Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text


Sas importance to the B.W). are the
7



ESTABLISHED 1895







e believe that the Common- ;
h Economie Conference has |
been asuccess. It has been a suc-
in the first place, because it
enabled leaders of all the
fries in this great Common-
h to meet together to discuss
F common problems--and the
future of the free world depends
Upon the genius of our Common-
ith countries,
t has been called an Economic
ference; but the problems we
considered, and have made
‘ contribution towards solving,
far transcended mere
mics—-we have been dealing
basic problems involving the
existence of all individual
and women of the Common-
3 Ath.
~ + Common Interest
, the second place, there has
@merged a clear pattern of com-
mMOn interest and purpose. We be-
Heve that, if the future policies of
the “ommonwealth countries can
five up to that high purpose, there
fs a real opportunity for the devel-
opment of all our countries to the
benefit not only of their people,
but of all the peoples of the free
ld—nay of the whole world:
for the Commonwealth must set
fhe pace ana inspire others.
' “As far as the colonies are con-
ned, and in particular the
W.1., apart from broad state-
mis of policy which create the
kground-— the fertile field for
ture colonial policies and actions
—those sections dealing with com-

Modity policy and Imperial pre-: be modified to

ference fully and explicitly protect
our vital interests. ;
“Salient features of immediate

te-affirmation of the value and
sanctity of Imperial preference;

wh the move towards a modification



of the “no new preference” clauses

of G.A.T.T,, the direct mention of

of the Commonwet

Broadcasting
Station For
Grenada

SEA

WELL, Dec. 13.—Mr
Luck, Acting Financial Advi

the Windward Islands
ment said shortly after his arrival

at Sea
fairiy
Broadc
erect:
about
under

well this mornir

Govern- |

ug

G. E

ser to



that a

powerful Government

vasting Station
i in Grenada at
$150,000, made

is

av

a C.D. & W. grant

to be
cost of

ailabk

It will serve the senyacs
Islands principally, but
hoped that it will cover gttedes
and the other islands in the area.
Luck came over to nego-
tiate an epitietoont with Barba-
behalf of his Government
supply of
to Barbados and the pur-
chase of the finished products.

Mr.

A conference for
will be

i

dos ‘on
with
copra

regards to the

it

this purpose :
held -at Hastings House} ‘'

on Monday and Tuesday, after
which Mr. Luek will stay on for)

a few
Mr,
old Oj
there
tween

days,

Luck said that under the
ls and Fats Agreement
Was an arrangement be-

Grenada and

and they in Grenada “are hop-
ing that that arrangement may

and that 4t will continue
the new agreement.”

Local Business

:| He

whieh

said

a certain extent,

under

that local musiness|
underwent som

long-term contracts as a means Of | | During those difficult periods, he}

vassuri’,, !ong-terme. *ectirity of |



mar 6 and prites

vestors the Sht te wransier
yapital gains across 4he exchanges.

New Hepes

|
“All these features open new

orizons and offer new hopes for
he production of greater wealth,

d thus further improvement of
living standards, of the peoples of
e B.W.I.

“But new hope, new wealth,)

| new prosperity, will not fall into
/ our lap We must think hard,
plan hard, work hard, for them.
It is up to every colony in the
B.W.1.—every man and woman,
whatever their race, colour, or
creed, whether they be Governor
or government official, or busi-
nessman, legistator, or labourer
-—-to do all in their power to

» onvforaal |
pre ry maicty: Mes cone |
wedtsicn abtowiadis srt. Yi. ing

Sunday





Crossing
Allantie In
Rubber Boat

L

ONDON,

ALIAN BOMBARD

ber boat.

Frenchman is attempting
cross the Atlantic in

NDON TALKS GIVE W.1.

STATEMENT OF POLICY -7B.Radar’ ™
FERS REAL CHANCE Sails Aiter

Al THE CONCLUSION
onomie Conference which was held in London? Mr
rantley Adams, Leader, Barbados House of Assembly,
d Hon. Albert Gomes, Minister of Trade and Commerce,
inidad who attended as advisers to the Secretary of
te for the Colonies, issued the following statement.

E

a ruo

Bembard set oui from ¢

Canary Islands off the \\
Coast of Africa on Ocwwi
18 and was reported sighic:!
800 miles from the West i-
dies.




SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1952







IBER



UA. Timber
Mission In
Barbados

SEAWELI I 13

jthree-man United K

9 Months

10vor coaster T, B. Radar}







a esierday after al ae :

lapse < nine nontns, during .

which time she was lying disabled ; ea

in Carlisie Bay. mer aesunathon is , 7

Trinidad and her new owner, Mr :

M. E. R. Bourne, is making the ;

trip. 1

It was on March 26 this year

that the Radar left Trinidad with
general cargo on board for Messrs, 9a
| Booker Bros. of British Guiana. erininad

At 4.25 p.m. the next day, ac- Eo +

cording to reports, the engine sud- 3 ae - aes mE
deniy stopped and the vessel Be-

gan to adrift, e M nw t ‘

It is likely that Bombard

nearest to

indian
Africa.
—Reule:

will call at Barbados whic
is the West

1

island



s| e
| Arrives For

N.A.T.O. Talks} ©

Acheson art

ato:

n

PAR

Jnited States Seeret:

ived by

landed at Orly fe
at 10.35 a.m.
Mr, Acheson. also is expected to

confer

the

The French and Brit
Secretaries were ex;

Mr.

diffieult !

with British
Barbados, Foreign Ministe:
the two nations w

to-de

Administagitio
elect Eisenhower.

Acheson their
the hope that he

Designats

them back to Secret
Johu Fost

on
h to

Is

North Atlantic Treat
Ministers’

Counci)
whieh opens Monda



D

ep
he

vith

Antho

—In wh

jtimes during the past six months, :, Me, ea
jis “picking up” for Christmas, ie nial, Pops ated
) Per x
|said, the price their ergp» Piaas oe
were “not satisfactory.” nial 1
Mr: Tiyek antt that there (us! om
been aa outbreak of powalytic) « q »
fae fete ivr, Buttes

affects animals, and is caused by!

grasp to the full the great op-|

ae aped offered by this)

istoric statement of Common-
wealth policy.
“The B.W.I, now have a real

ance to take their place in the|

ommonwealth and in the world. |
‘We must realise and exploit this |
miew spirit of confidence abroad in |

‘the Commonwealth.

Great Privilege
' “For us personally, it has been
‘A great privilege and an inspir-

in experience to been re-
‘Present at this historic gathering

‘of statesmen and leaders of the
Commonwealth. Our feelings of

"Batisfaction at what has been
» achieved are enchanced by the con-

Bciousness of effective representa-
Kion of the colonial point of view
L thanks in a large measure to

“the Secretary of State for the

Colonies and his official advisers,
whose grasp of the complex sub-
jects of the Conference has en-
sured that the colonial aspect of

these subiects wrought their full |

influence.





THE BRITISH WARNER PATHE NEWSREEL ORGANISATION film unit, whicl
F 7 y vendor The



LMING



{ Secretarysh ip.



French
roblems
ise with

}
to
en

esident-

Fore:

channel

fS
ulle

ore

Britis!

ny Ed



Minister

at prob-

W last4hiceting Se-
takes over the U.S.

After drifting for about four
days, the captain of the steamship
Amakura picked up the distress



signal, Radar was taken in tow I t I d x W ne ‘
and brought to Barbados, the \ Py las é A
sarest port | t Secretary in the Secreta
The Radar was then offered for | hortly t \ eM r
i i t aht by Mr ise n i M M if
’ ade certain ( Me fe Trade (
l. A ney el H , ‘
talled, and it t Fi i eu

juipped with senerating

I which gives the Radar her

uppl oO'n re-!

ve been completed and the |
has bee repainted

Radar is taking mixed

ector of Agriculture, the A
ie Colonial Engineer, the Manager of
° the Housing Board, the manager

o! the Housing Loans Organi

r electricity



tior
nd the Fisheries Officer, Later i:
The three members of the Timber Mission which arrived at Seawell yesterday morning leave the Marine » afternoon they visited the
Wotel accompanied by Mr. T. O. Lashley, (third from left) for a tonr of the Government Housing Schemes, |C@Oovernment Housing Schemes and
L. to R.: Mr. A. F. Lamb, Conservator of For-sts, Trinidad; Mr. C, W. Scott, leader of the Mission; the Fisheries Department
Mr. T. O. Lashley, Manager of the Housing Board; ind My. J. L. Richardson Today (Sunday) they will be
=i “ en on a tour of the island
Director of Agriculture

|
i
nae a U.S. Does Albamni $100,000 Por |: resi" sas

1+ rt d and other ports
tides ne captain, Herbert
“ver vho wa until recently
in of the auxiliary schooner,

Marion Belle Wolfe. Cargo in-





ernor it Gover nent

Acting Ge i I
° B.G, Elections [oe 8 itis, canes
Bomb Exercise |... cnm (hostess

for the Radar are the Schooner
Owners’ Association



er in the afternoon,
| thORGE I ¥, DG old discussions with

ey will





Vations Put

NEW YORK, De 13 Dec, 13 velopment and Welfare Organi.
The wailing of 579 air raid sirer ich ) he} 4 vans etuielsins tlon at Hastings House
r t oral ciec i

Forward New

nation’s largest atom bomb defense exer A inder the new consti From Colonial Office

It was based on the assumption that an atom bomb mo ou, Another $96,000 is reserv rhe Mission has been sent out

Trade Pla destructive than the one which levelled Hiroshima had { for payment of allowances t y the Colonial Office with the
nm been dropped on a major tralfic inter ( 1 Bre j i rs Of the legislature rreement f ti e Governments

I 1 Mullion nc tor re 1cerned, and it is being finaticed

PARIS, Dee. 13 nt 1 Defence rect of thé Speake Min-= Bb a grant under the Colonial

Western European nation’ rTAck Hert i i < te mbors of both Cham.bJevelopment and Welfare Act
pledged themselves today to try ! pr 1 ume evs of tht It of ;

new: legislature terms reference are:—~
0 eliminate their need for assist- {although re to correlate availifple informa-

tion on the timbers of British
Guiana and British Honduras,
their distribution, properties and
yroductive potentials; to examine i

'











of ti ut

ance from the United States ina! CAI | ED OFF jpolitan area » or a fen me discloses by Maes ain
weeping programme of “trade noty 4 minute warning of the hypothet J secretarys Preasurer hon
aid” Seventeen memiser nations Ileal. attack, tl dead _ numbered cawu» Frank McDavid

and the free territory of Trieste SEOUL, Korea, De i3 03,000 and injured 27300 vi. CBE on Priddy when
naking up the Organization for ‘Amazing’ South Koreun He tid € r@_foing on the’ be presented his budget te '











the bite of, the South American] 4S he left the plame Mr. Ache-}European Economic Co-operation, {troops recaptured embattled Lit- [basis that at lefist $4900 casual-, iereased provision 18 also ma ooh aatike oc. the Saath feneey
Vampire, son said: “l am very sac that this Ubanimou ly approved a pro-|tle Nori Hillon the western front | ies would b rétche® cases and|/or travelling expense nd ‘suth-Toncerned. with particula refer.
This bat which was once found | p, the last time I will bx bae k BI } oy vhic 5 the am d State today but cd } I : t there would be Upwards o istence illo nee to member ence to the intensive utilisation of |
in Trinidad was thought to be' aoline ocean, ve oP oe ushering in a n near 620,000 homele ir wo eferring to the cost of theling rorests: to consider new use }
non-existent in Grenada, but re~!{))\.\. eu ee far -renauata feed for these timbers; to examine the
cently there were two cases of wil} be taken at the: current roblems of handling these tim-
jthe disease, The Grenada Gov- nato px tir aay NOE ers in constructional wogk and
‘ernment received the help of two “fre said: “We probably will make recommendations on any
Trinidadians, and Government is view ah ¢ Pad eS done i easure necessary on the part of
investigating the possibilities of past amd survey the prol the roducing countries in the
obtaining a vaccine against the that- remain and make arra.ge- American official observer at} ace bunker lefenc ere in~| oo et ng Uae Tee preparation of the timbers to meet
disease. ments for another meeting prob- e meeting called the agreement ROK Command rdered {te together h ou H : BR yal M 7 equirements of consumers; to
ably in the beginning of 1952 an “historic event which repre-|§outh Koreans to withdr ive | nh countic i : . ; eth xamine the prospects for extend-
| He said that in the past four |*en's he ere official recognition hou and 45 minutes later, But vroughs U.P — at ; ng the markets of each of these
Y i years much had been done toward |f Europe triving to eliminate | stubin ‘ K 4 —— _ , a ve timbers he ‘aribbe
ta t Th i n ap StS, aid 5 mn South Korean till ee Ape for ithe , imbers in the British Caribbear
an e e | strengther ing the defence Panada was. aleo.repréasitied by ae desperately to Little Nori » : ; 0 iid the United Kingdom and to
s ining twevachieved in the ast (aiobserver, te \tom Plant or eee en oe
en | vears quite apart from th Countrie ith formal de lega-| rT ea cae ir eis t tage MeDavid threw |mean » by which the de mand fo1
huilding up of defences—was th tions incluced every one in West-. , le oh te os de il, Sey Ie bi " { the suggestion “that a splen~}the imbers might b imulated
{ruil d ; F eee ees oper. |ern Eurove except Spain and Fin- | yack in 20 minutes by deadly fire uN acuatlec lid opportunity is open to any u 1 to examine in the light of
Bridgetown was extremely busy /@¥ing © aes g nder-|!and. The 100,000 word report from 50 calibre machine guns | ficial member of the present]! er recommendations, the
yesterday. With only nine moré jation | based on ee ¥ and specifies no time when Europe may {49d U.S Patton tanks stationed | Mi ef ( iil who may wish to perpetu ippir equirement
shopping days left before Christ- | Standing and compen AMONE lope to be free of the need for |9" Little Nori’s crest, United EEP RIVER, Ont _ ate his memory and record of set-| Mm Scott, leader of the Mission
mas, housewives crowded stores |@ll nations.” —U American aid. It says that Europe | Press correspondent Fred Painton | Canada, De r 1 gift of thetold the Advocate that the part
jand groceries to make Christmas | 1ust be made economically inde-|reported from the blazing ar j Evacuat er ent ' @ On page 5
purchases. endent by means of expanded] that an Allied official told him he ire 1,000 met king for 1

Along Broad Street, the pave-

ments were packed with pedes-

trians, manv had to use the stree’.|



In some stores Santa Claus was |
on hand to welcome the childre:.
One lady lost her little girl in the
crowd. A few seconds later ~he
found her admiring Santa Claus
and his snow-white beard



9

Shopping Days



unit tried to take

a

before Xmas



many



storm

Wind Storms Leave
Death In Wake

|
; Oe 4 - oe
“r e y Owe ;
tell * at ’s largest : 20! : se e Lodi Wie + - :
in ae Ae : cine ' ' ny F Po a ae y
+ a Sea tin J] ‘“ { : :
tate- 1es é \ ie ‘ } ay we
a to »ARIS 13 r { * pm ming Def ori ‘ t r
Li ate thelr need for asaic althoug idents of the ( i .
1 F t t g } othetix | / Vt J ‘ ?
é é ‘ the 4 } l t ‘ 4 L ‘ ,
. c -r, | wo Sw he f ’ 0
‘ ; . nas 5 : , . rot , Y udget stu emt
< in amme . xd Ste . j the rl ‘ f ‘ ‘ . t embers
, aa ee STING ‘ ew ion Big Nori after pushi arl . : vor! I Bk
not |e Cre era jto its crest in naairly ix hours of | Wer iso ex} to f ae ral eleetion VicDavid tm a
sion | K et outlined the programme | hard, bloody fighting tic fire, ar pread peech pointed out that the indi-
teh to make We eckee k | Aggressive Re public of Korea |trut 1 frot last « cations appeared to point to prob
“st ient and s g ‘
apie ee: = i stren eres oh infantrymen pushed up the C ( 1 ele that part of the $100,000
ino ‘Gaateradicn mic -and: financia | lopes of Big Nori at 10.80 a night be recovered from forfeited
ut Pas : 7 behind a curtai f accurate tank | iler t I ts of un ¥ ’ ite
ems ; Amba ulor William H. Drapey }4,, ited Saoate a ; oP . ss ; in t it f unlucky ca id
Jr.,

FRANKFURT, Dec. 13.
id wind
northern

Frankfurt, [
Central Germany today wreaking
destruction and death. War bomb-

‘ed buildings
were unroofed.
shippings were

was held u



we





ys
>s.

by

‘
Three seamer

fallen

toppled

Hurricane-like rain ar
ripped across

the Saar

damaged.

p on the ma

and

west

and others
River and coastal

Traffic
in high-

trees and power
Airfields were damaged.
1 were drowned off

St. Nazaire and two missing fron

}One

intere

| Saarlander wa
falling tree.



THE MAURY VENDOR

kill

ed by

—U.P.

a capsized craft in the Rhine =
’
|
;
‘











roduction and exports and that} cons idered ROKs “the toughest] i de: | Atomic | ry pla :
the closest United States co-opera-' little soldiers in the world,” Chal R r i} fror plant .
tion will be necessary to that end. , —vUP uildings tod ! t

For the United States and Car { ' wo I
ida, the report said, the “indi: ne > ou



en ble” >eds ot eratior S st }
nre: no tariff inéreases and 1ow- | NOWSLOPID on oh

ng of tariffs towards a _ frec r« mn | fr Lin i
7 rket goal. Streamlining of es Kills I en ; r ed





om procedures Internatio ‘

o-operation to assure stable inter- '

national ommiodity prices and BOSTON, U.S.A., Dee. 13 tthe eh ! t
United States efforts to insure that Northern New England wa he | tipse ‘ !

American economy remains stabl buried under an 18-inch snov
—U.P blanket but began to reé store

power and communicatior dn

v |
‘ oo |
r ) the wake of the savag storm | eines t ope
US. Asks For U.N. | that lett a tot of ten ‘dead an ajo A, Key, (
|





© Old Brown Sherry

uncounted damage















V o Polar ait wee ¥ in from the f
> ping in from a
Committee beet causti ae aeet the Awinds | ' ® Cape Dry Red
aa deanall ‘ driven rainstorm that slow! 1 *} ( t ‘at
UNITED TIONS, Dec. 1 heading seaward and converted | vile ur (Claret & Burgundy)
United States accused Russia|;he rain into heavy amined atte
today of harstringing the United) clogging snow lop . . ® Kimberly Club Sherry
Nations through the illegal use of| Clinging snow snapped power rade Unions Open . °
the veto power and called fo lines and felled trees, reduced . 3 i
pecial committee to study t highway traffic to a craw) and Caribbe: ‘ida OF me eo Franschoeh No. 2
hole problem of admitting ne isolated at least 20 communities; An of tor th “i
ember nations Senator Ale in Vermount |. ap ORs ; ; 2 a (Sauterne)
inde: Wiley ranking Rey The storm dropped snow in the}! eee rh ,
lican Member of the Sen: Adironack mountains of up-stu ! na e ‘ . ¥ ; a
‘oreign Affairs Committee war: New York, then unleashed its full] Gon Pra ‘ | inbe rnet Sauv ignom
} against “hasty or ill ec action” on the membership|New Hampshire, Maine was fore- | ss@tion 0 ‘ 6 : . ‘ J “
problem He said that any such warned and highway crew kept) act as a c¢ - : / Sparkling Frans¢ ho« kh
“ au “ sate Lp , the etiviti i e Trade nior
ni might have unfortun: the roads open. eee P. oe f = “s (Ghdusaens ‘vse
: Wiley said the U.S. favoured AMBASSADOR DIES | tae tho ft the panish -sp¢ 4 es kli mr val b
Latin .America’s proposal to se! TOKYO, Dec. 13 ng territories) the gre jority Spar ing oodeberg
p @ special 15-member comrr Died: Philippine Ambas ador | f i ure y affiliated
ee to study the system of tack-| Jose P. Melencio, 58 e ICFTU and ORT (Burgundy type)
the technical problem-—U.P. —UP | vide ‘ tbl
e rae : . At prices considerably below those of
ortines Starts 2 eigen onda Paced
Marear rily f Port-of-S Duties
a Dutie
} Trinid ho spent t ¢ t
( ‘ A ; off \T ™ . y
Political Clean- up no 8, K.W.V.
: . 1
MEXICO CITY, Dec. 13. , cials alike by naming an entir fembers of the ar ies Pure _ tts Good
President Adolfo Ruiz Cortines| new 123-member Cabinet e] mr fT y (
ho « into power on Decer Aleman cabinet consid Chair P. A
| i promise of ocial| contain some top level tal I'riy 1 fer you K.W.V
t to clean up Mex helved in its entirety t their Time for



ing Guide’ for
opping during






tarted swinging | tines although not speaking





‘ roon The 6l-year ji ly against the ri ti ti aaa td ete
Executive called for “a ment I herite t ow these appear
‘ nest r suUblic na .ifrom / ide it ¢ i ane gularly In this «

t Sis ia ny ¢ t r trative. } over the holiday period

this he has disrr . od ere need
’ ficia Or nai teration ¢
oon will be on Mexic
( r begar k ing disj« ystern l
: ove forceme | med
t new ¢ est ¥ I at k
‘ww h





PAGE TWO

i en emer:

Rig XN mas Action RIG JIM MeLAIN John Wayne

NORTHWEST

i & Tomorrow T ta & i orre
44 A » p.m + ’
K.0.'s Cotossa
; Excitement |
ne pete Territory {{ ALWAYS MELLOW ... ALWAYS THE SAME f @ minimum of 50 Dutchmen
ABOUT FACE I < nt ke r et see — il irting J ary 1 was HE
CHINOOK here today by the are
} men Committee
NATURE S AFRICAN n Migrat Dutch f ‘ nte j
HALF ACRI ants will be workers.! vesterday by the Canadian Cruis
| aes eee peers TREASURE in “tne first half of 1952 approx- auth ate 30 pikes rr t : a:
. . is etch 00 Duich rated 201 took {wo boat load
TERRITORY sont erfen under LC.E.M’sj (ge 'WO Boat loa
[ stereos! | ike Sto oe. aoe A OS An SP dirs, Walherridietold inc Ie
! nen Be wc _—u. P. motto i travel light fe
A RICAN FEEL FIST ——— fof the suitcases are in rm
| ne are his!’ Mr. Wainwr t
| MONTANA BELLE THE LONG HORN A THMA Mucus Seater. trerveliink” ters sen
| | BRIDGETOWN SARBA OISTIN Ll d Fi t D can take. 99 much: aigre "
MVGETO SAR Rit ? oa 4
| Des 1 " 70 (Dial xaos oosene irs a with you
eee a = Don't let coughing, sneezing, y Mr. Wainwright re
-=



and
Have Fun
for

) OLD YEARS

7

4

% endly informal atmosphere everyone
acquaintance, and with the fine back-

> cround of a new Club House no better
) etting for a memorable Ola Years!

