prntouiut knowlton s. ... „ it was to please myself, the second %  I know it looks like Wellingtime, to please her. We never met need garlicton." said the artist, after a long again: there was no one else to expected to detect pause. -It's meant to Y. .i from the unused Nl %  a leney-drasi Uill as Wellington, and this shows i U n. him as he looked theti. Wh.-ie was this 'jail?" asked the pood q p pt aran ce. man. ..„ ( ld "Paris said the artist "on the i iKopa of Turkey night before Waterloo. Its htsm) forto lZj" let, %  %  pevHe. pW odreruurous exM cni-ttal. ulrii pitw to Rmtpgiuu /or sole o/ acc.'" %  "W/ii'/.;' UTOMg mimrir/u'rifTirt-fimliny C IIARLIE SUET points out that a potential reapportionment of unsrheduled priorities does not necessarily mean that the bottlenecking of goods In short supply ran be short-elm,.'Ming measures. He adds: "A redialnflationiiry or non-recessional ADVOCATE BRIDGE tf M. H.irriscn Cr.iy in-i'i Nerd. Narlli Siiulh c "W"^: HY. asked the passer-by. "*"' !!*W ,ollowwl by tn_ pictu ml U % %  BBrrOI creased upput." In jnistinp A WIFE has eompliiinod thai b. r %  husband k'ised her tune nnI We'll OUI .out bufith ind keep ihtm *.l hOaM." Kf .lf. %  . oat. ii I thou**!. %  ll m.,.t b. rhr if a %  %  fr .-,.1 I . '*k DIM B -lender J ain ol pionsjup .tend Mould o> aortn three valuah-e aneieii point* uiiuYr UM met hod of -ormg Nortli's One lteart wiw. doubled by 'he American R.t nlavcr Uu: Ilio British pair had the situation well in hand utter BQUthi re double. Wesi bid One rtiwde North passed, and fta-M'a blulT bid ol one No-Trumt waa doubled bv South West Mien htd c; ulw bul Nonh scored 830 m a flnal contract > %  [ rour Ilenris Thi redouble had an intimidating eflecc and Ihe Ameru-ans did nol j saennce in Fire Clubs in view of his modern tr Hpede suppori our East 0 aver preferred to over al with Two Diamond* tr Room a end was doubled v South for a penalty of 500 e.nJ.1. rrw'i l\l\ NIT (HOKDKKS) 5U fo 98< W (IUTAIN HBI (HORUKRS Cc4caaf--eUg l Creen. Blue. Gold. CURTAIN NKT-Rose. Clrcen. Blue. Gold —3". 38", and 40" wide TABU. CllrTUffl II" wide $1.05 to $1.38 $3.07. $3.39. AM $3.28 & $2.21. 3 %  B I i : COI.Ol'KKIl TOWELS WHITE TOWELS tt.10 S2.36 MIEETS 70 x 100 80 x 100 ... 90 x 100 PILLOW (ASKS IK x 311 BL'TTEII ML'SUN $3.75 $6.50 $7.72 9Xc 43 T. R. EVANS (WHITFIELDS) YOUR SHOE STORE Phone: 4220 II \ VI III I MOIIKOIII OS MIDNIGHT SATURDAY 22nd G L OB E A Film MINI II" S I VI I III ISM H TALENT STARS ON PARADE l-iri Allrynr— 10 Year Old Trumpeter Eree Ired Cold Canada Dry Eree 4 Cartons lleineken Beer Have Y.mr Head Examined if You Could K.-i-l This ' i niiHiii i m ii i



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THURSDAY %  HARH\l>OS AllVIKATt PACI MM Lad Bound Over For Inflicting Bodily Harm N ., Ma,kel Hill. Si. wt in the k, 'n> %  i w B. Chon...< %  juiy found him fimiiv have cauatd bodily he chanced to bounce h pushed him and they lei. n to 1 fight. Turney ordered thi-m out i.f (ul negu I ~ the ca i. Black ROCK road or out. Hayntai said he was going to November 11. knock him tfnwn He started tu walk i. %  Mr. J. S. B. Dear appe someone called him. While he was Gann St Howard ol tha liUck swinging around on being called. Kock Police Station said that on he was struck with a stnne whl %  11 he went to Black fractured hi* Jaw. Bock road and saw the en X-50D in the road, and lhi Tap On Shoulder volved In an accident with four Crm-eKsaUsted he said he had school children who w.i,taker, tapped Haynes on his shoulder '" 'be General Hospital after the and said, -This is it sock," but that ^ "t .>t the defendant %  was only an expression to the district. Baton % truck with the stone he did not _...,,,., ,, threaten to shoot Itaynes. '" Nm n Blalr Burae said he I :,nir-vear-old Elsie Carshop when ,,„,, (f H.chmond Q Haynes. Haynes told him not to sj ^ug ba,! lap him ngaln ana when \V,ut >n the i \i r J | r Braockai la appearllrrrulrx St. Hill said when th rt lng on behalf of Cnnnglon while shop proprietor sent Haynes and Sgt. Havnu is prosecuting (or Ihe Wsntstan nil of ih.shop. WickPnii-o. ham told Hayi i ng to shoot him. Raynet ran dOWi lb. IGNORED si<.\ \i road and Wickham did not p*> -,.„„.., MlimphlTy of Nurse ESSO PtBLIHII> NEW M \IM)F CARIBBEAN i -itiv* and colourful map of the Caribbean ha* n issued by Esso Standard n on all means of irans! which exist in the area and also showin large detail. i ( the moat Islands of this region. It has bean j.ubllshcd as a means of promoting travel throughout the Caribbean and at the H to foster undc:>i.mding and knowledge among the countries and territories which the area comprises. Although the akej of the map has been kept small enough to lie M and altln'i packet with information, it U exire-nely easy to read. A uled airlines serving lhi tean are ahowa with jpproximate flying times batwaaii U and ports of call | uled steamship lines ai dating passengers are indicated bo] and key. Railroads. highways and airports are sho.v.i .pect.u-uUr ranges of Ihc iM. .rile, bar ;-, Ul ., IS o n duty along After the shop proprtel L 1 be low" them out of ihe Khopi Wiekl %  ielmonl going lowaros told Haynes. "The only way I do (j[. i i 1,1. a impassable. not shoot you is (f God taka i a a (itch readWhen he heard thnt threat he ad-Caution, Road Obtruded" was aa down the out at the comer of MMOnl rood. ii. > a moba incoming Btlf IVfenre aM tn Mr. Smith suul that B defei . He did : tha high not %  i and pj potsibilttv that Hiy %  "' aboul 20 yards kh in.'s jaw. but in UW light of from him. %  %  '>* TUKtl UOttHIRIIS .MS made m %  %  mi ol OraenJand. ird the evidence of st *,nn" uSa I'obco im*a. continuous nggn-ssion yesterday that while she was kg to shoot shopping in Roebuck I Harm i November IB. the sum ot $iso perturbed at tha idea of Wickm her. ham's thnatanlni lO shool him George Kellgi.m .1 Aahbur? ,,lv Bw r" chasing h.m down the rond a d.ik was broken and entered on !V"/,nht. i bar 11 and clothing to tno „f „ of S12I was stolen. _, ,. u' threat to shoo Henry Goodman of "Ii''' •en si. aolamn Ihat it Christ Church ii-|iortd that grohad put tear In the mind of the partaa were stolen I witneagalnst going down the road, %  would have put more fear e\ In the mind of the mnn to It was directed. All they had to do was to deActing Governor Al Si. Lrvoiiar C. Glindon Heed. Director of Education, and the Acting Headmaster, Mr. G. C. Millar, who accompanied His Excellent-v on %  lour of the school. Mr. Turnar then tnsp. tad tha girli' school where he i by the Headmistress, Mi C GnfTlth Later, His Excellency paid an unomcial visit to the Bank Hall Grammar School whan received In lb. 1!< J. D. Uancrott. at ih.. aaaattauj yaaaarnnj r•oecl^i on %  roads at Ashton Hall, I [raw. Tha i ha Inspector HI ni* rep-'it on ina awhton Ball road slaleo that during lainy b are impaasvehicular .i.iiiie III cm lam aaaai added that "no attempt has ever "i > lalor to put drawing u> hli I UOM "f ;! %  A.i. %  ^"lkOn the Walkers' %  iwted in part: %  . % % %  i thai the road was grass grown throughout. -ud it i v.i>d from %  i UM roads were losakafl al tailain point*. ... %  into the tenantry, a bridge had Man coaatruotad |g orse which paaaas at The water passing UIKUINuiiod tha brtdga qva* a peiiod %  only suitable at one point for tha use of wholly danger us for vehicular kraAc, Dr. fc. thai In the case of ihe Walkers' Tenantry, Ihe require'i > enta of provMlprocess of time, (fag roads had got Into a state of disrepair. The q.i l,o fhuuld n DU< Ihg lepaira. He BgJd that b to maint. i an uttoa araa made In A ad in that reapad ha Utoughl thai was "all wrony.' 1 and that there waa nothing that the Board could do in tha Mr. Juatlcc J W B Chcner) ed l-'uisi%  %  fault two ii%  luad ban i:uil' A Audmc ll.iuw i -ii kcl "i> Aunu^ I>. n. Ill M k> :i t %  i' Baj hei motbi mcroft .. knife in hu aoahi tight ati denviug that Ik* BgW that Audine Harewnod was cut, .(hi the )ui> % %  dfll i'le hat it w; • < %  \here had been .1 inn familv light > %  OOd on Aug ust 12 wwman accustomed to being 00B* bnmght to the vicled for lighting Tha lU! %  %  I b rtm .-a.-hiirged couirs, wounding with U IIM* daaBgajta or ti" irlavou %  The lury found hei not guilty on fie i-M tount. M W W. Rcecc. C Solicit .r Getn-ral. prosecuted for the crown Mr. G. B Nilereprpsented Blackett. .1 %  v, aril naav Dr toll\4U ( kn akU th it he an r., %  %  bad %  !• %  Inch %  1 behind %  I arm and ont OB the left calf. All I .. outran itltc h ai The\ wert 11*1 wound %  • not rill lhi (crnrion the of guiltv. Hayna was bound over for 18 n at Olstln "ti November 18. Th e Polic* en investigating It 1// >(If h\t:llA\Gf Activities Al Y.M.C.A. Members of tha V M working on their playing field at the new Headquarters. Already a fairly large area t t • has been levelled and gaggf. planted. On December 10 the Y.M.C.A. Glee Clu(/, conducted by Mr. O, A. "Grafnc" Pilgrim, formerly of ihe Combermere School Gl?c Club, will stage their Christinas ( .<:. % %  %  at the V M C A. Naval Hall. The Police Band will assist with Ihe programme. The Y.M.C.A. Week of Prayer ended on Sunday last. The attendance throughout Ihe week 1-est for many years. Sir Gvorgv Svvl \ isil HabyCrwho s, 0e ran 1 %  %  in lie .ai Tuesday at 10.00 a,m. |fl ... ihe building, are mei by Mi John Baaeuaa. M.B.E., and nvne. After com] Ii un| the 1 the building, S11 Q ear an Mm: in the look. Thai Inatiiutlon must ixa .source of pjaaM pcMi to Mt Be cklaa and the stair For i-d a feelanthu 'i in tha .... %  the fi.dri-." veiilh Annual Heneiit the Priend1 1 • U s .\. in aiti of the Chlldren'i 1 %  held at ihe Mount 1 hurch on ' when a well arI na < v on the Coinn Kg Name. \u Parents la child which nt the chilh. League last month by a mother who did m>t give hei nai %  Almshouse where U wa later taken. Mi. John Decklai told the Adthe child is adthoul :i niirne without %  nntbei or without a falhei. I hope the parents will hiivc a heait and I. AaakMr llarrwuwd aatd Ibjgl Blacken ami -he wen friOBtlly terms lor mani re I tn akarh HI Ihe same • %  %  1 ihe iin%  ett suspected that she bold others .omeihing eonoarnang her. Si. John, about 1 a noka %  ered th^t %  ofna chlldn quarrelling. She held and as ;:<>ITI£ hone a was strut I ck with a .-ton. 111... kett then came t.. her and held her. They starlet to Aghi and Hla.kcti tot 1,. knife on the chest, behind bei %  n tier left forearm and) on her left calf. Cruet-examined .she she was not detained al Ihe lion* pltal on account of the woundl and ihe stitches arete a week later. She had Otkda been imed 40'for eutttng bM own %  rounding oan < for thMiwing aratet -.u another person, uiid had been Aned h* l>ealing Blnckett. Hei reputed husband had also bt for healing Blacketl. Tried To Stop Kihl Juseph %  Uaeraft said he waa the tuaband ol Haiewood Whin the rltht oct-iui..i on nVUBJual %  1 .it one of BbRKelt -. aon kii.K-ke.1 liirn gOWII nine. I'p". exaattned be aald he had Blackatl 11 ad 11..v 1111; ., k %  the fight 01 havinx aft. 1 the flijlil thai d< ntally I U| bis reputed wile tak jbg her %  ItibMa llirruawd, AudUkV %  nit ihe triad t" atop the HI.11 fc.-lt .tl-.i 1 lit I 1 Craaa-rxamlaed -he -., %  1 twtoe bean lined for beat ronle, <1>I OatftaM Sarseant al 1 UfcBl had g. 1 aa* li other. niarkett BgVl 01 % % % %  001 lg hei 1 Audlne ll irewood aftei th ffl<1 I nd. 1 %  he.,11 Hap %  exclaim lhal 11 > entail] %  il Han to cut her. cr*i-*aminr ov *r her. II 1 ut. f M, found Pk a cfc etl guilty lliaamaaiifl llinus LOVM I. BAY1.I.Y FUlUii I.awe Assist* Diary TIU'RSI>AY NOT 20 Reg. ft. Nathaniel HIOMH Rear. vs. I in.ni llr.ithwji A nd llrniil Harris hovgaiBtF IB lau artUaa NSW llllft %  n Bfcjt t Of '• %  %  -' :: 1 10 • %  a z \S VI. '' %  II, !...IT..l II: %  '• %  H .. gM I). .... .J 11 i' %  araae I If. l>r S 10 PTAME \m\wr.\0mtc of-' must: s/'/nwv 0 pertm.Cn:. .i.K—oeriin M 0 j-" >*' %  1XJUNICA GRAPEFRUIT—per doz. 0 per to ib POTATOES pen 10 lba. .00 5.40 per 110 Ib bag POTATOES—per 110 lb. bag S.S0 1 4.00 p PHI KTESSED CHEESE— per 5 lb Iin 4.00 CHACKEHS —per tin .96 Tlir Above ltfm for t'aafc A Carrj C'uatemen Only MAXAM CORNED BEEF HASH—l-lb, lin 78 MAXAM OX Tt 4.24 MAXAM iNEY PUDDING—1-lb tin .69 SWIFTS LUNCHEON BEEF !2-oz. tin ,83 MUTTON -pet tin ... M .M PAI.ETHOI ('ED STEAK—per tin ... .87 ROLL—per tin 04 PALETHORPE8 HEADY MEAL—per tin .•* HAIthl.s s n r,F \-EAU HAM4. TONtH.'E —Iier tin .89 1-lb, tin "• RANCH I i>AF—per lin 'II • RREAI^per tin 61 U 138 CON K tin I IM ICM STANSFELD.SC0n&C0.,LTD. Make HARRISONS Your Headquarters for Hardware!! XMAS Draw* near and lhiSeasonal llo.pilalilv iv bound lo mainKxlra Dt'in.i.d'. Cpon Vour Kilrhcn and Table Appointment* Be onre V011 hate all th*...' litil.iMngi which tend to ensure the success of the occasion OIK STOCKS include — II n.KKV In 3 tirades WIKK DISH (1.M.HS I'OTATO KK'KKS KITCHEN KNIVKS FOKKS and SI'tMINS COBKSCBEWI mi ( \\ OPENEBS I Isll KKTTI.KS VACUUM FLASKS ICING SVKIMiKS and Mills W1KK STRAINKRS %  I.OIK SIFTERS iVtHili SPOONS It '. ( Ii. \>l I 111 l./.KUS I.IMi; SQUEEZERS I'OTATO CHIPPEB8 COVERED ROASTERS BREAD and CAKE TINS t WISTKIl SETS 1SI KIN*. SPOONS PASTRY ROLLERS TIN ORATEBI — AIM — lloiihlless You will re(|iiir<' some ICrplHt -lllrlits and Additions lor both Table and Kitchen This la where We can help lor We have a complete range of all Ihe lleuuisite Items. Try US Hrt for all Yoni K%  Hai 1 %  wllh %  •• %  M.ui Irifaids ( Po. kei M poeket Die! < %  1 : lhan Par.el 1 Caee (on Hand %  Lettei Opanei in Case I'll me 12 kind*1 Shoe Horn In I Snooping I i'i il Nntr H.Hik W illel (l-tnim Cotafa A Nail File bi > <> %  Penknife in ti"* (2 kinfl-" Comb i" Case 1? kindal lh pftlng Puna (| kinds) Mending Sc* la Case K. ... Markei Eipp Parae Match r 'ae r.enls' Tn.y Put'.Ha <" %  p Ii Ca* Pouch (Zlpp) ami Gents' 3-Way Zipp Wallets with Ihe Map of Uarbadoa I M %  •< "I IBM laid, aha Mep ol Barbado and tinCn I In cut Tha above w,.i;-. tall) made la bean Notea wiUioul lokling Priri %  from Ui 30/1/. A 1st I %  : Compact 1 n v : iiui with t't.iBarba BRUCE WEATHERHEAD LTD. Head oj Broad Btreai \ MXS is just around thv Corner .. Why not Brighten up your Home with "SILVER STAR C0NG0LEUM The Floor Covering in many Lovely Colours! AND So EASY TO CLEAN! /^^e^^Ua^v HEAVTl PKgPAMAHONS KgCWTL} \RKI\HH • h\ Slmmpon \ .1. IM Blue Oreaa I %  Ai.leiiii BpOl < Perrnenenl w. ve K %  rtenl w*i Vrdena Spun C Ardena Mint' (Iniss Hath Mats \ in, It Grass S0I1.1 'Aulena Sachets In "M> Law Him(In.vs r~^. On Sale ol KNIGHTS LTD. THE EXHIBITION SEE Ol II 11 o\iu ill1 1 111 M.I. gay ; sv M\li:ill\I.S Inrlutlin,, man SHAKKKKIN 0 Sl.Mi. S2.32 & S2.40 per yd. COLOURED SHARKSKIN S2.lr9 per yd. in Pacific Blue. Surf Acqua, Lavender t.rey. Snioki It'ne Champaune PLAIN IOHAINE o Sl.jO SI.K0 & 52.111 |r >d PLAIN SEA ISLAND t OTTON at S2.:ill per yd. in White. Ilamhoo lllue PLOWERED MA 181 IND COTTON I J2.5H. M.0K. *4.s:i per yd PLAIN CREPI • -ii SI'IH |r sd HIIITI. & COLOURED KMBHOIIIKKHANOLAISE SI 7n. MM, M.6.1. Sl.31. •Ml & MSI pef yd. HlMIK & COLOURED I.MIIKOH 1 1:1 11 ORGANDIE 8 HJ3, CLM a SLn par yd. I MKKOIDKKKII Ml MIS |M| par >d CAVE SHEPHERD & Co., Ltd I". II. 12. I) Broad Strati



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r PAGE EIGHT HAKBAJX>S AUVOCAT* COMPARING WATCHEtf. Know Your Cricket LAW 45 %  g o. & COFFIN •i the gome, seta three Law*—45, 46 and 47 •d in Ba rb ados prior to the :i.e Oulu-s, and JUMSdlcti %  >.>. that it in no. fawei man thirt M I—Datleg of Unplrei Before tbr MM I* uni|ii' dull ••' e B Ul I %  wiih .inasaae. ted b 'it. -ipi in.' on ditn.ii -'' "HKIIKI or ii,, lAaawtlvi u...i t:.. wlcketa an pmi" tU mi'in a .ii.a vnti kot w aca l>enitn the watch b or IlM'k In br followed tlurittK Ple>. Simple B* Such P nllt. iln Tint apply U played by touring IC*HII.N til the N"lr to BM I ,>- • it OUl III Mir COdi i" % %  %  %  .1 to by %  arrives. Watclu-x n i-i* that The Law Hen h '' first glanci ealeh they have decided %  rotfcra ..n! the lima I to revenl rrom lynchroAWng %  eight ball % % %  %  %  tt (be % % %  ''i b which which cricket led le folj ini QM nateh. liu|i'.. (ml balls unlea bj rtic dutiei o( i %  merit. In Au %  .i artanca to the %  rwon in n match tucceaa % %  d gemi three clays M At 1*1 bach •• ltdl I that not onh were the ."'.I'.iiii n i ..in allowed loaotn uenperea re-ponsibie DM -i %  Hint phrase the lead tv ill wlckeu them -. lit luder of "nil frlvoAiMrulia l aVIara. of ill iiuriv whether TinLaw governing the Rolling, i1 1 r pretended ind an dhrrerliaalri to iHew what Hi dJfleri In Australia South Afrlci ok jweper before MM SPORTS QUIZ n> Ml ROi MM K I ONDON (II In get .,Frank SedTt..ni been Jir oslav Drobtiy to win the %  %  %  singles al her H^t attempt' 1 is. Who wen the Boigaao Giand Prix motor cycle this year? vou ape) the fnUowtafl fam'ii. date and place Unu illfl lb) New smith Wales. IMS. to Henuon. vx. 1918. (d) Trinidad. Went I ndin IH73-' I %  i Who i> HM oat) %  JOBkMt in English County cricket to have taken all toa wlcketa In an innings atnee the war' (til Former basket-ball player J. Davis won the 19M AaMrtcan Otymplc highjump trials. What height did he jump'' (7i Who was the last player before Frank Sediiman to win ail mice Men'trtfcM at Wimbledon? (Hi When wa the F. A. Cup Final first played at Wemb() Which was the to* to be admitted to the Wimbledon Champlonahlp' din What U the record number of runs scored off a six ball ovei ill) Who is the only player to have won the United fttatts Open Golf Champ. (U lii you s|K,| the folio* Inn i. aoccer teanu Highbn.y. H:.miden l*ark. ibroa I'ark. White Hart Ntntaa Park In Which year for the first time through from the Ufw i nun %  I14 What i* the maximum length of %  polo around* (IS) How manj bui R Uaare La %  race of tzc yards'' (i>i Whiit is the minimum height of the goal-posts in Ruffe) rootbaU! 17] Whal is the at length .a cricket bat? fUJ Whin did William i !tu; Hill) Tllden Orel win the Wiui M<-mn ClKiiiipionship' Who ..ipmine.l the I947-4B Australian Rugby team On ttstlf u Kngiand' Who la the enptolii ol Orent brilain's Olympic team? 111! If-IMV \.l\ I Mill ft M 1*52 .Xm* IIAMI' UK | io\ VT4Mr*fa M1TELI ni\i\r. l.OOKlMi 8UHPBI8ED. JM MicoH, lib pounds, ataggers back afUr laiam i wlt>rweight >hi>wp Jobuny Brattou, 148, lands a hard right earing thalr .^Ledulea lu-rounder in Madison Square Garden, Hew Ttrt Bi.tion Ooorrd afircli in ihe grst and Mventh and wi> awarded a T.K.O in to* Hiilitli round when referee Harry Keler stopped tin bout. 'flnternoftonol SoMndphofof DBPEUU SCORES CENTUM Y AGAINST CARLTON XI \ew World Record LONDON k i iishine %  %  i %  \ < were gogtl' tect hu eye*, a clip to nose and frogman'* rubber fins (eat He remained minute and 17 seconds UP graspit mi ., %  K to the sea bed to show hiw da* In August Eiuchf %  128 lbs of fish In IS hours. This summer he went on U(1 und*f> wakaf fishing expedition with Lord Mount batten who U very u this sport. • • • A crack American tintim* •lOise Egan Hanover, ran today In Bologna against four protVs%  %  The home eavared one kilotve furlongM ip I min U I evclist. (.i in I min 11.5 sees and Uh SB year old Gino Bnrt.ih Ii | mm J sees. 1.1 •MILLION: Of fAMILHS AGktt THAI: %  F • %  I COLGATE 'Cleans your te Cleans your breath THt COLGATE WAY TO COMPLETE .HOME-DENTAL CADE. Always brush ywr l**tk right altar soling with COIGATE DENTAL CREAM The friendly Sundaj %  an*, xi ended In a draw with iiei't-i/.i i oi :n K : ., antui %  toi %  (14) (in (16) %  (19) • 2lii It nusl not txcead 400 yan!'. Ten in. iilea at tan yards. The uprights must II feet.Thiee Mat 2 la I92U. W. MiU'..n 'guaensUnai II Whittle —L.fc.8. XI .ariicd their score from 40 for one to 239 for eight at the luncheon interval when Matthewdeclared the innings closed. This M runs to make to nvo.il an Inning*' defeat. rarer* were rvi'elwi in. .aid Harris 2d. Bowling (or Carltou K. Green id ge took >* ,n 14 overs and ('. rfhJl %  • I btc W make lit) the i" of play. No fewer than ti t .catcltog were 'Hopped. C, OfeanMen 38 and C. White 2K did beat in the second innings. C Matthew took two for 28 In 10 over*. CHESS RUSSIAN WINS WOMEN"S TOURNAMENT LONDON. Nov. 19. Russia's Ellzavct Bukova won Lhi International Women's Chess tournament, Moscow Radio repo; Ied Holland'*. Heemskerk an. 7-vorykona of the Soviet Union plata the only remaining adjourned same today prior to the last round However, the Dutch woman acknowledged dcfe.it without r..-uniln play. Bukova thus was certain of holding ilrst place regardlesb of the outcome of the List found issfeteheai sin d of .i possible 14 —u.r. B.C.L va THE REST In prep intton lor their rorta-1 loming fixture with the Barbados | Cricket Aaaoctatton team, the Barbados Cricket I_ i tirst Trial at %  tal Hospital grOOl when a H el. •< tH Etaal %  obtains in England I la] '''. kei i ore the Innocent looking shall .quatnl thi any swelhr Koe* Mrain." As Is the ewe t.-l.iv the l %  ltd (-iiK outer a I.Jitspjpeel. Bneh timplr.' %  inhcated on ; --aIs. !ll\l -. 1 t 1. |i I HU' LhU discussion of the "Duties 111 res." Why Jap Table Tennis Stars Are Slipping By A 1'urret.pondeiil LONDON. Nine ii. At the %  i^r ufh i Led %  And n iic: or then Buceeea, I used the Which liail not been lean in the top grade game %  nbly the .! of al< .lauan all the other coui But tlw l %  %  i %  %  %  Japan %  %  I i oasta] %  Te*1 bfau hi % %  in addl tion to .i series of othi Won The l.o| They ( ran world ehampii-n I I or Fujll I %  %  I mpion, am. T IP Will' Writing in the current issue of' '\rld SporU. he says: "Personally %  llaved th.it the top Japanese players, with their umuWen i-tier thnu I U Bomb... success wn lug iniinh in the element of .i to the tactical errors of the riuiope.Hi aces who playi -i b q ,m h on the defensive and allowed %  | b ev rawed by tho itlng -f the Jap*." Ijm llama does not uiuler-eati.l.ii.imse. foi he goes on It would W unjust to say that : %  .; daaarved. ' %  %  urjfl I'urthermore. ii hM %  of goixt to the game, by llustraUng and emptva mom that defence >i eve will not Id c ti.itnpionships Anyone run a world title ..' all-out player." thai the East will ome ->f ihe lostgheat i %  I thi next Worli %  :ps. to be held la %  Rum into, next March. Mama say*, ho i but I %  ii" | i.eaeh and was part of n four i n -ii' ilurin, i. .. | Ra I %  net their ..ppnsitioii In i %  against Shi)' I h tooted ten turn^ I %  !. i : god Ofth thiei n Itchea against Shih. "NaluraUy". says Barn.i "the vo Fjiglishmen must have been i i Ontasuout traveli plane is most tahouetlng nugi make allowance td nal fan! the defeata eennot I • i %  long %  thi H %  Bo %  > the defeats of Leech .ind Bergii The Hong KIT %  rare )UH I %  Japanese. nut bettl Of them i p OOd Of reai I fitly the Bombay outing has L.t.S Sedmnan won In Fotll petl 4—6, 0—2. 63. 6—2 Suzaiiiie Uiulen in 1919. Qeofl Duke Average 101.7 in i.li F. R. Brown. Sir Donald Bradzaen, Denis Compton. Sir Pelham V,' Trevor Bailey for E> against Lancashire in 1949 six feet nine Inehaa Bobby Riggs (U.S.A. i 1939. 1922-23. Bolton lH-:it West Ham 2 -0. Cl.nn. :tL' bj C. Sm..t' i f Glan gainal Hampshire in 1935. HU scoring strokes 4, fi; S; i Ben llogan in 1948 and 1950. Arsenal. Queen* Park. (jlascnu Hunger Tottei ham. Cardiff < In 1922, They'll Do It Every Time By Jimmy HJCIO bLONG AAILES OF -=LAT COUrJTr?/ mmm DAH&BR IS WAUGHT ARE FENCES OP OAK AND OP IROr4 ) WROJc3*4T'fafttstt— 11 r^aVfaslail Til*' l(;ir-li.il


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i'\r.r TWO ItMCIlMtl)-. \I)V(( \il TlimSDW. NOVIMHI R IB, IK1 (faJub Calling. D uotou. .... Bden ai d Fyfli S S G< 1/ to from Ml tW WBtMW M MsOrl < Uli* • JC in. rUr kn I KM. ar. Banaasaaaawv, WfetT%  %  aad i-o d-d ,>r notice. Dr roll l!h saw %  %  unr. I>r Carroll attar being trainri iith tit*%  i served %  MTUI* his wife was n %  i %  R A.K in Britain on an operational squadron Stir wil Iiorn In Wales and it very fond of music. l)r I ,nd of music in .niriitirm In sailing r'imrlh \i*it M DffD W LAM i I \ who arrtv.v MacOotmach I Argentiua an UM I Is now In Barbados on her fourth Site arrived here uu Sunday trxttw fn m i. I S ColotH%  a months holiday at the Blue Hu' %  l-ancaitrr said that she for several %  tta her brother M, %  award BchroadM ui UM Frozen Food C %  i" set %  V • .1 the Marine Hotel. . Uith ISurvluy* think R ETURNING to Grenada yes%  ftamooo by B.W.I.A. was Mr. r. E. Randall of B..i I ocaa'i who spent Royal. Originally from Enuland. Mr. 'Kint ui Grenada for over three years. Hii %  peets lo go home on long mtvi Ml was his first visit to the inland lie said and added %  Back Frum VS 1 M ltS J BIX>NDIN. wife of thyed u Coal Surveyor with Messrs Hannen Holland and Cubltts, contractors engaged in the reconstruction of C aatriaa, / .>'. MMgf Liken %  bftsaajaa M storm HL'NDV JII sting Italy, France a/id England. here on Saturday S S Qotjtto Irom the U.K. and will %  I guest of Lad] of Highgate. Upper CoQymora Mi* Ii two years ago an i (of a longer period I'rawrl A/rent Leave* M R KAHI. TAUSIG of Messrs Paul TauoiK and Bon AK'iit of New York Ciij. .. Trinidad last night by B.W.I.A. on his way back home. He was accompanied by his wife and they had spent a bhort holiday here as at the St. Lawn-rice Hold. M I'ausig attended the recent Travel Onntrts* in Miami, I since then visited Peru, Argmtlnsf, BnalL Uruguay ami Ttim.lad befonmmiBia! to Barbados. / r ,,, ,„. %  Tlt-tUlY M iss JESSIE THOM.*SON of Toronto. Canada, leaves this Ing by 11.W 1 A for Puerto DM h.-r way baa k boa i an enjoyable week's holiday in .iilog as a guest at the Marine II .tel. Miss Thompson is employed with the Manufacturers Life Insurance %  in Toronto. thi sSlMH Unit M R. COLIN THOMAS, Branch Manager of Messrs J. N. Harnman and i' i.ui. left for Trinidad on Monday by B.W.I.A on a shoi for The \\ inter M R B MYElt. a reUred company director of England and inwlfa. th t Hon'blc Mrs. Myewh> aniVM by the Gol/lto on Saturday are guests at EnmonThey have come to spend tbeir usual winter holidays. Cirri 11 iiiiii.u i fu> i W ING-COMMANDER L. A. Egglesfleld, Director General .r civil Avi. c irfbbMn AM i was a passenger for Jamaica via Trinidad bv B.W.I.A, on Monday. Si-fiinl In .~>tl ifiim P AV[NG his second via* to fall native Barbados In 50 years is Mr Ihniy Itoorly of Omaha. Nebraska, publisher of the Omaha World Herald. He arrived over the week-end by B.W.I.A. from IV.nidad accompanied by l. AIM and vs.ill be heir for three vvtek* the Marine Hotel. Mr. Doorlv. a brotlu-r ..f tinI..'. Martin Doorlv of Messrs. Martin Doori* and Co., LML, Bridgetown, llarbados eighteen years ago. rnn' IM.il. P Ltijnyt'il Unit M R P A.J. GOOD! of British Cclanese Overseas •: the West isit to the various agencies left yesterday evening by B.W.I.A foi via Grenada alter week in Barbados, as a guest at the Hole! Royal. i.< .\ i, b] UM laWa oonortunll for Trinidad was Mr J. D. 'orbesi .. i %  !...'.' %  .. %  ^f Hon^n Ltd 1-onilon. who was also in Barbados for n week as a guest at the Hotel Royal. Mr Forbes-Watson came out on a tour of the Caribbean, South and Central America, in Ihe interest of bis company and hat already covered the Caribbean. He expects in return home in about six months Mr. Goode and Mr. Forbes-Watson said that they thoroughly enjoyed their first visit to Barbados both from the business and social point of view. I' l-ttlllt I < II 1.1,in -tr M R.'D A. PERClVAL. Assistant Economic Adviser to the Comptroller for Development and Welfare has lust leturned from Trinidad by B.W.I.A. after attend| .ni: a Committee Meeting of the Caribbean Commrtfion at Kent: How < <, i tinft t'i>r Vit/cluntl M I SS DAISY STUART of Bcekles Road, left for England last Sunday on the SS. Cotofwbt*. Miss Stuart who nas gone to further her studies in music, will reside with her uncle, former R.A.F. sy Mr. Evans Alleyne. and hi* wife %  *TMS VOU1I DCDTVIXM Ai. IIOROSCOFT. • %  a |gaj—a\ff, --<-V,MB -S.. aat l""K IB XUr irlMay romn und Sa seearoassl M •• %  M\rv si •• APIII. -• 'ill Hi arcraprrli May Or M %  \ran. ti i.. M.*V S -T— !" |M-Mrr. I.ul inn may br Work on Main li fililncr U gmtirntl indlcal.OFia. Hold your f>IIS* hlsti II to ssVarad m >ucc*aa and plaa>i-. Tktund far-r*achlns. Ihlnaa jmi ot Inr4 lwfor. an JI.HI r* to JIU %  f'artrrrl— In* • .-ndlHitf " %  I iOTim.4iH* i r eKtra '( %  • U Jtl-T ** to A i 01 i'-—om nr>iK(l>^l advanlun deola yoii h icli a \ft icid Rat* 1 poteiiBrings I9S2 Touch IV EsMa, gON of equip. Bd buildins" on the Roys' Wl i r la go':.„ of under tl'^ perso na ) -iuection of Philip. The latest place 'n is the Print %  kall) VleI i a* been providtd with t> %  -r.ience, mritted wash basins (with fiot and ."Id laid an). \*ments have aUo %  r ied at the workshop, i kara arc now tidying up ;i lnrge yard. in the estates v i i. visited by Prince ready fell the %  rrn in the Home Park and Norfnlk farm in the Great Park of combine hari ment con' largely to one o| Ui'moat successful harvests In the i Of the estates. Staff Impressed o jaaaa >>v i*o. avsr-*** poaltlv-P prraoiiHl inl.-it-Mi rK [lanm aa a* o<'Tini, a as. oiTl t> HirrraarB aa (TsM| Boon after he w— %  n—.t-a snsto bcioi. .,..-.k.n. Ranter of v. I r.d by the %  [up made a ihensive 1<.ur of In %  it into the workings of p ;tnd Im;esse Mover ground the hSPV medium. be ready lor lhn unepet'e.I /Hv>riUtfe> my be o|H>tl> l>"t b BTSK— ,nv benerltB. JAMI AKV IM raaai AT s i *%• %  . %  > A-pfU Mm" seni t.iaoent t.r r l>"'i"" r "%  "•• * %  """" vour work. chrre wim "I'""* rare Friend IT manner tasaSBBi iiHNi r ?i •• slAasfll IPt—si Make no Pl" • %  %  %  •~pi where Uiev M.IIIO' BK-orp 1 1 %  .•cceeO r-ttbly %  make able leader, doet %  LISTENING HOURS 4 p The KewS, 4 10 p in The Dstly II p m No Name. 4 * p m 1 BY THE WAY-": 'y SEAOfCOMBa C OMPLAINTS tnH %  'Mneii tUtss band I.'IIK-" wag waft... Indicaitsi pic have ver> icn i uve nnaea wnrt |W>JI a I In ball as Wellington, ami this shows lino as helooked then." "Where was this ball' .isk.-,| tinman. "Paris." said the artist, "on the night before Waterloo. It's hlsKI Flut-fiiuliny C HARLIE SUET points out that a potential reapiH.rtnimn.nl of unscheduled priorities does not necessarily mean that the bottlenecking of goods In short supply can be short-circuited by unscrambling %  %  I .. %  !.A T, disinflationary or nun-recessional trend is usually followed by increased upput." In %  rgtWasj: A WIKK has nrsmplalnad that her husband kissed her twice immedialely after the marriage and then disappeared fr good. M. dc t;enlis once said "I only kissed Mm, da %  —— twice. The first time It was to please myself, the second lime, to please her. We never met again: there wa no one else to please" .da i. .HE i.ttoin l^ndu. lorawi bueball caar. %  %  ^niluwptwr. S n. v II p Alioyr IU pm ftl-it. It-'W l'M>iramnve Parade. 7pm 1 I ,Nm li ;l i i .ted Di-eiv Hadio Newareel. %  JB P | p m Sp!*l Deap* • l> ThOTfl %  %  Star Danced. ] %  ..i ,. %  i UM Editorlatoi. k Oaat s GLOBE PRINCE FELIX MARRIES i Hapsburg. 37year-old fourth son of the last i a churck here today %  • Anna Eugenie of Arenberg. 27year-old cousin of King Baudouln I ^littenng Kon ; ('i Catholic church ceremony was I '50 aristocratic guests. for Lontoday and fly to New Ydk UMtgsst. After a honeymoon in :he Caribbean they will make %  in Mexico, where the %  making prefabricated boil BBV %  their guests left for Villa Encar, tne Riviera home of Prince l Arenberg, uncle of the Felix was the only llapst >,,.., >il ln ,. Hitler lha country After an W flight he reached the n August li*3B. I g served with the Austrian battalion of the United BUtal Army Eslneg then he haa . Mexico and Latin Anna Eugenie was born at Ellingen Castle in Bavaria Id at the Veterinary faculty at Munich University. The at alwut two years ago in Bavaria—U.P. GST )OLK Christmas Cards AT Tin; Advocate Stationery. IK..I. % U Url.-s LOCIS L. BATLET Ballon Laae AflLA/i; WITH Fl'RY AND TERROR! Last snows TODA\ %M .M ROIAI mDDIS€ > %  ltd 11 WJI %  (,. 11 „.. inH lovrlv He i A J 10 7 fl %  rlt— lao on i i # a •'mfler sain of h*M world ehamland would i.~ I laluable match under Hie preaeni doubled by iie Amirlran f -. i ]i pair had live •ituation wall in hand afiei Souths redoubla. Wesi l*-d One Spade. Notui pMaad and la %  • bluff bid ol One No'irmnr idoiihtml bv South Went than DM c ua. but Nortd scored CJO in %  final contract ol Four Hearts The redouble had an Intimidating effect, and the American* d"l not convdrr a sacrifice in five Cluba In view ot nla moderate Kpade MipprjrL our Eav r> -i\ i t |nci.*nrd to ovenai ' i t li To Diati Room 3 and *a doubled b south for a penalty 0 f MM 'ipenlns TOMORKIMV (In T.. linlrolourl fHf IMMORTAL MU&kmekH IN THE Moii SPECTACULAR ADVENTURE OF ALU WD %  I m %  B S 8 CURTAIN NR fllliailWIl) 51 lo 98c c ciiinir-—Rose. Om e Blue. ;oid. CTRTAIN NKT -Rw. <;re*n. Blue. Gold $ 1.05 lo SI.38 —IU". 38". and 40" wide TABLE CI.OTHS-S4 wide BUT, $.1.39, ff.OK COLOURKI) TOWK1.S S3.28 & $2.26 WIlITi: IllWaiJI $2.20 & $2.36 SHEETS 70 x 100 $3.75 80 x 10 $C.50 90 x 100 $7.72 PILLOW CASKS 18 x 30 Mt IIITTLIt MUSUN 4K T. R. EVANS (WHITFIELDS) YOUR SHOE STORE I'hone: :-: |2U "I I I I I I JAMTTl lilt INS SHOI* Newt to Sinyrm CLOSING SATURDAY-November 22nd. FINAL WEEK — (1 ARANC'E SALE FIIIIIH ALL DRESSES . :.. aaJ M.M .\I !. NYLON UNDERWEAR uieatly reduced Al.l, BRAS .., SI.i)0 JIIII tl.9$ PANTIE-G1RDLES $1.00 and fill 11 RE l.INKN Ill.UXIt: lEASr S ST.tlfl per SM SHOUTS White and Col I i JIM CHILDREN'S DRESSES %tM MATKKIAI.S b l the Yard Htc. per Yd. ROD CAMERON i JANE NIGH 0 ,„...4. %  • I ,t )i ntuaooM e* HKIDfiETMWN PAl* i INT. IS* I I ill 111 WITfl %  1'NSHINR il'alar' ii \i:r. \i:i I -. 4 si a a 30 p < a Wa s,-, ^i ai VK > %  •••.! n % ria. a .i 11.-. j SSB pn. Bi Acllo.1 Film, BLUE LAMP 'aaa WAKNEH BaS, -pr,,,i i.as p.m GUNSLINGERS KOO II 11 T III V 1 111 ROYAL • Say %  a SSB L'nivvraal Dmiblr Rrputit* Duuble jh. Andrew SUlan BELLE OF OLD „,„„ „. Al-l IHMA AMI nr.*iv.i i HI mm run vs.s • no tTrehnlcokJii and pi •( %  |( U KAIIILIINl: w An^ltdd —— Uprnmi T.^ O.oitl*s TtMiraa t ... .V S 1ft RKO. Double Brian Don levy GIB Youni OA4 I >d I SI IDA a ( %  nl..Hllii| ll.il'. iii a a.ss ABnOTT aad n-ll l l i. C0MINROUND THE MOUNTAIN SLAUGHTER TRAIL CrC Ma?,.^r";'"'' JUNGLE OF SAMSON AND ONR roiis OF VKMl'S a HI: M • I DAI I.NIII ip...iin %  >ni,ia.i isa a sis TH BSIFS.R — and mi ssAiiir isrii "Color i CHANG urmins Frlda* JSth nt On T*irCarla> SL'IBT HAWK MHMMIM*MHM1>MIMMMM I HM* ll' 4IRII UOIIkOUl OS MIDNIGHT SATURDAY 22nd 00 r o B E A Film— M IS! OVN I \l I IIIIO'M l TALENT STARS ON PARADE latJ Alli-vnc—10 Year Old Trumpclcr Pn* IIT


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WHAT'S ON TODAY Alfca.ic* FYsmur CM CILJM thai Urki lainu lh *vronc> thai in H Hifut,.rr in Ihe duuntr, nd tlw food Ih.i I can 4t> berate ESTABLISHED 1B95 PRICE. FIVE CENTS nSUBDAY S WWJHtR REPORT %  ii i r TO etl • a p Maori' Mew, Xm-u* 17 " p rr' in in i..T.ai it %  Maintenance Of Canadian Market Important To BWI Sugar Producers I II \lll\. Ill t.t II IIOVII Jamaica Will Raise New Loan Commonwealth Sugar Agreement Incentive To Greater Production (From Our Own Correspondent) LONDON. Oil. 1!*. Provision made under the Commonwealth Susrar Agreement for meeting the requirements of Canada is referred to by Mr G. Vcrnon Tate. M.C.. Chairman of Caroni in his annual report today. "The importance of maintaining a Canadian market f The consolidated nei piollt at £2M,92" representan 1150,873 over Ihe proflt for the prevwui "' %  Subject to oonfl (ton HI UM Annual Meeting in London on December 10 I rt* nd of twopence per two shilling unit of the' London' •<** wl * !"*• !" '* ,h game as for the last six years. National Necessity ALGIERS. Nov. 19. Opening the regular session of the Algerian Assembly yesterday. French Governor General Roger Leonerd said. "France's presence In North Africa is a OaltOtMl necessiiy on which we will not bargain." France's achievements In the social, cultural and economic field speak for themselves. France waits for example^ of those who criticise her Shineeds no less%  Bng, Hf, Leonard raid. ence to Asiatic nations' .riticlsms %  From Our Own Car rtpon dene KINGSTON. Tea.. Now 19 The Governor announced In : %  message to the House of Representatives to-day that Government intended at th. favourable opportunity to raise a new loan in the London market for Jamaican development. Funds raised from the Last loan In London now are nearly Ml spent and many development schemes are In operation or In preparation to be financed The Colonial Office has advised Jamaica not to expect to raise more than £3.500,000 in London this time and the intention is to. raise that amount as early next 11**"** _Pff two shilling year as condltii market make It advisable invite public subscription. The Governor said this imloatl was a tempnr.iry measure pending full consideration rf a large scale loan programme against the background of the report of the World Bank mission which recently visited the island. ^publican Chinese Attacks Policy To Be 2 Discussed Hurled Back Hapufa Mr YORK Nnv II I Eisenhower will •enator Robert A. ,->mpo.iifon of tho in Administration programme. Etoanhewar, who arrived ?J!*. laU% Vt^rday from his Hashlngte,, meeting with Presl' rrt Trim ,„ (0 gci -day was tutor Taft. Chatrman of the RapubUean Polk?) C>mmiUco pracantaUva Jo Martin IDT. prospective Speaker • HOtiM of Representative, were to l>c his first callers PI 11.00 am E.R T I^ter in thday Mr B a anhow ai will meet itor Styles Bridge*, Senior Alexander Wilev and other kej Republicans. Senat, | T n and Martin will talk OVO) tog programme during ference with Mi |*.i Allied troops in hand ti SEOUL. Nov. 19. hand battles hurled back their Assault Broken PrsumahhrswuHnr^ei! P** ,r,od "* Ain a lP" r '' n "y under Senator Aff Taft told a news conference in We hingtoti yesterday thai be had) %  1*00 Mr BbCBOj CMM The filial attack heo a! 4 10 '-;• %  '.. IV.,.,,Vl*^av -l A.£rhVoke\no !" > X 'T* *'"lllt€ ,( h Aftor ho did not know|, hal noting became sporadic and ended at 8.10 am Allied trOOpa then sent out patrols to reh for any Reds lurking Io %  heavy Chinese C'omnru i>ts attacks last night and today aftainst "The Hook"—n, vital malmand ride (tuardinc tho wesiern Invasion roig.' to Seoul In n wift shift of flyhtini; to ihe Western fS"# RpfN hit the hill three times behind heavy artillery barra, Ooa Corirtfntmli KINGSTON. Nov. 18. Florizel Olasspole. British T.U.C. trained General Secretary of the National Workers Union and Parliamentary Secretary of of French rule in North Africa the People's National Party oppo—u.r. sltlon In the Jamaica Houe oi Representative-; was suspended from his services in the House today for six weeks on a motion by Ken Hill, head of the Jamaica K ATHENS. N. T.U.C and one time P.N.P. Tt "" BOW government of Premier leader who was ousted in March Alexander Pspagos was sworn in on charges of being a Communist. V*** imd £f, C S?L 0< The motion followed a verbal J 01 "' General Staff and three battle between both members in nior ,dcs ***'Sned their_posti IN*w CoviTiniU'iit the House when Hill charged that P.N.P administration jn Kingston' wag corr u pt and Qlasspott replied nar.iing Hill a Communist. The Speaker ordered th. withdrawal of the epithet and tilnsspole refuseo. —U.P. KISSIAX Mlt.t'D FOR OlfECriVS APPARATUS Moscow N A factoi een s*-ii to prison for eight yearti Jamaica Labeur party mesnban ()U( .| nii i( .. i led b, Mr. Hustamante voted in atU5 he Sovirl Government support of Hills motion after the newspaper livestla reported b> Speaker had named Olasspole i day.—t.P. 'United States Stands Firm UNITED NATIONS. New York Nov, 10. The United States is standing firm against mounting pressure Mom Western Allies to accept India's plan for ending taM Korean war. A serious rift appeared In the making as the Committee of eight FOUntfWS met secretly for the third t me in an eflorl to returnde the I-Milan proposition with the United States peace resolution plan on the 1 UW] law ll give: iiu ;i--ui iinic l-jsoners will not be forced lo return to their bOBBO* hinds Krishna M-nnn is scheduled to expound the Indian plan hilly to the Political Committee f hen I* meets at 3.00 p.m. E.S.T today. — v.r. Th. last big battle on "The H.iok"' took place (Vlnber 27, U len 3.000 Chinese attacked U.9. Marines holding the position. Marines beat off the attack* >->es to Reds who in point breached the Allied main line. In the central and ea*tern aBCtor of the front lempei aagtS lo 8 deRress above lTO Fahronhoit A hand grenade duel Holts Out in a sector on the eastern front costing North Koreans SO killed or wounded. United Nations also threw back I Ned probe. Allied light bombers (IB CasnStHftidM tuueka Winter supplies and amm lo c. '• rnurml front lines. B-l SuperfortS limled Red supply centres at Sonchon 35 miles from the Manchurliiti border and a f miles %  •uth of Sari won. U.a fighter pilots shot down or danuued !3 Red M.I.O.-ll's In iierial duali Monday aiid Tuesday. — v.r. rcsoluticn this afternoon to meet SK.iin Thursday arternoon B he another bid lo elect ore Ttiiresolution followed the reading of the opinion of Mr. Hann.|>s. tity CorporaUon's counsel, thai no Mayor was elected S unity and that the quest i hethar the matter could not be rirnnsidered until the explru -ix months did not arise cause th# statutory duty f'eating a Mayor had not < s.harged Mr. Hannays ..! %  | i.i'vised that the tv^inet) may by i noUltiOfl, fix a new date foi the I < > rtlon of a Mayor. HIRE I-ABOUftRRg .lent tha beach Barbados Omlf Oil Co. Ltd. which Ii Hesy "qnlpmont lor th* Oompany is The Uboarer* are standing on at which Uads from the public highway < %  I TrstiU Bvteh. St James, for •he heavy M.k Trmk oi dad wlta s iA ton draw work^ ig stored at a warahou** at Bi nwfl.id at. Liiry tbs steel 'anding mats wlu %  determine what went w %  res hurtled out ol i Innight, ploughed into Ihe rear ri<, uf M l-< < t lumped i. iraclu AU %  %  \. i %  h< President itiui then I %  nd the luxury U • i 13 miles ih ,,r i.,i as %  bortts attei ll i 11 puQad wi ol i ii.nutes afler midnight. .'.'.'. idantiOed ,, f ihe tu-ket ..'Hi' PM for the complets ly Moeked on 'he line ihe double trackad main link nown the Hhone Valley tiumish .enir.il U.S. Shauld Lower Tratfo Barriers NEW YOMK. Hi i'ievident Truman in a message the National Foreign Trtrte < onventloo Wi b rtrongJy urged < %  %  is tinn" barrlei %  %  i Ui Ttusaai RUl | Oh i own s/af In tbi out big scale did frem Amerllis message %  w rtd Trade tlnnst Mid tn iwit %  ', % %  i you Kremlin f.. ucei%  St.ihn'< i %  H> f i %  ihJl Iiu Waal win rail to i 11 • 11and economic proM will fall to fighting wiihi.i itself ,,. engaged hen Ibe tOTUJ heavy "Blue" to.ired out of ighl ">'* ploughed into it. rrelghl thifting oparatioi fiiertrand Russell lo Be Married LONDON, Nov. 19 | ANTIOUA. Nnv 19 I Bortrsnd Kussell gfl. ahiloso-' To-day at Oorernmenl Hou pher announced his engagement ori the occg i Iantatlon lo Miss Edith Finch, daughter of ot piixes for the ll52 Oerdao Eitward Hronson Pinch of New Competition, Hi-. Excellency Sir ; York CM* In a paid advertisement Kenneth Bluekburne announced in the Times, Then Mr. Russell thut a telegram was received' took the phone off the hook at his which ho felt was a result th.it suburban house so he would not be London in aware that the PeOB* lathered by callers. Nor would of Antigua now have nyone in the house unswer the .t lerlanding and an i-'tl —U.P. BARBADOS GULF OIL CO.. LTD. re varrylng out picp*r:i-ioiifor drilling at s site roughly half way between Turner's 11*11 and Swans Factory At arwenl the location Is being cleared with a view to choosing a spot for a ftrsn foundation Here the D Caterpillar Is seen In action while the aUB (leftl are preparing holeWor drnanlUagWhat WU1 Mr. Kifeenhowers Polity Hv> WASHINGTON. Nov. 19 bave budgetary nirerv -..died as OMrking A tidal wave of .-.peculation reduced taxation should become i aswendancy of the global %  >. swept over this capital as to the U* v Out the post-election situation insignificance of lh t National elevgovet [ dlcated tha..,,,,. betion results in terms of world polturen the two p<-rly winas Ing between Internationalists and -trcngihe.financial bunt. I With the revelation that the I majority of the public wanted a ' %  "change" the red implications of The .-Lruggle goes back io Ihe flic "change" are vet to be defined. (act that The developing issue is not .' tween Internationalists and p> tical "Isolationists" but betv--. elements committed to broad inter| tional wins. national policy and those which beMr F. East Berliners Face Food Scarce Winter By JOSK H.HSIIM. BRRUN. Nov. 19. The Beilin-SDviei Km cupboard is almost bare and F.ist (iai mans appear to be lacing a bleak winter according; ihlt raportg reaching West Berlin. The reports lajd the food shortage is growing worse and the Communist (iovcnuncnt is frantically searching for a scapegoat to blame it on. II said Bast German hou-seuivet wet* standing in line fol hours lo get food onl/ to be told suppll 4 nad run out, to* d riots were said lo have broken out recently at %  iltei ed points in Die -Soviet .. dea, Btatesoants oi communist nd propaganda announcement^ of Ihe East /one Press pin shortages on to such essentials as meat, potatoes, sugar, butter and fats. i srialsangaf of tinsituaU (>f m "'Rbt cars and locr-motlves also '"! m Eastern railroad TUNIS Nnv 10 his inaugural an f-ven onions are scarce. Jokes Police said Hv Tindt£n N B *I.. %  epC East Oertnany rweently that aliS .ccu^ o7 M^Ui ?ml onion shortage was raused by .roan have been arreiSd Thav the crr n to the are accused of. ettlngfirVio Neftw opmenU were grven free rein to State Security service to make town hall. 18 mile* smith of heTo I P "N. Nov. IB. meeting scheduled to take B laee to-day l>etween the hod limstry and Empire Sugar Producers has been postponed (Ol 21 hours. Empire sugar men will now see the Ministry tomorrow afternoon when tin lt*g crop prlco will be resumed. It is hoped that meetings will be concluded this week Mr. McCowai) has made a pro visional plane booking to retail to Trinidad on Sunday. Mr. Cuk mis made a provisional hookim for Monday. $220,800 To Help Antigua Slum Area Sleainship Kuns Aground NANIMO. Brtttat I bit Bib Nov. m A six-thousand toff] Pactft passenger steamship ol N MIII.O agasBBBSel %  refussttag Bta ll..) redu %  %  %  ill l .. .1 In kindling and DOsMd hei IKIW hnre babbw IN pan <>m,e last hgm hei revers> engine .led. Tiie vessel the dock t" complete %  III from v.'ni"uvci wKb ...... %  board. No one eras kinjured in the mishap. AN of the dnm.iKC to ves-sel Ui %  f'.P. I Dvravt i i arisl Ui" Irce worhl'long ni-mic progrees trill I only if its mend" I ' % %  enni ttit-ii i.ii world tiiei to m st.-iiidard of living to lb" it It must he ebhl lo do u' large aeale •M 11 . U US* rel .A MM '"i Id on Ho* one liS'id i SI IS production, curl %  n.t keep ihe prices of it* empetitive. and the Uhlh ii ihe other bind red '.. brads DM ertll ihoei tip Buun' ii. i %  lo Ihe benefit of Aj %  neouragjs brads will and improvemeni In thosi ig stand II W< CXiieet to Ond pOOf Communism on gfl • h". his messaee said — t'.P. LigM Karllii|i.iikr TOKYO. N.i-. lit i if Ire bultdUlgl nvswed when %  %  day The central M< %  i ltd II w a %  local .: .. i p Mr. .ed to help thei I SSI happy t'. ay thai tie Sirl-i> of State haa grant of $220.80O enabling ths government to tackle the cltjrl lai gest and most dem-ely populajed slum known as Oa The third major uprising utujl-and. The 1K48 local governyear at Southern Michigan Prison, ment purchased this abominable Die ajevftars largest walled penl-' unsighiiy area but owing tenliaiy. ended last night with'.of funds, congestion was unreUnting convicts subdued by shotlieved". nd machine gun (Ire. Rioting: (jonvicts Subdued JACKSON, Michigan, Nov Ig broke out in the nicss hall at r*r lime and for ,1 while ?,200 convicts were Involved, some haa knives and clubs No one was wounded -(C.P.) Sausage Racket Newsman Dies NEW YORK, Nov UI Louis P. Keemle. editor fld United Press Mail and Fealur< service died Wednesday in th Park East Hospital. He was 54 Keamle was ,it his desk tlnougt last week. Saturday night he dsysso p ad severe abdomlnnt Sunday was ta operat WEJXINOTON. Nov Sausage meet shipment, Britain, alleged to have developed 1 pains and into a "racket" threatening the'to hospital British meat ration, will be limited (Surgeons diagnosed ... to 2,000 tons this season Jt was as Pancreatitis. The v.: announced today. British preu re-{editor and writer had 1 port* quoted here said that whole WaT. since 1926 when he resigned New Zealand carcases were being 1 ** pssn editor of th B minced and shipped as sausage I Post^—ll.P. meat at better prices—L'.P. Y'wv \rrefttfd tiR\7.tu\\ I.M;ATIO\ n TMimw m asm: ItIO T>H JANDRO Brazil, Nov IV The rnMvspaper Tnbuna Dn. InBrensa'' sjld yesterday that, iitiBiiit< bad i%  tack Sergio ( orree Do L zillan Charge I) A and thai Pseahdent Oetuho Vargas has ordered the i cloaatt • tc.P.) Gilbeyls EMPIRE RED WINE Maintains thesamehigh Standard ofQualitym shipped to the West Indies for the past fifty years Agents



PAGE 1

PACE SIX BAkBAl>OS ADVOCATE THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 2. l5J. CLASSIFIED ADS.' " %  **"* ti.jip.( im I>II ip i on v\u: < I MK. IB* tag itt, November l'*H Irra. GIWI D n poLU limn ..'... 'loti.m. %  1 M| II Oeoig* • 1 M.I i, r • n-ei and In %  sled M alte-nd 11 Hill Chi O B i H IN MEMORIAM t i i >s|. rmocv ol %  .c AU>n. .epait.al thll 111* " **>' cio* Al'TOMOTIVK MWOHl) VAN M ...ed %  It I.-t. inly gooa O'lM' It 11 .'.1 *n %  In N 1% iplW.tercd n* i>r* and battrr. O* %  lai.d >..•! orler Mm CoUvnmrr art* UN ft) n SIZi < AH it. %  M .1 MSB 'rO t'DTd MM Ml •r. |.d condition B>-..Jf..rd M..1 la II lit Id Hood •audition CAB MMIH-OIIK. good %  > new Telepnone SMg II Vauaba'i ondHM i %  ..._g. %  " MM ir v Phori. Il.nae II tl W In il : rele.'' M<< day%  " Smith Lit. excellent earni* ami night. IUL nVATI Morar -i-or ,..••* an Terrace. -I .lev. ..I 1 %  .:...,.!, ;-. -•VIWlAI-C .lluale ll Terrace I'hrlet (hurth liar H land ri A G Bancroft. ....I 3S4C STANDARD a II Ift* model SS for enqulilae %  rotiUIn knVi>ene and %  %  IH V4VM %  I I. f i I %  Qantl* Ailev <• • d*.gb-i*v. Naomi Allrvn* FOIt HI.VI HOUSES SLATS ABgBoH-OW-Oiw Hi thie. bedraom. One '!> *•* b * toom A W I. i. . c rvid DUI fAKAWAV lull' ."', •*•" io*o ftoo-e. St Philip coaal Ulht.T HUM. Wiumilll euppiy. C*rpon. 5at\>n< roomMonthly iil m> P"". mKimmi ...<•.. IN ADVANCE. edBj HISS— KIWIIAVLN full. I M>n hm,**. Crane COail DOUDld <* %  "* 3 %  rr*m room.. Lighting rUirt. wet-i %  I 7 D,U %  WANTED mar r>..rHiFNcn jr KrtPTB .... I niil.il 1 AWT 1 P O Bo 4 Domini* MISCELLANEOUS .i ,-..„ Thiea nr tviee. new battery r Worm* SW 11 II SSIn ITSBD CARS — A Ane Miring two
  • • XHAS THKE LIGHTS will, hui —r> Khymta (It b> at> Dial *. Cour. l-ay Clarau* 14 II U--4n LIVESTOCK IIUTNEV thi i> U |hbrrd Uii (.HUT. j nuah —Coi'dim* nl i Oun Sll* Brit ton' nVNAMPTT' by Colro^ f Colo. Mi I M,...-1I. ling HIT i %  tihrru. roll by Jvtiam <>ul ol quick Wll r all TrtnMad and Barbddoa Cl I'la.rd Mh In only A Pat'Ca II II H .MECHANICAL i R**lr 1 coaled I %  ANTrn J.TON LOBP-V .n "d pric. la I-IIIMIWI %  '" %  WIN ( AMPOKM ">#• MALI' — imiblr for romr atop eonlTdtlt>g any dt* 1 ir civ nam* iink>* by %  *" CHAM i %  d a|ai"'l I AI1\ FURNITURE &f VUCTION AT HA1MI tOIIHI. (Near High School) UH-> ....*.. *.l....n ..< TO-DAY Wa I .-i •d u BLO i Cl valnabl. BHBjirrOM nl "NTHjl'F l iritNlTI'IU:, alx> S ,H. U alit< Mod. i ind olhi Hi'i.xhold Kt.,t. IIAVNCS CorirT ST JOHN PYX lADIOQIAU. 0>J %  I.-..,. *, OoAVa Tablr. Tip T.,,. raa.Ua, Drop Lr „, TahU. Wiltlni Da**, Tr i %  I ivariouai. V.inliy rblnti lid* boara. IIIIII. A Double Bndnl Setlaea. ritfrd <-.. Pram n(M InLUd !> %  : na nil* Stool.. Tabir Ijimpa lAXJ, TOt Mi'iVV IN MAIfOOANVl Opholilerod bn Chain Occa. 1 •' %  bii-at. Carved DtiMi Cabirn 1 %  hol.tcred Stool.. Ctand.'aUxT ( n ..| n| Tabr lth 1U.' I.i .lale-I^Jfad Diriina* TaMr li laid SldjataMfdL Te. Table l>. >p leaf Tabla. Small Oak Tattle OrnaNm.t I Antiau* liill Tatu> I g | iiad with •i lied •Jt> iraaa. Pi s.nfla atedi *ilh IU. pi .. iniaia Ch*aTr i Barvlnl Tabhri. Torr.er TaBlM 1 — o r*.— did OaV Table Baa, chatra. SuA%  %  i • r i i <'..u %  I Peed IU %  I'OIOUM PrlMl Framed Map*. Ulawwarr. WGaTT INC I -(r ... .1. rbh I M .1 T i ip i narda A -MILI KUD MrruW Wd. Cham, at Table* %  %  %  -•II Ir Tut l.ect-l. It.. il rnuma and an AUCTIONEERS Jp*. kL ill--.. MISdl.l.ANHHS IVP'.K A'V -PVS F<. %  ..." on \hat ran only be had nl NUHhbl •ii %  The include Car*. i-toli Swim Niii|< Ja Band. Ranali a <' iH rpU up il I IIINS-IN A CO., LTD. — Dial UTJ tO II BJ—*i IKAT T rBaal "NAHi.lN %  ngtne BaMucllon Oaai hull and engine in Sral Claaa o-dei Head, loi launching. €00 lb. lead i. hul a| land togalher anil Cbjaitel hoi... .tt^. %  %  i ...l .. ( |..a. .. %  t %  ; -i d balh I ai-|' ci lo orchard %  i e\.i. da bel-een th hour* \^9 and I p.m The ahova property will be aal up Cor B |e at Public (ompelltioi. %  Lucaa Blroat on rridav the Ipth Hpvttnbat at 1 pjn CABPLNOTON A SPALV It. 11 U •<• PIBaLM NOIH I S UgiOK IK INSI. NOTICIBonaewire ..( I'pper Roebuck Street St Mk-Nael. lor perrm.iii.ii "> -ell Splnl. Mat Uauaaa, A., at a .ton. wall hmld M at Upper Hiebul Street. City Ftaled II.i. lath day of Hotambwr IM3 lo i. a oBiprrni. F-O Police M.-i>ti-iDW U a H A l' HENUPPSON ll-.NKr Agenl lor Applicant 'hiapplM-atlon will be ton.id i LMronalnf Cm-it W be held it IVilBje Court. DlaUlCt "A on Monda> UM III d-> -I Dacambet 1*5). at II o cloca II : QUEEN ELIZABETH OPENS BRITISH PARLIAMENT [PABBArxis CHANCERY SALE T l"--. '.. %  itil l--..[.r((. Ii : dala wo *.d b*u>'.la. at tn. 1* me PLADfTtTF HICHAHD sTANl I DAXTI *'1U .AM THBSOli) lARW* FpaNt r I IIAHSn So.* n tnc parial lamina t, admiaaa M aiWtt land, of W %  I jate at BI-itwwaajaU •• %  I ..i.u. ol :1* Wounl PUntalio.. an a a Und ol the eaute of A Chapmai the eaaata -t H Cbapmai landa of the eatate of Thvmpaaei dacaaaod and
  • Citation
    The Barbados advocate

    Material Information

    Title:
    The Barbados advocate
    Uniform Title:
    Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
    Portion of title:
    Sunday advocate
    Place of Publication:
    Bridgetown Barbados
    Bridgetown, Barbados
    Publisher:
    Advocate Co.
    Publication Date:
    Frequency:
    Daily
    regular
    Language:
    English

    Subjects

    Subjects / Keywords:
    Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
    Genre:
    newspaper ( sobekcm )
    Spatial Coverage:
    Barbados -- Bridgetown

    Notes

    Dates or Sequential Designation:
    Apr. 22, 1983-
    Numbering Peculiarities:
    No issue published for May 3, 1983.
    General Note:
    On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
    General Note:
    Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
    General Note:
    Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

    Record Information

    Source Institution:
    University of Florida
    Holding Location:
    University of Florida
    Rights Management:
    Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
    Resource Identifier:
    17931718 ( OCLC )
    sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
    Classification:
    Newspaper ( lcc )

    Related Items

    Preceded by:
    Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

    Downloads

    This item has the following downloads:


    Full Text
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    eae
    WHAT’ x . f
    ALS ON TOBAY ey YESTERDAY'S W
    Court of Grand Sssions 10.00 1
    Meeting, St. Lucy Vestrs 3.ee Ratnfa! trom Codr
    Police Band Coricert, Princess ba + ota! Rainfall for m
    Alice Piaying Field 7.45 p.m. Highest Temperayur
    ee inf Wind Velocity 8 mil@ per hour
    sates 7
    re bet ae “ Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.608 (3 p.m.) 20.737
    , D { ; TO-DAY
    ; é Sunrise: 6.00 a.m
    . 7 Sunset: 6.32 p.m.
    For the cause that lacks assistance, :
    ‘Gainst the wrongs that need resistance, M on yey, Mavertier 17
    For the future in the distance. “y ighting: > “
    And the good that I can do. - S' rm aan, oe am., 5.3 p.m
    ESTABLISHED 1895 THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1952 oy Se Saw oe
    uF > -

    PRICE: FIVE CENTS
    CLEARING







    BEACH ROAD



    Maintenance Of Canadian Mar
    _ Important To BWI Sugar Producers’

    Commonwealth Sugar | Republican
    Agreement Incentive | Policy To Be
    To Greater Production: Discussed

    NEW YORK, Nov. 19.
    (From Our Own Correspondent) President-elect “isenhower will

    : LONDON, Oct. 19. diseuss with Senator Robert A.
    Provision made under the Commonwealth Sugar} Taft today the composition of the

    Agréement for meeting the requirements of Canada is|"°W , Republican Administration

    | Chinesé Attacks |
    |

    ne
    ~~

    Hurled Back |

    SEOUL, Nov. 19.
    Allied troops in hand to hand battles hurled back
    three heavy Chinese Communists attacks last night and
    today against “The Hook’ vital a —<
    Ina of

    |
    4
    s
    5
    !
    |
    |






    = celat? ing the western invasion atnaill
    referred to by Mr. G. Vernon Tate, M.C., Chairman of xy ee ee fighting to the Waltesa. 5 the hill three times
    Caroni in his annual report today. pir ‘Eisenhower, who arrived! behind heavy artillery ba 5 Le

    ¥ “The importance of maintaining a Canadian market for} \WiSnincten “wnuieo” EF ge he a : ent ta * Fe

    s Empire sugar producers needs little emphasis”, he tells} cent Truman was certain to eet sip ee inks cnc ee eee

    EY shareholders. “It is in fact of paramount importance to]« lot of advice before the day was} holes to hurl back Réds with City Council HERE OURERS clear the beach road at Trents Beach, St. James, for the heavy Mack Truck of

    S British West Indian producers because quite apart from ond Senator Taft, Chairman of! bayonets and fists. The Hook is; : Barbados Oil Co., Ltd., which is loaded with a 25-ton draw-works, to drive on to the highway.

    sf traditional ties which have long existed Canada is poten-] Fenisth Rotcy ners a_ long rolling ridgeline shaped \\7j]] Try Again way eqtipment for the Company is being stored at a warehouse at Bromefield, St, -Luoy:

    y tially an expanding market.” Martin jnr. prospective Epeaker like its name north east of the @ labourers are standing on one of the steel landing mats which was used to make the road

    eee mee Mr. Tate says that apart from}cf the New House of Representa- which leads from the public highway on to the beach -head,







    |



    Jamaica
    Will Raise
    New Loan

    (From Our Own Cortespondent)
    KINGSTON, J’ca., Nov. 19.
    The Governor announced in a



    {providing some security for the] tives,
    future, the Commonwealth Sugar] pt 11.00 a.m, E.S.T.

