Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text





ESTABLISHED 1895



B.T.C. AUTUMN R

Asks for More’
Men In Korea

Holder Of

}
|
CHICAGO, Nov. 15. |

Chicago Sun Times said on Sat-
urday that General Mark Clark
has asked for three or four more
United States divisions to prepare |
a new major offensive in Korea.

In the despatch signed by
Frederick Kyh, the newspapei
said Clark, Commander-in-Chief
in the Far East, requested addi-
tional forces from the Defence De«
partment, It said “according to
reliable sources he made it clear |
that his aim is to preparé a new

yesterday afternoon.

Results At



major offensive against . the

Chinese and North Korean Com-

munists, A Gi i
As a prelude to his vrovosal | ance

Clark told recent American visitors

in Tokyo that he believes the! 22ND RACE

stalemate in Korea is severely | 1. twinkle (Cressley)
damaging United States prestige. | 2 En Prix (Sinebi.
Clark, it is understood. intends <9 ene ae Race :
put the same request to President | 1. Firelady (Quested)
‘elect Eisenhower; when he later | 2. Pepper Wine (Crosstey)

visits Korea | & Tibor'an Lady (Singh)

, 3 20M RACE

Eisenhower would then be faced | 1. Colombus (O'Neil)
with an extremely awkward de- | 2. First Admiral (Yvonet)

Apollo (Fletcher)
2TH RACE
Apple Sam (Thirkell)
Super Jet (Â¥vonet)

Llusion (Holder)
26TH RACE
Fluffy MufMies

cision. On the one hand he is ac- | "
customed to fighting and winning | 2
war the tough way. Clark’s plans | 2
would rormally appeal to that im- | 3%
vulse. On the other hand Fisen-

. : 1. (Holden)
hower’s speeches in the recent 2. Topsy (Newman)
election campaign stressed the | 8. Magic Gaye (Belle)
need to reduce the number of | TH RACE
American troovs in Korea. That! L. Colombus (O'Neil)

e : 2. Cardinal (C ley)

is why the President elect em- 3. Cross Bow (vider)

nhasize? his project to train more

“STH RACE
South Koreans who would re- 3. Abu AC (Â¥vonst)
piace Allied soldiers |p RRS alas
' The s‘orv said Clark's reouesi , ? : :

met some support “in high places
at Pentecon includire that of the
Neputy Defence Secretary William
FPocter ond momhbers of the ioint
Chiefs of Staff.” It said. the latter
grain are svopased to discuss the |
reanest within the next week, but
WA daniging te ev santsa otil after |
Risenho'ver’s visit.—T_P.



| West Indians
Will Get Work
In Florida

A negotiating committee of the
Regional Labour Board has had
}talks in Kingston, Jamaica this
| week with representatives of the
| British West Indies Employers
|Committee in the United States
K.C.M.G.,| with a view to arranging terms
under which British West Indies
workers will be employed in cit-
rus and other crops in Florida
during the next few months.

Mutually — satisfactory arrange-



Sir George Seel
To Be Chairmen
W.L Confererce

S:r George Seel,
Comptroiler tor Development and
Weltare and British Co-Chair-
man of the Caribbean Commis-
sion, will leave Barbados on
November 22 for Montego pay,
Jamaica, where he is to act as ; y 5
Chairman of. the Fifth Session oO one erie been agreed .
the West Indian Conference and|* result large numbers of work~
attend the Fifteenth Meeting of /®S now employed in other States
the Caribbean Commission, under |in the United States of America
whose auspices hnatiaateduiet
sessions are held. frene ‘ 2 $

"ay sry | their present contracts will have
ton aa eee a ‘ opportunities of work during the

baer 3 mene? i sip winter season,

a, eeark tne peeve = ai It is probable that the numbers
ames ae “the Commission— ®Vailable in the United States will
pole ae Netherlands, the | ¢ imsufficiunt to meet the full re-
ieee: itinadinnn ana the United Guirements of the Florida grow-
ee wet ers and this may well give oppor-
ima bcak wee .'tunity for the recruitment of
Pn Mea eee. 6 2ddiuonal workers from Britist
1944 under the chairmanship of} Caribbean territories.



the laie Str Frank Stockdale; |
and it is again the turn of a
British territory and a British

Students In

chairmen.

The following oo of ne 4 ‘

Levelooment and Welfare staff, {i R :

@ On Page '16 _Laro kKiot

t | CAIRO, Nov. 15.
7 yen Rioting broke out among severa.
Annour:ce thousand Cairo University student
congregating for Martyr’s Day
On H-Bomb celebration today and 12 youth:

ny’ | were reported injured,

Kxpected | The fight started when a Moslem
| Brotherhood member Hassan Doh
WASHINGTON, Nov. 15, | delivered a speech declaring that
Inio.med sources said official (he Egyptians who fought in Pal-
confirmaticn of history’s. first) estine against the Jews and in the
hycrogen bomb explosion is ex-'!Canal Zone against the British

pected shortly perhaps byjnow should deciare an open war
President Truman early next|on “Red Communism”. Two hun-
week, if the Atomic Energy Com-! dred Communist youths yelled in
mission does not do it first. | reply “no re:ctionarizs! no Fas-

The source suggested that Mr. | cist! we demand the release of the
Truman may make Tuesday's) rest of political privoners’” (most-
meeting with President-elect Eis- |!

and as|

ce | and who would ordinarily be re-|
the )Cantepsote the conclusion of)

Seen anEeeniemed

Gen. Clark Columbus Wins Sweep:

Ticket No.

SS 2161 Gets $33,286

MISS ROSEMARY BOON’S brown cuit Lo.wiious oot
of Colrose-Busy Woman, secured sixteen points and raced
unbeaten to win the Big Sweep as the Barbados Turf Club's
four-day Autumn Meeting ended at the Garrison Savannah

The three-year-old colt brings to the lucky holder of
Ticket No, SS 2161 the sum of

$33,286.00.
")..1be .wweather
; and although there were no
|eora@: broken yesterday,
| Very keen racing was witnessed
by the crowd — the largest that
| attended the meeting.
The biggest upset

} was in the

was -again
re-

for the day
Worthing Handicap
; over nine furlongs which was
}won by Mr. S,. A. Blanchette’s
| four-year-old
| The Pari-mutuel paid $6.90
| win and the Forecast paid $184.80
}on the’ Firelady-Pepper Wine
combination,

gooa prizes having
$1,000 mark on one occasion and
the $900.00 mark on three occa-

fine

some



bay filly Firelady, |
to,

The Field-Sweep also paid some |
re-ched the |

sions. The $1,000 mark was reach- ,

ed in the last race of the
the Final Handicap,
Six Wins *

| Most successiu] Ow®er for the
|meeting was Mr. F. E. C. Bethell
| with six wins. He incidentelly
{headed the lict of trainers with
|seven wins to his credit. Hon'ble

Meet.

V. C. Gale ‘and Mr, J. T, Fletcher |

}trained four winners each while;

[the most successful Jockey was |

|Â¥Yvonet with six wins. Frank
|O’Neil came next with five,

| The Police Band under Capt.
'C. E. Raison was again in attend-
ance and rendered some lively
airs.

TWINTY-SECOND RACE
Gravesend Handicap

Eight horses out of an original
field of 15 faced the ‘starter in
| this event—the first of the day—
| over the 5% furlong distance,
| Of the eight going
|} Diamond piloted by Newman
| carried the top weight of 133 Ibs.
| while Poplin, Joan Star and
Wonderful each carried 2, 3 and
| 5% overweight respectively.
| Dynamite (Blades up) was left
flatfooted when the gates fiéw,
and Holder pushed Blue Grass to
the fore, Twinkle; Poplin and
Blue Diamond followed in that
order up to the four when Blue
Diamond took over: from Poplin.
Going past the three, Poplin
now trailed in the rear, having
been taken down by Dynanite
who had reduced the lead held
by the rest of the field.

There were some quick ex-
changes of positions at the two,

|
|
}



and coming into the home
tech, Twinkle challenged Blue
rass and took over mid way up
stretch to finish first and
‘register her second win of the
meeting.
Fn Prix who had come from

the fifth position rushed through
with a driving finish to snatch
@ On Page 4



Vietminhs
Renew Attacks

HANOI, Indo-China, Nov. 15.

Communist-led rebels opened a
“third front” in the rapidly ex-
panding Indo-China war with
hree bloody but unsuccessful
attacks against Hungyen, 28, miles
southeast of Hanoi,

The French and native garrison

in the lower Red River town man- |

aged to beat back screaming Viet-
minh attackers with artillery and
mortar before they reached the
barbed wire entanglements on the

|
{

|
|

Blue,

'

|
|
}

}

|

|

|

MISS ROSEMARY BOON leading in Colombus (Jockey Frank

|

onde

O'Neil up) after winning the Rockley Handicap over nine fur- |
tongs. Colombus raced unbeaten at the B.T.C. Autumn Me.t to

win the big sweep.

US. Concerned Over Racial
Confliets In

}

South Africa

UNITED NATIONS, Nov, 15.

THE UNITED STATES declared

“seriously concerned” o
Africa and favoured a ful

Charles A.
mittee said the:

yee that it was
acial conflicts in South

the
cussion on the issue,

Sprague. sp" ning!atea special Political. Cqm-
United States would oppose a move by the
Union of South Africa to declare that the

United Nations

“are not competent’ even to consider” charges that persons
of Indian origin are being discriminated,
reine atom Stade

James Street
Flarvest
Festival

The Harvest Festival Ser-
vices of the, James Street
Methodist Church are to be
held today, Sunday, Nov. 16th.
The morning service which
will be broadcast will com-
mence at 11 a.m. and the
preacher will be the Rev. K. E.
Towers, BA. B.D. In the
afternoon at 3 p.m. there will
be a Harvest Demonstration,
“The Things Essential” and
also a presentation ceremony
of Flower Baskets. The eve-
ning service at 7 p.m. will be
conducted by the Rev. Towers.

On Monday ovening at 7.30
p.m, there will be a repetition
of the song service “The
Things Essential” together
with other items.

You are cordially invited to
attend all these services.



KETAINS FLYWEIGHT

He said ‘we do not feel there
‘an be any lasting solution for

{racial problems short of full pars
Ucipation of all races in the life
of a nation. Yesterday we heard
an eloguent delegate of Pakistan
read from our Declaration of In-
;dependence, That was and is a
|charter of our liberty.”

Sprague said the United States
|has “grave doubts’
|move by India and Pakistan to set
jup a “Goed Offices’ Commission
to study the South African race
| problem The establishment of

uch a Commission would not be
a “practical. means of using our
influence,”

The United States strongly fa-
| ieee the “proposal offered by
jl!celand, Denmark, Sweden and
Norway which would call upon
all, member States to bring their
policies into conformity with their
obligation under the charter to
promote the observance of human
rights and fundamental freedoms.”

—U.P.
!

_ English Girl
Shot In Kenya

NAIROBI, Kenya, Nov. 15.
| Aushorities said an English





| From All Qua ae | M J D s we Vy.

|

and a

i
\

‘Red

| Governor

| Paulo
concerning the |

| promises to
| said Brazil

| elect

U.S





300 Dollar
Hollywood |
Doll Fancied |

{

\

Hollywood: At the first preview |

of Christmas toys a new Holly-'

wood-typs doll took everyone's

fancy, li was wearing sun glasses

mink coat, The doll—16
dollars and 95 cents; the coat

298 dollars plus 20 per cent Gov-

! forth receive State aid,

Sydney : Ninety-nine thousand
full grown cattle and 62,000
calves’ have died in the great
Northern Territory drought, ac-
cording to official estimates. They
were worth more than £1,700.000

Jerusalem: Any family with ten
children which settles in Isreel’:
Sea outpost of Eilat wil)
be given £500 by the Israeli Gov-
ernment,

New York: A carpet manufac-
Surer has bought a theatre net-
work TV programme cov: ring 15
cities 3,000 miles apert. Into 15
theatres will go deal®rs, salesmen
and shareholders to listen to a

| sales talk by the company's head

Joseph L, Bactwick, and see him
as he speaks.
R-ngoon; The Burmese
ernment has decided to go
@ On Page 16

Fog Blankets |
|

Gov-
into





London

LONDON, Nov. 15.
A. thick white fog blanketed
London early today reducing visi-
bility to a tew yards and forcing |

traffic to a crawl. In some arcas
of _the city, fog was so_ thick!
policemen guided automobiles

through intersections with flasn-}
lights, as parties-goers in evening
dress tried to find their way home. '
Early morning bus services were
jelayed and commuter trains ran
late. The fog was expected to
last until early in the afternoon, |

The Air Ministry said the fog |
was caused by a change in tem-
perature, lack of wind and a one

hundred per cent increase in

humidity.

London Airport. was. closed

throughout the night. |
—U.P,



!

