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GROUP OF COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS


Volume 5, Issue 6


Visit our online edition at www.mandarinnewsline.com


March 2011


Area alumni celebrate the 50th

birthday of the Peace Corps
By Karl Kennell


Students enjoy once in a

lifetime opportunity

By Contributing Writer Talie Zaifert, Martin J. Gottlieb Day School


Local Peace Lorps volunteers reunite
To many of us it seems as if it
was just yesterday; however, it was
1960 when then-Senator John F.
Kennedy challenged students at
the University of Michigan to serve
their country in the cause of peace
by living and working in develop-
ing countries. From that challenge
developed the Peace Corps, which
was born on March 1, 1961. Since
that day over 200,000 Americans
have served and still today the
mission of the Peace Corps sparks
the imagination and dedication of

www.mandarinnewsline.com
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lur online edition anr
throu each page of our lately suei
Cli on Any Advertiser's Ad with
a website and we will take you
to their websitel
Advertising Information
Call 886919 or
Sales., ,mandarinnewsline.com





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Library, located at 303 North
Laura Street in downtown Jackson-
ville.
*.7 Significantly for our neigh-
borhood, we can proudly count
several neighbors as veterans of
service in the Peace Corps. During
the upcoming event at the Main
Library, Mandarin neighbor David
Miron will include his experiences
and continuing efforts to enlist
volunteers in his presentation. He
will focus on increasing applica-
tions from liberal arts majors and
the Corps policy and the thrust be-
hind that. He will also be sharing
e. examples of how the volunteers are
young people wanting to have a strategically working with interna-
contribution to others' lives. tional organizations and agencies
To celebrate this momentous like the Carter Center and Centers
birthday there will be a full week of for Disease Control to implement
activities during the week of March such programs as Guinea Worm
1 through 7, in what Jacksonville eradication.
Mayor John Peyton has officially Recruited into the Peace
proclaimed as "Peace Corps Week." Corps on May 1, 1974, Mandarin
To kick off the birthday, local resident Larry Allen was a visual
alumni of the Corps will be sharing aids/graphic artist at the time. His
their experiences and work with experience in the Corps is so favor-
the public on Sunday, February 27 ably etched into his memory he
from 2:00 p.m. until 5:00 p.m. at
the conference center at the Main Peace Corps cont. on pg. 5


* Garden center ana Lanascape service
* Lawn & Shrub Spraying
* Indoor Pest Management
* T9rmite Protection
'.i IW/At . W .l d h . J .


Barry Manilow poses with the MJGDS Choir


January 26, 2011 was a big
day for the fourth and fifth graders
and their teachers at the Martin J.
Gottlieb Day School (MJGDS).
It's not every day that an elemen-
tary school choir is asked to share
a stage with legendary singer Barry
Manilow! Just a week before, these
students were practicing typical
songs in their school choir and
then one Friday afternoon, they
were informed that they will be
singing backup to Manilow singing


his hit, "One Voice" at the Jack-
sonville Veterans Memorial Arena.
Excitement was in the air
when parents and teachers received
the news. This was evident through
Facebook posts, classroom blog
posts, texts and phone calls. Not
only were their kids going to par-
ticipate in this amazing opportu-
nity, but they were also given com-
plimentary tickets to the show to

Students cont. on pg. 21


Mandarin Park is now new and improved


By Martie Thompson
Good news, Man-
darin! Mandarin Park
and Boat Ramp, the
36-acre jewel situated
at the southern end of
Mandarin Road on Jul-
ington Creek, reopened
in late January after
being closed for awhile
in late 2010 for needed
refurbishment. The
park originally opened
in 1992 with nature
trails and a playground.
The picturesque pier
was added in 1993 and
the boat ramp was added in 2006.
According to the District 6
City Councilmember Jack Webb,
park improvements include the
addition of 35 much-needed boat
trailer asphalt parking spaces to
conveniently service boaters using
the boat ramp, additional lighting,
park landscaping and new signage.


Final renovations to the park's
playground area, including addi-
tional benches and barbeque grills
nearby, are still underway and are
scheduled to be completed within
60 days.
Webb shares, "Our beautiful
regional park was in need of some
cleanup and TLC. I think our


w .* community will greatly
Enjoy these improve-
ments."
Over the next sev-
S eral years, Webb would
even like to see expan-
sion of Mandarin Park
into a far larger area
for District 6 residents
to enjoy. He envisions
possibly a boardwalk
along the creek similar
to that offered near
County Dock Road
and Walter Jones Park.
Mandarin Park and Boat
Ramp is located at 14780 Manda-
rin Road. Amenities include a boat
dock and ramp, pedestrian docks,
picnic shelters, a playground area,
2.25 miles of unpaved trail, shuffle-
board courts, tennis courts and a
visitor interpretive center. The park
is adjacent to Julington Creek in
Mandarin.


Page 3 What's New
Page 5 Hubbard House
Page 6 School District Journal
Third Thursday series
Page 7 Candidate forum
Page 8 Start Here, Go Anywhere
Page 9 Council scholarship
Page 11 Election Section
Page 17 Youth follow a dream
Page 19 Chinese New Year
Page 20 Quilt Discovery Day
Page 23 Faith News
Page 24 QuickStart tennis
Page 25 River Campaign
Page 26 Designer Showhouse
Page 27 Local classified ads
Page 28 Coast Guard auxiliary
Page 29 Tiger Cubs travel
Page 30 SewMuch Comfort
Page 31 Gardening


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Wkl'A- Maui

Community Happenings


Buy A Brick and support the other's c
Billard Park! Mark 2011 by be- promote
coming part of the park and a part station ii
of Mandarin history! As develop- art, cho.
ment and maintenance of Billard just abo
Commemorative Park continues, be done
decorative, personalized bricks anyone
continue to be offered for sale. sugar er
These can be placed in your choice ideas an
of three locations within the park: sagnfl.b
along sidewalks, the Veteran's Me- dates.
morial Monument area or near the
butterfly garden. The Billard Park The
is owned and maintained by the program
Mandarin Community Club and is "How N1
located at 11642 Brady Road. For of a Cri
more information, please call the Gilpin,
club office at 268-1622. Your sup- Nationa
port, as always, will be appreciated! The pro
Ramada
The Sugar Arts Guild of Hartley
North Florida meets monthly 10:30 a.
at the South Mandarin Library, open to
located at 12125 San Jose Bou- cost is $
levard. We are an organization of for non-
sugar artists, cake designers and or infor
confectioners from Northeast 268-24'
Florida who enjoy getting together
every month to visit, watch a A b
demonstration and sample each on Satu


9:00 a.r
Krantz I
in Manw
Bouleva
drive is
a 14 yea
who is a
For mor
faceboo
call Adr


Do you have community or club news you would
like included in Mandarin NewsLine?
Then contact Martie Thompson at:
editor@mandarinnewsline.com or 886-4919.


creations. Our purpose is to
e creativity and experimen-
n cake decorating, sugar
colate, pastries, candies and
ut anything edible that can
decoratively. We welcome
interested in meeting other
ithusiasts and swapping
d techniques to visit www.
logspot.com for meeting


e Mandarin Women's Club
n for Thursday, March 24 is
Jot to Become the Victim
me," by speaker Kevin M.
executive director for the
al Crime Stop Program.
gram will be held at the
a Inn, located at 3130
Road and doors open at
.m. Club membership is
all women. The luncheon
14 for members and $15
-members. For reservations
mation, please call Iris at
59 by March 20.

blood drive will take place
rday, March 26 from
m. to 12:00 noon at the
Dental Care office, located
darin at 12058 San Jose
ard, Suite 102. The blood
being sponsored to benefit
ar old boy fighting leukemia
a friend of the dental office.
re information, please go to
k.com/krantzdentalcare or
ia Krantz at 880-3131.


Dale Clifford, Chair, UNF
History Department, will be the
speaker for the program of the
American Association of Univer-


sity Women, Jacksonville Branch
on Saturday, March 19, begin-
ning at 11:45 a.m. at the San Jose
Country Club. Professor Clifford's
topic will be women and war in
the 20th century. The event is
open to anyone interested in the
history of women, AAUW's role in
that history and the goal of equity
for women in times of peace and
war. The luncheon cost is $17 for
members or $18 for non-members.
For reservations and information,
please call Susan at 642-7038 by
March 16.

The Ramsgate Homeown-
ers Association held their Annual
Meeting at the Mandarin Commu-
nity Club on Thursday, January 27.
Emily Lisska, executive director of
the Jacksonville Historical Society
was the guest speaker. This year's
Crime Watch program was on
Identity Theft Protection and was
presented by Gary Dickinson of
the JSO Community Affairs Divi-
sion. JSO Officers Haberman and
Sell (Zone 3) spoke on neighbor-
hood crime statistics. The evening
also included dinner and musical
entertainment by Richard Dickson
of the NE Florida Conservatory.
The Ramsgate Homeowners As-
sociation was organized in 1986
making it one of the oldest associa-
tions in Mandarin. There are 264
homes in the subdivision which
is located between Mandarin and
Loretto Roads.

The March General Meeting
of the All Star Quilters Guild will
be held on Monday, March 21 at
9:30 a.m. in the First Christian
Church of Jacksonville, located at
11924 San Jose Boulevard. The
program will be a trunk show of
quilts made by St. Augustine quil-
ter Mary Rhopa la Cierra. Visitors
are welcome! For more informa-
tion, please contact Dot Butler
at 642-6574 and visit us at www.
orgsites.com/fl/allstarquiltguild.

The River City Women's Club
will hold its monthly meeting on
Wednesday, March 16 at the Man-
darin Ramada Inn. The meeting
will begin at 10:30 a.m., followed
by lunch and a very interesting
speaker: Michael Lawson, a mem-
ber of the Southern Genealogists
Exchange Society, Inc. in Jack-
sonville will talk about "How to
Start Your Basic Genealogy Family
Project." Visitors are welcome! The
luncheon cost is $14; for reserva-
tions, please call 262-8719.

On Tuesday, March 15 at
10:00 a.m. the Dogwood Circle of
the Mandarin Garden Club will
host Carole Adams (past president
of the Audubon Society) for bird
watching. It will be held at Walter
Jones Park on Mandarin Road. In
the event of rain, we will hold the
meeting at the Mandarin Garden
Club, located at 2892 Loretto
Road. Open to the public! For
more information, please call 886-
4782.

The Italian American Club in
Mandarin has changed the date for
its Garage/Bake Sale from March
5 to Saturday, March 26 from 9:00
a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Lunch will also
be available. We will have home-
made cakes specially prepared by
our members and in addition there


will be cannolis available. We are
cleaning our closets and sheds to
raise money to do some new deco-
rating for our club. Come join us!
On March 5 we will be serving a
luncheon at St. Matthews Church
for a Fashion Show to benefit
Camp I Am Special. The luncheon
will be from 11:30 a.m. until 2:00
p.m. For further details check our
website at iacofjacksonville.com.

Baptist Medical Center South,
conveniently located at Old St.
Augustine Road and 1-95, is look-
ing for people to volunteer in the
hospital's gift shop. Previous retail
experience is a plus but it not re-
quired. Volunteers are asked to fill


one four-hour shift per week with
a one year commitment. The gift
shop hours are typically 9:00 a.m.
until 1:00 p.m. or 12:30 p.m. until
4:30 p.m. For a volunteer applica-
tion, please call Erin at 271-6081.

The South Jacksonville
Republican Club will meet on
Saturday, March 5 at the Golden
Corral on San Jose Boulevard.
Social time will begin at 9:30 a.m.
followed by the club meeting at
10:00 a.m. in the enclosed Meeting
Room in the restaurant. The meet-
ing will include an open forum for
Republican candidates participat-
ing in the upcoming Duval County
What's New cont on pg 4


6 weeks - VPK (4 year old)
Come by and meet our loving and caring staff
and while you are there be sure to take a peek at
our very spacious playground.
We have reasonable rates
and childcare vouchers Marbon
are accepted. Zaxby's

3560 Marbon Road I
904-262-2666 W
S - S0


RTPubtishing, (nc.

The CreekLine * The Ocean Breeze
c '/ ' NewsLine - ?'&t - tttn
Publisher
Rebecca Taus
publisher @rtpublishinginc. corn
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RT Publishing, Inc. saL a 0 PuperChaif
12443 San Jose Boulevard ..
Suite 403
E l.i,-^ Jacksonville, FL 32223 IFPA. s. JOHNS i
Ph: 904-886-4919 C-E B ME MER

The Mandarin NewsLine Community Newspaper is a free monthly publication
distributed via bulk mail to all addresses in Zip Codes 32223, 32258 and selected
routes in 32257. Submission of articles and photographs are received by mail or email,
although email to editor@rtpublishinginc.com is preferred. The writers' opinions do not
necessarily reflect the opinion of RT Publishing, Inc. Advertising Rates are available by
request.
RT Publishing, Inc. is not responsible for advertisement content or accuracy of
information provided by its advertisers. Nor does RT Publishing, Inc. endorse any of
the products or services included in this publication. RT Publishing, Inc. reserves the
right to refuse advertisement or copy from any advertiser. All rights are reserved and no
portion of this publication may be copied without the express written consent of the
publisher. � 2011.


Letters to the
Editor policy
At RT Publishing we wel-
come Letters to the Editor. We
request they be no more than
250 words. All letters must
include writer's name, address,
and telephone number. Only the
name will be published. E-mail
to editor@rtpublishinginc.com.
Anonymously sent letters will not
be published.





Page 4, c ,/,',,,,;,// NewsLine * March 2011 * www.c //,.'',,,,;/,NewsLine.com


From the

City Council

Member's Desk

By Contributing Writer jack Webb,
City Council Member, District 6
City Council President Jack Webb is an incumbent candidate
for the office of City Council Member, District 6. Please watch for
this column to reappear after the Duval County elections have deter-
mined a winner in this race

What's New cont from pg 3
primary election. This period will please visit www.relayforlife.org/
have a question and answer period mandarinfl or call 398-0537.
which will be a very informative to


all who attend.

The Toast ofJax - Toastmaster
Club meets each Saturday at 7:30
a.m. at the Ramada Inn Mandarin
in the conference room located in
GiGi's restaurant. Whether you're a
professional, student, stay-at-home
parent or retiree, Toastmasters
is the best way to improve your
communication and leadership
skills. Toastmasters can help you
lose the fear of public speaking
and learn skills that will help you
be more successful in your chosen
path. Please join us! For additional
information, please visit www.
toastofiax.org.

The American Cancer Soci-
ety has kicked off its fundraising
season. In an effort to fight back
against cancer and create more
birthdays, Relay for Life, the
American Cancer Society larg-
est fundraising event, is working
harder than ever to ensure a bright
future for those who find them-
selves in need of life-saving care.
Join the American Cancer Society
and Relay for Life of Mandarin on
April 16 and 17 as we celebrate the
11 million survivors who will have
birthdays that year and remem-
ber those who honorably fought
against the worst disease known to
mankind. For more information,


The Mandarin Museum and
Historical Society invites the public
to the presentation of the annual
Miss Aggie Award on Saturday,
March 19, from 1:00 p.m. until
3:00 p.m. at the Old Mandarin
Store and Post Office located at
112471 Mandarin Road. The free
event will include tours of the
historic building and enjoy Moon
Pies and RC Cola, favorite snacks
when the store served the Mandarin
community from 1911-1964. The
award honors a female Mandarin
resident who has contributed to the
community in the areas of busi-
ness, civic, educational or charitable
accomplishment. For information,
call the Mandarin Museum in the
Walter Jones Historical Park at 268-
0784 or visit the museum's website:
www.mandarinmuseum.net.

A VA Aid and Attendance
Benefit Seminar is held the last
Tuesday of every month at 11:00
a.m. at Wyndham Lakes, located
at 10660 Old St. Augustine Road.
Reservations are requested. Please
call 262-4600.

The AARP Driver Safety Pro-
gram for drivers 50 and older will
be held Tuesday and Wednesday,
March 8 and 9 from 9:00 a.m. to
12:00 noon at Memorial Hospital,
located at 3625 University Bou-


KeyDoaraconnectlonjax.com
9912 San Jose Boulevard


evard South. lhe fee for AARP
members is $12; non-members'
fee is $14 and participants must
attend both days for certification to
qualify for auto insurance discount.
To register, please call 391-1320.

The MOMS Club of Jackson-
ville/Mandarin-SE offers support
for stay at home and part-time
working moms living in zip code
32258. With the club you will
have enriching activities for you
and your children, during the day
when you need the most support.
A sample of activities includes park
days, beach days, monthly socials,
playgroups and field trips to the
zoo and museums. For additional
information, please email seman-
darinmoms@yahoo.com.

Shuffleboard is played on
Tuesday at 1:30 p.m. at Manda-
rin Park (south end of Mandarin
Road) next to the tennis courts at
the park entrance. Beginners are
welcome. Just show up unless it
rains or is just too cold to play.

The children's Bumblebee
circle of the Mandarin Garden
Club will get ready for spring on
Thursday, March 10 from 6:30
p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at the Manda-
rin Garden Club located at 2892
Loretto Road. Children ages five
through 18 are welcomed with an
adult. The Bumblebee circle started
their sixth year of existence in
September. Our monthly meetings
consist of garden related topics
with the focus for children. We
welcome parents, grandparents,
aunts and uncles to attend with
their respective children to attend
and begin to sharing in a lifetime
hobby. Additionally, our garden
club has adult circles available to
meet the needs of our community.
For more information, please email


Er.....��


mardaringardenclub@comcast.net
or call 268-1192.

The Mandarin Chapter of
AARP meets the third Friday of
every month at 2:00 p.m. at Au-
gustine Landing, located at 10141
Old St. Augustine Road. We are a
non-profit, non-partisan member-


Advertisment

New Business Profile!
website and sign up for our email list
to receive information about upcom-
ing events (including wine tasting
and beer dinners), musicians and
Specials.
We look forward to serving you!


Want to find Jacksonville's new-
est trend in dining? Look no fur-
ther than the Speckled Hen Tavern
& Grille, located on Jacksonville's
Southside just /2 mile from 1-95 and
the Avenues Mall (next to the Av-
enues Regal Theaters). Unlike any-
thing else in Jacksonville, the Speck-
led Hen is a locally owned "Southern
Gastropub" where you will receive a
fine dining experience at a fair price.
Our menu features Executive Chef
Nick Robson's creative assortment
of Southern inspired comfort foods
prepared with a new twist. Enjoy
everything from Lobster and Scallion
Fritters, King Crab Mac n' Cheese,
Shrimp and Grits to Braised Short
Ribs-just to name a few.
Making everything in-house us-


ing fresh, seasonal ingredients, the
menu changes with the season but
always offers something for everyone.
The food is complemented by a full
bar, an extensive beer selection and
a wine list selected to pair with our
food. Please join us for happy hour
beer, wine and cocktail specials.
Inside the restaurant you'll find a
lively environment highlighted by a
warm, casual d6cor. Our walls feature
local art which is for sale, with all
proceeds going directly to the artist.
In addition, we feature acoustic mu-
sic from some of Jacksonville's best
musicians every Wednesday through
Saturday night. Guests can also watch
sporting events on one of our many
large screen televisions. Check our


9475 Philips Highway

Jacksonville, FL 32256
(Next to Avenues Regal Cinema)

Phone 904-538-0811
Fax 904-538-0813
www.speckledhentavern.com
Lunch: Mon.- Sat. 11a.m.- 4 p.m.
Sunday Brunch: 10:30a.m.- 3 p.m.
Dinner: Mon.-Thur., 4-10 p.m.
Fri.- Sat., 5-11 p.m. * Sun., 3-9 p.m.
Happy Hour specials from 4-7 daily
and 12 - 7 on Saturday and Sunday


ship organization, affiliated with
the national AARP. Our activities
and programs are designed to help
people age 50 and over improve the
quality of their lives. Visitors are
welcome! For additional informa-
tion, please call 733-0516 or email
alex9520@comcast.net.

Eva Grayzel, master storytell-
er, will be performing at the Mar-
riott Southpoint, located at 4670
Salisbury Road, on Monday March
28 at 7:00 p.m. Her program "Les-
sons for a Lifetime," will remind
participants of what is important
in life. Sponsored by Jewish Fam-
ily and Community Services, it is
free and open to the community.
Please call 394-5737 for additional
information.

Ride with Me for Autism
2011, presented by the Jessica
Green Foundation, Inc., will be
held on Saturday, March 26, 2011
at the Camp Milton, Jacksonville-
Baldwin Rail Trail. The cost is
$25 plus $100 minimum pledge
(add $5 after February 26, 2011)
The day will feature safe rides,
great food, live entertainment,
prize drawings and awards for top
individual fundraiser, top fund-
raising team and largest team. For
additional information, please visit
www.ridewithmeforautism.org.
High school students from
France, Spain, Finland and Taiwan
will be arriving to the Jacksonville
area on July 7 to August 4 for a
four-week language travel stay. EF-
Educational Homestay Programs,
a nonprofit division of EF Inter-
cultural Foundation, sponsors the
group and has provided opportuni-
ties for language travel for almost
30 years. For more information,
please call Karensue McDowell at
287-2262 or e-mail Karensuemc-
dowell@comcast.net.


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www.cs //.,,:'.,//NewsLine.com * March 2011 * c ?/.,;,nii, NewsLine, Page 5


ST 'he Sheriff

Reports
By Contributing Writerjohn H. Rutherford,
Duval County Sheriff

Sheriff John Rutherford is an incumbent candidate for the office of
Sheriff of Duval County. Please watch for this column to reappear after
the Duval County elections have determined a winner in this race.


II


Setting the Pace for Peace
By Contributing Writer Ashleyjohnson, Hubbard House


Linda Cedillo, nine-year
Mandarin resident, is Setting the
Pace for Peace and she challenges
you to do the same. She will be
participating in Hubbard House's
second annual Setting the Pace
for Peace Domestic Violence
Awareness Walk, to be held on
Saturday, April 9, 2011.


a third of domestic violence cases
are ever reported. The good news
is that domestic violence can be
prevented. Like any other issue
worth taking a stand for, the first
step to a solution is awareness.
"This is an opportunity for
the residents of our community
to take steps together to end


Everybody Gets It.

Everybody Reads It.

8864919


abuse and to say that domestic
violence is a crime and will not
be tolerated," said Cedillo. "I'm
walking because through raising
awareness I can help give victims
a voice."
The Setting the Pace for Peace
Awareness Walk is free to partici-
pate in and is open to the public.
The walk will be held at the Ed
Austin Regional Park, located at
11751 McCormick Road and
begins at 9:00 a.m., with registra-
tion at 8:00 a.m. Visit www.hub-
bardhousewalk.com to register.
If you have any questions, please
contact Ashley Johnson by phone
at 354-0076 ext. 212 or by e-mail
at ajohnson@hubbardhouse.
org. All proceeds from this event
help Hubbard House continue to
providing its life-saving programs
and services to victims of domes-
tic violence and their children.
If you or someone you know
is in an abusive relationship please
call the Hubbard House 24-Hour
Domestic Violence Hotline at
354-3114 or (800) 500-1119.

Peace Corps cont. from pg. 1


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Page 6, < /,//r,//// cNewsLine * March 2011 * www.c //,/',,,,,;/,NewsLine.com


School

District 0Journal

By Contributing Writer Tommy Hazouri,
School Board Representative, District 7


March Madness!
The NCAA basketball tourna-
ment is popularly referred to as
"March Madness." Well, for public
education, the State of Florida has
its own "March Madness!" It is
the time FCATs are given, (March
and April this year), the Florida
Legislature is in session and school
districts around the state are biting
their nails as they attempt to put
together the budget for the next
school year. It is, to paraphrase Mr.
Dickens, the best of times and the
worst of times for public educa-
tion.
The state budget is the only
item that must be passed every year
in the legislature. And we cannot
shortchange our children's educa-
tion in that budget. Ask yourself,
is a K-12 education really the State
Legislature's Number 1 priority?
Or is a promise the state won't
keep; and, for the past decade has
not kept.
The new governor recently
gave his first budget proposal.
The citizens knew it wouldn't be
pretty-and it was ugly, very ugly.
He proposed cuts to education
from $22.5 billion to $19.1 billion
- some $3.4 billion dollars less
than even last year. The per-student
funding under the state's main for-
mula for school spending slides to
$703 per student less than last year.
I know, as taxpayers, we all
want government to do more with
less. However, in the case of our
children, we have been doing less
for years and its showing - Florida


is near the bottom of all 50 states
in education spending per capital.
We are becoming a Third World
state, in a world where education
should be the solution to our na-
tion's ills and successes.
Children are not democrats or
republicans. Children are not some
bad product that can be sent back
to the manufacturer.
They come in all shapes and
sizes and each child deserves the
very best we can give them to pre-
pare for their future and the future
of our nation. Every child deserves
the opportunity to learn, graduate
and be prepared for college and the
workforce.
No, money is not the answer,
but it is part of the solution. Now
is the time, now is the opportunity
to talk with or write to the gover-
nor and your legislators. It sounds
good to say we are going to cut
the budget, but who will speak for
our children. Our success as a city,
state, and nation depends on them
and our responsibility as adults is
not to let them down.
We have been fortunate in
Mandarin schools and in most
of our other schools. But when
you begin talking seriously about
cutting teachers, media specialists,
guidance counselors, librarians, art
and music and giving big corpora-
tions more tax breaks, building
more jails and putting more on
welfare, then our priorities are
turned upside down.
Yes, our school system is doing
better, but we all know we have a


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long way to go. As I often say, edu-
cation is a never-ending story. But
I honestly believe, public education
as we know it, is being undermined
by many of our elected officials
from the White House to the State
House.
Public education is the very
foundation on which our great
country was built. We must stop
the bleeding and we must continue
to invest in our children. If they
can't count on us, then who can
they count on?

Important Dates:
March 1: School Board Meeting,
6:00 p.m., Cline Auditorium,
1701 Prudential Drive
March 2: Student Early Release
Day
March 23: Student Early Release
Day
March 25: Teacher Planning Day
(No school for students)
March 28 - April 1: Spring Break
(Schools Closed)
FCAT Testing Dates:
March 1 - 3, 2011 and April 4 -
21, 2011
Please check with your child's
school for specific testing informa-
tion or visit our website at www.
duvalschools.org.

Upcoming City Election Dates:
* First Election - March 22, 2011
* General Election - May 17,
2011

Thought for the Month:
The school is the last expendi-
ture upon which America should
be willing to economize. -Franklin
D. Roosevelt
If you think education is
expensive, try ignorance.


1 ,,','; it NewsLine
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editor@mandarinnewsline.com


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Mandarin Art Festival

volunteers sign up for duty!
By Contributing Writer Susie Scott, Mandarin Community Club


Volunteers are still needed and
accepted! The Mandarin Commu-
nity Club, sponsor and host of the
Mandarin Art Festival, has been
taking calls and signing up volun-
teers at the first planning meeting
held February 7. But those wishing
to volunteer to make the 43rd
annual event on Easter weekend
April 23 and 24 the best ever are
still welcome to join the team and
the fun!
In 2010 the club partnered
with Howard Alan Events for one
of the biggest and best shows in
the 43 year history of this Manda-
rin event. HA Events is bringing
back the great art, artists and the
crowds, but the club needs volun-
teers to help with club-sponsored


activities like the bake sale, greeters
at the gates, Children's Art Show,
fundraising, program sales, green
market and more.
Come join the team as we
plan, prepare, promote and deliver
another super successful Mandarin
Art Festival. Meet new people,
enjoy the show as a team member
and volunteer. And don't forget
teens can acquire service hours as
volunteers for this family event.
Call the club at 268-1622 to
volunteer.
Planning meetings in March
will be held at 6:00 p.m. on Tues-
day, March 15 and March 29 at the
club located at 12447 Mandarin
Road.


Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings Park official to speak
about author's life at Third Thursday series


The park manager of the
Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings Historic
State Park, Valerie Rivers of Cross
Creek, will speak about the life of
the author at 7:00 p.m. on Thurs-
day, March 17, at the Mandarin
Community Club, located at
12447 Mandarin Road. Rivers is
the third speaker this year in the
Third Thursday Lecture Series
being sponsored by the Mandarin
Museum and Historical Society
and the Mandarin Community
Club. The public is invited to at-
tend the free lecture. Refreshments
will be served starting at 6:30 p.m.
Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings
(1896 - 1953) was a Floridian
author whose themes and setting
incorporated the rural community
that she lived in. Her best known
work, The Yearling, won a Pulitzer
Prize for fiction in 1939.
Rivers will speak about Rawl-
ings' life and how events during her
time influenced her works. Rivers
will introduce Rawlings' Cross
Creek farm and the importance
she placed on living with nature.
Rivers will also speak about Rawl-
ings' interactions and writings of
her neighbors and friends and the
author's observations of changes
within these relationships. The lec-
ture will incorporate passages and
personal writings from Rawlings.
Rivers is originally from
Orlando. Rivers began working as
park manager at Marjorie Kinnan


Rawlings Historic State Park in
1993. During her tenure, Rivers
oversaw the park be recognized
as a National Historic Landmark.
She led many restoration projects
and interpretive exhibits within the
park. She also established a citizen
support organization for the park.


For more information about
the Mandarin Museum and Histor-
ical Society and the Walter Jones
Historical Park, call the museum
at 268-0784 or visit the museum's
website at www.mandarinmuseum.
net.


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www.cs //,//,,:',,,/NewsLine.com * March 2011 * c /~;/,r,',l; NewsLine, Page 7


Open to the Public
The All Star Quilters
Guild, Inc.
www.orgsites.com/fl/allstarquiltguild
will be documenting quilts for the
Florida Quilt Project
sponsored by
The Sunshine State Quilters Assoc.
www.ssqa.org
Saturday * March 19th
10:00 AM to 3:00 PM
The First Christian Church
11924 San Jose Blvd.
Quilt information and photograph
will be entered into the national
Quilt Index.
www.quiltindex.org
Information
904-262-0268
904-642-6574


Mandarin Community Club
hosts District 6 City Council
candidate forum


The historic Mandarin Com-
munity Club will continue the
tradition of providing educational
and community programs by
hosting a Candidates Forum for
qualified candidates running for
the District 6 City Council. The
forum will take place on Thursday
evening, March 3 at 7:00 p.m. at
the club, located at 12447 Man-
darin Road.
Mary Baer of Channel 4 the
Local Station will be the guest
moderator and each candidate will
have the opportunity to respond
to questions from the audience.
The club has hosted forums as a
free community service to mem-
bers and the Mandarin public.
Candidate question cards are avail-
able as guests arrive and collected
prior to the start of the forum.
The District 6 City Council
seat is currently held by Council-
member Jack Webb (REP) who


is running for re-election against
two other candidates in the race,
Matt Schellenberg (REP) and
Greg Youngblood (REP).
* Meet, greet and mingle with
refreshments begins at 6:30
p.m.
* Forum begins promptly at
7:00 p.m. and ends at approxi-
mately 8:00 p.m.
* Forum opens with each can-
didate given two minutes to
make a presentation of their
qualifications and/or experi-
ence.
* Candidates will have two
minutes to answer questions
submitted by question cards.
* An open question and answer
period will close the Forum
(time permitting).
For more information, please
contact the club at 268-1622.
The forum is free and open to
the public.


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Message from young Mandarin philanthropist Osjah Castro


Hi everyone, it's 11 year old
Osjah Castro again. I wanted to
update you on my current com-
munity service project. If you
remember I adopted Timucuan
Elementary for the year and have
been doing things all year long to
help them out.
I am now working on "The
Cupcake Rodeo" and "I Gave The
Shirt Off My Back" silent auc-
tion. Think Cupcake Wars with a
rodeo theme. We have several local
bakeries competing in a cupcake
display but would love to have
several more. If you or someone
you know is a baker and would like
to participate please have them call
813-4481. There are some really
cool prizes for the winners!
Are you a celebrity? Do you
know someone who is? I'm looking
for shirts from celebs in music,
sports, TV, film and film. I've
already gotten shirts from the band


Hey Monday and from writer/
producer/director/actor Garry
Marshall, recording artist Sean
Kingston, actress Lauren Mayhew,
Ericka Dunlap (Miss America
2004), actress Allison Janney, TV
host of Dancing With The Stars
Tom Bergeron, Linden Ashby from
Mortal Combat, Disney's Next Big
Thing Jasmine Sagganario, Todd
McClure of the Atlanta Falcons
and more on the way! Can you
help with one? It can be any shirt
- the only two requirements are
that it be autographed and that it
is accompanied by a photo of you
either wearing it or holding it to
authenticate the origin.
Buy tickets to attend this event
on April 9 at Timucuan Elemen-
tary School from 1:00 p.m. until
4:00 p.m.! There will be lots of
cupcakes to eat, some entertain-
ment and of course there is the si-
lent auction for the celebrity auto-


graphed shirts. Tickets are available
for $10 donation each. They are
available through the main office at
Timucuan Elementary or call 813-
4481 or email OsiahsWish6(aol.


com. One hundred percent of the
proceeds go directly to the school.
Love,
Osjah


SNeed Customers?

886-4919


Stroke Centers earn a perfect
score at recertification visit


Baptist Medical Center Down-
town and Baptist Medical Center
South earned a perfect score from
The Joint Commission on their re-
cent Primary Stroke Center Recer-
tification survey. The surveyor was
impressed with the leadership and
staff, as well as the care provided to
stroke patients and their families.
There were no recommendations
for improvement in any areas of
the program.
"I am delighted that The
Joint Commission surveyor was so


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impressed with our program. It is
a true testament to the excellent
teamwork at Baptist," said Sean
Orr, MD, who leads the Baptist
Stroke Center team. Dr. Orr is a
board-certified neurologist with
Baptist Neurology who specializes
in stroke care and research.
The Acute Stroke Team at Bap
tist includes emergency medicine
physicians, neurologists, neuroradi-
ologists, neurosurgeons, registered
nurses, rehabilitation specialists
and social services staff.
The Baptist Stroke Centers
at Baptist Medical Center Down-
town and Baptist Medical Center
South have been certified by The
Joint Commission as Primary
Stroke Centers since 2007. The
Joint Commission's Gold Seal
of Approval demonstrates that
the Baptist Stroke Centers ap-
ply evidence-based protocols to
diagnosing and treating stroke
that have been shown to improve
patient outcomes.
By law, Florida's Emergency
Medical Services (EMS) personnel
are directed to transport patients
presenting with acute stroke symp-
toms to designated stroke centers.
An important facet of Baptist's
Primary Stroke Centers is their
focus on community education
and prevention of this potentially
debilitating disease.

Do you know the warning
signs of stroke?
* Sudden numbness or
weakness of the face, arm
or leg, especially on one
side of the body
* Sudden confusion, trouble
speaking or understanding
* Sudden trouble seeing in
one or both eyes
* Sudden trouble walking,
dizziness, loss of balance or
coordination
* Sudden severe headache
with no known cause


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Page 8, ? /,;,,,,,; NewsLine * March 2011 * www.cs //,,,/',,;/NewsLine.com


Encore!

Putting on the Ritz: Another fabulous gem
in our community
By Betty Swenson Bergmark, Professor Emeritus, jacksonville University


What a joy it was to see how
far the Ritz Theatre and Museum
has come since my last visit. I re-
member the initial efforts to restore
the 1929 Ritz Theatre movie house
as a center of the African American
culture that had thrived in the La
Villa area where it had been housed
and where in the 1929s to 1960s it
had been known as the Harlem of
the South. These efforts flagged for
lack of support until the city took
over in 1999. Under the unique
guidance of Executive Director
Carol Alexander, it has achieved
an exciting and unique place in
our community. Its mission is to
"research, record and preserve the
material and artistic culture of


African American life in Northeast
Florida and the African Diaspora
and present in an educational or
entertaining format, the many
facets that make up the historical
and cultural legacy of this commu-
nity." It achieves this in a variety of
ways, including concerts, films and
lectures and of course the unique
museum.
The museum's permanent
collection features an exhibit of
the history of African Americans
in Northeast Florida. An excit-
ing feature is "Lift Ev'ry Voice
and Sing." Known as the Negro
National Hymn, it was composed
by two native sons of Jacksonville,
James Weldon Johnson and John


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Rosamond Johnson. Exhibited in
a mixed media presentation, it tells
the Johnson story through pro-
jected images, music and dialogue.
In addition, a short term exhibit
will be on display until May 7.
Entitled "Through our eyes, 2011
for Women and Men of Color: The
art of Relationships," it will present
works by artists exploring the com-
plexities of various relationships.
In the theatre, there are three
regularly scheduled programs. On
the first Thursday of each month it
hosts the "Spoken Word," a gather-
ing of local poets, writers, rappers
and story tellers, who share their
tales in a relaxed cafe setting. The
first Friday of each month features
"Amateur Night at the Ritz," where
you are the judge of who stays and
who goes on to compete for prizes
and on the first Saturday a Jazz Jam
is featured in the Ritz Lounge with
good food and great vibes!
In addition to all of this, plus
films and lectures, the Ritz hosts
concerts by great artists. March will
feature sultry vocalist Rene Marie
on March 5, exciting Jazz star
Esperanza Spalding, the Chamber
Music Society on March 12 and
the incomparable and most im-
portant Jazz vocalist today, Dianne
Reeves on March 19.
The Ritz Theatre and Museum
is located at 829 North Davis
Street in Jacksonville. For more
information or tickets you can call
632-5555 or visit www.ritzjack-
sonville.com.

c /,,,,'-i,,,;, NewsLine

YOUR
Community Newspaper

886-4919


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Start Here and Go Anywhere

March Madness at the Library
By Contributing Writer Lynne Baldwin, Library Supervisor, Mandarin
Branch Library


The Mandarin Branch Library
is the best branch, bar none, at the
Jacksonville Public Library. Perhaps
I am a little biased. My name is
Lynne Baldwin. I am the manager
of the Mandarin Branch Library on
Kori Road. Each month I will be
sharing with you the latest news on
what's happening at the Mandarin
Branch Library.
March is my favorite month.
Spring begins in March. My birth-
day is in March. Most importantly,
March is Women's History Month.
The first adult book I remember
reading was about the Kings and
Queens of England and it changed
my life. It introduced me to Queen
Elizabeth I of England, the greatest
monarch in British History (well,
next to her father Henry VIII, but
that's another story). One of my
favorite books (also available as an
audio book) is Elizabeth: the Strug-
gle for the Throne by David Starkey.
On DVD, Elizabeth has been
portrayed by many great actresses
such as Bette Davis in The Private
Lives of Elizabeth and Essex, Cate
Blanchett in Elizabeth and the se-
quel Elizabeth: The Golden Age and
the incomparable Glenda Jackson
in Elizabeth R, the six part BBC
television miniseries. But I think
that the best thing about March
and Women's History Month is
that all of these titles and more are
available at the Mandarin Branch
Library. Come in and check them
out. And don't forget about our
eBook collection downloadable to
the Nook and other library com-
patible eReaders.
The Children's Department
offers a variety of programming
each week including Mother Goose


Time; Toddler Time; Preschool
Storytime and Stories for Fami-
lies for all ages. Mandarin teens
show their creative side in Writing
Inspired Teens Write a Book on
Friday, March 11 at 4:30 p.m. Join
the Fiction Book Club on March
14 at 1:00 p.m. for a discussion
of The Four Corners of the Sky by
Michael Malone. Our monthly
program calendar is available at
http://jpl.coj.net.
The Library is a designated
Early Voting Site from March 7
through 20 and a polling site on
March 22. AARP Free Tax As-
sistance will resume on March 28
after Early Voting ends. Visit our
website at http://jpl.coj.net for
more information.
At the Mandarin Branch Li-
brary you really can Start Here and
Go Anywhere from British history
to Toddler Time to the dreaded
income tax. Have a great March
and I will see you at the library.

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www.cs ////,,',,/,;,/NewsLine.com * March 2011 * c ?/,,, ;,',, NewsLine, Page 9


Poison Center services change with the times


Jacksonville "is no longer your
parent's poison center," states Dr.
Jay Schauben, director. "Times
have changed and we have changed
with the times."
As the 57 poison centers in
the nation prepare to celebrate the
National Poison Prevention Week
awareness campaign scheduled for
March 20 through 26, Schauben
explains that the Poison Center
continues to provide exceptional
patient care by specially trained
nurses, pharmacists and toxicolo-
gists through the 24 hour, nation-
wide toll-free, Poison Helpline (1-
800-222-1222), but now also aids
the Florida Department of Health
and other governmental agencies in
providing real-time public health
surveillance efforts for medication,
environmental and foodborne
threats.
The Florida/USVI Poison
Information Center - Jacksonville


played a key role in handling pub-
lic and healthcare professional calls
during the H 1N 1 and Gulf Oil
Spill emergencies, managing the
patient care issues associated with
these events.
Schauben states, "The Florida
Poison Information Center Net-
work Data Center electronically
transmitted epidemiologic and
clinical data from all three Florida
Poison Centers to the nationwide
database operated by the Ameri-
can Association of Poison Control
Centers and the statewide biosur-
veillance system within the Florida
Department of Health. These data
enabled public health organizations
to track these threats and plan
more effectively for the treatment
of individuals affected by these
events."
Schauben adds that the Poison
Center also monitors for drug/


chemical abuse patterns, bio/
chemical terrorist health hazards,
food poisoning threats, significant
medication adverse effects and
environmental health hazards not-
ing, "with the most recent public
health threats related to abuse of
synthetic marijuana and bath salts,
the Poison Center was able to en-
sure that the 142 medical facilities
in our service area had the latest
epidemiological information and
treatment advice."
These latest surveillance in-
novations are a natural evolution
of the Center's primary patient
care focus. Created by an act of
the Florida Legislature in 1989 in
response to the overwhelming need
for emergency poison information
in the State, the Florida Poison
Information Center Network
(FPICN) was born. The FPICN
incorporates a statewide network of
poison centers located in Jackson-
ville, Miami, and Tampa. These
centers collaborate to provide
efficient and effective services for
the general public and healthcare
professionals.
"As we again celebrate this
annual Poison Prevention Week,


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e tDental Exam &ir

Call orDetails
Aln(New PMrriens only).




Mandarin Council scholarship
announced


IC onc o u t it is a time to remind the commu-
SConcerns ab out nity that the health professionals
at the Poison Center are available
your drinking 24/7 to provide information and
advice regarding potential toxic
w ate r?" dangers ranging from the misuse of
medicines to potentially dangerous
household chemicals. It is also a
- Straight time to highlight the importance
of poison proofing homes," states
Sn answers Vicki Coppen, RN, the education
coordinator for the Florida/USVI
No high Poison Information Center - Jack-
pressure. sonville.
If you suspect a poison-
ing, need information related to
262-0197 poisons or would like free poison
prevention education materials in-
3-Q76. cluding magnets or stickers, call the
. " J-3760 Poison Center at 1-800-222-1222.
KO R R " Please put this number in your cell
SR I RD U. phone now-before you need it.
When the problem is poison, the
.. ...- . answer is poison control.


