Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text







ESTABLISHED 1895 BARBADOS, DECE iBER 28, 1952

QUEEN SEEKS HER PEOPLE’S

| - - Makes Xmas a rie = a
Broadeast

LONDON, Dee, 25.







Going To j’ca













|
Queen Elizabeth broadcast her first Cursstmes mes ONDON. £ 9
sage to her people today and Legged for their prayers : ‘ oe ™) ie. '
“that God. may gi Sais ; i | Prime Minister Winston Churchill sails next week by
that God may give me wisdom and strength and that I a4 M f alia | He will
pie . ‘ Bey » ne i roa hole l nar Me wi pen
may faithfully serve him and you, all the days of my life. ' ¢ es sy Ne Y " sh x oe ee dd are
e 26 year old Queen, sove- | afew days in New York and meeti both Kv

reign for ten months spoke frém | Eisenhower and President T before goir 1
Ze ace, > ae ae —— at} Y | \ © | Jamaica. Mr. Churchill summoned his top M ers fron
Sandringham Norfolk with nex 7 » Chris rs to for “al meet etore
husband the Duke of Edinburgh | ourists the C hristmas holidays ay f tf !
and their children, four year oldi | he sails
Prince Charles and Princess Anne! J aire
two, close by her. | tt ] e ~ chil nt pm efor \

Expressing her “affectionate | eI Soustelles Risenhowe k tde i
greetings” to 600,000,000 Com-!' m « ternational situation Wht
monwealth citizems in ali con. | j irer ie r eo . the Korean < e
tinents the Queen asked specially a e Ag F . ‘ore Myr enhower orm
for prayers when she receives the| a j ries 0 ol Mh broad outline eZ foreign

. crown of state at her coronation de

in Westminster Abbey next June]. Tourists frem the 5.S. Nieuw

2nd. Amsterdam mingled with the
She gave her people this pledge: | "ge congregation which attend
‘At my coronation next June, 1/ed the 11 o’clock service at St

shall dedicate myself anew for|Michael’s Cathedral on. Christ-

policy of his new administration

| y
French Govl. | The informal

Churehil’s U.S
PARIS, Dec, 2 lined by a Government spokes-
facques Soustelles, first mem-|man but while his visit to Pre

nature of M

t ie
I NS under-

















ervice. mas rm N bes of the General Charles Dejdent Truman will be a friendly
ie aie saline 8 “T shall do so in the presence of spent Chtisinas tne a jaulle’s Rally of French People gesture “a the retivine chia
eee a : : 94 great congregation drawn from | dos. . { Ghd F to Ah ive agreed to try executive, Mr Churehill tal
every part of the Commonwealth Many of the tourists walked} a - ,2 Government, was ex-|with Mr. Eisenhower were ¢
= . | ind Empire while millions outside |2round the City and visited! , bh age oa ate to tell = cea pected to hit all essentia ot
ew our Westminster Abbey will hear |places of interest. Some travell- ‘ | " A iriol whether he w ul foreign policy
= eri ne prayers being, off- tee by cars, Others preferred | J i, nail Ineaseitires alae la “s The —giefisiedinent vse the tek
. ered up within its walls and see | buses. ; j investit > > a cement of the trip
“| ‘ cine oe . Uy the Frene Ss ti am g > as se )
Commissioner a ot she a pene eke Ae ae pele dR |S ag Advocate; | a Ithe itis. pte : cara a the Mtisaee . ai i x lie ;
. ings an ie ¢ i; > DAP . -efer . arn > : i ‘ ‘ ‘ > £ S ane Mic &
A Sate Sie aan AOA ars bree in i ne ae mt THE POLICE BAND Minder Gapt. Raison playing at the General Hospital on Christmas Day. tentative Premier before he names|it did to Americans. It had been
= é é pa f 3 ‘ er » local! — — - - ee “a o——nnninii - t : ; : aie 1. “A
Arriv es upon century. jaccent. That is how I get to e tis ministers then approve the|tvoewn that Mr. Churchill intend-

A know your people”, , ® r e ° Boe cabinet “en bloc” {ad to go with his top subordinates
“Fray For Me e Sai 2 was gli 41 9 € I Scustelle yesterday accepted/ts Washington in February ot
MR, A. H. PICKWOOD, form- “You will be keeping He said that he was glad to be e ers 4 oO t 2 n |Mr, Auriol’s proposal ‘ . ie ae aes

‘ L 3 aireie 7 t form are’ » denavinve far the
ext Depity. - Coranai it aS 4 spending Christmas in Barbados Oo x Mareh but this departure for the

sioner of] holiday but I want to ask you ail It was his fi = y . ra ° | P'rance’s eighteenth post-war Gov-|17.S. and his subsequent Jamaican
Labour, British Guiana, arrived ata see ; Bs fs feat: sunny ‘Christmas. as U S D qT rment and immediately began | yacs cd aot ‘anttelp:
i a, ,é @) whatever your religion may be t ; { ati . , , \ . an ately ves vacation had not been anticipa
bre. Meiletdad ecco; in the er yo gior y be to, He thought it just as interesting as U ee é ise owe e e e u , ing lconsultations w ith different} qq. een anticiy
>

‘ay for 2 Hat day— ray a “ “hristmas” i sric: :
Canadian Cruiser to take up his| P'@Y fo" me on that day—to pray a “White Christmas” in America.





that God may give me wisdom ani



r . \Frenc h political partics delegates Diplomatic source in Lon

} i ; i Si 2s sOnNdOn
new appointment as Labour + “arr | =x Ey ow - Xm Hi l da: * iin the hope of getting their agree- | .. ‘ hee tar Site z
Citeunlesi¢her of this coliny, strength - sear) out the solemn } = NEW YORK, Dec. 25. as Oo L |ment for a “national front” Gov 2) aan : ar ane it

He was met on board by Mr.| agree yr ee a P. it Premier Stalin today offered to meet Mr. Eisenhower Shes oy jerhment =without ~=CommumstS|biropean views to Mr, Eisen-
Ais Mace Deputy abou Como} may faithfully serve Him "“onece | to try to ease world. tension. It isusaid he is interested CHICAGO, Dee, 27 along the lines repeatedly setii oie before Mr. Eisenhowe
missioner. - | and you all the days of my life.”, | ry as is | iS Sé e is interested in An unofficial tabulation showed |forth by De Gaulle, 3 fi efore I isenhower

Born in Kenya on July 18, 1909 | The. Queen was making her first Pk i d ending the Korean war in angwering questions put to him}|4i9 persons had been killed] The main points of Soustelle’s comsil s himself to any definite
Mr. Pickwood was employed in| Christmas broadcast since she suc-| aye t | by the New York Times. He said he believed that the war |throughout the U.S. in the Christ-| programme are: First; reform of |" a pe policy 5. his
«positions of responsibility on) ceeded her father King George |the constitution. Mr, Soustelle: (ugural acdress hey said Mr.



between the U.S, and Russia cannot be considered as i j- |mas holiday weekend accidents Stalin’s “ / i

‘ : sy s S$ nevi- |" 3 eekend acciden ; ‘ . . Stalin’s “feeler’ about 2et

Aon intattends ~ 3 auritius | Sixth last February, \ s : fs re ya el aaa shuding 340 vat 32 ires,; Seid that under the presen , C a a meeting

eet. 1931-43 “From. 4 940. 43, he The Royal Christmas broadcast ueen S al table. The countries can live in peace. SOURED Tee SE SERIE y. Ot FREER l¥rench constitution “nobody can, With Mr. Eisenhower naturally
i 3. 940—43, j . ns vs “ _—~—— i !

Pe three in plane crashes and 44 in Ww I
serveqd in the Local Forces in| beamed all over the world by the miscellaneous mishaps. Lovern. He said prompt con ll be discussed, but Mr. Church

— ni Mr. Stalin said sources of world







‘ At) Sie cach aaa Wu contention lie everywhere and in : i al refor r ‘lude| ill was reported more concerned

Mauritius, ‘ aC BRS aan traditional, since On Christmas Day the band had <0 everything, wherever abgvedaive Almost two full days of tne Eon eae elimi ecanctrt to hear first hand ideas Mr Fisen-
He was appointed Assistant) it was started by King George, three engagements. They played I "e ) vctions or. at ft col ar {Christmas holiday weekend were |; vi ide Pit srless, bower had formed as a resul

Commissioner of Labour, Mauriti-| V, 20 years ago. jChristmas -carols and music at tre es roys i : POUGY OF. SHRP. Hoes ind there was a strong possi and of Se eters ould bi Kor wip and we aa
i g server "the ‘Poised a igni fore p | ener a) shh i expression abs re as ~ i 1Senate, and the executive would : orean trip and to present

us in 1943 and served in that post | Poised and dignified before the |Queen’s Park from 7—9 a.m. The A O 2 000 He said’ he would’ co-operate bility that the holiday death toll = Livdkinthened at least by pro-| his own.

until 1948 when he was appointed| microphone in her study, the park was packed with people who omes : on a new diplomatic approach to}might reach a new record. Sion sak ah abherabiv! vite ood

to. a similar post in British Guiana.; Queen sat in the same chair and j|sang the well known carols with

enc “2 ny scaUs The ¢ + recor 55 is aamieds aah : Mr. Churchill was sistently
In 1946, he attended a course of|at the same desk used by her the band. They then played at the nd the Korean war because} The all time record of 555 holi-jno confidence in Government 1s consistently

4 LGU : Pg *y : + , ‘ age , ’
TAEGU, South Korea, USSR Was interested in ending{day traffic deaths was set last}would mean its dismissal andj W@tned against the West's be-

instruction with the Ministry of| father and grandfather. General Hospital from 9.30 to Dec. £7. hr coming entangled in Asian figh
* : : The Royal famil ath 1 in} c : , 4 sass 7 co J it pe ; C hristmas. new elections, 5 i gled in ¢ sian fig t-
ar 1951 rae ied _ Kingdom the Neacaeete. Meck aod stent her { 1S 50h ee His ea light shane “dee Nero anne The Tires found the answers The National Safety Council has Second: A bold investment and ing to the extent that European
nial Labour Officers’ course | voice on their private radio set land calpeoes, Later. in the after to-day, driving them on*#e, | {O°OUrsBUB™ and very, diferent} already predicteg that 590 persons|reconstruction plan, defence is damaged, and he was
$ se, set. |; é " - * "



|The Queen was heard at the end |), the ; :
; | nf an hour long broadcast in which | ein ity “Happlial Here the
Second Class | the B.B.C. linked the four corners |handsmen joined in the dancing

j of the world with Christmas greet-! jround the wards, with the nurses

Mail Inereases nes, pee messages and goodwill. ' on duty.

from “the attgtude displayed ‘At} will beskillea \ highways by| Third: Amelioration of the, ®*Peeted to put that viewpoint to
fy

the streets in icy cold weatr- 7 lane he ford (aay wna ; Mr senhower. agai
regent UN®se8sions, The ansWers}inidnight Sundi Standard of Ay. if. r. Eisenhower. again,
er. Four United States sol- le AHARE: wav nawever—> 4. - ;
There was no expectation that

diers were injured fighting brought about varied reactions,| Meanwhile a cold snap chiiled| Soustell ;
the blaze mostly of scepticism ae, large portions of the country but }4OoW ene to eve ee Mr, Churchill would go into eco

e cP, ene skies : aims. e said however that the *y Magi : c0~
One Korean civilian was soecieabeilmace peherally’ fale skies promised 190d policy of stabilization of prices, of 0M or financial problems, on















eee eee aan

















| programme dre / to an Yesterday afternoon the band reported in a serious condi- a holiday weather despite falling pao Page y " detailed aspects of foreign policy
In order to achieve a reason-' ©nd, Her Majesty was introduced) gaye a “delightful Christmas | tion and two others were Th 24g» I 1 d papers tyre aaek neredon. wae cma e dehelen or cea iuctivrtty such as the Iranian oil question
able standard of efficiency in the ‘© listeners and “began: |Party programme at the St. James |] Slightly hurt. Some Koreins rec nyure nust be back at work Monday | hich had already. been initiated, | 2% Britain’s admission in some
delivery of second ¢lass mail of I am speaking to you from’ Ajmshouse. Besides the inmates had to be restrained from began the trek today to avoid the}. ouid be pushed with the utmost] ™#nner to the Pacific defence
which there has been a substantial â„¢y own home where I am ec many residents and well wishers|| Pushing into the flames to I A eaen | > t . expected travel snarl Sunday vigour 5 pact, now confined to U.S., Aus-~
increase, the. Post Office authori- i198 Christmas with my family’ \attended the concert, || recover their possessions. ni ecidents uP Fourth: Support of Atlanti-|‘T!@ and New Zealand.—v.P,
ties have been finding it necessary the Queen said. “Let me say at)" ” The fire which was report- Peter and European institutions while 3
greater extent than before. sean HOMES Peer acta a , “— remaining engagements ted ed to have started in a soap _ Daphne King of Government its safeguarding France's. interest
to use the motor pick-up to a Gren are enjoying thems sas the band for joe are: Monday’ | factory was fanned by a Hill, St. Michael was involved in Red Soldiers and national strength iT
The volume of transit mail Much as mine are on the day 29th—St, Thomas’ | Almshouse’| strong wind and in two | an accident with a motor cycle os" up, |EFY Mossade h
continues to increase and, in Which is especially the children’s Christmas Party at 4.30 p.m. and | hours had wiped out the whil ie was riaing a bicycle on a rn . ST UMD ie .- a e4 we e
addition, provision must,be made festival. the Y.M.C.A., concert at 8 p.m. | congested west side of the Culloden Road, St. Michael about Cut I oO Pieces |
to meet the increasing cost which “Most of you to whom I am'Tuesday 39th — St. Andrew's area. Three big blocks of 10.3 um. on Friduy, She was ATS T t . | 7 Be i
will result from the thdrawal speaking will be in your own Aimshouse Christmas Party at | dwellings were destroyed taken to the Gerera) Hospital and omatoes e ny W eak
of -the = subsidised Canadian homes but I have a_ special, 3.30 p.m, } shortly before military and treated for a cut on her head, SEOUL, Dec, 27. The t sgse] Jenkins ¢
National Steamship service, thought for those who are serving | ec | civilian firemen were able to { Wher the secident occtrred A Commando force of U.N, a ae Bae . val r aoek
No payment was made by the their country in distant land far| re e es qvell the blaze. | King was riding her bicycle on] nfantrymen ranged deep into Meiacdauoe reat Fey it ° ,PEHRAN, Dec. 27,
Post Office for carriage of mails from their families, “Wherever Nine Killed A United Nations civil as- || Culloden Roac. The motor cycle} jo iis Jand on the Western] (°° st aes rity t cae Tih Premier Mohammed Mossadegh
by tho “Bady Boats as this you are, at home or away, in snow | sistance team+ pushed blan- was going in the opposite direc-}fiont today to surprise and cut ae” ee a ae ¥ and a num “ ' ported very weak to-day
service was included in the ~ in sunshine, I give you a Ti E: dl. e kets and clothing to the | on ; : ; tik to pieces a group of 75 Com- Ataris Ferg Cae etiine ners fier umes n paeerah pat
subsidy paid by the Governmen; affectionate greetings with every / homeless,—U.P. Shortly after 2 p.m, on Friday]}imunist soldiers by 2 bUSE - > Master Of rho ge roreign Minister Hossein
under the Canada — West Indies good wish for Christmas and the} n Xp oston Lionel Lioyd a labourer of C Raid : to ‘the Ct neces ie Gare he cen: F exerts) Sere UP.) ee
Trade Agreement, 192: New Year.” lrington Village, St. Michael was aiders an into 1e unese/here are 4 M a oO leech on hin (ULP.)
As a. result, the Legislature ig Family NAGOYA, Japan, Dec. 27. +r r “ involved in an accident on Hart's aut of the dese rted truce village
last week voted $1,000 for Tran-! “Wo cae emily us to. the An explosion and fire wrecked ESPLANADE Ge, cam t Se an oe eh idee ead ioe tue toe ie —
sit mail, The amount is _re- British Commonwealth and Em-|® section of Nagoya’s downtown y 77 esr to. A eaeER® Reds dead or worded belare
coverable, UP. pire—that immense union of|business district killing nine per- SEA W ALL oo oy W Se oe a pulling on nas he tN “ee
———--——= ‘nations with their hopes set in}Sons and injuring 22 others. Ton : Paathiy vuisimdentna de " [Rain and snow over North Korea
all four corners of the earth. shops- were demolished by the IS CRACKING Lloyd sustained minor bruises}]#"unded U.N, warplanes until
Co : l * Like our own families it can be blast and flames believed to have . bath | is lete in the afternoon when a few,
ngratu ations a great power for good—a force | originated when chemicals in a i i OP isic. Bishow of Clapham, St.ffights of M.LG. killing Sabrejets |
which I believe can be of im-j|photo shop caught fire. Extensive cracks have appeal Michacl was date ined at the Gen-] 4d fighter bombers roared
AMONG many cables of measurable benefit to all Honan«| ed in the coral stone facing the on H , al Fr fay fte helthrough break in the overcast
congratulations, Dr. Olain | ity.” The Queen recalled that the! Seven persons were killed in-|seaward side of the Bay Street ¢ral Hospital on Friday alter sh 5 rt}



sky to hunt for targets in north

il from a lorry which was trav-
Korea.

Louis Bombard has received | work of her father and grand-,stantly and two firemen died} Esplanade and portions of the wall {a





a telegram from Captain father “united our people ever|fighting chemical fed flames. It] along sea level have been dam- Gare pone sheen our Hill, Chris ie
Sess unetor ee more closely” and promised to} was the second big explosion to in tt M A ae ye 0G aging She Mey heenitted suffering from i
rakaka. aintai » ideals s « : @ ai s. Sixte in the form of a concrete facing a yee
maintain the ideals so near to|}rock Nagoya in four days. Sixteen extending 500 fect will soon be| head injuries and cuts on both

persons were killed and some 300
injured Monday when a nitrogen
fertilizer factory blew up.—U.P.

8.S. “Arakaka” met the | their hearts. “I shal! strive mv
doctor in mid-oceanm quring j utmost to carry on their work”
his crossing. The cable reads | |she Mid.

“Congratulations to a gal-

lont gentleman who had so

carried out along this areca hands and feet

14 Die In
In nee ey estimates
Iasse > egisia » last . t
week, an amount of $5,00p" wa Mixed Cargo | Plane Crash



ey Se Oe







voted to carry out the necessary i, |
much courage in his con- 2 ° repairs which are considered to) The 87-ton auxiliary schoone
irate snr tS detemaas iwr a a errorists be urgently needed Philip H, Davidson arrived in the} SEOUL, Dec, 27. |
luxury and safety were off- © ete ‘i color fro British Guiana on A Greek airforce transport plane
cred to him. Wishing you a |Fiiday with a cargo of mixed|crashed and burned near a South|

.

happy Christmas from all e Police Active ! 9: oducts, \Korean airfield early today killing
on board.” Signed Captain Kill 10 In A mbush 2,000 bags of rice was the mainj|all 14 persons aboard

Carter, - i The Police Department took} item of the schooner’s cargo and |

Dr, Bombard whe arrived steps during the holiday period | other cargo included 500 bags of | Four Greek crewmen, a US
in Barbados on Dec. 23 after SINGAPORE. Dec. 27. te ensure safe driving by holi-! chareoal, 40 tons of firewood and | airforce radio operator attd nine
a& 65-day crossing of the At. Sie évinte Ambushed.an-ar yey ee 7 dayers who toured the country a number of wallaba posts. Master | unidentified passéngers were kill-
lantie from Las Palmas to errorists ambushed an armoured estate car in Jahore, pb vehicles, “of the Philip Davidson is Captain|ed. It was the second Greek air-
Rarbados in a rubber dinghy Malaya yesterday, kilJing ten people. It was the worst in-!" All along the main highways,| Carney Sea!







c i ind the local agents|craft to crash in Korea within a

is“due to fly to New York |; cident in Malaya in many months. The killed included six|constables from the Land Force are the Schooner Owners’ As-| week,

early thissweek on his way |} Malay special constables, two Malay women, a Malay child |@"4@_ the Mounted Branch, pat- «ciation. Last Monday night a Royal

back to France. | : ? : \olled the roads, ¢ Hellinic air force hospital plane \

ANOTHER lita aiveaar Ca oe ee
_ CHRISTMAS

STA, Georgia, Dec. 27

Mr. and Mrs. Christmas
were the happy parents of
a baby giri born on Christ-
mas Eve night. They are to
decide on a name for her
and it is said in social circles
that it would either be

Ter ue oA iach i 7 af - 5 ;
‘Terrorists had placed a land-|s)ould drive with caution and
mine on the road and it exploded trosurd for othe: road

users.
as the armoured car passed mat|



That crash also killed 14 persons
rincluding gix hospital patients
The twin engined transport whijen
crashed’ today was ona _ routine!

urier circuit stopping at various |
airfields in South Korea.



{ it. The vehicle moved co for about
100 yards When it was stopped by
a rondblock, Anothm nae





HERE FOR RUM

I O.K, Service




1





© The motor vess
it tovs



POQBRICE NOTICES

then exploded unde: Zitlwr arrived in

Wlisle Bay on



10 yards to one side and over af priq;



from Halifax to load an-



¢ 1 a constant re-
and the Indian driver. minder 16° rivers” fhat- they

*



; hipment of rum. The
then opened fire with rifles, snot-}ye:ce] was last here. during the The plane failed to gain altitude

after a takeoff and crashed into 4

ft jsix yards bank. Thirty terroris:3] oj oe;
“ |

low Caw , pay,



guns, grenades and a brengun month of November. Loading will



























;
i / Two of the fourteen in the tart on Monday. Local agents for | “Merry” or peers Pp hil! about two miles from the
A P armoured car survived wninjured. the motor vessel are Martin | re airfield. An investigation is under-~
ya my | Police said most of the others! ponriy & Co., Ltd. } way.—U.P. i
Or 7) were killed by the explosion tl . :
pag bi ih ace-3 Are A 7 the . second land-mine whict
Bi i nnn TO, —_— ae 1 oe gouged a hole 15 m>tres deep - z e :
tf oe _ | the ground splitting the armoured ommuin “Ss S oO au {
i Ov me os raf Lo ae i Fi car in two, A party of five police , i
: abe p heard the explosion about a mile } {}
d ; away. They rushed to the scene HANOI, Indo-China, Dec. 27 tance by guerilla auxiliaries al-'of hard-bitten foreign legion| ~. i
7 Ma oye a Des “roe (Arm y and. the terrorists broke up into] Gommunist. suicide ‘squads en- ved mat of the regulars troops across the river to the rebe! S ‘Pre C¢ eet ; i
a + (ua inn several parties and withdrew.jtrenched in the sodden Red River nown locally as one of the tough- \side. Facing them wag a big for-| COtncere Jf FCC tgs (Kt
y ff Asin . | Police. and troops began an , "| delta rice paddies held out against + Communist, units—to escape | tified village used 1 regimental| i
¥ tad . tensive search for them.—U.P. overwhelming firepower while a icra tercourse in flooded! command post plus .a maller CO ‘) i
Vietminh regiment tried to eseape tield village stronghold or a ) f osnerc S {\
PROSPECTOR COMING [the,French trap sprung yesterday On this basis officers said the| oe eee i
| operation Bretagne nportant operation Bretagne Artillery quick firing guns} (tt
The Harrison line steamer Pros- as planned three weeks ago in|mounted in planes opened the at-j} i 5
pector is due to arcive in Cartisle| French headquarte nid the edic f Bui Chu, 61 miles! tack Communists ambushed our } 19.33 i})
Bay to-day. The liner is calling|Christmas offensive w imed a utheast of Hanoi first wave and we had to thre if i)
PAY 12. at the Harbour Police Station and you can see the rubber from Liverpool with general cargo | the h infantry nd pow A tf ! 1 told hor sursels back in the iver. fc 1S) \\}
dinghy in which Dr. Bombard crossed the Atlantic from Las Palmas to for the island. Local ag nt fo th rtul g : units ck t vi o u driv r 4 d : : f da f be fore rotection : ain f the ir ho yting } K.W.V. Table Wines, Sherries and Rrandy. {
Barbados in 65 days Prospector are..D heed G ; ‘of S hs - WkietGant . tr COEF hinge ue Sear Rae) eee ee dae acta 4 ici . .
Proceeds to go to the local 8.P.C.A. Ltd jvillage saig re po UP. ss PFS BAS















PAGE TWO SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY. DECEMBER 28, 1952
ET I IS iat Poa Payie ee eT ee eat! -



Comir KING KONG” The Fighth Wender ‘ ‘ Se a oe er
’ KONG” Th wr Ke 5 W f R 3 A } \RNAI Fre e ie ; Varried Yesterday Tae
Vi ; PATRICKS & . Gibbe: nd
HIGHWAY MAN BIG TREES exucla yeaterds i 4 i : me dresses , of blue em-
NOY? j ol \ H r i \ € ot ,
| : 1

ulder effect and
A :
: IMAM I GINLS
f | | : DON'T TA







TALK é happy Ch
W T OUGH
| Y THROL { ECRET mia Mayo ime “| Be
| LLEGE f nG 4 y
M 1O HAVE : _— mes. Of < A reception was held :
» TOOK 8 je Spencers Plantation, Ch. Ch. and
— & aoe , honeymoon is being spert
a ES : VE NOT F . i Maxwell
Pore, wl : oak PS : M nd s, Johnson wil: be
| Al - i he French |! t d j I i 3 nie thal nina
a emo en < He sper vhite alitas ng rtly for t rh in
yWN BARBAREES ey ay et ec She \ ‘ ot y ‘be Trinidad



{
= Special Flights. For Turfites

- — = ——
wT) o D AL & BG & &® 8 nm & s RITISH West indian Auwi
operated specis an
ae : . — Christmas Day and Boxing Da
Vine . ROWAL to take turfftes to ime Tr nidiarci
e Tues s + & 830 Turf Club’s Christmas Meetn
which opened on Boxing Da
Those leaving on Christma:



aa evening were Mr. Victor Chas
MOON rae woncn nace Mr. Edd@te Ward, Mr. and My
i AWi sa, Joe Goddard and daughter, Mr.

nd Mrs. Jack Dear and daughte

JUST FOR YOU roft AND Let wot Mr. Primee Walker, Mz. Geore
Nf ANNE he Ward, Mr. J. R. Béwards, Mr

Clayton Greenidge, Hon. Dr. A. £
ato, Dr. Eric Storey. Mir ’

lade t canteens












































ort i Mrs. Charles Peirce, Mrs. Muri
You Ved a Hart and Mrs. Elsie Moore
said ; Leaving on Boxing Day wet
PASSAGE ' | ERE COMES Mr, Colin Goddard; Mr. H. Cad-
esday i THE GROOM dard, Mr. Harold Waithe Mi
30} tL RS ¥ pia 1 Hubert Kinch. Mr. John Cx
THE PLAINS © MAN OF Miss L. Mill, Mr. Meurice Ski
ME P, : .
. AND to | EX OWN Mr. Bertie Proverbs Wi
MPEMAID \ . TI Gill ana Mr. H, A. Tudoi @
rd D es HE 3ERS"” highlighted the Christmas Party on Christmas Eve night at the Bridgetown Plaza.
| R. STEWART MASSI4* T CAROLEERS igiligins
| \ vo wlila WOLFMAN RAGING TIDE M rlanter of Springhead. St Here they ore simging carols for the employees of the Plaza Theatres. The Party was given by the
BEND OF | ALDATEAS th nd as =a _. > tans Management. ag ;
0 THE) i Lon Chane CATTLE DRIVE Janes me one a Fi aya ichoe! Teachers Returned To Canada
RIVER who left during the week ’ .
Siren mare aarenretaaoes 2 BWIA. for Trinidad to atte Intransit “VY ARYE teachers from the Cre- N he ‘
the Christmas ace Me=ting oie a “trole y rg % MONG the passengers return-
ds I &y iis ¥ ee ave! : RS. M. K. VESYPAL amives ae pg ee ogre AY xada on Tuesday
Chemist here on Wednesday by th /.575. ‘Prinidad by special flight or “Cu were Mrs. Elizabeth
‘ . 1 PE t ths’ holiday De Grasse from Jamaica on rou Boxing spend a week's Say who wa yending a holiday
To-might 8.30 & Mon.. Imes. >& 3.50 ee ee om. Cecit R. % St. Lucia to join her husber t ilidies 7 oe here who hae daughter Mrs,
Hinkson, son of Mr. Rancolph Who has eet a ee ‘ ‘They ave Miss Edna Schuyler. Roddy Austin of 8th Aven MR. & MRS. LLOYD JOHNSON )
ad M -M 5s cH linkson of “Journeys ind”. Black ee = Bri ices - ani Miss Alice Bowman and Miss Belleville and Mr. and Mrs. Ulrick Pleasure Trip T.C.A. Arrivals
Se cwiciy | Rock and a chemist emploved in Ooh ica by h¢ Mr. Mervyn “. McCormick, all of whem ary Van der Wald who were here on | gp», p. FLEMING of the RS.. MARY ROSNER, daugh-
a SWING: he? ry of C.P.IM.. Curucao a 3 M ae! the Ocean View Hotel. . eee rete - zuests at the Publicity Department ae ter aif B. Shotn meavhet of
f le i ived here on Wednesdi t . $ 4 cean View Hotel. American ae Ne York High Street and t late Mrs.
a9 GLORIOU 9 Rienase AcconUeD Fr J fi irrivals By Be Grasse City is ‘vi icine the clartioinc: oe Korn “ot. Bay “Strest returned
: CAL) ; shildren rom enezuela » Trinidad Solicitor City 1s visiting al ‘ ; ’ sit) et,
} MUSICAL! i gus ‘twee cy YRILENE PUILI rinidad goticttor a pleasure triy He arrived here from New York via Bermuda op
: & x x : x 15S C EAN E . yesterday morning by B.W.1.A. Tuesday afternoon by T.C.A. after
F ’ . cd ok. And e -8. ir RE ae e —" tTO M* air dresser of Port-of- M* BRUCE PROCOPE, Trini- from Grenada and will be re- paying a visit to her mother who
ai ‘ J EAVING for the U.K., on Ws ‘ AGERW > inl I in. Trinidad arrived here on 4 ed Barrister, is spending maining for eight da ost. Bind in tine THEA. Keane,
Lt sf cae . ae sy Se De Sree two children Henrys a es Ww inesd by the SS. De Grasse ‘he Christmas holiday as the guest ut the Ocean View Hote! .
ha z J vas Miss Liiiam Murray, dau2)- from Caracas, Venezuela, arrive » spend the Christmas and New of J. O. Tudor at Government Also arriving by T.C.A. on
a " 7 ter of Mr. James L. Murray on Sunday by LAS for tf ‘ holi is a — ® Hill. Mr. Procope arrived fron From Trinidad Tuesday was Rev. J. Mockridge
, 7 . > c *hri as and Ne ear hol : ae ' ence G P ) 7 ay by B.W " : o de aow ss
With ‘ oe a. oS hom neeee e we = i na mi N Gill ¢« social. alah Friday by B.W.1A., MISS 1 U GENE EF. GAY dau ee né oe who is down on a
ove t S.A., sit | z are gues a wo sic ; i . IVE + ‘ vi
it, Miss B. Coppin of New Hotel te Mary Ga
the Star aunt, ithe Grae She o's me : . Maxwell Hill, Christ Church i 1
dus Jerse Tae More In 1967 A an gE bso paciaing by wo fe oe Second Visit In Five Yoars arrived home from San Fernand Quiet Wedding
a NES Albert E. Steigerwa Commi i 4 ' olid.ys were 2c PPE ‘ _ Trinidad BAW.LA to spend ;
f . 7 AYNES Prin- ho § RS. FREDERICA HUNTE Chinas 6 Tes . ‘1 quiet wedc > cere ,
American R. A. C. W. HAYNES, Prin- “Agents of Caracas. He said : Alberto Reval and | as a e Christmas and New Year's 4 T a quiet wedding ceremony
a cipal of Bates Memorial his wife and he h alata Venezuela. They : 1unt of Miss Marjorie an heli S 1 Christmas day Miss Mar-
; : a mau sf an h ’ oy we ul enezuelk hey are yy, Py Raila nahirnen . * “ : :
In Paris! High School, | Trinidad, acc’ wy ives weeks dontey ‘leer 7 sandy Beach Hotel ar. Ge Be Baile ys ern kK oe : ESA vin Skeete was married to Mr,
panied by his wife, the former September last * on oe : he Colony prog Ayoerica la : AR OSWALD HENRY of Martin Tudor.
Aficc Sheil: Ramkissoon and ©¢P 2€ ast year 0 = = cs werk to spend a short holiday with [¥g « yy faxwe ‘onst The bride \ giv Y arri-
on ata aaaenr arrived visit to the island Rarbadien In Bermuda her frandmother, Mrs. Jutia a ’ ia vars - vant Pg ar Hect Burcim Taceieeee,
here recently by B.W.1.A. for a ‘ ATR CECIL SPRINGER, a ed ee get Hunte’s see- from Trinidad on Boxing Day by was the bridegroom's brother Mr.
four-week holiday which he 1s ¥2 RBorbadiar v ho has been md visit in five years B.W.1LA.'s special flight j. Cameron Tudor.
pending with his mother, Mrs. AYt holidaying a £ a Y z for the past Tr, . npn 0 onidnepeneanesmiidanm cieptnmmanestion ; ae aeeipieemebtadeie icine
Charlotte M. Greenidge ot Cacrabank Hote! ¢ vith the »yal Mail! “wo Peks
Apple Grove”, Cave Hill. ___ and Mrs. Oscar Glanz of Marat oh Compan returned Me ALISTAIR ELDER, a
Mr. Haynes who was last ~— who arrived over the weeken home on Tuesda by T.C.A. to 2 eichant of Port-of-Spain,
in 1947 said that he : and J nS B.W.1LA. : en cut seven wee “holi- Trinidad, arrived here on Friday
fumily will be leaving on Jan- Mr. Glanz who is President of day h his relatives at Eagle ty B.W.I.A., on two weeks’ holi-
vary 11 for Grenada nearer Irimex, a Commission Agence Hall He was accompanied by cay. He was accompanied by his
will be the guests of fir. M: * Maracaibo said that they would Mr I ddeus Darrell a cO- wife and Master Donald Paap.
Hosten, the Social Science ich be here for two weeks. This is \vorke n Bermuda who will They are guests at the Marine
Set ei ~~ . a ane e ee their first visit to Barbado also be aying for seven weeks. Hotel.
oc noo who 18 spe ic ga J ’ .

there with his parents.

Private Practitioner
D*. CAROL JACKSON, a
private practitioner from
Washington, DC. arrived on
Friday night by B.W.LA., via
Puerto Rico for ten days’ hcliday
nd is a guest it “Edgewater

: Hotel”, Bathshehba
; She said that she visited here
last year for about the same
period. SS
Back To Werk

= F WACK to her duties as a Dis-
Jean Millard i triet Nurse in Port-of-Spain,

Miss Marjorie Porter who spent

abode eet ay ie ma f is s I
o sca AY BY 7 | re weeks’ holiday as a guest at
Rely nde an Gee GEN MITCHELL) | esaeeten St he” a

LYRICS BY MUSIC BY





























brought paper hats, noise makers and streamers for the guests who welcomed him singing * ‘Jingle Bells.” Ru enormous bowl of ex ellont eminent Barbadian historio-
Capt. C. BE. RAISON, “balloon baton” in hand conducts the singers. um Punch. Behind . srapher is going to keep the facts



the studio the normal progragme right, it should be very specta-











f ars Yorter said she had a very en- se = bs eae . 4 -
Arthur Freed + Nacio Herb Brown CYD CHARISSE i s oo ible chs and hopes to return o HAS BEEN quite a hectic morning? so th it they “can write
arece me Kelly & Stanley Donen fm Ce me day np t home to their friends and rela-
“Art ur Freed. An M-G-M j art no an e will t iy » ave huddied round a
& M-G-M Records . . ferrer sf the be hardly ; ! ier el : to keep warm, j US,
“ Picture Miss Carmen Herrera « ! i ‘ a ) : : : ag a
Album! Municipal School of Nursing 19 efore Ne e 1 rat ra ‘was oe a Quick
=)))| Caracas, Venezuela, left on Friday wm. Ia lab i jon would have - thought
i night by B.W.1.A., for Trinidad on my See the ¥ ees had had enough of the
{{] hor way back home after spend- hat unless 3 have t ed ea, but maybe it was his ambi-
}ing a week’s holiday. She was @ able sam¢ , you. are = F Taw Nee O84 AISURAS
5 puest at the Aquatic Club. to be left out in the ol¢ morning in Barbados too
Ny COKE LE EAPO FOr EI { Sia ake ‘
2 FUSION GAVE a very J) UMOURED ihat there vill
4 GAtety NES NE p de a full scale pageant for
KB ro-¢ & morrow 8.30 pim heir st staf The severity of the Co. onatior the idea is al-
8 Mat. To-day 4.30 oe Se, broken up by ly in-the committee sta I
oo table pi ised I would not t
MAGNIFICENT DOLL sandwiches, cockt and i } : , sat ee
and at cas: cana aie i : — about ic but I understand
o he table there the history of Barbados is going
> vas y nlium id * . - -
LL BE YOURS ee FATHER CHRISTMAS visited the Crane Hotel on Christmas night during their dinner party He was a flaming r uddi ‘ “0 be the main theme, an
KS
x
.
.
%
.
S

From Puerto Rico jWas going on unperturbed cular,
OCCSCOCSSOA LOCOS A/TRS. E. GRIVAS of New York | Footnote: On Tuesday in my
AVE City. arrived of Friday night fRISTMAS MORNING os col umn I said that The Barbados
A., from Puerto Reo Rockiey Beach, the Wekacedre en noun ie-agen on







~~ by B.W.LA.,, ; ; ;
@ i aD Wy KAR , She was accompanied by her two | have almost, disappeared. Fnelisi sald Wetec ‘Ate wr en ae
I | children and will be staying with |people weré splashing abou: t} sorry. Now I hear that to F ys,

her aunt Mrs. A. White of|brine; why do they make a point be open on Sunday ae it is to
Brighton, Black Rock. of swiron 4x4 «that partic ls ir well ay eae ae

FESTIVITIES as SSS Gen Ki Gm =m EEE



Tuesday (eniy) 8.30 p.m
James Mason in
THE SEVENTH VEIL

AT

The Barbados Aquatic Club

WE WIS: OUR CUSTOMERS AND FRIENDS

(Lecal & Visiting Members Only)

CLUB
MORGAN

> Orchestras

For continuous music throughout the
night

DINNERS will be served between 7 and 9 p.m.

so

i
oe ' A Prosperous
oa : New Year
F:
_
te, yi
:

MEMBERS are ke@ kindly to make their reserva

ons as carly as possible. Dial 446!

FROM THE WANAGEMENT AND STAFF OF

T. R. EVANS

WE ALSO HOPE TO HAVE THE PLEASURE

Turkey — Chicken cy Steak dinners
served from 8 to LL p.m. ; j
DANCING from 9 pm. Music by Mr. C. CURWEN

Supper at any time and his Orchestra,



CCLOR BY

| foun

Svet Waltz, Statue Dance, and Ballon Dance. for

HATS! BALLOONS! which Prizes will he given; also DOOR PRIZE to

NOISEMAKERS!

OF SERVING YOU AGAJX IV 7953
the holder of the Lucky Ticket.’



|
i Mave RONALD ATTRACTIVE BALLROM DECORATIONS
i | | 1 Ai . v 2 she ‘ 4 i
Maio Retin Nev, ;
i WEDNESDAY at TH: Admission to Ballroom 3
j
i

7
BRIDGETOWN gee A &
(Dial 2310) wal 2 £

to greet the New Year

T. R. EVANS (WHITFIELDS)

YOUR SHOE STORE
Phone a ; 42%)

am 228 822 22 ©82 2s fez

dinner $4.00 :-: Dance $1.00











_SUNDAY, DECEMBER 28, 1952



Farm And Gardening Hints Jfotoring Newse~
Garden
By AGRICOLA

Rice

Rice, although not cultivated
locally, is such an important arti-
cle cf diet at all seasons of the
year, it occurred to us that if
would be of interest to give a few
brief notes on the crop. Rice in
one form er another appears to
have been included in practically
all the Christmas menus which
have been advertised, It is the
world’s most important article of
diet. To millions, in Asiatie coun-
iries, failure of the rice crop may
mean famine.

While, for centuries, rice
been. associated with the East,
cultivation of the cereal has spread
te other regions and now forms
an important crep in the United
States, Italy, Spain, Australia,
Brazil, Mexico, British Guiana and
elsewhere. Generally speaking
in the tropics, rice is used chiefly
as a vegetable and is frequently
the most important dish at a meal.
In temperate climates, apart from
an occasional curry, rice usually
figures as a pudding. Although
simple to prepare, some experi-
ence of cooking rice and of its
characteristics will make all the
difference to both appearence
when served and _ palatability.
Thus a long or medium grain rice
may prove more acceptable as a
vegetable with meat or fish, while
a short, plump grain type is likely
to be more glutinous and sticky
and makes better puddings. Rice
combines Well with green or dried
pulses to make a very nutritious
meal.

has

There are numerous varieties.
The best yielding sorts are low-
land or aquatic in respect of en-
vironment, although hill or dry
land rices are cultivated to some
extent. The crop cycle varies
with the variety but is hardly less
than four months and greater than
six. The cultural practices con-
sist of ploughing to break the
land and turn under weed growth,
followed by harrowing and level-
ling. The last should be thorough
as on it depends the effective dis-
tribution of irrigation water. The
final result is a mixture of soil
and water which has been thor-
oughly churned up to the consis-
tency of thick cream, into which
nursery seedlings four to five
weeks old, are set in bunches of
five or six about eight inches
apart each way. The water rela-
tions of rice are peeuliar in that
the plants are kept growing in
standing water of five or six
inches depth throughout their
life cyele, except for the last
fortnight when the water .is let
out of the fields to harden off
the nearly mature grain.

Rice, throughout its history, has
been regarded as a crop of low
unit value, grown by small farm-
ers using simple, often home-made
implements, with women-folk dor
ing the transplanting, weeding aud
barvesting, all by hand and sickle
Largely a family crop, rice has
seldom, in the tropics at any rate,
proved attractive to capitalistic
outlay for mechanisation. Severe
shortages brought about by World
War II and a consequent substan~
tial rise in value are creating in-
terest in modern methods and
large scale production units are
ceveloping rapidly. This is very
much the case in British Guiana,
our supplier ef this commodity, In
this connection, producers in the
tropics are learning from coun-
tries like the United States and
Australia which, enjoying the
benefits of protective tariffs (with
a low consumption rate compared
with tropical countries), have been
able to capitalise the industry with
advantage. To such an extent is
this the case that in many areas in
the United States, the seed is now
sown broadcast from low-flying
airplanes, Preparation of the
jJand, reaping and bagging the
grain (simultaneously in the field
as with wheat, etc.) are all carried
out mechanically.

|

| Good Paint is

an In

We stock a very large

imported Paints; and this year, because it is Coro-

nation Year, is when to

and new!

And the time to buy is NOW !

PAINTS, DRY COLOURS, LINSEED OIL, TUR-
PENTINE & FLOOR VARNISH





For Amateurs

Those lucky peéple who are
Starting a completely new garden
have a wonderful opportunity of
getting everything just right, an
opportunity which they should
make the most of.

In the well established garden
of some years standing there are
always certain things we would
like to change or to actually get
rid of. It may be a hedge that we
don't like, or a vine or garden bed.
But do they get changed? Very
seldom, for gardeners as a tribe
ave conservative, and plants, and
the general lay out of the garden,
although it may not be quite as
we like it, become like part of the
family, criticized, often abused,
but seldom got rid of !

But when making a new garden
the position is different it’s like
having a clean sheet of paper on
which we can write anything, for
in the new garden we can have
exactly what we want without
sacrificing any old friends. Slowly
and carefully we can plan the
position of every hedge, tree and
plant, placing them first where
they will be seen to the best ad-
vantage. The trouble when making
a new garden is that kind friends
are so generous with offers of
plants and cuttings, which are
difficult to refuse and which we
‘st'ck in the ground here and there,
often where we don't want them
at all. Once these plants start to
grow we hesitate to pull them up,
and once they flower—we are lost,
for few gardeners can bring them-
selves to deliberately pull up a
flowering plant even if it is not
wanted.

So, when starting a new garden
the best way is to think out care-
fully, first what type of garden
you mean to have, and then plan
the position and kind of trees,
vines, plants ete., you want and
stick to it. Otherwise the new
garden is apt to become a place of
confusion and disappointment.

In starting the new garden the
boundary wall or hedge must be
considered first.

A Hedge makes a beautiful and
inexpensive boundary, costing far
less than a wall, and being just as
effective. The choice will lie be-
tween a flowering hedge —- Pride
of Barbados, Hibiscus or Exora, or
a non-flowering hedge such as
Casuarina, Sweet Lime, Bread-
and Cheese, or Cherry. * Sweet
Lime makes the perfect hedge,
and when fully grown it is as in-
penetrable as a stone wall. Flow-
ering trees, vines and beds must
be planned. Fernery, Lily-pool and
paths, working the plan in from
the boundary toward the house.

One of the snags to be avoidec
when planning the new garden is
that of oyercrowding. It is diffi-
cult, when plants are young, to
visualize how big they become
when fully grown, with the resuli
that they are often planted too
close together, which spoils the
general effect later on.

Shrubs look better when planted
with plenty of space around them,
so that when they are in flower

they can be seen in their full
beauty,
Vines look lovely forming a

background over a_ bare wall or
fence, or over an arbour.

Each garden should have at
least one flowering tree, prefer-
ably more,

Paths too are inrportant, and it
is worth while to spend both time
and money in making them as well
and as permanent as_ possible, it
means less trouble in the long
run.

cestment!s

quantity of best quality

t
}
have your home sparkling
}

Coverings for walls both inside and out.
:
| BARBADOS CO-OP.

COTTON FACTORY LTD.

DEEDES

ee ee ce



Our first reaction this week is

border of Mexico to the frontier
with Texas in the North, a distance
of 1,938 miles, with a mostly met-
alled but rather rough road, vary-
ing in altitude between sea-level
and 10,000 feet, was won by Kling
in the 2.9 litre type 300 SL Mer-
cedes at the average speed of 108
miles per hour. This was in the
sports ear class against competi-
tion from Ferrari and Gordini
principally.

This remarkable performance
enhances the outstanding reputa-
tion whick these cars have built
up for themselves since their
debut at Le Mans, and which they
confirmed during the Italian Mille
Miglia. Jaguars, having carly
suffered a resounding defeat
against these cars, will have to
jook to their laurels.

In the standard car category of
the Pan American race, a Lincoln
carried the day at an average
speed of 91.2 M.P.H.

to the realm of more mundane
transport, the most recent

this island, is the new
Seven, or Austin A 30.

Austin

porters of these cars, and of one
private owner, we have had the
privilege of driving two different
examples of this new and prom-
ising breed, which shows every
sign of upholding the laurels so
justly earned by its famous pre-
decessor.
is

car most pleasing,

nent overflowing. The
room” is accessible through a neat

panel in the top of the bonnet, and draulic) are more than adequate,

despite the small overall space
alloted to it the engine seems quite
content te leave sufficient room
around it for normal maintenance
~—although removal of the starter
motor entails some trouble.

The engine itself is an 803 ce.
overhead valve unjt delivering a
maximum 30 B.H.P. at

R.P.M., but capable of delivering fitte
size
low revs for its size These char- by a
out from the
column,
the car very flexible in top gear, Freneh

a surprising amount of torque at

acteristics, combined with a well
chosen overall gear ration make

and it is possible to pull away
from speeds as low as 12 M.P.H.
in top without roughness or jud-
der. In the lay-out, the engine

unit follows the general outline eM,

of all

years,

Austin engines in recent

Suspension is conventional with and in our opinion make

coil and wishbone at the front and

long half-elliptic leaf springs at under ;
The wheels are small, England, where the horn
dom
function of satisfying the law. The
The body shows a clear indica- Sjenals Department is covered. by
tion of the trend of thought of the conventional flipper-indicators
the designer — that is to build operated by a non-self-cancelling
a motor-car with all the essentials gywitch on the dashboard, and this
in good measure, but with non- gwitch is equipped with a warn;
essential trimmings eliminated so jng-light which is in our opinion
as to keep the price down to the guficiently bright to cause dazzle
windows -4 night. The single windscreen-
wiper covers a useful proportion
ulilitarian altar, being replaced 4¢ the screen, but is of the non-
; parking type.
front aided by a ventilating quar- 4+ fest, the blade does not seem
ter section capable of opéning past «,, obstruct the driver’s vision.

the rear.
taking 5.20 x 13 tyres.

minimum. Wind-up
represent the first sacrifice on this

by sliding door windows in the
the 90 degrees. In the rear, the

main window is fixed, but the
quarter-light ventilator maintain

a surprisingly good circulation of plenty [ -
power -to-weight ratio is

air in the back seat.

AAA AAAAAAD



A Prosperous New Year

;

LOUIS L

Leg-room is
one closely approaching a gasp of quate, even for quite big people
astonishment.__the Pan-American @nd our memories were stirrec,
road race, run from the Southern phile riding in the back seat, b)
ecollections of rides in the back
f early
outh,
ffort
arriage and preventing our head
rom
oof represents
utstanding

qrmrine.

ie foem-rubber
shaped as
the body,
sible to spend a long time in this
without
position is
wings and the road close ahead to
be seen, though the throttle petal

SO

to

car

is

tiring
position
Every
the ache in thé instep caused by
holding the foot at an uncomfor-
table angle for too long.

Another
cerns the
Coming nearer home, and down “fishing
appears
new hang-over from the earlier Austih
design to put in an appearance on Seven, and this, combined with a
rather
necessary
second try before engaging first
Through the courtesy of the im- gear when at rest.

On
found to be quiet and the synchro-
cones. do their job very well, par-
ticularly
The

combined
The external appearance of the which,
being a standards,
scaled-down version of the A40 comfortable ride and a complete
and the A70, a design which curi- sense of security on road surfaces
ously enough seems to succeed in however bad, There is no float or
putting a quart into a pint pot wander, and practically no road
without any impression of immi- shocks

though
drove, one tended to come on early
indicating
not at that time (after 300 miles)
fully ~
by Tin. headlamps—is good, as is
only to be expected in view of the
fact that the lights fitted to thi«
4,800 small car are the same
d to vehicles of much greater
and speed, They are operated

seem more

more or less after the
style, although it would little
logical for the switch joe
to pass through the dipped posi- really

tion before going on to main beem
instead of vic



SUNDAY



By KEN DAVIS

rK r

ern
me
ing
list
willin
mund

food

surprisingly ade-

Austin Sevens in ou
where the simultaneou .
of retracting our under- es
pa
the
mos
early

disappearing
one
joys of

through
of the

our from

upPoistery is
to give full suppor litter
and it would be pos-
fatigue. The driving
good, enabling both

situated by
to hold
for any

motorist is

that it would be
the helf-throttle
length of time
familier with

lean
: chicks
small criticism con-
very long and flexible
rod” gear-lever,
to be something

time
which +
of a

tight gear-box makes it
sometimes to have a

the road, the gear-box is

by

in third and top gears.
and

three

are transmitted to the od
“engine drivers via the steering-wheel. double
The brakes (Lockheed Hy-

on one of the cars we

that the linings were —

bedded in. The lighting—

as those
less

fingertip switch mounted

side of the steering- °)'°

-versa, at pres-
A main beam warning-light



as

er



broiler
their broilers at a controlled price

from housewives tell

says

and
honoured

for a

is high

you use
crease
goes up.

successful

broilers.
and
This helps in controlling disease
Do not crowd broilers: provide one
square foot of
bird when raised indoors or 7
of one square foot per bird with |
outdoor yards.

bred-in

brooding

change

twice a day,
fifty per cent.

shut i
forgiving
cessors

comfortable,

broilers

keeping

what



ADVOCATE

pay

by

NOTES

e poultry keepers are trying
these d
business can only be run
rofit and the key to broiler
W t is pounds of meat per bax
OW many pounds of broiler meat
will the feed deliver per bag?

ays.

hat depends of course on the
fice you pay for your feed and
the price you get for your broil-
Nobody could expect to make
selling

e price of a fowl for

net what the control pric
bit what the seller is
: to take. Supply and de

sll gevern ft
disposal of mest local

et back to broilers.
the most important thing and you
nust expect to pay more for a bag
of feed that yields thirty

broiler meat than you would
bag that yields onl
i\wenty-five pounds,

the value

and

Ss as your

and lanky.
are bred

sell

weeks

to



and

for those
like a lot!

of hard driv.ng being 42

is filted in.the instrument pancl,
The horn is of the “Beep” type, the
s far too week
discreet a noise to be effective M.P.G. As we

able
viceavik

To all our

| | Friends and Customers

of

"
2
| Lane & Aquatic Club Gift Booth

G9 NE ENE EH 8 9 8 NN

local conditions, though in
is sel-
the useftl

used, it fulfils

did.

For all that, when

To sum-up, here is a very ser~-
little motor-car, with
of power,—in fact the

sufficient






|
&
&

BAYLEY

RAN RENT NN TR AN EN NNN

£
EG

have

(Dept B.A.5)
London, W.C.1

LEARN

throughout the

|

broiler

TO

much as a shop

net

sale
produce 4
contre! lists are more
in the breach than
the observance. Everybody knows
this but the authorities still keep |
the contrels goin
retains its name
been closed for business.

ong after it has
fut to
The feed is

"But deduct the price of the feed |
the meat and |
you'll find that the profit over feed |
cost goes up when the meat yield |

Other costs (chick cost, |
everhead) 1
the same regardless of th
So your

un

profit
profit-over-feed

Some of the tips recommended
reisers will |
be known to many poultry keepers |
but here are a few reminders for
those who are attempting to run
a broiler business for profit.

Don’t buy chicks that will grow

Be sure

to make good
Put ehicks in all at one |
all

at ¢

among

Fuel consump-
tion figures as given by the Motor
in their road test vary between
29 miles per gallon at a steady 50
M.P.H, to 525 M.P.G, at 20 M.P.H.,
everall consumption oyer

here,

COMMERCE

one

floor space

Early feathering is primarily
characteristic,
greatly influenced by crowding and
temperature.
yacked chickens bring lower price

but

feathering

most noticeable handling usually make slower
characteristics of this ¢ar' are the Cool brooding helps fi
very light and, positive steering, Protect your chicks with
with a suspension free water.
though hard by modern Keep broiler mash in
gives an amazingly

feeders at all times, For the first
provide a minimuin |
of one inch of feeder space per |
chick . From three to six wee'ss
larger feeders

feeder space per
From six weeks to market feed |
pellets on top of mash once or
Increase feeder space

for brutal use of the throttle on
wet roads to provoke wheel-spin
and a consequent rear-end slide, ’
but the day of the driver whose
throttle is always either open or
past, as modern cars ave |
than their prede-
of this form of treatment.
Austin Seveg is easily and |
pleasurably driven, is easy to park,
takes up very |
room On the road—leaving

us

by

curious anomaly, buy our fuel in
Us. gallons (the miniature vari-
ety), these figures will have to be
scaled down in proportion,

This is then a motor-car for the
shallow pockets, and is likely to
preye very popular, perhaps even
to the extent that its fore-runner

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SSS =



PAGE FOUR

INDIANS DUE IN T7DAD
JANUARY 4—6
*‘Miracle”’ Fielding Helped South
Africa Dismiss Aussies
By O. S. COPPIN



(From Our Own



SUNDAY ADVOCATE



Abu Ali Wins Governor’s Cup

Local Horses Do Well
As T.T.C. Xmas Meet Opens

|

F.A. CUP
SOCCER

(From Our Own Corresponden:

LONDON, vec. 26.

(From Our Own Correspondent)

Correspondent)

JAMAICA’S POST
OLYMPIC MEET

KINGSTON, J'CA, Dec. 27.

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 28, 1952

BRIGHT LIGHT
OUTSTANDING

Wins 5 Classics In A Season
BY BOOKIE

By her victory in the Trinidad Derby Mr. Cyril de B. Barnard’s

filly bright Light nas set the seal on a two and tnree-year-old career



r » ; 7 . aris > Ww story i the B.W.1.
‘ ; Trinidad’s M. Agostini ran{ which has no comparison in the whole history of racing in .

Look out Wolves’. West Brom-| stouuy at Sabina Park to-day|No other creole ever won as many classics and no other three-year-

HE INDIAN team, fifteen strong, reached London on December PORT-OF-SPAIN, Dec. 26. wich are chasing you for tal) the \second day of Jamaica’s| old ever raced so consistently during the course of a year with such

24. According to the schedule circulated they were due to A record crowd including a large number of visitors | Division “One” Championship. ° | success. In all, Brignt Light has won five classics this season between

arrive in London on December 26 so that they
of schedule. This is good news since plans for
settling the programme can now be definitely set in motion.

They are due to leave London on December 28 and this will
allow them to reach Trinidad between January 4 and January 6, 1953.

are two days ahead
receiving them and

meetin
In the second race three won
the first three places in this order
Dashing Princess (Lutchman), |
Firelady (Yvonet), Fluffy Ruffles
Holder). Bethell’s Abu Ali gave
Sarbados her second victory of
the day by capturing the ‘most
-oveted Governor's Cup and three |
thousand dollars. Turfites expect
the Barbados invasion to do ex-
tremely well at this meeting. The

MEET INDIANS IN SOUTH FIRST
PMUHEIR first engagement will be against the Trinidad East Indians
in the South and this is fixed for January 10 and 12. They open
their official fixtures in the first colony game with Trinidad from
January 14 to 19, The First Test match takes place at Port-of-Spain
from January 22 to January 28 and then they come on to Barbados.
Fixtures here are set to open with a colony game from Raseaey
31 to February 5 and the Second Test will be played here from Satur-

day, February 7 to Friday February 13. lay’s racing was largely one of
. Ss eiaie . Z s upsets with Bright Light, Oscar, |
NO NEWS OF AHMED AND GOPINATH Persian Maiden being the only

HERE has yet veen no confirmation nor denial in official West] favourites to trounce their oppon-

Indies cricket circles regarding the report from the India Kadio{®ts. Barnard’s Bright Light
that Ghulam Ahmed and C. D. Gopinath will be unable to make the| (Helder) won the Derby Stakes
tour. If this is true we would be more than glad to hear of their|C@Sily in a race in which the

substitutes in- order that we can form some authentic “Who's Who”

heavily backed Columbus ran un-
of the team. In any case the personnel of the team should reach the

placed and Gallant Rocks second |



Board soon and fans will know as soon 1s I receive the necessary place was the great surprise, |
information. Cavalier was scratched. W. E.
Julien’s Oscar in a field of such

BREWSTER DOING WELL IN U.K. favourites as Top Flight, Leap On, |

PORT fans will be glad to receive news of H. G, Brewster, Spare aoe Song, Marklight and Rock
tan and Combermere cricketer, footballer and athlete who is ae by ee ee
studying at Loughborough College, Leicester- i race: neo “vd

many surprise winners was Bomb
Sight (Newman), offspring of the
famous Brown Bomber. The big-

shire, England. He has had leave from his du-
ties as a member of the staff at the Combermere
School to pursue studies in Physical Education.

He has passed his Teacher's certificate with —_ ee tn ee aoe
a distinction in practical teaching. His subjects | frst race. Results:— ena .
taken were (a) Physical Education, (b) Eauca- : ? 7 a
tion—Psychological and Physical Development, FIRST RACE
(c) Education and Society, (d) Technique of London Bloodstock Cup: Six Fun.
Education, ' ted Garden Gay. Tunay Light 3. True

Brewster still found time to play the odd game | Foot. Time 1.20%. r
for Radcliffe and has been elected captain of|, SECOND RACE
Loughborough for the coming season. | a Shite tie ae rie

He has written a thesis “The Influence of Geo-j| riuty Rufies. Time 1.202/5.

graphy upon Industrial Development and has
been made a Fellow of the Royal Geographical
Society.

THIRD KACE
Derbu Stakes: One Mile 130
1. Bright Light, 2



Yards
Gallant Rock,

3









y 4 ‘ First Admiral. Tin 1.58.
He is now working on another thesis—“The | ; FOURTH RACE

West Indies’ rise to cricketing power and its| _ Breeder's Stakes: Six Funs 5

implications for the future” and his many sport- ones a Apolo. aye ye 1 oe

ing fans will wish him good luck. me TRIPTH RACE |
H. G. BREWSTER TIME—is collapsing George. Maraval Stakes: Six Furs. Class D1 |
and D2, El and E2 |

GOOD FIGURES BY CENTRAL PLAYERS Light Time 1.2375. Mark

HAVE recently discovered some interesting figures from the Cen- , SIXTH RACE ;
tral Cricket Club which has just carried off the Second Division | @°vermer's osheatiees Class A |
Championship of the Barbados Cricket Association competition. 1, Abu Ak, 2. Hope Dawns, 3. Adven-

It was during a luncheon given by the captain, Mr. F. A. Storey,
at Graeme Hall House last Sunday morning, when some well known
local ericket figures, that included the Internationals Clyde Walcott

tures Time 2.06 2/5
‘SEVENTH RACE

Fernandes Trophy: One Mile 190 Yards

: . Clays CL and C2 Winner

and Everton Weekes were drinking the health of the captain and his| 1. persian Maiden 2 Chandra, 3 Belle

team, that I discovered the strides which this little club has made | Surprise — 1.56% »

in its ree vears of existence KIGHTH RACE

in its three years of existence, Apex Pinte: Six Furs. Class Fl, 2

3 yrs. and Over
BRANCHED OUT UNDER WOOD 1. Pearl Divers, 2. Hopetul, 3. Baton
Tirae 1.234.

ROM a year of friendly cricket they branched out into the Secona 3

Division and chiefly through the spade work of veteran L. O. ,
Wood then first captain, they were able to build a team. This season
they could boast of six players who had performed with commend-
able individual credit. For example C. E, Hinds scored 571 runs in
17 innings (six times not out average 51.82), C. B. Goddard 515 runs
in 17 innings (five times not out average 42.92) while E. Weekes and
C. Patrick both passed the 300 run mark.

L. O. Wood, the oldest player in Barbados Cricket Association
cricket to-day was third in his club’s bowling averages taking 17
wickets at a cost of 8.58 runs each. Vere King 31 at 11.84 runs each
and C. E. Hinds 28 at 12.65 runs each were also good individual per.
formers.

footmark Wins
Slewards Cup:
Payne Injured

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Dec, 28
Footmark, Jamaica bred creole,
‘wno came to Trinidad as a three-
year-old in 1850, and won the
Derby, scored a brilliant victory
over the imported thoroughbreds
in the $3,000 Stewards’ Cup over
Six furlongs for A and B Class on
the second day of the T.T.C. races,
The five-year-old son of Merry
Mark withstood a blistering chal-|
lenge from Royal Windsor and
Abu Ali in the straight and won a|
bianket-finish.
Footmark paid $52—the
biggest Pari payment.
Barbados’ lone victory to-day
was scored by Dashing Princess
who repeated her B Class mile,
beating of Little Haven and Gol-
den Quip by two lengths, Phariite
threw Jockey Fred Payne who
came from England for the races.
Payne received serious head in-
juries. The day was good for punt-
ers and the biggest Forecast was
Magic Lantern — Happy Union
Which paid $1,030 on a $3 ticket,
The weather was beautiful and
the track slow.

CONGRATULATIONS SOUTH AFRICA
“THERE could scarcely be a more handsome dividend paid to mag-
nificent fielding than the feat in which the touring South Afri-
Cans, having first been themselves bowled out for 227 runs by Aus-
tralia in their turn dismissing the powerful Aussies for 243, but
sixteen runs more than their own total.

I was among those who felt that the Australians, having dismiss-
ed the South Africans in a day would have been able to consolidate
this early gain by piling up a sufficiently tall total to ensure that
they would be ample time in the three remaining days for defeating
the “Springboks”.

CREDIT FOR MAGNIFICENT FIELDING

HOSE who listened to the commentary must first give South
Africa every credit for what has been described as “miracle”
fielding since the Australian in all fairness to them, did not throw
their hands away.
Who could blame Neil Harvey for having been dismissed, caught
one handed off a full blooded drive at silly point by Cheetham or
Arthur Morris who saw one of his strokes strike Cheetham’s hands
for Tayfield to run back several yards and take what must have been

one of the most curious return catches in the history of the game,
The South Africans have now kept the issue open but in addi-
tion to this they have place@d themselves in a position for forcing a
win if their batsmen can put up a reasonable score and they can
trap Australia into batting on a five-day old wicket that must begin
to crumble or play tricks at least.

day's]

WOODBROOK STAKES

six fur, Class Fl, FQ two year oljs
1 Flying

Saucer (114) Payne, "2
AUSSIES’ GREAT FIGHTING SPIRIT Bord Wyn He) aide ees
5 na ) . B {
One must at all times remember the great fighting spirit of the | Mtce Lutechman , are ita)
Australians and I am not for one moment predicting that they wil] | Time 1 min, 7 sees

be defeated. We have seen them turn defeat into victory too often.

WOODBROOK STAKES
The West Indies know this to their bitter cost. Certainly, however

Six furlongs Class E, and E2





t ) 1, Magic Lantern (98 plus 4) Naidoo.
this knowledge will not prevent my giving an honest opinion on the]2. Happy Union (124) Lowe. Bonita
facts and happenings as they present themselves. ae) ae tg yvonet. 4. Gallant Rock
nag . aa ata’ . ‘ aan . . (126) vested
Perhaps the relentlessly efficient bowling machine of Lindwall, i Tonia be alt pecs

Miller, Bill Johnston and Ring might jump into high gear and bring
a comparatively ridicujously easy victory for Australia but this does
not preclude the possibility of South Africa being able to do a similar

CANNING MEMORIAL STAKES
three yea old and over
i mile and 130 yards Class C Maidens



: 1. Rosebuds (113) Singh. 2. Devil
thing with their tirelessly accurate off spinner Taytield and the help |symphony (113) Crosses. 3 iiinnire
of Mansell, Watkins and Murray if the two last named have recover. | Miracle (113) Newman 4 Balmatic Ul)

Lutehman
Time

ed sufficiently from their injuries.

1 min, 58 4/5 secs






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from Barbados and other West Indian ‘colonies attending
the first of the Trinidad Turf Club’s five-day Christmas
g saw fine performances by Barbados horses.

| like Ole Man River just kept flow-







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One point behind they have one
game in hand.

poxing aay’s biggest crowd—
| 59,000 at Shetflela—saw Albion
|roll up their sleeves at a 4—2z
_.. | deficit and clinch victory over

in the three
Leslie Laing of Jamaica won

the U.S.A. second.





Post Olympic meet to place third
hundred yards.

r .8 with Ji t of
nee Se ee _ ee | en Lignt has therefore won every classic for which she entered.

team beat the Jamaica Olympic |

Barbados and Trinidad and only the Barbados Guineas escaped her
grasp because she was notin it, If tne Breeders’ Stakes of 1991, which

the 2
sne won as a two-year-old, is added to the list her tally makes six.



}

a ti i is aturally turns to great creoles of

’ an CRS f ‘ i ieam in the one hundred metres At a time like this the memory na )
’ i mm | Weginesday with an SSth mimute } four este setting a new/the past. From 1930 onwards there has been a steady maceion ei
‘ fy | Ron Alien goal. Previously two} 7 ica record of 42.3 seconds.|"Umoer of classic races for creoies in Trinidad, B.G. and Barbados.
p om jown goals by Curtis and, Geenan fhe U.S. team were Milton! 4 tat year the’lrimidad Derby came into being. ae 9 naan es ous
2 _ a ee % eae Campbell, Mal Whitfield, Jim #2d the Breeders’ Stakes were the rege oo wane ‘ouae Mr. 0. P
DOK. olves against a Sunder-} ‘* ngs ARS ns cP ci ten years only two creoles managed to win both. . *Uee.
land team showing seven changes TEE “densien Chamaly Tete #ennett's Bachelor's Fort and Dr. Cyril Gitten’s ‘tommy a su

: couid only draw i—l. Et eae Hovees Ta Seach ts pee Bachelor’s Fort was a fine upstanding son of Bachelors Ay aga

+E rind Oe tt # Labo derb “McKenley : a nd "George Rather Warm and betore he agree ay Ags Tiere: taaakatt oes
summone e two ca 1S, : ; ete eee vommy Boy, a halfgbred by Sunwave out of we t

Stokes "Ken Thomivon and BiG }hoten, The toes Jamalce team | Crenaga bred isteareer was very indierent and apart om the

: . idfiela } ” i atson, we classics 5 _ many r ‘ :
ieee ee ee “a Stoke Andrade, Donald Davidson dak re ee ee ae cela y ,
* ‘and admonished them for too ee USA dt irom 1940, when the Barbados Derby and the Trinidad Trial
ams. arrison Diilard, U.S.A. hurdles | «,, a. . se-year-ol acing took on its own in-
. vigorous efforts by a. ‘we ble Psensation, set a new Jamaican | 5t@kes were instigated, Save err caer a couple the two-year-
They played to foot-ol-the-ta ‘aribt - : aividual looks and no longer was it necessary 10 coup)

* | patvern. Campbell's thirty minute }varbbean record in the one-| \iq classic with it for the purposes of assessing tne merits of the
equaliser meant Chelsea's firs: a and ten metres Hurdles | ( reoies. From 1940 10 1947 wnere were therefore three classics which
point since October aA to ieee rofhngs | wed Cana ns a creole could win in one season but none ever accomplished this

two-nil win at Doncas . 7 * . ; sh coveted triple crown.
ithe pag me draw on Christmas }the U.S.A. and third was Louis Panetta . s
J my day has put Sheffield United four night of Jamaica, Reginald Pear- There were, of course, a few who could no doubt have done it, but
> points clear in Division Two and{man of the U.S.A, beat George que to the War travel was difficult and the Trinidad horses especially
% Bristol Rovers’ one-nil victory at; Rhoden of Jamaica in the five- aid not patronize Barbados racing very much. The late Mr. A. C,
~ |Shepherds Bush—their ninth in| hundred yards with McKenley (ypowd’s High Hat (Restigouche-!anny Oliver), however, ran in all
by | Succession — keeps them five|and Whitfield tieing for third three classics in 1941 and won two of them: the Barbados Derby arid
_.__& | points ahead of Northampton in| place. The time was 06.8. the Trinidad Derby. The next year Gleneagle (Bachelor’s Tut-Grey
| the Third Division South, In third We Christmas day the first day (jen), could easily have won all three but did not contest the Bar-
MR. F. E. C. BETHELL | North Oldham are back on top) Of the meet McKenley won the jados’race. She won the Trial Stakes and the Trinidad Derby.
MR. F. E. C. lagain after temporarily giving | One-hundred metres in 1.4 secs.

|

é i The 2rmen. |

Kamarose passed the winning line first} Way to Grimsby. The fisherme: . ce ern
but was disqualified jlanded a_ goalless draw with | the two-hundred metres in
ANCHOR CUP | Chesterfield. on Christmas Day | secs.

Six Furlongs Fi and ¥2 3 year olf | but Oldham’s one-nil win

and over r 1 ti y. > =
1. Sunseeker (124) Newman. 2, New | gives them a one point advantage. |Jim Gathers U.S.A, McKenley
Rocket (118) Quested. 3. Stella solaris} Christmas Day feat of scoring Of Jamaica won the four-hundred
(198) Hoider, 4 Palccaine (129) Yvonet eight goals was Carlisle’s record. metres in forty-eight seconds.

STEWARDS CUP
Six furlongs Class A and A? B and Be
1, Footmark (114) Lowe. 2. Royal eer
)

Their luckless victims

leslie Laing of Jamaica won

Second was Milton Camp-
today | bell of the U.S.A. and third was

were Pee Reginald Pearman of
Scunthorpe. The centre forward the U.S.A, and third was Mal
for Whitehouse got five of them Whitfield of the U.S.A. Athletes

The next horse to win two classics in one season was Belledune,
Hon, J. D. Chandler’s filly by Restigouche out of Beauvais. She won
the Barbados Derby and the Trinidad Derby, but did not run in the
Trial Stakes. The roliowing year along came Jetsam, the first of the
Flotsam-Hope in the Valley combinations, which later proved so suc-
cessful. Jetsam won the Trial Stakes and the Trinidad Derby and
everybody will concede could also have won the Barbados classic if he
had been entered.

21.6

From 1947 there were four classics; the new addition to the list

sor (129) Newman. 3. Abi. Ait (1 : : ‘w si Trial Stakes at Arima. This race was won by Atomic
Paditans Kandy Tufti (124) Oneill, |—an individual best for the club. Junch “with the Ggvernor .Sir being the Derby Trial Sta i _ : , :
“rime + ae “30'3 5 node 7 The best individual goalscoring Hugh Foot K.C.M.G* at King’s 11 who then went on to win the Trinidad Derby and so to join the
bbe ite that ny ge feats today were Adrons’ four for House to-morrow. Enthusiastic band of double classic winners mentioned above. The following year
1. Rock Suna tim) "Wecaco, 2 | Notts Forest in their four-one crowds are attending the meet Yet another joined the happy band, this De D re ea
Honeymoon (122) Yvonet. 3 Buddha}wjin over Hull and three each by which continues on Monday when | gan who accounted for the Trial rs ree «Amped a Barbers
an) Alt, 4. Battle Seng (126) Crossley. | Albert Calland of Torquay and ren oa Wint of Jamaica and Se = take part in the Arima Derby Trial Stakes

‘me: i, min, /3 i “ dy Standfield of the erby. F oe
MPERIAL STAKE Murray of Darlington. Andy ani of the U.S.A, take ° .
Nine furlongs B Cines The best of Christmas Day was join the other athletes. In 1949 the first three-year-old to win eat ee ~, moenns

1. Dashing Princess (118) Lutehmaan. } Tgp Bennett’s four in Tettenham’s came on the scene, This was Mr. William Scott's Ocean Pearl,
2. Little Haven (116) Lowe. 3. Golden} enone win over Middles- S fi 1 d e Flotsam progeny, her dam being Pearly Glow. ence ttee
(123) enry mre ( ) Holder. ¢ St x 5 Der ‘Tri 1 2 ye
ont e: 2 mins. 6 1/3 secs | brough, ta 1é. Will Trial Stakes, the Arima Derby ‘trial Stakes and the nida iy

Aussies Out Fo
Small Scores
‘MIRACLE’ CATCHING

(From Our Own Correspondent)

MELBOURNE, Dec. 26.
NS, today enabled the South Afri-
lia for only sixteen runs more than

‘ee hale
the thita day’s play in the second
Test here they are 251 runs on Of 10.3 held
with six wickets in hand, and Rhoden

Russell Endean has his best form , Arthur Wint, Ja
at the right time to. reach his| 1% Jamaica O}
maiden test century and lead
the way to the South Africa total
which with two days to go may
grow into winning proportions,

Endean’s effort was typical of
his mentor Bruce Mitchell. So
far he has batted ten minutes]
short of five hours for his 115| and) and Mankad (India).
and has hit seven fours. He has Miller now needs a further
scored 700 runs on the tour and|*Â¥"S to become with Rhodes,
with 'Tayfield (fortytwo wickets| °Mly player in the world to s
to date) has a great chance of| ‘W° thousand runs and take
establishing new South African| ge wickets,
records in this country. South African 237 and (for aki

Â¥ . Australt,
By their fine Test form and ° "A deientinys Ist Innings |

enthusiasm the young Springbok| McDonald c sub b Mansell ........
side has indicated that Australia’s! Morris ¢ & b Tayfield





r

KINGSTON, Dec, 2

Kenley, Les Lain
Michael Agostini of
Monday in the 200 metres,

race will settle world-wide con’

had he started.

Stanfield won the event
Jathers was third
Laing was fifth
also will run
versus McKenley,
Lang, Jathers an

in 20.8
A miracle of cat
cans to dismiss Aus'
they. had.made om.
This effort was coupled with a
marathon performance by Tayfield
who is proving himself here to be
the world’s best off spinner, He
took up duty after lunch and
bowled unchanged for 26.4 overs
of eight balls each,
Stock bowlers Watkins and
Murray were off the field all after-
noon with injuries and Tayfield

ympiec captain,

in the Swedish relay ich
composite of the 100, aon 300

ing along.

He started the day’s .great
catching by running back ten yards
and diving to hold a ball just off
the grass after Cheetham at silly
point had jumped and hit a shot
from Morris over his head.

Cheetham caught Harvey bril-
liantly one handed at silly point
off a full blooded drive and Me
Glew ran twenty yards backwards

g ‘rewe : “c sCie Harv ao = a ‘ - 5

and screwed his a oo supremacy may be drawing to a Berry & Chegtham, b ‘Tay fieid :

Hin’ to hold a high soarer off | close, Miller © Kndeen bene nee
. .

Hole c¢ Waite b Mansel
Benaud b Tayfield.,
Lindwall run out .........,
Ring ¢ McGlew b .Tayfield .
Langley not out
Johnson 1.b.w
Extras

Powerful though the front line
attack is Australia cannot con-
tinue with, unstable batting and
get away with it,

Yesterday’s breakdown was
| the fifteenth time in the last nine-
teen completed innings that the
Australians have failed to top

But the wonder catch of the age
fell to Endean on the boundary.
Miller far and away Australia’s
most polished batsman had hit one
six and seemed assured of another
when Endean leapt on the bound-
ary and caught a ball high over-



Tayfield



| Total





~~ Meet Rhoden

Andy Stanfield, termed the fast-
est human alive, arrived in King-
ston to-day to compete versus Me
8, Jim Jathers,
Trinidad,

versy whether MecKenley would
have won the Olympic 200 metres

in 20.7,

1 in 21.2 Stanfield
in po 100 metres

oden, Dillard,
1 ; id Agostini as a
result of which the Jamaica record
jointly by McKenley
Stand dangerous.
maica’s long strid-

ters: the series which started on
Christmas day for the first time



She did not take part in the Barbados Derby.
ae r

Since Ocean Pearl there have been more classics added to the
list and the Jamaican gelding, The Jester 11, equalled her record when
last year he won the first running of the Easter Guineas at Union
Park, then the Trial Stakes and the Arima Derby Trial Stakes. He did
not run in the Barbados Guineas or the Barbados Derby but he did
race in the Trinidad Derby only to be soundly beaten by another
Jamaican, the fily Embers, who herself established a record by being
the first, and the last, horse that has won, or will ever win, a Jamaican
Derby and a Trinidad Derby. j I

1 have concerned myseif chiefly with the Barbados and Trinidad
classics because they are, by common consent, the most important in
the South Caribbean. But in 1946 the Demerara bred Whitsun Folly,
bz Mont*Agel out of Savoy Folly, was also a triple classic winner in
as much as she won the B.G. Trial Stakes, the Trinidad Trial Stakes
and the B.G. Derby. She ran and was beaten in the Trinidad Derby
but did not come to Barbados. So far she is the only horse ever*bred
in B.G. to win a Trinidad classic.

—_—

7.

The
tro-

and

How does Bright Light compare with the winners mentioned
above? For my part I rate only Jetsam and Gleneagle above her, As
I was unfortunate not to see her racing at all this season I am also
prepared to reconsider my opinion after I have seen her race. For all
I know she may have been better.

The only possible comparison that could have been made between
Bright Light’s race on Friday and past Derbies’ was unfortunately
eliminated when the broadcasting station went off the air at the precise
moment that the race was being run. We do not know, therefore, how
her time of 1.58 for the mile and 130 yards compares with the 1.56%
which was done by Persian Maiden over the same distance in the
Fernandes Trophy. wea) , :

However, of one thing I am certain, it will take an exceptional
creole to break Bright Light’s record in the classics and it might be
a long while before we see anything like her again,

en-

is a
and

20 ow
the THE GOVERNOR'S CUP
‘one The Governor’s Cup, for the fifth year in succession, went to a
horse that was either owned or trained in this island. The list reads:
Elizabethan, Storm’s Gift, Atomic I], Fuss Budget and now Abu Ali.
6 | Indeed, no other race in Trinidad has ever been monopolised to this
*43 Jextent by horses from Barbados. : :
83 To Mr, Fred Bethel and his gallant little colt Abu Ali I owe an
43 | apology. After he won here in November I did not think him capable
2. lof such form over 9} furlongs. True the race was rather inconclusive

due to the interference with Landmark and others which was caused
by Monro unseating his jockey at the start. Hope Dawns, one of the
co-favourites, however, was well away and ran as true a race as could
be expected under any circumstances. But Abu Ali, who was also
well away, defeated her on her merits and, indeed, was forced to run
a very trying finish to subdue her, In view of this there is no doubt
that the little colt is a very good one and at the present time one of
the best in training in the B.W.I.

head as it was soaring over the | 300, : BOWLING AMAL YSIS gee THE BREEDERS’ STAKES

pickets. The twenty-five-thousand Too many catches are being Tayfield ao ae eS : . 7 “

crowd stood and cheered him. given for the liking of Austral-|™M#sell sooseress 19 8S 88 8 | If good fortune smiled on us in the Governor’s Cup, it was
The Springboks have a great|ians — used to the relentless) meee 7m, AFRICA 2ND INNINGS — jj] luck which cost us the Breeders’ Stakes. Apple Sam, evidently

chance if their batsmen do their methods of the svearen rains Walte¢ Hole eae On ERR Po suffering the effects of his temporary lay off due to a knee injury,

job tomorrow. The pitch is good Miller, who captured his hun-, panini Sout crises Ms snd Figing Seager, te at ate ree 7

but it won’t last another three | dredth Test wicket when he had |Metesn ftw ‘x 26 | and Flying Saucer. gris ‘

days of play. | Waite caught by Hole, has now hacen ane eee 42 Nevertheless, I am glad to see that in siring Bomb Sight the
; MELBOURNE, Dec. 27. joined the select hand of five who Extras “ Brown Bomber has at last shown some of the promise which breeders



have compieted the Test “doubie”.
Others are Noble and Giffen (Aus-
tralia); Rhodes and Tate (Eng-! Bowling: Miller 2 for 39, Ring 1 fo

GEBDE BE Ve Be

Once again,in the present Test
series South Africa are in a win-
ning position. At the close of

Total (for 4 wickets)



SS

s situated opposite Hotel

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~—— | have held for him for so long. it is also more in his favour, i think,
that he has sired a winning two-year-old as it was expected that he
> 6g, | Might be inclined to produce plodders.





2

Gea sows
GREETINGS

Bast Wishes
for a Prosperous
1953
from
Eckstein Bros.
Bay St.

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SUNDAY, DECEMBER 28, 1952 SUNDAY ADVOCATE





PAGE FIVE









_—

SIX FLY SOLO IN MISS BIM “toncs” Smit wcetes

COLDS

THERE’S NOTHING

CURES AS SWIFTLY

AS
i CANADA'S LARGEST
THREE WOMEN | SELLING COUGH

MISSING AFTER | AND COLD REMEDY

PLANE GRASH j 30220200? gi KLEY’S

Plane and horepat
earched the Venezuelan coastal

waters for BN bcs Aven MIXTURE





TWO ‘teen-age boys, two
engineers and two commer
cial salesmen have flown selo
since the Barbados Light
Aeroplane Club’s Auster air-
craft “Miss Bim” took the air
last June, They are Peter
Wallbridge (17), Graham
“Gotch” Atwell (18), Gordon
Butcher (36), Ross McKenzie
(31), Jack Marson (31) and
Donald Edghill (27).

Wallbridge left schoo) in
April and wants to become an
airline pilot, Atwell plans to
join the Royal Canadian Air
Force, Butcher is a mechan-
ical engineer at Acme Engin-
eering Works, Roebuck
Street; McKenzie is T.C.A’s
Resident engineer; Jack Mar-
son and Donald Edghill are
commercial salesmen.

ee JOE & ROBERT

Number Seven

SHORTLY before going
to press the “Ad: te
was informed that Mr. E>

j
. ;
lyn Reece (46) Man ro

Three Houses’ Foot St

Philip made his first solo Y |
flight yesterday in “Miss ne






Bim”.

He is therefore the
seventh member of the club
to fly solo.







First to solo was Butcher in
just over seven hours. The others
made their first flights in under
10 hours.














It was in August last year that Airlines plane Christmas ev Reet per ea
a group of men interested in fly- ;
ing held a meeting and formed MEMBERS of the Barbados Light Aeroplane Club inspect the engine of "MISS BIM” the club’s Auster The. pilot and co-pilot report
what was to become the Barba- aircraft. Left to right:-—-Denis Malone, Stanton Topgin (instructors), Ross McKenzie, T.C.A. resident en- they swam ashore after the plane 7 .
dos Light Aeroplane Club, The gineer and Donald Edghill. McKenzie and Edghill are two of the six members of the club who have crashed five to six miles off the \ e little old
following month two members of flown solo. coast on a flight from the coastal Y 0
the Trinidad Light Aeroplane to join the Royal Canadian Air- operation by the loan of the land town of Barcelona to Caracas and ans
Club flew an Auster aircraft over Before trainees force At a relatively reasonable on which the hangar Was con- the plane kept afloat about ter \ ‘oad ‘ 5
on a goodwill visit. During their go solo they have price the Barbados Light Aero- structed minutes ‘ 3% a
four-day stay they put on a dis- to pass a medical plane Club can provide the ‘ %
play of precision and stunt flying test approved by " youth of the island with a great’ They also receive full co-opera- They said they passe aie we Ser
and took several members of the the Director of ; deal of the ground work in prep- tion from the airport authorities. preservers to the two, women ‘ Skilfully blended =
Barbados Flying Club up for a Medical Services| ; aration for a flying ‘career. The The Club in its first year has passengers and_ the tewardes ' t e . -
spin, as well as tests in} public have supported their en- developed rapidly and there is but the women became separated patiently aged

! . air regulations 43 tertainments well and govern- every indication that it will con- from them in the darkne ind éinniy ve vis . I ’ i
Shortly after their arrival and visual aid! ment have shown their co- tinue to do so. rough sea. (CP) Yourself a leap year's plow i

Philip Habib, pilot of the air- signals. A stud-} What have you done, be he j

craft said “we are net here to) ent must log 40) - di thst ietlillacceda ne ipacbegnion movin Lierpaaialie ‘ t {

sell the aircraft. We are here hours, some oft, \ whose ‘time y ‘

to ‘sell’ the idea of flying. They which must be



did just that. solo before i ! o-da ;
qualifies for his i. oa

By mid-January this year the student’s pilot li- “~~~ Rn 0)
Barbados club held its inaugural cense .) vear has slipped) away
meeting. Lectures on flying were “Miss Bim” Goraon Butcher Neuve wate every An
organised in preparation for the arrived in Bar-_
arrival of an aircraft, The Bar- dos registering 150 hours flying oa NGL MRI:
bados Government loaned the time. The total is now well over While geet the ne



club an acre of 340 hours. After every 10 hours
land at Seawell flying time the aircraft is check-
and members of ed by TCA’s Resident Engineer,
of the club con- Ross McKenzie. This takes the
structed a han- form of an_ inspection of air
gar on the spot. frame and engine. Every 50 hours
Dances were held the aircraft is given a thorough
to raise funds overhaul and checked from stem
and in May the to stern. ,
aircraft arrived. The aircraft is at the service
The following of any government department,
month “Miss and will be especially useful in
Bim” made her the event of fishing boats being

Lhe choice of



Ea MID ANGE coorcn

SOUT Wwe

first flight. reported missing. Tourists and pi tins tel oh
To-day the i anyone’ wishing to get aerial t t tear ; ee
Barbados Light photographs of the island can Worked | towet \ ro @

hire the aircraft which will be
nerepnre deiow Peter Wallbridge piloted _by one of the instruc-
members and 25 non-flying mem- ‘rs: Should a member of any
bers. There is one lady member other! flying club visit, the island,
Mrs. Peter Morgan of the St. Law- ©n the production of his pilot's

sponsored by

J &R_ BAKERIES
















rence Hotel. license he would be made a vis- makers of
iting member and could have the

Entrance fee to the club is $10 use of the aircraft, under simi- | ENRICHED BREAD 7 y Si
with an annual subscription of $25 lar terms as local members, A | DISTULERS TR ‘ INT
For non-flying members there is member of the Trinidad Light } and the bienders of DISTRIBUTORS: MARTIN’ DOOR!
no. entrance fee, Annual sub- Aeroplane Club has already made | :
soripeon So Wy ea tas tae WaRsty is Geoahes oe case ey & R_RUM On Sale at MARTIN DOORLY X CO. LTD.
This is. divided into 30-minute Ls Teo wee DR. BOMBARD and friends sitting in his rubber dinghy L’Heretique : eI
periods of instruction. The fee The Barbados at the Harbour Police Station yesterday. Right with move camera
includes aircraft insurance, pe- Light Acropiane a eerenenerre is Frank Watkins taking some “live shots” of the doctor for Televis

ion News, International News Service of New York. This film will
be flown to the United States at the earliest opportunity.

Club plans _ to
work as closely
as possible with
its “big brother” 4
Four ex-R.A.F. pilots are the jin Trinidad and
club’s instructors. They are Squad- there is a scheme
ron Leader David Henderson, Con- afoot to affiliate
troller of Civil Aviation —_ ay - the two clubs.
ernment Airport Manager, Stanton - " ‘
Toppin, Commercial Salesman and ekg r ope .
ex-R.A.F. Warrant Officer who is S°""l ‘ path oe
Chief Instructor; Denis ae
Barrister-at-Law and ex-R.A.P. g.nore ating Flying OMicer and Julian Mar- €or “hoxt year
ryshow, Air Traffic Control Offi- the “auditor will
cer, Seawell, and ex-R.A.F. Fly- present the club’s anae Maree
ing Officer. The instructors give jinancial report, and tnere will
their time free and deserve great he the usual election of officers
credit having had their first six and management committee,
pupils solo in under 10 hours. Already the club has one mem-
Royal Air Force trainees solo in per planning to become an air-
8 hours. line pilot and another who wants

trol, oil, engineer’s fees and
general maintenance.

BUY You JUST
HAD A DRINK
LAST monTta/







*

HOW MANY GLASSES —



due next month
and at the annual

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‘Ohe

SUUUETEUOOTT EHO eatin

PAGE SIX

ADVOCATE













Which Is The
Best Age?

