Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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WHAT'S ON TODAY YESTERDAY'S WEATHER REPORT
Police Court: 10.00 a.m we ¥
Advocate Christmas ard Cor eee ti

Exhibited at Museu 10 é pre
B.C. Films at St. Joseph and Mt be

5 and 7.30 p.m ‘ a
Mobile Cinema, Kingsland Pastur yy

Christ Church: 7.30 p.m

o

for the cause that lacks assistance,
ane & wrongs that need resistance, 4

or the future in the distance, { 5! i 38 ;
or the future in the distar ESTABLISHED 1895 TUESDAâ„¢. DECEMBER 9, 1952 CENTS .m., 30 pao







ay STEEL HIIDGE | | Delay In
Mid-east
Defence 7







Seven Frenchmen,
40 Moroccans Killed he


















































| By K. ¢ THALER
Ri ti t t | From All Quaaitis t ec
ioting Starts ae i
Restaurant
In Casablanca ° :
CASABLANCA, Dec. 8. } I O ;
| \
Seven Frenchmen and 40 Moroccans were killed to-day | nto ven ide
: in the worst incident in this French North African protec- | y rhe
torate in more than a year.-Three French civilians: were | aon The police haa to be t
* “ iC a > ant-
found mutilated in the industrial ‘Carrieres Centrale” | ¢\ ic. ‘tn Reatkene beta oa
quarter, their heads slit off and their clothes charred from \ from an oven where he had been
flames. Three other “European” civilians were wounded. | Bus bea by an angry customer who M
iain ~ declared his pizza was under- ther
we ee of: police sealed off as |cooked. When they arrived only ; eg
é native Medina quarter and) L £ the restaurant-owner’s feet could : += oo
ten tanks patrolled the tense Orona tor be seen sticking out of the oven. k ) : lans
streets. A crowd of Arabs were e | Pizza is a thin round slice of woe a}
reported to be holed up in a Will Be | dough covered with tomato sauce, ~~
mosque near a troublesome part - cheese and anchovies and baked of
of the city and police troops took | e inside a bread oven : tia im = Boe
up positions nearby. Televised 7 — ee
. Wellington, N,.Z.: The report to 1-Kast efence
Police have arrested Moham- | the General Assembly of the Pres- nnir ‘ ‘ nd of
med Bouazza, Secretary General | LONDON, Dec. 8 byterian Church of New Zealand A tag med
of the Communist-led General; Officials staging the coronation asked that the traditional Wed- ( Insteagy, ex=
Confederation of Labour and two | i bowed ‘> ‘public cat ee . be ding March be scrapped from the ‘ proceedit irougt
Communist - leaders. F c outcry ane’) marriage service because “it has liplomat hanne larity
| approved television coverage f/had its day.” The committee bt if the differenc vhich
Three newspapers of the Isti- |the event. The committee an | stated in its ‘report “We would ave et from tl mn
qual Nationalist | Government |nounced that TV cameras will be} welcome new music to rid us of rents of ther six nations on
, p > sturbane ¢ Mi ster , 1 31 East defe ” -
have been banned, eee in Westminster Abbey to too much Wagner and Mendels- LEFT: The 110 foot-span stee) bridge, weighing 18 tons, is here seen pointing at an brltain’s mi I a ey Plan
santas aa = see strike |cover much of the lengthy reli- } Sohn.” angle of 20 degrees down into the 80-foot ravine which runs south of the Belle ung boar ot ee
ores y. Bouarre . tra ——_ |gious ceremony including the Rome: The Russians have ap~ Pumping Station. In the foreground can be seen mon working the winch and hoist @ On page:
which may now be prolonged actual placing of the crown 0a, ologised to the Italian republican (top left) which eased the bridge into this critical stage of its launching. Near the wail camatiihaiadiiaieiale
5 until tomorrow according to uNn-|the Queen’s head. Some parts of ; government for havimg unwitting- top of the picture at the far end of the bridge is the tractor which held the strain
f confirmed reports, oy lthe rites will be banned. Thejly carried out monarchist propa- of the bridge during this process, In . Di
é ae aioe. iB. cos pains | nation’s televiewers will not see | anc in Moscow. When a team ABOVE: A view of the bridge looking south in its final resting place after it was € Op ( 1e
i Ne ae ast Fr’ a aoe i ma }the Queen’s brow and palm |of Italian girls went to Moscow = . successfully launched yesterday afternoon, This bridge will carry a 20-inch arterial
| at ine acd ae. ar ee er janointed with sacred oi] and they this summer to take part in a| . water main from the Belle Pumping Station to Grand View and Britton’s Hill . C | ‘
trade union leaders in Tunisia, IS) iy not see her receive com- | basketball tournament, the Soviet mi arse reservoirs. n aul an
reported to have spread to shops : es : authorit rave th Ite lian | 7
in. the international zone of |™union, The Coronation Commit- ay es gave Seahe’ Ei cae | rt x > ‘
; - cee a . \tee gave in on another yint ag to carry in a parade, But in- D l t 4S E t G ‘ | li , q “< |
Tangier and Tetuan in Spanish "°C ave that ano a ee stead of giving the girls the new-| e ega es IT ic | as erman ane wasn
Morocco, lthrough the streets of London will | Style Italian flag, they gave them | : ‘ oi
In the first of to- fate I'he be extended so that more people a pg Siena arms of thé | oO Vestries Communists BERMUDA, Det —
a wave of 600 people attacked the | can watch. The bulleting added 7 ‘ 2 ' Efforts to raise the wreckage
| BaHRN® Se ae nag | ty TR a Peat uet nua inate, QE: Be help fe elle Launche Arrested |. 2 acini
{ besieged saat by ty crowd | flypast over Buc kingh am Palace eneidl - New Zealand women’s Ss osen | rres a qf C.F. 4 Star of the ah nt w —
swelle 3, anc rench | 0 a _ . a. ore os a . i ‘ rashed two mile N.E. of Ber-
Sumaeidis soci a detachment to pa tet nase on alt fficial tea to Britain in 1954, members | The 110-foot-span steel bridge which will carry the ud tk Satur ia norning will
j restore order Senior Commonwealth officials fof the Wellington Women’s Cricket| Mr, G. S, Corbin, Parochial 20-inch arterial water main over the Belle Gully and con BERLIN, Dec. 8 at ‘
Pe: the Gu SS ont a heise which} Association will go baby-sitting, . Treasurer of St: Peter amie I8g nect up th new Belle E lec ‘trie Pumping Station with Grand| ,,lnformed. Communist source Tats or in
' —_— - the Queen will be asked to con= Cc, A Thornton were appointed : e e ectric 8 ALLO ) ae Monday predicted an Bast German one at ee. Sees :
‘ \sider for her coronation. The to represent the St. Peter Vestry} View and Britton’s Reservoirs, was suce essfully launched | show trial of two former top rank / . ; ag ~~
complete draft was passed on 10 B mb Fo on the General Committee of yesterday ing Communists in a move t a a rise =:
Sudden Lift nine Prime Ministers or their oO r | Vestries. The appointments were Hia Excellency the Acting |scapegoats for the failure of + ie beaoy ey » far
e e ae ee ae “- me T; , 9 | made = a ms eting Oe, ane Governor, Mr. R. N. Turner and|West German Communist 7 air ; : f + bar
V ish’ Commonwe: en-day eco- he yesterday afternoon. The Genera M Mrs. Turner visited the work dur-[halt effectively West Gern {1 itor the Cuban
In ietminh nomic conference. Complete se- - ueen 2 Committee is expected to held ore Czech | ing the ; ifternoon, and wate political inte on with the wa t eee : sin ist, “—
;crecy was maintaineq about the ts first meeting at the Parochial | present when the 18-ton bridgo| ; sgh ; ° eye tei g
actual phrasing of the titles. EDINBURGH, Dec. 8. | Buildings, Cumberland Street, on C { lreached its final setting on the] . Sources said the key figures MK \ have hela @
Assault —(C.P.) A home-made bomb the size of| December 10, to discuss amend- ommunis Ss north bank. of the sin ; the trial now being prepared by {Press conference but have been
@n egg was planted last night nent to the : owe Act, " a \ the East German attorney generat, }\'" ible = determine the cause of
HANOI, Indo China, Dec. 8. U. } in a Scottish mailbox marked; The appointments were mage A » t > 1 They both congratulated the} would be Kurt Mueller, former |"e crash ; gees
A French Army spokesman said .S. Government with the royal cipher of the|on the motion of Mr. Ge G. %& rre SLEC officers of the Waterworks De-| deputy West German Communist Through the Bermuda Govern
Monday that French authorities . Queen. Police said that the bomb] seconded by Mr. T. EB. Corbi |partment responsible for the} party chief and Paul Merkac | ent they have asked the: aid of
feared the sudden drop in Viet- Will Not Pay For was set by a Scottish Nationalist hy ihe aicole tine tis ped Ves. LONDON, Dee. 8 Pereent ae E. C. omnes former member of the Bast G a, U.S \ ‘ id ‘vat
ni osiege: = sti ocaUs . y sov- y a n anc € At 1 8 g Viechanica ungineer otf 1e@ De- ‘ * ‘ ar Kinve te uthoritie here it raising the
minh activity around besieged i protesting because the new nav thai he would do everything in] cjec) a ast ix high ranking | i wtiment: wasin cherge-of the man Politbure Roth ' on
Nasan indicates Reds have with- Seize Property ereign was described as Queen his power to satisfy members: He zechoslovak Communist Party qf ; 4 y arg : irrested SAY . , ¥
drawn the bulk of their forces foi ; Elizabeth II of Scotland. Tne}ron that if taxpayers were quite |2"4 Government officials were ee ning, ; assi won by ai L. ., Prayers were offered for Vic=
e strike elsewhere. He said the WASHINGTON, Dec. 8. Nationalist claim that Queen 1appy about the Vestries Act he reported to be arrested today in ee Ww ‘ Wirotas aes _ Along with Mueller and Merber jtims in Bermuda Cathedral yes~
lifting of the assault on the fortress! ‘The Supreme Court ruled on Elizabeth I of the sixteenth cen-|4ig not see why other houla ra ee we arre a “i purr be por 8 | D etah tern bey Mt , G ‘\ Sob ieie ouret alc a cee of anider n reas an ihe Hees erie
was “frankly puzzling” in view of ' | Monday that private property (tury did not rule Scotland. ‘ omplain oh y u rs 1: ah ot - superintende nt ind = Mr Rict . ' ra z or yeas a “omni es th Lic Chure :
ae 7 ri goslav ne Ss agenc 1 ie Tcia vere a ster d “ oO 1UrC
its importance in the French chai !owners do not have constitutional | CP. Acting Churchwarden nd monitored here jardson, Inspector, Mr. W. H.l¢ried for alleged links wit Cr.
of defence. f right to payment for property Mr. G. G. Gill was appointed to Garrod Chief Engineer Was} perialistic F ates ‘ane j —
He said however that the Com-|seized and destroyed by the + e act as Churehwarden in the ab- ch Vice-Premier Fielginer) present el aaah
munist Commander Vonzulyen'Unitead States government to Bie cle VET | sence of Mr. A. A. Gill whom the iid to head the list. Other Phe bridge, the first of ite kind| -{t0lsm'’—U. | N L
S “ : D states ve P sence Of Mr. # / X whom é to ac 1e list. VM ue ridg it st o ts 1 “~ er
Giap may merely be awaiting|prevent. it falling into enemy y Vestry granted one month’s leave, | in¢ slude d Maching Construction|to be launched in Barbados, was " ovemoer
reinforcements after suffering hands. The court held that the bd 7 Mr, A. A, Gill had requested Minister Augustin Kliment, form-|designed by the Grown Agents | ’ . Y
heavy losses in two attacks ‘fifth amendments of “fair com- ine Ahree months’ leave but a mbers| er ii Welfare nd abour! after they had been given the de | Sessions End
AL . , ation” for seized property decided that as the Parochial a ! Czen Berar I lav | tail f the gully It was con |
Military observers said Giap®s pensa : eae c E ‘ t , weak ; Natinnal | at ‘ ag) a a J on 4 cae
; . [does not apply to oil facilities “Kee : hands ff k year was nearing its end they)Kopriva ex-Minister for Nationa ucte 1 Glasgow where it wag ‘ eal
ammunition must be running low < eep your hands 0 other? «ile he a ‘ ree - Security, Genera idwik Swo-!| pre-erected before : . } * ate te
i , a i ‘ere pounded all lasts cestroyed by the army in the} people’s property and consider)‘ ila not grant three fy Cl € Ys ener 1 L ie o-| pre-erected before shipping ome i Yo ; Re
His forces were pounc é i Philippine Islands shortly after] y ‘self nies Shi = are not Mr. G. S. Corbin, Ve ry Clerk, | bod Defence Minister ink Work arten about 8 o'clock Sho in Da i V (
week, French troops within the Pearl Harbour ; i yourse) lucky t ie Worship Mr then drew Paragrapt 7 of “ Minister for Physical Culture and yesterday morning in fine weath- Ppp Ss “ys est { A,
fortress being fed by airlift The Cay facilities including going, NO told a-yeur old Vestries Act to the claien ooo ind Anton Gregor who!er, and during the three hours it ng Chief Ju ug B
The spokesman said Giap ae ett SSE age aS So ; ae ee oa mermber The Chairman, Rev.) dismissed a Minister for|took to complete the prelimin- fe a he ther c the jur
snail-like munitions supply system ee en, ae Bs labourer saihes a) te 5 Res A. J. Hatch, after reading ex-|Foreign Trade on December 4, | aries members of the public and be ore Xmas fter th them: { ‘
consisting almost entirely of eee eer posed ay -}man's Tenantry, - George yeS-teracts from the Act, said; “We| ,. even the workmen waited anx- ce the ‘
: a = «ihe jdacan district of Manila. The} terday when he fined him £10 for ; oa ates cand . The agency said that in addi , f ie : -
Coolies—may have left him shorty es . " j-jmust grant the Churchwarden b Y susly for \ first move over the ee
¢ mortar and artillery shells with | properties were destroyed onfstealing a bicycle trém John Mil-}i.. 0" ‘The Vestry then agreed|tiou @ “number of high rankifig) rollers Gniwhich it rested since SS,
ee ike heed a new odel Sere of General Douglas Mac] Jington of Belle Gully, St-Michael.}+ one month , state officials and many member: Geeta semen . at |
oe: a es Arthur on December 28, 1941 as} The offence was committed on] wr. T. §, Chandler, on a motion|of the Czech Communist Party”) months ago : Pe Chan naanlaeeraNEiNe |
slaught.— the Japanese entered the city. | August 3 this year. Sgt. E. W-lp. wr. G. G. Gill Senior Guard-|had been arrested in the latest | .
The owners of the Standara] King attached to Central Station}iin, was appointed to the Board|Ppurge.—U.P | Precautions | R A L E | 6 H | Ni D U 5 T R } E 5
New President ly Jacuum Oil Company Caltex —— for ae I weet of Guardians while Mr, T. E ie ade ele Every precaution, wa Latent
(Philippines) Incorporated and UTIOWes wes Tt Tepe. Corbin was appointed to the by the engineer for it afe Aerial vie f the 40 :
. ; ; The fine is to be paid bY] Road Board * ry) lashing fas tad teantnen Aerial view of the 40-acre
Of Israel eta aan pe ag monthly instalments of £2 or The oo al granted Dr. F. G Air Attempt Lo fhe ae aiiine’ wide Vy sh anes lant di Noitinehari Bialand
ag men - : or ; an alternz » of three > 1 des aatiien leave ' ee
Ithe properties. Government paid there is an alternative 0 Reader P.M.O. two weeks leave vinche ind blocks to reduce |
for MeOctRan stocks and ene months’ imprisonment with hard|p; Reader, in a letter to the Ves- Reéae h Sc acene Of he train of the bridge were
JERUSALEM Dec. | portation equipment. only labour. Burrowes elected to b€liry said that he had secured the ‘ ed. Shortly before _ eleven}
Russian born ‘Vietzhak Benzvi Companies demanded another ie anmmarty. : Bell services of Dr, Tony Gale to act Crash Abandoned o'clock, the first move across the}
a Or ene ea he 7 A wah urrowes while passing Belle]; his place â„¢ #0-ft. deep ravine was made
veteran Socialist Zionist Jeatles 166,000,080, for tie Test ot | je Gully, St. Michael saw Milling- Members present were; Rev “C)RI ‘ The tractor on the on if |
resident lemolis facil T a I CALIFO! A. De 4 , ith bank
has been elected President of|demolished facilities. he Court} ton’s ‘bic ycle outside of a house.J/a jy. Hatch, Mr. T. S. Chandler, Airt a "lw? Tray lheld — the train while a hand
Israel. The 68-year old who came of Claims upheld their right to! te took it to his home and made} yr-'G. G. Gill, Mr, T. EB. Corbin, Airforce rescue officiai te te ah Sere aie en enna 1g aoa
to Palestine at the turn of the ‘just compens ation.” The} several alterations. Mr. G. C. Parris and Mr, D. V. Sone attempts to Mach a crash inch by inch ,
century succeeds Dr. Chaim Weiz-(Supreme Court reversed that After altering the bicycle and] Jenimott C 47 transport high on snow « } When the bridg waasha
mann ‘who died last month.—€.P._ Tuling.—U.P hoping that it would not be 7 ped Mt. San Gorgonio b 4iT} certain point, it made “its “fir st
Select letatecaes bees _ - | identified, he took it to the bicycle Christ Church Monday and launched a slow | ti pointing its nose down the
shop of Donald Downes of Nel- The Christ Church Vestry at, #yea ly expedition toward the|20 per cent gradient, As it tilt
U. N. VOTES FOR INDIA PLAN TALKS son Street and by chance Mil- | their meeting yesterday afternoon! wreckage which may have carric \¢ i wayed slightly in a fairly
lington while walking in Nelson | appointed as delegates with pow-| 13 mer » death ng breeze hich was blow
|Street saw the bicycle for sale.|ers to C« xt, Mr. H: St. G. Ward : ing acro t} ravine at about}
He recognised it by the frame. and Mr. T. N. Peirce for the A i2Z-man party were to leavé er 12 miles an hour g
Millington then called the Po-|purpose of attending a general! Lake Suome, four airmiles trom The bridge as quickly right-| wor §
lice and Downes told the Police] meeting of representatives fromthe wreckage early Monday and}ed by block ind tackles on both
that Burrowes had brought the}the various Vestries to consider, expected to reach the crash scen¢]} sides, and from there on, was
| bicycle to his place and had askedjand make recommendations in) by Wednesday, Earlier efforts to| gradually towed across, it ; nose
him to sell it for him, 2 connection with suggestions for|reach the wreckage both by air| pointing down into the gully. ar est
Cpl. Byer of the Criminal In-]amendments to the Vestries Act./and on the ground were defeated After the lunchex recess
| vestigation Department searched This was decided after the Ves- {by howling winds and deep snow]further preparations were mac¢
’ | prey ( ad
|Burrowes’ home at tedman’sfiry had considered a letter from | drifts. and movement continued under
| Tenantry, St. George and found/the St- John Vestry dealing with | close supervision by the engin- & most
}some of the parts from Milling- me poe is iii | The wreckage is believed to be} cers, Mr. Parfitt and Mr. Carter
|ton’s bicycle. s. 8, cKenzie WSlthat of the airforce sport}on the south bank, and Mr, Em-





granted two months’ leave from 7 Fs r ; « 2,
- 1 his duties as a Vestryman. Sey- “ane te aeons _ _ lay @ On Page 6 moder
! BRITAIN WILL | ‘ral acting appointments then had | fle 1k peo aloes rane A ey 1
| u de the vari Boards | om. rizona, The la it- a °
SUPPORT. GHTS ° which Mr. McKenzie is a mem-|tempt to reach the plane wa ailor Jailed
| SUP OR’ -RI i | cycle lant Only Raleigh resources can give
you the QUALITY— RELIABILITY



| ber, | callec off Sunday when four

|
‘ . Cc. | The Vestry appointed the fol- |; veteran army ski-trooper rm F | .
OF A.1.O. | lowing: ned after reporting that they or 4ar ceny | — STRENGTH —and FINISH, which

Mr. A. G. Gittens, member of! were stopped by “sheer cliffs” and
LONDON, Dec. 8 | @ On Page 6 steep inclines’—U.P. esikéthn + ces oh makes distinguishes all Raleigh models,

Britain will back the Anglo-| tecniviaiek..\4 ith eee i fakisees . The bicycle you are proud to own.
Iranian Oil Company in maintain- | c. M A 9 ; esterday passed on 26-
ing its. property rights over pro- e a t Pi; 1y-ol :
jucts of the oil industry in South | nN. Cc r ur Ss ‘ an Paul of Schooner Laudalpl nc . .
Persia, British Foreign Secretary | who pleaded guilty before. Mis
Anthony Eden told Parliament to- By RALPH TEATHOR1 hower who is en route to Hawai'] Worship Mr. G. B. Griffith hes
day. 4 NEW YORK, Dec. 8 n a navy ship after a_ battle g Police Magistrate of District} ’
| Replying to questions, Eden sald There is considerable pecu-) front »k at the war A” of stealing a pair of gents’
“The British Government com-|lation that President-elect Eiser MacArthur would not elabor-| bro hoes on De '

enadian sailor Chive
tinue to regard products of the oil|hower will oon ask Generai| ate on tne pian in answer to Paul had one previous convic- T ia E A L L- s - E & L B i Cc yc L E
, . ; ‘ as ‘ “ ‘ ’

















industry in South Persia as the} Dou MacArthur » explain news pure r Maior Gen-| tic The case for the prosecu-

| property of the Anglo-Iranian Oil| his new plan to end the Koresn eral Courtne Wh itney ho waS|tion hat on December 5

Company. He said that in a note| wa General MacArthu e ¢ MacArthur taff in Jaf vhile Pa aa at the hbiisd. of Bart A

lto Persia on October 5, Britain|his five-montt lence ot e and now | usine sssoclate/| Rosanna St. Clair in Dukes Alley. arbados’ Leading Department

re-emphasized that the acceptance] major public issues last wee o tole Unite Pre that Mac-|St 1, ; ' tinvte oair. of Store Sells Them

of nationalisation ir art by Brit- 1t | nfident that Arthur does not intend tc n«| ‘ *4 . 71 ‘ .
f natio a Y 5 pa gi - ee ; : m 7 = Ba. 7 j te od ‘ee oo v pe | we ho vhich re é CAVE, SHEPHERD & CO
ey vern- t tale tec we i ¢ uld | j LTD.








er » the ne » give deta ile ,
) in a note on] ect f 12—13, Broad Stree
BRITISH DELEGATE Sir Gladwyn Jebb (rear, left) arid R, H. Coaton, of | oct, Sede? Gel cee tad oat:
: : : z ‘ ) I i 1N a xiation of ) t
South Africa (right) raise their hands in 1 approval as the United Nation Parliament on October 15, the} facturer Conventior the| vi di ; Thi
Political Committee votes overwhelmingly = immediate Sinem sion of British Government had reserved | grounds that it was not 7 learly left it t er er | shoe
idia’s nae peace plan. Russia's Foreign Mini r Andrei V ishinsky the rights of the Iran Oil Com-| matter for present put whether he ate f All
ter) looks down at some papers as the Soviet bloc is defeated. He pany, pending agreement on com-| cussior But he implied | ne~-time P
‘wainly lads ed to stave off the Committee’s vote, (International) pensation,U.P, »| ready to disclose it to Mr. Ei - U.P e |
oe a ww



PAGE TWO



irba t r t
juillity here on sé









Trivec Sunda
by B.W.LA. from Trinidac
short busines visit n

ul the Cce \ H

vi Not « ) te
Messrs C ( Lt
Port-of-Spair

Inspection Visit
I EAVING Sunday night
BW.LA, for Tr r





way to Briti Guik vas Myr
ee Talbot of Kent, C!
Church and a Director of the
Den.erar Electric Company, He
and expects to be back here for
Christ

Mi bot we wmerly Ge
ral Manager of the Demet



tr Company,

Weather Man
M* EDWARD STEEL, Meteor-
ologist of Pan American
Worla Airways stationed at San
Juan, Puerto Rico, arrived or
Sunday night by B.W-1.A. to sec
the possibilities of extending the
hours f the regular hour!
weather observations provided fe
International air transport
He expects to be here unti
Friday as a guest at the~QOcear
View Hotel
Enjoyable Holiday



FTER an enjoy holiday

in Jarbados, Anit

Neumeyer, Passenger Agent o

S.OAA New York, left or

Sutiday night by B.W.LA for

Trinidad and Jamaica on her wae
back home. It was her



first visit

to the island and she \y quite
delighted with it
Miss Neumeyer was a guest at

the Hotel Royal and Paradi
Beach Club

With Trinidad Guardian
\ R. C. G- ALLEYNE of the

Sar Fernando branch of

the Trinidad Guardian, returned
to Trinidad on Saturday evening
by B.W.LA. after four week

holiday, part of which he spent
with his brother Mr F. G
Alleyne, headmaster of St. Philip's
Boys’ School and the remainder
as a guest at Indramer Guest
House, Worthing and at Atlantis,
Bathsheba



MR, CHRISTIE SMITH
and his Christmas Hamper

What a Hamper!

R. CHRISTIE SMITH, Hon-
M orary Secretary, Barbados
Table Tennis Association, and As-
sistant Secretary B.A.F.A. receiv-
ed a handsomely decorated and
well stocked hamper yesterday,
but it was no honorarium for his
services throughout the year, he
held the lucky number in a raffle
for the hamper at Woodside Fair
on Saturday, in aid of local chari-
ties,

The hamper contained one 3-!b
tin of Klim, one tin of coffee, one
box of chocolates, one 2-lb tin of
ham, | bottle of Whiskey, one bot-
tle of sherry, one Gillette Razor,
one bottle prepared mustard, one
tin biscuits.

BY THE



HE othe: day ‘ letter |

appeared in a morning paper
asking what had become of
muffins, and why they had dis-
appeared,

1 followed the correspondence
on the subject, and very soon the
letter I had been expecting was

printed. It said that “the public

are better educated today in
the choice of what food is ood
for them,” and that diet ex-

perts” (sic) say that muffins are
indigestible. Because people who

cannot digest muffir cannot
digest them there are to be no
muffins by order of the diet
experts,” for those who can

digest them As to people being
better educated about food, the



‘obert Matouk, Managing Direc- for the U.S.A. via Puerto Rico |
tor of West Indian Enterprises. , w.1A.

He was accompanied by his She
brother-in-law Mr, Farid Men-
ous who had been here for a

the new Public Health Centre i:
Speightstown, returned f r o n
Trinidad on Sunday night by
B.W.1.A, where she took a ce
fresher course lasting for four
inpiaieh three of whieh aha wa — the passengérs leaving
attached to the Caribbean Medi-

tal Centre and the other with on Thursday morning on theis way

months and then again in July
Since then she has been travel- : : = i
ling through some of the islands “'’Tived on Thursday by B.W.LA

Supervisor with the Creole
Petroleum Company, B.W.IL.A

WAY...



T. R. EVANS (WHITFIELDS)

YOUR SHOE STORE
Phone:

RECESSIONAL POW-WOW.~ British West Indian delegates to the
Fifth Session of the West Indian Conference now meeting at Montego
Bay, Jamaica, get together during a pause in the proceedings to dis-
cuss points of the Conference agenda. Par left is Hon. V. GC. Bird of
Antigua, while in the group consulting together are (1. to r.) Norman
Manley of Jamaica, Mr. F. L. Walcott (Barbados) with back to
camera; F. BE, Miller (Barbados), Hon. Victor Bryan (Trinidad) and
Hon. D. P. Debidin (British Guiana)

Returned To Trinidad U.S. Holiday

ETURNING to Trinidad on ISS HULDAH GARNER Staff |
Sunday night by B.W.LA Nurse of the General Hospi- |
{ter a short holiday was Mr. tal left the island on Thursday |



3)

has gone to spend a six
months’ holiday with her father in

7 Brooklyn,
onth They were both guests

Accra Beach Club, Rockley. z .
Mr Matouk's parent have A Son

been in Barbados for several Wy erter at caldera to Mr
weeks staying at Accra. They ex and Mrs. “Berry” Thorpe on
pect to return to Trinidad shortly ! birth of a son on Saturday

Refresher Course night at the General Hospitai

ISS AURORA WALTERS, MTS. Thorpe is the former Doro-
Se - Heaitd uve f t Blackman of St. Andrew.
pattie bas eee °' Mr. Thorpe is Assistant Super-
visor, Visual Aids, Education De
partment

To Brooklyn

by B.W.LA. for Puerto Rico



the B-C.G. Campaign. to the U.S.A. were Mis Norma |
FE \. Smith of Prerogative, St.
Regular Visitor George and a former pupil cf
BR \CK.. in Barbados ig Miss Lynch's Secondary School and her
Jessie Clark of Montreal, cousin. Mr. Lawrence O Byer t
Canada who came in on Sund:z lormer Combermerian
night by B.W-LA, from Trini They are both going to continue
dad. She has com the winter their studies and will be residing
and is a guest at Sam Lord’s in Brooklyn.
Castic |
Miss Clark was here earlier On Long Leave }

the year during the winter

R. and MRS, E. G. GIGLIOLI
and infant daughter Yolando

the Caribbean. She said that {rom British Guiana for a holiday

she might probably remain in which they are spending as guest
Barbados until August next year. of Hon'ble and Mrs. H. A. Cuke |
= +

of “Banavie"” 4th Ave, Belleville. |
RRIVING by the same air- Mrs. Giglioli is the former Miss
craft from Trinidad were Madge Cuke, daughter of Hon'ble

Mr, and Mrs. R. G. Carman of and Mrs. H, A, Cuke, Her hus-
Oklahoma, U.S-A. who had been band is Rice Inspector at the
residing, in Venezuela for the Mahaicony Experimental Sta-
bast three years, They expect'tion and is now on long leave,
to be here for one week as guests
at Paradise Beach Club,

With Standard Oil

My Carman is Mechanical I ETURNING to Caracas, Ven-
ezuela, over the week-end

was Mr. David Poter-

7.C.A. Personnel fleld of the Standard Oil Com-

ETURNING to Canada on! ins He was here for seventeen

day is a guest at the Marine
Thursday morning by T.C.A. Hotel.



were Mr. and Mrs, Don Thomas
of Toronto, They said they had

Promoted To Major



two enjoyablk veek holiday in YAPT. NOEL WEATHERHEAD
Barbados as guests at the Hotel A a Barbadian who for the
Royal and regretted leaving so Sti : : re J
oon, The however are looking Fie va We Sick: Can nn
forward to returning next year, Paes ie , ” Py

Mi Thomas is a Passenger shire has just been promoted to the
Agent with T.C.A stationed in '@% of Major. He is due for re-
‘Toronto, posting which may be overseas.

Also returning to Canada by His wife and two sons are with

T.C.A. on Thursday was Mr, ‘im in England.

Vaughan MeCord of the Traffic When Maj. Weatherhead lived
Department of T.C.A. in Montre- in Barbados he worked with
al. He’ spent two weeks’ holiday Plantations Ltd’ ugar store ir

a guest at Cacrabank Hotel, Bay Street,

By Beachcomber

ase is meaningle ineg that the future belongs to the
every “expert” has his own pet chemist, and that far too many
iet The only fun to be got out people © are ready to. sell the

the whole dreary nonsense js birthright of a rational humar
watching the diet magnates being for a mess (and what







contradict themselves and each mess!) of tinned pottage

other, °

a ; Vot much use

Vhe chemical age RECENT row in a billiard
OT-FOOT upon this corre- saloon was apparently

spondence came an an- ¢auséd by “a man who used ar

nouncement that the production umbrella handle as a cue and hit
synthetic foods by biochemists the ball sideways.” It sound:

(notably from coal and oil) ay like a pleasing variation of the

olve all our food problems. The interminable anchor - cannon

Pr ‘ssor who ide this an- The most difficult way of playing

houncement at a dinner warned billiards is to substitute cork-

his audience not to be too screws for cues, and to cover the

optimistic (my italics) about this cloth with marine glue. Hardly

possibility. There is no doubt anything happens

el
JUST RECEIVED



|

RENOWN SHIRTS—
Plain Cols. (Tan, Blue, White) $4.48
RENOWN SHIRTS—Plain Cols.

(Tan, Blue Grey) .......0.0.0.... $4.54
RENOWN SHIRTS—Plain Cols.

(Tan, Blue, Grey) .......... 0... $5.94
RENOWN STRIPED SHIRTS ..... $3.12
RENOWN PYJAMA SUITS
inane .. $7.24, $8.74 & $8.91
NEW YORKER SPORT SHIRTS

(Tan, Blue, Grey) .............. ae $3.85
ELITE SEA ISLAND COTTON SHIRTS

(White Only) 20.00.0000... $8.39
SKY-SCRAPER STRIPED SHIRTS
tsecesseeees $3.07 & $3.18
P.Y. SUITS

Ss sagcteae Ns co $5.21 & $5.28
WESOMET P.Y. SUITS ........ $10.63
(Tan, Blye Grey) ....... .. ... $4.53











2-3 4220



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



PENICILLID
for the pigs

6 OOM FOOD

which is boosting
the growth of pigs ¥J

in America, should b¢

Stepping up supplies Oly

home-fed bacon in Britain
by next spring.

American “Boom Food
which contains the golden
drug aureomycin. nas an

g effect on dwar
that would normally
never reach marketable size

Now experiments carried out

Alastair Worden
have proved that a British fori
penicillin instead
ve

Ten dwarf pigs on a Bucking
namshire farm were given mea
containing procaine-peniecillin. «
form of “ wonder ~~
which is not destroyed in the
stomach. All reached bacon

t—more than 200ib,—at »
profitable price for che farmer

It also speeded the growth
rate of normal pigs, producing
more bacon for iess food

Two big Orms are ready u
mass-produce “ Boom Food,’ ou!
it canmot be sold to pig and
poultry keepers unt! Parliamen
in the New Year
Penicillin 4 *



alters 1
md







YOUR INDIVIDUAL HOROSCOPE
FOR TUBSDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1952

Look in the section mm which your
birthday comes and find what your
outlook is, according to the stars

MARCH 21 to APRIL, 4 (Aries)—For.
tunate day fo you ambitious onter-
prising tividuals, especially in new
and worth-while act.vities



APRIL 21 to MAY 2% (Taare) —pPxcel-

lent Venus (your planet) influences for
personal gain, happiness in little things,
the home, famtl

MAY 21 té JUNE 4) (Gemini)— Ney
advantages. fresh —_ opportunitie al
about; generous day, but you ma ive
to dig. Be € you don’t miss lead

JUNE “ to JULY 28 (Caneer)
Original and unique ideas boosted now
Allocate activities that you may be able

give each pour very best

JULY M4 te AUGUST 2 (Lee)—H you
follow the #ht road offered to-day you
should be able to wrap things up suc-
cessfully Give extra time to lovept
one

AUGUST %% to SEPTEMBER 2s (Virgo)

Promising, with your ingenious help

functioning at top speed, Make new

t meet the present squarely, Have
th ourself

SEPTEMBER rs te OCTOBER 28



(Ifbra)—Keep up with events, com
petitors nd result h 1 be
encouraging Added smart th.nking ir
} a few details can make a lot of
lifference

OCTOBER at to NOVEMBER 22
(Scorpio)--Your planet on inactive side
but other planetary vibrations are of
! if you are heedful and in right



mood

NOVEMBER “ to DECEMBER

(Sagittarius)—Fresh opportunity in most
well planned and executed endeavours
But don't have any chip on your

6houlder or think your idea are the
only ones

bee

DECEMBER &% to JANUARY ef ae ce ECE:
(Capricorn)—Some excellent advantages,|'he Force is proving so successful
but it is up to you to choose well your |} that
course of actidn. Occasionally check | 4

to avoid mistake nisjudgment

|
JANUARY ee to FEBRUARY 20;

(Aquarius)——Interest diversified out
avenues of activity highly favoured
Unexpe benefit sid through new
ources should ensue







FEBRUARY 21 to MARCH 20 (Pisees)
Continued unity with associates,
employer, employees and family should
round out the lasting kind of iceessful
day you desire Strive after harmony

you BORN TO-DAY are frank
capabie of doing fine t anything
you undertake. Somet
rritation through a too outspoken, and



critical attitude. This can disrupt good |
plana, business ventures. You have |
musical talents, business ability, should |
be fond of outdoor activity. You can |

do great things if you will. Birthdate
of: John Milton, great poet; Douglas
Fairbanks, Jr., actor

In the cocktail bar

[ F I were poor,’ said Vita
Brevis, “you wouldn't per-

ist 1

money, would you?” “If you had

© money, what else would there}

» to pursue?” riposted our hero }
Well, that’s honest enough,”
id Vita “Honesty is second

nature to me,’ said Foulenough,
But I generally use my first
nature. It gets better results.”
And you have the effrontery to
think that I would marry you,
knowing at it is my money
you want “T might grow to
love you for myself,” said Foule-
nough, you didn’t keep on





bringing up this question of

noney. How sordid it makes
my wooing!” “Well, pay for the

drinks. I must be going.” “You

see What I mean?” said Foule-
x0ugh, “You think of nothing
but money.’

Berceuse

Blow softly, wind of the night,

Moon, shed your tranquil light
Upon his bed

Here, lapped in sweet repose,

And snorting through his nose.
Lies Uncle Fred.



FREE
ENGRAVING

All pens bought from us
will be engraved with
your name or initials free

of charge.
See Your Jewellers
Y. De LIMA
& CO., LTD.

20 Broad St.

Marine Gardens.
$ and at Greystone Village

F000o0 PPDPDDDDOPIPDOLOTHH"



he-news notebook —



LLI



Lonk
the drug except on @
Drescription,

SHAVE IN BED

palented by
no sOup no

4 Londoner,

against (he face an up-and-down
spring-ioaded
burrel rotates six
Stanicy Elsky
"soon in plasi«
sal isfacvorily

West India

have further

the 26,800 ton

liner Empress
of Scotland,

Early in December the liner goes
into dry dock for an overhaul.

Social Survey

in Bri-
the
social Congratulations to ex-mayor
vey sok Cornelius John Townsend of Sal-
Minister from British ford, Lancashire who
The Rev. Bobb, who ar- celebrated his Golden
rived last month is to study local Anniversary If
idministration.

Bobb

addition,
ar-
ranged for him to visit a Y.M.C.A.
London. pire
spend Christmas with
in London.

M.P’s. Guest

commandant
Cadet Force



e House of Commons. It will
alled that the Cadet Force’s pote) jast
blown down
in
New headquarters have
established,

headquarters

and

its personnel has now reached
otal of 1,120—just 80 short of

Birthday Greetings
Douglas-Jones,



PQCKET CARTOON
LANCASTER



s you provoke}

|

n pestering me like this. Be!
onest now. You wouldn’t go}
n pursuing me if I had no}



those clever
rate of progress
experiment

resule of !f





CROSSWORD



Dape -calis (anag.). (9
Promptly fulfilling o
Penny shor: of



Space returns to
Cans to overlook. (4)



Broken tter.
Harsh way to rid tents,
Speed rate beyond hope? (9)

A twist; 56 many take oll.
Take a café bus to confuse
You reel back at this look

included, provides
the olrcuit of a plane figure.
it made trouble in March,
Meastire with saving grace,
Not taken on the arrival! plat

10. Condescend.
Deer, t'd make fun of, (6)





Often assumed with graces

-Seem

She's In & pena) settlement
terday Ss puezie







——



DUL i fale the me wel ent
I shaved in bed

CAN IT HAPPEN?

CAN a beailny person :cully
ve trightened to deat:
After studying the oaervous
mecnanisms which Ould tt
responsible tor such 4 Catas
trophe, doctors think that the

answer is Yes.

The orain-centre velievea w
be most concerned with emo.ion
—called the hypothalamus—is
linked directly with the heart by
nerves

So if it i6 violently stimulatea
it can throw the heart into an
abnorma! type of palpitation
whieh might be fatal,

Dr, W Proctor Harvey
supports this theory with e@
Case-record of an apparently

aiuny 28-year-old womun whe

velops a dangerous type o
Palpitation when only sligntly
scared

But he admits that ois tneory
@oes not explain Voodoo deatns

Intense terror of the medicine
man's “biack magic” power is
almost certainly Cause of
Voodoo death, out tt «ually
Wears down its victim gradually
imsteac of by sudden atiack,

BANG, BANG!

%e A MEETING of the Sritien
Interplanetary Society~ mer
and women WhO nope one 14

to 'ruvel to the moon—is to
heid in «a London public nouse
he talk will ve mainiy >t
rockets So the night chosen
for the bar-pariour tryst 1s

nmewturaily today ~November 5
1 ¥ teas Service

n Table Talk
By LONDONER

of the former Colonial Secretary
Caribbean cruise to be undertaken British Guiana, has celebrated
his 78th birthday. It will be re-
She will leave the called that Sir Crawford
New Year and will

back and on foot to m:
quiries, Since retiring,





ourite recreation—croquét.

Empire Builder

gold mines two bridges

Canada’s Red River and assisted
in the building of the famous
Cordova, Manhattan Bridge in New York.
and
in Jamaica, was
Alan

Gift

£3,000 it raised last year.



Listening Hours

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 6

|
|
| 1.00—6.00 p.m
|

Composer of the Week

these things
6.00—7.15 pom.

Sports Round-up, 7 p.m. The
7.10 p.m. Home News from
7.15 p.m. Rendezvous
7.45—10.80 p.m,

| Keeper





By M. Harrison-Gray
Dealer, South
East-West game

N.
wos
973
10.5

esa $4
6 8
9

AR?

©
-

ed OE EN ERE EERO RR ETRY

6

; 5 x
°
5

>>RS
eabieag

fo) tener ye. 0) OdNE AED EE eEROREOONEREEESEEEs &._.
5 POGOD
O-D>
"S7RKe

Post

Qu
4

~

North - South scored a
game in Room 1, but their
team lest 700 points on 3
At
both tables South bid One
Spade, West doubled, North
redoubled and East bid Two
Clu

The first South player

deal from match play.

error



a later round.

OR ORE Re eee sc EEE ER EL BE IEST sEEREE! rene.





the vilege of doublin:

Two Gabe and West di

not ii matters by

resei with Two Hearts.

North for a

| TALKING POINT
The question is this: Is man
1

an ape or an angel? My lord,
i am on the side of the angels.

—Disraeli.
| Refuse to be ill! Never tell
} people you are ill, Never own

1 it to yourself,—Lytton

was
member of the Commission
and to British Guiana in 1939
Trinidad, This cruise will be fol- vestigate the possibilities
lowed by three others to the West refugee settlement in the colony.
New York. He travelled more than
miles by rail, sea, air, on horse-
ke his in-
ir Craw-
ford has found time for his fay-

has
Wedding
. my Jamaican
make his sur- readers are thinking that

; Lands name sounds familiar they
ind to John O’ Groats—attending ight, Mr.

major parish conferences in Corn- years of age
conference

Townsend now
f helped to rebuild
social Jamaica after the 1947
quake, The steel constructional
firm which he heads have worked
in many other parts of the Em-
too. They have put steel-
werks into the Johannesburg

The West Indies’ contribution
East Belfast, to the 1952 Y.W.C.A. Christmas
Fair, held at London's Hyde Park
month, was a pair of
wooden book-ends made in Trini-
dad, They were simple, elegant—
and beautiful. The International
Stall was piled high with locally-
made gifts from Africa, Asi
the America’s. Overseas visitors
to London are flocking to
Fair which hopes to surpass

—L.E.S.





4 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m. Th
Service, 4.15 p.m, New Records

5.15
Listeners’ Choice, 5.45 pm Think on

S122M, 49.71M
6 p.m. Ulster Magazine, 6 15 “pan
Meet the Commonwealth, 6.45

S1.32M, 49.71M

|
{ 745 p.m. Personal Portrait, 8 p.m
| Piano Time, 8.15 p.m. Radio Newsreel,
Ja 30 p.m. Composer of the Week, 8.45
|} ®.m. Report from Britain, 9 p.m. From
the Third Programme, 10 p.m
| News, 10.10 p.m. From the Editoriais,
| 10.16 pom. Wynford Vaughan Thomas
Talking. 10.30 p.m His Brother's

—_-_

ADVOCATE: BRIDGE



ao eteenwes sa ceereserccnnenceserereconensensacesesescessess

44 ftgt tyt et tt tt ttt tt

common
rebidding his suit and East-
West were reprieved. On a
iand that is likely to be
useful in defence, the first
rule is to give the redoubler
the option of a penalty
double. North has promised
to speak again, and Spades
can be rebid if necessary on

North just made a final
contract of Three _ No-
Trumps for a score of 400.
In Room 2 he was fa



CURSDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1952
















SWAMP-ROOT can help you

UNHEALTHY KIDNEYS can rob you of all your
pep! That's why SMART PEOPLE help keep
their kidneys healthy — with SWAMP-ROOT!
Yes, miraculous SWAMP-ROOT will stimulate
and clean your kidneys! SWAMP-ROOT is re-
liable, because it's made from herbs — the
oldest medicine in the world! SWAMP-ROOT
helps you quickly — because it’s a liquid, and
your body absorbs it faster! DON’T NEGLECT
YOUR KIDNEYS! GET DR. KILMER'S SWAMP
ROOT TODAY, AND TAKE IT RIGHT AWAY!



<_<

SWAMP-ROOT

A.PRQDUCT. OF KILMER & CO.

16 OSSEGOES



GLOBE >

TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 Last Showing 3

Pane DEVER SCAKES THREE >

PIER ANGELI

BEAVE HER

GENE TIERNEY —

and
BORDER INCIDENT
RICARDO MONTABLAN
Ss csidpsiilinleticchuabibaeekaubnedanmanicins aca





FRID



2 Shows Today Last

Special j

TOMORROW & THURSDAY 4.45 & 8.30 P.M.

Thrilling Color Musical

Last :
445 & 8.30 p.m. | 445 & 8.30 p.m, 420 &
Warner Color Universal's Thriller

GENE KELLY

@ HEAVEN

CORNEL WILDE

AA SOG POETS

*



“ABOUT FA
2 Shows Today — f,



ordon MaeRAF

lay & Tomorrow
€.30 p.m

ON THE LOOSE

FRENCHIE Joan EVANS &












(Technicolor)

THE LION AND |
i THE HORSE t adel Shelley

TARZAN'S PERIL













McCREA WINTERS | Lex BARKER
Steve COCHRAN | eee ——- eonenenys won -
= = = | Thurs. Special 1.30 Suse. (anle)
bh 0. 1.30 | | :
smu LERS COVE | “ON THE Loose” | 445 & 8.20 "p.m
Les io a he Joan EVANS | “SMUGGLERS
Bowery Bays and | COVE”
aunvite @ | TARZAN’S PERIL Leo GORCEY
ree o Lex BARKER Bowery Boys
. er on g —_— an
WAKELY WILSON Wed. & Thurs SILVER TRAILS” {
] Wed. & Thurs 4.30 & 8.30 WAKELY
1.90 & 8.30 | “BLUE LAMP < peer
LILLI MARLENE’ Jack WARNER & | Coming
Lisa DANIELY & MEXICAN Rod* CAMBRON in
TOKYO FILE 212 HAYRIDE
Florence MARLY & Bud Lou | FORT OSAGE
Robert PEYTON | Abbott Costetle | (Cinecolor)
| BR YN | BARBAREES | OISTIN
r (Dial 5170) (Dial 8404)



ROOBDAL





EMPIRE OLYMPIC
To-Day 4.45 & 8.30 To-Day & Tomorrow
& continuing daily 4.30 & 8.15

1B DeMill Double

ci eMille’s ,, sereney
Masterpiece THE SECRET FURY
Starring

SAMSON Claudette Colbert

Robert Ryan
and

AND RIDERS OF THE
RANGE
DELILAH With

Tim HOLT
(Technicolor)

Thursday (onky)
Starring: 4.30 & 8.15
Hedy Lamarr HUNT THE

Vietor Mature wien
Gig Young
Lynn Roberts
Watch For and

e DANGEROUS



PROFESSION

HIGH With
George Raft
NOON Starting Saturday
WHIPHAND" &

Garry Cooper “LOST PATROL





WHEN

Richard MARTIN |

MAN. DOWN

THEATRES






ROXY ROYAL
Last two Shows (Last 2 Shows Today
Today 4.30 & 8.16! 4.90 & 8.90
Solumbia Double Double
Mickey Rooney Bing CROSBY
Anne James | Glor.a JEAN
in | in
SOUND OFF Ir 1 HAD MY WAY
(Cinecolor) | and
and PRIVATE AFFAIRS
SNAKE RIVER With
DESPERADOES| thigh Herbert
Starring i Nancy Kelly
Charles Starrett | Wed. & Thurs.
Smiley Burnett 4.20 & 8.30
\8O GOES MY LOVE
Wed. Thurs. & Fri. With
1 4.30 a 8.80 Don Ameche
By Speotal Request! Myrna Loy
Cecil B. DeMille’s | and
Masterpiece RIDE ‘EM
SAMSON AND lo WBOY
DELILAH! With

Bud Abbott &

‘Techn-color) Lou Costello



Starring oti neat
Hedy Lamarr Friday (only)
Victor Mature 4.30 & 8.30

—_—_——— TRAIN TO

Starting Saturday — ALCATRAZ
THE IVORY and
HUNTER'THE DAKOTA KID





“COGNAC” 1s

MENTIONED



THE NAME HENNESSYS' LEAPS
TO THE MIND—BECAUSE HEN.
NESSYS IS
MADE COGNAC FAMOUS,

THE BRANDY THAT

* V.S.O.P. (over 20 years)
* X. O. LIQUEUR
(over 40 years) °

STOKES & BYNOE LTD.—AGENTS.

SELECT THESE
EARLY

Varnishes, Enamels, Paints,

i Sandpaper, Steel Wool.

a“

1% Also

4 Plates, Platters, Cups,
$ Pans

|

1% Saucers, Saucepans, Pots,
X and

>

y Champagne, Port, Sherry
\ Cocktail, Pony Whisky,

x Liqueur, Half Pint Glasses.



“
3
% Do your shopping for
»,
% Household Items early at
y
+
x
*
SJ
>
s
S LIMITED
,
X
‘
POSSOOS SESS SSS FOSS 89099

FOSS SOOSPSOO FSS FOSS



UP THE HOME !!



SRO

%
5

9

>





a ll



TUESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATI ‘
FB a Rs lr f











FREE HOOK , ‘i
We ey B.W ae Resources Ik OF ASSASSIN OF! EAAIER FREED
“GOD’S WAY OF ‘ .
SALVATION paw’ ?) COMMOonwealith Pool

. qt eee LONDON
Central Ave., ian oe A ‘new deal” for the Colonial Empire is likely to be
one of the results of the Conference of Commonwealth

one ee Age | Prime Ministers now going on in London. It is the most

4 | vital conference affecting the economy of the entire Em-
ums ‘ pire since the Ottawa Conference, 20 years ago, at which

ms, Sore Mouth and | ° the Imperial Preference system was worked out
Tee! ‘ou may |
haves Pvorrhen. Tench. jouth or | Although the We@ Indies are balance ot payments for 1946-51

t will :
sooner or later cause your teeth to = 20t directly represented at the would have been much larger
fall out and may also cause Rheu- | Conference, a strong team of West As it is, the sterling area spent






















og to deotet creas, Amosan Indian leaders is on hand in Lon- during those six years some 2
side ery mouth asd aulckiy tight- | don to advise Mr. Oliver Lyttel- £2,381,000,000 more tham it -
i Seer arate ant Secretary of State for the earned
ig genie 8 or money back | Colonies, w ho will look after the 4 '
ea return of empty package. Get | interests of the Colonial Empire ,. What has been happening since
mosan from your chemist today. in the talks. the war is that the treat Do-
le sarantee protects you minions, _ particula Austt RELEASED FROM PRISON with full pard halil Tahr :
Among the West Indian ad- and South Africz have patted on the head in Tehr t ‘ ah t:vak Meochont an tee
eres as }Visers are Mr. Albert Gomes, building up big secondary ian Fadian Islami } 7 ’ ut Tran-
Trinidad’s Minister of Commerce, tries. This has been done at great Deputies) ’ : 5 2 ; of
Sor COLDS Labour and Industry, and Mr. capital expense the ex- Razmara & 19 i ' ” r Gen. All
— eat) | Grantley Adams, of the Barba- pense of their fe ra ma- pana ie rin i. — (laternational)
ba dos Executive Committee terial produ They have b ptiaccntataplpriessin ia tgeenemcanennn gntanarianriceerinntinmemtinngee. a
hi Mr. Gomes has stressed the taking out re than they have
[tai in the West Indies for capi- been able t it in to the com- . G 9
tal goods, but he pointed out mon dollar 0 k : ye
KIPA that all members of the Common- Mg wz Col ge S
INHALANT RUS wealth must put their resources In effect, the richer Dominic ‘
ST into a common pool; in this con- have been living off the dolla:
nection, he mentioned Trinidad’s earnings of the poorer Colonie F e
COLDS oil. He added that a_ realistic 7 . > IP e
view must be taken of the various ,,, he City Editor of the Londor ul q CE / “us
The dual purpose Inhalant plans for industrial development, 7#mes put it this way: “During
Rub. Applied to nostrils itre- the past few years, this country ; 4 ‘ ae
lieves catarrh, Rubbed into Mr. Adams said that the prob- has, in_ effect, borrowed some King George’s Jubilee Trust was inaugurated as a
chest, neck and back it eases lems of the West Indiés were £500,000,000 from the C National Thankoffering on the occasion of the Silver Jubilee



congestive conditions. those of all Colonies. They were, 4nd used it to finance capit: of His late Majesty King George V. its work continues as a

chiefly, getting a decent price velopment in the Dominion
for primary products and obtain- though the state of development rmanent memorial to a greatly-loved Monarch and a great
ing a share of whatever dollars in the Colonies is far more ele- reign

are available. mentary and their need far more The objce of King George's

brings QUICK relief urgent.



jilee Trust are to promote the

spect and we are not asking that Dominions. The fact t

our claims should t t front minions } t of thet R é | y I ee pee ee. en oe
) tle ss c ye put in fron ons have spent most of 1€11 7 ¢ . i thr it f
4 ag h OY a acn he birthright of all



2 any part the Common- surplu sterling balances, while
AR —E wealth.” the Colonies have doubled theirs To the wor of the Trust,
: will of course work automatical- Queen Elizabeth h ex id Youth will owe new ‘happiness
ee ” Main Task ly towards this end approved a model f the smatl and new opportunities during

The main task of the confer- One Of The Big Tasks will be used as a Royal Yach live from the time when they

YOU'RE GROWING ence, economic experts through- r The ship will launche le 10 to the » of eigt
out the world agree, is to discuss _ One of the big tasks of the we. \ajecty AD ' i di Mie bt Says 1gn=
Maj April,

the convertibility of sterling. If Prime Ministers’ Conference will onnte ro oe ro P, OUIg tee: pe
D 9 it were found practicable to make therefore be to persuade the Th coat ; oe eee rhe mete is helping to provide
s sterling freely convertible into Dominions to pause in their own e keel was laid at the Clyde- playing fields, camp sites, youth

dollars, without any- restrictions industrial development schemes 3'°° Yard of Mes John Brown hostels any other opportunities





















' : } ‘ » genes
Often as a woman anpevaches |imposed by the U.K: Government, @md to look outside the narrow \) - s a of built the “Que for healthy outdoor activity,
middle life, her nerves get ,and this would overcome one of the confines of their own lands to the ar panes 4 gees tana a
i ono PEA): ae oe : needs of the sterling : : The Royal and State Apartment é I ‘ }
she accepts this as a sign of age. most serious economic problems ; le sterling area as a ; : ramme, the Trust is assisting in
But why let yourself become edgy, facing the West Indies to-day— whole. It is not reasonable to ex- “ . m e after part of e ship, th, t nd equi yment of
run-down—or so nervous yon SY \that their trade with Canada 4s pect them to scrap the industries W'™ ccommo: ( for off elub i ae ee ehovs nd
without cause—at any time in life | being ruined by their inability to they have built up at such capi- 4nd crey forv Phe 5S Bias te entre: "f elt ree
For nearly fifty years wise, |spend for themselves more of the tal cost over the last seven years, Apar ents al hn the upper deck h a ial ' it 1 fon _ er ae
women have been meeting this | dollars they earn with their sugar, but it is hoped that they will the R | Apartmer m the shel- * he ; ee staal ea tates
— = = oe oil, bauxite, timber and other realise that the dollar-earning ter dec} a tie . ; ‘ need for the “a
bree _ Te ee oe ances ‘ : exi And i i bringing oO
rest, t | primary produce. potential of the Commonwealth Art ti are su hat th :
ood sad by kos Dr. ans | as a whole lies in the develop- ship can be ‘ir ‘ rural nd industrial areas at
lerve to up. For | But before this can be achieved ment of the rich natural re- } ¢ ; present neglected through lack of
‘ood I them ; i i i e- pital hip 4 minimu: 7
Vitamin Bs, iron and other {with any degree of security, a sources which the Colonial Em- structural aki rhe R ‘ pportunities for the
minerals in this time-tested long-term plan must be worked . s suc y : : encouragement of ability and the
< g I pire has in such abundance ind State Apartments coulk |
help build up your vitality | out for the development of the Hine ann : n of craftsmanship
and aid in toning up the ente =| Commonwealth as a whole, to co- If sterling area trade with the j/10™ onto. Waras, » operat
system—so you can face the future ordinate dollar spending in each dollar area is to be balanced, the heatres, and the like. The aft Phere no cause more noble,
with confidence. ' member of the Commonwealth. Commonwealth must produce ©d of the shelter deck is strong no duty more personal or urgent
Give Dr. Chase's Nerve Food a ; : more of the commodities which ‘ nough to allow a helicopter t than that of helping the younger
chance to help banish nervous It is in this respect that the ¢an be sold for dollars—food- !4nd on it with patients eneration for a more healthy
jearsand doubts. It helpsyourest | needs and welfare of the Colo- stuffs, mineral ores, timber and The new Royal Yacht will by ayd vigorous youth to-day mean:
ter, and feel better. name nial Empire have been largely ae ad . is ee 413 feet long over with a di fine d fitte » y 2
Ct is red pi A ¥Y rubber. A strong dollar demand long overall, ith a ¢ er ar tter men and women
2 your easusance, ve os gy Cr oetre exists for these things; it does Placement of about 4,000 tons citizens of the Empire to-
as a whole have made a greater jot exis for the ‘ London Press Service orro
T contribution to the financial of the gos nat on ; —$—$_$_______ *



BRING NEW BEAUTY stability of the Commonwealth pominions.

TO YOUR HAIR than gny other member of the DELA Y IN MID-EAST DEFENCE

sterling area. That is






























why more ot the ter-
Raw materials produced in the jjp, a rede .
. a g area investment must be from page 1 ‘ ‘
. : . as Colonial Empire have been im=- concentrated on the development ‘ ee pag be use it is contended
At this Holiday Season sentant earners of dollars, which concentrated on the development ‘Recent “Turkish approach ‘ reflect thelr growing in
When you want your }}); have gone into the sterling area’s the puilding up of secondary in ett ia ; ountries have be e- int n Western designed de
i Ste . |!common dollar pool. Between abrkies ee ate ee, Te ed here tentative fe {
Hair to look its best, i848 ond 1981, the Colonial Em- Guthrie. toms meeatce: of formal and it was stated tl It reported that Egyptian
Sale ; — lus of £225,- - ‘ pe Sh : a nothir definite 1a f rr © Jordan and Lebanor
try pire built up a surplu reached at the London talks, it emerged from’ them ‘er : fy SO eee
00,080 o this dollar ten. p yond will truly be the beginning of a Fy of Sotipiee Rohe " Bs
rr ce ea ehaden hk Saline “gute (cae deal” for the Colonial Em- Meanwhile, consultative m Colonel Adeeb Shishekli arc : in-
e ° | is during this period and the | P7e- -B.U.P. me ff mid-Eastern leader d di terpreted here to be linked with!
largest of those was New Zea-| _ —B.U.P. mats are being studied here th the onsiderations.—U.P.
POMADE land’s £49,000,000. : vamegeting
é Spending Denied
it will enable you to {| Without the Colonies’ contribu-|
; your ai nasiiw | tion—by earning valuable dollars
dress your hair easily and being denied the right to|
in all the latest styles spend them—the total accumu-|
lated deficit in the sterling area
SDSS POSE PLP PSP SFOS PLLLPPPCCE SOTO,
5
* , , oe
i. * |
* Barbados Co-Op }
. % |
S|
Cotton Factory }
otion facto %
% |
%
- = ¢ |
. Showroond &
x
%
%.
%
x |
% |
»
.
% |
It’s cooking and % |
: : .
baking time... we x |
- . 1
have new 2 & 3 $ |
8
burners ,... + ¥
>

KEROSENE

SESS O SSPE ELSES



| COOKERS
,
,
;
' }
: a single burner at $7.36 and ss |
: ovens from $10.31. 8
}
.
i/ %
ee
a
x
x
: Baking Pans %&
g
Mixing Bowls 3
s
e
Icing Sets §
2
and everything $ |
to make Xmas- %
time in the % |
i , 4s
en lyf | “THAT DREADFUL MAN IS STILL) WAITING
worthwhile ! % etteinne ee ’ : ee
% | IDE OR AN ANSWER!
CCE RRA LEAR AA» '\ a ees a



sama) “NEW DEAL” FOR COLONIES

<
Fusham. Gonsigned to Robert Thom

Seal. Consigned to the Schooner Own-

PAGE THREI

BLOOD IMPURITIES (48
Many ailments are caused by poor iw PIMPLES

may affect the whole system. Skin erup

and irritation, simple rheumatism and ; BOUS
joints are nature’s signal that you need Clarke’s 440 O7TwER
Blood Mixture. This famous medicine helps QY/A/
to cleanse the blood stream of impurities and COMPLARHTS
keep fit and free from these and similar
troublesome complaints. Be sure to ask for RHEUMATIC

CLARKE’S.»:.. “5
1 Blood Mixture



















SEA AND AIR
TRAFFIC |,

In Carlisle Bay ]

ee Philip H. Davidso wit
nea Henrietta, Cyr.l E. Smith
Tl, Ma a | ine

Mote Vessels f RB Rada Lady



NEURITIS.
LUMBAGE












ARRIVALS
SATURDAY DECEMBER é6TH
Yacht Ling, 10 tons, from Las Palmas
der C. Sullivan
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 7TH
S.S. Alcoa Planter, 3,931 ns, from
iadeloupé Under Captain H E



id

§.s Alstertal, 1252 tons from
enada under Captain Ww Bahr
gents:—S. F. Musson, Son & Co. Ltd
Sch PZilip Hu Davidson 87 tons,
om British Guiana under Captain C

POINT BRAND

s’ Association
S.S. Mutlah, 4557 ton from Trini
d under Captain J T Viviar

\gents:—Da Costa & Co. Lid |

DEPARTURES |

Sch. Belqueeh fur St. Vincent, MV |
aribbee for Dominica, Lady Noeleen
Dom.nica, Laudaipha for St Lucia
V. Athelbrook for Trinidad, Sch
orence Emmanuel for Martinique

Marion Belle Wolfe for BG
b Lucile M Smith for Britith
Hiane Sch Emeline = for British
viana, S.S. Crispin for Boston, $.8
tertal for Trinidad

Seawell

DEPARTURES BY BW.LA
For Venerucla—Dec. 6

and Value

BUY A BOTTLE TODAY!





e love, M. Foladore, B. HMuizi, L

I ©, C. Puigbo, C, Puigbo, C. Perez,
I t lL. Pedrotti, R, Maso, D
M, Zubr, F. Jones, G. Jones, P

t D, Porterfield M. Sandrin, O,

W M. Apat, M. Apat, N. Erikson,



For Jamaiba via Venesucla Dec. 6
Mr Edna Eskstein, Mrs. Dorothy da

Simmons, C. Walcott, J, Me Alister, W

Hest, E. Burke, L. Maingot, H. Maingot

( Herbert, H Talbot, S. Debysingh
Matouk, Nansour, A. Neumayer

“Our trade is chiefly with the uee Will welfare of Youth to assist the silva & son
U.K. and Canada,” he added, “and “Phe pressure must be for € hi i mar oluntary organisations in DEPARTURES BY BW.LA.
we are anxious to combine our More primary and less industrial the mother country which exist far Grenada—Deo. 7
loyalties with our trade. We are development, more development I ‘ | N I tr * F. Branch, C. Davis, J. Wick, A. Wick.
. é é ’ opr j with that aim and to provide the ° —Dec, 7 .
not going to be selfish in any re- in the Colonies and less in the Aue i ew means for healthy recreation R Babb. it TGhsene a Cc

fo. frinidad—Dec, 6
J. Ward, R. Ward, L. Mareano, C
Alleyne, J Archer, G. Bearden, R. |
rasewReekie, C. Knight, F. Knight
J. Sealy, M. Cave, FE. Ede, D) Bae
M. Ede, Ro Biets











For St. LuctaeDee, 6 |
J Mitchell, D. Barnes, R. Barnet. |
Bayley }
For Antigua—Dee, 6
M. Hensley, P. Hensley, FR. Bo a, |}
For Martinique—Dec. 6 |
G. Mottard, J, Ravinet, L. Ravinet, |
M. Moulin, A. Moulin |
ARRIVALS BY LAY |
F. Este, T. Lueccioni, P. Luccioni, M
be A. Este, A. Este, J. Sanjuan, C
‘ » G Frone G Blanco, A
Solorzano R Roja 1 Roja R
Portillo, A Aagard, 1 Aagard, M. |
Angard, E. Perez, RK. Perez, E. Shanis, |
J. Shamis, B. Shamis, BR. Shamis, N
Shamis, R. Stolear, B. Stolear, 1 “1
G Coll, R. Vegas, M. Mosquera, C
Cabrera ( Cabrera
DEPARTURES — BY LAV
For Veneauela Dee, Tth

BY BW.LA
ua Dee. 7
‘ sar, G. Kawaja

From Trinidad — Dee, 7

H. Nothnagel, H. Chester, A. Walters
Cc. dack, R. Rait, Lb, Carman, R, Car
man, B. Gill, T. Kerr, D, Allphin, R
Whittington, E. Steel, G Clarke, 'E
Garson, J. Clark, R. Ward



From Venesuela Dee. 6
F. Van Dijk M. Van Dijk, J Van
Dik, | Y Van Dijk, BE. Blat, HW. Blat, |
C. Breuille, G. MeKenzie, M. Kure, T
Friend, 8, Friend, C. Baglesham

BROWN LEATHES
BLACK PATENT
WHITE SUEBDE
























From Trinidad — Dee. 6
q dhe Hinkson D. H.nkson, €
sittisor i Gr ant rE Barrow, G. Bar $3.40
row, J. Barrow, D. Barrow, C. Barrow
Me Kenzie, R. Flen
ing “J, Jones, 0. Niemtschik $3.95
rey s
Today’s Gem
A happy disposition is bet-

ter than an estate of £10,000
a year.—Lord Avebury
The true pleasure of life is
to live with your inferiors
Thackeray

Rest is the sweet sauce of
labour.—Plutarch.

Speak softly, and carry a ——$————
a
big stick

Theodore Roosevelt

REAL CHRISTMAS GIFTS !!
DRESS SHIRTS

including ARROW, B.Y.D., ELITE, RENOWN,
NEW YORKER etc., ete.
in Plain Colours and Striped Designs
Prices from $3.94 to $5.60

SPORT SHIRTS

including ELITE, PREMIER, RENOWN, etc., etc.
in Plain Colours and Fancy Designs
Prices from $2.50 to $6.72

BOYS’ SHIRTS

in Plain Colours and Fancy Designs
From $1.90 to $3.07

SEA ISLAND SHIRTS

For Sport and Dress Wear
From $6.75 to $8.44



EVERY PURCHASER OF A PAIR OF ..

JOHN WHITE” or “K’ BRAND SHOES

DURING THE MONTH OF DECED
WILL AUTOMATICALLY HAVE A CHANCE
WITHOUT ANY FURTHER COST

A “HUMBER” CYCLE

COMPLETE WITH ALL ACCESSORIES.
























































PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS eal ADVOCATE

et EE es
Tinted Oy the Advocate Co., L4é., Broad -.., Sridgetowa



facaw wef Jr

Tuesday, December 9, "1952

CAPITAL |

CONTINUED material progress in Bar-‘
bados depends on the development of the
natural and. human resources of the island.
The widespread idea that living standards
can be improved‘by actions of government
alone or that full employment and a decent
living wage could be obtained if everyone
possessed social conscience is due to
Nothing has contributed more

an

a
ignorance,

to the entrenchment of such ignorance
than the contention of Karl Marx and
others that capital is radically opposed to

labour,

Orthodox economists define capital as
“that part of wealth which is accumulated
in order to assist future production.” Today
when the governments of the West Indies
are anxious to attract capital investment
in order to create greater employment
opportunities the sooner that the miscon-
ceptions spread by Marxist propagandists
are given the lie the greater will be the
opportunities for economic development.
The idea that capital is inimical to labour
is so easily proved false that it could only
be accepted by persons with no under-
standing of political economy.

Capital can of course be used selfishly
and can lead to great social evils such as
that created during the industrial revolu-
tion when the gulf between wealthy em-
ployer and poorly paid employee became
so wide and led to the emergence of a class
system so distinct that Disraeli was right
when he spoke of the “two nations” of
England. Class distinctions of that kind
have never existed in Barbados and could
not have existed because of the predomin-
antly agricultural economy of the island.
It is only in recent years that the growth
of an intelligentsia united in its contempt
for those engaged in trade has created a
new class which is very conscious of their
difference from the ordinary man-in-the-
street.

The truth about capital is that without
it, there can be no increased production.
The same may be said with justice about
labour. But whereas labour can be self-
sufficient in a primitive society in which
barter and not money is used, in advancing
communities no material progress can be
made without the assistance of reserve
funds. A man creates capital when he pro:
duces more than he consumes: and the
capital of a country represents the surplus
of production over consumption.

Had those who amassed huge fortunes
during the 19th century spent their wealth
on enjoying themselves there would never
have been available the immense capital
resources without which the railways and
other major developments could not have
been completed for use by their and sub-
sequent generations.