Democrats
Broke Promise

MIAMI, Florida, Nov. 15,

Senct Adhemar De Barros
Brazilian industrialist and former
of the state of Sao
accused the Truman Ad-
ministration of failing to keep |
South America, but
will take new hope
the advent of President-|
Eisenhower De Barros, |

three week

study of |
election procedures (and
vamp ugn

methods, Icft by air |
|last night for Brazil
|. He said the Truman adminis-!

with

nding

[tn fulfilling “promises to South |
America. He said “the Latin- |
American countries were prom-|
ised $600,000,000 under Point
|Four Programmes and half of!
}that was to go to Brazil but the |
Truman administration did not!
even get started in keeping that |
promis Yet the U.S. spent|

$42,000,000,000 in Europe.”
—U-P.



P.O.8. Council



“Tnment tax.
Rongoonf Triplets, quads and
quins born in Burma will hence-

a

PRICE : SIX

Cabin

Al

President-elect Eisenhc

role in th» fortheeming

Administration after a lengt
E. Dewey of New York.

A True Ard
Exact History

‘Today on page pine the
Advocate begins serialisa-
tion of the first History ever
written of this islang —
Rchard Ligon’s “True and
Exact History of ine isiand
of Barbados.” |



}

The serialisation of a his-
tory published as long ago
as 1657 is a rather unusual
step for a newspaper to
take, but we believe that
she public of Barbados is
anxious to know the his.
tory of its island, and since
Ligon his nol been reprint.
ed for over two hundred
and fifty years few Barba-
dians have had the oppor-
tunity to read this book



To make it easier for the

modern reader to read
Ligon’s History, which is
naturally written in some-

what outdateq English, Mr.
Tin Gale has modernised ||
the spelling except where |
h» thinks it would spoil the
effect of certain passages,



Speaker Given
Confidence Vote |

(Fiom Qur Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Nov. 15

The Legislative Council, afte:
debating for several hours, «4
n Jticn by Honourable T. U. B
Butler calling for the removal of
Henourable William Savary,
Speaker from his office on
F.iday evening rejected it. Adopt-
ecl instead was the amendment by
Honeurable Roy Joseph, Minister
of Education and Social Services
whieh put the Council on record
as having confidence in “the
complete imypartialjty”. af Mp
Speaker,

The Speaker who vacated the
seat in favour of his deputy,
Honourable Ashford Sinanan and
during the debate was applaude:
by the majority of the Hous:
when he returned at the end of|
the “unpleasant discussion’

The Council by a majority vote
also agreed to postpone for si
months consideration ot ar
amendment by Honourable A. P. I

James, member for Tobago seek
ing appointment of a committe
to consider the changes in the

colony's new constitution,

Chief reason advanced by mem
bers in favour of the postpone
ment was that sufficient time
had not elapsed for a test of th
1950 constitution, James’ amend-
ment was moved to a motion by
Hon. Butler which criticised the

traticn “did not even get started’ | constitution and called for ‘effec-

ive representation.”

| announced

CENTS

_

EETING END










¢

» Post
ARG AGIA, Nov. 15
ready for his important

ence with, ‘ outgoing
ith CoSveBwor Thomas

named Mr
Dewey S standby advisor on
matters of “emergency of a tem-

porary character" after meeting
with him in the final important
conference slated for the Presi
lent-elect's vacation here

The conference with Mr. Dewey
late yesterday, left Mr. Eisen-
hower’s four remaining days

here clear of any announced top
visits before he flies to Washing-

ton Tuesday for a m eting with
Mr. Truman and Cabinet mem-
bers

Mr. Eisenhower
four hours at

conferred
his golf courve re-
treat with Republican Governor
who played a large part in
winning nomination for President-
elect.

Mr. Eisenhower said afterwards

fo



that he found Mr. Dewey’s
“availability” as advisor in »p
policy matters of an urgent na-
ture more than gratifying to
me.”

In disclosing the part that Mr.
Dewey had agreed to take in

he

Eisenhower Administration, the
Prevident-elect implied he had
been unable to persuade Mr
Dewey to ace*pt a Cabinet post

Speculation

Besides re-opening speculation

about Mr, Eisenhower's Cabinet
choices the announcement on
Mr, Dewey’s unavailability for

the cabinet opened a new field

of speculation ‘about the part he:

will play in
decisions,
While neither Mr, Eisenhower
ior Mr. Dewey revealed the pre-
cise topics of their conversation
the President-elect’s staff had
beforehand that Mr
Eisenhower's forthcoming trip to
Korea would be broached,

It was emphasized in advance
hat Mr, Dewey's advice would
‘oncern “policy matters” rather
han details regarding this trip.
One such “policy matter” sub-
lected to heavy speculation was
he question of forcibly repatria-
ing Red prisoners. in Korea, Dip-
fomatic sources have said Mr
‘ruman will ask Mr, Risenhower
o make public his views on this
tuestion,

Republican policy

U.P.

NATO Can Reach
Defence Goals

LISBON, Nov.
General Matthew Bb, Hidgway
lew back to Paris today af.er
elling the Portuguese that what
1@ found in Lisbon in othe:
Vest Kuropean capitals—made him



15.

ure N.A.T.O. could reach its de-~
ence goals,

Tne European Supreme Com-
nander said “I am heartened and





couraged to find such a spirit of
Mplote co-operation as I found
ere Portugal’s N.A.T.O. role
is one of full partnership and I

have complete confidence that the
task assigned to the Portuguese

» cee if in fine hands.— U.P.






7,

(4



mnie







7 i v
; ly Communist). town’s outskirts. Losses on both CHAMPIONSHIP girl was shot and wounded in a

Seteaies eksemane bag Fieve " The demonstrations ended with -—— were ere er gun battle with three Africans Say No One Easy on the purse and on the eye,
ticipated announcement. Many » arriv f Lieut: Colonel here were mounting indica- TOKYO, Nov. 15. whom she caught creepin out Y 7 Ae : SEVONSHIRES ole:
servicemen involved in this Geist Abacl Weatear key member |tions that French tank raiders, | vou} aoe & tact ag lof the be aenais of a henke Sire Good For Mayor none" weer * H ~ 2 ea
autumn’s atomic tests at Eniwe- ie ice ACY headquarters dele- } who pierced 45 miles through Viet- shio Shirai won a , Hite aD cha was visiting in Nyeri, wonderful styling, in exqui its
tok proving ground in the Pac- gated by Premier Mohammed }minh lines northwest of Hanoi to- round decision over Hawaii § Dado | Miss Barbara Barclay 21. shot Irom Our Own Correspondert colours at reasonable prices which
ific already have reported IM/\Noguin to attend the ceremonies | wards their Red River fortress of | Marino p-siets tp Setaan “Sh0 li, the. wheiider rushed td her PORT-OF-SPAIN, Nov. 15. | will astonish you. And their snug,
letters home that an H-bomb| |) "hanalf of the Government. | Yenbay may be preparing ‘to Oe eee vee POxn ep | kedroom and picked up a pistol] Biggest local news here this | caressing fit is a sheer joy... a
rte. cn. Oe See Pi. ree PN se Pad ie anon eae | and a ae Mad jouneer Mem-~! week has been the inability of the| ‘ m of poise. DEVONSHIRES
Giver since the first of these ete | “—- BUNCHED IN THE HOME STRETCH Iso seized firearms and openes |Port-of-Spain City Council to | giv

ilso seized firearms and opened give a real boost to the morale ;
ters was‘ published in’ “Los »Ah-)|"'



























{fire at the fleeing Africans, The |°!®ct £ Mogor for the 1952-53 |, they're irresistible .. . the shoes
geles Daily” a week ago, A.E.C.| girl, the daughter of Hugh Bar-|*¢!™. The Council met this morn- you've longed for.
has been under wemenavous pres~ j¢lay, well known British farmer of }‘"% for the purpose of electing | Meg See them ... feel them ... try
sure to say something. So far it Menmingai near Nakuru was)! Mayor and Deputy. but in the | them on . . . at any good shoeshop.
has refused, relying on the past taken to hospital and was ré«| Process of the election, elimin- | Go w-davi. Go nowt
custom of issuing announcements | Deortae to be comfortable. ated every rember includiny the | Fh
about Eniwetok tests only when} 1” She) was staying with the| present Mayor of the 20-memb.. |
the tests were concluded. of! family of Charles M. Fernan-|body, who is willing to accept
hse dehictes test soctan ere sanw| Ger. Secretary of the Kenya | office.
s s } y or
back home, it may be inferred that | Royal Agricultural wr... Failure to choose a Mayor is |
operations are over and that an| “" Tlargely due to the fact that most |
executive amnounccment is im-| ' ° of the members with a following
minent.—U.P. | Antigua Celebrates on the Council are determined to | W. who value poise
Jervis | | Prince’s Birthday | Corousion voi! Executive for | choose DEVONSHIRES
sronation year, This poses a| on ae =
44 Servicemen { Mish its Biiitiatled ray — gore eer the gl
2 a facie ° nder cil can ho another meeting for
Die In Crash | Prinee Charles’ ANIA the election of a Mayor, The mat-
TOKYO. Nov. 15. I Nove ate rnelaee eaeaey? 14th | ter was adjourned to Tuesday in
; ’ : ce 1 mer, was celebrated by a@lorder to-obtain the legal opinion
Far East Air Forces said 44 publie holiday, A “dockyard re- of Hon. L. C. H 8, counsel
servicemen most of them return- jview’’ with a magnificent historic for the Cor aoe gabe is)
ing from rest leave in Japan were | {pageant sponsored by the Society E ,
killed when a US. Air Force C} cf Friends pf English Harbour was Meanwhile, in accordance with
119 “Flying Boxcar” crashed into | ithe great attraction of the day|the Corporation ordinance, the
a mountain near Seoul, Korea. when over a thousand people|Mayor remains in office until a |
The twin engined plane rammed | journeyed to Nelson’s Dockyard | successor is elected. Councillor
into the 2,000 foot mountain yes- | where they saw the period |George Cabral, of Portuguese des-
terday only a few minutes away) jcostumes of ladies, gentlemen and {cent continues to hold the office. | .
from its destination, an airport in sailors of the 18th century. There is considerable speculation
the Seoul area. A ground pariy Nelson himself was portrayed | jy political circles whether he can D EVO ha §
said there were “no rurvivors.” jin three scenes. In his » late continue as the city’s Mayor for | Cf 1
The toll was the , largest in any} jtwenties when he first visited he nett six months hadaute of Nay every pair guaranteed
ilitary plane crash since the} Antigua, secondly his meeting with ay ‘nanainhiven ical waa Council AYE
meearer DS padres i Lady Hamilton and thirdly Neilson |" argument that you hf ‘
ve ee f aboard leaving his dockyard in 1805 for }has made a decision to-day that| THE MANSFIELD SHOE CO., LTD., MANSFIELD, NOTTS., ENGLAND
Basie Rte socie Mapeiae Fc igre ithe battle of Trafalgar. none of its members were “fit and One of the NORVIC group of companie
were ae pers Pieigglh gt “wor We frst time in history |Proper” to hold office and can only | Trade Representative: C.L. Gibbs & Co., Ltd.,
to the ‘wer outiie tion leave in| lhe police beat the Retreat at the |Tescind its own resolution within} P.O. Box 56, Bridgetown
to ae omar seven were| THE FIELD OF HORSES as they bunched in the home stretch in the November Handicap. historic dockyard grounds in the |8ix oo by unanimous vote “ Barbados, B.W.|1.
vapen. od ae ” , , r , y 4 o ; resence of His Excellency and |@ meeting at which not le in ve aeameeineneeiaainiiea
crewmen, ee eS ee Edwards’ bay filly, eventually won by half a length, with Mr. K. D Lady biiithurne, 116 members are present } cn gn
—Ue- wards’ “To; .







PAGE TWO SUNDAY ADVOCATE

SUNDAY. NOVEMBER 16, 1952
—————



: ‘HE Woodside Lawn Tennis , oe &
48 usnament will open to-

morrow evening at “Woodside”,
| Bay Street.

In their drive to. colleet funds
for Christmas Charities the
ledies have organised a series of
tennis games when some of the
best local players will take part.

Tomorrow evening “Pone”
Hyn will meet Denis Wor:ne
in he Men’s Singles and the
| following evening Eric Taylor
‘and Dr. Charlie Mannmg will













a} oppose Darrell Trimingham and
SjLouis St. Hill in the Mer’s
| Doubles,

7 En-route fo St. Kitts
- R. and MRS. C. B. C. CON-
BOTTLE , NELL. and Mrs. Connell’s
L sister, Miss S. D. H. Shepherd,
arrived from England yesterday
by the Golfite. They are en routa
to St. Kitts where Mr. Connell is
Chief Engineer, St. Kitts Sugar

Factory.