Hats, Noisemokers ete, FREE
MEMBERS ONLY — $1.50

CARLTON





E
Ni

Â¥

—




COLONY CLUB

DECEMBER 25TH

seen WN NGG NNN NNN WO



Old English Xmas Dinner



Ee NS A
Dance 9 —
+ ~~~
ES.





“SASL ALA,



—PALLLEDBADPALAE ADA SASAPSA AAAS A gh 0! ayo hy

SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY,

Tc ——---—— +





a

{| THE PERFECT XMAS GIF1 50 Dutchmen

GRANTS WHISKY : sta (arub (alling

DON'T

PURINES TN DN TSR RG ARN

PLLC ELL ELLE





THIS EVENING 8.30 P.M. -- Monday — Tuesday 5 & 8.30 ¥











adian Bron Pow-



ing attacks of Bronchitis or Asth a dent of the Ca
oy your sleep and energy anc her a 1 : od

night without cying MEN- der Works and Director of Int
bac This great medicine Is not a tional Bronze |
smoke, injection or spray, but works





wde Work

> Powder Work





through the blood, thus reaching + Montreal. Brot A
Jungs and bronchial tubes. The fir is represented in 45 countris ly
dose starts helping nature imme Wainwright t ial’ the
ately 3 ways. 1. Heips loosen and r ainwright has v ea 7
move thick strangling mucus. 2. Thut and likes the West Indie
promotes freer breathing and sound r, “Tibi” has many hobb
more refreshing sleep. 2. Helps allevi- bt has many hob
ate roughing, wheezing.@s neezing. favourite — taking “n e-
Quick satisfaction or money back tures.” He has b shé
guaranteed. Get MENDACO from ss a . F
@hemist today. this year a “brand new novi
camera t’s a beaut,” sa Tit





Here until about the
vea Mi a Mr



t Ave tak y



Regular visitors to the island, the
Killed in 7 Minutes From Canada of next yea

Your skin has nearly 50 million tiny M* FRANK NEATE Viami Jeweller







Ocean View Hotel,



Mrs. W. G MacKenzie of Mo Mr







@ soft, clear, ores ey aipestn, sce Wegener runs his owr
‘ of ‘empty ta ‘kai et soupats sed treal who is on her third t ewelle establishment in Miami
Nixoderi | emisttodayend | Barbados. Mrs, MacKenzic
WILLIAM GRANT & SONS LTD DISTILLERS SCOTLAND ferovethe (| Darbados. Mrs. Muck Viret Visi
“Available from all Recognised Dealers” Nixoderm Detergent sear © FTE! ~~ t | eo
— STOKES & BYNOE LTD. — For Skin Troubles (ioubis. Meck Diem Gaaads AC io Mus Bae ian
) Vv 4 mobson,
i COLO SCLPCLCSSSSSSPP LPL LLL








morning by Re
| The GARDEN—St. James C.A. Mrs. Kinch who went sort Airlines It was her firs
Today & Tome-row 8.20 two months ago in the inter f trip to the island and she re
Mat. Today 4.20 p.m
LILLIT MARLENE re
+ ~ â„¢y, y % ens weeke ab leav
BOTHER TO KNOCK } Lisa’ DANIELY mS Oye. Weeks ae: Mi





































st

her health, was joined by her | - gretted very much having to

waved , R. AND MRS. STANLI ations 4 Mae :
$ wr ae sree foaehte from Can- Re “ ts Air ti Eeiereat ee the pleased “with what she has seen
G L a> B E g , 4.41 Et Y - on Thursday morning y US yesterday 1 With regards to the weather



DECE MBER 14, 1952

a CCC sac,



MR. AND MRS. “TIBI” WAINWRIGHT (the andering Wain

ne sar : ? -
w ‘ae * ‘ I ! 2 s. “ ” ow. ‘
lich Germs Mareso] Beach Flo wrights) arrived from Canada yesterday by the “Canadian Cruiser”.

"y expect to be here until the middle

Welcome Change

seams and pores where germs hide Deputy Coal Control O
wine” Pecting, ths nee tawa arrived from Canada : . R° rURNING to Miami, Florida RRIVING by the De Grasse
Mavlon Woot heh nt en neads. ay. ie kkot wes 3d Ua: rd during the week by B.W.LA on Theta ia England
: nk iser. r. Neate has ite dn Teintted ait 3 7 was Mrs E ainwright whx«
ishes, Ordinary treatments give ly . via Trinidad afte pending a as Mrs ue a )
temporary relie€ bec use they ao not Barbados before. Here unti 3 : holiday were Mr. an Mrs. Ludwig a guest at Cacrabank Hotel and
ate, Wtababur tit the aren yh ne Ar aying at the Marine Wegener, They were guests at the Will probably be .r®maining in
minutes and is guaranteed t: Arriving by the same

Barbados for six months or even
1 a year, .

Five y2ars ago, Mrs. . Wain-
wright spe nt a holiday in Jamaica
and had alw vanted to com¢
further south This is her first
opportunity, and although only
here for a few days, she is already





f
- she said that it was rather cold
in England when she left and
this is certainly a welcome

change



aD
N
j \ D : liss Gil vas st at Leavin, Today
. 7 ; . s TOKYO FILE 22 Mr. Kinch is Avsistant Ma ! N Gibson was a guest at the 4 F Ly
At 8 p.m. ee Cee ree x Florence MARLY »f Messrs. T. Geddes Grant L Ocean Viow Hotel EAVING to-day by B.W.LA
i vp oe, ° re tor Trinidad en route to Mar-
ee 64.50 AND Wed 530 pm . D, _ Christmas Holidays : : e
riCKETS $4.5 ih ON THE LOOSE } Repe i ate : tinique is Mr. George Grant, a
Tr *d 7, 7 y Tr , Aw Jos 1s : YHE “AROLEERS,” a barn ° narra e217 Teurveet Qn rei ‘ im ‘ ;
TUE RE TU EN Or THE TEXAN x TARZAN'S SaLne Len Barker ) j a ier will . ; i : M' W.K. FERGUSON. Assis “A nm-reial business man from
e Dale ROBERTSON — Joanne DRU $ | actanzan’s = Y =) ne rae ar rote a + € 3 l tant 6 the Attorney Fort-de-France who came over
; % r - = Sera ‘ E ieneral of Trinidad arrived on here a week ago in the interest of
|W YE A R'S EVE Pit 12; Cirele 24; House 36; Baleeny 60; Box 72 & OV > — E oe uy by B.W.LA. to spend the bis health.
ev ing at 8. > Clock hey aa ; : r re © ¢£ met
N E 3 OCCA LEO OEP OA oo oe N | Intil Dec. 24th a ett abrir _ ms spas witht hi ‘ rel cel : any” a guest at the
J ‘FET . ; | Sunday. It was so popular that ro ee ae wes =
GALA DENCE AND SUFFES & a 0o@ DA a tH EAT R £ $ REMEMBER rep. t pertonmaae war petueste a Canada and England
TICKETS 56.00 & | ot eds are for local Christmiz Students Leave EAVING for Canada by TCA,
wee Pe ae aie _ OLYMPIC ROXY ROYAL | FREE GIFTS aaa QO SITE a number of student on Thursday morning wa
elo-day 5 t ae wo shows , ;, . tter 7 t
Telephone 0107 me ind continuing daly) To-day 430 & 8.18 To-day to Tuesday | Today 430 & 8.30 Short Holiday t ara Tone Off a - rhe Sent As ary
f Stanley Krame R.K.O. Doubk 4.30 & 8.15 Universal Techr \ PENDING hort holid ¥ Lodge, C ngton Hich S y] cer who has gone up for mec
te Ce Stanley Kran Ses = ]] Spend $10.00 Cash or more |] PENDING a short holiday wiv 194%; Codrington} |
EVENING DRESS ONLY & Pr at otis ee spt Universal Double roe Boub'e on any day and get a piece . her parents, Mr. and. Mr K eae ic rsuline Cc nv ft ty sang a ne ; was accom-
Hi NAADA INN ATA INS nce Bea”, Songtsd, | MeaoGaa |] of phoma’ ware free." [I]. a. Farmer of tne Lodge School 0", T*inidad gn Friday ‘and yes~ Banled by Mrs, Hae,"
t Gary Cooper in Dinah Sher.dan er > s Mrs. J. A. Farmer who returned ‘“'°® Y & “4. to spend att Oo iple-
NPA ANZA ZS AABN BABS BS AS Thomas Bite aie . } in The bigger the purchase the is Mrs. A. Farmer or rm ict AM notte : s c
ADNAN TR PUN ISN TNIN, ASK tinted ae i ; i ee " COMANCHE 3etter the Gift. on Thursday by T.C.A. from Mon- — es ne as oli _ ao = eas eeteicen Mo ia
4,4, _ > * , ‘ 2 co en and otner relatives 1 iss g 0 ind v Mon-
LALLA LDP RRB POLPDA Lost patrot IVORY HUNTER TERRITORY treal where she had been on hol! . , \
err ee ¢ HIGH NOON ’ a (In Technicolor) and LOUIS L. BAYLEY day. . ; a am on Thursday by T.C.A., on a
% ‘ O i K $ The Story of n man! Yicter MeLagien HUNCEHACOWN) |BUCCANEER GIR} Mrs. Farmer was accompanied Congratulations be to her mother who is ill
Y 3 who was too prouc ports. aaa and Starring Of ee a he : ; ao Mrs. Elliott is the daughter of
. s - ner usband but he nt asi = 4 E . >
> L % to run eee aie” KATIE DID IT) Xyonne DeCarlo Bolton Lane. \ghrough to Trinidad. vaipmashe is (XONGRATULATIONS to Mr. Canon and Mrs. P. W.D. Moore
& a mate a le . elix
3 S ee Rau NeW®) Double with | di a aig wae UY employed ds Man Livny» ” Felix M. Jones, Assistant C i Feave
, PRIEDA | : ‘Monday & Tietdas | SESS SSS SSS ) rh ag Tite, Chief Sanitary Inspector of St & n .
p % and | Ann Blyth ; Works of Messr Wit» b
h t 8 3 . Next Friday BUCCANEER GIRL! Mark Stevens 420 & 8.30 and Co., of Port-o Joseph on being elected wn A’so- QEVE Mai ns who’ hac
¥ 7 urs oy @ a . x FRANCIS G s Starring The Biggest Comedy) Universal Double "” , clate Member of the Royal Sani- been holidaying as guests
% , eee ee en) Yvonne DeCARLo | in Yeirs | Harriet Hilliard HIS MORNING \étended W.L Conference ‘ty Institute, at Cacrabank Hotel, returned
» . % | Philip _ FRIEND | Wed. and Thurs Rod Cameron THIS ! Se R . EY MILL > Mr. Jones was an inspector for home on Thu rsday morning by
% fr. CRITCH IVAN presents @ Watch for Yuerday & Weanes-} 4.90 & 815 | in ind: oeeve M . OF ; ee pte M.C.I the past 14 years, during which T.C.A. They were Capt, H- H
% Bing Crosby Double. Phat: “hae Stewart in [HONEYMOON r 7 lrinid ag Dike y by BW LA. fine a “ ‘i ie wena? ep ne Pilot of at A, stationed
‘s . “ shat ames pwal | LODGE . , mn t as sda) > f specto ol 1 parish in 1 A ancouver, \o c I
x Jane v m mace aoe es = and SUNDAY MORNING ifter attending as an Adviser, the absence of r, Gittens who was Boulton; Miss Terry Halieese te d
ean § % 7 | WINCHESTER 13 |e AIDERS OF THI a Fifth West Indian Conference in Jamaica this year attending a Misc Barbara Heath or the 450
Q JUST FoR yor THE STORY OF and ERT A SWIM and:.a DRINK which took place at Mont Cour th. P Health Cen- type We on A
x RUBIN HOOD WOMAN HATER in Bay t . ; Oe Tea SO Ter Department of T.C-A, in
KR ihe Big Musten and ; ‘ 28 re. oronto and Miss Ruthy Day of
W OF 1952 ee: wid rok. y Dai
S Re peats—THE HIT PARADE SHO Ever Made SEALED CARGO Dev ne

%

: FEATURING

Â¥ * Slim Jim, Fire Fly, Eddie Hall, Prowler

Â¥ Senorita Belgrava Flying Saucer, Hilton
x Springer, Merlyne Rollock Etc,

.

Added Attraction--Free Free
Win a FALKS Three Burner STOVE

And See the Man that will Drink the Most
Ju-C Beverage For a Cash Prize

STEEL BAND CONTEST
JU-C BATID vs. COCA-COLA BAND
FOR THE CAAMPIONSHIP SILVER CUP

TICKETS ON SALE THE DAY OF THE SHOW
FROM 9 a.m.
Remember Hundreds fail to gain admission at the
Last Show
DON’T MISS THIS SHOW — C AND B EARLY
‘Lhursday 18th December
Secure Your Ju-C Beverages Early for Xmas

LPL LL LLLP EEE LECCE

ty



= OHEISTMAS EVE









4
ce
% OS
@ OLD YEAR FESTIVITIES
& AT
& Whe Rarbados Aquatic Club
é (Local & Visiting Members Only)
& uke
i 'NNERS will be served betwe — and 9 p.m
&
ge, «U8 (December 24th and et)
re
z PRICE $5.50
& MENU: CHRISTMAS EVE
& Fruit Cocktail
tar Consomme Julliene
& Rolled Stuffed Flying Fish
& Tartar Sauce
j Turkey Cranberry Sauce
& York Ham
ox X’mas Jug Ju
& Savoury Baked Yan
& Carrot Ring
i Plum Pudding Hard Sauce
a Vanilla te Cream Wafer
& Raisins and Nuts
Â¥: Demi Tasse
e IEMBE! asked kindly to make their reservat
ad earl ble. Dial 4461
S DANCING f 9 | ber 24th and 31st)
& Il I ( 1 and his Orchestr
ie t will be iven
? D » DOOR PRIZE
* f t Lucky Ticket
2: E BAI DECORATIONS
we
3 RGM

*-RICES—Stal °4; House 36; Baleony 48; Box 60

5.656665" 6 ooo OO OOOO
a a a PPLE LEELA EO

BENIN GS DREN IN DNDN GN ON NDA,

a
























MENU
Tomato Juice
Bouillon



— Saute

Peach Melba
Ye Olde Xmas

CCPL LLPLECOPEPPPLSELPLLLELCLES SS LEELESSSSESS







<

Ne




AXmas Di

inner HATCH
DESIGNED FOR yot _
ary. MARE labpea Ne AT
excellent eu n and hae

Cocktail
Fillet Of Flying Fish

Roasted Christmas
Turkey & Ham
Savoury Stuffing —
Cranberry Jelly
Giblet Gravy

O'Brian Potatoes

Green Beans Saute
Peas a la Francaise

Sweet Meat Mince Pies
‘ After Dinner Mints
Demi-tasse

Phone 8290
ACCRA
WEACH ¢





DOWN THE
















Tr. LAWRENCE
HOTEL

And Stay for the

Cold Buffet Luncheon
At $2.00 Per Person
SEE YOU AT THE
ST. LAWRENCE
























Jug-Jug
















Padding EMPIRE THEATRE

NOW SHOWING.
4.45 and 8.30 Daily.

When the hands



LUB

Arnan. Ontario, a Stewardess em-
ployed with T.C.A- and stationed
at Winnip2g, Manitoba
Wedding
AMES STREET WE THODIS
CHURCH was decorated will
crysanthemums, Stephanotis
Coralitas on December 6 for t)
wedding of Miss Betty Lest
Grant, daughter of Mr. ‘and Mi
lL. A. Grant of Westbury Nx
Road and Mr. Harry Allan Ward
ava of ivirs, Kath Wara of “To;
raine”, Black Rock, and the late
Mr, Harry Allan Ward,

and

The bride who was given
marriage by her father wore

vt Walle Jace over sati
Her unger tip veil was heid
p with orange blossoms and



snc armed a bouquct of Catle
elds, gerberas and corallill:
She was att a hy thre
rdesmaids, Mi Joan. Grant,
sister of the bride, Miss Phyllis
Waid, sister of the bridegroom,
and Miss Ann Hoad, Miss Gran
dress Was composed of green la
tue the other two wore dresses
2 gold lace. They carried sheaths
red roses and gerberas.
Bestman was Mr. Lionel Ward
ther of the ‘groom, The
shers were Messrs. David Grant,
Douglas King, Hilton Ward and


















Herbert Davis
3 After the ceremony which w:
: performed by the Rev, K, E.
= Tewers a reception was held «t
3 “Leverne”, Graeme Hall Terra:
*hrist Church.
mm Swiss
bd Jewelled aan im Sam
3 ZR ze
= Calendar
R
. ‘Chronographer
@ | :
; WALKING DOLLS SER AGRE he ay ee oe $13.38
5 with PATSY WESTIE DOLE aris. Se 8.16
on MM os os Ri Ds cat... Si aan Gee ‘
z Automatic RAMS es S4e., $2.18, $3.10, & $3.34
3 SS hed ++ eo Unies «Mis MERI CC Ga ces g. cial $6.62 & $21.00
bs Window vont me eee oe - $1.20, $2. 16, $4.80, $6.20 & $7.70
3 olsen pat Ss ett. Fe 8 od es 42¢., $1.20 & $1.41
Me eee ee es “08 $1.75 & $2.40
i $18.00 GAMES . sinh ee tia ¥
3 ; a All Prices
a is tela bd $1.81, 3.11 & $4.88
a satin $22.00 & $48.00
2 Also ONS euakan SCATES sien
z 15 Jewels, Lever Movement, Rolled Gold, Ladies STANLEY KRAMER PRODUCTIONS sER SCATES $6.40 pr.
be Watches, Swiss Made ND PLENTY seein
= 15 Jewels Waterproof Swiss Made Central Sweep Hand PLENTY MORE TOYS
S $22.00 so
= 17 Jewels Rolled Gold Waterproof Central Sweep Hand ALL ABOAID THE TOY SPECIAL TO TOY LAND
Ss Automatic
ay $42.00 AT
8 All These Watches are Guaranteed i Soo STANLEY KRAMER PRODUCTIONS
s WATCH & CLOCK SPECIAL f i} GARY COOPER... "HIGH NOON"
2 a. BALD: & CO i) cb Raise Se ae meee, T. R. EVANS (WHITFIELDS)
= } JOHNSON’S STATIONERY BUILDING i Lon Ohan>y+Henry Morgan - ONRECTED BY FRED YOUR SHOE STORE
NS Broad St. if ZINIEDAN « Screen Play t J s ud d
at Sale Agents for “Universal Geneva” iy Phone: 4220 +
The Watch Guaranteed for Life ))
ne Watch Guaranteed for Life_ enn 08S ©8 SEE see cen 2

: I



SUNDAY,



AT THE

HIGH

DECEMBER 14,

CINEMA :

1952

HyG.8.

NOON

Five new films are showing over this week-end and as
it is obviously impossible to give a full account of all, I am
picking out the two best to review and will give a brief de-

- Scription of the others. Of the five, four are serious films,
while the fifth is a light Technicolor-comedy in musical

style.
The Empire is

showing Gary
Cooper's latest

picture, “HIGH
NOON,” a tense Western that ‘s
really more a study of a fear-
ridden community than the usual
action-packed s t o r y. Director
Stanley Kramer has his own
methods of building and sustain-
ing suspense to a high pitch, and
they are particularly noticeable in
this film, With grimly slow pace,
sparse laconic dialogue, the relent-
less ticking of .a clock and a
haunting cowboy ballad that re-
curs throughout, tension is built
up with unique effect.

Gary Cooper plays the town
marshal who hae turned in his
badge, and the picture opens and
closes on the morning of his
wedding day. After the wedding,
news is received that a pardon-
ed murderer whom the marshal
had been responsible for appre-
hending five years before, is re-
turning with some of his boys on
the noon train to take vengean-e.
Realizing his duty, the marshal
pins on his discarded badge, re-
fuses to leave the town, and
when he ig unable to collect a
posse to help him, he faces the
gang alone. Well- pointed is the
bitter Irony that human weakness
and self-interest cause the decent
citizens and friends of the mar-
shal to desert him and leave him
to wage, single handed, a fight
that is theirs as well as his.

Mr. Cooper has one of his best
roles as the marshal and gives
@ strong stirring performance of
a man who realizes he will prob-
ably be killed, but whose in-
tegrity and sense of duty make
him take on a fight against hope-
less odds, Grace Kelly, a charm-
ing newcomer plays his Quaker
wife, who, though she deserts
him after the wedding, returns to
help ‘him in the unequal battle.
A splendid supporting cast is
headed by Thomas Mitchell, with
Lloyd Bridges, Lon Chaney and
Katy Jurado, a fiery Mexican.

Tiomkin’s haunting
music, % ether with
angular shotokraphic
the menenele without
little—
the in-
in this

Dimitri
background
excellent
shots and
dialogue — or with very
deepen the mood and
exorable march of action
outstanding western.

THE WAGONMASTER

Showing at the Plaza Bar-
barees, WAGONMASTER is a tale

of frontier adventure told with
realism and vigour, Based on
actual historical fact, the film
deals with the perils; hardships

of

or-

and adventures of a group
Mormons who, in 1870, were
dered to go to the San Juan valley
in Utah and establish a colony
there, With tWo#young f,wntiers-
men engaged by ifie lead o's to
guide the wagon-’ain ov the
trackless country, the pioneers set
out on their rugged and danger-

ous journey. Their exploits in
getting the train safely through
the swiftly flowing rivers and

over the perilous mountain passes
and their experiences with the
members of a stranded medicine
show, a party of Navajos who
fortunately turn out to be friendly
and a gang of murderous bandits,
all keep the pace moving at a
good clip and build up to a
thrilling climax,

Young Ben Johnson and Harry
Carey Jr. play the frontiersmen
with Joanne Dru as the gaudy
bell of the Medicine show Ward
Bond gives a lively performance
as the choleric Mormon leader
who has trouble keeping his lan-
guage under control. Delightful
touches’ of humour are suppled
by Alan Mowbray in his inimi-
table style while Jane Darwell
is fine as a militant pioneer.

As in “High Noon”, the musical
backifound 3s an i mh Do Ft oo a a ieieieineinieemmininintneintglia eM Nei TO i, icanimportant






,
{
| Men’s &
| Ladies’

Wallets

ee VU PPM a

{| Swimsuits
Gift packed
by Lastex
$14.32

Swimsuits
from $8.44



feature of the film, and it is highly ~
effective in setting the atmos<-
phere. Four new Western songs
with a fine lik and swing are
sung by the Sons of The Pioneers
and the whole musical score is
in the capable hands of Richard
Hagemen, a musician and com-
poser of no mean talent.

And now for the other three
films, ABOUT FACE at the Plaza
Bridgetown is based on
Broadway comedy of a few years
back “Brother Rat.’ It tells of
three cadets ata military
Academy—one of whom is secretly

married and about to become a
father. Between romancing and
getting into hot water, graduation
seems anything but a _ certainty,
but somehow they're all success-
ful. Thers are nine new songs in
this edition and a goodly sprink-
ling of slapstick and such pran-
kish doings as substituting dye for
the Lieutenants hair tonic which
has colourful results to say the
least. All the cadets and their
girl friends seem to have a swell
time and dance and sing at the
drop of a hat, Light musical
comedy style entertainment

RETURN OF THE TEXAN at
the Globe is not a Western as its
rather in-ept title suggests. It is
a present day rural drama, laced
with homey philosophy, The plot
is an unsophisticated one, for a
change, and concerns a young
widower who returns to his old
homestead to make a home for
his two sons and their grand-
father, His attempts to meet tha
payments on a loan from the
bank, Grandpaw’s poaching on
an unfriendly neighbour’s prop-
erty and a romance with its ups
and downs are the ingredients for
a warmly appealing story. Dale
Robertson and Joanne Dru play
the leads with Walter Brennan
distinguishing himself once again
in another good character role.

Also at the Globe is CON’T
BOTHER TO KNOCK with Rich-
ard Widmark and Marilyn Mon-
roe, A melodrama, it concerns a
young flier, jilted by his girl,
who becomes involved with a de-
ranged baby sitter in a New
York Hotel. The mysterious, but
attractive baby sitter pervades
the whole disturbing story and
any feeling if compassion for her
is quickly lost when it is realized
that she is homicidal and that the
object of her mania is a old
old child, Acting is good, but the
picture sensationally over-em
phasizes menace for the sake of
suspense, and the result is hor-
rifying





SUNDAY

Farm And Garden

By AGRICOLA
GREEN VEGETABLES

WE refer to last week’s

which it was pointed out that water is the key {
and until our local supplies in this respect were assu
production calling for the greatly increased use of

may have to wait.





Gardening Hints
For Amateurs

Have you planted your annual ‘
seeds?
If you have not, do not delay

tha,or the plants will not be flowering

n time the
ibition next year.
hy not try growing Carna-
tions this year?

Carnations (the border kind
are not difficult to grow and ther:
is at least one gardener in
Barbados who grows them right
out in the open so successfully
that she ean pick bunches at a
time of these lovely sweet-
smelling flowers.

Of course, like everything else
in gardening, there are certain
little likes and dislikes that
Carnations have which ever
grower should know about in
order to be successful. But,
once these are observed there
no reason why carnation plants
should not be grown by anyone
in this island,

Propogation

Border carnations are the best
kind to grow for the open bed,
and these are grown

(1) from imported seed.

2) from a slip or piping off an

old plant,

(3) or by layering a piece of

an old plant.

The seeds, or slips should be
planted in shallow boxes of very
light porous soil. Water very
lightly as these plants do not like
a soggy condition. Plant the
seedlings out in an _ open bed
when they are a few inches high.
Position And Preparation Of

The Bed

is

Carnation plants like an open
position in a sunny bed.

When preparing the bed, fork
in a moderate amount of well

rotted pen manure.

If the bed is at all heavy, it
must be lightened and sand and
wood ash are best for this, but
leaf mould is not recommended,
Lime however is very necessary
for the successful growth of
Carnations, and while the islands
soil is known to have natural
deposits of lime making it un-
necessary as a rule to add lime,
yet in the case of carnations, to
whom lime is so necessary, it is

@ on page ii



POULTRY N

For the first four days chicks
need special attention, Several
layers of old newspapers ought
to be spread over the megasse
litter to prevent chicks eating
the litter before they have learn-
ed to eat feed,

For the first day or two a lit-
tle starting feed should be
spriniled On the papers to teach

the chicks to eat. The top layer
of papers covering the litter
should be removed each day.

Feed is also placed in baby chick
feeders to which the chicks will
go after they have eaten the
feed sprinkled on the papers.
After four days it is safe to re-
move all of the paper covering
the litter and the chicks will
then eat from the feeders,

Wire platforms for water foun-
tains ought to be built when the
chicks are between 2 and 3
weeks of age. This is a precau-
tion against disease which may
result from wet spots and con-

taminated areas around the foun-
teins,

Grossmith
Lavender
Water from 59c.
Soaps (3 cakes)
$1.60

Yardley’s
Gift Shaving
Bowl $2.40

Yardley’s
Powders

# | Geo. Sahely & Co., (Bos) Ltd.



TES

Teaching eks to roost early
avoids crowding and piling up,
thus encouraging fast uniform
growth. By the time the chicks
are 3 weeks old, low roosts pro-
tected by wire should be in
place, Provide 3 inches of roos-
ting space per chick.

As long as the litter remains
clean and dry it does not need
changing, unless there should be
an outbreak of disease. How long
the litter remains dry depend
upon the kind and depth of the
litter used, on how often it is
stirred, on the ventilation of the

room, and on the care used in
preventing water being spilled
around the fountains. Should

there be an outbreak of disease,
it is always advisable to remove
all litter and thoroughly clean
and disinfect the room.

Make sure that plenty of clean
fresh water is always available.
Feed two pounds of chick star-
ting feed per chick ang then
chenge to a growing ration.

i

Ties and Socks



Hankies 9c.
Panties 68c.
Slips $1.74



Horticultural |






note on soilless agricu in

ent



req

ure and sunlight intensity all

rea
ite!
From what knov
no doubt that while ca
e high in the initial ‘|
operating charges are not likely
to be in the same proportion.
Factors such as rainfall, tempera-!
t
have to be considered in man-|
agement. Chemical control ensur-
ng the required standard in the

nutrient solution, pumping anc dis-

tribution, together with fertilizer
st, all figure in maititenance.
Where gravity fs made efficient

use of for circulating the solution, |
there is, of course. a correspond.
ing economy in the use of wata

which, in any cxse, is bound to be}
liberal.

It will be recalled however that
the high costs of maintaining}

greenhouse establishments, where!
frequent handling of soil and re
lated operations are heavy re
current charges, encouraged the

practical development of thi
method of culture under discur-
sion. Greenhouses in the

1 also have to be heated. Al
these factors have an unt



bearing on the
greenhouse vege
therefore, be p:

ellin ice
‘tables whic 1
ortionately hig
Tn an effort to combat steadi!
risthg operatin osts, commer
men have turned their a
Soilless possibi in me
erly climates, e
be Cuba, both of which are within
easy reach norther
in the United States. As exp! vim
to us by an experienc:
mercial operator, intensive te
especially of hi
m4



re sout
Florida and ma

ot parker

production

quality vegetables and rapid
port by plane allows vegetat
be marketed competitively
frigerating
to a minimum. Further,
blems such as crop rotation do not
arise, Insect pests and disea
more readily brought und col

trol.

costs too are rec

soil I

luced

Perhaps
inducement

the most important
influencing lop-
ments of this nature i tre-
mendous consumption « fresh
vegetables in the United State
According to the 1950 1951
Yearbook of the U
of Agriculture,
some fruit
food group in that « ntry,
to quote: “In the
1949, the commer
marketed a yearly
about 400 lb. of vegetables per
person in our country.” When t!
unrecorded production from home |
gardens and local truck fa
added, the final
average figure is inconceivable. |
The Yearbook further — states: |
“Next to milk and milk products, |
vegetables lead all other food
Sroups in production and con
sumption ”

deve



the

S. Department
vexgetabl and
are the second largest
And,
years 1940
al gro

age of

rr

consumpt





been ex-
Bermuda

We have recently
amining the position in
which before World War II, en-
joyed a lucrative marke
vegetables in Canada and th
West Indies. Lack of shippin
facilities, however, to a la
extent, have resulted in the lo
of these markets. But, it tat
that improved
permitting most of the
ties to be available for
sumption, both by tourist
Bermudans themselve

refrigeration
e¢ commod

local con- |

In th



connection, during last year nearly |
100,000 (persons arrived the
island, the greater umber of
whom were tourist When we
read of these staggering figure

it easy to picture what a stimu-
lus to industry, of one kind r
ancther, a tourist trade can ger
erate. Incidentally Berm

her vegetables in soil unde
al conditions

grow
natur



| It’s in the

Christmas,
parties, g
win or ee

of

course

The BCCF have broug





XMAS





3
cos | es

zames, gifts and prizes

toys than ever before:

UToys of
|) Plastic
i & Metal
Wat all BALLS
orices, FLUTES
PISTOLS

CARS, DOLLS

1 DECOKATIONS
Rf CORON VION

} COACHES
HORSEMEN

ADVOCATI











Prsyentution

'}
%
y

\f

air—! |
for

time

‘ht im more






TREE




&




< < <
LLL LL LEE FPP ESE SESS S SOS



BARBADOS CO-OP.
COTTON FACTORY LID. |





if you feel worn out, depressed, or
generally run down a glass or two a day of
Buckfast Tonic Wine will quickly rest
energy and tone up the whole nervous
Giving new vitality it fortifies you agai
and exhaustion and remember
Wine is especially valuable after iliness.

Gon ,
A Hl t
Genuine
EAU oe COLOGNE

Blues dold Labet

ES









ore lost
system,
st fever
Buckfast Tonle






bottle todey

» Piet » i as
! Perfect Choice of Fragrant Gifts
ait EAU DE COLOGNE

snoured gilt for HER or for HIM - refreshing,
rene. Don't forget it on your shopping list and
genuine 4711 from Cologne, plain or gift

look for the guarantee “K&tnisch” and for
the label of origin on the back of the bottles and packages
TOSCA
A name thet has captured the world by its note of gay ro-
4711 a glamorous Perfume
or & bewitching Eau de Cologne, both attractively priced

FAMOUS RHINE LAVENDER

That clean, sweet scent from dewy lavender fields, enclosed
in a flacon of old

The
fragrant
insist uf
packagec

time

Gis

mance Tosco is obtainable as

Vo

world charm. A gilt which will be joy-
fully acclaimed

PRESENTATION CASKETS
Speciully desiqned for fest
tion of “4711

Soap.

NG)

| ive occasions, containing a selec-
Blue & Gold Eau de Cologne, Cream

Perfume or perfurned Eau de Colognes

gilts

These are some
Items for the
Home...

Saucepans-Aluminium
and Enamel

Cups

Pressure Cookers



| The CORNER STORE

FOR XMAS SHOPPING






PAGE THREE



(\ «¢
FOR HOT-HOT DAYS \\
\\

USE COOL-COOL TALC ©

Soothing fresh and fragrant, \
keeps you dainty and com- ||
fortable, adorned in the
fragrance men love.








NG
a Samouds

RHINE
LAVENDER





























NEY
FOSCA S












Icing Tubes
Icing Sets

Pattie Pans
Bonché Pans
Stoves—2 & 3 Burners
Electric Table

Thermos Jugs

Lamps

Ice Cream Freezer
Aluminium Waiters |
Minecers |
Kitchen Knives

Fish Turners
Spoons
Potato Mashers
Ricers

Graters |
Skeives |
Strainers

Egg Beaters (rotary)
















PAGE FOUR SUN y

a



DEATH OF A SPORTSMAN

By BOOKIE

INTERNATIONAL TOP SCORE
IN B.C.A.—B.C.L. GAME





New















7
i ss Mrs. Vidmer May Win Golf Trophy
health and s G By O. 8. COPPIN
brill iance ered on
We ;
mn &
ico 3 RASS heres ee ay ae =
: = Manchester City Sg tanta wal
coe 2. Beat Chelsea 4- 0 St ae
“ neve face (From Our Own Correspondent) t out were together nen may or the wath the wrote

LONDON Dec. 14 reat Ss soe tees

Skilfully blended—
patiently aged













RACING NOTES:



South Africans i
ane fecovery ws ee




Preparations For



The choice of




connoisseurs

-27 at
all given









VISITING ENGLAND
FOR THE CORONATION °

We remind you that any one of the










good. —- AUSTIN family of cars ane
is a happy choice for the motoring o r one was
Sear re Williar Atkins ‘on,

family

You get so much enjoyment from
driving or riding in AUSTINS that you
invariably yield to the urge to be out
and about.

















There’s the smart surprisingly
roomy A.30 Seven, the A40 Somerset
with its new refinements and extra
— the handsome, fast A70 Here

ord all built in the Austin tradition
to make your pleasure a lasting one.



@ On page 5



CAVADA by CHRISTMAS i
SPELLING COMPETITION

h oe Date Extended lo Dec ember 20h





GO BY AUSTIN, AND HAVE A
GOOD JOURNEY.

QR
Hoe with the letters

i BUY CANADA, DRY



‘

'

,

{

} ¢
i ,
spellers:— Oi eee Se orton ee)
i First—A Turkey, a Ham and a Christinas Plum i
Second—A Ham.

A 40 Somerset i Consolation Prizes—20 Cases of Canada Dry
\ Beverages, ,

| |
{

Please write clearly,

vin vour name ya
§ ur name and

|
| Pudding
CALL IN AND LET US EXPLAIN HOW EASY IT IS








TO HAVE AN AUSTIN MEET YOU AT THE DOCKS ‘ee
ON YOUR ARRIVAL eeeeeeeeee erteeeeeeeeeeeec ae \



— PYRAMID |=iesseus=
ECKSTEIN BROS. HANDKERCHIEFS || CANADA DRY BOTTLING COMPANY OF

al ae a Pe kee ee ee | BARBADOS LIMITED

a A TOOTAL, PRODUCT Mason Hall Nireet

oO
(oO

bi “ae
see Register ade Mark Labe ¢ woke se me.













eS

SUNDAY, DECEMBER

Salvation
Army Annual
Social Appeal

The Salvation Army’s
Annual Social Appeal is to pro-
vide Christmas Cheer parcels for
poor families and treats for needy
childrer, and to assist the Sal-
vation Army's Work programme
during 1953. Donations should be
addressed to The Salvation Army,
P.O. Box 57, Bridgetown, If un-
able to send your donation, Please









dial 2467 and an Official Col-
lector will call.
Previously Acknow!-

edged $267.80
T. R. Evans ‘ 10.00
Barnes & Co., Ltd. 20.00
E. B. Williams Esq. 5.00
Mrs, Kate A. Ballou 2.40
“Burnham” kts ok ha 6.20
Wilkinson & Haynes

PMO eke ae ebs 5 « 10.00
Mr. A. M. Webb ..... 5.00
The Canadian Bank of

Commercé .......... 10.00
A Priend ........ 5.00
Mr. D, A, S. Lawless 1.20
Mrs. C. Esdaile . 1.00
Mrs, Agnes L. Gill 5.00
Burton & Co 12.00
Mr.. Louis Bayley 7.00
Y. De Lima & Co, Lid. 5.00
Alfonso De. Lima & Co. 5.00
Ocean View Hotel 5.00
Bata Shoe Store 5.00
Mr. J, Parravicino 5.00
Trevor Bowring Esq. 5.00
Mrs. G. M, King ... 2.00
Miss Dorothy Hutson 2.40
Marine Hotel 2.00
Hastings Hotel 5.00
Mr. Francis Cameror 5.00
Mrs. H. J. Boyce 1.00
Lady Hutson 2.00
Mrs, Dalawere 2.00

419.00

WALTER MORRIS,
Snr, Major,

Commande



Divisional

Dec. 12th 1952,



Evening Inslitute
On Xmas Holidays

Last week the Evening Institute
classes began their Christmas
holidays. The term just ended
was the first term for the recently
introduced advanced shorthand-
typing class. It was the fourth
term for some who are undergoing
a two-year éourse in three subjects

leading to Londo Intermediate
Arts.

Other evening classe ire hel
for men and wome t varic
centres throughout the islan At
St. John’s Mixed there
a shorthand-typing las The
typewriters are provided by the
Institute. Elementary ubjects
mathematics and dom«
are also taught.

At Mt. Tabor Mixe School
Shorthand, Book Keepin Eng-
lish, Needlecraft and Domestic

Science are taught. There are also
classes at St. dudes Bags’
St. Augustine’s Boys, Spe
Boys, Holy Trinity Boys
of these classes, Latin and Span-
ish are included in the
taught,

In Bridgetown clas ire
at the following centres, the Gir
Industrial Union, Y.M.C.A. for the
Clerk’s Union, Combermere Schoo!
for the Pharmaceutical Societ)
Barbados.

Set





ightstown



som



es held





“Fire Fighting”
of a fireman ar
intelligence, p

“Qualities
character,



fitness, strength of a high order
endurance and coolness in any
emergency”, Major R. Crages,

Fire Officer, said in a lecture at
the YÂ¥.M.C.A. on Friday night
Major Craggs was lecturing to

a group of young men on “Fire
Fighting.”
Craggs showed how

Major
various types of fire equipment
should be used and stressed that
it was speed as well as efficiency
that would prevent serious fires.

He saia it was the duty of every
member of the community to
notify the Fire Brigade as quick-
ly as possible in case of fire.
Every minute lost amounted to
one hour’s work on arrival at the
seene of the fire.

After the lecture two
were shown. The first was on the
proper use of ladders and the
other showed the speed and
efficiency of firemen in turning
out to a fire.

films










oo

In extra large
Jors and handy Tins

tiead and Chest Colds, Coughs








14,

1952





Anchors aweigh! .

FAREWELL

This beautiful White Lady Boat,
A graceful swan on waters afloat,
Bedecked in all her brilliant light
This parting night, a Wazzling sight,
Now slowly steams upon her way
To distant lands ere break of day.
While siren’s voice continues long,

Mid fading lights, tig farewell song.

A vacant berth in Carlisle Bay

If wishes could, we'd make her stay!

No lofiger shall be see them ride
At anchor on the gentle tide.
No more tnvigoraté: t





. The siren blows farewell,
And comrade ships in harbour goodbye tell,

——

Muscular Pains

Of ail good Stores
and Chemists

Aboard these comfor Ships.
No more from Canada will they sail
Bringing our cargoes and Our mail.
No more the old familiar call
“Wan a boat sah” from boatimen all,

No more will lavnehes come and
Bearing passengers to and fro.

go

Alds! Ye men who earned your bread,
The future now you view with dread!
Now that your gallant ship is gone,
Have faith and courage, and hope on!
Life’s changeful voyage lies ahead.

Dark clouds are hov'ring overhead.

But with the dawn, the clouds will clear:
The silver lining will appear

Dispelling all your anagious fear,

And once again there'll be good cheer.

Dear Lady Boat we'll ever remember

Your sad farewell

this night in November,

To captain and crew for service rendered,
With grateful hearts our thanks we tender.
And gracefully now to fate surrender.



Xmas Musie Al
St. Mary’s Church

On December 28 the St. Mary’s
Choir will gi¥e a_ recital of
Christmas Music at St. Mary's
Church at 4.15 p.m.

The first item on the _ pro-
gramme is the hymn “Christians
Sing Out With Exultation.” This
will be sting by the choir and
congregation. There afe in all

twelve items on the programme.
The first hymn will be followed

y a prayer by the Vicar then the
anthem “Now Once Again”
Fletcher.

The election includes pieces

from Handel, Mozart and Rowley.

Among the artistes taking part
are Miss Nel) Hal, Bandsman G,
Lovell, Mr. George Morris and
Bandsman F. Taylor



Canadian Cruiser

The Canadian Cruiser arrived
n port at 7.25 yesterday morning
from St. Lucia under Captain M.
O’Hara with general cargo for
he island. The Canadian National
Steamship Line had two ships in
time. The other



he ame was
Canadian Highlander whic'
rived on Friday from Halifax,
Both vessels are consigned to Gar-

Ltd

Austin & Co



Pen Pals

LATCHMEE NARINE, Aged 2!




of Reform Office, Reform, San
Fernando, Trinidad, would like
Pen Pals in Barbados, Hobbies
re Table Tennis. Billiards, Sea
athing Cinema going



KNIGHT, Aged
142, St. John’s
also like Pen
Both boys and

HUDSON M.
8 of P.O. Box
Antigua, would
Pals in Barbados.
girls Hobbies are Sports and
frames of all sorts, reading, writ-
politics, photography, handi-
stamps and coin collecting.

craft





YESTERDAY'S
WEATHER REPORT

Rainfall from Codrington:
nil.

Total rainfall for month to
date 2.93 ins,

Temperature: 73.5° F.

Wind Velocity: 10 miles per
hour.

Barometer (9 a.m.)
(11 a.m.) 29.897

TO-DAY

Sunrise: 6.12 a.m.

Sunset: 5.40 p.m

Moon: Last Quarter, Decem-

29.920;

ber 9.
Lighting: 6.00 p.m.
High Tide: 2.21 a.m., 2.04

p.m
Low Tide: 8.11 a.m., 9.08
p.m.





\==.= Rheumatism,
Aches, Sprains,

Insect Bites & Stings

Apply healing, soothing
THERMOGENE Medi-
cated Rub where the pain
is. Its penetrating medi-
cated warmth relieves the
charms
away the pain. Rub well
in except when applying

to bites and stings.

congestion and

insect Bites and Stings



DOUBLE-ACTION

THERMOGENE

MEDICATED RUB

In

big glass Jars and handy Tins



FLOKENCE M, ROCK,
“Sea View”,
Bay St.

U.K. Timber

Mission



SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Industrial
Mission Back
In London

From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, Dec. 13,

The five-man industrial mission
headed by Mr. J. Lincoln Steel
of the Imperial Chemical Indus-
tries arrived here today on the
“Cayina” after a six week visit
to Jamaica, _ Trinidad, Barbados
and British Guiana They are
to prepare a 20,000 word report
oh theiy invéstigations

The preliminary work on this
report was commenced on the
réturh trip and it is hoped that
it will be completed within a
wéek or ten days. Copies are to
be circulated to the four West In-
dian Governments and to the
Colonial Secretary .

Mr. Steel said he and his col«
leagues Had been impressed by
what they had séen in the vari-
ous territories. They had vis-
ited over 100 _ factories and
believed that a wise and sound
pattern of the development had
taken place.

Mr. Steel said there was need
in the next five or ten years for
much greater development of a
type which it would be beyond

the scope of local governments
to provide.

There was need therefore to
attract overseas capital and in«

vestors would need to be shown
that industry in the West Indies

was a sound proposition, In this
respect a great responsibility
rested with local

and political Waderg, They had
the biggest part to play by show-
ing wisdom restraint and
moderation



Listening Hours













@ From page |. SUNDAY, DECEMRER 14, 1982
has Already visited the Bahamas, *” — © Pm 25.58 M
Jamaica, British Hondut British 40 p.m. The News, 4.15 p.m. United
Guidna and Trinidad, and two of General . Assembly, 4.30 p.m
them paid a Short visit to Mexieo, O/"° TE Bur, $290 p. Comorter
Major Exporters Archie.

He said it was obvious that ©" icles 7 192M 49.71M
British Honduras and British 6.00 p.m. From The Bible, 6.15 p.m
Gitiana were the two major exe Enstish Magazine, 645 p.m Programme
porters of timber, whereas the Dena’ wecas "Stkin aaa a tne LY
other colonies were mainly im-= Caribbean Voice
porters. However, Trinidad in 7 — 10.45 p.m 112M 49.71 M
particular, had a very valuable 74 Ruinday Bevvice, 6:15 Ban
production of teak and other fydio Newsreel, 8.30 pm. Composer
woods. Gin hak” Bide Piaemee

He said that such questions 8S Orchest 10.00 pan. The News, 10,10
improved saw-milling, grading, p.m. From The Editorials, 10.15 p.m
and pressure treatment with, Wood London Form, 10.45 pm Music Maga:
preservative interest the Mission “= MONDAY, DECEMBER 15, 1952
specially. In addition to the two 4.00 — 6.00 pam “aM
major timbers in the irea—Hon- 1.0 p.in. The New i ib 3 mn)
duras Mahogany and British paily Service, 4,15 p Focus On Brit
Gyiana greenhart, both of which #h G 4.45 pin Linter Awhile
are known all over the world— }() ?" ‘en Chal st ‘6.21 a
theré were large quantities of z mods ete PRES
othér woods in the area, some of §@ pr Welsh Dalty. 6.15 pit
which were less easy to use in- Te Te te ine Gp Pun, Shae
ternally or market successfully, p.m. Home News From Britan, 7,15
and therefore deserved attention ? â„¢ Books To Re 0 pm. Theatre
becalise there were large quanti- 745 — th.se p.m 1M 4971M
ties of them. - —

: ; "cacti. sill pe BBC Singers, 6.15 pm
Newsreel, 8 30 pu Composer

Wee Spm Parone
Rough Seas 9. 00 Sister 945 p â„¢m The Billy
Mayerl Phythm. Ensemble, 10,00 p.m.
The News, 10.10 p.m t 1 The Eadi-
Sink 2 Boats y BAe sD ih. Sclet ce Review, 10.30

RATES OF EXCHANGE

Rough seas yesterday caused NEW YORK
two fishing boats to sink All 12% Pr Sheaves ee a
the crew of the two boats were Ranker, Kunnka ee
saved. The boats are the “Sin- Draft 70 1/10% Pr
doll” which belonged to Evane 72% Pr Cable ’ .
Greenidge of Bfighton, Black 10% Pr Gir Sv Ase oy
Rock, and the “Black Eagle” 549 P silve “mr, P
which belonged to Sydney CANADA,

Holdet of Beckwith Street 1 SOR ET. Bares as rion

The “Sindoll” went down Demand Drafts 74.95% Pr
about a mile and a half off the ,_ 7, ene Pearts. 188/20 Pr
West India Rum Refinery while /f § 29 ' ‘ Nt aks 4 ‘bicdsd we
the “Black Eagle” sank. off the , Coupor 72 9/10% Pr
Lazaretto 50 Pr Silver 20% Pr.

SPORTS COMMENTARY—Fron Page 4

R. Vidmer defeated C. Bayley.

R. Vidmer defeated W. Atkinson

J. Rodger defeated C. Bayley

I. Niblock defeated N. G. Daysh.
N. G. Daysh defeated G. Manning
E. A. Benjamin defeated I. Niblock.
K. R. Hunte defeated E. A. Benjamin
C. Thomas defeated P. Greig.

C. Thomas defeated A. W. Tempro
L. Smith defeated D. Hinkson,
Lord Dangan defeated. L. Smith,

G. Manning defeated R. Nofris.

P. Wallbridge defeated Dr. Kerr.
CHALLENGES

Nov. 2—B. Osbourne challenged C. Bellamy

Nov. 5—P. Wallbridge challenged Fitz Gerald

Nov. 8—F. Eastham challenged K. Murphy

Nov. 11—R. Inniss challenged P, Greig.

Nov. 1l—C. Thomas challenged S. Toppin

Nov. 1l—K. R. Hutte challenged F. Morgan

Nov. 11—N. G. Daysh challenged I, Niblock

Nov. 11—L. Maskell challenged C. Bayley

Nov, 11—J. Rodger chajlenged Atkinson

Nov. 11—R. Norris challenged G. Manning





IF YOU

are

ALWAYS |

TIRED

take

PHOSFERINE
TONIC WINE

Are you always tired? Are
your nerves bad so that you
cannot sleep? Do you easily
get depressed ? You need
Phosferine Tonic Wine.
Everyone likes this rich,
pleasant-tasting wine, which
has the valuable tonic pro-
perties of Phosferine. It will
give you new blood. You will
eat well and sleep well. Your
nerves will get stronger.

Take



PHOSFERINE TONIC WIN F.
| You'll soon feel better/



governments



DEC.

TOPICS

The ¢g “show-off last Thursda
_ ihe Exhibition night
Some had on trailing dresses
wi some were costumed tight
Rome predict new fashions
an t ould'’nt chll the name
. any fash on
Y ist the
The ntry girls looked classic
Too classic to explain
The had on all the colours
That gen precede rain
j Blue, red and green together
Plus crimson, yellow, gold
All these stitched up in one dre
! colours manifold
The hibits were lovel
The photos super fine
And boys the dining tables
Mirrered that polished sh.ne
dee d to L« girl come on
Let's ect all the Bread
And they saw the prize
a “ far head
The won first prize for salt bread
The bread you sometimes toast
Wit) Anchor Butter spread out
A Idren love this most
first prize





The whole-wheat bread wor
The bread the athletes eat
They'll tell you in a contest
The never fear defeat
Th bread gives strength and
energy galore
ves the power ~~ Samson
love it more and
Boxer footballers, eat it
And ve it
Wher Joe one time got hakey
Twas offered him by Lou
And boys a few weeks
New strength returned t
And through his entire bod
New blood began to flow
The Mixed Cakes téo won first prize
Four firsts our record t
This told of super baking
Robert narked to Lou
Fout eve
A tl il e
é t ent
i J P i
A on ring
1 € ea) mid-da
Thre t Ww dire
1 the trengthening wa
od extras for chr tir
Maybe « nice Sponge Cake
Send orders earts
De t ourself toe bake

sponsored by

J&

ENR

and











PAGE FIVE





14 — NO. 254 a

dHereds the




BY
JOE & ROBERT









THE SHIRT
THAT FITS TO ‘A “["

AT

R BAKERIES
makers of
ICHED BREAD

the blenders of

A WIDE RANGE AVAILABLE

J&R RUM















Just listen
ia that engin”

.. «SOMEBODY
OUGHT TO TELL
HIM TO

CHANGE TO

ESSO EXTRA MOTOR

NN

Thousands of motorists have used Esso Extra Motor Oil :
for years, and thousands of new owners are finding it the

best oil for their cars. Esso Extra Motor Oil is a premium grade
heavy duty oil containing a special! inhibitor specifically for
corrosion prevention, and an entirely new detergent which keeps
your engine clean and in perfe:t running condition. Esso Extra

Motor Oil is sold by practically every garage and service station
in Trinidad. :

IT PAYS TO SAY

FOR ALL PETROLEUM PRODUCTS,

ESSO STANDARD OIL

RR AS cet cies
M. JONES & CO. LTD.—Agents.

Li:

et



R.

ALE STORES







PAGE SIX SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14, 182

SE

’ BY DOROTHY . BARKLE)




















YOU CAN TASTE

THE CREAM ®
By PENSANT informal atm phere,

LER Christmas 1952 a rN


















































“es : ‘ 7 =
> v .
- I c “- slg |
i . aa tess the 5@cks Of plates and groups of]
le ar = . é itiery are placed. From these }
= 2 se ia ' ests provide themselves |
ad — ¥ he necessary plates and
pe ek nd forks wnich they take
, big rage” liga t ss to be filled with
ee had tee ale oe Ham, then on to the
D ’ | t th t HG at, ype Of sideboard ere they help them-
on t e a } emory, for few es to the vegetables put there
to-day have any servants a - .
COLD take hold! rly, fat less m4 Raney tare . are placed on a side
7 oP ates icon where the “help yourself’
Just a few drops of Vapex on your y diecult to get app) too,
prin ed . ‘ ner, but ver ;uests sit where they like about
handkerchief, and on your pillow e best. cooked
: ; eae the room, and if a few small
at night, wil! clear the head in- can u tabl are available these can be |
stantly. Vapex relieves your cold on ised, and everyone enjoys the|
from the first deep breath you take. nie. wie n 1 all the more because of the
Vapex is highly concentrated, ality
1 does not mean of course
economical, and = S tr 3uffet dinner is entirely
| pleasant to use. es Ge a ss, by no means, for even |
; a P earho ee xa an ” the t inexperienced hous
j Also the . . ; 9 ag . taff can cope with taking out a
| Vapex Inhaler— . shing up dirty plates and}
handy for pocke : ; sses, and fetching and carry-!
or hendbag— es sreanead But it does mean that the
aha ee mead "end oot of tess is relieved of the strain of
Ns . ibie-——exten vit to 4S 9 formal dinner without the help
= ed with gw f skilled ers
| thing th t n- For the Buffet dinner it is better
9 WAPEX bers of t é , while the fam- to keep the Menu as simple as
meee weak ly butler and his underlings possit - Sticking to the traditional | ‘
CLEARS CULDS QUICKLY waited swiftly and perfectly, wel), Christmas fare without a lot of
DAIRY MILK CHOCOLATE «Se ae a ae ms |
7 ers nt an 1 Spaci- everythin but legs variety is
A product of Thomas Kerfootd:Co.ltd.Engmnd | ous days of ous living are a good alin odes this type of | LEFT: Ensemble for resort wear designed in pure Irish linen, has closely fitted bodice with
: = past Even the Fibers and dinner, to serve fairly substantial | apron front with two stiffemed pockets; a circular skirt; and a brief pair of linen shorts,
a mI te t Taeanina seth a a ue We Rng ag : - | RIGHT: Knee-buttoned breeches in rust colour linen, have the new jutting hip pockets, and
é t 1952. to manage served in are worn with a sleeveless black rayon blouse, —By Louis London & Sons,
To ct ze from the forn |
Christmas dinner to the Buffet a simple Christmas | ’ 9
{ ii onstitute such Me but remember, as it is so | B A d A t S O I k
} t ll The table si le there must be Plenty of | efore n er ix Cc OC
| n ended to its full everything.
le » beautifully CHRISTMAS DINNER ' LONDON Fashions For Children were simple — cap sleeves, Peter
dex onal Christ- Turkey and Ham, Roast Beef Stepping out 1953-styles are The style, in clothes set by Pan coliars, button-tnrough front
ma t c galore, Ji English potato, String Beans |these knee-buttoned breeches in Prince Charles and Princess Anne and full skirt. They were in dark
| and the : can still be Plum Pudding and Brandy Butter | uSst-coloured linen, worn with a ig rapidly being reflected by blue nylon or checked gingham
placed; and cerved. at the head of Mince Pies. | Sleeveless blac rayon bli us€. manufacturers of children’s cloth- with white collar. And separates,
} the long table (altt the han Coffee, Liqueur, ‘They were pres ci by the Moy- ing. Pictures of the two children, bo long a fashion favourite, were
better cut beforeh ind ar- Sweets, Nuts, Fruit. gashel Fashion Group this week. ibly clad in corduroy dunga- introduced hére for children.
ranged conveniently in a dish near could be limited to!, Idea of the designer was that have become familiar. Green denim shirts were shown
Turkey) before dinner, whiskey hey should serve the purpose of And mothers watching a fash- with striped denim tops



: t!
Driveawa ie two outfits. They were, he declar- jon show for children given by a » Young reals
s atc oT, i Jiqueurs : : d 2 au : 5 oungest mannequin displaying
Yy s at dinner, and Liqueurs | 24 as suitable for cocktail partie top wholesaler were pleased to : ey

che serving the al, for there ‘with > _coffee . : the dresses was ; 2 1
Ri be: wet is la peheeeit ak ne = or pars Ct ane night | #5 for beachwear. But this met note that such styles will be mass- in ; vill be no formal sitting to ta To make this Christmas night! with a conservative reception. The produced. There were cotton | 1 | spite of rehearsals and coaxing
to he 1ited on, ¢ , uests will even more seasonable its fun to immediate reaction of women fronted by mother, there were un-~
| 1 « « i n

ul dungarees in blue and

he real difference ill lie i









| zs wait on themselve and each have a lighted tree for after din-| watching the parade was that the ite stripes, American-style Tehearsed tears backstage during
diseases now! | other; and th lone creates a jolly @ On Page 7 breeches would require the figure ns, and, for the very young, the parade.

Ashamed to go out with your friends | er of a Barbara Goalen. And men- ¢otton romper suits, terry-towel- From this full-scale fashion

because of ugly spots and pimples ? folk there, expressing their con- ]j lined. All would be easily show for children it was evident




hed. that styling have developed so
for those mother who much that mothers must now

oe roti sages = | What’s Cooking In The Kitchen | ed, opinion, suggested | that

|

| . they should be banned from beach
| Clear oP your skin trouble not

|

|

The beauty







| i cocktail party alike. er the old fashioned styles f take fashion into ; +.
‘ with D.D.D. End the discomfort, | few utes then add the cheese | 2"° : 4 2 _. prefer the o ashioned st) r ta ashion into account when
of Ferguson cottons... pain and embarrassment dace and | HAM " aoe r'é ae a , h ae 3ut perhaps those overseas May their children, and have time to choosing their children’s clothes.
- < all with the quick, certain action of and the ham (which a «uve | be more enthusiastic about keep- keep up with the necessary laun- Next Year's -Col
exquisite designs blossom acr | D.D.D. Prescription | Hot Ham Bread previously cut in small cubes). | ing in step with the latest fashion. ri ” dkkiilke “with frilled ‘akirts be ace A aoe
ae, Ree HOW D.D.D. ACTS SO ments For four people:—Cooked Ham Beat the whites of the eggs until) uring the same parade, came ra” ook out for ‘garance’ — a



star “cd sti ¢ Ste v¢ . 1 } ; >] e
and haircords . .. sparkling color starched stiffly to stand out over enjour that is being boosted into

. : st add to the mixture. s for ow tyle :
| D.D.D., unlike other reme- |1 1b, Butter 2 oz. Flour 4 table- Sf then adc Ry a suggestion for a née : ayers ( ace pettic ced as ff ; . ;
| spoonful “Milk 1 24 ! “ penser Sutter a pyrex dish, pour the beach-bag, attached to the beach layers of lace petticoat, looked ; fashion for Coronation year. A
§ »0n s, 3 K gle r t )

| dies, has a penetrating anti-





wash after wash . . . these















yee poe. As eg axe |}Nutmeg; Eggs 2; Grated cheese 2 mixture and see that it does not) outfit like a carpenter's ae of ‘Ali = Wontar straight o1 a Vavic pink with a bluish tinge, it
cottons that make up so aries Be aden tablespoonfuls. fill more than a third of the dish.| From the illustration, it will be © De ECE ful fe — on ees has a long history. It was well-
! estroy the germs, driv te p uls, : } 7 + 44 + natetad oF 3 elightfu or young childre c >

Bake in moderate oven for seen that the outfit consis of a : > knowr to ancient Egyptians and

a | out infection and bring Mince the ham. Put the butter . : ; : on re ‘ idvbear” bx > os 1 a 2 oa
Jor your children | safe, swift healing for in a saucepan and = melted tWenty minutes, When ready take closely-fitted bodice, w an we re te ddy bear yrders on was used until the 1870's, for the
| Eczema, Dhobi_ Itch, dd th = rm ty Aaah tabi ee ee it out and serve immediately, apron front formed by two out- dresses, and giraffe’ prints. trousers of the Zouaves in the

Tiere ache learn: add the flour, stir with a wooden Ham Spumette size stiffened pockets. The en- noticeable trend towards ‘gro\ French infantry. Its modern name

Gaal teh completes spoon all the tim Add the milk a gy P , le ‘was completed with a cir- up’ colours — lime yellows, dark eon, frotm..‘garat avipy ”

Biya bottle of D.D and let the sauce cook until very To make 20 spumette:—Cooked erskirt a aes a , ee ee & aViGlOR,

> if 7 . et overskir navys and peacock blues — wuS the French plant whic "OV.
—and have a Sa/ \thick. Season with a bit of pepper ham lb, Egg whites 2; Cream ' igectab et Daiehacbreeh Dt ch plant which provided
Obtathable from altleading stores r, clean skin fomorron = ‘ ' ) considered too harsh. Much pre- the dye efore the advent of

\and a very tiny bit of nutmeg. 2 Slasses; Pepper; Butter; Grated One other fashion point from

Salt is not nec essary but if you Cheese. the show was that dark ilex green oar se a a ne oes chemipa UY J :
use tin ham it is better to put a Mince the ham then add a bit will be the colour for the warm dised’ nahn - sate robles - Now Mr. Mattli, one of the
tiny bit. Take the saucepan off @t a time the whites of eggs: Sieve | weather In lightweight linens or ecinee ae ad ot First Eleven fashion designers, hy
the fire and let the sauce get cold, ©V@rything and put the puree in/jcotton, it will be smart and cool nila oe ae angie selecting it for his ‘colour-of-the-
7 a b . Put the bowl the i . y office wear children was seen in the matching yea, S

Then add the 2 eggs, 2 tablespoon- on ice | for city promoted it to the







#THE GUARANTEE Carried by a







satisfaction assured or the material





Alway s look for the name Fe rguson on the selvedge,











.% fuls of grated cheese and finally fr o hours. Then add _ the The Moygashel Fashion Group, ™Mother-and-daughter outfits, in e couture’ class. Silk satin
ee PRESCRIPTION the he m Stir for : fen emnAr ~ cre without taking the bowl off | which has 31 members, now pro- Which the daughte dress ap- has been dyed this colour for gala
‘ ia oe Od £9 a fe r se - ’ the ice. Add the cream véry little |duces 100 varieties of linen-type peared as a miniature edition of vening occasions, And plans are
éechitineieninocntl onerinsinsileptiphitnensighashilibainiiiietiineanianen , xe A : a »yre dl . ru » . pcinhtavepinuanmaiimaatesiins “i
some flour and Ie ‘ ae Ani clave then season with salt and pepper

Leave the bowl on the ice. Put

dish, Turk the dish upside some ® laFme saucepan on the tre with | AL Pretty Fa ace Is Enough For Mother

so that surplus flour ill fall out. the water boils, put the sauce-










Pour the mixture in the dish. } on the side of the stove By JOANNA PACE one glance at a photograph lifted think that you cannot rely | on
Cook in sau open full of water with a spoon shape an IT’S still a world where first a load of worry from the heart the study of a single photograph
for one hour. ar cooked take with the mixture and put|impressions count more than any- of a mother-in-law and turned my reply is: “What's wrong with
off the fire, ea , ,



for a few it in the boiling water, Make|thing else, isn’t it? It’s still a her into an enthusiast for a girl first appearances anyway?”
minutes, put in a plate and serve. enough spumette as you can with|world where most people make wife she had never seen?
} Easy Suffle of Ham the mixture. Let them cook for|up their minds about you in the You're So Wise . gis
Eggs 6; Salt; White pepper; twenty minutes in the water|first glance at your face. They told the mother of Cor- Hoe
Grated cheese 2 tablespoonfuls; Which must not boil too much.! Jt’s still a worla where you can Poral Geoffrey Bacon, R.A.M.C.,

face that conceals a
there are millions of
look honest and turn









Ham cooked 3 oz., Butter 2 oz When ready, take them out with | Jose a job or a man by the wrong that her son had fallen in love a fz ae Pike yn Fi wees.

Put in a mixing bowl the 6 egg a spoon, dry them and serve with | sort of expression in the first ten with a Korean girl and was en et Meee 1s pena is e tan
|yolks, add salt and pepper, Mix some butter which you will melt| seconds of an intreduction. bringing her home as his bride the aaredh tedtitaneee : me ze
|} and stir with a wooden spoon for a cn top of the spumette. Did you notice how tnis week ' Britain, cei Uh SHOUE WHAY Sore

of person is behind them,

How did Mr Bacon react to Thank goodness anyway that
the news that she is now the Mrs. Bacon is prepared to begin
first woman in this country to life with her son’s strange new
have as her daughter-in-law a Wife on such a sensible note.
Korean dancer who can speak no For the new Mrs. Geoffrey






MY FAMILY COULDN’T GET ALONG ©














| English? Bacon — formerly Miss Kim
> WITHOUT GENTLE, DEPENDABLE wie were a bit disturbed at Chung Yung, which means Gold-
first,” she said. “But when we en Friday — will indeed be
saw her photograph and what a Strange to life in Beachgrove-
| lovely girl she is we were quite road, Fishponds, Bristol.
| happy.” if Golden Friday goes with
} Congratulations, Mrs. Bacon. her new mother-in-law to do the
| You are a wise woman to extend weekly shopping she will be
| ;}such a warm welcome to the s to see the eggs for sale
| | wife your son is bringing home I on the grocer’s count-
| And to those People who may @ On Page 11
| |
|
}
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SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1952

ITH almost the entire attention of everyone
concentrated on the Men of the Moment, the
American State Department still found time
this week to try out a new experiment in international

relations.

To London came guinea-pig Margretta Stroup Austin
under her official title of Information and Cultural Officer
for Women’s Affairs. Mrs. Austin’s job, the first of its kind,
is to try to clear up the misconeeption held by English
women about American women

Her first and fore-
most task, apparently
is to destroy our dearly
beloved illusion that
American women ure a
sleek, spoiled sisterhood
who live luxuricusly in
a feminine - influenced
world.

So I thought
advisable to take her to
nen and try to buy her
off.

It was a blind date,
but I had no trouble
identifying Mrs. Austin.
She is smartly suited,
slickly groomed in the
—dare I say it?—
typical American way

“Now look, lady.” said
a “For years the
women here have looked
westwards for inspira-
tion, and we're just
@bout starting to get
somewhere. Now you
come along and want to
tell us that the women
in the United Sta
are hardworking
harassed housewives
whose husbands aren't
a bit scared of them.”

“Well, it’s true, you
know,” she answered
“If we have a_better







. time than our British Mar
counterparts Ys simply
because we’ gadget conscious.
But there are more households
over here with domestic help

than there are back home.”

She told me of the life and
hard times of one of her
friends who does all the cook-
ing, cleaning, and laundry for
the family, looks after her four
children (al) under eight), and
uses the money she saves by
doing the washing herself to
pay for a course in child
psychology,

I got in the last word, though.
“Can you cook?”"* I asked
Margretta (fortyish, divorcée,
mother of an 18-year-old son).
“No,” she said

We left the British and
American women to work out
their own destinies, and agreed
that the French women came
off best, anyway

How nice, we both sighed, to
live in a country where husband
troubles can be cured with a
gun—and a sympathetic jury.

* ~~ DEMOCRACY

PARLIAMENTARY | proce-
* dure was spectacularly spot-
lighted this week for all to see.
And a grand show it was.

Now, of course, the House of
Commons can get on with its
everyday routine of making
democracy work. The M.P.s can
swop insults in the Chamber,
and anecdotes in the bars.

And in the Central Lobby the
taxpayers with grievances to air
can sit out their days waiting to
catch a member on the wing.

Business was just about getting
into the “as usual” state when
I was there.

Said one of the policemen:
“Tt’s a bit early in the day for
the ‘regulars,’ but they'll be in
as soon as the weather changes.
While it's not too cold they
prefer to sit in the park.” The
“regulars,” he explained, were
mainly Spinsters Wanting Some-
thing Done About Pensions.

Education

Sitting on one of the benches
were two young men in padded-
shoulder, suits and long over-
coats, and seeming—to my inex-

rienced eye—rather “sharp”
ooking characters

The policeman gave them an
expert glance: “Oh, typical
constituents — probably .from
North London,” he said

Further inquiries revealed
that they wanted) to see some-
one about edutation. Sure
enough, a few moments later
the Minister of Educa 1 her-
self came out to see what_she
could do for them. Miss
Florence Horsbrugh smiled and
chatted for a while.

So you see, behind all the
——— a

* lecan

















@ From Page 6

ner hung with little amusing verse
and family jokes. If each member
reads out his own to the assembly
it makes for a lot of fun and
laughter.

It is only fair that the host and
hostess should enjoy their own
Christmas party as well as the

Doctors Prove



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Leading skin specialists proved

Palmolive Soop can improve com- 1 Wak ote febaaive Som, YA R DLE Vc gles AVENDER



CHRISTMAS 1952

a]

Complexion, use Palmolive bi
J

Mrs. Austin has THE THINGS THEY DO=by Robb Man, About Joon dete ata.
a new line on
Ameriean wives

ae
MEETING. Maurice Chevalier

red.

aay Vee
ne 45. Sf sae, ahs



YOUR INDIVIDUAL HOROSCOPE
FOR SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14, Is
Look in the seet
bo the ogi

on in wt





MARCH 21 to APRIL a Aries )—







tica rt of da t a
es irst. Al
J ut requiring ' t |
tuld have new success. S |

































eee ti7 inhale vot
gretta Austin, yesterday 4 1 to MAY % (Taurus |
pomp and circumstance; behind be a t
t protocol and precedent-- Hpwaver: Rema bapeeees”
British parliamen customs lan Cae
are so nice and cosy. | MAY 21 to JUNE 2&1 (Gemini)—
ve | eury rays encourage ment t
FUN | geod reading isic, the fine a
oo | general Personal affairs honoured
: > new way

* TABLE TALK in a City | JUNE % to JULY Cancer)—

estaurant: “Do you like | Fayourable Sun and Satu cts to
working in the Bank of Eng | day honour unselfish deeds, dealing
land “Oh, yes. It’s fun in | with the vuthority. Urs i- |
an abstract sort of way.” | ous work honoured |
* McSAMBA _ JULY #4 to AUGUST 2 (Lew)—sho 1a |
* | be nenpy piring day b t
* MR. ROBERT INGLIS er ae ot anaes (

(or, to use his trade name, and relaxing free
Roberto Inglez) is the Highland- } auc 3 te

zilian bombshell _ who | (Wirge)—Same
invited to South | Germin y can @
America to show the natives how thom | benetk a
the samba ought to be played. Day vours « t
He came back to London this —_—
week with a travel tale, told in SEPTEMBER 4 to OCTORER
a soft Scots accent, about his (Libra) —While ‘ t . ni
adventures down in Rio. in tendency 1 other + end |
First thing that surprised him forth rays you can benefit n if

was the furious pace of Latin- yo ct om = aceorda God's |
American living—-and ing bles





“Street accident about every ten
minutes. It’s commonplace to
see a corpse lying stretched out
on the pavement, with a lighted tial
candle at the feet. I guess all ‘
ambulances must be equipped
with candiss” NOVEMBER
- STH ittartus)—Re
Like home j Yesterday's, Jt
Wasn't there a coals-to-New-
castle touch about going to
Brazil tn the first place ? |

OCTOBER “t 6te NOVEMBER ®
(Seorpio)—Fine indicoatic r you it
) par Day rs @sst
laborious work R when





'% to DECEMBER % (Sag
ding influences fror
r spect





















- DECEMBER 23 to JANUARY 2 (Cap
I Weil, £ tmoumht £0- Bu aap | rteorn Saturn and | Sun's excellent
everyone in Brazil can sing and caote’ now, Mabagé” te idlasae ohure
dance sambas, there aren't aevies ion endi ytvebenndie Sas
really so many musicians who ?
can play them.” | JANUARY 2 to FEBRUARY uy
The gesture that impressed |} :Aquariu)—No time for me-wasti
Mr. Inglis so much was the | thoughts, deeds or hips ortt
kindly thought of the proprietor activit.es, purpose es encour