Had wealth been more equitably. distri-
buted and therefore consumed in the 19th
century our standards of living in the 20th
century would have been much lower than
they are. With all its defects and social
blemishes the capitalist system of the 19th
century underlined a lesson which all
countries must respect viz. that savings
and accumulations of capital are necessary
in the interests of the whole community

Today throughout the greater portion of
the globe high rates of taxation are making
it more and more difficult for savings to be
accumulated. Capital which used to be
invested by private persons in many coun-
tries of the world is being spent in an un-
successful effort to maintain individuals at
the standards of life to which they have

been accustomed.

The consequences of a spending regime
are already apparent. Whereas‘ the mil-
hons of the world’s population are

demanding higher standards of living there

are not enough savings in the richer coun-
tries to be attracted to capital development

ped countries of the
, people realise how much
money is required to create one job in in-
y. In Canada the “book value” of
reating such a job has been estimated at
5500 (Canadian) per worker.

In terms of replacement costs, however,
the capital investment necessary per work-
er has been estimated at the much higher
figure of $9,000 (Canadian). Capital, what-
ever the authors of social polemics may
call it, is used in commerce to express the
stock used by the merchant, manufacturer,
or trader in carrying on his business, in the
manufacture of articles for sale and in the
payment of wages and labour. Capital thus
defined in commerce includes not money
only, but also buildings, machinery and
everything else that is employed to assist
commercial operations.

One can be very sympathetic towards
those who are impatient to secure decent
living wages and higher living standards
for all. There must be very few persons
born in Barbados during this century
who have not, experienced poor living
standards some time during their life and
there are thousands still living under
deplorable conditions. But right
approach to greater prosperity can only be
made if everyone of us realises the basic
truism of political economy that capital is
a product of human labour saved for ‘pro-
duction, and directs his labour to produce
more than is consumed,

underdevel
Not many



n
ri



al

the





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

From A Free To A Slave



A lecture on the subject “From \ e
a Free’to a Slave Society” was ocies v
given at Codrington College on e
Friday last week by Mr. F. A., ae nt :
Hoyos, M.A., Senior ‘History the Royalist cause. The sarba-
Master of the Lodge School. We “@ns lost no time after the King’s
publish below a summary of the execution m pl claiming ms son
lecture. King as Charles II. The Governor,
Lord Willoughby not only pre-
. pared to d the island against
Men Of Property possible att by the Round-
In the early Gays after the heads, but sent out’ ships to en-
settlement, the prevailing society force the King’s authority in the
in Barbedos was a simple thing. other Caribbee islands. The Bar-
Its population consisted mainly badians were at onee denounced
of white small farmers, who as traitors to the Republican
owned a few acres each, and cause. The Commonwealth passed
white indentured servants who the Navigation Act of 1651, for-

helped them to raise crops of
tobacco and cotton—Peasant crops.
It was a society in which property
was widely distributed. Nearly
half of the population owned
some land and thus had a stake in
the country. In the main, the
People who owned the land in
small lots were Englishmen and
the indentured servants were
Irish and Scots. The latter were
transported to Barbados during
the civil war period and the
troubled time in Scotland and
Ireland.

The condition of
indentured servant
quite pitiable. The Negro slave,
who. came afterwards, was also
to suffer from the inevitable re-
sults of servitude. But the male
slave who was bought for £30
was the property of his owner for
fife and the latter, if he was
sensible, would try to see that his
investment went as far as possi-
ble. But the white servant
slavery for a limited period and
at times his employer would try
to get the most out of him while
he could and the result could be
disastrous to the servant. Still
latter had the consolation, denied
the African slave, that his period
of serfdom was lir
could look forward
and ownership of propetry.

the white
was often

was in













The economy of the isla n
those dars was essential) &
pee: sant economy. Land was wide-
ly distributed in the island _ and
it is import to bear in 1
that land w the besis of
democracy

Free Institutions

The Engl ishmen did
island exactly what
wherever he went
They brought to the isi
strong attachment to free i
tions Their migration
England to Barbados was
part of the vast movement wh
brought countless men and wom
to lay the foundations of
British Empire and the U
States. They were driven
the Old World by political
religious persecution and in
New World they sought to enjoy
the freedom that had been denied
them at home. Men, who had
left their country to get away
from tyranny, were bound to
place the greatest emphasis on
self-government, The inhabitants
of Barbados and the Caribbee
Islands like those of the American
Colonies were resolved to find
new opportunities of freedom,

The spirit in Barbados and in
other NMglish colonies was
thoroughly democratic. The island
shared one vital thing with other
young communities in the New
World, Land was divided into
freeholds. hat it must be again
emphasised, was the basis of their
democracy

A people, whose way of life was
so strongly rooted in ownership of
land, would insist on a measure
of independence. From early times
the freeholders in the island were
accustomed to certain rights in
their early assemblies. It was only
natural therefore that, when
Henry Hawley established the
first Parliament in the island, the
Ssettiers eagerly availed them-
selves of their new rights. Here
the lecturer gave a brief account
of the career of Governor Hawley
and the calling of the first House
of Assembly.

they
the w




Of course the permanence
the House of Assembly was large-
ly due to the fact that the great
issue of parliamentary govern-
ment was at time being fought
out in the Mother Country. In
1640 the English Parliamentarians
had won a notable victory when
Charles decided to end his period
of personal government and call
2 parliament. It was fortunate
that the vear after Hawley estab-
lished the House of Assembly the
English Parliament, won an im-
portant round in its battle with
Charlies I. But the Barbadian
Assembly would not have succeed-
€d unless the English settlers in
the island were animated by the
spirit of Hampden and Pym as
strongly as their fellow-English
Psriiamentarians at home,

The Spirit Of Freedom

The English freeholders were
sv0n egain to show their vigour
and independence. When Charles

I, was executed in 1649, the
settlers, like their fellows in
America, remained ‘Staunchly by



the ;

to freedom ;¢

of



bidding the island to continuc its



. HOYOS









































Led









an effe € d

wk (Rup-) months

to effect a | g. Indeed, it was
not until th s of the Battle
of Worcester (1651) had reached
him that Willc by was in-
duced to come to terms, The

great victory the Barbadians had
won, although they had to submit
to Cromwell, lay in the Articles
of Agreement which were drawn
up between Willoughby and
Ayscue That Agreement laid it
down that the government of the
Island should consist of “a Gov-
ernor, to be appointed from Eng-
land, the Council to be chosen by





him and the Assembly to be
elected by the freeholders.” In
other words, the parliament,
established by Hawley, was con-
firmed by Ayscue, as the repre
sentative of the English Parlia-
ment Still more striking was




the assurance given that English-
men living in the colonies would









enjoy all the rights of Englishmen
living in England, and that nx
taxes sho be imposed on Bar-
badians ut the consent of a
General Assem| sly

That was remarkable The
Same sentiments ere to be ex-

ican colonists



heir revolt from

re than a hundred

Indeed, it has been

claimed that the terms won from
Ayscue were later taken note of
by the American colonists and
that the Articles of Agreement
drawn up in Barbados in 1652
were to give shape to the Ameri-
can Declaration of Independence

in 1776!
That was the spirit of the island
in the early days after its settle-

ment, It was a virile community
of small holders It knew the
freedom that came from the

ownership of lahd and this helped
to reinforce the strong democratic
spirit it had brought from the
Mother Country

A Complete Change

But before
fradual change
of the island f
consequences The economy of
the island was to be completely
changed with the introduction of
sugar. The possibilities of large-
scale production of sugar attract-
ed men whe could afford to buy
large plantations Large scale



there was a
character

r-reaching





production
forced
ually

labour.
Grad-
farmers were
forced off the land, their places
were taken by big planters and
those of their indentured servants

thousands of African slaves.

meant ct
labour,
the small

eap
slavery

In vain did men like Sir Peter
Colleton call for gegislation to save
small holders from, extinction, In
vain did the Ligrels of the day

contend that no one who owned
land in the country should be
able to add to his possessions. The
big capitalists made their relent-
less advance. The holdings of
small men were swallowed up and
the poorer whites were forced to
emigrate and seek their fortunes
in such places cs Carolina, Ja-
maica, Surinam, St. Lucia and
other W.I. Islands Gradually
the island lost its s‘atus as a virile
colony and becarne, in the words
of Professor Harlow, “a political-
ly unimportant sugar plantation,
owned by absentee proprietors
end worked by Negro slaves.”
Barbados lost the health and sta-
bility of its early days and be-
came a sort of volcano. Instead
of a democracy based on a wide
distribution of property, it be-
came a colony divided into two



hostile camps, the Negro slaves,
far out-numbering masters,
and the white planters steadily

becoming obsessed more and more
with the feir of a slave insurrec-
tion.

Codrington And Ciueated

Two outstanding men—Codring-
ton and Coleridge—were to play
& great part in saving the island
from the perils and insecurities
of a slave society. During his
regime in the Leewards Islands,
Coarington Saw the urgent need

ic reform At a time












@.. land in the Leewards, too,
being bought up by wealthy



Was to
laying
ued land
ing for

Codring-
interrupted
war with the



m the Lee-.
occasion
the con-
He saw
unsettle times.
portation of slaves
tivation of sugar
shown the
re foundations
They went in
possible revolt
s fear drove

ews oo
* Wegroes

ca the



ave society
lant fear of a
he slaves and t
to unreasonable lengths.
Codrington raised his voice against
he fear that was crippling West
r society. He protested
inst the fear that refused to
teach the slaves the English lan-
guage, that refused to teach them
Christianity because they would
acguire ideas of equality that
would be the first step to freedom.
Yet though he was frustrated
during his term of office in thy
Leewards, he succeeded at a later
date to give practical effect to his
ideas. For in thg end he w
succeed in hin pruject of hav:
bodies of men trained to help in
the great task of improving th’
moral and material condition of
the Negroes and the Indians in the
Caribbean. The value of his be-
quest cannot be under-egtimated,
For at time when the EStablish-
ed Churches closed its doors to








the African slaves and denied
them the consolations of the
Christian religion, Codrington

pointed the way to a better future.

Bishop Coleridge came at a
time when the dangers of a slave
society seemed about to threaten
Barbados and the neighbouring
colonies with ruin. The Barba-
dias insurrection of 1816 had been
followed by upheavals in British
Guiana in 1823 and in Jamaica in
1831 The prophets of despair
were busy predicting that eman-
cipation would bring disaster and
that the British West Indies would
follow Haiti's example by exter-
minating the whites and setting
black republics. But Coleridge
was the man for the crisis. He

succeeded against tremendous
odds in establishing the Church
as an integrating force in these

communities and thus warded off
the threatened veril.

Latefundia Perdidere

The lecturer concluded by sup-
porting the thesis of Professor
Harlow that broad acres destroy-
ed Barbados as much as they des-
troyed ancient Rome. There
could be no doubt that Barbados
was a happier place in the early
days when property was widely
distributed, when something like
half of the population owned
small plots of land and thus had
a stake in the community. Its
democracy Was real because it
was based on a firm economic
foundation. There could be no
doubt that whet¥ the small holders
were forced out of existence and
the wealthy capitalist came on the
scene that the condition of the
island, though its national wealth
was increased, became unhealthy
and unstable.



B.B.C. RADIO. NOTES”

Buowe aoroeid uowuw0os e st iT

cricketers—or cricket fans — to
pick a World XI to play against
Mars; in a BBC programme in
the coming week you can hear
of two such World XI’s, one
picked by» Denzil Batchelor and
the other by Neville Cardus.
Neville Cardus, the world-famous
cricket writer—he is also equally
famous as a mvtsic critic — re-
views Denzil Batchelor’s recently
published “Book of Cricket’ and

in this talk takes up a challenge
put out by Mr. Batchelor in his
book. In his book Mr. Batchelor,
with remarkable courage, se-
lected a world “Team of, the half
century.’ that is, since 1900, for

a timeless test against Mars;
nominees are

his us in the 31 atid 49 metre bands
six Englishmen — and can

also “be heard — this

Tate, will probably be the best recep-

tion—in the 41 metre band. The

Brad- frequences of these three beams
and are respectively, 9.58, 6.035. and

(or 7.150) megacycles.

Hobbs, Fry, Compton,

Larwood and Lockwood:

four Australians -

man, ‘Trumper, Oldfield

Mailey; and one West Indian— 7.185
Worrell. Then he adds, ‘There

are all the winter evenings for

everyone to point out where I've

gone wrong.’ This Mr.

Cardus obligingly

invitation
accepts,

Plays From London
Three radio plays are available
to BBC listeners in the coming

and week—'His Brother's Keeper’ by

puts forward his XI to play Mars John Wyse on Tuesday at 10.30
at Lord's in a four-day match. p.m. ‘ Dr. Abernethy’ by Alicia
Neville Cardus's talk, subtitled Ramsay and Rudolfh de Cordova
‘Test Match: World vs Mars’ will on Friday at 7.45 p.m, and “A
be given as the Mid-Week Talk Wind on the Heath” by Ronald
on Wednesday next starting at Adam in ‘Radio Theatre on Sat-
10.15 p.m. It will be beamed to urday, 13th at 8.30 p.m.



Our Readers Say: :

St. Joseph Chapel

To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—I shall be grateful if you
will allow me to make an appeal
through your paper on behalf of
St. Aidan’s Chapel in St. Joseph.
I make the appeal to all our good
friends who love the little chapel
at Bathsheba, to help us raise
money for its repair, The walls









are in cons ant need of repairs
owing to effect of the salt
air from the sea, Tt repairs are
being done now ar should be
finished in about week
We are usir




commended
Messrs. Bar ‘
should resist the jan !
Chapel is self-supporting excey



for a small grant. from the Ves-
try. We shall be glad to raise
sufficient from this appeal to pay
the labour — which last week
amounted to $47.10.

Thanking you in anticipation. about 20 Americans are involved in the U.S |

Yours sincerely,

L.. C. MALLALIEU,

Rector. | quarters,

The Rectory |

i

lLie to resign.

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1952
—

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From H ENRY LOWRIE

WASHINGTON.

DESPITE all the troubles ahead of him in
the world’s biggest job, President-elect Eisen-
hower is feeling happier today.

Not because he has managed to get his golf
score down to the low eighties while on holi-
day at Augusta, Georgia.

But because one of his top advisers, 57-
year-old Walter Williams—a banker who
may be his first Commerce Secretary—paint-
ed a rosy picture this week-end of an
economy that would bring still greater pros-
perity and an even better living standard to

Americans.
BOSLEY CROWTHER, film critic of the

New York Times, predicts that any film
selected as the year’s best will have to sur-
pass “The Sound Barrier.”

HOW LONG does it take a woman to clean
her house? Mrs. John Immer, whose 37-
year-old husband, a professor at Washington's
American University, is going to tell the
women of Britain how to save time, says her
nousework takes four or five hours at the
most each day. |

Behind Professor Immer’s trip, which is
being paid for by the Mutual Security
Agency, is a visit he made to England with
his wife two years ago.

They were irked by the old- fashioned
equipment of their rented house and the un-|
co-operative ways of their maid. They re-,
organised to such efficiency that the neigh-:
bours came running for advice.

+ te

HOLLYWOOD'S “Television City”, a
35,000,000 (£12,500,000) dollar rival to New'
York’s “Radio City,” home’of the big broad-|
casting ~mpanies, was opened with the usual
Hollywood Hourish. The new “City” is said ||
to be a first-class fort and shelter in an atomic
attack. The buildings can withstand gamma
rays, heat radiation and concussion from
atomic blast.

MOTORIST thought many of their prob-

section.

The last word in safety construction, its
speed limit was fixed at 60 miles an hour, |
This meant that to many motorists it |
a good place to hit 90.

But today a 25-mile stretch was closed sit
cause in the fog—nothing to compare with |
what hung over the S- ath of England this|
week-end—40 motor cars crashed on it, kill-
ing two drivers and injuring 33 other people.

Tonight the road was re-opened but plaster-
ed over the 60 miles an hour signs was a new
regulation:
hour.”

“Maximum speed 35 miles an

* *
INTRIGUING statistics are advanced for i

a new drive to improve the country’s roads:
because of traffic jams Americans lose enough
time daily to make up a fortnight’s holiday
every year. And C. E. Wilson, boss of Gen-
eral Motors, estimates that 60,000,000 people
driving to work and school lose a total of
20,000,000 hours every day.
*

* *

STILL ANOTHER new use for plastic.
Dentists are experimenting with it as a filler. '
It is painted on layer by layer with a small
camel-hair brush. The Americans got the
idea from German scientists who discovered
its value while trying to find a substitute “4
gold fillings.

*

AFTER eight preliminary operations!
doctors in Chicago are now ready to go ahead
with their daring scheme to separate Siamese
twin boys joined at the top of their skulls.

The twins, born just over a year ago to Mr.
and Mrs. R. Brodie, have separate blood and
nervous systems. They are otherwise healthy,
and in crawling push each other in opposite
directions with their heads. Which gives
them their two nicknames Yale and Harvard
after the two rival universities.

Americans Are Hostile. ToU.N.O

NEW YORK
veloping .n America towards the United
Nations, said Dr. Ralph Bunche, UNOQ's

trusteeship director, tonight.
Dr. Bunche is an American Negro and a;

trained diplomat.

Doubt, cynicism, and even hostility are ies
He won the Nobel at

for his peace-making in Palestine.
He admitted that the American people’

s}

“initial hope and enthusiasm” for UNO are
“evaporating.”

He said: “The attitude of Americans is

much less a source of strength to UNO than

it used to be. But UNO is stronger today as!
an instrument of peace than in 1946.”

Dr. Bunche added that the Americans’
“volatile and fickle” attitude rises and falls!
with each change in the Korean war, |

He defended the patriotism of the 2,000
Americans working at UNO’s headquarters

Another United Nations official said that



Senate's anti-Communist probe at UNO head-
and this is one of the “harassing
|factors” that drove Secretary-General Trygve



(
(
}

lems were solved when a year ago the New}
Jersey Turnpike was opened — an almost |
straight 118-mile highway without one rt

ie
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ie 5S hE ACT NTE NET AIRE CS 1

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1952



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Electrician Acquitted Of Conspiracy

Jury Instructed To Return
Verdict In Accused’s Favour

Frank Massiah, a 38-year-old electrician of Bridge——

toad, St. Michael, was yest
of attempting to pervert t
and April 4, by making
Everton Myles were witne

erday acquitted of two charges
he course of justice on May 2

it appear that Stanley Bryan and

sses of the facts relevant to a

charge against him. He was acquitted after His Lordship

the acting Chief

whom the case was heard, i

dict ©f not guilty.

Massiah was represented by
Mr. E. K. Walcott Q.C., associated
with Mr. E. W. Barrow.

When Mr, W.: W. Reece, Q.c.,

Solicitor General closed the case

for the Crown after calling four
witnesses, Mr. Walcott said that
if there haq been conspiracy,
there would have to be corrobo-
1ation and if there was none
there could be no case.

Mr. Reece said that he could
not hide even from himself the
fact that the material witnesses
had broken down even before
cross-examination.

His Lordship told the jury that
no court could ask a jury to de-
liberate upon such evidence as
had been given. He invited them
to return a verdict of not guilty.
This verdict was returned. .

Inspector Everston Connell was
the first to give evidence, He said
that on March 29 about 6.22 a.m.
P.C, 230 Bradshaw brought Mas-
siah to the Bridge Police Station
and three charges were brought
against him, one, having an un-
licensed firearm, two having un-



licensed ammunition and three,
attempting to shoot Lionel
Brathwaite.

Massiah had been discharged.
Cross-examined he said the
charges were indictable,

When Lionel Brathwaite was

giving evidence he haq said that
Frank Massiah was in the road
when he pointed the gun and on
another occasion he said he was
beside a house.

Stanley Bryan an island con-
stable said that on May 2 he was
at N. B. Howell, Bay Street,
where he worked when Massiah
came to him about 7.15 p.m. and
told him he wanted him to give
him some assistance in a case.
He asked him what was the na-
ture of the case and he (Massiah)
answered that he had been
charged with attempting to shoot
a man,

Refused Request

He told Massiah that he was an
island constable and could do
nothing for him. Massiah said
that it was because he was an
island constable that he asked
him. Massiah took a piece of
paper out of his pocket, read
something to him and told him
he (Massiah) would give him
$20 if he gave evidence for him.
He asked him when the money
would be paid and he said dur-
ing hearing of the case. He told
Massiah that $20 was no money
and asked him how many other
witnesses he had in’ the case. He
Massiah said three or four more,
Myles, Frankie Waithe and an-
other mam called Charlie.

From the statement Massiah
read to him, hé was to say in evi-
cence that he was on Jordan’s
Lane accompanied by Myles and
he saw a man attempting to hit
him (Massialk) with two bricks.
He was then to say he saw Mas-
siai, go behind a house. pull out
a knife from his pock.t, .pen it
and point it in the direction of
the man. Meanwhile a wornan
came up and said to the man,
“Man I know you, Throw away
those bricks and go to work”,
and that he (Massiah) then went
through Jessamy Lane on his way
home.

Some days later about 9.45
e’clock Bryan saw Massiah in the
court yard and he (Massiah)
told him (Bryan) that Mr. Niles,
the barrister, wanted to see him.
Bryan asked Massiah when Mr,
Niles wanted to see him and he
said if he were not busy he could









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Justice Mr. J. W. B. Chenery before

nvited the jury to return a ver-

go then.
to Mr.

Massiah and he went
Niles and had an inter-
view with him, When he left
Mr. Niles’ office he saw Myles
standing on the pavement.

Didn’t Receive Money

Massiah never gave him any
money nor did he ever tell him
when the case was heard. He hap-

pened to be there on two occa-
sions when the case was Being
heard. He left before anything
happened.

When Massiah approached him
no one was present.

He had never given evidence for
anyone for money and if Massiah
had actually given him any money
he would have informed on him.

Cress examined he said that
when Massiah approached him ne
(Bryan) tried to convey the im-
pression that he was not going to
give evidence. He went to the
Police and gave a statement con-
cerning the case. He had given
evidence at*he court about six or
eight times. He never went in
the court unless he had something
specifically to do,

He said he could not remember
if he told the Police Magistrate
that Mr. Niles asked him whether
he knew anything about the case.

When he went to Mr. Niles a
man called Myles was not present.

He did not give a statement to
Mr. Niles. Mr. Niles. read one to
him,

If Massiah had given him the
$20 he would have taken it froin
him and given it to the Police.
When he saw Massiah the day of

the trial he asked him what had
become of the money.
He had told the Magistrate

that the day of the trial he hap-
pened to be in court for no partic-
ular reason.

When Massiah was arrested for
attempting to discharge a loaded
firearm he had foliowed him
while he was being taken to the
Police Station. While he was leav-
ing the station Massiah told him
to tell his brother (Massiah’s
brother) he was in a little trouble
but he did not do so.

Discharged Massiah

Acting Police Magistrate Mr.
G. B. Griffith said that on May 22
he discharged Frank Massiah of
the charge of attempting to dis-
charge a loaded firearm.

Everton Myles said he knew
Massiah for about six months, In
the early part of April Massiah
asked him to give evidence for
him. He asked him whether he had
witmesses and he said yes but they
were not proper ones. Massiah
said he would give him 14 or 15
dollars. Massiah took him to Mr
Niles and Mr, Niles asked him
whether he (Myles) was one cf
the witnesses, Massiah said yes
and Mr. Niles read a statement.

Massiah never gave him money
and he did not give evidence,

Cross-examined he said he was
never paid to give evidence, It
was about 6,30 o’clock one morning
he was coming out of the Spark,
Tudor Street when he saw Massiah
riding along Tudor Street. It was
then Massiah stopped and ap-

proached him. Massiah said he had
witnesses but did not think they
were reliable and asked him

whether he could give evidence.
He told him that he knew nothing
of the case. Massiah asked him a
second time to give evidence and
he agreed to do so, though he dii



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18 Months For
Manslaughter

Twenty-six-year-old Roybert
Sargeant, a shoemaker of Pros-
pect, St. James was yesterday
sentenced to 18 months’ impris-
onment. Earlier this sessions Sar-
geant was found not guilty of
murdering Arnold Hope, his com-
mon law wife’s step father, but
of committing manslaughter on
August 22, Before sentencing him
His Lordship the Acting Chief
Justice, Mr. J. W. B. Chenery
said that undoubtedly there had
been much provocation. While
perhaps an older or more discreet
person would have avoided the
occurrence, there was, as he had
said, much provocation. He would
therefore not pass as long a term
of imprisonment on him as he
would normally do.

Counsel for Sargeant was Mr.
C. Husbands.

9 MONTHS’ SENTENCE

His Lordship sentenced William
AustiA of St, Lucy to nine months’
imprisonment. Austin had earlier
in the session pleaded. guilty to
causing grievous bodily harm
with intent on Beathel Boyce by
striking her with a hammer on
September 30 this year.

sentencing him His
it was diffi-
man of

Before
Lordship said that
cult to conceive how a
his character had allowed him-
self to inflict the injury in an
outburst of passion. He had been
spoken of well by his employers
and by people of his district, both
lay and clerical. He still, how-
ever, had to send him to prison,
though he would be lenient.

Austin had been represented by
Mr, J. E. T. Brancker.

3 YEARS IN JAIL

Vernon Kinch a mason of Silver
Sands, who was found guilty
earlier in the sessions of at-
tempting to blow up a dwelling
house, Clara Webster and other
persons by placing explosive sub-
stance under the house on August
6 this year, was sentenced to
three years penal servitude by
His Lordship.

His Lordship told Kinch that
from all accounts he was a splen-
did workman and a man of good
character, but had allowed a
comparatively simple matter to
so derange his judgment as to
make him plot and plan the of-
fence for which in some coun-
tries he might be sent to con-
centration camp for life. It was
difficult to reconcile his ch racter
with the enormity of the offence,
but he would be as lenient as
the circumstances permitted him,
UNNATURAL OFFENCE

Ethan Brathwaite (18) and
Denzil Harris (17) of Brittons
Hill, who were earlier in the ses-
sions found guilty of committing
an unnatural offence on Septem-



ber 22, were each sentenced to
nine months imprisonment with
hard labour yesterday. by His

Lordship.

not intend giving any evidence.
Massiah agreed to meet him by the
Self Help but Massiah did not
come, On another occasion Massiah
agreed to see him but did not come
then either,



Myles was the last witness to
give evidence.

Mr. Walcott said that from the
evidence the case should not go to

the jury. : :
His Lordship invited the jury to
return a verdict of not guilty.

SWEET DISHES

Broad St.





: Children’s
Annual
Exhibition

Every year at the BarBados
Museum there is an exhibition
of art, needlework and handi-
crafts by school children and

prizes and certificates are award-
ed. This year’s prize list is as
follows:—

ART
Composition: —
(a) Animal
Ist. Iris Smith, Age 12, Codrington

High Schoo!
2nd. Enid Johnson, Age 12, St. John
Baptist Girls’ School.

(>) Figure

Senior:

ist. Brenda Daniel, Age 15, Queen's
College

2nd. Margaret Pilgrim, Age 16
Queen's College

Junior:

Ist. Myrtle Craigwell Age i2, St
Matthias Girls’ School

2nd. Wynsley Davis, Age 13, Haynes
Memorial School
(c) Imaginative
H. D. Alleyne,
mere School
Cut Paper work
E. I. King, Age 14,
Henry, Age 4
School, 7

Age 11, Comber

and K. M
Combermere

Christmas Card

A. F. Walrond, Age 12, Comber-
mere School.

Design

Diana Rust Age 15, Codrington

High School

Figure Drawing—Black and White

ist. F. Babb, Age 16, Barbado
Museum and Historical Society
Art Department Class, (Senior)

2nd, A. C. Toppin, Age 11, Barba-

dos Museum and Historical So-
cfloty Art Department Class
(Junior).

Flower Painting
Betty Cumberbatch, Age 15, Alex-

andra Girls’ School
Landscape
F. Kerr, Age 14, Barbados Museum
and Historical Society, Art De-

partment Class.
Poster
Yoland Bannister,
College

Age 14, Queen's

Potato Cuts

Gloria Rollock, Age 11, St, Peter's
Girls’ School
Seascape

Sylvia Austin, Age 12, St
Baptist Girls’ School

NEEDLEWORK

John the

Applique work

Ist. Denise Clarke, Age 10, St, Matthias

Girls’ School
2nd. Hazel Baker, Age 14, Boscobel
Girls’ School (Commended for
design)
Crochet
Ist. Sheila Wilkinson, Age 11, St.
Matthias Girls’ School
2nd. Ivy Cave, Age 14, St. Peter's Girls’
School; Myrtle Corbin, Age 14
St. Peter's Girls’ School
Embroidery
Marva Hewitt, Age 11, Boscobel Girls’
School

Embroldery—Local Motifs

Ist. Cynthia Clement, Age 11, St
Matthew's Girls’ School
2nd, Cynthia Thomas, Age 10, St
Matthew's Girls’ School
Hair Pin work
Luisdale Worrell, Age 14, St. Peter's

Girls’ School,
Handlerafis—Group Work
St. Peter's Girls’ School, Age 12-14
Smocking
Ivy Cave,
School
Any other Needlework
Ist. V. Jordan and E. Chandler, Age 14,
St, Peter's Girls’ School

Age 14, St. Peter's Girls’

2nd St. Peter's Girls' School Group,
Age 12-14,
HANDICRAFTS
Bookbinding

Ist, Norton Smith, Age 13. Black Bess

Mixed School,

2nd. Ezekiel Jordan, Age 13, Black
Bess Mixed School
CERTIFICATES OF MERIT
ART
Composition—
Animal
Betty Alleyne, Age 15, Codrington

High School,
Figure
Ist, Anthony Edwards
Memorial School
Composition
Alison Carr Brown
ton High Schoo!
Flower Painting
V. A. Williams, Age 15,

Age 10, Hayne

Age 11, Codring

Combermere

School
Poster
Margaret Heath, Age 13, St. Leon-
ard's Girls’ School
' NEEDLEWORK
Crochet
Iv ceve, Age 14, St. Peter's Girls’
School,
HANDICRAFTS
Bookbinding
A. R. Harris, Age 14, Combermere
School,



light pink, 46”.....

flowers and orchid





Prints

CHECK NYLON in self colours of pink,
blue and white, 36” wide

—per yard $2.43

EMBOSSED NYLON in Navy, Red and

GERMAN SHIP BRINGS

CARGO OF

FOODSTUFF

The German steamship Als'ertal paid its first visit to
the colony on Sunday when it brought a large cargo of

foodstuff to the island.

Thr

‘ee thousand, six hundred bags

of corn flour and 1,650 bags of onions were the main items.

Other cargo included 1,269 bags
of potatoes, 1,250 cartons of beer,
60 cases of cognac, 96 cases of
wine, 50 cases of muilk-powder,
80 bags of Pearl barley, 40 bar-
rels of salted mackerel, 18 cases
of hams, 28 cases of canned meat,
20 crates of cabbages and a ship-
ment of advertising material.
Captain W. Bahr is in command
of the vessel which is consigned
to S. P. Musson. Son & Co., Ltd.
GENERAL CARGO





arrival on
Alcoa Planter
from Guadeloupe with
general cargo for the island.
Thuis ship also brought 12 pas-
sengers. Five landed, The other
© are intransit. Captain H. E
Rushan is the master of the Alcoa
Pl nter. Local agents are Robert
Thom Ltd
RICE FROM B.G.

The 87-ton schooner Philip H.

Another
was the
arrived

Sunday
whicl

Davidson arrived on Sunday
ifternoon from British Guiana
with a shipment of 2,000 bags of

rice as the main item of its cargo.

Oth Tt ce consisted of 75
hunches of fresh fruit, 30 tons of
firewood, 600 bags of charcoal, 5%
wallaba poles and. 83 pieces of
greenheart, Captain Carney Sealy
is the master of the schooner

SCHOONERS LEAVE

iro



Three schooners left port over
the week-end for British Guiana.
They were the Marion Belle
Wolfe, the Lucille M. Smith and
the Emeline. These schooners do
a regular trade between British
Guiana and Barbados, They are
expected back over the week-end



All three are consigned to the
Schooner Owners’ Association
OTHER DEPARTURES

Other departures over the
week-end Were the schooner Bel
Queen for St. Vincent, the Lady

Noeleen for Dominica, the Laud-
nipha for St. Lucia and the motor
vessel Athelbrook which left for
Trinidad,

When the Athelbrook arrived
on Saturday afternoon it was
the motor vessel’s second visit in
five days. It took another ship-
ment of gallons of mo-

108,000
lasses for Trinidad. The other ves-



sels left with mixed cargo, With
the exception of the Athelbrook,
which is consigned to H. Jason
Jones, the other vessels aré con

1ed to the Schooner Owners’

ociation,
COTTON AND COCOANUT OIL

The schooner Gita M. which
arrived from Grenada on Satur-
day was yesterday unloading a
cargo of cotton and cocoanut oil

Besides 87 drums of cocoanut

oil and 50 bales of cotton, the
schooner also brought 450 bags
of cocoanut meal, She is con-

signed to the Schooner Owners’

Association,
ANOTHER YACHT




Pleasure yachts have been
calling at Barbados almost daily
for the past two weeks, Latest to
arrive is the yacht Ling undet
Mr. C. Sullivan, Ling’s last port
of call was Las Palmas, This
yacht is "now moored off the
Yacht Club
BRIN CASTOR OIL

A large shipment of castor oil
(292 drums), was brought here

by the 4,557-ton steamship Mutlah

which arrived in port yesterday
from Trinidad,

The Mutlah also brought a ship-
ment of 30 bundles of coal-pots
and 38 tierces of oranges.

Captain J. T. Vivian is in com-
mand of the steamship. Da Costa
and Co., Ltd, are the local
agents.

46"

$3.82

PRINTED NYLON SHEER in white ground with red

with gold flowers,

. G325

ground



YAVE SHEPHERD & €0., LTD. |

{0, 11, 12 & 13, Broad Street

PLAIN NYLON SHEER in black only,

wide

Larceny —
Decision |
|

Reversed

Their Honours Mr. H. A
Vaughan and Mr. A. J. H. Han-|
schell, Judges of the Assistant
Court of Appeal, yesterday re-|}

ed a decision of His Worsh'n!
Mr. A. W. Harper who imposed ;
fine of 30/- and 4/- costs on John
Young of Hothersal Turning, St
John for stealing a quantity <« |
corn meat valued t 10/- fro
Hothersal Plantation on August 27

Their Honours dismissed th
ease without prejudice, Young wa
represented by Mr. F. G. Smith
while Sgt Thornton of Fow
Roads Sub Station prosecuted for
the Police,

William Butcher a watchmen o
Hothersal Plantation told the court
that while he was on his way hom

1 August 27, he saw Young
coming out of Hothersal Planta-
tion yard with a bundle of corr

meat on his head. When Young saw

him he dropped the bundle and
sked him (Butcher) to give him
a chance.

As he began to waik in the

direction of Young he (Young)

ran and he chased him,

Sam Roach a labourer of Hother

sal Plantation said that he saw
Putcher walking behind Youn
Young appeared as if he was

trying to get away from Butcher
When he first saw the two meu,
Butcher was about 29 feet behind
Young.

Mr. Smith submitted that on the
whole the evidence was unsatis-
factory and there were too many
discrepancies. It would be highly
dangerous to convict his client for
stealing this corn meat,

In reversing the decision Their
Honours said that from the begin-
ning the case appeared not to be
strong enough and there were
several discrepancies, As they had
to try cases judicially, they felt
that it was their duty to give
Young the benefit of the doubt.

BOUND OVER



St. Clair Cyrus a 44-year-o!!
labourer of Jessamy Lane, St.
Michael pleaded guilty of wound-
ing Beatrice Burrowes on her
mouth by cuffing her on Dec, 6. He
appeared before His Worship Mt
G. B. Griffith yesterday.

He was bound over for six
months in the sum of £5
FINED 40/-

Martha Burke of Bank Hal!

St. Michael was yesterday ordered
a fine of 40/- by His Wor-

lo pay
Griffith for usine

ip Mr. G. B

indecent language on the Wharf |

The fine is to be paid in 14 days or
month's with

labour,

one imprisonment

hard



Concert Postponed

The Y.M.C.A, Glee Club's
Christmas Concert which was to
have taken plece to-morrow has
had to be postponed due to the
annual exhibition,

The concert has now been fixed
Monday,

for December 29, at 8

p.m,

——
SE

11 P2083

PRINTED NYLONS in
white with orchid dots,
white with green dots,
white with navy and
orchid with green dots,

46 inches wide

per yard.

$3.25










PAGE FIVE





Stocked in a Variety of Shades &

Qualities by all Leading Stores

— ee

To keep
Ltlle busy sadiesâ„¢
fit and active...

give them HALIBORANGE
every day

‘THERE'S NOTHING LIXE IT for building
up reserves of vital energy, promoting
healthy growth, strong bones and teeth

— and resistance to illness,







Made from purest halibut oil, cleverly blended
with the juice of ripe oranges, it is rich in
Vitamins A and D and so delicious in taste that
the most finicky youngster takes
it with delight.
Incidentally, it’s fine for grown-
ups too!

Haliborange

THE NICEST WAY OF TAKING HALIBUT OIL

Made in England by:
ALLEN & HANBURYS LTD., LONDON, E.2





JUST RECEIVED

JAMAICA CIGARS






GENTLEMEN ...... wu Boxes of 25
FLOR De MACHADO i” :
LONDRES , "



Blais ba Siti) .chietsens
PANETELAS digs ats a8 oe
PROM NT aks kta cdashadhahe\sriscoien eovsheanesnes . Bundles of 50

Also DOMINICA CIGARS

LONDRES .... in Boxes of 25
ERS oy condos sense fans oa ss ienesvalevibiones se te poo 1s)



THIS CHRISTMAS



Ga! fee

We have on Show

STEERING WHEEL COVERS

SE/ CUSHIONS
CAR MATS—Blue, Green, Wine, Black
COOL AIR VENTILATOR—Blue, Green, Amber, Red,

Clear
ILLUMINATED SWANS—Blue, Green, Red, Amber
ILLUMINATED BULLS
POLAROID SUN SHADES
SRARTON HORNS
CAR JACKS—Screw and Bumper
CHAMOIS LEATHER
POLISHES
POLISHES
SIMONIZ WAX & KLEENER
LOCKING GAS TANK CAPS
SOCKET jE£18S IN BOXES

WE INVITE YOUR INSPECTION

ECKSTEIN BROTHERS

NTAT

49RQ







PAGE SIX



Increased Agricultural Industry
In British Honduras During 1951

Timber Stili Main Export

LONDON.

Of a total population of 69,644 in British Honduras
8,838 people are engaged in the major industries according
to the Colony’s 1951 Colonial Report just published in
London.

Chicle bleeding is still the largest single source of
employment, employing 1,512 men, and many others de-
pend on forestry for a living.

“The people have been reared land communications with Belize,
to a timber economy and it will and another road is being built
require intensive re-education between the western highway
before they can be converted to and the Stann Creek valley.
agriculture,” the report notes. In 1951, 531 ships totalling 181,-

The timber industry is still the 492 tons entered the Colony as
main one of the colony and em- compared with 943 ships totall-

ploys 1,079 men. Chief exports ing 260,776 tons in the previous
of the industry are mahogany, year.

cedar, balsawood, rosewood and Passenger Service

pine, With the exception of the

During 1951 exports of mahog- Cayman Shipping Company which

any and pine timber increased operates small vessels between
over 1,950 sales, but there was 4 Belize and Kingston, Jamaica,
decrease in the sales of Cedar there is no regular passenger

logs, timber and chicle wood. service although passages
Che year was a record one for obtainable in vessels which call
all crops with the exception of every three weeks for shipments
rice in the Toledo district which of bananas to the United King-
suffered from excessive flooding dorm.
soon after planting. Nevertheless, Most of the internal mails of
the crop was nearly as large aS the Colony are carried in a smali
the preceding year’s and had motor vessel, the “Heron,” which
conditions been more satisfactory operates a twice weekly service
it would have exceeded tha from Belize to Punta Gorda, and
previous.year’s total. A record once a week extending the trip
crop of corn was harvested and to Puerto Cortes
1,300 tons were available for ex- The lack of a deep water port
port, some of which

are

rt, was sent to has been one of the main ob-
Trinidad, — stacles to the Colony’s sea com-

A rise in the controlled price munications, and the construction
of meat revived interest in the of a deep water pier at Com-

Colony’s livestock industry, al- merce Bight, in the Stann Creek
though’ a lot of work has to be istrict, is one of the main pro-
done to demonstrate the mean- jects under consideration by the

ing of proper stock and pasture Colonial Development and Wel-
management before this can be fare organisation.
regarded as an organised agricul- The main airfield of the

tural industry Colony is at Stanley Field, about

" ten miles north of .Belize, from
Banana Shipments _ which flights are flown to Kings-
Bananas have played an im- ¢on, Jamaica, Tegucigalpa,
portant part in the Colony’s ex- Florida, Guatamala and New
— over the year, the first Orleans. Passenger movements in
shipment of which was made in 1951 showed an increase of 28
October and regularly thereafter per cent. over that of 1950 and
at three. weekly intervals. By freight movements increased by
the end of the year exports had 97 per cent.
reached 13,000 stalks a



BARBADOS



OLD

WAR COMRADE CALLS ON IKE



ADVOCATE







|

When Your

| NERVES |
| trealloa E

and you feel cranky
and miserable. When
you can’t relax and

at night—can't

~~





BRITISH AIR MARSHAL Lord Tedde, drops in for a chat with President-
elect Dwight D. Eisenhower at the general's New York headquarters,
The two worked together during and after World War Il. Grinning in
background is Lewis Douglas, former U. S. Ambuassador to England.



B.W.L. Artistes

In London

A dream has come true for West Indian singers, musi- ‘ey, both of whom were very
cians and dancers in London. After many years of struggle helpful during the launching yes-
and disappointments, they have at last managed to put on terday.

LONDON.

theic own all-West Indian show at a London theatre.

Their show, “Cabaret Carib-
bean,” is described on the pro-
gramme as a West Indian party
It is playing to packed audiences
at the tiny Irving Theatre, just
off London's Leicester Square and
in the heart of theatre-land.

month. The report points out’ that The Irving is the newest of the

Steady work has been made in post-war development has been “little theatres” that have sprung
agriculture during 1951, but the concentrated on establishing a UP in London during recent years
Agricultural Department has been more broadly balanced economy During the day, it is an art gal-
hampered. by «a shortage of and has resulted in more roads lery. At night, canvas screens
trained staff and funds. being built to openéup nem: sn, cover the valuable pictures on the
The bBritusn ! I areas walls and chairs are moved in to

Honduras fishery for the Colony’s agric
1 ; ’ S @ ulture,
service which was established in : i —B.U.P



1950 was not able to begin opera-
brrto- Rime rae, Seen ton of its
aun! m April 1951. The work
of the rary ener has been Travel Agent
concernéd mainiv with crawfish-

ing and shrimp trawling. Despite On Holiday
disappointing results in shrimp i
trawling which was carried out Mr. Chesterfield Greene, a 65-
off the rivers of the Southern year-old travel agent of Boston,
portion of the Colony, there was and Mrs. Greene arrived in Bar-
a considerable increase in the Dados last Thursday to spend a
exports of crawfish in 1951, the three-month holiday. ‘They are
export total being double that of S¢#ving at Sandy Beach Hotel. Mr.

face the tiny stage that has been
built at one end of the long gal-
lery On that stage appear tal-
ented young artistes, many of
them unknown to the publie

During the past year, the Irving
has achieved a reputation a
firm stepping-stone on the way to
theatrical fame and several “un-
knowns” who have appeared there
have secured themselves an es-
tablished place in the theatrical
world,

It was Edric Connor, the Trini-
dadian baritone and actor who



the preceding year, Greene is a Barbadian. He was was responsible for the Caribbean
Since the end of the war there ee ee ae by his par- show at the Irving. He has worked

as five.

has been an immense improve- ff js a supporter of the Chil-

the bee Me in ths oat hat dren’s Goodwill League in Boston
hed y ae ne e past has and has brought some Christmas
= 0 rely mainly on the rivers presents for the children of the
and thesea, Children's Goodwill League here.
Under Colonial Development Mr, John Beckles:told an Advo-
and Welfare’ auspices, roads cate reporter yesterday that a
have been built linking up bothdate will soon be fixed for the
the west and northern areas by distribution of these presents.



A PLAQUE MARKS THE SPOT...
The only MP |
Cromwell
ever feared





for many years to bring Caribbean
artistes together in a show of their
own and nearly managed it last
year when the Trinidad All-Steel
Percussion Orchestra visited Lon-
don for the Festival of Britain
But his plans fell through because
no London theatre was available
then.

Appearing in another show at
the Irving recently, Mr. Connor
put his idea for an all-West In-
dian show to the management. It
was warmly accepted and Mr,
Connor was told to go ahead with
his plans

He collected a company of tal-
ented West Indians in London
some of them already famous, like
Lord Beginner, the calypsonian,
some of them well on their way to
the top of the profession, like
Louise Bennett, the Jamaican
actress and singer, and some of
them just starting out on_ thei
own, like Sylvia Wynne, a talented



ir » Lord deliver me from young dancer who has appeared

™ -Sir Harry Vane!” The with Boscoe Holder’s dance com-
y as that of Cromwell pany.
I ecasion: the dismissal .
f the Long Parliament. Connor Dances

ie Peet etter miempe Edrie Connor himself does not
here was only one man appear regularly in the show
vmong them that Cromwell Other engagements make that im-
feared. It was Harry Vane— possible, But on one occasion he

man with a conscience. Fhe wall Gane A eee



Vene had no great opinion County magistrates and
the Pro'ector. During the Churches on the other,
ANS of the Long Parlia- By August 1637 Vane had

‘s chief alm had had enough He sailed for

cen (0 keep the gutoctrat England, leaving behind a
on gaming complete reputation acknowledged by
putz! of the country’s friend and foe alike.

iffairs.

A man with Vane’s scruples Vane lived in retirement |



until 1640, when he became



has appeared in the show“in a
new guise for him—as a dancer

He is a powerfully-built man, but French West Indian Islands and the area.

RUSSIA





oa i fans member of Parliament for |
the R ation feared him Kingston-upop-Hull, In the |
as much as Cromwell had Long Parliament he was pro- LONDON.
: minent in the proceedings | Tie growing interest shown by
More direct against Strafford. the Communist ;bloc, especially

But Charles
ifect way of

had a more
dealing with
is enemies. No sooner was
e Stuart crowned than he
sted Vane and threw him








inf EARS T * Two years
late ane ead fe a
Tower Hill ;

Vane was the son of Sir
Henry Vane. a statesman

who Was led into the revolu-
tionary camp by his son.
Young Vane, educated at
Westminster School, joined
the revolutionary party at the
age of 15. His father sent him
to Magdalen College, Oxford,
to knock sense into him
Harry Vane took the first
opportunity of escaping to the
Continent. and in Geneva
became a Puritan. According

to Lord Clarendon the
recorder of tle “Great
Rebellion,” Vane was “ full of

bitterness against the church,
both against the government
and the liturgy.’

Emigrated
Old Vane urged Laud
Bishop of London, to take the
young man in hand. It wa

useless. Thus, when only 23
Harry Vane went to America
and becaine governor of
Massachusetts

But in Massachusetts re
ligious intolerance was as
severe as in the old country.
There came a _ trial of
strength between Vane- and

the Boston church on the one
side, and Deputy Governor
John Winthfop and_ the

In this connection he went
back on his conscience, To
obtain evidence against Straf-
ford, he touk from a cabinet
at his father’s home the notes
of a council meeting at which
Strafford had recommended
the introduction of an army
from Ireland to subdue
Englanc.

It was the chief evidence
against Strafford.

Important posts

Vane took a prominent
part in the impeachment of
Laud, but when the Civil War
came he was against the
execution of Charles I. s

Cromwell shut him up in
Carisbrooke Castle, but after
the Protector’s death, he had
important posts under
Richard Cromwell.

Vane House, Rosslyn Hil!
Hampstead, commemoretes

im.

LIVES

HERE



The plaque on the wall

London Express Setvice

Soviet Russia, in developing trade
with Commonwealth countries is



spotlighted by New Common-
wealth in its current issue.
Two events in_ particular—

East Germany's Leipzig Fair and
Soviet Russia’s Communist Party
Corgress—have both underlined
this interest, writes Mr. John
Cardew in a special article.
“Since the end of the war the

Leipzig Fair hag become the
most important shop-window of
the East, and this year over-

whelming emphasis was on heavy
industry,” Mr. Cardew continues

“China made her first appear-
ance as an exhibitor of machine
tools, heavy clectrical equipment
and textile and mining machinery,
and, while these goods were not
for sale, their significance, in
| the words of a Berlin newspap¢!
was that they documented China's

new productive capacity.”

|

| Mr. Cardew goes oh to say
there can be little doubt
when the Russians begin to



|the problem of finding new mar-



|ket for their “surplus gor
they will have a specially keen
eye on Commonwealth soure:
“Mainly because of Easter!
terest in Commonwealth rav
materials,” he adds, “the trade
of the Soviet bloc with the Com-
monwealth is already extens've
Whai is generally over-looked
thal while British trade with the
entire Eastern bloc is only about

one-sixth of the pre-war
Soviet, East European and
|Chinese purchases from the whole
|Sterhing Area have greatly in-
creased compared with the pre-



volume, a]

he appeared remarkably delicate
and agile in a bongo dance, which
one critic described as ‘a master-
piece of clowning.”

Another member of the cast who
has attracted attention is Errol
John, the West Indian poet who
broadcasts regularly in the B.B.C
West Indian service. Declaiming
some of his own poems, he proved
himself a fine and moving dram-
atic actor and some critics believe
that his appearance at the,Irving
may well prove the first big step
in a new theatrical career

With the success of this Carib-
bean show so firmly assured, West
Indian artistes in London are be-
ginning to make plans for Coro-
nation year—like everybody else
in the theatrical business, With
writers already at work on lyrics
and sketches for Coronation re-
vues, there are hopes that a steel
band may be brought to Britain
again from the Caribbean to take
part in the general Coronation
celebrations.

The last steel band which played
in Britain won universal admira-~
tion wherever it was heard, If a
steel band is brought across the
Atlantic again, it could do much
to enhance the prestige of West In-
dian entertainment before British
audiences.—B.U.P,

B.W.LA. Link
British And
French Islaisds



or have
fun in the day. Thenis
the time to take
Dodd's Kidney Pills.
For Dedd’s Kidney
Pills contain essential oils and medicinal
ingredients that act directly on the kidneys

Steel Bridge
Launched








from el so that within 1 hour they start draining

tage on & north bank. excess acids and wastes from

~~ wiknte procedure contin- op Sue wees clear. You
ued ‘according to pl relax. You pons yowseee: i itain’s ©
minutes aher ‘ares. ae wen Be sure to insist on Dodd's Kidney Pills, Here is Britain's gee pomree Tepe
hours of actual movement it| the favourite remedy for over half a
finally rested on its “bed’**on the eatery. | Dodd's are, quick acting—eale |
north bank. Immediately the ee Quis 2/ ot aiidrug ctures. 122
bridge was settled, Mr. Parfitt,

ackintosh's

Toffee de Luxe

Dodds Kidnev Pills

Mr. Carter and workmen crossed
on the wooden footpath from the
south bank to the northern side.

His Excellency the Acting Gov-

ernor, Mrs. Turner, and more

than a dozen interested persons HAPPY RELIEF |

ek the final stages, and 4 ° |

when r. Parfitt reached the vi ic!

north bank, they warmly con- FROM BACKACHE The Toffee with the rich, buttery

gratulated him and his assistants
on their success.
Celebrate
After the launching was com-
pleted, the Chief Engineer, and
the members of the senior staff,

flavour, The moment you put one in
* This

Neighbour said “Take Doan’s Pills”
HY PUT UP with neediess | ‘ : il i

W discomfort from backache, your mouth you will say

rheumatic pains, lumbago, stiff, |

aching muscles and joints or the |

common urinary disorders due to

is the most delicious toffee 1

haye ever tasted.*’ And it has a




joined with the other workmen sluggish kidney action when you
who also played their part in the might get happy relief. | yery high food yalue too — every
suceessful completion of the job, Many thousands of health |
and together they celebrated the cople. tems the they too! | piece is brimful of nutriment.
OSCAR ON. Boan’s Backache Kidney Pills.

aot launching of the bridge This well known diuretic and
involved much preliminary, i tisepti sluggish
theoretical and practical work”, Hunevs oo come 2 hae Ainetiogs
Mr. Garrod told the Advocate} of ridding the blood of excess usie MADE IN ENGLAND BY
later. acid and other impurities harmiws John Mackintosh & Sons Led.

Mr. Garrod said they owed a

to health. Grateful
debt of gratitude to Mr. D, G.

Foffee Town, Halifax, England.
where, recommend

eople, every= |
Boan’s Pillste |



Keir Engineer-Draughtsman of; their friends and neighbours. :
C.D. & W., who during the last Ash your o 9@ |
two years gave very much help| @+aur for DOAN Sw



in desgining the works of re-
organisation, se ies aa i sabtatieal
He also expressed his thanks

to Mr. Bancroft of Messrs. Elec-
tric Sales, and Mr. Boyce of Bulke-

Asked if he could give any in-
dication as to when the new
pumping station would be com-
pleted Mr, Garrod said they
have. Promised Government that
the Station and the arterial mains
emanating from it would be in
full operation by September next
year.

VEST
ESTRIES
@ from page 1

the Commissioners of Highways:
Mr. T. N. Peirce, member of the
Commissioners of Health; Mr. H
St. G. Ward, representative on the
Board for appointing the Rector
and Vicars and Mr. C, B, Brand-

{ keep fresh all day...!





ford, member of the Playing Field
Committee
Under General Business, Mr.

C. M. Drayton on behalf of other
members of the Vestry congratu-
lated Mrs, H. A. Talma for the
very able manner in which she had
carried out her duties as Church-
warden of the parish for the year.

ir. A, G. Gittens suppa@rted
these remarks and Mrs. Talma
briefly replied thanking members
for their kind remarks and said
that she was able to do so with the
help of other Vestrymen especial-
ly Mr. Harry Ward.

As it was the last Vestry meet-
ing for the year, Mrs. Talma ex-
tended the Season’s Greetings to
members

Mr. Brandford reciprocated on
behalf of other members.

Members present were: Mrs
H, A. Talma (Churchwarden) in
the Chair, Mr. H. St. G. Ward,

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a LEVER propuct











Mr. C. M. Drayton, Mr. C. B seed ae Sap pak ae aan tear ae
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Dec. 2. Brandford, Mr. C. Ifill, Mr. H.

B.W.LA.’s new Dakota services Garnes, Mr. G. C. Ward, Mr.
between Trinidad, Grenada, Bar- a; 2: Webster, Mr, A, G. Gittens,
bados, St. Lucia, Martinique, aad Victor Chase, Mr. T. N

rue | », Antigua, St. Kitis eirce,
nie Hatha Rico an up a new Thirty-three students from the
era in travel between the Eastern Upper forms of the Boys’ Founda-
Caribbean islands. tion School ac sGmapaniaa by Mr.

The 28-seater DC-3s which re- D, Prescott, As nan nase as th ift th t il Ch i t
cently went into service provide tended the Christ Church Vestry »oe e gl a reca $ ris mas every y

twice the seating capacity of the
have

Lockheed Lodestars which
not been withdrawn from service.

The resylt is that business and
pleasure itineraries can now
worked out wit the greatest

ease, and a number of islands can
be visited all in the space of a
week. Increased seats also mean

that the prospective passenger can
walk into any B.W.1.A. office in
the Leeward—W ndward and

INTERE

level The raw material
need—and will continue to
come very largely from
Asian Dominions and -Colo-
and the reasoning is prob-
ably that, even in the event of
the worst slump in the metro-
poiitan country, it will still be
possible for countries like India,
Pakistan and Ceylon to supply
jute, cptton, rubber ‘and other
commodittes against Soviet deliv-
eries of heavy equipment and
machinery.”
Two Aspects

Examining Soviet Ru
both this and last year,
pand her trade with
wealth countries in
Cardew continues:
“Two aspects in particular
the economic conference held in
Moscow last April have not re-
ceivca the attention they deserve
in the West especially in the
Commonwealth. First, there was

pevcial session devoted to trade
with under-developed countries
t which Indian and Pakistan
—many of them indus-

were the dominant
pokesman. Secondly, other East-

‘communist countries backed

up previous Soviet offers”

wal
they
neeg
the
nies,



a’s bids
to exX-
Common-

.Asia Mr,
of









Mr. Cardew then lists some of
offers made by Communist
states to trade their indugs-

trial and farm products for pro-
ice from an countries, ~

Referring again to the Leipzig

Fair, he adds At Leipzig heavy
t on Eastern industry as the
nswer to the problem of the un-

der-developed countries was again
arent, They were some for
five visitors from sia, inelud
a Pakistan, compared
about sixty from Britain and
eighty from the US.”







be

of

STED IN_
COMMONWEALTH TRADE

meeting yesterday afternoon to see

how the Vestry conducted their
business.

At the end of the meeting, Mr
Cc. B. Brandford, on behalf of
other members of the Vestry,

wished them a happy christmas,
















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obtain a booking without undue

delays awaiting confirmation of
seats. da
These improved facilities should

make air travel all the easier in



s He noted that the interest of
the East-Germans was_not alone
devoted to the under-developed |
Cotimonwealth territories. For}
on one occasion during the Fair,
the official report of the day's
activities claimed that greatest in-|
terest among overseas buyers
came from South Africa, Canada,
Australia, Pakistan and Indo-
nesia. South Africa and Australia
were not directly represented at
the Fair and inquiries were made
through British and American in-
termediaries.
ODuitstanding
Outstanding among the
German export was textile
chinery. The Germans laid em-
phasis on precision work in}
marufacture, which they claimed



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Furthermore, the East Gerr
are concentrating on the
duction of complete plants,
it is on these that they base s
of their highest hopes of e
their way into Commor
markets, Mr. Cardew pc

And, while East Germany is
pushing her sales of special light
industry products, increasing;
stress is also being laid on the!
ability of her heavy industry to|
play a Commonwealth role ;to}
Commonwealth dev ee

ment schemes,
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TUESDAY, DECEMBER

- Means To
Increase
Consumption

LONDON

The International Sugar Council |

is redoubling its efforts to
up a preliminary draft.of a new
world agreement on sugar which
li be ready for presentation to
World conference on sugar
when ,it meets in London next
: gh the Council has asked
the United Nations to call the
World conference, there is still a
et optimism among dele-
gates to the Council that a work-
able liminary draft agreement
eduld’ be ready before then.
-Ali the leading sugar producing
@ONsuming nations are agreed
the‘necessity for a new inter-
agreement. They are also
that there is . world sur-
of sugar and that there is

draw

ample room for increased con-|
sumption.

There is also general agree.:.en’
that two of the main .easons .or
dtsequilibrium in the sugar trade

are the currency restrictipns and

ced trade. These two con-
g causes to the restrictions
on vorld’s sugar trade can best

be discussed in the larger arena
of a world conference.

The Council has therefore cabled
the Secretary-General of the Unit-
ed Nations in New York request-
ing him to call the world confer-
ence on sugar, to be held in June
or July next year. The Council’s

l statement, announcing this

|
“The International Sugar Coun-

cil held a meeting on 24th Novem- |

ber,








*




1952, in London. It was at-
by representatives of 19
from eight other Governments and
the Food and
ed nisation, The Council adopt-
World Action
i ‘The International Sugar
Council, having considered at its
at previous meetings the sta-
ical position on the world
sugar market, finds that the situa-
mn is required to overcome the
lties which have arisen and
which will continue if such action
“*1. Considers that a Com-
Modity Agreement offers the
best means of dealing with such
» “ ‘2. Recognises that such an
Agreement will require negotia-
tion at an International Com-
=“‘3. Requests the Secretary-
meral of the United Nations
convene an_ International
conclusion of an Interna-
al Sugar Agreement.
»*'4. Suggests that this Con-
June or early-in July, 2953.
» ‘5. Authorises the Chairman
‘the International Sugar Coun-
the Secretariat of the Council at
the disposal of the United Na-
tions for such a Conference.’”
Council has been struggling to
combine the widely different
points of view of the world’s lead-
ing nations into a new and work-
able agreement. But in spite of
repeated efforts, it has failed to
ement, 4”
he Council took the decision to
oe to the United Nations after
would only lead to further un-
lance on the sugar market. The
yuncil’s special committee deeid-
@d early in October that conditions
ference.
Three Main Features
The proposed preliminary draft

rnments and by observers
following resolution,
ng on 24th November, 198
is sueh that international
is not taken.
difficulties.
modity Conference.
ar Conference to consider
mce be held in London late
cil to place the full facilities of
For the past five years, the
ing sugar producing and consum-
nd common ground for a new
it had agreed that any further de-
* Were favourable for suchea con-
of the new agreement, on which



ers three main features—
and import quotas; price structure;
and measures designed to increase
world consumption of sugar.
Since the Commonwealth re-
esentatives at meetings of the
ouncil have firmly insisted that
their production quotas under the
Commonwealth Sugar Agreement
should not be prejudiced, it is ex-
pected that considerable discus-
sion at the world conference will
centre round measures designed to
increase world consumption.
There has been a world surplus
of sugar for some time, delegates
to the Council pointed out, yet in
many countries the demand for
sugar has been greater than per-
mitted consumption. In_ Britain,
for example, some 50,000,000
people have been rationed ten per





ad



is directed te inwite__

tobe 1
of Westminster on the

(2 day oF May, 1937.
Ried 7

The invitation that was sent out fo
The invitations did not go out tli

The Queen’s invitations
ITE Queen, through hi :

_Ambas

sad





sc theAitaj Chard



9, 1952

|



|

British



¢

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



yeur sister Fanny in Llanfihangel-Glyn-Myfyr.”

Civil Jets Brea



VATIONAL
MOTOR
RALLY

ORBANSED Oy
rns mee

Rear | Grandma, one more gloomy weather forecast because your corns hurt and you won't GET a lift to

London Express Service

k

Crust Of Dollar Market

By BRETT OLIVER

LONDON.

3ritain’s perseverance with the
development of jet airliners has
started to bring in a fat dollfr
dividend, Not as big as the air-
plane makers would like to see,
but they have their fingers crossed
American airline chiefs are im-
pressed and the crust has been
broken with the bagging of con-
tracts to supply Pan American
World Airways with Comets and
Trans-Canada Air Lines with
Vickers Viscount turbo-props.

British producers are“now hop-
ing that others of the big Ameri-
can airlines will step into the
queue for their jets. Several U.S.
bosses are currently in touch with
the factories of de Havilland, Bris-
tol and Vickers-Armstrong. They
have been given all the facts, and
now are chewing over their de-
cisions. Meanwhile, fingers reésnain
crossed this side of the Atlantic. ..

U.S. Makers Displeased

There is a snag 2boa’ this crack-
ing of the dollar market. Ameri-
can aircraft makers are not exact-
ly pleased about it. Ever since
the war they have been tied down
to concentration on military jets,
while Britain jumped ahead with

Ss.






cent below their normal consump-
tion for 12 years.

Another bumper world sugar
crop—in the neighbourhood of
36,700,000 tons—is forecast for the
coming season, which would be

second only to last year’s record’

38,000,080-ton crop. Cuba is now
taking drastic measures to safe-
guard its sugar industry by cut-
ting production,

But the Cuban delegation to the
Council’s special committee meet-
ing ear
that Cuba was not prepared in-
definitely to carry the main bur-
den of restricting production to
maintain equilibrium in the world
trade. Her spokesman, Dr. Arturo
Manas, said at that time that Cuba
would insist on a more equal dis-
tribution of restrictive measures





y in October made it clear!

civil planes. Which, in a way, was
only fair—because America got a
wartime lead on airliners while
3ritain was concentrating on mili-
| tary bombers

Naw that the British civil jet
lead is being brought right home
|to the Americans, their aircraft”
| industry is dead set on having the
| door shut to the Comet and its
turbo-prop cousins. As a result,
the industry is pressing the new
Eisenhower government to block
British jets, arguing that the pur-
|chase of Comets is indirectly a
subsidy to the British Treasury
from the American Treasury.
| In other words, men like Floyd
|B. Odlum, chairman of Consoli-
dated Vultee Aircraft Corporation
are claiming that the money for
Comets ultimately comes out of
the U.S. taxpayers’ pockets and
“F s the aircraft industry.

Idlum the U.S. Treasury
| will help pay for the Comets be-
cause it pays subsidies to the air-
| lines to carry mail. And he backs
this up by saying that Consolidated
could have a 200-passenger jet
airliner flying by 1955 if the gov-
ernment would relesse the neces-
sary space and manpower from
work on military planes.

says







Stimulus

Britain's civii jet producers are
not unduly worried by this turn of
events. They know that at tre
| moment there is nothing to stop
jan American airline from buying
whatever planes it likes. But they
realize too that the U.S. Govern~
ment could make things decidedly
sticky by protecting the interests
of the big American plane firms
Another reason for keeping fingers
crossed right now, ft)

In spite of this behind-the-
scenes campaigning, British mak-
ers are confident of selling to the
Americans. Their own marketing
campaign was given a great stimu-
lus by the Pan American decision
to buy three Comet 3s for delivery
in 1956, with an option on seven
more. The Pan American step
was ample evidence that U.S. air-
lines are looking across the Atlan-



among the producing nations tic for fleet replacements, And it

After the latest meeting of the} was a rebuff for American air-
Council, however, it was felt that; craft manufacturers like Lock-
the gap between the viewpoints of | heed, Douglas and Boeing whose
Cuba and the British Common-} planes were rejected in favour of
wealth and Colonial producers] the Comet after a year of negotia-



had narrowed considerably.

UP.



7a .
ee

CORONATION _OE
THEIR_MAJESTIES
KING GEORGE VI &
QUEEN ELIZABETH

Y Command of TheKking,the Earl Marshal

{ Us

Arie

@ Earl Marshal.

t the Coronation of King George VI.
two months be‘ore the cer:mony



tions by Pan American,
Eddie Rickenbacher
head of America’s

colourful
Eastern Air-



lines, would also have Comets
ordered by now if Britain had
been able to give him an earlier

delivery date for the first batch.
Something may come. of it yet,
for Rickenbacher and de Havil-

land are still in touch

The slowness of British produc-
tion has often been criticised. In
fairness, it must be said that be-
sides running the risks attached to
initial concentration on the gas
turbine engine, factories actually
went ahead with production with-
out having orders for what they
were making. This was done after
gauging interest in jet travel, As
it has turned out, it is a pity they
did not go all-out right from the
start.

The fact now is that large-scale
production will be built up stead-
ily as big orders come in. New
plants are being built and sub-
contracting facilities greatly er-
panded. Air line chiefs know the
time factors involved and are pre-
pared for them.

Overseas Orders

Overseas orders so far received
for British jet airliners are, how-
ever, by no means insignificant,
even at this stage. De Havilland
has contracts for 23 Comets. Buy-
ing Series IA types are Canadian
Pacific Airlines (two), Royal
Canadian Air Force (two), Air
France (three) and another French
company U.A.T. (three).

2

The Series 2, for delivery in
1954-54, ha» been ordered by Brit-
ish Commonwealth Pacific Air-
lines (six), a Venezuela airline
(two) and Japan Air Lines (two).
Then, for the Series 3, there is the
Pan American order of three.

The 11% million-dollar order
by Trans-Canada Air Lines last
month for 15 Vickers Viscounts

brings the number of these turbo-
prop airlines on the books to 75
These include 12 for Air France,
four for the Irish airline, Aer Lin-
gus and six for Tran Australian
Airlines

Latest in the field to produce jet
airlines is the Bristol Aeroplane
Company with its high-perform-
ance, long-range Bristol Brittania
turbo-prop. Only one, the proto-
type,. exists to date. The British
Overseas Airways Corporation has
ordered 26 on the strength of this
alone, and is now negotiating for
a further five cargo-type Brit-
tanias,



Labour Relations

‘Committee

LONDON.
Mr. D,. Jones, (Labour, The
Hartlepools) asked the Secretary
of State for the Colonies whether
he has considered the desire ex-

pressed by the President of the
Georgetown Chamber of Com-
jmerce in June last, details of

| which have been sent to him, that
j}a Labour Relations Committee
should be established in British
Guiana; that such a body could as-
j sist to maintain industrial peace
jin the territory; and what steps he
| proposes to to bring about
{this improvement in industrial
| relations in this colonial territory
| Mr. Lyttelton: I understand that
the proposal is that the Georgétowa
| Chamber of Commerce should set
|up a Labour Relations Committee
to act as an employer's federation

take







in negotiations with labour. The
} formation of such a Committee
therefore, a matter for the C -
ber of C merce, which still
considering the suggestion

Development Commissioner,
St. Lucia

Jone



For B.G.?



amined the needs of the island
of . Lucia.
Mr. Lyttelton ‘very effort



being made to fill this important
appointment. Special experience of
agriculture and development wo

in the tropics is desirable and it



is not easy to find a man with the
qualifications needed
Labour Relations Councils

Mr. D. Jones, (Labour, Th
Hartlepools) asked the Secretary
of State for the Colonies if jx

will give a list of the West Indian
territories in which a Labour R

lations Committee exists similar
to the Joint Industrial Council set
up in Jamaica in July, 1952, be-

tween the employers and the major
trade unions catering for person
employed in the shjpping industry
Mr. Lyttelton: Standing joint
councils exist in Jamaica and
3arbados and are planned in An-
tigua. There is also Government
Whitley machinery in all territo-
ries, and, in addition, there i
provision collective
gainiig agreements for centra
t conciliation boards to
for example, in the
try, and f

committee

often in bar-

joir et

ite

indu



as in the
ugar industr)

—LES

Guiana

So far, no orders have come in
from overseas airlines. But there

has been much spirited nibbling,
specially from Canada and Mex-
ico. The Canadian Government is

considering adapting the Brittania
both as a maritime reconnaissance
aircraft and cargo plane. A de-
cision is imminent, and will prob-
ably result in the establishment of
a Brittania production line at the
Montreal works of Canadair
Limited, the main Canadian air-
craft company

It is hard to say when Britain’s
aireraft industry will be able to
uacross its fingers over dollar
market deals. In other markets,
it is steadily building up business.
Now it is waiting to see if Ameri-
can airlines generally will follow
fie Pan American Airways lead
and seal the future for British civil
jet aircraft,—L.E.S,





CANADA
WELCOMES W.L
FEDERATION

MONTREAL

The London talks to be held next
spring on the Federation of the
British West Indies are welcomed
in Canada by the Montreal Gaz-
ette, which ay in a_ leading
article

“To Canada, which has long

been a major trading partner with

the islands, such a move is of con-
siderable interest. The Federation
would take in an area of 6,884

square miles with a population of
more than 2,000,000, As economic
solidarity is the major project of
the proposed Federation, trading

procedures with the islands would |

be considerably changed
“Canadian interest in the
ish West Indies is, of
much more than a matter of trade
As their nearest Commonwealth
neighbour, West Indians have al-

srit-

ways looked to Canada as a coun- |

big |

try which is much more
brother than an old friend. West
Indians have come to Canada for
generations for their university
educations And West Indian
have: come to Canada to join our
armed forces in two great war

Classic Pattern

“The emergence of the British
West Indies as a Federated nation
will be in the classic pattern of
Commonwealth development. Ori-
ginally acquired in the imperial
pattern, either by colonisation or
by conquest, the islands first be-
came military and naval guardians
of British sea lanes to the New
World

“Gradually, a greater and great-
er measure of self-government has
developed Today, the islands
have sufficient autonomy to
able
their
The

legislative future will be
of them have
complete self-government
the Commonwealth, The nm
ire to continue
are, with their London-appo
governors still looking to Lor
for final decisions

“Both patterns
proof of
that ha
lations with her
as the self-governing dominions.’