    Agreement is an encouragement

    towards greater Empire produc-| with Senator Styles Bridges, Sen-/ p.m.

    tion. “For our part”, he adds, “we

    jare sparing nv effort to increase| key
    output and improve efficiency”. f
    | This brighter note is tempered | Legislative
    with words of caution, however,

    for Mr. Tate has to inform share-
    holders that prospects for 1953 are
    ladversely affected by the severe

    message to the House of Repre-|heavy rain fell almost throughout

    sentatives to-day that
    ment intended at the earliest
    favourable opportunity to raise a
    new loan in the London market
    for Jamaican development. Funds
    raised from the last. loan in
    London now are nearly all spent
    and many development schemes
    are in operation or in preparation
    to be financed.

    The Colonial Office has advised
    Jamaica not to expect to raise
    more than £3,500,000 in London
    this time and the intention is to
    raise that amount as early next
    year as conditions on the London
    market make it advisable to
    invite publie subscription.

    The Governor said this im-
    mediate loan was a temporary
    measure pending full considera-
    tion of a large scale loan pro-
    gramme against the background
    of the report of the World Bank
    mission which recently visited
    the island.

    Politician
    Suspended

    KINGSTON, Nov. 18.

    Florizel Glasspole, British

    T.U.C, trained General Secretary

    of the National Workers Union
    and Parliamentary Secretary of
    the People’s National Party oppo-
    sition in the Jamaica House of
    Representatives was suspended
    from his services in the House
    today for six weeks on a motion
    by Ken Hill, head of the Jamaica
    T.U.C. and one time P.N.P.
    leader who was ousted in March
    on charges of being a Communist.

    The motion followed a verbal
    battle between both members in
    the House when Hill charged that
    P.N.P. administration in Kingston
    was corrupt and Glasspoie replied
    naming Hill a Communist, The
    Speaker ordered the withdrawal
    - the epithet and Glasspole re-
    used.

    led by Mr. Bustamante voted in
    support of Hill’s motion after the
    Speaker had named Glasspole.



    BARBADOS GULF OIL CO., LTD. are carrying out preparations for drilling at a site roughly half way
    between Turner’s Hall and Swans Factory. At present the location is being cleared with a view to

    GoverN=|the reaping season.



    Jamaica Labour party members |



    PREPAR

    The planting
    programme was upset and i
    seems certain that the 1953 crop
    will be smaller than this year’s
    which constituted a record for the
    company.

    The consolidated net profit at

    £204,927 represents an increase Of | power w

    Sede over the profit for the] frm commitments or Cabinet Tier “inn big battle on' #
    previous year. sosts.—U.P. elas :
    Subject to confirmation at the : Hook” took place October 27,

    Annual Meeting in London on
    December 10 a dividend of two-
    pence per two shilling unit of
    stock will be paid. This is the
    same as for the last six years.
    National
    Necessity
    ‘ ALGIERS, Nov, 19.
    Opening the regular session of
    the Algerian Assembly yesterday,
    French Governor General Roger |
    Leonard said, “France’s presence
    in North Africa is a_ national
    necessity on which we will not
    bargain.” France’s achievements
    in the social, cultural and economic
    field speak for themselves. France
    waits for examples of those who
    criticise her, She needs no less-
    sons, Mr, Leonard said, in refer-

    ence to Asiatic nations’ criticisms
    of French rule in North Africa.
    —UP.



    New Governnient

    ATHENS, Nov. 19.
    The new government of Premier
    Alexander Papagos was sworn in
    today and the Chief of the Greek
    Joint General Staff and three
    senior aides resigned me Pa
    —U-P.

    RUSSIAN JAILED FOR |

    DEFECTIVE APPARATUS |
    MOSCOW, Nov. 19. !

    A factory director has been sent
    to prison for eight years for pro-
    ducing defective medical appar- |
    atus, the Soviet Government
    newspaper Izvestia reported to-
    day.—U.P. :



    choosing a spot for a firm foundation.



    What Will

    WASHINGTON, Nev. 19.

    A tidal wave of speculation
    swept over this capital ar to the
    significance of the National elec-
    tion results in terms of world pol-
    icy amd there are indications that
    a great struegle may be develop-
    ing between Internationalists and
    Zelatively Nationalist elemen s





    With the revelation that the
    majority of the public wanted a
    “change” the real implications of
    the “change” are yet to be defined.

    The developing issue is not be-
    tween Internationalists and poli-
    tical “Isolationi Ey between
    elements committ ad inter-







    Here the D-8 Caterpillar is seen in action while the men (left) are preparing holes‘for dynamiting.

    Mr. Eisenhower's Policy Be?

    lieve budgetary retrenchment and., and election was hailed a$ marki
    become |
    the primary objective of the new | But the post-election situation in-
    ‘dicated that basic differences be-

    ; reduced taxation should
    government

    In simple terms the question will



    ‘ ; ; far from being reconciled. Mr.|tool production is sunning behind
    eB att ‘ nited States Eisenhower personally has not yet | quotas in the year’s economic plan.
    leader and a éebte 7 reste’ a ie Id made post-election statemen‘s that | Power shortages have forced
    uvdane tthe fee : ae nat ial will clarify political opinion on his | many factories to run on reduced
    toward a ‘more enna: Foatics Dollies | International programme. | Schedules. Delays and shortages of
    in Finance and International trade } His view presumably would |freight cars and locomotives also

    The struggle goes back to the! first be stated comprehensively in |#?@ Teported in Eastern railroads. |

    fact that the Republican Party at
    of the July Convention

    ivided
    ided



    between “In-

    tornatior
    €

    were to be his first callers



    Later in the

    cay Mr. Eisenhower will meet



    The Chinese first attacked at-9

    truce village of Panmunjom just
    south of the -38th parallel, It oT EI Ma
    only 20 miles from Seoul. | oO ect yor

    (From Our Own Correspondent)

    U.S. Should



    Tuesday rushing pellmell
    through nine fields of barbed} | PORT-OF-SPAIN, Nov. 19.

    us, Senators Taft] wire. It took Allied soldiers three| The Port-of-Spain City Coun-
    will talk over the} hours of close quarter fighting to|cil which failed to elect a 1952—

    ator Alexander Wiley and other
    Republicans,
    and Martin

    French President's |

    : programme during}
    their conference with Mr. Eisen-;
    hower. Presumably Senator Taft!
    will also discuss with Mr, Eisen- |
    hower the men he has recom-

    crop time weather of 1951 when|â„¢ended for the Cabinet, Senator
    news conference in}

    Taft told a
    Washington yesterday that he had

    break that assault. At 1.15 a.m.
    Reds tried again apparently under
    trders to seize the hill at all
    costs. Again U.N. soldiers drove
    off the Reds. 5





    Assault Broken

    resolution this afternoon to meet
    again

    1953 Mayor at last
    statutory meeting,

    Saturday's
    agreed by

    Wife Escapes Death “wer Trade

    e
    | Barriers
    SAINT ROBERT D’ALBON, France, Nov. 19.

    The wife and son of the French President and hundreds NEW YORK, Nov. 19.
    of other sleeping passengers miraculously escaped death} President Truman in a message
    or injury early today when a crack all Pullman “Blue|{@ the National Foreign Trade

    Thursday afternoon to
    make another bid to elect one.
    The resolution followed the read-
    ing of the opinion of Mr, Han-



    given Mr, Eisenhower some Cab-
    inet recommendations «tthe Pres-
    ident-elect’s request. Senator Taft
    emphasized that ha did not know
    whether the men recommend

    would be appointed and there was!
    no indication here that Mr, Eisen-'
    as ready yet to make any

    assault in a 40 minute fight. After
    that, fighting became sporadic
    and ended at 8,10 a.m. Allied
    troops then sent out patrols to
    search for any Reds lurking in








    when 3,000 Chinese attacked U.S.

    +h ype holding the pone
    : arines beat off the attacks
    ‘ United States causing heavy losses to Reds who

    at one point breached the Allied
    main line,

    Stands Firm

    UNITED NATIONS, New York,
    Nov, 19.

    The United States is standing
    firm against mounting pressure
    trom Western Allies to accept
    India’s plan for ending the Korean
    wer. A serious rift appeared in the| a brief Red probe,
    making as the Committee of eight
    countries met secretly for the third| , Allied light bombers destr
    time in an effort. to reconcile the; 115 Communist tuueks,

    Indian proposition with the United| Winter supplies and amm

    States peace resolution plan on the
    ground that it gives no assurance
    that war pisoners will not be
    forced to return to their home-
    lands. Krishna Menon is sche-

    In the central and eastern s@e-
    tor of the front temperature
    dropped to 8 degress above zero
    Fahrenheit. A hand grenade duel
    broke out in a sector on the
    eastern front costing North
    Koreans 30 killed or wounded,
    United Nations also threw back

    Superforts

    the Manchurian border

    duled to expound the Indian plan} U.S.
    fully to the Political Committee} damaged 13 Red M.1.G.-15’s in
    when it meets at 3.00 p.m, E.S.T.} aerial duels Monday and Tues-
    today. day.

    —UP. —UP.



    East Berliners Face
    Food Scarce Winte

    By JOSE FLEMING
    BERLIN, Nov. 19.
    The Berlin-Soviet zone cupboard is almost bare and
    East Germans appear to be facing a bleak winter according

    to reliable reports reaching West Berlin. The reports said t!

    the food shortage is growing worse and the Communist
    Government is frantically searching for a scapegoat to
    blame it on.



    to have broken out recently at
    scattered points in the Soviet
    Zone, Statements of Communist
    ‘leaders and propaganda announce-
    ments of the East Zone Press pin
    penartages on to such essentials as
    meat, potatoes, sugar, butter and+
    fats,

    The seriousness of the situation
    was pointed up by the fact that
    he recent Cabinet session of the
    Red Government was devoted al=
    most exclusively to the food sup-
    ply problem. After the session,
    “firm measures’ were ordered to
    combat the shortages. However
    Reds appeared to be having a
    difficult -time firiding someone to
    blame for the situation,

    Premier Otto Grotewohl told the

    Coping, it was the fault of “hos-
    ile







    1 Captalist elements in the
    Supply Ministry.” The Centra)
    Committee of the Communist

    Party attributed the shortages to
    Sabotage” and the official Gov-
    ernment new:

    West
    responsible.



    “smugy! ms

    quotas.” In Communist
    jargon a big farmer is anyone
    a ee ee than 45 acres of

    Western officials believe this
    Red explanation probably comes
    closest to the truth. They said
    shortages are the direct result of
    farmer resistance to Communist
    land confiscation and collectiviga-
    tion policies.

    s@endancy of the gl i a7
    S ancy of the global viewpoint. | not well with Soviet zone econ-
    omy. A Communist spokesman

    tween the two party wings are still |@dmits that both coal and machine

    Even onions are scarce.

    his inaugural address Januar. : }
    7 - Deak o |Swept East Germany recently that |

    ! 1 possible ater messa





    te f } the onion shortage was caused by

    ‘ eve i division f the crop to the
    reir State Se service to make
    U.P. ster U.P.






    Jokes |

    nays, City Corporation's counsel,
    The final attack began at 4,10}4hat
    jawn. Wednesday, Allies broke the/Saturday and that the question

    no Mayor was elected
    whether the matter could not be
    reconsidered until the expiration
    of six months did not arise be-
    cause the statutory duty of
    electing a Mayor had. not been
    discharged. Mr. Hannays also
    advised that the Couneil may by
    resolution, fix a new date for the
    e'ection of a Mayor.

    A Victory
    For Tories

    LONDON, Noy, 19.

    Prime Minister Churchill's Con-
    servatives more than maintained
    their en voting mar-
    in last night in the first crucial
    est of their drive to roll back
    Socialist legislation passed by the
    previous Labour House of Com~

    1S. * approved: rr
    the decisive eeeche réading of the



    to Communist front lines, B-29] Bill restoring Britain's nationaliz-
    bombed Red supply|ed trucking industry to
    centres at Sonchon 35 miles from] ownership. Conservatives also in-
    and aj|tend to
    target five miles south of Sariwon, | sieel indus

    ivate

    tionalize the iron and
    ies, but the battle on

    fighter pilots shot down or|those issues is to come tater.

    —C.P.

    French Troops
    Attack Civilians

    UNITED NATIONS,
    NEW YORK, Nov, 19.
    The Moroccan Democratic party



    @ jfor independence Wednesday said

    it received a cable from its Tangier
    representative sta the “French
    Army attacked civilians in Casa-
    blanca who were celebrating the
    anniversary of the Sultan's ac-
    cession to the throne,

    French troops savagely dispersed
    he peaceful crowd smashing por-
    traits of the Sultan and removing
    all equipment set up in prepara-

    celebra mm Kom

    It said East German housewives jtion for the celebration,
    were standing in line for hours|venting

    the

    to get food only to be told supplies }‘aking place.”

    ING FOR DRILLING [hae run out. Food riots were said



    Bertrand Ruseell
    Te Be Married

    LONDON, Nov. 19.

    pher, announced his engagement
    to Miss Edith Finch, daughter of
    Edwatd Bronson Finch of New
    York City in a paid advertisement
    in the Times. Then Mr, Russell
    took the phone off the hook at his
    suburban house so he would not be
    bothered by callers. Nor would
    anyone in the house answer the

    door bell,
    —UP.



    Gonvicts Subdued

    JACKSON, Michigan, Nov. 19.

    The third malys ppetat this
    year at Southern Michigan Prison,
    the world’s largest wailed peni-

    8 service A.D.N. said|tentiary, ended last night with| of
    were jrioting conviets subdued by shot-

    gun and machine gun fire. Rioting
    broke out in the mess hall at sup-
    per time and for a while 2,200

    convicts were involved; some had

    knives and clubs.
    wounded .—(C.P.)

    Sausage Racket

    WELLINGTON, Nov. 19.
    Sausage meat shipments to
    Britain, alleged to have developed
    into a “racket” threatening the
    British meat ration, will be limited

    No one was



    There are other signs that ail|*? 2,000 tons this season jt was)as Pancreatitis,

    announced today. British press re-
    portg quoted here said that whole
    New and carcases were being

    céd and shipped as
    meat at better prices.—U.P.





    | Five Arrested

    TTINIS, Nov. 19.
    Police said five Tunisian Nation-
    alists accused of sabotage and
    arson have been arrested. They
    ised of setting fire to Neftas
    78 miles

    are ac
    outh of here

    —U.P.

    Bertrand Russell, 80, philoso-|

    sausage

    » oy Convention
    Train

    Dr. Adenauer
    Out Voted On |

    Treaty Issue |

    BONN, Nov. 19.
    Chancellor Konrad Adenauer}
    began repairing his splintered

    political fences in an attempt to
    win ratification of the West
    German Peace Treaty and the
    European Army Pact before the

    Christmas recess. Yesterday Mr.
    Adenauer suffered the worst
    political defeat of his career,
    when his usual “automatic;

    er in Bonn Parliament |
    collapsed and his motion to ratify»
    the tréaties next week was de-,
    feated by 19 to 16 votes. Mr.
    A wai defeated by

    n ) pro .
    ties who either with the
    Socialists and Communists against
    his motion or simply disappeared
    when the voting bells rang. Lat
    last night Mr. Adenauer called a
    caucus of his Christian Democratic
    Union Deputies in an attempt t:
    determine what went ve
    —UP.

    Sugar Talks
    Postponed

    (From Ov;



    Own Correspondent)
    IN, Nov. 19.

    The meeting scheduled to take
    lace to-day between the Food

    inistry and Empire Sugar Pro-
    ducers has been postponed for 24
    hours. Empire sugar men will
    now see the Ministry tomorrow
    afternoon when the discussion on
    1958°crop price will be resumed.

    It is ho
    be concluded this week,

    Mr. McCowan has made a pro-
    visional plane booking to return
    to Trinidad on Sunday. Mr, Cuke
    bas made a provisional booking
    for Monday.

    $220,800 To Help

    | Antigua Slum Area



    (From Gur Own Correspondent)

    ANTIGUA, Nov, 19.

    To-day at Government House
    on the occasion of presentation
    of prizes for the 1952 Garden |
    Competition, His Excellency Sir!
    Kenneth Blackburne announced
    that a telegram was received
    which he felt was a



    bette:
    deter-

    of Antigua now have a
    erderstanding and are
    'm' need to help themselves.
    ' “] am happy to say that the
    , Seoretary of State has approved
    a grant of $220,800 enabling the
    government to tackle the city’s
    largest and most densely popu-
    ltated slum known as Garlings
    | Land. The 1948 local govern-
    ment purchased this abominable
    tunsightly area but owing to lack
    ds, congestion was unre-
    lieved”.



    Newsman Dies

    !

    i NEW YORK, Nov. 19.
    | Louis F. Keemle, editor of
    United Press Mail and Feature

    {service died Wednesday in the
    |} Park East Hospital. He was 54.
    ! mle was at his desk through
    jlast week. Saturday night he
    developed severe abdominal
    jpaitis and on Sunday wag taken
    if hospital for an operation.
    Surgeons diagnosed his ailment
    The veteran
    itor and writer had been with
    .P, since 1926 when he resigned
    as nfews editor of the Baltimore
    Post—vU.P.





    | BRAZILIAN LEGATION
    | IN TEHERAN TO CLOSE
    | RIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil, Nov. 19

    e newspaper “Tribuna Da}
    Imprensa” said yesterday that
    att@mpts had been made to at-
    fack Sergio Correa Do Lago, Bra
    |zilian Charge D’Affaire I
    jund that President G~tulio Va a!)
    thas ordered the eheran Leg

    closed (C.P.)

    ) the

    result that
    London is aware that the peopl



    ploughed into the rear of a freight train,

    One person was killed and eight

    injured when the swift Paris-

    ;Marseilles express hurtled out of

    the night, ploughed into the rear

    ears of a freight train and jumped
    the tracks, All nine were railroad
    employees,

    Madame Vincent Auriol wife of
    President and their som Paul
    were aboard the luxury train when
    ihe accident happened 33 miles
    south of Lyons shortly after it
    had pulled out of Lyons station at
    twenty minutes after midnight.
    The one fatality was identified
    as the ticket collector for the
    leeping car company. Traffic was
    completely blocked on the line
    the double tracked main link cown
    the Rhone Valley through Central
    France
    The freight train was engaged
    in shifting operations when the
    long heavy te mere jt of
    » ed into it,
    A colt om catete nN



    Steamship

    Runs Aground

    NANIMO, British Columbia,
    Nov, id.

    A six-thousand ton Canadian
    Pacific passenger steamship of
    Nanimo smashed a refuelling sta-
    tion, reduced seven small boats
    to kindling and poked her bow
    ashore behind the Post Office last
    night when her reverse engine
    power failed. The vessel was ap-
    proaching the dock to complete
    her run from Vancouver with
    some 400 passengers and crewmen
    aboard, No one was killed or in-
    jured in the mishap. An estimate
    of the damage to vessel and shore
    instellations is not immediately

    that meetings will] available. —U.P.










    Wednesday night
    strongly urged the U.S. to lower
    its tariff barriers to help defeat

    Communism by fortifying the
    world’s economy

    Mr, Truman said the free na-
    tions must “find a way to earn
    their own way in the world”

    without big scale aid frorn Amer-
    ice. His message read at the annual
    World Trade dinner said in part
    “J don't believe I have to itemize
    for you Kremlins new blueprint
    for success—Stalin’s belief ig that
    the West will fail to Solve its
    trade and economic problems and
    will fall to fighting within itself.

    However | wish to point out that
    the free world’s long range eco-
    nomic progress will be possible
    only if its member nations find
    ways to earn thetr own’ way in
    the world and to assure a decent
    standard of living to their people

    It must be able to do this with-
    out large scale outside aid from

    west of the free

    world on the one hand ean increase
    jis production, curb inflation . .

    and keep the prices of its products

    competitive, and the United States

    on the other hand reduces its bar-

    riers to trade they will show up

    Stalin's lie,

    The President's message said it
    ‘iy to the benefit of America t
    encovrage trade with other nations
    and improvements in those nations
    living standards, “We can’t always

    expect to find people fichting
    Communism on an empty stom-
    ach”, his message said. —U.P.



    Light Earthquake

    TOKYO, Novy, 19
    Office buildings swayed when a
    light earthquake shook Tokyo to-
    day. The Central Meteorological
    Office said it was a local shock and
    caused no damage
    —-UP.



    Gilheys

    W & A GILBEY

    GARDINER AUSTING COL?

    | EMPIRE RED WINE

    Maintains
    the same high
    Standard
    of Qualityas
    shipped to the
    West Indies
    for the past

    hifty years

    eee
    —— So SSS

    So
    SS

    ~——— Agents

    ttc a a adit in th inept in tis,





    ose





    PAGE TWO







    R. AND MRS. D. 8S. CARROLL

    were amor he passengers
    arriving here on Saturday by the
    Elders and Fyffes S.S. Golfite from
    England
    Dr, Carroll has come to take up
    an appointment as Medical Officer
    of the Barbados General Hospital
    Born in Malaya, he was educated
    at King’s School, Canterbury in



    Kent, and studied medicine at St.
    Bartholcimew's Hospital, London
    where he qualified about eighteen
    month » Prior to coming out
    to Barbados, he held various hos-
    pital posts in England and also did
    some private practice.

    Dr, and Mrs. Carroll both saw
    service durffig the war. Dr. Car-
    roll after being trained with the
    R.A.F, in Arizona as a pilot, served
    in the Middle East while his wife
    was with the Women’s R.A.F. in
    Great Britain on an operational
    squadron, She was born in Wales
    and is very fond of music.

    Dr, Carroll too, is fond of music
    in addition to sailing.

    Fourth Visit

    RS. EDWIN W. LANCASTER

    of New Jersey, U.S.A. who
    arrived in Trinidad on October 7
    in the Moore MacCormack Liner
    Argentina and spent a week there
    is now in Barbados on her fourth
    winter visit, She arrived here on
    Sunday in the French S.S. Colom-
    bie from Trinidad after spending
    a month's holiday at the Blue Ha-
    ven Hotel in Tobago,

    Mrs. Lancaster said that she
    lived in California for several
    years and this summer, she spent
    two months there with her brother
    Mr, Edward Schroeder of the
    Frozen Food Co., in order to get
    away from the heat wave in New
    York, She is a guest at the Marine

    Hotel, va
    With Barclays Bank
    ETURNING to Grenada yes-
    terday afternoon by B.W.LA.
    was Mr, F, E, Randall of Barclays
    Bank, St. .George’s who spent
    about ten days’ holiday as a guest
    at the Hofel Reyal,

    Originally from England, Mr.
    Randall has been working in Gren-
    ada for over three years. He ex-
    pects to go home on long leave
    next year, ‘This was his first visit
    to the island he said and added
    that he had an enjoyable stay. ~

    Back From U.S.A.
    RS. J. BLONDIN, wife of the
    Manager of Sam Lord's Castle
    returned from a holiday visit to
    the U.S.A, via Puerto Rico by
    B.W.LA? om Monday,

    Spent Two Weeks
    R. AND’ MRS. S. H. FRIEND
    of Castries, St, Lucia, have
    just returned home by B.W.ILA.
    after spending two weeks’ holiday
    as guests at the Ocean View Hotel.
    Mr, Friend is employed as Cost
    Surveyor with Messrs Hannen
    Holland atid Cubitts, contractors
    engaged in the reconstruction of
    Castries,

    age

    OMPLAINTS that a “smell like
    second-hand garlic” was waft-
    ed from an oil-refinery indicate
    that some people have very sensi-

    tive noses and a profound knowl- ton’

    edge of the garlic trade.

    Only an experienced garlic-
    taster could be expected to detect
    the second-hand from the unused,

    But who buys second-hand garlic?.

    Are there musty grocers who sup-
    ply collectors?

    Gentleman, good appearance,
    public-school education, would
    exchange set of maps of Turkey
    and circular saw (part-worn) for
    31 ewt, second-hand garlic.

    Business executive, own
    anxious to “meet adventurous ex-
    officer with capital, with view to
    floating company for sale of sec-
    ond-hand garlic,

    Something wrong

    somewhere

    ° HY,” asked the. passer-by,

    “do you call this picture
    ‘Nelson’?”?

    “It is Nelson,” said the pavement
    artist.

    U.S. Visitor Likes
    Barbados
    RS EDITH BUNDY, an

    American who had been vis-
    iting Italy, France and England,
    arrived here on Saturday by the
    S.S. Gotfito from the U.K. and will
    probably spend three months’ holi-

    day. She is a guest of Lady Stow
    of Highgate, Upper Collymore
    Rock.

    Mrs. Bundy spent three weeks in
    Barbados two years ago and liked
    it so much that she has now re-
    turned for a longer period.

    Travel Agent Leaves

    R. KARL TAUSIG of Méssrs.

    Paul Tausig and Sons, Travel
    Agents of New York City, left for
    Trinidad last night by B.W.1A, on
    his way back home. He was ac-
    companied by his wife and they
    had spent a short holiday here as
    guests at the St. Lawrence Hotel.

    Mr. Tausig attended the recent
    World Travel Congress in Miami,
    Florida and since then visited
    Chile, Peru, Argentine, Brazil,
    Uruguay and Trinidad befor~ com-
    ing to Barbados.

    Leaving To-day

    ISS JESSIE THOMPSON of

    Toronto, Canada, leaves this
    morning by B.W.LA, for Puerto
    Rico on her way back home after
    an enjoyable week’s holiday in
    Barbados as a guest at the Marine
    Hotel.

    Miss Thompson js employed with
    the Manufacturers Life Insurance
    Company in Toronto,

    On Short Visit
    R. COLIN THOMAS, Branch
    Manager of Messrs J. N.
    Harriman and Co., Ltd., left for
    Trinidad on Monday by B.W.1.A.
    on a short visit.

    For The Winter
    R. R. MYER, a retired com-

    pany director of England and ed the B.T.C. Autumn Meeting |

    his wife, the Hon’ble Mrs, Myer
    who arrived by the Golfito on
    Saturday are guests at Enmore
    Hotel. They have come to spend

    Enjoyed Visit

    M*; British Celanese Overseas
    Ltd., London, who is in the West
    Indies on a goodwill visit to the
    various agencies left yesterday
    evening by B.W.LA., for Trinidad
    via Grenada after a week in Bar-
    bados. as a guest at the Hotel
    Royal,

    Leaving by the same opportunity
    for Trinidad was Mr, J. D. Zorbes.
    Watson, Overseas Kepresentative
    of Roneo Ltd., London, who was
    also in Barbados for a week as a
    guest at the Hotel Royal.

    Mr, Forbes-Watson came out on
    a tour of the Caribbean, South and
    Central America, in the interest of
    his company and has already cov-
    ered the Caribbean. He expects
    to return home in about six months.

    Mr, Goode and Mr, Forbes-Wat-
    son said that they thoroughly en-
    joyed their first visit to Barbados
    both from the business and social
    point of view.

    Assistant Economic

    Adviser
    M&2- A. PERCIVAL, Assistant
    Economic Adviser to the

    Comptroller for Development and
    Welfare has just returned from
    Trinidad by B,.W.1.A, after attend-
    ing a Committee Meeting of ‘the

    Caribbean Commission at Kent!

    House,

    Grenada Businessman

    R, ARNOLD. WILLIAMSON,
    ; Managing Director of Wil-
    liamson and Co., I.td., Automobile
    Proprietors of St. Georze’s, Gren-
    ada, returned home earlicr in the
    week by B.W.LA. after a tvio-week
    holiday visit. He was accompanied
    by Mrs, Williamson and they were
    guests at the Hetel Roya

    A former member of the Legis-

    lative and Executive Councils of
    Grenada, Mr, Williamson attend-

    while in Barbados,
    First Visit
    ISS ROMANA ROGERS of
    Herren, Rogers Travel Ser-

    |
    R. R. A. J. GOODE, Director}



    YOUR

    INDIVIDUAL HOROSCOPE

    TOR THURSDAY, NOVEMBER %&, Wor
    |. LOOK in the section in which your
    birthday comes and find what your
    outlook is, according to the stars

    | MAROH 21 to APRIL % (Aries)—A

    lull in prospects. May be best now,
    give you chance to take stock, note
    erroms. Don't step into others’ shoes

    if you shouldn't, nor advise out of turn,

    APRIL 21 to MAY & (Taurus)
    may look better, but
    | Ceceptive. Wark
    rote general
    prestige high.

    Thiags
    this may
    on matters further,
    indications. Hold your

    | MAY 21 to JUNE 7 (Geminl)—To-day
    you are offered wider scope,.in which
    to attain’ success and pleasute. The

    unusual and far-reaching, things you
    have not tried before, among top
    favoured,

    JUNE 2 to JULY 2% (Caneer)—In-
    fuences generous for writing, wise
    investments, improved promoting, ad
    vertising, handling general commodities



    Fe extra tactful at home.
    JULY & to AUGUST ® (Leo)—Some
    unexpected advantages, especially from

    investments, deals you have worked out
    ably for such a period. Rate poten-
    tialities carefully.



    | AUGUST 93 to SEPTEMBER °% (Virgo)
    |—Consider all angles before making
    | decisions. Be sure not to overlook
    achiesement by being; over-conservative
    jor too positive. Personal interests rate
    high.

    SEPTEMBER 24 to OCTOBER 3
    | (Lébra)—Influences urge a sane middle
    off-road) day in most matters. Exe't
    without strain and you can have good
    results. Concentrate, on essentials.

    OCTOBER “4 to NOVEMBER
    (Seorplo)—-You may tend to worry over
    | clouds. Don't! Look for the good about
    you and for success from worthy effort

    2

    NOVEMBER %% to DECEMBER
    (Sagittarias) — Ambition isn’t quite
    enough to = carhty things through to
    cesired guccess: Increase knowledge,
    quality of effort. Avoid conflict with
    nssociates.

    DECEMBER 23 to JANUARY 21 (Capri-
    eorn)-——Hover pround the happy medium,
    be ready for those unexpected changes.
    Advantages may be spotty but be grate-

    2



    be

    BARBADOS ADVOCATE

    Prince Philip
    Brings 1952 Touch
    To Estates

    MODERNISATJON of
    ment and buildings on the Royal
    estates at Windsor is going on
    under the personal direction of
    Prince Philip. The latest place
    dealt with is the Prince Consort's
    workshop in the Great Park,

    Whe workshop, typically Vic-

    equip-

    been started at the workshop,

    a large yard.

    “Other places in the estates
    which have been visited by Prince
    Philip and have already felt the,
    benefits of modernisation, are)
    Shaw farm in the Home Park
    and Norfolk farm
    Park.

    “Tntroduction of combine har-
    vesters and other equipment con-
    of the
    in the}

    in tie Great}

    tributed largely to one
    mest successful harvests
    history of the estates.

    Staff Impressed

    Soon after he was appointed
    Ranger of Windsor Great Park—
    am. office previously held by the
    law King—Prince Philip made aj
    af ine Po tour of inspection, |
    He went into the workings of
    each farm and workshop and im-
    pressed the staff with his knowl-
    edge of farming.

    e

    Later visits by the Prince have
    been “snap” ones. Sometimes he





    PRINCE
    FELIX
    MARRIES

    BEAULIEU, French Riviera,
    Nov. 19.

    church ceremony
    attended by 250 aristocratic guests.

    The couple will leave for Lon-
    don later today and fly to New
    York tonight. After a honeymoon
    in the Caribbean. they will make
    their home in Mexico, where the
    Prince is manager of a Swedish
    factcry,
    houses,

    making prefabricated

    After the ceremony, the bridal
    pair and their guests left for Villa
    Encar, the Riviera home of Prince
    Charles of Arenberg, uncle of the

    bride.

    Prince Felix was the only Haps-
    burg on Austrian soil when Hitler
    invaded the country. After an
    adventurous flight he reached *.e
    United States in August 1938.
    During the war he served with the
    Austrian battalion of the United
    States Army. Since then he has
    lived mostly in Mexico and Latin
    America.

    Princess Anna Eugenie was



    car or
    on his

    has driven himself in a
    galloped across the fields
    bay mare.

    —L.E.S,



    LISTENING
    HOURS

    born at Ellingen Castle in Bavaria
    and studied at the Veterinary
    faculty at Munich University. The
    couple met about two years ago in
    Bavaria.—U.P.

    Rolex Watches
    LOUIS L, BAYLEY



    BY TH. Ei WA Y=u BEACHCOMBER

    car,,





    vice, Lynbrook, Long Island, U.S.A.

    their usual winter holidays,
    oa 8 ere ° was an arrival by B.W.1A, from
    Civil Aviation Chief U.S.A. via Puerto Rico on 17th

    ING-COMMANDER L, A. inst.. and is a guest at the Marine
    Egglesfield, Director General Hotel,
    of Civil Aviation in the Caribbean This is the first visit here for
    Area was a passenger for Jamaica Miss Rogers and the object of her
    via Trinidad by B.W.I.A. on Mon- visit is to see for herself what we
    day. can offer Tourists, and is very
    ‘ 1 hopeful that her visit %o our
    Second In 50 Years Tsland will be of considerable help
    PAxine his second visit to his to her company. in attracting
    native Barbados in 50 years is “merican Tourists to visit our
    hear poury Doorly of Omaha, Ne- !sland.

    raska, publisher of the Omaha r
    World Herald, He arrived over Left For England
    the week-end by B.W.LA. from ISS_ DAISY STUART of
    Trinidad accompanied by his wire Beckles Road, left for Eng-
    and will be here for three weeks land last Sunday’ on the S.S,
    as a guest at the Marine Hotel. Colombie,

    Mr, Doorly, a brother of the late Miss Stuart who has gone to fur-
    Martin Doorly of Messrs. Martin ther her studies in music, will re-
    Doorly and Co., Ltd., Bridgetown, side with her uncle, former R.A.F.
    was last sin Barbados eighteen Sgé., Mr. Evans Alleyne, and his
    years ago. wife.



    “Nonsense, You mean Welling-
    ton, Nelson was never a soldier,
    and you've drawn him in military
    uniform, And that nose is Welling-

    te”

    mediately after the marriage and
    then disappeared for good, M. de
    Genlis once said: “I only kissed
    Mme. de twice. The first time
    it was to please myself, the second



    “T Know it looks like Welling-
    ton,” said the artist, after a long
    pause. “It’s meant to. You see,
    Nelson once went to a faney-dress
    ball as Wellington, and this shows
    him as he looked then.”

    “Where was this ball?” asked the
    man.

    “Paris,” said the artist, ‘on the
    night before Waterloo, It’s his-
    tory.” *
    hact-finding
    Soper ages SUET points out that |

    a potential reapportionment
    of unscheduled priorities does not

    please,”

    ADVOCATE BRIDGE



    By M. Harrison-Gray
    Dealer: North
    North-South game

    necessarily mean that the bottle- J 3
    necking of goeds in short supply AK 9862
    ean be short-circuited by unscram- Qo 9 ‘
    bling measures, He adds: “A re- ne 483
    disinflationary or non-recessional Q1075 OA Ae
    trend is usually followed by in- $$ 7 ©4
    creased upput.” 8 5 ©oKQ842
    In passing | 9 10°90) Ie aie g
    A WIFE has complained that her | K oa 3
    husband kissed her twice im- 8 & 5 “id
    Butterflies—11 ne
    — Britain's slend {
    u ter. les 120 on this 1950 worl fare

    pionship hand would be
    woe mpiee yecuable match

    n under the present
    method of scori P
    North's One
    doubled by
    East



    ig ete ag

    "Fi
    eart was
    the American
    layer, but the British
    pair had the situation well
    in hand after South's re-
    double. West bid One Spade.
    North passed, and Ast's
    bluff bid of One No-Trump
    was doubled by South. West
    then bid Clubs, but North
    Scored 620 in a final contract
    of Four Hearts.

    The redouble had an
    intimidating effect and the

    wenn ene ne nen e nnn nie ce ennnceeerenneraesanansees s seentenvenseanessnen-=

    Siete eee ee scecesrneesnecens sesceseseversetnseni ceseerseeeesesersenesEEsesSSCeRe se neseues ens sececees SEEREREEE QS CES









    time, to please her. We never met
    again; there was no one else to



    ful for any benefits

    Bolton Lane

    20,



    THURSDAY, NOVEMBER

    | JANUARY to FEBRUARY % cee

    (Aquarius)—Aspects stress sensible cur~-
    tailment of expenditures, and handling
    your work, chores with extreme
    Friendly manner important.

    2



    6.00 p.m.







    The News, 4.10 p.m. The Daily
    No Name, 4.45 p.m
    B.B.C. Concert

    ABLAZE WITH FURY AND
    TERROR!

    are
    we 4.15 p.m
    5

    Record, 5



    p.m

    FEBRUARY 21 to MARCH % (Pisces)

    er
    Make no appreciable changes except p.m, 31.32M, oe



    |

    }

    |

    i

    |

    2 : Prince Felix of Hapsburg, 37<

    ae. has been oe with} year-old fourth son of the last
    ry. modern convenience, in-| Austrian Emperor was married in
    cluding fitted wash basins (with), church here today to Princess
    het and cold laid on). Anna Eugenie of Arenberg, 27-
    Outside improvements have also year-old cousin of King Baudouin

    ae of Belgium. The glittering Roman

    and workers are now tidying up Catholic ; s : was










    where they will improve.’ Approach —— ~ ——-- ; -
    ; ri 6 m. Welsh Miscellany, 15 p.m
    problems unflinchingly, with resolve to a Bake ge erage 7 Dreams
    “ae Up and Programme Parade 7 p.m. The
    YOU BORN ‘TO-DAY: Highly de- News, 7.10 p.m He News from
    ‘veloped natives of Scorpio succeed Brits in, 7.15 pon We y ae. Rat
    notably when they really try. a 7.45—10.%0 -p.m, $id , 71a
    ake leader, doctor, nurse, public -—— — 2 ; ae
    ee oat, have courage of your 7.45 m Some Enctk aig aia
    convictions, Fine imagination in addi- €.15 pm Radio Hawsreel, : iz 4 aa
    tion to strong character, Can become Tehaik ky, 8.45 p.m a Bee a. 4
    outstanding writer Seek education, 9 p There was a ete an ‘ae Fe
    religion, and enjoy life. Birthdate; p.m wrchestral Music P A
    Keneshaw Mountain Landis, former News, 10.10 p.m From the Edi oy S
    baseball czar; Josiah Royce, philosopher, 10.15 pw A Captain of Industry, 3
    educator p.m. No Name
    starring ROD
    Last SHOWS TODAY 4.45 & 8.30
    ROYAL EDDING (Technicolour)
    FRED JANE SARAH KEENAN
    ASTAIRE POWELL CHURCHILL WYNN | —=

    and

    MANHATTAN MELODRAMA

    CLARK GABLE, MYRNA LOY, WILLIAM POWELL
    Opening TOMORROW (In Technicolour)
    -THE IMMORTAL MUSKETEERS IN THE MOST
    SPECTACULAR ADVENTURE OF ALL!

    OPENING FRI. 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
    and: Continuing Daily










    SHE'S GLORIOUS!
    'S UPROARIOUS!
    LAUGHS

    in









    GALORE WITH—












    OL NED!
    wn cee,
    Adaptation Lepan er
    ALEXANDkE DUMAS?

    She's
    glorious-
    and
    uproarious §
    in her first
    picture since
    ‘Sunset
    Boulevard’!

    WARNER

    Bros.
    POESENT

    JANETTA DRESS SHOP

    Next to Singers

    ui













    (CAMERON

    JANE NIGH

    CINECOLOR _
    PLAZA “cis'sito.

























    THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 1952.
    Get your Christmas Cards
    At THE Advocate Stationery.



    Heinz Cooked Spaghetti—
    m-m-m-m — here’s eating.
    Zippy, zesty tomato-sauced
    strands that have flavour
    galore just as they come
    from the tin. How wonder-
    ful Heinz Cooked Spaghetti
    tastes alone, and how well
    it mingles with left-over
    foods too. A delightful meal
    ready in a minute, for Heinz
    has cooked the Spaghetti
    for you, you simply heat
    and eat—and enjoy. Buy

    several tins today.



    B'TOWN (Soon)

    “Last 2 Shows Today past 2 Shows Today |
    4.20 & 8.30 p.m. 4.30 & 8.30 p.m.
    A KISS IN THE
    DARK PAINTING the
    Jane David CLOUDS WITH
    WYMAN : NIVEN & SUNSHINE (Color)
    KEY LARGO Dennis Virginia
    Humphrey BOGART MORGAN : MAYO
    Edward G, Robinson KISS TOMORROW
    Today's Special 1.30 GOODBYE
    JUNGLE James Barbara
    STAMPEDE | CAGNEY PAYTON
    and Teday'’s Special 1.30
    RENEGADES of

    TRIPLE TROUBLE
    The Bowery Bo's &
    “BOMBA ON

    PANTHER ISLAND
    Johnny SHEFFIELD

    Fri. 4.45 & 8.30 pm.

    SONORA



    8.30 p.m. & Continu-
    ing Daily 4.45 & 4.30
    Warner's Laugh Hit!

    “2 FOR Rod CAMERON in
    A BEDROOM C’ “FORT OSAGE”

    ‘In Natural _Color) (iin Cinecolor)

    BRIDGETOWN BARBAREES

    (Dial 2310)

    (Dial 5170)






    “THE LION AND THE HORSE” Stev







    ve COCHRAN.
    Yo-day (Only)
    4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
    Whole Serial
    BUCK ROGERS
    Larry Buster Crabbe



    Frid, & Sat. 445 &
    8.30 p.m,
    Big Action Film

    BLUE LAMP
    Jack WARNER

    _—_—_—____
    Sat. Special 1.30 p.m

    GUNSLINGERS
    Whip WILSON ~*
    and

    OKLAHOMA BLUES
    Jimmy WAKELY

    OISTIN
    (Dial 8404)





    ee

    THEATRES





    *
    The Protessor leads Rupert of miles. No wonder wis Americans did not — : c { ROYAL
    indoors. ‘We'll put your bunch exhausted. Ir tg a beauty. it @ sacrifice in Five Olute CLOSING SATURDAY: November i . ae en | ee oss eer aa & 8.30
    of Howers in water and keep them © must be the gem of my collection.” Budde anon poceeae eat eae ibe a ane To-day 4: eet? | “Universal Double
    tres you g ome,"* &. "a dear.” says > ep US q »public eat awe
    Planer Nels hue SRsrees tas: gneve’ 1. The” ashiectiagas paver preferred to overcall 22nd. Pee rn ae an eee ee aa
    ne... Taking. 4 book: t I id to kill a th | $ With Two Diamonds in : Maria Montez. BELLE OF OLD 5 WITH YOU
    f aking a boo rom nis said it was wrong ue 4 (hing Room 2 and was doubled by — as in MOONLIGHT AND, ana
    agp Ped ae OP AR i kL PR ps scznd Ss Mes 7 pe | $ South for a penalty of 500. FINAL WEEK — CLEARANCE SALE TURAL COLOR. ee ae teas] MOSER CACTUS one Abe
    “s o es. at, 4 Is a | : noun a fi ae ; ne love 'y le wouldn't | anecanimanananytusnenonvatessntonscsevenas Further Reductions ror a THE FORTY es! hs | rita Te
    e poor thing has come pundreds let Ferdy do + " ys i ry at
    Cictenepemernmepenmnistan —— PO Ai AIS Srey mee Tay a $5.00 and $9.98 in @ (Technicolor) } | with Rod Cameron
    } O JAMES WARREN Hag cue BANS cua sikinieenee © BLACKMAIL =| __David_ Farrar | Yeon. eS)
    S28 aun au a Ena HD qh MEIEIRAS © i sacri ts. cs Geka ee $1.00 and $1.98 HCVE ODE ANDRE PERDEAWc96GST enor aeew manner? paweun With With Tomerrew (Only) | "momen oS
    PANTIE-GIRDLES Reais «iad AU aie: sie $1.00 and $1.50 (Dial 2310) Ann Todd Seem Maranell 4.30 & 8.15 Double —
    NEN BRIDGE, TEA SETS ....... $7.00 per Set P LA Z A ’ jCpening fo-morrowlONE TOUCH ~
    CURTAIN NET (BORDERS )............00::ccee we B1¢ to 98¢ Buamisc- Wate Han Coloured now 3 $3.96 B’TOWN Opening Tomorrow | 4.30 & 8.15 oe Sakis a|Te Andrew Sisters
    CHILDREN’S DRESSES—now Bigs aan ae een ae $2.98 OPENING FRI. 2.30, 4.45 & & Continuing Daily Yoav Ma tng DRACULA'S |
    Colours—Rose, Green, Blue, Gold. MATERIALS by the Yard ...........0.. 60000, 80c. per ¥d 8,30 p.m 445 & 8.90 | Gig "voung eT Te DAeeOS
    : , and Continuing Daily 445 & | ABBorr ana in Got wattanie: #681 m
    8. .m. COSTELLO}
    CURTAIN NET -Rose, Green, Blue, Gold........... $1.05 to $1.38 at gen COMIN’ ROUND SLAUGHTER | Opening Saturday __ "BEEP
    ” ” ” | \ 5 di:
    —36”, 38”, and 40” wide THE MOUNTAIN. TRAIL | ah Soho tae ee
    ¢ Opening Friaay Sous] ‘eG Ly maga” lpia Green
    } j vonne ‘ar’
    TABLE CLOTHS—54” wide......... .. $3.07, $3.39, $7.08 2.20 & 8.30 | pee a :
    Cecil, B. DeMille's | JUNGLE OF eee
    fa COLOURED TOWELG.............. ws. $3.28 & $2.26 SAMSON AND | CHANG Opening Friday 28th) at
    Filmed On The Spot|SAMSON AND }
    Z WHITE TOWELS $2.20 & $2.56 | Wildest Siam DELILAM' __LOUISA
    SHEETS 70 x 100 ........ Seana eek: ssccirsvenye licstes $5.75 | * :
    ’ im°S A FREE WORKOUT ON
    90 Se DD dcr tactile a aeesecnsesonls $6.50, |
    : HT SATURDAY 22nd
    & s 90 x 100 MIDNIG 4£2n
    PILLOW CASES (18 5) OO ease. am 98¢ | BATTERIES | qs L oe B E
    :

    BUTTER MUSI



    T. R.

    Phone:



    JIN

    EVANS (WHITFIELDS)

    YOUR SHOE STORE







    FOR CARS
    TRUCKS & BUSES

    «el aA NCRRT tk EN e TA ANh I te.
    GARAGE © TRADING CO.
    VICTORIA STREET.






    CIT) LTD.





    A Film— MINE OWN EXECUTIONER’
    TALENT STARS ON PARADE

    Lerey Alleyne — 10 Year Old Trumpeter

    Free Iced Cold Canada Dry

    Free 4 Cartons Heineken Beer

    Hav e Your Head Examined if You. Could Resist This



    290000“

    PDPPLOOOODDDDODS-9-OO9-S-BPDOHDGPPOS HOG LTH EGY



    THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1952.

    GOLD COAST HAS OWN CIVIL

    Governor Becomes

    fF. 8. HERRING

    20th Century
    Centurion

    ».. A BOA.C. Security
    Warden,

    Mr. F. S. Herring, re-
    cently became a member of
    the select “Centurion Club”
    by walking a hundred
    miles in less than twenty-
    four hours, To achieve this
    distinction he left Bath,

    through the night, reaching
    Turnham Green, London,
    at 3.50 p.m. the following
    afternoon, °

    Mr. Herring, who has
    now competed in_ fast
    walking events

    from 100 yards to 100 miles,
    estimates that he has walk-
    ed over 6,000 miles in pur-
    suit of his hobby.
    Photograph shows Mr.

    Herring training on the
    perimeter track at London
    Airport, Mr. Herring’s

    speed during his 100 mile
    walk was 4)—5 m.p.h.

    Heavy Rains In
    Montserrat Cause
    Great Damage

    (From Our Own Correspondent)

    ANTIGUA Nov, 19.

    Torrential rainfall was experi-
    enced in Montserrat resulting in
    floods, landslides, roads obstructed,
    bridges washed away and houses
    damaged. Plymouth water supply
    was seriously impaired.

    His Excellency Sir Kenneth
    Blackburne accompanied by A.D.C,
    Capt. F. E. Hewitt scheduled to
    leave Antigua on November 24
    on the one-week routine visit is
    now facing an islandwide inspec-
    tion tour of the vast destruction.





    .
    Prominent E
    Dies In Grenada
    (From Our Own Correspondent)
    G ADA, Noy, 19.
    Henry Rudolph Gun Munro 72,
    well known eer and uncle of
    Franklyn, now Trinidad tennis ace,
    died this morning. He leaves a
    wife, two sons and two daughters.
    The death also occurred today
    of Mrs. Agnes Martin, Widow of
    the late John Martin, former
    Magistrate here. She was the
    mother of five children’
    them Mr, V. H. Martin, 7
    Bank, San Fernando, also Ts.
    Neville Howell and Mr. J. C. Mar-
    tin in Barbados, Edwatfd Martin,
    Antigua and Miss Freida Martin,
    Royal Bank branch here. The de-
    teased was the daughter of the
    lite Archdeacon Hutson who was
    Rector of St, George's.

    r



    WE ARE OFFERING A
    AUTO







    Final Authority

    LONDON.

    Another significant and important stage in the Gold Coast's
    constitutional and political advanee has been reached. On

    November 1,
    Charles Arden-Clarke) givin

    an Order was made by the Governor (Sir

    g the colony, as from that date,

    its own civil service. It is to be known as the “Local Service

    of the Gold Coast.”

    The Governor, and
    Secretary of State, is
    ultimate authority for “the ap-
    pointment, promotion, transfer
    and disciplinary control in regard
    te members of the Service.” It
    means the advancement of the
    colony's Africanisation policy.
    First preference in recruitment
    now go@s to qualified African can-
    didates. An overseas candidate
    will only be sought—on non-
    pensionable terms—if no African
    is available for the job concerned.
    And such non-pensionable over-
    seas men as are selected from
    November 1 will be automatical-
    ly members of the Loca] Service.

    not the

    now the

    It is laid down that promotion
    in .the public service will be
    based strictly on merit and
    ability.

    So far as the material condi-
    tions of service are concerned, no
    differentiation, it is stated, will
    be made on the ground that offi-
    cers are or are not members of
    the Local Service.

    Colonial Service officials,
    European and African, in the
    Gold Coast prior to November 1
    have not been required to join
    the Local Service, And there have
    been assurances, of course, from
    Premier Nkrumah that the Gold
    Coast does continue to need ex+
    patriate officials for different jobs,
    particularly in the technical field.

    The Colonial Police

    A publication of real impor-
    tance to the Colonies is due on
    November 24. It is titled “The
    Colonial Police.’ In it, the author,
    Sir Charles Jeffries, Joint Deputy
    Under-Secretary of State in the
    Colonial Office, gives us, I under-
    stand, the: first authoritative and
    full story of the development of
    the police forces throughout the
    colonies. Only in the event of
    grave disorders, such as oc-
    casioned at present by the Mau
    Mau in East Africa, is much
    thought paid by most people to
    the importance of the police in
    the colonies, and Sir Charles’
    book will without doubt be in-
    valuable in the light it throws
    particularly on problems of police
    organisation in relation to the
    swift development of colonial
    territories to-day. The history of
    police organisation in the differ-
    ent territories is sketched, and
    shows how basic principles of po-
    lice work in this country have
    been adapted to differing colonial
    conditions. “The Colonial Police”
    (Max Parrish, 18/6d.) is not a
    Colonial Office publication. It is
    an addition to a number of other
    excellent works of private
    authorship by Sir Charles.

    —L.E.S.

    Sale Of Land
    Approved

    The General Board of Health
    yesterday approved the division
    and sale in lots of 289,990% square
    feet of land at Fairways, Christ
    Church bys Mr. W. N. Alleyne.

    Permission was also given for
    the division and sale of 193 acres,
    8 roods, 26 perches of land in lots
    at Walkers Plantation, St. George
    by Mr. G, L, Farmer.

    The Board approved the division
    and sale of six of the prescribed
    lots, part of the 34,453 square feet
    of land at Clapham, Christ Church
    by Mr. C. St. Hill, and the division

    sale of lots 1 to 48, part of
    65,572 square feet at Green Hill,
    for which application was made by
    Mr. L, L. Toppin.

    Consideration of the other lots,
    Was postponed pendjng the avail-
    ability of adequate water supply.

    The Board granted the applica-
    tion of Messrs Cottle, Catford and!
    Co. on behalf of Messrs. Central
    Foundry Ltd. for approval of alter- |
    ations of a plan earlier approved
    by the Boa and postponed con-

    deration of the application of
    Mr. G. C. Mahon for the division
    and sale of 97,470 square feet in
    lots at Elridge, Christ Church.

    The application by Neweastle
    Estates Ltd. for the division and
    sale of 20 acres 3 roods 2 ches
    in lots was deferred pending an
    opinion from the Colonial Secre-

    tary.







    ai Will”
    Hold On To

    . Her Colonies

    PARIS.
    reason-
    France

    Withcut disregard
    able nationalist
    will oppose any action intended
    to diminish her sovereignty in
    most parts of her Colonia! Empire,
    it is learnea .a Paris.

    ng

    wishes,

    Since the end of the war, France
    has made considerable headway
    in modernising and equipping her
    overseas __ territories, Nearly
    £800,000,000 has been invested in
    improving conditions in French
    Colonies and the areas under
    French mandate.

    Official details have just been
    published of where and how these
    huge sums have been spent in the
    last five years in accordance with
    what is known as the Monnet
    Plan, drafted and carried out un-
    der the supervision of M, Jean
    Monnet, General Commissioner of
    the modernising plan.

    A second similar plan, to cover
    the next four years, is now under
    study. When it has been ap-
    proved, it will come into effect in
    1954. M, Monnet is now presi-
    dent of the International High
    Authority for Coal and Steel in
    Europe, and his assistant, M.
    Etienne Hirsch, has been ap-
    pointed General Commissioner to
    succeed him, The new plan will
    prebelnn be called the Hirsch

    an,

    Deveiopment in the French
    West Indies has been somewhat
    slower than in other French over-
    seas territories, But, thanks to
    improved methods of agriculture
    and irrigation, exports of some
    products such aS sugar and bana-
    nas from Guadeloupe have
    doubled since before the war,

    In French Guiana, a huge de-
    posit of bauxite has been found 40
    miles from the coast, estimated to
    contain 30,000,000 tons of the val-
    uable ore from which aluminum
    is produced. Ways and means
    are now being studied of extract-
    ing and exporting this ore,

    Big Progress
    Most spectacular progress un-
    der the Monnet Plan, however, has
    been made in French North Atri-
    ca, where coal production in Al-
    geria and krench Morocco, which
    totalled only 160,000 tons in 1938,
    is now approaching 900,000 tons a
    year. A big electric power scheme
    in these territories has been made
    possible by the construction of
    hydro-electric dams, and oilfield
    production has also increased.
    Phosphates are also being pro-
    duced in French North Africa
    and are even being exported to
    several South American countries
    which are traditionally producers
    and exporters of phosphate fer-
    tilisers themselves, These North
    African chemica] fertilisers have
    shown some extraordinary re-
    sults, chiefly in the cultivation of
    coffee and rice. '

    But there mas been less im-
    provement in agricultural output,
    partly because it takes time to
    persuade the natives of these ter-
    ritories to abandon their age-old
    methods in favour of more mod-
    ern ways of cultivation, But some
    of the best results have been ob-
    tained in developing production
    of citrus fruits in North Africa,
    which has been doubled since 1938





    , —

    —_————





    La a

    CO a 7 % This Christmas



    BARBADOS ADVOCATE

    ~ ELECTED €



    ‘HAIRMAN

    SIR HUGH DOW, whose appointment has just been announced as
    Chairman of the Royal Commission on East Africa,

    Committee Plans Trade
    Promotion Conference





    PORT-OF-SPAIN, Nov. 10.

    Plans for a Trade Promotion Conference scheduled for
    next year are being considered this week hy the Prepar
    atory Committee meeting at Kent Houce, Central Secre

    tariat, headq uarters,
    Royal Visit
    To B.W.I.

    LONDON,

    The British West Indies is to
    have an official Royal visit during
    Coronation year.

    The Queen’s aunt, the Princess
    Royal, who arranged recently to
    visit Trinidad in her capacity as
    commandant-in-chief of the Brit-
    ish Red Cross, has now an-
    nounced that she will extend her
    visit to British Guiana as well.

    At the invitation of Sir Hubert
    Rance, Governor of Trinidad, the
    Princess Royal will present col-
    ours to the local branches of th
    Red Cross in Trinidad, She is
    expected to arrive in the Colony
    early in January.

    Trinidad Leaseholds, Ltd, the
    oil company, offered the Princess
    nccommodation on one cf their
    tankers for her trip to the West
    Indies. She accepted gratefully,
    but asked that no special arrange-
    ménts be made for her voyage.

    Now the Princess has decided
    to extend her tour, on the invita-
    tion of the Government of British
    Guiana, An official announcement
    from St. James’s Palace in Lon-
    don, said:

    “Her Royal Highness, the Prin-
    eess Royal, has accepted an invita-
    tion from His Excellency the
    acting Governor of British Guiana,
    to visit British Guiana during hey
    coming visit to the West Indies.
    During her stay, Her Royal High-
    ness will inspect Red © Cross
    detachments and see Red Cross
    work in the territory.”

    Final arrangements for the
    Royal visit have not yet been com-
    pleted and it is not yet known
    how long the Princess will spend
    in the two Colonies. It is possible
    that she may make visits to other
    Colonies in the British West Indices
    while she js in the Caribbean,



    —B.U.P.
    and now reaches 500,000 tons a
    year, 8
    Less spectacular “°velopments
    have bezn made in the other

    Freach Colonies in Africa. Coffee
    production has become the main-
    stay of several of the West African
    Colonies, while big new _ ports
    have been built in these terri-

    tories,
    —B.U.P.










    Sunshine
    Right

    Into





    Your Home

    Committee

    The main specific job before the
    the formulation
    of an agenda for the Conference
    Among the subjects suggested for
    inclusion by the Commission are:
    Transportation and Communica-
    tions: Trade financing facilities,
    credits and collections; Standard-
    ising of commercial products and
    of trade terms; Dissemination of
    market information of prices and
    products; Export market coopera-
    tives,

    In his opening remarks, Mr
    Albert J. Powers, Chief of the
    Caribbean Section, Office of In-
    ternational Trade, U.S. Depart-
    ment of Commerce, who wa:
    elected Chairman of the Com-
    mittee, emphasised that the Con-
    ference should strive for tangibl
    esults, and should avoid an aca
    demic approach. He echoed the
    Commissien’s thought that th
    Conference should be so arranged
    as to stimulate the interest of th

    urng

    businéss communitie: as well a
    of governments.

    Others attending the meetin
    are:——

    Mr D. Mascart, Director

    Customs, Martinique; Mr, Candid

    Oliveras, Head, Economic Plan
    ning Unit, Puerto Rico Plan
    ning Board; Mr. D. A, Pe

    cival, Assistant Economie Advise:
    Colonial Development & Welfar«
    Organisation; Mr, Aubrey Starck,
    United Kingdom Trade Commis-
    sioner, Trinidad; Mr. W. T.. Smit
    Head, Division of Trade Policy
    Department of Economic Affairr
    Surinam; Mr, Willard Grant
    Director of T, Geddes Grant, Ltd
    Trinidad.



    Campaign Against
    Wayside Gard
    Vendors

    The Police have begun a cam-
    paign to clear wayside postcard
    vendors off the sidewalks where
    they congregate to sell their ware
    These sellers are however con-
    templating forming a delegation to
    interview the Commissioner of
    Police with a “ to having the
    campaign relaxed,

    Each year as the Christmas sea-
    son approaches, a number of young
    men patrol the city streets selling
    postcards from boxes, Sometimes

    they congregate on pavements and

    in shop doors, impeding the pro-

    gress of Christmas shoppers and
    ns.

    SPECIAL XMAS





    SERVICE

    Gairy Named, |
    Suspended
    From Couneil |

    From Our Own Correspondent) \
    GRENADA, Nov. 19. |
    Hon. Eric Gairy was “named!
    and suspended at a meeting o |
    the Legislature this morning afte |
    speaking just under 20 minutes o
    a motion urging the sending of
    Royal Commission to Grenada t
    probe generally the social an
    economic affairs and specificall
    employer-employee relations.
    After previous advice from Ad

    ministrator MacMillan in th
    Chair to refrain from imputations |
    of the worthiness of other mem- |
    bers, and later calm ‘advice wv,
    ontinue his speech when he sug-
    gested that the Administrak
    must be feeling uneasy as h
    might speak two or three days |
    Gairy went on to say that thn

    gruesome conditions in Grenadi |
    have been blamed on his Manua |
    and Mental Workers’ Union

    whereas members of the House |
    belonging to it had a clean sheet

    and “if other members around th

    table could make the same boast

    the motion would pass very eas-
    ily.”

    The Administrator asked th
    member for a withdrawal of thes:
    remarks and Gairy refused, claim
    ing that the House was the onc
    privilege of justice, The Adminis~
    trator read the relevant rules of
    the Council with regard to respect
    for the Chair, whereupon Hon,
    D, A, Henry nominated member,
    moved that Gairy be “named” and
    suspended, and the Attorney Gen-
    eral C, F, Henville seeonded.

    The majority voted zn favour of
    the motion and Gairy left the
    Chamber accompanied by three
    members of his block, and a vast
    crowd of his followers in the gal-
    lery who had been urged by Gairy
    to attend in a speech at a previ-
    ous public meeting also walked
    out momentarily interrupting the
    quiet of the Chamber.

    Try the vote Hons. T. A, Marry-
    show and H, A. McKie abstained.
    The name of Hon, Carlyle Noel,
    recently belonging to the Gairy
    block, slipped the Clerk of the
    Council in taking the vote but
    the member remained seated for
    the remainder of the meeting par-
    ticipating in the business together
    with Marryshow, E. V. A. Sylves-
    ter and McKie who are elected
    members, as well as two officials
    ind the two nominated members
    present.

    The suspension motion involves
    a duration till the next meeting
    and forfeiture of any remuneration
    Yo which the said member as 4
    legislator is entitled for the period
    of suspension, Among those listen-
    ing to the abortive debate was His
    Lordship J. lL. M, Perez, Chief
    Justice of Trinidad, who arrived
    here this morning for the sitting
    of the Appeal Court.

    Gairy had asked whether he
    might vete on the motion and the
    Administrator overruled this, Out-
    side the Chamber an excited crowd
    followed Gairy down street to the
    MMWYW office,

    Later, on a motion of adjourn-
    ment, Hon. W. E. Julien referred
    to the fact that two fires recently
    set to the residences of O. M
    Bain and Louis Strauss were,
    patent attempts of agson and sug-
    gested that the Government
    should offer a reward for evidence
    leading to the culprits, He said it}
    appeared certain that people were |

    seeking to commit murder |
    through fire as a means of revenge,
    threatening the lives of whole

    families. |
    Gairy’s 20-minute speech up to |
    the stage of the suspension, large!)
    consisted of charges against |
    “plantocracy” whom he described |
    as “responsible for the gruesome
    and undesirable atmosphere pre- |
    vailing in Grenada.” 1b

    et |

    Diamond Rings

    LOUIS L. BAYLEY
    Bolton Lane





    | "GGC. evectric







    PAGE THREE








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    ranid relief!

    Oh! what
    a nasty cough...

    REG?

    ZUBES COUGH MIXTURE | Z2UBES GOUGH LOZENGES

    A convorting, soothing mixture These are so handy to keep with
    that’s well known as you in pocket-size tins. Easy to
    a family remedy for

    >, Zubes bring quick relief to
    a sore and tickling throat. Just
    pop one into your mouth as

    tak
    coughs and sore throats.
    Let its gentle syrup ease
    and relieve your trouble.

    Specially suitable and soon as you






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    coughs. Always keep a threat

    bottle at home. coming On. ¢& Se S

    AND when you have a stuffy cold, carry the new ZUBES INHALER

    in your pocket or handbag. A sniff will clear your head in a jiffy.
    FROM ALL GOOD CHEMISTS AND STORES

    Agents: 1. S. GARRAWAY & CO., Bridgetown Ty



    One—!

    JUST ONE—and aren't we enjoying ourselves?
    Baby wonders what all the fuss is about’on this
    particular day —the toys, the new frock, the cake
    and this lovely, lovely candle — but what fun ! !
    And what a happy year it has been on the whole
    for everyone — particularly since we put baby on
    Cow & Gate. Steady progress — abounding health
    —- peace and contentment.

    Yes—carry on, baby, with that charming smile
    —at least we have given you a good start!

    COowéG

    4708

    ATE ¥885

    a Ly



    Dhe FOOD of? jy ago

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    OFFER!!

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    G.E.C

    VARIETY OF |
    ACCESSORIES.
    Periuacex Gasket Chamois Leathers we De, Me
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    w ‘orm -a-Gasket racle jac esive wos
    AGA lees | REFRIGERATORS
    | Reagan | Bic eR eee
    " Shaler Hot Patches
    mae Sparton 6 & 12 44 REDUCED TO
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    ” vere _ Rear View Mirrors i \
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    . nig Sizes % in., % in. 1 in We carry a large stock of best
    ” Car & ba METAL CIC aes i quality imported Paints, as well The refrigerating unit of the G.E.C ®
    | %—5 Ply Air Hose Schrader oi aes | as Dry Colours, Linseed Oil, eo fecenale tio - cae. CITY G AR AGE TR ADING
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    | - “yre "a ieieicsioas ann < = oa climate — and it’s handle incorporating CO LTD
    . a i lovely to look at, too | concealed lock. E
    ECKSTEIN BROTHERS ||. BARBADOS CO-OP. ms
    BAY STREET - DIAL 4269 | COTTON FACTORY Led. | Cid ER em: Shah: HPS
    anifiows siisidaeee: a heamiaalt | i com.











    no .

    PAGE

    BARBADOS ei ADVOCAT

    ee en oS RS SESS Prepay 6

    (Tinted by the Advocate Co,, Ltd., Broad -..

    FOUR



    - Bias
    » Bridgetown

    Thursday, November 20, 1952.

    RAGLE HALL

    IT WOULD be very discouraging if the
    district market planned for Eagle Hall
    should take as long to complete as the
    Bay Street Window opposite the General
    Hospital.

    Eagle Hall it has been’ pointed out
    before is an important cross-roads much
    used by visitors to the island and its
    market facilities have long been appreci-
    ated by residents. Recognition of Eagle
    Hall’s market facilities did lead in fact to
    the removal some months ago of certain
    shops in preparation for the erection of
    a market which would give protection to
    hawkers from sun and rain and which
    would make shopping easier for the house-
    wife.

    The removal of the shops has not been
    followed by any speedy action to erect
    a market shed, and several enterprising
    hawkers, impatient with the inconveni-
    ences of selling perishable foodstuffs on
    an exposed unprotected site have built for
    themselves small shelters which add
    beauty to the desolate site but give ade-
    quate cover from the sun and rain. In
    contrast to the inactivity which is evident
    with regard to the proposed Eagle Hall
    Market, opposite its site a service station
    for motor vehicles is rapidly nearing com-
    pletion.

    No example of the advantages of private
    enterprise. over public could be cited
    which would so readily be understood.
    The service station at Eagle Hall is being
    built on land which had to be cleared in
    the same way that land had to be cleared
    for the erection of the proposed market
    building. One might have thought that a
    market which was being erécted with the
    approval of the central government would
    have been built before work had even
    started. on the service station. In fact
    unless some erection follows soon it is
    possible that hawkers will, when it rains,
    seek shelter under the roof of the service
    station which is now rapidly nearing com-
    pletion. The Coronation as was pointed
    out in these columns yesterday is not far
    distant. Soon it is hoped that the Corona-
    tion Committee will take the public into
    their confidence and announce what
    works are to be undertaken. as a per-
    manent memorial of the Coronation.
    Meanwhile a list ought to be made in
    every parish of schemes which await com-
    pletion and the determination made that
    they will be completed not later than one
    month preceding the Coronation. Some-
    where near the head of this list. must be
    included the proposed market at Eagle
    Hall.

    no

    CACTI
    THE exhibition of miniature gardens at
    the Barbados Museum was a_ useful
    reminder to the public that each house-
    holder, no matter how small the plot of
    “his tenancy or ownership could beautify
    his surroundings. Especially was this mes-
    sage conveyed by the cacti which still
    remain in the now permanent rock gar-
    den of the Museum. Now the Civic Circle
    has advertised cacti to the much larger
    public which visits Seawell during the
    year. Near the entrance to the waiting
    room and opposite the covered open-gal-
    lery which leads to the main waiting
    room a simple garden of cacti gives resi-
    dents and visitors alike a favourable
    impression of a tropical island. The com-
    ment has often been made before that
    cultivation of eaeti is more prevalent in
    the United Kingdom than in Barbados.
    Tt will be a great benefit to the island if
    the activities ef the Horticultural Society
    and of the Civie Cirele should result in
    the spreading of cacti gardens throughout
    the island. Barbados would be a much
    prettier place if cacti and succulents were
    used as hedges instead of walls, and much
    stone now wasted for purposes of osten-
    tation would be saved for more necessary
    purposes.

    THE FOUNTAIN

    WHEN some months ago the fountain of
    Bridgetown was regrettably turned off
    during the day an announcement was
    made that the fountain would still play
    on days on which tourist ships visited the
    island. On several days when tourist ships
    have visited the island since the fountain
    has not played. Everyone hopes that soon
    the fountain will play. every day and that
    during the Coronation celebrations it will
    play night and day for at least one week.
    The idea that visitors come to Barbados
    only when tourist ships arrive is in need



    of revision. More people arrive in Barba-
    dos by air than by sea and aeroplanes
    come to Barbados daily. Also regular

    passenger carrying ships such as the
    Colombie and the Golfito qualify for the
    description of tourist ships. The aim of
    the authorities ought to be to keep the
    fountain playing every day even if salt
    water has There is nothing so

    SSiNng as a

    to be used

    fountain without water.



    LONDON

    The American’ elections, the
    opening of Parliament in Britain,
    the establishment of improved
    Anglo-Egyptian relations and the
    High Wycombe bye-election com-
    bine this week to etch a mark on
    Britain's history,

    It is traditional for British states-
    men to withhold official comment
    on elections in any foreign coun-
    try, Even when the defeated
    Japanese went to the polls last
    October to make their first “free”
    post-war choice of a government,
    British spokesmen refrained from
    expressing any preference regard-
    ing their future lea ip.

    In the case of the United States,

    the gisinclination to give an
    opinion has been even more
    marked. Z

    But what do the British people
    say?

    Always feeling sympathy for a
    defeated man, if he takes defeat
    well, they term Adlai Stevenson
    a big-hearted, generous loser.