Asks PENSANT

FOR YOUR NEW YEAR'S PARTY
SERVE THE CONNOISSEUR’S CHOICE

GRANTS WHISKY

Jellybag Cap» arrives

el : Shakespeare’s seven ages of
ALWAYS MELLOW... ALWAYS THE SAME man, es described in “As you Like .
it”, are familiar to many of us, “a
and while they are descriptive,






they are hardly flattering

If you Ui i
remember he starts with —“the ?
infant mewling and puking in the ‘
nurses arms’, — and continues | ui Sd,



through the various ages until the
lest, which he describes as “Sans
teeth sans eyes, Sans taste, sans—
everything”.

But however unflattering his |
description of the ages may be,
how apt and true his likening of |
the werld to a stage where we all |
have several parts to play, a dif- |
ferent part for each age.

Which then is the best age?

» If we condense the ages of man |
into five, anmq consider them
separately, which age .would we |
choose to live through again were
we given the choice? That is |
perhaps a_ difficult question to |
answer right off, and the choice

would certainly vary with various e
people, but few people would}
choose the repulsive but necessar~ |
(in order to get born) first age, |
that age as Shakespeare describes !
it of “Mewling and puking” of }
wet nappies and humiliating de-
pendency, an age which merci-
fully we do not remember.

And, would the age of child-
hood be considered by many peo-
ple to be the best age to relive?

Certainly not by the children
themselves, who live only for the
time when they can be grown up.



9

GRANT
ee

L0OlSe $0 WARD

TO WEAR



To the child, to be grown-up is . : :
the goal which he cannot reach +++ OR like this
fast enough, the Mecca where

And it is
who must traverse the
that dark, |

ali things are possible.
the child
most trying time of life,





JOHN FRENCP



*ICTURE BY



WILLIAM GRANT & SONS LTD DISTILLERS SCOTLAND



dangerous confused tunnel of |

adolescence, where anything may | Soleheiee A bora ihe Beraare

happen, and often does, 2 Stain Hear?) Braden, aie
No, not Many cr us would! (“ Son of My Right Hand”) Lyon,



choose to relive caildhood, Oa, but . Mamie (“A Small Pearl")

t

rsa Anne Echvards












. once childhood is passed, the Eisenhower. ., . Leonard
iF YOU darkness 9! adolescence progress- (“Bold Line”) Lord,
ively lhghtens, and youth, the rd
Seely Gabe ah ed or ote lots the fashion nitfalls of a new idea NOTED
é emerges. * TWO NEW gadgets this
h 2 Youth is the age of gaiety, of AND NEVER like this wiuiununmitiinars sits {cet Dot TEGAN EAE AUER ESCA Sawalie Ava these a
aVe laughter, of love and the fulfil- ANG! aatikives ne ne aeud-on give subergines. scarlet peppers 3 7 p tat “ an "
ment of love. Youth is the flower QRAWINGS @Y EVA fashion ts how rare it is green avocados: lasts three A i Epa un Ip.
of all the ages oo nm bets ating times ionger than towers ane stick in a gilt case
, ra . town Swifter’ wu " 3? ‘ver ='S quite as colourtul works like a _ propelling
Yet youth has its troubles too ° coming, more popular now “ncountereo came .- THAT paprika addeo iw pencil—the lipstick squeezes into
its emotional ups and downs, and P. | > Band : a Ee aes ; FROM 1 Lord Furness. wno nug 4uaniily vo an oll-vinegar-sugar the brush when you twist.
| the everlasting reaching out of O ice it’s here, and fer cheape: pent 800 cu:naas on new iressing isn't just an improve J pone one iW BEE OLY bes
youth for something not to be than any hat tashion since 1 ws fea to 1ook nent Us a transtf ma-ion ause the ce iS
found even in the closest and most the war are the new Jelly ronation Day THAT tinned butter beans ai tt should be nearer 25s



fee! oronerly dr few toods

trozer

essec is. 4d
unned

are one of the
grapetruit and

Will Play At

intimate of human relationship. bag Caps



APPETITE

A child’s aoe mug ana
dishes shaped like a train





























| have held executive positions in

He catches someone's eye trom the





come safely into a quiét harbour, And the dress Princess Alex








For in youth we are ever seek- You can see them toda "FROM Beverley Nichols on peas ure others) which are nice Th
; ns ay ws Ob S al a e beaker is the funnel
ing that oneness of soul which Savannah capping half the girls in. th "Gtey te heer, Ce a; | Oreserved than they are tresh tne.two dishes ate the tender
take the lucky few may attain for a f West End. You can find \Gr¢v,is the cruelles: cofbur-bar especially served. ve agie ‘The spoon and fork are shaped
brief time, but which quickly! , : them in London's shops oa Giicin Xun parsley and a dash of garlic like the driver and fireman. Easy
: ades. away like the ’ t The Police Band will present costing anything from l6s._ te ae vee, Mobin Wilson on to wash, bright plastic, and not
fades away like the mirage i ne news that Dior models are CRAZE ye (10s. 9d.)
PHOSFERINE really is their monthly programme of 16 guineas oeing made in London: “But Eee Clee Award only oe
In spite of this, youth is a â„¢uSic at the Savannah at 4.45 p.m You come across them 10w lovely to be able to buy ve IVY that x: planted indoor: ne thers to
° a” &D 3 col I —tne craze tor it grows Ww cause it encourages mothers
| ae f irik . to-day. The Band will be conduct colour. pulled this me's Dior in pounds.’ je ore . Br oe ake a fuss of “ . t
lovely period of life developing as ; | that: looking superb 2 ; 4stonishing speed. and the price Make a fuss of the “ won't ea
i it slowly does-into a wiser and|¢4 by Capt. C. E. Raigon. Th | the ante a Bg As r ae BOM ng See acon act zo up to match (from 2s. 1c child when it is so much wiser
| : 3 aa ; pad wav oI Prer do-Ching ” Jefire atet I 2s.
‘ a fe | more stable maturity. ; Programme is as follows and merely comic worn the and 1 w Daaaiy hinttewen is. 6d a plant inside one mont to take the food away
If you do not eat enough, you | . f MARCH-MEDLEY Wrong wae'ch ike wranc face | z F ed In M Martin's simotud >
ickly ive 7, nerve | .Yet in spite of all its attractions With the Home Guard Duthoit wrong way on the wrong face vith the French colonisation Hat ately oeee of ivy ihe the UP-TO-DATE ?
quickly get tired. Your nerves would many of us chonse to go|2. OVERTURE. which enabled us to obtain fat, small pots of ivy line th
yet bad. You cannot sleep | rea > " Morning, Noon and Night Suppe The perch excellent coffee and rolls in the %#ck of a wide black marble The queen was in tne parlour
get bad. al CSP | through youth a second time SELECTION remotest villages,’ s mantelpiece in Norman Polishing the grate ;
This is when ‘you need After youth we come to the Classical Memories Ewings For the Jellybag Cap ts so easy hada Nash house. ivv trails The oe was in Led kitchen
» asine 'T > Wine r . age rail 4 OPERATIC EXCERPTS to put on—but oh so hard t Tom large white urns ™ ohn ane up a plate
Phosferine Tonic Wine. You | ‘a ee oth Pe ORS, esis: and lolanthe Sullivan wear ; TABLE- TALK John (interior decorator) ie maid was in the garden
will like this rich, picasant- saxpe, was Of e urtn pé e PB a }5. TWO HANDELIAN PLECES ‘ { ‘Nor ome in ten of. ou * WHY WASN'T | ‘oid Fowler's country home ivy Eating bread and honey,
tasting wine, which has the ihowesr Guay 7/38 the stage of life; middle-age. ‘ Papaarmauet Godfrey custOmers wears it the righ ; THAT afuahrooms take grows in white pots on a white Listentta to the neighbours
rs . . weeten ‘i . ee E , “p= jo Bia 4 ] said a Salesgiri * Thes nalt as long to prepare and taste mantelpiece at Lady Offering her more money
valuable tonic properties of This is the age which youth) Melodies of Fritz Kre'sler—Wright | i pull it over on to one ‘Wice as mushroomy a! you wash (Allen) Lane’s nome, ivy trails Quoted by Jonquil Antony in
> , , AIR RELIGIOSO.
Phosferine, It will gfve you § regards with horror, yet which{7. AiR RELIGIOS | side like a Dopey cap. or thes the skins and leave them on, from a bow! on the dinner table “Mrs Dale at Home.” published
an appetite, make new blood, | once reached, proves less terrify-|» \MARCH-FINALE | tug. the end straight up in » THAT a bow! filled with purple which is heaped with grapes today by Macdonald. 8s. 6d.
Your nerves will get better ing tnan friendly. For middte- Fame 0 ad Glory. Albert Matt. | peee gor er Wear it like a sk). 4s Snneeeeeeennsesendesees: pa aa Peet an WHO CHOOSES
o™ = s . 2aCe < Vi (ING ‘MN eae puiiec own t weir eye . . ‘ Nave se iv nung
; ill sleep well. A Te) age is a quiet peaceful part to GOD SAVE THE QUEEN brows $ $ ing in wicker bowls ip
et Sena De u play, where many of us tind the e Bt they say : SORRY $ front of a window. or *, Li ee. ibrar se
ill secl atogether asnpier, jeisure and space to think for the! — } i some hair $ planted in white jars It) chooses e
st t » fo any years; a time! : ‘ | r it on wron , $ nung on the walls ress her mother chooses for ner
ret Ume sor many years; 3 hold on oneself, and, forgetting i $ Ivy trained up a fe entirely different affairs—
when, after our children have left <. pity turn our thoughts out- | . and gone about their own lives. f ty turn Snougnt | ! i t Ht catches your eye trum the other $ are ren » acknowledged expert on clothes
ake a ward bravely enough for the ad- side of the room, pins you into a & woe dowail like the Duchess of Kent
the house that was so full, be- : : r, | i aos of u window-sill ike the Duchess o en
2 ; : ; vantages of this age to outweig ‘orner and talks for half an hour, and s ned up r0 na it * For the dress the Ducness
PHOSFERINE TONIC WINE Sie tas 7 ae the ae jobs the disadvantages. In middle-age at i "" +e. iy el nig Pokuronar nice . ed ee ny Vanail es chose for Princess Alexandra to
} can turn to do the ayers ee * too illusions are shed one by one ™ nd : ater he telephones and § blinds; or ft “yn Wear at Christiaas partes was In
, too sions s y 2 iy }
that in the busy hurrying years for the rose-coloured spectacles of } earri pup a oad te os ub "Fos wintainte oetas es ; corners und x ted ore ca ee with a et
were never done. S ae . ian» nee a a je takes you to § rot the ceil > With pale blue. with a verv full
9 You'll secon feel better/ “Matto the met ana women whe 7? ath are broken. If we can nav- | eat. Iwo months later vou are asked 3 ee e ceiling OF seit blue sash. and plain
—— : gate all these troubled waters, we | GIVE-AWAY to a party together. s ; bodice with wide boat neck
3
;











| business and homes, the = Ir€- and find to our joy, that it is sti? * an MARR i ete pea ene ins her into NAMED andra ordered instead (while
| ment of middle age presents its tide aes ae dnt a : “ae by a a goes away “HER NAME js her mother was away) was in
| own problems. possitie to:lead ‘an en nap oa mn with her phone number. * Kim Cc ee y peacock-green orgdnzu, with an
useful life, even in middl | a wh seeoee Seno eeeensenreeceenenecsseseses Sung.” I read of tne elaborate tucked-and-bowed V

} The suaden cessation from or- And so we co ou Korean war oride ‘ast neck slimmer Skirt no sash
ganised work, and the change in of all which Shakes week * meaning Goider RB: suas ahi ay hed ae

. — ; 4 antal é ‘sans teeth’ a tiday. “ ppe o made
the caily routine is a mental a sity, oy oe “ : " | How charming is the custom esses, “took one look ut the
‘ shock even though it may be an jicalth old age is NOt quite ot giving us the meaning of frock her mother nad order ed
unconscious one, and the leisure #5 he descripes i it is a time, | Easiern names and decided it was too childish.”
which has probably been looked when, with all. the parts but this Hon felignrtut--1 Nestert Londou é Service
forward to for many a long day, last one played, we can feel justi- | on
at . when it comes, is often found to fied in sitting back, and watchir 2 | i “ 5 <*t
originating in the Mouth be unwanted, and unacceptable, the other players. It is a lonely | BY THE W A y By Kéechionk no need to use a crooked flute to Snibbo
To a woman especially this leisure time, for at this age the world is | eee y beacncomber play round corners. If you stand EAR Sir, *

is accompanjed by the heartache a strange place, and many fr iends | round the corner and play an or- | A week ago I drank a glass of

un- have gone, and age is



of losing her children. For, slow in mak- | ARLY in the morning raucous We'll all be in the workus, dinary straight flute the effect will Snibgleam floor-polish by: mistake
like other mammals—who push ing new contacts, or learning new voices were raised in song be- won't we? be the same. “A bend in a flute,” for the sparkling Snibbolade. As
| off their young and forget them ways. This age which is the last | 1eath the Wretch bedroom win- Mrs, Wretch shrank back from says the professor, “is as ridiculous it made me ill I drank a glass of
at an early age—the human ani- part we play on the stage of life, | jowe. “What the devil——-?" crieq the window. . “It’s those red- as would be a pointed drum or a_ Snibbozone Health-Juice, and at
| mal clings to her children for- by its very quality prepares us for he Colonel. The words of the bearded dwarfs,” said the Colo- round harp.” But, he points out, once felt better, Snibbo evidently
| ever, (a bad arrangement on the our final exit. 614. | serenade dosted ww! C al. ‘All twelve of them?” the w hole idea of playing round can not only make you ill, but can
| part of nature. which results in So we have the five ages of life | et i queried Mrs. Wretch. “All twelve,” corners is based on a fallacy, “It cure you—which is more than Ae
|} embarrassment for the child. today, infancy, childhood, youth, | Hail, smiling Colonel, and your said the Colonel gloomily. is mere clowning, as though a be said for soi ulaaarann tie Tab-
embarassment for the child. nee and old age. — | eat aioe sSaarothertecaieen Tie crooked flute momen thre rH play eth re lets. They only make you ill.
PS Op a adiadad BP at ag | ROFESSOR Ralph Armitage Read, Poked through one of these Yrs. gratefully,
If she don't return to the circus, writes to tell me that there 1 is piers.” Amy Curse:





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SUNDAY, DECEMBER 28, 1952

Dont put





your husband
in an apron

says DENISE ROBINS

Writer of 100 novels; married, with three daughters

DO not agree with
Lord Justice Denning
in the Court
is week that
if a woman neglects the
nousework jt is the duty of
the husband to *

who sal
of Appeal

to” and help.

I think that if a man once
Starts to ta a cooking and
rk and washing-up—
because his wife is either too

ceok-general ?

washing and cooking

oF ean SEPUBIANET not nap oie tee
ypewriting, If he did ask ind and 1 both on towne
‘buckle ‘Such @ favour she would the housework togettien.*

consider it monstrous.

expect to turn a tired
band into a servant.

He doesn’t
ask his wife to finish ner

then join him in the office in
the evening and do a couple

I think it is equally mon-
strous for any woman to

If she finds her own job



SUNDAY

"9








PAO T eee neaRS SEES EESESSEENS SSeELeesuseNEEEENSEEsEnee Hen

:
;
:



1! DISAGREE,
says Vera Lynn
“Cees

and hus bands
says singer



should help”
Vera

Husband Harry Lewis says:
“A man’s job is nard. but not
so hard as a woman's

hus- “T always help when needed.”





ADVOCATE

or too indifferent to do too / .
i react estab a gp gruet for bes we ous (>) | DISAGREE, ee |
. so that s . ,
ol! she ig the type who in hat she can do a = less. co says Mr. INNES ; Ay |
nstance leaves a : , Bf ,
Hitey tance leaves a... Melaxation {HIS Ausband- Meee
her duties as a wife. she will A husband has to go off the-howse wafer
— advantage of his kindly ¢2frly to earn his daily bread is “a question to bust up a ™ I ) ” > ,
a demand ft every 4nd stick at it all axy and happy marriage.” says thriller- ( R 4 ¢ Oj} y PEC |
; noe. gare sine relaxants. writer ee ; tae (who The vy B, X |
e ore mner eC @ ‘6 writ a OMe ) . }
He needs is earning the money that His view: * Husbands shoulda a °
= aioake she {s going to spend. nelp~theoretically. Practically, talk about how to stay married
lis is quite different if she If her methods are so sfat- 1 ‘ont do a great deal, but I if }
fs ft or hag nad eaaee = ternly that he eam no longer aq juni EAM By SYLVIA GOUGH ts. Peck keepsâ„¢the |
\ ; and nightly stand the op aah 09 gdp She keeps }
ihelp with a Httie washing-up home he he oper es me Says wife Dorothy: ‘It would 7 HEY come from doliy- She keeps it pr vate
mever did any man any my opinion. to heashean ; = very depressing if the hus- wood. California. a n your husband ts
harm. Then he can get separation or to stop sup- band helped with housework too they Mave bec: ; i Se arte
Bar to it. porting her That would willing zs ia, oy shows ten years. And bec t oo in acer
t why should a man soon teach her that she has ome ; » pat. two facts dont often 20 BL (Pie et ag
(ome back from his own job ~ As for butlering—well, my ube cote

tired out, longing for a chair
‘by his fireside, his pipe. and
@ little peace have to put on
@m apron and become a

I Say It Was Wrong —:
To Hang This Woman

Nearly 30 years ago Mrs. Edith
Thompson was executed for the
murder of her husband. Now
BEVERLEY BAXTER, M.P. re-
viewing a new book about the
case, says that in his view the
hanging was judicial murder.
WAS Edith Thompson guilty of

murder, or was she hanged for
adultery? Once more that ques-
tion is raised by the publication
of Lewis Broad’s The Innocence
of Edith Thompson.”

As I read the book my mind
first went back to that tempestu-
ous night in the House of Com-
mons five years 1g0 when by 9
free vote we suspended hanging.
On the Tory front bench sat Sir
John Anderson (now Lord Wav-
erley), who was permanent head
of the Home Office at the time of
the trial.

In his speech earlier in the
debate Sir John declared: “Where
there is a scintilla of a doubt the
Home Secretary has invariably
advised commutation.” Then Regi-

nald Paget interjected: “Was
there no question about Mrs.
Thompson?”

Resentment

Sir John stiffened, and his voice
expressed the resentment that he
felt. “Absolutely none!” he
snapped. Then in calmer tones
he said that there was no reason
for doubt at all in the part’ she
played in the affair. “There may
be room for doubt as to her de-
gree of guilt,” he said, “but as to
the fact that sie was in law guilty
of murder there can be no doubt
whatever.”

He spoke not merely as a Par-
liamentary Front Bencher but as
the senior civil servant who could

undoubtedly have saved Mrs.
Thompson; for example, by ex-
erting his influence over the

weaker personality of Home Sec-
retary Bridgeman.

Which may account for his ob-
vious resentment whea, in the
final speech from the Back
Benches, I gave it as my opinion
that she was hanged for adultery
and not for murder.

But again, while reading thi:
engrossing book, my mind went
back to the Saturday before the
double execution, I was then
Editor of the Sunday Express. The
commissionaire sent word that
there was a young woman who
had’ a message from Bywaters,

She was Bywaters’s cousin, a
nice-looking girl of about twenty,
who was crying so_ hysterically
that it took some time before she



her home

for nothing.

could speek echerently.

A Confession

Then she told us that Bywaters'
wanted this message delivered to
the Editor: “Tell him that I
killed Thompson because 1 saw
red. I didn’t know anything until
I saw him bleeding on the ground.
But Edith had nothing to do with
it. She is absolutely innocent.”

Here was a confession which
might be of some technical value.
At any rate it had to be convey-
ed at once to the Home Secre-
tary. But we learned that he
was spending the week-end at a
country house in North Wales,
and as it was a race with time
we chartered an airplane to carry
a reporter to the nearest airport.
It must have been one of the
earliest examples of & newspaper
using an airplane for such a pur-
pose,

But nothing came of it.

Three days later at 8 a.m, on
January 9, 1923, the man and the
woman were hanged. That night
two of the prisor from
Holloway prison (she was hanged
at Holloway, Bystanders at Pen-
tonville) came to the Daily Fx-
press and told a dreadful story

They said that Edith Thompson
had collapsed until her condition
was indescribable.. They wanted
us to urge that there should never
be another hanging of a woman,

Was their story true? Not very
long afterwards the hangman
committed suicide,

The author of the Innocence
of Edith Thorepson makes no
pretence of impartiality. He is
out to establish her innocence

The Judge

His chief target is the judge,
the late Sir Montague Shearman.
“Of all the Bench,” he writes “he
was the judge least able to take
a tolerant view of the character
and lapses of the woman in the
cock.

When the two barristers for the
comprehension of the fanciful
and fantastic. The romantic was
at a minimum in his make-up.”

Before him in the dock were a
man of 21 and a woman of 27.
They had indulged in a_ sordid
and wicked liaison, for she was
already married to a husband who
had been faithful to her.

When the two barristers for
defence asked that the accused
should be tried separately he only
gave it a moment’s consideration
and then refused.

Day after day the jury gazed

Z_lanks SANDALS

fer foot htallty- for children



“PLAY-UP”

a moral obligation towards

Nobody should be allowed
to get anything in this world b>

went My

see

together 1














nusband cas a c i” + |
1sbanc mas Ss a 3004 Martini. and Mrs. Gregory Peek who i “4 what colour they
ENDPIECE & London store arrived in London ViAve dining - room
. ine vy ne-u” aprons To Mrs. Peck I put some 1 :
b M ‘N . Ss and a questions on the problem ot * + *
tion of broken dishes. Staying happily married—even
when the lusband is the sort of 1 hree hildren
i who looks just as goog) = aged > eight. They
aylight as on ¢t reen So ee t
the ans my Pe thin i
said Mrs ' : ! a lo with a happy
our nome worth coming ba n i <
-——-warm, friendly. interesting i Mr eck, he thinks he
k
“ * * * *T gu are Si
There are obstacles which lappy be 4 vet
make tha: less easy than ft mau ‘ airied '
Seem. The Pe family moves a or ) Vv hectic
about a bit these days B ways keeps our
From California they moved friendly Danie ae Sie
; Rome. They now have a house il, jancy e—that is
at the two of them in the dock, tn Paris. Soon they will move what sh trying
adulterers and murderers. And tw Stockholm. But wherever ta do
though it was the _boy’s hand that : London Express Service
ad held the knife, -whose was
the evil mind that put it there?
From the hour that they appear- my rs
ed in the dock together they were ii ( i ( eh
J )

doomed.
Since the judge could not un-

What's Cooking

After The Holidays bi

derstand it why should we expect more margarine or butter
oe sity Tee ye and one How many of us do not know flour, Put the meat
Thompson was a woman capable ° nice and tasty dish of then et quite warm and
of a consuming love that fed its Here are two recipes for meatball
own fires with a wild, poetic 1d trifle which will be very use 2 ; b
imaginativeness. ful after the holidays Economic Trifle
Her Letters Turkey Meatballs ft-overs of any kind of

Read in court, her letters sound- Tice & tow Or the Bones of tho | emove the icing if there
ed tawdry, sinister and treach- roe ens Ths page a the trifle will be too

turkey and the neck and make ¢

little broth with some water, salt
ing one onion,

erous. But there are passages
of real beauty that reach ecstasy.













rO Next Satur









ke left-overs in very









Her tragedy was that she’ only ard

i ~ . x f ns at whic > Hoen and put at bottom of
truly lived in the realm of imag- eee ot a ae 5 ‘ h. Sprinkle a bit of
ination and brought doom upon !eft over from the ks. 4a the top and spread a cout
three people because Bywaters !unch or dinner put some bread ‘ly or cherry 1 OL
translated the imagination to real- (the inside of the loaf and it mu Way y ; Jani mt

. r he ea Make custard
ity. be § of the volume. of the meat). : mane &

She wrote letters that condemn- Mince the meat and the bread * rt » 1 t the 2
ed herself as a would-be murder- after soaking the bread in sone : Ree Se able
ess. According to those letters of the broth, Collect the minced sa ead Gate tae ag a et
she was feeding her husband a meat, the bread in a mixing bow] #P°° ve a rere re
monty diet of ground glass, but and add 1 pinch of salt, 2 table. *? of nt F ine oo
tie Autopmy, revealed thal 1E,NAE spoonatul of grated choise and 4 atti tng or a tp of when

* J : re alas ae 4 » an “ « é or.

the suburbs she dramatised her- in ar ag and se: F 7 If you use plain milk 2 glasses

self, saw herself as one of the | /..° mince wae nd « half would be enough, Mix

great murderesses of romance — ' . , the eg ind the sugar first, then

mee ee oe ae Put in a saucepan loz, of butter @4d the flour and then the mill

aware “if Jus any v or margarine, When melted add 1 I lume. If you see that

suburbaa wife. i : i ; th mixture is not very smooth
Justice? teaspoonful of tomato sauce a re

ustice? .. few peeled tomatoes, Add some t through a sieve, Then add 1

We cannot deny that Edith wore of the broth, enouch to fill ! yoonful of vanilla or if you
nen eee Oe Soe on 1/8 of & medion sage. saucevon, 1k taste of the lime best two
cannot deny that aie was an When this sauce starts to’ boil © ps of lime peet will be
adulteress. We cannot deny that Shape the meat mixture in small ‘ ak STE “ALL
she would have run away with Meatballs and put them in the mM M i ma Five oa
Bywaters except for her innate Sauce. Let everything boil fe aoe pe un a, Yee
respectability and her desire not ®bout 20 minutes, then take ‘ ra Coe - get ee ae
to bring shame upon her family, the meatballs out and if the 1c thick. When finished pour

WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED is not thick enough let ii boil the cake and add small pieces

* Published by Hutchinson. 303 @gain until it becomes quitt Ny or jam. Put in the fridge

pages, 12s. 6d. thick. You can also add a tity ice-box and serve ice-cold,








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TWO ORCHESTRAS THREE tt N
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itl, DAWN—O Year N
) r of Tu Chi = NEW YEAR'S EVE WITHIN
Peddine . ber ; ;) SOUND OF THE SEA
reservations ph. 4000 od S : , a . ‘ .
uppe r Ste KS, Ham & Eggs serv od ow Ak . Pe h Re ic
chr vughout the ht. Hats, Hor CQ Sutroundi: Bs .
Novelties from U.S., floo ; 1 = ;
dens and re igned iter ar in especial} nif
lighting comprise a setting gs 1 j t ne a n
teed to greet 1953 with a cal momagemen ensuring |
ing of rollicking fun, good fo 4, yo venin enjoyment The
smooth drinks and dancing a Accra Beach Club will t
Club Morgan n»xice for many and vo ive
ked to please phone early
HORSESHOES, T U RK IS it 829%
owe AND AXCHORS = WE SELL SERVICE AND GIVE
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Hi; . iat, tie 7 an ers Service Station vn eas
faa abenel aa one _ Hall Road. Drive in for Water,
ee Palins “kh : ~ Tyre, Battery and Crankca
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prices range from $1,50 to $14.50. windscreen clean free (wit!
Sterling Silver non-spill Compacts new | quid product available to
i round, octagonal or individual you at 62 cents per bottle). New
‘ les are extremely attractive at air pump servic two tyres in one
7.95 to $25.75. Costume Jewelry action with automatic pressure
is heavily displayed at snap-up register. Kerosene Oi! i erved
prices across a terrazo bar counter with
x all motoring accessories; open till
THIS MAGNIFICENT NEW midnight
AR is the 1953 Humber Hawk
Cole's Garage ph. 4316. Offer- ICECREAM, SOFT DRINKS,
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Humber Hawk is rightly claimed ¢eam contamers sold at 14c., 28¢.,
Superb from every “point of 80c.,—or for a slap-up party, you
ew" Definitely vee this one C8 buy it in bulk at 30c¢. a pint
ver the New Year and arrange ®VE" 9 gals, or 86c, a pint under 5
demonstration ride. Price is gals Prime favourites are the
$3,790, CHOC-ICES (chocolate coated) at
* ’ 12c, and Brickettes at 4
IF THIS WAS WRITTEN IN ’ . r ,
THE GAELIC or even broad LINOLEUM TRADE-MARKED

LANCASTREUM leur

orice the only three words to stand and. {oF

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per e. rom a land of bie ee
heather hills, Old Angus is Scotch vapid seller a the New Yeat
Whisky at its wonderful be and the B.C.C.F. are meeting a
nveyor of Greetings and ; heavy demand ;
Happy New Year
T DEAL OF THOUGHT

“A GRE





PAGE SEVEN



ITCHING stops
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Sunday, December 28, 1952

1952

THE YEAR now ending has been a
year ot continuous military operatio:
The Korean war, in which a total of tw
million casualties is claimed, continues

with no prospect of a speedy armistice:
the seven-year deadlock in Indo-China
has not been broken: while operations in
Malaya have not ceased.

There have been coups d’etat in Syria

and Egypt and more recently troubles in
North Africa. The Mau Mau atrocities in
Kenya have led to the concentration on

repressive measures in that colony which

must consequently delay movements fot
economic political development.
Trouble is South Africa. In
Burma, Nepal, Siam and Persia fears of

been ex

and
brewing in
have

Communist domination

pressed during the year and are not yet

absent. But although the hot war has
been raging on certain fronts and there
has been a rise in temperature in cer-
tain trouble areas, 1952 will be remem-
bered as a year of intensification of the
cold war between the West and the East
The collective action which is still bein
taken to prevent the success of Russian
and Chinese plans in Korea, the military
tightening up of the North Atlantic
Treaty Organisation and the drawing ol

the Bonn Republic of Germany into the
Western fold have led to severai chanse

in the policies formulated in Moscow
during the year

Soviet rearmament goes on and Stalin
continues to work for a split in the

Western camp but greater emphasis by)
Communist laid on
national independence as a more effective
means of split than the
“peace” movements although these are not
the latest held in

agents is to be
creating a

banned, having been
Vienna

Communists are to be patriots rather
than and greater hopes
are being placed on the intellectuals who

into non-Communist par-

revolutionaries

can infiltrate
ties and organisations.

This emphasis on national
ence and reliance on intellectuals rather
than on working class Communists is not
new but Stalin’s classification had to be
made because of the contradictory orders
which have been issued to Communists
ever since the peace campaign started.
Stalin knows that he must play a cun-
ning game if he is to win the cold war
and the effective.action which the United
States and the NATO countries are
taking to defeat Soviet imperialism forces
him to issue orders which mean that cer-
tain leaders of the proletariat will have
to “right-about-face” and collaborate
with bourgeois and even fascists.

Stalin's pact with Hitler was of course
an early instalment of the line which is
now being followed and Communists hate
to be reminded of it.

Realists who recognise that behind
the Communist peace movements and the
honeyed propaganda of “comradeship
and “brotherly love” lies the determi ed
Soviet bid for world conquest are aware
that the last thing Moscow wants 1s re-
form. It suits the Politburo better to
have a reactionary government than a
government which is sincerely practis.ng
reform, so long as the Communist Party
is not crushed.

independ-

ilin would not hesitate for a moment
to hasten the progress of Germany and
Japan on to the path of independent
c2ovelopment. Nor would he hesitate to
offer markets in the Soviet sphere to
members of the Atlantic alliance in an
effort to exploit the friction which results
from the struggle for markets. Stalin
has expurgated much of Marx but he
still believes that Marx was right when
he said that war between the imperialist
powers was inevitable. If the events ol
1952 may be taken as a guide they tend







not to support Marx’s dictum. The
streamlining of the NATO organisation
under General Ridgway; the military
naval and air exercises held under its
sponsorship: the movement towards a
European Defence Community: the form-
ation of a Pacific Defence Council: the
remarkable agreement on_ political and
economic measures throughout the Com-

Her Majesty is

monwealth of which
tc ; whieh the United

Head: the sympathy
States is showing for countries — with
responsibilities for overseas territories
are some of the indications that a split is
unlikely in the Western camp, at least
while the cold war between West _and
bast continues. a
Bat if the position has been held in 1952
the prospects of war have lessened

and if mie
there still remain enough problems anc
tensions to make accurate predictions im-
possible. Recent events in Czechoslovakia,

especially the resurgence of anti-Semitism
have shocked many of those who were
prepared to believe that Communist dom-
inated countries were not all that they
were made out to be by right-wing news-
papers. The drive which the government of
Peking has started against foreign Chinese
living in Calcutta has given Indians an
object lesson at home of what lies behind
the window-dressing of Communist China,
But isolated events cannot be taken as
reliable pointers to future developments
The stand which India takes against Com-
munism will be a decisive factor influenc-
ing the fate of millions of people in Asia

The Communists are making every effort
to gain India for their cause. _ The skilful
propaganda machine of imperialist Russia

SUNDAY ADVO(



ues sf i
} every evil of the
ciety it is pledged to crush.
Colonial peoples and peoples with low liv-
standards have until recently required



t e and exposes

“imperialist” s

ing

little persuasion in believing that there is
omething wrong with a society in which
they are never more than menials,” hewers

of wood and drawers of water.” But condi-

{

tions in most colonies have changed so
drastically in recent years that the boot is
é st on the other toot and the countries

with cclonial possessions are all anxiously
trying to force their colonies along paths
of constitutional development for which
many are unprepared. Communist propa-
anda in colonies tends therefore # con
centrate on attacking the orthodox social-
ists and labour leaders who are planning
reforms within the framework of the con-
stitution. Communists in the Caribbean
will even join forces with conservatives
and capitalists, their two former deadliest
enemies, to overthrow established Labour
leaders. Their orders are to foster discon-
tent and to fan race hatred. The Carib-
bean in this respect offers a fertile ground
ince discontent and racial hatred have for
than hundred years been the
stock in trade of the political tout. Not
all of those who keep this deadwood of
racialism alive in the region can be accus-
ed of communist sympathies but undoubt-
edly much of the virus still deliberately
spread owes its origin to fellow travellers
or secret Communist agents. Communist
ed a change after the initiative was taken

ore one

tactics in the Caribbean this year also suf-

fered a change after the initiative was taken
by Mr. G. H. Adams to purge Communism
ym the Caribbean Labour Congress. The

mission to Barbados and the subsequent

memorandum sent to Trade Unions and
trade union federations in the British
Caribbean by Mr. Richard Hart, as Secre-
tary of the Caribbean Labour Congress
hows clearly that the struggle fer control



st Indian labour organisations is
g waged openly. It is no longer possi-
to talk of there being very little Com-
munism in the Caribbean. The agents of






Moscow are operating here and will lose
no opportunity of exploiting ignorance
and discontent which everywhere leads
ulible people into the Communist net.
loss to Communism of the British

1 would be negligible compared
with the loss of India: but if Communism
triumphed in the Caribbean Stalin would
have gained another strategie victory on
the road to world domination by the
gigantic Soviet Empire which he controls.
At first sight Communism seems to have
made little gain in 1952 but it is actively
at work in every British territory as it is
in every country outside the Iron Curtain.

. r + ~
HUMAN NATURE
NATURE, as the Latin satirist Juvenal

summed up neatly, can be expelled with

a sharp-pointed stick but it has a habit

of coming back. The Australian hoom-

erang (a specimen of which can be seen





at the Barbados Museum) has sit :
characteristics, In politics too, nature is
never absent and _ politicians’ printed

to embarrass themselves
studént’ of political his-
it seems, never quite as
look and even Crowns
which looked so easy to bear or even to
kick away press on more heads than
would have ever been believed possible.
The world which seems so easy to re-
form at the sweet age of seventeen or
even at twenty-one seems no better and
sometimes worse after the ambitious
have made their efforts. Nature, the
nature of man, the fallen nature of man
resists the prods of millions of pitch forks

and improvements either take long in

coming or when ‘they come bring many
evils in their train.

Speedy communications have not only brought
human beings closer together. They have also ac-
customed humanity to grow weary of distant woe
and to keep its tears from the suffering at home
or at furthest, next door. The knowledge that
neariy half-a-million soldiers nave been killed
since the war in Korea began or that there have
been two million casualties in the same campaign
is horrifying enough when we think of it; but
how often do we think of it?) Emotional speeches
are regularly made whenever a Barbadian man or
woman is on the point of losing a job and almost
anyone within earshot is blamed for what is at
once recognised to be a national catastrophe,

When 20,000 more men were unemployed in the
Midlands last month because of the slump in the
motor industry no one in England tried to blame
this on anyone. - Dislocation of industry and re-
direction of labour has been with us as long as
nature and the discovery of the pitchfork itself
must have caused much unemployment among
our ancestors who lived so many aeons before
democracy and the “isms” and ideologies of mod-
ern life were on every tongue. What is true of
nature is not as true of other things, but every
now and again we are given gentle reminders that
life is not what we make it but that limiting
factors restrain m«ay of the noblest wishes. Bar-
bados, contrary tu the tiresome opinions of the
conceited and ill-informed has never lacked per-
ons imbued with the “sweetness and light” which
are necessary to promote either the corporal
works of mercy or the spreading of gracious cul-
tural and artistic living.

What has always limited its achievements
size, its financial resources and its people.

Those who are not too conceited to dismiss the
centuries of West Indian social, political and
economic history with an impatient shrug and a
comment that such history has never been writ-
ten will after study of no more than a small num-
ber of the thousands of books, papers, official
documents and personal letters which exist in
many well-equipped libraries in the Caribbean
and United Kingdom always find reason to praise
the many thousands of men and women who have
worked for the benefits which many enjoy in
these territories today. The howls of derision
with which the patient labours of many, whose

Speeches remain
and confuse the
tory. Things are,
simple as they





is its







very names and works have now been forgotten
by those who have special motives for dishonour-
ing. their memory have obscured the fact that

vards high levels of civilisation has to
be paid for with money. Art galleries, museums,
theatres, parks, monuments, halls of music and
all the many “musts” of modern intellectual and
cultural life that are taken for granted by many
town dwellers today, owe their existence mostly
to private munificence. The greatest grude which
intellectuals passing through the West Indies on
their ports of cultural call have long held against
West Indian men of property has been their re-
luctance to emulate their opposite numbers in
large countri¢

The support of private charities and the prior-
ity given to the claims of the sick and education
has frequently been overlooked. Today, ironic-
ally, the wheel has come full circle and the in-
tellectual is now turning a critical tongue (which
must at all costs be kept alive) against govern-
n whose excessive taxation policies have re-
duced the men of property to the stage of seeking
tax coneessions for themselves and who are find-
ing it increasingly difficult to support traditional
private charities ‘

Governments, it seems, are going to be
liberal in support of culture than were the men
of property, But this is cdnsistent with human
nature,

progress tc









less

loit every |



The man who

keeps Barbados

laughing on

Sundays

5 your Uncle Nat's lif
A the Plucky Ana

in bed with influenza and your
Uncle has been nurse housekeeper
and cook since Tuesday, nicst of
the news of the week has been
missed, or briefly glarced
while milk boils over and
ling kettle howls like a
through The Seca Nesc,

You must, there fore,

‘

a whist- 1

be content

with a short diary’ of events

scribbled on the kitchen table, “
The Kettle

"T’AKE morning tea to P.L.W,

P.L.W. says she feels on fire.
Drains teacup to put fire out. Asks
for more tea.

Run downstairs to put on whist-
ling kettle.

Run upstairs to look
for thermometer. Eventually find
thermometer, rinse under bath-

room tap, shake and ask P.L.W. to
open mouth

P.L.W., lying on back, opens
mouth wide like fledgling Waiting



ATE

Doctor asks: “Then why is she

Little Woman, is making al! that noise?” I answer

‘She may be delirious.” Doctor

says: “I'll come at once.” 7

As it is daily help’s day off, get

at, down on knees and rake out stove,

ight it and run upstairs to ask

banshee what P.L.W. would like for lunch.

P.L.W. asks: “What would
woman in Aylesbury jail have?"
I say: “Probably roast beef and
Yorkshire pud., but as we are
not in prison we can’t have meat
everyday and I can’t make York-
shire pud. any day. What cbout
filleted sole?”

' P.L.W. says: “Yes, and what
t ome coffee, as she’s still
on fire?”



Downstairs again to put on

whistling kettle and find stove has
gone
light, giving it plenty of draught.
Telephone
him to enter*back door and leave

out. Re-lay stove and re-

fishmonger and ask

with open beak for mother bird to Sole on kitchen table as I may
pop worms into it. Pop glass wo-m be upstairs with invalid.
under fledgling’s tongue
7 . taot re ngs ror > r
Whistling kettle howls Run Upstairs again to warn P.L.W.
downstairs to meet Lottie, the that doctor is coming and to take



Devil Cat, who because che is ter-
rified of whistling kettle is rush-





temperature :
stairs again with thermometer in

once more. Down-

ing upstairs. Almost meet death hand to answer call of whistling
on § rs with Lottie uader fcet, kettle; also to answer front door
but survive to make more tea. ’ bell for insurance assessor, who
$ . wants to look at damaged roof
While making tea, read Lorq from inside.
Jowitt’s account in House of Lords :
of woman prisoner in Aylesbury Assessor asks can he have a
jail who told him about the “won- Pair of steps and where is the
derful hot food” there, the com- loft? 1
fortable beds, and the library full Pick up steps with one hand
of Westerns. : and, with thermometer in other,
“You only have to ring a bell lead way upstairs to show assessor
for anything you want,” she in- loft. Downstairs again to silence

formed his lordship.

By this
P.L.W.,

time tea is
who

cold
can hardly breathe



shrieking kettle

and at t
wide open, is now roaring furnace.

and make coffee.
gas ring and look
with draught

Put
stove.

milk on
Stove,

through her nose and still has Close up everything, decide not to
thermometer in her mouth, is al- call fire brigade, and find milk
most asphyxiated. boiling over.

Snatch thermometer, whicl
reads 100, and tell P.L.W. about The Sole
woman in ylesbury jail. Drink- :
ing cold tea, PLWw. says she HILE making coffee, won-
wouldn't mind being there her- der if assessor is really as-

self, except that she doesn’t read
Westerns.

As P.L.W. wants
bottle, put on kettle again, rake
stove thoroughly, get in fuel, put
on too much fuel and put stove
out.

hot water

The Doctor

FWELEPHONE doctor.

trying to explain PI
symptoms, whistling kettle howls
again. Doctor, hearing howl over
phone, asks, “Is she in great pain?”
I answer, “No”.




sessor. Too old for cosh boy but,
you never know these days.
Upstairs again to find assessor
in proper place on‘steps. Down-
stairs again to open front door for

doctor. Upstairs again to take
coffee.
Doetor leaves prescription, so

downstairs again and out to chem-
ist. Come back to find sole has
arrived and Lottie has fillet on
kitchen floor.

Pointing dramatically to Lottie’s
platter of rabbit, tell her she is
low and mean to steal invalids





but Lottie continues to

lunch,

munch sole.
Prepare sole

while looking for salt, Lottie grabs |

with butter, and,|
another fillet. She seems to enjoy
it more with butter on it.

Put sole under grill, pick up
paper and read that Colonel A. C.
Gillem, commanding U.S.A.F.
base at Upper Heyford, wants peo»

ple here to invite American Ser-
vicemen to their homes. |
* * J
Remember how P.L.W. and I
sent written offer to entertain
American troops during’ war.
Ameriean authorities sent back



from which said: “.* you have an
American sold
you must not discuss (1) religion;
(e) politics; (3) sex.”

The P.L.W. wrote back: “As
we are both religious, fanatics,
anarchists, an sex maniacs, offer
cancelled.”

Put down paper and find Lottle
licking over mashed potatoes.

The Neighbour

.BVIOUSLY only one thing to
do. As Lottie has no morals

and fears nothing on earth but the !

Whistling kettle, she shall have
whistling kettle throughout cook-
ing operations.

Put on W. K. and let it how).
Lottie runs out of kitchen and
hides under dining room. sofa.

Through howling of kettle I hear
front door bell ring. It is a neigh-
bour who asks:

“Is there anything wrong?”

I answer “My wife is ill.”

The neighbour say “But
what's that terrible noise?”

I say: “That is my mad brother
having hallucinations.”

The neighbour says:

“Troubles never come
do they?”

I say: “No”, and shut the door.
Thanks to this interruption, the
sole is burned, When I take it up
to the P.L.W., she looks at the
charred mess and says:
“How do you get into Ayles-
bury jail and have all that won-
derful food?”







singly,





I reply: “When you are better
you could become a cosh girl.”
She says: “There are a lot of
people I would like to cosh, and
they wouldn’t be old ladies,
either, Will you buy me a cosh?”
I rep “T will buy you one for
Christm .







“Buy it before Christmas,”
she says, “so that I can cosh
somebody in time to have my
Christmas dinner in Aylesbury
jail.”

—L.ES.



COLONIAL MEDDLERS

Colonial constitutions vary wide-¢
ly but all British colonies have one
thing in common. They are all
subject ‘to the legislative suprem-
acy of the Imperial Parliament and
to the right of the Crown to dis-
allow their legislation on the ad-
vice of the Imperial government
They are not in other words self-
governing,

On the other hand colonial legis-
latures are not the delegates of the
Imperial Parliament. If they were.
representative assemblies would
be farcical institutions especially
in colonies with adult suffrage.
Colonial legislatures have full
power within territorial limits and
subject to the rule that any colo-
nial law repugnant to an Act of
the Imperial Parliament extending
to the colony (or any order or re-
gulation made under such Act)
shall to the extent of such rep
nancy be void and in-operative
Legal phraseology may perhaps
appear unexciting to some but the
meaning is clear.

In colonies with representative
legislatures the constitution can
also be freely amended provided
that amendments do not conflict
with imperial or local legislation
| if either of these has prescribed a
particular procedure. There al-
ways remains, however, a brake.
The Governor's assent is required
for all colonial legislation

Anyone who has studied British
-olonial history whether in a ter-
ritory which has since become
sovereign independent nation,







a territory which has since becom
a self-governing Dominion (suc
as Australia, Canada or Sout!
Africa) or in territories which ar
still colonies like the Caribbean},
cannot but be impressed by the
fact that the drive towards inde-¢
pendence always came from the
belief of the people on the spot
that they were better fitted to gov-
ern themselves than were the
legislators of Westminster. There
were many other reasons for the





emergence from coionial status
but none exerted greater influence
on the events which took place

than the reluctance of individuals
living in one part of the world tc
having their destiny decided by the
English Parliament at Westmin-
ster.

The British Caribbean
from the earliest ‘ays of colonisa-
tion shared this resentment of
control by London because the al-
{ways British Caribbvan islands
were settled by Englishmen who
carried with them English law and
ideas about the rights of English-

island®

(such as the United States) or ings
fe n baptised as Christiz

By George Hunte

Indian middle classes, But diver-
sity of law and diversity of Euro-
pean influences would have by
themselves not prevented the
fusion of the West Indian peoples
into a nation unified in resistance
to government from Whitehall.
The European nationals in the
West Indies had far more reasons
for unity than did the English and
Dutch in South Africa and the
French and English in Canada.
What prevented the emergence of
a Caribbean nation was the aboli-
ton of slavery. And the abolition
f slavery gave more than a hun-
dred years lease of life to the rule
of Whitehall in the West Indies.
Slavery had been introduced into
the British West Indies not by the
original settlers who came here to
live and build up a new English
life in a new world but by English
traders who wanted to make pro-
fits out of the slave trade. On the
other hand the movement for its





abolition could hardly have been
expected to originate among the
settler community who were un-
likely to be ahead of the mother

country in policies of enlighten-
ment. The cart does not lead the
horse. When slavery was abol-
ished compensation had to be paid
and not much of the compensation
remained in the West Indies to
finance developments which would
allow the West Indian legislatures
‘to tackle the colossal task of fitting
slaves who had not even (as in
he neighbouring French colonies)
; to take
ieir places in free society. The
istory of Barbados is exceptional




n that respect because of the
ieavy European settlement. But
tit would have been unnatural to

expect a self-governing Barbados
more than thirty years before the
passage of the second Reform Bill
to have acted as disinterestedly in
the interests of the non-white sec-
tions of the community, as a Par-
liament at Westminster which was
being’ subjected to the critical
pressure of the new public opinion.
Much of what was said in Eng-
land was of course greatly exag-
gerated Professor W. L. Burn
quoting Mr, G. M. Young's descrip-
tion of the Victorian age, “an age
of flashing eyes and curling lips,
more easily touched, more easily
shocked, more ready to spurn, to
flaunt, to admire and above all to
preach”, says it was far more apt
for 1833 than for 1883, but
modifications it still represents the
erude enthusiasm displayed by
some members of the British Par-



with










jmen to manage their own affairs Jiament who by asking questions
jin the land of settlement. Had the ghout British col feel that
| West Indies as we know them to- they are performing useful dutie
{day been settled only by English- »

men and not by Spaniards and Very often, however, the only
Frenchmen as well, English law consequence of the legislative
might have been the only law and supremacy of the Parliament at
English ideals of government the Westminster over the colonial Teg-
only ideals. In fact, in the British islatures is to reduce the effective-

territories of the Caribbean ther
still exists French law and Dutc
French and Spanish influences ar
firmly embedded among the West




of State fc
Colon
tt is easy enough for left-wing



ness of action which the
state the Colonie
1 Governors want

ecretary
and the
to take.



members of Parliament and their
journalist friends to criticise the
government's handling of affairs in
Kenya when they are sitting thous-
ands of miles away safe from the
murderous attacks of Mau Mau.
The supremacy of the British Par-
liament over Colonial legislatures
never seems less desirable than
when something goes wrong in a
British colony. Then everybody
the Secretary of State for the Col-
onies, the Governor or the Colon-
ial legislature all come in for a
share of the lashing tongues and
scratching pens which suddenly
inform the large ignorant British
public that they have a colony
somewhere which somebody has
been running wrongly. There is a
good reason I believe for the Par-
liament at Westminster retaining
its supremacy over colonial legis-
latures whenever self-government
would mean the penalising of min-
orities; this supremacy is as neces-
sary today in the interests of min-
orities as it was before in the in-
terests of majorities. But there is
no purpose whatever in the
supremacy of Parliament being
maintained if questions are to be
asked in Parliament by persons
with no stake in the colonies con-
cerned,





If Colonies do not become self-
governing the electors of the
colonies ought to elect one or more
representatives to successive Brit-

ish Parliaments to represent their
interests (and not as now the in-
terest" of individuals who get the
ear of certain Members of Parlia-

ment) throughout the session and
not only periodically at question

time. One agent of Barbados in
London for many years secured
election to the British Parliament
and representation was achieved
in this original manner but today
the West Indians who are elected
to Westminster owe full allegiance
to the British constituents who
have voted for them.

There are many stocx objections
to any proposals for colonials be
ing returned to the Parliament at
Westminster. Many of them are
put forward c onstructively and not
merely as obstacles. But however
strong may be the arguments
against Colonial participation in
the Imperial Parliament such par-
ticipation is better than a system



L





in your home, |







which allows individual M.P'’s and

their journalist friends to beat a!

big stick
the Sex



ind attempt to browbeat





etary of State for the
Colonies and Governors of Col-
onies into actions approved by
particular pressure groups. The



United Nation sembly Commit-
tee on non-self-governing terri-
tories has learnt a lot of technique
from tle pressure groups at West-
minster and colonial administra-
tion everywhere today is being
threatened with extinction.

That is why self-government
dwith safe-guards for minority
Sroups) seems a lesser evil to
many than it did before the army
of meddlers swelled tg the present
size, '











SUNDAY, DECEMBER 28, 1952





SS eee

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SUNDAY, DECEMBER 28, 1952 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE NINE















It was sometime in May 1951



Some Gld Places Visited And Photographed—1 SOME WARMING ADVICE BY A DOCTOR nn eee |



song HOW TO DODGE:







that a party of us pl ed te } ng nm were two Welling-

on a tour of some of the old $s tall the palms, but |
places of historic interest in the ape. by the trade j D :
Island; so resort was made to 1ese had beer

Volume one of the Journals of r party visit oc |
the Barbados. Museum and -His- 1951), Passing) BY CHAPMAN PINCHER Vitamins as specific protectiv
torical Society which contains a ar g a litter : igents against colds have also}
copy of the ‘Report of the C t we entered For the first time a doctor Ll re d. Yé¢t Cheney claim:|
mi‘tee appointed to enquire into he drawing-room,.a magnificent | comes forward to-day with some that some patients who were con
the present Condition of Historic aloon extending with various | sjear-cut advice on how t

> pre- sistently subject to colds have|

compartments over the greate?| vent and treat the colds which been « moplet.ly free from them]

Sites etc., in Barhados and to re-







































mation was forthcoming that it
has four massive walls inside
built crosswise. This residence is
said to be an old residence of the

of erection is unknown. It is
1eferred to as ‘Parham Park

century by the name of ‘The
Outlaw Downes,” who. wos the
then ownar, I* is stated tat this
wanton, act was performed be-
Willoughby family, and the date cause he wanted to be revenged

cn his ereditors.
Enquiries had been made



$ to

pecial sensitivity to such sub
tances brought on nose and eye
symptoms identical with those of
n inf *etious cold
| These cases benefited imme-
| jiately by treatment with anti-

port what steps should be taken I of the ground-floor storey- | make winter a misery for most for up to fourteen years since}

for their preservation,” dated Tt was filled with rare and curi~ | of ys king a large daily dose of

June 10th 1910. A route was C things, Bathered in the d After 25 years’ research vitamin A :

selected and the historical facts WHen-Suger Ww . a Some: Rt oat volving more than 60,000 patients Among precautions which

contained in this report were ty, and se sted we bie fei #, Marshall Cheney,aUsS ‘ople can take for themselves

typed out so that the party e; pic ures ; magh antes op physician, urges Brlish dock © Dr. Cheney recommends

would be able to make compari- “i eae There “had | ibandom the “nothing-I-can-do AVOID ov.r-tiring yourself

sons between now and _ forty ee sue ati in the. Wes: | *bout-it” attitude to colds by too many late nights, Un-

years ago. The facts relative to eet = a iy these isdasures In the Practitioner, a leading less you have a high natural
$ poe ye was taken Indies cient eo oun A bros British medical journal, he puts resistance, fatigue makes you}

arin . fneedims “y collecte —s , : * » more sceptib] < al

: on a “ah sar ados Diocesan ; ircase led up from the hall to | forward this argument me more su ceptible to attack,

9 Ee a ee E, Reece WARREN'S HOUSE x jes, out of which bed- | The attitude that a cold must 2. EAT plenty of protein—fish,
an . Clark-Hunt, while ong galerres, OM * : take its course is based on a false eggs, cheese, and what meat,
other notes were collected and daughter Elizabeth & his two cauee pone etree criticism in rooms opened a ‘aloe theory that all “colds” are caused you can g t—to increase your)
added. brothers John and saac the local press. However, the mur- baleonies & the os «microscopic germs call aty resistance ¢ issis

BS "an the morning of the 2Ist of | Thornehill.” vs a der of His Lordship ‘in Pt en x § n blinds. It was a_palace Bonny ia "hen ces a Ser ' hn, goer paste

«it . . . \ce 5 ve ¢ > >i Di

June, 1951, the party set out, and Timothy Thornhill’s son, Major- Park, Dublin, sometime after- with whicl ' eas os 6 pee treatment has yet been found, 3. AVOID chills, which drive}
the first place visited was “War- General Sir Timothy Thornhill, Wards awakened much syr ny oe Ve) Seal ee ne | In reality, the symptoms whic! the blood, with its protective
ren’s House.” This house is in is one of the famous Barbadians, 14 the people of Barbados tor his of those which had stirred . ae }we call “coids” can be caused t “anti-bodies,” away from the
good preservation on the out- His distinguished action against Widowed Lady. ‘ admiration of forelgr | of several different agents for se and throat—but do not
side; the present manager being the French placed him high on. Im 1879 the Princess Albert, Vie- trays in pe a aa 7, e hich remedies already exist wear much heavy clothing. |
out, no one could inspect the in- the list of famous of this Island, tor and George—afterward: Geor ie ara bes eee beatae ve In trying to find a cure ’ This Is Why |
terior of the premises. This The next point on the pro- V of England, etc., visited Barb > at W ety d Se tant = |the common cold scientists are I he -rtening report makes
house stands on approximately gramme was “Arnold’s Old Mill,” When on board the H.M.S. Buc- ot see apne ent ay hurr an | pursuing a phantom. ound. s nse to me |
four acres of land, mostly planted which is one of the oldest bits of chante, oat these B, ere ab + co os Aa y and could And in the process they have It explains many of the pecull-|
i é Q rees re s as , i i sla s . entertaine y the riggs y t is hac pe A setae s; a : il} : wi tt . Zl a.
wail bent Inwh Gat UF a a “ oh th 3 eee pe tt “9 FE rae Hil’ : “The ms ; ° t for ever. Something bet- | disc we pe = Ay sulpha drugs, ities . cold te some colds}

° e va- haps e ste m at é : or} eo. al ag cont n the ne t, ana “anti-histaminics,” all of allergic) ear u over-
hogany trees is one of the largest has borne this name from time that a once rare y Hill but als ey ties San ons which are effective in treating night while others (the infec-
remaining in the Island, Photos immemorial, One William Ar- corded by the historian eee ee ~ | some . ; "hey have us) linge for w 3: why
graphs were taken from > nold, Poyer relates, was the first Anthony Froude in his book = . ales. eee an” ceeeee pe ar Di ( eae oo k eine ome!
angles, also one of the entrance settler to land here from the English in the West Indies’; he vis- Hsving seen all that could bej (ir ot which are highly effec- brought hom: by your. children
to the living room, which has ihe ‘William and John’ in 1627. He tive in preventing other typ: 1d catch others. —
date ‘1686’ over the door. ched in 1688 and is buried at “All Dr, Cheney’s case r ¢ is how Puttu t idvice into action|

The next stop was made at Saints” Church in St. Peter. This one in every three pationt ’ 1 effort f th

t ‘Bagatelle House,’ wherg permis. mill is all that. remains of the ho complained of cor r but in the jen

8, sion was obtained to take photo- former plantation buildings, for tching cold proved to b ults might save h

’ graphs. This house is of massive it is related, that all were des- lergic” to hou dust, f ty your health, and the coun
construction, and although the troyed by fire by a well-known vowder, pollen, moulds or som ney
interior was not inspected, infir- character of the early eighteenth ngredient in their food, Their

Which Sort Do You Get?
fhe 60.000 patients studied by
Dr, Cheney showed that ai
industrial population falls in‘
four groups as regards suse>p
tibtlity to ecolds;—





















|histaminic drugs which are now CRrROMpP 2 with Near-nort re
House’ or ‘Little Parham,’ after the whereabouts of Arnol Till, vailable on a doctor’s prescrip- mode un of t
the English residence of Lord but no one in Bridgetown seemed on sr rent of tt}
Willoughby, a former owner. It to know exactly where it was So, .a 1 first step, Chen niotion Hith restetanea 4
is recorded that Lord Willoughby located: The road may showing idvises doctors to test all chronk ‘te Ig wenally ae 1 wit
of Parham—Governor of the a cross “Old Mill” in the vicinity j cold-cathers to discover wh.ther hieh restetanee te measles on?
whole province of - Carliola of Mount Progpect, this spot was | y are really suffering from momn
1649-1666, under the Earl of visited. After admiring the } ome allergy ,
Carlisle’s Patent—wrote in 1651 beautiful seenery of St. Andrew's | Cheney also claims that many GROUP 2, with good natura
; from “his house Barbados” to Sir from this section, enquiries were } nfectious colds are not caused | resistance, comprises abou
é George Ayscue (on board the made as to the name of the old BAGATELLE HOUSE | ‘iruses but by the much bigg« one-fifth of the population, Its
: Rainbow) in Speights’ Bay. mill; these brought forth the in- , | zerms called bacteri members have one or two slight
| The next point of interest on formation that this mill was not ited Barbados in 1887, and was seen of Farley Hill, the party then Such cases respond to treat colds every year,
i our programme was Jack Bay- ‘Arnold’s’ but Four Hills’ Planta- tertained by Sir Graham Briggs, proceeled to “Grenade Hall”, an} ent with penitillin, sulphona- GRrorp 8 — the average- re
f ley’s Hill or Mullins Fort but this tion old mill and works, and that 29d wrote— cid signal station and a relic of the ides, and other drugs which can ‘stanee group—contains about
was not visited as was proposed, Arnold’s Mill was “way back “After keeping by the sea for Military days of Barbados. This is |i}; bacteria, though they are haf the population, They
because it appeared to be sur- down de same road!” It was then 8" hour we turned inland, and just a ruin, but it is situated |-\coiecs against viruses he claim iverare two or three “stream-
* rounded by cane-fields, and was decided to continue on to “Far- 4! the foot of a steep hill we met about 950 feet above sea level, and | “Pellowing up this finding he em q year and usually con-
a not easily accessible. Records ley Hill”, the original home of ™Y host, who transferred me to there is a lovely view once oon 4$ | ried vaccines made from ba¢ treet measles, mumps, ant
* 7 hi s own carrii We had still gone beyond the copse of EERO -" | teria for immunisation against chicken-pox as children,
+ four or five miles to go through ny and other trees which now ob- 4 oa. phy were highly succ
i cane fields and ‘among sugar tructs the view at ground level. ful in mang cases, he reports GROUP 4, types, with poor
< mills. ; At the end of them Bs oy hotc graphs w ere taken ri ; | ' What To Do nacural resistance, mike ae
i came to a grand avenue of this rusn, and the party proceede¢ 7 y's cases show that peo the remaining 25 per cent.
4 bage palms, a idred o “Nicholas Abbey”. } Cheney's cases show sae They catch almost every cold
% dred and t1 fee |ple fall into the four — that’s going
4 The avenue led up to Sir (To be continued.) }shown on the right, as regard . L.E.S.
Graham’s house, which stands Next week—‘Nicholas Abbey’, All} their susceptibility to colds
800 feet above the sea. Th r- Saints Church, Carib Cave in}



: ne the fonder o the lease ° F a | ®
felsnd. ral bic a wit, Rouge Hall, and Aencide Mu sa A Poet Dies And
Leaves A Mystery

“ : HITE Is this, she asks, “In order to
Wren GAM "WHIT facilitate’ the gallant enterprises

PARIS of the masculine personnel of
\ MAN who electrified France jhe air force?”













| oh " i sing le > 1 e N inister coldly = a A Nee oe
| oe ae ee ie rty, and a 9 ae nadia women do| ALSO IN HALF POUND AND ONE POUND OVAL TINS
ty churned out lugubriou ot enlist to seek adventures of| salad

stalin, h : ” é EONS ONE ONE ENE ORE Oy as tated sates ac tt? ganas? mass 8s mast es ey,
I verses in praise of Stalin, has this kind.” at NIN DNDN DN IN DN IN IN INN DNDN DN DN ON BN ON NN INN ALY
just- died in Paris. He was 90 The Liberal Prince :
| year-old Paul El!uard As from to-day the number of
| Between the wars, Eluard waS yionayesques (citizens of Mon-
| France's greatest lyric poet. IN 406) will be increased from 3,500
lis last years, with painter 4, about 4,500. Reason: a decree



AARARAAS

Picasso and scientist Joliot fur by Prince Rainier of Monaco,
FOUR HILL OLD MILL he was one of the ama ; mending the existing law which
sctus its fi the Prench | ye, i a renner 8 f
state that as this spot commands the beautiful Farleyense fern Sou er basi , ey eee a ene a ge
a good view it was probably only (Adiantum Farleyense), for in His death was like an echo of citizenship is granted, Now
some signal station, It is near the grounds of this place are trees ri nite cums yaaa Weak cory two. generations (ere :.-Â¥8-
Bagatelle or ‘Parham Park’ Plan- planted by differert members of S Bon stu) weil ulosis, he was watch at Poul : a 1 eC
tation. the Royal Family incliding th ; st t ow falling ° . : mM W
, ‘ Seorg ing the first winter snow fé The news is hailed by a palace
coe, ae plage to ~. veer late King George V. outside his suburban. apartment sookesman as a sign of Prince
s Bennett’s House which was : A 4 : ] ACIP. ae Be ; : ,
aeneied about 1750, but to our QQ, arrival at ‘Farley Hill’ the when he collapsed and died, 7 Reinier liberalism and for-

day, with that passionate prid@ ward-looking views.”

great disappointment, this old only living things seen were a which France feels.for all its men

building had been pulled down peacock, peahen, aud a dog. Hav-



°Vear



nh buts : ; o peice 5 eattoelis whe sete * * of genius, no matter how way Quotes Of The Week |
ange weplased by # modern /bun= an teas Me ota enn Pee mene Cnr eee ae SEASION nbd yard, his death is mourned in Author ARMAND SALACROU: |
i Church was the having been granted this per- 1ewspapers which detested his | would never give a prize to u
faa 8 eka ‘tna ; a3 ‘ lities. book that confuses verbal por-
next on the list. ‘There is no re- mission by the wagging of the tail, “et Pe . sanes ; as
cord of the building of the first the party decamped from the car B.B.C. RADIO NOTES: s The Road To Stalin nography with genuine eroticism To all Our Customers and
Church of St. Thomas, but it ap- and proceeded on a tour of injpec- ~ Said Catholic writer Francol



pears to have been destroyed by tion. It was the first visit for most Mauriac: Politics simply do not MONSEIGNEUR GRENTE: The

T 7 .
the hurricane of 1675,” for the. of the party, and only one had ever New y ear Programmes xist for me in this matter. For yirtuous man is one who never
_#

Minutes of the Vestry for 14th ceen the cork tree and the Cam- my generation he was not only a way to temptation. The

Friends





February 1676 state— “That the phor tree which grow in the : : 1 isstue f” ‘Bporting: Review! |“ nm, poet, but poetry itself.’ fhy Aaa IE NO Ds 7 ma

Parish Church be erected in the grounds of this mansion. The pres- Including Message From 34! /ssue of “Sporting eee ; But the mystery remains: Why now what ten vtatior (

same place where it was former- ent building is not of any great Oliver Lyitelton aoe re Saree faa aviepads did this . passionate eae Smoke KNIGHTS DR G STORES
ly and that the dimensions be age, for it was largely rebuilt and Included in the mat Na present at these events, MS} and ingrained individualist em- Smoker U

Programmes to ws nda ; t 7.45 p.m, on Saturday,| brace a cause which, until the

54 x 40 from outside to out.” This enlarged by Mr. Graham Briggs, Yea;




































(AVE SHEPHERD & C0., LID, _ =e

10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street.





* I t ‘ i , I isitor oO : ari Felina] ¢
Church was completed in 1680, a very wealthy Barbadian, for the from London is a Wateh-nic! u- Ww ict Steed wer, np, Gorpiee t oH 1S oi ty’ ne ! this wank bs \ pr PANE WA WANA CA WA WACK CR WARK
was damaged by the storm of entertainment of Prince Alfred, Service from the Chureh of ickham Steec in. 1935 he wrote OW hoc seo 5 V < Saw ¢ AWK ' WAVAYA YA VA YAN
1731 and demolished by the hur- Duke of Edinburgh, who visited ya, fpnnet a ld ae h Fill Another talk erie vhich be-] detest the Soviet idolatry of Smoking, ; | €4 NG NG NZ NS NGS 3% GNBNG NG 8G NG) .
ricane of 1780. Barbados in 1861 while on board } broition BARS Sa ten n i tl coming week is| Stalin.” t oy, ee eeeee AEN ee camei- - —_— * ~ ;
tande the St. George. Mr. Briggs was wednesday. 31st The S. : tem ‘ by Wickham]. in 1952 he began a poem with coloured jacket and wearing da
The present Church now stands created a Baronet ten years later. of Stat. for the Col snioe th, pr steed.” As our readers doubtlese|the line: “Stalin to-day dissi la , was led in by her Bel
a little to the westward of the ~ {pn 1872 Lord Frederick Cavend- Hori. Oliver Lyttelt tghs ord Ir. Steed w formerly | pates all our unhappines in owner, M, Mullet, He «
former Church, on the site of the ish paid a visit to Barbados. He 1 a New - +) vi dig alae itor of ‘The Tin , lecturer in He joined the Communist plained that Yoghi wore dark
old Rectory which was also des- was greeted in royal style by the coneing rt if ifn ee ne oe Central Buropean ‘History at}Party in 1942 while he was a gl ; on the advice of a Swi
troyed in 1780. The change left people of St. Peter; for they erect. Meena et 10.15 p.m., also on th Kir College. London, and a| leading Resistance worker. It veterinary surgeon
¢ exposed certain grave stones eq Triumphal Arches along the “!S'. Two programmes to be wiar~ broadcaster on . world e him a Cause but clearly While he was introducing her,
: which must have been inside the qriye from Speightstown to Farley ' reer te events fairs for the BBC. Now 81 yeara| killed him as a poet. M. Mullet passed her a_ tiny
4 older Church, One in particular }4j)|, along which route he was ©! 1952, vith the oe nn Y eer Z sala | Ye Tan bey ise cigarette (‘‘cat-sized,” he ex-
' ; $e ; i is i a great deal and} Pept. Of Enterprise ;
‘ is of more than passing interest: escorted by gentlemen on horse- ! aveudiiine of many A Parla. women counbilior. ha lained), with a red tip, Yoghi
Here lyes interred the boddy back. This display by a Liberal imtrod Bie ie I eee y ae 1 ms a 7 ee eat am ea ie hiareon Hay pe s ita
of Major Gennerall Timothy such as Sir Graham Briggs Thor 1 yew Ye ns 7 wae tha Ae 4 } altet Wee, ee We. eran eave M. Mullet lit th (saveatin tan Was
Thornehill who departed the whose uncle Mr. Thomas Graham the Secretary of Me. PASTOR Y Ps ; ny ie t = i of Pe Ee ae ag ep M. Mi 1 ee : ont ¥ ht ae
hae » ac cewise + ore me catec ha p> onie that i € y while e has met many o volunteers or 1e Frenet I Mulle aid that 3
first of August 19S] as thee Y Se Briggs had F din i A ; ra or g t figures of the day. He} WRAFS are required to be insured with Lloyd’ because of
the boddyes of his two wifes sembly the giving of the ‘oath’ to | ing 10.30 par The sec f is eee y | Z 1 v ‘loy d's
boeth named Sussanna & his free coloured people in 1804, and of the programmes rev on Pues« lys at 10.15 p.m. | Un narried widow or r emokine habits
eldest sonn Thimothy & his had subsequently lost his seat— sporting events of 1952 in a spec. been on the 30th inst | divorcees, WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED
So, WU BG NG WGN NG NN 8 NW NN NN WN NN Be | {
Lm Na Na a D3 Ne Ne og No Ng Ts Mae he Naa? PaO AO TT BNO NG BN % }
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we Yes *
S To All Our Friends and Customers Sif; SUM time: to protect. your good |
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nh} ' ,
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Whe iciaiiieiiinicitiaaie pe Agents.

xs







PAGE TEN



OLYMPIC STORY—X

THE CLOSING CEREMONY

he

last

h
of my

So today I rea
final instalment
Story. The swimming eve
ended on Saturday, August
and the next day we all crowde*
into the Olympic Stadium to

and the Closing Ceremony.

On she afterr that
swimming finals there
indeed a full programme for

idition to five final t th
there was a
between Hur
followed by
it the indoor h
called

on the

ended

Football
id Yug
boxing

Fing

ot




final

all
in Finnish,

as it was

While
Stadium and
garian Nalic
was played twice
help fe pap
Borrow thal a gr
was coming to an end
garian Aninem is th






SWwimmins
Hua-

which

ald

Siti ne

g to

ur
en ine

| Anu





not



or
experience

Phe

ol



Hun-



eV
zest

neard,
of the
more of
song, it
first class classic
me think of

We hac
familiar
ming events

* the Hur
on : }
lashion







w



in devasia ing
last day the



at the Vict














ee
the finals of the Equestrian events

Vas
in

pool
i

or Messuhalh,

and
Olympic

i

ce
sae

ao"
eo

THE CLOSING CEREMONY of the Olympic Games at Helsinki



tremendous cheer r

ceremony. when we went would represent their countries
over to the ll Finul in 1¢ en-bloc in any competition, pro-
Olympic Stadium we heard » fessional or amateur

anthem again after the match wa It would indeed be very sur-
won very c¢ incin by e prising if Sritain ever won the



‘ery agile Hungarian team

For myseif I thought the foot-
ball was of a very nis
but the nexi day
to relate, I heard
press mem pulling
it had been a t
all the most r
they found to n ne
was that the match was too fast
The English seem to fee! that t
he some absolute right over
Soceer andit must not be pl
on anything but the Ey
ground. Contequently they regard
Soccer in Europe or
America, which often playe
on ground as hard as Kensington
in the light of a children’s gar



I









most 6&¢





Impressive Player

One of the most impressive
players in the Clympic Football
Final was the Hungarian captain
Puskas. He scored the opening
goal for Hungary and many times
drew rounds of applause by his
clever passing and dribbling. But
for this he earned only the ire of
my friend, the British critic, who
said “if those continentals came
to England we would soon put a
stop to Gil this fancy footwork
stuff.” Inshave- no. doubt © they
would, The ground would be like
glue and the ball like lead. *

It must not be imagined of
course that our British friend
was annoyed because Great Bri-
tain was knocked out in the flr
round by Luxembourg. This defent

st

occasioned no great surprise be-
cause Britain, like most of the
Western Countries, suffers in a
game like Soccer due to thei:
strict observance of the amateur
rule. As everyone know’, ama-
teur football is way below the
standard of the professional ga:

in Britain. Most of the con-
tinental countries however have

completely different way of in-
terpreting the amateur rules for
the Olympies and the bulk of the
teams that™“ played fi Ital

Hungary amd Yuvoslavix w

made up of men who played for



t

these countries in the Professior
World Championships In fa
the Hungarian and Yugoslav team






Olympic football cha
der th

countr

pionship un-
se circumstances. Another
which suffered in this re-








was Brazil. One of the
leading soccer countr
id to be satisfied with
ce to countr like Swed
ny, and Austria as i
the two mentioned above who m
the final

The Jumpers
Turning to the very last event




the programme, I must say
that before I went to Helsinki I
had never seen genuine show
jumping of any kind. A few law
hurdles in an odd event at our
local Gymkhanas was the sum
otal of my experience with tnis
sport and of course While our local
riders may be quite good their

horses are not, and jumping takes
specially trained horses to do the
job properly. Not only must they
be specially trained but only the
best an temperament as well
technique qualifies a horse as
go0d jumper.

as
a

In all the sports which horses
take part, Jumping I think poses
the greatest test. The jumper may
not necessarily have to be a thor-

“ughbred, He can be a hunter or
an Arab cross. But I would say
his intelligence has to, be far

above the average which we asso-
ciate with those in the racing
game.

Before going to Helsinki I had,
quite frankly, expected that jump-
ing, or any kind of horse show
other than racing, would bore me
[ was so completely wrong that
as I sat in the Olympie Stadium
it was as if I kept asking myself:
“well where have T been all my
life?”

The Grand Prix des Nations or
horseback jumping event consist-
d of 13 jumps or obstacles vary-
ing in height from 130 centimetres

to 160 centimetres, ie, 4 ft. &
inches to 5 feet 3 inches. There
was one wids water-jump and

one narrow water-jump behind a

hurdle. They started on the grand
stand side ran up the length of
the centre field taking two low
jumps, turned left and went across
to the other side. They took a
sharp left turn again gnd then
ran diagonally across the field

back in the direction of the grand

; stand

two double
single. They then turned
right, went across to the
other side again and ran up the
length of the field taking four
jumps including two low hurdles
and the narrow weter jump which
for the purposes «f the comypeti-
tion were counted as one obstacle.
Therefore on this _ particular
tretch there were only two ob-
stacles although four actual leap:
were required to clear them.
After this they turned right
ran across to the grand stand side,
made another sharp right turn
and ran diagonally across the
field taking four jumps, two clos«
doubles (counted as one obstacle),
p high single and triple bar-
rier, They then turned sharp left,
ran across to the grand stand side,
turned left again and ran up the
length of the field taking the wide
water jump andaéeé very high
solid gate jump. After turning
left to go across the field on the
way out there was one final double
jump just before the finish. They
ntered and left by the marathon
gate opposite the grand stand.

taking jumps
and a

sharp

a

Intelugence And Endurance

I have never seen such intelli-
gence and endurance exhibited by
horses in my life. What also im-
pressed me was the behaviour of
the crowd. It would be impossi-
ble to hold a horse show of this
kind in Barbados because it would
be a physical impossibility to keep
the spectators quiet. e Finns
were not accustomed. to horse
shows and when the Grand Prix
des Nations started they cheered
one or two of the first riders over
some particularly difficult jumps.
But the anneuncer soon put them
right by speaking over the public
address system and after he asked

for absolute silence during the
jumps, once or fwice, they co-
operated in the grand manner

Cheering is allowed only between
(he completion of one jumper'’s
round and the commencement of
the next. As the riders often met
each other at the gate this meant

short sharp bursts of cheering and |

lapping and the crowd kept it

up well. In a stadium with 70,000 |
people one could have heard a pin
l-op while each jumper went
!. rough his paces.

Tuere were 48 competitors in
the final and the individual com-
petition and the team competition
were decided together. Each
nation sent three competitors with
she exception of Japan, Korea and
Finland.



1a) Son Kills
inflicted two wounds on his wife Identification

ubove the right side of her chest
and below the left breast.

5 Xmas Tragedies In B.Guiai

(From Our Oy spondent)

GEORGETOWN, Dec







The Christm: holiday The cou i ii

; : ‘ 3 ie ple were married E
marred by five tragedies April this year. Mrs. Wang = xpert
o'clock on Christmas eve mo the sister of Iyella Stephenson
Adolphus “Shadow” Harris, who ; to have fought for the HOMESTEAD, Fla., Dec. 27.



years old, colony soccer star who ;, l
representet, B.G. against Trinidad
and Surinam died at the Public

lightweight boxing cham.
pionship here on Boxing Day, but
he Boxing Board two days ago

|
|



ef Windsor to assist with the




hospital in Georgetown celle ‘eam castes
seeks after he 5 rf knocked down cancelled his promoter’s licence, | Oakés murder case in 1943, was
ene eacsid Vea yee : Upper Corentyne was shocked | shot to death to-day by his son,
ee See : nh Christmas Eve morning when | James O. Barker, jr. The police
ad with the corpses of Adonis and Rajpo- | said young Barker admitted the

» two watchmen of the P.W.D. | shooting and that there has been
found
wheels
bodies

ina
with

“caravan” office on}! ang son for sometime.

wounds on their/ |
| Barker, who testified that he

“ | found the fingerprint of Alfred de |
On Christmas Day Charles Ban- | Marigny, son-in-law of Sir Harry
arswee, motor car owner and | Oakes on the screen beside the |

driver of the Essequibo coast, died} bed of the slain man, was tried by

.round )
Eve Ura Wong, :

found bleedin
scious on the s
town home
hospital but









jeorge-

hed her to











oe ores ten minutes after admission to the International Association of |
weahi aetonke: ; hospital. Banarswee met his death | Identifieation on charges of falsi-
pipe. SS caetien a hen his ca crashed on to a para-| ‘fving fingerprint evidence, but
c red jum with the murd tt after he had Jost his control

the charge was later arenes

Police alleged that
BUBBA ENE:
; all ita
y
=

the husband of the vehicle.



Ce

F

RA
5G NS NB Ws A

We Extend to our Friends and

Customers Sincere Wishes for a

HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS
NEW YEAR

The Barbados Foundry Lea.

FADIA PRGA DA ATS Dh TS TN DATE K
NGEG NE NENG 5 NG NE NENG NE GEA



j Gi NIN GN ENS DEGN QUIN ES ES ENE ONE

APRA LS RNA NING N NRE INNS



a
PAN

James O, Barker, Police Identi- | @
fication Expert called by the Duke |

Corentyne road programme were} family feuding between the father }





'

|
j



SNS BSNENANE NS NSE NS SN NN

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

By Trevor Gaizc



although Colonel
Llewelyn on Foxhunter received
al) the publicity in the British
papers it was largely due to Wil-
frea White that they won the com-
petition. White dropped only four
points in his two rounds while
Foxhunter lost 16% in the first
round in the morning. Col. Liew-
elyn afterwards said he knew
Foxhunter was not himself the
moment he got on his back that
morning. But in the afternoon he
came back and had the crowd 1
ecstacies with a faultless round.
Col. Stewart on Aherlow also did
very well losing only 16 points
The British therefore won the last
gold medal to be competed for at
the Olympic Games of 1952. But
for the Winter Games it was their
only one.

Closing Ceremony

The closing ceremony was as
impressive if not as crowded as
the opening. Only the flag bear-
ers and not the entire teams were

petition and







marched into the stadium, 1
order being the same as for the
wpening ceremony 1°. the Greek
flag leading ana the flag ot the
host country, Finland, bringing
up the rear. The others were in
Finnish alphabetical order which





would have to be studied for hours
to be understood

The standard bearers aitet
marching around the track line‘
up in front of the Tribune of Hon-
our and Mr. Sigfrid Edstrom,
President of the International

Nearly all the jumping was good Olympic Committee, together with
and there were only two falls Mr, Brik von Frenckell, President
both by Russian Officers. It was of the Organising Committee and
the only time I ever noticed a Mr, Eero Rydman, the Mayor of
Finn show his feelings tawards Helsinki, all advanced to the Tri-
the Russians, I could not help no- Lyne of Honour. The Greek flag
ticing my companions obvious * i .
delight when the Russians felj off. “85 ee, > ae ao otha
Nevertheless the riders were quite "ational anthem of that country,
good and I sus h this being done to commemorate

8 suspect that the fault 4 :

was really with their nicunts, the Greek origin of the Olympic
; Games. Then the Finnish and
Frenchman Outstanding Australian flags were hoisted i)

To pick out the outstanding tur to the accompaniment =!
rider and horse the Frenchman their respective anthems, these two
Jonqueres d’Oriola on Ali Baba countries being first the host
was far and above anybody else. country and the one in which the
Five of them were tied at the end next Games will be held.

yf the two rounds and therefore .
here had to be a jump off. This Mr. Edstrom then mounted tne
was over 6 of the most difficult Tribune of Honwiir and the littic |

speech he made is best quoted a: |
it signifies in precise manner the

sbstacles and the height was rais-
ed from 4 ft. 6% ins. to 5 ft. 10%

ins. In case of a further tie, after closing of the games and the call
he “jump off’ was completed, it for future Olvmnies. Here it is:
was given out that the competitor j
via the fastest time would be the “In the name of the Interna-
lumer. tional Olympic Committee. 1 offer
to the President and the people of
The Frenchman was the first Finland, to the authorities of the

out and decided that it was all City of Helsinki and to the organ-
speed or nothing. His mount never isers of the Games our deepest
made a false step and he flew gratitude, I declare the XVih'
ver the obstacles like a bird on Olympic Games closed and, in ac- |
the wing. The others, of course, cordance with tradition, I cali,
tried to follow him but made too upon the Youth of every country |
many errors. QO. Cristi of Chile to assemble in four years at M |
was second and his horse Bambi bourne. May they display at the |





was the one I liked most in th® fulness and concord so that the
whole show. Thiedemann of Gér-- Olympic torch may be carried on
nany was third while Wilfred with ever greatér eagerness, cour-
White on Nizefella came fourth. age and honour for the good

The British won the team com- humanity throughout the ages.”



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Aes SUNDAY, DECEMBER 28, 1952 SUNDAY ADVOCATI










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Dear Mother






















PAGE ELEVEN

ADVOCATE BRIDGE
by M. Harrisen-Gray











nh
e , > , ’ a ° 3 a
BERNARD WICKSTEED writes home from Korea | of ’
re » XN e @aAKQY6: BV KB YQ 2;
} @AYS &
f « rgn “ q} e @I545,;9 AIT, @ KRIS;
i Y ou Should Hav « Joing ( ul aks’
7 es , T i ' Tl : Otl . N iot i x * : .
f | ugh Wwe ust be dead three
\ rip 1¢ ler ~ 12 Li time ver, but the major mn gS tee at
\ Came wo life
a2 : i I
] ; j KOREA. Well, Mother, war is war, and y |
—_— = = — , oe é; EAR MOTHER eddunbee son he bt te ae anmbeed tet a spe ney laugh K ‘
a - muaericesce™ : ld blac ; r you have to be prepared for that BLASTED Gunners,” he said ; :
| ’ s / 2 ay cree pane now We sort of Ortop if you want to dine “That's their idea of a Funny | Ne ured
| r ise Oo cre¢ lon € country with colonels, but wasnt reacy Joke.’ Dian
OW oll on ji roads in a car at night, with only for what happened next. We were rote ‘ . K
ja tiny strip of light showing and negotiating a tricky corner, wi h ' ‘ ve got = verry a. |S z i f
e you hanging out of the window me hanging out of the side say- “'0e the road here, eng Wey Was} mquyln Kinz-@ :
Zoot-suit ; to tell us when we went in the ing Over your way. Over yout till some unsuspecting type 6 mies sea tient ae Q
i Ss rica m way. There’s a 50ft, drop on this long in the black-out and then let Sout would
- Well, they } 1 black-out or side,’ when all of a sudden thee Off a salvo over his head.’ )
a | t id behind t ront nes was a bang like the crack of door, From the darkness eal w 1
Iva 72 Sets here, and I can tell you it is far ® ud the air was filled with the of demoniac laughter aang ts
LONDON “He had time to act before Mau | w« than it eve V t hon rs
Leading Britis! newspapers of Mau was ever heard of He has} be ise there i nearly always a hh Abo t The Cats .
o fe all part re caustic when they had time to act since. He has done ( on Hie as d Uu , 4 A weee - ’
a . : i on ( ther o i9 North u
2 oO ic 1a learn that the Royal Commission neither ( id a
a ; 3 not : - ge t they pi H has 1 tra + failure I t front DO you remember last time I place of rat as quick ¢ the D
My Nac een pro to grast he measure ¢ the - ws eet? - > a fA > » { mel r
; e w S Mathie - tecan $e atte a Jeep w imajor was here I told you there € Piper of Hamelin D
carpet ng rere oe De ly Mirt . atic Si wheel We were going » cats in Korea? A Korean said But when it did turn up it was 1
i t heading “Slow Mo- Mite ell * fi ili fe r “do | See, the Royal Fusiliers, The color they must have all been eaten 1 the smallest kitten ever we ined —_
tion the Liberal Manchester ng in the face of the in isked u to line in hi dugout Well, Mother, you'll be glad to and no larger than a tennis ba . eke
| Guardian compared the Colonial ¢ the Colonial Office.” ‘Lights out hear that now the cats are comit isp: t 1 to
His hair is plastered with brti Office to the Mills of God, and ccused him of making a YOU drive on the wrong side of back to Korea, 1 had one in m Kitten hunt o-gan I
ee ae ee l irene ne, it 1 on his retirement when Mr. | the road here, you know, as they tent last night It wa fte the THE other way of getting into
ott _ | r. Lyttelton’s deci ton was in his audience|do in France, We were all right till rat .. : : i
his shining sho 0 }nounced on September 1M smmarkably reassul ve got to a noti sayin *AlL the Korean Cat Club is to go on F I )
Hts © Updy mou h Roy ‘ommission shot Ry an ate eameags PREY Sau | cam ats ie ag ned It was a great black and whie a kitten hunt and bring one back .
be 7 mMens ’ H that a Royal Commission sh ing ab ss of Kenya i! ‘ beyon this point. I
tice th acne... ile ; be appointed warmly we Sir PI . Mivror..‘did And than te die Bedab thing, wild as a mountain alive, It is quite as dangero t I ‘
terest is jazz must ih comed and the not take the chance to ring any! “I ne hnban: this round we leopard, and she bared her tee:h -game hunting in Africa respond t aie
cult for ¢t re Lin ments putforward la elis.’ my oT ¢ 7 d spat at me If you can capture a to Ir he ri
K Philij it . : With all these rats around evcn patrol your commandin fl : :
haps tl el uld no It summed uf “Events have Like the back of y hand, it is welcome, so I hope nearly pleased as if
beer if it had beer p- proved that this delay and inac-/ said, and went ay . tl n tame her t 1 brought in a Chinese I
preciated that the best part a tion were disastrous. ‘ barbed wire round a minefiek ‘ ble oO e Korean Cit In our camp we are lucky. We *
year had pas 1 since the arg Liberal News Chronicle A bit further on he stopped Club have a complete family ; ;
had be en address¢ d to him.” ex red itself toa eens ery ide a signpost at the top of a hill set ‘ cats living under the floorboard Hearts. , 1
ee adde a Eve n nQw, more than It is ° pity that his SUB~ | and asked me to get out and Mm a new er © of the officers’ mess, and the kit )
B - ee ’ ne the Raval oe was not acted upon eal | what it said. I shone my torch on boy ve started for resto taris ave. worth a hottie of% v
is only interest Jazz and oy. u a } sion is ne a ; in - ng, . les it and read: “Drive slowly. Dust land with cat Apiece
anda.” The draminn Sah 1 ’ ir tion t s a head and tern aa ® 7 no 1 so mar a e
Ma os The drawing ts Russic part t referer a fs ) heis wr It used more of its leader col- i ets. A ae I know } Pc . ¥ any If they fetched the same pr a
STOCKHOLM eg SUCUr Ee. & The Gu conceded that the umn to point out that the publica- 1 thoug that 5 what it wa 7 in his ¢ oc . ane es } at home we'd do well with ou ,
Wednesday 3 ee ‘ Commission would have to deal tion of Sir Philip’s report put paid |said the major This is the point the side of a mountain, that he sent 5)q tabby. wouldn't we? ar
P NIVERSIT Y= ch things neg ect he! with long-term problems but in- to a “whispering campaign 1in/ where we are under direct ene an urgent message to a friend in Well, Mother, that’s all now I \
students in Russia tt die and “at al Avs at th ‘sisted: “The delay is regrettable Kenya” which had it that ed — [eee vorre Re ites Be t moving 7° to send him a cat by air- wate ltt a
dream about “the SRP Sern ree ie itt the et ee balan ili | ‘We h a "t ae AL h furth a . Aso TNs
, eatn SL ‘ ; aan one ich her 1 1
divine” Linda Darnell, CHE WING | “The establishment of the Royal His “masterly survey of the | wher there was a whoomph be All the time they were waiting war correspondent a3 hd eo
sing Western jazz tunes \ | Commi ma be only a pre- com plex problems besettin€|pind us just where we'd stopped for it to arrive he used to Say ce 3
and show a marked liminary step. But what advance Kenya,” said the Chronicle, “could | «pgjq you so.” said the major non. he boy Just wait till that eat BERNARD
: . t o wen » if eve > preli n- mis . ee writte ys n-| 7 : Rit sa) ce ‘ ron . le pm ‘a
preference for the n do we rey ; hav = = oF ly have been written by and \ |chalantly Chinese © Ohestwinnte from Japan, We will rid the Lut
> “ bywaite arv step is so slowly made derstanding man w a life eT... Ph th :
knee-long.< soot ” ‘suit | _ The Conservative Daily Express experience in African service.” awe * shel) _ vie o
and are about to get manded “Why the hold-up?” The paper added this comment on ger ‘than our'¢0-pounder. Quit
a resounding kick in | __ It, too, wanted to know why the “There are two common delu- |*ective
their extra- narrow Colonial Office had taken thirteen gions about Africa. One is that} |
pants for doing so. months to reveal the warning the European farmer is an inter- |



}sounded by Sir Philip. And 1
|the Manchester Guardian it drev



and the other is that every |
African has a god-given right to



lope



foreign-made $



























ved ¢ Doritos of . tremendously ccited |attention to the fact that after so own a bit of Africa
Sovie vommunist Ou 2. Abduliavev ves n | long the Royal Commission i till “ As Sir Philip says, the Whites
Organisation (Kom- restauran and a good bodyles ‘ ttled there and built
somol), is curr pub Th umpa:gn ra an inter who have settlec rere n6, me
Ushing a serie articles yoint How did the | The Labour Daily Herald devot- 1? aye soca ab tik Maaek aes
which bring startling and the “Linda cu ed its entire leader column to an MUCH 4 De er eT Eee,
revelations about the real prey tO yeperae attack on the Colonial Secretary, Wher? else in the world does f land
attitude of the Russi Per 7 eons % > | rounding-up with a demand that man expect to have a piece of lanc
youth to the cultural r Alara Sationed iff Berlit lhe should quit his post. as his right
mentation imposed by Vienna, maybe through S ;__ Six Phoip’s advice, said the The Conservative Daily Graphic
regime : ) reign diplon 7 San Herald ‘was all the more remark- ceompletely ignored the delay in |
Che newspaper recently published ‘ a : lable since yreviously he had py hliching the re = :
a@ cartoon showing " the perfect y 4 ; ; I ; publishing the repor |
finished type of fore “Bs eem It ma hought the appointment of such It said: “There have heen many |
s personified bv « group of with the desp }a Commission inopportune. unjustified attacks on Mr, Lyttel-
oe “stylish” students ai the le jazz mus KE Of Mr, Lyttelton’s part in what ton and the men on the spot in|
Molotov University in Rostov. sale Ovie apd de, He = bre Mau Muddle"” the Kenya. This White Paper shows |
eof at | Herald — statec 10) shtened is their thinking | ;
ae LANGUID ’ “4 | “Mr. Oliver Lyttelton, Colonial BOW Ane | BECAUSE UPON THE CONDITION
ts bee: Lond pr | Secretary must shoulder the grave | OF THE KIDNEYS RESTS HEALTH
And this 1s how this Soviet-bred 7 |responsibility for this “ineredible “But there can be no progress lL HAPPINESS = LIFE ITSELF, /
ie university spiv is deserit | story of delay. till Mau Mau is stamped out.” £
- . a . IKE EVERY EXPERIENCED DOCTOR
2 weeenseee PTT re A AnOe CARER OR EERE NERO EDS RE EES E EERE TAD OR ROE OCEREE BREEDERS COEUR SEER ER EE EHH iy | oa iN MAKING A DIAGNOSIS
‘





| MUST FIRST FIND OUT THE
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tR STUFF .... . by GILES



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GREETING

Â¥

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The Management and Staff of

= BARBADOS HARDWARE

NEW YEAR

We wish all our ,Customers
and Friends
a very

PROSPEROUS NEW
YEAR

(().. LED.

