show that he is in form, butis request by Mr Fenner Brockway,

ing c ation j en he
ee: cone oh Malaysia Federation
The new Federation of Malaysia
Lock, Bowler-Batsman will come into being on August
There was a collapse after Dexter’s 31 thisyear. The agreement was
dismissal From 170 for 5 they signed in London hast Monday by
slumped to 189 for 8. Parks (5) the Governmenis of Malaya, Singa-
Titmus (0) and Trueman (1) were pore, Sarawak and North Borneo,
all dismissed cheaply Lock then Brunei did not sign but it is hoped
joined Sharpe, and these two took that they will eventually join in
command. Worrell tried all his with the reset of the federal territorirs.
bowlers, failed to move the batsmen.
The 200 came up, then 250, When
at last Gibbs bowled Wock, the score
had reached 278, and Dexter de.
clared. Lock scored a chanceless 56.

French Studezts
Visits

A party of over a dozen students
from Martiniquan Lycees will visit
Dominica, accompanied by teachers,
on July17. They will be accomo-
dated in St. Mary’s Academy hostel,
and have expressed a wish to visit
the Mayor, the Botanical Gardens,
Rockaway, Soutriere and perhaps
the Fresh Water Lake and Carib
Reserve, showing slides of +Martini-
que to our students and, remaining in
Dominica for about. a week.
Leader of the party is Professor
Pierre Lucette, founder-president of
the now flourishing Caribbean
Friendship Club,

The visitors will travel by sp ecial
beat.

se es t 5
Minister’s Father
Dies

Mr. N.A.N. Thomas, father
of Mr, N.A.N. Ducreay, Hon
Minister of Trade and Production,
was taken seriously ill in Mahauc
and died on Friday last week. Mr.
Ducreay had renounced his father’s
surname some years ago.

NOTICE

Vacancy In Post Of
Housekeeper. Princess
Margaret Hospital.

Cricket and his partnershlp with
Sharpe put on 89 forthe 9th wick-
et. Sharpe showed that he has the
right temperament for the big game»
and was undefeated with 85.

For West Indies, Gibbs got 4 for
49, Griffith 3 for $5, and: Sobers
2 for 80.

Pathetic Windies

Set to get. 309 in 278 minutes,
the West Indies gave a pathetic dis-
play. They were brusked aside for

38 deserves any mention. Trueman
finished with 7 for 44 and match
figures of 12 for 119, the best. per-
formance of his career. Trneman has
now taken 275 wickets in Test Cric-
ket and now looks certain to reach
the target of 300. A great fast bow-
ler is Fred Trueman

England’s victory by 217 runs
has leveiled the series with two more
matches to be played.

The final scores: — England 216,
Close 55, Sobers 5. for 60 and 278
for 9 declared. Dexter $7, Sharpe
85 not out, Lock 56, Gibbs 4 for
49, Griffith 3 for 55. West Indies
186; Trueman 5 for 75, Dexter 4
for 38 and 91, Trueman 7 for 44.

Wesley vs. Calibishie

On Wednesday roth July 1963

a cricket match was played on the

Calibishie Govt. School ground

between Wesley and Calibishie

Schoolboys. They each took one ¢7 506.60 p.a. inthe scale $1,506

innings; Wesley made tos and y69 — $1,626 x 72 — $1,842.

Calibishhie 68, runs. At the end of The appointment is pensionable and

play they were served with tea and jg subject to Medical fitness and 2

then the visitors left for Wesley. years probation in the first
ag instance

3. The officer shall perform her

FOR SALE duties eile otis general super-

vision of the Matron.

JUST RECEIVED PITCH 4. Meals will be provided.

PINE BOARD Free quarters will be provided in

1X 6x 8-20 FT. TONGUED the Nurses Hostel. No allowance

& GROOVED ml Nea in iy t a

. Leave will be granted in

Tie i et AP HAN & GO. LTD. ita alone with General Orders of

6. Applic*tions for the post

DON’T DEPEND ON YOUR should be addressed to the Chief

NEIGHBOUR’S — BUY Secretary, Administrator's Office and

YOUR OWN DOMINICA should reach him not later than

2nd 4ugust, 1963.
HERALD! ! 1! GO 72 July 13, 20.

Applications are invited for the
post of Housekeeper, Princess
Margaret Hospital.

2. The salary of the post is





‘



Children’s Corner (Questions)
t
Trade passed in Parliamentz——-— ——- --—-——

SATURDAY, JULY 13, 1963
ee “res

(a) What year was the Bill for the abolition of the slave

(b) In August—— ——~— the bill for the Emancipation of

Slavery became Law;
2

You sometimes piay in Peebles Park. Who was th

3,
Peebles after whom the park was nimed? ———— -—————-—--

NAME — -—— —— — —— — — —
SCHOOL

LAST WEEK’S RESULTS

How many Bank Holidays do we have in Dominica?

is

Only Two children qualified for prizes in last week’s contest. They
are: — 1st Leona Shillingford, C.H.S; and 2nd Neville Nicholas, D,G-S.



————$______-

THE “‘VARIETY” STORE

C. G. PHILLIP & CO, LTD.
LATEST ARRIVALS:—



|
]

R
p

5 9» 6 8 Ce 6 ps6 6S 8 6 $e 8 9 8 pg

Q

C

Frosted); Coffin furniture and Handles,
etc. etc.

POP y 1 Oe 6 9 tate 6 OS Oe 6 ONS 9“ 6 OMe $e 5 8“ 6 §“Nne 6 ST 6 Of Pa i eS

ROSEAU CREDIT UNION

~~ peminds—-—
- ALL MEMBER about the 12th
ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING
to be held at St. Gerard’s Hall on
MONDAY NiGNT, 2znd July (this month)
beginning at 8 o’clock.
CASH PRIZES will be offered, and may be won

only by MEMBERS WHO ATTEND.
July 13, 20





Temp meet ee ees, emis

ae 6 9a 6 Be 6 eS 9 6 Pe 6 9 6 9 6 oe 6 9 6 9 6 et 9 6 8 oe ie

JUST RECEIVED
A LIMITED PAIRAGE OF
COW INEIN TA
“SURE SCORE”
FOOUBANV EL
BOOS

GALL IN EARLY AND SECURE YOURS

WHILE THEY LAST
i? eee —






a 6 9a 6 9 6 $5 fa 6 nS PS 9S 8 Se SSS Ye 6 Se eof Se 4 $a se i pe pt



on
Done 13-—

» n
Se 6 0 pt fae 8 tb 9d Pt 8 fo Be 6 9 Vb S OR eS Ot

|. PRINTED AND PUBLISHED BY J, MAGARTSON CHARLES, THE HERALD’S PRINFEBRY, 31 NEW STREBT, ROSBAU, DOMINICA, SATURDAY JULY 13, 1963

J).

|
!

6 Se 1 Re 6 9s

efrigerators (all sizes and at special!

rices), Household Deep Freezers a-d!
lce Cream Freezers: Face Basins, Kitch-;
n Sinks and Bath Room Fittings; Baby;
ribs and Door Mats; Glass (Plain andj

|

vl neem erey
= |
i

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l

f
d.

£
L
|
|
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