Attention high school seniors
and first and second year college
students! Are you looking for
scholarships?
Jacksonville Chamber of
Commerce Mandarin Council
announces the Mandarin Council
Janice Meisel Scholarship. All 2011
graduating seniors and students in
their first or second year of post-
secondary school living in Manda-
rin are invited to participate. A one
year scholarship of $500 will be
awarded to a student who plans to
pursue a degree in business.
To be eligible, the applicant
must live in one of the three zip
codes (32223, 32257 or 32258)
and must have worked while at-
tending high school. The post-
secondary school that the applicant
plans to attend or is attending
must be an accredited school in the


state of Florida.
For an application and addi-
tional information, send a request
to mandarincouncil@gmail.
com. The application submission
deadline is April 25, 2010. Please
mail completed application packets
to Mandarin Council, c/o 3000
Hartley Road, Suite 7, Jacksonville,
FL 32257. The winners will be
announced at a presentation at the
Mandarin Council's May meeting.





47 .tHappr

St. Patrick's


Food-Fight benefits Mandarin
Food Bank


By Karl Kennell
Recently a "Food-Fight"
erupted at San Juan Del Rio
Catholic Church on State Road
13 in NW St. Johns County. It all
started when the 2011 eighth grade
confirmation class challenged the
congregations of the four Masses
held on the weekend of February 5
and 6. The young people appeared
at each Mass the weekend before
to challenge them to bring in the
most pounds of food to represent
their Mass congregation the follow-
ing weekend.
And what a "Food-Fight" it
turned out to be! The young people
were so successful in pitting each
Mass congregation in competi-
tion with each other that a whop-
ping 5,813 pounds of food were
collected during just those four
Masses. The Mandarin Food Bank
on St. Augustine Road across from
St. Joseph's Catholic Church was
the recipient of over 340 bags of
food delivered to right to their
door step.
Coordinator of the Food Bank
Bonnie McNulty was ecstatic at
the donation, because this is a
time when many people are in dire
need. The Food Bank serves over
fifty different families each week.
It is worth noting that the
congregation of the 11:00 a.m.


Mass on Sunday, February 6 won
the "Food-Fight!" We salute them
and the 2011 eighth grade confir-
mation class on their knock-out
success with their "Food-Fight."


/iana(1- /ii


NewsLine

Now delivered to

32223
32258
32257(select routes)

Don't miss your chance
to place your ad
in the only
community newspaper
with a
monthly circulation of
26,000 addresses!

Call Today!

886-4919
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AFRA BL AT

J~wcrw nl0ING-SFEINC-PBR~O


Call the
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Company
Jacksonville
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Page 10, < /://r/;// NewsLine * March 2011 * www.cs H//'.'',, ;/NewsLine.com


Catch the Olympic Spirit at Organic Lifestyles
7 C^ ,kfitr t c By Molly McKinney


% i Qymnazficb

* Boys & Girls Recreational Program - ages 5-11
* Pre-school Program - ages 3-4
* Tumbling Program - girls ages 7-18
* Boys & Girls Competitive Team

904-260-1983








Free Trial Class
11502 $5olu a Park Dr FF
Jakowitnvlle, FL registration2258

Be sure to visit the Children's
A Fr TrialCla Show
By Contributing Writer Chris Buckley, Children's Art Show Chairman


The Mandarin Community
Club will sponsor its 43rd annual
Mandarin Art Festival on Saturday
and Easter Sunday, April 23 and
24. One of the traditional and
most popular events is the Chil-
dren's Art Show featuring artwork
from as many as 20 of our area
public and private schools. For
many children, this show is their
first opportunity to exhibit their art
to a large public audience.
Cathy David of Young Rem-
brandts will be doing art demon-
stration lessons throughout the


weekend. It is a great opportunity
for young and old alike to sit down
to do an activity together.
This year, Marsha Blackford
will judge the artwork. Ribbons
will be presented in three grade
levels: kindergarten through second
grade, third through fifth grade
and sixth through eighth grade.
Best overall awards will also be
given to individual students as well
as school entries. Choosing from
all the great artwork always proves
to be the most challenging task of
the weekend.
Come out and enjoy the Art
Festival under Mandarin's old oak
trees. And, be sure to visit the
Children's Art inside the Mandarin
Community Club.


A widely circulated question
debated over orgos vs. non-orgos is
whether or not organic food is ac-
tually, scientifically, better for you
than conventional foods. Frustrat-
ingly, there is no concrete evidence
one way or the other just yet, only
the theories that have brought us
to the positions we find ourselves
in today. Proponents of the organic
produce argue that with fewer
pesticides, no growth hormones
and no antibiotics, the food that
is certifiably organic is better for
you. On the other side of the table,
conventional fans state that there is
no actual nutritional difference be-
tween an apple grown organically
and one that is grown without all
the concomitant restrictions. Nu-
merous studies have been started in
different countries to try and get to
the bottom of this debate.
Britain: a basic screening of in-
vestigative literature was conducted
to collect various individuals'
findings. They basically found that
the only major differences between
the two were in their nitrogen and
phosphorous levels, but the levels
of other essential vitamins and
minerals remained about equal.
There were noticeably higher levels
of polyphenols in the organic food
and so while they drew the tenta-
tive conclusion that no real differ-
ence existed, there was still room
for the possibility when factors
such as soil content and ecological
conditions were integrated.
In other studies, the Journal
of Agricultural and Food Chem-
istry printed a study in 2003 that
found higher levels of polyphenols
in organic and sustainable marion-
berries and, in Italy, higher levels
in organic peaches and pears. The
latter study also found more ascor-
bic acid (Vitamin C) in organic
peaches. In 2002 the European
Journal of Nutrition found higher
levels of salicylic acid in organic


MandarinKindergarten
through
12th grade
CHRISTIAN SCHOOL Accredited by: FCIS ACSI FKC



Prospective Parents are invited to an informational



Open House



March 11th at 9:00am



Please call to let us know you're coming!



(904) 268-8667


www.mandarinchristianschool.com


10850 Old St. Augustine Rd Jacksonville, FL 32257

Mandarin Christian School welcomes students of any race, color, nationality, gender, or ethnic origin to apply for admission.


vegetable soup, which holds anti-
inflammatory properties that aid
the immune system.
Research is shoddy on both
sides and needs improvement.
Critics are quick to jump on the
argument on both sides and point
out the shortcomings and we're
not going to have concrete answers
any time soon. Long-term research
needs to be conducted in order
to produce real results. The best
answer so far? Do what you find
conscionable. It is at least true that
fresh food is better than processed
food, so you could start there if
you still haven't made the jump to
100 percent organic. Eat locally
and support the economy close to
home; eat organic if you don't like
the ideas of pesticides and growth


The Mandarin Garden Club
will be holding a $1.00 Clothing
Sale on Saturday, March 5, from
9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. at the
clubhouse located at 2891 Loretto
Road. The sale will include a wide
variety of clothing, accessories
and shoes for women, men and
children.
The Mandarin Garden Club
65th Anniversary Cookbook, com-
posed of 500 delicious recipes and
helpful cooking hints, will also be
available for purchase.
The Garden Club is support-
ing our community by collecting
the following items which may be
brought to the clubhouse the day
of the sale: cell phones and accesso-
ries donated to the Duval County
4-H; eyeglasses, sunglasses and
cases donated to the Lions Club;
and any nonperishable, unexpired
food items and toiletries donated
to the Mandarin Food Bank. Do-
nated ink cartridges will be used to
purchase Mandarin Garden Club
office supplies.
For more information about


Need Customers?

886-4919
L j


hormones. Stop eating meat if
it makes you feel better. There is
strong evidence on both sides of
the argument, but a lot of good
things are associated with eating
organically, such as sustainability
and fair trade, that are not neces-
sarily in the conventional equation,
especially with big businesses like
Wal-Mart.
So, the best advice I can come
up with? Just be nice to the Earth.

S1/',,'',,, ;, NewsLine
YOUR
Community Newspaper
editor@mandarinnewsline.com


GALLERY of STARS
Northeast Florida
CONSERVATORY


Scholarship Series * Sundays - 3
$10 Donation
March 13 1st Coast Brass Quartet
27 'Major Mode' String Quartet
(Members of JSO)
A4* 3 Community Band
10 Conservatory Student Recital
* lf1 Community Strings
--# with Matt Daniel, piano,
Ariadna Perez, Cello & 'Bluegrass' Su
22 Cliff Newton, trumpet &
Joe Kreines, piano
May 8 Michael Mastronicola, piano
15 Philip Pan -violin


rPM






rprise


this event and the Mandarin
Garden Club please call 268-1192
or email mandaringardenclub@
comcast.net.


Socialization, activities,
meals, snacks and personal
grooming assistance.
Financial Assistance available
License #9109
731-40027am-6pm
www.almosthomedaybreak.com


Laura Dwyer - flute
David Gall - guitar
[904] 374-.639
www.nfconservatory.org
11363 San Jose Blvd Bldg 200 * 32223
iacioss fiom Tiee SteakhouseCoinei of San Jose& Mandaiin Roadc


Mandarin Garden Club to hold
$1.00 Clothing Sale
By Contributing Writer Yvonne Corbett, Mandarin Garden Club





www.MandarinNewsLine.com * March 2011 *"c /,r,,, t NewsLine, Page 11


IOMeet your local candidates 22, 2011



Meet your local candidates-First Election, March 22, 2011


In advance of the Duval
County First Election to be held
on Tuesday, March 22, Manda-
rin NewsLine invited each of the
candidates for Mayor, Sheriff,
Property Appraiser, Tax Collector,
City Council District 6 and all five
groups of City Council At Large to
submit a statement for this special
election section.
The content of the statements
was left up to each candidate;
the only stipulation was that the
statement could exceed 250 words.
No editing of the statements took
place. Each statement is printed
in its entirety, as submitted by the
candidate.
Alvin Brown, Democratic
Candidate for Mayor
I am a hometown kid who
worked through college as a meat
cutter at Winn Dixie and went on
to advise President Bill Clinton
and work as a Fortune 500 execu-
tive. I've come a long way from
where I started, but the lessons are
the same...working hard, taking
responsibility and stretching every
dollar to do more. Those were the
lessons my mother and grand-
mother taught us. When I worked
in the White House, I responsibly
managed $4 billion that was spent
on creating jobs and revitalizing
urban areas across the country. I
can use that experience to make
Jacksonville a better place to live,
work and raise a family
We face great challenges.
Jacksonville's unemployment rate
is above the national average. We
rank in the bottom half for job
growth among large cities. And,
too many Jacksonville students
don't graduate. We can do better.
As your new Mayor I will take
action. If elected, I will refuse to
raise taxes. I know - and you know
- that with the right leadership,
Jacksonville can fix its budget
problems by cutting wasteful
spending and increasing our tax
base with new businesses and jobs.
My plan starts with expanding the
public-private partnerships that
are so important to growing a local
economy and getting people work-
ing again. I have a plan to work
our way out of this financial mess
and I ask for your support to move
Jacksonville to the next level.

Andy Bryan, Write In Candidate


for Mayor
Did not respond.

David Crosby, Write In Candi-
date for Mayor
I grew up here, went to school
here, live here and work here. I was
a Boy Scout, played Little League
on Buck's Tire Company, drove a
wrecker for 103rd Street Shell, sold
parts at Honest Charlie's Speed
Shop and served over 26 years in
the Navy doing everything from
scrubbing toilets, teaching school,
to being the Maintenance Master
Chief in charge of an F-18 squad-
ron, 12 aircraft, 20 pilots and 175
hardworking sailors. I retired the
day they closed NAS Cecil Field. I
have lived in my current Westside
home since June 1985. I have been
a truck driver with Cypress Truck
Lines for over 11 years. I am not a
politician, I am not from a wealthy
family and I have no connection
to big business. I have no politi-
cal career to worry about, I owe
no favors and I have solicited no
campaign contributions. What I
do is fix things; I am a trouble-
shooter and that is what we need
right now. It is time to take a break
and fix the way our city conducts
itself, the budget and the school
system before we put politicians
back in charge. If elected, toes will
be stepped on, egos will be bruised
and feelings will be hurt, but we
will get good things done. If you
really want to get our city back to
basics, there is a blank line at the
bottom of the Mayor Candidates
just so you can make a difference.
Write in David Crosby.

Christopher Hills, Write In
Candidate for Mayor
Did not respond.

Mike Hogan, Republican
Candidate for Mayor
I am a Jacksonville native. My
ancestors were the first permanent
settlers in Jacksonville. No other
candidate can match our experi-
ence in business and government.
I have 25 years of business experi-
ence including executive sales,
labor-relations, real-estate, corpo-
rate safety and risk management
with the largest corporation in the
world, AT&T; five years as VP
Holmes Lumber Company; three
years as a consultant to W W Gay


Mechanical; eight years as a Jack-
sonville City Councilman; three
years as a Florida State Representa-
tive and seven and a half years as
Duval County's Tax Collector.
I am a true fiscal conservative
who can be trusted and I bring
proof of that fact by my record on
both the City Council and in the
Florida House of Representatives.
While working with Governor Jeb
Bush, I voted for the reduction of
almost $700 million in taxes for all
Floridians.
We are living in unprecedented
economic times. Unemployment
is through the roof, government
spending is out of control and
running up debt on our children's
future cannot be the solution. My
plan for Jacksonville is to secure
our financial future through sound
fiscal restraint and four years of
demonstrated respect for just how
hard Jacksonville's taxpayers work
to provide for their families. The
people of this city deserve a mayor
willing to make the tough finan-
cial decisions and difficult choices
needed to create a functioning and
viable financial structure to turn
this city around.

Stephen Irvine, No Party Affilia-
tion Candidate for Mayor
Did not respond.

Warren Lee, Democratic Candi-
date for Mayor
Did not respond.

Audrey Moran, Republican Can-
didate for Mayor
I am running for mayor be-
cause I love this city and I truly be-
lieve we can do better. My 26-years
of experience in the business com-
munity, the nonprofit sector and
in local government have given me
the tools to find creative and effec-
tive solutions to our most pressing
issues. I will put my experience to
work from day one - bringing fis-
cal responsibility, real results, trans-
parency and accountability to City
Hall. As a community, we need to
decide if we are satisfied with the
status quo or if we are ready to take
Jacksonville in a new direction. It
is time for a leader who knows the
challenges of meeting a payroll;
who has experience managing a
large staff and balancing a budget
in tough economic times; and


someone who understands the day-
to-day operations of government. Rick Mullaney, Republican
As mayor, I will make improving Candidate for Mayor
public education a hallmark of my I have never run for office be-
administration because education fore and am not seeking a career as
is the key to attracting and growing an elected official. I am running for
businesses, to building sustainable mayor because our city's future is
neighborhoods, to improving race hanging in the balance and I have
relations and to tackling crime, a plan to protect the taxpayers and
I know when neighborhoods are transform our city's future.
safe and thrive, our community As mayor, I will: 1) Cut
as a whole improves and a vibrant spending and get the city's fi-
downtown is at the heart of a great nancial house in order without
City. To learn more about my raising taxes. I did not seek the
vision for Jacksonville, please visit city employee union endorsements
the campaign web site at www. so I could be independent of the
imwithaudrey.com. Let's move unions and fix city finances. As
Jacksonville forward on 3.22.11. Mayor Delaney's chief of staff, I led
Vote Audrey Moran for Mayor. financial reform that froze salaries,
reduced the size of government and
James Moser, Write In Candi- cut taxes every year. 2) Create jobs
date for Mayor and grow the economy, including
Jacksonville is more than a city a focus on healthcare, logistics,
for James and his family; it's a way the port, aviation and the military.
of life. It's why he is running for 3) Make Jacksonville safe. As a
Mayor of Jacksonville. As a native prosecutor for 10 years and head of
of Jacksonville, James Moser has the state attorney's homicide unit
the vision to make Jacksonville for five years, I was named Prosecu-
even better. James Moser received tor of the Year for Florida and put
his education in the Duval County three convicted murderers on death
Public School system. He is a Navy row. 4) Improve public education.
veteran. He has been an educator I will bring stakeholders together
for over 20 years and is currently a to transform public education. We
computer teacher at an outstanding have come a long way since I was


high school.
As Mayor, James Moser will
use his insight to improve our city.
He would like to make Jackson-
ville an affordable and safe city to
live in. He wants to make smart
investments to reduce crime. New
jobs will be created. The military
will be maintained and supported.
The river quality will be improved
and the downtown area will be
re-vitalized. He wants to encour-
age legislation that would give the
Superintendent and school district
more authority to make immediate
interventions in schools in need of
improvement.
James Moser is a family man
with one child, Lisa. He is proud
to announce that he will become a
grandfather soon.
We need a Mayor who will
meet and listen to the people on a
regular basis. James Moser believes
that it is time for a new face, with
new ideas, and a different leader-
ship style. Let's elect James Moser
as the next Mayor of Jacksonville.
Please write the name "James
Moser" on the ballot on March 22.


a boy growing up in a Navy family
on the Westside, but we still have
not fulfilled what is possible for
our city.
I am running because I believe
in what we can be. I would be hon-
ored to have your vote. To see my
complete 34-point plan to shrink
government and grow jobs, please
visit my website www.mullaneyfor-
mayor.com.

Soren Brockdorf, No Party Af-
filiation Candidate for Sheriff
I love Jacksonville and as
Sheriff, I will diligently work to
reduce the budget. I have spent my
entire career as a Certified Public
Accountant reducing costs vis-a-
vis process mapping and systems
analysis. I will implement IBM's
Cognos Business Intelligence and
Financial Performance Manage-
ment software that will allow us to
eliminate 120 unnecessary govern-
ment bureaucrats by delivering
needed information directly to
the officer ($18,000,000 a year
in savings). The traffic in some
Candidates cont on page 12





Page 12, c 7/p,,,t,;,, NewsLine * March 2011 * www.MandarinNewsLine.com


Candidates cont from page 11

neighborhoods is safer than other
neighborhoods, yet they experience
28 percent more traffic stops, 53
percent more arrests and 7.5 per-
cent of all stops there are directly
related to profiling these neighbor-
hoods-I will put a stop to this.
In 2009, $79,433,651 in property
was stolen, and 101 people were
murdered (thank goodness Shands
saved 85 percent of the attempts).
We are the murder capital of
Florida and my time working the
Beaver Street/Moncrief Road area
for the Jacksonville Sheriff's Office
taught me the only thing that will
resolve this problem is putting
officers back on the streets and
vigilantly reducing response times.
One thing that we will do for
Mandarin is coordinate a safe and
acceptable way to move bikers and
runners through Mandarin. Please
vote Brockdorf for Sheriff.

Ken Jefferson, Democratic
Candidate for Sheriff
I am a lifelong resident of
Jacksonville where I was born
and raised. I attended the public
schools of Duval County, gradu-
ating from Ribault Senior High
School in 1975. I attended Florida
Junior College and Liberty Uni-
versity. I earned a Master's Degree
from St. Thomas Christian College
in Theology. I have had the honor
of serving as a police officer for the
past 24 years with the Jacksonville
Sheriff's Office. I have served in
various leadership roles during my
tenure, such as a Federal Program
Coordinator, Drug Education for
Youth Coordinator, Police Re-
cruiter, Burglary Detective, Sex
Crimes Detective, Public Informa-
tion Officer and an Academy Staff
Instructor. During the years 2006
and 2007 I was named the Spokes-
man of the Year for the State of
Florida.
I am seeking the office of
Sheriff because I am concerned
about some of the same issues that
concern you. We continue to lead
the state in homicides; our nega-
tive public safety image impedes
our economic growth. We cannot


attract major business, events or
investments in a city where people
think of us as the homicide capital
of the state. The image of JSO
among the general public is in
need of repair; we cannot be effec-
tive law enforcement practitioners
without gaining and maintain the
public trust. I want to restore con-
fidence among the average citizen
that JSO is capable, competent and
caring in executing our mission on
a daily basis.

John Rutherford, Republican
Candidate for Sheriff
I am proud to have served you
for the past 36 years as a Jackson-
ville police officer, the last eight as
your elected Sheriff. During my
law enforcement career I have had
the privilege of serving as a Ser-
geant, Lieutenant, Captain, Chief
and Director. Each leadership role
helped prepare me to serve as your
Sheriff.
Together our successes have
been many, most significantly the
crime reductions of the past two
years. We acquired, trained and
skillfully deployed the necessary
resources to fight crime, while
maintaining the lowest per capital
spending for public safety of any
major county in Florida. His-
toric reductions in crime (2009
down 10.5 percent and projected
decline of another 11.5 percent
in 2010) are the result of proper
resources, community involvement
and partnerships, and aggressive
prosecution - the lowest total crime
numbers since 1983!
In eight years, we built a na-
tionally-recognized intelligence-led
policing unit while fighting crime
effectively and reducing costs;
2003's Agenda for Excellence has
proven hugely successful in align-
ing the large and complex work-
force of the JSO as a crime-fighting
agency; we created a Community
Service Officer program saving tax
dollars and making policing more
efficient and effective. The CSO's
are a terrific "force multiplier" for
our sworn officers; we helped cre-
ate a Regional Domestic Security
Task Force and an Intelligence


Fusion Center; increasing citizen
security and making Jacksonville's
infrastructure safer from attack and
better prepared for mitigation and
recovery.
I will proudly continue to
serve as your Sheriff for the next
four years.

Curtis Southerland, Write In
Candidate for Sheriff
I've decided to run for office
after my brother Neil Souther-
land was wrongfully murdered by
JSO cop Jim T. Carey, the second
person he shot to death unarmed
and in handcuffs. State Attorney
Angela Corey, her assistant Bernie
de la Rionda and several within the
police department have covered
up the truth about what really
happened having put out tremen-
dous lies and misinformation, just
as they did in the Wendy's police
shooting and many others. You can
learn more on my family's website
at NeilSoutherlandCoverup.com.
Being an Independent and
not being part of the system, I will
work very hard to stop the corrup-
tion, cut waste, work with private
and public sectors to stop the root
causes of crime and ensure the best
for Duval county residents. A per-
son from the outside is needed. All
of the other candidate have long
been part of a corrupted bureau-
cracy, now is the time to make a
real difference by voting for me to
bring true change.
We must show government
officials will be held accountable!
If you vote for the same, you can
expect more of the same!
Write the name Curtis South-
erland on the ballet line for sheriff
this March 22nd during the First
election and Mayl7th for the Gen-
eral election. Thank you. Please visit
my website at CurtisforSheriff.com.

Kurt Kraft, Democratic Candi-
date for Property Appraiser
I am for term limits; eight is
enough. I personally believe an
elected official should serve no
more than eight years. Term limits
allow other citizens in the commu-
nity to provide elected leadership.


Currently, Jacksonville's Mayor and
City Council are term limited. My
opponent is in his eighth year. I
have been a Real Estate Appraiser
in the Duval County Property
Appraiser's Office for 27 years. I
have appraised some of the largest
and some of the smallest proper-
ties in Duval County. I earned my
Bachelor of Business Administra-
tion degree, with a major in Real
Estate, from Kent State University.
I played varsity football at Kent.
I have a State of Florida, Real
Estate Broker's license, voluntarily
inactive. I have civic management
and supervisory experience. Over
a period of years, I held several
leadership positions as a member of
Jacksonville Jaycees.
Per Florida Times-Union
article, June 6, 2010, titled "Fall-
ing property values produce tax
inequities." It is important that
tax inequities do not exist on the
tax roll. The job of the property
appraiser is to appraise all property
at fair market value per Florida law.
As your next property appraiser, I
will correct tax inequities on the
tax roll so that everybody is treated
fairly. I have been told many times
that taxpayers want to pay their fair
share and no more.
I will bring a sound manage-
ment approach to the Property
Appraiser's Office. I will lead with
integrity, efficiency and transpar-
ency. Thank you for your vote.
VoteKraft.com

Jim Overton, Republican Candi-
date for Property Appraiser
Elected Duval County Prop-
erty Appraiser in 2003. Native of
Jacksonville; fifth generation Flo-
ridian; Lee High School; business
degree with honors from Washing-
ton and Lee University; Master of
Public Administration and "Out-
standing Alumnus" from the Uni-
versity of North Florida. Certified
Florida Appraiser, licensed Real Es-
tate Broker, member International
Association of Assessing Officers.
Past-President Florida Association
of Property Appraisers, Past-Presi-
dent Jacksonville City Council.
Former long-time business owner.
Scout Leader, YMCA Board. Mar-
ried 33 years, two children.
Since taking office I have been
committed to making our public
appraisal process fair, open and
understandable. Our goal is to earn
your trust. Our office has served
our customers (the taxpayers) by
providing more information online
and in print; improving customer
service; initiating an internal ethics
program; overhauling our data
processing; greatly increasing pub-
lic outreach; managing appraisal
accuracy in an unprecedented real
estate market; and being account-
able by cutting pay and reducing
our budget. I ask for your vote to
continue our progress. Please vote
for Jim Overton for Property Ap-
praiser.

Michael Corrigan, Republican
Candidate for Tax Collector
Did not respond.

Dick Kravitz, Republican Candi-
date for Tax Collector
I have been actively involved
in my Mandarin community for
over 32 years. My wife, Shirley
Levin Kravitz, is a fourth genera-


tion Jacksonville resident and a re-
tired Duval County Public School
teacher. We have two grown sons,
Eric and Hirsh.
As a retail business executive,
I gained valuable customer-care
skills, which I will use to insure
that the Tax Collector's office is
run efficiently and that you, the
customer, is treated with respect
and courtesy. For my dedication to
customer service and best business
practices, I have received several
regional and national awards.
As a City Councilman and for-
mer Council president representing
Mandarin and as a State Legislator
for eight years until I was term-
limited, I earned a reputation for
always being responsive to the
needs of my constituents and for
consistently voting for less taxes
and smaller government. In fact,
when I was in the Florida House
of Representatives, I co-sponsored
landmark legislation to put a limit
on government spending.
Always interested in acquir-
ing land for parks in Mandarin, I
was very instrumental in securing
and developing hundreds of acres
of parkland, including Mandarin's
first soccer field, its first Regional
Park and the Walter Jones Histori-
cal Park.
Please visit my website,
Kravitzfortaxcollector.com for
additional information about my
background and qualifications. In
closing, I respectfully ask for your
vote as Tax Collector. Thank you.

Ryan Taylor, Republican Candi-
date for Tax Collector
My name is Ryan Taylor and
I am running for the office of Tax
Collector. I am a fourth generation
native of Jacksonville. I gradu-
ated from the University of North
Florida with a Bachelor of Science
degree in Computer Information
Systems. I am a member of the
Duval Young Republicans and I
have been active supporter of the
Jacksonville Agriculture Fair and
Boys and Girls Clubs since I was
a teenager. My wife Melissa and
I reside on the Southside and are
active members of First Baptist
Church of Jacksonville.
I have a distinguished track
record of 12 years experience with
the Tax Collector's Office. I am an
Assistant to the Tax Collector; my
current role is IT Manager Associ-
ate. I started there in the Reporting
Department and worked my way
up. I was a team leader on the key
implementations of both the queu-
ing system for the branch offices
and for the high speed processing
in the mail department, saving
time and energy for the employees
and cost efficient ways to process
the mail. Furthermore, I have criti-
cal hands-on experience in organiz-
ing, redeploying and merging the
blueprints and infrastructure for
the branch agencies for optimal
service efficiency. Through self-
initiative, I developed many of the
information systems throughout
the office to speed up production
and reporting.
My goal as Tax Collector is to
lower operating costs, decrease de-
linquency, all while maintaining an
exceptional level of service. I will
look for additional opportunities
Candidates cont on page 1 3





www.MandarinNewsLine.com * March 2011 *c 2/,,,t,,, ;,I NewsLine, Page 13


Candidates cont from page 12
to better service the constituents of
Duval County.

Matt Schellenberg, Republican
Candidate for City Council,
District 6
I'm a pro-life, fiscal and social
conservative. I believe in lower tax-
es and less government. I have lived
in Jacksonville for 48 years. This is
where I grew up going to church
and school, where my Mom and
Dad raised me and my 10 broth-
ers and sisters, and Jacksonville is
where I started my own family. I
have a deep love and strong passion
for Jacksonville and Mandarin.
I'm not a politician. I'm a
small business owner who has
survived these tough times by
making do with less. But our City
Council refuses to do with less.
They continue to raise our taxes
and have added new "fees" to our
garbage, storm water and JEA bills.
This is unacceptable. It is time for
a new approach. It is time for City
Hall to do with less. I have studied
the budget. I know where to cut it.
I am ready to impose some fiscal
responsibility on a City Council
out of control.
If you are tired of the same old
empty promises from politicians
and their out of control tax and
spend policies, vote for a new ap-
proach. Vote for me on March 22
and I will bring these conservative
principles to City Hall.


coming years. I once again ask for service" philosophy to government employees but ask unions to make
Jack Webb, Republican your vote, support and seek your and make sure you come first in concessions that will keep the city
Candidate for City Council, help in utilizing that passion for city hall. Visit www.VoteYoung- solvent. There has to be a "safety
District 6 the benefit of District 6. Promises blood.com or call 904-349-7273. net" for those that fall on hard


Four years ago, I sought elec- Made - Promises Kept. Please visit
tion to the position of Jacksonville www.ibackjack.net.
City Council, District 6. My deci-
sion to pursue elected office flowed Greg Youngblood, Republican
directly from my desire to serve Candidate for City Council,
the community that I had come to District 6
call home and grown to love. The Mandarin, are you better off
power of grassroots prevailed and I today than you were four-years
was afforded the privilege of serv- ago? Are the new taxes, fees and
ing as your representative, bureaucracy helping you? Can we
During that short period of trust the people that created a pen-
time, I have had the privilege of sion mess and raised our taxes to
advocating on your behalf during fix it? We say no! There is an alter-
some of the most trying economic native....With proven, business and
times ever faced by our com- public service, leadership experi-
munity, while at the same time ence. Greg Youngblood can restore
providing leadership to the entire the spirit of "public service" to our
City of Jacksonville in my service city. Greg will merge offices, reduce
as Rules Chairman, Vice President budgets, end the duplication of
and President of the City Council. government and save money for
Despite taking strong positions on our community while protecting
difficult issues, I have guardedly the quality of life we have come to
protected my independence and enjoy. As co-founder of Tools For
overwhelming commitment to the A Time Inc., Greg knows business.
needs of District 6. I remain always Greg Youngblood also knows gov-
mindful and protective of the trust ernment and as elected chairman
that you placed in me. of the Soil and Water Conservation
With that said, nothing over Board, Greg reduced the budget 18
the past few years has served to percent voluntarily while simul-
temper my passion for you, my taneously serving our community
constituents, nor dissuade me from for free. Greg Youngblood has also
my belief in the inherent value of identified the Garbage Tax and
public service. I seek your help in the Stormwater Tax as inappropri-
utilizing that passion, made all the ate double-billing from our city
more potent through an acquired because we already pay for those
measure of experience, for the con- services through property tax. Greg
tinued benefit of District 6 over the Youngblood will restore a "public


times. We can't go backwards, but
Steve Burnett, No Party Af- we can go forward learning lessons


filiation Candidate for City
Council, At Large Group 1
I, Steve Burnett, want to serve
you and will fight for a Bolder,
Leaner Jacksonville consolidated
city government! Navy Vet. At
Large members of council should
be the watchdogs on spending


and problem solving instead of
continuing the madness of growing
government in its size and scope.
The Boldness we showed in consol-
idating needs to be resurrected in
restoring a leaner structure to our
city government.


and unnecessary local government Kimberly Daniels, Democratic
intrusion into business and indi- Candidate for City Council, At
vidual lives. Large Group 1
Government has a place and Jacksonville needs more jobs.
it's defined by the City Charter. We need a government which
While every budget line item has a comes alongside good people who
constituency many are not within are trying to raise families and live
the scope of the City Charter; nice happy and safe lives. We need a
to do but not necessary. In these government which protects those
tough times necessary should be who require our protection - the
restored to the budget process. I very young and the old. And,
support strong public safety and as Lincoln once said, we need
to give all the opportunity for a leadership which will "think anew
good education. I do not support and act anew" because we need to
a government that picks winners achieve extraordinary results in a
and losers because it has become so short time to overcome our city's
large. Maintaining what we have problems.
and planning for growth which will The first priority of our city's
return are important for a govern- government has to be doing all
ment that should be an advocate we can to encourage job creation
for business development and in Jacksonville. Small businesses
not a place the promotion of self and start-up businesses are the key
interests. to reviving this economy. In this
The Council should repeal stagnant economy, Jacksonville
laws/programs that are not working citizens are struggling to support
as intended or no longer effec- themselves and their families. The
tive. We should not layoff city Candidates cont on page 14


I I allI I



PROMISES MADE, PROMISES KEPT
S-As your representative on Council, we have worked together to
improve and protect the character of our very special and
unique community. Our efforts have resulted in:

* Park improvements - Additional parking and police
protection for Albert's Field, the grand openings of Pickwick
Park and Palmetto Leaves Park, and most recently,
the improvements to our much loved Mandarin Park

* Neighborhood protection - Successful opposition to
commercial encroachment in neighborhoods where such
development is not appropriate, thereby preserving our
.: ~quality of life

* Regional traffic planning - Successful funding of State route
9B, which will decrease the traffic burden on Mandarin roads

* Leaner government - As chairperson for the Ad-hoc
Committee for Budget Efficiency, we eliminated 1500 positions
from city government. As City Council President, we cut $35
million dollars from the current city budget.

- * More responsive and responsible representation - I remain
ever mindful that I represent you, the residents of District 6.
I have guardedly protected my independence and have
remained committed to the needs of my constituents.


Campaign contributions and other materials Questions?z
Smay be sent to: Call us at 904-886-2872
John D. "Jack" Webb for City Council, District 6 Log on to learn more
12380 Aladdin Road about Jack Webb:
W -$lIJacksonville, Florida 32223 www.ibackjack.net

Paid political advertisement, paid for and approved by John D. "Jack" Webb, Republican for City Council, District 6





Page 14, c /,,,,lt, NewsLine * March 2011 * www.MandarinNewsLine.com


VolT



It's the

American

way!

First Election:
March 22, 2011
General Election
May 1 7, 2011
Candidates cont from page 1 3
Jacksonville Electric Authority
(JEA) has a cryptic rate structure
which punishes conservation and
rewards high consumption. That's
just one example of an area which
needs to be reformed and made
transparent. There are many more.
Economic growth not tax
increases will lift Jacksonville
out of this hole. We need to take
a long hard look at how we are
spending those hard-earned tax
dollars before we ask our citizens
for more. I want to be the voice of
those who haven't been heard in
the past. Families struggling to pay
high taxes and even higher utility
bills, small business people making
their payroll in these tough times
and our older citizens who fear
the night. Jacksonville deserves a
government which is as good as the
people who live here.

David Taylor, Republican Can-
didate for City Council, At
Large Group 1
I was born and raised in Jack-
sonville and I am a businessman,
not a politician. While working at
my father's residential air condi-
tioning and heating business at an
early age, I learned the value of a
dollar and the self worth associated
with having a job. Once elected,
I'll lead with integrity, cut taxes,
eliminate wasteful spending and
promote economic growth.
I'm the past president of the


River City Republican Club, a
member of the Republican Execu-
tive Committee, Westside Baptist
Church, Westside Republican
Club, Hyde Park Masonic Lodge,
West Jacksonville Civic Associa-
tion, Northeast Florida Builders
Association, Westside Business
Leaders, Rotary Club of West Jack-
sonville, the National Rifle Associa-
tion and Safari Club International.
Additionally, I serve on Sheriff
John Rutherford's Sheriff's Office
Advisory Council. I am endorsed
by the Fraternal Order of Police,
the International Association of
Firefighters, Northeast Florida
Builders Association, JaxBiz (a
division of the Jacksonville Cham-
ber of Commerce) and the First
Coast Manufacturers Association.
I've been married for more than
10 years to Julie and we've been
blessed with our daughter Shelby.
Julie is an Assistant State Attorney
under the direction of Angela Co-
rey. I will base all of my decisions
on principles of Faith, Family and
Fiscal Responsibility.

John Crescimbeni, Democratic
Candidate for City Council, At
Large Group 2
John Crescimbeni is a fiscal
conservative who has earned a
reputation for being "tight with
a dollar." On the Council, he has
asked the tough questions and
said no to unnecessary spending,
taxes and fees. He voted against
the $750 million no-bid landfill
contract and both of the mayor's
property tax hikes. He is the only
Councilmember who hasn't hired
an aide and he has never missed
a regular City Council meeting
during his 10 years of combined
service.
As the local owner of Hickory
Farms, John is a successful small
businessman who knows how to
cut expenses, balance budgets and
operate efficiently. He steadfastly
supports neighborhood rights and
recognizes the importance of good
schools and crime prevention for
a better economy and quality of
life. A resident of Jacksonville since
1965, John is a graduate of Bolles
High School and Jacksonville
University. He serves on a variety


of local boards, including the Jack-
sonville Humane Society, Friends
of the Jacksonville Public Library
and Tree Hill Nature Center. John
is married with three children and
one grandchild and attends Christ's
Church in Mandarin. He would
be honored to have your vote on
March 22.

Paul Martinez, Republican
Candidate for City Council, At
Large Group 2
As a business owner, a father
and a 30 year area resident, I want
Jacksonville to thrive. Right now it
is not thriving, but with hard work
and ingenuity we can turn things
around.
First, we must balance the
budget and cut taxes. For example,
we can cut spending by updating
the city's IT department, merging
offices and cross-training employ-
ees. Pension reform must also be
on the table.
I do not support any addition-
al taxes for JaxPort or Downtown.
For Downtown, I would entertain
the idea of a separate tax author-
ity so that revenue generated there
stays there. JaxPort improvements
would bring jobs, but we cannot
afford additional taxes and we
certainly can't afford another court-
house-like project that goes over
budget by more than $150 million.
Instead, we must encourage private
enterprise and seek federal and
state funding to improve JaxPort.
I fully support educational re-
form, because parents alone should
choose where their children attend
school. We must work closely with
parents, legislators, teachers and
the school board to improve Duval
schools. Our children are suffer-
ing and we are losing business and
residents to nearby counties with
better schools.
The St. Johns River is a valu-
able resource for Jacksonville, but
only 33 percent of it is in Duval
County. We must work with other
stake-holders to ensure the river is
clean and usable for generations
to come. Please visit my website,
www.electpaulmartinez.com and
my Facebook page to see more of
my ideas for Jacksonville.


Tom Patton, Republican Candi-
date for City Council, At Large
Group 2
I came to Jacksonville 12 years
ago to establish the first local news
department at WJCT-FM and dur-
ing my time there I had the oppor-
tunity to talk with local political,
business, and community leaders
about many of the city's issues,
such as the city budget, homeless-
ness, crime, Downtown, economic
development and the beautiful St.
Johns River. Now, I hope to have
an opportunity to finish those
conversations as a member of the
Jacksonville City Council.
As a member of the council, I
will work diligently to assure that
every dollar spent is spent wisely
and to create a climate in our city
that encourages businesses large
and small to put people back to
work. We will need to scrub the
next budget line-by-line in an
effort to find every savings and
efficiency possible. We should also
look for ways to streamline bureau-
cracy so that businesses large and
small have an opportunity to grow,
and create the jobs that are still so
desperately needed in our commu-
nity. Jacksonville has a great deal of
potential and the city looks to its
leaders to help it realize that poten-
tial. In these challenging economic
times, this is one of the most
important elections for Jacksonville
in recent memory. We need leader-
ship that will look forward and not
be satisfied with the status quo or
living in the past. Thank you very
much for your consideration.

Vince Serrano, Republican
Candidate for City Council, At
Large Group 2
We all know that when our
income drops we have to cut our
outgo to make ends meet. But cer-
tain city officials would rather raise
your taxes than cut their spend-
ing. As a native of Jacksonville I
love this city, its beautiful trees
and wonderful river. As a father
I am concerned that my children
may not have the same opportuni-
ties that I enjoyed. As a successful
businessman I wonder why the city
makes it so difficult and expensive
to do business here. As a neighbor I
care about those that want to work,
but can't find jobs.
We need common sense lead-
ership. It is time to elect a candi-
date who is willing to tackle the
real problems, make the hard deci-
sions, stand up against the power-
ful few and get Jacksonville back
on the road to prosperity. Someone
who you can trust to keep our
neighborhoods safe, improve the
educational opportunities for our
children, create new jobs and im-
prove the quality of life for all our
citizens, not just a few. For more
information please visit our website
at www.VinceSerrano4Jax.com. I
ask you to vote for me Vince Ser-
rano, City Council at Large, Group
2. Thank you!

Stephen Joost, Republican
Candidate for City Council, At
Large Group 3
Did not respond.

Greg Anderson, Republican
Candidate for City Council, At
Large Group 4
Jacksonville is my home and
I am excited about its future. Just


like the voters who will decide this
election, my wife and I choose to
live, work, worship and play here.
We are raising our two boys here.
I am running for City Council
because I see a need for strong
financial leadership and pro busi-
ness attitude on the council. The
decisions made in the next council
terms will have an important im-
pact on our community now and
in the future. I am running because
we need new leaders willing to
make decisions for the best interest
of our communities.
It is time to get our financial
house in order and to do this we
need experienced leaders willing to
make difficult decisions. For the
last four years I have served our
citizens on the TRUE Commis-
sion looking at the budget. This
combined with 25 years of experi-
ence in financial services industry
means that I am the most qualified
candidate for this council seat. I
am the only candidate in this race
with a true financial background.
Only a few weeks after taking
office, your next council will be
making budget decisions. I am
ready to contribute day one! My
financial background and ability to
understand revenues, expenses and
budgets are key qualities for this
next council. As a lifelong Republi-
can and a fiscal conservative, I will
bring a new energy and fresh ideas
to our local government.

Juan Diaz, Republican Can-
didate for City Council, At Large
Group 4
I am a pro-life, limited govern-
ment Conservative. My wife Kris-
ten and I are members at Christian
Family Chapel. I'm passionate
about our quality of life here -we
don't want to look to St. Johns
County to find that.
This is an important time to
bring new energy and ideas and
fiscally disciplined leadership onto
the Council. I am very active in the
community. I earned a law degree
at the University of Florida and
practiced as an attorney with CSX
and BAE Systems. My experience
includes service on the Chamber
Board, Leadership Jacksonville,
Republican Executive Committee
and several city commissions.
I am committed to being ac-
countable to YOU the taxpayer,
not beholden to special interests
downtown. I'm tired of our elected
officials saying one thing and doing
another. We need trust, goodwill
and a true vision for our city.
My focus is to support job
creation by reducing tax and
regulatory burdens that restrict
business growth. We need to get
people back to work. And we need
safe neighborhoods. I'm committed
to public safety, while also work-
ing with our unions to solve the
pension crisis that is stifling our
city financially. I'm willing to make
the tough decisions to "right-size"
our government and tighten its belt
just like Jacksonville's families have.
It's time for bold, new lead-
ership on the City Council. I'm
asking for your vote on March 22.
Visit www.diaz4jax.com for my
biography and more information
on our campaign.