Wish

¢
*

x





Cur Customers and Friends of new colours, an op
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SPLANTATIONS LIMITED.

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A Prosperous
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The selection presently on our floor offers a choice for instance,

portunity to choose your ZEPHYR.
le behind the wheel of a

» the New Year in a spirit

Charles Mc Enearney & Co. Ltd.

And potential car owners—! This is an excellent

time to consider a new car for 1953, such a ear,



as the brilliant CONSUL © or





PAGI

TWELVE



SUNDAY ADVOCATE

A PLAQUE MARKS THE SPOT... |
A careless ——

historian—

say historians

against Jam

roude that his
History of England from the
Fall gf Woisey to the Defeat

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 28,



o> PROT

HON!







f the Spanish Armada is
inreliable
Was admirably written
nd brought him great
ywn, but, sav other his
orians, Froude handled the
facts somewhat carelessby










go at all the popular
for Old Year

tion over the Powers ot

If you feel ‘tootired’ to enjoy life as you should,
Darkness, as typified by the

too listléss to take a keen and happy interest in

the same year.

: Evil ways



!
|
2 a . : The, plaque (arrowed) shows
endeavouring to support his > a :
own theories rather than to where Froude lived
follow the documents from us great friend, Was also /
which he compiled the work ¥ rously attacked, 1s
Froude himself admitted ude was born at Dart- Tt
that the dramatic poet “is ngion Rectory, Devonshire PART TIME
not bound, when it is incon- n April 1818, hi father.
venient, to what may be called Robert Froude, being arch-
the accident of facts.’ leacon of Totnes Mr. THERM
The truth is that ne was In January 1830, he went to ensures a good time m bal ty gue!
more concerned to represent Westminster School, and for al. You'll fine No ore after for fati ,
the triumph of the Reforma- yecame a King’s scholar in ee ee wre

Pope and Philip of Snain.



























and about 20 trifling sl
and that fs all that the




and

d ou, this advertisement
sane ‘ In Shadows of the all that goes, on around y ~
Trifling slips Clouds, published {n 1847 + sidiiieetaiecees has good news for you.

In a letter e Sir he =: Froude tells the story of if) ee he ell During the last twenty years, countless numbers of i
Skeiton in justific on for fdward Fowler who ’ * < ! or tl vorld have preved that, if you

\ enew oF : - : ’ ‘ people all over the world have preve »W 3 s
oF gamer) hae eceltful. is sathoved, eee | TODAY'S NEWS FLASH take Phyllosan tablets regularly, your steady g

é owe € f is removed, goes. tx ( r r . s f hed

mistakes in the whole bc where he falis litte gain in vitality, energy and cheerfulness will

BRITISH CARS 1952 i} : y
engages in a A delight both you and your friends. To regain

affair Specifications and

; 4 sal y , ou
utmost malignity has dis 1e story was Sala to Photographs your joie de vivre, to fee! youns ey. eee
covered ‘semble Froude’s own exper!- full of energy again, start taking
nees, but there is little sub- Au Interesting Book for Phyllosan tablets to-day! —_ Gea
ance {n this contention Motorists
At Oriel College he was

regarded as a recruit for the
‘ractarians, Yet, despite his
‘other's connection with the

: | PHIYLLOSAN





ovement, James Anthony : â„¢ 7
ver he ner we JOHNSON’S STATIONERY .
Prcuda tas. to Sitetih.
LEER.
a

Charles Kinysley, and {t was
t Kingsley'’s house that he
Mrs. Kingsley’s sister,

» original of the Argemone
! Kingsley’s Yeast, and
married her in October 1849

A plaque, recording the
fact that Froude lived there,
is on No. 5, Onslow Gardens,
Kensington,





1et













LEFT: Full length evening coat in seaweed green net.

— WONDER WHEELS N° 4
RIGHT: Ballerina evening dress with cellophane

Why Hercules cycues
arrive in Barbados
in perfect condition

itraw top and net skirt.

Not Silk Or Satin—But Straw

: TV SHAPES,
eA FASHION |

express Servies

Airliners
Airport

By Dorothy Barkley

LONDON quilted = satin,
There’s nothing new under the pink lining.

sun” so the saying goes, Often 1953 Day Styles
this is applicable to the fashion dipping ‘into ‘the



with a geranium

The special Hercules packing

methods — the result of 30 years
Also future |





id, /Stol ieee study of packing for countries
world, Styles, new at first glance, gor 1953 fashions was the house | * rell-
wor = som a ag ae of Marcus. Styles mostly fol- | overseas —ensure this. The en
ration trom clothes worn maybe lowed ‘the ‘same basic line. and| f wra d parts are placed carefully
by Queen Victoria, the Empress vere eminently wearable.” For'| ° a \ pped part 7
Josephine or the Gauchos of Mex- the line was giver eiiths xe Buyers Unlikely At £10,000 Each in strong cases so that they can be
ico,

|
of last year’s petticoated fulness. |
of the|









A Iona fast aid Skirts, though, were not HURN AIRPORT (HANTS). The Star Lion, heavily pink simply, safely and correctly as-
dl on asnion aesigner ’ 7 op s A dma le x ; off . jac > mitre 7 ¢ e
turned the ‘tables this week by the tight, straight, ‘hobble’ vari- eoaik ac ob aaitbler wreck ane whieh pes Wiis Bharehat sembled on arrival at destination.
: S : a 7 * ety. The tained ¢ on | a group net 7 Be “ = a
putting a common material to an Tide ne ‘still had ae a of Hurn Airport. They are num- Bennett took on a goodwill tour
uncommon use. His suggestion Soom” far walking Pits. wil bered among the 14 Tudors which to South America in 1947.
for an evening dress was not aac hy knife pleats All towid the Minister of Civil Aviation With no buyers likely, even at
silk, or satin—but straw. ¢_ groups of pleats within pleats. | (Mr, Lennox-Boyd) told the the rock bottom price of £10,000,
And here it is—in gunmetal Basically simple dresses always Commons he was anxious to sell the Tudors an likely to stay at
grey, teamed eik: a "balletleneth require stylish accessories Sug- for ve Oy Fhe, each (cost Hurn.—L.E.S.
gr y net skirt, to prove it. (Illus- #€Stions here included rolled o build th £ le . at ——$___$_—_____
at, The” , akesk idian-style | » of the four, its name “ey
trated). The full-skirted baller- *"a@keskin belt Ind style | One o ; :
P or A ah choker necklace closefitting to} almost obliterated by the weath- Gy
iar a iac See Je oer the neck, and contrasting colour- | er, is the Elizabeth of ae WEDDING
fend PD AGaIst NEW LASIOnS 1 overskirt or bolero | which Princess Elizabeth chris-
mut spoies Freeh and charming into Two new colours for tropical- | tened with a bottle of Empire BOYCE—ARCHER
sal ni i weight tailored suits were ‘‘desert | wine in 1947—the flag aircraft of . ‘m
Pa Ss the re traditional types 52nd ind “marine whi . ule ge bo
of es ae Revi ee To look cool on a hot day, one Tudor fleet, took place on Christmas Day at

pri PACKING AND
been neglected, For those ignor- ©4@ -wear an ivory silk dress The ceremony took place at the Providence Methodist Church






































1 { Ai id ch { at 9 a.m, when Mr, Ernest Boyce CUPATCH CEPARTMEN)
: yn , e ack ec » t i i . t *heers and at 9 a.m, Mr, Ernest B
ing fashion’s eccentricities, there ant ee a a eg es rather ee ee T ‘vlaieea of “Unity,” Baxters “Road was ‘
was cotton organza in a multi- acs baygeh on a ber tis Ahir er the aircraft, its tyres were flat â„¢arfied to Miss Eva Archer of
coloured handkerchief print, Mfditered “sharifores and rust was spreading over the Baxters Road. The ceremony was ee ae —
richly embroidered duchess du- dae 5ne¢ gS. urfaces. performed by Rev, Frank Law- 1
gana satin, and cotton pique, A Other details from the show:—! rence, ; ; a wa .
ad i > see yr t Q 3 } : Tha : - rg et a5 ey » F
black pique dress with an almost For a “dramatic” colour com- Two Years In Oven The ride who Ww as given in
off-the-shoulder neckline was bination, azure blue went with marriage by Mr, Ernest D, Mot {
transformed for evening by the ald tree * azure The four Tudors have stood in Uey, M.C.P., wore a dress of :
Me ae hn j hite sje C™merald green, An‘ azure blue viteheraft lace made in victorian |
addition of a huge white si shantung dréss, permanently the open at Hurn for nearly two ™ Dane “oe toate Ih victories 4 si
interwove y ack i z : e years : style with a yoke o ylon n 5 .
ae n with black and golc pleated on bodice and skirt had vA ohate Pepe Stila 8 he @nd_ rhinestone accessorie Her ; THE HERCULES CYCLE & MOTOR COMPANY ATO, f
ee : a swathed emerald green sash. pee, CONS. WHRGER, .: See x SRE bouquet was of radiance roses BIRMINGHAM , ENGLAND.
For grand occasions, the regal Reflecting the colour of the sash airport police, checking to see ' ‘ve balitad taser onal A
crinolines, worn by members of | ate ts . ‘ if souvenir hunters have been “4 Coralitas, ; ’ ‘e Sd 1 eee al —
ets ueoee was a large rhinestone brooch on Duties of bestman were carried .
the Royal Family, are still style- 4 black velvet choker necklace. busy. out by: Mr. H. O. St.C. Cumber- F
setters, And for a grand crinoline, — For the fashion-conscious teen- The other three Tudors are batch, Solicitor é -
what more suitable complement ager three-piecq outfits were the Star Lion, Star Panther and Afte a 5 an aed in
were? ‘ ; r the ceremony, the newly
than an extravagant evening suggested, One in navy wool geor- Star Leopard, sister aircraft of ede and ‘their guests attended a SOLD BY ALL LEADING DEALERS
coat? watts hud a full ait, oad k short TELEVISION ¢ : es ‘ the Star Tiger and the Star Ariel, reception at “Merton,” Spooners .
gestion of this week is the bolero lined with printed silk to as dinleee “ath sntcicenin CRATES, both of which disappeared in the Hill, the residence of Mr. and REPRESENTATIVES
full-length coat illustrated, In an match the shirt, The shirt's scarf Informal nome wes tar t 7 met, Me = Mrs. E, D. Mottley T GEDDES GRANT LTD., BRIDGETOWN
unusual seaweed green net, it has collar could be tied a@s’.a Shantune narem ents, Vilk » 1€ loss of the two Tudors led The couple received many
“lampshade” sleeves and ‘a vol- cravat. coats. Persian Inspire emer to the Ministry banning them as beautiful and useful gifts from easier?
uminous skirt, - Ay Pe AM lp Soe ’ sgPassenger carriers. their friends and well wishers
; For those who like something om ee Wi eect 4 - — = (Bitte nectnriomntnnningieionenen haan pon id « we ae ~
For a sophisticated version of unusual came light-weight jackets mee my Mostess Car ‘te $ 9O0OOO9OO 600007
the traditional “hostess-gown,” in modernistic patterns inspired Se eee ®
* : » sl tape ei 1 (above oe x
the new quilted satins will be by contempor: art trends, One Une Cannas Gite Rates sebaver > e 4
fashionable, Outstanding amongst in white wove boucle had an neck and sleeveless blouse bots g ®
5 : ” in navy blue The reversinty > / 3
those seen at another show was irregular black “scribble’’ pattern, coolie coat combines er noner g 9 v $
the button-through “coat-dress”, Hip-length, it was worn with a | in pink and chartreuse, the tron) . é
; : . ay, i tted with sparkling rhineston« S ®
Ballet-length, it was in black slim black barathea dress, \ ie Bil) buttons. " are > 2
London xp a >
ce P as ae a nr [ei Hold your Heinekens up to é
» Protects your gum 6
y — x at oe the light—it’s erystal clear $
, ; ; ells a Stor - ©
» Fights tooth decay eas 2 y ° t $
3 ..good anytime, anywhere. ®
e Freshens your mouth Backache, Rheumatic Pain Relieved g ; ; 3
: na ® because quality fells! $
wardening, painting, odd jobs round the house can 4



be a pleasure again when you afe?tee from backache,

theumatic pains, stiff, aching muscles and joints, lum- Q ;
bago or common urinary troubles due to iuapurities - :

in the blood. Where ever you are, let



3 Why not get happy relief by taking Doan’s Backache
Kidney Pills. They help the kidneys to rid the blood
of excess uric acid and other impurities which other-



9004



“Make mine a Heinekens”



wise might collect in the system and cause distress.

HALF A CENTURY of success in relieving ailments due to inadequate
kidney action is the proud record of Doan’s Pills. Grateful men and
women of all ages use and recommend this efficient diuretic and tirinary
antiseptic to their friends and neighbours,

be your guarantee for com-







plete enjoyment.



“PRRTE WEIR

and



8, 1/3
2/9
5/-

Ask your
Dealer for

clear
pure
because it’s

HEINEKEN’S

Gi citer ,
Ceaily Cue

use Palmolive Soap as Doctors advised
for a Brighter, Fresher Complexion!

Dostors prove thet Palmolive Soon
remarkably in many ways. Oily skin
skin wonderfully brighter

Backache Kidney Pills









if you feel worn out, depressed, of
generally run down a glass or two a day of
Buckfast Tonic Wine will quickly restore lost
energy and tone up the whole nervous system,
Giving new vitality it fortifies you against fever
and exhaustion and remember, Buckfast Tenle
Wine is especially valuable after illness.

can improve complexiors
cooks less cily—dull, drab
“looking skin appeors finer

POSS 7 PDO-YGOOOM

Coar

Ty
<4







y bottle today ;
} | Wash with Polmolive Soap, > M wasn @ $

So, do as 36 skin specialists 2 For 60 seconds manege wih E r N ~ >
advised m=. 5 solt, lovely lather, q BR .

e a / i $

3 Do this 3 times @ dey for 14 x :

days .

©



\ * i \ 4





SUNDAY, DECEMBER 28, 1952 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE THIRTEEN





HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON |
ewer) |












A REMINDER
BUY

BANISHES
CONSTIPATION
OVERNIGHT



Agents n JASON JONES & CO LTD
OPO SOD SEALE PSL PLE £
‘ ‘
3 %
R Rg
$ $
2 g
» <
. al 7 VOM x

IS THE FINES! *
REMEDY FOR y

RHEUMATIC
PAINS

DAGWOOD -- COOKIE WHY DIONT YOU 2 =
AND ALEXANDER , AND HERE || ea CONSULT ME BEFORE
AND T ALL NEEDED sp SARE THE BILLS | 142%) MAKING A BIG y~ 4
Ss (FOR YOU TO PAY | | Ssh (PURCHASE LIKE )-7 wy
1 THATEW SSS
zn rt ge >










BISCUITS
TO-DAY.



Don’t be without a bot-

tle—it’s a real standby

SLLSCSESE CESS



On Sale at .
5 KNIGHTS’ Drug Stores
: y SOCCOCEEGOSOCOU OOOO
pul

SPECIAL OFFERS AVAILABLE MONDAY TO WEDNESDAY AT ALL BRANCHES
: Eases SS ————— -



STOP WHIMPERING/
UST TELL ME WHERE DB










. Seitst : —

Usually Now We take this opportunity in wishing everyone
/ PEAS Tins es .. § 49 $ 45
Ge SAUSAGES Oxford & Cambridge .. 69 60

L xfore ambridge i i A Very Happy and
Bp.) EVAPORATED MILK ‘a's 30 27
MACARONTE ,..cccccccscvesesveres Al 38
: Prosperous 1953
JZ FRYS COCOA... cece eee eeeeee 51 A6
BEER CARIB ..... oe esa ee .24 21 GOOD LUCK



Paes. iad Poker ae Rita be a eS ee



4 JOHNNY HAZARD BY FRANK ROBBINS

NO TIR M/SIEU/ WE ‘AVE

BEEN WELL TAKEN CARE OF
BY MA/MSELLE SHERMAN/S
YOU ‘AVE ZE DINNER WEEZ
HER AT EIGHT! AU REVOIR!



MILL BEER HOLLAND’S BEST

PREFERRED FOR ITS FLAVOUR AND ol O7 EIR
obtainable at all wholesalers and retailers

LU SAPR PR DN PNM DN GN ON DNDN NTN DN IN NINN NIN NINN "WON DROS DNDN DN DS INN N IN DS DNDN NNN DN DN DNDN INS Ne



aN

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FOR STRENGTH

igi

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55S PEON PAS



ATHAN | | SPARE ME YOUR OPINIONS, JESSICA!) YOU'VE NEVER YOU'RE GOING THERE NOW
CAN } | I'LL SEE THAT SNIVELING ,__—~" SPARED ME OR BUT, UNCLE HARRY, MR
| | FOOL IN HiS OWN OFFICE! a, ANYONE ELSE! SOME | | FIELD HAS A BAD
| |THAT WILL SPUR HIM TO
PAY UP... pe

YOU'RE; ae

eal 3
ig &

( DAY YOU'LL PAY FOR | |HEART! THIS MIGHT ) T
THIS KILL HIM! A

ZYAX

-
a
2

WENGEA

z
3

7%

en
#2

GEAR Pa os Sat

a
PASSAGE.HES
ENTITLED To
Te ae a

ISHES. 2
7 r ere ren =

| C.F. HARRISON & CO. (earsavos) Ltd. | &
P.O. BOX 304 |
BARBADOS |



ON INE SAE SAR LAN GAG PA PA BEGAN SR A FW PA BAG SANA GA EN BN SNS A SR SB GS NN A NS NN A AN

x
a



2, BF WE WE NG WE SEN WZ NE WZ WANG NENG NZ WE WB NZ ZZ WANA US CANE WE WZ WB NEWS NE WZ NNN AVA ANY

2

ie





PA



POURTEEN SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 28, 1952

CLASSIFIED ADS.







a

LONDON CH: EMBER OF CREAR a RSS

TEN GREAT DISCOVERIES SINCE PENICILLIN EXAMINATIONS, 1955



















anaes Forms of entry uw bove examinations ma be obtains
TELEPHONE = 2508 from the Department of Education, Garrison
a ENTRY FEES :
J | Elementary Stage—for each single subject $ 1.63
eMORL FOE %. aL k ;
iN MEMORIAM | t Certificate Stage—ior each single subject except Foreign
| & Languages ° 2.28
a 4 . Fo ich Foreign Language 4.00
RAS NESTER Y :
€ ‘ t ter ee | AUTOMOTIVE ’ School Certificate of Commercial Education 12.00
rv Higher Stage—for each igle subject, except Foreign
STREPTOMYCIN CORTISONE & ACTH Langua 3.00
Discovered in 1944. The first successful 1948. First hospital tests showed bot! Forms must be completed and returneq to the Honorary Secre-
treatment for tuberculous meningiti Now

to be highly effective in the relief of rheuma tary, Lecal
toid arthritis. Since proved to be extremely F
valuable in the treatment af eye disorders



ation Cammittee, Londen Chamber of Commerce
of Education, Garrison, together with a copy of th

the standard treatment for certain other
types of TB Also effective against
pneumonia, septicaemia

CHLOROMYCETIN

1947. Effective against typhoid, typhus



the Departme



3
and sther complaints Birth/Baptismal Certifieate and the fees on or before Wednesday,
31st December, 1952

TERRAMYCIN Department of Education,







pneumonia, whooping cough, meningitis. che By Ro A ge Water tae manne - fs — : —_—— be
Can be given in tablet form by mouth plaints : HOMESTUDY COURSES FOR
04s. Eftoctive aga nat virus pneumonia, ae ene VACCINE } GENERAL CERTIFICATE of EDUCATION
spotted iever, heart intections, also given by 952. é first hopeful sign that | C
mouth lmmiunigauon against infaatile st On CAMBRIDGE SCHOCL & HIGHER SCH. CERT.
VITAMIN B 12 be possible. any cases have almost Maal for Oxford, can Univers Souroaey ACR RS above examina-
. certainly been prevented in America this ‘also for London L Vaiversity Degrees: A. ACr: RSA Bar, and other
1948. Now the standard treatment for year in the biggest-ever outbreas of polio } 100 ie Tutors. 22,000
Bernicious anwmia

Se ALLO. meng, Prospect leas: aeavon
WOLSEY HALL, OXFORD saan

Briuish firms oave towad at tw § PING NOTICES
e © too easy to Muke pruilis by HIP
, f f coe iat monutacturing UG. Usccveres
v1 26.12.52--In. | ajoining Royal Yae hub under licence or by wo % but —SS
; So. wal 1.20-+t-2.9 their own commereia) pruvgsses “ROYAL NETHERLANDS |

EE HILE ON SEA We - - aa
Christ Church, Dial 3065 | BLANKETS—Canadian Baby Blankets eer nen American ST ip co
12.52—6n. | au $1.60 each. Reversible ;
~- —————— | olour Baby Blanket ‘ i Pink When economies have had \ } STEAMSH! EUROPE The M/V “‘Caribbee” will ac-
MANHATTAN—Fiat 1, Welches.| 2.01 « I Blanket for ,



ISONIAZID

1952. Tests so far show it to be
apparently effective against certain forms i
of TB. Five

b

NEOMYCIN

1949. Effective against pneumonia.
meningitis, and eye infections



% cleansing charge, IN ADVANCE. Dia

8 1.11.52~--t.f.1 a -_ ‘
————-=> ANTIQUES — Of every description
Doâ„¢more, Bri 3 Cross Roac iass, China, old Jewels. fine Siive
d dinnmg roon three bed atercolours. Early books, Maps, Autc
t an@ bat Now vVaeant aphs ete., at Gorringes Antique Sh«









at Por 0
" j
vi ' “ t
Ww thers we er : “Jer
F
-d or } F r ;
Fugene Robinson ‘mot ies SEM ee Ea ae Sa
—— ELECTRICAL,
BARPETE ’ mory f
cde ther. I vy I ‘ tt ée st i Speed Automatic Record
fe ep ¢ Dec b 2t 1952 € lutte
E bere * tulle. & ( ita
ie tfr
V t iantt \
FOR KENT ;
HOUSES SUPPIES— (E jer 7 weeks ol
“PARAWAY—Bully furnished 3 bead-| °° ‘* ee ee ee
roam house, St. Philip coast. Lightin | et
lant, Watermill suppiy. Carport, 2 — ~~
Servant rooms. Monthly rent 960 plu MISCELLANEOUS








n ¢ v be made, laboratory VE a M.S. HERA 19th December, 1952 {{ «ept Cargo and Passengers for
The Moderr H A | h as yl which might have S.S. COTTICA 26th December, 1952 } \} Dominica, Antigua, the a’
. , ah taeneeeeie = jan . M.S. NESTOR 8th January, 1953 Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing 3rd.

gone wi Ong new discoveries, have bee !.S. HELENA 16th January, 1953. January 1953.











' Rer ver, br t ad treet
; first to be cut. cATRE 9s ? r |
; , M.& BONAIRE 23rd Janugry, 1953.

ps with medical ‘The geriickiliing pov 5 BONS ane ioe |4% The M/V “Moneka” will accept

x i ‘ our research in Britain chloromycetin aure< i M.S.ORANJESTAD 30th December, 1952. | }}) Cargo and Passengers ior Dom-
rom | r t t Garage | »eaorted € $5.00 ¢ The Modern : ‘ terramyein. and isonia SAILING TO TRINIDAD, PARAMARIBO } inica, Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis

Ser i ant, Water | 2) oppe, Broad Street \ sinee the war ? discovered tn the labo: AND BRITISH GUIANA 1a a8 Reais Salling #h Janu-
om « v. Mant wis plus #3 2 52 7 ia 3. STED ce er, 52. ary, ad

. ® ADVANCE. Dial] —— a. dams: There have been ten private firms in América M.S. STENTOR 26th December, 1952 y





S.S. COTTICA 12th January, 1953.
tfn COOPER'S AERSOL FLYSPRAYS e1 en

. fac . In the case of sirep'« in M.S. NESTOR 23rd January, 1953. B.W.I. SCHOONER OWNERS’
major discoveries since asia * ar a a6 mar a inane $ IAT INC,

y Vinita nundreds of our best men have There is always # jong, upnili Which was _diseovere M.S. BONAIRE 9th February, 1983, ASSOCIATION, | (INC.)
penicillin. Run your eye university, firms chipped | SAILING TO TRINIDAD & CURACAO ‘onsignee, Dia '
again down the list above up the U.S discoveries of sts already dominated by nearly one ae a v1 a s ere sed a! ames only)
to see how important they ‘cortisone and ACTH alone the \Americans, who, through towards its early clinical (rials M.S.'HELENA 2nd February, 1959.

are This galling situation entails heir etary re. Dave been in at The only way Britain ca! S. P. MUSSON, SON & CO. LTD.,
much more than loss of prestige te Who Ng vane tes’ Gritaan!

wardness in this field ? The
: 4 1 scientists? No. U.S.

in the case of Vitamin B12 The Government is driven to experts ant. that, the quality
was Britain even in the race import supplies of the new of British ‘

- - }eures quick death to Flies, Mosquitoes.
ushed or unturnished,| Cockroach, Obdtainable from all leadin
Apply at “Belfield | Stores in two sizes 12 oz. $3.50, 6 07
28.12.52-—In. | $2.16.
- | 29. 10. “2

WANTED EVENING COATS — For the Cool

evenings In a variety of colour also
| white $15.00
Dress Shopp




been fully occupied in following fight two compete in the expor





ve in Acer.







id Keep #1 the initt




Every one of them was There is usually a huge loss

made first in America. Only money pack





oO The Modern
oad Street





cal” research | s by inves







1G medical science is



BAGS of gold and



ae eat ma i Canauian National Steamships






























~—a * . ¥ hie drugs from America while the rene! sai

SFRVANTS—E : equins, brocade also bengaline and [his list Is too long to be British aashitehinres ake hatehine. Cae re tt ‘On Wcitne to population than the America ish eee aeaaais! oe
and reliable Park Maal e Re Gh de ae tiene tte k aie xplained away as a Suc- 1), ’ attri r aa rer SOUTHBOUND Sails Sails _Artives ate are.
5 pm. th Dec ) he Modern Dress Shoppe, Brc lad Street ‘SS of lucky breaks like , “fact that our scient ists are “: Montreal Balifax Barbados Barbados Demerara
oe in 38.18. 03-—Sn ah ‘disc | CDN. CONSTRIC10R = 16 Dec. 25 Dee. 26 Dec. 30 Dec.

iven the same “chanze to to



‘ CDN. CHALLENGER - 30 Deg, 8 Jan. 8Jan. 13 Jan
SUBSCRIBE now to the Datly Telegraph,

| England's lead:ng Daily Newspaper now
MISCELLANEQUS “ ng in Barbados by Air only a few
‘8 after publication in London, Contact
\tan Gale c/o Advocate Co., Ltd. Loca!

the chance discovery which ’ om F
gave us penicillin Refused | mice dladiverlaa we tHetr Teams needed CDN. CHALLE os fe ate ait vis
rhe truth is that the Amcri- Bee ee there _ Brew Britisn. CDN. CONSTRUCTOR . a ae yen ces. Bek, 10 Fed,



cans have got our medical
scientists on the run.



ave t mud > CDN. CHALILENGER _- 10 Feb, 19 Feb 19 Feb. 24 Feb
Rees wuae Seo tee CDN CRUISER - 24 Feb 5 Mar. 5 Mar. 10 Mar

makes Ge — Shoe-string





joint










3 5 . . 7 CDN. CONSTRUCTOR : 10 Mar, 19 Mar. 19 Mar, 24 Mar.
WATCH DOGS—One or two strong | Representative, Tei, 3113.) they nave produced so many because dollars cannot be spare HERE ure far fe rd University so th CON. Cone Seneca * # ats; See ee ke ee
watch dogs, preferabl months old of 4.03—t.2.p iew drugs in the last seven years to import all that is needed Real ectantiate r ecan work full-time
over Colony Club, Dial 0107 : 1 -

SCALES-_500Ih Platform Scak tuoay shat Briliah scientists have been rhis happened with strepto- in. Many of ch for “ wonder drugs. Th | NORTHBOUND Sails Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives































2 2.62--3 tt to . aur Y is ne: g 3 is the right sort of gesiure bu | » Demerara Barbados Barbades St. John Halifax
24.12, 69 land dusabia: The Genseai Ageran Gas Jevouing most of their time to mycin and aureomycin. It is pest are working on shoestring Reka y eaitnn Sars | CDN CRUISER 40 Dee. 26 Dec. 27 Dee. § Jan 7 Jan.
* | B’dos Ltd 16.1 12n atching up. ‘ happening now with terramycin budgets. , timan" to: proes auies |} €DN.CONSTRUCTOR |. ‘3Jan. 6Jan, 7Jan. 19 Jan,
*=ERS E ’ ro As each promising U.S. drug and cortisone. The Government is partly (o hep (0 DI aus yesus | CDN. CHALLENGER 17Jan. 2 Jan! 21 Jan, 2 Jan, 31 Jan.
ERSQNA 4 iE th NOTICES comes out, the Medical Research Scores of people owe Weir lame for failing w= invest The day OF ee backroom dis CDN. CRUISER $1 Jan 4 Feb. 12 Feb. 14 Feb.
Ay 4) ete Ze er + covery, like eming's Ck ‘DN. CONST "Te re ‘eb, 26 Feb.. 28 Feb
) Ye ounci] stages huge nough money. in a 1 CDN. CONSTRUCTOR i4 Feb. 18 Feb el
4 4 teals to confirm the eens 7 nedical research, is passing oan the og ‘a an | CDN, CHALLENGER 28 Feb 4 pias, uy Mar. a¢ Mar.
The + e are hereby warned against aN sia ’ American claims. | At the State ex- are now ing made by pr | CDN. CRUISER 14 Mar I 18 Mar 6 Mar. ar.
giving « t to my wife RETA TRQT OF CHRIST CHURCH Scores of our best by | pemnene: station teams cf scientists And ho | CDN. CONSTRUCTOR .. 28 Mar. 31 Mar. 4 Apr. 12 Apr. vo
MAN (nee Daniel) as 1 do. not. hold to Dairy Keepers, Etc doctors and | t Clevedon, Somer- teams of engineers are needed CDN. CHALLENGER 11 Apr. 14 Apr. 18 Apr. 25 Apr. ‘ay
‘aay, responyie. sab her ay aaxeye stration and Re-registration of all sclentists are where a search to race them into production ae : .
cle Sontractinis any debt OF a ‘bt a DATRiES Person employed in the switched vo experi- s being made for a ‘The lesson of Britain's for further particulars, apply to—

luction of Milk for sale, and Persons ments aimed 4

ivplus Milk for sale; under finding out more
of Health under Dairies about the drug—its | PINCHER
mm ill tak
|

Sanitars plage precise nature. and

signed by me

penicillin-type dru decline in medical re
JOSEPH TROTMAN

ese ic! | GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents.








effective agains applies to all fields of s
iberculosis, there endeavour. The surest

teat tap it a aSRERER NERS EN ERE

quality is excellent;

Chemists und engineers in lives to ine | generosity | of ngir seqpe pathetic. FP Pa RA chet A & TO ALL OUR CUSTOMERS AND FRIENDS z
industria : =

Shop Hill es
st or '





5 Inspectors
25 2—2n k

now it works in the
body.

ffice Oistin, Christ Church; from Friday

Janua 1953, betw the hours of

00 a.m, and 3.00 p except on Satur-

: whe Registration etc will take

ce between the hours of 9.00 a.m
1 12.00 o'clock noon

E order of Commissioners of Health







PURLIC SALES





designing expensive plant to free supplies of drugs which !owever. where comparison with the laboratori





firms spend months American friends who sent aver in the industrial firms and w WE EXTEND 3

nake it. British doctors could not get, America shows up worst. new.

Therm by the time they huve When our manufacturing London Expre

















































































m6 LARRiER
1. LASHLEY,
MAUGHN
McKECKNEY
MOORE, Doreen
MOORE, Jovee
MORRIS, Angela
NORVILLE, Candace

dent of LI, Mission
Sunday Night, December
GOVERNMENT HILL S
Speaker—Pastor W. W. Weithers. Sub- |
ject: RUSSIA AND PROPHECY

the nature and priority thereof re-
otherwise such persons will
ided from the benefit of tt
ind be depr.ved of al
aid propert
Oo noti 1 that they
d Court on Wed:

wings and
the elevators
and rudder aft
the tail.
Taking you
w the cockpit,














Lopdon Express Service



A_specia! Old Year's Service will be |



he then shows





speaker service



v Fet 5 held at the King Street Seventh-gay |
PERCH, Moreen i us 3 ; bruar ' Ris a you the con- Adventist Chureh Building beg.nning
"HTLLIP ere See ae oe t : 7.15 p.m. on Wednesday, December 31

PHILLIPS, Cor be ked trol column, me: n e
POWER, Alwyn : through which you move Une HARBOUR AND 1952. The aker for the , wil



RAE, Claudette ber eee eee surfaces, If you move it 10 be Pastor W. W. Weithers, and all



48. RIDLEY Monic ,

F. G. TALMA, the right the aileron on the

YOU'RE SHIPPING NEWS cordially invited to attend

a Miueet et teteee Clerk of the Assistant Court starboard, or right wing, will go
5 Js a 8 of Appeal

$1. THOMAS, Cynt! up and the one on the port. or



SOROS OOOO OOO OE,
22.11 .52—3n IN THE

left wing, will go down. If the

















°
f Parsh of Christ Chureh ut the new drug on the market, plants floally start up there are Only way Our A st “Wishes for the Season
REAL ESTATE (Sed.) H. StG. WARD, . B'S. "scientists “have produced fsually royalties to pay to the y J ¢ i =e
foe re aie ae another winner, and the chase US patent holders. Or we INCE the war, the S
HOUSE-—Situated on the beach at aoe a to catch up begins al! over have to rely on British branches dollar shortage has ;
Sones atts arey. to K, R. Hunte,| Torice TO D 4 ERS & MILK again. of U.S. firms to build the plants restricted the sale of S
Telephon or 46 ie hea a In the tast three years —and take the profit. U.S. products here. So man Established T
stable tt is herew.th published for genera) P HERBERT LTD
* formation that under the Dairy Regula- 1860 ’ Incorporated
AUCTION | ions of 1948, it is required that certia- | ————————____. __________ —— P f Map nents ree eee Tet 10 and 11 ROEBUCK STREET & MAGAZINE LANE.
2s issued during 1952 be surrendered e =
UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER © the Commissioners of Health during Wve
he month of January 1953, when re-
egistering of the dairies for that year’ BoYsS AND GIRLS MEET HERE 7 ~S =
By instructons received from the| must be done on ‘or before the filth day | oa Te
Insurance Co., I will sell on Tuesday,| .f Januar : ey : |
December SOth 1952, at Messrs. Courtesy Persons granted permits to dispose of . ae | . 77. Y a
Garage, Whitepark "Road (1) 1950 A-40! .irpius milk, along with milk vender Sinceré W oa A B h
Austin Car (damaged in aceldent).| yho have obtained licenses are also ré 7. ; mecere snes or Tg t
Terms Cash vitae? duleorn red to renew. their permits and
if D : ' licenses. “
Auctioneer forms of application for registration } . and Prosper OUus 1953
24.12.52—3n be obtained from the Sanitation De- BETHEL METHODIST CIRCUIT | J
aie aoe ment of St, Michael ~
J. M. KIDNEY, BETHEL METHODIST CIRCUIT | ( EN ] RAL EMPORII IM
EDUCATIONAL Cominissloniges’ of Hitatih 7 . BETHEL—11 a.m. Rev. T. J. Furley ;
ommissione Pa 2 " ; . cL. an ev. oy
St. Michael. mY tcl ol r | dish 7 p.m. Reception Service. (March of
5 SEC 7.12,52—4n Le . o>: * . Witness) B r d & T: d S
LY? cH’s SE ONDARY SCHOOL | __ Sea oe a NN ale lt Cnr. Broa udor Streets
SPRY 8 7 p.m. Mr. C. Brathwaite. °
ame follow Dg r anette ; h ave gained OFFICIAL NOTICE ¢ y T ig \ | sta y , BELMONT —11 a 7 Mr. I Blackman, | SSS
IDR a tile eho tae tne tne { I : ) . , “fey Mage age be SS SS
1963 es RBADOS ee —and AR N y ty 1 x shout DISTRIGT_® én a, | ROPES TOSS POPSPPP OEE EAP PFPO eT
EA tm i aadline”' Hennheadin PREC, wn 0, sm |
AL , Joar / EAL F.ROVIDENCE a.m, Mr. G. Jones, | ¢ ‘f e
3. BARROW, Dorothy (Equitable Jurisdiction), \ p.m. Harvest Cantata, 7 p.m. Rev. F.|& THE BLEND THAT HELD THE SWAY ¥%
4. BATES, Shirley \ROLD ARTHUR MARSHALL t e Vivian (Harvest Festival) iy ~
5. RAY Audrey Plasto VAUXHALL—11 a.m. Rev. F. Vivian, |¢ r
6 a Ace ae Senate ROLD VINCENT WORRELL i p.m. Mr.G Brewster 3 AT THE %
7. BLACKMAN, Wilma Defendant. ¥ TAY INT - x
8. BRATHWAITE, Coral Y pursuance of an Order in. this by DEREK DEMPSTER AVIAN hse ANNUA ST E:
9.. BRATHWAITE, Pearline | t in the above action made on the MORAVIAN ies iNt U L 1 DUSTRIAL EXHIBITION %
10. ROWEN, Ouida | 1 day of November, 1952, 1 give UT yourself in the Duke ot ROEBUCK STREET—9 Mor |? r -EG M4
2URKE, Fsthe t.ce to all 8 ‘ ) estate eae , Ra SRE
a, soseee te | Cae oe i nereaee Jaton aay sain, Edinburgh's shoes at White Service, Preacher! “Rev. OEE. New: | J.D. 7. SPECIAL RUM %
18. BYNOF, Maleita brance affecting all that certain Waltham airfield the other ene Te ee me 8 With ae Pee %
1 ‘ADD oulse ce o parcel of land situate at Salters i a f y 7
Oe ee a sn nance! ok and situate ai Salter: day, You are about to take your GRACE Hui — 11 a.m. Moming | (With the Distinctive Flavour) :
16. DARLINGTON, Sheila esaid containing by admeasurement first flying lesson Sap a, ay gn I * omaha : : , , .
DARL Si con tall + admeasureme *sson. S 2z) 7 p.m. Evening Service, Preacher: Mr. | § IS TOPS. TRY IT JURS' x
a _ Noe Ma Ve eee) ri ee oa. tithes “fifths Grek In R.A.F. language this ght will Y ou RE IN D. Culpepper. | $ Bl : 1 ; ‘ . i ,Y OURSELF %
19 EVELYN . ding on lands now or late of J #°,,Suee {n your pilot's log book as THE COCKPIT FULNECK=11 e < 1% ended & Bottled by
20. FIELDS, Cy: nman on lands now or late of E perience. S , Besecher: IEE. FG. Dewnbs Udllowed (t ; .
A Rae Soe ata ll ek | AMR SR Sou ae going wo a crit daatne, Sree ae ~=— JOHN D. TAYUCR & SONS LID
a GLASGOW. dir | Massiah and on a private road te eq as a dard elementary RA P trainer Service, Preacher: Mr Francis %
7REEN, Ol ? 1 there is i MONTGOMERY 7 pom ing |%
2%. GRIFFITH, Jc y to the public road or however els e de Havilland Chipmunk 4 eee ‘ 1% ‘k Str ig ‘
# GRIFFITH, Joo <{0, the public road or however els Piichibieutenant Gari! femeey Gordon Service, Preacher: Mr. A. Phillip % Roebuck Street Dial 4335
26. HEADLEY, Julia | cefere me an’ account of their said claims shows you round it He tells you i is an HEthe TIF a Gee on Robebetatnbbbonaasenncseeessaainnil 4
2%. HOWARD, Pauline } their witnesses, documents and all-metal low-wing monoplane and that GROP HILLSE wim, Bening Gervice:| PPLLPELLLL LLCS SPD SDSS PEPLESOPPSOSSSE
28 eee Alice | hers, to be exam ned by me on o oe is a de Havilland Gipsy Major Preacher: Mr. ¥. Q. @mith.- |
i n or Pridays setween a
| 2 (noon) and 3 o'clock in the rer EVENT ar yEN
sie” | 2caiee of 1 Fepa) ahd © o'einee in We itl tien. leads you round the alreraft SEVENTH PAxy ADVENTIST
f cONES 83 © Assistant Court of Appeal at th ing con- Sunday Night, December 28, 7.15 p.m. |
= tetas Sete as) 3 . ONES aren eee meraEe the trol surfaces. KiNG STREET S. D. A. CHURCH ]
war 1 in order that Speaker—Pastor M. G. Nembhard, Presi
35. KING, Pearl claims may be ranked according The ailerons on ‘ I ’ c papi

























|
.s
52. TURTON, Mor S neces Franklyn D. R.. Confident * |
Parents/Guardiat ' ‘ column § moved to, the Meth the AIR t Sli. mate Bie Oe ee ne SEA VIEW GUEST
rou.4 : ailerons reverse eir pos . Lewis arion Belle olfe, Frances 4 |
ore nel “as ene | OFFICIAL SALE When you pull the contro! as Os 5 Lacille M. Smith, Philip H |
Mt WO an RRADOS column back the elevators, will Motes RESET ieseihees Gs Se HOUSE
A D. PORDE tN THE ASSISTANT COUR : move up ey will go down Chipmunk ‘vice VI saa = “4 ,
Headmaster. | APPEAL Cam when you push it forward. mee euice Vl Sipe Rig. venkins Bphery HASTINGS, BARBADOS |
2.5 | (Equitable Jurisdiction) snkins Roberts, 12 tons, u . ‘ aily and Longterm Rates
~ |SAROLD “ARTHUR MARSHALL READY TO START . Tecan Ghee soe’ honts waded: on accor
r o be i ae Plaintut . \. E. Harris & C Lta |
PPSISOSIO IGS SIOISSOS9OH, | LANOLD VINCENT WORRELL > : ; bursts into life. Once ft is warm ich Wek GOdan WA Coke “drome it Permanent Guests |
: ‘ x! Defendan& 2 Moor ure whe and your instiuct nas im nder Captain M. King. Agents 7 |
Select your Chocolates from . YOTICE is hereby given that A wean Orease: Vecdin B f ovr i “7 se aitea! ‘ po Schoonet ,; San = > it~ c a awe Dianes ana Cemtels
the following:— B | Apia oct of the Assistant Court o! they do not work in jes out to the iuke-off ooint, |}. Sch. PRilip WM. Bapidson, $7 tons. tr Partiés arranged
BLACK MAGIC % P Sone - « a h A " s Feo renes the same Way as the handlebars ere the h 1V08 ie ptish Guiana under < apta c Sens ;
POT-OF-GOLD & | nek thas tbe autea ne oe ot a bicgele, It you Bush une ch protects jou from the |S? signed ee Rmoenar ' Owoes J. H. BUCKLAND
°HERRIES in s a} a tae one o aaa meht pedal forwar the rudder rushing wir. turns to face the | ve c Service VIII ot =r ietor
OMARASCHINO & Court House: Briwetewt moves to the right. and the wind and takes off. | Poin O2 2. Service Vill. 130. ton Proprie —
WELCOME % en the ho of 12 (noon) and elepiape will go to the .cight OVER | Martin Doorly & Co, Ltd PPLELEE PFPA AP OPS
. —. “ r afternoon on Friday Plight-Lieutenant Gordon uiso
[ge mire % Februa 1953, all that shows you the inst ruments you YOU TAKE
rs AZEL NUT s piece or parcel of land situate will have to watch and* the
FRY’S PEPPERMINT x in the parish of Saint George hrottle und flap levers. ITHIN a fewseconds = | ;
LUXURY % i : tenes at by The great moment arrives. the Chipmunk its air \y We Wish Our
Â¥ , iremer veteen = perches ant You put on your grey-blue borne and climbing | s
Also ‘ t perch or thereabouts > ‘i ) |
‘ ee i ’ veralls und parachute and away to fly over Reading, ° j Bia a e i ;
YARDLEY'S SETS > T. Mlenmas tan tate Sowa limb inty the front seat. Your Henley, Marlow. and Windsor, Customers & Friends To our customers and friends we send our hearty
4711 COLOGNE SETS % E. St. H lands now or late nstructor helps you with your Once you have got used to the wishes for a toyous seaso May you have a; New
XMAS CARDS u \inelia t ad on a private 4 vy Straps and climbs 1 sensation Flight - Lieutenant y oat: r :
os and > feet wide over which there is « mck seal. Rendy to sta Gordon oe you te take over a ear filled with promise.
> . AE | f e. 4 the public road or Flient - Lieutenant Gordon the controls, At first you fi
Many Other XMAS GIFTS X else the s ; ; xo Mant t oul raigh a
¥ € abut and to he cockpit deck. 1 it difficult to Keep straight an
N ¥| en sold the said ive twat evervthing is ali level, But within a few minutes °
a CARLTO! BROWNE 3. eigen UP for ele on Svary He sets the throttle and hi you begin to get the idea, ew ear
ou this chatty cena ee fe sure that all ts clea: Your instructor then taxes 3
Wholfesie & Retafl ae _fgnet aid for a sum t on the me over once Sem Dee ae ee SLI JASONS
2M Dat 4 Gt Steines. ai 14 shouts “Cc ’ White Waltham and lands. Your i}
Drug | F FG. TALM re ae st p the “ar e first fli was fun. It whetted ROBE S GENERAL SUPPLIES
%§ 62813 Dial .-: 136 Roebuck St. 3 Ag. € e Assistant Court Laster te and the engine your appetite for more, & CO. —High Street
“‘ | of Appea
PPOSFOS SSS FO SOF OAS IOC?

3



SSS









a ,

i





SUND:

AY. DECEMBER 28,

1952



goes out VOLT-FISHING Teese 2»

‘Pike a yard long rushed
towards my electric net’

HUNGERFORD, Berks,

Tuesday.
HIS picture shows
the most effective
piece of river-fishing
tackle ever devised. Using
it for only 20 minutes on
the River Dunn at Hunger-
ford today I caught 25 fat
trout, a dozen pike, and a

seore of fine grayling.

The tackle js all-electric.
A converted motor - cycle
engine drives a dynamo
Semera ting direct current.

steel chain dangling from

tun canine of ine boat feeds the
current into the water. A second

cable from the dynamo leads to pulled by magnetism. When I





a long-handied seoop made of
wire netting. z

gone Se current passes
the chain to the scoop
tieetrifying the water—and any
fish im the vicinity.

For some reason not wget
understood the fish are driven
wresistibly towards the scoop
and can lifted out.

I saw plump, 4ib. trout and
yard4iong pike rush from their
haunts im the weeds as though

CHAPMAN PINCHER



ACHIEVEMENT

When the scoop is dipped in tested
the water the circuit is i trying to ‘ear a hank of
wet the

SCOPTISH Selentists are test-

SUNDAY ADVOCATE





The eves Delay Over
h ea Legal Aid
ave it- Scheme

if Built rHERE, 3 eldeup ne,

Edited by





1951 i] .
S not expected
nearly four months

in August
report

ontl

tale) Iz Pesteuma et
ing it for possible use in com- .Berfiman who has
mercial sea fishing. scares of students

. ss Half the student
DUTCH experts who witnessed stan some Enea

tested





re void

Jani te th
Irom a 7 -

















ote tests are considering “ ws a : ome
it in lifeboats so that ‘A0OTA\« wn a musatt ned tees i
shipwrec ed people need not go “*" sen tioned =< ire creeping
hungry or thirsty, The juices of 800" “Deir crime The others gal aid i till out
an uncooked fish can safely Toor - ta tel Bit in PR Ing of nine out of eve
slake human thirst. “Th, ee , Bx; h es he prear befor
The purpose of the haul was told they « SCS ware cour
to remove cannibalistic pike ard Pitiey su ould ke _ the mones SECOND. the cost of going t
nanae ra — rob the jnierrogators who did not know too high for the rage |
gamer sre which were the “criminals THIRD, the tortuou orkir
All the trout—more than 300 While each student wa 1e law ‘ ire ott
ke rOhauaere film recorded his ey yndamental Magn
unha ater. nknown to hum na ‘2
The 160 pike and coarse fish cent students’ eve ik na
were transferred alive to a near- but 75 per cent oO i ono man will we
by canal to provide sport for a ied hevedtod gules by a . € right
fishing club—that is all except ible shiftiness.



ene fat grayling which I knocked
on the head for my supper

10.000 Weekiy



“e : An elephant

never forgete..

STOMACH
PAINS

DUE TO INDIGESTION
Try just ONE DOSB
ef MACLEAN BRAND
STOMACH POWDER! This
scientifically balanced forriula
—- relieves Stomach Pains

Heartburn, Nausea
@ Acidity due to Indigestion.

(Cae rae]

2 oo

Stemach
& Naas to

rVÂ¥ias

Bridgetown







LYD.,



Growing down












fe YOU BEGIN to get smaiie: tt eek ee eRe:
nmediately after you ha NOLNGL SeeRS POs ton of a ho
e i vour full sta > which hat somebody else occupic
usu y hap y tine ¢ u An bour is worried
we 20, Bir gham Univer \ blesome dog next door
ipeiors have discovered exnployee feels that he h be
id you go of losin wrongfully dismissed without full ame
Ht ver year payme nt of salary -~
ion ‘ They are typical ca >
: county court and the queue wo
ye ah passes through at. the rate { {
kt 10,000 cases a week VU TT 2 ¢e °
Boom? No et, et ee ot ois wovet ectheon
200M? iVO legal aid They sufter ecau \. 3 u
4 ONE OUT OF EVERY viv! those parts of the Legal Aid and nas nasi w
" sh yes 10 Advice Act that could help them eee”
married en I ive still kept on ice h . e ,
1 m cai & { | igh Court ise et tl v J
Taylor rep AN halnine ae c, a8) of ticeth Si wW en you ve tered vee



i hope u 1 F ‘ mostly husbands or wive os ies
1 bigger famil« hea P ng divorce co 9
ial r ised Now teke a closer look at the :
n the population costs of going to law, and see why ) L Yh the ’

justice can sti leave innocent



1 e Wa people with a sense of grievance ce ~!
ie 1 CASE 1: A week “end flier we a 3!
; 1 convicted ind ined 25 wit! was

: £5 5s. costs for a landing offence j
He ippealed and the fine was/
Not so i changed to a conditional di scharge. |

mm COAST WIM BUT he had to pay 42 cost | °9 e

% on top of the a taient tia guineas | 2
, yay wre he was twice as badly off as | AGENTS.

ippealed

police officer
damages against
The man

went bank-

officer got

not
2 \
arded £1,500
ypen-alr peaket
yst the ther

t o the police

he had

ASI wa



bax
othing “
RUT he Vas

bill



WINTANIN DN TION ON DN SHINN GE AGS aS

TO ALL OUR s

CUSTOMERS AND FRIENDS ©
WE WISH

till faced with hi

yet for more thar

PAPAL:



Thoma Horabin
North Cornwall
in an. aircraft
early in 1947 He
personal injut inc
symptoms 42% pole: ay & lo of goods and has just a

an cats 4 ' ; ted £3,017 ettlement

M.P
ine Mat Vas a par
that crashed

for
enge!







€



A Bright & Prosperous



in

blood pla lected





New Year



; The Costs

ometimes not financially
while, for mstance, if @ mat

a Complex « for |
in the cour
than £250 in the High
The costs will eat up el
for cash
il aid is

mijection

All the children
sent home to lead
While the
of the
been

were Lhe
normal] live
epidemic
children who
protected by :
1 speed ut globulin went down 1o ;
ly Only 26 of the others did s ry ; he sought

This differeace could not. ve The test ere ugesnah 3 More leg

due w chance, the doc i t '

Professor William Hammon : FUT i 4

| a ‘ oudh. iu o pour ‘
of Pittsburg Universit 1 A ie ike Yon

The protective power o! tt » redu {

im could almo er ¢ i i quire r :
mproved by injec , i we me} ;
iT “ belore Al) ex pr ,
break | t rear I

HONG KONG COMES TO

By TREVOR BLORE y es and ens middle boarding wae oe) aes
“on WR unKS @ne orres on Ty water- ew pr ir choot
” DEC EMBER ront, carving mahjong sets Northern a l , pattern of enlightenment
things. That is the fir painting spots on them late ai Colieg us opened ai Tarnale ar, and undtr con- Vveupe ‘aa which is a basie part
1 prog
journalists. It is the night, or treadling sewing- 1944 for the training of Certificat’ pideration the extension of { shitish Colonial policy strongly
’ 1 S BS ‘t as y OE > tes Ts. & as 4s : : e inin ie en, © y
ecess of all writers, from historians to novelists, aC a" ft = a pro Be. °- - wy Bayt a feee ve cqialifit t-acher-traint a panes Be aes upported by the present advanced
down the ages. And thi the outstanding feature of a ,.y Bee > Sa See DENRA ORY MSOs My ae ovisign is also being mi Gold Coast Government
) é IS 1S Une ulste ee “had not been industries (in the at the rate of ibout ten per teachers in the F aeton Pre
new venture in publishing inaugurated by the Colonial particular sense) they would have until, by the end of 1950, the ni and a train ;
Office with the first volume in the “Corona Library” had to be invented for Hong Kong ber of schools of ali types in t
Serie: bein ee iol : sary Alone.” Northern Territoris iad ineres
Offic we ; Kong by Harold Ingrams (H.M. Stationery Yet apart from the earliest ex- to 82 with a total of nearly 5
Fr aaa 6 port industry of all, the pre- pupils
bli mw t w-style ial of mercantile Victori in v- served ginger industry, and the During the las: two yee
ae ee tr sritish Co f he cr pouring in fron hipbuilding and repair industry primal das ri |
ong Ko \ ) f !
under the | t Cr
a distinguishex ' -

can defend
evere attack
sneap and easy

germs

the body





which
"

lait



raged. tid

con i
had 7 1s¢

t



t
county



method N
t Not

already used for immunisatio: . . , Py Sign ili CASI
A t _ f against measle ‘Antibodies tissu ts grown In a 5 ee
| — ~ UCH i ipee! rials
e TESTED A Mi: ii be inettied beter polio, “but
oO I SERUM he full value of i es
he serum can be ermined sarmur han 1 { n i fray BUT he mu his owi t
; reporte he, During su ' 3.000
ii / | "
The serum call@ gam? anise i090 Sera Oe ate ntists a hop le t itter how
lobu wa oaiatien: Mb to oh I bod r further laborator findin 4 ily me to-day no mé
uphill struggle ain ae wt BEES reece edt man fonda —no matte,
e r i of ~ {tO andreds of people ' ant t attack by pollo legal
o combat polio 222222 te Bee te ee i pee
s '
: ns, than the cbild It is
gamma giot n no natural amtibor worth
: feared by mothers A gamm for les:
‘ ince yearly epidemic

Mr. Pincher, in the centre, Ashes out a big one with his electric scoop ie
5,000 | Not chance D:: rou pete
that Lime es
body ‘
but the doctors hie ae fanene Yes hich Eons s ? u about &
ng from severe pollo ¢ out Wher becoming a David in any
useless bu narmie f . ; . . 7 : ena ic ne prey
‘ NFANTILE paralysis, neral im Sich a chil pursue
5 started in Britain five

Bs oe RE £250
CHILDREN ; ‘ i
bigge als u i by c ind a ' laimed for
) ) Dt
definite succes oO lar neut pre Do you wonder then that a fam
ren Are uscep trom . .
ther 28,000 ch m | battle against a Goliath
clin af the stra
a the iplaint most But Ty benefit than £50
ears age begi: ! t



ri wily 0



th Court



COLLINS’ DRUG STORE



not the an (

Until ao 011 researcher
1 upplies of the
een dependent on
€ hich were
{ifficult to rear.

carefull

hie present-da Street

vield its secrets | the rm

doctors ed
After years tsap

ing exper ty nvolv I

advance re repor ) children eading
t. Dh ’ lo

28,

Broad

PARARAAAAAARAARAAAR







isd aa ack
GNONINE EN Owe



AFE—

course for
the next month
next All this is part of a long





corners, trict which has new bec ind ten Ing

of Southern Togoland
A Government Teacher Ts

Me Nw



or Territoric
plan

for

“Write
injunc
secret of su

not






BICYCLES
ON TERMS &



iddin also



TRADED IN, REPAIR:

yea ining
orthern

Service
rerritoric

Our
at

Bicycle Department
your service:
repairs to all
in your bike
on terms...

is now
we can handle
makes and trade
against a new
its as as

New Look for
. The STARS - Warehouse

aia YOU - \ certai asures will
utify the
This ha



one

ABC



easy



Ls J .



more
of long st 3, Hong Kong is three middle boor ch !
, f until vers t entire



Bag
been

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almost been opens

ige

ae x
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t Ze ss is
s iy ges"
a3 2
aseS | Sees ese fens Eet8eS Ae a Pee oa Peete
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=
BAAR SRBITSS. af



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ll guesnceu




































"er ¢ oi * mm au a . considered necessary ip iew of “a
officer in h Se Cc | hil Ne lerri- ted to the entrepot trace hou FOUR IND VIPUA ' e fac that the aciale, & tourist @ A. BARNES & CoO LTD
asa writer o i books. > lif r In the past few years, however icl ; i FOR SUNDAY, DECEMBER 4%, L059! ‘ ill be characterised i *
It is a ne lea in Gove pal e note ¢ justry has taken an enormous ture and crafts have yromin Look im ihe senile : on ae { isit of at least 16 cruise ship
Peete’ ee va Aw leap forwards place in the cu oy tir t t verything should be done to
cretary of St ! ire ( “Trade still comes first in Hong school No villa ho
Mr. ee Lyttel is ¢ e! Hong Kong’s economy, but industry in without a garden or small farr _AROR eee ~ f the island Banar ae mae:
OW, 1 the Col | f sth ; Ri 1950 was running it a close which the principles of evops it. M ‘ ter f the building will |} : iM
° it x ) 1o 1 with tt impa f cond,” writes Mr. Ingrams. “The tion and the value of mar meen), Shwe (
poont of ata : tt r ne cevelopment of the industries in are taught. The middie | rei if fo MAS 20 (Tas K pac milar to that used b 1
a , erir nti ; vr ¢ i ar t é § K
ceenly to c rry entul : rial “« hose the last two or three years has schools all ha 1 craft method j tior uthorities at Sea- )
until we red a the ancestral paths are not easily b eo ne ie” and a schoo! farm, of mo A ; ae i}
countries with whose affairs we passed been .Qeariane , ge oat ee See cll will be construcged. The yard Q
are concerned.’ - ” : And he oes on to give us the acts. * ‘MAY tt to JUNE c ll be repaired ind. a stone wall v
, : First In Corona Library essential facts and figures. Hews eee ae sties to-d eur ind will be built between the Baggan \
Very High Standard ‘Hong Kong’ is .the first boo! Not only has Mr. Ingrams given local needs : ae dd © gor + Warat eae ° bilclty Cor r
His reference to the very high in the Corona Library, a seri : , delightfully readable and ir At the teache raining mesadias Warehouse and the ub icity Com- 1 5 3 \
standard” set for tl r I Pritain’s dependencies ich will formative book, but the other itse If all prospec e teact at me z o aut ¥ 28 (Caper mittee’s building. A Billboard with )
Mr. Ingrams is thorou fileA vi between the Reports at major partner in this new venture agriculture; and three afternor oe lpr, ine ies eo a Cokie elcoming slogan and may )
by this volun t 3 Blue Book f hae done a fine job of productior a week art evots Evenly tribu tec ” , ‘ Barbado 3 et ul By Harold Lewis
explained in ar juctors he one hand and Her Maiesty’s Stationery Office crafts and carpentr da ‘-
that. this e1 I ‘ turned out a volume which i = LY Uf to oe GUST 2 (Lee e ‘é
é i rie Oo ) c Lav . ~~ oe egiect those thing t ke
be written “by } hould be » jov to handle, fine print or ort Trade Trainin . ermottes now And wit Listening Hours
whose aualif oO elude t readable, that should give a paver for the connoisseur ana A Trade ‘I t re wv Aen ge Mme ia i cal end han 1 DEC. 28, 1952 This book is concerned ‘ ; {
4 cihle ramaeid of : ce lean” anes aan © omnia " rintine : i : ire happy Sunda it 5 2 s bo is concerned in the main with
where _ possible expe ( I id yet accurate picture excellent eorour Prinin’ 4. also opened in Talame last y« AUGUST 28 to SEPTEMBER 2s (Virgo) 1” 5.00 pam 26.53 M the progress of photo hy. bi ; well )
colonial adn tratior nd first- That is certainly what Harold of blenty of black-and-white 214 takes 40 | Prayer and ind principle har ‘ The } “as Bees i sche Ane gpl Sip tid. {
hand knowl of the te ’ ‘ complished illustration ear course hand. Afte : ‘ "Musi io ps Sunday Halt Hor ometimes, to look over one’s shoulder. For i
» Pen 2 “ : shes : 7} ould relieve te t ' ‘ t = pans Sew ie +} . > j }
concerned ton Afte frank account of the f . ‘ joiners masonr t 0 n. Composer of the Week hat reason I invite my associate editor. Hel- )
Sacsipet ( Y i listor . Education tn The Gold Coast es Aree tion xs } Archie Andrews’ Christmas Part : : , }
oar. iratic ve ¢ io , ; rie : hi hae ne EOE Sir or 4 i as ay truction ind — picid i toners roOBER mah ibrar a, 7.45 p.m 32M 40.71 M mut Gernsheim, who is the world’s leading }
ec Mr if ! I a ‘oau om nost delignt- sr is y hrm belie that cluding black Poe acne oh gt A iuthority o y ' . wMtogrs . en
although he had not pre i lection of people I have met @ducation the answer to mar In addition to prac 1 Guise 4 all chenect : " 600 pm. From The Bible, 6.15 p 7 : rity on Victorian photog upt to discu }
baen in Hone Kor rh in print for many a long day, and the growing-pains of the instruction vive Eng ocronEn 4 to NOVEMBER 2) Enklish Magazine. 6 obs Ds ee Be his year the changing scene of pictorial work ({
a Colonial officer ha nom ; vivid glimpses « vaker African Continent, I ic { corpio ‘ time the 10 ~ aed ace Marital tarting with the ‘eightic He has produced ))
“Bo . 1 Fe ' r te ; =e oe > the Gold Co f : Ws of fatigue or J or inasathcneti “to aia vee a M 40.71 M from various sources a number of prints whicl }
So he T rtar orner « e Gold a ling <« the on’t worry ep ul a eee , wer : i ve f }
understandi i ( rl from t wealth or 1 Soc Th , “NOVEMBER 23 (0 DECEMBER & > 46 und ervice, 61! were famous in their days, and these are fol- ,
4 is j he st . , 745 pm. Sunday Service ' 1 i {
peonle wi a ¢ ese 1 hant Britis! th of ¢ moet tt Sagttteriss) Whe , ne Radio New reel,’ 830 p.m. Coms oO owed (purposely)) with a selection from th «
of the nor (merchant nee) tf : note Nor ‘ aed Hoo ‘ houle of dae. Bykiont bee eee | ork of a few specially, invited leaders of mod i
In t+! e ¢ ese herma erritorie f that etter future Rc Make 10% san teen thn American ex { ' { yt {
oars f | ke lor DECEMBER 2 to JANUARY “1 (Capei- | ; Saris ae ae eat Nn AMerican EXMUDIIOT ORR R Dye. \
vA it r Fir , orn) ‘Her od fc “ pection 194 Music. Mnmestne hew ! hi view on whetl there a i
siaee lvarned ta” be ia t ‘ ‘ h a leges. is e Na ane eee , MONI A DEX 9, 1902 hee iny ‘progre at all ‘ ider ma ))
‘ : ‘ if
notes or t wr ern Territoris Today ere tar Atte nus ervi ile : oO calf A > (
ng@ges on dust 5 nets i : te a as eee. pe tne as tb PRBRUARY : . oan udge for mself A PHOTOGRAPHY YEAR {
i i € ’ indred schools * : 10 pm. The New 410 pm. The BOOK tialls ) ternat l review
in this ca fer reading “Hone ts in every ° with a enrolment of née An eerie Same ai tainives bape service, 4.15 p.m. Souvenirs of is essentially an international review j
c 1 writt le v r ¢ te and enic »ig eee _ * % BOP M visi 00 p.m. Listeners’ Choice we shall widen the cope f thi nvitation 1
Kong . r ' . sme , “ty a Aqua . e an 7 pom 41.02 M 40.71 M P ; I _ , itation is
ment } itsta 1 T flr o rt be é ¢ wt of pionee t KOK ext veal
use substar ; , th : ; I 7) oe in T ’ rr FEBRUARY ¢1 to MARCH % (PiKers) cjg paw ates Sen, er ” 64 i
eee ‘ is : te a pete ‘ : / : y your free hour Sports Round Up & Progra (s
Aft. ~ ; : progi ) “ v 7.00 p.m. The News, 7.10 1 \ }
miting in 1841 1 refi 5 nd setba ecu es
a aaa ( 4 Ir eric { “ took © Read and The Art sa
amiieed | uae inn aise pm vm oun Now on sale at the y
ed out tl 7.45 p.m. Invitation to the Opera, 8.15 ; {
1 } 44 4 4 ¢ »m. Radio Newareel, 8.30 p.m, Com- 4 e H
¢ yout f the Week + ' r ; Ad
ae : ig wean vocate Stationer
tin acl < i
>
€ e sec

om

Ne
“ee
ae





PAGE SIXTEEN





DON'T LOOK NOW



BUT THEY RE—



DRUSILLA BEYFUi
reporting .. .

VER to you

G

Knit fur, knit
skill you
home-made air

can

shoot of a fresh idea.
kind you have to look twice to recognise.
tweed-—and here's the kick
knit a fabric without

You
in the
a trace of a

a first-rate fashion for the trymg
Out of the waste of Knitwear land springs the
The new knitting is the

can


















SUNDAY | ADVOCATE SUNDAY, .DECEMBER. 28, 1952
| BEVERLEY BAXTER. .P., at the Cat Shao as
|
e { ny Pe ee € What Values!
As 1 was leaving my house I whereas a cat is diabolically cruel Linine
* est a CA aE found it difficult to explain to my to a mouse.
as er a re Sealyham, Disraeli, that he could ‘What is w champion cat worth? sj
a » ty 4 re se not come with me because I was While I was there a doughty 36" wide in shades of Navy,
mY going to visit the 56th champion- male cat named Gallant Homme} ?} a ;
. ~~ ship show of the National Cat-was sold for. £150: Already he is } blue, green, grey, lilac and rose
| Club. _ @ sire of distinction, and in| )) Par yatdegen anderen
7 ' . = re are pie oe or gs France, where he is going to take K 99¢
ou realise . @ > active. li i Wi 4
ahomtook’ place in 1808. up a new active life, he will a y
I have never been a cat-lovér.

ne

ihe photographs show what Knitting is coming t«¢
ihese two patterns arrived in London from Paris last

week
flaunt

They are bold
every respectable
they have not got what se
One has
like high, round necks
v-neck styles.”
Both have firm
many lace pattern twi
into millions.’

as

Neither puttetn seeds any improving once the

knitting is done,
popular styles
e all pseudo-peasant art
oldery after the knit
, the inexpensive pat



The









t Oks love it, and s¢
do the smart g'ossy Mag
zines.’

Th witn th
celot id nade in blac}
snd whit 1, with blac
velvet binding round tt
ige

Th utting he twe
i n bia j i w
t i ‘ ‘
Fiche ' n
w n Ven 1 4

Y Mier than the 1
’ ng wnat th



Selling angles

"RIWO adver ,
for wie same
le to
An an ft










d

nou i vc
Anow al the d

wu jobs

To get Mr t
the fabric the rtisem
m0Ws a pretty wil )
tured sitting up 1 while her
husband, wearing a shirt in ih
fabric, brings in her breakfus

th a dazzling smile

Her defences are down, thin}
the American advertisers, if you
show how the man about the
house waits on her

To Mrs. Britain to buy i:
the edvertisement shows a care
worn woman who looks as
Wiough she's been up and abou’
since dawn She is peiu
pondering about purchasing wwe
fabric for







her husband—and
saying : “ How often will I have
to mend it?”

_Mer defences are down, think
(he English advertisers. if
rhow how she waits on the man
about the house

you

we've

nowudays

and brazen

knitter's
lls.

n sets

icels, a
wool or

Cost

and
tradi

decisive patterns,
as we

nd lines

from 79s

like

smart
tion

“We



can
orders run

They

Worse

a chic stand-up collar, ‘Our customers
tried and failed to sell

sel!

new

© 115s. and look



General Naguib May Visit America




























Thess mih ia ture tigers and
tigresses, officially known 4s, Felis,
‘Demestica are. too Glodl,. too
superior, too feminine

They do not die temporarily of
grief when you leave the: house,
|nor do they go into paroxysms of
joy ‘when you’ return. "Their
thoughts are on the Nile, or of a
*Persfan garden, or something in

Siam
M or F?

No one knows the origin of. the
word “cat.” It is of ro language
or territory and it is with ut sex.
Alf cats, male or: female, are cats.
| L watched one of the judges sizing
up the charms of a_ blue-eyed,
\white furry ereature, and the
| judge was saying: “Oh, you love-
y little girl. Oh, you darling.”
You never hear that kind of thing
at a dog show ‘or at the Don-
castér Sales,

Did you know that all tortoise-
dhol eats are females? When
this information was given to
me by Mr. Stirling Webb at yes-
terday’s show I raised en eye-
brow to express surprise, where-
vpon he explained that if by
chances a male tortoiseshell cat is
born it has no future or hope of

Ceéllular



29 wide in white only

Per yard-.-——-——=-

Hopsack eit



eS made
The ~~ me Peer me



doubt add splendidly to his record,

The breede?s of the cats seemed
to be mostly women, and they
had that earnest, earthly, and un-
subtle look which comes to all
people who embrace the elemen-
tal,

I, have secn it in the breeders
of horses and of dogs. They are not
concerned with femininity but
only, with the female and the
male. At least, that is the im-
pression they gave me yesterday.

You will be sorry to learn that
the Abyssinian cat is almost
extinct, which is a pity, for the
Abyssinian is the nearest thing
alive to the sphinx.



36” wide in wine, navy, blue

eee
CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LID. |



10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street



FRSSOSGF



tor

Rene chek “he eter ae It is extraordinary how c'osely
* Were ie” tase iad to see us these creatures resemble tie hu-

man species in the land of their
origin. There was a Russian Blue
cat which was so dark, dusty and
rinister that I nearly decided to
report him to M.1.5.

But do not imagine that they
were all exotics. You will be
glad to know that there were
ordinary, grey striped _ silver
tabbies on view, the kind of cat
that rummages in the lanes and
whines at the moon, and will eat
anything that a garbage can will
produce,

las we went from cage to cage?
|They were neither pleased nor
| displeased, When I stroked the
‘ears of a Persian Blue it remained
deep in thought and quite disin-
{ terested. One. could have got a
better resylt by stroking a duchess
at a garden party.

er
Â¥.

Perfection

There was a collection of black-
eared Siamese cats, with wonder-
ful-blue eyes like lamps) which
‘pave me a definite sense of un-
co@thness, I wished that I had
worn a suit more in keeping with



They do not serenade the night,
they make it hideous, They are



£00 FOFSSLSODSOSSS ODS SSF SSE SISO SOAC OS









L just cats and do not pretend
the oceasion. ; to be anything else.
These lovely creatures really So I came away into the To All Our
‘45 ‘ike at home with the cele certain mode touched perfection, which is al- rugged unsubtle masculinity of
expert health and beauty to sleep in a ways an emotional experience for vincent Square, | Westminster,
a Bernarr is known to most Soup speci al aie tb wahtierente of rela wer > aera ohio ait
sritons as ve ccountable ‘ ‘ . * 1e1¢, a row
d.chap who will parachure ce ‘ four-legged Cleopatra. Stroke the feeling that with these red- Customers and
ts ao airplane on his . ae ams | their paws if you like; they will eyed, creamy cats of the Nile, and
Sahtad ant liken sae nt co oe They i weerere 2 these blue-eyed Persians, I had
ng red flannel underwear.) Lobste rved by Mrs ‘ ri 2 eee ye a pene ee te F | d WwW Wi h
Mit’ iat te Ane halt of tk as Douglas: when | she be, iat e 2 oe at crats whose lineage goes back to rlendas e 1S
Jonnie, his 44-year-old wife. Ginne? 1a al Family | ‘ tse ° boner ae r ng ae Tr the years when England was|¢# %
explained to the court—her This r creamy dish & asa us OH WETS 30 a , and are peopled by hairy savages, %
t appa Is aulng = separation made e of the liquic paid ed —_ cae eee ai Y 7
> ne’ se a regula fror ells si ere ey do no ead with mendi- i ?
home. Since Mr. Macfadden = in stock and \o ais is added t | eant eyes to be’ taken to the park Would he mind? A Prosperous New ear
pimave sianee. ce arn fresh cream of fresh mushroon for a run, I. wonder if Disraeli would
a bed, i made a pallet for him aati Zs Ano Steen or ienete: They do not whine to be put object if we brought a Siamese
en the floor adioinine mv room anaa rl sahiarthe > out on the balcony in order to cat to our house?
growl at the milkman’s horse. When the fire is chuckling in e
So well-bred the grate and the television is
They are so well bred that they talking about to-morrow’s rain,
ask for nothing because they there is something about a cat p C S MAFFEI & C Ltd
darn well know that they wil] Which asks nothing more than . ° . 0.; .
get what they want without to be left to its comforts and its
asking, 7 memories of when Cesar sailed











CAIRO. block in his way, then came out a smart and distracting move.
_ General Mohammed Naguib, in open defiance of the General’s It has distracted Egypt from
Egyptian Prime Minister, may formula for political clean-up. concentration on the old political
visit the United States shortly, At this point end with a little scene and its 1 party engi
Al Akhar newspaper reported to- fanfare Naguib left the a ital en's ssi ae pace en
day. It said it lcarned that a nd went on a tour ¢ Norther eering, and pbb rea it something
“visit by the Premier to the United E a . ‘ mn -¥ a a orthern new to get excited over, oven
States is being seriously consid. E#”Pt @ ttip which soon erupted newer than the “down with , the
ered in Witw of the results it into.@ great personal triumph British” and “out of Suez” pills
woula achieve and the publicity wich proved the tough wiry which the deposed politicos found
it would obtain for Egyptian and fMicer could win and influence govereign remedies for dodging
Arab ecuses It is not unlikely People as well as overthrow a world economic and the social
that the visit will take place Government and a King conditions of so many of Paypt’
very soon,” it added With the cheers of Egypt's mill- long down-trodden millions
Inited Press correspondent 1095 still ringing in his ears, Na-
Walter Coliths writing from Cairo 8! sped back to the capital and Meanwhile seemingly with his
this'to say of G mera? Naguib: in ene, two, three order slapped Jeft hand only Naguib has really
trong man” General into ia almost every prince cour- dane something to narrow the
Moh Naguib appeared tie and political leader who dared Breat gap between the millions ct
firmly hed as unquestioned \' back. This crackdown was pitifully poor and the few hun-
lor « v's destinies for as fllowed by another lull wherein reds of eminently wealthy.
lon he wants to remain at the ithe General now teceme â„¢emier While others talked about it for
canted and well sat back and wa'ted for generations Naguib in one decree
: surviving politicos to see the light broke up,all of Egypt's fabulously
His popularity with the masses ard co-operate large estates and limited land
of Egypt has advanced in three ownership to 200 acres per person.
major wav since he emerged Next Move Many headaches lie ahead of the
from comparative obscurity al- Lhen after tempers had cooled nerfection of.this reform, but it
most five months ago. in jail-and political Sniping from was the first real break given
ss . those on the outside ceased, the Egypt’s peasants since before the
Slow Starter General made his next move dsys of the Pharoahs, and the
He w,s overnight national hero release of now well ch stened peasants dgn't forget it, nor the
in the summer when his army formerly powerful figures. man who made it possible.
group seized power and _ forced After the last of almost 70 were .
King Farouk’s abdication, but then set free earlier this month, Nagui! In the same relatively quie*
his countrymen stood back to see gave the hation new encourage- Way he has also tried to bring
f he really could accomplish the ment with the abrogation of the cotton, . Egypt’s great export
task he Set himself. But Nagu b old constitution and the chance to under control and to halt the drain
wa 1 slow starter Throughout decide whether Egypt shall con- On his nation’s sterling balances.
the remainder of the summer he tinue a monarchy or become He closed cotton futures exchange
failed to make much headway in a republic to halt speculation and manipu-
the reform programme against The constitutional issue—as it lation, but this may haye future
corruption ard inefficiency in high has long been known in other adverse effects on world cotton
places countries where kings have al- sales. He also got an advance of
Old vested political interests ready tottered from their thrones five» million pounds of sterling
put every conceivable stumbling or were trying comebacks, was blocked by Britain and slashed
. ’ r el ane .
Chey'll Do It Every Time 5 rs ona By Jimmy Hatlo |



1
4

i GETS A WINK OF SLEEPâ„¢JUST TOSSES! | WHEN YOU FORGET YOUR KEYâ„¢THE RIOT

Accorone TO MAW, SHE



NEVER

| AND TOSSES ALL NIGHT LONG:

} WHATSA.

jf “MATTER, MAW?

| \ NO GLEEP AGAIN

|f LAST NIGHT P THE

(o0 RHEUMATIZ

\. BOTHERING
PAL

° 1

i \ YOu

| nil y
yy} 4s
‘5

‘ } ;
be 1;

eo

4





-, ae
THATA
CAT DOWN TH
WOULD KEEP
WATCHMAN A\w
BESIDES THAT.
HAD INSOMNIA:



Na



ND THE BARE

TS GETTING WORSEâ„¢)
| CLOSE My EYES» NOT
RR A SECOND:::








E BLOCK }i¢

ANIGHT- ¢ | 4
A oL

T'VE ALWAYS }) j

AN’ LATELY { 4

4} ‘

r 4

aan

SQUAD AND MARINES=+-NO CAN DO /

“a = = os
| ‘Bor JUST TRY TO ROU



Ss <







SE THE OLD DEAR





up the Nile.
That is the worse of going to
a show like:this.

Over one had

placed a card bearing the words:

cage the owner

Mee %



imports from the sterling areas.























_ . Ay ; : é It puts thoughts = =
Among other and less spectacu-|“Beauty lives by kindness.” It into one’s mind. . . *
lar moves, but which have never-lis a pleasing conjunction - of In these far-off days, quality of men, quality of materi-
theless attracted full public sup-| words, but what does it mean? No WORLD COPYRIGHT als and sheer ability put England in a commanding
port, has been the General’s almost|one is ever unkind to a _ cat RESERVED “ position.
private war on profiteering. Many AM
have been jailed _ for price- a ke fy ele = Bi Bh i hy
gouging, formerly a nearly un- i pA
heard of offence in the land of
bazaars and oriental markets. | Now, in the field

Administratively Naguib also ac- of Woollens, the
sjurtted himself well. He has uality loomed in
purged the civil service of /hun- the British Isles
uveas of corrupt and inefficient |
officers and even reshuffled his | remains the best in |
own cabinet to get men with the world.
«bility in proper posts. Simul- | os

ineously he has been running |
well so far as Egypt's foreign >
affairs are concerned. He has Qur selection does
vegotiated and appears not far

justice to this su-

from agreement with the British reme standard —

ind Sudanese over the Suez Canal Tropi *
nd Sudan, he is the strongest Modine can on
firare in the Arab League states an

and appears to have brought the
new neighbouring nation of Libya
‘nto the bloc,

b Coating weights.

For the time being at least,
Naguib has put’ Egypt’s often
troubled house in order and there

no one at present who chal-

lenges him fos the job.—U.P.



Some Shops Open

Many grocery shops in Upper
Roebuck Street were open yester~
day and housewives took the op-
portunity to replenish their
stocks. Many people had run short
of supplies for the long holiday
period, and faced with insuffi-
cient to eat to-day, were glad to

sce

C. B. Rice & Ce.









hear that some shops’ were etl iat .
Cat a cere quickly WHEN WINTER WINDS blew into Berlin the birds ana the of Bolten Lane
through’ ‘the * guptohinding dis- beasts at the zoo sent out an SOS for shelter, Zookeepers
tricts that the shops were open. answered the call and moved animals into their winter quar~ ie ini i i alll ai is
ters. This pelican_is_ headed for warmth of pheasant ‘ho = a



HF

WUE ERECTOR wey
ea ma

HAPPY NEW YEAR

CATCH UP OW YOUR

or Yloit ,

May we remind you of the pleasant chore of acknow-
ledging Xmas gifts by letter; written for preference on fine
Stationery such as that stocked by us in a variety of styles,
sizes, and in blocks or Stationery Sets.

te all our Customers

059 4 WN NN WN MN

t

is the wish of

‘



.B. With, of course, a complete” range
Pencils, Rulers, etc. readily available.

of Pens,

Wilkinson & Haynes Co., Ltd.

