Citation
Ais Lagoon Park : culture oriented eco-tourism

Material Information

Title:
Ais Lagoon Park : culture oriented eco-tourism
Creator:
Meyer, Matthew
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publisher:
College of Design, Construction & Planning, University of Florida
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2010
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Animals ( jstor )
Cities ( jstor )
Counties ( jstor )
Estuaries ( jstor )
Lagoons ( jstor )
Land use ( jstor )
Oceans ( jstor )
Rivers ( jstor )
Waterfronts ( jstor )
Wildlife ( jstor )
Indian River Lagoon ( local )

Notes

Abstract:
Throughout history, man's connection to water has influenced development patterns and shaped cultural identities. The Indian River Lagoon is considered the most biologically diverse estuary in the United States, home to more than 3,000 different species of plant and animal life. Ais Lagoon Park creates a new destination for both residents and tourists along the Indian River Lagoon. Located in Vero Beach, Florida, the park's design tells the story of local culture and natural ecology. It also demonstrates strategies to improve and restore the natural health and water quality of the Indian River Lagoon and its surrounding coastal ecosystems. The 70 acre site is currently occupied by the City of Vero Beach's Municipal Power Plant, Wastewater Treatment Plant, and a mobile home park. Ais Lagoon Park illustrates a redevelopment opportunity for the area as a catalyst to bring people back to the City's waterfront. Anchored around a restored coastal wetland, interpretive attractions exploring local culture and ecology offer immersive new guest experiences. Attractions include a wildlife sanctuary, local history center, conference space, film and production facilities, a native Indian shell mound, waterfront harbor, plaza, hotel, tree-house family bungalows, retail area ans central park.
Acquisition:
Landscape Architecture capstone project

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Permissions granted to the University of Florida Institutional Repository and University of Florida Digital Collections to allow use by the submitter. All rights reserved by the author.
Resource Identifier:
905851270 ( OCLC )

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Full Text

















AIS LAGOON PARK
Culture Qriented EIco-Tourism
A senior Thesis Project bY
Matt Meyer

VELRO BACM, FLORIDA






















































A15 LAGOON 1AKV













The University of Florida
College of Design, Construction and Planning




Ais Lagoon Park


An Undergraduate Thesis in
Landscape Architecture
By
Matthew Meyer

Faculty Advisor
Mary Padua

2010




Submitted in partial fulfillment of the degree Bachelor in Landscape Architecture
and has been reviewed and accepted by the faculty as an Honors Thesis


VL KO ECACH, FLOKIDA






















































A15 LAGOON 1AKV









ACKNOWLEDGEMENT5

I would like to thank my Capstone Advisor, Professor Mary Padua, for her support, enthusiasm,
and encouragement throughout the length of this project. I have enjoyed learning from her
expertise while attending the University of Florida (both in Paris, France and in Gainesville,
Florida). It has been a pleasure to work with and learn from Professor Padua over the last few
years.

I would also like to thank Professors Bob Grist, Kay Williams, and Tina Gurucharri. Their
enthusiasm, knowledge, and willingness to answer my many questions four years ago
ultimately led to my move from Architecture to Landscape Architecture. Without them, I would
have remained in Architecture.

I would also like to thank Bill Coan and Jeff Burton for teaching me how to think "outside of the
box" and develop an appreciation for the art of creating immersive guest experiences.

This project would not have been possible without the help of the following individuals who
shared their incredible knowledge of countless topics that ultimately helped lead to the
creation of this project:


Glenn Acomb Kristen Meyer Tony Morgan Jeff Sugar
Maryann Buehn Janet Meyer Sarah Pinelli John Ten Eyck
Eric Gordon Jeff Meyer Cristin Ryan Kevin Thompson
Les Linscott Carmen Mocerino Terry Schnadelbach

Finally, I would like to thank my wonderful friends and family for all of their support and
encouragement over the years. And a special thanks to all of the dolphins, manatees, birds,
Indians, sunken treasure, and citrus that helped inspire this project.


VL KO ECACH, FLOKIDA






















































A15 LAGOON 1AKV








TALE_ OF CONTENT


Chapter One

Chapter Two

Chapter Three

Chapter Vour

Chapter rive

Chapter 5ix

Chapter ,even

Chapter Fiight

Chapter Nine

Chapter Ten

Chapter Fleven

Chapter Twelve

Appendix


Introduction

Research

6atewau to the Tropics

Local Context

Site Analysis

Design Alternatives

Ais Lagoon Pari

Guest F experience

Master planning Diagrams

5ustainabilitu

Conclusion

References

initial Proposal, Vinal Presentation


VL KO M ACH, FLOKIDA






















































A15 LAGOON 1AKV




INTRODUCTION


INTRODUCTION
Chapter One



VELRO BEACM, FLORIDA







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AI5 LAGOON PARK






INTRODUCTION


PROJE CT
ABTRKACT

Throughout history, man's connection
to water has influenced development
patterns and shaped cultural identities.
The Indian River Lagoon is considered
the most biologically diverse estuary in
the United States, home to more than
3,000 different species of plant and
animal life.

Ais Lagoon Park creates a new
destination for both residents and
tourists along the Indian River Lagoon.
Located in Vero Beach, Florida, the
park's design tells the story of local
culture and natural ecology. It also
demonstrates strategies to improve and
restore the natural health and water
quality of the Indian River Lagoon and its
surrounding coastal ecosystems.

The 70 acre site is currently occupied by
the City of Vero Beach's Municipal Power
Plant, Wastewater Treatment Plant, and
a mobile home park. Ais Lagoon Park
illustrates a redevelopment opportunity


for the area as a catalyst to bring people
back to the City's waterfront. Anchored
around a restored coastal wetland,
interpretive attractions exploring local
culture and ecology offer immersive new
guest experiences. Attractions include
a wildlife sanctuary, local history center,
conference space, film and production
facilities, a native Indian shell mound,
waterfront harbor, plaza, hotel, tree-
house family bungalows, retail area, and
central park.


VL KO ECACH, FLOKIDA






CHA1TLhKONL


61WN IKAL AADOE


The project is located in Vero Beach,
Florida on approximately 70 acres
along the Indian River Lagoon. The
site presently includes the City's A
wastewater treatment facilities, CET CiTYI O
municipal power plant, and a mobile pa
home park. This project explores future
development opportunities following P N
the decommissioning of the existing -y
infrastructure.


TH ESITil

- Approximately 70 acres
- Located in Vero Beach, Florida in Indian
River County
- Situated along the Indian River Lagoon
- Site includes public and private
property L1 u
0' 10W' 300' 50C'' o1000


A15 LAGOON 1AKK






INTRODUCTION


Indian River County


Brevard County -

S4 r. Tsebas an an


Sr--- !Fellsme 1
S., Legend
Ble Cp'ess Indian River Major Roads
o ,S. O Shores
N .'. County Municipalities
Urban and Developed Land
Agriculture

%11 4. Rangeland
Florida Turnpike Sae Road 60 (o Tampa) Upland Forest
Vero Beacl"h
"". V tlands
hate r
A' I ;Atlantic Ocean
Saint Lucie County Project Site
0 2.5 5 10 15 20ite
Il Miles




General rojeAC, LontIAxt


VL-RO BEACH, FLORIDA






CHA1TLhKONL


CONTE-XT & SETTING: TM
/ .INDIAN RIVER LAGOON

The Indian River Lagoon is considered the most biologically
\ diverse estuary in the United States. Stretching for more
than one hundred fifty miles from the Ponce de Leon
,i Inlet in Volusia County to the Jupiter Inlet in Palm Beach
I County, the Lagoon is home to more than 4,000 different
species of plants and animals, including 36 rare and
--- -endangered animal species.

More than one third of the nation's manatee population
",-" lives in or migrates through the Lagoon.

S. This incredible natural resource has an annual
/"' economic impact of 730 million dollars in terms of
recreational, fishing, eco-tourism, and increased land
values.
rojlect
Site
*.- -. Human activity has greatly increased the amount
of freshwater draining to the Lagoon over the
last several decades, alternating natural systems.

-' / Improving water quality is one of the
most critical steps needed to maintain a
healthy ecosystem and ensure the future
prosperity of the Lagoon.
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2672/3854689326_ca82a5fb5c.jpg

A15 LAGOON PARK


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;~ _.-L.-






INTRODUCTION


Sebastian Vero Beach Fellsmere





Indian River County
Chamber of Commerce
http://www.ootcmag.com/lin ks/CityOfVeroBeach_logo.gif
http://ics.ifas.ufl.edu/county_logos/logos/.jpg
http://img4.coastalliving.com/i/2009/02/main.jpg


RFOJE CT
PROPOSAL

The City of Vero Beach is considering
decommissioning the existing
Wastewater Treatment Plant and
relocating it to a new site within Indian
River County. Increased operating costs
for the City's Municipal Power Plant
have also sparked debate in regard to
decommissioning the facility. The City
could decommission the Power Plant,
subsidizing Florida Power and Light as
the new electricity provider. These two
municipal facilities are also threatened
by storm surge and wind damage caused
by seasonal tropical storms due to their
proximity to the Atlantic Ocean and
waterfront location along the Indian
River.

Adjacent to the City of Vero Beach
Wastewater Treatment Plant and
Municipal Power Plant is Fairlane
Harbor, a 35 acre mobile home park
along the Indian River. The site
sustained significant damage during the
2004 hurricanes Frances and Jeanne,


including complete destruction of
numerous mobile homes.

Collectively, the aforementioned
properties combined create a site that
covers approximately 70 acres. The
City of Vero Beach is interested in
exploring development opportunities
for the waterfront site following
decommissioning of the public works
and utilities sites. The City is willing to
allow development of the municipal
properties in exchange for future
economic gains as the result of a new
waterfront development.

Project stakeholders include the City of
Vero Beach and the Indian River County
Chamber of Commerce. The Indian
River County Chamber of Commerce is
interested in capitalizing on potential
development opportunities as a
means to create jobs, generate new
tax revenues, and promote tourism to
the area. The stakeholders intend to
collaborate with a private developer and
design team to generate and implement
concepts for future land use.


VELRO BEACN, FLORIDA






CMAFTLhKONE


A55U MFTION5

1. The collective 70-acre site has
been acquired by the City and a
private developer and is cleared for
redevelopment.
2. The City of Vero Beach is
decommissioning and relocating the
existing Wastewater Treatment Plant
to a new location within Indian River
County.
a. Existing Structures are to be
removed and relocated.
b. 8 million gallons of reclaimed
water must be retained in
storage tanks on site
c. A pumping station will be
installed to transfer water to
the new location.
3. The City of Vero Beach is
decommissioning the Municipal
Power Plant due to increased
operating costs.
a. All existing structures are to be
removed and relocated.
4. Fairlane Harbor Mobile Home Park is
sold to a private developer.
a. All existing structures are to be


removed and relocated.
b. Existing residents are relocated
to a new location.
5. The spoil island located within the
Lagoon is designated for recreational
use.



LIMITATIONS

1. Need to retain existing 3 and 5 million
gallon storage tanks of reclaimed
water
2. Existing infrastructure of
underground utilities
3. Storm surge flooding and wind
damage from potential tropical
storms
4. Managing stormwater and pollutant-
laden water discharging into
the lagoon
5. On-site connectivity impeded as
a result of the 17th Street Causeway
Bridge bisecting the public works
site between the Wastewater
Treatment Plant and Municipal
Power Plant
6. Traffic signals at adjacent intersection
limits potential entry points into site


A15 LAGOON PARK







INTRODUCTION


VL KO ECACH, FLOKIDA






CHA1TLhKONL


GOALS & OIJJECTIVIE5

1. Create an iconic destination for residents and tourists that revitalizes the City's
waterfront
a. Integrate an open space system for public access and use
b. Develop a mixed-use program to allow continued site use during various times
of day
c. Establish gathering spaces for social activities and events
d. Take advantage of the site's resources and location as a 'gateway to the Atlantic
Ocean'

2. Improve the natural health of the Indian River Lagoon
a. Establish educational and interpretational opportunities concerning the
significance of the Indian River Lagoon
b. Create a series of constructed coastal wetlands to manage freshwater discharge
and stormwater runoff
c. Restore the area's natural ecologic systems by re-establishing native sea grasses
and mangrove forests along the waterfront
d. Create habitat for plant and animal communities

3. Generate revenue for the City of Vero Beach and the Indian River County Chamber of
Commerce
a. Construct places to attract new businesses, institutions, and tourist-driven venues
b. Capitalize on the Indian River Lagoon's abundant natural resources through
recreational opportunities such as kayak and canoe rentals, boat charters,
and guided naturalist tours
c. Capitalize on the area's abundant cultural resources through potential exhibition,
gathering, and interpretive spaces



A15 LAGOON PARK


http://www.verobeachactivities.com/images/kayaking.jpg


line_//.jpg


SI , oads/2010/r- 1/Generate I i- .-Revenue- S 1 Busines :'arkti ng.jpg '
Ioads/2010/O1/Generate-Revenue-Small-Business-Marketing.jpg






INTRODUCTION


TARGET MARKET


- Regional Tourist Destination
- Local Education and Use
- Foreign Travel Destination
- Length of Stay Guest Categories:
Day-trip
Weekend Getaway
Week-long Vacation


TARGET
DE-MOGRAFHIC

- Local Residents
- Foreign Visitors
- Elementary & Middle Schools
- Senior Citizens/Retirees
- Families
- Business Retreat/Conference Groups
- Film, Journalism, & Media Professionals
- Eco-Tourism/Nature Based Travelers
http://attorneygeneral.utah.gov/cmsimages/kids2.jpg
http://scrapetv.com/News/News%20Pages/Business/images-2/family-sum-
mer-vacation.jpg
http://thumbs.dreamstime.com/thumb 178/11879517681qTCle.jpg . ..
http://www.wayfaring.info/wp-content/uploads/2009/01/kayaking florida4.jpg "..
http://www.takegreatpictures.com/content/images/l Couple.Jpg
http://www2.reston.org/gallery/main.jpg
http://www.trianglerentacar.com/userfiles/Business%20Meeting.jpg



V KRO BEACH, FLORIDA





CHA1TLhKONL


DE-51GN
APPROACH


Research

Analysis

Synthesis

Alternatives

Design

Narrative Focus
Local Sense of Place
Culture & Ecology
Guest Experience


AI5LAGOON PAK]







INTRODUCTION


VL KO ECACH, FLOKIDA























































A15 LAGOON 1AKV




RKS5ARCH


RSKLLAKC
Chapter Two


VELRO BEACH, FLORIDA






CMAfTLR TWO


SeaO-ass, cue


'I'
1,r1b?


THIE INDIAN RIVER
LAGOON

Ais Lagoon Park is located along the
Indian River Lagoon in Vero Beach,
Florida. The Indian River Lagoon is
considered the most biologically diverse
estuary in the United States.

The Lagoon represents "a meeting place
for people, wildlife, and water." The
Lagoon is not only influenced by the
'eb and flo' from inlets and the Atlantic
Ocean, but also by rivers, streams,
canals, ditches, and ground runoff from
nearby communities.


W- --S





E
Id a 7R- .e- La-goo ._I--ntron T
.' - .; -










Indian River Lagoon, An Introduction to a National Treasure, Cover Image
-. -r.. ; .-.: ; -
e .
~ .l.' .-', .C-
_4L f .-,: -_,..: .


A15 LAGOON PARK







RKS5ARCH


FAST FACTS
Quick lagoon info


SThe watershed is 2,284 square milk with a surfe wmar
Ar A ofT53 SqUAIL 1IiS.
Six ounis bor&r the Iagoon. hwc'tc, porionf c' vmn
LuUnti.R aTr within fhe w;rrJlErI1,
SHle F Inlxr e l 0n e Ihl~ on0 with A4 c~. Thr is a sL Uch
ronnention xt Port CATnvral, Iower, navigatwiin locks that
sparth rbe port bain trom the Lagoin limit th cxdhrnc of
war.

'ijT a river
Thr launn ian esnr .r whemr ralt w;tr fmm nth Artantr
OcAn mixes with fnshwitmr from the Lznd and tribunar.ci. Th
reinng brckis (Jtigh4ly hy) watr moved more bty ther
wil duin by the ride and damf uir fltw hrotl Iaedwerst a
m h like river The wid4h > the I ig,!n ertes front one-htfs
rmile s 5 rmnd- wtsah an vW Jgc depth af 4 f~e

'uinronrr 'rn the economy
The lgoon it rponsible for One wstnrh a! the rgrjaii
ecinmy. 1 he iiroon %iparu r wrld-ret wnEd irr
ruktry, with, .rin eimtEd iumiuil vu bf $21 biflliOn. Th
Laoon a% o a nck) c more thn $300 million in bozt and
marine als annually.

Fisheries
Tbh lgoouii the ad.liEOf L dite uaL &JerVitgA&. fpn|kitgtjid
ursry ground for ocan "d flagti 6h- An Ctindmcd $30
r.11n10 is denied fmn I n .hery er.e... nuIL. Thc
i 0aon prvidAs An I tiucrid 50 percent of the Nai t n 1afldd 5 th
archr annually,
Indian River Lagoon, An Introduction to a National Treasure, 5


H.,i;: ,,' of the East Coavst
The Indian River Layon c locd ilonm the Aantic Flyway, i
key biolc-;.idl eil; lu mi any i.rniFll ipSrc.j of birth

Wildlife
. The igaon bsumn .~.ntt awrj re spd rha Liiy other
esmiry in Nrdth Amer"ua
Number ofat h peis 685
Number obirl fserirr r70
Nkubter fplant iptidt 2 1l0M
Number ofI nimi spetas 2,-20
SO 1cMn b nc l in hr lj oun ireii-i ploeid one orthc
&dens sea r=dI nwe;sng U rxu found in the wesmrn
lwmi9p.rlrm
SThe lgoon it the oany location in th< wortd co fWind th
A nrTIrei nir marsh nalke.

Pl -r life
* niuartlrnr lihic of aingtrowsisw*hh che woonbiiina
- ritime hamiucki, whichilude a nmbtr of ropica nmd
.hAm.pirl trrm anid Inth r pantf iar fiGnd in the r~eSm, but
n further oarth.
SThe lagoon cunams 27 pcrxrnt Fl-"d1F. 'lm in .i ral
imL uishefi.