Mr. and Mrs, Connell are
| returning from long leave. Miss
,_ Sh rd who had been residing

~ In England for several years with
|another sister Mrs. Wedlake,
plans to take up residence once

| again in that colony,

Visitors
mY Ge R. MYER and HON.
MRS. MYER—regular visi-
| tors to Barbados—were among

di j f x \
4 a J Es OTA |the passengers arriving from
ee | k= reg yesterday by the
zr }
) = | |
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a eee cccal PAINS __ PAINS lief and feel betean, too! nn nce == _ - E









rae ; THE BAGGAGE WAREHOUSE was crowded with visitors yesterday
afternoon. They came to welcome friends and relatives who arrived
To Honduras by the 8,8. “Golfito”. WR ANeny “i
N- CASTON, aged 25 of Sur- Seated (left to right) are: Mrs. ur Skeete, Mrs. rence
ra — Me sit a Daysh, Mrs. K. L. Alone, Mrs. Richard Packer and Mrs, Geoffrey
; , igi Skeete.
Tom eee eo Mr. Arthur Skeete, Mr. Neville Howell and Mr. John Martin are

or STUBBORN fang an Bronchial GLOBE

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ey ee, joes] COUGHS

NOW PLAYING












» Hei pm &) 445 & 630 om passenger through Barbados yes- ™ the background.
OP tan ear aay tiaiiei ts, Fats ; terday by the Golfito. He is on ‘ :
and continuing daily | Continuing to Tues also on Monday ~——ey ‘ a Intransit ACK in Barbados after an ab-
“na “RATON PASS” PRINCE OF PEACE ||| q AND or “he See eee went e sence of over six months are
“JACK & THE | penis Patricia (Cater) | ‘COUGHS: In 1947/48, Ken was at Reading RINIDAD'S Commissioner oi Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Potter. Mr.
"| MORGAN NEAL Fine Eee and ‘ i < feats Police, Col. E. H. F. Beadon Potter. is one of the Directors of
BEANSTALK and Steve Cochran ® Modern Story of University with John Saint and RCS, Oh eek aa the Colony Club, St. James
Sere ee st Alireetion” | 2Ut_ Saviour (Christ) 0 COLDS Ernest Moll of Barbados. Ken eccompaniied by his wife and two } b, St. James.
Buc a etior . a i i P re’ Jere rans. assen=
Abbott Costello PAINTING ae Tues. who bark 4G de on lt Weice wane ee Read- en oe Trinidad, eS "ahs PGolfite R. DAVID RICE of Messrs.
pS ‘THE be am. USUNSIINE YLL GET YoU { ing’s rowing team and represent- yesterday after four months’ C. B. Rice and Co., Ltd.,
Aa DARK es i ee Pow ed this university at one of Hen- holiday in England, spent mostly accompanied by his wife and son
ay Dennis irginia eorge & - 7 aS Bakes mf
vfikaog a | MORAG MANO | Maser ot the +n, THERE’S NOTHING ors anauel reamisee. bees ventas te ties Gua ae
nee LARGO. o. KIS TOMORROW NOR saree | f aan odage +f - M®* A. J. BELIX, who is spending almost four months in
Thurs. Special 1.90] James Barbara _Tex RITTER 0 0 Y nr E 21-year-old Charlie attached to the C.i.D, de- the U.K., France, Switzerland
JUNGLE See Thurs. ‘onk/) lexander joins Compania partment of the Trinidad Police @%d a couple of days in Italy.
STAMPEDE. Thor en 4.45 & 8.30 p.m — Azucareta . Dominicana, — sugar force was intransit by the same : 2 :
(A. Jungle Thriller) 1.30 Whole Seris! estate in the Dominican’ Repub- shi te had be: in England ETURNING by the same ship
{tunes ey TRIPLE. TROUBLE olen r o) AS Tigge agg hn his father he Stip. He had been in Englan R t
SONORA ng a abl + oe. = ae mised ® seer for seven months on a training were Dr. and Mrs. H. E
Packy. Lu PANTHER ISLAND | Larry Buster Crabie Ss would visit his ‘old school.” He course. Skeete, They had also been over
BRIDGETOWN BARBAREES | OISTIN CANADA LARGEST was a passenger arriving from ea
‘Dial 2310) (Dial 6170) {Dial 8404)





_———————
EMPIRE OLYMPIC ROXY ROYAL ie
os To-day & Tomorrow, , aie tae 2 To-Day 4.30 & 6%
To-day 449 & 8.20) 1.30 && BAS To and continuing daily! Republic Action SSP Laer e.19 (Attraction:
daDarnen =| Double Glenn Ford Maureen O'Hara
Tap "Hunter Brian Donlevy George Macready Paul Christian
in Forre m aac ker in AGOAD
B
ISLAND OF LOODLUM EMPIRE THE a aaa
GL
DESIRE | ADVENTURES MADELEINE
(Technicolor) OF CAPT, The Most Exeiting With
Excitement . . Thrills! FABIAN Picture =r Year Ann Todd
preg | eel tee Latest News Reel Monday & Tuesday
xtra 3 )

. —————ns | 4,80 Ae 8.90
Latest News Reel | Micheline Prelle |" Wednesday & |Double —

b)
Opening Friday 2ist.| | Monaiy & Teneday | ‘Thursday 4.30 & 8,18) Jon Hall
30 & 8 Maria My
ABBOTT and Doule ok

Double Attra: ms .
COSPELLO| “George Brent” | Tht Anarew Miatare



eke in ALL BABA AND
COMIN’ ROUND iy ston | MOONLIGHT AND THE FORTY
a | UMS ALONG wee eee
THE, MOUNTAIN TNE AMAZON and i and
Coming Seon = | Tum AVENGER | ra emeAneCongiinut
Oren With Coming Soon Wed. & Thurs
as tr c John Carrol THE SNIPER — 4.30 & 8.20
renner SNIPE THAT NIGHT
a en Lost FATROL va Tere il
4 ar
DELIAH id rE MAGIC RIVER LADY
(Technicolor) WHIPHAND CARPET (Rod Cr '
TO-NIGHT 8.30 P.M. LAST SHOWS OF
OUTCASTS OF POKER FLAT
DALE ROBERTSON — ANNE BAXTER
and
“LOVE i$ BETTER THAN EVER’
LARRY PARKS—ELIZABETH TAYLOR



TO-MORROW (MONDAY) & TUESDAY 4.45 & 8.30

CHEAPER BY THE DOZEN

(CLIFTON WEBB)
and

NO QUESTIONS ASKED
BARRY SULLIVAN—ARLENE Meu k





BUCKLEY'S ©

MIXTURE



use Palmolive Soap as Doctors advised
for a Brighter, Fresher Complexion!

Do-tors prove thot Palmolive Soap can improve complexions
femarkably in many ways. Oily skin looks less oily—dull, drab
tkin wonderfully brighter, Coorse- -looking skin appears finer














So, do as 36 skin specialists









England yesterday by the Golfito
His old school is Lodge.

Charlie left the Lodge School
in 1946, and shortly afterwards
went to study engineering at
Fletchers, Derbyshire. He has
just got through the Higher Na-
tional Certificate in Mechanical
Engineering, which is a big step
towards the degree of A. M. I.
Mech. E. (Associate Member of
the Institute of Mechanical En-
gineers) .

He plans to spend about five
days here before flying to British

other relatives for Christmas.
He leaves British Guiana early in
January 1953 for Santo Domingo,

HE engagement was an-

nounced last night between
Mr. Gerald Taylor, son of the late
Mr. Maleolm Taylor and Mrs.
Muriel Taylor of No. 10 Greame
| Hall Terrace and Miss Audrey
Maksymec, daughter of Mr. and
| Mrs. John Maksymec of Winnipeg,
| Manitoba, Canada,
| Miss Maksymee is also a
| graduate in arts of the University
of Manitoba,
| Home After Holiday
} R. J. DAVEY of the Colonnade
| Stores, accompanied by his
| wife and two children who had
| been in England for over three
; months’ holiday returned yester-
| day by the Golfito. * :

They are in residence at Pine
Hill.

2 fu, 60 ween: cotmntae woth + Moravian Minister _
=e EV. DUNCAN MOORE tf

Sharon Moravian Church
left yesterday for St. Kitts to at-
tend a Meeting of the Board of
} Directors to be held in that island.

From Curacao

M®. ELLIS GALL, who for the
past few years has been em-
ployed with Shell Oil Company of
Curacao, returned to the island
yesterday morning by B.W.1LA,
He will be staying with his rela-
tives at “Mayville”, Chelsea Road,



Guiana to be with hig father and |

RS. CLEMMIE BETTEN-

COURT GOMES of Georgy-
town, British Guiana and her
daughter Terry were intransit on
the Golfite yesterday. At Trim-
dad they will change ships for
British Guiana.

Terry, who had been at schoo!
in England and Switzerland, is
a former student of the Ursuline
Convent, Collymore Rock. This is
her first visit home in six years.

R. PERCY KING, another

passenger for Georgetown
by the same ship had been in
England for medical attention,
He is a brother of Mr. Joseph
King, formerly with Messrs.
Wm. Fogarty Ltd., here and now
with their branch in Port-of-
Spain, Trinidad.

R. ‘WILNOT HADAWAY of
Kingstown, St. Vincent, was
intransit home from Trinidad
yesterday by B.W.LA.
Mr. Hadaway spent about
three weeks’ holiday in Trinidad.

® 4 rn
NTRANSIT passenger from
England by the Gedlfito yes-
terday was Mrs. William Lam-
bert, whose husband Major
Lambert was a former Private
Secretary to Sir Alfred Savage
when he was Governor of Bar-~-
bados. Mrs. Lambert’s destination
is Trinidad where she will join
her two sons Gordon = and
Michael,

Major Lambert and their
daughter Pat, who are at present
in England, will be coming out
te Trinidad during the middle of
next year, shortly after the
Coronation,

Holiday Ended

RS. WILFRED WOOD-

HOUSE. wife of C.D. & W’s.
Building Development Adviser,
was another arrival from Eng-
land yesterday by the Golfito.
She had been spending the sum-
mer holidays with her two sons

for four months’ holiday in the
U.K and on the Continent.
Part of their holiday was spent
with their daughter and son-in-
law, Mr. and Mrs. Ritchie Pack-
er who returned to Barbados
ahead of them via New York and
Mrs, Packer was on hand to meet
them on their return.

Back Home

R. and MRS. MICHAEL

GREAVES of “Belmont,” St.
John, who had been in England
since the middle of May on hol-
iday returned home yesterday by
the Golfito.

Mrs, Greaves is a sister of Sir
Allan Collymore, Chief Justice of
the island, and Mr. Greaves is
a brother of Hon. Mrs. M. Han-
schell, M.L.C., who was also at

the Baggage Warehouse to meet
them.

a

Birthday Today
RS. NOOTT, wife of Ma).
C. E. Noott, Headmaster of
Cembermere School, accompan-
ied by their little daughter, were
passengers from England yes-
terday by the Golfite,

Mrs. Noott and her daughter
Jacqueline had been in the U.K.
for over three months on holiday
and the Noott family will cele-
brate Jacqueline’s first birthday
anniversary today.

Fifty Today

@‘ONGRATULATIONS to Mr,
Guy Adams on his fiftieth
birthday.

Guy, who is a younger brother
of Mr. G. H. Adams, C.M.G,, still
retains his boyish srnile.

Many happy returns of “the

day”.
Best Wishes
EST wishes to Mr, “Tom”
Went, M.B.E., on his 58th

birthday.

These include wishes for a com-
plete recovery to good health.

Mr, Went is now on leave, prior
to retiring from the post of
Colonial Engineer.

2-900965.060066-6- 4
/

St. Michael. who are at school there.



seeeeecee He expects to spend a month =
* seen SOS OOOO NOE OOO POOP OOP OOS PCP ESS SOOTE FOTOS 4; Soe es a, inte, xpects to, spend. a month
Excitement!

Curacao, " | AN ETT A: DRESS SHOP
“titty
THE onaeiadt JAMES

Today & ‘Tomorrow 8.30 p.m.

at the EMPIRE THEATRE

iLook!

Suspense !!