of the night-club in which he ged Tod hould pire. ye |
was to P ay shaving the place greater good effort
completely redecorated. Le and ” Re chi
On arrival, he found himself uns ip aL a aa ror a
turning out rhumba rhythm pecial eff te ’ good cauias, tal
in a room hung with tartan and pray 1 peat nd those unf
painted with views of the tunate peop der tyranny ru
Scottish countryside. “I was Thank God for our biessing |
told that that was to make me
feel at home. I didn’t have the YOU BORN TODAY: You have dis
heart to tell them I lef jtinet.ve cha and strong characteris
Scotland 20 years ago.” tics ess ma fine butes and
I said I } . Inglis had ore. sour Baar ie pate ee |
worn a and 4 Sey Gh: edeoeatt: ’ dilapepaltion Splendid |
cummerbund as return courtes\ |menthe eshead for advancement. Birth. |
“Good heavens. no‘ No date of G is. Doolittle, noted flyer
rhumba bandsmen in South Tycho Brahe e tronomer

America ever wear that fanc
dress, They wear dinner-jackets

*
* REALLY ?

ADVERTISER'S announce-
* tinaN York news-
The American College
ary contains Chioro-

———$——$—$—$$$$$$ $$





London Express Service

guests. The Buffet dinner makes
this possible, and any hostess who
has ever tried this form of enter-
tainmenr will be charmed by it
ease, and the gay informality it
creates, It has all the advantages
of the Cocktail party with none
of its disadvantages.
Why not try it?



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sunburned—has a boy's hair-crop which goes well with her
exaggerated Eton collar (brown velvet on green). Margaretta's
new coat also has am outsize collar in Persian lamb en deep

delicious |

gg pel “9 tree. And prob- (tinnned for easy ending)

: jably a thousand or more answers Guava Table-Jelly for 75¢, Ib. 1%

chats with Margaretia Scott | IDEA SPOT, Shoulder drape » gift problems at Cave, Shep- tb aa "Orange Maven ‘ide for
and Ann Todd, beth in their new winter coats, Ann—very | made from length of satin in |) erd’s loaded counters, Upstairs in g5¢ crumptious Mixed Peel too
vivid colour contrast to “that i's own department ote it 42c, a Ib. Loads of Seashe!l

little black dress.” Be sure t * Tortoiseshell and ornamental de-

it is deep enough to drape. SANTA XMAS BAZAAR is Signs in both, from this colourful

Pin with rhinestone brooches. full of Yuletide er with jam- Store |

—L.E.8. packed Xmas Stockings and Snow " site ied . ae

— ae eee men with tophats crammed with _ SHINING LINES OF NEW
rarty Novelties (the men, not the SHOES grect you at Geo. Sahe



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SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN

en li













.
NO XMAS DREAM NO MAKE- FAIRYLAND SHOP WITH A with firm
support...
idleness —iiiiaiiedamamamcetl BELIEVE but reall sly yours XMAS TREE lace h the st PI
. jany one (and there ly one of a cxaciuu thing > ning f -
a â„¢~ |kind) of gorgeou" Evening & Cock- ing Bags and Dress A ries Wy ; ee
7 ‘t resst from ¢ nd the ' J rZ ?
‘ \ jtail Dresses tror i and the | camar Zodia MAU CH OV V3
. be § Late displayed t he Moder j elt to comt 4
. ? & |Dress Shoppe, Broad St. There’s mont any dress or ensemble, G ,
‘ jalso a beautiful selection of “all- wrapped Evening all-wool Jerse Chansonette
| purpose dresses om North in glowing colours, Swimsuit { or
|} America—embroidere sanforized, Nylon Underwear sifts that look
jpriced $15.00, Dre essoric «xd, are good and priced to please
| lude bewitching Sheenglow Vei-' everyone! And Evening & Cock-
jvet Hats from Canada—an entire t il creations out of this world yet |
festive wardrc t budget prices. within your reach—at Bettina Ltd
| ph. 4941) The Village, Hast
| ' ‘
A DAINTY GIFT for a speci SPENDING CHRISTMAS IN




coceasion—C olour Set by Gala in- THE TROPICS? WA
cluding Lip <« & Nailvarnish (o HOME A VERY SPE
use “ ‘e only.’ » ;

Cal nee only.” Perfume, Soap, THING? Local West Indian Hand- |
Co ogne, boxed by Dralle, by Du work is the speciality of the Dom- |
tarry, by Yardley to slide into a inica Handeraft Co., in Bridge St.
) * stocking is Xmas te y . » . , : |
ong tockin this Xmas Eve. Won- Straw & Raffia Handbags and
jderful Candy Boxes—Chocolates, solourful Shopping Baskets line }
| Toffees and Mixed Sweets-—to Put the walis. You'll find

TO SEND
AL SOME- |







" . tts) and Picture Books, Annuals °% Broad St. For Men: Casuals :n |
PARIS “NEWSLETTER from’ SAM WHI and Games and wind-up, push- Plain and 2-tone from $7.86 You'll |
long, round-about and straight- like the choice of Black or Brow
n uprand-down mechanical toys are Sede from $8.94 and similar lace

waiting to tumble into Santa's Shoes in Leather at $13.85 Lacie

0 iss € er in fag. Bikes and Trikes and 200 Wedge Heels from Canada are
m.p-h. Racing Pedal Cars simply buy at $6.48 and similar shoes fot

wait your choosing among the the junior miss are tagged $6.03
prand—slam of Toys at Cave, Attractive colours too Sahely’

s a @
Shepherd's is a family stere with cappealin
] * : * low cost gift suggestions
& &
arre Chev







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PARIS Pie which opens SIMPLY GOTTA at Christmas PLASTIC & LEATHER BELTS
ERVING tea at a recent 2 aly po fh ys and it's well that you know how are sure-fire favourites for any Circular stitching rounds tl
on ’ Mpass.c ea c¢ , At ‘ . 1
British charity fune- recent year to simplify your catertng through boy, for any dad. At 39c. youll precious eurvee'd!
tion in Paris one of Mme Ci ier. who ts of Zephirin’s—qualit bakers and buy more than one of the ne \
Britain’s most ligib! peasen. @ 7 leged to have ieing specialists. For imstance, a colours at R, H, Edward's Man spoked center cup desi ive
based , Cees a isband after a jealous phone eall to 3222 will bring you Shop. Canadian Arrow Shirts in wonderful accentuation. If you






!
heiresses who has now ee a “crime Mince Meat Pies. Vol-au-Vent white and colour are high priority | lly { ft. Cl
taken up residence here which usually results Cakes, Sandwich Loaves and when Mother makes her purchase | want a really firm ti lanson
1



She is Olga Deterding 24-yes Bouché Cakes—right to your door. and Edward's has a new shipment ette’ is for you! In your favorite









































old daughter of the late Su ving moments tire > , Tw §
Henri Weterding Vier 2 Smad ase W be Mme Chevallier 5 And Rolls too—Dinner Rolls, Pack- Serge. Vicuna, Fancy Tweed and | fatvetoes
nate, and h recital of her desperate efforts to er and Crescent Rolls. Fancy that Tropical materials are very price : i
prane wii - — her _ hed as err tate just by dialling 3222 you ean consciou and again with an eye Genuine Maidenform Brassi
vy & } » embarrassment to a soctaliv ; . 7
Deterding } yromine husband, She is to plan ahead, order ahead and pre- to Mother, she may be interested eres are made only inthe United
beauty ell how e began to dress pare to enjoy your own party! in hole-proof American Socks at
brains fashionab studied diction and $1.24 States of America
gradua 1 read classic literature ' e * .
history a Bu, the most pathetic revela SOME OF US HAVE A 8 , T : ‘ TY © )
Edinburg oa Winch appgars in hep deposi- | y vapp & SOME OF US HAVE v4 CHRISTMAS CALAMITY — There is a MQUUCN/UI/
University) on tatement: “I cven s ad 2 A ORACKED GLASSWARE, BROK- :
and a reputed arned a es In the literary $1 LIMIT and some of us count in gN EARTHE RE, SHORTAGi for every type of figure
rd of her reviews by heart so that I could cents and the delightful gifts to . DISHE : ,
va. ike pa 1 conversation with sat ke Stat the i Snr OF DISHES. Time you had a
c nenta friend waa ee a vee peel LM change anyway and the Co-op Jat Oo Oe, Com
ortune, plus a or Sh. oe: Foble™)) Cotton Factory are supplied th | @ °
£500,000 share THEY SAID IT budget for us, Look at these: Kid- 4), dead Algal leg 7 pulled
oy ie : . the whole works. Teacups, Saucers 6:66:66: OOO
of the £2 m dies’ T-Shirts (2 to 6 yrs.) 40c. yy OC SELOE LA AG EKO
lion he left in OLGA OETERDING UOTES of the week: a oe : “| Plates, Mixing-Bowls and the same | \ ce 7 : ‘.
Snnans tebe rte nabes \ playwright, PAUL Socks 38¢. 2-tone Romper Suits (2 ¢hing ‘again in a complete line of | % Still Looking for. . .. S
divided up serve steak \ ROCHA; © Women are to 4 yrs) $1.12; Boys & Girls Hats Pyrex (includes Custard Dishes s
among h uke m antille—you :hav« $1,82 and Shoes $2.13, There’s a ,¢ ee | bane , ¢ The PERFECT GIFT? »*
eight children fran | three oO t m to be successful hole c terful { To. nde remember, for Xmas Pud- - ’ .
marriage SACHA GUITRY: “When a art ec nadine ern ‘al ki under ding(s)?). Everything in Cutlery | i »
Recentiy Miss Deterding woman tinds no one believes het $l including a novel m ng cow be h a s AS oO ee the ney >
applied to the Treasury to be he pt to lose even the desire yep, still under $1. Phone num- nS bought individuatty. And z Presentation Casket of *
placed in the category of an to t truth.” 1% 2316 with thoughts of the roast, Wire x > aAtlon iS ‘
emigrant Gastronome PRINCE CUR ay a eae ‘ Dish Covers are $1.22, % »
She was given Treasury per te KY ; I have an iron * ” » & / , >
mission to take out £1250 a year digestion nave no intenuion “TY . 3 3 p 4 . INT id PRESE "1 J » f l %
for the next four years, on of letiing get rusty by drink _ CUT COSTS, SAVE TIME, ROWNTERE'S PRESED ATION % } IM At iii = y
condition that she did not spend ng water’ SAVE FUEL, SAVE WEAK and CHRISTMAS BOXES of Mili, § ‘ 4 ase oy
more than 90 days in Britain HENERAL BILLOTE, defin own a Ferguson Tractor, Versa- Plain and Mixed Choes in “lb. Rom “_ Op 4 S
over that period 1 Army Genera A man . ‘ Paani , igh t y s are s s et | roll ' { {AR *.
After this four-year period she 10 stays in a chateau 10 mile tile to a degree, the light weight ° be a ' . — ee sold almost 1% Oo J x
will be able to draw the full behind the lines awaiting news Ferguson suits all jobs on the everywhere. Among them is the %
income from her British capital. {rom the front. When it arrives land, Tailored equipment includes *amous Black Magic line for him, Three lovely large cakes R
s generally false.” 3 5 1c ya: fi or . ies : ns . os
CAUSED A FL rer alse Subsoil, Mouldboard & Disc Plows; for her, for home and kiddies of this delightful soap "ai x
URRY LANDMARK GOES Manure Loaders, Fertilizer Dis- Black Magic is tinned and th* = dainty. plastic. céntaid »
Miss Deterding’s arrivai tributors, Grass Mowers. & Rakes; presentation boxes feature the 1g ¥ pi . a ~ |
oe nor in Periatan*eoe QNE of the great British land Crop Collectors and Trailers Avail- most pppealing picture-tops in | %& er ~
é ry arisia u marks on the Riviera coast able r yy 1 tracks and dic- years. Here's a gift to buy regard- | 1 male escorts ave are io lave dete oe aeaet able now with full tracks and d enti ani y x ITS A GIFT WORTH %
chosen and consist nat ummner A group of sel engine, the Ferguson is a s¢8s—to buy anyway—a must for | & ieee >
younger members of ! businessmen are negotiating for mighty mite, backed by and gold Xmas and a Js. A. Lynch & Co, |§ HAVING ‘ j
and British Diplomatic set purchase of the Hotel by Courtesy Garage, ph. 4616 LAd, distribution. 3 ;
He , life id orm Nesresco in Nice, They want to 0 RSP
ginnee parties » the foo d ie nto flats - ditch atnlitien rena
like the conversation ends to Vegrescc the of the ,
be monotonous Palace” } t i sold FS a |
Dining recently with < v have n driven out of rf
na sna ré bu “ by hee LAXxesS &
aw » elected a Britisn currency restrictions, a
; on tw nenu Y
imply on steak, She exp { CULTURE FOR SALE =
‘The one thing they never serve 2
a dinner parties is steak I Advertisement in a Parts r
want to get my teeth into one.” news per ‘Brilliant young
THE MINISTER’ Fren piaywright will gtve
$ WIFE less: in French culture to
’ ceudlis Ame t Old Guard Repubdit-
TT? ie a ae cans need not apply. Stevenson
varge of murdering her WB grelerrae RESERV
fi 2 ; R ies tL PY AT Cabine Ministe 1usband, lr Lu idom bapre ervlee



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PAGE EIGHT

BARBADOS etl ADVOCATE

Sees me Swen) fw wre oe re Caswane$e

~ Bridgetown



Sunday. December 14, 1952

findustrialisation



THERE are many misconceptions
ibout industrialisation prevalent in the
Caribbean that it is not too easy to suggest
Which is the most harmful

3 lly all the misconceptions may

traced back to wishful thinking. Be-
SE her cx ries have industrialised
he and improved their living stand-

! ic believers in industrial-
argue that the Caribbean can do
same thing. Because it is considered by

me that industrialisation leads to higher
living standards and higher opportunities
for employment than is provided by agri-
culture, the advocates of industrialisation
raisé their voices in its support. Because
it is asserted that agricultural workers are

ore less progressive
factory workers, there is a political



the



conservative and

fare and, clarion call for industrialisa-
tior

In point of fact industrialisation is not

panacea for low living standards. The
o-called industrial revolution was only

made possible because of the wealth and
exploitation of resources which preceded
the age of modern inventions. So far from
being regarded as a panacea for low living
standards and as a provider of greater em-
ployment opportunities, mechanisation and
the factory system (which is what is meant
by the relatively new term “industrialisa-
tion”) were bitterly resented because of
the dislocation of labour and the temporary
unemployment which inevitably results
when new methods of manufacture replace
old.

The most dangerous of all the miscon-
ceptions prevalent in the Caribbean about
industrialisation today is perhaps the mis-
conception that factories are great pro-
viders of employment. Factory work
need not be as productive or as rewarding
to labour as agricultural work. What de-
termines prosperity of an industry is the
amount of capital invested and the quantity
and quality of productivity achieved. There
is reason to believe that workers could ob-
tain as high real wages from agriculture
in whieh adequate capital had been invest-
ed as from employment in a manufacturing
industry. The world-wide pre-occupation
today with the necessity of producing more
food to feed more people even suggests
that greater profits may be made from
agricultural industries than from manufac-
turing industries,

Other countries have industrialised and
continue to industrialise but not even in
Belgium and the United Kingdom where
the people are very dependent on imported
food are as many as fifty per cent. of work-
ers. engaged in manufacturing and other
industries. In the United States industrial
workers form no more than 32 per cent. of
the employed population. But in these
highly industrialised countries ‘there are
far less workers engaged in agriculture,
although the output in agriculture is ex-
ceedingly high.

The conclusion to be drawn is that the
“services” occupations employ the greater
proportion of workers and it could not
easily be shown that greater industrialisa-
tion than already exists in the Caribbean
would provide greater employment in the
“services” occupations than would result
from increased exploitation of agricultural
and other natural resources. Few persons
realise the extent to which the Caribbean
is already industrialised.

Already the percentage of workers em-
ployed in Barbados in manufacture, crafts
and construction is 30% as compared with
29°~ in agriculture and 41% in services.

The Netherlands Antilles are highly in-
dustrialised and even have to recruit work-
ers from non-Dutch territories. Jamaica
imports less than half the manufactured
consumer goods sold in that isiand. And
Trinidad is, relative to its size, more in-
dustrialised in its economy than Puerto
Rico which is usually held up as a shining
example of what the Caribbean should do,
despite the fact of its dependence on the
American mainland for sale of its products

Misconceptions about industrialisation
easily spread in an area where for socio-
logical and political reasons misconceptions
already abound about the nature and work-
ing of capital.. The most naive views about
capital are widely held and the preoccupa-
tions of the majority of Trade Unions in
the Caribbean area during the last decade
have been with the securing of greater
shares of the profits of private enterprise
for the workers; not with the study of the
role of capital in the development of a
country. Any approach to the subject
' industrialisation which does not stress
t basic fact that capital investment is
needed to create even one job is unrealistic
and will add to the confused thinking
which is prevalent. It has been estimated
recently that in the Caribbean an average
between $5,000 and $8,000 is required per
worker to establish a new factory. This
means that a minimum of $100,000 capital
investment will be needed to employ only
20 persons in a small new undertaking.







Many of the prevalent misconceptions
about industrialisation would be dispelled
if there was realisation of the evident fact
that large sums of money have to be in-

vested before employment can be provided.
Industrialisatio: not therefore something
that can be accelerated by government

action only but is mainly dependent on the
quantity of capital that private investors



are willing to spend on the establishment

of factories in the Caribbean.
Unfortunately for the prospects of in-

dustrialisation in the British Caribbean

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

A NEW BIM

Some two years ago I wrote that

the experience of investors from the United | Bim is about the best thing tl

Kingdom in overseas countries has not
created an atmosphere favourable to in-
vestment. And the rapidity with which
constitutional changes take place in the
Caribbean, however much’ it may be wel-
comed in the region by nationalists, de-
tracts from the-little incentive which may
be offered by existing local governments.
The bitter experience of British investors
in Persia, Egypt and China has left an im-
pression among would-be investors which
will not easily be removed for many years.
If, as seems likely, the emphasis of the
Commonwealth countries and of the United
States is to be laid on the supply of capital
to increase primary production and the ex-
ploitation of raw materials and natural re-
sources, the competition for the available
capital as represented by the savings of
the more prosperous countries will be
severe and there is little likelihood of much
being risked in developing secondary in-
dustries in Caribbean markets which are
already partially supplied with locally
manufactured products.

The only hope that the peoples of this
region might have been entitled to enter-
tain with respect to industrialisation is the
hope that well-established British indus-
tries with considerable resources and high-
ly developed research facilities might be
attracted to open branch factories in the
Caribbean. This hope may yet be realised
to a certain extent, but if the forecasts of
what the British industrial mission which
visited the West Indies recently prove to
be correct then even this hope may have to
be relinquished. The prospect of greater
industrialisation leading to greater employ-
ment opportunities in the British Carib
bean is not bright, but every effort ought
still to be made to make investors feel that
they will be allowed to enjoy profits with-
out which there is no incentive to risk their
capital.



Ships

THE West India Committee circular for
November 1952 reproduces a_ broadcast
talk made to the West Indies in the Colonial
Service of the B.B.C. early last month.
The talk was made by Mr. A. A. Shenfield
formerly Economic Adviser to the Govern-
ment of Trinidad and Tobago. Mr. Shen-
field visited Barbados and other Eastern
Caribbean colonies in the summer of 1952
and has written a report on the possibility
of setting up a new shipping service be-
tween the Eastern Caribbean group of
colonies. r

The whole broadcast desesves notice
because it sums up in very lucid words the
existing situation with regard to inter-
island communicatign and communications
between the islands and British Guiana.

But one particular sentence deserves
especial attention at a time when West
Indian governments are on the way to de-
ciding finally for or against federation. “If
the colonies federate” says Mr. Shenfield
“they will fall apart again unless they have
good transport facilities within the federa-
tion.” This is a statement which no one
will dispute but there has lately been a
general tendency to forget the importance
which was attached to regular steamship
communication when the early proposals
for closer association were put forward.
The impossibility of a political federation
without good transport facilities is ap-
parent as soon as stated and there is little
likelihood of the London conference over-
looking this need.

But whether or not political federation
is to become a reality, the West Indies as
Mr. Shenfield rightly states, still require a
shipping service.

But having stated the requirements Mr.
Shenfield is not over enthusiastic about the
possibility of fulfilling them without sub-
sidy. He takes a passing shot at the high
cost of working cargo at West Indian ports,
and lists praedial larceny, lack of skill and
enterprise in growing, grading and market-
ing produce as combining with lack of
adequate communications to keep the Lee-
ward and Windward islands from becom-
ing suppliers of fruit, vegetables and meat
for Trinidad, British Guiana and Barbados.

The nearest he comes to offering a solu-
tion is in the suggestion that “if a sub-
sidised service were used so to develop the
economy of the area as to enable the sub-
sidy to be progressively reduced, it would
be worth while.” Unfortunately he gives

us no hint as to what subsidy would be re-

quired.

Bue he is outspokenly and refreshingly
frank in warning that if an. “unchanged
subsidy weré accepted as a permanent
liability of the governments the service
would impoverish, not enrich the people.”
Of that there can be no possible doubt. It
is a fear which is very widespread in many
connections throughout the Caribbean to-
day and accounts perhaps for more than
90 per cent. of the opposition to federation
in the area.

Yet without adequate communication by
ships how can federation succeed?

The Problems



From M. M. MacCOLL & NEWELL ROGERS

WASHINGTON.

comes out of Barbados—not for-
Retting sugar and Test Match
cricketers, of course. I see no
reason to qualify my opinion. For
the life of me I cannot understand
the altogether disproportionate
amount of hostile criticism peri-
odically unloaded over this quite
unassuming little magazine. What
ean be the explanation? I cannot
find any evidence that the editor.
or the contributors. or the artists,
or the printers. are suffering from
swelled head or disputing claims
with Bacon to be as good as
Shakespeare. The editor. Frank
Collymore, does sometimes appear
On the stage, to the very great
Pleasure and satisfaction of the
rest of us, but off it he is one of
the most retiring people in the
island. I should hove thought he
deserved encouragement in an
enterprise which I suspect he sus-
tains almost single-handed, in-
stead of being met with blasts of
‘ournalistic fury.

Even it the s\andard of Bim
were as low as we are occasion-
ally asked to believe—which it
most certainly is not—I still can-
not see what all the fuss is about.
[f people took the critic at all
seriously, we should have to con-
clude that no Barbadian, or West
Indian, whose work is not good
enough for high-ranking European
ox American magazines is entitled
to appear in print at all. This is
merely absurd. A young Barba-
lian or Jamaican will be pleased
at getting into Bim, but if he thinks
he will therefore immediately be
secepted by Punch or the Saturday
Evening Post he will soon discover
his mistake. And in the meantime
he may not find it so easy to get
into Bim. If he does not, the check
may be good for any incipient
vanity; if he does, T see no reason
‘o grudge him the encouragement.
â„¢ ay case, all young. or old, Bar-
‘adians with any literary ambi-
‘ions ought to have a try.

As a matter of fact Bim reaches
a very creditable standard indeéd.
This magazine, launched I believe
through the enterprise of the
Y.M.P.C., has persevered till it
attracts writers from all over the
West Indies and is known
‘hroughout the Caribbean, This is
not world-shaking fame, of course.
But the standard is at least as good
as that of many minor magazines
n England, and in occasional
contributions reaches that of
major. Bim has a definite piace
‘ the Caribbean scene, if only
hecause probably no other West
"ndian magazine gives so much
“nace to short stories.

The new Bim—-No. 1%, the first
of Vol. V—contains nine short
stories, three articles, seven poems,
1 special feature and give reviews.
't is illustrated by five photographs
wd a very pleasing black and
white lino cut frontispiece by
Tohn Harrison,

A. N. Forde’s Half-Crown at
Christmas is a seasonable tale of
a fairly comman type, about a
rich little boy and a poor little
boy, with no special distinction to
interfere with its sentiment, Edgar
Mittelholzer’s robuster tale of a
“‘hristmas party, Only a Giost
We'll Need, embodies a clever
iotion, and it does not matter that
we are left uncertain whether the
scandal was caused by ghost or
4y host. It is marred, I think, by

Education Costs Money

EVERYONE knows that educa-
don is in great demand in Barba-
dos. What is uncertain is the kind
of education that is wanted. Per-
aaps it would not be wrong to
suggest in the absence of statisti-
eal information to the contrary
hat all parents want their chil-
iren educated because they want
hem to have better opportunities
in life than they themselves pos-
sessed, There is nothing new
ibout this desire. What is new is
the wish to have this education for
their children provided free at no
sost to themselves, The clamour
for increased expenditure on edu-
sation will only subside when the
yeople understand that education
san never be provided free. Some-
one has to pay for the erection
nd maintenance of school build-
ings the provision of desks and
‘hairs, schoolbooks, teachers sal-
aries and all the other incidentals
necessary for the functioning of

a school. Someone does pay. The
point is who? At first sight the
answer seems apparent. “The

Government pays.”
It does and it doesn’t.

The Government unlike a pri-
vate business concern § gets its
ancome not from profits on ser-
vices rendered to the community
but almost exclusively from tax-
ation, customs and excise duties
and rents and profits on govern-
ment property or undertakings,
The Waterworks, the Post Office
and the Natural Gas Corporation
are instances of government earn-
ing activities evén though the
earnings may not be as great as
the expenditure on undertakings.
The amount that the government
spends on education comes out of
the total government revenue of
the year or from available, special
or loan funds. If the government
spends a great deal on education
there will be less left to pay for

a c > civil servants, the hospital and

THREE big dangers will face General} medical services, and the many
Eisenhower's Government when it takes|®ther expenditures which are
yoted every year when the Estim-

office in January. These are:—

ates are laid before the legisl4-

1. An air attack by the Reds in Korea, de-| ture.

livered with such weight as to threaten the

security of the UNO armies.

2
«

jeopardise the French forces.

iment of Barbados
An invasion of Indo-China by strong
armies of Chinese Communists which would | penditure,

But supposing that the govern-
were to allot
more than the present 22.3% of
the tax revenue to educational ex-
education would still
not be free. The people would
still be paying for it either di-

3. A Communist attempt to push Mossa-| rectly as taxpayers or indirectly

deg aside and seize power in Persia.

It is more than coincidence that on the eve|other taxes still to be
of the Eisenhower-Truman talks a stream of
reports is flowing into Washington from “in-| people

”

formed sources

at the Tokyo headquarters built; and although some

through customs duties, rum tax,
cinema tax, petrol tax or some
imposed.
The idea that education can be
provided free is nonsensical. The
pay for every new
place in every new schoo] that is
people

of General Mark Clark, Commander-in-Chief | pay a great deal more than others,

Far East.

there is no one who has sixpence
to spend who does not contribute

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1952



touch of self-consciousness
~h this most able West Indian
has not yet quite lost. It
Jeads him into over-emphasis of
his effects and sometimes into
curiously stilted conversation
Here I am reminded of a delighted
Jane Austen surprised by her last
cocktail into telling naughty
stories. It is true that English
Colonial society is sometimes more
like Jane Austen than one could
have imagined possible. Still,
surely few people nowadays say
things like “Someone seems to
have no sense of propriety, my
dear.” Mittleholzer, I fancy, needs
to recapture the naturalness of
style end ease of movement which
made such an excellent novel of
Morning at the Office.

Kenneth Newton’s In A Fine
Castle is the best story, I think,
after Samuel Selvon’s Calypson-
ian. Both are tales of Trinidad.
It is extremely noticeable tiat
the introduction of dialect nearly
always mukes a West Indian story
feap to life. Newton's story, I
think, has real pathos, though, as
so often in peasant stories, what
is strong and genuine in the ver-
nacular (“You can’t stay here
like dat. She ent so much beast,
man. Ley me carry you”) is in
danger of slipping into sentimental
writing when the dialect is drop-
ped. Newton gives us one mag-
nificent Trinidadian phrase of
catastrophic hypothesis: “Whether
she come or not, if even twelve
hell roll, you stopping in this
house,” A

the
wk



ler

Therold Barnes, like Mittelhol-
zer, had a clever notion in Next-
Door-Neighbour; here again I
feel he could somehow have made
more of it. For instance, it would
help the tale if we heard the first
girl’s name called out from the
apparent harem next door. Karl
Sealy's glimpse of New York, Cup
of Tea, very short, is both quaint
and vivid, with his usual energetic,
and economical pictorial effects;
he can make a picture which stops
in the mind. Jan Williams’ ghost
story is a fairly ordinary camp-
fire yarn; it might catch a North-
ern reader's eye by its West Indian
setting. John Wickham’s “Christ-
mas Is for Children” on the other
hand is written with some dis-
tinction, but T found the end con-
fused and its exaltation imper-
fectly motivated. I liked his article
on the British Guianese interior
better; an easy and excellent style
makes his traveller’s tale very
much more intresting than such
things usually are. Eula Redhead
again has shown a nice sense of
stvle in her amusine fairy story,
Czien ond the Turtle. We need
more Caribbean fairy tales like
these.

Samuel Selvon’s. Calypsonian
probably has more punch and
power than any of the other tales
It is the story of a Trinidadian
committing his first thefts, told
throughout in racy and vital dia-
ject (“Right now I so down that
bottom and I same thing’). As
in other cqguntries, the middle
class may be wiser and thriftier
and even nobler than the working
class, but they are very rarely
anything like as interesting. The
literary material of a doctor's or
lawyer's life probably lies rather
in his work than in his home; but
artisan and peasant move habitu-
ally. in a world rich in tragedy
and farce. Many West Indian (and

By George Hunte

towards the cost of education by
spending it. The freeness of edu-
cation is a myth, What is not a
myth, but stark reality is the rap-
idly increasing number of chil-
dren for whom education must be
provided. Before suggesting what
action might be taken to provide
education for these increasing
numbers of children (without in-
creasing the already high per-
centage of government tax rev-
enue spent on education) some
other factors desire attention,

First, throughout the Caribbean
area the cost to governments of
education has increased by at
feast six times during the last fif-
teen years. Allowing for depre-
ciation of money during the period
educational services must in con-
sequence of increased expenditure
have been expanded to a volume
between two and three times what
they tvere before the last war. It
is noteworthy too that whereas the
average cost per head of popula-
tion throughout the British Carib-
bean region in 1951 was $7 per
head of population, Barbados ex-
ceeded Trinidad’s expenditure of
$10 per head by half a dollar.
Secondly, the percentage of gov-
ernment tax revenue spent on
education does not represent
the total expenditure in Bar-
bados on education. A fraction
of expenditure on the government
centra| administrative staff, such
as the Secretariat. Treasury, Au-
dit, Public Works etc., ought
strictly speaking, to be charged
against education. The government
expenditure on education would
also have to be noticeably in-
creased or the educational facili-
ties of the island would be severe-
ly restricted if there were no pri-

vate or denominational schools.
Suppose, for example, the St-
Patricks Elementary Parish

School were forced to shut down
for lack of funds. What would
this mean to the island education-
ally? It would mean that pargnis
of 800 Barbadians boys and giris
would not have any school to
which their children could go and
it would mean that 280 of the
poorest children who receive one
free cooked meal daily during
term time would, like Mother
Hubbard's dog, get none. I have
already drawn to the public's at-
tention the fact that the govern-
ment of Barbados only pays a
contribution of $720 a year
towards the upkeep of this school
which in my opinion offers a bea-
con light that has to be followed
if the rising generation is to re-
ceive education without bank-
rupting the treasury or taxing
their parents and grandparents
beyond their abilities to pay.
Assistance enterprising
schools like Patricks Far-



to
the St
















THE LITTLE SHOP

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY BUILDING,





other) writers tale ff. their Broad Street.

steries in an inconclusive and un- THE LIQUOR STORE WITH THE BEST VALUE
satisfied m r; Sel knows Whisky from $4.80 a bottie, Gin from $3.00 a bottle,
how to finish: “The only thing is The Best Wines_ and Cockspur Rum.

the pliers going clip, and he

gasping Oh’ God, Oh God.” — SEE as









Of the poeiry, Owen Campbell's
Thus Land is, 1 expect, a loving
Getail of the scenery of St. Vin-
cent; he has something there, bur
the troubie with so much verse 01

For ali GARDENS.

VEGETABLE GARDEN MANURE
A Powder applied to the soil and worked and





— kind ti wae ager ote oo watered in. 8 cents a pound,
ers. aitention. hat is much Wwue FAT
of Daniel Williams’ two poems, > LIOL INL RE




A liquid manure put up in 1% Pint Bottles at 96 cents Bottle
Mix with water. Weak (1 Teaspoonful to 1 Gallon of water)
Medium (2-3 » » oo ” » )

Strong (4 ” Marsa ” ”
lad burn the foliage,

though he has a certain feeling
for the movement of the line, its
weight and pulse. So much mod-
ern verse, I often feel, would be








very much better without verbs When applied by watering pot does not
or any affectation of logical! ADCO
thought at all. Gerald Manley For use with your Compost Heap for converting the




Hopkins js lovely because he gives
us unbroken glimpses; he is not
really obscure. The modern
verse-spinners make me _ sigh
T. S, Eliot, who is a real poet
will have to answer for much one
day in Heaven when he faces the
bards of passion and of mirth
demanding explanations. L. E

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10 cents a pound,
WILKINSON & HAYNES CO. LTD.

Successors To
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od BECKWITH STORES

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Brathwaite, who has obviously
greatly developed at Cambridge,
is a little more comprehensible,



though not altogether so; but he
does try to make his verses think
I suppose it does not matter that
Geoffrey Drayton’s twelve short
lines, The Star, contain some
grave astronomical inconsisten-
cies and impossibilities. The best
poems, I thought, are E. M.
Keane’s The Age of Chains and
E. M. Roach’s Letter to Lamming
especially the latter. Both are
full of the age-old Caribbean
lamentation, but Keane strikes a
note of hope. Roach’s Letter. a
real musie and passionate rhythm
in its mourning, seems to utter
only defeat, and is sad reading to
those who care for the West Indies
and their destiny. But it is best
for the poets to say these things.
When at last they have spoken
everything. the hearts of all mer
will be purged to a new peace
and we can move forward,

Collymore’s special feature, A
to D of his Barbadian Glossary, is
ro fascinating that it deserves a
review of its own. All Bajans
should read it and contribute, and
discuss it in the correspondence
columns of the “Advocate’’. Har-
rison’s account of Nigeria is
masterly piece of writing. Not
again the perfect And laconic close
“Very bush”. There is an inter-
esting review of the London per-
formance of Derek Walcott’s
“Henri Christophe’’—a failure on
the radio, a success on the stage

The criticisms of Bim, glanced
at above, if other material lacked
always made a great point of
attacking the cover: now I liked
the covers. Colly seems to have
been intimidated into making a
change. May I prove to him that
it is impossible to please all the
people all the time by telling him

that the new cover is MUCH
WORSE?

Bim is a Barbadian effort due
to the hard work of a: public-



SUNBEAM WAFFLE ELECTRIC TWIN
IRON oe $59.51 HOTPLATES = $41.39

ELECTRIC TOASTERS
ELECTRIC KETTLES

HMV TABLE MODEL PORTABLE GRAMO-
RADIOGRAMS ..., $275 PHONES $51.19

spirited Barbadian, it is something
to be proud of, and it deserves
support. Barbadians who do not
buy Bim, like Barbadians who do
not turn out to watch the Barba-
dian eleven against Trinidad or
B.G., should be regarded as no
true citizens of the island.

A. D-S,








Bendix Washer—

ish school in Jemmotts Lane is an
obvious and realistic way of
tackling the pressure on schools
which will result from the in-
creasing number of. children
wanting education.

Edticational authorities know
that in the next fifteen years
the elementary school population
alone is expected to increase
by 44 per cent. in the British
Caribbean region, By 1961 it
has been estimated that the
average best attendance in Bar-
badian elementary schools will
have risen to 40,000 from the
26,000 estimated for 1951. The
direct current costs to govern-
ment for elementary education
have also been estimated. They
are $22 million as compared
with an estimated $1.2 million in
1951. The full costs of primary
education if all expenditure al-
lotted to education is included
would approximate more near-
ly to $1.6 million in 1951 and to
$2.7 million in 1961.

It must be noted that no allow-

ance hag been made in these
estimjites for pre-vocational
training —at —etementary —tevels:

nor has any mention been made
of secondary, technical, higher or
adult education, There is a good
case for arguing that Barbados
has great need of technical and
adult educational facilities, The
important fact to realise, however
is that unless educational expec-
tations are reduced and greater
efforts made to provide an edu-|
cation, more in keeping with the
actual resources of the island and.
with its potential level of pro-
ductivity, then -either more of
the government tax revenue will}
have to be diverted to education|
or taxation will have to rise!
steeply. How steeply may be’
realised by reflection on the fact
that it has been estimated that
to spend 22.3 per cent. of tax
revenue on education in 1961, the
government of Barbados would
require a tax revenue of $20
million, |




YOULL NEED A_ FULL
SUPPLY OF

The estimated revenue in the
current estimates was $12,390,194.)
The important facts which stand
out a mile for all but the blind;
to see are that education is never |





fres and must be paid for by the]

people who live in the country Ya : ~

where it is provided ie ~
That is why we ought to be




thinking in terms of assistance to

GODDARDS
(4 Guid Rl



approved schools, raising of the
school entrance ag>, the shift sys-
tem, payment of fees whenever




FOODARY, *
‘wld Cae *
RUM



pessible and the provision of less
expensive school - buildings We}
cannot give everyone equal se 1

|




tional opportunitie: because {
not earn enou 1oney S
In education as in
building we must have recourse )
to self-help methods, 3




so

to do
house-







NDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1952 SUNDAY

ROGUES OF THE SEA

ADVOCATI







Finding little else to write
about on St. Iago, Ligon con-
tinues to discuss the beauty of
the women he found there.
and likens himself to a horse
between two bundles of hay—
two beautiful sisters, = =










A TRUE & EXACT

HISTORY

OF hie Hand of |
|

In the afternoon we took
leave and went aboard, where |
we remained three or four days.
About this time some passen- |
gers of the ship, who had not
brought enough linen to change,

Hyde Of The





























desired leave to go ashore and Edward Lo b n the par-
took divers women along with ish of Westr t vas one of the |
them to wash their linen, But most cruel men that ever roved the |
(it seemed) the Portugese and = seas under the Black Flag; and ve
Negroes, too, found them hand- Jat times he extraordinaril
some and fit for their turns, and ee kind but, enough, only t
were a little rude; I cannot say anaes ”
ravished them, for the majority | \ No dout Ww have see
of them had been taken ‘co By RICHARD LIGON, Gent. a psychiatrist 1 ui been liv- |
Bridewel, Turnball Street and ing today, but as was he just
such places of education and so | roamed ar 1d the world with hate |
were better natured than to = bear Perhaps Ly yg bis |
suffer such violence. Yet, com-|proper men I have ever seen and, g pod with seven or eight seeds Sgainst humanity. ees
plaints were made when, they,as handsomely clothed. Their| jn ‘it, many of which we carried | He went to sea at an early age |
came aboard, both of such abuses| garments were made with much to Barbados, and planted there-|put on one of his visits ashore in |
and the stealing of their linen. |art, and all seemed to be made| They grew and multiplied | Boston he became so attached to
But they gave the place so by the tailor, The coverings tor! abundantly,’ and they call them | she town that he decided to settle
much praise that we were all their heads were not unlike there the St. Iago flower, which |there. Soon afterwards he mar- |
desirous to see it, for, after the| helme's; of blue and white| js a beautiful but not a sweet /ried Eliza Marble and he got a job |
rain, the place grew more beau- striped silk, some tawny and} flower. at the shipyard. He loved his wife |
tiful each day with the budding yellow, others of other sorts of| From these woods of pleasant dearly and was very sad when |
of new fruit and flowers. This'colours. But all of one fashion,| trees, we saw many birds flying, their first child died soon after
was the valley on the left,side;Their doublets close to their! some one way, some another, Of birth. But more trouble was t
ef the hill, which was more! bodies with caslocks made of|the fairest and most beautiful come his way The next child |
spacious and beautiful than that'the fashion of the Kings guard;] colours that can be imag ed in |lived, but his beloved young wife
on the right where the Padre|loose sleeves which came to their| Nature, Others whose colours me | died.
dwelt. The next day a dozen/elbows, but large and gathered| shapes come short of the pte It seems that Eliza's death was \
men of our company resolved to|so as to fit loose from their arms,| so excel in sweetness a oe responsible for Low's subsequent YAN
go and see this much admired|with four large skirts reaching! ness of voice, ¢s our Nightengales | ehaviour. He soon lost his: job | RAG
valley, and when our sailors with down to the middle of’ their! in England, are short of them, in at the shipyard and drifted about |

properties. |







































their long boat went to fetch| thighs, These were of a differ-|either of those two pirds | Until he instigated a mutiny on 4 Russel
water, (as they daily did) wejent colour from their suits, But in variety of tunes, out they | logwood schooner on which he was
went along with them and/Their breeches were indifferently ate beyond them, for in that they) serving, and then began his pirati- | | Whi isked why, he was
landed there in as high going large, coming down below the &re defective. ley of pleasure. cal career. wtitake G Cote can he
billows as I have ever seen so knee and the upper part so! Jn this- — ES. nd we At first he only had thirteen:men ie oe is
near the land. Much ado we wrought with whalebones within adorned er — at I 1 fain and unger am SO Aa NC cts seo the i r ‘ rt ing
had to be carried to land, though as to keep them hollow from marched with vee cad of 7 mile | boat, but his en eee ps a -|R have dei ack
we were On men’s backs, Yet touching their backs; to avoid softly, nenety +e ae ts as Sues ‘cae ie . a hnilen Mvatee in t el, who was v¢ annoyed
the grapple came as near the heat, which they were most wees? bs fas orca which we the Curibbean. . His “post gradu- att Vv to aithou
shore as they durst bring it, for|troubled with. Fetched cen eer The circle of ate” training he got from an old R allowée ve, he
wee bulge against the Upon their iegs ey wore this was about 00 feet, _ eee Lanrsness Wee ~ ‘ pis prov ; a
No sooner were we landed|buskins of the colour of their diameter oy trom well months, te pple: wee walls eetay |? mana t ach Jan
than the Captain of the Castle (suits, yet some made differently.' ground to the top of Tis tne however, in a conditior
accompanied by one soldier, Their "shoes were coloured for (which ty half from thence Russel & Roberts It believed that some of the
came towards us at a_ slow |the most part, though some were ae ear the surface of the| Low’s sympathy for married|pirates, without Russel's know-
normal pace, and desired to|White, but very few black. Their were Soe fifteen feet. |men—and ‘no doubt they deserve | ledge, PRR. Ree Spee. 0}
speak with one of us alone,|Weapons, as swords, pistols, mus- wi ; itself, not so much|it sometimes—is shown by the | board the ship before she was ca
Colonel Modiford bei |kets, pikes and partisans were Shei a -cellency | Story of Russel and Roberts, At |@¢ ift
clef man in the Company, wont | kept very bright and worn come-) 2 be eee ah Gh o cnouge time when Low captured}, Low had a different feeling to-
; > ‘ " 7 ‘lear e | : Shin wil ‘ a4 eancio*
with an interpreter to meet him, |!y and gracefully. This argued | °f ee the’ Nyeehs That repair | Roberts’ vessel off the island of St. | Warc ent ther e¢ “2 eH, ee
When he reached speaking dis-|4@ decency in the Commander, as Sales For whilst we stayed there | Nicholas, he was cruising in come | &n ba ; Pare aay UE ’ an
tance, he desired to know his|their awful respect did of his| watching the sailors fill their) Paty y wae Rot ore weal oop off Nar “The cap-
pleasures and this is what he|@Usterity. casks and contemplating the glory Se his aboard Low's ‘ane andi t Nathan Skiff as four (
told him. | Being now under guard, we} of the place, there appeared many Facadan he Aone well eau sinted|be an unmarried man, se ‘
He said that he understood marched into this valley, one of pretty young Negro virgins play=| with E ssitient aaah “7 rete the| | him “stripped everel
that divers of our women were|the most delightful places I have|jing about the well. Amongst them! pirates wanted to cruise they be-| beaten on deck, *fter which hi
ashore the day before and had|*Ver seen, for besides the high | especially, were two who came gan to discuss among themselves | &* ere slasne off. Then he
received some injury from the| 224 lofty trees, like the palmeto,|qown, each of them with @/)whether they should take him | ‘va t through the head and his
weople of the island, and it was royal, cocoa, cedar, locust, mas-/ natural pitcher, a calabash upon! along with them. Low, however cuttled
conceived that we were come/tick, mangrove, bully, redwood,|their arm, to fetch water from|asked Roberts if he happened to
armed to take revenge on those|Pickled yellow wood, coffee, fis-|this fountain. Creatures of such|be married, and if so did he have Day Of Blood
who had done the affront. He | tula, calabash, cherry, fig, whose shapes as would have puzzled | any children. The merchant skip- Ss» lv after Roberts w ca
therefore advised us either to | bodies are large enough for) Albert Durer, the great master of | per answered that not only was he i t i tes be an a use un
make a speedy return to the 'timbers; citrons, custard apple, proportion, but to have imitated; married, but that he had five/the We Indic FPipey cap urin
boat that had brought us or to, 8Â¥@vas, macow, cipres, oranges,|and Tition o1 Andrea de Sarta children when he left home, cs everal vessels, tney fell in
send back our swords and pistols lemons, limes, pomegranate, an-|for softnmes and muscles and | possibly eS six by then, one e an extré : ' ie . fra
and commit ourselves to his|°tto, prickled apple, prickled| curiosity of colouring, though w ith ea ee the "The Ww hen 1 eh : or Ty eka Mig
protection, And, if those in-|Pear, Pawpaw, these and more/a studied diligence; and a love from chia Spee ra the sane eae but it could ¢
j 7 Si lmay be accounted wood, and yet|both to the party and the work.) enquiries a out his wife, whether ire on board but it cou
structions were not presently put|'™ ay c ’ ree she was well-provided for or not. | be he tortured the sa
into action, we should in a very|@ aon. alae Be ies 0 To express all the perfections| Roberts replied that he had left) « revealed what ha
short time have our throats cut,| excellent fruit, a lof Nature and parts these virgins her in rather poor circumstances day they had beer
Then there is a lesser amount vee ‘ould require a more) and if the present trip turned out taken the Portuguese captain
We told him, that we had no| of the sort that bear the rarest | Posse ed, oe Re aa than mine. | poorly, the wife and children might placed the entire treasure, wor
intention of revenge for any) fruit, and whose bodies cannot skilfu earns his} ‘all were excel-| suffer for bread. Low, whose own over half million dolla in
wrong doing, and that the only| be accompted wood as_ the ue Wate ‘motions were. the|child was then living in Boston, money bag, whion he pended
cause for our landing was to] plantain, pine; banana, melon, Sites aa that is a beauty nojturned to Russel and said “Jt will out of the cabin window. Whe
see the beauty of the place we| water melon etc. and a few nie see nny aac rial and there-|not do Russel”, the pirates boarded his ship he cut
had heard so much of’from our} grapes, but those inconsiderable ear cie ake well be silent.
people who had been ashore and by reason they can never make Yet o lathe or two would not be

wine since they have no winter |
and so by that means they can
never ripe together. One is green,

who had given a very large tes-
timony both of the pleasantness

amiss to express the difference
between these and those of north

HH)

i

a)
cet .

and fruitfulness i 2 ae Proce ; "
peony Sieit oa seeoun ee some another ripe, another rotten, which | Africa; an . aon aie ean | ,
for the place and the people. As| Teason will ever hold that no| Binny, i Mi ot taal ot those that Os
for sending our weapons back to| Wine can be made on _ islands opia eee ay : ein if Gambia
the boat, we desired his pardon,| Where there is no winter; or with- | dwell ne +t ae ft shat nosed
for the ‘reason that the billows ae atl degrees of the line ot ae ee eee forehead&
were so very high at the time, es afte heard that wine is made| But these are composed of such

we could not send them to the
boat without their being dipped
in sea water and that would

features as would mar the judge-
ment of the best painters, to un-|
dertake to mend.

in the East Indies, within less
than fifteen degrees. But it is of |
the Palm tree, out of which body

spoil them. Since most of them , aw yine ¢ xil,| Wanton, as the soil that bred
were rich swords and pistols, we ar. wa Sia wae ae | them, sweet as the fruits they fed
were loath to have their beauty) day; but no wine of grapes for|on; for having come so near, as
covered with rust which the salt] the reason aforesaid, |their motions and graces might
water would cause. We pre-| Other kinds of trees we found | perfectly be discerned, I guessed
ferred that one of his soldiers] good to smell were Myrtle, Jas-|that nature could not, without
stayed with one of our men and| mine, Tamarind, a tree some-|help of art, frame such accom-
keep them safe till our return. what of that size bearing a beauti-| plished beauties, not only of

colours, and favour, but of motion



He was content to do this and| ful flower. The first half next the |

we committed ourselves to his| stalk, of a deep yellow or gold | too, which is the highest part ot}

protection. He put a guard of|colour, the other part being | beauty. }

10 soldiers upon us, part Portu-| larger of a rich Scarlet. It is If dancing had been in fashion .

gese and part Negro; the most] shaped like a carnation and when | on this island, I might have been te f








part of either kind as the most! the flowers falls off, there grows @ on page 11

LOVELY
LINGERIE
GIFTS

ROBERTS














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the rope ai he treasure fell int«









Edward Low: Jekyli And

Seas

NINE

PAGE

eve

«=e

FOR LINOLEUM
WOOD FLOORS
AND. FURNITURE

HYGIENIC WAX

POLISH

FOR BRIGHT. AND









HEALTHY ‘HOMES



JOINT AND
MUSCLE PAINS

may mean kidney trouble

A function of the kidneys is to eliminate
harmful impurities from the system. If the
kidneys grow sluggish, these impurities-—



the sea.

Low went d with rage at this
discovery He lashed the captair
to the mast and slashed off his lips |
with a cu Broiling the sev
ered men of the man's f
he then compelled the mate wn |

ul eat them wher till

hot r re After that the

pirates kil every member of the

ew of Nostra Signiora de
Victoria

Low was a sadist. His style of
torture changed slightly as hi
tastes varied, There was one peri-

i when he delighted in hanging
those he captured. At other time
new. tortures would be suggested
approved and inflicted. He en-|

joyed making men turn cannibal
yne day he captured two whalir

iy and the f one
t his ca in’s heart, and the
of tl ther eat their cay
bich he had roaste
i with salt and

ide mate o



pri

end of
ever,
crew 1

the
and ever
ainst
a ship :
ted that
Low's ship
id that he onl



hin



725 the «
La

ittac

i Ch

rrivit
he }

HO
d by
tmas i
f thirt



a ere

rship wa
iptur« him, ar
and = three
hip’s boat. Le
had irdered hi
and | crew h
mutinied and set him adrift with
out food or water, But I
escaped death in one form
it in another The
tain took his prisoners to Mar
and, thene, after standin

’ nee to

vered
idrift in 1
turned ut

quartermaster

onl
meet

h
nique

trial, they were all hanged for

acy



U.K. TRADE
POSSIBILITIES
IN COLUMBIA

LONDON
Viission to
have
Columbia, have cabled th
President of the Board of Trad
that they have had a most frienc
ly reception and that there is

rm ire to increase

tween countries

The th

ribbe

U Trade

K

( n

vho

des

the two T

ission feel that there is a grow- |
which |
United Kingdom traders can share}
have

if potential market in

nd they that there

er

report
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PAGE TEN SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1952

Olympic Story. VIII By TREVOR GALE









Sprint Cycling Dull? KLIM





=~
<4
mn

is produced

~
Apparently the note on whic! es . he dilemma of passing high
I finished last Sunday’s instalment teep banking or waiting

precludes my writing about swit
ming only to-day. I theret
have no alternative but to further
elucidate why I think the type of
race like the 1,000 metre cycle
event-4s the worst kind of t

in any form of sport

u | the short stretch to make
his Just kick. He chose the latter
eourse and of course only managed
pass Potzernheim. Sacchi mean-
hile. finished the race with a
very comfortable expression, a
And that was the final of the
1,000 metre cycle sprint, I could
net help thinking of the 5,000
metre with Zatopek, Chataway,
Viimoun and Schade, as | stood
in the Velodrome. Incidentally the
inal was slower than a good
any of the heats, but thig is not
prising,

fhe tandem race which is over
2,000 metres is merely a repeti-
on of the same tactics except
thet ome may see an additional
print or two interspersed with
some further periods of crawling.
The Time Trial, which is a race
against the clock, and the 4,000
metre Team Persuit are the only,
two events in which one can see
ony effort made at sustained
peed, But in the Time Trial each
n rides by himself while in the
Team Persuit, the two teams in Buy a Tin of...

I said I would not travel

to see it and there must be many
more people like me judging from
the paucity in numbers of the at-
tendance at the cycling events in
Hdisinki. Now in every type of
sporting event that one attend

it is generally the one which
brings an all out effort from the
competitors which is enjoyed the
most. One goes to a boxing match

j if the fighters do not mix "
ip and finish the fight either on

e floor or nearly touching it,
then one goes away feeling that
one has not had one’s money’s
worth,

One gues to a horse race and
if the pace is not turned on in
full force from the beginning
then it leaves one with the dis-
tinct feeling that perhaps the best







GIVE YOUR HAIR A
XMAS PRESENT







PHENSIC tablets clear the head and dispel



horse has not won. Many years cach heat start on opposite sides tightness and pain behind the eyes. They
ago horse racing in England saw of the track a the one which ‘. : , ai

a leisurely canter in the open returns the fastest time wins, Oc- A h bring down high temperature, relieve stuffy,
stages*and°a sudden scurry over easionally one team catches up s s congested feelings, at the same time soothing

the last one or two fu
Happily American jockeys
changed all this and most races
are now ridden at a fair clip
from beginning to end

é

vith and passes the other but this

soldngn happens after the first POMADE



the nerves and counteracting depression.
The, aches and pains of ’Flu disappear in
no time. PHENSIC tablets act quickly

‘
No what can the cycle au- Use it as directed, and you
rities do to stop this ridiculous

In the track events in athletics, " sone s ‘ 3
where surely man, as the most ite of affairs, As I see it they () Wil Mave the Silkiest, most and safely. They neither harm the heart
ntelligent animal on Earth, ave two courses open to them. glamorous hair you could or ae $s
would be expected to lead the They must either make a time ‘ nor upset the stomach. Keep a supply of

PHENSIC tablets by you always.

Phensic*:"

t for each lap and any rider desire. Add beauty to your
) cannot complete a lap in the
required time is automatically dis-

r they must make the .

for the whole distance use A. h. POMADE
the qualification for riders going
cn to the letter heats and the

final. That would mean all riders OPPS SFOS FEV’ -

way, do we see them slouching
around the track and then all
making a dash for the tapes in
the last 50 yards? Certainly not.
The day of the runner who held
something in reserve in the 400
metres has long passed and day
by day the style of running in

hair the easy way—



eee eee


















the longer distances has changed with the fastest times in the first| 9
so that to-day even in a marathon tae ret ni : % ee round of heats would qualify for |g
speed is concentrated on from ' a a ,_ round, instead of | ¥ ’
i i aking 1e first t >

the very Beginning. Liat KEN FARNUM on the track at the Velodrome in Helsinki.’ Behind each ‘heat, as the anaes oe 7 ‘ FOR FLU, COLDS bi CHILLS, RHEUMATIC PAINS

Of course.no one with a knowl- him is the steep slope of the banki . case may be. | § . 3@
cigs Sing any ind aten Hi he an eo Oe Maa ttl a en ee er aol LUMBAGO, NERVE PAINS, HEADACHES, NEURALGIA
meen and motor cycle racing, e ae tas cans ee Peete oe |S 5 3 3
wi leny the value of making a changed it would appear that winner, Instead he was complete- jay ‘arn ; : > y
sprint at the psychological mo- sprint cycling is forever’ doomed ly outmanoewvred by Sacchi and a aaa 2 bigger than) IS THE FINEST
ment when one has one’s rivals to be a dull affair, In Helsinki I Potzernheim, There were only Games are held 5 Ms er al REMEDY FOR
at a disadvantage. But the ten~ saw some races in which the three of them and Sacchi led at erazy countries Certainiy i a.
dency to-day is always to have pistol cracked and the contestants first followed Potzernheim tralia there will oa . Po ot
whatever game you are playing, hardly moved from the Sturting with Cox last The pace of the ple attracted to acl ~ aa pore Y
going at a reasonably warm pace line within the first half minute, race would have had to be seen were in F nlande A ae there | 4 RHEUMATI
from the beginning. It is only by There they were like a troop of to be believe A crawl is to erowd vou ae bigger ths vere the %
this method that one can really performing monkeys balancing at describe it conservatively. Twice here at an cane f nial is see! 3
find out who is the best man, the starting line each refusing to in the first lap anq a half 1 at irapielecitens age football match | g

In cyeling, apparently, a)l this be the first man to go off in front. thought Cox should have gone age SP q | ¥ PAINS
is different. Why this form of One of them; I think it was the to the front but he absolutely ' " The Swimming 3
sport should be different from any Champion Sacchi himself; actual- refused. Potzernheim actually in- ...°" king back on the entire}
other is particularly baffling to 1Y went back a fraction of an creased the speed ne Asante inte e I spent in Helsinki I cannot}
me. Frankly I see no reason for inch while balancing. As far as the last lap in front but it was ){'â„¢@â„¢ber more pleasant moments}
it. I can ascertain, th is no limit ebvious they all still had a lot Urin those spent at the swim-| %

MH ig as if the cyclists have tO the time that they can go on in reserve. Ag they crossed the ™!"8 tadium. The layout and Don’t be without a bot-
agreed that it is stupid to ride “°ing this sort of thing and to line for the last 200 metres (the urroundings of the whole place " oh
fast ov@r anything but the Jast two C#"ry it to its most ridiculous only part of the race which is ™™ bave been arranged by| % tle—it’s a real standby.
hundred yards, and in fact, they CoMclusion, a race could possibly timed) they had not yet really #"°hitects with a decided flare for|
sometimes ride as if the last 29 take half an hour or more, begun to go all out. I began to king the most out of nature.| ¥ On Sale at
would suit them just as well, The final of the 1,000 metre Wonder if they ever would. it was also the only place where | e
Nothing could be more conducive cycle sprint was as Hdonslosiva : : , { saw any large portion of water| ¥ , 1 19 —
to the worst man winning an « race as | have seen anywhere Eventually they printed the ss blue as the seas in this part| 2 KNIGHTS Drug Stores
event instead of the best. Lionel Cox of Australia, in ae last quarter lap fully extended of the world. Perhaps that was| § g

But unless the rules are opinion, should have when ried with Sacehi passing Potzernhein what made me feel go at home. | 4 &

on the banking and Cox faced @ on page 11 4 oo





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SUNDAY, DECEMBER 1

OLYMPIC
STOR)

@ from page 10



The
Statium,

pool,

was

like the ?
built in 19Â¥9
the 1940 games w eV
came off, and vy
hill just behind the tte Pine
trees surrounded it and t
more the
garden, It
with eight
mers which
smaller



look of
was fifty
lane for

next





pools, one f















Com ‘ning Hints
For Aniateurs

@ From page 3

break the
add a little

idition of lir

wise t gen-
lime.

2 to the
n books
sup-

old



ushing down

and add ng this when
ip the bed. But if thi
is not available, builder
(after being slacked
e to the air) by add-
square yard. This
course be added



t f
Lust of







one just for practising. T time before any planting is
was purified by what wes cali ne. When shaping. the bed it
ozone and one could hey e IS best to heap it three inches
large machines underne t level of the surround-
grand stand in c at 1 to isure good drain
It was also heated 14 Good drainage is essential
this was what made carnations, and if the bed is
with some wild Aust: uli inclined to be heavy, a
friends of mine who told layer of broken crocks and large
attendants they were compet nes should be buried deep
tors and went swimr ean ier where the carnations are
evening after the even Were ‘© be planted in order to give the
it not for .an infected thro y Water a ch nee to drain away.
would have joined then elf, Planting Out

An advantage which th« Carnation seedlings should be
ming events had ove , planted as their name _ implies
others was the atte: along the border, or edge of the
royalty nearly- every da bed, Give them plenty of room
longer hours than they by placing them one foot apart
anywhere elsé. This Be careful when doing this job,
persons of H.R.H, tl ke of not to sink the little plants any
Edingburgh, The Duke Kent, @eeper in the bed than they were
Prince Bernhard of the Nether. 2" the box, or the stems may rot.
lands and his two little daugh- .
ters the Dutch Princesses. The Maintenance
Duke of Edinburgh, especially After the seedlings have be-
attracted much attention from come well rooted in the bed,
the fairer sex not only at the keep the bed well forked, but
Swimming Stadium, but care must be taken not to break
wherever he went in Helsinki the surface any deeper than a

The first day I went to the couple of inches or injury to the
swimming I found that the ar- roots may result.
rangements for the pre were Carnations do not require a
more like what they were at ich soil, and if manure is added







Cycling, although we did
have as much freedo
swimmers however had ¢ » to
almost any part of the stand and
I found myself sitting among a
mixture of French journalists