Jim Robinson, Republican
Candidate for City Council, At
Candidates cont on page 1 5





www.MandarinNewsLine.com * March 2011 *c /,,,n,,,,; NewsLine, Page 15


Candidates cont from page 14
Large Group 4
Many people have labeled
the upcoming city elections as the
most important since consolidation
in the late 1960s. The crises are
different today, but we no doubt
have crisis. The city and its citizens
remain mired in an economic re-
cession unequalled since the Great
Depression. With some evidence
of recovery in our sights, it is time
now for the city to return to finan-
cial stability. This will take cour-
age and discipline to accomplish
- something different than politics
as usual.
I am a candidate that is the
right person, at the right time, for
the right reasons. My professional,
business and life experiences are
a rich blend that has prepared me
to address situations just like this.
As a civil engineer, I am a problem
solver. I will make decisions on
facts, not politics. As a business-
man, I have had the life altering
experience of meeting payroll for
over 20 years. I know when to say
no and I know how to efficiently
spend the resources that are avail-
able to me. I am also a former US
Army officer. The city's need for
such experience is now more than
ever. This also matches with my
ability to give this office the time it
needs. I retired from my company
last year and have the time it will
take. Finally, I am running, pure
and simple, to serve this city that
I love. I have no further political
aspirations. Please vote for me, Jim
Robinson, on March 22, 2011.

Fred Engness, Republican Can-
didate for City Council, At
Large Group 5
Did not respond.

Donald Foy, No Party Affiliation
Candidate for City Council, At
Large Group 5
Did not respond.

Sean Hall, Republican Candi-
date for City Council, At Large
Group 5
As an airborne/Infantry officer
in the US Army and Army Na-
tional Guard for 14 years, I have


learned how to manage and lead a
team through extreme difficulties,
while continuing to produce posi-
tive results. I will utilize my experi-
ence to work with local businesses
to make sure city government does
not impede the free market from
succeeding in Jacksonville.
My most recent endeavor into
the private sector with Panasonic
Computer Solutions has provided
an unparalleled perspective in both
the national and international
business markets. As an executive
business development manager for
Latin America, I was accountable
for driving and creating new op-
portunities for Panasonic through-
out Central and South America.
The opportunity to develop rela-
tionships with stakeholders in these
countries gives me a unique insight
into the unlimited partnership and
trade opportunities with the world.
My objectives are to: Create
new jobs in Jacksonville by grow-
ing local businesses and maximiz-
ing our Port's full potential; Protect
our city's quality of life by priori-


tizing expenditures in the areas of
public safety and neighborhood
infrastructure; Address water quan-
tity, quality and access issues re-
lated to the St. Johns River; Focus
on efforts to develop Downtown to
its fullest potential.
Please vote for me on March
22nd. Let's make Jacksonville a
better city than it was yesterday.
Visit www.Voteforseanhall.com or
contact via email sean@voteforse-
anhall.com or Facebook: Sean Hall
for City Council. Thank you.

Robin Lumb, Republican Candi-
date for City Council, At Large
Group 5
My name is Robin Lumb and
I'm a candidate for City Council
in Group 5 at Large. This is a
countywide race where everyone
can vote. I'm a 30 year resident
of Jacksonville, a small business
owner and Vice Chairman of the
Republican Party of Duval County.
My wife, Joanna, and I have been
married for 28 years and live in
Riverside. In 2009 I was the Re-


YOUNGBLOOD'S COMMITMENT TO YOU
* Keeping YOUR community safe to live, work and play
* Reducing YOUR taxes
* Reducing YOUR government
* Becoming YOUR voice

ON MARCH 22, PLEASE VOTE FOR GREG YOUNGBLOOD
PD POL ADV Paid for and Approved by Greg Youngblood for City Council District 6 (R)


votetappouni


Fo Jackovil*it ouclGru At-ag


publican leader in Jacksonville who
actively rallied opposition to the
Pelosi-Reid health care legislation,
organizing Town Hall meetings
and speaking at public forums all
across North Florida. In 2010 I led
the grassroots campaign to organize
voter turnout for Republican can-
didates like Marco Rubio. I'm been
active in the Republican Party be-
cause I believe it's our best hope for
electing pro-business conservatives
who believe in free markets, smaller
government and less spending.
As your representative on City
Council I'll be the kind of com-
mon sense conservative you can
rely on. These are the issues that
are critical to our citizens: Jobs:
I'll work to modernize and expand
our port facilities and to jumpstart
industrial development at the Cecil
Commerce Center. Fiscal respon-
sibility: I'll insist on strict budget
discipline with spending priorities
that focus on essential services
and basic needs. I will not support
property tax hikes or higher fees;
pension costs must be brought un-
der control. Public safety: The city's
most important function is public
safety. I'll work to ensure that our
citizens are adequately protected by
police and fire services.

Robin Rukab, Republican
Candidate for City Council, At
Large Group 5
My fundamental belief is that
government is here to serve the
citizens and not for the citizens to
serve the government. My pas-
sion is simply to be the voice for
you and all Jacksonville citizens.
Jacksonville is our wonderful city
- the best in the world - but it
is far from perfect. We are faced
with many problems and we need
common sense leadership at the
helm to guide us through these
tough economic times. My primary
focus will be on consumer protec-
tion, creating more jobs, lowering
taxes, developing more and better
youth programs, cultivating small
business and protecting our senior
citizens.
After working under the ad-
ministration of four different may-
ors, I understand how to get things
done downtown. I have been an


/ 22 years of Small Business Experience


$ 22 years of Public Service

$ Family man married 21 years


/ Attends Christian Family Chapel in Mandarin


advocate for you in our consumer
affairs department and I know I am
qualified and experienced enough
to represent you in our city govern-
ment. My door will always be open
for my esteemed constituents.
I would be honored to have
your vote and will represent you
with dignity in our municipal
government.

Michelle Tappouni, Republican
Candidate for City Council, At
Large Group 5
From childhood I have been
told what a privilege it is to be
a citizen of this country-to be
allowed to participate in building
a community that reflects the best
and finest instincts of its people. As
part of this privilege, I thank you
for the opportunity to speak to you
directly about why I want to be
your City Council representative
for Group 5 At-Large.
I am passionate about Jack-
sonville and the opportunities for
a stable and growing job market, a
supportive business environment,
protection of the St. Johns River
and support for individual and
community initiatives that benefit
all of our citizens. My belief is that
all of these areas are connected and
require cooperation and account-
ability; resulting in recognition of
Jacksonville as a first class city.
I have broad-based business
experience including more than 25
years of practical experience in all
aspects of the construction indus-
try, including project manage-
ment, trainer and consultant. My
experience will bring people and
organizational skills to the job of
city councilwoman.
My campaign is comprised of
four main pillars, Restoring Trust,
Reviving Jobs, Safe Neighborhoods
and Building Community. You
can learn more about each of the
areas by visiting my website, www.
votetappouni.com. I am optimistic
about the impact individuals can
have when they get involved with
their community and will listen to
the questions and concerns of my
constituents with an open mind
and heart. I ask that you consider
me to be your representative for
City Council Group 5 At-Large.


Building community,

creating a vision for

Jacksonville's future.


L Building Community


C Reviving Jobs


C Restoring Trust


C Safe Neighborhoods


Political advertisement paid for and approved by Michelle Tappouni, Republican, for Group 5 At-Large City Council Seat for Jacksonville.


mopw-pp





Page 16, c -/,,,n,, ,, NewsLine * March 2011 * www.MandarinNewsLine.com

A Caribbean celebration of St. Patrick's Day
By Contributing Travel Writer Debi Lander, www.bylandersea.com


Mention a visit to Montser-


rat and you can expect quizzical
expressions. Spanish mountain?
Massachusetts college? West Indies
island? The name applies to all
three, but only the Emerald Isle
of the Caribbean beckons with
shamrocks, sunshine and the still-
smoldering Soufriere volcano.
Travelers savvy enough to ven-
ture beyond neighboring Antigua,
Guadeloupe or St. Kitts find a
tropical throwback to another time.
The British-governed territory
endears itself to divers, nature lov-
ers and vacationers with unspoiled
reefs and a unique Irish-Caribbean
culture. Montserrat's people main-
tain phoenix-like hope, despite
the fact that the volcano rendered


two-thirds of
their island
off-limits.
Outside
Ireland,
Montserrat
is the only
place to
declare St.
Patrick's Day
a national
holiday -
even passport
entries come
stamped in
the shape of
a shamrock.
Celebra-
tions honor the 17th-century Irish


indentured
servants who
settled here
after fleeing
anti-Catholic
violence. The
festival also
recalls a failed
slave uprising
of March 17,
1789. Resil-
ient islanders
merge all tra-
ditions and
ethnicities for p


a week-long
party.


mile isle. Sir George Martin, the
former Beatles producer, built AIR
Studios for recording stars like Paul
McCartney, Sting and Elton John.
Many artists subsequently built
vacation villas as personal retreats.
Then, on July 18, 1995, a
loud rumble, like a jet roar, swept
over the sultry landscape. Smoke
rose from a green mountain-not
wispy puffs but powerful columns
shooting skyward. The plumes kept
churning, the noise kept pounding
and 10,000 residents in Plymouth,
the capital had to evacuate.
Soufriere acted up again
and again until she blew her
top, exploding like a wild child,
transforming the verdant peak into


'lymouth, frequently called the modern-day Pompeii


Back in the '80s and early
'90s, music ignited the 39 square


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gray shale. Today, she continues:
one day she's gentle and kind; the
next, she rages. Montserrat lifestyle
teeters on the edge and her 4,500
remaining residents will never be
the same.
Still, a sojourn to her simple
ways blesses one with a laid-back
escape. Black sparkly beaches
typically lie empty, except in the
fall when the green and hawksbills
turtles nest ashore. Guides lead
divers into warm aquamarine sea
caves and rock formations where
spotted morays, porcupine fish
and octopuses hang. Deep-sea
fishing benefits from the lack of
cruise-ship traffic. Wahoo, bonito,
shark, marlin and tasty yellowfin
tuna cavort just two to three miles


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offshore. Hikers find well-marked
trails established by the National
Trust.
A boat ride to see the ruins of
Plymouth, frequently called the
modern-day Pompeii, is a must.
Worldwide, no other destination
compares with the ghostly appari-
tion of the lost city. Onlookers
gasp at the now-forbidden territory


construction materials, systems and fixtures.
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standing as if Medusa turned it to
stone.
Currently, St. Patty's Day
parades start near Little Bay, the
proposed new capital and march to
the Village Heritage Festival, where
replicas of plantation slave huts
and traditional African food take
center stage. Try Duckna, a paste of
sweet potato, coconut and spices,
wrapped in taro leaves and tied
with strands of banana palm. The
national dish, Goat Water, reigns
most popular despite its less-than-
enticing name. It looks, tastes and
smells like spicy gumbo.
Expats and visitors from other
Caribbean islands unite at beach
bars and rum shops. The bands
play while patrons quaff Guinness
along with mango rum punch.
But...no green beer. Music once
brought prosperity to this island
and now it simply unites. Come
see the haunting beauty and listen
to her legacy of song.
If you go: www.visitmontser-
rat.com


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www.MandarinNewsLine.com * March 2011 *c /,,,t,,,,, NewsLine, Page 17


Youth Scene

Local stars follow a dream
By Alexa M. Velez


Beth Mathis, Shelby Todd, Benjahmin
Svyatoslav Ellis


had arrived bright
and early to secure
their place in line for
the Cirque Dreams
casting call.
First in line was
20-year-old Ben-
jahmin Svyatoslav
Ellis. A graduate of
Douglas Anderson
School of the Arts,
Ellis has a color-
ful background in
various athletic arts
including tumbling,
dance and rhythmic
gymnastics.
"I love what I
do and I have always
had a passion for it
even before I knew
what 'it' was," he
shares. His dream
is to become "the
soloist that everyone


%.-


The Doctor Who Listens

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Why go to a sales person when you can see a

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wonderful sounds of life? v


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Dr. Rosann W. Faull, Au.D., CCC-A
Board Certified Doctor of Audiology * 32 years expe i,-r 1- .ri

12276 San Jose Blvd. Suite 710 * Jacksonville, FL A3


Conenintl loate ina pofesioal ocaionwit amle arkng


What does it take to follow a
dream? Is it dedication, persever-
ance, optimism or the willingness
to take chances? On January 29,
acrobats, gymnasts, musicians,
dancers, singers and others with
special talents were given the
chance to follow their dreams and
audition to appear in the Cirque
Dreams Illumination production
that was held at the Jacksonville
Times-Union Center this past
February. Out of the first 100
contenders, only one performer
was selected for an appearance in
the show. The auditions were held
at the Avenues Mall. Before the
stores had even opened that Satur-
day morning, three hopeful stars


wants.
Second in line was 19-year-old
Shelby Todd, a level 10 rhythmic
gymnast who has practiced rhyth-
mic gymnastics for over 14 years.
"It's hard, but in the end, I'll
tell you what, it was worth all
those practices-it really was. It's
fun," Todd says.
She came to the audition be-
cause she had trained with Cirque
Du Soleil in California back in
2004 and loved it. "It's so different
and you learn so much. Now that
they are bringing it to Jacksonville,
I wanted to try it."
Third in line was 19-year-old
Beth Mathis, a dancer and aerial
hoop artist. She has been dancing


for over 10 years and is currently a
member of the DanceWorks Com-
pany at Florida State College.
"I came today because no
matter what the outcome, it's a
great opportunity to experience
the audition process, meet new
people, and make connections,"
she says.
Mathis loves performing. "It's
kind of a high, really. It's some-
thing you do once and you just
have to keep doing it."
As Mathis, Todd and Ellis
stretched in preparation for their
auditions, spectators watched
in awe at the extreme levels of
flexibility all three posses. Some


passersby even took out their cell
phones to snap pictures of the
seemingly impossible contortions
into which they could pretzel
themselves. Undoubtedly, these
performers have devoted years of
training and dedication to achieve
this level of skill.
Even though only one act
was ultimately awarded a spot on
the Cirque Dreams Illumination
show, all who auditioned should
be commended for taking a chance
to follow their dreams. And they
should always, as motivational
speaker Les Brown said, shoot for
the moon. Even if you miss, you'll
land among the stars.


Daylight Savings Time
Begins
Sunday, March 13





Page 18, c /,,,/ni,,, NewsLine * March 2011 * www.MandarinNewsLine.com


1


J:


This 3-module series begins with The Basics, covering:
* Money management and spending plans
* The military pay and entitlements system
* Leave and Earnings Statement (LES)
* Available financial resources at duty stations and command
* Selecting and using a financial institution and advisor


All workshops are free and open to the public.
Pre-registration is strongly recommended.
To pre-register and get more information on all workshops
and more resources, visit jaxpubliclibrary.org
and check out JPL on the Homefront


Flnra
Investor Education
FOUNDATION


investing
@your library'


FLORIDA
STATE COLLEGE
t lacksonville


Pictured is a group
known as "The Man-
darin Ladies." Every
year during Super
Bowl week, the Man-
darin Ladies who
volunteered for Super
Bowl XXXIX, meet
at the Ale House to
reminisce. This year
was our sixth meeting
since the game was
played on in Jackson-
ville on February 6,
2005. Terry Meier
(blue shirt) was our captain. She mapped out our schedule to all the events we were assigned as volun-
teers. We had fun getting to the events via city bus, trolley or car. Overall it was a great experience.


New Business Profile!


InStyle Jewelry and Accessories has opened in the
Shops at Julington Creek in Mandarin, near
Hurricane Wings at the Julington Creek Bridge.
InStyle Jewelry & Accessories offers many "designer


inspired" fashion items for women and girls of all ages.
We consider our r!l ( m-, "affordable luxuries" as most
fashion pieces are priced under $50. We search many
vendors for trendy designs in jewelry and pocket-books
to bring our customers items not seen in other stores and
at a great value. We offer wonderful gifts for birthday
parties and hostess gifts! InStyle carries many collegiate
items such as watches, jewelry and accessories for the
southeast schools. Stop in a take a peek!
InStyle Jewelry & Accessories is your local home for
Trollbeads and Chamilia beads. Today, Chamilia is fast
1*,,..!.i,, h 11ic "it" brand in the rapidly growing custom-
ized jewelry category. The company has a growing collec-
tion of 600+ beads and a successful Disney" partnership
with an exclusive collection of authentic Disney beads
not available anywhere else.


~t


PDr. Alan Krantz and his team members from Krantz Dental Care
cooked and served dinner to nearly 50 people at the Ronald Mc-
Donald House on January 28, 2011. This house serves as a home
away from home for families so that they may be close to their
hospitalized child. Providing a place to stay at little or sometimes
no cost, the Ronald McDonald House affords families access to
specialized medical treatment that they couldn't ordinarily afford.

Why recycle? The importance of
recycling in our community
By Contributing Writer Meghan Bender, Community Programs
Manager, Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundation


What is recycling? According
to Environment-Green, "recy-
cling is the process of turning one
products useful part into a new
product." We recycle to conserve
on the consumption of energy and
other resources. We also recycle to
keep trash out of landfills. Did you


The Convertible Colilenon . to ro/,



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How about a convertible bracelet? With over 100
sterling silver and/or 14k gold clasps to choose from,
you can change the clasp to fit your mood, the season
or the holiday.
We invite you to stop in and check out the many
affordable luxuries at InStyle Jewelry & Accessories!

12795 San Jose Blvd., Suite 8

Mandarin, FL 32223

904-262-8799
Mon - Sat 10:00 am - 5:30 pm
Closed Sunday
www.currentsgifts.com
www.iluvTrollbeads.com


know that every year the average
baby generates more than a ton of
trash?
More than 90 percent of
our trash could be used again by
recycling. Recycling is easy; in the
United States there are more than
9,000 curbside recycling programs
and 12,000 drop-off centers.
Here are 10 ways you can
recycle:
1. Use a microwave to cook
instead of a conventional oven.
Microwaves use 50 percent less
energy than ovens
2. Bring your own reusable gro-
cery bags to the grocery store
3. Use compact fluorescent light
bulbs. These light bulbs are
an energy-saving alternative to
normal light bulbs; they'll save
you money on your electric bill
and last 10 times longer too
4. Turn off the faucet while
brushing your teeth
5. Enroll in a recycling program.
Begin recycling all of your
household plastic, metal, alumi-
num, paper and glass goods
6. Stop your junk mail; you will
not receive it anymore and it'll
save more than 150,000 trees in
just one year
7. Shop green by buying recycled
products; avoid buying Styro-
foam as it is un-recyclable
8. When you can, ride your bike
or walk instead of drive
9. Unplug your electronics when
they're off and not being used
10. When writing or printing use
both side of paper
These recycling tips are
brought to you as part of the
education mission of the Firehouse
Subs Public Safety Foundation.
Firehouse Subs sells their recycled
pickle buckets for $2 apiece and
all proceeds benefit Firehouse Subs
Public Safety Foundation.


" February 22 & 24, 2011
(5:30 - 7:30 p.m.)

on the H om front FSCJ Urban Resource Center
Room 103
601 W. State Street
Jacksonville, Florida 32202


JPL on the Homefront: Smart investing@your library'
is a financial education program designed specifically for
veterans, service members, and their families.


JACKSONVILLE
PUBLIC LIBRARY
Start Here. Go Anywhere.


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www.MandarinNewsLine.com * March 2011 *c /,,,,,,,,i NewsLine, Page 19


Pre-K rocks the house for
Catholic Schools Week
By Contributing Writer Theresa Cline, Pre-K teacher, St. Joseph
Catholic School


. 11 * I I * I*II


In February, St. Joseph Catho-
lic School celebrated Catholic
Schools Week. It was a fun-filled
week of bands, drum lines, story
tellers and ice cream! The week also
provided the opportunity for the
students to experience the joy of
giving to others. Children provided
Spiritual Acts of Mercy for their
families, donated canned goods
and school supplies, made Valen-
tines for children at the Sulzbacher
Center and prayed for our military
during Eucharistic Adoration. Our
Priests, Deacons and Sisters were

S?//,/,',, //,, NewsLine
Everybody Gets It.
Everybody Reads It.

Copy deadline for April issue:
March 10!
editor@mandarinnewsline.com


celebrated and appreciated with
beautiful handmade cards from the
students.
The highlights of the week
were visits from the bands at Bish-
op Kenny and Bishop Snyder High
Schools. Everyone, including the
teachers, raised the roof dancing to
drum beats and Michael Jackson
songs! Energy from the Pre-K kids
set the tone for a jammin' pep rally!
A favorite of all the children
was a visit from Dilly the Ice
Cream Cone delivering yummy
Dilly Bars. The week of charity,
celebration and appreciation ended
with the children bringing flowers
for their teachers. Every teacher re-
ceived a beautiful bouquet followed
by a delicious lunch at Bonefish
Grill. The children, teachers, staff
and volunteers experienced a truly
magnificent week. However, every-
one will agree that the best part of
the week was the blessing received
from the opportunity to show the
love of God by serving our com-
munity.


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Sambursky Chiropractic, LLC
683-4376
Immediate same day appointments available. Including Saturdays!
Massage Therapist now on Staff (Lic#MA58338)
We Accept: Aetna - Blue Cross Blue Shield
United Healthcare - Cigna - Medicare . Automobile Insurance
We also accept Cash paying patients.
12421 San Jose Blvd. #300 (just South of Solantic)
Serving the Mandarin and Julington Creek area.
www.backbonejax.com


On February 3,
the MOMS Club
of Mandarin-
Southeast hosted
a Chinese New
Year Celebra-
tion in honor of
the Year of the
Rabbit.


Dr. Bruce Sambursky
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* We also offer inventory liquidation service for builders, home and
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Page 20, c /,,,,lt,; NewsLine * March 2011 * www.MandarinNewsLine.com


yvVE-- IKAU C

A Children's Name Brand
Consignment Event
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50-80% OFF
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P U. -5ES


The All Star Quilters Guild:
Quilt Discovery Day

By Contributing Writer Dot Butler, All Star Quilters Guild
Quilt
Discovery
Day is an
event held
to find and
document -
the history
of quilts that
are currently
located in
Florida. The
Sunshine
State Quilters
Association
(www.ssqa.org) is sponsoring the quilt and its maker are a
Florida Quilt Project to perma- known, a picture and ld
nently document quilts with as of the quilt are still valu
much of their history as possible. this endeavor. Quilts do
All quilt lovers and historians will to be "Florida made" to
be able to access and enjoy the the Florida Quilt Projec
information online in the national currently in the state mx
Quilt Index (www.quiltindex. mented. Quilts may be
org). The All Star Quilters Guild is though we are especially
participating in the Florida Quilt in documenting older q
Project by holding a Quilt Discov- their history is lost. You
ery Day on Saturday, March 19 up to three quilts for th
from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. at Discovery Day. Please b
the First Christian Church, located available information or
at 11924 San Jose Boulevard. quilt maker.
Why is there such a need For more informati
for quilt documentation? Quilts, Quilt Discovery Day, pi
in most cases, are handed down tact Sunnie Malesky at
within families. They are part of a or Dot Butler at 642-65
family's history. Since quilt making visit us at www.orgsites.
has historically been done primar- starquiltguild. For more
ily by females, documentation is an tion on the Florida Qui
act of recording women's history visit the Sunshine State
as well. Documentation records Association at www.ssqa
the quilt's history: when it was cess the national Quilt I
made, by whom, where and why www.quiltindex.org.
it was made, how it was used and
the previous and current owner.
This adds meaning and richness to c //,,,;; ./ Ne
a quilt for future generations and
quilt historians. IS
The Quilt Discovery Day will YOUR
give those in our area access to the Commun
documentation process. Quilts will C mmuni
be measured carefully, described Newspape
completely, photographed and the
history of each quilt maker will be
recorded. Even if the story of your editor@mandarinne


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MHS Happenings

National Signing Day: A great
success at Mandarin High
By Grant Gunderson, MHS Student


no longer
description
able for
not need
be part of
t. Any quilt
ay be docu-
of any age,
Interested
uilts before
may bring
e Quilt
ring any
n the actual

on on the
ease con-
262-0268
574 and
com/fl/all-
informa-
It Project
Quilters
i.org. To ac-
ndex visit


wsLine



ty


vsline.com


Need an orthopaedic surgeon

for you and your family?
Our office is located at 14540 Old St. Augustine Rd., Suite. 2201 (32258).
We are dedicated to meeting the needs of this community!


Brandon J. Kambach, MD Gregory C. Keller, MD

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The seven athletes who signed
are as follows:
* Riley Carter - Appalachian
State/women's softball
* Allie Johnson - St. Petersburg
College/ women's softball
* Eduardo Garcia - University of
Florida/ men's cross country,
men's track and field
* Tyler Kordenbrock - University
of North Carolina-Pembroke/
men's basketball
* Taylor O'berry - Francis Mason
University/women's soccer
* Jarrod Widdows - Daytona
State University/men's baseball
* Ryan Montez - Jacksonville
University/men's football
Widdows is the third baseball
player to sign a national letter
of intent this year as both Bryan
Mathews and Spencer Herrman
both signed with the UNF Ospreys
earlier this year.
Carter and Johnson are two
outstanding and versatile players
who will have a huge and immedi-
ate impact at the college level. Both
are pitchers for the Lady Mustangs
fast-pitch softball team and can't
wait to play their final year in high
school, a time that will be very
bittersweet for both young ladies.
They are the second and third
ladies on the squad, respectively,
to sign a letter of intent as Brooke
Smith signed earlier this year with
Florida Tech.
Mandarin High School is
losing seven magnificent student
athletes in these young men and
women. However, they're doing
the right thing and taking the next
step to taking on responsibility and
becoming young respectable men
and women.
MHS will forever miss these
talented senior athletes and will
always welcome them home as
well as wishing them luck as they
further their athletic careers to the
collegiate (and hopefully one day
professional) level.
^ ,, ^
W~wy


High school sports give
most teenagers something to do
that keeps them busy and out of
trouble. But sometimes, sports can
change their life in more ways than
one. For seven athletes at Man-
darin High School, that's exactly
what participating in a high school
sport did for them.
On Wednesday, February 2,
seven senior athletes at MHS made
a huge next step that would change
life as they knew it. Friends, family
members and even fellow team-
mates of the super seven packed
into the Mustang gymnasium to
show their support and provide a
little tender-loving care.


New: March 4

First Quarter: March 12

Full: March 19

Last Quarter: March 26


























Children's librarian Anne Clements read stories to the
Bumblebee Circle of the Mandarin Garden Club at their
February meeting.

Important visitors at St. Joseph
Catholic School
By Contributing Writer Kirsten Gordon, Third Grade Teacher, St.
Joseph Catholic School


The third grade classes at
St. Joseph Catholic School had
some important visitors from the
past and present. The children
gave their biography book reports
dressed as the person they read
about.
Cleopatra, Amelia Earhart,
Neil Armstrong and Walt Disney
were some of the people who were


NewsLine

YOUR
Community Newspaper
editor@mandarinnewsline.com









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showcased. Each child had to read
a biography, write a written report
and then give an oral presentation
in the first person.
Do you know who invented
the paper bag or who the teddy
bear was named after? The stu-
dents learned not only about their
person, but also a little about the
other students' important people.


Students cont. from pg. 1
watch Manilow and their stu-
dents perform. The children
weren't quite as excited as the
parents, yet. In fact, the ques-
tion, "Who is Barry Manilow?"
was common amongst the kids.
It wasn't until the parents and
teachers showed the students
YouTube videos of Manilow per-
formances and explained that the
arena offers seating capacity for
16,000 people that the students
began to grasp this unbelievable
happening.
Manilow's musical director,
Ron Walters, visited the MJGDS
Choir at school the day before
the show to work with them so
they would be prepared for the
show. The students were instruct-
ed to wear red shirts, black pants
and sing loudly. After school on
January 26, the students were
transported to the arena in a
school bus and were taken to
the performers' entrance of the
arena. After a rehearsal and stage
blocking, the kids were taken to a
dressing room to eat dinner and
get dressed for the show. There
was special seating for them to
enjoy the first part of the concert
because they were part of the
finale.
The choir's performance was
amazing! The kids came out with
confidence, smiles and sang their
hearts out! Once their song was
over, a cannon of confetti and
streamers began shooting out
into the audience, which was a
huge surprise for the kids.


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After the show, Manilow
greeted the students and posed
for a picture with them. It was
quite an evening that the families
of the choir will never forget. To
watch a movie of their experi-
ence, please visit us on the web at
www.mjgds.org and scroll down
to the Network Channel.

MJGDS students had the thrill of a
lifetime by performing with legend-
ary singer Barry Manilow at the
Jacksonville Veterans Memorial
Arena in January.


www.MandarinNewsLine.com * March 2011 *c c/ r i NewsLine, Page 21


















e sa m a


tos@@Sk...E






aae--





Page 22, c 2/-A,,,,, ;n NewsLine * March 2011 * www.MandarinNewsLine.com


Host your own

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Blancc," it's time for Harry's Adventures in Wine.
Let Harry's Adventures in Wine be your guide
through the wonderful wine regions of the world, without
, -leaving the comforts of your own home.
We do not sell wine, only educate, entertain and share
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Remember When?

Tapestry by Memphis Wood, 1981

Memphis Wood (1902-1989)
was one of Mandarin's distin-
guished artists. She was born
in Dacula, Georgia. After re-
ceiving her master's in fine arts
from University of Georgia,
Miss Wood moved to Jackson-
ville in 1929 and dedicated
herself to art education in the
community. She excelled in
many mediums, but was most
well known for her fabric art.
Today her works can be found
in collections throughout the
Southeast. Prior to her death
in June, 1989, in Atlanta, Miss
Wood was the recipient of
many honors, including the
Arts Assembly of Jacksonville
Award, City of Jacksonville Memphis Wood Day, and the Florida
Art Education Distinguished Service. To learn more about Manda-
rin history, please visit the Mandarin Museum & Historical Society.
For more information, call 268-0784 or email mandarinmuseum@
bellsouth.net.
Photo provided by the Mandarin Museum and Historical Society.
Watch this space each month for more memories!



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Youth Arts Scene

Java, joe and poetry
By Danielle Wirsansky


The scratch of a scribbling
pen, the rustle of worn paper
pages, the steep earthy aroma of
coffee-all of these are the indica-
tions that a writer is in the room.
And on March 19 and 22, the
Douglas Anderson Creative Writers
are going to be busy. Kicking off
the March events will be a book
fair, followed by the freshmen Cof-
fee Reading.
Barnes and Noble will be host-
ing the first ever Creative Writing
Booster Book Fair on March 19. It
is a fundraiser to help raise depart-
ment funds. The event will take
place at the Town Center location
and it will go on throughout the
day. The creative writers of the
department, ranging from high
school freshmen to seniors, will be
hosting mini events during the day
at this location such as poetry and
spoken word workshops for adults
and children, an Open Mic and
children's book readings. Local au-
thors such as Dr. William Napier, a
creative writing teacher of Douglas
Anderson, will be presenting and
lecturing as well. As supporters
shop, Barnes and Noble gives the
organization a percentage of net
proceeds from the book fair sales.
"It's a really great way to get
involved with the Creative Writing
Department. I'm very excited to see
how the community will respond
to this program on March 19," says
Julia Fluker, a junior.
Almost everything in the store
can be counted as a book fair sale,
except such items as gift cards and
Nook eReaders. In order for sales
to go towards the event, vouchers
must be used or the clerk informed
before the final purchase is made.
"I shop for books all the time
and am happy I will have an op-


portunity to help the department
by doing so," says junior Alexander
Titcomb.
The students are especially
excited to be a part of the promo-
tion. Says Lea Eaves, a junior, "I
am especially excited for the chance
to experience Dr. Napier as a
published writer and not just as a
teacher."
Soon after this event, the
Coffee Reading is taking place on
March 22.
"I'm so excited for this event-
it really makes me feel like I am a
part of the Creative Writing De-
partment," says sophomore Leah
Wright.
Four are performed every
school year, each one hosted by the
freshmen, sophomores, juniors and
seniors. The Coffee Reading is a
reading of student work, ranging
from poetry to fiction to non-fic-
tion. Students must submit pieces
ahead of time and "audition" to be
chosen to perform.
"I find the Coffee Readings to
be great social experiences to inter-
act with other writers," says junior
Laurel Richardson, a student in the
department.
Refreshments are served
during the intermission and the
school's literary magazine, eLan,
will be sold. There is no admission
fee and the event is held at the
D.A. Theatre at 7:00 p.m.
"I love books; even if I wasn't a
creative writing major I'd still love
them, they have a magical quality
about them. Both the Book Fair
and the upcoming Coffee Read-
ing are brilliant opportunities to
support the Creative Writers and
to buy some awesome books," says
freshman Brianna Sessions.


When you have school-age
children, homework is a fact of life.
But it doesn't have to be unpleas-
ant. Do your part to help your
child get the most from his or her
homework with this advice:
* Show your interest. Ask chil-
dren about their homework
assignments. Talk about why
they're important and what the
child can learn from them. You
need to show that homework is
important and worthwhile.
* Establish a routine. Set aside
regular time for homework-
right after dinner, perhaps. This
helps the child get into the
habit of beginning on time.
* Eliminate distractions. Turn off
the TV and radio and provide
adequate space where your child
can work without being both-
ered by siblings, parents making
dinner, etc.
* Help your child prioritize. Time
management is essential. Your
child should keep a notebook or
log all of his or her assignments
so none of them gets forgot-
ten. Advise them to identify


which assignments will be most
difficult and time-consuming
so they can start on those when
they're fresh.
* Offer help-within limits.
Don't do their homework for
them. If they get stuck, ask
questions and guide them
through the difficulties so
they're doing the work them-
selves. Otherwise they won't
learn the subject-or responsi-
bility for doing their own work.
* Praise their efforts. Getting
the right answer is important,
but so is supporting the process.
Praise them for working hard
and not giving up when they're
tired or frustrated.
* Give them a break. Let children
take short breaks if they start
to get too frustrated with a
particular assignment. You don't
want a complete meltdown over
an arithmetic problem.
* Work with the teacher. Stay in
contact with your children's
teachers so you know what their
expectations are-for the child
and for you as a parent.


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/ann arin NewsLine

For all your community news!

Martie Thompson, Editor
editor@rtpublishinginc.com
Donna Lang, Advertising Sales
dl@rtpublishinginc.com


Do your homework on helping
kids with theirs


._ ..





www.MandarinNewsLine.com * March 2011 * c 2A,,,',lt;,i NewsLine, Page 23


On Saturday, I
rin Lutheran Churc
a pot luck dinner ai
Dinner will be serve
p.m. until 7:00 p.m
be a children's aucti
p.m. to 7:30 p.m. a
the main auction w
will also be a silent
and raffle items. Do
be given during the
local businesses hav
cards and services!
invited to attend.

First Christian
(Disciples of Christ
ing their annual gar
Saturday, March 26
all sorts ofhouseho
furniture, books an
to choose from. The
during this garage s
with the ongoing m
Christian Church ii
Community. Please
church, located at 1
Boulevard, on Satur
between 8:00 a.m.

Ash Wednesday
be held at Mandari
odist Church, locat
San Jose Boulevard
12:15 p.m. in the S
6:30 p.m. in the Fa
ship Center.

Lenten Evensor
Music will feature T
ganist and director
Cathedral Choir, w
a service for Lent or
noon, 13 March 13
St. John's Cathedral
East Church Street.
include "Kyrie" by'
"Crux Fidelis" by R
"Salvator Mundi" b
"Adoramus Te" by I
Magnificat and Nut
Walmisley plus othc
program is free and
be available. For ad
mation, please call

It's going to be
ebration! On Marcl
Christian Fellowsh
Mandarin Assembly
celebrate its 40th an
10:15 a.m. service.


4/arch 5 Manda- Powers and the congregation will
ch will have welcome as their guests all the for-
nd auction. mer pastors of Freedom Christian
ed from 6:15 Fellowship: Rev. James Arbogast,
i. There will Rev. Anthony Planes, Rev. Bill
on from 7:00 Enfinger and Rev. Ron Nichols.
t which time Marvin Hartley will minister in
ill begin. There song. We invite you to join us in
auction table this momentous occasion at 3423
)or prizes will Loretto Road. For more details,
auction. Many please call the church office at 268-
e donated gift 2244.
The public is
After 20 years in rented
space, Buckman Bridge Unitarian
Church Universalist Church will have its
t) will be hav- own home. Sunday, January 30 was
age sale on their last day holding worship at
T. There will be the Mandarin Community Club,
Id items, some where they have worshiped for
d more for you about 18 years. They have moved
e funds raised into their new building located at
ale will help 8447 Manresa Avenue off Collins
ministries of First Road at the south fence of NAS
n the Mandarin Jacksonville. Upon their move to
stop by the their new location, they planted a
1924 San Jose tree on the new grounds, signifying
rday, March 26 their plans to grow!
and 2:00 p.m.
Join Shalom Jacksonville on
y Services will Sunday, March 6 at 1:30 p.m. at
n United Meth- the Jacksonville Main Library for a
ed at 11270 docent-led tour of the US Holo-
on March 9 at caust Memorial Museum's traveling
anctuary and at exhibit, "Deadly Medicine: Creat-
mily Life Wor- ing the Master Race." Following
the library tour, we'll meet at the
nearby MOCA-Museum of Con-
ng Service of temporary Art for "Art for Educa-
Fim Tuller, or- tion" created by the Jacksonville
of the St. John's Jewish Center school students and
ho will conduct local artists. The fee for MOCA's
n Sunday after- entire museum tour is $8 for
at 5:00 p.m. at adults; $5 for seniors, families are
,located at 256 free. If you wish to caravan, please
The music will meet at the JCA school parking lot
William Byrd, at 12:45 p.m. or meet the group
oger-Ducasse, at 1:15 p.m. in front of the library
y John Blow, bookstore at 303 North Laura
Mozart and the Street. Reservations are required
nc Dimittis by so we have enough docents. Please
er works. The contact Isabel at 448-5000 x 206
a nursery will or shalomjax@jewishjacksonville.
ditional infor- org for information and directions.


356-5507.

a Grand Cel-
h 27, Freedom
ip (formerly
y of God) will
anniversary in the
Pastor Stephen


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Do you have a Catskills Connection?


If you ever spent time in the
Catskills, you know that those
memories stay with you forever.
Believe it or not, there are many
people in Northeast Florida who
have a Catskills connection.
Some grew up in this unique
New York State area, others va-
cationed or worked in the famed

St. Patrick's Day:
March 17
& .1


hotels or bungalow colonies, still
others attended summer camp
in one of 50 small hamlets.
Are you connected to the
Catskills? If so, please contact us
so we can let you know of our
upcoming activities. A nostalgic
program is in the works and
volunteers are needed!


To be placed on the mailing
list or serve as a volunteer for
the next program, please contact
Mimi Kaufman, 880-4014 or
email sexymandms@bellsouth.
net or Isabel Balotin, 268-3362
or catskillgal@comcast.net.


Jewish Java-a place connect


New to the community?
Been in Jacksonville a few years
but looking to make connections?
Like to schmooze? If so you have
an open invitation to join us for a
casual coffee and schmoozing pro-
gram: Shalom Jacksonville's Jewish
Java which meets the first Wednes-
day of every month from 9:00 a.m.
to 10:30 a.m. at Let's Nosh on San
Jose Boulevard. Coffee and tea are
free.
It's the perfect place to meet
new people, catch up with old
friends and acquaintances, find out
the latest happenings in the Jewish
community, get the latest issue
of the Jewish News and general
community information. There are


AuutieLadn
for ou
OneDayOny Sle


10141 Old Saint Augustine Road
Jacksonville, FL 32257
904-880-1116


no solicitations. Upcoming javas:
March 2 and April 6.If you are new
to the community and would like
more information, please contact
Isabel Balotin, 448-5000 x 206 or
shalomj ax@j ewishj acksonville.org.
The Jewish Federation' Shalom
Jacksonville is the official Jew-
ish welcome wagon of Northeast
Florida and is sponsored by Blue
Cross Blue Shield of Florida.

C M/,, f,,,, ,; NewsLine

YOUR
Community Newspaper
editor@mandarinnewsline.com






ST. JOSEPH'S
CATHOLIC CHURCH
March 2011
Lenten Schedule
Ash Wednesday Mass
March 9
Main Church
8:15 a.m.
12:00 noon
7:00 p.m.
Stations of the Cross
Wednesday
Main Church
March 16th 7:00 p.m.
March 23rd 7:00 p.m.
March 30th 7:00 p.m.
April 6th 7:00 p.m.
Parish Penance Service
April 13th 7:00 p.m.
11730 Old St. Augustine Rd.
Jacksonville, Florida
904-268-5422


ft
the community
to your
House of Worship
editor@mandarinnewsline.com


Commemorates the pa-
tron saint of Ireland, Bishop
Patrick (A.D. 389-461) who
about A.D. 432 left his
home in the Severn valley,
England and introduced
Christianity to Ireland.


Augustine Landing
Independent Retirement Living


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Page 24, c -//.//;// NewsLine * March 2011 * www.MandarinNewsLine.com


UmoI
NIis


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Lunch Buffet Mon. thru Fri. llam-2pm 1/2 Price 1/2 Price
Parties * Catering Available
Banquet Room Up to 50 people With coupon only. With coupon only.
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Playing the game of tennis just got easier: Introducing QuickStart format


By Contributing Writer Celia Rehm
Introducing a game kids will
love! Jax Parks and the Jacksonville
Youth Tennis Association (JYTA)
introduce the QuickStart format
of play using racquets, balls and
courts that are sized right for kids
so they can enjoy the game right
from the start. JYTA, a new United
States Tennis Association (USTA)
registered nonprofit organization
has formed a partnership with Jax
Parks to initiate a USTA junior
team tennis league for ages eight
and under and ages 10 and under
using the QuickStart format of play
at three city public sites: Boone
Park, Southside Tennis and Burnett
Park. QuickStart tennis equipment
will be provided at all three sites
through a USTA Florida grant.