K.R. HUNTE & Co., Led.

y

* APPLE EDEN PE IERE EE I PEE 8



Full Text

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srMlW \I>VIH \TI -I MlW. I>l < I HBI R A PLAQUE MAR K* THE SP OT... A careless historian— say historians it - i 1 IMJU c." fcnK.-ind f. Sy.mtoi Armada •bitIt ffU adniiraU.i -.d brought t: tii greai %  but. st" of 1 %  %  U Fill carelessly jr.nK to tlIPP n*n the : ii than to • th %  • . u him* .1 idi that the dram itk • not bound when II inc.n11 may be called deni ol fartThe truth Is that nr wa, np : %  %  : I %  : it. %  Poptand %  n Trilling tliei In a Bir John %  %  % %  Id 'f to five real Ml the W'I. and |ht la a! utmost malignity h > %  IMMIP ; &VSS^ LEFT rull length evening coal in >*>wd p#n net RIUHT Ballerlm evening rtre— with celloph %  %  Not Silk Or Satin^Eut Straw Ity Dorothy Hartley %  great *.... itaacked. II Dart ; i II HU rather Robert Ffudp. e-ing arch* In January 1830. he n iter SrhV" iN q .iltcd Mil i lining IM1 l>av Btylen Aisu dlppini Ii to the rulure for 19S3 I the houac Ice HKNttly followed the lame baaic line, and entl> waarable For with There'nothina no* undai the i Mtt %  I hi* Is applicable to %  hava taken their inspiration from l by Qur-en VtCtOI i I I •X Mi i„ %  line was Mnu with po "' 1 ad fulness. A l.ondo-1 balhlon deall : ; ""' "' 'he turnnJ the I rbM thl %  11. %  putting a common malarial to an ' uncommon use Hit '" : "'' n "" 1 | Boc an avanlna dn i Tf u '" % %  r '|" *•* 'ilk. ... traw, or pi And here it it.—in gunmetai h;,V[ %  aiinple dreaai : -.llet-l-TVlh "^l 1 ""' %  • iklrt, ti* i .i i I Ii ina dress of this ftylf no Iv ", i own against m but looks tn i l i .r^tln. s coloui %  ., wciuiu lailorad sull .sun UB mora trtdrUooal types '"' r and h.i'..not been neglected Tm those ignor*• w '-" %  "' lv *' rv %  ** %  ,!1, %  log i. oion' N entil Itli there v '" ,l %  %  cobWab pattern and WBJ cotton <>iu.,tw., In a muii:ltnelualc it with btBOl ad handkerchief print. •""' '' '"" "' OW r hi.. ( ml re Ian d dw bai d ntungs. !ci "'he, .euds froin ,,. sho,v ofl-the-slmolder neekllne was |f f" •' '"'n.iti. coloui comiranafom.^ fo, eve„i,^ i, v the 1,ln ,ll< '" "-'' blue went with lHoK ,, ,' r f An'a/uu. bJU> van with black >nd old SSS" '"'"^ i'"""""-';"> pleaUtl on bodice and *kitt hmi FOT ,'i Uie ret.il i . the Royal Family, .ire stm Btylerand crinoline. wh.it moq iti in .in axti vagani evaning B i aaaUon ol ihii full-length coat Illustrated i turra erarf in red green net, ii tua collar could i "lamp end %  volcram, umlnoui skh-t. For Ihoae who iik. thing %  %  i .( came llght-weighl (ackefi %  %  ii modi rnletii aiitti ad "" "' MH'H'-d satins will be i y .oiitcmponurjr art trond fashion. ding amorupR | n white woven boucle had an • p %  another ihow | pattern. *•„ h"" i .i length, it was worn wflli %  In black llm bbek barathea dress. i ilhcd %  sash. (cling llir colour ot the sni.ii torn %  %  .i black velvet chokai m klaca Fur the faahlon 1 i %  %  lull km .mil .i short bolero lined iiii printed Ilk la 4 Tudor Airliners Rust At Airport liuyors Uniikoiy At tlO.000 I'.uvh AIRPORT (HANTS). Fmii Tudoi BirJUneri stand in oaai the perimeter track ol Hiirn Ani>it They are num| . thl Mmctii ot Civil ftvl ii .i. 'Mr. Ix'nnnx-Doyd) told the Commons he wan anxious to -ell for -is little as tio.ooii c to build waa £150.000). the foui. %  %  weather, is the rjlz-beth of Enrfand. which Prl I ihr.si< nad with .. bottle "i Bmptrt wine In 104"—the flag alnnift of whal was to hava bee: I Tudor Bl 1 emonv took place at ixindon Airport imld i %  i I mfan % % %  ro-day, whan i rl Itcd Iwi %  '[. tl;r. waa spreadnik ovag the I Two Years In Own The four Tudors have stood In % %  >.| '-n .it Hum for I* %  t 3 ears. Their 0CU> VtaHOTl .n. DW ." %  lue. chsieklng to aec if souvenir hunter., have beeti .sy. Tba otbar three Tudors are ti B st.., uon s: J( Panther and Mar Ixnpord. rJater airerafl of I the 8U \ let, i-ith ..f which dl South At Of the two Tudors led tn. Ministry barmlns lassengei %  cd now with rust, was the anplane which Air Vice-Marshal Bennett t.-* on . goodwill toot to South America in l!4T With no buyers likely, evei the rock bottom price of £ 10.000 tna rudon %  itay at L.F.*. WEDDING BOYCE-ARCHER — WONDER WHEELS N 4 Why Hercules CYCLES arrive in liarbados in perfect condition Tbe special Hercules packing methods the result of y> \*ear> study ol packing lor countries overseas ensure this. The wellwrapped parts are placed carefully in strong cases so thai they can be simply, safely and correctly assembled on arrival at destination. A qui eftj took pin• t Church Mj %  • Unity," Baxters. Rd n .urtcd lo Mis.-. Bva Anlu-i ol Haxhara Road The ceremony n ad bj Rev. Frank I Hiiee. The bride who wamarriage by Hi Brnaal D. Mot%  %  v. M Ci 1 wore %  itchcrafl Ian II V I ..tm ihtneatone i-ouquet was of radiance ;.nd cornlit.is. DufJaa "f bestman were i irried %  bv \: H i> sc • -,.1,1itob. Solicitor. After the ceiemony. the newly* vnls ami tlu-ii gueata att %  [ %  '. ipOOTH Mill, the Mi an l |, M(ll The couple received man: beautiful and useful 'i.i ir friends and well • Protects your gums • Fights tooth decay • Freshens your mouth in orfih anil iStinam* tta < d-Md -llli %  •wSIWi thm,, •ltd -III huMo-. I.mdam *f keeps and healthy use Polmohve Soap as Doctors advised for a Brighter, Fresher Complexion! 0o*, ...., ts* r.1-.,.,.. 5 Backache, Rheumatic Pain Relieved Liardenms. painting, odd iobi lv a plraiurc again when und the house ca e i -ec from backach.. rl|.-i;nuiupain*. • 1 tm • d w M 4v*\ ?.ML-.>J^.,wm.llAJ.--* =55^



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M'SIIW. IlKI.MIlt.ll it. 1932 M \ll\\ MlMK ATI I HI: I i Farm And Garden By AGRICOLA Gardening Hints fftotorinq /Nav'S^opJCS For Amateurs By KIN HAMS POULTRY NOTES Hire Those tadkj people who are %  tailing a completely new prdH '-oltivated have a wonderful opportunity of locally, i* such mi important U%  "* %  l"t right W da tl diet at all seasons of ihe opportunitywhich they should pan it twimatf In us thai iB make the %  wculd bo of mieit t la give .. few Rial in '' lh e *" established garden one i-mi ti another npp*-r la of IUIM years standing ihere are have beat < Main thing:, we would all lha CfcriataM gen like to change ar lo actual!/ gel 11 if the rid or. It may he a hedfe thai < %  i' "' don I lik.-. oi J vine or gai '•-*. To milU.ni ,i. A-an, court,i„i do ihey get ch :i :,-. V. '.„',' ,, rrval ruUlvalaaa ul ih-.anal na. ,prd % %  lu "'h,"'"• %  > -nd ... iorma wr '* %  '< %  bacama like ,.. n u.iporlant ci. in lha United '•'""'i. Crlualaad, oil*.. Slates. IIH.Y. Spurn. Australia buI ldom got rid of th. i—iii !" ,. different n' like %  %  Tl Our first paflg '.i. I klHlj appro* i in the tropic*, rice is used chiefly .ma is frequently the most imp.irt.nl dish at • meal i temperate climate*, .apart from the position iVlaai lot in the new garden w | what ona liment "the I'an-Ai Souther tl with Texas in the North, <>f 1,938 miles, with a no ailed but rjther rough raa ttide between sea-leva) by Klin* HI the 28 litre type 3oo I ingly occasional currv. rice usually **•" %  "'•>" VHi we want tlgures as a pudding. Although sacrificing an* old friends. Slowly simple to prepare, some e-tperland caiefulb an i an, ence ul cooking nee and of iU i'itioii f ,-vei hedge, tree and characteristics will make all lha plant* plaeinu them Drat wltere difference to both appearence ihey will be seen ti> the best admile* per hour This was in the when *erv-*i and palatabilily. vantage The trouble when m-ikinsports card Thus a long or medium gram rue nrw garden if that kind friendtjon (rum rcrrari i n I may prove more acceptable as a -rp n nfrn ,„ w Ilh „n rT of nm-iuailv. vegetable with n*t or hshw-hila u *J cutting* whirl, .ire i, short, plump gram type ' M" 1 ? ,,imcult to refuse and which we Thi refnartabl. I to b more glutinous and stuk> wVk in tha -miund hero and there enhances, lha OuUtanding I and make, betlar puddings. Hire "^'Vhc'RK £ "* combine, wall with green old. ud %  !" £ ^0^ ClW?-tartIo "P ** tnemselve* plat. pulses to make .i very nutritious "7 a "' "V*," 1 '*' pl „ .J**" rtihut At I* u m,t wri llj grow we hesitate to pull them up. <••*"* *< t* aUlt*. and wh ch in* and once thev flowor-we are lost, !" n fj!' m dU,U Th.re are numaiuus varlatiet, for few gardeners can bring themMtgUa. J-guars. h iv ug early The bast yielding sorts are lowarlve* to dallberatelv pull up a sui""^! land <-r aquilic In respeel of anflowering plant rven if it b not uronment, .iltnough hill or dry wanted, land rices are cultivated to somo extent. The crop e>c!,. varies So. when starting a new garden with the variety but is hardly less the bent wav is to think out carethan lour months ami greater than fully, first what typ* oi garden si*. The cultural practices ionyou mean to have, and Ihen plan fiat of ploughing to break the 1hr p^ttion and kinrl of avaoa, \*uL^ I 1 "? U d W# d r owlh vine-, plant, etc vou followed by harrowing ano level,, iH ,^ Z Otherwl.* trlbulion of irnnidion water Tha rn "f"' l ln and diMppomtmen' final result U a miature of soil In starling the new garden the and water which has been thorboundary wall or hedge must be oughly churned up lo the conslacon(ld ered Ar tie inosi inipo't.int thing i i for a bag l kg thirty pound. I %  pounda. i-i .. i the It-1 i uf 1h meat an I you'll rind tlul ihe profli iijst goaa IIJ> when lhe mral yield i< hign Other cost|i : d overhead) run aboil The unie rxgardlea* of lbfeed %  %  gaaa bat poa%  ible to a| .me in th %  bling both wings and live faksd % % % % % %  fffii oUat "I known U) mail, . .I. .. hra ii'.giiinsi ;he*o cars, will have la ( laminar with Ihoae who are attempt.ng t. run look to their laureU. he ,„ M „„, ,, business (or | In the standard car MtMtaTl %  %  '' %  '' '' buy chktha th.it v. the Pan A. % %  : pay H, I the dav at an average .. > hicks are bied lo make gil %  2 MVil a Wa %  ,, A | ., chicks in .11 ..1 one "*"-•** %  (ha very long and Baxible Umr ;in(l „ U plll „. . Coming nearer home, and < '<•, gear-ler.'.ir v hiei T „, s M lpB In eocakollual dl i %  M lhi not ciowd broilers ; : grown live oi inches depth throughout their life cvcle. except for the last nd tr. the realm of more munda Ihe new transport, the most %  > place of design to put In an .ippeai Ihis Island, la QM Mw Auitj %  n>4ki^ Seven, or Austin A 30 nccessnry sometimes to have a second try before engaging fli t rhruufc!. I ..,gear when at rest kaily fcatlMring is pMgaarU] p-rters of these cars, and of one gear-bom 1* brd-ln characteristic, but it t I, pa latniafratura Bar %  prl %  lhe meal maKp this ear are the Cool brooding he) %  -. %  s oh bined with %  auapi i though hrd "-I'-i K ol tlriving two different i -.-mp.es uf thii IM .; ..ml promi-mg breed, whuh iiow CVeTJ %  Ign of upholding lhe 1 |ueUy earned b> li hu ii. oagM wiU iff^ l^ ,ot,t ,,r rd when raited B of one aquarg tool pay g I %  'i ,i .! helps faatharlnB III,*, with %  %  ithuut any impression of vcrfiowing. Tho k jcces-sible thtOUgffl panel in the top of the i I dosplle lhe small overall space o!toted to it the aoflna m lonlenl la leave sufficient room arooad it for aormal m —although raeaoval of Btmotor entails some In am ksflgaj I i an i MI float or tu-allv no road to the 1 •-ring-wheel. .Jilt nn.on ot the A4U comfortable "he nearly mature g?-m -" "• fully grown It Is U s inand the A7U. a des gn which eUl Rice, uwoughoui its hutory bag penetrable us a none wall Flowoualy enough scem> to Bocoaad nt I been regarded as a crop of bn* *'''"* trees, vines and beds mut pulling a i|uar% into a pint pot wander, unit value grown by fm ill farmbe planned. Fernery. Lily-pool and ers using simple, often home-made path.* working (he plan in from implements, with women-folk 4a> f he boundary toward the house, nig trn> Inmspl.iriting, weeding at.d __ ^ ._ fc ..-^ harvesting, all by hand and sickle <* / ,h f " lo ** vo """ Largely a lamily crop, rice hai wn n planning the new gardcr seldom. In tlu* tropics at any r.ie. that of overcrowding. 11 U dihV provod attractive lo capitalistic eu. when pUnu arc young, in outlay for mechanisation. Severe visualise bow big they become nhort-ges brought about by W, i Id when fully grown, with the raattl A r II mil a convequent nibatapthat thoy aro often planted tonal rise in value are creating inclrxs together, which spoilt, the general effect later on. 'is at all time*. Fo. i tree weal i provlda i n DM b of feeder I i lilek From three to ix wee old < h tarn to urgM %  • loilble feeder upa.e |ier chick. r"i. in i\ waiffhl to i' '!>* pel etg "ii top or mean %  : nfty per cent nghodo %  11 The brakes (Locklmed %  tt.ough on on.of the cars we I to eoinc on e-rly lha Irunr were i.ol al thai ;i" ,t mile.) I()1 uluUl | u „. „ ( u „. iiirollle oi full) i< %  ?""* v..t i i |p piovoke wheel-spm harfc y The engine itself is an Ht3 M, tcrest in modem methods and general effect later on. overhead valvo unit delivering ,large scale production units are maximum 30 B.H.P. al t.Boo i eveloping rapidly. This is very Shrubs look better when plantd H.H.M.. but capable of rMlvt i n| much lhe case 111 British Guiana with plenty of space ari>und ihem. B -uipiisaBg amount ur supplier of this commodity In so that when Ihey are in flower i„w revs (or Lta ihw These this connection, producers in lhe Ihey can be seen in their full acterlai tropics are learning from .uubeauty. tries like the United Slates and . ...... .„ th. Australia which, enjoy.ng th. Vines look lovely forming .. and ,. (| -o.,, b|# „ ( vlM benefits of protective t.n Ha fwlih Liackgrouad oftr a bare wall — a low consumption rate compared fence, or over an urbour. .ith iroptoal countriaa), hava been .. i l in view Of the the Ughti fitted to thig as lliufco %  %  %  %  %  led %  ^11 out bail ' ''ting.1. : i %  from speeds a* low n* 12 Ml'i -• %  I I I Ihout roughne^. lion I i %  given by the Moll der. In the t.y-out. the %  road teal vary bat uugayuaQt real i l.ut th* 'lay "f the driver whose Ulirottti la always eilliei open oi I i' ivlng 1h.ui then Bred Of Ihlg I >nn i.T Im ii. %  i i.im Beve| ii ...siij ari > lo p.ok. %  •mi'i table, and bjdpM up vri> little room on U 'I Bg llh *li able iaap.lalU.lh.indu.tqr with E">h "'^" ^""'l,"^",, '1 ,mU (Slaw? tUTTma* S ..dvanlai. To such an cilsnt u to one flowering tree, prflcr([ n A „„i n ,. n j| n „ ,„.. |h* liutcununt pal MI'll v. U| M.P.G. .1 Hi U I'II lliU Ihe cas. thai ill many arvac in '•oly more. ......I; aonauaaptUw aval iown'TSl^fM'hilySS Patha too are important, and it 8u.pcn.ion is conveiili......! v.,r, %  .. 1..... 1 ... a -atolnjU ImlLnePlena ... of tho ..worth while lo .p.n.1 bnlh tin..,.„„ ... -""• *• JaST^apinl and hl„lni lh. a"d mca, in making them a. well „„„ „,„-,,hp.,e 1... ^"'.i „. m ,.,mu,tan„„. ly ,,,.lhe .eh, . a. P-nan.nla. j-gblj Jhj^J. %  >M are ". I $•, -faf %  In proportion. rhe bod] l iy This is then a ii.uiui-i... forth JU with whed tele.)" are all carried means leas trouble %  •ut mechanically. run. of taa tread of thought of the designer — thai is to i.t.dil a motor-car with all th< tn good ineusuie. but essential trtmmh as to keep the pindOVftl t" minimum. Wind-up wind",'. represent the flrst aacnflce OJ .tiur. being replaced of ,|„. L siid.ng dooi arkaclowi m th front aided by a ventilating qual ter section capable of opening pa i the 90 in rear, mam ttiudow is fixed, hut the gill vi a surpri-ii air in lhe back seat. hallow pocket*, and f i at • "I. | prove very pwpulai. ptih..|. i II to the extent it,..t II | n did. I u itch i:ha w ri j ing-iigiit "P"' %  1 night The wiper %  • %  '' %  pi"P"''" %  .. hut r i at rest, the blade aaV I aa>-' '; y W May h.ipp.n.ii and good Health bo your! Ihroughoul 1953 STORE LTD. f


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ESTABLISHED I85 BARBADOS. DEC! HER 28. 1962 K tgffvl^S QUEEN SEEKS HER PEOPLE'S PR Makes Xmas Broadcast III! IIOM'll Vl Tourisls Attended Cathedral IIM. Tilt Ql'EEN New Labour Commissioner Arrives MB. A H PICKWOOD. form. erly Deput, Commissioner of Labour, British Guiati. here iwiMll af' .ioo n in the Canadian frulaer to take up his new appointment a* Labour Commissioner ol this colony. He was met on board by Mr. R. N Jock. Deputy Labour Comnlnlour. Born in Kenya on July 18. 1909. Mr. Pickwoott was etnployed in -positions oi roopoasiDDIi) on sugar plantations in Mauritius frorr. 1931—43. From 1940—43. he served In the Local Forces In Mauritius. He was appointed Assistant Commissioner of Labour. Mauritius in 1943 and served in that pool until 1948 when he waul appointed to a similar post in British Guiana. In 1940 In.i'.t%  Instruction with the Ministry ol Labour in the United Kingdom and in 1951, he attended a Colo. nial Labour Officers' course. l.ONI.,)N Dec. Quen Elizabeth broadcaai hot tn tin peopl) i an M turn praye: "that God may give ma wladoni and atroi %  may faithfully serve him and you, all the days: of pa* ,.. The 26 year old Queen, sove%  ton nt nth* spoke ( %  home at, %  husband the Dufci roau oMi Am two, close %  %  greetings'* to fli>o.ooo.oi. ..li con-| t BcnU llM i • peciallv the coronation hum the s.s. Nttna 2nd. Amsterdam mlnalod wiih tin She gave hci people this plcd-fe1-rge congregation which attend 'At my coronation nut June. 1 *'d 'he II o'clock service at St f the ancient ceremony in On.tourist told th • Advwair which kings, and queens before me "I much prefer to to i navi taken part through century; bus I like to hear ih.local upon ccmurv ant. That is how I get to •• %  . L *-•• I know your people'. *.. „ \ *J M "* M '' %  * was glad to be You iii ue keepltu .,.,„„ Christmas m itatbados holiday but I want t,. ask you ..11 It was his first sunnv Christmas. whatever your religion inaj t>, : lie thought d ,ust as Inter pray for me on thai day—to pr..' a White ChriMmas'' trt Amenta, thnt God rruiy five me wisdom trench to carry out s Mr. CrWchill Going To J'ca l.OND* Prlin Minister Wii i the tjuren Harj for a hi i irw da) %  to Noa Voi h ti Biaenhowai and Praalde l I" i Jamaica. Mr. Churchill Ml the Chriatmai hohdar; ho aaili %  innphasi i I %  pan r hts Souslelles Tries To Form French (rovl. PARIS Dei of th, Oeneral Charles Do dent Truman will ulle's Rally -r French people gesture THE POLICE BAND*tindr dp! Secontl Class Mail Incr&ases In order to achieve a reason-' able standard of offsciOMI y In LhC delivery ui second class mail of %  which there has been u substantial increase, Ihe. Post Office ties have been finding it necessary greater extent than before. |o use 'he motor pick-up to a The volume of trai Continues to I'I addition. provision inn i to meet the Irscresurina cost which will result from the urhdruw.it of ihe Mib-id -i Canadian N.itiiui.ii Steamship norvl < %  No payment was msrde by the Poai I i i i by th. 1 "had] >' • ita Lai strvice was Included in the subsidy paid bj I I under the Can id i U' [ndie Trade Agreci % %  • nt, i'J2?. As a result, the I IMU week voted 11.000 sit mill, riuamount is recoverable, i p. Congratulations AMON'C main cable* of eoDiralulitloru. lir Olain l .in. Bombard ha* received a iHnr.iii rrom Capulu Cartel, Mauler wf the S.8. "Araksks." B.S. "Arakaka' mrt the doelor in mld-ocea.ii during his ennalni. The rable reads ''ContralulalloiM to a sall.'iii gentlernan who had so much r*urae In his eonMetiont to carry on when luxury and *aletwen ffired in him. \\ I-MI.I; >ou a happ) i iin.utii from all • n 1.1..Ml -hl.iwil ( .1.1,,,. f irler. lir Bombard Mho arrived In iuii.ui..<>n Dae* 23 after i US-da) i-rosulnc of the At. lanlle Iram I .a* Falnuto Itarbadu. in > rubber dlncht Is due to tlv |0 N>> Vurk earlj till* uerk on hi way b.tek u. Franre ih, promises I shall be makint; ail that I may f;uthfull> %  and you all the days of my lite." The Queen was maUni her Mr.-: Chrilmas %  i %  ceeded her father K l| %  tkUl last February. TAB Royal Cba*(otroaa broadteatt beamed all over the world by the BBC has been traditional since it was started by Kina George. V, 20 rears ago. Poised and diemfled before the niicrophuin in her study, the Queen sat in the same chair and nt the snme desk used by her father and mndfafttar. The Roval family Ralhcri-d in Lhe drowliiK room lo listen :<> her voice on their privati radio set The Queen w.-rs heard nt th.end if an hour lone broadcast In which he BHC linked the four corners -if the world with Christmas Rreetinp. and messages and food will. As lha m-ngrammc drew to on end. Her Majesta A u inlroduced lo listeners ondbeuan: %  I urn speakiiiR to you from my own home where I am spendWith my family" the Queen said. "Let me say at once how 1 hope that your children are cnioyinji thenu*tvei H much as mine are on the day illy the children's r< %  In whom I an, %  prakuig will be In your own b i' i navi i iin uuht fin those who their counto In dbrtanl land tar ,\ famUlee. When vei you are, at home or away, in snow or in sunshine, I K>VC you my affectionate greeting;?: with ever)' good wish tin Christ ma: and the New Year." Hi:: Kamik etoni ail or ui tn tht British Commonwe.illh pire—thnt immense union of itli their hopi I | i nil four eoraera i>r the earth. Uke HIT Own families it B gteat power for pood—a force which 1 believe can DO of im!r benefll lo all humanity'' The tjueen recalled that the work of her father and grandfather "united our i; more e l oae l y" niul proiiuBed to maintain the ideals -near In 1 %  drat "I shall strive m^ .utmost to carry on their work" she said. Police Band Played Al Queen's Park On Chrlstnyu Daj the band had Ihicc i-nptacement-. Thev played ninsimas carol* and miine a! Queen's Park fmm ~ 9 am The park ..is paeked with pe tpk who sang lhe well knuwn carols w.th lhe band. They thon played at the Gi'ni'i.il Hospital frmn 9.30 to 1030 a.m. This was a light programme of pupulnr dance tunes and calpsoes. I-ater in the afternupp, the Bund played at the Hospital. Here lhe bandsmen joined in the dancing; around the wards, wilh the nurses on duty. Yesterday aftern:on Iho bapd (ive a delightful Christmas Party pronramme nt th Si James BaaMaa the inmates TH.,: i.'sidents and well wishers amended the concert. The remaining engagements fur i for 1952 are: Monday 29th—St. Thomas' Almshuuse Christmas Party at 4.30 p.m. and tie v M C.A concert at a p.m. .(•lib St. Andrew's %  %  r Party .>i 3J0 i.m. Nine KilUsd In Explosion NAGOYA. Japan. Dec 27. loalon and An wiecliad .n section of Nagoya's downtown buslnaai district killing nine persons and injuring 22 other*. Ton .-Imp* were demolished by the blast and flames believed to hove [originated when chemicals in a iphoto shop caught tire. Seven persons were killed instantly and two fTtr-men died lighting chemical fed flames. I* was the second big explomn in rn k Nagoye in four days. Sixteen peraone were killed and some 300 Injured Monday when a nitrogen :. it.ii/. IT factory Mew up —t'r Mr. Stalin Offers To Meet Mr. Eisenhower I MEW YORK iw 25 Premier Stalin bniay olf-rvit lo meet Mr Elaenhower to try to ens.worl I tartMon li is gaid he is interested in ending the Korean war in araweiim: quest loin put to him by ihe New \ ork Times. Hr akl he U ved Dial tinw bel roan the U s. and Russia table The countriei can |iv*Malay Terrorists Kill 10 In Ambush "^P^OdCE NOTICES 4* Mi* -m-\ wi .. SINGAPORE. Dec 27 Terrorists ambuahed an armoured estate ear in Jahorc, Malaya yeatarday, kilbng ten people. Pt was the worst b> cidenl in Malaya In many months The killed included six Malay special coruTtabiea, two Malay women, a Malay child and the Indian drive] f hr.d place mine on the rood a* the arn nun it The rehii le m *n • loo yardl fthei bck. ABO* men exploded undei lo i II 10 j to one tide ai %  Ihea opened lire wilh i .•' I Ifuiw KKiiadOs and a brenguri Two of the f"i rtsea In the armoured ear IM Police s*id most of the others •he explosion of the second land-mine which ,-oug.d a hole Ifl mrtrai •he around sallttlng the armoured tar in IWO, A party of live police heard the explosion about a mile away. Thev rushed lo the scene .mil the terrorists broke up into several parties and Police and troot lensi\e search for them I P. PROSPECTOR COMING / in Destroys Homes 0/2,000 rAtul. South Korea. Her. :;. Hre deilruyed Hie nomeit of 2.000 Koreans here curl' i" i'.t. driving tin in .i" i lhe -Heeli In ley rM weeNer. Four Culled -LI. MIdleni were injured hihtlnr ui blare. t>ne Korean rlvillan was reported In a srriou* 4-nditlun and two olbrrs were illgtiily hurl. Somr Kure.ii-. had la be resiraiu.-d irum BSSahBag into the llamrs lo recover thrlr po*se**son*. The lire anUal was reported lo have started in a soap factory was fanned h% a %  araag uinj and in t" hours had wiped out the %  ongested •.'-.! stdo <>f In arri fteee h! hloek. ol dnell'iias were destroyed Ohortll iM'T.iriinilil.tN mil civilian lirem-n were ahlr to qi-ll Ihe blare. A tailed Nations %  i. II %  sh rl ea es a*onir' w hod Man k'-i and ilotlnng U, |h* •lomele| f aanol he considered as mevipeaoft, Mr Stalin said *urecs of world i intention inevery when tssl m %  %  old war 1 in' would i llplon %  le %  pproacn to end Use Korean aai beeau i I S8H *nmler. led In nding i :i Mmr* fotind the .-ncnuroftUig' t*n.i veiy .lulauvut horn 'ho attBudi rl plaveo at reumt >'N usnliiiis. Ti.. brought af ..... vei < P Three Injiinnl In Accidents I) i King %  %  H Si rrtdio si"' in 3ii %  BSPLANADE SEA WALL IS CJU<:KII\G erswh have i in thn ooral ston seaward side of the Baj Stra> > and portions of tinwall %  lev* nave bean daaai gp eted that repain ii u. mi mtendlng 500 l I % %  U ooi U earrlad out aksBi Bri i i In supplementary %  %  %  ss(i by th' Leglslei i %  ek. an amount >( $5.ooo was ted to arry out the ru dared t<> %  l fbiice Active The POUre Department iok 1 i : the holiday period ensure safe driving by holldayeri who uwnd the country vehicles. g All alonir the main hieliways, constables from the Land Foree ;.nd the Mounted Branch, patoiled the roads, 0 constant rerndskder la oriven that they mid drive with eatrl n %  othei road users %  m on Frtdio She wei % %  I Hoop) ii i i .r on iii %  rldent ; %  ;'%  :i..,-m i rde war* going lo the opposKe dlrec thortlj fn i %  %  h i i< '"i i.! ... i ib i of CarV II iae, st Michael was ..n Hart's % %  with the car x-it?l own KI >j ';< %  ild aa %  nd riu" II. %  Charb I ronaj both of worn ln| v.%  ChrM Chun h, Lloyd suatalni d OUT.. on iH-lh l a > -l*pham. St. *.. the fJen%  ral Hospital on rrida) aftei mi Ml from %  • imi trai alw mg Trwrnbury' Hill, Christ Chun h abnol 2 pan "•i am from I %  i' no UiUl i leet Mi\d Cktr^o %  i v Hi;ii. Daoideoi I I. i of mixed 2.W0 bags .,[ T ; %  X | % % %  i II go and ... .ui. i %  wood and M.i'ei t the Darideon is Captain .. %  r., s Ih i wal agents .. OWTH i \ 419 Die In U.S. During Xmas Holiday CIIUAGO. Dae, 27. An unpajrlnl tabuiailoa %  llii perons had iwi killed thvoughoul the UA. in the Chriatmai holldaj waastand aeotdanl Including 34n in traffic, U In Rrai Ihrae m ptaao 11 lahas and '•* li rnlsa eltanooug mlabap Ainu. two full day: of the %  i.iliiliy weekend wen' ksfi and there was %  %  urong poaal blHty th.it uia nallrtgy di gl I 41 mik'ht ieach a now record. The aii Umo roaord >>f S5S holldeathj waa sot laet ."h 11st ma*. The Kattonal Safely Council haa ehreody pre.lutej] that BOO pateOtUJ AMI i k.ited on the hlg inlawghi nuaaay. M.-anwlnlc cold --tutf chilled '""' i ton ions of the counbA hut reneralb (air Udi i roai bolldaj waathei daaplta fanlna iperature Many par* rl inbach .it woik \i..n.i .\ an the trek today in .ivm.i tin I I I' ,u i Pi lo h %  >• agree ... uthre CoverruBeni DI with Mi i:i %  pnted lo-day to tcit Preetdeni perted to hit i \ .i io| whethei ha iii Foreign poln The i .. | %  onstU ition tlv v embly mual i| | tentative I'rcnilcr before he naPMsj !;. ininisters then approve tin %  %  .LI ,n< •.ia.... rue ftadeioaai 1 lined by but \' siandaid of BH njBOj aassj tl, HERE FOR RUM The motor vrsavl O.I-: %  i a C %  : le Bay on rrom Halifax to toai aaof turn The nerd during tnu month of Novemboi i swuHng m n | %  : %  %  Do 'I i> C-... Ltd. ANOTHER CHRISTMAS \l (.1 OTA, t.rorela. lie. 1] Mr. tn.i Mrs. ( brlilaaas v>ere in hi|ip> pari-nK al a bah> |0rj iMirn un i lirrst BBSH Ive nisht. Diet are to djocida an i asm for her mil II is said in social • Ire tea tlut H M'uild either lie Kerry or HIPP* —t'.p. Red Soldiers Oil To Pieces OBOUL, Dai ii force "( UN. I wtt vim n i ingad dean Into u m HI land on uv wi fiont todav to lUrprloO ami cut %  .i KMiiip of %  Raidei ran uito lha Chlnm I "i %  : UTJCl Mll.ic rhey opened up p guni end *•'(' U Rod dead w wounded before polling bach % %  << tiU N Unaa. n .ii.i snow ovai Nnui, Korea 1 U N warj.l..i. i. ta in Ihe nftarnoon when %  • few %  M I L kUllng BabrehrJ glitei • eabai i i ared through breaks in tin %  sky to hunt for utfgetl In north Korea. —IIP. 14 Die In Plane Crash BDU Dae, 2: A Oreeh nlrfor tti crashed and bun %  %  all u r -' Pour Qraak erewmeo, %  LVS I.I..I ... i .%  > %  i,. unidenlifled pas-singers wort killed, li waa the second Oreeh i craft tonash hi Korea within week. Last Monday night <• Royal 11-111 r. %  .HI Inn. hospital plane collided with a U.S. Jel I i i BBS niTi'.. iv Ti.,' ,., %  ( ..%  i .. -. The iwm engfrsi d 111 ,i,.-i uadai %  routi 1 courier ircull Moppin I V.K auri i i he plane failed to gen aPi-i a lakeofT and trashed into a bill about i .v., q ||ai hrotn QM airfield. An investigation is under il — I'.P. bfiw he intended I •fsni HO mid however t %  alloy of itabflliaUon >i pi lowering of pSOdueUOB COatl mi the In iI i oductivlM ohlch bad ntn"Bii\ bean initiated ihould be i d with tl rigour, Fourth Support ol no Bufopean IneUtutlons **. lni • a*t |uarduv| vano intere n allot —|t.P. %  I of Ihe trip %  i much aa i lurnrlM I %  the British press and puMua It did to Americans It had been n aa bant Mr. Churchill in tendtn i'*>'' tie constitution Mi : ^u'"l addi... ih- Sid Hr si.id that under th.prasei b ,,,s ., trt 'if' about ., meeting FYeuch consfjtutlon rvobody ran *"* Mr Buennowei i lb...id prompt con*"' be discusotd, but Mi Churchtitutionai raforrn would loclude| '" mare concsened lhe strengtheninsof the emneutlvi l h '''" "** '" %  | hl '-'M Ol tin pcaotleall) powerless '".' i.l • "' % %  i .. %  alt of uti :o go with has hip Wd WashhiKtcn UI 11 March but this departure U.S. and his sub-, .p ation ha.i not ted i>ipi..n,.ri, soureai in Load Old Mi I'hurihill thought it tvlsable t.. put Mr. iawi lo hower before Mi Ea* ny deflnito I." i' lo bii Seiuite, ami the %  • %  %  H .nengthentsd at h-ast hy innrhVoo Hi.i' ..'I •• % %  nblj vote of e rorandanee In Oovaruaneni ould mean Us dismissal and i long. s id A bold Invent ran) tad raroruurucUon plan. Third Amelioration of ih Korea own. trip and In present Mr CfaurehUl was coaafMaatly warned igahul ih> u. coming untangled in Asian lighting to the extent thai Kuropean d. time ia darnaae i. god be was -X|jeled lo put that ViewnolOI to Mi Elsenhou'i again There was no expectation thai Mr. Churrhill would go homle oi :iii.iii.i..i piol %  detailed aspects of f Igrj poUo) I the It snlan oil ., %  •i Britain 1 ) admlasion in some mnai lo the Pacli defence ei nou confined to U.S. Ausm .'• ii ind —r.p. Dr. Mosaadegfa \ erj Weak i %  % % %  •.., raaatl %  '• %  nnother arrival on %  :>.,. uUf, D I %  : %  fosoadi %  i of emptj drums I ipta %  %  nternal Grorgo Fcrgusson la the master of ih • he /eaJntne Roberi ind Ita agents Tai i. B. Harris O (fjw.j (Ring out the id fRuuf in the /lew Communists Hold Out HANOI, [no..' hi 1 Ide L> %  I Harrison line %  pectwr ta due to nrrive trerirh"!! UI I delta rice paddie.i overwhelming firepower while a • nt '.ned to escape I Beat 3*AY lie. al Uie Harliom Police dineliy m wl lea T>I Bombard tri M d-\ 1 Prel ta go to tc< local Station and you can %  •* the mbber


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-1 \HM DECEMBEB 28. 19S2 HMDA1 Ainu. ATI. PAGE OF IDFA5 RESEARCH Edited by CHAPMAN PINCHER ACHIEVEMENT j goes out VOLT-FISHING HDMQEftfVRD. Berks. • %  %  %  iq u la soamiblr >•> .-. Tuesday r*tKL' ll XilfCl ZOJ1J/ rtlSn£lI '''*•' ** IUM-I HONGKMOftD. Berks, ^^^ rvMHi %  VllIS [crluir sllOW> %  thr iiiii^l % %  llYrliv. m pui. of III. I llslLIIII, I -irkIf .-vi devised. I'MIH It for only ZO minute* on the Hirer Dunn at Hunrerford I.KI.II I i .mi lii £5 fat trout, A doaen pike, and J ore of fine grayling. Hir tl<*]f s .ill i-Li Lrli A converted motor cycle mrinr dm.-, a d?n inv. (c-nrriUiii direct rurrrnt. A ater! %  h.tm daiirlmf, fruni lac center of the boat ii-.illit. urn in Into Ihr %  •In. \ -..HIII -a hi. fram Ihr dvnamo kad> hi 'Pike a yard towards my > UIIIIC lutudhd urn nil m nfci .i ...rr lirtUN! When thr mw is dls+rd in inlr in. %  in ii.i i..impk-U-d. So current [ %  % %  iri.ni Ih. chain to Hi•rovfi rfcrctrifyina; thr water—and an hah In thvtrinity A"or MW rf ajon not jsrJ anaVrvfood tht uh orr dnrei. irroiiliofa imuurds Ike spoor uad .n Of /f*d out. 1 MW plump. 41b. Irani *u*l •nlU*i, phr ra.li front tar It hannti HI the treea* M n,..„,i. %  Klllr*! n> m.iflii-lisni Whet) | long rushed electric net' Unvtes, of '-IBanks, i .fVUj fr .. r r kr. |r. < rurtunatrl. M hi Mo n riMami philips iiwtalhnx It in tlfrbuaU ta Ih.i •hipnmKt-d pmplr nfrd not go huntr* ot ihin.1% Ihr iui.fi. .>r ID uii.iHihrd 1i-h rail ..ilrl* •Oaha banuii thici Thr puiiMix o( tbr haul waa l.i remote canniballMir pikr ami "roarar" hah il 411 thr trout—mot. ihau SOS i ih. in — %  r. rrlirlfd .ii H in.1 Ut thr a-alrr. Ihr I mi pi*, and m">hah arrr Iran-fri ml alivr la a near '•• .nial to pr.i\idu|i| i The eves have itif guilty T HE bellel thai a ami pen la a suniere.1 is iK) uia Mi Idle, to Proleasar r !i rtrrrliuan who tuU rk.lt 1< v'lUk-:: . : i i Over Aitl Scheme <'ia\ LettU .m i I ui A ^ ' :.' No ^ .i\i HI i in i \ i ;:\ %  m %  /Vi / m /. .i %  i n r..\-i iWIM S 5.000 CHI1 DREN rBSTBD \ A touch of hope in the uphill struggle to combat polio i\ot chance 'Antibodies' M D I NFANTILE paj %  tat | m u .s i a, red bj ma %  itartM in Ban vicltl |l >• %  r. T %  %  %  dvan %  i. l*h' wbicn ran dtti %  i k %  intmi on %  111 U.S. %  i %  In i out :hc dorr in !,•.. -.ipc**.HJ far Thi' i oJ'Wihu/i. wus in*-!) i,n 57.000 rhltdirri in % %  *.. nut irotn aertn pi A furnrr 38.000 cnddi •Jir wnr Hffr—onr 10 1 .1. -. mi i:.M1 Aii :n. f'htrrfi mm %  winic ii.. epkk B oi the rhilnrrn |i (l bj iwen proti RlubuUii arm do*n *HI .; %  > %  ... %  %  Prafvawi n-miam n ., %  Thr proi %  M botl ... % %  %  %  %  •>x>rrl it nor o! %  %  %  i A The tvst %  %  *jn %  ) attack %  f%  *. .1. n (jc HI. \ %  %  : Ii. |oh| %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  THIRD Ih. %  %  %  in.mm WMU %  A netahbou %  11) dwniaMd %  %  .i.iiiii> Douti i %  > Quaui throufti .it Hi. %  icoal oi.i \ ^ I thai i-ouid help ih. m .pi on MM %  %  %  i Uvorcc %  i pit II i \si. i A wort %  UM .. ondllli i ii ...-I %  M. rltlnal I %  i, %  ..badly "fl" I. ilad DfflCCI wi i riic man Irani ImiiKllllll in r i" • ii '>" lac*d Hi' hu %  %  %  I \S| 11... HOI II %  i ornwail .. m IM1 M %  %  %  I : .,BtUamonl %  Dei you wondV %  il> in.in lo-day i>" '"' i % %  .,:, DB] I %  Thr Cmmta H om Um %  Bnan ...... %  i or far M Uia ~ Uu Uiah i ,i tap II %  %  lo pool %  I • %  s HONG KONG COMES TO LIFE rd HoiHl Kone* 1* the IU I lil \ I IK HI OKI DECEMBER ot tbJ %  "j"' i' /''if • 1 -<:'' I from historians to novelists down ii' i i .: % %  ii ... in...I .i hing inauKuratt-d by the C Offiic frith the Arm mi (II M Si ii Office, 27i ii'i ) % % %  \ ,; . ., Hong K %  Oi''.... %  i, %  ltd dni "IItmett in i %  i ;. UI-I-I books. "It Imrnt pul S.-I. Mr. Oliver UytUll ivord. •'Wf in the ( proud %  : U i keenlv to can until '. paths ITaj e | are concerned" irs ,„ toromm Uh Verv (In Ii Si i-Klartl His <• fcrencr to %  Mr Inm volum* 1 Al" .... that th. %  %  ibte, that %  bouU wherr • : ind I fr.ink aeeoui.' %  l %  ( %  %  %  i %  1 unda-i i %  i i %  .ace : • %  i 'h Konp" • %  nisUndlnn %  Aft, %  1 rd out that I long K % %  poi Fact. "Throufh %  rha teer %  "ent • nrners. loading and of1-loadl;i r lotnei 'i rout, cat *eu . i ..iiituif apnu i Uieni law J night. r treadluic %  sayingni-ithlnac w. tasi a> n i >•!• gets s feeling that if Chare %  ...i not been indUHlrnm the ..•IINT! they kwenHd n M Yf1 iipuri fiim, thi port induntry of all. %  %  %  P %  iv it men intl %  i I %  %  • %  Trod. In H a| i i.it milu'trv In IllfSf) was running tl ;i clcaw ond," wi lee Mi. Inerts developnent of the Induitriev in i %  kajl tiro or three years has %  untie" And he Roe* on lo ivr Ur "he essential facts and fleuren Nof .."Iv hj. Mi Mane i 'l.liihtfullv read*.!-' 1>'IOK hurt %  tnar in true ne* ha" rton" i nductimi. %  %  %  . %  %  lllustr.v Kihtmlion In The GoM ( •*>.t s %  i %  %  %  I i Watfan t.on In tl %  i i ijati) %  %  %  %  %  ly eighl tl %  %  orossion %  %  rlrechl din%  of Soul her i Jkaj %  %  l<".4 flH II,. B '%  -. hen, ne n <>• • %  .ii primary d %  %  % %  %  : ill ',.,, I Northe %  Ti to BJ with In tin%  I pupil%  1 %  I ture and %  %  %  • %  ehook %  %  %  Al th. agrieulturi %  %  %  Tudej Tralaik oi cludiriR i %  %  %  %  %  Northern l '" %  %  %  i.i iiI >tralntria I ictlttle men h ".7/. STARS %  %  ..~iYtxr n i i* \rn %  i I II 1 ... H \ V .. | I %  • M it ;i IB n M %  Jl N. I! W II 11 n ."-.. %  I %  .,, ... II > ti Look /#• H arehwoB • %  bi| lourisi 16 en bould hr dene u %  th. Island .iildlng w.ll nie Tw.. id • f *'.,ritnni Sen. %  bniejnd. The yu*'t nd ; %  ntone wall I ih. B .; %  %  PubUctt) Com•\ Billboard erith i %  > %  : UttBtting Hours .Kloa.. >a mi fallaur ~*. i nan I MOVSI IU | ItRU U. ISM %  t iSIIII •*" %  lp in From Thr Hililr S It p n %  %  aj sw as n Tassas. ... \m m pm $\ at M • : I ,n.i... HI I Ml I i.l. i %  **>* % % %  i~ MM mi i .pi ... .\si \ai i.. >> * %  "i MAB4 >' m %  I'. .. • pHi Thr N> IS in., re* i M I. ,T. SMvanrn •di.tr 1 fa p HI I IMM( Choi,* %  •: n m tl* N -l'v| eon*t ui M. Id >'I la ton to %  I'M *.l %  STOMACH PAINS WI TO INDICtSTION Try Imei ONE DOSB • f MACLbAN BRAND STOVlAiai POWDUt 1 T.u %  a'nirfnailT balanced torr.mui a'.itkli rvlk-roj S^onUHh I'J v rasrulrncr. H ran hum. Naurs •V Adilit* due to Indigcinon. never fotq i\ 4>iK^ .." wt\eit you've 4tied a... MURRAY'S MILK STOUT MANNING & CO., LTD. AGENTS. TO ALL OUR | CUSTOMERS AND FRIEND E WE WISH A Bright & Prosperous New Year & I .• >: COLLINS' DRUG STORE %  S 28. Bro.,,1 Slr-.-l BICYCLES TPADEP !N. 01 THOU > %  REPAIIU Our Bloyole Oupiriwn' Is now :iyo-ir nervlce: wo can handle ropalr.i ti all makes and trade la your bike against %  new one on terns... Its as oasy as ABC A BARNES ft CO.. LTD. m ~* PHOTOGRAPHY YEAR BOOK 1953 %  I" in i. %  is a* o ,.. Tha By Harold Lewis Thus b*o.k i. i i. HI i r.i-l m the* main wilh but It tl gj w.-ll. on %  Lime b look ovw %  •*. %  I %  mut G#n .ii.'im s/ho lg the world Ity -.ii Vi.-tm inn phot ir th. %  %  from \.i re folOl lU.'il%  I I .ii' PHOTOGR M'ln Vl'AK BOOK %  -. i-ar. Now on sale at the Advocate Stationery



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rw.i. n\u -I ND \\ \l>Vi>. \ II U'NDAl DECEMBER M. I*B 1 LAM • %  %  TeOUGH HK.HWAVMJW %  iFC*CT MG TRC£S 4 %  1 IX* I TALK m L %  AND A %  %  NOT 2 .i 'M;II. ft = r — %  —i — J ..'il I III A I HI % ill'IKI \ %  %  Ol \l %  • %  • B ID II Hl\ %  tK | | JUST FOR YOU \M> i | %  ,-.-., mm %  %  i Ma* '. ,i • baa v.u w.i. • %  i .1 i tmm 1 M rut M>M 1 mum Ml fl tMM urn mi • *\S III Ml XV\I|> %  it tana MM BEND OF THC u imu RIVER i>*ik<'>t*W 1 Mil. I.KIVI J.M-l M.< IM GIOBI lo—i-ki A lo I' Mtflt, 1 *>*. %  H. !• p.A. ~ u.r u'r M R. P A AK:%  A! sad.>r in I %  %  v II .W i. A II ft* %  %  i. %  A • Sfi-fmft Fiijtht* rW |M ft |KfTlKh ft.-: | Chriansuu. Ub> ami B. K1Ilf: ito^ in :J. I lubV ClM-MUn* .v,. which oprmvi CM Thou,HM.vi.ir .*, < hrasusss* WT1 Ml \ I i* ... ( %  raeiiKlgaH Mm I. H II fc-i M Mr. Beset i. Prov.il> M Oil nnrt Mi II VfR STrWAIT MAI J.iinc* war who left flur.riK ti„ li W.l A lor TrtrrMusri b ti Chrtatmaa !! % %  e Mctin fruab Callina M Mi .i".! %  %  %  %  I i Ruper: Uic IMM •a -r %  "M I %  *** held -t %  honeymoon i being spe-.t at : (wc-u. Johnson wiU bo or :heir horn, m .. i ^PhNIMNC two monUit -^ Mi .I SrVINM I f aw.cj> |,V MUSIWt! / llinkami. eon of M | i d ;i ctte>mt*l etnpl ed in P.I.M M .mi! raw chlldian /.A. -any i a. L I AVINt; to' OM I* K.. OO W. Mi-LIBM MUCI tor Ot Mr. Jiimofc i_ Mnri.iv li.uh Hi.ll Sh< llrn cndinK wilh his %  Bbj M GrmtoMm • < \i>iiii Giiivr'*, Cava Hill. Mr. Haynts* who was LaM %  i L.I thai !:• md 'AK I. milv will t..UMvlofl on J-"i,.ry M for (iranad.1 where they %  Ail I >%  the fUMti of Mr. A. O. the Sin lal BManat tag I>J the Batt-s Mamortal Blah Sthool who b aponoUna •' holiday •i. i. Miih ins parami I'rii-t/i' l*riivtHiinifr • AlUil. JACKSON. Pt WustunKton, t.i*. arrived on i, %  | nu,\ via Puerto RlCO for tt ii "Edsewaiei Hotel", B i Mod i"'" in? it. ii'* Mi. aaaaal %  B ACK to bad trid K> t-of-8p*in who SIM-Ilt KoUda) m on-Sea", The str.-.uu %  .i-ii in the i : P.>rtpr said she had • %  v. T> %  | p Wn %  ... tnlrtinm'l M RS M K mw heir on U.oo. .. IV '.ra^r o b I .. i huacu' araap baa just been afapotnat c:.. in Caatrlai Bhi f panled by her f'rtmi I fin-ziifttt M R. and Mi. I %  STBOBRVl US two chil frora Caracas, Va^eaauela, Offl Snnrt.iv and an Hotrl Mi Sli i Bb %  his \if.thr^e weela' atopten a I vilt to thf UM> Plaaa TWl < .^. baaat Tw*er 1 ... lU Cr 1 ok Brtroleuni Corpoci.li.iri'Veneruelb. Ae*. oveudad b>tojecwl flight "< IL-iKina Da> to apend a waefc'' < %  Mi Edn* Si-huyUUlot Bowman ami Mi* 1 M.<'rn>K*. all ol whom "!• '. %  II..'.' Irrieats l?y /*< %  GraMBi A LSO holidnyiiiK ^ Cn.rabi.iik Hob and Mm. Oaear Olanc ot who arrived over "" B W I A In Olaru %  trltnex. n Commb S Marncniuo "aid lliiil th. > wtMlld be here for two weekr> I their th-" fieri I M ISS CYRItXM i I'll l-anvothere en by ihe SA D line* o % %  am ot %  i. >: %  %  %  totn ., i i la They are ROM rUirtxuHi'ii In BermurUi \ 'R tNOXR, ^ B^rbarban, who lias been Hi.pasl i -.jv.-., retume.1 asda r CJi. to ,.-.-k'' bollM %  i | Hi %  pnnirri hv Ojrrrell. a coBrr.nuda who will i i \ >-n areeka, /v uifcht at tta* Bndffto' *. The Party wm given by the tfi'turiii'il In L'uiiatf.i A MONG the pea* bare eltb hot dauabfa Hi Roddy Austin of ith BeUevUM md Mr, and H VM %  i A R OSWALD I.I VIA -Rhyl", Mai .'hrtet Church B w i. A gpaetal flight. f>/W afaaaW*V %  .: %  . !,% ing earaa ay Mi" M to Mr. %  %  ka* s>van tn marri%  <. i kli Bert Stt.ikci Bi Mman v.ni the bridegroom's brother Mr. %  i tn Tudor. 7Vr. Wlmtn M H AI.ISTAIR ELDER, I • h ai %  > i' i-ofB pam, Trlnidml !, %  I • i'WI A on two weeks' ''.hllinv .o-rotnpanied by hianm nd Master Donald nooliiag "* ue*t~ m the Marine Hotel. %  H mi r i .. trwi m a ino i who are buddtad iund a be hard;. p worm. Jealous. .. qtucfc i*. i an 'i' my W en d had had enough of (he Jmt unlew. vou r .,,. ambl%  tn be left i .'_> M CfBB3 I FATHER CHRIHTMAR hiongli* %  Capt C E RAIHOX Crane Hotel on ChriaUaa* night iturtiif their dinner wirty He atakcf and atreaavr* for the gueau who welcomed hi an ringing "Jingle Bell* %  lullooi. baton" in banu tonducta the linger-. -car AYO REAGAN WEDNESDAY M aaoMmowN % % %  A M A (DUI 2310) arg.^lJL-% Ol II 1 'I-All I 2;sir/irii;s r The Barbados Aquatic Club rtjgaral & VNiii:i.; M-IHIMT* tlnl> ) |>INNBBfl will be servef betweam 7 arul l .> pJOs. i i>eier ::ist i PRit I' $:i.:.i> Very Spn lal Menu. • • iiv *s psa ia a bl l Dutl 44i'.l DAJXC1NG from 9 p.m. Music by Mr. ( CUBWEN nid bit tircheitra. m I Si; me DcttMM, und Ballon l>ance. for rVtae^ ..ill he given; nl^o DOOR PRIZF to the holder of the l.mk. Ticket ATTRACTIVE BAI.LROM !iKfORATTONS. \(Imission to Ballroom 3 l'rtnn Puvrlu Riru M r ORIVAS of New Y Cltv. arrived on Friday uiglil /~*HliISTMAS \1. i. l-WIA.. from Puerto Fico V-< M.-kiej baach Ua.She was accompanied b> her two'have almost dlsapiic oWdren and will be staying with people were spl .'hi her aunt Mr*. A. WhRe of brine, why do thev make a no [Irighion. Black Rock. of |i< n .... that partien 1 th. -i.-i U al%  !hi.uoc tan.. t! _,-j i wouM ,,„, ,. JV (-J (..ruiwiciMis..cocbl : t .t t .rsu.iid • l OM • %  %  %  history of Barbados is ROIIIR wan a naming nb-m pod be the main theme, an in enormous bowl of exct ni cralnent Barbadian historioi rrapher is gunii; to keep On i right. It should be ver> spectaFoornoic: On Tuesday In my .olumii I raid thai The Harbu,!..* Piayf*' Green Rnom U open on %  i luy I ',i *ald Wednc.idJiv. AND Fun %  sorry. Now I hear that it | lo i be open on Sunday evenings as Rum Punch. Behind the studio the Dot on u well I I I I I I an 4 £ HAS. otar commas wn nwaa A Prosperous New Year mm rax naBuavav i> imrr or T. R. EVANS n nan HOPE m net asx staaaaav ni I.KMM, mi t f,\;\ /•> /..,, T. R EVANS (WHITFIELDS) AM H -inn -r.iKi "1. •-; IB. %  n Ban onm am I i I I I I



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9UNDA1 l>l( I MBKR 2*. 15? M'NIIW \n\'l'AT ru.i i IM nir za NO 25r, SIX FLY SOLO IN MISS BIM TOPICS TWO teen-age bo. %  since the i> Aeroplane Club's Ausier an craft "Mis* Bim" look the air last June. Thev are Peter Wallbridge (17), Graham "liolch" Atuell (ltt), Gordon Butcher < :<> i. Koss McKemn(11). Jack Marion (31) and Donald Kdghill (27). Wallbndge left scrvoi in April and wants to become fin airline pilot. Atwell plans to J oin the Royal Can:. I 'orce, Butcher is a mechanical engineer at Acme En^'irUVrks. Roebm-K Street; McKenzie is TCA* Resident engineer; Jack Marson and Donald Edyhill arc commercial saltFir*t to solo was Butcher in just over seven hours. The other imide their llrsl flijihrin undn 10 hours. It was in August 1W J*r thai a group u( men interested in n>Inic held a meeting and lormed what was to become the Barbados Light AeropluniClub. Thi following month two members ol the Trinidad Light Aeroplam Club flew an Auci aircraft CM on a goodwill visit. During thrt four-day stay thev put on a disto pass i*la> "f precision and stunt flying test a\ and took several members of ih< Barbados Flying Club up for spin. BY JOE & ROBERT TVi. mber Seven M!">KTM* 1 %  ran %  thi V.Ijt i UIH iiiliirnirg Mil >!' • lvn Krere H> i %  %  %  sfJBSS i %  1 Philip %  ala ftlahi eeMerda In MiBim". He \s Il<> : i: ..i HM in %  la ti* ••In. THREE \\<>MI.\ *lS6BiG VFTEK PLANE CRASH ;<. plan it %  I %  i Barbado* Light Aeroplane Club inspect the engn MIHS BIM \Ut %  iiib AimUr Shortly after HMBT arrival Philip lliblb. pilot ol the aircraft ald we are out here U> *ell ihe airrrall Wr are here n, -rir the idea of flvini Thr\ did iut that. By mid-January Ibis Barbados club held its inaugural meeting. Lecture, on flying aircraft Left to rmln Demi Malone. Stanton Top mi Otintnutors). Row McKemie, TCA. rasidrm cu glDoai and Donald Etlglull MrKenrlr and F.dghill art two of the *ix member* of the club who have i. fob median Airoperalioi a) " lee* <>t MM toad ssj .Mil. i uw hangrai as oeti%  i-.ido* Ught A-T pi n %  tbe rhe* ;.\*u receive full i ind work In preplion from thr airpnrl .i Hying i ifeei Th* The dub in Its firsl %  • ai I Mponert their endeveloped rapUb Blld there | ...MIever) iwHeatlori thai li hown then < %  .limn *"> <>• %  flown iolo. ni *,uli they have iv ed i the Director of Madieal as well as tests in] regulation %  and vi-1 vignals. A student must log 40J hours, some <'t v.-hii h must be fore he ((ualiios for his student's pilot li"IftBS B i %  : .... i rra bed fl* la roast on a nigh: • town of Barrel*.i .. n inutes for STUBBORN hang on Bronchial COUGHS AND COLDS a COUGHS | COLDS \wmmtd THERE'S NOTHING CURES AS SWIFTLY AS CANADA"S LARGEST SELLING COUGH AND COLD REMEDY BUCKLEY'S MIXTURE %  s [ %  nd lhs life f> %  • %  %  %  am In the dart routh ea ,C9 Skilfu/h kknded fttitietitty aged •rgaidaad In preparation for the arrived in Barnrrlval of an aircraft. bados Government 1 club an acre of lund at Seawell and members of uf the club constructed a nan1 gar on the spot. Dancewere held to raise funds and in May the aircraft arrived. The following month "Miss Bim" made hen first flight. OarAN nm> ing 13d hours nrlng t. %  r i PI %  • %  340 hour* %  1" hours AMu tie t the %  Engineer, it,.id KensJe. Tin. %  form of an Inapei Uoi all HM and angltM. Even so hour> 11Kaircraft igiven I thorough overhaul and checked h 1.i stern. The airerafl iat UM ol and will the event i its being 1 reported nUattni TMirl %  jsgrbsM adshlns photographs of liv ttit i will lx* i noted b] one ol the Instructors. Should a member of any oU ei nj im; club vlsli Uv on the prOdUCtloa <>f RU pDot'B ids a visiting member and could have the Entrance fee to the club U *10 U at tin aira ill UMk wilh an .. Fur non-flying %  I no entrance fee Annual >ubAeroplane Club h scriplion is $10, and it cofU UM w tin facUltj when tie was rnssnbcri $ll an hour in '.he ;nr recentl) in Barbados on run Wallbrlatr To-day, the Harbados Light Aeroplane Club has 45 flying members and 25 non-flying members. There bj one lady member Mrs. Peter Morgan nf the St Lawrence Hotel. This is divided into 30-minute period^ of instruction. Its PM aircraft insuranci'. ] %  trol. oil. engineer's fees and general maintenance. four ex-R.A-F. pilots are the club's instructorThe> ,ireS chief Instructor; Dam* Malone. Barrister-at-Law and ex-R^.F. ^. ltKllll l%mamm Flying Offleer and Julian Marr ir n ,. v ryahow. Air Traffle Control OfflH^, auditor Will JIM. cer, Seawell. and ex-R.A.F. FlyprwP nt the clubs ing Officer. The intruetors give „nani lal lepoit, and IM their time free nnd deserve great be the usual SM credit having had their iirst six ann managemenl commll pupils solo in under 10 hours. Already the club %  Royal Air Force trainees solo in ^cr pfenning to become 8 hours. line pilot and snoUwi arho mM The '. Light A club plan closely is possible with II in Trinidad and %  afoot to %  h.l, U bTptloni s r i r due next month and at the annusl general meet Ing ~~ mW^ SWTHE TRUC >QVG&! K SL BUS TYRE THAT WAS *IRFnv MORE POPULAR THAN ANY OTHE 11 Sistt vefi of ksdcnMa m tvre-mahinc have la.. that there U DO i be bettered H : J oe eo <*** " Tni.k and Ru T\ thi fine bani. paitci IMi'ROM (i r DUNL^P TRUCK AND BUS TYRE 1.. L-l'-l* .!•> 1 %  1 1 %  %  sponsored by J & R BAKERIES m.tkers of ENRICHED BREAD and the blenders of J & R RUM ANGUS SCOTCH WHISKY "t • i a. i %  DR. BOMBARD and friend* ilttiug In hirubber dinghy L'Hereii.|iie ni the Harbour Police fltaUon ysUrday RIKIH with move camera i1'iuik W>tkin* taking some 'live "hot*" of the dorter for Teh-vi* ion New liitrr'.UIonal New* Hervlee of New Yoik Tin(I'm will lie flown to HIP United State* at the earliest opportunity HOW MANY GLASSES THE QUARTER POUND TIN of Andrews fs of special interest to those who take a laxative onl> occanorutly, to those who do a lot of travelling. ind to those who would like lo try this lamou effervescent for a very moderate initial outlay I r.:n> of it! Fifteen glasses of iparklinii enervctcm Andrews from the quarter-pound tin. Here's econom Here's value! Here's Inner Clemli*


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•-I Ml Y III ( I Ml'.l I! .'.. IM M MIW \ll\lk \ll I' U.I I I I M \ Dear Mother iBVOt Mi %  USSX f'v If, UtHTimm-Cray BERNARD WJCkSTEED mile* home from Korea ^ on Should Have Joined Our Trip The Other Nighi SPIVSKl I %  STOCK HOI M Wednesday T TN1VERSIT Y | I .-ludenU in If /%  la ^^ dream b nit the divine" Linda Darnell. sinn Western jazz tunes and show a narked preference for the knee-long "a < II —and are about to set a resounding kick In their extra narrow pants for doing to. CuinaomoUkaya Pravda. the newspaper ot ihe Soviet Communist \ Organisation %  Kom%  UDl'i! publishing a series ol %  which bring elarii m revelations ab-ur i attitude ol thi R youth to the enltur mrntaMon Imposed DV ihe regime (Tie newspaper rM %  car.":. finished Ivor 0( %  Dervniried tn "sivltsh" IMA Mololov Datfarl LANGUID Xottt'Sllit Ivan (jets an official carpeting ./:< %  hall ..t aru H u ,1 ki t*g ax %  <• • tan %  %  i :. i?Ve srHh ROB : • %  %  paper H ol Ber nuni'v to bui a mo i %  %  %  i I sucn %  t uwir ria*s Slow Motion On East Africa CHEWING N %  l An. AOdu. %  %  nucb up %  i %  in A 0 d u • I %  • %  %  %  R '. .... !' : I I :, i cooi %  %  LoiU l i %  newspapers of ..<>.-!! thfl ll %  i A'I %  posed %  JN Sif Philip . Colonial Orl led. %  nounccd < J5. 1952. thai i Rq %  U ",! %  wel•ho time and tl r .. v*. Philip am %  But pat p would not have %  %  : meob had i I %  year i ik Ihe Royal %  • In action nd term of reference, but DO Ix lad thai the %  with long-term problem* but InIll thai "The establishment of U %  U mi nar> step. But what ike if oven the preltrnln% %  The C Uh hold-up?" tl i to know win the B .1 tha warnlnjc Philip, And like %  %  after io inng the Royal ConunlaaV %  %  %  .i.i A votann to an %  p with a demand that he should quit %  %  '.. I i Herald %  • remarki %  \ loual) he had" thoughl the ippolntinent of such ;i Conunlaalon Inoppot I < i| v. i tti %  I irl in what the Mau Huddle" Ihe H.i.,1.1 Ui i iliver Lytli Iton %  Hits for Ihl ii rrdll %  ol He baa h.id urn to ad a. He I eitl I! %  I M ice ol "the iti. : %  I u i f Kenvi M %  %  .id* have %  %  %  Nj*a Chronleli I rernon. %  iuau|geettoo wai aol acted upon earKORBA % % % %  %  ear at Bajhl, wta only p of imhi >huwmg end %  a II li '.i t hon o utha ol %  I it* be prepaml for that I I I Wr Ml %  g a tl ing %  < >\ 1 1 rout we) re"! a son. drop on n u .... %  I with i c .XV:'. %  XI • K I I %  %  H came ;.i Im Th.y Umk MI.ASTF.1) Gunner-' he Mid. BM of J Fuimj %  .! suspeetiii,' I] i along In thi %  From Uh i 1 nr iteal" III Inughter o( iha: '. onda Oh. iboui The Cats %  In I thai Ihe piibhca%  put paid l, ., -whuperina campaign In Kenya" winch had II Itoat he ". •>. ircea at work hc%  reaj ol IM %  %  K tk < rek i led '^' : ceramern C are two coitiM. M..n..Unit Aim .. On • i Europe m farmer Ii in intcr... ... Afrlean hai %  nod-Riven righi t. own i i• %  • A Sir Philip say*, the White end I'm) I %  i < rary bit a ... i ,'iv U the Hlark No. %  : i:hf The ConeervaUve Dallj Qraptak Ignored the delay In I % %  %  I ; %  %  i. have been mans itaci on HI Lytk I ton and the man on tha Ken] i 'i' ; White Paper ihowi h %  enllahk nad i^ 'in ir ihinkinK the fu1 "Bui there can hv no aragraai i till Mau '' othi > n ( R' a I.ickis .Mil YOU dl 1W %  %  do in Franca We ware all riahl till %  %  i A im hirthet on he rtopped IM %  t U I 11 O'liifli el • I thought that's what It wa>." %  Better no moving %  Wr hadn't ich further t mih hind m ju %  %  e-twanty' % % %  A Hi A bit | i.i Quite %  %  Kori i A K. they muel have m* H ihei %  ll black and "hi r i i hope %  %  K cuft %  %  %  I with %  %  i.i Pott, dug in %  %  an urgent lm .i oat b) ali AM the time Uv %  were waiting I tO ,i\ b the boyi '"Juil i Ui Bui when it did turn the smallest kitten ever and no larger Us in % %  tennis bail Kiiini hunt i in gl ar way ol in Cat (inh a kitten hunt and I>I mg i bunting, in Africa. if son can eaptare %  i I on patrol yi ui %  brougnt i I In OUI (.imp %  have 11 -:-: famlb .. mnti'i the Ae> : tin kit' I if (lit at korna we'd do wall with our old Ubb) i ouldn I %  %  II now. dap %  : v. I : . %  %  %  %  %  %  Heart Wur I,. MUX .wr arreavaaaVaal BUtK %  i -. i tl H I i ev' lai v \ i • a g K ; • in in ^/DOCTORS TKTWDHEY5 nl rU* HI lhc famous threefold action of PHIiNSIC •ablets RELIEVES PAIN, SOOTHKS NERVES, COUNTERACTS DEPRESSION. No matter how interne the pain, no matter how weary your nerves, how depressed you feel, PHKNSIO tablets will bring you relief and comfort, quickly and saiely. Remember this — PIIIiNSIC tablets neither harm the heart nor upset the stomach. Don't accept substitutes. Keep a supply of I'Hi-NSIC tablets by youl Ph enste TWO TABLETS •> BRING QUICK — RELIEF V. FOR RHEUMATIC PAINS, LUMBAGO, NERVE PAINS, HEADACHES, NEURALGIA, FLU, COLDS & CHl'.lS %  We wish 9 %  V I 9 %  %  3 a v 3 PROSPEROUS i I III %  and our .Customers Friends a very YEAR NEW \\rVIIO\S LIMITED, Bridgetown & Sp?ightitown i & & I %  1 %  %  %  a %  %  I %  I %  1 1 GREETINGS t S The Management and Staff of | BARBADOS HARDWARE CO., LTD. •s %  Coir Customers and Friends Wish A Prosperous New Year I In • MM tinn jiriseiitK .n i,\\t ssWH nflVrs I rhuire n| BCl (olniirv Bfl iip|Mrlunil> In etlQDgg vuiir innilil. invitation In lllde behind Ihe uhrrl r>l a super car mid drive into (he Sew V* ar in a spirit ol .K Iiie\einent! Charles Mctoearttey & Co., Ltd. I I.iI i-...-lli-1'l 1st 1151, Mt.h %  rmi. ;.,„, CONSCI "r



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I III t: 11 I \ M Sll \\ WIVIM III -I snu im I HBEH is. IK1 CLASSIFIED ADS. ULIFHONI iftOI 1\ Ml Mn|:i \M %  I OH III \ I HOVM S -j i>t u m i iftit -i i % % %  >i .upt) Caipoit Servant roa*ni MonlhU peat SB" pi II NNimiil cKar(. IN ADVANCE IllMil 1 ll-SII -II T ad**. -i I and taatB TblMB .1 *4 M ,>n i f \ I Olt S til .UTOMOllVr U.rCTKILAl %  M-.lt AuaM I I ... I.IV1.SKK K MISCELLANBOUI Kail* twaBa. M -I LurcUta** A %  ijain< KOY1 VMM CK.U 1 %  %  taat< (;ua. i rt Mod-n I 'iBnine BBS) Sliaai WAVIJ:H HELP : %  a m atlH :* (ll ~ rl II ? %  II 51 -Ir MISCKLLANkOL'S OOiii-rH* AF.HSOI. FLVIPHAVS NI ve* MjtMi death to Flu.. MaaQultoaa i'w'"n Obtainable (rore. ail laadin ••••I In two Bin II ai U SO. I • %  I HA1' %  !" i us BVUM.YQ HAUH I l%  iu>i old %  I'uiMivtr i ..i viii '.. :-i' %  t Ml ''HUMAN IMAN PI HIM SALES REAL BBTAfl %  I I I' Al'(THl\ UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER Ca I ml '•111 IBM l ii %  i ...... ieH *" %  MMMIII Hale -I I p m %  inu \nov\i LVMIIS BBCONDAR1 M 11(H)' %  mi mn i i %  %  l*a* 1 AIJ-EYNE, Jean 1 Al.l AMBY. Joan I HA'il'OW. Dorothy BATSS -i %  %  RAVNR Andin. in ACKsrr ; HI • i. . %  iiiiAniM,\;ri i BK ITHM \ %  %  11 Bl'RKI i u ii< sun 11 i I] M\ \ H 14 CADOI I I !' ( 1 J VI •• it DA in II i % %  %  V. HUH iMa 'll ETN GRirrrm i %  HOWARD Allre :i II I %  I I llrp M. i %  l. -i, l'*.i. I Evrlvn XAI'OIIN %  %  N'MIMII! I PCFCH fill! t IP" KVDI Aim in i ilX.f* l %  %  . (, %  -iTtw.rV.ar .... hi m* Bafff T'lffrapa aland* laad:r IUII Nr.i-r now I.> Alf nil a !•-> -' i ll'atlon In lamdon Contaet %  n Qa.a r n'in '.. ltd Loee Li'i'i.uttva ' I I • I'l 111.14 NOTICES rxm-H ng i itm.i in a< ti N..M.. i. Bain k*>p. II. ... "I'-'i i "i Dloyad . IM I I ia.1 IMI 11 OMl Y •-• %  ixionrn .. i, ul i II *t<; mi t si % %  l" kit I-1 K* Mil M n "lion II la htn i 'u.niatMii (hat I n .. ireum-d ii...t MrtaaV .-%  ilth ii..i n>k Ra month o I. %  ...• %  > IS43. when ia•S^larlni .lot thai y*f I I'V'XHI* Battled pi.i.il I., difpoaa o( -ill.' | Mill. ,l ..i Uti.nl I thru .... oiim ol appliCalNHi toe "Malnad limn Ih* %  haapMav OFFICIAL NOIICE UM I im \"i-i \M %rr II n dM MI.HP AI'TIH-H MAKKIIALI. %  %  l.\ I" W.ilUJUJ. IM.t.,1 t . t i <4r i>n th. ma, I (>V Ii>vlii| ny nwn -, I anVrtin* ..II (I. OB parcel ml land >n ia|c ai Saltn,.id litam" ln| l.v m land. tii>* I !*, In.. Matil bound lu iiini' %  • aj* ., i MM halmt i %  dm UBifnb and I", mr OH da) I rlwiK-u Ih %  II.,OrV %  ( in* I • i 1111 | | -V# Vv*,'-*',*,-,VW*-Sri.. I our I %  %  IBU. .. inn dai rAUIA %  OFFICIAL SALE %  iv IHI t~.l.| Ul < Ml II ill *rri \> %  %  : follow il \( K v| \,H I'OT-Kl l.Ol.l> i III KKIIS In VI \lt \-l IIINd Wt'.tA <1MI HArPINEHK I KV v i| W| i \| 1 IKV R. I'l I'l'l RMIN I LTXl'RV AIM VMimivs -.i is 4:il OIIM.M *l I-\vi \-. ( AKIlS and Mam oihrr XM Ml (.11 IC. CARLTON IROWNI Itelrndanll %  %  I %  I'l Hid-*. %  %  I .. ..I ,. ., U % %  .! b] l i..i.*vm H4GI>*B an-i 1 I 1 .11 lab %  a |Ki* %  %  2S13 Dial .-. l TEN GREAT DISCOVERIES SINCE PENICILLIN Not oneBBis ours! STREPTOMYCIN \ ,* I .CHLOROMYCETIN IMI I 1 <-'ivr Jrt.iinst typhoid, typhu.pneumonu. wtuKipiiucough, menirmllis Cm b-Klv.'i) in uuiri form by mouth AUREOMYCIH IMa \ 'ivc a,1 :. ,t vlru* pntumnnia. ipoll.n --art i' tlonv jfcio 4lv"fi liv rnoulh VITAMIN B.I2 NEOMYCIH IMS. Bfftcimi agairm pn-imionl ii-nirmiiu. and f?v miecUun* CORTISONE & ACTH mo" „Uf n i >od to b<' TERRAMYCIN I9M. Eflectlvr agalDil pneumonia ch<-it (lLsordTs. dysentcrv. and (c:dny mm%  POLIOMYELITIS VACCINE ISM. The tinti noparlui iin inununUauoQ aialtui infaAUli be po&aibi*. Many case* narr .iimidH I been prevented in Am*r 1 •he biggeit-ever our.. ISONIAZID I..IM CM 1 miMiM -srniMi 1 \ \MI\ \ 1 KMM 1 %  IMIV 1 : Klrmrntar%  %  • : I %  -inglt ur>jact 1 Lancujiari 1 1 .nil Laiixuage I ::f\cal of Con* II %  ...., igdart • %  • I %  iilaw.c ..1 M HataW 01 btCOM Wedivrtdat 3U| ll.nuili.T. IML UrpAi: 'iun. m issi. TWu w far n Uie (line Uie> prodi inner unn ih* chase up beglru, all OWl riundreds 01 our uei sm DOCUpt"! 11 f %  • %  :I-I up t!ie 0.8 dic.iverie o( %  ..r,d AtTTH alone This galling Miuation entaiH in re than lov< o! pi nitte is unialtv a hupr | impori supplies ol "> %  finigv ironi America wh %  There i always a long, upnili a il 'M com;.' • rseta slresd. %  he Ami %  %  %  %  %  %  .. MM ahead V. 1 ,s 10 olani*l* ti i:dness in 'Ins field I The .'a ? No. U.S. kflga hat 'he quality Psrb medical KU IJ oeiler than tncira. I uur JeclUie lo it t.ict tha*. oi Refused Iepum an t .en *.*) %  tame 1 hai I NVAIflABl.Y there iiglte discoveries u needed lll-a tuiporn"ii With ainaplo01 n< 'h tan Ucoies 01 people oae Uieir Shoe-string T H 1 %  medical K 11 .. .-a' .1: adieu. 1 10 iii.eai oaugh i^l %  ..1 11 n I, At th" S'a'.ai%  ennnninl 11 ..Clevedoii Someranare .. %  urtiisn t. 1 M ii la. auouiaclunii. Q i^ider lkaanc HI inair own canmertial from puoli-^baa Am When eiunuiaias tu. OS made lafeMMS rial %  new diacoveri" '1 nrv to be cut. raw %  .. d:scoven-d in Ul .-. .;i I In the case ot strei si %  near!;, toaards ;l ear.-. 1 :. I %  "* hsssat e %  Teams needed F lOtTR %  Oxlora I'nivir :n %  1 %  1itt.i,.' 1 %  man lo oiudun1 %  %  GENERAL CERTIFICATE of EDUCATION CAMBRIDGE SCHOOL A HIGHER SCH CERT. daa* alao 'OLa*a.a U^.....n, O.,.-Ct. 1> Bar. and odBU OBBaa, DiauBH aa> SiBdaB— auii .1 a-nai 100 Oiadu.e IiMon J10OO aWBi l-'-JV Mo*rau haa> ia>u aaau l-o.p-.ij. .oats, awnnoa uaadaa ^ !" '-..-.,*C I> PaiM> MA 11.0 Di-aoo, of Jk. Ocpt 111* WOLSEY HALL, OXFORD •- SHIPPING NOTICES ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. -.MINI. H''..| II lull %  •' QPJ \ %  ..' brr. ItW Hh Janua<-v. IBSJ. A IAIKI 1 January. IMS. •AiUNa \n it sort M S ORANJESTAp Nth Davambct. ISaZ ULIMi 1" iKIwrDAB. rABAMVaiH.i Mit aamxi *n 1 w \ .1 I sil'MOH Hin Di c isaiiii ;• Hi January. ISM M V NESTOH Mm Januaiv IB&J (Ittc an. rabruary, i*> aVIllM. in IRIMIlUt A 1 I SAIMO •t'llFM-iJ oalji M a iir.i-A Mn Jaauarr. lata. I'A 1 • % %  • %  %  it a r. mi --.IN -us a . LTII. A...I. January ISS3. Tha M ^fcjau and faasaaiaMia |ox awua. aiitain*i. Mid S4 Km-. Sailing Sth -r. I;J 11 W I SCHOONEB A^'WCIAIIOK. 'IN'C 1 ronngnee. Dial 1*1. Ciiii.iiliiiii Niitiniial Sli!iiiiislii|is V 1. .ns made fr a Tret:ve analn* llaOUH I a catch again lives 10 uie generoailv 01 ifienai atiio > %  free tuppltes of drugs wind, sniuui doctors could DPI W 11 ell jur ma :.uractu ring plant* naally siart up mere are ii.uallv rovalTii-B ro pav 10 the 1)8 patent hoidrr* Or ... 10 rely on Bntlah orsnen-.* Ol U 3. Ilrma to build the U'.IV.N 1 I.I 1 .. a ibercula.,-. HIT.iff only gie % %  lentJia. Their -, IBhtv is ex %  I* u ihe industrial firms %  in r. comparison with iiBciica hows up aorst. lea 01s of raog The l ddtu :nameers in Bt 1 ul lirllg :. medical Only way s The Bin is through covenea. ID vent ions and ideas ,Ttiev will tar 1 % %  • %  the laburaione* an Lo-oaOn Bapn -III III 11.11 Ml kail. SBIIB Anlvaa Arrival •|. atiaal 1 1.. lt.ll.tda* COM. Co'. • Per tt DM M Det B> rjae CDJ4 I-IIAI 1 r-.iR .-"i Oea. S Jan. %  J.n 1) JB II Jan ft r*b 5 Feb. IS Frh 11 pa* 1 H-. %  5 Ma< 10 Mar It Mai It Mir. M MBL .. — %  1 nf > Apr V Avi M.I llll .1 ' ••Ill .fi.'. BtBa Ann*. Anlvli • l.bl llalllai CIN 1 II % %  pga 1 Jan %  %  %  3 J,.n 1 J-II If Jan. 17 Jan. %  %  %  1 31 Jan. Jan. 31 Jan SI J1.11 1 Feb. I'.-b 11 Fab. 14 F>b. 11 Frit II Fa*. IB IVI. as r-sb lilt III' Hi Fan u 4 M-r. 11 Mar. 14 Uar WKH 11 Mai 17 Mir IS Mm Mar IS Mai .-TBl'C'TMIt IS Mitr 11 Mm. 4 APU Apr. IH Aar. 1 11 LENGEIt 11 A1-1 H At. IS Apr. M Aar. 1 afar gar rwlhar aatUealara, aaalr la— GARDINER AUSTIN & CO LTD.— A| enU. •INCB '.lie *ar. ihe (dollar Mi ir.cied %  product* here in Al.l. OUR CUSTOMERS AND FR1KNDS S WE EXTEND £jj Our Jiest 'Wishes for the Season I BOYS AND GIRLS MEET HGRE Climb CHURCH SERVICES y. • .1 1: hed 181D It ami II KOI 111 (h T. HERBERT LTD Incorporated .1 I 1 \ M KiA/IM. LANK *% a de Haviiiand flir of HflT.p He then leads you round fhe .. *iwi p-iliits out the hving con1 r o 1 surracea Ihe ailerons on the win.- and the elevators and ruiidrr at 'he tall Taking you to he cockpti he -I.L-II sliowa you the control oolumn :hrotigh which you move iti -.urraoea. If rou move n lie rkgbt Uie ailcr\>u larboard, or rlghi winn Bill | up and Uie one on Uie pun < left wmg. Bui go down II III %  ilumn u moved 10 Uie left tl> a.lerona revers.their ooaiuons When rou pull ihe gOMM kiilumn back the eieraiors w move up. They will go djw %  MB vou ouih it lorward. •taor ro o • IIIB %  biOfgtg. in uedal .-.1.1 II IK. Mnie way as ".< %  • %  %  '.1 tnc .: %  • ai 1 airplane will gn 10 UM Y liaht-l. eutemuit O ird n. rue greu iiioTiu-ni amvta. \\> p\i on vour grey-Blue 1 Dtu itte lionl teat V %  1 mbg '.mo I %  . tin n ou im I I f %  %  OIK* it Ii warm ids :ie %  !>d tie •o lao* tha n. 1 '-. Maricai Bella . h. I.1.1IU M Urn ltl> Phi .Hon. aae.hinr B Dwarwaa %  I \KM. \l %  ..l.i C-pla pVrauaaan I..F ll..r rl A %  %  a .HI M Kind Ami YOU TAKE OVER w I .11-. a If* -• ;ue CtUPBMini ....: t iiwa* 10 fly over ite-.i rig. liartOB and Windsor. HI :iae go: aaad Phghi • Lieutenant Oordoo icila rou to lake over DUW. Ai Orsi you :ital 11 j:rDcuii to keep straight and I 11 within a few mlnuvea >i>u begui 10 get the idea. Vour instructor then taxes %  MS again, beads for '. ilUiam and lands. TOOT ghl was tun. It wheued 1 Ml ..ppeute tor more. I Smcere Wishes for A Bright .ary.1 Prosperous 1953 CENTRAL EMPORIUM Cm. Brood & Tudor Streets $ THE BLEND THAT HELD THE SWAY AT THE INDUSTRIAL INHIBITION |; .1. n T. iPCCIAl III'M (Wilh the Dilinclive Flavour) •: IS TOPS. TRY IT FOR YOURSELF Blended & Bullied bv !• TAYLOR & SONS LTD. Hocbuck StTtMt 'SSSSSSSSSSSSS+'SSSWSSS atVllrWfJ BM ADll V .1 1 -•! %  *< NUM. psss i iss I, 1.1 I %  aWG -rtOJST a. D A 1 11 %  %  dam o( I. I • and'. Mill ll.irmhrr .'• : 11 p 1:11i> A in n Pa a \w-unri. 1 IH-l RtmalA AND PKOIMSXT A paek 1 Id M A.lvmll.t IBM Th. 1 I.* paalor OU i %  ares % %  wl he King Sliel gevi Church Bmldlnc I lnnili.1 nvermbu > %  .-.-... W.-.'.-.-.-^V.-.-.V.'^ SEA VIEW GUEST HASTINGS. BAKHAIIOS D.nlv .Hid Lungterm Ralca quoted on r. rermmenl Onesla f!rotnr Ulnner and Cocktail r.triie. arrancrd J II BUCKLAND ftopi We Wis/i Customers 6 Our Friends 5% ZHappy 5>Yew tyear & CO.-High Street To our customers and f* u-tshrs JUT a -vyo%u teat' Veer Jlif.'d uilh promise. •.d uv send ot Man iroat hai* '.% %  I rr 1 tu Weiu GENERAL HARDWARE SUPPLIES


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SI \I.\Y AM'OCATK BY CARL ANDERSON PAGR linen I s BY CHIC YOUNG -iO 1 KXihT THEM TOOAV. AND HERE APf THE BiLL*5 FOP MXI t> PAV -1 WHV DWI -IOU \ **,( CCNSULT ME f)EFC?e ) ^. 'JS VAKING A Bia rf • "jT L f'JOTHASE LIKE i-'.' 5 ^r THAI FLASH GORDON BY DAN BARRY BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS v • •-.; J. RIP KIRBY BY ALEX RAYMOND %  PI ~. CAV %  L*JC-6 -AES-r -tt-a I LL E TM*T SNrVPjMS --^SffcREP Ml 00 %  —, THE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES A REMINDER BUY PEEK FREAK BISCUITS TO-DAY. acctatm CHOCOLATI LAXATIVE n !" rw *'wl t *rL BANISHES CONSTIPATION OVERNIGHT I S ACROOL IS TI1K FINEST REMEDY FOR RHEUMATIC PAINS llon'l be uilhoul il bnllle—it's m rrl sUndby. On S.lc al KMt.lilS' tat torn SPECIAL OFFERS AVAILABLE MONDAY TO WEDNESDAY AT ALL BRANCHES PEAS Tins s\| s\(;i:s ovfnni & dmbrMg IA AI'OUATF.K MILK MACAKONI I livs COCOA I1KKK I'ARIII Usually ... A .89 M II .51 .24 Now S .1.1 ." .27 M M .21 \\v ink.Udi %  ppMtwritj in irtaUM nmy 31 c Very fHappy and Prosperous 1953 QOOO l.l IK D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street MILL BEER HOLLAND'S BEST PREFERRED FOR ITS FLAVOUR AND QUALITY obtainable at all wholesalers and retailers GUINNFSS FOR STO UT STRENGTH %  %  & & & & & & & -• %  %  %  I & & s & a I I 5? V 9 V T & & %  C & K & & I & & & & & a X I a & & & a a a X & a a m C. F. HARRISON & CO. (BARBADOS) Ltd. P.O. BOX 304 BARBADOS I 1 %  %  *• -v a a a %  I a a %  & £ S. & & A A X s MIIIIIIIIIIIIVIIilHM^tjtiMvf^^M^^^v^^VillSIIIS^M^^^^M^^^^Vf*'



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i ID.W in i i HI i l: -I Mill UlliH Ul PAGE slsi Sonit* Old Places Visited And Photographed—1 Sttltt II IAM//\I, \t)M< I It) I iNH'/mit By JOHN PRIIil M \ It was sometime la that a party of on a tour oi places of historic interest in the Inland; so resoil was made i" Volume one ot The J the Barbados ||U aura ui HI toncal Society whirh contains .. copy of the -Report < %  mriec appointed to enquire in* the present Cotkdtl : I in Barhadoi %  port what steps should be taken for their prescrva.,..: June 10th 1910. A : n-nl fads contained in this report were typed out *o lhat would be able to niak< sons between now and forty years ago. The facts re the Churches visited was taken from 'The Barbados Diocesan History." by Canons .1 and C. C. Clark-Hunt, while other note* were coll. added On the morning of the 21st of June. 1951. the party set the first place visited B) II M'MAS I'lM Mi It %  %  %  I %  %  % %  greater ind-floor storey. i %  %  %  %  %  iy*tc,an urgeIHl SS. 1 HOW TO DODGE A COLD 1 nava lb %  For the tlr^: IU1M I do comes forward eHRtr-cul jdvicc on r. iv to i vent atui I make winter I nw of us. dally dose of After '-'."' % % %  A ill ( BMndK — WARRENS HOUSE daughto brotheis John RDd Thornchill."' M J'' %  Hot M This hOUM good preservatii? Mda; the present manage: out. no one could inspect lerior of the o caused some ad\ i dai of Hi* I x moth* ThornhiU's son. Majoip -" h Dul Gafioral Sir Tin reu awakened jnuch %  : %  . ., N In lhP ,. x forward this argument d ....... • Uara. U bag. the in Is one of the fan %  %  being th, ad him huh n ta WTptbaPrtncaaa Alb. m In(ha list of famous of n This The next point Vof England, etc.. vi.vit. house stands on approximately gramme >l,| Mill." when on board the H M four acres of land, in royally in m.ihogany trees, but there is a masonr> wdi kept lawn. One of the mabapj in the Waati a Wot hogan> tn nrig in the Island. Photo, bwnamortal. One William A greet* were taken f| 9 %  the first An angles, also one of Ihj to the living room, which ha> UM 'WUttom .. %  i .1. %  -, |6T) It. date '1686' over the door Th.next rtop arai made .'t S ' | Church in St V b telle Houaa,' where permit, mil remains <>f tin xion was obtained to take photoformat plantation in graphs. This house is of m.i. Ibid, thai all • construction, and although the Iroyed by lire uj .. w< ll-know., interior was not inspected, infirCharacter of the e,r!\ ination was forthcoming that It century bj the imm? has four massive wafis inside Oil Who built crosswise This residence is then %  r I • of hum IB md could thing worse may *'iat all "colds" ; itllra-mit-mn-oj.i,' pef 'uses fo' ieldei I %  I I In reality, the i call -. f an which remedies alltwlj I In ttyiim %  <> And %  cm jmrsuinu a ph— t om. I and -ean-l li-'K.'i ere e/P.vtir. la fren'nii, some ivpes "f colds. They hare tin own our IMC-IPICJ and 11 1* %  ...*r.iblgfi natural n e. fatigue mat more su r protein— rtsh. %  %  %  kstasot and assist treatment I AVOID L, with Its | ... and thio.t—bm do not ... i touting Tins Is Why Th he apoi t ma, %  up ovai the inf., on I s weeks; why I %  h BAOATT.T.M. MOUflK Th.next point of Interest i %  that this mill was nol the party 1 our programme was Jack Bay'Arnolds' but Four Hills' Planta. tertained by Sir Oral I %  I Grenade H tr\ Wy's Hill or Mulllns Fort but this tion old mill and works, and thai nd M K "' was not visited as was proposed. Arnold's Mill was ".v because it appeared to be surdown de same ro.id!" It was then rounded by cane-fields, and was decided to continue not easily accessible. Records ley Hill", the orifllial home of %  ; %  'ML 1 -'daJsi %  "as mm*' ^^BE "^S^-< * ^^^^BBlC"^l£.''* ^ m ^***j&*. !" %  ^ % %  r •^SrfSis^t. "After kaaplnjj bj an hour we tUl tt ll situn'.d at the f .i i to then I four or %  %  ground level %  %  or ahun%  %  island, was running wild, though aad.1 %  M,. . r .. <* Allcndole I Arnolds Mill, prevent! %  %  %  %  %  I .{ ImnieItateb by treatment ilrug* which i %  %  | %  %  : i> | tfl 11 %  n iruse-, I, rf Lad bad i — it a 1th penicillin, %  %  thai sre %  I : I %  : -. | I l ful 111 m %  iorts. What To I).. i.., e IOW i pla mil Into ti i %  i olds %  ... 1 Ihi %  I Which Sort >o Ynn Go*? i.KN'D aaUMoa MOaUad I Di Chene] thawed that -i n lastrlal pnnuiiiinn rails hal four (N.ups .„ regards * i p %  '.' ti to eeUfcu— PtOt l. wKli ..-,p o I i Ol P '. . IK iaad M ui %  . i i> lan '.. onr-fifth .f uVs BO|HUaUsl li .n mil r li.n.line ol tv.. Ugtll %  .lit. every yesr. OHO< r :i — th average* rirmin oaaif itaa ibaal i Ui pa) it las-i fh • ih'. and •sir • %  II* r'ltrk(.iinir 4. tyr %  i ai ii NOMI Itie r< in •.nil.,: Thej < %  >• < %  < %  *"' oen the corll tree and the I IFebruary lf~6 state in the Parish Church be erected In the grminds Of this mansion. The prsame place where it wai former,.,| building in rtoi ly and that the dimensions i* :iUv ,,„ H W ai largalv t 54 x 40 from OuiSuM to out I | -. Mr Graha: Church was completed in 168U. IVI was damaged by the storm of entertalnn f Prlnei \' %  • %  ... t nc f„ u a bill, to *. ^ .1^^ i SAM Wllllf i %  i ordet to ,i enterprises 561'AltlS D ( | %  U it—ton i antun kind." The Liberal Priace ; the number of Itlsi o. %  .( Mon1 it | % % %  • Prince Ralnlei ol gutting law which %  i. n the war antltled %  %  %  .i. i %  i srls. I it oM r ,,!,-. i ird wa ... . DO I da last v< ..i 1 a was on* ol end ih< I ''' %  (Hire* %  *l,SO IN HAI IND UNI POUND OVil flSJ i.MnM&M%i\M\S\i\Myf\M^W,>l\Wm 4 two Is granti'l : %  i | %  %  0l I'r inc. 1 %  %  %  %  GRENADA HALL OLD SIGNAL STATION New Your Pnsgtamtnes nchuUng Ha u i %  Frooi OISTOT Lyitd %  %  cd t,^. thn atArm fit A~. nn t n& an ....f r llibk. 4 ir..j ; %  nriggk %  %  laturda] Uirkham Si., d 1 .'. ' %  I r I 1 %  %  many %  %  rouwritten Hii death wai %  %  : %  which France I <|iMilr><. Of The Week death iRM tND tALAOKOV UU bool i i The Koatl To Stalin | ., i ny wftfa ponulm Said Catl er Franco i i MON8I I'.M i f: 0BENT1 i t u mrrtaUon Th man 1 one who Bui the i r.tloe is did ihi Smoker in. n. until the war, he o. of si >knig. %  the Una Stalin to i Ha (oti ad tha < i |tt ... leading Raaistano %  %  . 1 Iliad hli Depi, ot Baterpriaa %  %  i Hi I %  %  \ %  i trtoon. Introducing her. [.. .id her :i tinh. Thornchill who departed lh* w hose uncb ^^ flrst of August 1R81 as likewise Brlgg' h i In the A^State for i the boddyes of his two wlfei aamhl) u ....... th. day. no boeth named Su ad people in 180-t MS p oldest sonn Thimithy his had subsequently lost his aaal llloi i %  th a red tip Yoghl i It between hej taoth wiui ,r An inijuning why f ntei %  required v l d o %  '. i M illel III the i I WOal ii oent .in H. -imrn si \5. I I I To All Our Friends and Customers WK TENDBB oi R BEST THANKS FOB VOlu mii.NiiMinAND PATRONAGE DURING I*. -• AND IN AM. SIMii;nv UI WISH Mil A HAPPY and PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR C. F. HARRISON & CO. (BARBADOS) LTD. .Still time to protect your good clothes it ii/i a PLASTIC APRON V.o havo them in blue, pink, green and while patterns Each only % J „>() AVI SHEPHERD & CO., I. ID. ZHappy ?New ^ear To al! Our Customers and Friends %  5? K SS I %  V i B! H i •S, %  I KNIGHTS DRUG STORES m I irJ3*4*3V.434.4*S3.i*4S'.S / %  '' %  / MARTELL CORDQN It I i: II IOKDUII AHtNl an**' lira* STANSFELD SCOTT & Co., Ltd. Agents.