Getting outside
Salc parks j eder wAildJle reuci g j l ta. naJml horse rnd:
orthI puMir laniK fer range af tnpartniti i r i creJtral
enrilt a rii and enilroniaicrll Irerninr iand appricullCro


Thousands of plants and animals depend
on the lagoon and its water quality for
survival. People depend on the Lagoon
for many recreational and commercial
uses.


Human activity has also polluted the
water quality of the Indian River Lagoon
over the years.


"Directly or indirectly, we are all
responsible for maintaining the health
of the Indian River Lagoon system. As
residents, as government leaders, as
visitors and as responsible individuals we
can each do our part to effect positive
changes within the Lagoon." (Indian
River Lagoon, 3)


This Chapter outlines some of the
facts, figures, threats, and concerns
related to the overall value and quality
of the Indian River Lagoon. Samples
from numerous area advocacy groups,
brochures, and information were
collaborated to produce the content
herein.


VEKRO BEACH, FLORIDA






CMAfTLR TWO


FACTS & FIGURES

"The IRL is an estuary, not a river. Unlike
true rivers, water flow in the IRL is not
driven by gravity. Rather, it is the wind
that primarily drives circulation patterns
within the lagoon."

"Like all estuaries, the Indian River
Lagoon is a semi-confined water body
characterized by a high degree of
mixing of saline oceanic water and
freshwater from upland sources. Water
is exchanged between the Indian River
Lagoon and the Atlantic Ocean through
ocean inlets."

"The salinity, tidal influence and degree
of flushing characteristic of a particular
portion of the lagoon depends in large
part on its proximity to an inlet and to
freshwater inputs from streams, rivers,
ditches, and canals."

"The Lagoon straddles a subtropical
climate to the north, and a warm-
temperate climate to the south.
The influence of these two distinct


biogeographical provinces is one of
the factors underlying the spectacular
biodiversity found within the Lagoon.
High biodiversity is also fostered by
the presence of a number of distinct
habitats that serve as home to the plants
and animals of the Indian River Lagoon.
Seagrass meadows, mangrove forests,
and salt marshes are foremost among
IRL habitats whose continued health is
essential for a healthy lagoon."

"The IRL watershed is home to more
than 2,100 different species of plants
and more than 2,200 animal species,
including some 700 fish species, and
310 bird species. Approximately 50
threatened or endangered species can
be found in the Indian River Lagoon
region, including 12 plants and 36
animals. The Indian River Lagoon has
been cited as the most biologically
diverse estuary in North America."


A CRADLE_ O
BIODIV ERSITY

The Indian River Lagoon serves as a


Indian River Lagoon, An Introduction to a National Treasure, 5


Indian River Lagoon, An Introduction to a National Treasure, 5
breeding ground for thousands of
plants and animals. One example
is the pink shrimp, which journeys
between the estuary and the ocean
during its lifecycle. Another animals,
such as sea turtles, may spend much
of their juvenile life stages living within
the Lagoon. The estuary is a complex
system of fresh and salt water. The


A15 LAGOON PARK


~cLn~






RKS5ARCH


Estuaries, The Cradle of the Ocean, 3


Indian River Lagoon is highly diverse in
plants and animals due to its location at
the convergence of the subtropical and
temperate climates.

The north-south orientation and narrow
shape of the Lagoon, combined with the
convergence of the two climate zones,
allow for this biodiversity.


CONCERNS:
THKRAT5 TO THI
ICO5SYSTLM

Some of the greatest challenges facing
the Indian River Lagoon today include:


-Loss of seagrass beds
-Isolation and loss of wetlands
-Fisheries decline
-Threats to biodiversity
-Water and sediment quality
-Spread of invasive species


The following list of quotes is obtained
from a brochure created by the Harbor
Branch Oceanographic Institute
concerning present threats to the
system:

"The most serious threats to the health
of the Indian River Lagoon include
reduced water quality due to manmade
hydrologic changes, non-point source
pollution, loss and fragmentation
of habitats, overuse/overharvest of
resources, and the threat of invasive
exotic species."

"For many decades, human activity
has greatly increased the amount of
freshwater that drains to the Indian
River Lagoon. A network of agricultural
and drainage canals has been created
that discharges large volumes of
freshwater, such that the lagoon


VERO B ACM, FLORIDA






CMAfTTK TWO


currently receives two-and-a-half times
more freshwater than the system was
naturally required to handle. The
natural volume and timing freshwater
inputs to the lagoon have been greatly
altered and the health of the estuary
has been measurably impacted."

"Unlike pollution coming from a factory
or water treatment facility, non-point
source pollution cannot be traced back
to a single point of origin. It includes the
dilute discharges of contaminant-laden
water from residential and agricultural
sources, nutrient inputs from septic
drainage fields, and pollutants carried to
the lagoon as stormwater runoff."

"Stormwater runoff problems are
compounded in urbanized areas. In
undeveloped portions of the watershed,
rainfall percolates down into porous soil
and nutrients and other contaminants
are mechanically and biologically
filtered out before stormwater reaches
the lagoon. As more and more land
is devegetated and paved over, this
important natural process is lost."


Seagrass coverage
Progressive Improvement In light penetration and seagras coverage from Titusvllle to Ver Beach


1986-1989
rUwmum cwYns* 9,.39 ew


1991-1996
nm. ,lltlrrr v Sit 1 I*I i 'r -rI'?


CaICI'S


1998-2003






-4J '
maw~n~ ca~~a~a


,-)i


Melbourne


EXCELLENT
GOOD "
FAIR Veo Beach
SPOOR
-- ScRSegment bounelry
Blatus Assesment Crteril
* percent surtfce rihl indicator of carlty
* percent of seagran daplh-rlHt target
* percent ls ofl grass ince 1943


31 JAii *lie miMwUu .*. Doul-.
MP FfSiJ'. n Ti.w Irk .rA 1 .' IM t ef 1 W..W

Indian River Lagoon, An Introduction to a National Treasure, 19

"There are several sources of direct
habitat loss within the Lagoon.
Development of the Indian River Lagoon
shoreline has sometimes necessitated
the removal of mangrove stands, salt


No swgrnmnt was considered -execire" r ras havirv lully mnt
its iagrwi resource Larges, The single-year se gras9 target
lor Orvard and Indian River counties is about 50,000 acres.


marsh vegetation or seagrass meadows.
Various state permitting processes aim
to minimize such habitat loss."


"Less apparent forms of direct habitat


A15 LAGOON PARK


20


Tllu'.vllu






RKS5ARCH


loss also impact the Indian River
Lagoon. Since the mid-1950s, more than
40,000 acres of highly productive salt
marsh and mangrove marsh has been
converted into mosquito impoundments
designed to thwart the reproduction
cycle of salt marsh mosquitoes. Both
the productivity and the nursery habitat
value of impounded marshes are lost to
the rest of the lagoon."

"Small-scale direct habitat loss also
occurs in the Indian River Lagoon and
the cumulative impact of such damage
is significant. One example is prop
scarring of slow-growing seagrass beds
by motorized watercraft. Increased
utilization of the lagoon by recreational
users exposes sensitive, vital habitats to
accidental damage."

"Invasive exotic species occur in all
portions of the Indian River Lagoon
watershed, from upland habitats to
wetlands to aquatic habitats within the
lagoon to adjacent coastal habitats.
Exotics compete with and often crowd
out native species, generally reducing
ecosystem biodiversity and function.


Exotic species usually have few natural
controls to help keep their numbers in
check."


SOLUTIONS

"Directly or indirectly, we are all
responsible for maintaining the health
of the Indian River Lagoon system. As
residents, as government leaders, as
visitors and as responsible individuals we
can each do our part to effect positive
changes within the Lagoon." (Indian
River Lagoon, 3)

Many groups and agencies have put into
effect plans to restore the protect the
Indian River Lagoon. A Comprehensive
Conservation and Management Plan
(CCMP) was created for the Indian River
Lagoon National Estuary Program by
the St. Johns River water Management
District.


ADVOCACY

Education is one of the most essential
components to ensure continued


http://celebrating200years.noaa.gov/events/sanctuaries/
seagrass_meadow650.jpg


VEKRO B~ACH, FLORIDA


iILL ;.// WWW. II ILe U Il.rl.lI/~ VItr Ulv I L I L /UIUUlV/U IIUdlrige i eu/
Biotopes/en_GB/Seagrass_beds/_%20marina%2196_small.jpg


nap:llWWW.UInep-wcmc.urFlImuIrIlnel grdssadsld/ IImeTu_
seagrass_beds_pgVI.jpg








CGAfPTL TWO


\V/l; it r -:ci

S iIu,,.. ir .Irr unlLrijf, ,1m..uamiin pln,.r
li.J I1lln il l l krriL li% ha mlhial li,'r-

EIkMluL. r -jrL'.. rqutlr .urllijd HMN-I
v-"gr.K* P !'AlI In drjir 1ihJln lrnr1 IhtcA VI.*.1*
link pLilu% fInm.* nL i pal isl I; l h l, l LhXI .tli 'l. I';I
lNIII ri iinM v.rLl.h- kin..I .rt. l q"rl -a ,rHr...' nU. n
nir ul. l un- ?rim Ir-J l *I |.|iL k T.l.- ii .ilin
ilt \ iu lit iii.m k i.muk. iL r diL f in

|XTkfk- .f 11-lulh St.Lur.&Le LI frugL' I.jIl L ah (-vl L
I-tnia- ll lmIni si trt In-i. irr. ,u.ni. l- Ili .n.iI .urnlr.,I
ill is.I,.Al WITi- fn i FM1 1r1111e 14i.-' -n .11 .i6 Im li~"-
diijig.p i hipj PP fo.1 t1,; *; %al urk.I^f t% liC pihAL


\V.hi ci,\ L',1 "

'tau'n S cn iplical mIyn eMollcallT lT
vnlalubl rumrnar s *i ll a. rirfl a IriIl .;arrl ri
-, LuIr Ufl fly *'itIl prujur'hi.i lJrLjr4 @riun iiluiuie
in Ind word Aa rl a prlciipal Eir'.p.rlruil.r il in
rrnaine 10o0 I w
"' "


- \ ; '. 1. : .

Hurnidr of mirig plant and inlials live aming
e agrar .1mr f in cwm pa r.riil; aM nul a C; Ti1Ti.iniT-
Sea lurties arj nrmailffl ~a upin 1 gris Mariy
IVpnf nl 'hiirrp cai ii. f r ir arn RFhrll 1 T
uea0d I1gi enbv e *il hilin s5agna; madovr,
Larlgt tfr.r, Mnii Lra.iifis l tF.agMriA mAnwinrir, ID
cat thcxc sonffr minimal.
Sveny pern oi frs nmusiIl nEns r somM I0s
ilpeld Ipnm letgrdai LJInrulllliIts dl jinte lll I P
Treir ih*Pq 'AugOhsl Lirger, Fupp cl FArldat Iraiv.
Ingy risla|old abld .i)nn ior' Ijl Ircarig I rJdubltll
eagrai b ao impIo rw is wirer qiully sumaIi
ing toose sedtcir and ienr some ollutats out
of the water. Without snagrn many aras would be
a seascape ti unsa ili sIanc MdM anf iliud.
Seagras cornmun.res irei n leinrlal p rt~ liil
web omnmiap stl llk w watf habltas lriLt litn
wUllana anid manigritav (ornmulliles to1 haidttlom
and rars roeds


c-


Ai.L


SlIhaJL IDVIIn l ai dit Ikmig ftrfe ilfrI 1 aiia
Lait idtia v i ni Rta Nt is R vrrv tiuuizr j t rr pilri
ufr Iht;^ i.e. in yL "iPR sM tiITw.ry, CrIniTanCiruIlI
Qu2 Iwl a1W In it, M LIP hErtMIw2. Ty eIll
'CIllll I UIl r dLliit, Wl9tLiLEltl Will. LiLr
agIU' Cnri rntl d w'.tU7 cladutry maskm It dfflrinllt
hrir *ii lghtl In nrtnaitr rlnwn lr~ -gWIIW nn ith
Insaltn. W Iitcfl Iin~i %1Uli s. P1, 7eraTi Cin nfl
mirvivkr :nlit rui


----- tr.ua-.I -'4
1191 LI.1 glL .'I n .. ,,,
lltI an Ia rj. ,l ImB. -
fn l Jrld vqr-'feL il S ra.--M l
waium 1 lNT muir r.

m1 rr-e c w I A
tp1I V1cT r rj cll ir 1
h 14. wII*g'JCIInwlflrVi1)
'M w '________________


How do we harm seagrass?
We ;i) lan lrrsaiss ,r er ways. B8k
owraf of now se0Fasg can Ne daedUN Ais
Inrl li rr.1" u in praiiO rij Inr ', .'.II 141'
niarirm enwimnmints
$orn Fufll: Walir ruLilnn EX.rAn.d1in
drwnical tIrtfzts, sii, aad lme is a
r u|tm nrta to snet$. HRuln rrfln
itinmtlil, iu'taus.Iol, ndr aqidim ual W e4 i

tl uujlI '.Urln ~ ilh,'j [U Flunl. .I

I rIS Balhig; IrrfrjCI htiLw! rg Aic' ly
in haftllow wers n an i ingving cOrwt
Bial prowe 4 cra rip LlI lSigraiji si dea
turchdRs irovuh grass neadws Thils
"prop dredging' iinagisn weagn aid cam
evntwrh^l vywit brain area wtirer ti
iad wher ar oanls once Ilouriled.
DrlDging and BillIlng Dreoae and rni pro
Ipr, (ofUwnltoo of mhifuls, tail buling
o1 docks and b1i)tg also COribut 10o
Ithe artiu W1( airis. Dth O 1adr out
saOrasS S tLd i 4 n WO wrf4ow,


While Florida's population has been steadily growing,
our aagrass meadows have been declining

tub Flornia umaan Flals Phul\na
STimpie Din: 40% ol Ith sagrlasls ha IWn Iat
alincs 9IWaG,
* s1. JOei M un Wind IS al Cgamm 72% Ion a
-l saarel" tSci 1950.
* "Bl'cpt Ipaor hIall; 43% of IgnsvE bd I
In h nor thmim scamon w W lilr t. s
* adlai illner LgiMlm $0% ol IM segirass from
Stuart inorh Io Tifidewle mao WiLan II t
*Ciillrrbars I al uellwnln m 1I im|O ea : u We roan 1" ?w
29% ul uglaia last amc 1WO |


Florida's Seagrass Meadows, 2


Florida's Seagrass Meadows, 3


AI5 LAGOON PARK


22







RKS5ARCH


Indian River Lagoon
National Estuary Program
st Johns River
..- Water Management Distict
Palm Bay Serace Center
525 r.:l.-' ,'.... ( .1,e Pl;.j ., -S.E
SPalm FP FL 32909
i 984-4950
(8c; 276-3747



United States
Environmental Protection Agency
Region 4
61 Foriyhi Sr eet. SW
SAt anta GA 30303,9960
.*4 P:-1,562-9900

w eWepa-gov


St. Johns River
Water Management District
40i49 Reid Street P Box 1429
Paatka, FL 32178-1429
38&6) 324-'Sc
80) 451-7106
www.S/f wmd com



South Florida
Water Management District
MartrinSt. Luce Service Center
210 Atanta Avenue
Stuart, FL 34994
(772) 223-2600
S(800) 250-4100
nin n nn n d.go v
Indian River Lagoon, An Introduction to a National Treasure, Cover


prosperity of the Indian River Lagoon.


Volunteer groups from across Florida
have joined together to protect the
natural resources of the Lagoon. These
groups help organize and participate in
events like beach and river cleanup,
remove invasive plant species, and teach
school children about the functions, and
significance of the Lagoon.


Government agencies have put into
effect laws and regulations concerning
water quality, pollution, and activities
within the Lagoon.


Other funding helps produce brochures,
websites, and other personal media for
people to learn more about the story of
the Indian River Lagoon.


Together, these efforts seek to foster
continued improvements toward the
greater health of the Indian River
Lagoon.









VEKRO BEACH, rLORIDA






















































A15 LAGOON 1AKV




GATEWAY TO TMEL TROIC5


GATEWAY TO THI TROFIC5
Chapter Three


VELRO BACH, FLORIDA






CMHAFTEKTHK MR


THMEL RFL5NT
DAY IMAGE

Vero Beach is the county seat of Indian
River County and incorporates five
towns: Vero Beach, Sebastian, Fellsmere,
Orchid, and Indian River Shores.

Known for its relaxed, charming lifestyle,
residents may enjoy the scenic natural
beauty of the area along Florida's
east coast. The area website, www.
verobeach.com, portrays the region as
follows:

"Homey, yet casually elegant, Vero
Beach and Indian River County attracts
visitors and residents because of the
cultural wealth and inherent natural
beauty of the area. Vero Beach was
rated the "Best Small Town in Florida
& 12th in the Nation" and was named
one of "The 100 Best Art Towns in
America." Known as the "Gateway to
the Tropics," Vero Beach is located in a
climatic transition zone that offers an
unusual mix of vegetation found in the
coastal Carolinas ancient oak trees


and pine forests blended with swaying
palms and colorful blooms typical of
the tropics. The area is also recognized
as the 'Citrus Capital of the World,'
producing the finest Indian River citrus
for the domestic market and worldwide
export.

The Indian River Lagoon, passing
through Vero Beach, forms a significant
portion of the Intracoastal Waterway,
and is a hub for boating & fishing, water
skiing, and other small-craft waterborne
activities. Sheltered from the open
ocean, the Indian River area of Vero has
a number of public and private marinas
and boat launch facilities.

Vero Beach and Indian River County
have some of the best places in the
country for surfing and the most unique
places for diving and snorkeling as well
as Nature Preserves to explore. Whether
you prefer to spend your vacation in a
setting closer to nature, or if you just
want to spend a night or two shedding
the trappings of civilization, Indian River
County is a great place to visit."


donb.photo.net/photo_cd/d/b21.jpg
http://67.219.128.10/ReefOceanResort/controlpanel//covbseal.large.jpg
www.bansemer.com/.../the_shallow_inlet.jpg
http://www.usacitydirectories.com/travelamerica/images/vero-beach.jpg
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~flindian/wabasso.jpg
http://pics4.city-data.com/cpicc/cfilesl3754.jpg
http://www.gonomad.com/family/0712/vero%20photos/-vero-beach.jpg
http://www.turtlemoundtours.com/dolphin.gif


A15 LAGOON PARK


z6





GATEWAY TO THE TROfIC5


Vero Beach, florida:


"Gateway to the


VELRO BEACH, FLORIDA


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'Tropics...