The spring season of the USTA their children at a public park to JYTA is registering now via please visit the Ja
junior team tennis league for ages play tennis for the spring season, email at JYTAjam@gmail.com or (http://www.coj.
10 and under (QuickStart tennis) the same as with baseball, soccer call 262-1399. Recreation+and+
will run from March 29 through and other junior sports. Kids can The spring season will kick-off ces/Recreation+a
May 12. It is a seven week program. start playing right away with their with a free QuickStart jamborees rogramming/Rec
Sessions will run twice weekly and friends on smaller courts, with at each site to start off the season. Athletics/QuickS
will consist of three weeks of tennis lower nets, lighter racquets tailored RSVP is required. Ask about how htm) and USTA
instruction followed by four weeks to their size, low and slow bouncing to sign up for your child for this (http://10andun
of match play. The registration cost balls, shorter matches and simpli- fun event as well! parents.htm.)
of the program is $75, plus $19 for fied scoring. For additional information,
the Junior USTA membership. For
the registration fee, the childwill Protect yourself from springtime allergy
get a QST racquet, Nike jersey, 14
sessions, end of the year playoff/ The arrival of spring brings job of wiping residual pollen from len can cling to c
party and an award trophy. There sunlight and flowers and green them. And wash your hands (you so vacuum your
are no other costs. leaves on the trees-and seasonal al- may even want to shower and get your sheets more
Match play will be onsite and lergies. Tree pollens and mold spores into some pollen-free duds). When other times of th
will operate similar to almost every can wreak havoc on the 35 million you wash your clothes, use a dryer, for bath towels, t
other youth sport. Parents will now Americans who suffer itchy eyes, rather than an outdoor clothesline, filtration system
have the opportunity to sign up runny noses, scratchy throats and 5. Avoid "pollen magnets." Pol- irritating particu


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Call for
Spring Spe


acials


fatigue due to allergies.
Beyond the many over-the-
counter and prescription medica-
tions available, you can take some
simple steps to reduce your misery:
1. Limit your exposure. After
months of cabin fever, staying inside
with the windows shut tight may
seem a shame on a lovely day, but
consider the alternative: sneezing
and wheezing and rubbing your eyes
nonstop. Stay indoors when condi-
tions are ripe for an allergy attack.
2. Plan your outings. Rainy and
non-windy days are best for keeping
pollen at bay. Remember, too, that
pollen counts peak in the midday
hours. Avoid grassy and wooded
areas. Check your local news source
for pollen counts.
3. Park strategically. Pollen can
coat your car on heavy days. Keep
your car in the garage as much as
possible. When you park outside,
try to avoid parking under a tree.
Your car may be cooler when you
get into it, but you'll be less likely to
get a noseful of pollen in the process
of opening the door.
4. Scrub up. When you come
back into your home, remove your
shoes or at least do a thorough


* ,





GYMNASTICS 0

Our #1 Priority: Your Children

Motivating classes for all ages

Fun Additional Programs

Spring Break Camp

March 28th - April 1st

CALL TODAY!

SI^i^ 9^s W- - 9'.,^^^^SS^B


ax Parks webpage
net/Departments/
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oo. An in-home air
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Why eat your vegetables? Not
just to get to dessert faster


Mother always said, "Eat your
vegetables." The problem is that
too many of us still aren't listening
to her. According to the Centers
for Disease Control and Preven-
tion, only 26 percent of United
States adults eat three or more serv-
ings of vegetables a day, although
current recommendations call for
four to five servings. The benefits
are significant: Eating the right
kind of vegetables in the appropri-
ate quantities can cut one's risk
of diabetes, heart disease, kidney
failure, and other serious illnesses.
What kinds of vegetables
should you be eating? Well, all
kinds, but here's what you're get-
ting:
* Fiber. Beans and other high-
fiber vegetables fill the stom-
ach, reducing your cravings
for more food while reducing
cholesterol levels and improv-
ing digestion and regularity.
* Potassium. Tomatoes, sweet
potatoes, spinach and winter


squash improve blood pressure.
They may also reduce the risk of
kidney stones and bone loss.
SVitamin A. Carrots, pumpkin,
kale, collard greens, and other
veggies enhance the health of
eyes and skin. Beta-carotene
and other carotenoids cut one's
risk of macular degeneration,
cataracts, coronary artery dis-
ease and stomach cancer.
SFolates. Asparagus, black-eyed
peas, spinach and other folates
consumed during pregnancy
help prevent birth defects,
especially to the spinal cord and
help the body form red blood
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www.MandarinNewsLine.com * March 2011 * oc /,ti/iit/;i NewsLine, Page 25


Your beautiful pool: Why water quality matters!


By Contributing Writer John Adkins,
When you jump into your pool,
you want the water to be clean, clear
and perfectly balanced. You don't
want bacteria, chlorine smells or
cloudiness to ruin the day. It's easy
to maintain your water quality by
knowing these three major measure-
ments: pH, chlorine levels and alka-
linity. If you have a basic water test
kit, you can measure these factors
and make the correct adjustments to
keep your water quality at the ideal
levels.
The pH reading determines the
acidity of the water. Your body has
a basic ph of 7.6 to 7.4. In order for
your skin and eyes to feel comfort-
able in your pool, you need to main-
tain the pH at the same level as your
body. If the pH is too low or too
high, your eyes will burn and your
skin will itch. Pools have a tendency
to be too high in pH and when this
happens you adjust by adding acid,
either muriatic or sulfuric. I prefer
sulfuric acid because it doesn't give
off fumes. This has the effect of low-
ering the ph. One cup of acid will
lower the pH by .2 for every 10,000
gallons of water. Be sure to dilute it
in a bucket of pool water and put it


In February, St. Johns River-
keeper launched the River Friendly
Campaign to raise awareness about
the impact of our actions upon the
health of the St John River and to
encourage residents and businesses
to adopt "river friendly" practices.
Kicking off the River Friendly
Campaign is the Rain Barrel Proj-
ect, featuring artistically-designed
rain barrels located throughout the
community to promote water con-
servation and to educate the pub-
lic about how to be "river friendly."
The goal of the campaign is to
provide informative resources and
tools that will help you to make
more informed choices to better
protect your St. Johns River.
One of the most important
factors in protecting and cleaning
up the river is the involvement and
commitment of each of us, the
citizens to whom the river belongs.
With so many people now living
within the watershed of the river
(over four million people), our
actions collectively add up to have
a significant impact on the health
of the St. Johns. When we flush
our toilets, fertilize our lawns, use
bleached paper products, turn on a
light, drive a car or build a home,
we potentially contribute to the
problems facing our river. But,
by each doing his or her part and
being "river friendly," there is no



81%

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Source: Circulation Verification Council.
Residents in zip codes 32223 and 32258.


Owner, Adkins Pool Service
into the deep end of the pool away
from the sides. Wait 15 minutes
before getting into the pool.
Alkalinity is very similar to pH.
Very high alkalinity will raise the pH
of the pool causing you to add more
acid. However alkalinity is very im-
portant for the pool. It acts as a buf-
fer for the other chemicals. If your
alkalinity is too low, you can raise
it by adding baking soda (sodium
hydrogen carbonate). A normal level
for alkalinity is 80ppm (parts per
million). If your alkalinity is too low,
add up to four pounds of baking
soda to raise it 10ppm per 10,000
gallons. You can buy this at the gro-
cery store. Vinyl liner pools should
have alkalinity levels of between
110 - 140 ppm to help preserve the
liners. Alkalinity also helps capture
the sunlight and give your water that
sparkling blue look. Add the baking
soda through the skimmer basket
while the pool is running.
Chlorine levels are also impor-
tant. Too little chlorine and your
water will not be properly sanitized.
Too much chlorine is wasted and
can cause irritation of the eyes


doubt that together we can save
our St. Johns River.
One of the most important
things that each of us can do is to
use our voice and vote to com-
municate our concerns and to elect
legislators who will work to protect
our St. Johns. As you are deciding
who to vote for in the upcoming
elections, make sure that you give
consideration to who would best
represent the interests of our river.
We need strong effective leaders
who understand the river's impor-
tance to our economy and quality
of life and will stand up for its
protection.
So, this spring, keep your eyes
open for our rain barrels and your
mind open to the ways you can
be more "river friendly." Our St.
Johns River needs us now more
than ever before. Learn more about
the campaign, upcoming events
and workshops and how you can
build a rain barrel by visiting www.
stjohnsriverkeeper.org.


and skin. Most pools in use in the
United States use chlorine as a steril-
izer. Some pools get their chlorine
by converting salt (NaC1 or sodium
chloride) into chlorine. Most pools
use three-inch chlorine tablets as the
main source of chlorine. The proper
level of chlorine should be between
1.5 and 3.0 ppm.
So go get out your four-in-one
test kit and follow the instructions.
You should test your water every
week all year long. If your test kit
is old, go to the pool store and buy
new bottles of the reagents inside the
kit. If you don't have a test kit - get
one. They are cheap and the reagents
will probably last you a year. Keep a
weekly log that includes the readings
and what you added. When you test
the water the next week, you can see
the effect and make the appropriate
adjustments. I want your pool to be
as nice as mine and so do you!
For additional information,
please contact
thepoolprofessor@att.net.


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Book Review
Indulgence in Death
Written byJ.D. Robb. 373 pages. Published by G.P. Putnam's Sons, November 2010.
Review by T. G. Stanton


From Ireland to New York and
various areas around the universe,
murder finds Eve Dallas just about
anywhere. Even in a tranquil
family visit to Ireland, she and her
husband Roarke end up in the
middle of murder. Upon returning
home, the hits just keep on com-
ing. Lieutenant Eve Dallas is back
in New York and back to work as
notice of the murder of a limou-
sine driver comes across her link,
the future of communication in
the mid 21st century. The NYPSD
provides fair gear to their officers,
but Roarke provides better gadgets
for his cop.
This murder is unique in many
ways; the choice of weapon, a
crossbow, is only the first element.
Further investigation leads to
prominent companies and promi-
nent executives. Are there leaks in
these security companies or hackers
out there that just want to kill? Eve
and her partner Peabody find the
circumstances very circumstantial
in this murder, then again in the
second, third and so on. Each
death is a different type of victim,
with a different type of weapon


and in this century, some weapons
are not come easy to come by. In
addition, after more searching, the
next crime, murder by bayonet,
leads to the owners of companies
implicated in the deaths.
From golden limousines to
world famous chefs, these mur-
ders take those in the top of their
professions and put an end to their
careers. However, where-oh-where
is the connection? Professionals
who provide for those used to liv-
ing lives of indulgence are
being murdered in very different

in*1I^WIJ an JA


manners.
J.D. Robb has written many
Dallas and Roarke novels and this
one provides the same genuine
characters and a multitude of
twists and turns. Since her mar-
riage, Eve is much more used to
some indulgences, but murder still
gets to her and she fights for those
who have been killed and can no
longer fight for themselves. In this
as in many other novels, Roarke is
nearby; he aids the investigation
and aids in keeping his cop safe.


J. Bradley Hall, DMD




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Page 26, c .//,//;// NewsLine * March 2011 * www.MandarinNewsLine.com


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Designer Showhouse 2011

Preview Luncheon announced


The Jacksonville Symphony
Guild has announced that the
17-acre Coxwell Estate, located at
9433 Coxwell Lane in Jacksonville,
will be its 2011 Designer Show-
house. The Showhouse will feature
a variety of fund-raising events to
benefit the Jacksonville Symphony
Orchestra.
According to Rose L. Little-
field and Marge Burgess, Sym-
phony Guild Designer Showhouse
co-chairs, this year's fund-raising
efforts will begin on Thursday,
March 31 at 10:00 a.m. with
the annual preview luncheon at
the Garden Club of Jacksonville,
located at 1005 Riverside Avenue.
The cost per person is $60. Ad-
vance reservations are required and
seating is limited. For tickets and
reservations, call 280-2373.
Nationally-recognized land-
scape designer and architect, Mary
Palmer Dargan, ASLA, APLD, will
be the keynote speaker. Dargan
will address specifics about the lo-
cal Showhouse project and design


features along with her renowned
work in landscapes and gardens.
She has appeared on Ground
Breakers on HGTV and has pub-
lished Timeless Landscape Design:
The Four Part Master Plan. She
will soon publish Lifelong Land-
scape Design: Gardens for Health
and Longevity. Visit the website at
www.dargan.com.
In addition to the Preview
Luncheon, The Showhouse Speaker
Series will be held at the Show-
house from April 5 through April
21 at 11:00 a.m.
Admission to the Speaker
Series is free with the purchase of a
Showhouse ticket. Also, individu-
als who volunteer for two shifts as
a docent at the Showhouse may
attend the entire Speaker Series at
no charge.
The Speaker Series Calendar is
as follows:
Tuesday, April 5, 2011: Don-
ald Wright/ Unexpected transfer
tax provisions of the Tax Relief

Showhouse cont. on pg. 27


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www.MandarinNewsLine.com * March 2011 * c 72c/,it,,t;, NewsLine, Page 27


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of sudden thrombosis of any artery
affected with artherosclerosis.
Even patients who have previ-
ously had a heart attack, heart
surgery, angioplasty or a stent
benefit in survival and protection
from other cardiac events by taking
stations. And patients who take these
drugs while undergoing surgery or
intervention for cardiac or vascular
problems have a noticeably lower
rate of complications during the
surgical time period.
Few adverse effects of stations
have been recorded since their
introduction 40 years ago. How-
ever, the effects can be severe and it
is important to know the potential
down-side of these drugs. In rare
circumstances, stations can cause
liver damage. There are no symp-
toms with liver damage, so doctors
do frequent laboratory tests when
use of a station is started to closely


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$375+ 7% tax i. I,, : ' a month. Rent can split
w/other LMT Phone: 904-288-0064
Join the Baptist South circle of care. Visit
e-baptisthealth.com for the most up to date list
of job openings. Listings are updated daily and
change often. If you have any questions, please
call Human Resources at 271.6078.
Full time directors -Part time teachers-HUN-
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a passion to make a difference. BA and teaching
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Showhouse cont. from pg. 26
Act of 2010, signed into law on
December 17, 2010; how the
provisions affect estate and trust
planning.
Wednesday, April 6, 2011: Dr.
Joanne Dragun, M.D. Dr. Dragun,
Medical Director of Radiation
Oncology, 21st Century Oncology,
specializing in radiation oncology
and tomotherapy in the treatment
of cancer.
Thursday, April 7, 2011:
Louise Johnson of- In The Garden
Landscape and Design
Moving beyond a one-size-
fits-all approach to landscaping,
design, horticulture, pavers and
construction material to create
elegant outdoor concepts.
Tuesday, April 12, 2011:
Author Jeanne Ward (Guild Board
Member) Her latest book, You're It!
Successful Single Mothering after
Divorce. Maintaining yourself,
your family and your sense of
humor in challenging times.
Wednesday, April 13, 2011:
Chef Eric Fritsche, Pastiche. Chef
Fritsche will feature a farm-to-table
cooking demonstration with local
produce harvested at Twin Bridges
Farms in Macclenny, Florida.
Thursday, April 14, 2011:
Chef Shirley Munn. Personal chef
and owner of Let's Eat In, will
speak on "It's never too late to fol-
low your bliss!" Munn is a Licensed
Personal Chef and will share her
life-changing paradigm shift.
Saturday, April 16, 2011:
Louise Johnson, In The Garden
Landscape and Design. Elegant
outdoor concepts and how to bring
your house and garden in perfect
harmony. Concepts on opening up
the relationship between indoors


all ages? Also, does your child need community
service' credits? We are non-profit 501 ( C )
( 3) corporation, Please call 374 8639 Northeast
Florida Conservatory.
Angels Elite Academy applications are being
accepted for pre-school teachers. Applicants must
have completed 40 hours of Childcare Develop-
t.. ..1 . i ! ... . I ... ;.. maybe mailed
to:Angels Elite Academy @ 3560 Marbon Road,
Jacksonville, Fl 32223 or may be dropped off at
the center.
South Mandarin martial arts school well
established in the community is looking to hire
a highly motivated instructor of any style for
part time/full time employment. Must be a
3rd degree or higher. Pay is on commission and
bonuses. Please email martialartsinstructors@
yahoo.com.
Wanted Artist & Crafters for the Buckler's Craft
Fair, March 12 & 13 at the Clay Co. ...:. .....
Exhibit - 1 www.BucklerCraftFair.com or
call 386 860-0092 for special discount price for
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Business Services
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and outdoors.
Tuesday, April 19, 2011: Chef
Brian Siebenschuh, Orsay's Restau-
rant. Chef Brian will talk about us-
ing responsible products, including
organic, local and sustainable items
in cooking and food preparation.
Wednesday, April 20, 2011:
Sandy Polletta, co-owner of
Edgewood Bakery. Chocolate as
the main ingredient or the garnish.
Learn new tips, techniques and
recipes.
Thursday, April 21, 2011: M.
Firdos Ziauddin, M.D. Dr. Ziaud-
din, of 21st Century Oncology
will speak on the evolving role of
surgery in the treatment of patients
with breast cancer.
The Showhouse opens to the
public on Saturday, April 2 and
runs through Sunday, April 24.
Several special events will be held
including the Preview Gala on
Friday, April 1. In addition to the
Showhouse Boutique, by Avondale
Gift Boutique, this year's Show-
house debuts "The Village Shops,"
where interior design and home
specialty items will be available
for sale to the public. Also, the
Designer's Sale will be held on
Monday, April 25 following the
closing of the Showhouse.
Advance ticket prices are $15.
Groups of 10 or more may pur-
chase tickets for $12 per person.
Tickets will be available on site at
the Showhouse for $20. There is
no cost to visit "The Village Shops"
or to attend the Designer's Sale.
Contact The Guild office at (904)
358-1479 for tickets and general
information. Visit the website at
www.jaxsymphonyshowhouse.com.


monitor liver function. Statins can
also cause a wide range of muscle
injury. In its worst form, myositis
results from station use. This rapid
muscle destruction can lead to
kidney failure. This side-effect is
rare, but muscle pain and cramps
are frequent and far less serious
side-effects of stations.
If your doctor prescribes
stations, follow their advice for labo-
ratory tests. If your atherosclerosis
leads to vascular disease, see a vas-
cular surgeon. Today's vascular sur-
geons are the only specialists who
are skilled in all vascular therapies.
Vascular surgeons are the experts
who provide the best diagnosis and
treatment for vascular conditions.
To learn more about your
vascular health and to find a vas-
cular surgeon, visit the Society for
Vascular Surgery's website at www.
VascularWeb.org.


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S Happy St. Patrick's Day

from your friends at
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Statin drugs can improve vascular health


LIESDi NUE





Page 28, c -/,,,/,//// NewsLine * March 2011 * www.MandarinNewsLine.com


Cum Laude Society induction held at
St. Johns Country Day School


Tory Finley, Mary Geary, Sarah Voigt, Alex Herndon, Ali MacDonald,
Nick Fields, Katie Young, Maddison Larson, Elizabeth Greenhalgh,
Clara Robison, (not pictured Chadd Myers, and Sarah Hartley).


On Friday, January 28, 2011,
a special assembly was held in
St. Johns Country Day School's
Performing Arts Center to honor
12 students selected for member-
ship in the Cum Laude Society.
Newly inducted members include
seniors Nick Fields, Maddison
Larson, Sarah Voigt, Elizabeth
Greenhalgh, Katie Young, Chadd
Myers, Alex Herndon, and Clara
Robison, and juniors Mary Geary,
Tory Finley, Sarah Hartley and


Ali MacDonald.
Now and then, the Cum
Laude Society welcomes into its
membership a St. Johns teacher
whose admirable contributions
to the school's academic program
and whose devotion to teaching
warrant his or her induction into
this exclusive society. This year
the Society is honored to induct
Fine Arts Department Head and
art teacher Tamara Culbert, who
was a member of the Cum Laude


Society in high school and a Phi
Beta Kappa at Northwestern.
The Cum Laude Society is a
national organization whose pur-
pose is to accord recognition for
outstanding scholastic achieve-
ment. The first chapter was
established in 1906 at the Tome
School in Port Deposit, Mary-
land by Dr. Abram W. Harris.
Dr. Harris envisioned a Society,
modeled after the Phi Beta Kappa
Society, the oldest and most
respected college honors organiza-
tion in the United States.
One hundred and four years
later the Cum Laude Society
includes 344 chapters nation-
wide. One of only 13 chapters
in the state of Florida, the St.
Johns Chapter of the Cum Laude
Society was formed in 1959 and
was the first chapter established in
the state.
Each year the current student
chapter member with the best
academic record is appointed
chapter president. This year's pres-
ident is Mike Patterson. Current
student members of the St. Johns
Chapter are seniors Annie Bob-
bitt, Lynn Killea, Ishaan Madhok
and Taylor West.


United States Coast Guard Auxiliary Update

Double-check for a safe boat
By Contributing Writer Ralph Little, Flotilla 14-8


Having and knowing how to
use the required safety equipment
on your boat can mean the dif-
ference between life and death in
the event of a boating accident or
mechanical failure. Who wouldn't
like to have their preparations for a
safe boating season double-checked
by a knowledgeable expert? With
the arrival of the 2011 decals,
the auxiliary's vessel safety ex-
aminers are prepared to perform
free vessel safety examinations


wherever your boat is located in
Northeast Florida. The examiner
will conduct a thorough check
of your boat's safety equipment
and be a source of information
on requirements. The exam itself
can be accomplished in as little as
15 minutes, but the examiner will
spend as much time as is necessary
to discuss what you need to know.
Examiners have different criteria,
depending on the motor and type
of vessel such as those over 40 feet,


Visit our


New &


Improved


Website!

www.mandarinnewsline.com


* Digital Edition

* Government Links

* Schools

* Weather Center

Links to all of our advertisers listed

in the category that you need!


runabouts, kayaks or a personal
watercraft.
The exam starts with your reg-
istration data and proceeds to cover
up to 15 requirements and as many
as 17 discussion points, depend-


Advertisment


TOOLS FOR A TIME is a Mandarin based
company that continues to provide individuals
and company's the ingredients for success in
today's business world; especially when you are
looking to start your own business. With a
unique concept of providing you with all the
resources you need to start your own lawn and
landscape business, TOOLS FOR A TIME has
aligned itself with a partner, TurfPAC, that has
the relationships and resources to make you
successful. TurfPAC can provide you with all
the equipment, signs, uniforms, business cards,
postcards, flyers, door hangers, Visa/MasterCard
machine, websites, accounting software and just
about everything you need to be successful. They
can even help brand your company and set up an
advertising campaign to help build your
business grow. The philosophy of helping others
to help yourself truly does hit home with the staff
and management at Tools for a Time. "We want
you to be successful so that long term we build
a loyal customer that understands Tools For A
Time and TurfPAC are here to help grow your
business and are committed to being the best at
what we do" says Roy, the store manager.
On March 5th, 2011, TOOLS FOR A TIME is
having its annual Career and Business Expo
from 9AM to 3PM to honor those that serve our
country and community. There will be door prizes,
free food and equipment giveaways. Stop by and
see the JSO and JFRD and thank them for their
service to our community. You may even find out
how easy it is to start your very own business and
leave as our newest customer.


a W IfIECHO shindaiwa.


ing on the size and type of vessel
and pertinence to the situation.
Required items will cover display
of registration numbers and the
presence and serviceability of safety
equipment such as life preserv-
ers, distress signals and navigation
lights. Over 12 percent of 100,000
vessel examinations were failures
due to distress signal issues. Exam-
iners also cover pollution protec-
tion notices and practices, especial-
ly for vessels with marine toilets.
If you wish to have more detail on
the exam, go to http://a0530801.
uscgaux.info/checklst.htm .
With the award of a decal to
a passing vessel, it is good for the
year of issue. The boater receives
a copy of the report with the
examiner's phone number to set up
next year's check-up. As a bonus,
your examiner may notice unsafe
situations you hadn't detected. Our
examiners have spotted a shredded
drive belt, a broken ventilator fan
and unsafe battery connections
that could have made for expensive
tows or fuel explosions. Email John
Hadley at hadley.beverly@yahoo.
com or call 519-0481 or 626-3772
to schedule a vessel examination.
Flotilla 14-8 will present
the next one day course, About
Boating Safely, on March 5 at the
Stellar Building, located at 2900
Hartley Road in Mandarin. The
class will run from 7:30 a.m. to
5:00 p.m. with 30 minutes for
lunch. A fee of $25 is charged for
each student and just $5 more for
the second member of a family.
Call Bob Strong at 721-1346 for
specifics on where and when cours-
es are offered and to register or to
indicate interest in the courses. If
you wish to join the United States
Coast Guard Auxiliary, contact
Charles Smith at 541-1660.


Tirst

(Day


of

Spring


9larci 20

Iii_


I





www.MandarinNewsLine.com * March 2011 * oc 2-/-,,in NewsLine, Page 29


African violets ABC
By Contributing Writer Linda McQueen


The African violet was first
discovered in 1892 among the
rocky mountain ridges in Tanzania
by Baron Walter von Paul while he
was serving as the imperial district
governor of Tanganyika. He sent
seeds to his father in Germany
where it acquired the botani-
cal name Saintpaulia. It became
popular in European countries and
was brought to the United States
in 1926 by the
California nurs-
ery of Armacost
and Royston.
The blooms were
basic blue in
color, had the
standard pansy
shape and the
leaves grew in a
rosette pattern.
With the
growing inter-
est in African
violets, hybridizers have come up
with an amazing variety in bloom
color and shape as well as leaf
shapes and variegations. Today the
African violet is the most popular
houseplant.
African violets are classified
as rosette or trailing. Rosette has a
single crown and depending on the
plant size, this single crown may
have a diameter from two inches to
two feet! Trailing violets are geneti-
cally developed to form multiple
crowns and should be encouraged
to do so. These crowns appear from
the leaf axils (where the leaves join
the main stem).
African violets are also classi-
fied according to size from a large
to a micro-miniature. A standard
will grow to over eight inches in
diameter across a single crown,
but must not exceed 16 inches at
maturity. This is the most popular
size among growers. Large hybrids
grow to more than 16 inches across


the single crown at maturity and
some of these plants can reach a
diameter of around three feet. The
semi-miniature is catching up in
popularity because the size works
well as window sill plants. These
hybrids are from six to eight inches
across a single crown at maturity.
Miniatures grow up to six inches
across a single crown while micro-
miniatures are less than three
inches.
Classifica-
tion of blooms
and leaves are
more complex.
Briefly, colors
Snow available
include blue,
* purple, red-vio-
let, orchid, lav-
ender, red, pink,
white, yellow,
bi-colored and
multi-colored.
Flower shapes are single, double,
semi-double, star shaped, wasp,
fringed and ruffled. Leaf shapes can
be plain, ruffed, fringed, scalloped,
spooned, pointed and variegated.
The Heart of Jacksonville
African Violet Society is a group
of African violet lovers who are
committed to sharing their passion
for this plant. Their annual display
and sale will be on March 25 and
26 at the Carriage Club Retire-
ment Community, located at 9604
Southbrook Drive. Hours are from
12:00 noon to 6:00 p.m. on Friday
March 25 and from 9:00 a.m. to
5:00 p.m. on Saturday March 26.
This event is free. On display will
be prized specimens in all catego-
ries. Plants and plant supplies will
be available for sale.
If you would like more infor-
mation about African Violets, visit
their website at www.jacksonvil-
leviolets.org or contact bobbi@
jacksonvilleviolets.org.


Th. T,-1,, -- A . .- � p r :I II I i - -I


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Nearly 2,000 expectant Moms gave birth at Baptist Medical Center South in
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floors, original artwork, private bathrooms,
bedside controls, mini-refrigerators, an interactive
flat-screen TV, WiFi, a DVD player and a large
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is our priority.

* A special dessert for Mom and Dad with sparkling
wine. Toast your new family addition!

* Registered nurses specially trained in maternity
care. We love taking care of Moms and babies,
and it shows!

* C-section operating rooms, centralized monitoring
of baby and Mom, and a 14-bed level II NICU that
is a service of Wolfson Children's. Your peace of
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Find out why more and more of
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904.271.6000


SJacksonville Humane Society
a Call for viewing and adoption: 725-8766
AI 1 I


Please say hello to Bow! He is an 11 month old Ameri-
can Staffordshire terrier mix. He has been at JHS since
October 2010 and was really hoping he could start the
New Year off in a home of his own. He has lived both
inside and outside and gets along great with other dogs.
He also likes children and has participated in our JHS
Teen Dog Walking and Waggin' Tails kids club. Won't
you please come meet Bow today!?


Bow
11 months old
Staffordshire
terrier mix


AC -%


I


I





Page 30, c .//r//// NewsLine * March 2011 * www.MandarinNewsLine.com


u A


Presenting c'
Sponsor: .lv.


Proceeds
benefit the
First Coast Fund
of the
Firehouse Subs
Public Safety
Foundation


Thursday, April 7
River Bend Golf Links * Green Cove Springs
Tournament Co-Chairs
David McConnell, Waste Management, Inc.
Stephen Joost, Firehouse Subs
Sponsorship opportunities are still available.
Register as a sponsor.
Sign up as an individual or a foursome.
Email us at Foundation@FirehouseSubs.com
or call 886-8300 x223.


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GARAGE SALE MANIA
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Sue Fischer and Sew Much Comfort adapt garments

Labor of love supports our troops
By Donna Keathley


w
VIP Sponsors:


When Mandarin resident Sue
Fischer is not working at Publix,
delivering items to the food pantry
or working on her Blue Jean Minis-
try, she's at her sewing machine
supporting the troops. For the
past two years, she has been taking
regular clothing items and adapting
them for use in military hospitals
across the world. Fischer became
a seamstress for Sew Much Com-
fort in 2009. This is a nationally-
recognized non-profit organization
which provides clothing to support
the unique needs of our wounded
service members in all branches of
the military and National Guard.
To be approved to be on the
"sewing team," Fischer had to
complete the adaptation of a pair
of boxer shorts. She received a
Quality Check Packet from Sew
Much Comfort's corporate offices
which included the boxers and the
materials and instructions on how
to properly sew the garment. The
organization says that the skills
required to become a seamstress
are on an intermediate level of sew-
ing-Fischer passed the test and
was off and sewing.
The garments that Fischer
and her team alter give medical
personnel and service members the
ability to have ready access to their
injuries by utilizing the adaptive
openings in their clothing. The
openings provide easy access for
medical exams and physical and
occupational therapy sessions. The
clothing provided by Sew Much
Comfort allows injured service
members to easily dress themselves
and the clothing appears as normal
as civilian attire.
Any given day Fischer is work-
ing on a pair of pajamas, a sweat
shirt or some athletic shorts. The
task is to open up all the seams
of the garment, sew seam bind-
ing to both seam sides and apply
a Velcro closure system. This is no
small trick; a sweat shirt takes this
veteran seamstress about six hours
to adapt both sleeves making them
completely open down both sides
from the cuff to the waistband. A
pajama bottom takes her about
four hours.
Luckily Fischer has met some
friends along the way that help
open up the seams and get the gar-
ments ready for her to sew the ex-
tensions. This keeps her humming
at the sewing machine and getting
around a dozen or so garments in
the mail each month to Sew Much
Comfort's distribution center in
Colorado.
As word got around about the
project, Fischer's circle of friends


also began to donate garments.
New quality fabric garments are
always needed for the next sewing
afternoon at Fischer's house, which
has itself been adapted for the proj-
ect. After trying to bounce around
and sew in the back bedroom using
the bed for a cutting table, her
husband, George was in on the
project too!
Together they quickly decided
that the little used formal dining
room in their home was a win-win
for the sewing room make-over
project! George Fischer did all the
work himself. The formal dining
table is now a great cutting board.
There's plenty of room for the sew-


ing machine, a huge thread spool
rack was hung on the wall along
with a flat screen television for
entertainment.
Fischer says this "labor of love"
work is perfect for her as she has
always liked to take things apart.
But it's more than labor; all the
seamstresses volunteering for Sew
Much Comfort must pay all ship-
ping costs to send the completed
garments for distribution and
many pay for the garments they
stitch themselves.
To learn more about Sew
Much Comfort you can visit the
website at www.sewmuchcomfort.org.


Super Bowl Party benefits Relay for Life
















Heidi Clemons and Jeff Roy at the annual Super Bowl party raising
funds for Nancy's Village in memory of a dear friend taken too early
with cancer. Proceeds are donated in her memory to the American
Cancer Society. Many thanks to all who attended and generously
supported the event!

MHS Sports Roundup


By Anthony Paris, MHS Student
With the month of March,
spring sports are now in full mo-
tion. The Mandarin High School
baseball team will play the first
home game of the month against
Fletcher at 6:30 p.m. on March 4.
They will also play First Coast on
March 8, Baldwin on March 11


H Lindell & Farson, P.A.

i vlAttorneys At Law


J. Michael Lindell, Esq.
Board Certified Trial Lawyer
James A. Farson, Esq.
Former U.S. Navy JAG
Roger K. Gannam, Esq.
R. Howard Walton, Esq.
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Reserve JAG
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Complex Business, Real Estate, & Construction Disputes

Automobile, Motorcycle & Trucking Accidents,
Insurance Disputes, & Wrongful Death
"The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free, written information about our qualifications and experience.


and another home game on March
18 against Fletcher at 7:00 p.m.
The boys' lacrosse team will be
playing several games this month,
starting with a match against
Episcopal on March 1. On March
3 they will play against Bolles at
home at 7:00 p.m. Paxson, Lee and
Fletcher will also be home games,
taking place on March 10, 17 and
25 respectively.
The girls' lacrosse team has a
busy home schedule, with games
on March 1, 10 and 24 versus
Sandalwood, Paxson and Stanton.
All games begin at 5:30 p.m.
On Saturday, March 4, the
girls' track and field team will be at
the University of North Florida to
compete in the UNF Invitational
meet. We wish them the best of
luck!
The end of the year is slowly
coming into view. Most senior
athletes are preparing for college at
this point, with only around two
months left in high school. This
is an important time of year for
athletes and students at Mandarin
High School, as well as for the
coaches and teachers.


Tory Stellabotte, Julia Cueto and Sue Fischer at the sewing machine.


Everybody Gets It.

Everybody Reads It.


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Conveniently Located
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Jacksonville, FL 32223-8630


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www.MandarinNewsLine.com * March 2011 * oc 2-/A,,i/ NewsLine, Page 31


March Madness in the garden
By Contributing Writer Master Gardener Camille Hunter with Duval County Extension,
University of Florida/IFAS


For North Florida gardeners,
March is the month for gardening
madness. You can plant and grow
just about anything this month.
Cool season vegetables and annuals
are in their prime, while warm sea-
son veggies and flowers are at their
A message from the
St. Johns River Water Manage-
ment District...
water less
Beginning with the return
to Eastern Standard Time
in November, residential
lawn watering is limited to
one day per week:
* Homes with odd number
addresses: Saturday
* Homes with even number
addresses: Sunday
* Nonresidential
properties: Tuesday


Restrictions apply to wa-
ter from private wells and
pumps as well as public and
private utilities.

Water for no more than one
hour per zone.

Water only when needed
and not between 10 AM and
4 PM
Visit www.floridaswater.com


starting point. March is the begin- Another option is to look
ning of our longest growing season online. A Google search on "how
and the best month to plant popu- to make a square foot garden" will
lar veggies like tomatoes, squash, bring up several sites with direc-
peppers, eggplant and beans. Many tions. Create just one of these small
cool season veggies such as lettuce raised gardens and you will be
and peas, planted in winter, will be hooked.
maturing and ready for harvesting For the best North Florida
this month. This is also an excellent growing information look for
time to start an herb publications from the
garden. I is, rity Press
If you are n, r of Florida,
a gardener but , such as
would like to duce Vegetable
give it a try, .. Garden-
start small. A P ing in
square raised Florida
bed, four feet by veggie
on each side, I ,e lu reu James
is a good way S~rphens. If it is
to begin. It is easy to care for flowers you are in-
and can grow a surprisingly large terested in, check out Your Florida
amount of produce or flowers. I Guide to Perennials by Sydney
astonished myself last spring when Park Brown and Rick Schoellhorn
I grew over 60 pounds of cucum- and Your Florida Guide to Bedding
bers in a raised square bed that Plants by Robert Black and Edward
size. My small garden would have Gilman. These are excellent books
produced even more but I pulled available through local bookstores.
up my plants in early June. Garden Online, your best resource
pests are rampant in summer and it for growing advice is found at the
is a good idea to pull up cucumber University of Florida website So-
plants before then. I made a lot of lutionsForYourLife.ufl.edu. Click
pickles and everyone I knew was on Lawn and Garden, then use the
checking the internet for cucumber search box to find the information
recipes. you want. A search on "growing
Mel Bartholomew in his best tomatoes" for example, brings up
selling book Square Foot Garden- several publications on growing
ing provides detailed information tomatoes in Florida.
on putting together and planting Like most master gardeners I
a framed, square-foot raised bed. am addicted to gardening and this
Bartholomew's growing informa- is a great time of year to indulge
tion is not geared towards our area ourselves. We have our own March
but he does offer planting charts Madness, only ours isn't played on
for getting the most from a small a court; it is played outdoors, in
space. the dirt.


Home [7-g


Improvement


Guide

Whether

it needs

repairing,

replacing,

painting,


ever,


you'll find


April


issue of


NewsLine




Now in
JACKSONVILLE




Full Text
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Page 3 What’s New Page 5 Hubbard House Page 6 School District Journal Third Thursday series Page 7 Candidate forum Page 8 Start Here, Go Anywhere Page 9 Council scholarship Page 11 Election Section Page 17 Youth follow a dream Page 19 Chinese New Year Page 20 Quilt Discovery Day Page 23 Faith News Page 24 QuickStart tennis Page 25 River Campaign Page 26 Designer Showhouse Page 27 Local classi ed ads Page 28 Coast Guard auxiliary Page 29 Tiger Cubs travel Page 30 SewMuch Comfort Page 31 Gardening The Every Address Community Newspaper in Mandarin’s 32223, 32258 and selected routes in 32257 Zip Codes MandarinNewsLineSM Visit our online edition at www.mandarinnewsline.comMEMBER OF THE RT PUBLISHING GROUP OF COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS Mandarin NewsLine12443 San Jose Boulevard, Ste. 403 Jacksonville,FL 32223 What’s Inside Volume 5, Issue 6 March 2011 www.mandarinnewsline.com Visit our online edition and ip through each page of our latest issue! Click on Any Advertisers Ad with a website and we will take you to their website! Advertising Information Call 886-4919 or Sales@mandarinnewsline.com Presorted Standard US Postage Paid Callahan, FL 32011 Permit No.4 € Garden Center and Landscape Service € Lawn & Shrub Spraying € Indoor Pest Management € Termite Protection ARE BUGS AND WEEDS A PAIN IN YOUR GRASS?$20off WITH THIS COUPON € Expires: 5/31/2011 €0311CreekLine/NewslineCall for your FREE estimate (904) 733-7488new lawn or indoor pest serviceAsk about our Crabgrass and Mosquito Treatments! BUGSWEEDSTERMITESRODENTS Garden Center: (904) 733-7549|8178 San Jose Blvd.tradsofjacksonville.com Pest Control: (904) 733-7488|5131 Bowden Road To many of us it seems as if it was just yesterday; however, it was 1960 when then-Senator John F. Kennedy challenged students at the University of Michigan to serve their country in the cause of peace by living and working in developing countries. From that challenge developed the Peace Corps, which was born on March 1, 1961. Since that day over 200,000 Americans have served and still today the mission of the Peace Corps sparks the imagination and dedication of Local Peace Corps volunteers reunite.January 26, 2011 was a big day for the fourth and fth graders and their teachers at the Martin J. Gottlieb Day School (MJGDS). Its not every day that an elementary school choir is asked to share a stage with legendary singer Barry Manilow! Just a week before, these students were practicing typical songs in their school choir and then one Friday afternoon, they were informed that they will be singing backup to Manilow singing Barry Manilow poses with the MJGDS ChoirGood news, Mandarin! Mandarin Park and Boat Ramp, the 36-acre jewel situated at the southern end of Mandarin Road on Julington Creek, reopened in late January after being closed for awhile in late 2010 for needed refurbishment. e park originally opened in 1992 with nature trails and a playground. e picturesque pier was added in 1993 and the boat ramp was added in 2006. According to the District 6 City Councilmember Jack Webb, park improvements include the addition of 35 much-needed boat trailer asphalt parking spaces to conveniently service boaters using the boat ramp, additional lighting, park landscaping and new signage. Area alumni celebrate the 50th birthday of the Peace CorpsBy Karl Kennellyoung people wanting to have a contribution to others lives. To celebrate this momentous birthday there will be a full week of activities during the week of March 1 through 7, in what Jacksonville Mayor John Peyton has o cially proclaimed as Peace Corps Week.Ž To kick o the birthday, local alumni of the Corps will be sharing their experiences and work with the public on Sunday, February 27 from 2:00 p.m. until 5:00 p.m. at the conference center at the Main Library, located at 303 North Laura Street in downtown Jacksonville. Signi cantly for our neighborhood, we can proudly count several neighbors as veterans of service in the Peace Corps. During the upcoming event at the Main Library, Mandarin neighbor David Miron will include his experiences and continuing e orts to enlist volunteers in his presentation. He will focus on increasing applications from liberal arts majors and the Corps policy and the thrust behind that. He will also be sharing examples of how the volunteers are strategically working with international organizations and agencies like the Carter Center and Centers for Disease Control to implement such programs as Guinea Worm eradication. Recruited into the Peace Corps on May 1, 1974, Mandarin resident Larry Allen was a visual aids/graphic artist at the time. His experience in the Corps is so favorably etched into his memory he Peace Corps cont. on pg. 5Students cont. on pg. 21 Students enjoy once in a lifetime opportunityBy Contributing Writer Talie Zaifert, Martin J. Gottlieb Day Schoolhis hit, One VoiceŽ at the Jacksonville Veterans Memorial Arena. Excitement was in the air when parents and teachers received the news. is was evident through Facebook posts, classroom blog posts, texts and phone calls. Not only were their kids going to participate in this amazing opportunity, but they were also given complimentary tickets to the show to Mandarin Park is now new and improvedBy Martie ThompsonFinal renovations to the parks playground area, including additional benches and barbeque grills nearby, are still underway and are scheduled to be completed within 60 days. Webb shares, Our beautiful regional park was in need of some cleanup and TLC. I think our community will greatly enjoy these improvements.Ž Over the next several years, Webb would even like to see expansion of Mandarin Park into a far larger area for District 6 residents to enjoy. He envisions possibly a boardwalk along the creek similar to that o ered near County Dock Road and Walter Jones Park. Mandarin Park and Boat Ramp is located at 14780 Mandarin Road. Amenities include a boat dock and ramp, pedestrian docks, picnic shelters, a playground area, 2.25 miles of unpaved trail, shu eboard courts, tennis courts and a visitor interpretive center. e park is adjacent to Julington Creek in Mandarin.

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Page 2, Mandarin NewsLine • March 2011 • www. Mandarin NewsLine.com of St. Augustine www.oastaug.com 904.825.0540 JAMES GRIMES, MD Total Joint & Sports Injury ALBERT VOLK, MD Shoulder & Sports Injury KURTIS HORT, MD Reconstructive Foot & Ankle BRIAN HAYCOOK, MD Spine Specialist JOHN STARK, MD Hand, Wrist & Elbow SINA KASRAEIAN, MD Sports Injury BETH PEARCE, DPM Podiatric Foot & Ankle SPECIALIZING IN SPORTS MEDICINE, ARTHROSCOPIC SURGERY & JOINT REPLACEMENTS TOTAL BONE & JOINT CAREfor all of you 10601 San Jose Blvd. Suite 22 Jacksonville, FL 32257 904-288-1100READY FOR MORE? VISIT OUR HEALTH STARTS HERE INFORMATION STATION AND TALK TO OUR HEALTHY EATING SPECIALIST AND LEARN HOW TO MAKE HEALTHY EATING SIMPLE, AFFORDABLE, AND ACCESSIBLE. I-95 I-295 San Jose Blvd. Enter this access code at eatrightamericachallenge.com: cerafljax visit us and pick up your free eat right america certificate for a personal 28 day program designed to properly nourish you and your family!WE BELIEVE IN PROMOTING THE HEALTH AND WELLNESS OF OUR CUSTOMERS, TEAM MEMBERS, AND COMMUNITY THROUGH EDUCATION AND SUPPORT. SEE PROGRAM MATERIALS IN-STORE AND ON LINE.