Murder!! Eth & 12th December %

Next Door to Singer



















Sa
%
D4
: : - ieee ie ates
x + y ‘olor
: when St SANTA offers Benen Seine wks Maro
% THE BARBADOS PLAYERS present x y) Gpeplel Notice euP em FROCKS for all occasions from . $5.00
x NO SHOWS ON | ALWAYS in
» ¥ HEAR’
: “THE THIRD VISITOR” : W TUESDAYS | | cioria‘Warven SHORTS and BLOUSES ................-..+- $3.98
% . ONTIERSMAN
* Gerald Anstruther’s tremendously successful Thriller > i THURSDAYS y Eaee MoRAE |
* 4 SaaS SSS?
* ‘om the Duke of York’s Theatre, London . Hu :
. Produced by ANNSTTE DANGAN “LOWER RN ete eG vcitis Tee $ .9%6
, oduc by x i FLO ED LINEN ........ pa
S Can You Solve the Mystery? } GRAFAINE FLOWERED LINEN ....,........--- ‘
x Come and ‘See! ! : CEPEA PRINTS ...............6--.00ceeeneeee es 69
\ "POR CBSSOS46O8 EMAL ALSO OSS EPR PLAIN CHAMBRA 36” WE eee ins ks vance 84
THE ANNUAL FLOWERED BEMBERG SILK ................-: 1.44
7 : 5 i shades) ...,...... 1.28
POPPY D A NC KE including these mechanical EMBOISSED MORCAIN (in all shades)
Ss TO RO eis hk cea iw ti eee’ $5.75
Under the Patronage of The Acting Governor 80 > 100 eos UT Rk 6.50
and Mrs, Turner | @ TELEPHONES BOD TT, :
wane pee ot ‘ MN Se ts 7.72
The MARINE HOTEL Te PRELIOW CASRS:18-% 30 oo ocseee ccs scceceeee 8
@ CARS St, a a eae AR
Kindly lent by the Management © BOATS ;
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER? 22ND le ies ciasseediiliesl-alethiees
* PRAMS, DOLLS, GUNS, CRANES, CARS, ETC.
By kind permission of Col, Michelin | © SCALES i
THE POLICE BAND DANCE ORCHESTRA @ PRAMS
e
T. R. EVANS (WHITFIELDS)
Ball,Room Tables may be reserved. see the display ateun
‘Phone Mrs, J. CONNELL, 2067 r YOUR SHOE STORE
e : ° “ ‘>
The Corner Store Phone: 4220
Dancing 9 p.m. to 2 a.m, Admission $1.00 1)
i



- a EEE
a



te
—_
-
os



ee ee ee ee ee ee Se pe







rm

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1952

AT THE CINEMA

ity G. it.

MIXED

THIS WEEK seems to

number of films seen, and to be written up!
of which two are comedies,

GRILL

have outdone itself «with fhe
Five in all,
one a tropical adventure and

two melodramas, so there is plenty of choice and since
most people prefer comedies, let’s start with them.



Lou Costello & Bud Abbott

JACK AND THE BEAN-
STALK is at the Plaza, Bridge-
town, with Abbot and Costello
and the two of them roar through
the old fairy tale and turn it into
a boisterous burlesque. Filmed in
Technicolor, it bulges with songs
and dances and the slap-happy
antics of the two comedians.
Starting off in sepia, we see Lou
Costello as ~a_ baby-sitter who
falls asleep and_ visualises his
own version of “Jack” while the
child reads the story, However,
life in magic world of colour is
enlivened by explosive eggs,
catapulting trees, a singing harp,
the giant’s amazonian house-
keeper and the giant himself.

Though the picture fxequently
runs away with itself, it has its
moments and will appeal to Ab-
bott and Costello fans.

LOVE IS BETTER THAN
EVER is the other comedy, which
can be seen at the Globe, In this
we have Elizabeth Taylor, who
seems to get prettier with each
film, and Larry Parks in a tenu-
ous romantic comedy of “girl
chases boy and eventually gets

boy!” Miss Taylor plays a small
town dancing teacher who
attends a convention in New

York and falls head over heels in
love with a Theatrical agent.
Mr. Parks is the agent with a
strong allergy to matrimony!

Horse-racing, baseball, the 21
Club and the Copacabana are the
backgrounds for the dizzy
romance which finally culminates
in a false engagement announce-
ment and backstage goings-on of
a dancing exhibition. with two
hundred children. Both stars do
their best. and the Broadway
theatrical dialect is amusing and
flippant.

ISLAND OF DESIRE, based
on. Hugh Brooke’s novel “Satur-
day Island” is playing at the
Empire, It is one of these exotic,
but highly improbable South Sea
Island adventures that is long
on gorgeous settings, tropical
flora and fauna, sunsets and good
photography, but short on acting
and direction. The northern
coast of Jamaica is the locale for
a romantic interlude ind the lives
of a young marine Corporal and
a prim and proper army nurse
who have been shipwrecked. All
goes well in their idyllic paradise
until the crash-landing of an
R.A.F. flier whose arm has to be
amputated with the natural
follow-up that he and the nurse
fall in love, and the marine—
not without a struggle—bows out.

In this triangle are Linda
Darnell, Tab Hunter and Donald
Gray. Youthful Mr. Hunter is
cefinitely a credit to the Marine
Corps as he provides food, cloth-
ing and shelter for the nurse
with unbelievable speed. He's a
nice looking kid and with more
experience should do well. As
it is, he gives the part freshness
and vitality, -but is inclined to be
wooden. Linda Darnell is the
spinsterish nurse (to begin with)





Soothes baby's colic pains, upset
stomach and discomfort due to con-
stipation. or acid-indigestion!
wile



Overcomes liverish feeling, bilious,
\headechy upset . . . makes’ you fee!

better_ia ‘proctically no time!

and to accept her in’ this role
imposes considerable strain on
the imagination—to say nothing
of her successful amputation with

rot much more than a bowie
knife in the way of medical
equipment. However, she is

yery lovely to look at and”proves
to: be very adept at making hats
and weaving cloth! Donald Gray
makes a handsome flier, but his
portrayal is stilted and his accent
just too, too B.B.C,

There is the usual under-sea
battle—this time with a. shark—
and a good fight between the
two men, but on the whole
script, direction and acting are
undistinguished.

And now for the melodramas.
At the .. Plaza, Barbarees is
RATON. PASS while OUTCASTS
OF POKER FLAT ‘1s playing: at
the Globe. Both these films are
Westerns, but of different types.
RATON PASS is_ conventional
in treatment and action while
OUTCASTS, though laid in the
West during the period of the
Gold Rush, deals with the con-
lict of human emotions,



(rardening Hints Farm And Garden

AGRICOLA

For Amateurs

Gardeners often ask for advice
as to what can planted to grow
and flower q ly.

The tru l answer to that
one is Ni b

Some plants do mature and
flower sooner than others, yet
none can be hurried beyond
their appointed time, for you
can't hurry nature,

Not that nature. can’t hurry
herself. The Mahogany trees ara
example of that, for one day they
appear as bare sticks, and the
next t are covered in a green
sheen of delicate new leaves.

Grass is another example of
how nature can hurry, for after
a rte of rain the ine w grass
w urn overnight. Nature
can cdtaibey Burry, but she can-
not be hurried,

But a kno’ of the differ-
ent times the yarjous plants take
from seed planting to flowering

ill help, and from among these
times some plants may be found

at are quick. enough in flower-
ing to satisfy those gardeners
who are in a hurry.

The foilo

list has been
taken from that excellent little
rdening. book “Gardening in

arbados for Amateurs”.

Any of the seeds on this list
can be planted at this time, and
from the list it will be possible
to calculate exactly when they
will start to flower.

Starring Dennis Morgan and ERIOD OF TIME BETWEEN
Patricia Neal, RATON PASS is OWING OF SEED AND SET-
the mati of a ambitious and G OF FLOWER
unscrupulous adventuress who ,,
marries a young rancher and by innias *s *¢ 6 Weeks
her perfidy, provokes a range & apdragon .. + Boon
war in the Pass. Filled with ey *3 ay 6 ”
thudding hooves, clashing fists Se hel ro. itt +f; : ”
and roaring guns, the action pro- Car me tuft utton Be
ceeds at breakneck speed in this Cc rea hy sf 1 ”
sweeping melodrama which is Petunia ae 4 ig y
filmed against a background of Marigola t a 7 ?
mountains of Colerado and New Gecaniurs he "49 ”
Maxie. Dahlia ran cae te he

Patricia Neal plays the mer- 7. ne a S ee
cenary and treacherous “femme Nasturtium a i"
Fatale” who links up with a +

murderer and his gang to do her
husband out of his lands. Help-

ed by Steve Cochran, whose
characterization is one of men-
acing brutality and _ violence, I

am glad to say they both come
to a sticky end.

Dennis Morgan is the invinci-
ble rancher who finally restores
law and order while Basil Ruys-
dael plays his father—a grand
old man, with more guts and
character than the rest put to-
gether.

OUTCASTS OF POKER FLAT
is remotely based on a. famous
story by Brett Hart in which a
group of shady characters find
themselves snowbound in a hut
in the High Sierras. It appears
that the activities of a murder-
ous bank robber—who makes a
getaway—have so_ enraged the
people of Poker Flat that the
decide to run their un@esirable
elements out of town, These in-
clude the robbers wife, a ro=
fessional gambler, an_ elderly
drunkard and a prostitute, all of
whom just make the cabin be-
fore the storm, They are joined
by a pregnant girl and her
fiancé and, of course, by the
bank robber. This cosy little
party is at the mercy of the gun-
man, portrayed by Cameron
Mitchell as one of the most de-
spicable, sadistic, half-crazed
and brutal characters I have
ever encountered. Anne Baxter,
as his wife, is on the receiving
end for her fair share of assault
and battery while Dale Robert-
son, the gambler whom _ she
loves, eventually kills the bandit,
who in the meantime has bashed
in the head of the old “dipso”
and shot the prostitute for good
measure,

The only redeeming feature in

the film is the acting’ which is
uniformly good with a_ special
mention for Cameron Mitchell.

MY FAMILY COULDN’‘T GET ALONG
> WITHOUT GENTLE, DEPENDABLE

As an alkalizer for neutralizing excess stomach acidity and re-

lieving the pains and discomforts of acid-indigestion, Milk of

Magnesia, a product of Phillips, is one of the fastest, most effective

known. As a laxative, Phillips acts gently and thoroughly, wifhout
griping or discomfort, and without embarrassing urgency. Phillips
tones up the entire digestive system . . . is the ideal antacid-laxative
for_all the family! Get Phillips today!

liquid or Tablets I i}
MILK OF MAGNESIA
ane oe

A PRODUCT OF



It will be seen from this list that
the quickest returns are to be
had from Yellow Pea, and Bache=
lor’s Button, both of which will
start to flower in five weeks’
time from the moment of planting
the seeds. Zinnias, Cosmos, and
Balsam come next as they each
take six weeks, Marigolds follow
taking seven weeks to mature.
Snapdragon eight weeks, Candy-
tuft nine, while the rest on the
list take ten to twelve weeks
respectively.

Another list, taken from the
same garden book is also very
useful, for it gives the names of
those plants whose seeds can

with a seed-box and
can be planted directly into the
ground. Here it is.

“SEEDS OF THE FOLLOWING
MAY BE _ SOWN
E THE PLANTS ARE
TO GROW.”
Zinnia, Yellow Pea, Bachelor’s
Button, Ragged Robin, Marigold,
asturtium, Balsam, Canna,
olly Hock, Tithona, Cut and

Come Again, Cosmos, Candytuft,
Sun Flower.

To be able to plant seeds direct
into the place where they are to
grow is a great coving in time
and trouble, and has the advan-
tage that there is no check in
growth from the seedlings being
transplanted,

There is however, the danger
of Ants carrying them away, and
this must be watched out for.
Also it is difficult to get an even
spring, and sometimes a_re-
arrangement of some of the little

Jants may be necessary. But
this is quickly done and does not
disturb the majority of the plants.



Apart from that, it is a sordid
tale of violent emotions, with
too much accent on _ violence,
sadism and downright brutality.




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SUNDAY

By

ADVOCATE



A MANURIAL CONTROVERSY

IT IS, WE THINK, true to
whether in the political, social,

extremists, life in general

ay that if there weré no

economic, scientific and even religious spheres—would be

a lot more peaceful.

spawned in the minds of extre
that there is nothing good in w
it often helps to ventilate issue

Indeed, in the last analysis, war is

ts. All this is not to say
med argument, since
ind theréby enables those

on whom final decisions rest in practice to adopt a sane,
middle course, having regard to the evidence on both sides

This apples particular
force to a_ controversy which
flares up from time to time in the
domain of manures and fertilizers.
There is one now.

Tt is the old question
ganie versus inorganic manures;
or, the natural versus the un-
natural (artificial), as some say;

with

of or-

or again, minerals versus non-
minerals; or, yet again, dung
versus chemicals. First, we
should remind ourselves that
from the point of view of the

plant there can be no strict line
pf demarcation since, in what-
ever form applied, the elements
must be worked over by

soil organisms to the simple
chemical forms which the plants
can use. Such changes are ac-

c jished faster in the case of
quick acting fertilizers, hence
they have become of increasing
importance in the production of
annual crops — the _ principal
source of our food supply. There
is a second point: it is not strictly
correct to use the term un-
natural or artificial in connection
with fertilizers, since, in the or-
iginal state, most of them are the
products of nature — mined and
refined for ease of handling and
trade purposes. Even nitrogen—
the principal: fertilizing ingredi-
ent in sulphate of ammonia, an
industrial by-product -— is also
obtainable from the air, a fact
which gives ‘us ‘access to practi-
cally unlimited supplies.