*11
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CHAFTE KTHKMR


Ais Indians


Ais Indians


-The -T-reasure Coast


[Lar-I American ktettemIent


Railroads and Development


\'ero Beac 1k i- Born


Roaring T-wenties _.and Boom


C-reat epre.ssion anJ V\oril \!ar II


Post World War II to Present


15OOs- 1700s


I OOs I 1OOs



1500s 1800s
1 1, I 1 2







191 9-19z8


1 +6-Fresent


Florida's earliest settlers arrived more
than 10,000 years ago to the peninsula.
European arrival in America marked
some of the first personal interaction,
and conflict, with Native Americans.

As the first to colonize Florida, the
Spanish had some of the greatest
exchange with the natives. Along
Florida's east coast, the Ais Indians
claimed dominance as one of the most
powerful tribes in the state.

The Ais developed a reputation for
being one of the most brutal and feared
tribes known to the Europeans. The
Ais often killed all survivors of nearby
shipwrecks during Spanish settlement.
While Florida's northern tribes were
farmers, southern Florida tribes like the
Ais were relatively nomadic, journeying
along the Indian River Lagoon harvesting
shellfish, hunting wild game, and
gathering seasonal plants. The Ais
settled in clustered communities along
the waterfront. "Although the Spanish
called the local aboriginal inhabitants


AI5 LAGOON PARK


28






GATEWAY TO THE TROfIC5


primitive and barbarous, anthropological
evidence suggests that the Indians
here had developed a religious and
governmental structure of some
complexity (Johnston, 6)."

Spanish Colonialism

Ponce de Leon discovered Florida
in 1513. The announcement began
Spanish Colonization of the peninsula,
beginning with a settlement at St.
Augustine in an effort to thwart attempts
by the French to colonize near present
day Jacksonville.

As Spanish Colonists continued settling
Florida, hurricanes and tropical storms
wrecked ships just offshore. Survivors
frequently encountered native Indians,
and in 1546 a Spanish vessel wrecked
offshore of present day Cape Canaveral.
All survivors were murdered by the Ais,
with the exception of a young boy, who
was integrated into the tribe.

Over the next several decades, Spain
continued to grow their settlement at St.
Augustine with the intention to expand


Morris, Theodore. Indian River County Main Library


http://


with new settlements along Florida's
east coast. Limited supplies, internal
mutinies, and conflicts with the Ais
prevented settlement of the Indian River
area. Spaniards continued southward
and evenutally established settlements
further south in present day Jupiter. As
a result the Indian River region remained
hidden for many decades to come.


vww.treasurelore.com/florida/florida_chart.jpg
The Treasure Coast & the 1715 Fleet

Havana became Spain's central port for
New World operations. Trade routes
between the Americas, Asia, and Europe
were established as Spain built upon its
financial empire.

The Spanish regularly sent Fleets back


VL KO MIACH, FLOKIDA







CHA1TL KTHKL-L-


and forth between Spain and the New
World. Explorers collected spices and
treasures from the Incas in Peru, gold
from the Aztecs in Mexico, and porcelain
and spices from the Philippines and
China. The Spanish would carry goods
across the isthmus of Mexico on foot to
Vera Cruz, where they would be loaded
onto ships for return to Spain.


In July of 1715, one such Fleet prepared
to leave Cuba for the return to Spain.
Commanded by Captain Don Juan
de Ubila, the Fleet of eleven ships
accompanied by a French battleship for
protection, set sail northward, catching
the Gulf Stream on their journey along
Florida's east coast. On July 31, a
hurricane came ashore, striking the Fleet
and smashing the ships against the coral
reefs and shoals between the present
day Fort Pierce and Sebastian Inlets. All
ships were lost, along with a registered
cargo of gold and silver "pieces of eight",
which had been accumulated over a
four year period. If lost today, that same
cargo would be worth around $100
million.


1622

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andi security. Galleons onlhi ned th M Q0 FI apPIiI (f
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11kW Cr'rn n r v w ow N1( it Ins, .vcC INi ( II(5 tIC T II-N
ut liti iomrs Ilhe i. Lu:I,, 4k lof i the CoUknR ur.[% aI QC
mL0rr pCm.irt fmrI4Iur tiv'e knoIs in Cav.rorabi wind-,
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1715. awl 1733 wimeLkd e I scows .1 lr xmIIII'
.I4tt]; tIW I 1141dIN ctist iu-9 fjr 1.JndJ. IuR I If Lhc shp-
drivcrn asbui niuf inqxekrn- day 1-. PMrrcv b, i hby rican
in 41715. lh;ts hcelt designated a rs :I m~ate Unkli[-1c17
Atchtwcioi-ltdI Prcesercv Stri Pedri, a vicitni 44
ffih 1733 Ihurrianr chitat wtrvced over 20 silhips aloini
like WoriIb revil', I,, the sile ofm aitlthcr Prcvcr c v-1
Islarnor.Wa. Bcglh shipwrecks ame visited annualhy
b~y hundreds of snorrklkm- aud divcm


Smith, Miller, et. al., 26


A15 LAGOON 1AKK


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GATEWAY TO THE TROfIC5


The Fleet Disaster of 1715 was a terrible
loss for the Spanish. Crews from St.
Augustine were dispatched to salvage
treasures lost in the wrecks, but little
goods and valuables were recovered.
For more than two centuries, this
treasure remained buried just offshore
of Indian River County. In the 1940s
these wrecks were rediscovered,
sparking a modern day gold rush to find
buried treasure. Since the rediscovery,
this region of Florida has been referred
to as the Treasure Coast.

Early American Settlement

Florida became a State on March 3,
1845. This spawned an immigration
of people into the area. Swamps,
wetlands, heat, humidity, and
mosquitoes kept many people out of the
southern half of Florida.

Most travel into the Treasure Coast
region was limited to steamboat, which
was capable of navigating the narrow
waters of the Indian River Lagoon.
Initial settlement occurred in sparsely
scattered quiet waterfront communities.


Railroads and Development

The development of the Florida East
Coast Railway by Henry Flagler sparked
an incredible growth for Florida. Enticed
by tropical vegetation and an escape
from the winter cold, many northerners
took the journey southbound on
Flagler's railway to the Sunshine State.

Such development opened up
opportunities to begin settlement along
the mainland side of the Indian River
Lagoon. Agriculture offered a promising
bounty to many ambitious northerners
willing to make the move southward.
Citrus became a highly lucrative and
effective crop to grow throughout the
Treasure Coast region.

Vero Beach is Born

In 1925, Vero Beach became the
County seat of the newly created Indian
River County, which broke away from
neighboring St. Lucie County.

Roaring Twenties Land Boom


Smith, Miller, et. al., 20


VELRO BEACN, FLORIDA


Johnston, 88


4^y






CMHAfTEKTHK MR


The beginning of the twentieth century
marked the start of an incredible land
boom to what was previously a quiet,
unpopulated Treasure Coast. A thriving
Citrus industry encouraged the creation
of a massive series of ditches, canals,
and mosquito impoundments, clearing
land and draining wetlands for prime
agricultural use. Settlers moved to the
area with high hopes of becoming rich
from the sale of citrus, pineapples, and
other crops. Communities were laid out
and homes were built to keep up with
the population.

The Great Depression and World War II

The Great Depression marked the end
of the land boom, shattering hopes and
dreams as jobs were lost and demand
diminished. As things began to recover,
World War II became the driving force
in the economy, and the Vero Beach
Airport became a US Naval Station and
training ground for soldiers.


boom began as Veterans returned
home and the American economy
flourished. In the following years, Vero
Beach and Indian River County residents
experienced tremendous growth while
an increasingly famous citrus and tourist
industry began to shape the image of
the region as it is known today.


Johnston, Back Cover


Al'


Johnston, Back Cover


LUNDEEN
.KMD


Johnston, 89


World War II to Present


Following World War II, a new land


Johnston, Back Cover


A15 LAGOON PARK


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._... .







GATEWAY TO TH~ TROfIC5


Legend

-- Major Roads

L...J County Municipalitlss
Urban and Developed Land
Agriculture
Rangeland
Upland Forest

Wbter


Cultural Attractions
-Downtown Vero Beach
Indian River Citrus Museum
Indian River Historical Society
-McClarty Treasure Museum
-Mel FisherTreasure Museum
-Riverside Theater
-Sebastian Fishing Museum
-Vero Beach Museum of Art
Area Golf Courses
-Bent Pine
Grand Harbor
Hawk's Nest
-Indian River Club
John's Island
Orchid Island
Quail Valley
Riomar CC
-Sandridge
Windsor
-Vero Beach CC

Retail/Shopping Attractions
Beach Shoppes
-Indian River Mall
Three Avenues
-Vero Outlets

Recreation/Nature Attractions
Area Beaches
McKee Botanical Gardens
Environmental Learning Center
Pelican Island National Wildlife Refuge
Oslo Riverfront Conservation Area
Sebastian Inlet State Park
-St. Sebastian Preserve State Park


Area Attractions





* Culture/Local History

SGolf Course

0 Major Shopping Center

O Recreation/Nature




Today, Vero Beach is home to a wide
range of area attractions. Many culture
and nature based experiences attract
a variety of locals and tourists to enjoy
their offerings each year. Additionally,
numerous golf courses and retail venues
create other places of interest.


VERO BEACN, FLORIDA




CHA1TK KTHKLK K


Culture based


1IIxperiencs


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m7


AI5LAGOON PAK]





CATr WAYTOTH~ TKOFIC5


Nature based Experiences


VL KO MIACH, FLOKIDA





CHAfRTMRE KTHK-



Recreation(/Golfr based Experiences


http://www.Iuxury.com/images/5 635.jpg


A15 LAGOON PARK


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GATEWAY TO THE TKOPIC5



Retail/Sho,5ing based experiences
D 'T IL_... .. ...


http://www.verobeachstores.com/images/vero%20beach%200utlet%20Mall%201.jpg http://www.countryinns.com/ch /images/hotels/FLVERO/loc 450.jpg
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VL KO MIACH, rLOKIDA






















































A15 LAGOON 1AKV




LOCAL CONTEXT


LOCAL CONTEXT
Chapter Four


VLERO BLACH, FLORIDA





CHAzT K FOUK


Metropolitan Areas:
-Lakeland
-Orlando
-Palm Beach
-Space Coast
-Treasure Coast

Major Airports:
-Melbourne International
-Orlando International
-Palm Beach International
-Sanford International

Major Research Institutions:
-Embry Riddle
Aeronautical University
-Florida Atlantic University
-Florida International
University
-Harbor Branch
Oceanographic Institute
-NASA
-Stetson University
-University of Central Florida


Major Sea Ports:
-Port Canaveral


Major Tourist Attractions:
-Brevard Zoo
-Busch Wildlife Sanctuary
-Central Florida Zoo
-Daytona Speedway
-Gatorland
-Holy Land Experience
-Kennedy Space Center
-Lion Country Safari
-Palm Beach Zoo
-Rapids Water Park
-Sea World Orlando Resort
-Universal Orlando Resort
-Walt Disney World Resort


Area Attractions:


100 Mile


5ite Radius


AI5LAGOON PAK]


40


,


4000h,",






LOCAL CONTF-XT



Indian River County

Legend
SResidential
,. Conmercial
S, Inslitutional
S\Recreational
,i, "Seba :an a- Industrial
SFell nre r orLhid Apo
P" P public VYrks
S: Indian River Agriculture
Shores
)ores Rangelarnd
Herbacous Dry Prairie
_ .Bea Upland Forest
''* V Wtlands
er Bec-- '

.i VWater
"' Atlantic Ocean

f Project Location
0 2-5 5 10 15 20
1 1 Mites









Counts Land C(se

VEKRO BEACM, FLORIDA





CMHAFTL~ OUR


Residential Land Use

Legend
Residential
VWtlands
V~ter
Atlantic Ocean


Commercial Land Use

Legend
M Commercial
Wetlands
waterr
Atlantic Ocean


Industrial Land Use

Legend
M Industrial
Wetlands
Water
Atlantic Ocean


Area Land (se: 4 Mile Site Radius


A15 LAGOON PARK
41


11 `~






LOCAL CONTEXT


I
I


I
r


Public & Civic Land Use


Legend
SInstitutional
Recreational
Wetlands
Water
Atlantic Ocean


4


Infrastructure Land Use


Legend
Utility Corridor
SPublic Wbrks
Wetlands
Water
Atlantic Ocean


Natural Land Use

Legend
Agriculture
Rangeland
..:: Herbaceous Dry Prairie
SUpland Forest
VWtlands
Seagrasses
Vater
Atlantic Ocean


Area


Land (jse: 4+ Mile Site Radius


VELRO BEACH, FLORIDA


-+


4


as c r r r
UI,


s. a& I ___ a





CMHAfrTK OUR


Developed Land Use

Legend
Residential
Commercial
Industrial
VWtlands
Water
Atlantic Ocean


L





\




Public & Civic Land Use

Legend
SInstitutional
Recreational
Wetlands
Water
Atlantic Ocean


Area Land (5e: Mile Ste Radus

AI1 LAGOON PARK
Lf"4f





LOCAL CONTEXT


3 |


1*


A
t I tI-UM M _ii


Infrastructure Land Use

Legend
Utility Corridor
Public Works
VWtlands
Water
Atlantic Ocean


Natural Land Use

Legend


Agriculture
Rangeland
Herbaceous Dry Prairie
Upland Forest
Wetlands
Seagrasses
Water
Atlantic Ocean


Area


Land (Jse:


1 Mile Site Radius


VLERO BEACH, FLORIDA


" ...............:..
::............. ,


P
W4
* \
Nil






















































A15 LAGOON 1AKV





SITL ANALY5I5


51TE ANALYSIS
Chapter five


VL KO M7ACH, FLOKIDA


+7






CMHAFTLR FIV


SITE LAND USE

MOBILE HOME
PARK 35.50 ac

WASTEWATER
TREATMENT PLANT 16.00 ac

MUNICIPAL
POWER PLANT 16.70 ac

(SPOIL ISLAND) (2.50 ac)

TOTAL LAND USE 70.70 ac


~1PUREI
0' 100' 300 500


A15 LAGOON 1AKV


48


locoK-,





SITL ANALY5I5


City of Vero Beach
Municipal Power Plant






City of Vero Beach
Wastewater Treatment Plant






Fairlane Harbor
Mobile Home Park


: 1 t


1 1 WI~tc,,.


VL KO ECACH, rLOKIDA


9






CMNAFTLR FIV


EXISTING SITE
CIRCULATION & ACCESS

' 4 LANE PRIMARY ROAD

SSECONDARY ROAD

CAUSEWAY BRIDGE

PEDESTRIAN ACCESS

MAJOR INTERSECTION
.I. WITH TRAFFIC SIGNAL

POINT OF ENTRY

EXISTING PARKING

EXISTING BOAT
ACCESS/PARKING

PROPERTY LINE


f7~7I
~j~ F 0' 100CO 300'
A1 I AGON 50c),


A15 LAGOON FAKK


I OO71/


50





SITL ANALY5I5


VL KO ECACH, FLOKIDA


I i:






CMNAFTKR FIVe


OPPORTUNITIES AND
CONSTRAINTS

- POINT OF INTEREST

~r TRANSPORTATION NODE

GOOD VIEWSHED

BAD VIEWSHED

!/ NEED FOR AUDIO/
VISUAL BUFFER

STRUCTURES (TO BE
RETAINED)

EXISTING SEAWALL

UTILITY LINES

AREA TO REMEDIATE

SEAGRASS BEDS

PROPERTY LINE

*ENTIRE SITE LOCATED
WITHIN FEMA FLOOD
PLAIN



1 ACRE
5&S 0t O1 00' 300' 500' 100'


AIS LAGOON PARK





SITL ANALY5I5


%


Existing Infrastructure


L


Need for Bioremediation


SD


Stormwater Discharge and
Water Quality



VELRO B ACM, rLORIDA


.-c ,


5)






CMNAFTKR FIV


U 7L
lk,R HLIVAN


n- NATURAL ECOLOGY

MANATEE VIEWING
AREA

COMMON DOLPHIN
MOVEMENT PATTERN

COMMON MANATEE
.. .i MOVEMENT PATTERN

MIGRATORY BIRD
.,. STRATEGIC HABITAT

SEAGRASS BEDS

MANGROVE
WETLANDS

COASTAL
WOODLAND

PROPERTY LINE










-ACRE 11O.ET
aeF 0' 100 300' 500' 1000'


AI5 LAGOON PARK






SITL ANALY5I5


hP


VL KO ECACH, FLOKIDA


55






















































A15 LAGOON 1AKV




DL51GN ALTLRNATIVL,5


DS51GN ALTERNATIVES
Chapter Six



VLRO B~ACn, FLORIDA
57




CMAFTL K5IX


AI5 LAGOON PARK


58


i,_






D-5SIGN ALT KNATIVL,5


CONCEFPTUAL
EXFLORATION5

The initial design investigations for this
project included a series of conceptual
design explorations.

Since the premise outlined in the
project proposal is simply to explore
development opportunities for
the waterfront site, there is no
predetermined program.

Design investigations explored
development opportunities from the
perspective of three different project
stakeholders:

-Conservation Driven Approach
-Revenue Driven Approach
-Interpretation Driven Revenue
Approach

These design explorations illustrate
an essential component of the
design process during initial concept
development. These master plans
served as a generator toward the actual


VERO BEACH, FLORIDA


selected and detailed master plan.

Such explorations helped establish what
worked and failed when placed on the
site, and help justify the final program
used in later investigations.

This chapter details a series of
design studies, including diagrams
and conceptual site plans, indicating
potential future land uses for the current
70 acre site.