and members of the French
swimming team. Another day in
the seat next to mine was Fanny
Blankers-Koen herself, relaxing
after her sensational exit fron
the women’s track events. e
seemed quite happy and inci-

dentally looked quite fit





Just behind my —§ seat was the
radio booth with broadcasters
from all over the w d calling
their respective coun nd to



my surprise I heard one n-
nouncer calling the British West
Indies. I then heard hi ive a
description of some of im-



ming events and the res









The first afternoon :
swimming I saw the final of the
men’s Spring Board Div and
one or two heats for the 1,500
metres. I missed the
the 100 metres howev:

I had to choose betwe t
ing this or some of the cyclin
The Spring Board diving, I
thought was very spectacular but
I did not know’ what still
in store for me or jp ps I
might have thought it tan
D. G. “Skippy” Browning, seem-
ed to be favourite and after I
saw him; do two dives I quite
understood why everybody sit-
ting around thought it was a
foregone conclusion. The system
of scoring was complicated and
I could not follow it, but I
thought that Juan Capilla of
Mexico did as well a if not
better than Anderson and Clot-
worthy both of the U.S.A |-
though they came second nd
third,

Next I saw the f is H
Fruuhashi of Japan win |}
1,500 metre heat and
was struck with his r
style. I have commented on it

before in my despatches but it is

worthy of note a second time in
as much as Furuhashi was once
hailed as stylist to be followed
by future generations. From the
first I saw of him I could not
see how anybody could hope to
copy him. His style was as
unique as Zatopek’ way of

running.



to them during growth, it should
be in the form of liquid manure.
This is very easily made by
soaking a bag of horse or cow
manure in water for two days
until the water is the palest yel-
' Soot water is also very
icial and can be prepared in
same way,



Staking The Carnations

Staking is for the



necessary
carnation plants, as otherwise
the weight of the flowers brings
the plant to the ground and the
flowe are spoilt,

Another necessity is to thin out
the nation bud (which gen-
€ “ar in clusters) to one
each stem, so giving
th to develop into





A Pretty Face

@ From Page 6























_Ligon’s

@ from page 9
rsuaded that they had beer
ight jfhose motions by
10 had studied the art But con-

some





the Pe e's m Ac U
t st the island affor ded
rot but cast away t



th and attribute all to _
atur Innocent and youthf
their ages about fifteen. Seei

their beauties so fresh and yout!

l, with all the perfections |
named, I thought it good t

ina


















out whether their. voices
language would be as sweet ar
harmonious their other p S
were con id, by the help of
a gentl o spoke Port
gese, I acc d them 1 be
to praise their beau 1ape
and manner of dressing, which
were extremely pretty. Their hair
not shorn as the Negroes in the

places I have named, close







heads; nor in quarters, and m:

as they used to wear it, whict
ridiculous to all that see ,
but themselves. They wore in
a due proportion of | oO as
to have their shorte the
natural curls, they appeared as
Wyers and artificial dressings to
their faces.

On the sides of their che
they plait little of it, for the pur-
pose of tying smail ribbons, small
beads of white amber or lue
bugle, sometimes of the rare 11 -
ers that grow there. Their ears
hung with pendants, their necks
and arms adorned with bracelets
of counterfeit pearls and blue
bugle such as the Portuge be-
stow on them. For, they are free
negroes and wear upon the small
of one of their legs the badge of
their freedom, which is small
piece of silver or tin, as big as the
stale of a spoon. Because of the
smoothness and lightnes no
impediment to their 1ovements.
Their clothes were petticoats of
striped sil next to their linen

which reached to their middle leg;
and upon that a mantle of blue
taffeta, tied with a ribbon on the







right shoulder. This came under
the left arm and hung down care-
lessly somewhat low than the
petticoats, so that a great part of
the natural beauty of their backs
and necks before, lay open to view
their breasts round, firm and
beautifully shaped.







Upon my addre : to them they
appeared a little di bed and
whispered to each other, but had
not the confidence to speak aloud.
I had in my hat a piece of silver

and silk ribbon which I perceived
that their well shaped eyes often
darted to. But their modesties
would not give them confidence to
ask. I took it out and divided it
between them, and they accepted
with much alacrity, and in turn
drank to one another my health in
the liquor of the pure fountain,
which I perceived their wanton
smiles and jesticu ons and the
casting of their towards me.










eyes





er. It is still the Korean custom When they thought they had ex-
to ell eggs “by the yard” pressed enough they would change
rapped in straw plait their countenances and put them-
id when she comes home in selves in the most modest postures
the evening she will be just as But we had brought a case of
urprised to see her father-in- bottles of English spirits with us
sitting hatless. In Korea and I called for some to drink a
rried men wear hats indoors health to them in a small dram cup,
as well .as\out, I gave it to one of them and she
smelled it. Finding it too strong
Chopsticks for their temper, poured some of
A it into one of their calabashes.
Mi Bacon senior has handy Then they added water to it as to
a pair of wooden chopsticks for make it cool enough for their pal-
her new daughter-in-law. But ates. They drank again, but all
although there will be rice, until this would not give them the con-
more used to British fidence to speak, but in mute lan-
there will be no kimchi. guage and pretty motions, showed
ichi is a national dish in that they wanted neither wit nor
It is made of cabbage, discretion to make an answer. It
dried fish, ginger, and seemed it was not the fashion there
the whole mixture for young maids to speak to

packed in an earthen. pot, strangers in so public a place
prinkled with salt, fermented in I thought I had been sufficiently
the sun and then bu i un- armed with the perfections I found
derground fo ome mont in the Padre’s mistress, as to be
free from the darts of any other
But in -other things—a sense beauty of that place in so short a
of humour for instance — the time. But I found the differenc«
two Mrs. Bacons will find they between young, fresh beauty and
have 1uch in common. those that are made up with the
And because of the elder Mrs. addition of State & Majesty, which
3acon’s human attitude to her for though they counsel and per-
daughter-in-law’s picture she will suade our loves; young beauty
be off to a good start forces, and so commit rapes upon
—L.E.S our affections. In fact, had not



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St NDAY ADVO¢ ATE
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he bee in my
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t loth to



habitation, 1








































ft between
F so equal
ny love
could be par-
tion ais-
placed at
1 equal etween two » .
pottle f r | goodness
bottles of Hay, vax The Only Pain Reliever
xed uy eitt hether that Mm . . “
horse must not jually starve t Vv t 5
For, if he fed « er, it must be con aining I amin qd
argued tt etite was more
BAEe: ees SOR else that bottle If you are suffering from a Cold,
s ter t Other- Chill, Headache or Nerve Pain
vise ld move him to start taking YEAST-VITE
choc e wre the other | Tablets AT ONCE. You will be
In this position I was with my | overjoyed at the difference it
two mistresses, or rather, my two makes to you. Your Pain, Cold,
halv ef one mistre for had or Chill symptoms will quickly
they been joined i so made one, disappear, and you'll feel ever
he point o love W Id have so much bet
met there being divided, and :
m) n mn rke was RELIEVES YOUR PAIN
fi to fix but in one and
f MAKES YOU FEEL WELL
In this doubtful condition I took wor. There’ ‘
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should neve na two Such Per ONLY pain reliever
illel paragons in m whole search NERVE PAINS which ALSO contains
throughout t The Sep ree COLDS, CHILLS the tor Vitamin By
for their at likeness and lustre onres "
ee ner 1 _ a rire atte bites 7 and seine ee it oan -
7s _ ; poe =f 4 ic
win I nformed of this oy ‘3 RHEUMATIC TO-DAY That’s the
a Hermit came often to visi YEAST-VITE ” Y best way to get quick re-
us when we came on land as we ao PAINS licfand fk 1 Rates, too!
often did, and it was not far off ween en en
trom his cell
But you think it strange that a
man of my gravity and age should
have so much to do with beauty
and love. I have three argument
to protect me. The first is that in
my younger days I was much in-| ——
clined to painting, in which art, ®
colour, favour and shape is much i ay
eaecibad ‘These Beatties Ware a IN THE WEST INDIES MEN WEAR
proper subject of all these perfec-
tions (being in themselves perfect) |

I could not but consider them with
a studied diligence

Next, I had long at sea
without setting foot on land, and
that has a way of making all ob-
jects on land look beautiful,
hese, be in the highest degree
paramo could not but surprise
my fancy. Besides, the place being
extremely beautiful and lovely,

been

so



could not but secretly harbour in
it the spirit of love, a passion not |
to be governed. Therefore, I hope |
you will pardon my wild extrava-
gance

3ut, the main roason of this, is, |
I had little else to say, for the
island being a place of very little |
or no traffic, could not afford much
of discourse They have very
good and large cattle which they
kill at very early rates. And, like-
wise, horses of excellent shapes

d mettle. But they are contra-
band goods and whoever deals in
them (without pecial ligence)
forfeits both ship and goods, if
they have power to compel them
But I believe they have not, hav-

by the
us often
Having
would

ing been partly informed
Hermit who came to see
and hear news and beg
been given something, he
not stick to impart somewhat of
the weakness of the island and
that would have cost him dear if
it had been known by the Padre
Some of his information to us wa
that the forts and block houses on







either side o* the Pry, on which |
we saw the appearance of ord-| fast, it can also be obtained in
nances good store and large, we
were made to understand that a wide range of colours and lighter
those forts were neither regular,
nor the guns brass or iron, but weights for more casual we
only such as Henry 8th took Bul-
loyne vrith.
This we found by experience to
be true, for upon our first differ-
ence with Bernardo and the Padre, i wees ay
we weighed Anchor and removed OYGASHEL
ourselves out of the distance of m
the castle which stood in the bot- | PURE CREASE-RESISTING LINENS REGO.
tom of the Pry and expected to be |
shot at from those forts and block } :
houses, but no fire was given. So A. S. Bryden & Son (Barbados) Ltd.
1ey had been furnished Wl
| si artillery as would — have Sales West Indies
reached us, we should certainly Stevenson & Son Ltd., P.O.’ Box 1704, NASSAU, Bahamas
have heard from ther We also ws
enquired of our Intelligence the

is the ve

manufiac-
there, but

*Moygashe
STEVENSON & SON LTD,,

what trades or
practised

Hermit

tures were DUNGANNON

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@® On Pare 16





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PAGE

ELEVEN




THE QUARTER POUND TIN of Andrews is of special
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I ———

ORDEAL BY ICE "=

Focus On

PAGE TWELVE SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1952



























































4“¢

ENNETT COLLEG

SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND = -

can help you to success
through personal postal tuition

HOUSANDS OF MEN tn importent
of this famous English Colles

M. Herzog tells the grim, dignified story British
of the conquest of a mountain FIULs

By GEORGE MALCOLM THOMSON Guiana

positions were once students
They owe their success to
Personal Postai Tuition—The Bennett College way. Now you










































































ANNAPURNA By Maurice be es id aot ek are offered the same chance to qualify for a fine career, higher
Herzog. Cap 15s 288 page — Benday and f riday , } pay and social standing
‘ : n the coming week listener , ;
; ae the BBC will hear another of the One of these courses will lead to your advancement
: ae : ‘Focus’ programmes this time o i Accountancy Agriculture Motor Engineering
rt partons tatdat 4 : : IN TH E AMAZ]I NG Auditing Architecture Plum ‘
Herz rit particular interes to wu a3 B sok epee Aiccratt Maintenance Power Station —_
’ + Focus on British Guiana’ and i Commercial Boiler Engineering pepincering
! st wing light n ot 4 - : . Arithmetic Building Press Tool Wo:
writte ind produced by Eileer
jimalava affairs ae nh ana | ' meee + amazed by the conv Costing Carpentry Pumping Machinery
er 8.000 . ‘ Hots; in,includes reeordings wit! . 6 Economies Chemistry uantity Surveying
. Library List ye ¢QG Ines j ve. if’ bottle and Modern Business Civil Enginecring ‘adio Engineering
‘ yung Gui é both in B.C
‘ ‘ WINGS OF THE WIND. By Pete: ~ a ‘ oo. his new nail pc Methods — Clerk of Works Road Making
Stainforth. Faleon Préss. 15 % pages. Ut Britain being interviewer s 'A lutionary new Shorthand Diese! Engines Sanitation
War as seen t t { First Writing of the programme Eileer ; ob English Draughtsmansh Sheet Metal Work
Parachute Brigade : is oe ae oes ; i aty of Cime to fight General Education Electrical Engineering Steam Engineering
ally at Arnhem. The cream of the army: PO's 5 that B.G. is be upset | fe an age is Geography Electrical Jostruments © Surveying
nsedeell adventure. tune tu +. KNown as the land of the Six Jone to your clothing or f re! Journalism Electric Wiring Tolecommunications
: oe re AS of dubtceta Petbles~cthic 4 . ety Languages Engineering Drawings Television
1 in hg ‘ echo of desperate . a ue = peoples being} Professic at home! Patpernstion fee pe
{ " , \merindians ricans lar Th nsa neck ublic . Engines re raph
GC} : @& AMEUSH FOR THE HUNTER. By Cl iis = Por A in rm, Ind a n afta: . é a Police Sebjects” Machine Desiga Works Maan
ng i F . Green. Michael Joseph. 19s. 64. - linese, ortugueé se and othe measures Ou ned - right amount Short Story Writing Mechanical Engineering Workshop Practice
t 272 pages. Fva Droumek arrives at Lon- European settlers. She points out of polish to cover one lf ctly! pov abpcorienae 1 = abansahrgrorenyy® gihcgee gaat aes. op gel igre | OVERSEAS
fos ‘Cutan I . n ee” the that there are divided opinion New CUTEX Nail Polish contains Enamelon TO ee Ce ION, WEFT ELS, ERMLANS.* Speer CoRNOnTE
me to fpr Eva? The question, #bout this country which will hav. the miracle-wear ingredient ... ourweats and | Please send me free your prospectus on: j Pras
‘ > t asked b mer, a perceptive - univers: ; rage xt ve fo I ishes! Ask ¢ ;
(2) because MAURICE HERZOG sorter, is answered ax'tension mounts te the first. timer scr eet ee | pbsisht ieadea ie To eee "Exams
he suifere ( i ms limax in FP. L. Green‘ -managed || “ ae ee ee eet | wrens eo ‘ !
* his finge i toes fron Not a t der the socks, on Sen's well-managed Gevelopment ‘requires capital| WAR i a ak sais
1 bite irresistible upw 1 ree which , a 7a GRASS HARP. Ry Troman which cannot be found at present | WEES ci tt Se ee | : TODAY
} hy lit ne tb Seen ‘i; . ’ ‘apote ecinemann, 10s, 6d. 191 pages . hea etn on a for a free prospectus on
ae is a bool I c h ad ded u } fh eesent little novel from the OF #2 the long term future; other; ni _ < ; oun Sef Uididor 31 | Wor ables: Lust choose
for tl wt lo f cl ’ Tragedy arrive n the down- ; the trouble starts on Speak optimistically of the vast, PLEASE WRITK IN BIOCK LETTERS ' md post i
book about mountaineering hich war durne He gloves y ma Vv a albo decides unexplored stretches of territor >
ll enthrall those € OV which ‘he has take T : , y - Gropsy cure in this land which is nearly the 95
i h off for a ' must be put ha 3 r 14.12.52
4 " on ‘ he. ement, slide irretrievably down business footin size of the United Kingdom and
yuntain f belo the mountain Neves tie: ts RHODES. By Sarah Gertrude Mil- yet has only half a million in-|-
i must €, minvte did it occur to me to use Bhodee te wih Tivineeiane, uh cbt habitants, What is definite is thi:
! I he ves the sox vhich I ale e in Africa, His ideal: “Equal SUgar and rice are grown in great ¢
@ \ ell planned and wa cat n reserve fo st (iehts for civilised men south of the quantities, bauxite is one of the LE
arry v r just gimbesi.” Enierce ris sditio: .?, . 4 ; t "a
‘ » will recognise and gyeh a mishap Ponds geipreed, Fevised edition in most valuable assets ‘while jute A @ ep GK |
a yu ror ete When the two climbers reach _ @ DON’T LOOK ROUND. By Vioiet Cattle and timber are being T S!
j 5 nr hi ngle the neare camp Maurice Trefusis, Hutchinson. 16s. 240 pages. developed. She touches on the p
“ompani chenal, ir ch- hs Alicia ; Memories of Edwardian England and fe , eet &, A ILL
ce me nion a ! nal s se your h nd SayS someone. An pre-war France written on the principle: question of West Indian Federa-| BweEVEC FORGE 6+ an
ing the pea at s * uneasy silence falls My fingers “I have not ted. I have merely by- t10n and emphasises that the} t g .
the attack is something that all ivere violet and white and hard passed the truth whenever unpalatable.” Guiariese whom you will hear in| COUGH SYRUP
an understand. Herzog \¢ ” " ; Modish drawing by Philippe Julian : asl . Ci |
cal und : fai | 88 wood Iloating on a sea of match the bo selective nostalgia the programme speak only for
scribes it with simplici na joy remote from reality Herzog WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERV themselves in saying whether B.G ‘ : £
m 8 3 SERVED selves in saying whether B.G. With Vitamin C
power. is the last to understand the ~L.E.S. should federate now or stand on th tami
Long before describing the day gravity of what has ‘happenede - SS ber own looking for trade and :
of the fina! ascent—June 3, 1950 Feet as well as hands are ; ¥ close co-operation with South! STOPS KIDDIES
“Herzog. has communicates to afféeted Muslims Warned America, especialy Brazil, Their), COUGHS & COLDS
us the strange sense of dedica- _ The descent from Annapurna comment, like that of many of |
tion which grips — the climber’s 'S a prolonged agony, dignified ‘ CAIRO, their fellow countrymen is ‘Let's | In a Jiffy ‘
heart when he is faced by one of bY courage and comradeship, — Islamic religious leaders wait before we decide either to
those supreme tests of nerve and Snow blindness, avalanches, loss throughout the Middle East, federate or stand on our own.’
endiraens of direction—every affliction be- alarmed by the successful infiltras This programme ‘attenipts to ; ~— AND TASTES SO GOOD THEY BEG FOR MORE!
The reality of the impulse, the Sets the party. There is a good tion of Communist agents into interpret British Guiana to the ; x
command that it lays on men’s Surgeon with the expedition; aren ha * ne pare this week English-speaking world at large a Mothers, $ou’ll bless the day, this Soaring cough syrup, made spreciatty {
ow . “ante, > the reader probably his d is ¢ . , instructed “preachers” to warn 3 na on * for little folks, came down from Canada to save es—your es
hearts, is accepted by the reader probably hi drugs and his knife Afialinis 4 * 2 ues Be ae but we shall be interested to sec ( —ttom the menhate of cotighs and cpldé that Kahs on awd joa. to
without question, The challenge save the lives of both Herzog Red Sin Mie mosques of anti- what the world is being told, dangerous complications. With JACK and JILZ these nasty, sniffy
of the peak is there, and must be and Lachenel, ed propaganda through this programme, of our- colds and bad coughs go faster than you would believe possible. And

answered, _ Herzog’s account of the ordeal i An reports on Communist ac=
So Herzog clings (and we 18 proud and poignant. It is irohare a a Kheae Sheikh
cling with him in imagination) also vivid. At the very end of Sete oy Is} ~nNeE fh ; cusses to
to the tent poles of Camp V as the journey, when the expedition P oie Cc Sia onlcia aeae
dawn breaks on the last day of mounting the train for ~Kat- for ‘then Ce ie eee eee megacycles, and the second at 7.45
the attack. He and Lachenal set mandu capital of Nepal: .
off, in their eiderdown clothing “With a sort of old broom made
through which the icy wind of twigs, they pushed everything

how they love the pleasant taste of JACK and JILL.

ITS NeW, DIFFERENT SAFE

JACK and JILL ‘* new but thoroughly tested in thousands of cases
and is guaranteea to relieve kiddies’ coughs and colds faster than
anything you have ever tried, and most important of all JACK
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selves and our close neighbour:
There will be two broadcasts, the |
first at 4.15 p.m. on Monday, 15th.
Dec. in the 25 metre band, 11.75

His words have the same in- P:-â„¢. on Friday, 19th. right after
fluence as those “ot ies Papal the special programme to the West |
‘ f Nuncio in the Catholic world, Indies. This latter broadcast will
whistles. Frostbite is their great- on to the floor. In the midst of a For Sheik Hussein is the Rector b¢ beamed to us in the 31 and 49

est foe—how great a few hours heap of rubbish rolled an amaz-= of Al-Azhar, Cairo’s mosque tuni- Metre bands, 9,58 and 6.035 mega-

will reveal, Meantime, they itug number of toes of all sizes versity, focal point of the cycles, respectively but judging _ oo



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climb upwards with deceptive Which were then swept on to the Mohammedan religion in the from recent weeks reception will

ease, A ge before the startled eyes Middle Kast. be best on the beams to the :
eee te PRE aR eRe eae ‘Islam efproves private own- Pacific in the 41 metre band, 7.185
touching beauty; the mountains A year later Herzog was still , Pp eo » 7 “4 e

ership. It moderates its defects— and 7.150 megacycles and have ft handy
































seem to belong to dreams; he in hospital, having “rather a bad in the individual, not the system * = =
smiles at the paltriness of his et. But he was able to die —by urging the ‘wealthy to look Writer From British Guiana AGENTS. ot aoa ee
own efforts; he can stand apart tate this graphic account of stern after the poor > OIG POSS OVRIOSOOOON.
eee eee himself. It i : te rtp ge Ne glowing heroism ‘Islam also recognises that men This seems to be British|| oan er ee en ee POSS OFF FO OOOO OOO
effect of hallucination produced which will become one of the have varying abilities enabling Guiana’s week in the BBC's x 4
by height and cold. At last they classics of mountain-climbing them to achieve varying degrees schedule as in addition to the | t Make sure that you do not have any regrets. >
reach the top! With its superb photographie of material well-being. To pro= above progr: . : ill fis
: : . a ® programme B.G. will figure ", |
“Our hearts overflowed with illustration _ Annapurna is tect the poor from capitalist ex= jn ‘Caribbean Voille’ Of Sunday, For | Shop TO-DAY At
an unspeakable happiness If worthily the Evening Standard ploitation Islam prohibits usury. 14th, inst. in the person of Ian } j
only the others could know If Book of the Month. “Look at the Communist claim Carew the British Guianese poet
Gply everybody could know! THE RULING FEW. By Sit David {0 have eliminated exploitation! whose “Death of the Gods" telling 7 [ $
The summit was a corniced crest Kelly Hollis and Carter, 25s, Then study the condition of Coma . the Wile a wane cine > ou s
of ice, and the precipices on the 449 pages. munist countries. Ruling officials = — Cer ne i tie ie The | IS Y a e
far side which plunged vertically WHEN Sir David Kelly went !!ve ‘in Czarish luxury; workers henir pebarediae The “eat of the |
down beneath ,us, were terrifying as sritain’s ambassador to leading the drabbest lives cannot ; ea Aabslca | Je have a larg ange of
“a , : ; 9 ay shange their factories programme will be devoted to a | We have a large Range of
unfathomable. There could be Stalin’s Moscow, he took with ° ep change their factories. short -xtoty ‘Poona’ B¥ Eutos i lie : |
few other mountains in the him recollections of visits as an ,.. Muslims share their antagon- Tarvis of , Trinidad Bro. a ne ~GUOS |
world like this.” undergraduate to Tsarist Russia. Raa with all oo a ~~ bégins at 7.15 abn. "Binday "i sth. | i Ss 7 r 4 Ve ne «
They took photographs, put up He as able to see modern ;@* €Ven, greater reason for do- hla ha chats eh ae } 4 ts O "7 “yO
a French flag, thought with Russia in historical perspective we 80 cm Communism is more in the 31 and 49 metre bands
humility of their comrades in the and to analyse it as a world “28” 8 faith it is a financial and Double Bill
cam} below through whose problem, obscure and met social system ang te COMPACTS 84c
“am elow, through whose » obscure and menacing, shatever its « ; n Wednesday next, 17th. inst., MPACTS wiv.esees a a ; ice it every pocke
efforts and sacrifices success had He recalls, as useful for to-day ,, and. whatever its ages may the. BC \ ill | Na dnae tw ; ake with prices to fit eve FY. POS ket
tr. (hark Ae $ aaa +. mht : to say, Communism eventually ends eB will broadcast two plays, TRAPRY COTnn eae me o €10¢0 9
eome There are times when Palmerston’s remark (1860): “It by’ persecuting any religious beginning at 9.00 p.m, The first DUBARRY GIF 84c., $1.18, $1.80, $2.00
th most ers eal ees ine = sae de been the practice of system 3 te Oh ~adantation, of Somemet TRINKET Sit?’ $5.85. $10.42 | Here again is the ever popular Ciro Single Strand
suddenly ned-up. si » , ssig ( ay 1ent *x< f , . ’ VINE oniiy “ t $2 | * t Er sry
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an sxe YOu ie ms & PF 5 a apicly 4S among all those opposing Com- the second is Shaun Sutton’s pTTaAnW eprre “C7 19 97 ¢& | ines » , Wings, & G swe 4
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ee a ee a ee ee ee ee ee ee eee ee eer

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1952

HENRY

SUNDAY ADVOCATI PAGE THIRTEEN

= ee







BY CARL ANDERSON

—— f oy | —- “lh

The popularity of Jolin White shoes is built on

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{ their outstanding VALUE is what men expect and
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John White. See them for yourself in leading
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poi Ci a =
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IM KING OF THIS COUNTRY > ‘, / LIKE ME, OR
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GE KING/ SHE ‘as )
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7 BGGEST LOAFER YOU UP IN BUSINESS TWICE -BUT = “
ie Be Sees | 3 WINDSOR PHARMACY =
secs! Jcotece: pa ya aC Ste Sane RY A | 2 a
© II ary 3 ORE TIMES THAN | &
< c
| a BROAD ST. TELEPHONE No, 2292 a
& a ORES, Wak oa
| ANNA ADIN AS DAD NODS ING savannas ENGNG NG NG NG NG NG NB NS NG NG GN NN NN NN NS
|
| THE LITTLE SHOP
| ad A AMA».
BY ALEX ay eee
were Vr itl [NoT YOu \ iF IT DOESN T | A : ‘
[120 Sie verb FOR IESSICA | |e FOUNDED. WAVE ALREADY WE'VE GOT TO reine: aD | % G. r A hole in the wall where Gifts suit each and every purse.
| MILLBANKS AND MYSELF. I DETERMINED THAT HE IS —~ CET TESSICA cr |
\, SUSPECT HER oan ze A reer aN x (aia re inl WE MU LA j ic : | e
\ HARRY IS BAC N T LC Wik ” \ Ee , } - ‘
EOE eT pene Che Vinest Leather Work and
: 2 ‘ fdsvening Bays
by
FINNIGANS OF BOND STREET
and FIFTH AVENUE
©
€vquisite Srench Perjumes
by
BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES LUCIEN CELONG and LENTHERIC
i
ne Tea Deepa ee ee ee ! e ;
@ THE PR eerie || [Tale Man muct XY Yes, THATS THE | [= | E e\ a :
30 Me SED ‘ HAT \ yee i
c sora ‘oe The Finest Wines of Srance and Spain
ao y and the Best Prices for Australian Wines
;
WHISKY Brands from $4.80 a bottle
GIN Brands from $3.00 a bottle
and the Island’s Famous COCKSPUR RUM
The answer to your Christmas shopping problem lies in t!
LITTLE SHOP :
Johnson’s Stationery Buildi Broad Street i











PAGE FOURTEEN







SUNDAY

ADVE



aT





Vii





CLASSIFIED ADS |ANNOUNCEMENTS PURLIC SALES | 47°S HERE AT LAST =

TELEPHONE 25086


























































































oo } tine Square al
DIED i \ Deana i Snares :
DIED FOR SALE rt. 3 Sus ABELLE — A tage
December 1: Good ¢
ROLLINS, T fune — . . Ter ¥ORTHING i RD
Murray's residence, West LOST & FOUND . Gea. Going for Only 4 ie
erent, ©. 08 nS AUTOMOTIVE A 3 Begroon Good as N tone
the St. James Cemeter i gnidw, about 11,000 sq By NAVY
asked to attend j GARDENS, Geing for On ‘ 0) Ne
wy (daughte M: e.J CAR-One (#1) 10 WLP Ang t LOST IN BELLEVILLE A very Desirable
ve, Flora, Owen, Carl M erfect condition. At S. Bute ne-Storey, (Partly Stone) 2 Bed
g°andchildrer McEne ev & Co. 1 MCKET ke ket S G Garage. Very Good Condition,
14 in Se Ks “e for Or £1,900 Net. Almost
, m ; ite H St. Jame Reer Partly Stone) Bunge
THANKS CAR—CITROEN SALOON. NEW AND ‘ it 4.000 sq. ft., AT GOVT. HELL, |
CLARKE The Clarke family bes | UNREC TERED Black wit! eathe c eo On = ) Net. IN ae ON
througt t a t thank ! 1 ister’ lor I Bladon ty, w _ : . te )B : € i : I .
those who ttended the funeral 388: ‘ WAN I ED : Bt a - eee . : "a
PX Presser path heir Te a ‘ diiotemsinini Out $70.00 1 a ; r
cents beren\ One (1) Prefect Ford 1948 m C9100 Net. Goad I , oe
9591n we addition } : —_—_—_—_—_— on ome eugew -\at Maxwe ill, about '% Acre oir
ee cantites ae : 1 Se diatiach tuapemeea’ Wibod 2 20 WANTED TO RENT for Only 13 cts. Net sq. ft. It ts]
TALMA:—The Talma family gratefully }¢00 p'm. or Phone 4590 Furnished one bedroom Bungalow with | Well Known that D. F. de Abreu LEADS
ack age with deepest apprecia- 14.12.82—1n, |C* nsils. Gentler alor t.| for LOWEST PRICES and MOST DE-
Hon alf-expressions of apmpatny ‘ten sh al —_ ————— | Michael or St. 1 ence. Write Box K.| SiRABLE PROPERTTES including SEA-
te se S ne o Advocate Advtg ept ww " ;
dered them and alse thank all whe] 42LLMAN STATION WAGON ~Only |‘ Advonate Ad ; th is og |e uly ANYWHERE. DIAL 3111.
attended t funeral ent wreaths or ]36.000 miles. Owner driven. Appearance 3.16. des Call Olive Bough Hastings
n any other w endered assistancێ | good as new. Perfect working , order + 54 = a : a =
i their recent bereavement roug! BRADSHAW & COMPANY. " a woe: |. DENIS MONIE & CULPEPPER Tw
the passing of ALICE M. TALMA late cistern.) PUORLIC NOTICES ises at Bathsheba, either tomether or
oad, Christ Church my eparately. App s ay <
oer Beets ee 4 12 52——br TRUCK Ford Truck, 1940. Apply _. et anise } St. Philip 7.12.52—4:
——_——${$S$$$—$_ en es iW. Maloney, Chancery Lane, Ch. Ch = wi _ erasers $$ —_—
WALCOTT— Through this medium we 13.12. 52—2n, NOTICE LAND—2 Lote of land ‘adjoining each
ask to thank family and friends who? —————— anitiaitioe jother, containing respectively ’
N "E ve t | si > feet and 12,072 uare feet sttu-
diy sent wreaths, cards, or 1 ELECT NOTICE is hereb iven that the] square ; ane B+
ce Wwahgathised with us on our rece RICAL on Books of the pany will be se “ Blue Waters Terrace, Rockley
Y Mevakvement caused. by the death acini inn _ — [closed from the 16th of Dec . Apply
a Giny Walestt, pare se BATTERY TESTERS ~— Hiuh discharge" i952, until the 29th of Decernber COTTLE. CATFORD & CO
Bits (wife). Gladys, Gwen, Gordan,| Battery Testers and Polarity Indicators, 141959’ poth days inclusive 11.12.52—6n,
oy ichildren) ; 14.12.52—1n. | suitable for Garages etc. Dial 38878,) &, order of the Board of Directors.) ———————————____
. DaCosta & Co., Ltd., Biectriog a a WEST INDIA BISCU?T CO. LTD., HOUSE--Situated be ash _
. =e ;. CORBIN St. Lawrence App » K. R inte.
IN MEMORIAM Seas AP
= fd a nnn pee : ae Secretary wie 137 oF 461
_— -——_ ae G ARRARD—3-Speed Automatic Record 12.12.52—4n. | > 52—-t.f-4
DUNCAN—In loving memory of our] ( ngers just received, © a limited es Te acitepaaihil iia re me ne ary ai
dear beloved Mother and oe Te .ntity P. Cc. S. Maffe Co Ltd 7 sd will offer for sale at
Mother who departed this Ife on Dec 3.12 t.f.n J EP office No. 17 High Street, Bridge-
14th, 1947 ‘i een ? NOTICE m Friday, the 19th day of De-
3 lways yur hearts , at 2
We loved’ her but Jesus loved her FURNITURE Owners of graves. at the Westbury | “the messuage or dwellingho
best Cemetary are respectively asked to have as HEMPSTEAD with the lar th
May her so find peace and com- them cleaned up for the G¢oming festl- | betonging, containing 2 acres, 3 roods, 2
sus her Sav li Se ee a ne ae | oepe rambo. dat Hinds
aoe a uae in nonvedl CHAIRS Upright Chairs all in S. A. BULLEN, perches eee us pen at Hind:
May we all meet our beloved Mother | Mahogany $10 up, Rockers $20, Morris Bupt. & reanirer, | °F Mood, Saint Michael. a.
a aes Chairs $30 each at Joiners’ Shop, School 13.12 52 -an| The dwellinghou era
oS 14.12.62—1n. | Gap, Hindsbury Road 19.12.52—2n eee, | CHAWiNg and d-ning rooms, sitting room,
Thelma & Family ae ‘aie : a . Jeusteasts 3 bedrooms h with running water
ee nT eee . . Th : Garage, servants’ rooms and water mill
ES oe Beloved| CHAIRS—Two Mahogany Tub Chair i ‘ r s’ TOO ne WANE
OO ies ere Se ny departed | Perfect condition — $10.09 each. Perkins NOTICE Inspection any day after 12 noon on
een De , Dial 3331 after 4,30 14.12,52—In application on the premise
Se a vacant atill Sere Sees WOMEN’S SELP-IELP | COTTLE, CATFORD & CO. |
we Gap is vacant & TRNITU ; , Zan} No orders for flowers will be t | 2.52
as. ;. : FURNITURE-Three piece Mahogany 2
The Lord has called her home upholeter set Which whe “aret paine at |for Xmas but flowers will be on 2] - ——— - — —
Au tee taker fa heats the Exhibition. Apply: §. T. Small, |as usual on 24th December, froth 8 a.m RETREAT oe
ma we meet sen , ‘ Polivm k to 3.30 p.m. 30.11, 52—3n HASTINGS ROAD oppos'te cean
ees eta Nieves), Gpraen Hewitt. iad ay A: aes eer eas 52-—2n mentite atm “ _—-— | View Hotel, containing sont verandah,
Rita Hewitt (Niece), ; cess \two publie rooms, four rooms, ba
Donald Downes & Family ‘ FU, reiy aces OR e and kitchen. Very suitable for
In FURNITURE—All those loveiy p_ ece j ; /
- oe Bey ve - that were sent to our last Exhibition ¥F s L | conversion ee aa oe Ean
Vardrobe, Dressir | standing on 870 s 2
—~ v ty of our]|comprised of Double Wardrobe, Dressing ae 7 ing
ey Father Miriam Beate:ée Mas-| Table, Side Board, Dining Table & | —-—~-~ | oars ph Gatite “Soh sites
Siah, who fell asleep on December 14, Shing, es A aie, re MISCELLANEOUS ln dye tne Sines Sudan
P Stree al 3825 2.8 i . ndaaci we 7a v é
; —- . | angement to inspect
vs rth to earth, and dust to dust,” | — — fa “| HALLS' WINE—12/6 each. The Original | Or alee eae
Calmly now the words we say, LIVESTOCK Supreme Wine, Ton.c Restorative. Drink! ooerty for 8: public competition
Leaving her to sleep in trust this wine and its powerful tonic restora-| ?! their office, 17 High Street, on
Till the Resurrection day es ftive effect will be felt at once, 48] Fy i eday, 18th December, 1952
Father in Thy gracious keening, CALVES — “Well bred calves from} >anishes that tired feeling. Good for COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.
Leave me now Thy servant sleeping. selfs tained herd,’ Dayrelis Dairy | Old Folks Bruc e Weatherhead I nited Solicitors
ae on en by eRe is Farm, Dial 3987 10,12.52—5n, | Agents for Halls’ Wine 14.12 3 9 9n
Ianthie Bayley, el, daebubleanaiianiubesiases’ i“ nreine - eo came ue
Borah RA SOR (GTN) ‘ 1 CHOW-CHOW Puppies, red and black.{ INFLATED RUBBER TOYS A ple’ | WOODVILLE, Fontabelle, standing on
14.12.6910 | pigven champions in pedigree. Mrs. C.M.}@ssortment in large =e 7apopnkee | ipproximate 1% acres of Land with
Howe, Navy Gardens Phone 5073 Camels, Clowns, Rabbits and Dogs, #4c, | {PProxuy i other . Tree Inspection
nimaneyee Le each. The Modern Dress Shopp | Gee 4 \, Telephone 3940.
> RENT ¢ 4,12.62-—1n lh te 52-3. | daily 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Telep ;
OR i aaa line 2.52—3n. | 5 4n
2 PIES French Poodle Cros eee r e os iene
_. | Loebrador, Price: Dog, $15.00, tches KARDOMAH ne Corea te | ACTION
raise s _ $10.00, Apply St, Augustine's’ Viearage | Morn and every Morn 14,12.52——1n. |
ous 1G : FA, | -aefemeed ene ahi
HOUSES Saeki eee oid “KARDOMAH"-Tips 7 The most} RUOTIOR. BA OF TRUCK
i aaaoeiemmeene | aA ln K ; ps Te SAL
FLAT & HOUSE — fully furnished, RACE-HORSES—The following — race- | fragrant and refreshing Bah 12.52-~In. | been instructed by the B'dos
St. Lawrence On-Sea. Phone 3503, ; horses landed in Tetestdag, a em OS asepaaghl t to sell by public auction «it
29.3.52—t.f.n. | Mohamia, Arabian Girl, Indian 2 eee ae — ag es the Garrison on Thursds next 18th
rn Eayptian Gift, Admirals Delight, Medi- | i eo : aS alte rant are | Mecember at 2 o'élock one (1) three ton
FARAWAY—Fully furnished 3 bed-|terranean, Likely, Fary Falls, Sabre, a & Rolls, as sz a ait | Dodge Truck. Terms cash

Philip coast. Lighting
‘t, Watermill supply. Carport, 2
rvant rooms. Monthly rent plus
$3 cleansing charge, IN ADVANCE, Dial
a7 1,11,52—t.tn

NEWHAVEN — Fully furnished 4-bed-
room house, Crane coast Doub'e Garage
3 Servant rooms, Lighting risa Jets
rill supply, Monthly rent $7! us ¥3

charge, IN ADVANCE. Dial
we ” 2.11,62—t.f.n.

EE ————
ONE _BOND-—Murhill Street, obtainable

toom house, St.
Burns, Okami,
Hazlewood,
Flawless Pearl
Melitta Ro







Apply te

San er

Junior.
Dairy,









At
Clover Breaking











Nintdelys.

£450.
£750

At

Wave
Pp

At
»O

nando, Tr



MECHANICAL







Demilo, Full Blown,

Royal




















Pebblestone, Sister — am Royal uae

bayna, Delusion, Cordwainer, Bobbie
Sunbayna, py ted
Bridge,
Tree,

At

Lime
Lge
£ 650.

52

9.12












end,

Casey
Bennett, Southern
ridad

6n

Gents’ wheel, excellent

used;

e@ Hobbs

ary ist, Phone 2382 or 4334, , ——— ——
from January 1s hone pea, ob dat Rove
_ — ~ condition, little
OFFICES — Comfortable. airy, all] pump. Tel, 2470.
modernh conveniences, Reasonable rental.
Lucas Street. Dial 3315. apie BICYCLE—On
14.1 —3n

————— —-—- H Oo

Edward
Austin & Co,



“ROOMS—Cool and comfortable furn-
ished or unfurnished, for particulars
dial $289. 14.12.52—In

os
ROOMS—Two (2) furnished rooms for



MACHINE—One Singer treadle machine
Millicent

s c/o

Ltd,



Apply:

Tent, site Ttoyal Theatre aiaee: par
bath. garage Attached eek-ends |) —————__——
and holidays accepted, Phone 8401 TYPEWRITER

$50.00 in
morrow

14,12, 52—1n ood

UNFURNISHED Cottage, five small
rooms, Water -- Enclosed Yard — Cool
situation behind Garrison facing pasture.
Vacant now. Dial 2949.











c

Royal
condition

(Monday)

head

of
Racing Cycle in good condition
Measrs

light
13.12.52

Barb

Gard

and

2n.'



ican

Apply

iner

13.12,52—2n

Mrs

12.12.52

Portat
dial 4¢

14,12

practically new

Small “Croton” near Esso Service Station,
Barbarees Hill

{





on



for



iMADE “A” CHICKEN for frying or

roosting available “rough plucked” or

SR A hy in year, | Oven dressed” Also selected breed-
Delienbiui sursoumaings. lt” conventen: | Wh, ces, MHglish lady, weil furnished, per- | oy.0:,. 4 ‘ ;
manent home a cae persens we a ane Fee “s al een
childrefh. Phone 8350 or Box » Clo Selle, A aE ere aaah
Advocate Advtg. Dept 13.12.59—8n PULLETS Imported White Leghorr
‘ ‘|pullets, ready to lay and hens lay.ng



800 layers






















P " L 1 Sy tury, White Park 13.12 —2n
ERS i RACING HOMERS—Blue checkered
te and Reds. Dial 3182, F. A, Hunt
The public are hereby warned against Grar dview »_ Hast 2 52- “In
giving credit to any person or persons
whomstever in my name as # do not MISCELLANEQUS
hold myself respons.ble for anyone | _ tie etnthecwnanly
contracting any debt of debts 4 NCHO! — English Home brewed
mame unless by a written order signed The beer that's different
by me. 14.12. 5
: CLYDE EF, TAYLOR, deem B30
Salters, St. George. Ideal Presents
13.12.82—2n. | Aiso’ larg ass Jars with Fish and
—_—_—___ —.--—-- —~~ 1 Plants, Several Varieties Tropical Fish





The public are hereby
giving credit to my

each. Siar

wife, rke

ERNESTA SMALL. (nee Forde) as I do

not hold myself responsible for her

anyone else contracting any

debts ih a ‘
der signe y me.

Ss “ MARCUS SMALL,

debt
nameé uniest by a written















nese Fighter

Phone




5148





Apply to Miss May Harding,



1,50

14, 12.52-



desert;
fine







each

In

‘tion,

ilver
Watercolours, Early books, Maps, Auto-
graphs ete., at Gorringes Antique Shop

Arct je Cla
——..—-—_
ANTIQUES — Of every
Glass, China, old Jewels,
Ware oo ard adjoining Royal Yacht Club.
St. M-chael, arbados
ee 4 12 52—2n. | ie aes Es ee
BINOCULARS~A new assortment. Just
received at Imperial Optical Co., Over
K. R. Hunte, WA 5n
_ LAND FOR SALE «COATS — One Ladies inex Winter
oat One Ladies Black Spring Coat
A few choice house spots Particulars. Dial aaa
to the South West of the 14.12 2n
Rockley Gelf Club, adjoin- ig Rs cae me Big :

3 CHERRIES IN MARASCHINO—D
ing Golf Club Road, om bus WI jc jous Moirs Marasch no Chore chon,
route to town. Jates in I-Ib attractive boxes. Priée 15

These spots look across Bruce Weatherhead Ltd
9 ,
the Golf Course on one side 14. $8. ea






















and over Blue Waters to COOPER'S AERSOL FLYSPRAYS en-
Reckley Bay on the other. euras quick oath to Wiles, Mosquitoes,
Though you may not wish ee omnes ainable from all leading
y A Stores in two at . $3.5 ;
to build immediately, the Ste ee eee eo Fe
purchase of one of these 29, 10, 62—
spots is a good investment. : einen mm
EVENING COATS Short Woollen
Full particulars from— Fivening Coats, lovely for this cool
The Secretary, weather, $17.00, The Modern Dress
Rockley Golf & Country Shoppe, Broad Street 14,12. 52—3n
Club. EVENING BAGS—A_ most attractive
| rtment of the latest types of
a SSSSSSSSFSSm | Aiverican evening bags. Imitation gold
cage bags-sequin gold and s-iver
lovely brocaded and velvet evening
From $4.77 to $7.98, The Modern
Dr s¢ Shoppe, Broad Street
14 12 52—3n
iecibnatcaemeneis
PRODUCTS—Petroleum Jelly
ska in Drums. Nu Jol, Paraffin Oil,
1 Plastic Blouse form and Pals. Flit Sprayers, Flit
$ 5.00 Qrts, Pints and ‘2 Pints. Flit
‘ \c osol, Fit Powder Esso Handy Oil,
1 Plastic Bra Stand 10.00 Household Wax, Lighter Fuel, Radiator
1 Millenery Head 00 Cleaner, Radiator Protector, Stop Leak,
a ane , Sponges, Spark Plugs, Brake Fluid,,
i Singer 206 “Zig- Drums and Pails, All of these can be
Zag and Embroid- obtained from R. M, Jones & Co., Ltd
ery” Machine 190,00 Phone 4784 27.11.52—t.f.n
1 Singer Treadle GENTLEMAN’S Evening sail Coat
Machine 170.00 40 quite new, reasonable phone |
6 1 2—2n |
2 Jones Electric Ma-
chines each 110.00 Gere PPO P OF,
‘. ' ’ " ? is
i , a § 1s x
ABinger Hand Me- = FOUNDATION OLD =
. ou. 's
¥ Dress Hangers, each 10 S hOVe’ i T 2
; : BOYS ASSOCIATION
1 Show Case 59.00 % ¥
? tall Cedar Show s Old Boys of the Ch, Ch. X%,
Case 65.00 % Foundation School are re- %
; & minded of the Reunion &
1 Portable Stock = §* which will take place at the %
Card. File .... 25.00 11/8 school on Friday 19th Dec. %
1 Calculating Maching Xs i. 8 p.m. Refreshments , \
new—original ie iS will be served and a small %&
Odhner 229.00 % subscription will be collect- %
¢ ea to assist in defraying %
Phone 3062 some of the expenses. $
Laue enemas | § 36S GOGSGGGOS9S SO OSO OSS





\

4



















RO









































MAGNIFIERS—Many types available at |




































































































































































































DARCY A. SCOTT,

Govt































Auctionee
13.12.52
























-4n














r



f



SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1952

TOPS ON YOUR 1953 DIARY

MONDAY. DEG. Lb —

MR.
(right) local
Trucks deliver their bulk loads of gasoline at the Station.



5

. GRAND OPENING TO-MORROW

P.M.



KENNETH JONES, J.P., Proprietor (left) is being congratulated by Mr. Clarence Skinner
anager of the Shell Petroleum Marketing Co., Bulk Installation as the first Tank

THE YONKERS SERVICE STATION

EAGLE HALL





LONDON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE — SPRING
EXAMINATIONS, 1953

Forms of entry for the above examinations may be obtained
rom the Department of Education, Garrison,





E RY FEES:
Elementary Stage—for each single subject .. ¥h is $ 1.68
Certificate Stage—for each single subject except Foreign
Languages ms 2.28
For each Foreign Language is ss 4.00
5 School Certificate of Commercial Education 12,00
Higher Stage—for each single subject, except Foreign
sanguages A 2 i 3.00
Fort must be completed and returned to the Honorary Secre-
tary, Local Education Committee, London Chamber of Commerce
at the Department of Education, Garrison, together with a copy of
th» Birth/Baptismal Certificate and the fees on or before Wednes-

I





Tmperial Optical Co,, Lower Broad St. | elke a ae
Over K. R. Hunte. 7.12. 52—5n
Sen ’ “c1In ¢
NUTRECIA’ Whole Milk Powder UNDER THE SILVER
None Beret % 14,12 —tn HAMMER
PERFECTION STOVE PARTS Ple , 1 SDAY 16t 1 ondet ot Bes
note that all Perfection Stove parts ¢ Ww - ett 3 Sane PUSniine
be obtained from R. M, Jones & Co,|) B. Knight we wi bata :
Ltd White Park. Phone 4784 t Bush Hilt Howse, Garrison whieh
: r oT includ
ae oS we | Round Tip Top Table, Writing and
PYJAMAS—Little Boys’ Pyjamas. Sizes| © ent Tab in Mahogan Uphol
from 3 to 6 year Well made in, fast | Choir Fi ‘ gt sal’ | Sreenint
colour cotton material. $2.16 The} rr eve ns ror pas oe pre r
Â¥ iss 8 6, Bros street ables anc resses sdar ss, Sim,
Modern Dress Shoppe, neo Linptis Wea Medetedah and Cott: Deep
ee ane Je ae | Sleep and Fibre Matt Zine Tor
SKIRT HANGERS—Combination Skift| 4nd other Tables; Ru ng te
Hangers that will hold about six items| Chairs, Mat Gi ie dts teas
on each hanger, like slips, skirts and) Oll Refrigerator and many othe’ item
suits. Onhy BAC ch. The Modern e 11.50 o'clo anaes
Dress Shoppe, Broad Street BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,
= Auctioneers
aes a ~ 12.12.52—2
STOV: The famous Florence Stoves let ie ceacewistrtienta nel
in 2 and 3 burner models. Laurie Dash ” ~ .
& Co,, Tudor Street. Phone 5061 | UNDER THE ILVER
6.12. 52--3n. } HAMMER
Abs Tialv'a P | On Thursday 18th by order of Dr
SOnO"-~ Jat Ferniburst, Deacons Road
SHOWCASES—Three mahogany Show- | eee ineltidep: ok
ra - 5 g ne sate| Morris Suite, (Settee & 2 A Cha
cases. Can be seen at the Advocate |. th Cushions) Lohe ” Coffee Table
Stationery, Broad Street. 28.11.82—1n | Ottomans; Morris Tables Floor : Lamr
Z a jall in Birch, Round Tip Top Table
akIRTS ahs lade Neated | Settee; Sideboard, Ornament Table
dee ie N a Bl ot ca eee Mahogany Axminster Carpet '
White, Wine. Brave th Chairs, Waggon; Glass & Chir *, Dinner,
Mader as Bhoone ne Tea & Coffee Services; Case of Platec
Modern Dress Shoppe, Bro as bat 3 Ki : Forks &c. (80 piece R
oe ae Treadle Machi Cutlery
“SCHWARTZ"— Peanut Butter i | Spoons Forks ete. : A Me ole . Cae
pared Mustard ete,, say ‘“Sehwartz 1a | Tuble, Stmme ee a a
be sure 14.12 } end Mattres Falk surne |
- ez is | Stove & Oven, Larder hen Tables
STOVES Two Burner Fa oR me R ee et.
Cookers and Twin Burner Beatr ce} * 8 eS , :
Stoves, Laurie Dash & Co., Tudor Street BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.
Phone 5061 6 Sn AUCTIONEERS
. a arse = l4 2—2
UN SHADES-—All types available. New | aaa
and reconditioned at low prices, Imperial) p==—:) —
Optical Co., Lower Broad St. Over K. R.
HHunte, 7 52—5n | )
————_$_____— ——— | ‘ d Y M i \
SUBSCRABE now to the Daily Telegraph Barba OS Museum
England's leading Daily Newspaper nov | . ° 7 °
arriving in Barbados by Air onty a fev i ii ae { \ Q { I
days after publication tn London, Contact | Is Ore a SOE It y
lan Gale c/o Advocate ©o., Lid. Loca |
Representative. Tel. 3113. biG 4+ | ART DEPARTMENT
ATi »
Pa | ANNUAL EXHIBITION OF
TANK—One (1) | CONTEMPORARY WEST
Bay: C. J. Hassel, INDIAN ART
viLeTOUTO D rt | ith February to (5th March, 1953
STOUT-—Do not be
Pints, all dealers | The N ’
—_—_— _ mete ' « pora Ww
WATCHES—-A complete range just ar-| ‘ be i
rived ineluding Ladies & Gents elf M r Garr ,
winding wrist watches at unbeatable Februa to 18th March
prices, If you peed a watch to. give “ ibit ane
uaranteed service see these at A, IL ar nal works
WAiITHE, Jeweller, Cor, Jame fo ole- | All works submitted must
ridge Streets. 52—-2n each tl Bart M n by
- imeem — 7 o'clock f o rh da 12th
WALLETS — For Ladies’ Gents anc February, 195
Children, A fine assortment of @mbossed 4, The Department reserves the
Wallets, many of them with lovely eeht to decline tc ing the
dec6rations, A wonderful gift fron work ' exhib
$1.8) to $2.40. The Modern Dres . tt shall % t beoltite
Shoppe, Broad Street 14, 12.52—3n. | dlectetion of the. Departmert to
nn aemannencaimans hang fewer than the ber f
OPO 99DOS9OSPSOOV9FOEE:, | works submitted
+ Ne
% @ } 6. All exhibits st ave
. * r % | ‘
‘ eS] tmly attached fro of
y POR SALE §/i| favours ts fens
% ~ ject, name of exhil and price
% S | if for sale, e.g
SS ONE CONCRETE BLOCK, SLAB * - ste
* "i 4 . m1; SUNSET
x ND BRICK MACHINE x | JAMES SMITH
% This machine is capable of ¥ | $40.00
x Waking all sizes of slabs. Bricks ® |
XM and Hollow Blocks. Just imported x + Alb “oll. batntin =
Pare weer Deen: used, -reant ro! amed in wooden ame t
@ Selling owner has no proper to & | less than. three-quarters of
» for operating this mach.ne a very & | nich wide.
@ good investinent for years to come. X& | .. Warerodk 1
x Apply to a ce 8" | must have white ou vlc
: a Jt: G. NOBLE 3 | must not exceed three inc
S Upper’ Roebuck > | width, but may b tt
X* Opposite ¢ > * iscretion ' ‘ t
x 14.1 @ | 9. No draw or waterco
¥ " ° hall be on heavier pay ‘
PPLADPLDDGOODP OD OO GOHOH S| beard than its mount. All d
§ mus
ecure m«
Y ta s nfr cd
q Scote i plast
ali - st
rpost
10. Sc d
(3) Three spots of land at \ t , Sen
Maxwell Main Road. Each . , -
is 12,600 sq. feet. 1 Wo bit

Several
St. James.

spots at Thorpes,

Several spots at Cave Hill
(1) one acre each.

(2) Two acres below St
Joseph’s Church.
(2) Two acres at St. El



beth’s Village, St. Joseph

D’ARCY A. SCOTT
Auctioneer
Dial 26438. 13.12.62













SAK Moe



64,4,44,4 “
PEE EMM MM Oo,





d-y, 3lst December, 1952.

J=partment of Education,

Jarbados.

‘SHIPPING



NOTICES



ROYAL NETHERLANDS





The M/V. “CARIBBEE” will
accept Cargo and Passengers for
STEAMSHIP co. Dominica, Antigua Montserrat,
|" Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing
SAILING FROM EUROPE Friday, 19th inst.

S STENTOR, 12th December, 1952. | ‘
3 HERA 19th December, 1952 The M/V. “MONEKA will
S N TOR, 9th January, 1953 accept Cargo and Passengers for
S. HERSILIA, 16th January, Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,



1959, |
| Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing
| Tuesday 23rd inst

B.W.1, SCHOONER OWNERS’



NG TO EUROPE
NJESTAD, 30th December, 1988. |







SAILING TO TRINIDAD, PARAMARIBO | ASSOCIATION (INC.),
D BRITISH GUIANA Consignee. Dial No, 4047,
M.S » 26th mber, 1952. |
M.S , 23rd January, 1952 | B.W.I. SCHOONER OWNERS’
SAILING TO CURACAO | ASSOCIATION (INC.
M.S. VIVITA, 16th December, 1952 Consignee, Dial 4047
.. 5 6.12.52

MUSSON, SON & CO. LTD.,
Agents. |









Canadian National Steamships





















SOUTHBOUND Sails Sails Arrives Sails Arrives
Montreal Halifax Barbados Barbados Demerara
CDN. CRUISE) 28 Nov 3 Dec. 12 Dec, 4th Dec. 20th Dec.
CDN, CONSTRUCTOR -- 16 Dec. 25 Dec. 25 Dec. 30 Dec,
CDN. CHALLENGER 30 Dec, 8 Jan, 8 Jan. 13 Jan.
CDN. CRUISER 13 Jan. 22 Jan. 22Jan, 27 Jan.
CDN, CONSTRUCTOR -—- 27 Jan. 5 Feb. 10 Feb.
CDN. CHALLENGER 10 Feb, 19 Feb, 24 Feb.
CDN CRUISER 24 Feb 5 Mar. 10 Mar.
CDN. CONS CTOR 10 Mar 19 Mar, 24 Mar.
CDN. CHALLENGER - 24 Mar. 2 Apr. 7 Apr.
NORTHBOUND Sails Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives
Demerara Barbados Barbados St. John Halifax
CDN CRUISER 23 Dec 87 Dec. 27 Dec, 5 Jan. 7 Jan.
CDN. CONSTRUCTOR 3 Jan. 6 Jan 7 Jan. Jan, 17 Jan.
CDN. CHALI sER 17 Jan. 20 Jan. 21 Jan, 20 Jan. 31 Jan.
CDN. CRUISER 31 Jan. 8 Feb. 4 Feb. 12 Feb. 14 Feb.
CDN. CONSTRUCTOR 14 Feb. 17 Feb 18 Feb. 26 Feb. 28 Feb.
CDN. CHALLENGER 28 Feb. ® Mar 4 Mar. 12 Mar. 14 Mar.
¢ DN CRUISER 14 Mar, 17 Mar. 18 Mar. 26 Mar, 28 Mar.
CDN, CONSTRUCTOR 28 Mar. 31 Mar. 4 Apr. 12 Apr. 18 Apr.
CDN. CHALLENGER 11 Apr. 14 Apr. 18 Apr, 25 Apr. 1 May









tor further particulars, apply to—

GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents.

HARD Times “|
WITH BACKACHE

MORE
DAYS TO CHRISTMAS

and your Jewellers

SHOPPING

Often due to sluggish kidney action ALEX YEARWOOD —
FEIS T effers you the ideal Christ-
Las rouble Gk ee jj} mas Gifts for your dear
hs ed with _ | ones,
ee Tite, hot aching If you are looking for a gift

‘ fsorders for the home we recommend
hain teen bad a Westminster Chiming

oe

sluggish kidney action, | .

. Clock (Kienzle) you could
Why put up with pain and dise | not want a better Gift and

omfort when you ary
ellef by taking Donen Sr apes ‘so reasonable too,

< ills, Also fine bargains in Gold
sehdes sluggish cies eas Bangles, and Wrist Watches
elp them to rid the blood of excess oe a ee

at this store, where quality
is good and prices are low.
All Engraving on Rings done

tic acid and other impurities
vhich otherwise might is
he system and cause distress,
Joan’

Pills have many free of charge.
to a ee ALEX YEARWOOD
Lely Ae Jeweller of Bolton Lane




DOAN'S ; |

SSS =

yOUs
\

There are still a few of our beautiful
CANADIAN DOLLS

If would like secure one do not delay.

CENTRAL EMPORIUM

BROAD & TUDOR STREETS



left.

you to

Cur.

SS <= wwe
PCL CP LPSEOPS EP PLEAS PPA LOSE



NOTHING LIKE.... :
A WARM BATH :

AND A BRISK COLD SHOWER ! 8
WHY NOT ORDER AN 3
SCOT HEATER =











‘

DIAL 4753

REALTORS LIMITED
OFFERS

BUNGALOW

Situate in Rockley New Road
commanding a magnificent view of
the Golf Course unobstructed to
the-sea, It comprises three bed-
reoms, one with built-in cup-
boards, drawing and dining rooms,
modern kitchen, toilet and bath.
Downstairs: Servants’ room with
toilet and bath, garage for two
cars, and enough room for laundry
ete. The

Property stands on
approximately 19,000 square feet
of land.

BUNGALOW

Situate at Graeme Hall Terrace
very attractively designed, com-
prising three bedrooms with toilets
and baths attached, dining and
living rooms, kitchen, verandah to
The West and a nice patio to the
East. The property stands on
approximately % acre of land.

COVE SPRING COTTAGE

A lovely cottage standing on 2
roods 27 perches of land situate
at St. James Coast having its
own private bathing beach, and
comprising three bedrooms, with
private toilet and bath to main
bedroom, drawing and dining
rooms, European bath with hot
and cold running water and
separate toilet, modern kitchen,
and a gallery on two sides,

WYNDOVER

Overlooking the very beautiful
Six Men's Bay, St. Peter. Stand-
ing on approximately 4% acres of
land having an extensive orchard
with specially selected fruit trees.
The house comprises three bed-
rooms, dining room, living room,
modern toilets and baths with hot
and cold water. Large verandahs.
Extensive outbuildings including &
large garage, two servants rooms,
laundry, workshop. This property
has been extensively renovated by
the present owner.

HOMEMEDE
Situate in the Garrison, St.
Michael, comprising four bed-
roo! combination living and



dining rooms, separate toilet and
bath, kitchen with built-in cup-
boards, verandah the whole length
of the building. The outbuildings
comprise two servants rooms with
water toilet and a garage for two
cars, The above property stands
on approximately 7,500 square feet
of land. This house has gas and
no electric rationing. Inspection
by appointment only.
THURSISDON

Situate at Maxwells Coast Road,
comprising of four bedrooms all
with running water and one with
dressing room attached, living and
dining room, large kitchen,
separate toilet and bath, open
verandah on two sides with one
facing the sea. Outbuildings, 3
servants rooms, garage for two
ears. The property stands on 3
roods, 18 perches of land. In-
spection by appointment only.

OCEAN SPRAY
Situate at Rockley Road adjoin-
ing the famous Rockley Beach,
best sea bathing in the island.
Divided into three flats and bring
a very high monthly rental. Thi
will be many prospective pureh-

asers for this property. Do not
delay.
KENILWORTH
Situate at Weilches, Christ

Church, within 100 yards of the

sea. Very reasonably priced.
Please contact us as soon as
possible,

PARAGON
Situate near Seawetl Airport,
Christ Church, comprising two
large bedrooms with dressing

rooms attached, two medium size
bedrooms with dressing rooms and
built-in cupboards, toilet and bath,
large open verandah entire length
of house with a lovely view of
Chancery Lane Beach and the sea.
Downstairs: Entrance lobby, living
and dining rooms, breakfast room.
pantry, kitchen, large study, and a
lovely open patio to the South.
This property also has lovely
grounds and a portion of arable
jand containing 742 acres. Inspec-
tion by appointment only.

GAINSBOROUGH

Situate at Corner of Welches
Road and Tweedside Road, divided
into two flats each comprising of
three bedrooms, Living and dining
rooms, toilet, bath and kitchen.
Out-buildings: two separate gar-
ages and two separate servants’
rooms, This pro can be
bought for a very reasonable
La Inspection by appointment
only,

Situate at the Garrison,
Church,

Christ
comprising of two bed-
rooms, living and dining rooms,
pantry, kitchen, toilet and bath.
Also a large verandah to the East
and North of the building. Out-
buildings: Servants room and gar-
age, also a number of selected
fruit trees and standing on approx-

smately 7,500 sq. ft This house
LAND

Situate at St. James Coast, be-

tween Colony Club and Coral

Reef Club. Spots can be had with
or without a frontage to the sea,
but ali spots have a right of way

to sea, .

REALTORS Limited

REAL ESTATE AGENTS
AUCTIONEERS
VALUERS
151/182 ROEBUCK STREET
BRIDGETOWN PHONE 4900









JOHN

v4.
BLABDON

& ce.

AF.S., F.V.A.

Extensive Listings of Good
Class Property and Land
Always Available



FOR SALE

——

WILLESDEN, MARINE GAR-
DENS—A substantial roomy pro-

perty on an attractive and
valuable corner site of nearly %
acre with tennis lawn, flower

beds and flowering shrubs, The
house is approached by a covered
walk from the entrance gate, a
finishing touch indicative of the

general high standard of con-
struction. i rooms are all on
one floor and consist of a front
enclosed gallery, well propor-

tioned dining room with folding
doors leading to verandahs on
both sides of the house, drawing
and breakfast rooms, 3 doube
bedrooms all with dressing rooms,
a tiled bath and separate toilet.
Usual servants’ quarters and
garage, The site ts cool and
admirably situated in an unspoiled
residential district close to the
main hotels and clubs.

MIRAMAR COTTAGE, ST.
JAMES COAST — A_ charming
beach house in perfect setting,
Coral Sand beach with the best
sea-bath.ng the Island can offer,
private grounds heavily planted
with flowering shrubs of many
varieties. Contains lounge/dining-
room, good verandah facing sea,
2 bedrooms with basins, 2 bath-

rooms, modern kitchen, servants’
Quarters and garage, Rare oppor-
tunity to acquire a reasonably

priced property in such a good
positon on this fashionable coast.

WINDY WILLOWS, PROSPECT,
ST. JAMES. — Soundly construct-
ed stone bungalow with spacious
living room, 2 large and 1 small
bedrooms, excellently placed ver-
andah directly overlooking {he
sea, downstairs kitchen, servants’

room, and storerooms. Offers
invited.
NEW BUNGALOW, LODGE

LAND, ST. MICHAEL, — We are
instructed to offer this very de-
sirable home constructed by a lead-
ing firm of building contractors.
The accommedation provides #
spacious betrooms, with built-in
wardrobes, large drawing room,
separate dining room, kitchenette
with breakfast room, and large
pantry, The garage and servant's
Guarters are detached Mains
water and quota of electric light
This property is situated in a new
and select residential area from
which there are fine panoramic
views of Bridgetown and the har-
bour. The site is very cool and
only 3% miles from town centre.
The property is available with from
approx, ‘4 to 1% acres as required
and the price asked is very fair
indeed. We can recommend this
listing very highly.

BRIGHTWOOD, St. Lawrence. A
pleasant and comfortable property
which mellows nicely with its
surroundings. Own beach frontage
and exceilent bathing facilities.
Three bedrooms, living room and
dining room, kitchen, separate
toilet and shower, wide L shaped
verandah looking sea-wards. Sep-
arate garage and servants’ rooms.
Ideal seaside home in a good
residential quarter,

RESIDENCE, THE GARDEN,
WORTHING — Modern coral stone
bungalow on corner site with
wide frontages. Pleasant garden
with flower beds, lawn, concrete
patio, and number of bearing fruit
trees. Accommodation comprises
large living room, covered gallery,
3 bedrooms witn built-in ward-
cobes, well fitted kitchen, garage
with covered way to house, ser-
vants’ quarters and all
offices. All public utility services
one of the most attractive homes
aow available in the medium price
range.

MALTA, St. Peter—Extensively
re-modelled house of massive
stone construction with approx.
‘4 acre flower gardens, lawns and
young fruit trees. There are
Spacious verandahs on two sides
with views over beach, large liv-
ing room, 3 double bedrooms, 2
bathrooms (both with tubs) mod-
ern kitchen and butler’s pantry,
downstairs is the laundry, good
servants’ accommodation for 3, 2
Garages and storerooms. Full pub-
lic services plus own deep well
with electric pump. Right of way
over beach with superb bathing.
Opportunity for a discriminating
buyer.

LAND, TWEEDSIDE ROAD,—
Excellent factory or business site
of nearly % acre with frontage to
main road over 100 ft. One of the
few available locations in such a
a position close to Town cen-
re,

NEW BUNGALOW, BLUE
WATERS—Recently built home of
good sound construction, floor
Jevel well raised off the ground,
large living room, 3 good airy
bedrooms all with built in ward-
robes, tiled bathroom and shower
pleasant and sizeable modern
kitchen, good jarage and
servants’ quarters, ved drive-
way and walled garden on corner
Site. This property has our
recommendation and is a home
most people would be pleased to
own.

MODERN HOME, ST, PETER—
A luxuriously appointed residence
with four bedrooms, 8 tiled bath-
rooms with hot and cold water,
butler’s pantry, kitchen, store-
rooms, 2 garages. The grounds are
expertly laid out with a pro-
fusion of flowering shrubs. Own
right of way to sea,

LA CASITA, Rockley New Road
—Compact modern stone bungalow
well designed with central living
room, dining or bedroom, large
main bedroom and small spare
bedroom or dressing room, tiled
bathroom with latest type tub
bath supplying hot water, airy
verandah, kitchen and garage. The
grounds are about 1 acre well laid
out with lawns, profusion of
serubs, flower beds, vegetable gar-
den and young fruit trees. Easy to
run with minimum of domestic
help and very suitable for retired
people,

ABERGELDIE, Maxwell Road—
Very soundly constructed stone
bungalow erected in 1937 when
building material and workman-
ship were of a higher standard
than is usually obtained today.
This property has a drawing room,
dining room, kitchen, break-
fost room and 3 good bedrooms. A
wide gallery runs on 3 sides and
complete privacy is obtained.
There is a two car garage and
the site is 15,000 sq. ft. with good
land, bearing fruit trees, A good
solid home obtainable for a rea-
sonable figure,

BENSAM Sheringham Gar-
dens, Maxwells — Pleasantly situ-
ated modern stone built bungalow
with about % acre and right of
way to the sea. The building is
conveniently planned with a large
living room, having access to a
covered front verandah;
room; kitchen and 3 bedrooms
with washbasins The detached
garage is of good size and has
servants’ quarters adjoining.
Situated in a well developed semi.
private coastal residential area
and possesses many commend-
able features. Full main services,
A safe investment.

Plantaticns Building
Phone 4640



apes

LP,

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1952




























































— ’ vara “ ~~ ne
i RM, 1952 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE PIOREEN
The wrath i CHURCH SE ICE hole, prac Mou PART ONE ORDERS OOPS OOOREOORSDODS SE SSS PLCS OONN DERE R SSID EEIOT ae
ai Lun Ht A A OEY 4 : ets >
3 RGOLP BAPTIST CHURCH : ;
“ : Tod Street—K. P. HANSEN—Pastor | wor O, PF. ¢ Waleot «
Your Horoscope ANOHIEAS te St IAMES NATIONAL maprice T2QE SHEGECK. F MANSENS Pastor | on ; R
: cud vee Swser Briése | age. Morning Wor 10 3 The Barbados Regimer :
y : , EON ARI S CHURCH K ‘ : Evangelistic Service at 30 p.m Issue No. 4 12 Dec 2 . 5
: ssaek HUET a GRbieaes cabanas Sie tnt Reiidemneitetnsericnntielighicialinwiniatinsti i ilbiniiianrisibidtiininiinniaaiiinion | ©
og ara , ; i cee Song | UNAUTHORISED WEARING OF UNIFORM :
@ ard ! tt se oe fond ght at 7% Bop The attention of «ll ranks is drawn to Clause 19 ‘ hunteer Regulatic .
J =—~ ‘ ‘ People 1 Ta nigh | 1949 which the Commanding Office ¢ powe » inflix 4 a 7
pe for the; } Ines f wea iniform of the Regirmer t ar of it without per x @
) Biren: S| SE SAPNCe ng ree ee | Seettet Sacech orc cee m S PLUM PUDDING © Ib) PRARS Ce
> METHODIST : Rarbax : he night ; 7.8 pm Choir |! ORDERLY OFFICER AND ORDERLY SERIFANT bor WEEK ENDING 3 it $
* ' ‘ € Ps ¢ hear ° DEC. 52 ° i ; : ‘
‘ N =e Okaarty. Cohen: ' : : ALMONDS ib. 2
t : ae attes 4 : CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ' ‘ eters epee ¥ 2 GRAVI @
i oe Rabb debe Vins 3 hureh of Christ Setentist, | oe ealie sana . RAISINS
, ete Up Ba : 9 Quintyne : ae
sil mm haa Ce Orderly Serjeant » ©. T. SAUSAGES CURRANTS 7

i E Wednesdays & p A Service whic? ' : , ise pal * ‘
vractic E ' r : : I nelhide Testirn« mies of Christ an Science “errs ; ae ‘ ' ; ee 3
cont 2 I PM I : emma ited & Healing ‘ Acsytan odie ‘ on >
Horose: ; pa ’ eeaden taheselaes -3 SUNDAY, DRCRMBER 14, 1952 — she Baresiet Hepes UPILLIT BISCUITS PRUNES : oe
ee : " . , ? ery RABEAVICR aus TOs. sae Members of the W.Oe & Site Mess are reminde: thre Home’ to mipmibe MIXED FRUIT P $
lave... aff INK HALI-9.90 am : PISCOPAL ‘Golden Text: Psalms 25: 2, 21, 22 Bnd © friends en at. $9 Dee. 8. Members are oe eS ee ; hs ee
Peiends, i — Sineki« “ey rie Mi THE ST. NICHOLAS F >) my Bed: 1 truct ta tee % 5 the Secretary x ane of the memb of the mmittee of Management 2