There is no space here to list
the .substances which properly
fall into each group—the natural
and the artificial, or the organic
and the inorganic, . whichever
terms are used. We _ can only
discuss the subject briefly in its
broad aspects. Both sides admit
and, of course, it is common
knowledge that organic matter is
of prime importance; indeed, the
loss of humous material through
mismanagement of soils has be-
come a matter of grave concern
te governments and authoritics
charged with the conservation of
natural resources. On the other
hand, it cannot be reasonably ex~
pected that organic matt®r can
supply all the deficiencies caused
by removal of plant nutrients
through heavy cropping under
modern, intensive methods.

But now, the protagonists in the
organic field have made extraya-
gant claims, Among these is the
Statement that chemical fertilizer
induces poor health in plants and
renders them prone to disease,
Further, that the quality of agri-
cultural produce is compromised
by the use of chemicals and con-
sumption of such produce has led
to an increase in certain human
diseases, notably cancer and heart
ailments, Still further, it is elaim-
ed that by the: ferti) -

izer industry together with its hold,

on investigators afraid to speak
the truth are the root causes of
the trouble. We recall that the
late Sir Albert Howard (knighted
for his work in India) who was,
in the oy, part of his career, at-
tached to the Imperial Department
of Agriculture for the West Indies,
claimed in his “Agricultural Tes-
tament” that the increasing use of
chemical fertilizers caused the
breakdown of sugar-cane seed-
lings, rendering their frequent re-
placement necessary. We in the
West Indies know the answer to
that.

It must suffice to say, in conclu-
sion, that all the evidence points
in the opposite direction to the ex-
travagant claims mentioned, The
wise agriculturist, therefore, will
continue to follow a middle course
--husbanding his sources of or-
ganic matter but supplementing it
by judicious use of fertilizer under
expert guidance. The world, in-
dubitably, owes a debt of grati-
tude to British brains (not Mos-





«











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ve CORATING i ca)

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BARBADOS CO-OP.
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POULTRY
NOTES |

Today there is a new word]
anti-biotie which farmers use. |
They have heard that if you feed |
livestock and poultry anti-bioties
ye will get extra profits. It is!
truce that penicillin, terramycin, |
streptomyein, aureomycin and |
ot! antibiotics are being used |
in onjunction with Vitamin
B-1 to help young pigs and

chickens to
Turkeys fed
“miracle growth | promoters”
t per levels have made
early Wins as much as 25% faster
tham previously. Gains for
chickens average about 10% faster

make faster gains.
by certain of these
at

than without any anti-biotics.
How’ do anti-biofics work?
Scientists say frankly that they
do not know. It is said that
anti-bioties cut down harmful

bacteria in the
intestinal tract.
It is also said
that they have
a direct stimu-
lating effect on |
the growth pro-
cess. We do nap
know. But

' whatever the
reason, research workers are find-
ing out which ones are best for
which animals, at which levels
they should be used in the ration
to get optimum results, what com-
binations are most effective and
how the minute quantities requir-



ed can be mixed evenly in feeds.
Tt is unsound and often costly to
buy a ration simply because it con-

tains one or another of the won-
ce ngredients. The use of the
intibiotic in a feed is no guar-

antee that it will make a greater

profit for the farmer. The kind
ef livestock and poultry being |
fed, as well as. their stage of |
growth and most of all the
quality of the ration to which

anti-bioties are added, determines
which antibiotic or combination
of anti-biotics is needed and the

amounts required for maximum
economical growth,

Reputable feed manufaeturers
with research laboratories and
reféarch farms are providing

feeds with these new ingredients,
Keepers of poultry and live-
Stock should measure the value of

tie feed used by what it will
Pepeuce rather than whether it
c@ntains this anti-biotic or that
one, »

Mang facts about @uti-biotios

be discovered tested

are yet to
but their future is

and, proven

assured. In less than two years
they have been brought from
the stage of “none available for

commercial use’ to an

bility that finds them in the feeds

of almost every reliable feed
manufacturer.

Anti-bioties cannot make a good
ration out of a poor one. hey

must be added to feeds which
centain a balance of all the nut-
ritive factors known to be nec-
essary. But added to such feeds
in . the conbinationgs and levels
foufid necessary to promote fast,
profitable gains, they ‘will most
certainly help the k eper of pigs
and poultry to make extra
prolits,

af

the. discovery and
of commercial fer-

cow!) for
development
tilizers,

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Your Home
This Christmas





availa- |



PAGE THREE



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PAGE FOUR





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SUNDAY

B.C.L. FACE THEIR
STIFFEST OPPOSITION
EVER

By O. S. COPPIN

TRINIDAD COLUMNIST WOULD DROP
BARBADIAN PROS.

HE Barbados Selectors have choset. a very strong team to meet

the Barbados Cricket League team in the annual B.C.A.-B.C.Ik
fixture. They could have puid the League no greater compliment, and
I must express profound disagreement with a brother scribe of mine
who subscribes to the view that this opportunity should have been
seized by the B.C.A. for experimenting with promising talent.

In my view the object of this fixture is to test the relative strength
of the Barbados Cricket League and although it might give rise to
a pardonable feeling of some frustration.on the part of those who
have been for some years now on the very threshold of selection in
an island XI, yet the main purpose of the fixture must be served.

Those who have followed the progress of League Cricket over
the past ten years with some attention to detail will no doubt agree
‘hat the very composition of the Barbados team constitutes ‘an out.
standing monument of achievement and fruitful industry on the part
of those who have planned and played League Cricket for the period

under review,
B.C.L. SHOULD BE PROUD

wrt Heremnay gy pon not feel proud to have arrayed against
it cricketers of the reputation and respecti t

Weekes, Conrad Hunte, Frank King, C. De Peiza = 6. Salen
as the Barbados Cricket League has done, such an Associa-
tion had given this talent to Barbados Cricket Association cricket?

The fact that the B.C.L. has been able to do this must corre-
spondingly weaken their team but their contribution to senior cricket
will not be gauged by the results of this match.

I have already advocated two of these fixtures per season and
then one of such fixtures could be earmarked for experimenting with
non regulars. For example I must agree that players like ank
Phillips and Keith Bowen of Spartan, Brickie Lucas of Carlton and
young players in that category would then have been provided with
the ‘scope for establishing any claims which they undoubtedly have
for inclusion in an island eleven.

A LOOK AT THE ISLAND XI

Witt regard to the island eleven itself it is obvious that this
is not the best available island xi that can be put into the field

or should I be more explanatory and say that seasoned players like
Wilfred Farmer of Police who performed with commendable individ-
ual credit against Jamaica, Horace King and Adzil Holder of Empire
and Gordon Proverbs, Denis and Eric Atkinson of Wanderers have
all staked their strong claims. for inclusion, not only on their form
we! the season but on their performances in recent Intercolonial fix-
ures, ee

The Barbados Selectors with such a strong nucleus of players
were obviously able to experiment in the case of R. C. Branker of
the Combermere Intermediate team and G. Sobens, recently of the
Police Boys’ Club team and now of the Police team,

With batting centred around Weekes, Walcott, Marshall, Hunte,
Grant, Williams, Smith, Sobers and De Peiza and the bowling in

the capable hands of pace bowlers Barker and Frank King, and the
spinners C. B. Williams, Roy Marshall, Cammie Smith and the
slower medium men left arm Sobens and Branker, the B.C.L. will
be meeting with the stiffest combination they have encountered in
their entire existence.
WHITHER WEST INDIES CRICKET

HAT of West Indies cricket? The latest news from the Trini-

dad Press, the unofficial mouthpiece of the West Indies Cricket
Board of Control, is to the effect that one Trinidad journalist has
found Clyde Walcott unfit,

This news, untrue as it is, still intrigues me, because in the first

place it is news to Clyde Walcott himself and secondly it must have
been. obtained by sources close to the supernatural,
d It is true that words can be made to say or mean anything but
it is putting it a bit thick to be able to stay all the way in Trinidad
and examine Walcott in Barbados and then pronounce him unfit just
because Guillen is so brilliant and Binns only slightly less brilliant,
in Trinidad of course.

In a maze of figures the writer of the article who has more
information at his disposal than either the representatives of the
West Indies Cricket Board of Control here or the Barbados Cricket
Association itself, points out that the West Indies Cricket Board of
Control could save $3,000 by excluding Roy Marshall, Ken Rickards

and Clyde Walcott.
SHEER “CHEEK”

Of all the consummate misinformed and clumsy “cheek,” this
takes the cake. It is true and painfully obvious that the writer is
foreign to West Indies Cricket history but certainly this earns him
no extenuation for making a nonsense of West Indies cricket.

Does he know that Walcott can make a West Indies team on his
batting, flelding and bowling? Does he know that Walcott dominated

the batting in the West Indies tour to New! Zealand at the end of
the Australian tour?

Whom would he substitute for Roy Marshall and Ken Rickards? |

Does he know that Simpson Guillen has gone off to New Zealand and
could hardly pow help to justify his effusion under reference?
: Why not tell the West Indies Board how they can save $144,000
instead of the $3,000 he mentions? I should like to point out that
even if the figures of $8,000 which the writer quotes would have to
be paid the professionals is correct, that this would be a small sum
— a Sek nadene ato ee eee which people like Walcott
a arsha elped to place higher on the world cric
“Blighty” in 1950, at least remains there, ae aie
WHAT DID THE PROS CONTRIBUTE?
HO made the £30,000 profit for the 1950 tour? Not the West
Indies Cricket Board of Control but included in the list of
workers were Walcott (remember his Lord’s century), Weekes
Worrell, Marshall, Valentine and Ramadhin, 5 .
The Tests against India will be International
results will be ‘as important as those to be obtaine
Australia or any other Imperial Cricket member a
or nonsensical experimenting should be duly r

games and the
d against England,
ind so any juggling
ecorded to be used
rogress come up for

judgment before the bar of West Indian cricket opinion.

COLONEL VIDMER IN NEW ROL

VT HAVE LEARNT that Colonel (Dick) Vidmer wae won both
the Open Shemp any end = pant Play Championship com-
ons a e Rockley P
+ mete beeen Golf Club is about to try

Since Ernest Wakelam,
Professional will not be comi
this winter, the Colonel who i
has volunteered to fi
the best of his ability.

The Colonel admitted at once that he was tak-
ing the job with some misgivings but he has had
considerable experience in e
Championship and the Medal Play Championship
which he has won are the only events not played
off handicap and therefore are the only real cham«
pionships in the true sense of the word. 4

Members of the Rockley Club who were so dis-
appointed at’ the news of Mr. Wakelam’s inability
to come will no doubt be glad to learn that they

the Canadian Golf
ng out to Barbados
s strictly an amateur
Il the professional’s place to



will still be provided with the opportunity for having their games

checked and polished.

VIDMER


















eaching and the Open‘

ADVOCATE



AUTUMN MEETING ENDS

|
@ From Page 1
the second place away
3lue Grass by % a length,
1% lengths behind Twinkle.
TWENTY-THIRD RACE
Worthing Handicap
Three were scratched from
this 9 furlong event for Class B
and lower, leaving a field of ten.
Castle-In-The-Air, who won
ever this distance on Thursday
in run away Style, was given a
top weight of 128%. Tiberian
Lady carried 61 overweight,
Nefari 1, Mrs. Bear 4, Belle Sur-
prise 6 and Dashing Princess 416.
Castle-In-The-Air refused to
start, but the others got off well
with Mrs. Bear leading the field
followed by Dashing Princess,
Tiberian Lady. Coming into the

from
and

straight approaching the stands,
it was Fire Lady followed by
Tiberian Lady, Mrs. Bear, and
Dashing Princess all bunched
beautifully.

Dashing Princess however
went past the Judges for the

first time leading the field as a
result of brisk exchanges. Fire
Lady went back into the lead
around by the five, and carried
the field down the stretch, pull-
ing away after reaching the
x Ww d up at the
i moved u >
s Pepoer. V1 1PS, JOP but Pouestea
brought the filly around the
bend, into the home stretch and
past the winning pole 14% lengths
ahead of Pepper Wine who beat
Tiberian Lady into third place
by two lengths.
TWENTY-FOURTH RACE
Belleville Handicap

Six were scratched jeaving a
field of seven. Of these, First
Admiral, Jolly Miller, Caprice ana
Apollo each carried 1, 2, 3 and 3
Ibs. overweight respectively,

As the gates flew, Apollo
| (Fletcher up) got off first and was
in this position when the field
| passed the stands for the first
time. First Admiral (Yvonet) was
second with March Winds (Hajal)
third, On nearing the five furlong
pole, First Admiral challenged’
land took over from Apollo and
led the field until well past the
three furlong pole. In the mean-
time March Winds had moved up
to second position and Colombus
| who was lying in the fifth posi-
| tion made a challenge coming
| around the bend from the outside.
| The brown Colt passed the field
going up the straight to win com-
fortably by one and a half lengths
from First Admiral who beat
Apollo into second place by a
neck,

TWENTY-FIFTH RACE

Junior Handicap

This was the second five and a
half furlong event for the day.
| Eleven were scratched, leaving a
j field of five of which Battle Line,
| Illusion and Super Jet each car-
ried 5, 7 and 3 lbs. overweight re-
spectively.