—B.U.P.

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pains, itching and torment from Piles
since the discovery of Hytex (formerly
known as Chinaroid). Hytex starts to
work in 10 minutes and not only stops
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be
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chosen |
within |





1a0n

heartening
dom and goodwill
characterised Britain’s re-
colonies, as well |

et
LL ee

- Bigger Efforts For World Sugar Pact

| Tree Expert
In Sahara

LONDON





















Mr. Richat St. Barbe Baker,
63 year-ol world-famou trec
expert, now studying soil erosion
in the Sahara has already learned

| shaioh about t spread of advanc-
ng deserts, he says

He has ist reporte il to
London headquarter

Having crossed a thousand

desert in the Northern

I feel more than evel
th itude of the problem with
which African colonists—both the
French and the British—are con-
fronted.”

Thirty years ago, appalled by
the devastation caused by whole
sale tree cuttin and consequent
soil erosion, Mr. St. Barbe Barker
| founded Men of the Tree
| This was a body composed of
} silviculturists, farmers and pion
eers and backed by a number of
ss men.

} The aim was to induce a “unt

lversal tree sense” among tht

| world peoples and ta conserve

oil especially in tropical countric

where extremes of heat and rain

fean quickly turn flourishing crop

lands into deserts when protectit

| tree: ive felled. —L.E.S,



| Further Grant
For Central

Cotton Statiout

The Secretary of State has now

West Indies General allocation of
Colonial Development and Wel-
fare funds for the maintenance
and continuation of the work of
the Central Cotton tation in
Antigua.

Under Colonial Development
and Welfare Scheme provision
was made up to the 3lst Decem-





approved of a further grant of |
£13,826 being made under the

PAGE SEVEN





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just like a car.

FORT ROVAL GARAG

Phone 2385



5

Sole Distributors 4504



MR. PLANTER

We recommend for
the famous —

MASSEY - HARRIS

42 B.H.P. Heavy Duty 6 cyl, Diesel Engine



your serious consideration

WHEEL TRACTOR

(Also available with Half-Tracks)

with our 5 tons ALL-STEEL CANE CARTS fitted with over-run Brakes
and Pneumatic Tyres.

These units have already been tried and proved to the satisfaction
of their owners — be amongst these satisfied owners.

LET US ASSIST YOU WITH YOUR TRANSPORT PROBLEMS

Other Massey-Harris Agricultural Equipment available includes

GRASS MOWERS AND LOADERS

} RAKES
PEN MANURE

LOADERS AND BAGASSE MANURE SPREADERS

FERTILIZER DISTRIBUTORS

Etc., Etc., Etc,

Your Enquiries

invited :—

COURTESY GARAGE

DIAL 4616



ROBERT THOM
Whitepark

LIMITED
Road

Agents

woe













PAGE EIGHT






















































































































BARBADOS ADVOCATE

PUBLIC NOTICES | LOST & FOUND



rer iv








































TUESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1

GOVERNMENT NOTICE



Colonial Law Students






















































































































lie 1 LOST Meet l Starrs UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF THE WEST INDIES
I cpepaetaipdintonsnsisiensnas { t e in- i _ eet * ont one
“a a tentio { Highway STEPHNEY WHEEL complete with BARBADOS EXHIBITIONS 1952
DIED FOR SALE i Taiana ee’ tre | Venue Welw “Meter Get wie LONDON , iety's Coloniat |, The Examination for two (2) Barbados Government Exhibitions
| | to authorise them to}disk painted Cream, Cover No. Begins! “Colonial law st dents a dyir ne “ the Society’s Coloniat tenable at the University College of the West Indies will be con-
SIMMONS—On 8th December, 1952 Maric aes S66. pee Stee to). one ©. Garage Owner and Ve, B sagen ftir HUBIIDE CORREO. : ducted in Barbados by the University College in consultation with
aiene sed 81. The / ak ' rl Jon rel! who lost his sight)Car Owner part.cularly requested to|in ritain had an opportunity last Mr. Hopkinson, in a speech to y =
her Que | AUTOMOTIVE ee ee eee ee for Sue eae Paney.ia={month of meeting men prominent the guests, stressed his Party’s|the Director of Education, and will consist of:—
; m oe af explosion during the vear 1939 Headmaster, Combermere School, Phone|in legal circles here. genuine and sincere interest in pro- (i) a written examination to be held in the week beginning
St. Pet Cemetery. 0% d . , cis ek sane COREE, A | ? %.12.52—2n.| The occasion was @ tea-party gressive evolution of self-govern- Monday, February 23rd, 1953.
ked to attend ‘GLEDOZER suitable ("cor th sh of 3 ae given at the Royal Empire Society ment for the Colonies. ‘andi ;
ui. Norma Whitehead TD9 and BDH Crawier lor the parish « a } by the’ Inns of Court Conserv Candidates must be:—
u } au -Raising 7 uy . ~ =, ¢ . < >t ©
‘ Checenman f. Deliveries prompt frome u ke | ———_——_—- WANTED ative and Unionist Society. The Inns of Court Conservative (a) under twenty (20) years of age on the 3lst January
A ee py ae | A. Sir David Maxwell Fyfe, Q.C. Society has an ambitious pro- 1953;
t Dia tes yar 1 arochia reasurer ® ce Wh ee j i i i
6. 18.580 Pac’ chase aa Wekabeaae ts ae aoe MI NEOUS the we rd Secretary, and Chair- gramme for the winter of discus- (b) Natives of this island; or
eenrnienntnemnannimmiicmmmnsamemnt | Pareto 3t¢ ae SCELLA : Soc j h sion urrent interest 2 . hy
ir CAR—Morris-Oxiord, good as new. = lack Res > Sera » een ap — --—- —_— on a a = Gee = oor << in, ° Co 1 (c) Children of a native of this island; or
ee le is ca mileage under 3,000. ‘Telephone 2940 PERCY H_ BURTON. RESIDENCE—English couple require} 2 © guests. ers present particularly concerning the Colon- (ad) Children of persons who are domiciled and have been
MEMORIAM 4.11.52—t.f.o Parochial Treasu Flat or House exeeptionally eool from|included: Mr. Henry Hopkinson, ies. . , a , ; ne
ae EMORIAS . | SS St. Michael, April for 15 months. Phone, 8306 ; Minister of State for Colonial The first of these, at the end of resident in this island for a period of not less than
MA¥VERS—in loving memory of on thor o Mr. E.R by “i Fat Tl dtusticinde tans __%:12-82—In. | Affairs; Mr. J. E. S. Simon, Q.C., November, will be on the “Colour ten (10) years. °
son Bernard DeCotircey Mayer Pe 4.12.52--3n MESSIAH PUHL i vp Vice-Chairman of the Bar.” Colonial and commonwealth Candidates will be required to produce with their applications,
ell asleep : - . : ;
De till comes o'er c good condition BARBADOS CHORAL SOCIETY ic SALES ciety; Mr. Ashe Lincoln, Q.C, students are expected to take part. Birth Certificates together with certified statements declaring that
Secre ten f Apt J. Atwell, c/o Dears Garag CHRISTMAS CAROLS ‘ ; : : 3) year
> t0 oe : ars
For brought before u 7.12.52--6n at BARBADOS they have been receiving their education for the past three (3) ye
Sad es « ear — + - —_——_—__——- - ST. MIOHAEL’S CATHEDRAL : ‘ i i 4 ¢ nduct
Eve remembered by HiLLMAN STATION WAGON--Only se Mai REAL ESTATE in this colony and that their moral character and general cond
Walter 1 3 parent ‘ ose — miles en ven aepearanee WaSepOe, aa DECEMBER CHANCERY SALE are satisfactory.
isister 2.5: go0c new. Perfec working rder a p.m, onsen tapneslabenapteetlabaat nothin . 4
BRADSHAW & COMPANY Programmes may be obtained from the] DENIS MONIE & CULPEPER — Two The undermentioned property will be set up for sale at the Registration Office, Applications for admission as candidates of Barbados Govern-
6.12, 52—t.f.n. Clark of the Cathedral, | the widvorate houses at Bathsheba, either together or Public Bulidiags, Bridetiwn, between 18, (meen) and 2 p.m. for the sum and or | ment Exhibitions must be sent to the Director of Education, Educa-
- i piadeiniend Station rom Mess separately. Apply D. S. Payne. Ha e date spec w not ther Fo! it wy set up on each succeeding
ELECTRICAL Spencer, Marhill Street 5.12.59--2n, |S Philip 712.52 ear Friday st the tame place and during the same hours until sold. Full particulars ‘tion Office, The Garrison, St. Michael, not later than Friday, 23rd
‘ . ales ‘ erepeseenereenneansamneneaniianicae on applic January 1953. siisaeoesinunie -
ELECTRIC REFRIGERATO ee | ——-——- | "LAND—® Roods of land at Plaintiff; HYGH OWEN SAINT CLAIR CUMBERBATCH ?
LEY * vc oT, eee a rr — VESTRY ELECTION Saint George Butting an tases -. _ Defendant: D. SBALY & CO. LIMITED Applicants for admission as candidates for Barbados Government
guarantee) Manufa COUR- Goring, Charles Pilgrim and Hubert J
. TRSY GARAGE Dial “6 " White and on Gun Hill. For fonthos PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land situate near Warners in| Exhibitions must also forward direct to the Registrar of the University
FARAWAY—Fully furnished 3 bed- 6.12.52--8n particulars apply Carrington & Sealy, the parish of Christ Church and Island aforesaid formerly s' College of the West Indies, Jamaica, their Applications for Entrance
room house, St. Philip coast. Lighting | Deas as ee ae Lucas Street, Bridgetown to contain by estimation Four Acres or thereabouts but found by ; - f
plant, Watermill supply. Carport, 2) “GamRawp—3-Speed Automatic Record 6.12.52--9n recent survey to comta.n Five Acres and Six Perches or thereabouts|to the University College. The closing date for applications for
Servant rooms. Monthly rent 960 PIUS|Ciinwers just received, a limited neliiapaiieationicth -_——- renames abutting and bounding on the North on lands of Warners Plantation | 9. tance is 31st January 1953.
$3 cleansing charge, IN ADVANCE. Dial] ouliiity, fC. S. Maffe: & Co. Ltd . RETREAT M. = — Sues Soom ot eee ies oy aoe heb wat icati . re p Ini sity Col
4476 1.11.52—t..n 9.19 fantom PARISH OF ST. MICHAEL HASTINGS ROAD opposite Ocean - H. Sullivan « ate oO jaynes deceai on N.B. Forms of Application for Entrance to the University Col-
—___—__ -- - r I HEREBY give notice that 1 have} View Hotel, containing closed verandah, Routiton nde NEWHAVEN — Fully furnished 4-bed- | “REFRIGERATORS Canadian Frigid-|ppointed the Parochial Building, Cum-|tWo public rooms, four bedrooms, bath on a Road and on the West on the Public Road or however else lege and particulars o! e necessary qualifiga ’
room house, Crane coast Double Garage | aire, made by Gencral Motors with §-|berland Street, Bridgetown, as the place] otc. and kitchen. Very suitable for} ooo. ppce STOO OO Un and an outline of the courses available must be obtained from the
8 Servant rooms, Lighting rlant, Vue e3| Year guarantee, Only a limited quantity | where Parishioners of the parish of St j Conversion into separate apartments, and > “E: 19th Decemb 962 : sis 7 iors fr the Resident
mill supply. Monthly rent, $7 plus, §) | of these machines. Call early at K. R,|Michael and other persons auly qualified ouaine fo aa sq. ft. of valuable | DATE OF SALE: 19th December, 1 Hw. WRLIAMS Registrar of the University College, Jamaica, or from the Resi
cleaning charge, - Ee $ HUNTE & CO, LTD Dial 5136 to vote at any electic { Vestrymen for ® 94lcin and. « 3 > < ag
“470. 2.11,52—t.f.n "7-12 58-6n. |the said Parish may assemble on Monday,, _Water and electric light servicés Registrer-in-Chancery Tutor, Extra Mural Department, Boys Scouts Headquarters, Beckles
a TT the 5th day of January, 1953, between | Garage and servants rooms. She atch Road, St. Michael, or from the Director of Education
OFFICES—Cool, spacious, and reason FURNITURE the hours of 10 and 11 a.m. to elect a] Dial 8242 for arrangement to inspect. :
ably priced, Only two more ava lable, Vestry for the Parish of St. Michae,| The Wndersigned will offer the BARBADOS . Department of Education, .
K. R. Hunte Co., Lid., Lower 7 ere aeaey TE f the yer 1953 property for sale by public competition
Birent .12,82—6n | CABINET, settee with cane bottom| — ”°“"peRcy H. BURTON, at thelr office, 17 High Street, on CHANCERY SALE 26th November, 1952.
ee ae ee ‘Scmiee ae fe —t So, Sune _DRemn table, small Parochial Treasurer Thursday, 18th December, 1952 9.12.52—2n.
MONTE--Ch. Ch urnishe side-board, all t abov: re h . cee OTTLE, CATFORD , ‘ e Sa cael lal sndeeendeece
aceiaathdns Phone 83° 2 berbice chairs with “catherette, uphols. at 7 ~~ Solicitors a eran ran es << tn Ay Pes" ~ oye aia,
5 12.62—6n. |tery and a small liquc al t 1 : . ie Bul gs, getown, ween novn) and 2 p.m. for sum o
Do S| Beattors Dinited-or ‘phone ae ee ee coubel BT 9, 12-52—-9M. lithe date specified below. If not then sold it will be set up on each succeeding ICES
grr eine 7 " i " iculars
*.12,82-4n| 1 HEREBY give notice that I have| , WOODVILLE, Fontabelle, standing on ee ee et, te ee ee
eee =: nvidia ctuamae tastes inte: : o acres o'! Ww . a
MISCELLANEOUS FURNITURE—To close out #0 Morris| ine the Vertey Room Oisiin as the visce | Cocoanut and other ‘Trees, Inspection Plaintif: = WINSTONE IRVE@) GRIFFITH Te eet ce es
See oe aay ae Rattan Chairs at $11.00 each, absolutely | where all persons duly qualified co vote 4aily 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Telephone 3940, Detendent: ARs Ore Wen bie soeenes on ot Island LFF ELLE LLLP SFE =A
De bent 2 te " t ent. | ew: Can be s at Medmenham, Pine | at any election of Vestrymen for the said 9.12,62—4n BONA CSCOLA BROOME his attorney on record in the Islay.
ave the best form of entertainment: | Hill, on the 12th December, 9 a.m. to] Parish ble on Monday, th
Make yaur children’s Xmas party a real 2 5 ' sellen 9, eee ee eee ae 7, me PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece or pateel of land situate at Six Men's in
aes. Full particulars from GITTENS Bultuble for Pasa ee buy. |5th day of January, 1953, between the the parish of Saint Peter and Island abovesaid containing by ad- M V Yhe M/V “MONEKA will accept
& COMPANY, Bay Street. Phone 4740 : 6.12.53 hours of 10 and 11 o'clock in the morning AUCTION measurement One rood Thirteen Perches or thereabouts (of which . . Cargo and Passengers for Dom-
7.12,$2-—t.f.1 3.12, 52-8n }to elect a Vestry for the Parsh of area Eight perches form part of an abandoned Public Road) abutting inica, Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis
ome waren - «Christ Church for the year 1953 eat mnaecantlinintn sity teint lethinot apa and bounding on lands of Six Men's Plantation on the seashore on and St. Kitts, Sailing Friday 12th
LIVESTOCK WOOD GODDARD, lands of R. & G. Challenor Ltd, and on the Public Road or howeye: DA Ea
ANNOUNCEMENTS Parochial Treasurer, UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER else the same may abut and bound together with the messuage â„¢
- ALSATIAN PUPPIES—Born of ‘Susan’ Christ Church. Dwellinghouse thereon and all other buil and erections on the The M/V “CARIBBEE” will
oh Pree Winner of Pups for best b.tch and best 6.12.52—3n,] By instructions received from the In- said parcel of land erected and built standing and being with the will be arriving at Barba- accept Cargo and Passengers for
e arbados uatic 4 P S)locally bred exhibit t 1951 BExhibitio: no eee ions I surance Co., I wll sell i . 8 c cs a ‘ ‘ =
their patrons tha: the Catering Depart-|and Count of Verchield, (Imported) PARISH OF ST. JOSEPH See sstudak acon ae ieew Tecey, Deca» eee aie Rae Oo. dos on TUESDAY 9th De Dominica, Antigua, nae
ment undertakes orders for Plum Pud- | wo Wiles, Senshaw, Pine Plantation] | HEREBY give notice that I havel|age, Whitepark Rd. (1) 1947 30. H.P.|DATE OF SALE: 19th December, 1952 cember and will be sailing day, 19th inst a
dings aud Christmas Cake Dial el Gap. Phone 2784 7.12.52—3n, [appointed the Vestry Room at the Dis-| Chevrolet Wagon, (Until recently the . ae , H. WILLIAMS on WEDNESDAY 10th De- may en
52- sitet icheaeia tithe eda i. —._--. | veNSary as the place where all persons] property of the P F Registrar-in-Chancery. ‘ ‘ erase ms
a PUPPIES French Poodle Crossed |¢)¥, Gualified to vote at any election} in accident) tee ee (Damaged . 4.12.52—4n, cember for St. Lasts. ge B.W gee pian so
Labrador Pretty, intelligent, affectionate, |! Vestrymen for the said Parish may VINCENT GRIFFITH, ci nin eeinlabeepne —_— Vincent, Grenada, Aruba, = ' . ——
Make nice Xmas Gifts. Apply: Mrs. |4ssemble on Monday, the Sth day of Auctioneer accepting Passengers and ‘ Consignee, Dial 4047
Burrows, St. Augustine s Vicarage, St. |January, 1963, between the hours of 10 7.12, 52—4n Freight ( any 6.12.52
George 6 an [and 11 o’cleck in the morning to elest} ——— . 9.12.52—1n .
eis Lhe L Balochi na a Vestry for the year 1953. 9.12.06— .
gn RACE-HORS Tcitin Cake A. 'T. KING, LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
“ae horses landed in Trinidad, at £800— Parochial Treasurer, Real Bann catian of Nathaniel Allsopp, ‘ fonable
Hwoham:a, Arabian "Git, Indian Gift Of seegeh [all Bt, Mickel, fot vee ion | APPLICATIONS are invited for twe vacant nen-peamone
iutyptian Gift, Admirals Delight, Medi- it ‘dead : . r permission to A .
‘ Bic terranean,. Likely, Fa:ty Falls, Sie. "SoS aN OF Bk, SRG at re Malt Liquors. dee. at 8 board part-time posts of Assistant Visiting Surgeon on the staff of the
Pebblest Sist Lama, R ARI ST. R « ; attache o residence ‘
Bunbayna, Delusion Cord witnes Genes 1 HEREBY give notice to all persons} at Kew Road Bank Hall, St. Michael, General Hospital.
Burns, Gkami, Nintdelys, At’ 2560 duly qual fled to, vote at ithe, election of} nd ated this @th day ss December, 1982. Applicants must be registered medical practitioners.
a P' 7 oO estrymen or nis ‘arish, a ave c: ’ L8Q
|Plewieus Pearl at Full Bh wn, Bridge, appointed the Parish Room, Speights-| Police Mag:strate._ Dist. “Ay The salary attached to the appointment is $240 per annum and
Melitta Rose. At £750—R 3 * | town as the place where all such persons ‘ NIFL ALLSOPP, ‘ i i endered to se neta oy a ee ee ee
Ie Melitta Ross. 4 t £780 “Roy gen. may ieodt on kaoyaas the eee cae Tentiaes. the officer will be entitled to fees for services rendered paying CANADIAN SERVICE
. Junior. Apply to O. P. Bennett, Southern | January, 1953, Brine chica ie ees sae arte ae is —— patients in the Hospital. , From Montreal, Halifax and Saint John,
a Se Perna , Trintds a Plow 2 eC a bi 2 obtain the ‘irec
Desert Song se ae ah $2—6n, | Vestry for the Parish of St, Peter for 4 Police Court, District “A” on Friday, Further information may be ed from D) tor of Expected Artival
Tell Me Little Gypsy the yeer 1008, | conmun Pe ctth. day of December, 1952, at} Medical Services to whom applications should be forwarded by 15th 2 , Halifax Si John Dates Barbados
Morocco MECHANICAL Parochial Treasurer, Poll ifn A. MeLEOD. December, 1952. a “Space” ef ck Omen 5 Dee 3 Secahoer
Evenin; inlay ieeltieeinhbcheitateniinlidienliesaes St. Peter ‘olice Magistrate, Dist. “ , rt 23 : Cc. a y
> a oe 5 MACHINE—One Singer Sewing Ma- 6.12.52—3n, 9.12.62—1n 8.11,52.—2n, A VESSEL 3 Dec. 19 Dec 8 January
wamp chine, treadle model, in perfect condition, LI Na aN em AEE ey U.K. SERVICE
no reasonable offer refused Call at PARISH OF ST. JAMES ean i
$1.44 dele Litad ce: te vadod t ert SF 82 TAD. QUOR LICENSE NOTICE : VACANT POST From Newport, Swansea, Liverpool and Glasgow
7.12.52-3n [appointed the Vestr Room near the AD Expected Anrival
The Parting Son ae ie ornare Parish Chureh as the place where “all ore te Yes £ Heanas PRENOIPAL, GOVERNMENT TRAINING COLLEGE, TRINID Newport Swansea Liverpool Glasgow Dates Barbados
a e ‘lan iB ‘ TRICYCLES—Just received, suitable] persons duly qualified to vote at any| Michael. for tebciuiten tc oll’ aabete, Applications are invited for the post of Principal, Government | ss. VGRIRULY” if inducement) 21 Nov. 3% Nov. 16 December
awa Mambo ‘or children from 3 years to @ years, J election of Vestrymen for the sa:d Parish a ‘ . 7 tend i as. "N. O. i
Lili Marlene Redman & Taylors Garage Ltd may assemble on Monday, the 5th day Ba re fee: ae cone wapees Training arene the Education Department which will become _ROGEINAES ¢ Dek ta eke. bah $ te haas
9,12. 52—31 f , 1953, between the hours of ‘ f i as. * =
Indian Love Call , :? = a 10 pepuery, ae in the miornines to ps wick Gap, Westbury Road, St, Michael. vacant early in 1 Cost TRADER” Early January Mid Jan Early February

WHEEL STRAKES — For use with
Massey-Harris or WD 9 Wheel Tractors
Overeome wheelspin AND ENCREASE
TRACTION of your Tractor in fieids
Courtesy Garage 4616

I Want To Be With You Always
Is It True What They Say
About Dixie

6

12,52—6n

Christmas Suggestion



MISCELLANEAUS
AMERICAN CHRISTMAS CARDS
Very attractive lines, nicely worded
Boxes of 16 different cards at $1.00 per
box See them at our showroom at 14
Swan Street The Standard Agency

(B'dos) Co, Phone 3620
9.12.52—I1n

A lovely as-
finest Christmas Cards.

CHRISTMAS CARDS
sortment of the



You certainly should see these at the

Cosmopolitan Pharmacy Just off

Broad Street, Prince Wm. Henry Street.

6.12 62—4n

ESSO PRODUCTS—Petroleum Jelly

, > White in Drums, Nu‘*Jol, Paraffin Oil,
Wall Safe anne and Pals Flit Sprayers, Filit
Gallons, Qrts, Pints and % Pints. Flit

Portable Type- | Acrosol, Flit Powder. Esso Handy Oil,

writer | Household Wax, Lighter Fuel, Radiator

Cleaner, Radiator Protector, Stop Leak,
* . Sponges, Spark FPlugs, Brake Fluid,,
Curtis Gin Drums and Pails, All of these can be



obtained from R, M. Jones & Co
Phone 4764

Ltd
27.11.52—t.f.n



Baking Dish



PERFECTION STOVE PARTS — Please
note that all Perfection Stove parts can
be obtained from RB. M. Jones & Co.
Ltd., White Park. Phone 4784
27.11.52—t.f.n.

Webley Air Rifle

Winchester Target Gun
Husquvarna Sewing Machine
Voightlander Camera

Ariel Motor Cycle
Francis-Barnett Motor Cycle
Photograph Album
Bulloch-Lade Whisky

Original Odhner Adding Machine

SHOWCASES—Three mahogany Show-
cases. Can be seen at the Advocate
Stationery, Broad Street.



28.11.52—In



Special offer for 10 days.
3 Burner Valor Stoves & Ovens
Tyre Co,, Trafalgar & Spry

Dial 2696 §,.12.52—t.f.n.

STOVES
2 &
Auto
Streets,

ee

BRADSHAW & (0.

STOVES—The famous Florence Stoves



in 2 and 3 burner models. Laurie Dash
Co., Tudor Street. Phone 5061
6.12.62—3n

SUBSCRIBE now to the Datly Telegraph
England's leading Datly Newspaper now
arriving im Barbados by Alr only a few
days after publication in Londen. Contact
Ian Gale c/o Advocate fo., Ltd. Laca!
Representative. Tel. 3113,
17,4.52—t.f.0



SS

TODAY'S NEWS FLASH

Your Diary for 1953

BROWNE'S NAUTICAL
ALMANAC

CHURCHILL'S VOL. V
SECOND WORLD WAR
At
JOHNSON’S STATIONERY





UNIVERSITY COLLEGE HOSPITAL
OF THE WEST INDIES
Applications are invited for a post of
Registrar in Surgery at the University
College Hospital, duties to commence
on the Ist ef April, 1985

The appointment will be for one year
in the first instance, Salary will be
in the seale £700--£1,000 per annum,
depending experience and qualifica-
tions, and {is subject to a deduction of
£100 p.a. in respect of board, residence,
etc Return first class passage by sea
will be paid Further information may
be gbtained from the Hosp.tal Manager
and Secretary.
Applications stating
qualifications, together
testimonials, shuld
Manager and

and details

with twe
reach the
Secretary, Uni-
College Hospital of the West
Mona, Jamaica, B.W.1., before
of January, 1953

age
of
recent
Hospital
versity
Indies,
the 31st





Like These
Are Sure To Please



; NOTICE
THTFUL BUREAUS and Attention to all Contractors
ving Dressing Tables in and Persons in the Building

Popular Shapes, Sizes and finishes

Business. You can now

Bow and Recessed fronts

Counter-sunk and flat tops. Cab. Se

riole or straight legs, with or obtain: -

without VANITY STOOLS é ooD BUILDING
CHOOSE YOUR BURBAU ir G

Mahogany, Cedar, Birch, Fir or

Deal, with from 1 to 7 drawer ®

md in various polishing Enam- ‘

ellings or sanded

at 21 ets. per cub. ft. ex

BRILLIANT M/RRORS Quarry or delivered at 28





Beesiied oF plain. “ ‘t in g cts. per cub, ft. All orders
Buy Your Bureau Now, from » promptly executed.
—. to Ninety-eight Saving ; Coasult « - »
1® H. D. BAYLEY,
i¢ Above Dash Valley,
L.S. WILSON |}; si Geoe
wilgetd Phone 5016
SPRY STREET. DIAL 4000 29.11.52—3n.







OPPOOPOSOOOOOOOSOOOOOS |



a Vestry for the year 1953

P. H. TARILTON,
Parochial Treasurer,
St. James.
6,12,52—3n.





PARISH OF 8ST. J
I HEREBY give notice
appointed the Vestr:
Chureh as the place where all persons
duly qualified to vote at any election
of Vestrymen for the said Parish may
assemble on Monday, the 5th day of
January, 1953, between the hours of 10
and 11 o'clock in the morning to elect
a Vestry for the Parish of St. John for
the year 1958



IT hay

that e
Room at the Parish



H. S, FRASER,
Parochial Treasurer,
St. John
6.12. 52--3n
PARISH OF ST. >Â¥
I HEREBY give notice that I have
appointed the Vestry Room near the
Parish Clfurch as the place where ail
persons duly qualified to vote at any
election of Vestrymen for the said Parish
may assemble on Monday, the 5th day
of January, 1953, between the hours of
10 and 11 o'clock in the morning to elect
a Vestry for the Parish of St. Lucy for







the year 1953.
OSWALD DEANE,
Parochial Treasurer
St. Lucy
6.12.52—3n
PARISH OF ST. PHILIP
I HEREBY give notice that I have

appointed the Church Boys’ School near
the Parish Church, as the place where
parishioners of the parish of St. Philip
and other persons duly qualified to votu
at any Election of Vestrymen for the
said Parish, may assemble on Monday
Sth day of January, 1953, between the
hours of 10 and 11 a.m. to elect a Vestry
for the Parish of St. Philip for the ycar

1958,
P, 8. W. SCOTT,
Parochial Treasure,
St. Philip.
6.12,52--3n

PARISH OF 8ST. ANDREW

I HEREBY give notice that I have
appointed the Vestry Room near the
Almshouse as the place where all persons
Guly qualified te vote at any election of
Vestrymen for the said Parish may
assemble on Monday, the Sth day of
January 1963, between the hours of 10
and 11 o'clock im the morning to clect
a Vestry for the Parish of St. Andrew

for the year e: a. mate







Parochiel Treasurer,
St. Andrew.
6.12.52-—an
_— —
PARISH OF 8ST. GEORGE

I HEREBY give notice to all persons
duly qualified to vote at the election
of Vestrymen for this Parish, thet T have
appo.nted the St, George's Vestry Room
as the place where all such persons may
meet on Monday, the Sth day of January,
1953, between the hours of 10 and 1!
o'clock in the morning to elect a Vestry











for the Parish of St. George for the
year 1953
H. JOHNSON,
Parochial Treasurer
st
612 n
PARISH OF ST. THOMAS
1 HEREBY give notice.that IT have
appointed the School House near te
Parish Church as the place where ©jl
persons duly qualified to vote at %.Â¥

election of Vestrymen for the said Parwh
may assemble on Monday, the Cth diy
of January, 1953, between the hours of
10 and 11 o'clock in the morning to elect
a Vestry for the Parish of St. Thomas
for the year 1953
F. F. PILGRIM,

Parochial Treasurer,
St. Thomas
6.12.52—3n

ADVOCATE
STATIONF?”

GEEYSTON:,

Just the Little shop is, .he village

where the Best Books, Stationery
and Xmas Cards are now on show.

’
































The post is pensionable and the salary is $5,280 a year.
of Living Allowance at such rates as may be in force from time to



Dated this 8th day of De ber, 1952,
To:--B. A. McLEOL, fen cember, 1952.

Police Magistrate, U.K. AND CONTINENTAL SERVICE









i dae & maaan time is also payable. The appointment will be subject to medical From Hamburg, Rotterdam and London
ere : ~ “Applicant. |fitness and the successful candidate will be on probation > er Ra dere
N. his appl.cation will be consid- ; i Th ointment will also be subject to Hamburg Rotterdam London Dates Barbados
ered at a Licensing Court to be held at|ears in the first instance. e app n : ns Reo : F 4 q 7 eer
Police Court.” District "A" on Friday, the Colonial Regulations ang the Civil Service Regulations’ and eee Ge ee eens
e 1¢ day © recember, at ll : ‘ *
o'clock, a.m, : Instructions in force for the time being, in so far as they are appli-
EB. A. McLEOD,* |cable. Agents — PLANTATIONS LTD.
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A” Phone 4703
9.12.52~jn| TRAVELLING : saloaepnehietedeiaion alate Siacoiglia

L ~Pety — The successful candidate will be authorised to keep a car for

LIQUOR LIC ENSE NOTICE the performance of his duties and will be eligible for travelling allow-
ghopkeeper of Military Rond, Bush HMall.|ance in accordance with the regulations in force from time to time.
Matt vars erat evden nee | QUALIFICATIONS
attached to residence at Military Road, Applicants should possess :—

Bush Hall, St. Michael.
Dated this 8th day of December, 1952.
To BE. A. MecLBOD, Esq.,
Police Magistrate, Dist

(a) An Honours degree of a British University; and
(b) A recognised post-graduate teaching diploma; and
(c) Experience of training teachers in a recognised Training

STEAMSHIP COMPANY,

ie



“Ao















THERESA TAYLOR, A NAD N SER CE - HTL
N.B.—This application eae College. c WA VE Caen ”)
§ B >| w con- .
sidered at a Lice: 2 » ili ition i ce is hi
sidered af a Licensing C qurt to be hela by Amine to take charge of tuition in elementary science i ghly SUURERO UND ears a Tis. togacees
the 19th “day "of December, 1992, ai etna 4 ye pend pce ee
clock, a.m s
: 4 . MONTREAL 20 Nov — — —
Riles Sere ee ae 1. To control and conduct, under the direction of the Director gt. JOHN gt ss 29 Nov 20 Dec. 8 Jan,
t 9.12,52—In. of Education, the Government Training College for teachers, ARR. BARBADOS "6 pen: ai Dee. ” ee » ve.
LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE consisting of approximately 120 men and women students. ea le si te a uate!
Tas sheteuion at Game Tana 7 a takee part la and disatt the instruction given by the im. assenger Accommodation Available
Pere Nor hee Ot tee eerie staff to students in training for teaching posts in primary For further information apply: Da COSTA & CO., LTD.; Phone 2122.
a ae in respect ot a soared and shingle and intermediate schools. . aS
5 a corner 0: stmon Cc r, onnec
Hindsbury Road, St. Michael, eae, 3. To perform such other duties in c tion with the train- NEW. YORK. SERVICE (EVERY FOUR WEEKS)
rolnen gt Re Jasense at ing of teachers as may be required by the Director. Such a
attached at” Villa Road, Brittons wily duties will include the usual extra curricular activities and ATED AER AOR ALCOA, —AXODA,
St. chael, isi ang’ boarding oste!
Dated this 8th day of December, 1982, general MUpCrvinsan of arr ements in 2 h as. NORFOLK -_ - 17 Jan —
â„¢! E. A. McLBOD, Esq, 4. To visit schools to supervise students during practice-teaching BALTIMORE 24 Nov. 22 Dec. 19 Jan. 18 Feb.
ee Mee NTANCE nbtae and to secure liaison with the Training College. see oe ie OS
N.B.—Thts inet (noalinant. Applications should be submitted to the Colonial Secretary, Trini- Limited Passenger Accommodation Available .
hi application w con-





sidered at a Licensing Court to be held

dad and Tobago, and must reach him before the 3ist December, 1952.
at Police Court, District “A” on Friday,

Copies and not originals of certificates and testimonials should be

NEW ORLEANS SERVICE rontvicatiy







the 19th day of December, 1952, at
11 o'clock, a.m submitted, 29,11.52—3n.
E. A. McLEOD,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A.” SOUTHBOUND A STEAMER A A A
912.52-1n.}| POST OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC WORKS, GRENADA STEAMER STEAMER STEAMER

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE Applications are inviteq for the post of Superintendent of Public wane ae Nev’ 3 Bee basen on

The application of George Gill, shop- . ee t . J JAMAICA 27 Nov ll Dec. 25 Dec 7 oe:
keeper of My Lords Mill St Michael, Works, Grenada, on contract for three years. tn BDOS. ea R ee ie Des. 3 Jan.
See permission | to sell Spirits, Mait}SALARY: ,

iu . bs board : “ -
shop stisthed tc residence st Rls toran The salary of the post will be in the range from £1,200 to Fer further information apply ROBERT THOM LTD. Phone 4228








Hill, St. Michael,
Dated this &th day of December
To E. A. McLEOD, Esa.,
Police Mag.strate, Dist A.”
GHORGE GILL,

£1,500 per annum according to the candidate’s experience and
qualifications, In addition, a transport allowance at the rate
of £315 per annum is payable. Cost of living allowance is not

1952.

ray ie saat of he pork GIVE BOOKS — THIS CHRISTMAS ;
sidered at a Licensing Court to be heid ee * 2
Bt Police Court, District “A” on, Friday, The Officer will be required to perform all duties appertain- 3
the “ath day er 8 ing to the office of Superintendent of Public Works, ADVOCATE STATIONERY ° $
ats tne eO., H In addition, he holds the following appointments by virtue 8

9 12.—1n, of his office : >

Chairman of the Central Road Authority;
Chairman of the Central Water Authority;
Chairman of the Queen’s Park Committee;
Member of several other Boards and Committees,
He will also be required to undertake such other duties as may
from time to time be imposed on him by the laws of the Colony
or by direction of the Officer Administering the Government.





4,4,
POSSESSES EEE AAPL LLL

| GRAMOPHO? RECORDS

Only 50 more to close you can have these at
3 for $1.00

.







RESULTS
GAS
FOR



USE QUALIFICATIONS :
BEST The Candidate must be a Corporate Member of the Institute CENTRAL EMPORIUM
of Civil Engineers and must have good Administrative experience .
NATURAL and ability. enr. Broad & Tudor Sts.

SCLC EE ELC?

QUARTERS :

Quarters are not ordinarily provided, but if necessary, con-
sideration may be given to this question. In the event of quarters
being provided rental will be charged at a rate not exceeding
10 per cent, of the officer’s salary.

LEAVE & PASSAGES:

eS 3, 3554, s
Z 5000000 rs —PEOCEE SS SEO SELES PSL EPPO.



KARL EDMONDS







WHITE POTATOES 8c.
per Ib.

Bags of 110 Ibs. at $7.70

DUTCH ONIONS I6c. The officer will be eligible to earn leave, provided that his F.R.S.A., C.P.A.
a work and conduct have been satisfactory, at the rate of one week Certifi Public Accounta Intario
‘ ” for each completed period of three months resident service. wes ae Apes jit = : vi ;
GREEN CABBAGE 36c. Free first class passages are provided on first appointment, K. R. HUNTE BUILDING
per Ib. and on satisfactory termination of contract, for the officer and Lower Broad Street
Dutch Table APPLES his —: Barbados.
40c. pr lb. ~eave passages are not provided, Sere einen
” Applications should be addressed to the Chief Secretary, Wind- Temporary Phone 507%

At No. 11 Swan Street ward Islands, St. George’s, Grenada, ang must reach him not later

‘than $3lst December, 1952.





—









TUESDAY,

DECEMBER 9, 1952





BY CARL ANDERSON



ee



| { THE TRANSMITTER bn
[CUT CUT AT THAT PONT,

“{ SEMGEANT FLINT.













ITH THE KING'S POLICE ..AND THE CASTLE WALL .. ARROWS ae
wo, AWAY By A SINGLE BRISTL E WITH THE waiTi NG H} CAL FLY STRAIGHT





FUSILLADE, MEEMIR’S MINUTE-
A MEN MARCH UPON THE CASTLE... }

DEFEND ERS’ PIKES AND
ARROWS...

AND TRUE AS
ONY BULLET!



eye REE! WE MUST

i plaid eaonit
1V at THe mo MENT, eR Y SOMEHOW, CAPTAIN i” \
toe Y GUAR? IS M'SIEU THAT'S JUST WHAT 1’ J

| ~~ WESTLEY J AFRAID OF -













LOGICAL! AND THE
MURDERER STILL CARRIES
THE WEAPON ! ‘

WOULDN'T YOU GUESS
THAT ANOTHER ATTEMPT

WILL BE MAVE ON HER






FIGURE IT THIS WAY.
WHOEVER FAILED TO KILL
PUNCH SHERMAN VIP KILL =
ALBERICH.,.. BECAUSE HE aR

MIGHT HAVE TALKED!


















BY GEORGE MC, MANUS

satilalenipccnttiagsitia. |
“CONT BOTHER ME! Speen nnal





6ORRY - DADDY- ave YOld GOT

BUT TM LATE NOW





}
48 M GOING OVER TO BUT-ITLI d A FEW NAILG ?
SUSPENDER BUTTON: FOR THE SEWING _/ | MOTHER'S HOUSE MATT !
~ ON ME PANTS ARE \ BEE AF MISS <~ KELP HER WITH er ) > A "ee en HAY ae
= TERSTITCH'S * SEWING — “ MINUTE TO
aici / SEW ON 6OME
ae ( So ao
\ BUTTONS -
| .

a
ofa

RIP KIRBY

I’M GOING TO HAVE
TH THAT MAN... TLL
T TO THE TRUTH!

AS

ae)

Mae |
|

> ea WAPT mn) |








Zou EONS) AS 5 XS
(PAWEL YQ |
\

t

/









BARBADOS ADVOCsA TE

FS

AABN AA RARE,

4
&

GPRS GAYA v0 in A RATA AA

og
7

en

S













Pr \Gi NINE

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“ Vienna Rausas res
Meathunech
Tins Peaches Tins Pears
| Tins Grapes
Tins Fruit Ceektai







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sree. |

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NOW OBTAINABLE AT ALi. LEADING * We can still supply 4h %
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— Northern CHERRIES in MARASCHINO (Chocolates) 3.94 per box
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: : 4 ; CHOCOLATE ROLL BISCUITS 56

Grape Fruit—tins SE 80 XMAS PLUM PUDDINGS—tins 2.04

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HANISH BLUE CHEESE 1.29 per tb.
Breakfast Roll 64 60 GONGONZOLA CHEESE Le eh as
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D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street









BOOKS FOR GIRLS

ALL ATV S156 EACH

Now on sale at ADVOCATE STATIONERY





Access

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HANDBAGS
PURSES &
CARRY-ALLS







all colours &
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@ Plasti Shopping
Bags . $4.09
@ Plastic Diaper
Bags for Baby — $2.04
@ Canvas & Plastic
* Carry-alis in smart
Ly designs. Variety of ©
b sizes.
eo
ij @ Plastic Bags in @® Bags for Girls
4

white. from 96«

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SFE ss SS





PAGE TEN



Aussies Lead S. Africa By 301 Runs

Know, Vente. Cricket ANOTHER GOOD HARVEY INNINGS

LAW 46—sy 0. Ss. COPPIN



Our Own Correspcendent)
BRISBANE, Dec. 8
With four second innings wick
ets in hand and an advantage o



To-day we conelude the study|points as to where the umpire} win the firs€ Test here agains
of Law 46 which deals with the/shoulq stand, fair and unfair} gouth Africa But for all tha
Duties of Umpires play etc., I have received a ee
rap ft ber of queries especially dealing etting ability has gone.
GROUND, WEATHER with fair and unfair play. B g® y 8

x om ft I have consulted the M.C.C.

AND LIGHT j ruling on the matter and it seems

Unless agreement to the con-|to me to be the best thing to pub-

a eae the captains (during |"eaders who might not have been
actual play the batsmen at. the|Clear on the points themselves
wickets may deputise for their|¢an also have the benefit of the
captain) may elect to decide in| rulings in question.

regard to the fitness of the

ground, weather or light for play
otherwise or in the
agreement, the umpires
quired to decide.

Play should only be
when the conditions

are

are

that it is unreasdnable or danger-|pire’s view should be unobstruct-

is made before the start of | lish the rulings here so that other

event of dis- |
re-|

suspended | it is
so bad

| UMPIRE MUST SEE

Here they are In answer to

}one query I would point out that
clearly in the interest of

the fielding side that the Um-|

301 runs, Australia are set fair tO) shouteg at them, “Wait until Bed-

there are signs that their old run-/ wickets fell for 198 to-day before

















BARBADOS ADVOCATE

| Australia’s openers left-handed| — -
Arthur Morris. and McDonald GOLF:

were nearly two hours in adding} */"“* -
fifty and an &mnpatien,t crowd)-—



f



t) ser and Truman get at you.” W. Ik C

t! “ Six Australian second innings a er up
spirited hitting by Lindwall and T. 5 t

| Langley retrieved the position, ournamen

The Australians might have

| Been in even worse straights but

| for lapses in the field by the South

| Africans.

| Big scores have not been made

iby Australia for some time and

| there has been a lack of stability

| Since the departure of Bradman

land Barnes.

| Harvey . again

By EDDIE HAMILTON
LONDON.
It’s time
was applied to the
raising the

some commonsense
problem of
£4,000 which the R.
played well for and A. say they need if they are
\ fifty-two but there is no more cer-
} tainty throughout the order.
Tayfield flighted his off spinners
| well to take three for 111 in thir-
| ty-two overs but Watkins was un-

to send a Walker Cup team to

the States next year.
Suggestions on

throughout

raise the wind have so far pro-

how golfers

the country might

For Gelfers

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1952

~
SOOO OOOO
%

SHIRT

GARBERDINE $4.50

SHIRT

*
$3.75 &

66,566"
OSLO SPOTTOOSSâ„¢

POPLIN DRESS

*
S|
2 |
% |
%

s
ou $1.98 B

SHIRT

a

COTTON SPORT! . $1.95

IN RIOT OF SHADES



ey
x
% |
%
%
%
3
ous for it to continue. The ground|ed. They would therefore be un- | | able ng repeat his first innings — little hard cash, When Z s
: ; . and success and finished with none for | 25ked the R. and A. this weel &
is unfit for play when water] wise to press the umpire to stand | forty r e LOY | how their fund stood, I was told: x
stands on the surface or when it;where he does not want to; they | | 2 “The response from clubs is slow %
is so wet or slippery as to dgerve | ae oa ‘ieee Mere nine Morris © Melle b Tayfield.... sa |but steady, we are still in x
the batsmen or bowlers of a doing so either, : ; Donald stpd. Waite b Tayfield 17 | argent need of mi ” x
; pire. is re ne Hassett .c McGie . 7 gent need of more money. © |
reasonable foothold, or the fields- An umpire’ is ne at i re Harvey fan ee aoe a I can't blame the golfers for FROM INDIA ~
men of the power of free move-!inform any incoming batsman i | Milter Lb.w. Tayfiela 3 | putting the Walker Cup appeal) $ ~
ment. Play should not be sus-/the number of balls remaining in é Hole |.b.w. Melle 42 |so far down their list of charity R
pended merely because the grass;an “Over” in progress, but he Eiviwalt not ot 20 gariributieaiae-T "aan: 400.) oats x REXWEAR COTTON SHEETS
is wet and the ball slippery should give the information if | " ” aware of what the boys on the x 80” x 100” Each
asaed for it. Total ‘for six wkts.) 22 | football terraci ie i y A seth eeammevagnsoseserunradecaso ir ee
A PLAY STOPS J » sg - ” — Fi cr. ootball terracing would say if “s
etn — ¢ ones Gon casese ono yee - | Bowling: Melle--two for 18; Tayfield the S.R.A. asked for money to . >
tilede Of vise z RAY LINDWALL ‘three for 111 send a side to South Africa. FROM U.S.A. xX LIBRAY COTTON SHEETS
After. any suspension of play,| OF C'ose OF play. Offer Something x ony Mloageish ng
= += tig *. : ine freee FIELDSMEN’S DON’TS No, the Walker Cup Commit- x x y 0o+becete odetsdensbadees
fas been le oO 1em, e : ; y
ires, unaccompanied by any of CYCLING: | glee ‘won't get our money unless % bg
p a. : . ; AL we , | they can offer something better ¥ LILY-WHITE COTTON SHEETS
the players, will without further) The wearing of gloves by the] 7" than the licking I anticipate for] $ % ”
instruction carry out an inspec- | \ pea ag? is an pdersioge ; | dux teum at Bete, thm, neat x TO” "S00" Backs wFisevidinienes
tion immediately after conditions! practice but fieldsmen should no Me ° ‘ | Rentheae i . SS., ; 4
: ake | ‘ r all Brit- y
improve, and will continue to In-|wear gloves, bandages or plaster Le XICANS Leading | To the Sports Editor ish team, amateur or professional REXWEA
spect at intervals. Immediately to protect org? hands, without I Cc I SIR,—It has been my good for-| has Sie eaataes in, mocsing’ a au FROM U.K ¥ 2 R COTTON PILLOW CASES
the responsible parties decide|the consent of the opposing cap- , Ra » tune to be among the fairl re Sco . 20” x 80% Bach. oecccccacccctcccstecs
that play is possible, they must|tain and then only if special cir- n ye e€ CE . nong fairly large} tory on American soil.

call upop the players to resume | cumstances

the game.

Sinee publishing the first part | permission
of this Law which touched upon!such cases,



CRICKET:

Second Division —

John P. Egglesfield, of Wanderers Cricket Club per-
formed the ‘hat-trick’ as the last series of Second Division
games got underway last Saturday.

Egglesfield’s performance was against Combermere

School grounds. His final analysis was five wickets
for nine runs. Other good performances last Saturday were
returned by Mr. Smith of Combermere, who in the same
match captured five of Wanderers wickets at a personal
cost of 40 runs, Goddard of Y.M.P.C., who took six wickets
for 11 runs against Lodge and his team-mate Austin who

at the

took four for 11.

In their match against Wander-
ers, Combermere were skittled
out for 57 runs, of which Mr,

Smith scored 24. He was the only
double figure batsman. Besides
Egglesfield performance, Ram-

say also bowled well to capture
three of the school boys’ wickets
for 20 runs,

Wanderers Reply

In their turn at the wicket,
Wanderers realised 132 runs,
with Egglesfield putting in a

good all-round performance by
scoring 26, Packer 25, Ramsay 18
and Armstrong 16, Bowling for
Combermere, Mr. Smith took



necessitate it. The
is entitled to inquire if
has been granted in

MEXICO, Nov. 8.

Mexicans dominated the first
| ten places in the standings at the
} end of the eighth lap of around
Mexico bicycle race holding all
but one third—which was occu-
ied by Rolland Bezamat of
| France with twenty-nine
thirtysix minutes and one sec-
ond. ‘
The first four Mexicans were
first Julio Cepeda with twenty-
nine hours, thirty-three minutes
fifty-one seconds, second Juven-
tino Cepeda twenty-nine _ hours,
thirty-four minutes, fifty-three
seconds, fourth Galdino Cruz
twenty-nine hours, thirty six min-
utes, thirty five seconds, fifth
Guillermo Santoyo twenty nine
hours, thirty-seven minutes, five
seconds.

umpire

Foreign Standings

z | In foreign standings Giacomo
10 runs. while Goddard and) Citter the Venezuela ed the field
Austin wreaked havoc among the| jn the twelfth place with twenty
batsman, taking six for 11 and|nine hours, thirty-seven minutes
four for a_ similar amount of) fifty-nine seconds, Granco Cac-
runs respectively. |cioni of Venezuela was thirty

Batting again, Y.M.P.C, scored| second with twenty nine hours
24-for the loss of one wicket by | fifty-one minutes six seconds,
the close of play.



urday, | af ave oa eee ws
1 ores: onds anc uis Bahamandes of
PMO ve Lotte at Beckles {Chile was fifty-eighth with thirty
Hance ct | ,| hours, twenty-nine minutes, fifty-
Y.M.P.C, 1st innings:— 52 ae |"s oe. di ie
Edghill 17; Redman four for 16,| 1" team standings Mexico oc-

cupied -all of the first eleven
Mayers four for 21, Brookes one) places except for the ninth held

five for 40 and Weekes two for |for 6, Douglas one for 4), and 24!) Venezuela and the eleventh
25 , a} for one. 4 by France.

Batting again, Combermere had| Lodge ist innings 22 (Cook 10; _uP
scored 18 for the loss of one;Goddard six for 11, Austin four ee
wicket by close of play. ee eee ee . EET
is not out 14, | anderers vs. Combermere at) . .

At Beckles Road where|Combermere. SWIMMING:

Y.M.P.C, entertained the Lodge | Combermere list innings:— 57| ——-— .
boys, ¥.MP.C. batted first and| (Mr. Smith 24; Egglesfield five

were all out for 52. B. Edghill|for 9, Ramsay three for 20), and
batsman to reach |18 for one (Skeete 14),

was the only
double figures, his score was 17,

When Lodge batted, they fared
even worse than the home team
for they wero



BONING :

Scrap This Absurd Rule |.

By MALCOLM TURNER

LONDON.

The Boxing Board of Control
have a rule requiring any boxer
who has lost his last four con-
tests to appear before, his area
council for questioning. If the
council is not satisfied with his
answers they may recommend
London headquarters to suspend
his licence,

This regulation has been intro-
duced with the praiseworthy ob-
ject of protecting boxers from
becoming ‘“punch-drunk” — a
much publicised malady that is
not nearly so common as the de-
tractors of boxing would have us
believe.

Any boxer may lose four de-
cisions in a row. They may be
narrow points verdicts which



ye not affected him physically
or mentally in any way and I



| They'll Do It Every Time —
V TAKE SOME OF YOUR. STUFF
4 OUT, SO WELL HAVE ROOM
FOR OUR FISH, WILLYA, JOE?




AN; SAY HAVE YOU gor
SOME < :
, eau 7



dismissed for 22\Smith five for
runs with Cook top-scoring with'for 20).



Long Distance
Swim

|_ Seventeen - year - old Malcolm
Browne, member of Snappers
water polo team on Sunday swam
non-stop from Christ Church
lighthouse to Rockley Beach—a
distance of ap-
proximately five
miles — in’ two
hours and 20
minutes.. At one
time he _ estim-
ated he. was al-
most’ a mile off
shore.

Wanderers ist innings 132)
| (Egglesfield 26, Packer 25, Ram-|
\say 18 and Armstrong 16; Mr.!
40, Weekes three















think it is ridiculous that they
should be galled upon to explain
such defeats,

What would happen in other
sports if a rule like this were en-
forced?, It would be farcical to
ask the manager of a football team
to explain four losing games in
succession or a jockey to say why

After his swim
Browne said he
originally plan-



his last four mounts were beaten. ned to swim to
t h-e-~ Barbados

It is equally absurd in boxing. Aquatic Club
Well-known boxers have been} (another _ three
requested to appear before recent) Malcolm Browne mile@s) but an in-
meetings of the Scottish council jurea ankle

of the board, and this week an-| (hurt playing football recently)

other prominent fighter was sumM- | tpgubled him, Otherwise he was
moned, | quite fresh when he _ reached
No doubt he, like the others,; Rockley. When his ankle is bet-

was told it was Just a routine! ter, he will make another attempt.

check-up. But weil-meant though | Browne, who works for the Ww.
the rule is I suggest it should be| Biscuit Co, Ltd., represented
scrapped or that the number of| Barbados in one of the inter-
defeats calling for an .inquiry | colonial water polo games against
should be inereased to six.—L.E.S. | Trinidad in October,

By Jimmy Hatlo |
JOELL CuT THis SS=
UP FOR ME. EASIER
TO STORE INHIS
FREEZER













NS Sn
S GC[E
YEAH! WERE WN

GONNA GIVE you mM
A SLICE, Y'KNOW. |||!
THIS LL KEEP FOR

YEARS IN HERE,



























YOU GET OUT OF - |
» YOUR OWN FREEZER?|

B. \TEANX AND A LIFT OF

THE HATLO LID 7 @
> C.F SOETESIER, SR,
a LY ‘42h mARVEW ALE,
z ee 7 LOLS /g, MO.

hours, | the whole day’s play was like,

|Guiseppe Cavagna of Venezuela
The games conclude next Sat-| Was forty sixth with thirty hours

|crowd who at Kensington Oval | Sending our boys over. the
last Saturday saw the opening of! water as “poor relations” isn’t
j the annual B.C.A., B.C.L. cricket} likely to put them in conquering
}match, and now for the benefit! mood.

}of those who have found it in-| Let's get the finances on a per-
; convenient to attend I ask you! manently even keel.

| for space in your most valuable; 1 offer golf headquarters this
} column to explain to them what! solution to their problem: Invite
; the 3,000 or so golf clubs in
| While I do not want to be too| Britain to run a summer tourna-
rash in dealing with any indi-| ment on the lines of the Victory
vidual member or members of) Shield competition of the Down-
are team I oat hardly be com-| field, Dundee club.

mitting myself when I _ out- i

spokenly declare that the game sete eS ee
jin itself has been a very dull af-| +ounds as they like during the
|fair. It has been unable to en-| three summer months of this
| tertain any but the cricket thirsty | handicap tournament’s run — by
| “which must have been very few | paying 6d. for each card they take
jindeed” and for the selectors | out i

| themselves who must have been Their best foug scores fount
| watching the game it has pro-|each month, the lowest aggregate
vided little or no scope at all for | winning a monthly sweepstake.
|them. Indeed to be frank about|The 12 lowest rounds over the
| the entire day’s play all that I! three months win the Shield.
have seen for anyone to rejoice The Downfiela tourney has pro-
about was the remarkable bowl-| duced a revenue of up to £10 a
ing performance of the B.C.L.,| month to the club.

medium fast .bowler Rudder} Make the fee Is. a card, half
who in an inspired spell during | going to the club, and donate the
|the afternoon made the batting | other 6d. to the Walker Cup fund.
jand the batsmen look terribly If the competition was organised
| sick, and had it not been for Roy |on a national scale for one sum-
Marshall and to a lesser extent| mer month, and the 3,000 British
Clyde Walcott we might have; clubs were prepared to guaran-
seen a very strong B.C.A. bat-|tee the fund £1 annually, the
ting team crumple under his on-} feeling of charity would be re+
slaught for less than fifty runs,| moved.

and in less than an hour's play Members would support a new-

|

What has been responsible for| Style competition that would per-
Rudder’s great success on aj mit them to play morning, after-
wicket which could not be de-} moon and evening. The R. and A,

annual

scribed as very difficult for bats-] Would be certain of an ue
e

men, I shall now explain, First-|imcome and the fature of
ly he discovered quite early that Walker Cup would be MESA. 4
there. was some sort of life in the |! :(@t a» L.E.S.

wicket, and looking at him as I °
did from the Kensington stand HARD LUCK

you could see determination
Mrs. Eileen Sheridan, the Co-



written all over his face, for de-
termined he was to extract every
ounce of life out of the wicket
jand he succeeded in doing so.
| Secondly, unlike the other pace-

| bowlers he did not concentrate ventry house-wife who cycled
jon short-pitched deliveries but} from Land’s End to Hyde Park in
rather quite sensibly bowled a! record time, is the subject of the

| steady length getting the ball to! week’s hard luck story. She has
moye in to the batsman and| jearned that her performance of
away from him, and his ability) cevering the 287 miles in 16 hours
to get the one to lift most dis-| 45 minutes, breaking the record
concertingly from the proper} by over 20 minutes, will not be

length made batting .look as officially recognised, The reason
difficult as the development of

the “Hydrogen Bomb,” thus I
rather suspect that on such a
performance Rudder must have
posed a most serious threat for) ported in one of Britain’s daily
the number one position as a pace! papers the morning that she set
bowler for the Barbados team tc! syt.—L.E.S.

play against India, It has been! C

for a very long time now sincé we |

forbidding advance publicity on
record attempts—for reasons of
road safety. Eileen’s bid was re-



last saw bowling of this type at! sy re E
Kensington. Oval. In actual fact! Bu St S
the last time I saw ‘such @| . Roebuck Street was busy yes-
demonstration of this kind of |terday morning with shop keepers

bowling was in 1942 when Lance

'who came to the city to order

Career. Tam particularly ‘happy |e weekly, stocks of provisions.
about this bowler because he is Lorries. “ana. .cars".cwned by

eity and country merchants were
parked on both sides of the road, |
and in some places, only one line;
of traffic could get through,

A policeman between Pinfold
and Crumpton streets helped to
direct traffic, but several anima)
drawn carts using the highway
kept traffic at half speed.