    However, irrespective of Re-
    publican party policy, they are
    glad to see Eisenhower appointed
    to the world’s biggest job. Re-
    membering Eisenhower's wartime
    leadership, his name is a house-
    hold word in Britain, and syn-
    onymous with» decency, honesty
    and fair play,

    In London, on the same day that
    America polled, the opening of
    Parliament lent the city a touch
    of pageantry and colour, Great
    crowds turned out to'see the young
    Queen, who look especially
    lovely, and the Dukejof Edinburgh
    as, preceded and ‘followed by
    mounted Sovereign’s Escorts in
    gleaming breastplates and plumed
    helmets, they drove in the Irish
    State coach past the troops of the
    Household Brigade lining the
    route.

    The state occasion over, Par-
    liamentary members turned quick-
    ly to the vital business of the
    moment. One thing emerges from
    the tens of thousands of words
    spoken. Britain has still to adjust
    herself to post-war conditions ne-
    cessitating increased production
    for less pay before the country’s
    economy can be set on a stable
    nasis, Furthermore, demands from
    Socialist quarters that the period
    of military conscription should be
    reduced from two years to
    eighteen months cannot be met
    without endangering Britain's

    security.
    New Era?

    The announcement that Gen-
    eral Neguib will pay compensation
    tor the Britons killed and in-
    jured in Cairo’s riots last January
    may presage a new era in relay
    tions between Britain and the
    Moslem world,

    General Neguib’s action follows
    closely on the recent successful
    visit to Britain of Turkey's Prime
    Minister, Mr. Adnan Menderes,
    and his Foreign Minister, Mr, Fuat
    Koprulu. Then, Mr. Menderes
    indicated that he would do every-
    thing possible to help smooth out
    Anglo-Egyptian differences — as
    well as to achieve a settlement in

    BARBADOS ADVOCATE

    NEWS FROM BRITAIN



    ity

    Vaughan Jones

    the Anglo-Persian oil dispute.

    At the same time British states-

    men were highly encouraged by

    the way General Neguib was

    seeking to re-organise Egypt’s ad-

    ministration and suppress graft
    and corruption within government
    ranks.

    It appears now that General :

    Neguib will consider realistically
    and co-operatively Britain’s view-
    point that the Sudan must be
    allowed to determine for herself
    the form of her new Government.

    So the chanees seem better than
    ever that the leaders of the three
    countries will be able to agree on
    the Sudan’s future status.

    Improved Anglo- Egyptian rela-

    ‘tions may also create a favourable
    atmosphere for the establishment
    of the much discussed Middle East
    Command in which Egypt would
    be represented.

    At
    in-

    party in power have improved
    their position in a marginal con-
    stituency.

    So it shows that the electors
    there have more faith in Mr.
    Churchill’s Conservative leader-
    ship than in Mr. Attlee’s Socialist
    experiments.

    Marriages

    The break-up of marriages at-
    tracts public attention only when
    attended by fiamboyant circum-
    ‘stances.

    Today, nearly every woman in
    Britain is debating |-—- for and
    against—the acquittal by a French
    court of a plain-looking, fortyone-
    year-old wife who had shot her
    husband because he had spurned
    her for the love of an attractive,
    married red-head, seven years her
    junior.

    The Royal Commission on
    Divorce, which is continuing its
    detailed survey into the reasons
    for marital break-ups in Britain,
    finds, however, that the most
    common cause of divorce has its
    roots in mundane _ separation.
    Husband and wife are parted for
    some length of time; they grow
    ‘out of each others’ lives, find new
    interests, and then.one or both
    discover there is no return. Con-
    tributory factor to such separation
    has been the housing shortage of
    recent years.

    Another view put to the Com-
    mission, which has been sitting
    in Edinburgh, is that men should
    not have to pay even innocent
    former wives maintenance after
    the wives’ have re-married. This
    was submitted by the National
    Married Men’s Association, who
    claimed that enforced maintenance
    of a re-married woman was
    capitalising a man’s past error,

    At the same time, the National
    Council of Women, sitting at





    Majestic—And No

    The world’s officially organised
    “culture” is to cost the record
    sum next year of more than
    £3,500,000, if the United Nations
    Educationii, Scientific, and Cul-
    tural Organisation has its way.

    And the bill for Britain will be
    £400,000 to £500,000, ”

    Along the elegant Avenue Kleber
    n Paris is the former German
    Jecupation headquarters, th e
    ‘uxury Hotel Majestic. For a
    rent of £18,000 a year it now
    houses 750 UNESCO employees of
    18 nationalities,

    The Majestic’s tenants are the
    rest paid, tax-free office workers
    n the world, One in four has a
    ‘ar—most of them foreign, im-
    »orted duty free with sterling and
    lollars, !

    They and their hotel are an
    ‘-tonishing proof that behind the
    ‘egular series of vague resolu-
    ions, recommendations, studies,
    o- ordinations, considerations, and

    oh yes—discussions and con- 1953

    ultations, the mystic and remote
    iix-letter word UNESCO does
    epresent some positive reality.

    Positive .

    For the privileged guests at the
    Majestic are certain positive,
    .nd on occasions even realistic.

    They have voted themselves
    his year 10 per cent, cost-of-liv-
    ing and salary increases. Now
    ‘hey are negotiating with the
    French Government for duty-free
    cigarettes,

    And around the Majestic are
    parked at any one time. more
    plendid foreign cars, with yellow
    Diplomatic Corps ,plates, than in
    any other spot in Paris, For senior
    executives have diplomatic rank
    too,

    Now the Majestic has produced
    its highest provisional budget. It
    is to be discussed this month by
    500 delegates from .65 countries.

    This giganti¢ © talk-feast, to
    which Britain is sending 19 dele-
    gates and staff at sits, ewn cost,
    will plan the next year’s cultural
    exchanges and their price.

    It will try to see if nine reluc-



    Our Reade

    Congratulations
    To The Editor, The Advocate—

    SIR,—No time is better suited

    or the assessment of a task than
    it its completion, It is because of
    ‘hat, that I take this fitting op-
    portunity to offer my sincere con-
    gratulation and thanks to Mr, F.
    A. Hoyos and Mr, John Prideaux
    for the very interesting and in-
    formative articles they have been
    contribyeing fo ‘your newspaper
    for the past few weeks,

    The task wss no doubt onerous,
    but they have succeeded in a
    large wa¥ ‘in bringing to the pub-
    lic of Barbados a true picture of
    their heroes, and the background
    of their struggles us a people.

    Seldom, if ever, have we been
    treated to such a thorough expo-
    ition of the facts of our history,

    nd.such penetrating analysis of

    ur great sons as was the case at
    issue ’

    Sir, my_only hope is that their
    work will not be left there, but
    that it will be put into BOOK
    FORM, for the. use of ourselves,

    To the Editor, The Advocate—

    Spared

    SYDNEY SMITH
    reports from Paris on
    UNESCO's spending

    tant member countries, three-
    quarters of a million pounds be-
    hind with their subscriptions, cea
    be persuaded to show a litue
    more than academic enthusiasm
    for world cultural conferences,
    What sort of programme wilt
    UNESCO’s conference debate for
    next year? Well, of course, it does
    not know yet. But let us take a
    sample—the last month’s opera-
    tions; a fair average twelfth of
    the blessings for which we Brit-
    ish alone will be asked to pay
    close on half a million pounds in

    Let it be
    UNESCO. paid an average of 20
    per cent, travel expenses for all
    the comings. and goings, and from
    £3 10s, to £5. 5s. in dollars as

    ‘daily subsistence allowances for

    all the “experts” involved.

    First we had a “Constitutive
    Conference” to plan the formation
    of the International Social Science
    Council,

    Then we had a “Committee of
    Experts” (fares and allowances
    on the usual basis) to discuss the
    rights of the average man to
    “participate in the cultural life
    of the community.”

    They meant : Can we freely go
    to art shows, theatres, cinemas,
    and read the books and listen to
    the music we like?

    After much discussion these ex~
    perts decided we can.

    Next in Rangoon there was a
    “seminar” for South Asian and
    South Pacific youth leaders on
    education, Frankly, I cannot find
    out what they did or who they
    were. But there was certainly no
    political sereening for these

    rs Say:

    eo
    The books on Sir Walter Raleigt
    and Lord Nelson have outlivec

    their usefulness.

    L. B. BRATHWAITE.
    Health Centres

    the High Wycombe by- gu
    election the Conservatives
    creased tht r majority from 1,753
    to 2,100. Tnis is only the second
    time since the war’s end that the



    Eastbourne, passed a resolution
    asserting that wives with private
    means should support husbands if
    they become needy “through age,
    incapacity, disablement or other
    misfortune.”

    In London, meantime, the first
    domestic proceedings court has
    been set up in the Chelsea dis-
    trict. It is sited in a converted
    schoolroom, and the atmosphere
    is informal. The court has soft
    chairs and restful lighting and
    decorations. Twice. a week’ hus~

    parting couples to patch up their
    differences,

    The Coronation and the crowds
    of overseas visitors who come to
    view it are certain to attract to
    London a motley fraternity of
    tricksters, spivs and wide boys,
    Their target will be the pocket-
    books of not only Britons but their
    ests. Many will claim to be
    “gui p>

    To spare visitors from such bad
    experiences, Sir Alexander Max-
    well, chairman of the British
    Travel and Holidays Association,
    has sponsored a regular course in
    guide-lecturing. | Seventeen men
    and fourteen wom’n from many
    different walks of life are for
    three months studying under a
    “master”, Mr. H, L. Bryant Peers,
    what they will weed to know to
    tell the visitors from Vancouver,
    or Buenos Aires, Hong Kong, Ka-
    rachi or Capetown, ‘They will
    learn something about all of
    London’s historic buildings, about
    her places of entertainment and
    restaurants, as well as about her
    varied institutions.

    Retains Popularity

    The Queen Mother retains her
    great popularity im Britain be-
    cause she keeps up her contact
    with the people.

    This week she visited the Royal
    Festival Hall’s International
    Kitchen exhibition where fifty-
    seven women representing nine-
    teen countries showed their cook-
    ery skill by preparing their own
    national dishes with food available
    in Britain. Each little kitchen.
    fully equipped, was staffed by a
    {national group of three. The
    Queen expressed her appreciation
    of many of the dishes—which were
    an object lesson to British house-
    wives in demonstrating that food
    in England need not be dull.

    All the Western European coun-
    tries were represented, as well ad
    the U.S., Brazil, India and Pakis-
    tan, Indonesia, Malaya and Israel.

    Japan, Jugoslavia and Austria
    contented themselves by display-
    ing cold dishes,

    At the exhibition it was assumed
    that the men of the house might
    also help the housewife. Display-
    ed for him to wear was a working
    coat of blue denim, trimmed with
    maroon. And for washing up,
    there was a blue and yellow
    striped apron with yellow top.

    —L.E.S.

    Chinese, Burmese, Indonesian, In-
    dian, and other youth leaders,
    Then there was a thrilling Com-
    mittee for the Co-ordination of
    Congresses of the “International

    Council for Philosophic and
    Humanistic Studies.” In other

    words, a planning of meetings of}

    “learned men” such as the In-
    ternational Commission on Folk
    Arts and Folk Lore in “lovely
    places like Berne, Istanbul, Pal-
    ermo, ‘and Florence—fares paid,
    of course,

    After that came the “Pro-
    visional Committee on Science
    Abstracting.” The report on what
    they abstracted beyond ten dollars
    a day living allowance is not yet
    available,

    Then we had an “International
    Committee on Monuments and
    Historical Sites,” This august body
    resolved that “in the event of
    armed conflict’ — I understand
    they meant war—monuments like

    | UNESCO ought to be neutral.
    understood that

    £1,000 a- Week

    Next came a delicious piece—
    a meeting of experts on the politi-
    cal role of women, Most of them
    were men, and they reached
    similar conclusions to a woman
    named Pankhurst well over 40
    years ago.

    READY 10 BUILD

    AN ATOM PLANE |

    By NEWELL ROGERS

    NEW YORK, Tuesday,
    TO the new President may fall the breath-

    catching task of launching not only the
    world’s first atom-powered submarine, but!
    the first atom-powered aircraft.

    On half a million acres of rugged, desolate

    country in south-eastern Idaho, deep behind
    the Rockies, scientists and engineers are
    working in squat concrete buildings on the
    “UA-boats” power plant.

    The dun-coloured desert is now the nation-

    al reactor testing station.

    * *
    THE paca ncel named Nautilus, is

    under construction on the Thames near New
    London, Connecticut.

    And the Atomic Energy Commission an-

    nounces it is ready to start work in Idaho on
    the plane.

    It notifies contractors that preliminary

    plans will be ready in ten days for a city
    devoted solely to this aircraft.

    The desert is going to bloom—whether for

    mankind’s glory .or shame will be mankind’s|{
    decision.

    * * 3
    CARPENTERS are working in Washington

    on street stands for people to see the inaugu-
    ration of the new President next January 20.

    * * *
    MEET Mr, Danny Kaye, the film producer

    of London and Hollywood, and no longer
    just an actor if you please. Like Charles
    Chaplin, Kaye is going to do more of the

    work behind as well asin front of the
    camera.

    Unlike Chaplin, however, he will allow a
    lady named Sylvia Fine to write the words
    and music of his first film production,

    “Knock on Wood,” mostly to be made in

    London. In private life she is Mrs, Kaye.

    * * *
    CUNARD quickly snuffed out a water-

    front rumour about the Queen liners. The
    rumour: They would be laid up for major

    alterations and fitted with stabilising fins.
    The truth, according to Cunard: They will
    be out of service for a seven-week overhaul

    only. But tourist-class quarters may be some-

    what enlarged for Coronation year.

    * * Re
    NEW YORK’S youngest, highest-priced
    newspaper, the Daily Compass, died a quiet
    death. It was Left-wing and sold for about
    8d. a copy. Starting with a circulation of
    150,000, it ended with 30,000.

    * *

    IN HOLLYWOOD a picket parades along
    North Edinburgh-street. His sign reads
    “Esther, please, please let me visit my baby.”
    Philip Chain is picketing his divorced wife
    Esther, who refuses to let him see their
    three-year-old daughter Darlene.

    * * *

    IN World War II Mrs. Omer Willette got a
    telegram announcing Sergeant Willette’s
    death in action. It was a mistake, Two weeks
    ago came another wire announcing his death
    in action in Korea. Last night a telephone
    call from Tokyo—Sergeant Willette on the
    line to say he is only wounded and will be
    home soon. Says seven-year-old George Will-
    ette: “Daddy is bullet proof.”

    HE PAYS FOR SMASH HITS

    By HENRY LOWRIE

    NEW YORK.
    FRANK RUSSELL, 52-year-old business



    The month ended with three} Man, smiled as he wrote out cheques

    especially dreary conferences on
    “Voluntary International Work
    Camps,” “Young Workers’ Prob-
    lems,” and “Group Travel Grants
    for Workers.”

    This last is the sort of thing
    that sent Austrian firemen to
    Stockholm to see how the Swedes
    put fires out.
    ae found they used water,

    For its administrative work
    alone in this remarkable month
    of achievement the Majestic’s
    Paris bill was nearly £440,000.
    Britain’s share of that ,was just
    over £1,000 a week.

    I trust you are enjoying your
    moneys worth.
    | —L.E.S.



    Not Compositor

    ‘o, The Editor, The Advocate.
    Sm,—I notice an item in your
    per of the 12th inst. under the

    aeading of “12 Months for Steal-

    ing” on Page 5. In the item is the
    ame Chesterfield Alleyne which
    is also my name and I would like
    you to notify your readers that it

    wis not Chesterfield Alleyne the

    Sir,—May I suggest that thew Compositor.

    Leader of our Government inform 5
    the Secretary of State for the Col-
    onies that, in view of the proposed

    CHESTERFIELD ALLEYNE.
    Disestablishment

    °

    Salary and conditions of Service,
    it is extremely unlikely that any
    Medical graduate with the addi-
    Uonal qualification- of a D.P.H.
    would apply for the post of Medi-
    cal Officer in charge of any Health
    Centre in Barbados.

    If the Government cannot pay
    more it should face the facts and
    not insist on the additional D.P.H.
    qualification. Plans however
    praiseworthy become useless if
    barriers are created which prevent
    them from being. implemented.
    Any well qualified Doctor with 4
    year’s Tropical experience is quite
    capable of being in charge of a
    Health Centre.

    To, The Editor, The Advocate,

    SIR,—I was much horrified to
    see that the Government had not
    acted with such prudent economy
    as to include disestablishment of
    tle Church in its Five Year Plan,
    but an official statement that the
    Five Year Plan is not all the legis-
    lation the Government intends
    making has brought me some
    relief,

    The community can surely ben-
    efit from a disestablished Church,
    and the revenue obtained from
    that source, which at present is
    f deliberate waste, could do much

    ind posterity, Is not the work of At present it appears that Health to relieve the suffering masses in
    these two gentlemen the correct Centres, like Federation, will re- this Island from their miseries.
    material to be introduced in our main a perennial topic of discus- I am,

    chools, whereby our children can sion, { Yours truly,

    earn something about themselves? MEDICO. ECONOMIST.

    Government pointed
    report that, while the number of men in
    prison has dropped by 1,162 the number of
    women prisoners has risen by 262.

    recently for 12,214 dollars (about £4,700).
    The money was to pay for 3,468 windows
    broken by boys all over America during

    the baseball season.

    Mr. Russell was fulfilling a pledge he

    made 40 years ago when he was caught by
    a policeman after breaking a window in a
    street game.

    “Some day,” he said, “I’ll pay for every

    window which kids break.”

    FROM his poor start, Russell beeame a

    millionaire—it is incidental that he made
    his money in the glass business—and dis-
    tributed cards to children to give to house-
    owners whose windows they smashed.

    The cards promised free repairs. But the

    ball must be returned to the children.

    Said Russell: “I was warned that I would

    be encouraging juvenile delinquents and

    would probably have to pay 100,000 dollars
    (£35,000).

    “But I’m tickled pink. Boys don't have to

    run away now.”

    * * *
    THE WAY these big Hollywood compan-

    ies roam all over the world making pictures
    riles the local trades unions.

    But over their objections 17 films are

    planned for foreign shooting next year.
    They include “King Arthur and the Round
    Table” to be made in England and “Briga-
    doon” to be filmed in Scotland and England.

    WITHOUT offering an explanation. the
    out in a week-end

    l

    THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1952. °



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    SS ARENA

    THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1952.

    Rien pon Saban hn SO MC ae
    Lad Bound Over For £&SSO PUBLISHES Board Of Health £5 Fine

    inflicting Bodily Harm

    Nineteen-year-old Louis Haynes of Market Hill, St.
    George, was yesterday bound over in the sum of £50 to
    keep the peace for 18 months by Mr. Justice J. W. B. Chen-
    ery after an assize jury found him guilty of inflicting
    grievous bodily harm on 22-year-old Joseph Wickham of

    the same district on July 25 this year.

    When the foreman returned the
    verdict he told the Registrar that
    the jury wished the Court to be
    lenient towards the prisoner.

    Mr. W. W. Reece, Q.C., Solicitor
    General prosecuted for the Crown,
    Mr. - G. Smith appeared on
    Haynes’ behalf.

    Five witnesses gave evidence for
    the Prosecution.

    Dr, Skomorok said that on July
    25 he examined Joseph Wickham.
    Wickham’s lower jaw was frac-
    tured. The blow which caused the
    fracture could have been caused
    by a stone. The injury was not
    > kag to cause permanent disabil-
    ity.

    Wickham said that on July 25
    he went into a shop belonging to
    a man called Turney on Market

    Hill, St. George, where Haynes and 11

    others were, He passed near
    Haynes and brushed him. Haynes
    told him not to touch him and he
    asked Haynes what was the mat-
    ter between them. He went fur-
    ther into the shop and when he
    was passing near Haynes again,
    he chanced to bounce him. Haynes
    pushed him and they began to
    fight. Turney ordered them out of
    the shop and as they were going
    out, Haynes.said he was going to
    knock him, ddwn.

    He s to walk home when
    someone sana him, While he was
    swinging around on being called,
    he was struck with a stone which
    fractured his jaw.

    Tap On Shoulder

    Cross-examined he said he had
    tapped Haynes on his shoulder
    and said, “This is a sock,” but that
    was only an expression common
    to the district. Before he was
    Btruck with the stone he did not
    threaten to shoot Haynes,

    Blair Burke said he was in the
    shop when Wickham tapped
    Haynes. Haynes told him not to
    tap him again and when Wickham
    again touched him and they began
    to scuffle, the shop proprietor or-
    dered them out of the shop. He
    did not see what happened when
    they went out on the road,

    Hercules St. Hill said when the
    shop proprietor sent Haynes and
    Wickham out of the shop, Wick-
    ham told Haynes he was going to
    shoot him. Haynes ran down the
    road and Wickham did not pur+
    sue him. Later Wickham came
    back with a cut on his jaw,

    Cross-examined he said that
    Haynes told Wickham on more
    than four occasions to leave him
    alone.

    Conway Burke said that he was
    at the shop the night when Wick-
    ham and Haynes had the scuffle.

    - After the shop proprietor ordered

    them out of the shop, Wickham
    told Haynes, “The only way I do
    not shoot you is if God take me.”
    When he heard that threat he ad-
    vised Haynes not to go down the

    road.
    Self Defence

    Mr. Smith said that the defence
    was not quibbling over the high
    possibility that Haynes fractiwed
    Wickham’s jaw, but in the light of
    the evidence the defence was say-
    ing that the blow that caused the
    injury was made in self defence.
    They had heard the evidence of
    Wickham’s. continuous aggression
    and his threatening to shoo
    Haynes. Haynes could not but be
    perturbed at the idea of Wick-
    ham’s threatening to shoot him
    and immediately after the threat
    chasing him down the road a dark
    “ight, the case was a perfect case
    of self defence.

    Since Wickham’s threat to shoot
    Haynes had been so solemn that it
    had put fear in the mind of the
    witness who advised Haynes
    against going down the road, it
    would have put more fear even
    in the mind of the man to whom
    it was directed.

    All they had to do was to de-
    cide whetner the injury was great-
    er than the occasion demanded.

    After half an hour’s deliber-

    . &tion the jury returned a verdict
    of guilty. Haynes was bound over | _...........

    for 18 months.



    Assize Diary

    THURSDAY NOV. 20
    Reg. vs. Nathaniel Browne
    Reg. vs, Ethan Brathwaite

    and Denzil Harris

    TAKE ADVANTAGE
    SPECTALS.

    Venezuelan Fined
    £10 For Dangerous

    . >
    Driving

    His Worship Mr. E. A. McLeod,
    Police Magistrate of District “A”,
    yesterday tined 29-year-old Com-
    mission Agent Hugo Garin of
    Caracas £10 to be paid forthwith
    when he pleaded guilty of driv*
    ing the car X-509 on Biack Rock
    road on November 11 in a manner
    dangerous to the public,

    Garin was also convicted, rep-
    rimanded and discharged for driv-
    ing the car X-509 without an
    appropriate licence on November

    L

    “Mr. W. W. Reece Q.C., who
    prosecuted for ‘the Police asked
    the Ccurt to amend the original
    charge to one of driving in a man-
    ner dangerous to the pubiic. In
    the original charge Garin was
    alleged to have caused bodily
    harm to Meta Cox and Carter Cox,
    two school children, through wil-
    ful neglect while driving the ca/
    X-509 on Bilaek Rock road or
    November 11, ;

    Mr. J. S. B. Dear appeared for
    Garin, Sgt. Howard of the Black
    Rock Police Station said that on
    November 11 he went to Black
    Rock road and saw the car X-509
    in the road, and this car was in-
    volved in an accident with four
    school children who were taken
    to the General Hospital after the
    accident, :

    He learnt that the defendant
    was the driver of the car,

    REMANDED

    Twenty-four-year-old Elsie Car-
    rington of Richmond Gap, St.
    Michael was remanded with bail
    until November 25 by His Worship
    yesterday on a charge of inflicting
    grievous bodily harm on Dencine
    Spencer also of Richmond Gap cn
    October 3.

    Mr, J, E, T. Brancker is appear-
    ing on behalf of Carrington while
    Sgt, Haynes is prosecuting for the
    Police.

    IGNORED SIGNAL

    Lionel Humphrey of Nursé
    Land, St. Michael was fined 10/-
    by His Worship yesterday when
    he was found guilty of ignoring
    a police stop signal while driving
    a van on Constitution Road about
    10.15 a.m. on October 15,

    Inspector King of the Central
    Police Station said that on Octo-



    ber 15 he was on duty along
    Constitution Road, The lower
    part of Belmont going towaras

    Queen’s Park was impassable.

    Due to this a sign which read:
    “Caution, Road Obstructed” was
    put at the corner of Belmont
    road, He saw a motor van coming
    towards him and noticed that the
    defendant was the driver,

    Ho signalled the driver. He did
    not stop'and only pulled up after
    he had travelled about 20 yards
    from him.

    THREE ROBBERIES





    Cynthia Sergeant of Greenland,
    St, Andrew, reported to the Police
    yesterday that while she was
    shopping in Roebuck Street on
    November 18, the sum of $150
    was stolen from her.

    ‘George Kellman of Ashbury
    St. George reported that his house
    was broken and entered on No-
    vember 17 and clothing to the
    value of $121 was stolen, :

    Henry Goodman of Oistin,
    Christ Church reported that gro-
    ceries were stolen from his shop
    ‘at Qistin on November 18.

    The Police are investigating
    these reports,



    RATES OF EXCHANGE

    NOVEMBER. 19, 1952
    NEW



    Selling YORK Buying
    Of . Cheques. on ;
    "i Sanhers 70 7/10% pr.

    ight or Demand
    Daft 70 5/10% pr.
    72°4/10% pr. Cable: ates -, f
    / urvency 69 2,/10%
    aren Coupes 68 5/10% pr-
    0% pr Silver 20% pr.
    CANADA
    5 0% pr. Cheques on °
    ge me Bankers 74% pr

    . Demand Drafts 73.85% pr.
    Sight Drafts 73 7/10% pr.
    Cable

    78 ee 72 8/10% pr-

    a /10% urrenay
    74 3/10’ fe Benois 71 8/10% pr.
    60% pr Silver 20% Dr:

    dnd

    OF THESE

    ..80 per tin CONDENSED. MILK—per tin ........... 380

    60 per doz, DOMINICA GRAPEFRJIT—per doz. -.60

    .60 per 10 lbs. POTATOES—per 10 Ibs. ......... hae

    5.50 per 110 lb, bag POTATOES—per 110 lb. bag... 5.50

    4.00 per 5 Jb, tin PROCESSED CHEESE—per 5 ib tin 4,00

    96 per tin CRAWFORDS CREAM CRACKERS a
    —per tin 2

    The Above Items for Cash & Carry Customers Only

    MAXAM CORNED BEEF HASH-—1l-Ib. tin...........
    MAXAM OX ‘'TONGUES—2-lb. tin

    SWIFTS LUNCHEON BEEF with CEREAL—12-o0z.
    SALISBURY.CORNED MUTTON—>per tin
    PALETHORPES HARICOT MUTTON—per tin
    PALETHORPES STEWED STEAK—per tin

    PALETHORPES MEAT ROLL—per tin
    PALETHORPES READY MEAL-—per tin ..... on acai ie

    MAXAM STEAK & KIDNEY

    PUDDING—1I-lb, tin ...
    tin

    HARRIS'S GALANTINE OF VEAL, HAM & TONG

    BRONTE ROAST BEEF—per

    RANCH LUNCHEON BEEF LOAF—per tin x
    RANCH MINCED CORNED BEEF in CEREAL—per tin
    LOAF—per tim .....

    TONGUES—per tin .

    RANCH VEAI
    BRONTE FAMBS
    ‘ COCKADE

    —per tin
    Sie MMM go aia ace cele pt 6 ate ~

    FINE. RUM

    STANSFELD, SCOTT & CO., LTD.



    SSS





    nnn

    NEW MAP OF
    CARIBBEAN

    A very informative and colour-
    ful map of the Caribbean has
    just been issued by Esso Standard
    Oil, S.A. This map contains in-
    formation on all means of trans-
    portation which exist in the area
    and also shows in large detail,
    fifteen of the most important
    islands of this region. It has been
    published as a ineans of pro-
    moting travel throughout the
    Caribbean and at the same time
    f° foster understanding and
    nowledge antong the countries
    and territories which the area
    comprises.

    Although the size of the map
    has been kept small enough to be
    convenient and although it is
    packed with information, it is ex-
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    flying times between terminals.
    and ports of call for all sched-
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    highways and airports are. shown
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    ranges of the islands are indi-
    cated by shaded relief treatment.

    Over 100 colourful pictures
    graphically describe the . culture,
    history and recreation of the area.
    Tourists to the Caribbean will
    also be aided by the accurate de-
    piction of major points of in-
    terest on the various island in-
    sets. The legends, notes, ‘and
    other explanatory details con-
    tained in the map, have been
    printed in English, Spanish and
    French.

    The Esso Map of the Caribbean
    has fulfilled a long felt need in
    this area and it has been very
    favourably received by Govern-
    ment officials, travel bureaux,
    tourist committees, airline and
    steamship companies, as a very
    important contribution to the de-
    velopment of tourism and travel
    in the Caribbean,



    Acting Governor
    At St. Leonard’s
    Schools

    His Excellency the Acting
    Governor, the Hon. R. N. Turner,
    attended by Captain W. H. R.
    Armstrong, A.D.C., yesterday
    morning visited the St. Leon-
    ard’s School for boys and the St.
    Leonard’s school for girls.

    On arrival at the boys’ school,
    His Excellency was met by Mr.
    C, Glindon Reed, Director of
    Education, and the Acting Head-
    master, Mr. G, C. Millar, who ac-~
    companied His Excellency on a
    tour of the school,

    Mr. Turner then inspectéd the
    girls’ school where he was met
    by the Headmistress, Mrs. C.
    Griffith.

    Later, His Excellency paid an
    unofficial visit to the Bank Hall
    Grammar School where he was
    received by the Headmaster, Mr.
    J. D, Bancroft.



    Activities Al
    Y.M.C.A.

    Members of the Y.M.C.A, are
    working on their playing field at
    the new Headquarters. Already
    a fairly large area of the field
    has been levelled and. grass
    planted,

    On December 10 the Y.M.C.A,
    Glee Club, conducted by Mr.
    O. A. “Graffie” Pilgrim, formerly
    of the Combermere School Glee
    Club, will stage their Christmas
    Concert at the Y.M.C.A. Naval
    Hall. The Police Band will assist
    with the programme. ;

    The Y.M.C.A. Week of Prayer
    ended on Sunday last, The at-
    tendance throughout the week
    was the best for many years.

    Make
    HARR





    BARBADOS ADVOCATE

    Receive Report Ors

    The General Board of Health
    at their meeting yesterday re-
    ceived Reports from the Govern-
    ment Chief Sanitary Inspector on
    the condition of existing tenantry
    roads at Ashton Hall, St. Peter,
    and Walkers, St. Anarew.

    The Chie: Sanitary. Inspector
    in his report on the Ashton Hall
    road stated that during raimy
    weather the roads are umpass-
    able to pedestrian and vehicular
    \ratfic in certain places, and
    added that “no attempt has ever
    vbecn made by the Vendor to put
    the roaas in order,”

    ihe Boara viewed the matter
    very se:nously, and decided to
    were to the vendor drawing to his
    attention the provisions of the Act,
    and requiring him to complete the
    neeessary works.

    in his Report on the Walkers’
    Tenantry road, the ' Chief Sani-
    tsry Inspector stated in part:

    During the course of his inspec-
    tion, it was observed that the
    road was grass grown throughout,
    and it was understood from
    some of the tenants, that during
    rainy weather thé roads were
    generally flooded at certain points,

    Midway along the road leading
    into the tenantry, a bridge had
    been constructed ta span the
    water’ course which passes at
    this point. The water passing
    through the course has under-
    mined the bridge aver a period
    of time and the bridge is now
    only suitable at one point for
    the use of © pedestrians, but
    wholly dangerous for vehicular
    traffic.

    Dr. E. B, Carter, Chairman of
    the Board pwinted out that in
    the case of the Walkers’ Tenan-
    try, the requirements of provid-
    ing roads had been met, but in
    process of time, the roads had
    got into a state of disrepair,

    The question was, who should
    now carry out the necessary
    repairs, He said that in regard
    to maintenance, no provision was
    made in the Act, and in that
    respect he thought that the Act
    ne “all wrong,” and that there
    was nothing that the Board could
    do in the matter.



    Sir George Seel
    Visits Baby Creche

    Sir George and Lady Seel
    visited the Children’s Goodwill
    League and Baby Creche on
    Tuesday at 10.00 a.m. and spent
    nearly an hour looking around
    the building.

    On arrival they were met by
    Mr. John Beckles, M.B.E., and
    the Matron, Miss Browne.

    After completing the tour
    the building, Sir George wrote
    the following in the Visitors’
    Book; “This institution must be
    a .source of great pride to Mr
    Beckles and the staff. For
    efficiency, cleanliness and a-feel-
    ing of enthusiasm, it compares
    most favourably with any similar

    of

    institution I have seen in the
    West Indies. I wish it every
    success for the future,”

    The Seventh Annual Benefit

    Concert, sponsored by the Friend.
    ly Committee in the U.S.A,
    aid of the Children’s Goodwill
    League was held at the Mount
    Morris Presbyterian Church on
    November 9 when a well ar-
    ranged programme was presented,

    Many Barbadians serve on the
    Committee.

    No Name, No Parents

    The male child which was left
    at the Children’s Goodwill
    League last month by a mother
    who did not give her name and

    address, is still in St. Michael’s
    Almshouse where it was later
    taken,

    Mr. John Beckles told the Ad-
    vocate; “The child is without a
    name, without a mother or with-
    out a father. I hope the parents
    will have a heart and claim him,”

    ISON 'S

    Your Headquarters

    XMAS
    Draws near and the |
    Seasonal Hospitality

    is bound to
    make Extra

    Demands

    Upon Your
    Kitchen
    and Table
    Appointments
    Be sure
    You have

    all those

    little things
    which tend
    to ensure the

    success of
    the
    occasion



    for Hardware! !

    OUR STOCKS
    include —

    CUTLERY in 3 Grades
    WIRE DISH COVERS
    POTATO RICERS
    KITCHEN KNIVES

    FORKS and SPOONS

    CORKSCREWS and

    CAN OPENERS

    FISH KETTLES
    VACUUM FLASKS
    ICING SYRINGES

    WIRE STRAINERS
    FLOUR SIFTERS
    WOOD SPOONS

    ICE CREAM FREEZERS
    LIME SQUEEZERS
    PCTATO CHIPPERS
    COVERED ROASTERS
    BREAD and CAKE TINS
    CANISTER SETS
    MEASURING SPOONS
    PASTRY ROLLERS
    TIN GRATERS

    — Also —

    and TUBES

    A Bie Assortment of Domestic Utilities in
    GLASS, ENAMELLED, TIN,
    | AND ALUMINIUM WARE



    | HARRISON'S







    Imposed On

    Tenantry Roads Woman For Wounding

    PAGE FIVE







    AMAS is just around the
    Corner...

    Mr. Justice J. W. B. Chenery yesterday fined Louise
    Blackett of Sargeant Street, St. John, £5 to be paid in seven

    days or in default two months’

    imprisonment when an

    Why not Brighten up your

    assize jury found her guilty of wounding Audine Harewood

    of the same district on August 12.

    Blacketi
    counts,
    â„¢m,

    was charged on two
    wounding with intent to
    disfigure or do grievous
    bodjly harm, and two, wounding
    The jury found her not guilty on
    the first count.

    Mr. W. W. Reece, Q.C., Solicitor
    General, prosecuted for the Crown.
    Mr. (3, B. Niles represented Black-
    ett.

    The Prosecution called five wit-
    esses,

    n

    Dr. Colim Vaughn said that he
    exami.ned Harewood on August 12
    when she was brought to the
    hospital. She had a two = inch
    wound on her chest, one behind
    herndeft eor, one on the left fore-
    arm and one on the left calf. Ali
    the wounds required § .'‘iches.
    They were nét wounds whicn
    vould endanger life, but he would
    not call them trivial because some
    were very long. +

    Cross «examined he said that he
    examinea Blackett the same day.
    She had two lacerations on het
    face,

    Harewood said that
    Blackett and she were not on
    friendly terms for many years.
    They used to work in the same
    cane field together and the un-
    friendliness arose because Black-
    ett suspected that she told others
    something concerning her.

    On August 12 they were home at
    Sargeant Street, St. John, about
    7 p.m. when she heard a noise
    outside. She went out and discov-

    ered that some children were
    quarrelling. She held her child
    and was going home when she

    was struck in her back with a
    stone. Blackett then came to her
    and held her. They started to
    fight and Blackett cut her with a
    knife on the chest, behind her
    left ear, on her left forearm and
    on her left calf. i

    Cross-examined she said that

    a week later, She >.4 once been
    fined 40/- for cutting her own
    child, once for wounding someone
    else, once for throwing water on
    another person, and had been
    fined for beating Blackett. Her re-
    puted husband had also been fined
    for beating Blackett,

    Tried To Stop Fight

    Joseph Bancroft said he was the
    reputed husband of Harewood.
    When the fight occurred on August
    12, he tried to stop it, but one of
    Blackett’s sons knocked him down
    with a stone,

    Cross examined he said he had
    been fined for wounding Blackett
    He denied having a knife durin
    the fight or having exclaim
    after the fight that he had acci-
    dentally cut his reputed wife, tak-

    her for Blackett because of

    ing
    the darkness.
    Helena Harewood, Audine’s sis-

    n ter, said that she tried to stop the

    fight and Blackett also cut her.
    Cross-examined she said that she
    had twice been fined for beating
    people,
    Cpl. Garfield Sargeant said thgt
    Harewood and Blackett had given
    over each other.

    Blackett gave evidence in her
    own defence. She said Audine
    Harewood beat her and after the
    scuffle they had on the ground,
    she heard Harewood's reputed
    husband exclaim that he fad ac-
    cidentally cut Harewood when at-
    tempting to cut her.
    that

    Cross-¢xamined she said

    Audine Harewood threw her to
    the ground and lay over her. It
    was then that she was cut.




    3

    Doubtless
    You will
    require some
    Replacements

    and
    Additions
    for
    both Table
    and Kitchen
    use

    This. is
    where We

    We have a
    complete

    range of

    } all the
    Requisite

    Items,

    Try US first
    for all
    Your

    Requirements





    Hardware Store

    Tels, 3142 & 2364

    she was not detained at the hose
    pital on account of the wounds
    and the stitches were ‘taken out





    Home with

    “SILVER STAR"
    ~CONGOLEUM

    The Floor. Covering in many

    Netly Blackett, her daughter,
    said that she saw Audine _Hare-
    wood and Joseph Bancroft beat
    her mother and saw Bancroft with
    a knife in his pocket before the
    fight started. ‘

    Mr. Niles said that he was not
    denying that the fight occurred or
    that Audine Harewood was cut,
    but it was for the jury to decide
    who cut her. It was evident that
    there had been a big family fight
    and that Audine Harewood was a
    woman accustomed to being con-
    victed for jighting. The jury could
    searcely do otherwise than come

    Lovely Coiours!

    to the conclusion that Audine

    Harewood’s reputed husband hae

    cut Audine accidentally in the

    darkness. AND
    The jury found Blackett guilty

    of wounding Harewood,

    Diamond Rings
    LOUIS L. BAYLEY

    So EASY

    To









    Bolton Lane
    ! CLEAN!
    GUTS THAT ARE
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    eather Novelties with the
    Crest of Barbados. Just the
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    pore atone eee RICKETT STREET (Opposite Post Office) — PHONE 4918
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    Gents’ Tray Purse : |

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    with the Map of Barbados (
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    Handbag Mirror with Col-
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    + Also Attractive Gift Sets

    ‘









    EXHIBITION



    SEE OUR WONDERFUL
    RANGE OF DRESS
    MATERIALS Including —

    WHITE SHARKSKIN @
    $1.86, $2.32 & $2.46 per yd.
    COLOURED SHARKS KIN $2.09 per yd.

    !
    | in Pacific Blue, Surf Acqua, Lavender
    Grey, Smoke B!uc, Champagne

    PLAIN ROMAINE G
    $1.50, $1.80 & $2.16 per yd.
    PLAIN SEA ISLAND COTTON
    at $2.30 per yd.
    in White, Bamboo, Biue
    FLOWERED SEA ISLAND COTTON @
    $2.58, $4.08, $4,83 per yd.
    PLAIN CREPES .......... @ $1.08 per yd.
    | WHITE & COLOURED EMBROIDEREr
    ANGLAISE @ $4.78, $4.88, $4.63, $4.34,
    $4.45 & $4.52 per yd,

    WHITE & COLOURED EMBROIDERED
    ORGANDIE @ $3.63, $3.95 & $4.76 per yd.
    EMBROIDERED MUSLIN @ $5.33 per yd.

    |
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    CAVE SHEPHERD & Co., Ltd |

    12,

    OO, tt. 13 Broad Street.









    LL nasneneesetnennseen

    WHAT'S ON TODAY

    Court of Grand Sessions
    Meeting, St. Lucy Vestry
    Police Band Concert, Princess

    10.00 a

    3.00 p

    Alice Playing Field 7.45 p
    Meeting of Alliance Fran-
    calse, B.C 8.00 p

    â„¢m



    Por the cause that lacks assistance,

    Gainst the wrongs that need resistance,

    For the future in the distance,
    And the good that I can do



    Maintenance

    ESTABLISHED 1895



    Commonwealth Sugar | Republican’
    Agreement Incentive | Policy To Be

    To Greater

    (From Our Own Correspondent)

    Provision made under the Commonwealth 2
    Agreement for meeting the requirements of Canada is
    referred to by Mr. G. Vernon Tate, M.C., Chairman of

    Caroni in his annual report

    “The importance of maintaining a Canadian market for
    Empire sugar producers needs little emphasis”, he tells

    shareholders. “It is in fact

    British West Indian producers because quite apart from

    traditional ties which have
    tially an expanding market.

    Jamaica |
    Will Raise
    New Loan |

    (From Qur Own Correspondent)
    KINGSTON, J’ca., Nov. 19.

    The Governor announced in a
    message to the House of Repre-
    sentatives to-day that Govern-
    ment intended at the earliest
    favourable opportunity to raise a
    new loan in the London market!
    for Jamaican development. Funds
    raised from the last loan in
    London now are nearly all spent
    and many development schemes
    are in operation or in preparation
    to be financed.

    The Colonial Office has advised
    Jamaica not to expect to raise
    more than £3,500,000 in London
    this time and the intention is to
    raise that amount as early next
    year as conditions on the London
    market make it advisable to
    invite publie subscription.

    The Governor said this im-
    mediate loan was a temporary
    measure pending full considera-
    tion of a large scale loan pro-
    gramme against the background
    of the report of the World Bank
    mission which recently visited
    the island.

    Politician
    (From Our Own Correspondent)

    * KINGSTON, Noy. 18.
    Florizel Glasspole, British
    T.U.C, trained General Secretary
    of the National Workers Union

    and Parliamentary Secretary of
    the People’s Nationa] Party oppo-





    sition in the Jamaica House of
    Representatives was suspended
    from his services in the House

    today for six weeks on a motion
    by Ken Hill, head of the Jamaica
    T.U.C. and one time P.N.P.
    leader who was ousted in March
    on charges of being a Communist.

    The motion followed a verbal
    battle between both members in
    the House when Hill charged that
    P.N.P. administration in Kingston |
    was corrupt and Glasspcote replied
    naming Hill a Communist. The!
    Speaker ordered the withdrawal |
    of the epithet and Glasspole re-
    fused. |

    Jamaica Labour party members |
    led by Mr. Bustamante voted in
    support of Hill’s motion after the |

    Discussed

    _. NEW YORK, Nov. 19.
    _ President-elect Eisenhower will
    miscuss with Senator Robert A.
    Taft today the composition of the
    new _ Republican Administration
    and Legislative programme.

    Mr. Eisenhower,
    here late yesterday from his
    Washington meeting with Presi-
    dent Truman was certain to get
    a lot of advice before the day was
    over. Senator Taft. Chairman of
    the Republican Policy Committee
    and Representative Joseph W
    Martin jnr, prospective Speaker
    cf the New House of Representa-
    tives, were to be his first callers
    ft 11.00 am. E.S.T. Later in the
    cay Mr. Eisenhower will meet
    with Senator Styles Bridges, Sen-

    Production:

    LONDON, Oct. 19.
    Sugar

    today.

    who arrived

    of paramount importance to

    long existed Canada is poten-
    ”

    Mr. Tate says that apart from
    providing some security for the
    future, the Commonwealth Sugar
    Agreement is an encouragement
    towards greater Empire produc-

    ‘tion. “For our part”, he adds, “we]|ator Alexander Wiley and other
    are sparing no effort to increase}key Republicans, Senators Taft
    output and improve efficiency”. and Martin will talk over the
    Thie brighter note is tempered|Legislative programme during} brane
    with words of caution, however,|their conference with Mr, EKisen- ;
    for Mr, Tate has to inform share-] bower. Presumably Senator Taft
    holders that prospects for 1953 are} ‘\Y ll also discuss with Mr, Eisen-|
    ladversely affected by the severe|Ower the men he has recom-
    crop time weather of 1951 when mended for the Cabinet. Senator
    heavy rain fell almost throughout| Taft told a news conference in

    Washington yesterday that he had
    given Mr, Eisenhower some Cab-
    inet recommendations at the Pres-
    ident-elect’s request. Senator Taft
    emphasized that ha did not know
    whether the men recommended
    would be appointed and there was
    no indication here that Mr, Eisen-
    hower was ready yet to make any

    the reaping season. The planting
    programme was upset and _ it
    seems certain that the 1953 crop
    will be smaller than this year’s
    which constituted a record for the
    company.

    The consolidated net profit at
    £204,927 represents an increase of
    £150,873 over the profit for the



    / firm commitments on Cabinet
    previous year. posts.—U.P. ,
    Subject to confirmation at the
    Annual Meeting in London on
    December 10 a dividend of two- + e
    mce per two shilling unit of U t d Sta
    Hock will be paid. This is. tho|‘ Me } tes

    game as for the last six years.
    National
    Necessity

    | Stands Firm

    UNITED NATIONS, New York,
    Nov, 19.

    ._ The United States is standing
    firm against mounting pressure
    from Western Allies to accept
    India’s plan for ending the Korean
    war. A serious rift appeared in the
    making as the Committee of eight
    countries met secretly for the third
    time in an effort to reconcile the
    Indian proposition with the United
    States peace resolution plan on the
    ground that it gives no assurance
    that war pisoners will not be
    forced to return to their home-
    lands Krishna Menon is sche-
    duled to expound the Indian plan
    fully to the Political Committee
    when it meets at 3.00 p.m. E.S.T,

    today.
    —U.P.

    ‘ ALGIERS, Nov. 19.
    Opening the regular session of
    the Algerian Assembly yesterday,
    French Governor General Roger |
    Leonard said, “France’s presence
    in North Africa is a national
    necessity on which we will not
    bargain.” France’s achievements
    in the social, cultural and economic
    field speak for themselves. France
    waits for examples of those who
    criticise her. She needs no less-
    sons, Mr. Leonard said, in refer-
    ence to Asiatic nations’ criticisms

    of French rule in North oe

    —U-P.



    New Government

    ATHENS, Nov. 19.
    The new government of Premier
    Alexander Papagos was sworn in
    today and the Chief of the Greek
    Joint General Staff and three
    senior aides resigned Bok, poate.
    —U.P.

    RUSSIAN JAILED FOR |

    DEFECTIVE APPARATUS |
    MOSCOW, Nov. 19. |

    A factory director has been sent]
    to prison for eight years for pro-

    By JOSE
    The Berlin-Soviet zone

    to reliable reports reaching

    ducing defective medical appar-;
    atus, the Soviet Government: 0 ae 3 Nei ] ;
    newspaper Izvestia reported to- Government is frantically



    Speaker had named Glasspole. |

    PREPARING FOR DRILLING

    day,—U.P. blame it on.



    BARBADOS GULF OIL CO., LTD, are carrying out preparations for drilling at a site roughly half way

    between Turner’s Hall and Swans Factory.

    choosing a spot for a firm founda



    WASHINGTON, Nev. 19

    & tidal wave of speculation
    swept over this capital as to the
    significance of the National elec-
    tion results in terms of world pol-
    icy and there are indications that
    a great struegle may be develop-
    ing between Internationalists and
    mintive] Nat



    lative ionalist elemen

    With the revelation that the
    majority f the publi vanted
    “change” the real implications of

    © be defined.
    t be
    is

    the “change” ¢
    The devel
    tween Inte

    ti







    At present the location is being cleared with a view to

    tion.

    Here the D-8 Caterpillar is seen in action while the men (left) are preparing holes*for dynamiting.

    What Will Mr. Eisenhower's Policy Be?

    lieve budgetary retrenchment and, and election was hailed as marking
    reduced taxation should become | as@endancy of the global view point,
    the primary objective of the new | But the post-election situation in-
    government licated that basic differences be-
    tween the two purty wings are still














    I nple tetrns the questic w

    {11 simple ; he question will|far from being reconciled Mi
    be whether the United States Eisenhower personally has not yet
    strengthens it res ? 1a 5 oly
    i 1g 4 ade post-electior ytementts that
    leader :
    Wuinteas. 4 *| will clarify political opinion on his
    i : | International programme

    p ! pre vably would

    t é dd com hensively in
    ta the al addre January 20
    tk t ( > ¢

    etween “In-
    U.F

    Barbados





    THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1952.

    Of Canadian Ma. :
    Important To BWI Sugar Producers|

    | Chinese Attacks |
    Hurled Back |

    Allied troops in hand to hand battles hurled back
    three heavy Chinese Communists attacks last night and
    today against “The Hook”—# vital mainiand ridge guard-

    ing the western invasion
    fighting to the Western fre

    behind heavy artillery barrages.

    > metagenome ee ene

    However U.N, defenders rose
    up from their trenches and fox
    holes to hurl back Reds with
    | bayonets and fists. The Hook is
    ;a long rolling ridgeline shaped
    like its name north east of the
    truce village of Panmunjom justi
    south of the -38th parallel. It is}
    ;Only 20 miles from Seoul.

    The Chinese first attacked at 9
    | Pm. Tuesday rushing pellmell
    jthrough nine fields of barbed
    | wire, It took Allied soldiers three}

    {hours of closé quarter fighting to|cil which faile? to elect a 1952—
    that assault. At 1.15 a.m./1953 Mayor
    again apparently under | statutory
    at alljresolution this afternoon to meet

    ' Reds tried
    ;*rders to seize the hill
    costs. Again U.N,
    | off the Reds,

    ; Assault Broken

    that, fighting became
    }and ended at 8.10 a.m,
    ‘troops then sent

    the area.

    Marines holding the position,
    Marines beat off the attacks
    causing heavy losses to Reds who
    at one point breached the Allied
    main line, |

    In the central and eastern see-
    tor of the front temperature
    dropped to 8 degress above zéro
    Fahrenheit. A hand grenade duel
    broke out in a sector on the
    eastern front costing
    Koreans 30 killed or

    a brief Red probe.
    Allied
    115

    to Communist front lines,
    Superforts bombed Red
    Manchurian

    the border

    damaged 13 Red M.1.G.-15’s in
    aerial duels Monday and Tues-
    day.

    —U.P.



    East Berliners Face
    ‘Food Searece Winte

    FLEMING
    BERLIN, Nov. 19.
    cupboard is almost bare and

    East Germans appear to be facing a bleak winter according

    West Berlin. The reports said

    the food shortage is growing worse and the Communist

    searching for a scapegoat to
    , were standing in

    had run out. Ford riots were said

    | to have broken out recently at
    jSeattered points in the Soviet
    |Zone. Statements of Communist

    'leaders and propaganda announce-
    ments of the East Zone Press pin
    ;Shortages on to such essentials as
    meat, potatoes, sugar, butter and!
    | fats,





    Will Try Again
    To Elect Mayor

    soldiers drove} again
    make another
    The resolution followed the read-
    ing of the opinion of Mr,
    nays, City Corporation's counsel,
    The final attack began at 4,10}4hat
    jaum. Wednesday. Allies broke the/Saturday and that the question
    assault in a 40 minute fight. After|whether the matter could not be
    sporadic | reconsidered until the expiration
    (Allied}ef six months did not arise be-
    out patrols to| cause
    search for any Reds lurking in| e'ecting a Mayor had. not been
    discharged.
    The last big battle on’ “The}advised that the Couneil may by
    Hook” took place October 27, 28) resolution, fix a new date for the
    when 3,000 Chinese attacked U\S.}e'oction of a Mayor.

    Northjservatives more than maintained
    wounded, | their Parllamentar
    United Nations also threw back] gin last night in the

    light bombers “bein

    5 Cormurdst toucks,.b ey -ap
    Winter supplies and ammunition} the decisive sdecha reading of the

    B-29/ Bill restoring Britain's nationaliz-
    supply | ed
    centres at Sonchon 35 miles from} ownership. Conservatives also in-
    and a/tend to denationalize the iron and
    target five miles south of Sariwon.| steel indusffries, but the battle on
    U.S. fighter pilots shot down or|those issues is to come tater.

    representative stating the ‘French
    Army attacked civilians in Casa-
    blanca who were celebrating the
    anniversary of the Sultan’s ac-
    cession to the throne,

    the peaceful crowd smashing por-
    traits of the Sultan and removing
    all equipment set up in
    It said East German housewives{tion for the celebration, t
    line for hours [venting
    | to get food only to be told supplies }taking place.”

    SEOUL, Nov. 19.

    » tq Seoul. In a swift shift of
    the hill three times

    ‘City Council





    (From Our Own Correspondent)

    PORT-OF-SPAIN, Nov. 19.
    The Port-of-Spain City Coun-

    at last Saturday's
    meeting, agreed by

    Thursday afternoon to
    bid to elect one.

    Han~«
    Train”

    Dr. Adenauer
    Out Voted On }
    Treaty Issue |

    BONN, Nov,

    no elected



    Mayor was

    the statutory duty of

    Mr, Hannays_ also

    19,



    Chancellor Konrad Adenauer; south
    @ began repairing his splintered
    ictory political fences in an attempt to
    win ratification of the West
    German Peace Treaty and the Jag

    For Tories

    LONDON, Nov. 19
    Prime Minister Churchill’s Con-

    |Kuropean Army
    Christmas recess,
    Adenauer = suffered
    political defeat of
    when his usual “automatic ;
    majority’ in Bonn Parliament |
    collapsed and his motion to ratify»

    Pact before the
    Yesterday
    the
    his

    voting mar-~-
    first crucial
    fest of their drive to roll back
    Socialist legislation passed by the
    rrevious Labour House of Com-
    ais: approved ’-308—~

    feated by 19 to 16 votes. Mr.
    Adenauer was defented by
    normally pro-Government Depu-
    ties who either voted with the
    Socialists and Communists against !
    his motion or simply disappeared
    when the voting bells rang. Lat
    last night Mr. Adenauer called a
    caucus of his Christian Democratic
    Union Deputies in an attempt t
    determine what went wren
    —UP.

    trucking industry to private

    —C.P,





    jinjured
    Viarseilles express hurtled out
    the night, ploughed into the rear
    ars

    he

    employees.

    the
    }

    }
    he

    the

    The



    a eqtipment for the Company is being stored
    he labourers are standing on one of the stee! landing mats which was used to make the road
    which leads from the public highway on to the beach-head,

    when

    the

    PRICE: FIVE CENTS
    (LEARI

    YESTERDAY'S WEATHER REPORT

    Moon:

    ne ali trom Codri@f#ton: Prt
    » & ‘etal Rainfall for ma@@h to date: 2.24 in
    Highest Te rature? $5 °F
    Lowest Temperature F
    Wind Velocity 8 mil@® per hour
    a) Barometer (9 a.m. 29,808 «3 pur 20.757
    : TO-DAY
    Sunrise: 6.00 a.m
    Sunset: 5.32 p.m







    New, November 17

    Lighting: 6.60 p. 7
    High Tide: 6.21 a.m., 6.37 p.m
    Low Tide; 11.25 p.m



    REACH ROAD



    HERE LABOURERS clear the beach road at Trents Beach, St. James, for the heavy Mack Truck of
    Barbados Guif Oi! Co., Ltd., which is loaded with a 25-ton draw-works, to drive on to the highway.

    at a warehouse at Bromefield, St, Lucy.

    swift

    French President's | U.S. Should
    Wife Eseapes Death

    SAINT ROBERT D’ALBON, France, Nov. 19.

    The wife and son of the French President and hundreds

    of other sleeping passengers miraculously escaped death
    or injury early today when a crack all Pullman “Blue
    ploughed into the rear of a freight train,
    One person was killed and eight
    Paris-

    of

    of a freight train and jumped

    tracks

    All nine

    President and their

    accident

    France

    of Lyons
    had pulled out of Lyons station at

    shortly

    freight train was
    the treaties next week was de--in shifting operations when the
    long heavy “Blue” roared out of
    the night and ploughed into



    were railroad

    VMacdame Vincent Auriol wife of

    on Paul

    33

    for

    ‘were aboard the luxury train when
    happened miles

    after

    it

    twenty minutes after midnight,
    The one fatality was identified
    ticket collector
    leeping car company. Traffic was
    Mr.\ completely blocked on the line
    worst {the double tracked main link down
    career ithe Rhone Valley through Central

    the

    engagod

    it,

    UP.

    Steamship

    Runs Aground

    NANIMO, British Columbia,

    Fi h T) , Nov, |
    rence roop S Il Ik A six-thousand ton Canadian
    nie 3 ugar a Ss Pacific passenger steamship of
    ac Nanimo smashed a refuelling sta-
    All k Civilians Postponed tion, reduced seven small boats
    UNITED NATIONS, to kindling and poked her bow

    NEW YORK, Nov. 19.

    (From Our Own Correspondent)

    Ministry and Empire Sugar Pro-
    ducers has been postponed for 24
    hours. Empire sugar men _ will
    now see the Ministry tomorrow
    afternoon when the discussion on
    1953 crop price will be resumed.

    It is hopeq that meetings will
    be concluded this week.

    Mr. McCowan has made a pro-
    visional plane booking to return
    to Trinidad on Sunday. Mr. Cuke
    as made a provisional booking
    for Monday.

    —UP.
    — 220,800 To Hel
    Bertrand Russell lee Shum pe
    Te Be Married |

    French troops savagely dispersed

    repara-

    us ES
    the celebration rom





    rom Gur Own Correspondent) {
    LONDON, Nov. 19. | ANTIGUA, Nov, 19 |
    Bertrand Russell, 80, philoso-; ‘To-day at Government House |

    | The seriousness of the situation pher, announced his engagement ©n the occasion of presentation
    |was pointed up by the fact that!to Miss Edith Finch, daughter of of prizes for the 1952 Garden|
    he recent Cabinet session of the}Edwatd Bronson Finch of New Competition, His Excellency Sir!
    Red Government was devoted al-| York City in a paid advertisement Kenneth Blackburne announced
    most exclusively to the food sup-|in the Times, Then Mr, Russell that a telegram was received!
    ply problem, After the session,|took the phone off the hook at his’ which he felt was a result that
    “firm measures” were ordered to}*4burban house so he would not be London is aware that the peopl: t
    combat the shortages. However bothered by callers, Nor would of Antigua now have a_ better
    Reds appeared to be having 4 anyone in the house answer the erderstanding and are deter-
    difficult time firiding someone. to ace. pall: U.P. ae bs Bee to can thas th

    vle > . . 4 | —OU.P. am O say a i
    blame for. the situation. | Setretary of State has approved

    Premier Otto Grotewohl told the

    cebines it was the fault of “hos-
    tile

    i Captalist elements in the
    Supply Ministry.” The Central
    Committee of the Communist

    Party attributed the shortages 10
    “sabotage” and the official Gov-
    ernment news service A.D.N, said
    West German “smugglers” were
    responsible.

    The biame also is placed almosi
    daily by the Communist Press on
    “big farmers who fail to meet
    delivery quotas.” In Communist
    Jargon a big farmer is anyone
    who Owns more than 45 acres of
    | land,
    | Western officials believe this
    Red explanation probably comes
    closest to the truth. They said
    shortages are the direct result of
    {farmer resistance to Communist
    jfand confiscation and collectiviza-
    | tion policies.

    There are other signs that ail
    is not well with Soviet zone econ-
    omy. A Communist spokesman
    admits that both coal and machine



    tool production is running behind |

    quotas in the year’s economic plan.
    Power shortages forced

    have

    many factories to run on reduced |

    schedule
    freight

    Delays and shortage;
    and locomotives
    are reported in Eastern railroad

    cars





    Even onions are scaree. Joke

    swept East Germany recently that

    . nion shortage caused by

    tr to the

    te . ory rates
    U.P

    os at better prices.—U.P.

    1
    |
    |



    Va grant of $220,800 enabling the
    ‘government to tackle the city’s 4

    Gonvicts Subdued

    ==

    _largest and most densely popu- |);
    JACKSON, Michigan, Nov. 19. | lated slum known as Garlings1}}
    this} Land. The 1948 local govern-

    The third major uprisin, }
    year at Southern Michigan Hrson, ment purchased this abominable
    the world’s largest walled peni-! unsightly area but owing to lack
    tentiary, ended last night with|of funds, congestion was unre-
    rioting convicts subdued by shot- lieved”.
    gun and machine gun fire, Rioting|
    broke out in the mess hall at sup-|
    per time and for a while 2,200
    convicts were involved; some had!

    knives and clubs No one was}



    Newsman Dies

    wounded ,—(C.P.) | NEW YORK, Nov. 19.

    |. Louis F. Keemle, editor of

    {United Press Mail and Feature|

    {service died Wednesday in the

    |} Park East Hospital. He was 54

    Keemle was at his desk through
    |



    Sausage Racket

    WELLINGTON, Noy. 19. jlast week. Saturday night he
    Sausage meat shipments to developed severe abdominal
    Britain, alleged ‘to have developed | paitis and on Sunday was taken
    into a “racket” threatening the | to hospital for an operation.
    British meat ration, will be limited | Surgeons diagnosed his ailment
    to 2,000 toms this season jt was'as Pancreatitis The veterart
    announced today. British press re-|editor and writer had been with
    portg quoted here said that whole | U.P. since 1926 when he resigned
    New Zealand carcases were being|@§ news editor of the
    inced and shipped as sausage | Post—U.P.

    Baltimore



    BRAZILIAN LEGATION

    | IN TEHERAN TO CLOSE
    | RIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil, Nov ¥
    The newspaper “Tribuna

    aoe said yesterday



    Five Arrested

    TUNIS, Nov.



    19
    Police said five Tunisian Nation-

    ; attémpts had been made
    alists accused of sabotage and|fack Sergio Correa Do
    arson have been arrested

    e accused of setting fire to Neftas | and that Presider

    t Ge
    G

    tulid Var 3} ))

    "0

    78 miles

    £ to i \
    Lago, Bra-|
    They|zilian Charge D’Affaires in Irat
    nn
    )

    outh of here] has ordered the Teherat

    —U.P. | closed.—(C.P.)

    ——

    some 400 passengers
    aboard,
    jured in the mishap, An estimate
    of the damage to vessel and shore
    inst» llations
    available.

    No one

    is

    U.P.

    EMPIRE RED WINE




    w

    not

    aN
    aL ee ee,

    GILBEY

    A

    ashore behind the Post Office last

    The Moroccan Democtatie party LONDON, Nov. io, | Sight when her reverse engine

    |for independence Wednesday said} The meeting scheduled to tak: Pei ta tok inane
    lace to-day | » Food | Proa : SOmIpIG

    it received a cable from its Tangier} Place to-day between the Fooc her run from Vandobvar with

    and crewmen
    killed

    in-

    immediately

    Lower Trade
    | Barriers

    NEW YORK, Nov. 19.
    President Truman in a message
    to the National Foreign Trade

    Convention Wednesday night
    strongly urged the U.S. ta lowe:
    to help defeat
    fortifving the

    its tariff barriers
    Communism by
    world’s economy)

    Mr. Truman said the
    tions must “find a way to earn
    their own way in the world”

    ittout big scale aid from Amer-
    ico. His message read at the :
    World Trade dinner said
    “T don't believe T have
    for

    tree na-

    nnual
    in part
    iter, ize
    you Kremlins new blueprint
    for success—Stalin’s belief is
    the West will fail to Solve its
    trade and economic problems and
    will fall to fighting within itself

    to

    that

    However J wish to point t that

    the free world’s long range eco-
    nomic progress will be possible
    only if its member nations find
    ways to earn their own’ way li

    the world and to assure a decent
    standard of living to their people
    It must be able to do this with-
    out large scale outside aid from
    Vite. 1.8. Lf. the rest of the tree
    world on the one hand can increase
    jis production, curb inflation . .
    and keep the prices of its products
    competitive, and the United States
    on the other hand reduces its bar-
    riers to trade they will show up
    Stalin’s lie.
    The President's message said it

    is to the benefit of Ameri te

    encourage trade with other nation

    and improvements in those nations
    fichtiy



    people
    an empty
    said

    expect to find
    Communism on
    ach”

    living standards, “We can’t alway
    tom-

    his message —U.P



    Light Earthquake

    TOKYO, Novy. 19
    Office buildings swayed when a
    light earthquake shook Tokyo to-
    day, The Central Meteorological
    Office said it Was a local shock and
    caused no damage

    —Ur.



    ee Re et ae oe

    Gilbeys |

    —_

    lad

    od

    aah

    Le ai a







    Maintains
    the same high
    Standard
    of Quality as
    shipped to the
    West Indies
    for the past
    fifty years

    ee

    a I
    ee

    en tn

    & H

    *

    (

    GARDINER AUSTING CL?
    ~——en AGOHEE =





    45

    F’
    €
    WJ







    PAGE TWO

    SPs sees tv





    S. CARROLL
    « € ‘ y sat the
    Elders Fyffes S.S. Goljsito from
    En ri
    L c e to take uf
    ntme Me >al Officer
    of the Bar € Hospital
    Born in Ma as educated
    at K Schoc Canterbury in
    Kent ti medicine at St
    Ba mew Hospital, London
    where he ualified about eighteen
    Prior to coming out

    to Barbados

    pital

    he held various hos-
    in England and also did







    some private practice.

    Dr, and.Mrs. Carroll both saw
    service durfig the war. Dr. Car-
    roll after being trained with the
    R.A.F, in Arizona as a pilot, served
    in the Middle East while his wife
    was with the Women’s R.A,F, in
    G t Britain on an operational
    s iron, She was born in Wales

    d is very fond of music.
    Dr. Carroll too, is fond of music
    in addition to sailing.

    Fourth Visit

    ar

    N RS. EDWIN W. LANCASTER
    of New Jersey, U.S.A. who
    arrived in T idad on October 7
    in the Moore MacCormack Liner

    Argentina and spent a week there
    is now in Barbados on her fourth
    ter visit, She arrived here on
    iday in.the French S.S, Colom-
    from Trinidad after spending



    a month's holiday at the Blue Ha-
    ven Hotel in Tobago.

    Mrs, Lancaster said that she
    lived in California for several

    years and this summer, she spent



    two n hs there with her brother
    Mr. iward Schroeder of the
    Frozen Food Co., in order to get
    away from the heat wave in New
    York. She is a guest at the Marine
    Hotel, 1

    With Barclays Bank
    ETURNING to Grenada yes-
    terday afternoon by B.W.LA,

    was Mr, F, E, Randall of Barclays

    Bank, St. .George’s who spent

    about ten days’ holiday as a guest

    at the Hotel Royal,
    Originally from England, Mr.

    Randall has been working in Gren-

    ada for ove. three years. He ex-



    Carib Calling



    U.S. Visiter Likes Enjoyed Visit
    Barbados M® R. A. J. GOODE, Director |
    MES. EDITH BUNDY, an ; 7, ° British Colansse Overses
    I American who had been vis- LAd., London, who is in the West
    iting Italy, France and England, Indies on a goodwill visit to the
    arrived here on Saturday by the various agencies left yesterday

    evening by B.W.1.A, for Trinidad

    S.S, Gotfito from the U.K. and will .
    : via Grenada after a week in Bar-

    probably spend three months’ holi-

    day. She is a guest of Lady Stow bados,.as a guest at the Hotel
    of Highgate, Upper Collymore Royal, ‘ "
    Rock Leaving by the same opportunity

    for Trinidad was Mr. J. D. #orbes-
    Watson, Overseas Representative
    af Roneo Ltd., London, who was |
    also in Barbados for a week as a
    guest at the Hotel Royal.

    Mr, Forbes-Watson came out on

    Mrs. Bundy spent three weeks in
    Barbados two years ago and iiked
    it so much that she has now
    turned for a longer period.

    Vravel Agent Leaves

    re-

    R. KARL TAUSIG of Messrs. a tour of the Caribbean, South and : esti high

    Paul Tausig and Sons, Travel Central America, in the interest of |
    Agents of New York City, left for his company and has already cov- |



    Trinidad last night by B.W.I.A, on ered the Caribbean. He expects |» are offered wider scope.in whieh Philip and have already felt the
    his way back home. He was ac- to return home in about six months, ||", (Hin suecess and = pleasure. The henefits of modernisation, are
    companied by his wife and they Mr, Goode and Mr, Forbes-Wat-!}..ve not triad? hofarae oaee Yon Shaw farm in the Home Park
    had spent a ehest heater here as son said that they thoroughly en- | f:voured. "and Norfolk farm in the Great
    guests at the St. Lawrence Hotel. joyed their first visit to Barbados | : Park. F
    Mr. Tausig attended the recent both from the business and social | p,)) 5% “2,,t0 JUMY 28 (Cancer)—In-
    World Travel Congress in Miami, point of view. |inveetments, improved. promoting,..ad- 1ntroduction of combine har-
    Florida and since then visited Assistant Economic | vertising, handling general commodities. vesters and other equipment con-
    Chile, Peru, Argentine, Brazil, Advi: Pe extra tactful at home tributed largely to one of the
    Uruguay and Trinidad before com- f viser t JULY % to AUGUST 2% (Leo)—Some
    ing to Barbados. ie RD. A. PERCIVAL, Assistant | unexpected advar especially from history of the estates.
    Leaving To-day Economic Adviser to the) investments, deals you have worked out
    ISS JESSIE THOMPSON of Comptroller for Developnient and | ?”l%,, £0", Such © Period. Rate poten Staff Impressed
    Toronto, Canada, leaves this Welfare has just returned from |
    morning by’ B.W.LA. for Puerto -Tinidad by B.W.LA, after attend-| AUGUST 28 to SEPTEMBER 2% (Virge) Soon after he was appointed
    . oa ‘ i i Cc ider all angle before vaking
    Rico on her way back home after 128 4 Committee Meeting of ‘the | (cone gel aire not to. overlook

    Caribbean Commission at Kent
    House,

    Grenada Businessman

    R. ARNOLD WILLIAMSON, |

    Managing Director of Wil-
    liamson and Co., Ltd., Automobile |
    Proprietors of St. George’s, Gren-/|
    ada, returned home earlier in the |
    week by B.W.LA, after a two-week |

    an enjoyable week’s holiday in
    Barbados as a guest at the Marine
    Hotel.