Super Jet ridden by Yvonet got
off to a flying start and was tol-
lowed by Apple Sam and Illusion.
Jim'La Rue and Battle Line were
left flat-footed at the gates.

The field singled out in Indian
file by the three furlong pole
with Super Jet still in the lead
} closely followed by Apple Sam.
, Yvonet kept the chestnut colt
‘to the fore until the field came
|around the bend to enter the
straight when Apple Sam (Thir-
kell up) challenged and took over
by the seven furlong pole to win
| comfortably by one and a half
‘Jenghts. Illusion was third
| lengths behind Super Jet.
| TWENTY-SIXTH RACE
| This event was run over s¢ven
jand a half furlongs with a field
|of twelve, ten being scratched.
Of those going, Street Arab, The
Thing and Vectis each carried 4,
8 and 5 lbs. overweight re-
spectively.

Aim Low (Crossley up) led the
field followed by Mary Ann rid-
den by Yvonet, Vectis (Quested),
Magic Gaye and Topsy. The field
raced past the five furlong pole
in this order. Aim Low kept the
lead all the way until they reach-
ed the two furlong pole when
there were some exchanges com-
ing around the bend, they bunch-
ed and Fluffy Ruffles piloted by
Holder came through with a driv-
ing finish to win by half a length
from Topsy who beat Magic Gaye
into s¢econd place by a head.

TWENTY-SEVENTH RACE
Rockley Handicap

Seven were scratched from the
original 13 entries for this event,
the one but last of the Meeting.

It was run over a distance of 9
furlongs, and the handicappers



five



gave Cross Bow a top

130 lbs. Columbus carried 122
pounds. while Assurance and Col-
leton each carried one and five

pounds overweight respectively.

When the gate flew, Cross Bow
was left flat-footed, and the field
got off with Cardinal, Seedling
and Columbus leading that order

At the mile, it was still Assur-
ance and Columbus, but up the
stretch past the stands, Cardinal
took over from Columbus, and the
positions were, Assurance leading
followed by Cardinal, Seedling,
Cross Bow and Columbus.

There were séme quick ex-
changes around the turn by the
Paddock, and when te field went
down the back stretch, it was

Columbus, Cardinal, Cross Bow,
Assurance, Colleton and Seedling
At the half mile it was still
Columbus followed by Cardinal,
and at the three furlong pole
Columbus pulled away from the
field, racing down the, Drill Hall
stretch at a thundering pace.

In hot pursuit were Cardinal
and Cross Bow, and turning into
the home stretch, Cardinal chal-
lenged, but his efforts were futile,
and Columbus raced home the
winner by half length to register
his fourth victory of the Meet.

Cardinal finished second a length
away from Cross Bow.

TWENTY-EIGHTH RACE
Final Handicap

Dashing Princess, Lunways
Mrs. Bear, Flying Dragon and
Belle Surprise were scratched and
9 horses came under the starter’s
orders in the final event of the
Meeting, run over the 744 furlong
distance

The field got off to a good start
with Abu Ali, Yasmeen, Harrow-





een, Firelady and Pepper Wine
moving ,down the stretch past the
Stand h that order. Castle-In-
The-Air had a late jump, and
trailed the field.

There were many quick ex-
changes down the back stretch

but Abu Ali maintained the lead
past the three, down the Hastings
stretch, and into the home stretch
to win by a head from Landmark
who had all along taken the
better of the hard tussle between
herself and Pepper Wine.

Old Boys Beat
Present Boys

The first Past vs Present cricket
match of the Coleridge and Parry
School, played at the school
grounds on Wednesday, resulted in
a victory for the Old Boys.

The Present, having won the
toss, elected bat on a good
wicket and were all out at lunch
for 66. The Past replied with 84
for 5 at close of play.

H, O. Husbands, Old Boy of
Coleridge, made the day’s highest
score of 37 while C. Skinner, Old
Boy of Parry, dominated in the
bowling department taking 5
wickets for 16 runs in 7 overs,

R. M. Griffith of Present top
scored for his team with 22 and
F. Phillips also of Present bowled
well to take 4 wickets for 22 runt
in 6 overs.

- Other good scores were 19 by
E. L. Thompson of Old Boys, 18 by



to

G, Rock of Present and 14 by
C. M. Griffith of Present.
Following are the scores .—

PRESENT BOYS’ 1ST INNINGS

S. Goodridge l.b.w. b
Cumberbatch









L. O'B. Thompson 1.b.w ¥

E. L. Thompson 0
R. M. Griffith b S. Yearwood 22
G, Rock b C, Skinner 18
Cc. M. Griffith b C. Skinner . 14
D. Denny*c Campbell, b R, Chase 5
R, Brome stpd. wkpr. Husbands b

C. Skinner i?" 1
F, Phillips b R. Chase 1
V. Worrell b C. Skinner 0
N. Reeves b C, Skinner 0
M. Jordan not out 1

n.b 3

Total ‘b6
BOWLING ANALYSIS
oO M R y
E. L. Thompson 4 2 7 ¥
B. Cumberbatch 3 0 11 1
C. Greaves 3 0 "8
R. Chas $3 2 12 2
R. A. Yearwood . 4 1 8 1
C. Skinner 7 1 16 5
PAST BOYS’ 1ST. INNINGS
H. O. Husbands stpd wkpr,

C. M. Griffith, b Phillips 37
E. L. Thompson b Phillips 19
R, Chase c Griffith, b Phillips.....; 2
C. Campbell stpd. wkpr. b Phillips.. 7
C, Skinner not out 12
L. Husbands l.b.w. Griffith. i
S. Yearwood not out, 2

b2, Lb. 1, n.b. 1 4

Total (for 5 wickets) 84

BOWLING ANALYSIS

o M R. W

D, Denny 5 3. Oo
L. O'B. Thompson + e bey 0
R. Brome ..,...+.. 5 o 19 60
F. Phillips . ; 6 1 22 4
R. Griffith .,... 2 1 9 1









ent of} Has St.



SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1952
———————————

RACING NOTES
Kitts Produced A Champion ?
By BOOKIE



TH three days of racing to be discussed it is
difficult to pick on any special event for tas
chief topic. 1nere is however a very special LO1se
which everyboay is talking about. ‘Innis horse is Miss
Kosemary Boon’s Coiombus, A black colt stauaing
a litue unaer sixteen hands, he did Not makes his

«ppearance at the meeting until last Monday, Tnis was in the nine
-ucong Snot Hail Stakes .or & class horses and afver lyimg in the rear

» We early stages, Colombus Came trough at We nnisn te wih in a
very convincing manner trom Cardinal. At ne ume It Was Wought
ae woud make a good norse in the future. But no one, ¢xcépr per-
waps his trauncr, knew Just how near that future was. As it wurned
vur Colompbus came Out tne winner of the sweep With No jess tnan
.our wins to his credit, The nature of his wins is quite anoth®r story.

1 cannot remember any horse who ran in only 7% and 9 tuclong

-aces al one meeung aNd nmished up unbeaten, Xe iis xs JUSL WHat
~momous las gone. His weight was lignt enough in tne rst cace be-
ause, not only was he a tWree-year-old, bul a Maiaen aS Wel, in
wi second race however, over 742 furlongs, he was Moved ligut up
v lz/ ibs. and once again he deteated the same Cardinal, ifis ume,
« thougnt, snowing much more dash and speed. Where he iooxea
uke @ baby in his first race he now lookea like a precocious two-
year-oia snowing off, Although Cardinal was sui allowing nim 4 ips.
.¢ the end of the race it was clear that it should have been we ower
way round, p

xesterday Colombus not only beat the F class horses over 742
tiwlongs once again, but west up into D class, and over nine furlongs,
uumetered a sound defeat to an old stayer like Cross Bow. Cross
oow, it must be said, allowed him four more pounds than weignt-
sor age and in addition made a bad start. But at the finish he was
sull 4 lengths behind Colombus who apparently had a litile to spare.
#etween them, once again, came the consistent Cardinal.

It as difficult to find past three-year-olds with which we might
compare Colombus. Atomic II immediately sprung to everyboay's
mind, for he too did not come into prominence unti] the August meet-
ing of his third year. Then all he did was to win one F class race with
very lignt weight from a G class horse. At the end of that montn
he went to Arima and won two races. On the face of it therefore,
appearamces are that Colombus must be even better than Atomic II
was at his age.

This is very interesting indeed because here we are in November
with only five weeks to go before the Trinidad Derby and it is not
until this eleventh hour that we find something capable of giving
Bright Light a run for her money in the Trinidad Derby. Up to the
ume that Colombus won his third race at the Meeting I was still
prepared to make Bright Light a firm favourite. But the manner of
ais fourth win over 9 furlongs leaves me in considerable doubt, It
is now a race worth going to see. ,

Next I must say that I have never enjoyed a race more than |
did the South Caribbean Stakes. After years of campaigning for the
return of mile and a half races to our programme here, and in Trini-
dad, and receiving the proverbial brick wall oppositfon, it was not
only pleasant, but downright astonishing, to return to the isiand
after an absence of only tive months, to find a complete metamor-
phosis in the attitude of the most militant objectors to a race of this
distance,

Mr. Chase’s Landmark is a stayer of a high order and I can think
of few mile and half races that ‘were ever run at such a warm clip.
Castle in the Air seem to have bolted with Johnny Belle in this race,
and it was not surprising that when he passed the judge box for the
first time to see that he had done the 54% furlongs in 1.09. I thought we
were going to witness another race like the famous affair with Alwin
when she ran off with Fred Thirkell, never looked back, and won in
convineing style from Haven, a ptevious Governor’s Cup winner.

But Landmark, who was always well up, took his measure at the
three furlong. She caught and passed him at the foot of the stretch
and then came home in a beautiful driving finish, much as I have
often seen her finish a 5% or 7 furlong race. Young Whittaker,
making his debut as a jockey, rode a good race to bring Flieuxce
second. But mile and a half races I think have been instigated a little
ate for poor Flieuxce. Two years ago when she was wasting her
time ‘on shorter distances with formidable milers like Elizabethan and
Rebate, she might well have won quite a number of them. I also
noticed that Belle Surprise, formerly thought to be a sprinter by her
fast times over 5 furlongs at exercise, ran third not very far behind.

Mr. Fred Bethell’s Abu Ali accounted gor two races in class
A. Much cracked up before the meeting opened, he must have
begun a bit short for he was beaten pointlessly on the first day.
le is not a bad little horse but I can see nothing extraordinary
n him. Yvonet, whose average at winning the first and last races
it a meeting must be very high indeed, set him off at break-neck
peed in the Final Handicap and I found it much to the credit of
he horse that he stayed on so well, But he did not have the tough
»pposition which others have had in this race in the past.

Others in the top classes who deserve mention are Castle in the
Air and Fire Lady, who were both winners over 9 furlongs, Castle
n the Air won a very amazing race. Over the last three furlongs
ne seemed to be running away from them with ridiculous ease.
His run in the mile and a half had apparently made him fighting
fit.

Two who were not winners but who did not fail to impress were
Yasmeen and Pepper Wine, The former gave Abu Ali a taste of
real speed in the Sprinters Stakes which he could not match over
the first three furlongs. It is clear that if she could be properly
prepared she would be much better by far. The latter, now a mare
~~ eight years showed so much speed at the end of the Final
Handicap that one wonders what she would haye done with them
in her prime, It is against a creole like this, long past her best, that’
we can judge our standard as it was, when she and Atomic IIL
were ruling the roost, against the present day lot.

The racing in C class produced some mixed results. Of the
five races in the three days there were four winners. Mr. “Bunny”
Edwards’ newly imported filly Fluffy Ruffles was the double
winner and well deserved this honour. She had shown promise
from exercise and with only two months in the tropics to acclimatise
{ think she did more than is usual for horses who have been here
for such a short time.

Spear Grass and Test Match were two others who won. I find
them similar in the respect that they may win a race just as
easily as they will loose one and so they keep us in the dark
most of the time,

The other winner in this class was the mare Mary Ann. She
was the only other creole, besides Pepper Wine, racing in’ the
imported classes at this meeting and when she defeated them over
542 furlongs giving weight to all except Careful Annie it was
another victory for the late great O.T.C. Will the sires of to-day
keep up the standard of creoles as this horse maintained it through-
out the war years and just after. Comparing their racing form

with his they should be streets above him. But that is left to be
seen.