59





CHAFPTRK5IX


Concept 1: Maximum Conservation and Restoration


Proposed Program

-Indian River County History Museum
-Cafe
-Nature Trails
-Constructed Wetland to Manage
Stormwater, slowing the rate of fresh
water discharge into the Lagoon
-Eco-tourism based recreation tours and
excursions
-Surface Parking
-Service Area


AI5LAGOON PAK]


6o





DESIGN ALTERNATIVE-5


C onceptual Master Plan


1 ACRE
435SF 0' 100'


300' 500'


VELRO BEACH, FLORIDA


looole





CHAPTT K5IX


Concept 2: Maximum



Proposed Program

- Harbor/Marina
- 5 Star Hotel
- Convention Center
- Family Oriented Time Share Hotel
- Family Oriented Resort Pool

- Retail, Dining, and Entertainment
District


Revenue generator


- Treasure Coast based Adventure Park


- Structure Parking
- Surface Parking
- Back of House Support Areas

- Constructed Wetland


AI5LAGOON PAK]


6z


1

r.





DESIGN ALTERNATIVE-5


C onceptual Master Plan


1 ACRE
1SF 0' 10 300'3


VELRO BEACH, FLORIDA


63


500'


looole





CHAPTRK51X


Concept : Interpretation Driven Revenue

Proposed program ----

-Central Harbor/Marina
-Retail, Dining, and
Entertainment District

-Central Harbor/Marina
-Hotel
-Convention Space
-Resort Pool

-Local History Museum
-Native Animal Park

-Surface Parking .
-Structure Parking

-Created Wetland with an
Interpretive Trail System

19^


AI5LAGOON PAK]





DESIGN ALTERNATIVE-5


C onceptual Master Plan


SACRE300
45 oS o0' 300'


VELRO BEACH, FLORIDA


65


500'


looole






















































A15 LAGOON 1AKV




AI5 LAGOON PARK


AIS LAGOON PARK
Chapter Seven


VELRO BEACH, FLORIDA






CHA1TL-K5r-VL N


TMEL MASTERK
PLAN

Investigations undertaken during
the design alternatives phase helped
develop an understanding of the most
appropriate approach for the final
master plan.

The final master plan explores the
concept of man's connection to the
Indian River Lagoon and how the
relationship has influenced cultural
development.

For centuries, the Ais used and
harvested the resources of the Indian
River Lagoon. Early settlers were
attracted to the natural beauty of the
area and a thriving seafood market.
Steamboats traveled up and down
the Lagoon opening up the area to
development and new residents. The
railroad and citrus industry continued
to evolve the relationship between the
Lagoon and its residents.

Over the last century, water quality and


68


the natural health of the Indian River
Lagoon has been diminished. Efforts
over the last few decades have greatly
improved the conditions of the region
and will continue as more people learn
about the significance of this natural
resource.

The final master plan, Ais Lagoon Park,
strives to capture the spirit of Vero
Beach, Indian River County, and the
Indian River Lagoon in a local culture
based eco-tourism destination.

Selected program includes elements
oriented around the story of the Lagoon.
The idea is to address key issues related
to the natural health, modern day
threats, and continued success of the
Indian River Lagoon in a fun, interactive,
and educational manner.

Everything is the area is in some way
connected to the Indian River Lagoon,
including various ecosystems, canals,
waterways, streams, and local culture
and activity. This project strives to help
show these relationships.



A15 LAGOON PARK






A15 LAGOON 1AKK


______ l






..





I-.
rI )i m


I LEGEND

I
I Wildlife Sanctuary

Mixed Use Waterfront

SPublic Open Space/
Recreation


/


Hotel/Lodging

Parking & Transportation

Utilities/Infrastructure


Master Land Use Plan


01100,


VL KO ECACH, FLOKIDA


69


300' 500'


11~1000,







CHA1TL-K5r-VL N


LEGEND


_ JWildlife Sanctuary
.1. Central Plaza
2. Lagoon Ecosystem
mo m 3. Mangrove Fringe Ecosystem
4. Freshwater Marsh Ecosystem
5. Coastal Hammock Ecosystem
Mixed Use Waterfront
6. Treasure Coast Showcase
7. Dolphin Amphitheater
8. Red Mangrove Restaurant
9. Spanish Galleon
10. Vero Beach Plaza
11. Harbor/Marina
Public Open Space/Recreation
12. Discovery Pointe
10 _13. Trail System
14. Picnic Pavilions
15. Boat Launch
16. Tennis Courts
17. Manatee Observation Park
Hotel/Lodging
18. Mangrove Treehouse Villas
19. Campfire Pit & BBQ Pavilions
20. Treasure Coast Hotel
Parking & Transportation
21. Vehicular Parking
22. Bus Drop Off/Parking
23. Watercaft Parking
Utilities/Infrastructure
24. Pumping Station
25. Reclaimed Water Storage



Master Site Plan
o 100' 300' 500' 1000



70 Als LAGOON FARK







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VL KO ECACH, FLOKIDA





































72- AI5 LAGOON 1AKV




THN GUQS T rXPFLRIKINC


THL GULST LXPFLRINCL
Chapter _igkht



VERKO BEACt FLORIDA
75






CHAFT-K LIGHT


A15 LAGOON 1AKV


7+






THN GULS5T rXPLRILNCL


AIS LAGOON PARK

Throughout history, man's connection
to water has influenced development
patterns and shaped cultural identities.
Located at the convergence of
subtropical and temperate climate zones
along Florida's east central coast, the
Indian River Lagoon is considered the
most biologically diverse estuary in the
United States. More than 3,000 species
of plant and animal life are found within
this treasured region of the state.

Anchored around a restored coastal
wetland, Ais Lagoon Park combines the
natural beauty and ecology of the Indian
River Lagoon with the rich cultural
story of the Treasure Coast to create an
exciting new destination for the east
central Florida region. The park offers
guests the opportunity to experience
first-hand the amazing wonders that
have attracted people to this region of
Florida for centuries.

There is something for everyone at
Ais Lagoon Park as they experience


the natural beauty of the Indian River
Lagoon. Guests may start the day
watching the sunrise from their own
Treehouse Villa, or climb atop an ancient
Indian Shell Mound. Guests may spend
the day exploring natural trails through
native ecosystems, engage with bobcats,
dolphins, manatees, and other animals
in their native habitats, or enjoy a kayak
excursion to one of the nearby spoil
islands. Whether intending to spend the
day immersed in native ecosystems and
habitats, dining on local ingredients, or
discovering the area's natural treasures,
Ais Lagoon Park will create lasting
memories for all visitors to this exciting
destination.

Whether visiting for a day, a weekend, or
a week, Ais Lagoon Park has something
to offer. The Indian River Lagoon has
been an invaluable resource to the area
for centuries. The park embraces the
spirit of the Indian River Lagoon, its
local culture, and natural beauty in a
distinctly new culture based eco-tourism
destination for Indian River County and
the Treasure Coast.


VEKRO B~ACM, FLORIDA


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GUE-ST ARRIVAL

Guests may visit Ais Lagoon Park by
car, bus, boat, bicycle, or on foot.
Those traveling by car or bus begin
their adventure on a narrow one lane
road passing underneath the canopies
of windswept live oaks and twisting
cabbage palms. Weaving their way
through the coastal hammock, they
soon catch a glimpse of Discovery
Pointe, a large reconstructed native
Indian shell mound rising along the
water's edge. Continuing along the
road, guests will discover views of
Tesoro Tower and the Treasure Coast
Showcase. After parking, guests walk
along a palm-lined promenade to Vero
Beach Plaza. Guests traveling by boat
should notice Discovery Pointe emerging
above the mangroves as they approach el i
the docks located within the central ,.
harbor. Upon disembarking, guests
arrive at Vero Beach Plaza. Guests
approaching on foot or by bicycle will
enjoy a winding trail system as they
move from Indian River Boulevard to
Vero Beach Plaza.



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VERO BEACH
FLAZA

Vero Beach Plaza serves as the central
gathering point and property orientation
for guests to Ais Lagoon Park. Tesoro
Tower serves as one of the iconic
elements of the park and connects to
the Treasure Coast Showcase. Guest
services and information windows are
located at the base of Tesoro Tower.
Here guests may purchase tickets,
book boat charters, kayak excursions to
nearby islands, rent personal watercraft,
make reservations to area restaurants,
check-in to the hotel and the Mangrove
Canopy Villas, get oriented to the
park's many amenities, or speak with
a knowledgeable staff member to get
suggestions for where to go next.











V KRO B~ACN, FLOKIDA
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CHAFTLK LIGHT


DI5COVERKY
FOINTE-

Native Indian Shell Mounds, or
'middens', as they are also referred to
as, are essentially large ancient refuse
piles. Primarily composed of shellfish,
such as clam and oyster shells, these
mounds were built up to great heights
over tens, hundreds, or even thousands
of years by Native American Indians.
Eventually, these mounds grew to an
elevation high enough to serve as an
observation point, territorial marker,
or security outpost. Spanish Colonists
first settling Florida often discovered
these shell mounds while sailing along
the Indian River Lagoon and Florida
coast. Historically, Indian River County
was home to one very large shell mound
located near present day Sebastian.
Estimated by anthropologists to have
taken 4,000 years to build, the property
was sold in 1904 to a construction
company and the shell mound was
used to provide the aggregate for all of
the roads in the area. Today no shell
mounds remain in the area.


Guests arriving early to catch the sunrise
will want to climb Discovery Pointe for
the best view. Built to resemble an Ais
Indian Shell Mound like those historically
found in the area, Discovery Pointe
offers a fun way for Guests to Ais Lagoon


Park to take in scenic views of the park,
the Indian River Lagoon, and Vero
Beach while providing an interpretive
experience that recaptures forgotten
history.


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TRKEAS5IKE
COAST
5HOWCASL

Connected to Tesoro Tower is the
Treasure Coast Showcase, a mixed-use
space housing facilities for festivals,
exhibitions, conferences, weddings,
film and production, a walk-through
attraction exploring the history of the
Treasure Coast, a caf6, and a 40 room
hotel featuring scenic panorama views
of the Indian River Lagoon and Ais
Preserve Marine & Wildlife Sanctuary.

Guests wishing to learn about the rich
history of the region will enjoy the
immersive Treasure Coast Experience.
Here, guests will explore detailed walk-
through exhibits illustrating the story
of the area's first inhabitants, the Ais
IN Indians. Other significant moments in
the region's history are also featured,
including Spanish Colonialism, the 1715
Fleet Wreck and origins of the Treasure
Coast, early American settlement, the
S- impact of the railroad, a booming citrus
industry, and the history of Vero Beach
valschool.com/ classes Hide_Tanning%20%28Glen_
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VLKO B ACN, FLOKIDA
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CHAFT-K LIGHT


and Indian River County. The Treasure to the area as well as help ma
Coast Experience exits outside into the Lagoon Park to a broader audi
entry plaza to Ais Preserve.

The Citrus Cafe & Market offers guests
an assortment of seasonal local
offerings. Props and relics characteristic
of the area's citrus industry help
establish the abstracted packing house
http://www.thebestweddingreceptionever.com
theme, while a large glass atrium
provides scenic views of the Lagoon
and area grounds. Here, guests can
enjoy freshly squeezed orange juice
and samples of Indian River Grapefruit
supplied by local growers. The adjoining
retail area allows guests to bring home
their favorite selections. An outdoor
dining patio accompanies the cafe,
where guests will catch a closer look of
the nearby recreated Spanish Galleon.
The Citrus Cafe may also be rented out
for private parties and events.

Film and production facilities intend
to entice nature based documentary
crews to visit the region to capture the
incredible beauty of the Indian River
Lagoon and Treasure Coast region. In
turn, this will help promote tourism


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ence.







TVh GUQ5T rX1TLKILNCT


VL KO ECACH, FLOKIDA






CHAFT-K LIGHT


SPAN IS
GALLEON

Adjacent to the Treasure Coast
Experience, guests may walk along the
boardwalk to a nearby island to explore
a recreation of a 1715 Spanish Galleon.
Kids of all ages will discover the
complexities of sailing the Spanish trade
routes between the Europe and the New
World. Those willing to journey into the
cargo hold may even find the treasure
hidden underneath.


museum.jpg


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RED MANGROVE

RK5TA URANT


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After an exciting day exploring Ais
Lagoon Park, guests may taste the
incredible seafood found within the
region at Vero Beach's newest fine dining
establishment. Offering panoramic
vistas of the Indian River Lagoon, guests
may enjoy dinner at the park's signature
restaurant, The Red Mangrove. The
menu features the area's finest seafood,
S with all ingredients harvested locally and
inspired by regional flavors.


VL KO ECACH, rLOKIDA


85





CHAFT-K LIGHT


DOLPHIN
AMPMITHMATEK

Located along the Lagoon near the
Citrus Cafe & Market, the Dolphin
Amphitheater provides the perfect
place for guests to enjoy an outdoor
performance. Designed for concerts,
performances, awards ceremonies,
guest speakers, or local festival, the
Dolphin Amphitheater adds to the
diversity of attractions available at Ais
Lagoon Park.


A15 LAGOON 1AKK


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TMH GUL5ST rXPFRILNCL


AI5 PRE _SEKRVE
MARINE & WILDLIFE
SANCTUARY

Fascinating coastal ecosystems exist
within the region surrounding the
Indian River Lagoon. Each ecosystem
creates unique environments inhabited
by flocks of birds, marine life, or land
dwelling animals. Ancient live oaks
twist upward to the sky, illustrating the
impressive power of tropical storms.
The Ais Preserve Marine and Wildlife
Sanctuary offer guests an opportunity to
experience the beauty, complexity, and
diversity of a coastal wetland.

Within the preserve, guests are given
the chance to explore the following
ecosystems: the Lagoon, Mangrove
Fringe, Freshwater Marsh, and Coastal
Hammock. Within each of these
ecosystems, guests discover first-hand
immersive animal habitats showcasing
species native to each ecosystem.
Interpretational opportunities within
the preserve educate guests by paying
tribute to the architecture and culture


of the Spanish colonial period as well as
the area's pre-Columbian settlers, the
Ais Indians.

The Ais Preserve Marine and Wildlife
Sanctuary allows guests to experience
the beauty of the marine and wildlife
associated with the Indian River Lagoon
while gaining an understanding of the
connectivity and relationships between
each ecosystem. Guests will learn
about current concerns and threats
to the natural health of the Indian
River Lagoon, specifically in regard to
water quality and stormwater runoff.
Interactive exhibits and attractions will
offer guests solutions on how to help
make a difference. All of the animals
featured in the Preserve have either
been injured, diseased, or sick and
have been removed from their native
habitats. The Preserve duals as a
research and recovery facility for animals
as they are rehabilitated back to health.


VERO B~ACN, FLORIDA


85






CHAFTLK LIGHT


CE-NTKAL FLAZA

Upon entering Ais Preserve, guests find
themselves immersed in a lush native
forest, mixed with mangroves, live
oaks, and cabbage palms. This wooded
zone helps remove guests from the
cultural architecture and environment
of the Treasure Coast Showcase as they
transition toward the Lagoon Plaza.

Once arriving at Lagoon Plaza, guests
will find abstracted artwork depicting
animals and plants found within the
region. Here, they may decide which
direction to take in a loop encircling
the Preserve. The architecture is low
and flat, hidden beneath the canopy of
surrounding vegetation. Restrooms and
a retail store are located in the central
plaza.











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TM1 GUQ5T TX1TKI LNCT


THE- LAGOON

From the Central Plaza guests may
embark on a boardwalk across a
waterway toward the Lagoon ecosystem.
On the other side of the boardwalk,
guests soon discover a vista featuring
sea turtles and dolphins. Upon rounding


the corner, guests are surrounded by
the dolphin and sea turtle habitat as
they learn about the roles each animal
plays in maintaining the health of the
Indian River Lagoon. As guests move
further along the pathway, the trail
descends into an underwater viewing
rotunda featuring views of the dolphins,


sea turtles, and stingrays. Exiting the
underwater viewing rotunda, guests
soon find themselves at the surface
again overlooking a stingray habitat.
Here, guests are offered an opportunity
to wade in the water and pet the rays. A
snack bar and restroom facility is located
nearby.


VL KO MIACH, FLOKIDA


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CHAFT-K LIGHT








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THE- MANGROVE_
FRINGE-

After enjoying quick snack, guests
continue along another boardwalk
through a forest of red mangroves.
This transition zone carries guests


from the Lagoon into the Mangrove
Fringe. Beyond the mangrove forest, the
pathway opens up again to a manatee
habitat. Here, guests get an up close
look at the sea cow, and descend once
again into another underwater viewing
location.


From the underwater viewing area,
guests continue into a facility illustrating
as if they are descending underwater. As
they continue inward, guests find brief
films and interactive exhibits featuring
marine life found within the Indian River
Lagoon. After moving through a series
of exhibits and films, guests enter a large
room filled with aquariums and touch
tanks featuring several of the animals
featured in the previous rooms.

Marine biologists and educators are
standing by to answer any questions and
share their knowledge about the Indian
River Lagoon. Adjacent to this room is a
classroom facility used for school groups
on field trips or for private groups and
parties.

As guests begin to ascend from the
depths, windows overlooking the nearby
freshwater marsh habitats become
visible.


VL KO ECACH, rLOKIDA


89






CHAFT-K LIGHT


A15 LAGOON 1AKV


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THE
"~r;TKS 5HWAT1IK

MAK5H

Guests ascending from the theater
I and aquarium rooms soon discover in
freshwater marsh aviary. Inside this
structure, guests are able to witness
dozens of birds found within the region.
Freeform pathways meander through
bird habitats. Guests may purchase food
for the birds and feed them by hand.

.. ." '. Upon exiting the aviary, guests find
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themselves on a boardwalk overlooking
the Indian River Lagoon with a scenic
vista of the entire Ais Preserve. A
restaurant caf6 with outdoor seating
offers visitors a chance to stop and eat
lunch or grab a snack before continuing.

The boardwalk narrows as guests
approach the swamp. As guests
round the corner they find themselves
overlooking the alligator habitat.
Continuing onward, guests soon discover
a habitat featuring the river otter.



VLKO B ACH, FLOKIDA





CMAflTLKR EIGHT


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Full Text

PAGE 1

VERO BEACH, FLORIDAAIS LAGOON PARKCulture Oriented Eco-Tourism A Senior Thesis Project by Matt Meyer

PAGE 2

AIS LAGOON PARK

PAGE 3

VERO BEACH, FLORIDAThe University of Florida An Undergraduate Thesis in Landscape Architecture By Faculty Advisor 2010 !"#!$" %"&'

PAGE 4

AIS LAGOON PARK

PAGE 5

VERO BEACH, FLORIDAACKNOWLEDGEMENTS(!"%""! and encouragement throughout the length of this project. I have enjoyed learning from her )"*%+,+-% +/3("!% years. ($-45!'-3' !!!6 !!!%!"35!( have remained in Architecture. ($78$!9 ):%"""!!%)" '";%""% "!" ";< +(!!"" !%""! (""";3 -! Maryann Buehn =4 7 78 Carmen Mocerino Tony Morgan > Terry Schnadelbach 78 7'= 4%'!"