On the pavements and entran-

of a calibre quite
these parts, and
dict that if he is given his op-
portunity now, West Indians
would have something to rejoice
about in the not too distant
future, for the long time search
to find a successor to England’s
Maurice Tate would have come
to an end when Rudder takes his

unusual in
I strongly pre-

rightful place for the West In-|ces to side streets sellers of fruit,
dies against India in his first test| Vegetables etc., added to the
; match, busy condition of the street,

Thanking you for space. {| Swan Street which was used
ARCHIBALD PERCH, (as a “one way” street on Satur-



Gall Hill, day was opened to traffic from
Christ Church, ‘both sides yesterday. Traffic
8.12.51, : {through this street was also

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PAGE 1

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PAGE 1

PACE TIN BARBADOS ADVOCATE IIIMill i)l( IMBI-H M. IK Aussies Lead S. Africa By 301 Runs Know \ our Cricket LAW 46—Bt ii. a. IJIPPIS ANOTHER GOOD HARVEY' INNINGS Mludl the study • uj which Mai %  %  IHIMMI. UCATHER IM) LKillT Unless agreement to the con'iary is made >>efore (he start ol a niau-h. the captains (dunnf reader. dual play th. i.^rlcai i for ihcit %  I'll lo demle in rmarrl lo the ntneaa of the .IOOTHI asaethai o. light (or play; Hi. vent oj dis%  nrr re%  Uired 1.. I P Khoul 1 %  .nl. I point* M to wh.n th. ninfiii-*' jhoul.i dund. (ait uriii unfau e l li.r.< in i '.•• publish the mling* here so that other ho might not have been the point* themselves dave the benefit of the rulings in question. UMPIU INI "i i Here ih. > are. III answer to ana query I would point out that It is .IcrK in UM int. mi .>r art sobadjthe OeMim. side that tin I'm lo COOltnUt. Tha pound tdL Tb*J VOUld therefore ha une tO prtM the umpire to stand siaiii' on the Kiirfne* or when it rram nj deal nol mnl It or slippery ; to deprive I nrr not ittoWOd W insist on hu 'he bntMTirn Of bowlOl nl ;i 4> tea-enable foothold, or the field*-, A'"'1 required I men of Ihc pOWOi %  > B %  %  >* %  mfoi m ID* IrtCominf 1 ment. Plav %  hould nol be su*. the number of bull remaining pended merely bccniiM the Bran M "Uv.i In Mt .II.'the ball %  Upparj % %  %  % %  I8BAHI DeK JArthur Morns and McDonald two beam Mt adding ets in hand and on advantagja OI, n(Iv Bnd hn unpatietn crowd. are sat fair to, ahuuled at them. Wait unMl Bedn.i Tnanan get at you." first Tost Here again*! South Africa Bill foi all that there are sign* th.it t:ie r old an* gelling ability has gone. in. but %  • lll'lll.l aa.iad %  ii An Umjiire should I. 10 i %  . ( piaq t it i nsMr.N's DQtm not AFTU PLAV STOPS After pension ol play, the captain*, or, if Ihi ha-, been lett to Ihem. the unianj ol will wilhout further instruction carry ul '"' inspection, learned i itelj nftei .11 contl "pect at UltarvaJa, Immediately to prolact ihen hands, without tne reapoif.Mr paxtaH decide' the consent of UM opposing capIbal play i* possible, they must lain and then only if special eiri .ill upn,i the i l .instances necessitate it The the game umpire tj entitled to inquire If Since publishi HI: the first par) permission ha heen granted m rl Thi* Law whu h touched upon such cases. (KHKET: A i-trallan eoond ini i-*wi.krtI'll f..i I9S to-day before %  i irl -.i brtttng by iJndWdUl and i i the position. The An trali. it\% miglii iuvt Been m even worse stra ghts hut • H IbO Held by the South Africans. HIK scores nave not been made %  "' %  %  %  %  *'"'• %  baa been u kick Of aUbillty; %  nca UK llOpaitma of Rradmari and Bamea. rlarvcy.again played well fur Bfty-two but there Is no more cer. laiutv throughout the ordai Tavileld flighted his off splnnera wrli to take three fot 111 (l thiinv. i bul W itking was un"'' %  la ntpeat his first innings d wMk none fur forty Ufllr b Tyr*ld %  td i" The wearing Of ajovaa b) 'he — per UJ an i.i i' in lioi bul tleldsmen ihould nol tu Uujwaai Blows, bandages or plaster ToUl Second Division John P. EKglcsficld, of Wanderers Cricket Club performed the 'hut-trick' as the lust series of Second Division Carries got underway last Saturday. Esglesfield's perfoimance was against Cumbermere at the School grounds, EUl Anal analysis was five wukels for nine runs. Other good performances last Saturday were returned by Mr. Smith of Combermere, who in the same match captured live of Wanderers wickets at a personal cost of 40 runs. Goddard of Y.M.P.C, who took six wickets for 11 runs against Lodge and his team-mate Austin who' t.ok four for 11. i imdih agonist Wander-110 runs while Oodilurd and Qambat ni ere .MH> skittled I Austin wreaked havoc niniiiut the L OUt for n runs, of which Mr. lutlsman, taking six for 11 and Smith scored. 1'4. He was the only four for a siiuil.n amount of 1 double figure ts-.tsman. Beside* runs respectively. F.u-lr.iflcld pefformanee, Hum-1 BatUng again, Y.MJ'.C. scored bowled well to capture i 24 for the loss of one wicket by wickets j lho el(MC of pluyi The games conclude next Saturday. „ i Kullowlng axe the scores:--^ 1 Y M.P.C. Koud. EDDIF HAMILTON LONDON It's time tome iummunscit.se u.i, .ippiifd to the problem of raising the 1'4,000 which the H. %  % % %  %  J A. gay they need If they are to send i Walker Cup team to %  'i. S:.i*r nt-xt .Mar. Suggetions on how golfer throughout the country might rafaM UM nind batra ao far produced little hard cash. When 1 asked the R. and A. this week how their fund stood, 1 was told: "The response from clubs is alow but steady. we are still in 1 urgent need of more money." I can't blaino the Rolfen foe 5 pulling the Walker Cup appeal M> far down their list of charity contributions. I am too well %  wan of whnt the boys on the Btaai m football terracing would say if far is Tuiflrfd ,l S.R.A. asked for money to send a side to South Africa. Offer Something No. the Walker Cup Committee won't get our money unless they can offer something better ] than the licking; 1 anticipate for our team at Boston, Mass.. neat 1 September. After all, no BrilT<> (he .Sport* Editor mb tenm. amateur or professional, SIH It has been my good for-! has succeeded in scoring a tune to be among the fairly large'toiy on American soil. a bp ,it Kensington Oval' Sending our boya over l_st Saturday saw the opening ot water as "poor reUtloruV' lent the annual B.C.A.. B.C.U cricket likely to put them in conquering match, and now for the benefit i mood. of those who have found it in, Lets get the llnances on a perconvenjani lo %  ttand 1 ask you martently even kaeL for space in your most valuable I offer golf headquarters this Holland He/amal of column to explain to them what solution to their problem Invite h twenty-nine hours the whole days play was like. the 3,01)0 or so golf clubs in OWtytla minutes and one sec-; While I do not want to be too Britain to run a summer tourna0,, S,. „ r h } n dealing with any Indim.nt on the lines of lb* Victory le 'rut four Mexicans were vldual member or members .,f Shield competition of the Down'lio ( epeda witli twenty-| either t* am I can hardly be comli.-pj, Dundee club. KAY LINDWALI 1.1 tU Walker Cup Tournament For Golfers i w .; I 9 UARBERDIM IU porliN I>RI— ',J $ SHIRT RBFR11IM M. SHIRT % I'l.lN lasssWa SHIRT; SHIRT! \ COTTON SPORT Sl-*$ IN RIOT OP SM IMI SHOES FROM INDIA SHOES FROM U.S. A Linens'ami erctem Mexican^ Lt^ding In Cycle Race MEXICO, Nov. 8. %  I :>., '.rl tan places In the standings at the end of the eighth lap of around Mexico bicycle rice holding all third— which was occuMAIL BAG pie, Franc first nine hours, thirty-three minutes | milting myself when I oulUtyHHM seconds, second Juvenspokenly declare that the game Una r.peda twenty-nlne hours., in Itself has b*H'n a very dull afihirty-four minutes, fifty-three 1 fair. It has been unable to ensecond-. fourth Caldino Crui i lertam any but the cttekal :lur, Iwenly-ninc hours, thirty six mln"which must have been very few utes. Ihlrty live seconds. Ilfth indeed" and for the selector, f iiullermo Sontoyo twenty nine [ themselves who must have been hours, thirty-seven minute-", five. wntching the game it hai seconds. Handicap Tournament Members can play as many inunds as they like during the three summer months of this handicap tournament's run — by paying 6d. for each card they take out. Their best foul: acoYes rount proeach month, the lowest ai Foreign SlundingN ,;';s, Y.M.I'C. 1st innings;— 52 (B. Edghill 17; Redman four f"i 10, Mayers four for 21, Brookes uuu for fl, Douglas one for 4), and 24 the school boys' for 20 runs. Wanderers Keply In their turn at the wicket, W.iiulerers realised 132 runs, with Eggleatielil putting in good alT-rouml performanc.bv .-fining 2C. Packer 25. Ramsay 18 and Armstrong 1. Howling for C.iiTiherrncrc. Mr. Smith look Rvo fi-r W mid Wei kes two for • % %  Balling again. Combermere hail Lodge l?t Innings 22 (Cook 10; %  fired 18 for the loss of one > Goddard six for 11, Austin four .vicket by close of play. Skeete for 11). U not nut 14. Wanderers vs. Combermere at At Beckles lto.d where C'oinbermereu YMl'C entertained the Ixidge Cumberniere 1st innings:— 37 boya Y.MfC lwtted llmt and (Mr. Smith 24; Egguaatleld ftvo were ill >. nd the only batsman to reach 18 for one (Skeete 141. double figures, his score was 17. | Wanderers lit iuiuims 132 When LoCsf* Lmtted. they fared I (Egglcslletd 28. Packer 25. Kainavttl worse than thihome team'say 18 and Armstrong Ifl; Mr. .. r ilicy were illamissed for 22 Smith five foi 40. Weekes three* runs with Cook lop-scoring with for 20). In foreign standings Glacomo C'itter the Venezuela led the field in the twelfth place with twenty nine tlOttrS, thirty-seven minutes flfty-nlne 'icniids. Cranco Cacii.ni of V.-iie/ueia wa,s thirty IVoond armi twenty nine hours Bftw-CNM minutes six seconds, Oalaappo Cavagna of Venezuela was forty sixth with thirty hours live minutes, thirty-three seconds and Luis Bahomandcs of l-le at Becklea £ h,t w flfty-eighlh with thirty hours, twenty-nine minutes, flftytwo seconds In taam standings Mexico oeeuplad ail of the first eleven places except for the ninth held by Venezuela and the eleventh. i %  Fr mi e U.P. >• iiggregate ^^? 11 . r ." NC "f" l aU Ior winning a monthly sweepstake. them, ndeed to lx> frank about i The U lowest rounda over the the entire days play ail that I three months win the Sh eld have seen for anyone to rejoice The Downfleld tourney has proahi.tit >v,is the remarkable bowl| duccd a re\-enue of up to £10 a UUj p-if..rmance Of the B.CJ... month to th.club medium fast ,bowlar Hudd.r Make the fee Is. a card, half whn In an inspired spell during going to the club, and donate the the afternoon made the batting other 6d. to the Walker Cup fund and Ihe batsmen look terribly If the competition was organised swmmiyc; n i M any entj an I iiunk it is i dktdOUa lhat they should be tailed upon lo explain men (Megaa. What would happen in other %  norta if .. rula like thia arara ao* forced" it would ufarcical to ask the mauagei >.t .. fiMitUill learn foui loalng • n ., .in. key ti his last four mounts were iK-aten. Long Distance Swim Bsrvantean year old Malcolm Browne, member of Snappers water polo team on Sunday swam non-stop from Christ Church lighthouse to ftocklcy Beach—a distance of approximately five miles — In two hours and 20 minutes. At one time he estimated he was almost a nulr olT shore. it is equally absurd in boxing. w.'ii-ktiown bam %  bava baan appeal before recent 'i council of the board, .md tins araah an other prominent tighter was nionecL No doubt he. like the others, j Rockli was told n eras |ual %  rouUna wt, he check-up. Bul well-ineam Ihouwh t Q, the rule is 1 suggest it should ba scrapped or that the number of defeats calling fm an lnou.tr> should !>. %  ineieased in six—L.K.f* After his swim Browne said he originally planned to swim tt) theBarbados Aquatic C 1 11 b (another three .K.I it. nri miles) hut an injured ankle %  n| (hurt playing football recently) umtroubloii him. Otherwise he was quite fresh when he reached When his ankle Is betill make another attempt. e. who works for the W.I. Biscuit Co., Ltd., represented Barbados in one of the Intercolonial water polo games against Trinidad In October. clubs of L.E.S. ;l had il not been for Koy Marshall and tu a lesser extent Clyde Waleott we might have seen a very strung B.C.A. batling team crumple under his onslaught for leas than fifty runs, and In less than an hours play Whnt has lieen responsible for Rudder* great ^cces* on a wicket which could not be described as very difficult for batsmen. I shall now explain. FlrstI) he discovered quite early thai ort of life in the wicket, und looking .,'. him as 1 did from the Kensington stand you could see determination written all over his face, for determined he was to extract every ounce of life out of the wicket .itul he succeeded in doing so. Secondly, unlike the othei p.tboWHH he did not concentrate short-pitched deliveries bul rather quite sensibly bowled a steady length gettin K the ball lo week's hard luck atory. BUL move in to the batsman and %  learned that her performance away from bun, and his ability lw vei mg Ihe 287 miles In 16 hours :u get the one to lift moat dis45 minutes, breaking thi concern"ngly from the proper by over 20 minutes, will not be length made batting look as. officially recognised. The reaaoi difficult as the development of | is that in 1890 a rule was madi the "Hydrogen Bomo," thus E forbidding advance publicity 01 rather suspect that on such a; record attempts—for reasons o performance Rudder must have 1 road safety Eileen's bid was reposed a moat serious threat for ported in one of Britain's dad ihe number one position as a pure' papers the morning that she s I..F.S ational seal* onto, and the 3,000 British were prepared to guarant fund £1 annually, the feeling of charity would be removed. Members would support a newttyto competition thai would permit them to pla) noiiiing. afternoon and evening The R and A. would be certain of ar Income and the future Walker Cup would be a: .••I HARD LUCK LADY Mrs. Eileen Sluiidan. the Coventry house-wife who cycU from Land's End to Hyde Park 1 record lUna, is Uia subject of U bowler for the Barbados learn t< play against India. It lias been foi a very long time now since we .% %  t saw bowling of this type at Kensuiglon Oval. In actual fad' ihe last tune I saw such le:ii..ii.-U..tinn Of this kind •II was In 1942 when l-i .uout Ihi, bowler bofu*e ho is !,..,„' '., r .. i-.ililinuultc unumal In 1 "' um I'.irts, und I strongly pnp"' Icrdi h. j SHOES! ^ FROM U. K. 1 SHOES 1 FROM CANADA I; IN GREATEST VARIETY ^ IMAGINABIE AT I; THANIS j Pr. Win. H*nry St. I j I.I WM \K COTTON -Hi 1 1 *. 8S" x 100" Each I.IBRAY COTTON SHEETS M0" x 100" Each LlLV-WIIITi: COTTON SHEETS 78" x 9W" Farh RFXUFAR COTTON PILLOW CASES 20" x 3U" Farh PILLOW COTTON M Inrhr. wide. Per yard A SPECIAL LACK DRFKSING TABLE SETS. 1 piece set Round Pieces | aae If y..nr experleooe dc match their. to see If yoa, don't avoid the nervousness How lyMm finfchBi-t work. It hat a -MJinlnff" and •oolrtlsff tStol on fi* uc-i.i . y VI*IIBV IAI to Ollr* nuir mtiulrtMl |MlH. C'OITipi. 11IA*' dulrril. a pain — so often associated with %  those days"! Remember Lydla Plnkham'a. tuo — if you're suffering the "hot Hashes" and other funcUonallrcaosed ihatraea of "change of Ufe." Oet Lydla Plnkham's Compound or iMrtc. Impror-rd TableU with added Iron I trial sire only SMI Jlarj j W Ma f | d^ alt*^'.> It Every Time r TAKE S0'E OF HXIR. STUFFVr 7&ANX AMD A LIFT Cf=^ THE **ATLO UD TO 9 4*/2Y WcV'ftV J.'sT, 3 r "*-l m.iVr Busy Street buck Street was busy >esf mnrning with shop keeper* to the city to orde uad .ntry merchanL* wenparked on both sides of the IMIII. ruinitj now, Km ind.iS. %  ". " m ?. rnulrt 1 u,reu t-. „ 1 A policeman between Pinfold and Crumpton streets helped to direct traffic, but several animal drawn carts using the highway kept traffic ot half speed. On the pavements and entrances to side streets sellers of fruit, first test i vegetables *tc., added to the andUJon of the street. Swan Street which was used jns a "one way" street on Satur|da> was opened to traffic from both sides yesterday Traffic (through this street wa also aaaaaeaasaaaaaaaa die port unity would have >omething to rejoice .ibout in the not too distant future, for the long tuna search to tlnd .1 successor to England's Maurice Tale would have come 10 an end when Rudder takes his nghtful place for the West Indies against India In hi: match. Thanking you for space. ARCHIBALD PERCH. Gall Hill. iri-1 Church 8.12.51. aaa..aa ease ooeeee The Ideal Christmas Gift D11 MAIIKIER FILTER TIP CIGARETTES in SPECIAL FLAT PRESENTATION PACKAGES of 50 Each. OBTAINABLE FROM ALL TOBACCONISTS $1.16 per |i;lrk;iMiSO WILKINSON & SOLE HAYNES CO. LTD. AGENTS. ANIMAL TOYS MERRY-GO-ROUNDS TOT-CYCLES PONIES Our TOY BAZAAR is quit., IU-W ihis year, with a M'lection ol hard wearing, practical toys that will prove to be an investment lor 195:1! Take advantage of our Xinas Layaway Plan: :. r ', Hounpayineiit will hold your purchase until Christmas Eve: :v*vv.-.v<*M.t.-.vs*-.f.vs* K. R. Hunte & Co., Ltd. LOWER BROAD Phone SIM



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TUESDAY, DM I MRrR I, US, B\RB.\IX>S \l>Vli( \T1 PACI. rixi Electrician Acquitted Of Conspiracy Jury Instructed To Return Verdict In Accused's Favour f >'• 38-year-old elKlrician of Bnd S eKoad. Si Michael. ... acquitted of two chi or attemplini: lo pervert the course of justice on Mav 1 and April 4. by makinii it appear that Stanley Bryan and re witnesses of the facts relevant to a •' him Hiwas acquitted after His Lordship "V "" 'ustice Mr. J. W. B. Chenerv beforo Children's Annual Exhibition GERMAA SHIP HRIXGS C \HGO OF FOODSTUFF l Months For Manslaughter %  M(II1 — ART A|. OHfe ) *ear at the H Museum there u an of art. utrvdlework ai crmfU by Khool ch prizes and certificate* ate award. cu This year's prize list Is ai • ^i^&falZ3Em7SZ BSSTSSSL O?T£! *"""uihy. peel. Si. James was vesterdav ut ;.sented bv %  > then. Massiah and he went M-ntencod lo 18 months' Impelsffc WaJcott yc. associated to Mr. Nilea and had an inier' nment. Earlier this sessions SarI W. Barrow, vie* with him. When he left want was found not guilty of when Mr. v.. V. Rrecc. Q.c. Mr Niles' orhc* he saw Myles murdering Arnold Hope, his comsol:citor General closed the case standing on the pavement. mon law wife's step father, but ho Crown alter callinu four Didn't Receive Monev of committing manslaughter on A tl .aid that MasMah ueVcr*av*turn an *"*"* 22Before sentencing h.m had been conspiracy. JST^r dSTteMSr ttU !"\ H Lotd^P the AettM Chief would have lo be corrobo„.J„\u' ? \ tell nun Jua lce Mr j w B .Id be no case. •* %  ""* lo U xhrr on ,v 'id thai he could r.ut hide even from himself the noi n "• '* before anything person fart thai the material witm%  had broken down even belon? ll V. ; l.ii the colony on Si;i foodstuff I.. ilic hlind Tii:'et' thousand, six hundred bags rt Hour and 1.850 bans of onions were the main -'* bags | Aft II •< John -.1... •Malar i*i Brvnda Daniel Oa*tas* IM Mtm*t#t Piiat Oua.n %  CUaa> Ale IS. ttutrti'i Aa> IS •a ,.,-.-* of eogna,-. # %  ; ,.,..-. < i %  case* of mill 80 bags of Peail barley, 40 barrels of salted mackerel. 18 case;; of hams. 28 case* of c..lined meat. 2d crates of cabbages and a s'.up( advertising Captain W. Bahr is in i %  H P Musson Son A. I I.IM-HAL xi .... Larceny Decision Reversed cross-exam inMmn D QM ens. prcsjttl id&hip told the Jury that • % %  no court could aOr, a Jury to deanyone for raoney and if Massiah liberate iUj given him any money II" nvtted than ha would have informed on him. rdtet of not guiltv. Orcai examined he said that Th| s vei wbsjn iiaatfafe approacbad bin oa '">•*• •"" %  € % % %  %  I M (Bryan) tried lo convey the imI to e ive evidence. Me aid preaaion th.it he wai not %  .1 lo the rt. 230 Bradshaw brought Mas. police siah to Ihe Bridge Pol; and three ch %  licensed firearm, two having unfhecourt laid lhat undoubtedly thi l Wi..l. II..I. Air I*. It.Mir. Ma %  %  .: M .. I..Ill.4t,. e II D AMttStt, A*V II CumbrtHooeura kn it. A .nd Mi. A. J !! II tfi arrival on tU, Judsfes of th r A the Alroa Planter rl Court of APIMMI | i %  M vibo imposed A I young ol .Miing. st John foi i lanllty therefore not pass as long a len of Imprisonment on him WouM normally do I for Sargeant Was Id: C. Hu-bandv 9 MONTHS imilllH H H.l.l.i-lil^ -. >.-.-:. ,i WU lU Austin of st. Utoy to nln tl prtsonment. Austin ruul earlier mouFht Mas. Police and save a statement eon. ""*"'""""" %  >' %  >'•• •;•<< s-.ation cerning the case He had aweii '" tbe ouion &•*** *"' h : Charge, were brought , rur?.bou? .??S ^^iJS^nmlS^i^^K i, one, having an un,.., % ,, im ,unava* MJU ,t, Ulth lnlent on Baathel Boyce b> -> having unSTL^^uSV.' 1 ^ d her with a hammer on %  %  I attempting to Brathwalta. i;,h had been Craaaexamined ha charges n I 1 September 30 this year. He I said he could not remember Before sentencing him His If he told the Pollca Magistra'e Loi-dshlp said lhat It was difflthe ,hat Mr N :, v ''^" h,rn •*•*•• ru,! '" conceive how u man <-t Ing about the case, his character had allow .--i Un When he wcni to Mr. Niles J " *0 ">1icl Ihe injury m n e he had s.ild that ; l •^• iU 1, M vl, s w " no present, outburst of passion He had been Frank Masaiah was in the I to *•• "' ^" b> "'* em P lo y "-' when hi .ai Mr, NUaa, Mr. Nile-, read one to ' l b v P"f another o. i %  („• was him. y >r if 'i. If Massiah had given h.m the Stanley ltr>an . a 20 he would ha -table said thai on May 2 he was him and given u lo the Pobc at N. B. HoWi Mratt, When ha HW Massiah the day &. v.her* he workad when Massiah the Inal he asked him what bad 3 YEARS IN JAIL came to him about 7.15 p.m. and become of the monev. — t" fjlva He had told the Magistrate Vcrnon Kinch a mason of Silver case. tnat thc d:iv „ f IhP lr)n he hap Sands, who was found guilty %  pencd to be in iourt fei %  ' "'* '" th c sessions of atular reason. tempting to blow up a dwelling triet. both al. He still, howbail to send him lo prltOn, t \VL 1 \r", though he would be lenient Aulin had been represented by Mr. J. E. T Branckei < .1 r..rt ...a. r I KIM. AS* u. •%  K. M MaMifv, Aav l Caiiriin.i I MSkSH • aid t .:• .1 Ae met* achool aasan ^^ 19 rodrwiiiKfi H'ari 1 risen in.oiM nurh IM sraMl.i r aUbb. A.. it. nati.a>,L.-. MuMutn ami I Art II... 7nd A C Tunpln. Air 11. Baiba doa MuMutn and HuiMtal *oAn Dfparnnant CUM IJaalar). II""" ralalMM Btly Cib*iMlcti. Aai> II Alex•iMlra Oirla' School. tiainaai r Kril Air I*. Raitodo* Muw.m and 11 Art lU liarli.i.i:! Volaml Banni.lrr Air 14, QtMPfh'n faMsaa r.ut. %  i -engwra. 1 %  : thfl A'eo< I'l nirr Thorn Ltd KICK FROM IK. The 87-ton schooner it ii Idaaa arrived Robert -k Al* II. St rehN 10/fro> \ 1 litlin M with a shlpmcnl In Item of lb IChBB n %  %  i, lhP n ,. %  .. out of n ti i . . .. What Y"ung sa' Thr.%  !. %  %  M.rian Belle Wolf • ih. I u. in.H smith and i aaal at i n liiiti-M %  %  h a 1. urei ol Hothei .\alklng bohil 1 I I %  %  CHOONI RI I \\ I be basjan %  tan and be ctiaaad him t rwners' A Oim nirARii iti s vrroiiMoRK aal.gae vaih 1*1 Dam*. Claikr A 10 atrkv School Snd M.I.I Pl.krr. A| Gal. glMll aastgsu. CW sl.il IM. Sliriu Hu. Matuuaa OlrU a.tiool i e oo gt abta lhat him, Massiah MatllirI ItMl r*ntl>U Maltl.rw %  lair Pirt %  •< %  lold him he htm sonic assistance He asked him what was tl hi i Massiah) had bei-n """ """'' ,,., Webster and other charged with ad rt.plini; to shoot When M .i.. %  %  ., |, Ml ns by placing explosi\. I > "V utul.T the bouse ..n August School; Ki'fused i: T n n. had followed him 6 this year, was sentenced 1 < *' Hat that h* was an while he was tft Ih* three year* penal servitude by %  "**•."[,,,„, Island constable and could do Police Station. WhllO hi wag IMVHis Lordship. 1 was £ecause M hc' ta^n ? & £ ^SS^JSTJK ***&& h p C ,ec a e^l ffRS U9M ^*££^*&J*pi paper out of his ..aalaal^J *" ^fcgL.,} t^ 'haracler. but had allowed thing to him ami tod h.m liharcd Massiah ,.,n„>aratively simple matt., .. Manlahl would aivu him Acting Police Mr. BO derange his Judgment as to hTgave X. te him" £ %  • " U| " *?> M "> S ? ,nk S" p Li l H^' "*S He asked h.m when tbe monev h? d'*arged Frank Massian of fence for which in some counwould be paid and h c said durthe charge of attempting to distries he might be sent to coning hearing of U <.,ld 'large a loa led i centratlon camp for life. It "' Massiah that $20 was no money *-verts*. M>lr said he knew diftleull to %  liktd him how manv other Maslah for about sM months, In with the enormity of Ihe offence, he h^d in the ea>, He the aarly part of April Massiah but he would be as lenieni aa Massiah said three or four moro, aakod him tdgiv* evidence lb* the cireuinslances permllled him. Mylas, Pranklg Waltha and anhim. He asked him whether he ha i ,,VATIH*I nKFFViF ian called Chariia sai andh* i i hot they WW ^ T K ^'w wtB the itatemant Mas s i a h arafa not pioper one*. Massiai Ethan Brathwntte (18) and %  %  him. he was I i gld he would give bun 14 or \* Dentil Hauls (17) of Brill SI lencf that h e was on Jordan's,, took him to M< Hill who weneai lie. In 1-i.ne accompanied b) ; ; -, ., found guiilv <1 eoinimU HK nil whether be (Mjrlag) W*S one f in nnnatoial otTencc on S.-pteinffl Maiil.la* M K I, • I Mr.nr. Clement. AaT-iniiai Aa> \.u^ at. IVI. Other queen f .i st. Vli cent ih. VUa r f sslai a %  i.....i 'ilpha f.n Bt. I v..s. I AlhelbrmH. which left Im %  ( X.belbr.M.k irrtvi rl ll was %  i %  %  %  IhCI Vi I eptlon ol viiieii.io.ik which is i . %  Own. it Ion, Young appeared as if he i When lie fatal saw the two me.' A-' about 29 fe*l behln' %  %  %  unsatisfactory .1 ; tvould b* hlghl) %  '. %  illng lb ......Ii:..I,. ...->,. Walk st ivirr Olrla' School. ASe 1* 14 %  assaau I CSV*, Aa* 14. SI Pvtar-l Otrl-' Mrhoal A*i -Ih.. N.adlxa.rh 1.1 V Jo-dan and Y. ChaadrSt, A.H SI. PtWi'i Olrla' School In* St IVler %  ii MMhis sND i 04 OANI I OIL I %  r ...II 'I'll. it from the bvKin tilng the else appaarad not lo h U tra WII to Irs %  < %  %  ,, t My. ""'• (rl ,•> to glV' Young the heiu-tlt of the doubt. 11(11 Ml OVr.at HAVnil lakbladlM M....I .-Ichoul I .'Hi Jordan. As* I B. HIS** Skltuol n-RArrs Aa* II Hlark a*** (..' M I Salm %  H; drum ol oil and SO bat** • %  < %  school.. t 450 bag* %  i mui ma il. 8h< i . darday, Mgncd to the Behoonai Ownoi i[ c ... Aaaoel itloti woiiuit rACHT i n 44-ycnr-o' i %  ( .1. • HI | i |ullt) at troun i ii. it. on 1"* id. b] i tiffing hai on Dat I Hi before His Worship MI I m I. Ml* Ol -ii i ii %  'hen l.i say he i M l the witnesses. Massiah said y und Mr. Nil. i i ter 22. %  tenced to null months imprisonment with .'avc "£m'monev hard labour yesterday. I. HI and";: o1-a-s Ihe man a t "*' M "' u i*d he UU never paidI to gin.evidence. It ni)1 inU n d giving any e, t know vou Throw -wav wa ,boul a 30ucIock : siah agreed to nuel him by ih those i and %  t. wo:k ; !;• %  was coming out of Ih.-Sp.uk. Sl 1( Ht|p bv)I Massiah did nol rnd that he (M went Tmlor S,:PP wh, n ^ MW Massiah com e. On another occasion Massiah ihrougn way riding ..long Tudor Street, it was agre e(i lo are h'm but did not cornhome. uw Massian stopped and apxhl ^ cither. bout 9.45 proached him. Massiah said he had i 'clock Bryan saw Massiah in ihe witnesses bul did nol think they Mylti a* ihe lasl witness to court yard and hc (Massiah) were reliable and asked him give v told hln %  it Mr. Niles whether he could kive evidence. Mr. WalestU SSkd that from ihe the ban io-.ee him. He told him that he knew nothm* evidence the ea-e should nol go i Bryan asked Massiah when Mr. of the case. Mavinh asked him n the lory. • him and he prcond time to give evidence and His Lordship Invited the Jury i-> said if he were not busy he could he agreed to do so, though he d.l return I verdict of not guilty. a in IH>al I tan— n-m Altars*, A** Huh 8eho.il. Haws l.i Ami iinv Kdaai.1. % %  %  %  na.Hll.n A. H II..... months lo the sum of t'> i IM ii lav.. ofdl r..l II %  /. \V f The hue hi li be paid In If ot %  m ntl %  • %  %  •.." : hour. All. itr, Ar U I Heath Ale 13. HARRISON'S Broad St. Tels 3142 & 2364 WE SPECIALISE IN GLASSWARE AMI CARRY A COMPLETE ASSORTMENT OF KITCHEN AND TABLE REQUISITES including CLEAR POLISHED TL.MBLERS-C.T. TO 1 PINT BOWLS CABS PLATES COASTERS CREAM JUGS SHERBETS NAPPIES SUGAR BASINS SWEET IMSIIES WATER BOTTLES JABS— H AND 1 CALL—WITH METAL SCREW-ON COVER And Lcits of Oilier IM-ful linn*.—Plain and Decorated In Eine Swedish Glass We Have CHAMPAGNES PORTS. SHERRIES. CLARETS. I.IQI'ERS COCKTAILS AND ', PINT TUMBLERS These arr All Available in Plain or Elrhed Greek Key Pall Our Slorks also include a comprehensive Assortment of I'VIIEX' and "PHOENIX" HEAT-PROOF OVEN GLASSWARE I I STAID COPS, CASSEROLES. PIE PLATES SOUP PLATES. UTILITY DISHES Etc. This is a Busy Period Parliculary for Housewives—There is so much lo be done. Furthermore uilh all the extra Seasonal Expense It is Vitally Necessary to Buy to the Best Advantage—May We Therefore Remind You that VOI WILL SAVE lllliil TIME A.\l MOM., It. SIIOITIM. AT %  Age H, SI t HANOI. gATTS Ae II Combefmare I %  %  i b Mi C Sullivan. Line'* i' v : i %  %  %  yacht is now flkaOfOd off the I iiKiN'fis CAtfOl on. Coneert Pmlponed ... i ., fmin Trinidad The Mini ih %  and :<* tier l.ii.i dn J T V mand of Ihe st. I Co Ltd agonts. ', | I v I %  %  en %  had lo bs poatponad due to in %  The eont art h 11 p m HARRISON'S B^d St. CHECK NYLON in self colours of pink, blue and while. J*" wide —per yard vpZ.4^ EMBOSSED NYLON in Navy. Red and light pink. 46" ... $3.82 PRINTED NYLON BBEES la irbtta franl wMli nil flowers and orchid ground with gold Dowers. 46" wide .. $3.25 tAVE SHEPHERD & CO.. IB. tO, 11, 12 & 13, Broad St-ed I'l. MS NYLON aaaflCn i black only, W wide IpZ.O J l'j:i\TII WIIAS in while will, nnhi.l dofg white with gjrtM dots, while wilh navy and orchid wilh fffxhl dots 46 inches wide per yard. $3.25 A XMAS GIFT! ."LSB t&K *r.-.-/.<•< sod so dclicwus in taiir thai ^_ the nnii hn.kk* youngster lakes ^Lit wilh drl.Rht •*-* %  % —amgg** I(KIIICIII-I1V, ii** fine lor urowi \ -'"r w loo Haliborange Mod* in England by: ALLEN a. HANDUKYS (II)., LOMK1N, E.2 jus i iti c i m JAMAICA CIGARS GENTLEMEN B x.s of 2S KI.OU lie MACHAD0 LONDBES ,19 PANETELAS M Also GEMS Bundles of 50 Also DOMINICA CIGARS I.ONDKES In Boxl of 23 CORONAS 2 9 KNIGHTS LTD. jeaaaaaasaaajaaaai VMVK . WWTS anUSTMAS He hJve on Mm" SI I I l(|\(. Will II. ( ftW'KH si \ I 11 SHIONrJ i \H sfATH Blue, ar**a Wtm fstsok t Olll AIK UMII. MiiK-niue. t.reen. Amk r. Red. < i ii i i MINX ii ii sw \s> ittor. Qreca, Red. Aaihst II. 1,1 MIN \ III* HI IIS POLAROID si %  ^II xi>l s -!• \i: KIN IHIKV. < AR juhs -s,,.n sad Bamaer ( II XM.lls IK \ I lit H I'OLIslll I POLISH) %  BIMONI7 M W I Kl IIAm 1 IH KIN.. GAS TANK CAPS •..H Ml I I IN HUM INSPECTION ECKSTEIN BROTHERS BAY sVTRFFT nTAl d9RQ



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—— II I 8DAV. I.KlLMBKH a. |M2 ll\IIUAIHi> llltill V 1 I I'M., If not uvtd b l*lUon, Bleu* wi.l, lor i II:I. IIIMIK Wblch HikM "GOD'S WAY OF SALVATION PLAIN" I. BobwU. Qospa] Book Ttoct Some*. 30 Outn] AY. BriiDi, MX Gums Bleed! Hlaodtn* Hum*, Bar* Mouth n1 UM T#th IOMII that ,KU %  ..,. ta*a STorrna*. Tranca South • paraapa MM Mkd flUaSaa that WIU •oeaar ar lalar cauaa your taath la fall oul aad may aiao -auaa lit lalUm and Haul Troubla. AmoaJ" i Oral tej %  was -ie.11. %  %  "NEW DEAL" FOR COLONIES aa4 a**a TOUT taauVar nwnaV ha."M rat urn of airtplr M ' ^LCOLDS The dual purpotc Inliibnt Rub. ApplifJi"iio'tri!-iif-hcvci catarrh KubbcJ into cheat, neck jri.lki.k il ci.c .ongcstivc (inidiitoni. KIPAK l: :,i'i QUICK relief ^et bad. anil ARE "NERVES" A SIGN YOU'RE GROWING OLD? Often M %  noddle liff. bounvra gel I •he acorpCa tbia u a aigo of age. But arht Ut yourself brcookBedgy. r J; i dowa—or to nervou* yea cry witboul MM o. f Cot t I Labour and Industry, and Mr. capital expend %  Adams, of UM I dos Bxecutrvt C I Mr. Gomes has %  trnaarju' nc^cd in II tut goodi.. but he |x>intet| out mod dollar pool. thai ;.n men ben "i Iba Ccaunoawealth mutt put tht-lr rMUIIHI into a common i 1 th BQclton, he mentioned | 1 ,, ,., .. ..... view must be takthe j. : IHU said that :• %  lems of the West Indlt those of all l -,pH a "'i' pn onl n 11 I lor prim.n> products and obtainUIUUKII the Of the l ii avallabM. inentary nnd then i i urnnt. "Our : %  %  %  '. with tha t'.K. and CaiwU." nd flu pftM ,muat be lor we arc anxious to combine OUT IBOf* |>nri,. %  it going to be selrUb : : a t*EF.D r-iajy. If'.CAtID ttOU PRISON Wltb MI I i SEA AND AIR TRAFFIC In Carlisle Bay i %  tmm \i rwaiH TH (itn LJ. lainix ivan SI M"v n IMBFR :*ni S Alcoa 1-lal.ln. INI t.>rva. RMB II r 'aitad to Retort Tnoaa I sl-1" M.tt.r aV . „ i t.i i/ kg u Dat '• %  ? lama. ""•ft C'aSUin C ,. ( .I,I.J la il, tta.nn Oa.ilurldtHi Mutlah a.M (,..,. i r v.\uii Maav ailrnenti ar.„..,... .1 t>y puo( nkiuil whi P/U0Tf£ may sfled daa whoa* mum. Skin rrapn. olOmT^ and trntauaa. aWpat rheamiatiam and pain/uP aK *C_ blood Miat-re TKa famoua mrJjur.r halpa SKIN %  rlraraat UM bkxal iiream of impunun and /-_.-. ,-, % %  • • yam tat and free from ineae and iuaila: ^^ all T i' f tbS ence, aoonon lc axpari Utrouab i'-.t the W": I %  '..n • the convertibility if iin i R were iDUnd pi %  j sterling freel> convartll dollars, wlUraul an> ; imposed h\ the 1 K *. this would ov> i most serious ecoi f.n ing the \'.that their trade with c being ruined by their InabUlt) to spend Tor themselves molt of the craUari ihej earn w ith ail, bauxite, iimtxi and other I induce. But before this • with any degiee id long-lei: Lb* worked lUt for the development .if the Commonwealth as R whole, b) CO.rdinate dollar spending in aact member of the Commonwealth. It is in IhU respect that the needs and welfare of tha OoaaRRIN'O NEW RKAl'TV TO Y(K HAIR At this Hntidny Season When >ou want your Hair t look its best. try A. K. POMADE ft will enable you ID dre.. yoqr hair easily in all the latest styles IMM ID U.CI WrVW/'< 1 Empire have %  > oeKltHted. slthough the CotonMI as a whole have inadi eontribiition t One of I I %  I •il.d to loOl ' tha %  taritnsj area u s whole. II i I %  %  ..ii M-.II a, but it i taped Lhs raallaa ... -earning potential of the Comri H ,i Wboll .tnHii rathe i i pin hai if sin with tha %  C'oininonweallii must produce %  l can be sold DM dollars foodsiuils. iiunii.i ores lirabat and rubber. A strong dollai exists r..i ihoae thlnajs; •' doe-i not exist Bar Hi, ..* if the i. I %  1'Hieenli •<' %  duslrles. II SOOM measure of reached at the Will truly be Hie haWlniklllg •i' piiiisliiiX In I %  : 1 them II 1.1 uming to i Industrial % %  %  i. lot the .ind the %  nawAS n aaa sth a>i4i .. % %  i ^> \ V Alt..',! %  %  I M.tii % %  iq. -i. N CukHHi. I.' Iia-a*. I. \e--i..l. II., I Uri nan* t>s-t'. %  11 w,n u N as *i.. ia.-• DM i c DavM J Wk, A Wiek. i. %  i.it.i,i.-ii.. i %  II II M*IIM-. • i it l*r ktaiualejaa—Of •< I u.iuia i H-sii.i i aai I \ Moulin ' *• K. I I i. I I %  P I i > Bale, i sj.nl I D Bojat %  %  : stptnfl the yotingei %  %  i i women i mpfra lomatt I ft i DELAY m Mini. i .s/ iwuw;}; i.. VaMfaajaas %  0 frem i-.. ; I %  I' ,l! %  mats are being l %  a, i I i reported thai IL Jin. thi impend ina Irong mall I Adeeb %  %  I .P. %  Barbados Co-Op Cotton Factory )howroon1 It's rooking and ii.il.in.; lime . we have new 2 St 3 burners from $2287 a single burner at S7.3G nnd ovens from S10.31. KEROSENE}! OIL COOKERS i:..i.M Pan* £ BBaaTaaag Bowls ^ %  *••* I /J y and everything *J LJ] to make Xmasi lime in the S kitchen really *J worthwhile * Ibday'i Caai 1 NaVPV dujiosilio" i bt" U n„i. an I.IN 0| i-J0.000 Lon l The irue airasara a] lo live N.i). ifour Msetora. 11 S3.40 S3.95 54.90 $4.00 n IPtef iign 1'rici. from S2.SH I" SC.T2 BOYS SHIRTS Plain ColuurK and Fancv Design; Irom 11.90 lo $J07 & .N:% SEA ISLAND SHIRTS For Sport and Dress Wear From -: !u -..II I.Vi:KY SUBCHASn <• A '"OK Of JOHN WHITE or K BRAND SHOES UUHINC THI MONTH OF DECEMBER WILL AUTOMATICALLY HAVE A > NISG, wniinr; A:.Y FURTHER I I A "HUMBER" CYCLE COMPLVTS WITH ALL ACCESSOl HARRISON'S — Dial 2664



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PAUE SIX IIARBAI.Oi. VI.VOI ATI TIFS1MY. DKtfcMBEai a. iUt AgriculIural ind ustry Honduras During 1951 OLD WAR COMRADE CALLS ON IKE Increased In British Timber Still yfain Export LONDON Of a total population of 69.644 in British Honduras 8.838 people arc engaged in the major industries according to the Colony's 19M Colonial Report just published in London. Chicle bleeding is still the largeM single gouroe tU employment, employing 1.512 men. and many others depend on forestry for a living. "The people have oeen reared land communicauons wit) to a timber economy and It wUI "d another road is being i require intensive re-education net ween the western highway before they can be inverted to and the Sunn Creek valley, agriculture the report notes. In 1951.531 ships totalling 181The Umber Industry is still the 42 ton* entered the Colony as main one of the colony and em* umpared with S43 ships totallploys 1.079 men Chief exports ing 2tlO.~7(J ton* it. UM pievn.ua of the industry are mahogany, cedar, balsawood, rosewood and Passenger Service pine. WHfa i ,exception of the During 1931 exports of muttonCayman Shipping Company which any and pine timber increased operates sm.ll vessels between o\er 1.950 sales, but there was a Heli/e and Kingston. Jamalea, c.ecieaae in the sales of Cedar there is no regular passenger logs. Umber and jhlcle wood. service although passage* are ,e year was a record one lor obtainable in vessels which call all crops with the exception of every three weeks for shipments rice in the Toledo dlstrl ( which of bananas to the United Kingsuffered from excessive flooding dom. •oon after planting. Nevertheless. Most of the Internal mails of the crop was near.) as Urge < the Colony are carried in a smal the preceding year'-, and had m^tor uwl the Heron." vvhicl> BOS been mwe sat itbu tori operate* a tWnee weekly service it would have exceeded tho i ia ,n Belfie to Punta Corda, and previous year's total A record one* weak exivmling the trip crop of com was harvested and to Puerto Cortes. 1.300 ton* were available tor eThe lack of a deep v. port, some of which wa* sent to nas been one of the main obTrinidad. stacla* to the Colony's sea comA rise in the rontrnlled price municattona. and the eoiutruction of meat revived Interast In the f ; ^vcp water pier at Com^ %  olony %  livestock Industry, alm erce Bight, in the Stann Crock though a lot of work has to be. Lstrtct, i* one of the main prodone to demonstrate the meanjeet* under consideration by the ing of proper stock and pasture Colonial Development and WelivAnngeniffii before this can lie fare organ bat ion. regarded as an organised agriculThe main airfield of the tural Indu'*" Colony is at Stanley Tield. about ten miles north of Beli.> Banana Shipment* which flights are flown to KlngsBananas have played an imton Jamaica, Tegiicigali>a. portaSM part In the Colony's exFlorida. Guatemala and No* Lean. ports over the year, the ilrst Orleans. Passenger movements in gramrr shiinent of which was made in 1951 ,| 10 w<.l an increase ot 28 It is playing to packed IU 0* clowning." October and regularly thereafter MT eatf OVflg that of 1950 and at 'he tiny Irving Theatre, lust Another member of the cast_wh .it three weekl> intervals. By freight movements increased by "IT London's Leicester Squan .ind has attraclcc the end of the year exports had 97 per rent. I lf.000 k %  month T hc report points out thai Stead* work has (>een made in |H >,t-war development ham been agriculture during 1951. but the ...nceiitraled on establish inn a Agricultural DeparUneni has been murc t,r,rtui|> b tampered by a -mortage of nd h(ls resulted In m. trained SUIT and funds h*mg built to onCo up new areas The Brnin nondu.a* fishery for #„ Colony's aaricultura. NERVES SSJIISM All MARSHAL Lurd Teddt*. drops In for a chat with Presidentelect Dwlght I> Klsenhower at the general's New York headquarters. The two worked togolher during and after World War II. Grinning ui background Is Lewis Douglas, former U. S. Ambassador to England. B.W.I. Artistes In London Sleel Bridge Launched 9 from piir I lage on life north bank. The whota procedure contbv ued according to plan, and at tr imnut. after three, after two hours of actual movement it finally rested on its 1 *bed"*on the north bank. Immediately the bridge was settled, Mr. Parfltt, Mr. Carter and workmen cros*ed on the wooden footpath from the 'it ink to th, noithcrn side. Hts Excellency the Acting Qovernor. Mrs. Turner. am than a dozen interested person %  wa ln Htl the final stages, and when Mr Pjiliti rc-.hc.i the .nik. they warm!) congratulated him and his assistants an their success. Celebrale Afut the launching was pen plctM. the Chief Engineer, and the members of the senior staff, joined with the other workmen who als* played their part in Ihe successful completion of the job. and together they celebrated the occasion The lauiuhtng of the bridge involved much [>•• theoretical and practical work". Mr. Oariod told the .Uverate later. Mr. Garrod sold they owed l debt of gratitude to Mr. D. G K* I haw ih. lX>NDON. A (jreatn has t-oimtnil fctf Wa1 Indian singers, musif, cians ami dancers, IM London. After many years of struggle helpful during the launching yaa•nd d.sappointments. they have al last managed to pul on •"•Jjgj d lf hr couW Rive nv irt then* own nil-West Indian show at a London theatre dlcauon as to when the nan Their show, 'Cabartt Caubht appeared remarkably delicate pumping station would be romdcKhbcd on the proand agUS in a bongo dance, which ,.'. tel, M, C.irrod said tnry A. Iiultan party %  nbcd as -, a masterj,ae* ^omised Government that the Station and the arterial mainemanating from it would be full operation hy September VESTRIES %  ervioa. which was established 1950 was not able to liegln operatlofiB until the completion of its launch in April 1951 The work of the fishery officer •.,.-. beeo (onoexned .nair.le wltli ciawflslilng and snrimp trawlin* Despite 'lisapixgntlng result. In shrimp trawling which Wus carried out off the river* of the Southern portion of the Colony, there was a considerable increase in the export* of crawfish in 1951. the export total being double that of "A"i"'l —ati.r N. P%  from [>i.:e I of High Travel Agent On Holiday year-old travel the preceding year, 1, is Errol ... the heart ol theatre-land John Ov W I Indian poet who The Irvlni gleasts ragulariy In UM P.B.* "little theatres" that have sprung West Indian service \> up in L000V during recenl During tt %  talhlmsell 1 ing drainlerv At night, canvas scrteni gtlc actor and som ,, %  .., the valuable pictures on Uu thai 1 -'t the.Irving walls utl t trad in to mai nmll prova the first big step face the tiny stage that has been In .< nan Iheal t* "> builat OfU end of the long talWith the SUCCass of tinC arioMT. Ian On that si pearl > assured, west enmm Indian srtbrtei in la>ndon ore besi y wai ginning to make plans for Corob nation ••• %  <•> -Uaa •varyhodji else rind vie an %  itri< .1 buslnaM With ford, memi rk on lyrics committee and ttStOhSa lot Coronation rt.Under General Buiilif.. Mi I ur lhan ar hopes that a steel C M Drayton .a. behalf of other li^n.1 ma* be biuht to Britain memlwrs of the Vestr) cuiigialuIgiin from the Caribbean to take laled Mr, II A Talma.for the ,, ,, ; the general Coronation jj^^l^mann^hj*^ %  : %  JUMWn t.i the 1 1 During the past year, the Irving has achieved a reputation firm stepping-stone on Ihe way to u — -„ ,. theatr..al famt and several 'un:'.' ,\":^f. r 1 leld ..? re *.e n ^. b ::: taOWOa" Who have appeared thenhave secured thernsctves an esplace In Ihe theatrical I Health. Mi utive on ppoiiitiinj the Rei ind Mr C B Bianlr >f the Playing Field mi m-d.cr.i oflis* L,i*w.i 1 start dnini •I'CM H* .nd HIHMW • % %  •• tl ik. UM*1 1W UM4 U ->. < %  rtlai VMI Uk i"d lI ?••>* ->"r.' hnNto insist M Dwddt k-ln.. FSg.. the >•?•*• i .m.4j h* • !" r hall a -tsrt. Dee/a an *u*k .tar.. ,11 Dodds Kidnev Pills HAPPY RELIEF. FROM BACKACHE Nal|hbour u>,d -Ta** Doan'. nib" VV/HY PUT UP with needless jiKonfon fwm baefcathe, rheuinaiw pau. lumbago, anfl. aUung anrtUet sod putois or the common uruury Jatunkri due to aV.ggivn kidney uuon Uo you migtH get happv relief. Vtan iheu*snd of health* K ele bks* the day they ior* an'i B>Oa>.hc K-Jacv l'Uls. This well known diuiruc and urinary antiiepiic helps sluggish kalnevi 10 carry out iheir fuocdun of ridding ibe blood ot sce> uafe acid and other impurities harmlw* lohaltb Grateful people, everywhere, recommend Doan'i Pills te Meads and ncighboun LacKiniosns Toffee de £uxe The Toftee adjtt the rich buttery flavour. The moinenl psjgj put one in your uioulb von fill aas t %  Thia the uio.1 |sJMgaM lafln I ever laalea." And it I ery high food value too — e piere IS briml il -t uutriinrnl. MADE IN INCLAND I.' John Mitktntoih k Sa^i Led. Toga* Town. Hariri*. InglinO. DOANS :. / keep fresh ail day.. J. %  ad MiQraim unv*d in Bar. a uii.Ki bado. Uw Tfunday T,. iftnd .' world lhrce-mor.lh holid.y. They an' u w „ Rdrlr Conner, ill, r.uii•Uyiw al Sandy lleacn lli'Ul. Mr. d.di.n baritone and nclor who Barbadian. Hr • %  w „ raaponalblr foi Ihe Caiibbran Since the end of the war ; X #£t!F ** P r h 8 been immense ImproveHr ,, U pporUr of the Ch.lar Ustes togttlk, .. merit n the coinmunleaUons of dre „. s ,;„,.,„,„ u .. lf uo g Hl sloM !" "J itJl|v mMUUJ#d „ Us .,. 1 inowan in nri.ain won uiimi^.i ( .......--— -%  ""a M-V Toln show a, rle baS worked |Jon wlsamiW ll wn. heard. If a hese remark, and M-*. Ta for manv years to bring Caribbean steel band is brought across the brief! wepled £•£$ %  memlxrj a,ti*tes together in a show of thei, Atlantic .gain, it could P nnich '^ their kind remarks and said had to rely mainly on the ind the sea. rhildren's Goodwill U-ag'ue here. Under Colonial Development Mr. Join, Beck lea told an Adv Welfare ausplcat, roads rate repoi lei yattorday thai have been built linking up both dato will ioun be lUvd .01 Ukf the wnt and northern areas by distribution of then pr< \ PLAQUE MAR KS THE SPO T.. The only MP Cromwell ever feared I' Lord deliver me from d,r Hurry Vane! The tu that ol Cromwell the dismissal :' 11 Long Parliament :i. %  till .pre w. .nly one man 'ha* Cnmwell It was Harry Vane %  nan with a conscience. % %  .. To rctor During tMe • •be Long Parka. I aim had ,) \ht a it >crs' n n.ng complete >*l of the country's 'ffalr.* A mar; *.".r Vane's srrupl'* 'jjld not be an ally ol Cromwi-:; Charles II after the R itoration feared him as nvi %  is Ct mwi il had. H.W .I.A. Link British Aizd Preach Mawdfl .11V Of I-on 11 l>l>|{l'-OF-bPAlN. Dee L iiuiA new 1 ented Wati fhdlai h Condon between Trinidad. Grenada. Bar*ome of them alrendv tamou*. l %  Lucia. Martmiuue. .. a ; %  %  %  a them lust ttarung "* %  on thei wrvice provtd own. like Sylvia Wynne, 1 talented wing dancer I pany 'i 1 m ii So EfSJ.'TJ ilanre COmC'outtor Unnci^s %  %  %  U d ear njgularK in the show make tl dble. But on 1 ns oe. "I in the shOV guise tor him—as a dancei I a powerfully;-ouilt man. but French West MI from service. The re-ult i ih 1 business and I %  J. now I %  Ut wit 1 the greatest of ST Of Is! : all In the *pace of 1 rsngad atatj al 1 %  walk Into any BW.IA, oflfcst in the Leeward W ndward Lie to do so with Hie Vestrymen cspecialMr. Harrv Ward Ait Was the last Vestry meeting for the year. Mr* Talma ex% % %  1 %  -.. s.,mi mbcrs. Mi Ilrawlford reciprocated on bt'talf of other member*. Meml>er* present were: Mrs H. A. Talma (Churchwarden) in the Chair. Mr. Jl. St G Ward. Mr C. M. Drayton. Mr. C. B Brindford. Mr C Hill. Mr. 11 Games. Mi G < Ward. Mr J F Webster. Mr A G Gitten*. Mr Victor Chase. Mr. T. N Peirce. %  iiree students from the the Boys' Foundation Sehool accompanied by Mr. D. Prescott, Assistant Master, attended the Christ Church Vestry tig vestndnv afterm-.: iiducted thei business At the er.J l the meetmkM C B. Brandfoid. on bahalf ol other members of the Vestry, wished them a happy Christmas. Use LIFEBUOY TOILET SOAP It's cast to keep fresh ail day—just use Lifebuoy Toilet Soap whenever you wash! It dccp-ctcansing lather really frees you of weariness, keeps you fresher so much longer. So get a tablet of Lifebuoy today and make sure of day-long !rchne**! FOR PERSONAL FRESIISESS ALWAYS &6t&l6lOok ...thc gift that recalls Christmas every day booking without undue iwaiting confirmation ol 1 1 11.' obtain delays seats. These improved facilities should make air travel all the easier in August 1837 Vane had ouih England, leaving behind >iad enough He sailed More direct Bu' < ar."' bad a more [ d ding with N 1 : and became governor V 1 But ID -.t~ re llglou* int ranee was %  severe a* in Lhe old country. There came a trial of strength between Vane and the Boston church on the one bide, and Deputy Governor John Winthrop and the j aasSan lit tn In reputation acknowledged by friend and foe alike Vane lived tn retirement until 1840. when he became member . iwilh Commonwealth countri. s i* nl, and the reaaunlna is t>robon one occasion during he FSir. *po lighted by New Commonabli that. eye*. In ihe avanl ol thc offlcla report of the days we \U. in its current issue th worst slum]) .11 the metroactivities claimed thai greatest 111T .. ..v.uK in particularpoiltan country, it will still be Iciest among overseas buyers %  *• n*noanv l*ui\f Pali II '" %  India, cama fro,,, South Africa, Canada. ComnlnnS r... I to supply A^la. Kklstan and Imiori.raresa--4iave both underiln ' cotton, mbbei and other nesia. S'iilh Afn.,1 and Australi. ^"JKrSS waneaftr Job. mirodilh sgs 2LTJV?** ff" Caitiew 111 a special article I heavy equipment and the Fa r and tnqu"Since th.end .d the Wai l inough Hrm Leipzig Fair has becoms the Two Aspects tcrmediaiie^ most imporiapt ttop-wlndow ol Bxamlnlni ODiHvtandinu the last and this y* """ both ttiK and la-t yeai. ta exOutst-n.laig among Ihe I I Whelming emph:i*l$ was on heav. pand tier trade with CommonCnman export was hHtUM ,industry." Mr Cardew rontii %  wealth countries m Asm Mi chliifry Tmtinman.* laid em,i, in IIGH contlnuasi ph.-i11 lalM work In ancc as an exhibitor of In p.ntnulai ol tliariufaeture, whleh ihey claimed tools, he 1 the 1 %  lertnct tatld In y\9 iMn an advantana over ih* gnd hntlla and mining maciuia vv \i Sl -,.w la-t April have not reUM watt concentrated on anil whl) these good v n the attention they deserve quantity production They also for sale, their shanlAeance, in ui ihi West especialLy In UW claifi tag* in delivery i iM. there wa tin %  v Ind t" irads In respect ol chemical equiprtith under-developed countries merit, ihev wire both ready and st which Inn %  I mans of them indusmarkets. claiming thit India, vcrc the dominant Pakistan. Australia and South Atr:ca cfiuld me.t mans • rountrles hacked ren/dremenls in Bast Germany. 1 • Furtharmore, the anal Gent 1 %  • 'Titrating on Ux M tMn Ol CO) DM k 1 iea to trade then inoiu.1 on Ih M that they base some 1 edging 1 f %  \ ivirli % %  %  %  to . %  tddi "Al Lgrinui beav) And. while Bast Gen pushing her sales of special light 1 problem of the unindustry products, ii again stress Is also being laid on the fortyabUlty of her heavy industry to 1 1 t h developU the words of u Berlin a ibnl they document) 1 nev productive capacity" I v.t Cai Ii lie little dOUbt Whti LtV the probkrn of findlna new kP.: tor their they will havi %  %  %  I tcreat In I dth raw g • gent rallv ovi .1 Bril Ih ih.' a—Ill Easte:1 veloned countries aar-vxth of the pre-war volume. i>pparent They tret E u r 1 : Asia, including play a Commonwealth A^gase purchases from the whole Inon. and Pakistan, compared Commons Area have greatly inwit-i about sixty from Britain and ment schemes, crtassd compared with the preeight 0*** to Sat 444 SaaggflU h| Whiff* E5TERBROOK Lets You Cnwna* Ihe Riajhl Paint fne the Way You Write Kvery day uf the year your gift will I* recalled with happy memories of ChristioJia when you give Ksterbrook-^the perfect writing iiulmment. Katerbrook pens offer even more than beuuty and laatingaervice. They make Ihe mnut indniduai of gifta becauae l*lHterbrook lets you choujeexiictly the right point for every at vie of writing from .'ft numbered and interchange:! h OtVK ESTERVnooK to ei Potnl Styl I Sttvdtook ih. ua* AMERICA'S FIRST PEN MAKER 1">r,l aoln, Sryla, GAKniNER Al'STTN & COLid. Lawac B,o,d nraal



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TUESDAY. DECEMBER 9. i52 BAKIUIHI UI\lK VII PAOI MAIN Bigger Efforts For World Sugar Pact Means To Increase Consumption LONDON The Inlet is redoubl. up a pnl" inary dl world in which will be t. latlon ii> The worl content i when. II *i Ahhou t Ihe Council ha the Unlt.-n \ %  % %  world oonfi nrtea, then li still a feelkag of gates to i %  kl that a woritable prel: recmr.it rdUld or then. All th. %  Mac: near producing and con-.. on the in i A\ m % % %  inlernational < -ement They arr also agreed tl there is .. wa Id suiplus of %  ample r for increased consumption There : that two of (he disequilibrium in Ihe .-... %  re the currency restrictions and peed trade. These t auses t.i Iha worlds lugar trade can best be aHieiiswxl iii the l.i. of_a woild conference. V Council has therefore cabled ry-Gcnenil of the Unitl Netu'ti-. in v g him to call the world uKnr. to be held In Juno i: The Council's f statement, announcing this %  Imsai I The liitt-r! Honal Sugar Council held .i M.CM.I: :. -;• her. 1952. in London li was ntIjtideri i > repi— itivea of is Qovorniiifiits and by observers from eifciit o'hi'i <; %  ^^ %  jV the Food and Agriculture Otfin; .ili.m. The Council adopted th. following resolution. World Action ^^KThe International Suiar OMlI*.I. h.ivini; %  jUHng on 24th November, IBM, a n; | i.. %  I position on Q paBBBBB; market. tkm 1.t ecBor. ll r< quired lo overcome the dinVnl'ies which have arisen and Which will continue if BUCfa action Is not Liken ^V*'l. Considers that a Common itAgreement offi bast means of dealing: I dif *"2. Recognises Ihal SUCh III Agreement will reqUlP tlon at an Internntionnl ComModity Conference. "3 Request Ihe S< TVce Expert In Sahara LOU %  %  Hi t n Iquai si . \ : than < %  which A %  %  %  %  %  ; St. I %  %  and p %  pan, %  %  %  among heal and quick!) turn Itoi %  H i i British Civil Jets Break Crust Of Dollar Market lt> BUR OLIVER LONDON. %  -cith the development of jet airliners has started to bung in a fal dividend Not as big as the alrikera would like to see, but f %  lingers crossed eral of the United Nations American an line chiefs are imconvene an international pressed and the crust has been ir Conference to consider broken with the bagging of cotirnnclusion of an Internatract! to supply Pan American il Sugar Agreement World Airwaj with Comet! and SugnesU thai this Conn ,i -Canada Air Lines with IN haw In London late \. • ;kl ,ho-prop*. June or early in July. iw.>.t Hntt'h producers BM now hni>K*_'5. Authorises the C-li.uim.oi lm; ,| i(l ,,ihe r of the bc turbo-prop a reeult, aidea running the rtafca attached to the Industry is preaalng tha new Initial coneantratlon on the gas 111 to block Untune engine, factories ncluallv Limit.o. the main Canadl t .. arguing that the purwent ahead with production withcraft company. chase of Cm ll) a out having orders for what Ihey It is haul to say when Britain's subsidy tu Un llutiah freawury were makuig This was done after uimaft industry w ill bo able to from the American Treasury. gouging Interest in let travel. Al j acroaa Ha lingers over dollar In other WOrd men UkC Floyd It has turned out, it is ii pity thev market deals In other M It. Odium, chairman of Consul)did not go all-out right from the it is steadily building op buatneea dated Vultoo Aircraft Cor] atari, Now H la waiting to sea i< I ilalming that the money for The fact now ll thai large-scale ran airline*; generally will follow far, .. M lei havi i %  ui tines Hut there i %  it* .1 nibbling, i i m < %  nada at d Hex II idian lino rnmenl li .: .nla| tint: the Itiittania both a%  ii Itima roi 01 aircraft and cargo plane A decision Iimminent, anil Will prob* hment of Britlanla production Una Hi nlreal works >i I Further GnuH For Cri.lrul Ootfoi; ShUitwt %  iii, Bt %  ...... ci3N2i> being anaNla undai tha Vfaat Indus Oaneral aUooath i Cototila] Da^elopinanl and Weii ti,. malanananca Unuatlon "i lha tha Central I otto* Antigua. i ni. i i ...in., .I Development %  ., \\. (hi Bohemi was made up to ihe Hit Chi her. 11(52. rot the establl hn i .. A ,.,.. ration ni lha nation, as knaariei ol a OBjeer roc tha w. %  Indloa t.. carry out agrb ultural :. ... I' %  dvlce na c aaaa n '" '" *< %  otton growing Induatrj 14th I UNTIL DEC Don'l rorM FREE ENGRAVING Con-. for such P ' fll has bee-n stiuggling to a Idely different of t' J sugar producing and a r %  Into a new and woikagreement But in %  -s^ss agreement. ^frht R Coumn, OdeaiU I Were fav fjayencc lol ..mi Vtckers-Armslrong. Tliev n given all the facts, and '!> %  ti decisions. Meanwhile. Huge: a Of the Atlan'ie. . I'.S. Makers Displeased Than is a snag ibout this crackI u in fll to tag of the doUar market. American aircraft makers are not exactly pleased about it Kver alnc the wai they have been tied down on military Jets, ultimately conns out ol production will !>• %  built up BtaaidNie Pa the L'S taxpayi pockets and Ily as Ml a In Na An 'i oi Air' %  | %  (or Brit HI;the aircraft I plants are being built and ifl i..i:.s. Odium says the U.S. Treasury Bad common pjround foi I lead to further unt sugar market. The itraH %  greati MU help pay I % %  Ul hoc chiefa know tho la to lha airtuna factors Involved and an pn i, ks pared lot them, this up by saving thai COMOlid could have a 200-|wssiin;'r jit lilliner dying by IMA if the government would n sary space and manpower from waik MI milll : %  lint... mlttee deeidcent below their normal cunsumpOctober lhat conditions (Ion for 12 years. irable for sucha conAnother bumper world sugar crop ,.:hbourhood of Three Main Feature* 36.700.000 tons—is forecast for the The proposed preliminary draft coming season, which would be of the new iicri-cment, on which s.-cond only lo laai record 2, i-<...... King, cov38.000.000-: er* HIP. ' : %  %  • gnd in,p.nl quotas; price structure, guard Itt augU industry by cul%  nd mea uraa designed to increase Ung iiroductlon. world consumption of sugar. But the Cuban delegation totha Since the Commonwealth r< Council s s]vinl committee mcettgttenlalives at meetings or the Ing early in October made it clear Council have firmlv insisted that thai Cuba was not prepared inIheit production quol H under the ilellnitcly to carry the main burrnrniuuiiwcalth Sugar Agreement den of reitrlcting production o EouJd not be prejudiced, it i~ %  maintain equilibrium In the world Scted that .' %  : '"' %  D Al"'" Son at the wo, 1 %  > -' lh '" m *'fat Cuba centre round RU ad to would Ins.s on a more equal dLsIncrease world COnaumpt IribuUon of "flrt' !" "" !" There had batn a aforld surplus among the P'"*'"cineJw n Karens : !" < r milted consumption for example, some people have been ralioned ten per Stiniulii. vii |ai produeara i Overseas Orders %  I il i are. houcver. by no meal •van at tins atage, De Havllland is BuyINI! Sen.IA t-.p ... I'acllb Alllllies (two). |(o>,.| W.I. 2LS-" ?JHf5J!E= BrtTB „ Britain wealth and Colonial producers 50.000.000 had narrowed considerably. events. Ihey know thai at tr moment there is nothing lo stop an American airll I I Hul thej rcnllre loo that II |. D merit could make thlngi decidedly ticky by i of the big Vmerl | ana Brini Another :• Wd i IgW now mm of this iH-hind-thcanea (three) and another Kr< DO) npany U.A T (three?. i. 1 \AIJA WELCOMES FEDERATION MONTIiKM. •i-ti. i held next B i •. i. ration ol the .'. %  i by Die Montreal i-<> ait*, whli %  n %  irtlcli To Can %  i % %  I (In All Ring i oefcata, iin-> ha Identity Mangles. Tie Slidi %  Caaaa n more >• Mg %  .. % %  . %  for their And West Indi. m I %  1 have argo-type llntCltgglc Pattern Labour Relations Committee For B.G.? LONlJoN. amlnad lha needs of Ihe islan Mr. D. loner, (Labour, %  1 Rartlapooli 1 Baked lha Secretary Mr. Lytl % %  eff-it of Slate He has considered Ihe desire ax.; pressed b) ttM Piesidenl of t*ie agricultuie and devel Ipfnant wo fieorgetown Chamber of ComIn the IrOpIca i^ l< f is not easy t ad a which have been sent to him. that quaLU l.ihoui Keluliutis %  % %  1 %  'n ; 11. Hl.t. n Mr, I) Jo ( ii (Labour. juiana; that such a body could asHtrtll „ sk nat to maintain Induati %  %  %  %  u, %  •rntorlea In which a Lnbour ...... %  I unclersland that Chamber of Coanmerca should set Labour Relations C %  •The aanarganaa ol II Wr-.t Imhea si a rederated nation Will D0 m the classic: 1 lonnnoNweaUh devclopim oi Originally acquire! in the Imperial % % %  .nation or by eonqui 1 guardlana of Iiritish sea i'' 1 World rod great%  if-government has 1, ped Today, the islands ... % %  1 at,:, to decide for Uw futun will h%  Ihej ,.,• -. if. ti %  %  for Anal 'I'%  1 ' %  |om and goodwill • %  %  %  .. as well :.ing do MANICURE SETS CaWLlY ifiUI and llercnatnick-andavan, Wlyl ,\~ wht the faatuna and the II %  ^B T m W? V ni'.licd it>ling of a car I brse vehicles have pi load apgcaj 120 cubic tccl 111 the Cowlcy Van' P unnvaJM lor speedy deliveries because they have the rnJlt jKilormance ol a car. . All At.I I.IIK Phon^ 2385 Sole Di.lribulort 1504 MR. PLANTER We the %  nii'nil famous — %  pei ioui consiiteration The Queen'* invitalicm fpHE Qai I n through % %  Amba-sidors and QU A m ba Minis-..: n fX invited head nominate thi 1 tires But the offtc to these roreigi a ll not Of J'nt before the New Year %  is far r 'he cards ha* not ttei n : tent out from 1 all ufnee t %  [linanlace 1! %  : %  %  %  j D -luly. ll*W. be%  an and the major ; %  up aLybour Heia .ns CDtaanmasj employed In the shipping mdustrv to act as an employer's feder..T .,,„,„ > staridiriK jo|n exit in Jamaica —B.I .P. negoliations a h a Committee | %  'merce. which %  %  llevelopmrnt OHM miss iom-r. SI. I.ucia Mr D. Jonaa rLabour, The : %  of Stale for I Barbados and are planned in Ar. „ tigua. There is also '. *"" Whltley machinery In all terrlto riej. and. in addition, there ( %  %  ', boards to sett I r ex-mple. in th ,stry, expects to appoint the f> nltatlve eonunltti ment Commi'sior.er recommended Untish Culana sugar ind by the team of expert*, who ex-LIB, CurbYourPiles H la no lon*r % %  •• % % %  f t '" " ealna Hi-nine %  <• % %  •'" '"" %  •*•• iT— Ih. di—,..f r .. H,t. Cfo.m,rtF %  %  -.—n % %  1 Hd.eiidi Mjt aiari* •• ark la IS nalitulaa aiv •.< %  '.nl> al"pa in. pain i.ut alao lak*a *ui iaiwall!. mtof bl~4.na anl .....l.ai. ...-• Irrllallnn ll.rli < DFUI <,th>r ir-.uklaa raiH4 bT I'D** au< ha.H.-^.'hN.r....i.r... II.. Haiti. < onallpailon. ua -A .(. %  % %  aaa u •'i ""uw* 4'VCCWI I'-Ui unaar Ih* poalit** euaranlaa H^la> tnwal a.op lotr alia hUM nS iroublaa o. rr.ot.ar bark a* •I aawptr %  *< %  MASSEY HARRIS 42 B.H.P. Heavy Duty 6 cyl, Diesel Engine WHEEL TRACTOR f.\lo availahlr uilh llal(-Trniks) wilh mir j lon< AI.I.STKKI. CAM. CAMS MM B




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    WHAT'S ON TODAY YESTERDAY'S WEATHER REPORT
    Police Court: 10.00 a.m we ¥
    Advocate Christmas ard Cor eee ti