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SL'VDAY. I>n I.MULR 2. 132 Don't put \ m !" m your husband in an apron SLNDAY ADVOC Ml PACE MA I \ u ., says DENISE ROBINS Of IOO <*li, not agree with Jugttec Deamoi aid in ti)e Coart this 1 DO Lord whc of Appeal this week that if a woman neglects the nousework it i. the dutv of the niubanc |g buckle 10" ^nd nelp I thing that ii a man one start* to do the diking and nouifwom and wasmng-ap-because his wife is either too lazy or ton Indifferent u> do it herself-it will rstabllih a wrong precedent If jhe 1B the type who in the nrsi instance leave* a home dirty and walks out mi her dotle> a* a wif-. srl e will take advantage of has ktndir aid and demand it evert night He needs . It la quite differ" !" ir atir W HI or ha* had a particularly hard da* ; and nlgh;|\ help with 1 #tie waging UP %  never did any man any harm Then he c*r\ get down to It But why should a mar corn* bark from his wn job tired out longing for a ehair by hL, ftrertde his pipe and %  mile peace have to put -r\ M apron and become a urried, uiih ihrrc daaghaeri eook-general ? He doaan i ask hla wife to Oruan nei w-ishlng and i-oosing and then join htm in the office in the evening and do eour ot hour* accountancy v r Vpcwrlting ir he did ask such a favour she would ( %  onMder it monstrous I think It Is equally monstrous for any woman to expect u> turn a tired husband into a servant If she finds nee own job •oo much for her she should try to reorganise her me;hod> ao that she can do a bit tecs .. Relaxation A husband has to go off early 10 <*jrn Ms dally breMi and sack M it ajj < %  % and inuat have Kinie rei*j ia> i lie U th; Ur^.idwi.in. %  J earning the niJii.y that sne la going to spend ir f.-r method* Vso slat%  • rah % %  II rat am % % % %  kjgan i stand the disorder in his horn.hiMas ever* nnrit. in my opinion, to demand I M-psratkin or to nop support in her That would won 'each ner that she r^ %  moral obligation towardner home Nobody thoula bf allowi'c to get anything in this wor-d :or nothing I DISAGREE, fdrra Vtra Lymm E H T A I %  LY ti u .Jands should help" s i II g a r tare Wbrnevey aty Of\n my hu n ft u, and dt> • > i.-w jays: i nam em not %  "i ir\ | i*rfled." DISAGREE, lays Mr. INNE5 % %  1 b BuwbaudheJpin< wiieinL* .illair Tu--tion ro bust up a MM rnrulerI hwum i liusen ostio ng at home Mi; i.d.l-Jiiid I :t*liv, M a great deal mil I .M %  i l| mid ng il 'he iiusinuseom UK •rnJ-n -iiLnand shows <--tough -well mv TYlan CLboui lown HiNG STOPS QUICKLY wrcm d %  a rh.(;UEGC)R\ PECKS talk about how to stay married By SYLVIA GOUGH I NUPII il 'i gaog Mnr % %  J? / JTo Han Nearly 3* year* ago Hrs. tdKSi Thompnon was asawgdsjd for the murder of her hukband. New KVEftLEY \i'.\ i i i: al.P. revlewlns ; i ne hmk aboul the uld fi*e\ ""^.-rentlv at the two of them In the dock, adulterers and murderers Ann A (nnfesMon —though It was the boy's hand Dial Then she told ui Ihat Bywatcrsffbad luld the knife, whos. wnanted this message delivered to tho evil mind that put rt there? vie*' the tiMEditor"Tell him that I From the hoii. that they appesrliamlnc was )udlrlal mwrder. killed Thompson because I saw cd in tindock together tM) mm WAS KHlth Thompson guilty of red didn't know anything until doomed. iiurder. or was she hanged fo* s""* Bl| n hlecdlng on the ground. Since the judj:e could not un;idulter>" Once more that cuesBul Edith had nothing to do with der*tiuid it why should W gapad tion Is raised by the publication '' *** '* absolutely innocent." the Jury of eleven men anrl one of LewU Broad's The Innocence H rP wa a confession which woman to be wiser'.' Who could f Edith Thompson.* might be ol some technical value, explain to them that Edith As I read the book my mind Al nv rttc ha i to bc conveyThumpaon was a woman capable flrat went back to that tempestu• "' onCf to lh *' Homo Scoreof a consuming \o\t1ht fed itous night In the House of Com,lir > But we learned that he own fires with a wild, poetic '.sglnatlvcnets. r aiiin 1 wood Ca| X ihei ir* And Of : I • ind Mm Oragarj I'" •rrivea i sta n* %  %  L . .' I' i *onh ciiminK —warm trienJl. * I : B aooui .. %  i nsn o i iavi Boon inei' BUI allrrev-'l In I'-r to 9loCft!uti -.snrt '- ling room %  %  M .1 1x II %  ' l %  kiuriA* Servtas Whals Cooking In The kitchen 1!.Aficr TinHolidays ro ..i mons five years MB when by a *'* spending the week-end at a free vote we suspended hanging, country house in North Wales. On the Tory front bench sat Sir an 1 ** %  WB rtc wl,h nu John Anderson (now Lord Wav*'e chartened an airplane to carry erley), who was permanent head reporter to the nearest airport, of the Home OtTlcc at the time of It must have been one of the thatrial. earliest examples of a newspaper of real bcauW that reach ecstasy'. In his speech earlier in the using an airplane for such a purHer tragedy was that she only debate Sir John declared: "Where there is a scintilla of a doubt the Home Secretary tins jl %  %  i lm | ,tnd ir.fl.whioh Will b. ful attti I i know butter 'i. Boui Pul i-i :iiiit let %  nn .'iid %  •: V-IHF : I ON HM )t -M' • %  hi N %  %  %  %  ' at raan. n Hi-i BfKH ^ii r: K i ^ %  1:1 m IMS wn \\( Ro t* %  .Imps ind In". an ILM to tnw Btc Hag Uvmf iion-.j.iii Cuaagaitui I nal ur individual %  atiwatb au |*1 .'94 t. %  • ti snap-up HM^ MXI.MIK nn Hi %  Ml %  UM 1943 Humber Hawk i %  u i:u<; oil. %  1 u smooth rUte ig, high pasaeni inlliant t potni of this -.tie %  idc Price in 7ft0. H Tills U\s WKiritN IN nil '.\lll. i Id on i >i n \N %  %  .rs WlusK\ i,. by Train latvelj >n IIHI la bg I ">ilv. PuuncUa St %  pei i.. MI, From ., i.,ui ..t • • .OKI I \ AWIMS1 ii i" i in HOST ftaa \ \i -VIMIN i.n t Broad St.. ow %  ... h. i .,-... ,i m II %  i %  i a. %  %  %  Silvn Orej with Black, i are from %  11 VK s ill Ol nil ~s \ in ^gamWaaaaaaal i %  %  I 11 (-rwer . ramrlsi snd dtHtr amtfiagliiiatagj ytrld tdm hater. Wl s|| | s|K\||'| *MI |.|M nil SaaTLKS \ \i St Drive %  %  aid proitu %  I. '. %  %  l te'h from the Back Her Letters Bead in court, her letters soynd,•,. f^„> -* u w. M l.wdrv. flAta*. and IroachJ. %  truly Uved "in the realm of Im.ig. ( Wi;h lr ' h Hut nothing .ame of It. Inatton and brought doom upon '" ••'"'' '""" Three days later H H am. on threipeople because B>-waters """ h '" Oinnei January 9 1M3 the man and the trajulatad the imagination to IsiaV '" ' : ' woman v.r-r* hanged. That night it.\ be | of ihe volUSM of torn UK It), two of the prisor staff from She Mrrati letten that coodoannaliac* the iHHolloway prison (she was hanged ed herself a* a would-be murderafter *naa1n| tJ Holloway Ilystandern at Peness. According 'o thai lOOviUa) came to the unily F\she was feeding her husband press and told a dreadful story ste.tdy diet t>t ground glass. Thev snid that Edith Thompson ifie autopsy n-Maltd thai it had collapsed until her condition not true As a fenntr fatale of %  rag indescribable They wanted the suburbs she dramatised hei us to UTgk Ibal there ihould never adf, saw herself as one of the be .i.niher hanging of I woman, (real murderesses of romance -Was their storv true" Not very and she saw to It that her husband if %  I : Id 1 pinch ol tpooiWul Of B '< I and I -gg yolk Mix I %  long afterwards the hangman committed suicide. Tho author ol the Innocent"? of Edi'.h Thompsan makes nn i %  ... of impartiality. He is t to .vtabhsh her innocence The JudKe His chief urge' is the judge. UM l.it. Sir Montague Shearman cared for just like any other t iburba.i wife. Justice^ W. i .tiuiot deny that Edith Thompson caused the death of her husband and her lorer. We cannot deny thnt she was an adulteress We cannot deny that ha *** • !" e Put in or margarine. When mcl i U'aspminful ->f '.<<> Bra peeled 1 ... IS of a mediui WlH'ii thil I lUCt mlxtur< she would h.ve run awav" wrth 11 the neiu-h"' h, write* "he Bywaters except for her innate %  '"" the ludge I -t ..Lie to Uk respectabilitv and her detln' "tolerant view of the character to bring shame upon her fnmih : nd If Ihe Of and upaos c>ock. When the U the woman In the %  Benches. I gave it as my opinion comprehension of the fanciful that she was hanged for adultery and fantastic. The romantic was .ind not for murder. at a minimum in his make-up. But again, while reading thi: Before him in the dock were a engrossing *KX*. my mind went man of 21 and a woman of 27. back to the Saturday before the They had Indulged in a sordid double execution. I was then anrl wicked liaison, for she was Editor of the Sunday Express. The already married to a husband who ,'ommissionaire sent word that had been faithful to her there wag a young woman who When the two barristers id? a message from Bjaasleil She was Bywater*'s cousin, ice-looking girl of about defence asked that the accused should be tried sci-aratcly he only gave it a moment's consideration opvaic;irr nrsravrn l not • Published by HutcMnson. 303 again popei, 12.. 6d. thick. thick en You con also add I %  mioniir Trifle ..I any kind of i %  IfiO ill be loo %  nd put at bettor* -if r .' i i %  • |aoi ... custard I put the 2 i t tableof sugar rtd I cat gft> II VOU UM I ',n ariu bo of a Up %  >( waler in milk 3 glasses I ltd u ID in If rou see that i v smooth i %  : i or If you %  %  %  I will I STW All. i Uwt u> boll %  i — crying so hysterically and then refused, at It took somtime before she Day after day the jury taxed O^LLXAMS SANDALS for Axfp htofik'~J&f fk*tdr*H> %  %  p .in al Mil Rl \M HOI i DtUNttfl ( K.\RI 1 II \\l l \MH 'i %  :i IIIM at nigt I %  i \ .i ill Sti %  Savoan I %  ... m bos i" In '• • %  %  gak Prh CHOI h gs % %  h ... I INOl DM IR UN MAKKIH I \M \s|t:il gfl aimplt v. %  %  ton Factory, ph • ii t<. ioa %  n CLOTM Bhelvi Tabk I i our combln il.-" I i %  si 4ti pel MI. Thl. ia . gad It* r. i < i %  -.'iii.i A OMCAT l \l Ol MUM (•111 HAM I" IN <.l\ IN io THI* ii ii i wn ui i I.-MWM in n t'AR.' i-lrii Rg |D 'I •' H%  v ,-r I .1' %  I %  %  I<,.v.-i %  AI>I. ii to di Ive .' D.D.D.#*C\ PRESCRIPTION 9 {fjtf* l/ f \ • \ • %  i r I of %  lovelier figure in mffidenj/prms MaiaVii.tlr* -'#*--****,',','**,*,i***, .;;•.*,',*,'.***,•.•.'.*.',•*',',•,• \onri We lice to ;IIIMM our C'llsloiners and Ihe (ieiieral I'uhlit lh;il our Spares llcp.irtitH til u ill he closed for Mock fpfclggj fifoo rjTnrfpJ .Mil Ihieinb^i. |MJ mil.I Monday, ;.ih JumiHry ItU I FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD. Its a drum ooitia true Maideoetta* marvelous accnl ggj cur tea, the firm young lilt it gltas your figure! Discom this popular Maidenforni bra tf>dat, in your (atm-ite bbfiaj Ganuiu* Uaidanform Hrassi eraaaremadaimlv nilL ggggtaaw Ammrlcm Ibare i* a mtllf/ff//t>r//t for evart type of figim v/eutfcliiing eaceii nomoch ocidity ond relleving ih* point ond docomfoni o* ocid-indigaitioo. Milk of Mogneslo, a product of Phiilipi. it one of rke foiWtf, most f!< -1.%  known. As a fosohVe. Phillrpi octi gently and Ihorooghly, wiiSo.f griping or discomfort, and wrfhouf *mbo"Oiing urgency. Phillips tones up ma nfi# diges'rva trs*w. it iha ideal antocid-loxoti.s for mil ma family I Get Phillip* today! Liquid or Tablets look for this label .*m *•*. MJK euseau a go. ****** MILK OF MAGNESIA A PRODUCT OF p |^| L L I P S % %  TeXMADf IS WEIL MAN



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PAGE TEN SUNDAY .ADVOCATE SUNDAY. DECEMBER 28. MM OLYMPIC STOKY—X By Trevor GaU ==r~ THE CLOSING CEREMONY So today I re* h the last am< Ilii.tl iDMUBMnt Of '!' %  "Km Story. The BWUMUni t'ndvd or Saturday! Almost and the t all crow< t %  OljnUMC Start %  the finals of the Equestrian event-. I | many. On ,hndaunlafl %  %  e tieeen H followed I StMUun i *rian National araa played could not I • % %  sorrow :. A. %  zest of U %  • %  ong, t I %  < 1 i %  %  %  %  .. • d 11 %  %  t f emaadem cheat caramaBy. Ti.cn when at wc-.i i in Th, Olympic heard thi anthem Bfl %  %  TIIF, CLOSING CEREMONY of in would represent ihcti countnei -land tattni tern doubla jump* turned fcssional or an-. % % %  sharp right, wen! It would indeed DC Jfaln and ran up UM prising if Brttali %  :< • ft • th. Bald taking four Olympic f-.lb.ill championship "Tdl,* d tha narrow wMtr jump wtdeh •se circumstance-. Anoihr !" %  •" "-' %  "-""£'*•"'-""" For my**.! i Ihougfct Urt footcountry which S-'ilS !SM "_'** "* x **W onl> two hl>ut %  [ "- flBM I! h'td h %  all tha most i who mthcy found I was that The Ear" h. • some absolute right over P r .in* It must on anytlUt U %  trctcri there were Oftlj two ol>. %  at tual iMpa *.hein. Aftu thi* they turned right ran across to the Rrnnd stand aide. ITI.nl. %  ..itd ran diagonally acro*> the The Jumpers Turnlne tn the very In* evev united a? one Obet i the programme, I must • %  ..• • ; | rlai The; mt i %  .'loij-.d. T i ...: 'grand atanaTm -. L ^ .1 ._ .-!_* %  i lumil lKfl BH..II'.nil -mi mi It.. Soccer tn Europe or So* America, which on around %  li rd .. Kin tha lu:: ren'a fan Impre^ive Player i i lien u. .,, odd BVen'. Bl our 1 Gymkhanas Was the sum with *n: %  nder* ma> be quite good tl hors'" are not. and lumping lkr-. One of ha -.no.: I norm to do the player* i crly. Not only muat lh< Final was tl.. iU lv 1" '^Ij 'rained hut only the Puikag, H. v .., d th* opening b *" ,ri '• %  niperament a* well .. nuelferHuiiik.lv i.nd man, Urn* g^ff** 0 horw> " draw roundof applause by his "** """P** elever passing and dribbling, li .1 in all the sport? which horse-for this ha earned only the ire of take port. Jumping I ihmk pa m. friend. Lba BflUfti 'line who the graatosl lest. Tin ,umi>ei n, %  ^ud "if tit'.;, rontlnantalti came not Meanartl] have to i* a th to England we would *oon put a Ughbrag ll> i an BN hunter stop to hncj footwork %  l At i. en ltut I would xtuiT." I -*av ,iduubt ihvV nb i would, 'i i would b* Ilka %  lV l, 1 gllM and the i H -.k' lead. !" *_^l w '" n ,ho ' 1 %  it again and ran up thi length of the field taking the wid< mrn and . atry hitii i>lid Ratilump After tumtH| |11 lo ge acros* the gjali "icre was one nnnl Joubli wimp lust before the finish. Thev BDd left by the marathon .!. %  ppoiti dia urand stand In'rlliuenre And Endurance I hnve n.Mp ien tuck Inlelligantg and awduranca axhlMtau b) i my life. What Un lmroc WBJ UM i ehavloui < %  ( lh< crowd. It would IK im|>oaiiiolii ^ horse show of thi. [ kind in Barbadoa bacauaa it would I l nii.-ii.il nnpussllmitv to ki.p :.u rji t II< ( ustolnad lo horse i v\hen the C.rand I'rix di NaUorja marted they chaarad N< azl3 all the lurnpin* was good and there were only two falls both by Russian Officers. It was the only lime I ever noticed a Finn show hi feelings tuwauU the Russians. I could not help noikina my companions obvious delight when the Huaaiam fell off Nevertheless the ndors were quite good and 1 suspect that the fault win t""r i...tint*. Frenchman Outstanding To pick out the outstanding rider and horse the Frenchman Jonquara* d*OrioU on A body rise. Five of th.-i. wan tied at tha end >( the two round! and therefore her* had t" be a jump off. Thu lha most difficult Ad Un iniiilit was raised from ft. 6. ma. to V% ins. In case of a furthc hi "jump nfi" aras ivaj given out thiit the competitor .•i..i the fastest time would I* the inner. The Frenchman was the ilrsl out and decided that it was all speed or nothing. His mount never 'iiadc a false step and he flew ivar the obstacles like ;i bird on he arlng The othara. of course. tried to follow him but made to ny errors (). Crtttl of Chile was second and hi %  horse Bambt area the one I llkrd moat in tl'* whole show. Thledern.,nn of '!ernan arai thud while Wiirnd Wh i NlsafeUa came fourth. The Itrlthh won the team eonv petition and BMItoeajh OaaaVaal ] stil ihr publicity In the British papers it *as largely due to Wiltre<. Whit.lh.<: they won the compcfttton. White dropped only four polnfs in his two rounds while Fo*hunler lost ! In the fl;*t round in the morning. Col Ucw"<-rwards said he knew Foafiunter wi< not himself the moment he go: at morning But in the afternoon he %  and had the crowa ieeataclea with a faultless round. CoL Stewart or. Aheilow also did vary •"•*' lo"ng only 16 points The British therefore won the but gold medal to be competed for :.' 1152. Bu" for the Winter Oam only one Ctnaing Ceremony Tlw closing ceremony was as impressive if not as crowded as the opening. Only the flag bearers and not I %  •" %  • were p>arehed Into lha rtadlum; tf order being the same %  opening ceremony I. flag hading ar^l the flag ot The he-t ran %  ler which would have lo be studied for hours to be understood The itanderd bearers atte: Marchmfc arsMggd the I up in from "f the Tribs.r our end Mi Sigfrid Edstrocn lYeetdent oC the intemationMi <>lympit Catfirnrttae, togeihei wit* Mr. Erik von French*! 1, Pre^idei.t of the OrganiBing Commute* and Mr. Eero Rydman. the V|yor el Hahnnki. BU advanord to the Tnbua* of Honour. The Oreck Bhl was hoisted to the strains of th national arrlhem of that eountrv this being done to commemorate the Greek origin of th. Games. Then the Finn in n Australun flap were turn to the accompaniment their reapective anthem* traaaw te 'rtuntrieft being ftret the hos' country and the one tn which *h%  will IKheld Mr Edstrom Uvjl mounted On Tribune of Honoi.t and the Ittth apaaah he mrn'' % %  best quoted it it dgnMei In pvactaa manner HM %  losirol the uamea and the < -.11 Bfl. B •It tha aanr*a o/ th. rK-ael OI|/"'l< rmrunirrt '" the Prrsidur niH NW fiNta'Kf. to On HBTfiorlalaB oj tlw •Uy oi Helsinki and fo the OTWU iteri of the Games our deep. ifraiifud.-. / declar. JJM* X\':^ Olvmpie Oamea cloaed and. in u. corifance icith tradition, I cali Upon Ihe Youth of ei-pew COUe'-u 10 aasrnible in four wears ef Jlfhoti'Me. May ihry dia-plai. ih.erfatneat and concord so that the Olmnputaecn may be carried %  Mi i r yreat^r tauer and honour for the uood of kwnmnttv fhrooohoul lite aoes." It must not be, Un. course tbiil our ssYttttfl trial wa aADgggaj buoausN I. tain was knock. round by Lwnembiura. Thlt defe.m Before going to Helsinki I had. % %  or two of the first riders over %  quite : (peeled thai lumpsome particularly difficult tump. ing, or any kind of horse show Bui ihe announcer soon put them ..n i icing, would bori m< rlyht b> speaking over the pubHc I w WTQshl thai i Idicus system and after he asked I wit i'i S'.idiurfl for ahnolute silence during the vasioiied no greet l kept asking myself tumps, use Britain, like most ol th i ft mi life?Western Counttit. sufl ^amc like Soccer due to tin -trict obieyvaiic of Ihe iule. Aa era teur football is way l standard of DM proft iu Britjin. Moat of the contmental rountn. 'erpn-lln; tin Mt. Olymp* bulk of the taam thlt"p1n> %  i. Ilungary m"1 Vo-. %  : \ mado up ol* men wh pitrie:•' the P bat p ksfl fhice, they m the grand mannei gearing Is allowed only between he completion of one Jumper's P and and ihe commencement of i ;. lha next As the rtdCtl often met : J of 13 | li oihiM .it the gate th Inff in heu;hi iiom ISO c I %  'HUSU of cheering and to 160 centimetre*, l.a t n 3i bspptu and the crowd kept it i ti ft ;t m• i : 'ire Up "ell lit | stadium with 70.000 wld water-jump ple one could have heard a pin one narrow water-jump behind a '""I while each lumper wont World I the Bunj i.in T ,i rough nil pace: Lh ..( |umpe,luri took a 1 %  %  | |; .,. ...uon ot J.p.n. K,„. ,., Int. were 4B • ^.inpetiini i:i the final and the individual comi rtltion mi tin team ceavpetitlori ware daeldad togethei K.-n it nation sent three competitors with d 5 Xmas Tragetlics In B.(>uiaiiu Son Kills ilrnm OH I OMrrQETOWN. Da The (Arista marred by five cdn At • o'clock in Adolpiu., Bit II..Mi-. 21 yej.rs old p lony soccer star who .i I I Trinidad •i!tm died a: tl boapttsu in (; %  %  • iwn, thre* %  bv A hi:-ir. ( %  ... I v i '. our.d Eve Urs V u fou'id BBH M.OUS on the steps of 1. i udiad hei to hospital but s!" -' Hi.rigbl ide of her cheat %  ".loft htl narrled in y M| this year. Mrs. Wong is • of tvrlla Steplieiison to have fought for the t.t>velght l>oxtnc eh:tm'm 1 on BoxingDay, but 111 Board two days ago I his promoter's licence. ' ntyne was shocked Eve morning when I %  %  D of ihe P.WJ3. Ccrentyne road programme were t 'uund in a "caravan" ofllce on' otntda on their i On Christmas Day Charles Banarstvee, motor car owner and equlbo coast, died' ten minutes after adn.. boftital. Hanaro %  had on to a para• control if the vehicle Identification Expert HQIOBTIrsD, Fla.. Dec. 27 James O. Barker. Police tdentt. Fxpeit called by the Duke r Wind t with the irdat caaa u laHS. ami h it to death to-da> by his son, James o D anker, n : ing Barker admitted lha shooting and thai there has been family feuding between the fulhe • I "Tlic i: i\ i i; '75' u car with thosthidden vuluet essential to plea lininaculale Interior { Luxurious t'emfort Economical AH dies,arc point* worth noting when considering purchasing a car above average; a car that will serve you far into the futare .... who taatiAed tauri ha found tha flngarprtnt of Alfred de MHngnv. son-in-law of s i H uOakes on the s.' %  %  ad of the slam man. was tried be Association ol 'ieliver\ or Towing Wag"". Mobile Power Planl in one REDMAN & TAYIOKS GARAGE LTD. • %  ^H ^ WE TAKE THIS x We Extend to our II Friends and g £ £ Customers Sincere Wishes for a S HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR OPPORTUNITY TO WISH ALL OUR CUSTOMERS AND FRIENDS A Bright & Prosperous Neu' Year Th* %  ark aF.„..dr 7 L„i. |PERKINS & CO., LTD. \ K B? Roebuck Mre~< — Dial 2072 & 4S02 5RMKII*fIff£fBffa^ Quick relief from Colds, Coughs Sore Throats Bronchitis In extra large jart %  md Uandy tins MaM se Cksst Caiae, goashi At the *> *l#n of a co!d or coujh. rub %  M Rub On your cheu. tfroat. and back feel its penetratin| warmth doin|; you jood. slimutatlng your circulation, dupcrilng congeition! Breathe-in its pfeassnt medicated vapour to soothe sore lungs and throit. (htpgeta sti-rTiness. and ease your breathing! AUo stir t teatpoonnjl of the Rub Into a jug of hot wer and inhale the steam. Relieve muscular aches and paint by rubbing In Thermogene Rub where the pain is. So healing! So soothing! Try It — you will say thic % %  scalar 'alas Thermogene Medicated Ruh is a real blessing! lawct Bits* aa4 lt-ats Obtainable from all good stores and chemists Hj^_ Be prepared — get some Thermogene Medicated Rub today! THERMOGENE MEDICATED RUB For Colds and Coughs, Aches and Pains Sift that PhaA£A THE SHIRT THAT FITS TO A T • i ii #w nivci ii iniatr: ,\T AI.I. sromes



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I'M.I s|.\ SUNDAY ADVOCATE -I M>\\ HI I I %  %  !' %  21 IM1 FOR YOUR NEW YEARS PARTY SERVE THE CONNOISSEURS CHOICE GRANTS WHISKY tLWATS MELLOW... ALWATS TIT SAMB GRANTS WHISKY WILLIAM CRAM IONS LTD DIST11 IF YOU have NO APPETITE take PHOSFERINE TONIC WINE If VOU Jo noi cat enow quickly tiled, YOU Ml iI Yi i This is whCII VOU need rioe rook Wine. You %  M ihc %  • pert %  of PI hot. Ii will jfre you an appetite, make new blood. ran DCTVtl will |C1 IviUT. You will ilccrj m And you will fed ihogechei Eup) Take FHOSFERINE TONIC WINE J You'll soon -feel belter! ~ Now! The Full Benefits of a Chlorophyll* Toothpaste in a New, Exclusive Colgate Formula HCMS TOOIH DICKY. U ay d.-nlmt* Dkuneacid*inihrcnoulhrurtoothdocsw. Ivon tUM poaueene* OaKiete Chloroprisll TooU rigbt ! %  those deatructis i regular brushli ,: withCol| .it.' Chlorophyll To II ich tw effective aid in fighting tooth (fa ay] Grten Toothpaste >' tested and ap,. fcy Colgate \\ hi.ll 'lil-i't. KllOT I Itlnl. Il'a tho fljawjt ofakrophyl toothpaste tha world's largest maker of quality d.nlUrkea inn produce! JVew Shakespeare's W vn ages of man. is described In 'A f.miliar to many of us 1 L| If you %  rth — %  Uw Infant mewling and puking in the nurses arms". — und tttcrtUauet Uvougfc ihc variuus age* until the loot at "Sans teeth sans eyes, M ni taste, sins— evoryth-ng". But however unflattering hit description of the ages may be. how rtpl and true his likening of the world to a stage where we .ill have several parts io phy. a different part for eac'i age. Which (hen Is the best age -1 If m condense the ages of man into rive, a n ( i which age would we I choose to live through again were the ehOsN? Thai -s %  difficult question to ; ; tilt\ off. and the (hour would certainly vary with various lit few people would choose the repulsive but necessar • to get horn) first age. that age as Shakespeare describes %  it of "Mewling ami pukingof | wet nappies ami huiml .iting .!<•ttney, an age which mercifully we do not remember. And, would the age of child! hood be considered by many peoON besi age to n children themsstlvoa, who live only for the % % %  •-. bo gl %  Child, to be grown the goal which he cannot • fast enough, the all things are possible. And the child who mu*t traverse the Dying UnM of UIO, ihai dark, dongOfOUl .-or fused tunnel of adolescence, where anything may happen, and often does. nsaoj ei us would to relive c.ulonood. On. but Once iniidhood is passed, the doriBMOi ivel> lightens, and youth, the Lively i a re-free age of youth emerges. Youth is the age of gaiety. Of laughter, of love and the fulfil ni.-lit of love. Youth is (he flower of all the ages. u bles too : %  tnsOttOMl ups and downs, and Listing reaching out of youth for something nut to be found even In the closest and most InilmAte of human relationship. For in youth *,• are ever seeking that oneness of soul which the lucky few may attain for Incf time, but which QjUlcklj like the mirage ,t 'ith I* ;, %  %  • %  K period of II fi developing %  II %  lowlj SON into a wiser nni more stable maturity L. 1*01 n spile of all Ita Ittrft would many of u* I, %  %  through youth ,i second . and we can lurn to ,1o the rumtI Uidt in the busy hurrying years WOn never dOOO. list nii-ii have held executive positions iv and homes, the retire„ isHf *" %  The suiden cessation from The Mice Band wOJ DTMHH their monthly programme of music nt the Savannah at 4.45 p.m to-day. The Band will be conduct ed by Capt. C. E. liaison. Th. programme is as follows:— MAiU'ii WDM i. Wnn lh. Mom Guard BtoUi-.' i -Vr'KTI i Mb-nlftf. Noon JI.I S*i.-t *i>r CUisMal Mi. | .HI. IHIKAIU gKcntpn I..l-r>hia the war are the new Jellv bag c ipi You can see men. capp.ng nail the girh %  west End You can flno them :n London's shops c tfting inythlng Imm ifts t'1 guineas I ; %  1 %  %  „ • % %  [hi lace ntraocorni: won ng face i %  .: II i i!ii-i.nii'iiii.iu..i.i iv.' III'-III .II rf.ve | HI: ggaj %  'inn 'orburui The perch hold on onesel: turn our thoughts outl oly enough for the ad•tT their young and forget them ways. This age which is the las* early age—the human ampart tra play on the stage of life mal clings to her children forby Its vary QiialHj prep a roa ua fw ever, (^ bad arrangement on the our llnal exit. part of nature which IWslUl BO WO I .;,-> „i |if,ombarraaarnent <"' the child today, infancy. childhix> embarassmciit for the child. middle-age and old age. gi ~ Which would you choose to rcfully needs therefore a Ann live? \\\\\1UIIII.///// •-aff: the Jeilroaa Cap :s so easv to Hit on— but Oh to Inrtf f, B iei "• %  • i "ears i: ray." tud i SJ|".K;: If pu r -ua s'nigni up in n peSK Of cap Du.ird do-*n %  %  hare some n, %  %  loo ol B %  .jnt eay I n -ne onofograph is a ling %  it MUr skefced hac ouluft > and io enormous s*.ur %  • GIVE-AWAY + nit niMviiK mat tella .. aoout he pert, n .tne a enole persunal carUoot %  '" %  '•••* ru.lH-M. ft.-vo ;)-X un .;>-• "n nem i l i^'ea in took mi I) Dai -na I %  % %  BeterWl Nteae %  Orei is MP croelis hHO\l V|„ M,!,:,, ,| wfl ori i DHw But iable to buv %  Nrt n-.rS on French IndO-Cbina "JtfJr*] %  : i % %  treat j a %  hich .nablrd us t 0 obtain I in th' n svane I'.i'sdoi :!HlrKM ft i. %  i otnte o" *cio'irtui THAI oaptiat 4. 8d a plant inside one ; In Mart Harttal I ha:, small not* A A .de Dlnck i %  % %  %  %  %  D V'tm HI MJIIII'II. Nash hoUM.v. from lame wru'e urni i 1'ihn %  TI'I %  oi 1 ecorai Koalrr'* countrv no -.:• Ci ra i n rnn[elit.rce i \Urni I ane's nome. %  ': %  SORRYwrong number II l ii. n. .our , u..,,, n„ „ihrr o* ihii II ptn. i., A lid tain r I. .Ii ... hum and %  j mm reef ohmir niimbrt. ' l.lif In lilrphonr* ana ne Ml UjaehOfj and a ,. -m ro rrk laler ne takr< vnu u, !•> month* 11i.i >o„ arr ..(.. d part. !..j.ii„ r mF .id I I 'I.' -. .. and i.ikohnnr iiNin i re Irnm inpm. hrr into I.i. ill ing m tuekei Tron* of a %  In tra ni'd iu .. screen io n:de ihc cetebr!'!es would do the same— to read about Bernard i" A Stern Bear"i Hradm Ben f Son of My Bight Hand "> Ljon. Hanale t~ A Small Pearl ' Elsenheaer. . Leonard I" Bold Line "i Lord. NOTED A TWO Ni:W K.>dH-"S trr-s ** week receive the Anne E.I--vards Award (Second Classi O A no* ;:p-orui-cu;m ;>stick in a gilt case it worts like a oropeiiing pencil—:he lipstick squeezes into the brush when you twu*. Second Class Award only oecause the price Is Ci IDs when ii should be nearer 35a A child's nursery mug sna dishes shaped like a train The bciilter is the tunnel the two duties are the tender The spoon and fork are shaped like the dr.ver and fireman Easy to wash, bright plastic, and noton expensive (10* 9d.) Second Class Award only oe cause It encourages mothers U make a fuss of the "won't eat child when it is so much wiser io lake the food awav UP-TO-DATE ? Th? otiren iiflj in the oarttnit Poluhtno the orofe, The kina iros m the fcitcften WwhMiq up a piafe Ffle moid U!Bi in the oorden hatuui bread and hontw. Listening to the neighbour! Offering her more moneu S noted Dy Jonquil Antony in V Dale at Home' published today by Macdonatd 8s Od. WHO CHOOSES Fndav. ~ •Il.lTllLliJ ol %  iu us the aaeten nsui % %  BY THE WAV rUfc URCSs a 16-year-oia S irl chooses for nersell and Ule ress her mother chooses lor nei are entirely different affairs— • %  ven when the mother u co acknowledged eDen on cloth** side of a .> IkJ '-ne IlM
' the dress tnt Uuehep rhose for Prince*. *,leandr> >.o oat oar.ies was ir ITHI '. u:. : garanaa :,,>. %  with nale blue with a ve-v fuu skirt blue sash ano pla.r bod'.Ct :m wide ooai neck And ihe dr,-ss I'r.nrets AIM andra ordered instead twrni* her mother us awavi was m peacock-grecn Organis tftlb tg elaoora'e tuckyI-*nd-bowed V necK slimmer skirt no tean -The Princess" reoort* Mr H. Fi.iw'r. nn m^ae noth the dresses took one look ai the Irocs her mo'hej naa ordered and decid'd ll **< too -nildisn editc ounas. or nun* n %  NAMED ^ III K WMI *Kim C b u n r tungI re%,d of -ne Korean war or.de %  mean.na Oo.der need to use a ci iy round corner.-. >ked fluic io Snihbo If you stand round the corner nnd play an org-* A weeti jigo 1 drank a glass of uorKus, dlnary straight flute the effect will SnibgUem tloor-rolish by mlstako By Beachcomber |"">"" • uo^/^y'^rnunc'cncc?,"' A Iv vnlrc. were rilwcl in sons be. TOl IM? be Ihc same "A l*nd in a nuu. I win^ ,!,) Wrdcli shrank back from says the Drolessor. "Is a, rlcllrulou* '' cried "''' *lndow. "It's those redas would be a pointed drum or a or.li of tho warded dwarn," nld the Coloround harp." But, he points out. AM twelve of them?" the whole idea of playing round !27£L%L5"!&: A ," """." " bami o„ ii£ ^ \HVJNGc 'A % YEAST-VITE i— %  We'll all be icon't we? %  ath the Wretch bed l0W, '-What U 1 he Colonel. The % %  renade floated up .— -• ; !" SJ"^!S, day this u lit. r ''"' ""*"(/ MalsW tromoonist were to play with In „';.;,.„ r ; ;\ !" ^cMd rt i„s, ho o n „ c,: gKKiiKliKHKIIfffsBSs^^ S If I i See Us For Your Stationery for the sparkling Sntbholade. As ft made me II) 1 drank a glass of Snlbbotone Health-Juice, and nt once felt better Snibbo evidently can not only make you ill, but tan Whkb Is more than can r Boimlnger's Falrv Thtstj only make you 111. Yr. gratefully. Amy Curse. s? The Only Pain Reliever containing Vitamin B< CHICKS COMMON CUM PITIfsstll. In recent clinical tests. nveiiled that chlorophyll promotes t lie growth of firm, limit hy stum (i-aue. New Colgate Chlor.v[ihyll Tolh|>oate brings you the l-m lit ofchlorophyllin woter-solulr. chlorophyll inn to help you care for Bore.tender guma. IfyoawsniiogetQL'ICKRI-:!.)!:!' from PAIN, and ako to ernoy ihe bcnctliv of Viuunin B, j HI muit take YEAST VITE Tahleu. Thcre'i noihing elc like YEAS I VITE. It is ihe ONLY pain reliever which ALSO contains the tonic Vitamin By Don't waitgo and get some TOAST-' Tablets now. (HEADACHES NERVE PAINS COLDS, CHILLS, 1!!!^!!!5LL C p ,l,s RELIEVES YOUR PAIN Hid MAXES roll FEEL WELL For A Prosperous 1953 Requirements Attractive Boxes of Stationery Perfumed Stationery Serviettes & Doyleys Waxed Ice Cream Containers Yardley*s Gift Sets Lentheric Gift Sets Pear! Necklaces Lovely Boxes of Cadbury Chocolates Etc.. Etc. YEAST-VITE THE WINDSOR PHARMACY | I'KOAO ST. TELEPHONE No. 2292



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I'M.I I Kill SUNDA1 llivot Ml SUNDAY PECEMBEB g. 1M2 BARBADOS *& ADYtfcrVTE Slllld.i>. Detenihii H IN] iiii THE | linuoua military opts 11 ni two i with t. ... deadlock |] .' i There %  i "lip* d rial 1 mor' recently tumble*. In Afi lei The Mau Mat] atrocil i bavt l< ':. %  -anoti bstion on HI that colonj i* niil devclopiiu-nt. Trouble ibrewing In South Aim*;. In Burma, Nepal, Stain and >' %  Conununial domination ii;i\>' i" 1 ilurin^ the year and are i. n tl h the hot been raying on certain ii %  has been a use In tempera! tn %  uble areas. 1952 will be Intensification of the %  %  %  K rea thi %  tl I %  Irawinj ol rn told have lad • %  • in the policies formulati the > %  .IT Soviet rearmam nl • %  i work for a iplil In ; %  D unlit agents la to I rial Independei meanj oi creating a split loan the i nol i. the latest having l**" n( IH '" Communists are to be | il, r than revolul are being placed on the intellect can infiltrate into non-Commuiusi | .•id organisations. Tli: ence and reliance on intellect ,. than on w not new but Stalin's i had to be made became of the contradictory or which have been laauad to CofnmtU i ,i since the peace Da w pa i ga started Stalin knows that he must play %  cunning game if he is \-> win the coW war | n gl tiOTJ '.vhich the Ul and the NATO countries are taking to defeat Soviet Irnpertaliim ti him to issue ordera which mean thai i i tin leaders of the proietarial will l • %  to "rightnibout-faca" and collaborate with bourgeois and even taadits pad With Hnler was of course an early InaUlment of the line which is now hem,; followed and Communists h ltd i.i be reminded of it. Baalists who race Dili tl si I the Communist peace ntovementi and the tnda of "con ami "brotherly love* lies th. letermii ed Boviel bid 1 i world conquest ere as i that the last thing Moscow wants i form. It suits the PoUtbux. have .i reactionarj (overnmani than a government which is .sincerely practl reform, n long %  >the C m n ui I I is not cruabed, Stalin would not hi Late foi to hasten the pi o g resi of Germans Japan on to the path of Independenl lopment, Nor would he hesitate to offer markets In the Soviel rphere I members of the Atlantic alliance ui an I Kploil the friction which results from the struggle for marketStalin ated much of Marx bul still Icheves that Mai': w.i> II ht wlien thai war between th-Impei la powei was inevitable If the event [Q52 : i guide thej not to support Marx's dictum. The gtreamlinin NATO under General Ridgway, the mill! held nndi aMoaorahipj the aaovemeni I European Defence Community: the formation of %  Pacific Defence Coum the agreemenl on political i ess % %  the ComB ..„ m i ... of which Her Head pathy whteh the united COUI with responsibilities for oversea territoi lea are iome of the Indications thai %  spin is unlikely m the Western camp, at leant wMlo the cold war bets w< ,. Bui if the and ,ve leaaenad their %  % %  iln enough pi tensio i make accurate pred.ction t entainl %  ,. tl ., %  ol anti-Sem h IV( ;,!„„ ihose who were prepared to believe that Communist dominated countnc were nol all thai were made out to be by right-Wing newspapers. The drivi which the go* Peking baa rtai ted a ii t for. Igi I Ihineae living in Calcutti Ind object lesson at hom< ol what lies behind the wmdow-dressinn of Communist C Hut Isolated event! cai nol be taken as reliable pointers to future developmi The stand whin. Endia takes s l Commull %  ' (actor Infi Ino t :;llions of people In %  dn India for their cause 1 kilful propaganda machine of imperialist R of the I bilged to crush. I peopli with low liv%  JVC until recently required Ui which %  But eondi%  'hat the boot is tl I the c rtintries with cclonial i are all anxiously oog paths :i nt for which many ai I I'mnmunist propatei Is therefore to con i thodox socialleaden who are planning the ivorfc stitutlon Communists in the Caribbean will even join farces with then two former deadliest crthrow established Labour : i The Caribt off era s fertile ground %  i i ive for hundred yew thi stock m trade ol the political tout. Not all of those who keep this dead* then ml but undoubtedly much of the virus still del spread owt in to fellow travellers I' nmunist ad %  change alter the Initiative was taken the Caribb* I i also tut* %  %  I %  %  Ui Ions and trade union In the British % % %  Mi Rii hard i il %  %  tl talk ol iv little Communism in the Can: ting herr and will lose ty of exploit which i gullible the Communist net Communism ol the British %  : with the loss of IndJ imunuan triumphed in the Caribbean Stalin would ained anothei ictory on .. lation by 'he • I Empire which In Communism seems to have i n m i%2 bul %  at woi : !. Ill MAX \ ATI HI: MATT RE, as the l.atin satirist Juvenal summeH up neatly, can be expelled with a she) i is a habit of coming back. The All (a specimen of which can at the Barbados Museun I characteristics. In politics too, nature is never printed dn to embai rass themselves and confuse the sfndent of political history Things are It tvei quite as simple as they look and even CroWBi winch looked so easy to bear or etn kick away press on more heads than would have ever been believed | The world which seems so easy to rehum at the sweet age of seventeen or • twenty-oias seems no bt tl nibitious have made their effort.. Nature, the nature of man. the fallen nature of man the prods of millions of pitch forks and in ; either take long in oi when they come br;i evils in then %  human . .. ... next docs Tl %  ..>i(ijrrs navt I %  %  %  %  %  lion casualUts in the same campaign i ... %  tl I %  how often do < %  think of it Emotional speeches llan man or what is vt 10 %  .. were unemplor %  cause '>f the |lu no one In Rnsland iried to UarM i .Hem of Indusu %  lbs pitci fork lu* If muM ham I ten unimploymtnt among our .ui. %  -l no ninny < % %  • %  • . i %  gain we arp i %  t lit that Umltlnf • restrain n rths noblest M lahei BarUresoma opti i i ,ni(l ilt-liiformed has never lacked pcrUl thight" which '" %  r the corporal .icious cul%  %  %  uevrmrnts. Is lt\ %  %  %  %  i Wi Ii .i.in .i-i.ii. poiitJ 'I nl On ua atul a I that %  %  :\ of n' more UMui ae ofnci il %  DUUU wen-equtpped llbrarkM In Uu Caribbean %  i Kmcdnm always ilnd reason to praise %  .Is TIIF. I.IOUOB STORE WITH THE BEST VAI E from H*' boM The Best Winw JIIII C.H-tapur Rum. NATHANIEL GUBBINS A ?/ 0l iL Unc, N *''8 "'e partner, PlUCk) lat!l, W ciK-irna:^;^. and cook sines i. (< v| %  mis.,d. or hrielK ,;. "h,h milk. *„|s over,,. %  howl, uk a ijanaSe %  ith a short d %  Crtbbled on the kitchen The Keltic AKI morning tea to :• L ay P.I w -aj* KM reel on lire. %  Run downstairs to put o.. whistling kettle. Hun I %  %  %  %  %  uth. P I W lytng on beck, opens muth wide Hk< Sedghruj D l>rak tor mother hirci to pop worms into it. Pop glass Wo-m uml.-r fledeling's tongue Ing ketlls howls Hun to meet Lottie, the rifltd of whistling ketlh taira, Almost mat I Mth Lottie aider t et. %  While making tea. read Lord HI House of Lords prisoner Ut Aylesbury 1 who told him about the • v.i,]..Hirful hot h-Kl iluie. the comeaa, and the library full B7< terns. • lo ring a bell :. • )us lordship. Bv this time tea is cold and she can hardly breathe through her nose and still bai ter In her mouth, is alI which >. and tell PI. v. nan in Aylesbury jail Drinking cold tee, Pl.W. says she wouldn't mind bring there h, ,;... .,;' %  | l W • on kettle again, rake ItOVe thoroughly. *;et in fin-I. put on loo much fuel and put ItOVe %  %  Docto: aski > %  at ones. Then why is she del The Doctor T-HKl'liONE doctor. While trying to explain PI.V iptoms. whistling kettle howls %  ohone. asks "Is she In gi I answer, "No". as] As it is dan) at down on %  .'id run upstairs to ask tPX.1V m nh! iik'' 'or lunch. r i..w. aafca: "Wkel woman in Aylesbury ;ail hai %  %  '" Probably roatt beef and Yorkshtr,pud., bul 'i pad. 0'iy day. U'haf cbOHl c i w nyi Yet, wi yat -'.•I' M ihe'i tiiii on ii"-'." • put on whistling kettle II d gone out. 1!< -lay stove and re%  ii.shiwinger and ask %  %  golf "ii kitchen table ;is 1 may H :. II W that doctor Is coming and to take temperature once more stairs again with ihenrhand to answer call of whistling front door hell for from il asks can I pair of steps and where is the l.ft" Pick up steps with in other. le.id way upstairs to show assessor loft Dos • to silence %  M make eoffe*-. and look i-. with draught wide open, is now roaring furnace. Close up tverythlo kt, and rtnd milk boilinp over. The Sole W HILE making coflcv. wonder it assessor is really assessor. Too old for cosh boy but, %  again to lint Downstairs again to open front dooi fdr 1 ; %  %  '.,. co flee. Doctor i ilounntalrs again and out to chemist Comi back to find arrived ind Lotus bai BUel on kilrhen floor. P<4niing dramaUcallj I %  rabbit, tell her she is low and mean to sic-: lunch, but Lcttie continues to munch with butler, and. vhik looking for salt, Lottie grab* I tu eiijny : 'n butter on it. Put %  olfl under grill, pick lip t read that Colonel A C. (,illn;i. iHiiiin.iidn^ USA F base at U v..ntspe,>pll ben tO InvttS American Scrlo their homes. m bOW PL.W. and I sent written niter tu entertain American brOOOS during war. Arneria.tii .mlliot Hies sent back from which said: you have an American soldier In your home. i religion; %  i : \\ %  %  %  beck: "As we are boih religious, fanatics, oi -, x innniacs. offer cancel l ed.*' Put down papal and find Lottie licking over mashed potatoes. The \ei|jhbour O BVTOU8L1 onl] i rts thing to do As LottJi has no morals and fears nothing on earth but the kettle, she shall have i kettle throughout cooking operations. Pul OB W. K. and let it howl. Lottie runs out of kitchen and hides under dining room sofa. Through howling of kettle I h< ar front door bell ring. Il Is a neighbour who asks%  re fl'iyt'iiiiu iof i snswi r "ll) wife is ill." The neighbour says: "Bul | r.-rrible noise?" That is my mad brother having hallurinatl Tha neighbour says: Sg stntfly. do tfcear* ind shut the door. to 'his interruption, the lirned. When I take it up i the i'1-w.. iha looks at the 'id says: •to Aylcsburi; jail and liare all that WOftrood? ta I n ply: "When you nr-bettei you could become a cosh girl." She says: ••There are a lor of Hfci to rosh, and Iheu u'outdu'f be old laJles. rVUI |fOM bWf ie a i-oth"" "I will buy vou one for Christmas." "Buu i I jail.before Christmas." n that I i i lime to hate rnu .Aylesbury —L.E.S. roio\i vi miim i it* Colonial constitutions •# ll\#*"/.•-., If,,,*!., r British colonies have one D J V€Ok^gB HUtllO thing in comn Bul dlv Th-% .. jubject io the legislative suprem.,. nyoft! ...mentand J* ,' "' t ""10 !he right wn lo disK??". inmunce, would have by dlow the,, legislation on the adff h ":* prevented tht p. t the Imperial Rovernmew 2f* n o( i)( west Indian peoples words Mi'. a naUon unified In re governing. i Sovernment from Whitehall. 1 l^an nationals in thi Imperial Parliament. Ifthc) % %  kUve assemblies would %  %  m colonies with adult suflragv. Colonial legislatures have full power within territorial 1 I | : II %  1'jtch in South Africa and th v d English la I A i nerasnee of in nation was the aboliUwrery. And the abolition bject to the rule that in* tulo'.' 8 BVCr > I S hunrepugnant to | | '*J> '' % %  '* Jfase of life to the rule the Imp-: Whitciuli in the W.-.• lonv (or any order or re5?" V J mtroduced into .-idT such Act i ,n,t Br i"sh West Indies not by the ^^Ulll tt> the ext nl of such repuc' n If,al settlers who came here tu be void and In-operative ".i? nd bui1 '' U P." new English Ler.l p| 1 Uu: by English appeal unexciting to some but th, """'*'* w !" wanted ton meaning i JJ <•"< "' " lvt !>..'!• On the ,*?* ( -7 1 m " h represent;.-.. ,n,g U,c d Of the mother perial or local legislation counl d a m em. The rt does not lead t e particular prc R is a ^\ BT, a brake, lshed compensation had to l* paid -"Hi and not much of the eon,., for all colonml leiislatiun remsmed In the Wc-t 1 .• who has studied British fl r -ts which would % %  hither in a tergJJm, „ lf W( ... n(1|3|1 |,. gllIil [ Urc ; to taekl. the i of flttlng t not e\*en (as in iring French %  %  hr. The %  I %  MMvy Kuropaeit %  E %  becon Iin (SUL I hick has since becom. w verelgn I natloi %  a self-governing Dominion as Australia, Canada or Sout Africa) or in territiiries which nr 1 lies like th, i "" '• ".us before tb form Hill pandanca always came from the Iwhef of the people on the . better titled U. h .A. ,',..; ^ ?£%". '"'XVlv n legislators of Wc. minster There lu „„ „ f u ,. ommill (tv as p.. iblected to tin .. he new public oplnl rnat was said ofcourwarMtl ts purl Of the w w L liny decided h;" %  exerti I'M"' | ;'The nrmh Csra^anlsl. I from the earliest 'ays of colonlsa, h ocked. a lion shared thi* n-sentmenl of flflunI u a ^ m \ re anf | ;ihovc a]1 to eontiol |.% Uuulon tvause the illpI nieaut ways British Cinibbvai, kland | hl w] h were settl.M by Fnclwh-nen who modifications it st %  ;;ti nicm KnKii.shJas/and crU dc enth %  1 their own affairs in the lind of settlement. Had tl West Indit day been settled I %  %  man SS well. English ll h. % %  .' %  : about British ; thej arc perfi rn %  eon-. the legislative uaht liave lieen the only law and aupremacv of thi leaU of government the W< lalatures Is to reduce the cffeeUve%  sen of action whii -till exists French law and Hutch, of Slat-'. an ,j t |,p French and Spanish influences arc Colonial Governors want to take firmly embedded, among the West It is easy enough for left-wing of Parliament and their journalist friends to criticise the • nt s handling of ban they are sitting thousands of miles away safe from the murderous attacks of Mau Mau. The supremacy of the British Parliament over Colonial legislatures never se, kebla than ll| BOeS wrong in a British colony. Then everybody State for the Co|Govsi nor or the Colonial legislature ,iii come in for a the lashing tongues and I pens wtuch %  uddenb inform the large ignorant British public that thry have a colony i •which somebody has : %  Rood reason I believe for the Parliament at Westminster retaining v | ty\ ,'tiiouial legisiaiurea \' Ik PfuJl'trTtg; of minbil supremacy is | i in the interest.-, of minl .' %  %  the li %  i i B H Uiers u no purpose whatever ID UM of Parliament bCUUJ -I if questions are to be l iment by pei -lake in the colonies nol bso ens ielfof the Kht to elect one or more astve British Parliaments ; %  > ropn [ud not as now the in. Individuals who Ret the ear Ol certain Members of Parliarnenl) Utrousjhout the session and i."' i question time. One agent of Barbados In for many yeal alecUOfl to the British P and representation was achieved urinal manner but today Iha Wast Indiani who are elected t We *mln b i owe full allegiance British constituents who has %  voted lor them. There are nianj stocK objections 1 tor colonial* be'!* feturi .ament at : them are ll ulivelv and not BUt Sou.,,-: strong may bo the arguments ipation in rllsment such par%  w-hh h allows individual M.P*s and their journalist friends to beat a big stick and attempt to browbeat %  %  for the IS of Colonies ini %  proved by r pressure groups. The United Natnms A %  ling territories has learnt a lot of technunt* i w. %  ..nd colonial administration everywhere tnda. threatened with extinct why self-government dwith safe-Kuards for min"nt\ groups) seems a lesser evil la many than it did before the army of meddlers swelled tj the presen" A Prosperous Neif Year TO ALL OIR CBBTOIOBS From WILKINSON' & HAYNKS Co.. Lid. Successors To C. S. PITCHER & CO. % %  hone J2. 4M7 HFTKWITH STOHlN O^ Drapes Bedspreads Net Curtain . materials — a choice M'leetion to give y








ESTABLISHED 1895 BARBADOS, DECE iBER 28, 1952

QUEEN SEEKS HER PEOPLE’S

| - - Makes Xmas a rie = a
Broadeast

LONDON, Dee, 25.







Going To j’ca













|
Queen Elizabeth broadcast her first Cursstmes mes ONDON. £ 9
sage to her people today and Legged for their prayers : ‘ oe ™) ie. '
“that God. may gi Sais ; i | Prime Minister Winston Churchill sails next week by
that God may give me wisdom and strength and that I a4 M f alia | He will
pie . ‘ Bey » ne i roa hole l nar Me wi pen
may faithfully serve him and you, all the days of my life. ' ¢ es sy Ne Y " sh x oe ee dd are
e 26 year old Queen, sove- | afew days in New York and meeti both Kv

reign for ten months spoke frém | Eisenhower and President T before goir 1
Ze ace, > ae ae —— at} Y | \ © | Jamaica. Mr. Churchill summoned his top M ers fron
Sandringham Norfolk with nex 7 » Chris rs to for “al meet etore
husband the Duke of Edinburgh | ourists the C hristmas holidays ay f tf !
and their children, four year oldi | he sails
Prince Charles and Princess Anne! J aire
two, close by her. | tt ] e ~ chil nt pm efor \

Expressing her “affectionate | eI Soustelles Risenhowe k tde i
greetings” to 600,000,000 Com-!' m « ternational situation Wht
monwealth citizems in ali con. | j irer ie r eo . the Korean < e
tinents the Queen asked specially a e Ag F . ‘ore Myr enhower orm
for prayers when she receives the| a j ries 0 ol Mh broad outline eZ foreign

. crown of state at her coronation de

in Westminster Abbey next June]. Tourists frem the 5.S. Nieuw

2nd. Amsterdam mingled with the
She gave her people this pledge: | "ge congregation which attend
‘At my coronation next June, 1/ed the 11 o’clock service at St

shall dedicate myself anew for|Michael’s Cathedral on. Christ-

policy of his new administration

| y
French Govl. | The informal

Churehil’s U.S
PARIS, Dec, 2 lined by a Government spokes-
facques Soustelles, first mem-|man but while his visit to Pre

nature of M

t ie
I NS under-

















ervice. mas rm N bes of the General Charles Dejdent Truman will be a friendly
ie aie saline 8 “T shall do so in the presence of spent Chtisinas tne a jaulle’s Rally of French People gesture “a the retivine chia
eee a : : 94 great congregation drawn from | dos. . { Ghd F to Ah ive agreed to try executive, Mr Churehill tal
every part of the Commonwealth Many of the tourists walked} a - ,2 Government, was ex-|with Mr. Eisenhower were ¢
= . | ind Empire while millions outside |2round the City and visited! , bh age oa ate to tell = cea pected to hit all essentia ot
ew our Westminster Abbey will hear |places of interest. Some travell- ‘ | " A iriol whether he w ul foreign policy
= eri ne prayers being, off- tee by cars, Others preferred | J i, nail Ineaseitires alae la “s The —giefisiedinent vse the tek
. ered up within its walls and see | buses. ; j investit > > a cement of the trip
“| ‘ cine oe . Uy the Frene Ss ti am g > as se )
Commissioner a ot she a pene eke Ae ae pele dR |S ag Advocate; | a Ithe itis. pte : cara a the Mtisaee . ai i x lie ;
. ings an ie ¢ i; > DAP . -efer . arn > : i ‘ ‘ ‘ > £ S ane Mic &
A Sate Sie aan AOA ars bree in i ne ae mt THE POLICE BAND Minder Gapt. Raison playing at the General Hospital on Christmas Day. tentative Premier before he names|it did to Americans. It had been
= é é pa f 3 ‘ er » local! — — - - ee “a o——nnninii - t : ; : aie 1. “A
Arriv es upon century. jaccent. That is how I get to e tis ministers then approve the|tvoewn that Mr. Churchill intend-

A know your people”, , ® r e ° Boe cabinet “en bloc” {ad to go with his top subordinates
“Fray For Me e Sai 2 was gli 41 9 € I Scustelle yesterday accepted/ts Washington in February ot
MR, A. H. PICKWOOD, form- “You will be keeping He said that he was glad to be e ers 4 oO t 2 n |Mr, Auriol’s proposal ‘ . ie ae aes

‘ L 3 aireie 7 t form are’ » denavinve far the
ext Depity. - Coranai it aS 4 spending Christmas in Barbados Oo x Mareh but this departure for the

sioner of] holiday but I want to ask you ail It was his fi = y . ra ° | P'rance’s eighteenth post-war Gov-|17.S. and his subsequent Jamaican
Labour, British Guiana, arrived ata see ; Bs fs feat: sunny ‘Christmas. as U S D qT rment and immediately began | yacs cd aot ‘anttelp:
i a, ,é @) whatever your religion may be t ; { ati . , , \ . an ately ves vacation had not been anticipa
bre. Meiletdad ecco; in the er yo gior y be to, He thought it just as interesting as U ee é ise owe e e e u , ing lconsultations w ith different} qq. een anticiy
>

‘ay for 2 Hat day— ray a “ “hristmas” i sric: :
Canadian Cruiser to take up his| P'@Y fo" me on that day—to pray a “White Christmas” in America.





that God may give me wisdom ani



r . \Frenc h political partics delegates Diplomatic source in Lon

} i ; i Si 2s sOnNdOn
new appointment as Labour + “arr | =x Ey ow - Xm Hi l da: * iin the hope of getting their agree- | .. ‘ hee tar Site z
Citeunlesi¢her of this coliny, strength - sear) out the solemn } = NEW YORK, Dec. 25. as Oo L |ment for a “national front” Gov 2) aan : ar ane it

He was met on board by Mr.| agree yr ee a P. it Premier Stalin today offered to meet Mr. Eisenhower Shes oy jerhment =without ~=CommumstS|biropean views to Mr, Eisen-
Ais Mace Deputy abou Como} may faithfully serve Him "“onece | to try to ease world. tension. It isusaid he is interested CHICAGO, Dee, 27 along the lines repeatedly setii oie before Mr. Eisenhowe
missioner. - | and you all the days of my life.”, | ry as is | iS Sé e is interested in An unofficial tabulation showed |forth by De Gaulle, 3 fi efore I isenhower

Born in Kenya on July 18, 1909 | The. Queen was making her first Pk i d ending the Korean war in angwering questions put to him}|4i9 persons had been killed] The main points of Soustelle’s comsil s himself to any definite
Mr. Pickwood was employed in| Christmas broadcast since she suc-| aye t | by the New York Times. He said he believed that the war |throughout the U.S. in the Christ-| programme are: First; reform of |" a pe policy 5. his
«positions of responsibility on) ceeded her father King George |the constitution. Mr, Soustelle: (ugural acdress hey said Mr.



between the U.S, and Russia cannot be considered as i j- |mas holiday weekend accidents Stalin’s “ / i

‘ : sy s S$ nevi- |" 3 eekend acciden ; ‘ . . Stalin’s “feeler’ about 2et

Aon intattends ~ 3 auritius | Sixth last February, \ s : fs re ya el aaa shuding 340 vat 32 ires,; Seid that under the presen , C a a meeting

eet. 1931-43 “From. 4 940. 43, he The Royal Christmas broadcast ueen S al table. The countries can live in peace. SOURED Tee SE SERIE y. Ot FREER l¥rench constitution “nobody can, With Mr. Eisenhower naturally
i 3. 940—43, j . ns vs “ _—~—— i !

Pe three in plane crashes and 44 in Ww I
serveqd in the Local Forces in| beamed all over the world by the miscellaneous mishaps. Lovern. He said prompt con ll be discussed, but Mr. Church

— ni Mr. Stalin said sources of world







‘ At) Sie cach aaa Wu contention lie everywhere and in : i al refor r ‘lude| ill was reported more concerned

Mauritius, ‘ aC BRS aan traditional, since On Christmas Day the band had <0 everything, wherever abgvedaive Almost two full days of tne Eon eae elimi ecanctrt to hear first hand ideas Mr Fisen-
He was appointed Assistant) it was started by King George, three engagements. They played I "e ) vctions or. at ft col ar {Christmas holiday weekend were |; vi ide Pit srless, bower had formed as a resul

Commissioner of Labour, Mauriti-| V, 20 years ago. jChristmas -carols and music at tre es roys i : POUGY OF. SHRP. Hoes ind there was a strong possi and of Se eters ould bi Kor wip and we aa
i g server "the ‘Poised a igni fore p | ener a) shh i expression abs re as ~ i 1Senate, and the executive would : orean trip and to present

us in 1943 and served in that post | Poised and dignified before the |Queen’s Park from 7—9 a.m. The A O 2 000 He said’ he would’ co-operate bility that the holiday death toll = Livdkinthened at least by pro-| his own.

until 1948 when he was appointed| microphone in her study, the park was packed with people who omes : on a new diplomatic approach to}might reach a new record. Sion sak ah abherabiv! vite ood

to. a similar post in British Guiana.; Queen sat in the same chair and j|sang the well known carols with

enc “2 ny scaUs The ¢ + recor 55 is aamieds aah : Mr. Churchill was sistently
In 1946, he attended a course of|at the same desk used by her the band. They then played at the nd the Korean war because} The all time record of 555 holi-jno confidence in Government 1s consistently

4 LGU : Pg *y : + , ‘ age , ’
TAEGU, South Korea, USSR Was interested in ending{day traffic deaths was set last}would mean its dismissal andj W@tned against the West's be-

instruction with the Ministry of| father and grandfather. General Hospital from 9.30 to Dec. £7. hr coming entangled in Asian figh
* : : The Royal famil ath 1 in} c : , 4 sass 7 co J it pe ; C hristmas. new elections, 5 i gled in ¢ sian fig t-
ar 1951 rae ied _ Kingdom the Neacaeete. Meck aod stent her { 1S 50h ee His ea light shane “dee Nero anne The Tires found the answers The National Safety Council has Second: A bold investment and ing to the extent that European
nial Labour Officers’ course | voice on their private radio set land calpeoes, Later. in the after to-day, driving them on*#e, | {O°OUrsBUB™ and very, diferent} already predicteg that 590 persons|reconstruction plan, defence is damaged, and he was
$ se, set. |; é " - * "



|The Queen was heard at the end |), the ; :
; | nf an hour long broadcast in which | ein ity “Happlial Here the
Second Class | the B.B.C. linked the four corners |handsmen joined in the dancing

j of the world with Christmas greet-! jround the wards, with the nurses

Mail Inereases nes, pee messages and goodwill. ' on duty.

from “the attgtude displayed ‘At} will beskillea \ highways by| Third: Amelioration of the, ®*Peeted to put that viewpoint to
fy

the streets in icy cold weatr- 7 lane he ford (aay wna ; Mr senhower. agai
regent UN®se8sions, The ansWers}inidnight Sundi Standard of Ay. if. r. Eisenhower. again,
er. Four United States sol- le AHARE: wav nawever—> 4. - ;
There was no expectation that

diers were injured fighting brought about varied reactions,| Meanwhile a cold snap chiiled| Soustell ;
the blaze mostly of scepticism ae, large portions of the country but }4OoW ene to eve ee Mr, Churchill would go into eco

e cP, ene skies : aims. e said however that the *y Magi : c0~
One Korean civilian was soecieabeilmace peherally’ fale skies promised 190d policy of stabilization of prices, of 0M or financial problems, on















eee eee aan

















| programme dre / to an Yesterday afternoon the band reported in a serious condi- a holiday weather despite falling pao Page y " detailed aspects of foreign policy
In order to achieve a reason-' ©nd, Her Majesty was introduced) gaye a “delightful Christmas | tion and two others were Th 24g» I 1 d papers tyre aaek neredon. wae cma e dehelen or cea iuctivrtty such as the Iranian oil question
able standard of efficiency in the ‘© listeners and “began: |Party programme at the St. James |] Slightly hurt. Some Koreins rec nyure nust be back at work Monday | hich had already. been initiated, | 2% Britain’s admission in some
delivery of second ¢lass mail of I am speaking to you from’ Ajmshouse. Besides the inmates had to be restrained from began the trek today to avoid the}. ouid be pushed with the utmost] ™#nner to the Pacific defence
which there has been a substantial â„¢y own home where I am ec many residents and well wishers|| Pushing into the flames to I A eaen | > t . expected travel snarl Sunday vigour 5 pact, now confined to U.S., Aus-~
increase, the. Post Office authori- i198 Christmas with my family’ \attended the concert, || recover their possessions. ni ecidents uP Fourth: Support of Atlanti-|‘T!@ and New Zealand.—v.P,
ties have been finding it necessary the Queen said. “Let me say at)" ” The fire which was report- Peter and European institutions while 3
greater extent than before. sean HOMES Peer acta a , “— remaining engagements ted ed to have started in a soap _ Daphne King of Government its safeguarding France's. interest
to use the motor pick-up to a Gren are enjoying thems sas the band for joe are: Monday’ | factory was fanned by a Hill, St. Michael was involved in Red Soldiers and national strength iT
The volume of transit mail Much as mine are on the day 29th—St, Thomas’ | Almshouse’| strong wind and in two | an accident with a motor cycle os" up, |EFY Mossade h
continues to increase and, in Which is especially the children’s Christmas Party at 4.30 p.m. and | hours had wiped out the whil ie was riaing a bicycle on a rn . ST UMD ie .- a e4 we e
addition, provision must,be made festival. the Y.M.C.A., concert at 8 p.m. | congested west side of the Culloden Road, St. Michael about Cut I oO Pieces |
to meet the increasing cost which “Most of you to whom I am'Tuesday 39th — St. Andrew's area. Three big blocks of 10.3 um. on Friduy, She was ATS T t . | 7 Be i
will result from the thdrawal speaking will be in your own Aimshouse Christmas Party at | dwellings were destroyed taken to the Gerera) Hospital and omatoes e ny W eak
of -the = subsidised Canadian homes but I have a_ special, 3.30 p.m, } shortly before military and treated for a cut on her head, SEOUL, Dec, 27. The t sgse] Jenkins ¢
National Steamship service, thought for those who are serving | ec | civilian firemen were able to { Wher the secident occtrred A Commando force of U.N, a ae Bae . val r aoek
No payment was made by the their country in distant land far| re e es qvell the blaze. | King was riding her bicycle on] nfantrymen ranged deep into Meiacdauoe reat Fey it ° ,PEHRAN, Dec. 27,
Post Office for carriage of mails from their families, “Wherever Nine Killed A United Nations civil as- || Culloden Roac. The motor cycle} jo iis Jand on the Western] (°° st aes rity t cae Tih Premier Mohammed Mossadegh
by tho “Bady Boats as this you are, at home or away, in snow | sistance team+ pushed blan- was going in the opposite direc-}fiont today to surprise and cut ae” ee a ae ¥ and a num “ ' ported very weak to-day
service was included in the ~ in sunshine, I give you a Ti E: dl. e kets and clothing to the | on ; : ; tik to pieces a group of 75 Com- Ataris Ferg Cae etiine ners fier umes n paeerah pat
subsidy paid by the Governmen; affectionate greetings with every / homeless,—U.P. Shortly after 2 p.m, on Friday]}imunist soldiers by 2 bUSE - > Master Of rho ge roreign Minister Hossein
under the Canada — West Indies good wish for Christmas and the} n Xp oston Lionel Lioyd a labourer of C Raid : to ‘the Ct neces ie Gare he cen: F exerts) Sere UP.) ee
Trade Agreement, 192: New Year.” lrington Village, St. Michael was aiders an into 1e unese/here are 4 M a oO leech on hin (ULP.)
As a. result, the Legislature ig Family NAGOYA, Japan, Dec. 27. +r r “ involved in an accident on Hart's aut of the dese rted truce village
last week voted $1,000 for Tran-! “Wo cae emily us to. the An explosion and fire wrecked ESPLANADE Ge, cam t Se an oe eh idee ead ioe tue toe ie —
sit mail, The amount is _re- British Commonwealth and Em-|® section of Nagoya’s downtown y 77 esr to. A eaeER® Reds dead or worded belare
coverable, UP. pire—that immense union of|business district killing nine per- SEA W ALL oo oy W Se oe a pulling on nas he tN “ee
———--——= ‘nations with their hopes set in}Sons and injuring 22 others. Ton : Paathiy vuisimdentna de " [Rain and snow over North Korea
all four corners of the earth. shops- were demolished by the IS CRACKING Lloyd sustained minor bruises}]#"unded U.N, warplanes until
Co : l * Like our own families it can be blast and flames believed to have . bath | is lete in the afternoon when a few,
ngratu ations a great power for good—a force | originated when chemicals in a i i OP isic. Bishow of Clapham, St.ffights of M.LG. killing Sabrejets |
which I believe can be of im-j|photo shop caught fire. Extensive cracks have appeal Michacl was date ined at the Gen-] 4d fighter bombers roared
AMONG many cables of measurable benefit to all Honan«| ed in the coral stone facing the on H , al Fr fay fte helthrough break in the overcast
congratulations, Dr. Olain | ity.” The Queen recalled that the! Seven persons were killed in-|seaward side of the Bay Street ¢ral Hospital on Friday alter sh 5 rt}



sky to hunt for targets in north

il from a lorry which was trav-
Korea.

Louis Bombard has received | work of her father and grand-,stantly and two firemen died} Esplanade and portions of the wall {a





a telegram from Captain father “united our people ever|fighting chemical fed flames. It] along sea level have been dam- Gare pone sheen our Hill, Chris ie
Sess unetor ee more closely” and promised to} was the second big explosion to in tt M A ae ye 0G aging She Mey heenitted suffering from i
rakaka. aintai » ideals s « : @ ai s. Sixte in the form of a concrete facing a yee
maintain the ideals so near to|}rock Nagoya in four days. Sixteen extending 500 fect will soon be| head injuries and cuts on both

persons were killed and some 300
injured Monday when a nitrogen
fertilizer factory blew up.—U.P.

8.S. “Arakaka” met the | their hearts. “I shal! strive mv
doctor in mid-oceanm quring j utmost to carry on their work”
his crossing. The cable reads | |she Mid.

“Congratulations to a gal-

lont gentleman who had so

carried out along this areca hands and feet

14 Die In
In nee ey estimates
Iasse > egisia » last . t
week, an amount of $5,00p" wa Mixed Cargo | Plane Crash



ey Se Oe







voted to carry out the necessary i, |
much courage in his con- 2 ° repairs which are considered to) The 87-ton auxiliary schoone
irate snr tS detemaas iwr a a errorists be urgently needed Philip H, Davidson arrived in the} SEOUL, Dec, 27. |
luxury and safety were off- © ete ‘i color fro British Guiana on A Greek airforce transport plane
cred to him. Wishing you a |Fiiday with a cargo of mixed|crashed and burned near a South|

.

happy Christmas from all e Police Active ! 9: oducts, \Korean airfield early today killing
on board.” Signed Captain Kill 10 In A mbush 2,000 bags of rice was the mainj|all 14 persons aboard

Carter, - i The Police Department took} item of the schooner’s cargo and |

Dr, Bombard whe arrived steps during the holiday period | other cargo included 500 bags of | Four Greek crewmen, a US
in Barbados on Dec. 23 after SINGAPORE. Dec. 27. te ensure safe driving by holi-! chareoal, 40 tons of firewood and | airforce radio operator attd nine
a& 65-day crossing of the At. Sie évinte Ambushed.an-ar yey ee 7 dayers who toured the country a number of wallaba posts. Master | unidentified passéngers were kill-
lantie from Las Palmas to errorists ambushed an armoured estate car in Jahore, pb vehicles, “of the Philip Davidson is Captain|ed. It was the second Greek air-
Rarbados in a rubber dinghy Malaya yesterday, kilJing ten people. It was the worst in-!" All along the main highways,| Carney Sea!







c i ind the local agents|craft to crash in Korea within a

is“due to fly to New York |; cident in Malaya in many months. The killed included six|constables from the Land Force are the Schooner Owners’ As-| week,

early thissweek on his way |} Malay special constables, two Malay women, a Malay child |@"4@_ the Mounted Branch, pat- «ciation. Last Monday night a Royal

back to France. | : ? : \olled the roads, ¢ Hellinic air force hospital plane \

ANOTHER lita aiveaar Ca oe ee
_ CHRISTMAS

STA, Georgia, Dec. 27

Mr. and Mrs. Christmas
were the happy parents of
a baby giri born on Christ-
mas Eve night. They are to
decide on a name for her
and it is said in social circles
that it would either be

Ter ue oA iach i 7 af - 5 ;
‘Terrorists had placed a land-|s)ould drive with caution and
mine on the road and it exploded trosurd for othe: road

users.
as the armoured car passed mat|



That crash also killed 14 persons
rincluding gix hospital patients
The twin engined transport whijen
crashed’ today was ona _ routine!

urier circuit stopping at various |
airfields in South Korea.



{ it. The vehicle moved co for about
100 yards When it was stopped by
a rondblock, Anothm nae





HERE FOR RUM

I O.K, Service




1





© The motor vess
it tovs



POQBRICE NOTICES

then exploded unde: Zitlwr arrived in

Wlisle Bay on



10 yards to one side and over af priq;



from Halifax to load an-



¢ 1 a constant re-
and the Indian driver. minder 16° rivers” fhat- they

*



; hipment of rum. The
then opened fire with rifles, snot-}ye:ce] was last here. during the The plane failed to gain altitude

after a takeoff and crashed into 4

ft jsix yards bank. Thirty terroris:3] oj oe;
“ |

low Caw , pay,



guns, grenades and a brengun month of November. Loading will



























;
i / Two of the fourteen in the tart on Monday. Local agents for | “Merry” or peers Pp hil! about two miles from the
A P armoured car survived wninjured. the motor vessel are Martin | re airfield. An investigation is under-~
ya my | Police said most of the others! ponriy & Co., Ltd. } way.—U.P. i
Or 7) were killed by the explosion tl . :
pag bi ih ace-3 Are A 7 the . second land-mine whict
Bi i nnn TO, —_— ae 1 oe gouged a hole 15 m>tres deep - z e :
tf oe _ | the ground splitting the armoured ommuin “Ss S oO au {
i Ov me os raf Lo ae i Fi car in two, A party of five police , i
: abe p heard the explosion about a mile } {}
d ; away. They rushed to the scene HANOI, Indo-China, Dec. 27 tance by guerilla auxiliaries al-'of hard-bitten foreign legion| ~. i
7 Ma oye a Des “roe (Arm y and. the terrorists broke up into] Gommunist. suicide ‘squads en- ved mat of the regulars troops across the river to the rebe! S ‘Pre C¢ eet ; i
a + (ua inn several parties and withdrew.jtrenched in the sodden Red River nown locally as one of the tough- \side. Facing them wag a big for-| COtncere Jf FCC tgs (Kt
y ff Asin . | Police. and troops began an , "| delta rice paddies held out against + Communist, units—to escape | tified village used 1 regimental| i
¥ tad . tensive search for them.—U.P. overwhelming firepower while a icra tercourse in flooded! command post plus .a maller CO ‘) i
Vietminh regiment tried to eseape tield village stronghold or a ) f osnerc S {\
PROSPECTOR COMING [the,French trap sprung yesterday On this basis officers said the| oe eee i
| operation Bretagne nportant operation Bretagne Artillery quick firing guns} (tt
The Harrison line steamer Pros- as planned three weeks ago in|mounted in planes opened the at-j} i 5
pector is due to arcive in Cartisle| French headquarte nid the edic f Bui Chu, 61 miles! tack Communists ambushed our } 19.33 i})
Bay to-day. The liner is calling|Christmas offensive w imed a utheast of Hanoi first wave and we had to thre if i)
PAY 12. at the Harbour Police Station and you can see the rubber from Liverpool with general cargo | the h infantry nd pow A tf ! 1 told hor sursels back in the iver. fc 1S) \\}
dinghy in which Dr. Bombard crossed the Atlantic from Las Palmas to for the island. Local ag nt fo th rtul g : units ck t vi o u driv r 4 d : : f da f be fore rotection : ain f the ir ho yting } K.W.V. Table Wines, Sherries and Rrandy. {
Barbados in 65 days Prospector are..D heed G ; ‘of S hs - WkietGant . tr COEF hinge ue Sear Rae) eee ee dae acta 4 ici . .
Proceeds to go to the local 8.P.C.A. Ltd jvillage saig re po UP. ss PFS BAS












PAGE TWO SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY. DECEMBER 28, 1952
ET I IS iat Poa Payie ee eT ee eat! -



Comir KING KONG” The Fighth Wender ‘ ‘ Se a oe er
’ KONG” Th wr Ke 5 W f R 3 A } \RNAI Fre e ie ; Varried Yesterday Tae
Vi ; PATRICKS & . Gibbe: nd
HIGHWAY MAN BIG TREES exucla yeaterds i 4 i : me dresses , of blue em-
NOY? j ol \ H r i \ € ot ,
| : 1

ulder effect and
A :
: IMAM I GINLS
f | | : DON'T TA







TALK é happy Ch
W T OUGH
| Y THROL { ECRET mia Mayo ime “| Be
| LLEGE f nG 4 y
M 1O HAVE : _— mes. Of < A reception was held :
» TOOK 8 je Spencers Plantation, Ch. Ch. and
— & aoe , honeymoon is being spert
a ES : VE NOT F . i Maxwell
Pore, wl : oak PS : M nd s, Johnson wil: be
| Al - i he French |! t d j I i 3 nie thal nina
a emo en < He sper vhite alitas ng rtly for t rh in
yWN BARBAREES ey ay et ec She \ ‘ ot y ‘be Trinidad



{
= Special Flights. For Turfites

- — = ——
wT) o D AL & BG & &® 8 nm & s RITISH West indian Auwi
operated specis an
ae : . — Christmas Day and Boxing Da
Vine . ROWAL to take turfftes to ime Tr nidiarci
e Tues s + & 830 Turf Club’s Christmas Meetn
which opened on Boxing Da
Those leaving on Christma:



aa evening were Mr. Victor Chas
MOON rae woncn nace Mr. Edd@te Ward, Mr. and My
i AWi sa, Joe Goddard and daughter, Mr.

nd Mrs. Jack Dear and daughte

JUST FOR YOU roft AND Let wot Mr. Primee Walker, Mz. Geore
Nf ANNE he Ward, Mr. J. R. Béwards, Mr

Clayton Greenidge, Hon. Dr. A. £
ato, Dr. Eric Storey. Mir ’

lade t canteens












































ort i Mrs. Charles Peirce, Mrs. Muri
You Ved a Hart and Mrs. Elsie Moore
said ; Leaving on Boxing Day wet
PASSAGE ' | ERE COMES Mr, Colin Goddard; Mr. H. Cad-
esday i THE GROOM dard, Mr. Harold Waithe Mi
30} tL RS ¥ pia 1 Hubert Kinch. Mr. John Cx
THE PLAINS © MAN OF Miss L. Mill, Mr. Meurice Ski
ME P, : .
. AND to | EX OWN Mr. Bertie Proverbs Wi
MPEMAID \ . TI Gill ana Mr. H, A. Tudoi @
rd D es HE 3ERS"” highlighted the Christmas Party on Christmas Eve night at the Bridgetown Plaza.
| R. STEWART MASSI4* T CAROLEERS igiligins
| \ vo wlila WOLFMAN RAGING TIDE M rlanter of Springhead. St Here they ore simging carols for the employees of the Plaza Theatres. The Party was given by the
BEND OF | ALDATEAS th nd as =a _. > tans Management. ag ;
0 THE) i Lon Chane CATTLE DRIVE Janes me one a Fi aya ichoe! Teachers Returned To Canada
RIVER who left during the week ’ .
Siren mare aarenretaaoes 2 BWIA. for Trinidad to atte Intransit “VY ARYE teachers from the Cre- N he ‘
the Christmas ace Me=ting oie a “trole y rg % MONG the passengers return-
ds I &y iis ¥ ee ave! : RS. M. K. VESYPAL amives ae pg ee ogre AY xada on Tuesday
Chemist here on Wednesday by th /.575. ‘Prinidad by special flight or “Cu were Mrs. Elizabeth
‘ . 1 PE t ths’ holiday De Grasse from Jamaica on rou Boxing spend a week's Say who wa yending a holiday
To-might 8.30 & Mon.. Imes. >& 3.50 ee ee om. Cecit R. % St. Lucia to join her husber t ilidies 7 oe here who hae daughter Mrs,
Hinkson, son of Mr. Rancolph Who has eet a ee ‘ ‘They ave Miss Edna Schuyler. Roddy Austin of 8th Aven MR. & MRS. LLOYD JOHNSON )
ad M -M 5s cH linkson of “Journeys ind”. Black ee = Bri ices - ani Miss Alice Bowman and Miss Belleville and Mr. and Mrs. Ulrick Pleasure Trip T.C.A. Arrivals
Se cwiciy | Rock and a chemist emploved in Ooh ica by h¢ Mr. Mervyn “. McCormick, all of whem ary Van der Wald who were here on | gp», p. FLEMING of the RS.. MARY ROSNER, daugh-
a SWING: he? ry of C.P.IM.. Curucao a 3 M ae! the Ocean View Hotel. . eee rete - zuests at the Publicity Department ae ter aif B. Shotn meavhet of
f le i ived here on Wednesdi t . $ 4 cean View Hotel. American ae Ne York High Street and t late Mrs.
a9 GLORIOU 9 Rienase AcconUeD Fr J fi irrivals By Be Grasse City is ‘vi icine the clartioinc: oe Korn “ot. Bay “Strest returned
: CAL) ; shildren rom enezuela » Trinidad Solicitor City 1s visiting al ‘ ; ’ sit) et,
} MUSICAL! i gus ‘twee cy YRILENE PUILI rinidad goticttor a pleasure triy He arrived here from New York via Bermuda op
: & x x : x 15S C EAN E . yesterday morning by B.W.1.A. Tuesday afternoon by T.C.A. after
F ’ . cd ok. And e -8. ir RE ae e —" tTO M* air dresser of Port-of- M* BRUCE PROCOPE, Trini- from Grenada and will be re- paying a visit to her mother who
ai ‘ J EAVING for the U.K., on Ws ‘ AGERW > inl I in. Trinidad arrived here on 4 ed Barrister, is spending maining for eight da ost. Bind in tine THEA. Keane,
Lt sf cae . ae sy Se De Sree two children Henrys a es Ww inesd by the SS. De Grasse ‘he Christmas holiday as the guest ut the Ocean View Hote! .
ha z J vas Miss Liiiam Murray, dau2)- from Caracas, Venezuela, arrive » spend the Christmas and New of J. O. Tudor at Government Also arriving by T.C.A. on
a " 7 ter of Mr. James L. Murray on Sunday by LAS for tf ‘ holi is a — ® Hill. Mr. Procope arrived fron From Trinidad Tuesday was Rev. J. Mockridge
, 7 . > c *hri as and Ne ear hol : ae ' ence G P ) 7 ay by B.W " : o de aow ss
With ‘ oe a. oS hom neeee e we = i na mi N Gill ¢« social. alah Friday by B.W.1A., MISS 1 U GENE EF. GAY dau ee né oe who is down on a
ove t S.A., sit | z are gues a wo sic ; i . IVE + ‘ vi
it, Miss B. Coppin of New Hotel te Mary Ga
the Star aunt, ithe Grae She o's me : . Maxwell Hill, Christ Church i 1
dus Jerse Tae More In 1967 A an gE bso paciaing by wo fe oe Second Visit In Five Yoars arrived home from San Fernand Quiet Wedding
a NES Albert E. Steigerwa Commi i 4 ' olid.ys were 2c PPE ‘ _ Trinidad BAW.LA to spend ;
f . 7 AYNES Prin- ho § RS. FREDERICA HUNTE Chinas 6 Tes . ‘1 quiet wedc > cere ,
American R. A. C. W. HAYNES, Prin- “Agents of Caracas. He said : Alberto Reval and | as a e Christmas and New Year's 4 T a quiet wedding ceremony
a cipal of Bates Memorial his wife and he h alata Venezuela. They : 1unt of Miss Marjorie an heli S 1 Christmas day Miss Mar-
; : a mau sf an h ’ oy we ul enezuelk hey are yy, Py Raila nahirnen . * “ : :
In Paris! High School, | Trinidad, acc’ wy ives weeks dontey ‘leer 7 sandy Beach Hotel ar. Ge Be Baile ys ern kK oe : ESA vin Skeete was married to Mr,
panied by his wife, the former September last * on oe : he Colony prog Ayoerica la : AR OSWALD HENRY of Martin Tudor.
Aficc Sheil: Ramkissoon and ©¢P 2€ ast year 0 = = cs werk to spend a short holiday with [¥g « yy faxwe ‘onst The bride \ giv Y arri-
on ata aaaenr arrived visit to the island Rarbadien In Bermuda her frandmother, Mrs. Jutia a ’ ia vars - vant Pg ar Hect Burcim Taceieeee,
here recently by B.W.1.A. for a ‘ ATR CECIL SPRINGER, a ed ee get Hunte’s see- from Trinidad on Boxing Day by was the bridegroom's brother Mr.
four-week holiday which he 1s ¥2 RBorbadiar v ho has been md visit in five years B.W.1LA.'s special flight j. Cameron Tudor.
pending with his mother, Mrs. AYt holidaying a £ a Y z for the past Tr, . npn 0 onidnepeneanesmiidanm cieptnmmanestion ; ae aeeipieemebtadeie icine
Charlotte M. Greenidge ot Cacrabank Hote! ¢ vith the »yal Mail! “wo Peks
Apple Grove”, Cave Hill. ___ and Mrs. Oscar Glanz of Marat oh Compan returned Me ALISTAIR ELDER, a
Mr. Haynes who was last ~— who arrived over the weeken home on Tuesda by T.C.A. to 2 eichant of Port-of-Spain,
in 1947 said that he : and J nS B.W.1LA. : en cut seven wee “holi- Trinidad, arrived here on Friday
fumily will be leaving on Jan- Mr. Glanz who is President of day h his relatives at Eagle ty B.W.I.A., on two weeks’ holi-
vary 11 for Grenada nearer Irimex, a Commission Agence Hall He was accompanied by cay. He was accompanied by his
will be the guests of fir. M: * Maracaibo said that they would Mr I ddeus Darrell a cO- wife and Master Donald Paap.
Hosten, the Social Science ich be here for two weeks. This is \vorke n Bermuda who will They are guests at the Marine
Set ei ~~ . a ane e ee their first visit to Barbado also be aying for seven weeks. Hotel.
oc noo who 18 spe ic ga J ’ .

there with his parents.