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www. Mandarin NewsLine.com • March 2011 • Mandarin NewsLine, Page 3 What’s NewCommunity HappeningsDo you have community or club news you would like included in Mandarin NewsLine? en contact Martie ompson at: editor@mandarinnewsline.com or 886-4919. RT Publishing, Inc.RT Publishing, Inc. 12443 San Jose Boulevard Suite 403 Jacksonville, FL 32223 Ph: 904-886-4919 Publisher Rebecca Taus publisher@rtpublishinginc.comEditor Martie Thompson editor@rtpublishinginc.comArt Director Richard L. Macyczkographics@rtpublishinginc.comDirector of Sales, John Blume € jb@rtpublishinginc.com Advertising Sales, Linda Gay € lg@rtpublishinginc.com Advertising Sales, Donna Lang € dl@rtpublishinginc.com The CreekLine • The Ocean BreezeMandarin NewsLine • Players Journal The Mandarin NewsLine Community Newspaper is a free monthly publication distributed via bulk mail to all addresses in Zip Codes 32223, 32258 and selected routes in 32257. Submission of articles and photographs are received by mail or email, although email to editor@rtpublishinginc.com is preferred. The writers opinions do not necessarily re”ect the opinion of RT Publishing, Inc. Advertising Rates are available by request. RT Publishing, Inc. is not responsible for advertisement content or accuracy of information provided by its advertisers. Nor does RT Publishing, Inc. endorse any of the products or services included in this publication. RT Publishing, Inc. reserves the right to refuse advertisement or copy from any advertiser. All rights are reserved and no portion of this publication may be copied without the express written consent of the publisher. © 2011. At RT Publishing we welcome Letters to the Editor. We request they be no more than 250 words. All letters must include writers name, address, and telephone number. Only the name will be published. E-mail to editor@rtpublishinginc.com. Anonymously sent letters will not be published.Letters to the Editor policy Angels Elite Academy Now enrolling! 6 weeks … VPK (4 year old) Come by and meet our loving and caring sta and while you are there be sure to take a peek at our very spacious playground.We have reasonable rates and childcare vouchers are accepted. 3560 Marbon Road904-262-2666 50% OFF Bring in this ad and receive your 5th week of daycare. New customers only. MarbonZaxbysSan Jose Blvd. Buy A Brick and support the Billard Park! Mark 2011 by becoming part of the park and a part of Mandarin history! As development and maintenance of Billard Commemorative Park continues, decorative, personalized bricks continue to be o ered for sale. ese can be placed in your choice of three locations within the park: along sidewalks, the Veterans Memorial Monument area or near the butter y garden. e Billard Park is owned and maintained by the Mandarin Community Club and is located at 11642 Brady Road. For more information, please call the club o ce at 268-1622. Your support, as always, will be appreciated! e Sugar Arts Guild of North Florida meets monthly at the South Mandarin Library, located at 12125 San Jose Boulevard. We are an organization of sugar artists, cake designers and confectioners from Northeast Florida who enjoy getting together every month to visit, watch a demonstration and sample each others creations. Our purpose is to promote creativity and experimentation in cake decorating, sugar art, chocolate, pastries, candies and just about anything edible that can be done decoratively. We welcome anyone interested in meeting other sugar enthusiasts and swapping ideas and techniques to visit www. sagn .blogspot.com for meeting dates. e Mandarin Womens Club program for ursday, March 24 is How Not to Become the Victim of a Crime,Ž by speaker Kevin M. Gilpin, executive director for the National Crime Stop Program. e program will be held at the Ramada Inn, located at 3130 Hartley Road and doors open at 10:30 a.m. Club membership is open to all women. e luncheon cost is $14 for members and $15 for non-members. For reservations or information, please call Iris at 268-2459 by March 20. A blood drive will take place on Saturday, March 26 from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon at the Krantz Dental Care o ce, located in Mandarin at 12058 San Jose Boulevard, Suite 102. e blood drive is being sponsored to bene t a 14 year old boy ghting leukemia who is a friend of the dental o ce. For more information, please go to facebook.com/krantzdentalcare or call Adria Krantz at 880-3131. Dale Cli ord, Chair, UNF History Department, will be the speaker for the program of the American Association of University Women, Jacksonville Branch on Saturday, March 19, beginning at 11:45 a.m. at the San Jose Country Club. Professor Cli ords topic will be women and war in the 20th century. e event is open to anyone interested in the history of women, AAUWs role in that history and the goal of equity for women in times of peace and war. e luncheon cost is $17 for members or $18 for non-members. For reservations and information, please call Susan at 642-7038 by March 16. e Ramsgate Homeowners Association held their Annual Meeting at the Mandarin Community Club on ursday, January 27. Emily Lisska, executive director of the Jacksonville Historical Society was the guest speaker. is years Crime Watch program was on Identity eft Protection and was presented by Gary Dickinson of the JSO Community A airs Division. JSO O cers Haberman and Sell (Zone 3) spoke on neighborhood crime statistics. e evening also included dinner and musical entertainment by Richard Dickson of the NE Florida Conservatory. e Ramsgate Homeowners Association was organized in 1986 making it one of the oldest associations in Mandarin. ere are 264 homes in the subdivision which is located between Mandarin and Loretto Roads. e March General Meeting of the All Star Quilters Guild will be held on Monday, March 21 at 9:30 a.m. in the First Christian Church of Jacksonville, located at 11924 San Jose Boulevard. e program will be a trunk show of quilts made by St. Augustine quilter Mary Rhopa la Cierra. Visitors are welcome! For more information, please contact Dot Butler at 642-6574 and visit us at www. orgsites.com/ /allstarquiltguild. e River City Womens Club will hold its monthly meeting on Wednesday, March 16 at the Mandarin Ramada Inn. e meeting will begin at 10:30 a.m., followed by lunch and a very interesting speaker: Michael Lawson, a member of the Southern Genealogists Exchange Society, Inc. in Jacksonville will talk about How to Start Your Basic Genealogy Family Project.Ž Visitors are welcome! e luncheon cost is $14; for reservations, please call 262-8719. On Tuesday, March 15 at 10:00 a.m. the Dogwood Circle of the Mandarin Garden Club will host Carole Adams (past president of the Audubon Society) for bird watching. It will be held at Walter Jones Park on Mandarin Road. In the event of rain, we will hold the meeting at the Mandarin Garden Club, located at 2892 Loretto Road. Open to the public! For more information, please call 8864782. e Italian American Club in Mandarin has changed the date for its Garage/Bake Sale from March 5 to Saturday, March 26 from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Lunch will also be available. We will have homemade cakes specially prepared by our members and in addition there will be cannolis available. We are cleaning our closets and sheds to raise money to do some new decorating for our club. Come join us! On March 5 we will be serving a luncheon at St. Matthews Church for a Fashion Show to bene t Camp I Am Special. e luncheon will be from 11:30 a.m. until 2:00 p.m. For further details check our website at iaco acksonville.com. Baptist Medical Center South, conveniently located at Old St. Augustine Road and I-95, is looking for people to volunteer in the hospitals gift shop . Previous retail experience is a plus but it not required. Volunteers are asked to ll one four-hour shift per week with a one year commitment. e gift shop hours are typically 9:00 a.m. until 1:00 p.m. or 12:30 p.m. until 4:30 p.m. For a volunteer application, please call Erin at 271-6081. e South Jacksonville Republican Club will meet on Saturday, March 5 at the Golden Corral on San Jose Boulevard. Social time will begin at 9:30 a.m. followed by the club meeting at 10:00 a.m. in the enclosed Meeting Room in the restaurant. e meeting will include an open forum for Republican candidates participating in the upcoming Duval County What’s New cont on pg 4

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Page 4, Mandarin NewsLine • March 2011 • www. Mandarin NewsLine.com ship organization, a liated with the national AARP. Our activities and programs are designed to help people age 50 and over improve the quality of their lives. Visitors are welcome! For additional information, please call 733-0516 or email alex9520@comcast.net. Eva Grayzel, master storyteller, will be performing at the Marriott Southpoint, located at 4670 Salisbury Road, on Monday March 28 at 7:00 p.m. Her program Lessons for a Lifetime,Ž will remind participants of what is important in life. Sponsored by Jewish Family and Community Services, it is free and open to the community. Please call 394-5737 for additional information. Ride with Me for Autism 2011, presented by the Jessica Green Foundation, Inc., will be held on Saturday, March 26, 2011 at the Camp Milton, JacksonvilleBaldwin Rail Trail. e cost is $25 plus $100 minimum pledge (add $5 after February 26, 2011) e day will feature safe rides, great food, live entertainment, prize drawings and awards for top individual fundraiser, top fundraising team and largest team. For additional information, please visit www.ridewithmeforautism.org. High school students from France, Spain, Finland and Taiwan will be arriving to the Jacksonville area on July 7 to August 4 for a four-week language travel stay. EFEducational Homestay Programs, a nonpro t division of EF Intercultural Foundation, sponsors the group and has provided opportunities for language travel for almost 30 years. For more information, please call Karensue McDowell at 287-2262 or e-mail Karensuemcdowell@comcast.net. 880 -0002 keyboardconnectionjax.com 9912 San Jose Boulevard New Business Prole! Want to nd Jacksonvilles newest trend in dining? Look no further than the Speckled Hen Tavern & Grille, located on Jacksonvilles Southside just ½ mile from I-95 and the Avenues Mall (next to the Avenues Regal eaters). Unlike anything else in Jacksonville, the Speckled Hen is a locally owned Southern GastropubŽ where you will receive a ne dining experience at a fair price. Our menu features Executive Chef Nick Robsons creative assortment of Southern inspired comfort foods prepared with a new twist. Enjoy everything from Lobster and Scallion Fritters, King Crab Mac n Cheese, Shrimp and Grits to Braised Short Ribs„just to name a few. Making everything in-house using fresh, seasonal ingredients, the menu changes with the season but always oers something for everyone. e food is complemented by a full bar, an extensive beer selection and a wine list selected to pair with our food. Please join us for happy hour beer, wine and cocktail specials. Inside the restaurant youll nd a lively environment highlighted by a warm, casual décor. Our walls feature local art which is for sale, with all proceeds going directly to the artist. In addition, we feature acoustic music from some of Jacksonvilles best musicians every Wednesday through Saturday night. Guests can also watch sporting events on one of our many large screen televisions. Check our website and sign up for our email list to receive information about upcoming events (including wine tasting and beer dinners), musicians and specials. We look forward to serving you!9475 Philips Highway Jacksonville, FL 32256(Next to Avenues Regal Cinema) Phone 904-538-0811 Fax 904-538-0813 www.speckledhentavern.com Lunch: Mon.Sat. 11a.m.4 p.m. Sunday Brunch: 10:30a.m.3 p.m. Dinner: Mon.-ur., 4-10 p.m. .Happy Hour specials from 4-7 daily and 12 7 on Saturday and Sunday Advertisment 641 2122 Ext 213641 2122 ext. 204 PLEASE DONATE! 280 4252(Winn Dixie Shopping Center) Ponte Vedra Site 641-2122(Next to our Family Store) P (W in From the City Council Member’s DeskBy Contributing Writer Jack Webb, City Council Member, District 6 City Council President Jack Webb is an incumbent candidate for the o ce of City Council Member, District 6. Please watch for this column to reappear after the Duval County elections have determined a winner in this race Jan Rowe All of your insurance under one roof904-260-681112443 San Jose Blvd. Ste. 401 Jacksonville, FL 32223 when you bought your car, you shopped the market. LET US DO THE SAME FOR YOUR Auto Home Business Life What’s New cont from pg 3primary election. is period will have a question and answer period which will be a very informative to all who attend. e Toast of Jax Toastmaster Club meets each Saturday at 7:30 a.m. at the Ramada Inn Mandarin in the conference room located in GiGis restaurant. Whether youre a professional, student, stay-at-home parent or retiree, Toastmasters is the best way to improve your communication and leadership skills. Toastmasters can help you lose the fear of public speaking and learn skills that will help you be more successful in your chosen path. Please join us! For additional information, please visit www. toasto ax.org. e American Cancer Society has kicked o its fundraising season. In an e ort to ght back against cancer and create more birthdays, Relay for Life, the American Cancer Society largest fundraising event, is working harder than ever to ensure a bright future for those who nd themselves in need of life-saving care. Join the American Cancer Society and Relay for Life of Mandarin on April 16 and 17 as we celebrate the 11 million survivors who will have birthdays that year and remember those who honorably fought against the worst disease known to mankind. For more information, please visit www.relayforlife.org/ mandarin or call 398-0537. The Mandarin Museum and Historical Society invites the public to the presentation of the annual Miss Aggie Award on Saturday, March 19, from 1:00 p.m. until 3:00 p.m. at the Old Mandarin Store and Post O ce located at 112471 Mandarin Road. e free event will include tours of the historic building and enjoy Moon Pies and RC Cola, favorite snacks when the store served the Mandarin community from 1911-1964. e award honors a female Mandarin resident who has contributed to the community in the areas of business, civic, educational or charitable accomplishment. For information, call the Mandarin Museum in the Walter Jones Historical Park at 2680784 or visit the museums website: www.mandarinmuseum.net. A VA Aid and Attendance Bene“ t Seminar is held the last Tuesday of every month at 11:00 a.m. at Wyndham Lakes, located at 10660 Old St. Augustine Road. Reservations are requested. Please call 262-4600. e AARP Driver Safety Program for drivers 50 and older will be held Tuesday and Wednesday, March 8 and 9 from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon at Memorial Hospital, located at 3625 University Boulevard South. e fee for AARP members is $12; non-members fee is $14 and participants must attend both days for certi cation to qualify for auto insurance discount. To register, please call 391-1320. e MOMS Club of Jacksonville/Mandarin-SE o ers support for stay at home and part-time working moms living in zip code 32258. With the club you will have enriching activities for you and your children, during the day when you need the most support. A sample of activities includes park days, beach days, monthly socials, playgroups and eld trips to the zoo and museums. For additional information, please email semandarinmoms@yahoo.com. Shu eboard is played on Tuesdays at l:30 p.m. at Mandarin Park (south end of Mandarin Road) next to the tennis courts at the park entrance. Beginners are welcome. Just show up unless it rains or is just too cold to play. e childrens Bumblebee circle of the Mandarin Garden Club will get ready for spring on ursday, March 10 from 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at the Mandarin Garden Club located at 2892 Loretto Road. Children ages ve through 18 are welcomed with an adult. e Bumblebee circle started their sixth year of existence in September. Our monthly meetings consist of garden related topics with the focus for children. We welcome parents, grandparents, aunts and uncles to attend with their respective children to attend and begin to sharing in a lifetime hobby. Additionally, our garden club has adult circles available to meet the needs of our community. For more information, please email mardaringardenclub@comcast.net or call 268-1192. e Mandarin Chapter of AARP meets the third Friday of every month at 2:00 p.m. at Augustine Landing, located at 10141 Old St. Augustine Road. We are a non-pro t, non-partisan member-

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www. Mandarin NewsLine.com • March 2011 • Mandarin NewsLine, Page 5 DinnerandtheSymphonyDates: ACelticCelebration…March5€ThePlanets…April16 ONLY$65PERPERSON Includes: LuxuryBusService. ToandfromtheTimes-UnionCenter, leavingfromSt.JohnsandMandarin. Pre-concertDinner. PrixFixeDinner. SymphonyConcertTicket. TaxandGratuity. Reservationsarelimited.CallBillCosnottiat(904)356-0426. TheBlueCrossandBlueShieldofFloridaPopsSeriesMarch3,4,5ACELTIC CELEBRATIONDANCING,BAGPIPES, FIDDLESANDMOR EFidelityNationalFinancialMasterworksSeriesApril14,15,16HOLST:THEPLANETSAlso:JOSEFSTRAUSS-MusicoftheSpheres VAUGHANWILLIAMS-TowardtheUnknownRegionBUYYOURTICKETSNOW JACKSONVILLESYMPHONYORCHESTRADinnerandtheSymphony Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra Summer CampBegins June 20 Themed weeks and special guests. Full and half day week or just drop in for the day.Classes oered Mom-N-Tot Recreational classes for girls and boys beginning as early as age 2 Competitive boys and girls gymnastic team Competitive cheer team Tumble/cheer classes Tumbling classes 904-262-20029545-1 San Jose Blvd.(Corner of Sunbeam Rd. and San Jose Blvd.) www.wcgymnastics.com 9 9 9 9 0 0 0 0 4 4 4 The Sheriff Reports By Contributing Writer John H. Rutherford, Duval County SheriffSheri John Rutherford is an incumbent candidate for the o ce of Sheri of Duval County. Please watch for this column to reappear after the Duval County elections have determined a winner in this race.Linda Cedillo, nine-year Mandarin resident, is Setting the Pace for Peace and she challenges you to do the same. She will be participating in Hubbard Houses second annual Setting the Pace for Peace Domestic Violence Awareness Walk, to be held on Saturday, April 9, 2011. e event is a 3.5 mile (shorter option is available) fun, family walk in the park, complete with a family fun zone including bouncy houses, face painting, music and more. While the walk is fun, the purpose is serious … to increase awareness about domestic violence and to raise funds to continue e orts in ending abuse in our community. Last year, in Duval County, more than 7,800 incidents of domestic violence were reported and nine individuals lost their lives at the hands of someone they once loved and trusted. Unfortunately, domestic violence is an issue that often goes unspoken. In fact, statistics estimate that only Setting the Pace for PeaceBy Contributing Writer Ashley Johnson, Hubbard House Everybody Gets It. Everybody Reads It. 886-4919a third of domestic violence cases are ever reported. e good news is that domestic violence can be prevented. Like any other issue worth taking a stand for, the rst step to a solution is awareness.  is is an opportunity for the residents of our community to take steps together to end abuse and to say that domestic violence is a crime and will not be tolerated,Ž said Cedillo. Im walking because through raising awareness I can help give victims a voice.Ž e Setting the Pace for Peace Awareness Walk is free to participate in and is open to the public. e walk will be held at the Ed Austin Regional Park, located at 11751 McCormick Road and begins at 9:00 a.m., with registration at 8:00 a.m. Visit www.hubbardhousewalk.com to register. If you have any questions, please contact Ashley Johnson by phone at 354-0076 ext. 212 or by e-mail at ajohnson@hubbardhouse. org. All proceeds from this event help Hubbard House continue to providing its life-saving programs and services to victims of domestic violence and their children. If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House 24-Hour Domestic Violence Hotline at 354-3114 or (800) 500-1119. not only remembers the exact day he joined but the day his experience ended in May 1976. He begins explaining his term saying,  ere were 14 in our group. I was one of ve artists. We were assigned to various agencies in San Salvador, the capital of El Salvador, in Central America.Ž He continues, My rst assignment was with the Salvadorian Demographic Association. ere my graphic works helped the agencys social workers get the word out about their venereal disease program.Ž Walt and Marlyn Ogburn were volunteers in Talcahuano, Chile from 1976 to 1978. ey arrived just three years after the military overthrew communist President Salvador Allende in a bloody coup. ere he taught marine ecology and intertidal ecology at the Talcahuano campus of the Catholic University of Chile. She worked in hospital administration and health care education. e couple is an example of how the Corps has bonded people together for life. As a testament to the ongoing allure of the Corps, Mandarin lifelong neighbor Avi Richman was not only valedictorian when she graduated from Mandarin High School, but was in the Peace Corps from May 2008 to August 2010. She was a small business educator and advisor in Nicaragua. ere in the beautiful city of Granada she helped the Ministry of Education to implement a course about how to start ones own business. About her experience she says, I became part of the community ƒ I can now put any number of faces on poverty ƒ they are not ugly or sad ƒ they are beautiful and laughing and they are my friends and family.Ž Like going to the moon, the challenge made in 1960 lives on today proudly in our memories. Celebrate the 50th birthday of the Peace Corps and those who have served„we are proud of them! Peace Corps cont. from pg. 1 Duval County Schools Spring Break March 28 April 1

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Page 6, Mandarin NewsLine • March 2011 • www. Mandarin NewsLine.com Offering investment advisory services as a representative of 0156581-00002-00 Prudential Financial Planning Services, a division of Pruco Securities, LLC. Jim Taylor provides TaylorMade Solutions Call me at 904-705-1692 or TaylorMade4You@bellsouth.net to discuss how I can provide Solutions tailor-made for You.Monthly Accounting ServicesOver 25 years experiencePersonal & Business Income Tax PreparationFormer Internal Revenue Agent & Lic. to practice before the IRS QuickBooks® Set-Up, Training & Support Call me now to Review your QuickBooks setup and show you how it can simplify your accounting. Excel® Spreadsheet Design, Training, & Support 15 % OFF of your DinnerFood Only (No Alcohol) Oer Expires 3/31/11 Jacksonville Health & Wellness CenterTreating: Headaches, Back, Leg, Neck & Arm Pain, Work & Auto Injuries268-65689957 Moorings Dr., Ste. 403(off of San Jose Blvd)Mandarin, Jacksonville 32257 Dr. Jon Repole, D.C. Call today for our Cash Discounts and First Visit Specials Chiropractic CareSafe Gentle Care for Children & Adults Nutrition Counseling how to maintain good health through gentle Conditions treated: weight loss, fatigue, chronic and acute pain, New Address GOVERNORSGOLD SEAL AWARD Give Your Loved Ones Golden Care river garden hebrew homeAvailable 7 days a week Half days available 2002-2004 2004-2006 2006-2008 2008-2010 2010-2012 CALL TODAY! (904)288-7851 11401 OLD ST. AUGUSTINE RD. | JACKSONVILLE, FL 32258ADULTDAY@RIVERGARDEN.ORG | RIVERGARDEN.ORG School District Journal By Contributing Writer Tommy Hazouri, School Board Representative, District 7March Madness! e NCAA basketball tournament is popularly referred to as March Madness.Ž Well, for public education, the State of Florida has its own March Madness!Ž It is the time FCATs are given, (March and April this year), the Florida Legislature is in session and school districts around the state are biting their nails as they attempt to put together the budget for the next school year. It is, to paraphrase Mr. Dickens, the best of times and the worst of times for public education. e state budget is the only item that must be passed every year in the legislature. And we cannot shortchange our childrens education in that budget. Ask yourself, is a K-12 education really the State Legislatures Number 1 priority? Or is a promise the state wont keep; and, for the past decade has not kept. e new governor recently gave his rst budget proposal. e citizens knew it wouldnt be pretty„and it was ugly, very ugly. He proposed cuts to education from $22.5 billion to $19.1 billion … some $3.4 billion dollars less than even last year. e per-student funding under the states main formula for school spending slides to $703 per student less than last year. I know, as taxpayers, we all want government to do more with less. However, in the case of our children, we have been doing less for years and its showing … Florida Volunteers are still needed and accepted! e Mandarin Community Club, sponsor and host of the Mandarin Art Festival, has been taking calls and signing up volunteers at the rst planning meeting held February 7. But those wishing to volunteer to make the 43rd annual event on Easter weekend April 23 and 24 the best ever are still welcome to join the team and the fun! In 2010 the club partnered with Howard Alan Events for one of the biggest and best shows in the 43 year history of this Mandarin event. HA Events is bringing back the great art, artists and the crowds, but the club needs volunteers to help with club-sponsored e park manager of the Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings Historic State Park, Valerie Rivers of Cross Creek, will speak about the life of the author at 7:00 p.m. on ursday, March 17, at the Mandarin Community Club, located at 12447 Mandarin Road. Rivers is the third speaker this year in the ird ursday Lecture Series being sponsored by the Mandarin Museum and Historical Society and the Mandarin Community Club. e public is invited to attend the free lecture. Refreshments will be served starting at 6:30 p.m. Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings (1896 … 1953) was a Floridian author whose themes and setting incorporated the rural community that she lived in. Her best known work, e Yearling, won a Pulitzer Prize for ction in 1939. Rivers will speak about Rawlings life and how events during her time in uenced her works. Rivers will introduce Rawlings Cross Creek farm and the importance she placed on living with nature. Rivers will also speak about Rawlings interactions and writings of her neighbors and friends and the authors observations of changes within these relationships. e lecture will incorporate passages and personal writings from Rawlings. Rivers is originally from Orlando. Rivers began working as park manager at Marjorie Kinnan is near the bottom of all 50 states in education spending per capita. We are becoming a ird World state, in a world where education should be the solution to our nations ills and successes. Children are not democrats or republicans. Children are not some bad product that can be sent back to the manufacturer. ey come in all shapes and sizes and each child deserves the very best we can give them to prepare for their future and the future of our nation. Every child deserves the opportunity to learn, graduate and be prepared for college and the workforce. No, money is not the answer, but it is part of the solution. Now is the time, now is the opportunity to talk with or write to the governor and your legislators. It sounds good to say we are going to cut the budget, but who will speak for our children. Our success as a city, state, and nation depends on them and our responsibility as adults is not to let them down. We have been fortunate in Mandarin schools and in most of our other schools. But when you begin talking seriously about cutting teachers, media specialists, guidance counselors, librarians, art and music and giving big corporations more tax breaks, building more jails and putting more on welfare, then our priorities are turned upside down. Yes, our school system is doing better, but we all know we have a long way to go. As I often say, education is a never-ending story. But I honestly believe, public education as we know it, is being undermined by many of our elected o cials from the White House to the State House. Public education is the very foundation on which our great country was built. We must stop the bleeding and we must continue to invest in our children. If they cant count on us, then who can they count on? Important Dates: March 1: School Board Meeting, 6:00 p.m., Cline Auditorium, 1701 Prudential Drive March 2: Student Early Release Day March 23: Student Early Release Day March 25: Teacher Planning Day (No school for students) March 28 April 1: Spring Break (Schools Closed) FCAT Testing Dates: March 1 … 3, 2011 and April 4 … 21, 2011 Please check with your childs school for speci c testing information or visit our website at www. duvalschools.org. Upcoming City Election Dates: € First Election … March 22, 2011 € General Election … May 17, 2011 ought for the Month: e school is the last expenditure upon which America should be willing to economize. ~Franklin D. Roosevelt If you think education is expensive, try ignorance. Mandarin Art Festival volunteers sign up for duty!By Contributing Writer Susie Scott, Mandarin Community Clubactivities like the bake sale, greeters at the gates, Childrens Art Show, fundraising, program sales, green market and more. Come join the team as we plan, prepare, promote and deliver another super successful Mandarin Art Festival. Meet new people, enjoy the show as a team member and volunteer. And dont forget teens can acquire service hours as volunteers for this family event. Call the club at 268-1622 to volunteer. Planning meetings in March will be held at 6:00 p.m. on Tuesday, March 15 and March 29 at the club located at 12447 Mandarin Road.Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings Park official to speak about author’s life at Third Thursday series Rawlings Historic State Park in 1993. During her tenure, Rivers oversaw the park be recognized as a National Historic Landmark. She led many restoration projects and interpretive exhibits within the park. She also established a citizen support organization for the park. For more information about the Mandarin Museum and Historical Society and the Walter Jones Historical Park, call the museum at 268-0784 or visit the museums website at www.mandarinmuseum. net. Mandarin NewsLineEverybody Gets It. Everybody Reads It.editor@mandarinnewsline.com

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www. Mandarin NewsLine.com • March 2011 • Mandarin NewsLine, Page 7 500 FREE Points with this Ad FREE Snacks! FREE Beverages! FREE Drawings! FREE Tournaments! Phone Time at only 3¢/min!T h e G A M E S Y O U L O V E ! No purchase required!1MANDARIN Join the Fun! Cyber Café! IN ST AN TCA SH IN ST AN TC ASH W IN Sto $ 4, 5 0 0! W IN Sto$ 4, 5 0 0!Orange Park Middleburg Green Cove @ Harvey’s Food, drinks & other amenities for paying customers while revealing sweepstakes ONLY! No loitering! *Must be 18. Sweepstakes registered where required with Florida Department of Agriculture to promote sale of long distance phone/internet time as game promotion under Florida Sta tute 849.094. 1No purchase necessary for deminimus sweepstakes participation as required by 849.094, additional participation & non-deminimus free items r equire phone time purchase. Visit local store for complete details. Sweepstakes promotions are sponsored by Phone-Sweeps LLC and Tele-Sweeps LLC. Promotional off ers limited and subject to change without notice. No more driving...the Best Games are here in Mandarin! “we run a class joint here!” GET LUCKY ...at PLAYERS! ! s ! ! V Mandarin @ 10092 San Jose for new customers only Brian E. Floro DMD, PAGeneral and Family Dentistry Placing and Restoring Dental Implants Veneers and Teeth Whitening Lumineers, Clear Braces, and the Sapphire Professional Whitening System Located in the Memorial Imaging Center Corner of Loretto Road and San Jose Blvd. Preferred Provider of Most Major Dental Insurance 12710 San Jose Boulevard Jacksonville, FL 32223 Direct line: 904-288-6235teresaclark@watsonrealtycorp.comwebsite: www.jaxhome.comTeresa ClarkREALTOR ® BrokerAssociate 12710S J Southside Waterfront-Approx. 6 acres of pure beauty with custom built 3600 sq ft home with upgrades galore. 400 ft water front w/dock. Salt water pool with hot tub, 1000 sq ft cottage plus det. 4 car garage. Paradise awaits…$1,450,000 MLS # 559989 San Marco Charm-All brick 4/2 with 1974 sq ft and enclosed front porch. Beautiful hardwood patio in back with garden like setting. Close to San Marco Square…$285,000 MLS #567589 Q U I L T Discovery Day Open to the Publice All Star Quilters Guild, Inc.www.orgsites.com//allstarquiltguildwill be documenting quilts for the Florida Quilt Projectsponsored bye Sunshine State Quilters Assoc.www.ssqa.org e First Christian Church11924 San Jose Blvd. Quilt information and photograph will be entered into the nationalQuilt Index.www.quiltindex.org Information e historic Mandarin Community Club will continue the tradition of providing educational and community programs by hosting a Candidates Forum for quali ed candidates running for the District 6 City Council. e forum will take place on ursday evening, March 3 at 7:00 p.m. at the club, located at 12447 Mandarin Road. Mary Baer of Channel 4 the Local Station will be the guest moderator and each candidate will have the opportunity to respond to questions from the audience. e club has hosted forums as a free community service to members and the Mandarin public. Candidate question cards are available as guests arrive and collected prior to the start of the forum. e District 6 City Council seat is currently held by Councilmember Jack Webb (REP) who Hi everyone, its 11 year old Osjah Castro again. I wanted to update you on my current community service project. If you remember I adopted Timucuan Elementary for the year and have been doing things all year long to help them out. I am now working on  e Cupcake RodeoŽ and I Gave e Shirt O My BackŽ silent auction. ink Cupcake Wars with a rodeo theme. We have several local bakeries competing in a cupcake display but would love to have several more. If you or someone you know is a baker and would like to participate please have them call 813-4481. ere are some really cool prizes for the winners! Are you a celebrity? Do you know someone who is? Im looking for shirts from celebs in music, sports, TV, lm and lm. Ive already gotten shirts from the band Baptist Medical Center Downtown and Baptist Medical Center South earned a perfect score from e Joint Commission on their recent Primary Stroke Center Recerti cation survey. e surveyor was impressed with the leadership and sta , as well as the care provided to stroke patients and their families. ere were no recommendations for improvement in any areas of the program. I am delighted that e Joint Commission surveyor was so Do you know the warning signs of stroke? € Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, arm or leg, especially on one side of the body € Sudden confusion, trouble speaking or understanding€ Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes € Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination € Sudden severe headache with no known cause Mandarin Community Club hosts District 6 City Council candidate forumis running for re-election against two other candidates in the race, Matt Schellenberg (REP) and Greg Youngblood (REP). € Meet, greet and mingle with refreshments begins at 6:30 p.m. € Forum begins promptly at 7:00 p.m. and ends at approximately 8:00 p.m. € Forum opens with each candidate given two minutes to make a presentation of their quali cations and/or experience. € Candidates will have two minutes to answer questions submitted by question cards. € An open question and answer period will close the Forum (time permitting). For more information, please contact the club at 268-1622. e forum is free and open to the public.Stroke Centers earn a perfect score at recertification visitimpressed with our program. It is a true testament to the excellent teamwork at Baptist,Ž said Sean Orr, MD, who leads the Baptist Stroke Center team. Dr. Orr is a board-certi ed neurologist with Baptist Neurology who specializes in stroke care and research. e Acute Stroke Team at Baptist includes emergency medicine physicians, neurologists, neuroradiologists, neurosurgeons, registered nurses, rehabilitation specialists and social services sta . e Baptist Stroke Centers at Baptist Medical Center Downtown and Baptist Medical Center South have been certi ed by e Joint Commission as Primary Stroke Centers since 2007. e Joint Commissions Gold Seal of Approval demonstrates that the Baptist Stroke Centers apply evidence-based protocols to diagnosing and treating stroke that have been shown to improve patient outcomes. By law, Floridas Emergency Medical Services (EMS) personnel are directed to transport patients presenting with acute stroke symptoms to designated stroke centers. An important facet of Baptists Primary Stroke Centers is their focus on community education and prevention of this potentially debilitating disease. Message from young Mandarin philanthropist Osjah CastroHey Monday and from writer/ producer/director/actor Garry Marshall, recording artist Sean Kingston, actress Lauren Mayhew, Ericka Dunlap (Miss America 2004), actress Allison Janney, TV host of Dancing With e Stars Tom Bergeron, Linden Ashby from Mortal Combat, Disneys Next Big ing Jasmine Sagganario, Todd McClure of the Atlanta Falcons and more on the way! Can you help with one? It can be any shirt … the only two requirements are that it be autographed and that it is accompanied by a photo of you either wearing it or holding it to authenticate the origin. Buy tickets to attend this event on April 9 at Timucuan Elementary School from 1:00 p.m. until 4:00 p.m.! ere will be lots of cupcakes to eat, some entertainment and of course there is the silent auction for the celebrity autographed shirts. Tickets are available for $10 donation each. ey are available through the main o ce at Timucuan Elementary or call 8134481 or email OsjahsWish@aol. com. One hundred percent of the proceeds go directly to the school. Love, Osjah Need Customers?886-4919

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Page 8, Mandarin NewsLine • March 2011 • www. Mandarin NewsLine.com TANSFADE;WRINKLESDONT. DON'TTRADEYOUR YOUTHFULSKIN FORATEMPORARYTAN!LetPVPSbeyourfirstchoiceforanti-agingproductsand rejuvenatingtreatments.ForaFREEskinanalysis,contact ourofficeat904.273.6200. Bookyourvisitnowandremembertohaveourlicensed AestheticiansorAdvancedRegisteredNursePractitioners matchyouwiththeperfectskincareregimenforyourskin typeandanti-aginggoals.WecarryOBAGI,SkinMedica, LatisseandVIVITE.Microdermabrasion ChemicalPe els IntensePulsedLight-Photofacial FractionalResurfacing MicrolaserPeel ErbiumLaserResurfacing BOTOX®Cosmetic Juvederm Radiesse ... andmanymore!904.273.6200 www.pvps.com SIXLOCATIONS:PonteVedraBeach€Southside€AmeliaIsland€Mandarin€Riverside€St.Augustine Free agent with every policy. I’ll make sure your auto coverage is the best fit, then show you all the State Farm® discounts you could be getting. Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there.® CALL ME TODAY. FreeDiscount Double Check™ too.1003065State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company, State Farm Indemnity Company, Bloomington, IL Jim Register Jr, Agent 12058 San Jose Blvd, Suite 302 Jacksonville, FL 32223 Bus: 904-268-5522 jim.register.g2k4@statefarm.com Lunch or Dinner Special $3OFF with purchase of two lunch or dinner entreesExcludes Speedy Gonzalez and Daily Lunch Special. Good with coupon only, Exp. 3/31/11. 268-8722Visit: donjuansjax.com Authentic Mexican Cuisine MEXICAN RESTAURANT MEXICAN RESTAURANTAuthentic Mexican Cuisine MEXICAN RESTAURANTAuthentic Mexican Cuisine Happy St. Patrick’s Day from 13760 Old St. Augustine Road 32258 (Located next to Kohls) www.bartramparkanimals.com Where your pet can expect compassionate, knowledgeable care, ALWAYS! ( 904 ) 402 8222 10% OFF Spays & NeutersWith this ad. Sat 9am-6pm What a joy it was to see how far the Ritz eatre and Museum has come since my last visit. I remember the initial e orts to restore the 1929 Ritz eatre movie house as a center of the African American culture that had thrived in the La Villa area where it had been housed and where in the 1929s to 1960s it had been known as the Harlem of the South. ese e orts agged for lack of support until the city took over in 1999. Under the unique guidance of Executive Director Carol Alexander, it has achieved an exciting and unique place in our community. Its mission is to research, record and preserve the material and artistic culture of e Mandarin Branch Library is the best branch, bar none, at the Jacksonville Public Library. Perhaps I am a little biased. My name is Lynne Baldwin. I am the manager of the Mandarin Branch Library on Kori Road. Each month I will be sharing with you the latest news on whats happening at the Mandarin Branch Library. March is my favorite month. Spring begins in March. My birthday is in March. Most importantly, March is Womens History Month. e rst adult book I remember reading was about the Kings and Queens of England and it changed my life. It introduced me to Queen Elizabeth I of England, the greatest monarch in British History (well, next to her father Henry VIII, but thats another story). One of my favorite books (also available as an audio book) is Elizabeth: the Struggle for the rone by David Starkey. On DVD, Elizabeth has been portrayed by many great actresses such as Bette Davis in e Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex, Cate Blanchett in Elizabeth and the sequel Elizabeth: e Golden Age and the incomparable Glenda Jackson in Elizabeth R, the six part BBC television miniseries. But I think that the best thing about March and Womens History Month is that all of these titles and more are available at the Mandarin Branch Library. Come in and check them out. And dont forget about our eBook collection downloadable to the Nook and other library compatible eReaders. e Childrens Department o ers a variety of programming each week including Mother Goose Encore!Putting on the Ritz: Another fabulous gem in our communityBy Betty Swenson Bergmark, Professor Emeritus, Jacksonville UniversityAfrican American life in Northeast Florida and the African Diaspora and present in an educational or entertaining format, the many facets that make up the historical and cultural legacy of this community.Ž It achieves this in a variety of ways, including concerts, lms and lectures and of course the unique museum. e museums permanent collection features an exhibit of the history of African Americans in Northeast Florida. An exciting feature is Lift Evry Voice and Sing.Ž Known as the Negro National Hymn, it was composed by two native sons of Jacksonville, James Weldon Johnson and John Rosamond Johnson. Exhibited in a mixed media presentation, it tells the Johnson story through projected images, music and dialogue. In addition, a short term exhibit will be on display until May 7. Entitled  rough our eyes, 2011 for Women and Men of Color: e art of Relationships,Ž it will present works by artists exploring the complexities of various relationships. In the theatre, there are three regularly scheduled programs. On the rst ursday of each month it hosts the Spoken Word,Ž a gathering of local poets, writers, rappers and story tellers, who share their tales in a relaxed café setting. e rst Friday of each month features Amateur Night at the Ritz,Ž where you are the judge of who stays and who goes on to compete for prizes and on the rst Saturday a Jazz Jam is featured in the Ritz Lounge with good food and great vibes! In addition to all of this, plus lms and lectures, the Ritz hosts concerts by great artists. March will feature sultry vocalist Rene Marie on March 5, exciting Jazz star Esperanza Spalding, the Chamber Music Society on March 12 and the incomparable and most important Jazz vocalist today, Dianne Reeves on March 19. e Ritz eatre and Museum is located at 829 North Davis Street in Jacksonville. For more information or tickets you can call 632…5555 or visit www.ritzjacksonville.com.Start Here and Go Anywhere March Madness at the LibraryBy Contributing Writer Lynne Baldwin, Library Supervisor, Mandarin Branch LibraryTime; Toddler Time; Preschool Storytime and Stories for Families for all ages. Mandarin teens show their creative side in Writing Inspired Teens Write a Book on Friday, March 11 at 4:30 p.m. Join the Fiction Book Club on March 14 at 1:00 p.m. for a discussion of e Four Corners of the Sky by Michael Malone. Our monthly program calendar is available at http://jpl.coj.net. e Library is a designated Early Voting Site from March 7 through 20 and a polling site on March 22. AARP Free Tax Assistance will resume on March 28 after Early Voting ends. Visit our website at http://jpl.coj.net for more information. At the Mandarin Branch Library you really can Start Here and Go Anywhere from British history to Toddler Time to the dreaded income tax. Have a great March and I will see you at the library. Shuffleboard! Every Tuesday, 1:30 PMMandarin ParkBeginners welcome! Just show up! Mandarin NewsLineYOURCommunity Newspaper886-4919