PAGE 6

AIS LAGOON PARK

PAGE 7

VERO BEACH, FLORIDATABLE OF CONTENTSChapter One Introduction Chapter Two Research Chapter Three Gateway to the Tropics Chapter Four Local Context Chapter Five Site Analysis Chapter Six Design Alternatives Chapter Seven Ais Lagoon Park Chapter Eight Guest Experience Chapter Nine Master Planning Diagrams Chapter Ten Sustainability Chapter Eleven Conclusion Chapter Twelve References Appendix Initial Proposal, Final Presentation 1 15 25 39 47 57 67 73 103 111 119 123 131

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AIS LAGOON PARK

PAGE 9

INTRODUCTION VERO BEACH, FLORIDAINTRODUCTIONChapter One C C h h h t O O 1

PAGE 10

CHAPTER ONE AIS LAGOON PARK 2

PAGE 11

INTRODUCTION VERO BEACH, FLORIDAPROJECT ABSTRACT'!? @%"! "" '(>% !% *!! DEEE8"" !3 (>%3 G$+ "? 3( !!"% 6(>% ! 'HE" G$?" 5'! !!"3 %"!"" "" J3 "%)" 8!!% )" "#!" %(! "KN ! "3 3

PAGE 12

CHAPTER ONE AIS LAGOON PARKGENERAL OVERVIEW'";G$ +"")!HE (>%3' "? ! !"""! !"3'";)" %"!"" !!) 3THE SITEN"")!HE NG$+( >% N(>% N""% "" % "" 4

PAGE 13

INTRODUCTION VERO BEACH, FLORIDA Indian River County Blue Cypress Lake Indian River G$ +! O (>% >PE,'!"/ $%O+'" Interstate QR Genera l Project Context ; 5

PAGE 14

CHAPTER ONE AIS LAGOON PARK ; "% 3 ;" "%! %*! #^!! (G7"(!$ !!ZEEE8 ""!DP !" ?!"" %!3 ' !!"HDE!! #N! % &!%! % %! (!"%6 !"! ! ""3"
PAGE 15

INTRODUCTION VERO BEACH, FLORIDA PROJECT PROPOSAL'G$ !!) 5'! ( >%3(" ?" %" !!3' !! K+ "%3' !" !! "! ")!O ( >%3 ;G$ 5'! "+ &DY!!" (>%3' #! WEEZ+7 !" !!! %! ""! %"")!HE' G$ )"%"!"" !!" ' %"!!" "") ! %"!3 ; G$(>% !!!3'( >%!!! "K" %"!"" !; )%"!! 3' "%%" !!"! "37"
PAGE 16

CHAPTER ONE AIS LAGOON PARKASSUMPTIONS_3'%HEN 6 "%%" %"!3 W3'G$ !! )5'! (>% 3 3=) !%3 3X!! ! 3"!" 3 D3'G$ !!" " 3) !%3 Z3+&&! "%%"3 3) !%3 3=) 3 Y3'" 3LIMITATIONS_3`)DY! ! water W3=) D3!@ !!"" storms Z3!"N Y3ON%!" _H $" 5 '!" P3'k; !"" 8

PAGE 17

INTRODUCTION VERO BEACH, FLORIDA 9

PAGE 18

CHAPTER ONE AIS LAGOON PARKGOALS & OBJECTIVES 3(""!" 3%"!)N"!%! 3="%% 3'%?q xcean 3=""" #(>% 3! !8 3>?!N% !% 3"!!! !"#$% &&&&&&Commerce 3"N%% 3"K(>%? "" 3"K?") "%" "%N!N$N3;" "< VV 3"3 V ! V V z \ HH3 ;" "< VV 3%%! V ! V 3;" 10

PAGE 19

INTRODUCTION VERO BEACH, FLORIDA TARGET MARKETN>' N=* N+'% N-< NN" N5N5NGTARGET DEMOGRAPHICN> N+G N=!{ NKV> N+! N$>V-" N+!7!{ N=N'!V`$'% 11"< VV !!!3! V !\_HX V __XH[Y_HPX6'3;" "
PAGE 20

CHAPTER ONE AIS LAGOON PARK12 DESIGN APPROACH ' ( ' ) `%+ {= -=)"

PAGE 21

INTRODUCTION VERO BEACH, FLORIDA13

PAGE 22

AIS LAGOON PARK14

PAGE 23

RESEARCH VERO BEACH, FLORIDARESEARCHChapter Two C C h h h t T T 15

PAGE 24

CHAPTER TWO AIS LAGOON PARK THE INDIAN RIVER LAGOONAis Lagoon }ar~ is located along the Indian iver Lagoon in €ero Beach Florida. The Indian iver Lagoon is considered the most biologically diverse estuary in the United States. '"9!" for people wildlife and water.Ž The @ q@?! xcean but also by rivers streams 8! !! ( >%(`'%(! 16 (>%`=!$

PAGE 25

RESEARCH VERO BEACH, FLORIDA Thousands of plants and animals depend on the lagoon and its water ‚uality for survival. }eople depend on the Lagoon !!! uses. &!%" water ‚uality of the Indian iver Lagoon over the years. ƒirectly or indirectly we are all responsible for maintaining the health of the Indian iver Lagoon system. As residents as government leaders as visitors and as responsible individuals we "8"% changes within the Lagoon.Ž „Indian iver Lagoon …† This Chapter outlines some of the # related to the overall value and ‚uality of the Indian iver Lagoon. Samples from numerous area advocacy groups ! collaborated to produce the content herein. (>%(`'Y17

PAGE 26

CHAPTER TWO AIS LAGOON PARK FACTS & FIGURESThe IL is an estuary not a river. Unli~e %@(> driven by gravity. ather it is the wind "!%" within the lagoon.Ž Li~e all estuaries the Indian iver !N# characteri‡ed by a high degree of miˆing of saline oceanic water and freshwater from upland sources. ‰ater is eˆchanged between the Indian iver O ocean inlets.Ž 9'@ @" "" part on its proˆimity to an inlet and to freshwater inputs from streams rivers ditches and canals.Ž The Lagoon straddles a subtropical climate to the north and a warmz temperate climate to the south. '@ biogeographical provinces is one of the factors underlying the spectacular biodiversity found within the Lagoon. Šigh biodiversity is also fostered by "! habitats that serve as home to the plants and animals of the Indian iver Lagoon. Seagrass meadows mangrove forests and salt marshes are foremost among (> 3: The IL watershed is home to more W_EE8"" and more than 2200 animal species !HEE#" …10 bird species. Approˆimately R0 threatened or endangered species can be found in the Indian iver Lagoon region including 12 plants and …‹ animals. The Indian iver Lagoon has been cited as the most biologically diverse estuary in Œorth America.ŽA CRADLE OF BIODIVERSITYThe Indian iver Lagoon serves as a breeding ground for thousands of plants and animals. xne eˆample is the pin~ shrimp which journeys between the estuary and the ocean during its lifecycle. Another animals such as sea turtles may spend much of their juvenile life stages living within the Lagoon. The estuary is a compleˆ system of fresh and salt water. The (>%(`' Y (>%(` ' Y 18

PAGE 27

RESEARCH VERO BEACH, FLORIDAIndian iver Lagoon is highly diverse in "! the convergence of the subtropical and temperate climates. 'N shape of the Lagoon combined with the convergence of the two climate ‡ones allow for this biodiversity. CONCERNS: THREATS TO THE ECOSYSTEMSome of the greatest challenges facing the Indian iver Lagoon today include zLoss of seagrass beds N( zFisheries decline zThreats to biodiversity z‰ater and sediment ‚uality zSpread of invasive species The following list of ‚uotes is obtained from a brochure created by the Šarbor $O"( concerning present threats to the system The most serious threats to the health of the Indian iver Lagoon include reduced water ‚uality due to manmade hydrologic changes nonzpoint source "! of habitats overuse‘overharvest of resources and the threat of invasive )": 9+!!% has greatly increased the amount of freshwater that drains to the Indian iver Lagoon. A networ~ of agricultural and drainage canals has been created that discharges large volumes of freshwater such that the lagoon ’stuaries  The Cradle o f the xcean  … 19

PAGE 28

CHAPTER TWO AIS LAGOON PARK%NNN! more freshwater than the system was naturally re‚uired to handle. The %!! inputs to the lagoon have been greatly altered and the health of the estuary has been measurably impacted.Ž 9*"!! or water treatment facility nonzpoint " to a single point of origin. It includes the dilute discharges of contaminantzladen ! "!" #" !83: 9!8"! compounded in urbani‡ed areas. In %"" rainfall percolates down into porous soil and nutrients and other contaminants are mechanically and biologically #! the lagoon. As more and more land is devegetated and paved over this important natural process is lost.Ž There are several sources of direct habitat loss within the Lagoon. ƒevelopment of the Indian iver Lagoon !! the removal of mangrove stands salt !%! G"!“"! to minimi‡e such habitat loss.Ž Less apparent forms of direct habitat (>%(` '_ [ 20

PAGE 29

RESEARCH VERO BEACH, FLORIDAloss also impact the Indian iver Lagoon. Since the midz1QR0s more than ZEEEE"% marsh and mangrove marsh has been converted into mos‚uito impoundments " cycle of salt marsh mos‚uitoes. Both "% value of impounded marshes are lost to the rest of the lagoon.Ž Smallzscale direct habitat loss also occurs in the Indian iver Lagoon and !%!"! #3O)!""" scarring of slowzgrowing seagrass beds !K^3( K )"%% accidental damage.Ž 9(%%)" "(>% watershed from upland habitats to 6 lagoon to adjacent coastal habitats. =)!"^ %" !%3 =)"% controls to help ~eep their numbers in chec~.Ž SOLUTIONSƒirectly or indirectly we are all responsible for maintaining the health of the Indian iver Lagoon system. As residents as government leaders as visitors and as responsible individuals we "8"% changes within the Lagoon.Ž „Indian iver Lagoon …† Many groups and agencies have put into 8"" Indian iver Lagoon. A Comprehensive %! „CCM}† was created for the Indian iver `=! the St. ”ohns iver water Management ƒistrict.ADVOCACY=! !" \ \" G(3 ;" "
PAGE 30

CHAPTER TWO AIS LAGOON PARK Florida  s Seagrass Meadows 2 F lorida  s Seagrass Meadows …22

PAGE 31

RESEARCH VERO BEACH, FLORIDAprosperity of the Indian iver Lagoon. €olunteer groups from across Florida have joined together to protect the natural resources of the Lagoon. These ""K"" events li~e beach and river cleanups remove invasive plant species and teach #3 •overnment agencies have put into 8 6"% within the Lagoon. xther funding helps produce brochures websites and other personal media for people to learn more about the story of the Indian iver Lagoon. '8 !"%! greater health of the Indian iver Lagoon. (>%(` '%23

PAGE 32

AIS LAGOON PARK24

PAGE 33

GATEWAY TO THE TROPICS VERO BEACH, FLORIDAGATEWAY TO THE TROPICSChapter Three C C C h h h t T T h h h 25

PAGE 34

CHAPTER THREE AIS LAGOON PARKTHE PRESENT DAY IMAGE€ero Beach is the county seat of Indian >%"#% % visitors and residents because of the beauty of the area. €ero Beach was 9$!'+ {_W`:! one of The 100 Best Art Towns in !3:49'":G$ !K8 !)% – "– "!!" "'K q"5? "#(>% !! )"3 '(>%" G$!# "(5 {# !N^ %!" ocean the Indian iver area of €ero has !""%! €ero Beach and Indian iver County %!" #!6 "% `%)"35 ""% “; " ""%K(>% "%3:26"< VV 3!! V "3 "< VV 3!3! V ! V EH_W V %|WE" V N%N3;" "O> V " VV %33;" donb. p hoto.net‘ p hoto ˜ cd‘d‘b21. jpg

PAGE 35

GATEWAY TO THE TROPICS VERO BEACH, FLORIDA Vero Beach, Florida: Gateway to the Tropics...Ž 27

PAGE 36

CHAPTER THREE AIS LAGOON PARK A Cu l tura l Histor y .. . Ais Indians Spanish Colonialism The Treasure Coast Early American Settlement Railroads and Development Vero Beach is Born Roaring Twenties Land Boom Great Depression and World War II Post World War II to Present 1500s 1700s 1500s 1821 1500s 1800s 1861 1892 1893 1910 1925 1919-1928 1929-1945 1946-PresentAis&Indians +?%! _EEEE"3 ="%!! !#" @`%! #K+ "! )% +?( !!! "3 '%"" ! ="' ^%% ""!3 5+? !+ %!; (>%% #! "' !! 39" 28

PAGE 37

GATEWAY TO THE TROPICS VERO BEACH, FLORIDA"!%" %( %" %!! !"),7P/3: Spanish&Colonialism %+ _Y_D3'! "K" !3 8 !" +K" 7%3 " +"! ";83%% 6%( _YZP"% 8""%3 %%! )" 3 O%)%" !3 )" !+? 3!"" !@ "%!(>% 3" %! "7"3 (>%! !!3 The&Treasure&Coast&*&the&1715&Fleet &%!"?" `5"' !=" "" #!"3 '"+ 29Morris Theodore. Indian iver County Main Librar y "< VV 33! V @ V @\3;" "
PAGE 38

CHAPTER THREE AIS LAGOON PARK and forth between Spain and the Œew 53=)"" !( !K)" "!"" 3'" !) GK onto ships for return to Spain. (7_H_Y+"" %"3 !!"7 *+%" !"+" " -!; +?3O7D_ !+ !" " +( " %9": !% "3(! ™_EE !330Smith Miller et. al. 2 ‹ S mith Miller et. al. Q Smith Miller et. al. … š

PAGE 39

GATEWAY TO THE TROPICS VERO BEACH, FLORIDA '+_H_Y "3!3 "% %%3 +! !;8 of Indian iver County. In the 1Q›0s % "!# buried treasure. Since the rediscovery + to as the Treasure Coast. +'(, +!D _XZY3'"!! ""3!" ! !"!"" +3 %' !! "% (>%3 (!" 6!! Railroads&and&Development '%"!+= >&+" +3= "%" !! ; +?3 %"!"" ""! !(>% 38"! !! !!%3 !% 8%" '3 Vero&Beach&is&Born (_[WYG$! ( >%! 33 -$31Smith  Miller  et. al.  2 0 ”ohnston œ œ

PAGE 40

CHAPTER THREE AIS LAGOON PARK ' ! !"%6 ""'3% !% !!"! "! 3!% "! !""" "!! !"" ""3 The&Great&Depression&and&World&War&II '-"! !" !;! !3% 55((!% !G$ "!*`% World&War&II&to&Present +55(( !G !!! @3(G Beach and Indian iver County residents )"! ! "! 332”ohnston œQ ”ohnston  Ba c~ Cov er ”o h nston Bac ~ Cover ”ohnston Bac~ Cove r

PAGE 41

GATEWAY TO THE TROPICS VERO BEACH, FLORIDA €ero Beach +! Area Attractions V& ;"" >V` 'G$! )" %; 83 !% "3', NG$ N(>%(! N(>%& N'! N+'! N>%' N+! NG$! Area&Golf&Courses N$ N-& N&?` N(>% N7?( NO( NG N>! N N5 NG$ .( ', N$"" N(>% N'% NGO ./', N$ N4$N=%! N(`5> NO>%% N( N3%33

PAGE 42

CHAPTER THREE AIS LAGOON PARK Culture Based Experiences 34"< VV #)3! V žŸ3"_3{@Ÿ{)Ÿ;"

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GATEWAY TO THE TROPICS VERO BEACH, FLORIDA Nature Based Experiences 35

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CHAPTER THREE AIS LAGOON PARKRecreation/Golf Based Experiences 36 " < VV 3) 3! V ! V Y \ PDY3 ;" "< VV HZ3YZ3HX3DZ V — V "% V # V -&!3;" " < VV 3 3! V" % V ! V" \ " V X V (! V -&_|WX_|W[ 3 ;" " < VV !3 " W3! V" W V !) V HH] V Z[ V ZP V WP_HPPZPWXHYE V 3 ;" " < VV %3! V ! \ V " V X V E V H V Z V _ V _WPZZDZHEW_ZHEX3 ;"

PAGE 45

GATEWAY TO THE TROPICS VERO BEACH, FLORIDARetail/Shopping Based Experiences 37 " < VV 3 3! V V X V (! V $ V (>%EE_3 ;" "< VV 3DN%! V ! V ZNN[XZ)Y_D3;" "OV\ZYE3;"

PAGE 46

AIS LAGOON PARK38

PAGE 47

LOCAL CONTEXT VERO BEACH, FLORIDALOCAL CONTEXTChapter Four C C h h h t F F 39

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CHAPTER FOUR AIS LAGOON PARKArea Attractions: 100 Mile Site Radius Metropolitan&Areas: zLa~eland zxrlando z}alm Beach zSpace Coast zTreasure Coast Major&Airports: N( NO( N!$( N( 023 && z’mbry iddle *% N+*% N+( *% zŠarbor Branch O"( zŒASA N*% N*%+ Major&Sea&Ports: N% 02-',3 N$%  zBusch ‰ildlife Sanctuary N+  zƒaytona Speedway z•atorland zŠoly Land ’ˆperience z¡ennedy Space Center zLion Country Safari N!$  zapids ‰ater }ar~ zSea ‰orld xrlando esort N*%O> z‰alt ƒisney ‰orld esort40

PAGE 49

LOCAL CONTEXT VERO BEACH, FLORIDA €ero Beach Fellsmere xrchid (>% Shores Indian River County ch ch ch ch ch h h h c ch h h h h h h ch h h h h h c h h h h c h h h h h h h h h h h c c h h h h h ; County Land Use41

PAGE 50

CHAPTER FOUR AIS LAGOON PARK >*Area Land Use: 4 Mile Site Radius!!*(* 42

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LOCAL CONTEXT VERO BEACH, FLORIDA Area Land Use: 4 Mile Site Radius{%*(*`* 43