    Exhibited at Museu 10 é pre
    B.C. Films at St. Joseph and Mt be

    5 and 7.30 p.m ‘ a
    Mobile Cinema, Kingsland Pastur yy

    Christ Church: 7.30 p.m

    o

    for the cause that lacks assistance,
    ane & wrongs that need resistance, 4

    or the future in the distance, { 5! i 38 ;
    or the future in the distar ESTABLISHED 1895 TUESDAâ„¢. DECEMBER 9, 1952 CENTS .m., 30 pao







    ay STEEL HIIDGE | | Delay In
    Mid-east
    Defence 7







    Seven Frenchmen,
    40 Moroccans Killed he


















































    | By K. ¢ THALER
    Ri ti t t | From All Quaaitis t ec
    ioting Starts ae i
    Restaurant
    In Casablanca ° :
    CASABLANCA, Dec. 8. } I O ;
    | \
    Seven Frenchmen and 40 Moroccans were killed to-day | nto ven ide
    : in the worst incident in this French North African protec- | y rhe
    torate in more than a year.-Three French civilians: were | aon The police haa to be t
    * “ iC a > ant-
    found mutilated in the industrial ‘Carrieres Centrale” | ¢\ ic. ‘tn Reatkene beta oa
    quarter, their heads slit off and their clothes charred from \ from an oven where he had been
    flames. Three other “European” civilians were wounded. | Bus bea by an angry customer who M
    iain ~ declared his pizza was under- ther
    we ee of: police sealed off as |cooked. When they arrived only ; eg
    é native Medina quarter and) L £ the restaurant-owner’s feet could : += oo
    ten tanks patrolled the tense Orona tor be seen sticking out of the oven. k ) : lans
    streets. A crowd of Arabs were e | Pizza is a thin round slice of woe a}
    reported to be holed up in a Will Be | dough covered with tomato sauce, ~~
    mosque near a troublesome part - cheese and anchovies and baked of
    of the city and police troops took | e inside a bread oven : tia im = Boe
    up positions nearby. Televised 7 — ee
    . Wellington, N,.Z.: The report to 1-Kast efence
    Police have arrested Moham- | the General Assembly of the Pres- nnir ‘ ‘ nd of
    med Bouazza, Secretary General | LONDON, Dec. 8 byterian Church of New Zealand A tag med
    of the Communist-led General; Officials staging the coronation asked that the traditional Wed- ( Insteagy, ex=
    Confederation of Labour and two | i bowed ‘> ‘public cat ee . be ding March be scrapped from the ‘ proceedit irougt
    Communist - leaders. F c outcry ane’) marriage service because “it has liplomat hanne larity
    | approved television coverage f/had its day.” The committee bt if the differenc vhich
    Three newspapers of the Isti- |the event. The committee an | stated in its ‘report “We would ave et from tl mn
    qual Nationalist | Government |nounced that TV cameras will be} welcome new music to rid us of rents of ther six nations on
    , p > sturbane ¢ Mi ster , 1 31 East defe ” -
    have been banned, eee in Westminster Abbey to too much Wagner and Mendels- LEFT: The 110 foot-span stee) bridge, weighing 18 tons, is here seen pointing at an brltain’s mi I a ey Plan
    santas aa = see strike |cover much of the lengthy reli- } Sohn.” angle of 20 degrees down into the 80-foot ravine which runs south of the Belle ung boar ot ee
    ores y. Bouarre . tra ——_ |gious ceremony including the Rome: The Russians have ap~ Pumping Station. In the foreground can be seen mon working the winch and hoist @ On page:
    which may now be prolonged actual placing of the crown 0a, ologised to the Italian republican (top left) which eased the bridge into this critical stage of its launching. Near the wail camatiihaiadiiaieiale
    5 until tomorrow according to uNn-|the Queen’s head. Some parts of ; government for havimg unwitting- top of the picture at the far end of the bridge is the tractor which held the strain
    f confirmed reports, oy lthe rites will be banned. Thejly carried out monarchist propa- of the bridge during this process, In . Di
    é ae aioe. iB. cos pains | nation’s televiewers will not see | anc in Moscow. When a team ABOVE: A view of the bridge looking south in its final resting place after it was € Op ( 1e
    i Ne ae ast Fr’ a aoe i ma }the Queen’s brow and palm |of Italian girls went to Moscow = . successfully launched yesterday afternoon, This bridge will carry a 20-inch arterial
    | at ine acd ae. ar ee er janointed with sacred oi] and they this summer to take part in a| . water main from the Belle Pumping Station to Grand View and Britton’s Hill . C | ‘
    trade union leaders in Tunisia, IS) iy not see her receive com- | basketball tournament, the Soviet mi arse reservoirs. n aul an
    reported to have spread to shops : es : authorit rave th Ite lian | 7
    in. the international zone of |™union, The Coronation Commit- ay es gave Seahe’ Ei cae | rt x > ‘
    ; - cee a . \tee gave in on another yint ag to carry in a parade, But in- D l t 4S E t G ‘ | li , q “< |
    Tangier and Tetuan in Spanish "°C ave that ano a ee stead of giving the girls the new-| e ega es IT ic | as erman ane wasn
    Morocco, lthrough the streets of London will | Style Italian flag, they gave them | : ‘ oi
    In the first of to- fate I'he be extended so that more people a pg Siena arms of thé | oO Vestries Communists BERMUDA, Det —
    a wave of 600 people attacked the | can watch. The bulleting added 7 ‘ 2 ' Efforts to raise the wreckage
    | BaHRN® Se ae nag | ty TR a Peat uet nua inate, QE: Be help fe elle Launche Arrested |. 2 acini
    { besieged saat by ty crowd | flypast over Buc kingh am Palace eneidl - New Zealand women’s Ss osen | rres a qf C.F. 4 Star of the ah nt w —
    swelle 3, anc rench | 0 a _ . a. ore os a . i ‘ rashed two mile N.E. of Ber-
    Sumaeidis soci a detachment to pa tet nase on alt fficial tea to Britain in 1954, members | The 110-foot-span steel bridge which will carry the ud tk Satur ia norning will
    j restore order Senior Commonwealth officials fof the Wellington Women’s Cricket| Mr, G. S, Corbin, Parochial 20-inch arterial water main over the Belle Gully and con BERLIN, Dec. 8 at ‘
    Pe: the Gu SS ont a heise which} Association will go baby-sitting, . Treasurer of St: Peter amie I8g nect up th new Belle E lec ‘trie Pumping Station with Grand| ,,lnformed. Communist source Tats or in
    ' —_— - the Queen will be asked to con= Cc, A Thornton were appointed : e e ectric 8 ALLO ) ae Monday predicted an Bast German one at ee. Sees :
    ‘ \sider for her coronation. The to represent the St. Peter Vestry} View and Britton’s Reservoirs, was suce essfully launched | show trial of two former top rank / . ; ag ~~
    complete draft was passed on 10 B mb Fo on the General Committee of yesterday ing Communists in a move t a a rise =:
    Sudden Lift nine Prime Ministers or their oO r | Vestries. The appointments were Hia Excellency the Acting |scapegoats for the failure of + ie beaoy ey » far
    e e ae ee ae “- me T; , 9 | made = a ms eting Oe, ane Governor, Mr. R. N. Turner and|West German Communist 7 air ; : f + bar
    V ish’ Commonwe: en-day eco- he yesterday afternoon. The Genera M Mrs. Turner visited the work dur-[halt effectively West Gern {1 itor the Cuban
    In ietminh nomic conference. Complete se- - ueen 2 Committee is expected to held ore Czech | ing the ; ifternoon, and wate political inte on with the wa t eee : sin ist, “—
    ;crecy was maintaineq about the ts first meeting at the Parochial | present when the 18-ton bridgo| ; sgh ; ° eye tei g
    actual phrasing of the titles. EDINBURGH, Dec. 8. | Buildings, Cumberland Street, on C { lreached its final setting on the] . Sources said the key figures MK \ have hela @
    Assault —(C.P.) A home-made bomb the size of| December 10, to discuss amend- ommunis Ss north bank. of the sin ; the trial now being prepared by {Press conference but have been
    @n egg was planted last night nent to the : owe Act, " a \ the East German attorney generat, }\'" ible = determine the cause of
    HANOI, Indo China, Dec. 8. U. } in a Scottish mailbox marked; The appointments were mage A » t > 1 They both congratulated the} would be Kurt Mueller, former |"e crash ; gees
    A French Army spokesman said .S. Government with the royal cipher of the|on the motion of Mr. Ge G. %& rre SLEC officers of the Waterworks De-| deputy West German Communist Through the Bermuda Govern
    Monday that French authorities . Queen. Police said that the bomb] seconded by Mr. T. EB. Corbi |partment responsible for the} party chief and Paul Merkac | ent they have asked the: aid of
    feared the sudden drop in Viet- Will Not Pay For was set by a Scottish Nationalist hy ihe aicole tine tis ped Ves. LONDON, Dee. 8 Pereent ae E. C. omnes former member of the Bast G a, U.S \ ‘ id ‘vat
    ni osiege: = sti ocaUs . y sov- y a n anc € At 1 8 g Viechanica ungineer otf 1e@ De- ‘ * ‘ ar Kinve te uthoritie here it raising the
    minh activity around besieged i protesting because the new nav thai he would do everything in] cjec) a ast ix high ranking | i wtiment: wasin cherge-of the man Politbure Roth ' on
    Nasan indicates Reds have with- Seize Property ereign was described as Queen his power to satisfy members: He zechoslovak Communist Party qf ; 4 y arg : irrested SAY . , ¥
    drawn the bulk of their forces foi ; Elizabeth II of Scotland. Tne}ron that if taxpayers were quite |2"4 Government officials were ee ning, ; assi won by ai L. ., Prayers were offered for Vic=
    e strike elsewhere. He said the WASHINGTON, Dec. 8. Nationalist claim that Queen 1appy about the Vestries Act he reported to be arrested today in ee Ww ‘ Wirotas aes _ Along with Mueller and Merber jtims in Bermuda Cathedral yes~
    lifting of the assault on the fortress! ‘The Supreme Court ruled on Elizabeth I of the sixteenth cen-|4ig not see why other houla ra ee we arre a “i purr be por 8 | D etah tern bey Mt , G ‘\ Sob ieie ouret alc a cee of anider n reas an ihe Hees erie
    was “frankly puzzling” in view of ' | Monday that private property (tury did not rule Scotland. ‘ omplain oh y u rs 1: ah ot - superintende nt ind = Mr Rict . ' ra z or yeas a “omni es th Lic Chure :
    ae 7 ri goslav ne Ss agenc 1 ie Tcia vere a ster d “ oO 1UrC
    its importance in the French chai !owners do not have constitutional | CP. Acting Churchwarden nd monitored here jardson, Inspector, Mr. W. H.l¢ried for alleged links wit Cr.
    of defence. f right to payment for property Mr. G. G. Gill was appointed to Garrod Chief Engineer Was} perialistic F ates ‘ane j —
    He said however that the Com-|seized and destroyed by the + e act as Churehwarden in the ab- ch Vice-Premier Fielginer) present el aaah
    munist Commander Vonzulyen'Unitead States government to Bie cle VET | sence of Mr. A. A. Gill whom the iid to head the list. Other Phe bridge, the first of ite kind| -{t0lsm'’—U. | N L
    S “ : D states ve P sence Of Mr. # / X whom é to ac 1e list. VM ue ridg it st o ts 1 “~ er
    Giap may merely be awaiting|prevent. it falling into enemy y Vestry granted one month’s leave, | in¢ slude d Maching Construction|to be launched in Barbados, was " ovemoer
    reinforcements after suffering hands. The court held that the bd 7 Mr, A. A, Gill had requested Minister Augustin Kliment, form-|designed by the Grown Agents | ’ . Y
    heavy losses in two attacks ‘fifth amendments of “fair com- ine Ahree months’ leave but a mbers| er ii Welfare nd abour! after they had been given the de | Sessions End
    AL . , ation” for seized property decided that as the Parochial a ! Czen Berar I lav | tail f the gully It was con |
    Military observers said Giap®s pensa : eae c E ‘ t , weak ; Natinnal | at ‘ ag) a a J on 4 cae
    ; . [does not apply to oil facilities “Kee : hands ff k year was nearing its end they)Kopriva ex-Minister for Nationa ucte 1 Glasgow where it wag ‘ eal
    ammunition must be running low < eep your hands 0 other? «ile he a ‘ ree - Security, Genera idwik Swo-!| pre-erected before : . } * ate te
    i , a i ‘ere pounded all lasts cestroyed by the army in the} people’s property and consider)‘ ila not grant three fy Cl € Ys ener 1 L ie o-| pre-erected before shipping ome i Yo ; Re
    His forces were pounc é i Philippine Islands shortly after] y ‘self nies Shi = are not Mr. G. S. Corbin, Ve ry Clerk, | bod Defence Minister ink Work arten about 8 o'clock Sho in Da i V (
    week, French troops within the Pearl Harbour ; i yourse) lucky t ie Worship Mr then drew Paragrapt 7 of “ Minister for Physical Culture and yesterday morning in fine weath- Ppp Ss “ys est { A,
    fortress being fed by airlift The Cay facilities including going, NO told a-yeur old Vestries Act to the claien ooo ind Anton Gregor who!er, and during the three hours it ng Chief Ju ug B
    The spokesman said Giap ae ett SSE age aS So ; ae ee oa mermber The Chairman, Rev.) dismissed a Minister for|took to complete the prelimin- fe a he ther c the jur
    snail-like munitions supply system ee en, ae Bs labourer saihes a) te 5 Res A. J. Hatch, after reading ex-|Foreign Trade on December 4, | aries members of the public and be ore Xmas fter th them: { ‘
    consisting almost entirely of eee eer posed ay -}man's Tenantry, - George yeS-teracts from the Act, said; “We| ,. even the workmen waited anx- ce the ‘
    : a = «ihe jdacan district of Manila. The} terday when he fined him £10 for ; oa ates cand . The agency said that in addi , f ie : -
    Coolies—may have left him shorty es . " j-jmust grant the Churchwarden b Y susly for \ first move over the ee
    ¢ mortar and artillery shells with | properties were destroyed onfstealing a bicycle trém John Mil-}i.. 0" ‘The Vestry then agreed|tiou @ “number of high rankifig) rollers Gniwhich it rested since SS,
    ee ike heed a new odel Sere of General Douglas Mac] Jington of Belle Gully, St-Michael.}+ one month , state officials and many member: Geeta semen . at |
    oe: a es Arthur on December 28, 1941 as} The offence was committed on] wr. T. §, Chandler, on a motion|of the Czech Communist Party”) months ago : Pe Chan naanlaeeraNEiNe |
    slaught.— the Japanese entered the city. | August 3 this year. Sgt. E. W-lp. wr. G. G. Gill Senior Guard-|had been arrested in the latest | .
    The owners of the Standara] King attached to Central Station}iin, was appointed to the Board|Ppurge.—U.P | Precautions | R A L E | 6 H | Ni D U 5 T R } E 5
    New President ly Jacuum Oil Company Caltex —— for ae I weet of Guardians while Mr, T. E ie ade ele Every precaution, wa Latent
    (Philippines) Incorporated and UTIOWes wes Tt Tepe. Corbin was appointed to the by the engineer for it afe Aerial vie f the 40 :
    . ; ; The fine is to be paid bY] Road Board * ry) lashing fas tad teantnen Aerial view of the 40-acre
    Of Israel eta aan pe ag monthly instalments of £2 or The oo al granted Dr. F. G Air Attempt Lo fhe ae aiiine’ wide Vy sh anes lant di Noitinehari Bialand
    ag men - : or ; an alternz » of three > 1 des aatiien leave ' ee
    Ithe properties. Government paid there is an alternative 0 Reader P.M.O. two weeks leave vinche ind blocks to reduce |
    for MeOctRan stocks and ene months’ imprisonment with hard|p; Reader, in a letter to the Ves- Reéae h Sc acene Of he train of the bridge were
    JERUSALEM Dec. | portation equipment. only labour. Burrowes elected to b€liry said that he had secured the ‘ ed. Shortly before _ eleven}
    Russian born ‘Vietzhak Benzvi Companies demanded another ie anmmarty. : Bell services of Dr, Tony Gale to act Crash Abandoned o'clock, the first move across the}
    a Or ene ea he 7 A wah urrowes while passing Belle]; his place â„¢ #0-ft. deep ravine was made
    veteran Socialist Zionist Jeatles 166,000,080, for tie Test ot | je Gully, St. Michael saw Milling- Members present were; Rev “C)RI ‘ The tractor on the on if |
    resident lemolis facil T a I CALIFO! A. De 4 , ith bank
    has been elected President of|demolished facilities. he Court} ton’s ‘bic ycle outside of a house.J/a jy. Hatch, Mr. T. S. Chandler, Airt a "lw? Tray lheld — the train while a hand
    Israel. The 68-year old who came of Claims upheld their right to! te took it to his home and made} yr-'G. G. Gill, Mr, T. EB. Corbin, Airforce rescue officiai te te ah Sere aie en enna 1g aoa
    to Palestine at the turn of the ‘just compens ation.” The} several alterations. Mr. G. C. Parris and Mr, D. V. Sone attempts to Mach a crash inch by inch ,
    century succeeds Dr. Chaim Weiz-(Supreme Court reversed that After altering the bicycle and] Jenimott C 47 transport high on snow « } When the bridg waasha
    mann ‘who died last month.—€.P._ Tuling.—U.P hoping that it would not be 7 ped Mt. San Gorgonio b 4iT} certain point, it made “its “fir st
    Select letatecaes bees _ - | identified, he took it to the bicycle Christ Church Monday and launched a slow | ti pointing its nose down the
    shop of Donald Downes of Nel- The Christ Church Vestry at, #yea ly expedition toward the|20 per cent gradient, As it tilt
    U. N. VOTES FOR INDIA PLAN TALKS son Street and by chance Mil- | their meeting yesterday afternoon! wreckage which may have carric \¢ i wayed slightly in a fairly
    lington while walking in Nelson | appointed as delegates with pow-| 13 mer » death ng breeze hich was blow
    |Street saw the bicycle for sale.|ers to C« xt, Mr. H: St. G. Ward : ing acro t} ravine at about}
    He recognised it by the frame. and Mr. T. N. Peirce for the A i2Z-man party were to leavé er 12 miles an hour g
    Millington then called the Po-|purpose of attending a general! Lake Suome, four airmiles trom The bridge as quickly right-| wor §
    lice and Downes told the Police] meeting of representatives fromthe wreckage early Monday and}ed by block ind tackles on both
    that Burrowes had brought the}the various Vestries to consider, expected to reach the crash scen¢]} sides, and from there on, was
    | bicycle to his place and had askedjand make recommendations in) by Wednesday, Earlier efforts to| gradually towed across, it ; nose
    him to sell it for him, 2 connection with suggestions for|reach the wreckage both by air| pointing down into the gully. ar est
    Cpl. Byer of the Criminal In-]amendments to the Vestries Act./and on the ground were defeated After the lunchex recess
    | vestigation Department searched This was decided after the Ves- {by howling winds and deep snow]further preparations were mac¢
    ’ | prey ( ad
    |Burrowes’ home at tedman’sfiry had considered a letter from | drifts. and movement continued under
    | Tenantry, St. George and found/the St- John Vestry dealing with | close supervision by the engin- & most
    }some of the parts from Milling- me poe is iii | The wreckage is believed to be} cers, Mr. Parfitt and Mr. Carter
    |ton’s bicycle. s. 8, cKenzie WSlthat of the airforce sport}on the south bank, and Mr, Em-





    granted two months’ leave from 7 Fs r ; « 2,
    - 1 his duties as a Vestryman. Sey- “ane te aeons _ _ lay @ On Page 6 moder
    ! BRITAIN WILL | ‘ral acting appointments then had | fle 1k peo aloes rane A ey 1
    | u de the vari Boards | om. rizona, The la it- a °
    SUPPORT. GHTS ° which Mr. McKenzie is a mem-|tempt to reach the plane wa ailor Jailed
    | SUP OR’ -RI i | cycle lant Only Raleigh resources can give
    you the QUALITY— RELIABILITY



    | ber, | callec off Sunday when four

    |
    ‘ . Cc. | The Vestry appointed the fol- |; veteran army ski-trooper rm F | .
    OF A.1.O. | lowing: ned after reporting that they or 4ar ceny | — STRENGTH —and FINISH, which

    Mr. A. G. Gittens, member of! were stopped by “sheer cliffs” and
    LONDON, Dec. 8 | @ On Page 6 steep inclines’—U.P. esikéthn + ces oh makes distinguishes all Raleigh models,

    Britain will back the Anglo-| tecniviaiek..\4 ith eee i fakisees . The bicycle you are proud to own.
    Iranian Oil Company in maintain- | c. M A 9 ; esterday passed on 26-
    ing its. property rights over pro- e a t Pi; 1y-ol :
    jucts of the oil industry in South | nN. Cc r ur Ss ‘ an Paul of Schooner Laudalpl nc . .
    Persia, British Foreign Secretary | who pleaded guilty before. Mis
    Anthony Eden told Parliament to- By RALPH TEATHOR1 hower who is en route to Hawai'] Worship Mr. G. B. Griffith hes
    day. 4 NEW YORK, Dec. 8 n a navy ship after a_ battle g Police Magistrate of District} ’
    | Replying to questions, Eden sald There is considerable pecu-) front »k at the war A” of stealing a pair of gents’
    “The British Government com-|lation that President-elect Eiser MacArthur would not elabor-| bro hoes on De '

    enadian sailor Chive
    tinue to regard products of the oil|hower will oon ask Generai| ate on tne pian in answer to Paul had one previous convic- T ia E A L L- s - E & L B i Cc yc L E
    , . ; ‘ as ‘ “ ‘ ’

















    industry in South Persia as the} Dou MacArthur » explain news pure r Maior Gen-| tic The case for the prosecu-

    | property of the Anglo-Iranian Oil| his new plan to end the Koresn eral Courtne Wh itney ho waS|tion hat on December 5

    Company. He said that in a note| wa General MacArthu e ¢ MacArthur taff in Jaf vhile Pa aa at the hbiisd. of Bart A

    lto Persia on October 5, Britain|his five-montt lence ot e and now | usine sssoclate/| Rosanna St. Clair in Dukes Alley. arbados’ Leading Department

    re-emphasized that the acceptance] major public issues last wee o tole Unite Pre that Mac-|St 1, ; ' tinvte oair. of Store Sells Them

    of nationalisation ir art by Brit- 1t | nfident that Arthur does not intend tc n«| ‘ *4 . 71 ‘ .
    f natio a Y 5 pa gi - ee ; : m 7 = Ba. 7 j te od ‘ee oo v pe | we ho vhich re é CAVE, SHEPHERD & CO
    ey vern- t tale tec we i ¢ uld | j LTD.








    er » the ne » give deta ile ,
    ) in a note on] ect f 12—13, Broad Stree
    BRITISH DELEGATE Sir Gladwyn Jebb (rear, left) arid R, H. Coaton, of | oct, Sede? Gel cee tad oat:
    : : : z ‘ ) I i 1N a xiation of ) t
    South Africa (right) raise their hands in 1 approval as the United Nation Parliament on October 15, the} facturer Conventior the| vi di ; Thi
    Political Committee votes overwhelmingly = immediate Sinem sion of British Government had reserved | grounds that it was not 7 learly left it t er er | shoe
    idia’s nae peace plan. Russia's Foreign Mini r Andrei V ishinsky the rights of the Iran Oil Com-| matter for present put whether he ate f All
    ter) looks down at some papers as the Soviet bloc is defeated. He pany, pending agreement on com-| cussior But he implied | ne~-time P
    ‘wainly lads ed to stave off the Committee’s vote, (International) pensation,U.P, »| ready to disclose it to Mr. Ei - U.P e |
    oe a ww
    PAGE TWO



    irba t r t
    juillity here on sé









    Trivec Sunda
    by B.W.LA. from Trinidac
    short busines visit n

    ul the Cce \ H

    vi Not « ) te
    Messrs C ( Lt
    Port-of-Spair

    Inspection Visit
    I EAVING Sunday night
    BW.LA, for Tr r





    way to Briti Guik vas Myr
    ee Talbot of Kent, C!
    Church and a Director of the
    Den.erar Electric Company, He
    and expects to be back here for
    Christ

    Mi bot we wmerly Ge
    ral Manager of the Demet



    tr Company,

    Weather Man
    M* EDWARD STEEL, Meteor-
    ologist of Pan American
    Worla Airways stationed at San
    Juan, Puerto Rico, arrived or
    Sunday night by B.W-1.A. to sec
    the possibilities of extending the
    hours f the regular hour!
    weather observations provided fe
    International air transport
    He expects to be here unti
    Friday as a guest at the~QOcear
    View Hotel
    Enjoyable Holiday



    FTER an enjoy holiday

    in Jarbados, Anit

    Neumeyer, Passenger Agent o

    S.OAA New York, left or

    Sutiday night by B.W.LA for

    Trinidad and Jamaica on her wae
    back home. It was her



    first visit

    to the island and she \y quite
    delighted with it
    Miss Neumeyer was a guest at

    the Hotel Royal and Paradi
    Beach Club

    With Trinidad Guardian
    \ R. C. G- ALLEYNE of the

    Sar Fernando branch of

    the Trinidad Guardian, returned
    to Trinidad on Saturday evening
    by B.W.LA. after four week

    holiday, part of which he spent
    with his brother Mr F. G
    Alleyne, headmaster of St. Philip's
    Boys’ School and the remainder
    as a guest at Indramer Guest
    House, Worthing and at Atlantis,
    Bathsheba



    MR, CHRISTIE SMITH
    and his Christmas Hamper

    What a Hamper!

    R. CHRISTIE SMITH, Hon-
    M orary Secretary, Barbados
    Table Tennis Association, and As-
    sistant Secretary B.A.F.A. receiv-
    ed a handsomely decorated and
    well stocked hamper yesterday,
    but it was no honorarium for his
    services throughout the year, he
    held the lucky number in a raffle
    for the hamper at Woodside Fair
    on Saturday, in aid of local chari-
    ties,

    The hamper contained one 3-!b
    tin of Klim, one tin of coffee, one
    box of chocolates, one 2-lb tin of
    ham, | bottle of Whiskey, one bot-
    tle of sherry, one Gillette Razor,
    one bottle prepared mustard, one
    tin biscuits.

    BY THE



    HE othe: day ‘ letter |

    appeared in a morning paper
    asking what had become of
    muffins, and why they had dis-
    appeared,

    1 followed the correspondence
    on the subject, and very soon the
    letter I had been expecting was

    printed. It said that “the public

    are better educated today in
    the choice of what food is ood
    for them,” and that diet ex-

    perts” (sic) say that muffins are
    indigestible. Because people who

    cannot digest muffir cannot
    digest them there are to be no
    muffins by order of the diet
    experts,” for those who can

    digest them As to people being
    better educated about food, the



    ‘obert Matouk, Managing Direc- for the U.S.A. via Puerto Rico |
    tor of West Indian Enterprises. , w.1A.

    He was accompanied by his She
    brother-in-law Mr, Farid Men-
    ous who had been here for a

    the new Public Health Centre i:
    Speightstown, returned f r o n
    Trinidad on Sunday night by
    B.W.1.A, where she took a ce
    fresher course lasting for four
    inpiaieh three of whieh aha wa — the passengérs leaving
    attached to the Caribbean Medi-

    tal Centre and the other with on Thursday morning on theis way

    months and then again in July
    Since then she has been travel- : : = i
    ling through some of the islands “'’Tived on Thursday by B.W.LA

    Supervisor with the Creole
    Petroleum Company, B.W.IL.A

    WAY...



    T. R. EVANS (WHITFIELDS)

    YOUR SHOE STORE
    Phone:

    RECESSIONAL POW-WOW.~ British West Indian delegates to the
    Fifth Session of the West Indian Conference now meeting at Montego
    Bay, Jamaica, get together during a pause in the proceedings to dis-
    cuss points of the Conference agenda. Par left is Hon. V. GC. Bird of
    Antigua, while in the group consulting together are (1. to r.) Norman
    Manley of Jamaica, Mr. F. L. Walcott (Barbados) with back to
    camera; F. BE, Miller (Barbados), Hon. Victor Bryan (Trinidad) and
    Hon. D. P. Debidin (British Guiana)

    Returned To Trinidad U.S. Holiday

    ETURNING to Trinidad on ISS HULDAH GARNER Staff |
    Sunday night by B.W.LA Nurse of the General Hospi- |
    {ter a short holiday was Mr. tal left the island on Thursday |



    3)

    has gone to spend a six
    months’ holiday with her father in

    7 Brooklyn,
    onth They were both guests

    Accra Beach Club, Rockley. z .
    Mr Matouk's parent have A Son

    been in Barbados for several Wy erter at caldera to Mr
    weeks staying at Accra. They ex and Mrs. “Berry” Thorpe on
    pect to return to Trinidad shortly ! birth of a son on Saturday

    Refresher Course night at the General Hospitai

    ISS AURORA WALTERS, MTS. Thorpe is the former Doro-
    Se - Heaitd uve f t Blackman of St. Andrew.
    pattie bas eee °' Mr. Thorpe is Assistant Super-
    visor, Visual Aids, Education De
    partment

    To Brooklyn

    by B.W.LA. for Puerto Rico



    the B-C.G. Campaign. to the U.S.A. were Mis Norma |
    FE \. Smith of Prerogative, St.
    Regular Visitor George and a former pupil cf
    BR \CK.. in Barbados ig Miss Lynch's Secondary School and her
    Jessie Clark of Montreal, cousin. Mr. Lawrence O Byer t
    Canada who came in on Sund:z lormer Combermerian
    night by B.W-LA, from Trini They are both going to continue
    dad. She has com the winter their studies and will be residing
    and is a guest at Sam Lord’s in Brooklyn.
    Castic |
    Miss Clark was here earlier On Long Leave }

    the year during the winter

    R. and MRS, E. G. GIGLIOLI
    and infant daughter Yolando

    the Caribbean. She said that {rom British Guiana for a holiday

    she might probably remain in which they are spending as guest
    Barbados until August next year. of Hon'ble and Mrs. H. A. Cuke |
    = +

    of “Banavie"” 4th Ave, Belleville. |
    RRIVING by the same air- Mrs. Giglioli is the former Miss
    craft from Trinidad were Madge Cuke, daughter of Hon'ble

    Mr, and Mrs. R. G. Carman of and Mrs. H, A, Cuke, Her hus-
    Oklahoma, U.S-A. who had been band is Rice Inspector at the
    residing, in Venezuela for the Mahaicony Experimental Sta-
    bast three years, They expect'tion and is now on long leave,
    to be here for one week as guests
    at Paradise Beach Club,

    With Standard Oil

    My Carman is Mechanical I ETURNING to Caracas, Ven-
    ezuela, over the week-end

    was Mr. David Poter-

    7.C.A. Personnel fleld of the Standard Oil Com-

    ETURNING to Canada on! ins He was here for seventeen

    day is a guest at the Marine
    Thursday morning by T.C.A. Hotel.



    were Mr. and Mrs, Don Thomas
    of Toronto, They said they had

    Promoted To Major



    two enjoyablk veek holiday in YAPT. NOEL WEATHERHEAD
    Barbados as guests at the Hotel A a Barbadian who for the
    Royal and regretted leaving so Sti : : re J
    oon, The however are looking Fie va We Sick: Can nn
    forward to returning next year, Paes ie , ” Py

    Mi Thomas is a Passenger shire has just been promoted to the
    Agent with T.C.A stationed in '@% of Major. He is due for re-
    ‘Toronto, posting which may be overseas.

    Also returning to Canada by His wife and two sons are with

    T.C.A. on Thursday was Mr, ‘im in England.

    Vaughan MeCord of the Traffic When Maj. Weatherhead lived
    Department of T.C.A. in Montre- in Barbados he worked with
    al. He’ spent two weeks’ holiday Plantations Ltd’ ugar store ir

    a guest at Cacrabank Hotel, Bay Street,

    By Beachcomber

    ase is meaningle ineg that the future belongs to the
    every “expert” has his own pet chemist, and that far too many
    iet The only fun to be got out people © are ready to. sell the

    the whole dreary nonsense js birthright of a rational humar
    watching the diet magnates being for a mess (and what







    contradict themselves and each mess!) of tinned pottage

    other, °

    a ; Vot much use

    Vhe chemical age RECENT row in a billiard
    OT-FOOT upon this corre- saloon was apparently

    spondence came an an- ¢auséd by “a man who used ar

    nouncement that the production umbrella handle as a cue and hit
    synthetic foods by biochemists the ball sideways.” It sound:

    (notably from coal and oil) ay like a pleasing variation of the

    olve all our food problems. The interminable anchor - cannon

    Pr ‘ssor who ide this an- The most difficult way of playing

    houncement at a dinner warned billiards is to substitute cork-

    his audience not to be too screws for cues, and to cover the

    optimistic (my italics) about this cloth with marine glue. Hardly

    possibility. There is no doubt anything happens

    el
    JUST RECEIVED



    |

    RENOWN SHIRTS—
    Plain Cols. (Tan, Blue, White) $4.48
    RENOWN SHIRTS—Plain Cols.

    (Tan, Blue Grey) .......0.0.0.... $4.54
    RENOWN SHIRTS—Plain Cols.

    (Tan, Blue, Grey) .......... 0... $5.94
    RENOWN STRIPED SHIRTS ..... $3.12
    RENOWN PYJAMA SUITS
    inane .. $7.24, $8.74 & $8.91
    NEW YORKER SPORT SHIRTS

    (Tan, Blue, Grey) .............. ae $3.85
    ELITE SEA ISLAND COTTON SHIRTS

    (White Only) 20.00.0000... $8.39
    SKY-SCRAPER STRIPED SHIRTS
    tsecesseeees $3.07 & $3.18
    P.Y. SUITS

    Ss sagcteae Ns co $5.21 & $5.28
    WESOMET P.Y. SUITS ........ $10.63
    (Tan, Blye Grey) ....... .. ... $4.53











    2-3 4220



    BARBADOS ADVOCATE



    PENICILLID
    for the pigs

    6 OOM FOOD

    which is boosting
    the growth of pigs ¥J

    in America, should b¢

    Stepping up supplies Oly

    home-fed bacon in Britain
    by next spring.

    American “Boom Food
    which contains the golden
    drug aureomycin. nas an

    g effect on dwar
    that would normally
    never reach marketable size

    Now experiments carried out

    Alastair Worden
    have proved that a British fori
    penicillin instead
    ve

    Ten dwarf pigs on a Bucking
    namshire farm were given mea
    containing procaine-peniecillin. «
    form of “ wonder ~~
    which is not destroyed in the
    stomach. All reached bacon

    t—more than 200ib,—at »
    profitable price for che farmer

    It also speeded the growth
    rate of normal pigs, producing
    more bacon for iess food

    Two big Orms are ready u
    mass-produce “ Boom Food,’ ou!
    it canmot be sold to pig and
    poultry keepers unt! Parliamen
    in the New Year
    Penicillin 4 *



    alters 1
    md







    YOUR INDIVIDUAL HOROSCOPE
    FOR TUBSDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1952

    Look in the section mm which your
    birthday comes and find what your
    outlook is, according to the stars

    MARCH 21 to APRIL, 4 (Aries)—For.
    tunate day fo you ambitious onter-
    prising tividuals, especially in new
    and worth-while act.vities



    APRIL 21 to MAY 2% (Taare) —pPxcel-

    lent Venus (your planet) influences for
    personal gain, happiness in little things,
    the home, famtl

    MAY 21 té JUNE 4) (Gemini)— Ney
    advantages. fresh —_ opportunitie al
    about; generous day, but you ma ive
    to dig. Be € you don’t miss lead

    JUNE “ to JULY 28 (Caneer)
    Original and unique ideas boosted now
    Allocate activities that you may be able

    give each pour very best

    JULY M4 te AUGUST 2 (Lee)—H you
    follow the #ht road offered to-day you
    should be able to wrap things up suc-
    cessfully Give extra time to lovept
    one

    AUGUST %% to SEPTEMBER 2s (Virgo)

    Promising, with your ingenious help

    functioning at top speed, Make new

    t meet the present squarely, Have
    th ourself

    SEPTEMBER rs te OCTOBER 28



    (Ifbra)—Keep up with events, com
    petitors nd result h 1 be
    encouraging Added smart th.nking ir
    } a few details can make a lot of
    lifference

    OCTOBER at to NOVEMBER 22
    (Scorpio)--Your planet on inactive side
    but other planetary vibrations are of
    ! if you are heedful and in right



    mood

    NOVEMBER “ to DECEMBER

    (Sagittarius)—Fresh opportunity in most
    well planned and executed endeavours
    But don't have any chip on your

    6houlder or think your idea are the
    only ones

    bee

    DECEMBER &% to JANUARY ef ae ce ECE:
    (Capricorn)—Some excellent advantages,|'he Force is proving so successful
    but it is up to you to choose well your |} that
    course of actidn. Occasionally check | 4

    to avoid mistake nisjudgment

    |
    JANUARY ee to FEBRUARY 20;

    (Aquarius)——Interest diversified out
    avenues of activity highly favoured
    Unexpe benefit sid through new
    ources should ensue







    FEBRUARY 21 to MARCH 20 (Pisees)
    Continued unity with associates,
    employer, employees and family should
    round out the lasting kind of iceessful
    day you desire Strive after harmony

    you BORN TO-DAY are frank
    capabie of doing fine t anything
    you undertake. Somet
    rritation through a too outspoken, and



    critical attitude. This can disrupt good |
    plana, business ventures. You have |
    musical talents, business ability, should |
    be fond of outdoor activity. You can |

    do great things if you will. Birthdate
    of: John Milton, great poet; Douglas
    Fairbanks, Jr., actor

    In the cocktail bar

    [ F I were poor,’ said Vita
    Brevis, “you wouldn't per-

    ist 1

    money, would you?” “If you had

    © money, what else would there}

    » to pursue?” riposted our hero }
    Well, that’s honest enough,”
    id Vita “Honesty is second

    nature to me,’ said Foulenough,
    But I generally use my first
    nature. It gets better results.”
    And you have the effrontery to
    think that I would marry you,
    knowing at it is my money
    you want “T might grow to
    love you for myself,” said Foule-
    nough, you didn’t keep on





    bringing up this question of

    noney. How sordid it makes
    my wooing!” “Well, pay for the

    drinks. I must be going.” “You

    see What I mean?” said Foule-
    x0ugh, “You think of nothing
    but money.’

    Berceuse

    Blow softly, wind of the night,

    Moon, shed your tranquil light
    Upon his bed

    Here, lapped in sweet repose,

    And snorting through his nose.
    Lies Uncle Fred.



    FREE
    ENGRAVING

    All pens bought from us
    will be engraved with
    your name or initials free

    of charge.
    See Your Jewellers
    Y. De LIMA
    & CO., LTD.

    20 Broad St.

    Marine Gardens.
    $ and at Greystone Village

    F000o0 PPDPDDDDOPIPDOLOTHH"



    he-news notebook —



    LLI



    Lonk
    the drug except on @
    Drescription,

    SHAVE IN BED

    palented by
    no sOup no

    4 Londoner,

    against (he face an up-and-down
    spring-ioaded
    burrel rotates six
    Stanicy Elsky
    "soon in plasi«
    sal isfacvorily

    West India

    have further

    the 26,800 ton

    liner Empress
    of Scotland,

    Early in December the liner goes
    into dry dock for an overhaul.

    Social Survey

    in Bri-
    the
    social Congratulations to ex-mayor
    vey sok Cornelius John Townsend of Sal-
    Minister from British ford, Lancashire who
    The Rev. Bobb, who ar- celebrated his Golden
    rived last month is to study local Anniversary If
    idministration.

    Bobb

    addition,
    ar-
    ranged for him to visit a Y.M.C.A.
    London. pire
    spend Christmas with
    in London.

    M.P’s. Guest

    commandant
    Cadet Force



    e House of Commons. It will
    alled that the Cadet Force’s pote) jast
    blown down
    in
    New headquarters have
    established,

    headquarters

    and

    its personnel has now reached
    otal of 1,120—just 80 short of

    Birthday Greetings
    Douglas-Jones,



    PQCKET CARTOON
    LANCASTER



    s you provoke}

    |

    n pestering me like this. Be!
    onest now. You wouldn’t go}
    n pursuing me if I had no}



    those clever
    rate of progress
    experiment

    resule of !f





    CROSSWORD



    Dape -calis (anag.). (9
    Promptly fulfilling o
    Penny shor: of



    Space returns to
    Cans to overlook. (4)



    Broken tter.
    Harsh way to rid tents,
    Speed rate beyond hope? (9)

    A twist; 56 many take oll.
    Take a café bus to confuse
    You reel back at this look

    included, provides
    the olrcuit of a plane figure.
    it made trouble in March,
    Meastire with saving grace,
    Not taken on the arrival! plat

    10. Condescend.
    Deer, t'd make fun of, (6)





    Often assumed with graces

    -Seem

    She's In & pena) settlement
    terday Ss puezie







    ——



    DUL i fale the me wel ent
    I shaved in bed

    CAN IT HAPPEN?

    CAN a beailny person :cully
    ve trightened to deat:
    After studying the oaervous
    mecnanisms which Ould tt
    responsible tor such 4 Catas
    trophe, doctors think that the

    answer is Yes.

    The orain-centre velievea w
    be most concerned with emo.ion
    —called the hypothalamus—is
    linked directly with the heart by
    nerves

    So if it i6 violently stimulatea
    it can throw the heart into an
    abnorma! type of palpitation
    whieh might be fatal,

    Dr, W Proctor Harvey
    supports this theory with e@
    Case-record of an apparently

    aiuny 28-year-old womun whe

    velops a dangerous type o
    Palpitation when only sligntly
    scared

    But he admits that ois tneory
    @oes not explain Voodoo deatns

    Intense terror of the medicine
    man's “biack magic” power is
    almost certainly Cause of
    Voodoo death, out tt «ually
    Wears down its victim gradually
    imsteac of by sudden atiack,

    BANG, BANG!

    %e A MEETING of the Sritien
    Interplanetary Society~ mer
    and women WhO nope one 14

    to 'ruvel to the moon—is to
    heid in «a London public nouse
    he talk will ve mainiy >t
    rockets So the night chosen
    for the bar-pariour tryst 1s

    nmewturaily today ~November 5
    1 ¥ teas Service

    n Table Talk
    By LONDONER

    of the former Colonial Secretary
    Caribbean cruise to be undertaken British Guiana, has celebrated
    his 78th birthday. It will be re-
    She will leave the called that Sir Crawford
    New Year and will

    back and on foot to m:
    quiries, Since retiring,





    ourite recreation—croquét.

    Empire Builder

    gold mines two bridges

    Canada’s Red River and assisted
    in the building of the famous
    Cordova, Manhattan Bridge in New York.
    and
    in Jamaica, was
    Alan

    Gift

    £3,000 it raised last year.



    Listening Hours

    TUESDAY, DECEMBER 6

    |
    |
    | 1.00—6.00 p.m
    |

    Composer of the Week

    these things
    6.00—7.15 pom.

    Sports Round-up, 7 p.m. The
    7.10 p.m. Home News from
    7.15 p.m. Rendezvous
    7.45—10.80 p.m,

    | Keeper





    By M. Harrison-Gray
    Dealer, South
    East-West game

    N.
    wos
    973
    10.5

    esa $4
    6 8
    9

    AR?

    ©
    -

    ed OE EN ERE EERO RR ETRY

    6

    ; 5 x
    °
    5

    >>RS
    eabieag

    fo) tener ye. 0) OdNE AED EE eEROREOONEREEESEEEs &._.
    5 POGOD
    O-D>
    "S7RKe

    Post

    Qu
    4

    ~

    North - South scored a
    game in Room 1, but their
    team lest 700 points on 3
    At
    both tables South bid One
    Spade, West doubled, North
    redoubled and East bid Two
    Clu

    The first South player

    deal from match play.

    error



    a later round.

    OR ORE Re eee sc EEE ER EL BE IEST sEEREE! rene.





    the vilege of doublin:

    Two Gabe and West di

    not ii matters by

    resei with Two Hearts.

    North for a

    | TALKING POINT
    The question is this: Is man
    1

    an ape or an angel? My lord,
    i am on the side of the angels.

    —Disraeli.
    | Refuse to be ill! Never tell
    } people you are ill, Never own

    1 it to yourself,—Lytton

    was
    member of the Commission
    and to British Guiana in 1939
    Trinidad, This cruise will be fol- vestigate the possibilities
    lowed by three others to the West refugee settlement in the colony.
    New York. He travelled more than
    miles by rail, sea, air, on horse-
    ke his in-
    ir Craw-
    ford has found time for his fay-

    has
    Wedding
    . my Jamaican
    make his sur- readers are thinking that

    ; Lands name sounds familiar they
    ind to John O’ Groats—attending ight, Mr.

    major parish conferences in Corn- years of age
    conference

    Townsend now
    f helped to rebuild
    social Jamaica after the 1947
    quake, The steel constructional
    firm which he heads have worked
    in many other parts of the Em-
    too. They have put steel-
    werks into the Johannesburg

    The West Indies’ contribution
    East Belfast, to the 1952 Y.W.C.A. Christmas
    Fair, held at London's Hyde Park
    month, was a pair of
    wooden book-ends made in Trini-
    dad, They were simple, elegant—
    and beautiful. The International
    Stall was piled high with locally-
    made gifts from Africa, Asi
    the America’s. Overseas visitors
    to London are flocking to
    Fair which hopes to surpass

    —L.E.S.





    4 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m. Th
    Service, 4.15 p.m, New Records

    5.15
    Listeners’ Choice, 5.45 pm Think on

    S122M, 49.71M
    6 p.m. Ulster Magazine, 6 15 “pan
    Meet the Commonwealth, 6.45

    S1.32M, 49.71M

    |
    { 745 p.m. Personal Portrait, 8 p.m
    | Piano Time, 8.15 p.m. Radio Newsreel,
    Ja 30 p.m. Composer of the Week, 8.45
    |} ®.m. Report from Britain, 9 p.m. From
    the Third Programme, 10 p.m
    | News, 10.10 p.m. From the Editoriais,
    | 10.16 pom. Wynford Vaughan Thomas
    Talking. 10.30 p.m His Brother's

    —_-_

    ADVOCATE: BRIDGE



    ao eteenwes sa ceereserccnnenceserereconensensacesesescessess

    44 ftgt tyt et tt tt ttt tt

    common
    rebidding his suit and East-
    West were reprieved. On a
    iand that is likely to be
    useful in defence, the first
    rule is to give the redoubler
    the option of a penalty
    double. North has promised
    to speak again, and Spades
    can be rebid if necessary on

    North just made a final
    contract of Three _ No-
    Trumps for a score of 400.
    In Room 2 he was fa



    CURSDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1952
















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    UNHEALTHY KIDNEYS can rob you of all your
    pep! That's why SMART PEOPLE help keep
    their kidneys healthy — with SWAMP-ROOT!
    Yes, miraculous SWAMP-ROOT will stimulate
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    ROOT TODAY, AND TAKE IT RIGHT AWAY!



    <_<

    SWAMP-ROOT

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    16 OSSEGOES



    GLOBE >

    TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 Last Showing 3

    Pane DEVER SCAKES THREE >

    PIER ANGELI

    BEAVE HER

    GENE TIERNEY —

    and
    BORDER INCIDENT
    RICARDO MONTABLAN
    Ss csidpsiilinleticchuabibaeekaubnedanmanicins aca





    FRID



    2 Shows Today Last

    Special j

    TOMORROW & THURSDAY 4.45 & 8.30 P.M.

    Thrilling Color Musical

    Last :
    445 & 8.30 p.m. | 445 & 8.30 p.m, 420 &
    Warner Color Universal's Thriller

    GENE KELLY

    @ HEAVEN

    CORNEL WILDE

    AA SOG POETS

    *



    “ABOUT FA
    2 Shows Today — f,



    ordon MaeRAF

    lay & Tomorrow
    €.30 p.m

    ON THE LOOSE

    FRENCHIE Joan EVANS &












    (Technicolor)

    THE LION AND |
    i THE HORSE t adel Shelley

    TARZAN'S PERIL













    McCREA WINTERS | Lex BARKER
    Steve COCHRAN | eee ——- eonenenys won -
    = = = | Thurs. Special 1.30 Suse. (anle)
    bh 0. 1.30 | | :
    smu LERS COVE | “ON THE Loose” | 445 & 8.20 "p.m
    Les io a he Joan EVANS | “SMUGGLERS
    Bowery Bays and | COVE”
    aunvite @ | TARZAN’S PERIL Leo GORCEY
    ree o Lex BARKER Bowery Boys
    . er on g —_— an
    WAKELY WILSON Wed. & Thurs SILVER TRAILS” {
    ] Wed. & Thurs 4.30 & 8.30 WAKELY
    1.90 & 8.30 | “BLUE LAMP < peer
    LILLI MARLENE’ Jack WARNER & | Coming
    Lisa DANIELY & MEXICAN Rod* CAMBRON in
    TOKYO FILE 212 HAYRIDE
    Florence MARLY & Bud Lou | FORT OSAGE
    Robert PEYTON | Abbott Costetle | (Cinecolor)
    | BR YN | BARBAREES | OISTIN
    r (Dial 5170) (Dial 8404)



    ROOBDAL





    EMPIRE OLYMPIC
    To-Day 4.45 & 8.30 To-Day & Tomorrow
    & continuing daily 4.30 & 8.15

    1B DeMill Double

    ci eMille’s ,, sereney
    Masterpiece THE SECRET FURY
    Starring

    SAMSON Claudette Colbert

    Robert Ryan
    and

    AND RIDERS OF THE
    RANGE
    DELILAH With

    Tim HOLT
    (Technicolor)

    Thursday (onky)
    Starring: 4.30 & 8.15
    Hedy Lamarr HUNT THE

    Vietor Mature wien
    Gig Young
    Lynn Roberts
    Watch For and

    e DANGEROUS



    PROFESSION

    HIGH With
    George Raft
    NOON Starting Saturday
    WHIPHAND" &

    Garry Cooper “LOST PATROL





    WHEN

    Richard MARTIN |

    MAN. DOWN

    THEATRES






    ROXY ROYAL
    Last two Shows (Last 2 Shows Today
    Today 4.30 & 8.16! 4.90 & 8.90
    Solumbia Double Double
    Mickey Rooney Bing CROSBY
    Anne James | Glor.a JEAN
    in | in
    SOUND OFF Ir 1 HAD MY WAY
    (Cinecolor) | and
    and PRIVATE AFFAIRS
    SNAKE RIVER With
    DESPERADOES| thigh Herbert
    Starring i Nancy Kelly
    Charles Starrett | Wed. & Thurs.
    Smiley Burnett 4.20 & 8.30
    \8O GOES MY LOVE
    Wed. Thurs. & Fri. With
    1 4.30 a 8.80 Don Ameche
    By Speotal Request! Myrna Loy
    Cecil B. DeMille’s | and
    Masterpiece RIDE ‘EM
    SAMSON AND lo WBOY
    DELILAH! With

    Bud Abbott &

    ‘Techn-color) Lou Costello



    Starring oti neat
    Hedy Lamarr Friday (only)
    Victor Mature 4.30 & 8.30

    —_—_——— TRAIN TO

    Starting Saturday — ALCATRAZ
    THE IVORY and
    HUNTER'THE DAKOTA KID





    “COGNAC” 1s

    MENTIONED



    THE NAME HENNESSYS' LEAPS
    TO THE MIND—BECAUSE HEN.
    NESSYS IS
    MADE COGNAC FAMOUS,

    THE BRANDY THAT

    * V.S.O.P. (over 20 years)
    * X. O. LIQUEUR
    (over 40 years) °

    STOKES & BYNOE LTD.—AGENTS.

    SELECT THESE
    EARLY

    Varnishes, Enamels, Paints,

    i Sandpaper, Steel Wool.

    a“

    1% Also

    4 Plates, Platters, Cups,
    $ Pans

    |

    1% Saucers, Saucepans, Pots,
    X and

    >

    y Champagne, Port, Sherry
    \ Cocktail, Pony Whisky,

    x Liqueur, Half Pint Glasses.



    “
    3
    % Do your shopping for
    »,
    % Household Items early at
    y
    +
    x
    *
    SJ
    >
    s
    S LIMITED
    ,
    X
    ‘
    POSSOOS SESS SSS FOSS 89099

    FOSS SOOSPSOO FSS FOSS



    UP THE HOME !!



    SRO

    %
    5

    9

    >


    a ll



    TUESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATI ‘
    FB a Rs lr f











    FREE HOOK , ‘i
    We ey B.W ae Resources Ik OF ASSASSIN OF! EAAIER FREED
    “GOD’S WAY OF ‘ .
    SALVATION paw’ ?) COMMOonwealith Pool

    . qt eee LONDON
    Central Ave., ian oe A ‘new deal” for the Colonial Empire is likely to be
    one of the results of the Conference of Commonwealth

    one ee Age | Prime Ministers now going on in London. It is the most

    4 | vital conference affecting the economy of the entire Em-
    ums ‘ pire since the Ottawa Conference, 20 years ago, at which

    ms, Sore Mouth and | ° the Imperial Preference system was worked out
    Tee! ‘ou may |
    haves Pvorrhen. Tench. jouth or | Although the We@ Indies are balance ot payments for 1946-51

    t will :
    sooner or later cause your teeth to = 20t directly represented at the would have been much larger
    fall out and may also cause Rheu- | Conference, a strong team of West As it is, the sterling area spent






















    og to deotet creas, Amosan Indian leaders is on hand in Lon- during those six years some 2
    side ery mouth asd aulckiy tight- | don to advise Mr. Oliver Lyttel- £2,381,000,000 more tham it -
    i Seer arate ant Secretary of State for the earned
    ig genie 8 or money back | Colonies, w ho will look after the 4 '
    ea return of empty package. Get | interests of the Colonial Empire ,. What has been happening since
    mosan from your chemist today. in the talks. the war is that the treat Do-
    le sarantee protects you minions, _ particula Austt RELEASED FROM PRISON with full pard halil Tahr :
    Among the West Indian ad- and South Africz have patted on the head in Tehr t ‘ ah t:vak Meochont an tee
    eres as }Visers are Mr. Albert Gomes, building up big secondary ian Fadian Islami } 7 ’ ut Tran-
    Trinidad’s Minister of Commerce, tries. This has been done at great Deputies) ’ : 5 2 ; of
    Sor COLDS Labour and Industry, and Mr. capital expense the ex- Razmara & 19 i ' ” r Gen. All
    — eat) | Grantley Adams, of the Barba- pense of their fe ra ma- pana ie rin i. — (laternational)
    ba dos Executive Committee terial produ They have b ptiaccntataplpriessin ia tgeenemcanennn gntanarianriceerinntinmemtinngee. a
    hi Mr. Gomes has stressed the taking out re than they have
    [tai in the West Indies for capi- been able t it in to the com- . G 9
    tal goods, but he pointed out mon dollar 0 k : ye
    KIPA that all members of the Common- Mg wz Col ge S
    INHALANT RUS wealth must put their resources In effect, the richer Dominic ‘
    ST into a common pool; in this con- have been living off the dolla:
    nection, he mentioned Trinidad’s earnings of the poorer Colonie F e
    COLDS oil. He added that a_ realistic 7 . > IP e
    view must be taken of the various ,,, he City Editor of the Londor ul q CE / “us
    The dual purpose Inhalant plans for industrial development, 7#mes put it this way: “During
    Rub. Applied to nostrils itre- the past few years, this country ; 4 ‘ ae
    lieves catarrh, Rubbed into Mr. Adams said that the prob- has, in_ effect, borrowed some King George’s Jubilee Trust was inaugurated as a
    chest, neck and back it eases lems of the West Indiés were £500,000,000 from the C National Thankoffering on the occasion of the Silver Jubilee



    congestive conditions. those of all Colonies. They were, 4nd used it to finance capit: of His late Majesty King George V. its work continues as a

    chiefly, getting a decent price velopment in the Dominion
    for primary products and obtain- though the state of development rmanent memorial to a greatly-loved Monarch and a great
    ing a share of whatever dollars in the Colonies is far more ele- reign

    are available. mentary and their need far more The objce of King George's

    brings QUICK relief urgent.



    jilee Trust are to promote the

    spect and we are not asking that Dominions. The fact t

    our claims should t t front minions } t of thet R é | y I ee pee ee. en oe
    ) tle ss c ye put in fron ons have spent most of 1€11 7 ¢ . i thr it f
    4 ag h OY a acn he birthright of all



    2 any part the Common- surplu sterling balances, while
    AR —E wealth.” the Colonies have doubled theirs To the wor of the Trust,
    : will of course work automatical- Queen Elizabeth h ex id Youth will owe new ‘happiness
    ee ” Main Task ly towards this end approved a model f the smatl and new opportunities during

    The main task of the confer- One Of The Big Tasks will be used as a Royal Yach live from the time when they

    YOU'RE GROWING ence, economic experts through- r The ship will launche le 10 to the » of eigt
    out the world agree, is to discuss _ One of the big tasks of the we. \ajecty AD ' i di Mie bt Says 1gn=
    Maj April,

    the convertibility of sterling. If Prime Ministers’ Conference will onnte ro oe ro P, OUIg tee: pe
    D 9 it were found practicable to make therefore be to persuade the Th coat ; oe eee rhe mete is helping to provide
    s sterling freely convertible into Dominions to pause in their own e keel was laid at the Clyde- playing fields, camp sites, youth

    dollars, without any- restrictions industrial development schemes 3'°° Yard of Mes John Brown hostels any other opportunities





















    ' : } ‘ » genes
    Often as a woman anpevaches |imposed by the U.K: Government, @md to look outside the narrow \) - s a of built the “Que for healthy outdoor activity,
    middle life, her nerves get ,and this would overcome one of the confines of their own lands to the ar panes 4 gees tana a
    i ono PEA): ae oe : needs of the sterling : : The Royal and State Apartment é I ‘ }
    she accepts this as a sign of age. most serious economic problems ; le sterling area as a ; : ramme, the Trust is assisting in
    But why let yourself become edgy, facing the West Indies to-day— whole. It is not reasonable to ex- “ . m e after part of e ship, th, t nd equi yment of
    run-down—or so nervous yon SY \that their trade with Canada 4s pect them to scrap the industries W'™ ccommo: ( for off elub i ae ee ehovs nd
    without cause—at any time in life | being ruined by their inability to they have built up at such capi- 4nd crey forv Phe 5S Bias te entre: "f elt ree
    For nearly fifty years wise, |spend for themselves more of the tal cost over the last seven years, Apar ents al hn the upper deck h a ial ' it 1 fon _ er ae
    women have been meeting this | dollars they earn with their sugar, but it is hoped that they will the R | Apartmer m the shel- * he ; ee staal ea tates
    — = = oe oil, bauxite, timber and other realise that the dollar-earning ter dec} a tie . ; ‘ need for the “a
    bree _ Te ee oe ances ‘ : exi And i i bringing oO
    rest, t | primary produce. potential of the Commonwealth Art ti are su hat th :
    ood sad by kos Dr. ans | as a whole lies in the develop- ship can be ‘ir ‘ rural nd industrial areas at
    lerve to up. For | But before this can be achieved ment of the rich natural re- } ¢ ; present neglected through lack of
    ‘ood I them ; i i i e- pital hip 4 minimu: 7
    Vitamin Bs, iron and other {with any degree of security, a sources which the Colonial Em- structural aki rhe R ‘ pportunities for the
    minerals in this time-tested long-term plan must be worked . s suc y : : encouragement of ability and the
    < g I pire has in such abundance ind State Apartments coulk |
    help build up your vitality | out for the development of the Hine ann : n of craftsmanship
    and aid in toning up the ente =| Commonwealth as a whole, to co- If sterling area trade with the j/10™ onto. Waras, » operat
    system—so you can face the future ordinate dollar spending in each dollar area is to be balanced, the heatres, and the like. The aft Phere no cause more noble,
    with confidence. ' member of the Commonwealth. Commonwealth must produce ©d of the shelter deck is strong no duty more personal or urgent
    Give Dr. Chase's Nerve Food a ; : more of the commodities which ‘ nough to allow a helicopter t than that of helping the younger
    chance to help banish nervous It is in this respect that the ¢an be sold for dollars—food- !4nd on it with patients eneration for a more healthy
    jearsand doubts. It helpsyourest | needs and welfare of the Colo- stuffs, mineral ores, timber and The new Royal Yacht will by ayd vigorous youth to-day mean:
    ter, and feel better. name nial Empire have been largely ae ad . is ee 413 feet long over with a di fine d fitte » y 2
    Ct is red pi A ¥Y rubber. A strong dollar demand long overall, ith a ¢ er ar tter men and women
    2 your easusance, ve os gy Cr oetre exists for these things; it does Placement of about 4,000 tons citizens of the Empire to-
    as a whole have made a greater jot exis for the ‘ London Press Service orro
    T contribution to the financial of the gos nat on ; —$—$_$_______ *



    BRING NEW BEAUTY stability of the Commonwealth pominions.

    TO YOUR HAIR than gny other member of the DELA Y IN MID-EAST DEFENCE

    sterling area. That is






























    why more ot the ter-
    Raw materials produced in the jjp, a rede .
    . a g area investment must be from page 1 ‘ ‘
    . : . as Colonial Empire have been im=- concentrated on the development ‘ ee pag be use it is contended
    At this Holiday Season sentant earners of dollars, which concentrated on the development ‘Recent “Turkish approach ‘ reflect thelr growing in
    When you want your }}); have gone into the sterling area’s the puilding up of secondary in ett ia ; ountries have be e- int n Western designed de
    i Ste . |!common dollar pool. Between abrkies ee ate ee, Te ed here tentative fe {
    Hair to look its best, i848 ond 1981, the Colonial Em- Guthrie. toms meeatce: of formal and it was stated tl It reported that Egyptian
    Sale ; — lus of £225,- - ‘ pe Sh : a nothir definite 1a f rr © Jordan and Lebanor
    try pire built up a surplu reached at the London talks, it emerged from’ them ‘er : fy SO eee
    00,080 o this dollar ten. p yond will truly be the beginning of a Fy of Sotipiee Rohe " Bs
    rr ce ea ehaden hk Saline “gute (cae deal” for the Colonial Em- Meanwhile, consultative m Colonel Adeeb Shishekli arc : in-
    e ° | is during this period and the | P7e- -B.U.P. me ff mid-Eastern leader d di terpreted here to be linked with!
    largest of those was New Zea-| _ —B.U.P. mats are being studied here th the onsiderations.—U.P.
    POMADE land’s £49,000,000. : vamegeting
    é Spending Denied
    it will enable you to {| Without the Colonies’ contribu-|
    ; your ai nasiiw | tion—by earning valuable dollars
    dress your hair easily and being denied the right to|
    in all the latest styles spend them—the total accumu-|
    lated deficit in the sterling area
    SDSS POSE PLP PSP SFOS PLLLPPPCCE SOTO,
    5
    * , , oe
    i. * |
    * Barbados Co-Op }
    . % |
    S|
    Cotton Factory }
    otion facto %
    % |
    %
    - = ¢ |
    . Showroond &
    x
    %
    %.
    %
    x |
    % |
    »
    .
    % |
    It’s cooking and % |
    : : .
    baking time... we x |
    - . 1
    have new 2 & 3 $ |
    8
    burners ,... + ¥
    >

    KEROSENE

    SESS O SSPE ELSES



    | COOKERS
    ,
    ,
    ;
    ' }
    : a single burner at $7.36 and ss |
    : ovens from $10.31. 8
    }
    .
    i/ %
    ee
    a
    x
    x
    : Baking Pans %&
    g
    Mixing Bowls 3
    s
    e
    Icing Sets §
    2
    and everything $ |
    to make Xmas- %
    time in the % |
    i , 4s
    en lyf | “THAT DREADFUL MAN IS STILL) WAITING
    worthwhile ! % etteinne ee ’ : ee
    % | IDE OR AN ANSWER!
    CCE RRA LEAR AA» '\ a ees a



    sama) “NEW DEAL” FOR COLONIES

    <
    Fusham. Gonsigned to Robert Thom

    Seal. Consigned to the Schooner Own-

    PAGE THREI

    BLOOD IMPURITIES (48
    Many ailments are caused by poor iw PIMPLES

    may affect the whole system. Skin erup

    and irritation, simple rheumatism and ; BOUS
    joints are nature’s signal that you need Clarke’s 440 O7TwER
    Blood Mixture. This famous medicine helps QY/A/
    to cleanse the blood stream of impurities and COMPLARHTS
    keep fit and free from these and similar
    troublesome complaints. Be sure to ask for RHEUMATIC

    CLARKE’S.»:.. “5
    1 Blood Mixture



















    SEA AND AIR
    TRAFFIC |,

    In Carlisle Bay ]

    ee Philip H. Davidso wit
    nea Henrietta, Cyr.l E. Smith
    Tl, Ma a | ine

    Mote Vessels f RB Rada Lady



    NEURITIS.
    LUMBAGE












    ARRIVALS
    SATURDAY DECEMBER é6TH
    Yacht Ling, 10 tons, from Las Palmas
    der C. Sullivan
    SUNDAY, DECEMBER 7TH
    S.S. Alcoa Planter, 3,931 ns, from
    iadeloupé Under Captain H E



    id

    §.s Alstertal, 1252 tons from
    enada under Captain Ww Bahr
    gents:—S. F. Musson, Son & Co. Ltd
    Sch PZilip Hu Davidson 87 tons,
    om British Guiana under Captain C

    POINT BRAND

    s’ Association
    S.S. Mutlah, 4557 ton from Trini
    d under Captain J T Viviar

    \gents:—Da Costa & Co. Lid |

    DEPARTURES |

    Sch. Belqueeh fur St. Vincent, MV |
    aribbee for Dominica, Lady Noeleen
    Dom.nica, Laudaipha for St Lucia
    V. Athelbrook for Trinidad, Sch
    orence Emmanuel for Martinique

    Marion Belle Wolfe for BG
    b Lucile M Smith for Britith
    Hiane Sch Emeline = for British
    viana, S.S. Crispin for Boston, $.8
    tertal for Trinidad

    Seawell

    DEPARTURES BY BW.LA
    For Venerucla—Dec. 6

    and Value

    BUY A BOTTLE TODAY!





    e love, M. Foladore, B. HMuizi, L

    I ©, C. Puigbo, C, Puigbo, C. Perez,
    I t lL. Pedrotti, R, Maso, D
    M, Zubr, F. Jones, G. Jones, P

    t D, Porterfield M. Sandrin, O,

    W M. Apat, M. Apat, N. Erikson,



    For Jamaiba via Venesucla Dec. 6
    Mr Edna Eskstein, Mrs. Dorothy da

    Simmons, C. Walcott, J, Me Alister, W

    Hest, E. Burke, L. Maingot, H. Maingot

    ( Herbert, H Talbot, S. Debysingh
    Matouk, Nansour, A. Neumayer

    “Our trade is chiefly with the uee Will welfare of Youth to assist the silva & son
    U.K. and Canada,” he added, “and “Phe pressure must be for € hi i mar oluntary organisations in DEPARTURES BY BW.LA.
    we are anxious to combine our More primary and less industrial the mother country which exist far Grenada—Deo. 7
    loyalties with our trade. We are development, more development I ‘ | N I tr * F. Branch, C. Davis, J. Wick, A. Wick.
    . é é ’ opr j with that aim and to provide the ° —Dec, 7 .
    not going to be selfish in any re- in the Colonies and less in the Aue i ew means for healthy recreation R Babb. it TGhsene a Cc

    fo. frinidad—Dec, 6
    J. Ward, R. Ward, L. Mareano, C
    Alleyne, J Archer, G. Bearden, R. |
    rasewReekie, C. Knight, F. Knight
    J. Sealy, M. Cave, FE. Ede, D) Bae
    M. Ede, Ro Biets











    For St. LuctaeDee, 6 |
    J Mitchell, D. Barnes, R. Barnet. |
    Bayley }
    For Antigua—Dee, 6
    M. Hensley, P. Hensley, FR. Bo a, |}
    For Martinique—Dec. 6 |
    G. Mottard, J, Ravinet, L. Ravinet, |
    M. Moulin, A. Moulin |
    ARRIVALS BY LAY |
    F. Este, T. Lueccioni, P. Luccioni, M
    be A. Este, A. Este, J. Sanjuan, C
    ‘ » G Frone G Blanco, A
    Solorzano R Roja 1 Roja R
    Portillo, A Aagard, 1 Aagard, M. |
    Angard, E. Perez, RK. Perez, E. Shanis, |
    J. Shamis, B. Shamis, BR. Shamis, N
    Shamis, R. Stolear, B. Stolear, 1 “1
    G Coll, R. Vegas, M. Mosquera, C
    Cabrera ( Cabrera
    DEPARTURES — BY LAV
    For Veneauela Dee, Tth

    BY BW.LA
    ua Dee. 7
    ‘ sar, G. Kawaja

    From Trinidad — Dee, 7

    H. Nothnagel, H. Chester, A. Walters
    Cc. dack, R. Rait, Lb, Carman, R, Car
    man, B. Gill, T. Kerr, D, Allphin, R
    Whittington, E. Steel, G Clarke, 'E
    Garson, J. Clark, R. Ward



    From Venesuela Dee. 6
    F. Van Dijk M. Van Dijk, J Van
    Dik, | Y Van Dijk, BE. Blat, HW. Blat, |
    C. Breuille, G. MeKenzie, M. Kure, T
    Friend, 8, Friend, C. Baglesham

    BROWN LEATHES
    BLACK PATENT
    WHITE SUEBDE
























    From Trinidad — Dee. 6
    q dhe Hinkson D. H.nkson, €
    sittisor i Gr ant rE Barrow, G. Bar $3.40
    row, J. Barrow, D. Barrow, C. Barrow
    Me Kenzie, R. Flen
    ing “J, Jones, 0. Niemtschik $3.95
    rey s
    Today’s Gem
    A happy disposition is bet-

    ter than an estate of £10,000
    a year.—Lord Avebury
    The true pleasure of life is
    to live with your inferiors
    Thackeray

    Rest is the sweet sauce of
    labour.—Plutarch.

    Speak softly, and carry a ——$————
    a
    big stick

    Theodore Roosevelt

    REAL CHRISTMAS GIFTS !!
    DRESS SHIRTS

    including ARROW, B.Y.D., ELITE, RENOWN,
    NEW YORKER etc., ete.
    in Plain Colours and Striped Designs
    Prices from $3.94 to $5.60

    SPORT SHIRTS

    including ELITE, PREMIER, RENOWN, etc., etc.
    in Plain Colours and Fancy Designs
    Prices from $2.50 to $6.72

    BOYS’ SHIRTS

    in Plain Colours and Fancy Designs
    From $1.90 to $3.07

    SEA ISLAND SHIRTS

    For Sport and Dress Wear
    From $6.75 to $8.44



    EVERY PURCHASER OF A PAIR OF ..

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    PAGE FOUR

    BARBADOS eal ADVOCATE

    et EE es
    Tinted Oy the Advocate Co., L4é., Broad -.., Sridgetowa



    facaw wef Jr

    Tuesday, December 9, "1952

    CAPITAL |

    CONTINUED material progress in Bar-‘
    bados depends on the development of the
    natural and. human resources of the island.
    The widespread idea that living standards
    can be improved‘by actions of government
    alone or that full employment and a decent
    living wage could be obtained if everyone
    possessed social conscience is due to
    Nothing has contributed more

    an

    a
    ignorance,

    to the entrenchment of such ignorance
    than the contention of Karl Marx and
    others that capital is radically opposed to

    labour,

    Orthodox economists define capital as
    “that part of wealth which is accumulated
    in order to assist future production.” Today
    when the governments of the West Indies
    are anxious to attract capital investment
    in order to create greater employment
    opportunities the sooner that the miscon-
    ceptions spread by Marxist propagandists
    are given the lie the greater will be the
    opportunities for economic development.
    The idea that capital is inimical to labour
    is so easily proved false that it could only
    be accepted by persons with no under-
    standing of political economy.

    Capital can of course be used selfishly
    and can lead to great social evils such as
    that created during the industrial revolu-
    tion when the gulf between wealthy em-
    ployer and poorly paid employee became
    so wide and led to the emergence of a class
    system so distinct that Disraeli was right
    when he spoke of the “two nations” of
    England. Class distinctions of that kind
    have never existed in Barbados and could
    not have existed because of the predomin-
    antly agricultural economy of the island.
    It is only in recent years that the growth
    of an intelligentsia united in its contempt
    for those engaged in trade has created a
    new class which is very conscious of their
    difference from the ordinary man-in-the-
    street.

    The truth about capital is that without
    it, there can be no increased production.
    The same may be said with justice about
    labour. But whereas labour can be self-
    sufficient in a primitive society in which
    barter and not money is used, in advancing
    communities no material progress can be
    made without the assistance of reserve
    funds. A man creates capital when he pro:
    duces more than he consumes: and the
    capital of a country represents the surplus
    of production over consumption.

    Had those who amassed huge fortunes
    during the 19th century spent their wealth
    on enjoying themselves there would never
    have been available the immense capital
    resources without which the railways and
    other major developments could not have
    been completed for use by their and sub-
    sequent generations.

    Had wealth been more equitably. distri-
    buted and therefore consumed in the 19th
    century our standards of living in the 20th
    century would have been much lower than
    they are. With all its defects and social
    blemishes the capitalist system of the 19th
    century underlined a lesson which all
    countries must respect viz. that savings
    and accumulations of capital are necessary
    in the interests of the whole community

    Today throughout the greater portion of
    the globe high rates of taxation are making
    it more and more difficult for savings to be
    accumulated. Capital which used to be
    invested by private persons in many coun-
    tries of the world is being spent in an un-
    successful effort to maintain individuals at
    the standards of life to which they have

    been accustomed.

    The consequences of a spending regime
    are already apparent. Whereas‘ the mil-
    hons of the world’s population are

    demanding higher standards of living there

    are not enough savings in the richer coun-
    tries to be attracted to capital development

    ped countries of the
    , people realise how much
    money is required to create one job in in-
    y. In Canada the “book value” of
    reating such a job has been estimated at
    5500 (Canadian) per worker.

    In terms of replacement costs, however,
    the capital investment necessary per work-
    er has been estimated at the much higher
    figure of $9,000 (Canadian). Capital, what-
    ever the authors of social polemics may
    call it, is used in commerce to express the
    stock used by the merchant, manufacturer,
    or trader in carrying on his business, in the
    manufacture of articles for sale and in the
    payment of wages and labour. Capital thus
    defined in commerce includes not money
    only, but also buildings, machinery and
    everything else that is employed to assist
    commercial operations.

    One can be very sympathetic towards
    those who are impatient to secure decent
    living wages and higher living standards
    for all. There must be very few persons
    born in Barbados during this century
    who have not, experienced poor living
    standards some time during their life and
    there are thousands still living under
    deplorable conditions. But right
    approach to greater prosperity can only be
    made if everyone of us realises the basic
    truism of political economy that capital is
    a product of human labour saved for ‘pro-
    duction, and directs his labour to produce
    more than is consumed,

    underdevel
    Not many



    n
    ri



    al

    the





    BARBADOS ADVOCATE

    From A Free To A Slave



    A lecture on the subject “From \ e
    a Free’to a Slave Society” was ocies v
    given at Codrington College on e
    Friday last week by Mr. F. A., ae nt :
    Hoyos, M.A., Senior ‘History the Royalist cause. The sarba-
    Master of the Lodge School. We “@ns lost no time after the King’s
    publish below a summary of the execution m pl claiming ms son
    lecture. King as Charles II. The Governor,
    Lord Willoughby not only pre-
    . pared to d the island against
    Men Of Property possible att by the Round-
    In the early Gays after the heads, but sent out’ ships to en-
    settlement, the prevailing society force the King’s authority in the
    in Barbedos was a simple thing. other Caribbee islands. The Bar-
    Its population consisted mainly badians were at onee denounced
    of white small farmers, who as traitors to the Republican
    owned a few acres each, and cause. The Commonwealth passed
    white indentured servants who the Navigation Act of 1651, for-

    helped them to raise crops of
    tobacco and cotton—Peasant crops.
    It was a society in which property
    was widely distributed. Nearly
    half of the population owned
    some land and thus had a stake in
    the country. In the main, the
    People who owned the land in
    small lots were Englishmen and
    the indentured servants were
    Irish and Scots. The latter were
    transported to Barbados during
    the civil war period and the
    troubled time in Scotland and
    Ireland.