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SUNDAY,



NOVEMBER 16, 1952

RACING RESULTS B.T.C. Autumn Meeting

AT GARRISON SAVANNAH, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1952
WEATHER: Fine

22nd Race : GRAVESEND HANDICAP—Class “G” and Lower—$500

TRACK: Firm

($165, $80, $40)—51¢ Furlongs



1. TWINKLE, h.b. b.f. Dunusk- Whit Lady, 101 lbs., Mr. 3s. J. Sealy
Jockey Crossley.

o wo

. EN PRIX, h.b. ch.
Nothnagel.
. BLUE GRASS, h.b. ch.h, Roidan-Pet, 114 Ibs.,

Jockey Singh

Jockey Holder.

ALSO RAN: Poplin (Quested 110+2 lbs); Dynamite (Blades 97 Ibs)
Joan’s Star (Belle 103+3 lbs.); Blue Diamond (Newman 133 lbs.).
EL: Win: $3.12; Place:

FINISH: Easy, 1 lengths, I length,

TIME:

irae sue -08.

SE
28rd Race : WORTHING HANDICAP—Ciass “B” and Lower—$900

($300, $150, $55)—9 Furlongs
1, FIRELADY bf. ~~ Phoenix-Dido, 113 lbs., Mr. S. A. Blanchette
Jockey Quested
2. PEPPER WINE: b.m. 0.T.C. -Condiment, 107 lbs., Hon. J. D.
Chandler. Jockey Crossley

3. TIBERIAN LADY b.m. Tiberius- Warm Welcome, 108+6 Ibs., Nr.

Vv. Ch

ALSO RAN; Castle in the Air, (Belle 128 lbs.
1, Mrs, Bear (Holder 1044-4 lbs.) ;
unWw;

5 lbs.)
TIME: 1.5

START.

1.09}. a MUTUE

ase. Jockey Singh)

ashing Princess (O'Neil 109+4 Ibs.
5 4/5.

Test Matc

Jetsam-Sun Maiden 128 lbs., Mr. N. L.
Mr’ George A. Forde

; Nefari (Hajal 97

mais PARI-MUTUEL: Win: $6.90; Place: $3.30; $5.18
RECAST: ft. 80.

Goo FINISH: Easy 1} lengths, 2 lengths.

24th Race : BELLEVILLE HANDICAP—Class “F” and Lower
(3 y.o, & over) —$700, ($235, $115, $40)—74¢ Furlongs

. COLOMBUS br.c. Cobrose-Busy Woman, 130 Ibs. Miss “Rosemary

n.

wo nw

Jockey O'Neil.

Jockey Yvonet.
. bg. Sun Plant Apronette,

Hawkins. Fletcher.

109+-3 Ibs,

. FIRST ADMIRAL b.g. Admiral’s Fig-Flak, 117+1 lbs, Mr. F. E. C.
Bethell.
. APOLLO.

Miss K. C.

ALSO RAN: March Winds (Hajal 98 lbs); Jolly Miller (Quested

100+2 lbs); Chutney (Crossley 122 lbs); Ca
PARI-MUTUEL: Win: $1.8

TIME:

FO AST: $8.
START: Good. FINISH: Easy 14 lengths, neck.
TRAINER

1.35 4/5.

52
Mr, J. Fletcher.

a (Blades 84+-3 lbs.

Place: $1.28, $1.40,
e

CO
25th Race : JUNIOR HANDICAP—Class “F” and Lower (2 y.0.)
$700, ($235, $115, $40)—5% Furlongs

1. AP AM,
area Yocnes

eo w

Yvonet.,

A. Proverbs. Jockey Holder.
ALSO RAN: Battle Line (Hajal 92 Ibs.); Jim La Rue (Blades).

TIME: 1.09 4/5,
FORECAST: $1.80

TRAINER: Mr. J. R. Goddard.

26th Race

2. ToRSY. chi

FINISH: Easy:

B- igisam-Apple Fritter, 128 lbs., Mr. J.B,

SUPER JET, che Jetsam-Wedding Gift, 115 lbs, Mr. F. E. C.
Bethell. “ Jocke

. Tver, bet. Jim Cracker Jack-Will O'the Wisp, 101 Ibs, Mr.

PARI-MUTUEL: Win: $1.26; Place: $1.10, $1.14.
14 lengths, 5 lengths.

: NOVEMBER HANDICAP—Class “C” and Lower—$800,

($265, $135, $50)—744 Furlongs
Te nate b.f. Pink Flower-Golden Fa Fairy, 121 lbs. Mr.
war

Jockey Holder.

Jockey naar

3.

Jock

Emir d’Iran-Killocure, 125 lbs, Mr. K. D. Edwards.

Magic Gaye, +t, Magic Red-Ecilace, 118 lbs. Mr. M. E. R.
urne,



A RAN: Devirs Symphony (Blades 105 lbs.); High and Low
130. 1s, pate
S. ss dls
3. The Thi
Darham Sas" {
TIME: R



27th Race :

etcher 115 lbs.
1.35 4/5.

ood. FOS SH: Close:
Hon, V. C.

)
PARI-MUTUEL: Win:

‘ab (Singh 110+-4 lbs.), Mary Ann (Yvonet
ittaker 115 lbs.); Aim Low (Crossley 109
(James 97+8 ibs.); Vectio (Quested 106+5)

$3.54; Place: 1.54;

4 length, head,

ROCKLEY HANDICAP—Class “D” and Lower—$800,

($265, $135, $45)—9 Werteney



~

y Crossley.
3. BOW, b.g. Burning Bow-Chivalry,
Gale)

Jockey O'Neil.

‘ ‘COLOMBUS br.c, Cobrose- Busy Woman, 122 “Tbs. Miss Rosemary

DINAL b.g. O.T.C.—Biretta 118 lbs. Mr. J. W. Chandler

Banos (Hon. ¥. G&

ALSO

: Assurance (Ali 1021 lbs); Colleton (Singh 109+5

(Belle 106 Ibs.)

'B1 . PARI-MUTUEL: Win $3.26; Place:
04.
FINISH: Close } length,

TRAINER: Mr. J. Fletcher.

28th Race : FINAL HANDICAP—Class “A & B” Only—$1,000,

2. LANDMARK, ch.m. Pylon II-Esperance,

130 lbs. Mr. Cyril
lbs.) ;
$1.70; $1.44.

1 length.

($335, $165, $60)—714 Furlongs

1. ABU-ALI, ch.c. Persian Gulf-Fair Witness, 122 lbs. Mr. F. E. C.
Bethell Jockey Yvonet.

Jockey Singh.

3. PEPPER WINE,
Chandler.
ALSO RAN: Castle in the Air (Belle 123 lbs); Demure (Whittaker
105+2 lbs, Harroween (Quested 128 lbs.);

120 lbs);. Firelady (Fletcher 113 lbs.) Sweet Rocket (Lewis
105+4 Ibs.) .

TIME: 1.33%. PARI-MUTUEL: Win: $3.54; Place $1.54; /1.74;
$2.52

FORECAST: $16.92

START: Good. FINISH: Close 1 head, 1 length.

Jockey Crossley.

TRAINER: Mr. F. E. C. Bethell.

133 Ibs. Mr.
bm. O.T.C.-Condiment

104 lbs. Hon, J. D.

1.36, $1.42, $1.72

’ (Yvonet 118 2),
s (Newman 115 lbs.); Belle fm (Whittaker 102+

Vv. Chase

Yasmeen (Newman



Prize List vs

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

RESULTS OF
2¢ SWEEP

FOURTH Day
TWENTY-SECOND RAC!

PAGE: FIVE







NOV. 16 —

NO. 250

TOPICS













Prize Ticket. No. SMSh
2nd 2189 : 264.00 |
~ 0857 132.00
The prize list is as follows:— wn 338 ’ 86.00 | JOE & ROBERT
Ticket No. Horse Place Amoun' 5th = 19.00)
SS —2161 Colombus 16 Ist $33,286 vo ah -) a5aa 10.00 |
AA—9172 Cardinal 14 2nd 16,648.00 0739 10.00 |
OO—2012 Super Jet li 3rd 8,811.00 «eh holders ooh, tickets nos.
B — 4173 Fluffy Ruffles 10) 4th & Sth( i 1259 , |
GG—2613 Twinkle 10) divide ( 3,916.09 TWENTY-THIRD RACE |
OO—2434 Abu Ali 9 6th 1,958.00 prize Ticket. No Amount |
A — 9901 Apple Sam 8) ith, 8th¢ ae ar a This sovereign Whisky pOssesses that distinction of fevwas
PP— 9133 En Prix 8) and ( 1,958.50 3h 1432 172.99 which will claim your allegiance from the firs: sip.
R — 2625 Landmark 8) yth divide’ ath 3387 86.49 .
, - is BS
72 other horses divide $271.94 each. oth en 39.00 IisHL Ni D
LIST OF HORSES DRAWN se 230 10.00
10th 013 10.00
Baie Fire Lads, Bead timn Le Mus, a173—Fiutty Rufies, gdm lMaglg BEM lakers, no UEEN
C—5352 Dashing Princess, 9998—Careful Annie. 1314—Darham ..38 Pode gtacal
Jane, 5525—(Cons.) Jinx. , rie Amenst | The waters boys are troubled
D—7888 Viceroy, 2061—Flieuxce, 1021—Caprice, 2831—Trim- *T! ‘ee $260.58 And Tehabod le siamoed SCOTCH WHISKY
brook, 3095—Vectis. 2ad 1780 434.62 _Up outside the door post
i 4179 217.31 A split is in the camp lel
F—5341 Joan’s Star, 8663—Devil's Symphony, 6224—Test Match, +"! * a Mp0 | Who told you so? asked Robert w. $. owRac a CO. LID., BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS
9421—Frederick The Great. ih 4383 10.00 And he replied to Joe |
H—9925 Erench Flutter, 3582—Stirling Dawn. 7h 3073 10.00 One of the vary comrades MAC HONATD & SNM TO OUSTHLERS CRIT
I—-2799 Sea Foam, 5213—Vigilante $5.00 cach to holders of tickets nos n Friday ni sald sc . merry a
seers Soe Coes, Wee ee Dole ee 0 re OE ins wtietestersce andindl and hot: onan IN CUBA MEN WEAR
—6417 eerschaum, —Cross Bow. ‘ wTH RACE The hottest Joe have seen
L—6147—Mary Arn, 1153-—Harroween. Poize rweNryen No Amount Twas then Lou ise tae ant
Q—6228 Yasmeen, 0986—Street Arab, 6987 Tiberian Lady, 03382— st Be y ee, Upon the European
Betsam. gra 2161 258.82 | 1t really was untimels
0084 5 © give a friend “the slide |
R—2625 Landmark, 9028—Chutney. oh 0109 10.00 | Because we were all consciou | mm OYGAS HM € L
S—9953 Tlopsy, 2942—Spear Grass. oe a0 seth se neigere. of Genet a It's getting cold outside tee
T—4003 Hi and Low. eee

V—2470 Jolly Miller.





0085. Can it be fair dear comrades
Right in the dead of night





TWE -SIXTH RACE
W—5426 Battle Line. Prige at hs et, ne Aageens | To throw one through a window linen—
X—9339 Aim Low, 4093—The Thing. i Gar Ses a8 Can you say this is right
Z—5356 Belle Surprise, 7296—Blue Nelly. ue : 3rd 4084 282.71 ‘Tell us, Gea eambades tel! us |
AA Bear, 2390—Driftwood, $172—-Cardinal! h 2828 141.35 Can you ali call it fair
BB—8371 Contralto, 7983—Pepper Line, 4208—Jealousy h om) ee To “sack” Your year-round girl friend the n’s
CC—8459 Castle in the Air, 3011—Lunways, 2353—Street Arab, {i} ors 10.00 | Now Christmas drawing near } ma es
8863— Assurance. 8th 6790 10.00 { Where is that patty spirit |
‘ 9h 3903 10,00 ay ell us comrades, pray
DD—9587 Apollo, 8051—Seedling, oth 3590 Oe | seehes of man's canvictior
EE—4796 Nit Wit. th 3360 10,00, "Must be banished? Nay f b i
FP—1110 Furst Admiral ee ge aR, PR. SRO | ody. abric
GG—9290 Rambler Rose, 8765—Poplin, 2613--Twinkle, 8784- 18, 6121 2086, 2088, 4083, 405, 2827 SR rite et Lomamuaion
Wonderful. 8.29 TWENTY-SEVENTH RACY And substitute the same time
‘ . Lukewarm Democracy”
II—8765 Diamond Queen. Prise ee Arvount | . . |
KK—7287 March Winds, 7586—Pepper Wine. gna 5086 56774 Freedom of speech and action
LL—0801 Nefari, 6803—Gavotte, 6220--Magic Gaye. ted 1524 283,87 | se aa . aieura. beantes |
MM—8865 Galashiels, 3772—-l\lusion, : bs 4th roe 0.0" | \Thap any five year plan
NN—3801 Blue Diamond, 7968—Demure, 8143 Fils D'Iran, 5172-+ on 4980 10.00 | “aha
Dynamite. $5.00 each to holders of tickets tos.) Mut spineless men must suffer



positions in the struggle to reach
the top twelve before Feb. 1
when the team which will re-
present Rockley in Trinidad will
be selected, were Colin Thomas,
who jumped two rungs with
victories over A. W. Tempro and
Dorian Cole; Ted Benjamin, who
played himself into the first
division by beating Geoffrey
Manning; P. D, McDermott, who
started a long and potentially
sensational climb by defeating
Cole; Keith Murphy and William
Grannum,. Several others accept-
ed challenges from their pursuers
and successfully defended their
positions.