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CHAPTER FOUR AIS LAGOON PARK Area Land Use: 1 Mile Site Radius%"*{%* 44

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LOCAL CONTEXT VERO BEACH, FLORIDA Area Land Use: 1 Mile Site Radius(*`* 45

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AIS LAGOON PARK46

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SITE ANALYSIS VERO BEACH, FLORIDASITE ANALYSISChapter Five 47

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CHAPTER FIVE AIS LAGOON PARK SITE&LAND&USEMxBIL’ ŠxM’ }A¡ ‰AST’‰AT’ T’ATM’ŒT }LAŒT MUŒICI}AL }x‰’ }LAŒT „S}xIL ISLAŒƒ† TOTAL&LAND&USE …R.R0 ac 1‹.00 ac 1‹.š0 ac „2.R0 ac† 74674&ac SPOIL ISLAND ABANDONED POST&OFFICE CITY&OF VERO&BEACH WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT CITY&OF VERO&BEACH MUNICIPAL POWER&PLANT FAIRLANE HARBOR MOBILE&HOME PARK INDIAN&RIVER&LAGOON INDIAN&RIVER&BOULEVARD 17TH&STREET&CAUSEWAY&BRIDGE CONSERVATION AREA „ T T APARTMENTS RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL& OFFICES COMMERCIAL& OFFICES ‰ ‰ T T M } } N N D D D D A A A A A A I I I I I I N N N N N N D D D D D D I I I I I I A A A A A A A A A A I A A AN AN SINGLE&FAMILY RESIDENTIAL SINGLE&FAMILY RESIDENTIAL SINGLE&FAMILY RESIDENTIAL CONDOMINIUM RESIDENTIAL48

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SITE ANALYSIS VERO BEACH, FLORIDA City of Vero Beach Municipal Power Plant City of Vero Beach Wastewater Treatment Plant Fairlane Harbor Mobile Home Park 49

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CHAPTER FIVE AIS LAGOON PARK EXISTING&SITE& CIRCULATION&*&ACCESS8&LANE&PRIMARY&ROAD SECONDARY&ROAD CAUSEWAY&BRIDGE PEDESTRIAN&ACCESS MAJOR&INTERSECTION&&& WITH&TRAFFIC&SIGNAL POINT&OF&ENTRY EXISTING&PARKING EXISTING&BOAT&&&& ACCESS9PARKING PROPERTY&LINE INDIAN&RIVER&LAGOON INDIAN&RIVER&BOULEVARD 17TH&STREET&CAUSEWAY&BRIDGE CONSERVATION AREA 50

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SITE ANALYSIS VERO BEACH, FLORIDA 51

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CHAPTER FIVE AIS LAGOON PARK INDIAN&RIVER&LAGOON INDIAN&RIVER&BOULEVARD 17TH&STREET&CAUSEWAY&BRIDGE CONSERVATION AREAOPPORTUNITIES&AND& CONSTRAINTSPOINT&OF&INTEREST TRANSPORTATION&NODE GOOD&VIEWSHED BAD&VIEWSHED NEED&FOR&AUDIO9&& VISUAL&BUFFER STRUCTURES&;TO&BE&&& RETAINED< EXISTING&SEAWALL UTILITY&LINES AREA&TO&REMEDIATE SEAGRASS&BEDS PROPERTY&LINE =ENTIRE&SITE&LOCATED WITHIN&FEMA&FLOOD&&& PLAIN E 52

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SITE ANALYSIS VERO BEACH, FLORIDA Stormwater Discharge and Water Quality 53

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CHAPTER FIVE AIS LAGOON PARK NATURAL&ECOLOGY&&&MANATEE&VIEWING& &&&AREA &&&COMMON&DOLPHIN&&& &&&MOVEMENT&PATTERN &&&COMMON&MANATEE&&& &&&MOVEMENT&PATTERN &&&MIGRATORY&BIRD& &&&STRATEGIC&HABITAT &&&SEAGRASS&BEDS &&&MANGROVE& &&&WETLANDS &&&COASTAL& &&&WOODLAND &&&PROPERTY&LINE INDIAN&RIVER&LAGOON INDIAN&RIVER&BOULEVARD 17TH&STREET&CAUSEWAY&BRIDGE CONSERVATION AREA 1 1 H 17 T 7T TH TH S T ST TR TR 7 1 7TH&ST 7 7 T TH& S T TR T TR RE RE & & & && & & && & & 54

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SITE ANALYSIS VERO BEACH, FLORIDA 55

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AIS LAGOON PARK56

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DESIGN ALTERNATIVES VERO BEACH, FLORIDADESIGN ALTERNATIVESChapter Six C C C h h h t S S i i 57

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CHAPTER SIX AIS LAGOON PARK 58

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DESIGN ALTERNATIVES VERO BEACH, FLORIDACONCEPTUAL EXPLORATIONS'% ";" )" "! ";""!")" %"!"" "!"!3 %)" %"!""! ""%8"; < N%%"" N>%%"" N("%>% "" ')" !" "" %"!3'!" % !"3 )"" " ";#"! % '" ! "" " HE359

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CHAPTER SIX AIS LAGOON PARK Concept 1: Maximum Conservation and RestorationProposed ProgramN(>%&! N N`' N5 ! N=N! ) N N%60

PAGE 69

DESIGN ALTERNATIVES VERO BEACH, FLORIDA Conceptual Master Plan (>% &! 5 ("% '! >=) +61

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CHAPTER SIX AIS LAGOON PARKConcept 2: Maximum Revenue GeneratorProposed ProgramN&V NY& N% N+!O'!& N+!O> N>=! N'% N N N$&"" N5 62

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DESIGN ALTERNATIVES VERO BEACH, FLORIDA Conceptual Master Plan +! O > Y& {% > ' %63

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CHAPTER SIX AIS LAGOON PARKConcept 3: Interpretation Driven RevenueProposed ProgramN&V N> =! N&V N& N%" N> N&! N`%! N N N5 ("%'! 64

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DESIGN ALTERNATIVES VERO BEACH, FLORIDA Conceptual Master Plan ! > >&{ % 65

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AIS LAGOON PARK66

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AIS LAGOON PARK VERO BEACH, FLORIDAAIS LAGOON PARKChapter Seven C C h h h t S S 67

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CHAPTER SEVEN AIS LAGOON PARKthe natural health of the Indian iver !3=8 over the last few decades have greatly !"% !"" # resource. '#!" strives to capture the spirit of €ero $(>% Indian iver Lagoon in a local culture N!3 Selected program includes elements oriented around the story of the Lagoon. ' ! (>%% !3 ’verything is the area is in some way (>% %! ! %3'";%" "THE MASTER PLAN(% %"" develop an understanding of the most """""# master plan. '#!")" "!? Indian iver Lagoon and how the "@ development. + harvested the resources of the Indian >%3= %!3 Steamboats traveled up and down the Lagoon opening up the area to development and new residents. The %%" Lagoon and its residents. O%668

PAGE 77

AIS LAGOON PARK VERO BEACH, FLORIDA % Mangrove " €illas ' Showcase •uest ƒiscovery !" "(Master Land Use PlanLEGEND‰ildlife Sanctuary )*5 O""V > &V {'" *V( 69

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CHAPTER SEVEN AIS LAGOON PARK Master Site PlanLEGENDWildlife&Sanctuary _3K 2. Lagoon ’cosystem …. Mangrove Fringe ’cosystem ›. Freshwater Marsh ’cosystem Y3&!!=! Mixed&Use&Waterfront P3' H3"!" œ. ed Mangrove estaurant Q. Spanish •alleon _E3G$K __3&V >%?(. _W3% 1…. Trail System _Z3% 1R. Boat Launch _P3' _H3O% Hotel9Lodging 1œ. Mangrove Treehouse €illas _[3!"#{$$% WE3'& >@ QW_3G WW3$"O8V WD35^ Z. WZ3!" 2R. eclaimed ‰ater Storage 1 2 … › R ‹ š œ œ œ œ œ Q 2… ‹ ‹ 10 22 Q Q Q Q Q 2… … 2… 2… 2… 2… 2… 2… 2… 2 … … … … … 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 0 1 10 0 1 10 0 0 11 2 2 21 1… 2› 1› 12 1 1 1 12 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 2 2 2 2 2R 1R 1‹ 1š 1œ 1Q 1 1 2070

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AIS LAGOON PARK VERO BEACH, FLORIDA 71

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AIS LAGOON PARK72

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THE GUEST EXPERIENCE VERO BEACH, FLORIDATHE GUEST EXPERIENCEChapter Eight C C C h h h t E E i i h h h t 73

PAGE 82

CHAPTER EIGHT AIS LAGOON PARK 74

PAGE 83

THE GUEST EXPERIENCE VERO BEACH, FLORIDAAIS LAGOON PARK'!? @%"! "" % "!"!K +? (>% !% *DEEE" "! 3 ! ( >% ' ) +3'"8 "")" #N!K %"" + '!% )" (>% 3-! ! 'G!" (3-!" )" %! "!! %; )" 5" !!%! %? !!%) 3 5% ! 83'(>% % '"! "(>% N! (>% '3 75

PAGE 84

CHAPTER EIGHT AIS LAGOON PARKGUEST ARRIVAL-!% 3 '% % "" "% "!5% !! !"% % (! ?3 %% ''' 3^" "!N"!G $K3-% %! %!%"" 3*"! %G$K3"" ;! !%!(>%$% G$K3 76

PAGE 85

THE GUEST EXPERIENCE VERO BEACH, FLORIDAVERO BEACH PLAZAG$K% """ 3' '% !" '3%! ''3 &!" ) "^ !% N% "G "?!!" 8!! )3 77

PAGE 86

CHAPTER EIGHT AIS LAGOON PARKDISCOVERY POINTE`%( q!? "!!"# ! !" %% `%!( =%! %% %"! "3" #+^% ! (>%+ 3&(>% !%! "3 =!"% ZEEE"" _[EZ !"! "% 3' !!3 -% !% %3$! ( % 8%" (>%G $"%"% )"" 378

PAGE 87

THE GUEST EXPERIENCE VERO BEACH, FLORIDATREASURE COAST SHOWCASE'' '!)N "% ) #!"N )" '¢ZE! "!% (>% %{53 ; !!%'=)"3 &)"N ) ?# (O#!! ? "!_H_Y +5' !! !"! G$ 79 \5!|W[\!3;" "
PAGE 88

CHAPTER EIGHT AIS LAGOON PARK(>%3'' =)") "K%3 '¢{8 ! 8" ?" " !! "%% & ;K; !"(>%-" ""'; ! % "!"¢ "-3 '¢! "%"% +!" ! %" (>% '3( ""!! "! 3 80 "
PAGE 89

THE GUEST EXPERIENCE VERO BEACH, FLORIDA 81

PAGE 90

CHAPTER EIGHT AIS LAGOON PARKSPANISH GALLEON;' =)"! )" _H_Y"-3 4% !")" ="` 53'; !%# 3 82"
PAGE 91

THE GUEST EXPERIENCE VERO BEACH, FLORIDARED MANGROVE RESTAURANT^))" ! G$?# !3O8"! %(>% !;"? '>%3' !?# % "@%3 83"
PAGE 92

CHAPTER EIGHT AIS LAGOON PARKDOLPHIN AMPHITHEATER ¢{" !""%" "; "!3 "!! "% "!" %% 3 84"
PAGE 93

THE GUEST EXPERIENCE VERO BEACH, FLORIDAAIS PRESERVE MARINE & WILDLIFE SANCTUARY+!) (>%3=! 6%! @! !% " !"%""! '%5 8"" )"!") %3 5"%% )" !<% ++ &!!35 !%#N !!%! "%!3 (""" "%" "" ?"N! ( '%5 )" ! (>% %" !3( >%"# 6!83 (%) 8" !83! %% ; %!%!% '% %! 3 85

PAGE 94

CHAPTER EIGHT AIS LAGOON PARKCENTRAL PLAZA*"%# !%!!% !)!%% "!' K"!%! %! ' K3 O%K #" !" 3&! " %3' @" %3>! "K3 86

PAGE 95

THE GUEST EXPERIENCE VERO BEACH, FLORIDATHE LAGOON+!K! ! !3 O %% "*" " ! "! (>%3!% " % %" =) % #!% %3 &8"" " ! 3 87

PAGE 96

CHAPTER EIGHT AIS LAGOON PARK 88

PAGE 97

THE GUEST EXPERIENCE VERO BEACH, FLORIDATHE MANGROVE FRINGE^;6 !% 'K !% +3$!% """! 3&" % 3 +!% 3 # #!%) !(>% 3^!% )#! !#6! %! "%! 6 ( >%3;! !" #""%" " ! "% !! %3 89

PAGE 98

CHAPTER EIGHT AIS LAGOON PARK 90

PAGE 99

THE GUEST EXPERIENCE VERO BEACH, FLORIDATHE FRESHWATER MARSH-! 6!!% !%3( K3 +!"! -!" !3 *")%# !%% (>% %%3 ¢ 8%" 3 ' ""!"3 #!% %3 % %3 91 ( >% (`' P

PAGE 100

CHAPTER EIGHT AIS LAGOON PARK 92 "< VV 3#"! V WEE[ V EH V NN3;"

PAGE 101

THE GUEST EXPERIENCE VERO BEACH, FLORIDA! ! DEE!! 3& "+! 3! "# " !"!3 ') %%" %%3 '" "+? "%3O % % %%% 3&! "" " ^! !!" "! "3'" "K3THE COASTAL HAMMOCK'#! %&!!3& % "!!" "35 !!%! ) 3 ;%3 '!! )3' 93

PAGE 102

CHAPTER EIGHT AIS LAGOON PARK 94

PAGE 103

THE GUEST EXPERIENCE VERO BEACH, FLORIDA 95"< VV 3)K3! V %|WEK V |WE V V$|WEZWE_H;" V$|WEZWE_H 3 ;" "< VV 3 V V V ! V 3;" "< VV 3_D3! V "(! V V V ;" 3 ;"

PAGE 104

CHAPTER EIGHT AIS LAGOON PARKMANGROVE CANOPY VILLAS^")" '=)"% ! %"G '%"G 'WD! !!% "£!8% (>%3 ! "G8! !% )“3>" !% "G! "=N %"G )" "' 3 '%"G !!% ;%" 8 """"3 $;% "" "G %G$K3 96

PAGE 105

THE GUEST EXPERIENCE VERO BEACH, FLORIDA " < VV #%3 V " N V " V WEE[ V _E V @ " N N N " ;" +97

PAGE 106

CHAPTER EIGHT AIS LAGOON PARKRECREATION & PUBLIC OPEN SPACE(!! "")" """3% !`%( 8"! "% !8"" ;" ; 3' %3 "" )" (>%3 '"(>NDZ %% !" )"3 98

PAGE 107

THE GUEST EXPERIENCE VERO BEACH, FLORIDA 99

PAGE 108

CHAPTER EIGHT AIS LAGOON PARKPARK EXCLUSIVE EXPERIENCES 8 )%%% ; "%)%) %3 !)%)" < N%`“! =)"' N%4% N$' N5^> N-`5 N(!"=) N' N$' 100 "< VV 3N"3! V ! V V 3;" "< VV !3 V " V VWEEPVE_\\V!VEPE__Y \ \E_\ZXE3;" V 3;" "< VV 3N"3! V ! V

PAGE 109

THE GUEST EXPERIENCE VERO BEACH, FLORIDA 101"< VV V V " V \\3;" "< VV 3""! V WEXE3;""< VV D3"3"3! V \4%&)G = V ;E+¤W( V D V H;7W3;" "
PAGE 110

AIS LAGOON PARK102

PAGE 111

MASTER PLANNING DIAGRAMS VERO BEACH, FLORIDAMASTER PLANNING DIAGRAMSChapter Nine C C h h h t N N i i 103

PAGE 112

CHAPTER NINE AIS LAGOON PARK SITE&LAND&USE ‰ildlife Sanctuary Miˆed Use ‰aterfront }ublic xpen Space‘ > Šotel‘Lodging {'" *V( 104

PAGE 113

MASTER PLANNING DIAGRAMS VERO BEACH, FLORIDA GUEST&ACCESS&*& CIRCULATIONPOINT&OF&ENTRY VEHICULAR&ACCESS VEHICULAR&PARKING& MOTORCOACH&ACCESS MOTORCOACH&&&& DROP&OFF WATERCRAFT&ACCESS WATERCRAFT&DOCKING PEDESTRIAN&&&& CIRCULATION 105

PAGE 114

CHAPTER NINE AIS LAGOON PARK SERVICE9EMERGENCY& VEHICLE&ACCESS&*& CIRCULATIONSERVICE9EMERGENCY&&& VEHICLE&ACCESS SERVICE9&&& MAINTENANCE&AREA 106

PAGE 115

MASTER PLANNING DIAGRAMS VERO BEACH, FLORIDA OPEN&SPACE&AND& VEGETATIONSTRUCTURES VEGETATION 107

PAGE 116

CHAPTER NINE AIS LAGOON PARK PUBLIC&VERSUS& PRIVATE&SPACEPUBLIC&AREAS PRIVATE&AREAS 108

PAGE 117

MASTER PLANNING DIAGRAMS VERO BEACH, FLORIDA SUPPLEMENTAL&GUEST& EXPERIENCESNIGHTTIME&ANIMAL&&& EXCURSIONS ISLAND&TOURS KAYAK&ADVENTURES NATURALIST&WALKS BOAT&TOURS 109

PAGE 118

AIS LAGOON PARK110

PAGE 119

SUSTAINABILITY VERO BEACH, FLORIDASUSTAINABILITYChapter Ten C C h h h t T T 111

PAGE 120

CHAPTER TEN AIS LAGOON PARKLOW IMPACT SITE DESIGN & DEVELOPMENT=%!% " )"% }ar~. O !! %(>% 35 6N )")"!!% %! ! !“!" " 3 % ) !! (>%3 ! !"%"! K! !< N! N>&% N-> N N%%! N`%G N=> N5 N& N> N={% '"! #!"%"! !!6 3112