    The condition of
    indentured servant
    quite pitiable. The Negro slave,
    who. came afterwards, was also
    to suffer from the inevitable re-
    sults of servitude. But the male
    slave who was bought for £30
    was the property of his owner for
    fife and the latter, if he was
    sensible, would try to see that his
    investment went as far as possi-
    ble. But the white servant
    slavery for a limited period and
    at times his employer would try
    to get the most out of him while
    he could and the result could be
    disastrous to the servant. Still
    latter had the consolation, denied
    the African slave, that his period
    of serfdom was lir
    could look forward
    and ownership of propetry.

    the white
    was often

    was in













    The economy of the isla n
    those dars was essential) &
    pee: sant economy. Land was wide-
    ly distributed in the island _ and
    it is import to bear in 1
    that land w the besis of
    democracy

    Free Institutions

    The Engl ishmen did
    island exactly what
    wherever he went
    They brought to the isi
    strong attachment to free i
    tions Their migration
    England to Barbados was
    part of the vast movement wh
    brought countless men and wom
    to lay the foundations of
    British Empire and the U
    States. They were driven
    the Old World by political
    religious persecution and in
    New World they sought to enjoy
    the freedom that had been denied
    them at home. Men, who had
    left their country to get away
    from tyranny, were bound to
    place the greatest emphasis on
    self-government, The inhabitants
    of Barbados and the Caribbee
    Islands like those of the American
    Colonies were resolved to find
    new opportunities of freedom,

    The spirit in Barbados and in
    other NMglish colonies was
    thoroughly democratic. The island
    shared one vital thing with other
    young communities in the New
    World, Land was divided into
    freeholds. hat it must be again
    emphasised, was the basis of their
    democracy

    A people, whose way of life was
    so strongly rooted in ownership of
    land, would insist on a measure
    of independence. From early times
    the freeholders in the island were
    accustomed to certain rights in
    their early assemblies. It was only
    natural therefore that, when
    Henry Hawley established the
    first Parliament in the island, the
    Ssettiers eagerly availed them-
    selves of their new rights. Here
    the lecturer gave a brief account
    of the career of Governor Hawley
    and the calling of the first House
    of Assembly.

    they
    the w




    Of course the permanence
    the House of Assembly was large-
    ly due to the fact that the great
    issue of parliamentary govern-
    ment was at time being fought
    out in the Mother Country. In
    1640 the English Parliamentarians
    had won a notable victory when
    Charles decided to end his period
    of personal government and call
    2 parliament. It was fortunate
    that the vear after Hawley estab-
    lished the House of Assembly the
    English Parliament, won an im-
    portant round in its battle with
    Charlies I. But the Barbadian
    Assembly would not have succeed-
    €d unless the English settlers in
    the island were animated by the
    spirit of Hampden and Pym as
    strongly as their fellow-English
    Psriiamentarians at home,

    The Spirit Of Freedom

    The English freeholders were
    sv0n egain to show their vigour
    and independence. When Charles

    I, was executed in 1649, the
    settlers, like their fellows in
    America, remained ‘Staunchly by



    the ;

    to freedom ;¢

    of



    bidding the island to continuc its



    . HOYOS









































    Led









    an effe € d

    wk (Rup-) months

    to effect a | g. Indeed, it was
    not until th s of the Battle
    of Worcester (1651) had reached
    him that Willc by was in-
    duced to come to terms, The

    great victory the Barbadians had
    won, although they had to submit
    to Cromwell, lay in the Articles
    of Agreement which were drawn
    up between Willoughby and
    Ayscue That Agreement laid it
    down that the government of the
    Island should consist of “a Gov-
    ernor, to be appointed from Eng-
    land, the Council to be chosen by





    him and the Assembly to be
    elected by the freeholders.” In
    other words, the parliament,
    established by Hawley, was con-
    firmed by Ayscue, as the repre
    sentative of the English Parlia-
    ment Still more striking was




    the assurance given that English-
    men living in the colonies would









    enjoy all the rights of Englishmen
    living in England, and that nx
    taxes sho be imposed on Bar-
    badians ut the consent of a
    General Assem| sly

    That was remarkable The
    Same sentiments ere to be ex-

    ican colonists



    heir revolt from

    re than a hundred

    Indeed, it has been

    claimed that the terms won from
    Ayscue were later taken note of
    by the American colonists and
    that the Articles of Agreement
    drawn up in Barbados in 1652
    were to give shape to the Ameri-
    can Declaration of Independence

    in 1776!
    That was the spirit of the island
    in the early days after its settle-

    ment, It was a virile community
    of small holders It knew the
    freedom that came from the

    ownership of lahd and this helped
    to reinforce the strong democratic
    spirit it had brought from the
    Mother Country

    A Complete Change

    But before
    fradual change
    of the island f
    consequences The economy of
    the island was to be completely
    changed with the introduction of
    sugar. The possibilities of large-
    scale production of sugar attract-
    ed men whe could afford to buy
    large plantations Large scale



    there was a
    character

    r-reaching





    production
    forced
    ually

    labour.
    Grad-
    farmers were
    forced off the land, their places
    were taken by big planters and
    those of their indentured servants

    thousands of African slaves.

    meant ct
    labour,
    the small

    eap
    slavery

    In vain did men like Sir Peter
    Colleton call for gegislation to save
    small holders from, extinction, In
    vain did the Ligrels of the day

    contend that no one who owned
    land in the country should be
    able to add to his possessions. The
    big capitalists made their relent-
    less advance. The holdings of
    small men were swallowed up and
    the poorer whites were forced to
    emigrate and seek their fortunes
    in such places cs Carolina, Ja-
    maica, Surinam, St. Lucia and
    other W.I. Islands Gradually
    the island lost its s‘atus as a virile
    colony and becarne, in the words
    of Professor Harlow, “a political-
    ly unimportant sugar plantation,
    owned by absentee proprietors
    end worked by Negro slaves.”
    Barbados lost the health and sta-
    bility of its early days and be-
    came a sort of volcano. Instead
    of a democracy based on a wide
    distribution of property, it be-
    came a colony divided into two



    hostile camps, the Negro slaves,
    far out-numbering masters,
    and the white planters steadily

    becoming obsessed more and more
    with the feir of a slave insurrec-
    tion.

    Codrington And Ciueated

    Two outstanding men—Codring-
    ton and Coleridge—were to play
    & great part in saving the island
    from the perils and insecurities
    of a slave society. During his
    regime in the Leewards Islands,
    Coarington Saw the urgent need

    ic reform At a time












    @.. land in the Leewards, too,
    being bought up by wealthy



    Was to
    laying
    ued land
    ing for

    Codring-
    interrupted
    war with the



    m the Lee-.
    occasion
    the con-
    He saw
    unsettle times.
    portation of slaves
    tivation of sugar
    shown the
    re foundations
    They went in
    possible revolt
    s fear drove

    ews oo
    * Wegroes

    ca the



    ave society
    lant fear of a
    he slaves and t
    to unreasonable lengths.
    Codrington raised his voice against
    he fear that was crippling West
    r society. He protested
    inst the fear that refused to
    teach the slaves the English lan-
    guage, that refused to teach them
    Christianity because they would
    acguire ideas of equality that
    would be the first step to freedom.
    Yet though he was frustrated
    during his term of office in thy
    Leewards, he succeeded at a later
    date to give practical effect to his
    ideas. For in thg end he w
    succeed in hin pruject of hav:
    bodies of men trained to help in
    the great task of improving th’
    moral and material condition of
    the Negroes and the Indians in the
    Caribbean. The value of his be-
    quest cannot be under-egtimated,
    For at time when the EStablish-
    ed Churches closed its doors to








    the African slaves and denied
    them the consolations of the
    Christian religion, Codrington

    pointed the way to a better future.

    Bishop Coleridge came at a
    time when the dangers of a slave
    society seemed about to threaten
    Barbados and the neighbouring
    colonies with ruin. The Barba-
    dias insurrection of 1816 had been
    followed by upheavals in British
    Guiana in 1823 and in Jamaica in
    1831 The prophets of despair
    were busy predicting that eman-
    cipation would bring disaster and
    that the British West Indies would
    follow Haiti's example by exter-
    minating the whites and setting
    black republics. But Coleridge
    was the man for the crisis. He

    succeeded against tremendous
    odds in establishing the Church
    as an integrating force in these

    communities and thus warded off
    the threatened veril.

    Latefundia Perdidere

    The lecturer concluded by sup-
    porting the thesis of Professor
    Harlow that broad acres destroy-
    ed Barbados as much as they des-
    troyed ancient Rome. There
    could be no doubt that Barbados
    was a happier place in the early
    days when property was widely
    distributed, when something like
    half of the population owned
    small plots of land and thus had
    a stake in the community. Its
    democracy Was real because it
    was based on a firm economic
    foundation. There could be no
    doubt that whet¥ the small holders
    were forced out of existence and
    the wealthy capitalist came on the
    scene that the condition of the
    island, though its national wealth
    was increased, became unhealthy
    and unstable.



    B.B.C. RADIO. NOTES”

    Buowe aoroeid uowuw0os e st iT

    cricketers—or cricket fans — to
    pick a World XI to play against
    Mars; in a BBC programme in
    the coming week you can hear
    of two such World XI’s, one
    picked by» Denzil Batchelor and
    the other by Neville Cardus.
    Neville Cardus, the world-famous
    cricket writer—he is also equally
    famous as a mvtsic critic — re-
    views Denzil Batchelor’s recently
    published “Book of Cricket’ and

    in this talk takes up a challenge
    put out by Mr. Batchelor in his
    book. In his book Mr. Batchelor,
    with remarkable courage, se-
    lected a world “Team of, the half
    century.’ that is, since 1900, for

    a timeless test against Mars;
    nominees are

    his us in the 31 atid 49 metre bands
    six Englishmen — and can

    also “be heard — this

    Tate, will probably be the best recep-

    tion—in the 41 metre band. The

    Brad- frequences of these three beams
    and are respectively, 9.58, 6.035. and

    (or 7.150) megacycles.

    Hobbs, Fry, Compton,

    Larwood and Lockwood:

    four Australians -

    man, ‘Trumper, Oldfield

    Mailey; and one West Indian— 7.185
    Worrell. Then he adds, ‘There

    are all the winter evenings for

    everyone to point out where I've

    gone wrong.’ This Mr.

    Cardus obligingly

    invitation
    accepts,

    Plays From London
    Three radio plays are available
    to BBC listeners in the coming

    and week—'His Brother's Keeper’ by

    puts forward his XI to play Mars John Wyse on Tuesday at 10.30
    at Lord's in a four-day match. p.m. ‘ Dr. Abernethy’ by Alicia
    Neville Cardus's talk, subtitled Ramsay and Rudolfh de Cordova
    ‘Test Match: World vs Mars’ will on Friday at 7.45 p.m, and “A
    be given as the Mid-Week Talk Wind on the Heath” by Ronald
    on Wednesday next starting at Adam in ‘Radio Theatre on Sat-
    10.15 p.m. It will be beamed to urday, 13th at 8.30 p.m.



    Our Readers Say: :

    St. Joseph Chapel

    To The Editor, The Advocate—

    SIR,—I shall be grateful if you
    will allow me to make an appeal
    through your paper on behalf of
    St. Aidan’s Chapel in St. Joseph.
    I make the appeal to all our good
    friends who love the little chapel
    at Bathsheba, to help us raise
    money for its repair, The walls









    are in cons ant need of repairs
    owing to effect of the salt
    air from the sea, Tt repairs are
    being done now ar should be
    finished in about week
    We are usir




    commended
    Messrs. Bar ‘
    should resist the jan !
    Chapel is self-supporting excey



    for a small grant. from the Ves-
    try. We shall be glad to raise
    sufficient from this appeal to pay
    the labour — which last week
    amounted to $47.10.

    Thanking you in anticipation. about 20 Americans are involved in the U.S |

    Yours sincerely,

    L.. C. MALLALIEU,

    Rector. | quarters,

    The Rectory |

    i

    lLie to resign.

    TUESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1952
    —

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    From H ENRY LOWRIE

    WASHINGTON.

    DESPITE all the troubles ahead of him in
    the world’s biggest job, President-elect Eisen-
    hower is feeling happier today.

    Not because he has managed to get his golf
    score down to the low eighties while on holi-
    day at Augusta, Georgia.

    But because one of his top advisers, 57-
    year-old Walter Williams—a banker who
    may be his first Commerce Secretary—paint-
    ed a rosy picture this week-end of an
    economy that would bring still greater pros-
    perity and an even better living standard to

    Americans.
    BOSLEY CROWTHER, film critic of the

    New York Times, predicts that any film
    selected as the year’s best will have to sur-
    pass “The Sound Barrier.”

    HOW LONG does it take a woman to clean
    her house? Mrs. John Immer, whose 37-
    year-old husband, a professor at Washington's
    American University, is going to tell the
    women of Britain how to save time, says her
    nousework takes four or five hours at the
    most each day. |

    Behind Professor Immer’s trip, which is
    being paid for by the Mutual Security
    Agency, is a visit he made to England with
    his wife two years ago.

    They were irked by the old- fashioned
    equipment of their rented house and the un-|
    co-operative ways of their maid. They re-,
    organised to such efficiency that the neigh-:
    bours came running for advice.

    + te

    HOLLYWOOD'S “Television City”, a
    35,000,000 (£12,500,000) dollar rival to New'
    York’s “Radio City,” home’of the big broad-|
    casting ~mpanies, was opened with the usual
    Hollywood Hourish. The new “City” is said ||
    to be a first-class fort and shelter in an atomic
    attack. The buildings can withstand gamma
    rays, heat radiation and concussion from
    atomic blast.

    MOTORIST thought many of their prob-

    section.

    The last word in safety construction, its
    speed limit was fixed at 60 miles an hour, |
    This meant that to many motorists it |
    a good place to hit 90.

    But today a 25-mile stretch was closed sit
    cause in the fog—nothing to compare with |
    what hung over the S- ath of England this|
    week-end—40 motor cars crashed on it, kill-
    ing two drivers and injuring 33 other people.

    Tonight the road was re-opened but plaster-
    ed over the 60 miles an hour signs was a new
    regulation:
    hour.”

    “Maximum speed 35 miles an

    * *
    INTRIGUING statistics are advanced for i

    a new drive to improve the country’s roads:
    because of traffic jams Americans lose enough
    time daily to make up a fortnight’s holiday
    every year. And C. E. Wilson, boss of Gen-
    eral Motors, estimates that 60,000,000 people
    driving to work and school lose a total of
    20,000,000 hours every day.
    *

    * *

    STILL ANOTHER new use for plastic.
    Dentists are experimenting with it as a filler. '
    It is painted on layer by layer with a small
    camel-hair brush. The Americans got the
    idea from German scientists who discovered
    its value while trying to find a substitute “4
    gold fillings.

    *

    AFTER eight preliminary operations!
    doctors in Chicago are now ready to go ahead
    with their daring scheme to separate Siamese
    twin boys joined at the top of their skulls.

    The twins, born just over a year ago to Mr.
    and Mrs. R. Brodie, have separate blood and
    nervous systems. They are otherwise healthy,
    and in crawling push each other in opposite
    directions with their heads. Which gives
    them their two nicknames Yale and Harvard
    after the two rival universities.

    Americans Are Hostile. ToU.N.O

    NEW YORK
    veloping .n America towards the United
    Nations, said Dr. Ralph Bunche, UNOQ's

    trusteeship director, tonight.
    Dr. Bunche is an American Negro and a;

    trained diplomat.

    Doubt, cynicism, and even hostility are ies
    He won the Nobel at

    for his peace-making in Palestine.
    He admitted that the American people’

    s}

    “initial hope and enthusiasm” for UNO are
    “evaporating.”

    He said: “The attitude of Americans is

    much less a source of strength to UNO than

    it used to be. But UNO is stronger today as!
    an instrument of peace than in 1946.”

    Dr. Bunche added that the Americans’
    “volatile and fickle” attitude rises and falls!
    with each change in the Korean war, |

    He defended the patriotism of the 2,000
    Americans working at UNO’s headquarters

    Another United Nations official said that



    Senate's anti-Communist probe at UNO head-
    and this is one of the “harassing
    |factors” that drove Secretary-General Trygve



    (
    (
    }

    lems were solved when a year ago the New}
    Jersey Turnpike was opened — an almost |
    straight 118-mile highway without one rt

    ie
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    VEGETABLE GARDEN MANURE
    A Powder applied to the soil and worked and

    watered

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    LIQUINURE

    A liquid manure put up
    Mix with water. Weak

    Medium (2-3
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    in 1!% Pint Bottles at 96 cents Bottle
    a Teaspoonful to 1 Gallon of water)
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    Phone 4472, 4687



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    SPECIALS
    Ital. Ketchup 7'5 oz. 24c. ea.
    Nut Roll ...... 15¢. ea.

    Carr's Crackers 1.20 per tin
    Carr’s Biscuits

    Short Bread... 24c. per pkg.
    Nu Milk

    Almond Crisps

    Sheriff's Fruit





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    Plum Puddings
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    OO
    ——


    ie 5S hE ACT NTE NET AIRE CS 1

    TUESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1952



    BARBADOS ADVOCATE



    Electrician Acquitted Of Conspiracy

    Jury Instructed To Return
    Verdict In Accused’s Favour

    Frank Massiah, a 38-year-old electrician of Bridge——

    toad, St. Michael, was yest
    of attempting to pervert t
    and April 4, by making
    Everton Myles were witne

    erday acquitted of two charges
    he course of justice on May 2

    it appear that Stanley Bryan and

    sses of the facts relevant to a

    charge against him. He was acquitted after His Lordship

    the acting Chief

    whom the case was heard, i

    dict ©f not guilty.

    Massiah was represented by
    Mr. E. K. Walcott Q.C., associated
    with Mr. E. W. Barrow.

    When Mr, W.: W. Reece, Q.c.,

    Solicitor General closed the case

    for the Crown after calling four
    witnesses, Mr. Walcott said that
    if there haq been conspiracy,
    there would have to be corrobo-
    1ation and if there was none
    there could be no case.

    Mr. Reece said that he could
    not hide even from himself the
    fact that the material witnesses
    had broken down even before
    cross-examination.

    His Lordship told the jury that
    no court could ask a jury to de-
    liberate upon such evidence as
    had been given. He invited them
    to return a verdict of not guilty.
    This verdict was returned. .

    Inspector Everston Connell was
    the first to give evidence, He said
    that on March 29 about 6.22 a.m.
    P.C, 230 Bradshaw brought Mas-
    siah to the Bridge Police Station
    and three charges were brought
    against him, one, having an un-
    licensed firearm, two having un-



    licensed ammunition and three,
    attempting to shoot Lionel
    Brathwaite.

    Massiah had been discharged.
    Cross-examined he said the
    charges were indictable,

    When Lionel Brathwaite was

    giving evidence he haq said that
    Frank Massiah was in the road
    when he pointed the gun and on
    another occasion he said he was
    beside a house.

    Stanley Bryan an island con-
    stable said that on May 2 he was
    at N. B. Howell, Bay Street,
    where he worked when Massiah
    came to him about 7.15 p.m. and
    told him he wanted him to give
    him some assistance in a case.
    He asked him what was the na-
    ture of the case and he (Massiah)
    answered that he had been
    charged with attempting to shoot
    a man,

    Refused Request

    He told Massiah that he was an
    island constable and could do
    nothing for him. Massiah said
    that it was because he was an
    island constable that he asked
    him. Massiah took a piece of
    paper out of his pocket, read
    something to him and told him
    he (Massiah) would give him
    $20 if he gave evidence for him.
    He asked him when the money
    would be paid and he said dur-
    ing hearing of the case. He told
    Massiah that $20 was no money
    and asked him how many other
    witnesses he had in’ the case. He
    Massiah said three or four more,
    Myles, Frankie Waithe and an-
    other mam called Charlie.

    From the statement Massiah
    read to him, hé was to say in evi-
    cence that he was on Jordan’s
    Lane accompanied by Myles and
    he saw a man attempting to hit
    him (Massialk) with two bricks.
    He was then to say he saw Mas-
    siai, go behind a house. pull out
    a knife from his pock.t, .pen it
    and point it in the direction of
    the man. Meanwhile a wornan
    came up and said to the man,
    “Man I know you, Throw away
    those bricks and go to work”,
    and that he (Massiah) then went
    through Jessamy Lane on his way
    home.

    Some days later about 9.45
    e’clock Bryan saw Massiah in the
    court yard and he (Massiah)
    told him (Bryan) that Mr. Niles,
    the barrister, wanted to see him.
    Bryan asked Massiah when Mr,
    Niles wanted to see him and he
    said if he were not busy he could









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    Justice Mr. J. W. B. Chenery before

    nvited the jury to return a ver-

    go then.
    to Mr.

    Massiah and he went
    Niles and had an inter-
    view with him, When he left
    Mr. Niles’ office he saw Myles
    standing on the pavement.

    Didn’t Receive Money

    Massiah never gave him any
    money nor did he ever tell him
    when the case was heard. He hap-

    pened to be there on two occa-
    sions when the case was Being
    heard. He left before anything
    happened.

    When Massiah approached him
    no one was present.

    He had never given evidence for
    anyone for money and if Massiah
    had actually given him any money
    he would have informed on him.

    Cress examined he said that
    when Massiah approached him ne
    (Bryan) tried to convey the im-
    pression that he was not going to
    give evidence. He went to the
    Police and gave a statement con-
    cerning the case. He had given
    evidence at*he court about six or
    eight times. He never went in
    the court unless he had something
    specifically to do,

    He said he could not remember
    if he told the Police Magistrate
    that Mr. Niles asked him whether
    he knew anything about the case.

    When he went to Mr. Niles a
    man called Myles was not present.

    He did not give a statement to
    Mr. Niles. Mr. Niles. read one to
    him,

    If Massiah had given him the
    $20 he would have taken it froin
    him and given it to the Police.
    When he saw Massiah the day of

    the trial he asked him what had
    become of the money.
    He had told the Magistrate

    that the day of the trial he hap-
    pened to be in court for no partic-
    ular reason.

    When Massiah was arrested for
    attempting to discharge a loaded
    firearm he had foliowed him
    while he was being taken to the
    Police Station. While he was leav-
    ing the station Massiah told him
    to tell his brother (Massiah’s
    brother) he was in a little trouble
    but he did not do so.

    Discharged Massiah

    Acting Police Magistrate Mr.
    G. B. Griffith said that on May 22
    he discharged Frank Massiah of
    the charge of attempting to dis-
    charge a loaded firearm.

    Everton Myles said he knew
    Massiah for about six months, In
    the early part of April Massiah
    asked him to give evidence for
    him. He asked him whether he had
    witmesses and he said yes but they
    were not proper ones. Massiah
    said he would give him 14 or 15
    dollars. Massiah took him to Mr
    Niles and Mr, Niles asked him
    whether he (Myles) was one cf
    the witnesses, Massiah said yes
    and Mr. Niles read a statement.

    Massiah never gave him money
    and he did not give evidence,

    Cross-examined he said he was
    never paid to give evidence, It
    was about 6,30 o’clock one morning
    he was coming out of the Spark,
    Tudor Street when he saw Massiah
    riding along Tudor Street. It was
    then Massiah stopped and ap-

    proached him. Massiah said he had
    witnesses but did not think they
    were reliable and asked him

    whether he could give evidence.
    He told him that he knew nothing
    of the case. Massiah asked him a
    second time to give evidence and
    he agreed to do so, though he dii



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    Tels 3142 & 2364



    SUGAR BASINS

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    Furthermore with all the extra



    18 Months For
    Manslaughter

    Twenty-six-year-old Roybert
    Sargeant, a shoemaker of Pros-
    pect, St. James was yesterday
    sentenced to 18 months’ impris-
    onment. Earlier this sessions Sar-
    geant was found not guilty of
    murdering Arnold Hope, his com-
    mon law wife’s step father, but
    of committing manslaughter on
    August 22, Before sentencing him
    His Lordship the Acting Chief
    Justice, Mr. J. W. B. Chenery
    said that undoubtedly there had
    been much provocation. While
    perhaps an older or more discreet
    person would have avoided the
    occurrence, there was, as he had
    said, much provocation. He would
    therefore not pass as long a term
    of imprisonment on him as he
    would normally do.

    Counsel for Sargeant was Mr.
    C. Husbands.

    9 MONTHS’ SENTENCE

    His Lordship sentenced William
    AustiA of St, Lucy to nine months’
    imprisonment. Austin had earlier
    in the session pleaded. guilty to
    causing grievous bodily harm
    with intent on Beathel Boyce by
    striking her with a hammer on
    September 30 this year.

    sentencing him His
    it was diffi-
    man of

    Before
    Lordship said that
    cult to conceive how a
    his character had allowed him-
    self to inflict the injury in an
    outburst of passion. He had been
    spoken of well by his employers
    and by people of his district, both
    lay and clerical. He still, how-
    ever, had to send him to prison,
    though he would be lenient.

    Austin had been represented by
    Mr, J. E. T. Brancker.

    3 YEARS IN JAIL

    Vernon Kinch a mason of Silver
    Sands, who was found guilty
    earlier in the sessions of at-
    tempting to blow up a dwelling
    house, Clara Webster and other
    persons by placing explosive sub-
    stance under the house on August
    6 this year, was sentenced to
    three years penal servitude by
    His Lordship.

    His Lordship told Kinch that
    from all accounts he was a splen-
    did workman and a man of good
    character, but had allowed a
    comparatively simple matter to
    so derange his judgment as to
    make him plot and plan the of-
    fence for which in some coun-
    tries he might be sent to con-
    centration camp for life. It was
    difficult to reconcile his ch racter
    with the enormity of the offence,
    but he would be as lenient as
    the circumstances permitted him,
    UNNATURAL OFFENCE

    Ethan Brathwaite (18) and
    Denzil Harris (17) of Brittons
    Hill, who were earlier in the ses-
    sions found guilty of committing
    an unnatural offence on Septem-



    ber 22, were each sentenced to
    nine months imprisonment with
    hard labour yesterday. by His

    Lordship.

    not intend giving any evidence.
    Massiah agreed to meet him by the
    Self Help but Massiah did not
    come, On another occasion Massiah
    agreed to see him but did not come
    then either,



    Myles was the last witness to
    give evidence.

    Mr. Walcott said that from the
    evidence the case should not go to

    the jury. : :
    His Lordship invited the jury to
    return a verdict of not guilty.

    SWEET DISHES

    Broad St.





    : Children’s
    Annual
    Exhibition

    Every year at the BarBados
    Museum there is an exhibition
    of art, needlework and handi-
    crafts by school children and

    prizes and certificates are award-
    ed. This year’s prize list is as
    follows:—

    ART
    Composition: —
    (a) Animal
    Ist. Iris Smith, Age 12, Codrington

    High Schoo!
    2nd. Enid Johnson, Age 12, St. John
    Baptist Girls’ School.

    (>) Figure

    Senior:

    ist. Brenda Daniel, Age 15, Queen's
    College

    2nd. Margaret Pilgrim, Age 16
    Queen's College

    Junior:

    Ist. Myrtle Craigwell Age i2, St
    Matthias Girls’ School

    2nd. Wynsley Davis, Age 13, Haynes
    Memorial School
    (c) Imaginative
    H. D. Alleyne,
    mere School
    Cut Paper work
    E. I. King, Age 14,
    Henry, Age 4
    School, 7

    Age 11, Comber

    and K. M
    Combermere

    Christmas Card

    A. F. Walrond, Age 12, Comber-
    mere School.

    Design

    Diana Rust Age 15, Codrington

    High School

    Figure Drawing—Black and White

    ist. F. Babb, Age 16, Barbado
    Museum and Historical Society
    Art Department Class, (Senior)

    2nd, A. C. Toppin, Age 11, Barba-

    dos Museum and Historical So-
    cfloty Art Department Class
    (Junior).

    Flower Painting
    Betty Cumberbatch, Age 15, Alex-

    andra Girls’ School
    Landscape
    F. Kerr, Age 14, Barbados Museum
    and Historical Society, Art De-

    partment Class.
    Poster
    Yoland Bannister,
    College

    Age 14, Queen's

    Potato Cuts

    Gloria Rollock, Age 11, St, Peter's
    Girls’ School
    Seascape

    Sylvia Austin, Age 12, St
    Baptist Girls’ School

    NEEDLEWORK

    John the

    Applique work

    Ist. Denise Clarke, Age 10, St, Matthias

    Girls’ School
    2nd. Hazel Baker, Age 14, Boscobel
    Girls’ School (Commended for
    design)
    Crochet
    Ist. Sheila Wilkinson, Age 11, St.
    Matthias Girls’ School
    2nd. Ivy Cave, Age 14, St. Peter's Girls’
    School; Myrtle Corbin, Age 14
    St. Peter's Girls’ School
    Embroidery
    Marva Hewitt, Age 11, Boscobel Girls’
    School

    Embroldery—Local Motifs

    Ist. Cynthia Clement, Age 11, St
    Matthew's Girls’ School
    2nd, Cynthia Thomas, Age 10, St
    Matthew's Girls’ School
    Hair Pin work
    Luisdale Worrell, Age 14, St. Peter's

    Girls’ School,
    Handlerafis—Group Work
    St. Peter's Girls’ School, Age 12-14
    Smocking
    Ivy Cave,
    School
    Any other Needlework
    Ist. V. Jordan and E. Chandler, Age 14,
    St, Peter's Girls’ School

    Age 14, St. Peter's Girls’

    2nd St. Peter's Girls' School Group,
    Age 12-14,
    HANDICRAFTS
    Bookbinding

    Ist, Norton Smith, Age 13. Black Bess

    Mixed School,

    2nd. Ezekiel Jordan, Age 13, Black
    Bess Mixed School
    CERTIFICATES OF MERIT
    ART
    Composition—
    Animal
    Betty Alleyne, Age 15, Codrington

    High School,
    Figure
    Ist, Anthony Edwards
    Memorial School
    Composition
    Alison Carr Brown
    ton High Schoo!
    Flower Painting
    V. A. Williams, Age 15,

    Age 10, Hayne

    Age 11, Codring

    Combermere

    School
    Poster
    Margaret Heath, Age 13, St. Leon-
    ard's Girls’ School
    ' NEEDLEWORK
    Crochet
    Iv ceve, Age 14, St. Peter's Girls’
    School,
    HANDICRAFTS
    Bookbinding
    A. R. Harris, Age 14, Combermere
    School,



    light pink, 46”.....

    flowers and orchid





    Prints

    CHECK NYLON in self colours of pink,
    blue and white, 36” wide

    —per yard $2.43

    EMBOSSED NYLON in Navy, Red and

    GERMAN SHIP BRINGS

    CARGO OF

    FOODSTUFF

    The German steamship Als'ertal paid its first visit to
    the colony on Sunday when it brought a large cargo of

    foodstuff to the island.

    Thr

    ‘ee thousand, six hundred bags

    of corn flour and 1,650 bags of onions were the main items.

    Other cargo included 1,269 bags
    of potatoes, 1,250 cartons of beer,
    60 cases of cognac, 96 cases of
    wine, 50 cases of muilk-powder,
    80 bags of Pearl barley, 40 bar-
    rels of salted mackerel, 18 cases
    of hams, 28 cases of canned meat,
    20 crates of cabbages and a ship-
    ment of advertising material.
    Captain W. Bahr is in command
    of the vessel which is consigned
    to S. P. Musson. Son & Co., Ltd.
    GENERAL CARGO





    arrival on
    Alcoa Planter
    from Guadeloupe with
    general cargo for the island.
    Thuis ship also brought 12 pas-
    sengers. Five landed, The other
    © are intransit. Captain H. E
    Rushan is the master of the Alcoa
    Pl nter. Local agents are Robert
    Thom Ltd
    RICE FROM B.G.

    The 87-ton schooner Philip H.

    Another
    was the
    arrived

    Sunday
    whicl

    Davidson arrived on Sunday
    ifternoon from British Guiana
    with a shipment of 2,000 bags of

    rice as the main item of its cargo.

    Oth Tt ce consisted of 75
    hunches of fresh fruit, 30 tons of
    firewood, 600 bags of charcoal, 5%
    wallaba poles and. 83 pieces of
    greenheart, Captain Carney Sealy
    is the master of the schooner

    SCHOONERS LEAVE

    iro



    Three schooners left port over
    the week-end for British Guiana.
    They were the Marion Belle
    Wolfe, the Lucille M. Smith and
    the Emeline. These schooners do
    a regular trade between British
    Guiana and Barbados, They are
    expected back over the week-end



    All three are consigned to the
    Schooner Owners’ Association
    OTHER DEPARTURES

    Other departures over the
    week-end Were the schooner Bel
    Queen for St. Vincent, the Lady

    Noeleen for Dominica, the Laud-
    nipha for St. Lucia and the motor
    vessel Athelbrook which left for
    Trinidad,

    When the Athelbrook arrived
    on Saturday afternoon it was
    the motor vessel’s second visit in
    five days. It took another ship-
    ment of gallons of mo-

    108,000
    lasses for Trinidad. The other ves-



    sels left with mixed cargo, With
    the exception of the Athelbrook,
    which is consigned to H. Jason
    Jones, the other vessels aré con

    1ed to the Schooner Owners’

    ociation,
    COTTON AND COCOANUT OIL

    The schooner Gita M. which
    arrived from Grenada on Satur-
    day was yesterday unloading a
    cargo of cotton and cocoanut oil

    Besides 87 drums of cocoanut

    oil and 50 bales of cotton, the
    schooner also brought 450 bags
    of cocoanut meal, She is con-

    signed to the Schooner Owners’

    Association,
    ANOTHER YACHT




    Pleasure yachts have been
    calling at Barbados almost daily
    for the past two weeks, Latest to
    arrive is the yacht Ling undet
    Mr. C. Sullivan, Ling’s last port
    of call was Las Palmas, This
    yacht is "now moored off the
    Yacht Club
    BRIN CASTOR OIL

    A large shipment of castor oil
    (292 drums), was brought here

    by the 4,557-ton steamship Mutlah

    which arrived in port yesterday
    from Trinidad,

    The Mutlah also brought a ship-
    ment of 30 bundles of coal-pots
    and 38 tierces of oranges.

    Captain J. T. Vivian is in com-
    mand of the steamship. Da Costa
    and Co., Ltd, are the local
    agents.

    46"

    $3.82

    PRINTED NYLON SHEER in white ground with red

    with gold flowers,

    . G325

    ground



    YAVE SHEPHERD & €0., LTD. |

    {0, 11, 12 & 13, Broad Street

    PLAIN NYLON SHEER in black only,

    wide

    Larceny —
    Decision |
    |

    Reversed

    Their Honours Mr. H. A
    Vaughan and Mr. A. J. H. Han-|
    schell, Judges of the Assistant
    Court of Appeal, yesterday re-|}

    ed a decision of His Worsh'n!
    Mr. A. W. Harper who imposed ;
    fine of 30/- and 4/- costs on John
    Young of Hothersal Turning, St
    John for stealing a quantity <« |
    corn meat valued t 10/- fro
    Hothersal Plantation on August 27

    Their Honours dismissed th
    ease without prejudice, Young wa
    represented by Mr. F. G. Smith
    while Sgt Thornton of Fow
    Roads Sub Station prosecuted for
    the Police,

    William Butcher a watchmen o
    Hothersal Plantation told the court
    that while he was on his way hom

    1 August 27, he saw Young
    coming out of Hothersal Planta-
    tion yard with a bundle of corr

    meat on his head. When Young saw

    him he dropped the bundle and
    sked him (Butcher) to give him
    a chance.

    As he began to waik in the

    direction of Young he (Young)

    ran and he chased him,

    Sam Roach a labourer of Hother

    sal Plantation said that he saw
    Putcher walking behind Youn
    Young appeared as if he was

    trying to get away from Butcher
    When he first saw the two meu,
    Butcher was about 29 feet behind
    Young.

    Mr. Smith submitted that on the
    whole the evidence was unsatis-
    factory and there were too many
    discrepancies. It would be highly
    dangerous to convict his client for
    stealing this corn meat,

    In reversing the decision Their
    Honours said that from the begin-
    ning the case appeared not to be
    strong enough and there were
    several discrepancies, As they had
    to try cases judicially, they felt
    that it was their duty to give
    Young the benefit of the doubt.

    BOUND OVER



    St. Clair Cyrus a 44-year-o!!
    labourer of Jessamy Lane, St.
    Michael pleaded guilty of wound-
    ing Beatrice Burrowes on her
    mouth by cuffing her on Dec, 6. He
    appeared before His Worship Mt
    G. B. Griffith yesterday.

    He was bound over for six
    months in the sum of £5
    FINED 40/-

    Martha Burke of Bank Hal!

    St. Michael was yesterday ordered
    a fine of 40/- by His Wor-

    lo pay
    Griffith for usine

    ip Mr. G. B

    indecent language on the Wharf |

    The fine is to be paid in 14 days or
    month's with

    labour,

    one imprisonment

    hard



    Concert Postponed

    The Y.M.C.A, Glee Club's
    Christmas Concert which was to
    have taken plece to-morrow has
    had to be postponed due to the
    annual exhibition,

    The concert has now been fixed
    Monday,

    for December 29, at 8

    p.m,

    ——
    SE

    11 P2083

    PRINTED NYLONS in
    white with orchid dots,
    white with green dots,
    white with navy and
    orchid with green dots,

    46 inches wide

    per yard.

    $3.25










    PAGE FIVE





    Stocked in a Variety of Shades &

    Qualities by all Leading Stores

    — ee

    To keep
    Ltlle busy sadiesâ„¢
    fit and active...

    give them HALIBORANGE
    every day

    ‘THERE'S NOTHING LIXE IT for building
    up reserves of vital energy, promoting
    healthy growth, strong bones and teeth

    — and resistance to illness,







    Made from purest halibut oil, cleverly blended
    with the juice of ripe oranges, it is rich in
    Vitamins A and D and so delicious in taste that
    the most finicky youngster takes
    it with delight.
    Incidentally, it’s fine for grown-
    ups too!

    Haliborange

    THE NICEST WAY OF TAKING HALIBUT OIL

    Made in England by:
    ALLEN & HANBURYS LTD., LONDON, E.2





    JUST RECEIVED

    JAMAICA CIGARS






    GENTLEMEN ...... wu Boxes of 25
    FLOR De MACHADO i” :
    LONDRES , "



    Blais ba Siti) .chietsens
    PANETELAS digs ats a8 oe
    PROM NT aks kta cdashadhahe\sriscoien eovsheanesnes . Bundles of 50

    Also DOMINICA CIGARS

    LONDRES .... in Boxes of 25
    ERS oy condos sense fans oa ss ienesvalevibiones se te poo 1s)



    THIS CHRISTMAS



    Ga! fee

    We have on Show

    STEERING WHEEL COVERS

    SE/ CUSHIONS
    CAR MATS—Blue, Green, Wine, Black
    COOL AIR VENTILATOR—Blue, Green, Amber, Red,

    Clear
    ILLUMINATED SWANS—Blue, Green, Red, Amber
    ILLUMINATED BULLS
    POLAROID SUN SHADES
    SRARTON HORNS
    CAR JACKS—Screw and Bumper
    CHAMOIS LEATHER
    POLISHES
    POLISHES
    SIMONIZ WAX & KLEENER
    LOCKING GAS TANK CAPS
    SOCKET jE£18S IN BOXES

    WE INVITE YOUR INSPECTION

    ECKSTEIN BROTHERS

    NTAT

    49RQ




    PAGE SIX



    Increased Agricultural Industry
    In British Honduras During 1951

    Timber Stili Main Export

    LONDON.

    Of a total population of 69,644 in British Honduras
    8,838 people are engaged in the major industries according
    to the Colony’s 1951 Colonial Report just published in
    London.

    Chicle bleeding is still the largest single source of
    employment, employing 1,512 men, and many others de-
    pend on forestry for a living.

    “The people have been reared land communications with Belize,
    to a timber economy and it will and another road is being built
    require intensive re-education between the western highway
    before they can be converted to and the Stann Creek valley.
    agriculture,” the report notes. In 1951, 531 ships totalling 181,-

    The timber industry is still the 492 tons entered the Colony as
    main one of the colony and em- compared with 943 ships totall-

    ploys 1,079 men. Chief exports ing 260,776 tons in the previous
    of the industry are mahogany, year.

    cedar, balsawood, rosewood and Passenger Service

    pine, With the exception of the

    During 1951 exports of mahog- Cayman Shipping Company which

    any and pine timber increased operates small vessels between
    over 1,950 sales, but there was 4 Belize and Kingston, Jamaica,
    decrease in the sales of Cedar there is no regular passenger

    logs, timber and chicle wood. service although passages
    Che year was a record one for obtainable in vessels which call
    all crops with the exception of every three weeks for shipments
    rice in the Toledo district which of bananas to the United King-
    suffered from excessive flooding dorm.
    soon after planting. Nevertheless, Most of the internal mails of
    the crop was nearly as large aS the Colony are carried in a smali
    the preceding year’s and had motor vessel, the “Heron,” which
    conditions been more satisfactory operates a twice weekly service
    it would have exceeded tha from Belize to Punta Gorda, and
    previous.year’s total. A record once a week extending the trip
    crop of corn was harvested and to Puerto Cortes
    1,300 tons were available for ex- The lack of a deep water port
    port, some of which

    are

    rt, was sent to has been one of the main ob-
    Trinidad, — stacles to the Colony’s sea com-

    A rise in the controlled price munications, and the construction
    of meat revived interest in the of a deep water pier at Com-

    Colony’s livestock industry, al- merce Bight, in the Stann Creek
    though’ a lot of work has to be istrict, is one of the main pro-
    done to demonstrate the mean- jects under consideration by the

    ing of proper stock and pasture Colonial Development and Wel-
    management before this can be fare organisation.
    regarded as an organised agricul- The main airfield of the

    tural industry Colony is at Stanley Field, about

    " ten miles north of .Belize, from
    Banana Shipments _ which flights are flown to Kings-
    Bananas have played an im- ¢on, Jamaica, Tegucigalpa,
    portant part in the Colony’s ex- Florida, Guatamala and New
    — over the year, the first Orleans. Passenger movements in
    shipment of which was made in 1951 showed an increase of 28
    October and regularly thereafter per cent. over that of 1950 and
    at three. weekly intervals. By freight movements increased by
    the end of the year exports had 97 per cent.
    reached 13,000 stalks a



    BARBADOS



    OLD

    WAR COMRADE CALLS ON IKE



    ADVOCATE







    |

    When Your

    | NERVES |
    | trealloa E

    and you feel cranky
    and miserable. When
    you can’t relax and

    at night—can't

    ~~





    BRITISH AIR MARSHAL Lord Tedde, drops in for a chat with President-
    elect Dwight D. Eisenhower at the general's New York headquarters,
    The two worked together during and after World War Il. Grinning in
    background is Lewis Douglas, former U. S. Ambuassador to England.



    B.W.L. Artistes

    In London

    A dream has come true for West Indian singers, musi- ‘ey, both of whom were very
    cians and dancers in London. After many years of struggle helpful during the launching yes-
    and disappointments, they have at last managed to put on terday.

    LONDON.

    theic own all-West Indian show at a London theatre.

    Their show, “Cabaret Carib-
    bean,” is described on the pro-
    gramme as a West Indian party
    It is playing to packed audiences
    at the tiny Irving Theatre, just
    off London's Leicester Square and
    in the heart of theatre-land.

    month. The report points out’ that The Irving is the newest of the

    Steady work has been made in post-war development has been “little theatres” that have sprung
    agriculture during 1951, but the concentrated on establishing a UP in London during recent years
    Agricultural Department has been more broadly balanced economy During the day, it is an art gal-
    hampered. by «a shortage of and has resulted in more roads lery. At night, canvas screens
    trained staff and funds. being built to openéup nem: sn, cover the valuable pictures on the
    The bBritusn ! I areas walls and chairs are moved in to

    Honduras fishery for the Colony’s agric
    1 ; ’ S @ ulture,
    service which was established in : i —B.U.P



    1950 was not able to begin opera-
    brrto- Rime rae, Seen ton of its
    aun! m April 1951. The work
    of the rary ener has been Travel Agent
    concernéd mainiv with crawfish-

    ing and shrimp trawling. Despite On Holiday
    disappointing results in shrimp i
    trawling which was carried out Mr. Chesterfield Greene, a 65-
    off the rivers of the Southern year-old travel agent of Boston,
    portion of the Colony, there was and Mrs. Greene arrived in Bar-
    a considerable increase in the Dados last Thursday to spend a
    exports of crawfish in 1951, the three-month holiday. ‘They are
    export total being double that of S¢#ving at Sandy Beach Hotel. Mr.

    face the tiny stage that has been
    built at one end of the long gal-
    lery On that stage appear tal-
    ented young artistes, many of
    them unknown to the publie

    During the past year, the Irving
    has achieved a reputation a
    firm stepping-stone on the way to
    theatrical fame and several “un-
    knowns” who have appeared there
    have secured themselves an es-
    tablished place in the theatrical
    world,

    It was Edric Connor, the Trini-
    dadian baritone and actor who



    the preceding year, Greene is a Barbadian. He was was responsible for the Caribbean
    Since the end of the war there ee ee ae by his par- show at the Irving. He has worked

    as five.

    has been an immense improve- ff js a supporter of the Chil-

    the bee Me in ths oat hat dren’s Goodwill League in Boston
    hed y ae ne e past has and has brought some Christmas
    = 0 rely mainly on the rivers presents for the children of the
    and thesea, Children's Goodwill League here.
    Under Colonial Development Mr, John Beckles:told an Advo-
    and Welfare’ auspices, roads cate reporter yesterday that a
    have been built linking up bothdate will soon be fixed for the
    the west and northern areas by distribution of these presents.



    A PLAQUE MARKS THE SPOT...
    The only MP |
    Cromwell
    ever feared





    for many years to bring Caribbean
    artistes together in a show of their
    own and nearly managed it last
    year when the Trinidad All-Steel
    Percussion Orchestra visited Lon-
    don for the Festival of Britain
    But his plans fell through because
    no London theatre was available
    then.

    Appearing in another show at
    the Irving recently, Mr. Connor
    put his idea for an all-West In-
    dian show to the management. It
    was warmly accepted and Mr,
    Connor was told to go ahead with
    his plans

    He collected a company of tal-
    ented West Indians in London
    some of them already famous, like
    Lord Beginner, the calypsonian,
    some of them well on their way to
    the top of the profession, like
    Louise Bennett, the Jamaican
    actress and singer, and some of
    them just starting out on_ thei
    own, like Sylvia Wynne, a talented



    ir » Lord deliver me from young dancer who has appeared

    ™ -Sir Harry Vane!” The with Boscoe Holder’s dance com-
    y as that of Cromwell pany.
    I ecasion: the dismissal .
    f the Long Parliament. Connor Dances

    ie Peet etter miempe Edrie Connor himself does not
    here was only one man appear regularly in the show
    vmong them that Cromwell Other engagements make that im-
    feared. It was Harry Vane— possible, But on one occasion he

    man with a conscience. Fhe wall Gane A eee



    Vene had no great opinion County magistrates and
    the Pro'ector. During the Churches on the other,
    ANS of the Long Parlia- By August 1637 Vane had

    ‘s chief alm had had enough He sailed for

    cen (0 keep the gutoctrat England, leaving behind a
    on gaming complete reputation acknowledged by
    putz! of the country’s friend and foe alike.

    iffairs.

    A man with Vane’s scruples Vane lived in retirement |



    until 1640, when he became



    has appeared in the show“in a
    new guise for him—as a dancer

    He is a powerfully-built man, but French West Indian Islands and the area.

    RUSSIA





    oa i fans member of Parliament for |
    the R ation feared him Kingston-upop-Hull, In the |
    as much as Cromwell had Long Parliament he was pro- LONDON.
    : minent in the proceedings | Tie growing interest shown by
    More direct against Strafford. the Communist ;bloc, especially

    But Charles
    ifect way of

    had a more
    dealing with
    is enemies. No sooner was
    e Stuart crowned than he
    sted Vane and threw him








    inf EARS T * Two years
    late ane ead fe a
    Tower Hill ;

    Vane was the son of Sir
    Henry Vane. a statesman

    who Was led into the revolu-
    tionary camp by his son.
    Young Vane, educated at
    Westminster School, joined
    the revolutionary party at the
    age of 15. His father sent him
    to Magdalen College, Oxford,
    to knock sense into him
    Harry Vane took the first
    opportunity of escaping to the
    Continent. and in Geneva
    became a Puritan. According

    to Lord Clarendon the
    recorder of tle “Great
    Rebellion,” Vane was “ full of

    bitterness against the church,
    both against the government
    and the liturgy.’

    Emigrated
    Old Vane urged Laud
    Bishop of London, to take the
    young man in hand. It wa

    useless. Thus, when only 23
    Harry Vane went to America
    and becaine governor of
    Massachusetts

    But in Massachusetts re
    ligious intolerance was as
    severe as in the old country.
    There came a _ trial of
    strength between Vane- and

    the Boston church on the one
    side, and Deputy Governor
    John Winthfop and_ the

    In this connection he went
    back on his conscience, To
    obtain evidence against Straf-
    ford, he touk from a cabinet
    at his father’s home the notes
    of a council meeting at which
    Strafford had recommended
    the introduction of an army
    from Ireland to subdue
    Englanc.

    It was the chief evidence
    against Strafford.

    Important posts

    Vane took a prominent
    part in the impeachment of
    Laud, but when the Civil War
    came he was against the
    execution of Charles I. s

    Cromwell shut him up in
    Carisbrooke Castle, but after
    the Protector’s death, he had
    important posts under
    Richard Cromwell.

    Vane House, Rosslyn Hil!
    Hampstead, commemoretes

    im.

    LIVES

    HERE



    The plaque on the wall

    London Express Setvice

    Soviet Russia, in developing trade
    with Commonwealth countries is



    spotlighted by New Common-
    wealth in its current issue.
    Two events in_ particular—

    East Germany's Leipzig Fair and
    Soviet Russia’s Communist Party
    Corgress—have both underlined
    this interest, writes Mr. John
    Cardew in a special article.
    “Since the end of the war the

    Leipzig Fair hag become the
    most important shop-window of
    the East, and this year over-

    whelming emphasis was on heavy
    industry,” Mr. Cardew continues

    “China made her first appear-
    ance as an exhibitor of machine
    tools, heavy clectrical equipment
    and textile and mining machinery,
    and, while these goods were not
    for sale, their significance, in
    | the words of a Berlin newspap¢!
    was that they documented China's

    new productive capacity.”

    |

    | Mr. Cardew goes oh to say
    there can be little doubt
    when the Russians begin to



    |the problem of finding new mar-



    |ket for their “surplus gor
    they will have a specially keen
    eye on Commonwealth soure:
    “Mainly because of Easter!
    terest in Commonwealth rav
    materials,” he adds, “the trade
    of the Soviet bloc with the Com-
    monwealth is already extens've
    Whai is generally over-looked
    thal while British trade with the
    entire Eastern bloc is only about

    one-sixth of the pre-war
    Soviet, East European and
    |Chinese purchases from the whole
    |Sterhing Area have greatly in-
    creased compared with the pre-



    volume, a]

    he appeared remarkably delicate
    and agile in a bongo dance, which
    one critic described as ‘a master-
    piece of clowning.”

    Another member of the cast who
    has attracted attention is Errol
    John, the West Indian poet who
    broadcasts regularly in the B.B.C
    West Indian service. Declaiming
    some of his own poems, he proved
    himself a fine and moving dram-
    atic actor and some critics believe
    that his appearance at the,Irving
    may well prove the first big step
    in a new theatrical career

    With the success of this Carib-
    bean show so firmly assured, West
    Indian artistes in London are be-
    ginning to make plans for Coro-
    nation year—like everybody else
    in the theatrical business, With
    writers already at work on lyrics
    and sketches for Coronation re-
    vues, there are hopes that a steel
    band may be brought to Britain
    again from the Caribbean to take
    part in the general Coronation
    celebrations.

    The last steel band which played
    in Britain won universal admira-~
    tion wherever it was heard, If a
    steel band is brought across the
    Atlantic again, it could do much
    to enhance the prestige of West In-
    dian entertainment before British
    audiences.—B.U.P,

    B.W.LA. Link
    British And
    French Islaisds



    or have
    fun in the day. Thenis
    the time to take
    Dodd's Kidney Pills.
    For Dedd’s Kidney
    Pills contain essential oils and medicinal
    ingredients that act directly on the kidneys

    Steel Bridge
    Launched








    from el so that within 1 hour they start draining

    tage on & north bank. excess acids and wastes from

    ~~ wiknte procedure contin- op Sue wees clear. You
    ued ‘according to pl relax. You pons yowseee: i itain’s ©
    minutes aher ‘ares. ae wen Be sure to insist on Dodd's Kidney Pills, Here is Britain's gee pomree Tepe
    hours of actual movement it| the favourite remedy for over half a
    finally rested on its “bed’**on the eatery. | Dodd's are, quick acting—eale |
    north bank. Immediately the ee Quis 2/ ot aiidrug ctures. 122
    bridge was settled, Mr. Parfitt,

    ackintosh's

    Toffee de Luxe

    Dodds Kidnev Pills

    Mr. Carter and workmen crossed
    on the wooden footpath from the
    south bank to the northern side.

    His Excellency the Acting Gov-

    ernor, Mrs. Turner, and more

    than a dozen interested persons HAPPY RELIEF |

    ek the final stages, and 4 ° |

    when r. Parfitt reached the vi ic!

    north bank, they warmly con- FROM BACKACHE The Toffee with the rich, buttery

    gratulated him and his assistants
    on their success.
    Celebrate
    After the launching was com-
    pleted, the Chief Engineer, and
    the members of the senior staff,

    flavour, The moment you put one in
    * This

    Neighbour said “Take Doan’s Pills”
    HY PUT UP with neediess | ‘ : il i

    W discomfort from backache, your mouth you will say

    rheumatic pains, lumbago, stiff, |

    aching muscles and joints or the |

    common urinary disorders due to

    is the most delicious toffee 1

    haye ever tasted.*’ And it has a




    joined with the other workmen sluggish kidney action when you
    who also played their part in the might get happy relief. | yery high food yalue too — every
    suceessful completion of the job, Many thousands of health |
    and together they celebrated the cople. tems the they too! | piece is brimful of nutriment.
    OSCAR ON. Boan’s Backache Kidney Pills.

    aot launching of the bridge This well known diuretic and
    involved much preliminary, i tisepti sluggish
    theoretical and practical work”, Hunevs oo come 2 hae Ainetiogs
    Mr. Garrod told the Advocate} of ridding the blood of excess usie MADE IN ENGLAND BY
    later. acid and other impurities harmiws John Mackintosh & Sons Led.

    Mr. Garrod said they owed a

    to health. Grateful
    debt of gratitude to Mr. D, G.

    Foffee Town, Halifax, England.
    where, recommend

    eople, every= |
    Boan’s Pillste |



    Keir Engineer-Draughtsman of; their friends and neighbours. :
    C.D. & W., who during the last Ash your o 9@ |
    two years gave very much help| @+aur for DOAN Sw



    in desgining the works of re-
    organisation, se ies aa i sabtatieal
    He also expressed his thanks

    to Mr. Bancroft of Messrs. Elec-
    tric Sales, and Mr. Boyce of Bulke-

    Asked if he could give any in-
    dication as to when the new
    pumping station would be com-
    pleted Mr, Garrod said they
    have. Promised Government that
    the Station and the arterial mains
    emanating from it would be in
    full operation by September next
    year.

    VEST
    ESTRIES
    @ from page 1

    the Commissioners of Highways:
    Mr. T. N. Peirce, member of the
    Commissioners of Health; Mr. H
    St. G. Ward, representative on the
    Board for appointing the Rector
    and Vicars and Mr. C, B, Brand-

    { keep fresh all day...!





    ford, member of the Playing Field
    Committee
    Under General Business, Mr.

    C. M. Drayton on behalf of other
    members of the Vestry congratu-
    lated Mrs, H. A. Talma for the
    very able manner in which she had
    carried out her duties as Church-
    warden of the parish for the year.

    ir. A, G. Gittens suppa@rted
    these remarks and Mrs. Talma
    briefly replied thanking members
    for their kind remarks and said
    that she was able to do so with the
    help of other Vestrymen especial-
    ly Mr. Harry Ward.

    As it was the last Vestry meet-
    ing for the year, Mrs. Talma ex-
    tended the Season’s Greetings to
    members

    Mr. Brandford reciprocated on
    behalf of other members.

    Members present were: Mrs
    H, A. Talma (Churchwarden) in
    the Chair, Mr. H. St. G. Ward,

    luse LIFEBUOY TOILET SOAP

    It’s easy to keep fresh all day—just use
    Lifebuoy Toilet Soap whenever you wash! Its
    deep-cleansing lather really frees you of weari-
    ness, keeps you fresher so much longer. So get
    a tablet of Lifebuoy today and make sure of
    day-long freshness!

    FOR PERSONAL FRESHNESS ALWAYS

    X-LBT 667-1110-55



    a LEVER propuct











    Mr. C. M. Drayton, Mr. C. B seed ae Sap pak ae aan tear ae
    PORT-OF-SPAIN, Dec. 2. Brandford, Mr. C. Ifill, Mr. H.

    B.W.LA.’s new Dakota services Garnes, Mr. G. C. Ward, Mr.
    between Trinidad, Grenada, Bar- a; 2: Webster, Mr, A, G. Gittens,
    bados, St. Lucia, Martinique, aad Victor Chase, Mr. T. N

    rue | », Antigua, St. Kitis eirce,
    nie Hatha Rico an up a new Thirty-three students from the
    era in travel between the Eastern Upper forms of the Boys’ Founda-
    Caribbean islands. tion School ac sGmapaniaa by Mr.

    The 28-seater DC-3s which re- D, Prescott, As nan nase as th ift th t il Ch i t
    cently went into service provide tended the Christ Church Vestry »oe e gl a reca $ ris mas every y

    twice the seating capacity of the
    have

    Lockheed Lodestars which
    not been withdrawn from service.

    The resylt is that business and
    pleasure itineraries can now
    worked out wit the greatest

    ease, and a number of islands can
    be visited all in the space of a
    week. Increased seats also mean

    that the prospective passenger can
    walk into any B.W.1.A. office in
    the Leeward—W ndward and

    INTERE

    level The raw material
    need—and will continue to
    come very largely from
    Asian Dominions and -Colo-
    and the reasoning is prob-
    ably that, even in the event of
    the worst slump in the metro-
    poiitan country, it will still be
    possible for countries like India,
    Pakistan and Ceylon to supply
    jute, cptton, rubber ‘and other
    commodittes against Soviet deliv-
    eries of heavy equipment and
    machinery.”
    Two Aspects

    Examining Soviet Ru
    both this and last year,
    pand her trade with
    wealth countries in
    Cardew continues:
    “Two aspects in particular
    the economic conference held in
    Moscow last April have not re-
    ceivca the attention they deserve
    in the West especially in the
    Commonwealth. First, there was

    pevcial session devoted to trade
    with under-developed countries
    t which Indian and Pakistan
    —many of them indus-

    were the dominant
    pokesman. Secondly, other East-

    ‘communist countries backed

    up previous Soviet offers”

    wal
    they
    neeg
    the
    nies,



    a’s bids
    to exX-
    Common-

    .Asia Mr,
    of









    Mr. Cardew then lists some of
    offers made by Communist
    states to trade their indugs-

    trial and farm products for pro-
    ice from an countries, ~

    Referring again to the Leipzig

    Fair, he adds At Leipzig heavy
    t on Eastern industry as the
    nswer to the problem of the un-

    der-developed countries was again
    arent, They were some for
    five visitors from sia, inelud
    a Pakistan, compared
    about sixty from Britain and
    eighty from the US.”







    be

    of

    STED IN_
    COMMONWEALTH TRADE

    meeting yesterday afternoon to see

    how the Vestry conducted their
    business.

    At the end of the meeting, Mr
    Cc. B. Brandford, on behalf of
    other members of the Vestry,

    wished them a happy christmas,
















    Standard Pen and Pencil Set in Gift Box



    obtain a booking without undue

    delays awaiting confirmation of
    seats. da
    These improved facilities should

    make air travel all the easier in



    s He noted that the interest of
    the East-Germans was_not alone
    devoted to the under-developed |
    Cotimonwealth territories. For}
    on one occasion during the Fair,
    the official report of the day's
    activities claimed that greatest in-|
    terest among overseas buyers
    came from South Africa, Canada,
    Australia, Pakistan and Indo-
    nesia. South Africa and Australia
    were not directly represented at
    the Fair and inquiries were made
    through British and American in-
    termediaries.
    ODuitstanding
    Outstanding among the
    German export was textile
    chinery. The Germans laid em-
    phasis on precision work in}
    marufacture, which they claimed



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    TUESDAY, DECEMBER

    - Means To
    Increase
    Consumption

    LONDON

    The International Sugar Council |

    is redoubling its efforts to
    up a preliminary draft.of a new
    world agreement on sugar which
    li be ready for presentation to
    World conference on sugar
    when ,it meets in London next
    : gh the Council has asked
    the United Nations to call the
    World conference, there is still a
    et optimism among dele-
    gates to the Council that a work-
    able liminary draft agreement
    eduld’ be ready before then.
    -Ali the leading sugar producing
    @ONsuming nations are agreed
    the‘necessity for a new inter-
    agreement. They are also
    that there is . world sur-
    of sugar and that there is

    draw

    ample room for increased con-|
    sumption.

    There is also general agree.:.en’
    that two of the main .easons .or
    dtsequilibrium in the sugar trade

    are the currency restrictipns and

    ced trade. These two con-
    g causes to the restrictions
    on vorld’s sugar trade can best

    be discussed in the larger arena
    of a world conference.

    The Council has therefore cabled
    the Secretary-General of the Unit-
    ed Nations in New York request-
    ing him to call the world confer-
    ence on sugar, to be held in June
    or July next year. The Council’s

    l statement, announcing this

    |
    “The International Sugar Coun-

    cil held a meeting on 24th Novem- |

    ber,








    *




    1952, in London. It was at-
    by representatives of 19
    from eight other Governments and
    the Food and
    ed nisation, The Council adopt-
    World Action
    i ‘The International Sugar
    Council, having considered at its
    at previous meetings the sta-
    ical position on the world
    sugar market, finds that the situa-
    mn is required to overcome the
    lties which have arisen and
    which will continue if such action
    “*1. Considers that a Com-
    Modity Agreement offers the
    best means of dealing with such
    » “ ‘2. Recognises that such an
    Agreement will require negotia-
    tion at an International Com-
    =“‘3. Requests the Secretary-
    meral of the United Nations
    convene an_ International
    conclusion of an Interna-
    al Sugar Agreement.
    »*'4. Suggests that this Con-
    June or early-in July, 2953.
    » ‘5. Authorises the Chairman
    ‘the International Sugar Coun-
    the Secretariat of the Council at
    the disposal of the United Na-
    tions for such a Conference.’”
    Council has been struggling to
    combine the widely different
    points of view of the world’s lead-
    ing nations into a new and work-
    able agreement. But in spite of
    repeated efforts, it has failed to
    ement, 4”
    he Council took the decision to
    oe to the United Nations after
    would only lead to further un-
    lance on the sugar market. The
    yuncil’s special committee deeid-
    @d early in October that conditions
    ference.
    Three Main Features
    The proposed preliminary draft

    rnments and by observers
    following resolution,
    ng on 24th November, 198
    is sueh that international
    is not taken.
    difficulties.
    modity Conference.
    ar Conference to consider
    mce be held in London late
    cil to place the full facilities of
    For the past five years, the
    ing sugar producing and consum-
    nd common ground for a new
    it had agreed that any further de-
    * Were favourable for suchea con-
    of the new agreement, on which



    ers three main features—
    and import quotas; price structure;
    and measures designed to increase
    world consumption of sugar.
    Since the Commonwealth re-
    esentatives at meetings of the
    ouncil have firmly insisted that
    their production quotas under the
    Commonwealth Sugar Agreement
    should not be prejudiced, it is ex-
    pected that considerable discus-
    sion at the world conference will
    centre round measures designed to
    increase world consumption.
    There has been a world surplus
    of sugar for some time, delegates
    to the Council pointed out, yet in
    many countries the demand for
    sugar has been greater than per-
    mitted consumption. In_ Britain,
    for example, some 50,000,000
    people have been rationed ten per





    ad



    is directed te inwite__

    tobe 1
    of Westminster on the

    (2 day oF May, 1937.
    Ried 7

    The invitation that was sent out fo
    The invitations did not go out tli

    The Queen’s invitations
    ITE Queen, through hi :

    _Ambas

    sad





    sc theAitaj Chard



    9, 1952

    |



    |

    British



    ¢

    BARBADOS ADVOCATE



    yeur sister Fanny in Llanfihangel-Glyn-Myfyr.”

    Civil Jets Brea



    VATIONAL
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    London Express Service

    k

    Crust Of Dollar Market

    By BRETT OLIVER

    LONDON.

    3ritain’s perseverance with the
    development of jet airliners has
    started to bring in a fat dollfr
    dividend, Not as big as the air-
    plane makers would like to see,
    but they have their fingers crossed
    American airline chiefs are im-
    pressed and the crust has been
    broken with the bagging of con-
    tracts to supply Pan American
    World Airways with Comets and
    Trans-Canada Air Lines with
    Vickers Viscount turbo-props.

    British producers are“now hop-
    ing that others of the big Ameri-
    can airlines will step into the
    queue for their jets. Several U.S.
    bosses are currently in touch with
    the factories of de Havilland, Bris-
    tol and Vickers-Armstrong. They
    have been given all the facts, and
    now are chewing over their de-
    cisions. Meanwhile, fingers reésnain
    crossed this side of the Atlantic. ..

    U.S. Makers Displeased

    There is a snag 2boa’ this crack-
    ing of the dollar market. Ameri-
    can aircraft makers are not exact-
    ly pleased about it. Ever since
    the war they have been tied down
    to concentration on military jets,
    while Britain jumped ahead with

    Ss.






    cent below their normal consump-
    tion for 12 years.

    Another bumper world sugar
    crop—in the neighbourhood of
    36,700,000 tons—is forecast for the
    coming season, which would be

    second only to last year’s record’

    38,000,080-ton crop. Cuba is now
    taking drastic measures to safe-
    guard its sugar industry by cut-
    ting production,

    But the Cuban delegation to the
    Council’s special committee meet-
    ing ear
    that Cuba was not prepared in-
    definitely to carry the main bur-
    den of restricting production to
    maintain equilibrium in the world
    trade. Her spokesman, Dr. Arturo
    Manas, said at that time that Cuba
    would insist on a more equal dis-
    tribution of restrictive measures





    y in October made it clear!

    civil planes. Which, in a way, was
    only fair—because America got a
    wartime lead on airliners while
    3ritain was concentrating on mili-
    | tary bombers

    Naw that the British civil jet
    lead is being brought right home
    |to the Americans, their aircraft”
    | industry is dead set on having the
    | door shut to the Comet and its
    turbo-prop cousins. As a result,
    the industry is pressing the new
    Eisenhower government to block
    British jets, arguing that the pur-
    |chase of Comets is indirectly a
    subsidy to the British Treasury
    from the American Treasury.
    | In other words, men like Floyd
    |B. Odlum, chairman of Consoli-
    dated Vultee Aircraft Corporation
    are claiming that the money for
    Comets ultimately comes out of
    the U.S. taxpayers’ pockets and
    “F s the aircraft industry.

    Idlum the U.S. Treasury
    | will help pay for the Comets be-
    cause it pays subsidies to the air-
    | lines to carry mail. And he backs
    this up by saying that Consolidated
    could have a 200-passenger jet
    airliner flying by 1955 if the gov-
    ernment would relesse the neces-
    sary space and manpower from
    work on military planes.

    says







    Stimulus

    Britain's civii jet producers are
    not unduly worried by this turn of
    events. They know that at tre
    | moment there is nothing to stop
    jan American airline from buying
    whatever planes it likes. But they
    realize too that the U.S. Govern~
    ment could make things decidedly
    sticky by protecting the interests
    of the big American plane firms
    Another reason for keeping fingers
    crossed right now, ft)

    In spite of this behind-the-
    scenes campaigning, British mak-
    ers are confident of selling to the
    Americans. Their own marketing
    campaign was given a great stimu-
    lus by the Pan American decision
    to buy three Comet 3s for delivery
    in 1956, with an option on seven
    more. The Pan American step
    was ample evidence that U.S. air-
    lines are looking across the Atlan-



    among the producing nations tic for fleet replacements, And it

    After the latest meeting of the} was a rebuff for American air-
    Council, however, it was felt that; craft manufacturers like Lock-
    the gap between the viewpoints of | heed, Douglas and Boeing whose
    Cuba and the British Common-} planes were rejected in favour of
    wealth and Colonial producers] the Comet after a year of negotia-



    had narrowed considerably.

    UP.



    7a .
    ee

    CORONATION _OE
    THEIR_MAJESTIES
    KING GEORGE VI &
    QUEEN ELIZABETH

    Y Command of TheKking,the Earl Marshal

    { Us

    Arie

    @ Earl Marshal.

    t the Coronation of King George VI.
    two months be‘ore the cer:mony



    tions by Pan American,
    Eddie Rickenbacher
    head of America’s

    colourful
    Eastern Air-



    lines, would also have Comets
    ordered by now if Britain had
    been able to give him an earlier

    delivery date for the first batch.
    Something may come. of it yet,
    for Rickenbacher and de Havil-

    land are still in touch

    The slowness of British produc-
    tion has often been criticised. In
    fairness, it must be said that be-
    sides running the risks attached to
    initial concentration on the gas
    turbine engine, factories actually
    went ahead with production with-
    out having orders for what they
    were making. This was done after
    gauging interest in jet travel, As
    it has turned out, it is a pity they
    did not go all-out right from the
    start.

    The fact now is that large-scale
    production will be built up stead-
    ily as big orders come in. New
    plants are being built and sub-
    contracting facilities greatly er-
    panded. Air line chiefs know the
    time factors involved and are pre-
    pared for them.

    Overseas Orders

    Overseas orders so far received
    for British jet airliners are, how-
    ever, by no means insignificant,
    even at this stage. De Havilland
    has contracts for 23 Comets. Buy-
    ing Series IA types are Canadian
    Pacific Airlines (two), Royal
    Canadian Air Force (two), Air
    France (three) and another French
    company U.A.T. (three).