a ; er nt ORTHODOX (Welches Read) oa ot oon a8 a ee PART Tt ORDERS GOLDEN RROW R M ;
els, Cha ; ad Se are er | preserve me; for walt on thee. Redeem . 7 i \ F
igatio a Lik PRIGHTSTOWN-_1 dating “end Sermon. 5 cr i israal, © God. Out of ol his WecenEn The Barbados Regiment Serial No. 4 . U $
Tins ¢ I : Stee Chiat 7pm. Bvensons Phe following Citations are included ia, - STRENGTH. INCRE ASE . * 3
a) © “stounded educated people the t 8 a. Mi t Bro Ww ete i ; ‘ne ate ree he Lord's gee te 730 Pte Seale, C.D RR’ Ceyv) faker { the Regiment ar - ” I lect,
vache aoe MAC KEY New On Monday" 1st! Aa . nn Pastas _ ; si peept; Jacob is the tot of his a crakhater markekes ’ vont h + wet % Nov 2 »
seme sort of secor ‘ ee tk pre . re ends vd well wishe inheritance en 2 a 7. 4 ‘ . ‘ F “ 7 _ $
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s a 2 t - 4 P we Dec <=
end REE your Astral Interpreta- by the Police Band y esday: Evening | t Scriptures. 2. PROMOTION .,
tion if you foru 4 - ' » tt Rev t by Mary Baker Bddy. ~ ” . ~ ‘i ‘ i : . > . $
(Mr. Mts. or Miss. addresse ‘ae sa i FE Vivi ve. the widoact will be. “7 aa Phe divine Mind that made man main- | 361 Pte Griffith, C. L A" Coy — Preenoted ee Roebuck Street Dial 2072 & 4502 >
birth all clearly written by yoursne ne | Harvest Festiv ; ‘ ‘ Josiua’. Joshua | aind Tile Wit LAGS Sad ERED, la 2 D ¢
money wa Seine: TO | Service 1 Young Peot je ESaneren , ; ; ®
pestage cte., but send Lo ie EO ee hey Tt rey H 2 i, 28,Pe Grimm, c 1 Tansterted oy wet 12 De 999999909690 000-006-6:94-6-0. 096-6-6-0609998-46-04009.9000.00 2

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‘ip or ‘Colns) for. stationery, testie | op lOntaym7 30 by ee ee NOONE TUE OCT Vie S/Arm Sit McComie, G. R. BNAQ Granted one $ Leave
’ n c r tt terature ” . . rie Dec »2 é
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1 ble i iT ; 7 (
eeurue of he statem E you |7 DALMEITH il a.m. Mr. G. Marvil GENERAL CERTIFICATE of EDUCATION HR. DANIEL, Captain Bg ; ;
nd ¥¢ affuir rite now as this offer‘ on ; Staal ‘ . { \ciuvans j
aT tt tnite, em. Address: |7 pm: Reve ving wt A CAMBRIDGE SCHOOL & HIGHER SCH. CERT. The Barbados Regiment \ Preliminary Notice »

~~ 3OR ept. 213-E), Upper ol roceiee 2 = SSS SSE }
Forjett S Bombay 26., India. Postag Tit DISTRIc , Mr ” Wolsey Hall, Oxford, can successiuliy prepare you by for the above examina-
to India is ¢ cents ostage Griffith, 7 p.m. Mr. EB, Russell. _ ary pelior London University Degress; ACP; RSA; Bar, aod other
nO VIDENGE m:- Rev 2 rT. J exams. Distance is no disadvantage. Scatl of over 100 Graduate Tutors. 22,000
Sacrament QKr I G 1930-51. Moderate Fees, instaiments. Prospectus lease mention gq - ~ 7S
my wheat sik. eettioa) free frome. D Parker, M.A LL. Director of Studles, Dept. DLY. it For PAINTS, VARNISHES
>. VAUKH/ ‘ Y Re T.'3 , \
Furley, Sacrament, 7 p Mr. L. Maye ot
mee ; WOLSEY HALL, OXFORD ‘eure ht and the Useful Household Items
f A.M.E. CHURCH : | »
/ Ho SLY MORE ROCK—11 a.m, Exposi wr y for the Coming Xmas Season of







Servi

Exod s XII, con. 3.30 pm. Sunda

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DECCA RECORDS «3: 3

in s exter Call At
ster: Rev. E. A. Gilkes

BETHEL METHODIS1 eee % Restored ( Rede
Rog ae Youthful Vigor } tures T. HERBERT LTD
EDMUNDO ROS er: Res - New ms st M In 24 Hours ‘



HOUSEHOLD FURNISHINGS AND EFFECTS

at



Incorporated



if ROEBUCK ST. and MAGAZINE LANE “OVERDALE”, GRAEME HALL TERRACE





AUCTION SALE























































































































)
| {;
‘
\ EE RE \ _
Blue Tango Calla Calla = ‘ by Hol} ommur 7 : . Y j = SSF ==
he F E v - Pea | £3%96599699896999955 «, ¢
Mary Ann Prescher: Ray, Exec tom = Gbewes Fort if ied | $PesrvosesenssewssosssssssssessosnseessosIOITe | {I TUESDAY, 23rd DECEMBER 1952
elicado Weeke aoe x nl AY THAT 7 TUR CWwayv . )
Boys and Girls Leve Saturday ea = S m. Morning § b y New Discovery * THE BLEND THAT HELD THE SWAY * i
ic i pr Wwening Service reaehe: Mr - | .

Night Wi St. Hil Do you feel old before your time? Are \ AT THE » ° {i
Poco Loco in the Coco MONTGOMERY: 7 1 Evening cun-aben, worn out and ansh e te keen ur \ ~ 444
Voila Viol. e, F u« Ph 1 speed and pleasures of modern life? Do ‘ ’ 1 t lio’T a . Y > q {

DUNBCOM pmo t | COR ROY Senet wereatP ies Sete |x ANNUAL INDUSTRIAL EXHIBITION — ff « iN VE. a4 . Oo. |
SOUTH PACIFIC e, P sob ’ — Vole iar or have an inferiority complex? Do you enjoy t x i)
HOP Pp en'ne ¢ societ { men or do beautiful wo » pass , . \gq* Y ‘, ?
“- a } che _ G 5 t ned by . dpous & sevend glance? If vou au er from \ J. BD. I ° SPE 1A L re M x Auctioneers }
Cail Me Madam THE METHODIST Cat i these conditions, then you are the victrm at week $ ~ " ‘
Kis » K > jands, and unless your glands are fortified and Y i 5 :
Kiss Me Kat ; ; Stimulated, you ean not hope to regain youthty 1x (With the Distinctive Flavour) S|
Kiss of Fire—Anne Sheldon coos an as oy SNe RCH vigour and snimation % . ” own mvour % | i
; Fe : GOVERNMENT i CHURCH . iy . *
Blacksmiths Blues h Nembhard Vitalize Your Glands ss IS TOPS. TRY IT FOR YOURSELF %
Ivcry Rag—Billy Cotton t ‘ I Fortunately for those who suffer from run-down x mex; % i
Botch A Me—Ted Heath land Salen, & Gryemen am 3 youre. wepariense x ; % + $ aH
Would I Love You aa fas Re stimuiate grand ectlvity ana. thus bring a ys Blended & Bottled by % | } \ ‘i
Be My Love istina P the || SRBOs, ct mete fir Mean gertaloae x y rhe 2nd A I
Haif As Much Crist tasteleas, tablet form. All you need to do % JOHN D TAYLGR & SONS LTD | 8 4 t « 10 m a WR ER GRR
am SALVATION ARMY fs to take two litte tablets three times be . . oi] e
Love Where Are You Now CARLTON each ary rls Preseriptic a starts, work | % S i e 5 ee
, »ih yuis ematrane : * 7 pdiately, stimulating the glands, in- | a “on oe .
Crest Si Bon—Louls Armstrong | rrvest pate riot. Immediaey, at ?ulating. the elantsy tn x Roebuck Street Dial 4385 ndustrial Exhibition
Stow Coach ¢ eet ‘ p.m F ne whole body, As your glands rap come | rectly upon the gland system, the nerves, s ‘ > | t
At Last at Last—Crosby neon ee toning younger, more animated, tnd pot | und,te build new Blood and vigour, tare 6 ‘iteeococeqvooeoeocoeeooqqoooooon. cone eeeesN it
. ‘ . Ml and Mr v Morri only able to keep up »¥ your work, but ‘ fshi . » « iit
CHARLIE KUNZ ed by the Divisic Band realis nm Oe ae over ator, fe | bq hours wnd thee. they "Tea ten pon in SPOOLS SSOSE POPPE SSOE CLL CELL LLP tit 5 t
CHECKER HALI quent! n an younger eithin C ek th mF 2 - Ht e
Medleys No, 102/107 vice. 1 H D. . , | have been accomplished time %, ) a} Y a Y Be
octor Preises ViTabs ||| aisha aad & O BRIGHTEN
Twenties Waltz ogramme Dr. J. Rastelli, wid a European | alow given op hope et reee Welee Ole > MT 4 a ad ; representing
= ae =e. 1 Pe an. rec tly stated “Many s den; | 4 and Vigorous again x
For Repair anc amienance Lie of uthtul vi 4 vitalite bes the : 4
Be" Date tas nad “Calcaain scone fol Wacko gna | Result Gueranteed > SD THE HOME !! > 4. abet
it ineienaatare. ond. ieee Harvest Festiva ic n. H tioning properly, we would tstanding has been the success ‘. 4 4 see ‘
Ditice cauipment is always at the |,,21 0,0. Holiness Meet » ning eae ot expe Wieck | Beresford & Co.. Lid.
tice equi B S$ ‘ 3 enderec ) oun ear 7 fs s , . i cases shrougho .
dis petal. oF our clients, vi tor a ding tone Trae eee * cal ! fot ed nd : emtrety etlatactory: ' x SELECT THESE
eutenant C. Hind der this guarantee get Vi-Toba from yous x Mechanical confusion? Nothing of interest or ef under-
3 emist at v 8
BRIDGETOWN CENTRAL funel menor if! | {or voutselt Row new blood tingles through s EARLY Standing to anyone? For all the difficulty of arranging th:
1 am ness eeting, 3 p.1 Ref C ao , , M ne 4 7
wis aeons 7 p.m. Salvition ourating the glands. and | sparkle yitep 9 firmer spring. an $ collection of Pumps and parts of Pumps, Engines and part
Meet | 1 OULN{il vigour and vi- | and as irously a id i ¥ of Engines
Snr Capta'n. W. Bishop, inity to the body j prime. Then if for any femson mat ait you . Varnishes, Enamels, Paints, I ouneaa YI _ te cer ve BARBED!
WELLINGTON STREFT 24-Hour Results | #16 not completely satisfed, merely returm ‘ } -TD, 'H so attractively laid out agains,
I a.m, Holiness "Meeting, | p.m. | Because Vi-Tabs are is nga tg cert ceas det We abe , Sandpaper, Steel Wool. colour backgrounds of cream, green and white fuily merited
mpa ‘ 7 , seten ly designed yo chemist toda aran' ; .
fecting * eee SS and propaird to act ¢ Ie you. Oe ee ae M4 ning the CONSOLATION AWARD.
Ss Major Gibbs a *- ToR ie . m oe ae
WY Con Vineiies” ; 8M cuit agi 2 ait MEE Sen, Gane ak gia Slogs
SPRIGHTSTOWN | F i-Tabs ° Guaranteed Manhood, Vialite ° Plates, Platters, Cups, er 7
ll an Mecting n Sans For _ first ime on show allowed to remain mute
n f n. Salvatior a PODS PH®DDDOOOOHOOOO GOOG were the fine new range if evidenee to the Public, but
aE i : .
We Beresford Pumps (to meet every section was é i
Cat pt Worre s : . Saucers, Saucepans, Pots, . : eraphi-
7 CORNER TOD Ay’ NEWS EL AS } rs SBA VIEW GU ICEre, Satoepann, Pots early every domestic and cally Ulastrated — working
- « Meetin } pn t O WEW. vA \@ Ob. 4 and industrial requirement), and principles, specifications and
> 1 r ) ‘ par ; Cees meee 6 1OUSE also the “Freedom” Range advantages — with the re-
BRADSHAW & ( ( | Snr. Major J. Hollingswort! Your Diary fer 1953 hs I j Champagne, Port, Sherry of Lister Diesel Engines. sult that anyone could well
t i 2: an os R > : Then the Lister Alternator sppreciate the fi tits
| NES NATIIIC AASTINGS, BARBADOS ‘ktail, Pon hisky, : “DP mine e Aner potts
S°LLOODLASG PEI PIOPIOVIOE, BROWNE'S NAUTICAL )¢ fea . ee — A ocktall, Po : Ww : Sets, the last word in gen- of both Pumps and Lister
* ARBADOS TABLE TENNIS & ALMANAC ‘3 ’ quote d pts “request F Liqueur, Half Pint Glasses, crating current for private Equipment, Several en.
id ASSOCIATION ¥ A 1 @ ; ; | e or industrial use and popu- quiries made at the booth
° {3 % CHURCHILL'S VOL. V ° I er Guests >| | lar over Barbados especially shew the effect of the
. { Drawir of & r) @ welcome | : * i the ide ’ ‘
y , ¥ " s 2 i e Do your shopping for 1 the countryside boundrys logical .
;e Bievele held at Queen's & SECOND WORLD WAR {Dinner and Cocktail — x Neither was the display presentation, or
Y 0 J RS EL F i 0 % At i ¢ Parties arranged z Household Items early at ss
i 14.12 in & : . S| o *
| : % : ne J. H. BUCKLAND | 8 %
Can You Sa ‘NO’ to | © .4etot stato AEA POLLED JOHNSON’'S STATIONERY \$ Proprietor 9 ¢ & 1 a
All Th Qu ti 2 j aa LO OO@ 20 2DOPOSOOSO4” | x 8 he Barb os i ou ndary Lid.
( ‘
ese Questions ? saliseahdlitia dite titcs ss saidiiennineeiasnen mameceit ae :
Do you suffer from ; A se, a aye 1 LIMITED (PHONE 4226), WHITEPARK.
‘ z ‘ Av: oe of Experien »] > > F $
BACKACHE? } The ustial Xmas Cake sale wil Again years of Experience tel) in the Blending of ih! ¥ ae RR seas Me are a
RHEUMATISM? 5 De Chelan Sueaaeey. Den Rum at the Annual Industrial Exhibition | 964499445 9999G0F99 HOS OOF SC ROCOOOO OOO OS HARARE REALE HARE? SERRE da
€ 7 c tr ' Pr Sathana she ee
nae i 5 We have secured “Top Henours” in all Locally ()\, aac
{ ’ i Seite 4, Sear. 454; 44 44454, 4,4, 4, ‘
Loss OF ENERGY? at Distributed Rum and Falernum Liquor 1 Ie ete AL ah ti dtc di ta aaidiad 7eNee % SPL PLLA LEA LEAL P PLPC EM
* i ~

ee ——————————SSSS=SF These Blends are served at the “BAMBOO BAR”

‘ i
*. ”
If your answer is “YES” to any one ofthe | \) LE ARN TO AGN At THE ST. LAWRENCE HOTEL 1 s Y ) ; s y ) { 1
questions then you are likely a victim of | }) 4). .0°8"0" pf 1S Co Siimpire iw DN
faulty kidneys. Don’t delay. Act at once, | } have we areioed their solikibe | & ) dB - \ AM)

Take Dodd's Kidney Pills—the proved iain cae postal MER. A MES. PETER MORGAN

remedy. For over half a century millions of : yee aa eames ieee a7 vn AOE
inal he Se, ites (WEST INDIES) LEMITED
|
(
\





1953 TELEPHONE

DIRECTORY










sufferers in all parts of the world have found

prompt relief and permanent benefit through \

the use of this famous remedy, Dodd’s to Been oene paw }

Kidney Pills are safe —sure--ensy to buy aNDON Prospec ms o

and easy to take. Bottle of 40 pills3/..J16 | : ONTCOM MERCE. as !
(
{
t

444°
GOS OOOPOSOCT? rer





oot BeA'B) ie Beh Holborn wishes to remind the ;
Dodd’sKidney Pills |" at’s'w'ts"ustd™" {fff Rocbuck Stree :
< = ae %.








public that

TELEGRAMS

CONTAINING

ADVERTISEMENTS ano CHANGES IN

raw

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_LISTINGS



The attention of the Publie is,drawn to the
fact that our Sole Agents in connection with

‘
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$
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ALLA ALOSELSAAP ES

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® % the Classified Section and all Advertisements
ristmas 8 and Listings in Display (Heavy Type) in the
x 1953 Telephone Directory are the Colonial Ad-
$ vertising Co., (B’dos) Ltd., of James Street,
6 1% Bridgetown (Telephone 5134) to whom all en- :
4 % quiries should be addressed. .
ree in S 4 ¥ Correspondence dealing with Changes in %
? % Listings or Extra Listings should, however, y
s continue to be addressed to the Telephone 3
| g Company, P.O. Box 272 *
: , si o “
ESPECIALLY IN rR ° *
b & .
GLY or LT CATEGORIES 2 PLEASE NOTE :
And potential car owners—! This Christmas is an &! oO FINAL DATE FOR *
excellent time to consider a new car for 1953, such 71 2 IN »
a car, for instance, as the brilliant CONSUL or % 3 SENDING IN x
ZEPHYR. a ai x Y Changes and Extra Listings for 3
» 2 4 r » oy > ” ae Pr StF tn ~
The selection presently on our fleor offers a choice should be file d Karly if de live ry * % the 1953 DIRECTORY is the t
4 , : %' B 4 pees > 59 *
of new colours, an opportunity te choose your by Christmas Day is desired . $ 3ist of DECEMBER 1952 *
model, invitation to slide behind the wheel of a % > * e *
super car and drive into the New Year in a spirit * s 3 \fter this Date no Changes, Extra e
ef achievement! * > Listings ete., can be made. *
Rates on Application t %
x & 6 *
Charles Me knearney & Co : y
HAT TEN ) WU. *hone 317 V3 7 ) TELEPHONE € ‘
Me S WG & : Ves Phone 3178 > > THE BARBADOS TELEPHONE (o., Ltd. &



‘ ) f ;







PAGE SIXTEEN

“Fin ed For Stealing
10 Tins Corned Beef

G.B

4 yé er

Griffith, Acting Police Magis-
day fined 18-year-old carpenter
Park Lane, St. Michael 50/- to be
month’s imprisonment with hard
of corned beef from the Spark
eel, on December 11

U.S. And U.K.
« » Sign Atom
. Agreement

WASHINGTON
e. A agreement between Britain
! and the United Statés for sharing









ra ( e staircase and information on the production of
fissionable materials, the develop-
t vent of nuclear reactors and gen
nN Ba tol research and development of
t ' atomie energy for non-wWarlike
r tne purposes has been reached and witl
1 € 90n be announced,
( Tue It is along the lines of the
similar agreement between Canada
é id the United States made last
I January
t € aa
1 He : The agreement is possible, ev
left Ss we iringent McNlanon la

torbidding the sharing of Amer -

GAMBLERS FINED ca’s atom and H-bomb secrets witn

















; oul , how stands since it cover
i ci Martindales atom research in fields not re-
Lic nd Irvin Hare- lated to weapons.
ty rd I 1, St. Mich- 1 igniticant, however, that
S le uilty before His (he agreement has been reached
Ww Pe h yestel- uimost on the heels of Britain's
| Villa irst successful A-bomb experi-
0 st ¢ 12 ment,
ane ere n¢ 10 € to In the same way the Canadian
in 14 ral erna~ agreement came soon after Ameri-
14 t mprisonment nh ca decided to build a huge new
bour atomic reactor on the Savannah
River and found that she needed
I o have vita) data from Canada
eee eee ‘oncerning the Dominion’s great
B ca Chalk River reactor.
anAaAnAa But America seems to be fast
moving to the conclusion that
on everything must ‘soon be shared
Controls vith Britain, including the most
ig secret information about the
F Lo End | O5 S bombs
4 b De The Defence and State Depart-
ments and the Atomie Energy
LONDON. Commission have reached agree-
Bananas are to be freed from ment on the changes that must ne
Te distribution contro) Made in the Atomic Energy Act.
nannies nL vid ieeane’ > An early opportunity of seeking
( ; Minister of Food. says Comeress approval will be sought
; change | been possible be~ after the new Congress imeets
use of an improvement in sup- ‘" 7 @muary. f
plies, The argument will be put for-
He has also decided after con- Ward on a strictly practical basis
ultation with producers in the that because America is unable
British Cameroons that the im- at present to tell her allies abroad
portations and marketing of West anything about the new atom
\frican bananas should return to Weapons or their availability the
private traders at the same date, men trying to plan the defence ot
Discussions about the future Western Europe by N.A.T.O, are
m eting of Jamaican bananas, hopelessly bogged down.
begun n September. A The problem is regarded as so
ty Statement will be made pressing that Republican’ spokes-
later on imports from Jamaica men are certain to be approached
and other source even before the new Congress
Under the present contract Meets, so that the spade work can
is, Britain has under- Pe done ahead of time.
to purchase at least 85 pet The announcement of the agree-
ce of -the island exportable Ment with Britain on the non-
urph until the end of 1954, Weapons side will probably .1e
Mr. Bustamante, leader of the timed to have its effect on the
J ican, delegation, said on re~ Congressmen whose views have
ng } that if the nego- @lready been profoundly affected
is were successful Britain by the Australian A-bomb ex-
W ad veceive millions more plosion.
b is next year,
present controlled price is It is regarded as certain among
pound, The level is con- 8h officials of the Atomic
dered unrealistic at this time, E®ergy Commission in Washing-
Earlier Majo Lloyd-George to that some time this year there
the supply of bananas this Will be all-out co-operation be-
r would be nearer pre-war tween Britain, Canada and the
Ie for the first time. U.S.A., involving not only the ex-

—B.U.P.

___NEARLY $500,000
FOR SUGAR WORKERS

change of secret information, but
ilso exchange of technicians and
co-operation in the production of
fissionable materials,

—L.E



vn Correspandent)



ST. KITTS, Dec. 12.
\ nearly $500,000 will be
i during the next few

ng workers
bonus

aa ey suga Reynolds Co. Ta
wo cute Buy U.S. Bauxite
Mines In B.G.

of the crop
55,000 tons
GEORGETOWN,

Reynolds Metals Co., one
the largest aluminium pro-
ducers in the United States, is
contemplating buying the bauxite
mines owned by the American
Cyanamide Co, in British Guiana,
it is reported in Georgetown,

Dr, Wilson Mitchell and Rolf
Roley, two experts from the
Reynolds Mining Co., a subsidiary,
have completed a survey of the
properties



53 esti

ated

at
Wage and other conditions of
being negotiated
representatives of the
ociation and the Labour

ire now
b een The
Ass of

LIGON’S HISTORY

@® from Page 11
nswered that they were few
ierable. Sugar, sweet-
et Y being the great-
t that they had. Yet by the

tre’s leave, we carried away
head of cattle, eight
or which Bernardo made
y double, the usual price be-
ich. He made wus pay

And for £10 each
rs have had for four or

But he was content

te our commodities

we



ere



Nee oy The Cyanamide Co,, which em-
ploys about 500 people announced
recently it will discontinue opera-
tions in British Guiana at the end
of the year, It explained that
most of the ore mined is suitable
only for metallic aluminium pro-
no duction rather than of the chemi-

cal grade needed by the Company

—B.U.P.

horses

were

the exchange,
1

No. ro be Continued

Thevit {oo It Every Time
311 WAS STEAMING UP |
-S ABOUT HIS NEW LARD-| :
AADE LIKE SVENGALI |

Aoginiered US Patent! Oftce








|

~——___-—— nae |
/ SURE HE OST 12 OUTA 13, BUT THAT | “WHAT CAN YA Ga as |
( “ORE I. HAD HIM. HE NEVER HAD \ / HAD NORMA We Ghee ; ahve |
\ pr HANDLING ! XM TEACHING HIM \ REVOITED To FoRM! soa ais ie
\ FROM THE GROUND UP! WERE GORNA / (ANY GOOD! AM I A MAGICIAN 2

MURDALIZE PUuGSIANO! IM __
$2) DIRECTING EVERY MOVE 7!







4 -# a 1
\ SS MY Gly MAKESâ„¢ fF ee F Ve sapling
a th ——__- Les Pare y
Ie D> Ain = i | 9-208







Boon Bur
SANG ~ OH, Boy ! DID SVENGAL! DESERT |
THE SUNKEN HULK ? (youRe sxi?) || |

> SS THINK OF THE TIME I WASTED |



LOCAL

;



After the films taken by the Warner-Pathe unit are shown in the
U.S.A, and U.K., it is likely that the tourist trade to the Eastern





Caribbean will increase. Here the unit shoot scenes of the pottery
vendors at work,
£125,000 FOR TROOPS
QUARTERS AT ST. LUCIA
LONDON,
In the House of Commons on Tuesday, December 2,

Mr. David Jones, (Labour, The Hartlepools,)
Secretary of State for the Colonies whether he is now able
to give an estimate of the expenditure to be incurred in
rehabilitating the barracks other quarters at The
Morne, St. Lucia, for the reception of the newly formed
British West India Regiment; and whether he will have
regard to the faet that it is desirable to relate these works
to the Castries construction, so as to make best use of the
building force on the island

al

. Is the right, hon, Gentleman
Mr. Lyttelton replied Expendi- a ht f ro tee
ture is estimated at £ 125,000, L were ay yan weutes for St.
spread over three years. The pro- ARs ae als CRAn Ss bya
posal to revive the British West other compare ple oe and
82 s st}, ; : se s
India Regiment is still under con- fag ae are sia Yel
sideration by the Colonial Gov-|~ " Tah :

“I shall certainly give the mat-

ernments concerned and it is un- ”
i ter my personal attention,’ Mr.
likely to be settled by the date ht ivalton eEoledtolt UP
when the reconstruction of Cas-j| : * 3 .
tries should be finished. |
|

Bank Commission

No Nappie *





On Wednesday, December 3

Sir Richard Acland, (Labour, \ \ so

Gravesend,) asked the Secretary Rash Fs. ~ a Kd
of State for the Colonies, Mr el” SYS LA
Oliver Lyttelton, whether he will ev » De © tA
consult with representatives of z ao er
the International Bank for Devel- Wise mother uses Cuticura Ointmeat
opment and Re-Construction an after baby’s bath and at every nappie

of the Government of Jamaica sc
as to urge that the report of the
Bank’s recent mission to Jamaic¢
shall be published either in full
or at least in respect of those
parts which are not of a confiden-
tial nature as between the Bank
and the Government.

In his reply Mr. Lyttelton said
“There is no need, The Bank in-
tend to publish the report.”

Increased Unemployment

change to keep him cool and comfortable.
The mildly medicated, gentle emollient,
Cuticura, soothes chafing, sores, inflamma-
tion, and deals sweetly with-nappie rash,

gee Cate ae

OINTMENT





SUNDAY ADVOCATE
PRODUCTS



|
|
|
|

asked the}

|
|

|

Mr. David Jones, (Labour, The if We have the ideal & |
Hartlepools,) asked the’ Secretar) E |
of State for the Colonies whethe = CHRISTMAS GIFT &
he is aware of the serious increas a: forthe CHILDREN & |
in the number of unemployed per refer to. our lar oe va-tee
sons in British Guiana, by com ‘ty of Beautiful decorated
parison with a year ago;. of the Erins of TC FREE 7 {

concern of the citizens at this in
crease; what steps he is taking t
provide employment; and wha
additional assistance he is pro
viding the Governor, in order to}
commence schemes of work to re. | 2
lieve the situation.

#: W indsot .
S}Pansies &

"as [ower Bridge 3
~Country Bridge
@Country Village &

Castle Bullfinches



Flowers

|
\ 3









“The number of registered un-| may Westminster Abbe y
employed increased during the | matty de Park Cornei ote &
past year by some 500 to 2,654," | § pA the above {at 52e. each}
Mr. Lyttelton replied. “There \3 Father Xmas tin—60c, each
should be many new opportun- | 2 Birds
ities for work, as the development | § RIA England 3
plans for the Colony are being | ggQueen Mary
carried out. These include eel nin
sive drainage and irrigation ;gag?'UP : i
schemes, initiated under the pre- | SgPretty Girl &
vious Government, the first of] @Ehe above at 84c. each
which has been approved at an] g@clory of Garden &

estimated cost of some £ 1,600,000, | SABen Lomond
Towards this Her Majesty's Gov-|Â¥ Cornish Coast
ernment will grant £900,000 un- RM Broadway
der the Colonial Development a a sree
Welfare Act.” Fretty Gir
. he wae All the above at 1.32 each
Mr Mare Tuberculosis â„¢ 3 Yoemen of the Guard
r, avid Jones, (Labour, The | aR 1.68 each

Hartlepools,) asked the Secretary SR windjannuat

of State for the Colorfes, Mr 7
Lyttelton, whether he will publisi SP Flowers

ana

&
&
&
&
&





the figures showing the incidence =. ay above at 2.16 each
ot tuberculosis on the island of perigee bee ty SI
St. Lucia; whether he will give ROld Curiosity Shop



the figures for a convenient The above at 2.40 each

date

AANA







for the past five years; and wheth Metal Cash Boxes complete
er he will give comparable figure . with key filled with
for other Colonial territories â„¢ Barco ieee ina id
Mr. Lyttelton replied “The ree
cases of tuberculosis notified. ir Bro: oe ey eee :
St. Lucia for the years 1946 t pwe Have &. Deavetws. 9-60
1950 were: 1946, “4 cases; 1947 encoun tin of Toffee for 14/-
103; 1948, 138; 1949, 67 and 1950, | ggSPecial—A Father (Christ-@
26. oti # mas Model containing
“Comparable figures for othe) a I Ib. of delicious Toffees
Cojonial territories are published‘ y for 5/6. KK
in the Annual Medical Reports me Call in and see this beau
produced by each Colonial Gov- | Satitul display of Toffee for:
ernment.”’—B.U.P. | yourself &
ta eee S BRUCE WEATHERHEAD -
By Jimmy Hatlo | 3 ee ae
Senn riaaatiate a | Head of Broaqg St. i

SYN GN INNA NNN

|
14

WHEN THE BIRDIES










&

|
|
|
|
|
|

. SOCCSSSE SOS SOOO SSDS SESS SSS SFOS SEES

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1952



se

| .
| Homecoming











| Remember!




























Of Sheffield i
2)
aecns H

LONDON. :

Fee a cg you will probably need some i
Commande A a )
West Indies Stati .S, Shef- | of them before Christmas comes \

© cr t _— ; )
at her home { uth, | }
a oO} *, ha i , pt. Glasses 26 & 48c. Cake Pans, set $1.16 \
been away 1 on last 1 (0 a é ‘
year ae | 14 pt. Glasses 23, 29, 39¢, Patty Pans 47 & 60c.
: os ing ah ervic will | Pia Brame 95¢
ndies she a made will s voc,
wisits to the Uni tes, Can-| Pony Whisky Glasses : }
jada and many Am«¢ oe each ... 14, 16 & 38c. Sponge .
j countries. In a little more than a Finger Pans 90c. i
nonth before sailin fror Ber- (
muda for the United Kingdor Bell Shaped Egg Whiskers $1.67 |)
| the Sheffield c: at the Rodman ) Tumblers, each.. 12c. p n
Naval Base it he a ted S ae : { Icing Sets.. $2.14 & 4.89
orts i -eru and Panama, am : .
fae a ity essful visit t j Fruit Juice Glasses, Cheek
ths Chi! port of velre P. ) each .. AB & 20c. Cake set .. 88c, & 1.19
U.P. i}
\ Ribbed Tumblers Ricers, each ...... $1.22
} 12 & 15¢e. Thermos Flasks,
Keep it DARK with | duds’ ea. $1.64, $2.75 & $6.63
| 3ulge Tumblers

SHADEINE | : 7 15 & 19¢, Thermos Refills
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quite unusu jr in fact.




















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of fine Watches picked up on the way
through Switzerland. And Toys, natural-
ly, from Santa’s Unlimited.





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to Hunte’s.

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see when you come in.”

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AND A AY EW YEAR

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SUNDAY DECEMBER 14, 1952



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SUNDAY DECEMBER 14,

The Racing Year In Barbados

Racing in Barbados in 1952 en-
joyed another successful season,
both on the financial side and from
the point of view that more horses
than ever participated in the three
race meetings. From the financial
angle the most significant event
was the record first prize of $52,360
paid out in the public sweep run

on the August meeting. It was
won by the holder of a single
ticket.

The above prize was far in
advance of any prize in
any sweepstake ever run
in the entire British West In-

dies and was $8,000 in advance of
the previous best paid out by the
Barbados Turf Club in August
1950. There is a strong possibility
that it will also be the last prize



Bught Light and

that will ever reach such a high
figure, as increased taxation on
the public sweepstake is sure to
take its toll.

With regard to the actual racing
1952 might be said to mark the re-
turn in even greater numbers of
the imported thoroughbred since
the years of World War II. For a
number of years, of course, the
number of these horses has been
steadily on the increase. But in
1952 not only did a further in-
erease take place but the creole
horses were noticeably fewer in
classes A, B, and C. Nevertheless,
there is no decrease in the number
of creoles being bre.i in the island
and it is left to be concluded that
either the native bred stock has
deteriorated or cannot hold its
own against the increasing num-
bers of importeds

The Classics

The contest for the two Barba-

divided, rather








dos classics we

unfortu into two separate
and di parts. In the first
there was the filly Dunquerque
and in the second there was the

filly Bright Light

The Barbados Guineas, the first

classic of the year in the South
Caribbean, was run at the March
meeting over 74% furlongs. One of

the favourites, in spite of a cough
which hampered her preparation,
was the Hon, J. D. Chandler’s
Dunquerque, a filly by the famous
Q.T.C. out of Belledune, the latter
the winner of both the Barbados
and Trinidad Derbies of 1943. A
small filly, but very well put to-
gether, Dunquerque had made a
reputation for herself as a two-
year-old when she won the Trum-
peter Cup and two other races at
the November meeting of 1951. So
pointlessly had she beaten her
field on each occasion that it was
evident that she was a filly of un-
doubtedly top class. In as much as
Bright Light, her chief rival, was
not in the race, and Dunquerque
was meeting the same creoles she
had already beaten so badly, it is
not surprising that she was made
one of the favourites for the
* Guineas. P
Dunquerque Coughing
Her cough, however, made back-
ers a bit skeptical and there was
considerable support for Mr. Cyril
Barnard’s Cavalier, a gelding by
Burning Bow out of Chivairy, Mr
Bill Chandler’s Cardinal, a gelding
by O.T.C. out of Biretta, and Mr.
S. J. Rock's Seedling, a colt by
O.T.C, out of Linseed. Cavalier
specially went very well at ex-
ercise and was thought to be the
one who showed most signs of
stamina. Both Cardinal and Seed-
ling were also thought to be strong
in this respect but Cavalier, hav-
ing run at the Christmas meeting,



looked more experienced than
these two.
Colombus Best Looking
There were 11 final acceptors

who took entry for the race but
of these only seven went to the
post. These were, in order of
starting positions: Cavalier, Dun-
querque, Seedling, May Day,
Apronusk, Colombus and Car-
dinal. May Day, by Debonair out
of Fiona, was bred in St. Lucia,
and incidenjally, had been ex-~
ported as a two-year-old to Can-
ada, where he could not race due
to tendon trouble. He had return-
ed to the West Indies and had
come to Barbados the previous
November Apronusk was a weil
grown gelding by Dunusk out of
Apronet®, a mare that had al-
ready produced a winner or two
for her owner Miss Kathleen
Hawkins, and Colombus was per-
haps the biggest of the lot being
a lovely black colt bred in St.
Kitts by Mrs. Rosemary Wigley
by Colrose out of Busy Woman
It was obvious however that the
last. mamed was very backward
and was in the race more for ex-
perience than with any thought
of winning.

From a good start Cavalier went
into an early lead and setting a





1952

brisk yet comfortable pace was in

eommand of the situation when
the field had covered five of the
seven and a half furlongs Car-
dinal meanwhile had been lying
second for most of the journey
followed by Seedling with Dun-
querque not far behind while the

rest of the field was tailed off.

Approaching the two furlong
post Cardinal began to gain on
Cavalier and by the time they
turned into. the stretch these two

were battling it out together. Dun-
querque meanwhile had also been
making headway and after pass-
ing Seedling joined issue with
Cardinal and Cavalier in the
stretch. Cavalier cracked most
noticeably with a furlong left to
dinal and Dunquerque



CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT



E THREE



=» Hookie

Barbados Derby, it might
was a foregone conclusion
it took place. By one of
unfortunate circumstances
the three-year-old bunch had be-
gun isintegrate and when both
Dunquerque and Cavalier were
forced te withdraw due to one ail-
ment or another, this left the field
more at the mercy of Bright Light
than ever. Mr. Barnard’s cham-
pion filly had by this time won
the Easter Guineas at Union Park
and then the Trinidad Trial Stakes
at the June meeting, so that when
she came here for the Barbados
Derby she was already classified
C1. She was incidentally the first
creole classified

The
be said
before
thos



ever as



high as

After the












August neeting is
Barbados Bright Light went back
to Trinidad where she picked up
yet another clissic in the shape of
the Derby Arima
Up toa the ha
there fore yn four class hich
is more than any other ere ha
ever accomplished in the B.W.1
She also vy three races in the
imported « ss.

The rest of the three-year-old
raci in 1952 saw evival at the
November meeting. This was due
largely to the progress made by
Miss Rosemary Boon’s Colombus
vho, as we have seen, was very
big and backward when he ap-

ired for the first time at the

rch meeting in the Barbados



Guineas.

Dunquenrgue Win the (Classics



a ee

: ha

Oy een

; a}
; pen



IMPORTED HORSES have been

of a C class race. This
it difficult te hold ity own.

year

then raced to the winning pole in
a tight tussle. At the finishing
line Dunquerque just managed to

t her neck in front and was the
winner by this narrow margin
while Cavalier finished three
ler is behind Cardinal. A fur-



ther few lengths away was Seed-
ling in fourth place

1.362 for this dis-
tance was slow and while it was
Sot surprising for the cautious
type of race Crossley had ridden
on Dunquerque, ye. it did not
speak very well for Cavalier who
had cracked up after 6% furlor
of pace setting. Cardinal had fin-
ished strongly and had clearly
made much progress since he was
two years old. Still he seemed
to lack finishing speed.

Tho time of





Dunquergue's victory was well
earned and especially so as it
could be seen that the effecis of
her cough had not yet worn off
It is also worthy of note that she
had run the race faster than
Watercress had in 1950. She is
the first foal of her dam Belle-





inerease in racing
more

on the
there were

this wh contesting this classic
Her full sister Best Wishes had
been classified C2 the year before
when she won the event

In addition to winning the two

Trinidad classics Bright Light had
also won a C class six furlong in
Port-of-Spain in hetter time than

the imported mare Ostara, who
won in A class on the same day
Therefore even those who hoped

see the question settled between
herself and Dunquerque
than half expecting to ss

latter really give her a race,
this on the grounds of stam-
Such hopes, however
to realised for the



ere n
more
the
and
ina onl

were not be

whole year

The story of the Barbados
Derby is therefore best told in the
brief words made famous by the
description of races won by the
immortal Eclipse; “Bright Light
first, the rest nowhere” Actual-
ly the rest did not number more
than three, these being First Ad-



miral, Rambler Rose and Seed-
ling who finished behind her in
this order. First Admiral had

since the war
than ever and the locally bred horse

Here is a picture

is finding














) ’ rouble prevented
him fre his best at the
Aug iithough he man
ged tc in ond to Cardinal
in the M } Handicap, after
being out of ave ji previous
race which w: lso won by Car-

]
Colombus Unbeaten

In November Colombus came
ut as sound as a betl and :unning
four races in the most exemplary

ini not only turned the tables
on Cardinal but ended up the
meeting with an unbeaten certifi-
cate and fe races to his credit
It was a performance worthy of
the best thre ir-olds that have
ever run in Barbados and on the
last day o| the meeting Colombus
defeated an F class field over 7%
url , alle , them from 8 to
3 lbs., ‘anc the same day
beat the over 9 furlongs
in receipt ight only from the
aged ar ) miler Cross Bow,
Seedling was ilso among the
latter

Cardinal also won a race at the
November meeting and showed

classified in B class at the time
and Rebate, who was third,
allowed him 11 Ibs. Firelady, a

B2 horse however, was in receipt
of 8 Ibs,

The Flying Yasmeen

The A class Dalkeith
was the big sprint event
meeting and this went
Tow Edwards’ filly Yasmeen,
who almost set up a record for
the 54 furlongs She completely
ran her opponents off their legs to

up by three lengths.

Stakes
of the
to Mr.

my



in eased
cond was Harroween and third
old creole mare Pep, Wine.



On the second day the Barba-
cos Tart Club Handicap, another
A class nine furlong was won
again for Mr. C. A. Peirce but
this time by his filly Fuss Budget.
Wi the light weight of 106 Ibs.
she defeated Firelady, Rebate and
Landmark in this order as well as
Notonite, Gun Site, Embers and
Slainte, Notonite appeared to be
feeling the going and did’ not
repeat his performance of the first
day. Fuss Budget, however, went
on to win again on the third da
over the same distance carrying
top weight of 130 lbs. and beaiing

















her B_ class opposition with
ridiculous ease. Ten started in
this race, Pepper Wine was
cond and Doldram was third.
In the Dalkeith Handicap te
clas horses were seen over
74 furlongs and running great
race Mr, M. E. R, Bourne’s mare
Rebate won in a driving finish
from Notonite to establish a track
record for this distance. She car
ried 3 Ibs. and received only
2 Ibs om Notonite The con-
istent Landmark was third
r igust meetis was note
able for the revival of a mile and
a half race for the first time in
Barbados since the early years of
the war It was also the first
time that a race of this distance
run anywhere in th South
ibbean since the Trinidad
Governor’s Cup was last decided
over a similar route in 1946
Landmark Outstanding
The August meeting was alsa
’ for the emergence of Mr
Victor Chase Landmark as one
uw the most outstanding mares

hat had been imported for a long
while. Not only did she win the
mile and half Champion Stakes,
but two days before doing so she
von the Stewards Stakes over 74
furlongs from a field of ten horses

classified A and B, When she
came out for the Champion
Stakes therefore she was forced

to carry a 7 Ib. penalty and with
the substantial weight of 131 Ibs.
she was set the formidable task
of allowing from 8 to 20 Ibs, to
her 7 opponents. These numbered
Slainte and Red Cheeks, to whom

she allowed 8 and 9 Ibs. respec-
lively, while to the Jamaican
form

Derby winner Embers, who was

supposed to be a first rate stayer,
she gave 20 Ibs. Tiberian Lady,
her stable mate received 19 Ibs
Flieuxce 17 lbs.. and to Doldrum
and Firelady, who finished sec-
ond and third she gave 18 and 13
lbs. respectively.

Landmark raced twice more at
the August meeting and was
third and second on these subse-
quent occasions. Other horses in

Imported Horses Dominate Programmes

dune who is by Restigouche out
of Beauv a mare by Diaphon
ut of Statira, with whom Hon
J. D. Chandler started his stud
at Todds in St. John and who
produced, besides Belledune, the
classic winners, Belleplain and

Gun Hill.

At the remainder of the March
meeting Dunquerque was third to
Mary Ann and Apollo in the Castle
Grant Handicap for D class over
5% furlongs and on the third day
she won again, this time over
ni furlo from Anclto, Colle-
Ann and

1°
ton, Cross
Usher.

Bow, Mary

Seedling Promising

Cardinal also went on to run
well at the rest of the March
meeting but did not do as well as
Cavalier and Seedling who both
beat him when they won the
3ridgetown Handicap and Creole
Handicap respectively over 5%
1 7% furlongs. Seedling, in
ticular y promising
ver the latter ince doing it
in better time Dunquerque
had taken in the Guineas.







tr













shown promise over short dis-
tances in Trinidad while Rambler
Rose had shown no _ particular
promise at all. But it was very
surprising to see Seedling beaten
so badly when one remembered
the promise he had shown when
winning over 742 furlongs at the
March meeting His form in the
Derby was therefore very disap-
pointing For this he made
amends by winning two races in
F class before the August meet-
ing was over.

Mr. Barnard’s champion filly
was the second horse of the samc
breeding to win the Barbados
Derby, for only the year before
he ister Best Wishes had been
the victor. Both these fillies are
by Burning Bow out of Felicitas

(by Colorado Kid), as well as Bow





Bells who won the Trinidad Trial
Stakes in 1950. Mr. Barnard has
therefore been’ ve successful
th this mare, who by throwing
§ h roger } become or
famous brood es j
South Caribbear

enerai improvement. Meanwhile
hi stable ompanion Chutney,
who had been very disappointing
ill along, also made a welcome

return to form and won very con-



vincingly over 5% furlongs in F
class On the whole the three-
year-olds of 1952 1 ht be classi

fied as up to standard while Bright
Light, Dunquerque and Colombus

were definitely above the average.
At the time of writing one would
be inclined rate them in the
above order with perhaps a 5 Ib.

to













lifference in weight between each
The. principal weight for age
and handicap races during the
year saw some very evenly con-
tested events and a fair mixture
of winners throughout the season
At the Spring meeting in March
the Barbados Turf Club Stakes
was won by Mr. CA. Peirco’s
Notonite from a fielq of eight
which included Firelac Rebate
Ember the Jamaica I
dad Dert ‘ er of 950
Site and
easy victory r ho 2



the top class who had a good
meeting were Sweet Rocket, Pep~
per Wine, Firelady and Harroween
who each won a race. The first
two over 5) furlongs and Firelady



and Harroween over 9 and 7}
furlongs respectively. Rebate and
Notonite, who did so well in
March seemed to be entirely off
The November fixture saw
nother spendid victory by Myr
Victor Chase’s Landmark over
another distance of u mile and a
half; this time in tne South
Caribbean Stakes in’ which = she
set up @ track record of 2 minutes
31% seconds, Second in this vace
Flieuxce in receipt of 15 Ibs

nd third Belle Surprise, im
receipt of 19 Ibs, Castle in the
Air, who set the 2 jan well
) finish fourth after covering the
t five furlongs at hreak eck
ced in 1.09. Incidentoliv the

f Ithough advertised as
mile and a half” nly

1 furlongs and 145 rds.

@ On Page 18





THE



FESTIVE LOOK

THIS WAY FOR
PARTY FASHION

By DOROTHY BARKLEY

Dressing for a party is the one
Christmas occasion which doés not
call for too much decoration. Most

women, fortunately, will agree
that a minimum of trimmings
«nd furbelows create a far bet-
ter effect, .

But some porty-goers still con-
trive to flaunt the “Christmas
‘Tree look”—too much jewellery,
tom mény artificial flowers, and a
posse’ of bracelets worn at one
und the sarne time. There is a sim-
ple explanation for this. It is
caused by a Ieck of systematic
planning. A great deal of time and
trouble have been spent on chcos-
ing the dress — be it cocktail,
evening or dinner; but too little
tim? and trouble are spent on the
aceessories that ave to be worn
with it. Ye it is the aecessories
that mark the difference between
tw woman who is ¢clegant and one
who is merely well-dressed.

It is not only thos» who have
money to spend on beautiful
clothes who are the outstanding
amongst’ party-goers. Those with
original and inexpensive id°as of

their own for accessories — even
if the dress itself is two years old
—can be equally suecessful.

Consider seme of the ideas sug-
gested here. Their success depends
om the way you weer them. Can
you ¢arry ‘hem off with a fair,
wearing them in an_ individual,
not everyone else’s way?

Starred for Christmts evening
oceasions are:

@ Reversible shaw!, with long
bl-ck fringes. This particular
model is in light-w®tight wool
jersey - émerald green con-
trusted with black and is
simple enough to make your-

self at home. {f even a
light-weight woot doesnot
stit the climate choose a

fringed shawl in open-work
lace p tern. It the most
fashionable complement for a
cocktail or evening dvess.
(Mlustra‘ed).

@ Cocktail gloves. Do you realise
that gloves are not merely
something to keep the hands
covered, concealed or warm,
but can be the elegant ac-
cessory? Take these cocktail
gloves as an example. The
way to be ditrerent with

this Christmas is to
have them fringed, spattered
with. soapbubble sequins or
trimmed rounc the cuff and
side seam with a nylon frill
‘o be original, wear a brace-
let outside the glove (T'us-
trated). ©

is

@ The art of wearing flowers
the fashionable way is an art
to be acquired. This year,
wear an outsize, double-
centred rose pinned to the
shoulder of the dré make an “armlet’ of flowers,
sewn onto a band, and wear
it just below the elbow. Again
wear a pair of gold gipsy
earrings and twine a_ tiny
flower round each one, (Illus-
trated). Or sow a group of
artificial flowers to the corner
of a handkerchief and Ie. it
trail from a hip pocket (Illus-
trated),

To give an unusual touch to
your evening dress, why not
have a mink (or other fur)
choker and match it with a
miniature fur muff? The muff

can do double duty as an
evening bag — if it nas a
zipped pocket in the lining.
(Illustrated).

@ An original type of earring
for the occasion is styled
after a miniature pewter

jug, and screws onto the ear.
Place a small piece of cotton
wool, saturated with your
perfume, in each jug (Illus-
_ trated).

@ [f you want an evening bag
in the newest shape, choose a
circular one in transparent
perspex, fastened with a gilt
clasp. (Illustrated).

Or a gay cap with a different
air- The newest is simply a
band of ribbed knitting pulled
on over the head, 1920's style,
and finished with any type of
brooch from a cairmgorn to
costume jewellery. (Tlus-
trated. 4

Finally, go to the party ina
mood to enjoy yourself, and not
in the mood expressed by Proust:
“Parties have little reality until
the following day, when they
oecupy the attention of the people
who were not invited.’

CAIAGAIAIIG

Anagrambles .

You are given a word and an
extra letter and are required to
make another common word of
the combined letters. For ex-
ample, L F AS ES plus M is

measles, i

CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT

—

SUNDAY.

DECEMBER 14, 1952



PARTY RECIPES

France

Two suggestions from the French
housewife’s party fare . MAR-
QUISETTE and BUCHE AUX
MARRONS.

For MARQUISETTE you
need:

4 oz cround almond
oz icing or caster sugar
oz grated chocolate
e222
Mixed together with the egg

into a thick paste, Break off

pieces the size of a walnut, and

roll into balls im cecoa powder.

Leave to cool in a cool place

:eor am hour or so.

And for BUCHE AUX MAR-
RONS:

1!» Ibs. chestnuis

4 om sugar

4 ox checelate

4 o« bufier (or other fat)

Boil chestnuts, peel and sieve
them. Melt butter. sugar and
chocolate. Mix them togethe:
with a wocdin spoon, adding t>e
chestnuts. Flace mixture on a
large sheet of greaseproof paper,
rol it wp to Teok like a log.

will

4
4
I

Leave to cool for a day.

This recipe comes from the
Lyons district. The Lyonnaise
housewife decorates the log with
grated nuts, marks it with a fork
so that the outside resembles the
tark, and serves it in slices.

Denmark

To the Danish housewife, no
Christmas dinner is complete
without a goose prepared in the
authentic way, and served with
red cabbage and browned pota-
toes. Clean the goose well, and
stuff generously with apples and
prunes, Roost for two or three
hours, according to size, leaving
the oven door open for the last
quarter-of-an-hour to allow the
skin to get crisp. Prepare a thin
coffee from margarine and sugar
in a frying pan and put small
boiled potatoes in; keep turning
until the toffee covers each potato,
The red cabbage should be cooked,
for about two hours, in a special
mixture consisting of two ounces
of margarine, one ounce of sugar,
a tablespoon of vinegar and one or
two cupsful of fruit juice.

For something a little different
to round off a meal, take another
leaf from the Danish housewife’s
cookery book and try CITRON-
FROMAGE, For six people you
will need:

5 eggs

5 oz sugar

1% lemons

7 leaves of gelatine

One cupful of water

Whipped cream

Mix the yoke of the eggs and
the sugar together until almost
white. Add the juice from the
lemons and the melted gelatine.

Whip the white of the eggs un-

til quite stiff and add imme-

diately after the gelatine, Turn
mixture into a dish and leave
to set. Decorate with whipped
cream.

Scotland

Culinary export from Scoitand
goes by the name typical enough,
of Scotch Mist, For this sweet, you
will need;

} doz. macaroons

14 coz. sporge fingers pink dnd

g.een colouring

% pint cream

1 liqueur glass maraschino

Crush macarons ¢énd fingers,

moisten with maraschino, add

half the cream and mix into a

stiff paste. Put into a glass or

silver dish heaped into a

pyramid. Whisk remainder with
a little sugar and er,
Divide it, and colour one
pink the other green. Put into
a forcing bag a good tablesnoon-
ful of cach co'our alternativel,
and place over pyramid, Dec-
orate according to taste,

Holland

“OLYKOEK” is a festive favour-
ite with the Dutch. Make suffic-
ient dough for two dozen sweet
rolls (normal recipe, with yeast).
Cut off small pieces of light dough,
and enclose brandied raisins or

- ee yan ee! ? raisins anc citven in centre of
. ws iS .......-° each when shaping into small
3: HARNESS with S is .......-” balls. Let them stand until light
4. CRANKS with A is........! Z e
RAIN 4 © f 5 Then. fry in hot, deep fat (360
SAIN tng ‘Seka “¢ 870°F.) for about three. minutes,
Pr ararel, ‘2g. cumsuvey ‘tT :uonnoe drain and roll in powdered sugar

while warm. Seak in rum and

serve with whipped cream.

America
Nuts are always a welcome
addition to the party table. Try
SRICED NUTS, the American way.
Teke the following ingredients:
4% Ib nuts
1 cup fine granulated sugar
1 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons cinnamon
1 teaspoon ginger
‘teaspoon nutmeg
1 tablespoon water
T egg white
Sift sugar, salt and spices to-
gether three times. Add water

>,



to egg white and beat slightly.
Dip nuts in egg white, then roil
in sugar-spice mixture. Cover
bottom of small baking pan
with half of sugar
mixture, place nuts on top so
that they do not touch each
Other, cover with remaining
sugar mixture. Bake in very
slow oven (250° F.) for about
2 hours. Remove from oven
and shake excess sugar from
nuts,
Or perhaps you might prefer
SUGARED NUTS.
Tak~
2 cups shelled nuts
1 cup granulated sugar
4% cup water

Blinche nuts. Place in sauce-
pan and in warm place,
Combine sugar and water in
another pan, stir until sugar is
dissolvea and boil without stir-
ring, until a small amount of
syrup forms a soft ball in cold
water (238° F.). Hold pan of
nuts several inches above heat
and shake vigorously while
slowly pouring syrup over nuts.
Stir nuts occasionally, then
add remaining syrup, drop by

drep, until all is used. Nnts
should be evenly covered with
a coating of sugar. Store in
closely covered tin box.
Germany
Here are recipes for two cakes
which the ‘German housewife

traditionally bakes for Christmas:

Christmas Stollen Cake
500 gramms plain flour
2 dessertspoons baking powder
200 gramms sugar
2 eggs

1 teaspoon rum flavouring
teaspoon vanilla essence
4—6 drops almond essen-e
Pinch grated nutmeg
Pinch ground cloves

125 gramms butter (or fat)
50 gramms suet

125 gramms sultanas
125 gramms raisins

125 gramms almonds or kernels
40 gramms mix*d peel

Icing sugar
250 gramms White (dry) cheese
Butter, for decoration.

Mix flour and baking powder
and sieve on to a board. Make
hole in centre, and put in sugar,
eggs and flaveurings. Mix into
a dough. On top of dough
place white cheese, butter cut
into pieces, fincly chopped suet,
sultanas, iaisins, almosds and
mixed cut peel. Mix to fine
dough on board. Shape into a
rectangle and tum one edge
over to within one inch of
other edge. Grease a tin ind
ping the grease either with
jour or grease-proofed paper.
Put dough on this and bake
for 70—80 minutes in medium
oven. When paint with
melted butter and ite with
icing sugar. Cast as cake or

current loaf.

Thick Pepper Cake
375 gramms of dark treacle
125 gramms of sugar
2 tablespoons lard
1 teaspoon ground cloves
pinch of ground ginger
pinch of white pepper
60 gramms mixed peel.
1 teaspoon almond flavouring
lemon flavouring to taste
500 gramms plain flour
1 dessertspoon baking powder
6 tablespoons milk
few almonds for decoration

Put treacle, sugar and lard
altogether. and melt. When
nearly cold stir in flavourings

(cinnamon, cloves, ginger, pep-
per, almond, lemon). Stir in
flour and baking powder alter-
natively with milk and mixed
peel to make a dough. Spread
dough on to a greased baking
tin with tablespoon dipped in
milk. Dough should be one
inch thick. Mark into oblongs
with knife do not cut —
and decorate with almonds

Bake for 20—25 minutes in
medium oven, This cake may
be iced.
Note : 500 gramms — approx:
1 Ib.
Swedes
What informal party table is
complete without canapes? Try

some of these Swedish sugges-
into different shapes. Shrimps
and mayonnaise eaviar and
tions, on small pieces of toast cut
leeks; ham, apple and cherries;
liver pate, cucumber and olives;
roasted veal, cucumber, meat-
jelly and tomatoes. Decorate with
parsley or dill,

And don’t forget the children.

Try “Creole Bananas” for them.
Peel bananas, divide lengthwise
and cut each strip in half. Soak
sections in a little rum or rum

flavouring and water. Dip in
thick batter, fry until golden
brown, dredge with sugar to

which a little vanilla powder has
been added, and tickle up with a
few drops of rum and sugar.

—And Now For A Drink!

At some stage of the festivities
you will need to serve a punch
or a fruit cup. Recipe for a
Tropical Punch is as follows:

2 wineglasses rum

a few “petals” of thin lemon
rind

1 wineglass syrup

1s pint crushed ice

a little grated nutmeg

To make syrup: take &
pint water, '4 lb lump sugar
(or smaller quantities if

desired) and flavouring essence,
Dissolve sugar in water, bring
to boil when dissolved, simmer
for four minutes. Shake all
above ingredients together and
serve at once.

If you prefer a non-alcoholic

érink, try Snow Cocktail:
1 gill strained grapefruit
juice

1 gill strained orange juice

2 heaped tablespoons sugar

1% gills water

1 large*tumbler crushed ice

2 unbeaten egg whites -~

Dissolve sugar in water, bring
to boil, simmer for five minutes.
Chill, Add fruit juices, place
in a screw top jar with ice and
egg whites, and shake well for
five minutes, Serve.

Ny Sy Ry By Sy hy

Have you kept to the well tried
favourites, the traditional Christ-
mas recipes?

There are few things to whicn
each country, in its own way,
attaches more tradition than toe
the Christmas menu. But with-
out breaking violently with
tradition, wouldn't something
new, perhaps an idea’ from
abroad. add spice to the occa-
sion?

Try the cosmopolitan flavour,
some of the following continen-
tal and American ideas. Be
brave about your originality—
stick to the original names.

Italy

ZABAGLIONE, an unusuak
sherry based drink, For two por-
tions you will need:

3 egg yolks

1-2 tablespoons sugar

2 half eggshelifuls sherry (or

Marsala or Madeira)

Beat yolks thick, add sugar
end beat until dissolved.
Measure sherry in half
shell and warm slightly. Ai
to egg yolks and beat over
barely simmering water untiF
thickened and very light.
Turn into serving glasses and
top with a dash of cinnamon.
Another favourite of the Itaf-

ian housewife is COTOLETTA
ALLA MILANESE (veal cut-
lets dipped in whipped
smothered with bread crum!
and fried.



SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1952

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PAGE SIX

wie
JA.

By Monica Dehn

JUST FOR ONE DAY in the year, the high barbed
wire that cuts the Holy City in two is pushed aside and
Jew and Arab forget their hatred, and the two sectors of
Jerusalem, modern and Jewish in the one side, ancient

and Arab on the other, are joined.
round, Arab Legion












CHRISTMAS

SUPPLEMENT

———

SUNDAY,

DECEMBER 14, 1952



THE NEW JERUSALEM #

in order of precedence. First













The year t
guard in their gay red and comes the Dean of the Consular
white checked head-dresses, and corps in Jerusalem, the Greek
Israel soldiers, wearing British Consul General. Amongst ‘ them,
patiledress, have stared sullenly Britain’s Consul Ge neral in the
at each other across the few Holy City Mr, H. R. 1D. Gibbon
vards of no man’s land and kept Moneypenny, is the only diplo-
_ tensed finger on the trigger. mat stationed on the Arab side of

I sr from Christmas Eye until the lines who crosses ‘to Israel

; . Chris " , 5 » pilgrimage
n ristmas day, the to join the pilg ,
yt i ca aside the All the members of the Con-
‘flos held a little absentmind- Svlar corps are. in diplomatic
dl F P ACTOSS the lines are dress. Their cocked hats glitter
— S Christian worshippers with braid, their silver swords
erreang lo “their annual pil- gleam through the blackness - of
a Laxael Oe ‘ the cold Jerusalem m.idwinter
grimage to Bethlehem. night
nid + November, on- Bet.
: ci oe Nee and As the convoy moves off, the
eras = closely to- t te of ‘Come all ye
sible this brie 1 from the bells in the
5 € possible thi r : ,
. a eae 7 Christ 1 t f he pale pink ton
demonstration : Y C.A.“opnbatte.
he ' vf 5 t tae
i. vinding vd «} leek limo.
: hilleide by border, a
‘ x os ‘ mn palatial
Fe tine I during ; ene Ce
seruti ) the Israel tl se iach
the , pasted: / 30 ao} Arab I naire and
throug! ri a ee a wether give the pilgrim
TIsrael-Jord Li xec Armi t ant Ohiesi
Commission and ‘firially returnea ™ Pe. ctteen Ie Rr aaeea Nias Stand
to the Gov 1 yf modern Jer- 7 fi eked
sd dinar for °! ri a,
. , i} apam Biren BOs and give each other
= P t le of the year. Then,
nd ci p ym Cr - ist they wave the
i he star whicl \ is the
is€ ner € i ¢ to
up of pilgrir it
I K 0
i l
1 ( St lar ( ] 1 the r I
I ri work}! in € of Jazarett t
! he line’ up formally Tiberias nd the Mount of. the

: Daddy’s - Boots

By VU. Scantlebury

“J S today Christmas, mum-
my?” asked Janet as she
watched her mother arrange some
flowers on the table.
“No, dear,”’ replied her mother,
The

“today is Christmas Eve.
day before Christmas is called
Christmas Eve, Tomorrow will

be Christmas.”
“And when will Santa Claus be
coming?” continued Janet
“Oh,” said mother, “ he will
bring the presents this efternooir
and I want you to invite two of

your friends here at 5 o'clock.
Santa will give them presents
too.”

Mother went on arranging the
flowers and Janet watched her
thoughtfully. Then she said:
“Mummy, is it true that Santa

Claus comes down the chimney?”
“Some people say so,” answer-

ed the mother, “Others say he

comes through the keyhole.’

“He would have to be very
small to get through the keyhole
and his presents would have to be
small toof’ said Janet.

“I don’t know,” replied mother,
“perhaps he can make himself ai
his presents small or big, just as
he wishes. Anyway, go and tell
Betty and Ann to be here at ex-
actly five o'clock this evening.

Janet skipped joyfully outside on
her way to invite ‘her friends.
When she passed Mary's house,
she saw Mary all dressed standing
on the steps.

waaaragns
# am going into town’ Mary
told Janet, “Mummy is go-
ing to let me pick out the doll®
I want. [I am going to pick out a
big one.”

“Tam not going into town,”
said Janet, “but Santa is coming
to our house at five this evening.”

Mary who was eight years old
and felt herself quite grown-up.
told six year old Janet. “Santa
Claus! There is no one named
Santa Claus. It is your father and
mother, Do you think tl.at one
man could carry presents for so
many people in a short time’”

Janet thought a little, then she
said, “Anyway, mummy told me
‘and

to call Ann Betty to our
home at 5 o’clock to see Santa
Cleus and he will give them
presents and I am going to tell
them.”

With that, Janet pranced. off
to eall them,

Ani and Betty were quite ex-

cited over meeting Santa Claus
and promised to be on time.
When Janet went back home,
she told her mother, “Mummy,
Mary says that there is no San-
ta Claus, that it is your mummy

and daddy. Is there a Santa
Claus, mummy?”

“Well, dear” replied the}
mother, “if you believe that

there is a Santa Claus, you will
see him. But it is time that you
should go to bed and rest for a
time, You've had a busy morn-
ing.”

At half past four the evening,
Janet was dressed and waiting
for Santa Claus. “Where is Dad-
dy?” she asked.

“He is down at the office. He
won't be home until late to-night |
Everybody is very busy at
Christmas,” replied her mother.

“I'll go and see if Ann and Bet-
ty are ready,” suggested Janet
“Yes,” agreed her mother, and
Janet went to call her friends.

WIIdtaagad

T FIVE O'CLOCK three ex-
cited children gathered at
Janet's house, The clock began to
strike — one, two, three; four—
and on the fifth stroke, the door
opened and in ytepped Santa
Claus himself. He had his long
‘white beard — if he had cut it
since last Christmas, it had grown
back again and was as long and
white as ever—his coat was}
bright red and on his back he had

a big sock,

“Good evening, Santa,” cried |
Janet, Ann and Betty, as they |
had been told to do, And—before |
the children could say another |
word, Santa had slipped a aetaat't
in each girl's hand. He then said, |
“I have many other children to |
go to this evening, my dears, so
I can’t stay ahy longer. Goodbye
and MERRY Christmas,” and was |
through the door like a bird,

When Deddy came home fro
the office, Janet told him o}
Santa’s visit and said that she :
Was not going to open her pres- }
ent until Christmas.

Then she asked:
where were you when
Claus came. here?”

“T was et the office, dear,”*re-
plied, the father.

“Do you stay barefooted at the
office, Daddy?”

“No Janet,” replied
Why do you ask that?”

“Well, because, Daddy,” | said
Janet slowly, “Santa had on your
boots.”

SBN NB NE 9 NB NN WN NB NN NNN NNN NNN 8 NW NN 8



“Daddy,
Santa

Daddy,

M4

"



Sih. meee

A MEMBER of the Arab National Guard (left)
formation from a mounted shepherd outside St. Stephen's
Gate — looking towards the Mount of Olives in unrestful
Chureh (in grove of trees), and lower, the Church of All
Palestine. Churches seen in the picture are the Russian
Orthodox Church (in grove of trees), and lower, the Church
of All Nations, reputed to be erected over the Garden of
Gethsemane. In it is enshrined the rock on which Christ
prayed on the night He was betrayed by Judas to the Roman
soldiers

seeks in-







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Transfiguration; orphan children
in the care of religious orders; the
elderly, maimed and weak of the
Christian charitable institution
in Jeruselem. With them are the
hundreds of Israel’s Christiar
Arabs living in the villages of
Galillee for whom Christmas is
the one occasion on which they

can. meet members of their
families ‘on the other side.’
But in twenty-four hours thx

make-believe peace comes abrupt-
ly to an end. The last straggler
is pushed unceremoniously inta
Israel and the high barbed wir
barriers are rolled back.into place
Once again Arab Legion guards
and Israel soldiers stare sullenly
at each other ecross thefew yard
of no man’s iand,

WACRAIGAAA

Buried-Treasure
Men Work At The
Tower

THEY KNEW MORE THAN
CHARLES II

With the help of









new informa-
tion, a search is being made in
the Tower of London for treasur
reputed to have been buried
since about the time of Charles II
_ One of those taking part is
Mr. Charles Quarrell, hon. Sec-
retary of the Speleological Socic ty,
who said to-day “Attempts to
find the treasure were made by
Charles II and Pepys. They both
failed, ,

‘Their lines’ of inquiry were
based on the existence of a cer-
tain type of arehitccture, Ours are
based on further architectural in-
formation

“We are usin every possible
modern device neluding elec-
trical instruments.@We have eve!
‘alled in the help of clairvoy-
ants.”

The treasure believed tc
have been buried by Sir John
Berkestead, a London jeweller
who became Governor of the

Tower in. 1652, was later accused
of extortion and cruelty, was
arrested in Holland, and executed
in 1662.

Come Right
Over Folks !!

it’s a NEW STORE



SA BA. HRN NAT NAT GWT NALA ATARI TN TN CT NNN

a



SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14,



PAY US A VISIT
AND SELECT

1952

HARDWARE
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CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT

PAGE SEVEN



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o
ECKSTEIN BROS. — Way Strect

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PAGE EIGHT CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT | SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1952

Spacemen MJRediscover Christmas

By NORMAN MOSS

O* E again it was Christmas cal d
Eve on Earth and the spate- songs







i pretty little pictures
as cards. We sing
carols. We are













vere on their astral of good cheer, Everybody
ooring until the day after “ ‘That's righ t
20x iF Day. Father had slipped the idea, Now iy
T 1 neet a friend in the “Ura- we are bringing Chr istmas ‘back?’
ium Arms »ther was adjust- ““Because of the revolution.
g the supersonic cookes in the To show that Big Brother’s gone
itchen; grandfather was showing and we’re human again. We did
ff sorne snapshots to his grand- away with thought controllers
rildren And these,’ he told Then radio travel.. Then news-
the children ig through peak. Then even television, Just
ereo-tele-viewers, “are some as we brought back singing, and
riends of mine and myself on art, and sport, and lipstick. And

smother Christmas Eve, It was a now Christmas.’
very important Christmas Eve—for
it was the first Christmas on the

ew planet a long time ago--it Ry Ny Ry BY

as in the year 2152.

The snapshots showed the « wusT then John came into the
time-honoured scene. In the sSons ‘We've _ opened the
background Wien ae cargo carrier,’ he told me. ‘A lot