PAGE 121

SUSTAINABILITY VERO BEACH, FLORIDA STORMWATER& MITIGATIONGREEN&ROOFS CONSTRUCTED&&&& STORMWATER&&&& MITIGATION&SYSTEM STORMWATER& RUNOFF&FLOW RESTORED&STORM&&& SURGE&VEGETATION&&& BUFFER 113

PAGE 122

CHAPTER TEN AIS LAGOON PARK ECOSYSTEM& RESTORATIONRESTORED&&&& MANGROVE&&&& VEGETATION RESTORED&MARSH9&& WETLAND&VEGETATION RESTORED&COASTAL&&& HAMMOCK&&&& VEGETATION SEAGRASS&&&& RESTORATION&AREA CONSERVATION&AREA 114

PAGE 123

SUSTAINABILITY VERO BEACH, FLORIDA HABITAT&RESTORATIONRESTORED&ECOSYSTEM&&& AND&CREATED&ANIMAL&&& HABITATS MIGRATORY&BIRD&&& HABITAT MANATEE&HABITAT CONSERVATION&AREA 115

PAGE 124

CHAPTER TEN AIS LAGOON PARK G"!!%3 #!83 >% %" !3 `%%!3116

PAGE 125

SUSTAINABILITY VERO BEACH, FLORIDA =)!!%3 ("%!"%3""3117

PAGE 126

AIS LAGOON PARK118

PAGE 127

CONCLUSION VERO BEACH, FLORIDACONCLUSIONChapter Eleven C h E l 119

PAGE 128

CHAPTER ELEVEN AIS LAGOON PARKFINAL THOUGHTS: WHAT IVE LEARNED%" "" "O !"" " 3 The&Power&of&Research '!6 )%!3 '""; % ! 6"35 ";% 3 Real&World&Issues =)% %% "" ";3 O!" %% " ";3 "+[ !!"6 ";35) !!%)" %%ž%" )"" "!? !3 0> ! ""; %"3(! "!! "!% 3 O! ?N" ""% "O!% K% 8%" 6! 3 The&Value&of&Sense&of&Place '% 6% "3!"" "6K !3 !" (>%' (>%3' "!! 3(! 63120

PAGE 129

CONCLUSION VERO BEACH, FLORIDA 121

PAGE 130

AIS LAGOON PARK122

PAGE 131

REFERENCES VERO BEACH, FLORIDAREFERENCESChapter Twelve C C h h h t T T l l l 123

PAGE 132

CHAPTER TWELVE AIS LAGOON PARK124Bondo Charles. !" . •ainesville University of Florida 200š. }rint. Braden Susan . # . •ainesville University }ress of Florida 2002. }rint. Burgess obert Forrest. $!%$%!&' Œew •or~ BobbszMerrill Company Inc. 1Qš‹. }rint. Chin Andrew ƒ. ()#***#+!,*. •ainesville University of Florida 1QQ2. }rint. City of €ero Beach ‰ater and Sewer ƒepartment. )+*' €ero Beach City of €ero Beach ‰ater and Sewer ƒepartment 1Qœ0. }rint. Craig Smith Stephen ”. and Fagence Michael. +!*&#()#+!,* . ‰estport }raeger }ublishers 1QQR. }rint. Curl ƒonald ‰. !#!!. 3`¦<%(_[[W33 ƒunlap Beth. !/0' ¡ingsport ¡ingsport }ress 1Qœš. }rint. +"!=%!3 !#!+,!+,& . ”upiter Florida Inland `%WEEX3$ +"!=%!3 ! 3'<%>WEEX3$3 +"!=%!3 &* . Tallahassee ƒivision of >WEEX3$3

PAGE 133

REFERENCES VERO BEACH, FLORIDA125+"!=%!3 3'<%>WEEX3 Brochure. ++5%!!3 +##! . St. }etersburg Fish and ‰ildlife esearch (WEEZ3$3 ++5%!!3 2!# . St. }etersburg Fish and ‰ildlife esearch (_[[H3$3 ++5%!!3 !/+# 33<+5>(WEEH3 Brochure. ++5%!!3 !/! . St. }etersburg Fish and ‰ildlife esearch (WEEH3$3 ++5%!!3 !/!342,& . St. }etersburg Fish and ‰ildlife >(WEEW3$3 Florida }ower and Light. !/!! . Fort }ierce Florida }ower and Light Company 1QQ2. Brochure. Florida }ower and Light. !/)! . Fort }ierce Florida }ower and Light Company 1QQ2. Brochure. Florida }ower and Light. ! . Fort }ierce Florida }ower and Light Company 1QQR. Brochure. Florida }ower and Light. $!# 3+<+!"_[[Z3$3 •ordon ’lsbeth ¡. !/"' •ainesville University }ress of Florida 2002. }rint. ”ohnston Sidney }. "&#!+,&#' €ero Beach Indian iver County Šistorical Society 2002. }rint.

PAGE 134

CHAPTER TWELVE AIS LAGOON PARKIndian iver County Main Library. 56571+$! . €ero Beach Indian iver County Main Library Archive Center and •enealogy ƒepartment 200Q. Brochure. Indian iver County Main Library. !+$! . €ero Beach Indian iver County Main Library Archive Center and •enealogy ƒepartment 200Q. Brochure. Indian iver County Main Library. 31"#+#+$! . €ero Beach Indian iver County Main Library Archive Center and •enealogy ƒepartment 200Q. Brochure. Indian iver County Main Library. !8"&+$! . €ero Beach Indian iver County Main Library Archive Center and •enealogy ƒepartment 200Q. Brochure. Indian iver County Main Library. 0+$! . €ero Beach Indian iver County Main Library Archive Center and •enealogy ƒepartment 200œ. Brochure. Indian iver County Main Library. 91+!+$! . €ero Beach Indian iver County Main Library Archive Center and •enealogy ƒepartment 200Q. Brochure. Indian iver County Main Library. !+$! . €ero Beach Indian iver County Main Library Archive Center and •enealogy ƒepartment 200Q. Brochure. Indian iver County Main Library. 0+$! . €ero Beach Indian iver County Main Library Archive Center and •enealogy ƒepartment 200Q. Brochure. (>%`=!3 !+,*,,*:; . }alm Bay St. ”ohns iver ‰ater Management ƒistrict 1QQ‹. ƒigital Format.126

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REFERENCES VERO BEACH, FLORIDA(>%`=!3 !+,3%1*/,2&&* . Melbourne St. ”ohns iver ‰ater Management ƒistrict 200š. Brochure. (>%`=!3 !+,%!< . }alm Bay St. ”ohns iver ‰ater Management ƒistrict 200š. }rint. (>%`=!3 !+,* . }alm Bay St. ”ohns iver ‰ater Management ƒistrict 2010. Brochure. (>%`=!3 !+,%/= . }alm Bay St. ”ohns iver ‰ater Management ƒistrict 200œ. Brochure. Lewis III oy . !+#** . Boca aton CC }ress 1Qœ2. }rint. Masterson ”im. !+,>! 3+<&$O"(WEE[3$3 Masterson ”im. !+,>! 3+<&$O"(WEE[3(%3 Murley ”ames. +$,2?#"*"' $><+ University 200‹. Brochure. }ola~ows~i ¡enneth ”. @+&#)! . Ann Arbor The University of Michigan School of Œatural esources 1Qœš. }rint. utes ‰alter A. }enner ichard Š. and Adams Lawrence. "!,* . xˆford Architectural }ress 2001. }rint. >3$=< '&' Fort }ierce March 2010. }ersonal Interview.127

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CHAPTER TWELVE AIS LAGOON PARKSchmid Anne M. and Scovia~zLerner Mary. "!+ 3`¦<$(_[XX33 !>33!+3-%<*%+_[[H33 !(3 2&* . Fort }ierce St. Lucie County 200š. Brochure. !(3 "!A*"#!+,' Fort }ierce St. Lucie County 200š. Brochure. !(3 *2&*2D . Fort }ierce St. Lucie County 200š. Brochure. !(3 '& . Fort }ierce St. Lucie County 200š. Brochure. Stanbridge uth M. !$!<8"+ . €ero Beach uth Stanbridge 200R. }rint. St. ”ohns iver ‰ater Management ƒistrict. !/E#%)+ . }alat~a St. ”ohns iver ‰ater Management ƒistrict 200œ. Brochure. St. ”ohns iver ‰ater Management ƒistrict. !+,(! . }alat~a St. ”ohns iver ‰ater Management ƒistrict 200Q. Brochure. St. ”ohns iver ‰ater Management ƒistrict. (+*!)' }alat~a St. ”ohns iver ‰ater Management ƒistrict 200…. Brochure. St. ”ohns iver ‰ater Management ƒistrict. )! . }alat~a St. ”ohns iver ‰ater Management ƒistrict 200‹. Brochure. St. Lucie County Šistorical Society. '&"*' Fort }ierce St. Lucie County Šistorical Society 2000. Brochure. St. Lucie County ‰aterfront Council. !&1F!+,<*/,2& . Fort }ierce St. Lucie ‰aterfront Council 200š. Brochure.128

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REFERENCES VERO BEACH, FLORIDATen ’yc~ ”ohn . Assistant ƒirector ‰ater and Sewer ƒepartment 03)* . €ero Beach ƒecember 200Q. }ersonal Interview. U.S. Fish and ‰ildlife Service. !<)!#+# . €ero Beach U.S. Fish and ‰ildlife Service 200Q. Brochure. ‰assmer ƒouglas A. et al. 2G! . •ainesville University of Florida 1Qœœ. }rint. ‰eller obert. 1!+# . ‰est }alm Beach Florida Treasure Bro~ers 1Qœ0. }rint. ‰renn ƒouglas M. ()#,*' 5<*(_[XD33129

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AIS LAGOON PARK130...FIN

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VERO BEACH, FLORIDAAPPENDIXInitial Proposal; Final Presentation 131

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}age 1 of 18 Final CapstoneProposal for Faculty Review LAA 4357 Senior Independent Project Seminar 4December2009 Matt Meyer PROJECT TITLE: Project VB: (Actual name will come later with concept developmentÂ…) PROJECT LOCATION: Vero Beach, Florida PROJECT TYPE: Resort & Tourism SITEOVERVIEW& CONTEXT: The Indian River Lagoon is considered to be one of the most biologically diverse estuaries inNorth America. Home to thousands of species of marine life, including manatees, dolphins, sea turtles, sharks, fish, birds, and other wildlife, the Indian River Lagoon attracts tourists from across thecountry and around the world. The proposed site development is located in Vero Beac h, Florida in Indian River County. The property is situated along the Indian River, a part of the Intracoa stal Waterway. The current land use of the 70 acre site includes both public and private property. The public pr operty contains the cityÂ’s municipal power plant and the cityÂ’s wastewater treatment facilities. Thispublic property is bisected by the 4 lane 17thStreet Bridge leading to the barrier island. The private property contains a mobile home park, Fairlane Harbor. The city is considering plansto relocate the existing wastewater treatment plant to a new fac ility west of town, therefore decommissioning the current facility. In recent months, residents have complained a bout the city power plant, arguing it is to o costly

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}age \ of 18 to maintain.Residents believetheirhigh city utility taxes associated with its use make it unfeasibleto continue operations. Th is creates an opportunity to decommission the existing power plant and transferthe city Â’s utility provider to Florida Power and Li ght. The Fairlane Harbor mobile home pa rk sustained significant damage during the 2004 hurricanes, Frances and Jeanne. The low elevation along the river combined with the fragile structure of the mobile homes caused many residents to reconsider living there. Historically, Vero Beach has been known as a resort town. Tourism is a primary industry for the region, specifically inregard to the areaÂ’s abundant natural resources. Since its establishment in the 1920s, Vero Beach has attracted residents and tourists alike to experience the areaÂ’s amenities, ranging from the sandy beaches on the barrier island, to boating, fishing, marine life, wildlife, Mc Kee Jungle Gardens, public parks, recreation facilities, Holman Stadium and spring training for the Los Angeles Dodgers, trails and forests, world famous citrus, and a small town feel. Many of these reconsiderations to the siteÂ’s current l and uses are recent developments. Collectively, the three properties occupy prime real estate along theIndian River, creating an incredible opportunity for redevelopment and an ability to rev italize Vero BeachÂ’s waterfront. A majority of the land use along the Intracoastal within the cityis single family residential, which limits views and accessalong the river for public and/orcommercial use.The siteis an opportunity to generate revenue for the city bycreating a tourist based waterfront development while embracing the areaÂ’s sense of place. STATEMENT OF GOALS AND OBJECTIVES: I am interested in landscape architectural practice concerning concept design and its applications to large scale master planni ng of immersive environments. In particular, I enj oy spaces that present a strong sense of place. Asense of place is essentialto an y great design. I am interested in applying th e concepts and skills I have learned in past academic and professi onal experiencestoward a site in Vero Beach, Florida by illustrating areaÂ’s natural and cultural history in a detailed spatial environment. The siteÂ’s locat ion along the Indian RiverLagoon creates an ideal setting to generatelocal content based narratives. Decommissioning the existing wastewater treatment facilities and power plant will require me to address many issues related to site contamination and remediation. These constrai ntswill require an understanding of the e nvironmental concerns on site while provi ding an opportunity to explore the funda mentalsof ecological restoration.

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}age ] of 18 My primary goal is to revitalize the waterfront along the river to create something unique and ap propriate.Thismay spark intere st and insight for the city. In doing so, I hope the project will allow an opportunityto explore high design concepts to my great est abilities, specifically with resp ect to thenatural ecology of the Indian River Lagoon and surrounding areas. It will be an eng aging interactive educational experience that embraces the historical spirit and characterof the region. Goals& Objectives: 1.Revitalize the cityÂ’s riverfront with a new iconic place for residents and tourists Develop a master plan to capture and detail the intended gu est experiences, applying skills learned during past academic and professional experiences Illustrate the natural and cu ltural history of the IRL, Vero Beach, and Treasure Coast in a detailed spatial environment Embrace the adjacent causeway bridge as the gateway to the Atlantic Ocean 2.Addressenvironmental concernscaused byexisting land use Synthesize existing environmental concerns through research and analysisto form a development suitability map for the site Integrate modern methods in sustainability to address th e high density proposed uses for thesite, while applying experimental techniques a nd methods along the way Reference ASLAÂ’s Sustainable Sites Initiativeas a design approach Incorporatecisterns, rain barrels, and rain gardens into the design in response to the water demands of proposed plantingsand facilities Integrate a series of created wetlands as a stormwater management and control 3.Restore a percentageof thesiteÂ’s original natural ecologyand include education and interpretation based components and program elements Research historical ecology and integrate plantings and st rategies into created wetlands, planting plans, and trails Create habitat environments for bird s, marine life, and other species Restore native sea grasses and mangrove forests along the river edge 4.Develop opportunitieswithin the site to generate revenue for the city Potential for interpre tive wildlife and marinelife ex hibits with the establishmen tof a wildlife sanctuary and research center Potential for Nature based experiences:kayaking, canoeing, trails Potential for Cultural and museum based exhibits

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}age 8 of 18 Potential for a hotel to anchorthe development Potential for a retail, dining, club, and entertainment district Potential for extreme sports venues; zip lines, jet skis, marina Potential revenue through parking fees Potential job creation through wildlife sanctuary & research center Potential for citrus and local farmersÂ’retail, shipping and information area Potential for a small water park, pl ayground and/or recreational complexas an exclusive amenity componentof the hotel 5.Create a public open space system for recreational use; both passive and active Utilize created coastal mangrove wetl ands and ecological rest oration areas for passive recreation spaces Provide access for boats and water sport vehicles Integrate opportunities for fishing and ot her forms of Intracoastal recreation Create a trail systemforinterpretationand exploration 6.Establish educational opportunities for teaching and information Develop a series of conceptual narratives to capture th e spirit of FloridaÂ’s rich natural and cultural history, specifically pertaining to the region of the state known as the Treasure Coastand the Indian River Lagoon FOUNDATIONS OF THE PROJECT: Books: 1.Smith, Roger C., et al. An Atlas of Maritime Florida . Gainesville: University Pr ess of Florida, 1997. Print. 2.Bondo, Charles. Interpretation as a Means to Design Public Spaces: A Focus on Charles Towne Landing State Historic Site. Gainesville: University of Florida, 2007. Print. 3.Schmid, Anne M., and Scoviak-Lerner, Mary. International Hotel and Resort Design . New York: PBC International, 1988. Print. 4.Polakowski, Kenneth J. Zoo Design: The Reality of Wild Illusions. Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan School of Natural Resources, 1987. Print. 5.Chin, Andrew D. Urban Waterfronts: Common Components in Successful Redevelopment Projects. Gainesville: University of Florida, 1992. Print. 6.Craig Smith, Stephen J., and Fagence, Michael. Recreation and Tourism as a Catalyst for Urban Waterfront Redevelopment . Westport: Praeger Publishers, 1995. Print. 7.Lewis III, Roy R. Creation and Restoration of Coastal Plant Communities . Boca Raton: CRC Press, 1982. Print.