    2

    The Series 2, for delivery in
    1954-54, ha» been ordered by Brit-
    ish Commonwealth Pacific Air-
    lines (six), a Venezuela airline
    (two) and Japan Air Lines (two).
    Then, for the Series 3, there is the
    Pan American order of three.

    The 11% million-dollar order
    by Trans-Canada Air Lines last
    month for 15 Vickers Viscounts

    brings the number of these turbo-
    prop airlines on the books to 75
    These include 12 for Air France,
    four for the Irish airline, Aer Lin-
    gus and six for Tran Australian
    Airlines

    Latest in the field to produce jet
    airlines is the Bristol Aeroplane
    Company with its high-perform-
    ance, long-range Bristol Brittania
    turbo-prop. Only one, the proto-
    type,. exists to date. The British
    Overseas Airways Corporation has
    ordered 26 on the strength of this
    alone, and is now negotiating for
    a further five cargo-type Brit-
    tanias,



    Labour Relations

    ‘Committee

    LONDON.
    Mr. D,. Jones, (Labour, The
    Hartlepools) asked the Secretary
    of State for the Colonies whether
    he has considered the desire ex-

    pressed by the President of the
    Georgetown Chamber of Com-
    jmerce in June last, details of

    | which have been sent to him, that
    j}a Labour Relations Committee
    should be established in British
    Guiana; that such a body could as-
    j sist to maintain industrial peace
    jin the territory; and what steps he
    | proposes to to bring about
    {this improvement in industrial
    | relations in this colonial territory
    | Mr. Lyttelton: I understand that
    the proposal is that the Georgétowa
    | Chamber of Commerce should set
    |up a Labour Relations Committee
    to act as an employer's federation

    take







    in negotiations with labour. The
    } formation of such a Committee
    therefore, a matter for the C -
    ber of C merce, which still
    considering the suggestion

    Development Commissioner,
    St. Lucia

    Jone



    For B.G.?



    amined the needs of the island
    of . Lucia.
    Mr. Lyttelton ‘very effort



    being made to fill this important
    appointment. Special experience of
    agriculture and development wo

    in the tropics is desirable and it



    is not easy to find a man with the
    qualifications needed
    Labour Relations Councils

    Mr. D. Jones, (Labour, Th
    Hartlepools) asked the Secretary
    of State for the Colonies if jx

    will give a list of the West Indian
    territories in which a Labour R

    lations Committee exists similar
    to the Joint Industrial Council set
    up in Jamaica in July, 1952, be-

    tween the employers and the major
    trade unions catering for person
    employed in the shjpping industry
    Mr. Lyttelton: Standing joint
    councils exist in Jamaica and
    3arbados and are planned in An-
    tigua. There is also Government
    Whitley machinery in all territo-
    ries, and, in addition, there i
    provision collective
    gainiig agreements for centra
    t conciliation boards to
    for example, in the
    try, and f

    committee

    often in bar-

    joir et

    ite

    indu



    as in the
    ugar industr)

    —LES

    Guiana

    So far, no orders have come in
    from overseas airlines. But there

    has been much spirited nibbling,
    specially from Canada and Mex-
    ico. The Canadian Government is

    considering adapting the Brittania
    both as a maritime reconnaissance
    aircraft and cargo plane. A de-
    cision is imminent, and will prob-
    ably result in the establishment of
    a Brittania production line at the
    Montreal works of Canadair
    Limited, the main Canadian air-
    craft company

    It is hard to say when Britain’s
    aireraft industry will be able to
    uacross its fingers over dollar
    market deals. In other markets,
    it is steadily building up business.
    Now it is waiting to see if Ameri-
    can airlines generally will follow
    fie Pan American Airways lead
    and seal the future for British civil
    jet aircraft,—L.E.S,





    CANADA
    WELCOMES W.L
    FEDERATION

    MONTREAL

    The London talks to be held next
    spring on the Federation of the
    British West Indies are welcomed
    in Canada by the Montreal Gaz-
    ette, which ay in a_ leading
    article

    “To Canada, which has long

    been a major trading partner with

    the islands, such a move is of con-
    siderable interest. The Federation
    would take in an area of 6,884

    square miles with a population of
    more than 2,000,000, As economic
    solidarity is the major project of
    the proposed Federation, trading

    procedures with the islands would |

    be considerably changed
    “Canadian interest in the
    ish West Indies is, of
    much more than a matter of trade
    As their nearest Commonwealth
    neighbour, West Indians have al-

    srit-

    ways looked to Canada as a coun- |

    big |

    try which is much more
    brother than an old friend. West
    Indians have come to Canada for
    generations for their university
    educations And West Indian
    have: come to Canada to join our
    armed forces in two great war

    Classic Pattern

    “The emergence of the British
    West Indies as a Federated nation
    will be in the classic pattern of
    Commonwealth development. Ori-
    ginally acquired in the imperial
    pattern, either by colonisation or
    by conquest, the islands first be-
    came military and naval guardians
    of British sea lanes to the New
    World

    “Gradually, a greater and great-
    er measure of self-government has
    developed Today, the islands
    have sufficient autonomy to
    able
    their
    The

    legislative future will be
    of them have
    complete self-government
    the Commonwealth, The nm
    ire to continue
    are, with their London-appo
    governors still looking to Lor
    for final decisions

    “Both patterns
    proof of
    that ha
    lations with her
    as the self-governing dominions.’

    —B.U.P.

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    pains, itching and torment from Piles
    since the discovery of Hytex (formerly
    known as Chinaroid). Hytex starts to
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    be
    to decide for themselves what

    |
    \
    chosen |
    within |





    1a0n

    heartening
    dom and goodwill
    characterised Britain’s re-
    colonies, as well |

    et
    LL ee

    - Bigger Efforts For World Sugar Pact

    | Tree Expert
    In Sahara

    LONDON





















    Mr. Richat St. Barbe Baker,
    63 year-ol world-famou trec
    expert, now studying soil erosion
    in the Sahara has already learned

    | shaioh about t spread of advanc-
    ng deserts, he says

    He has ist reporte il to
    London headquarter

    Having crossed a thousand

    desert in the Northern

    I feel more than evel
    th itude of the problem with
    which African colonists—both the
    French and the British—are con-
    fronted.”

    Thirty years ago, appalled by
    the devastation caused by whole
    sale tree cuttin and consequent
    soil erosion, Mr. St. Barbe Barker
    | founded Men of the Tree
    | This was a body composed of
    } silviculturists, farmers and pion
    eers and backed by a number of
    ss men.

    } The aim was to induce a “unt

    lversal tree sense” among tht

    | world peoples and ta conserve

    oil especially in tropical countric

    where extremes of heat and rain

    fean quickly turn flourishing crop

    lands into deserts when protectit

    | tree: ive felled. —L.E.S,



    | Further Grant
    For Central

    Cotton Statiout

    The Secretary of State has now

    West Indies General allocation of
    Colonial Development and Wel-
    fare funds for the maintenance
    and continuation of the work of
    the Central Cotton tation in
    Antigua.

    Under Colonial Development
    and Welfare Scheme provision
    was made up to the 3lst Decem-





    approved of a further grant of |
    £13,826 being made under the

    PAGE SEVEN





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    PAGE EIGHT






















































































































    BARBADOS ADVOCATE

    PUBLIC NOTICES | LOST & FOUND



    rer iv








































    TUESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1

    GOVERNMENT NOTICE



    Colonial Law Students






















































































































    lie 1 LOST Meet l Starrs UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF THE WEST INDIES
    I cpepaetaipdintonsnsisiensnas { t e in- i _ eet * ont one
    “a a tentio { Highway STEPHNEY WHEEL complete with BARBADOS EXHIBITIONS 1952
    DIED FOR SALE i Taiana ee’ tre | Venue Welw “Meter Get wie LONDON , iety's Coloniat |, The Examination for two (2) Barbados Government Exhibitions
    | | to authorise them to}disk painted Cream, Cover No. Begins! “Colonial law st dents a dyir ne “ the Society’s Coloniat tenable at the University College of the West Indies will be con-
    SIMMONS—On 8th December, 1952 Maric aes S66. pee Stee to). one ©. Garage Owner and Ve, B sagen ftir HUBIIDE CORREO. : ducted in Barbados by the University College in consultation with
    aiene sed 81. The / ak ' rl Jon rel! who lost his sight)Car Owner part.cularly requested to|in ritain had an opportunity last Mr. Hopkinson, in a speech to y =
    her Que | AUTOMOTIVE ee ee eee ee for Sue eae Paney.ia={month of meeting men prominent the guests, stressed his Party’s|the Director of Education, and will consist of:—
    ; m oe af explosion during the vear 1939 Headmaster, Combermere School, Phone|in legal circles here. genuine and sincere interest in pro- (i) a written examination to be held in the week beginning
    St. Pet Cemetery. 0% d . , cis ek sane COREE, A | ? %.12.52—2n.| The occasion was @ tea-party gressive evolution of self-govern- Monday, February 23rd, 1953.
    ked to attend ‘GLEDOZER suitable ("cor th sh of 3 ae given at the Royal Empire Society ment for the Colonies. ‘andi ;
    ui. Norma Whitehead TD9 and BDH Crawier lor the parish « a } by the’ Inns of Court Conserv Candidates must be:—
    u } au -Raising 7 uy . ~ =, ¢ . < >t ©
    ‘ Checenman f. Deliveries prompt frome u ke | ———_——_—- WANTED ative and Unionist Society. The Inns of Court Conservative (a) under twenty (20) years of age on the 3lst January
    A ee py ae | A. Sir David Maxwell Fyfe, Q.C. Society has an ambitious pro- 1953;
    t Dia tes yar 1 arochia reasurer ® ce Wh ee j i i i
    6. 18.580 Pac’ chase aa Wekabeaae ts ae aoe MI NEOUS the we rd Secretary, and Chair- gramme for the winter of discus- (b) Natives of this island; or
    eenrnienntnemnannimmiicmmmnsamemnt | Pareto 3t¢ ae SCELLA : Soc j h sion urrent interest 2 . hy
    ir CAR—Morris-Oxiord, good as new. = lack Res > Sera » een ap — --—- —_— on a a = Gee = oor << in, ° Co 1 (c) Children of a native of this island; or
    ee le is ca mileage under 3,000. ‘Telephone 2940 PERCY H_ BURTON. RESIDENCE—English couple require} 2 © guests. ers present particularly concerning the Colon- (ad) Children of persons who are domiciled and have been
    MEMORIAM 4.11.52—t.f.o Parochial Treasu Flat or House exeeptionally eool from|included: Mr. Henry Hopkinson, ies. . , a , ; ne
    ae EMORIAS . | SS St. Michael, April for 15 months. Phone, 8306 ; Minister of State for Colonial The first of these, at the end of resident in this island for a period of not less than
    MA¥VERS—in loving memory of on thor o Mr. E.R by “i Fat Tl dtusticinde tans __%:12-82—In. | Affairs; Mr. J. E. S. Simon, Q.C., November, will be on the “Colour ten (10) years. °
    son Bernard DeCotircey Mayer Pe 4.12.52--3n MESSIAH PUHL i vp Vice-Chairman of the Bar.” Colonial and commonwealth Candidates will be required to produce with their applications,
    ell asleep : - . : ;
    De till comes o'er c good condition BARBADOS CHORAL SOCIETY ic SALES ciety; Mr. Ashe Lincoln, Q.C, students are expected to take part. Birth Certificates together with certified statements declaring that
    Secre ten f Apt J. Atwell, c/o Dears Garag CHRISTMAS CAROLS ‘ ; : : 3) year
    > t0 oe : ars
    For brought before u 7.12.52--6n at BARBADOS they have been receiving their education for the past three (3) ye
    Sad es « ear — + - —_——_—__——- - ST. MIOHAEL’S CATHEDRAL : ‘ i i 4 ¢ nduct
    Eve remembered by HiLLMAN STATION WAGON--Only se Mai REAL ESTATE in this colony and that their moral character and general cond
    Walter 1 3 parent ‘ ose — miles en ven aepearanee WaSepOe, aa DECEMBER CHANCERY SALE are satisfactory.
    isister 2.5: go0c new. Perfec working rder a p.m, onsen tapneslabenapteetlabaat nothin . 4
    BRADSHAW & COMPANY Programmes may be obtained from the] DENIS MONIE & CULPEPER — Two The undermentioned property will be set up for sale at the Registration Office, Applications for admission as candidates of Barbados Govern-
    6.12, 52—t.f.n. Clark of the Cathedral, | the widvorate houses at Bathsheba, either together or Public Bulidiags, Bridetiwn, between 18, (meen) and 2 p.m. for the sum and or | ment Exhibitions must be sent to the Director of Education, Educa-
    - i piadeiniend Station rom Mess separately. Apply D. S. Payne. Ha e date spec w not ther Fo! it wy set up on each succeeding
    ELECTRICAL Spencer, Marhill Street 5.12.59--2n, |S Philip 712.52 ear Friday st the tame place and during the same hours until sold. Full particulars ‘tion Office, The Garrison, St. Michael, not later than Friday, 23rd
    ‘ . ales ‘ erepeseenereenneansamneneaniianicae on applic January 1953. siisaeoesinunie -
    ELECTRIC REFRIGERATO ee | ——-——- | "LAND—® Roods of land at Plaintiff; HYGH OWEN SAINT CLAIR CUMBERBATCH ?
    LEY * vc oT, eee a rr — VESTRY ELECTION Saint George Butting an tases -. _ Defendant: D. SBALY & CO. LIMITED Applicants for admission as candidates for Barbados Government
    guarantee) Manufa COUR- Goring, Charles Pilgrim and Hubert J
    . TRSY GARAGE Dial “6 " White and on Gun Hill. For fonthos PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land situate near Warners in| Exhibitions must also forward direct to the Registrar of the University
    FARAWAY—Fully furnished 3 bed- 6.12.52--8n particulars apply Carrington & Sealy, the parish of Christ Church and Island aforesaid formerly s' College of the West Indies, Jamaica, their Applications for Entrance
    room house, St. Philip coast. Lighting | Deas as ee ae Lucas Street, Bridgetown to contain by estimation Four Acres or thereabouts but found by ; - f
    plant, Watermill supply. Carport, 2) “GamRawp—3-Speed Automatic Record 6.12.52--9n recent survey to comta.n Five Acres and Six Perches or thereabouts|to the University College. The closing date for applications for
    Servant rooms. Monthly rent 960 PIUS|Ciinwers just received, a limited neliiapaiieationicth -_——- renames abutting and bounding on the North on lands of Warners Plantation | 9. tance is 31st January 1953.
    $3 cleansing charge, IN ADVANCE. Dial] ouliiity, fC. S. Maffe: & Co. Ltd . RETREAT M. = — Sues Soom ot eee ies oy aoe heb wat icati . re p Ini sity Col
    4476 1.11.52—t..n 9.19 fantom PARISH OF ST. MICHAEL HASTINGS ROAD opposite Ocean - H. Sullivan « ate oO jaynes deceai on N.B. Forms of Application for Entrance to the University Col-
    —___—__ -- - r I HEREBY give notice that 1 have} View Hotel, containing closed verandah, Routiton nde NEWHAVEN — Fully furnished 4-bed- | “REFRIGERATORS Canadian Frigid-|ppointed the Parochial Building, Cum-|tWo public rooms, four bedrooms, bath on a Road and on the West on the Public Road or however else lege and particulars o! e necessary qualifiga ’
    room house, Crane coast Double Garage | aire, made by Gencral Motors with §-|berland Street, Bridgetown, as the place] otc. and kitchen. Very suitable for} ooo. ppce STOO OO Un and an outline of the courses available must be obtained from the
    8 Servant rooms, Lighting rlant, Vue e3| Year guarantee, Only a limited quantity | where Parishioners of the parish of St j Conversion into separate apartments, and > “E: 19th Decemb 962 : sis 7 iors fr the Resident
    mill supply. Monthly rent, $7 plus, §) | of these machines. Call early at K. R,|Michael and other persons auly qualified ouaine fo aa sq. ft. of valuable | DATE OF SALE: 19th December, 1 Hw. WRLIAMS Registrar of the University College, Jamaica, or from the Resi
    cleaning charge, - Ee $ HUNTE & CO, LTD Dial 5136 to vote at any electic { Vestrymen for ® 94lcin and. « 3 > < ag
    “470. 2.11,52—t.f.n "7-12 58-6n. |the said Parish may assemble on Monday,, _Water and electric light servicés Registrer-in-Chancery Tutor, Extra Mural Department, Boys Scouts Headquarters, Beckles
    a TT the 5th day of January, 1953, between | Garage and servants rooms. She atch Road, St. Michael, or from the Director of Education
    OFFICES—Cool, spacious, and reason FURNITURE the hours of 10 and 11 a.m. to elect a] Dial 8242 for arrangement to inspect. :
    ably priced, Only two more ava lable, Vestry for the Parish of St. Michae,| The Wndersigned will offer the BARBADOS . Department of Education, .
    K. R. Hunte Co., Lid., Lower 7 ere aeaey TE f the yer 1953 property for sale by public competition
    Birent .12,82—6n | CABINET, settee with cane bottom| — ”°“"peRcy H. BURTON, at thelr office, 17 High Street, on CHANCERY SALE 26th November, 1952.
    ee ae ee ‘Scmiee ae fe —t So, Sune _DRemn table, small Parochial Treasurer Thursday, 18th December, 1952 9.12.52—2n.
    MONTE--Ch. Ch urnishe side-board, all t abov: re h . cee OTTLE, CATFORD , ‘ e Sa cael lal sndeeendeece
    aceiaathdns Phone 83° 2 berbice chairs with “catherette, uphols. at 7 ~~ Solicitors a eran ran es << tn Ay Pes" ~ oye aia,
    5 12.62—6n. |tery and a small liquc al t 1 : . ie Bul gs, getown, ween novn) and 2 p.m. for sum o
    Do S| Beattors Dinited-or ‘phone ae ee ee coubel BT 9, 12-52—-9M. lithe date specified below. If not then sold it will be set up on each succeeding ICES
    grr eine 7 " i " iculars
    *.12,82-4n| 1 HEREBY give notice that I have| , WOODVILLE, Fontabelle, standing on ee ee et, te ee ee
    eee =: nvidia ctuamae tastes inte: : o acres o'! Ww . a
    MISCELLANEOUS FURNITURE—To close out #0 Morris| ine the Vertey Room Oisiin as the visce | Cocoanut and other ‘Trees, Inspection Plaintif: = WINSTONE IRVE@) GRIFFITH Te eet ce es
    See oe aay ae Rattan Chairs at $11.00 each, absolutely | where all persons duly qualified co vote 4aily 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Telephone 3940, Detendent: ARs Ore Wen bie soeenes on ot Island LFF ELLE LLLP SFE =A
    De bent 2 te " t ent. | ew: Can be s at Medmenham, Pine | at any election of Vestrymen for the said 9.12,62—4n BONA CSCOLA BROOME his attorney on record in the Islay.
    ave the best form of entertainment: | Hill, on the 12th December, 9 a.m. to] Parish ble on Monday, th
    Make yaur children’s Xmas party a real 2 5 ' sellen 9, eee ee eee ae 7, me PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece or pateel of land situate at Six Men's in
    aes. Full particulars from GITTENS Bultuble for Pasa ee buy. |5th day of January, 1953, between the the parish of Saint Peter and Island abovesaid containing by ad- M V Yhe M/V “MONEKA will accept
    & COMPANY, Bay Street. Phone 4740 : 6.12.53 hours of 10 and 11 o'clock in the morning AUCTION measurement One rood Thirteen Perches or thereabouts (of which . . Cargo and Passengers for Dom-
    7.12,$2-—t.f.1 3.12, 52-8n }to elect a Vestry for the Parsh of area Eight perches form part of an abandoned Public Road) abutting inica, Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis
    ome waren - «Christ Church for the year 1953 eat mnaecantlinintn sity teint lethinot apa and bounding on lands of Six Men's Plantation on the seashore on and St. Kitts, Sailing Friday 12th
    LIVESTOCK WOOD GODDARD, lands of R. & G. Challenor Ltd, and on the Public Road or howeye: DA Ea
    ANNOUNCEMENTS Parochial Treasurer, UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER else the same may abut and bound together with the messuage â„¢
    - ALSATIAN PUPPIES—Born of ‘Susan’ Christ Church. Dwellinghouse thereon and all other buil and erections on the The M/V “CARIBBEE” will
    oh Pree Winner of Pups for best b.tch and best 6.12.52—3n,] By instructions received from the In- said parcel of land erected and built standing and being with the will be arriving at Barba- accept Cargo and Passengers for
    e arbados uatic 4 P S)locally bred exhibit t 1951 BExhibitio: no eee ions I surance Co., I wll sell i . 8 c cs a ‘ ‘ =
    their patrons tha: the Catering Depart-|and Count of Verchield, (Imported) PARISH OF ST. JOSEPH See sstudak acon ae ieew Tecey, Deca» eee aie Rae Oo. dos on TUESDAY 9th De Dominica, Antigua, nae
    ment undertakes orders for Plum Pud- | wo Wiles, Senshaw, Pine Plantation] | HEREBY give notice that I havel|age, Whitepark Rd. (1) 1947 30. H.P.|DATE OF SALE: 19th December, 1952 cember and will be sailing day, 19th inst a
    dings aud Christmas Cake Dial el Gap. Phone 2784 7.12.52—3n, [appointed the Vestry Room at the Dis-| Chevrolet Wagon, (Until recently the . ae , H. WILLIAMS on WEDNESDAY 10th De- may en
    52- sitet icheaeia tithe eda i. —._--. | veNSary as the place where all persons] property of the P F Registrar-in-Chancery. ‘ ‘ erase ms
    a PUPPIES French Poodle Crossed |¢)¥, Gualified to vote at any election} in accident) tee ee (Damaged . 4.12.52—4n, cember for St. Lasts. ge B.W gee pian so
    Labrador Pretty, intelligent, affectionate, |! Vestrymen for the said Parish may VINCENT GRIFFITH, ci nin eeinlabeepne —_— Vincent, Grenada, Aruba, = ' . ——
    Make nice Xmas Gifts. Apply: Mrs. |4ssemble on Monday, the Sth day of Auctioneer accepting Passengers and ‘ Consignee, Dial 4047
    Burrows, St. Augustine s Vicarage, St. |January, 1963, between the hours of 10 7.12, 52—4n Freight ( any 6.12.52
    George 6 an [and 11 o’cleck in the morning to elest} ——— . 9.12.52—1n .
    eis Lhe L Balochi na a Vestry for the year 1953. 9.12.06— .
    gn RACE-HORS Tcitin Cake A. 'T. KING, LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
    “ae horses landed in Trinidad, at £800— Parochial Treasurer, Real Bann catian of Nathaniel Allsopp, ‘ fonable
    Hwoham:a, Arabian "Git, Indian Gift Of seegeh [all Bt, Mickel, fot vee ion | APPLICATIONS are invited for twe vacant nen-peamone
    iutyptian Gift, Admirals Delight, Medi- it ‘dead : . r permission to A .
    ‘ Bic terranean,. Likely, Fa:ty Falls, Sie. "SoS aN OF Bk, SRG at re Malt Liquors. dee. at 8 board part-time posts of Assistant Visiting Surgeon on the staff of the
    Pebblest Sist Lama, R ARI ST. R « ; attache o residence ‘
    Bunbayna, Delusion Cord witnes Genes 1 HEREBY give notice to all persons} at Kew Road Bank Hall, St. Michael, General Hospital.
    Burns, Gkami, Nintdelys, At’ 2560 duly qual fled to, vote at ithe, election of} nd ated this @th day ss December, 1982. Applicants must be registered medical practitioners.
    a P' 7 oO estrymen or nis ‘arish, a ave c: ’ L8Q
    |Plewieus Pearl at Full Bh wn, Bridge, appointed the Parish Room, Speights-| Police Mag:strate._ Dist. “Ay The salary attached to the appointment is $240 per annum and
    Melitta Rose. At £750—R 3 * | town as the place where all such persons ‘ NIFL ALLSOPP, ‘ i i endered to se neta oy a ee ee ee
    Ie Melitta Ross. 4 t £780 “Roy gen. may ieodt on kaoyaas the eee cae Tentiaes. the officer will be entitled to fees for services rendered paying CANADIAN SERVICE
    . Junior. Apply to O. P. Bennett, Southern | January, 1953, Brine chica ie ees sae arte ae is —— patients in the Hospital. , From Montreal, Halifax and Saint John,
    a Se Perna , Trintds a Plow 2 eC a bi 2 obtain the ‘irec
    Desert Song se ae ah $2—6n, | Vestry for the Parish of St, Peter for 4 Police Court, District “A” on Friday, Further information may be ed from D) tor of Expected Artival
    Tell Me Little Gypsy the yeer 1008, | conmun Pe ctth. day of December, 1952, at} Medical Services to whom applications should be forwarded by 15th 2 , Halifax Si John Dates Barbados
    Morocco MECHANICAL Parochial Treasurer, Poll ifn A. MeLEOD. December, 1952. a “Space” ef ck Omen 5 Dee 3 Secahoer
    Evenin; inlay ieeltieeinhbcheitateniinlidienliesaes St. Peter ‘olice Magistrate, Dist. “ , rt 23 : Cc. a y
    > a oe 5 MACHINE—One Singer Sewing Ma- 6.12.52—3n, 9.12.62—1n 8.11,52.—2n, A VESSEL 3 Dec. 19 Dec 8 January
    wamp chine, treadle model, in perfect condition, LI Na aN em AEE ey U.K. SERVICE
    no reasonable offer refused Call at PARISH OF ST. JAMES ean i
    $1.44 dele Litad ce: te vadod t ert SF 82 TAD. QUOR LICENSE NOTICE : VACANT POST From Newport, Swansea, Liverpool and Glasgow
    7.12.52-3n [appointed the Vestr Room near the AD Expected Anrival
    The Parting Son ae ie ornare Parish Chureh as the place where “all ore te Yes £ Heanas PRENOIPAL, GOVERNMENT TRAINING COLLEGE, TRINID Newport Swansea Liverpool Glasgow Dates Barbados
    a e ‘lan iB ‘ TRICYCLES—Just received, suitable] persons duly qualified to vote at any| Michael. for tebciuiten tc oll’ aabete, Applications are invited for the post of Principal, Government | ss. VGRIRULY” if inducement) 21 Nov. 3% Nov. 16 December
    awa Mambo ‘or children from 3 years to @ years, J election of Vestrymen for the sa:d Parish a ‘ . 7 tend i as. "N. O. i
    Lili Marlene Redman & Taylors Garage Ltd may assemble on Monday, the 5th day Ba re fee: ae cone wapees Training arene the Education Department which will become _ROGEINAES ¢ Dek ta eke. bah $ te haas
    9,12. 52—31 f , 1953, between the hours of ‘ f i as. * =
    Indian Love Call , :? = a 10 pepuery, ae in the miornines to ps wick Gap, Westbury Road, St, Michael. vacant early in 1 Cost TRADER” Early January Mid Jan Early February

    WHEEL STRAKES — For use with
    Massey-Harris or WD 9 Wheel Tractors
    Overeome wheelspin AND ENCREASE
    TRACTION of your Tractor in fieids
    Courtesy Garage 4616

    I Want To Be With You Always
    Is It True What They Say
    About Dixie

    6

    12,52—6n

    Christmas Suggestion



    MISCELLANEAUS
    AMERICAN CHRISTMAS CARDS
    Very attractive lines, nicely worded
    Boxes of 16 different cards at $1.00 per
    box See them at our showroom at 14
    Swan Street The Standard Agency

    (B'dos) Co, Phone 3620
    9.12.52—I1n

    A lovely as-
    finest Christmas Cards.

    CHRISTMAS CARDS
    sortment of the



    You certainly should see these at the

    Cosmopolitan Pharmacy Just off

    Broad Street, Prince Wm. Henry Street.

    6.12 62—4n

    ESSO PRODUCTS—Petroleum Jelly

    , > White in Drums, Nu‘*Jol, Paraffin Oil,
    Wall Safe anne and Pals Flit Sprayers, Filit
    Gallons, Qrts, Pints and % Pints. Flit

    Portable Type- | Acrosol, Flit Powder. Esso Handy Oil,

    writer | Household Wax, Lighter Fuel, Radiator

    Cleaner, Radiator Protector, Stop Leak,
    * . Sponges, Spark FPlugs, Brake Fluid,,
    Curtis Gin Drums and Pails, All of these can be



    obtained from R, M. Jones & Co
    Phone 4764

    Ltd
    27.11.52—t.f.n



    Baking Dish



    PERFECTION STOVE PARTS — Please
    note that all Perfection Stove parts can
    be obtained from RB. M. Jones & Co.
    Ltd., White Park. Phone 4784
    27.11.52—t.f.n.

    Webley Air Rifle

    Winchester Target Gun
    Husquvarna Sewing Machine
    Voightlander Camera

    Ariel Motor Cycle
    Francis-Barnett Motor Cycle
    Photograph Album
    Bulloch-Lade Whisky

    Original Odhner Adding Machine

    SHOWCASES—Three mahogany Show-
    cases. Can be seen at the Advocate
    Stationery, Broad Street.



    28.11.52—In



    Special offer for 10 days.
    3 Burner Valor Stoves & Ovens
    Tyre Co,, Trafalgar & Spry

    Dial 2696 §,.12.52—t.f.n.

    STOVES
    2 &
    Auto
    Streets,

    ee

    BRADSHAW & (0.

    STOVES—The famous Florence Stoves



    in 2 and 3 burner models. Laurie Dash
    Co., Tudor Street. Phone 5061
    6.12.62—3n

    SUBSCRIBE now to the Datly Telegraph
    England's leading Datly Newspaper now
    arriving im Barbados by Alr only a few
    days after publication in Londen. Contact
    Ian Gale c/o Advocate fo., Ltd. Laca!
    Representative. Tel. 3113,
    17,4.52—t.f.0



    SS

    TODAY'S NEWS FLASH

    Your Diary for 1953

    BROWNE'S NAUTICAL
    ALMANAC

    CHURCHILL'S VOL. V
    SECOND WORLD WAR
    At
    JOHNSON’S STATIONERY





    UNIVERSITY COLLEGE HOSPITAL
    OF THE WEST INDIES
    Applications are invited for a post of
    Registrar in Surgery at the University
    College Hospital, duties to commence
    on the Ist ef April, 1985

    The appointment will be for one year
    in the first instance, Salary will be
    in the seale £700--£1,000 per annum,
    depending experience and qualifica-
    tions, and {is subject to a deduction of
    £100 p.a. in respect of board, residence,
    etc Return first class passage by sea
    will be paid Further information may
    be gbtained from the Hosp.tal Manager
    and Secretary.
    Applications stating
    qualifications, together
    testimonials, shuld
    Manager and

    and details

    with twe
    reach the
    Secretary, Uni-
    College Hospital of the West
    Mona, Jamaica, B.W.1., before
    of January, 1953

    age
    of
    recent
    Hospital
    versity
    Indies,
    the 31st





    Like These
    Are Sure To Please



    ; NOTICE
    THTFUL BUREAUS and Attention to all Contractors
    ving Dressing Tables in and Persons in the Building

    Popular Shapes, Sizes and finishes

    Business. You can now

    Bow and Recessed fronts

    Counter-sunk and flat tops. Cab. Se

    riole or straight legs, with or obtain: -

    without VANITY STOOLS é ooD BUILDING
    CHOOSE YOUR BURBAU ir G

    Mahogany, Cedar, Birch, Fir or

    Deal, with from 1 to 7 drawer ®

    md in various polishing Enam- ‘

    ellings or sanded

    at 21 ets. per cub. ft. ex

    BRILLIANT M/RRORS Quarry or delivered at 28





    Beesiied oF plain. “ ‘t in g cts. per cub, ft. All orders
    Buy Your Bureau Now, from » promptly executed.
    —. to Ninety-eight Saving ; Coasult « - »
    1® H. D. BAYLEY,
    i¢ Above Dash Valley,
    L.S. WILSON |}; si Geoe
    wilgetd Phone 5016
    SPRY STREET. DIAL 4000 29.11.52—3n.







    OPPOOPOSOOOOOOOSOOOOOS |



    a Vestry for the year 1953

    P. H. TARILTON,
    Parochial Treasurer,
    St. James.
    6,12,52—3n.





    PARISH OF 8ST. J
    I HEREBY give notice
    appointed the Vestr:
    Chureh as the place where all persons
    duly qualified to vote at any election
    of Vestrymen for the said Parish may
    assemble on Monday, the 5th day of
    January, 1953, between the hours of 10
    and 11 o'clock in the morning to elect
    a Vestry for the Parish of St. John for
    the year 1958



    IT hay

    that e
    Room at the Parish



    H. S, FRASER,
    Parochial Treasurer,
    St. John
    6.12. 52--3n
    PARISH OF ST. >Â¥
    I HEREBY give notice that I have
    appointed the Vestry Room near the
    Parish Clfurch as the place where ail
    persons duly qualified to vote at any
    election of Vestrymen for the said Parish
    may assemble on Monday, the 5th day
    of January, 1953, between the hours of
    10 and 11 o'clock in the morning to elect
    a Vestry for the Parish of St. Lucy for







    the year 1953.
    OSWALD DEANE,
    Parochial Treasurer
    St. Lucy
    6.12.52—3n
    PARISH OF ST. PHILIP
    I HEREBY give notice that I have

    appointed the Church Boys’ School near
    the Parish Church, as the place where
    parishioners of the parish of St. Philip
    and other persons duly qualified to votu
    at any Election of Vestrymen for the
    said Parish, may assemble on Monday
    Sth day of January, 1953, between the
    hours of 10 and 11 a.m. to elect a Vestry
    for the Parish of St. Philip for the ycar

    1958,
    P, 8. W. SCOTT,
    Parochial Treasure,
    St. Philip.
    6.12,52--3n

    PARISH OF 8ST. ANDREW

    I HEREBY give notice that I have
    appointed the Vestry Room near the
    Almshouse as the place where all persons
    Guly qualified te vote at any election of
    Vestrymen for the said Parish may
    assemble on Monday, the Sth day of
    January 1963, between the hours of 10
    and 11 o'clock im the morning to clect
    a Vestry for the Parish of St. Andrew

    for the year e: a. mate







    Parochiel Treasurer,
    St. Andrew.
    6.12.52-—an
    _— —
    PARISH OF 8ST. GEORGE

    I HEREBY give notice to all persons
    duly qualified to vote at the election
    of Vestrymen for this Parish, thet T have
    appo.nted the St, George's Vestry Room
    as the place where all such persons may
    meet on Monday, the Sth day of January,
    1953, between the hours of 10 and 1!
    o'clock in the morning to elect a Vestry











    for the Parish of St. George for the
    year 1953
    H. JOHNSON,
    Parochial Treasurer
    st
    612 n
    PARISH OF ST. THOMAS
    1 HEREBY give notice.that IT have
    appointed the School House near te
    Parish Church as the place where ©jl
    persons duly qualified to vote at %.Â¥

    election of Vestrymen for the said Parwh
    may assemble on Monday, the Cth diy
    of January, 1953, between the hours of
    10 and 11 o'clock in the morning to elect
    a Vestry for the Parish of St. Thomas
    for the year 1953
    F. F. PILGRIM,

    Parochial Treasurer,
    St. Thomas
    6.12.52—3n

    ADVOCATE
    STATIONF?”

    GEEYSTON:,

    Just the Little shop is, .he village

    where the Best Books, Stationery
    and Xmas Cards are now on show.

    ’
































    The post is pensionable and the salary is $5,280 a year.
    of Living Allowance at such rates as may be in force from time to



    Dated this 8th day of De ber, 1952,
    To:--B. A. McLEOL, fen cember, 1952.

    Police Magistrate, U.K. AND CONTINENTAL SERVICE









    i dae & maaan time is also payable. The appointment will be subject to medical From Hamburg, Rotterdam and London
    ere : ~ “Applicant. |fitness and the successful candidate will be on probation > er Ra dere
    N. his appl.cation will be consid- ; i Th ointment will also be subject to Hamburg Rotterdam London Dates Barbados
    ered at a Licensing Court to be held at|ears in the first instance. e app n : ns Reo : F 4 q 7 eer
    Police Court.” District "A" on Friday, the Colonial Regulations ang the Civil Service Regulations’ and eee Ge ee eens
    e 1¢ day © recember, at ll : ‘ *
    o'clock, a.m, : Instructions in force for the time being, in so far as they are appli-
    EB. A. McLEOD,* |cable. Agents — PLANTATIONS LTD.
    Police Magistrate, Dist. “A” Phone 4703
    9.12.52~jn| TRAVELLING : saloaepnehietedeiaion alate Siacoiglia

    L ~Pety — The successful candidate will be authorised to keep a car for

    LIQUOR LIC ENSE NOTICE the performance of his duties and will be eligible for travelling allow-
    ghopkeeper of Military Rond, Bush HMall.|ance in accordance with the regulations in force from time to time.
    Matt vars erat evden nee | QUALIFICATIONS
    attached to residence at Military Road, Applicants should possess :—

    Bush Hall, St. Michael.
    Dated this 8th day of December, 1952.
    To BE. A. MecLBOD, Esq.,
    Police Magistrate, Dist

    (a) An Honours degree of a British University; and
    (b) A recognised post-graduate teaching diploma; and
    (c) Experience of training teachers in a recognised Training

    STEAMSHIP COMPANY,

    ie



    “Ao















    THERESA TAYLOR, A NAD N SER CE - HTL
    N.B.—This application eae College. c WA VE Caen ”)
    § B >| w con- .
    sidered at a Lice: 2 » ili ition i ce is hi
    sidered af a Licensing C qurt to be hela by Amine to take charge of tuition in elementary science i ghly SUURERO UND ears a Tis. togacees
    the 19th “day "of December, 1992, ai etna 4 ye pend pce ee
    clock, a.m s
    : 4 . MONTREAL 20 Nov — — —
    Riles Sere ee ae 1. To control and conduct, under the direction of the Director gt. JOHN gt ss 29 Nov 20 Dec. 8 Jan,
    t 9.12,52—In. of Education, the Government Training College for teachers, ARR. BARBADOS "6 pen: ai Dee. ” ee » ve.
    LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE consisting of approximately 120 men and women students. ea le si te a uate!
    Tas sheteuion at Game Tana 7 a takee part la and disatt the instruction given by the im. assenger Accommodation Available
    Pere Nor hee Ot tee eerie staff to students in training for teaching posts in primary For further information apply: Da COSTA & CO., LTD.; Phone 2122.
    a ae in respect ot a soared and shingle and intermediate schools. . aS
    5 a corner 0: stmon Cc r, onnec
    Hindsbury Road, St. Michael, eae, 3. To perform such other duties in c tion with the train- NEW. YORK. SERVICE (EVERY FOUR WEEKS)
    rolnen gt Re Jasense at ing of teachers as may be required by the Director. Such a
    attached at” Villa Road, Brittons wily duties will include the usual extra curricular activities and ATED AER AOR ALCOA, —AXODA,
    St. chael, isi ang’ boarding oste!
    Dated this 8th day of December, 1982, general MUpCrvinsan of arr ements in 2 h as. NORFOLK -_ - 17 Jan —
    â„¢! E. A. McLBOD, Esq, 4. To visit schools to supervise students during practice-teaching BALTIMORE 24 Nov. 22 Dec. 19 Jan. 18 Feb.
    ee Mee NTANCE nbtae and to secure liaison with the Training College. see oe ie OS
    N.B.—Thts inet (noalinant. Applications should be submitted to the Colonial Secretary, Trini- Limited Passenger Accommodation Available .
    hi application w con-





    sidered at a Licensing Court to be held

    dad and Tobago, and must reach him before the 3ist December, 1952.
    at Police Court, District “A” on Friday,

    Copies and not originals of certificates and testimonials should be

    NEW ORLEANS SERVICE rontvicatiy







    the 19th day of December, 1952, at
    11 o'clock, a.m submitted, 29,11.52—3n.
    E. A. McLEOD,
    Police Magistrate, Dist. “A.” SOUTHBOUND A STEAMER A A A
    912.52-1n.}| POST OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC WORKS, GRENADA STEAMER STEAMER STEAMER

    LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE Applications are inviteq for the post of Superintendent of Public wane ae Nev’ 3 Bee basen on

    The application of George Gill, shop- . ee t . J JAMAICA 27 Nov ll Dec. 25 Dec 7 oe:
    keeper of My Lords Mill St Michael, Works, Grenada, on contract for three years. tn BDOS. ea R ee ie Des. 3 Jan.
    See permission | to sell Spirits, Mait}SALARY: ,

    iu . bs board : “ -
    shop stisthed tc residence st Rls toran The salary of the post will be in the range from £1,200 to Fer further information apply ROBERT THOM LTD. Phone 4228








    Hill, St. Michael,
    Dated this &th day of December
    To E. A. McLEOD, Esa.,
    Police Mag.strate, Dist A.”
    GHORGE GILL,

    £1,500 per annum according to the candidate’s experience and
    qualifications, In addition, a transport allowance at the rate
    of £315 per annum is payable. Cost of living allowance is not

    1952.

    ray ie saat of he pork GIVE BOOKS — THIS CHRISTMAS ;
    sidered at a Licensing Court to be heid ee * 2
    Bt Police Court, District “A” on, Friday, The Officer will be required to perform all duties appertain- 3
    the “ath day er 8 ing to the office of Superintendent of Public Works, ADVOCATE STATIONERY ° $
    ats tne eO., H In addition, he holds the following appointments by virtue 8

    9 12.—1n, of his office : >

    Chairman of the Central Road Authority;
    Chairman of the Central Water Authority;
    Chairman of the Queen’s Park Committee;
    Member of several other Boards and Committees,
    He will also be required to undertake such other duties as may
    from time to time be imposed on him by the laws of the Colony
    or by direction of the Officer Administering the Government.





    4,4,
    POSSESSES EEE AAPL LLL

    | GRAMOPHO? RECORDS

    Only 50 more to close you can have these at
    3 for $1.00

    .







    RESULTS
    GAS
    FOR



    USE QUALIFICATIONS :
    BEST The Candidate must be a Corporate Member of the Institute CENTRAL EMPORIUM
    of Civil Engineers and must have good Administrative experience .
    NATURAL and ability. enr. Broad & Tudor Sts.

    SCLC EE ELC?

    QUARTERS :

    Quarters are not ordinarily provided, but if necessary, con-
    sideration may be given to this question. In the event of quarters
    being provided rental will be charged at a rate not exceeding
    10 per cent, of the officer’s salary.

    LEAVE & PASSAGES:

    eS 3, 3554, s
    Z 5000000 rs —PEOCEE SS SEO SELES PSL EPPO.



    KARL EDMONDS







    WHITE POTATOES 8c.
    per Ib.

    Bags of 110 Ibs. at $7.70

    DUTCH ONIONS I6c. The officer will be eligible to earn leave, provided that his F.R.S.A., C.P.A.
    a work and conduct have been satisfactory, at the rate of one week Certifi Public Accounta Intario
    ‘ ” for each completed period of three months resident service. wes ae Apes jit = : vi ;
    GREEN CABBAGE 36c. Free first class passages are provided on first appointment, K. R. HUNTE BUILDING
    per Ib. and on satisfactory termination of contract, for the officer and Lower Broad Street
    Dutch Table APPLES his —: Barbados.
    40c. pr lb. ~eave passages are not provided, Sere einen
    ” Applications should be addressed to the Chief Secretary, Wind- Temporary Phone 507%

    At No. 11 Swan Street ward Islands, St. George’s, Grenada, ang must reach him not later

    ‘than $3lst December, 1952.





    —






    TUESDAY,

    DECEMBER 9, 1952





    BY CARL ANDERSON



    ee



    | { THE TRANSMITTER bn
    [CUT CUT AT THAT PONT,

    “{ SEMGEANT FLINT.













    ITH THE KING'S POLICE ..AND THE CASTLE WALL .. ARROWS ae
    wo, AWAY By A SINGLE BRISTL E WITH THE waiTi NG H} CAL FLY STRAIGHT





    FUSILLADE, MEEMIR’S MINUTE-
    A MEN MARCH UPON THE CASTLE... }

    DEFEND ERS’ PIKES AND
    ARROWS...

    AND TRUE AS
    ONY BULLET!



    eye REE! WE MUST

    i plaid eaonit
    1V at THe mo MENT, eR Y SOMEHOW, CAPTAIN i” \
    toe Y GUAR? IS M'SIEU THAT'S JUST WHAT 1’ J

    | ~~ WESTLEY J AFRAID OF -













    LOGICAL! AND THE
    MURDERER STILL CARRIES
    THE WEAPON ! ‘

    WOULDN'T YOU GUESS
    THAT ANOTHER ATTEMPT

    WILL BE MAVE ON HER






    FIGURE IT THIS WAY.
    WHOEVER FAILED TO KILL
    PUNCH SHERMAN VIP KILL =
    ALBERICH.,.. BECAUSE HE aR

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    BY GEORGE MC, MANUS

    satilalenipccnttiagsitia. |
    “CONT BOTHER ME! Speen nnal





    6ORRY - DADDY- ave YOld GOT

    BUT TM LATE NOW





    }
    48 M GOING OVER TO BUT-ITLI d A FEW NAILG ?
    SUSPENDER BUTTON: FOR THE SEWING _/ | MOTHER'S HOUSE MATT !
    ~ ON ME PANTS ARE \ BEE AF MISS <~ KELP HER WITH er ) > A "ee en HAY ae
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    ae ( So ao
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    AS

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    > ea WAPT mn) |








    Zou EONS) AS 5 XS
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    BARBADOS ADVOCsA TE

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    SFE ss SS


    PAGE TEN



    Aussies Lead S. Africa By 301 Runs

    Know, Vente. Cricket ANOTHER GOOD HARVEY INNINGS

    LAW 46—sy 0. Ss. COPPIN



    Our Own Correspcendent)
    BRISBANE, Dec. 8
    With four second innings wick
    ets in hand and an advantage o



    To-day we conelude the study|points as to where the umpire} win the firs€ Test here agains
    of Law 46 which deals with the/shoulq stand, fair and unfair} gouth Africa But for all tha
    Duties of Umpires play etc., I have received a ee
    rap ft ber of queries especially dealing etting ability has gone.
    GROUND, WEATHER with fair and unfair play. B g® y 8

    x om ft I have consulted the M.C.C.

    AND LIGHT j ruling on the matter and it seems

    Unless agreement to the con-|to me to be the best thing to pub-

    a eae the captains (during |"eaders who might not have been
    actual play the batsmen at. the|Clear on the points themselves
    wickets may deputise for their|¢an also have the benefit of the
    captain) may elect to decide in| rulings in question.

    regard to the fitness of the

    ground, weather or light for play
    otherwise or in the
    agreement, the umpires
    quired to decide.

    Play should only be
    when the conditions

    are

    are

    that it is unreasdnable or danger-|pire’s view should be unobstruct-

    is made before the start of | lish the rulings here so that other

    event of dis- |
    re-|

    suspended | it is
    so bad

    | UMPIRE MUST SEE

    Here they are In answer to

    }one query I would point out that
    clearly in the interest of

    the fielding side that the Um-|

    301 runs, Australia are set fair tO) shouteg at them, “Wait until Bed-

    there are signs that their old run-/ wickets fell for 198 to-day before

















    BARBADOS ADVOCATE

    | Australia’s openers left-handed| — -
    Arthur Morris. and McDonald GOLF:

    were nearly two hours in adding} */"“* -
    fifty and an &mnpatien,t crowd)-—



    f



    t) ser and Truman get at you.” W. Ik C

    t! “ Six Australian second innings a er up
    spirited hitting by Lindwall and T. 5 t

    | Langley retrieved the position, ournamen

    The Australians might have

    | Been in even worse straights but

    | for lapses in the field by the South

    | Africans.

    | Big scores have not been made

    iby Australia for some time and

    | there has been a lack of stability

    | Since the departure of Bradman

    land Barnes.

    | Harvey . again

    By EDDIE HAMILTON
    LONDON.
    It’s time
    was applied to the
    raising the

    some commonsense
    problem of
    £4,000 which the R.
    played well for and A. say they need if they are
    \ fifty-two but there is no more cer-
    } tainty throughout the order.
    Tayfield flighted his off spinners
    | well to take three for 111 in thir-
    | ty-two overs but Watkins was un-

    to send a Walker Cup team to

    the States next year.
    Suggestions on

    throughout

    raise the wind have so far pro-

    how golfers

    the country might

    For Gelfers

    TUESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1952

    ~
    SOOO OOOO
    %

    SHIRT

    GARBERDINE $4.50

    SHIRT

    *
    $3.75 &

    66,566"
    OSLO SPOTTOOSSâ„¢

    POPLIN DRESS

    *
    S|
    2 |
    % |
    %

    s
    ou $1.98 B

    SHIRT

    a

    COTTON SPORT! . $1.95

    IN RIOT OF SHADES



    ey
    x
    % |
    %
    %
    %
    3
    ous for it to continue. The ground|ed. They would therefore be un- | | able ng repeat his first innings — little hard cash, When Z s
    : ; . and success and finished with none for | 25ked the R. and A. this weel &
    is unfit for play when water] wise to press the umpire to stand | forty r e LOY | how their fund stood, I was told: x
    stands on the surface or when it;where he does not want to; they | | 2 “The response from clubs is slow %
    is so wet or slippery as to dgerve | ae oa ‘ieee Mere nine Morris © Melle b Tayfield.... sa |but steady, we are still in x
    the batsmen or bowlers of a doing so either, : ; Donald stpd. Waite b Tayfield 17 | argent need of mi ” x
    ; pire. is re ne Hassett .c McGie . 7 gent need of more money. © |
    reasonable foothold, or the fields- An umpire’ is ne at i re Harvey fan ee aoe a I can't blame the golfers for FROM INDIA ~
    men of the power of free move-!inform any incoming batsman i | Milter Lb.w. Tayfiela 3 | putting the Walker Cup appeal) $ ~
    ment. Play should not be sus-/the number of balls remaining in é Hole |.b.w. Melle 42 |so far down their list of charity R
    pended merely because the grass;an “Over” in progress, but he Eiviwalt not ot 20 gariributieaiae-T "aan: 400.) oats x REXWEAR COTTON SHEETS
    is wet and the ball slippery should give the information if | " ” aware of what the boys on the x 80” x 100” Each
    asaed for it. Total ‘for six wkts.) 22 | football terraci ie i y A seth eeammevagnsoseserunradecaso ir ee
    A PLAY STOPS J » sg - ” — Fi cr. ootball terracing would say if “s
    etn — ¢ ones Gon casese ono yee - | Bowling: Melle--two for 18; Tayfield the S.R.A. asked for money to . >
    tilede Of vise z RAY LINDWALL ‘three for 111 send a side to South Africa. FROM U.S.A. xX LIBRAY COTTON SHEETS
    After. any suspension of play,| OF C'ose OF play. Offer Something x ony Mloageish ng
    = += tig *. : ine freee FIELDSMEN’S DON’TS No, the Walker Cup Commit- x x y 0o+becete odetsdensbadees
    fas been le oO 1em, e : ; y
    ires, unaccompanied by any of CYCLING: | glee ‘won't get our money unless % bg
    p a. : . ; AL we , | they can offer something better ¥ LILY-WHITE COTTON SHEETS
    the players, will without further) The wearing of gloves by the] 7" than the licking I anticipate for] $ % ”
    instruction carry out an inspec- | \ pea ag? is an pdersioge ; | dux teum at Bete, thm, neat x TO” "S00" Backs wFisevidinienes
    tion immediately after conditions! practice but fieldsmen should no Me ° ‘ | Rentheae i . SS., ; 4
    : ake | ‘ r all Brit- y
    improve, and will continue to In-|wear gloves, bandages or plaster Le XICANS Leading | To the Sports Editor ish team, amateur or professional REXWEA
    spect at intervals. Immediately to protect org? hands, without I Cc I SIR,—It has been my good for-| has Sie eaataes in, mocsing’ a au FROM U.K ¥ 2 R COTTON PILLOW CASES
    the responsible parties decide|the consent of the opposing cap- , Ra » tune to be among the fairl re Sco . 20” x 80% Bach. oecccccacccctcccstecs
    that play is possible, they must|tain and then only if special cir- n ye e€ CE . nong fairly large} tory on American soil.

    call upop the players to resume | cumstances

    the game.

    Sinee publishing the first part | permission
    of this Law which touched upon!such cases,



    CRICKET:

    Second Division —

    John P. Egglesfield, of Wanderers Cricket Club per-
    formed the ‘hat-trick’ as the last series of Second Division
    games got underway last Saturday.

    Egglesfield’s performance was against Combermere

    School grounds. His final analysis was five wickets
    for nine runs. Other good performances last Saturday were
    returned by Mr. Smith of Combermere, who in the same
    match captured five of Wanderers wickets at a personal
    cost of 40 runs, Goddard of Y.M.P.C., who took six wickets
    for 11 runs against Lodge and his team-mate Austin who

    at the

    took four for 11.

    In their match against Wander-
    ers, Combermere were skittled
    out for 57 runs, of which Mr,

    Smith scored 24. He was the only
    double figure batsman. Besides
    Egglesfield performance, Ram-

    say also bowled well to capture
    three of the school boys’ wickets
    for 20 runs,

    Wanderers Reply

    In their turn at the wicket,
    Wanderers realised 132 runs,
    with Egglesfield putting in a

    good all-round performance by
    scoring 26, Packer 25, Ramsay 18
    and Armstrong 16, Bowling for
    Combermere, Mr. Smith took



    necessitate it. The
    is entitled to inquire if
    has been granted in

    MEXICO, Nov. 8.

    Mexicans dominated the first
    | ten places in the standings at the
    } end of the eighth lap of around
    Mexico bicycle race holding all
    but one third—which was occu-
    ied by Rolland Bezamat of
    | France with twenty-nine
    thirtysix minutes and one sec-
    ond. ‘
    The first four Mexicans were
    first Julio Cepeda with twenty-
    nine hours, thirty-three minutes
    fifty-one seconds, second Juven-
    tino Cepeda twenty-nine _ hours,
    thirty-four minutes, fifty-three
    seconds, fourth Galdino Cruz
    twenty-nine hours, thirty six min-
    utes, thirty five seconds, fifth
    Guillermo Santoyo twenty nine
    hours, thirty-seven minutes, five
    seconds.

    umpire

    Foreign Standings

    z | In foreign standings Giacomo
    10 runs. while Goddard and) Citter the Venezuela ed the field
    Austin wreaked havoc among the| jn the twelfth place with twenty
    batsman, taking six for 11 and|nine hours, thirty-seven minutes
    four for a_ similar amount of) fifty-nine seconds, Granco Cac-
    runs respectively. |cioni of Venezuela was thirty

    Batting again, Y.M.P.C, scored| second with twenty nine hours
    24-for the loss of one wicket by | fifty-one minutes six seconds,
    the close of play.



    urday, | af ave oa eee ws
    1 ores: onds anc uis Bahamandes of
    PMO ve Lotte at Beckles {Chile was fifty-eighth with thirty
    Hance ct | ,| hours, twenty-nine minutes, fifty-
    Y.M.P.C, 1st innings:— 52 ae |"s oe. di ie
    Edghill 17; Redman four for 16,| 1" team standings Mexico oc-

    cupied -all of the first eleven
    Mayers four for 21, Brookes one) places except for the ninth held

    five for 40 and Weekes two for |for 6, Douglas one for 4), and 24!) Venezuela and the eleventh
    25 , a} for one. 4 by France.

    Batting again, Combermere had| Lodge ist innings 22 (Cook 10; _uP
    scored 18 for the loss of one;Goddard six for 11, Austin four ee
    wicket by close of play. ee eee ee . EET
    is not out 14, | anderers vs. Combermere at) . .

    At Beckles Road where|Combermere. SWIMMING:

    Y.M.P.C, entertained the Lodge | Combermere list innings:— 57| ——-— .
    boys, ¥.MP.C. batted first and| (Mr. Smith 24; Egglesfield five

    were all out for 52. B. Edghill|for 9, Ramsay three for 20), and
    batsman to reach |18 for one (Skeete 14),

    was the only
    double figures, his score was 17,

    When Lodge batted, they fared
    even worse than the home team
    for they wero



    BONING :

    Scrap This Absurd Rule |.

    By MALCOLM TURNER

    LONDON.

    The Boxing Board of Control
    have a rule requiring any boxer
    who has lost his last four con-
    tests to appear before, his area
    council for questioning. If the
    council is not satisfied with his
    answers they may recommend
    London headquarters to suspend
    his licence,

    This regulation has been intro-
    duced with the praiseworthy ob-
    ject of protecting boxers from
    becoming ‘“punch-drunk” — a
    much publicised malady that is
    not nearly so common as the de-
    tractors of boxing would have us
    believe.

    Any boxer may lose four de-
    cisions in a row. They may be
    narrow points verdicts which



    ye not affected him physically
    or mentally in any way and I



    | They'll Do It Every Time —
    V TAKE SOME OF YOUR. STUFF
    4 OUT, SO WELL HAVE ROOM
    FOR OUR FISH, WILLYA, JOE?




    AN; SAY HAVE YOU gor
    SOME < :
    , eau 7



    dismissed for 22\Smith five for
    runs with Cook top-scoring with'for 20).



    Long Distance
    Swim

    |_ Seventeen - year - old Malcolm
    Browne, member of Snappers
    water polo team on Sunday swam
    non-stop from Christ Church
    lighthouse to Rockley Beach—a
    distance of ap-
    proximately five
    miles — in’ two
    hours and 20
    minutes.. At one
    time he _ estim-
    ated he. was al-
    most’ a mile off
    shore.

    Wanderers ist innings 132)
    | (Egglesfield 26, Packer 25, Ram-|
    \say 18 and Armstrong 16; Mr.!
    40, Weekes three















    think it is ridiculous that they
    should be galled upon to explain
    such defeats,

    What would happen in other
    sports if a rule like this were en-
    forced?, It would be farcical to
    ask the manager of a football team
    to explain four losing games in
    succession or a jockey to say why

    After his swim
    Browne said he
    originally plan-



    his last four mounts were beaten. ned to swim to
    t h-e-~ Barbados

    It is equally absurd in boxing. Aquatic Club
    Well-known boxers have been} (another _ three
    requested to appear before recent) Malcolm Browne mile@s) but an in-
    meetings of the Scottish council jurea ankle

    of the board, and this week an-| (hurt playing football recently)

    other prominent fighter was sumM- | tpgubled him, Otherwise he was
    moned, | quite fresh when he _ reached
    No doubt he, like the others,; Rockley. When his ankle is bet-

    was told it was Just a routine! ter, he will make another attempt.

    check-up. But weil-meant though | Browne, who works for the Ww.
    the rule is I suggest it should be| Biscuit Co, Ltd., represented
    scrapped or that the number of| Barbados in one of the inter-
    defeats calling for an .inquiry | colonial water polo games against
    should be inereased to six.—L.E.S. | Trinidad in October,

    By Jimmy Hatlo |
    JOELL CuT THis SS=
    UP FOR ME. EASIER
    TO STORE INHIS
    FREEZER













    NS Sn
    S GC[E
    YEAH! WERE WN

    GONNA GIVE you mM
    A SLICE, Y'KNOW. |||!
    THIS LL KEEP FOR

    YEARS IN HERE,



























    YOU GET OUT OF - |
    » YOUR OWN FREEZER?|

    B. \TEANX AND A LIFT OF

    THE HATLO LID 7 @
    > C.F SOETESIER, SR,
    a LY ‘42h mARVEW ALE,
    z ee 7 LOLS /g, MO.

    hours, | the whole day’s play was like,

    |Guiseppe Cavagna of Venezuela
    The games conclude next Sat-| Was forty sixth with thirty hours

    |crowd who at Kensington Oval | Sending our boys over. the
    last Saturday saw the opening of! water as “poor relations” isn’t
    j the annual B.C.A., B.C.L. cricket} likely to put them in conquering
    }match, and now for the benefit! mood.

    }of those who have found it in-| Let's get the finances on a per-
    ; convenient to attend I ask you! manently even keel.

    | for space in your most valuable; 1 offer golf headquarters this
    } column to explain to them what! solution to their problem: Invite
    ; the 3,000 or so golf clubs in
    | While I do not want to be too| Britain to run a summer tourna-
    rash in dealing with any indi-| ment on the lines of the Victory
    vidual member or members of) Shield competition of the Down-
    are team I oat hardly be com-| field, Dundee club.

    mitting myself when I _ out- i

    spokenly declare that the game sete eS ee
    jin itself has been a very dull af-| +ounds as they like during the
    |fair. It has been unable to en-| three summer months of this
    | tertain any but the cricket thirsty | handicap tournament’s run — by
    | “which must have been very few | paying 6d. for each card they take
    jindeed” and for the selectors | out i

    | themselves who must have been Their best foug scores fount
    | watching the game it has pro-|each month, the lowest aggregate
    vided little or no scope at all for | winning a monthly sweepstake.
    |them. Indeed to be frank about|The 12 lowest rounds over the
    | the entire day’s play all that I! three months win the Shield.
    have seen for anyone to rejoice The Downfiela tourney has pro-
    about was the remarkable bowl-| duced a revenue of up to £10 a
    ing performance of the B.C.L.,| month to the club.

    medium fast .bowler Rudder} Make the fee Is. a card, half
    who in an inspired spell during | going to the club, and donate the
    |the afternoon made the batting | other 6d. to the Walker Cup fund.
    jand the batsmen look terribly If the competition was organised
    | sick, and had it not been for Roy |on a national scale for one sum-
    Marshall and to a lesser extent| mer month, and the 3,000 British
    Clyde Walcott we might have; clubs were prepared to guaran-
    seen a very strong B.C.A. bat-|tee the fund £1 annually, the
    ting team crumple under his on-} feeling of charity would be re+
    slaught for less than fifty runs,| moved.

    and in less than an hour's play Members would support a new-

    |

    What has been responsible for| Style competition that would per-
    Rudder’s great success on aj mit them to play morning, after-
    wicket which could not be de-} moon and evening. The R. and A,

    annual

    scribed as very difficult for bats-] Would be certain of an ue
    e

    men, I shall now explain, First-|imcome and the fature of
    ly he discovered quite early that Walker Cup would be MESA. 4
    there. was some sort of life in the |! :(@t a» L.E.S.

    wicket, and looking at him as I °
    did from the Kensington stand HARD LUCK

    you could see determination
    Mrs. Eileen Sheridan, the Co-



    written all over his face, for de-
    termined he was to extract every
    ounce of life out of the wicket
    jand he succeeded in doing so.
    | Secondly, unlike the other pace-

    | bowlers he did not concentrate ventry house-wife who cycled
    jon short-pitched deliveries but} from Land’s End to Hyde Park in
    rather quite sensibly bowled a! record time, is the subject of the

    | steady length getting the ball to! week’s hard luck story. She has
    moye in to the batsman and| jearned that her performance of
    away from him, and his ability) cevering the 287 miles in 16 hours
    to get the one to lift most dis-| 45 minutes, breaking the record
    concertingly from the proper} by over 20 minutes, will not be

    length made batting .look as officially recognised, The reason
    difficult as the development of

    the “Hydrogen Bomb,” thus I
    rather suspect that on such a
    performance Rudder must have
    posed a most serious threat for) ported in one of Britain’s daily
    the number one position as a pace! papers the morning that she set
    bowler for the Barbados team tc! syt.—L.E.S.

    play against India, It has been! C

    for a very long time now sincé we |

    forbidding advance publicity on
    record attempts—for reasons of
    road safety. Eileen’s bid was re-



    last saw bowling of this type at! sy re E
    Kensington. Oval. In actual fact! Bu St S
    the last time I saw ‘such @| . Roebuck Street was busy yes-
    demonstration of this kind of |terday morning with shop keepers

    bowling was in 1942 when Lance

    'who came to the city to order

    Career. Tam particularly ‘happy |e weekly, stocks of provisions.
    about this bowler because he is Lorries. “ana. .cars".cwned by

    eity and country merchants were
    parked on both sides of the road, |
    and in some places, only one line;
    of traffic could get through,

    A policeman between Pinfold
    and Crumpton streets helped to
    direct traffic, but several anima)
    drawn carts using the highway
    kept traffic at half speed.