    Miss Thompson jis employed with
    the Manufacturers Life Insurance
    Company in Toronto,

    On Short Visit
    R,
    Mx

    COLIN THOMAS, Branch





    BARBADOS ADVOCATE



    Prince Philip
    Brings 1952 Touch
    To Estates



    MODERNISATJON of equip-
    ment and buildings on the Royal
    _— ‘ estates at Windsor is going on
    YOUR INDIVIDUAL HOROSCOP: ’ : ;
    DUAL HOROSCOPE under the personal direction of
    LOR THURSDAY, NOVEMBER %, wae Prince Philip. The latest place
    dealt with is the Prince Consort’s
    LOOK in the sectior which : ; » Gres :
    birthaay comes and find what your Workshop in the Great Park.
    outiooke..is, according to th. “Zhe workshop, typically Vic-
    tegian, has been provided with
    un eee te — ee (Aries)—A ry. modern convenience, in-
    1 ‘ yspects " best ’ ; . ’ eH
    give you nanan to “take “otodhs ‘noes cluding fitted wash basins (witit
    lerroms. Don't stép into others’ shoes hot and cold laid on).

    if you shouldn't, nor advise out of turn,

    Outside improvements have also

    APRIL %1 to MAY 2% (Tavrus)—'Things, D@@n started at the -workshop,
    may look better, but this may. be’ and workers are now tidying up
    eceptive. Wark on metters further, g large yard.

    general indications. Hold your

    “Other places in

    MAY 21 to JUNE 21 (Geminl)—To-day Which have been visited by Prince











    achievement by being over-conservative
    or too positive Personal interests rate
    high

    am, office previously held by the
    ‘t King—Prince Philip made a

    c
    He went into the workings of



    Celene hae -_ at glee * each farm and workshop and im-
    of-road day in most matters. Exett pressed the staff with his knowl-

    without strain and you can have good

    edge of farming.
    results. Concentrate on essentials. 8 " 8

    OCTOBER %4 *to Novemper Later visits by the Prince have



    anager of Messrs J. . ; Sot : (Scorpie)—You may tend to worry over been “snap” ones. Sometimes he
    Harriman and Co., Ltd., left for Hog =f visit. He was accompanied |cjouds. Don't! Look for the good about has driven himself in a
    Trinidad on Monday by B.W.1.A. oy Ne. “then ont they were | you and for success from worthy effort. Galioned across the fields on his
    on a short visit. . A ft pe Me, Saker ere, -. | NOVEMBER 23 to DECEMBER 2 bay mare,
    Ki ize ne ‘ormer member of the Legis-| (ci pittart Ambit sn't quite —L.E.S:
    or The Winter oy BS, : 7 Sagittarius) mbition isn quite .E.S.
    ; lative and Executive Councils of| enough to carry things through to
    R. R, MYER, a retired com- Grenada, Mr, Williamson attend-|cesired success: Increase knowledge,
    pany director of England and ed the B.T.C, Autumn Meeting | ¢uality of effort. Avoid conflict with

    his wife, the Hon’ble Mrs, Myer While in Barbados,
    who arrived by the Golfito on First Visit

    Saturday are guests at Enmore ISS ROMANA ROGERS of
    Hotel. They have come to spend Herren, Rogers Travel Ser-

    their usual winter holidays. vice, Lynbrook, Loug Island, U.S.A.
    Civil Aviation ‘ Chief was an arrival by B.W.1.A, from |



    nssociates.

    corn)
    be ready for those unexpected chi
    Advantages may be spotty but be ere



    LISTENING
    HOURS

    NOVEMBER

    DECEMBER 2% to JANUARY 21 (Capri-
    Hover pround the ha





    ful for any benefits.

    JANUARY 2 to FEBRUARY 2 | THURSDAY, -
















    ‘ : : ; U.S.A. via Puerto Rico on 17th | (Aquarius)—Aspects stress sensible cur- 4-06.00 Pm Soe eae ee "
    pects to fo ‘ome on ak meye ING-COMMANDER L, A. inst. and is a guest at the Marine |tailment of expenditures, and handling [~~ "ao Nows, 4.10 p.m. The Daily
    next year ‘nis was his first visi E k, chores with extreme care k 4.10 |
    to the island he said and added _Egglesfield, Director General Hotel. Grndite wanhae tnpeetant Serv 4.15 p.m. No Name, 4.45 p.m
    thet he had-an enjoyable stay of Civil Aviation in the Caribbean ‘This is the first visit here for |*"S"* ™ errr yt ag Record, 5 p.m. B.B.C. Concert
    - i ck: F : U.S. 4 Area was a passenger for Jamaica Miss Rogers and the object of her| FEBRUARY 21 to MARCH 2% (Pisces) Orc! ak 918M, 49.71M
    ae SNE lo hgea> via Trinidad by B.W.I.A, on Mon- visit is to see for herself what we|—Make no appreciable changes except O00 apart iel
    RS. J. BLONDIN, wife of the day. ean offer Tourists, and is very Wie et auinety wit ear to 6 |. m. Welsh Miscellany, 6.15 p.m
    Manager of Sam Lord’s Castle f ; hopeful that her visit #0 our |), F Bariety Bnet °0, 40 p.m. “Spore nee
    returned from a holiday visit to Second In 50 Years Tsland will be of considerable help 5 ates aa Nes SERB nit Boche News. from
    the U.S.A, via Puerto Rico by pAzne his second visit to his to her company. in attracting! YOU) BORN “TO-DAY: tien eed 7.15 p.m. We Britain.
    B.W.1.A7 on Monday. native Barbados in 50 years is Araneae Tourists to visit our|)"Oei, when they really tr3 as 10.90 pam, BLINN, 49.710
    nr sland. . » leader, doctor, nurse, publi ; : oe
    Spent Two Weeks Mr. Henry Doorly of Omaha, Ne- °° make able seeder ye courage of your 7.45 p.m, Some Enchanted Evening,
    s braska, publisher of the Omaha : + 7 ete "Ine ination in addi- €.15 Radio reel, 8.30 p.m
    ME, AND_MRS. S. H. FRIEND World’ Herald, He arrived over Left For England CONV ne eae naracter, Can. become ‘Tchaikovsky, 8.45 p.m. Special, Despateh,
    of Castries, St, Lucia, have the week-end by B.W.I.A. from ISS DAISY STUART of| outstanding writer. Seek education, @ pom, There, wast flan gy p.m,. ‘The
    just returned home by B.W.LA. Trinidad accompanied by his wire Beckles Road, left for Eng- and _ute, |: Birineaees News, 10.10 p.m, “rom the Editorials,
    after spending two weeks’ holiday and will be here for three weeks land last Sunday on the S.S. rede’ d Royce, philosopher, 10.1 . A Capta. of Industry, 10.30
    as guests at the Ocean View Hotgl. as a guest at the Marine Hotel. Colombie. pu vas
    Mr, Friend is employed as Cost Mr. Doorly, a brother of the late Miss Stuart who has gone to fur-
    Surveyor With Messrs Hannen Martin Doorly of Messrs. Martin ther her studies in music, will re- J a
    Holland and Cubitts, contractors Doorly and Co., Ltd., Bridgetown, side with her uncle, former R.A.F.
    engaged in the reconstruction of was last ,in Barbados eighteen Sgs., Mr. Evans Alleyne, and his
    Castries, years ago. wife, GLOBE
    B y Tq Hf, fi WA Y= BEACHCOMBER Last SHOWS TODAY 4.45 & 8,30
    ww iG
    mm (Technicolour)
    OMPLAINTS that a “smell like “Nonsense. You mean Welling- mediately after the marriage and ROWAL EDD
    second-hand garlic” was waft- ton, Nelson was never a soldier, then disappeared for good. M. de] prep JANE SARAH KEENAN
    ed from an oil-refinery indicate and you've drawn him in military Genlis once said; “I only kissed ASTAIRE POWELL CHURCHILL WYNN

    that some people have very sensi-
    live noses and a profound knowl-
    edge of the garlic trade.

    Only an experienced garlic-
    taster could be expected to detect
    the second-hand from the unused.

    But who buys second-hand garlic?.

    Are there musty grocers who sup-
    ply collectors?
    Gentleman, good appearance,
    public-school education, would
    exchange set of maps of Turkey
    and circular saw (part-worn) for
    31 ewt, second-hand garlic.
    Business executive, own car,
    anxious to-meet adventurous ex-
    officer with capital, with view to
    floating company for sale of sec-
















    7) 1 5 : o98
    ond-hand garlic, necking of goods in short supply x ‘ zs 9862
    vo ake 4 ean be short-circuited by unscram- :
    Something wrong bling measures. He adds: “A re- o A83
    somewhere disinflationary or non-recessional 2Q ing 5 ax a
    « HY,” asked the. passer-by, trend Puaee followed by in- ost © 4
    ac ‘s ie ae , crease put. » § ©oKQ842
    fart ie you call this picture In passing | @J10975 & KQ42
    {t is Neison,” said the pavement WIFE has complained that her | +K on 3
    ar husband kissed her twice im- $ Q 103 ;
    Saecrnnteiniade ——_ z AJ1076 i
    a ;
    Patiinie Britain's slender gain of }
    Rupert and the Bu tterflies Il Beets gue world cham. :
    ; ct Te eens onship han would be }
    TTA ia per n a rp RE {4 worth three valuable match }
    Mt | } points under the present }
    i

















    uniform. And that nose is Welling- Mme, de ——- twice, The first time
    ton’s.”’ it was to please myself, the second

    “lL know it looks like Welling- time, to please her, We never met
    ton,” said the artist, after a long again; there was no one else to
    pause, “It’s meant to, You see, please.”

    Nelson once went to a fancy-dress
    ball as Wellington, and this shows
    him as he looked then.”

    “Where was this ball?” asked the
    man,

    “Paris,” said the artist, “on the
    night before Waterloo, It’s his-
    tory.”

    hact-finding

    HARLIE SUET points out that |

    a potential reapportionment

    of unscheduled priorities does not
    necessarily mean that the bottle-



    Witeta via tania



    By M. Harrison-Gray
    Dealer: North
    North-South game







    method of scori

    n
    North's One Freart was

    doubled by the American
    East player. but the British
    pair had the situation well

    In hand after South's re-
    double. West bid One Spade.

    North assed, and ASU's
    bluff bid of One No-Trump

    was doubled by South. West
    then bid Clubs. but North
    scored 620 in a final contract
    of Four Hearts.

    The redouble had an
    intimidating effect and the

    Feeteeeeene-scnaseeueneneneerseersssssecrseresest encesrsesersssssseneserssseesenssenaseuot acs sonecoes OESRERESERL CGR





    Tt Protessor leads Rupert of miles No wonder uo is | Americans did not consider
    doors. “We'll put your bunch exhausted, tr ig a beauty it | a sacrifice in Five Clubs.
    of towers tn water and keep them = must be the gem of my collection | In view ot his moderate
    resh until you go home.” he says. ‘*Oh, dear’ says Rupect | ¢ Spade support, our East
    se hold this butterfly tor anxiously “The schoolmaster vik. preterred to overcal!
    Taking a dook trom his said it was wrong to kill a thing | I Ronn Sian ere eae ats
    es he po ver it, “Ah!” id t i in'a collection hecause | South f ene ad coubied by -|
    es ‘ p é Behe ig ; outh for a penalty of 500.
    smile as | a wea rd lovely e would | Teeancensnsensneesuccenencencesssesesssseces
    ' BOF . me Ferdy " ..ondon Express Service
    CURTAIN NET (BORDERS)............00.5060eee 51¢ to 98¢
    Colours—Rose, Green, Blue, Gold.
    CURTAIN NET -Rose, Green, Blue, Gold.......... $1.05 to $1.38

    PILLOW CA
    BUTTER MUSI

    T. R.

    = Soe See She See Gee

    YOUR SHOE STORE
    Phone: Se 4220

    [a8 S22 GSS Sas ene

    —36”, 38”, and 40” wide
    TABLE CLOTHS—54” wide

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    WHITE TOWELS ou..cccsisessstsssssestessreseensesyie Mvikasioie $2.20 & $2.56
    SHEETS FO TE a csctoness itch Gambontsosessessencagbnsens $5.75



    $3.07, $3.39, $7.08



    AN

    EVANS (WHITFIELDS)



    and

    MANHATTAN SMELODRAMA

    CLARK GABLE, MYRNA LOY, WILLIAM POWELL
    Opening TOMORROW (in Technicolour)

    THE IMMORTAL MUSKETEERS IN THE MOST

    SPECTACULAR ADVENTURE OF ALL!






    SHEN OE R Re:

    e
    Adaptalion teem
    ALEXANDKE DUMAS?

    *

    a ot
    PTAA a,



    PATRICIA

    Havwarp MebiNa

    JANETTA DRESS SHOP
    Next to Singers
    CLOSING SATURDAY—November
    22nd.

    FINAL WEEK —
    Further





    CLEARANCE SALE
    Reductions

    ALL DRESS
    ALL NYLON
    ALL BRAS 4
    PANTIE-GIRDLES .... Jat ble’e
    PURE LINEN BRIDGE, TEA SETS .



    n

    «te ae Ge . $5.00 and $9.98
    UNDERWEAR greatly reduced

    ’ $1.00 and $1.98
    $1.00 and $1.50

    $7.00 per Set

    SHORTS—White and Coloured—now .......... $2.98
    CHILDREN’S DRESSES—now .............. ae cinn ee
    MATERIALS by the Yard ................. ..80c, per Yd.








    TRUCKS & B

    GARAGE
    VICTORIA STREET.

    | cn }
    |



    the estates}

    yvehensive tour of inspection, | United

    BATTERIES

    FOR CARS

    ML BILE el” ER DL EE RO hee I NS ARON

    TRADING CO.

    PRINCE
    FELIX



    7

    MARR ‘ES

    BEAULIEU, Fret. Riviera,

    No 19.
    Prince Felix of Hapsburg, 37-
    year-old fourth son of the last

    Austrian Emperor was married in
    a church here today to Princess
    Anna Eugenie of Arenberg, 27-
    year-old cousin of King Baudouin
    of Belgium. The glittering Roman
    Catholic church ceremony was
    jattended by 250 aristocratic guests.
    }

    The couple will leave for Lon-

    ‘don later today and fly to New

    York tonight. After a honéymoon
    in the Caribbean they will make
    |their home in Mexico, where. the
    |Prince is manager of a Swedish
    factory, making prefabricated
    | houses,

    |

    | After the ceremony, the bridal

    most successful harvests in the|Pair and their guests left for Villa

    |Encar, the Riviera home of Prince
    |Charles of Arenberg, uncle of the
    brice,

    }. Prince Felix was the only Haps-

    Ranger of Windsor Great Park—|burg = Austrian soil when Hitler
    jianvadec
    |

    ;adventurous flight he reached the

    the country. After an
    States in August 1938.
    During the war he served with the
    Austrian battalion of the United
    States Army. Since then he has
    lived mostly in Mexico and Latin
    America,

    Princess Anna

    Eugenie was

    car or|born at Ellingen Castle in Bavaria

    and studied at the Veterinary
    faculty at Munich University. The
    couple met about two years ago in
    Bavaria.—U.P.

    Rolex Watches
    LOUIS L, BAYLEY
    Bolton Lane



    FURY AND
    TERROR!

    ABLAZE WITH






    starring ROD

    CAMERON
    JANE NIGH

    CINECOLOR

    1h



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    P BARBAREES
    A (Dial 5170)
    OPENING FRI. 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
    and: Continuing Daily

    GLORIOUS!

    UPROARIOUS!
    HS GALORE WITH—





















    SH







    She's
    glorious -
    and
    uproarious
    inher first “Sai
    picture since
    ‘Sunset
    Boulevard’!

    WARNER |

    Baos. i
    PQSSENT












    SUE EROGLE sAMINL PERDEAD+ COMEST ANDLD*W-BANCAPET OUwaND
    P LA Z (Dial 2310)
    A B'TOWN
    OPENING FRI. 2,30, 4.45 &
    8.30 p.m
    and Continuing Daily 445 &
    8.30 p.m.

    USES

    LTD.





    THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1952.

    lcer your Christmas Cards
    At THE Advocate Stationery.













    Heinz Cooked Spaghetti—
    m-m-m-m — here’s eating.
    Zippy, zesty tomato-sauced
    strands that have flavour
    galore just as they come
    from the tin. How wonder-
    ful Heinz Cooked Spaghetti
    tastes alone, and how well
    it mingles with left-over
    foods too. A delightful meal
    ready in a minute, for Heinz
    has cooked the Spaghetti
    for you, you simply heat
    and eat—and enjoy. Buy

    several tins today.



    BTOWN (Seon) “THE LION AND THE HORSE” Steve COCHRAN

    ‘Last 2 Shows Today
    4.20 & 8.30 p.m.
    A KISS IN THE



    Yo-day (Only)
    4.45 & 8.30 p.m.

    Last 2 Shows Today |
    4.30 & 8.50 p.m.

























    DARK PAINTING the Whole Serial
    Jane David CLOUDS WITH BUCK ROGERS
    WYMAN : NIVEN & | SUNSHINE (Color) | ¢ oi+y Buster Crabbe
    KEY LARGO Dennis Virginia | 2 =
    Humphrey BOGART MORGAN : MAYO | Fria, 5 &
    Edward G. Robinson KISS TOMORROW cance »
    . Today's Special 1.30 GOODBYE Big Action Film
    JUNGLE = James r Barbara
    STAMPEDE | “AGNEY PAYTON BLUE LAMP
    Pp and Teday's Special 1.30 Jack WARNER
    RENEGADES of TRIPLE TROUBLE | ——————————
    SONORA | rhe Bowery Bo's & Sat. Special 1.40 p.m
    Becky Tae “BOMBA ON
    Frid. 280 — 44) & | PANTHER I GUNSLINGERS
    8.20 p.m. & Continu- | Johnny SHEF Whip WILSON
    ing Daily 4.45 & 8.30 py and
    Warner's. Laugh Hit! | Prt. 445 & 8.30 p.m,
    “2 FOR Rod CAMERON in | OKLAHOMA BLUES
    BEDROOM C’ ORT OSAGE Jimmy WAKELY
    ‘In Natural Color) 1 Cinecolor) otaetity ab
    BRIDGETOWN BARBAREES OISTIN
    (Dial 2310) (Dial 5170) (Dial 8404)
    mi ok at tials ih temaatie e sialieaalie arti =

    OODAL THEATRES



    EMPIRE OLYMPIC ROXY ROYAL
    To-day only Te-day (Only) To-day 4.20 & 8.15) To-day 4.30 & 8.30
    4.30 & 8.30 4.20 & B15 Universal Doubie | Universal Double

    Universal Double Republic Double

    The Andrew Sisters
    Jon Hall

    THAT NIGHT







    | in
    ariz e WITH YOU
    ere eens BELLE OF OLD | MOONLIGHT AND ch
    ALI BABA AND MEXICO . fae ’ RIVER LADY
    TON en eee and FREIDA } Starring
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    and 3 David Farrar Yvonne DeCarlo _
    MADELEINE BLACKMAIL “Tomorrow (Only)
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    ri 7 4.00 & 8.30
    Ann Todd __ William Marshall || 4.30 & 8.15 Double —
    Opening To-morrow|GNE TOUCH ;
    cna eee 4.30 & 8.15 | OF VENUS & The perce Sisters
    50 y R.K.O. Double DRACULA'S 7
    1 f LA'S
    « Os tae Brian Donlevy DAUGHTER MOONLIGHT AND
    ABnOTT ana. eee (Not Suitable for } CACTUS
    COSTELLO | Children) and
    ; SLAUGHTER |< __FREIDA
    COMIN ROUND | Opening Saturday
    TRAIL 4.20 & 8.15 | Opening Saturday
    THE MOUNTAIN (Cinecolor) THE SNIPER — | 4.30 & 8.30
    Opening Friday 28th} ead an |Richard Green
    2.30 & 8.30 an THE MAGIC Yvonne DeCarlo
    j
    Cecil B. DeMille's | 1 CARPET in
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    pt ere tie DESERT HAWK
    SAMSON AND) CHANG |Opening Friday 28th ri
    }Filmed On The Spot|SAMSON AND bya
    In Wildest Siam DELIL/ LUUTS
    ILAH LUUISA



    dDOO®

    ORKOUT ON

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    GLOBE

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    et





    THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1952.

    BARBADOS

    ADVOCATE





    GOLD COAST HAS OWN CIVIL SERVICE

    Governor Becomes
    Final Authority

    F. 8. HERRING

    20th Century

    Centurion

    A B.O.A.C. Security
    Warden,

    Mr. F, S. Herring, re-
    cently became a member of
    the select “Centurion Club”
    by walking a hundred
    miles in less than twenty-
    four hours, To achieve this
    distinction he left Bath,
    Somerset, at 6 p.m. one
    evening and walke d
    through the night, reaching
    Turnham Green, London,
    at 3.50 p.m. the following
    afternoon, °

    Mr. Herring, who has
    now competed in _ fast
    walking events ranging

    from 100 yards to 100 miles,
    estimates that he has walk-
    ed over 6,000 miles in pur-
    suit of his hobby.

    Photograph shows Mr.
    Herring training on the
    perimeter track at London
    Airport, Mr. Herring’s
    speed during his 100 mile
    walk was 44;—5 m.p.h.

    Heavy Rains In
    Montserrat Cause
    Great Damage

    (From Our Own Correspondent)

    ANTIGUA Nov. 19.

    Torrential rainfall was experi-
    enced in Montserrat resulting in
    floods, landslides, roads obstructed,
    bridges washed away and houses
    damaged. Plymouth water supply
    was seriously impaired.

    His Excellency Sir Kenneth
    Blackburne accompanied by A.D.C.
    Capt. F. E. Hewitt scheduled to
    leave Antigua on November 24
    on the one-week routine visit is
    now facing an islandwide inspec-
    tion tour of the vast destruction.





    Prominent Engineer
    Dies In Grenada

    (From Our Own Cor!espondent)
    GRENADA, Noy. 19.

    Henry Rudolph Gun Munro 72,
    well known engineer and uncle of
    Franklyn, now Trinidad tennis ace,
    died this morning. He leaves a
    wife, two sons and two daughters.

    The death also occurred today
    of Mrs. Agnes Martin, Widow of
    the late John Martin, former
    Magistrate here. She was the
    mother of five children’ among
    them Mr. V. H. Martin, al
    Bank, San Fernando, also Ts.
    Neville Howell and Mr. J, C. Mar-
    tin in Barbados, Edwatd Martin,
    Antigua and Miss Freida Martin,
    Royal Bank branch here. The de-
    teased wag the daughter of the
    lite Archdeacon Hutson who was
    Rector of St, George's.



    ‘

    WE ARE OFFERING A







    Another significant and impc

    constitutional and political advanee has been
    was made by

    November 1, an Order
    Charles Arden-Clarke)
    its own civil service.
    of the Gold Coast.”

    givin

    The Governor, and not the
    Secretary of State, is now the
    ultimate authority for “the ap-
    pointment, promotion transfer

    and disciplinary control in regard
    te members of the Service.” It

    means the advancement of the
    colony's Africanisation policy,
    First preference in recruitment

    now go@s to qualified African can-
    didates, An overseas candidate
    will only be sought—on non-
    pensionable terms—if no African
    is available for the job coneerned,

    And such non-pensionable over-
    s@as men as are selected from
    November 1 will be automatical-

    ly members of the Local Service.
    It is laid down that promotion
    ir the public service will be

    based strictly on merit and
    ability.
    So far as the material condi-

    tions of service are concerned, no
    differentiation, it is stated, will
    be made on the ground that offi-
    cers are or are not members of
    the Local Service.

    Colonial Service officials,
    European and African, in the
    Gold Coast prior to November 1
    have not been required to join
    the Local Service. And there have
    been assurances, of course, frorm
    Premier Nkrumah that the Gold
    Coast does continue to need ex
    patriate officials for different jobs,
    particularly in the technical field.

    The Colonial Police

    A publication of real impor-
    tance to the Colonies is due on
    November 24. It is titled “The
    Colonial Police,”’ In it, the author,
    Sir Charles Jeffries, Joint Deputy
    Under-Secretary of State in the
    Colonial Office, gives us, I under-
    stand, the: first authoritative and
    full story of the development of
    the police forces throughout the

    colonies. Only in the event of
    grave disorders, such as oc-
    cusioned at present by the Mau
    Mau in East Africa, is much
    thought paid by most people to
    the importance of the police in
    the colonies, and Sir Charles’

    book will without doubt be in-
    valuable in the light it throws
    particularly on problems of police
    organisation in relation to the
    swift development of colonial
    territories to-day. The history of
    police organisation in the differ-
    ent territories is sketched, and
    shows how basic principles of po-
    lice work in this country have
    been adapted to differing colonial
    conditions. “The Colonial Police”
    (Max Parrish, 18/6d.) is not a
    Colonial Office publication. It is
    an addition to a number of other
    excellent works of private
    authorship by Sir Charles.
    —L.E.S.

    Sale Of Land
    Approved

    The General Board of Health
    yesterday approved the division
    and sale in lots of 289,990% square
    feet of land at Fairways, Christ
    Church by: Mr. W, N, Alleyne.

    Permission was also given for
    the division and sale of 193 acres,
    8 roods, 26 perches of land in lots
    at Walkers Plantat ion, St. George
    by Mr. G. L. Farmer.

    The Board approved the division
    and sale of six of the prescribed
    lots, part of the 34,453 square feet
    of land at Clapham, Christ Church
    by Mr, C. St. Hill, and the division
    and sale of lots 1 to 48, part of
    265,572 sauare feet ai Green Hill,
    for which application was made by
    Mr. L, L. Toppin.

    Consideration of the other lots
    was postponed pendjng the avail-
    ability of adequate water supply.

    The Board granted the applica-
    tion of Messrs Cottle, Catford and
    Co. on behalf of Messrs. Central
    Foundry Ltd. for approval of alter-,
    ations of a plan earlier approved
    by the Board, and postponed con-

    deration the application of
    Mr. G. C. Mahon for the division
    and sale of 97,470 square feet in
    lots at Elridge, Christ Church.

    The application by Neweastle
    Estates Ltd. for the division and
    sale of 20 acres 3 roods 2 perches
    in lots was deferred pending an
    opinion from the Golonial Secre-
    tary.













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    It is to be known as the “

    LONDON.
    rtant stage in the Gold Coast’s
    reached, On
    the Governor (Sir
    » the colony, as from that date,
    Loeal Service

    France Will
    Hold On To

    Her Colonies

    PARIS,

    Without disregarding reason-
    able nationalist wishes, France
    will oppose any action intended

    to diminish her sovereignty in
    most parts of her Colonial Empire
    it is learnea .n Paris.

    Since the end of the war, France
    has made considerable headway
    in modernising and equipping her
    overseas territories, Nearly
    £800,000,000 has been invested in
    improving conditions in French
    Colonies and the areas under
    French mandate

    Official details have just been
    published of where and how these
    huge sums have been spent in the
    last five years in accordance with
    what is known as the Monnet
    Plan, drafted and carried out un-
    der the supervision of M, Jean
    Monnet, General Commissioner of
    the modernising plan.

    A second similar plan, to cover
    the next four years, is now under

    study. When it has been ap-
    proved, it will come into effect in
    1954. M, Monnet is now presi-

    International High
    Coal and Steel in
    Europe, and his assistant, M.
    Etienne Hirsch, has been ap-
    pointed General Commissioner to
    succeed him, The new plan will
    probably be calied the Hirsch
    Plan,

    dent of the
    Authority for

    Deveiopment in the French
    West Indies has been somewhat
    slower than in other French over-
    seas territories, But, thanks to
    improved methods of agriculture

    and irrigation, exports of some
    products such as sugar and bana-
    nas from Guadeloupe have

    doubled since before the war,

    In French Guiana, a huge de-
    posit of bauxite has been found 40
    miles from the coast, estimated to
    contain 30,000,000 tons of the val-
    uable ore from which aluminum
    is produced, Ways and means
    are now being studied of extract-
    ing and exporting this ore,

    Big Progress

    Most spectacular progress un-
    der the Monnet Plan, however, has
    been made in French North Atri-
    ca, where coal production in Al-
    geria and brench Morocco, which
    totalled only 160,000 tons in 1938,
    is now approaching $00,000 tons a
    year. A big electric power scheme
    in these territories has been made
    possible by the construction of
    hydro-electric dams, and oilfield
    production has also increased

    Phosphates are also being pro-
    duced in French North Africa
    and are even being exported to
    several South American countries
    which are traditionally producers
    and exporters of phosphate fer-
    tilisers themselves, These North
    African chemica}| fertilisers have
    shown some extraordinary re-
    sults, chiefly in the cultivation of
    coffee and rice. ‘ vs

    But there nas been less im-
    provement in agricultural output,
    partly because it takes time to
    persuade the natives of these ter-
    ritories to abandon their age-old
    methods in favour of more mod-
    ern ways of cultivation, But some
    of the best results have been ob-
    tained in developing production
    of citrus fruits in North Africa,
    which has been doubled since 1938





    — —

    —

    — -


    ‘|| INTERIOR
    ‘|| EXTERIOR

    FLOORS

    We carry a
    quality





    la Mia

    , Pre st * o4 This Christmas
    ite ORATING Sty

    large
    imported
    as Dry Colours,
    Turpentine and Flocr Varnish.

    ELECTED ¢€

    HAIRMAN



    SIR HUGH DOW, whose appointment has just been announced as
    Chairman of the Royal Commission on East Africa,





    Committee Plans Trade
    Promotion Conference

    Plans for a Trade Prom
    next year are being conside

    atory Committee meeting at Kent Houce, Central §

    tariat headquarters
    Royal Visit
    To B. W.I.

    LONDON.
    The British West Indies is to
    have an official Royal visit during

    Coronation year.
    The Queen’s aunt,
    Royal, who arranged recently to
    visit Trinidad in her capacity as
    commandant-in-chief of the Brit-

    the Princess

    ish Red Cross, has now an-
    nounced that she will extend her
    visit to British Guiana as well
    At the invitation of Sir Hubert
    Rance, Governor of Trinidad, the
    Princess Royal will present col-
    ours to the local branches of th
    Red Cross in Trinidad, She is

    expected to arrive Colony

    early in January

    in the

    Trinidad Leascehclds,
    oil company, offered the
    accommodation on one of their
    tankers for her trip to the West
    Indies, She accepted gratefully,
    but asked that no special arrange-
    ments be made for her voyage.

    Now the Princess has decided
    to extend her tour, on the invita-
    tion of the Government of British
    Guiana, An official announcement
    from St. James’s Palace in Lon-
    don, said:

    “Her Royal Highness, the Prin-
    eess Royal, has accepted an invita-
    tion from His Excellency the
    acting Governor of British Guiana
    to visit British Guiana during hex
    coming visit to the West Indies.
    During her stay, Her Royal High-
    ness will inspect Red Cross
    detachments and see Red Cross
    work in the territory.”

    Final arrangements for the
    Royal visit have not yet been com-
    pleted and it is not yet known
    how long the Princess will spend
    in the two Colonies. It is possible
    that she may make visits to other
    Colonies in the British West Indics
    while she js in the Caribbean

    —BUP.

    Ltd., the
    Princess



    and now reaches 500,000 tons a
    year. 7m

    Less snectacular ‘ovelopments
    have been made in the other
    Frenc) Colonies in Afrieu, Coffee

    production has become the main-
    stay of several of the West African

    Colonies, while big new ports
    have been built in these terri-
    lories,

    —B.UP.







    f i




    Sunshine
    Right

    Into








    Your Home

    of best
    well

    stock
    Paints, as
    Linseed Oil,

    BARBADOS CO-OP.
    Il COTTON FACTORY Ltd.



    |

    PORT-OF-SPAIN, Nov. 10.

    ition Conference scheduled for
    red this week *y the Prepar
    Secre

    The main specific
    7 mmittee “ss the

    an agenda f: th
    Among the subband 2 suggested fi

    nelusion by the Commission ars
    Transportation and Communic
    tions; Trade financing facilitic
    credits and collections; Standard-
    ising of commercial products and
    of trade terms; Dissemination of
    market information of prices and
    products; Export market coopera-

    tives

    job before the
    formulation
    Conference

    In his opening remarks, Mr
    Albert J, Powers, Chief of the
    Caribbean Section, Office of In-
    ternational Trade, U.S, Depart-

    ment of Commerce, who was
    elected Chairman of the Com»
    inittee, emphasised that the Con
    ference should strive for tangib|
    results, and should avoid an aca
    demic approach. He echoed ti
    Commissien’s thought that tl
    Conference should be so arrange
    as to stimulate the interest of th

    business communities as well a
    ft governments,

    Others attending the meetin
    ire

    Mi dD Mascart, Director «
    Customs, Martinique; Mr, Candid
    Oliveras, Head, Economic Plan
    ning Unit, Puerto Rico Plan
    ning Board; Mr Lh. aie cat
    cival, Assistant Eecnomie Advise:
    Colenia] Development & Welfar«
    Organisation; Mr, Aubrey Starcl
    United Kingdom Trade Commis
    sioner, Trinidad; Mr. W. T. Smit
    Head, Division of Trade Polics
    Department of Economic Affair:
    Surinam; Mr Willard Grant

    Director of T. Geddes Grant, Ltd

    Trinidad,



    Campaign Against
    Wayside Card
    Vendors

    The Police have
    paign to clear

    begun a cam-
    wayside postcard
    vendors off the sidewalks where
    they congregate to sell their ware
    These sellers are however con-
    templating forming a delegation to
    interview the Commissioner of
    Police with a view to having the
    campaign relaxed.

    Each year as the Christmas sea-
    son approaches, a number of young
    men patrol the city streets selling
    postcards from boxes, Sometimes
    they congregate on pavements and
    in shop doors, impeding the pro-
    gress of Christmas shoppers and
    ogg

    Gairy Named,
    Suspended
    From Council

    From Our Own Correspondent
    GRENADA, Nov. 19

    Hon. Eric Gairy was “named

    and suspended at a meeting ©

    the Legislature this morning af

    speaking just under 20 minutes «
    a motion urging the send of
    Royal Commission to Grenada t
    probe generally the social an
    economic affairs and specifical
    employer-employee relations

    After previous advice from Ad
    MacMillan in the!
    to refrain from imputation
    of the worthiness of other mem
    bers, and later calm’ advice wv,

    tinue hi peech when he sug-
    gested that the Administrat«
    must be feeling uneasy as h
    might speak two or three day
    Gairy went on to say that th
    ‘ruesome conditions in Grenadi
    have been blamed on his Manua
    and Mental Workers’ Union
    whereas members of the
    belonging to it had a clean sheet
    ind “if other members around th
    table could make
    the motion would pass very
    a.

    The Administrator asked th
    member for a withdrawal of thes
    remarks and Gairy refused, claim
    ing that the House was the on
    privilege of justice, The Adminis-
    trator read the relevant rules of
    the Council with regard to respect
    for the Chair, whereupon Hon,
    D, A, Henry nominated member,
    moved that Gairy be “named” and
    suspended, and the Attorney Gen-
    eral C, F, Henville seeonded.

    The majority voted :n favour ol
    he motion and Gairy left the
    Chamber accompanied by three
    members of his block, and a vast
    crowd of his followers in the gal-
    lery who had been urged by Gairy
    to attend in a speech at a previ
    ous public meeting also walked
    out momentarily interrupting the
    quiet of the Chamber,

    In the vote Hons, T. A. Marry-
    show and H, A. McKie abstained
    The name of Hon, Carlyle Noel,
    recently belonging to the Gairy
    block, slipped the Clerk of the
    Council in taking the vote but

    the member remained seated fo
    the remainder of the meeting par-
    ticipating in the business together
    with Marryshow, E. V. A. Sylves-
    ter and MeKie who are elected
    members, as well as two officials
    ind the two nominated member
    present.

    The suspension motion involves
    a duration till the next meeting
    ind forfeiture of any remuneration
    Yo which the said member as a

    egislator is entitled for the period
    of suspension, Among those listen-
    ing to the abortive debate was His
    Lordship J. L. M, Perez, Chief
    Justice of Trinidad, who arrived
    here this morning for the sitting
    of the Appeal Court.

    Gairy had asked whether he
    might vote on the motion and the
    Administrator overruled this, Out-
    side the Chamber an excited crowd
    followed Gairy down street to the
    MMWU office,

    Later, on a motion of adjourn-
    ment, Hon. W. E, Julien referred
    to the fact that two fires recently
    set to the residences of O. M
    Bain and Louis Strauss were



    ministrator

    Chair



    the same boast
    eas





    ested that the Government
    should offer a reward for evidence
    leading to the culprits, He said it
    appeared certain that people were
    seeking to commit murder
    through fire as a means of revenge,
    threatening the lives of whole
    families.

    Gairy’s 20-minute speech up to
    the stage of the suspension, large!
    consisted of charges against
    “plantocracy’’ whom he deseribed
    as “responsible for the gruesome
    and undesirable atmosphere pre-
    vailing in Grenada.” '

    Diamond Rings

    LOUIS L. BAYLEY
    Bolton Lane





    |
    Hous«

    |
    |

    patent attempts of agson and sug- |

    _ PAGE THR THREE



    Oh! what
    a nasty cough...

    ZUBES bring
    ranid relief !



    REG?
    US COUGH LOZENGES

    Th e so handy



    — ear

    ZUBES COUGH MIXTURE

    A comforting, soothing m



    to keep with





    that’s well known as nocket-size tins. Easy to
    a eee eee for Zubes bring qui icf to
    coughs and sore throats. '
    8 A sore are tick! throat, Just
    Let its gentle syrup ease :
    pop one = inte our mouth as

    and relieve your trouble



    Specially suitable and s00N 48 YOu
    safe for children’s Keel cS
    coughs. Always keep a ra Gs ,



    bottle at home. g on



    «~~
    . city the new ZUBES INHALER

    4 snif/willclear your head in a jiffy.
    CHEMISTS AND STORES

    VY & CO.



    AND when you have a stuffy co
    in your pocket or handbag

    FROM AiL GOOD

    Agents: 1. S. GARR AW Bridgetown “



    One -!

    JUST ONE—and aren't we enjoying ourselves?
    Baby wonders what all the fuss is about’on this
    particular day —the toys, the new frock, the cake
    and this lovely, lovely cande—but what fun !!
    And what a happy year it hs been on the whole
    for everyone — particularly sine we put baby on
    Cow & Gate. Steady progress-abounding health
    ~~ peace and contentment

    Yes —carry on, baby, with that charming smile

    — at least we have given you a good start!







    tena AGilt |
    mh Fe od



    "EEC.



    ELECTRIC

    ene at



    The refrigerating unit of the G.E.C.

    refriecrator is so finely made that it

    is hermetically sealed after manu- ”
    facture and never needs servicing

    This refrigerator will stand up to nied ehrotiutn plated
    afiy extreme ‘cf climate — and it’s handle incorporating

    t

    lovely to look at, tcc !



    concealed lock.

    saan fy
    i A,





    SPECIAL XMAS

    OFFER

    $50800

    G.E.C
    REFRIGERATORS

    REDUCED TO

    $460.00

    THIS SPECIAL OFFER IS
    ONLY GOOD [OR

    NOVEMBER and DECEMBER
    CITY GARAGE TRADING
    CO., LID.

    Victoria Street — Dial 4671.





    PAGE FOUR BARBADOS ADVOCATE







    ‘ THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1952. °
    i rr ener enter ne a ne






    oid ADVO NEWS FROM BRITAIN B If © aie res
    AD OCATE : A fine assortment of CADBURY'S and ROWNTREE’S Chocolates
    ~ Bice TSS 2 re os Bef in Presentation Boxes, — Ale --—~
    a acd kites i ls es iedllasicais a ‘ rr Hy Eastbourne, passed a resolution | aes re BARLEY SUGAR
    . “" 1e merican elections, e asser ives with private ASCALL’ RSHMALLOWS
    iia ss opening of Parliament in Britain, Vau h BD J _ Sar oe capper: Waabends if AN ATOM PLANE } JACOB’S ASSORTED BISCUITS
    Thursday, November 20, 1952. the establishment of improved Gea Domes incy become needy “through see, THE WINDSOR PHARMACY.
    iRieenenlits on ee High Weert bge-ainction Sheet the Anglo-Persian oil dispute. at disablement or other '
    ry a i E ka ul i ‘i bine this week to etch a mark on t the same time British states- . By NEWELL ROGERS
    _ BEE. * ama Britain’s history, ee 7 weTe nig .. ae ~ by In London, meantime, the first
    IT WOULD be very discouraging if the It is traditional for British states- the way Genera eguid “8S domestic proceedings court has
    4 : easily

    men to withhold official comment Seeking to re-organise Egypt's ad-
    on elections in any foreign coun- â„¢inistration and suppress graft
    try, Even when the defeated and corruption within government
    Japanese went to the polls last ranks.

    October to make their first “free” It appears now that General







    NEW YORK, Tuesday,
    TO the new President may fall the breath-
    catching task of launching not only the
    world’s first atom-powered submarine, but!

    CON

    In ROLLS 6 Feet and 9 Feet Wide
    CUT TO YOUR LENGTH
    MATS 9Ft. x 9 Ft. and 9 Ft, x 714 Ft.

    been set up im the Chelsea dis-
    trict. It is sited in a converted
    schoolroom, and the atmosphere
    is informal The court has soft
    chairs and restful lighting and

    district market planned for Eagle Hall
    should take as long to complete as the
    Bay Street Window opposite the General

    ae t-war choi f overnment, Neguib will consider realistically 5 eek’ hus- E . ae oy
    Hospital. British apokeaen refrained fre.‘ and co-operatively Britain’s view- ee ae = eee Behan +. ik the first atom-powered aircraft. ALSO
    Eagle Hall it has been pointed out | expressing any preference regard- point that the Sudan must be 44i: charges of neglect, cruelty or On half a million acres of rugged, desolate

    ing their future leadership. allowed to determine for herself

    before is an important cross-roads much In the case of the United States, the form of her new Government.

    FIBRE MATS

    » and it is the in- i i
    sfisertion pours | nuip| country in south-eastern Idaho, deep behind

    , ; ’ ‘ . PLAIN AND DECORATED
    used by visitors to the island and its | the ence aaa Bo ws ——e ney — than ‘arting couples to patch up their| the Rockies, scientists and engineers are in 4 Sizes
    2 : ; inion has bee vi" ever that the lea three va
    market facilities have long been appreci- | 7Pitked. art countries will be able to agree on as is working in squat concrete buildings on the
    But what do the British people the Sudan’s future status. Coronation and the crow

    ated by residents. Recognition of Eagle
    Hall’s market facilities did lead in fact to
    the removal some months ago of certain
    shops in preparation for the erection of
    a market which would give protection to
    hawkers from sun and rain and which
    would make shopping easier for the house-
    wife.

    The removal of the shops has not been
    followed by any speedy action to erect

    “UA-boats” power plant.
    The dun-coloured desert is now the nation-
    ‘ al reactor testing station.

    of overseas visitors who come to

    say? Improved Anglo- Egyptian rela- iw. it-are certain to attract to

    Always feeling sympathy for @ tions may also create a favourable
    defeated man, if he takes defeat atmosphere for the establishment
    well, they term Adlai Stevenson of the much
    a big-hearted, generous loser, Command in which Egypt would

    However, irrespective of R&- be represented.
    publican party policy, aro At the High Wycombe by- Suests.
    glad to see Eisenhower ap lection the Conservatives in-
    to the world’s biggest job. Re- pina their majority from 1,753 __ T° Spare visitors from such bad
    membering Eisenhower’s wartime to 2,100. This is only the second experiences, Sir Alexander Max-
    leadership, his name is a house- time since the war’s end that the Well, — of the British
    hold word in Britain, and syn- party in power have improved Sag and an noe es

    onymous with» decency, honesty ; Z eae 7 5
    and fair play, Ae in a marginal con guide-lect ‘S . Beves calles

    OIL CLOTH

    WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LID.
    Successors To

    . 5. PITCHER & CO

    es tet:
    THE SUBMARINE, named Nautilus, is C. .
    Phone 4472, 4687 BECKWITH STORES

    under construction on the Thames near New
    London, Connecticut.

    And the Atomic Energy Commission an-
    nounces it is ready to start work in Idaho on
    the plane.

    ,, Many will claim to be





    Fj
    |

    a market shed, and several enterprising
    hawkers, impatient with the ihconveni-
    ences of selling perishable foodstuffs on

    In London, on the same day that
    America polled, the opening of
    Parliament lent the city a touch
    of pageantry and colour, Great
    crowds turned out to'see the young

    gleaming breastplates and plumed

    o it shows that the electors
    there haVe more faith in
    Churchill’s Conservative leader-
    ship than in Mr. Attlee’s Socialist

    and fourteen women from many
    different walks of life are for

    * three months studying under a

    “master”, Mr. H, L. Bryant Peers,
    what they will weed to know to

    It notifies contractors that preliminary

    plans will be ready in ten days for a city
    devoted solely to this aircraft.



    FJ nviettas

    i i i bloom—whether for
    an exposed unprotected site have built for ]| Queen, who look especially . °XPeriments. tell the visitors from Vancouver, The on is going to ill b ankind’s F or all around,
    th lves small shelters hich add lovely, and the Dukejof Edinburgh Marriages or Buenos Aires, Hong Kong, Ka-~ mankind's glory or shame wi em \ :
    ere tr eee ene: Wet RO NOE. ie bemoedad and {followed by phe break-up of marriages at- 72°hi or ent mer = decision. round-the-clock service!
    beauty to the desolate site but give ade- mounted Sovereign’s Escorts in 4). ot¢ public attention only .when a ——- ae . X

    quate cover from the sun and rain. In
    contrast to the inactivity which is evident
    with regard to the proposed Eagle Hall
    Market, opposite its site a service station
    for motor vehicles is rapidly nearing com-
    pletion. i

    No example of the advantages of private

    helmets, they drove in the Irish
    State coach past the troops of the
    Household Brigade lining the
    route.

    The state occasion, over, Par-
    liamentary members turned quick-
    ly to the vital business of the

    attended by fiamboyant circum-
    ‘stances.

    Today, nearly every woman in
    Britain is debating |— for and
    against—the acquittal by a French
    court of a plain-looking, fortyone-
    year-old wife who had shot her
    husband because he had spurned

    her places of entertainment and
    restaurants, as well as about her
    varied institutions.
    Retains Popularity
    The Queen Mother retains her
    great popularity im Britain be-
    cause she keeps up her contact

    moment. One thing emerges from jer for the love of an attractive, ‘with the people.

    the tens of thousands of words

    married red-head, seven years her

    This week she visited the Royal

    * Ws ee.
    CARPENTERS are working in Washington

    on street stands for people to see the inaugu-

    ration of the new President next January 20.

    * * *
    MEET Mr. Danny Kaye, the film producer

    of London and Hollywood, and no longer



    DaCosta’s have the pick of the
    footwear crop—the styles that lead
    for smartness, service, comfort!
    Shoes for school wear .. . for
    Street ... dress... and business.

    nterpr over: pubueeakt> Bos.cited spoken. Britain has elt to adjust junior Festival Hall’s International] just an actor if you please. Like oe
    @ ise ic 1 herself to post-war conditions ne- , ; Kitchen exhibition where fifty- ‘ oing to do more of the 2
    ceasitating’ increase@’ ‘production The Royal Commission on Chaplin, Kaye is going Here’s a wonderful chance for

    which would so. readily be understood.
    The service station at Eagle Hall is being
    built on land which had to be cleared in
    the same way that land had to be cleared
    for the erection of the proposed market
    building. One might have thought that a
    market which was being erected with the
    approval of the central government would
    have been built before work had even
    started- on the service station. In fact
    unless some erection follows soon it is
    possible that hawkers will, when it rains,
    seek shelter under the roof of the service
    station which is now rapidly nearing com-
    pletion. The Coronation as was pointed
    out in these columns yesterday is not far
    distant. Soon it is hoped that the Corona-
    tion Committee will take the public into
    their confidence and announce what
    works are to be undertaken as a per-
    manent memorial of the Coronation.
    Meanwhile a list ought to be made in
    every parish of schemes which await com-
    pletion and the determination made that
    they will be completed not later than one
    month preceding the Coronation, Some-
    where near the head of this list. must be
    included the proposed market at Eagle
    Hall.

    CACTI
    THE exhibition of miniature gardens at
    the Barbados Museum was a_ useful
    reminder to the public that each house-
    holder, no matter how small the plot of
    ‘his tenancy or ownership could beautify
    his surroundings. Nspecially was this mes-
    sage conveyed by the cacti which still
    remain in the now permanent rock gar-
    den of the Museum. Now the Civic Circle
    has advertised cacti to the much larger
    public which visits Seawell during the
    year. Near the entrance to the waiting
    room and opposite the covered open-gal-
    lery which leads to the main waiting
    room a simple garden of cacti gives resi-
    dents and visitors alike a favourable
    impression of a tropical island. The com-
    ment has often been made before that
    cultivation of eaeti is more prevalent in
    the United Kingdom than in Barbados.
    Tt will be a great benefit to the island if
    the activities ef the Horticultural Society
    and of the Civie Cirele should result in
    the spreading of cacti gardens throughout
    the island. Barbados would be a much
    prettier place if cacti and succulents were
    used as hedges instead of walls, and much
    stone now wasted for purposes of osten-
    tation would be saved for more necessary
    purposes.

    THE FOUNTAIN

    WHEN some months ago the fountain of
    Bridgetown was regrettably turned off
    during the day an announcement was
    made that the fountain would still play
    on days on which tourist ships visited the
    island. On several days when tourist ships
    have visited the island since the fountain
    has not played. Everyone hopes that soon
    the fountain will play every day and that
    during the Coronation celebrations it will
    play night and day for at least one week.
    The idea that visitors come to Barbados
    only when tourist ships arrive is in need
    of revision. More people arrive in Barba-
    dos by air than by sea and aeroplanes
    come Barbados daily. Also regular
    carrying ships such as the
    Colombie and the Golfito qualify for the
    description of tourist ships. The aim of
    the authorities ought to be to keep the
    untain playing every day even if salt



    to
    passenger



    There is nothing so

    watel

    has to be used

    sing as a fountain without

    for less pay before the country’s
    economy can be set on a stable
    nasis. Furthermore, demands from
    Socialist quarters tha, the period
    of military conscription should be
    reduced from two years
    eighteen months cannot be met
    without endangering Britain's

    security.
    New Era?

    Divorce, which is continuing its
    detailed survey into the reasons
    for marital break-ups in Britain,
    finds, however, that the most
    common cause of divorce has its
    roots in mundane separation.
    Husband and wife are parted for
    some length of time; they grow
    ‘out of each others’ lives, find new
    interests, and then.one or both
    discover there is no return. Con-

    seven women representing nine-
    teen countries showed their cook-
    ery skill by preparing their own
    national dishes with food available
    in Britain. Each little kitchen.
    fully equipped, was staffed by a
    national group of three. The
    Queen expressed her appreciation
    of many of the dishes—which were
    an object lesson to British house-
    wives in demonstrating that food

    The announcement that Gen- triputory factor to such separation 19 England need not be dull.

    eral Neguib will pay compensation
    fur the Britons killed and in-
    jured in Cairo’s riots last January
    may presage a new era in relar
    tions between Britain and the
    Moslem world,

    General Neguib’s action follows
    closely on the recent successful

    has been the housing shortage of
    recent years.

    Another view put to the Com-
    mission, which has been sitting
    in Edinburgh, is that men should
    not have to pay even innocent
    former wives maintenance after

    All the Western European coun-
    tries were represented, as well ad
    the U.S., Brazil, India and Pakis-
    tan, Indonesia, Malaya and Israel.

    Japan, Jugoslavia and Austria
    contented themselves by display-
    ing cold dishes.

    At the exhibition it was assumed

    visit to Britain of Turkey’s Prime ‘the wives’ have re-married. This ‘that the men of the house might

    Minister, Mr.

    Adnan Menderes, was submitted by the National also help the housewife.

    Display-

    and his Foreign Minister, Mr. Fuat Married Men’s Association, who ed for him to wear was a working

    Koprulu.
    indicated that he would do every-
    thing possible to help smooth out
    Anglo-Egyptian differences — as
    well as to achieve a settlement in



    of a re-married woman was

    capitalising a man’s past error,
    At the same time, the National

    Council of Women, sitting at





    Then, Mr. Menderes claimed that enforced maintenance coat of blue denim, trimmed with

    maroon. And for washing up,
    there was a blue and yellow
    striped apron with yellow top.

    / —_IL.E.S.

    Majestic-And No Expense

    The world’s officially organised
    “culture” is to cost the record
    sum next year of more than
    £3,500,000, if the United Nations

    Spared



    Chinese, Burmese, Indonesian, In-

    dian, and other youth leaders,
    Then there was a thrilling Com-

    mittee for the Co-ordination of

    Educationci, Scientific, and Cul- SYDN oe ~_, of a tee
    tural Organisation has its way. > FE : ounc: or ilosophic and

    And the bill for Britain wili be ~ mY SMITH Humanistic Studies,” In mo
    £ sounne to £500,000, ” reports from Paris on yore $ planning ee meetings of}

    long the elegant Avenue Klebe: ?, ‘learned men’ such as the In-
    n Paris is the former German UNESCO's — spending ternational Commission on Folk
    Jecupation headquarters, t h e Arts and Folk Lore in ‘lovely
    ‘uxury Hotel Majestic. For a tant member countries, three- places like Berne, Istanbul, Pal-

    rent of £18,000 a year it now
    houses 750 UNESCO employees of
    18 nationalities,

    The Majestic’s tenants are the

    »est paid, tax-free office workers

    n the world. One in four has a
    ‘ar—most of them foreign, im-
    »orted duty free with sterling and
    lollars.
    They and their hotel are an
    ‘-tonishing proof that behind the
    ‘egular series of vague resolu-
    ions, recommendations, studies,
    o-ordinations, considerations, and

    oh yes— ultations, the mystic and remote
    six-letter
    epresent some positive reality.

    Positive .

    For the privileged
    Majestic are certain
    ind on occasions even realistic,

    They have voted themselves
    his year 10 per cent. cost-of-liv-
    ing and salary increases. Now
    ‘they are negotiating with the
    French Government for duty-free
    cigarettes,

    And around the Majestic are
    parked at any one time. more
    plendid foreign cars, with yellow
    Diplomatic Corps ,plates, than in
    any other spot in ‘is, For senior
    executives have diplomatic rank
    too,

    Now the Majestic has produced
    its highest provisional budget. It
    is to be discussed this month by
    500 delegates from .65 countries.

    This gigantic ” ‘talk-feast, to
    which Britain is sending 19 dele-
    gates and staff at sits, ewn cost,
    will plan the next year’s cultural
    exchanges and their price.

    It will try to see if nine reluc-

    s at the

    Our Reade

    Congratulations
    To The Editor, The Advocate—

    SIR,—No time is better suited

    xr the assessment of a task than
    it its completion, It is because of
    ‘hat, that I take this fitting op-
    portunity to offer my sincere con-
    gratulation and thanks to Mr, F.
    A. Hoyos and Mr, John Prideaux
    for the very interesting and in-
    formar articles they have been
    contribating to ‘your newspaper
    for the past few weeks.

    The task was no doubt onerous,
    but they have succeeded in a
    large wa¥ fu bringing to the pub-
    lic of Barbados a true picture of
    their heroes, and the background
    of their struggles as a people.

    Seldom, if ever, have we been
    treated to such a thorough expo-
    ition ef the facts of our history,
    nd.such penetrating analysis of
    ur great sons as was the case at
    issue, .

    Sir, my_only hope is that their
    work will not be left there, but
    that it will _be put into BOOK
    FORM, for the.use of ourselves,
    ind posterity, Is not the work of
    these two gentlemen the correct
    material to be introduced in our
    , whereby our children can
    learn something about themselves?

    chool

    word UNESCO does

    positive,"



    quarters of a million pounds be-
    hind with their subscriptions, cen
    be persuaded
    more than academie enthusiasm
    for world cultural conferences,
    What sort of programme wilt
    UNESCO's conference debate for
    next year? Well, of course, it does

    ; not know yet. But let us take a

    sample—the last month’s opera-
    tions; a fair average twelfth of
    the blessings for which we Brit-
    ish alone will be asked to pay
    close on half a million pounds in
    1953.

    Let it be understood
    UNESCO paid an average of 20

    per cent. travel expenses for all a

    the comings. and goings, and from
    £3 10s, to £5. 5s. in dollars as
    daily subsistence allowances for
    all the “experts” involved.

    First we had a “Constitutive
    Conference” to plan the formation
    of the International Social Science
    Council,

    Then we had a “Committee of
    Experts” (fares and allowances
    on the usual basis) to discuss the
    rights of the average man to
    “participate in the cultural life
    of the community.”

    They meant : Can we freely go
    to art shows, theatres, cinemas,
    and read the books and listen to
    the music we like?

    After much discussion these ex~
    perts decided we cau.

    Next in Rangoon there was a
    “seminar” for South Asian and
    South Pacific youth leaders on
    education. Frankly, I cannot find
    out what they did or who they
    were. But there was certainly no
    political sereening for these

    2
    rs 39ays
    eo
    The books on Sir Walter Raleigt
    and Lord Nelson have outlivec

    their usefulness,
    L. B. BRATHWAITE.

    Health Centres
    To_the Editor, The Advocate—

    to show a litue

    that

    ermo, ‘and Florence—fares paid,
    of course.

    After that came the “Pro-
    visional Committee on Science
    Abstracting.” The report on what
    they abstracted beyond ten dollars
    a day living allowance is not yet
    available,

    Then we had an “International
    Committee on Monuments and
    Historical Sites,” This august body
    resolved that “in the event of
    armed conflict” — I understand
    they meant war—monuments like
    | UNESCO ought to be neutral.

    £1,000 a Week

    Next came a delicious piece—
    meeting of experts on the politi-
    cal role of women, Most of them
    were men, and they reached
    similar conclusions to a woman
    named Pankhurst well over 40
    years ago,

    The month ended with three
    especially dreary conferences on
    “Voluntary International Work
    Camps,” “Young Workers’ Prob-
    lems,” and “Group Travel Grants
    for Workers.”

    This last is the sort of thing
    that sent Austrian firemen to
    Stockholm to see how the Swedes
    put fires out.
    oe found they used water,

    For its administrative work
    alone in this remiarkable month
    of achievement the Majestic’s
    Paris bill was nearly £440,000,
    Britain’s share of that ,;was just
    over £1,000 a week.

    I trust you are enjoying your
    money's worth.

    | —L.E.S.



    Not Compositor

    ‘o, The Editor, The Advocate.
    Sm,—I notice an item in your
    per of the 12th inst, under the

    aeading of “12 Months for Steal-

    ing” on Page 5. In the item is the

    ame Chesterfield Alleyne which
    is also my name and I would like
    lyou to notify your readers that it

    wis not Chesterfield Alleyne the

    Sir,—May I suggest that thew Compositor

    Leader of our Government inform 4

    CHESTERFIELD ALLEYNE.

    the Secretary of State for the Col- ; °

    onies that, in view of the proposed

    Salary and conditions of Service,
    it is extremely unlikely that any
    Medical graduate with the addi-
    Uonal qualification- of a D.P.H.
    would apply for the post of Medi-
    cal Officer in charge of any Health
    Centre in Barbados.

    If the Government cannot pay
    more it should face the facts and
    not insist on the additional D.P.H.
    qualification. Plans however
    praiseworthy become useless if
    barriers are created which prevent
    them from being implemented.
    Any well qualified Doctor with a
    year’s Tropical experience is quite
    capable of being in charge of a
    Health Centre.

    At present it appears that Health
    Centres, like Federation, will re-
    main a perennial topic of discus-
    sion,

    MEDICO.

    Disestablishment
    To, The Editor, The Advocate,

    SIR,—I was much horrified to
    see that the Government had not
    acted with such prudent economy
    as to include disestablishment of
    the Church in its Five Year Plan,
    but an official statement that the
    Five Year Plan is not all the legis-
    lation the Government intends
    making has brought me some
    relief.

    The community ean surely ben-
    efit from a disestablished Church,
    and the revenue obtained from
    that source, which at present is
    f deliberate waste, could do much
    to relieve the suffering masses in
    this Island from their miseries.

    I am,
    Yours truly,
    ECONOMIST.

    Government pointed out

    work behind as well as in front of the
    camera.

    Unlike Chaplin, however, he will allow a
    lady named Sylvia Fine to write the words
    and music of his first film production,
    “Knock on Wood,” mostly to be made in
    London. In private life she is Mrs, Kaye.

    * * *

    CUNARD quickly snuffed out a water-
    front rumour about the Queen liners. The
    rumour: They would be laid up for major
    alterations and fitted with stabilising fins.

    The truth, according to Cunard: They will
    be out of service for a seven-week overhaul
    only. But tourist-class quarters may be some-

    what enlarged for Coronation year,

    * * *
    NEW YORK’S youngest, highest-priced
    newspaper, the Daily Compass, died a quiet

    death. It was Left-wing and sold for about

    8d. a copy. Starting with a circulation of
    150,000, it ended with 30,000.

    * we *
    IN HOLLYWOOD a picket parades along

    reads

    North Edinburgh-street. His sign
    “Esther, please, please let me visit my baby.”
    Philip Chain is picketing his divorced wife
    Esther, who refuses to let him see their
    three-year-old daughter Darlene.

    * * *

    IN World War II Mrs. Omer Willette got a
    telegram announcing Sergeant Willette’s
    death in action. It was a mistake. Two weeks
    ago came another wire announcing his death
    in action in Korea. Last night a telephone
    call from Tokyo—Sergeant Willette on the
    line to say he is only wounded and will be
    home soon. Says seven-year-old George Will-
    ette: “Daddy is bullet proof.”

    HE PAYS FOR SMASH HITS

    By HENRY LOWRIE



    NEW YORK.
    FRANK RUSSELL, 52-year-old business
    man, smiled as he wrote out cheques
    recently for 12,214 dollars (about £4,700).
    The money was to pay for 3,468 windows
    broken by boys all over America during
    the baseball season.

    Mr. Russell was fulfilling a pledge he
    made 40 years ago when he was caught by
    a policeman after breaking a window in a

    street game.

    “Some day,” he said, “I’ll pay for every

    window which kids break.”

    FROM his poor start, Russell became a
    millionaire—it is incidental that he made
    his money in the glass business—and dis-
    tributed cards to children to give to house-

    owners whose windows they smashed.

    The cards promised free repairs. But the

    ball must be returned to the children.

    Said Russell: “I was warned that I would
    be encouraging juvenile delinquents and
    would probably have to pay 100,000 dollars

    (£35,000).

    “But I'm tickled pink. Boys don’t have to
    run away now.” '
    * * *

    THE WAY these big Hoilywood compan-
    ies roam all over the world making pictures
    riles the local trades unions.

    But over their objections 17 films are
    planned for foreign shooting next year.

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    MEAT DEPT.

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    JUST ARRIVED

    They include “King Arthur and the Round},

    Table” to be made in England and “Briga-
    doon” to be filmed in Scotland and England.
    *

    WITHOUT offering an explanation. the
    in a week-end

    report that, while the number of men in
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    women prisoners has risen by 262. i

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    THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 2

    Rn tn nee tO ae
    Lad Bound Over For §©SS0 PUBLISHES Board Of Health €5 Fine

    0, 1952.

    inflicting Bodily Harm

    . Nineteen-year-old Louis Haynes of Market Hill, St.
    George, was yesterday bound over in the sum of £50 to
    keep the peace for 18 months by Mr. Justice J. W. B. Chen-
    ery after an assize jury found him guilty of inflicting
    grievous bodily harm on 22-year-old Joseph Wickham of

    the same district on July 25 this year.

    When the foreman returned the
    verdict he told the Registrar that
    the jury wished the Court to be
    lenient towards the prisoner.

    Mr. W. W. Reece, Q.C., Solicitor
    General prosecuted for the Crown,
    Mr. F. G. Smith appeared on
    Haynes’ behalf.

    Five witnesses gave evidence for
    the Prosecution.

    Pr, Skomorok said that on July
    25 he examined Joseph Wickham.
    Wickham’s lower jaw was frac-
    tured. The blow wh.ch caused the
    fracture could have been caused
    by a stone. The injury was not
    og to cause permanent disabil-
    Wickham said that on July 25
    he went into a shop belonging to
    a man called Turney on Market
    Hill, St. George, where Haynes and
    others were, He passed near
    Haynes and brushed him. Haynes
    told him not to touch him and he
    asked Haynes what was the mat-
    ter between them. He went fur-
    ther into the shop and when he
    was passing near Haynes again,
    he chanced to bounce him. Haynes
    pushed him and they began to
    fight. Turney ordered them out of
    the shop and as they were going
    out, Haynes.said he was going to
    — him, down.

    e 8 to walk home when
    someone San While he was
    swinging around on being called,
    he was struck with a stone which
    fractured his jaw.

    Tap On Shoulder
    Cross-examined he said he had
    tapped Haynes on his shoulder
    and said, “This is a sock,” but that
    was only an expression common
    to the district. Before he was
    struck with the stone he did not
    threaten to shoot Haynes, 7
    Blair Burke said he was in the
    shop’ when Wickham tapped
    Haynes. Haynes told him not to
    tap him again and when Wickham
    again touched him and they began
    to scuffle, the shop proprietor or-
    dered them out of the shop. He
    did not see what happened when
    they went out on the road,
    Hercules St. Hill said when the
    shop proprietor sent Haynes and
    Wickham out of the shop, Wick-
    ham told Haynes he was going to
    shoot him. Haynes ran down the
    road and Wickham did not pur+

    sue him. Later Wickham came
    back with a cut on his jaw.
    Cross-examined he said that

    Haynes told Wickham on more
    than four occasions to leave him
    alone.

    Conway Burke said that he was
    at the shop the night when Wick-
    ham and Haynes had the scuffle.

    - After the shop proprietor ordered

    them out of the shop, Wickham
    told Haynes, ‘The only way I do
    not shoot you is if God take me.”
    When he heard that threat he ad-
    vised Haynes not to go down the

    road.
    Self Defence

    Mr. Smith said that the defence
    was not quibbling over the high
    possibility that Haynes fractured
    Wickham’s jaw, but in the light of
    the evidence the defence was say-
    ing that the blow that caused the
    injury was made in self defence.
    They had heard the evidence of
    Wickham’s. continuous aggression
    and his threatening to shoot
    Haynes. Haynes could not but be
    perturbed at the idea of Wick-
    ham’s threatening to shoot him
    and immediately after the threat
    chasing him down the road a dark
    fight, the case was a perfect case
    of self defence.

    Since Wickham’s threat to shoot
    Haynes had been so solemn that it
    had put fear in the mind of the
    witness who advised Haynes
    against going down the road, it
    would have put more fear even
    in the mind of the man to whom
    it was directed.

    All they had to do was to de-
    cide whetner the injury was great-
    er than the occasion demanded.

    After half an hour’s deliber-

    . ation the jury returned a verdict

    of guilty. Haynes was bound over
    for 18 months.



    Assize Diary

    THURSDAY NOV. 20
    Reg. vs. Nathaniel Browne
    Reg. vs, Ethan Brathwaite

    and Denzil Harris





    SPE

    50:

    Venezuelan Fined
    £10 For Dangerous
    . >
    Driving

    His Worship Mr. E. A, McLeod,
    Police Magistrate of District “A”,
    yesterday tined 29-year-old Com-
    mission Agent Hugo Garin of
    Caracas £10 to be paid forthwith
    when he pleaded guilty of driv+
    ing the car X-509 on Biack Rock
    road on November 11 in a manner
    dangerous to the public.

    Garin was also convicted, rep-
    rimanded and discharged for driv-
    ing the car X-5C9 without an
    appropriate licence on November
    11

    5 L

    “Mr. W. W. Reece Q.C., who
    prosecuted for “the Police asked
    the Court to amend the original
    charge to one of driving in a man-
    ner dangerous to the public. In
    the original charge Garin was
    alleged to have caused bodily
    harm to Meta Cox and Carter Cox,
    two school children, through wil-
    ful neglect while driving the ca!
    X-509 on Black Rock road on
    November 11, .

    Mr, J. S. B. Dear appeared for
    Garin, Sgt. Howard of the Black
    Rock Police Station said that on
    November 11 he went to Black
    Rock road and saw the car X-509
    in the road, and this car was in-

    - volved in an accident with four

    school children who were taken
    to the General Hospital after the
    accident, 2

    He learnt that the defendant
    was the driver of the car.

    REMANDED

    Twenty-four-year-old Elsie Car-
    rington of Richmond Gap, St.
    Michael was remanded with bail
    until November 25 by His Worship
    yesterday on a charge of inflicting
    grievous bodily harm on Dencine
    Spencer also of Richmond Gap cn
    October 3.

    Mr, J, E, T. Brancker is appear-
    ing on behalf of Carrington while
    Sgt. Haynes is prosecuting for the
    Police.

    IGNORED SIGNAL



    Lionel Humphrey of Nursé
    Land, St. Michael was fined 10/-
    by His Worship yesterday when
    he was found guilty of ignoring
    a police stop signal while driving
    a van on Constitution Road about
    10.15 a.m. on October 15,

    Inspector King of the Central
    Police Station said that on Octo-

    ber 15 he was on duty along
    Constitution Road, The lower
    part of Belmont going towaras

    Queen’s Park was impassable.

    Due to this a sign which read:
    “Caution, Road Obstructed” was
    put at the corner of Belmont
    read, He saw a motor van coming
    towards him and noticed that the
    defendant was the driver,

    Hoe signalled the driver. He did
    not stop’and only pulied up after
    he had travelled about 20 yards
    from him.

    THREE ROBBERIES

    Cynthia Sergeant of Greenland,
    St, Andrew, reported to the Police
    vesterday that a os ones
    shopping in Roebuc reet on
    Nosunber 18, the sum of $150
    was stolen from her.

    George Kellman cf Ashbury
    St. George reported that his house
    was broken and entered on No-
    vember 17 and ee to the
    value of $121 was stolen, L

    tents Cicatenes of Oistin,
    Christ Church reported that gro-
    ceries were stolen from his shop
    ‘at Qistin on November 18.

    The Police are investigating
    these reports,



    RATES OF EXCHANGE

    NOVEMBER. 19, 1952
    w

    Selling NE YORK Buying
    * i eques. on :
    va ete Sore 70 7/10% pr.
    is ht of Demand
    ort Beat 10 5/10% pr.
    ga4/i0% pr. Cabie =: ne tease iss ns
    70 9/10% pr. Currency 69 2/100% pr.
    edvaves sss» COUPONS 68 5/10% pr.
    50% pr Silver 20% pr.
    CANADA
    5 0% pr. Cheques on
    ee m Bankers TaA% pr
    Demand Drafts 73.85% pr-
    Sight Drafts 73 7/ 10% pr.
    75 8/10% pr. Cable ustategnsnn®
    7 7 72 5/10°% pr.
    3/10¢ rreng
    Ea, veh Saiuons 71 8/10% pr.