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}age 5 of 18 8.Rutes, Walter A., Penner, Rich ard H., and Adams, Lawrence. Hotel Design Planning and Development. Oxford: Architectural Press, 2001. Print. 9.Wrenn, Douglas M. Urban Waterfront Development . Washington: Urban Land Institue, 1983. Print. 10. Indian River Lagoon Comprehensive C onservation Management Plan (CCMP). Indian River Lagoon National Estuary Program: St. Johns River Water Management District, 1996. Digital Format. 11.Wassmer, Douglas A., et al. Ecology of the Bobcat in South-Central Florida . Gainesville: University of Florida, 1988. Print. Websites: 1.Indian River Lagoon http://www.indianriverlagoon.org/ 2.Indian River Lagoon Restoration Plan http://www.evergladesplan.org/fa cts_info/fact_sheets.aspx#irl 3.Restore AmericaÂ’s Estuaries http://www.estuaries.org/ 4.Wastewater Treatment Plant Decommissioning http://www.water.siemens.com/en/serv ices/mobileandtemporary/Pages/Monos ep_Products_WW_Trt_Pipeline.aspx OtherResources: 1.History of Vero Beach and Indian River County Indian River County Library 2.Indian River County Historical Society Vero Beach, Florida 3.Mc Clarty Treasure Museum Sebastian, Florida 4.Sustainable Treasure Coast Final Report PDF from the City 5.Vero Beach Zoning Map and Comprehensive Plan PDF from the City 6.Vero Beach Vision Plan PDF from the City 7.Wastewater Treatment Plant Decommissioning Proposal

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}age ^ of 18 PDF from the City CASE STUDIES: Local Ecology; Educat ion & Interpretation: 1.Busch Wildlife Sanctuary Jupiter, Florida http://www.buschwildlife.com/ The Busch Wildlife Sanc tuary is a non-profit animal re habilitation center and hos pitalfor injured animals. The site contains trails and educational progra ms about area wildlife. The facilities and program willbe analyzed in consideration for potential wildlife specific/research center applica tions to the Project VB site. 2.Environmental Learning Center Wabasso, Florida http://www.discoverelc.org/ The ELC is approximately 15 minutes north of the Project VB site. Located on 64acres on a small island in the middle of the river, this nonprofit learning center focuses on the ecology and wildlife of the Indian River Lagoon. The center offers trails and boardwalks through pristine natural mangrove forests along the lagoon. Facilities include classr ooms and outdoor learning spaces frequented by local elementary school kids. Many education sessions are led by naturalists with knowledge of the local ecology. Canoes and kay aks are also available, as well as a “wet lab” filled with tanks of local marine life found within the Indian River Lagoon. The wet lab features interactive displays and signage describing the ro les of the flora and fauna foundwithin the local ecosystems. School field trips mayinclude activities like mangrove seed planting and wading through the sea grasses to seinefor marine life. P ontoon boat tours along the Indian River are also available. Dolphins, birds, fish, and other wildlife are highly visible throughout the property. 3.Wild Florida; Jacksonville Zoo Jacksonville, Florida http://www.jaxzoo.org/things/exhibits.asp#WF The Wild Florida section of the Jacks onville Zoo will be referenced as a m odel and framework for potential animal selection and habitat design within the wildlife areas of Project VB. 4.Wild Florida; Brevard Zoo Melbourne, Florida http://www.brevardzoo.org/explore_florida.php

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}age 7 of 18 The Wild Florida section of the Jacks onville Zoo will be referenced as a m odel and framework for potential animal selection and habitat design within the wildlife areas of Project VB. 5.Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute Fort Pierce, Florida http://www.fau.edu/hboi/ Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute employs scientists, en gineers, and researchers to explore the oceans. For more than forty years, the institute has conduct ed research of the worldÂ’s oceans, with extensive coverage of FloridaÂ’s waters and the Indian River Lagoon. HBOI is also home to the O cean Discovery Center, a place where students and visitors may learn about the oceans. During the concept and progra m development stages of desi gn, the components of this center will be explored to determine th e potential demand and applica tions of a research center within the Project VB site. 6.Manatee Observation and Education Center Fort Pierce, Florida http://www.manateecenter.com/ Located approximately 25 minutes south of the Project VB site, this non-profit facility is dedicated to the observation and education of the West Indian Manatee. Like the projec t VB site, this center is located adjacent to the discharge waters of the Fort Pierce power plant. In tracoastal water is pumped into the power plant to cool pipes, later returning to the river 7 degrees warmer. During winter months, mana tees congregate around these warmer waters. The Manatee Observation and Education Center is located adjacent to the power plant, and is thereforeable to provide great manatee viewing. The interpretational and educ ational components, as well as the site design along the riverfront will be considered during the concept development stages of design. 7.Oslo Riverfront Conservation Area Vero Beach, Florida http://fmel.ifas.ufl.edu/orca/index.htm The Oslo Riverfront Conservation Area contains approximately 70 acres of unspoiled tropical hardwood hammock along the Indian River. Approximately 10 minutes south of the Project VB s ite, this preserved natural ecosystem contains trails and information about the areaÂ’ s wildlife and ecology. This site is an important reference for what types of ecosystems and natural environments may have existed many years ago on the Project VB site. Upon further exploration and research, this site will be used to determine potential ecosystems and wildlife for use within the proposed animalhabitats and restored coastal wetland areas.

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}age _ of 18 8.Sea World OrlandoAnimal Habitats: Dolphin Cove , Manatee Rescue, Manta Aquarium,Turtle Pointand Stingray Lagoon Orlando, Florida http://www.seaworld.com/sitepage.aspx?PageID=514 These unique environments at Sea World Orlando will be refere nced when planning and de signing animal habitats for the marine life areas within Project VB. The educa tional components and guest interaction qualities within these habitatsexemplify immersivedesign. There is potential to integrate concepts and design ideas from these areas into the wildlife sanctuary of Project VB. Waterfront/UrbanDevelopment: 1.Las Olas Riverfront Fort Lauderdale, Florida http://www.riverfrontfl.com/ Las Olas Riverfrontattracts visitors to its assortment of retail, dining, and entertainment offerings along Fo rt Lauderdale’s waterfront. The mixed-use development’s lush landscap ing, pedestrian friendly spaces, and variety of program elements he lp create an engaging place for people to enjoy. The site is within proximity to other area offerings, including hotels, movie theaters, an art museum, convention space, and a science museum. Visitors may also embark on riverboat tours or stroll along the waterfront, enjoying sights of the city. Las Olas Riverfront helped revitalize Fort Lauderdale’s dow ntown bybringingpeople back to the waterfront. Itdemonstrates the potential benefits of a mixed-use waterfront development. Project VB’s setting along the Indian River exhibits potential for a similar type of development. 2.The Grove Hollywood, California The Grove offers a unique blend of retail and consumer environments. As a major revitalization projec t, the Grove juxtaposesthe Los Angeles Farmer’s Market with a new high end commercial development. Connected by a trolley line, the two sections complement each otherin a strange mix of land uses.Anchored by acentral park open space, the Grove incorporatesretail, dining, entertainment venues, and a cinema into a unique “lifestyle center”. The relationship between the Farmer’s Market and commercial development district willaid in developing concepts and strategies for Project VB’s program and site plan.

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}age ` of 18 Hotel & Accommodations: 1.Costa d’Este Hotel Vero Beach, Florida http://www.costadeste.com/ Marketed as the Gloria and Emilio Estefan’s newest “Personal Luxury Resort”, Costa d’Este offers 94 luxury guest rooms along Vero Beach’s oceanfront. The resort offers many amenities, including a spa, beach access, recreation excursions, and a signature restaurant . The hotel targets the high end clientele known to frequent Vero Beach. 2.Lowes Portofino Bay Hotel at Universal Orlando Orlando,Florida http://www.loewshotels.com/en/hotel s/portofino-bay-hotel/overview.aspx The Portofino Bay Hotel captures th e spirit of the famous Italian seaside fishingtownalong the Mediterranean. With 750 guest rooms, this large hotel accommodates the demands of the tourist driven Orlando market. A large wa terfront harbor is embraced by the structures of the hotel, creating anintimate and inviting environment. Additional site amenities include 45 suites, 3 themed swimming pools, private cabanas, achildren’s activity center, full service spa and fitness center, valet parking, business center, 42,000 square feet of convention space, and several bars and restaurants. Thedesign anchors the site around the central waterfront harbor. Project VB ’s site has the potential to incorporate a waterfront oriented design, making Lowes Portofino Bay Hotel an example to consider during the concept development stages. 3.Disney’s Vero Beach Resort Vero Beach, Florida http://dvc.disney.go.com/dvc/guest/resorts/resortDetail?id=ProspectsVeroBeachResortLandingPage&bhcp=1 “Take a beach holiday on Florida's picturesque Atlantic treasure coast. Anchored by a grand Inn and flanked by clusters of villas, Disney's Vero Beach Resort is both an idyllic retreat and a perfect family-fun destination. Have a blast on the beach surfing,boating, or just splashing around. At the end of the day make yourself at home among the old world architecture of spacious Vacation Homes and stand-alone beach cottages. Enjoy the rich environment and history of the region just two hours southeast of theWalt Disney World®Resort.” DVBR is a 211 room Disn ey Vacation Club Resort. With tailored

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}age 14 of 18 recreational offerings for Guests of all ages, the resort provi des a wide range of amenities. The resort offers a large swimming pool with a three story waterslide, spa, miniature golf course, host-ledactivities, rental equipment, three restaurants, two bars, massage services, evening campfires, nature trails, guided excursions, biking, shuffle board, tennis, volleyball, and basketball courts. The ResortÂ’s designand details are inspired by local history. The site has underground parking to minimize its developm ent footprint and to preserve views. Two thirds of the property has been left undeveloped for conservation. DVBR has been awarded as one of the top 100 family resorts in the world for several years and has been acknowledged for its commitment to preserving the local environment. Its small footprint and site specific environmental sensitivity exemplify the impor tance of smartsite design and planning. Many of the features and qualities of the resort may be incorporated into the hotel component of Project VB. 4.Driftwood Resort Vero Beach, Florida http://www.thedriftwood.com/ The Driftwood Resort is one of Vero Be achÂ’s oldest and most historic hotels. Located on the oceanfront, much of the building material is constr ucted from driftwood found along the areaÂ’s beaches. Currently the resort is a timeshare hotel, with a restaurant and bar. The iconic architecturepresents a vernacular unique to the area. 5.Vero Beach Hotel & Spa Vero Beach, Florida http://www.verobeac hhotelandspa.com/ As the Treasure CoastÂ’s newest Condo-Hotel, the Vero Be ach Hotel and Spaoffers a wide range of services and amenities to its guests. The hotel condominium concept pr ovidesthe luxurious hotel quality services to its 113 vacation home guest rooms and suites.The high end property features a spa, pool, signat ure restaurant, bars, and concierge services. Beach access and underground parking are also on site. PERSONAL CONTACTS: ESSENTIAL MATERIALS: Site context and background Local history and related research Inventory & analysis Site synthesis/suitability Program

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}age 11 of 18 Base maps HAVE: GIS Data Site Inventory & Analysis High Resolution Aerial Program Preliminary Research & Context NEED: Site Synthesis 1 Foot Contour Intervals AutoCAD base with ROWs, road ways and bridge elevations Site specific local history and related research for narrative development DATA SPECIFIC TO THE PROJECT: Cultural Context (Research): Tourism and recreational related offerings within the region History and context of tourism in the region Site history and context: Native peoples; Spanish settlement; colonization; F lorida Crackers; railways; citrus industry; town establishment; development tre nds; modern day uses and dema nds; historical significance Natural Context (Research): Methods in ecological restoration; coastal wetlands Development trends and landscape changes over time Site historyand context: Native animals, native ecosystems, historical changes, ecological changes, trends, endangered and threatened species PROPOSED PROGRAM: Hotel (Potential for Condo/ Hotel as analternative) 1.Convention Center 2.Small Scale Water Park & Water Play Areas

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}age 1\ of 18 Retail, Dining, & Entertainment District 1.Watercraft Rental Area 2.Boat Launch and Marina 3.Fishing Pier 4.Harbor 5.Cultural Museum with Exhibition Space Local History Component Local Seafood Market Local Citrus Market Marine Life & Wildlife Sanctuary 1.Research & Education Center 2.Interpretive Trails 3.Animal Habitats 4.Educational Components Public Open Space 1.Central Gathering Point 2.Performance Space/Amphitheater Restored Coastal Wetlands 1.Stormwater Management Mitigation 2.Ecological Education with Interpretive Trails 3.Passive and Active Re creation Opportunities Transportation & Parking 1.Water Taxi Shuttle Service 2.Watercraft Parking 3.Vehicle Parking Back of House Support Areas 1.Administration 2.Employee 3.Horticulture 4.Maintenance 5.Shipping & Receiving 6.Storage 7.Technical/Engineering

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}age 1] of 18 PROPOSED APPROACH& PROJECT TIMELINE: Fall Semester 2009 Preliminary Research & Data Collection Site Selection Rationale Proposal Development Develop Goals and Objectives Develop Program Site Visits Inventory and Analysis Site Synthesis and Suitability Gather Base Materials; Images Structure and Organize Files Develop Layout Template for Book and PowerPointSlides Conduct site specific research (Cultural and Natural) for conceptual narratives Spring Semester 2010 Week 1—January4-8 Develop Conceptual Narratives Finalize Layouts for Book and PowerPoint Review Synthesis with Faculty Mentor Week 2—January11-15 Finalize Conceptual Narratives Begin Character Sketches Develop Relationship Diagrams Week 3—January18-22 Develop Conceptual Site Plans Week 4—January25-29 Develop Conceptual Site Plans Week 5—February 1-5

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}age 18 of 18 PreparePresentationand Update Book Interim Presentation (February 4 & 5) Week 6—February 8-12 Select and Combine Concepts for a Master Plan Character Sketches Week 7—February 15-19 Begin Design Development Week 8—February 22-26 Continue Design Development Begin Digital Model Week 9—March 1-5 Continue Design Development Continue Digital Model Week 10—March 8-12 Spring Break Week 11—March 15-19 Conclude Design Development Continue Digital Model Week 12—March 22-26 Finish Digital Model Exportand Format Graphics and Content Week 13—March 29—April 2 Attending LABASH at UNLV Week 14—April 5-9 Prepare Final Presentation Week 15—April 12-16 Revisions and Adjustments Week 16—April 19-23 Revisions and Adjustments; Practice Presentation Final Presentation (April 22 & 23)

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GENERAL OVERVIEW Project&Type • Cultural‘’cozTourism ƒestination Project&Location  Site situated along the Indian iver Lagoon in €ero Beach Florida

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THE SITE EXISTING&LAND&USEMobile Šome }ar~…R.R0 acres ‰astewater }lant1‹.00 acres }ower }lant1‹.š0 acres Spoil Island2.R0 acres TOTAL&LAND&USE74674&acres  Located in Indian iver County

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THE PROPOSAL  The City of €ero Beach is interested in eˆploring future land use and development opportunities for the proposed site due to increased operating costs and demands on the current municipal utility facilities  Indian iver County is interested in creating a new destination to revitali‡e the areas waterfront  The Indian iver County Chamber of Commerce is interested in creating a new tourist destination to enhance the areas sense of place

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ASSUMPTIONS 1.The collective š0 acre site has been ac‚uired by the City and a private developer 2.The City of €ero Beach is decommissioning and relocating the eˆisting ‰astewater Treatment }lant to a new location within the Countya†All eˆisting structures and utilities are to be removed and relocated b†œ million gallons of reclaimed water must be retained in storage tan~s on site c†A pumping station will be inst alled to transfer incoming water to the new location….The City of €ero Beach is decommissioning the Municipal }ower }lant due to increased operating costsa†All eˆisting structures and utilities are to be removed and relocated›.Fairlane Šarbor mobile home par~ is sold to a private developera†All eˆisting structures are to be removed and relocated b†’ˆisting residents are relocatedR.The spoil island Iz…› is designated for recreation

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LIMITATIONS 1.Œeed to retain eˆisting … and R million gallons of reclaimed water 2.Œeed to retain eˆisting infrastructure of underground water utilities ….Storm surge flooding and wind damage from potential tropical storms ›.Managing stormwater and pollutant laden water discharge to the Indian iver Lagoon R.xnzsite connectivity impeded by the 1šthStreet Causeway Bridge bisecting the site between the ‰astewater Treatment }lant and Municipal }ower }lant ‹.Traffic signal at adjacent intersection limits potential entry points into the site

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GOALS & OBJECTIVES

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DESIGN APPROACH Research Analysis Synthesis Alternatives DesignŒarrative Focus Local Sense of }lace Culture § ’cology •uest ’ˆperience

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REGIONAL CONTEXT

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LOCAL CONTEXT

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 The most biologically diverse estuary in the United States  Šome to more than ›000 different species of plants and animals  xne third of the nations manatee population lives in or migrate through  Annual economic impact valued at ¨š…0 m illion  Šuman activity has increased freshwater discharge altering natural systems  Improving water ‚uality remains one of the most critical concerns for the future

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A TREASURED HISTORYƒ

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DESIGN ALTERNATIVES Initial project investigations eˆplored the following design approaches each with a different set of program elements  Conservation and estoration  Maˆimum evenue  Interpretation ƒriven evenue

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THE MASTER PLAN

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THE MASTER PLAN

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THE MASTER PLAN

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SITE SUSTAINABILITY

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T T h e A r r i v a l G u e s t E x p e r i e n c e  Automobile  Motorcoach  ‰atercraft  Bicycle‘xn Foot

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V V e r o B e a c h P l a z a  Tesoro Tower  Šarbor‘Marina  •uest Services  xrientation  ‰atercraft ental

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T T r e a s u r e C o a s t S h o w c a s e  Treasure Coast ’ˆperience  Citrus Café § Mar~et  Conference Center  ‰edding eceptions  Film § }roduction Facilities  Lodge Šotel  Spanish •alleon

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 esearch § ’ducation  ehabilitation § escue  Coastal ‰etland ’cosystem Advocacy  The Indian iver Lagoon Story A i s P r e s e r v e M a r i n e & W i l d l i f e S a n c t u a r y

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T T h e L a g o o n E c o s y s t e m  Sea Turtles  ƒolphins  Stingrays  Underwater €iewing  Snac~ Stand

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M M a n g r o v e F r i n g e E E c o s y s t e m  Manatees  A‚uarium  The Lagoon Story  Classrooms

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F F r e s h w a t e r M a r s h E c o s y s t e m  The Aviary  estaurant with xutdoor ƒining  estrooms  Alligators  iver xtters

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C C o a s t a l H a m m o c k  •ray Foˆ  Bobcat  ƒeer  ed ‰olf  accoon  xpossum

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D D o l p h i n A m p h i t h e a t e r  Concerts  }erformances  ’vents  Ceremonies

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R R e d M a n g r o v e R R e s t a u r a n t  Fine ƒining  }anoramic €iews  Local Seafood  egional Ingredients

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M M a n g r o v e C a n o p y V i l l a s  Treehouse Style €acation Cabins  }anoramic €iews  2 and … Bedroom Units  Full ¡itchen  xutdoor }atio  Campfire‘BB© Area

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O O t h e r O f f e r i n g s  ƒiscovery }ointe Shell Mound  ecreation and xpen Space

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S S u p p l e m e n t a l G u e s t E E x p e r i e n c e s  Œighttime ’ˆcursions  •uided Tours  Œaturalist ‰al~s  ¡aya~ Adventures  ‰atercraft ental

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C C o n c l u s i o n s : W h a t I  v e L e a r n e d  }ower of esearch  eal ‰orld Issues  Concept Integration  •uest ’ˆperience  Master }lanning  The €alue of Sense of }lace


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