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www. Mandarin NewsLine.com • March 2011 • Mandarin NewsLine, Page 9 FILL YOUR LIFE WITH PURPOSE... Train to become a Nurse! Call now for a brochure 888.440.2433sanfordbrown.edu/jacksonville Sanford-Brown Institute I 10255 Fortune Parkway, Suite 501 | Jacksonville, FL 32256Sanford-Brown Institute does not guarantee employment or salary. Credits earned are unlikely to transfer. Career education CEC2 367553…06/10 “Concerns about your drinking water?”Call the Water Treatment Company Jacksonville has trusted for over 20 Years. Straight answers No high pressure. 262 0197 3760 KORI RD. Comfortable Dentistry You Can Trust & Afford! (New Patients Only) Alan M. Krantz, D.D.S. Satisfaction Guaranteed Call for more details. © 2011 chrisad (Ne w P ati i ents O n l y ) & Call for Details Jacksonville is no longer your parents poison center,Ž states Dr. Jay Schauben, director. Times have changed and we have changed with the times.Ž As the 57 poison centers in the nation prepare to celebrate the National Poison Prevention Week awareness campaign scheduled for March 20 through 26, Schauben explains that the Poison Center continues to provide exceptional patient care by specially trained nurses, pharmacists and toxicologists through the 24 hour, nationwide toll-free, Poison Helpline (1800-222-1222), but now also aids the Florida Department of Health and other governmental agencies in providing real-time public health surveillance e orts for medication, environmental and foodborne threats. e Florida/USVI Poison Information Center … Jacksonville Attention high school seniors and rst and second year college students! Are you looking for scholarships? Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce Mandarin Council announces the Mandarin Council Janice Meisel Scholarship. All 2011 graduating seniors and students in their rst or second year of postsecondary school living in Mandarin are invited to participate. A one year scholarship of $500 will be awarded to a student who plans to pursue a degree in business. To be eligible, the applicant must live in one of the three zip codes (32223, 32257 or 32258) and must have worked while attending high school. e postsecondary school that the applicant plans to attend or is attending must be an accredited school in the Recently a Food-FightŽ erupted at San Juan Del Rio Catholic Church on State Road 13 in NW St. Johns County. It all started when the 2011 eighth grade con rmation class challenged the congregations of the four Masses held on the weekend of February 5 and 6. e young people appeared at each Mass the weekend before to challenge them to bring in the most pounds of food to represent their Mass congregation the following weekend. And what a Food-FightŽ it turned out to be! e young people were so successful in pitting each Mass congregation in competition with each other that a whopping 5,813 pounds of food were collected during just those four Masses. e Mandarin Food Bank on St. Augustine Road across from St. Josephs Catholic Church was the recipient of over 340 bags of food delivered to right to their door step. Coordinator of the Food Bank Bonnie McNulty was ecstatic at the donation, because this is a time when many people are in dire need. e Food Bank serves over fty di erent families each week. It is worth noting that the congregation of the 11:00 a.m. Mandarin Council scholarship announcedstate of Florida. For an application and additional information, send a request to mandarincouncil@gmail. com. e application submission deadline is April 25, 2010. Please mail completed application packets to Mandarin Council, c/o 3000 Hartley Road, Suite 7, Jacksonville, FL 32257. e winners will be announced at a presentation at the Mandarin Councils May meeting.Food-Fight benefits Mandarin Food BankBy Karl KennellMass on Sunday, February 6 won the Food-Fight!Ž We salute them and the 2011 eighth grade con rmation class on their knock-out success with their Food-Fight.ŽPoison Center services change with the timesplayed a key role in handling public and healthcare professional calls during the H1N1 and Gulf Oil Spill emergencies, managing the patient care issues associated with these events. Schauben states,  e Florida Poison Information Center Network Data Center electronically transmitted epidemiologic and clinical data from all three Florida Poison Centers to the nationwide database operated by the American Association of Poison Control Centers and the statewide biosurveillance system within the Florida Department of Health. ese data enabled public health organizations to track these threats and plan more e ectively for the treatment of individuals a ected by these events.Ž Schauben adds that the Poison Center also monitors for drug/ chemical abuse patterns, bio/ chemical terrorist health hazards, food poisoning threats, signi cant medication adverse e ects and environmental health hazards noting, with the most recent public health threats related to abuse of synthetic marijuana and bath salts, the Poison Center was able to ensure that the 142 medical facilities in our service area had the latest epidemiological information and treatment advice.Ž ese latest surveillance innovations are a natural evolution of the Centers primary patient care focus. Created by an act of the Florida Legislature in 1989 in response to the overwhelming need for emergency poison information in the State, the Florida Poison Information Center Network (FPICN) was born. e FPICN incorporates a statewide network of poison centers located in Jacksonville, Miami, and Tampa. ese centers collaborate to provide e cient and e ective services for the general public and healthcare professionals. As we again celebrate this annual Poison Prevention Week, it is a time to remind the community that the health professionals at the Poison Center are available 24/7 to provide information and advice regarding potential toxic dangers ranging from the misuse of medicines to potentially dangerous household chemicals. It is also a time to highlight the importance of poison proo ng homes,Ž states Vicki Coppen, RN, the education coordinator for the Florida/USVI Poison Information Center … Jacksonville. If you suspect a poisoning, need information related to poisons or would like free poison prevention education materials including magnets or stickers, call the Poison Center at 1-800-222-1222. Please put this number in your cell phone now„before you need it. When the problem is poison, the answer is poison control. Mandarin NewsLineNow delivered to 32223 32258 32257(select routes)Don’t miss your chance to place your ad in the only community newspaper with a monthly circulation of 26,000 addresses!Call Today!886-4919 Happy St. Patrick’s Day

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Page 10, Mandarin NewsLine • March 2011 • www. Mandarin NewsLine.com … ages 5-11 … ages 3-4 … girls ages 7-18904-260-198311502 Columbia Park Dr W Jacksonville, FL 32258www.FirstCoastGymnastics.com Free Trial Class & $5 OFFwith registration GALLERY of STARS ( 904 ) 374-8639www.nfconservatory.org (across from Tree Steakhouse Corne r of San Jose & Mandarin Road) March 13 1st Coast Brass Quartet (Members of JSO) e Mandarin Community Club will sponsor its 43rd annual Mandarin Art Festival on Saturday and Easter Sunday, April 23 and 24. One of the traditional and most popular events is the Childrens Art Show featuring artwork from as many as 20 of our area public and private schools. For many children, this show is their rst opportunity to exhibit their art to a large public audience. Cathy David of Young Rembrandts will be doing art demonstration lessons throughout the A widely circulated question debated over orgos vs. non-orgos is whether or not organic food is actually, scienti cally, better for you than conventional foods. Frustratingly, there is no concrete evidence one way or the other just yet, only the theories that have brought us to the positions we nd ourselves in today. Proponents of the organic produce argue that with fewer pesticides, no growth hormones and no antibiotics, the food that is certi ably organic is better for you. On the other side of the table, conventional fans state that there is no actual nutritional di erence between an apple grown organically and one that is grown without all the concomitant restrictions. Numerous studies have been started in di erent countries to try and get to the bottom of this debate. Britain: a basic screening of investigative literature was conducted to collect various individuals ndings. ey basically found that the only major di erences between the two were in their nitrogen and phosphorous levels, but the levels of other essential vitamins and minerals remained about equal. ere were noticeably higher levels of polyphenols in the organic food and so while they drew the tentative conclusion that no real di erence existed, there was still room for the possibility when factors such as soil content and ecological conditions were integrated. In other studies, the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry printed a study in 2003 that found higher levels of polyphenols in organic and sustainable marionberries and, in Italy, higher levels in organic peaches and pears. e latter study also found more ascorbic acid (Vitamin C) in organic peaches. In 2002 the European Journal of Nutrition found higher levels of salicylic acid in organic e Mandarin Garden Club will be holding a $1.00 Clothing Sale on Saturday, March 5, from 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. at the clubhouse located at 2891 Loretto Road. e sale will include a wide variety of clothing, accessories and shoes for women, men and children. e Mandarin Garden Club 65th Anniversary Cookbook, composed of 500 delicious recipes and helpful cooking hints, will also be available for purchase. e Garden Club is supporting our community by collecting the following items which may be brought to the clubhouse the day of the sale: cell phones and accessories donated to the Duval County 4-H; eyeglasses, sunglasses and cases donated to the Lions Club; and any nonperishable, unexpired food items and toiletries donated to the Mandarin Food Bank. Donated ink cartridges will be used to purchase Mandarin Garden Club o ce supplies. For more information about Organic LifestylesBe nice to the earth!By Molly McKinneyvegetable soup, which holds antiin ammatory properties that aid the immune system. Research is shoddy on both sides and needs improvement. Critics are quick to jump on the argument on both sides and point out the shortcomings and were not going to have concrete answers any time soon. Long-term research needs to be conducted in order to produce real results. e best answer so far? Do what you nd conscionable. It is at least true that fresh food is better than processed food, so you could start there if you still havent made the jump to 100 percent organic. Eat locally and support the economy close to home; eat organic if you dont like the ideas of pesticides and growth hormones. Stop eating meat if it makes you feel better. ere is strong evidence on both sides of the argument, but a lot of good things are associated with eating organically, such as sustainability and fair trade, that are not necessarily in the conventional equation, especially with big businesses like Wal-Mart. So, the best advice I can come up with? Just be nice to the Earth.Be sure to visit the Children’s Art ShowBy Contributing Writer Chris Buckley, Children’s Art Show Chairmanweekend. It is a great opportunity for young and old alike to sit down to do an activity together. is year, Marsha Blackford will judge the artwork. Ribbons will be presented in three grade levels: kindergarten through second grade, third through fth grade and sixth through eighth grade. Best overall awards will also be given to individual students as well as school entries. Choosing from all the great artwork always proves to be the most challenging task of the weekend. Come out and enjoy the Art Festival under Mandarins old oak trees. And, be sure to visit the Childrens Art inside the Mandarin Community Club.Mandarin Garden Club to hold $1.00 Clothing SaleBy Contributing Writer Yvonne Corbett, Mandarin Garden Clubthis event and the Mandarin Garden Club please call 268-1192 or email mandaringardenclub@ comcast.net.Need Customers?886-4919 Mandarin NewsLineYOURCommunity Newspapereditor@mandarinnewsline.com Mandarin Christian School welcomes students of any race, color, nationality, gender, or ethnic origin to apply for admission.Accredited by: FCIS ACSI FKC January 15that 9:00am1 0 8 5 0 O l d S t . A u g u s t i n e R d J a c k s o n v i l l e , F L 3 2 2 5 7 March 11th at 9:00am Socialization, activities, meals, snacks and personal grooming assistance. Financial Assistance available 731-4002www.almosthomedaybreak.comLicense #9109M–F 7am–6pm Adult Day Program for those with Alzheimers or other memory loss. Almost HomeDAYBREAK

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www.MandarinNewsLine.com  March 2011  Mandarin NewsLine, Page 11 THE JACKSONVILLE ASSOCIATION OF FIRE FIGHTERS PRESENTSTwww. A P Election 2011In advance of the Duval County First Election to be held on Tuesday, March 22, Mandarin NewsLine invited each of the candidates for Mayor, Sheriff, Property Appraiser, Tax Collector, City Council District 6 and all Þ ve groups of City Council At Large to submit a statement for this special election section. The content of the statements was left up to each candidate; the only stipulation was that the statement could exceed 250 words. No editing of the statements took place. Each statement is printed in its entirety, as submitted by the candidate. Alvin Brown, Democratic Candidate for Mayor I am a hometown kid who worked through college as a meat cutter at Winn Dixie and went on to advise President Bill Clinton and work as a Fortune 500 executive. I've come a long way from where I started, but the lessons are the sameÉworking hard, taking responsibility and stretching every dollar to do more. Those were the lessons my mother and grandmother taught us. When I worked in the White House, I responsibly managed $4 billion that was spent on creating jobs and revitalizing urban areas across the country. I can use that experience to make Jacksonville a better place to live, work and raise a family We face great challenges. Jacksonville's unemployment rate is above the national average. We rank in the bottom half for job growth among large cities. And, too many Jacksonville students don't graduate. We can do better. As your new Mayor I will take action. If elected, I will refuse to raise taxes. I know Ð and you know Ð that with the right leadership, Jacksonville can Þ x its budget problems by cutting wasteful spending and increasing our tax base with new businesses and jobs. My plan starts with expanding the public-private partnerships that are so important to growing a local economy and getting people working again. I have a plan to work our way out of this Þ nancial mess and I ask for your support to move Jacksonville to the next level. Andy Bryan, Write In Candidate for Mayor Did not respond. David Crosby, Write In Candidate for Mayor I grew up here, went to school here, live here and work here. I was a Boy Scout, played Little League on Buck's Tire Company, drove a wrecker for 103rd Street Shell, sold parts at Honest Charlie's Speed Shop and served over 26 years in the Navy doing everything from scrubbing toilets, teaching school, to being the Maintenance Master Chief in charge of an F-18 squadron, 12 aircraft, 20 pilots and 175 hardworking sailors. I retired the day they closed NAS Cecil Field. I have lived in my current Westside home since June 1985. I have been a truck driver with Cypress Truck Lines for over 11 years. I am not a politician, I am not from a wealthy family and I have no connection to big business. I have no political career to worry about, I owe no favors and I have solicited no campaign contributions. What I do is Þ x things; I am a troubleshooter and that is what we need right now. It is time to take a break and Þ x the way our city conducts itself, the budget and the school system before we put politicians back in charge. If elected, toes will be stepped on, egos will be bruised and feelings will be hurt, but we will get good things done. If you really want to get our city back to basics, there is a blank line at the bottom of the Mayor Candidates just so you can make a difference. Write in David Crosby. Christopher Hills, Write In Candidate for Mayor Did not respond. Mike Hogan, Republican Candidate for Mayor I am a Jacksonville native. My ancestors were the Þ rst permanent settlers in Jacksonville. No other candidate can match our experience in business and government. I have 25 years of business experience including executive sales, labor-relations, real-estate, corporate safety and risk management with the largest corporation in the world, AT&T; Þ ve years as VP Holmes Lumber Company; three years as a consultant to W. W. Gay Mechanical; eight years as a Jacksonville City Councilman; three years as a Florida State Representative and seven and a half years as Duval County's Tax Collector. I am a true Þ scal conservative who can be trusted and I bring proof of that fact by my record on both the City Council and in the Florida House of Representatives. While working with Governor Jeb Bush, I voted for the reduction of almost $700 million in taxes for all Floridians. We are living in unprecedented economic times. Unemployment is through the roof, government spending is out of control and running up debt on our children's future cannot be the solution. My plan for Jacksonville is to secure our Þ nancial future through sound Þ scal restraint and four years of demonstrated respect for just how hard Jacksonville's taxpayers work to provide for their families. The people of this city deserve a mayor willing to make the tough Þ nancial decisions and difÞ cult choices needed to create a functioning and viable Þ nancial structure to turn this city around. Stephen Irvine, No Party AfÞ liation Candidate for Mayor Did not respond. Warren Lee, Democratic Candidate for Mayor Did not respond. Audrey Moran, Republican Candidate for Mayor I am running for mayor because I love this city and I truly believe we can do better. My 26-years of experience in the business community, the nonproÞ t sector and in local government have given me the tools to Þ nd creative and effective solutions to our most pressing issues. I will put my experience to work from day one Ð bringing Þ scal responsibility, real results, transparency and accountability to City Hall. As a community, we need to decide if we are satisÞ ed with the status quo or if we are ready to take Jacksonville in a new direction. It is time for a leader who knows the challenges of meeting a payroll; who has experience managing a large staff and balancing a budget in tough economic times; and someone who understands the dayto-day operations of government. As mayor, I will make improving public education a hallmark of my administration because education is the key to attracting and growing businesses, to building sustainable neighborhoods, to improving race relations and to tackling crime. I know when neighborhoods are safe and thrive, our community as a whole improves and a vibrant downtown is at the heart of a great City. To learn more about my vision for Jacksonville, please visit the campaign web site at www. imwithaudrey.com. Let's move Jacksonville forward on 3.22.11. Vote Audrey Moran for Mayor. James Moser, Write In Candidate for Mayor Jacksonville is more than a city for James and his family; it's a way of life. It's why he is running for Mayor of Jacksonville. As a native of Jacksonville, James Moser has the vision to make Jacksonville even better. James Moser received his education in the Duval County Public School system. He is a Navy veteran. He has been an educator for over 20 years and is currently a computer teacher at an outstanding high school. As Mayor, James Moser will use his insight to improve our city. He would like to make Jacksonville an affordable and safe city to live in. He wants to make smart investments to reduce crime. New jobs will be created. The military will be maintained and supported. The river quality will be improved and the downtown area will be re-vitalized. He wants to encourage legislation that would give the Superintendent and school district more authority to make immediate interventions in schools in need of improvement. James Moser is a family man with one child, Lisa. He is proud to announce that he will become a grandfather soon. We need a Mayor who will meet and listen to the people on a regular basis. James Moser believes that it is time for a new face, with new ideas, and a different leadership style. Let's elect James Moser as the next Mayor of Jacksonville. Please write the name "James Moser" on the ballot on March 22.Meet your local candidatesÑFirst Election, March 22, 2011Rick Mullaney, Republican Candidate for Mayor I have never run for ofÞ ce before and am not seeking a career as an elected ofÞ cial. I am running for mayor because our city's future is hanging in the balance and I have a plan to protect the taxpayers and transform our city's future. As mayor, I will: 1) Cut spending and get the city's Þ nancial house in order without raising taxes. I did not seek the city employee union endorsements so I could be independent of the unions and Þ x city Þ nances. As Mayor Delaney's chief of staff, I led Þ nancial reform that froze salaries, reduced the size of government and cut taxes every year. 2) Create jobs and grow the economy, including a focus on healthcare, logistics, the port, aviation and the military. 3) Make Jacksonville safe. As a prosecutor for 10 years and head of the state attorney's homicide unit for Þ ve years, I was named Prosecutor of the Year for Florida and put three convicted murderers on death row. 4) Improve public education. I will bring stakeholders together to transform public education. We have come a long way since I was a boy growing up in a Navy family on the Westside, but we still have not fulÞ lled what is possible for our city. I am running because I believe in what we can be. I would be honored to have your vote. To see my complete 34-point plan to shrink government and grow jobs, please visit my website www.mullaneyformayor.com. Soren Brockdorf, No Party AfÞ liation Candidate for Sheriff I love Jacksonville and as Sheriff, I will diligently work to reduce the budget. I have spent my entire career as a CertiÞ ed Public Accountant reducing costs vis-ˆvis process mapping and systems analysis. I will implement IBM's Cognos Business Intelligence and Financial Performance Management software that will allow us to eliminate 120 unnecessary government bureaucrats by delivering needed information directly to the ofÞ cer ($18,000,000 a year in savings). The trafÞ c in some Candidates cont on page 12

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Page 12, Mandarin NewsLine  March 2011  www.MandarinNewsLine.com ElectionCandidates cont from page 11 Candidates cont on page 13neighborhoods is safer than other neighborhoods, yet they experience 28 percent more trafÞ c stops, 53 percent more arrests and 7.5 percent of all stops there are directly related to proÞ ling these neighborhoodsÑI will put a stop to this. In 2009, $79,433,651 in property was stolen, and 101 people were murdered (thank goodness Shands saved 85 percent of the attempts). We are the murder capital of Florida and my time working the Beaver Street/Moncrief Road area for the Jacksonville Sheriff's OfÞ ce taught me the only thing that will resolve this problem is putting ofÞ cers back on the streets and vigilantly reducing response times. One thing that we will do for Mandarin is coordinate a safe and acceptable way to move bikers and runners through Mandarin. Please vote Brockdorf for Sheriff. Ken Jefferson, Democratic Candidate for Sheriff I am a lifelong resident of Jacksonville where I was born and raised. I attended the public schools of Duval County, graduating from Ribault Senior High School in 1975. I attended Florida Junior College and Liberty University. I earned a Master's Degree from St. Thomas Christian College in Theology. I have had the honor of serving as a police ofÞ cer for the past 24 years with the Jacksonville Sheriff's OfÞ ce. I have served in various leadership roles during my tenure, such as a Federal Program Coordinator, Drug Education for Youth Coordinator, Police Recruiter, Burglary Detective, Sex Crimes Detective, Public Information OfÞ cer and an Academy Staff Instructor. During the years 2006 and 2007 I was named the Spokesman of the Year for the State of Florida. I am seeking the ofÞ ce of Sheriff because I am concerned about some of the same issues that concern you. We continue to lead the state in homicides; our negative public safety image impedes our economic growth. We cannot attract major business, events or investments in a city where people think of us as the homicide capital of the state. The image of JSO among the general public is in need of repair; we cannot be effective law enforcement practitioners without gaining and maintain the public trust. I want to restore conÞ dence among the average citizen that JSO is capable, competent and caring in executing our mission on a daily basis. John Rutherford, Republican Candidate for Sheriff I am proud to have served you for the past 36 years as a Jacksonville police ofÞ cer, the last eight as your elected Sheriff. During my law enforcement career I have had the privilege of serving as a Sergeant, Lieutenant, Captain, Chief and Director. Each leadership role helped prepare me to serve as your Sheriff. Together our successes have been many, most signiÞ cantly the crime reductions of the past two years. We acquired, trained and skillfully deployed the necessary resources to Þ ght crime, while maintaining the lowest per capita spending for public safety of any major county in Florida. Historic reductions in crime (2009 down 10.5 percent and projected decline of another 11.5 percent in 2010) are the result of proper resources, community involvement and partnerships, and aggressive prosecution the lowest total crime numbers since 1983! In eight years, we built a nationally-recognized intelligence-led policing unit while Þ ghting crime effectively and reducing costs; 2003's Agenda for Excellence has proven hugely successful in aligning the large and complex workforce of the JSO as a crime-Þ ghting agency; we created a Community Service OfÞ cer program saving tax dollars and making policing more efÞ cient and effective. The CSO's are a terriÞ c "force multiplier" for our sworn ofÞ cers; we helped create a Regional Domestic Security Task Force and an Intelligence Fusion Center; increasing citizen security and making Jacksonville's infrastructure safer from attack and better prepared for mitigation and recovery. I will proudly continue to serve as your Sheriff for the next four years. Curtis Southerland, Write In Candidate for Sheriff I've decided to run for ofÞ ce after my brother Neil Southerland was wrongfully murdered by JSO cop Jim T. Carey, the second person he shot to death unarmed and in handcuffs. State Attorney Angela Corey, her assistant Bernie de la Rionda and several within the police department have covered up the truth about what really happened having put out tremendous lies and misinformation, just as they did in the Wendy's police shooting and many others. You can learn more on my family's website at NeilSoutherlandCoverup.com. Being an Independent and not being part of the system, I will work very hard to stop the corruption, cut waste, work with private and public sectors to stop the root causes of crime and ensure the best for Duval county residents. A person from the outside is needed. All of the other candidate have long been part of a corrupted bureaucracy, now is the time to make a real difference by voting for me to bring true change. We must show government ofÞ cials will be held accountable! If you vote for the same, you can expect more of the same! Write the name Curtis Southerland on the ballet line for sheriff this March 22nd during the First election and May17th for the General election. Thank you. Please visit my website at CurtisforSheriff.com. Kurt Kraft, Democratic Candidate for Property Appraiser I am for term limits; eight is enough. I personally believe an elected ofÞ cial should serve no more than eight years. Term limits allow other citizens in the community to provide elected leadership. Currently, Jacksonville's Mayor and City Council are term limited. My opponent is in his eighth year. I have been a Real Estate Appraiser in the Duval County Property Appraiser's OfÞ ce for 27 years. I have appraised some of the largest and some of the smallest properties in Duval County. I earned my Bachelor of Business Administration degree, with a major in Real Estate, from Kent State University. I played varsity football at Kent. I have a State of Florida, Real Estate Broker's license, voluntarily inactive. I have civic management and supervisory experience. Over a period of years, I held several leadership positions as a member of Jacksonville Jaycees. Per Florida Times-Union article, June 6, 2010, titled "Falling property values produce tax inequities." It is important that tax inequities do not exist on the tax roll. The job of the property appraiser is to appraise all property at fair market value per Florida law. As your next property appraiser, I will correct tax inequities on the tax roll so that everybody is treated fairly. I have been told many times that taxpayers want to pay their fair share and no more. I will bring a sound management approach to the Property Appraiser's OfÞ ce. I will lead with integrity, efÞ ciency and transparency. Thank you for your vote. VoteKraft.com Jim Overton, Republican Candidate for Property Appraiser Elected Duval County Property Appraiser in 2003. Native of Jacksonville; Þ fth generation Floridian; Lee High School; business degree with honors from Washington and Lee University; Master of Public Administration and "Outstanding Alumnus" from the University of North Florida. CertiÞ ed Florida Appraiser, licensed Real Estate Broker, member International Association of Assessing OfÞ cers. Past-President Florida Association of Property Appraisers, Past-President Jacksonville City Council. Former long-time business owner. Scout Leader, YMCA Board. Married 33 years, two children. Since taking ofÞ ce I have been committed to making our public appraisal process fair, open and understandable. Our goal is to earn your trust. Our ofÞ ce has served our customers (the taxpayers) by providing more information online and in print; improving customer service; initiating an internal ethics program; overhauling our data processing; greatly increasing public outreach; managing appraisal accuracy in an unprecedented real estate market; and being accountable by cutting pay and reducing our budget. I ask for your vote to continue our progress. Please vote for Jim Overton for Property Appraiser. Michael Corrigan, Republican Candidate for Tax Collector Did not respond. Dick Kravitz, Republican Candidate for Tax Collector I have been actively involved in my Mandarin community for over 32 years. My wife, Shirley Levin Kravitz, is a fourth generation Jacksonville resident and a retired Duval County Public School teacher. We have two grown sons, Eric and Hirsh. As a retail business executive, I gained valuable customer-care skills, which I will use to insure that the Tax Collector's ofÞ ce is run efÞ ciently and that you, the customer, is treated with respect and courtesy. For my dedication to customer service and best business practices, I have received several regional and national awards. As a City Councilman and former Council president representing Mandarin and as a State Legislator for eight years until I was termlimited, I earned a reputation for always being responsive to the needs of my constituents and for consistently voting for less taxes and smaller government. In fact, when I was in the Florida House of Representatives, I co-sponsored landmark legislation to put a limit on government spending. Always interested in acquiring land for parks in Mandarin, I was very instrumental in securing and developing hundreds of acres of parkland, including Mandarin's Þ rst soccer Þ eld, its Þ rst Regional Park and the Walter Jones Historical Park. Please visit my website, Kravitzfortaxcollector.com for additional information about my background and qualiÞ cations. In closing, I respectfully ask for your vote as Tax Collector. Thank you. Ryan Taylor, Republican Candidate for Tax Collector My name is Ryan Taylor and I am running for the ofÞ ce of Tax Collector. I am a fourth generation native of Jacksonville. I graduated from the University of North Florida with a Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Information Systems. I am a member of the Duval Young Republicans and I have been active supporter of the Jacksonville Agriculture Fair and Boys and Girls Clubs since I was a teenager. My wife Melissa and I reside on the Southside and are active members of First Baptist Church of Jacksonville. I have a distinguished track record of 12 years experience with the Tax Collector's OfÞ ce. I am an Assistant to the Tax Collector; my current role is IT Manager Associate. I started there in the Reporting Department and worked my way up. I was a team leader on the key implementations of both the queuing system for the branch ofÞ ces and for the high speed processing in the mail department, saving time and energy for the employees and cost efÞ cient ways to process the mail. Furthermore, I have critical hands-on experience in organizing, redeploying and merging the blueprints and infrastructure for the branch agencies for optimal service efÞ ciency. Through selfinitiative, I developed many of the information systems throughout the ofÞ ce to speed up production and reporting. My goal as Tax Collector is to lower operating costs, decrease delinquency, all while maintaining an exceptional level of service. I will look for additional opportunities

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www.MandarinNewsLine.com  March 2011  Mandarin NewsLine, Page 13 Campaign contributions and other materials may be sent to: John D. JackŽ Webb for City Council, District 6 12380 Aladdin Road Jacksonville, Florida 32223 VOTE FORCity Council „ District 6 „ RepublicanMarch 22, 2011 PROMISES MADE, PROMISES KEPTAs your representative on Council, we have worked together to improve and protect the character of our very special and unique community. Our efforts have resulted in:Park improvements „ Additional parking and police protection for Alberts Field, the grand openings of Pickwick Park and Palmetto Leaves Park, and most recently, the improvements to our much loved Mandarin Park Neighborhood protection „ Successful opposition to commercial encroachment in neighborhoods where such development is not appropriate, thereby preserving our quality of life Regional traffic planning „ Successful funding of State route 9B, which will decrease the traffic burden on Mandarin roadsLeaner government „ As chairperson for the Ad-hoc Committee for Budget Efficiency, we eliminated 1500 positions from city government. As City Council President, we cut $35 million dollars from the current city budget. More responsive and responsible representation „ I remain ever mindful that I represent you, the residents of District 6. I have guardedly protected my independence and have remained committed to the needs of my constituents. Vote for Jack Webb March 22nd Questions? Call us at 904-886-2872 Log on to learn more about Jack Webb: www.ibackjack.net Paid political advertisement, paid for and approved by John D. JackŽ Webb, Republican for City Council, District 6 2011Candidates cont from page 12 Candidates cont on page 14to better service the constituents of Duval County. Matt Schellenberg, Republican Candidate for City Council, District 6 I’m a pro-life, scal and social conservative. I believe in lower taxes and less government. I have lived in Jacksonville for 48 years. This is where I grew up going to church and school, where my Mom and Dad raised me and my 10 brothers and sisters, and Jacksonville is where I started my own family. I have a deep love and strong passion for Jacksonville and Mandarin. I’m not a politician. I’m a small business owner who has survived these tough times by making do with less. But our City Council refuses to do with less. They continue to raise our taxes and have added new “fees” to our garbage, storm water and JEA bills. This is unacceptable. It is time for a new approach. It is time for City Hall to do with less. I have studied the budget. I know where to cut it. I am ready to impose some scal responsibility on a City Council out of control. If you are tired of the same old empty promises from politicians and their out of control tax and spend policies, vote for a new approach. Vote for me on March 22 and I will bring these conservative principles to City Hall. Jack Webb, Republican Candidate for City Council, District 6 Four years ago, I sought election to the position of Jacksonville City Council, District 6. My decision to pursue elected of ce owed directly from my desire to serve the community that I had come to call home and grown to love. The power of grassroots prevailed and I was afforded the privilege of serving as your representative. During that short period of time, I have had the privilege of advocating on your behalf during some of the most trying economic times ever faced by our community, while at the same time providing leadership to the entire City of Jacksonville in my service as Rules Chairman, Vice President and President of the City Council. Despite taking strong positions on dif cult issues, I have guardedly protected my independence and overwhelming commitment to the needs of District 6. I remain always mindful and protective of the trust that you placed in me. With that said, nothing over the past few years has served to temper my passion for you, my constituents, nor dissuade me from my belief in the inherent value of public service. I seek your help in utilizing that passion, made all the more potent through an acquired measure of experience, for the continued bene t of District 6 over the coming years. I once again ask for your vote, support and seek your help in utilizing that passion for the bene t of District 6. Promises Made – Promises Kept. Please visit www.ibackjack.net. Greg Youngblood, Republican Candidate for City Council, District 6 Mandarin, are you better off today than you were four-years ago? Are the new taxes, fees and bureaucracy helping you? Can we trust the people that created a pension mess and raised our taxes to x it? We say no! There is an alternative....With proven, business and public service, leadership experience. Greg Youngblood can restore the spirit of “public service” to our city. Greg will merge of ces, reduce budgets, end the duplication of government and save money for our community while protecting the quality of life we have come to enjoy. As co-founder of Tools For A Time Inc., Greg knows business. Greg Youngblood also knows government and as elected chairman of the Soil and Water Conservation Board, Greg reduced the budget 18 percent voluntarily while simultaneously serving our community for free. Greg Youngblood has also identi ed the Garbage Tax and the Stormwater Tax as inappropriate double-billing from our city because we already pay for those services through property tax. Greg Youngblood will restore a “public service” philosophy to government and make sure you come rst in city hall. Visit www.VoteYoungblood.com or call 904-349-7273. Steve Burnett, No Party AfÞ liation Candidate for City Council, At Large Group 1 I, Steve Burnett, want to serve you and will ght for a Bolder, Leaner Jacksonville consolidated city government! Navy Vet. At Large members of council should be the watchdogs on spending and unnecessary local government intrusion into business and individual lives. Government has a place and it’s de ned by the City Charter. While every budget line item has a constituency many are not within the scope of the City Charter; nice to do but not necessary. In these tough times necessary should be restored to the budget process. I support strong public safety and to give all the opportunity for a good education. I do not support a government that picks winners and losers because it has become so large. Maintaining what we have and planning for growth which will return are important for a government that should be an advocate for business development and not a place the promotion of self interests. The Council should repeal laws/programs that are not working as intended or no longer effective. We should not layoff city employees but ask unions to make concessions that will keep the city solvent. There has to be a “safety net” for those that fall on hard times. We can’t go backwards, but we can go forward learning lessons and problem solving instead of continuing the madness of growing government in its size and scope. The Boldness we showed in consolidating needs to be resurrected in restoring a leaner structure to our city government. Kimberly Daniels, Democratic Candidate for City Council, At Large Group 1 Jacksonville needs more jobs. We need a government which comes alongside good people who are trying to raise families and live happy and safe lives. We need a government which protects those who require our protection – the very young and the old. And, as Lincoln once said, we need leadership which will “think anew and act anew” because we need to achieve extraordinary results in a short time to overcome our city’s problems. The rst priority of our city’s government has to be doing all we can to encourage job creation in Jacksonville. Small businesses and start-up businesses are the key to reviving this economy. In this stagnant economy, Jacksonville citizens are struggling to support themselves and their families. The

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Page 14, Mandarin NewsLine  March 2011  www.MandarinNewsLine.com ElectionCandidates cont from page 13 Candidates cont on page 15Jacksonville Electric Authority (JEA) has a cryptic rate structure which punishes conservation and rewards high consumption. That’s just one example of an area which needs to be reformed and made transparent. There are many more. Economic growth not tax increases will lift Jacksonville out of this hole. We need to take a long hard look at how we are spending those hard-earned tax dollars before we ask our citizens for more. I want to be the voice of those who haven’t been heard in the past. Families struggling to pay high taxes and even higher utility bills, small business people making their payroll in these tough times and our older citizens who fear the night. Jacksonville deserves a government which is as good as the people who live here. David Taylor, Republican Candidate for City Council, At Large Group 1 I was born and raised in Jacksonville and I am a businessman, not a politician. While working at my father’s residential air conditioning and heating business at an early age, I learned the value of a dollar and the self worth associated with having a job. Once elected, I’ll lead with integrity, cut taxes, eliminate wasteful spending and promote economic growth. I’m the past president of the River City Republican Club, a member of the Republican Executive Committee, Westside Baptist Church, Westside Republican Club, Hyde Park Masonic Lodge, West Jacksonville Civic Association, Northeast Florida Builders Association, Westside Business Leaders, Rotary Club of West Jacksonville, the National Ri e Association and Safari Club International. Additionally, I serve on Sheriff John Rutherford’s Sheriff’s Of ce Advisory Council. I am endorsed by the Fraternal Order of Police, the International Association of Fire ghters, Northeast Florida Builders Association, JaxBiz (a division of the Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce) and the First Coast Manufacturers Association. I’ve been married for more than 10 years to Julie and we’ve been blessed with our daughter Shelby. Julie is an Assistant State Attorney under the direction of Angela Corey. I will base all of my decisions on principles of Faith, Family and Fiscal Responsibility. John Crescimbeni, Democratic Candidate for City Council, At Large Group 2 John Crescimbeni is a scal conservative who has earned a reputation for being “tight with a dollar.” On the Council, he has asked the tough questions and said no to unnecessary spending, taxes and fees. He voted against the $750 million no-bid land ll contract and both of the mayor’s property tax hikes. He is the only Councilmember who hasn’t hired an aide and he has never missed a regular City Council meeting during his 10 years of combined service. As the local owner of Hickory Farms, John is a successful small businessman who knows how to cut expenses, balance budgets and operate ef ciently. He steadfastly supports neighborhood rights and recognizes the importance of good schools and crime prevention for a better economy and quality of life. A resident of Jacksonville since 1965, John is a graduate of Bolles High School and Jacksonville University. He serves on a variety of local boards, including the Jacksonville Humane Society, Friends of the Jacksonville Public Library and Tree Hill Nature Center. John is married with three children and one grandchild and attends Christ’s Church in Mandarin. He would be honored to have your vote on March 22. Paul Martinez, Republican Candidate for City Council, At Large Group 2 As a business owner, a father and a 30 year area resident, I want Jacksonville to thrive. Right now it is not thriving, but with hard work and ingenuity we can turn things around. First, we must balance the budget and cut taxes. For example, we can cut spending by updating the city’s IT department, merging of ces and cross-training employees. Pension reform must also be on the table. I do not support any additional taxes for JaxPort or Downtown. For Downtown, I would entertain the idea of a separate tax authority so that revenue generated there stays there. JaxPort improvements would bring jobs, but we cannot afford additional taxes and we certainly can’t afford another courthouse-like project that goes over budget by more than $150 million. Instead, we must encourage private enterprise and seek federal and state funding to improve JaxPort. I fully support educational reform, because parents alone should choose where their children attend school. We must work closely with parents, legislators, teachers and the school board to improve Duval schools. Our children are suffering and we are losing business and residents to nearby counties with better schools. The St. Johns River is a valuable resource for Jacksonville, but only 33 percent of it is in Duval County. We must work with other stake-holders to ensure the river is clean and usable for generations to come. Please visit my website, www.electpaulmartinez.com and my Facebook page to see more of my ideas for Jacksonville. Tom Patton, Republican Candidate for City Council, At Large Group 2 I came to Jacksonville 12 years ago to establish the rst local news department at WJCT-FM and during my time there I had the opportunity to talk with local political, business, and community leaders about many of the city’s issues, such as the city budget, homelessness, crime, Downtown, economic development and the beautiful St. Johns River. Now, I hope to have an opportunity to nish those conversations as a member of the Jacksonville City Council. As a member of the council, I will work diligently to assure that every dollar spent is spent wisely and to create a climate in our city that encourages businesses large and small to put people back to work. We will need to scrub the next budget line-by-line in an effort to nd every savings and ef ciency possible. We should also look for ways to streamline bureaucracy so that businesses large and small have an opportunity to grow, and create the jobs that are still so desperately needed in our community. Jacksonville has a great deal of potential and the city looks to its leaders to help it realize that potential. In these challenging economic times, this is one of the most important elections for Jacksonville in recent memory. We need leadership that will look forward and not be satis ed with the status quo or living in the past. Thank you very much for your consideration. Vince Serrano, Republican Candidate for City Council, At Large Group 2 We all know that when our income drops we have to cut our outgo to make ends meet. But certain city of cials would rather raise your taxes than cut their spending. As a native of Jacksonville I love this city, its beautiful trees and wonderful river. As a father I am concerned that my children may not have the same opportunities that I enjoyed. As a successful businessman I wonder why the city makes it so dif cult and expensive to do business here. As a neighbor I care about those that want to work, but can’t nd jobs. We need common sense leadership. It is time to elect a candidate who is willing to tackle the real problems, make the hard decisions, stand up against the powerful few and get Jacksonville back on the road to prosperity. Someone who you can trust to keep our neighborhoods safe, improve the educational opportunities for our children, create new jobs and improve the quality of life for all our citizens, not just a few. For more information please visit our website at www.VinceSerrano4Jax.com. I ask you to vote for me Vince Serrano, City Council at Large, Group 2. Thank you! Stephen Joost, Republican Candidate for City Council, At Large Group 3 Did not respond. Greg Anderson, Republican Candidate for City Council, At Large Group 4 Jacksonville is my home and I am excited about its future. Just like the voters who will decide this election, my wife and I choose to live, work, worship and play here. We are raising our two boys here. I am running for City Council because I see a need for strong nancial leadership and pro business attitude on the council. The decisions made in the next council terms will have an important impact on our community now and in the future. I am running because we need new leaders willing to make decisions for the best interest of our communities. It is time to get our nancial house in order and to do this we need experienced leaders willing to make dif cult decisions. For the last four years I have served our citizens on the TRUE Commission looking at the budget. This combined with 25 years of experience in nancial services industry means that I am the most quali ed candidate for this council seat. I am the only candidate in this race with a true nancial background. Only a few weeks after taking of ce, your next council will be making budget decisions. I am ready to contribute day one! My nancial background and ability to understand revenues, expenses and budgets are key qualities for this next council. As a lifelong Republican and a scal conservative, I will bring a new energy and fresh ideas to our local government. Juan Diaz, Republican Candidate for City Council, At Large Group 4 I am a pro-life, limited government Conservative. My wife Kristen and I are members at Christian Family Chapel. I’m passionate about our quality of life here –we don’t want to look to St. Johns County to nd that. This is an important time to bring new energy and ideas and scally disciplined leadership onto the Council. I am very active in the community. I earned a law degree at the University of Florida and practiced as an attorney with CSX and BAE Systems. My experience includes service on the Chamber Board, Leadership Jacksonville, Republican Executive Committee and several city commissions. I am committed to being accountable to YOU the taxpayer, not beholden to special interests downtown. I’m tired of our elected of cials saying one thing and doing another. We need trust, goodwill and a true vision for our city. My focus is to support job creation by reducing tax and regulatory burdens that restrict business growth. We need to get people back to work. And we need safe neighborhoods. I’m committed to public safety, while also working with our unions to solve the pension crisis that is sti ing our city nancially. I’m willing to make the tough decisions to “right-size” our government and tighten its belt just like Jacksonville’s families have. It’s time for bold, new leadership on the City Council. I’m asking for your vote on March 22. Visit www.diaz4jax.com for my biography and more information on our campaign. Jim Robinson, Republican Candidate for City Council, At It’s the American way!First Election: March 22, 2011 General Election May 17, 2011

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www.MandarinNewsLine.com  March 2011  Mandarin NewsLine, Page 15 YOUNGBLOODGREG City Council District 6 WHEREYOUCOME FIRST www.VoteYoungblood.com 904.349-7273 VOTE MARCH 22 YOU Keeping YOUR community safe to live, work and play YOUR taxes YOUR government YOUR voice Are you better off today than you were 4-years ago ? Our city is expecting a $60-million budget shortfall next year. This year they raised our taxes to balance the budget. We all agree, the current path of taxes, fees and debt are very destructive to families and businesses. We need real leaders downtown to merge some agencies and reduce a number of high salaried positions (we currently have a H.R. person making $250,000.00). Greg Youngblood will restore con“dence in the future and allow job opportunities to return to our community. 22 years of Small Business Experience 22 years of Public Service Family man married 21 years Attends Christian Family Chapel in Mandarin 2011Candidates cont from page 14Large Group 4 Many people have labeled the upcoming city elections as the most important since consolidation in the late 1960s. The crises are different today, but we no doubt have crisis. The city and its citizens remain mired in an economic recession unequalled since the Great Depression. With some evidence of recovery in our sights, it is time now for the city to return to Þ nancial stability. This will take courage and discipline to accomplish Ð something different than politics as usual. I am a candidate that is the right person, at the right time, for the right reasons. My professional, business and life experiences are a rich blend that has prepared me to address situations just like this. As a civil engineer, I am a problem solver. I will make decisions on facts, not politics. As a businessman, I have had the life altering experience of meeting payroll for over 20 years. I know when to say no and I know how to efÞ ciently spend the resources that are available to me. I am also a former US Army ofÞ cer. The city's need for such experience is now more than ever. This also matches with my ability to give this ofÞ ce the time it needs. I retired from my company last year and have the time it will take. Finally, I am running, pure and simple, to serve this city that I love. I have no further political aspirations. Please vote for me, Jim Robinson, on March 22, 2011. Fred Engness, Republican Candidate for City Council, At Large Group 5 Did not respond. Donald Foy, No Party AfÞ liation Candidate for City Council, At Large Group 5 Did not respond. Sean Hall, Republican Candidate for City Council, At Large Group 5 As an airborne/Infantry ofÞ cer in the US Army and Army National Guard for 14 years, I have learned how to manage and lead a team through extreme difÞ culties, while continuing to produce positive results. I will utilize my experience to work with local businesses to make sure city government does not impede the free market from succeeding in Jacksonville. My most recent endeavor into the private sector with Panasonic Computer Solutions has provided an unparalleled perspective in both the national and international business markets. As an executive business development manager for Latin America, I was accountable for driving and creating new opportunities for Panasonic throughout Central and South America. The opportunity to develop relationships with stakeholders in these countries gives me a unique insight into the unlimited partnership and trade opportunities with the world. My objectives are to: Create new jobs in Jacksonville by growing local businesses and maximizing our Port's full potential; Protect our city's quality of life by prioritizing expenditures in the areas of public safety and neighborhood infrastructure; Address water quantity, quality and access issues related to the St. Johns River; Focus on efforts to develop Downtown to its fullest potential. Please vote for me on March 22nd. Let's make Jacksonville a better city than it was yesterday. Visit www.Voteforseanhall.com or contact via email sean@voteforseanhall.com or Facebook: Sean Hall for City Council. Thank you. Robin Lumb, Republican Candidate for City Council, At Large Group 5 My name is Robin Lumb and I'm a candidate for City Council in Group 5 at Large. This is a countywide race where everyone can vote. I'm a 30 year resident of Jacksonville, a small business owner and Vice Chairman of the Republican Party of Duval County. My wife, Joanna, and I have been married for 28 years and live in Riverside. In 2009 I was the Republican leader in Jacksonville who actively rallied opposition to the Pelosi-Reid health care legislation, organizing Town Hall meetings and speaking at public forums all across North Florida. In 2010 I led the grassroots campaign to organize voter turnout for Republican candidates like Marco Rubio. I'm been active in the Republican Party because I believe it's our best hope for electing pro-business conservatives who believe in free markets, smaller government and less spending. As your representative on City Council I'll be the kind of common sense conservative you can rely on. These are the issues that are critical to our citizens: Jobs: I'll work to modernize and expand our port facilities and to jumpstart industrial development at the Cecil Commerce Center. Fiscal responsibility: I'll insist on strict budget discipline with spending priorities that focus on essential services and basic needs. I will not support property tax hikes or higher fees; pension costs must be brought under control. Public safety: The city's most important function is public safety. I'll work to ensure that our citizens are adequately protected by police and Þ re services. Robin Rukab, Republican Candidate for City Council, At Large Group 5 My fundamental belief is that government is here to serve the citizens and not for the citizens to serve the government. My passion is simply to be the voice for you and all Jacksonville citizens. Jacksonville is our wonderful city the best in the world but it is far from perfect. We are faced with many problems and we need common sense leadership at the helm to guide us through these tough economic times. My primary focus will be on consumer protection, creating more jobs, lowering taxes, developing more and better youth programs, cultivating small business and protecting our senior citizens. After working under the administration of four different mayors, I understand how to get things done downtown. I have been an advocate for you in our consumer affairs department and I know I am qualiÞ ed and experienced enough to represent you in our city government. My door will always be open for my esteemed constituents. I would be honored to have your vote and will represent you with dignity in our municipal government. Michelle Tappouni, Republican Candidate for City Council, At Large Group 5 From childhood I have been told what a privilege it is to be a citizen of this countryÑto be allowed to participate in building a community that reß ects the best and Þ nest instincts of its people. As part of this privilege, I thank you for the opportunity to speak to you directly about why I want to be your City Council representative for Group 5 At-Large. I am passionate about Jacksonville and the opportunities for a stable and growing job market, a supportive business environment, protection of the St. Johns River and support for individual and community initiatives that beneÞ t all of our citizens. My belief is that all of these areas are connected and require cooperation and accountability; resulting in recognition of Jacksonville as a Þ rst class city. I have broad-based business experience including more than 25 years of practical experience in all aspects of the construction industry, including project management, trainer and consultant. My experience will bring people and organizational skills to the job of city councilwoman. My campaign is comprised of four main pillars, Restoring Trust, Reviving Jobs, Safe Neighborhoods and Building Community. You can learn more about each of the areas by visiting my website, www. votetappouni.com. I am optimistic about the impact individuals can have when they get involved with their community and will listen to the questions and concerns of my constituents with an open mind and heart. I ask that you consider me to be your representative for City Council Group 5 At-Large.