    Silver 20% pr




    i pr.



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    5.50 per 110 Ib, bag POTATOES—per 110 lb. bag... 5.56
    4.00 per 5 Ib, tin PROCESSED CHEESE—per 5 lb tin 4,00
    96 per tin CRAWFORDS CREAM CRACKERS

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    The Above Items for Cash & Carry Customers Only

    MAXAM CORNED BEEF HASH—1-Ib. tin........... 78
    MAXAM OX "TONGUES—2-lb. tin ..........6. 0.0000. 4.24
    MAXAM STEAK & KIDNEY PUDDING—l-lb. tin... 69
    SWIFTS LUNCHEON BEEF with CEREAL—12-oz. tin 83
    SALISBURY.CORNED MUTTON—per tin ............ 68
    PALETHORPES HARICOT MUTTON—per tin ........ 56
    PALETHORPES STEWED STEAK—per tin .......... 67
    PALETHORPES MEAT ROLL—per tin .............. 64
    PALETHYORPES READY MEAL—per tin ..... C0 Loh uy 63 4
    HARRIS'S GALANTINE OF VEAL, HAM & TONG Ps

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    NEW MAP OF
    CARIBBEAN

    A very informative and colour-
    ful map of the Caribbean has
    just been issued by Esso Standard
    Oil, S.A. This map contains in-
    formation on all means of trans-
    portation which exist in the area
    and also shows in large detail,
    fifteen of the most important
    islands of this region. It has been
    published as a means of pro-
    moting travel throughout the
    Caribbean and at the same time
    ie foster understanding and

    nowledge anfong the countries
    and territories which the area
    comprises.

    Although the size of the map
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    convenient and although it is
    packed with information, it is ex-
    tremely easy to read. All sched-
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    terest on the various island in-
    sets. The legends, notes, ‘and
    other explanatory details con-
    tained in the map, have been
    printed in English, Spanish and
    French.

    The Esso Map of the Caribbean
    has fulfilled a long felt need in
    this area and it has been very
    favourably received by Govern-
    ment officials, travel bureaux,
    tourist committees, airline and
    steamship companies, as a very
    important contribution to the de-
    velopment of tourism and travel
    in the Caribbean.

    Acting Governor
    At St. Leonard’s

    Schools

    His lxcellency the Acting
    Governor, the Hon. R. N. Turner,
    attended by Captain W. H. R.
    Armstrong, A.D.C., yesterday
    morning visited the St. Leon-
    ard’s School for boys and the St.
    Leonard’s school for girls.

    On arrival at the boys’ school,
    His Excellency was met by Mr.
    C. Glindon Reed, Director of
    Education, and the Acting Head-
    master, Mr. G. C. Millar, who ac-
    companied His Excellency on a
    tour of the school,



    Mr, Turner then inspectéd the
    girls’ school where he was met
    by the Headmistress, Mrs. C.
    Griffith.

    Later, His Excellency paid an
    unofficial visit to the Bank Hall
    Grammar School where he was
    received by the Headmaster, Mr.
    J. 1D. Bancroft.



    Activities Al
    Y.M.C.A.

    Members of the Y.M.C.A, are
    working on their playing field at
    the new Headquarters. Already
    a fairly large area of the field
    has been levelled and_ grass
    planted.

    On December 10 the Y.M.C.A,
    Glee Club, conducted by Mr.
    O. A. “Graffie” Pilgrim, formerly
    of the Combermere School Glee
    Club, will stage their Christmas
    Concert at the Y.M.C.A. Naval
    Hall. The Police Band will assist
    with the programme.

    The Y.M.C.A. Week of Prayer
    ended on Sunday last, The at-
    tendance throughout the week
    was the best for many years.

    Make

    XMAS
    Draws near and the |
    Seasonal Hospitality

    is bound to
    make Extra
    Demands
    Upon Your
    Kitchen
    and Table
    Appointments
    Be sure
    You have
    all those
    little things
    which tend
    to ensure the
    success of
    the
    occasion





    ; ®





    HARRISON'S





    BARBADOS ADVOCATE

    Receive Report Ors





    Imposed On

    Tenantry Roads Woman For Wounding

    The General Board of Health
    at their meeting yesterday re-
    ceived Reports from the Govern-
    ment Chief Sanitary Inspector on
    the condition of existing tenanury
    roads at Ashton Hall, St. Peter,
    and Walkers, St. Anarew.

    The Chie: Sanitary. Inspector
    in his report en the Ashton Hall
    road stated that during rainy
    weather the roads are !mpass-
    able to pedestrian and vehicular
    wattic in certain places, and
    added that “no attempt has ever
    been made by the Vendor to put
    the roaas in oraer.”

    ithe Boara viewed the matter
    very se:ously, and decided to
    wene to the vendor drawing to his
    attention the provisions of the Act,
    and requiring him to compiete the
    necessary works.

    in his Report on the Walkers’
    Tenantry road, the ‘Chief Sani-
    tary Inspector stated in_ part:

    During the course of his inspec-
    tion, it was observed that the
    road was grass grown throughout,
    and it was understood from
    some of the tenants, that during
    rainy weather thé roads were
    generally flooded at certain points.

    Midway along the road leading
    into the tenantry, a bridge had
    been constructed ta span the
    water course which passes at
    this point, The water passing
    through the course has under-
    mitted the bridge aver a period
    of time and the bridge is now
    only suitable at one point for
    the use of © pedestrians, but
    wholly dangerous for vehicular
    traffic.

    Dr. E. B, Carter, Chairman of
    the Board pwinted out that in
    the case of the Walkers’ Tenan-
    try, the requirements of provid-
    ing roads had been met, but in
    process of time, the roads had
    got into a state of disrepair,

    The question was, who should
    now carry out the necessary
    repairs, He said that in regard
    to maintenance, no provision was
    made in the Act, and in that
    respect he thought that the Act
    was “all wrong,” and that there
    was nothing that the Board could
    do in the matter.



    Sir George Seel
    Visits Baby Creche

    Sir George and Lady Seel
    visited the Children’s Goodwill
    League and Baby Creche on

    Tuesday at 10.00 a.m. and spent
    nearly an hour looking around
    the building.

    On arrival they were met by
    Mr, John Beckles, M.B.E., and
    the Matron, Miss Browne.

    After completing the tour of
    the building, Sir George wrote
    the following in the Visitors’
    Book; “This institution must be
    a .source of great pride to Mr
    Beckles and the staff. For
    efficiency, cleanliness and a-feel-
    ing of enthusiasm, it compares
    most favourably with any similar

    institution I have seen in the
    West Indies. I wish it every
    success for the future.”

    The Seventh Annual Benefit

    Concert, sponsored by the Friend-
    ly Committee in the U.S.A,
    aid of the Children’s Goodwill
    League was held at the Mount
    Morris Presbyterian Church on
    November 9 when a well ar-
    ranged programme was presented.

    Many Barbadians serve on the
    Committee.

    No Name, No Parents

    The male child which was left
    at the Children’s Goodwill
    League last month by a mother
    who did mot give her name and
    address, is still in St. Michael’s
    Almshouse where it was later
    taken, ,

    Mr, John Beckles told the Ad-
    vocate; “The child is without a
    name, without a mother or with-
    out a father. I hope the parents
    will have a heart and claim him,”

    E

    HARRISON'S

    Your Headquarters
    for Hardware! |!

    OUR STOCKS
    include —

    CUILERY in 3 Grades
    WIRE DISH COVERS
    POTATO RICERS
    KITCHEN KNIVES

    FORKS and SPOONS

    CORKSCREWS and

    CAN OPENERS

    FISH KETTLES
    VACUUM FLASKS
    ICING SYRINGES

    WIRE STRAINERS
    PLOUR SIFTERS
    WOOD SPOONS

    ICE CREAM FREEZERS
    LIME SQUEEZERS
    PCTATO CHIPPERS
    COVERED ROASTERS
    BREAD and CAKE TINS
    CANISTER SETS
    MEASURING SPOONS
    PASTRY ROLLERS
    TIN GRATERS

    — Also —

    and TUBES





    Mr. Justice J. W. B. Chenery yesterday fined Louise
    Blackett of Sargeant Street, St. John, £5 to be paid in seven

    days or in defaalt twe months’ imprisonment

    assize

    when an

    jury found her guilty of wounding Audine Harewood

    of the same district on August 12.

    Blacketi was charged on two
    counts, wounding with intent to
    maim, disfigure or do grievous

    harm, and two, wounding
    The jury found her not guilty on
    the first count.

    Mr. W. W. Reece, Q.C., Solicitor
    General, prosecuted for the Crown.
    Mr. (+, B. Niles represented Black-
    ett,

    The Prosecution called five wit-
    nesses

    Dr. Colin Vaughn said that he
    exam.icd Harewood on August 12
    when she was brought to the
    hospital. She had a two inch
    wound on her chest, one behind
    herueft esr, one on the left fore-
    arm and one on the left calf. Ali
    the wounds required _ stitches.
    They were nét wounds whicn
    vould endanger life, but he would
    not call them trivial because some
    were very long. +

    Cross «examined he said that he

    examinea Blackett the same day.
    She had two lacerations on het

    face,

    Harewood said that
    Blackett and she were not on
    friendly terms for many years.
    They used to work in the same
    cane field together and the un-
    friendliness arose because Black-
    ett suspected that she told others
    something concerning her.

    On August 12 they were home at
    Sargeant Street, St. John, about

    7 p.m. when she heard a_ noise
    outside. She went out and discov-
    ered that some children were
    quarrelling. She held her child
    and was going home when she
    was struck in her back with a

    stone. Blackett then came to her
    and held her. They started to
    fight and Blackett cut her with o
    knife on the chest, behind her
    left ear, on her left forearm and
    on her left calf. ¢

    Cross-examined she said that
    she was not detained at the hos-
    pital on account of the wounds
    and the stitches were taken out
    a week later, She had once been
    fined 40/- for cutting her own
    child, once for wounding someone
    else, once for throwing water on
    another person, and had been
    fined for beating Blackett, Her re-
    puted husband had also been fined
    for beating Blackett,

    Tried To Stop Fight

    Joseph Bancroft said he was the
    reputed husband of Harewood.
    When the fight occurred on August
    12, he tried to stop it, but one of
    Blackett’s sons knocked him down
    with a stone,

    Cross examined he said he had
    been fined for wounding Blackett
    He denied having a knife durin
    the fight or having exclai
    after the fight that he had acci-
    dentally cut his reputed wife, tak-
    ing her for Blackett because of
    the darkness. ,

    Helena Harewood, Audine’s sis-
    ter, said that she tried to stop the
    fight and Blackett also cut her.

    Cross-examined she said that she
    had twice been fined for beating
    people,

    Cpl. Garfield Sargeant said thgt
    Harewood and Blackett had given
    over each other.

    Blackett gave evidence in her
    own defence. She said Audine
    Harewood beat her and after the
    scuffle they had on the ground,
    she heard Harewood's reputed
    husband exclaim that he had ac-
    cidentally cut Harewood when at-
    tempting to cut her.

    Cross-examined she said that
    Audine Harewood threw her to
    the ground and lay over her. !t
    was then that she was cut.

    ——————



    ‘

    Doubtless
    You will
    require some
    Replacements

    and
    Additions
    for
    both Table
    and Kitchen
    use

    This, is
    where We
    can help

    for |
    We have a
    complete

    range of

    } all the
    Requisite

    Items.

    Try US first
    for all
    Your

    Requirements



    A Big Assortm-nt of Domestic Utilities in
    {| GLASS, ENAMELLED, TIN,
    li AND ALUMINIUM WARE



    |e



    Hardware Store
    Tels, 3142 & 2364

    Neily Blackett, her daughter,
    said that she saw Audine _Hare-
    wood and Joseph Bancroft beat
    her mother and saw Bancroft with
    a knife in his pocket before the
    fight started. ‘

    Mr, Niles said that he was not
    denying that the fight occurred or
    that Audine Harewood was cut,
    but it was for the jury to decide
    who cut her. It was evident that
    there had been a big family fight
    and that Audine Harewood was a
    woman accustomed to being con-
    victed for jighting. The jury could



    PAGE FIVE

    XMAS is just around the
    Corner...

    Why not Brighten up your

    Home with

    “SILVER STAR’
    - CONGOLEUM

    The Floor. Covering in many





    searcely do otherwise than come
    to

    Lovely Coiours!

    the conclusion that Audine

    Harewood's reputed husband had

    c

    darkness.

    0



    ’







    ut Audine accidentally in the

    AND
    So EASY

    To

    The jury found Blackett guilty
    f wounding Harewood.



    Diamond Riugs
    LOUIS L. BAYLEY
    Bolton Lane



    CLEAN!

    STS) THAT ARE
    KASILY POSTED.

    POST EARLY FOR
    CHRISTMAS

    We have a beautiful As-
    sortment of Hand Painted

    eather Novelties with the
    Crest of Barbados. Just the
    for

    Gift
    abroad.

    your trieands



    a

    Cur Key Case
    Pocket Manicure in Case
    Pocket Dictionary
    Cigt. Case Leather Parel
    Cigt. Case (one Hand)
    Ladies’ Oval Zipp Purse
    Letter Opener in Case
    Ladies’ Handbag Purse
    (2 kinds)
    Shoe Horn in Case
    Shopping List
    Loose Leaf Note Book
    Gents’ Wallet (Long)
    Comb & Nail File in Case
    Penknife in Case (2 kinds)
    Comb in Case (2 kinds)
    Ladies’ Shopping Purse
    (2 kinds)
    Mending Set in Case
    Key Case (2 kinds)
    Book Marker
    Round Zipp Purse

    PHONE 4918
    Match Cases
    Gents’ Tray Purse

    SSF
    Hair Grips in Case

    Tobacco oven (Zige) \ BEA UTY
    Gents’ 3-Way Zipp Wallets PREPARATIONS

    with the Map of Barbados
    in Colour, The Map of the



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    VASES IN MANY COLOURS

    LOVELY GLASSWARE ROGERS CUTLERY
    STOVES 1, 2 & 3 BURNERS
    BREAKFAST, TEA & DINNER SETS

    cexera. HARDWARE suru

    RICKETT STREET (Opposite Post Office)




    West Indies in Gold, the ‘ . i
    Map of Barbados in Gold | RECENTLY ARRIVED '
    and the Crest of Barbados |

    Ardena Soapless Oil Shampoo

    Ardena Blue Grass Cream Rinse

    Ardena Spun-Cream Pin Curl
    Permanent Wave Kit

    in Gold. The above Wal- |
    lets are specially made to |
    fit the New British Carib-
    bean Notes without fold-
    ing.

    Prices of the above Leather

    Novelties range from
    3/. up to 30/-

    |Super fine Spun Cream Perma-
    | nent Wave

    | Ardena Super fine Spun Cream

    Also Permanent Wave
    We have an_ attractive ]]) Ardena Spun Cream Permanent
    Ladies’ Compact andi! Wave Refills
    Handbag Mirror with Col-
    oured views of Barbados, 'Ardena Blue Grass Bath Mats ..

    ‘Ardena B. Grass Solid Cologne.

    | Ardena Sachets in “My Love” &
    “Blue Grass”

    Sale at

    KNIGHTS
    LTD.

    EXHIBITION

    BRUCE WEATHERHEAD st

    LTD.

    Head of Broad Street Beauty Cases

    , Also Attractive Gift Sets



    THE



    2



    SEE OUR WONDERFUL
    RANGE OF DRESS
    MATERIALS Including —

    WHITE SHARKSKIN @
    $1.86, $2.32 & $2.46 per yd.
    COLOURED SHARKS KIN $2.09 per yd.

    in Pacific Blue, Surf Acqua, Lavender
    Grey, Smoke Blue, Champagne
    PLAIN ROMAINE @
    $1.50, $1.80 & $2.16 per yd.

    PLAIN SEA ISLAND COTTON
    at $2.30 per yd.

    in White, Bamboo, Blue
    FLOWERED SEA ISLAND COTTON @
    $2.58, $4.08, $4,83 per yd.
    PLAIN CREPES . @ $1.08 per yd.

    WHITE & COLOURED EMBROIDERE?
    ANGLAISE @ $4.78, $4.88, $4.63, $4.34,
    $4.45 & $4.52 per yd.

    WHITE & COLOURED EMBROIDERED
    ORGANDIE @ $3.63, $3.95 & $4.76 per yd.

    EMBROIDERED MUSLIN @ $5.33 per yd.

    —

    CAVE SHEPHERD & Co., Ltd |

    Bee BAU eae ER







    Street.

    Broad

    TS

    SaaS aS SS SSS SS







    seni istnainenatiaaatoniseishies
    WHAT'S ON TODAY

    Court of Grand Segsions
    Meeting, St



    one

    YESTERDAY'S WEATHER REPORT

    Retatal from Codrif#ton: ha
    & ‘otal Rainfall for meh to date: 2.24 in
    . 4 Highest Temperaturey 86.5 °F
    Lowest Temperature). 71.5 °F
    Wind Velocity 8 mil@® per hour
    ‘ Barometer (9 a.m, 29,806 (1 p.m.) 28
    : TO-DAY
    / Sunrise: 6.00 a.m
    Sunset: 6.32 p.m

    Moon: New, November 17
    Lighting: 6.00 p. rr

    High Tide: 6.21 a.m
    Low Tide; 11,25 p.m

    10.00 a.m

    Lucy Vestry 3.4 n
    Police Band Concert, Princess pa
    Alice Playing Field 7.45 p.m.
    Meeting of Alliance Fran- SS
    calse, B.C 8.00 p.m ¥ 5

    te

    Por the cause that lacks assistance,
    Gainst the wrongs that need resistance,
    For the future in the distance,

    And the good that I can do

    ar bados

    ESTABLISHED 1895



    5.97 pom

    THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1952. PRICE: FIVE CENTS
    ‘ ky f CLEARING BEACH ROAD :

    Maintenance Of Canadian Mai

    Important To BWI Sugar Producers

    Commonwealth Sugar |
    Agreement Incentive
    To Greater Production:

    (From Our Own Correspondent)







    | Chinese Attacks |
    Hurled Back

    SEOUL, Nov. 19.

    Republican |
    Policy To Be |
    |



    Discussed

    NEW YORK, Nov, 19.







    LONDON, Oct. 19 i ident-elect Eisenhower will a troops in hand to hand battles hurled back
    iB , - id. “iseuss with Senat . three heav i is
    Provision made under the Commonwealth Sugar] Taft today the pe the today ‘i eet [ apera: iote pre alld om
    Agreement for meeting the requirements of Canada is}"©W . Republican Administration as ee ¢ Hook’’—w vital mainland ridge guard-
    referred to by Mr. G. Vernon Tate, M.C., Chairman of |""@ [¢sislative programme oe Sie wencee hens 5 ao. Hg ated :
    Caroni in his annual report today. ‘ Mr Eisenhower, who arrived ink Nall artiinny taaaiiree: a ’
    “The importance of maintaining a Canadian market for Ww co ee yesterday from_ his 7 ry a ML cat ies a aalle
    Empire sugar producers needs little emphasis”, he tells} on) ‘Tribe wie wee Freel} _figwever U.N, coeutees as é
    s ¢ . “It is in fact of paramount importance to]a lot of advice hehe fey © Bet} up from their trenches and fox ‘Cit Co il
    ene idere oe etianced feos quite Short from |« nie eercae Tae cen was;holes to hurl back Reds with y unc HERE LABOURERS clear the beach road at Tronts Beach, St. James, for the heavy Mack Truck of
    maya ect indian p ale éd Canada is the Republican Policy airman of) bayonets and fists. The Hook is! ® ' ° Barbados Gulf Of! Co, Ltd., which is loaded with a 25-ton draw-works, to drive on to the highway.
    traditional ties which have jong exist anada is poten-|_ na Repressniatn Committee! “long rolling ridgeline shaped | W ill Tr r iin Heavy oqtipment for the Company is being stored at a warehouse at Bromefield, St, Lucy.
    tially an expanding market. Martin Semative Joseph W |like its name north east of the, y The labourers are standing on one of the steel landing mats which was used to make the road

    i Jn, prospective Speaker
    cf the New House ot Representa-

    tives, we — hie fi ra
    (future, the Commonwealth Sugar] pt 17 qn ot ©. *, be bis first callers

    |

    truce village of Panmunjom just!
    south of tne -38th parallel. It is! I El Ma
    ; Only 20 miles from Seoul. | O ect yor

    Mr. Tate says
    /providing some

    that apart from

    which leads from the public highway on to the beach-head,
    security for the peiigiipiiatiaeeninbaplllt ic



    Jamaica

    re : 11.00 a.m. E:S.T, Later in the 9 i KY | r * l
    : wag (eer eater Be soi [o ty Uae Shae, il, Cage Mat atcee wg] mw ow om commen | ECD President's | U.S. Should
    W ion. “F' art”. he adds. “welator al or, Styles Bridges, Sen-|p.m. Tuesday rushin limell ‘ " m
    ill Raise — Sie a ee rare ae a dlexender Wiley and other | through nine fields ‘of Pharbed PORT-OF-SPAIN, Nov. 19, 4 ’ L Trac: .
    | onaty Fand in rove efficiency”. | and BF ch op: Senators Taft) wire, It took Allied soldiers three| The Port-of-Spain City Coun- 8 ower : @
    Tr. _ | outpu na is tempered | Lewishhinu, Will talk over the! hours of close quarter fighting to|cil which failed to elect a 1952-- ] é SCa es ea } | i
    Cw oan | This brighter note is temperec their tive Programme during) break that assault. At 1.15 a.m.|/1953 Mayor at last Saturday's , . B " 9
    : ea nae ene ¢ eer eee hower erence with Mr. Eisen~i Reds tried again apparently undef| Statutory meeting, agreed by barriers
    (From Qur Own Correspondent) tuudilers Wand brempects fox. 1059 are , ales digtane ete aie ene | eres to seize the hill at alljresolution this afternoon to meet SAINT ROBERT D’ALBON, France, Novy. 19,
    Tha Goversse’ saipuiotmed ie ,|@dversely affected by the severe)hower the men he has recom-|°O*ts: Again U.N, soldiers dreve/@#ain Thursday afternoon _ to The wife and son of the French President and hundreds

    message to the House of Repre-

    crop time weather of 1951

    when

    mended for the Cabinet. Seng |
    Taft told a if ne ie



    off the Reds, make another bid to elect one,

    The resolution followed the read-

    of other sleeping passengers miraculously escaped death

    A ; heavy rain fell almost throughout news conference in : i ' - in} -ar j ona erack all Pullman “Blue
    sentatives to-day that Govern~|the reaping season. The planting] W@shington yesterday that he had Assault Broken ae on ae ae Bar sory oF vy tap early today mene yy freight tr Convention Wednesday night
    ment intended at ‘the earliest! programme was upset and it}Siven Mr, Eisenhower some Cab- Phe Hind) dtteck began. at Sah SAT e | City Gocmeation's coe Train” ploughed into the rear of a freight train, airongly ‘unged. (ie US: 49 1bwe:
    favourable opportunity to raise &lseems certain that the 1953 crop{ it recommendations. atthe Pres- | ayn. Wedeusdae Albee alee Waleatuedee ana test Ge Gael remem One person Was killed andielght lite sitie bartiers {0 help defeat
    new loan in the London market! Witt be smaller than this year's|i@ent-elect’s request. Senator Taft) josq Ab 7, ae Ay eee mt the question jinjured when the swift Paris-

    for Jamaican development. Funds

    enrphasized that ha did not know



    assault in a 40 minute fight. After} whether the matter could riot be



    Communism by fortifvine the



    i i ‘ Marseilles express hurtled out of n
    : | which constituted a record for tl ; i ‘i : : ‘ D Ad I Marsed b oo Two-ld's ec

    raised from the last. loan OL pshencne dig a rece or the whether the men recommended pay ee nc ae ys Gates ta en oe 7. enauer the night, ploughed into the rear old's economy
    London now are nearly all spent i -ofi would be z ad é p ras! 4 , . rae = eens ot arise bo- oars of a freight train and jumped Mr. Truman said the free na-

    : The consolidated net profit at indicate ted and there was'troops then sent out patrols tojeause the statutory duty of ee
    and many development schemes j 9994 997 represents an increase of | ;\© indication here that Mr. Eisen-! search for any Reds lurking in| etecting a Mayor had not been t ote MD the tracks. AN nine were railroad} tions must “find a way to earn
    are in operation or in preparation £150,873 over the profit foe tka hower was ready yet to make any fia brea any sischanied ez flanvaee ph | employees. their own. way in..the world’
    a ye Son tifise Hes -ddviada previous year. Sake oe on Cabinet] “phe last big battle on’ “the | advised that the Couneil may by T t I Madame Vinicert Acriol wife off 'ittout big scale ald from Amer-
    Jamaica not to re eh bi Subject to confirmation at the eee Hook” took place October 27, 28} resolution, fix a new date for the rea y ssue ‘the President and their son Pau! | lee. His message read at the ennual
    more than £3,500,000 in London |A=nual Meeting in London on when 3,000 Chinese attacked U\S,|e'ection of a Mayor. |were aboard the luxury traln when | Werld Trade dinner said in part
    this time and the intention is to December 10 a dividend of two- Ti. S Marines holding the position. BONN, Nov. i9. |iie accident happened 33 miles“! don't believe I have to itemize
    raise that amount as early next}Pence per two shilling unit of], United States Marines beat off the attacks Chancellor Konrad Adenauer! south of Lyons shortly atter it|for you Kremnlins new blueprint
    year as conditions on the London ,8tock will be paid. This is the : causing heavy losses to Reds Wet | began repairing his splintered |)ad pulled out of Liyons station at] for suecess—Stalin’s belief is that
    market to | Same as for the last six years. at one point breached the Allied

    make it advisable
    invite public subscription.
    The Governor said this im-
    mediate loan was a temporary
    measure pending full considera-



    National

    Stands Firm

    UNITED NATIONS, New York,

    A Victory
    For Tories

    main line, |

    In the central and eastern see-
    tor of the front temperature

    {Kuropean Army

    political fences in an attempt tojiwenty minutes after midnight.

    West
    the | ag
    the

    of the
    Treaty and
    Pact before

    Yesterday

    win ratification

    The one fatality was identified
    German Peace

    the ticket collector for
    leeping cay company, Traffic was

    Christmas recess. MP. j completely blocked on the line

    the

    the West will fail to Solve its
    trade and economic probleme and
    will fall to fighting within itself

    However J wish to point out that

    NEW YORK, Nov. 19.
    President Truman in a message
    fo the National Foreign Trade

    the world and to assure a decent

    dropped to 8 degress above zer i ‘ » free W's long range eco-
    tion of a large scale loan pro- wih i Nov, 19. Fahrenheit, A had precede duel LONDON, Noy, 19, | S@enauer suffered the worst {the double tracked main link down Mahle soo. aA be. G0 sible
    Same agpinat: She DEE Seroule fecessity ., the United States is standing| broke out in a sector on the| Prime Minister Churchill's Con- os oy tauar Nautomanne (tte Rhone Valley through Central only if its member nations find
    of the ee s the ot en fim against mounting pressure|eastern front costing North{servatives more than maintained ajority” iH | asin Parliament!" ince ways to earn thelr owns way ta
    the isarid, eee ee ALGIERS, Nov. 19, |£79Mm, Western Allies to accept| Koreans 30 killed or wounded,] their eee eee mar}





    Opening the regular session of
    the Algerian Assembly yesterday,



    India’s plan for ending the Korean
    war. A serious rift appeared in the

    United Nations also threw back

    gin last night in the first crucial
    a brief Red probe.

    fest of their drive to roll back

    collapsed and his motion to ratify ) The freight train was engaged
    the treaties next week was de-.)) shifting operations when the









    standard of living to their people

    : i i i ) feated by 19 to 16 votes. Mr. |) heavy “Blue” roared out off It must be able to do this with-
    “4 ene @ i z .{ making as the Committee of eight : : Socialist legislation passed by the : ong heavy Aa gta “ee
    Politicicam | crm sis eran presence | counties wel screlly forthe nga] Aiea att bombers dastapag| previo Cabour Mdune ot Cone] MGMT ae Efe, Hip night and plough ii” at age Ball a
    e ' ‘ in North Africa is a nationals *™@¢ in an effort to reconcile the; 115 Communist trucks, bri vag: ~ Phey approved 808-2621 (in, who either voted with the : ~~ bworld on the one hand can increase
    - roy necessity on which we will not] {dian proposition with the United| Winter supplies and ammunition} the decisive second reading of the Socialists and Communists against DS tucti curb inflatior
    Sus mde bargain.” France’s achievements! ©‘#tes peace resolution plan on the| to Communist front lines, B-29] Bill restoring Britain’s nationaliz- his motion or simply disappeared ° Awa et ‘| f its roduces
    in the social, cultural and economic | Pound that it gives no assurance] Superforts bombed Red supply|ed trucking industry to private vhen the vatin, bells rang “Lat Steamship feoipeeltive, 4h he Ur i rd 3 ites
    field speak for themselves. France| *@t war ppisoners will not be| centres at Sonchon 35 miles from| ownership. Conservatives also in- i en ht Mr yer Miss ‘dalled a Ww competitive, and the United States
    (From Our Own Correspondent) waits for examples of those who} °rced to return to their home-|the Manchurian border and a|{tend to denationalize the iron and| {St nig his Ck ett Di aide on the other hand reduces its bar-
    ‘ KINGSTON, Nov. 18. criticise her. She needs no less.) ‘@nds. Krishna Menon is sche-| target five miles south of Sariwon, | sieel indus Ties, but the battle on} C@ucus of his C hrist an moe om is ; d rier: to trade they will show up
    Florizel Glasspole, British sons, Mr, Leonard said. in refer.| @tied to expound the Indian plan U.S. fighter pilots shot down or|those issues is to come tater. Union seein in an a temp uns roun Stalin’s lie,
    gs Rate mete Teaty | ence to Asiatic nations’ criticisms|2ully to the Political Committee| damaged 13 Red M.LG.-18's in ror NE heleationinthnenstieiirt big: The President's message
    : ; on i 3 ale f : mle eae { “ne f erica te
    and Parliamentary Secretary of , of French rule in North Africa. rites it meets at 3.00 p.m. E.S.T, He duels Monday and Tues- NANIMO, British Columbia, : ec eee ‘
    5 —UP. y. ay. Nr ’ ? ‘ é ‘
    the People’s Nationa] Party oppo- —UP. —UP. ‘ Nov, 19. and improvements in those nations
    sition in the Jamaica House of , French Ti iS A. six-thousand ton Canadian | © | IL ocak oes
    Re y, S - / Toop a Ss A ; c rs ; living standards, “We can’t al
    presentatives was suspended Ne G ment 3 Pacifie passenger steamship of : St naam? Meation
    from his services in the House 1eCwWw overnmen ; i Atl ke Givilia Nanimo smashed a refuelling sta-}@xpect to find pr P , naetian
    today for six weeks on a_motion : \ ac ns Post oned tion, reduced seven small boats|Communism on an empty stom
    by Ken Hill, head of the Jamaica ATHENS, Nov. 19. as n N to kindling and poked her bow] ach”, his message said, =U
    T.U.C. and one time PNP. The new government of Premier er ] ers ace ; UNITED NATIONS, , 8 F

    leader who was ousted in March

    Alexander Papagos was sworn in

    NEW YORK, Nov, 19,

    ashore behind the Post Office last



    h b t,| today and the Chief of the Greek The M De ti f (ren OONDON. Now to night when her reverse engine
    on_charges of being a Communist. | OOS) 2) SSSR e@ Moroccan Democratic party 1 Noy. 19, “ip . sssel was ap- c
    The motion followed a verbal|Joint General Staff and three ‘ @ ‘for independence Wednesday. said The meeting scheduled to tako}|POW*! ae ae A hye sat ite Light Earthquake
    battle between both members in| S¢mior aides resigned their posts, OO Cal ce In el it received a cable from its Tangier} Place to-day between the Food|Proaching the dock to Pith
    the House when Hill charged that —UP.

    P.N.P. administration jn Kingston |
    was corrupt and Glasspole replied }



    RUSSIAN JAILED FOR



    By JOSE FLEMING

    representative stating the “French
    Army attacked civilians in Casa-

    Ministry and Empire Sugar Pro-
    ducers has been postponed for 24

    her run from Vancouver
    some 400 passengers and crewmen

    aboard, No one was killed or in-

    TOKYO, Nov
    Office buildings swayed when a

    19

    | 7 Sats P

    ig | lane > © hours. Empire sugar men will 4 light earthquake shook Tokyo tos

    naming Hill a Communist, The} DEFECTIVE APPARATUS | BERLIN, Nov. 19. Pueeeiee Db ag 4a e now see the M\pistey tomorrow|jured in the mishap. An estimate day, rhe ‘Veniral Melegrote eal
    of te datiat cha oldamee ee MOSCOW, Nov. 19 ! The Berlin-Soviet zone cupboard is almost bare and i ; ; afternoon when the discussion onjof the damage to vessel and shore} Office said it was a local shock any

    of the epithet and Glasspole re-|
    fused.

    3 | to
    Jamaica Labour party members |



    |} ducing defective

    prison for eight years for pro-
    medical

    A factory director has been sent}

    East Germans appear to be facing a bleak winter according
    to reliable reports reaching West Berlin. The reports said

    cession to the throne,
    French troops savagely dispersed

    1958 crop price will be resumed,
    It is hopeq that meetings will
    be concluded this week,

    instellations is not immediately

    available, —U.P.

    caused no damage

    ee



    appar- : 4 > +, |the peaceful crowd smashing por- So
    led by Mr. Bustamante voted in ri some | the food shortage is growing worse and the Communist “ 1 REA Mr. McCowan has made a_pro-
    y 3 n atus, the Soviet Government P \ q ' traits of the Sultan and removing
    support of Hill’s motion after the | newspaper Izvestia reported to- Government is frantically searching for a scapegoat tofall equipment set up in repara-{ Visional plane booking to return
    Speaker had named Glasspole. day.—U.P. blame it on. It said East German housewives jtion for the celebration, thus pre-}t© Trinidad on Sunday, Mr. Cue







    eo rt a: , were standing in line for hours]venting the celebration from ved at a provisional booking
    m od Sar = er ee | to get food only to be told supplics|taking place.” or Monday,
    PREPARIN G FOR DRILLING had run out. Food riots were said —UP,
    {to have broken out recently at

    seattered in Soviet
    Zone, Statements of Communisi

    |
    the
    t

    t aders and propaganda announce-

    points

    ments of the East Zone Press pin
    shortages on to such essentials as

    Bertrand Russell
    To Be Married

    $220,800 To Help

    | Antigua Slum Area

    (From Our Own Correspondent)





    Gilbeys



    EMPIRE RED WINE

    ‘meat, potatoes, sugar, butter and + LONDON, Nov. 19, ANTIGUA, Nov, 19

    | fats, Bertrand Russell, 80, philoso-| ‘To-day at Government House}
    The seriousness of the situation pher, announced his engagement On the occasion of presentation
    was pointed up by the fact that! to Miss Edith Finch, daughter of of prizes for the 1952 Garden|
    be recent Cabinet session of the}|Edward Bronson Finch of New Competition, His Excelleney Sir!
    Red Government was devoted al-} York City in a paid advertisement Kenneth Blackburne announced |
    most exclusively to the food sup-|in the Times, Then Mr, Russell that a telegram was received

    ply problem, After the session, |took the phone off the hook at his’ which he felt was a

    “firm measures” were ordered to}£4burban house so he would not be

    combat the shortages. However
    Reds appeared to be having
    difficult time firid'ing someone
    blame for the situation.
    Premier Otto Grotewohl told the
    Cabinet it was the fault of “hos-
    tile Captalist clements
    Supply Ministry,”
    Committee of the

    The Central
    Communist

    |
    {0

    in the



    bothered
    anyone in
    coor bell,

    by callers, Nor would

    —UP.



    Gonvicts Subdued

    JACKSON, Michigan, Nov, 19.

    the house answer the ,

    better
    deter-

    of Antigua now have a
    ercderstanding and are
    'm sed to help themselves,

    “T am happy to say that th
    Sesretary of State has approved
    a grant of $220,800 enabling the
    to tackle the
    most densely
    known

    government city's
    largest and

    popu-
    ‘lated slum

    as Garling

    result that
    London is aware that the people}{i{

    Maintains

    The 1948 local govern-

    Standard

    The third major pr ialny this | Land.
    year at Southern Michigan Pri

    Party attributed the shortages to son, ment purchased this abominable
    the world’s largest walled peni-| unsightly area but owing to lack

    “sabotage” and the official Gov-
    ernment news service A.D.N, said





    : tentiary, ended last night with|ef flinds, congestion was unre- lit
    West German “smugglers were |rioting convicts subdued by shot- “lieved”, 0 Nd L Yas
    responsible. fun and machine gun fire, Rioting!

    broke out in the mess hall at sup-|
    per time and for a while 2,200

    convicts were involved; some had |

    The biame also is placed almosi
    daily by the Communist Press on
    “big farmers who fail to meet

    Newsman Dies





    shipped to the



    the samehigh

























    : knives and clubs No one was} ° |

    jargon’ a “big tamer “irenpans | woes: (CP) | tae ME LORE: ey West Indies |

    BARBADOS GULF OIL CO., LTD. are carrying out preparations for drilling at a site roughly half way who ow aoe ci ee tt | Louis F. Keemle, editor of i

    between Turner's Hall and Swans Factory. At present the location is being cleared with a view to land ns more than 45 acres o | United ‘ia aa ae meets \

    choosing a spot for a firm foundation. oe ’ 7 : ; /Service die ednesday in the ht h {

    Here the D-8 Caterpillar is seen in action while the men (left) are preparing holes*for dynamiting. Wastern officials believe this Sausage Racket | Park East Hospital. He was 54 or é as \{

    a - a ——— simon Red explanation probably comes Keemle was at his desk through \

    - os e - closest to the truth. They said he aera: Nov. 19. {last week. Saturday night he , ears i

    W 7 Br ® ss ‘6 Shortages are the direct result of usage meat shipments to, developed severe abdominal {it

    W hat ill Mr. Eisenhow er Ss Policy Be ? | farmer resistance to Communist | Britain, alleged ‘to have developed | paitis and om Sunday was taken L

    land confiscation and collectiviza-|into a “racket” threatening the hospital for an Comeniicn. ih

    7 ‘ + t aad 4 | ho il i i i imite: r s diagnosed his ailment d . {\

    WASHINGTON, Nov. 19. _ lieve budgetary retrenchmer ud, and election was hailed ¢ 4 | tion policies, British meat ration, will be limited Surgeons Giagnosed Lada {{

    A tidal wave of speculation| reduced taxation should becon | aséendancy of the Wisbal vine peut There are other signs that all|‘® 2,000 tons this season jt Ween Pancreatitis bd tells { {{{

    swept over this capital as to the | the primary objective of the new | But the post-election situation in| 18 not well with Soviet zone econ- |4mnounced today. British press re- | @ditor and writer had been with os 6 )

    significance of the National elec-| government ated that basic differences be-|Omy. A Communist spokesman |P0tt® quoted here said that whole |U.P. since 1926 when eee RVamererrer 15d

    tion ami is terms of werld pons te sinreh is een the two party wings are still jadmits that both coal and machine |New Zealand carcases were being Hi em of the Baltimore 1a) rN GILBEY : X

    on there ae scotos rn eee ka ernatiia ise ita far from being reconciled. Mr. |tool produetion is running behind a. ont shipped + paar, at —U.P. ‘ pT }

    4 great : Sere ee ~. - «2 | strengthen t ol os “isenhower personally has not yet | quotas in the year’s economic plan, ;|meat at better prices.—U.P, i a AA a fie bl

    ; ore, t lists an engthen l : ad aa : , Oo eee tS = year’s economic pla i“ : ‘ °

    ifatively Nationalist elemens | leader and accepts greater financial | Tage Post~electioy rtatements that | Power shortages have forced | BRAZILIAN LEGATION \)) Pan H

    , , , der ) | wi arify politica on his | many f hong 4 ‘ 4} / " oe . on A Te

    w tat ‘sas | towed toa, ©s | International pr y teetbinden Eee Leen a Rive & al | IN TEHERAN TO CLOSE \\

    th the revelation he schedule plays and shortages of ; ive Arrestet | RIO DE ie 2 i), Nov. I¢ 5)

    es the publi 3 Seals chad ARE iccarerintivan ated | : IE JANEIRO, Brazil, Nov, 19 ‘ ee a eae

    : € r ‘ b : xe ai Sie tl : siiteds: | | The newspaper “Tribuna Da i GARDINER AUSTING COL? i

    © rel i in Rastern rai =s TUNIS, Nov, 19. | Inmprensa” said yesterday that {\{ ‘ gents: \

    a ee JOKE Police said five Tunisian Nation- | attempts | been mad at~{) " i

    a ; very ‘i alists accused of sabotage and| tack § rea Do I B iy

    4 aes rt use arson have been arrested, They|zilian Charge D’Affaire n I \

    ; te 1 iz f ( to the | are accused of setting fire to Neftas|pnd that President Getulio Vargas (i

    a k nt te € make | tow all, 78 miles south of here! has ordered the Teheran Legation nancial Rite Te ie

    U.P U.P ~U.P. closed.—(C.P.) FAL ARR RN







    PAGE TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE

    THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1952









    Prince Philip PRINCE

    Brings 1952 Touch |

    To Estates FELIX |







    |cer your Christmas Cards
    At THE Advocate Stationery.

    — Cwub Calling










































    D" AND MR; S. CARROLL U.S. Visitor Likes Enjoyed Visit
    eblitine vere con Satins tae aie Barbados M® R. A. J. GOODE, Director | MODERNISATJON of equip-
    Elder Fyffes SS. Golfito from RS. EDITH BUNDY, an of British Celanese Overseas ment and buildings on the Roys!
    r American who had been vis- Ltd., London, who is in the West YOUR INDIVIDUAL HOROSCOPE = ee at Wind moe 38. g0l=e On j
    come to take up iting Italy, France and England Indies on a goodwill visit to the unde —— personal direction of |
    t ytme Medical Officer arrived here on Saturday by the V@Tious agencies left yesterday| "0" THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 7e, 10m Prince Philip. The latest plese BEAULIEU French Riviera
    f the Bar General Hospital. S.S. Golfito from the U.K. and will €Vening by B.W.LA. for Trinidad) Loox im the section in wt gat Gee Natt Ja the Prince. Consors Pe eee: “Nov. 19.
    Born it he was educated probably spend three months’ holi- Via Grenada after a week in Bar-|pirthday comes and find your “YF oe 2 Daan a evi oy
    at Kin i, Canterbury in Sor. nae is a — of Lady Stow Reval, as a guest at the Hotel outlook is, according to th : te a yas heat provided with Prince Felix of Hoveburs, 37-
    Kent ied medicine at St. © ighgate, Jpper Colly re (ar aa b eo ear-old fourth son of the last
    Bartholome Ho vital, Lo: Ro-k ene Pr FIO Leaving by the same opportunity | , in ho aie i fe ee ry. modern convenience, ree aoe strian Emperor was married in
    where he qualified about ei Mrs, Bundy spent three weeks in [0% Trinidad was Mr. J. D. Worbes-| give you chance to take stock, note “lucing fitted wash basins (with), church here today to Princess
    morths ago. Prior xo conling out Barbados two years ago and liked W4tson, Overseas Representative|«rrors. Don’t stép into others" shoes hot and cold laid on). Anna Eugenie of Arenberg, 27-
    to Barbados, he held various hos- it so much that she has now re- 2f_Roneo Ltd., London, who was |‘! You shouldn't. nor advise out of turn, Outside improvements have also year-old cousin of King Baudouin
    ital posts in England and also did turned for a longer also in Barbados for A week asa} arrm 21 to MAY 2 ¢Taurus)—Things, [SM started at the workshop, Sn caliieel ;
    ger period. of Belgium. The glittering Roman
    2 private practice, Tr i Agent L aes guest at the Hotel Royal. |may look better, but this may. be' and workers are now tidying up ot, a 8
    Dr anda Cased? Goth caw ‘avel Agen Leaves Mr, Forbes-Watson came out on |< «certive. Work on matters further. g jarge yard. Catholic church ceremony was
    service dite: cia. aa Pen R. KARL TAUSIG of Méésrs. a tour of the Caribbean, South and fe eee indications. Hold your jattended by 250 aristocratic guests.
    after being trained with the Paul Tausig and Sons, Travel Central America, in the interest of | * ; “Other places in the estates} , iH leav
    ; Arizona as a pilot, servea 8ents of New York City, ieft for his company and has already coy-| MAY 2% te JUNE 21 (Gemini)—To-day Which have been visited by Prince The couple will leave for Lon-
    in ti fiddle East while his wife 22!Didad last night by B.W.I.A, on ered the Caribbean, He expects|Â¥ou are offered wider scope. in which Philip and have already felt ttiejoan, later today and Ay % New
    was with the Women’s R.A.F. in his Way back home. _He was ac- lo return home in about six months, seat’ taee eeeeeiaeateade rain won benefits of modernisation, are work tone After a Raneymagon
    Great Britain on an operational ©O™Panied by his wife and they Mr, Goode and Mr, Forbes-Wat-! ave not. tried before’ among ‘top Shaw farm in the Home Park|!" the Caribbean: they will make
    uadron, She was bern in Wales ©@4 spent a short holiday here as son said that they thoroughly en- | fvoured. and Norfolk farm in the Great! | ea ir home in Mexico, where the
    and is very fond of music guests at the St. Lawrence Hotel. joyed their first visit to Barbados; ji oo te suLy 28 (Caneer)—In. Park. ; ee ince is manager of a he ers
    7 c paws Tz ig atte > > re = = eon \ fz y 5 >
    Dr, Carroll too, is fond of music _Mr. Tausig attended the recent both from the business and social} riences generous for writing, wise a : rh oe making —_prefabricate
    in addition to sailing. World Travel Congress in Miami, point of view. }invertments, improved promoting, .ad ntroduction of combine har-| ous
    F th Visi Florida and since then visited Assistant Economic ertising, handling general commodities. vesters and other equipment con-|
    ourth isil Chile, Peru, Argentine, Brazil, oe Pe extra tactful at home tributed largely to one of the| After the ceremony, the bridal
    M's EDWIN W. LANCASTER Uruguay and Trinidad before com- Adviser JULY 24 to AUGUST % (Leo)—some Most successful harvests in the|P@ir and their guests left for Villa
    of New Jersey, U.S.A. who ing to Barbados. RD. A. PERCIVAL, Assistant | unexpected advar es, especially from history of the estates. | Encar, the Riviera home of Prince
    arrived in idad on October 7 Leaving To-day Economie Adviser to the! stig ee ushe yon Nare Sereee eet Charles of Arenberg, uncle of the
    in Moore, Maccormack Liner A iss JESSIE THOMPSON ot Comptroller for Developme end | nua erai 7 Stall Impressed |r
    is now in Barbados on her fourth peepee ey leaves this Trinidad by B.W.LA. efter attend-| AUGUST 23 to SEPTEMBER 2 (Virge) _ Soon after he was appointed) Prince Felix was the only Haps-
    winter visit, She arrived here on ™Orning by B.W.LA. for Puerto ing a Committee Meeting of ‘the |~—Consider all angles before making Ranger of Windsor Great Park—| burg on Austrian eoil when Hitler
    Sunday in.the French S.S. Colom— Rico on her way back home after Cari decisions. Be sure not to overlook . ly held by the|invaded the country. After an
    Sunday - s. ee . . : , aribbean Commission at Kent oe : * al office previously he y f
    bie from Trinidad after spending 2" enjoyable week's holiday in fouse achievement by being overcome tte lae King—Prince Philip made a)adventurous flight he reached the
    a month's holiday at the Blue Ha-— ©2?bados as a guest at the Marine “A * or ne Dee eee Ce ana f ‘ction,|United States in August 1938.
    a month’s holiday at the Blue Ha= 7594 0) Grenada Businessman _ |'*. egmprehensive tour of inspection. | Pnited & do otk wie tee
    ven Hotel in Tobago, 7 < le went into the workirfgs o uring the war he served with
    Mrs. Ta neanee ere that she Miss Thompson js employed with R. ARNOLD WILLIAMSON,;) serremprr 24 to OCTOBER | an a - ones Roatan and im-|Austrian battalion of the United
    lived in California for several the Manufacturers Life Insurance Managing Director of Wil- | (ti™™)- mafaenees ast ‘matters. Exe't pressed the staff with his knowl-|States Army. Since then he has
    years and this summer, she spent “@™pany in Toronto, | liamson and Co., Lid., Automobile | without strain and you can have 004 edge of farming. lived mostly in Mexico and Latin
    two months there with her brother On Short Visit ereonerns of St. George's Geta | results. Concentrate on essentials. Amnevita,
    Edward Schroeder of the R. COLIN THOMAS, Branch ®°4 returned home earlier in the; | woner 24 °t NOVEMBER |. 2 Later visits by the Prince have 2
    Food Co., in order to get M Manager of Messrs J. N. week by B.W.LA., after a two-week | ;scorpio)-You may tend to worry over been “snap” ones. Sometimes he} Princess Anna Eugenie was
    é from the heat wave in New Harriman and Co., Ltd., left for holiday visit. He was accompanied | ¢jouds. Don't! Look for the good about has driven himself in a car or| born at Ellingen Castle in Bavaria
    York. She is a guest atthe Marine ‘Trinidad on Monday by B.W.1.A, 2¥ Mrs. Williamson and they were | you and for success from worthy effort. calioned across the fields on his/and studied at the Veterinary
    Hotel on a short visit. Ae guests at the Hote] Royal, NOVEMBER 2% te DECEMBER 2 bay mare. faculty at Munich University. The
    With Barclays Bank For The Winter l ro rues ‘member of the Legis. (Sagittarius) Ambition isn't quite —L.E.S. | couple met about two years ago in
    on - n ative an ecu Of|enough to carnmy things through to Bavaria.—U.P.
    ETURNING to Grenada yes- i os a 1 od ‘cess: Increase knowledge, ee .
    terday afternoon by B.W.I.A. 8 ee eee See es Bie; Watineneait Send | uate of effort ‘Avoids conflict with

    pany director of England and
    his wife, the Hon’ble Mrs, Myer
    who arrived by the Golfito on
    Saturday are guests at Enmore
    Hotel. They have come to spend
    their usual winter holidays.

    Civil Aviation’ Chief

    ING-COMMANDER L, A.

    Egglesfield, Director General
    of Civil Aviation in the Caribbean

    Area was a passenger for Jamaica
    via Trinidad by B.W.I.A. on Mon-

    was Mr, F. E, Randall of Barclays
    Bank, St. .George’s who spent
    about ten days’ hcliday as a guest
    at the Hotel Royal,

    Originally from England, Mr.
    Randall has been working in Gren-
    ada for over three years. He ex-
    pects to go home on long leave
    next year. This was his first visit
    to the island he said and added
    that he had an enjoyable stay. ~

    men From U.S.A.

    RS. J, BLONDIN, wife of the day.
    ica of Sam Lord’s Castle _ F ;
    returned from a holiday visit to Second Ia 50 Years
    the U.S.A, via Puerto Rico by AYING his second visit to his
    B.W.LAS on Monday. = native Barbados in 50 years is
    is Tan he r. Henry Doorly of Omaha, Ne-
    Spent Two Weeks braska, publisher of the Omaha
    R. AND MRS, S, H. FRIEND World Herald. He arrived over
    of Castries, St. Lucia, hawe the week-end by B.W.I.A, from
    just returned home by B,W.I.A. Trinidad accompanied by his wire

    after spending two weeks’ holiday
    as guests at the Ocean View Hotel.

    and will be here for three weeks
    as a guest at the Marine Hotel.

    Mr, Friend is employed as Cost Mr. Doorly, a brother of the late
    Surveyor With Messrs Hannen Martin Doorly of Messrs. Martin
    Holland and Cubitts, contractors Doorly and Co., Ltd., Bridgetown,
    engaged in the reconstruction of was last ,in Barbados eighteen
    Castries. years ago.



    BY THE WAY-»

    OMPLAINTS that a “smell like
    second-hand garlic” was waft-
    ed from an oil-refinery indicate
    that some people have very sensi-

    “Nonsense. You mean Welling-
    ton. Nelson was never a soldier,
    and you've drawn him in military
    uniform. And that nose is Welling-

    live noses and a profound knowl-—
    edge of the garlic trade

    Only an experienced garlic-
    taster could be expected to detect
    the second-hand from the unused.
    But who buys second-hand garlic?
    Are there musty grocers who sup-
    ply collectors?

    Gentleman,

    good appearance,





    ton’s.”

    “I know it looks like Welling-
    ton,” said the artist, after a long
    pause, “It’s meant to. You see,
    Nelson once went to a fancy-dress
    ball as Wellington, and this shows
    him as he looked then.”

    “Where was this ball?” asked the
    man,






    public-school education, would _“Paris,” said the artist, “on the
    exchange set of maps of Turkey night before Waterloo, It’s his-
    and ¢t rcular saw (part-worn) for. tory
    : second-hand garlic. Fie ‘t-finding
    se See aiea a) See, Sees HARLIE SUET points out that
    famect,adeenturous er” C2, ‘a potential reapportionment
    nsche a ioriti 25
    floating company for sale of sec=- of uns duled priorities does not

    necessarily mean that the bottle-
    necking of goods in short supply
    ean be short-circuited by unscram-
    bling measures. He adds: “A re-
    disinflationary or non-recessional
    trend is usually followed by in-
    creased upput.”

    In passing

    WIFE has complained that her
    husband kissed her twice twice im-

    eet and the Buttertites~ I 1

    ond-hand garlic.



    Something wrong
    somewhere

    asked the. passer-by,
    you call this picture

    HY,”

    ‘do

    ‘Nelson
    “It is Nelson,”
    artist.



    said the pavement







    Protessor leads Rupert of miles, No wo nder " 5
    “We'll pur your bumch — exhausted. Ir ts a beauty it
    ers in water and keep them must be the gem of my collection
    trash until you go home,”" he says. ** Oh, dear,”’ says Rupert
    se this butterfly tor anxiously * The schoolmaster
    e 1 book trom his = said it was wrong to kill a thing
    shelve over it, Ah * and put & ina collection because
    sir nt E as | fir s rare and lovely. He would:



    has come

    let Ferdy do wl"
    savin es

    CURTAIN NET (BORDERS)
    Colours—Reose, Green, Blue, Gold.

    Blue, Gold





    CURTAIN NET -Rose, Green,
    —36”, 38”, and 40” wide

    TABLE CLOTHS—54” wide

    COLOURED TOWELS

    WHITE TOWELS





    SHEETS 70 x 100...
    BO RO ingore oe staaoaein
    9 OO BBE asi sebbasachoventharesslis dass
    PILLOW CASES 18x 30.

    BUTTER MUSLIN

    YOUR SHOE STORE
    Phone: 220

    “aa SEE see wares eis

    $3.07, $3.39, $7.08
    . $3.28 & $2.26

    T. R. EVANS (WHITFIELDS)

    the B.T.C, Autumn Meeting |
    while in ‘Barbados, r
    ‘irst Visit
    ISS ROMANA ROGERS of
    Herren, Rogers Travel Ser- |
    vice, Lynbrook, Long Island, U.S.A. |

    }

    was an arrival by B.W.LA, from |

    U.S.A. via Puerto Rico on 17th}
    inst.. and is a guest at the Marine
    Hotel,

    This is the first visit here for
    Miss Rogers and the object of her
    visit is to see for herself what we
    ean offer Tourists, and is very
    hopeful that her visit %o our
    ‘sland will be of considerable help
    to her company in attracting |
    American Tourists to visit our
    Island.

    Left For England

    ISS DAISY STUART of

    Beckles Road, left for Eng-
    land last Sunday on the S.S.
    Colombie.

    Miss Stuart who has gone to fur-
    ther her studies in music, will re-
    side with her uncle, former R.A.F.
    Sg., Mr. Evans Alleyne, and his
    w ife.

    BEA CHCOMBE: R

    mediately after the marriage and
    then disappeared for good, M. de
    Genlis once said: “I only kissed
    Mme. de ——— twice. The first time
    it was to please myself, the second
    time, to please her. We never met
    again;
    please.”

    Sete tide rcs



    By M. Harrison-Gray
    Dealer: North

    North-South game
    «ts

    A K9862

    |

    a

    BOO

    10 76

    Britain's slender
    120 on this 1950 world cham.
    Pionship hand would be
    worth three valuable match
    points under the present
    method of et

    North's One Heart was
    doubled by the American
    East player. but the British
    pair had the situation well
    in hand after South's ont
    double. West bid One S)
    North assed. and “a4
    bluff bid of One No-Trump
    was doubled by South. West
    then bid Clubs, but North
    scored 620 in a final contract
    of Four Hearts.

    The redottble had an
    intimidating eflecc and the
    Americans did not consider
    a sacrifice in Five Clubs.
    In view of his moderate
    Spade support, our East
    player preferred to overcal)
    with Two Diamonds in
    Room 2 and was doubled by
    South for a penalty of 500.

    ___kondon Express Service

    51¢ to 98¢

    ain of

    FPeseeeeeee-scenseenensneeeeeseecesenenetseTe see CereernesunsapessEREsELEEEAESeseseeereeot ses seneeeee GERESERERL OES



    $1.05 to $1.38

    $2.20 & $2.56



    there was no one else to

    nssociates

    LISTENING
    HOURS

    NOVEMBER

    DECEMBER 23 to JANUARY 21 (Capri-
    corn)—Hover around the happy me
    be ready for those unexpected c
    Advantages may be spotty but be
    ful for any benefits



    on THURSDAY, 20,

    FEBRUARY 2

    JANUARY

    to














    (Aquarius)—Aspects stress sensible cur 1.00-—45.4 p.m, pean) on
    tailment of expenditures, and handling ep . - — es
    your work, chores with extreme care += Pp cn. rae eatenaa ra eat
    Friendly manner important cde BRP we Poy Reh
    FEBRUARY 21 to MARCH % (Pisces) Orct ras ai 4
    Make no appreciable changes except 6.00—7.15 p.m, .. 91.2M, 49.71M
    where they will improve.” Approach — ———— Abdeewtoa!

    . shingly tr ssolve to 6 m. Welsh Miscellany, 6.15 p.m
    oe ms unflinchingly, with resc Varicty ‘Ahoy! 6.43 p.m. Spors sa
    Pet Up sid Programme Parade The

    . B Z »- Nev 10 p.m. Hom » from
    YoU BORN TO-DAY High de New 7 :
    ‘veloped natives of Scorpio succeed Brits 7.15 p.m. We arita ain. is
    netably when they really try You 7.45—10.20 p.m, M, 49.7
    ake @ » leader, doctor, nurse, public viet - ,
    “ 2 ile ag have courage of your 7.45 m, Some sa nehar ted. Evening,
    icti rine im in addi- €.15 Radio Newsreel, 6.30 p.1™
    eee become Tchaikovsky, 8.45 p.m. Special Despateh,
    outstanding writer ck education, © p.m. There was © Star Danced, 9.4
    religion and er life. Birthdate: pm rchestral Music, 10 p.m +
    Kentshaw Mountain Landis, former News, 10.10 p.m. From the Eaitorials,
    t : ll czar Josiah Royce, philosopher, 10.15 A Captain of Industry, 4
    educator. p.n » Name
    Last SHOWS TODAY 4.45 & 8.30
    ROVAL WEDDING cain
    FRED JANE SARAH KEENAN
    ASTAIRE POWELL CHURCHILL WYNN



    and

    MANHATZAN SELODRAMA

    CLARK GASLE, MYRNA LOY, WILLIAM POWELL
    Opening TOMORROW

    THE IMMORTAL MUSKETEERS IN THE MOST
    SPECTACULAR ADVENTURE OF AIL!







    (in Technicolour)

    . LMatthic Coe OLOR

    PATRICIA

    » MEDINA






    Havivarp

    JANETTA DRESS SHOP
    Next to Singers
    CLOSING SATURDAY—November
    22nd.





    FINAL WEEK — CLEARANCE SALE
    Further Reductions

    ALL DRESSES . ALL NYLOI UNDE RWEAR greatly reduced

    ALL BRAS Frureet 4d $1.00 and $1.98
    PANTIE- GIRDLES| se Maes. ABN a on $1.00 and $1.50
    PURE LINEN BRIDGE, TEA SETS ....... $7.00 per Set
    SHORTS—wWhite and Coloured— now $2.98
    CHILDREN’S DRESSES—now .............2... sees $2,098
    MA TMEMALS bythe Yard ..... Pie oe .80c, per Yd.














    FOR CARS

    GARAGE
    VICTORIA

    TRADING
    STRCET

    co.

    BATTERIES

    Rolex Watches

    LOUIS L, BAYLEY

    ABLAZE WITH FURY AND
    TERROR!



    PLAZA

    OPENING
    and



    SHE’S GLORIOUS!

    Bolton Lane

    with

    CINECOLOR

    -e-aeters

    (Dial 5170)

    FRI.
    Continuing Daily



    SHE'S UPROARIOUS!











    LAU GHS

    She's
    glorious ~
    and :
    uproarious

    in her first“
    picture since ;

    ‘Sunset
    Boulevard’!

    WARNER |

    Bros.
    PQESENT

    eeu USERSON

    GALORE WITH—

    JAMES WARREW sic com-sssconss ©

    SHCVE ORO AMINE PERREAR- C3*E

    PLAZA

    OPENING FRI. 2.30, 4.45 &

    ST ANDERSON MANEAETT CUMIN
    (Dial 2310)
    B'TOWN

    8.30 p.m

    and Continuing Daily 445 &

    TRUCKS & BUSES

    ALLE DRIP LEB LN IAN BION hee NNR IS ARO

    LTD.

    8.30 p.m.

    BARBAREES





    JANE NIGH

    4.45 & 8.30 p.m.


















    Heinz Cooked Spaghetti—
    m-m-m-m — here’s eating.
    Zippy, zesty tomato-sauced
    strands that have flavour
    galore just as they come
    from the tin. How wonder-
    ful Heinz Cooked Spaghetti
    tastes alone, and how well
    it mingles with left-over
    foods too. A delightful meal
    ready in a minute, for Heinz
    has cooked the Spaghetti
    for you, you simply heat
    and eat—and enjoy. Buy

    several tins today.















    BTOWN (Soon) “THE LION AND THE HORSE” Steve COCHRAN
    ‘Last 2 Shows Today ast 2 Shows Teday | Yo-day (Only)
    4.20 & 8.30 p.m. 4.30 & 8.30 p.m. 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
    A KISS IN THE >
    DARK PAINTING the Whole Serial
    Jane David CLOUDS WITH BUCK ROGERS
    WYMAN : NIVEN & SUNSHINE (Color) | + srry Buster Crabbe
    KEY LARGO Dennis Viegitio DT: we iessab hes Sule
    Humphrey BOGART MORGAN : MAYO Frid. & Sat. 445 &
    Edward G. Robinson KISS TOMORROW 8.30 p.m.
    5 Today's Special 1.30 GOODBYE Big Action Film
    JUNGLE A James Barbara
    STAMPEDE | “AGNEY PAYTON BLUE LAMP
    Suwanee Today's Special 1.30 Jack WARNER
    E ES of - . ' 7
    Paes TRIPLE TROUBLE
    athy ena The Bowery Bo's & Sat. Special 1.30 p.m
    < a “BOMBA ON
    Frid. 2.30 — 445 & PANTHER 15 GUNSLINGERS
    8.20 p.m. & Continu- | Johnny SHEF Whip WILSON
    ing Daily 4.45 & 8.30 7 as and
    Warner’s. Laugh Hit! | Ft. 445 & 8.30 p.m. "
    “3 FOR Rod CAMERON in OKLAHOMA BLUES
    BEDROOM C’ “FORT OSAGE” Jimmy WAKELY
    ‘In Natural Color) (zin Cinecolor) Bhindi seilincncbetiiai
    BRIDGETOWN BARBAREES OISTIN
    (Dial 2 (Dial 5170) (Dial 8404)





    THEATRES







    ~ ROO DAL



    EMPIRE OLYMPIC ROXY ROYAL
    To-day only To-day (Only) To-day 4.20 & 8.15 To-day 4.30 & 8.30
    4.30 & 8.30 130 & 8.15 Universal Doubie Universal Double

    Universal Double Republic Double

    The Andrew Sisters













    Jon Hall lB in THAT NIGET
    Maria Montez ELLE OF OLD MOONLIGHT AND J
    ~ CACTUS and
    ALI BABA AND MEXICO ond RIVER LADY
    THE FORTY 1
    THIEVES and FREIDA | Starring
    (Technicolor) with Rod Cameron :
    and ¥ David Farrar _Yvonne DeCarlo
    MADELEINE BLACKMAIL 1 “Tomorrow (Only)
    With ay With Tomerrew (Only) 4.20 & 8.30
    Ann Todd Oe ee renee 4.30 & 8.15 Double —-
    pening To-morrow|GN 1c
    Opening Tomorrow 4.30 & 8.15 san oa Wakue & The Reece Sisters
    S20 & 8.90 R.K.O. Double DRACULA'S
    # Continuing Pally! Brian Donlevy DAUGHTER MOONLIGHT AND
    ’ : Gig Young oe bt ; CACTUS
    ABBOTT and in (Not Suitable for | ini
    COSTELLO | Children)
    | ——_—___—__—__— FREIDA
    COMIN’ ROUND SLAUGHTER | Opening Saturday ties
    TRAIL 4.20 & 815 | Opening Saturday
    THE MOUNTAIN THE SNIPER — 4.30 & 8.30
    Sen ees (Cinecolor) chs re
    Opening Friday 28th on Richard: Green
    330 & 8.50 and THE MAGIC __l¥vonne DeCarlo
    Cecil B. DeMille's | JUNGLE OF | Sie ee in
    Masterpiece | \— sat y
    eee rr aed DESERT HAWK
    SAMSON AND! CHANG |Qnening Friday 28th a
    Filmed On The Spot|SAMSON AND zs
    In Wil = Siam DELILAH LOUISA

    DELILAH



    MIDNIGHT SATURDAY 22nd
    GLOBE

    A Film—MINE OWN EXECUTIONER’
    TALENT STARS ON PARADE

    Lerey Alleyne —10 Year Old Trumpeter
    Free Iced Cold Canada Dry

    Free 4 Cartons Heineken Beer

    Have Your Head Examined if You Could Resist This 3





    THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1952.

    eb am

    Sein

    November 1, an Order

    of the Gold Coast.”

    in ap:

    The Governor, and not ‘the
    Secretary of State, is now the
    ultimate authority for “the ap-
    pointment, promotion, _ transfer

    and disciplinary control in regard
    te members of the Service.” It
    means the advancement of the
    colony's Africanisation policy,
    First preference in recruitment
    now goés to qualified African can-

    didates, An overseas candidate
    will only be sought—on non-
    pensionable terms—if no African

    is available for the job coneerned.

    And such non-pensionable over-
    seas men as are selected from
    November 1 will be automatical-

    ly members of the Local Service.
    It is laid down that promotion
    ir. .the public service will be
    based strictly on merit and
    ability.

    So far as the material condi-
    tions of service are concerned, no
    differentiation, it is stated, will
    be made on the ground that offi-
    members of



    cers are or are not
    the Local Service.

    Colonial Service officials,
    European and African, in the
    Gold Coast prior to November 1
    have not been required to join

    the Local Service. And there have
    been assurances, of course, from
    Premier Nkrumah that the Gold
    Coast does continue to need ex
    patriate officials for different jobs,
    particularly in the technical field.

    F. 8. HERRING

    20th Century
    Centurion

    A BO.A.C. Security The Colonial Police
    Warden, A publication of real impor-
    tance to the Colonies is due on
    Mr. F. S. Herring, re- November 24. It is titled “The

    cently became a member of
    the select “Centurion Club”
    by walking a hundred
    miles in less than twenty-

    Colonial Police,” In it, the author,
    Sir Charles Jeffries, Joint Deputy
    Under-Secretary of State in the
    Colonial Office, gives us, I under-

    four hours, To achieve this stand, the first authoritative and
    distinction he left Bath, full story of the development of
    Somerset, at 6 p.m. one the police forces throughout the
    evening and walked colonies. Only in the event of
    through the night, reaching grave disorders, such as oc-
    Turnham Green, London, casioned at present by the Mau
    at 3.50 p.m. the following Mau in East Africa, is much
    afternoon, thought paid by most people to

    Mr. Herring, who has the importance of the police in
    now competed in _ fast the colonies, and Sir Charles’
    walking events ranging book will without doubt be in-
    from 100 yards to 100 miles, valuable in the light it throws
    estimates that he has walk- particularly on problems of police
    ed over 6,000 miles in pur- organisation in relation to the
    suit of his hobby. swift development of colonial

    Photograph shows Mr. territories to-day. The history of
    Herring training on the police organisation in the differ-
    perimeter track at London ent territories is sketched, and
    Airport, Mr. Herring’s shows how basic principles of po-

    speed during his 100 mile
    walk was 4}—5 m.p.h.

    Heavy Rains In
    Montserrat Cause
    Great Damage

    (From Our Own Correspondent)

    ANTIGUA Nov, 19.

    Torrential rainfall was experi-
    enced in Montserrat resulting in
    floods, landslides, roads obstructed,
    bridges washed away and houses
    damaged. Plymouth water supply
    was seriously impaired.

    His Excellency Sir Kenneth
    Blackburne accompanied by A.D.C.
    Capt. F. E. Hewitt scheduled to
    leave Antigua on November 24
    on the one-week routine visit is
    now facing an islandwide inspee-
    tion tour of the vast destruction.

    lice work in this country have
    been adapted to differing colonial
    conditions. “The Colonial Police”
    (Max Parrish, 18/6d.) is not a
    Colonial Office publication, It is
    an addition to a number of other
    excellent works of private
    authorship by Sir Charles.
    —L.E.S.

    Sale Of Land
    Approved

    The General Board of Health
    yesterday approved the division
    and sale in lots of 289,990% square
    feet of land at Fairways, Christ
    Church by: Mr, W. N, Alleyne.

    Permission was also given for
    the division and sale of 193 acres,
    83 roods, 26 perches of land in lots
    at Walkers Plantation, St. George
    by Mr. G. L. Farmer,

    The Board approved the division
    and sale of six of the prescribed
    lots, part of the 34,453 square feet
    of land at Clapham, Christ Church







    Prominent Engineer

    1 ' by Mr. C. St. Hill, and the division
    Dies In Grenada and sale of lots 1 to 48, part of
    (From hit, Gib Correspondent 265,572 square feet at Green Hill,
    GRENADA, Nov. 19. for which a agen was made by

    ‘ Mr. L, L. Toppin

    Henry Rudolph Gun Munro 72,
    well known engineer and uncle of
    Franklyn, now Trinidad tennis ace,
    died this morning. He leaves a
    wife, two sons and two daughters.