Christmas ‘Tree, yee NaS of Christmas stuff—but no snow.
neath wre loads © gar TT ae I suppose we'll have to do with
parcels, Beside it was a sleig * our own home-made snow, even

ith a couple of reindeer har- though can't get it quite white











nessed to it. The ground was ‘z ed : pnd
nd they've sent the reindeer!
covered with snow — but that “ ‘Oh yes Earth told me they
fooked artificial +., were coming. What are they like
The youngest of the family ts handle?’
finally asked “But grandpa, what “Well they look like the
were yoy all doing? things on the old Christmas cards,
Grandfather settled down into anyway,’
his seat, while the ae “*But why did that incredible
gathered around him, and jan on Earth send them up here
he said though he couldn't yithout de-germing them
remember how often he'd said ‘‘A note with the reindeer said
t before “Well, I'll tel he thought it might somehow
you. “At the time, we were up on spoil the Christmas spirit if he
the planet. We had come out to did.’
the new planet, your grandmother All I could answer was: ‘Well,
nd I, as pioneers to the first ; suppose he meant to be kind CHRISTMAS — 2152: Shape of things to come,

OMINY. «WE: tert na ol Sap But I don’t know—when I think
n the days of Big Brother anc of the amount of stupidity on
e never wanted to come back tO farth, I'm very glad indeed that



‘Of course,’ said the wisefrom the other dimensional ;ver ribbon and red and green



YY here sou’ve 2 to
See ene es wane Seeeenae cherub. ‘Human in the good jungle.’ | WRT | wrapping of a package that had
“‘Why are they so stupid on se.’ “ “If you see the point of it,|come across from Earth. When I
Ry Ny Ny NY Earth?’ John asked me. “ “Why don’t some of you you might be able to help,’ sug-|saw what was in it, I shouted in
“So I told him, ‘They’re not /ong-lived people materialize gested John hopefully, ‘You! excitement. ‘It’s a ticket! A ticket

and join in, if you are really know, help get the others in the|to Earth and a holiday there,

» N THE wv Planet we were really so stupid, just amateurs at OV t we
C Pesé oe lowtan control, Gome things "Tiving, for instance. interested. Do you have any feel- spirit of the thing and all that.|Should we take it?”

efor , »y were ings about it?’ Maybe you understand it better

1d the newspeak and no Before the Revolution they were 5 - -s : . ui ix a

3.B.C. — those aed hard times all conditioned to live in a certain .. . . , than we do. If you’re not doing Yes, of course, we can go
eee ed ee eee kers, only way under the old Big Brother E do indeed see a certain anything else, that is? back there when we like. 3

xr ot Paki ane Gor wdiir regime. They had to destroy that point in your Christmas. “ ‘We are never doing anything| know, we'll go next year—fon
in ype é - you : : | ritus ¢ sa? | * >
or 4 other to cook on, ‘4ut conditioning entirely. They were Of all the forms of ritual that else, Christmas. ; ‘ :
rrandm r ‘to ¥ ; you people practise to bring you | ™ ‘Next year? Oh yes,’ said

planet left with knowledge of some few
things, and none at all, no expe-
rience, in others Lost people
with a lot of technical tricks,
that’s about all.

closer to one another. this seems “Two days later, on Christmas| your grandmother _ reflectively.
one of the most promising. We Eve, Grandmother stood trem-| ‘From now on there will be ona
do, we think, understand your bling with excitement while I| every year. I never thought of
aim,’ replied the materialisation worked my way through the sil-! that.’ ”

e prospered on the
id for many years did not hear
word from Old Earth—not even
radio-echo, Then suddenly came
reat news across the Ether. ihe
Old Earth was looking up. Big ia a 4 jist AY fe an amemm aN a Se

soe Ce en ote |
NN NNN NNN NNN NS

oe

«i to satellite Men on Earth





her's arching with Reverse- 4 HAT is why we seem _ s0
ne Detectors for ancient human much more intelligent her
t Probing about, back- Living together: does not require
1 n time, they came across so much intelligence when there
hat eemed a happy cene On are only a few people.’
ne day each year when millions ‘At this point thoughts began
children laughed together, So to buzz in my head and I knew
ey discovered ‘Christmas” it was the indigenous inhabitants |

wain. And the Inter-Planetary trying to materialize. In those

Society for Human Happiness days the original Planet Natives, |

tespatched Christmas Comets’ (a small timid people who lived

to all planetary colonies loaded natural life-span of 850 years)

with decorations, trees, instruc- had fled into the jungle of the

tion leaflets for making Christ- Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Dimen-

nas Pudding. sions. So they were invisibly all

around us, the .short-lived con-

querors, and only materialized to

Ry Ry Ny NS shoot at us an inquisitive thought

or a deep and difficult comment

ie . from their wise old brains,

x: HAD just.aven- one “It felt as if a whole tribe were

clipping down the ladder of the

dimensions into my _ conscious-
ness

“ ‘Look, inhabitants, I said. ‘If |





SAG SAS NNGAZ sence om

Cosmic Radar screen that a
third Christmas Comet was com-
ing in—the crackers, the turkey,
and a box with the mysterious old

Ce net erties. ‘Scotch and you’re going to, communicate, ing |
“Then a shell-shaped guided yery ted. Ave beem working
spuce ship appeared in the sky D@%d. Please,’ if you're going to |§ R
above the planet, communicate with me, material- >) oonensi

“ It's. another cargo carrier ee) Ee someting we’ recognise BRIG ,

2 . ; om tr and ta Trop ‘ 7" so
een Te T sald, Td etteE “ ‘And, couldn’t you material- HTEN UP ELECTRIC KETTLES

>
‘Probably, the tinsel’ sald frandmother asked, “and not |3@ | FOR CHRISTMAS & IRONS, PLATES,
2
2
2







grandmother. ‘The tinsel we need : .
something horrid as you usually . ~ =
CUPS & SAUCERS,

ee eS ree ee aan do?’ A little winged cherub ap-
MEAT DISHES, VEGE-
TABLE DISHES,

Tree? . peared. ‘Thank you. That’s
“ “Christ-mas’, We've got to better
KEROSINE OIL
STOVES & OVENS,



fearn the name correctly again! “ ‘We have been observing
‘Yes, Yes, you’ve said..that with some interest your
before, I'll get it right next time,’ tions for the C hristmas
said grandmother.
‘All right, now be quiet while

preps

a-
feast,’ =
said this Cupid-without an- 3

ot



sip , arrow. Is it something new?
I bring the ship in and we'll see “a oy :
Pape ry ei @caith uentiies . . Yes, my friend. T don't 2 BROOMS SHES
waar sp it,” I said working at the know how much you understand ve BRUSHES
7 of this. It is the spirit that of all Kinds

Mary, the little girl who lived counts, the Chvistinas piri

mext door, appeared, ‘Can I come sale ; a : . 9 ey =
in if lastay awa from the cantsel Earth is bringing it back in a GLASSWARE in a wide
big way, and naturally we are

=
=
panel?” she asked joining in on this outpost.’ o variety including
=
m
=
‘im
z





‘Why of course you can, darl-
: , “ ‘The spirit. And tel) me’ We offer ere
CHAMPAGNE, PORT

fing,’ said grandmother, ‘Do you

want me to tell you about Mis— pow ae ae wee ereemis A
wi e outward forms make for P INTS and

SHERRY, COCKTAIL

ENAMELS : f

the big event?’ the Christm: pirit?”
“ vervbody'’s telling us : > ris us spiri
NST ORSE a MANOR Us Spottt “ ‘Well, they help, We haven't ae,
VARNISHES FONE WHARE-E,
and STAINS LIQUEUR, HALF PINT



it in school now,’ retorted sMary
*“ Do you know when people Much else to work on. There’
celebrated Christmas?’ asked M@body around who celebrated

grandmother almost slipping into Christmas’, I explained. ‘Just

1 schoolmistress’s role, some relics and the old stories



5S EAE






















“* A hundred years ago,’ an- about it.’ i RS GLASSES
swered Mary proudly. “ ‘T must say that the ide a A:
And do vou know what we rather appeals to me I'm not:

lo at, Chris AS? y, ure that everyone else } ‘
eM bs haa ast Tearnt’ if ‘all ‘got iIthough they are w iting 2 er I A I IONS L I D &
‘Wo all have good will’ she: re- « ugh It seems. to a E
plied immediately. ‘We ‘all thinic thne f fer 18

bout nora hs at pani as human nean LOWER BROAD STREET. Hes]
manger, We all give each other the € you FRIED DE PN PAG PN PEON DE NNN INN DON DS, ©



SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1952 CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT PAGE NINE

XMAS AND THE CHILD

As Christmas comes round each By Peonsant started on that day when presents
year, many parents are faced with were given and received. Here
the question as to the right Or emotions, emotions which might Donala the Duck or any of tne again, some parents, who perhaps
wrong of keeping up the fiction of otherwise remain bottled up to fictional characters that entertain have no religious belief them-
Santa Claus Will the children, react unhappily in later years. and enrich our lives. He selves, may hesitate, wondering
(they wonder) resent this decep-- When things go wrong it is Teddy will, as he g rows. older, bOW they can impart the religious
tion as they grow older and find Bear, Santa Claus, and all the take a delight in helping to Side of ‘Christmas to their chil-
out for themselves that Santa Mother Goose familiars that come impersonate him, telling the Santa Gen When it means nothing to
Claus is not the flesh and blood to his rescue, to act as a buffer story to younger brothers and tem.
fate coe ‘Ot the cnagiaaticle between him and-harsh reality, sisters, and in “time to his own _ And once again to the _ wise

a e the agina and what more charming person- , ; . M oa ,- Parent this should present no
regulated to the Status of Mother ality coulg he find to Bee neogie himself, Gn ae eee afte: problem, for every child, no mat-



hte:





SHOP IN) COUR ORT’

=
=
>
Pe

Goose, Peter Pan, Christopher his ima .

“big . ginative life than Santa year met f th ter what his parents religious be-
RoliG, ond a net of others? Will Cjaus? What more exciting thrill. >f childhood” Bees re et rik liefs, should -be given the oppor- | am FOR THESE \MAS
the shock of discovering, that ing or fascinating story could } given the fun, the delicious ‘Unity of religious knowledge, a | a: GIFTS.

pa ail nv is Daddy and Mum there be than that of Santa Claus anticipatory excitement of play- Kmewledge that may prove of 3}
who the stockings and trim with his Reindeer team coming ing the Santa Claus game each Comfort to him in after years, and =

the tree, shake their confidence, “ } ; : el Agim
and apoil’ othet Christnawen itor on Christmas eve to fill his stock- year, from Christmas Eve when Wich will in any case leave him

¢

i PATE DECNTEGERS BN GRE DS OA GR GEG






> ing, and bring that specially 5 ings ss in a position to decide for himself. 2 :
them? longed for doll or train? “ee anette oie roe Christmas also presents a gold- SPARKLING IS BASIER !%
Parents tne world over have “Yes” many parents will still «The Night Before Christmas” ©" Opportunity to parents to bring
asked themselves these questions Persist “but what of the truth of yead: then to bed, to lie in shiver. home many a lesson to their 38 Toys, Games, Puzzles, Gift
for centuries, and tortured them- the Santa Claus story. How can jng ‘excitement’ determined to Children. Fort at Christmas time | 3 Se's for Ladies, Gift Sets forj
selves with a feeling of guilt as We insist on truthfulness in our gtay awake to catch a glimpse of the family tie seems to grow, SéGents, Pertumes and rye
the child asks, “But Mummie is Children, and then practice this Santa Claus! to next morning Stronger, and emotions are softer | sm@@0a Colognes, Boxes of Soap
he real?” And they reply “yes.” deception ourselves?” with its joy of presents, the lighted and flow freer in a myster ious | gated Cusson: Seay ween.
To the unimaginative parent this But why be more concerned tree, crackers and sweets. Oh Way that make us all—children (Donald Duck Mickey?
problem may present itself, but ever the truth about Santa Claus plessed childhood memories, lucky included — more receptive. This Bouse, Bambi, Pluto and

to those parents who can recap- than over the Fairy Tales, or any the child who can have them and &iVes parents the chance to teach PThomper) Gift pkgs. Cigar- &
ture even a fleeting memory of of the Nursery Rhymes? Do we unconsciously store them up, thus their children in a practical way, x ettes, Cigars. Boxes cf Choe Aq
past happy Christmases it is just Worry over the truth of the “Cow providing himself with the “Secret thought and generosity for others, :Olates, Boxes of Biscuits



no problem at all, for they know that jumped over the Moon” “Lit- preaq” which will nourish and especially other children less for- 1 us Toffee, Tins Boiled ee

that no one in their senses would tle Jack Horner” “Old Mother cuctain him when life has stripped tunate. ay Sweets, Sou ra Lei ather &

deny a child the joy of the illusion Hubbard” or any of the score of him bare of all illusions’ , Christmas Day is the children’s; #4: Goods, Porker Pens and

of Santa Claus other characters dear to the chilc ‘ay, and every parent wants to Dy Sets, Waterm-n he. us ane
The story of Santa Claus, Fath. Certainly not, nor do the children Christmas nowever should not make it as lovely a day as is pos- | mm Sets.

er Christmas, call him what you analyze or criticize their truth or be allowed to be a time only sible for them. But a lavish dis =

will, is the thrill, the poetry, the Otherwise, they just take them excitement and “receiving” to t p of presents alone, i but Ss -



emotional outlet, of early child- for sranted oe : mor eae pleasure to the child 2
hood and it comes at a period in : S soon as he is old enough to and for those lasting memories of

oo Ve : . ee As the normal child grows o!d- ‘ : y ehat ae ; % | 0!
ac g y : ; understand, the fuller deeper lovely Christmases to be retained
a child's life when fact and fiction ev hetwhl slif edallyrand assnathis derstanc the uller dee} y Christmases to be reta i C
are so interwoven in the child's > a ‘lene 2, meaning of Christmas should be beyond childhood, Christmas must SS Plant New Buildi
mind .as to be almost indistin- 170M the belief of Santa Claus as taught him, as told in the story of be lived by the child in its fullest | Plantations New Building &

RATA



guishable. Many a child, whose ® flesh and blood person into the Bethlehem. He should be made to deepest sense, with its lessons of boa Lower Broad Street.
life is not adjusteq entirely to his Knowledge that if he is not as real ,now that it is because of that unselfishness, generosity and = DIAI » 4045
liking, or whose human relation- #8 Mummie and Daddy yet he is @ first Christmas Day when Jesus thought for others well and truly aon

ships do not run smoothly, finds beloved character and as real in was born that we celebrate interwoven with the lighter joy ~ RGN NERS +4 VA NONE EN Ge

his imaginative life a form of @ll our lives as Sherlock Holmes, Christmas t -day, and how the of the day
escape, and a safety valve for his Mr, Pickwick, litthe Miss Muffet, custom of present giving wa MERRY CHRISTMAS!





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FINE MEATS -
aes | CRAVEN A
ere CIGARETTES
Ox Tails
a Sonaies for a delighiful
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Turkeys





Insist on








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PAGE TEN



















OMEONE switched st
light and opened the wit
- gneonlight spilled round
edges of the curtains and
the darkened roor The




the
She breathed

mKe @sS





round

t a look an

2 er, who came

a ul of parcels to

out down. Between them they
ow j ething large and
e in through the door and
ni away. There was silence
for 2 moment, tien the three
wh had be yvatching insidd
the r I softly down to












y, came
Andrew.
> at the
had roll-
> and a
grin that curved
hair; whenever he
loose limbs jigged to
hough he were danc-
f i so old that
eve mber when
ome house. He
ur ery wizened and
is thin legs wet cased in tar-
a trou ers; as though he had
found h long e very surpris-
ing ! eyebrows had risen into
two high arches, wr nkling his
forehead up above them. !
NDREW was a honey-col-
oured bear, He had held his
arms out so often in greeting
that one of them had stitfened
and now he could no longer
ring it down.
Ot was Monkey who spoke
frst. He looked at the heap of
pareels and then at the object
that stood by the door. He shook
his head. x
“A bicycle’, he said, “just as
I feared. That parcel with the
sharp edges | is a camera, Our
day is done.” 3 ‘
They looked at each other
sadly and nodded their heads,
“But she has given us
presents,” said Peter. He neyer

cared to look on the sad side of
life.

Monkey glanced at him in pity.
“What did she give us last year:

he asked.
“Embroidered dressing gowns
with our own initials!” said
Andrew.

“And tbe year before?” :
“Shoes in our own sizes! said
Peter proudly and tapped with

his own on the floor.

“Then open your parcel and
look,” said blondes, and he wait-
ed whilst Peter unwrapped the
tissue paper.

A aie off the Christmas
Tree! One of the decorations
that were left over! Just as f
thought. We were forgotten

until the last moment and it was

all she could find.” Sadly Mon-
key and Andrew unw rapped
their own stars and help them

limply by their tinsel strings.

bs

Monkey looked at Andrew.
“This is the moment,” he said
“Do we go or stay?” -

Andrew squared up his
shoulders and spoke deep from
his chest.

. “[ think we should go,” he said
gruffiy. ‘Remember Ebbin.”
PTQTHEY nodded. Ebbin
been the Brother's
lord of the nursery when
had first arrived. One
still see him lying about
times, when nobody could
where to put him eway,
kinder not to look
é nothing you could
him now
“TC. ‘Ww
Ebbin,”
vously,

had
bear,
they
could
some-
think
but it
There
ay to



pe be

gay to
dancing ner

ildn't
aid Peter,

uld not

Ebbin,”

be

said

ae
be
grimly
‘It
Brother
Ebbin,”
looked uj

comforta
Mor




for the
sees old
and he

mistress’s

must be sad
when he

said Andrew,
» again at his




CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT

Journey For Three;

By ANNE BARRETT




Mon
hard
Peter stood
on the tips of his tbes
forward ever the bed.
“I wish,” he began lightly
& toy may have one wish in
whole course of its lifetime,
ene wish only, “I w
be happy!”





started

ough his

1 that she











said
Andrew ish had
gone by.

As she tossed again in the
moonlight and murmured some-
thing in her sleep, the first two
stole out of the door. For a
mnmoment the finger tips of her
outflung hand rested lightly on
Andrew's head, en, as she
turned and drew it in again, he
followed the others outside

They after Monkey
across the lippers hall . and
mounted each other's shoulders
to unlock the front door. They
lowered the elves backward
down the fro teps and at last
they were out in the street.

USED to turn somersaults

over these rails!” cried
Peter, and lingered to turn just
one more.

“No looking backwards!’ .said
Monkey firmly, ne question is,
where shall we go?”

“Where the lights are!” cried
Peter.

“To a hospital?” suggested
Andrew.

Monkey wrinkled uy his face

and thought hard,

“We must get right away first,”
he said, “or, sure as bedtime the
postman or milkman will find us

and bring us back,” and he
started resolutely down the
street.

The houses towered above
them like mountains and the
pavement flowed on like a river

in the moonlight.
the noise that his shoes made on
the stone, Peter danced on ahead
of the others, his shadow jigging
up and down on the lamp-posts.

and lights!” he
but the others went more

“Dancing
cried,

slowly, not wanting to miss any 4

chance. Monkey climbed up to §
look in through a nursery win-
dow, but the bed was surround-
ed by proud-lookirg toys who
put out their tongues at him;
Andrew pushed his nose under
the doorway of a humbler house,
but only to draw it out again 3

quickly as the dog inside snapped

at what he thought was a rat.
They passed the lighted win-
dows of a shop, but it was long
since closing time; with a shud-

der they passed by a
full of broken toys marked down








to threepence each.

At last they grew tired, and
because Peter was the only one
who seemed to know where he
was going, Andrew. and Monkey
gave up their exploring and
followed him. Still dancing and
singing he was making his way
towards the reddish glow that
shone in the sky, and aiter a
while ii began to seem to the
others that perhaps they might
find what they were looking for
there. too. Old Monkey only
wanted warmth from the frosts
night now, and where there
were lights, he thought, there
might well be a fire.

NDREW was looking for a
star.

For a long time now he had
wondered ‘about Christmas; it
was his birthday and he thought
he ought to know He wondered
why people gave each ot
sents and hung shiny t
over the house; why the
that pleasant peculia
in th He knew that

» g to do ith a star
were pictures it

hei ( tmas card
ang abo. n thei
ong He ited
tar, and suddenly, as he
down the dark streets, it
io him that this was his chance.
Such a light in the sky might
















junk stall &

See een





¢ from a star

rew brighter as they

it; at last they

rner and then stood

what they saw.

y had come to an open
with a winged statue in
idle ad all around them
walls of the build-

T-like
were shimmering and spark-
inning with lights,

~








orar “and urple. and

and i, Not thing stayed

same f a minute; the
colour. vanihed and changed 3
and raced up to the sky, draw-
ing fountains that glittered and
bubbling glasses of wine. Names
were written, winked and ther
vanished away; as Monkey anc

Peter and Andrew stared up at

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1952



\e
&
&
&
&
&
&
a
&
&
&
4
&
&
&
&
&
&
S
:




» SHOP EARLY AT
» THE STORE WITH
THE WIDEST
VARIETY



:LEATHER GOODS

WALLETS, KEY CASES, PURSES, MANICURE
SETS

MUU E CEE ER EM UNITES

BH BUN i NN NN A UN CN



then their faces turned from , PIPES, CIGARS, CIGARETTES
green to lilac, and from lilac to
pink. : PERFUMERY

For a moment Peter was stil
ee ee eee at aj by YARDLEYS, GOYA, HOUBIGANT, CHAN-
sea-gree | ; + Sa y AT —~
“SALLY DAY!” and then blink- NEL, MORNY, COTY, LENTHERIC and the
ed and came on again, “SALLY S Finest Colognes
DAY! SALLY DAY! SALLY
DAY!” Suddenly, like a cather- a
ine wheel himself, he was off, 3
leaping and singing and bqnd- S In attractive GIFT BOXES by CADBURY, FRY,
ing in the air, all the colours gm y' KERS 2 - :
of the lights reflecting in the = 5 me CRAC R the very finest in
blacks of his button eyes. He ay °
ara too excited. te notice when’ mae FOUNTAIN PENS —All the Best Makes
the crowd in front of the other =
two suddenly parted, leaving a =
free passage te the theatre out- 4
side which they were standing. b> oc ee An eo dee of

> o Bes
ote = Fine Selection TONIC WINES

ALLY Day, the dancer!” =z : 7 &

cried a voice, and the name = An Inspection of Our Stock will suggest &
rustled over the crowd like the 3 Many Other Things &
wind over grass. “The show’s b> &
over, she’s coming out!” and at . * y, ai ® .
that? moment she appeared, Her = ge Come in at Your Convenience &
gold hair was as bright as the = e &
shimmering fountain and her = z
green eyes sparkled with a NS
hundred reflections. Peter, who 3% Cc OLLI NS LTD. Kroad Street
had given one last,’ tremendous

On Page 27

vm 6 NN NS

Delighted with }

DECORATIONS





RARBATIOS HARNWARE §

Corner



Step upstairs and see
TOYS, GAMES, BOOKS,
DOLLS, XMAS TREES







ELECTRICAL ACCESSORIES,
KETTLES, ELECTRIC IRONS
PYREX WARE, GLASSWARE,
ELECROPLATED GOODS,

CONGOLEUM, TEA SETS,
STOVES, VARNISHES

TOY TEA SETS
TOOL SETS
TUG BOATS
MARBLES

All these TOYS can be
purchased at unbeatable

Prices



of Swan 6 ‘Suste: eninge



SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1952 CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT PAGE ELEVEN





|

“No Sale” For | gy aCe ee EEN

| Robbery AR
“I see that this: holdup was not
a total loss,’ Inspector I.S.|
|Sharpe commented as he rang
that NO SALE sign on the cash
register and looked at the one
dollar bills in the drawer

“What happened to the light?”
asked Detective Blanding. The

clerk had just screwed in a new

bulb in the overhead light fixture 7
and was now sweeping fragments
of brokeh glass into a corner
AAAAAINF
With a wry grimmace at Bland- P
ing, the clerk laid aside his broom the Finest
and replied, “The stickup fellow
shot it out, I dropped behind the
counter when he came in. Maybe SHOES
he was drunk or maybe ae wes f
one of those shooting gallery
gangsters. Anyway, he fires a or the Whole
shot at the light, Then he grabs
only the ten spots in the cash
register and dashes out, I am too
\frightened to chase the guy be-
cause he-likes to use his gun it
|seems to me. Why should I be a
target for the undertaker?”
} waatdagda
| Sharpe closed the cash register
with a jangle. “You will make a
lbetter target for the District
| Attorney Come along!”
What caused Sharpe to reject
the clerk's story as untrue?
“‘yjoswyy
| Aquowt oy} Surveys szayye dnploy ev i
| aouvsvadde ay} OATT Of @UaDs ayy Pew)
| pey aap aL “yNO yUOM {4A END Joe
| aaqsifaa yseo ayy Ut SIT sze]]Op ua, Pur
| auo useNnzeq d9UaIOYIP ey. UMOUR e@aro
} Jou pinoo ueUl dngons eu. somnsuy

474270240






Family



If each of four’ contestants
played the other three one check-
er game in a tournamnt, how
many games would be played?
poked oq prnom sours xIg svemsuy

|

|
|
|
|
|



SHE IS THE GikL IN THE STRAND TEASHOP WHO
RECAME A STAR

SHE won a beauty competition and went into British pictures...
JOAN RICE is the name. She is still under contract to J. Arthur Rank,
but she is making a Hollywood film, “His Majesty O'Keefe,” in the
Fiji Islands with a Hollywood leading man, BURT LANCASTER. |
This is the first picture to arrive in London. About that sarong, 22- |

}

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ORDER A RICH DELIGHTFUL
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BAKED IN FOR YOUR ENJOYMENT



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PAGE TWELVE



CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT

Why Trust A Man On Fashion? |

By SYLVIA GOUGH

TOA FILM a
>» Leonard

EF lizabethan’ * outfit

here for you to ar

alout—designed by

year-old Sheila Grat

Mc

ley He









for the film,
idiculous.” Wor 1
acders who have en

e film - called “It

Started In Paradise”

t e criticised the er

t us sparking

€ dp

WHAT a









ly
d s! It’s perfect! What
a y you are not just
nch or two sh
so much red is t
TOO much!” Oni
woman could :
thing like that
So for praise of what
w vea -unspe > by
the smallest drop of
aci we usual e.
t One or men
Surprising tha
fashion stores
tagged on to t idea
He much m«
pil would w
aw our purer if
al experienced rile
assistant endor
choice
it nap 4
\ usually t
Another Womar
prisingl ofter
othe voman A i
heard somet
h r heard
ri other
he hich i
1 rter nowad
Ww everyon
tt ” Except
nale assistant i
easily tip the ile
vay—and hi
shopping
juy why thi tter
endence on men for
ise, for endorse
hoice and rf
e, for the att
the ideas
oH,
Objective
\ isked ROBB, the fashion
2st. He said Men are more
objective about fashion, They
ean see how a woman should look
quite dispassionately.’
We asked FREDERICK
STARKE, the fashion designer:
“Men are more objective about
fashion,” he said, “They cari-see
hew a woman should look quite

Gis passionately,”

We asked CECIL BEATON,
photographer of beautiful women
anc beautiful clothes; “Men are
more chjective about fashion. ,,.”



38: AGED AND MELLOWED

the fashion business went
thought
hree of which are pictured who is young

the “New wear themselves

SOS

ONE oj the

A tour round the Top Eleven—
all men, and members of Lon-
don’s high fashion warren—would
hardly have carried the argument

further—because gallantry, which
is good business, camouflages
ruth. ,

It is ‘this Women designer:

have a surgical attitude to fash-
ion, ‘They take our defects and
the¥ camouflage them; they take
our good points and they highlight
them. That is @ very womanly
skill.

But being in the fashion—par-
ticularly being among the leaders
of it—demands more than that.

WOMEN design





c

Morat

for others what they would |

One wholesale designer I know,
and

outsize, designs dresses for
women who ate young
and outsize. A Hat de-
signer who is pretty, |

dark, and French, de- |
signs hats for women

who are pretty, dark,

and French.

So the moral seems |

to be: Go to a woman,
if you can find one, wn!
looks just like you.
Otherwise, trust a man
For he will never mind |
how good you look. He}
sees you as a customer, |
not as a competitor. |
}
|
}

Spot

Yourself? |

KNOW yotirself, and
you know your neigh-
bour. But how
many women can hon-
estly define their own
temperaments?

Marriage expert Dr.

Eustace Chesser* refers
to people grouped into
four types. Do you see
yourself as—

SANGUINE? That is,
enthusiastic but change-
able.



‘ontro- V

versial outfits— \
short jacket in "sa Says Dr. Chesser: —
black - and - whit / 7 ll
diagonal stripea ) "Ha uppy is the person
cotton with large who can rightly be clas-
white collar and sified as ANGUINE,
slashed ‘sleeves ) his mind anal to be
orn over a ons 1 cheerful, hopeful, quiet
piece playsuit —in many respects he

is to be envied.

But just because he
has these pleasant ten-
dencies he may be
tempted to view life
through rose - tinted
glasses and not make

allowances for others
whose temperamental
endowment is totally

differenti

In his generally tense state, the
nan of CHOLERIC temperament

may rush in to demand sweeping
reforms, and may find it hard to
understand why the multitude

does not share his enthusiasm for

radical changes.
feels that every
attempt

The woman who
thing she might
is foredoomed to failure,

ana who therefore never attempts
MATIC

anything
type.
She finds it exceedingly difficult
to convince herself that she can,
by an effort of will, take action
which will make her happier and

is PHLE

the







SUNDAY, DECEMBER {f4,



1952

Pawar p BROWN,
star of the play
River Line,” coves

her leopard belt, The
paws are slotted

through in front and
fasten by the claws.

PRETTY? OH RIDICULOU 1S ?=
On ROTH?



TSOCKTAIL adres
tan duc!

also increase the comfort and
well-being of those around her.
The individual who walks
hand-in-hand with fear is the
MELANCHOLIC, a_ source. of
misery to himself and to all

to come to you as the Acme
of Prrfaction —

FHEINNNESSY



in olive yreen ribbed

Ottoman silk

SUIT

around him,

* In his new
and Freedom,”
12s. 6d





book, “Marriage

Rich

and Cowem,
LES.





SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1952

CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT

ON VISIT TO KOREA

Sra, Tope pre ete: * _ a

a





United States President-elect Dwight D. Eisenhower is shown as he conferred
with the “top bras?” of the armed forces in Korea at Seoul during his visit to Korea.
It was revealed that the President-elect arriv ed in Korea Tuesday, Dec. 2, toured the front
line areas, conferred with Army and Navy commanders and left for home.

ABOVE is Mr, Eisenhower with two of the high military figures with whom he conferred.
With President-elect Eisenhower are Gen. Mark Clark, Supreme Commander in the Far
East, and Gen. James A. Van Fleet (right), Commander of the 8th Army.

(International Soundphoto).

WAZ ASI

PAGE THIRTEEN

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weessential to @ Immaculate Interior &
iz, Dleasurable @ Luxurious Comfort K
motoring, . . . @ Economical we
=
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All these are points worth voting when considering &
purchasing a car above average; a car that will re

serve you far into the future ....

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= Teugh! Compact! Built for hard labour on a

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En i AN DN WN NNT BAT DDN

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Say Santa is
coming



He's not very
far

So order your
gallons

OFS &R

Tesi gappaabainasee sisi.



CURIS see Ce ECCT EERE EES Eee EE SEES

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Prie Reid’ tia li eee Tee aly



PAGE

BEAUTY
ON THE
BEACH

FOURTEEN





By DOROTHY BARKLEY
LONDON,

Passion f er flown from
Bermuda specially for the occa-

n, decorated the oak-panelled
room where Horrockses showed
their new collection last week,
and provided an evening corsage
for models during the parade.

The cotton dresses, bandbox
fresh and pretty as a_ picture,

brought to mind a

a young bride, or a wardrobe for

a South Pacific luxury cruise,
Adaptability has long been a
favourite trick with London and
Paris designers. And it was the
keynote of this Horrockses col-
lection, Cute little boleros cov-
ered up sun dresses, and match-

ing dresses transformed playsuits
for off-the-beach wear

Newest way of making one out-
fit do the work of two was the



recipe for afternoon-into-evening
wear. The recipe ran thus: take
one slim-fitting afternoon dress,
in a black silk finished poplin.
To adapt it for evening wear
simply add very full ground-
length over-skirt (one in harle-
quin-checked organdie would be
new), and the outfit is complete
for evening.

Besides the famou silk-
finished poplins, and denim (it’s
going to be the material), other
fabrics suggested for warm
weather were nylon, silk jersey,
shantung and organza. Pink was
one fashionable colour; in candy
stripes for beach wear, in print-
ed pattern for dresses and
housecoats Grey was another:
grey denim skirts with grey and
white striped tops, and grey pin-
striped poplin dresses

Fashionable tints for the plain,
self-coloured _ poplins, included
burnt tangerine coffee lime
green and peony red

Two “adaptable” beach styles
ure illustrated, First, a sun dress
in printed cotton, Basically, it is

trapless dress. Its bodice is
boned for comfort and its skirt

has unpressed pleats which give
it fullness without bulkiness on
the hips. The wide stripes can be
in turquoise and white, pink and
white, or tan and white, super-

imposed by a finely etched black
floral pattern The dress has a
matching bolero (not illustrated)
which transform it into an off
the beach outfit

Second, a beachsuit with four
component parts—shirt, skirt and
twopiece playsuit. The matching
shirt ind — skirt, fashionabiy

striped, fit
and can be

together like a dress,
worn over the play-

suit, And the playsuit’s strapless
top can be worn with the skirt.

Most fashionable accessory for
the beach will be the finger-

length button-through shirt, worn









ouiside shorts, Smartest in striped
cotton, it will be copied by any-
one with any fashion sense, And
denim jean will be equally
fashionable. Formerly seen only
on the farm or down on the
range, the have stepped into the
model « s. Tailored and edged
with white piping they are a















‘Toy





trousseau for }

Cars, Toy
Moter cycles,

XMAS TREES

























edition of

streamlined
mer self.

Why is it that so many of these
world,
beach-goer
clad in

styles are lost to the
that the average
remains imperturbably
comfortable clothes?

Beachwear designers do not
put fashion before comfort. None
of them is seriously suggesting
that a beach should resemble a
Bond-street store, or those on it
look as if they had stepped from
the pages of a glossy magazine

(though some _ admittedly
dreams to this effect)

On the contrary, their
have comfort and_ fashion in
equal quantity. Beach-goers
haps will take this te heart
London's First Eleven de

ers are showing their
collection. They act as

windows” for British fabrics and
fashion, and have an
influence on current fashion
is interpreted by the stores
smaller shops

One of the most
shown this week was
Victor Stiebel, well-known
“Royal” designer. He

leading materials were net
taffeta, and embossed
He retains his

the tiny waist, and the full



held out by stiff petticoats, And

there is a definite tendency LEFT:

towards sparkle and glitter. He

would have us scintillate with without bulkiness.

rhinestones on a velvet dress and RIGHT: Four-piece beach outfit in candy striped cotton.
shine with a miniature tiara on skirt, with a two-piece play suit.

neat curls.

their

have

styles

sign-
mid-season
“shop

important
as it

interesting
that of
as a
concen- .
trated on evening dresses, and the
paper
velvet.
preference
skirt

CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT



wil

essiill



for-

and
still

per-

and

for

playsuit can be worn with the skirt.

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14,

1952

AMERICA’S FIRST LADY

Mamie Eisenhower
By Yowell Rogers

NEW YORK, November 6
NEW YORK
She greets people with an af-
fectionate “Hi” and—until now
“Just call me Mamie’
his new First Lady of the land,
Mamie Doud Eisenhower
She looks forward to the White
House for one basic reason — to
see more of her husband there
than she has since their return
from France.




sala

She is fair, with 1augning blue
eyes, and her brown hair is grey-
ing. She tries to shun sweets
and cakes to keep her weight at
9st, 12 lbs. She is 5 ft 4 in. tall,

She has worn her hair in a bang
for 30 years—‘“because I have a
very high forehead and they cut
it up.” She has a “pert” nose and
short upper lip.

She uses pale nail varnish and
little make-up.

She speaks rapidly, smiles
readily, gestures generously and
bursts out frequently with “My
Godfrey.”





Strapless sundress in printed poplin. The bodice is boned for
comfort, and the unpressed pleats give fullness in the skirt

Shirt and
The strapless top of the

New in Barbados. but very old in Holland

MILL BEER from 700 years old KLAVER BREWERY
MIEL~ions--drink MILL beer





Aeroplanes,
iks, Steam
istols,

Buses,
Water P

AND XMAS
DECORATIONS.





ee

Engines,

TREE

ARREST AIS



Yachts,

a really

DOLLS, DOLLS,

DOLL HOUSES,

DOLL HOUSES FURNITURE.
AN EARLY VISIT !
THE KIDS WITH YOU:

ROBERTS & CO.

PAY Us

ALONG

=
BRING



Carpenters’ Tool Sets, Crackers—a wide vari-
ety, Toy Books, Note Books, Diaries, Bibles,
A. & M. Prayer Books, Gift Stationery in
very beautiful boxes, Gift Boxes of Soaps—
fine Gift.

DOLLS —






High St.

(Showroom Upstairs)

She that in the White
House it will be only more of the

says

same, of being an army officer’s
wife—“Just a case af playing the
wife again, entertaining peopl

and meeting people.”

She has great talent for

friendship and warmheartednes
She likes people and parties, She
also likes quiet rather than the
radio and T-V. She has never
made a speech, does not pretend
to know politics, and dislikes

publicity

She will replace Mrs. Bess Tru-
man's bridge club in the White
House with double deck Canasta
sessions, She would rather play
Canasta than eat.

She made close friends of Can-
esta playing Ruth Butcher, wife
of Eisenhower's wartime aide in
Britain, and Mary Allen, wife of
George Allen. (Allen, a business-
man, is called “The White House
Jester” because he could make his
old friend President Truman roar
at jokes. Now he probably will
be often at the White House to
make President Eisenhower roar.)

She gets along easily with other
women—an art learned on army
posts with army wives. She is
not according to herself as good
a cook as her husband, whose

| charcoal-broiled steaks with but-

ter and garlic sauce are famous.
| She will see that there is a
| White House kitchen nook where
|he can make his equally famous
vegetable soup,

She will revive Sunday night
suppers in the White House — an
unbreakable army post custom.
| She likes orange juice and eggs
and bacon for breakfast, a sand-
| wich or salad for lunch, chicken
or steak dinner,

, ._ She will find a use for Truman’s
| White House piano—she plays by
fear for her own amusement only

She has no hobbies or special

| talents

(She says Eisenhower and
Churchill compared notes = on
painting, and adds: “Mr. Church-

| ill is good, but he has had in-
| struction Ike hasn’t and he’s
wonderful.”’)

Her favourite pastime is baby-
sitting with her three grand-~
children, David 4, Barbara Anne
3, Susan Elaine nine months,
whose father Major John Eisen-
hower is in Korea.

} She was alone when her
|} son Deud Dwight was born-
| (As election night was her fin-
| est hour, so her first-born’s death
' three years later of scarlet fever
twas her blackest hour).

She married Lieutenant Dwight

first

| Eisenhower on July 1, 1916. (Her
maiden name was Doud and her
family was well-to-do.)

She is thrifty with a dollay, a
habit learned on army posts, often
buys clothes by mail, and handles

‘the family finanees. ¢
| She likes black, dark blue, or
green dresses “because gayer col-
ours don’t do a thing for me.”

She also loves frilly pink knit-
ted bed-jackets,

She chooses rose and green as
her.favourite colours for rooms
and likes to decorate furniture
with yellow for sunlight. (Her
White House bedroom will be
mauve when she moves there next
January, but not for long.)

Dial 3301







SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1952

TOE: Ben 2 LORK WOO

IS SET FOR A REVIVAL—BY MR. WILCOX

OST successful starring
partnership in British
films was that of JAMES
MASON and MARGARET
LOCKWOOD in The
Wicked Lady.

It may not have been Art
in the loftier sense; it was
certainly Box Office—with
record figures.

Now Herbert Wilcox is plan-
ning to renew the partnership.

That is why he
Harold

has postponed

production of
The King’s sesosessesssons
General — in

een a eae Cc ’
sOCK WOO! wh
play the onway
crippled a
heroine of
Daphne du







Maurier’s
romance,
ing

throw
a bat

act-



a + teneeeeenes

ered

the General—and Miss

rd. Our former

who has not
near)




ausdar

» for



up his
















vood film

s being

ike Mr

hinks Ma worth

this means re-

tHiject some vigorous person-
ality into British films t

hope the apy ev



























Lockwood rt 1 a
cinemagoers vided
The box-offices can do wit on, DSHS dosen. Ravope :
Wicked Lady's money, so fae want tieis
the Lady herself—a arte Continen
,
ars CYCLE GIRL
ed ave
grown up dramatic then, ok Vv nese-Sw a
anes again, they would have furia Schell is 1! r-
a big opportunity to give the pr ) f the gir x
public romance—glamour, if you role in fi:m rsion of :
like—without the nonsense this Heart of the Matter r
time. Graliat Greene story. §
turns from her home in «
THE HOLD-UP after Christm to co-sts wit
Trevor Hieward and Elizabeth
% Why has Graham Allan, — ;
Greene's first play Virgi McKenna, Er
written direct for the > had favouri r the part, has
its world premiere in holm drawn her candidature
—in a Swedish tr tion? unusual wisdom, she _ de 4
After a delay of months, West t studio work by day 4d
End rehearsals for The Living rmances by nigh



Room do not art until January way to burn ot



andie at



The culprit—an unwitting but both end

flattered one — is 2l-year-old ‘wo years ago Maria Schell
Dorothy Tutin. She has her first ed Sir Alexander Korda io
starring role in the play; author ase her from a _ long-term



and management, with unusual contract; she had grown uncom-




candour towards a girl picked at fortable at drawing a subslan-
an audition say she is “the only tial weekly wage for doing
actress in the country” th nothing—while he looked for a
would be willing to entrust with suitable part. She preferred
the role. acting repertory in Switzerland

So they are prepared to wait [or £10 a week—and cycling to

for Miss Tutin to finish her film ‘Work











part with Olivier in The Between the cycle tours, how-

gar’s Opera. Two established ever, Miss Schell has established
stars engaged for the play have herself on the British screen
taken interim jobs while waiting, When John Boulting was given
too: Mary Jerrold (75 next -50 stars to direct in the Festival
month) and Valerie Taylor film e Magic Box. 24-year-old



Meanwhile, productions of The

Maria—as Friese-Greene's §
Living Room are being prepared

wife—was the only ‘foreigner

SS
in

Thats The Slogan

By STEPHEN RALMAR
An Australian Visiting Britain

Well, the truth is that in nearly
two months’ stay we have had no
use for our food parcels; found
the food infinitely better prepared
and very much cheaper than in
most other parts of the Continent
—and rather plentiful.

It is true tht we did find meat
and butter rather scarce commo-
dities as soon as we started to
live in a flat and to run our own



Heavily armed with food parcels,
raincoats, umbrellas. and rubber
boots, we arrived in Britain.

The result so far: My wife put
on 3 lb. I myself 7 lb. in weignt
—and took weeks to reduce to
normal: our rain-gear nearly
rotted away until the weather
broke and we made more
friends in seven weeks than we
could possibly have expected in as
many years.

To the average Briton it possi-
bly sounds a far-fetched joke,
but to the average traveller it is
reality; nearly everybody with the
best of intentions tries to talk you
out of a visit to Britain. Reasons
brought forward?

1. You will starve to death;
there is nothing to eat in Britain.

2. Last year we had a beauti-
ful summer; “Yes — both days of
it.” This, once you are _ here,
sounds what it is — a wisecracx;
but it is accepted literally by an

XMAS
GREETINGS,



Hrhes














See Britain and Live—

CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT

HOME, JAMES?

MASON - LOCKWOOD PARTNERSHIP



bo







Mary Marti, or | 3

A! ¥ home ane |
’ 2

eves in ou 1 tob | 2a



the New Year
Martin will be back. U
a pupil. After four
South Pacific she has
take singing lessons

For -her 1953 London season
Miss Martin is exehanging her
flat_in Grosvenor Square for a
smaller one in Park Lane he
will no longer be on a Drury
Lane super-tax salarv AS an
unemployed student, she should
still do quite nicely at the new
address

LOST CAUSE

ok QUOTE OF THE WEEK
from Danish-born Holly

wood star Coleen Gray, in

London to make a picture:

“1 went to the Amertean
Embassy and recorded my vote
jor Stevenson. Tallulah isn't
the only actress who knows
about politics.”

WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED

London Erpress Service

M

s time a
vears in

decided to

here.











Now fi
vette

pleasant surprise — that a aa
when the sun did not shine nearly |
all the day was an exception
rather than the rule.

And the so-called haughty
stuck-up Briton? We found it
difficult to travel more than 15
minutes on any train before we |
were being told of the beauties |
of the countryside we were just |
about to visit; about parts we
just simply “had” to see; about
places to go to and hotels to stay
in,

We feel that it is very important
to tell about all this to an even
greater extent than is done ¢
ready abroad. Everybody knov
the urge to see Paris. and that on:
must go to Naples and die-but |
only an _ infinitesimal minority
knows that to see the unlimited
beauty and wealth of countrics
one must come to London -






The evidence c’ British goo





ss is — and has always been—well
ichj ,¢ household; but apart from thes ’ °
astonishingly large number of apes v2 own, at the moment
h ne y = & oe Heited tw 1ortages we found that in kno » but at th ” - y
people who have never. visited aa n 7 , fers, according to all our econ-
es ere east
Britain before. nore is ab 7cas* onists, from stiff competition
allt d than “The unexcelled beauty of Brit-
3.. The Engl cold, un- is univer ved outside tnee mazing cheapne in com-
friendly € y look down on United Kingdom. And in the rn par nt day st rd
Colonials and/or foreigners, which- jority of urant most. wit of 1 ther
ever the case may be, you will tour a all eat in them -- co enui I -
feel a stranger, unwelcome and prices are rprisingly reasonable 1 1 tr
very much on { uitsid u ‘ ;

MAMA

NGS NANG SNES

2







PAGE FIFTEEN

BUNUN MEAN NENE RENN MAAC RE NENA
2



FOR LADIES :

SPUN in attractive designs and shades priced at 73c., 87e.
and up.

CREPE ROMAINE at only $2.00

MARQUISETTE at 62c., 69c., 77c. and $1.68.

RAYON PANTIES from 85c. to $1.10

WONDER-BRA BRASSIERS at $2.54

“ARISTOC” & “BALLITO” NYLON HOSE at $1.59 and
$2.20

The Latest Styles in LADIES SHOES from
priced from $5.08 and up.

FOR MEN:

RENOWN SHIRTS at $3.24, PREMIER Long Sleeve Sport
Shirts at $4.42

SKYSCRAPER SHIRTS at $3.10. Also in stock “ELITE”

island cotton shirts and the well known “Arrow”

the U.S.A,








OTTIS VESTS at $1.20

PIN STRIPED SUITING at $2.93 & $3.74

GABERDINE SUITING at $4.54 & 4.86

GEN FELT HATS from as w as $2.40 up

The finest assortment of “CLASSIC” and “JOHN WHITE”
SHOES priced from $8.43 $10.70

FOR CHILDREN :

We have in stock a fine assortment of Girls and Boys shoes
and hose

Just opened BABY BLANKETS 7.16 & $2.25

FOR THE HOME :

SINGLE BEDSTEADS with Spris at $20.50 & $22.50

DOUBLE BEDSTEADS with Spring at $30.50 s

Also in stock a limited amount of th: famous “SIMMONS”
Bedsteads, Springs ang Pillow

CANNON TOWELS at 838c. &
only 12¢,

CURTAIN NETS from 80c. to $1.42

Fine quality CRETONNES at $2.00 & $2.85

St.01

DISH CLOTHS at



LASHLEY’S LIMITED.

Swan & Prince Wm. Henry Streets

NG NG NG NU NG NN NG GN NW

2

A FEW OF YOUR FAVOURITE

“LL SEE YOU IN MY DREAMS”
—Doris Day

“DON’T BLAME ME”
“MOON MIST’—Duke

Johnnie Ray

Ellington and His
Famous Orchestra

“HOLD ME CLOSE TO YOU”
—Billy Eckstine

“A FESTIVAL OF CAROLS”—by the Choir
of Westminster Abbey

“FOR THE VERY FIRST TIME”
—Tony Martin

“IT SAW THREE SHIPS” Dennis Noble
~Baritone

“THE HOLY CITY’—Part I & II
“THE KENTUCKY MINSTRELS”
“KISS OF FIRE”—Billy Eckstine
“WHEEL OF FORTUNE”—Billy Williams
NEGRO SPIRITUALS

e



Now available at—



ELAR PARRA NR IN PS NIN DED DN DNDN NN ANA NAN NR NN NTN ON NAAN

°F.

as



AS SN EN BN A PA PA PRN PN PR PN PN PN BR DN BS PN DPN FN RN DN INN TA DNS ONS SONS



NEUES

DA COSTA =

®

& CO. LTD... 3

ELECTRICAL DEPT. <

5 Di G5 ON DER DE DEDN HN BN TA TH DN NIN GS OM PEGN NBS S



“PAGE SIXTEEN





Parking Facilities

make your Shop-j
bd

5
Q
a
o
®
a
n
E
o



Rhinestone Jewellery

Earrings for pierced ears

owe pant Betts & Earrings *
Sterling ver Identit

Charm Bracelets ——

Royal Crown Derby Earrings & Brooch sets
Rolex Gents & Ladies wrist watches

Gold watch straps

Gold Bangles & Gold Signet Rings

Gold charms in all different shapes

Cobalt Porcelain Ash Trays & Cigarette Holders
Bedroom clocks

Ladies Compacts

Waterman Fountain pen & Pencil sets

Gents Kremtz Tie Slides

Xmas Decorations

Beatrix Potter Characters

China Ornaments




GIVE

ROLEX

The Masterpiece
of Watch
Craftsmanship

5 LOUIS L. BAYLEY

Jewellers of Bolton Lane & Barbados Aquatic Gap







: A SURE EERE CRBC CEE NEN

sb



6885833

le:

Comb & Brush Sets

Johnson & Johnson Sets

Cumbella Cleansing Tissues

Baby Rattlers—Soap Dishes

Baby King Silverplate Spoon
Fork Sets

Vinolia Baby
Bears)

&

Powder (Teddy

CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT
eriidoiboniaiaclimancapicstensenshictiaeniapencencemeiitiih

5 JECCOT ELLE SLESL ESL S SESE L ES Sew SSeS
2

ae

'





WAP FARRAR AR AAA AAA AANA ANS

IAAANAAAR AAR AMARA

& |
es

SS EEEROREnEE cok ee

Gifts ©f

Beauty
aud Charm

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14,

195,

After-Work Shoppers Boost

The Christmas Rush
By Vivien Batchalor

SHOPPERS have answered the
controversy about later shopping
hours by packing the stores be
| tween 5 p.m. and 6 p.m, this week

One department selling gifts up
to £2 reports that average takings
for the last hour’s opening have
totalled a quarter of the takings
for the rest of the day,

Busiest departments for the
last hour: those selling Christ-
mas cards, gifts and cosmetics.

The Dog’s Picnic

At the Army and Navy Stores
I saw a dog’s picpic basket com-

lete with a feeding bowl, a

ottle for water, and a tin for
food, and a rubber ball and ring
to keep the dog amused. Cost:
27s 6.d.

For 43s, 6d. you can buy him a
playpen in case he is jealous of
the baby’s,

Presenting Foxhunter
Next Monday, at Jacqmar,

shoppers will find a silk scarf, a
yard square, called “Fox-hunter.”

ted on the scarf is a portrait
of the horse and pictures of his
exploits, The scarf costs 89s. 6d.
and part of the proceeds from
each sale is being given to the
Olympic Equestrian Fund.

They ‘saved’ Nylons
Many stores are arranging a
“hosiery week” next week and
promise that nylons will be easier
to obtain. Supplies are short, but
stocks have been saved for
Christmas.

Frayed Edges?

Carpets which are fraying or
worn out can be repaired—
and the edges stopped from
further fraying—with a new
adhesive called ‘Copydex’
which costs 2s, 9d. a tube at
Whiteleys, Gamages and Self-

ridges,
Space Men
If your son or nephew is a fan
Lee Dan Dare (I gather a gentle-

man who adventures into space),
or of Jeff Arnold (he rides the
range) he had better not see the

new watches made by Ingersoll.
Each model has a. coloured dial
and as the watch ticks Dan Dare
fires his ray gun twice every
Jsecond (and Jeff



Arn Id





we



A Wonderful range
of Exclusive Gifts

— by —





ELIZABETH ARDEN

six shooter. The cost 30s
jewellers.
Cashmere Again

Cashmere for so long almost un-
obtainable, is creeping back into
the market but it is still pricey.
Aquascutum have twin sets in
pure cashmere for £11 11s,
Centre Piece
Robinson have scooped
out the deportments which nor-
mally occupy the centre of
their store in Oxford Circus, and
turned the space into a complete
Christmas Gift Counter, Here all
in one place you can find scarves,
jewellery, bags, blouses, cosmetics
—all the gift ideas.

“We thought it would save
people having to tramp round the
store from department to depart-
ment an official said,

Draughty?

Sensible idea for those who
feel the cold when wearing a
mackintosh instead of a warm
winter coat has been devised by
the Sheepskin Shop, It is called
an inter-fur and is made of
soft sheepskin and full lined
It goes under any full-length
coat or mackintosh and costs

£10, 10s

at most

Peter

Evening Bag

At the Royal Film show Vivien
Leigh’s evening bag aroused com-
ment. It was pyramid-shaped,.
with the top fastened by a
jewelled circlet and a long looped
handle, It opened out into petals
rather like a tulip, You can get
one like it in black velvet or gros-
grain at Fenwicks for 6% gns.

Case into Table

Many stores report a surprising
run on picnic sets as presents, One
with a little more imagination
than most is in a_ plastic case
which opens out to form a table
on legs, or you can leave the legs
folded and use it as a tray. It
contains two vacuum flasks, four
cups and plates, sandwich box
two screw-top jars and a milk
bottle, There are many colours,
including red, white and blue

with a Coronation motif inequered
on the box. It costs £5 19

Gamages,
Wortp Copyrignur RESERVED




RARAAARA S

AGN

ay




ARDENA

SKIN TONS



BBs 95.9095 945 95 95 05 9 NS BB BG

Gifts for Boys
and Girls

Sharp Toffee Decorated Tins—84c.
& $1.48

Blue Bird Toffee Decorated
—B5de., & $2.40

Mackintosh Toffee Decorated Tins
—$1.32, etc.

Pascall’s Marshmallows,
Sugar etc.

Caley’s Crawford Chocolates

Walters Palm Toffee Decorated—
4-Ib. tins

Cadbury Chocolates — \-lb. and
1-Ilb, Boxes

X'mas Stockings

Presentation Soap—Father X'mas
Snow Men.

Gifts $or Dad

Wardonia, Gil'ette, Schick and
Rolls Razors

Fountain Per and Pencil Sets

Shaving Sets in Leather Cases

Macgrer Shaving Sets

Yardley Shavings Bowls and Gift
Sets

Wallets, Tray Purses

Cigarette Cases and Lighters

Cigarettes in Presentation Boxes

Dunhill, Comoy aud Mayfair Pipes

ames se Clones

Tins

Barley



Gifts For
The Family
Caley's Crackers
X'mas Table Cloths and Runners

X'mas Serviettes,

Mats

Table and Glass

Presentation Tins of Biscuits

Thermos Aluminium Jugs

Thermos Flasks

Presentation Boxes of Chocolates
—Cadbury,
Moirs

X'mas Trees and Lights

Fry, Rowntree ang

Table Decorations
X'mas Wrapping Paper, Cord,

Tags, Seals, Holly, Spray, Ete.

FRENCH PERFUMES

By Lanvin — My Sin, Scandal,
Arpege, Pretexte

By Guerlain—Shalimar, L'Heure,
Blen etc,

Maree! Rochas—Femme, Mous-
seline etc

Chanel—No. 5

Jean Patou—Joy, Moment Su-

preme, Amour Amour

Ciro—Reflexions, Surrender, Dan.
ger

Worth—Je Reviens, Dans la Nuit,
ete.

Caron—Bellodgia, Nuit de. Noel,
ete.

Colognes—Yardley, Atkinson, 4711,

Bourjois, Roger and Gallet
French Face Powder

Presentation Sets by

Max Factor, Goya,
Richard Hud Nut,

Yardley,

Cussons,



ARpiee

Seer compnene

UY CEM ;

CRE




fu
d ABET AI

Harriet Hubbard Ayer
Morny Bath and Toilet Soap
Morny Talc, and Bath Powder in

Gardenia, Jasmine, French Fern,
Verbena, Sandalwood.

Vanity Cases,
Sets.

Comb and Brush

NAAR AAARA ANAAARATTANT



| ie KNIGHTS DRUG STORES



SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14,

THE SHOW MUST GO ON:

When you, you portsmer
are sitting dow to your Christ-
r linner today, give a thought







{ rofessional footballer.
F ‘ in i 0 laxa-
tic I h busiest time of the
vear He t é ial
matches, he must ta in full
traini and his Christma
dinner frequently eaten fa
from home

the professional foot
ball Christma i just hard
le He may have to leave
hor efore Christmas Eve and
I eturn until late Christma
Day ind then report to his club

for training cr treatment on Box-
ing Day

There can be no plum pudding

foi in ntil the 90 soccer min-
the game is not held until the
afternoor then his Christmas

dinner is served about five o’clock
Any large-scale celebrations, in-

eluding parties, must take place
well before or after the 25th
The holiday period usually

means three games in. one week
Teams play Christmas Day, Box-
ing Day and the following Sat-
urday. But as Christmas this
year falls on a Thursday the
football League have decided that
clubs shall play only twice in-
stead of three times in_ three
days

Some lucky players will not
have to travel far from home
Manchester United, for instance
will stay in Lancashire by travel-
ling up to Blackpool. They will
return home the same day.

Others not so fortunate such
as Cardiff City and Huddersfield
will hive fourteen or fifteen
hours im the train. So they will
spend nearly two whole days
awa l/l,



Cardiff this Christmas will be
at Newcastle. The Welshmen
will leave home early on Christ-
mas Eve and will be lucky if
they ‘are back before midnight
the following day, Their Christ-
mas dinner will probably be
taken on the train as they pass
through Wolverhampton

Of course there are advantages
to Christmas matches, Attendance
figures are higher than at other
times, At Sheffield last year 61,-
680, compared with an average of
41,000 for the rest of the season,
watched the local derby between



aA:
~

SLR IRDNDE EN DAES TR PA SALON DES UN

1952



We



CHRISTMAS SU PPLEMENT



\ t New-
astle € i to
verage of 49.000, saw the I ted
play Sunderl i ii 4
50,000 é y
Cardiff l Sw €
G t
puble
nd or
Fx
cs ck r he «
1 £2 wi ft i r
ther the ect rse
o additional ese $s
¢ I un I
paid ir i by 1d
4 and l he

Employees of the, JC. must be moved into a vacant
Boomerang Company each year room before another piece can



hold their Christmas Party in bi

the same office (F, in the dia-

gram above),

faced with the problem of mov-
ing the company piavo to that
spot. This necessitates several
changes of furniture about the

matters worse,

and each year are



a ust part



nals refuse to
religious

ist legisla-

ied to enable them
t time he prin-

‘ twelve

Gunter, the}

Port ith full-back,



ted at his own request
t ie which played
l
h S¢ thougt are rare,
football i how busir
i applic
Miu G On



ANT
MTT
W\MN AZ

moved into its place)

How then, with the least|

amount of moving, can the staff
change the places of the

piano

in room C and the bookcase in}
room F? B is the only vacant}

room at the start and the first,

floor. And this year, to make move must be made to it. The
Ima Beaver, who tinal positions of the other pieces

never attends

manded that the bookcase be pu!

the party. has de- of

in office C so that she can use it

Each of the

the company
shown above,
the rooms

contains one large

six rooms which Wo

; a pea
rents connects as 1945",

and each of five of sou

piece of furniture (which, we 4°

must assume,

PURITY
BREAD
,A WINNER EVERYTIME









ray

is so large that it .







Ss} S@AOW JO JaquINU 4seary



furniture do not matter

ajqissod aq Aeur suopnyos
ourid ‘aseoxo0q ‘yauTqeo ‘eqou
yey ‘oueld ‘aqoapaem ‘your
oyood ‘aqoIpaem ‘oury dd Yseyo
JOIpAUM — ‘aEUIHOOG
MIO} 1 UT @aow
WA IO, WOO, OY OF any
JO Sedvid a4} eAOWW ‘UaazUaAag
‘we AlOS







Ee Se REET





QUALITY TELLS
IN EVERY LOAF

PURITY BAKERIES

LIMITED



PAG (DR GART



PAGE SEVENTEEN





| SNS NS NG NS NS A A I NE NZ © VAR 3 ME

hv)
eA Fea Funnies *
as Ww
a i a
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= COLOURED PARCEL
COMICS Kor $1.00

FOR UR ei
CHILDREN Joo. ee

© JOHNSON'S STATIONERY

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aM NG NS Ss NN SE EN NEN

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Cy gee 5 Father ¢ as has lots of
a < f To
For all tne t Girls and
Boy
Gifts 4 for Grownups

res a special one foi

t that’s worth its
» gold

TER’S” ‘Superlative i
’ , or Old



14 Ib. tin only 24 cents
1) Yb. tin only 48 cents

{%
im
\j
\}

There’s Health and Energy

in every Tin. To waste



Grain would be a sin

“PETER’S” COCOA is a
NESTLE’S PRODUCT

xs ou um ks nn SN RAS



saan ways

pees a

5 NG NE NG WA NG NN NW WN NG NNN NN NN WG WS

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ERGOT



PAGE EIGHTEEN CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT PAGE EIGHTEEN

The Racing Year In Barbados—from sau 3 E4’4UVSEBMMEEVMMVUVMMMMY MY
THE PERFECT XMAS GIF1

Prnupal Waght For Age And GRANTS WHISKY

Handicap Races ALWAYS MELLOW... ALWAYS THE SAME
9





n.e'R" “d "4° | ; ke f _
GUTSTANDING HORSE OF THE YEAR Abu AL third, conceding 17 tbs
to the winner. Previous to this,
Abu Ali tad won the A class}
sprint in fine style from Yasm
who it must. be said was saline
half fit, and later went on to take
the Fin al Handicap from a field
of nine with Landmark second
nd Pepper Wine third- Abu Ali
thus lived up to the promise he
had shown in C class earlier in
tt ason |




The Two-year-olds



00-year-old Barbed
vere not a particularl
They we: ne I
tI | R ( 4
APE t
r ple }
I I t e Au
rather ¢
I k tl '
t h [ e-
t a 1 o1
{
eater
i \u
i 1 n
. No
F ¥ ‘ MI
B h
fi I
Fred Beth sf WILLIAM GRANT & SONS LTD DISTILLERS SCOTLAND

at “Available trom all Recognised Dealers”
ee. 4 ee P ihewe> te OA, . tine mun Rane — STOKES & BYNOE LTD. —
tn otek a a a a Fan econ to Apple. Sunt) he SONA NINN NS NS NNN NN NW

Bear after her time du











victory in the Stafford Handicap over 74 furlongs, August Se 1 to Super J the two | guys -
vietory 2 races Lie avon Was th ily vit NG NUNS NU NSW 5 We NS NW NN
i wood, Another of .fetsitm’s ork sa
Vin 3 Seo Herroeween On the third day of the Novem- gen‘y she is out of the et bendae xs Dy yt &
vas i ae form on > ber me ting a mare Pawky ow! ied hy cH LD. | &S 7 &
nd s ed wa iG MONK what Chandler nd, aft : et
her best distance by esi g he y wot by running mentioned horses, might be ct bbs or
whe Bimshbire “Stake on the firs’ away. from his field in the sidered fourth best twe
day over this distan Her stakle A clacs South Cai ibbes an Handi- -old seen: out for th seasien
companion Firelady 43 second cap over nine furlon Landmark The remainder Ippearrad to be

d Castle in the Air thiid was second, conceding 28 lbs. and

ORIENTAL GOODS
DRESS GOODS x
GENTS’ WEAR _ ee

TOYS FOR
KIDDIES ;
COSTUME

JEWELLERY |
Etc., Ete.

Sissies isle tise

oN S

a very poor lot indeed

NENG ABA Ages yess

Ex-soldier
uses Queen’s

yacht design

A doctor’s wife from Wat-
lington, Oxfordshire, has
| won top prize in embroidery
designing for the Coronation.
An invalid ex-gunner from
Forest Gate has been awarded

a consolation prize.

The doctor’s wife, Mrs. O. L.
Truscott, used a lion-and-crown
pattern. The 1914-18 veteran,
Mr. T. W. Rhodes, of Osborne
Road, Forest Gate, used the
Queen’s yacht.

The Embroiderers’ Guild, who
sponsored the competition,
received 73 entries from all
parts of Britain. All were
cushion covers with a Corona-
tion design, and the winning
designs will be used by
embroiderers here and overseas

Blue and white

Mrs. Truscott kept other
embroiderers in mind when
designing her cover. The lion
and-crown pattern can oe
worked in darning or drawn-
fabric stitches by beginners. or
in applique by experts Fora
nursery, it could be worked in
checked gingham

“It 1s a round cushion. so the
design must appear’ correctly
from any angle.” said Mrs
Truscott. “The colours are
pale blue and white with gold
lions. and crowns and jewels
may be added if desired.”
Mrs Truscott teaches embrot
dery to her itocal Women’s
Institute. Runner-up to her in
the competition was Mrs A
Miss Sinclair Satmon, displays Mr. Rhodes’s design ut Smith. of Bearsted neor Mord
finbroiderers’ Guild) Secretary, the Queen's yaeht. stone, Kent. She used tyoe
Commonwealth flowers with
the rose, thistle, ieek and um
rock in her design

Mr Rhodes was ¢t ony
male prize winner—a!' gna
eer _of the Guilds 1509

THESE BARGAIN

se ms NOW! HOUSE
to em Sr "Sei BN BUR BURN RA ENN DN BND DEEN OA DSN ES

\

PA
e

nw
ce i
& :
& 3
om
i
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&
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& ;
(i
&
&
&
cm :
&
& ;
& F
& if

*

CGS 8 0 NN SW NN NN NN
FE PIN DA PAIN TAS AGATA AGAIN: Re



SILK SCARVES —

SHAWLS —White Trimmed with Gold
NYLON HOSIERY

HAND BAGS — All Shades and Shapes
EVENING BAGS

PREDSPREADS



ia
ae
ss

£
‘a

AND

A Full Range of:
UNDERWEAR

BUY

WANA GAIGNE NONE





THE

FX NA SR NNN ENN BAN NN RN NS

xA



SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1952 CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT PAGE NINETEEN j§







er Tee eee NOG NS NS NN NS










































4%
&
x s
3 g -
&
&
&
&
&
&
&
Si
%
&
4 .
tn
cB
ws
we
tage
we
ve
ve
OUR Collection of Books we
is second o none in town a
and we have them to suit all 3
ages and _ tastes, whether am
your hobby is collecting a
stamps or taking pictures. s
The kids will certainly revel pa
in the books you can choose =y
for them in our book shop Ss
both in Broad Street and at Sy
Greystone, Balmoral Gap. =
—
OUR selection of Fountain NOW here is something we are
Pens and Pencils include all sure you have not seen before:
the famous makes such as A nylon bristle brush with a
Parker, Swan, Waterman’s, leather pouch on its back which
Summit Conway Stewart, holds a shaving set and comb, and
Esterbrook, Platignum and its real leather too. We also have
Wyvern. And, of course, the same real leather cases with
what makes a _ better gift manicure sets, wallets, souvenir
than a Fountain Pen and sets and shaving sets.
Pencil Set.
—

OUR Gift boxes of Sta ionery have to be seen to
be really appreciated...There is nothing that
makes a more elegant gift at Christmas time and