    On the pavements and entran-

    of a calibre quite
    these parts, and
    dict that if he is given his op-
    portunity now, West Indians
    would have something to rejoice
    about in the not too distant
    future, for the long time search
    to find a successor to England’s
    Maurice Tate would have come
    to an end when Rudder takes his

    unusual in
    I strongly pre-

    rightful place for the West In-|ces to side streets sellers of fruit,
    dies against India in his first test| Vegetables etc., added to the
    ; match, busy condition of the street,

    Thanking you for space. {| Swan Street which was used
    ARCHIBALD PERCH, (as a “one way” street on Satur-



    Gall Hill, day was opened to traffic from
    Christ Church, ‘both sides yesterday. Traffic
    8.12.51, : {through this street was also

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    =—-~ —

    HERE'S A SLICE OF
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    1

    a ea i EK pt sete: on






    PAGE 1

    PACK KIC.HT BARBADOS ADVOCATE TIK-OAV. I'D I MBER . IMS CLASSIFIED ADS. ,,,H,M svrKKS %  * %  ••'* %  TK'. LPHONK 2>0t IHfcD %  1 %  rend. : lNMK.MOKIAM MIH m:vr HOI'S I S MM SALE Al rfOHOTn I CAW M.. ••• Under a.***. 1,". .... an*. Apfc.. I*AH IS* FAA*AV rulU >, ..... i %  u.n t Walennill tJl-p Caiport. Ell room. Monthly i-nl SSO plus f) dNVm chaise. IN ADVAKCK I "%  .-LfljaV-f II.I I MAN STATION WAI I It MO (tlllr1M.net dtivwi AIWHJDN %  ..(-I wurklna Or,*** HI'AI.SMAW A C0M1 IIJU tin %  I .s i rT or V S A (urutwi Ma. .' %  < %  I; TRSV '1ANAC.K 1)1-1 Ml* • I1H *l NrntlAVCM full' S Baevanl room*. LaSh" mill aut-plt alrmthl* eleeaws chars*. IN &f AT* fursiHhed *-bed %  riant. Water,.l T* plu* HVAM1 II 111 )J 11.1 .1 ... .blv pn.-.r K N HskBt* Co sue*' MBLHOMTI Oh MISCELLANEOUS CABINET .it.. ..„, bMti I Ml I* 1 | %  *(,!•. tail .-I. -i—a.d. all the abov. ere manr*,., ? i-rh+ce chain wMh miKtmit upho i < Iteaiio*. Limited or phone ape*. T 1 at* U>* tti fotw • Make your children** — %  >"'' %  ."*' **., i A COMPANY. Be) Slrerl rSsone • A >' % o i NCSMKNTS ..I Autem %  FURMTL'KE IVHMII II %  MM Chair, al 1 %  %  w Con he seen al M'dm.i lit* Dec p %  i a ii LIVBBTOCK ISATIAN Pl'l'l'l < I > it at l'H Eat hi blllo! .. nl. -H .TmiKiled r Wile. %  ">!.. Ptnt Pli...i..linn Phone US* 7 II *] In PUPPIES, nrnch Poodle I'lOttcd .ah...dm I' %  iTMI-MI. %  ii (in M I RI • %  It S1-*B t'AI I HOHSI home! lnndl in I I*Bhem a. A'afeian lln India I VI IPebble'l**.* Slater be*,*. K,,., A,nh... I" %  h ru.lee. Fee. I Al rtvi NOTK r .i lev tM < %  ( in* Mid perlfk • a result" Mr l I -ft BLN i Ihe a—Ml" ol -ml PMr' %  la W-*v NOtlCR Mi Ti % % %  % % %  i Wedr.'-!... || %  II Michael MESSIAH T MMHAII.a I'AtHIIIIIAI. • IHMWDAV imi Dtx-RMnut M a it p m li.ar.nm.. may • obiamr.1 itoaa M flaik of in* Caihrdi.-.!. in* Advora UMI%  r M. .,. W.rd at %  MM VESTRY ELECTION NOTICES m-.HEMV Klv* nn'.r that I hi** I ni'iuif. CUM. hwland NUfl. III".P a* the plaea •"" 1-anal.lonrr. • ln parlali ol ai laicliaal and oihcr pcrhioa aul q u>UlkiJ nla at uii> alrvUin ul VailrviMm tui %  • ,i II. r Ml. da. ul Jat.uao. IMI Wiwn.. i.a I...M uf I* and II .n| u aktct a r 1i* for th. Pan.i. 4 Hi M^W. r Ihr yar laaj II IK V || BURTON. LOST STTl'IIM tPio.iom tmn W. and> 7. (..rmr % %  *n turn IO .ill I I ..' 'I HiMifxlrr. Combtrrni W AMI If MOCRLLAMROUR ..... Houaa fin n I lona i.. ar la %  taalhi Priona I I'l If i.ir BJOMM REALRSTATR DKNIB MONIB rULHOTlB Twi i-.—. al Hainanaba. allha, .,„„,, of -pa^atol. Apply I) S Pavn, Harrow I Philip 7 12 M .^ LAND -a Rood* f I MM Qiif j i Hutunf < nnf Chatln Ptla __^ • II 1 -tM. MTRi \ r MvariMit iu>Ai> oppoau Otaam I -mUlni i a Hoard ;n>ndU. an public rootna. lour om>... nata aC and kiutirn Vrr> nil it 11 !•> wnvaraion i-.io aaparauapartment*. And idiii on la.aTo *q II of valuable "'ater %  Ic.l l ..... nd arn .I.I t lor i underalflned l>i'1-tn I", aala U> utilillc al tbalr atlWe. II Idan Thuiaaar. Ith Da, emh*r COTTU;. CAWOHI) le*t ii'n.ai>( I" intpptl J| oil I-I thv uubltc cxnpalillun A O %  v*riry Naon. r the %  Mh day ol January laW I .fid n ... I.-ii, in* momu u. rlr. i a Vtr lot in. Par -h Ckrlat Ckir.K lu' iha *ra. IMI WOOD tOUCMUn. %  / %  arnrhial Ttaetuiar. .1 CaMaTtaV rAPlaat U at I IIFfUXBV alvr nMm that a. th* pl V. I, I(. %  .11 the m. <;in. s.l ir 72.-. Dcserl Sane T*ll Mr l-IUIr .H't Morocru A Komrrtfr Krpnlnr, Sudiiip Firr $i.ll The ) %  inniu Koni ll.iU4ii.in M4ina>i. Mh M.H..I, lo.h.i, I % % %  %  I .Ii 1 Hani To Ite WHk Vnu Alavsn Is II Truf What Thrv Hay About HIM. Christmas Suggestion < urlli l.ln It .km : in-!, W Li.-. Air KIHe ninrlimtrr Tsrsrl Ctun lluaquvanui H>wtni Marhine Volthlliuidrr ('amera ".riel Molar I'yrlr rraiKl^-Rarnell Molor Tyrlr I'huloriMpti A Ilium I'.nllo, li| ulr Hltlski lltKliul Uill.ii.r AddiriK M i. h.nr %  ) %  ., Wat iJmS. • %  ;. caatn t H..uthem I II M >IK< ll\M( Al. .. v. ii, M 1 related. Call rattotM ** !" 1 II 13 : H'livi l IS ItaM -rff.:vrd ai.ll-hlp %  %  i from a >aara L. • r-n flrdman A T..U..L ii.. ufj 1.1.1 II an a illi UMI. STNAKE8 Tor y.Harn> in WO t Wheel eonaa •.hralaput AND H4CHEA8I TIlA.TKlN of raw r. Ipa> Oaiaae *1 MLS( KLLANl.*lUS t'AHita a..led I II ' pel .-,... al 14 I i %  1 in (-llllkSTMAK l'AHl A %  MflH-lll of %  ..n mm %  • % %  II II %  •• .1 .1,: t'SSti I'HiiDI i H i .1)1111 tit) *h %  1 IV. I. I I Oallont. git* l-inta an.) '> J'mU Aeroanl. rill Powder r.*o Handy llouaehold W.i., LlKM.r ' . Cleaner. Radiator Protn-txr St< n > Le..k Span***. Spa'" Plu*. II..ke Fluid.. Drum* end Pail. A tibl.ined from K. M Join. A < „ I M Phone 1M JI II Sa I f n MaaffaVnOM ROVBMI rv .nte that all %  •erfeeltoi. to\* pan. c. lie obtained from R M Janaa C< lid White l*eik. Phone •* n II iitt i KIIUWCAXEII Thtee ATUVIS Hpecui of!., for in day* A a Phirtier Valor Pto.ea A ilvena Ufa T>ie Co. TrataUrar A Spry lal ata* i t vote -i a,,, election VteUjaaia for the WD Puii.li ma) aemble nn afi.l.>. the Ml. day u muary. llea. keta.en IIK hauM of II d II a'clwl in the morntni to elei ii.r real IH3 A T h. %  Paroiiiifll Treaaurer. ., ,„. • II ia la rtiXIDVIUA. ItinUiHlli-. -tandina i aa at* n, aerea el land with ooah.it and .ilher Tteea Impectio.. lall> Ham to I p m Telephone aPW t l> f* -n Colonial Law Students Meet Legal Stars LONDON. Chairman of the Society's Coloni i'. Colonial law studenu studying Committee. Ii. Britain rud an opportunliy lait Mr. Hopklnaon. in a apeech to month of mrtting men prominrrt the aueats. atreaaed his Party'J jn legal t-irclca here. grnuine and sincere interest in piuThe occasion was • '^a-party greasivp evolution of aalf-governven at the Royal Empire Society men! for the Colon in.' \i\n\ i,t CtHirl Cons. • alive and Unionist Society. The Inna of Court Conservative Sir David Maxwell Fyfe. g.( Society has an ambitious proUie Horn* SacreUry. and Chairgramme for the winter of discus* RIM of the Society, spoke witn slon* on topics of current mtereel. many of the guests. Others present particularly concerning the Colonincluded: Mr. Henry Hopkinso-i. kr*. of Slate for Colonial Th first of these, al the end of Affairs. Mr J E. S. Simon. Q.C November, will bo on the "Colour M.P.. Vice-Chairman of the Bar." Colonial and commonwealth Mr. Ashe Lincoln. Q.C students are expected to take partGOVERNMENT NOTICE IMHI -* PAHrlAD"" CHANCERY SALE • i Miei.iioned property will la m insllfldeetn-.n. bel-reen II I cifled b.to*. If not then raU a am place and durtnj lite t up lor sale at OJ.I and iI .VI be -. r Fleauli.tton OnVe, HUGH T* D : aid alu-eeeld farmcrkauppoaad > or thereabout, but found by and Sl> Peerhea 11. -l PI'MlfRrrTV AIX TfffAT .. tail, i.iece or pare.I •he panah el Chmt Church and li to contain b> *ti" at ton Pour Ai %  ecenl iui.f. to oaila.r rive Aer* 4butuns and bmindlns on the Nort m the X-.1 on land, fona-arly l Allen Walcoll but now of g M H II Sullitan *i- the Batata of J Hayne* deceaaed On the South on land, of Graeme Hall Plantation on Larata of T Coaatd on a Plaad and on the Weet on ISM Pviblio PUaad 1 ho%or elaa th* aame may abut or bound UPM.T PNICE: gl.OM. 0 O OATt: OP SA1J! ISth Deccmhe. IMS H WaUlAMS 11 ae/i .lr a r-1 n-Chanr r ry • il u an. •ARBAD • %  CHANCERY SALE IMVERIIITV COLLEGE OK fill tfaatfl BARBADOS EAHIBITIONS 1M The Examination for two (J) Baroutlos G %  %  tenable al th e University College of the West Indies will i ductttl in Barbados by the University Collog,. in i-imsultat..... the Director of Education, and will consist of:— (i) a written examination to be held in thi* week beginnir.g Monday. February 23rd. 1953. Candidates must be:— College. Tin clo-lne | it will be eel up on each suet fl.dat al Ihe same place ..nd during Die same hour> until .old. Full part WINieTUNE IKVU4C OIUlTlTH JAMs4 IHfTUN aalOOtdX arting hen EDNA OftCUlA BH'JOML hit -I' • %  <• the in."* AUCTION UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER Oy Inttmellona rerrlveu from Ihe !. •iiran.e ,\, I w.U SSlI 0*1 Fl It. Ilih .i I p n n u.e i ..urttir Oar. age. Whitepark Ski leal J" NT ChevTolel WiaStM.. .Until rarenUy Ihr peonr'tt nl lh* PoUre Dept I Da.' .Bed in a-e.4ei<*i Tssm. Caah VaefCgMI %  II1TITH, LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE Nll.-ni.l Allf-.B*.. Ke. Road. Bank i >>-i H oi >i riisa ii.at I have Hi, Bpeushi.. MH ). BajhjaSM r Mh day of 1SU. between the hours of it !." "i l'-i I V..ii. for the Pail.h ol !t Pate, htr Ihe teal IBOd CORB1N. Ii.., m MI. %  usnl l-K'UKKTY All THAT eartalii piece or the parish of a-.n.l Peter a .i.it One rood Tt.lr area BxaSit parchai harm pact mo beunduig uei lands of blx Men Linda of R A C Challenor Ltd •f land ,.tuelc al But Hens In aid containing by adthenabouta lof wt.ieh Public Raadi abut tin* Plantation on th. •aashotr v" 1h* Public Road or howrv.e. nd bound together DwelUnghouae thereon sod all Other buikSliuu and IPKUUII* OI. the %  Bid parcel ol land erected and bulll -tandins and t*lnS '<" the •ppurleiiaiicp. t'pfarr JT.K'E gM a o DAT*: QT MlfCl rMh Deeessk-e. ISM WM.UA>48 lK(iliai-lfH' hancao GOVERNMENT NOTICES SHIPPING NOTICES M. V. DAERWOOD will be arriving at Barbaf|>as an TI'LSDAY 9Ui December and will be viMIm: .. j, WFDM.SDAV I"' Dr. erotber for HI. Lurla, Si Vinrciv*. (.rrn.rt. \ruba. srrepllns I'absrngen and Freight. U 11.52In. Ha ^i i\*ii ^ .inlrd Ihe Veatiy Boom near th, .I> aa th, place whe.e al iiu..l fled lo vole at an lion of Vestrymen '•" Ihe — a Pun.: ..... .,1. i.n -.1... .i... II • %  '!" da IBSJg, %  — inen for In. .aid I'-n.h may .earniUle Ml Mend q Uta Mh 1-43. between Ihe hours o nd II a'charl in lh* nionilna 1" • V. .Iiv lii Ihr Par ah of Si Join he yswi lasa ii %  i"A*nt .,.,-..' III. ,...I l-.l •) %  H Ihe Bias dult quallfWd lo •astlleai ..r Vestrymen foe th. may aaaemble on Monda Ihe 0 pf January, IBS), between the h. IS and 11 o'clock in the ii.irmns to .l*CI a v..it. lor the Pariah of st. Lucy lo* Ihe 1 *ai IBM .vu, Al.ll IK \M. i, lf.fl IB rtSJM* oi -r ninir 1 liriliaiV si.< nota-r that t hav. ippoinli'd Ihe Chu'tli Boya' School neai Ihe Paruh Church, aa ihe place when any Election of VaatmsMM lui ih |d I' >h. may aaarmble on M a n da/ I Jiiuar>. ISM. b*l\.eei. i>. I....ii, ..I 111 and II a m lo elect a Veti lie l-atlali ul SI. Plilllp toUti %  .nd Miina,' I reudrnee it R. RiMd B... %  h.ll SI Ulcl.ael n.ted ihl. Blh dv ,H Decrnibet lfM. ro X A McIJEOD Km Po-ae t*aa -"al. Ii %  A NATHANtn. AlUDIf uai g£g* %  aW g' tV -irt. IN-lrlil A" un PrtrlS). Ihe ISth day of December. IMI, M 11 n.biek | %  A Pvlkra slaautiatr inn "A," ^^^^^^^^^^^ S it MIn LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE APPLICATIONS are Invited for two vacuiit noa-pnalonablf> part-time posts of Assistant Visiting Surgeon on the staff of the Crncral Hospital. Applicants must be registered medical pruclltionci? The salary attached to the appointment is $240 per annum and the officer will be entitled to fees for services rendered lo paying patients in the Hospital. Further information may be obtained from the Director of Medical Services lo whom applications should be forwarded by llh December. 1952 I.11.5J.—2n. W*.U>U] 10 appln. BSJkSt SSI Hi.hj.ri r... permuaioo (.. Mall Liquor. Ac at a wall u i :-nlin alla.he.1 | a i..idi"i.. • Ick Gap. We.tbi.rv ll.uid Si Haled Una SUi day of Decci r> K A Mrl.a*r>D Em. Police U.,.i-, IH.I A Ucsssssng mrl. Dlat'Ht -A* 1 daw of Decembr.. N!. 1 . >l) I [li.l A' t II PSLIQUOR LICKNSi: NOT1CK Mr-hael. f 1 '.. %  I'I. l..i Mllrlarv I o„.l HH.II Hal: r perinl* 1 : I ........ .„ %  Hiih Hall. SI MMharl Dated thi. Blh day of Deri-mh* lp| r.> l: A S*.lt*>U> |u •MI... MasMtrsja DM A ntnm-.-iA TAVIHH „ _ Applh-ar.*N n This application .ul be oat. %  i-.l [ I,,I„I, ,.,.,, (. 1. ,„i a at Pun,* touit. Dlaln.l 'A' on rtldaw Ihe IStii day of Decen.be*. ISM. 11 aelork. a m K A sscUtOP, Polii-e M Ii .lr r-i.1 A" 8 II W--I1 LIQUOR LICKNSI-: NOTICE The appl.alon of C..n.'..i %  • *Hapkeaoar nf Villa Road, holder fa* 1 m,,.. I trenae No SS4 of ISSI. S'anteel lo her In rr.pecl of a board and ahlns .hop al mmrr of laialn.ond to.ne %  n d.ii,.i. Kad. SI Michael for pe astan lo u .aid Liquor Itcenae al iK'ard and Uiinale shop altarhed al Villa ll.uid It. I MUhael. tinted Ihl. Mh da> of Deer Mrl HI Eaq H ;„ VACANT TOST PRINCIPAL. GOVERNMENT TRAINING COLUEGE. TRINIDAD Appli.aiioiis are invited for the post of Principal. Government Training College in the Education Department which will become 'acant early in 1953. The post is pensionable and the salary Is 35.280 a year. Cotl if Lr. ing Allowance at such rates as may be in force from time to lime is also payable. The appointment will be subject to medical lltnesa and the successful candidate will be on probation for two years In the lint instance. The appointment will alao be sublect to the Colonial Regulations and the Civil Service Regulations' and Instructions in force for the time being, in so far as they are applicable. TRAVELLING The successful candidate will he authorised to keep a car for •he performance of his duties and will be eligible for travelling allowniie in accordance with the regulation* in force from time to time. Ol 1 ALIFI CATIONS Applicants should possess — (a) An Honours degree of a British University; and A recognised post-graduate teaching diploma: and (c) Experience of training teachers in a recognised Training College. Ability to take charge of tuition in elementary science is highly iles Ira ble. DI'TIEH OF THE POUT 1 To ro'itrol and conduct, under the direction of the Director of Education, the Government Training College for teachers, consisting of approximately 120 man and women students. 2 To take part in and direct the lnatruction given by the ataff to atudenti in training for teaching poeta in primary and intermediate schools. 3 To perform such other duties in connection with the train* j ing of teachers as may be required by the Director. Such ssssstal will include the usual extra eumcular activities and 1 general MipervLsioii of arrangements in boarding hostels. 4. To visit schools to supervise students during practice-leaching and to secure liaison with the Training College. Applications should be submitted to tht Colonial Secretary. Triniil.id nnd Tobago, and must reach him before the 31st December, 1932. Copies and not originals of certificates and tesitrnoiiialfi should be submitted, 29.11.8a—So. SAGUENAY TERMINALS F.um Mont .. JANNA as. -noawsi 1 a A vn.su CANADIAN Sr.RVKI Ml, Halifax ..nd Balnt Jotta lap.cted Aarlval ll..11.. | J I,JI Ual*s Barbade. Ki Kv ;i Rat IB December — P Deo S He.-. u Deeember U.K. HERV1CK From Newport, Swansea, Liverpool and Glasgow 1 ii"--K.I Arrival Newport l.i.ifi lUnaa.l I.)..ia. Hale. Barbade. • a OaiaULV ill .ndt.cen.rnt> .'1 .'. IS December KOGBJVAEH B Dec. IS Dae. IB Dec. a January a %  "POLYTHADni Early Jam..... Raaiy Prbrunv U.K. AND CONTINENTAL SERVICE Froaa Hamburg. Rotterdam and I ..ml. HI Agents PLANTATIONS LTD. Phone 4703 ALCOA STEAMSHIP COMPANY, INC POST OF KIPFRINTFNDENT OF PUBLIC HORKU. GRENADA invited for the post of Superintendent of Public onlmct for three yeara. Appllrnltnni Works. Grenada. SALARY: The salary of Hit post will be m the range Irotn 1.200 to 11.500 per annum according to the candidate's experience .md iiualincatiouii. In addition, a transport allowance al the into ol C315 por anruim Is payable. Coat of living allowanco Is no* payable DUTIES : The Oflicer will be required to perform all duties appertaining to the office of Superintendent of Public Works. In addition, he holds Ihe following appointmentby virtue of his office i Chairman of the Central Road Authority. Chturwian of the Central Wster Authority Chairman of the Queen's Park Committee: Member of several other Boards and Cocnmittee.i. He will also be required to undertake auch other duties a may from lime to lime be imposed on him by the laws of "he Colony direction of thr Officer Administering the Government. QUALIFICATIONS : The Candidate must be a Corporate Member of Ihe Institute of Civil Engineers and must have good Administrative experience and ability. QUARTERS: Quarters are uot ordinarily provided, but if necessary, con^deration may be given lu this question. In iheevent of quarters being provided rental will bo charged at a rate not exceeding 10 per cent, of the officer's salary. LEAVE J, PASSAGES: The officer will be elqjible bj earn leave, provided that his work and conduct have been satisfactory, at the rata of one week for each completed period of three months resident service. Free first class passages are provided on Rrat appointment. and on satisfactory termination of contract, for the officer and his f.imily Leave passages are not provided. a should be addressed to the Chief Secrel.irv. Wind.1 Island.-.. St. George's. Grenada, and must reach him not later than S'' December, 1952. 23 11 82—Sn il.\AIMA\ SI IK V H I!' (roRTXIBHTi Y) SOl'THaWfl'ND MONTKEAI. n *T JOHN HALU-AX S* ARJt BARBADOS U Limited I'a.aenB*' For further information Doc 11 lie Ipply: Da COSTA I i fajj Jan. 3D Jan. VIEW YORK SERVICE winy mis WKKSI aoUTHBOLND pHJfuTOLJJt BALT1MOU N*;w VOSUC Arr B'DOa SB Dae. IS Dae 1 Jan. NEW oiti.i: \\s sniiiu iiaaiaaaiin %  01 rsanlMD A PtaaUassR %  HAHIB an mi Nl OK1JCANM MOR1LE JAMAICA Aft B DOS IS Nov S Dec SO Dr. IT Hov II Dec. S Dec *> Dae. t Ja.. '_ %  "formalt on BBSMP BOUkHTT TIIOM LTD. ssssssssssassTMSP I |1 IrBgasnsssssssasBj GIVE BOOKS THIS CHRISTMAS | ADVOCATE STATIONERYs saeeeeBBsaci I t.n.i>ioi>iio\i Only 50 more I %  IMOilltS an havr i i I %  M M| :i for SI.IHI CENTRAL EMPORIUM cnr. Br,.ad & Tud %  s-. r 'f-'^^^^r.v^.v.-.-.-.-.^.-...-,...,...,..., v ,.,.,.,., VlV ,.,. l .,._.,.,.,.,., KARL EDMONDS F.R.S.A.. C.P.A. Certified Public Accnunt.. K. R. Ill'\TE HUH DTNC I AfWehT BfOasd Si I Bail, i Temporary PI





    PAGE 1

    PAGE Mm CcUtib Ccdlinq IURU VIM.\h\<>( vil. IIIMiW. IHllMltlK I. itei %  V M !t HAi %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  •-Spurn ln/n< Irui I Ml II U 1 I H I. T*l!..t K 1 nreWfsW Man M K BSOWARD olocut ..r i n WB>-utioned m San luan, %  .., %  %  tl U ,. I V pan ii. : .... %  .,' %  rh* ; %  F.nfttyiiUli' livliilu\ Am:;: %  UM Anitii N %  BAA.I left on ">*'" Ii* w.i A la tod with ii %  tlH Hotel Re I lab U/// Vriniilii'l i.uiiiiluiii M l I Q \IJ.I\M %  Pei Band %  %  to Trinn by a %  bgotlwi Mi r t; Ailayna, bMdnu b I i %  H in* it r In'ii..mr Guest % %  BatlMhabg From Mr. Pinthtr s science in-ffcc-news nofefrooft— PENICILLIN /or r/ie pigs B CAW IT HAPPEN > A CA.N %  otl ^ M trig* rn i O (J M f Uoil *n.ch la DOuMUl the gro* | .' p ID A Die r sleppin* up -upp.n i %  home-red bacon in Britair by next spring Amancan Boom two which conUim the goidri drug aureomycin nu an aatoniahlng effect on dwari pig* that would normal) %  never n ft ibla lU N0 prr.iii"i. %  ... Or f wlMN I tl-.l.lr W...,!,• Oav* proved mat a Hrirno torn oeaiUsf nln g penicillin instead tiN pQaetiv* Tan dwarf p;,cs or. > tsUckin* naonhlre rann were ifivdo um ooaiaJDina proeaiiw-penicilim form of the wonder drug wtuati la ooi 'leairoyeu ID UM auwnach AH 'cached baton UM anw IUXPJMIONAI. POWWOW .1O. ,. lion Victor Bryan (T.(iudd) and lion D I* Drl.tdin |Br;?i (i MR CIlRIBTir. SMITH and hi* CuiiMmA* Hamper H hill II fllllll/H'l M \< y HBIST1E SMI PH II •• %  ': • : \ in 11 looked bampat %  • %  %  iek> i.iimiifi i ;.n UM KM Fall .i OM S-lb tin >( Kill ona Ui oi i if" 'M Of i :." latl OfM .Mb till "f ham, t battle <>' Whaasay, ona bat* ,., i tin blicuiU. Ifvlurnvil Tn TrimtUiil %  hi bj ii w i A %  Lndiai i by hla (..rid Manin..who I. I afatouli I'm %  %  %  id ihortl) ffi'frfnhrr CaaVBA M ISS AtlKtJKA WALTEHS. Hrallh N > Public Hraitii Caatri ii -. !i returned t r n %  %  laUl moBBha, fhrr*<>i whlft %  %  i %  i nlra .II.I in,othi i with Kvfiiilur I isilur Barbados i* altl Clark of M da who cBmi in on 1 l! W i .'. : i %  ml "id i a OMMBI lh wlntoi ha .in I ihm Mgmn MI -lnl\ than -hi' hai" through %  ama i f Iba i w t'dtibbe^n. She wild that %  ..in in mill Aikjual • A HHIVINC i,v the nmr ircratl ktad wwra Ui R. G > ..i in.. II <>i PSA who had bran rWaldinaj v. n< auala loi Iha baal tin i e i fhag maai •.. bo here I h Club '.iii. %  i nmnBUj. R P.C I I'.r.nnn./ Bl URNIHG ta i ai i %  %  %  %  %  .n ttad ii-..' Ini BO % % %  forward to —tliT'm I is II Passenger S I rung in Canada b^ Thurad.1. v-ugh..i. Mcc.-rd ..f iha Traffi) r i ul. lie iptfiit two week* BCllda] cnaataJi HaaoL V.8. 111 iila s M iss HI LOAH QARNI '• %  t.il lefi the latafl for the USA Via I'urrto Rtco ^\ B WJJL gone to apend %  KIX innntha* holiday w|t| | i'l I klVM I Sim C RATUIATIOM to Mr. anrl M rhorpB i.i. lie pitai %  Blackmail of Bt %  %  Jo itrooklyn A Ml '"• %  ..*, | Lagtllij 1 .. %  't.. Rioo %  i '.. | | ' I \ Smitn ol Praa-oajB t NBy St. %  % %  %  i %  paaail I %  v School and in : i ii'.-i i -i %  i .. %  %  %  i-iyn. On hnif( BjCaMBJ ]Vt U ""' ll(S %  (; owuou ' : Vnl.,i„: i. TIUIIMK.V i,\ II u i A %  rta f..i .i holktaj < i rlon'blo and Mrs H. A. Cuka Baaavf*" ith Ava BtllovUkf. %  illoli bj the ronnc t Mi,-. nfadfi CUM, VB. ^at au tad ay Londoocr. aweda Bo WJWO t>' nruari or %  Wtii %  BMBg i (fiuaco Biiaiiiai ne laca an up-ad4ko aioiluii of iQf aprmg-ioadad IBBMJOIOI "tauirt Baaa] u, raaraai n "">n in pu* u lor •ySa H Wijret .ii.ii.. ft %  wn nmOianut BBUd ranairuiDlc ioi sucn •'. doaton UHBI 'nu UM aotra DVIIOTO U. oe MHI ccMKemed wiu —h nan or BmrVag So If i: at riaieauy aiatnuMtaa it % %¡ nrow iiw neart into an abn..rma. type oi paipiuuoo wnten T.n' <-tatai llt. w r %  ... i .. i Harvey f aiipwr.il n.> 'haory win a ca-vnui.ro of an appar -J% r fuBj ]g v**r ola aoman aiB riupa a daoiernu* WBi polp"ni'nn when noly alletiCv acn -i B it idmm thai Ola 'neon At-ola;ti V.rjd.1' Intense 'error at tn* -n- oiaca magtr puwai t aln % % %  oaruuilT the cauar at Vc--don deatfl. lu* H %  eara down *• viciun fn ill] Uuieao a| tiv auddan auacg. BANG BANC + % Ml 11 ISO of UIP Bntan — m-,..o:ancf*r Sur". a/ti' ">mi wtio 'mp* i. o the moon— l hrid -n a lAndon publ:i n l* will oe mainiv ru'Keia So the oigbi aftoaan fo. -lif oar parlour irva* i> %  • i^r i • .fSTARS \WestIndian Table Talk MIIVIIII g BBBBMM ora %  UI nt T BM i r IW*I %  ll(Ml K.l i tar staei ia II ... trail *,„. f m iuna n*> IU. >BU wnbliia,,, enW( %  in i-ia, r-a— .i %  MHIl -. -HI .. itaaBBjM .. at-, II rtarawaai BacrlBBBBai about, am M '• v, i > all %  II ^1 IMil i .4a.> bMM-4 now %  "ii i > %  ...-, .< %  .. %  !%  io-4a> nu a aga up auc. r BBM l" tvtl •' %  ' Wf——> 1 IWrawl • hl|> -I lap -pred MaHr ni"' %  • nKliia in '• ,. 1,4 ..I rUBaKBM 'riiiiia ., ,. Miiiuaii Baanaeh \nu, III^IKI ,.ti inarnvr aM* i rlan iwation* am oi 111 IlCtll IIKIHIMB -a M JANVABf n I iprlraln' i.. II %  up lo you lo i-ln.. u* at ac1l*> < a-r.i.n.njllv rn*rh • .. By UShJDONER I liavp furthei datalb of the Caribbean cruise to <* %  lilatlaalafcll by Ihr 26,100 ton liner fnipiai a !. She will leave the K in the New Year and will call at Barbados, Jamaica and Trinidad Thla erular will be followed by three others lo the Waat Indies, made from New York. Dacambai the liner goes dock for an overhaul Social Survey badlu BrtaO lg in BrlUUn on the invitation of the i to study social i* Rev. D. C. J. Bobb Minister from Brltisn tie Rev. Bobb, who ar.1/ itlon. To Bkakd nu Landi lO Qgoota—attendlm; major pariah inferencea In Corn•rall and %  atu rettei nig estates in Ixiidon H. .Mil spend Cuiatnua with %  .i %  M P' %  (iuesl M It. de Cordova, commandant of the Army and II Jamaica, was tin tjupst nl l-l. Col. Alan IfKlbbin, HP for East Belfast. Intkfl Ho i brTakallad thnt the Cadet Force's rwadouartara Bran blown down ouruiK UM rwcanl hurricane in leadguarters have been established, however, and %  i Braonnaj has novi raajebad 1.120—just 80 short of B^ THE WAY... By Beachcomber *TMU: lattaj 1 llnj paper 4-kinv iLvh..t luiii I r une ui piufTins. and why thoj BM trad l foilov,. || Dgra ai RMBI iba Utter I %  %  ling was %  are battar i-lucati'd | foo tot than thnt rituflna arv %  ..iin.it digest than th<'. mufllns TxpeiTs for those flige?.'t than Ai | ... %  food "• • ii, .. peg %  • a %  Th,, hl'IMJrul OfriLIOT-rOOT upon -ins ,,.,,.%  chamiata 1 •olVa all o thai .inwarneil .iH-ut th ubt p to thi B I M-ii the %  1 hum.it a mess fan. tinned ;-'!iaa-. \->t murh uw \ nCZNT row in .. billiwu asag apparent U eaused by "a man who used an 1. .nid hit the ball aidewnyv" It afBmmV .. %  in| | i Itlon '.f lln uitoriiiiiuib %  Ufluuli w..i of plawlng %  ta corkawews for cues, arm t.. cloth witli marine gtua R IsBUpiBM RENOWN SHIKTS— Plain (ol. (Tan. Ulue. While) $4.48 RENOWN SHIKTS—Plain Col*. (Tan. Blue (afftrvj J4J1 RENOWN SHIRTS—Plain Cl. (Tan. Blue. On) ) ••'' III SOWN STRIPED SHIRTS $3.12 RENOWN PTJAMA SLITS 87.24, $8.74 & SS.91 VEW YORKER SPORT SHIRTS (Tan. Blue. Gray) .. ;.s.'. EUTE SI A ISLAM) COTTON SHIRTS (While Only) $K.;i SKYSIKAPIR SIKIPLH SHIKTS $3.07 & 83.IR SLUMBERTTME P.Y. SI'ITS $5.21 & $5.28 i.am. \m\ p •. MU.UI M n.*.. Cfitiniia .ii.it> iih aaawr ui •Ixiuld n.imd oul U %  Bfln aflrr ham YOU BORM Tnlurr> n. mi-i lalant*. buMnroa ability, .hi.,to bt Sand f auMoor —tim. "%  gnat 'ini(. if SWU -..I BSrtnd.'i l John Mlltaai. froal patl IVuflaa r.irba okJ Jr actor In thcocktail txir I P I wan i wnjldn'l perl this. Be 1 Y U 1 had ra> !' ymi had %  I % %  said Vn.i Honesty Is second But I generally use ni% first ll gets batter afl I knowing D nj nonaj you want I might grow to love you I nough, up this question of. rjgdad it makes Well, pay loc the link*. I must be %  oins.*' "Yo u lid Foulev..n Odnh ol nawuni ll-Tiftisr Biota soft I w. lei'id o| (lie niphl. Mi .on. jried pour rronquil IiyHf [/pM Ma bad Hen, topped in i. aal rtpoae. A'ld snorftH(f (hroupri his nose Lie. ( %  ,.„ Pr*d %  M Boe M eeaaee —Itrillah OalaaM, relebrated hia 78th birthday It an ealle.1 that Sir Crawford wa member of the Commission sent to British Guinna in 11130 to vestigala the posatbitMie< lefugee settlement in UM BUad "Hire than 1S,000 mile b\ rail, lat, air on horseback and on foot to make his innuiiies. Since rotinm.'. Sir Crawford has found time for his fav%  "creation—croquet. Empire Builder 'oiigtatulation B tn ex-mayor < orneliiis John Townsend of Salford. I^ncaahire who has Just catobratad hli Golden Wedding Anniversary. B my J %  re thinking that the •jndj familial ihev nn' nm. Mr Townsend now 71 • earof age, hel|>*-1 \ A CO.. IllL'll HiOH.i St. Marine Hardens and at Greystone Village Well, if those alffntf BtfasaTfall mainiam (hri> pre.rni rule ml PruH"" (ki i. PfofHiMt Ihr lo.i eapcroncoi u-e %  H^P-ir< (rom Briwin. B p m From £T iL" 1 r,om ,h Bdilotw.. ULf l 'll H V.„.hn Thoma. T-lfcrna to pi. m, BroiDer'a SWAMP-ROOT can help you I MM U fjn KlUM^tiaO rob >ou ul all your pep' Thai wki %M %  FBneu help aep ibeir kidneys .-.'//>)ouk IWalapasBlOl Yea, miraculous AMP-BOOT will %timml*it and ./.JM j.iur kidncis' VWAMP SOOT I* ' %  fadUe, bcijuif kl nud> Irom herbs ll.. nldesi medi.ine in ihe wta-ld' .sw*na-aix>l helps you *..*/>beiause im liquid, ami rOBI K-lt arnorb* .i laalr.' DON i MI.I i> i ml a MI)M1 *.l t I1B. KlLkflBS > •pm-ii ii III^ \NV II n BaOHl • VN SWAMP-ROOT A PHOOUCI or KILMER a CO. € I O II I HI IIW S A III! l.aal Show ill! %  HI in ll MiKII I Hill I PUR ANCELI GENE KELLY rOMOBKOW A THI'lUDAY Ml A 130 f.M II \M III K 19 III \>l\ '"] ,ENE i IKKNI Y iHNFI. Wll.DF VOHDIK IMIIIIM HICARDO VnNTAl.l \'. Kal Ainu I I it : -ttaw. tWa, tod.j THE LION AND THE HORSE •CHBAri -ll-VIR .i.ti Whip %  M.ll M'd 4 rhar. i • a %  • Hill K1IIIM kjrOELI A IiilstO INI I % % %  !• %  • M ,111 BUDOI i OWN %  Mai tsiai FRENCHIE mr. spn..,t ija i 1 i EVANS Waul Thm. t ip a M an n> i i Lajap.i if* WAKNFJI K II tatUM II A V Rill I OH THE IOOSE DTAJBI A TAMAN S f*tRJL Laa H u Mi' 1 i t^ a %  p m -•II OOLBBa i-OVI' Iro <;oRC-m' *.' R"d • CAUniON I fOkT OSACt" IIO O BT 41 I III 4IHI S IIMI'IRI: SAMSON AND DELI L AH iTrchnicolori aunlna Reg] l^marr M.tiil DdMBSS L •II Kl I I I It* ROTAL Banri TM.I i.sa a ass DoublBln|f i %  %  .-iHV Olma JFAN Cinrrolof and 'S\KI aivra tO-riKABOl • at Ml H %  % %  v.\ THiiTtd... 4 30 a, HI HI M I III wnn W-d thai-, a Fit i 4 :a> at saa k-.'-i Baa .tv III.-.' VI I Ml With Knar, Herbel Wad a Tkwfi • a i %  -II I.Ill -Ml I III I Wnn Don Amechp CROSSWORD rT p B %  a* - r %  || • !" r | • %  i a H iui i .. ma .!. %  ... rriooa. ?*"' w al-aaiif A tsrui. so man) laa* op. fan.' a i-ai* DIM V^aif-.ar bnea BB aM 111 ine.udad pro>. i (limnt at a plan* Aimre. it>i in Marrii. it M'ii"i" w.th aaving grwrw. >n iha armal p i lorni mi 10. Oindaacdnti SSaU W "" %  '"' Bad sai-ti CMoaa (i She* Hi a p*n* aettlerruot H ... i •van •a-i,. ADVOCATE BRIDGE By M. Harrison-Cray ii. icr South I ..-I He.1 same A 10 I S '.Kin t K 10 i 4 .AKQJI W 1 : 6 J 10 l 7 MorUi Souiii •i-otttl a game m Room 1 but t ie r esun lost 700 points on U.is dca.1 from inaich MB] tmth taJi>.SouUi bid One s-aadr. W-L dowbled. NorUt %  •eOoBbled and Bast bid Two Th* farat aouth phM/ai 'Md the comam. err.it ul rebtddbag his suit and Ea.-WCM ware reprieved On .i %  nit that U Ukaly to be %  lefenee. U-BTat rule is to give the redoubter lie up'Jon of a petui.;. toubk* North ha> pnami-etl 'O siirwk aataUii and Spa*-: can be reWd J nocwaaary on a later round N,a-tai just mad* a Onal fpnteart of Tbrwe NoTnimpst for a aoorw of 400 in ttoom a he wa* allowi-d BM prtvlMaw ul douii.'.nK r.i Oafaa. ami w.wt 53 %  io' :nrnrowa matters by haMaBT wH* T*o Heaj-i.OOasWi by Nurtli for paoasaly of 1100 WHEN "COGNAC" is MENTIONED THE NAME HENNESSVS LEAPS TO THE MIND-BECAUSE HENNBBSTS IS THI BRANDY THAT MADE COGNAC FAMOUS. HENNESSYS THREE STAR V S. O. P. (over 20 years) X. O. LIQUEUR (over 40 years) STOKES • 8VNOE LTD-AGfNTS TIME TO BRIGHTEN Vm THE HOME!! I 8MLWCT TI/ISE s t: \RI. ) Varnrshr.. liMwieK. Paint*. Sjiidpswer. Steel Wool %  '.. % %  Platters. ( N pv Pans Sa Brer*.. Saueepana, Vol* and %  hampacne. Port. Sherr Cocktail. Pony WhiMo. Liqurur. Half Pint Cilaaaea TALKING POINT The question it fhla. Is man in ope or an anaW My lord. J dm on Ihe side -.f The anoeU. Disraeli. Refuse lo be III' rVeeer fell oewple you arr ill. Nevtr otm tf to vowrself —Letton Do your ahaaaUg foe Household Items early at i PLANTATIONS LIMITED aataaa*ag



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    WHATS ON TODAT M | *<""W Chnwui C.rd Compctm. I at MlMrutli 10 P IT, B C in !" a* • %  Jo—p n and 1 an* T SB p m Mobile m,. !" K jufsU n d r.itur* YfST(gDAY 1 -VFA "HUt REPORT rj IK* riuw thai lac** a*al*Unc*. QatfiM Ihv wrong! that nratf IOIIUHM. for th* futunr In th* diiianrr '.'.d Iha food that 1 can do Seven Frenchmen, 40 Moroccans Killed Rioting Starts In Casablanca CASABLANCA. Dec. 8 Seven Frenchmen and 40 Moroccans were killed t< day in the worst incident in this French North African pTObWtorate in more than a year. StUM Krein-h civilians were found mutilated in the industrial 'Carneres Centrale" quarter, their heads slit off and thrlr clothes charred from flames. Three other -European" civilians were wounded. Coronation Will Be Televised Hundred* of police *eled o*T Ihe natiM' Medinu quarter and ten tanks patrolled the tense streets. A crowd of Arabs were reported to lxholed m> in ;i mosque near %  troubleaoaM pan of the .,iv and police troops took up positions nearby. Police have arrested Mohammed Boua/jui, Secretary General of the Communist-led General. Confederation of Labour and two Communist leaders. mNDON. Dec. 8. Officials staging the coronation ibowed to public eatery and approved television i-overage "i Three newspapers of the lullthe evenl. The committee anqual Nationalist c• < p '.meed that TV cameras will tie have been banned. Disturbances allowed in Westminster Abbey to cover much of the lengthy rcliararnony including ii actual placing of the crown 0 t bead B> n ittc-. will i.tbanned. Th' %  „. came during a 24-hour strike called by Bouazza's trg Which may now !*• prolonged until tomorrow acrurding to unconnrmed reports The strike. inpiutwi -iinit %  „,,,„,„, ,^1^^,.^^ wU | not „. the murder last Friday of Hitched. It)u g ltl ^ n .. ^w ullrt pi m Tangier and Tetuan In Bpa nMl Moroeeo. In the first of to-day's rioti :. w„\e Of WI people attacked the police tjtii.ii which they had besieged inst night. The crowd swelled to 3.000 .ind French nuthorittM sent i detachment t restore ordei I I" Sudden Lift In Vietminh Assault another piunt the procession through the streets of lnrtnn will bg> Ml :hal more people %  h The bullatlni ...i*i*-'i U %  th R \ t %  • 11 tag* .i huga B] v.. Buckingham PeAeca mi (-,,•. r Senior Commonwealth ofnclals tha rtyk and Utlaa whleb the Queen will be jsked to consider for her coronation The 'mplete draft wan passed on o M their ntandinfl the Briili Cnmirnnwenlth ten-day ecoomic conference. Complete s— reey was maintained about the rtual phrasing of the titles. —(C.P ) t'nun Ml Quurtmrm: Restaurant Owner Pushed Into Oven %  •gee: the pollca had u be HeilM in to reacue restaurant%  IWM. Southern Italy, from an oven here he had been pushed by an angt> cnete declared hu plzia wu umtcrrooked When ihc> ,ni the restaurant-iwnrr's feet could be seen sticking out of the oven. Plus Is a thin round "hec of dough covered with tomato sauce. chtese and anchovies and baked %  bread oven WHlingUn. N./.r The repot' to U Oeneraj Assembly of th*Prebyterlan Chuuh ot New Zealand Baaed that th* traditional Wedl h be scrapped from the %  beceuse "It has had its day." The committee stated In it* report. 'We would welcome new music to i Id -i too much Wtigncr .ind Mondtf sohn aUaae: The Hussnuta have apologised to the It ilian republican .men: Dor imiag unw-utingi out r i nirehist propai ii. Moaon* Ink Ol Italian Kirl* want to Moscow this summer lo lake part in %  basketball tournament, the Soviet %  utbarlUat aave Uieni an Italis"' flag to carry in a parade. But Instead of giving the girls the newityta Italian Bag, thaj gave theni an old one with the arms ( the Rural house on itWellington, NZ.. To help tin.i %  %  < %  ol the C6.000 needed to n New Zealand "fOfnen'l team to Brium in lM. member^ of the Wellington Women's Cricket Association will go baby-fitting. HANOI. Indo China, Dec. A Pr-nch Aery spokesman Monday that french authorities feared the sudden dmp Dl \ -' running low. HIi forcei arere pounded all la-t week. Fieneh tioops within the rortreai belni (ed by alrllfl The ip OaWg m a M nd Ciiap fnail-hke munitions supply system —consisting almost entirely of Coolies—may have left him nhort of mortar and artillery shells with which la spearhead a new n-igiaueht — I'-F. New President Of Israel JERUSAI£M Dec. 1. RusslBii-bnrn Vietzhak BeuvL veteran Socialist ZaflBl Mdl has been elected President ol Israel. The 68-year old who came %  (Me-tine at the turn of th century succeeds Dr. Chalm Wel7m.tnn who died la-t month.—C.P 'Ized property doe* not apply to riil facilities daatrayad by the army In the Philippine Islands shortly after Pearl Harbour. The oil facilities including wharves, pipelines. gtoragW "iid %  nrehouses Rfffi located In Pandewaa district of Manila The properties were destroyed oi order of General Douglas Mai Arthur on Dcccmlier 2fl. 1841 a: the Japanese entered the eity The owners of the Standard Vacuum Oil Company Caltex (Phihpi iii-si Incorporated and Shell Company or the Philippine IslamU demanded payments for the properties. Government paid r.ileum stocks and t portation equipment only. Ooanpeniee demanded another $6,000,000. for the rest of th* demolished facilities The Court of Claims upheld "Just CO) Supreme C'otirl ruling.—I'.P. Bicycle Tliit^f Fined £10 %  Keep your hands off othe i i u topa rty and vouratU lucky thut you are not going to prison," His Worslup Mr. G. B. Griffith told 24-year-old 1..I-.UIi-r James liurrowes of Redman's Tenantry, St. George yesterday when ho lined him £ 10 for stealing a bicycle frdm John MilJmgton pf Belle Gully. St Mlcttaet The uflence was committed on August 3 this year. Sgt. E. W. King attached to Central Station E iosecuted for the Police while urrowes was not represented The line i* to IKpaid by monthly instalments of £2 there is an alternative of three months' imprisonment with hard 1-hour. Burrowes elected to b> tried summarily. Burrowes while passing Bell Gully, St. Michael saw Millingi,., > %  ,. %  .rut la of a nou %  U. N. VOTES FOR INDIA PLAN TALKS BfiuSH OPtOATI Sir Gladwyn Jcbb (rear, left) and R. H. Ceatai I South Africa (right) raise Ibeir hands in approval aa the United .'. Political Committee votes overwhelmingly for Immediate discussion of Korean peace plan. Russia* Foreign UlnMe* At M I >^K* down at some papers as thp Soviet bloc M defeated He ad to itsvc a OM poanmrneea rot* (Htemettonai) their right to : Hl took it to hl Rome and made .t ion." The ,.,, v n South ;Persia. Britub Foreign BeeretaT) Anthony Eden told Parliament toUu Replying to queetiene, Bdei "The British Government con, linuc to regard products of the oil Industry in S-mth Persia as the property of the AngU>-Iraman Oil Company. He said that in a note i M ryetobar B Britain that the acceptance .aiuation in par%  %  Mr. F>!. [ October It and m a at Parliament on October 15, the British Government had reserved Mi G S Corbln, Parochial of St pctci ."id M C. A Thornton were appotntedl to rengeaant the 8t Potei v, %  on fiw Oeneral " n '., i.. rt.e .,|.|,inimenl* wero Unf ol the VeelT) r t | rday aternoon Th i (| eetod to hold its first meeting at the I Cumberland street, on 10, t" discus I The appointment* w •n the moUn Mr T K CortEtl U Corotn thanked the \ i i try lor appointing aim do e* arytating it La itaSfy members He roll that if taxpayen wen utti LU I" al" %  their. Should ActiiiK i hnrchviiinleii Mi Q i t O P MO two wi. in Header, In %  try, said that he had *<• en t Di Pony Ol preen vere. Rev. A. J Hatch. Mr T S Chand Oni, Ml T E Corl n. Mr. G. C. Pnrris and Mr. D. V. !. Christ Church Tht Chratl I their meeting yeaterdav %  out Ml H st t. Steel Bridge Al Belle Launched Tha UO-fnut-apaii attftl brMge which wQI .any tht 1M) inch nrlcrial watej mam over Hie BHIe Cully and con neit nptha nrw Bell* Blctj ic Pumpiiuj SUUoii wtth Gruini UCCd hill) launched ,hty. Id* Acting % 9 a""s i Oovarnor. Mr. B. Morr Czech Coiiiinunisls \rrrslr,l i LONDON At least six blah %  ind <:•." i eportad to i mg the afternoon, ind wen h. I, the la-ton brtu Una "I, ttit h Ol 'lie guUj Th> both congiatulatad the ol tin WetarworS !• %  I'.iilnn'il I e|Mili*iblc fur tlic launching. Mr. I, t Paritt, ,i Rngioeer ol the Dol arlmanl wan in chaii;i ,i Ihi [aunchlng, assisted by Mr. L ftmlage Junini Enguieei. Mr .'. A. Johnaon Mi RichMr, W II was ian, Mr. (, %  i poet Clarrod. nktt t oh Vice Premier t : Rid rk .1* .'. %  %  .. %  K ni formIrelfai i l.i.hel..'. rhe bridgi rat oC III kind to i"' laum in.i in ii..iU.dos. was %  %  given the 'le Na< irucl i Ob Bin arh> • %  i shipping. • .11 ..IK. lit H O'elOOfe m line weuthi rin| the ihr* dun I %  '' look lo complei ihi prelimlnt. Tl.e ggl in • ,,i.l Uul lin uinl. i <.f Blah ranking %  uf ihe c;rrh Conmuinl %  Par! I |. %  .. %  %  d it, iht lateet i v public and Ited • i over the rested sine %  East German Gommwiists rWteited UHU.IN !>,' .. Informed Comm mi I Monday predicte-i an K.i brtal of la hi met scapegoats f->r the (allun I kmnan Conunui halt effectively West tegratton rtth %  .,, 11 the ii i.ii Don QBtn i %  %  i the Fjist Oerman ittor ",,,,1,1 u. fotn di mil' Wi part] iin.i %  i i ii,, , ,.i man Pttlitburo Both Aieni a th Moat* I M< rbei %  %  ed •%  t Oennan Conunui b i \' alleged link Wi %  v r. Vil \llIIIJII To RuMeh S*-iu' Of < .r;i-.i Mhuiiluiifil I ALII%  %  donad atu n i al c *7 Iran %¡ /:: high on ped Mt. ban (."• Mondej ji.ii Uuioonad J at.steaijj expedition i i S rwII a ;,ir T N Patrce tor the A i-man part] an purpose ol aiiendin fc a aonoral '-'• Suon* kw from meeting of representative. l<' Ufa aagty M' the ni' and m-ke Weane^day. h. eonneetloo with waaaMtking forlrea amendments to Ihe V.-strie Act. Bu ,i I wen ft.r tha Vi ccided %  i. 11, %  i < %  the St John Vestry dealing with the matter Mi. C S. McKenzie was I Hag as a Vestryman lev%  i.,: aettng appointmenu U %  l U. be made on the various Boards uf which Mr. McKenUe Is a member. The Vestry appointed the follow ing: Mi A G. Gittens, member if e> on Page *lng wu, The wre, k.iK" \t bssU %  that of which disappeared laat Tllgltt who held from Arizona. The laat atleeant lo raaah bin piana R •. rbn I %  my lau^rooi Uirned aftai rap pod bj %  line—t '.r\ of tl I \ H Ahull Prrtaulioiis %  Uken I Die II launcl i Ihe bridga were re eleven the %  %  [, ravine *., %  ah bank %  i' i hand il BjgfOBJ Inch When %  mm down thi ncnt As it 101 %  ghtlj n i tahi. %  i 1 I n en boui '. rlaht. nd tackh (ram there on. was giaduslly towed across, its nose pointing down Into the gutty, AM. I tti. Ufa* boon receea tl OM Were ma^c, ratseni i oattfiued undei late M" I %  %  '' by the en|[ineers, Mr Parfltt and Mi. Caller n 0 • bank, and Mi Enu • -... rage a 14 Shopping Day* before Xmos E'pt'.s %  1 I r mem%  %  %  %  •HTnunh %  I %  %  %  PI in0 tin pace 1 37 People %  >i* lii Ciiliun Plane Oash MR 1. I %  IIr i 81 % %  %  1 n i -in m so for % %  hava ieen .., ibla to •nee of %  ,i. i, Throuih the \'%  have ashed the at.i of rj.ST %  .lame. Pi lyeis ..iIn It'' In tha Korruui —t'P. yovembor SvssiotiK End %  %  %  %  n< Gen. MacArlhur's Plan It RALPH It \lHOril i e -.KW VOBH Dec. fk %  %  l Pn bower win siim ak Qeanrei tite on tha ptan %  < %  aawar to a Douglas Mac Arthur to expl n nn his new plan to end the KoVc n oral I war G. mlence on major public issues laat tithur does not • %  stalemated w.. hosvei Hi red to give details -A hu In I %  I %  I '.the nghU of the Iran O-l Com-' matter for preset l panv. pending agreement on comcussion Bu'. he implied he was hit one-time comma) pensauon — C . t ready to discloie t: to Mr. Elsenl iSuilor Juiled For larceny Sentence of three months imprisonment with hard laboui passed on 20idiai Mil %  ( "*. %  t'aul of Iha B cl toonoj Uudalpba eho pi*-i-d i;uiiiy baforf Hu Mr '. it Gnmth Aet: Distrli I i r ol Bents' %  Paul hat one previous conviction. Tin %  • %  e t"i the prosecu%  %  %  a i I to Cen; prosecuted for i the Police. RALEIGH INDUSTRIES Only Raleigh re*oascefl can give you the QUAiirr— *GIIABKJTY — STBINOTH — and FTSOSil. which dutmguivhcs all Kileigh models. The btc) Je )ou aieproud tu own. RALEIGH THE ALL-STEEL BICYCLE (Mt fr I O-^t aaixf* BHnM rate*, ( \\ I sin pilKRII & CO. LTD. IS—IJ. Broad Street ao ocu ii coHru'i WIIMOMI a iTuaMiraoiM j. sa untouusaoB'wvB.



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    I'M. i rm R HUIRWMIS MlV. Ilrcrmhrr 9. 15Z CAPITAL rogran in Bar-' badon >i< %  ."pmcnt of the natural and, human n % %  < %  island. The u: I that living standards can be improved*by actions of government • • %  ii.lnyment and a decent i possessed a social conscience is due la ignorance. Nothing has contributed more to the entrenchment of such ignorance than the contantion 01 Karl Marx and others that capital is radically opposed to labour Orthodox economists define capital as "that p.;: which is accumulated : i ( i assist future production." Today when the governments of the West Indies arc anxious to attract capital investment in order to create greater employment opportunities the sooner that the misconceptions spread by Marxist propagandists are given the lie the greater will be the opportunities for economic development i that capital is inimical to labour is so easily proved false that it could only l>e accepted by persons with no understanding ol political economy. Capital can ol course be used selfishly and can lead to great social evils such as that created during the industrial revolution when the gulf between wealthy employer and poorly paid employee became so wide and led to the emergence of a class system so distinct that Disraeli was right when he spoke of the "two nations" of England. Class distinctions of that kind have never existed in Barbados and could not have existed because of the predominantly agricultural economy of the island, v in recent years that the growth of an intelligentsia united in its contempt for those engaged in trade has created a new class which is very conscious of their difference from the ordinary rnan-m thestreet Tlu truth about capital is that without it, there can be no increased production The same may be said with justice about labour. But whereas labour can be selfsufficient in a primitive society in which nd not money is used, in advancing communities no material progress can be made without the assistance of reserve funds A man creates capital when he produces more than he consumes: and the capital of a country represents the surplus of production over consumption. Had those who amassed huge fortunes during the UHh century spent their wealth on enjoying themselves there would never have been available the immense capital resources without which the railways and other major developments could not have been completed for use by their and subsequent generations. Had wealth been more equitably distributed and therefore consumed in the 19th centuryour standards of living in the 20th rentury would have been much lower than they are With all its defects and social blemishes the capitalist system of the 19th century underlined a lesson which all countries must respect viz that savings and accumulations of capital are necessary* in the interests of the whole community Today throughout the greater portion of the globe high rates of taxation are making H more and more difficult for saw accumulated. Capital which used to be invested by private persons in many countries of the world is being spent in an unsuccessful effort to maintain individuals at the standards of life to m-hich they have been accustomed. The consequences of a spendir.. are already apparent. Whereas' the mil! *r.* %  rids population are demar : • .ndards of living there I enough savings in the richer countries to be attracted to capital development %  ed countries of the world. Not many people realise h money is required to create one job in industry. In Canada the "book value" of asm tsl -nsted at S5.50Q (Caradiar i) per worker In tn ment costs, however, the can| necessary per worker has been estimated at the much higher figure of (9.000 (Canadian) Capita!, whatever the authors of social polemics may call it, is used in commerce to express the --•d by the merchant, manufacturer, or trader in carrying on his business, in the %  cturc of art* .. tod in the payment of wages and labour. Capital thus defined In commerce includes not money only, but also buildings, machinery and everything else that is employed to assist icrcial operations. One can be very sympathetic towards those who are impatient to secure decent Irving wages and high** living standards fur all. There must be very few persons born in Barbados during this century who have not. experienced poor living standards some time during their life and there are thousands still living under deplorable conditions. But approach to greater prosperity can only be made if everyone of Ul realise! 'He basic %  pital is a product of human labour saved fur production, and directs his labour to produce more than is consumed. From A Frt*c* To A Slave* Society A lectm%  gives at Codnngton College on Friday but *.., Hoyoa. M.A.. Benin Master of the Lodge Sri l p labour. %  the smalt farmers were 1*.n,.i,'"reed of? thl*i i. m*ir placet > H f>y*\t* ...use.The tU !itcr and j loal .aiming his son b > thousands of African riavei. Men Of I'roperlv .t n lo save In the early days after the howls, but sent out ships to envais did the Litgt*ts of the day settlement th*prevailing society force the Kjng"i auihoritv m the contend that no en.who owned in Darbelos was simple U . land*. The Barl3 ''' 1 '" £* Milr> should be Its population consisted mainly badiaru a %  > ld IO m* of white mall farmer iiapubUcan *>'* |UU ma -.:,eir relentowned a few acres each, and OSjUse The ton monweaBh passed < %  %  evince. The holdings of white indentured servants who the Navigation Act of 1651, for,V"* n mrn "555 swallowed up and to continue it. 2iJSsTlJ U J2.*.^ f SS?J; tobacco and cotton—Peasant crops It was a aociet.v in which property •aUgYtes and seek their fortunes in such places males. Surinam. St, Lucia and other W I Island. Gradually the island lost its rtattts as a virile colony and beean f In the words f Professor HarU. a polititalb unimportant rjgar plantation. owned by absence proprietors -id worked by Negro slaves." Barbados tort the health and rta' its early days and bedring ion And Coleridge was widely distributed Nearl; half of the population owned some land and thus had a stake in the country, Bi the main, the people who owned the land in small lots were Englishmen and the Indentured servants were Irish and Scots. The latter were transported to Barbados during the civil arse period and the troubled time in Scotland and Ireland. The condition of '.-. indentured servant was often quite pitiable. The Negro slave, who came afterwards, was also to suffer from the inevitable results of servitude But the male slave who was bougT' was the property of his owner for life saM 'he was sensible, would try to see that his investment went as far as passable But the white serv %  I T a limited period and at times his employer would try to get trie most out of him he could and the result could be disastrous to the servant Still the profitable latter had the consolation, derued T the African slave, that h- j. •* e secun the pasta* ,r ....... Laying The econorny of the island in WIUJI the Dutch. Baa '• %  -• aw si l ..-.-:::;. .ana those day, was .seenUally a could not let ahVog-soXnsS^E *"? *** ***** <* P"*"*"* '<* peasant econorny. Land was widewithout makang started w~>tr*tj ?Jf2L n 5fl 1 1 ,' : I"' 1 .— 1 *? d ttatUndwa. theb-of *-*+,._**_• pe riseaaent b, SaTrefc, + !" *XTC> -^ were not repressMed. by the osstbrea. free fnMitulfum if cd m f "1 *'" ** *** *£* .. %  •. % % % % %  % % %  • ^ ;.%  : .":-•;•; %  •: >vsafls Uui Their migration from JJ^T,*,,^?! *j?! h _^**i/?: to increase the cultivation of sugar England to Barbados was only "*** *•* Uberuea and pnvikees.^ fc^ ^^y shown J he part of the vast m o veme nt which fo -,*_. ^ Ih m to — ti— planters the insecure foundations Two 04*'_.nc.:.t BMD —Codrington and Colendae— wt i g;eat part in aavtag the island from the penU and insecurities of a slave soc4et>. the Leewards Islands. Codnnftoa, saw tne urgent need for economic reform At a time the LeewanU. too. c Wow at the capita \ HOTO* brought countless men and women Barbadians B*se foundaUons of the British Empire an-j ;•* Ceaas M easM send out an lmpres,ve squadron, with two thousand slave society They went :ear of a possible revolt f the stave* and *•.U n drove They were driver. command Hlf !" "£__f*> b . I*nlhs the OH World by political and of Sir George Ascu*. to reduce tcdnns^ rwsed h.j voice against persecuLon and In the the Island to jubmmion. New World they sought to that era* :e intimielssy. cr.ppWng West lie protested the freedom that had been den i thean at home Men. who had made left their country to from tyrjnr.y. place the greatest emphasi_ self-government. The inhabit r MS5I) had reached of Barbados and the Caribbee *?"" ,r 3 iH"ughby was inIslaii'is Iik those uf th cho,<-n b < ""f r -H '1?, t d A people, whov •> %  of lit.w.< ,-,.. ,. 'he *",'"" ,l """ n d f";^ to stron(ly rooted in ownenhip ol c.ubli.l.. . h !" '•>• eoMoUUon. or Ihe land, would imisl on %  > of Independence him that Willoughby was inH !" h^ !" duced to corr.c to terms The ^ u,,na i" s trrm l great victory the Barbadians had "£r\" d *V "* "JS won. although they had to submit ^_*_ l0 *!" PJ'Vha of Agn i , n u'"ceed in ,iw pi ild be the first itep to freedom Yet though he was frustrated during] his term uf office in tl.% at a later %  fleet to hi* tli* ( nd he was to \n-)t-.i of having bodies of men :r.iined to help in the great task of improving tlu* i material condition of es and the Indians In the Caribbean. Th< value of his bethe freeholder* in the island list on a measure firmed by %  ,?.,?Vh* w -From early times sent. 1 *' n ** d J"vS* in the island were ment Still more -striking was ,„",??„ ,ul Lea U in uie iiiano were mnn n;in UHHT irting was .,__ „.,-., .w. A ~ ,,.. _* ._.._ aceu^onwd u. return rbjhu in lb. amirance (Jven ... Iheit elr .uemUie. 11 only ">" Uvtni In Ih. !" ^'JT-MSSI'S Ihereio,.. mat. hrn '-)"> all tne „ s ht> of Enrlithmrn ?5jJ" •" 'Jf "i"| !" Hew H.-le, e.bl„ed IKe J" tllStta.^ on^B,?' ."". ""utter.,. n'oV l.T. bad been Ottt P.iliamtol in tne uland. the \'"' lh ""~ %  m P M •" B f %  f,,il„ed by uahnvaU In Brtttah "" Au !" '"iu, Th e ptnphet, of despai Thai wat rcfnarkablt The "" :m 'bat emane X ripaUon would brlnf disastrt and and Ute ralUnr of tb firft Houae prev4-d I • n rolonltU "> %  ' hr Btlliah West Indies would r revolt fion .' \'-r'.:..'> Haiti's example by extet* 'lating the whites and settinx black republics. But Colerldee was the man far the < i. succeeded acalnl. tremendou odds in establishing the Chutch as an Inteiratins; force in these communities and thus warded off the threatened i*til ^. ^. Enxland nvora than a hundtcrl Of course the per:, .od.it has been the House of AaaemMy was lira,c |, ln ri ., mm (rom ly due to tne fad U.a! the sttat Ayacue weir latet taken note of Issue of parliamentary foyertiw ,,., Amentan cjonlats and meat was at time being fought Ih,.'. \,:reemer.t out In the Mother Cojntt. In ci.iwn up in Batbadoa In 165? 1640 the English PatiiamenUtuins wee to give snap. had won a notable victory when can Declaration of Independence ..... ... Charle. decicVM to end his period 1> I.atefundi. Ferdidere of personal govetntnen. and call That . U>> ll I The lectutet concluded by a parliament It waa fortutuste in lh early day. after It. settleporting the thesis of Professot that the yeat aftet H.wlev esubm !" " : '%  •*"• community Harlow that broad actes desttoyLrfsed the Hou of Aase-mbly the oJ- h?'*" '*• ", B .Y b ", d !" ," %  "£*,? 'Hfe Erurlish Pariiamect won bssZ 'reedom that came from the troye-l ancient Rome There ..... .'."'..; ., i. i eouM b* no d iM lb.1 rnrbadi A^ahl. w„a..^...^.rt£*f •*"*' h"" brought from the days when proper!, was widely Aaaembly would not nave succeed, .t^.f., ( dlcutbuMd. when something like •d UI1U%  . h ,|, of the population owned the island were animated by the \ Complete ( halite of land and thus had aplnt of Hampdcn and Pym as a stake in the communi'. strongly as their fellow-English But before ;. democracy was real because it enui..->ns at florae. gradual chat.:' i actor was baaed on a firm economic Thy Spirit Of Freedom foundation. Thorc could be no The English freeholders weic l '' r '' "' clinibt that whelf the small holders Boon aatain to ahow their viamr 1 ' '' forcrd ou' * existence and an? ItlTsssasasUsel^ten tT^*SV thang.-d Ihj capitali.l came on the 1 w .?*Z%SZ m ?. ,i2 "-" %  Tl '•'•'"" %  '-• "' law-tne that the condition of the L_"if ^!T „.. ... •"* production of mo. atttactIsland, though its national wealth !?£-£', 0l.*£2'*lV!ZZ\ ' "" 1""<-<1. became unhtgjth) AmetKa. temalned guunchly by bjtge plan: Horn I-.tge scale and unstable BOOM DAYS UiNDLII IKE I From IIKNHY LOURIK WASHINGTON. DESPITE all the troubles ahead of him in the world's biggest job. President-elect Eisenis feeling happier today. Not because he has managed to gel score down to the low eighties while on holiday at Augusta. Georgia. But because one of his top advisers. 57 year-old Walter Williams— a banker who may be his first Commerce .Secretary—paint ed a rosy picture this week-end of ar economy that would bring still greater prosperity and an even better living standard to American*. BOSLEY CROWTHER. 1.1m critic of the New York Time*, predicts that uq Bin selected a iho year's best will have to surpa&s "The Sound Barrier." • • • HOW LONG does it take a woman to clean her house* Mrs. John Immer. whose 37year-old husband, a professor at Washington's American Vniversity. is going lo tell the : Britain how U) lV> time, says her housework takes four or five hours at the most each day. Behind Professor Immer's trip, which is being paid for by the Mutual Security Agency, is a visit he made to England with his wife two years ago. They were irked by the old-fashioned equipment of their rented house and the unco-operative ways of their maid. They re%  r,:anised to such efficiency that the neighbours came running for advice. • • • HOLLYWOOD'S "Television City". ; %  .15.000,000 (i: 12.500,000) dollar rival to New' York's "Radio City." home of the big broadcasting "-unpanies. was opened with the usual Hollywood flourish. The new "City" is said to be a first-class fort and shelter in an atomic attack. The buildings can withstand gamma rays, heat radiation and concussion from atomic blast. MOTORIST thought many of their problems were solved when a year ago the New Turnpike was opened — an almost straight 118-mile highway without one intersection. The last word in safety construction, its speed limit was fixed at 60 miles an hour. This meant that to many motorists it seemed a good place to hit 90. But today a 25-mile stretch was closed because in the fog—nothing to compare with what hung over the S' ath of England this week-end—40 motor cars crashed on it, killing two drivers and Injuring 3.'! other people. Tonight the road was re-opened but plastered over the 60 miles an hour signs was a new regulation: "Maximum speed 35 miles an hour." • • • INTRIGUING statistics ;ire advanced for a new drive lo improve the country's roads: because of traffic jams Americans lose enough time daily lo make up a fortnight's holiday every year. And C. E. Wilson, boss of General Motors, estimates that 60.000,000 people driving to work and school lose a total of 20,000,000 hours everv daw • "•' • STILL ANOTHER new use for plastic. Dentists are experimenting with it as a filler. It is painted on layer by layer with a small camel-hair brush The Americans got the idea from German scientists who discovered its value while trying to find a substitute for gold fillings. AFTER eight preliminary operations doctors in Chicago ate now ready to go ahead wiih their daring scheme to separate Siamese twin boys joined at the top of their skulls. The twins, bom just over a year ago to Mr. and Mrs. R. Brodie, have separate blood and nervous systems. They are otherwise healthy. and in crawling push each other in opposite directions with their heads. Which gives them their two nicknames Yale and Harvard after the two rival universities. Jl'T M |M K I'KI I'M' ITIONS KuKr^-a. B?sTl -r \I.IIi it,) M. sohsaarn te ra wO Ua" THF. WINDSOR PHARMACY Fmr all GAMBE&S. \ K.I I X It I I l.AHIIKN MAM M A Fcvsaer -ipl-ci tWm sou ana worked and Aateied ti %  i'nl* pound. LHHIMmE A liquid manure put up ... 14 Pint JJ.tUe* at M eenla BetUe Mix with waier. Weak il To.iSBJon.al to 1 Gallon 01 Medium (2-3 ,. .,1 • Strong (4 .. .. I •• ••• When applied by watering pot does Ml burn the foliage. 1 mPw 1 0 For use with your Compost Heap for convening the wasl materials of your gulden into Manure. IS i. ni, a pound. WILKINSON A HVYNES CO LID. Successors To C. S. PITCHER & CO. Thonr .?. 4U7 BIX KM ITU STOKE* B.B.C. IIADIO \OI I H II Sliouii aoii^ejd iK.u.ai' cricketer*—or cricket fans — S i k l World XI to plar against .i BBC programme in Ihe coming week \ou can hear ..f iwo *uch World XI puked b>-I>enrit Batchclur and the other l> N.viile Cardus. Neville Csirdutv the wurld-famom I itar—he is also equally famous as a rm-.ii: critic — reviews DenI Bauheloi".publuhed 'Book of Cri.kv!' uti in thi* talk takes up a challenge put out by Mr. Batchclur In hiS book. In his book Mr. Batchelor. with remarkable courage, ae> lectetl a world 'Team <.f centurr/ thai n. since 1900, for sfessMaeas Eng '!in-.en — Habtw. Ii impton. Tale. I„ Brood and l.rkood; four ^utrjlians Bradmn. Trumper, Oldaeld and Mailt %  ; and one Wwt I Worrell. Taasta are all the winter t-veningn for everyone to point out a Cardus oi>liKmel at Lord's In a ( NetUk < Haia* wiu U the Miii-Week Talk ii tin g nt 10.15 p.m. It will be beamed to u> m the 31 and 49 mc'.i. bands and can aa*0 be heari — this will probably be the best rccep:hf 41 metre b.ind. The frequences of these three bei__ aie respectively. 9.58. 6035 and 7 185 lor 7.150) megacycle*. Tlays From London Three radio play* are available I • BBC UitSMn In ihc coming week—'His Brother Keeper' by John Wyae on Tuesday at I0.JO Mb Or, Absjrnsjthy' by Allda Bumay and Hi.dolph de Cordova IHI Friday at 7.45 p.m. and Wind on tbsj H-'.'S. I> Ronald Adam in 'Radio Theatre on Saturday. 13th at 8.90 p.m. Our Readers Say; Si. Jn9'i>h i hui" I To The Editor. The Adrocaie— sni i %  bill bf mfsrful you will allow me to make an appeal throurh vour paper on behalf of • 1 m St. Joseph. ;i our good %  al Bathshc'i).!. la h.lp us iv-c %  are W Ml %  air from U •pairs are lu'uiii ba tlnished i*i We are ui-imnipnilr U should %  mp. Tho %  D aiaUtl from ih Vi Ir) We shall be glad lo raise sufficient from this appeal lo pay the labour — which last weak amounted to 847.10. Thankinf you in anticipation. .:v slncerel>. iu \i.iF.r. Rector. Si Joseph. NINON-^-xquMle gosHamer silk in plains, SM.02 and flowered. S8.72 SHARKSKIN—2-lone and in plain. S2.74 and S2.24 TAFFKT.A—a colonrlu\cly selection for Christmns DaCosIa & Co., Lid. totals Are Hostile To DM NEW YORK Doubt, cynicism, and even hostility are developing .n America Inwards the United .Nations, said Dr. Ralph Bunche. UNO's trusteeship director, tonight. Dr Bunche is an American N<-gTO Bod A trained diplomat He won the Nobel Prize for his peace-making in Palestine. He admitted that the American people's "initial hope and enthusiasm" lor UNO arc "evaporating." He said: "The attituuV of Americans is much leas a source of strength to UNO than it used to be. But UNO is stronger today as an instrument of peace than in 1W6." Dr Bunche added that the Americans' -volatile and fickle" attitude rises and falls with each change in the Korean war He defended the patriotism of the 2.000 Americans working at UNO's headquarters Another United Nations official I about 20 Americans are involved in tlul" S Senate's anti-Communist probe at '' N quarters, and this |i one of the "harassing factors" that drove Secrelary-tleneral TrygVC Lie to resign. r^fahf* Chickens Ducks UQUEBS Drambuie ( h-irireuie t uracau hut,in,..| Cha-rr., Brand* <>old Braid Ram 3 Year* Old DBCBMBa SPKCIALS Hal. Kelrhup 7'.. or. 24e. ea. Nut Roll I5e. ea. Carr'* CTarkrr* I '.'a j„f Ho <"arr'i Blsculto Short Bread i per akc. Nu Milk Almond f'risp* shrnn* Frnlt Puddlms 5Sr. per Un I 111 < H TIIESF %  i \ K Bakery l<"r ( | (run i iM 5100 each I'liim Puddlns:* $2.00 m h Jl ST ARKIVII) siirnnp* frum Bung Kant 1 •• 1 lb pkes Malvern* hoc. Iti-.uiU MaUirn* Pig Biscuit* Phone GODDARDS Early