    The death also occurred today
    of Mrs. Agnes Martin, Widow of
    the late John Martin, former
    Magistrate here. She was the
    mother of five children among
    them Mr. V. H. Martin, a
    Bank, San Fernando, also Ts.
    Neville Howell and Mr. J. C. Mar-
    tin in Barbados, Edwatd Martin,
    Antigua amd Miss Freida Martin,
    Royal Bank branch here. The de-
    teased wag the daughter of the
    lite Archdeacon Hutson who was
    Rector of St. George's.

    ————
    WE ARE OFFERING A VARIETY OF
    AUTO ACCESSORIES.

    Periuavex Gasket Chamois Leathers

    Consideration of the other lots
    was postponed pendjng the avail-
    ability of adequate water supply. |

    The Board granted the applica-
    tion of Messrs Cottle, Catford and |
    Co. on behalf of Messrs. Central
    Foundry Ltd. for approval of alter- |
    ations of a earlier approved ,

    the Boar

    deration af the application of
    Mr. G, C. Mahon for the division
    and sale of 97,470 square feet in
    lots at Elridge, Christ Church,

    The application by
    Estates Ltd. for the division and
    sale of 20 acres 3 roods 2 perches
    in lots was deferred pending an

    tary.















    ECKSTEIN RROTHERS

    |
    BAY STREET DIAL 4269 |





    Another significant and important stage in the Gold C
    constitutional and political advance has been reached, On
    was made by
    Charles Arden-Clarke) giving the colony, as from that date,
    its own civil service. It is to be known as the

    and postponed con« |

    Newcastle |

    opinion from the Colonial Secre- |



    Governor Becomes

    Final Authority

    LONDON.
    rast’s
    the Governor (dir

    “Loeal Service

    ‘Veanee W ill
    Hold On To

    Her Colonies









    PARIS
    Without disr ; reason-
    able nationalist wishes, France
    will oppose any action intended

    to diminish her sovereignty In
    most parts of her Colonia) Empire,
    it is learnea .n Paris.

    Since the end of the war, France
    has made considerable headway
    in modernising and equipping her

    overseas _ territories, Nearly
    £800,000,000 has been invested in
    improving conditions in French
    Colonies and the areas under
    French mandate

    Official details have just been

    published of where and how these
    huge sums have been spent in the
    last five years in accordance with
    what is known as the Monnet
    Plan, drafted and carried out un-
    der the supervision of M, Jean
    Monnet, General Commissioner of
    the modernising plan.

    A second similar plan, to cover
    the next four years, is now under
    study. When it has been ap-
    proved, it will come into effect in
    1954. M. Monnet is now presi-
    dent of the International High
    Authority for Coal and Steel in
    Europe, and his assistant, M.
    Etienne Hirsch, has been ap-
    pointed General Commissioner to
    succeed him, The new plan will
    probably be called the Hirsch
    Plan,

    Development in the French
    West Indies has been somewhat
    slower than in other French over-
    seas territories, But, thanks to
    improved methods of agriculture
    and irrigation, exports of some
    products such as sugar and bana-
    nas from Guadeloupe have
    doubled since before the war,

    In French Guiana, a huge de-
    posit of bauxite has been found 40
    miles from the coast, estimated to
    contain 30,000,000 tons of the val-
    uable ore from which aluminum
    is produced. Ways and means
    are now being studied of extract-
    ing and exporting this ore

    Big Progress

    Most spectacular progress un-
    der the Monnet Plan, however, has
    been made in French North Atri-
    ca, where coal production in Al-
    geria and krench Morocco, which
    totalled only 160,000 tons in 1938,
    is now approaching 900,000 tons a
    year. A big electric power scheme
    in these territories has been made
    possible by the construction of
    hydro-electric dams, and oilfield
    production has also increased,

    Phosphates are also being pro-
    duced in French North Africa
    and are even being exported to
    several South American countries
    which are traditionally producers
    and exporters of phosphate fer-
    tilisers themselves, These North
    African chemica} fertilisers have

    shown some extraordinary re-
    sults, chiefly in the cultivation of
    coffee and rice, , vs

    But there nas been less im-

    provement in agricultural output,
    partly because it takes time to
    persuade the natives of these ter-
    ritories to abandon their age-old
    methods in favour of more mod-

    ern ways of cultivation, But some 5

    of the best results have been ob-
    tained in developing production
    of citrus fruits in North Africa,
    which has been doubled since 1938





    =< —

    =







    Pk

    Pe sk Be

    BARBADOS

    ADVOCATE

    GOLD COAST HAS OWN CIVIL SERVICE

    ELECTED ¢€

    HAIRMAN



    SIR HUGH DOW, whose appointment has just been announced as
    Chairman of the Royal Commission on East Africa,

    Committee Plans Trade
    Promotion Conference





    PORT-OF-SPAIN, Nov. 10.

    Plans for a Trade Promotion Conference scheduled for
    next year are being considered this week by the Prepar
    atory Committee meeting at Kent Houge, Central Secre

    tariat headq uarters
    Royal Visit
    To B.W.I.

    LONDON.

    The British West Indies is to
    have an official Royal visit during
    Coronation year.

    The Queen’s aunt, the Princess
    Royal, who arranged recently to
    visit Trinidad in her capacity as
    commandant-in-chief of the Brit-
    ish Red Cross, has now an-
    nounced that she will extend her
    visit to British Guiana as well.

    At the invitation of Sir Hubert
    Rance, Governor of Trinidad, the
    Princéss Royal will present col-
    ours to the local branches of th
    Red Cross in Trinidad. She is
    expected to arrive in the Colony
    early in January

    Trinidad Leasehclds,
    o|! company, offered the Princess
    accommodatiun on one of their
    tankers f. + her trip to the West
    Indies, She accepted gratefully,
    but asked that no special arrange-
    ments be made for her voyage.

    Now the Princess has decided
    to extend her tour, on the invita-
    tion of the Government of British
    Guiana, An official announcement
    from St. James's Palace in Lon-
    don, said:

    “Her Royal Highness, the Prin-
    eess Royal, has accepted an invita-
    tion from His Excellency the
    acting Governor of British Guiana
    to visit British Guiana during hey
    coming visit to the West Indies.
    During her stay, Her Royal High-
    ness will inspect Red Cross
    detachments and see Red Cross
    work in the territory.”

    Final arrangements for the
    Royal visit have not yet been com-
    pleted and it is not yet known
    how long the Princess will spend
    in the two Colonies. It is possible
    that she may make visits to other
    Colonies in the British West Indies
    while she js in the Caribbean

    —B.UP.

    Ltd,, the



    500,000 tons a
    hi

    Less snectacular “°velopments
    have been made in the other
    French Colonies in Africa. Coffee
    production has become the main-
    tay of several of the West African
    Colonies, while big new_ ports
    have been built in these terri-

    tories,
    —B.UP.

    and now reaches

    year,









    Sunshine
    Right

    Into



    Your Home



    This Christmas




    |
    Shellac | Yellow Polishing Cloth. ||
    «0 Form-a-Gasket Miracle Black Adhesive |||
    A ae Miracle Tub Cunt ’
    a Sealer
    aaa Devex acne ree
    ” Shaler Hot Patches
    a Sparton 6 & 12 Volt
    ” Black Horns
    Rad Dressing Clear Hooter 12 Volt }
    ” liator Horns
    Cement
    | a tor Rust Chrome Rim Embellish- | ere
    Preventor ers ||)
    * Engineer’s Expanding Reamers {oe
    | a a owe Blue Extra Cutters for FLOORS
    | onder Wax Reamers || | :
    Dunlop Patching bar em Auto Engme Valves
    ” —- — » | Fan Belts all Models
    ” renee T Rear View Mirrors iy
    ” ahead a ape Insulation Tape
    ” Ri atting Pram Tyring
    - Radiator Hose 1% in., 5% in., 1 in
    All Sizes ican ARI * We carry a large stock of best
    a Car & aa = pumps ||. quality imported Paints, as _ well
    | Ee = Ply air Hose Schrader Air Line we ‘as Dry Colours, Linseed Oil,
    rader Metal Tyre i
    Valves Lionide Leatherette Turpeatag end Plot ‘Vari.
    a Tyre Pressure All Shade |
    Gauges Birkmyre Canvas

    BARBADOS CO-OP.
    COTTON FACTORY Ltd.



    The main specific job before the
    Committee the formulation
    f an agenda for the Conference
    Among the subjects sugges
    inclusion by the Commiss are
    Transportation and Communic
    tions; Trade financing facilitic
    credits and collections; Standard-
    ising of commercial products and
    of trade terms; Dissemination
    market information of prices and
    products; Export market coopera-
    tives

    In his
    Albert J
    Caribbean
    ternational

    wag





    remarks, Mr
    Chief of the
    Office of In-
    U.S, Depart-
    ment of Commerce, who was
    elected Chairman of the Com-
    inittee, emphasised that the Con
    ference should strive for tangib!
    results, and should avoid an
    demic approach, He echoed th
    Commissien’s thought that tt
    Conference should be so arranged
    as to stimulate the interest of th
    business communities well a
    f governments,

    Others attending
    ire

    Mr. D. Mascart,
    Customs, Martinique; Mr
    Oliveras, Head, Economic
    ning Unit, Puerto Rico Plan
    ning Board; Mr. D, A. Per
    cival, Assistant Economie Advise:
    Colenia] Development & Welfar¢

    opening
    Powers,
    Section,

    Trade,

    as

    the meetin
    Director ¢
    Candid
    Plan

    Organisation; Mr, Aubrey Starch
    United Kingder, Trade Commis
    sioner, Trinidad; Mr. W. T.. Smit
    Head, Division of Trade Polics
    Department of Economie Affaire
    Surinam; Mr. Willard Grant
    Director of T, Geddes Grant, Ltd
    Trinidad,



    Campaign Against
    Wayside Card
    Vendors

    Police have begun a cam-
    paign to clear wayside posteard
    vendors off the sidewalks where
    they congregate to sell their ware
    These sellers are however con-
    templating forming a delegation to
    interview the Commissioner of
    Police with a = to having the
    campaign relaxec

    The

    Each year as the Christmas sea-
    son approaches, a number of young
    men patrol the city streets selling
    postcards from boxes, Sometimes
    they congregate on pavements and
    in shop doors, impeding the pro-
    gress of Christmas shoppers and

    pedestrians.

    ‘EEL.



    The refrigerating unit of the
    refrigerator is so finely mad
    is hermetically sealed after
    fact ire anc never ne eds se
    This refrigerator will stand
    any extreme ‘of climate

    lovely to look at, too |

    ht TT _ arene tnti NEI dA ei thet cashes So

    -and it’s

    i,

    PAGE THREE —

    Gairy Named.



    + .°
    Suspended
    e
    From Council
    ey eee Oh! what 2UBES bring
    GRENADA, Nov. 19 - cael
    Hon. Eric Gairy was piaried a nasty cough ae ranid relief ’
    and suspended at a meeting 0 |
    the Legislature this morning afie

    speaking just under 20 minutes o
    1 motion urging the sending of
    Royal Commission to Grenada t
    probe generally the social an
    economic affairs and specifical!
    employer-emplcvee relations
    After previous advice from Ad
    ministrator MacMillan in th: |
    Chair to refrain from imputation







    |
    of the worthiness of other mem |
    bers, and later calm‘ advice wu,
    itinue hi peech when he sug-
    gested that the Administra
    must be feeling uneasy as h | sinh
    1 PUBES 8 |
    might speak two or three day ZUBES cauaH MIXTURE ZUBES COUGH LOZENGES
    Gairy went on to say that th A comforting, soothin; rh ¢ so handy to keep with
    ruesome conditions in Grenada that's well known as
    have been blamed on his Manua } spate awaits for cket-size tins, Easy to
    and Mental Workers’ Union | een , a . , Zubes bring quick relief to
    whereas members of the Housc coughs and sore throats a ind tickling throat. Just
    belonging to it had a clean sheet Let its gentle syrup ease . ati nai oie anda
    ind “if other members around th. | and relieve your trouble 7
    table could make the same boast, | Specially suitable and soon a u
    the motion would pass very eas safe for children’s feel vat ES
    ay Ad . ~ ; coughs. Always keep a throa ~~ y
    The Administrator asked th bottle at home g on ~ a
    member for a withdrawal of thes ©. ey
    remarks and Gairy refused, claim AND when you have a stuffy cold, « the new ZUBES INHALER
    ing that the House was the onc in your pocket or handbag. A sniff will clear your head in a jiffy.
    privilege of justice, The Adminis- , ze
    trator read the relevant rules of FROM ALL GOOD CHEMISTS AND STORES
    the Council with regard to respect Agenis: 1, S. GARRAWAY & CO,, Bridgetown a

    for the Chair, whereupon Hon,
    D, A, Henry nominated member,
    moved that Gairy be “named” and
    suspended, and the Attorney Gen-
    eral C, F, Henville seconded.

    The majority voted in favour ol
    the motion and Gairy left the
    Chamber accompanied by three
    members of his block, and a vast
    crowd of his followers in the gal-
    lery who had been urged by Gairy
    to attend in a speech at a previ
    ous public meeting also walked
    out momentarily interrupting the
    quiet of the Chamber,

    In the vote Hons, T. A. Marry-
    show and H, A. McKie abstained
    The name of Hon, Carlyle Noel,
    recently belonging to the Gairy
    block, slipped the Clerk of the
    Council in taking the vote but
    the member remained seated for
    the remainder of the meeting par-
    ticipating in the business together
    with Marryshow, E. V. A. Sylves-
    ter and McKie who are elected
    members, as well as two officials
    ind the two nominated members
    present,

    The suspension motion involves
    a duration till the next meeting
    and forfeiture of any remuneration
    % which the said member
    legislator is entitled for the period
    of suspension, Among those listen-
    ing to the abortive debate was His
    Lordship J. L. M. Perez, Chief
    Justice of Trinidad, who arrived
    here this morning for the sitting
    of the Appeal Court.

    Gairy had asked whether he
    might vote on the motion and the
    Administrator overruled this, Out-
    side the Chamber an excited crowd
    followed Gairy down street to the
    MMWU office,

    Later, on a motion of adjourn-
    ment, Hon. W. E. Julien referred
    to the fact that two fires recently

    aeoa



    /

    One —!
    JUST ONE—and aren't we enjoying ourselves?
    Baby wonders what all the fuss is about on this
    particular day —the toys, the new frock, the cake
    and this lovely, lovely candle — but what fun ! !

    set to the residences of O, M

    Bain ' and Fouls ‘Strauss were | And what a happy year it has been on the whole

    patent attempts of agson and sug- | for everyone -— particularly since we put baby on
    |

    nested that the Government} Cow & Gate, Steady progress —- abounding health

    hould offer a reward for evidence
    leading to the culprits, He said it |
    appeared certain that people were
    seeking to coinmit murder
    through fire as a means of revenge,
    threatening the lives of whole
    families.

    Gairy’s 20-minute speech up to
    the stage of the suspension, large!
    consisted of charges against
    “plantocracy” whom he described
    as “responsible for the gruesome
    and undesirable atmosphere pre-
    vailing in Grenada.”

    Diamond Rings

    LOUIS L. BAYLEY!
    Bolton Lane

    ECIAL XMAS
    OFFER

    $508.00

    G.E.C
    REFRIGERATORS

    REDUCED TO

    >460.00

    THIS SPECIAL OFFER IS
    ONLY GOOD FCR

    NOVEMBER and DECEMBER
    CITY GARAGE TRADING
    CO., LTD.

    Dial 4671.

    ~~ peace and contentment.
    Yes—-carry on, baby, with that charming smile

    —at least we have given you a good start!



    he FOOD of”









    J.B, LESLIE & Co., Ltd.

    ELECTRIC

    10h) ab mots





    G.E.C,
    that it
    manu-
    rvicing

    Wp fo Solid chromium-plated
    handle incorporating

    concealed lock.

    Victoria Street







    (tinted oy the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad -..,

    PAGE FOUR



    eifd ADVOCAT

    a eee es ee

    Bridgetown

    Thursday, November 20, 1952.

    RAGLE
    * 4
    aA BE.8. HALL

    IT WOULD be very discouraging if the
    district market planned Eagle Hall
    should take as long to complete as the
    Bay Street Window opposite the General
    Hospital.

    Eagle

    for

    Hall it has been pointed out
    before is an important cross-roads much
    used by visitors to the island and its
    market facilities have long been appreci-
    ated by Recognition of Eagle
    Hall’s market facilities did lead in fact to
    the removal some months ago of certain
    shops in preparation for the erection of
    a market which would give protection to
    hawkers from sun and rain and which
    would make shopping easier for the house-
    wife.

    The removal of the shops has not been
    followed by any speedy action to erect
    a market shed, and several enterprising
    hawkers, impatient with the inconveni-
    ences of selling perishable foodstuffs on
    an exposed unprotected site have built for
    themselves small shelters which add
    beauty to the desolate site but give ade-
    quate cover from the and rain. In
    contrast to the inactivity which is evident
    with regard to the proposed Eagle Hall
    Market, opposite its site a service station
    for motor vehicles is rapidly nearing vom-
    pletion.

    No example of the advantages of private
    enterprise over public could be cited
    which would so readily be understood.
    The service station at Eagle Hall is being
    built on land which had to be cleared in
    the same way that land had to be cleared
    for the erection of the proposed market
    building. One might have thought that a
    market which was being erected with the
    approval of the central government would
    have been built before work had even
    started. on the service station. In fact
    unless some erection follows soon it is
    possible that hawkers will, when it rains,
    seek shelter under the roof of the service
    station which is now rapidly nearing com-
    pletion, The Coronation as was pointed
    out in these columns yesterday is not far
    distant. Soon it is hoped that the Corona-
    tion Committee will take the public into
    their confidence and announce what
    works are to be undertaken as a_ per-
    manent memorial of the Coronation.
    Meanwhile a list ought to be made in
    every parish of schemes which await com-
    pletion and the-determination made that
    they will be completed not later than one
    month preceding the Coronation. Some-
    where near the head of this list. must be
    included the proposed market at Eagle
    Hall.

    residents.

    no

    sun

    ‘ ‘
    CACTI
    THE exhibition of miniature gardens at
    the Barbados Museum was a_ useful

    reminder to the public that each house-
    holder, no matter how small the plot of

    ‘his tenancy or ownership could beautify

    his surroundings. Especially was this mes-
    sage conveyed by the cacti which still
    remain in the now permanent rock gar-
    den of the Museum. Now the Civie Circle
    has advertised cacti to the much larger
    public which visits Seawell during the
    year. Near the entrance to the waiting
    recom and opposite the covered open-gal-
    lery which leads to the main waiting
    room a simple garden of cacti gives resi-
    dents and visitors alike a favourable
    impression of a tropical island. The com-
    ment often been made before that
    cultivation of caeti is more prevalent in
    the United Kingdom than in Barbados.
    Tt will be a great benefit to the island if
    the activities of the Horticultural Society
    and of the Civie Circle should result in
    the spreading of cacti gardens throughout
    the island. Barbados would be a much
    prettier place if cacti and succulenis were
    used as hedges instead of walls, and much
    stone now wasted for purposes of osten-
    tation would be saved for more necessary
    purposes.

    THE FOUNTAIN

    WHEN some months ago the fountain of
    Bridgetown was regrettably turned off
    during the day an announcement was
    made that the fountain would still play
    on days on which tourist ships visited the
    island. On several days when tourist ships
    have visited the island since the fountain
    has not played. Everyone hopes that soon
    the fountain will play every day and that
    during the Coronation celebrations it will
    play night and day for at least one week.
    The idea that visitors come to Barbados
    when tourist ships arrive is in need
    of revision. More people arrive in Barba-

    has





    }
    onl

    qa by air than by sea and aeroplanes
    come to Barbados daily. Also regular

    ass er carrying ships such as the
    Colombie and the Golfito qualify for the
    de { of tourist ships. The aim of
    th ought to be to keep the
    fou ! every day even if salt

    There

    in witl

    is nou

    out watel

    LONDON
    The American’ elections, the
    opening of Parliament in Britain,
    the establishment of improved
    Anglo-Egyptian relations and the
    High Wycombe bye-election com-

    bine this week to etch a mark on
    Britain’s history,

    It is traditional for British states-
    men to withhold official comment
    on elections in any foreign coun-
    try, Even when the defeated
    Japanese went to the polls last
    October to make their first “free”
    post-war choice of a government,
    British spokesmen refrained from
    expressing any preference regard-
    ing their future leadership.

    In the case of the United States,

    the gisinclination to give an
    opinion has been even more
    marked.

    But what do the British people
    say?

    Always feeling sympathy for a
    defeated man, if he takes defeat
    well, they term Adlai Stevenson
    a big-hearted, generous loser.

    However, irrespective of Re-
    publican party policy, they are
    glad to see Eisenhower appointed
    to the world’s Liggest job. Re-
    membering Eisenhower's wartime
    leadership, his name is a house-
    hold word in Britain, and syn-
    onymous with decency, honesty
    and fair play.

    In London, on the same day that
    America polled, the opening of
    Parliament lent the city a touch
    of pageantry and colour, Great
    crowds turned out to'see the young
    Queen, who look especially
    lovely, and the Dukejof Edinburgh
    as, preceded and ‘followed by
    mounted Sovereign’s Escorts in
    gleaming breastplates and plumed
    helmets, they drove in the Irish
    State coach past the troops of the
    Household Brigade lining the
    route.

    The state occasion over, Par-
    liamentary members turned quick-
    ly to the vital business of the
    moment. One thing emerges from
    the tens of thousands of words
    spoken. Britain has still to adjust
    herself to post-war conditions ne-
    cessitating increased production
    for less pay before the country’s
    economy can be set on a stable
    nasis, Furthermore, demands from
    Socialist quarters tha, the period
    of military conscription should be
    reduced from two years to
    eighteen months cannot be met
    without endangering Britain’s

    security.
    New Era?

    The announcement that Gen-
    eral Neguib will pay compensation
    for the Britons killed and in-
    jured in Cairo’s riots last January
    may presage a new era in relar
    tions between Briiain and the
    Moslem world.

    General Neguib’s action follows
    closely on the recent successful
    visit to Britain of Turkey’s Prime
    Minister, Mr. Adnan Menderes,
    »nd his Foreign Minister, Mr. Fuat
    Koprulu. Then, Mr. Menderes
    indicated that he would do every-
    thing possible to help smooth out
    Anglo-Egyptian differences — as
    well as to achieve a settlement in

    BARBADOS ADVOCATE

    NEWS FROM BRITAIN





    ky
    Vaughan Jones

    the Anglo-Persian oil dispute.

    At the same time British states-
    men were highly encouraged by
    the way General Neguib was
    seeking to re-organise Egypt's ad-
    ministration and suppress graft
    and corruption within government
    ranks.

    It appears now that General
    Neguib will consider realistically
    and co-operatively Britain's view-
    point that the Sudan must be
    allowed to determine for herself
    the form of her new Government.
    So the chances seem better than
    ever that the leaders of the three
    countries will be able to agree on
    the Sudan’s future status.

    Improved Anglo- Egyptian rela-
    tions may also create a favourable
    atmosphere for the establishment
    of tre much discussed Middle East
    Command in which Egypt would
    ve represented.

    At the High Wycombe by-
    election the Conservatives in-
    creased their majority from 1,753
    to 2,100. This is only the second
    time since the war’s end that the

    party in power have improved
    their position in a marginal con-
    stituency.

    So it shows that the electors
    there have more faith in Mr.
    Churchill’s Conservative leader-

    ship than in Mr. Attlee’s Socialist
    experiments.

    Marriages

    The break-up of marriages at-
    tracts public attention only when
    attended by fiamboyant circum-
    stances.

    Today, nearly every woman in
    Britain is debating |—— for and
    against—the acquittal by a French
    court of a plain-looking, fortyone-
    year-old wife who had shot her
    husband because he had spurned
    her for the love of an attractive,
    married red-head, seven years her
    junior.

    The Royal
    Divorce, which
    detailed survey
    for marital break-ups in Britain,

    Commission on

    finds, however, that the most
    common cause of divorce has its
    roots in mundane separation.

    Husband and wife are parted for
    some length of time; they grow
    ‘out of each others’ lives, find new
    interests, and then.one or both
    discover there is no return, Con-
    tributory factor to such separation
    has been the housing shortage of
    recent years. .

    Another view put to the Com-
    mission, which has been sitting
    in Edinburgh, is that men should
    not have to pay even innocent
    former wives maintenance after
    the wives have re-married. This
    was submitted by the National
    Married Men’s Association, who
    claimed that enforced maintenance
    of a_re-married woman was
    capitalising a man’s past error.

    At the same time, the National
    Council of Women, sitting at



    is continuing its
    into the reasons

    Eastbourne, passed a_ resolution
    asserting that wives with private
    means should support husbands if
    they become needy “through age
    incapacity, disablement or other
    misfortune.”



    In London, meantime, the first
    domestic proceedings court has
    been set up in the Chelsea dis-
    trict. It is sited in a converted
    schoolroom, and the atmosphere
    is informal. The court has soft
    chairs and restful lighting and
    decorations. Twice a week’ hus~
    bands and wives may bring to it
    their charges of neglect, cruelty or

    esertion, and it is hoped the in-
    ‘ormal surroundings will help
    parting couples to patch up their
    differences,

    The Coronation and the crowds
    of overseas visitors who come to
    view it are certain to attract to
    London a motley fraternity of



    tricksters, spivs and wide boys. ;

    Their target will be the pocket-
    books of not only Britons but their
    guests. Many will claim to be
    “guides”.

    To spare visitors from such bad
    experiences, Sir Alexander Max-
    well, chairman of the British
    Travel and Holidays Association,
    has sponsored a regular course in
    guide-lecturing. Seventeen men
    and fourteen women from many
    different walks of life are for
    three months studying under a
    “master”, Mr. H, L. Bryant Peers,
    what they will reed to know to
    tell the visitors from Vancouver,
    or Buenos Aires, Hong Kong, Ka-~
    rachi or Capetown, ‘They will
    learn something about all of
    London’s historic buildings, about
    her places of entertainment and
    restaurants, as well as about her
    varied institutions.

    Retains Popularity

    The Queen Mother retains her
    great popularity in Britain be-
    cause she keeps up her contact
    with the people.

    This week she visited the Royal
    Festival Hall’s International
    Kitchen exhibition where fifty-
    seven women representing nine-
    teen countries showed their cook-
    ery skill by preparing their own
    national dishes with food available
    in Britain. Each little kitchen.
    fully equipped, was staffed by a
    inational group of three. The
    Queen expressed her appreciation
    of many of the dishes—which were
    an object lesson to British house-
    wives in demonstrating that food
    in England need not be dull.

    All the Western European coun-
    tries were represented, as well ad
    the U.S., Brazil, India and Pakis-
    tan, Indonesia, Malaya and Israel.

    Japan, Jugoslavia and Austria
    contented emselves by display-
    ing cold dishes,

    At the exhibition it was assumed
    that the men of the house might
    also help the housewife. Display-
    ed for him to wear was a working
    coat of blue denim, trimmed with
    maroon. And for washing up,
    there was a blue and yellow
    striped apron with yellow top.

    —L.E.S.

    Majestic—-And No Expense

    The world’s officially organised
    “culture” is to cost the record
    sum next year of more than
    £ 3,500,000, if the United Nations
    Education«i, Scientific, and Cul-
    tural Organisation has its way.

    And the bill for Britain will be
    £400,000 to £500,000, ,

    Along the elegant Avenue Klebe
    n Paris is the former German
    Jecupation headquarters, t he
    ‘uxury Hotel Majestic. For a
    rent of £18,000 a year it now
    houses 750 UNESCO employees of
    18 nationalities,

    The Majestic’s tenants are the
    »est paid, tax-free office workers
    n the world, One in four has a
    ‘ar—most of them foreign, im-
    »orted duty free with sterling and
    jollars, |

    They and their hotel are an

    tonishing proof that behind the
    egular series of vague resolu-
    ions, recommendations, studies,
    o-ordinations, considerations, and

    oh yes—discussions and con-
    ultations, the mystic and remote

    .x-letter word UNESCO does
    epresent some positive reality.

    Positive .

    For the privileged guests at the
    Majestic are certainly positive,
    ind on occasions even realistic.

    They have voted themselves
    his year 10 per cent. cost-of-liv-
    ing and salary increases, Now
    hey are negotiating with the
    French Government for duty-free
    cigarettes.

    And around the Majestic are
    parked at any one time. more
    plendid foreign cars, with yellow
    Diplomatic Corps plates, than in
    any other spot in Paris, For senior
    executives have diplomatic rank
    too

    Now the Majestic has produced
    s highest provisional budget. It
    is to be discussed this month by
    )00 delegates from .65 countries.

    This gigantic © talk-feast, to
    which Britain is sending 19 dele-
    gates and staff atsits @wn cost,

    will plan the next year’s cultural
    exchanges and their price.
    It will try to see if nine relue-

    Spared

    SYDNEY SMITH
    reports from Paris on
    UNESCO's spending





    tant member countries, three-
    quarters of a million pounds be-
    hind with their subscriptions, can
    be persuaded to show a little
    more than academic enthusiasm
    for world cultural conferences.

    What sort of programme wil
    UNESCO's conference debate for
    next year? Well, of course, it does
    not know yet, But let us take a
    sample—the last month’s opera-
    tions; a fair average twelfth of
    the blessings for which we Brit-
    ish alone will be asked to pay
    close on half a million pounds in
    1953. |

    Let it be understood that
    UNESCO. paid an average of 20
    per cent. travel expenses for all
    the comings and goings, and from
    £3 10s. to £5. 5s. in dollars as
    daily subsistence allowances for
    all the “experts” involved,

    First we had a “Constitutive
    Conference” to plan the formation
    of the International Social Science
    Council.

    Then we had a “Committee of
    Experts” (fares and allowances
    on the usual basis) to discuss the
    rights of the average man _ to
    “participate. in the cultural life
    of the community.”

    They meant : Can we freely go
    to art shows, theatres, cinemas,
    and read the books and listen to
    the music we like?

    After much discussion these ex-
    perts decided we can,

    Next in Rangoon there was a
    “seminar” for South Asian and
    South Pacific youth leaders on
    education. Frankly, I cannot find
    out what they did or who they
    were. But there was certainly no
    political sereening for



    Our Reader's Say ::

    Congratulations
    To The Editor, The Advocate—
    SIR,—No time is better suited
    »y the assessment of a task than
    its completion, It is because of
    hat, that I take this fitting op-
    »ortunity to offer my sincere con-
    eratulation and thanks to Mr, F.
    \. Hoyos and Mr. John Prideaux
    for the very interesting and in-
    ormative articles they have been
    contributing fo ‘your newspaper
    for the past few weeks.
    The task was no doubt onerous,
    ut they have succeeded in a
    large waY IM bringing to the pub-
    lic of Barbados a true picture of
    their heroes, and the background
    of their struggles as a people
    Seldom, if ever, have we been
    treated to such a thorough expo-
    tion of the facts of our history,
    nd such penetrating analysis of
    ur great sons as waS the case at
    ue
    Sir, my only hope is that their
    ork will not be left there, but
    that it will be put into BOOK
    FCRM, for the use of ourselves,
    nd posterity Is not the work of
    tlemen the correct
    te ] e introduced in our
    nereby hildren
    t themselves?



    these two ge!

    irn something at

    The books on Sir Walter Raleigt
    and Lord Nelson have outlivec
    their usefulness,

    L. B. BRATHWAITE.

    Health Centres

    To the Editor, The Advocate—
    Sir,--May I suggest that

    t

    Leader of our Government inform 4

    the Secretary of State for the Col-

    onies that, in view of the proposed®

    Salary and conditions of Service,
    it is extremely unlikely that any
    Medical graduate with the addi-
    ional qualification. of a D.P.H,
    would apply for the post of Medi-
    cal Officer in charge of any Health
    Centre in Barbados.

    If the Government cannot pay
    more it should face the facts and
    not insist on the additional D.P.H.
    qualification. Plans however
    praiseworthy become useless if
    barriers are created which prevent
    them from being implemented
    Any well qualified Doctor with 4
    year’s Tropical experience is quite
    capable of being in charge of a
    Health Centre

    At present it appears that Health
    tres ation, will re-

    discus-



    topic of

    ion i

    MEDICO



    these |

    pis
    thes Compositor.

    Chinese, Burmese, Indonesian, In-
    dian, and other youth leaders,

    Then there was a thrilling Com-
    mittee for the Co-ordination of
    Congresses of the “International
    Council for Philosophic and
    Humanistic Studies.” In other
    words, a planning of meetings of
    “learned men” such as the In-
    ternational Commission on Folk
    Arts and Folk Lore in ‘lovely
    places like Berne, Istanbul, Pal-
    ermo, ‘and Florence—fares paid,
    of course.

    After that came the “Pro-
    visional Committee on Science
    Abstracting.” The report on what
    they abstracted beyond ten dollars
    a day living allowance is not yet
    available,

    Then we had an “International
    Committee on Monuments and
    Historical Sites,” This august body
    resolved that “in the event of
    armed conflict” — I wunderstund
    they meant war—monuments like
    UNESCO ought to be neutral.

    £1,000 a Week

    Next came a delicious piece —
    a meeting of experts on the polit!-
    cal role of women, Most of them
    were men, and they reached
    similar conclusions to a woman
    named Pankhurst well over 40
    years ago.

    The month ended with three
    especially dreary conferences on
    “Voluntary International Work
    Camps,” “Young Workers’ Prob-
    lems,” and “Group Travel Grants
    for Workers.”

    This last is the sort of thing
    that sent Austrian firemen to
    Stockholm to see how the Swedes
    put fires out.

    They found they used water,
    too.

    For its administrative work
    alone in this remarkable month
    of achievement the Majestic’s
    Paris bill was nearly £440,000,
    Britain’s share of that ,was just
    over £1,000 a week.

    I trust you are enjoying your
    money's worth.

    —L.E.S.



    Not Compositor

    ‘o, The Editor, The Advocate.
    Str,—I notice an item in your
    paper of the 12th inst. under the
    yeading of “12 Months for Steal-
    ing” on Page 5. In the item is the
    mame Chesterfield Alleyne which
    is also my name and I would like
    you to notify your readers that it
    not Chesterfield Alleyne the

    CHESTERFIELD ALLEYNE.
    Disestablishment

    To, The Editor, The Advocate,

    SIR,—I was much horrified to
    see that the Government had not
    acted with such prudent economy
    as to include disestablishment of
    te Church in its Five Year Plan,
    but an official statement that the
    Five Year Plan is not all the legis-

    lation the Government intends
    making has brought me some
    relief.

    The community can surely ben-
    efit from a disestablished Church,

    and the revenue obtained from
    that source, which at present is
    f deliberate waste, could do much
    to relieve the suffering masses in
    this Island from their miseries.
    I am,
    Yours truly,

    ECONOMIST.

    ST

    ca etl Rare atte as A eta hene tes nm



    ‘

    Government
    report that, while the number of men in
    prison has dropped by

    READY TO BUILD
    AN ATOM PLANE

    By NEWELL ROGERS

    NEW YORK, Tuesday,
    TO the new President may fall the breath-

    catching task of launching not only the

    world’s first atom-powered submarine, but
    the first atom-powered aircraft.

    On half a million acres of rugged, desolate
    country in south-eastern Idaho, deep behind

    the Rockies, scientists and engineers are
    working in squat concrete buildings on the

    “UA-boats” power plant.

    The dun-coloured desert is now the nation-

    al reactor testing station.
    * * x
    THE SUBMARINE, named Nautilus,

    London, Connecticut.

    And the Atomic Energy Commission an-
    nounces it is ready to start work in Idaho on

    the plane.

    It notifies contractors that preliminary
    plans will be ready in ten days for a city

    devoted solely to this aircraft.

    The desert is going to bloom—whether for
    mankind’s glory or shame will be mankind’s

    decision.

    * * x
    CARPENTERS are working in Washington
    on street stands for people to see the inaugu-

    ration of the new President next January 20

    MEET wt Danny Kaye, the film producer
    of London and Hollywood, and no longer
    just an actor if you please. Like Charles
    Chaplin, Kaye is going to do more of the
    the

    work behind as well as in front of
    camera.

    Unlike Chaplin, however, he will allow a
    lady named Sylvia Fine to write the words
    and music of his first film production,
    “Knock on Wood,” mostly to be made in

    London, In private life she is Mrs, Kaye.

    *
    CUNARD quickly snuffed out a water-
    front rumour about the Queen liners. The
    rumour: They would be laid up for major

    alterations and fitted with stabilising fins.

    The truth, according to Cunard: They will
    be out of service for a seven-week overhaul
    only. But tourist-class quarters may be some-

    what enlarged for Coronation year.

    * *
    NEW YORK’S youngest,

    150,000, it ended with 30,000.

    * * *
    IN HOLLYWOOD a picket parades along
    reads
    “Esther, please, please let me visit my baby.”
    Philip Chain is picketing his divorced wife
    Esther, who refuses to let him see their

    North Edinburgh-street. His sign

    three-year-old daughter Darlene.

    * * *
    IN World War II Mrs. Omer Willette got a
    Willette’s
    death in action. It was a mistake. Two weeks
    ago came another wire announcing his death
    in action in Korea. Last night a telephone
    call from Tokyo—Sergeant Willette on the
    line to say he is only wounded and will be
    home soon. Says seven-year-old George Will-

    telegram announcing Sergeant

    ette: “Daddy is bullet proof.”



    HE PAYS FOR SMASH HITS

    By HENRY LOWRIE
    NEW YORK.



    FRANK RUSSELL, 52-year-old business
    ‘miled as he wrote out cheques

    man,
    recently for 12,214 dollars (about £4,700).

    The money was to pay for 3,468 windows
    broken by boys all over America during
    the baseball season.

    Mr. Russell was fulfilling a pledge he
    made 40 years ago when he was caught by
    a policeman after breaking a window in a
    street game.

    “Some day,” he said, “I’ll pay for every
    window which kids break.”

    FROM his poor start, Russell became a
    millionaire—it is incidental that he made
    his money in the glass business—and dis-
    tributed cards to children to give to house-
    owners whose windows they smashed,

    The cards promised free repairs. But the
    ball must be returned to the children.

    Said Russell: “I was warned that I would
    be encouraging juvenile delinquents and
    would probably have to pay 100,000 dollars
    (£35,000).

    “But I’m tickled pink. Boys don't have to
    run away now.”

    *
    THE WAY these big Hollywood compan-
    ies roam all over the world making pictures
    riles the local trades unions.

    But over their objections 17 films are
    planned for foreign shooting next year.
    They include “King Arthur and the Round
    Table” to be made in England and “Briga-

    doon” to be filmed in Scotland and England. |}

    * *

    WITHOUT offering an explanation. the
    pointed out in a week-end

    highest-priced
    newspaper, the Daily Compass, died a quiet
    death. It was Left-wing and sold for about
    8d. a copy. Starting with a circulation of



    THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 1952. °





    is
    under construction on the Thames near New

    Just Received - - -

    A fine assortment of CADBURY’S and ROWNTREE’S Chocolates

    in Presentation Boxes,

    — Also —

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    THE WINDSOR PHARMACY. }
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    1,162 the number of i
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    MEAT DEPT.

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    MILK FED DUCKS

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    SWEET BREADS
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    FRESH CARROTS
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    LUNCHEON BEEF
    MINCED BEEF
    ROAST BEEF
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    U.S.A, Nov. 19
    “Golfito”

    England Nov. 22nd



    THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 19



    Lad Bound Over For SSO PUBLISHES Board Of Health @5 Fu



    inflicting Bodily Harm

    Nineteen-year-old Loui

    Hayries of Market Hill, St.

    George, was yesterday bound over in the sum of £50 to
    keep the peace for 18 months by Mn». Justice J. W. B. Chen-
    ery after an assize jury found him guilty of inflicting
    grievous bodily harm on 22-year-old Joseph Wickham of
    the same district on July 25 this year.,

    When the foreman returned the
    verdict he told the Registrar that
    the jury wished the Court to be
    lenient towards the prisoner,

    Mr. W. W. Reece, Q.C., Solicitor
    General prosecuted for the Crown.
    Mr. F. G. Smith appeared on
    Haynes’ behalf.

    Five witnesses gave evidence for
    the Prosecution.

    Pr, Skomorok said that on July
    25 he examined Joseph Wickham.
    Wickham’s lower jaw was frac-
    tured. The blow which caused the
    fracture could have been caused
    by a stone. The injury was not
    likely to cause permanent disabil-
    ity.

    Wickham said that on July 25
    he went into a shop belonging to
    a man called Turney on Market
    Hill, St. George, where Haynes and
    others were. He passed near
    Haynes and brushed him. Haynes
    told him not to touch him and he
    asked Haynes what was the mat-
    ter between them. He went fur-
    ther into the shop and when he
    was passing near Haynes again,
    he chanced to bounce him. Haynes
    pushed him and they begen to
    fight. Turney ordered them out of
    the shop and as they were going
    out, Haynes.said he was going to
    knock hint down.

    He started to walk home when
    someone calléd him, While he was
    swinging around on being called,
    he was struck with a stone which
    fractured his jaw.

    Tap On Shoulder

    Cross-examined he said he had
    tapped Haynes on his shoulder
    and said, “This is a sock,” but that
    was only an expression common
    to the district. Before he was
    struck with the stone he did not
    threaten to shoot Haynes,

    Blair Burke said he was in the
    shop when Wickham tapped
    Haynes. Haynes told him not to
    tap him again and when Wickham
    again touched him and they began
    to scuffle, the shop proprietor or-
    dered them out of the shop. He
    did not see what happened when
    they went out on the road,

    Hercules St. Hill said when the
    shop proprietor sent Haynes and
    Wickham out of the shop, Wick-
    ham told Haynes he was going to
    shoot him. Haynes ran down the
    road and Wickham did not pur+
    sue him. Later Wickham came
    back with a cut on his jaw.

    Cross-examined he said that
    Haynes told Wickham on more
    than four occasions to leave him
    alone.

    Conway Burke said that he was
    at the shop the night when Wick-
    ham and Haynes had the scuffle.
    After the shop proprietor ordered
    them out of the shop, Wickham
    told Haynes, “The only way I do
    not shoot you is if God take me.”
    When he heard that threat he ad-
    vised Haynes not to go down the

    road.
    Self Defence

    Mr. Smith said that the defence
    was not quibbling over the high
    possibility that Haynes fractired
    Wickham’'s jaw, but in the light of
    the evidence the defence was say-
    ing that the blow that caused the
    injury was made in self defence.
    They had heard the evidence of
    Wickham’s. continuous aggression
    and his threatening to shoot
    Haynes. Haynes could not but be
    perturbed at the idea of Wick-
    ham’s threatening to shoot him
    and immediately after the threat
    chasing him down the road a dark
    aight, the case was a perfect case
    of self defence.

    Since Wickham’s threat to shoo
    Haynes had been so solemn that it
    had put fear in the mind of the
    witness who advised Haynes
    against going down the road, it
    would have put more fear even
    in the mind of the man to whom
    it was directed.

    All they had to do was to de-
    cide whetner the injury was great-
    er than the occasion demanded.

    After half an hour's deliber-
    ation the jury returned a verdict
    of guilty. Haynes was bound over
    for 18 months.





    Assize Diary

    THURSDAY NOV. 20
    Reg. vs. Nathaniel Browne
    Reg. vs, Ethan Brathwaite

    and Denzil Harris




    T .
    Venezuelan Fined
    : =

    £10 For Dangerous
    . .

    Driving
    His Worship Mr, E. A, McLeod,
    Police Magistrate of District “A”,
    yesterday tined 29-year-old Com-
    mission Agent Hugo Garin of
    Caracas £10 to be paid forthwith
    when he pleaded guilty of driv+
    ing the car X-509 on Biack Rock
    road on November 11 in a manner

    dangerous to the public.
    Garin was also convicted, rep-
    rimanded and discharged for driv-
    ing the car X-509 without an

    appropriate licence on November
    i, L
    “Mr. W. W. Reece Q.C., who
    prosecuted for “the Police asked

    the Court to amend the original
    charge to one of driving in a man-
    ner dangerous to the pubiic. In
    the original charge Garm was
    alleged to have caused bodily
    harm to Meta Cox and Carter Cox,
    two school children, through wil-
    ful neglect while driving the ca
    X-509 on Black Rock road on
    November 11,

    Mr. J. S. B. Dear appeared for
    Garin, Sgt. Howard of the Black
    Rock Police Station said that on
    November 11 he went to Black
    Rock road and saw the car X-509
    in the road, and this car was in-
    volved in an accident with four
    school children who were taken
    to the General Hospital after the
    accident,

    He learnt
    was the

    that the defendant
    driver of the car.



    REMANDED
    Twenty-four-year-old Elsie Car-
    rington of Richmond Gap, St.

    Miehael was remanded with bail
    until November 25 by His Worship
    yesterday on a charge of inflicting
    grievous bodily harm on Dencine
    Spencer also of Richmond Gap on
    October 3.

    Mr, J, E, T. Brancker is appear-
    ing on behalf of Carrington while
    Sgt. Haynes is prosecuting for the
    Police.

    IGNORED SIGNAL

    Lionel Humphrey of Nursé
    Land, St. Michael was fined 10/-
    by His Worship yesterday when
    he was found guilty of ignoring
    a police stop signal while driving
    a van on Constitution Road about
    10.15 a.m, on October 15,

    Inspector King of the Central
    Police Station said that on Octo-
    ber 15 he was on duty along
    Constitution Road, The lower
    part of Belmont going towaras
    Queen’s Park was impassable.

    Due to this a sign which read-
    “Caution, Road Obstructed” was
    put at the corner of Belmont
    road, He saw a motor van coming
    towards him and noticed that the
    defendant was the driver. i

    He signalled the driver. He did
    not stop’and only pulled up after
    he had travelled about 20 yards
    from him.

    THREE ROBBERIE

    Cynthia Sergeant of Greenland,
    St, Andrew, reported to the Police
    yesterday that while she was
    shopping in Roebuck Street on
    November 18, the sum of $150
    was stolen from her,

    George Kellman of Ashbury
    St. George reported that his house
    was broken and entered on No-

    Ss

    vember 17 and clothing to the
    value of $121 was stolen. oA
    Henry Goodman of Oistin,

    Christ Church reported that gro-
    ceries were stolen from his shop
    at Qistin on November Ween

    The Police are investigating
    these reports.

    RATES OF EXCHANGE





    NOVEMBEP. 19, 1952
    Selling NEW YORK Buying
    724 » pr, Cheques. on b
    Bankers - 7/10% pr.
    Sight or Deman 2
    Drafts 70 5/10% pr
    92 4/10% pr. Cable . =
    70 9/10% pr. Currency 69 2/10 + pr
    . Coupons Be 5/10% pr
    50° pr Silver 20% pr
    CANADA
    75 8/10 pr. Cheques on dis
    : Bankers 74 * pr
    Demand Drafts 73.85 & pr
    Sight Drafts 73 7/10% pr
    75 8/10% pr. Cable Se ates
    74 3/10 pr. Currenay 72 5, 10% pr
    Coupons 71 8/10% Pp
    50% Silver pr

    20%



    pr

    ~

    TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE
    SPECIALS.









    ..30 per tin CON’ «uwSED MILK—per tin .......... .30
    60 per doz, DOmMINICA GRAPEFRUIT—per doz. -.60
    60 per 10 Ibs. POTATOES—per 10 lbs. ........ ..
    5.50 per 110 Ib, bag POTATOES—per 110 lb. bag... 5.50
    4.00 per 5 Ib. tin PROCESSED CHEESE—per 5 lb tin 4.00
    96 per tin CRAWFORDS CREAM CRACKERS
    —per tin .96
    The Above Items for Cash & Carry Customers Only
    MAXAM CORNED BEEF HASH—1-lb. tin... 78
    MAXAM OX ‘TONGUES—2-lb. tin ........ +6 4.24
    MAXAM STEAK & KIDNEY PUDDING—I-lb. tin 69
    ' SWIFTS LUNCHEON BEEF with CEREAL—12-oz. tin 83
    SALISBURY CORNED MUTTON—per tin 68
    PALETHORPES HARICOT MUTTON—per tin .. 56
    PALETHORPES STEWED STEAK—per tin 67
    PALETHORPES MEAT ROLL—per tin ... ; 64
    PALETHORPES READY, MEAL—per tin ............ 63
    HARRIS'S GALANTINE OF VEAL, HAM & TONGUE
    —per tin 89
    BRONTE ROAST BEEF—per 1-lb. tin . 77
    RANCH LUNCHEON BEEF LOAF—per tin : 61
    RANCH MINCED CORNED BEEF in CEREAL—per tin 61
    RANCH V LOAF—per tin . © oi 64
    BRONTE MBS TONGUES—per tin 1.38
    . COCKADE FINE RUM

    »



    STANSFELD, SCOTT & CO., LTD.

    oS ee





    NEW MAP OF
    CARIBBEAN

    A very informative and colour-
    ful map of the Caribbean has
    just been issued by Esso Standard
    Oil, S.A. This map contains in-
    formation on all means of trans-
    portation which exist in the area
    and also shows in large detail,
    fifteen of the most important
    isiands of this region. It has been
    published as a means of pro-
    moting travel throughout the
    Caribbean and at the same time
    to foster understanding and
    knowledge anfong the countries
    and territories which the area
    comprises.

    Although the size of the map
    has been kept small enough to be
    convenient and although it is
    packed with information, it is ex-
    tremely easy to read. All sched-
    uled airlines serving the Carib-
    bean are shown with approximate
    flying times between terminals.
    and ports of call for all sched-

    uled .steamShip lines accommo-
    dating passengers are. indicated
    by symbol and key. Railroads,
    highways and airports are shown
    and the spectacular mountain
    ranges of the islands are indi-
    cated by shaded relief treatment.
    Over 100 colourful pictures
    graphically describe the . culture,

    history and recreation of the area,
    Tourists to the Caribbean will
    also be aided by the accurate de-
    piction of major points of in-
    terest on the various island in-
    sets. The legends, notes, ‘and
    other explanatory details con-
    tained in the map, have been
    printed in English, Spanish and
    French.

    The Esso Map of the Caribbean
    has fulfilled a long felt need in
    this area and it has been very
    favourably received by Govern-
    ment officials, travel bureaux,
    tourist committees, airline and
    steamship companies, as a very
    important contribution to the de-
    velopment of tourism and travel
    in the Caribbean.



    Acting Governor
    At St. Leonard’s
    Schools

    His Excellency the Acting
    Governor, the Hon. R. .N. Turner,

    attended by Captain W. H. R.
    Armstrong, A.D.C., yesterday
    morning visited the St. Leon-

    ard’s School for boys anq the St.
    Leonard's school for girls.

    On arrival at the boys’ school,
    His Excellency was met by Mr.
    C. Glindon Reed, Director of
    Education, and the Acting Head-
    master, Mr. G. C. Millar, who ac.
    companied His Excellency on a
    tour of the school,

    the
    met
    Cc.

    Mr. Turner then inspectéd
    girls’ school where he was
    by the Headmistress, Mrs.
    Griffith.

    Later, His Excellency paid an
    unofficial visit to the Bank Hall
    Grammar School where he was
    received by the Headmaster, Mr.
    J. D. Bancroft.



    Activities Al
    Y.M.C.A.

    Members of the Y.M.C.A, are
    working on their playing field at
    the new Headquarters. Already
    a fairly large area of the field
    has been levelled and = grass
    planted.

    On December 10 the Y.M.C.A,
    Glee Club, conducted by Mr,
    O. A. “Graffie” Pilgrim, formerly
    of the Combermere School Glee
    Club, will stage their Christmas
    Concert at the Y.M.C.A. Naval
    Hall. The Police Band will assist
    with the programme.

    The Y.M.C.A. Week of Prayer
    ended on Sunday last, The at-
    tendance throughout the week
    was the best for many years.

    Make



    HARRISON'S

    Your Headquarters
    for Hardware! !

    XMAS
    Draws near and the
    Seasonal Hospitality

    is bound to
    make Extra
    Demands
    Upon Your
    Kitchen
    and Table
    Appointments
    Be sure
    You have
    all those |
    little . things
    which tend
    to ensure the
    success of
    the
    occasion







    BARBADOS ADVOCATE



    Receive Report Ors

    The General Board of Health
    at their meeting yesterday re-
    ceived Reports from the Govern-
    ment Chief Sanitary Inspector op days or
    the condition of existing tenantwy ,
    roads at Ashton Hall, St. Peter,
    and Walkers, St. Anarew.

    Mr. Justice J. W. B

    in default two

    Blackett was charged on two



    1e Imposed On
    Tenantry Roads Woman For Wounding

    Chenery
    Blackett of Sargeant Sireet, St. John
    months’
    assize jury found her guilty of wounding Audine Harewood
    of the same district on August 12.

    PAGE FIVE



    AMAS is just around the

    Corner...

    esterday fined Louise
    £5 to be paid in seven
    imprisonment when an

    Vv



    Why not Brighten up your

    Home with

    Netly Blackett, ber daughter

    Lia peed le counts, wounding with intent to said that she saw Audine Hare

    road stated that during rainy maim, disfigure or do grievous wood and Joseph Bancroft beat
    as bodily harm, and two, wounding. her mother and saw Bancroft with
    weather the roads are impass- . before the

    The jury found her not guilty on
    the first count.
    Mr. W. W. Reece, Q.C., Solicitor

    able to pedestrian and vehicular
    watfic in certain places, and

    added that “no attempt has ever .
    veen made by the Vendor to put General, prosecuted for the Crown

    the ‘roaas: in order.” Mr. G. B. Niles represented Black-
    ihe Boara viewed the matter ett. “: . . 4

    very se:lously, and decided to The Prosecution called five wit-

    Weave to the vendor drawing to his. "@S*¢

    attention the provisions of the Act, Dr. Colim Vaughn said that he

    and requiring him to complete the exam ncd Harewood on August 12

    recessary works. ;
    ; ° , when she was brought to the
    in his Report on the Walkers’ hospital. She had a two inch
    Tenantry road, the Chief Sani- wound on her chest, one behind
    tory Inspector stated in part: one on the left fore-

    hendeft e>r,
    arm and one on the left calf. All
    the wounds required stitches
    They were nét wounds whicn
    “Ould endanger life, but he would
    not call them trivial because some
    were very

    During the course of his inspec-
    tion, it was observed that the
    road was grass grown throughout,
    and it was understood from
    some of the tenants, that during
    rainy ‘weather the roads were
    generally flooded at certain points,

    Midway along the road leading
    into the tenantry, a bridge had examined Blackett the same day.
    been constructed ta span the She had two lacerations on her
    water course which passes at face,
    this point. The water passing Amdine Harewood
    through the course has under- Blackett and she
    mitted the bridge over a period friendly terms for
    of time and the bridge is now They used to work in

    long.

    Cross examined he said that he

    said
    were
    many

    only suitable at one point for cane field together and
    the. use of pedestrians, but friendliness arose
    wholly dangerous for vehicular
    traffic

    Dr. E. B. Carter, Chairman of
    the Board peinted out that

    the case of the Walkers’

    children
    held her child
    was going home when she
    struck in her back with a

    ing roads had been met, but in ered that
    process of time, the roads had quarrelling.
    got into a state of disrepair, and
    The question was, who should was
    now carry out the necessary stone. Blackett then came to her
    repairs, He said that in regard and held her. They started to
    to maintenance, no provision was fight and Blackett cut her with ¢
    in the Act, and in that knife on the chest, behind
    he thought that the Act left ear, on her left forearm
    “all wrong,” and that there on her left calf.
    nothing that the Board could
    do in the matter.

    some were

    She

    made
    respect
    was

    her

    and
    ?





    Cross-examined she said that
    she was not detained at the hos»
    pital on account of the wounds
    and the stitches were taken out
    a week later, She had once been
    fined 40/- for cutting her own

    ope child, once for wounding someone
    Visits Baby Creche else, once for throwing water on

    another person, and had been

    Sir George and Lady Seel fined for beating Blackett, Her re-
    visited the Children’s Goodwill puted husband had also been fined

    League and Baby Creche on for beating Blackett
    Tuesday at 10.00 a.m. and spent .



    Sir George Seel

    nearly an hour looking around ‘ < ‘igh
    the building. Tried To Stop Fight att
    On arrival they were met by Joseph Bancroft said he was the

    Mr. John Beckles, M.B.E., and .
    the Matron, Miss Browne. putes
    After completing the tour
    the building, Sir George
    the following in the
    Book; “This institution

    husband of Harewood.
    When the fight occurred on August
    of 12, he tried to stop it, but one of
    Vv rca Blackett’s sons knocked him down
    inttey bi with a stone,
    : oaniat ha aid 2 . Cross examined he said he had
    B eel on ant tale al been fined for wounding Blackett
    efficiency, cleanliness and a.-feel- ee one Ne See uae
    ing of enthusiasm, it eompares , . 2 rs
    most favourably with any similar after the fight that he had meee
    institution — I have seen in the dentally cut his reputed wife, Lg
    West Indies. I wish every ihg her for Blackett because o
    success for the future.” the darkness.

    The Seventh Annual Benefit 1 inde ale
    Concert, sponsored by the Friend- Helens Harew seipeg volte te

    ly Committee in the U.S.A, in ‘et Said that she tried to stop the
    aid of the Children’s Goodwill fight and Blackett also cut her.
    League was held at the Mount €ross-examined she said that she
    Morris Presbyterian Church on had twice been fined for beating
    November 9 when a well ar- people.

    ranged programme was presented Cpl. Garfield Sargeant said thet

    i

    Many Barbadians serve on the Harewood and Blackett had given
    Committee. over each other,

    No Name, No Parents Blackett gave evidence in her

    ; e own defence. She said Audine

    The male child which was left
    at tne Children’s Goodwill Harewood beat her and after the
    League ‘last month by a mother scuffle they had on the ground,
    i heard Harewood's reputed

    who did not give her name and she f
    address, is still in St. Michael’s husband exclaim that he had ac-
    Almshouse where it was later cidentally cut Harewood when at-

    taken, ‘
    Mr, John Beckles told the Ad-
    vocate; “The child is without a Cross-€xamined she said

    name, without a mother or with- Audine Harewood threw her
    out a father. I hope the parents the ground and lay over her.
    will have a heart and claim him.” was then that she was cut,

    tempting to cut her,

    that
    to
    It







    OUR STOCKS Doubtless
    include — You will
    CUTLERY in 3 Grades ee seo
    WIRE DISH COVERS rane
    POTATO RICERS Addition
    KITCHEN KNIVES —
    FORKS and SPOONS both Table
    CORKSCREWS and ‘d Kiteh
    CAN OPENERS -
    FISH KETTLES - "
    VACUUM FLASKS This is
    ICING SYRINGES where We
    and TUBES can help
    WIRE STRAINERS for
    FLOUR SIFTERS
    WOOD SPOONS =
    ICE CREAM FRREZERS teams a
    LIME SQUEEZERS all the
    POTATO CHIPPERS Reauisite
    COVERED ROASTERS tea
    BREAD and CAKE TINS fae
    CANISTER SETS Try US first
    MEASURING SPOONS for all
    PASTRY ROLLERS Your
    TIN GRATERS Requirements

    — Also —



    A Bic Assortment of Domestic Utilities in



    |

    e |



    GLASS, ENAMELLED, TIN,
    AND ALUMINIUM WARE









    Hardware Store

    Tels. 3142 & 2364

    a knife

    f

    denying that the fight occurred or

    t

    but it was for the jury
    who cut her.

    \

    a

    woman accustomed to being con-
    Vv

    Ss
    t



    ’

    ss
    t
    {
    that
    not on
    years
    the same
    the un-
    because Black-
    P tt suspected that she told others
    . omething concerning her.
    wos: On August 12 they were home at
    in Sargeant Street, St. John, about
    Tenan- 7 p.m. when she heard a_ nois¢
    try, the requirements of provid- outside. She went out and discov-

    e

    \})
    |

    in his pocket
    ight started.

    “SILVER STAR"
    CONGOLEUM

    The Floor. Covering

    Mr. Niles said that he was not

    was cut,
    to decide
    It was evident that
    here had been a big family fight
    nd that Audine Harewood was a

    hat Audine Harewood

    in many

    icted for Aghting. The jury could
    earcely do otherwise than come
    o the conclusion that Audine
    iarewood’s reputed husband hac

    Lovely Colours!

    “ut Audine accidentally in the
    jarkness, AND
    The jury found Blackett guilty

    f wounding Harewood



    So EASY

    TO

    Diamond Riugs
    LOUIS L. BAYLEY
    Bolton Lane





    CLEAN!



    GUTS THAT ARE
    FASILY POSTED.

    POST EARLY FOR
    CHRISTMAS

    beautiful As-
    Hand Painted
    with the
    Just the
    friends

    We have
    sortment of
    eather
    Crest of
    Gift for
    abroad,

    Novelties
    Barbados,
    your

    FOR THES





    Ray
    Pee
    Car Key Case
    Pocket Manicure in Case Y iy
    Pocket Dictionary os
    Cigt. Case Leather Parel MAY WE SUGGEST
    Cigt. Case (one Hand) ee

    PRESSURE COOKERS

    VASES IN MANY COLOURS

    LOVELY GLASSWARE ROGERS CUTLERY
    STOVES 1, 2 & 3 BURNERS

    BREAKFAST, TEA & DINNER SETS

    Ladies’ Oval Zipp Purse
    Letter Opener in Case
    Ladies’ Handbag Purse

    (2 kinds)
    Shoe Horn in Case
    Shopping List





    Loose Leaf Note Book aqummenseen

    Gents’ Wallet (Long) 7 eae eee
    Comb & Nail File in Case GENERAL HARDWARE SUPPLIES
    Penknife in Case (2 kinds) —_—_—————— ante

    . due 1e :

    cation’ Sbowping oo RICKETT STREET (Opposite Post Office) — PHONE 4918





    (2. kinds)

    Mending Set in Case
    Key Case (2 kinds)
    Book Market
    Round Zipp Purse
    Match Cases
    Gents’ Tray Purse
    Hair Grips in Case
    Tobacco Pouch (Zipp)

    and
    Gents’ 3-Way Zipp Wallets
    with the Map of Barbados
    in Colour, The Map of the
    West Indies in Gold, the



    BEAUTY
    PREPARATIONS






    Map of Barbados in Gold RECENTLY) ARRIVED
    and the Crest of Barbados

    in Gold. The above Wal- ||| Ardena Soapless Oil Shampoo

    lets are specially made to Ardena Blue Grass Cream Rinse

    New Carib-

    Notes

    British
    without

    fit the | Ardena Pin Curl
    bean
    ing.
    Prices of the above Leather

    Novelties range from

    Spun-Cream
    fold- Permanent Wave Kit

    Super fine Spun Cream Perma-

    nent Wave





    3/. up to 30/- |Ardena Super fine Spun Cream

    Also Pe:imanent Wave
    We have an _ attractive Ardena Spun Cream Permanent
    Ladies Compact and Wave Refills
    Handbag Mirror with Col- |
    oured views of , Barbados ‘Ardena Blue Grass Bath Mats

    ‘Ardena B. Grass Solid Cologne. On Sale’ et 4

    BRUCE WEATHERHEAD ‘Ardena Sachets in “My Love” & daa do @

    LTD “Blue Grass” KNIGHT:

    Head of Broad Street Beauty Cases

    Also Attractive LTD.

    Gift Sets







    — SS

    THE EXHIBITIO





    a

    SEE OUR WONDERFUL
    RANGE OF DRESS
    MATERIALS Including —

    WHITE SHARKSKIN @
    $1.86, $2.32 & $2.46 per yd.
    COLOURED SHARKSKIN ... .... $2.09 per yd.

    in Pacific Blue, Surf Acqua, Lavender
    Grey, Smoke B!ue, Champagne
    PLAIN ROMAINE G
    $1.50, $1.80 & $2.16 per yd.
    PLAIN SEA ISLAND COTTON
    at $2.30 per yd.
    in White, Bamboo, Blue
    FLOWERED SEA ISLAND COTTON @
    $2.58, $4.08, $4,853 per yd.
    PLAIN CREPES ... . @ $1.08 per yd.
    & COLOURED

    WHITE EMBROIDERE®
    ANGLAISE @ $4.78, $4.88, $4.63, $4.34,

    $4.45 & $4.52 per yd.

    WHITE & COLOURED EMBROIDERED
    ORGANDIE @ $3.63, $3.95 & $4.76 per yd.

    a
    — __ HF oo

    — Soe eee







    EMBROIDERED MUSLIN @ $5.33 per_yd. eas
    | CAVE SHEPHERD & Co., Ltd
    10, 11, 12, 13 Broad Street.

    {









    PAGE SIX






































































































    |
    !
    ~
    TELEPHONE 2508
    — — si pneeccese acento eaas sutctcttities |
    ~ ~ ~ ft ’
    DIED FOR SALE
    CLARKE he 9th N embe 1S |
    st te : Fred AUTOMOTIVE |
    c arke « er late
    residence Chureh at
    4 o'tloek tik the BEDFORD VAN 10/12 cwts lit-
    Chureh Cer are t ised and ir eally good condition
    Erma, and Edwa Dial 4616, Courtesy Garage
    children, Josept . t 14.11.52—6n
    a es Arche -law
    om 20. 11.52—In AR—Austin 10. Newly upholstered,
    new tyres and battery Owner leaving
    MARTIN—-On: 19th November 1952 sland. Neatest offer $500.00 Collymore
    Fthet Martin tnee H itson e — Reck, Phone 4598 20 yee a ans FO OE bbb anctteon 52—2n
    sid@tice The Lodge, (St. George,
    Gren CAR Hil-mar “CAR—Hil-man Mink, ip good condition. 1x, in good condition,
    ne Mart Nina Howe ne iriver c B. Brandford, Hast-
    20.11. 52—-1n Dial 4065 20.11. 52—2n
    ST. 8.LL—On November 2), 1952—At CAR—Pr. fect Ford in good condition
    her residence Evelyn’s Avenue, Bay Dial 8213 16.11,.52—3n
    land — ALBERTHA ST. HILL sae a
    Her funeral icaves the above ad CAR Morris-Oxford, good as new
    dress Ht 4.1 p.m. to-da for the sflet ge under 3,000. Telephone 2049
    Seventh Ds Adventist. Church 4.11.52—t.f.n
    King Street and tnence to = ——
    Westbury Comete Friends CAR 1951 v, uxhail Velox 18,090 miles
    asked to attend xcelent condition Phone Burke
    David St. Hill, Chauffeur of Mr vurtesy Garage 4569 19. 11,52—2n
    Evelyn Husband) Mrs Se -
    Alleyne Mrs Pearsot CAR Ford tr ct Car, excellent con-
    iGrand Ch laren) a 8 tion, Dial 4050 day-time 8678 night-
    ‘ aug Charles Smith 18.11.52—6n
    Car & Mrs Li mt a
    oF Sister) 20.11.52— 7A t—One Vauxhall, 1999 model 25
    + { good condition. For enquiries
    A. G. Bancroft, Woodside, Fon-
    IN MEMORIAM vbolle Dial 3946 18.11,.52—3n
    ALLEYNE—ia loving memory of “STANDARD & H P. X 997 in good
    mother, Constance Estelle Alleyne whe ondition. Three new tyres, new battery.
    departed. this life on 20th Novemb hone D. E. Worme 4065
    1948 18.11.52—2n
    Four’ y@are roll on since a ee ence hi alates
    When mother dear was called away USED CARS — A fine selection includ-
    In heaven a noble work was done} ing two (2) Hillman Minx, Morris Oxford
    When God gave unto her etert ustin A-40, Vauxhall Velox, Ford Pre-
    L ent perpetual shine upon her ect, Chrysler Windsor suitable for Hire
    May she rest in peace. especially and a 1938 Chrysler Royal
    George Alleyne (son), Naomi Aled en suitable for conversion to Pickup—Dial
    idar ghter-in-law) , Milton Thoms 4616, Courtesy Garage. 14, 11.52- on
    (st p-som hs 20.11.52 a m 3
    ELECTRICAL
    FOR RENT CHOOSE YOUR OWN PROGRAMMES
    annctpbnamashe -— ON A PYE. 18.11, 52—€,
    HOUSES One K.B. 6 tube Batteny Set Radio,
    = complete with two Batteries, one Pick-
    FLAT & HOUSE — fully furnished.) |. ang one 12 volt wind charger. Apply
    St. Lawrence On-Sea. Phone seo ‘ Mr. Fredie Rowe, Bay Wood, St. James
    mS. 05.5.7 19.11.52—2n
    “FLATS ABERGELDIE—One (1) three’ “Ra DIOGRAM—No reasonable offer re-
    bedroom. One (1) one bedroom: |rjcod. Apply A. Garnes, ¥.M.C.A
    Apply to Mr. C. Field Dial 4255 " 19.11 52—2n
    18,11.52—6n
    ak gt eee ae “XMAS TREE (LIGHTS with Nursery
    FARAWAY — Fully curnished 4 beo- | Enymes (12 to set) — Dial 439) — Cour-
    room house, St. Philip coast. Lightin: tesy Garage 14. 11.52—6n
    plant, eee supply. es .
    Servant rooms. onthly ren .
    $3 cleansing charge, IN ADVANCE, Dial LIVESTOCK
    4476 1.11,52—t.f.r |
    ee —— fat -
    NEWHAVEN — Fully furnished 4-bea- CHUTNEY horoughbred B.G. CHUT-
    rootn house, Crane coast Double Garage NEY 3 y.o Dunusk —Condjment)
    8 Servant rooms, Lighting plant, Water-/J D. Chandler Gun _ Site ritton'’s
    mill supply. Monthly rent $78 plus $3/ Hill 20.11.52—3n
    cleaning charge, IN| ADVANCE. Diai | ———_—___—______-
    4476. 2.11,52—t.f.0 RACE HORSES 2 y.o. half-bred
    ——— —-—-—— _—— gelding ‘DYNAMITE’ by Colrose (the
    ROOMS- Two (2) large y rooms sire of Colombus} out of Mishette. Ran
    Barbados Bokertes Ltd., James Street. /3rd at the November meeting
    Phone 4758 18.11 .52—6n 2 y.o. Thoroughbred, colt ‘NIT WIT
    aah ds sama by Jetsam out. of Quick Wit. Nominated
    WANTED for all Trinidad and Barbados Classics
    next year, Placed Sth in only race.
    —-~———-|Appiy to C. A. Peirce
    HELP 18.11.52—3n
    Ca a ee eae ~
    EXPERIENCED QUALIFIED BOOK- MECHANICAL

    KEDPER for Limited Liability Compay
    Apply to P.O. Box 84, Reseau, Dominic









    |
    rk
    |









    BW 13.11.52—t.f.n “AMEPA—Kodak Reflex 3.5 coated lens
    nee > wah flash attachment and all colour
    filters, $200.00 for quick sale.
    MISCELLANEOUS Apply Realtors Lid. Phone 4900. .
    WANTED Os 19.11, 52—t.8.n
    5-TON LORRY in good con on, Full |
    details and price to Box Q.R. Advocate | MISCELLANEOUS
    Co mi -
    $$ | AMERICAN TOYS—Exclusive, prett
    Toys that can only be had at Hutechin-
    PERSONAL | son's ' These include Cars, Planes,
    _—— ees Pistols, Swim Rings, Jazz Bands, Dolls,
    The ptibife are hereby warned against etc. Ranging from 24 cents up. G. W
    civing credit to my wife CLADYS HUTCHINSON & CO., LTD. — Dial 4222
    CAMPBELL (nee HALL) as 4 do net 20.11. 52—3n
    had myself responsible for her or any- | ——.______ —
    one else contracting any debt or debis| BOAT—21 x 7” 6” Boat. “NAHL IN,’
    in my name uhless by a written order | Morris Marine Engine: Reduction Gear

    hull and engine in first class order
    Ready for launching, 600 Ibs. lead on
    keel. Will sell in whole or engine, hull,
    ind lead separately. Seen at Yacht Club.
    Phone Dre Massiah or Skinner
    18.11,52—6n
    LS—Conrn Flakes, All Bran, Rice
    Krispies, Quaker Oats in Tins and Oat-
    flakes, Barley, Sago and Linseed loose
    W. M. FORD, 35, Roebuck St. Dial 3489
    19,11, 52—1"
    _ *REAMOL IVE SOAP" Through an
    verstoek we have had to reduce same
    from 15e. to 10c., so now is your op-
    portunity to buy for Xmas, KNIGHT'S
    LTD 18.11,52—3n

    igned by me.
    ment CHAPLES CAMPBELL.
    Ivy, St. Michael.