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Page 16, Mandarin NewsLine  March 2011  www.MandarinNewsLine.com Business Prole! How many times have you passed by a salon or spa wishing you could receive a relaxing massage but were discouraged to book an appointment due to lack of aordability, convenience or timing? At Massage Green’, we guarantee that every visit ts within your budget, works with your schedule and most importantly, delivers a soothing experience that becomes a regular part of your healthy lifestyle. At Massage Green’, we think of ourselves as an aordable luxury. We oer an introductory price of $29.95 for all rst time one hour clients, and $59.95 for rst time 90 minute clients. Ask us about membership pricing, including family memberships. eres no denying the power of massage therapy. Regardless of the adjectives we assign to it (pampering, rejuvenating, therapeutic) or the reasons we seek it out (a luxurious treat, stress relief, pain management), massage therapy can be a powerful ally in your healthcare regimen. Experts estimate that ninety percent of disease is stress related and perhaps nothing ages us faster, internally and externally, than high levels of stress. While eliminating anxiety and pressure altogether in this fast-paced world may be idealistic, massage can, without a doubt, help manage stress. At Massage Green’, we are committed to reversing the aging process through therapeutic techniques that when combined with regular exercise, proper nutrition and ecofriendly surrounding can increase human and planet longevity. is translates into: fatigue All Massage Green’ locations must be built with green certiedŽ or eco-friendly construction materials, systems and xtures. We are the rst national therapeutic massage franchise that has made the pledge of going greenŽ so that our clients and employees are exposed to the healthiest environment possible. At Massage Green we clean with 100% toxic free cleaning products and we use organic lotions and oils for every massage.10601 San Jose Blvd. Suite 212(near Whole Foods)880-0050Mon-Sat 9am-8pm Sunday 11am-6pmLicense # MM23876Advertisment VARSITY INSURANCE, INC. Being selective pays... We choose not to represent 100 insurance companies... And earned the right to represent the best. Call: 268-6365 Since 1990 – Specialist in preferred auto and homeowners insurance. Live the Golden Life, AFFORDABLY Experience the elegance of The Coves while living independently in one of our gracious residences. Youll enjoy the lifestyle you deserve at a pr ice you can afford. NOBUYIN! NO ENTRA NCEFEE! CALLTODAY! (904)292-268311501 OLDST. AUGUSTINERD. | JACKSONVILLE, FL 32258THECOVES@RIVERGARDEN.ORG | RIVERGARDEN.ORG Not Too Big RemodelinGINTERIOR AND EXTERIOR State Certified Contractor Since 1978Licensed and Insured Experience • Quality • Value Dallas Lee262-1098 Office 955-0056 Cell NTBRLic#CRCO12331 Mention a visit to Montserrat and you can expect quizzical expressions. Spanish mountain? Massachusetts college? West Indies island? The name applies to all three, but only the Emerald Isle of the Caribbean beckons with shamrocks, sunshine and the stillsmoldering Soufriere volcano. Travelers savvy enough to venture beyond neighboring Antigua, Guadeloupe or St. Kitts Þ nd a tropical throwback to another time. The British-governed territory endears itself to divers, nature lovers and vacationers with unspoiled reefs and a unique Irish-Caribbean culture. Montserrat's people maintain phoenix-like hope, despite the fact that the volcano rendered A Caribbean celebration of St. Patrick’s DayBy Contributing Travel Writer Debi Lander, www.bylandersea.com St. Patricks Day parade Plymouth, frequently called the modern-day Pompeiitwo-thirds of their island off-limits. Outside Ireland, Montserrat is the only place to declare St. Patrick's Day a national holiday Ñ even passport entries come stamped in the shape of a shamrock. Celebrations honor the 17th-century Irish indentured servants who settled here after ß eeing anti-Catholic violence. The festival also recalls a failed slave uprising of March 17, 1789. Resilient islanders merge all traditions and ethnicities for a week-long party. Back in the Ô80s and early Ô90s, music ignited the 39 square mile isle. Sir George Martin, the former Beatles producer, built AIR Studios for recording stars like Paul McCartney, Sting and Elton John. Many artists subsequently built vacation villas as personal retreats. Then, on July 18, 1995, a loud rumble, like a jet roar, swept over the sultry landscape. Smoke rose from a green mountainÐnot wispy puffs but powerful columns shooting skyward. The plumes kept churning, the noise kept pounding and 10,000 residents in Plymouth, the capital had to evacuate. Soufriere acted up again and again until she blew her top, exploding like a wild child, transforming the verdant peak into gray shale. Today, she continues: one day she's gentle and kind; the next, she rages. Montserrat lifestyle teeters on the edge and her 4,500 remaining residents will never be the same. Still, a sojourn to her simple ways blesses one with a laid-back escape. Black sparkly beaches typically lie empty, except in the fall when the green and hawksbills turtles nest ashore. Guides lead divers into warm aquamarine sea caves and rock formations where spotted morays, porcupine Þ sh and octopuses hang. Deep-sea Þ shing beneÞ ts from the lack of cruise-ship trafÞ c. Wahoo, bonito, shark, marlin and tasty yellowÞ n tuna cavort just two to three miles offshore. Hikers Þ nd well-marked trails established by the National Trust. A boat ride to see the ruins of Plymouth, frequently called the modern-day Pompeii, is a must. Worldwide, no other destination compares with the ghostly apparition of the lost city. Onlookers gasp at the now-forbidden territory standing as if Medusa turned it to stone. Currently, St. Patty's Day parades start near Little Bay, the proposed new capital and march to the Village Heritage Festival, where replicas of plantation slave huts and traditional African food take center stage. Try Duckna, a paste of sweet potato, coconut and spices, wrapped in taro leaves and tied with strands of banana palm. The national dish, Goat Water, reigns most popular despite its less-thanenticing name. It looks, tastes and smells like spicy gumbo. Expats and visitors from other Caribbean islands unite at beach bars and rum shops. The bands play while patrons quaff Guinness along with mango rum punch. But...no green beer. Music once brought prosperity to this island and now it simply unites. Come see the haunting beauty and listen to her legacy of song. If you go: www.visitmontserrat.comReach 26,000 potential customers!Advertise in Mandarin NewsLine!886-4919

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www.MandarinNewsLine.com  March 2011  Mandarin NewsLine, Page 17 Call for an appointment: 904-262-5550 Conveniently located in a professional location with ample parking. Dr. Rosann W. Faull, Au.D., CCC-A Call for a free consultation. The Doctor Who Listens So You Can Hear! Why go to a sales person when you can see a Board Certied Doctor of Audiology? Are you hearing and understanding all the wonderful sounds of life? OFAMERICA$500 OFFAny Pair of Advanced Phonak Hearing AidsOffer valid Feb. 15 until March 30th, 2011 What does it take to follow a dream? Is it dedication, perseverance, optimism or the willingness to take chances? On January 29, acrobats, gymnasts, musicians, dancers, singers and others with special talents were given the chance to follow their dreams and audition to appear in the Cirque Dreams Illumination production that was held at the Jacksonville Times-Union Center this past February. Out of the Þ rst 100 contenders, only one performer was selected for an appearance in the show. The auditions were held at the Avenues Mall. Before the stores had even opened that Saturday morning, three hopeful stars Youth SceneLocal stars follow a dreamBy Alexa M. Velezhad arrived bright and early to secure their place in line for the Cirque Dreams casting call. First in line was 20-year-old Benjahmin Svyatoslav Ellis. A graduate of Douglas Anderson School of the Arts, Ellis has a colorful background in various athletic arts including tumbling, dance and rhythmic gymnastics. "I love what I do and I have always had a passion for it even before I knew what Ôit' was," he shares. His dream is to become "the soloist that everyone wants." Second in line was 19-year-old Shelby Todd, a level 10 rhythmic gymnast who has practiced rhythmic gymnastics for over 14 years. "It's hard, but in the end, I'll tell you what, it was worth all those practicesÑit really was. It's fun," Todd says. She came to the audition because she had trained with Cirque Du Soleil in California back in 2004 and loved it. "It's so different and you learn so much. Now that they are bringing it to Jacksonville, I wanted to try it." Third in line was 19-year-old Beth Mathis, a dancer and aerial hoop artist. She has been dancing Beth Mathis, Shelby Todd, Benjahmin Svyatoslav Ellisfor over 10 years and is currently a member of the DanceWorks Company at Florida State College. "I came today because no matter what the outcome, it's a great opportunity to experience the audition process, meet new people, and make connections," she says. Mathis loves performing. "It's kind of a high, really. It's something you do once and you just have to keep doing it." As Mathis, Todd and Ellis stretched in preparation for their auditions, spectators watched in awe at the extreme levels of ß exibility all three posses. Some passersby even took out their cell phones to snap pictures of the seemingly impossible contortions into which they could pretzel themselves. Undoubtedly, these performers have devoted years of training and dedication to achieve this level of skill. Even though only one act was ultimately awarded a spot on the Cirque Dreams Illumination show, all who auditioned should be commended for taking a chance to follow their dreams. And they should always, as motivational speaker Les Brown said, shoot for the moon. Even if you miss, you'll land among the stars. Daylight Savings Time Begins Sunday, March 13

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Page 18, Mandarin NewsLine  March 2011  www.MandarinNewsLine.com New Business Prole!InStyle Jewelry and Accessories has opened in the Shops at Julington Creek in Mandarin, near Hurricane Wings at the Julington Creek Bridge. InStyle Jewelry & Accessories oers many designer 12795 San Jose Blvd., Suite 8 Mandarin, FL 32223904-262-8799Mon … Sat 10:00 am … 5:30 pm Closed Sundaywww.currentsgis.com www.iluvTrollbeads.com inspiredŽ fashion items for women and girls of all ages. We consider our oerings aordable luxuriesŽ as most fashion pieces are priced under $50. We search many vendors for trendy designs in jewelry and pocket-books to bring our customers items not seen in other stores and at a great value. We oer wonderful gis for birthday parties and hostess gis! InStyle carries many collegiate items such as watches, jewelry and accessories for the southeast schools. Stop in a take a peek! InStyle Jewelry & Accessories is your local home for Trollbeads and Chamilia beads. Today, Chamilia is fast becoming the itŽ brand in the rapidly growing customized jewelry category. e company has a growing collection of 600+ beads and a successful Disney® partnership with an exclusive collection of authentic Disney beads not available anywhere else. How about a convertible bracelet? With over 100 sterling silver and/or 14k gold clasps to choose from, you can change the clasp to t your mood, the season or the holiday. We invite you to stop in and check out the many aordable luxuries at InStyle Jewelry & Accessories! Jewelry & Accessories This program is made possible by a grant from the FINRA Investor Education Foundation throughSmart investing@your library®, a partnership with the American Library Association.JPL on the Homefront: Smart investing@your library®is a “nancial education program designed speci“cally for veterans, service members, and their families. February 22 & 24, 2011 (5:30 7:30 p.m.)FSCJ Urban Resource Center Room 103 601 W. State Street Jacksonville, Florida 32202This 3-module series begins with The Basics, covering: Money management and spending plans The military pay and entitlements system Leave and Earnings Statement (LES) Available “nancial resources at duty stations and command Selecting and using a “nancial institution and advisor All workshops are free and open to the public. Pre-registration is strongly recommended. To pre-register and get more information on all workshops and more resources, visit jaxpubliclibrary.org and check out JPL on the Homefront Resident experiences portrayed by models. Assisted Living Facility #5572 “My green thumb is just part of my good nature.” Pictured is a group known as The Mandarin Ladies.Ž Every year during Super Bowl week, the Mandarin Ladies who volunteered for Super Bowl XXXIX, meet at the Ale House to reminisce. This year was our sixth meeting since the game was played on in Jacksonville on February 6, 2005. Terry Meier (blue shirt) was our captain. She mapped out our schedule to all the events we were assigned as volunteers. We had fun getting to the events via city bus, trolley or car. Overall it was a great experience. PDr. Alan Krantz and his team members from Krantz Dental Care cooked and served dinner to nearly 50 people at the Ronald McDonald House on January 28, 2011. This house serves as a home away from home for families so that they may be close to their hospitalized child. Providing a place to stay at little or sometimes no cost, the Ronald McDonald House affords families access to specialized medical treatment that they couldnt ordinarily afford.What is recycling? According to Environment-Green, “recycling is the process of turning one products useful part into a new product.” We recycle to conserve on the consumption of energy and other resources. We also recycle to keep trash out of land lls. Did you Why recycle? The importance of recycling in our communityBy Contributing Writer Meghan Bender, Community Programs Manager, Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundationknow that every year the average baby generates more than a ton of trash? More than 90 percent of our trash could be used again by recycling. Recycling is easy; in the United States there are more than 9,000 curbside recycling programs and 12,000 drop-off centers. Here are 10 ways you can recycle: 1. Use a microwave to cook instead of a conventional oven. Microwaves use 50 percent less energy than ovens 2. Bring your own reusable grocery bags to the grocery store 3. Use compact uorescent light bulbs. These light bulbs are an energy-saving alternative to normal light bulbs; they’ll save you money on your electric bill and last 10 times longer too 4. Turn off the faucet while brushing your teeth 5. Enroll in a recycling program. Begin recycling all of your household plastic, metal, aluminum, paper and glass goods 6. Stop your junk mail; you will not receive it anymore and it’ll save more than 150,000 trees in just one year 7. Shop green by buying recycled products; avoid buying Styrofoam as it is un-recyclable 8. When you can, ride your bike or walk instead of drive 9. Unplug your electronics when they’re off and not being used 10. When writing or printing use both side of paper These recycling tips are brought to you as part of the education mission of the Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundation. Firehouse Subs sells their recycled pickle buckets for $2 apiece and all proceeds bene t Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundation.

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www.MandarinNewsLine.com  March 2011  Mandarin NewsLine, Page 19 Accepting and Selling furniture (living room, dining room, bedroom, etc) Home decor (lamps, rugs, artwork, tchotchke) New items arrive daily. We are ready to accept your entire house, estate, etc. We also oer inventory liquidation service for builders, home and furniture industry businesses, etc. For More Information call: 880 8448 or email us at: ENCOREDECOR@bellsouth.net10830 San Jose Boulevard ( across from Walmart)Visit us online at: www.EncoreDecorFL.comWE OFFER FREE PICKUP SERVICE FOR APPROVED ITEMS Hours: Mon Sat 10 7 Sun 12-5 Jacksonvilles Largest Upscale Consigment Store THE PATIENT OR PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS A RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PAY, CANCEL PAYMENT OR BE REIMBURSED FOR PAYMENT FOR ANY OTHER SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT THAT IS PERFORMED WITHIN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO THE ADVERTISEMENT FOR FREE, DISCOUNTED FEE, OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE S, EXAMINATIONS OR TREATMENT.Dr. Bruce SamburskyChiropractic PhysicianOver 22 Years of Experience SPECIAL OFFER Must present this ad to receive offer. Not Valid with any other offers. Expires 4/10/11 Sambursky Chiropractic, LLC683-4376 Immediate same day appointments available. Including Saturdays! Massage Therapist now on Staff ( Lic#MA58338 ) .12421 San Jose Blvd. #300 (just South of Solantic )Serving the Mandarin and Julington Creek area.www.backbonejax.comINITIAL EXAMINATIONONLY $59(NORMAL VALUE $90 VALUE) Stop suering from: We now oer Laser Therapy for sports related Injuries.(As used by many professional sports teams) Fitness Together12 Week Physique Transformation $200 OFF12 Week Program*New clients only with this ad. Oer Expires 3/31/11 In The Tree Steakhouse Plaza 11362 San Jose Blvd.904-268-5355www.FTJACKSONVILLE.com Carol Lokeitek of Jacksonville lost 50 lbs from January to June and will never fear another January 1st ! See Carols full story at FTJACKSONVILLE.COM< Before After > Full Service Lawn Maintenance E dgcon www.edgconborders.com Concrete Borders981-0090 FREE ESTIMATESLandscape to Concrete Licensed & Insured In February, St. Joseph Catholic School celebrated Catholic Schools Week. It was a fun-Þ lled week of bands, drum lines, story tellers and ice cream! The week also provided the opportunity for the students to experience the joy of giving to others. Children provided Spiritual Acts of Mercy for their families, donated canned goods and school supplies, made Valentines for children at the Sulzbacher Center and prayed for our military during Eucharistic Adoration. Our Priests, Deacons and Sisters were On February 3, the MOMS Club of MandarinSoutheast hosted a Chinese New Year Celebration in honor of the Year of the Rabbit. Pre-K rocks the house for Catholic Schools WeekBy Contributing Writer Theresa Cline, Pre-K teacher, St. Joseph Catholic Schoolcelebrated and appreciated with beautiful handmade cards from the students. The highlights of the week were visits from the bands at Bishop Kenny and Bishop Snyder High Schools. Everyone, including the teachers, raised the roof dancing to drum beats and Michael Jackson songs! Energy from the Pre-K kids set the tone for a jammin' pep rally! A favorite of all the children was a visit from Dilly the Ice Cream Cone delivering yummy Dilly Bars. The week of charity, celebration and appreciation ended with the children bringing ß owers for their teachers. Every teacher received a beautiful bouquet followed by a delicious lunch at BoneÞ sh Grill. The children, teachers, staff and volunteers experienced a truly magniÞ cent week. However, everyone will agree that the best part of the week was the blessing received from the opportunity to show the love of God by serving our community. Mandarin NewsLineEverybody Gets It. Everybody Reads It.Copy deadline for April issue: March 10!editor@mandarinnewsline.com

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Page 20, Mandarin NewsLine  March 2011  www.MandarinNewsLine.com Taekwondo & Brazillian JuJitsuBuy 2 Months get 1 Month FREE Uniform included inTaekwondo ClassesNo contract needed. A Children’s Name Brand Consignment EventNew & Gently Loved Items50-80% OFFHuge selection of NEW smocked/monogrammable items NAME BRAND CLOTHES, SHOES, TOYS & EQUIPMENTMake money on outgrown items -Buy more for so much lessDon’t miss our St Johns/South Duval Sale! March 2–5 13720 Old St Augustine Rd (near Subway) www.weetradekids.com704-8953 WEE TRADEDress Your Children their Best for Less ! follow us on Al’s HoneyDo Handyman One Call Does It All www.1honeydohandyman.com Carpentry • Pressure Washing • Caulking & GroutingRepair • Replace • Install • Clean • Paint Licensed and Insured • Satisfaction Guaranteed 904-651-4499Call for a Free Estimate or visit our web-site Quilt Discovery Day is an event held to Þ nd and document the history of quilts that are currently located in Florida. The Sunshine State Quilters Association (www.ssqa.org) is sponsoring the Florida Quilt Project to permanently document quilts with as much of their history as possible. All quilt lovers and historians will be able to access and enjoy the information online in the national Quilt Index (www.quiltindex. org). The All Star Quilters Guild is participating in the Florida Quilt Project by holding a Quilt Discovery Day on Saturday, March 19 from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. at the First Christian Church, located at 11924 San Jose Boulevard. Why is there such a need for quilt documentation? Quilts, in most cases, are handed down within families. They are part of a family's history. Since quilt making has historically been done primarily by females, documentation is an act of recording women's history as well. Documentation records the quilt's history: when it was made, by whom, where and why it was made, how it was used and the previous and current owner. This adds meaning and richness to a quilt for future generations and quilt historians. The Quilt Discovery Day will give those in our area access to the documentation process. Quilts will be measured carefully, described completely, photographed and the history of each quilt maker will be recorded. Even if the story of your High school sports give most teenagers something to do that keeps them busy and out of trouble. But sometimes, sports can change their life in more ways than one. For seven athletes at Mandarin High School, that's exactly what participating in a high school sport did for them. On Wednesday, February 2, seven senior athletes at MHS made a huge next step that would change life as they knew it. Friends, family members and even fellow teammates of the super seven packed into the Mustang gymnasium to show their support and provide a little tender-loving care.The All Star Quilters Guild: Quilt Discovery DayBy Contributing Writer Dot Butler, All Star Quilters Guildquilt and its maker are no longer known, a picture and description of the quilt are still valuable for this endeavor. Quilts do not need to be "Florida made" to be part of the Florida Quilt Project. Any quilt currently in the state may be documented. Quilts may be of any age, though we are especially interested in documenting older quilts before their history is lost. You may bring up to three quilts for the Quilt Discovery Day. Please bring any available information on the actual quilt maker. For more information on the Quilt Discovery Day, please contact Sunnie Malesky at 262-0268 or Dot Butler at 642-6574 and visit us at www.orgsites.com/ß /allstarquiltguild. For more information on the Florida Quilt Project visit the Sunshine State Quilters Association at www.ssqa.org. To access the national Quilt Index visit www.quiltindex.org.MHS HappeningsNational Signing Day: A great success at Mandarin HighBy Grant Gunderson, MHS StudentThe seven athletes who signed are as follows: • Riley Carter Ð Appalachian State/women's softball • Allie Johnson Ð St. Petersburg College/ women's softball • Eduardo Garcia University of Florida/ men's cross country, men's track and Þ eld • Tyler Kordenbrock Ð University of North Carolina-Pembroke/ men's basketball • Taylor O'berry Ð Francis Mason University/women's soccer • Jarrod Widdows Ð Daytona State University/men's baseball • Ryan Montez Ð Jacksonville University/men's football Widdows is the third baseball player to sign a national letter of intent this year as both Bryan Mathews and Spencer Herrman both signed with the UNF Ospreys earlier this year. Carter and Johnson are two outstanding and versatile players who will have a huge and immediate impact at the college level. Both are pitchers for the Lady Mustangs fast-pitch softball team and can't wait to play their Þ nal year in high school, a time that will be very bittersweet for both young ladies. They are the second and third ladies on the squad, respectively, to sign a letter of intent as Brooke Smith signed earlier this year with Florida Tech. Mandarin High School is losing seven magniÞ cent student athletes in these young men and women. However, they're doing the right thing and taking the next step to taking on responsibility and becoming young respectable men and women. MHS will forever miss these talented senior athletes and will always welcome them home as well as wishing them luck as they further their athletic careers to the collegiate (and hopefully one day professional) level. lunar phases New: March 4 First Quarter: March 12 Full: March 19 Last Quarter: March 26Mandarin NewsLine is YOUR Community Newspaper!editor@mandarinnewsline.com

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www.MandarinNewsLine.com  March 2011  Mandarin NewsLine, Page 21 GARAGE STORAGE Get Your Car in Your Garage! Heavy Duty Adjustable Storage System Aordable and Ecient Professionally Installed Lifetime Warranty FREE ESTIMATES! PRICE GUARANTY!Spring Home and Patio Show Booth #101 March 3rd 6th 718-4608To Learn More Call or Visitwww.monkeybarsjax.com The third grade classes at St. Joseph Catholic School had some important visitors from the past and present. The children gave their biography book reports dressed as the person they read about. Cleopatra, Amelia Earhart, Neil Armstrong and Walt Disney were some of the people who were Childrens librarian Anne Clements read stories to the Bumblebee Circle of the Mandarin Garden Club at their February meeting.Important visitors at St. Joseph Catholic SchoolBy Contributing Writer Kirsten Gordon, Third Grade Teacher, St. Joseph Catholic Schoolshowcased. Each child had to read a biography, write a written report and then give an oral presentation in the Þ rst person. Do you know who invented the paper bag or who the teddy bear was named after? The students learned not only about their person, but also a little about the other students' important people. watch Manilow and their students perform. The children weren't quite as excited as the parents, yet. In fact, the question, "Who is Barry Manilow?" was common amongst the kids. It wasn't until the parents and teachers showed the students YouTube videos of Manilow performances and explained that the arena offers seating capacity for 16,000 people that the students began to grasp this unbelievable happening. Manilow's musical director, Ron Walters, visited the MJGDS Choir at school the day before the show to work with them so they would be prepared for the show. The students were instructed to wear red shirts, black pants and sing loudly. After school on January 26, the students were transported to the arena in a school bus and were taken to the performers' entrance of the arena. After a rehearsal and stage blocking, the kids were taken to a dressing room to eat dinner and get dressed for the show. There was special seating for them to enjoy the Þ rst part of the concert because they were part of the Þ nale. The choir's performance was amazing! The kids came out with conÞ dence, smiles and sang their hearts out! Once their song was over, a cannon of confetti and streamers began shooting out into the audience, which was a huge surprise for the kids. Students cont. from pg. 1 After the show, Manilow greeted the students and posed for a picture with them. It was quite an evening that the families of the choir will never forget. To watch a movie of their experience, please visit us on the web at www.mjgds.org and scroll down to the Network Channel.Mandarin NewsLineYOURCommunity Newspapereditor@mandarinnewsline.comMJGDS students had the thrill of a lifetime by performing with legendary singer Barry Manilow at the Jacksonville Veterans Memorial Arena in January. OPEN A RELATIONSHIP SAVINGS ACCOUNT TODAY. We make it easy to sign up, and with 1.20% APY, we make it easy to reach your savings goals even faster. Get started today by visiting 53.com/savings or calling 1-877-579-5353.1.20%APYRELATIONSHIP SAVINGSINTEREST ON BALANCES OF $10,000 OR MORE WITH A FIFTH THIRD CHECKING ACCOUNT AND DIRECT DEPOSIT ESTABLISHED AT TIME OF OPENING.* Deposit balances are insured up to the maximum amount permitted by law. Please see www.fdic.gov for insurance coverage. *Specia l offer only available with a Fifth Third Checking Account with monthly Direct Deposits. If your checking account is closed for any reason (by you or us), or transferred to anoth er kind of account, or if direct deposit is cancelled, standard interest rates/annual percentage yields (APYs) apply. Balances of $250 to $2,499 earn 0.15% APY. Balances of $2,500 to $9,999 e arn 0.25% APY. Balances of $10,000 or more with a Fifth Third checking account and direct deposit established at time of opening earn 1.20% APY. Annual Percentage Yields accurat e as of 01/09/2011 and valid for new Relationship Savings accounts opened on/after 01/09/2011. For APY or interest informa tion on existing deposit accounts, contact us at 1-877-579-5353 or visit your local Banking Center. APYs vary by market. Rate may change after the account is opened. Relationship Savings Interest Bonus (Double-Interest Bonus): Open a Relationship S avings account and a Fifth Third checking account, or link a new Relationship Savings account to an existing ac tive Fifth Third checking account, and your Relationship Savings accou nt will receive the Double-Interest Bonus if you conducted one of the following checking activities: One (1) direct deposit of $100.00 or more received in the previous 35 calendar days; Or your Fifth Third checking account must have (i) one (1) automatic checking transfer of $100.00 or more into a Fifth Third personal savings account during the previous 35 calendar days AND (ii) total net transfers from your checking to savings during the previous 35 days equal $100 or more; Or any combination of “ ve (5) or more of the following checking activities in the previous 35 calendar days: Debit card purchases (signature or PIN); cleared check(s); online and/or telephone bill payment(s). Your Fifth Third checking account is considered activeŽ by satisfying any of the aforementioned requirements above. An Interest Bonus (equal to the amount of interest already earned in the previous statement cycle) is paid to the account at th e end of your next statement cycle based on the previous 35 calendar days checking activity. Interest is paid only on days when balance is $250 or more. Minimum balance to open checki ng and savings account is $50.00 for each account. $25 fee if account(s) is closed within 180 days of opening. A total of six preauthorized or automatic withdrawals are allowed per m onth for Savings accounts. Return check and overdraft fees apply to all checking accounts. Fees may reduce earnings. Fifth Third reserves the right to refuse any deposit. Fifth Third Ban k, Member FDIC. Equal Housing Lender. 1.20%(Pause).An everyday rate this good probably needs a moment to sink in.APY

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Page 22, Mandarin NewsLine • March 2011 • www.MandarinNewsLine.com Whydo smart kidsstruggle? ©2006 Huntington Learning Centers, Inc. Independently owned and operated.HLC-2011 MANDARIN886 9600BEACHES220 1212 Accredited CITA & SACS Trans-Regional SchoolIndependently owned & operated CL $100OFF ACADEMIC EVALUATION If your child had struggled with schoolwork this year, take action now to make his or her grades better. Huntington Learning Center can help. Our certiweaknesses and tailor a program of instruction to meet his or her needs. Just a few hours a week can Call Huntington today. Your child can learn. Hu reading writing math spelling phonics study skills confidencemotivation state testing prep self-esteem SAT & ACT FCAT Testing Prep Host your own Wine Tasting Party!Does reading a restaurant wine list make you “blush?” Do decisions between Beaujolais, Bordeaux and Burgundy make you see “red?” If any or all of these questions make your mind go “blanc,” it’s time for Harry’s Adventures in Wine. Let Harry’s Adventures in Wine be your guide through the wonderful wine regions of the world, without leaving the comforts of your own home.We do not sell wine, only educate, entertain and share the “pleasures of the palate” with a personal touch. Look familiar?I Can Help!Home Theater or Stereo Wiring.Friendly, Professional Service 25 Years Experience Your System will be operating at its full potential! Call for a Consultation TODAY. When you have school-age children, homework is a fact of life. But it doesnt have to be unpleasant. Do your part to help your child get the most from his or her homework with this advice: € Show your interest. Ask children about their homework assignments. Talk about why theyre important and what the child can learn from them. You need to show that homework is important and worthwhile. € Establish a routine. Set aside regular time for homework„ right after dinner, perhaps. is helps the child get into the habit of beginning on time. € Eliminate distractions. Turn o the TV and radio and provide adequate space where your child can work without being bothered by siblings, parents making dinner, etc. € Help your child prioritize. Time management is essential. Your child should keep a notebook or log all of his or her assignments so none of them gets forgotten. Advise them to identify Remember When?Photo provided by the Mandarin Museum and Historical Society. Watch this space each month for more memories!Tapestry by Memphis Wood, 1981Memphis Wood (1902-1989) was one of Mandarins distinguished artists. She was born in Dacula, Georgia. After receiving her masters in ne arts from University of Georgia, Miss Wood moved to Jacksonville in 1929 and dedicated herself to art education in the community. She excelled in many mediums, but was most well known for her fabric art. Today her works can be found in collections throughout the Southeast. Prior to her death in June, 1989, in Atlanta, Miss Wood was the recipient of many honors, including the Arts Assembly of Jacksonville Award, City of Jacksonville Memphis Wood Day, and the Florida Art Education Distinguished Service. To learn more about Mandarin history, please visit the Mandarin Museum & Historical Society. For more information, call 268-0784 or email mandarinmuseum@ bellsouth.net. which assignments will be most di cult and time-consuming so they can start on those when theyre fresh. € O er help„within limits. Dont do their homework for them. If they get stuck, ask questions and guide them through the di culties so theyre doing the work themselves. Otherwise they wont learn the subject„or responsibility for doing their own work. € Praise their e orts. Getting the right answer is important, but so is supporting the process. Praise them for working hard and not giving up when theyre tired or frustrated. € Give them a break. Let children take short breaks if they start to get too frustrated with a particular assignment. You dont want a complete meltdown over an arithmetic problem. € Work with the teacher. Stay in contact with your childrens teachers so you know what their expectations are„for the child and for you as a parent.Do your homework on helping kids with theirs e scratch of a scribbling pen, the rustle of worn paper pages, the steep earthy aroma of co ee„all of these are the indications that a writer is in the room. And on March 19 and 22, the Douglas Anderson Creative Writers are going to be busy. Kicking o the March events will be a book fair, followed by the freshmen Coffee Reading. Barnes and Noble will be hosting the rst ever Creative Writing Booster Book Fair on March 19. It is a fundraiser to help raise department funds. e event will take place at the Town Center location and it will go on throughout the day. e creative writers of the department, ranging from high school freshmen to seniors, will be hosting mini events during the day at this location such as poetry and spoken word workshops for adults and children, an Open Mic and childrens book readings. Local authors such as Dr. William Napier, a creative writing teacher of Douglas Anderson, will be presenting and lecturing as well. As supporters shop, Barnes and Noble gives the organization a percentage of net proceeds from the book fair sales. Its a really great way to get involved with the Creative Writing Department. Im very excited to see how the community will respond to this program on March 19,Ž says Julia Fluker, a junior. Almost everything in the store can be counted as a book fair sale, except such items as gift cards and Nook eReaders. In order for sales to go towards the event, vouchers must be used or the clerk informed before the nal purchase is made. I shop for books all the time and am happy I will have an op-Youth Arts SceneJava, joe and poetryBy Danielle Wirsanskyportunity to help the department by doing so,Ž says junior Alexander Titcomb. e students are especially excited to be a part of the promotion. Says Lea Eaves, a junior, I am especially excited for the chance to experience Dr. Napier as a published writer and not just as a teacher.Ž Soon after this event, the Co ee Reading is taking place on March 22. Im so excited for this event„ it really makes me feel like I am a part of the Creative Writing Department,Ž says sophomore Leah Wright. Four are performed every school year, each one hosted by the freshmen, sophomores, juniors and seniors. e Co ee Reading is a reading of student work, ranging from poetry to ction to nonction. Students must submit pieces ahead of time and auditionŽ to be chosen to perform. I nd the Co ee Readings to be great social experiences to interact with other writers,Ž says junior Laurel Richardson, a student in the department. Refreshments are served during the intermission and the schools literary magazine, eLan, will be sold. ere is no admission fee and the event is held at the D.A. eatre at 7:00 p.m. I love books; even if I wasnt a creative writing major Id still love them, they have a magical quality about them. Both the Book Fair and the upcoming Co ee Reading are brilliant opportunities to support the Creative Writers and to buy some awesome books,Ž says freshman Brianna Sessions.Duval County Schools Spring BreakMarch 28 April 1 For all your community news!Martie Thompson, Editor editor@rtpublishinginc.com Donna Lang, Advertising Sales dl@rtpublishinginc.comMandarin NewsLine

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www.MandarinNewsLine.com • March 2011 • Mandarin NewsLine, Page 23 Faith News Open Mondays through Fridays 8:30am – 5pm 1631 Race Track Road Suite 101230-7977Most Insurances AcceptedPediatric Associates of Julington Creek, PAOffering care for Infants, Children & Adolescents Mary Ann Garcia, M.D., FAAP Victor Luz, M.D., FAAP On Saturday, March 5 Mandarin Lutheran Church will have a pot luck dinner and auction. Dinner will be served from 6:15 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. ere will be a childrens auction from 7:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at which time the main auction will begin. ere will also be a silent auction table and ra e items. Door prizes will be given during the auction. Many local businesses have donated gift cards and services! e public is invited to attend. First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) will be having their annual garage sale on Saturday, March 26. ere will be all sorts of household items, some furniture, books and more for you to choose from. e funds raised during this garage sale will help with the ongoing ministries of First Christian Church in the Mandarin Community. Please stop by the church, located at 11924 San Jose Boulevard, on Saturday, March 26 between 8:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. Ash Wednesday Services will be held at Mandarin United Methodist Church, located at 11270 San Jose Boulevard on March 9 at 12:15 p.m. in the Sanctuary and at 6:30 p.m. in the Family Life Worship Center. Lenten Evensong Service of Music will feature Tim Tuller, organist and director of the St. Johns Cathedral Choir, who will conduct a service for Lent on Sunday afternoon, 13 March 13 at 5:00 p.m. at St. Johns Cathedral, located at 256 East Church Street. e music will include KyrieŽ by William Byrd, Crux FidelisŽ by Roger-Ducasse, Salvator MundiŽ by John Blow, Adoramus TeŽ by Mozart and the Magni cat and Nunc Dimittis by Walmisley plus other works. e program is free and a nursery will be available. For additional information, please call 356-5507. Its going to be a Grand Celebration! On March 27, Freedom Christian Fellowship (formerly Mandarin Assembly of God) will celebrate its 40th anniversary in the 10:15 a.m. service. Pastor Stephen Powers and the congregation will welcome as their guests all the former pastors of Freedom Christian Fellowship: Rev. James Arbogast, Rev. Anthony Planes, Rev. Bill En nger and Rev. Ron Nichols. Marvin Hartley will minister in song. We invite you to join us in this momentous occasion at 3423 Loretto Road. For more details, please call the church o ce at 2682244. After 20 years in rented space, Buckman Bridge Unitarian Universalist Church will have its own home. Sunday, January 30 was their last day holding worship at the Mandarin Community Club, where they have worshiped for about 18 years. ey have moved into their new building located at 8447 Manresa Avenue o Collins Road at the south fence of NAS Jacksonville. Upon their move to their new location, they planted a tree on the new grounds, signifying their plans to grow! Join Shalom Jacksonville on Sunday, March 6 at 1:30 p.m. at the Jacksonville Main Library for a docent-led tour of the US Holocaust Memorial Museums traveling exhibit, Deadly Medicine: Creating the Master Race.Ž Following the library tour, well meet at the nearby MOCA-Museum of Contemporary Art for Art for EducationŽ created by the Jacksonville Jewish Center school students and local artists. e fee for MOCAs entire museum tour is $8 for adults; $5 for seniors, families are free. If you wish to caravan, please meet at the JCA school parking lot at 12:45 p.m. or meet the group at 1:15 p.m. in front of the library bookstore at 303 North Laura Street. Reservations are required so we have enough docents. Please contact Isabel at 448-5000 x 206 or shalomjax@jewishjacksonville. org for information and directions. 11730 Old St. Augustine Rd. Jacksonville, Florida 904-268-5422ST. JOSEPH’S CATHOLIC CHURCHMarch 2011 Lenten Schedule Ash Wednesday Mass March 9 Main Church 8:15 a.m. 12:00 noon 7:00 p.m. Stations of the Cross Wednesdays Main Church March 16th 7:00 p.m. March 23rd 7:00 p.m. March 30th 7:00 p.m. April 6th 7:00 p.m. Parish Penance Service April 13th 7:00 p.m. Invite editor@mandarinnewsline.com If you ever spent time in the Catskills, you know that those memories stay with you forever. Believe it or not, there are many people in Northeast Florida who have a Catskills connection. Some grew up in this unique New York State area, others vacationed or worked in the famed New to the community? Been in Jacksonville a few years but looking to make connections? Like to schmooze? If so you have an open invitation to join us for a casual co ee and schmoozing program: Shalom Jacksonvilles Jewish Java which meets the rst Wednesday of every month from 9:00 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. at Lets Nosh on San Jose Boulevard. Co ee and tea are free. Its the perfect place to meet new people, catch up with old friends and acquaintances, nd out the latest happenings in the Jewish community, get the latest issue of the Jewish News and general community information. ere are Do you have a Catskills Connection?hotels or bungalow colonies, still others attended summer camp in one of 50 small hamlets. Are you connected to the Catskills? If so, please contact us so we can let you know of our upcoming activities. A nostalgic program is in the works and volunteers are needed! To be placed on the mailing list or serve as a volunteer for the next program, please contact Mimi Kaufman, 880-4014 or email sexymandms@bellsouth. net or Isabel Balotin, 268-3362 or catskillgal@comcast.net. Jewish Java—a place connectno solicitations. Upcoming javas: March 2 and April 6.If you are new to the community and would like more information, please contact Isabel Balotin, 448-5000 x 206 or shalomjax@jewishjacksonville.org. e Jewish Federation Shalom Jacksonville is the o cial Jewish welcome wagon of Northeast Florida and is sponsored by Blue Cross Blue Shield of Florida. Commemorates the patron saint of Ireland, Bishop Patrick (A.D. 389…461) who about A.D. 432 left his home in the Severn valley, England and introduced Christianity to Ireland.St. Patrick’s Day: March 17 Mandarin NewsLineYOURCommunity Newspapereditor@mandarinnewsline.com 10141 Old Saint Augustine Road Jacksonville, FL 32257904-880-1116 10141 O ld Saint Au g ustine Roa d J ac k sonvi ll e, FL 3225 7 9 04-880-111 6

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Page 24, Mandarin NewsLine • March 2011 • www.MandarinNewsLine.com 260-4866 www.starlightjax.com Star ightGYMNASTICS Our #1 Priority: Your Children Motivating classes for all ages Fun Additional Programs Spring Break Camp March 28th – April 1st CALL TODAY! Conveniently located at the corner of I-295 and San Jose Blvd. Buy 1 Entree Get 2nd Entree 1/2 PriceWith coupon only. Cannot be combined with another oer.Sun. thru urs. Dinner OnlyExpires 4/10/11 Banquet Room Up to 50 people262-5190 Buy 1 Pizza Get 2nd Pizza 1/2 PriceWith coupon only. Cannot be combined with another oer. Sun. thru urs. Only Expires 4/10/11 Santionis Cucina Italiana Cucina Italiana Lifespan Yoga’ 904-233-6162www.lifespanyoga.com. All classes at 11363 San Jose Blvd. #200(across from the Tree Steak House). For all ages & stages! KIDS CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP Sunday, March 6, 2:00 … 4:00 pm, for 8…11 year olds and completed 3rd grade. $29.00 per child. YOGA for BEGINNERS 7pm Wed, 7pm Thurs, and 10 am Saturday. NEW! SATURDAY KIDS YOGA Includes art, music, stories, relaxation & character education. (age 6-11) FREE YOGA CLASSES for those in treatment for CANCER. 10 am each Wednesday morning. Restorative Yoga WORKSHOP...Coming Soon Regular Weekly Classes (see website for times) KIDS YOGA (ages 5-8), KIDS YOGA (ages 9-11), KIDS YOGA for HOMESCHOOLERS (ages 6-11), TEEN YOGA (ages 12-16), CHAIR YOGA Introducing a game kids will love! Jax Parks and the Jacksonville Youth Tennis Association (JYTA) introduce the QuickStart format of play using racquets, balls and courts that are sized right for kids so they can enjoy the game right from the start. JYTA, a new United States Tennis Association (USTA) registered nonpro t organization has formed a partnership with Jax Parks to initiate a USTA junior team tennis league for ages eight and under and ages 10 and under using the QuickStart format of play at three city public sites: Boone Park, Southside Tennis and Burnett Park. QuickStart tennis equipment will be provided at all three sites through a USTA Florida grant. e spring season of the USTA junior team tennis league for ages 10 and under (QuickStart tennis) will run from March 29 through May 12. It is a seven week program. Sessions will run twice weekly and will consist of three weeks of tennis instruction followed by four weeks of match play. e registration cost of the program is $75, plus $19 for the Junior USTA membership. For the registration fee, the child will get a QST racquet, Nike jersey, 14 sessions, end of the year playo / party and an award trophy. ere are no other costs. Match play will be onsite and will operate similar to almost every other youth sport. Parents will now have the opportunity to sign up their children at a public park to play tennis for the spring season, the same as with baseball, soccer and other junior sports. Kids can start playing right away with their friends on smaller courts, with lower nets, lighter racquets tailored to their size, low and slow bouncing balls, shorter matches and simplied scoring. Playing the game of tennis just got easier: Introducing QuickStart formatBy Contributing Writer Celia RehmMother always said, Eat your vegetables.Ž e problem is that too many of us still arent listening to her. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, only 26 percent of United States adults eat three or more servings of vegetables a day, although current recommendations call for four to ve servings. e bene ts are signi cant: Eating the right kind of vegetables in the appropriate quantities can cut ones risk of diabetes, heart disease, kidney failure, and other serious illnesses. What kinds of vegetables should you be eating? Well, all kinds, but heres what youre getting: € Fiber. Beans and other highber vegetables ll the stomach, reducing your cravings for more food while reducing cholesterol levels and improving digestion and regularity. € Potassium. Tomatoes, sweet potatoes, spinach and winter squash improve blood pressure. ey may also reduce the risk of kidney stones and bone loss. € Vitamin A. Carrots, pumpkin, kale, collard greens, and other veggies enhance the health of eyes and skin. Beta-carotene and other carotenoids cut ones risk of macular degeneration, cataracts, coronary artery disease and stomach cancer. € Folates. Asparagus, black-eyed peas, spinach and other folates consumed during pregnancy help prevent birth defects, especially to the spinal cord and help the body form red blood cells.Why eat your vegetables? Not just to get to dessert faster No contractsLicensed and Insured904 307 6700Call forSpring SpecialsClean Cut Lawns of JAX JYTA is registering now via email at JYTAjam@gmail.com or call 262-1399. e spring season will kick-o with a free QuickStart jamborees at each site to start o the season. RSVP is required. Ask about how to sign up for your child for this fun event as well! For additional information, please visit the Jax Parks webpage (http://www.coj.net/Departments/ Recreation+and+Community+Servi ces/Recreation+and+Community+P rogramming/Recreation+Activities/ Athletics/QuickStart+tennis. htm) and USTA webpage (http://10andundertennis.com/ parents.htm.) e arrival of spring brings sunlight and owers and green leaves on the trees„and seasonal allergies. Tree pollens and mold spores can wreak havoc on the 35 million Americans who su er itchy eyes, runny noses, scratchy throats and fatigue due to allergies. Beyond the many over-thecounter and prescription medications available, you can take some simple steps to reduce your misery: 1. Limit your exposure. After months of cabin fever, staying inside with the windows shut tight may seem a shame on a lovely day, but consider the alternative: sneezing and wheezing and rubbing your eyes nonstop. Stay indoors when conditions are ripe for an allergy attack. 2. Plan your outings. Rainy and non-windy days are best for keeping pollen at bay. Remember, too, that pollen counts peak in the midday hours. Avoid grassy and wooded areas. Check your local news source for pollen counts. 3. Park strategically. Pollen can coat your car on heavy days. Keep your car in the garage as much as possible. When you park outside, try to avoid parking under a tree. Your car may be cooler when you get into it, but youll be less likely to get a noseful of pollen in the process of opening the door. 4. Scrub up. When you come back into your home, remove your shoes or at least do a thorough Protect yourself from springtime allergy attacksjob of wiping residual pollen from them. And wash your hands (you may even want to shower and get into some pollen-free duds). When you wash your clothes, use a dryer, rather than an outdoor clothesline. 5. Avoid pollen magnets.Ž Pollen can cling to carpets and linens, so vacuum your rugs and change your sheets more frequently than at other times of the year. at goes for bath towels, too. An in-home air ltration system can help remove irritating particulates. Offering investment advisory services as a representative of 0156581-00002-00 Prudential Financial Planning Services, a division of Pruco Securities, LLC.