Private Practitioner
D*. CAROL JACKSON, a
private practitioner from
Washington, DC. arrived on
Friday night by B.W.LA., via
Puerto Rico for ten days’ hcliday
nd is a guest it “Edgewater

: Hotel”, Bathshehba
; She said that she visited here
last year for about the same
period. SS
Back To Werk

= F WACK to her duties as a Dis-
Jean Millard i triet Nurse in Port-of-Spain,

Miss Marjorie Porter who spent

abode eet ay ie ma f is s I
o sca AY BY 7 | re weeks’ holiday as a guest at
Rely nde an Gee GEN MITCHELL) | esaeeten St he” a

LYRICS BY MUSIC BY





























brought paper hats, noise makers and streamers for the guests who welcomed him singing * ‘Jingle Bells.” Ru enormous bowl of ex ellont eminent Barbadian historio-
Capt. C. BE. RAISON, “balloon baton” in hand conducts the singers. um Punch. Behind . srapher is going to keep the facts



the studio the normal progragme right, it should be very specta-











f ars Yorter said she had a very en- se = bs eae . 4 -
Arthur Freed + Nacio Herb Brown CYD CHARISSE i s oo ible chs and hopes to return o HAS BEEN quite a hectic morning? so th it they “can write
arece me Kelly & Stanley Donen fm Ce me day np t home to their friends and rela-
“Art ur Freed. An M-G-M j art no an e will t iy » ave huddied round a
& M-G-M Records . . ferrer sf the be hardly ; ! ier el : to keep warm, j US,
“ Picture Miss Carmen Herrera « ! i ‘ a ) : : : ag a
Album! Municipal School of Nursing 19 efore Ne e 1 rat ra ‘was oe a Quick
=)))| Caracas, Venezuela, left on Friday wm. Ia lab i jon would have - thought
i night by B.W.1.A., for Trinidad on my See the ¥ ees had had enough of the
{{] hor way back home after spend- hat unless 3 have t ed ea, but maybe it was his ambi-
}ing a week’s holiday. She was @ able sam¢ , you. are = F Taw Nee O84 AISURAS
5 puest at the Aquatic Club. to be left out in the ol¢ morning in Barbados too
Ny COKE LE EAPO FOr EI { Sia ake ‘
2 FUSION GAVE a very J) UMOURED ihat there vill
4 GAtety NES NE p de a full scale pageant for
KB ro-¢ & morrow 8.30 pim heir st staf The severity of the Co. onatior the idea is al-
8 Mat. To-day 4.30 oe Se, broken up by ly in-the committee sta I
oo table pi ised I would not t
MAGNIFICENT DOLL sandwiches, cockt and i } : , sat ee
and at cas: cana aie i : — about ic but I understand
o he table there the history of Barbados is going
> vas y nlium id * . - -
LL BE YOURS ee FATHER CHRISTMAS visited the Crane Hotel on Christmas night during their dinner party He was a flaming r uddi ‘ “0 be the main theme, an
KS
x
.
.
%
.
S

From Puerto Rico jWas going on unperturbed cular,
OCCSCOCSSOA LOCOS A/TRS. E. GRIVAS of New York | Footnote: On Tuesday in my
AVE City. arrived of Friday night fRISTMAS MORNING os col umn I said that The Barbados
A., from Puerto Reo Rockiey Beach, the Wekacedre en noun ie-agen on







~~ by B.W.LA.,, ; ; ;
@ i aD Wy KAR , She was accompanied by her two | have almost, disappeared. Fnelisi sald Wetec ‘Ate wr en ae
I | children and will be staying with |people weré splashing abou: t} sorry. Now I hear that to F ys,

her aunt Mrs. A. White of|brine; why do they make a point be open on Sunday ae it is to
Brighton, Black Rock. of swiron 4x4 «that partic ls ir well ay eae ae

FESTIVITIES as SSS Gen Ki Gm =m EEE



Tuesday (eniy) 8.30 p.m
James Mason in
THE SEVENTH VEIL

AT

The Barbados Aquatic Club

WE WIS: OUR CUSTOMERS AND FRIENDS

(Lecal & Visiting Members Only)

CLUB
MORGAN

> Orchestras

For continuous music throughout the
night

DINNERS will be served between 7 and 9 p.m.

so

i
oe ' A Prosperous
oa : New Year
F:
_
te, yi
:

MEMBERS are ke@ kindly to make their reserva

ons as carly as possible. Dial 446!

FROM THE WANAGEMENT AND STAFF OF

T. R. EVANS

WE ALSO HOPE TO HAVE THE PLEASURE

Turkey — Chicken cy Steak dinners
served from 8 to LL p.m. ; j
DANCING from 9 pm. Music by Mr. C. CURWEN

Supper at any time and his Orchestra,



CCLOR BY

| foun

Svet Waltz, Statue Dance, and Ballon Dance. for

HATS! BALLOONS! which Prizes will he given; also DOOR PRIZE to

NOISEMAKERS!

OF SERVING YOU AGAJX IV 7953
the holder of the Lucky Ticket.’



|
i Mave RONALD ATTRACTIVE BALLROM DECORATIONS
i | | 1 Ai . v 2 she ‘ 4 i
Maio Retin Nev, ;
i WEDNESDAY at TH: Admission to Ballroom 3
j
i

7
BRIDGETOWN gee A &
(Dial 2310) wal 2 £

to greet the New Year

T. R. EVANS (WHITFIELDS)

YOUR SHOE STORE
Phone a ; 42%)

am 228 822 22 ©82 2s fez

dinner $4.00 :-: Dance $1.00








_SUNDAY, DECEMBER 28, 1952



Farm And Gardening Hints Jfotoring Newse~
Garden
By AGRICOLA

Rice

Rice, although not cultivated
locally, is such an important arti-
cle cf diet at all seasons of the
year, it occurred to us that if
would be of interest to give a few
brief notes on the crop. Rice in
one form er another appears to
have been included in practically
all the Christmas menus which
have been advertised, It is the
world’s most important article of
diet. To millions, in Asiatie coun-
iries, failure of the rice crop may
mean famine.

While, for centuries, rice
been. associated with the East,
cultivation of the cereal has spread
te other regions and now forms
an important crep in the United
States, Italy, Spain, Australia,
Brazil, Mexico, British Guiana and
elsewhere. Generally speaking
in the tropics, rice is used chiefly
as a vegetable and is frequently
the most important dish at a meal.
In temperate climates, apart from
an occasional curry, rice usually
figures as a pudding. Although
simple to prepare, some experi-
ence of cooking rice and of its
characteristics will make all the
difference to both appearence
when served and _ palatability.
Thus a long or medium grain rice
may prove more acceptable as a
vegetable with meat or fish, while
a short, plump grain type is likely
to be more glutinous and sticky
and makes better puddings. Rice
combines Well with green or dried
pulses to make a very nutritious
meal.

has

There are numerous varieties.
The best yielding sorts are low-
land or aquatic in respect of en-
vironment, although hill or dry
land rices are cultivated to some
extent. The crop cycle varies
with the variety but is hardly less
than four months and greater than
six. The cultural practices con-
sist of ploughing to break the
land and turn under weed growth,
followed by harrowing and level-
ling. The last should be thorough
as on it depends the effective dis-
tribution of irrigation water. The
final result is a mixture of soil
and water which has been thor-
oughly churned up to the consis-
tency of thick cream, into which
nursery seedlings four to five
weeks old, are set in bunches of
five or six about eight inches
apart each way. The water rela-
tions of rice are peeuliar in that
the plants are kept growing in
standing water of five or six
inches depth throughout their
life cyele, except for the last
fortnight when the water .is let
out of the fields to harden off
the nearly mature grain.

Rice, throughout its history, has
been regarded as a crop of low
unit value, grown by small farm-
ers using simple, often home-made
implements, with women-folk dor
ing the transplanting, weeding aud
barvesting, all by hand and sickle
Largely a family crop, rice has
seldom, in the tropics at any rate,
proved attractive to capitalistic
outlay for mechanisation. Severe
shortages brought about by World
War II and a consequent substan~
tial rise in value are creating in-
terest in modern methods and
large scale production units are
ceveloping rapidly. This is very
much the case in British Guiana,
our supplier ef this commodity, In
this connection, producers in the
tropics are learning from coun-
tries like the United States and
Australia which, enjoying the
benefits of protective tariffs (with
a low consumption rate compared
with tropical countries), have been
able to capitalise the industry with
advantage. To such an extent is
this the case that in many areas in
the United States, the seed is now
sown broadcast from low-flying
airplanes, Preparation of the
jJand, reaping and bagging the
grain (simultaneously in the field
as with wheat, etc.) are all carried
out mechanically.

|

| Good Paint is

an In

We stock a very large

imported Paints; and this year, because it is Coro-

nation Year, is when to

and new!

And the time to buy is NOW !

PAINTS, DRY COLOURS, LINSEED OIL, TUR-
PENTINE & FLOOR VARNISH





For Amateurs

Those lucky peéple who are
Starting a completely new garden
have a wonderful opportunity of
getting everything just right, an
opportunity which they should
make the most of.

In the well established garden
of some years standing there are
always certain things we would
like to change or to actually get
rid of. It may be a hedge that we
don't like, or a vine or garden bed.
But do they get changed? Very
seldom, for gardeners as a tribe
ave conservative, and plants, and
the general lay out of the garden,
although it may not be quite as
we like it, become like part of the
family, criticized, often abused,
but seldom got rid of !

But when making a new garden
the position is different it’s like
having a clean sheet of paper on
which we can write anything, for
in the new garden we can have
exactly what we want without
sacrificing any old friends. Slowly
and carefully we can plan the
position of every hedge, tree and
plant, placing them first where
they will be seen to the best ad-
vantage. The trouble when making
a new garden is that kind friends
are so generous with offers of
plants and cuttings, which are
difficult to refuse and which we
‘st'ck in the ground here and there,
often where we don't want them
at all. Once these plants start to
grow we hesitate to pull them up,
and once they flower—we are lost,
for few gardeners can bring them-
selves to deliberately pull up a
flowering plant even if it is not
wanted.

So, when starting a new garden
the best way is to think out care-
fully, first what type of garden
you mean to have, and then plan
the position and kind of trees,
vines, plants ete., you want and
stick to it. Otherwise the new
garden is apt to become a place of
confusion and disappointment.

In starting the new garden the
boundary wall or hedge must be
considered first.

A Hedge makes a beautiful and
inexpensive boundary, costing far
less than a wall, and being just as
effective. The choice will lie be-
tween a flowering hedge —- Pride
of Barbados, Hibiscus or Exora, or
a non-flowering hedge such as
Casuarina, Sweet Lime, Bread-
and Cheese, or Cherry. * Sweet
Lime makes the perfect hedge,
and when fully grown it is as in-
penetrable as a stone wall. Flow-
ering trees, vines and beds must
be planned. Fernery, Lily-pool and
paths, working the plan in from
the boundary toward the house.

One of the snags to be avoidec
when planning the new garden is
that of oyercrowding. It is diffi-
cult, when plants are young, to
visualize how big they become
when fully grown, with the resuli
that they are often planted too
close together, which spoils the
general effect later on.

Shrubs look better when planted
with plenty of space around them,
so that when they are in flower

they can be seen in their full
beauty,
Vines look lovely forming a

background over a_ bare wall or
fence, or over an arbour.

Each garden should have at
least one flowering tree, prefer-
ably more,

Paths too are inrportant, and it
is worth while to spend both time
and money in making them as well
and as permanent as_ possible, it
means less trouble in the long
run.

cestment!s

quantity of best quality

t
}
have your home sparkling
}

Coverings for walls both inside and out.
:
| BARBADOS CO-OP.

COTTON FACTORY LTD.

DEEDES

ee ee ce



Our first reaction this week is

border of Mexico to the frontier
with Texas in the North, a distance
of 1,938 miles, with a mostly met-
alled but rather rough road, vary-
ing in altitude between sea-level
and 10,000 feet, was won by Kling
in the 2.9 litre type 300 SL Mer-
cedes at the average speed of 108
miles per hour. This was in the
sports ear class against competi-
tion from Ferrari and Gordini
principally.

This remarkable performance
enhances the outstanding reputa-
tion whick these cars have built
up for themselves since their
debut at Le Mans, and which they
confirmed during the Italian Mille
Miglia. Jaguars, having carly
suffered a resounding defeat
against these cars, will have to
jook to their laurels.

In the standard car category of
the Pan American race, a Lincoln
carried the day at an average
speed of 91.2 M.P.H.

to the realm of more mundane
transport, the most recent

this island, is the new
Seven, or Austin A 30.

Austin

porters of these cars, and of one
private owner, we have had the
privilege of driving two different
examples of this new and prom-
ising breed, which shows every
sign of upholding the laurels so
justly earned by its famous pre-
decessor.
is

car most pleasing,

nent overflowing. The
room” is accessible through a neat

panel in the top of the bonnet, and draulic) are more than adequate,

despite the small overall space
alloted to it the engine seems quite
content te leave sufficient room
around it for normal maintenance
~—although removal of the starter
motor entails some trouble.

The engine itself is an 803 ce.
overhead valve unjt delivering a
maximum 30 B.H.P. at

R.P.M., but capable of delivering fitte
size
low revs for its size These char- by a
out from the
column,
the car very flexible in top gear, Freneh

a surprising amount of torque at

acteristics, combined with a well
chosen overall gear ration make

and it is possible to pull away
from speeds as low as 12 M.P.H.
in top without roughness or jud-
der. In the lay-out, the engine

unit follows the general outline eM,

of all

years,

Austin engines in recent

Suspension is conventional with and in our opinion make

coil and wishbone at the front and

long half-elliptic leaf springs at under ;
The wheels are small, England, where the horn
dom
function of satisfying the law. The
The body shows a clear indica- Sjenals Department is covered. by
tion of the trend of thought of the conventional flipper-indicators
the designer — that is to build operated by a non-self-cancelling
a motor-car with all the essentials gywitch on the dashboard, and this
in good measure, but with non- gwitch is equipped with a warn;
essential trimmings eliminated so jng-light which is in our opinion
as to keep the price down to the guficiently bright to cause dazzle
windows -4 night. The single windscreen-
wiper covers a useful proportion
ulilitarian altar, being replaced 4¢ the screen, but is of the non-
; parking type.
front aided by a ventilating quar- 4+ fest, the blade does not seem
ter section capable of opéning past «,, obstruct the driver’s vision.

the rear.
taking 5.20 x 13 tyres.

minimum. Wind-up
represent the first sacrifice on this

by sliding door windows in the
the 90 degrees. In the rear, the

main window is fixed, but the
quarter-light ventilator maintain

a surprisingly good circulation of plenty [ -
power -to-weight ratio is

air in the back seat.

AAA AAAAAAD



A Prosperous New Year

;

LOUIS L

Leg-room is
one closely approaching a gasp of quate, even for quite big people
astonishment.__the Pan-American @nd our memories were stirrec,
road race, run from the Southern phile riding in the back seat, b)
ecollections of rides in the back
f early
outh,
ffort
arriage and preventing our head
rom
oof represents
utstanding

qrmrine.

ie foem-rubber
shaped as
the body,
sible to spend a long time in this
without
position is
wings and the road close ahead to
be seen, though the throttle petal

SO

to

car

is

tiring
position
Every
the ache in thé instep caused by
holding the foot at an uncomfor-
table angle for too long.

Another
cerns the
Coming nearer home, and down “fishing
appears
new hang-over from the earlier Austih
design to put in an appearance on Seven, and this, combined with a
rather
necessary
second try before engaging first
Through the courtesy of the im- gear when at rest.

On
found to be quiet and the synchro-
cones. do their job very well, par-
ticularly
The

combined
The external appearance of the which,
being a standards,
scaled-down version of the A40 comfortable ride and a complete
and the A70, a design which curi- sense of security on road surfaces
ously enough seems to succeed in however bad, There is no float or
putting a quart into a pint pot wander, and practically no road
without any impression of immi- shocks

though
drove, one tended to come on early
indicating
not at that time (after 300 miles)
fully ~
by Tin. headlamps—is good, as is
only to be expected in view of the
fact that the lights fitted to thi«
4,800 small car are the same
d to vehicles of much greater
and speed, They are operated

seem more

more or less after the
style, although it would little
logical for the switch joe
to pass through the dipped posi- really

tion before going on to main beem
instead of vic



SUNDAY



By KEN DAVIS

rK r

ern
me
ing
list
willin
mund

food

surprisingly ade-

Austin Sevens in ou
where the simultaneou .
of retracting our under- es
pa
the
mos
early

disappearing
one
joys of

through
of the

our from

upPoistery is
to give full suppor litter
and it would be pos-
fatigue. The driving
good, enabling both

situated by
to hold
for any

motorist is

that it would be
the helf-throttle
length of time
familier with

lean
: chicks
small criticism con-
very long and flexible
rod” gear-lever,
to be something

time
which +
of a

tight gear-box makes it
sometimes to have a

the road, the gear-box is

by

in third and top gears.
and

three

are transmitted to the od
“engine drivers via the steering-wheel. double
The brakes (Lockheed Hy-

on one of the cars we

that the linings were —

bedded in. The lighting—

as those
less

fingertip switch mounted

side of the steering- °)'°

-versa, at pres-
A main beam warning-light



as

er



broiler
their broilers at a controlled price

from housewives tell

says

and
honoured

for a

is high

you use
crease
goes up.

successful

broilers.
and
This helps in controlling disease
Do not crowd broilers: provide one
square foot of
bird when raised indoors or 7
of one square foot per bird with |
outdoor yards.

bred-in

brooding

change

twice a day,
fifty per cent.

shut i
forgiving
cessors

comfortable,

broilers

keeping

what



ADVOCATE

pay

by

NOTES

e poultry keepers are trying
these d
business can only be run
rofit and the key to broiler
W t is pounds of meat per bax
OW many pounds of broiler meat
will the feed deliver per bag?

ays.

hat depends of course on the
fice you pay for your feed and
the price you get for your broil-
Nobody could expect to make
selling

e price of a fowl for

net what the control pric
bit what the seller is
: to take. Supply and de

sll gevern ft
disposal of mest local

et back to broilers.
the most important thing and you
nust expect to pay more for a bag
of feed that yields thirty

broiler meat than you would
bag that yields onl
i\wenty-five pounds,

the value

and

Ss as your

and lanky.
are bred

sell

weeks

to



and

for those
like a lot!

of hard driv.ng being 42

is filted in.the instrument pancl,
The horn is of the “Beep” type, the
s far too week
discreet a noise to be effective M.P.G. As we

able
viceavik

To all our

| | Friends and Customers

of

"
2
| Lane & Aquatic Club Gift Booth

G9 NE ENE EH 8 9 8 NN

local conditions, though in
is sel-
the useftl

used, it fulfils

did.

For all that, when

To sum-up, here is a very ser~-
little motor-car, with
of power,—in fact the

sufficient






|
&
&

BAYLEY

RAN RENT NN TR AN EN NNN

£
EG

have

(Dept B.A.5)
London, W.C.1

LEARN

throughout the

|

broiler

TO

much as a shop

net

sale
produce 4
contre! lists are more
in the breach than
the observance. Everybody knows
this but the authorities still keep |
the contrels goin
retains its name
been closed for business.

ong after it has
fut to
The feed is

"But deduct the price of the feed |
the meat and |
you'll find that the profit over feed |
cost goes up when the meat yield |

Other costs (chick cost, |
everhead) 1
the same regardless of th
So your

un

profit
profit-over-feed

Some of the tips recommended
reisers will |
be known to many poultry keepers |
but here are a few reminders for
those who are attempting to run
a broiler business for profit.

Don’t buy chicks that will grow

Be sure

to make good
Put ehicks in all at one |
all

at ¢

among

Fuel consump-
tion figures as given by the Motor
in their road test vary between
29 miles per gallon at a steady 50
M.P.H, to 525 M.P.G, at 20 M.P.H.,
everall consumption oyer

here,

COMMERCE

one

floor space

Early feathering is primarily
characteristic,
greatly influenced by crowding and
temperature.
yacked chickens bring lower price

but

feathering

most noticeable handling usually make slower
characteristics of this ¢ar' are the Cool brooding helps fi
very light and, positive steering, Protect your chicks with
with a suspension free water.
though hard by modern Keep broiler mash in
gives an amazingly

feeders at all times, For the first
provide a minimuin |
of one inch of feeder space per |
chick . From three to six wee'ss
larger feeders

feeder space per
From six weeks to market feed |
pellets on top of mash once or
Increase feeder space

for brutal use of the throttle on
wet roads to provoke wheel-spin
and a consequent rear-end slide, ’
but the day of the driver whose
throttle is always either open or
past, as modern cars ave |
than their prede-
of this form of treatment.
Austin Seveg is easily and |
pleasurably driven, is easy to park,
takes up very |
room On the road—leaving

us

by

curious anomaly, buy our fuel in
Us. gallons (the miniature vari-
ety), these figures will have to be
scaled down in proportion,

This is then a motor-car for the
shallow pockets, and is likely to
preye very popular, perhaps even
to the extent that its fore-runner

SSeS

EARN .
Thousands of L.S.C. Students
British Empire
ere their galerie’

rough s' ing Our easy posta
courses (n BOOK-KFPRPING, =
on.
COMMERCIAL

RETARYSHIP, BUSINESS
GAN@ZATION,
LAW, ECONOMICS, etc, Reduced
fees to overseas students

mas awarded. Prospectus free—

LONDON sCHOOL OF

116, High Holborn
England.

LADIES’ CANADIAN
WEDGE HEELS in
White, Maroon,
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The




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cook-

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per

10 | A subsidiary company of Imperial Chemical industries Ltd.



a}
it is}

Bare- |
gains

germ



your |

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————

some

May happiness and good



Health be yours through-
out 1953

MANNING & CO., LTD.

THE CORNER STORE

This
Shipment of Men’s, Ladies’ &
Children’s Shoes is budget
conscious & excellent value ! !

$6.48 MEN’S CASUALS
plain—$7.86

2-tone—$12.08

Choice of Black
or Brown SUEDE
$8.94 & $9.35

LEATHER Bik/Wht
or Bro/Wht—$10.21
BROWN LEATHER

Sole Agents and Distributors
SONS

(BARBADOS) tro.





rHREER

—_———










——_$_$











SSS =
PAGE FOUR

INDIANS DUE IN T7DAD
JANUARY 4—6
*‘Miracle”’ Fielding Helped South
Africa Dismiss Aussies
By O. S. COPPIN



(From Our Own



SUNDAY ADVOCATE



Abu Ali Wins Governor’s Cup

Local Horses Do Well
As T.T.C. Xmas Meet Opens

|

F.A. CUP
SOCCER

(From Our Own Corresponden:

LONDON, vec. 26.

(From Our Own Correspondent)

Correspondent)

JAMAICA’S POST
OLYMPIC MEET

KINGSTON, J'CA, Dec. 27.

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 28, 1952

BRIGHT LIGHT
OUTSTANDING

Wins 5 Classics In A Season
BY BOOKIE

By her victory in the Trinidad Derby Mr. Cyril de B. Barnard’s

filly bright Light nas set the seal on a two and tnree-year-old career



r » ; 7 . aris > Ww story i the B.W.1.
‘ ; Trinidad’s M. Agostini ran{ which has no comparison in the whole history of racing in .

Look out Wolves’. West Brom-| stouuy at Sabina Park to-day|No other creole ever won as many classics and no other three-year-

HE INDIAN team, fifteen strong, reached London on December PORT-OF-SPAIN, Dec. 26. wich are chasing you for tal) the \second day of Jamaica’s| old ever raced so consistently during the course of a year with such

24. According to the schedule circulated they were due to A record crowd including a large number of visitors | Division “One” Championship. ° | success. In all, Brignt Light has won five classics this season between

arrive in London on December 26 so that they
of schedule. This is good news since plans for
settling the programme can now be definitely set in motion.

They are due to leave London on December 28 and this will
allow them to reach Trinidad between January 4 and January 6, 1953.

are two days ahead
receiving them and

meetin
In the second race three won
the first three places in this order
Dashing Princess (Lutchman), |
Firelady (Yvonet), Fluffy Ruffles
Holder). Bethell’s Abu Ali gave
Sarbados her second victory of
the day by capturing the ‘most
-oveted Governor's Cup and three |
thousand dollars. Turfites expect
the Barbados invasion to do ex-
tremely well at this meeting. The

MEET INDIANS IN SOUTH FIRST
PMUHEIR first engagement will be against the Trinidad East Indians
in the South and this is fixed for January 10 and 12. They open
their official fixtures in the first colony game with Trinidad from
January 14 to 19, The First Test match takes place at Port-of-Spain
from January 22 to January 28 and then they come on to Barbados.
Fixtures here are set to open with a colony game from Raseaey
31 to February 5 and the Second Test will be played here from Satur-

day, February 7 to Friday February 13. lay’s racing was largely one of
. Ss eiaie . Z s upsets with Bright Light, Oscar, |
NO NEWS OF AHMED AND GOPINATH Persian Maiden being the only

HERE has yet veen no confirmation nor denial in official West] favourites to trounce their oppon-

Indies cricket circles regarding the report from the India Kadio{®ts. Barnard’s Bright Light
that Ghulam Ahmed and C. D. Gopinath will be unable to make the| (Helder) won the Derby Stakes
tour. If this is true we would be more than glad to hear of their|C@Sily in a race in which the

substitutes in- order that we can form some authentic “Who's Who”

heavily backed Columbus ran un-
of the team. In any case the personnel of the team should reach the

placed and Gallant Rocks second |



Board soon and fans will know as soon 1s I receive the necessary place was the great surprise, |
information. Cavalier was scratched. W. E.
Julien’s Oscar in a field of such

BREWSTER DOING WELL IN U.K. favourites as Top Flight, Leap On, |

PORT fans will be glad to receive news of H. G, Brewster, Spare aoe Song, Marklight and Rock
tan and Combermere cricketer, footballer and athlete who is ae by ee ee
studying at Loughborough College, Leicester- i race: neo “vd

many surprise winners was Bomb
Sight (Newman), offspring of the
famous Brown Bomber. The big-

shire, England. He has had leave from his du-
ties as a member of the staff at the Combermere
School to pursue studies in Physical Education.

He has passed his Teacher's certificate with —_ ee tn ee aoe
a distinction in practical teaching. His subjects | frst race. Results:— ena .
taken were (a) Physical Education, (b) Eauca- : ? 7 a
tion—Psychological and Physical Development, FIRST RACE
(c) Education and Society, (d) Technique of London Bloodstock Cup: Six Fun.
Education, ' ted Garden Gay. Tunay Light 3. True

Brewster still found time to play the odd game | Foot. Time 1.20%. r
for Radcliffe and has been elected captain of|, SECOND RACE
Loughborough for the coming season. | a Shite tie ae rie

He has written a thesis “The Influence of Geo-j| riuty Rufies. Time 1.202/5.

graphy upon Industrial Development and has
been made a Fellow of the Royal Geographical
Society.

THIRD KACE
Derbu Stakes: One Mile 130
1. Bright Light, 2



Yards
Gallant Rock,

3









y 4 ‘ First Admiral. Tin 1.58.
He is now working on another thesis—“The | ; FOURTH RACE

West Indies’ rise to cricketing power and its| _ Breeder's Stakes: Six Funs 5

implications for the future” and his many sport- ones a Apolo. aye ye 1 oe

ing fans will wish him good luck. me TRIPTH RACE |
H. G. BREWSTER TIME—is collapsing George. Maraval Stakes: Six Furs. Class D1 |
and D2, El and E2 |

GOOD FIGURES BY CENTRAL PLAYERS Light Time 1.2375. Mark

HAVE recently discovered some interesting figures from the Cen- , SIXTH RACE ;
tral Cricket Club which has just carried off the Second Division | @°vermer's osheatiees Class A |
Championship of the Barbados Cricket Association competition. 1, Abu Ak, 2. Hope Dawns, 3. Adven-

It was during a luncheon given by the captain, Mr. F. A. Storey,
at Graeme Hall House last Sunday morning, when some well known
local ericket figures, that included the Internationals Clyde Walcott

tures Time 2.06 2/5
‘SEVENTH RACE

Fernandes Trophy: One Mile 190 Yards

: . Clays CL and C2 Winner

and Everton Weekes were drinking the health of the captain and his| 1. persian Maiden 2 Chandra, 3 Belle

team, that I discovered the strides which this little club has made | Surprise — 1.56% »

in its ree vears of existence KIGHTH RACE

in its three years of existence, Apex Pinte: Six Furs. Class Fl, 2

3 yrs. and Over
BRANCHED OUT UNDER WOOD 1. Pearl Divers, 2. Hopetul, 3. Baton
Tirae 1.234.

ROM a year of friendly cricket they branched out into the Secona 3

Division and chiefly through the spade work of veteran L. O. ,
Wood then first captain, they were able to build a team. This season
they could boast of six players who had performed with commend-
able individual credit. For example C. E, Hinds scored 571 runs in
17 innings (six times not out average 51.82), C. B. Goddard 515 runs
in 17 innings (five times not out average 42.92) while E. Weekes and
C. Patrick both passed the 300 run mark.

L. O. Wood, the oldest player in Barbados Cricket Association
cricket to-day was third in his club’s bowling averages taking 17
wickets at a cost of 8.58 runs each. Vere King 31 at 11.84 runs each
and C. E. Hinds 28 at 12.65 runs each were also good individual per.
formers.

footmark Wins
Slewards Cup:
Payne Injured

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Dec, 28
Footmark, Jamaica bred creole,
‘wno came to Trinidad as a three-
year-old in 1850, and won the
Derby, scored a brilliant victory
over the imported thoroughbreds
in the $3,000 Stewards’ Cup over
Six furlongs for A and B Class on
the second day of the T.T.C. races,
The five-year-old son of Merry
Mark withstood a blistering chal-|
lenge from Royal Windsor and
Abu Ali in the straight and won a|
bianket-finish.
Footmark paid $52—the
biggest Pari payment.
Barbados’ lone victory to-day
was scored by Dashing Princess
who repeated her B Class mile,
beating of Little Haven and Gol-
den Quip by two lengths, Phariite
threw Jockey Fred Payne who
came from England for the races.
Payne received serious head in-
juries. The day was good for punt-
ers and the biggest Forecast was
Magic Lantern — Happy Union
Which paid $1,030 on a $3 ticket,
The weather was beautiful and
the track slow.

CONGRATULATIONS SOUTH AFRICA
“THERE could scarcely be a more handsome dividend paid to mag-
nificent fielding than the feat in which the touring South Afri-
Cans, having first been themselves bowled out for 227 runs by Aus-
tralia in their turn dismissing the powerful Aussies for 243, but
sixteen runs more than their own total.

I was among those who felt that the Australians, having dismiss-
ed the South Africans in a day would have been able to consolidate
this early gain by piling up a sufficiently tall total to ensure that
they would be ample time in the three remaining days for defeating
the “Springboks”.

CREDIT FOR MAGNIFICENT FIELDING

HOSE who listened to the commentary must first give South
Africa every credit for what has been described as “miracle”
fielding since the Australian in all fairness to them, did not throw
their hands away.
Who could blame Neil Harvey for having been dismissed, caught
one handed off a full blooded drive at silly point by Cheetham or
Arthur Morris who saw one of his strokes strike Cheetham’s hands
for Tayfield to run back several yards and take what must have been

one of the most curious return catches in the history of the game,
The South Africans have now kept the issue open but in addi-
tion to this they have place@d themselves in a position for forcing a
win if their batsmen can put up a reasonable score and they can
trap Australia into batting on a five-day old wicket that must begin
to crumble or play tricks at least.

day's]

WOODBROOK STAKES

six fur, Class Fl, FQ two year oljs
1 Flying

Saucer (114) Payne, "2
AUSSIES’ GREAT FIGHTING SPIRIT Bord Wyn He) aide ees
5 na ) . B {
One must at all times remember the great fighting spirit of the | Mtce Lutechman , are ita)
Australians and I am not for one moment predicting that they wil] | Time 1 min, 7 sees

be defeated. We have seen them turn defeat into victory too often.

WOODBROOK STAKES
The West Indies know this to their bitter cost. Certainly, however

Six furlongs Class E, and E2





t ) 1, Magic Lantern (98 plus 4) Naidoo.
this knowledge will not prevent my giving an honest opinion on the]2. Happy Union (124) Lowe. Bonita
facts and happenings as they present themselves. ae) ae tg yvonet. 4. Gallant Rock
nag . aa ata’ . ‘ aan . . (126) vested
Perhaps the relentlessly efficient bowling machine of Lindwall, i Tonia be alt pecs

Miller, Bill Johnston and Ring might jump into high gear and bring
a comparatively ridicujously easy victory for Australia but this does
not preclude the possibility of South Africa being able to do a similar

CANNING MEMORIAL STAKES
three yea old and over
i mile and 130 yards Class C Maidens



: 1. Rosebuds (113) Singh. 2. Devil
thing with their tirelessly accurate off spinner Taytield and the help |symphony (113) Crosses. 3 iiinnire
of Mansell, Watkins and Murray if the two last named have recover. | Miracle (113) Newman 4 Balmatic Ul)

Lutehman
Time

ed sufficiently from their injuries.

1 min, 58 4/5 secs






5, 7 - >
x POSS OGS SOOO PPO PESO EVSS PPPS POPPSPEP PS PEP
8

‘

CHRISTMAS SPECIALS!

Just opened — NYLON SHIRTS
— all colours

SUEDE SHOES in Navy Blue,

Grey, Brown
tt

—~>S

SES EMI e Bae

The Management of :—

BOOKERS’

a

READY MADE SUITS
ranging from
$35.00 up

ee

to more modern premise





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as usual,



from Barbados and other West Indian ‘colonies attending
the first of the Trinidad Turf Club’s five-day Christmas
g saw fine performances by Barbados horses.

| like Ole Man River just kept flow-







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ly Dial 4449 for Your Requirements

One point behind they have one
game in hand.

poxing aay’s biggest crowd—
| 59,000 at Shetflela—saw Albion
|roll up their sleeves at a 4—2z
_.. | deficit and clinch victory over

in the three
Leslie Laing of Jamaica won

the U.S.A. second.





Post Olympic meet to place third
hundred yards.

r .8 with Ji t of
nee Se ee _ ee | en Lignt has therefore won every classic for which she entered.

team beat the Jamaica Olympic |

Barbados and Trinidad and only the Barbados Guineas escaped her
grasp because she was notin it, If tne Breeders’ Stakes of 1991, which

the 2
sne won as a two-year-old, is added to the list her tally makes six.



}

a ti i is aturally turns to great creoles of

’ an CRS f ‘ i ieam in the one hundred metres At a time like this the memory na )
’ i mm | Weginesday with an SSth mimute } four este setting a new/the past. From 1930 onwards there has been a steady maceion ei
‘ fy | Ron Alien goal. Previously two} 7 ica record of 42.3 seconds.|"Umoer of classic races for creoies in Trinidad, B.G. and Barbados.
p om jown goals by Curtis and, Geenan fhe U.S. team were Milton! 4 tat year the’lrimidad Derby came into being. ae 9 naan es ous
2 _ a ee % eae Campbell, Mal Whitfield, Jim #2d the Breeders’ Stakes were the rege oo wane ‘ouae Mr. 0. P
DOK. olves against a Sunder-} ‘* ngs ARS ns cP ci ten years only two creoles managed to win both. . *Uee.
land team showing seven changes TEE “densien Chamaly Tete #ennett's Bachelor's Fort and Dr. Cyril Gitten’s ‘tommy a su

: couid only draw i—l. Et eae Hovees Ta Seach ts pee Bachelor’s Fort was a fine upstanding son of Bachelors Ay aga

+E rind Oe tt # Labo derb “McKenley : a nd "George Rather Warm and betore he agree ay Ags Tiere: taaakatt oes
summone e two ca 1S, : ; ete eee vommy Boy, a halfgbred by Sunwave out of we t

Stokes "Ken Thomivon and BiG }hoten, The toes Jamalce team | Crenaga bred isteareer was very indierent and apart om the

: . idfiela } ” i atson, we classics 5 _ many r ‘ :
ieee ee ee “a Stoke Andrade, Donald Davidson dak re ee ee ae cela y ,
* ‘and admonished them for too ee USA dt irom 1940, when the Barbados Derby and the Trinidad Trial
ams. arrison Diilard, U.S.A. hurdles | «,, a. . se-year-ol acing took on its own in-
. vigorous efforts by a. ‘we ble Psensation, set a new Jamaican | 5t@kes were instigated, Save err caer a couple the two-year-
They played to foot-ol-the-ta ‘aribt - : aividual looks and no longer was it necessary 10 coup)

* | patvern. Campbell's thirty minute }varbbean record in the one-| \iq classic with it for the purposes of assessing tne merits of the
equaliser meant Chelsea's firs: a and ten metres Hurdles | ( reoies. From 1940 10 1947 wnere were therefore three classics which
point since October aA to ieee rofhngs | wed Cana ns a creole could win in one season but none ever accomplished this

two-nil win at Doncas . 7 * . ; sh coveted triple crown.
ithe pag me draw on Christmas }the U.S.A. and third was Louis Panetta . s
J my day has put Sheffield United four night of Jamaica, Reginald Pear- There were, of course, a few who could no doubt have done it, but
> points clear in Division Two and{man of the U.S.A, beat George que to the War travel was difficult and the Trinidad horses especially
% Bristol Rovers’ one-nil victory at; Rhoden of Jamaica in the five- aid not patronize Barbados racing very much. The late Mr. A. C,
~ |Shepherds Bush—their ninth in| hundred yards with McKenley (ypowd’s High Hat (Restigouche-!anny Oliver), however, ran in all
by | Succession — keeps them five|and Whitfield tieing for third three classics in 1941 and won two of them: the Barbados Derby arid
_.__& | points ahead of Northampton in| place. The time was 06.8. the Trinidad Derby. The next year Gleneagle (Bachelor’s Tut-Grey
| the Third Division South, In third We Christmas day the first day (jen), could easily have won all three but did not contest the Bar-
MR. F. E. C. BETHELL | North Oldham are back on top) Of the meet McKenley won the jados’race. She won the Trial Stakes and the Trinidad Derby.
MR. F. E. C. lagain after temporarily giving | One-hundred metres in 1.4 secs.

|

é i The 2rmen. |

Kamarose passed the winning line first} Way to Grimsby. The fisherme: . ce ern
but was disqualified jlanded a_ goalless draw with | the two-hundred metres in
ANCHOR CUP | Chesterfield. on Christmas Day | secs.

Six Furlongs Fi and ¥2 3 year olf | but Oldham’s one-nil win

and over r 1 ti y. > =
1. Sunseeker (124) Newman. 2, New | gives them a one point advantage. |Jim Gathers U.S.A, McKenley
Rocket (118) Quested. 3. Stella solaris} Christmas Day feat of scoring Of Jamaica won the four-hundred
(198) Hoider, 4 Palccaine (129) Yvonet eight goals was Carlisle’s record. metres in forty-eight seconds.

STEWARDS CUP
Six furlongs Class A and A? B and Be
1, Footmark (114) Lowe. 2. Royal eer
)

Their luckless victims

leslie Laing of Jamaica won

Second was Milton Camp-
today | bell of the U.S.A. and third was

were Pee Reginald Pearman of
Scunthorpe. The centre forward the U.S.A, and third was Mal
for Whitehouse got five of them Whitfield of the U.S.A. Athletes

The next horse to win two classics in one season was Belledune,
Hon, J. D. Chandler’s filly by Restigouche out of Beauvais. She won
the Barbados Derby and the Trinidad Derby, but did not run in the
Trial Stakes. The roliowing year along came Jetsam, the first of the
Flotsam-Hope in the Valley combinations, which later proved so suc-
cessful. Jetsam won the Trial Stakes and the Trinidad Derby and
everybody will concede could also have won the Barbados classic if he
had been entered.

21.6

From 1947 there were four classics; the new addition to the list

sor (129) Newman. 3. Abi. Ait (1 : : ‘w si Trial Stakes at Arima. This race was won by Atomic
Paditans Kandy Tufti (124) Oneill, |—an individual best for the club. Junch “with the Ggvernor .Sir being the Derby Trial Sta i _ : , :
“rime + ae “30'3 5 node 7 The best individual goalscoring Hugh Foot K.C.M.G* at King’s 11 who then went on to win the Trinidad Derby and so to join the
bbe ite that ny ge feats today were Adrons’ four for House to-morrow. Enthusiastic band of double classic winners mentioned above. The following year
1. Rock Suna tim) "Wecaco, 2 | Notts Forest in their four-one crowds are attending the meet Yet another joined the happy band, this De D re ea
Honeymoon (122) Yvonet. 3 Buddha}wjin over Hull and three each by which continues on Monday when | gan who accounted for the Trial rs ree «Amped a Barbers
an) Alt, 4. Battle Seng (126) Crossley. | Albert Calland of Torquay and ren oa Wint of Jamaica and Se = take part in the Arima Derby Trial Stakes

‘me: i, min, /3 i “ dy Standfield of the erby. F oe
MPERIAL STAKE Murray of Darlington. Andy ani of the U.S.A, take ° .
Nine furlongs B Cines The best of Christmas Day was join the other athletes. In 1949 the first three-year-old to win eat ee ~, moenns

1. Dashing Princess (118) Lutehmaan. } Tgp Bennett’s four in Tettenham’s came on the scene, This was Mr. William Scott's Ocean Pearl,
2. Little Haven (116) Lowe. 3. Golden} enone win over Middles- S fi 1 d e Flotsam progeny, her dam being Pearly Glow. ence ttee
(123) enry mre ( ) Holder. ¢ St x 5 Der ‘Tri 1 2 ye
ont e: 2 mins. 6 1/3 secs | brough, ta 1é. Will Trial Stakes, the Arima Derby ‘trial Stakes and the nida iy

Aussies Out Fo
Small Scores
‘MIRACLE’ CATCHING

(From Our Own Correspondent)

MELBOURNE, Dec. 26.
NS, today enabled the South Afri-
lia for only sixteen runs more than

‘ee hale
the thita day’s play in the second
Test here they are 251 runs on Of 10.3 held
with six wickets in hand, and Rhoden

Russell Endean has his best form , Arthur Wint, Ja
at the right time to. reach his| 1% Jamaica O}
maiden test century and lead
the way to the South Africa total
which with two days to go may
grow into winning proportions,

Endean’s effort was typical of
his mentor Bruce Mitchell. So
far he has batted ten minutes]
short of five hours for his 115| and) and Mankad (India).
and has hit seven fours. He has Miller now needs a further
scored 700 runs on the tour and|*Â¥"S to become with Rhodes,
with 'Tayfield (fortytwo wickets| °Mly player in the world to s
to date) has a great chance of| ‘W° thousand runs and take
establishing new South African| ge wickets,
records in this country. South African 237 and (for aki

Â¥ . Australt,
By their fine Test form and ° "A deientinys Ist Innings |

enthusiasm the young Springbok| McDonald c sub b Mansell ........
side has indicated that Australia’s! Morris ¢ & b Tayfield





r

KINGSTON, Dec, 2

Kenley, Les Lain
Michael Agostini of
Monday in the 200 metres,

race will settle world-wide con’

had he started.

Stanfield won the event
Jathers was third
Laing was fifth
also will run
versus McKenley,
Lang, Jathers an

in 20.8
A miracle of cat
cans to dismiss Aus'
they. had.made om.
This effort was coupled with a
marathon performance by Tayfield
who is proving himself here to be
the world’s best off spinner, He
took up duty after lunch and
bowled unchanged for 26.4 overs
of eight balls each,
Stock bowlers Watkins and
Murray were off the field all after-
noon with injuries and Tayfield

ympiec captain,

in the Swedish relay ich
composite of the 100, aon 300

ing along.

He started the day’s .great
catching by running back ten yards
and diving to hold a ball just off
the grass after Cheetham at silly
point had jumped and hit a shot
from Morris over his head.

Cheetham caught Harvey bril-
liantly one handed at silly point
off a full blooded drive and Me
Glew ran twenty yards backwards

g ‘rewe : “c sCie Harv ao = a ‘ - 5

and screwed his a oo supremacy may be drawing to a Berry & Chegtham, b ‘Tay fieid :

Hin’ to hold a high soarer off | close, Miller © Kndeen bene nee
. .

Hole c¢ Waite b Mansel
Benaud b Tayfield.,
Lindwall run out .........,
Ring ¢ McGlew b .Tayfield .
Langley not out
Johnson 1.b.w
Extras

Powerful though the front line
attack is Australia cannot con-
tinue with, unstable batting and
get away with it,

Yesterday’s breakdown was
| the fifteenth time in the last nine-
teen completed innings that the
Australians have failed to top

But the wonder catch of the age
fell to Endean on the boundary.
Miller far and away Australia’s
most polished batsman had hit one
six and seemed assured of another
when Endean leapt on the bound-
ary and caught a ball high over-



Tayfield



| Total





~~ Meet Rhoden

Andy Stanfield, termed the fast-
est human alive, arrived in King-
ston to-day to compete versus Me
8, Jim Jathers,
Trinidad,

versy whether MecKenley would
have won the Olympic 200 metres

in 20.7,

1 in 21.2 Stanfield
in po 100 metres

oden, Dillard,
1 ; id Agostini as a
result of which the Jamaica record
jointly by McKenley
Stand dangerous.
maica’s long strid-

ters: the series which started on
Christmas day for the first time



She did not take part in the Barbados Derby.
ae r

Since Ocean Pearl there have been more classics added to the
list and the Jamaican gelding, The Jester 11, equalled her record when
last year he won the first running of the Easter Guineas at Union
Park, then the Trial Stakes and the Arima Derby Trial Stakes. He did
not run in the Barbados Guineas or the Barbados Derby but he did
race in the Trinidad Derby only to be soundly beaten by another
Jamaican, the fily Embers, who herself established a record by being
the first, and the last, horse that has won, or will ever win, a Jamaican
Derby and a Trinidad Derby. j I

1 have concerned myseif chiefly with the Barbados and Trinidad
classics because they are, by common consent, the most important in
the South Caribbean. But in 1946 the Demerara bred Whitsun Folly,
bz Mont*Agel out of Savoy Folly, was also a triple classic winner in
as much as she won the B.G. Trial Stakes, the Trinidad Trial Stakes
and the B.G. Derby. She ran and was beaten in the Trinidad Derby
but did not come to Barbados. So far she is the only horse ever*bred
in B.G. to win a Trinidad classic.

—_—

7.

The
tro-

and

How does Bright Light compare with the winners mentioned
above? For my part I rate only Jetsam and Gleneagle above her, As
I was unfortunate not to see her racing at all this season I am also
prepared to reconsider my opinion after I have seen her race. For all
I know she may have been better.

The only possible comparison that could have been made between
Bright Light’s race on Friday and past Derbies’ was unfortunately
eliminated when the broadcasting station went off the air at the precise
moment that the race was being run. We do not know, therefore, how
her time of 1.58 for the mile and 130 yards compares with the 1.56%
which was done by Persian Maiden over the same distance in the
Fernandes Trophy. wea) , :

However, of one thing I am certain, it will take an exceptional
creole to break Bright Light’s record in the classics and it might be
a long while before we see anything like her again,

en-

is a
and

20 ow
the THE GOVERNOR'S CUP
‘one The Governor’s Cup, for the fifth year in succession, went to a
horse that was either owned or trained in this island. The list reads:
Elizabethan, Storm’s Gift, Atomic I], Fuss Budget and now Abu Ali.
6 | Indeed, no other race in Trinidad has ever been monopolised to this
*43 Jextent by horses from Barbados. : :
83 To Mr, Fred Bethel and his gallant little colt Abu Ali I owe an
43 | apology. After he won here in November I did not think him capable
2. lof such form over 9} furlongs. True the race was rather inconclusive

due to the interference with Landmark and others which was caused
by Monro unseating his jockey at the start. Hope Dawns, one of the
co-favourites, however, was well away and ran as true a race as could
be expected under any circumstances. But Abu Ali, who was also
well away, defeated her on her merits and, indeed, was forced to run
a very trying finish to subdue her, In view of this there is no doubt
that the little colt is a very good one and at the present time one of
the best in training in the B.W.I.

head as it was soaring over the | 300, : BOWLING AMAL YSIS gee THE BREEDERS’ STAKES

pickets. The twenty-five-thousand Too many catches are being Tayfield ao ae eS : . 7 “

crowd stood and cheered him. given for the liking of Austral-|™M#sell sooseress 19 8S 88 8 | If good fortune smiled on us in the Governor’s Cup, it was
The Springboks have a great|ians — used to the relentless) meee 7m, AFRICA 2ND INNINGS — jj] luck which cost us the Breeders’ Stakes. Apple Sam, evidently

chance if their batsmen do their methods of the svearen rains Walte¢ Hole eae On ERR Po suffering the effects of his temporary lay off due to a knee injury,

job tomorrow. The pitch is good Miller, who captured his hun-, panini Sout crises Ms snd Figing Seager, te at ate ree 7

but it won’t last another three | dredth Test wicket when he had |Metesn ftw ‘x 26 | and Flying Saucer. gris ‘

days of play. | Waite caught by Hole, has now hacen ane eee 42 Nevertheless, I am glad to see that in siring Bomb Sight the
; MELBOURNE, Dec. 27. joined the select hand of five who Extras “ Brown Bomber has at last shown some of the promise which breeders



have compieted the Test “doubie”.
Others are Noble and Giffen (Aus-
tralia); Rhodes and Tate (Eng-! Bowling: Miller 2 for 39, Ring 1 fo

GEBDE BE Ve Be

Once again,in the present Test
series South Africa are in a win-
ning position. At the close of

Total (for 4 wickets)



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~—— | have held for him for so long. it is also more in his favour, i think,
that he has sired a winning two-year-old as it was expected that he
> 6g, | Might be inclined to produce plodders.





2

Gea sows
GREETINGS

Bast Wishes
for a Prosperous
1953
from
Eckstein Bros.
Bay St.

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SUNDAY, DECEMBER 28, 1952 SUNDAY ADVOCATE





PAGE FIVE









_—

SIX FLY SOLO IN MISS BIM “toncs” Smit wcetes

COLDS

THERE’S NOTHING

CURES AS SWIFTLY

AS
i CANADA'S LARGEST
THREE WOMEN | SELLING COUGH

MISSING AFTER | AND COLD REMEDY

PLANE GRASH j 30220200? gi KLEY’S

Plane and horepat
earched the Venezuelan coastal

waters for BN bcs Aven MIXTURE





TWO ‘teen-age boys, two
engineers and two commer
cial salesmen have flown selo
since the Barbados Light
Aeroplane Club’s Auster air-
craft “Miss Bim” took the air
last June, They are Peter
Wallbridge (17), Graham
“Gotch” Atwell (18), Gordon
Butcher (36), Ross McKenzie
(31), Jack Marson (31) and
Donald Edghill (27).

Wallbridge left schoo) in
April and wants to become an
airline pilot, Atwell plans to
join the Royal Canadian Air
Force, Butcher is a mechan-
ical engineer at Acme Engin-
eering Works, Roebuck
Street; McKenzie is T.C.A’s
Resident engineer; Jack Mar-
son and Donald Edghill are
commercial salesmen.

ee JOE & ROBERT

Number Seven

SHORTLY before going
to press the “Ad: te
was informed that Mr. E>

j
. ;
lyn Reece (46) Man ro

Three Houses’ Foot St

Philip made his first solo Y |
flight yesterday in “Miss ne






Bim”.

He is therefore the
seventh member of the club
to fly solo.







First to solo was Butcher in
just over seven hours. The others
made their first flights in under
10 hours.














It was in August last year that Airlines plane Christmas ev Reet per ea
a group of men interested in fly- ;
ing held a meeting and formed MEMBERS of the Barbados Light Aeroplane Club inspect the engine of "MISS BIM” the club’s Auster The. pilot and co-pilot report
what was to become the Barba- aircraft. Left to right:-—-Denis Malone, Stanton Topgin (instructors), Ross McKenzie, T.C.A. resident en- they swam ashore after the plane 7 .
dos Light Aeroplane Club, The gineer and Donald Edghill. McKenzie and Edghill are two of the six members of the club who have crashed five to six miles off the \ e little old
following month two members of flown solo. coast on a flight from the coastal Y 0
the Trinidad Light Aeroplane to join the Royal Canadian Air- operation by the loan of the land town of Barcelona to Caracas and ans
Club flew an Auster aircraft over Before trainees force At a relatively reasonable on which the hangar Was con- the plane kept afloat about ter \ ‘oad ‘ 5
on a goodwill visit. During their go solo they have price the Barbados Light Aero- structed minutes ‘ 3% a
four-day stay they put on a dis- to pass a medical plane Club can provide the ‘ %
play of precision and stunt flying test approved by " youth of the island with a great’ They also receive full co-opera- They said they passe aie we Ser
and took several members of the the Director of ; deal of the ground work in prep- tion from the airport authorities. preservers to the two, women ‘ Skilfully blended =
Barbados Flying Club up for a Medical Services| ; aration for a flying ‘career. The The Club in its first year has passengers and_ the tewardes ' t e . -
spin, as well as tests in} public have supported their en- developed rapidly and there is but the women became separated patiently aged

! . air regulations 43 tertainments well and govern- every indication that it will con- from them in the darkne ind éinniy ve vis . I ’ i
Shortly after their arrival and visual aid! ment have shown their co- tinue to do so. rough sea. (CP) Yourself a leap year's plow i

Philip Habib, pilot of the air- signals. A stud-} What have you done, be he j

craft said “we are net here to) ent must log 40) - di thst ietlillacceda ne ipacbegnion movin Lierpaaialie ‘ t {

sell the aircraft. We are here hours, some oft, \ whose ‘time y ‘

to ‘sell’ the idea of flying. They which must be



did just that. solo before i ! o-da ;
qualifies for his i. oa

By mid-January this year the student’s pilot li- “~~~ Rn 0)
Barbados club held its inaugural cense .) vear has slipped) away
meeting. Lectures on flying were “Miss Bim” Goraon Butcher Neuve wate every An
organised in preparation for the arrived in Bar-_
arrival of an aircraft, The Bar- dos registering 150 hours flying oa NGL MRI:
bados Government loaned the time. The total is now well over While geet the ne



club an acre of 340 hours. After every 10 hours
land at Seawell flying time the aircraft is check-
and members of ed by TCA’s Resident Engineer,
of the club con- Ross McKenzie. This takes the
structed a han- form of an_ inspection of air
gar on the spot. frame and engine. Every 50 hours
Dances were held the aircraft is given a thorough
to raise funds overhaul and checked from stem
and in May the to stern. ,
aircraft arrived. The aircraft is at the service
The following of any government department,
month “Miss and will be especially useful in
Bim” made her the event of fishing boats being

Lhe choice of



Ea MID ANGE coorcn

SOUT Wwe

first flight. reported missing. Tourists and pi tins tel oh
To-day the i anyone’ wishing to get aerial t t tear ; ee
Barbados Light photographs of the island can Worked | towet \ ro @

hire the aircraft which will be
nerepnre deiow Peter Wallbridge piloted _by one of the instruc-
members and 25 non-flying mem- ‘rs: Should a member of any
bers. There is one lady member other! flying club visit, the island,
Mrs. Peter Morgan of the St. Law- ©n the production of his pilot's

sponsored by

J &R_ BAKERIES
















rence Hotel. license he would be made a vis- makers of
iting member and could have the

Entrance fee to the club is $10 use of the aircraft, under simi- | ENRICHED BREAD 7 y Si
with an annual subscription of $25 lar terms as local members, A | DISTULERS TR ‘ INT
For non-flying members there is member of the Trinidad Light } and the bienders of DISTRIBUTORS: MARTIN’ DOOR!
no. entrance fee, Annual sub- Aeroplane Club has already made | :
soripeon So Wy ea tas tae WaRsty is Geoahes oe case ey & R_RUM On Sale at MARTIN DOORLY X CO. LTD.
This is. divided into 30-minute Ls Teo wee DR. BOMBARD and friends sitting in his rubber dinghy L’Heretique : eI
periods of instruction. The fee The Barbados at the Harbour Police Station yesterday. Right with move camera
includes aircraft insurance, pe- Light Acropiane a eerenenerre is Frank Watkins taking some “live shots” of the doctor for Televis

ion News, International News Service of New York. This film will
be flown to the United States at the earliest opportunity.

Club plans _ to
work as closely
as possible with
its “big brother” 4
Four ex-R.A.F. pilots are the jin Trinidad and
club’s instructors. They are Squad- there is a scheme
ron Leader David Henderson, Con- afoot to affiliate
troller of Civil Aviation —_ ay - the two clubs.
ernment Airport Manager, Stanton - " ‘
Toppin, Commercial Salesman and ekg r ope .
ex-R.A.F. Warrant Officer who is S°""l ‘ path oe
Chief Instructor; Denis ae
Barrister-at-Law and ex-R.A.P. g.nore ating Flying OMicer and Julian Mar- €or “hoxt year
ryshow, Air Traffic Control Offi- the “auditor will
cer, Seawell, and ex-R.A.F. Fly- present the club’s anae Maree
ing Officer. The instructors give jinancial report, and tnere will
their time free and deserve great he the usual election of officers
credit having had their first six and management committee,
pupils solo in under 10 hours. Already the club has one mem-
Royal Air Force trainees solo in per planning to become an air-
8 hours. line pilot and another who wants

trol, oil, engineer’s fees and
general maintenance.

BUY You JUST
HAD A DRINK
LAST monTta/







*

HOW MANY GLASSES —



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and at the annual

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SUNDAY SUNDAY,

‘Ohe

SUUUETEUOOTT EHO eatin

PAGE SIX

ADVOCATE













Which Is The
Best Age?

Asks PENSANT

FOR YOUR NEW YEAR'S PARTY
SERVE THE CONNOISSEUR’S CHOICE

GRANTS WHISKY

Jellybag Cap» arrives

el : Shakespeare’s seven ages of
ALWAYS MELLOW... ALWAYS THE SAME man, es described in “As you Like .
it”, are familiar to many of us, “a
and while they are descriptive,






they are hardly flattering

If you Ui i
remember he starts with —“the ?
infant mewling and puking in the ‘
nurses arms’, — and continues | ui Sd,



through the various ages until the
lest, which he describes as “Sans
teeth sans eyes, Sans taste, sans—
everything”.

But however unflattering his |
description of the ages may be,
how apt and true his likening of |
the werld to a stage where we all |
have several parts to play, a dif- |
ferent part for each age.

Which then is the best age?

» If we condense the ages of man |
into five, anmq consider them
separately, which age .would we |
choose to live through again were
we given the choice? That is |
perhaps a_ difficult question to |
answer right off, and the choice

would certainly vary with various e
people, but few people would}
choose the repulsive but necessar~ |
(in order to get born) first age, |
that age as Shakespeare describes !
it of “Mewling and puking” of }
wet nappies and humiliating de-
pendency, an age which merci-
fully we do not remember.

And, would the age of child-
hood be considered by many peo-
ple to be the best age to relive?

Certainly not by the children
themselves, who live only for the
time when they can be grown up.



9

GRANT
ee

L0OlSe $0 WARD

TO WEAR



To the child, to be grown-up is . : :
the goal which he cannot reach +++ OR like this
fast enough, the Mecca where

And it is
who must traverse the
that dark, |

ali things are possible.
the child
most trying time of life,





JOHN FRENCP



*ICTURE BY



WILLIAM GRANT & SONS LTD DISTILLERS SCOTLAND



dangerous confused tunnel of |

adolescence, where anything may | Soleheiee A bora ihe Beraare

happen, and often does, 2 Stain Hear?) Braden, aie
No, not Many cr us would! (“ Son of My Right Hand”) Lyon,



choose to relive caildhood, Oa, but . Mamie (“A Small Pearl")

t

rsa Anne Echvards












. once childhood is passed, the Eisenhower. ., . Leonard
iF YOU darkness 9! adolescence progress- (“Bold Line”) Lord,
ively lhghtens, and youth, the rd
Seely Gabe ah ed or ote lots the fashion nitfalls of a new idea NOTED
é emerges. * TWO NEW gadgets this
h 2 Youth is the age of gaiety, of AND NEVER like this wiuiununmitiinars sits {cet Dot TEGAN EAE AUER ESCA Sawalie Ava these a
aVe laughter, of love and the fulfil- ANG! aatikives ne ne aeud-on give subergines. scarlet peppers 3 7 p tat “ an "
ment of love. Youth is the flower QRAWINGS @Y EVA fashion ts how rare it is green avocados: lasts three A i Epa un Ip.
of all the ages oo nm bets ating times ionger than towers ane stick in a gilt case
, ra . town Swifter’ wu " 3? ‘ver ='S quite as colourtul works like a _ propelling
Yet youth has its troubles too ° coming, more popular now “ncountereo came .- THAT paprika addeo iw pencil—the lipstick squeezes into
its emotional ups and downs, and P. | > Band : a Ee aes ; FROM 1 Lord Furness. wno nug 4uaniily vo an oll-vinegar-sugar the brush when you twist.
| the everlasting reaching out of O ice it’s here, and fer cheape: pent 800 cu:naas on new iressing isn't just an improve J pone one iW BEE OLY bes
youth for something not to be than any hat tashion since 1 ws fea to 1ook nent Us a transtf ma-ion ause the ce iS
found even in the closest and most the war are the new Jelly ronation Day THAT tinned butter beans ai tt should be nearer 25s



fee! oronerly dr few toods

trozer

essec is. 4d
unned

are one of the
grapetruit and

Will Play At

intimate of human relationship. bag Caps



APPETITE

A child’s aoe mug ana
dishes shaped like a train





























| have held executive positions in

He catches someone's eye trom the





come safely into a quiét harbour, And the dress Princess Alex








For in youth we are ever seek- You can see them toda "FROM Beverley Nichols on peas ure others) which are nice Th
; ns ay ws Ob S al a e beaker is the funnel
ing that oneness of soul which Savannah capping half the girls in. th "Gtey te heer, Ce a; | Oreserved than they are tresh tne.two dishes ate the tender
take the lucky few may attain for a f West End. You can find \Gr¢v,is the cruelles: cofbur-bar especially served. ve agie ‘The spoon and fork are shaped
brief time, but which quickly! , : them in London's shops oa Giicin Xun parsley and a dash of garlic like the driver and fireman. Easy
: ades. away like the ’ t The Police Band will present costing anything from l6s._ te ae vee, Mobin Wilson on to wash, bright plastic, and not
fades away like the mirage i ne news that Dior models are CRAZE ye (10s. 9d.)
PHOSFERINE really is their monthly programme of 16 guineas oeing made in London: “But Eee Clee Award only oe
In spite of this, youth is a â„¢uSic at the Savannah at 4.45 p.m You come across them 10w lovely to be able to buy ve IVY that x: planted indoor: ne thers to
° a” &D 3 col I —tne craze tor it grows Ww cause it encourages mothers
| ae f irik . to-day. The Band will be conduct colour. pulled this me's Dior in pounds.’ je ore . Br oe ake a fuss of “ . t
lovely period of life developing as ; | that: looking superb 2 ; 4stonishing speed. and the price Make a fuss of the “ won't ea
i it slowly does-into a wiser and|¢4 by Capt. C. E. Raigon. Th | the ante a Bg As r ae BOM ng See acon act zo up to match (from 2s. 1c child when it is so much wiser
| : 3 aa ; pad wav oI Prer do-Ching ” Jefire atet I 2s.
‘ a fe | more stable maturity. ; Programme is as follows and merely comic worn the and 1 w Daaaiy hinttewen is. 6d a plant inside one mont to take the food away
If you do not eat enough, you | . f MARCH-MEDLEY Wrong wae'ch ike wranc face | z F ed In M Martin's simotud >
ickly ive 7, nerve | .Yet in spite of all its attractions With the Home Guard Duthoit wrong way on the wrong face vith the French colonisation Hat ately oeee of ivy ihe the UP-TO-DATE ?
quickly get tired. Your nerves would many of us chonse to go|2. OVERTURE. which enabled us to obtain fat, small pots of ivy line th
yet bad. You cannot sleep | rea > " Morning, Noon and Night Suppe The perch excellent coffee and rolls in the %#ck of a wide black marble The queen was in tne parlour
get bad. al CSP | through youth a second time SELECTION remotest villages,’ s mantelpiece in Norman Polishing the grate ;
This is when ‘you need After youth we come to the Classical Memories Ewings For the Jellybag Cap ts so easy hada Nash house. ivv trails The oe was in Led kitchen
» asine 'T > Wine r . age rail 4 OPERATIC EXCERPTS to put on—but oh so hard t Tom large white urns ™ ohn ane up a plate
Phosferine Tonic Wine. You | ‘a ee oth Pe ORS, esis: and lolanthe Sullivan wear ; TABLE- TALK John (interior decorator) ie maid was in the garden
will like this rich, picasant- saxpe, was Of e urtn pé e PB a }5. TWO HANDELIAN PLECES ‘ { ‘Nor ome in ten of. ou * WHY WASN'T | ‘oid Fowler's country home ivy Eating bread and honey,
tasting wine, which has the ihowesr Guay 7/38 the stage of life; middle-age. ‘ Papaarmauet Godfrey custOmers wears it the righ ; THAT afuahrooms take grows in white pots on a white Listentta to the neighbours
rs . . weeten ‘i . ee E , “p= jo Bia 4 ] said a Salesgiri * Thes nalt as long to prepare and taste mantelpiece at Lady Offering her more money
valuable tonic properties of This is the age which youth) Melodies of Fritz Kre'sler—Wright | i pull it over on to one ‘Wice as mushroomy a! you wash (Allen) Lane’s nome, ivy trails Quoted by Jonquil Antony in
> , , AIR RELIGIOSO.
Phosferine, It will gfve you § regards with horror, yet which{7. AiR RELIGIOS | side like a Dopey cap. or thes the skins and leave them on, from a bow! on the dinner table “Mrs Dale at Home.” published
an appetite, make new blood, | once reached, proves less terrify-|» \MARCH-FINALE | tug. the end straight up in » THAT a bow! filled with purple which is heaped with grapes today by Macdonald. 8s. 6d.
Your nerves will get better ing tnan friendly. For middte- Fame 0 ad Glory. Albert Matt. | peee gor er Wear it like a sk). 4s Snneeeeeeennsesendesees: pa aa Peet an WHO CHOOSES
o™ = s . 2aCe < Vi (ING ‘MN eae puiiec own t weir eye . . ‘ Nave se iv nung
; ill sleep well. A Te) age is a quiet peaceful part to GOD SAVE THE QUEEN brows $ $ ing in wicker bowls ip
et Sena De u play, where many of us tind the e Bt they say : SORRY $ front of a window. or *, Li ee. ibrar se
ill secl atogether asnpier, jeisure and space to think for the! — } i some hair $ planted in white jars It) chooses e
st t » fo any years; a time! : ‘ | r it on wron , $ nung on the walls ress her mother chooses for ner
ret Ume sor many years; 3 hold on oneself, and, forgetting i $ Ivy trained up a fe entirely different affairs—
when, after our children have left <. pity turn our thoughts out- | . and gone about their own lives. f ty turn Snougnt | ! i t Ht catches your eye trum the other $ are ren » acknowledged expert on clothes
ake a ward bravely enough for the ad- side of the room, pins you into a & woe dowail like the Duchess of Kent
the house that was so full, be- : : r, | i aos of u window-sill ike the Duchess o en
2 ; : ; vantages of this age to outweig ‘orner and talks for half an hour, and s ned up r0 na it * For the dress the Ducness
PHOSFERINE TONIC WINE Sie tas 7 ae the ae jobs the disadvantages. In middle-age at i "" +e. iy el nig Pokuronar nice . ed ee ny Vanail es chose for Princess Alexandra to
} can turn to do the ayers ee * too illusions are shed one by one ™ nd : ater he telephones and § blinds; or ft “yn Wear at Christiaas partes was In
, too sions s y 2 iy }
that in the busy hurrying years for the rose-coloured spectacles of } earri pup a oad te os ub "Fos wintainte oetas es ; corners und x ted ore ca ee with a et
were never done. S ae . ian» nee a a je takes you to § rot the ceil > With pale blue. with a verv full
9 You'll secon feel better/ “Matto the met ana women whe 7? ath are broken. If we can nav- | eat. Iwo months later vou are asked 3 ee e ceiling OF seit blue sash. and plain
—— : gate all these troubled waters, we | GIVE-AWAY to a party together. s ; bodice with wide boat neck
3
;











| business and homes, the = Ir€- and find to our joy, that it is sti? * an MARR i ete pea ene ins her into NAMED andra ordered instead (while
| ment of middle age presents its tide aes ae dnt a : “ae by a a goes away “HER NAME js her mother was away) was in
| own problems. possitie to:lead ‘an en nap oa mn with her phone number. * Kim Cc ee y peacock-green orgdnzu, with an
useful life, even in middl | a wh seeoee Seno eeeensenreeceenenecsseseses Sung.” I read of tne elaborate tucked-and-bowed V

} The suaden cessation from or- And so we co ou Korean war oride ‘ast neck slimmer Skirt no sash
ganised work, and the change in of all which Shakes week * meaning Goider RB: suas ahi ay hed ae

. — ; 4 antal é ‘sans teeth’ a tiday. “ ppe o made
the caily routine is a mental a sity, oy oe “ : " | How charming is the custom esses, “took one look ut the
‘ shock even though it may be an jicalth old age is NOt quite ot giving us the meaning of frock her mother nad order ed
unconscious one, and the leisure #5 he descripes i it is a time, | Easiern names and decided it was too childish.”
which has probably been looked when, with all. the parts but this Hon felignrtut--1 Nestert Londou é Service
forward to for many a long day, last one played, we can feel justi- | on
at . when it comes, is often found to fied in sitting back, and watchir 2 | i “ 5 <*t
originating in the Mouth be unwanted, and unacceptable, the other players. It is a lonely | BY THE W A y By Kéechionk no need to use a crooked flute to Snibbo
To a woman especially this leisure time, for at this age the world is | eee y beacncomber play round corners. If you stand EAR Sir, *

is accompanjed by the heartache a strange place, and many fr iends | round the corner and play an or- | A week ago I drank a glass of

un- have gone, and age is



of losing her children. For, slow in mak- | ARLY in the morning raucous We'll all be in the workus, dinary straight flute the effect will Snibgleam floor-polish by: mistake
like other mammals—who push ing new contacts, or learning new voices were raised in song be- won't we? be the same. “A bend in a flute,” for the sparkling Snibbolade. As
| off their young and forget them ways. This age which is the last | 1eath the Wretch bedroom win- Mrs, Wretch shrank back from says the professor, “is as ridiculous it made me ill I drank a glass of
at an early age—the human ani- part we play on the stage of life, | jowe. “What the devil——-?" crieq the window. . “It’s those red- as would be a pointed drum or a_ Snibbozone Health-Juice, and at
| mal clings to her children for- by its very quality prepares us for he Colonel. The words of the bearded dwarfs,” said the Colo- round harp.” But, he points out, once felt better, Snibbo evidently
| ever, (a bad arrangement on the our final exit. 614. | serenade dosted ww! C al. ‘All twelve of them?” the w hole idea of playing round can not only make you ill, but can
| part of nature. which results in So we have the five ages of life | et i queried Mrs. Wretch. “All twelve,” corners is based on a fallacy, “It cure you—which is more than Ae
|} embarrassment for the child. today, infancy, childhood, youth, | Hail, smiling Colonel, and your said the Colonel gloomily. is mere clowning, as though a be said for soi ulaaarann tie Tab-
embarassment for the child. nee and old age. — | eat aioe sSaarothertecaieen Tie crooked flute momen thre rH play eth re lets. They only make you ill.
PS Op a adiadad BP at ag | ROFESSOR Ralph Armitage Read, Poked through one of these Yrs. gratefully,
If she don't return to the circus, writes to tell me that there 1 is piers.” Amy Curse:





einai“



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=,
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 28, 1952

Dont put





your husband
in an apron

says DENISE ROBINS

Writer of 100 novels; married, with three daughters

DO not agree with
Lord Justice Denning
in the Court
is week that
if a woman neglects the
nousework jt is the duty of
the husband to *

who sal
of Appeal

to” and help.

I think that if a man once
Starts to ta a cooking and
rk and washing-up—
because his wife is either too

ceok-general ?

washing and cooking

oF ean SEPUBIANET not nap oie tee
ypewriting, If he did ask ind and 1 both on towne
‘buckle ‘Such @ favour she would the housework togettien.*

consider it monstrous.

expect to turn a tired
band into a servant.

He doesn’t
ask his wife to finish ner

then join him in the office in
the evening and do a couple

I think it is equally mon-
strous for any woman to

If she finds her own job



SUNDAY

"9








PAO T eee neaRS SEES EESESSEENS SSeELeesuseNEEEENSEEsEnee Hen

:
;
:



1! DISAGREE,
says Vera Lynn
“Cees

and hus bands
says singer



should help”
Vera

Husband Harry Lewis says:
“A man’s job is nard. but not
so hard as a woman's

hus- “T always help when needed.”





ADVOCATE

or too indifferent to do too / .
i react estab a gp gruet for bes we ous (>) | DISAGREE, ee |
. so that s . ,
ol! she ig the type who in hat she can do a = less. co says Mr. INNES ; Ay |
nstance leaves a : , Bf ,
Hitey tance leaves a... Melaxation {HIS Ausband- Meee
her duties as a wife. she will A husband has to go off the-howse wafer
— advantage of his kindly ¢2frly to earn his daily bread is “a question to bust up a ™ I ) ” > ,
a demand ft every 4nd stick at it all axy and happy marriage.” says thriller- ( R 4 ¢ Oj} y PEC |
; noe. gare sine relaxants. writer ee ; tae (who The vy B, X |
e ore mner eC @ ‘6 writ a OMe ) . }
He needs is earning the money that His view: * Husbands shoulda a °
= aioake she {s going to spend. nelp~theoretically. Practically, talk about how to stay married
lis is quite different if she If her methods are so sfat- 1 ‘ont do a great deal, but I if }
fs ft or hag nad eaaee = ternly that he eam no longer aq juni EAM By SYLVIA GOUGH ts. Peck keepsâ„¢the |
\ ; and nightly stand the op aah 09 gdp She keeps }
ihelp with a Httie washing-up home he he oper es me Says wife Dorothy: ‘It would 7 HEY come from doliy- She keeps it pr vate
mever did any man any my opinion. to heashean ; = very depressing if the hus- wood. California. a n your husband ts
harm. Then he can get separation or to stop sup- band helped with housework too they Mave bec: ; i Se arte
Bar to it. porting her That would willing zs ia, oy shows ten years. And bec t oo in acer
t why should a man soon teach her that she has ome ; » pat. two facts dont often 20 BL (Pie et ag
(ome back from his own job ~ As for butlering—well, my ube cote

tired out, longing for a chair
‘by his fireside, his pipe. and
@ little peace have to put on
@m apron and become a

I Say It Was Wrong —:
To Hang This Woman

Nearly 30 years ago Mrs. Edith
Thompson was executed for the
murder of her husband. Now
BEVERLEY BAXTER, M.P. re-
viewing a new book about the
case, says that in his view the
hanging was judicial murder.
WAS Edith Thompson guilty of

murder, or was she hanged for
adultery? Once more that ques-
tion is raised by the publication
of Lewis Broad’s The Innocence
of Edith Thompson.”

As I read the book my mind
first went back to that tempestu-
ous night in the House of Com-
mons five years 1g0 when by 9
free vote we suspended hanging.
On the Tory front bench sat Sir
John Anderson (now Lord Wav-
erley), who was permanent head
of the Home Office at the time of
the trial.

In his speech earlier in the
debate Sir John declared: “Where
there is a scintilla of a doubt the
Home Secretary has invariably
advised commutation.” Then Regi-

nald Paget interjected: “Was
there no question about Mrs.
Thompson?”

Resentment

Sir John stiffened, and his voice
expressed the resentment that he
felt. “Absolutely none!” he
snapped. Then in calmer tones
he said that there was no reason
for doubt at all in the part’ she
played in the affair. “There may
be room for doubt as to her de-
gree of guilt,” he said, “but as to
the fact that sie was in law guilty
of murder there can be no doubt
whatever.”

He spoke not merely as a Par-
liamentary Front Bencher but as
the senior civil servant who could

undoubtedly have saved Mrs.
Thompson; for example, by ex-
erting his influence over the

weaker personality of Home Sec-
retary Bridgeman.

Which may account for his ob-
vious resentment whea, in the
final speech from the Back
Benches, I gave it as my opinion
that she was hanged for adultery
and not for murder.

But again, while reading thi:
engrossing book, my mind went
back to the Saturday before the
double execution, I was then
Editor of the Sunday Express. The
commissionaire sent word that
there was a young woman who
had’ a message from Bywaters,

She was Bywaters’s cousin, a
nice-looking girl of about twenty,
who was crying so_ hysterically
that it took some time before she



her home

for nothing.

could speek echerently.

A Confession

Then she told us that Bywaters'
wanted this message delivered to
the Editor: “Tell him that I
killed Thompson because 1 saw
red. I didn’t know anything until
I saw him bleeding on the ground.
But Edith had nothing to do with
it. She is absolutely innocent.”

Here was a confession which
might be of some technical value.
At any rate it had to be convey-
ed at once to the Home Secre-
tary. But we learned that he
was spending the week-end at a
country house in North Wales,
and as it was a race with time
we chartered an airplane to carry
a reporter to the nearest airport.
It must have been one of the
earliest examples of & newspaper
using an airplane for such a pur-
pose,

But nothing came of it.

Three days later at 8 a.m, on
January 9, 1923, the man and the
woman were hanged. That night
two of the prisor from
Holloway prison (she was hanged
at Holloway, Bystanders at Pen-
tonville) came to the Daily Fx-
press and told a dreadful story

They said that Edith Thompson
had collapsed until her condition
was indescribable.. They wanted
us to urge that there should never
be another hanging of a woman,

Was their story true? Not very
long afterwards the hangman
committed suicide,

The author of the Innocence
of Edith Thorepson makes no
pretence of impartiality. He is
out to establish her innocence

The Judge

His chief target is the judge,
the late Sir Montague Shearman.
“Of all the Bench,” he writes “he
was the judge least able to take
a tolerant view of the character
and lapses of the woman in the
cock.

When the two barristers for the
comprehension of the fanciful
and fantastic. The romantic was
at a minimum in his make-up.”

Before him in the dock were a
man of 21 and a woman of 27.
They had indulged in a_ sordid
and wicked liaison, for she was
already married to a husband who
had been faithful to her.

When the two barristers for
defence asked that the accused
should be tried separately he only
gave it a moment’s consideration
and then refused.

Day after day the jury gazed

Z_lanks SANDALS

fer foot htallty- for children



“PLAY-UP”

a moral obligation towards

Nobody should be allowed
to get anything in this world b>

went My

see

together 1














nusband cas a c i” + |
1sbanc mas Ss a 3004 Martini. and Mrs. Gregory Peek who i “4 what colour they
ENDPIECE & London store arrived in London ViAve dining - room
. ine vy ne-u” aprons To Mrs. Peck I put some 1 :
b M ‘N . Ss and a questions on the problem ot * + *
tion of broken dishes. Staying happily married—even
when the lusband is the sort of 1 hree hildren
i who looks just as goog) = aged > eight. They
aylight as on ¢t reen So ee t
the ans my Pe thin i
said Mrs ' : ! a lo with a happy
our nome worth coming ba n i <
-——-warm, friendly. interesting i Mr eck, he thinks he
k
“ * * * *T gu are Si
There are obstacles which lappy be 4 vet
make tha: less easy than ft mau ‘ airied '
Seem. The Pe family moves a or ) Vv hectic
about a bit these days B ways keeps our
From California they moved friendly Danie ae Sie
; Rome. They now have a house il, jancy e—that is
at the two of them in the dock, tn Paris. Soon they will move what sh trying
adulterers and murderers. And tw Stockholm. But wherever ta do
though it was the _boy’s hand that : London Express Service
ad held the knife, -whose was
the evil mind that put it there?
From the hour that they appear- my rs
ed in the dock together they were ii ( i ( eh
J )

doomed.
Since the judge could not un-

What's Cooking

After The Holidays bi

derstand it why should we expect more margarine or butter
oe sity Tee ye and one How many of us do not know flour, Put the meat
Thompson was a woman capable ° nice and tasty dish of then et quite warm and
of a consuming love that fed its Here are two recipes for meatball
own fires with a wild, poetic 1d trifle which will be very use 2 ; b
imaginativeness. ful after the holidays Economic Trifle
Her Letters Turkey Meatballs ft-overs of any kind of

Read in court, her letters sound- Tice & tow Or the Bones of tho | emove the icing if there
ed tawdry, sinister and treach- roe ens Ths page a the trifle will be too

turkey and the neck and make ¢

little broth with some water, salt
ing one onion,

erous. But there are passages
of real beauty that reach ecstasy.













rO Next Satur









ke left-overs in very









Her tragedy was that she’ only ard

i ~ . x f ns at whic > Hoen and put at bottom of
truly lived in the realm of imag- eee ot a ae 5 ‘ h. Sprinkle a bit of
ination and brought doom upon !eft over from the ks. 4a the top and spread a cout
three people because Bywaters !unch or dinner put some bread ‘ly or cherry 1 OL
translated the imagination to real- (the inside of the loaf and it mu Way y ; Jani mt

. r he ea Make custard
ity. be § of the volume. of the meat). : mane &

She wrote letters that condemn- Mince the meat and the bread * rt » 1 t the 2
ed herself as a would-be murder- after soaking the bread in sone : Ree Se able
ess. According to those letters of the broth, Collect the minced sa ead Gate tae ag a et
she was feeding her husband a meat, the bread in a mixing bow] #P°° ve a rere re
monty diet of ground glass, but and add 1 pinch of salt, 2 table. *? of nt F ine oo
tie Autopmy, revealed thal 1E,NAE spoonatul of grated choise and 4 atti tng or a tp of when

* J : re alas ae 4 » an “ « é or.

the suburbs she dramatised her- in ar ag and se: F 7 If you use plain milk 2 glasses

self, saw herself as one of the | /..° mince wae nd « half would be enough, Mix

great murderesses of romance — ' . , the eg ind the sugar first, then

mee ee oe ae Put in a saucepan loz, of butter @4d the flour and then the mill

aware “if Jus any v or margarine, When melted add 1 I lume. If you see that

suburbaa wife. i : i ; th mixture is not very smooth
Justice? teaspoonful of tomato sauce a re

ustice? .. few peeled tomatoes, Add some t through a sieve, Then add 1

We cannot deny that Edith wore of the broth, enouch to fill ! yoonful of vanilla or if you
nen eee Oe Soe on 1/8 of & medion sage. saucevon, 1k taste of the lime best two
cannot deny that aie was an When this sauce starts to’ boil © ps of lime peet will be
adulteress. We cannot deny that Shape the meat mixture in small ‘ ak STE “ALL
she would have run away with Meatballs and put them in the mM M i ma Five oa
Bywaters except for her innate Sauce. Let everything boil fe aoe pe un a, Yee
respectability and her desire not ®bout 20 minutes, then take ‘ ra Coe - get ee ae
to bring shame upon her family, the meatballs out and if the 1c thick. When finished pour

WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED is not thick enough let ii boil the cake and add small pieces

* Published by Hutchinson. 303 @gain until it becomes quitt Ny or jam. Put in the fridge

pages, 12s. 6d. thick. You can also add a tity ice-box and serve ice-cold,








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sARS CONTINUOUS MUS'¢
itl, DAWN—O Year N
) r of Tu Chi = NEW YEAR'S EVE WITHIN
Peddine . ber ; ;) SOUND OF THE SEA
reservations ph. 4000 od S : , a . ‘ .
uppe r Ste KS, Ham & Eggs serv od ow Ak . Pe h Re ic
chr vughout the ht. Hats, Hor CQ Sutroundi: Bs .
Novelties from U.S., floo ; 1 = ;
dens and re igned iter ar in especial} nif
lighting comprise a setting gs 1 j t ne a n
teed to greet 1953 with a cal momagemen ensuring |
ing of rollicking fun, good fo 4, yo venin enjoyment The
smooth drinks and dancing a Accra Beach Club will t
Club Morgan n»xice for many and vo ive
ked to please phone early
HORSESHOES, T U RK IS it 829%
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faa abenel aa one _ Hall Road. Drive in for Water,
ee Palins “kh : ~ Tyre, Battery and Crankca
oe t drops and tiny singles, check—distiled water i free,
prices range from $1,50 to $14.50. windscreen clean free (wit!
Sterling Silver non-spill Compacts new | quid product available to
i round, octagonal or individual you at 62 cents per bottle). New
‘ les are extremely attractive at air pump servic two tyres in one
7.95 to $25.75. Costume Jewelry action with automatic pressure
is heavily displayed at snap-up register. Kerosene Oi! i erved
prices across a terrazo bar counter with
x all motoring accessories; open till
THIS MAGNIFICENT NEW midnight
AR is the 1953 Humber Hawk
Cole's Garage ph. 4316. Offer- ICECREAM, SOFT DRINKS,
{ an ineredibly smooth ride CIGARETTES AND CANDY from
With shockless steering, high 9 a.m. til 10.30 night rh
ficiency aluminium cylinder head, brand new BICO shop on B
noramie vision, great passen- § upplies Vanilla Stra
r space, powerful .brakes and Prune, Peach among the ma
brilliant new body styling the flavours of 4 02., 8 20 oz. Ic
Humber Hawk is rightly claimed ¢eam contamers sold at 14c., 28¢.,
Superb from every “point of 80c.,—or for a slap-up party, you
ew" Definitely vee this one C8 buy it in bulk at 30c¢. a pint
ver the New Year and arrange ®VE" 9 gals, or 86c, a pint under 5
demonstration ride. Price is gals Prime favourites are the
$3,790, CHOC-ICES (chocolate coated) at
* ’ 12c, and Brickettes at 4
IF THIS WAS WRITTEN IN ’ . r ,
THE GAELIC or even broad LINOLEUM TRADE-MARKED

LANCASTREUM leur

orice the only three words to stand and. {oF

ut would be OLD ANGUS Simply means the best floor-cov
SCOTCH so we'll keep to En wa rh he rome ) " wea ri }
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few of the backgr me ey hae 7 og

c e background of OLD in, priced from 53c, a yard. OU

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per e. rom a land of bie ee
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Whisky at its wonderful be and the B.C.C.F. are meeting a
nveyor of Greetings and ; heavy demand ;
Happy New Year
T DEAL OF THOUGHT

“A GRE





PAGE SEVEN



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Sunday, December 28, 1952

1952

THE YEAR now ending has been a
year ot continuous military operatio:
The Korean war, in which a total of tw
million casualties is claimed, continues

with no prospect of a speedy armistice:
the seven-year deadlock in Indo-China
has not been broken: while operations in
Malaya have not ceased.

There have been coups d’etat in Syria

and Egypt and more recently troubles in
North Africa. The Mau Mau atrocities in
Kenya have led to the concentration on

repressive measures in that colony which

must consequently delay movements fot
economic political development.
Trouble is South Africa. In
Burma, Nepal, Siam and Persia fears of

been ex

and
brewing in
have

Communist domination

pressed during the year and are not yet

absent. But although the hot war has
been raging on certain fronts and there
has been a rise in temperature in cer-
tain trouble areas, 1952 will be remem-
bered as a year of intensification of the
cold war between the West and the East
The collective action which is still bein
taken to prevent the success of Russian
and Chinese plans in Korea, the military
tightening up of the North Atlantic
Treaty Organisation and the drawing ol

the Bonn Republic of Germany into the
Western fold have led to severai chanse

in the policies formulated in Moscow
during the year

Soviet rearmament goes on and Stalin
continues to work for a split in the

Western camp but greater emphasis by)
Communist laid on
national independence as a more effective
means of split than the
“peace” movements although these are not
the latest held in

agents is to be
creating a

banned, having been
Vienna

Communists are to be patriots rather
than and greater hopes
are being placed on the intellectuals who

into non-Communist par-

revolutionaries

can infiltrate
ties and organisations.

This emphasis on national
ence and reliance on intellectuals rather
than on working class Communists is not
new but Stalin’s classification had to be
made because of the contradictory orders
which have been issued to Communists
ever since the peace campaign started.
Stalin knows that he must play a cun-
ning game if he is to win the cold war
and the effective.action which the United
States and the NATO countries are
taking to defeat Soviet imperialism forces
him to issue orders which mean that cer-
tain leaders of the proletariat will have
to “right-about-face” and collaborate
with bourgeois and even fascists.

Stalin's pact with Hitler was of course
an early instalment of the line which is
now being followed and Communists hate
to be reminded of it.

Realists who recognise that behind
the Communist peace movements and the
honeyed propaganda of “comradeship
and “brotherly love” lies the determi ed
Soviet bid for world conquest are aware
that the last thing Moscow wants 1s re-
form. It suits the Politburo better to
have a reactionary government than a
government which is sincerely practis.ng
reform, so long as the Communist Party
is not crushed.

independ-

ilin would not hesitate for a moment
to hasten the progress of Germany and
Japan on to the path of independent
c2ovelopment. Nor would he hesitate to
offer markets in the Soviet sphere to
members of the Atlantic alliance in an
effort to exploit the friction which results
from the struggle for markets. Stalin
has expurgated much of Marx but he
still believes that Marx was right when
he said that war between the imperialist
powers was inevitable. If the events ol
1952 may be taken as a guide they tend







not to support Marx’s dictum. The
streamlining of the NATO organisation
under General Ridgway; the military
naval and air exercises held under its
sponsorship: the movement towards a
European Defence Community: the form-
ation of a Pacific Defence Council: the
remarkable agreement on_ political and
economic measures throughout the Com-

Her Majesty is

monwealth of which
tc ; whieh the United

Head: the sympathy
States is showing for countries — with
responsibilities for overseas territories
are some of the indications that a split is
unlikely in the Western camp, at least
while the cold war between West _and
bast continues. a
Bat if the position has been held in 1952
the prospects of war have lessened

and if mie
there still remain enough problems anc
tensions to make accurate predictions im-
possible. Recent events in Czechoslovakia,

especially the resurgence of anti-Semitism
have shocked many of those who were
prepared to believe that Communist dom-
inated countries were not all that they
were made out to be by right-wing news-
papers. The drive which the government of
Peking has started against foreign Chinese
living in Calcutta has given Indians an
object lesson at home of what lies behind
the window-dressing of Communist China,
But isolated events cannot be taken as
reliable pointers to future developments
The stand which India takes against Com-
munism will be a decisive factor influenc-
ing the fate of millions of people in Asia

The Communists are making every effort
to gain India for their cause. _ The skilful
propaganda machine of imperialist Russia

SUNDAY ADVO(



ues sf i
} every evil of the
ciety it is pledged to crush.
Colonial peoples and peoples with low liv-
standards have until recently required



t e and exposes

“imperialist” s

ing

little persuasion in believing that there is
omething wrong with a society in which
they are never more than menials,” hewers

of wood and drawers of water.” But condi-

{

tions in most colonies have changed so
drastically in recent years that the boot is
é st on the other toot and the countries

with cclonial possessions are all anxiously
trying to force their colonies along paths
of constitutional development for which
many are unprepared. Communist propa-
anda in colonies tends therefore # con
centrate on attacking the orthodox social-
ists and labour leaders who are planning
reforms within the framework of the con-
stitution. Communists in the Caribbean
will even join forces with conservatives
and capitalists, their two former deadliest
enemies, to overthrow established Labour
leaders. Their orders are to foster discon-
tent and to fan race hatred. The Carib-
bean in this respect offers a fertile ground
ince discontent and racial hatred have for
than hundred years been the
stock in trade of the political tout. Not
all of those who keep this deadwood of
racialism alive in the region can be accus-
ed of communist sympathies but undoubt-
edly much of the virus still deliberately
spread owes its origin to fellow travellers
or secret Communist agents. Communist
ed a change after the initiative was taken

ore one

tactics in the Caribbean this year also suf-

fered a change after the initiative was taken
by Mr. G. H. Adams to purge Communism
ym the Caribbean Labour Congress. The

mission to Barbados and the subsequent

memorandum sent to Trade Unions and
trade union federations in the British
Caribbean by Mr. Richard Hart, as Secre-
tary of the Caribbean Labour Congress
hows clearly that the struggle fer control



st Indian labour organisations is
g waged openly. It is no longer possi-
to talk of there being very little Com-
munism in the Caribbean. The agents of






Moscow are operating here and will lose
no opportunity of exploiting ignorance
and discontent which everywhere leads
ulible people into the Communist net.
loss to Communism of the British

1 would be negligible compared
with the loss of India: but if Communism
triumphed in the Caribbean Stalin would
have gained another strategie victory on
the road to world domination by the
gigantic Soviet Empire which he controls.
At first sight Communism seems to have
made little gain in 1952 but it is actively
at work in every British territory as it is
in every country outside the Iron Curtain.