    20,.11,52—2n









    +—Cheese Tins SIb Tins,
    Dutchman Head and Cut Cheese





    in

    oz. Tir
    at 73 per lb, W. M FORD, 35
    Roebuck St Dial 3489 19.11, 52—2r





    INDIAN CORN—At $5.00 per bushel.
    Mount Pleasant Plantation, St. Philip
    18.11, 52—6n





    apis csiaa eerie etch onae aie ———_—_————_

    NUTS Almonds, Walnuts in shell, Pea-
    nuts Shelled, Salted nuts in Tins and
    Cashew nuts. W. M. FORD, 35, Roe-
    nuck St. Dial 3489 19.11.52—2n
    “REVITONE “TONIC” For restoration
    { physical energy, we recommend this
    aluable tonic Obtainable at Knight's
    Yrug Stores. Price 90 c. bot,
    ‘e 11,52—3n



    AUCTION
    AT

    HAYNES COURT,
    Joha.



    (Near High School)

    Approach oposite Colleton and
    follow coloured road marks
    Shreugh Haynes Hill.

    ON

    TO-DAY

    AND FOLLOWING DAY
    IF NOT CONCLUDED



    STOVES The famous TURM &
    VALOR — 3 Burner on stand, 1 Burner
    % Ovens — DIAL 4391 — COURTESY
    jARAGE 14.11,52—6n

    ——_—_—
    SUBSCREBE now to the Daily T Negray?
    England’s leading Daily Newspaner oo

    wriving in Barbados by Air only a few
    ays atter publication in London. Contact






    * c

    We are favoured with instrue- BO ative “nk miset” Ltd, Loca
    tions from Mrs. H. M. BLOW to : 99.4 S8—t.t.n
    sell by Auction the fine collection a eT aii eee
    of valuable SHER?YTON and TINNED MEAT S—Corned Mutton
    ANTIQUE FURNITURE, also good toast Beef, Meat Luneh, Luncheon Bee!
    quality Modern Pieces, Glassware, nd Bacon in Tins, W. M. FORD, 35

    and other Household Effects
    HAYNES COURT, ST. JOHN

    VIEWING DAY PRIOR TO AND

    at oebueck St, Dial 3489 19.11.52—2n

    TAPE 1% Rolls Venetian Blind Ladder



    MORNING OF SALE Tape for making Venetian 19.11 8a a
    e 1 2—$n
    pPXE RADIOGRAM, oval a EE
    ining Table, Set of Dining Chairs, TOOLS—1 — Ban¢ Saw, 1—6” “Plan:
    Oceas. & Coffee Tables, Tip-Top = a 1 andar 1 4 Wood
    Tables, Drop Leaf Table, Writing rning lathe with slidesrest and Cabinet
    Desks, Trinket Table, -Ornamenta: ff turning tools. Phone 8332.

    Tables, Armchairs,

    Upright Chairs
    (various),

    Vanity Cabinet, Side-

    52

    19.11

    boara, Single & Double Ended TYRES Special Offer at Reduced
    Settees, Fitted Coektail Cabinet, pone pak pec Car Tyres 30 x 5, 650
    Bedside Table & Cabinets, Dress- 16, 600—16 500—16, 400-19, Dial 2006,
    ing Tables, Chests of Drawers, Auto Tyre Co 16.11. $2—t.f.n

    Booksheives, Full-length Mirror in
    Adjustable Frame, Bow-Fronfed
    Inlaid Dressing Table with Mirror,

    “VOSENE” for Dandruff falling hair
    scale irritatio

    oy premature baldness,









    Stools, Table Lamps. (ALL THE dead and dustreless hair-—there are
    ABOVE IN MAHOGANY). 4 Up- Nature's danger signals. Do not neglect
    bolstered Easy Chairs, Occas them. Try “Vosene.” Knight's Ltd.
    Tebles, Iniaid Cabinet, Carved ; 18.11.52—3n
    Sue eainet Upholstered Stools, | ee SOR. Sere
    irandfather Clo-’. Dining Table WEETABIX — Fresh shipment nov
    with Brass Feet, Gate- vailable. John F. Hutson Ltd. Dis-
    Dining Table, Inlaid Sideboard, wibutors 19.11.52—2n
    Tea Table. Drop Leaf Table, Lay — —

    Oak Table, Ornamental Anti

    Gilt - Table, Double a _

    Spring Mattress, Single

    Spring Mattress, Pr Single Bade

    with Box Springs, Inlaid Chertor

    Drawers, Wiald Serving Tebicn
    Corner Tables, Laree Oak Chaet
    Old Oak Table, Easy Chairs, StaA-

    TH nace, FURNITURE



    re & Table Lamps, Carpets & f * u

    reah ae aac ante: [Nf] And Other Things
    Colours, prints, Framed wee

    | ING” mis refrigerator Falke 4 AT MONEY-SAVING

    | cei hate cates Set version

    Marte Somme tae e iWaree: Bureaus, $9 to $95, Wardrobes,

    Bedsteads,



    hoards & Other Kitchen Furniture Springs, Laths, Cradles



    Servants’ Beds, Chairs, & Tables Washstands, Nightchairs §7

    Kitchen “Utensils, Tools, Cream .

    feperatof, Several Churns and por eee Radio

    will Bugkets, O11 Drums, 300-400 (or Chine, Wedboam and Kitchen,
    all Tank, Shooting Stich :

    viaicee te Wha ealncasne Larders, Waggons, Metal Ware

    Bedspreads: and’ many other Drainats | oS. See levees

    Teas” ste : PLEASURES in Morris and Caned

    Suites and separate pieces, Morris

    Gaa ON dak yAth OF ons, Couch, Easychairs $3.50

    HAMMER casks timaauin faenadl

    urts $5 u are

    ae s, Banjos, Gramo

    SPLENDID
    Powerful Tone, Good
    ight Keys, Iron Frame
    and BUY FT

    L.S. WILSON

    SPRY

    = PIANO

    Rick

    Wood

    Jona 4. Biadon
    & Co.

    A.F.S., F.Â¥.A
    PHONE 4640
    PLANTATIONS BUILDING

    Br

    IT

    STREET DIAL 469










    annum,
    cepted) from 2—4 .p.m.,



















    Térrace, Christ Church standing on 23,630
    square feet of land









    PUBLIC



    LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

    The application of Vera Grezilda Clarke



    |
    housewife of Upper Roebuck Street, St } =
    Michael, for permission to sell itt: B Cl { G |
    Malt Liquors, &c., at a stone wall build- | “ t E C }
    ing at Upper Roebuck Street, City e
    Baie Ber St Ravine, we, | A ings 40S8€ Ol Urea mpire areer
    To:—G. B. GRIFFY . Esq., |
    s aoe aEeerete, LONDON, Nov. 7. in a_ position to give valuable,
    oS AT ae een The sudden death of Sir Reginald Coupland at South- **rvice fe We dor Bae ‘wae
    N.B.—This application will be consia- | ampton yesterday has robbed the Commonwealth of one of Gyj54. és ee cette aaa iedt a
    ered at a Licensing Court to be held at Ste fcr, . ic ; “s . ¢ = - a -
    Holice Court, District “A” on saopday the | its foremost historians and devoted ‘servants. For 39 years, the Indian problem though, was
    Ist day of December, 1952, at 11 o'cigck | he had focussed a brilliant intellect on the study and writ- not in accordance with his views,|
    a G. B. GRIFFIT ing of Colonial affairs and his death at 68 has cut short a which tended towards federa-!
    Ag. Police Magistrate, Dist. ° remarkable contribution to academic annals. tion.



    0.11



    LIQUOR LICENSE NOTI



    N OTICES



    BARBADOS ADVOCATE









    THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 2), 1952.







    | PUHLIC SALES |
    PUBLIC SALES | QUEEN ELIZABETH OPENS BRITISH FARLIAMENT ge cae
    e 2 7 5 : CHANCERY SALE
    ; mentioned property will » « ale at the Registration Office,
    : ings, Bridgatoy betweer for the sum and on
    REAL ESTATE fied below If not ther ip on each succeeding
    ——— | . e place and during the rs unti! sold Full particulars
    os 1 te me
    oo : te i ne Te wr PLAINTIF! RICHARD STANLEY NICHOLLS
    | Opposite ° idmer view )
    Rockley Beach. Phone D. E Worre DEFENDANTS: WILLIAM THEPOLD BARNES
    18.11.52 and
    EE asemiscnihiiihen a aa FRANCIS DONALD BARNES
    lin head aacacting a6 fie Feranes al PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of ‘and situate at Black
    labd together with the Dwell nghouse Rock in the parish of Saint Michael and Is'and abovesaid con-
    the’ eon For { rther parti ul 1 A aly taining by admeagurement six acres one rood twenty-three perch-
    Charles Chees. an C/ H 1.8 ; vat | abutting and bounding on lands of the Mount Plantation on
    He. if High Street. Phere 418, | ands of W. W. Reece on lands of the estate of A. Chapman
    a we ~ 36 ii 523 | deceased on lands of the estate of R. Chapman deceased on
    = j lands of the estate of Thompson ee. and = a i oie
    “PROPERTY ane ; | which there is a_ right of way to the public road cal a
    PROPERTY consisting 380 square feet } Rock Road or wever else the same may butt and bound
    oe oor Pons. gy a oe eed j Together with ajl and cingular the bu.ld ngs and eee on
    . 7 ¢ - € im
    attached and outoffices and palings there- the said parcel of land erected and built standing and being
    fo belonging situate at Holborn Gap | with the appurtenance ’
    Westbury Road, St. Michael. The above |
    wa be set up for sale at the Office of PSET PRICE: £3,000.0.0
    undersigned on Thursday the 2/th 5 > we s 952
    Novernber 1952 at 2 o'clock in the after ~ATE OF SALE: 5 December, 1¢ 20.11.52—4n
    ndon. ‘
    HAYNES & GRIFFITH, |
    20.11.52—3n }
    That desirable dwellinghouse called j
    “OVERDA situate at Graeme Hal)

    SHIPPING NOTICES



    throne, formally opening the new session of Parliament. The prepared by the outlines
    contemplated legislation. Viscount Alexander, preceding the earries the state sword. Elizabeth an-
    nounced that the steel and trucking industries International Radiophoto)

    Death Of Sir Reginald Coupland



    |
    |

    |



    In

    CE

    He resigned his Chair at Oxford
    in 1948 but continued his studies
    of Imperial and Colonial affairs

    of ship on their respective themes.
    Coupland followed up his study
    of Wilberforce, in the centenary

    The humanitarian
    imperial rule caught
    ald’s interest

    aspect
    Sir Regin-

    when he was still SOUTHBOUND



    The application of Wilbur White, shop- ‘ .
    keeper of Brighton, holder of Liquor|@ young man and it was to this year of abolition, by an account to the end of his life, In fact,
    License No. 301 of 1962 granted to, miliott field that he devoted the greater of the British anti-slavery move- when he died at Southampton MONTREAL
    feld St. Philip, for permission to use|Patt of his later efforts. Indeed, ment. The work by which he yesterday, he was on his way to| SDS,
    seid liquor license at a 2 storey wall'it was the moral appeal of the himself would have wished South Africa to make further 7
    ee But dare? Mavember, 1952-|PPblem of the backward peoples chiefly to be judged, however, investigations.—L.E.S,
    To G. B. GRIFFITH, Esa. ee ae eee eae him yee that Pe se on oo = s °
    g. Police Magistrate, away from classical studies. the years ore e last war >
    District “Ar Starting on his career as a the history of East Africa. His terling Area
    WH. WHITE, : ; y ee , .
    } Applicant scholar in ancient history, Sir gifts of accurate and lucid pres- G Re
    NB ~This application will be consid, | Reginald was in 1907 elected to entation and felicitous style are old eserves
    eres ata sicensing our oO e he atl. ij ehi i ” 2 ye ace
    Police Court, District. “A" Monday |@ . teaching fellowship in the here seen to best advantage.
    the ist day of December, 1952, at. 1% Subject at Trinity College, Oxford. In “East Africa and ne Up By £30m. SOUTHBOUND
    ‘eloek, a.m ’ " |He made an_ enthusiastic and Invaders” (1938), he brought ;
    Aé.- Polls tactatiate Tae ok. successful tutor but, as in the together for the first time, from _ The sterling area gold and dol- NORFOLK
    2 11.82—1n |case of other classical scholars of scattered sources, the history of lar reserves rose by $82 million oe aes



    LIQUOR LICENSE NOTI

    The application of Laura Peters, shop-

    keeper of Barbarees Hill, holder
    Liquor License No. 1054 of 1952, gra
    to Rose Hewitt in respect of a
    ind shingle shop at Black Rock,
    fichael, for permission to use
    iquor License at bottom floor of
    '6 Roebuck Street, City.
    Dated this 18th day of November,
    To G. B. GRIFFITH, Esq.,
    Ag. Police Magistrate, Dist. “A
    LAURA PETERS,
    Applica
    N.B.—This application will be
    dered at a. Licensing Court to be
    t Police Court, District *
    He lst day of Devnibed
    1 o'clock, a.m,
    G. B. GRIFFITH,
    Ag. Police Magistrate, Dist.



    Applications are

    for duties at the Visiting Out-p
    Hospital commencing on Ist December,

    Attendance at clinic

    board

    A” on Monday | Philosophy, Politics

    ba
    20.11.5210

    LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE |



    PAYMENT OF PRIZES.

    ~ GOVERNMENT NOTICE



    Visiting Out-patient Medical Service,

    (U.S.) during October to bring
    the total reserves to $1,767 million
    or £631 million, compared with
    £601 million at the end of Sep-
    tember, This is the best monthly
    figure since the March quarter of
    1951, and represents the first un-
    aided reversal of the fall in the
    reserves which started in the
    third quarter of 1951. Even with-
    out U.S, Defence Aid amounting
    to $35 million (£12.5 million) in
    October, the reserves would still
    have been up by some $47 million
    (£17 million).

    The October surpius of £29
    million compares with one of £4.6
    million in September and with a
    deficit of £16 million in August.

    Britain’s surplus with the E
    ropean Payments Union also

    the coast from Greek times to
    1856 and gave a vivid account of
    the Arab settlements. A later
    volume, “The Exploitation of
    East Africa,” is sufficiently des-
    cribed by its sub-title, “The slave
    trade and the scramble.”

    his generation, his interest early
    turned towards the study of the
    problems of the modern world.
    {In 1913, the Beit Lect#reship in
    Colonial History became vacant
    asta |at_ Oxford and though he had,
    No. | till that time, done no work in
    this field, he was appointed to
    1952 / the post.
    | He did outstanding work and
    was elected, in 1920, to the Beit
    Chair in the same subject.
    Soon after this, the School of
    and Econo-
    and Sir
    prominent in es-
    olitics side of the
    whidh the» political
    British Empire
    i special subject.

    Arr, B'DOS.
    CE cra abe

    of
    nted

    SOUTHBOUND

    Visited Empire
    Sir Reginald did not study the
    Empire from his home in Oxford.
    He paid several lengthy visits to
    ‘he African Continent, going to
    East Africa in 1928 and West
    frica in 1933. He was in the
    West Indies in 1936 and on his
    return drew attention to the con-
    ditions which later excited tne
    criticism of the Royal Commis-
    sion.
    In

    nt
    con-
    held

    “t/ mics was instituted
    \Reginald was
    aoe the
    course,
    structure ok the
    figures as



    The applic.tion of Miriam . Apple 1923 he went to India as a jun.ved last month by a further
    vhalte, shopkeeper of Carrington Village | Many Contacts member of the Royal Commis- £21 million to over £34 million.
    oak aeeitée Yo utes A Matighan i But the work which pleased sion on the Superjor Civil Ser- This is the largest surplus for
    espect of a 2-storey wall building at him most and brought him into vices and, in 1936—37, he served nearly two years (since Novem-
    Preis Theisen de ete thee the closest contact with young 1n Palestine as a member of the ber 1950) and will fall to be set-
    tg 2-storey. wall building in Nelson Md old interested in his subject ae Commission on the affairs ye at — py we ana
    ‘treet, City was the Raleigh Club, an under- Of that country. In each case it of gold to the United ngdom by
    Dates fe eth ah et Nevantee, 192. | graduate society for the discus- ue mainly due to his efforts ine or aint ee ot
    Ag. Police Magistrate, Dist. “A.” sion of imperial questions of ‘hat a minority report was aver- Pi as « million, whic
    Pe HENDERGON' CLARKE, which he was the guiding spirit a The report of the paleetion pet ae a aieaeett oo
    fn r Applican j Pai oi $s a z r a
    tin. —this annibation will’ we con- throughout the inter-war period, ee A master y und Francd
    \dered at a Licensing Court to be hela | till its activities were suspended ®!most classic account of the. Althoust ial
    ‘ Police Court, District “A on Monday n 1939. oo and political conditions of which tent hate edbiten the
    ie 8 a ember, oe, 8 é Bi , Pars
    ‘von cm B sinter B it Codie wae haved eg the sueebeviiie tater of his total can be isolated, it is stressed
    Ag. Police Magistrate, Dist. "A." cabstantint jets ad Nah tlane hand, It was a deep disappoint- ' Laer an too much em-
    20.11 ,.58—1n k viously Ment to him that the policy put PlUass § hould not be placed on
    wor in what had previously forward was eventually sat Gs results for a single month in
    BARBADOS TURF CLUB on . potas field. er Coe side. “Sit he Bad Rhe dhtina assessing long-term prospects.
    1 | him, olonial history came Of ¢, ation of being a member of the a a

    age and took its place beside the
    |older

    India Office Committee which

    drafted the constitution of Burma.

    In Touch With Barbados

    histori al studies in which





    MAIL NOTICE













    Just the little shop in the village
    where the Best Books, Stationery
    and Xmas Cards are now on show.

    28 Oct.

    1



    Friday, 28th inst.

    STEAMSHIP

    CORONA

    21 Nev.
    25 Nov.
    7 Dec.

    ALCOA
    PARTNER

    7 Nov.
    11 Nov.
    23 Nov.

    KIM

    1 Nov.
    5 Nov.

    Limited Passenger Acommodation Available.

    For further information apply: Da COSTA & CO., LTD.; Phone 2122.

    ALCOA ALOOA

    PEGASUS PLANWER sTRAMER

    25 Oct.
    27 Oct.
    31 Oct.
    12 Nov.

    24 Nov.
    28 Nov.
    12 Dec.

    Dec.
    Dec

    22
    26 .
    7 Jan.

    EVROS

    6 Nov.
    8 Nov.
    13 Nov.
    22 Nov.

    20 Nov.
    22 Nov.
    27 Nov.
    6 Dec.

    20 Dec.
    4 Dec.
    6 Dec.
    11 Dee.

    “Mr. THERM

    See the
    NEW

    6d. “Consolation, Cash Prizes, |" himself had learnt his craft Coastal Station |
    2/- Stand Bweep, Pari-Mutuei | ,, His earliest volume dates froom Sir Reginald had intenden >
    ind Forecast Competition Prizes | | World _ War I when, debarred evote his later years to an in- LASER AND WIRELESS EWI.) Ltd.
    will be paid on and from MON- |‘Tom War service by his always- tensive study of tne methods of With the following ships through ea
    JAY, 24th instant. delicate health, he edited the war Government in the Colonial ter- Barbados Coast Station:—
    speeches of Pitt which were re- tories but, on the outbreak of . 5% ,Brasil ss. Reina Del Pacifico:
    Horses an@ Serial Prizes on/|issued, as readable as ever, with World War II, he abandoned Sraneeeh, 74% “bark bt. 'venore,
    and from Monday, Ist December'!a preface by Winston Churchill, his project and embarked soon §.5:. Dolores, s.s. Uruguay, s.s. Mormac
    1ext. in 1940. He had the power of ofterwards on a study of the con- FOrReeh 8. Zags Harker. wae re
    Payment will be from 12.00 presenting great issues through stitutional problem of India. He No‘se Lady, 8.5. Salam Muitine, 8.5
    noon to 8,00 p.m. daily he great figures who embodied .ravelled to the East and the Sangamon, s.s. Lancero, s.s. 8. Barbara,
    ro . them. Thus his books of “Wil- esults of his work were pub- *5__York Pennsylvania, s.s-S. Monica, |
    G. A. LEWIS, | Lerforce” (4923), “Raffles” (1926) lished under the auspices of |
    Secretary. | und “Kirk of the Zambesi” (1928) Nuffield College, Kolex Watches | a rte
    20.11.52.—2n. | were works of sound scholar~ With this background, he was Police Headqua' ,
    —_—--— SEE cate = aad LOUIS L. BAYLEY | 14th November, 1952.
    |



    COMPANY

    does if again!

    No need to worry, one of our
    ELECTRIC HAIR DRYERS

    will do the job in a hurry

    BARBADOS a BAND

    VACANCIES exist in the Fossa BAND for FIVE BOYS
    between the ages of 14 to 15% years to be trained as Band

    2, Applicants will be interviewed at St. Cecilia Barracks,

    Passage Road, at 10 a.m. on Saturday, November 22nd, 1952.
    R. T. MICHELIN,
    Commissioner of Police.





    B.W.1. SCHOONER OWNERS’
    ASSOCIATICN (INC,),

    Consignee. Tele. No. 4047.

    The House contains 2 open galleries, or
    drawing, dining and breakfast rooms, 4
    bedrooms each with running water, ’
    kitchenette toilet and bath. Electric light ni
    and gas. Garage, servants’ toilet and bath | 3 The M/V “CARIBBEE" will
    in. yard, also orchard } 7 TE accept Cargo and Passengers for
    Inspection every day between the hours \ ANY Oc’ - Dom.nita, ‘ous imac Monisers.
    of.4 and & p.m , Nevis and St. itts. Sailing
    The ahove property will be set up for | . Tuesday 2th inst.
    gale at Public competition at our office 7 e }
    in Lucas Street on Friday the 2pth . } STA :
    “ * i
    November at 2 pam. e epALY WOAmaOD fe CODING ast Rhea acibte, Geen ixtzsbeth ish emported by her busbond, the Dubs et Rete» en Be. ae
    N & SEALY, | burgh, as she passes through the Royal Gallery of the House of Lords to make her first speech from the ' GREYSTONE, HASTINGS Dominica. Antgin, EO ueasS
    din thiptelort | o s

    Ana

    CANADIAN SERVICE (f0RTNGHTLY)

    ALCOA
    PURITAN

    9
    21

    NEW YORK. SERVICE (Eveny FOUR WEEKS)

    A
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    19 Jan.
    Jan.



    NEW ORLEANS SERVICE (FORTNIGHTLY)

    A
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    GASEL REFRIGERATORS
    At your Gas Showroom to-day
    operating by NATURAL GAS

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    CENTRAL EMPORIUM

    cnr. Broad & Tudor Sts.

    16.11.52.—2n,

    a SIR SEDI





    Mails tor British Guiana by the Sch Bolton Lane
    nklyn D.R. will be closed at the
    Post Office as under
    Mail at 12 noon, Boge intec
    4 a 2 p.m, and Ord all at
    General Howpital MA 2 ae ge, Oe Sh MR. PLANTER
    invited from registered medical practitione:: SO ee ,
    atient Medical Service at the Genera! >
    1952. if
    The salary payable for eee in tae is at rT oe * 00 per VOTICK We recommend for your serious consideration
    wa required Gaily (sumdays ex TICKET HOLDERS of No. 1275 _
    rom Saturdays from 12 noon to.2 p.m. tind 853 in the 9 of the the famous
    Applications should be addressed not latersthan 25th Novembe St. John’s and St. Michael's

    1952, to the Medical Superintendent, General Hospital,
    further information may be obtained.

    Variety too...!
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    Sir!...for you,

    ey tor. you, Rpemiee!

    'K. R. HUNTE & CO, LTD. |
    LOWER BROAD STREET

    Ph. 5136

    of Xmas

    Cathedral C.L.B, Camp Fund are
    sked to call at Lindisfarne
    St. John. 22.11.52—1n

    from who:

    20.11.52—2r



    and Pneumatic Tyres.

    GRASS MOWERS AND LOADERS

    A whole thrilling RAKES
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    FERTILIZER DISTRIBUTORS
    Madam! And very

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    Your Enquiries invited :—

    COURTESY

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    Comb & Brush Sets
    Watches & China

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    Toys! — Toys! — Toys!

    DIAL 4616

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    THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 206, 1952. BARBADOS ADVOCATE * LGE SEVEN
    ee a ee ee ee. i ES TT a ee - —_ —







    Molex Watches
    LOUIS L. BAYLEY

    PENTALUX |=

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    AND ADJOINING DISTRICTS

    ie THE SELECTION OF CARDS
    ENTERED IN THE

    ADVOCATE CHRISTMAS CARD
    COMPETITION

    WILL BE ON SHOW AT

    ADVOCATE STORE GREYSTONE — HASTINGS |
    i



    ‘ I WONDER GS
    ern MAD AND: Ni

    SPEAKING TO ME - Lt. TRY, a
    THAT OLD TRICK-I'LL THRC )



    ME HAT IN -AN! IF ir co Mee
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    THE AD ADVOCATE

    RIP KIRBY BY ALEX RAYMOND

    a



    THE PHANTOM






    WAMIBESI? THEY STOLE MY JE is pS eS WHATS
    . OWs MY DAUGI ree! WAMBES 1b s i \ AF TER THE EM Bhi i b fn -f 4

    GIFT STATIONERY |

    COME IN AND INSPECT -
    OUR STOCK.





    RE ee

    PAGE EIGHT
    r
    '
    |
    .
    |
    |
    Ls
    Mi iis

    COMPARING



    SPORTS 000
    QUIZ

    WATCHES.

    Know Your Cricket

    LAW

    By UO. 8S.

    he 47 M.C.C., ¢

    mpire

    ae
    out 1 1) € L 4
    y LO whici

    1947 coac

    introduction of the
    dict 101 Umpires l Laws 4
    I te
    et
    I r 4
    i t
    Da > int vi .C ¢ m, re
    view tf the mat! juirie eo
    ceive Li n recent irs.
    In the circum es, | have de-
    cided to eal wit these thre
    Law eparate

    Law 45—Duties of Umpires

    Before the toss for innings, the
    umpires shall acquaint themselves
    with any special regulations, and
    shail agree with both captains on
    any other conditions affecting the
    conduct of the match; shall satisfy
    themselves that the wickets are





    e Cricket,

    45
    COPPIN
    f the Laws of the game, sets

    in three Laws—45, 46 and 47
    as used in Barbados prior to the

    defined the Duties and Juris-
    3—55, that is in no fewer than

    ian at first meets the eye. Tour-
    ng captains too should remember
    this.
    Special
    Special Regulations are defined
    y'the M.C.C; as those within the

    iramework of the Laws, referred
    to in the M.C.C, code of Laws of
    the Game as those authorised by
    the M.C.C. in respect of County
    or by Overseas Governing
    Bodies in respect of cricket in the

    yuntries concerned. ‘
    Such regulations, it is pointed
    out, do not apply to matches

    played by touring teams unless in-
    cluded in the Notes to the Laws
    set. out in the code under refer-
    ence and in the Interpretations of

    Official Laws, or agreed to by



    before the visiting

    properly pitched; and shall agree both parties

    between themselves on the watch team arrives,

    or clock to be followed during Watches

    play. 4 The Umpires must remember

    Simple? are they study this Law that

    The Law seems very nple atf#he captains are entitled to know

    first glance but let us eXamuine it. which watch they have decided

    The checking of Special Regul: to follow and the time. There i:

    tions before the commencemé of nothing to prevent a captain from

    a match is important. For example keeping his own check on the time

    in Australia an over consist nor from synchronising his own

    eight balls but in all othe: timepiece with the watch which

    tries in which cricket i played the umpires have decided to fol-

    under the auspices of the M.C. low during the match,

    an over usually consists of ix Important

    balls unless by special arrange- The duties of Umpires have al-

    ment. ways been considered of the great-

    In Australia the lead necessary
    to enforce a follow-on in a match
    lasting three days or more is
    200 runs while in the “six ball over
    countries,” if L am allowed:to coin
    that phrase the lead necessary to
    enforce a follow-on is 150 runs

    Australia

    The Law governing the Rolling,
    Mowir ind Wateri of the pitch
    differs in Australia, South Africa
    and New Zealand from that which
    obtains in England, the We;
    Indies and other Imperial Cricket
    countries. *

    Therefore the looking
    statement “the {impires shall ac-
    quaint themselves with any spec-
    important



    innocent

    ial regulations” is mort

    est possible importance to the
    success and general progress of
    the game. As far back as 1841 I
    find that not only were the
    umpires responsible for the pitch-
    ing of fair wickets themselves but
    they were to judge of “all frivo-
    lous delays, of all Hurts, whether
    real or pretended and are disere-
    tionally to allow what time they
    think proper before the Game goes
    on again,”’ As is the case today the
    umpires could only order a bats-
    man out on appeal. Bach umpire
    t his own wicket adjudicated on
    ll appeals.

    » In the next
    tinue this discussion of the “Duties
    f Umpires.”



    article I shall con-

    (7)

    '

    (6)

    (7)

    (8)

    9)

    (10)

    (11)

    | (5)

    (

    {

    (

    4

    (

    (

    Why Jap Table Tennis |
    Stars Are Slipping

    By A Correspondent
    LONDON.



    Nine months go, the table
    tennis world was stunned, At the
    Bombay championships Japan
    who had not shown their colour:

    for fifteen
    with the majority

    years, walked of
    of the trophies.

    And more startling than the
    fact of their success, was _ th¢
    manner in which they gained it.
    For their player all used the
    ‘pen-holder’ grip, which had not





    been seen in the top grade game
    for twenty years
    Their succe caused much dis

    cussion. For t e tennis is prob
    ably the most universal of al
    games. There is | 4 country
    where it is not yed. And witl
    the exception Japan all the

    followed the

    adopted the
    I

    had

    urope and

    other countries

    id of


















    estern grip
    3ut the Bombay championship.
    caused doubts. “Was the Wester?
    rip best, « a é i irckec
    n-holde ty] r re r ctis
    ter all?”
    Two me ho had faith in th
    est arih el orl
    m Johr LA n
    Her T 1
    t ‘ ! 1
    ith the blessing of the
    Table Te Association to play
    official “Test Matches”, in addi
    tion to a series of other games
    Won The Lot
    They on the ke and lef
    Japan undefeated a tear No
    even world champion Satop witl
    i i mnge ba or Fujii
    10 in rate er tha
    prey i
    iphant re
    Doc this prove tl iperiorit
    xf the western O
    1 ‘ (



    rély, indicate

    Leach and B z
    According to Victo1
    fa er





    [aa

    The

    alwz

    are doing.

    | IMPORTANT PRINCIP
    & Concentrate



    Writing in the current issue of
    World Sports, he says: “Personally
    } never believed that the top Jap-

    inese players, with their unor-
    thodex style, were better than
    ours, Their Bombay success was

    iue mainly to the element of sur-~
    prise, and to the tactical errors of
    the European aces, who played too
    nuch on the defensive and allowed
    hemselves to be overawed by the
    ird hitting of the Japs.”

    But Barna does not under-esti-
    nate the Japanese, for he goes on:
    It would be unjust to say that

    |

    |

    heir success was not deserved. On |

    ie contrary! Furthermore, it has}

    |

    one a lot of good to the game, by |

    llustrating and emphasising the
    mm that defence alone will not
    vin world championships. Anyone
    vho sets
    be an all-out player.”
    tarna thinks that the East will
    itt provide some of the toughest
    position at the next World
    Championships, to be held in
    harest, Rumania, next March.
    it will come, Barna says, hot
    n Japan, but from Hong Kong.
    The Japanese visit of Leach and
    ergmann was part of a_ four
    hs world-wide tour during
    ich they played in Hong Kong.
    vas there that they met their
    ughest opposition. In eleven en-
    counters against Shih-Sui-Cho,
    sergmann was defeated ten times
    nad Leach recorded only three
    ins in ten matches against Shih.
    Naturally”, says Barna “the
    Englishmen must have been
    erribly tired. Continuous travel-
    ng by “plane is most exhausting.

    out to win a world title |

    |
    \

    12)

    13)

    14)

    15)

    16)

    18)

    19)

    20)

    (1)

    9

    (4)

    (6)

    (8)

    (9)
    10)

    (11)

    ||

    id one must make allowance for}

    hat. But the defeats
    xplained by fatigue alone.”

    “To me, and I suppose to many
    thers who saw the Hong Kong
    layers in Bombay, the defeats of
    Leach and Bergmann came as no
    urprise. The Hong Kong players
    ere just as good as the Japanese,
    yt better. Several of them
    ywed great possibilities, though
    king peed of reaction, Evi-
    ntly the Bombay outing has
    ne them a lot of good.”—L.E.S

    Barbados Police

    LES

    iys

    OF MOTORING

    on what you

    cannot be}

    |

    (12)

    (18)

    SS





    BARBADOS ADVOCATE

    By ALL-ROUNDER

    LONDON,

    In how many .sets did
    Frank Sedgman beat Jar-
    Oslav Drobny to win the
    Men's single at Wimble-
    don?

    Who was the last player
    before Miss Maureen Con-
    nolly to wih the Women's
    singles at her first attempt?
    Who won the Belgian
    Grand Prix ‘motor cycle
    event this year?

    Can you spoi the following

    famous cricketers from the
    date and piace of birth
    (a) Lima, Peru. 1910 (b)
    Cootamundra, New South
    Wales, 1908. (c) Hendon,
    Middlesex. 1918. (a)
    Trinidad, West Indies.
    1873?

    Who is the only amateur
    in English County cricket

    to have taken all ten
    wickets in an innings since
    the war?

    Former basket-bali player
    J. Davis won the 1982
    American Olympic high-
    jump trials. What height

    did he jump”?

    Who was the last player
    before Frank Sedgman to
    win aii three Men's titles
    at Wimbledon?

    When was the F. A, Cup
    Final first played at Wemb-
    ley?

    Which was the last county
    to be admitted to the
    Wimbledon Championship?
    What is the record mumber
    of runs scored off a six
    ball over?

    Who is the only player to
    have won the United States

    bout. .



    Open Golf . Championship ‘ ; ed. Hollapd’s Heemskerk an
    switin since the wast AGAINST CARLTON XI Zvorykona of the Soviet Union
    a bikie het scheduled to complete the
    Can you sput the following it " 4 : : os a te r only remaining adjourned game
    British soccer teams {fom : The hee mone fixture XI carried their ome 60 today prior to the last round. How-
    the names of their grounds eee St ar = anc - oa for one to 289 for eight at the ever, the Dutch woman acknowl-
    Highbury, Hampden Park, men’s 2 endec in a draw with luncheon interval when Matthew edged defeat without resuming
    ce Park. White Hart Der eiza scoring a century fot declared the innings closed. This play. Bukova thus was certain of
    fone. Nini Ps a “™ the Gentlemen. The Gentlemen’s gave Carlton 94 runs to make to holding first place regardless of
    rar admich «hers tex the avoid an innings’ defeat. — the outcome of the last found
    first time did Wimbledon 3 Chief scorers were DePeiza 117, matches. She scored 11! points
    champions have to play (14) It. must not exceed,800 Grant, 31 and Harris 28. Bowling of a possible 14. 7
    ‘ P x a for Carlton K, Greenidge took —U-P.
    through from the _ first- yards. two for 54 in 14 overs . i
    round? (15) Ten hurdles at intervals of White tin ; 45 it 15 Soars
    What is the maximum ten yards. ite ire afk B.C.L. vs THE REST
    length of a polo ground? (16) The uprights must exceed Due to some poor. catching, In preparation for their forth-
    How many hurdles are 11 feet,- Carlton were able to make 110 coming fixture with the Barbados |
    there in a race of 12( Oy a2 ; for five at the close of play. No Crieket Association team, the!
    yards? (17) Three feet 2 inches, fewer than five catches were Barbados Cricket League _ will}
    What is the minimum (18) 1920. dropped. C. Greenidge 38 and C. open their first Trial at the Men- |
    height of the goal-posts in (19) W. McLean (Queensland). White 28 did best in the second tal Hospital grounds on Sunday |
    Rugby football? (20) H, Whittle pbs innings, C. Matthew took two for when a B.C.L. team will oppose |
    What is. the ‘maximum —L.E.S. 28 in 10 overs, the Rest,
    length of a cricket bat? \
    When did William (Big|
    Bill) Tilden first win the

    Wimbledon Championship? ;



    Who captained the 1947-48 |
    Australian Rugby Union |
    team on their visit to
    England? |
    Who is the captain of
    Great Britain’s Olympic
    team?

    ANSWERS

    Sedgman won in four
    4—6, 6—2, 6—3, 6—2.
    Suzanne Lenglen in 1919,
    Geoff Duke. Average speed
    101.7 m.p.h.

    F, R.- Brown, Sir Donald
    Bradman, Denis Compton,
    Sir Pelham Warner.

    Trevor Bailey for

    against Lancashire in



    ARE FENCES OF OAK

    sets

    Essex
    1949.

    Six feet nine inches,

    Bobby Riggs *(U.S.A.) in} CHASM WHERE GRIM
    1939. DEATH BER ‘S
    1922—-28, Bolton beat West THE SAME Pi
    Ham 2—0.

    Glaibatens in 1921, | PLANNERS VOTE
    32 by C, Smart of Glamor- FENCELESS “ THE
    gan against Hampshire in| JERKS!

    1935. His scoring strokes

    were 6, 6, 4, 6; 6; 4.

    Ben Hogan in 1948 and

    1950.

    Arsenal, Queens Park, Hast AND 470 OF
    Glasgow Ranger, Totten- COS VAN « SON,
    ham, Cardiff City. «) 50%): aR,
    In 1922, aie





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    AND OF IRON, WROUGHT >+*+



    LONG MILES OF FLAT COUNTRY
    WHERE DANGER IS NAUGHT





    HRATTON STOPS MICELLE 11/\C: he



    LOOKING SURPRISED, Joe Miceli, 146 pounds, staggers back after
    former welterweight champ Johnny Bratton, 148, lands a hard right
    during their scheduled 10-rounder in Madison Square Garden, New
    York. Bratton floored Miceli in the first and seventh, and was awarded
    a T.K.O. in the eighth round when referee Harry Kessler stopped the

    —-(International Soundphoto).

    DE PEIZA SCORES CENTURY













    THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1952.



    New World |
    Record

    LONDON
    Ital under-water fishing |
    hampion, Air Force Lieutenant |
    Raimonde Buche, 40

    |





    ished a new world
    127 feet below the sea without |
    living suit off NapJes. His only |

    equipment were goggles to

    tect his eyes, a clip to close his | .
    nose, and frogman’s rubber fins 7
    for his feet. | Mm a
    He remained under water, 1} —
    minute and 17 seconds and came |
    up grasping in his hand a co k |
    marker anchored to the sea bed
    to show how deep he had gont
    In August Buche won th
    underwater fishing title, catching [ THE COLGATE WAY
    128 Ibs of fish in 16 hours. This “ TO COMPLETE
    summer he went on an under- HMOME-DENTAL CARE
    water fishing expedition with
    Lord Mountbatten who is very
    keen on this sport,
    * * *
    A erack American trotting
    horse Egan WHanover, ran today
    in Bologna against four profes-
    sional cyclists and was beaten by
    all four.
    The horse covered one kilo-
    metre (five furlongs) in 1 min
    16.4 sees, while the fastest
    cyclist, Giovanni Corrieri did it

    in 1 min, 11.5 secs and the slowest
    39 year old Gino Bartali in 1
    min 15 secs. —L.E.S.

    CHESS:



    RUSSIAN WINS
    WOMEN’S TOURNAMENT

    ; LONDON, Nov. 19.
    Russia's Elizavet Bukova won
    the International Women’s Chess
    tournament, Moscow Radio repe:t-







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    Full Text



    PAGE 1

    THURStt.u Mm MBfcR M, Ittt BARBADOS ADVOCATE PACK THKtE GOLD COAST HAS OWN CIVIL SERVICE Governor Becomes Final Authority i 111 ii it i ii \nniw LONDON. Another significant and important iia^e in the ii and political advance hat Md. On NnMnibor 1 ;in Order wik m. Chaili ke> :.i\m %  illcolony, M Irom tliai date. ii. ...i . be known as the "Local Servuv %  1 ip.Qn|d COM!" France Will Bold On To Her Colonies F. 8 HBUUNO 20th Oentury Centurion ... A B.O.A.C Securit* Ware**. Mr. F. 8. Herrlm. rrcenUr bMur a member of the select "Cenlarion Club" by walking a hundred miles In leu than twentyfour hoars. Te achieve this iliiiinrtlon he Irft Bath. Someraet. at 6 p m on? rvenini and walked ihrouih the nlfht, reaching Turnham Green. London. at 3 39 p.m. the followlnc sfternoon. Mr Herring, who haa naw rum pried In fast walking evenin ranging from lefl yard* to 100 mllea. estimates that he haa walk., ed over 6.000 miles In puraalt of his hobby. Photograph shows Mr Herring (raining on the perimeter track st London Airport. Mr. Herring'* %  need during his 100 mllr walk waa 4|—5 m.p.h. The Oovarnor, and not ih* S: %  ultimate author It) %  < % %  "the aptranafer ^nd dlatfbunary control in regard tmemliet' of the &• \ %  I t of lite colony'* Arrlcanlaatlofi policy. %  i %  iun.int I An uveraras candidate 1 '"• ,wn „• ... rvf ptnfiontbW terms— If n African .L,Lfor the job concerned. "lt DaUwusUM *>, %  ... France, able overW,I > oppos** any action intcrnled November I will be .lutomntieelmusl ?* rl ' ' tn'P'"'1> members uf ike Local Service. ,s l** 1 !" *. -n ngts. S V id fli*" lha! Pr ^, ,,W ^ Sti W the rd of the war. rYanro "=""• £"*£* "£7"* *"' % has made con.1* based atrietly on merit and ln ,. ,. (|llipi „„, her • b "">' , territories. N c a r I > So far a* the material eonamrsno.ooo.000 has been invested In i are concerned, no improving rondltlon, piRerentlation, it Ii i t atao, a ('ninnies nnd the be made on the ground that off.trench mandate. eers are or are not members of the Local I details have )uit been Colonial Ser. loc oltklaK published el tVssgfa anil how |gg Eunipe:iti and African, In the huge sum* have been apem \„ (be Gold Coast prior to Novemlxv I last live real il I trice with have psn been required to Join what Is known BI the Monnel the local Service. And there have Plan, drafted and carried wut unborn assurances, of cnure. from d*r the supervision of M Jean Premier Nkrum.th thai tinQOM Monret. General Commissioner Of Coast does continue to need exthe modernising plan. patriate officials for different Jobs. A second simllir plan, to rover ijnrticui.irlv in the technical Held, 'be next four years, is now under The Colonial 1',.! %  %  .. udy. When it has been apinc colonial folico proved, it will coma Into effect In publication of real .mpor,<,-. llllW llfl ^,. dent of the International High Gairy Named. Suspended From Couneil .from I SSSWHSaMl CHEN ADA. Nov. 10 | iiamen and us penned at a meeting n rung all.%  oeaJtliuj J notion urguj the M ruling of lo Grrnadj t H rally the social an kfraln and n :.[ ... %  After p: from Ai! kCttian In th from imputation of the *> %  i t mem 11 i i ihv ad' i migtil %  ) %  Qaui .win on i Oh! what a nasty cough... ZUBES bring ra 1 ii relief! BIR HUlllI DOW, •h^. |>ioimim Chairman of the loyal Ooaamiasaen < llUIOlllli-t'll French under Committee Flans Trade Promotion Conference I'l.ms for a Trade IU-VI year are bonu' •tor) Cominittet n larial heaiiquai let I %  11 r 11 !K)RT-OK-SPAI\. N 10 mution Conference sefu'duV u bssd a clean sheet indj "it other members mound tb Uble COUM make the IgSBM BflMgl the motinn would pasa very easThO AdnuuistiiiUn nsked Ui mernbag Rtg %  withdrawal of theslemarks and Caiiv tefused, claim the House was the On-privilege of Justuv. The Administrator read the relevant rules of I with regard to respect the chair, whgomipon Bon i>. A. iienrv Dooungged moved thai QeJn be H named'< and suspended, and the Albhi\ Qffleral C. P. HenvlUe sswonded. The nmjorlty votad .n f.ivo'ii pi the motion and Gairy left tht iiccompanied by thre REC? 2UIES C0U0H ntlXTUPt ftKI tOUCH LOZENGES The main spedttc yob before th Ihe formulation nt nn agenda fur th ( \mong the subjets suj i are Transportatmn nnd C >niniuiii' %  I'hamlH'i -.. compan MI, : Trssdi ananclng faeUltlei momben of hi-* block, and a vast credits and collections. Standard crowd of big followers in the galIAMra) oercial producta am ler| wlu> had been urged by Gairy . — • ... i \ V %  "' trade terms; Dlsseminatinn I to attend In a speech at a MMV| SSl* SSli 1 ".^ I lk, 1 l|prmauon of prkee and oui p„i,he meeting also w.ike. \>it during products; Export marku coopera( .„| momentarily interrupting tin lv quiet of the Chamber. ," b u n 1| ". m D n !!j ? !" "; 5 Mbert hi'w.n.d H A McK.e.b-SS 1 he name of lion. Ca.lyle Noel. mrree. Ih ' aa ' to Ihp Colonies U due on November M. I; IUWd The Authority tor Coal ml Btul IT, Ccloui.l Police In It Ihr .uthoi, Europe, and his anlM.nl. M S r J Ch i rU L. J *" ri ';i 01 "' *?""}* Etlenno Hlr:h. hs. MM Undrr-Secraury ot Slate in Hie ,,„i n ,„i General Commlulonei In %  >•!. who arranged r. %  | M Colonial Omce. nlvea u., I under. succ eed hnn Th* new ohm wilt *"" Tnnnlnl in tier en ,„„, OAVii of stand, the first authoritative and probably b called th,. Ilhsch r.'niiu.nUant-111-chlet of the Brittemationol Tniile. UJ l>--| full story ot the development of ]' .n Red Cross, has now an, wm hatCoronation year. The Queen's aunt. the police forces throughout thu iiounc\t Hut she will extend her F |cetad CtwlntMfl of tin Olafl lalllinl— Only In the event of Development u, Hi,. Flviu Ii I'll to Rntish Cmana as well. mlttee einnh.i-..,',! Ih.,1 II •rave disorders, such as .v"" %  l",n! Uen somewhat At the invitation of Sir Huh, tanalbl cu.loned at present by Ihe Man flower than In other f ranch oveiHnnce. Oovernor of Trinidad. Ihe „„|„ anc | should avoid an ara Muu In East Africa, Is much %  •*• territories. But. thanks to rnncess Rol Ill pr. ,1 Ml.icn,,,aporoach li thr.usht paid by most people to improved methods of amculturo ours to the local branch, ,1 11 ,,,.,,, ,„ ul ,, the importance of Ihe poll,-.in aim imaalloii. exports ot some Red cross in In .„l si., U Qonfarann should I, so the colonies, and Sir Charles' pruducts such.,as stifar and banaeupcctod to .rrlve in th. t olony us to aUmulale Ih, nu f Ron Mitly lielnninuK to block, .lipped the t lr fiiunril In takltiK Ine the member rein ,111, ,1 the remainder of Ihe m, tirtpaUnl m the i,„„i„ 1 wlUi Marryshow. E. V. book will without doubt be In<\". from Ouadeluupe have valuable In Ihe Until it throw, doubled aUtee before the war. particularly on problem, of poll,-.. '" French Guiana a huge deuriani.allon in relation to the P", 11 "' tuUKlte has been foundI 40 .wilt dove menl ot colonial ""'. """iS'-" £?V 1 """";"* ' ,„„ territories to-da.. The history „( eontiin S0.tj.00o tona of the val"*{" .,_ liable or from vidrh nlimiir.iiiia '' 1 ""early In January oil company, nnVml the Prlnees* iwcornniodaUon on or* tanker* for hev trip tn the We^it BQJ .1111 |.te,i ra iteAmr, Ht l a\ \ JtUun.s In Montsefrat Catiac Great Dttiuigc ,nm our on C>mi-M|, ANTIGUA Nov. 111 Torrential rainfall was experienced In Montserrat resulting In Hoods, landslides, roads obstructed, bridges washed away and houses damaged Plymouth water supply was seriously Impaired. His Excellency Sir Kenneth police organisation In the differ,T-~^^" ,, W T"^ "J !" "":"" but asked that no special arrange,nt territory ll ske.,-lied, and P !" "^ •>• "|(I J '"'''' .„e„l ,„, h., voy. shows how lyaslc principles of po" !" n w ^8 ati'hed of extraviNp „ p r i„cess has decided lice work in thu country have ln nrt P"lng this ore u n hpr Uun ^ |h _. nvlw been adapted to differing colonial R ;_ p riMlr s tion of the Government of British conditions. The Colonial Police" M lr X u !" iT^ro,reu. „„C.ui.na. An ofneial announcement (Max Parrish. l8/d.) U not a d "S" Z^Tvu,, jtaSnta, Baa •'"'" s J !" K Palme In LonColoni.l Office publication It j, tZ^i.SSTKiSi.'KS^iiT. don. aid an audition to a number of other excellent work* of private authorship by Sir Charles. ,ng — L.E.S. Sale Of Land Approved hovvi • 1. n... 1 been made in French North Alri, where coal production in Al.' ii %  1.T hindi Morocco, which totalled only 180.000 tons In lU.'IB, is now approachinu 900,000 tons n koar. A big electric power seheme i Uiegc Icrntoriii has been made i-iinnuiiHtic as well sd ttovernmenls. Others attending tin .ire-— Mi. D. Mascart. Director < Customs, Martin Uliveias, Hi AOHtic I" lit I*ueil A I'ei latent kVenomlc AM to the abortive dt bale was Hi: Uirdshlp J. I* M. PtttC, CsUM %  i Trinidad, who arrived here this morning for the sitting of Ihe Appeal Court. Oaln had asked whelln Tho General Board of Health yesterday approved the dlvlsii and tali tu tncs,. Icrritoi a.. hn.s lieen modr ,. _, t ... ,,_ . u , possible b, the construction of i'" r ,' n, „ h ,f l r ""'",' nL \'-\tl ;H}C: I. ...erT-eolnr th /Vmencan cecntrlea h||> |h( | n ,„.,., |l wl „ „, Her Royal Hlghneaa, the ITIn, iT, 'j!;, !" ,'"'S' ."' ,' ',"['" '!',''", m ' l v " n ""' """"" %  nd ""' ,: has .......pied.,, Invlta9SCS M w VeSn Ailminl.li .to, overruled this Out ellency the ^""1"; !" Mr ( ."•".' „ ".''.'. ndetheCh ., KcltoTerowd acting Oovenw r of British tluiana IS, V,', ' %  ^•' aa !" "'' %  '• followed Gulry down aueet lo the Gulaia during Me; TrtliUtod vi.lt to the West Indies visit pOSslll, she may make visit* to othei rveral Sout: e-hich are tradltuinaliv producers of 239.090 >j square „.,, f ,,,,,„ rs „, .j.^jT.t(W. n the two Coi Blackburn, accompanied by A.D.C. & ur ? n K^aP&TftSF T^ ^^^''^ "" C.pt. T I. Hewitt scheduled to "svmiiSon was also Sven^'for 'L'" !" C "'" i ^^ .i % %  .a (eimission as jiso Hi\en ior th,.,. ...i,.,, ..vti mr,n t leave Antigua on November 24 lhe givi^on nnd H | e of i93 ^^^ Ki^-aJJET,' ?&. ruti v ii.-. .f on the one-week routine visit i 3 roods, 26 prrehes of land in lots S& hnd h ioL.cepwith I V '(> • IvsaVOjasCt rtlwf to a sore and ikkling throat. Just pep one ksto row momh as reel urn • 1 /I HI S l\H MIR ASH "kt sea aam <> a4af, i.lJiK/iti.'l 1 lr)hM,*Hr III HOM ALL GOOD CHEMISTS AND STOKES Varo ftasSsiBM •• I.' ,, (SL-/ have begun a ca...lear wayildo. postcard appeored cortalj) )UST ONE —and aren't we cn,oylrtf, ourselves t Baby wonder, whit alt the futi Is about on thli particular day—the tori, the new frock, the cake %  nd this lovely, lovely candle but what fun ! And what a happy ytr it has been on the whole for everyone particularly unce we put baby on Cow a, Ge. Steady progress abounding health peace and contentment. Yet carry on. baby, with that charming smile — at least we have given you a good start I Promiiient Eiigiiwcr Dies In Grenada Mr foppin. GRENADA. Nov. 1: Henry Rudolph Gun Munro well known engineer and uncle of Consideration of the other lots, Franklyn, now Trinidad tennis ace. . as postponed pending the availdied this morning. He leaves u ability of adequate water supply. I wife, two sons nd two daughters. The Board granted the applies-' The death also occurred today tion of Messrs Cottle. Catford and of Mrs. Agnes Martin. Widow uf Co. on behalf of Messrs. Central the late John Martin, former Foundry Ud. for approval of alterMagistrate here, She was the allons <>f %  plan earlier approved mother of five children among by the iv>i.rd, and postp-med eonihasm Mr V H Martin Roval sfderation ot lhe npplication of %  S S: FJT',,W5 ^i l3K Mr. O. C. Mahon for Ihe division n -n I S* ir rl?? """ " "' 7 470 S( uare feet in Neville Howell WdMr.J C-gg, nl EiHdge. Christ Church, tin in Barbados. Edward Martin Thf app k ation bv Newcastle Antigua and Mis* Freide Martin. tMaXo% Ltd for the division and Royal Bank branch here. The UIS L, BAYLET pedestrian>. Kolton tanr B.I'.P. SBSSSSSaaaaaaaaaWaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa COW & GATE iVU&B 3*aFOOD<,/ J B. USUE&Co.lld ROYAL B A III IS Ajenls WE ARE OFFERING A VARIETY OF AUTO ACCESSORIES. I'eri.i.iex Gasket Shellac w Fonrj-a-

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    THURSDAV. V,\ I Mill I 20. 1*52. BARBADOS AUVOCATt. PAGE THRU: GOLD COAST HAS OWN CIVIL SERVICE Governor Becomes m Final iuthority II Mil It < II \IIC >l \ -S LONDON. Anothi and nrportanl stage in the, Qold I] and political advance hfM i i d*r anta nis Ctsaria* Arden-CI i ItA < %  V. I | i|tO cl theti.ilil Coaal Franc**' Will Hold On To Her Colonies With The Go* not ihe now ihe ultimate authority lot "the appointment, promo tontrol in retard H 1 of tiw colony's policy. I :. : M eandidate • no AlMran u available lui the job concerned. *'>} %  .. in ei I ulll be automata! I B sU M.*" """ f r !" l ni VZ ' %  ".r ,t. uf Ihc WAI. FY.IM ir the public service will to hai ,. ,,„.. ll|( ral ,|, headway d strictly on merit and l nmo< ,, M .. nppmf hPr Near 1) %  I %  ;-""" CBOO.tWO.000 rm. been invested In tion. of service ..re eoneerncd. no mprov int eonditi %  I d.iTei-iiuallon, it I* slated, will r be ir>Ade on tlie around thnt of!.Franc!) n | eers are or are not n la* Local have just been v lee offlrtala, pubUsbad or whtra and how these Buropaan -nut Afucan, in tlie Initfe Muni hava been .-p-iii in th Gold Coast prior to Novosnbe 1 last PARIS %  l nee I oppoti' Intended at DO %  %  .1 avast.. *' JH 1 %  • %  of thr Boyal Coi abhll So far Committee Plans Trade Promotion Conference 1'OKT-OK-SPAIN. N rians for %  Tiadt* Pforfli Uon C I alulod f" in vt \r.ii ,i bi %  contJclvrcd thli wcrk '\ tin' Prvpu %  lory Coawnlttet meeting tl Ken) rlouM, cirttntJ Seen tiirial headqii.u in i r S. HERRINU 20th Century Centurion . A mi u Security Warden. Mr. F. 8. Herrlni. recently brcimr a member of Ihe select "Onim Club" by walklnc a hundred miles In lea B lhan tvtrntyfour hours To ii In.' %  lludlstlnrtton h. Irft Rath. Somerset, at l.ui tatrmV otlieials for ililTcnnt jobs. *. %  ..<.-,• particularly In the tsjcfa %  • \ \<* now mvlrr Th.. I i •,, ,. ,i ,>,,i, study. When it ban been apihe colonial Police proved, It will come into efTeet it. A publication or real Impoo IflMi M MoiHiet „ now ,,,,..,. lance to the_ Colonies is duon ..f BUb .,., „,, '" %  •''_ .ao nraaffld ,<<-u\U .. Colonial Offlee. Rives ua, I undor^ceeed him Th" new aUn will " %  Trinidad Ir hoi coparity ai ,. „. „ t m_ atand. the ftmt authoritative and probably be called th, landani-in-chiei of the Ifrit, rr „ ,t full Horj of iiu* devolopmom of pi.,„ i u %  the police rorcei u^nuanoul tba HI eKUraJ htr ., Chalrnun of the Com Only m the event of iK-vem.^nmt in the Fren. M visit %  %  rave plpmejBn, -u.-h as CN I D* •. %  %  been aomewh^l At the invitation ol Sir Hon. t ,,.,..,.,, should Itnvfl U tmiKi"! cisloned at preaent by the Mau "lower than to other French o.e. Kance. Ooyernor of Tiuuduu. t"e uU nvold „„ BC1 Mau in Kast Africa, is much <^ ai terrtlorie*. But. Ihanta u> Prlnc. Royal -ill preaenl rol,. VMI dun: %  Ihe I'.muil.itiii' %  •I an aaanda t H Ih t ... i Trans puitat Ion and Commutil^ Cha %  uedils and collections. 9 %  %  1.1 inoi Urn i Inatton i %  i ki-i Information of i Gair) Named, Suapended From Couiu-il C. HEM AD A No*. 10 named 'nine aft,probe generally the MM From Ad I Chair to refrain from Un| .if the worl itnt Mtvb %  %  i %  %  %  Ontry ward on to nj that tn Uoni in OraruHL idaim.i mi inManui and Mental Wmkn*" Union '\ heraae i I the Koto* belongtai b) It i."t %  i k her membera aroumi th cl make the aMM BOewl n v ould p- van MI II] • %  Admuiiitrator aabod th' I il of the* rrailaJM and Oalry refueled, claim Ihe Mouse waa ihe onDrivlle#e of luatice The Administrator read tlie relevant rules of .1 with regard t.> raajbael •i r(., Cnatr, enawnupon Bon l). A. Henry nwilllaalart nu'iiiUi. moved thai Oati i I %  suspended, ami the Attarm | QB> oral V. F. Henville aeeonded. Tlie majority voted in I he motion and Gam led Uv by tC 0h! what a nasty cougn... ZU8ES bring ra:id relief! t:.i' <" %  %  thought paid b) moot people to improved methods of africuJtLro ourlo the 1 the importance of the poll,.m u '"> irnialion. export* of sonic ltd < irnco ihould h u arraiucP ules. and Sir Charles' pr-xlucta such a* sugai and bana<-xi"-.ted to to tunnitate tl book will without doubl tnin•• .l !" Ouadeloupe have early In January Heavy Huiiih In MontseiTat CautM* Great Dituiagc valuable in the liuht it throws doubled aince before the war particularly on problems of police '" F rcrK n ('"'lana. a huc deurgar.. a tion in .elation lo ihe l"'lT "[ b a ' ,0 und *0 iwift development of colonial ,, 1 %  '' ^J^LS?? 1 • ,lm .? l d \ territories to-day. The ln.ro-> „f ront-in SO.OM.000 ton5 of the vnlpolice OKffanlaaUon In ; r 1 n-o... which aluminum cnt territorial la tketched, and JS P*i"*lWft-Mjl ,CJ S •nOWl how baa.c pnnc.ples of pof ^Jff&£?jJS* **""* lice work in IhiV country have in anH p *l r '*ni' *hia ore been adapted to differing colonial M:., i riM ,_.,... condition*. The Colonial Polite" .^J.lv!!Pi5_ „ .ii.,, ,_,,. ia,j i_ „,%  Moat spo, laiuiiii* proareaa un,s i0t a dor the Moimet 1'1-n. however, haa been made in French North Alnwhere <-oal production m Al Colonial Oihce publication. It u an addition to a number of OIIDI excellent works of private Ltd the off) i tankers for her trip to the West %  ... •ocepbad %  b>it askd thai no %  p*dai arrangement be made for boi voyage. Now th. Prim •.i i xtond her tour, on 'be mvltallon of the Govrrnnieiit ol Brittah Guiana. An official annoom<'mcnl from St .lames'a Palnce in Ixmiiald %  authorship by Sir Charlei —LXS. ANTIGUA Nov. IP. Torrential rainfall was experienced in Mont&errat ii'sultmg in floods, landslides, road.* obstructed, bridges washed away and houses damaged. Plymouth water lupply wa eeripusly impaired. His Excellency Sir Kenneth Blackburn* accompanied by A.D.C. Capt. F E Hewitt scheduled to leave Antigua on November 24 on the one-week routine vUlt %  • i!ow facing an islandwide Inspection tour of the vast destruction Sale Of Land Approved and r rentii Moioeeo. which totalled on 1 / 160.000 tonu. |9M is now approaching t>T>0,0U0 tons a year. A big alaetrto poerfar arhemw %  mtoruM has been made possible by the construction of hyuro-eleetrie dams, and oilfield production has also increased Phosphates ar. also being produced in French North and are even bell iW., H,ah„... ,h.. ,„' %  etlnaj apverni %  ol Hi Itu n lu to visit Bidish Ciiaita during h* ceming \dt to the Vi'i-nl Indie* During has sla> Ihi Koyi.l Highness will inspect Red Cross detachment, ana • % %  Ked Croas work in the leintoiy Final arrangements fur UM loci ol land nl Falnvayi, ChrlM SuW, uim^ivi. TBM North ""l" ,he ""l "B 1 "'*."* some extraordinary reBl'P UK pn AH it Promineni En^aeer Die A In Grenadu GRENADA, Nov. IP. Henry Rudolph Gun Munro 72. well known engineer and uncle of Franklyn, now Trinidad tennis ace. died this morning. He leaves a wile, two aoni and two daughters The death also occurred today Permission was also given for thown the division and sale of 193 acres. „„,,,, a^fly n trw eejWvaaorl of 3 roods, 20 perches of land in lots ,.„,-,,,. ,„,* 1( ., at Walkers Plantation. St. 0org by Mr. G. L Farmer Hut there na been lew im"'id now fedc h eg 800,01 The Board approved the division proverncnl In ag/kultural OVlpul eal '• and 'ale of six of the prescribed partly because It take* time to Leal %  noctaculai %  <• i lots, part of the 34.453 square feet 1 .,, ,.,(,. m, natlvea ol these barhave be i mad< Of land at Clapham, Christ Chinih ( tiandoo tiieir ifa nH tti Col U by Mr. C. St. Hill, and the division methods in favour of more modproduction has bcoimc the malngnd sale of lots 1 to 48, part of rrn w.n. uf cultivation But miiio la. of iOVtral Of DM Well A 109.572 suuare feet HI Oreen Hill, of lh b st results have b*n Ob'.in, while big pV< for which application was made by tained in developing production have been built in Mr. L. L. foppin. ipi <•( his block, and a vast 11 the gal11 who had boon urged by Can. %  attamd in a niH*eeh at a previ U public meeting also walkri it momentarily interrupting tie 0 net Of the Chamber. In thr vote linns. T. A. Marryshow and II A M|Cle abstained I ..t II, HI tailyle Noel Ix'longing to the Oair> llppad th. (Ink of ih. f ml in takiiii; th. vote UU ihe member rein lUWd •in( %  •m.iiralt'l of th,uici'lillg par%  wiUi Mnrryshow. E V A BtflVf t.-i and Mi Kir who Bl %  .inU-iIM well as tWO orTleiul 1 nd the two nominated memher> 1 ii anil panalon motion mvotvea duralion till tinnext mawtlnf .i im leitun "' any resnunoroUofi >• which tlie said member .. a entitled lor Ihe period tfaoni those listen%  | to the abort i vi Lordahlp J. I. M. Pong, ChJeJ T.inidad. rthn airiv^l Ii. ... llnv morning for DM %  ittim of the Appeal Courl. Oalry liaff aahed whether he might vole on the motion and the i dor overruled tinOUt %  followed Gukry down street to tin MMWU ofllce. Later, on % %  > inotnm <>f adjoimi%  n.-nl. Hoii W. K Juliet. -Iin-a in tinfaet that two fires reeciitl) • t lo the residencee of O. M i ..m an.I Lottla Strauss were patent attempt-, of aasun and augHuit the Government hOUld OfM a i e ward for tvManct leading to the eulpriU. 11,. said H pi in i i-.-ii.iui that people eran leckuin lo tx>mmit inurdi i llirough llr,. in a mi an..f i. vmf %  I.M ataguni UM I n "t avhole femllwig, Galry's 20-minuUi speech up to the stage of the %  Uepefsston, lai %  oiuisted of charges against "plantix-racy" whom he described Inch year^as the CJvisUnaa sea„ -reeponslble for the gruesome ..nd undesirable atmosphere preeaUuuj in Grenada." ii.ents. attending the Mi I) Mascart. I'M Martli H. .. %  i gum* PI i r.i i %  ii o Pl" Bofldi M. n A Pei \ isti.nl I i.. %  loon %  nl '. .'.II Uon, Mi Aiil i. Lulled Kn.kil"o I i I illlilan Mi w r Trad P %  %  i iii.,i ilir-etoi of T i • %  rJdi Grant Ltd Trinidad. Campaign V-ain-i W.aVHiflf Gatfd Vendora REC? ZUIE5 COIT.H tW>XTUR5 RKI COUCH LOZENGES kaspaMi %  -.-./"hcstHiogquKk rdicf to klniB thioal. Jusl %  ihaii well > a fanaU asjagd) II cough\ and oic tnroai 1 Cl it* gem i.and i > SpctuiU tu.uble safe foi .InlJi.-n coughs Ma I Inane I \ i > ,„ aaar/i -./-•-' FHOM ALL GOOD /' H) S JHH IJ I R ''•or HNr araa* in a ilfiv. CHtMljrs AND STOKES but what fun ! And what a happy year it liitwen on the whole for everyone particularly BJOJ we put baby on Cow A Gate. Steady p-ogmi abounding health peace and contentment. Yci carry on, baby, with [hit charming smile at lean we have givrn you a good start! Consideration of the other lots %  us postponed pending Ihc availbllily of adequate water supply. The Board granted Ihe application of Messrs Cottle. Catford and ing citrus i.ults in North Alii'. *riicti has been doubled since lfS" iii.ittit'iif young men patrol Ihe city slrvets telling C tcards from boxes, iontetinige y congregate on pavements and In shop DOOi nni^ding the prohese ternxress of Christmas shoppers and peUcatrlaliN -HI T ^a——— COlrVfifGATEKJ&B ^FOODo/ jT^i ROYAL BABIES DUa4 Hiafta I 111 is I_ BAYLEY K.II..M I ..II. J B USLIt & Co.. lid Ago nh of Mrs. Agnes Martin. Widow •! Co on behalf of Messr.. Centrnl tho lfltp John Manui. larnwi Foundrv Ltd. for approval of alterMaHatrate here. She WM Ihe allonl o£ a pUn earlier approved mother ol five children amor* V' hr "" : "i "l* """i""^' 1 '""', thwn Mr V H Martin Rovnl Mo>rlion dt the application ol SS J^' awirTIa wK Mr. Q. C. Mahon for Ihe dlvl.lon n ^ ? i ?? %  f^? i"l .al' "' '.. !" iure feel In Neville Howell andllr.J. CJJar,, |Is Brld (1 r] „' ,.„„„„ lin in Barbado.. Edward Martin ,, „ bv N(muU Anllirua and Mw feida Manm. Brt,,,, Ltd for tlie division and Hoyal Bank branch heie. The ciM |,. Ilt 20 acres I roods 2 parches ceased was the daughter of the ln Iol was deferred pendlrsa an I te Archdaacon HuUou who wan opinion from the Colonial SecreHeetor of St. Georie's tary. WE ARE OFFERING A VARIETY OF If # AC1ESSOMES. I'm.,.,ex flasket Shellac w Form.a Oaakef „ Fabric Cleaner ,. Auto Top Sealer Transparent Glaaa Sealer Black Top DreaalDtf Radiator Liquid Cemenl „ Radiator Boat Prevrntor ,. Enaineer'a Prussian Blue Hulls W.miliT Wax Dvnlnp Palrhlns' Outfit, Rubber Solution French Chalk .. Insulation Tape Ribbed MaAlii.c .. Radiator Hoae All Sites Car Truck Jacks %  -.-. Ply Air Hoaa Schradrr Me.al Tyre Valve. „ Tyre Pre*irr r.auees ECKSTEIN BAY STREET Chamois Leather* Yellow Pillshlng Cloth. Miracle Blnrk Adhesive Miracle Tub Caulk Sealer Durev Masking; Tape Shaler Hoi Patches Spartnn 0 A 12 Volt I lain.s Clfaw n — l av 12 Volt Home Chrom" Rim Kmbellbhen Fxpandlnr; Reamers Extra Cullers for Ream en Auto Engine Valves Fan Belts all Models Rear View Mirron Insulation Tape Pram Tyring; W in.. Si in., 1 in METAL CYCLE PUMPS Schrader Air Line Blow Gun Lionide Leatherette All Shade Birkrr.yre Canvns BROTHERS DIAL 4269 We carry a lurgc stock of beat quality imported Paints, at well ai Dry Colour!, Linaeed Oil, Turpentine and Flrxr VarnishIt Milt 10 OS CO-OP. COTTON FACTORY iAd. SPECIAL XMAS OFFER!! %  & &£ ELECTRIC fiTi tgm-vi. $508.00 G.E.C REFRIGER4TORS REDUCED TO $460.00 THIS SPECIAL OFFER ONLY GOOD FOR IS Off unit of the '.I.'.. --neiically tested tftci manu%  and nevcf Mod I p efieggri lof will stand up to si.v catrenai o* curnaaa — ma ft'% SalMl (IrromiuTi-plitH llWldlatcopt>r.n| COitS*'tfl lOCk. NOVEMBER and DECExMBER • CITY GARAGE TRADING CO., LTD. Victoria Street Dial 4671. 1



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    I in RSDAY, NOV1 Mill i: n\iimi>o-; (mm \ri; HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD BY ALAN FRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG FLASH GORDON BY DAN BARRY JOHNNY HAZARD BY FRANK ROBBINS BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MO MANUS SIXJ. MAO AND NOT 0PCAKIN& TO •£ THAT OL.O TCOC-ltL *.* MAT 1VJ -AM' r T CXJT At3AMI'LL KNOW ***> 6Ta two 6 6TIU. 3 ^_ TO we RIP KIRBY visa. BY ALEX RAYMOND %  %  ThE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES PENTALUX GLO llolrt \;.lr(i% LOUIS I,. B.WI.I 1 ,.. li-inr FOR EXTERIOR AND INTERIOR NTALUX GLOSS FINISH / HT-IU USE THE VERY BEST WIDE & ATTRACTIVE RANGE OF COLOURS PAINT IIMIIII AT All. IJ:AII\(. II <\ni>n \m MOIII.S World's Crtatml SKIN OINTMENT /amBuk Mofhinc, Hciling, Antiwptic k.;r a bM NUTS—per lb. . DRIED KKUIT SALAD prr pk t (.HKKN SKAI. RIM CORONATION WINE Usually NOW .72 (III .57 :.ll 75 fill M I 211 1.20 .:i 1. 511 1.44 KI.II APPLba 1'OL.AK l IM. Ml II >,. i IUII'II I .111 M I MAPS I Mills I \ltl I U Mil! (.It \l'l. M IN II, I KKIsTIK* IMIHIA lOII.I I I Ml rtTFM Ml I MIS I A VIAL . • HI' MH:I UKI Ml I MM Kl \s ^|>rr III 'I \ I Kill 1 %  l: • I D. V. SCOTT &Co. ODNEWS ESPECIALLY FOR THE RESIDENTS OF THE HASTINGS AND ADJOINING DISTRICTS THE SELECTION OF CARDS ENTERED IN THE ADVOCATE CHRISTMAS CARD COMPETITION WILL BE ON SHOW AT ADVOCATE STORE, GREYSTONE HASTINGS THE ADVOCATE BEAUTIFUL BOXES \^ ^>. GIFT STATIONERY COME IN AND INSPECT *m OUR STOCK.