of course the boxes outlast the stationery and
therefore make useful items in the house for
many a year.



How about those friends of yours who Are you the photographie or autograph
play card games. Be it Bridge, Canasta, collector? Whichever you are you
or just ordinary Patience we have the will find our Photo Albums and Auto-
cards and the sets to suit them. Our graph Albums are really smart and
Canasta Sets especially are just wha’ attractive. We do not have to tell you
the enthusiast requires and think of the that pictures make the best record of
many happy evenings that you and the life and times of individuals and
your friends can spend together. the many happy hours that can be

spent looking back at old photographs.

et ss eews
1 a ON OR
44 eae ee ee wie

For Ladies only we have the most attractive
compacts in a variety of styles and the ones for
visitors who are resident in the island at this
season will always remind them of their visit
here. For the men our cigarette cases provide
a wide choice in taste

VOCATE





STATIONERY

e

NANA NARA ARAA AS

>
Ai Bi DDN NNN NN SH BA DW ON BNR EN DN BOT EN AL NTATDN A DNDN PHIM DN TN DSDNA ZN TA GNA GR ON TAN SA ATA TANT





PAGE TWENTY CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT SUNDAY DECEMBER 1H, 1952



LLELIE LE LE LE LLL ELE LE IIE ELE LE 1

ay

b THE ADVOCATE
© XMAS NUMBE
COMPETITION

Win a Wines.



15 lb. Turkey and your favouri

Se ed

q This year our competition takes the fo1 reasure

clues to be hunted for in each advertisement is a “Hunt” for w«
phrases, pictures of things incorporated in each of the 59 advei
in this number

n of a T

This

<

rds

tisement

at

}



The Treasure comprises once again a lovely 15 lb. Turkey, a bottle
of Dry Monopole Champagne, a bottle of Sherry, a bottle cf Gold Braid fr
Rum, a bottle of Hennessey’s Brandy and a bottle Alleyne & Arthur's 1
Special.
Here are the rules of the competition
(1) Each verse has in it separate words, phrases or references to ; a im
pictures appearing in each advertisement ” Rn et cee eee Wie Od -And>Ahede - aelicipi
os. A . The millions that bu t, by them tempting and sweet,
(2) These clues should lead you te the advertisement to which each we are told There's nothing to beat them
" . } an “ . - . 52. Carpenters’ tool sets, trains for the Quality Street
particular verse applies. The correct answer to each verse will ny.
therefore be either the name of the firm in the advertisement or PGS toe a ee ee TY Panne, egret (oh nae tae
the name of the brand or make of the goods advertised 33. Now turn your attention to things Go straight down the broadv
(3) Only one answer will be found in each advertisement and there- prote’ nent petuetiaie fetes teal. CoV GaR Te eRe ohn coat aa
: ‘ : will come ight tward bound
fore all the advertisements appearing in this issue must be con- 54; Mere we heave Ridden values én rnese’ ilk sult: \overy: “tant
a a give them to you 0 i this the last clue > we
(4) The first correct solution to all 59 clues opened by the Advertising 35. We turn now to history, just studs ow ae
this pag We pray pou don't f o win the
Manager of the Barbados Advocate will be the winner of the iin naw anh: cepeimabls: “hk tane al aise toa,
competition.
(5) In the event of no completely correct solution being opened the ENTRY FORM
highest number of correct answers first opened will receive the (Cutout dad. A ao
prize.
(6) The competition closes December 23rd, at 4 p.m.
_ : : MEADE ia baie Giria eaaareeey PEIN Orta Hes
(7) Each entry must be accompanied by the coupon printed below. ss
(8) No entry without a coupon will be accepted. ADDRESS nese esse teen ee eees z
Here is an example to go by: Let us suppose that the clue was:— I agree to abide by the decision of the Editor and Adver- c .
. “It’s cooling, refreshing, just like a breeze, tising Manager er the Barbados A lvocati it
And so you can use it, as much as you please.” Phone: number (business and/or home)
J , 3 .

The answer would be Limacol from this advertisement. This example

does not however exclude the Limacol advertisement in this issue from

(Sign here) |
the campetition.









BENE NENG NONE N NENA:
Stairt 27. Here's a small problem, easily done NENG SE NENG nee ae
Here's your Turkey, go right It's @ hussy, a traveller, a peach, Sy
through all in one Law:
All the clues--its up to you. The heght of good quality mere
Clues. so you'll find
Softened with year famed for its
1 A Merry

Xmas with all its cheer,

king
Brighten up for it, because its here. °9 The Star of the Bast, the gifts that

NTRS TRINNY.




















































2. Santa smiles within the globe, it brought,
Doubtless dressed in his red robe The colour, the splendour that from
3. There they gaze at all the tays, them was wrought
Great delight for girls and boys 20 Santa indulges in all kinds of sport
4. They come first, they're always But as a Bronco Buster he might
come to nought vee
year, they really should at And now Time s fleeting > gee -
Ss s Gifts various and wide, on your way ae:
Tonics too, inspect and decide Craftsmanship a. ° « a
6. Plenty of music, you will agreé pleasure to-da eee
Choose for yourself and don't blame 32 § So charming, so he ’pful, he makes we
me ov feel glac te
7. /Two thousand delights for the k@ls There's always variety, and good —
aes to be haa A
To keep ther quiet give them more » for a K#ig, maybe for a a
8. Now that € travel here and B ea
there delicious, its here to ‘be ae
You need some comfort what you ee oe ened Ins pr n ; : , ; a4 eA" wT
wear + Pemember the present you give to L timed him seve és with my Pierce Chronograph ae
9. Here's a gift wortl weight in the car . oe
gold, It x t have’ protect on to. carry Wy Watch, surely one of the sportsman’s best ia.
For every person young and old ou far io
10. Nothing to rust or break or mend Opportunity knocks © open the!3 e =,
Comfort, work-saving, a real good door, ‘ BY UR OG ies wth ccsenice :
friend . You too be a wi with quality we:
11. Holly and Bells bring Xmas cheer, pure i , , 7 é wa sea g , . 4
Now and all through the coming 26. A real good spree, shake it and T. GALE—In the ‘Sunday Advocate’ Olympic Sto &
svear turn it, ‘
12. Plenty to choose from, not a grouse, Xmas cheer, laugh, joke nd burn &
Gifts galore for all through the it ‘
aa Zz
13. Me ody rings by candlelight, Loac ot varety, presents galore, pon
Listen, enjoy it for a Xmas bright. s > in Preat comfort st this fam- / { 2
ia, pibiom sptey Ht for a ras beignt. We have Watches by af! the best
be, t ‘ " € oar. 4}
For look through the window end , yet it a gninet hu ' | th Id
what do you see ? » odds Howm maxers dai over wor i
15. Delicious, delightful for Xmas Eve, w We rful, magical qua gift, ec 9 -
Rich .n flavour you must believe With two or wit t will give
16. Santa’s not very far, so hurry and ou a hift. . ° oe
wnta’s je Se ae For Ladies a variety of styles that &
Of what you will order to eat or t z
drink, ‘ ah @ bug in a ig may be é 7
1h Paechietn: hen Sinad,. fn diecent mia hae are enchanting. For men whatever
wa's, ‘ is the sportsman, timed to the ~
Three of the choisest, not any ene 3
more days B «© marvel of Workmanship, a very
a i tyt ane ieieeuk: they require whether for every-day
and each bey, Royal, majestic, man: times first,
Don’t sit and be muddled, just give You stand out distinctively, and we é l a ‘ 4 a
them a toy have a thirst. ; use for spe mi
19. There's Xmas tradition, we all know 4: Len ely sparkling, delightful and r 7 cla precision tt ng in
whit, amt ‘
A grand cid cuvtom, but make it jerful gifts, so Atting and right hairy ‘ :
A ke . sho: Kank aed tite bene’ a their work or for sporting events.
10. Gifts fom the young, gifts for the land of the Scot,
old, A perfect and maryellous g ft have ¢ '
Toys, games and tea-gets, ai there we got. Su > c
oe he nd wo ibis ee uadisinn Peer eu the ch names as Gruen, Omega, Cyma,
a Unique in its tread, the latest and oaue of that ner
best Tr e's plenty to choose from, for . ! 4
ie nivde*oeu Did caniidrh that’s kat ice aan Pierce, Uno, Lanco. Osco and Mercury.
really the test a < or the Iacies, the» children,
32. A smiling rosy face you wear, ‘ s
it’s geod to watch you drinking y ust pay ¢ sit and buy ,at
here. .
23. Numerous and colourful, which wil) i7, & basket and bide
puit you” .
Any choice make, we'll do the Job, i needed for tha’ 7. De LIMA
too. ‘
°4. The best of all values, and on you 4 wt you, with gifts
may &0, a ae ’
More power and space, as you very You prublems are ever, you'll sleep r
well know a Weld Senight. a>. e
25. Style, wear and quality, plenty of 49. Vou fina reading and writing, an@
hohe playinw and art,
ease, 4 .
Lae R oblem, and yeu if A @@ikect on of articles, won't you re ,
It “solves, the ps iirc on of waticte : Your Jewellers 0- Broad St.
ye. Now let e French language 86. Your feasting and cheering with
own stor fT, ’ " ‘ auikies Maile Daniony ditesiiiitetitsiieiced deihah ahh Saini dininabidhy bitte aiteab thione,
r 4 tik tay 5 nah ow i vas iss pr AO TN a se tas ga ao 9 ¢
eens well ‘ NPR BRGY ied Makes 29 GNARL MNES

’

e





.
‘







SUNDAY DECEMBER



cers A ROYAL JELLY-BAG HAT TURNS UP
axcre’” AMONG

Is It REALLY Best To |
Follow William 1V?

By Roger Fulford | once reminded us, “You always

IN the preparation for the
Coronation the centre of interest
at this moment is the temporary

annexe to the Abbey This will
be attached to the west door A
mode! of the structure has been

proudly displayed by Mr David
Eccles, the Minister of Works;
the cost of it (£650,000) ha
roused the ire of a Socialist M.P
The annexe is useful—and, if
we are to believe Mr Eccles
essential, Here will be piaced
the retiring rooms for the chief
personalities in the procession
and an opportunity for quiet after
the buffeting journey in coach or
earriage—often a less easy ride
than
main purpose of the building is
tc give space wh@ge the various
processions can be grouped in
order, out of sight from the con-
gregation in the Abbey.

Five So Far

While the usefulness of the
annexe cannot be denied, its
beauty is more open to question.
Only five have been built—the
first dates back to 1831 when
William IV was crowned.

They have all heen semi-
ecclesiastical in appearance with
a heavy preponderance of Gothic
For Q@veen Victoria the annexe
was adorned with some very ugly
and uncomfortable Gothic oak
furniture,

For King Edward VII a_ few
suits of armour were introduced,
and tastefully posted against the
walls, bringing in a fain atmos-
phere of jousts, challenges and
tourneys. For King George V
the annexe was in the Tudor
style, hung with stamped leather,
and the armour was supplement-
ed with such weapons of war as
swords pikes and halberds.

Festival Style

At the tast Coronation the
annexe was simpler, and the
model for next year might be
described as in Festival of
Britain style. A ribald clergy-
man onee said that the ——
Pavilion made him think that
Paul's had gone down to the
and pupped, Some might be ex-
cused for thinking that the
ghosts of the South Bank build-
ings were now about to do the
same thing in Broad Sanctuary,

Governments and Ministers
need watching in these matters,
though we have fortunately pro-
gressed since the days when the
Government called in an under-
taker to decorate the Abbey for
Queen Victoria’s Golden Jubilee



14, 1952 CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT



the spectators suppose. The :

PAGE TWENTY-ONE

SS BS SNS NN NNN NN NENG NN NS NSH

om
DON'T FORGET TO &
REMEMBER e
5S

&K

&



ALL THE SHOWPIECE TIARAS 2
By ANNE EDWARDS 2
2

HE most striking new
& fashion note at yesterday's
royal dress show was not in
the show at all. Tt was set
by the Royah Family
For the Queen and Princes
Margaret both turned up

ALLEYNE ARTHUR'S
RUM

So Smooth! —_

NARG

velyel coa
Tne Queen wore the dark ¢
velvet one she bought for
Canadian tour, with 4 bro
sequinned hat. Prince
Margaret wore a wine-red ve}
coat with one of the new fells
bag hats in blue velvet

The show itself was clearly 4
queenly oc on rhe modes
wore tiaras; the dr *s
magnificent; the pr s
high. And if none of the gown
Was new enough to set a fashion
at least they saved the Queen
a shopping tour.

PRICE: £200

For here, in u specially decked-out
room at Claridge’s, was the work
of the 11 top London designers
Forty-five mannequins displuves
56 different dresses in a price
range between £100 and £200

PICTURED on the left are two
ball dresses by Michael Sherard
Embroidered water-green rayor
satin, with huge wisterla ana
lilac satin stole; and cream
coloured pure silk duchesse satin
with pleated bodice and two
sweeping panels of pleats.

INSET; Princess; jelly-bag hat

TV FOOTNOTE ; The dress show
was repeated for TV last night
The mannequins were apparently
photographed from above and
the cameras fore-shortened the
slenderest girls in London into
squat little women. Considering
the dresses appeared to b
modelled by mid h cd
not show up !

London Bourens Seiviiw

» Mellow! A








SUNN ERNST

















CHRISTMAS
COCKTAILS
AND THE
? BEST COCKTAILS
CALI FOR
BURNETT'S
GIN

Sa



want to water down the views of



H Jason Jones & Co Ltd.

CORRE STRONELSE SR SE NALS SS NASHEED

experts “with a strong admixtur
i Lo working n the Bx nmon sense sig wre
polished oak he decided i to WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED i
giv the Coronation Chair a lick ~ol,.E8 was a
varnish, RN ae ti GNINGS INNA DN
























PS WA WE WB NE SANG SINIGNERIGNE

i NBM era XS ge Ie.
A Precedent am NOON 2 OOS 6 &
hatever the public may | am bf
feel about the seemliness of the = Her
the question remains | gy ao
really necessary ma: ee
I umending it to the public | i
Ir es said that he was ' or
following the precedent of Wil- You'll rope in all the . hon
lia IV’s Coronation, He is like Gifts you're looking for pa”
Lord Melbourne (though not still! ; BOYS TOOL KITS =
perhaps quite such a man of the . ; d : 5 Wiis a8
world) who when discussing the Mavhe a few extras j . dandy size to %G
ation with Queen Victoria © fill the stocking - work with indoors x
\ ed to say ‘Best to teat : ~ we

at -apacity! or out $3.54 ;
follow William Iv.” eee ch
But perhaps neither Melbourne <
nor Mr. Eccles has studied oa
William IV’s ideas on corona- MECHANICAL DOLLS s
tions with quite the care they ber
mapscr a brother to wx
William IV was a strange and sister gift for $ ws
unconventional character who te
wished to abolish coronation ew.
altogether. He consulted the %

iS

leading lawyers of the time

en
whether he could do without a if.
coronation on the ground that it Z

q

was “a useless and_ ill-timed
expense.”

= go:
2

SRTNE

Bishop's Kisses

When he was told that it was}
a necessity, he cut the ceremonial |
o the minimum, He particularly
objected to being kissed by the
bishop on performing their |
homage When he was told that
the Conservative peers would
boycott the ceremony unless he
agreed to this, he simply said:
“I enticipate from that greater |
convenience of room and less
heat.”’

The total cost for the corona-
tion of King William IV was
£40,000— £10,000 less than we
are spending on the annexe. in
195. Wits called it at the time
Half-Crownation

As We Were
When William IV deleted |

(FUN





ceremonies in the Hall, this part
went likewise, and the annexe—
a decidedly shoddy substitute for
the splendours of Westminster
Hall—came into being. There
would seem to be a case for
economising on the annexe and/
reverting to the processional |
arrangements which existed be-!
fore “the Half-Crownation.”
Expense and the fatigue to the
Queen should be the governing
factors. No doubt the cre
will have much to say against it,
but, as a great Prime nines Sl





PAGE TWENTY-TWO



CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT



SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1952




The Christmas Tree That Sang [7

Far north of the tropics, Christ-
mas trees are real trees that sume-
times grow in the’ gardens
homes in towns and village:
in the wide open spaces. They
are often called Fir trees. In the
month of December, mary fami-
lies who have no young Fir trees

of

anu

in their garden, go out into the
country to find a tree that is
young and straight with strong

branches to take the weight of
Christmas presents. Some trees are
too tall to be taken inside the
house and if they’re in the gar-
den, they’re decorated with twink-
ling, coloured lights—just to show
that they are not ordinary trees,
but real Christmas trees,

This story is about a Fir tree
that was one of a group of trees
that grew close together making

and too heavy to be taken away
and they were just left to grow.
No one from the new town that
was growing up nearby ever
thought of going into the woods
at Christmas to see if there were
any young trees hidden in the
depths. And if they had, they
would have scoffed at the little,
ragged Fir tree that Ricky and
Janet found the day they went
for a summer picnic, They told
their parents about the funny lit-
tle tree and their daddy walked
over and looked at it.

“It has not had very much sun
and perhaps something has eaten
into the roots,” he said. “Anyway,
we'll dig it up and make room for
it in our garden. Maybe it will
be strong enough this year to
be your first real Christmas tree.”

So that’s what they did. Ricky,
who was seven, helped to dig up
the little tree, and Janet, who
was five, carried it gently wita her
mummy, out of the deep woods
and down the road to the garden
of their new home.

Sure enough, with careful look-
ing after and all sorts of things
put into the soil round the roots
Ricky said it was like giving it
a daily dose of medicine—the tree
began to grow and look less rag-
ged. Daddy said they would reed
to put it in a big pot before
Christmas or maybe the winter
cold would make the ground too
hard for them to lift it out.

They continued to fuss and take
care of their little tree—just like
an old woman with her hens, dad-
dy said, Then December came and
to Ricky and Janet that could
mean only one thing—Christmas'

“Oh, daddy, let’s bring the tree
into the house now,” they called.
“Mummy, have you’ mad a
place for it in the living-room?”
Tt seemed to Ricky and J
ter the longe ime they }







known, the tree 1
was carefull on md in
the corner 3}








By William Forres Stewart

ren danced and clapped their
hands for this was the first time
they had ever known a real, live
Christmas tree in their home.

“Do you think it will be strong
enough to carry all our presents?”
asked Ricky, doubtfully. All at
once he had a great fear that his





train-set from Santa would be too
heavy. “And my pram, mummy—
will it be too big for the tree?”
Janet ran to her mother with anx-

ious eyes.
The two children were told that
Santa would leave the. heavy

toys at the foot of the tree and
just put the light parcels on the

SGN NG NG NG GN NG GN NNN NN NWN WN NN

a green forest, They were too tall ,?



’ Here are

%

Ta

+ tS see

CG



Meat abs



AO Oa EO EE ee FO eer



2 wonderful Gifts

for Xmas and throughout
the coming Year

A re, rigerator bottle full of
ebimacol + the favourite
toilet lotion of the Caribbean

branches. The days before Christ-
mas were mostly taken up with
making sparkling decorations to
give the green coat of their Fir
tree a covering that looked like
snow to match the heavy white
blanket that had blown across
their garden. They Were glad that
the little tree was not exposed
to the cold outside. But they were
glad to see the snow; for in this
country where Santa comes on .a
sleigh, there would have been
nothing for the long steel runners
to slide across—and then, terrible

thought, he might have had to
postpone his trip till the New
Year!

The night before Christmas

was the most exciting night the
children had ever known. They



had a hard time eating their tea
and a much harder time eating
their supper. They could not keep
their eyes away from the little
tree—once so bent and ragged,
now so straight and proud of its
coloured balls and bells and
tinsel. And very, very proud, the
children thought, of the thick
otton-wool snow on its branches

n und the foot of its slim

em, made it just as white
the tree outside—but not
early » cold!

Just before they went up to
bed and after they had sent off
Y last note “just in case he

uld forget” to Santa, Ricky

Jar stood before their tree









i hining eyes. “Wouldn’t it
e been an awful thing if we
adi found our tree.” ticky
id to his mother . . . He shivered,
“It would still be hidden in the
fore and then we would have
had to ask Santa to put our par-
cels beside our stockings—just

like we used to do.”

Janet said, “Is it all ready now,
mummy? Is it all ready for
Christmas Day?”
down at
They
quite

looked
and smiled.
was quite,
moment, Ricky
turning for a
tree. His brow

Both
their

parents
children
the tree
For a
behind,
at the



look

last ,
was puckered and he was think-
ing. His mother caught the look
and smiled at daddy: “You know,
don’t you, what it is that Ricky’s
trying to remember?”

His daddy said, “Yes, I know.
He will find it in the right place
in the morning!”

Of course the children had no
idea of what it was their parents
were talking about, They began
their prayers and tried to re-
member to pray for all the child-

fwo











ren

that would not be geiting
the wonderful presents they would
be getting—“But why, mummy,
why doesn’t Santa go to every
little boy and girl?’ — and if
Ricky got mixed up with his
prayers and railways and the
Christmas tree and Christmas eve,
and if Janet fell asleep before
she had properly started, then
there were a lot of children like

Ricky and Janet all over the
world, doing the same... .

It seemed to Ricky that the
sweet music he heard came into

his sleep and he raised his head.
He called very softly to his sister
and they both sat up and listened,
It’s

“Why! coming from our
Christmas tree!” Ricky whis-
pered. They heard a choir that

sounded like angels’ voices, sing-
ing all the carols that the child-

ren had learned at school and
sung at home. “Come on!’ said
Ricky, quickly. “Let’s go down-

NG ENE ES HS

arpne noon Shen. ees
s tairs.”’
ried to
room

Hand in hand, they hur-
the door of the living-
where they could hear
‘Hark the Herald Angels Sing’
and as they looked inside, their
eyes grew big and round with
the wonder of what they saw.

They could not see the coloured
balls and decorations on the
tree; there was just*a silver mist
where once there had been the
eotton-wool snow. And rising
straight up out of the mist was
the top of their tree—and on the
very top of that, so that it look-
ed to Ricky and Janet as if it
floated, was a silver Star.

“Look, Janet, it’s the Star—
that’s what I was trying to re-
member to-night!” As they
watched and listened, there came
the glad singing of ‘Noel,’ and
bathed in the light of the moon,
the children sang and sang and
lifted their faces to the brilliance

@ On page 24

GNIS NN NNN DEN ON TN AN AANA A AANA AAS

RANG



&



SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1952 CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT PAGE TWENTY-THREE











White Lady |

And his wife? America’s firs
1





iy-elect said reAcently “I
used to life in a gold-fish Ca SD, OWE “But the
bowl She fits the pattern, OM, dll 1 wobery

says EVE PERRICK en














“Im a hometown . girl,” iy
Mamie Eisenhower umming up

all the q ities which Americar For dov om
men believe they want Americ fort anc and « atirely la
women to have work ‘ there's ie entirely lac ngi

But the English idea of a typical | nothing to teuch a “PUNLOPILLO.:
American woman pictures some- DUNLOPILLO mat a
ne quite different Someone ex- tress mngdan fi )
pensively elegant mooth, an fe *
ophisticated—with a bright line f “Well, won't DUNLOPILLO =<

ss Ss eC 5 7? ?
in slick speech d ase 4 soon sag— and perish Wy 4/

We're wrong, you know Look | You may be right, But t € in a few years, possibly ?”
at the line-up for America’s I'm suve rubber isn't Ne 4\ ‘ : < ’
First Ladie the consorts of the healthy.” , > x
latest and last three Presidents. | j ty
They are pictured below in date | LN
order | é 4 “Just the opposite, mada!

1.—Mrs, Herbert Hoover—social | lve used a DUNLOPILLG
worker with the homely look. | *) “Isn't healthy, madam? at home for nearly 20

2.—Mrs. F. D. Roosevelt—in- | “4 t@ Nearly every hospital years and it’s still as
ternational public figure with the | ¢ “vses DUNLOPILLO, shapely and re~
home look which is made from silient as ever ¢é

3.—Mrs, Harry 8S. Truman—the latex foam—and has t
woman from Missouri with the very little in common v \
homely, look, with ordinary cubber!" am : LAY

Mamie Eisenhower will fit in all | 6 Wag age the Fe a
. “ \ CL work-saving points?
right when she changes her ad- ee \
dress to the White House in & J bat
January —L.E.S. | “In what way ~ ’ ‘

; \ aif 2 v
ts it different?” A ny

“No turning or re
or airmg Ni t cre
ated, Nothing to rust or

Clock Stopper

ANSWER in one minute







{
MARBGAREE LOCK WOOD and her You are visiting Aunt Matilda {| break or mend.”
‘ eas binge poew, cueke new party who has purchased one of those ,
rocks, rgaret origina wore a gown modernistic clocks without fig- | Lie ‘It's entirely porous
Ree es Sree Tete cates er per new ures—there are big dots in place | Je for one thing...made
it copied in ince lace over black taffeta; the neckline is of the usual hour symbols and | , UP of millions of tiny % DUNLOPILLO aattresses
picked out in jet and crystal beading. ‘Toots’s frock is in check lines to indicate quarter and | air cells which ‘breathe have every advantage and no disad-
Patterned white lace over white taffeta, and she wears a half hours. } with every movement of vantage. Waite for Ulustrated leaflet,
ribbon hairband,. EYE-NOTE: Margaret Lockwood wears ne You've had a pleasant visit, | the body. So it’s coal or call at:
masoara on her top lashes; makes up the lower ones only. and time has slipped by fast. | in hot weather and temperate in DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING
Suddenly, you realize with a start | cold. It’s hygienic and germ-reaia- CO, LTD,





that it seems to be ten to one ting. It’s damp-resiatant...” Local Distributors
Then you become aware that
you’re looking into a big mirro:

at the reflection of the clock face. |
What time is it Sener” o ECKSTEIN BROS. — Bay STREET — DISTRIBUTORS.

‘uaAela Jalse

| mmmanee 2 NS NENG SNE VSN NNN NONSENSE NENG

&
&
—
; &
&
&

ro HRISTMAS



100m







h



SPOT



NENENENENE

HOCK section, 10 (c6aM, Om ade aul it that has been observed
TOU rs t el ire adé u

, ed cord y; the skirt ts i
a a oe 4 for many years, and that

660 Years Ahead




es ; still continues to the pres-
fj) ent day—
A GRAND OLD CUSTOM

TURKEY «xo HAM

AND |
Baer

DRY
MONOPOLE

CHAMPAGNE

a “THE CHAMPAGNE YOUR
GUEST WILL PREFER”



ee

duke C



SINGAPORE authorities are expected to take a hand in correcting
the birth certificate of ten-year-old John Morris, of Blackpool. Ac-
cording to his certificate, he is living 660 years in the future.

For whén John was born a prisoner in Changi Jail, Singapore in
1942, the Japanese official made out the certificate in terms of the
Japanese calendar and dated it “June 3, 2602”,

Now his mother, Mrs. Maryse Bradley—she has’ remarried since—
wants the date rectified. But it may not be so simple. Somerset House
officials in London cannot help. Singapore has its own registration
laws, and Mrs, Bradley is understood to be applying to the authori-
ties there.

ra

Ke



PAGE TWENTY-FOUR







Enough to tempt a saint—

























even Santa!

Mackinloshs
‘Quality Street

e£ce

A DELICIOUS ASSORTMENT OF TOFFEES & CHOCOLATES



%

Genuine dia-
monds for 'teen-
agers. ‘




NG NG NN NE NE EDK DE DEN DES NN NE NS NNN





Genuine leather
fitted travel kit

HLTH ULL

peorls dou. alll

ble strand,




=I

For the Gifts you give
with Pride, let

ALFONSO

be your guide.



NDI ILD NNN RIES 6 0%"

From ALFONSO B. de LIMA
SU/LVNNINUIUULIVANGVOOLVAALUAOULSUAOULLAOULLUULNAL










CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT



SUNDAY



DECEMBER 14, 1952





Mrs. Kirk Takes The Hairpins Off




































| Mrs. Kirk, from Erie, Pensyl- GEORGE MALCOLN THOMSON stayed at our receptign,,..our
}vania, went to Moscow (1949) : = _ watches were synchronised.”
determined to keep her eyes © yet Oh. yes,” was the SRSWES _ Was the gesture observed? Mrs
open, her powers of criticism un- wa hope one day $0. gO abroad. Kirk doubts it: “the Soviet heads
impaired, and her spirit high, as That would be int resting anc were well down in the troughs
became the wife. of the new /@ptul It would,, indeed,” 1e- But her Jast thought was one of
American Ambassador, ‘Admiral Ped Mrs. Kirk. | a sisterly solitude: “Poor ‘Madame
Now she has written a To hear a Russian criticising Gromyko must be feeling very
lied Postmarked WV yw, American buildings it had been tired this morning.”
from letter too much From such glided scenes Mrs.
in America Now Russian buildings .... ON Kirk turns to domestie © details:
inger Kirks, Marion, this topic Mrs. Kirk could write the deep-freeze ¢abinets in the
nd Rog can_ never ? ume, and Vvé nearly does American Fimbassy, out of order
bted that Moscow had 0: The dirt and down-at-heel~ after a single year (“there seems
put ne edge on their mother’s "ess; the slipshod way in which to be no conception of mai n-«
nati satire they are put up, 01 to fall dow gice the difficulties of buying
gain; their perpe > flow in Moscow; the problem
At t a um Vishin the destructive of Russian servants.
("I reall liked her d fou pair gangs ‘
her pitiful with her hair dyed Climax of these horrors is the “The Br'tish Counsellors wife
that curi mahogany affect overcrowding, Mrs Kirk is tells me taat she hag lost four
| by elder! European actresses”) baffled because, “there do not maids this year, the Luxembourg
Mme. Gusev (wife of the former appear to be great epidemics of Minister’s wife, two....No hot
;}Soviet Ambassador to Britain) disease,” water. The furnace man was
criticised American buildings For, with “socialised medicine home, drunk....The British are
| “so plain like large boxes” - to to the ninth degree,’ equipment down tn a second-rate lot (of
|} Mrs. Kirk in the best hospitals is “like that servants), except for their Bel-
|} Mrs. Kirk, who had used up of a second-class English nursing giem cook, who goes to bed with
jall her kindness on Mme Vis- home.” Could condemnation go a bottle of cognac to console
hinsky, contented herself by further? himselt for having come to Mos-
| noticing that Mme. Gusev, in a : cow.. .The Egyptian Minister is
monstrous hat of cabbage foses, _ Yet, in spite of it all, the going his own cooking.”
looked like a provincial ladwv at- Russians fail obstinately to die Where do all the servants go?
tending her son’s~ wecding and like dies. Mrs. Kirk gives it uP: To Siberia, if they are unlucky.
that she ate pastries, “extending “They are — they must be — a

her little finger in the most re-
fined possible way.

As she was leaving Mrs, Kirk
took occasion to ask Mme Vis-
hinsky interpreter if she
had learned her English in Mos-

young

, m my

Vivat













SEVEN
DIAMOND
CLUSTER
RING




Gi DEGRA DNTN NNN AN NNN












\

FAMOUS
MAKE ©
COMPACTS










LHARARARN RAR

AAA

GOLD
DIAMOND
cross

A

A! AGE








tough people.”

Mrs. Kirk was equally observ-
int when she comes to describe a
diplomatic reception

“The hordes had fallen on the
upper _ tables. I took off my
diamond ear-rings and-put them
bag — no us
thing in that mob. There was a
tap on my shoulder and a cordial
sreeting Mme Gromyko”
whom Mrs. Kirk had met a year
before “in a plum silk dress
sminiscent in style and cut of
my Great Aunt Fanny who died
in 1920

From Mme. Gromyko, Mrs.
Kirk’s eyes passes on to take in
Marshall Budenny “tossing down
glass after glass.” But it is time
for the American contingent ta
quit the reception, “Dad” (Ad-
miral Kirk) “had told us we were
all to leave after 45 minutes, the
same length of time the Soviets



@ From Page 22

of the Star above their Christmas
Tree—for this was Christmas
Morning, the Birthday of the
| Children’s King.

When Ricky and Janet woke
up the sun was still low in the
sky. “It’s Christmas !” they cried.
“Christmas! Christmas! Merry
Christmas! Quickly they looked
into two bulging stockings. Paper
jand string flew across their beds

| —“Ohhh—” there were breath-
less gasps. “Look Ricky!” and
|“‘Look at this; Janet, gee!”

| Then: “Let’s get mummy and
| daddy and go down to the Tree!”
|The two children rushed from
|their room, “Come on!” they

losing any- i



The Christmas Tree That Sang

The cook at the Norwegian
Embassy, told by the authorities
«he must no longer work for for-
e{gners, packed her bags and left
for Siberia on her own account.
‘Volurttary emigration entitles
the individual to keep his or her
assport.”’
To escape from the servants
ind the Sanitation and the
speeches at Communist Party
rallies (America attacked 25
times Britain, 2) Mrs. Kirk
would, from time to time, jeave
Moscow on one of the four roads
permitted to diplomats (48 hours’
notice necessary).

Once she
Leningrad:

ventured as far as
room (dirty) and
bath (no hot water), 54 dollars
for the afterncon. It was more
than she could bear “I got into
the train and went to sleep ex-~
hausted by sheer rage.”

World Copyright reserved

and daddy!” They rushed into
the hall and downstairs where
they opened the door into the

living-room, In the corner stood
the Christmas Tree, straight and
beautiful with red and gold and
blue and green balls and bells on
cotton-wool snow and glittering
with tinsel and all round the foot
were brightly coloured parcels.
Two of them were very big par-
cels.

But it was the silver Star, high
on the top of their Christmas
Tree that the children saw first;
and remembering, they stopped,
and for a brief moment, listened
, Then, because they were
children, they reached out with
whoops of delight for the
treasures in store.

aaa aaa a aa

| called “Merry Christmas, mummy
Lg

|

}

|














H. JASON JONES &



. She wanted

MORE EGGS
So she

decided on

PURINA






CO. LTD.—Distributors.

ee ee a ee eas



SUNDAY,

DECEMBER 14,

1952



_A True Story

The Ghosts Of Goldings

MAS TIME is one of the seas-
ons of the year when stories
of the curious and inexplicable
excite and interest the small ma-
jority who like these sort of |
things One "joins a circle of
friends who have gathered
gether at the far end of the
randah, just as someone is say-
ing, “But you can’t ilwe
explain these things away. They
just happen, and there you are.”
I happened to do just such a
thing, and when I could get a
word in edgeways, I said, “Let
me tell you of some of my ex-
periences.” So I began:
These things pertaining to
occult, do not happen only at
Xmas time, but all through the
year, at ahy time and in_ any
place, mostly in old places.
Goldings was one of these old
houses. When we bought the
place we knew it had a reputa-
tion for being haunted. It was a
very large old rambling house,
and we understood that it was
onee a two-storey dwelling, the
top floor of which had been
blown off in the hurricane of
1831. (Once when we were hav-
ing some repairs done, we came
across an old window blocked up
inside a wall with the date 1767,
I'm not quite sure, above the
arch of the window), It had two
large front rooms, dining and
drawing room, with a wide hall-
way dividing the two, which ran
the length of the rooms, from the
front door to the opposite end.
This other end opened with a
door on to a porch, which over-
looked the tennis lawn, and had
a view of the undulating country
beyond. It was a lovely view,
unspoiled by houses, with just
the single-track railway line
running in the mid-distance.

ve- ©





Most of our fam-
ily did not believe
in anything super-
stitious, but I must
confess that I had a

(J slight leaning that
way. However it did
not make me _ un-

y happy nor worried,
I loved the old

place. But many in-

explicable things

dig happen, and on

the very first day of

out moving in too.

At about noon, | was coming
up the tong drive, which swept
round the front of the house and
then away to the back. As I
passed the windows of the break-
fast-room, I looked up and Vv
an old black maid standing at the



window. She was dressed in
black, white apron and one of
those old-fashioned “tom-tit”



caps with streamers was perched
on top of her head, She looked
very grave and sad. Although
puzzled, I thought of an old serv-

ant I haq had formerly, and
whén I got inside [ asked my
nurse if Walcott had come to

help us move in.

*Â¥ SS SS

“No, madam She isn’t here,
only. cook and me,” she replied.

We searched everywhere, but
no one ever saw her again

Well, we settled in to spend
many a long year at Goldings.

One night, or rather about 3 a.m.,
we awoke to hear a sound as if
someone W sawing wood out in
the stables. -My husband got up,
and with the two boys, went out
to investigai®. When they enter-
ed the loose boxes, they saw ane
of the horses, a_ highly-strung
filly, in a sweat and shivering



from head to foot The scund
had stopped, but as they return-
ed to the house, it started again
This went on for an hour or
more. The next morning a
thorough search Was made, but
no tree grew near-enough to the
stables, so that a braneh could
grate on the roof. We learnt
afterwards that in those very

stables. a by-gone gentleman hal
a workroom there, He wus very
fond of making furniture, which
was his favourite hobby.

Another experience was on one
early evening, just after dusk. I
was citting on the long front
verandah about six feet from the





entrance, when I heard light
footsteps coming quickly up the
front Ds I w screened from
view by a thick vine, so could
only ir then The footsteps

passed along the other end and
entered a side door, and contin-
ued inside right along the passage,

to a bedroom door, Thinking it
was neighbouring friend, I
called out to say where I was.
The footsteps turned passed

however.
the

longer,
“She
she?” I

in that old place.

By Francis Milner

ack
and
to- it
ifter
and
the
ren
footsteps only
the
thought

and
stopped
happened

down the
Nothing
again
to old nurs
she was
same
were

front steps
more, But
some time
We were out
keeping watch in
plaee, while the child-
asleep. This time the
ame to the top of
steps and stopped, Nurse
she saw a faint figure,
standing quite still, but that was
all. There was sequel to this,
About two hours after

message came ‘to our maid,

sleeping in the servant’s quarters,
saying to
father had

come

at once
passed away.

S

At the time — now tell about,

as her

we had a dear old cook, who had
been with us 4
came to

long time. She
me one day and said,
I can’t stay here any

She won't let me.”
won't let you? Who is

1

svery night down-

‘Missis,





as
‘Well, mum,

stairs, as I is closing the kitchen
door, she does
white arm
and does wave
“But do you ever see who it is?”
“No, mum.
And that was that,

put out she long
from de udder side
me way

But I ain’t staying.”
We had an interesting time
The ghosts of

the past, those gentry of by-gone
days, resented us in some way

same

CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT

\

|
|
there. It transpired that a former |
occupant of the house had used,
this room as his private den, and
would never brook any interfer-
ence therein. Maybe he was the
gentleman of the stable
work-room,

Ss Sy

We sold Goldings several years
ago, but I still think of the old
lacé and the lovely Xmases we
spent there, besides all the other
happy days and nights. I was
never frightened of its by-gone
inhabitants 1 like to remember
all those weird incidents, and I
co not mind that they cannot be
pxplained, I think the old house
must often wish for the long,
long ago days, of peace and
plenty when charm; and
elegance, gaiety and laughter;
flooded its halls. Especially at
Xmas time, the children’s time;
when their happy laughter was
mingled with their eagerness to
open their presents round the
huge Xmas tree. And the joy of
the grown-ups at the happiness
and contentment all around them,

Houses are like vhat, you
know, they feel and @nderstand.

At least some do, I have not
been back there since we left it,
but its ghosts must_ still be
walling. oc ki
| .

Or perhaps it was not that, per-{

haps they wanted to be friendly, |

for we suffered no ill from their

interference
were buried

there too,






Maybe some slaves
because |
old nurse often saw a dark man |

|



standing under a mango tree in

the back ard, very still and

very watchfal. Perchance he

was guarding some buried treas-

ure. [I wish he had indicated
where it was!

.

rven the dogs of}

tne past visited us!

There was one nice

big black fellow, that

my little girl
ambling along
wide hall-way

saw
the

porch door. She

and
Me visited her once
or twice in the nur-



from
the front door to the
fol-:
lowed him, saw him
sit down on the porch |
then disappear. |

y



sery beside her cot,

but she was not

frirhtened of him, |

Maybe he once be-|

longed to a_ little!

girl like her. j

Out of so many eurious and
irexplicable things, I will tell |
two more, ‘before I get toc!
monotonous, My brother was
staying with us at the time, and
one Sundeay afternoon he was
strolling up the long straight |

drive, when he saw two elderly |
yards in |
The; were dressed

ladies
front
in
a r Ly
them » be of the
family and hastened his steps to
meet them. Just then they stop-
ped by ‘ry old mahovany tree
in the drive, and there they dis-
appeared. He was only about
four away by that time.
The old
been coming to pay us a visit, to
see what we were doing w'th
what hac once been theirs.
Perhaps th were Satisfied that
all was well, so there was no
need to go further,

Ss ®

I have said that our ghostly
visitors were not resentful of us,
but there was one who was. It
must be understeod that under-
neath the nuntber of rooms which
cormprised the house in which we
lived, there ° ume
number identical in size and cor-
responding to each other. Of
these rooms two were used as

about
of him
te and were conversing in
Ly manner. He + took

twenty







two aunts



yards
dear





|
souls must

j

|
|
|



bedrooms, ofte of which was oc-
cupied by mire i the other|
one by a housemaid. |

This gi woke up one night
screaming, snd we hastened to
find out what was wrong. Sh |
said that @ tall white gentleman, |
looking very ; *rociuus, |
had stood by her bed and told

her to get out,
room and he w

as that was his
ntei no one in

BE MEN NEN NG NE NG NEN NN

*

\e
| 3
ze

2

al
aa



WG NG NG NG NG NN NN NNN

2
2

atopy”








PAGE TWENTY-FIVE



THE BEST VALUE ON
WHEELS

&



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@ MORE MILES PER GALLON

@ MORE POWER
@ MORE

(15 H.P.)
SPACE

Rm
COURTESY GARAGE
(Robert Thom Limited)

White Park Road

AN A PNA NN HNN

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The Gold Seal is found on all Duniop car
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DUNLOP

The Worlds Master /yre-

ECKSTEIN BROS — BAY ST



DISTRIBUTORS



PAGE TWENTY Six CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1952





Can You Find All of the Artist's Errors?



Emma C. Mf Kean

cE ery: i SIEIM CUS "FZ “MO] CO} By SOUP Jay UO j9xV0G
: everyone else, our artist !s up to Te 1Oty SpIe rik To baoy so} Say ueg sy

0 “S9H1P Jey 8413 Jo Sapjs “G1 ‘seyIO Gove

her neck in things to do for the wea auto aecke Ne at i sia cen at

Christmas holidays. She’s been so busy, souip oe merce 7m 30 mel Bink a occe
Oo 108m 7 5

in fact, she couldn't find time to check * i10p 30 pees, yuo prow iia ‘Bt, geod, 20

~, Ba} 0) 0 9 ‘ wi ®

this drawing for errors. Can you, as a bt sry Roveus jou op buses sania JO sepis

test of knowledge and observation, find ‘0 ‘Suo1m dn eunjojd "G “yo}BW Jou Op BUlBZIND

jo Sopris 8 ae eoh Ou 3nqg ‘Sujeno ‘L “Suya

the 25 or more mistakes which she made? qcutren cities yujo oa eae doy ¢ eee ees k
“19UIP Sov[desy Jo Sepis uo SyDIIq “GZ ‘OpIF OUTEG JOUUBS SHOIG “g “Badv] G}00q jy JO OUD ee 9 Hi

«no jo Pebieut Bote eS ausyssy bieae genes Alto “F "det UO PBB OA0]3 oul SiveM vyU ‘Ayes aqQve It

“9t_ “OIVAS 90) CUO PUB Oeys J91j03 CUO BAVOA é en Uy Spawjs Japioy S81puBo "RF “UM
143 ‘FZ ‘49YI|p 8004s #1a;3 “EZ “YoOs eu s[UO Pisdn O18 @oRidery SAOqH SYOOS "T :sI0MSUY

Wanted: Some Old Ti oys Its Your Move

oe a pleasant Christmas sentiment we hope

you'll remember in these rhymes. You are to
supply the names of the toys necessary to fill the
blanks and complete the verse,







.
Mails
i

| No matter who asks it, there init
jis one question for which the}
|

\s

ynly possible correct answer is !] [raze
|





“yes.”
Within one minute can you say

|}what it is?
} adllads ‘stats,
saop WYA\,, ‘St UONsSeNb syL ‘woosuy

‘

|| Trick Questiow
What uneven number can be}

divided equally into two even
numbers?





There are some thoughtful girls and boys,
Who gave poor tots their last year toys.
That poorer children might know cheer;
That Santa brings this time of year.

They gave some tops that spin and hum;

I saw among the toys, a ————,

Thanks indeed some kind child rates;

He even gave his roller .

I found he also gave a —————;

Tt was not hig, but it could float,

And freshly, brightly painted red oo is the season for dippers
Among the toys, there was a in punch bowls. Here's one

fA pur AT vary nos pue ‘Aypequoznoey
| ‘opppral au) YBNI WIND XT !wenaAtes




112) 3) 41516









Some youngsters cleared all shelves and nooks, on the checkerboard. White, mov- | —- > San
To give their favorite story —__—. ing upboard, moves and wins in lo | Vl 44

I’m sure that Santa will remember, four moves.—Millard Hopper. | | 8 9 10 | | I | 3 I}
, 5 ; “BUT 99/1 "t-0 “gE-2 HO

Those who shared in December, ‘0e-or Seon” zs “de tiaerae oir | —t—4 -

' “By00g "pois uat “pl-£2 Aut Sy VIA edu
od "BAIVYS “WINIpP e1u Soureu Ao} Suyssyu OY, : WoyN]Og OWE "SI-CL 89 so! ons Sworrnyog 2

DARTWORDS i cou





T ae. SAE mora in Dart- changing ong! letter in the | WV RS. TIZZIE TONGUELASH
‘as i week Ss receding \¥ ra. i i
firti PROTRUDE and. the on = we anciiiatea who always picks the height

etr S$ you have to - may ie ¢ e is .
get (rum one to the other by With the preceding word-in a of the rush hour to do her Christ
fearranging the other 48 Saying. simtie,.metaphor. or Seasonal mas mailing finally reached the
Parcs in aush & Wasehadithe ~ Sasnolaticn pt iqpas. \ head of the line at the parcel post
reiationship between any i ° an
word and the one next to it o. it may fofm with the | t window. Taking the top package

: Preceding. word @ name of a a T ‘@e tort ° i
Oia ner Pe One oF selx well-known peraon. piace or Subt from ies sxpaes weape. = ys
bing tn or fietion ‘ =" quired o me «clerk as to its
R our thinking
ULES & it may be associated By pulls Oo etithte figures weight.
1. The word may pe an With the preceding word in cap, you cae ‘ 5 “That will cost 17 cents to
anagram of the word that ® Utie of tn the action of a from 1 to 9 inclusive fod letters a
precedes it. oe play. or other eompo- anu solve this Yuletide substrac- mail,” he replied.
0 w
4 It may be a synonym ot is tion problem: ‘That package is for my
she word that precedes it A typita! succession of SANTA nephew, Tommy,” volunteered
words might be; Severn— CLAWS ih, “Se lect,
oy it mag pee vous by ere nae ~ ROge — Sore — adding oo! etter >. or ere feiow — Mellow thou it woul ;
subtracting one from or Mallow -Marsh—Marigold. cobh JO 2Opuyewar ve Ruut Fa a: houvht if woule be 2

‘gc19c «(Ulo4y «£698% Pensqng ‘uoHNMOS





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' GIVE IT FULL PROTECTION
THIS CHRISTMAS AND
ALL YEAR ROUND WITH...



1 Keeps your motor cleaner. . . smoother-

eo VEEDOL
2 Protects against bearing corrosion

3 Improves performance—greater economy MOTOR OIL







found wherever fine cars travel —

ROBERT THOM LIMITED—AGENTS

DEIN IN EGS DUDS PEPE ARIE RIN DESK NTE PRES DE DREN

NES EN DNGS GEIS ISIS IS TS SARE IN OS TRIN DER OS TET cag GANGAL
EDR GN GN TRIN INS DRS DS BN PRIN DR GN DN GRR DS DTN DN GRIN TSN SAS,

a





aaa

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14,

1952





leap, missed his footing and fell
flat on the pavement in front of
her, his star still clutched in his
hand.

“Oh look!” She turned to her
escort. “Someone must have
thrown him to me! A Christmas
present! Oh, isn’t he sweet!” and
she pressed her fingers to her
lips and blew kisses to the crowd
as she stooped to pick him up.
“He'll be my mascot, I know he'll
bring me luck! T'll keep him
forever and take him with me
wherever I go!” and holding him
by the arm she pirouetted a few
steps with him past where An-
drew and Monkey were standing
to the door of her car.

The crowd roared with delight
and as Peter was borne away
dancing in triumph the other
two saw him wave to them and
saw samething fly out of this
hand and fall at their feet. It
was his star and as the crowd
moved away again after their
favourite, Andrew picked it up
and held it with his own.

Monkey shivered and took
Andrew by the arm.

“Seems quiet without him,” he
said, “I ean hear singing from
the end of that street where the
buses are going. Shall we go down
there too? I don’t think people
would stand and sing on a night
like this if there wasn’t a fire,”

Andrew nodded. They might
be singing about his star. A bus
drew up beside them and they
jumped up on to the step.

oe

PSTAIRS only!” They climb-
ed up among the mounting
feet and sat down gasping, too
breathless for a moment to do
anything but listen. Just in front
of them a couple with a small
girl were talking to their neigh-
bour.
“Been taking her Ss
liarers g to see the
They nodded,
“Your only one?”

WEIS NGG NG NG HN A NN A A A

Rass TO



HAILED AS
BARBADIAN

THE

W814 NGG NG NN WNW NN A NN

“

a

NUTRICIA POWDERED
MILK



From Paye Ten

JUUHNEY FUR THREE

The father snorted and the
mother laughed out loud. “One
of five! There’s her and the twins,
a boy of three and a baby girl.”

Andrew -felt Monkey stiffen to
attention beside him.

_ The couple in front were talk-
ing

again. “Oh, how cold it is:
How I long to ‘get back beside
our big fire!” said the wife

“What a pity we couldn’t find a
monkey for young Tom, as he
wanted, they don’t seem to make
them any more.”

Monkey started, looked out of
the window for a moment as he
made up his mind, and then
firmly turned round.

“You come too,” he whispered
to Andrew, “Just imagine, a
house with five children! They
could

hardly grow out of us
there.”

Andrew shook his head. He

was a one-person bear and the

thought of five children held no
charms for him. Besides, he was
after his star,

Monkey unwound the string of
his little one and pressed it into
Andrew’s hand,

“Goodbye, old friend,” he said
hurriedly, and climbing down
carefully he lowered himself in-
to the shopping basket. It was
only just in time for at the next
stop his new family got off.

OLDING the three stars, An-
drew sat alone on the top of
the bus,

“All change!” He crept down
among the feet again and stood
on the pavement to think. While
Monkey had been making up his
mind they had gone past the
singing place; in the distanco
Andrew could still hear the faint
sound of the carols. “Star of
Wonder! Star of Light!” So they
were still singing about it. He
must go back and find out.

But Andrew was small and the
night was large, there was no-
body about to follow now, and
as he wandered in what he
thought was the right direction.
a prowling cat sprang out from



STOCK UP ON



BEST BY
FAMILIES.

MOST

ON

CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT



thd shadows and chased him far

PAGE TWENTY-SEVEN



bells

rang out
out of his way. The sound of the It was Christmas Day, but An-

from the

singing grew fainter; at last An- drew was asleep.

drew could hear it no longer and
sank down on a doorstep, quite
lost.

A cold wind blew round the
corner and shivered the tips of
his fur, his short legs ached and
his! pads were sore. For a moment,
his heart ached too; he thought of
the nursery, the pile of parcels,
thd bicycle by the door.

What turn he would have rid~
ing it! A little spark lit in his
heart at the thought, then glowed
warmer as he remembered Mon-
key and Peter and their luck.
Thinking of his friends and with

new courage, he got to his feet,
and looked down the deserted
street.

And there at the end of it was
the star.

There was no mistaking it, it
shone brighter than any he had
ever seen, resting on the topmost

branches of a giant Christmas
Tree, He ran and stumbled up the
dark hill towards it. The tree
stood at the top of some steps in
the doorway of a building, and
Andrew could see the dark shape
of a great dome rising behind the
star. With great difficulty, for
each step was as tall as himself,
he climbed to the top and stood
beneath the tree,

sf

‘HE wind that had ruffled his

fur shook a fragrance of pine
woods down from its needless
and set the great star and all the
little lights beneath it trembling.
A powdering of silver dust fell
like snow from the air. Andrew
looked up at the large tree and
its green, feathery arms Seemed
to curve down over him in pro-
tection. Suddenly he felt tired.
Still trailing his
hind him he crept in among the
comforting branches and lay
down. The tree swayed slightly
above him and then the deep

Tah

“Ky '
m _ Tat w ove®
Mr take

jar



SALE AT ALL GROCERS

small stars be- 3

When the midnight service was
gone
two were still left on the

over

away,

and the people had

steps by the tree.

a

am so very
man, “but all the toys were dis-
tributed earlier. If only you had

sorry,”

come before. ... ;

=

woman,
poor,

tree.



was working,” said

who seemed



Now I've nothing to

him at all.”

The
and then down at

“Look,”
little
from the
be better
bent to pick them up.
such lovely toys too, this year,”

man looked at her
he said,
stars seem to have
tree, even those
than nothing,” and

“We

dome

said the

the
to be very
and her eyes searched the
give

sadly
the ground.

“some of the
fallen
would
he

had

ee

my




Prtie-
he went on, “paintea carts and
shops; the most beautiful things.”

The woman shook her head, “I
didn’t want none o’them smart
toys,” she said, “not for him.
Only something for Christmas
that’d teach him to love. Ain't
that what it’s for? Set his heart
on a bear poor little chap; there’s
a lot o’love in bears, Still, its
good of you to get them stars,”
and she held out her hand to re-
ceive them,

As the verger tried to pick
them up he gave an exclamation,
“They seem to be caught on some~
thing inside,” he said, and pulled
a little harder.

The branches of the Christmas
Tree parted, Still holding the
stars in one hand and with the
other one raised in greeting, An-
drew stepped out.

SHG NG NG NG NEN NS NB NG NN NN WW NN NN WN

NG NG NG NS NES NS NSN WW NW NN NN NN fs HN NN NN NS

|

ISIE BABIN NBA RNAS

CHE



GRIFFITH’S

Cards

Z
%

XMAS TREE
TOYS, TOYS

TOYS,











2

SE per lb. (Lots of it)

PLANTERS PEANUTS

GIFT BOXES CHOCOLATES

SILVER DRAGEES for CAKES

FRUIT in Tins, FRUIT SALAD, PEARS, ETC,
RAISINS, PRUNES, CHERRIES, PEEL

BRIDAL ICING SUGAR
3 Varieties — White, Raspberry, Chocolate

BACON in pkgs. (Canadian)

> GREFFITHS $ Rockley Dial 4514
AN SNDN BN BN EXDA IN NENW SN NNN NN TNS
NN NSS NS NNN NSN

FINEST. XMAS FAVOURITES

EREWLD SPECIALLY FOR NOT CLIMATES

but contains Real!

G
besides being a Delicious Drink z

KARDOMAH TIPS TEA |

KARDOMAH PURE COFFEE &
SIMEON HUNTE & SON LTD. — Zz
Gi GN DADS PRIS RATS RDA Da



Decorations,

ANCHOR BUTTER

PEGE DA FE GDL PE PA DADA DN ATR AA TR ARAN

&
4
a
&
&
a
&
a
A
&
&
B
&
&
&
a
&
&
&
&
&
&
me

STOUT

(viTAMIN STOUT) er

is no Heavier than a Lager

Food

value

Si
&
&
&
&
&
&
hi

&

AND



Agents.



e

PAGE TWENTY-EIGHT





TENNENTS



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CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT

|

—<—



A SPORTS QUIZ IN
EASY STAGES

Compiled By DENNIS HART

After aten your Christmag
dinner and settled in your arm-
|chair, sipping a glass of your

| favourite beverage, it is unlikely
}that you will feel very energetic.
Perhaps then you would like to
while away the minutes testing
|your sports knowledge,
The questions begin with the
}easier ones and kecome a little
;harder, If they become too diffi-
}cult, well just lay down the
}paper and doze off—after all it is
} Christmas.

Anyway the tapes are up and
|here we go with five simple
|} questions on events which took
| place this year.

| 1, Who won the F.A, Cup?
2, Which horse won the Derby,
ang who rode it?
3. Which county
| cricket championship?



won the

4. What was the name of the
Grand National winner?
| 5, Who won the 5,000 metres,

110,000 metres and the marathon
lin the Olympic Games at Helsinki?
| Still going strong? Right now
we enter the first bend,

| 6. A new English bowler came
to the fore in the Test series
} against India this summer, Who is
| he?

| 7% There are
Wimbledon. Name
year’s winners.

8, Who won the women’s figure
| Skating at the Winter Olympics?
| 9, Still on the Olympics, but
| track and field events this time.

Where were they held in 1936,
| and where will they be held i:-
1956?

| 10, Who has scored the most
centuries in first-class cricket, and
what is the total?

Hope you are not flagging 23
we come now into the hack-
straight.

11, Which soccer clubs play at

five titles at
three of this

Highbury, Ninian Park, White
Hart Lane and the Baseball
Ground?

12. In the last English cricket
season, «two players from one
county performed the ‘double’.
Who were they and what is their
county?

13, Who won the world base-
ball series?

14, How closely did you follow
the golf competitions? Who won
(a) The British Open (b) The
American Open (c) The British
Professional Matchplay Champion-
ship (d) The British Amateur?

15. Who holds the world mile
record?

We are now coming round the
last bend, Are you still awake?

16, What wicketkeeper holds the
record number of dismissals in
a season?

| 17. Who. were known as (a)
| the Croucher (b) the Bounding
| Basque (c) the Ambling Alp (d)
| the Wee Blue Devil?

| 18 Who won the 1952 World
| Professional Indoor Lawn Tefinis
Championships?

| 19% A few years ago a player
|made his one and only appear-
}anee at Wimbledon, and won ail
| thtee titles. Who was he?

| 20, Please supply the middie
|name in each case—Keith R....
| Miller; Raymond R.... Lindwall;
‘Stanley H...... Mortensen;
Reginald H Harris,



SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14,

Is the pace getting too hot?
We are on the home’ straight
now, so stick at it, get out the

whip and home James and don’t
spare the horses,

21. When were the Australians
last beaten by an English county
side?







22, Where and what is ‘The
Hill?’

23, Three Olympic track and
field records not broken at Hel-
sinki, are held by one man. Who
is he? What are the records?

24. Who did Primo Carnera
beat for the world heavyweight
championship?

25. What is the weight of the
hot in athletics, and how high
are the hurdles in (a) the 120
yards (b) 440 yards

Well have you patsed the «
finishing post. Did you get trem

all right?

Just in case you did, here is a
bonus question. What sport in-
valves the quickest actions?

If you get this fill
your and drink yourself
toart,

right

up

glass a

ANSWERS

they

Newcastle,
senal 1—0.
Tulyar, ridden
Smirke,
Surrey.

Teal, ridden by
Thompson.

Emil Zatopek.
Freddie Trueman,
bowler
five winners,
Frank
doubles —

beat

Ar-

te

by Charlie

Arthur

the

Yorkshire fast

Here are all

singles
Men’:

sa aG BS

Men’s
Sedgman;



Frank Sedgman and Ken
McGregor; Mixed doubles—
Frank Sedgman and Doris
Hart; Women’s singles
Maureen Connolly; Women’s
doubles — Doris Hart and
Shirley Fry.

Jeanette Altwegg.

In 1936 they were held in
Berlin, in 195@ they will be
held at Melbourne.

Jack Hobbs, the former
Surrey and England open-
ing bat. He scored 197,
Arsenal; Cardiff City; Tot-
tenham Hotspur; Derby
County.

10,

11.

Ray Smith and Trevor
Bailey of Essex.
New York Yankees, they
beat the Brooklyn Dodgers
by four matches to three.
(2) Bobby Locke; (b) Juli-
an Boros; (ec) Fred Daly;
(d) Harvie Ward.

Gundar Haegg of Sweden
who returned 4 min, 1.4
sec. for the distance at

Les. Ames, former Kent and
Malmo in July, 1945.
England player, who th 1929
accounted for 127 batsmen
(79 caught, 48 stumped).
(a) G. L. Jessop, England
batsman of ,\fty years ago,
because. of his ‘crouching
stance; . (b) Jean . Borotrai

17.

1952



FOR AFTER DINNER RELAXATION



French lawn tennis player;
(c) Prime .Carnera, former
world. heavyweight boxing
champion; (d) Alan Mor-
ton, Scotland’s greatest-
ever outside left.

Richardo “Pancha”

zales.

Gon-

Bobby
1939.

Keith

mond

Stanley
Reginald
ris.

In 1912, by Hampshire

It is name given to part
of the terracing on the Syd-
ney Cricket Ground, which
is famous for the barrack-
ing of the crowds who fill
it.

Riggs of America, in

Ross Miller; Ray-
Russell Lindwall;
Harding Mortenson;

Hargreaves Har-

toto

toe

Jesse Owens of America.
At the Clympic Games in
1936. he covered the 100
metres in 10.2 sec, the 200
metres in 20.7 sec, and a
distance of 26 ft. 514 ins.
in the long jump. These
are still Olympic records,
although the 100, and 200
metres tumes have been
equalled .

te

Jack Sharkey
him out
of their
25 The shot
the hei
the 120
and in

He knocked
in the sixth round
fight in June 1933.
weighs 16 lb. and
ht of the hurdl in
yards is 3 ft. 6 ins.
440 yards 3 ft.





Now for the bonus © question,
and the answer is weight-lifting,
Some of the quick jerks can only
be recorded on the fastest of
comeras. How many qualified
for that drink?

BORROWED JEWELS
MADE HER
LOOK BRILLIANT

CAIRO.
Zeinab Nahas,
Egypt's most beau-
was fooling them

So Madame
once termed
tiful woman,
all along.

At Cairo’s brilliant receptions
even the wives of diplomats and
wealthy industrialists used to
stare at—and envy—her fabulous
jewels.

They used to wonder how she
got them.

Now, Madam Nahas
vealed the secret.

They were either
or worse still,
says so? Why.

has re-
imitations,
borrowed. Who
Madame herself.

The old «afd Party leader’s
wife told investigating officials
this when they arrived to open
her safe and ask her how she
acquired her wealth.

The safe was full of imitation
jewellery, but contained only
one genuine diamond clip. This
a gift from the Aga Khan, was
worth £800, she asserted.

Questioned about the real
jewels she gaily wore at glitter-
ing parties when her husband
was Prime Minister, she answer-
ed: “I borrowed them from
jewellers and returned them
immediately afterwards.

And _ she
desire ‘to’ shine
But
or

added: “It was my
at the rebeptions.
the, jewels were. either -fakes
not. mine:







SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1952



I'm Dreaming Of A Late = ©

Christmas

THE Christ
gun—at least
are concerned.

Now good cheer, gaiety, and
jollification are ald very well, but
I say no one can be jolly for two
months and still be excited on
Christmas Eve.

Since the end of lest month the
stores have been begging us to
buy early this year.

mas season has be-
as far as the shops



By Phoebe
Young

last-minute pandemonium,”
one gift-department buyer
But rush into the pandemenium,
say I. Who wants to buy presents,
© list in one hand and a pencil
for ticking off in the other?
Who wants to plan ahead



says

to

Already the windows are glit- ,; 7 :

s â„¢ a ; one give Uncle Tom a pipe-rack mie
tering with tinsel and shrouded out of a stirrup just because he
with cotton wool; already the cmokes a pipe? He would far
crackers have a department tO sooner have a» last-minute sur-
themrelves, and the calenders ar€ prise.
round every corner. The Hope

“FOR YOUR CHRISTMAS” “We start the Toy Fair early

LIST” ... “CHRISTMAS IN
NURSERY”... “A GIFT
HIM,” shriek the shops.

Of course there is a
reason for it all—there is a
reason for everything,

in the hope that parents wilt
bring in their children at the end
of the summer holidays or at
half-term,” says the toy-depajt-
ment buyer.

jut even the children baulk at
this.

THE
FOR

good
good

“If only customers would do a i Be at ka
Christmas shopping earlier, they noord, small Bip ask 2 store
would get better service, better ore pefore Christmas Eve?” —
selection, and they would avoid ; .

SSNS
A Christmas

Bugdet Poser
a

Yes, there’s even an answer for
that one: “Reindeer are too slow
for me,” said Santa Claus. “I
came from Greenland by Comet.”

The Result

What is the result of all this
premature Christmas spirit? An
“Oh my goodness, not Christmas
AGAIN,” kind of a feeling, in-
stead of “HURRAY, it’s Christmas
again,”

And, worst of all, it is now im-
possible to buy one plain hand-

as



When the Christmas _ season
rolls around in the accounting
department of Bookem&

Rookem, the staff gets down to
the serious aspects of book-keep-
ing. The cashier frantically seeks
to collect on the I O U’s in the|
eash box, The office boy deter-|
mines to get back the money he|
lays out for lunches, What with }
the pools, loans, collections, etc.,
it is all a body can do to salvage
a bit of one’s pay envelope for}
living expenses, much less set,
something aside for gift-giving;
and holiday entertaining.

Betty has decided that the best
way to avoid this last-minute
struggle is to..budget her salary. |
That is why she is so_ busily
assorting ‘the dollar bills into}
neat piles on her desk. |

“Let me see,” she is saying, |
If I divide my pay into seven|
equal lots, that will give me,
the same amount to spend each |
day. But there is four dollars
left over, Now suppose I only
budget for the working days and
divide my pay into five equal
groups, but—now—there is three
collars left. I know what I'll do.
Ill put all my pay into three
equal divisions, one for clothes, |
one for board and the third for}
daily expenses—but—now there is
two dollars left.” |



From the above soliloquy you
may have surmised that arith-
metic is not Betty’s strong point.
She does not want to bother with
change and since she earns a
round number of dollars she wants
to do her budgeting in a round
number of dollars. And _ since
Betty earns less than a hundred
dollars a week, that is not easy to
do, How much does Betty earn
anyway?
sy Suryses oe am amy
au yur Mouy am os *y Jo afayinur e sy
yey} euo Apuo ayl ST 6b “6L PUr Gt ‘GI
‘66 ‘tO “SE ‘“b 9A pue soLieyes feotjey)
-odAy oaseyt jo yous uloly & }RTIGNS am
‘a10a10UL, “ SaAvay Uaass Aq paplatp
aingy 4ed say MON “£2 pur fo ‘£% ‘86 ‘89
‘et ‘9 32” syunOWUR a qissod ayy sny |
1a pue Io ‘12 ‘96 ‘99 ‘9f ‘9 O18 SIIBTp |
asay) ut Burpwa (oor wry Ssaz) eerq: JO |

“es















saidyinu: ay) wy puy aM ‘aiqet sauir | B b :