. r + ~
HUMAN NATURE
NATURE, as the Latin satirist Juvenal

summed up neatly, can be expelled with

a sharp-pointed stick but it has a habit

of coming back. The Australian hoom-

erang (a specimen of which can be seen





at the Barbados Museum) has sit :
characteristics, In politics too, nature is
never absent and _ politicians’ printed

to embarrass themselves
studént’ of political his-
it seems, never quite as
look and even Crowns
which looked so easy to bear or even to
kick away press on more heads than
would have ever been believed possible.
The world which seems so easy to re-
form at the sweet age of seventeen or
even at twenty-one seems no better and
sometimes worse after the ambitious
have made their efforts. Nature, the
nature of man, the fallen nature of man
resists the prods of millions of pitch forks

and improvements either take long in

coming or when ‘they come bring many
evils in their train.

Speedy communications have not only brought
human beings closer together. They have also ac-
customed humanity to grow weary of distant woe
and to keep its tears from the suffering at home
or at furthest, next door. The knowledge that
neariy half-a-million soldiers nave been killed
since the war in Korea began or that there have
been two million casualties in the same campaign
is horrifying enough when we think of it; but
how often do we think of it?) Emotional speeches
are regularly made whenever a Barbadian man or
woman is on the point of losing a job and almost
anyone within earshot is blamed for what is at
once recognised to be a national catastrophe,

When 20,000 more men were unemployed in the
Midlands last month because of the slump in the
motor industry no one in England tried to blame
this on anyone. - Dislocation of industry and re-
direction of labour has been with us as long as
nature and the discovery of the pitchfork itself
must have caused much unemployment among
our ancestors who lived so many aeons before
democracy and the “isms” and ideologies of mod-
ern life were on every tongue. What is true of
nature is not as true of other things, but every
now and again we are given gentle reminders that
life is not what we make it but that limiting
factors restrain m«ay of the noblest wishes. Bar-
bados, contrary tu the tiresome opinions of the
conceited and ill-informed has never lacked per-
ons imbued with the “sweetness and light” which
are necessary to promote either the corporal
works of mercy or the spreading of gracious cul-
tural and artistic living.

What has always limited its achievements
size, its financial resources and its people.

Those who are not too conceited to dismiss the
centuries of West Indian social, political and
economic history with an impatient shrug and a
comment that such history has never been writ-
ten will after study of no more than a small num-
ber of the thousands of books, papers, official
documents and personal letters which exist in
many well-equipped libraries in the Caribbean
and United Kingdom always find reason to praise
the many thousands of men and women who have
worked for the benefits which many enjoy in
these territories today. The howls of derision
with which the patient labours of many, whose

Speeches remain
and confuse the
tory. Things are,
simple as they





is its







very names and works have now been forgotten
by those who have special motives for dishonour-
ing. their memory have obscured the fact that

vards high levels of civilisation has to
be paid for with money. Art galleries, museums,
theatres, parks, monuments, halls of music and
all the many “musts” of modern intellectual and
cultural life that are taken for granted by many
town dwellers today, owe their existence mostly
to private munificence. The greatest grude which
intellectuals passing through the West Indies on
their ports of cultural call have long held against
West Indian men of property has been their re-
luctance to emulate their opposite numbers in
large countri¢

The support of private charities and the prior-
ity given to the claims of the sick and education
has frequently been overlooked. Today, ironic-
ally, the wheel has come full circle and the in-
tellectual is now turning a critical tongue (which
must at all costs be kept alive) against govern-
n whose excessive taxation policies have re-
duced the men of property to the stage of seeking
tax coneessions for themselves and who are find-
ing it increasingly difficult to support traditional
private charities ‘

Governments, it seems, are going to be
liberal in support of culture than were the men
of property, But this is cdnsistent with human
nature,

progress tc









less

loit every |



The man who

keeps Barbados

laughing on

Sundays

5 your Uncle Nat's lif
A the Plucky Ana

in bed with influenza and your
Uncle has been nurse housekeeper
and cook since Tuesday, nicst of
the news of the week has been
missed, or briefly glarced
while milk boils over and
ling kettle howls like a
through The Seca Nesc,

You must, there fore,

‘

a whist- 1

be content

with a short diary’ of events

scribbled on the kitchen table, “
The Kettle

"T’AKE morning tea to P.L.W,

P.L.W. says she feels on fire.
Drains teacup to put fire out. Asks
for more tea.

Run downstairs to put on whist-
ling kettle.

Run upstairs to look
for thermometer. Eventually find
thermometer, rinse under bath-

room tap, shake and ask P.L.W. to
open mouth

P.L.W., lying on back, opens
mouth wide like fledgling Waiting



ATE

Doctor asks: “Then why is she

Little Woman, is making al! that noise?” I answer

‘She may be delirious.” Doctor

says: “I'll come at once.” 7

As it is daily help’s day off, get

at, down on knees and rake out stove,

ight it and run upstairs to ask

banshee what P.L.W. would like for lunch.

P.L.W. asks: “What would
woman in Aylesbury jail have?"
I say: “Probably roast beef and
Yorkshire pud., but as we are
not in prison we can’t have meat
everyday and I can’t make York-
shire pud. any day. What cbout
filleted sole?”

' P.L.W. says: “Yes, and what
t ome coffee, as she’s still
on fire?”



Downstairs again to put on

whistling kettle and find stove has
gone
light, giving it plenty of draught.
Telephone
him to enter*back door and leave

out. Re-lay stove and re-

fishmonger and ask

with open beak for mother bird to Sole on kitchen table as I may
pop worms into it. Pop glass wo-m be upstairs with invalid.
under fledgling’s tongue
7 . taot re ngs ror > r
Whistling kettle howls Run Upstairs again to warn P.L.W.
downstairs to meet Lottie, the that doctor is coming and to take



Devil Cat, who because che is ter-
rified of whistling kettle is rush-





temperature :
stairs again with thermometer in

once more. Down-

ing upstairs. Almost meet death hand to answer call of whistling
on § rs with Lottie uader fcet, kettle; also to answer front door
but survive to make more tea. ’ bell for insurance assessor, who
$ . wants to look at damaged roof
While making tea, read Lorq from inside.
Jowitt’s account in House of Lords :
of woman prisoner in Aylesbury Assessor asks can he have a
jail who told him about the “won- Pair of steps and where is the
derful hot food” there, the com- loft? 1
fortable beds, and the library full Pick up steps with one hand
of Westerns. : and, with thermometer in other,
“You only have to ring a bell lead way upstairs to show assessor
for anything you want,” she in- loft. Downstairs again to silence

formed his lordship.

By this
P.L.W.,

time tea is
who

cold
can hardly breathe



shrieking kettle

and at t
wide open, is now roaring furnace.

and make coffee.
gas ring and look
with draught

Put
stove.

milk on
Stove,

through her nose and still has Close up everything, decide not to
thermometer in her mouth, is al- call fire brigade, and find milk
most asphyxiated. boiling over.

Snatch thermometer, whicl
reads 100, and tell P.L.W. about The Sole
woman in ylesbury jail. Drink- :
ing cold tea, PLWw. says she HILE making coffee, won-
wouldn't mind being there her- der if assessor is really as-

self, except that she doesn’t read
Westerns.

As P.L.W. wants
bottle, put on kettle again, rake
stove thoroughly, get in fuel, put
on too much fuel and put stove
out.

hot water

The Doctor

FWELEPHONE doctor.

trying to explain PI
symptoms, whistling kettle howls
again. Doctor, hearing howl over
phone, asks, “Is she in great pain?”
I answer, “No”.




sessor. Too old for cosh boy but,
you never know these days.
Upstairs again to find assessor
in proper place on‘steps. Down-
stairs again to open front door for

doctor. Upstairs again to take
coffee.
Doetor leaves prescription, so

downstairs again and out to chem-
ist. Come back to find sole has
arrived and Lottie has fillet on
kitchen floor.

Pointing dramatically to Lottie’s
platter of rabbit, tell her she is
low and mean to steal invalids





but Lottie continues to

lunch,

munch sole.
Prepare sole

while looking for salt, Lottie grabs |

with butter, and,|
another fillet. She seems to enjoy
it more with butter on it.

Put sole under grill, pick up
paper and read that Colonel A. C.
Gillem, commanding U.S.A.F.
base at Upper Heyford, wants peo»

ple here to invite American Ser-
vicemen to their homes. |
* * J
Remember how P.L.W. and I
sent written offer to entertain
American troops during’ war.
Ameriean authorities sent back



from which said: “.* you have an
American sold
you must not discuss (1) religion;
(e) politics; (3) sex.”

The P.L.W. wrote back: “As
we are both religious, fanatics,
anarchists, an sex maniacs, offer
cancelled.”

Put down paper and find Lottle
licking over mashed potatoes.

The Neighbour

.BVIOUSLY only one thing to
do. As Lottie has no morals

and fears nothing on earth but the !

Whistling kettle, she shall have
whistling kettle throughout cook-
ing operations.

Put on W. K. and let it how).
Lottie runs out of kitchen and
hides under dining room. sofa.

Through howling of kettle I hear
front door bell ring. It is a neigh-
bour who asks:

“Is there anything wrong?”

I answer “My wife is ill.”

The neighbour say “But
what's that terrible noise?”

I say: “That is my mad brother
having hallucinations.”

The neighbour says:

“Troubles never come
do they?”

I say: “No”, and shut the door.
Thanks to this interruption, the
sole is burned, When I take it up
to the P.L.W., she looks at the
charred mess and says:
“How do you get into Ayles-
bury jail and have all that won-
derful food?”







singly,





I reply: “When you are better
you could become a cosh girl.”
She says: “There are a lot of
people I would like to cosh, and
they wouldn’t be old ladies,
either, Will you buy me a cosh?”
I rep “T will buy you one for
Christm .







“Buy it before Christmas,”
she says, “so that I can cosh
somebody in time to have my
Christmas dinner in Aylesbury
jail.”

—L.ES.



COLONIAL MEDDLERS

Colonial constitutions vary wide-¢
ly but all British colonies have one
thing in common. They are all
subject ‘to the legislative suprem-
acy of the Imperial Parliament and
to the right of the Crown to dis-
allow their legislation on the ad-
vice of the Imperial government
They are not in other words self-
governing,

On the other hand colonial legis-
latures are not the delegates of the
Imperial Parliament. If they were.
representative assemblies would
be farcical institutions especially
in colonies with adult suffrage.
Colonial legislatures have full
power within territorial limits and
subject to the rule that any colo-
nial law repugnant to an Act of
the Imperial Parliament extending
to the colony (or any order or re-
gulation made under such Act)
shall to the extent of such rep
nancy be void and in-operative
Legal phraseology may perhaps
appear unexciting to some but the
meaning is clear.

In colonies with representative
legislatures the constitution can
also be freely amended provided
that amendments do not conflict
with imperial or local legislation
| if either of these has prescribed a
particular procedure. There al-
ways remains, however, a brake.
The Governor's assent is required
for all colonial legislation

Anyone who has studied British
-olonial history whether in a ter-
ritory which has since become
sovereign independent nation,







a territory which has since becom
a self-governing Dominion (suc
as Australia, Canada or Sout!
Africa) or in territories which ar
still colonies like the Caribbean},
cannot but be impressed by the
fact that the drive towards inde-¢
pendence always came from the
belief of the people on the spot
that they were better fitted to gov-
ern themselves than were the
legislators of Westminster. There
were many other reasons for the





emergence from coionial status
but none exerted greater influence
on the events which took place

than the reluctance of individuals
living in one part of the world tc
having their destiny decided by the
English Parliament at Westmin-
ster.

The British Caribbean
from the earliest ‘ays of colonisa-
tion shared this resentment of
control by London because the al-
{ways British Caribbvan islands
were settled by Englishmen who
carried with them English law and
ideas about the rights of English-

island®

(such as the United States) or ings
fe n baptised as Christiz

By George Hunte

Indian middle classes, But diver-
sity of law and diversity of Euro-
pean influences would have by
themselves not prevented the
fusion of the West Indian peoples
into a nation unified in resistance
to government from Whitehall.
The European nationals in the
West Indies had far more reasons
for unity than did the English and
Dutch in South Africa and the
French and English in Canada.
What prevented the emergence of
a Caribbean nation was the aboli-
ton of slavery. And the abolition
f slavery gave more than a hun-
dred years lease of life to the rule
of Whitehall in the West Indies.
Slavery had been introduced into
the British West Indies not by the
original settlers who came here to
live and build up a new English
life in a new world but by English
traders who wanted to make pro-
fits out of the slave trade. On the
other hand the movement for its





abolition could hardly have been
expected to originate among the
settler community who were un-
likely to be ahead of the mother

country in policies of enlighten-
ment. The cart does not lead the
horse. When slavery was abol-
ished compensation had to be paid
and not much of the compensation
remained in the West Indies to
finance developments which would
allow the West Indian legislatures
‘to tackle the colossal task of fitting
slaves who had not even (as in
he neighbouring French colonies)
; to take
ieir places in free society. The
istory of Barbados is exceptional




n that respect because of the
ieavy European settlement. But
tit would have been unnatural to

expect a self-governing Barbados
more than thirty years before the
passage of the second Reform Bill
to have acted as disinterestedly in
the interests of the non-white sec-
tions of the community, as a Par-
liament at Westminster which was
being’ subjected to the critical
pressure of the new public opinion.
Much of what was said in Eng-
land was of course greatly exag-
gerated Professor W. L. Burn
quoting Mr, G. M. Young's descrip-
tion of the Victorian age, “an age
of flashing eyes and curling lips,
more easily touched, more easily
shocked, more ready to spurn, to
flaunt, to admire and above all to
preach”, says it was far more apt
for 1833 than for 1883, but
modifications it still represents the
erude enthusiasm displayed by
some members of the British Par-



with










jmen to manage their own affairs Jiament who by asking questions
jin the land of settlement. Had the ghout British col feel that
| West Indies as we know them to- they are performing useful dutie
{day been settled only by English- »

men and not by Spaniards and Very often, however, the only
Frenchmen as well, English law consequence of the legislative
might have been the only law and supremacy of the Parliament at
English ideals of government the Westminster over the colonial Teg-
only ideals. In fact, in the British islatures is to reduce the effective-

territories of the Caribbean ther
still exists French law and Dutc
French and Spanish influences ar
firmly embedded among the West




of State fc
Colon
tt is easy enough for left-wing



ness of action which the
state the Colonie
1 Governors want

ecretary
and the
to take.



members of Parliament and their
journalist friends to criticise the
government's handling of affairs in
Kenya when they are sitting thous-
ands of miles away safe from the
murderous attacks of Mau Mau.
The supremacy of the British Par-
liament over Colonial legislatures
never seems less desirable than
when something goes wrong in a
British colony. Then everybody
the Secretary of State for the Col-
onies, the Governor or the Colon-
ial legislature all come in for a
share of the lashing tongues and
scratching pens which suddenly
inform the large ignorant British
public that they have a colony
somewhere which somebody has
been running wrongly. There is a
good reason I believe for the Par-
liament at Westminster retaining
its supremacy over colonial legis-
latures whenever self-government
would mean the penalising of min-
orities; this supremacy is as neces-
sary today in the interests of min-
orities as it was before in the in-
terests of majorities. But there is
no purpose whatever in the
supremacy of Parliament being
maintained if questions are to be
asked in Parliament by persons
with no stake in the colonies con-
cerned,





If Colonies do not become self-
governing the electors of the
colonies ought to elect one or more
representatives to successive Brit-

ish Parliaments to represent their
interests (and not as now the in-
terest" of individuals who get the
ear of certain Members of Parlia-

ment) throughout the session and
not only periodically at question

time. One agent of Barbados in
London for many years secured
election to the British Parliament
and representation was achieved
in this original manner but today
the West Indians who are elected
to Westminster owe full allegiance
to the British constituents who
have voted for them.

There are many stocx objections
to any proposals for colonials be
ing returned to the Parliament at
Westminster. Many of them are
put forward c onstructively and not
merely as obstacles. But however
strong may be the arguments
against Colonial participation in
the Imperial Parliament such par-
ticipation is better than a system



L





in your home, |







which allows individual M.P'’s and

their journalist friends to beat a!

big stick
the Sex



ind attempt to browbeat





etary of State for the
Colonies and Governors of Col-
onies into actions approved by
particular pressure groups. The



United Nation sembly Commit-
tee on non-self-governing terri-
tories has learnt a lot of technique
from tle pressure groups at West-
minster and colonial administra-
tion everywhere today is being
threatened with extinction.

That is why self-government
dwith safe-guards for minority
Sroups) seems a lesser evil to
many than it did before the army
of meddlers swelled tg the present
size, '











SUNDAY, DECEMBER 28, 1952





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SUNDAY, DECEMBER 28, 1952 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE NINE















It was sometime in May 1951



Some Gld Places Visited And Photographed—1 SOME WARMING ADVICE BY A DOCTOR nn eee |



song HOW TO DODGE:







that a party of us pl ed te } ng nm were two Welling-

on a tour of some of the old $s tall the palms, but |
places of historic interest in the ape. by the trade j D :
Island; so resort was made to 1ese had beer

Volume one of the Journals of r party visit oc |
the Barbados. Museum and -His- 1951), Passing) BY CHAPMAN PINCHER Vitamins as specific protectiv
torical Society which contains a ar g a litter : igents against colds have also}
copy of the ‘Report of the C t we entered For the first time a doctor Ll re d. Yé¢t Cheney claim:|
mi‘tee appointed to enquire into he drawing-room,.a magnificent | comes forward to-day with some that some patients who were con
the present Condition of Historic aloon extending with various | sjear-cut advice on how t

> pre- sistently subject to colds have|

compartments over the greate?| vent and treat the colds which been « moplet.ly free from them]

Sites etc., in Barhados and to re-







































mation was forthcoming that it
has four massive walls inside
built crosswise. This residence is
said to be an old residence of the

of erection is unknown. It is
1eferred to as ‘Parham Park

century by the name of ‘The
Outlaw Downes,” who. wos the
then ownar, I* is stated tat this
wanton, act was performed be-
Willoughby family, and the date cause he wanted to be revenged

cn his ereditors.
Enquiries had been made



$ to

pecial sensitivity to such sub
tances brought on nose and eye
symptoms identical with those of
n inf *etious cold
| These cases benefited imme-
| jiately by treatment with anti-

port what steps should be taken I of the ground-floor storey- | make winter a misery for most for up to fourteen years since}

for their preservation,” dated Tt was filled with rare and curi~ | of ys king a large daily dose of

June 10th 1910. A route was C things, Bathered in the d After 25 years’ research vitamin A :

selected and the historical facts WHen-Suger Ww . a Some: Rt oat volving more than 60,000 patients Among precautions which

contained in this report were ty, and se sted we bie fei #, Marshall Cheney,aUsS ‘ople can take for themselves

typed out so that the party e; pic ures ; magh antes op physician, urges Brlish dock © Dr. Cheney recommends

would be able to make compari- “i eae There “had | ibandom the “nothing-I-can-do AVOID ov.r-tiring yourself

sons between now and _ forty ee sue ati in the. Wes: | *bout-it” attitude to colds by too many late nights, Un-

years ago. The facts relative to eet = a iy these isdasures In the Practitioner, a leading less you have a high natural
$ poe ye was taken Indies cient eo oun A bros British medical journal, he puts resistance, fatigue makes you}

arin . fneedims “y collecte —s , : * » more sceptib] < al

: on a “ah sar ados Diocesan ; ircase led up from the hall to | forward this argument me more su ceptible to attack,

9 Ee a ee E, Reece WARREN'S HOUSE x jes, out of which bed- | The attitude that a cold must 2. EAT plenty of protein—fish,
an . Clark-Hunt, while ong galerres, OM * : take its course is based on a false eggs, cheese, and what meat,
other notes were collected and daughter Elizabeth & his two cauee pone etree criticism in rooms opened a ‘aloe theory that all “colds” are caused you can g t—to increase your)
added. brothers John and saac the local press. However, the mur- baleonies & the os «microscopic germs call aty resistance ¢ issis

BS "an the morning of the 2Ist of | Thornehill.” vs a der of His Lordship ‘in Pt en x § n blinds. It was a_palace Bonny ia "hen ces a Ser ' hn, goer paste

«it . . . \ce 5 ve ¢ > >i Di

June, 1951, the party set out, and Timothy Thornhill’s son, Major- Park, Dublin, sometime after- with whicl ' eas os 6 pee treatment has yet been found, 3. AVOID chills, which drive}
the first place visited was “War- General Sir Timothy Thornhill, Wards awakened much syr ny oe Ve) Seal ee ne | In reality, the symptoms whic! the blood, with its protective
ren’s House.” This house is in is one of the famous Barbadians, 14 the people of Barbados tor his of those which had stirred . ae }we call “coids” can be caused t “anti-bodies,” away from the
good preservation on the out- His distinguished action against Widowed Lady. ‘ admiration of forelgr | of several different agents for se and throat—but do not
side; the present manager being the French placed him high on. Im 1879 the Princess Albert, Vie- trays in pe a aa 7, e hich remedies already exist wear much heavy clothing. |
out, no one could inspect the in- the list of famous of this Island, tor and George—afterward: Geor ie ara bes eee beatae ve In trying to find a cure ’ This Is Why |
terior of the premises. This The next point on the pro- V of England, etc., visited Barb > at W ety d Se tant = |the common cold scientists are I he -rtening report makes
house stands on approximately gramme was “Arnold’s Old Mill,” When on board the H.M.S. Buc- ot see apne ent ay hurr an | pursuing a phantom. ound. s nse to me |
four acres of land, mostly planted which is one of the oldest bits of chante, oat these B, ere ab + co os Aa y and could And in the process they have It explains many of the pecull-|
i é Q rees re s as , i i sla s . entertaine y the riggs y t is hac pe A setae s; a : il} : wi tt . Zl a.
wail bent Inwh Gat UF a a “ oh th 3 eee pe tt “9 FE rae Hil’ : “The ms ; ° t for ever. Something bet- | disc we pe = Ay sulpha drugs, ities . cold te some colds}

° e va- haps e ste m at é : or} eo. al ag cont n the ne t, ana “anti-histaminics,” all of allergic) ear u over-
hogany trees is one of the largest has borne this name from time that a once rare y Hill but als ey ties San ons which are effective in treating night while others (the infec-
remaining in the Island, Photos immemorial, One William Ar- corded by the historian eee ee ~ | some . ; "hey have us) linge for w 3: why
graphs were taken from > nold, Poyer relates, was the first Anthony Froude in his book = . ales. eee an” ceeeee pe ar Di ( eae oo k eine ome!
angles, also one of the entrance settler to land here from the English in the West Indies’; he vis- Hsving seen all that could bej (ir ot which are highly effec- brought hom: by your. children
to the living room, which has ihe ‘William and John’ in 1627. He tive in preventing other typ: 1d catch others. —
date ‘1686’ over the door. ched in 1688 and is buried at “All Dr, Cheney’s case r ¢ is how Puttu t idvice into action|

The next stop was made at Saints” Church in St. Peter. This one in every three pationt ’ 1 effort f th

t ‘Bagatelle House,’ wherg permis. mill is all that. remains of the ho complained of cor r but in the jen

8, sion was obtained to take photo- former plantation buildings, for tching cold proved to b ults might save h

’ graphs. This house is of massive it is related, that all were des- lergic” to hou dust, f ty your health, and the coun
construction, and although the troyed by fire by a well-known vowder, pollen, moulds or som ney
interior was not inspected, infir- character of the early eighteenth ngredient in their food, Their

Which Sort Do You Get?
fhe 60.000 patients studied by
Dr, Cheney showed that ai
industrial population falls in‘
four groups as regards suse>p
tibtlity to ecolds;—





















|histaminic drugs which are now CRrROMpP 2 with Near-nort re
House’ or ‘Little Parham,’ after the whereabouts of Arnol Till, vailable on a doctor’s prescrip- mode un of t
the English residence of Lord but no one in Bridgetown seemed on sr rent of tt}
Willoughby, a former owner. It to know exactly where it was So, .a 1 first step, Chen niotion Hith restetanea 4
is recorded that Lord Willoughby located: The road may showing idvises doctors to test all chronk ‘te Ig wenally ae 1 wit
of Parham—Governor of the a cross “Old Mill” in the vicinity j cold-cathers to discover wh.ther hieh restetanee te measles on?
whole province of - Carliola of Mount Progpect, this spot was | y are really suffering from momn
1649-1666, under the Earl of visited. After admiring the } ome allergy ,
Carlisle’s Patent—wrote in 1651 beautiful seenery of St. Andrew's | Cheney also claims that many GROUP 2, with good natura
; from “his house Barbados” to Sir from this section, enquiries were } nfectious colds are not caused | resistance, comprises abou
é George Ayscue (on board the made as to the name of the old BAGATELLE HOUSE | ‘iruses but by the much bigg« one-fifth of the population, Its
: Rainbow) in Speights’ Bay. mill; these brought forth the in- , | zerms called bacteri members have one or two slight
| The next point of interest on formation that this mill was not ited Barbados in 1887, and was seen of Farley Hill, the party then Such cases respond to treat colds every year,
i our programme was Jack Bay- ‘Arnold’s’ but Four Hills’ Planta- tertained by Sir Graham Briggs, proceeled to “Grenade Hall”, an} ent with penitillin, sulphona- GRrorp 8 — the average- re
f ley’s Hill or Mullins Fort but this tion old mill and works, and that 29d wrote— cid signal station and a relic of the ides, and other drugs which can ‘stanee group—contains about
was not visited as was proposed, Arnold’s Mill was “way back “After keeping by the sea for Military days of Barbados. This is |i}; bacteria, though they are haf the population, They
because it appeared to be sur- down de same road!” It was then 8" hour we turned inland, and just a ruin, but it is situated |-\coiecs against viruses he claim iverare two or three “stream-
* rounded by cane-fields, and was decided to continue on to “Far- 4! the foot of a steep hill we met about 950 feet above sea level, and | “Pellowing up this finding he em q year and usually con-
a not easily accessible. Records ley Hill”, the original home of ™Y host, who transferred me to there is a lovely view once oon 4$ | ried vaccines made from ba¢ treet measles, mumps, ant
* 7 hi s own carrii We had still gone beyond the copse of EERO -" | teria for immunisation against chicken-pox as children,
+ four or five miles to go through ny and other trees which now ob- 4 oa. phy were highly succ
i cane fields and ‘among sugar tructs the view at ground level. ful in mang cases, he reports GROUP 4, types, with poor
< mills. ; At the end of them Bs oy hotc graphs w ere taken ri ; | ' What To Do nacural resistance, mike ae
i came to a grand avenue of this rusn, and the party proceede¢ 7 y's cases show that peo the remaining 25 per cent.
4 bage palms, a idred o “Nicholas Abbey”. } Cheney's cases show sae They catch almost every cold
% dred and t1 fee |ple fall into the four — that’s going
4 The avenue led up to Sir (To be continued.) }shown on the right, as regard . L.E.S.
Graham’s house, which stands Next week—‘Nicholas Abbey’, All} their susceptibility to colds
800 feet above the sea. Th r- Saints Church, Carib Cave in}



: ne the fonder o the lease ° F a | ®
felsnd. ral bic a wit, Rouge Hall, and Aencide Mu sa A Poet Dies And
Leaves A Mystery

“ : HITE Is this, she asks, “In order to
Wren GAM "WHIT facilitate’ the gallant enterprises

PARIS of the masculine personnel of
\ MAN who electrified France jhe air force?”













| oh " i sing le > 1 e N inister coldly = a A Nee oe
| oe ae ee ie rty, and a 9 ae nadia women do| ALSO IN HALF POUND AND ONE POUND OVAL TINS
ty churned out lugubriou ot enlist to seek adventures of| salad

stalin, h : ” é EONS ONE ONE ENE ORE Oy as tated sates ac tt? ganas? mass 8s mast es ey,
I verses in praise of Stalin, has this kind.” at NIN DNDN DN IN DN IN IN INN DNDN DN DN ON BN ON NN INN ALY
just- died in Paris. He was 90 The Liberal Prince :
| year-old Paul El!uard As from to-day the number of
| Between the wars, Eluard waS yionayesques (citizens of Mon-
| France's greatest lyric poet. IN 406) will be increased from 3,500
lis last years, with painter 4, about 4,500. Reason: a decree



AARARAAS

Picasso and scientist Joliot fur by Prince Rainier of Monaco,
FOUR HILL OLD MILL he was one of the ama ; mending the existing law which
sctus its fi the Prench | ye, i a renner 8 f
state that as this spot commands the beautiful Farleyense fern Sou er basi , ey eee a ene a ge
a good view it was probably only (Adiantum Farleyense), for in His death was like an echo of citizenship is granted, Now
some signal station, It is near the grounds of this place are trees ri nite cums yaaa Weak cory two. generations (ere :.-Â¥8-
Bagatelle or ‘Parham Park’ Plan- planted by differert members of S Bon stu) weil ulosis, he was watch at Poul : a 1 eC
tation. the Royal Family incliding th ; st t ow falling ° . : mM W
, ‘ Seorg ing the first winter snow fé The news is hailed by a palace
coe, ae plage to ~. veer late King George V. outside his suburban. apartment sookesman as a sign of Prince
s Bennett’s House which was : A 4 : ] ACIP. ae Be ; : ,
aeneied about 1750, but to our QQ, arrival at ‘Farley Hill’ the when he collapsed and died, 7 Reinier liberalism and for-

day, with that passionate prid@ ward-looking views.”

great disappointment, this old only living things seen were a which France feels.for all its men

building had been pulled down peacock, peahen, aud a dog. Hav-



°Vear



nh buts : ; o peice 5 eattoelis whe sete * * of genius, no matter how way Quotes Of The Week |
ange weplased by # modern /bun= an teas Me ota enn Pee mene Cnr eee ae SEASION nbd yard, his death is mourned in Author ARMAND SALACROU: |
i Church was the having been granted this per- 1ewspapers which detested his | would never give a prize to u
faa 8 eka ‘tna ; a3 ‘ lities. book that confuses verbal por-
next on the list. ‘There is no re- mission by the wagging of the tail, “et Pe . sanes ; as
cord of the building of the first the party decamped from the car B.B.C. RADIO NOTES: s The Road To Stalin nography with genuine eroticism To all Our Customers and
Church of St. Thomas, but it ap- and proceeded on a tour of injpec- ~ Said Catholic writer Francol



pears to have been destroyed by tion. It was the first visit for most Mauriac: Politics simply do not MONSEIGNEUR GRENTE: The

T 7 .
the hurricane of 1675,” for the. of the party, and only one had ever New y ear Programmes xist for me in this matter. For yirtuous man is one who never
_#

Minutes of the Vestry for 14th ceen the cork tree and the Cam- my generation he was not only a way to temptation. The

Friends





February 1676 state— “That the phor tree which grow in the : : 1 isstue f” ‘Bporting: Review! |“ nm, poet, but poetry itself.’ fhy Aaa IE NO Ds 7 ma

Parish Church be erected in the grounds of this mansion. The pres- Including Message From 34! /ssue of “Sporting eee ; But the mystery remains: Why now what ten vtatior (

same place where it was former- ent building is not of any great Oliver Lyitelton aoe re Saree faa aviepads did this . passionate eae Smoke KNIGHTS DR G STORES
ly and that the dimensions be age, for it was largely rebuilt and Included in the mat Na present at these events, MS} and ingrained individualist em- Smoker U

Programmes to ws nda ; t 7.45 p.m, on Saturday,| brace a cause which, until the

54 x 40 from outside to out.” This enlarged by Mr. Graham Briggs, Yea;




































(AVE SHEPHERD & C0., LID, _ =e

10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street.





* I t ‘ i , I isitor oO : ari Felina] ¢
Church was completed in 1680, a very wealthy Barbadian, for the from London is a Wateh-nic! u- Ww ict Steed wer, np, Gorpiee t oH 1S oi ty’ ne ! this wank bs \ pr PANE WA WANA CA WA WACK CR WARK
was damaged by the storm of entertainment of Prince Alfred, Service from the Chureh of ickham Steec in. 1935 he wrote OW hoc seo 5 V < Saw ¢ AWK ' WAVAYA YA VA YAN
1731 and demolished by the hur- Duke of Edinburgh, who visited ya, fpnnet a ld ae h Fill Another talk erie vhich be-] detest the Soviet idolatry of Smoking, ; | €4 NG NG NZ NS NGS 3% GNBNG NG 8G NG) .
ricane of 1780. Barbados in 1861 while on board } broition BARS Sa ten n i tl coming week is| Stalin.” t oy, ee eeeee AEN ee camei- - —_— * ~ ;
tande the St. George. Mr. Briggs was wednesday. 31st The S. : tem ‘ by Wickham]. in 1952 he began a poem with coloured jacket and wearing da
The present Church now stands created a Baronet ten years later. of Stat. for the Col snioe th, pr steed.” As our readers doubtlese|the line: “Stalin to-day dissi la , was led in by her Bel
a little to the westward of the ~ {pn 1872 Lord Frederick Cavend- Hori. Oliver Lyttelt tghs ord Ir. Steed w formerly | pates all our unhappines in owner, M, Mullet, He «
former Church, on the site of the ish paid a visit to Barbados. He 1 a New - +) vi dig alae itor of ‘The Tin , lecturer in He joined the Communist plained that Yoghi wore dark
old Rectory which was also des- was greeted in royal style by the coneing rt if ifn ee ne oe Central Buropean ‘History at}Party in 1942 while he was a gl ; on the advice of a Swi
troyed in 1780. The change left people of St. Peter; for they erect. Meena et 10.15 p.m., also on th Kir College. London, and a| leading Resistance worker. It veterinary surgeon
¢ exposed certain grave stones eq Triumphal Arches along the “!S'. Two programmes to be wiar~ broadcaster on . world e him a Cause but clearly While he was introducing her,
: which must have been inside the qriye from Speightstown to Farley ' reer te events fairs for the BBC. Now 81 yeara| killed him as a poet. M. Mullet passed her a_ tiny
4 older Church, One in particular }4j)|, along which route he was ©! 1952, vith the oe nn Y eer Z sala | Ye Tan bey ise cigarette (‘‘cat-sized,” he ex-
' ; $e ; i is i a great deal and} Pept. Of Enterprise ;
‘ is of more than passing interest: escorted by gentlemen on horse- ! aveudiiine of many A Parla. women counbilior. ha lained), with a red tip, Yoghi
Here lyes interred the boddy back. This display by a Liberal imtrod Bie ie I eee y ae 1 ms a 7 ee eat am ea ie hiareon Hay pe s ita
of Major Gennerall Timothy such as Sir Graham Briggs Thor 1 yew Ye ns 7 wae tha Ae 4 } altet Wee, ee We. eran eave M. Mullet lit th (saveatin tan Was
Thornehill who departed the whose uncle Mr. Thomas Graham the Secretary of Me. PASTOR Y Ps ; ny ie t = i of Pe Ee ae ag ep M. Mi 1 ee : ont ¥ ht ae
hae » ac cewise + ore me catec ha p> onie that i € y while e has met many o volunteers or 1e Frenet I Mulle aid that 3
first of August 19S] as thee Y Se Briggs had F din i A ; ra or g t figures of the day. He} WRAFS are required to be insured with Lloyd’ because of
the boddyes of his two wifes sembly the giving of the ‘oath’ to | ing 10.30 par The sec f is eee y | Z 1 v ‘loy d's
boeth named Sussanna & his free coloured people in 1804, and of the programmes rev on Pues« lys at 10.15 p.m. | Un narried widow or r emokine habits
eldest sonn Thimothy & his had subsequently lost his seat— sporting events of 1952 in a spec. been on the 30th inst | divorcees, WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED
So, WU BG NG WGN NG NN 8 NW NN NN WN NN Be | {
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we Yes *
S To All Our Friends and Customers Sif; SUM time: to protect. your good |
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Whe iciaiiieiiinicitiaaie pe Agents.

xs




PAGE TEN



OLYMPIC STORY—X

THE CLOSING CEREMONY

he

last

h
of my

So today I rea
final instalment
Story. The swimming eve
ended on Saturday, August
and the next day we all crowde*
into the Olympic Stadium to

and the Closing Ceremony.

On she afterr that
swimming finals there
indeed a full programme for

idition to five final t th
there was a
between Hur
followed by
it the indoor h
called

on the

ended

Football
id Yug
boxing

Fing

ot




final

all
in Finnish,

as it was

While
Stadium and
garian Nalic
was played twice
help fe pap
Borrow thal a gr
was coming to an end
garian Aninem is th






SWwimmins
Hua-

which

ald

Siti ne

g to

ur
en ine

| Anu





not



or
experience

Phe

ol



Hun-



eV
zest

neard,
of the
more of
song, it
first class classic
me think of

We hac
familiar
ming events

* the Hur
on : }
lashion







w



in devasia ing
last day the



at the Vict














ee
the finals of the Equestrian events

Vas
in

pool
i

or Messuhalh,

and
Olympic

i

ce
sae

ao"
eo

THE CLOSING CEREMONY of the Olympic Games at Helsinki



tremendous cheer r

ceremony. when we went would represent their countries
over to the ll Finul in 1¢ en-bloc in any competition, pro-
Olympic Stadium we heard » fessional or amateur

anthem again after the match wa It would indeed be very sur-
won very c¢ incin by e prising if Sritain ever won the



‘ery agile Hungarian team

For myseif I thought the foot-
ball was of a very nis
but the nexi day
to relate, I heard
press mem pulling
it had been a t
all the most r
they found to n ne
was that the match was too fast
The English seem to fee! that t
he some absolute right over
Soceer andit must not be pl
on anything but the Ey
ground. Contequently they regard
Soccer in Europe or
America, which often playe
on ground as hard as Kensington
in the light of a children’s gar



I









most 6&¢





Impressive Player

One of the most impressive
players in the Clympic Football
Final was the Hungarian captain
Puskas. He scored the opening
goal for Hungary and many times
drew rounds of applause by his
clever passing and dribbling. But
for this he earned only the ire of
my friend, the British critic, who
said “if those continentals came
to England we would soon put a
stop to Gil this fancy footwork
stuff.” Inshave- no. doubt © they
would, The ground would be like
glue and the ball like lead. *

It must not be imagined of
course that our British friend
was annoyed because Great Bri-
tain was knocked out in the flr
round by Luxembourg. This defent

st

occasioned no great surprise be-
cause Britain, like most of the
Western Countries, suffers in a
game like Soccer due to thei:
strict observance of the amateur
rule. As everyone know’, ama-
teur football is way below the
standard of the professional ga:

in Britain. Most of the con-
tinental countries however have

completely different way of in-
terpreting the amateur rules for
the Olympies and the bulk of the
teams that™“ played fi Ital

Hungary amd Yuvoslavix w

made up of men who played for



t

these countries in the Professior
World Championships In fa
the Hungarian and Yugoslav team






Olympic football cha
der th

countr

pionship un-
se circumstances. Another
which suffered in this re-








was Brazil. One of the
leading soccer countr
id to be satisfied with
ce to countr like Swed
ny, and Austria as i
the two mentioned above who m
the final

The Jumpers
Turning to the very last event




the programme, I must say
that before I went to Helsinki I
had never seen genuine show
jumping of any kind. A few law
hurdles in an odd event at our
local Gymkhanas was the sum
otal of my experience with tnis
sport and of course While our local
riders may be quite good their

horses are not, and jumping takes
specially trained horses to do the
job properly. Not only must they
be specially trained but only the
best an temperament as well
technique qualifies a horse as
go0d jumper.

as
a

In all the sports which horses
take part, Jumping I think poses
the greatest test. The jumper may
not necessarily have to be a thor-

“ughbred, He can be a hunter or
an Arab cross. But I would say
his intelligence has to, be far

above the average which we asso-
ciate with those in the racing
game.

Before going to Helsinki I had,
quite frankly, expected that jump-
ing, or any kind of horse show
other than racing, would bore me
[ was so completely wrong that
as I sat in the Olympie Stadium
it was as if I kept asking myself:
“well where have T been all my
life?”

The Grand Prix des Nations or
horseback jumping event consist-
d of 13 jumps or obstacles vary-
ing in height from 130 centimetres

to 160 centimetres, ie, 4 ft. &
inches to 5 feet 3 inches. There
was one wids water-jump and

one narrow water-jump behind a

hurdle. They started on the grand
stand side ran up the length of
the centre field taking two low
jumps, turned left and went across
to the other side. They took a
sharp left turn again gnd then
ran diagonally across the field

back in the direction of the grand

; stand

two double
single. They then turned
right, went across to the
other side again and ran up the
length of the field taking four
jumps including two low hurdles
and the narrow weter jump which
for the purposes «f the comypeti-
tion were counted as one obstacle.
Therefore on this _ particular
tretch there were only two ob-
stacles although four actual leap:
were required to clear them.
After this they turned right
ran across to the grand stand side,
made another sharp right turn
and ran diagonally across the
field taking four jumps, two clos«
doubles (counted as one obstacle),
p high single and triple bar-
rier, They then turned sharp left,
ran across to the grand stand side,
turned left again and ran up the
length of the field taking the wide
water jump andaéeé very high
solid gate jump. After turning
left to go across the field on the
way out there was one final double
jump just before the finish. They
ntered and left by the marathon
gate opposite the grand stand.

taking jumps
and a

sharp

a

Intelugence And Endurance

I have never seen such intelli-
gence and endurance exhibited by
horses in my life. What also im-
pressed me was the behaviour of
the crowd. It would be impossi-
ble to hold a horse show of this
kind in Barbados because it would
be a physical impossibility to keep
the spectators quiet. e Finns
were not accustomed. to horse
shows and when the Grand Prix
des Nations started they cheered
one or two of the first riders over
some particularly difficult jumps.
But the anneuncer soon put them
right by speaking over the public
address system and after he asked

for absolute silence during the
jumps, once or fwice, they co-
operated in the grand manner

Cheering is allowed only between
(he completion of one jumper'’s
round and the commencement of
the next. As the riders often met
each other at the gate this meant

short sharp bursts of cheering and |

lapping and the crowd kept it

up well. In a stadium with 70,000 |
people one could have heard a pin
l-op while each jumper went
!. rough his paces.

Tuere were 48 competitors in
the final and the individual com-
petition and the team competition
were decided together. Each
nation sent three competitors with
she exception of Japan, Korea and
Finland.



1a) Son Kills
inflicted two wounds on his wife Identification

ubove the right side of her chest
and below the left breast.

5 Xmas Tragedies In B.Guiai

(From Our Oy spondent)

GEORGETOWN, Dec







The Christm: holiday The cou i ii

; : ‘ 3 ie ple were married E
marred by five tragedies April this year. Mrs. Wang = xpert
o'clock on Christmas eve mo the sister of Iyella Stephenson
Adolphus “Shadow” Harris, who ; to have fought for the HOMESTEAD, Fla., Dec. 27.



years old, colony soccer star who ;, l
representet, B.G. against Trinidad
and Surinam died at the Public

lightweight boxing cham.
pionship here on Boxing Day, but
he Boxing Board two days ago

|
|



ef Windsor to assist with the




hospital in Georgetown celle ‘eam castes
seeks after he 5 rf knocked down cancelled his promoter’s licence, | Oakés murder case in 1943, was
ene eacsid Vea yee : Upper Corentyne was shocked | shot to death to-day by his son,
ee See : nh Christmas Eve morning when | James O. Barker, jr. The police
ad with the corpses of Adonis and Rajpo- | said young Barker admitted the

» two watchmen of the P.W.D. | shooting and that there has been
found
wheels
bodies

ina
with

“caravan” office on}! ang son for sometime.

wounds on their/ |
| Barker, who testified that he

“ | found the fingerprint of Alfred de |
On Christmas Day Charles Ban- | Marigny, son-in-law of Sir Harry
arswee, motor car owner and | Oakes on the screen beside the |

driver of the Essequibo coast, died} bed of the slain man, was tried by

.round )
Eve Ura Wong, :

found bleedin
scious on the s
town home
hospital but









jeorge-

hed her to











oe ores ten minutes after admission to the International Association of |
weahi aetonke: ; hospital. Banarswee met his death | Identifieation on charges of falsi-
pipe. SS caetien a hen his ca crashed on to a para-| ‘fving fingerprint evidence, but
c red jum with the murd tt after he had Jost his control

the charge was later arenes

Police alleged that
BUBBA ENE:
; all ita
y
=

the husband of the vehicle.



Ce

F

RA
5G NS NB Ws A

We Extend to our Friends and

Customers Sincere Wishes for a

HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS
NEW YEAR

The Barbados Foundry Lea.

FADIA PRGA DA ATS Dh TS TN DATE K
NGEG NE NENG 5 NG NE NENG NE GEA



j Gi NIN GN ENS DEGN QUIN ES ES ENE ONE

APRA LS RNA NING N NRE INNS



a
PAN

James O, Barker, Police Identi- | @
fication Expert called by the Duke |

Corentyne road programme were} family feuding between the father }





'

|
j



SNS BSNENANE NS NSE NS SN NN

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

By Trevor Gaizc



although Colonel
Llewelyn on Foxhunter received
al) the publicity in the British
papers it was largely due to Wil-
frea White that they won the com-
petition. White dropped only four
points in his two rounds while
Foxhunter lost 16% in the first
round in the morning. Col. Liew-
elyn afterwards said he knew
Foxhunter was not himself the
moment he got on his back that
morning. But in the afternoon he
came back and had the crowd 1
ecstacies with a faultless round.
Col. Stewart on Aherlow also did
very well losing only 16 points
The British therefore won the last
gold medal to be competed for at
the Olympic Games of 1952. But
for the Winter Games it was their
only one.

Closing Ceremony

The closing ceremony was as
impressive if not as crowded as
the opening. Only the flag bear-
ers and not the entire teams were

petition and







marched into the stadium, 1
order being the same as for the
wpening ceremony 1°. the Greek
flag leading ana the flag ot the
host country, Finland, bringing
up the rear. The others were in
Finnish alphabetical order which





would have to be studied for hours
to be understood

The standard bearers aitet
marching around the track line‘
up in front of the Tribune of Hon-
our and Mr. Sigfrid Edstrom,
President of the International

Nearly all the jumping was good Olympic Committee, together with
and there were only two falls Mr, Brik von Frenckell, President
both by Russian Officers. It was of the Organising Committee and
the only time I ever noticed a Mr, Eero Rydman, the Mayor of
Finn show his feelings tawards Helsinki, all advanced to the Tri-
the Russians, I could not help no- Lyne of Honour. The Greek flag
ticing my companions obvious * i .
delight when the Russians felj off. “85 ee, > ae ao otha
Nevertheless the riders were quite "ational anthem of that country,
good and I sus h this being done to commemorate

8 suspect that the fault 4 :

was really with their nicunts, the Greek origin of the Olympic
; Games. Then the Finnish and
Frenchman Outstanding Australian flags were hoisted i)

To pick out the outstanding tur to the accompaniment =!
rider and horse the Frenchman their respective anthems, these two
Jonqueres d’Oriola on Ali Baba countries being first the host
was far and above anybody else. country and the one in which the
Five of them were tied at the end next Games will be held.

yf the two rounds and therefore .
here had to be a jump off. This Mr. Edstrom then mounted tne
was over 6 of the most difficult Tribune of Honwiir and the littic |

speech he made is best quoted a: |
it signifies in precise manner the

sbstacles and the height was rais-
ed from 4 ft. 6% ins. to 5 ft. 10%

ins. In case of a further tie, after closing of the games and the call
he “jump off’ was completed, it for future Olvmnies. Here it is:
was given out that the competitor j
via the fastest time would be the “In the name of the Interna-
lumer. tional Olympic Committee. 1 offer
to the President and the people of
The Frenchman was the first Finland, to the authorities of the

out and decided that it was all City of Helsinki and to the organ-
speed or nothing. His mount never isers of the Games our deepest
made a false step and he flew gratitude, I declare the XVih'
ver the obstacles like a bird on Olympic Games closed and, in ac- |
the wing. The others, of course, cordance with tradition, I cali,
tried to follow him but made too upon the Youth of every country |
many errors. QO. Cristi of Chile to assemble in four years at M |
was second and his horse Bambi bourne. May they display at the |





was the one I liked most in th® fulness and concord so that the
whole show. Thiedemann of Gér-- Olympic torch may be carried on
nany was third while Wilfred with ever greatér eagerness, cour-
White on Nizefella came fourth. age and honour for the good

The British won the team com- humanity throughout the ages.”



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THE SHIRT

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Aes SUNDAY, DECEMBER 28, 1952 SUNDAY ADVOCATI










OO YOU LiKE my S
NEW HAT. DEAR ?

ate’
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Dear Mother






















PAGE ELEVEN

ADVOCATE BRIDGE
by M. Harrisen-Gray











nh
e , > , ’ a ° 3 a
BERNARD WICKSTEED writes home from Korea | of ’
re » XN e @aAKQY6: BV KB YQ 2;
} @AYS &
f « rgn “ q} e @I545,;9 AIT, @ KRIS;
i Y ou Should Hav « Joing ( ul aks’
7 es , T i ' Tl : Otl . N iot i x * : .
f | ugh Wwe ust be dead three
\ rip 1¢ ler ~ 12 Li time ver, but the major mn gS tee at
\ Came wo life
a2 : i I
] ; j KOREA. Well, Mother, war is war, and y |
—_— = = — , oe é; EAR MOTHER eddunbee son he bt te ae anmbeed tet a spe ney laugh K ‘
a - muaericesce™ : ld blac ; r you have to be prepared for that BLASTED Gunners,” he said ; :
| ’ s / 2 ay cree pane now We sort of Ortop if you want to dine “That's their idea of a Funny | Ne ured
| r ise Oo cre¢ lon € country with colonels, but wasnt reacy Joke.’ Dian
OW oll on ji roads in a car at night, with only for what happened next. We were rote ‘ . K
ja tiny strip of light showing and negotiating a tricky corner, wi h ' ‘ ve got = verry a. |S z i f
e you hanging out of the window me hanging out of the side say- “'0e the road here, eng Wey Was} mquyln Kinz-@ :
Zoot-suit ; to tell us when we went in the ing Over your way. Over yout till some unsuspecting type 6 mies sea tient ae Q
i Ss rica m way. There’s a 50ft, drop on this long in the black-out and then let Sout would
- Well, they } 1 black-out or side,’ when all of a sudden thee Off a salvo over his head.’ )
a | t id behind t ront nes was a bang like the crack of door, From the darkness eal w 1
Iva 72 Sets here, and I can tell you it is far ® ud the air was filled with the of demoniac laughter aang ts
LONDON “He had time to act before Mau | w« than it eve V t hon rs
Leading Britis! newspapers of Mau was ever heard of He has} be ise there i nearly always a hh Abo t The Cats .
o fe all part re caustic when they had time to act since. He has done ( on Hie as d Uu , 4 A weee - ’
a . : i on ( ther o i9 North u
2 oO ic 1a learn that the Royal Commission neither ( id a
a ; 3 not : - ge t they pi H has 1 tra + failure I t front DO you remember last time I place of rat as quick ¢ the D
My Nac een pro to grast he measure ¢ the - ws eet? - > a fA > » { mel r
; e w S Mathie - tecan $e atte a Jeep w imajor was here I told you there € Piper of Hamelin D
carpet ng rere oe De ly Mirt . atic Si wheel We were going » cats in Korea? A Korean said But when it did turn up it was 1
i t heading “Slow Mo- Mite ell * fi ili fe r “do | See, the Royal Fusiliers, The color they must have all been eaten 1 the smallest kitten ever we ined —_
tion the Liberal Manchester ng in the face of the in isked u to line in hi dugout Well, Mother, you'll be glad to and no larger than a tennis ba . eke
| Guardian compared the Colonial ¢ the Colonial Office.” ‘Lights out hear that now the cats are comit isp: t 1 to
His hair is plastered with brti Office to the Mills of God, and ccused him of making a YOU drive on the wrong side of back to Korea, 1 had one in m Kitten hunt o-gan I
ee ae ee l irene ne, it 1 on his retirement when Mr. | the road here, you know, as they tent last night It wa fte the THE other way of getting into
ott _ | r. Lyttelton’s deci ton was in his audience|do in France, We were all right till rat .. : : i
his shining sho 0 }nounced on September 1M smmarkably reassul ve got to a noti sayin *AlL the Korean Cat Club is to go on F I )
Hts © Updy mou h Roy ‘ommission shot Ry an ate eameags PREY Sau | cam ats ie ag ned It was a great black and whie a kitten hunt and bring one back .
be 7 mMens ’ H that a Royal Commission sh ing ab ss of Kenya i! ‘ beyon this point. I
tice th acne... ile ; be appointed warmly we Sir PI . Mivror..‘did And than te die Bedab thing, wild as a mountain alive, It is quite as dangero t I ‘
terest is jazz must ih comed and the not take the chance to ring any! “I ne hnban: this round we leopard, and she bared her tee:h -game hunting in Africa respond t aie
cult for ¢t re Lin ments putforward la elis.’ my oT ¢ 7 d spat at me If you can capture a to Ir he ri
K Philij it . : With all these rats around evcn patrol your commandin fl : :
haps tl el uld no It summed uf “Events have Like the back of y hand, it is welcome, so I hope nearly pleased as if
beer if it had beer p- proved that this delay and inac-/ said, and went ay . tl n tame her t 1 brought in a Chinese I
preciated that the best part a tion were disastrous. ‘ barbed wire round a minefiek ‘ ble oO e Korean Cit In our camp we are lucky. We *
year had pas 1 since the arg Liberal News Chronicle A bit further on he stopped Club have a complete family ; ;
had be en address¢ d to him.” ex red itself toa eens ery ide a signpost at the top of a hill set ‘ cats living under the floorboard Hearts. , 1
ee adde a Eve n nQw, more than It is ° pity that his SUB~ | and asked me to get out and Mm a new er © of the officers’ mess, and the kit )
B - ee ’ ne the Raval oe was not acted upon eal | what it said. I shone my torch on boy ve started for resto taris ave. worth a hottie of% v
is only interest Jazz and oy. u a } sion is ne a ; in - ng, . les it and read: “Drive slowly. Dust land with cat Apiece
anda.” The draminn Sah 1 ’ ir tion t s a head and tern aa ® 7 no 1 so mar a e
Ma os The drawing ts Russic part t referer a fs ) heis wr It used more of its leader col- i ets. A ae I know } Pc . ¥ any If they fetched the same pr a
STOCKHOLM eg SUCUr Ee. & The Gu conceded that the umn to point out that the publica- 1 thoug that 5 what it wa 7 in his ¢ oc . ane es } at home we'd do well with ou ,
Wednesday 3 ee ‘ Commission would have to deal tion of Sir Philip’s report put paid |said the major This is the point the side of a mountain, that he sent 5)q tabby. wouldn't we? ar
P NIVERSIT Y= ch things neg ect he! with long-term problems but in- to a “whispering campaign 1in/ where we are under direct ene an urgent message to a friend in Well, Mother, that’s all now I \
students in Russia tt die and “at al Avs at th ‘sisted: “The delay is regrettable Kenya” which had it that ed — [eee vorre Re ites Be t moving 7° to send him a cat by air- wate ltt a
dream about “the SRP Sern ree ie itt the et ee balan ili | ‘We h a "t ae AL h furth a . Aso TNs
, eatn SL ‘ ; aan one ich her 1 1
divine” Linda Darnell, CHE WING | “The establishment of the Royal His “masterly survey of the | wher there was a whoomph be All the time they were waiting war correspondent a3 hd eo
sing Western jazz tunes \ | Commi ma be only a pre- com plex problems besettin€|pind us just where we'd stopped for it to arrive he used to Say ce 3
and show a marked liminary step. But what advance Kenya,” said the Chronicle, “could | «pgjq you so.” said the major non. he boy Just wait till that eat BERNARD
: . t o wen » if eve > preli n- mis . ee writte ys n-| 7 : Rit sa) ce ‘ ron . le pm ‘a
preference for the n do we rey ; hav = = oF ly have been written by and \ |chalantly Chinese © Ohestwinnte from Japan, We will rid the Lut
> “ bywaite arv step is so slowly made derstanding man w a life eT... Ph th :
knee-long.< soot ” ‘suit | _ The Conservative Daily Express experience in African service.” awe * shel) _ vie o
and are about to get manded “Why the hold-up?” The paper added this comment on ger ‘than our'¢0-pounder. Quit
a resounding kick in | __ It, too, wanted to know why the “There are two common delu- |*ective
their extra- narrow Colonial Office had taken thirteen gions about Africa. One is that} |
pants for doing so. months to reveal the warning the European farmer is an inter- |



}sounded by Sir Philip. And 1
|the Manchester Guardian it drev



and the other is that every |
African has a god-given right to



lope



foreign-made $



























ved ¢ Doritos of . tremendously ccited |attention to the fact that after so own a bit of Africa
Sovie vommunist Ou 2. Abduliavev ves n | long the Royal Commission i till “ As Sir Philip says, the Whites
Organisation (Kom- restauran and a good bodyles ‘ ttled there and built
somol), is curr pub Th umpa:gn ra an inter who have settlec rere n6, me
Ushing a serie articles yoint How did the | The Labour Daily Herald devot- 1? aye soca ab tik Maaek aes
which bring startling and the “Linda cu ed its entire leader column to an MUCH 4 De er eT Eee,
revelations about the real prey tO yeperae attack on the Colonial Secretary, Wher? else in the world does f land
attitude of the Russi Per 7 eons % > | rounding-up with a demand that man expect to have a piece of lanc
youth to the cultural r Alara Sationed iff Berlit lhe should quit his post. as his right
mentation imposed by Vienna, maybe through S ;__ Six Phoip’s advice, said the The Conservative Daily Graphic
regime : ) reign diplon 7 San Herald ‘was all the more remark- ceompletely ignored the delay in |
Che newspaper recently published ‘ a : lable since yreviously he had py hliching the re = :
a@ cartoon showing " the perfect y 4 ; ; I ; publishing the repor |
finished type of fore “Bs eem It ma hought the appointment of such It said: “There have heen many |
s personified bv « group of with the desp }a Commission inopportune. unjustified attacks on Mr, Lyttel-
oe “stylish” students ai the le jazz mus KE Of Mr, Lyttelton’s part in what ton and the men on the spot in|
Molotov University in Rostov. sale Ovie apd de, He = bre Mau Muddle"” the Kenya. This White Paper shows |
eof at | Herald — statec 10) shtened is their thinking | ;
ae LANGUID ’ “4 | “Mr. Oliver Lyttelton, Colonial BOW Ane | BECAUSE UPON THE CONDITION
ts bee: Lond pr | Secretary must shoulder the grave | OF THE KIDNEYS RESTS HEALTH
And this 1s how this Soviet-bred 7 |responsibility for this “ineredible “But there can be no progress lL HAPPINESS = LIFE ITSELF, /
ie university spiv is deserit | story of delay. till Mau Mau is stamped out.” £
- . a . IKE EVERY EXPERIENCED DOCTOR
2 weeenseee PTT re A AnOe CARER OR EERE NERO EDS RE EES E EERE TAD OR ROE OCEREE BREEDERS COEUR SEER ER EE EHH iy | oa iN MAKING A DIAGNOSIS
‘





| MUST FIRST FIND OUT THE
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tR STUFF .... . by GILES



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PANIES WONT INSURE A
PERSON WHOSE KIDNEYS
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YES THE DOCTORS
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If you don’t feel well look first to
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WAY



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GREETING

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The Management and Staff of

= BARBADOS HARDWARE

NEW YEAR

We wish all our ,Customers
and Friends
a very

PROSPEROUS NEW
YEAR

(().. LED.

Wish

¢
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Cur Customers and Friends of new colours, an op
model, invitation to slic
super car and drive int

of achievement!

SPLANTATIONS LIMITED.

Bridgetown & Spcightstown

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A Prosperous
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PAGI

TWELVE



SUNDAY ADVOCATE

A PLAQUE MARKS THE SPOT... |
A careless ——

historian—

say historians

against Jam

roude that his
History of England from the
Fall gf Woisey to the Defeat

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 28,



o> PROT

HON!







f the Spanish Armada is
inreliable
Was admirably written
nd brought him great
ywn, but, sav other his
orians, Froude handled the
facts somewhat carelessby










go at all the popular
for Old Year

tion over the Powers ot

If you feel ‘tootired’ to enjoy life as you should,
Darkness, as typified by the

too listléss to take a keen and happy interest in

the same year.

: Evil ways



!
|
2 a . : The, plaque (arrowed) shows
endeavouring to support his > a :
own theories rather than to where Froude lived
follow the documents from us great friend, Was also /
which he compiled the work ¥ rously attacked, 1s
Froude himself admitted ude was born at Dart- Tt
that the dramatic poet “is ngion Rectory, Devonshire PART TIME
not bound, when it is incon- n April 1818, hi father.
venient, to what may be called Robert Froude, being arch-
the accident of facts.’ leacon of Totnes Mr. THERM
The truth is that ne was In January 1830, he went to ensures a good time m bal ty gue!
more concerned to represent Westminster School, and for al. You'll fine No ore after for fati ,
the triumph of the Reforma- yecame a King’s scholar in ee ee wre

Pope and Philip of Snain.



























and about 20 trifling sl
and that fs all that the




and

d ou, this advertisement
sane ‘ In Shadows of the all that goes, on around y ~
Trifling slips Clouds, published {n 1847 + sidiiieetaiecees has good news for you.

In a letter e Sir he =: Froude tells the story of if) ee he ell During the last twenty years, countless numbers of i
Skeiton in justific on for fdward Fowler who ’ * < ! or tl vorld have preved that, if you

\ enew oF : - : ’ ‘ people all over the world have preve »W 3 s
oF gamer) hae eceltful. is sathoved, eee | TODAY'S NEWS FLASH take Phyllosan tablets regularly, your steady g

é owe € f is removed, goes. tx ( r r . s f hed

mistakes in the whole bc where he falis litte gain in vitality, energy and cheerfulness will

BRITISH CARS 1952 i} : y
engages in a A delight both you and your friends. To regain

affair Specifications and

; 4 sal y , ou
utmost malignity has dis 1e story was Sala to Photographs your joie de vivre, to fee! youns ey. eee
covered ‘semble Froude’s own exper!- full of energy again, start taking
nees, but there is little sub- Au Interesting Book for Phyllosan tablets to-day! —_ Gea
ance {n this contention Motorists
At Oriel College he was

regarded as a recruit for the
‘ractarians, Yet, despite his
‘other's connection with the

: | PHIYLLOSAN





ovement, James Anthony : â„¢ 7
ver he ner we JOHNSON’S STATIONERY .
Prcuda tas. to Sitetih.
LEER.
a

Charles Kinysley, and {t was
t Kingsley'’s house that he
Mrs. Kingsley’s sister,

» original of the Argemone
! Kingsley’s Yeast, and
married her in October 1849

A plaque, recording the
fact that Froude lived there,
is on No. 5, Onslow Gardens,
Kensington,





1et













LEFT: Full length evening coat in seaweed green net.

— WONDER WHEELS N° 4
RIGHT: Ballerina evening dress with cellophane

Why Hercules cycues
arrive in Barbados
in perfect condition

itraw top and net skirt.

Not Silk Or Satin—But Straw

: TV SHAPES,
eA FASHION |

express Servies

Airliners
Airport

By Dorothy Barkley

LONDON quilted = satin,
There’s nothing new under the pink lining.

sun” so the saying goes, Often 1953 Day Styles
this is applicable to the fashion dipping ‘into ‘the



with a geranium

The special Hercules packing

methods — the result of 30 years
Also future |





id, /Stol ieee study of packing for countries
world, Styles, new at first glance, gor 1953 fashions was the house | * rell-
wor = som a ag ae of Marcus. Styles mostly fol- | overseas —ensure this. The en
ration trom clothes worn maybe lowed ‘the ‘same basic line. and| f wra d parts are placed carefully
by Queen Victoria, the Empress vere eminently wearable.” For'| ° a \ pped part 7
Josephine or the Gauchos of Mex- the line was giver eiiths xe Buyers Unlikely At £10,000 Each in strong cases so that they can be
ico,

|
of last year’s petticoated fulness. |
of the|









A Iona fast aid Skirts, though, were not HURN AIRPORT (HANTS). The Star Lion, heavily pink simply, safely and correctly as-
dl on asnion aesigner ’ 7 op s A dma le x ; off . jac > mitre 7 ¢ e
turned the ‘tables this week by the tight, straight, ‘hobble’ vari- eoaik ac ob aaitbler wreck ane whieh pes Wiis Bharehat sembled on arrival at destination.
: S : a 7 * ety. The tained ¢ on | a group net 7 Be “ = a
putting a common material to an Tide ne ‘still had ae a of Hurn Airport. They are num- Bennett took on a goodwill tour
uncommon use. His suggestion Soom” far walking Pits. wil bered among the 14 Tudors which to South America in 1947.
for an evening dress was not aac hy knife pleats All towid the Minister of Civil Aviation With no buyers likely, even at
silk, or satin—but straw. ¢_ groups of pleats within pleats. | (Mr, Lennox-Boyd) told the the rock bottom price of £10,000,
And here it is—in gunmetal Basically simple dresses always Commons he was anxious to sell the Tudors an likely to stay at
grey, teamed eik: a "balletleneth require stylish accessories Sug- for ve Oy Fhe, each (cost Hurn.—L.E.S.
gr y net skirt, to prove it. (Illus- #€Stions here included rolled o build th £ le . at ——$___$_—_____
at, The” , akesk idian-style | » of the four, its name “ey
trated). The full-skirted baller- *"a@keskin belt Ind style | One o ; :
P or A ah choker necklace closefitting to} almost obliterated by the weath- Gy
iar a iac See Je oer the neck, and contrasting colour- | er, is the Elizabeth of ae WEDDING
fend PD AGaIst NEW LASIOnS 1 overskirt or bolero | which Princess Elizabeth chris-
mut spoies Freeh and charming into Two new colours for tropical- | tened with a bottle of Empire BOYCE—ARCHER
sal ni i weight tailored suits were ‘‘desert | wine in 1947—the flag aircraft of . ‘m
Pa Ss the re traditional types 52nd ind “marine whi . ule ge bo
of es ae Revi ee To look cool on a hot day, one Tudor fleet, took place on Christmas Day at

pri PACKING AND
been neglected, For those ignor- ©4@ -wear an ivory silk dress The ceremony took place at the Providence Methodist Church






































1 { Ai id ch { at 9 a.m, when Mr, Ernest Boyce CUPATCH CEPARTMEN)
: yn , e ack ec » t i i . t *heers and at 9 a.m, Mr, Ernest B
ing fashion’s eccentricities, there ant ee a a eg es rather ee ee T ‘vlaieea of “Unity,” Baxters “Road was ‘
was cotton organza in a multi- acs baygeh on a ber tis Ahir er the aircraft, its tyres were flat â„¢arfied to Miss Eva Archer of
coloured handkerchief print, Mfditered “sharifores and rust was spreading over the Baxters Road. The ceremony was ee ae —
richly embroidered duchess du- dae 5ne¢ gS. urfaces. performed by Rev, Frank Law- 1
gana satin, and cotton pique, A Other details from the show:—! rence, ; ; a wa .
ad i > see yr t Q 3 } : Tha : - rg et a5 ey » F
black pique dress with an almost For a “dramatic” colour com- Two Years In Oven The ride who Ww as given in
off-the-shoulder neckline was bination, azure blue went with marriage by Mr, Ernest D, Mot {
transformed for evening by the ald tree * azure The four Tudors have stood in Uey, M.C.P., wore a dress of :
Me ae hn j hite sje C™merald green, An‘ azure blue viteheraft lace made in victorian |
addition of a huge white si shantung dréss, permanently the open at Hurn for nearly two ™ Dane “oe toate Ih victories 4 si
interwove y ack i z : e years : style with a yoke o ylon n 5 .
ae n with black and golc pleated on bodice and skirt had vA ohate Pepe Stila 8 he @nd_ rhinestone accessorie Her ; THE HERCULES CYCLE & MOTOR COMPANY ATO, f
ee : a swathed emerald green sash. pee, CONS. WHRGER, .: See x SRE bouquet was of radiance roses BIRMINGHAM , ENGLAND.
For grand occasions, the regal Reflecting the colour of the sash airport police, checking to see ' ‘ve balitad taser onal A
crinolines, worn by members of | ate ts . ‘ if souvenir hunters have been “4 Coralitas, ; ’ ‘e Sd 1 eee al —
ets ueoee was a large rhinestone brooch on Duties of bestman were carried .
the Royal Family, are still style- 4 black velvet choker necklace. busy. out by: Mr. H. O. St.C. Cumber- F
setters, And for a grand crinoline, — For the fashion-conscious teen- The other three Tudors are batch, Solicitor é -
what more suitable complement ager three-piecq outfits were the Star Lion, Star Panther and Afte a 5 an aed in
were? ‘ ; r the ceremony, the newly
than an extravagant evening suggested, One in navy wool geor- Star Leopard, sister aircraft of ede and ‘their guests attended a SOLD BY ALL LEADING DEALERS
coat? watts hud a full ait, oad k short TELEVISION ¢ : es ‘ the Star Tiger and the Star Ariel, reception at “Merton,” Spooners .
gestion of this week is the bolero lined with printed silk to as dinleee “ath sntcicenin CRATES, both of which disappeared in the Hill, the residence of Mr. and REPRESENTATIVES
full-length coat illustrated, In an match the shirt, The shirt's scarf Informal nome wes tar t 7 met, Me = Mrs. E, D. Mottley T GEDDES GRANT LTD., BRIDGETOWN
unusual seaweed green net, it has collar could be tied a@s’.a Shantune narem ents, Vilk » 1€ loss of the two Tudors led The couple received many
“lampshade” sleeves and ‘a vol- cravat. coats. Persian Inspire emer to the Ministry banning them as beautiful and useful gifts from easier?
uminous skirt, - Ay Pe AM lp Soe ’ sgPassenger carriers. their friends and well wishers
; For those who like something om ee Wi eect 4 - — = (Bitte nectnriomntnnningieionenen haan pon id « we ae ~
For a sophisticated version of unusual came light-weight jackets mee my Mostess Car ‘te $ 9O0OOO9OO 600007
the traditional “hostess-gown,” in modernistic patterns inspired Se eee ®
* : » sl tape ei 1 (above oe x
the new quilted satins will be by contempor: art trends, One Une Cannas Gite Rates sebaver > e 4
fashionable, Outstanding amongst in white wove boucle had an neck and sleeveless blouse bots g ®
5 : ” in navy blue The reversinty > / 3
those seen at another show was irregular black “scribble’’ pattern, coolie coat combines er noner g 9 v $
the button-through “coat-dress”, Hip-length, it was worn with a | in pink and chartreuse, the tron) . é
; : . ay, i tted with sparkling rhineston« S ®
Ballet-length, it was in black slim black barathea dress, \ ie Bil) buttons. " are > 2
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©



\ * i \ 4


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 28, 1952 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE THIRTEEN





HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON |
ewer) |












A REMINDER
BUY

BANISHES
CONSTIPATION
OVERNIGHT



Agents n JASON JONES & CO LTD
OPO SOD SEALE PSL PLE £
‘ ‘
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IS THE FINES! *
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AND ALEXANDER , AND HERE || ea CONSULT ME BEFORE
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. Seitst : —

Usually Now We take this opportunity in wishing everyone
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Ge SAUSAGES Oxford & Cambridge .. 69 60

L xfore ambridge i i A Very Happy and
Bp.) EVAPORATED MILK ‘a's 30 27
MACARONTE ,..cccccccscvesesveres Al 38
: Prosperous 1953
JZ FRYS COCOA... cece eee eeeeee 51 A6
BEER CARIB ..... oe esa ee .24 21 GOOD LUCK



Paes. iad Poker ae Rita be a eS ee



4 JOHNNY HAZARD BY FRANK ROBBINS

NO TIR M/SIEU/ WE ‘AVE

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BY MA/MSELLE SHERMAN/S
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ATHAN | | SPARE ME YOUR OPINIONS, JESSICA!) YOU'VE NEVER YOU'RE GOING THERE NOW
CAN } | I'LL SEE THAT SNIVELING ,__—~" SPARED ME OR BUT, UNCLE HARRY, MR
| | FOOL IN HiS OWN OFFICE! a, ANYONE ELSE! SOME | | FIELD HAS A BAD
| |THAT WILL SPUR HIM TO
PAY UP... pe

YOU'RE; ae

eal 3
ig &

( DAY YOU'LL PAY FOR | |HEART! THIS MIGHT ) T
THIS KILL HIM! A

ZYAX

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GEAR Pa os Sat

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ENTITLED To
Te ae a

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ON INE SAE SAR LAN GAG PA PA BEGAN SR A FW PA BAG SANA GA EN BN SNS A SR SB GS NN A NS NN A AN

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2, BF WE WE NG WE SEN WZ NE WZ WANG NENG NZ WE WB NZ ZZ WANA US CANE WE WZ WB NEWS NE WZ NNN AVA ANY

2

ie


PA



POURTEEN SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 28, 1952

CLASSIFIED ADS.







a

LONDON CH: EMBER OF CREAR a RSS

TEN GREAT DISCOVERIES SINCE PENICILLIN EXAMINATIONS, 1955



















anaes Forms of entry uw bove examinations ma be obtains
TELEPHONE = 2508 from the Department of Education, Garrison
a ENTRY FEES :
J | Elementary Stage—for each single subject $ 1.63
eMORL FOE %. aL k ;
iN MEMORIAM | t Certificate Stage—ior each single subject except Foreign
| & Languages ° 2.28
a 4 . Fo ich Foreign Language 4.00
RAS NESTER Y :
€ ‘ t ter ee | AUTOMOTIVE ’ School Certificate of Commercial Education 12.00
rv Higher Stage—for each igle subject, except Foreign
STREPTOMYCIN CORTISONE & ACTH Langua 3.00
Discovered in 1944. The first successful 1948. First hospital tests showed bot! Forms must be completed and returneq to the Honorary Secre-
treatment for tuberculous meningiti Now

to be highly effective in the relief of rheuma tary, Lecal
toid arthritis. Since proved to be extremely F
valuable in the treatment af eye disorders



ation Cammittee, Londen Chamber of Commerce
of Education, Garrison, together with a copy of th

the standard treatment for certain other
types of TB Also effective against
pneumonia, septicaemia

CHLOROMYCETIN

1947. Effective against typhoid, typhus



the Departme



3
and sther complaints Birth/Baptismal Certifieate and the fees on or before Wednesday,
31st December, 1952

TERRAMYCIN Department of Education,







pneumonia, whooping cough, meningitis. che By Ro A ge Water tae manne - fs — : —_—— be
Can be given in tablet form by mouth plaints : HOMESTUDY COURSES FOR
04s. Eftoctive aga nat virus pneumonia, ae ene VACCINE } GENERAL CERTIFICATE of EDUCATION
spotted iever, heart intections, also given by 952. é first hopeful sign that | C
mouth lmmiunigauon against infaatile st On CAMBRIDGE SCHOCL & HIGHER SCH. CERT.
VITAMIN B 12 be possible. any cases have almost Maal for Oxford, can Univers Souroaey ACR RS above examina-
. certainly been prevented in America this ‘also for London L Vaiversity Degrees: A. ACr: RSA Bar, and other
1948. Now the standard treatment for year in the biggest-ever outbreas of polio } 100 ie Tutors. 22,000
Bernicious anwmia

Se ALLO. meng, Prospect leas: aeavon
WOLSEY HALL, OXFORD saan

Briuish firms oave towad at tw § PING NOTICES
e © too easy to Muke pruilis by HIP
, f f coe iat monutacturing UG. Usccveres
v1 26.12.52--In. | ajoining Royal Yae hub under licence or by wo % but —SS
; So. wal 1.20-+t-2.9 their own commereia) pruvgsses “ROYAL NETHERLANDS |

EE HILE ON SEA We - - aa
Christ Church, Dial 3065 | BLANKETS—Canadian Baby Blankets eer nen American ST ip co
12.52—6n. | au $1.60 each. Reversible ;
~- —————— | olour Baby Blanket ‘ i Pink When economies have had \ } STEAMSH! EUROPE The M/V “‘Caribbee” will ac-
MANHATTAN—Fiat 1, Welches.| 2.01 « I Blanket for ,



ISONIAZID

1952. Tests so far show it to be
apparently effective against certain forms i
of TB. Five

b

NEOMYCIN

1949. Effective against pneumonia.
meningitis, and eye infections



% cleansing charge, IN ADVANCE. Dia

8 1.11.52~--t.f.1 a -_ ‘
————-=> ANTIQUES — Of every description
Doâ„¢more, Bri 3 Cross Roac iass, China, old Jewels. fine Siive
d dinnmg roon three bed atercolours. Early books, Maps, Autc
t an@ bat Now vVaeant aphs ete., at Gorringes Antique Sh«









at Por 0
" j
vi ' “ t
Ww thers we er : “Jer
F
-d or } F r ;
Fugene Robinson ‘mot ies SEM ee Ea ae Sa
—— ELECTRICAL,
BARPETE ’ mory f
cde ther. I vy I ‘ tt ée st i Speed Automatic Record
fe ep ¢ Dec b 2t 1952 € lutte
E bere * tulle. & ( ita
ie tfr
V t iantt \
FOR KENT ;
HOUSES SUPPIES— (E jer 7 weeks ol
“PARAWAY—Bully furnished 3 bead-| °° ‘* ee ee ee
roam house, St. Philip coast. Lightin | et
lant, Watermill suppiy. Carport, 2 — ~~
Servant rooms. Monthly rent 960 plu MISCELLANEOUS








n ¢ v be made, laboratory VE a M.S. HERA 19th December, 1952 {{ «ept Cargo and Passengers for
The Moderr H A | h as yl which might have S.S. COTTICA 26th December, 1952 } \} Dominica, Antigua, the a’
. , ah taeneeeeie = jan . M.S. NESTOR 8th January, 1953 Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing 3rd.

gone wi Ong new discoveries, have bee !.S. HELENA 16th January, 1953. January 1953.











' Rer ver, br t ad treet
; first to be cut. cATRE 9s ? r |
; , M.& BONAIRE 23rd Janugry, 1953.

ps with medical ‘The geriickiliing pov 5 BONS ane ioe |4% The M/V “Moneka” will accept

x i ‘ our research in Britain chloromycetin aure< i M.S.ORANJESTAD 30th December, 1952. | }}) Cargo and Passengers ior Dom-
rom | r t t Garage | »eaorted € $5.00 ¢ The Modern : ‘ terramyein. and isonia SAILING TO TRINIDAD, PARAMARIBO } inica, Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis

Ser i ant, Water | 2) oppe, Broad Street \ sinee the war ? discovered tn the labo: AND BRITISH GUIANA 1a a8 Reais Salling #h Janu-
om « v. Mant wis plus #3 2 52 7 ia 3. STED ce er, 52. ary, ad

. ® ADVANCE. Dial] —— a. dams: There have been ten private firms in América M.S. STENTOR 26th December, 1952 y





S.S. COTTICA 12th January, 1953.
tfn COOPER'S AERSOL FLYSPRAYS e1 en

. fac . In the case of sirep'« in M.S. NESTOR 23rd January, 1953. B.W.I. SCHOONER OWNERS’
major discoveries since asia * ar a a6 mar a inane $ IAT INC,

y Vinita nundreds of our best men have There is always # jong, upnili Which was _diseovere M.S. BONAIRE 9th February, 1983, ASSOCIATION, | (INC.)
penicillin. Run your eye university, firms chipped | SAILING TO TRINIDAD & CURACAO ‘onsignee, Dia '
again down the list above up the U.S discoveries of sts already dominated by nearly one ae a v1 a s ere sed a! ames only)
to see how important they ‘cortisone and ACTH alone the \Americans, who, through towards its early clinical (rials M.S.'HELENA 2nd February, 1959.

are This galling situation entails heir etary re. Dave been in at The only way Britain ca! S. P. MUSSON, SON & CO. LTD.,
much more than loss of prestige te Who Ng vane tes’ Gritaan!

wardness in this field ? The
: 4 1 scientists? No. U.S.

in the case of Vitamin B12 The Government is driven to experts ant. that, the quality
was Britain even in the race import supplies of the new of British ‘

- - }eures quick death to Flies, Mosquitoes.
ushed or unturnished,| Cockroach, Obdtainable from all leadin
Apply at “Belfield | Stores in two sizes 12 oz. $3.50, 6 07
28.12.52-—In. | $2.16.
- | 29. 10. “2

WANTED EVENING COATS — For the Cool

evenings In a variety of colour also
| white $15.00
Dress Shopp




been fully occupied in following fight two compete in the expor





ve in Acer.







id Keep #1 the initt




Every one of them was There is usually a huge loss

made first in America. Only money pack





oO The Modern
oad Street





cal” research | s by inves







1G medical science is



BAGS of gold and



ae eat ma i Canauian National Steamships






























~—a * . ¥ hie drugs from America while the rene! sai

SFRVANTS—E : equins, brocade also bengaline and [his list Is too long to be British aashitehinres ake hatehine. Cae re tt ‘On Wcitne to population than the America ish eee aeaaais! oe
and reliable Park Maal e Re Gh de ae tiene tte k aie xplained away as a Suc- 1), ’ attri r aa rer SOUTHBOUND Sails Sails _Artives ate are.
5 pm. th Dec ) he Modern Dress Shoppe, Brc lad Street ‘SS of lucky breaks like , “fact that our scient ists are “: Montreal Balifax Barbados Barbados Demerara
oe in 38.18. 03-—Sn ah ‘disc | CDN. CONSTRIC10R = 16 Dec. 25 Dee. 26 Dec. 30 Dec.

iven the same “chanze to to



‘ CDN. CHALLENGER - 30 Deg, 8 Jan. 8Jan. 13 Jan
SUBSCRIBE now to the Datly Telegraph,

| England's lead:ng Daily Newspaper now
MISCELLANEQUS “ ng in Barbados by Air only a few
‘8 after publication in London, Contact
\tan Gale c/o Advocate Co., Ltd. Loca!

the chance discovery which ’ om F
gave us penicillin Refused | mice dladiverlaa we tHetr Teams needed CDN. CHALLE os fe ate ait vis
rhe truth is that the Amcri- Bee ee there _ Brew Britisn. CDN. CONSTRUCTOR . a ae yen ces. Bek, 10 Fed,



cans have got our medical
scientists on the run.



ave t mud > CDN. CHALILENGER _- 10 Feb, 19 Feb 19 Feb. 24 Feb
Rees wuae Seo tee CDN CRUISER - 24 Feb 5 Mar. 5 Mar. 10 Mar

makes Ge — Shoe-string





joint










3 5 . . 7 CDN. CONSTRUCTOR : 10 Mar, 19 Mar. 19 Mar, 24 Mar.
WATCH DOGS—One or two strong | Representative, Tei, 3113.) they nave produced so many because dollars cannot be spare HERE ure far fe rd University so th CON. Cone Seneca * # ats; See ee ke ee
watch dogs, preferabl months old of 4.03—t.2.p iew drugs in the last seven years to import all that is needed Real ectantiate r ecan work full-time
over Colony Club, Dial 0107 : 1 -

SCALES-_500Ih Platform Scak tuoay shat Briliah scientists have been rhis happened with strepto- in. Many of ch for “ wonder drugs. Th | NORTHBOUND Sails Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives































2 2.62--3 tt to . aur Y is ne: g 3 is the right sort of gesiure bu | » Demerara Barbados Barbades St. John Halifax
24.12, 69 land dusabia: The Genseai Ageran Gas Jevouing most of their time to mycin and aureomycin. It is pest are working on shoestring Reka y eaitnn Sars | CDN CRUISER 40 Dee. 26 Dec. 27 Dee. § Jan 7 Jan.
* | B’dos Ltd 16.1 12n atching up. ‘ happening now with terramycin budgets. , timan" to: proes auies |} €DN.CONSTRUCTOR |. ‘3Jan. 6Jan, 7Jan. 19 Jan,
*=ERS E ’ ro As each promising U.S. drug and cortisone. The Government is partly (o hep (0 DI aus yesus | CDN. CHALLENGER 17Jan. 2 Jan! 21 Jan, 2 Jan, 31 Jan.
ERSQNA 4 iE th NOTICES comes out, the Medical Research Scores of people owe Weir lame for failing w= invest The day OF ee backroom dis CDN. CRUISER $1 Jan 4 Feb. 12 Feb. 14 Feb.
Ay 4) ete Ze er + covery, like eming's Ck ‘DN. CONST "Te re ‘eb, 26 Feb.. 28 Feb
) Ye ounci] stages huge nough money. in a 1 CDN. CONSTRUCTOR i4 Feb. 18 Feb el
4 4 teals to confirm the eens 7 nedical research, is passing oan the og ‘a an | CDN, CHALLENGER 28 Feb 4 pias, uy Mar. a¢ Mar.
The + e are hereby warned against aN sia ’ American claims. | At the State ex- are now ing made by pr | CDN. CRUISER 14 Mar I 18 Mar 6 Mar. ar.
giving « t to my wife RETA TRQT OF CHRIST CHURCH Scores of our best by | pemnene: station teams cf scientists And ho | CDN. CONSTRUCTOR .. 28 Mar. 31 Mar. 4 Apr. 12 Apr. vo
MAN (nee Daniel) as 1 do. not. hold to Dairy Keepers, Etc doctors and | t Clevedon, Somer- teams of engineers are needed CDN. CHALLENGER 11 Apr. 14 Apr. 18 Apr. 25 Apr. ‘ay
‘aay, responyie. sab her ay aaxeye stration and Re-registration of all sclentists are where a search to race them into production ae : .
cle Sontractinis any debt OF a ‘bt a DATRiES Person employed in the switched vo experi- s being made for a ‘The lesson of Britain's for further particulars, apply to—

luction of Milk for sale, and Persons ments aimed 4

ivplus Milk for sale; under finding out more
of Health under Dairies about the drug—its | PINCHER
mm ill tak
|

Sanitars plage precise nature. and

signed by me

penicillin-type dru decline in medical re
JOSEPH TROTMAN

ese ic! | GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents.








effective agains applies to all fields of s
iberculosis, there endeavour. The surest

teat tap it a aSRERER NERS EN ERE

quality is excellent;

Chemists und engineers in lives to ine | generosity | of ngir seqpe pathetic. FP Pa RA chet A & TO ALL OUR CUSTOMERS AND FRIENDS z
industria : =

Shop Hill es
st or '





5 Inspectors
25 2—2n k

now it works in the
body.

ffice Oistin, Christ Church; from Friday

Janua 1953, betw the hours of

00 a.m, and 3.00 p except on Satur-

: whe Registration etc will take

ce between the hours of 9.00 a.m
1 12.00 o'clock noon

E order of Commissioners of Health







PURLIC SALES





designing expensive plant to free supplies of drugs which !owever. where comparison with the laboratori





firms spend months American friends who sent aver in the industrial firms and w WE EXTEND 3

nake it. British doctors could not get, America shows up worst. new.