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    TUUKSI BARBADOS ADVOCATE. Lad Bound Over For Inflicting Bodily Harm nl Harass at Market Hill. St Qaorgi In UM sum of £50 to kp the peace for 18 months by Mr. Justice J W. B. Chenery after an assize jury found him guilty of inliicttnt; grievous bodily harm on 2:1 year-old Joseph Wickham of the same district on July 25 this year. verdict he told the II. _, # wished the Court in be \ I'IM'Z llt'IUIl I'lM'll lenient towards the prison PACK I IVI Driving Mr. F. G. Smith appeared Hsynes' behalf Five witnesses gave the Pro--eahlp Mr. E. A. McLeod. Pr. gkantwak said thai on Juh >'• '"' M-'gutr.te of District -A". 25 ho examined Joseph Wickham JH-ycar-old ComWickham's lower jaw was frac"""'on Agent Hua Garln of lured. The blow which caused the CansBU t !" '" he pa d forthwith likely to cause permlmi,, dUah,,XS-TtTSTpttfl """ wi^fch—, <..A ...,. „r..w *x Oarin was *uo convicted, repWiralM said that or. July 2* rimanded and discharged lot dnvhe went into a shop belonging to tnf x SOtf "* wllnou an H .IT. !" ll L Tu r n y ^ ""* -. Hill. St. Georee, where Haynea and ], L other* were He passed near RJa,. w W llMfi. y.C, who Haynes ana brushed him. Ham f or the FoUi told him not to touch him and he truCourl to any ml the original %  •> Haynes what was Ike roalcharge to one "f diiving in a mantor between them. He went furncr d*iigerous to Hit* public. In ther into the shop and when he ih,original charge Gann was waa passing near Haynes strain, aliased to haw CIUM>J bodily he chanced to bounce him. Haya and Carter Cox pushed him and tin., began to two school chilarcn. through wilflght. Turney ordered thtm out of ltd nagJcirt while driving the OR the shop and us they were going X-S09 on Black ROCK road or out. Haynea said he was going to November 11. knock hun dhuii. He starlet, to v. n Mr. .! S 11 Ucar appeared for Minic-me called him. While he was Gann. Sgt. Howard of the Black twinging around on being called. H>K Police Station said that on he waa struck with a stone which November 11 be went to Black fractured his Jaw. Rock road and saw the car X-S08 was inTap On Shoulder volved in an accident with four Croaa-eaaanined he said he had school children who were taken tapped Haynea on his shoulder 1O >•"* General Hospital after the and said, This is a sock," but that oocMont was only an expression jommon H lMrnt thlt lhe defendant to the district. Before be was was ^ driver of the car. Struck with the nono he did not threaten to shoot Haynea, BUIr Burke said he was in the shop when Wickham tapped KtvYIANDI l> Tw iuv-four-year-old Elsie CarESSO PUBLISH!,M.W MAP OF CARIBBEAN A very informative and colourlul inap of the Caribbean hat %  %  ,*.... OU, S.A. Thiv map contains intvrii.jition on all means of irans,'i the area and also shows in large detail, fifteen of the moat important idanda of this region. It has been I ublished as a i.>eans of promoting travel throughout the Caribbean and at the tame timto foster understanding and knowledge among the countries and territories which the area comprises. Although the ize of the map has been kept small enough to be convenient and although it is Hh information, it If ex%  isv t( read. All scheduled airlinei serving the Caribbean are shown with approximate flying times between terminal*, and ports of -all for all scheduled steamship lines acenvnodatii'g passengers are indicated hy svmboi ard key. Railroads, highways and airports a and the spectacular ranges of the Island* are indicated by shaded relief III Over 100 colourful pictures graphically describe the culture, history and recreation of the area Tourists to the Carlbb. also be aided by the accurate Ill November 25 by His Worship again touched him and they began yesterday en a charge of inflicting to scuffle, the shop proprietor "rnievous bodily harm 00 dorcd them out of the shop. He ;,,.. ;nhmond Gap .n did not see what happened wtM they went out on the i r T Brancfcei is nppearllrreulr. -;t Hill i when th" ing on behalf of CarTUUtoO while shop pri i i md s^i. Haynea la pnawcuusi for the Wickham out of the shop. WickPolice, ham told Havnes he was going to shoot him. Havnes ran down the KiNORID SIGNAL road ami Wickham illd not pursue him. Later Wickham came back with a cut fin hi Lionel pulled up after iboul 20 ytroa Humphrey of Nurse Land, St Michael was fined 107a^. "r 'iVal .w by lit* Wo '> when Haynea told Wickham on more B Ilce gl slEnM whlU drlvini than four occasions to eave him „ ill0n Hoad about alone. 10.15 a.m on October 15. tanw.iv Burkr said that he was inspector King of tin .it the shop the i.ight whi tat ion said that on Octoham ami Ha.vne-. had the •euflat, ber 15 he was on duty along shop proprietor ordered Const.tut 1011 Road. The lower ti.em out of tin loop, Wickham part of Belmi nl going toward* told flaynes. "The only way I do gu en's Park was impassable. not shoot you is if God take me." fj -, to this a sign which readWhen he heart! that threr.i be id' < %  itklO, Hoad Ob.lructed" was vised Havnes not to go down the put at the corner of Belmont road. 1 He saw a motor van coming Self Deface %  Wn•";'' "gf** xh x xh the drlvor Mr. Smith said that the defenc lied the driver. He did was not quibbling over the high i" 1 potsihihtv that I 1 Wickham'a jaw. but in the Ugh) of from him. the evidence the defence was nay-..,.... K (>BBI'KI|:N ing that the blow that u cd th^ "" r : R DDr,,,r %  til liefence. Cynthia Sergeant of Ol They had heard the evidence of s Andrew, reported to the Police Wickham'*. enntinumm aggression yesterday that while she was and his threatening to shoot shopping in Hoebuck sti.-.t OB 1 %  %  could not but be November IB. the sum of |150 perturl"" 1 M of Wickwu> stolen from her. ham's threatening to shoot him George Kellgian cf Ashbury reat St. George reported that his house chasing him down the rond a dark was broken and entered on t*oj-iKht. th KAbtr 17 and clothing to thQ of self oV • v..l ie of $121 was stolen. Since Wickham'.threat to shoo: Henry Goodman of OUtin. Haynes hart l>cen so solemn that It Christ Church reported 'bat grehad pul fear in the mind of the Ofriea were BtoWn from his Shop witness who advised Haynes ut OUUn > NOVOTDW ' %  against going down the road. II Tfa Polios -re imcstigstmg would have put more fear even UMM reports. in the mind of the man to whom .—,—— It wns directed. i—T—an — All they had to do was to deJMTA'.S" OF E\CMA.\Gl cide whetner the Injury was greater than the occasion demanded. After half an hour' dnlfl 1 a-ion the lurj rtturiMd %  verdict *" *"'" of guilty. Havnes was bound over for 18 months ArCting Governor At St. Lrmiar.r Schools His Excellency the Acting Governor, the Hon. II. N Ttirnei. attended by Captain W. II. It Armstrong, A.D.C., morning visited the St. Leonard's School for boys and the St. Leonard's school for girls. On arrival at the bo His Excellency was met by Mr. C. Glindon Reed, Director of Education, and the Acting HeadI.st. r. Mr. G. C. Millar, who accompanied His Excellency on a lour of the school. Mr. Turner then impt%  1 UM girls' school where he was met hy the Headmistress, Mrs. C. Griffith. Later. His Excellency paid an unofficial visit to the Bank Hall Grammar School where be ffM received by the Headm.. J. D. Bancroft. The General Board of Healtt at their meeting yesterday received Reports T: ment Chief Sanitary Inspectui on the condition _f existing lenantij roads at Ashton ll.dl. | and Walkers, St. Anorvw The l hie. Saint >rv liuiicctor .n hu report on tne Aahu-ii Hall road stated that during rainy weather the roads are impassable to pedestrian and %  certain places, and odded that no utiempi has ever ue,.!, made by the Vendor to put %  %  in order." lhe Uoaro viewed the mailer ixvided to •wiaaj u> hii ii< proviUons of the Act. una requiring mm to eo—pieui an nec e ear.v works. %  road, HuChief Sanlt rj inspector stated m part: Uurlng the course ot his Inspec\Mii. 1: wax observed that the road was grass grown throughout, and it was understood from ruin. \'either lhe roada were flooded at certain points Midway along the road leading into lhe tenantry, a bridge had been constructed to span the water course which passes at The water passing through the course has undermined the bridge over a period of time and the brtd** only suitable at one the use of pedestrians, but .\ holly danger us for vehicular trust Dr. E. li. carter, Cnairrnan of that In the case of the Walker try. the n"o,u.inents of providing roods had been met. but m the load.s had got into a slate of disrepair. The question was, who should i-.y out the necessary icpairs. He said that I p DO provision was made lu the Ac I. .md in tli.it respect he thought that tl* Act was "all wrong," and that there Wat nothing that the Board could %  natter. Mr. Justice J. W. K Choncn y< id lti n-t on August l^. ii. 1111. v,t cotin'a. wounding with. In* maisa. dsaAgure or do grievous wood and Joseph Baiur-fi boat bodily harm, and two, a mother and saw Ban. 1 The tun found her not guilu on Ki li< in nii poeki before the MHint light started. %  6 W W.Rcew Q.C.. Solicitor M[ ^ ^ |u „, „„ Gei> rsl. i.r.v^ecuted rOra^ CTOWI. (U nv|n hj |fH „,,„, Mr UXB Nile, represented Blacklhat Xud...e> HilWMd 1 ££& \here had been a big family tight Dr fallVaughn said th.t hi .o ,t that Audlne Haicwood was a exani i.id ll-rewood on August 12 woman accustomed to brinit OBB* when she was brought to the victcrt for .ightmit. Thr HM haapital. She had a two r i that Attdlas ner.j> ft e r, DM on the left foreMarawoodi rtpwMd husband hm' and \i \ i" 'he ha wounds required ..rhe*. dnrknejsa. The loiv roon,i iti.Kkc.i mnlty %  Activities At Y.M.C.A. Members of the Y.M.C.A. are working on their playing field at the new Headquarters. Alreaciv a fairly large area of the A"ld has been levelled and grass planted. On December 10 thf V M C.A Glee Club, conducted by Mr. O. A. "Grafflc" Pilgrim, former I v of the Combermcrc School Gli-e Club, will stage their Christmas Concert at the Y.M.C.A. Naval Hall The Police Band will assist wilh the programme. The Y.M.C.A. Week of Prayer ended on Sunday last. The attendance throughout the week was the best for many years. Sir George Seel r I8its IkibyCreche rge and Lady Seel flatted the Children^ Goodwill League and Baby Creche on Tuesday at 10.00 a.m. and spent nearly an hour looking around the budding. On arrival the> mn met i.v Mr. John Becklcs. M.B.E., and the laau , Mi-Brawn*, After completing the tour of the building. Sir George wrote 'he following 111 the Vfaritora 1 Cook; This institution must be a .source of great pride to Mr U e c k 1 v s and the staff. For %  : .. (. : mu of enthusiasm, it 1 urably with any similar InsUtuuon l have seen in tba West Imlies. I wish it evcv success for (lie f uttir • %  venlh Annual Benefit C'.nceri. %  por ra o r od by the Friend. ly Committee In the C.S.A. In %  id of the Children's (;.. ..luiii MM tl UM M nit.: Morris I*reshyterlan Church on 'J a hen .1 well arranged i>r 1 gran %  %  c on the Committee. No Name, No Parents The male child which wat Ml at tiuchii-hm'Goodwill League last month hy n mother who did not give btt mime and la still in St. anehael'i Almshouse whe:< taken. Mr. John Heckles told the AdrtM child is without I name, without a mother or without a father. I hope the parents will ban a heart and claim him." wounds widen • onld en lanaa* life, but he would not cull them n.vial becauai were vn too* %  Ooaa examined he said thOl he i.ukett the same day Abe had two lacerations on net lace. jgjnjaa, Uarsaood aaM that Hii. kett and she . friendly terms for maiu MM TIM9 used to work in the same cane field together and the unfriendliness arose because Blackaft su'peetrd that she told others omething concerning her. On August 12 tlu.v WOre h-.me it %  at St John ..bout 7 p.m. when 'lir board I noist ihi worn 0 ii ered that sonie cM|(tPI I she hold boi hild and was going home when -tie ...is struck in her 1 %  lone, lll.ickett then IHM to her and held her. They started to fla.li* and Hh" kett cut hi knifo on the chest, bol tefi ear. on kOf left forearm am OB her left calf. fruaa-exarolaed she she was not n account of the wOUOd .ml UM stitches wrre taken ou a week later. She ondl boM rinod 40/fhS g her for Blaekot* boeavai 1 dartttoa, Helena Hsrrwood. Audine's %  Id that slie trici to stop I fight and Blackett aHso cut her Civaa-rsamused she Mild I hud twice l>een lined foi hentini peoplo, Col. Girfleld Kars'snt Harewootl and Blw kett had g.vet other. Black pit n-uavksMHO IB h" .n defenc She said Audine Harcwood bOW hOI and after the •rufno IhOy had on the gtorgOd. lhe heard laarOwOods roputad band exclaim thai he iha.l HCiiicntally cut HarewcMKl when at%  • mpting to cu'. her. Oeaa-rxemlned -lo lit 1 RarOwOOd threw her In tii. ground and lay over her It wa then that she was cut. n.n.i.o.Mi iiinus 1 til 1I. HAYl.EY llollon Lane Assize Diary TlintSDAY NOV 20 Re*, vs. Nathaniel Browne Krt. vs. Lilian Brathwalte and Densll Harris -2 i in pr <; NOVEMBCP 1*. IW NSW 0K n c^wquM •• . n-nSers !" • Wl orD.m.nd Hiafta !" > T* S 10** pi" Cierencv f.s a 10Pt an 1 ii' pi Dnfla 'j I ie. pi TAKE IflllVfia #' THESE SPECIALS .30 p?r tin CONDENSED MILK—per (In 30 .60 (M DOMINICA C.ItAI'EFUVIT—p*r dot .60 .60 | 10 lbs 60 3.50 per 110 lb, bag POTATOES—per 110 lb. bag.. 3.30 4.00 pei .1 lb. tin PROCESSF.il CHEESI per 5 lb tin 4.00 .M pei tin ciiAWFotms citEAM CRACKEItfl —per tin 6 The Above Item, foe Cash A C.rry fustomers Onb KAXAM CORMFIl HEF.F HASH — 1-lb. lift TH MAXAM (IX TONOUB8 .......... 424 MAXAM STEAK AKIDNEY I l-lb. tin ... SWIFTS l.l'NCHFON REFF with CEREAL— 12-oz. tin .83 i MUTTON—per tin PAI.FTHOIIPFP HARICOT MirTTON—per tin .56 PALETHORPES STFWRr) STEAK—per tin 67 I ROLL—par tin PA1.FT1 V MFAI^-pe, tin • .3 HARRIS s riF VEAL. HAM TONGUE —per tin .39 BIION'M I F -per l-lb. tin 1 OAF—per tin RANCH MINCED roRNF.ll BEEF in CERF.AI—per tin 61 F.A1 LOAF 84 1 18 I IW K Mil rtM RIM STANSFELD, SCOn & CO., LTD. Make HARRISONS Your Headquarters for Hardware!! XMAS Draws near und lhe Seasonal Hospitality is bound to make Kxtra Demands Upon Your Kitchen and Table Appointment. Be sure You have all those little linn, which tend to ensure lhe success n( the occasion OUR STOCKS include — 1 I ri.KKV in 1 (irades WIRK DISH COVKRS POTATO III! IKS 1,1 11 III N KNIVKS FORKS and SPOONS t'OKKSt'KKWS and CAN OPKNKKS KISI1 KKTTLES VACUUM FLASKS KING SYRINdls and TUBKS WIRK slit MM It-. 1 I.OI'R SIFTERS WOOD SPOONS It I. ( HKAM FRKK/KRS I.I.MK SQl'KK/KKS POTATO ( IIIPPKRS CIIVKRKD KOASTKRS inII MI and CAKE TINS I MUSTEK SETS I 1 ASI l(IN(. SPOONS PYSTKY ROLLERS TIN OaATESS -iltl Doubtless You will require some Replacements and Additions lor both Table and Kitchen This i. where We can help lor We have a complete ran|(r of all lhe Requisite Items. Try US first for all Your Requirements A Bi Assortment of Domestic Utilities in n (UAsa iH>imi HII. TIN. | il AND Al .I'.MINII M WARE HARRISON'S C'*rS 77/1/ XHH \su i POSTBk POST EARLY FOR CHRISTMAS Wo I I i.l A torlnit'iii ol Hunt I Painted v ..).,-., w nh (he Croat i ItsM the C.ttX IV VflUf tnencl* abioad. Pocket Minicuie in ..-< %  Pockot Dwuonary t Ca \ .•',,., r.n.H Clgt Case (one Hand) pp Purse Lettei Oponoi in Handbag Purse (I kinds) BhoppHii i i-1 Note Hook n ,ii,i (i-oiiRi i i. ,v N-il File In Case i %  in COM ill kiml'i Comb in Cooa <2 kinds) Ihopplna Purse (2 kuxM Mendlni Sc' in COM K. Cast II Round /i|>( Parse Match I i ii'tii%  Ti.,v Pin• %  Hall i.nps in Case rabaeeo Poueh (Zlpp) anil Gents' 3-Wsy 7.ipp Wallets with the Map of Barbados in Colour, The Mup of the Wct ln.Hrin — PHONE 4911 ^d^/fafa%. IIEAUTY PREPARATIONS WftXNTL\ \RRl\KD Arriens Soaplesa Oil .Sliumpo. Artlens Blue Grass C \,hii.. S|nin-rream IVniuoient Wave Kit Super line Spun Cflton Panoa %  irlil \V..\. Buptl fine Spi nenl Wan \rdona Spun Cream Permanent ,V..v. %  ,:ili2.II9 per yd. in PaciAe Blue, Surf Acqua, Lasender firry, Smoke It'itc. Champuifne PLAIN KOMAINK -I ,"



    PAGE 1

    PACE FOl'B BARBADOS ADVOCATE Tlll-RSDAV. NOVEMBER U. IKt BARBADOS witik ADVOCATE r.. ->.-i ii • 1/H-M* ftf Ih* AdT.oW Ok. IM. IriM ... Hil4i>to.. lVBllai, November 2e, 1552. I V(.ll IIAll IT WOULD be eery discouraging i( the market planned I take as long to complete as the Bay Street Window opposite the General Hospital HalJ it has been i*>inted out is an important cross-road* much used by visitors to the island and its market facilities have Ion*; been appreciated by residents. Reco>>nitif Eagle Hall's market facilities did lead in fact to the removal some months atfo of certain shops in preparation for the erection of a market which would give protection to luiwki-is frotn sun and rain and which would make shopping easier for the housewife. The removal of the shops has not been followed by any speedy action to erect a market shed, and several enterprising hawkers, impatient with the kieonvenlences of selling perishable foodatuAi Ota an exposed unprotected site have built for themselves small shelters which add no beauty to the desolate site but give adequ.iN ;n the sun and rain. In contrast to the inactivity which is evident with regard to the proposed Eagle Hall Market, opposite Ita site ,i lervke ttsfUon for motor vehicles is rapidly nearing completion. No example of the # advantages ol private %  over public could be cited which would so readily be understood. The service station at Eagle Hall is being built on land which had to be cleared in the same way that land had to be cleared for the erection of the proposed market building. One might have thought that a market which was being erected with the approval of the central government would have been built before work had even started on the service station. In fact unless some erection follows soon it is possible that hawkers will, when It rains, seek shelter under the roof of the service tatM which is now rapidly natllng BOsfl pletion. The Coronation as was pointed out in these columns yesterday is not far distant. Soon it is hoped that the Coronation Committee will take the public into their confidence and Announce what works are to be undertaken as a permanent memorial of the Coionation. Meanwhile a list ought to be made in even perish ol %  cheinea which await complctlo-. ;md in* determination mndr that they will be completed not later than uiie month preceding the Coronation. Somewhere near the head of this ILt must be included the proposed market at Eagle Hall. CACTI THE exhibition of miniature gardani .'I tlw> Barbados Museum was a useful reminder to the public that each householder, no matter how small the plot of his tenancy or ownership could beautify his surroundings. Especially was this me?iage conveyed by the cacti which Mill m the now permanent rock garden ol the Museum. Ni.w tinCIVIC Circle has adveitise.1 cacti to ihe much larger public winch visits Seawall during the year. New the entrtnea to the watting room and opposite the covered open-fallen which leads to the main waiting room a simple garden of c;icti fivee reeldents aim visitors alike a favourable Impression of %  tropical island. The comment has often been made before that cultivation at ceeti is more prevalent in the United Kingdom than in Barbados. Tt will be a greet benefit to the island if the activities aj the Horticultural Society and i the Civic Circle should result in Biding of ceetl gardens throughout the Island. Barbados would be a much prettier place if cacti and succulents were used as hedges instead of walls, and much si ne now wasted for purposes of ostentation would be saved for more necessary purposes. THE FOTXTAI.X WHEN some months ago the fountain ol Bridgetown was regrettably turned off during the day an announcement was made thai the fountain would still pl.iv on days on which tourist ships visited the island. On eeveial days when tourist ships have Visited the island since the fountain lias not played Everyone hopes that soon the fountain will play every day and that during the Coronation celebrations it will play night and day for at least one mak The Idea that visitors come to Barbados only when tourist ships arrive is in need I tore peonl< arrive In Barbados by air than by s*-.i ..n.i uioplanes Baifaad daily Also regular sucti as the Colombia and the ClulHto qualify foi the tton ol tourist ships, TI %  hn of %  ought to be t' keep the every d 13 even if salt T %  a fountain NEWS FROM ilitll U\ LONDON ||, dion.-. trie ^^ upen.ng of Parliament in Britain. V %  % %  !*• %  # %  .. %  ••*.•. the establishment of improved • Mf|naiSi -eetnr* Aiij;iii-F(:\ 1". -i alatasm and tha ,, , H. Genera Nrg.. Eastbourne, passed a revolution •verting Uial wivf*-.th private means shouln support husbands if Uiey become needy "through age incapacity, disablement or othei misfortune." In London, meantime, the first domeatlc proceeding! court ha* _!__.:._ 1 .. piin.ilraltrai ati-ir. mino r *— inll "* WK .. . __. iw In an 1 liaeHjl uaan" min.rtration and suppress graft I -tii the defeated nd corruption within government Japanese went to the polls last ranks. tricL It u sits** In a conv-rwd schoolroom, and the atmosphere ia informal. The court haa soft October to make their first "free" It PP !" now that Gener, 1 %  ^^ lighting post-war choice of aovarnmenL Neruib will consider realm-rally .___.,__. !" British epokesmen ooini inai in* sua*n musi i llowed to deli-mime for herself i of neglect, cruelty or ng any preference regardpoint that the Sudan must ba ^ leadership allowed to determine for heraelf !" "f n ~ mnA iT hnoail the" In-* RK 2r£--iiTZLrsExsz; csri Kro u n du,, op s 1 ** UnaUon counts wUI br able Xo vr* . who come to view It are certain to attract to Indon a motley fraternity of id wide boys. Their target will be th* pocket(he oplnwh marked. Bui what do Ih,. British people the Sudan'* future status, say? Improved AngloEgyptian relaAlways feeling sympathy for a uons may also create a favourable defeated man. If he takes defeat atmosphere for the establishment .v ll. Ihey term Adlai Stevenson & ^ much di SCUMe d Middle Eaat !" "'**" a big-hearted, generous loser. Command in which Egypt would / *V i ll-.wever. irreapecUvc of B^be represented boo,u of %  ** onl >' B"n* bu l thelr rjubUoSB party policy, they are At P th(l Hlgn Wycombe by*"** %  „ Hany mM cUlm to * glad to see Elsenhower appointed election u,,. ConaenraUvea in* u ,' 0 *" %  . •rarldi biggest job. RecreMe d their majority from 1,753 H5* !" vkltoij from such bad numbering bsenhower's wartime to 2 |00 Thif js J Qn f ^ ifcond experiences. Sir Alexander Maslendershlp. hw name la u house,, ._ „.„.., en( i ,*_. the we ''' ch *irman of the British owmou. with dccOTcj-. honnty lhflr p^,,^ ,„ „,„„„,! „„. h" >PiJorjd iwUrmm to and fair pUy. .,,!u e nc V guidc-locturlr.g. Sovcnlrcn men In London, on the i day lh1 „ ", h „„., ,,,., „„ -i„n,_ nd lourttwi women from many America polled. Ihe opening ol ^ " " '",}!£ T„ u? different walk, of life are for Ihere have nor. faith in Mr. thm momhi „ udv| „, und „ VSZ^JfA: S^ 3£S7cX£^ ,.d.: ship than In Mr Attlec's Sociaiis*. periments. The Marriage* master". Mr. H. L. Bryant Peers. what they w'll iteed to know to tell the visitors from Vancouver, or Buenos Aires. Hong Kong. Ka%  a-chi or Capetown. 'l"hey wnll attended by namboysnt e, 8 public ..--^..-n ^^F^^=^'^ crowds turned out tow* the youn. Queen, who lookad eapeciall> lnt.lt. ud the Dukeiof Edinburgh as. preceded and .followed by mounted Sovereign's Escorts In SS"&%rl£S& S -T """"her Place, of enterulnnien. 1Mb pa^t the troop, of the • Tf,, v -..^H.. ,-,._. wnman in restauranu. as wall aa about her U Brmde lining the B ^SS,\ debating;for and v,r " 'noU'utlon. '""• against-the aequiiul by a French Relainj Copul.rily The state occa.lon over. Parcour „f pi a m-l.iklng. fortvoneThe Queen Mother retain h. %  ..y members turned quick,. car ^, w wl (, w ho had shot her great popularity in BrlUln bely u. the vital business of the huJbnnd because he had spurned eauie rfie keep, up her contact moment One thing emerges from h „ or ^ ovc of ,„ ur .ctlve. w !" the people, the tens of thousand* of words mnrrte md-hcad seven year, her Th' s w eek she visited the Royal Britain has still tn adjust r • Festival HaU' International herself to post-war condition, ne-r* ^ ., commlMion on Kllehen exhibition where flfty'" '.".""".K Pr S!' ^. n Diorcc. which .. continuing Ita "even women repre^n.lng nlne!" "IS b ? !" L U 2. ...w! detailed survey into the reason, teen eounu-le. showed theneookcan lie sex on a stable ra ^ u ,i hreak-ups in Britain, ery .kill by prepnnng their own %  ^ilSX pirloS nno.'r'Kw,,^ thi? th, mo.{ -attonal dUheswIth foi av.ilabl *i niilitjrv cooacrlptlaa ihould be reduced from two years to t'lgliieen nionllo eaBDOl be met without endangering llrlt.iin'v ^•curity. New Era? The announcement that Genti-,butory factor to such separation ln En^'afd need not be dull 1.1 Noguib will pay compensation has ixca lhc housing shortage of Al1 lh e Western European r Ihe Biiton-, killed and inrpcen t years. iiired in Cairo's riots last January may presage a new era in relaAnother view put to the Com< turns between Britain and the mission, which has been sitting Moslem world. in Kdinburgh. is that BMB Ciiinal Negulb's action follows not have to pay even loatty on the recent successful former wives mtint "imce after Mil U) Britum of Turkey's Prime the wives have re-married. This Minister. Mr. Adrian Menderts, was submitted by the National nd his foreiwi Minister. Mr. Fuat Married Man's Association, who cd for him to wear was a working Koprulu. Then, Mr. Mendeies claimed that enforced maintenance coat of blue denim, trimmed with Indlofetad that he wiiuld do everyof a re-maiTled womiin was maroon. And for washing up. thing possible to help smooth out rapitalising a man's past error. there was a blue and yellow \n KIOEgyptian differences — as At the same time, the National striped apron with yellow top. rtt-ll as to achieve a settlement in Council of Women. siltiiiK at — L.E.S. common cause of divorce has its >n Britain. Each little kitchen, roots in mundane separation. /"Hy equipped, was started by a Husband and wife are parted for maUonal group of three. The some length of time; they grow Queen expressed her appreciation out of each others' lives, find new t m n > or the dishea— which were interests, and then one or both n object lesson to British housediscover there la no return. Conwives In demonstrating that food tries were represented, aa well a the U.S., Brazil. India and Pakistan. Indonesia. Malaya and Israel. Japan. Jugoslavia and Austria contented thesisclve. by displaying cold dishes. At the exhibition it was assumed that the men of the house might lao help the housewife. DisplayMajestic—And Xo Expense TIM world'* officially organised "culture" Is to cost the record turn next year of more than L3.S0n.ooo. if Ihe United Nations MtiMUontil, Scientific, and CuK lural Oiganisiiliun has its way. And the bill for Britain will be £400.000 to £500,000. Along the elegant avenue Kleber former German i i-u pat ion headquarters, the luxury Hotel Majexlle. For a rent of £ 18.000 a year it now i | 1 .() I'NKSl'O employee-. ..f 18 nationalities. The Majestic'?* tenants are the est paid, tax-free office workers. ; the world One in four haa a .ITmost of them foreign, imi .Hod duty free with sterling and loUan. They and their hotel are an finishing proof that behind the .giilar series of vague reaoluins. recommendn tiona, studies, •ordinations, considerations, and llscuasions and conthe mystic and remote word UNESCO does "me positive reality. Positive For the priv il eged guests at the %  re certainly positive. nd on iic.-ialon even isallatle. The) have voted themselves %  10 per cent. cost-of-HvI1J and Mlery inrieaseNti Itey are negotiating with the Kreni-h Government for duty-free I ga iet tea. And amund the Majestic are i< iiked at any one time more l IssidM foreign cars, with yellow Diplomatic Corps plats*, than In %  iy other ipot In Ptiria. For senior EeeuUvea have diplomatic rank loo. Now 'he Majestic has produced ' highest provisional budget. It lo IH* discussed this month by MM delegates from 65 count. Ics. This gigantic (a Ik-feast, to %  vhlch Britain is sending 19 deleuales and rUafT at its own cost. v. ill plan the next year's cultural • t banM and their price. It will try lo soc if nine reluc-x -letter Spared N*.l>\l *. SMITH reports from Paris on UNESCO's spending tant member -ountiiea, threequarters of a million pounds behind with their subscription*, cp-i be penuaded to show a iili.e more than academic enthusiasm for world cultural conferences. What -nil oi programme will UNESCO's conference debate for next year? Well, of course, it does not know yet. But let us take a sample—the last month's operations; a fair average twelfth of the blessings for which we British alone will be asked to pay close on half a -i.illi \ pounds in 1MB* Let it be understood that UNESCO paid an average of 20 per cent, truvel expenses for all Ihe comings and goings, and from £3 10s. to £5. 5s. In dollars as daily subsistence allowances for all the "experts" involved. First we had a "Constitutive. ConAjrenoe*' to plan the formation ol the International Social Science Council. Then we had a "Committee of Experts" (fares and allowances on the usual basis) to discuss the rights of the average man to "participate In the cultural life of the community." They meant : Can we freely go to art shows, theatres, cinemas, and read the books and listen to the music we like? After much discussion these experts decided we can. Next in Rangoon there was a "seminar" for South Asian and South I'aciili youth leaders on education. Frankly, I cannot find out whet they did or who they were. But there was certainly no political screening for thesa Chinese. Burmese, Iinmnrsian. Indian, nnd other youth leaders. Then there was u thrilling Committee for the Co-ordination of Congresses of the "International Council for Philosophic and Humanistic Studios." In other words, a planning of meeting* of "learned men" such as the International Commission on Folk Arts and Folk Lore In lovely places like Berne, Istanbul, Palermo, end Florence^—fares paid, of course. After that came the "Provisional Committee on Science Abstracting." The report on what they abstracted beyond ten dollars a day living allowance la not yet available. Then wc had an "International Committee on Monuments and Historical Sites." This august body resolved that "in the event of armed conflict" — / undcraland ihs-v meant tear—-monuments like UNESCO ought to be neutral. •Cl.aet week Next came a delicious piece— a meeting of experts on the political role of women. Most of them were men, and they reached similar conclusions to a woman named Pankhursl well over 40 years ago. The month ended with three especially dreary conferences "Voluntary International Work Camps," "Young Workers' Problems." and "Group Travel Grant.* for Workers." This last is the sort of thing that sent Austrian firemen to Stockholm to see how the Sweder put Arcs out. They found they used water, too. For its administrative work alone in this remarkable month of achievement the Majestic'. Paris bill was nearly £440.000. Britain's share of that .was Just over £ 1,000 a week. I trust you are enjoying your money'-. worth. READY TO BUILD AN ATOM PLANE By NlffBi ROGERS NEW YORK. Tuesday, TO the new President may fall the breathcatching task of launching not only the world's first atom-powered submarine, but the first atom-powered aircraft. On half a million acres of rugged, desolate country in southeastern Idaho, deep behind the Rockie?, scientists and engineers are working in squat concrete buildings on the "UA-boats" power plant The dun-coloured desert is now the national reactor testing station. • • • THE SUBMARINE, named Nautilus, is under construction on the Thames near New London, Connecticut. And the Atomic Energy Commission announces it is ready to start work in Idaho on the plane. It notiftM contractors that preliminary plans will be ready in ten days for a city devoted solely to this aircraft. The desert is going to bloom—whether for mankind's glory or shame will be mankind's decision. • • CARPENTERS are working in Washington | on street stands for people to see the inauguration of the new President next January 20. • • • MEET Mr. Danny Kaye, the film producer of London and Hollywood, and no longer just an actor if you please. Like Charles Chaplin, Kaye is going to do more of the work behind as well as in front of the camera. Unlike Chaplin, however, he will allow a lady named Sylvia Fine to write the words and music of his first film production. "Knock on Wood," mostly to be made in London. In private life she is Mrs. Kaye. • • • CUNARD quickly snuiTed out a waterfront rumour about the Queen liners. The rumour: They would be laid up for major alterations and fitted with stabilising fins. The truth, according to Cunard: They will be out of service for a seven-week overhaul only. But tourist-class quarters may be somewhat enlarged for Coronation year. • • NEW YORK'S youngest, highest-priced newspaper, the Daily Compass, died a quiel death. It was Left-wing and sold for about 8d. a copy. Starting with a circulation of 150,000, it ended with 30,000. • • • IN HOLLYWOOD a picket parades alono. North Edinburgh-street. His sign reads "Esther, please, please let me visit my baby." Philip Chain is picketing his divorced wifeEsther, who refuses to let him see their three-year-old daughter Darlene. • • • IN World War II Mrs. Omer Willette got a telegram announcing Sergeant Willette's death in action. It was a mistake. Two weeks ago came another wire announcing his death in action in Korea. Last night a telephone call from Tokyo—Sergeant Willette on the line to say he is only wounded and will be home soon. Says seven-year-old George Willette: "Daddy Is bullet proof." Our Reader*s Say; Vol Componilor Cangrtilutationx To The Editor. The Advocate— SIB.—No time is better Matted >r the assessment of a task than il il completion It Is because of it I 1 ike thiattune; <>i>'iiinitv lo offer my BlAcers ooO" ,1'otulallon and thanks to Mr. F V Hoyos and Mr. John l'i A fOf thrver mutiM o.ntiibuh the pa.; lew weeks. re MM MM SIR,— May %  ct mere* £ and in1 -*'* dcr of our Government Inform I a.iiclM uSv h ,ve bec\i lhe Seel-*.-.'* of State for the --ol' W?h. -MB? MWSDES Vt* ,IU,t ,n v,ew of ,he Proposed*) Ella* Sili S l y and "*"<"" of Service. The Editor. The Advocate. SB,—I notice an item in your per of the 12th Inat. under the leading of "12 Months for Stealing*' on Page 5 In the item is the kiamc Chesicrflcld Allcvne which 'la also my name and I would like 'you to notify your readers that alls not Chesterfield Alleyne the suggest that lhe Compoailor. CHPSTEHFIELD ALLEYNE. The b' Hi, -luh/i\hnwn I To, The Editor. The Advoctle. they have succeeded v in bringing to the public Ol Barbados a MCS. and the backgr ( their struggles as a people Seldom, if evi -. h-ve we been donal qualificationat u DP.H~ S f£'T I ... w *i much horrined lo Medl"** l ne Government had not m, acled with such prudent economy Centre in Barbados ,ts tn include disestablishment of If the OovernraaM cannot pay ^ Church in its Five Year Plan. IT 'imuld face the facts and Dut *n official statement that the T,L '"nl^nJ WOuWI PP '> f r ,hC P' ; <>( M true picture o ,_,, nftj ,,, lhillK( llf am Hr lhe background r n rp in,,^.*, %  such a thorough expoMt iaUA on the additional 1) PH. -^ve Year Plan is not all the leglsillon rf the fneti of our history, qualification. PI ana however % %  "On the Government intends iui -,m-h pencil alma iiiiulysw of praiseworthy become useless If making has bro-ighl me iome ur great sons as was the case at barriers are created which prevent relief. them from being implemented. The community pan surely benSir. my only hopo is that their Any well qualified Doctor with a" *flt from a disestablished Ch'irch lUnoj IHleft taezsvtaUl .......\ Tropical experience is quite end the revenue obtained from will be put InU; IHXiK capable ol being In charge of a that source, which at present it* FORaf, POr UnUM Ol ourselves. Health Centrr. a deliberate waste, could <1. U no) Uu work -if Ai presenl it %  ppsen that Health to relieve the suffering ma real srUI rethis Island irom their mr i'-!r.idured in our main a pen | nnii { Yours truly rneihing arjout Ihematlvaar MEDICO. j ECONOMIST HE PAYS FOR SMASH HITS By HENRY LOWR1E NEW YORK. FRANK RUSSELL. 52-year-old business man, smiled as he wrote out cheques recently for 12.214 dollars (about £4.700). The money was to pay for 3,468 windows broken by boys all over America during lhe baseball season. Mr. Russell was fulfilling a pledge he made 40 years ago when he was caught by n policeman after breaking a window in a street game. "Some day," he said, "1*11 pay for every window which kids break." FROM his poor start, Russell became a millionaire?—it is incidental that he made his money in the glass business—and distributed cards to children to give to houseowners whose windows they smashed. The cards promised free repairs. But the ball must be returned to the children. Said Russell: "I was warned that I would be encouraging juvenile delinquents and would probably have to pav 100,000 dollars (£35,000). "But I'm tickled pink. Boys don't have tc run away now." • • THE WAY these big Hollywood companies roam all over the world making pictures riles the local trades unions. But ovtr their objections 17 films are planned for foreign shooting next year. They include "King Arthur and the Round Table" to be made in England and "Brigadoon" to be filmed in Scotland and England. • • • M'lTHOUT offering an explanation tht timcnl pointed out in a week-end %  that, while the number of men in prison has dropped by 1,162 the number of women prisoners has risen by 262. Just Received A lu oaaorUMat of CADBUKrS and EOWNTBEE'l Chocolate* la Praaeautlao Boxaa — Ala* — FASCALL S OLOCOaX BAILEY BUOAK FASCALX. a MAEJHUALLOWS JACOBS ASSORTED BlBCuTTS THE WINDSOR PHARMAY CONGOLEUM In ROLLS t Feet and 9 Feel Wide CUT TO TOUR LENGTH MATH Ft i 1 Ft ul I Ft. a TM Ft — ALSO — FIBRE MATS PLAIN AND DECORATED In Slsea and OIL CLOTH WILKINSON UAVNEfc CO., LTD. Successors To C. S. PITCHER & CO. Phone Hit. 4G11 HFCKWITH STORES For all around, 'round-the-clock service! DaCotta's have the pick of the tr-otwear crop—the styles that lead for tmartflCM, service, comfortShoes for school wear ... for %  treet . dress . and business. Here's a wonderful chance for busy men to take care of shoe needs for years to come! Choose styles for dress-up occasions, for sports and casual wear, for nighttime fun. You'll find Just what you want, now! Complete range of Men's shoes from $10 up . Willow Calf, Box Coif, Suedes in black, brown and blue. Casuals In Brown. For the Ladies our vacation-keyed selection features famous brand shoes you'll like to wear and wear and wear! Fashlon.ise styles for every occasion— slings, straps, slipons and ties in our wide variety. Evening Arcola Sandals in black and white r.'id the popular Court Shoes. Gould's Sandals —red, black, white, silver and gold. Da Costa & Co., Ltd. HMM THE GOOD EART, MEAT DEPT. MILK FED CHICKENS MILK FED DUCKS OX TAII£ SWEET BREADS PORK SAUSAGES FHF.SII CARROTS FRESH BEET ROOT FRESH ORANGES FROZEN STRAWBERRIES FROZEN PINEAPPLE FROZEN PEACHES FROZEN PEAS FROZEN BRUSSEL SPROUTS FROZEN SPINACH JUST ARRIVED WALNUTS FILBERTS ALMONDS SALTED NUTS MARSH MALLOWS CARR'S BISCUITS CANNED MEATS & FISH LUNCH TONGUES CORNED BEEF with Cereal CORNED MUTTON l.l'NCHEON BEEF MINCED BEEF ROAST BEEF BEEF LOAF OX TONGUES HERRINGS MAC KERE L A PRESENT FOR EVERYBODY A Bol. COLD BRAID Rt'M A BatMVSCATLE WINE A Carton C. A. CIC.ARFTTFS MAIL EARLY "Lady Rodnev" i \ Nav. It C.elfllo" England Nav 22nd PHONE GODDARDS WE DELIVER



    PAGE 1

    p.ir.r TWO BARBADOS ADM THURSDAY, sovi Mill I 20, 12. CaJuJb galling D R. AND MBS D S CARROU. I nWtor l.ikn Knjwtl I,.,; Ilnrh.,,1... A4R I' A."j COODE D ., tDITH BUNDV in M u BHU,hC, 1 .n r O vcr r S 1V1 American who Sad been via"*;• L""*"'. "ho la in the W.H co, !" i„ • ik. | rnm vd England. J, n .'Jw.. on .iiS? w '," v !5J c Saturday by the **"" %  "'S'JJ*. "'" W"**! .ai H pit .' i %  %  IK andwili JJfSK S *! '"' '"""> %  ' Item aa M.i.ya, he w educated probably spend three roooth. holl{.'AS !" "* !" 'S" iv in day. She ti a rueat of Lady Slow %  £?. %  • %  HiKhKale. Upper Collymonno f u Hal. London Work. 'it three week, in twoyitn ago and liked ~*STARS %  Prince IMiilip Brings l'i.">2 TIHH-II Vo K-lal1 \t ii'iR<)4rnra Leaving by the Trinidad was ; w . ^ .„„ ..,„.... . !" ,„. !" i ,on t?*"*?* "-p r"lv i w much that phe ha* now re*{ J 1 "? }** u !" ion -J*£ WM U^PT^U K*h ... '""' ^A*""/ /-WeMr ForbM-WaUon came out on M KA L TAUSIC1 of % % %  •"• %  ,, " ?'." Caribbean. South and Paul TauUf and Sons. TravH Central Amerlci the Interact of '.,: Ihe war. Dr. Car: t ITtSltI 2rv t id ***" ,s of %  • York CI<| %  ' %  h ' comply and has already cov\^ddleTlTAS?hiriyite Trimdad lt night by B W.I.A. on erd the Caribbean. He expert* r the Women 1 RAF* In "" wav buck non "" He w *<" Io !" turn nome In about ai* months Ortat Br.tain on^an oiSa'tlonal """P"** "^ •* "• nd they Mr. Coode and Mr. Forbea-WatMuadron ShV Ltom^iSS had spem %  *""" n 1,d r "*" M * n ld tha ,h *> 'horou.hly enIndTuTerv fond of mCaic P*"**-" 1 ,nc %  *: Lawrence Hotel, joyed.their first visit tolSBibar'~ Dr. Carroll too. Is fond of music kti n to nailing MODERNISATION of equipbulldtiSp on the Royal eatjtes at Windsor t< MII( nn peraonal direction of oa TMI a-i>**. MOVaMBta - N Prince Philip. The latest place ttaolt with is the Prince Consort's %  typically Vicprovided with convenience, inbaairu. (with Dor.. .ie P into .1 • ind cold laid on). .. Nt.M'i i ri -dvia* .-,! <,i iur(• it side unpnivementB have also i-an. 11 i. MAT aa .T..r.. Trv^, "•" started at the workshop. laaXI.r liu( IM) T...Y • %  < ptlv* Worn on TTJIUH futtS*t a Lirse vlrd %  • ifM.I r a week In Bar, ^ ^^ BfU f *t at the Hotel i -<: %  - • %  -c^orcjin* to uv ha been pr same opportunltv ,?**!Jf !" "J *** a ^2^:* tidylnit up ,rd Tauslg attended the recent both from the business and social WofiaM-TD-ii.v wtiii ii liave been vlsit'tl by Prince " "T^. ." "**' .**P 1 "1 *^; f Philip ..nd have already felt the """ lirni nta 'f mod. Sha v farm In the Home Park and Norfolk farm in ie Orent Part luurlh limit I < and I M %  Peru. ||M %  Had iii.i/ii. M BW W LANCASTER Uiunua> and Tnnidad befo-comi Jersey. U.S.A. who id on October 1 New Jerse arrived In in the Moore MacCormock Liner Argentina an.) spent a week theie i Barbados on her fourth winter visit. She arrived here ou Sunday .nthe French S.S. ColotnU.S.A. who in*to Barbados. LvuriHfi Tit-day .XmMimtnnl Ecimttmir itlrtavr J^|R.*D A. PERCIVAL. AssisUnl M iss JKSS1I-: THOMPSON of Toronto. Canada, leaves this morning by B.W.l.A. for Puerto „ Hico on her way back home alter ,-._.I!K! v ^t.i. v.*—!* %  -. K^IIM.U ."-ariooei enjoyable week's teimdad after spendlnR u* nSS' !" -,,a montn i iiiue HaS^!*** M a uest at lh Mwine roMsjo, Cjmptroller fur Development and Welfare has Just returned from Trinidad by B.W.l.A. after attcr.fiCommitlee Meeting of the Commission at Kent Jl*f R M Jt'L fa .-.pent two month*, then wita lier brother Mi. tdward Schroedcr of the • id Co., m order to get i %  % %  .tVB in Ne holiday in \. m '[ !" On-nmia bann*M*man WR. ARNOLD WILLIAMSON. JI LT M u auorar w %  (I tidvata|r r*\ boMUMtiU, dMla you havi ably lor •urn n pr.iod i.^iitiM rarvlully. worn I M .!.!. r ,'.....nt n %  I .,. "Thiroductiun id r-iuipment conlaraah i" BM "* Uw* mo*! .lucecssful harvests in the | of the estates. StafI ]mpr*v.cd Haniman and Co.. Ltd., left for tuest at the Marine Trinidad on Monday by B.W.l.A • • on ti fhort visit. II if A Uarvhiy* Iftink for THv % inter R F.TURNING to Grenada yesT^tR R. MYER, a reUred comterday afternoon by B.W.l.A. iVl pany director of England and was Mr. F. E. Randall of Barclays his wife, the Hon'ble Mrs, liver Qeoi ne's who spent wnu arrived by the Golflto on %  irdny are guests at Enmotat the limol Royal. Botai They have come to speivj Oriainally from England, Mr. their usual winter holidays. Randall has been working in Or" Miss Thompson is employed with the Manufacturers Life Insurance Company in Toronto. fM Short Vimil Messrs J. N. ho i Way vMl He w „ acc.npannd W m. .ppo.r.t~. n (Jirai Park" ass, ^ffce previously held by the Philip madr rdfrpretv PRINCE FELIX MARRIES K-ii of Hapsburg. 37year-old fourth son of she last Kniperor was mamea in church here today to Princess Anna EusJ %  i.t-erg. 27year-old cousin of King Baudouin The giitteung Roman Catholic church ceremony was ittcuded by 750 aristocratic guests. uple will leave for Lontoday and fly to New Lgfet. After a honeymoon in :he Caribbean they will make in Mexico, where the s factcry. making prefabricated hOUBss, After the ceremony. UH bHdjpI their guests left for Villa %  Itivirrn home cf Prince Charles of Arenberx. uncle of the t.ir mm Christmas Cards AT rm: Hdoocate Stationery. Prince Felix was the only Hapsburg On Ao-lr—a ...it uli.n HttllT invaded i' After an ad\*^ilurous flight he reached .10 IcnsVvV'tuur* of1 '• || Stiites in August 1938. Managing Director of Williamson and Co JafaL, Automobile; Pnopriaton of St. George's, Gren-I ada, returned home carlltT In the j week by B.W.l.A. after a two-week ver three years. He expacts to go home on long leave i.md he said and added that he h;id an enjoyable stay. It„,k From t.S.l. M RS. J. BLONDIN, wife of the day. Manager of Sam Lord's Cestli Cirri Aviation'Chivf W ING-COMMANDER L. A. Egglesneld, Director Generul Of civil Avtiilion in the Caribbean Area was a passenger for Jamaica via Trinidad by, B.W.l.A. on Monret uined from a holiday visit i erta Rico by 11 W I A on Monday. SjH-nt TWO Kvrk* M H AND MRS. S. H FRIEND World'Herald. of Cui.tr: sLucia, have the week-end just .. %  i HW.I.A. after spending two weeks' holiday i cesd View HofjL Mi Friend ii < in ployed as Cost Surve>o T .with Messrs Hunnen Martin Doorly of Messrs. Martii Holland and Cubltls, contractors Doorly and Co., Ltd., Bridgetown, engaged in the reeonstruction of was last /f tor F.nglaml M I S S DAISY STUART of Beckles Road, left for England last Sunday on the S.S. Odmnbie. Miss Stuart who has gone to furiudies In music, will reside with her uncle, former R.A.F s^i. Mr. Evaus Alleyne. and his wife oiTostra M u KOVSUMB n •••urn You may land U %  lnuili Dun't' UHIH % %  ih.|ix>d abo-i> IOU and lor aurrrx from worlhy rfl.r'. s.i.l 'II.' i: U Li. %  'II i; B loa|iltarla>> Amblllon lan'l ^uilc i..iush Io car'y Ihlnga tdn.iinh (0 nertaar k.-.-lrd... Hort Avoid eonairt with ii. u.n* into the workings of ; II and workshop and imslaff with his knowlJJ '— edge of fanning. Later visits by the Prlno l>een 'snap" ones. Son has driven himself in a car 01 .1 MTOM the fields on hii bay mare. — L.E.S. IIHIXMI -n !• JANTABf tl Ifaarli-i" Itovei ground th iun bo srav|.il for any brnrflt* LISTENING HOURS i M %  • iinm tat *"p"H iir*" aaisaMa •*r.pidit..- >nd handims TI Io -*< (Mwi ,|.|.'..„ii.. i ".n '• aaaai i vaolv* to I MIP N.-i. 4 io p m The !>ily V "> No Nam*. 4 4B p m • >rd. • p m BBC. Concwt %  —; li p.m. i-.lM .HI!" %  > BY THE WAY-* V BKAC/ICOVHKH dge of Only on experienced garlic1 to detect the secoini %  ind from the unused hand Arc (here musty grocers who supon. yood appraror public*arhfHil education, tcould exehanpe sei i. far i i-'md onrlnBwtines* i % %  iilnv. anxious lo'iiu-ei adrcituroui exgh capiral. u-ifh view io pa 'i for sale o] fecorid-'iaiiil uarlic. > picas* myself, the second it looks like Wellinglime. Io please hei. Wimet one else Io C ( iMPLA I NTS that u "smell like •Nonsense You mean Wellingmediately alter the marriage and d-hand garlic" was waftIon. Nelson was never a soldier, then disappeared for good. M. iked from an oil-rellner> indicate and you've drawn him in nallltar)f i -' nils once said: "I only kissed that some peopta bava very sensiuniform. And that nose is WellingMmc.de twice. The llrst time Wa am anfl T>mlMind knuwl^'."V. %  — — — U edge of the garlic trade I i ton," said the artist, after a long again: there S iuse. "It's meant to. You see. please" clson once went to a fancy-dress ball as Wellington, and this shows i him as he looked then." "Where was this ball?" asked the man. "Paris," said the artist, "on the .>/ >api of Turkey 'light before Waterloo. Il's hls%  • Ijiari.u-omJ fortor t" ".'• %  ^Ubiy lMd ";;..,:; v !" : ts—i. pMbllC IBto ittimg chamet*r Can bn'r*III>on. and enjoy B. |,,r Y*""*' fc*". KrPKi> Mountain l-r.dl. lorn • Scai. ioaUh Royc< d*lor p m WaUh Hlse*llany. • 1 P m .1 P m Th. Naw, T if ,. %  M %  Nr. ttxm i T 1ft i n nntain t.i-i. PKM. ana m Bom* Enchants, ^-enim n Radio N'-'Cl %  P n .ky. B 4S p.m. Spec"! lrapalr Thrr WBS a Star Dancod. Bj Tt-haaK.1 MuiK. IB p.m. TI 0 10 p m Flom lh. Editorial I.iduttry. 10 : _GLOBE Laat IHOWI TODAY Ml .M inn vi v. II in vi. nucD ASTAIKE JANE SA!AH CHUllCHII.L iTrehnirolour) KEEN AN WYNN I Mi he served with the Austrian battalion of the United Sl.i'cArmy Since then he haa lived mostly in Mexico and Latin %  %  i Anna Eugenie was born ,it F.lllngen Castle in Bavaria id studied at the Veterinary faculty ot Munich University. Tht pie met about two years ago in aria—U.P. Roles Watches LOUIS b BAT LET HoJten Lane \BLAZ: WITH n'RY AND TERROR! vg is in 114!S sa i onir wi i CI^RK GABLE. MYHNA LOY, WILLIAM POWELL ADVOCATE BRIDGE fiinwirhiTi' plctun W HY. asked 1 "Ii ii Nelson." said the pavement frivt-/iniiiny C HARLIE SUET points out that a potential reapportionment of unscheduled priorities does not is. %  .. %  -.inl> nu .in that the IxiUlc necking of goods in short supply be short-circuited by unscramHc adds: "A re%  non-recessional followed by inI 1)11 ng measures. disinflationary o passcr-bv trend is usually creased upput." In Bn$tlng A WIFE hag hu.hand k tplained that her kissed her twtof im| Rupert and the Butterflies—II •y M. Harriiot-Cray Dealrr : Ninth North South cimr i Q 10 7 5 J 1 S s > J 10 975 .' s M : O K W 6 J v a io s o A J la 7 a lender gain of 130 on ilu* 1M0 world chum piocuuitp :iand would be worm ilirec valuah> mau-li points under the prosam meiiioo ol .*. tiring North's or.e Tlesri was doubled by the Ameriesn %  sat player tui the Brii^h pair had Hie situation well In hand after Souib's redouble West hid One Spade No rtli pBMod and aVl'l blurr bid or One No-Trump wfL* doub]ed bv Sou'Ji West then hid Culm but North •cored 830 in a final ronirart or Four Hearui The 'redouble had en ui.invda: ng erreci and the Americans did not con-i.der a aaenfier in rm OWM In view ot his moderate ttpede support, our ROM p.aver preferred to oreri-al with To Diamorvd* n Room 3 and was doubled by south tor %  penalty of 500. t-mJul ft—i : **f" ] CURTAIN NET (BORDERS) 51* Io Wt K I I Cl'RTAIN MB (BORDERS) Colour*—Rose. Green. Blue, Gold. Cl'RTAIN NET-Row. Green. Blue. Gold $1.05 to SLM — 3". 38", and 40" wide TABLE CLOTHS—54" wide -0t. W.. f>8 COI.Ol'RF.D TOWELS SIM & tftM SI! 211 & S2.3C WHITE TOWELS SHEETS 70 x 100 *5. 80 x 100 $6.50 !I0 x 100 $7.72 PILLOW CASES 18 x 30 Ut 111'TTER MCSLIN 4 Oprnln, HIMIIKKIIU (In Trilinkoluurl 'HE IMMORTAL MuSkintki m THE MOST SPECTACULAR ADVENTURE OF AUI if lotns a a PAIKICIA HAYWARD MEDINA JAM lit IM1ISS SHOP Next to Singer* CLOSING SATURDAY-November 22nd. FINAL WEEK — CI.KARANCE BALI Further Reductions ALL OHESSES .'. 5.VM an,i S.9R ALL NYLON UNDERWEAR |Tw|Uj reduced ALL Bit AS Sl.00 and SI.98 PANTlE-aiRDLKS SI.o 411 i |IM PURE UNEN IUUDGE. TEA SETS S7.00 per Set SHORTS--White and Coloured -nov, B.M CHILDREN'S DRESSES m $1 98 MAl'ElilALS by the Yard . Ste. per Yd. ROD CAMERON i JANE NIGH ICINICOLOR PLAZA HAHHARF.ES ilh.il 5170) OPENING Mil. 4.45 & 8.30 p.m i i COBttnUlnl Daily MIIS I.LOKHH S' BHE'fl ri'ROARiors: I. Ml,IIS GALORE WITH— • • .. % %  PLAZA 1AMES WAROfN Mint(Dial 2310) DTOWN OPENING FBI. 2.30. 4.45 & 9 30 p.m and Continuing Dailv 445 & 8.30 p.m. i i I T. R. EVANS (WHITFIELDS) YOUR SHOE STORE I BlIOCooked 1|iaglmiil in-in-ni-iii hrn-'s raliiip. /ippv, Kfftty lmati>**atHTd -ir.nnlthat havr flavour galore just a llu*y romo from tintin. How wonderful Heinz Cookcxl Spaghetti taBtt'8 alone, anil liow well it mingle., with left-over ti -" 1too. A delightful meal ready in a minute, for Heinz has cooked the Spaghetti for you, you nimply heat and eal — and enjoy. Buy several imtoday. P I A A IIA KK Jana David %  AVMAM : NIVEN & Kir I.AK(. Miini|i'iiv IWX.AIIT Edward G. HobinMn fcdayl % %  •rial I a> ii M.n %  \ '! % %  I i and BKNKOAORR al RONOBA NorkT Law fttd. rm i ii A %  "i p m ( anliiu lai li.it, il". BM l.-i LIT'! Laugh HII' "J fOB HI I.ITIM.-I < %  Ii Natural c-mn iinni.i iou\ niMivii tat tXOt'DR WITH al'NIIHtNK iCaflar Ai.M V PAVTON radar* -arclal I *D 11:111 ii...! r:li rtia BOXI-TX Bo %  & nOHIt.1 ON I' ** %  I IM \MI -nrrrvLiJi in MI %  • •roar OKAO. IH> ClnRARRAREES "I'm Boora* %  rry Butter Crabb, liiK Action Film BLUE LAMP %  at, -P....I in P „ GUNSI.INGERS OKLAHOMA BLUES ROODAL THEATRES I Ml'li To-day .H a i Al.1 II AHA AMI mi roan Mill \ I • Tfchnlcolon HAUILtlM. Oaaalnc Tamarta,, *. a J0 OeaMawtef !> %  "< OLYMPIC la-da? lOnlTI tjm a ua Republic Double BELLE OF OLD MEXICO and BLACKMAIL wun William Martha)! Opiiinj! Mk 111 R K O Double ROXV To-day 4.90 *> %  >" DBtveavpl Th Andre* Slum i ami % I'M TOI 11 or viNl's a UBACl IJl* Ii M ..II 11 |: itin M. Ta-Jay - a %  ' L'nlve^aal Double Starrlnc Rnd Cameron Yvonne Dt. I.t-.rra. lObl] I I M UP Double Tlie Andrew BMler* Phone: % % %  SLAUGHTER TRAIL (Ctnccotor) and JUNGLE OF CHANG o. i l Halarda* ifUBM i Wl i Mil -'-III 1 — and | DIP 'I M.li •} r*-rr.i IQappn Qirnif.ic Friday 1 I.AMBON ANII in I II M< ipenni Saturday IK • %  ' ichard Oreen ,-onne DeCarlo L*IBT HAWK &f&f • &f&f&f&f&f&f •••••• &f • &f &f&f • &f < IMMMMO II'% A FREE WOHKOUI OS MIDNIGHT SATURDAY 22nd GLOB E A FilmMM IM>N IVIIIIIIIIMK TALENT STARS ON PARADE laway Allryne — 10 Year Old Trumptltr PrM Irrd Cold Canada Dry Free 4 Carlnns llelnekrn Beer Ban Vour Head Examined 11 You Could Resin Thi> iaa aaaaaaaaa



    PAGE 1

    PACK TWO BMtUAIMIS AllVl %  ( Ml TlHllM'U Mix I Mill R N, IKZ. £W/> galling : % % % % %  I 1 M *|!|* * mug by B.W.I A for T •.i,i M Buii ,% % %  Ihrc. i two year ago MI ti that he BH i turned fur a longer period. Iimvl igrnt I -UKfnjoyil \i*it P A. J GOODE, Director British Celanese Overseas Ltd., London, who 11 In the Writ Indict on a goodwill visit to the %  sjtii rtej __T Trinidad via Grenada after a wick in Barbados as a guest at the Hotel Royal. Leaving by the same opportunity for Trinidad was Mr J. D. fforbesWalrnn, Oversea* Hepresentat ve I.ul Ixtndon. who was ',"< %  ?' M R KAIU '^ K: *-" %  <"rS'K'c'ESKiS'sS.Sh'.S ',„,,.• ninVi ilia ih 1T1 P""'Tausi. and Son.. TravH Onlral America, In the lnlere ol i.lctieried £*"<> •* ""•** C.^. toll (o. hi , and ha, already cov..>.! h> 11 W.TA.wi ered the Caribbean. He expect. %  ih. !" , H r"in hl % %  '""'" l m " %  > wa •*> return home In about ai month. oJSrt Brilahi on an ODmUontl ?' m l' u d " h ' " %  "" ""> Mr. Coodc and Mr. Forbea-WatruTriean. h 5a. l.n m wile, h;,a 'I"" • '""" holiday here u son tald Uiat thej thoroughly enand u. very (ond of muilc > %  "' ,h r ""' ' %  "> Barbados loo. i, fond ol mu.lc "' %  £"""< ••"'"< I 'he recant both 'rom the uiolneu and social n .., to sallin. Woid Travel ..,nr.,. m MianU poln. of view .. _.. .-. .. I i and Mine then visited tlata/fin/ rV-mmmu'•""" %  ' %  Arfenttne, llraiil. X^L M .ay and Trinidad before comli/n.*r i B %  j %  li MrbedM. 7A. STARS %  ; l*OSCOIX THI BMAI Non MM %  MAPCH ;i w %  %  I .:; I DIH.'I ill-P i .ex.M.it. r.< WorM oa tigthlch Priaoe Philip Brings 1952 TOIHII To EHU*.adot as a guest at the Marine Miss Thompson >*, employed with the ManufarUiitis l.il, Insurance %  paju in Toronto. tin Shnrt I/-./ M R COUH THOMAS. Branch Manager of Messrs J. N. H-iiriniJN and Co.. Ltd. left for Tiinnl.nl on Monday by B.W.I A visit for Thr Winter M R. R. MYER, a retired company director of England and Ml adit, I In llon'ble Mrs. lb*. s wV) speiu wno arrived by the Guifilu on daysj holiday as a guen Saturday are guests at Enmore I > i..bei %  -.iick linM %  vifk Then i* DOW in Barbados on her fourth MM arrived here oo Sunday in the French S.5. Colomn Trinidad after spendiiiR U Blue HaJ ..ncaster said that she years and this summer, she spent her brother h i ol MM Od CO in oi.kr to Btt li the heat wave In New is a guest at the Marine BOML %  H fth Uunlay* Bank R ETURNING to Grenada yesafliTiioon by B.W.I.A. E. E. Randall of Barclay J M R.*D A. PERCIVAL. Assistant Economic Adviser to the iptrollcr for Developn.ent and Welfare has Just returnad from Trinidad by B.W.I.A. after attendI .ng a Committee Meeting of the Canbbeftn Commission at Kent loam '.' •inulii ffuninHMHmun M R. ARNOLD WILLIAMSON. Managing Director of Williamson and Co., Ltd., Automobile Proprietors of St. George' ada, returned home earlier m ||sa BW.I.A. after a two-week imat holiday visit. He was accompanied .^aT^pei; by Mrs. Williamson and they were PUtl of Hapslmrg. 37sssar-old fourth son of the last '• a church here today to Prim Anna Eugenie O, Aienberg, 2~COUSBl of King Baudouin guttering Ro i Caiiiollc church ceremony was %  Maoded bj MO %  I itoei itij gsjaaei tor U.TI. nn nave aite* farm in the Home Park and Norfolk farm in fin II -.F n U Ml ,( %  --.i-In. P rl m. "m^Dves* ton>ctin's. *d" — sotroducUon of combine h-ndiii.* Kfrtn.i eeawseeVE lactrul ol home. tributid larnch to MM of ItJlflf M la AI-OI'ST n lUri-tmr 10,, successful harvests in .!(ivnnt< ^1,-. nf the estates. %  : teto tor isr.luih. MI. i. I M. •ini.SUIUillrrii S' -ConMOVr all %  njlrl betonir.nH.ng R^DgeT of %  Staff ImpresM-il afb ; Wind-.. -I I i I Mill 1 ( i at the Hotel RoyaL A formei member of the legislative and Executive Councils of Grenada. Mr. Williamson attendad tin BT.C. Autumn Meeting while in Barbados. Unit Vinil %  ae •>!' pointed Great Park Ay held by the la* King •PHnc* Philip made a I* l|, went into the Workings of ??£?%!<** <•**> '" rm ana wonwhop and im.reised the staff with his knowl... end yeu i an na* |ix4 t dge of forming. Owasssera east Met. Later visits by the Prince have I .tp" ones. Son t an himself In a car or ecroaa the Held< on his bay mare. —L.E.S. *-i.ite. sa iDfitMiim Mnt qu.tc '> ihinga throust lo knowledaa. •Ilorl Avoid eenaicl wnh Motel RoyaV Originally from England, Mr. Randall has been working ui Grenada for ove. three years Hi• \M on long leave .nis was his first visit :nd he said and added that he had an enjoyable stay. Itnrk from I ..S..1. M ,: ,, Hotel Thcv have: come to spend their usual winter holidays. (Virnf Ariutitm C.hivf W IN(;-COMMANI)ER L. A. Egglcstleld. Director Genernl of Civil Aviation In the Caribbean Aiea was a passenger for Jamaica via Trinidad M li W I \ on MonM ISS ROMANA Herrcn. Rogcn mi laird's Castle returned from a holiday visit to UM U S A. Via Puerto Rico by ROGERS of „ t Travel SerLynbrook. Lo..g Island. U.S.A. was an arrival by B.W.I.A. from I'.S.A. via Puerto Rico on 17th lost. and is a guest at the Marine Hotel. This Is the first visit here for Miss Rogers and the object of her visit Is to see for herself what we can offer Tourists, and is \cry in.u'lul that her visit lo our inland, will be of considerable help to her company in attracting Tourists to visit our Island PH1HMI MII'M ** lOaat*. .i (ipii'ind Ihe haw br ready for thoae uivtrxp'< /uvanleSM may IM .plly bul He arsl"liil for any I M'/f for I ti-hintl M ISS DAISY STUART Heckles Road, left for England last Sunday on the S.S. CollitllhliMiss Stuart who has gone to furSiroml In ,70 ,..i,P AVING n ( s icrond V | f | t to his native Barbados in SO years is v\* -. T..... U .,.,£. B r Henry Doorly of Omaha, NeM B AND MRS. S. H. FRIEND World Herald. He arrived over Lucia, have the week-end by B.W.I.A. from me bi UWIA l*i.tii.i. tl | accompanied l.v I. .ii. Hi i "ill be hue for three weeks View Hote] U %  guest .it ilu Marine Hotel. Mi l loyed as Cost the. of the late Surveyor with Messrs Hannen Martin Doorly of Messrs. Martin ther her studies In music, will m,l CublttS, contracun Dooril .mo CoLatL, Bridgetown. si