~9a1y) ey. UTNOIy. Fupaun sa -
pee pene Sec se ren y arbados Co-operative
sazeojpur “g pue ¢ Wor g Zunoensqng
z snid aoam jo adr * ot Ame ¥
Sots cee Co roatale | wpttom Pactosy , Lid

nas, cu io/f Auto Tyre Co.

de u fq pa > —

s2etop
pus sfemje *
Mouxy not se‘
AQ Pealos
yoo e

i Trafalgar Store

“Penny for Santa Claus?” |

“HE,” she said, “has the courage

The Finest Bicycle Butt lo -dasy ae

See them now at =



CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT PAGE TWENTY-NINE





|
|
kerchief without having a gift- |
wrapped box of six, with doggi s’|
heads on the corners, thrust upon |
one
It won't do, and I for one will}
shop on Christmas Eve, in a mad |
impulsive burst of will,

]
All My I
By JOANNA PACE

I OBSERVE a minor revolution. |
More and more women seem to be
buying shoes that really fit. A
race sight these day is the hob- |
bling figure who has sacrificed |
comfort for imagined elegance,
and jammed a size 5 shoe *on a |
size 6 foot. |

I WONDER why there are so}
few necklines to choose from |
when you go to buy a sweater. }

I DON’T see the reason, but 1
report the odd fact: As soon as |
the weather got colder, grape- |
fruits and melons suddenly be-
come much cheaper in the shops

I ENVY American girls the
knee-length nylon stockings they
can buy to wear under. evening }
dresses. The nylons stay yp with
elastic ’

I SENSE a new peril in London
life. A couple of weeks ago a
voice squeaked every hundred
yards: “Penny for the guy?”
Now—or at least last night—I was
niet at the tube station with:

good











Dara i 2
INU Kw = i
" se
a

ad
ah.



CORDON

alle

BLEU

and EXTRA



CORDON ARGENT




I HEARD her the first time.

LTD.

STANSFELD, SCOTT & CO.,

of MY convictions.” —L.E.S.



4ND AT ALL LEADING DEALERS
THROUGHOUT THE ISLAND





ol

PAGE THIRTY

Complete the Xmas
Word

As you can see, each set of w ‘
sells out the word CHRISTM AS





1 complete the rd



IV CHR



isT
Vv. CHR
Ist
M
Vi. CHR
IST
MAS ii nd gods.
vil. CHR A grey-white metal

Ist Band of a_sleeve
MAS: Doctrine®, tenets
SV WRop-purgL_sLim-umyur
~O8HD ‘HA ‘SVINUPIE-OLLSIG-O1t0HHOD



IA ‘SVIWpuers uaLsT2 - st
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Hl ‘SVIWe0-18 PSToprABoOUOYHD =“
WN 1ALSUG-uesiyHO “I rosUy

AAAAAIAAG?

e
This Takes
. .
Figuring
Green and Redd have gardens
side by side, both (each) being
200 square yards in area, Green
watked around first one and then
the other and discovered that he
travelled six more yards in coms
pleting the circuit of his own gar-
de. than he did in going around
Rede’s garden plot. What were
the sizes of the two plots?
‘spred uaa Aq Ayueny s.ppey ‘spied
quate AQ aay-AQuaM) S.lodas) suo”
AOMIPLAIF

For The Party

AS a Christmas party enliven-
er, place a quarter on a table and
stand an empty bottle upside
down on it, (It is advisable to
use a short rather than a tall
bottle.) Challenge guests to re-
move the bottle from the coin
without touching the bottle, with-
out touching the coin, and with-
out upsetting the bottle.

It is done by banging your
fist on the top of the table near
the bottle several times. Don't
bang too hard or the bottle may
upset. A series of short, sharp
bangs will send vibrations to. the
bottle, which will cause the
bottle to move very slightly and
gradually edge itself o the
quarter without being upset.

WHACAAING

Who’s Who Here Hub ?

THREE boys went to a holiday
party together. As they walked
down the street abreast, Dodson,
on the right of Wilson, separated
Wilson from Morrison. Frank
was on Ted’s right, and Walter
was at the end. The sister of
Morrison is Walter's girl-friend.
From these clues can you give the
full names of all three?

vostuow «yung
“uospod POF, ‘UONTTAA THEM jamsuy u

We PTI e va ee Rr 2B -vr

CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT

By Eugene Sheffer
HORIZONTAL

1—WI! was offered t
ther as a sacrifice? (.

6— Whose overthrow was prophe
sied? (Ezek. 39:1)

9—One who resists authority

14—Sojourn.

15—Anglo-Saxon money

16—Papal veil.

17—Directed.

19—One who believed
clung to Paul (Acts 1

21—Large cask.

22—-Secrete.

23—Rodent.

24—Small insects

27—Speck.

28—Prefix: twice.

29—Egyptian goddes

30—Crippled.

31—Attention

33—Tin container

34—Wax

356—Was afraid.

37—The king of what place was
iron by Joshua? (Josh. 8:29)

38—Exclamations of Sh

39—Abel's brother (Gen. 4:8

40—Note in the scale.

41—Samuetl’s mother (1 Sam. 1:20)

43—How many days had Lazarus
been in his grave before Jesus
raised him? (John 11:17)

i4—Lower limb.

45—Cue.

46—Discomfort.

47—Authoritative proh*bition.

3a mbol for sodium.

ower.

SO—Finst bird sent forth from the
Ark by Noah (Gen. 8:7)

51—Imitate.

53—First king of Israel.

54—Foot-like organ.

55—What tribe was chosen to be
assistants to the priests in tab-
ernacle service? (Num. 18:6)

57—In what valley did the Philis-







Boxing Les Lesson

THE only toys of last
year’s Christmas presents
which little Johnny hasn't
broken up are blocks. He
has a set of small blocks
that are one-inch cubes.
He has fun putting them
into and taking them. out of

a box,

How many of _ these
blocks. could he put into an
empty box four inches
wide by four inches deep by
four inches long?

Warning: There’s a catch
to this box.

‘Sydure aq

L.UPMom 4, JaqzeeroyL, “xoq AWdwa
we ous {nd 9q Plo yoo;G suo
STO ‘pourem OM se “SHIOZ ‘UOT;
-sanb yo}eo & Ss} STUL aeMsuy

This Is Plain

Five and one, five and one
And then five hundred.
If this is not plain
Then someone has blundered
“ureyd sgeqy ..PIArA,, pom
} ULC} peuOTUEU! seINsy ayy JO SyueTe
bo [BuswnUu UBWOY euL Jamsuy



tines spread themselves? (2
Sam.

61—Betelnut-palm

62—Hebrew high priest 1 Sam.
1:9)

64—Musical study

65— Upper air




66—Sward
67—Cc pare
VERTICAL
pronoun
2 a
4 ntain spurs.
f kings un whose
*) prost Dan
6 19 Heavenly Fattier
7—Correlative of either.
Bani the * (2Sam 23.335)
Paul addressed an Epistk

the Christ

10— Epoch

1i~—Obstruction

122—Charles Lamb

13—For fear that.

8—Half an em

20—Citrus drink.

22— Habitation.

24— What is the 33rd book of the
Old Testament?

25—What is the 23rd book of the
Old Testament?

26—Soft metal

27—Pilanet

28—Legume

30—Leban's older daughter (Gen
29:16)

31—Legatee.

32—Cancel.

34—Conversation.

35— Woodland deity.

36—God to whom the Philistines
sacrificed and reiniced be-
cause of capture of Sarnson
(Judg 16:23)

38—Feminine name.

39—Piece of money.

ns in this city.

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1952



42—A cits —Saucy.

10:11) § It guided the wise men (Mat.
43— Weaken 2)
$4—Bulgarian coin. 54—Protestant Episcopal (abbr.)
46—Stops é

built by Asshur (Gen.





47—Queen of Ahasnerus ‘Esth. § Free.

1:11) 58—Diving bird.
49—Seottish explorer 59—Cyprinoid fish
50—Reject 60—Adult males.

51—Win 63—Rehold!

Te
















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Ls
N

NS
PT TN

We
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are

WCC TT



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NS
Liki del ad dcksd

Lt UN ft Tt Ny |

Yd

Nt WN

aia
WN TT

Nt TEIN | LENG

WT
HET aN
CTs
coi




Fes.
| | LEN
NNEBENS

oT
|_| | ES



TT WY 41 *
| | | WN
BES
AAEM BK

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er

Copyright. 1952, Kine Features Syndtiest« tre



Cryptogram
Charles Dickens, whose story,
A Christmas Carol,” expresses
the spirit of this season which go
many persons feel, had a personal
credo regarding the uletide
which many might well emulate,
It is given in his words below as a
substitution cryptogram for you to
solve.
One word will reveal at least

eight letters

GVGISS FNLNQ

AFQGRSKMR GL

KZ FBM@QS, MLT

S@Z SN IBBO GS

MIS SFB ZBMQ.

Teak
‘yaeoy fie
reMsUY

ous we aw doay o7 An pue
Ut s¥uNsMyd «souoy Th 1,

RIOIRMQIIVG

Just Weight

If you were to use an old-
fashioned balancing scale to
weigh out Christmas candy,
you'd. find any whole number of
pounds between one and forty
could be weighed using just four

different balancing weights
What four?
youn
ayy op Rnom syysIeN duane
a4} PUW suTU “aaryy “VU caameuy

THE coon. wD DAYS WERENT W
GOOD ARTER ALL:

Grandmama had to depend on clumsy, inefficient cookers
to do her Christmas baking. To-day the most modern kitchen
is equipped with the most modern cooker—the one that gives

perfect satisfaction combined with the greatest economy—the

Sr ALKS

KEROSENE COOKER

This Christmas give your home the

Present with a future—A



°
Triogram
YOU are given a QUE for each |
of the fullowing words. Can you!
fill in the letters to fulfill the | Z
definitions? Each has seven let-)
ters.



EON l—lvic it et) ]













QUE... Questions
QUE... Press |
QUE Drink |
QUE. Floral piece
QUE Ol.
QUE City of Iowa |
sta” ‘fstitetpatlapas
aUs... Watery ralivpalov4vislora
att Represed __CilalstalaiAploloVZolvivish
fonviseg canal? greene’ SSE CMOSSWORD PUZELE SOLOTION
‘ananbry yaenbs ‘seenty suonntoe

FIGURE IT OUT





Joseph Doakes came to town to yj il
visit his sister, Josephine As ; c out the
they were driving down the main you've seen him.
street, Joe asked Josie to stop in
front of an office building, saying Tne oung Moen was not Joe’s
“T’d like to go in here for a min- by rriage, so how did
ute or two to see a nephew of it € i asn't Josie
mine whose mother wil! expect
me to look him. up.”

“Go ahead,” said Josie “He's nos dy 3 > x5 pro t
not my nephew, so I'll let you ») “ ne ae










FALKS KEROSENE COOKER





SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14,



BLOOD, SWEAT, BUT NO TEARS 2*888ewewwwweummeueeuy

“Father Christmas,
Cloud, Iceland” so the address
proclaimed. The blue envelope
with its tuppenny-ha’penny
stamp rested in the traineq hand
of the postal sorter. All round
him stretched the pigeon-holed
sorting bays of the overseas mail
floor at London’s General Post
Office.

“Well, well,” said the sorter,
turning to his companion, “Christ-
mas must be closer than I thought.
Here’s the first of the Father
Christmas mail, A good one too.”

He put it aside and returned to
his stack of letters with a shake
of his head, a smile and a thought
of Christmas and the children.

This was way back in Septem-
ber. But, as the mail sorter assert-
ed, it meant that Christmas was
on the way.

The letter, with its fairy tale
address and childish scrawl, was
the first of about six thousand of
its kind to pass through London
General. They came in from over-
seas as well as from homes round
Britain. It is a law of the Post
Office that a ietter must get as
near to its destination as possible.
Ap a request to “Santa Claus,
Snow Cottage, Iceland’, which
might have been posted in Fiji,
comes first to London on its way
to Iceland.

Wee A7778

The Post Office in Iceland,
able to find ita, who is prc
bly out on his rounds in any case,
holds the letter for a time and
then it Ah, well, for who
but Santa is entitled to read the
Christmas prayer of a child?

me. 61.



un.










There is one exception to this
rule of forwarding on Father
Christm mail. That is when
the child letter. is . addressed
simply to “Father Christma or
“Father Christmas, Fairyland” or
“Toyland” or when the letter is
sent to “Santa Claus, the North
Pole.” In those cas the letters

are held at their office of origin.

Father Christmas, to children
has many homes, judged by the
variety of addresses where they
hope to find him. There was an-
other to “Father Christmas, Rein-
deer Hotel, Iceland” and yet
other with the direction ‘he
North Pole, Arctic Ocean, Sibe-
ria.” One child tried to reach him
through “Fairy Land, Iceland
England.”

an-



WIMAAIAT

Children’s mail is the lighter
side of the pre-Christmas rush at
the London G.P.O. The rest re-
presents solid slogging—twenty-
four hours a day, seven days a
week, from early October right
through to Christmas itself.

In that time, the postal clearing
houses of London handle millions
of cards and letters, tons of par-
cels, tens of thousands of cable-
grams and radio telephone calls.
A portion of them flows out in a
torrent of goodwill to countless
Christmas, hearths in the far corn-
ers of the world. And back from
the Commonwealth and a score of
foreign countries comes a stream

of the same Christmastide spirit.the right direction when it leaves |
two-way England’s shores

The volume of this







1952

Hy BRETY OLIVER

traffic abroad is gigantic; so great,

that postal supervisors cannot
give entirely accurate figures.
They estimate, anq the estimates

astound. In one four-week period
this year for instance, 363 tons of ¢
letters and cards left London for
overseas—by air alone, All some-
thing between half an ounce, and
an ounce for each item and the
tonnage represents something like :
20 million separate envelopes.
Not all were Christmas messages,
but it was the. Christmas traffic
which brought the numbers up to

the astronomical figure ¢

Meeeeats out the United Kingdom, from the

For the men who staff London’s Commonwealth overseas and from | da
vast sorting floors and dispatch lands where monarchi no longer |
halls, Christmas begins even be. exist. |

fore the English autumn is_ pro-
perly underway. From early Oc-
tober, the volume of foreign mail
starts t0 mount es people in Brit
























not fully addressed, it may move
about from ons town to another,
all with the same name, till finally i=
% reaches the right one. Often, by

en,
Generally though, according to
London postal heads, people)

larly round Christmas when they
want

Britain's
year, a speci
through the
the

3.W.1., which is the local office for

CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT PAGE THIRTY-ONE








Sometimes when the article is | Se
| di
|

THE BEST BEER

Christmas is well past.|

iddregs their a

mail weil, particu-

AS NG NG GN NE NN

to make
resents don’t go astray
High on the list of Christmas
emembrance are the members of
Royal Family Every
of mail passes |
Post Office towards
Royal Courts of Lone It
omes from well-wishers through-

doubly sure their

il clas:



9







%

It converges on London and is | oe
rwarc to the Post Office at | 33






















ain turn their thoughts overseas > i "1 |S
: nN - the Roy: louschoid. There, a} >
Reminded by the Post Office that Court Soctinan enlients the toil |e EENESE EERE YS EB
a parcel for an old friend, a niece ; abe R a Fan aa t t :
or a nephew in some remote part, a | ae m ¢ vA
of the world must have plenty of ‘” ye am Palace, where ’ e ANAL
time to bridge the distance, Brit- Pec! stall oper ore q rsa ry \ pDmcwn 1
ons wrap up their presents with rhe volun : gree Ss ] S | HE BE S ] B] iD R
Christmas Eve sometimes. still impossible for everything to go ps - : . si Me
two months away. The Post Office "fore the Queen or to other mem- | mH co rr
thanks them for it, because far b°rs of the Royal Family. So it | iy OR y OU LO O ES
too often people leave posting till is classified and a letter of thanks | @& 3 ; , ere uN
the last moment. Then the rush return of good w es} ¢ | See _ ; p , , <
in with tt Christmas mail and off. me TRY A FEW CARTONS OF KINGSBEERSS
something like a wate. us 1 so far ap + Office Sn orm . ' ony > were >
onae ling like 1 tidal wave hits And so far is the Post Offi € THIS CHRISTMAS. AND ENJOY THE BEER’
the postal worker: meerned, the Christmas toil s ae wipiacaab e

; , 1 part of the serviet\ Like John BREWED FOR A KING. pa

It is one of our biggest. prob- Wesley, that man of religion who oN
lems,” I v told ‘by a supervisor ‘The world is my parish ” Gn
n the overseas branch of the ; Ps .. wainke s Se odes _ -NTS —
General. Post Office. “We like to ‘nC, men of the Post Office tools R. M. JONES & CO., LTD.—acent z
Shik eCtstcean oaies e world us their 1 ENC EW OSEAN BE OE OS ECO ENC OW ORONO OE ONAN OW OX ON ne

ch thet wenttatee in thee : work for: it. aesoesii NENG EN DNDN DN DNDN G9 ON DN DNDN ON NINN NNN
but every vez we get p tings a aoe 2
coming: in. for the ends of the 4
earth right up tg Christmas Eve, or bites er ° fo c fe

we have surface par- 4 ; ; Ist, Sf ’ yf
through onl few WLS lV Gf) (hihi SMAPS é
» Christmas, addressed A SAL WHEY AIO Fit
New Zealand or the ——
and exon bearing the BF
‘Not to be opened _ till mB
as Day’. Of course, there
hly chance of these pre- |

sents arriving in time. But gen-

erally,

people are very good.”
Not so difficult to deliver as the
“Father Christmas” spate of ‘let-
ters but requiring a __ special |
handling is mail addressed in
foreign languages. This increases,
like the rest, before Christmas |
and a sorter frequently strikes a
parcel or letter whose address,
conveys nothing to him at all. It
is put aside and goes to a trans- |

lation department where a lin-
guist adds in English the name
of the town and country for |
which it is meant.
AAAAAAG
Similarity of place names all |

over the world complicates things |
too, In London, where mail is
sorted out for dispatch to every |!
imaginable part of the globe,
minute care is taken to see that |
the letter or parcel is heading in





By HELEN BURKE

This has been turkey week
at Smithfled, I have just seen the
best-looking lot of the finest En-
glish birds ever, all named and
all with special good points.

Breeders, it seems, are breed-
ing birds for fuller breast meat:
of these I prefer the pure white
varieties. They are broad and
meaty, but, I am told, cannot yet
compete commercially with the
black and bronze birds,

The weight range for all birds
was from 9 to 30lb. Wholesale
prices, at the moment, are 5s. 2d,
a lb, for hens and 4s. 7d, a lb.
for cocks—but no-one can predict
what they will be by the time
Christmas comes,

Avocados Cheaper

Persimmons are 6d. each, this

’ week, Avocado pears are down to
ls. 6d. each—a large reduction—
and they are . If you use
coconut in cooking, you can buy
fit fresh and alrea shelled for
ls. 6d. a half poun

Reatly For Cooking

Cheapest meat in the market
to-day is hare. One retail firm
sells brown hares, weighing be-
tween 6 and 8lb., for 6s. 6d. each,
while Scotch hares, which are
smaller, cost 4s. 6d, each, These
are sold cut up, ready for cook-
ing. $

Rock pigeons — that is, stew-
ing pigeons—cost 1s, 9d. each and
wood pigeons 2s, 9d. each, Both
make very good pigeon pies.

For Spaghetti

A little meat goes a long way
fin a sauce Bolognese, My Italian
grocer gave me her recipe many

Turkeys? Best Ever This } 7

Talking Food
years ago, I have yet to find
better,

Pour a little olive oil into a
thick pan and, in it, fry a chop-
ped shallot and (for four persons)
not more than 12 ounces of finely
chopped raw beef. Add a few
chopped mushroom stalks and
fry for two minutes more, Add a
couple of tablespoons red wine
and a pinch each of basil and}
rosemary.

Now add two to three table-|

a
.

spoons of tomato puree, 1—2
lumps cf sugar, a minced clove of |
garlic, and as much stock or

water as you think you will need

Season to taste, Cover and sim-'
mer for 30-45 minutes. The sauce
is then ready to be poured over
¢ 0 0 k ed spaghetti, macaroni,
noodles or any fancy-shaped pasta
you want,

I have used, recently little
pasta “wheels,” complete with!
spokes, They are much easier to
eat than spaghetti or noodies and |
are most attractive. |

Footnote: My latest buy is to- |
mato puree in a tube. It costs,
ls, 9d. in any continental grocery |
stores, All you have to do is
squeeze out what you want as!
from a tube of tooth paste. I
have used it for four dishes and
till have half a tube left. It is
much cheaper than fresh toma-
toes

Pineapple Dish i

This past week, I bought
beautiful large pineapple. I want-
ed it for a special party, and this
is what I did with it. }

oes. 8














DW NTIS AUN





ps oe :

“pM

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see your Goodyear tire dealer!



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CITY GARAGE TRADING CO., LTD~vicroria street.





tT

PAGE THIRTY-TWO





CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1952



THE 1952 YEAR OF SPORT

CRICKET

The year 1952 was

id deiiet fc Barbados. FOOTBALL
spor or arbado Never be- r ,
fore in the history of this country WATER POLO

have the sponsors of organised %Pace does not permit, my. indulg-
sport been able to stage so many i%g in an analysis of personalities
competitions on the Intercolonial Yet I must commend Denis for
level, his all round performance, his

The Barbados Water Polo As- leadership and his enthusiasm,
sociation, the Barbados Basketball
Association, the Barbados Tornado
Association, the Barbados Table
Tennis Association, have all enter-
tained teams representative of cor-
responding Associations from the
neighbouring colonies here.

In addition to this the Emplre
Cricket and Football club made a
successful tour of some of the
Leewards and the Queen’s College
Netball team toured Trinidad with
great credit to themselves,

CRICKET
HE local cricket season has
been an interesting one and
up to the vlosing series in each of
the divisions the championship of
each division could not be de-
cided,

Spartan and Carlton have ended
the season as joint champions of
the First Division, Spartan, Carl-
ton and Wanderers were tied on
points when the final series o
First Division games opened and
it was on the results of this game
+that the final destination of the
cup’ rested,

Ironically enough rain spoilt this
fixture and as both Spartan and

a peak year



DENIS ATKINSON

St. Hill had his best season for

years and he was a tower of
strength in the bowling depart-











ment.
Carlton had already collected
points fer a first innings lead the Spartan eae sosal the
status quo remained as far as they png} material «it has hia : bla #9
were concerned. Wandere were fet together m any one season
out of the running since it was at perhaps within fhe last quarter of
their expense that Carlton had g century in. its history.
gained points for a first innings Frank King, Barbados, and
lead and similarly Empire were Trinidad cap, turned out for then
also out of the running having F Phillips. Keith Bowen, Grani,
been associated with Spartan in Harrison all promising youngster
corresponding circumstance reinforced by the captain Keith
WANDERE Walcott, himself an old stager now

Denis Atkinson had OK and the consistent performer Hat
son for Wanderers and although ris. However they never got weld
NG NG NB NGNGNZNENG!



THAT IS SURE



MM

wt

DELICIOUS

a

something to suit every taste. Ask your





+: el lida elisalnalte

BISCUITS

Choose from their extensive range this Christmas—there is
favourite store for ;

By O. S. COPPIN

éé into the
which the comparative plethora of
talent suggested and the fact that f
they have been bracketed with
Carlton as champions shows the
richness that needed the leaven of ¢
streamlined teamwork,
CARLTON
* OOGLES” WILLIAMS, Brick-
ie Lucas and Edghill were
the three beacons which blazed
and burned that the rest of tht
Carlton team could find their way
io the top. Man for man Carlton
could never hope to equal Spartan
but as a team and because of the
resultant high standard of team-
work and team spirit they were
able to bridge that gulf and share
the honours.

Boogles is de-
finitely one of the
best all rounders
in these parts
and I think that
at long last Lucas
should earn his
island cap. After
all we in Barba-
dos seem not to
be slanting the
2mphasis on an
investment in
youth ‘as other
islands are open-
Cc. B. WILLIAMS ly doing.



y

EMPIRE t

DePeiza, wicket-keeper, bats 1

man, pace bowler, aominated the both old timers carried off the

Empire team. He batted consis- !}
tently, kept wicket up to a very
high standard and on the Gdd t

occasion when his quick bowling








required was able to pull his @IKIPPER GODDARD was away
weight. for the greater part of the
cer too was consistent and season but on his return he stabil-
hostile, his direction, pace and ised the batting forces with credit-
endurance showed such improve- able individual distinction. He
ment thie season that his will be Dlayed two very good innings
imong the strongest claims for in= #8ainst Wanderers and Spartan
cl Y in the island team :o| that saved his team embarrass-
}ment and stamped him as being






NOMEN
TO PLEASE

|

Amn



|

RA

match winning’ force oppose
who knows where he



batting and

still a diffi¢ult batsman to dislodge
ond a useful one in the best com-
pany.

|
|
|
| and Bradshaw :
¢)/ had their good moments but these :
:| were too few and they saw some §
lean days.



TABLE TENNIS
YACHTING ture with Wanderers would be
ET tied om points with Central and
BASKETBALL in that case the names would be
the visiting Indiams and bracketed as in the cate with

may 0° Spartan and Carlton but Comber-
mere, up to the time of writing
seem unable to do this.

FOOTBALL

oo 1952 football season was a

successful one especially from
the financial point of view and
from the point of view as well
that there was ample evidence of
a werlth of local talent, Which if
developed along the right lines
should place Barbados football in
a very favourable position with
regard to relative standards in the
Caribbean.

Crowds attended throughout the
season and it is reasonable to as-
sume that the future of soccer in
the island is assured.

Notre Dame won both the First
Division and Second Division Cups
and at one time it seemed as if
they would sweep the Board and
establish a local record that would
bid fair to remain intact for many
years to come. That is, they were
in a good position for carrying off
the Third Division competition as
well but they met with some set-
backs in the Third Division.

INJURIES
NJURIES too militated
their chances in the
Knockout competition and
knocked out in the
round by a _ seemingly
Empire team.

rom there.
PICKWICK
Pickwick suffered growing: pains
juring the season. They are ob-

against
Open
they
first
inspired

JOHN GODDARD

‘iously trying to build up a young Were

eam but Theodore Birkett a regu-
ar and left arm Harold Jordan
1oncurs and shared most of the
bowling successes in

hat order,
GODDARD



POLICE
Police had a lean year. Mullin
as pace bowler



Farmer too did not reproduce

;| the good form he showed when he
tier: | led
ki earlier in the year but this does
not write him off by any means.
He is a sound field, and a punish- traticn, laudable teamwork and
ing batsman once he strikes form

H. BARKER

Barbados against Jamaica

Notre Dame
bination.

were a good com-
There wus good concen-
abundant evidence of a

high
standard oj fitness.

SOBERS They wilt

“JACOB’S”—there is a lovely assortment of decorated tins from
which to choose.

Lageaniry

Celebration

Diana

Royal Afternoon Cea

Carnival

Outward
Round

Drummer

TO MENTION ONLY

A FEW. .

Put JACOB & CO.’S BISCUITS

List This Xmas.

on Top of

S) APAPAINGRONPA DN GAINIRA STOKES & BYNOE LTD.—Agerls. |
Y .

your

NG NG NG NG NG NG NG NG NGG NN NNN NNN NN NN 8 8 9 NA NN 8 8 A AN A GS



wx











(NAAN,

pee find of the year for Polica continue to figure prominently in
and the unfortunate loss o B.A.F.A. football for some years to
League Cricket was of course G. Come, In My opinion.
Sobers the left arm all rounder of Carlton won the Knockout Cup.
the Pclice Boys’ Club who joined It was ironic that Carlton who
Police during the closing stage of pare. pare Poe ve me ae =
the season, pall in the senior division for the
We saw sufficient of him when Past four or five seasons and have
he scored a century against Wan- poe Rig fe thnd soi ei wethe
derers and then another against tign should win a Ghean. piOuship
Lodge in the following match _in the year in which they finished
addition to sharing the bowling poettom of the First Division. This
honours. He should go-far and is not written in any disparage-
should be of great use to the ment of their achievement because
Police in the future. they rallied well and moulded
COLLEGE themselves in the Knockout com-

AA



sie © Seen suffered from an ex- Petition into a match winning
ws |} “4 edus of boys as school teams combination,
iv must at one time or another. Cam- FAVOURITE

i@, mie Smith and Worme left them
auring the season but they per-
formed well for them before. Mr.
Headley of the staff who has been
turning out with the boys relig-
iously improved with every match
towards the close of the season
and climaxed this with a well

MPIRE started the season as
rank favourites but a listléss
performance against Everton,
whom they had obviously under-
rated and an inexplicable lack of
spirit in their fixture with Spar-
tan destroyed all the good work
earned century against the Police, er way eae ones —
: LODGE f division and the championship as
ODGE SCHOOL were obvious- well.
ly not up to First Division They knocked out the redoubt-
standard this season and | under- able Notre Dame but most of the
stand that it was not their desire team went on tour and Carlton
that they should have competed in knocked out a ‘desperately weak~-
the First Division. As such they ened team. However, if they had
met with little success but there been up to strength Carlton would
was always the cheerful sports- have had to put. up the perform~-
man’s spirit in the’ face of the poe alee career fo have de-
heaviest defeat and we have learnt “°*'© DISAPPOINTING
to associate sportsmanship with PARTAN triki R
the Lodge School through all the AN were strikingly dis-
years regardless of whether they appointing. Old stagers could
won, lost or drew and this year "°t find their feet and the young-
was no exception, : ae peda Maen ong Day a from
. 7" e t e ? nexperi-
INTERMEDIATE enced. I think that they will have
i ‘M.P.C. carried Off the Inter- to build a new team next season.
4 meédiate championship. They Everton too held on by the skin

Px GAIN RE BPS GAGA GR DNIN DR DSN DREN ENTS ON

won by a handsome margin from of their teeth to save relegation
i '
we | their nearest rivals

-

the Barbados that is in line for Carlton. They
Regiment. The Brancker brothers, definitely struck a very bad patch
Irwin Burke and skipper “Ben” 2nd they too will have to build a
Hoyos were the outstandine team. next season.
formers during the season COLLEGE
SECOND DIVISION _ College fielded some promising
WNENTRAL 3 seem destined to individual players and early in the
} ear. Of Bhe Sethed Disieion eel shar aaa <7. team to ex-
Cup. Combermere if they é¢ould Ree oe Saat: Ree. woe

gain a possible in their final flix, @ On Page 34. PI

per+





SUNDAY, DECI DE CEMBER

TOMORROW IS
WEIHNACHTEN

14,

By Vaughan _

The streets empty as the cold
winter sun sinks over the Father-
land and a hush falls on the
city’s pavements. A few bus¢és and
trams course half empty along
the snowy roads, a few cars
speed past the closed doors of
shops and cinemas, theatres and
restaurants and bomb-wrecke:l
buildings, It is only the lonely
wayfarer who is out and abroad

Inside each home the tradit-
ional tannenbaum—the fir trec—
has been ne with gleaming
silver threads, Ro:
tiny coloured lanterns light up
its branchts. L'ttle packets, wrap-
ped in fancy. coloured paper are
heaped round its by A‘l of‘er-
noon the bustliug fausfrau ;
bcen arranging her tree. On high
she has hung a gilded angel and
below a motley group of | ttle
figuves from the fairy tales. She
has fixed the shining tinsel deco-
rations and silver wrapped
chocolates to catch the lighting’s

iinbow glints.

It is Christmas Five Heiligen-
acht. The night of the Family;
the night when German brothers
end sisters, uneles and aunts
gather together with the children
and their parents to re-live the
marvel of Christmas,

It is the moment of the vear
whea all but the closest friends
are excluded from the horne,

For days past, firms and fac-
tories - even police barracks-
have given their parties. The

sy candles and -

vis
real
fore

Put
"an

way hugging a toy, a teddy memery is dim

of chocolate be The traditional carp is wait
ing packed into car and tc be eaten, and the
‘ruc’ to be dropped home again. too. Dishes of little cakes lie on
the night of the the sideboard, with fruit and ruts
y. the doors are closed and beside them

or
ve

to-night,

a piec

ne world locked out

let

tre
Aron

and

de





talking

TVs
awed






children of those whe work and 24

scrve there have already been
lined up at long tables. Father



Christmas, in his traditional robes

db 1g his rod (to reprove e
those children who have been °° !
naughty during the year) has relativ
t ih red around them Boister- £101

ously he has handed them out
uttle presents, urged the m to
@€s with cakes Fac-

gers, office chiefs and
kindly matrons have patted their
neads They have sung the



ma German children’s warms

And they have gone hap-

z

Â¥ For TIM
Arrow

Elite
SHIRTS Reliance

Renown

SHOES

PLAINS

UE See eee

A
S

FOR EVERY GIR.
DOWNSTAIRS AT WHITFIELDS

iG A PA RNIN DN TA UPC PR IN TETSU EE DS BUN DN DNDN DNDN DNS 4 "TN SASN DN TN OA ON A NSN BION DN PN PACS NO

TIES. many colourful designs

tel gi
for

id tabl
starred



corations,
together,

cally, a

friends

tear

e&

sits

ts are F weanc hed, a few candles packed off to bed, while all the

1 are lit and the others walk to the heavily-l den}
with colour. candle-lit dining table, and recall
under paper

the family the family, the anecdotes of each
perhaps a little and all.

little

are

rite the boisterous spirit of German

bruta lity.

Eve

a people so heavily eN- heen solemnly drunk, perhaps a!
with memories of jack- few ofthe family’s eldest rise dis-

—<*. ATE Knee } te the Wau
[lGREET IN ine y where the pasicr is holding » in- |

st

ushered in to vine and litres of beer, bellow

off
3 joy,

ts tmbroe them,
» old

of

Se ree oat ser a Oak ee SLOMAN SSDNA RDNA DEN NIA NAIA

_CHRISTMAS STUPPLEMENT

PAGE THIRTY-THREE



3M 2 844 NG SG NS HNN
I= FOR STYLE

Zs FOR COMFORT
IS FOR QUALITY
AT THE

IS BEST PRICE

» “Kay
SHIRTS

THE SHIRT
THAT SOLVES
THE XMAS
GIFT PROBLEM
veh laughter and think perhaps Es FOR A MAN

h iin of the days when Germany |
the fancy ssioulated to conquer the world 2 ae an pd
uncles ana But tonight, in their hour of nos- SS

Wx

———— |

post-war years, with their cold
ind hunger, their mise: y¥ and des-
pair, se€m far distant, and their

ing
roast goose

The bright So the youngest children are

streamers to each other the adventures of
sentimen- And. later, when the wine has

creetly, and, for one of the few
times in the year, make their way
nearby

rught service. “Silent Night. Holy | §
Night”, they will join in the
smging, and w.il wish well to all |
mer

Tomorrow is a new Cay, Tomor-
tow is Weihnachten, Ciiristm is
Day, and they will be back again

\oliday making. Tomorrow they
But it is vill go to exuberant parties and all
list ‘ aght revels and drink bottles of

casement





ASAE ONG CORE ER FA RESTA CA AA HATA CAAT



=
si

near, happy not to be alone. again,





a bottle

her, from



1

trink
join in the toasts

ink to the

n the

family

ound seem far away, so
for a night are any thougnts ot
md revenge



bottl

SUITINGS—PINSTRIPES &

NEW

TOYS TOYS TOYS

AND BOY

@
) uw
the circle

war®rs,
and friends,

and

of Schnapps,

the kitchen ree eTeE

i'n Soma me gy CAVE ON 6 | SHARKSKIN| ANGLAISE

THESE

Ger

RAN GE DOULTON FIGURINES



memory of
to absent
and the
friendship

in Lemon, Pink, Aqua
40 ins wide

— $203» | $215

- BROADWAY DRESS SHOPPE |

HEAD OF BROAD STNEET

peueSSSeeeeEeeeeesEanss eee eEEEEEeR

in many colours

The bitter



rd, father
, hor

1 SSONG NaN AGNOMENGNS
bieesiiniesnicsslll



84.6995 NS NSW NN SNS NNN NNN NN NN NN

CALL IN AT==—-=

T.R EVANS
(WHITFIELDS)

DIAL 4220
FOR QUICK — COURTEOUS
SHOPPING SERVICE

Sam. to 4pm

For HER ALSO
eens, eres TABLE CLOTHS
HANDBAGS oreceaer
HATS in all colours ee EM SQUARES
DRESS MATERIALS aur WARE
_ PRESENTATION GIFT SETS CUTLERY

7

CHILDREN'S

COLOURED

YOUR SHOE STORE ~ reACOT COVERS

=~

SE Se ee



| PAGE THIRTY-FOUR





CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT



SUNDAY DECEMBER 14,

1952



THE 1952 YEAR OF SPORT | CAN THE HYPNOTISTS

ing while Caviar making their
debut to the game, should do wei
next year, now that they have hud
a season to find out what the

@ From page 32

good crossfield play and grqund
passing. However, they went to
pieces as a team although they *. :
played one or two very geod geme is all about.
games. . : YN
They have some very good ma- el ee
terial on which to build next sea- ‘TT: ae eee
son and I see no reason why they about two months, Phe re were
should not be a good bet for fin- only four teams, Starfish again
ishing among the first three in the WOM the league cup and Golditisa
First Division. came through with flying colours
to snatch the K.O. cup from them,
WATER POLO when it looked as though Starfish
RINIDAD water polo teams would take both trophies as they
visited Barbados in October did last year.
and Barbados retained both the Finally a word about the future.
Elite Cup (men) and Crushy Cup The Manager of the Trinidad
(ladies) which are piayea tos teams Mr, Harold Mahon in his
annually by the two colonies. speech at the luncheon in honour
In the men’s league, Snappers cf the visitors gave water polo
who from the formation of the players something to think about
Water polo association in 1947 when he said that the two associa-
have always been a team to be tions should look farther afiek
reckoned- with, proved this year Aim at the Olympics he said.
that they are still tops, by winning Venezuela is planning to visit
both the league and the K.O. Trinidad. In Trinidad, he went on,
con.petitions. This is the fifth year we are not able to control gate
in succession that they have won receipts. In Barbados, the water
the K.O. Cup. polo association does. Why no!
A men’s “B” League was or- make it a triangular meeting next
yanised this year and proved 4 year year in Barbados.
great success. Youngsters and be- Incidentally the Barbados as-
ginners who would not have been sociation has been trying to
able to ‘make’ the “A” teams arrange a tour with Venezuela foi
had an opportunity of showing some months now without suc-
their worth in this division. cess. Here now i> something to

LADIES LEAGUE ee

N the ladies league only four
teams entered as against five A triangular tour of this nature
in 1951. Competition was not 4 would attract huge crowds. The
keen this year and throughout the only problem is where to put
season the ladies complained of them as accommodation at the
not having proper ,facilities for Barbados Aquatic Club is limited.
practising. The standard of the
school teams was not as high as
the other teams Starfish and Gold-
fish, However the school teams
put up game performances, and
should have gained valuable ex-
perience which will serve them in
good stead next year.

That briefly is a “picture” of
“what went on” in water polo
during the year now coming to an
end.

lasted

TRIANGULAR



BARBADOS TOPS

UT let’s take a closer. look. Bw hs
First, the visit of two Trinidad
teams to Barbados in October. D.
Barbados won every game. The

Barbados ladies were far superiol Phic is a :

. mn Hani is is a problem which the water
to their rivals, The display of the polo association mut solve They
Trinidad Ladies was disappoint- could arrange a series of. eae
ing. visits within the next three years.

i rege ¢ a pas » years,
With regard to the men how bringing in Jamaica and Bermud
ever, although the goal totals in ppep ee. euk Clorapies th pe a.

aie s 3 § ey cer-
the three tests were 13 for Bar fainlp aNOUIA have: been saa ae
bados as against 4 for Trinidad, put “aside a sizeable ‘nest. ege’
this does not give quite the correct which would Its sa pl a
impression as to the standard of sending a West Padice ta hg

play. not one from Barbados.
BASKETBALL
The highlight of the 1952 Bas



BANNISTER G.

MeCLEAN

GOOD STANDARD

yp npere of play was good on
both sides. As swimmers the
Trinidadians could hold their own, the Cari ay i
coure d arib-Bears Your, which
pd ee rs what rer Barba- brought down the curtain « a
meee a ra ee een he successful sea°con and also had
_ oo ae Pearl ote © Jaid the foundation for the fur-
ad go e@ ball to thet” thor development of this game in
forwards. Time and time again Barbados The superior — skill
tactics, rhythm of movement ‘and
even the showmanship of the



the Trinidad forwards failed to
do their job.

Kenneth Ince
e-was named the
yutstanding play-
or of the Barba-

4}jos team. He has ‘Pectators.
: siee team Bar- , 0” the local scene, the standard

every has improved and there is a great-
with “" "umber of devotees of the
This 8@me. Of the clubs. special men-













combine effectiveness with a de-

vados in
¢ncounter
Trinidad.



He got good sup- (for their showmanship ) Y.M.P.C

» won ha

ket-Ball season may be considere:| Goodridge

Carib-Bears are all calculated to game. It is

‘ear he was cap- tion should be made of Harrison staged
ain of the team, Coller>, H.CO.B., Carlton, Pirates Twelys Regattas commencing in
January and

lost to Miss B. Carrington in the
Quarter-Finals. who in turn lost
to Miss R. Williams in the Semi-
Finals at the start of the season.
No one would have guessed that
both Miss R. Williams. and J.
Clarke would have gone to the
finals. Both players performed
well this year, but Miss R. Wil-
game proved
Clarke’s. In



attacking
taperior to Miss J
the Ladies Doubles Miss_ B,
Carrington and P. Chandler,
proved too strong and ran out
“Doubles” is very
attractive to watch, and the
Mixed Doubles were exception-
ally good Play reached a high
siandard N. Gill and Miss B.
Carrington won from L. Worrell
and Miss N. Hall in a thrilling
5 set match.
MEN’S SINGLES

The Men’s Tennis throughout
the season reached a new height
climax when

liams’

easy winners.

and reached _ its
they won the series against
South Trinidad, For the Trini-
dad team Carl Williams was their
best player closely followed by
Debbysingh. Fans will however
remember the prolific smashing
of Arnold Mendes who always
pleased the crowd, the modest
and imperturbable Dr. Sarkar—
surely a good. model for patience.
The local players gave good djs-
plays in all 8 tests. Special
mention should be made of Camp-
bell Greenidge, Frank Willoughby
and Blair Murray and to a lesser
degree of N. Gill, R. Phillips and
C. Sheilds.
INTER-CLUB

t N_ the Men's Inter Club

League Competition Pelican
idsomely. They also won
the K.O. No club seemed capa-
ble of stopping the consistently
grand display of L. Worrell, R.
Phillips and F. Willoughby.

In the Grades “A” and ee
competition -the best tennis ©
the pabnok was witnessed. All the
Grade “A” players were in tip
top form. Louis Stoute lost to
C. Shields, who lost to L. Wor~
rell and in turn lost to N. Gill
to reach the finals, At the other
end of the ladder, Rawle Phillips
disposed of B. Murray _and
Willoughby to meet N. Gill in a







hectic battle. Phillips won in 5}

sets.

GOOD DISPLAY
ROM a field of 60 players, D.!
Archer (Y.M.P.C.) gave a;
good display to beat D. Guiler |
(M.H.S.) The Boys’ Champion~
ship was won by E, Inniss. (Com-
bermere School) a coming
champion, if ever there was one.
The Men’s Double were an eX~
citing affair from start to finish.
L. Worrell and R. Phillips
(Pelican) were the winners in 4
sets from C. Greenidge and E.
(Barna), N. Gill
(Everton) proved that he is still
the island’s best when he again

beat Campbell Greenidge
(Barna) -in the _ island wide
championship.

The local association is to be
complimented on their efforts to
encourage. greater interest in the
the wish of the
association to send a mixed team

sire to please and entertain the to South Trinidad next year and

efforts will be made to bring this
tour to fruition.
1952 YACHT RACING IN
BARBADOS
The Royal Barbados Yacht Club
their usual series of

continuing into

Ssoort. from old # d in the 2nd. Division Harri- June. All of these races were held




stagers Delbert Son College, Boys’
Ban Ais 2 - 4 lice aie their robustness)
George eClean, Boys’ ub performances are all
Geoff Foster, Albert Weatherhead, the more creditable, since it wa
oe and Maurice Foster in goal their first season in asket-Ball.
h aren that he ws probably at the My advice to players is to con-
wae of his career as a goalkeep- (ontrate on hard and diligent prac
had plenty to choose from. ‘He lost {i084 a high degree of fitness, for
the M ; a . itis the most strenuous game piay-
bit way tape atom Gacioegy ed Incally and demands ¢reater
Jordan next season. Jordan has 2 eee the rules and finer
bundle of energy and his swim- points of the game. To this end I
ming is imroving every year: If he eet Pisce - erp aks on tactics,
ecules this way he gees be an es 7 &
‘island player of merit for many
years to come. Charles Evelyn, TABLE TENNIS
HE LADIES’ Competitions
created great interest and

“Mortimer” Weatherhead, Mal-
colm Browne, Jchn Chabrol and
lig rn ie aes ss prenigerable pomaevesient was
7 o shown hroughou the season—
the limelight next season, outstanding players being Misses
. Wood, R. Williams, J, Clarke,
TWO SECTIONS 1, ‘Carrington and M., Manning:
Now for the men’s league. !t Many other girls also gave good
was split into. two sections “A” performances—in the inter “club
and “B”, with five teams in each league competion sarna and
division. Snappers won both cups Queen's College tied on points
in the ‘A’ while in ‘B' division, and in the K.O. Queen's College
Whipporays, well skippered by showed up better and won-from
Feter Potter won the league cup Barna in the finals,
and Bonitas the K.O. trophy. OPEN CHAMPIONSHIP
Police turned in an improved per- N the Ladies’ open champion-
formance to their last year’s shoiv- ship some surprises were

K. INCE









Club and on Saturday afternoons commenc-

ing at 2,30 p.m. Approximately
36 yachts participated in this
series, comprising of Five Classes
—namely B, C, I, D and Tornado
On the whole, the Series was
successful, good weather pre-
vailed throughout and the racing
was always keen. It is hoped that
the number of yachts entering
for the 1953 Series will increase
considerably .

HE high
] light vacht-
ing for 1952 was
the Intercolon-
ial Tornado Re-
gatta against
Trinidad held
in Barbados in
October. Al-
though Barba-|
dos again won
both the Troph-
ies, the Trini-|
dad team
commended for
their excellent performance. Of
tht six races sailed, f6ur were
won by Mr. E.-L.°G. Hoad in}
“Vamocse.” _-by good helmsman-
skin and sterdv Sailing. Mr Hoad|
well deserves these good results
as his keen interest in yachts ond

recing. is unfailing.

T. HOAD

must be well

seen. Miss M. Wood (last your’
champion) who had played
throughout the season undefeated

a

* sleeplessness headache,

JF hypnotism does all the good

that is claimed by those
vyho practise it, then it is strange
that -doctors as a ‘whole make
such little use of it.

As a rule the medical profes-
sion it only too eager to take
up any remedy which gives some
promise of easing the troubles of
patients. In fact the history
of medicine is full of the names
of remedies which doctors have
acclaimed with enthusiasm and
then abandoned in dic-gust. .

Why do they hold back?

Why then has hypnotism never
had a full-scale trial when, ac-
cording to its exponents it can be
used to alleviate the most diffi-
cult of all the ills that afflict
mankind—those that are a con-
sequence of a seething unrest in
the mind?

The reason, probably is that
hypnotism is still associated in
many doctors’ minds with quack-
ery, magic or mumbo-jumbo.

Though they may believe it can
do good, their confidence in the
method is seldom great enough
to overcome the feeling that the
technique of hypnotising some-
one is rather absurd, with the
constant répetition of such com-
mands as “You are getting sleep-
ier” and “Your limbs are feeling
heavier’.

Successful hypnotists must be
quite confident in their own pow-
ers. Sometimes they give the im-
pression of being a little too con-
fident a few suggestions made
to a hypnotised patient and away
he or she goes with a completely
new temperament able to face
life with joy and courage once
more—or 50 it seems from som?
hypnotists’ reports.

ne medical hypnotist, accor
ing to a recent report, is helping
children to pass examinations by
putting them to sleep and tellins
them that when they wake up
they will have no difficulty with
whatever subjects they have been
labouring over at school.

When it comes to the treatme st
of common neurotic condition>—
anxiety.
hysteria—nearly all psychiutrists
agree that hypnotism can 3?
much good, but, they emphasise,
the results are unpredictable. It
is impossible, for instance to
forecast. that a certain percentage
of a group of patients with ob-
sessional neuroses will be im-
proved by hypnosis. There are
many failures.

Hardly a hint of failure

But hardly a hint of possible
failure is allowed to appear in
Dr. Philip Magonet’s new book
Hypnosis in Medicine (Heins-
mann, 9s. 6d.) which he has wri‘-
ten in order to widen medical
interest in hypnotherapy. This is
‘a pity because Dr. Magonet, who
is president of the Medical Hvo-
nosis Association, puts un a case
for hypnotiem which would in 7)
way have been weakened by
mentioning a few of its dis-
advantages.

In an informative introdnct’
he dispels many of the commonr
misconcentions “hout hyennnticn
and outlines its chectiered his‘o



You | Work

CURE ILLNESS ?

from Mesmer onwards. Much of
the book is given up to discussions

on the place of hypnotism in the ~-

treatment of a variety of psy-
chosomatic and _psychoneurotic
disorders and Dr. Magonet quotes.
many case’ histories in support
of his views. Some of these are
not always so convincing as he
seems to think they are.
The weman who was
depressed

For instance he records the
curious result of his treatment of
a neurasthenic woman who be-
came very depressed.

‘She had lost interest in her
husband whom she loved as weil
as in her friends, home, and per-
sonal appearance. She had even
pat her baby, to whom she was
‘devoted, into a private home, as
she felt completely incapable of
looking after it properly.’

After treatment by hypnosis
she felt strong and cheerful and
completely able to cope with
things. .

Dr. Magonét continues: “She
told me she had received a tele-
phone call from the matron of
the home where her baby was
being looked after, to be told there
was a case of poliomyelitis there.
If Lhad got that message a month
ago,’ she told me. ‘I shouid have
§0ne raving mad with worry. But
I am feeling so well now that the
news did not bother me.”

Evidently whatever else it did
hypnosis did not induce in this
mother the feeling that she must
have her baby at home again and
away from the danger of infantile
paralysis,

This astonished the doctors
' Though hypnotism is unreliable
in its effect, there is not the sligh(-
est doubt that it can be a very
powerful therapeutic weapon.
Only a few weeks ago a remarka-
ble cure by hypnotism was re~
ported in the British Medical
Journal, a cure which has aston-
ished doctors all over the worl.

The patient was a boy of 16
who had been born with a rare
disease the effect of which was
to cover the skin of the body with

® thick horny black casing.

No treatment was of any avail,
and a young doctor as a last resort
decided to try hypnotism. He put
the patient to sleep in the usual
way and suggested that his left
arm would et better, About five
days later the thorny casing of
the left arm softened and fell off,
leaving th- ekin normal under-
neath With further hypnotics
suggestions, nearly all the affected
skin heeme normal,

‘Ideas must change’

A well-known specialist, com-
menting on this case in the BMJ
described the patient’s disease as
just as much an anatomica) dis-
ability a as clubfoot. In his
opinion the fact that hypnotism
could cure it “demands a revision
‘of current concepts of the rela-
tion between mind and bady.”

This extraordinary result shouid
certainly back up Dr. Magonoet’s
plea for a more extended use of
hypnoticm by doctors.

World Copyricht Reserved
—L.E.S.

When You

Cali On Doctor X

By CHAPMAN PINCHER

Shyness or fear of feeling foo!
ish no longer prevents the patien’s
of one go-ahead London doctor
from telling him all the symptoms
that worry them,

They get that over-before they
see him — by filling in a 195-
item quiz-form about their pain
palpitations, and pet annoyances
while sitting in the waiting-room

After a two-minute) glame
through the answers the docto
claims to be able to get a reliable
idea of what may be wrong wi'r
a patient and which complain’
can be eliminated from the
diagnosis.

Then he gets on with the d>-
tailed physical examination with-
out unnecessary questioning.

Tho ouiz-forms — one for men,
one for women — are worded so
that anyone can understand them

The questions”

Here are~ some sample
tions:—

*Does your heart often race like

mac? Do you bite your nails

badly? Are headaches common

ques-

Are you scared
there afte no

in your family?
to be alone when
friends near you?

Do you often catch severe
colds? Are you considered @
touchy person? And even: Do

you smoke more than 20 cigar=
eties a day?

Patients answer each questio®
by pencilling a ring round ‘Yes”
or ‘No’. The quiz takes about 15
minutes to complete.

A supply of forms is left in the
waiting room with a notice asking
patients to fill one in on arrival.

The answers

Ths doctor claims that the quiz
saves consulting-room time and
leads to more certain diagnosis
than would be possible in an in-
terview alone.

It also protects the doctor
against the too-talkative patieat
who confuses the diagno*is by
harping on his favourite :ymptoms
and forgetting to mention others
which may be more important.

And it solves the problem of
how to pass the time profitably
while “queueing” in the waiting-
room,






NG NS NS NG NS NS NG NG NS NSN NS NS NO

HUNDREDS OF “GIFTS TO DELIGHT THE «LITTLE ONES”

BIG SELECTION OF FASCINATING DOLLS A REALLY WONDERFUL RANGE OF TOYS
* «2
( ( MANY INTERESTING AND AMUSING GAMES

UNDOUBTEDLY — THE BIGGEST AND BEST ASSORTMENT IN TOWN OUR HUGE SELECTION INCLUDES

LEAD SOLDIERS MECHANICAL AND OTHER PEDAL MOTOR CARS

STEEL WAGGONS AND VAN TOYS DOLLS’ PRAMS & GO-CARTS
TOY MOTOR CARS MECCANO SETS — All Grades HOUSES & FURNITURE
SAILING YACHTS CLOCKWORK TRAINS Cc HIL DREN'S CRICKET SETS
RUBBER TOYS—Many Kinds RUBBER BALLS PEDAL BICYCLES & TRICYCLES
JIG-SAW PUZZLES TEDDY BEARS TRUMPETS AND WHISTLES

METAL WHEELBARROWS



— ALSO —
RATTLES, BALLOONS, GLASS AND TINSEL XMAS TREE DECORATIONS, PAPER

GARLANDS, PAPER BELLS, AND BALLS, XMAS WRAPPING PAPER, LABLES AND
TAPES, CRACKERS, ETC. re

PAY US A VISIT AND BRING THE CHILDREN — THEY WILL ENJOY THEMSELVES.

s% HARRISONS XMAS BAZAAR

Fs NA AT AN A NOK EAA AE S\N A NEN RN ENN NNN ON ARENT A A NS





(rs GN NG NG NG NG NG NG NG NG NG NG 8 NS NG 8 WW



GN NG BN 0 NF 05 EN NS NG NG NN NN NNN

~
; B.B.C. ORANGE

B.B.C. GINGER

NNN yy

A Very Merry Chrustmas

Barbados Bottling Company Limited

Roebuck Street Nomgenen ws.) A



5 pi ENB HN KE NON NN OK CN AN NP ENE

Authorised MBottlers of

ex 9s x 4 5 4 KE A KK —P — ete! < ge



——ee












“GINGER y
ALE

'








gee BEVERAGES ©

wor

e y
oe BEVERAGES







KOLA ORANGE |

&

OR NOT





THIRSTY



from

BOTTLERS LTD.



Full Text



PAGE 1

SI'NTIW. nKfT.MRFII II IMI CHRISTMAS SI'PPl.KMKNT PAGE TBIMVFUT A True Story The Ghosts Of Goldiei | THE BEST VALUE ON WHEELS VMAS TIME is one of the sea>the >oar when Moms gy jrancm Milner %  Ml UHI inexplcable -* icie II transpired !lal a former %  f the house lU toon as his private inn. and ..ould never biook any uitcrlctthe front ieps ,„.,. n^iem Maybe he was the on nf of the curkui exctta uid tatares* the small DMMho iik.these nrl %  thint; OM'lolni a circle of %  "><' ppid Nothing more. But iamc j-mlleman % %  ( t friends who have gathered toit happened again MOM lime ll|k loom gclhcr at the far end of the "! %  w *•* %  out randan, just as someon.%  %  % %  M VV 1& ing. "Bui you cant all H* l!1 Child"^ "^ "W explain Ihesc thlnfl away. This i'ii wan nine the \v e ol(l Goldini: ippen. and there you are." 1" %  line t> the lop of ..go. but I sliil think of Ihe OH l happened to do |aat stopped, Nurse u, re on d the lovely Xmascs we thing, and when 1 could get a thotignt she saw a faint iljure, gptat there, besides all the other word in edgeways. I aid • i .,r ig quit* still, but ,ppy days and nights. I was me tell rog of l M >f iv> < %  >.j] ( t neve* frightened of its by-gone poriancaa." Sc, lowvwr. About two hour, after inhaggtantl l like t>> r member These Uunfj if* rame to our. maid. „.:i those weird liilMlli. nnd I occult, do not happen only at ,i e epiiiK in the servant's quarters, 0 no t m i m (hat they cannot be Xma* lime, but all through the M yln* to corn* at once as her explained I think the old house """ mffij -* -' *~ frth€l %  *•* must "'" %  kWSh '"' lh '"" %  pL old place*. coidm*. a>Ion. ol tM* ok) Va , ff!i,?1 "2,,"' hOUM* When We l.MCh: 111 *W "W ^W JilSii 52? -M V -*?~ M tluii present* round the \: tri-e And Ihe )oy of rown-ups at ihe happlneei itnteiitrnent all aroun,) lh< in two-storey dwelling, the Mn*is, , I ean't slay here any top door of which had been -,,„ w ,,„. i c m e '• blown off in lh. h U r.ica. of .'*' r ^ ^' \^ u : Who || 1831. (Onee when we were h-vW vo "; *" vu "" ing some repairs done, we came ".'' %  ashe ^. ^.. ,,„._, acres, an old window blocked up Well, mum %  • ery *£*<*mside a wall with the date 1167. Ktair*. * I ictoatnl ihe kitchen I'm not quite sure, above the dm". : lie I arch of Ihe window). It had two while ami large front rooms, dining and Had deal wavi m war.' I drawinfl room, with a wide hall"Bui do you ever tee who it la? l way dividing ihe two. which ran "No, mum. But I ain't staying." i the length of the rooms, from the And that was that, front door to the opposite and. v/e hud .in interestiiiK fine Thi "!her en.l oiiened with a j„ that old place. The ghosts of door on to a porch, which ovei. tnc pgg^ those gentry of by-gone resented us In aome way md i House.* are like thai, pal ga pul out she long know, they (eel and Understand, from de udder side At least some do. I have not en back there since we lefl It. t Its ghosts must .still be 'Una;. ,. kj .||||fJ VAUXHALL • ItOBI MII.KS I M; IIAI.I.CN • Moru POWER (IS H P i • MORK SI'AC IS fOIIIIIIM 4. iltlf.1 £ (Robarl Thom l.mui.-di g[ Uul 4i>lli While Pjrk RoW • looke-1 1li' -hlch and had j MV i view of the undulatn beyond, li araa a Urri unspoiled by hottaas. with just Ihe single-track I.MIV.. uinning in lh.' iniil-dislancc it perh % %  < %  am %  it"i U %  •' i haps they \> intaal to be rriendl .Tered no ill ttom I I U %  Mybe some glai I 1 there too. iMCaUM %  nvu %  oflan gatt i dart man in i manfo Tec In the back-] rd. very still ami %  ttttotai but I rnual vary watchful. Perchance he %  mi I had a was guarding aome bu-i-d brajashghi leanlni thai uie. I wlah he had indicated 001 ||i -i ut inn lam' U dtd not behf anylhlng su|iei< iiiiil.i I % %  i loved i i explicable di ( i ha| | tha very nrsl day ntll the dogk of j i %  .i visited us : There was one nice >ug black fellow, that my little girl sow] • ubling along the AlrtuTk %  •' BaJaVaraj f>ora| % % %  .e front doiw Io the! arch door. She (ol1 % % %  %  i him, saw him il down on the porch iiul then disappear. He visited her once >r twice In the nurerv lieside her co', Ml she was nol fri htenod of him. Maybe he once bc' i I to a litllc tfiri like bar. a many curious and "iing?. I will tell before I get lo. My brouii • %  • %  layUtl wflb us at the tune, and onSurd i v afternoon he was IroUng op the long straight •e he saw two eldeil> ibaut twenty yards in "he; %  > i -e dressed ||g i .-ere converslli^ in manner He tool. kg two aunts of the At about noon. I up the tang drive, v %  round the fion* of lh) I then away hi 'he back. At I passed the wlndV fasl-room. I looked up and saw an old black ma d gtandlnf at Ihe window, ana blnck. aiilltl at those old-fashioned "Wm-Wt" caps with streamer* was perched on top of her i %  \-.-,\ gl.lVl puxuaoT i tboughl ^nl I had hial (ormari*. and when 1 got inside I aske.1 my U Bfakott had come 10 help us m ^ * %  No, madam. Slu W only cook and me." she replied We iMrrni i • % %  • rj •fBai i but no one avai saw hei %  Well, wa aattli many a long y i,,;",;:::' and w,th lh, two boyi warn out hi tea dn md then.hey duM iBVaaUaMh Whan the? enter, aapean Ha ; ..niy about ed the ln;jsc i % % % % %  %  I %  ' nrm > ,,v n i '""'' of the boiaag, .' Ughly-ati >W souls must have fillv, m a sweat .11-1 BDlverini bear oomlng lo pay us ;< visit, to from hca,i 10 to The KUl M were doing w th Had itoppi : "">'hal h*.-. once been theirs, ed to it %  "e-c s.itisfled that This Dtmlop 60CDS&IL on your tyres means for an t| .-.. -II. so thcri f.rlher. *r ^ I bat %  .lot our ghostly icnlful of us, This erenl „!,,!i %  •' %  '' thorouch eoarota was • no tree gtTW neai cn-^jah t i the stable %  '"'' bra I grate on Ihe root We learn' afleiv .ii : stable p b>-g..r a workrr*ni thei-. fond ef malting Inrnttura, which was h j (evourttc hobby. Ano'her eSpi %  %  *' ps on tn „,lv v. ftei dusk. I t ain-d oy n t m o-.ner ied S da r ght along the passage, said Chat a tall white fenUaman. to a bedroom door. Thinking it looking ver i.ve.oua, was neighbouring friend. T had stood liv her l>ed and told called out In gay where I was. her to g~*. out, as that was his The 'otteteps tui-ned. passed room and h w a*a M one In gMtlrmaii ha.i ,„, n.^. vrm „„ who „,. .. **2 i List be leraaaod that undergffMi of rooms which omprisad (gaj house in which we • and corother. Of l wo wore used as The Gold lettl ia fOBnd on all Dunlop ca* lyres the tyreg with lha stronger, mote flexible casing and the unique Dunlop patented tread. These features provide the highest resistance lo abrasion and wear. The Cold Seal on your new Dunlop tyres means most miles for your money. DUNLOP 7fo HlbrMs /y/asTerTy^ ECKStC.N aaoi > ST Di5im>uioi



PAGE 1

PAGE TWELVE si \i>\\ AIIVIH Ml SI M>\\ llll I MH1K ORDEAL BY ICE M. Herzog lolls the grim, of the conquest of A Wiirniiiril slor\ mountain /.' I.IHR1.I 1/1//V//1/ rim\isi,\ iN* MI i:v \ If r. %  %  %  %  %  MAUIUCt MlkZOC N.I a tbMfM aw taa a /;/' At/*//* VOTl j Focus On British Guiana NfXl .\|olll(.l\ 1IK| • rul.i\ lb> BBC 'Focus' i>i to written, and pro Btl %  \ rltlUK of '.he pi H rmpiai ti e %  ,./ hlUN, PortuKiii• mEuropean Httlart then %  %  %  M count %  %  "I'lton boo* vt .. %  I iln ir\ l.i.f a. •*!*• rni WISH n. I.,. • i..m..rii> ijtr.li r*. ttn-li --.•-..,• LB< nxilf n* Irtim. %  n^ !" u ? 1 %  Imublr I I Iv'down look al n mou I Th1. ; %  • espadlUoa • ...... ,K i.;.Vn %  ;, vi..,., .reTa.l.. N.Ukln... If. m P.... "V."* 0 .: '"*" %  handa" tayg aomeone. An %  eBfc\ I MM I* I* I I n-rr >•/ Buffrage n< %  • development r q %  %  I in I'n. land arhii h li nc i %  %  of th* United K ..(to .---> ••''•<' %  . yet h.u. only h..U u toilUa %  . /.i, I '",,"..„* uTrSS?i MbHante. What j. definite li toll l HI* id BUgW and nee are grown in Rtc;i! qunntlUea, bauxite is on %  Ins the peal I rnething thai nil ran u %  l/iriR i%  %  nt-—Ji i ,.il,l;i •; ;>nrt hard Hit ? b He nog 1 the latt i., understand the %  'Ct t* well a. %  -JI %  M|aUV* %  I I V % %  el* while lute .1 n d iii' %  v.. .<,,... .... IU IH-.II IT. OOlj f..: tonrto th.-m-iv-s m laybifl • > tbi should federate now land her own looking for trade unn clotc co-operation with South —Hrrvog hn| Mr* tfHSllfllS WiiritCU America, eN % %  ihls n-ck Enslbh-nH^kinc WCII Ul nl lam to warn but we -.hall be Interested u, gat* ()c fintat 4.13 j.' on Ihl I 1 uvri >.f the ordeal s.. Rema clbogi (and we I* 1 ,:. n dawn breaJu un the I %  I .. I'"" !" Communism * Kuirinnee %  rff. in their 1 lathing H tkrough *h -ii ( I %  .1 tied e '" "-' %  : .tr;"" 1 ,:: 1 I the from recent week) re%  %  ; (>e Imtt on the / pnvau own"' %  "< * U — -i. 7.IM % %  ral Hi rJafi eti •%  •< 7 150 C %  Bj H reveal. 1 l.iih !.[,.> .11 I I I To Rarxog the titn'im.t{ beauty; the mounta 1 ..t 7.4 In' 1 '" *"' 1 1 iatn i a* hl •tter opal ttu ^P**'*" 1 P Indira. Thii latta? 1 II 1 l-> ). %  : % %  ai they cl reach Uw "Our %  v. ith Ulustral 'i rthil> Die iher aUd |„ ui IndrrMual, not I rr 1 at the l dieiiri-iiuT the wealthv 1,, In tVrit..r VMP. II-;I;.I. I-.,.,... wealthy to look wrtter From Briltah (.nmna N hlnwell It la tha m %  ,. ,, ., ., ,, .. Th .' Guiana'* .li'R-w schedule hie 1 %  ;is able 1 tliouRht with Ru %  idea In the and I ^,,1 ),j throug) %  Aorta Ha 1 1 .:. tiny 1 numerate |g0) n H • ha.. Ilwayi been l| 1 led the 1 •. %  • you itli illuminating t>..nd it. fronucr* an 1 j tuury. it wan with thin the i mrnunlal claim have rlii-un:,' condition "i COTOH n unlai enintrw Rulihi DooelU 1 %  In 1 ri*h luxury; workent u adlng the drabbaat lives cannot '' el %  1 i, %  hare thati %  nUgim : ''" ,,: all nliKioti. I-ut Mam Jarv '' 1 % %  -! for do"•awl IVaT C'oiTiinuiii.sin is mor> in 'he 31 an. 11 %  > f-'th II 1* a nnnm-ial and ., „,„ 1 rataai, Double Kill And whatever its ngenU may On Wtsinrtb. inat., UTii^ni eventtttUS ends f he BBC wi! • %  utinx any 1 llgi u %  Inning at itun | is an adaptation ..f • 1 11M remain forarnoat Maiightm'a lory. "P.iO." while those op|>osing Comthe miniil i. Sh.un to IHBrittib %  BBC'i addition to ihi B.G wtil figure 14th hut, in thparson of tan Carew, the Brltl 1 %  %  : < %  ( the de..tli o( a p tvaattl will TIIIIK pteea in 1 hour progrnmine Tba n j ronamme '.sill ^t.>r> %  %  I'oon.i' |.. of Trinidad. Hroadcast %  • ; 1 I |.ni Bund iy, 14th. I BROOKLAX puts you right OVERNIGHT up. "Rustic Haunt Newondn BtaoUtl :• 'k. l u ,..„t. kt I.H.,,1. laullvi h I,.,, ik. Um I %  rko %  .. %  ml 1 mull pfii HcJIIhal ru^^^^vft.v .:'I',""\;,':,','I afVai THERE IS TIME!! HI W li the lime.To look SMART If you are smart To buy a Now Suit for the Christmas All THERE IS A SOI GABBADDfl a TROPICAL si ITS from MSI." up PANTS ban s.r,ii :.,. THE LONDON SHOP LTD. STOMACH PAINS MM TO INDIGESTION Try IUII ONB DOS8 •f MACLBAN BRAND rrOMAOt POWDER I Tm a rirtaa t c al l y balanced formula •wkrf rcaVws Stomach I'.mv PlatulciMz. Heanbura, Nsutcs •r Aoditr doe to lodigritina. I UM hi I-AIM > M ftf^fn you've hied a... URRAY f S : STOUT MANNING & CO., LTD. AGENTS. """>'" *-"' UOM UM d*v lSl •mwlm couch yiup. m*d pilly lot lllfkt falKK, i:n.r di*n Horn Canada lo lave klddtt*—four Klddira fiom Ih* r.i-,iac of mush* and i>ti have ar-l Jtl.L Mffl rw but fhoioua-hly le.ied m 1 rahfvr *ldrtlrirmij'i ani! %  maa ti al 1 Another famous Buckley Product Out lavr you Bui-kU,,. : %  dy. and U at fa, Muture .a lor >ngr en and kav* n handy. lurt of 1 >y Latxiialorbw lutur*. r.n.M. 1 lareeM aellliaf eough and %  aaai • n-Khiey. ...T 1 l-.nli. of JACK and JUJ. TODAY War Th* l.tnlifs a rs .. Bl 84c. n, *2.OII au rtrta M R nal lr Prices ->l %  I orTrr— liarbadiis Hardware Co.. Ltd. (Tinll.uis.For rtll|l.H) No. lb Svinn St ::— 1'liunitill*. 11116. 3334. -,•''--*.*.'.*x.-.'.'.-.',^-,',',v,'.-.--'**,'.'.-.-.'.'-'.'.-.'.''#*,',',^-,-.*,-,*,-,',',v M.ikr sure -hat you dr. pot have any ir^rcls. SJlbp TO:|AV Al Louis L. cy trgaj EUnge