Therm by the time they huve When our manufacturing London Expre

















































































m6 LARRiER
1. LASHLEY,
MAUGHN
McKECKNEY
MOORE, Doreen
MOORE, Jovee
MORRIS, Angela
NORVILLE, Candace

dent of LI, Mission
Sunday Night, December
GOVERNMENT HILL S
Speaker—Pastor W. W. Weithers. Sub- |
ject: RUSSIA AND PROPHECY

the nature and priority thereof re-
otherwise such persons will
ided from the benefit of tt
ind be depr.ved of al
aid propert
Oo noti 1 that they
d Court on Wed:

wings and
the elevators
and rudder aft
the tail.
Taking you
w the cockpit,














Lopdon Express Service



A_specia! Old Year's Service will be |



he then shows





speaker service



v Fet 5 held at the King Street Seventh-gay |
PERCH, Moreen i us 3 ; bruar ' Ris a you the con- Adventist Chureh Building beg.nning
"HTLLIP ere See ae oe t : 7.15 p.m. on Wednesday, December 31

PHILLIPS, Cor be ked trol column, me: n e
POWER, Alwyn : through which you move Une HARBOUR AND 1952. The aker for the , wil



RAE, Claudette ber eee eee surfaces, If you move it 10 be Pastor W. W. Weithers, and all



48. RIDLEY Monic ,

F. G. TALMA, the right the aileron on the

YOU'RE SHIPPING NEWS cordially invited to attend

a Miueet et teteee Clerk of the Assistant Court starboard, or right wing, will go
5 Js a 8 of Appeal

$1. THOMAS, Cynt! up and the one on the port. or



SOROS OOOO OOO OE,
22.11 .52—3n IN THE

left wing, will go down. If the

















°
f Parsh of Christ Chureh ut the new drug on the market, plants floally start up there are Only way Our A st “Wishes for the Season
REAL ESTATE (Sed.) H. StG. WARD, . B'S. "scientists “have produced fsually royalties to pay to the y J ¢ i =e
foe re aie ae another winner, and the chase US patent holders. Or we INCE the war, the S
HOUSE-—Situated on the beach at aoe a to catch up begins al! over have to rely on British branches dollar shortage has ;
Sones atts arey. to K, R. Hunte,| Torice TO D 4 ERS & MILK again. of U.S. firms to build the plants restricted the sale of S
Telephon or 46 ie hea a In the tast three years —and take the profit. U.S. products here. So man Established T
stable tt is herew.th published for genera) P HERBERT LTD
* formation that under the Dairy Regula- 1860 ’ Incorporated
AUCTION | ions of 1948, it is required that certia- | ————————____. __________ —— P f Map nents ree eee Tet 10 and 11 ROEBUCK STREET & MAGAZINE LANE.
2s issued during 1952 be surrendered e =
UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER © the Commissioners of Health during Wve
he month of January 1953, when re-
egistering of the dairies for that year’ BoYsS AND GIRLS MEET HERE 7 ~S =
By instructons received from the| must be done on ‘or before the filth day | oa Te
Insurance Co., I will sell on Tuesday,| .f Januar : ey : |
December SOth 1952, at Messrs. Courtesy Persons granted permits to dispose of . ae | . 77. Y a
Garage, Whitepark "Road (1) 1950 A-40! .irpius milk, along with milk vender Sinceré W oa A B h
Austin Car (damaged in aceldent).| yho have obtained licenses are also ré 7. ; mecere snes or Tg t
Terms Cash vitae? duleorn red to renew. their permits and
if D : ' licenses. “
Auctioneer forms of application for registration } . and Prosper OUus 1953
24.12.52—3n be obtained from the Sanitation De- BETHEL METHODIST CIRCUIT | J
aie aoe ment of St, Michael ~
J. M. KIDNEY, BETHEL METHODIST CIRCUIT | ( EN ] RAL EMPORII IM
EDUCATIONAL Cominissloniges’ of Hitatih 7 . BETHEL—11 a.m. Rev. T. J. Furley ;
ommissione Pa 2 " ; . cL. an ev. oy
St. Michael. mY tcl ol r | dish 7 p.m. Reception Service. (March of
5 SEC 7.12,52—4n Le . o>: * . Witness) B r d & T: d S
LY? cH’s SE ONDARY SCHOOL | __ Sea oe a NN ale lt Cnr. Broa udor Streets
SPRY 8 7 p.m. Mr. C. Brathwaite. °
ame follow Dg r anette ; h ave gained OFFICIAL NOTICE ¢ y T ig \ | sta y , BELMONT —11 a 7 Mr. I Blackman, | SSS
IDR a tile eho tae tne tne { I : ) . , “fey Mage age be SS SS
1963 es RBADOS ee —and AR N y ty 1 x shout DISTRIGT_® én a, | ROPES TOSS POPSPPP OEE EAP PFPO eT
EA tm i aadline”' Hennheadin PREC, wn 0, sm |
AL , Joar / EAL F.ROVIDENCE a.m, Mr. G. Jones, | ¢ ‘f e
3. BARROW, Dorothy (Equitable Jurisdiction), \ p.m. Harvest Cantata, 7 p.m. Rev. F.|& THE BLEND THAT HELD THE SWAY ¥%
4. BATES, Shirley \ROLD ARTHUR MARSHALL t e Vivian (Harvest Festival) iy ~
5. RAY Audrey Plasto VAUXHALL—11 a.m. Rev. F. Vivian, |¢ r
6 a Ace ae Senate ROLD VINCENT WORRELL i p.m. Mr.G Brewster 3 AT THE %
7. BLACKMAN, Wilma Defendant. ¥ TAY INT - x
8. BRATHWAITE, Coral Y pursuance of an Order in. this by DEREK DEMPSTER AVIAN hse ANNUA ST E:
9.. BRATHWAITE, Pearline | t in the above action made on the MORAVIAN ies iNt U L 1 DUSTRIAL EXHIBITION %
10. ROWEN, Ouida | 1 day of November, 1952, 1 give UT yourself in the Duke ot ROEBUCK STREET—9 Mor |? r -EG M4
2URKE, Fsthe t.ce to all 8 ‘ ) estate eae , Ra SRE
a, soseee te | Cae oe i nereaee Jaton aay sain, Edinburgh's shoes at White Service, Preacher! “Rev. OEE. New: | J.D. 7. SPECIAL RUM %
18. BYNOF, Maleita brance affecting all that certain Waltham airfield the other ene Te ee me 8 With ae Pee %
1 ‘ADD oulse ce o parcel of land situate at Salters i a f y 7
Oe ee a sn nance! ok and situate ai Salter: day, You are about to take your GRACE Hui — 11 a.m. Moming | (With the Distinctive Flavour) :
16. DARLINGTON, Sheila esaid containing by admeasurement first flying lesson Sap a, ay gn I * omaha : : , , .
DARL Si con tall + admeasureme *sson. S 2z) 7 p.m. Evening Service, Preacher: Mr. | § IS TOPS. TRY IT JURS' x
a _ Noe Ma Ve eee) ri ee oa. tithes “fifths Grek In R.A.F. language this ght will Y ou RE IN D. Culpepper. | $ Bl : 1 ; ‘ . i ,Y OURSELF %
19 EVELYN . ding on lands now or late of J #°,,Suee {n your pilot's log book as THE COCKPIT FULNECK=11 e < 1% ended & Bottled by
20. FIELDS, Cy: nman on lands now or late of E perience. S , Besecher: IEE. FG. Dewnbs Udllowed (t ; .
A Rae Soe ata ll ek | AMR SR Sou ae going wo a crit daatne, Sree ae ~=— JOHN D. TAYUCR & SONS LID
a GLASGOW. dir | Massiah and on a private road te eq as a dard elementary RA P trainer Service, Preacher: Mr Francis %
7REEN, Ol ? 1 there is i MONTGOMERY 7 pom ing |%
2%. GRIFFITH, Jc y to the public road or however els e de Havilland Chipmunk 4 eee ‘ 1% ‘k Str ig ‘
# GRIFFITH, Joo <{0, the public road or however els Piichibieutenant Gari! femeey Gordon Service, Preacher: Mr. A. Phillip % Roebuck Street Dial 4335
26. HEADLEY, Julia | cefere me an’ account of their said claims shows you round it He tells you i is an HEthe TIF a Gee on Robebetatnbbbonaasenncseeessaainnil 4
2%. HOWARD, Pauline } their witnesses, documents and all-metal low-wing monoplane and that GROP HILLSE wim, Bening Gervice:| PPLLPELLLL LLCS SPD SDSS PEPLESOPPSOSSSE
28 eee Alice | hers, to be exam ned by me on o oe is a de Havilland Gipsy Major Preacher: Mr. ¥. Q. @mith.- |
i n or Pridays setween a
| 2 (noon) and 3 o'clock in the rer EVENT ar yEN
sie” | 2caiee of 1 Fepa) ahd © o'einee in We itl tien. leads you round the alreraft SEVENTH PAxy ADVENTIST
f cONES 83 © Assistant Court of Appeal at th ing con- Sunday Night, December 28, 7.15 p.m. |
= tetas Sete as) 3 . ONES aren eee meraEe the trol surfaces. KiNG STREET S. D. A. CHURCH ]
war 1 in order that Speaker—Pastor M. G. Nembhard, Presi
35. KING, Pearl claims may be ranked according The ailerons on ‘ I ’ c papi

























|
.s
52. TURTON, Mor S neces Franklyn D. R.. Confident * |
Parents/Guardiat ' ‘ column § moved to, the Meth the AIR t Sli. mate Bie Oe ee ne SEA VIEW GUEST
rou.4 : ailerons reverse eir pos . Lewis arion Belle olfe, Frances 4 |
ore nel “as ene | OFFICIAL SALE When you pull the contro! as Os 5 Lacille M. Smith, Philip H |
Mt WO an RRADOS column back the elevators, will Motes RESET ieseihees Gs Se HOUSE
A D. PORDE tN THE ASSISTANT COUR : move up ey will go down Chipmunk ‘vice VI saa = “4 ,
Headmaster. | APPEAL Cam when you push it forward. mee euice Vl Sipe Rig. venkins Bphery HASTINGS, BARBADOS |
2.5 | (Equitable Jurisdiction) snkins Roberts, 12 tons, u . ‘ aily and Longterm Rates
~ |SAROLD “ARTHUR MARSHALL READY TO START . Tecan Ghee soe’ honts waded: on accor
r o be i ae Plaintut . \. E. Harris & C Lta |
PPSISOSIO IGS SIOISSOS9OH, | LANOLD VINCENT WORRELL > : ; bursts into life. Once ft is warm ich Wek GOdan WA Coke “drome it Permanent Guests |
: ‘ x! Defendan& 2 Moor ure whe and your instiuct nas im nder Captain M. King. Agents 7 |
Select your Chocolates from . YOTICE is hereby given that A wean Orease: Vecdin B f ovr i “7 se aitea! ‘ po Schoonet ,; San = > it~ c a awe Dianes ana Cemtels
the following:— B | Apia oct of the Assistant Court o! they do not work in jes out to the iuke-off ooint, |}. Sch. PRilip WM. Bapidson, $7 tons. tr Partiés arranged
BLACK MAGIC % P Sone - « a h A " s Feo renes the same Way as the handlebars ere the h 1V08 ie ptish Guiana under < apta c Sens ;
POT-OF-GOLD & | nek thas tbe autea ne oe ot a bicgele, It you Bush une ch protects jou from the |S? signed ee Rmoenar ' Owoes J. H. BUCKLAND
°HERRIES in s a} a tae one o aaa meht pedal forwar the rudder rushing wir. turns to face the | ve c Service VIII ot =r ietor
OMARASCHINO & Court House: Briwetewt moves to the right. and the wind and takes off. | Poin O2 2. Service Vill. 130. ton Proprie —
WELCOME % en the ho of 12 (noon) and elepiape will go to the .cight OVER | Martin Doorly & Co, Ltd PPLELEE PFPA AP OPS
. —. “ r afternoon on Friday Plight-Lieutenant Gordon uiso
[ge mire % Februa 1953, all that shows you the inst ruments you YOU TAKE
rs AZEL NUT s piece or parcel of land situate will have to watch and* the
FRY’S PEPPERMINT x in the parish of Saint George hrottle und flap levers. ITHIN a fewseconds = | ;
LUXURY % i : tenes at by The great moment arrives. the Chipmunk its air \y We Wish Our
Â¥ , iremer veteen = perches ant You put on your grey-blue borne and climbing | s
Also ‘ t perch or thereabouts > ‘i ) |
‘ ee i ’ veralls und parachute and away to fly over Reading, ° j Bia a e i ;
YARDLEY'S SETS > T. Mlenmas tan tate Sowa limb inty the front seat. Your Henley, Marlow. and Windsor, Customers & Friends To our customers and friends we send our hearty
4711 COLOGNE SETS % E. St. H lands now or late nstructor helps you with your Once you have got used to the wishes for a toyous seaso May you have a; New
XMAS CARDS u \inelia t ad on a private 4 vy Straps and climbs 1 sensation Flight - Lieutenant y oat: r :
os and > feet wide over which there is « mck seal. Rendy to sta Gordon oe you te take over a ear filled with promise.
> . AE | f e. 4 the public road or Flient - Lieutenant Gordon the controls, At first you fi
Many Other XMAS GIFTS X else the s ; ; xo Mant t oul raigh a
¥ € abut and to he cockpit deck. 1 it difficult to Keep straight an
N ¥| en sold the said ive twat evervthing is ali level, But within a few minutes °
a CARLTO! BROWNE 3. eigen UP for ele on Svary He sets the throttle and hi you begin to get the idea, ew ear
ou this chatty cena ee fe sure that all ts clea: Your instructor then taxes 3
Wholfesie & Retafl ae _fgnet aid for a sum t on the me over once Sem Dee ae ee SLI JASONS
2M Dat 4 Gt Steines. ai 14 shouts “Cc ’ White Waltham and lands. Your i}
Drug | F FG. TALM re ae st p the “ar e first fli was fun. It whetted ROBE S GENERAL SUPPLIES
%§ 62813 Dial .-: 136 Roebuck St. 3 Ag. € e Assistant Court Laster te and the engine your appetite for more, & CO. —High Street
“‘ | of Appea
PPOSFOS SSS FO SOF OAS IOC?

3



SSS









a ,

i


SUND:

AY. DECEMBER 28,

1952



goes out VOLT-FISHING Teese 2»

‘Pike a yard long rushed
towards my electric net’

HUNGERFORD, Berks,

Tuesday.
HIS picture shows
the most effective
piece of river-fishing
tackle ever devised. Using
it for only 20 minutes on
the River Dunn at Hunger-
ford today I caught 25 fat
trout, a dozen pike, and a

seore of fine grayling.

The tackle js all-electric.
A converted motor - cycle
engine drives a dynamo
Semera ting direct current.

steel chain dangling from

tun canine of ine boat feeds the
current into the water. A second

cable from the dynamo leads to pulled by magnetism. When I





a long-handied seoop made of
wire netting. z

gone Se current passes
the chain to the scoop
tieetrifying the water—and any
fish im the vicinity.

For some reason not wget
understood the fish are driven
wresistibly towards the scoop
and can lifted out.

I saw plump, 4ib. trout and
yard4iong pike rush from their
haunts im the weeds as though

CHAPMAN PINCHER



ACHIEVEMENT

When the scoop is dipped in tested
the water the circuit is i trying to ‘ear a hank of
wet the

SCOPTISH Selentists are test-

SUNDAY ADVOCATE





The eves Delay Over
h ea Legal Aid
ave it- Scheme

if Built rHERE, 3 eldeup ne,

Edited by





1951 i] .
S not expected
nearly four months

in August
report

ontl

tale) Iz Pesteuma et
ing it for possible use in com- .Berfiman who has
mercial sea fishing. scares of students

. ss Half the student
DUTCH experts who witnessed stan some Enea

tested





re void

Jani te th
Irom a 7 -

















ote tests are considering “ ws a : ome
it in lifeboats so that ‘A0OTA\« wn a musatt ned tees i
shipwrec ed people need not go “*" sen tioned =< ire creeping
hungry or thirsty, The juices of 800" “Deir crime The others gal aid i till out
an uncooked fish can safely Toor - ta tel Bit in PR Ing of nine out of eve
slake human thirst. “Th, ee , Bx; h es he prear befor
The purpose of the haul was told they « SCS ware cour
to remove cannibalistic pike ard Pitiey su ould ke _ the mones SECOND. the cost of going t
nanae ra — rob the jnierrogators who did not know too high for the rage |
gamer sre which were the “criminals THIRD, the tortuou orkir
All the trout—more than 300 While each student wa 1e law ‘ ire ott
ke rOhauaere film recorded his ey yndamental Magn
unha ater. nknown to hum na ‘2
The 160 pike and coarse fish cent students’ eve ik na
were transferred alive to a near- but 75 per cent oO i ono man will we
by canal to provide sport for a ied hevedtod gules by a . € right
fishing club—that is all except ible shiftiness.



ene fat grayling which I knocked
on the head for my supper

10.000 Weekiy



“e : An elephant

never forgete..

STOMACH
PAINS

DUE TO INDIGESTION
Try just ONE DOSB
ef MACLEAN BRAND
STOMACH POWDER! This
scientifically balanced forriula
—- relieves Stomach Pains

Heartburn, Nausea
@ Acidity due to Indigestion.

(Cae rae]

2 oo

Stemach
& Naas to

rVÂ¥ias

Bridgetown







LYD.,



Growing down












fe YOU BEGIN to get smaiie: tt eek ee eRe:
nmediately after you ha NOLNGL SeeRS POs ton of a ho
e i vour full sta > which hat somebody else occupic
usu y hap y tine ¢ u An bour is worried
we 20, Bir gham Univer \ blesome dog next door
ipeiors have discovered exnployee feels that he h be
id you go of losin wrongfully dismissed without full ame
Ht ver year payme nt of salary -~
ion ‘ They are typical ca >
: county court and the queue wo
ye ah passes through at. the rate { {
kt 10,000 cases a week VU TT 2 ¢e °
Boom? No et, et ee ot ois wovet ectheon
200M? iVO legal aid They sufter ecau \. 3 u
4 ONE OUT OF EVERY viv! those parts of the Legal Aid and nas nasi w
" sh yes 10 Advice Act that could help them eee”
married en I ive still kept on ice h . e ,
1 m cai & { | igh Court ise et tl v J
Taylor rep AN halnine ae c, a8) of ticeth Si wW en you ve tered vee



i hope u 1 F ‘ mostly husbands or wive os ies
1 bigger famil« hea P ng divorce co 9
ial r ised Now teke a closer look at the :
n the population costs of going to law, and see why ) L Yh the ’

justice can sti leave innocent



1 e Wa people with a sense of grievance ce ~!
ie 1 CASE 1: A week “end flier we a 3!
; 1 convicted ind ined 25 wit! was

: £5 5s. costs for a landing offence j
He ippealed and the fine was/
Not so i changed to a conditional di scharge. |

mm COAST WIM BUT he had to pay 42 cost | °9 e

% on top of the a taient tia guineas | 2
, yay wre he was twice as badly off as | AGENTS.

ippealed

police officer
damages against
The man

went bank-

officer got

not
2 \
arded £1,500
ypen-alr peaket
yst the ther

t o the police

he had

ASI wa



bax
othing “
RUT he Vas

bill



WINTANIN DN TION ON DN SHINN GE AGS aS

TO ALL OUR s

CUSTOMERS AND FRIENDS ©
WE WISH

till faced with hi

yet for more thar

PAPAL:



Thoma Horabin
North Cornwall
in an. aircraft
early in 1947 He
personal injut inc
symptoms 42% pole: ay & lo of goods and has just a

an cats 4 ' ; ted £3,017 ettlement

M.P
ine Mat Vas a par
that crashed

for
enge!







€



A Bright & Prosperous



in

blood pla lected





New Year



; The Costs

ometimes not financially
while, for mstance, if @ mat

a Complex « for |
in the cour
than £250 in the High
The costs will eat up el
for cash
il aid is

mijection

All the children
sent home to lead
While the
of the
been

were Lhe
normal] live
epidemic
children who
protected by :
1 speed ut globulin went down 1o ;
ly Only 26 of the others did s ry ; he sought

This differeace could not. ve The test ere ugesnah 3 More leg

due w chance, the doc i t '

Professor William Hammon : FUT i 4

| a ‘ oudh. iu o pour ‘
of Pittsburg Universit 1 A ie ike Yon

The protective power o! tt » redu {

im could almo er ¢ i i quire r :
mproved by injec , i we me} ;
iT “ belore Al) ex pr ,
break | t rear I

HONG KONG COMES TO

By TREVOR BLORE y es and ens middle boarding wae oe) aes
“on WR unKS @ne orres on Ty water- ew pr ir choot
” DEC EMBER ront, carving mahjong sets Northern a l , pattern of enlightenment
things. That is the fir painting spots on them late ai Colieg us opened ai Tarnale ar, and undtr con- Vveupe ‘aa which is a basie part
1 prog
journalists. It is the night, or treadling sewing- 1944 for the training of Certificat’ pideration the extension of { shitish Colonial policy strongly
’ 1 S BS ‘t as y OE > tes Ts. & as 4s : : e inin ie en, © y
ecess of all writers, from historians to novelists, aC a" ft = a pro Be. °- - wy Bayt a feee ve cqialifit t-acher-traint a panes Be aes upported by the present advanced
down the ages. And thi the outstanding feature of a ,.y Bee > Sa See DENRA ORY MSOs My ae ovisign is also being mi Gold Coast Government
) é IS 1S Une ulste ee “had not been industries (in the at the rate of ibout ten per teachers in the F aeton Pre
new venture in publishing inaugurated by the Colonial particular sense) they would have until, by the end of 1950, the ni and a train ;
Office with the first volume in the “Corona Library” had to be invented for Hong Kong ber of schools of ali types in t
Serie: bein ee iol : sary Alone.” Northern Territoris iad ineres
Offic we ; Kong by Harold Ingrams (H.M. Stationery Yet apart from the earliest ex- to 82 with a total of nearly 5
Fr aaa 6 port industry of all, the pre- pupils
bli mw t w-style ial of mercantile Victori in v- served ginger industry, and the During the las: two yee
ae ee tr sritish Co f he cr pouring in fron hipbuilding and repair industry primal das ri |
ong Ko \ ) f !
under the | t Cr
a distinguishex ' -

can defend
evere attack
sneap and easy

germs

the body





which
"

lait



raged. tid

con i
had 7 1s¢

t



t
county



method N
t Not

already used for immunisatio: . . , Py Sign ili CASI
A t _ f against measle ‘Antibodies tissu ts grown In a 5 ee
| — ~ UCH i ipee! rials
e TESTED A Mi: ii be inettied beter polio, “but
oO I SERUM he full value of i es
he serum can be ermined sarmur han 1 { n i fray BUT he mu his owi t
; reporte he, During su ' 3.000
ii / | "
The serum call@ gam? anise i090 Sera Oe ate ntists a hop le t itter how
lobu wa oaiatien: Mb to oh I bod r further laborator findin 4 ily me to-day no mé
uphill struggle ain ae wt BEES reece edt man fonda —no matte,
e r i of ~ {tO andreds of people ' ant t attack by pollo legal
o combat polio 222222 te Bee te ee i pee
s '
: ns, than the cbild It is
gamma giot n no natural amtibor worth
: feared by mothers A gamm for les:
‘ ince yearly epidemic

Mr. Pincher, in the centre, Ashes out a big one with his electric scoop ie
5,000 | Not chance D:: rou pete
that Lime es
body ‘
but the doctors hie ae fanene Yes hich Eons s ? u about &
ng from severe pollo ¢ out Wher becoming a David in any
useless bu narmie f . ; . . 7 : ena ic ne prey
‘ NFANTILE paralysis, neral im Sich a chil pursue
5 started in Britain five

Bs oe RE £250
CHILDREN ; ‘ i
bigge als u i by c ind a ' laimed for
) ) Dt
definite succes oO lar neut pre Do you wonder then that a fam
ren Are uscep trom . .
ther 28,000 ch m | battle against a Goliath
clin af the stra
a the iplaint most But Ty benefit than £50
ears age begi: ! t



ri wily 0



th Court



COLLINS’ DRUG STORE



not the an (

Until ao 011 researcher
1 upplies of the
een dependent on
€ hich were
{ifficult to rear.

carefull

hie present-da Street

vield its secrets | the rm

doctors ed
After years tsap

ing exper ty nvolv I

advance re repor ) children eading
t. Dh ’ lo

28,

Broad

PARARAAAAAARAARAAAR







isd aa ack
GNONINE EN Owe



AFE—

course for
the next month
next All this is part of a long





corners, trict which has new bec ind ten Ing

of Southern Togoland
A Government Teacher Ts

Me Nw



or Territoric
plan

for

“Write
injunc
secret of su

not






BICYCLES
ON TERMS &



iddin also



TRADED IN, REPAIR:

yea ining
orthern

Service
rerritoric

Our
at

Bicycle Department
your service:
repairs to all
in your bike
on terms...

is now
we can handle
makes and trade
against a new
its as as

New Look for
. The STARS - Warehouse

aia YOU - \ certai asures will
utify the
This ha



one

ABC



easy



Ls J .



more
of long st 3, Hong Kong is three middle boor ch !
, f until vers t entire



Bag
been

Ware! house



almost been opens

ige

ae x
’
t Ze ss is
s iy ges"
a3 2
aseS | Sees ese fens Eet8eS Ae a Pee oa Peete
e é =
=
BAAR SRBITSS. af



Kt ind ya a mercantile community de-





ll guesnceu




































"er ¢ oi * mm au a . considered necessary ip iew of “a
officer in h Se Cc | hil Ne lerri- ted to the entrepot trace hou FOUR IND VIPUA ' e fac that the aciale, & tourist @ A. BARNES & CoO LTD
asa writer o i books. > lif r In the past few years, however icl ; i FOR SUNDAY, DECEMBER 4%, L059! ‘ ill be characterised i *
It is a ne lea in Gove pal e note ¢ justry has taken an enormous ture and crafts have yromin Look im ihe senile : on ae { isit of at least 16 cruise ship
Peete’ ee va Aw leap forwards place in the cu oy tir t t verything should be done to
cretary of St ! ire ( “Trade still comes first in Hong school No villa ho
Mr. ee Lyttel is ¢ e! Hong Kong’s economy, but industry in without a garden or small farr _AROR eee ~ f the island Banar ae mae:
OW, 1 the Col | f sth ; Ri 1950 was running it a close which the principles of evops it. M ‘ ter f the building will |} : iM
° it x ) 1o 1 with tt impa f cond,” writes Mr. Ingrams. “The tion and the value of mar meen), Shwe (
poont of ata : tt r ne cevelopment of the industries in are taught. The middie | rei if fo MAS 20 (Tas K pac milar to that used b 1
a , erir nti ; vr ¢ i ar t é § K
ceenly to c rry entul : rial “« hose the last two or three years has schools all ha 1 craft method j tior uthorities at Sea- )
until we red a the ancestral paths are not easily b eo ne ie” and a schoo! farm, of mo A ; ae i}
countries with whose affairs we passed been .Qeariane , ge oat ee See cll will be construcged. The yard Q
are concerned.’ - ” : And he oes on to give us the acts. * ‘MAY tt to JUNE c ll be repaired ind. a stone wall v
, : First In Corona Library essential facts and figures. Hews eee ae sties to-d eur ind will be built between the Baggan \
Very High Standard ‘Hong Kong’ is .the first boo! Not only has Mr. Ingrams given local needs : ae dd © gor + Warat eae ° bilclty Cor r
His reference to the very high in the Corona Library, a seri : , delightfully readable and ir At the teache raining mesadias Warehouse and the ub icity Com- 1 5 3 \
standard” set for tl r I Pritain’s dependencies ich will formative book, but the other itse If all prospec e teact at me z o aut ¥ 28 (Caper mittee’s building. A Billboard with )
Mr. Ingrams is thorou fileA vi between the Reports at major partner in this new venture agriculture; and three afternor oe lpr, ine ies eo a Cokie elcoming slogan and may )
by this volun t 3 Blue Book f hae done a fine job of productior a week art evots Evenly tribu tec ” , ‘ Barbado 3 et ul By Harold Lewis
explained in ar juctors he one hand and Her Maiesty’s Stationery Office crafts and carpentr da ‘-
that. this e1 I ‘ turned out a volume which i = LY Uf to oe GUST 2 (Lee e ‘é
é i rie Oo ) c Lav . ~~ oe egiect those thing t ke
be written “by } hould be » jov to handle, fine print or ort Trade Trainin . ermottes now And wit Listening Hours
whose aualif oO elude t readable, that should give a paver for the connoisseur ana A Trade ‘I t re wv Aen ge Mme ia i cal end han 1 DEC. 28, 1952 This book is concerned ‘ ; {
4 cihle ramaeid of : ce lean” anes aan © omnia " rintine : i : ire happy Sunda it 5 2 s bo is concerned in the main with
where _ possible expe ( I id yet accurate picture excellent eorour Prinin’ 4. also opened in Talame last y« AUGUST 28 to SEPTEMBER 2s (Virgo) 1” 5.00 pam 26.53 M the progress of photo hy. bi ; well )
colonial adn tratior nd first- That is certainly what Harold of blenty of black-and-white 214 takes 40 | Prayer and ind principle har ‘ The } “as Bees i sche Ane gpl Sip tid. {
hand knowl of the te ’ ‘ complished illustration ear course hand. Afte : ‘ "Musi io ps Sunday Halt Hor ometimes, to look over one’s shoulder. For i
» Pen 2 “ : shes : 7} ould relieve te t ' ‘ t = pans Sew ie +} . > j }
concerned ton Afte frank account of the f . ‘ joiners masonr t 0 n. Composer of the Week hat reason I invite my associate editor. Hel- )
Sacsipet ( Y i listor . Education tn The Gold Coast es Aree tion xs } Archie Andrews’ Christmas Part : : , }
oar. iratic ve ¢ io , ; rie : hi hae ne EOE Sir or 4 i as ay truction ind — picid i toners roOBER mah ibrar a, 7.45 p.m 32M 40.71 M mut Gernsheim, who is the world’s leading }
ec Mr if ! I a ‘oau om nost delignt- sr is y hrm belie that cluding black Poe acne oh gt A iuthority o y ' . wMtogrs . en
although he had not pre i lection of people I have met @ducation the answer to mar In addition to prac 1 Guise 4 all chenect : " 600 pm. From The Bible, 6.15 p 7 : rity on Victorian photog upt to discu }
baen in Hone Kor rh in print for many a long day, and the growing-pains of the instruction vive Eng ocronEn 4 to NOVEMBER 2) Enklish Magazine. 6 obs Ds ee Be his year the changing scene of pictorial work ({
a Colonial officer ha nom ; vivid glimpses « vaker African Continent, I ic { corpio ‘ time the 10 ~ aed ace Marital tarting with the ‘eightic He has produced ))
“Bo . 1 Fe ' r te ; =e oe > the Gold Co f : Ws of fatigue or J or inasathcneti “to aia vee a M 40.71 M from various sources a number of prints whicl }
So he T rtar orner « e Gold a ling <« the on’t worry ep ul a eee , wer : i ve f }
understandi i ( rl from t wealth or 1 Soc Th , “NOVEMBER 23 (0 DECEMBER & > 46 und ervice, 61! were famous in their days, and these are fol- ,
4 is j he st . , 745 pm. Sunday Service ' 1 i {
peonle wi a ¢ ese 1 hant Britis! th of ¢ moet tt Sagttteriss) Whe , ne Radio New reel,’ 830 p.m. Coms oO owed (purposely)) with a selection from th «
of the nor (merchant nee) tf : note Nor ‘ aed Hoo ‘ houle of dae. Bykiont bee eee | ork of a few specially, invited leaders of mod i
In t+! e ¢ ese herma erritorie f that etter future Rc Make 10% san teen thn American ex { ' { yt {
oars f | ke lor DECEMBER 2 to JANUARY “1 (Capei- | ; Saris ae ae eat Nn AMerican EXMUDIIOT ORR R Dye. \
vA it r Fir , orn) ‘Her od fc “ pection 194 Music. Mnmestne hew ! hi view on whetl there a i
siaee lvarned ta” be ia t ‘ ‘ h a leges. is e Na ane eee , MONI A DEX 9, 1902 hee iny ‘progre at all ‘ ider ma ))
‘ : ‘ if
notes or t wr ern Territoris Today ere tar Atte nus ervi ile : oO calf A > (
ng@ges on dust 5 nets i : te a as eee. pe tne as tb PRBRUARY : . oan udge for mself A PHOTOGRAPHY YEAR {
i i € ’ indred schools * : 10 pm. The New 410 pm. The BOOK tialls ) ternat l review
in this ca fer reading “Hone ts in every ° with a enrolment of née An eerie Same ai tainives bape service, 4.15 p.m. Souvenirs of is essentially an international review j
c 1 writt le v r ¢ te and enic »ig eee _ * % BOP M visi 00 p.m. Listeners’ Choice we shall widen the cope f thi nvitation 1
Kong . r ' . sme , “ty a Aqua . e an 7 pom 41.02 M 40.71 M P ; I _ , itation is
ment } itsta 1 T flr o rt be é ¢ wt of pionee t KOK ext veal
use substar ; , th : ; I 7) oe in T ’ rr FEBRUARY ¢1 to MARCH % (PiKers) cjg paw ates Sen, er ” 64 i
eee ‘ is : te a pete ‘ : / : y your free hour Sports Round Up & Progra (s
Aft. ~ ; : progi ) “ v 7.00 p.m. The News, 7.10 1 \ }
miting in 1841 1 refi 5 nd setba ecu es
a aaa ( 4 Ir eric { “ took © Read and The Art sa
amiieed | uae inn aise pm vm oun Now on sale at the y
ed out tl 7.45 p.m. Invitation to the Opera, 8.15 ; {
1 } 44 4 4 ¢ »m. Radio Newareel, 8.30 p.m, Com- 4 e H
¢ yout f the Week + ' r ; Ad
ae : ig wean vocate Stationer
tin acl < i
>
€ e sec

om

Ne
“ee
ae


PAGE SIXTEEN





DON'T LOOK NOW



BUT THEY RE—



DRUSILLA BEYFUi
reporting .. .

VER to you

G

Knit fur, knit
skill you
home-made air

can

shoot of a fresh idea.
kind you have to look twice to recognise.
tweed-—and here's the kick
knit a fabric without

You
in the
a trace of a

a first-rate fashion for the trymg
Out of the waste of Knitwear land springs the
The new knitting is the

can


















SUNDAY | ADVOCATE SUNDAY, .DECEMBER. 28, 1952
| BEVERLEY BAXTER. .P., at the Cat Shao as
|
e { ny Pe ee € What Values!
As 1 was leaving my house I whereas a cat is diabolically cruel Linine
* est a CA aE found it difficult to explain to my to a mouse.
as er a re Sealyham, Disraeli, that he could ‘What is w champion cat worth? sj
a » ty 4 re se not come with me because I was While I was there a doughty 36" wide in shades of Navy,
mY going to visit the 56th champion- male cat named Gallant Homme} ?} a ;
. ~~ ship show of the National Cat-was sold for. £150: Already he is } blue, green, grey, lilac and rose
| Club. _ @ sire of distinction, and in| )) Par yatdegen anderen
7 ' . = re are pie oe or gs France, where he is going to take K 99¢
ou realise . @ > active. li i Wi 4
ahomtook’ place in 1808. up a new active life, he will a y
I have never been a cat-lovér.

ne

ihe photographs show what Knitting is coming t«¢
ihese two patterns arrived in London from Paris last

week
flaunt

They are bold
every respectable
they have not got what se
One has
like high, round necks
v-neck styles.”
Both have firm
many lace pattern twi
into millions.’

as

Neither puttetn seeds any improving once the

knitting is done,
popular styles
e all pseudo-peasant art
oldery after the knit
, the inexpensive pat



The









t Oks love it, and s¢
do the smart g'ossy Mag
zines.’

Th witn th
celot id nade in blac}
snd whit 1, with blac
velvet binding round tt
ige

Th utting he twe
i n bia j i w
t i ‘ ‘
Fiche ' n
w n Ven 1 4

Y Mier than the 1
’ ng wnat th



Selling angles

"RIWO adver ,
for wie same
le to
An an ft










d

nou i vc
Anow al the d

wu jobs

To get Mr t
the fabric the rtisem
m0Ws a pretty wil )
tured sitting up 1 while her
husband, wearing a shirt in ih
fabric, brings in her breakfus

th a dazzling smile

Her defences are down, thin}
the American advertisers, if you
show how the man about the
house waits on her

To Mrs. Britain to buy i:
the edvertisement shows a care
worn woman who looks as
Wiough she's been up and abou’
since dawn She is peiu
pondering about purchasing wwe
fabric for







her husband—and
saying : “ How often will I have
to mend it?”

_Mer defences are down, think
(he English advertisers. if
rhow how she waits on the man
about the house

you

we've

nowudays

and brazen

knitter's
lls.

n sets

icels, a
wool or

Cost

and
tradi

decisive patterns,
as we

nd lines

from 79s

like

smart
tion

“We



can
orders run

They

Worse

a chic stand-up collar, ‘Our customers
tried and failed to sell

sel!

new

© 115s. and look



General Naguib May Visit America




























Thess mih ia ture tigers and
tigresses, officially known 4s, Felis,
‘Demestica are. too Glodl,. too
superior, too feminine

They do not die temporarily of
grief when you leave the: house,
|nor do they go into paroxysms of
joy ‘when you’ return. "Their
thoughts are on the Nile, or of a
*Persfan garden, or something in

Siam
M or F?

No one knows the origin of. the
word “cat.” It is of ro language
or territory and it is with ut sex.
Alf cats, male or: female, are cats.
| L watched one of the judges sizing
up the charms of a_ blue-eyed,
\white furry ereature, and the
| judge was saying: “Oh, you love-
y little girl. Oh, you darling.”
You never hear that kind of thing
at a dog show ‘or at the Don-
castér Sales,

Did you know that all tortoise-
dhol eats are females? When
this information was given to
me by Mr. Stirling Webb at yes-
terday’s show I raised en eye-
brow to express surprise, where-
vpon he explained that if by
chances a male tortoiseshell cat is
born it has no future or hope of

Ceéllular



29 wide in white only

Per yard-.-——-——=-

Hopsack eit



eS made
The ~~ me Peer me



doubt add splendidly to his record,

The breede?s of the cats seemed
to be mostly women, and they
had that earnest, earthly, and un-
subtle look which comes to all
people who embrace the elemen-
tal,

I, have secn it in the breeders
of horses and of dogs. They are not
concerned with femininity but
only, with the female and the
male. At least, that is the im-
pression they gave me yesterday.

You will be sorry to learn that
the Abyssinian cat is almost
extinct, which is a pity, for the
Abyssinian is the nearest thing
alive to the sphinx.



36” wide in wine, navy, blue

eee
CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LID. |



10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street



FRSSOSGF



tor

Rene chek “he eter ae It is extraordinary how c'osely
* Were ie” tase iad to see us these creatures resemble tie hu-

man species in the land of their
origin. There was a Russian Blue
cat which was so dark, dusty and
rinister that I nearly decided to
report him to M.1.5.

But do not imagine that they
were all exotics. You will be
glad to know that there were
ordinary, grey striped _ silver
tabbies on view, the kind of cat
that rummages in the lanes and
whines at the moon, and will eat
anything that a garbage can will
produce,

las we went from cage to cage?
|They were neither pleased nor
| displeased, When I stroked the
‘ears of a Persian Blue it remained
deep in thought and quite disin-
{ terested. One. could have got a
better resylt by stroking a duchess
at a garden party.

er
Â¥.

Perfection

There was a collection of black-
eared Siamese cats, with wonder-
ful-blue eyes like lamps) which
‘pave me a definite sense of un-
co@thness, I wished that I had
worn a suit more in keeping with



They do not serenade the night,
they make it hideous, They are



£00 FOFSSLSODSOSSS ODS SSF SSE SISO SOAC OS









L just cats and do not pretend
the oceasion. ; to be anything else.
These lovely creatures really So I came away into the To All Our
‘45 ‘ike at home with the cele certain mode touched perfection, which is al- rugged unsubtle masculinity of
expert health and beauty to sleep in a ways an emotional experience for vincent Square, | Westminster,
a Bernarr is known to most Soup speci al aie tb wahtierente of rela wer > aera ohio ait
sritons as ve ccountable ‘ ‘ . * 1e1¢, a row
d.chap who will parachure ce ‘ four-legged Cleopatra. Stroke the feeling that with these red- Customers and
ts ao airplane on his . ae ams | their paws if you like; they will eyed, creamy cats of the Nile, and
Sahtad ant liken sae nt co oe They i weerere 2 these blue-eyed Persians, I had
ng red flannel underwear.) Lobste rved by Mrs ‘ ri 2 eee ye a pene ee te F | d WwW Wi h
Mit’ iat te Ane halt of tk as Douglas: when | she be, iat e 2 oe at crats whose lineage goes back to rlendas e 1S
Jonnie, his 44-year-old wife. Ginne? 1a al Family | ‘ tse ° boner ae r ng ae Tr the years when England was|¢# %
explained to the court—her This r creamy dish & asa us OH WETS 30 a , and are peopled by hairy savages, %
t appa Is aulng = separation made e of the liquic paid ed —_ cae eee ai Y 7
> ne’ se a regula fror ells si ere ey do no ead with mendi- i ?
home. Since Mr. Macfadden = in stock and \o ais is added t | eant eyes to be’ taken to the park Would he mind? A Prosperous New ear
pimave sianee. ce arn fresh cream of fresh mushroon for a run, I. wonder if Disraeli would
a bed, i made a pallet for him aati Zs Ano Steen or ienete: They do not whine to be put object if we brought a Siamese
en the floor adioinine mv room anaa rl sahiarthe > out on the balcony in order to cat to our house?
growl at the milkman’s horse. When the fire is chuckling in e
So well-bred the grate and the television is
They are so well bred that they talking about to-morrow’s rain,
ask for nothing because they there is something about a cat p C S MAFFEI & C Ltd
darn well know that they wil] Which asks nothing more than . ° . 0.; .
get what they want without to be left to its comforts and its
asking, 7 memories of when Cesar sailed











CAIRO. block in his way, then came out a smart and distracting move.
_ General Mohammed Naguib, in open defiance of the General’s It has distracted Egypt from
Egyptian Prime Minister, may formula for political clean-up. concentration on the old political
visit the United States shortly, At this point end with a little scene and its 1 party engi
Al Akhar newspaper reported to- fanfare Naguib left the a ital en's ssi ae pace en
day. It said it lcarned that a nd went on a tour ¢ Norther eering, and pbb rea it something
“visit by the Premier to the United E a . ‘ mn -¥ a a orthern new to get excited over, oven
States is being seriously consid. E#”Pt @ ttip which soon erupted newer than the “down with , the
ered in Witw of the results it into.@ great personal triumph British” and “out of Suez” pills
woula achieve and the publicity wich proved the tough wiry which the deposed politicos found
it would obtain for Egyptian and fMicer could win and influence govereign remedies for dodging
Arab ecuses It is not unlikely People as well as overthrow a world economic and the social
that the visit will take place Government and a King conditions of so many of Paypt’
very soon,” it added With the cheers of Egypt's mill- long down-trodden millions
Inited Press correspondent 1095 still ringing in his ears, Na-
Walter Coliths writing from Cairo 8! sped back to the capital and Meanwhile seemingly with his
this'to say of G mera? Naguib: in ene, two, three order slapped Jeft hand only Naguib has really
trong man” General into ia almost every prince cour- dane something to narrow the
Moh Naguib appeared tie and political leader who dared Breat gap between the millions ct
firmly hed as unquestioned \' back. This crackdown was pitifully poor and the few hun-
lor « v's destinies for as fllowed by another lull wherein reds of eminently wealthy.
lon he wants to remain at the ithe General now teceme â„¢emier While others talked about it for
canted and well sat back and wa'ted for generations Naguib in one decree
: surviving politicos to see the light broke up,all of Egypt's fabulously
His popularity with the masses ard co-operate large estates and limited land
of Egypt has advanced in three ownership to 200 acres per person.
major wav since he emerged Next Move Many headaches lie ahead of the
from comparative obscurity al- Lhen after tempers had cooled nerfection of.this reform, but it
most five months ago. in jail-and political Sniping from was the first real break given
ss . those on the outside ceased, the Egypt’s peasants since before the
Slow Starter General made his next move dsys of the Pharoahs, and the
He w,s overnight national hero release of now well ch stened peasants dgn't forget it, nor the
in the summer when his army formerly powerful figures. man who made it possible.
group seized power and _ forced After the last of almost 70 were .
King Farouk’s abdication, but then set free earlier this month, Nagui! In the same relatively quie*
his countrymen stood back to see gave the hation new encourage- Way he has also tried to bring
f he really could accomplish the ment with the abrogation of the cotton, . Egypt’s great export
task he Set himself. But Nagu b old constitution and the chance to under control and to halt the drain
wa 1 slow starter Throughout decide whether Egypt shall con- On his nation’s sterling balances.
the remainder of the summer he tinue a monarchy or become He closed cotton futures exchange
failed to make much headway in a republic to halt speculation and manipu-
the reform programme against The constitutional issue—as it lation, but this may haye future
corruption ard inefficiency in high has long been known in other adverse effects on world cotton
places countries where kings have al- sales. He also got an advance of
Old vested political interests ready tottered from their thrones five» million pounds of sterling
put every conceivable stumbling or were trying comebacks, was blocked by Britain and slashed
. ’ r el ane .
Chey'll Do It Every Time 5 rs ona By Jimmy Hatlo |



1
4

i GETS A WINK OF SLEEPâ„¢JUST TOSSES! | WHEN YOU FORGET YOUR KEYâ„¢THE RIOT

Accorone TO MAW, SHE



NEVER

| AND TOSSES ALL NIGHT LONG:

} WHATSA.

jf “MATTER, MAW?

| \ NO GLEEP AGAIN

|f LAST NIGHT P THE

(o0 RHEUMATIZ

\. BOTHERING
PAL

° 1

i \ YOu

| nil y
yy} 4s
‘5

‘ } ;
be 1;

eo

4





-, ae
THATA
CAT DOWN TH
WOULD KEEP
WATCHMAN A\w
BESIDES THAT.
HAD INSOMNIA:



Na



ND THE BARE

TS GETTING WORSEâ„¢)
| CLOSE My EYES» NOT
RR A SECOND:::








E BLOCK }i¢

ANIGHT- ¢ | 4
A oL

T'VE ALWAYS }) j

AN’ LATELY { 4

4} ‘

r 4

aan

SQUAD AND MARINES=+-NO CAN DO /

“a = = os
| ‘Bor JUST TRY TO ROU



Ss <







SE THE OLD DEAR





up the Nile.
That is the worse of going to
a show like:this.

Over one had

placed a card bearing the words:

cage the owner

Mee %



imports from the sterling areas.























_ . Ay ; : é It puts thoughts = =
Among other and less spectacu-|“Beauty lives by kindness.” It into one’s mind. . . *
lar moves, but which have never-lis a pleasing conjunction - of In these far-off days, quality of men, quality of materi-
theless attracted full public sup-| words, but what does it mean? No WORLD COPYRIGHT als and sheer ability put England in a commanding
port, has been the General’s almost|one is ever unkind to a _ cat RESERVED “ position.
private war on profiteering. Many AM
have been jailed _ for price- a ke fy ele = Bi Bh i hy
gouging, formerly a nearly un- i pA
heard of offence in the land of
bazaars and oriental markets. | Now, in the field

Administratively Naguib also ac- of Woollens, the
sjurtted himself well. He has uality loomed in
purged the civil service of /hun- the British Isles
uveas of corrupt and inefficient |
officers and even reshuffled his | remains the best in |
own cabinet to get men with the world.
«bility in proper posts. Simul- | os

ineously he has been running |
well so far as Egypt's foreign >
affairs are concerned. He has Qur selection does
vegotiated and appears not far

justice to this su-

from agreement with the British reme standard —

ind Sudanese over the Suez Canal Tropi *
nd Sudan, he is the strongest Modine can on
firare in the Arab League states an

and appears to have brought the
new neighbouring nation of Libya
‘nto the bloc,

b Coating weights.

For the time being at least,
Naguib has put’ Egypt’s often
troubled house in order and there

no one at present who chal-

lenges him fos the job.—U.P.



Some Shops Open

Many grocery shops in Upper
Roebuck Street were open yester~
day and housewives took the op-
portunity to replenish their
stocks. Many people had run short
of supplies for the long holiday
period, and faced with insuffi-
cient to eat to-day, were glad to

sce

C. B. Rice & Ce.









hear that some shops’ were etl iat .
Cat a cere quickly WHEN WINTER WINDS blew into Berlin the birds ana the of Bolten Lane
through’ ‘the * guptohinding dis- beasts at the zoo sent out an SOS for shelter, Zookeepers
tricts that the shops were open. answered the call and moved animals into their winter quar~ ie ini i i alll ai is
ters. This pelican_is_ headed for warmth of pheasant ‘ho = a



HF

WUE ERECTOR wey
ea ma

HAPPY NEW YEAR

CATCH UP OW YOUR

or Yloit ,

May we remind you of the pleasant chore of acknow-
ledging Xmas gifts by letter; written for preference on fine
Stationery such as that stocked by us in a variety of styles,
sizes, and in blocks or Stationery Sets.

te all our Customers

059 4 WN NN WN MN

t

is the wish of

‘



.B. With, of course, a complete” range
Pencils, Rulers, etc. readily available.

of Pens,

Wilkinson & Haynes Co., Ltd.

K.R. HUNTE & Co., Led.

y

* APPLE EDEN PE IERE EE I PEE 8




PAGE 1

I' M.I SIXTEEN -IMIW AUVIM..WI MMI.IV. UEtKMBKU 28. 1WJ DON'T LOOK NOW BIT THEY'RE — OUUSILLA BEYFLU reporting . VRI Ut you %  first-rat* luahlou : Out of l*i* waste of knitwear land spruw U i thoot of a fresh idea. The new knitting kind you have to look twice to recognise Yo. ear 'ur knll tweed and here* the kick ID the ne you ran knit a fabric without .> trace al i %  b tograpli' ahoK what knitting U rmnlni U arrived In London (PHH P %  ri]-> arr bold and brazen and mart, Thcj flnunt every respectable knitter's tradition Wnr-".. not got what sells One has a chb* Munc-up collar. Our custome'.* %  life tilth, UMind neck*, we've tried and failed to atl] v-aeck Both have firm decisive patterns 'We can VI pattern twin avti u *• %  like otdan run into tiiilllon.-. Neither p.iMeiu needs any improving once the na i :..• t, 'Ini.r. Hit it style* nowadays %  •it .iii %  knit ..i' pat %  mog %  fh uiittmi wita to I %  *.. %  I %  trti % %  i Selling angle* %  %  l.tr d.l II. %  %  lied Wllll%  1 II 1 I I ii • to irr an %  (OS <* k^ii tiir men, n no*. fillkni tted BlVOLSr BAWI.K HP. al il.:Cat I Might As Well Have Stroked A Duchess I A* I was lenving mv house I wltcres* a cat il diabohralU %  ruel UlUHtl II Uifl'n ull Id explain III II Seajyham. Disraeli, that he could What h a eaedajalofl rat worth? I with me beca*i*e I was While I was (here t doughty vtfit the HXIt championmale cat named OaOknl *hip show of the National Catuni „,id f^tiHO, Already he it flub bji distinction. ,md la ir von are food at arithmetic s>anoe, .where he is going lo take vi will r*aUag thai the first up „ j^ ac „ V( „|hc wi .. w0 %  how took place m ISM i I haw tr"tov*r. The* miniature tiger* and^ I arc too too feminine not iiniMnaofaflil) ef arSef whin >ou leave thr house i.ni aO they go tnV> pjr< %  Joy wh.n you telum. Their .ne on the Nile. ir nf a •Perstan jar dm, or ~.>mlhlng in Sunn. M r F f N i .ate kn Cellular Th* SIMMM: "Tlsey NMl ••f ro language and ii N •"'! %  eea. rf Ai' eaie, male or female, are cat*. ** .. md the had that 'judge wa saying; "Oh, you loveMlDtM little gill Ob, you darling." peopl. i iH-ar that kind ..f thing tai. • dof 'how or at the DonI bav*seen it .n th. U t#r Sale~ "I horse* and i.f diii>. They arc not l yon know that all lortolS"concerned with femininity but Vats are female*? When only with the female and the Ui.s information was given to mule. At least, :hat Ii the imhfT. Stirling Wehb at >esprevdoa they ganDM f* u-rdny. terday's show I raised rn eyi y ou w \\\ b,Mirry to learn 'hut brow to express surprise, wherelru Abys>iuian cat is almost upon be explained that II by e ^[i ncl W hlch Is a pit>, for the :honi'. a male tortotseshell cat is Alys*in,an is the nearest thing II ha. no future or hop Of ,„,. ut ht sph)nx piofeny He ,s rlwimeel t- ^ |t c xtrardlnars how c'owly •tenle bachelorhood. ,T these creatures n.-emble t.*> hu%  .„;.:' $£%£"$ ~:X^}'f£'£Z oxpl^sed. When 1 stroked the cat which was so dark, dusty and .-. ,,r I Persian Blue it remained timster that 1 nearly decided to thought and quite dlsin(>e#p ii i-esied. One could have got a i.rter result by stroking o duchess il a garden party Perfection There was a collection of blackr .red Siamese eats, with wonderreport him to M.I.S. Hut do not imagine ihat they were all exotics. You will glad lo know that there were ordinary, grey stuped sll tabbies on view, the kind of cat that rummage^ in Uu lanes and whines at the moon, and will cot anything that I garbage can will I tmif on hrr TO I worn baufj *l BUU liu looks a Aoueh he' been up and itwn nee da: S:ie !• o e u [ %  oniterni bout purciiM' U) mend %  i KM .!•, %  ifoien. Til* %  •*or koa 'i" van fl loHIIwool or blacK a* U kj X ^ **. •ai Tw. lo ii* gad oi %  -i lame wiUi '.he oekv he.ltii and beaurv eiprn. Bemarr :i known ui ruwSt Bnuint as ung reo danrn-l u:tderwer.i But mat u not Salt • %  i <\\n Ms H-year-oM ie t-pla:ned u. ihe eoun-lter ^ll*l> %  lnd ui itum* for etpani He never .>l up a regular 9 Dee Mr \i %  ieep* on Uie fluor. and 0J not oeiteve in aleepinK Oil bed i made a pat!.' •' %  toe n. SOUP special rm%m %  J SOUP lo -! %  I aaeen. Il read by Mm Dougla i %  Alien Ui uned li Uoyal Pani.h li i >... .-..-r., ,1 .;. from li: i md u iiu a* addeu i irenri reran of fresh mushioorr I DJUI General Naguib M.ay Visit America te eye* like lamps, which P^oouce. ta me a deflnlle sense of unTn do not serenade the night, ...fhnet*. I wished that 1 had ^ make „ n|de ^ ,,im a suit more in keeping with Ju t ca ,, „ nd dn no[ pr ? et< n(l the occasion. ( tu be anything el: Theta lovely creatures really ^ t CBmc away lnlo lne touched perfection, which is alru|U ^d i uiisubtkluasculiuity of ways an emotional experience for v„ 1( ent Square, Westmliwte the onlooker. They have the whcre lnc exhibition is being grace and the indllTerence of u heW Y et I could noi throw off four-legged Cleopatra. Stroke lht feehiig that with these redI their paws if you like, tley will oyertf rream y cats of the Nile, and not mind. They are wrapped in thrW blue-eyed Persians, I had the White garments of the .en^^ ln the compony nf arUlo tunes, ernls whose lineage goes bock to Some of them have hot -water lho y ears when England bottles on which lo n-sl. and are peopled j^y halr> 'ftViige-. ivered with tiny blankets. They do not plead with memli.-..nt eves to be taken to the park for n run. 1 wonder if Disraeli would They do not whine to be put object if we brought a Siamese MM on the balcony In order to tat to our hou*eV growl at the milkman's hor:>e. When the fire Is chuckling in So \M II In • %  (! l,u krate and the television Ii They are so well bred ihni they talkingabout to-morrow'* rain .isk for nothing because they lh,,ro '* something tBDul darn well know that they will which asks nothing more thar get what thev srrl aflhaut l %  !•*• '" • rsjgaloiti and its asking. memories of when Carsar sailed CAIRO ..I Mohammed Naguib. %  aypUaa Prime Minister, ma* MM: ihl Unttad States shortly. Al Akhar newspapei reported today. Ii -nul it Icirned that a %  visit by tne Premier to the United Statei%  %  red In v-ic\( "i 'he raaulli ii "-ou!n the put.init> • it w mill obtain foi Egyptian ami ' It Is not .inlik.lv loch in his way. then came out „ small and distracting more. import* from the sterling are, ' lnvpi from Among other and less spectacu. .1 clean-up. coucentrat .m on the i raovaa, but which have nevexAi this point end with %  little goane and its usual party M.-. I tod full pubic suplb Itfl UU enpltiil eermg. and given II something poit, has been ihe General's almost %  %  : of Northern new lo g-n excited over, ever ,.m lie ^ ..r on profiteering Many trip which noon erupted newer than Hie 'down with the have been |aOed '"' pnre' onat triumph BrlUsh' grid "Ut of Sue?ptlh gouging, formerly ., nearly unproved the tumh wiry which the dep i roui ratard fleace Ihe land of Eaypi Into i %  ...I. Would he mind ? J9 wide m white only 88j^ Hopsack 36" wide m wine, navy, bluj baige and while Per yard... 98y^ CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD. 10. II. 12 & 13 Broad Sueti I To All Our Customers and Friends We Wish A Prosperous New Year • P. C. S. MAFFEI & Co., Ltd. Over one cage the placed a card bearing the word 'Beauty lives by kindness" It is a pleasing conjunction of words, bui what does It mean? No one is ever unkind to a cat up the Nile. ad That is the worse of going to how like this It puts thoughts o one's mind. WORlO) COPYRIGHT RESERVED I ke place ..'. United cot 'cspondeni ;.-. Iter Col i i . ilimh r: • %  i t.Miied^ outd will and Muence gove %  tot dodalhf ai well oveettaruH d nrorid economw and lht %  'inn-• ,nd a Ring IOI-.-I'. wlta ne c h eefi of Igyi |onj down-trodden mill) i !< %  tn ringing lg hli ear*, Ka1 pad hack to the capital and "tw Mill hu two, three ordei lapped An hand into tar %  bttoal i irdiaie %  ometlung t., riarron the leal h-adei who dared i'eet gap between ihe mtllkmi t batVt, Thi.s ciackilowo wee pmfully poor und the h 111 T %  %  . ... %  j.aai ty with i.i nf Egypt i d in three emerged urity ll' ago. Slow Starter lie H. In the %  uawnei wnen hu %  %  : mtlniea i : owed b) inother lull ..... .! | i> sat hark and %  UJVlvIng taili'i, 0 '. Pd c '-' ; Next Move liter i pers had in jell ami political mote on the outside .,.!,.. and oriental inn Ket •\. .iiaiii tratlvelj Naguib also aciiunted tiimelf well. He hm .1 oad ihi %  h -i otrvli • of hun,.i >( corrupt and I .ii reshuffled hi* own cabinet to gei men With .bility in proper posts. Simul.-• %  ougi) be ''a* been running well MI fog ..> Egypt'* foreign He has I DO) far ...I.f Egypt's fabulmrslv h. m agrveinent with the lit tish .md limited land ami Sudanese over the Suez Canal owner*iiip to 200 acre* per person nd Sudan, he is the strongest lie ahead of Ihe ure in the Arab League states 'faction of this reform, but ii and appears to have brought th. m dicds of eminently wealth, While others touted r geinr.it i.iiNaguib ui one decree egottated and appe. %  %  ping i was the first real break giv leeed, the Egypt's ueasants i neighbouring nation of Libya nta the bloc. %  W* Oenaral inade afci aaat rebec leyi of the Pharoahs, end the i no* wall eh • peaeents do/i't forget it. not the Formerly powerful iigures man wno mad \f. I i last of almost TO were risen ihU rnorrth, Nagui 1 i" the lama reUUvery qiue. i ec gave the Tiation new encourageWaj he has also tried to bi n %  m with the ohngatlon of the cotton, Egypt's great export fUl ii Hut Nagii b old constitution and the chance to undei control and l" halt the drair %  Egypt shall conn n his nations sterling balance* id. remainder of the nimmi %  i N become He dosed cotton future* exchangf id twe IWB) in .. rea ul Ik U '1 "" ""'' rnenlpu OfurtiurftOMl hWue ai 1 Jdion. but lhi.i may have fut nefflclenc) n high has long been kimwn in other adverse effects on world eotuw housewives Ui '! %  %  ''-' R -" %  ..limn re^linVsh-"the.r Old eeati polltfa %  read) tottered frorn ineli • • ve million pounds of steiitnn fllll ks ^ ll 1 vW ljd run thorx BneelTebks rtunbUni ot bloated by Bntaln ami stashed of „,p P |, cs f or the long hoUd.i% _^_ ('.I'*', and fai'<*d with insufhlent to cat to-d,iy. were glad to thai some shop* wan en. Word spread OUlCkl) >m housewife to housewife all rough the surrounding clisicts that the -hup* were open. I licv'll Do It Every Time i \ci \ sj£) TO MAW. S*4E MEVER 5^S A WNK OP S^EP-JOST TOSSES A*0 TOSSES A-'SIGMT LOnk3-Eor the lime being at least | Nigulb has put Egypt*, often tt ulilett house m order and there no one at present who chalfc the job.—I'.P. Some Shops Open Many grocer> shops in Csssei M •DOT JUST TUY ID IXJ6C THE OLD V&AR WHEN 'OJ %  ysSET YOUR KEY-TWE RIOT SSOI^^ND 1UWMES— M OCAdOO/ r WHIN WHIM WINDS bit* .n.o Berlin the birds ana the beails at the *oo sent out an SOS (or shelter. Zoolcoepers answered Ihe call and moved animals into their winter quarters. This pelican u headed. Xm warmUi. ai uhcaj.^ni hnu*a CATCH UP OH vot/e Mnv we remind >mi of the pleasant chore of acknowledging Xinn* gifts by letter; written for preference on line Stationery Mich as. that Mocked by us In a varielv of gtylgg %  sues and in I.lucks or Stationery Sets. N.B. With, of course, a completerange al Ten* FenriK, Rulers, etc. readily ;ivni|ah1e. k. R. HUM I I' Co.. %  i.l. In these fur-ofl days, quality of men. quality of materials and sheer ability put Kngland in a commanding position. Now. in Ihe Held of Woollen;., the r illfy loomed In Britbih Isle remains the best in the world. Our selection does justice t thi* *uS ireme standard — j Tropical. Light, Medium and Coaling weights. ice & Co. • I llK.a. Latae I HAPPY NEW YEAR Wilkinson & Haynes Co., Ltd. ^ ^KMffnKnnnMHftniiKtuiMMnffna* \ \



PAGE 1

PAC.r FOUR s' SDAV ADVIMATK SUNDAY. DECEMBER 28. IKS INDIANS DUE IN TDAD JANUARY 4-6 "Miractv" dividing IMpetl South Africa Dismiss Aussies BY O. S. COPPi.\ 'TMlF I -ironic re-ehed London on December M M. At fording t> Ihe • %  %  due lo in London on December 26 MI th.ti thrv are two days ahead of schedule. Thi* i* good new* since plans for r*cei\jji them -nd seltiins ihe programme can now be deilmtel Th > art dui mm Ljondoa on Daeambei 2* and this will allow them lo reach Trinidad between January 4 and January 0 I9M. Abu Ali Wins Governor's Cup Local Horses Do Wei As T.T.C. Xmas Meet Opens ho fust three placet in thu ordc. Dashing Princes. (Lutchman). firelady (Yvonet). fluffy Hurtle. Holder) Betbell'i Abu Ali gave larbadc* her second victorsof he day by capturing |] ovetcd Governor* Cup and three housand dollar*. Turin. he Barbados invasion to do exu-rnelv well at this meeting. The upsets with IlriRht Ug| reman Maiden being the onli to trounca Tr.-ioption. ant*, Barnard'* Bright Light 1 pastli in a race u wMen ihe heavily backed Columbus ran unplaced and Gallant Rocks aecond the necessary P 1 "** %  ihe great -urpruCavalier was snatched Julicn* Ogcai in rt rtaid i atara. I.IUAVSTtK DOING WELL W IK. farourlte* as Top flight, Leap Oi S PORT fani anil 1glad to 1 B Boar. %  *"> So tl Matkhght and it. tart ani' "-—*—-—— —•-*—*— *- %  -— ---..-. %  . Diamond %  ran bt in MKKT INDIANS IN SOI Til FIRST %  T^Hni: Bral a n g aa ja m agi arlll be again*! the Trinidad East Indian* ..rl this is fixed tor January 10 and 12. They open n the first eolonv game with Trinidad from January M to 19. The First Test m..' from January 22 to January 28 and then ihe> eoOM on to Bar twin-. FbCtUH a act to open with | eotOny game from January 31 to Februar> 5 and the Second Test will lie pl-ved here frm Saturday. Fi %  PMaam) Pafaruarji 13 NO NIV i OF AIIMFD AND GOMNATt. Ti ||! I on no coDOrmatlon DM gsnial in oAatLaJ v. 1 1 X Indies crkl nding the lepoit from the India Radio Uimad and C i> Ooptrurth will be unable to make the l BOUklK (From Our Own Correspondent) PORT-OF-SPAIN. Dec. 26 A record crowd including a large number of visitors from Barbados and ulher West Indian colonies attending the first of the Trinidad Turf Club's five-day Christmas | saw fine performances by Barbados horses. In ina second race thrcr won Board soon and fans will know informal i raaafc lekasM faptball. who ii in I ..ghborough College, Lccerterl -" £""'" !" *!-P "V hlra. England He has had leave from hi duL "E? fJKS !t winn 5 %  g* %  ml | tb. stall at iheCombeeman ^£ h ' .! i 2fiEM S boot ... pu.suc s,ud,es MI Physic* Uucatkll ^t^SS" SSS^ h!nJn£ naneH hi. T P h.r'. -,i.wi= !" i.i. K !" 1 tortcut paid six hundred Mid twenty-two dollars in the irren. O %  n. %  %  lAJ.NUO.V !%  'Look out Woives'. *cst Biomwictt are chasing you Division 'One" Liiaiupionsnip. One point behind tnc> nave one game in I bigget crowd— aS.uuo -l Shcmciosaw Albion loii up the.r sleeve* at a 4 — 't dedal and clinch factory ovei Wednesday witn an tt^m intnuti Hun Allen goal. 1'iwiuiuiy two own goals by Curtis and Cannot. ... s cop>Ivaa against i ..,, ibovnag •fV .. Reicrce Unrnrd > I Buriiinoned the two LMoataaf Kns Titomp on and BlU Ltickson of Cliclscin iiii.iiick. during Ihc second half at Sloki und ddmonished them for too vigorous efforts by both teams. They played lo foot-ol-ihe-ubie l-MWerii. Campbell's thirty nunuu i illiy origin Light has set the seal on a two and Inree-year-old careei which has no comparison in the whole history of racing m the B.W.I. to-day I No other creole ever won aa many classics and no outer three-yenr.. raced so consistenUy during the course of a year with such %  rnpic meet to place third success. In all, Brtgnt Light nas on live classicsithU season between hundred yards. Barbados and Trinidad and only the Barbados Guineas escaped hex Le.lie I-aing of Jamaica won the ^rasp because she was not in it. II tne Breeacrs' Stakes of lwi, which ace in 30 8 with Jim Gatharg of -.na won as a two-yeai-old, u addeu to the list her tally maaes six aVA. second. The U.S.A. might Lignt has therefore won every classic for which she entcreu ..'. the Jaman* Olympic i in the one hundred metres four relay netting pan* Jamaica record of A't.4 seconds. I'he U.S. team mra MUton ^mpbrll. Mai Wh..eld. Jm nillaid. T %y J m!T? \*1X'T,, tim. Bachelor-! hurt was hne upsianoing son o. Bachelors iw ana ,.! a,', n r.-,* ^ihc. Warm add beiore he nrusned racing was promoted to C class. oinmy Ho*, a halSabred D> bunwjve out oi Mcrr> Maiden, wat, orenaaa bred His career was very mdinerent and apart from the iiwo classics was no! made up oi many more notable successes. Me [never got further than class £. ,n l '.-,.( t-sa st. rt w '-roni iwu, wncn the Barbados Derby and the Trinidad Trial M'I.HI.', Ii. I ne,? J !" ,^ s, k were msligaied, thrve-y.ar-old racing IOOK on iis own to^arthh*. ,\ .-^..r.1 ,,, .^1 !" 1^ i o.v.ou-1 IOOKS -IMJ no longer was il necessary 10 couple the two-yoarmn ^ Iri, i inr .P. TltJSC M c,-sa,c with it lor tie pui poses oi assessing ine menu oi the •Uraofcae. rrom linu io m. uiere Ml IcarntOn three classics which a Creole could win In BM MMOn but none ever accompiisned thi* •nuch coveted uiple crown. At a Ume like this the memor> naturally turns to great Creoles of 1 ihe past. From 1JI30 onward* tneie nas oeen a sieady increase in the nunwtf ol classic races DM ei lo W W 1 rinioad, b-C. and Baroados in UUH year the irinidad Derby came into being. Ittt Innidaa UerD> -no ine Bleeders Staaes were the only classics until IWU. In irtos* len years only two Creoles managed to win l>oin. 1 nese were Mr. O. P. Benneu's Bachelors fort ana Dr. Cyril UUtoni 'tommy Boy. < upstanding son ol bacnelur s Tut and rtorb McKenley and George/ I tie local Jan..i! A ing Watson. Donald Andradc. Donald Davidson and I Joing the distance in M.s atca. 1 beeond Wafl Milton Campbell o' HM U SA. and thud was Louis vnignt of Jamaica. Hegmald Pearof tne USA. Ix'at Qnorgl f Jamaica bs, the tiveyards with McKenley third Ha i u passed his Teacher's certificate with 1'iacticat teaching His subjects t;iken wire i;i i Physical Educatmn. (hi Eauca' %  P fh logical and Phj leal DavalopaMOt, (i > Education and Sr*cle4y, <'!' Tirhni'iue of Education. Brew rtar still fmind time to plaj the odd game f.-r H.i.l.lifle and has been elected captain of IatughiM>rough for the coming season. .ritten a thesis "The Influence of Geography upon Industrial Developnu-nt and has %  de a Fellow of the Royal <>eographlcal S %  UK} He Is now working on another thesis—"The %  Mies' rise to cricketing power and Its implications for the future" and his many sporting; fans will wish him good lurk. H u narwarra TIMEis collapsing George. C.OOI) nGUBEfl BY CKNTKAL PLATUS 1 IIAVK recently discovered some interesting figuraa Crom the Centr;il CrtdMt Club which has just carried off the Second Division Championship of the Barbados Cricket Association competition. It was during a luncheon given by the captain. Mr F. A. Storey, at Gracmi Hall Houaa last Sunday mormni: %  -anji local cricket ngurai thai included the Internationals Clyde Walcott and Ivarton WNfcai wa*a drtnUng the health "( the captain and his tonm, lh.' 1 .I'M. iv.led the strides which thtl little Club has made xisk Ilrst race. Results:— riBWT BA.L -,_ i ...4.1. HI..^... ,.„ r ,, rmn, lUM II. Vt H..-.., | <;•>.! Lund> l^nltl. J Tru '-,,,-._. o.,t Tim. i jut •HUMI MM I • i ir.pt., ita Pan < u ai. aI liainiiai I'lincvM 1 t~ r luff. Ili.fflr-. Tiit. 1 an j in. i. i -, I.. %  -!.. ..:. M||, |, „i, i nnaai i >.i i ; OaUaai Hack, .t KI Admiisl. Tina I H. roi am \, •O.Mir. xuio an • %  ••. Appl. am Tim* I V* ., %  i i .'. i MB F It BFTHELL K.m.ropatard lh( in inning line Hrrt l.ut --, a^qualined \< ii r MI I a'laai* II ui III MM ••• %  r IIMI Nevmiain S. New Qu*>trd 1 Stella toluru un li.. an Pallialai l. Yvonet I Time 1 mm a • %  11 u MILi \ r . l-rt—.. (Uaa A —a \f H ana Bat I Footmark %  l|i low* %  Hoyal Wir.d.r Tuln !>*• Uncilt There were, of course, a few who could no doubt have done it, but due to the War travel was ditttculi and the Iruuaad horses especially uid not patronize Barbados racing very mucn. The late Mr. A. C. ODowds High Hat iResugouchc-Fanny Oliver), however, ran in al inree classics in 141 and won two of tnern; the Barbados Derby and tne Trinidad Derby. The next year Gieneaglc (.Bachelor's Tut-Gie. I, could easily have won all three but did not contest the Baithe Trial Stakes and the Trinidad Derby. i I Hun,I III I •I... HUIfi %  I ana II II.Tlnve I SSI l HlXIH KM t. f. lap MM Iran •aS l --.. .1.4 AL. 1 Hope l)a*.i. J Tuna a OB 1 i • IVIMH %  AC I %  Sea 1'epXr 0 Mil. I '"• > I •••* 01 "11-i.r ff*Uoi SUlden I Cti-l-lr. : SSI %  mum tMi v>r IMUA> rwrt 1 BM B> HNt B Ma-doo. 171 1VMHI } UttUth* %  Hie ftrng IIMI fr.-aj. Tmr I mm. 51 1 i aet* IMrtKIAI. StAKSS -"• lBrla.il. II I la,. I !..,.hi!< Praseaaa OlBi Uutchauin. Uttla Haven illai Lowa. J Oolden < M...i lie. HMOer Tli.. I nun. %  IS arc. — keeps them five I and Whilileld Ueing for points ahead of Northampton n place. The time was afl.8. DlvtMon Boilth. In third On Christmas day the first day il(en CQma M51l North Oluhan. an o-ck on top of ihe meet McKcile, won the ja o race. She i again after temporarily giving I one-hundred metres in 1.4 sees. way to Grimsby. The fishermen : L ll,e Lautg of Jamaica won T he next hor to win two classics in one season was Belledune, landed a goalless draw with IM : -hundred metres in 21.6 Hon. J. D. Chandlers Ally by Besugouche out of Beauvaia. She won Chesterfield on Christmas Day *ccs. Second was Milton Campi nc Barbados Derby and the Truuoad Derb>, but did not run in the but Oldhani a one-nil win today bell of the U.S.A. and third was ria i stakes The loltowing year along came Jetsain, the ilrst of the gives them a one point advantage. | Jjm Gathers USA. McKenley nmsam-Hope in the Valley combinations, which later proved so sucChruiunas Day teat of scoring of Jamaica won the four-hundred ,-essful. Jetsam won the Trial Suites and the Trinidad Derby and eight goals was Carlisle's record, metres in forty-eight .seconds, everybody will concede could also have won the Barbados classic II hi.Their luckless victims were Second was Reginald 1 •carman of had been entered. Scimthorpc. The centre forward the U.S.A. and third was Alal w „ (c, WbUnouac got n\. .•; u.cm whttaoatl %  >< tha rs.v nu^taaatoi Vnm IM1 OMn mn toui el a a an W; UM % %  %  %  ddmoai to ug ., %  : -ah individual l>et for the club, lunch 'with tne Governor Sir !*• ** Derby Trial Stakes at Arima. This race was won by Atomic The best individual goahvcoring Hugh Foot K.C.M.G* at King's H who then went on to win the Trinidad Derby and so lo join :nc fe^u today were Adrons' four for House to-morrow. EnthufiaaUc bana ' double classic winners mentioned above. The follow-ing year Moats Forest in their four-one crowds are attending the meet *•* another joined the happy baud, this being Jetsam s full I •*un over Hull and three each by Albert Calland of Torquay Muria. of Darlington. I Tde beat of Christmas Day was '1st* Ben net fa four In Tettenham.lonen-ooe win over Mlddlctt' brough. BK,\N< IIKI) OUT I'MHKK H'OOI> F ROM a .. %  .' i l friendly ciickel lhe> branched out into the Secom. 1 DIviMir. and chiefly through UM apnda "iih Ol '. IMII 1. Q Wood then lust captain, they wan "hie faQ build %  Uaaa This season they eon i playari who had performed with con.n.md> able Individual credit Koi example ('. K Hind-<. e.i 571 runs in I" falling, (SIX lime* not OUt average 5l.82i. C H i;. lit.ml 515 runs in 17 innings (fW tunes not Out average 42.92) while I Weekcs and C. Patrick both paaaad tha 100 run ma.k. I. O. Wood, tha oldest plgytf In llaibadi. • 11. ket Association cricket to-da> wan third in his club's bowling avemges taking 17 wickets al a cost of 8.S8 runs each. Vere Kin* 31 at 11.84 runs each %  Ad C I Hindi 3S al lil.Ui runa nrh were also good individual per. funnel CONCRATlllaATIONS SOI Til AFRICA T^HKKE could scarcely be a mure handsome dividend paid to magnificent fielding lhan the feat in which the touimg South Afribecii themselves bowled out for 227 runs l Australia in their turn cVlamiaatng tha powarful Amaii i", J43, but Mxteen runs more than their own total. I w.is among those who frit that the Australians, having dismiss%  would have l>een able to eonsnlulale thU aarly gain by piling up a lulTicienilv tall total to en they would lie ample time m the thra*j remaining datya fi" (trfcallna the 'SpringU.k. CEBDIT FOB MAtiMMiFNT riBUMNG T^llOSF. who listened lo Ihe COmnWBUrj must lirst give South %  Africa every credit for what has been described M "mir.ti le" holding since tha Australian In all i di lo them, did not throw their hands away. Who could blame Neil Harvey lor having bOM di-nnssrd caughl DIM handed Oil %  full blOOONhJ dilVe lit MIU pi.it l lv lluafhalll M ArUiui MOM i .-it" taw OM of Ins -nokes stnke Ch-'elham's hand: for Tljytleld t.. ion hack sevfrral yards and lake what HUM! h.tv,. i., one of the motl CUrlOUl icturn nUln.m the hlstms ..( Ihe game. The South Africans have now kept (hi' lasufj OBM bill m iddlHon '" l Uraj I IVI placad tha m aalvaa in pnattion DM forcing a win If then batsman can put up a reasonable scoiv and they can Imp Australia into battue on ;• llvi-dav old wieket llud must begin to ciumble Ol pig] Irkkl at LfhUt AL'SSIKS" (iBKAT riGHTINO SI'IKI I 1 '" • al all limes rememher the urem Aghrlng pirlt of the Australians and I UI not for one moment pradaCUfia thai Hie% uill be defeated. We hav,. s.irn them torn defeat into victor) too oflen, The Wi t this to their bitter cost. Cert.iinjv however this knowledge will nol prevent my giving an hones; Opinion on Ihe l..i rs and happening* .is they pieseul theiliselve I'.iliil. il, ulcntlessly efllcient howling machine of I.indwall. Miller. Hill Johnston and Hing might Jump into high gear and brinf a comp.i.iti.i'U iidnidously easy victory for Australia hut I %  | ...Nile the possibility of South Afiiea U-ing.,|.|, lo do a imilar thing with Iheii %  nate oil spinner T.i>nel.i and the help of Mansell, Watkins ami Ifurray if the two laat narm d ruvva rtGOWa l-d BUfllcirnMy from then ni)iirles. %  r'a .ml ovtt I IVail D 1 Baloi i-.ia iai. loolmark \\ inn Stewards Cup: Jfayne Injured PCiKT-OF-Sl'AIN, Dee. 28 Footmark, Jamaica brad eraoaa, WIM came io Truuuad as a tnreeyear-old in 1B5U, and won the Derby, BOM M victory over ihe Imported thoroughbred-s if. Ihe 13.000 Stewards* Clip OVtl MX furlongs for A and B Class on %  i daj "i UM I T.I raM I %  %  • >car-old son of Merry Ivlark witnstood a blister ng chgl-amgaj from Royal Wtodaor and Abu Ah in the straight and won a i i.illkeV: %  I i blggaat I'arl piiyimnt. Barbadoi lone victory to-doy W i by Da rtlna r %  MM npMtad hci it Cam (1 ; DMUhg of uitla Haven and Oolden yuip by two U-ngths. Pharl'tc threw Jo %  ,„. who ..one froi i England IMyne leceiveil MTU.H I„ ,| .I joinThi day wai gi"'d for pvmlIhe 1.1^, i Ko,,, .... ... Magic Lantern — Happy Union Which p.Md SI.i3(i en .i $3 ticket The wenther wai btUl the irack slow. Aussies Out For Stnall Scores "MIRACLE'' CATCJII1SC (From Our Own Correspondent) MELBOURNE, Dec. 26. CalXMlVMr 1114 l-.nl H.n .114 Hlra i.ufchnui n toa MB| .1 .il f Manic Ixiilrin itMl |.ln. 41 NaHfatO. %  P Hi !..,.• 1 ll,-i,l.. Pta II Yvaj-Mt ... i.nl Rwh UJ*.tnt ni. I mm H 1 I ,NMNC. VIKMnaiM. KMKIt, -n. lima Tn 1 itAndy Standtleld of the U.S.A, join Ihe other %  thltlaal Stanfield WiU Meet Rhoden KINGSTON, Dec. 27, Andy Staniield. termed Uie fastest human alive, arrived IO Kingston to-day to compete versus MV Keni,. y i A LuinMt Jlm JaUlers %  asnatl Agoslini of Trmidau Monday m the 200 metres. The race will settle world-wide contronray \heUicr McKenley would MM Won Ihe Olympic 200 metres hud he started. Staniield won the event m 20.7, —, — • Jalheis was third in 20.8 and A miracle uf catching today enabled the South AIn^ 0 \. w i ; ,s ru lfUl >* 21.2 suntieid cans to dismiss Australia (or only sixteen runs more than varauj M-T-.. r| %£$! njlUn? they had made oal Wcdrioad-y. Lang, Jaioers and Agostim as ', This effort was coupled with :. i the thifd day's ploy in the mx-ond result of which the Jamaica recom marathon performance by TayAeld %  Test here they are 251 runs on "t 10.3 held jointly by McKenley with MX wickets in hand. and Rhoden stand dangerou.s. Kussell Kndcan ha* his best form Arthur Wint, Jamaica's long stridBt the right lime to reach his | '. n g_ JgaagJea Oly m pic OaptoUn, enmaiden tent century and lead the way to the South Africa total winch wltfa ;•• dayi to go may grow into winning proportions. Kiulcm's effort was typical of! his mentii lluu. MiLncll. So far he has batted ten minutes' abort of live hours for his lIS.h", d > nl Mankad (India). .HI has hit seven fours. He has Miller now needs a furthei 201 scored 700 runs on the tour and "K 'V h eo P J •*** Khodca, the with Tayfleld (fortytwo wickets ,ll >' V'ayer in the world to score t.. date) has a great chance of w ho isand runs and take one -..bllshlng new South African records in this country. A a %  MIU •.•atralU. M i„ r ., < %  i,b I, Mun.HI a> b Tli v(l. Id I % %  % %  %  l, Tn.iwid Melia •. UanaU Kndaan b Tayn*ld . attending the meet %  •*' 1 another joined ihe happy baud, this being Jetsam s lull "rattier I'hich continues un Monday when ugan who accounted for the Trial Slakes and the Trinidad Derby bu*. Arthur Wint of Jamaica and ?** not lakc l' ar ,n ""• Arl,na Dcrby Trlal Slakc,, or lhe U, ^D U, "' ho is proving himself here to be the world's best off .spinner, He took up duly after lunch and DOWls*) unchanged for 20.4 QVCTl nf sight balls each. Slock bowlers Watkins and Murray were off the Held all afternoon wi'.h injuries and Tayfleld |ie Ole Man River just kept flowing along. il. rhartsd lbs ilay a great catching by running back ten yards and diving tu hold a ball Just off the grass after CheeUiam at silly point had jumped and hit a shot from MOaTla OVOJ his head. Chealham caught Harvey brilliantly one handed at silly point. oil .. tun blooded drtw and Mm % %  %  i backwards and screwed his neck unmercifully to hold a high soarcr oft Ring. Hut tha wonda* catch of the au (ell to Kiule.in <>n the boundary. Mill. far and away Australia'.. most polished batsman had hit one six and seemed ., suie.l of another when £ndcan leapt on lhe boundary and caught a ball high ovarbaad at It was snaring over the pickets. The twenty •five-thousand crowd stood and I'lccicd him. The Springboks have a great • ,i their bntsmen do their )i'l> tonmrriiw. The pitch is goo I hut it won't List .mother throe I MK1.HOUKNK. Dec. 27. LfUn.tn the present Test roan ."inning position. A*. Ihe close of '• I tha series which .started S ^h tni i" 4. ay K ror lhe ,lrst "nic ii. UM Swedish relay winch is a composite of the 100. 200, 300 and Derby. In IW49 the Ilrst three-year-old to win more than two classus came on the scene. This was Mr. William Scott's Ocean Pearl, another flaUam progeny, her dam being Pearly Glow. Ocean Pearl won the Trial Stages, the Arima Derby Trial Stakes and the Trinidad Derby. She did not take part in the Barbados Derby. ,^y -..as " — Since Ocean Pearl there have been more classics added to the list and the Jamaican gelding. The Jester II, equalled her record when last year he won the lirsl runiung of the taster Guineas at Union Part. IhSB the Trial Stakes and the Arima Derby Trial Stakes. He did nol run in tha Barbados Guineas or the Barbados Derby but he did race in lhe Trinidad Derby only lo be soundly beaten by another Jamaican, Ihc hUy Embers, who herself established a record by being (he first, and llic laat, horse lhat has won, or will ever win, a Jamaican. Darby and a Trinidad Derby. 1 have concerned myself chiefly with the Barbados and Triiudad classics because thev aie, bv common consent, the most important in the South Caribbean. But in 1946 the Demcrara bred WhUsun Folly, b fc MontrAgel out of Savoy Folly, was also a triple classic winner in as much as she won the B.G. Trial Stakes, the Trinidad Trial Stakes and the B.G. Derby. She ran and was beaten in lhe Trinidad Derby uut did not come to Barbados. So far she is the only horse ever'bred in B.G. to win a Trinidad classic. How"*does" Bright light compare with the winners mentioned above? For my part I rate only Jetsam and Gleneagle above her. As 1 was unfortunate not to see^ her racing al all this season I am also prepared lo reconsider my opinion after I have seen her race. For all I know she may have been belter. The only possible comparison that could have been made between Ilnghi Light's race on Friday and past Derbies' was unfortunately i-liiiniialed when the broadcasting station went off the air at the precise moment that the race was being run. We do not know, therefore, how her time of 1.58 for lhe mile and 130 yards compares wilh the 1 .SO! which was done by Persian Maiden over the same distance in the Kernandcs Trophy. However, of one thing I am certain. Il will take an exceptional creole to break Bright Light's record in lhe classics and It mighl be a long while before we see anything like her again. hundred Tost ^ The i By their fine Test form and enthusiasm lhe young Springbok Mcnoiv side has indicated that Australia's JJ""" supremacy may be drawing to a : ,,",7i*' ClOS*.'. 'Miller Powerful though lhe front line "" %  fan* Man.*.. attack is Australia cannot conu.*,ii h ,,T,* y ( !!T 1 d tinue with, unstable batting and iin.i Mtui L laaaaaa* '" get away wiUi It. Lansav 'tot out Yesterday's breakdown was I %"l,'f Ta*iwui the fifteenth Ume in the last nine-: teen completed Innings that ihe TNtai Autr.li.ns hsvc failed Io Uip, ,„ .v. ,,sc. ANALVSI, Too many catches are being r.ytvid so ' jven for the liking of AustralM lans — used methi.h of the Ilradman regime. Miller, who captured his hundredth Test wicket when he had Walk' caught by Hole, has now joined the select hand of live who have completed the Test "double". Others arc Noble und GilTen (Australia), Rhodes and Tatc (EngII WJII* C Hoi*I. Mill.. § rniW.n mi out ... i" Melon I b w'"b 'BUSH ..... *, THE GOVERNOR'S CUP n i. I *kkU> Milki 1 IV ] I: i i I .>'.v////#w,v////V///V/Ay//.y/',v//,v,',v/,v/^^^ :• 11I It I MM IS SPECIALS! The Governor's Cup. for lhe fifth year in succession, wenl to a horse that was either owned or trained in this island. The list reads: Elizabethan, Storm's Gift, Atomic II, Fuss Budget and now Abu Ali. Indeed, no olhcr race in Trinidad has ever been monopolised to HUB exteul by horses from Barbados. To Mr. Fred Bethel and his gallant little coll Abu Ali I owe an apology. After he won here in November I did not think him capable of such form over Hi furlongs. True the race was rather inconclusive due to the interference with Landmark and others wklch was caused by Monro unsealing his jockey at the start. Hope Dawns, one of the co-favourites, however, was weU away and ran as true a race as could be expected under any circumstances. But Abu AU, who was also well away, defeated her on her merits and, indeed, was forced to run u very trying finish to subdue her. In view of this there is no doubt thai the little colt is a very good one and al the present lime one of the best in training in the II.W I. THK t.lii l lii KV STAKES It good fortune smiled on us in lhe Governor's Cup, it was ill luck which coat us lhe Breeders' Stakes. Apple Sam, evidently suffering lhe eltects of his temporary lay off due to a knee Injury, could only manage a fodrth to the outsiders Bomb Sight, Lord Wyn and Flying Saucer. Nevertheless. I am glad to see that in siring Bomb Sight the Brown Bomber has at last shown some of the promise which brae dart have held foi him for so long. Il is also more Ln his favour. I Uiuik, that he has sired a winning two-year-old as il was expected that he might bo Inclined to produce plodders. Just opened NYLON SHIRTS — all colours SUEDE SHOES in Navy Blue. Grey. Brown READY MADE SUITS ranging from $35.00 up PRICES TO SUIT EVERY POCKET THE LONDON SHOP LTD. EXCLL'SIVK GEVTLKMKVS OUTFITTERS KEAIIVMADES & MADK-TO-ORDEHS Law n Broad Street Phone: 4785 .. ....".-. ni.i.iu .-wrr.i lllimr I.N >' % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % %  % %  '. % % %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  .•.•. %  ^. % % %  %  %  .;:;:;:::-. The Management af :— llOOKLIiV (B'DiiS) DRUG STORES | ^taato LTD. •-% % % %  s'V*.-S*, .^WaJtaKl S •"•• r* TfT-rr*-r*" %  •**" *Msm£M2 £ i Bee lo inform the Customer* of:— BOOKKK.V ALPHA VIIAKMU Y is U-ing removed to more modern premises situutril opposite Hotel Koyal, and il is rebelled lhat ur shall he forced lo close for u few days from 29lh to :tls| December I952 for the purpose of removal and Stock TakiniRK OPKMNC. on FRIDAY 2ND JAM'ARY 1953 for (ieneral Business. Telephone Orders will be accepted a* usual. Simply liinl 1419 for Your RrM|s GREETINGS i UNIVERSAL — Dia> O' brush lor po.ui* protection igilnn White' Anis. Borers. Rot .mi F u nj. Pjim or polish o-cr treated wood. N odour. No firc-ritk. %  %  --*•• ai I ECONOMICAL — H,(hl, concentr a te&_t.vft v urrl.|aTB4>aail diluted 'or use— joei further and com leu. * %  *aw--a* •Sat PERMANENT — Cinnot wjih-out or c.iporne *Comfclne wtch' the fibcei, toufheni ih timber .nd ankc* k Cra^ajiiiuaXAfae. perirune"! proieibon ^~ ** !" %  %  aaal %  Allot 'titi'atle"Co"!*llrf.\-a ..-.--^^ £"11 ^_ Kern ^.^Ca^antf a*Bi*s**aW^\ 1 i JJ AMsUinailabbAm; %  Jt H. JASON |ON£S a CO. ITO. P.O. ton 141, • ie.rb.doi. >^>^^^ti %  %  I %  %  %  %  %  %  %  final LOi&hcA §ak a (pAaApeJwiu 1953 Sck&lsdn £AM. £aif Si'*V\W*W\M\i\i\frM\UW,\M\M\UW,\i\>