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www.MandarinNewsLine.com • March 2011 • Mandarin NewsLine, Page 25 33% OFF ( Our Regular Price or any competitor's Regular Price ) BIG GREEN SALE! * THE BIGGEST SALE OF PLANT MATERIAL IN FLORIDA CONTRACTORS WELCOME Trout Creek Location at World Golf VillageOVER 45 ACRES OF PLANT MATERIAL WITH HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS OF S J&NURSERY & LANDSCAPING W o rl d d d Go Go Go Go Go Go G G G Go Go Go Go Go l l l lf lf lf lf lf lf lf lf lf V i G IN GOD WE TRUST TOTAL LANDSCAPES DESIGN & INSTALLATION SODDING & IRRIGATION Free Estimate & Consultation! *Entire Inventory of Palms, Trees, Shrubs & Grasses!Huge Inventory To Select From EXCELLENCE IN ELDER CARE PROGRAMS AND SERVICESCALL TODAY! (904)260-1818 11401 OLD ST. AUGUSTINE RD. | JACKSONVILLE, FL 32258WWW.RIVERGARDEN.ORG Providing personalized medical and skilled nursing care in a gracious residential settingAHCA 5 STAR RATED COMMUNITY for excellence in long-term careGOVERNORSGOLD SEAL AWARD5 time recipient Your Neighborhood Dentist 262-6188 J. Bradley Hall, DMD 12443 San Jose Blvd., Ste 101 (San Jose Oce Center just North of Sonnys Bar-B-Q) Serving Mandarin for 18 Years Most Dental Plans Accepted New Patient SpecialsCall for details. When you jump into your pool, you want the water to be clean, clear and perfectly balanced. You dont want bacteria, chlorine smells or cloudiness to ruin the day. Its easy to maintain your water quality by knowing these three major measurements: pH, chlorine levels and alkalinity. If you have a basic water test kit, you can measure these factors and make the correct adjustments to keep your water quality at the ideal levels. e pH reading determines the acidity of the water. Your body has a basic ph of 7.6 to 7.4. In order for your skin and eyes to feel comfortable in your pool, you need to maintain the pH at the same level as your body. If the pH is too low or too high, your eyes will burn and your skin will itch. Pools have a tendency to be too high in pH and when this happens you adjust by adding acid, either muriatic or sulfuric. I prefer sulfuric acid because it doesnt give o fumes. is has the e ect of lowering the ph. One cup of acid will lower the pH by .2 for every 10,000 gallons of water. Be sure to dilute it in a bucket of pool water and put it Your beautiful pool: Why water quality matters!By Contributing Writer John Adkins, Owner, Adkins Pool Serviceinto the deep end of the pool away from the sides. Wait 15 minutes before getting into the pool. Alkalinity is very similar to pH. Very high alkalinity will raise the pH of the pool causing you to add more acid. However alkalinity is very important for the pool. It acts as a buffer for the other chemicals. If your alkalinity is too low, you can raise it by adding baking soda (sodium hydrogen carbonate). A normal level for alkalinity is 80ppm (parts per million). If your alkalinity is too low, add up to four pounds of baking soda to raise it 10ppm per 10,000 gallons. You can buy this at the grocery store. Vinyl liner pools should have alkalinity levels of between 110 … 140 ppm to help preserve the liners. Alkalinity also helps capture the sunlight and give your water that sparkling blue look. Add the baking soda through the skimmer basket while the pool is running. Chlorine levels are also important. Too little chlorine and your water will not be properly sanitized. Too much chlorine is wasted and can cause irritation of the eyes and skin. Most pools in use in the United States use chlorine as a sterilizer. Some pools get their chlorine by converting salt (NaCl or sodium chloride) into chlorine. Most pools use three-inch chlorine tablets as the main source of chlorine. e proper level of chlorine should be between 1.5 and 3.0 ppm. So go get out your four-in-one test kit and follow the instructions. You should test your water every week all year long. If your test kit is old, go to the pool store and buy new bottles of the reagents inside the kit. If you dont have a test kit … get one. ey are cheap and the reagents will probably last you a year. Keep a weekly log that includes the readings and what you added. When you test the water the next week, you can see the e ect and make the appropriate adjustments. I want your pool to be as nice as mine and so do you!For additional information, please contact thepoolprofessor@att.net.In February, St. Johns Riverkeeper launched the River Friendly Campaign to raise awareness about the impact of our actions upon the health of the St John River and to encourage residents and businesses to adopt river friendlyŽ practices. Kicking o the River Friendly Campaign is the Rain Barrel Project, featuring artistically-designed rain barrels located throughout the community to promote water conservation and to educate the public about how to be river friendly.Ž e goal of the campaign is to provide informative resources and tools that will help you to make more informed choices to better protect your St. Johns River. One of the most important factors in protecting and cleaning up the river is the involvement and commitment of each of us, the citizens to whom the river belongs. With so many people now living within the watershed of the river (over four million people), our actions collectively add up to have a signi cant impact on the health of the St. Johns. When we ush our toilets, fertilize our lawns, use bleached paper products, turn on a light, drive a car or build a home, we potentially contribute to the problems facing our river. But, by each doing his or her part and being river friendly,Ž there is no doubt that together we can save our St. Johns River. One of the most important things that each of us can do is to use our voice and vote to communicate our concerns and to elect legislators who will work to protect our St. Johns. As you are deciding who to vote for in the upcoming elections, make sure that you give consideration to who would best represent the interests of our river. We need strong e ective leaders who understand the rivers importance to our economy and quality of life and will stand up for its protection. So, this spring, keep your eyes open for our rain barrels and your mind open to the ways you can be more river friendly.Ž Our St. Johns River needs us now more than ever before. Learn more about the campaign, upcoming events and workshops and how you can build a rain barrel by visiting www. stjohnsriverkeeper.org. River Friendly Campaign now in full swingBy Contributing Writer Jimmy Orth, Executive Director, St. Johns Riverkeeper From Ireland to New York and various areas around the universe, murder nds Eve Dallas just about anywhere. Even in a tranquil family visit to Ireland, she and her husband Roarke end up in the middle of murder. Upon returning home, the hits just keep on coming. Lieutenant Eve Dallas is back in New York and back to work as notice of the murder of a limousine driver comes across her link, the future of communication in the mid 21st century. e NYPSD provides fair gear to their o cers, but Roarke provides better gadgets for his cop. is murder is unique in many ways; the choice of weapon, a crossbow, is only the rst element. Further investigation leads to prominent companies and prominent executives. Are there leaks in these security companies or hackers out there that just want to kill? Eve and her partner Peabody nd the circumstances very circumstantial in this murder, then again in the second, third and so on. Each death is a di erent type of victim, with a di erent type of weapon and in this century, some weapons are not come easy to come by. In addition, after more searching, the next crime, murder by bayonet, leads to the owners of companies implicated in the deaths. From golden limousines to world famous chefs, these murders take those in the top of their professions and put an end to their careers. However, where-oh-where is the connection? Professionals who provide for those used to living lives of indulgence are being murdered in very di erent manners. J.D. Robb has written many Dallas and Roarke novels and this one provides the same genuine characters and a multitude of twists and turns. Since her marriage, Eve is much more used to some indulgences, but murder still gets to her and she ghts for those who have been killed and can no longer ght for themselves. In this as in many other novels, Roarke is nearby; he aids the investigation and aids in keeping his cop safe.Book ReviewIndulgence in DeathWritten by J.D. Robb. 373 pages. Published by G.P. Putnam’s Sons, November 2010. Review by T. G. Stanton 81 %of Mandarin residents read Mandarin NewsLine!Can you afford to miss these potential customers??Source: Circulation Veri cation Council. Residents in zip codes 32223 and 32258.

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Page 26, Mandarin NewsLine • March 2011 • www.MandarinNewsLine.com Tree Work byMitch Drake & Sons (904) 703-5040 (904) 287-3819Licensed, Insured & Workmans Comp Over 35 Years Experience Check out our reviews and 5 Star rating at Yellowbook.com! THE FOLLOWING ADS HAVE NOT BEEN SCREENED BY THE SOUTHEASTERN ADVERTISING PUBLISHERS ASSOCIATION (SAPA); Therefore, any discrepancies thereof shall not be the responsibility of the aforementioned association. Your publisher has agreed to participate in this program and run these ads as a service to the Southeastern Advertising Publishers Association. ADOPTION PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? We can help you! Housing, Þ nancial and medical assistance available. Choose adoptive family involved in adoption plans. Call 24/7. Forever Blessed Adoptions. 1-800-568-4594 SAPA PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring adoption experts. You choose from families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. 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Shipping Paid 1-800-266-0702 www.selldiabeticstrips.com Reader Advisory: the National Trade Association we belong to has purchased the following classiÞ eds. Determining the value of their service or product is advised by this publication. In order to avoid misunderstandings, some advertisers do not offer .employment. but rather supply the readers with manuals, directories and other materials designed to help their clients establish mail order selling and other businesses at home. Under NO circumstance should you send any money in advance or give the client your checking, license ID, or credit card numbers. Also beware of ads that claim to guarantee loans regardless of credit and note that if a credit repair company does business only over the phone it.s illegal to request any money before delivering its service. All funds are based in US dollars. 800 numbers may or may not reach Canada. 268-7808 – e Jacksonville Symphony Guild has announced that the 17-acre Coxwell Estate, located at 9433 Coxwell Lane in Jacksonville, will be its 2011 Designer Showhouse. e Showhouse will feature a variety of fund-raising events to bene t the Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra. According to Rose L. Littleeld and Marge Burgess, Symphony Guild Designer Showhouse co-chairs, this years fund-raising e orts will begin on ursday, March 31 at 10:00 a.m. with the annual preview luncheon at the Garden Club of Jacksonville, located at 1005 Riverside Avenue. e cost per person is $60. Advance reservations are required and seating is limited. For tickets and reservations, call 280-2373. Nationally-recognized landscape designer and architect, Mary Palmer Dargan, ASLA, APLD, will be the keynote speaker. Dargan will address speci cs about the local Showhouse project and design features along with her renowned work in landscapes and gardens. She has appeared on Ground Breakers on HGTV and has published Timeless Landscape Design: e Four Part Master Plan. She will soon publish Lifelong Landscape Design: Gardens for Health and Longevity. Visit the website at www.dargan.com. In addition to the Preview Luncheon, e Showhouse Speaker Series will be held at the Showhouse from April 5 through April 21 at 11:00 a.m. Admission to the Speaker Series is free with the purchase of a Showhouse ticket. Also, individuals who volunteer for two shifts as a docent at the Showhouse may attend the entire Speaker Series at no charge. e Speaker Series Calendar is as follows: Tuesday, April 5, 2011: Donald Wright/ Unexpected transfer tax provisions of the Tax Relief HIV/AIDS Testing & Counseling ReSource Centerat THE CHURCH of Jacksonville 8313 Baycenter Road (near Baymeadows Road and Philips Highway) FREE and CONFIDENTIAL HIV testing Wednesdays 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Sundays 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. or by appointment. HIV is preventable … learn facts about HIV/AIDS, learn how HIV is spread, and learn how to prevent the spread of HIV Most importantly … GET TESTED! Call (904) 739-6900 ext 1523 for more information. Designer Showhouse 2011 Preview Luncheon announcedShowhouse cont. on pg. 27 Adkins Pool Services, Inc.401-1556thepoolprofessor@att.net Are you paying too much for pool service? Let Me Take Care Of It! I’ve ever had!” John M. “My pool has never looked so good!” Susan M.

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www.MandarinNewsLine.com • March 2011 • Mandarin NewsLine, Page 27 Community MarketplaceAttention Small Businesses!!!For just $39 per issue you can reach 26,000+ addresses (min. of 6 issues) Call 886-4919 today! Massage Therapy Alicia Hunter LMTOnly $50 an hour #MM12329/MA53865 Swedish • Deep Tissue Neuromuscular Therapy ( 904 ) 514 5788www.myspace.com/huntermassageA New U Massage located in San Jose Office Center, Next to Sonny’s and Ace Hardware $5 OFF with this ad. 268-1616 I-295 Loretto RD.San Jose BLVD.Julington Creek2951 L o r etto Rd.A CE Certain restrictions apply SPECIAL OFFER $29.99/mo. for 5x10American Classic Lawns“Quality Lawn Maintenance”Mandarin N. St. Johns County707 4468Residential from $30.Commercial Residential SHOE REPAIR & ALTERATIONS Whole Foods Shopping Center Expert Alterations 10601 San Jose Blvd.904-292-0246Mandarin Landing Shoe Repair Carpet Cleaning 30 Years Experience FREE ESTIMATES 744 8000 American EagleLawn Care Quality ServicesAffordable RatesLicensed & Insured No ContractsFREE Estimates502-0891 Bayard AntiqueVillage & MallAntiques, Collectibles, Jewelry, Dolls and large variety of items.12561 Phillips HwyPlease check Website for all info.www.bayardantiquevillages.net J&B Professional & DependableMaking lawns look great for 21 years!805-8888 Lawn Service at Fruit Cove287-0601 Boat Storage Dry or Wet Powerboats & SailboatsJulington Creek Pier 3 742 8458 Call Mandarin NewsLine886-4919 Your ad here for only PENNIES per reader! Emp lo ym entWater Treatment Installer, experienced. For established Water Treatment Company. BeneÞ ts 262-0197 or Fax: 260-6292. Seeking Licensed Massage Therapist @ A New U Massage(MM12329) Mandarin furnished massage room available NOW. Room rent is $375+ 7% tax ($401.25) a month. Rent can split w/other LMT. Phone: 904-288-0064 Join the Baptist South circle of care. Visit e-baptisthealth.com for the most up to date list of job openings. Listings are updated daily and change often. If you have any questions, please call Human Resources at 271.6078. Full time directors -Part time teachers-HUNTINGTON LEARNING CENTER seeks multi-task individuals who are conÞ dent, high energy, possess excellent communication skills and a passion to make a difference. BA and teaching certiÞ cation required. Come join our team! Fax resume 543-0227. Arwood Waste is seeking ,experienced CDL drivers for Roll-off and Front Load garbage trucks. And a experienced Secretary. You can apply at www.arwoodwaste.com or 751-5656 Pet Sitting Company is hiring, Part time work with pets in CR210/WGV area. Adult applicants. Flexible Hours. Call Robin at 687-9610 www.allearspetsitting.com Physical Therapist Ð For outpatient rehab department located on CR-210. One year orthopedic/ sports medicine experience is encouraged. Florida license required. Email rŽsumŽ to tpulzone@oastaug.com . For additional information, please visit www.oastaug.com . HELP WANTED: VOLUNTEERS needed Ð do you like working with music and students of all ages? Also, does your child need Ôcommunity service' credits? We are non-proÞ t 501 ( C ) ( 3) corporation. Please call 374 8639 Northeast Florida Conservatory. Angels Elite Academy applications are being accepted for pre-school teachers. Applicants must have completed 40 hours of Childcare Development Program. Applications may be mailed to:Angels Elite Academy @ 3560 Marbon Road, Jacksonville, Fl 32223 or may be dropped off at the center. South Mandarin martial arts school well established in the community is looking to hire a highly motivated instructor of any style for part time/full time employment. Must be a 3rd degree or higher. Pay is on commission and bonuses. Please email martialartsinstructors@ yahoo.com. Wanted Artist & Crafters for the Buckler's Craft Fair, March 12 & 13 at the Clay Co. Fairgrounds Exhibit Bldg...see www.BucklerCraftFair.com or call 386 860-0092 for special discount price for spaceFor R entMANDARIN HOME FOR RENT Lovely 3 bedroom/2 bath home with fenced in yard, screened lanai, custom built shed and 2 car attached garage. Fans in most rooms, tiled Þ replace and more. $1195.00 per month with 1 month security. Pets will be considered. Avail. April 1st. Call 904-707-1700B u siness Servi c esDanni Duster OfÞ ce Cleaning For free consultation, call (904) 762-6424 and receive 10% off your Þ rst visit. Tutor available. "Retired Teacher" Grades 1-6 for reading, spelling or dyslexia. Call 904-260-3468. 2 Indoor Heated Pools Strike-Zone Beach Blvd & 9AHeartland-Kingsley Orange Park Keep swimming all year long. Swimming Safari Swim School260-1836www.swimmingsafari.comNow offering “Swimming Birthday Parties!” www.snipstree.comCLEAN UP/ LAWN MAINTENANCEPaul OklevitchISA CERTIFIED ARBORISTOver 20 Years Exp. Bucket Truck/Bobcat Tractor Work New Classi“ ed Rates!$9 Þ rst 25 words,10¢ each additional word $1.50 bold first line Call 904-886-4919 LOCAL Classi edsAct of 2010, signed into law on December 17, 2010; how the provisions a ect estate and trust planning. Wednesday, April 6, 2011: Dr. Joanne Dragun, M.D. Dr. Dragun, Medical Director of Radiation Oncology, 21st Century Oncology, specializing in radiation oncology and tomotherapy in the treatment of cancer. ursday, April 7, 2011: Louise Johnson of In e Garden Landscape and Design Moving beyond a one-sizets-all approach to landscaping, design, horticulture, pavers and construction material to create elegant outdoor concepts. Tuesday, April 12, 2011: Author Jeanne Ward (Guild Board Member) Her latest book, Youre It! Successful Single Mothering after Divorce. Maintaining yourself, your family and your sense of humor in challenging times. Wednesday, April 13, 2011: Chef Eric Fritsche, Pastiche. Chef Fritsche will feature a farm-to-table cooking demonstration with local produce harvested at Twin Bridges Farms in Macclenny, Florida. ursday, April 14, 2011: Chef Shirley Munn. Personal chef and owner of Lets Eat In, will speak on Its never too late to follow your bliss!Ž Munn is a Licensed Personal Chef and will share her life-changing paradigm shift. Saturday, April 16, 2011: Louise Johnson , In e Garden Landscape and Design. Elegant outdoor concepts and how to bring your house and garden in perfect harmony. Concepts on opening up the relationship between indoors and outdoors. Tuesday, April 19, 2011: Chef Brian Siebenschuh, Orsays Restaurant. Chef Brian will talk about using responsible products, including organic, local and sustainable items in cooking and food preparation. Wednesday, April 20, 2011: Sandy Polletta, co-owner of Edgewood Bakery. Chocolate as the main ingredient or the garnish. Learn new tips, techniques and recipes. ursday, April 21, 2011: M. Firdos Ziauddin, M.D. Dr. Ziauddin, of 21st Century Oncology will speak on the evolving role of surgery in the treatment of patients with breast cancer. e Showhouse opens to the public on Saturday, April 2 and runs through Sunday, April 24. Several special events will be held including the Preview Gala on Friday, April 1. In addition to the Showhouse Boutique, by Avondale Gift Boutique, this years Showhouse debuts  e Village Shops,Ž where interior design and home specialty items will be available for sale to the public. Also, the Designers Sale will be held on Monday, April 25 following the closing of the Showhouse. Advance ticket prices are $15. Groups of 10 or more may purchase tickets for $12 per person. Tickets will be available on site at the Showhouse for $20. ere is no cost to visit  e Village ShopsŽ or to attend the Designers Sale. Contact e Guild o ce at (904) 358-1479 for tickets and general information. Visit the website at www.jaxsymphonyshowhouse.com.Showhouse cont. from pg. 26(NewsUSA) ere are many bene ts for patients with all types of atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) when they take statins. Side-e ects are relatively rare and there are many varieties of statins available that allow careful selection for the best statin for each individual patient. Statins lower badŽ (LDL) cholesterol, which reduces the rates of stroke, heart attack, and atherosclerosis of leg arteries. Data suggest that statins bene cial e ects go beyond simply lowering the level of badŽ cholesterol in the blood stream. ey stabilize atherosclerotic plaques, making sudden rupture that causes stroke and heart attack less likely. ey also lessen in ammation within the artery by improving the function of cells that line the inside of the artery. is likely leads to a lower chance Statin drugs can improve vascular healthof sudden thrombosis of any artery a ected with artherosclerosis. Even patients who have previously had a heart attack, heart surgery, angioplasty or a stent bene t in survival and protection from other cardiac events by taking statins. And patients who take these drugs while undergoing surgery or intervention for cardiac or vascular problems have a noticeably lower rate of complications during the surgical time period. Few adverse e ects of statins have been recorded since their introduction 40 years ago. However, the e ects can be severe and it is important to know the potential down-side of these drugs. In rare circumstances, statins can cause liver damage. ere are no symptoms with liver damage, so doctors do frequent laboratory tests when use of a statin is started to closely monitor liver function. Statins can also cause a wide range of muscle injury. In its worst form, myositis results from statin use. is rapid muscle destruction can lead to kidney failure. is side-e ect is rare, but muscle pain and cramps are frequent and far less serious side-e ects of statins. If your doctor prescribes statins, follow their advice for laboratory tests. If your atherosclerosis leads to vascular disease, see a vascular surgeon. Todays vascular surgeons are the only specialists who are skilled in all vascular therapies. Vascular surgeons are the experts who provide the best diagnosis and treatment for vascular conditions. To learn more about your vascular health and to nd a vascular surgeon, visit the Society for Vascular Surgerys website at www. VascularWeb.org.Happy St. Patrick’s Dayfrom your friends at Mandarin NewsLine

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Page 28, Mandarin NewsLine • March 2011 • www.MandarinNewsLine.com On Friday, January 28, 2011, a special assembly was held in St. Johns Country Day Schools Performing Arts Center to honor 12 students selected for membership in the Cum Laude Society. Newly inducted members include seniors Nick Fields, Maddison Larson, Sarah Voigt, Elizabeth Greenhalgh, Katie Young, Chadd Myers, Alex Herndon, and Clara Robison, and juniors Mary Geary, Tory Finley, Sarah Hartley and Cum Laude Society induction held at St. Johns Country Day School Ali MacDonald. Now and then, the Cum Laude Society welcomes into its membership a St. Johns teacher whose admirable contributions to the schools academic program and whose devotion to teaching warrant his or her induction into this exclusive society. is year the Society is honored to induct Fine Arts Department Head and art teacher Tamara Culbert, who was a member of the Cum Laude Tory Finley, Mary Geary, Sarah Voigt, Alex Herndon, Ali MacDonald, Nick Fields, Katie Young, Maddison Larson, Elizabeth Greenhalgh, Clara Robison, (not pictured Chadd Myers, and Sarah Hartley).Having and knowing how to use the required safety equipment on your boat can mean the difference between life and death in the event of a boating accident or mechanical failure. Who wouldnt like to have their preparations for a safe boating season double-checked by a knowledgeable expert? With the arrival of the 2011 decals, the auxiliarys vessel safety examiners are prepared to perform free vessel safety examinations United States Coast Guard Auxiliary UpdateDouble-check for a safe boatBy Contributing Writer Ralph Little, Flotilla 14-8wherever your boat is located in Northeast Florida. e examiner will conduct a thorough check of your boats safety equipment and be a source of information on requirements. e exam itself can be accomplished in as little as 15 minutes, but the examiner will spend as much time as is necessary to discuss what you need to know. Examiners have di erent criteria, depending on the motor and type of vessel such as those over 40 feet, runabouts, kayaks or a personal watercraft. e exam starts with your registration data and proceeds to cover up to 15 requirements and as many as 17 discussion points, depending on the size and type of vessel and pertinence to the situation. Required items will cover display of registration numbers and the presence and serviceability of safety equipment such as life preservers, distress signals and navigation lights. Over 12 percent of 100,000 vessel examinations were failures due to distress signal issues. Examiners also cover pollution protection notices and practices, especially for vessels with marine toilets. If you wish to have more detail on the exam, go to http://a0530801. uscgaux.info/checklst.htm . With the award of a decal to a passing vessel, it is good for the year of issue. e boater receives a copy of the report with the examiners phone number to set up next years check-up. As a bonus, your examiner may notice unsafe situations you hadnt detected. Our examiners have spotted a shredded drive belt, a broken ventilator fan and unsafe battery connections that could have made for expensive tows or fuel explosions. Email John Hadley at hadley.beverly@yahoo. com or call 519-0481 or 626-3772 to schedule a vessel examination. Flotilla 14-8 will present the next one day course, About Boating Safely, on March 5 at the Stellar Building, located at 2900 Hartley Road in Mandarin. e class will run from 7:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. with 30 minutes for lunch. A fee of $25 is charged for each student and just $5 more for the second member of a family. Call Bob Strong at 721-1346 for speci cs on where and when courses are o ered and to register or to indicate interest in the courses. If you wish to join the United States Coast Guard Auxiliary, contact Charles Smith at 541-1660. Society in high school and a Phi Beta Kappa at Northwestern. e Cum Laude Society is a national organization whose purpose is to accord recognition for outstanding scholastic achievement. e rst chapter was established in 1906 at the Tome School in Port Deposit, Maryland by Dr. Abram W. Harris. Dr. Harris envisioned a Society, modeled after the Phi Beta Kappa Society, the oldest and most respected college honors organization in the United States. One hundred and four years later the Cum Laude Society includes 344 chapters nationwide. One of only 13 chapters in the state of Florida, the St. Johns Chapter of the Cum Laude Society was formed in 1959 and was the rst chapter established in the state. Each year the current student chapter member with the best academic record is appointed chapter president. is years president is Mike Patterson. Current student members of the St. Johns Chapter are seniors Annie Bobbitt, Lynn Killea, Ishaan Madhok and Taylor West. First Day of SpringMarch 20 Visit our New & Improved Website! www.mandarinnewsline.com Links to all of our advertisers listed in the category that you need! Advertisment

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www.MandarinNewsLine.com • March 2011 • Mandarin NewsLine, Page 29 Nearly 2,000 expectant Moms gave birth at Baptist Medical Center South in 2010, enjoying a unique and personalized birth experience on the most exciting day of their lives. Amenities and services that support this special time include: €Lovely labor and delivery suites with hardwood floors, original artwork, private bathrooms, bedside controls, mini-refrigerators, an interactive flat-screen TV, WiFi, a DVD player and a large sleeping sofa for your guest. Your familys comfort is our priority. € A special dessert for Mom and Dad with sparkling wine. Toast your new family addition! € Registered nurses specially trained in maternity care. We love taking care of Moms and babies, and it shows! €C-section operating rooms, centralized monitoring of baby and Mom, and a 14-bed level II NICU that is a service of Wolfson Childrens. Your peace of mind matters. € Breastfeeding support by certified lactation consultants, even after you go home. Find out why more and more of your neighbors are choosing Baptist South for their personalized birth experience. 14550 Old St. Augustine Road South Jacksonville, FL 32258904.271.6000 Visit our maternity suites online! e-baptisthealth.com/south DELIVERED AT e African violet was rst discovered in 1892 among the rocky mountain ridges in Tanzania by Baron Walter von Paul while he was serving as the imperial district governor of Tanganyika. He sent seeds to his father in Germany where it acquired the botanical name Saintpaulia. It became popular in European countries and was brought to the United States in 1926 by the California nursery of Armacost and Royston. e blooms were basic blue in color, had the standard pansy shape and the leaves grew in a rosette pattern. With the growing interest in African violets, hybridizers have come up with an amazing variety in bloom color and shape as well as leaf shapes and variegations. Today the African violet is the most popular houseplant. African violets are classi ed as rosette or trailing. Rosette has a single crown and depending on the plant size, this single crown may have a diameter from two inches to two feet! Trailing violets are genetically developed to form multiple crowns and should be encouraged to do so. ese crowns appear from the leaf axils (where the leaves join the main stem). African violets are also classied according to size from a large to a micro-miniature. A standard will grow to over eight inches in diameter across a single crown, but must not exceed 16 inches at maturity. is is the most popular size among growers. Large hybrids grow to more than 16 inches across The Tiger Cubs of Bartram Springs Elementary recently attended a Jacksonville University football game and had a tour of the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Of Þ ce downtown. Bow11 months old Sta ordshire terrier mix Call for viewing and adoption: 725-8766 Jacksonville Humane SocietyPlease say hello to Bow! He is an 11 month old American Sta ordshire terrier mix. He has been at JHS since October 2010 and was really hoping he could start the New Year o in a home of his own. He has lived both inside and outside and gets along great with other dogs. He also likes children and has participated in our JHS Teen Dog Walking and Waggin Tails kids club. Wont you please come meet Bow today!? African violets ABCBy Contributing Writer Linda McQueenthe single crown at maturity and some of these plants can reach a diameter of around three feet. e semi-miniature is catching up in popularity because the size works well as window sill plants. ese hybrids are from six to eight inches across a single crown at maturity. Miniatures grow up to six inches across a single crown while microminiatures are less than three inches. Classi cation of blooms and leaves are more complex. Brie y, colors now available include blue, purple, red-violet, orchid, lavender, red, pink, white, yellow, bi-colored and multi-colored. Flower shapes are single, double, semi-double, star shaped, wasp, fringed and ru ed. Leaf shapes can be plain, ru ed, fringed, scalloped, spooned, pointed and variegated. e Heart of Jacksonville African Violet Society is a group of African violet lovers who are committed to sharing their passion for this plant. eir annual display and sale will be on March 25 and 26 at the Carriage Club Retirement Community, located at 9604 Southbrook Drive. Hours are from 12:00 noon to 6:00 p.m. on Friday March 25 and from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Saturday March 26. is event is free. On display will be prized specimens in all categories. Plants and plant supplies will be available for sale. If you would like more information about African Violets, visit their website at www.jacksonvilleviolets.org or contact bobbi@ jacksonvilleviolets.org.

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Page 30, Mandarin NewsLine • March 2011 • www.MandarinNewsLine.com GARAGE SALE MANIA 12345 Main Street Plantation South Great Selection Clothes, Shoes, Toys, Tools Sat 10 am 4 pm only $20.00Place your order today!Call 886-4919 Mandarin NewsLine! GARAGE SALE MANIA Every 2rd Saturday of the Month! starting in the April Issue of Mandarin NewsLine! Reserve your space BEFORE March 10! With the month of March, spring sports are now in full motion. e Mandarin High School baseball team will play the rst home game of the month against Fletcher at 6:30 p.m. on March 4. ey will also play First Coast on March 8, Baldwin on March 11 MHS Sports RoundupBy Anthony Paris, MHS Studentand another home game on March 18 against Fletcher at 7:00 p.m. e boys lacrosse team will be playing several games this month, starting with a match against Episcopal on March 1. On March 3 they will play against Bolles at home at 7:00 p.m. Paxson, Lee and Fletcher will also be home games, taking place on March 10, 17 and 25 respectively. e girls lacrosse team has a busy home schedule, with games on March 1, 10 and 24 versus Sandalwood, Paxson and Stanton. All games begin at 5:30 p.m. On Saturday, March 4, the girls track and eld team will be at the University of North Florida to compete in the UNF Invitational meet. We wish them the best of luck! e end of the year is slowly coming into view. Most senior athletes are preparing for college at this point, with only around two months left in high school. is is an important time of year for athletes and students at Mandarin High School, as well as for the coaches and teachers. When Mandarin resident Sue Fischer is not working at Publix, delivering items to the food pantry or working on her Blue Jean Ministry, shes at her sewing machine supporting the troops. For the past two years, she has been taking regular clothing items and adapting them for use in military hospitals across the world. Fischer became a seamstress for Sew Much Comfort in 2009. is is a nationallyrecognized non-pro t organization which provides clothing to support the unique needs of our wounded service members in all branches of the military and National Guard. To be approved to be on the sewing team,Ž Fischer had to complete the adaptation of a pair of boxer shorts. She received a Quality Check Packet from Sew Much Comforts corporate o ces which included the boxers and the materials and instructions on how to properly sew the garment. e organization says that the skills required to become a seamstress are on an intermediate level of sewing„Fischer passed the test and was o and sewing. e garments that Fischer and her team alter give medical personnel and service members the ability to have ready access to their injuries by utilizing the adaptive openings in their clothing. e openings provide easy access for medical exams and physical and occupational therapy sessions. e clothing provided by Sew Much Comfort allows injured service members to easily dress themselves and the clothing appears as normal as civilian attire. Any given day Fischer is working on a pair of pajamas, a sweat shirt or some athletic shorts. e task is to open up all the seams of the garment, sew seam binding to both seam sides and apply a Velcro closure system. is is no small trick; a sweat shirt takes this veteran seamstress about six hours to adapt both sleeves making them completely open down both sides from the cu to the waistband. A pajama bottom takes her about four hours. Luckily Fischer has met some friends along the way that help open up the seams and get the garments ready for her to sew the extensions. is keeps her humming at the sewing machine and getting around a dozen or so garments in the mail each month to Sew Much Comforts distribution center in Colorado. As word got around about the project, Fischers circle of friends also began to donate garments. New quality fabric garments are always needed for the next sewing afternoon at Fischers house, which has itself been adapted for the project. After trying to bounce around and sew in the back bedroom using the bed for a cutting table, her husband, George was in on the project too! Together they quickly decided that the little used formal dining room in their home was a win-win for the sewing room make-over project! George Fischer did all the work himself. e formal dining table is now a great cutting board. eres plenty of room for the sewing machine, a huge thread spool rack was hung on the wall along with a at screen television for entertainment. Fischer says this labor of loveŽ work is perfect for her as she has always liked to take things apart. But its more than labor; all the seamstresses volunteering for Sew Much Comfort must pay all shipping costs to send the completed garments for distribution and many pay for the garments they stitch themselves. To learn more about Sew Much Comfort you can visit the website at www.sewmuchcomfort.org. Sue Fischer and Sew Much Comfort adapt garmentsLabor of love supports our troopsBy Donna Keathley Super Bowl Party benefits Relay for LifeHeidi Clemons and Jeff Roy at the annual Super Bowl party raising funds for Nancy’s Village in memory of a dear friend taken too early with cancer. Proceeds are donated in her memory to the American Cancer Society. Many thanks to all who attended and generously supported the event! Tory Stellabotte, Julia Cueto and Sue Fischer at the sewing machine. Everybody Gets It. Everybody Reads It. 886-4919 Lindell & Farson, P.A.Attorneys At LawConveniently Located in South Mandarin 12276 San Jose Blvd., Suite 126 Jacksonville, FL 32223-8630904-880-4000 www.lindellfarson.com J. Michael Lindell, Esq.James A. Farson, Esq.Roger K. Gannam, Esq. R. Howard Walton, Esq. Automobile, Motorcycle & Trucking Accidents, Insurance Disputes, & Wrongful Death Complex Business, Real Estate, & Construction Disputes LINDELL &FARSON Lindell & Farson, P.A. 904-880-4000

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www.MandarinNewsLine.com • March 2011 • Mandarin NewsLine, Page 31 For North Florida gardeners, March is the month for gardening madness. You can plant and grow just about anything this month. Cool season vegetables and annuals are in their prime, while warm season veggies and owers are at their starting point. March is the beginning of our longest growing season and the best month to plant popular veggies like tomatoes, squash, peppers, eggplant and beans. Many cool season veggies such as lettuce and peas, planted in winter, will be maturing and ready for harvesting this month. is is also an excellent time to start an herb garden. If you are not a gardener but would like to give it a try, start small. A square raised bed, four feet on each side, is a good way to begin. It is easy to care for and can grow a surprisingly large amount of produce or owers. I astonished myself last spring when I grew over 60 pounds of cucumbers in a raised square bed that size. My small garden would have produced even more but I pulled up my plants in early June. Garden pests are rampant in summer and it is a good idea to pull up cucumber plants before then. I made a lot of pickles and everyone I knew was checking the internet for cucumber recipes. Mel Bartholomew in his best selling book Square Foot Gardening provides detailed information on putting together and planting a framed, square-foot raised bed. Bartholomews growing information is not geared towards our area but he does o er planting charts for getting the most from a small space. March Madness in the garden By Contributing Writer Master Gardener Camille Hunter with Duval County Extension, University of Florida/IFASAnother option is to look online. A Google search on how to make a square foot gardenŽ will bring up several sites with directions. Create just one of these small raised gardens and you will be hooked. For the best North Florida growing information look for publications from the University Press of Florida, such as Vegetable Gardening in Florida by veggie guru James Stephens. If it is owers you are interested in, check out Your Florida Guide to Perennials by Sydney Park Brown and Rick Schoellhorn and Your Florida Guide to Bedding Plants by Robert Black and Edward Gilman. ese are excellent books available through local bookstores. Online, your best resource for growing advice is found at the University of Florida website SolutionsForYourLife.u .edu. Click on Lawn and Garden, then use the search box to nd the information you want. A search on growing tomatoesŽ for example, brings up several publications on growing tomatoes in Florida. Like most master gardeners I am addicted to gardening and this is a great time of year to indulge ourselves. We have our own March Madness, only ours isnt played on a court; it is played outdoors, in the dirt. A message from the St. Johns River Water Management District...Beginning with the return to Eastern Standard Time in November, residential lawn watering is limited to one day per week: € Homes with odd number addresses: Saturday € Homes with even number addresses: Sunday € Nonresidential properties: Tuesday Restrictions apply to water from private wells and pumps as well as public and private utilities. Water for no more than one hour per zone . Water only when needed and not between 10 AM and 4 PMwater less Visit www. ß oridaswater.com Home Improvement Guide Whether it needs repairing, replacing, painting, or whatever, you’ll find the right person for the job! April issue of Mandarin NewsLine

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