The ladies were almost as active
with Mrs, Brenda Wilson regaining
No. 1 position by defeating Mrs.
Doreen Beasley, while Mrs. Vera
Manning moved upward with ‘a
victory over Mrs, Peggy Smith in
an extra-hole match.

White Hat Thursday

While more than a dozen
challenges remain outstanding,
attention next week will be center-
ed on the Medal Play Champion-
ship and President’s Cup events,
which will be played over 36
holes, eighteen on Saturday and
eighteen on Sunday. The Cham-
nionship will go to the low gross
score as it is one of the two
cratch events contested annually,
and the President’s Cup will go
to the low net score for the two-
round effort.

With nineteen entries already
filed, a field of thirty or more is

expected to have signed up before
Thursday night, when the entries
close and a White Hat auction will
be conducted by Ted Benjamin at



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1133, 1135, $985, S987, 1523, 1525, 4354 And sometimes stand defeat }







OO—2434 Abu Ali, 2012—Super Jet, 7262—Flying Dragon. 356 They should like giants cry, “No!” |
PP—2117—My Love IT, 9133—En Prix, ¥ TWENTY-RIGHTH RACE fae Peete See Shey eee
QQ—5884—Colleton. co 7 groasz3| Like the three Hebrew children
RR—7211 Mr. Friendship. ond 2212 "585.85 i be should say t ep can’t do’
3S . . : ‘o-day they would be honoured
SS—2161—Colombus, 2612—Cavalier. ith be ‘ae By Robert, Joe and Lou | Yes, more and more
ath ue iO | They've jumped out of the fry. par | men are demanding
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ae hor 10.00 And boys riuiit out the: fire ‘ Moygashel ’ fabries for
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played _ simultaneously next vacancy left open by the Captain Mrs. V, Manning defeated Mrs. vedi = se eosiaght pail
Saturday and Sunday, the Rockley and Vice-Captain at the time of ! Smith. _ | “Toast now with J & R ah
divot-diggers turned their energies the annual meeting in September. ,, M's. Wylie defeated Mrs. N.} ang when you “try the new plan f
to Challenge Ladder matches with The results of the Challenge !°™Pr0- Give it “five years’ from the pa SHEL
* some spectacular results, Ladder matches during the past _ Mrs. E. Vidmer defeated Mrs, sored b PURE CREASE-RESISTING LINENS R£GD,
Among those to better their week and the challenges, indicat- ‘VY. MacIntyre, sponsore y





ing the date they were posted, ..Mrs. H. King defeated Mrs, v.|
follow, Players are reminded that ’@™"ine. |

J&R BAKERIES



challenges must be accepted. within Challenges f A. S. ’ den & Son (Barbados) Lid.
ten days of posting or a walk- WNovember 11—Mrs. Wylie chal | makers o Sales West Indies:—
over conceded, ienged Miss Atwell, anal | ENRICHED BREAD Stevenson & Son Ltd., P.O. Box 1704 NASSAU, Bahamas.
MEN’S LADDER November 12—Mrs, King | *
‘, jlenged Mrs, MacIntyre. th blend f et od a fat
4. W. Tears’ deltas. cate a aaa Sr) AOS Ae ennaee 6 sear Ee eae me Nan
. . Y sfeatec . cha ged ‘Ss. . D 6

Inniss, November 13 — Mrs, Grace} J&R RUM

Peter Greig defeated V. Hunte. challenged Mrs, Smith,

me Oe Benjamin defeated G,
Manning.

P. D. McDermott defeated D,

Cole.

D. Hinkson
FitzGerald.

Keith Murphy
King.

W. Grannum defeated S,

Colin Thomas
Tempro,

Colin Thomas defeated D, Cole.

A. W, Tempro defeated D, Cole.

Challenges

November 4—Daysh challenged
Maskell.

November
ed Norris,

November 8—-Atkinson challeng- |
ed Bayley.

Noy, 9. Greig challenged Inniss. |

November 11—Murphy chal-
lenged Lisle Smith.

Nevember 11—MecDermott chal-
lenged Kellman,

defeated G A.
defeated H. V }

Toppin, |
defeated A. W

)-—-Osborn challeng- |

November 11—Benjamin chal-
lenged Niblock |
November 11 — Hinkson chal-
lenged Lord Dangan. |
Novembtr 12 — Eastham chal-
lenged King. }
November 18—Cole challenged |

Tempro.

November
lenged Grace

13—Grannum chal-

have

PTIC OINTMENT

scalds, and
insect bites from the
entry of harmful bacteria,
and stimulates healing.
Keep a tin handy for

The Finest Bieycte Butt To-day

i\| See them now at =
Barbados Co-operative
Cotton Factory Ltd.
Auto Tyre Co.

| Trafalgar Store

AND AT ALL LEADING DEALERS
THRCUGHOUT THE ISLAND

at a touch
Obtuinabie everywhere.









Fad
i

A
=
j



PAGE SIX

The Truth in |
‘Your Horoscope

Would you like to know without an:
cost what the Stars indicate for you, som
of your past experiences, your strong ar.d



























weak points, ete Here is your chance
i » test FREE the skill of Pundit Tabore,
India’ r- ost
| Astrologer
' plying
the ancient sci
art ‘ }
€ ace }
is prec |
a t sound
ractical advice |
mtained in his '
oroscope on ;
Business. Specu-
jation, Finances,
cp , ics Love -_ affairs,
Ferguson Fabrics Lave = nmaies,
Lotteries. Trav-
bring beauty els, Changes, Lit-
me | igation, Lucky
into_ your life... Times Sickness |

| ete., have astounded educated people the |
world over. GEORGE MACKEY of New |
York believes that Tabore must pox+ some sort of second-sight. |
To popularise his system Tabore wili
send you FREE your Astral Interpreta
tion if you forward him your ful! nanmv

vith the loveliest, most colourful
design you've ever seen... in

prineil seersuckers , cambrics ,

(Mr. Mrs. or Miss, addresses and date o
voiléand haircords that wear birth all clearly written by yourself. No|
money wanted foi Astro’ogical work

i ir 0} postage etc., but send 1/- tn B.P.O. ‘(No

with ae of freshness | Stamps or Coins) for stationery. testi

i moniais and other interesting Iterature
without changing You will be amazed at the remarkable
accuracy of his statements about you
and your affairs. Write now as tnis offer
may not be made again Address
PUNDIT TABORE, (Dept. 213-E:, Uppe:
| Forjett Street, Bombay 26.. India. Postage
to India is 4 cents

|

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|



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satisfaction assured or the material will be replaced.
Always look for the name Ferguson on the selvedge.

stm eta aT

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SUNDAY ADVOCATE

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1952

HISTOR Y | Children Get The

goes to | World Talking
$a PEC AT) nx canon avon wanmne





—_—



OXFORD.

Tre Coronation begins to |THE woman from Bagdad had

have an influence on flown to see the dreamy spires
United States fashions. of Oxford.
Jewels emphasise crowns, | Rlaring at us were the raucous
velvet is becoming one of the sounds of the hurdy-gurdy; the
most popular fabrics, and shrieks from the giant dipper.
Cooma Feta omens | Oxtord wa" having is, ant
Some designers,’ Looking St. Giles Fair bang in the mid-

further, have found ideas in dle of the city.

A ; ; My c anion was vice-president

ish histor ¥ companion p
oe Serie hat of her country’s National Coun-
here: cil for Social Welfare.

Twenty countries have sent 200
delegates here to the conference
oi the International Union of
Family Organisations.

It is = significant sign of the times.
A proof of the importance
attached internationally to three
things: the stability of marriage.
the function of the family, and
the happiness of children.

Dr. David Mace, pioneer of mar-
riage guidance, links the three:
“A couple. unhappily married
find compensation for their

| frustration by over-mothering
their children. A happy couple
will leg their children free.”

And these are the messages the
nations have brought:—

BELGIUM: “Every mother here
I | with ten or more children gets
lersey, | a medal. A League of Large

| Families helps all Belgian
| parents with four or more chil-
dren,”

LEFT: Ballerina-length evening dress in velvet. It has a crinoline skirt quilted in a diamond pattern

and trimmed with matching bows. By Dorter’ neck. By Dorville.
Cocktail dress in fine black wool with “bolsville.

Focus On The Neckline

RIGHT:



KING ARTHUR'S COURT inspired |
this hat in ruby red felted
the chin

fastened under

LONDON, By DOROTHY BARKLEY cues damson, almond ae and | en vee 3 ery the

, » ple ; 7 : . »lack mixture is suggeste or yore coal i
ait Wena Pie wodime po suggestion. Fur collars are at- afternoon wear. The dress has a som bail aateeabal family by
here abs two suggestions from tached not to the suit collar, but high neck, slender skirt, and a An MP. frots TYALY ins K
the current Dorville collecticn $a". individual crepe “vest” flaring side panel. | ah oo

showing two up-to-date styles of which is worn beneath the suit so Chesterton: “A child is sent to

i oe { | schoo ly when
: that the fur overlaps the suit A second, more original used school for instruction only w
eens “ fi collar. In this way, the suit will for tartan flannel is for a full} wan too late fo ee oe:
First comes the “bolster” col- stil] be wearable long after the length hostess or dinner gown.| : at s ont has kage o~
lar, illusjrated here on a dress Of fur fashion has died out. The plaid here is in bottle green eo oe gg at ’
fine black wool. Obviously taking ; fitted bodice and full skirt, with always by his mother.
‘ts inspiration from the ruff, it As a postscript to their collec- the fullness springing from the | And AMERICA and BRITAIN
adds an unusual touch to an tion, Dorville have designed a

. . hip yoke,
otherwise completely plain dress
end makes the perfect foil for

jewellery. Although shown here

|} are teaching the Continentals
in this cenference a good deal
about giving children sound

complete section for the young
working girl, or as she is usually

J New Ideas in Plastics
termed these days, the “Budget”

| sex education and preparing
on a wool dress, it could be made girl. ‘These clothes have shed With the British Plastics Ex- adolescents for marriage.
in a wide variety of materials to much of that “utility” look dur- hibition in London, plastics are |
suit different climates,



ing the past year and now show a
mose faithful reflection of cur-
rent fashion, Suits here follow
the “middy” line, dresses have
flat, all-round pleated skirts, and

—L.E.S.
once more in the news. One of the
newest developments is the use of |
“electric welding” for making the |
seams. This makes the traditional

way of sewing seams on plastic |



CRUSADER HELMET is in white | - _

velour, circled with jewels. Flaps may | i >
FROM SMALL .

By way of contrast is the sim-
plicity of the neckline suggested
for evening, This latest variation,

be worn over the ears or tied |
in showing the trend away from







: fashionable fringe trimmings are materials olq fashioned. Chief
ihe completely strapless top, on suit pockets. Colours include advantages of the new method are } Wy "tS Vt 4
Available favours not the halter-neck, but tobacco brown, and shades of blue longer wearing and absence of | 4
narrow matching straps, thin as varying from sky to blueberry perforation marks. f ’
at most good shoelaces. The short ballerina- ; . he i
stores length dress has firmly establish- Selected for special mention are One of the main features of the } ,

ed itself as an evening fashion, a pinafore dress in a grey and exhibtion was the fashion parade

SS particularly amongst those who white flecked tweed, which is arranged to show the wide use of | fore

1 P a , " prefer to wear evening dress for worn with a matching stole and plastics in clothing. Raincoats in tewil ,
Hell | real | S the theatre. This design, in black white polo-necked sweater, and a plastic materials are intended for | n ‘
be velvet, is quilted all over in a middy-line jumper suit in Black evening as well as day wear. The Tash x

LIQUID SILVER POLISH diamond pattern, trimmed with Watch tartan. It has a flat-pleat- glamorous evening coats are far

bows, and had a crinoline skirt.
For day wear, Dorville offered
the fur-trimmed



ed skirt, and a low V-neckline 1

moved from their prosaic ser-
which can be dressed up with

viceable ancestor, the “mae.” A}

; »
BEGINNINGS



suits so much either scarves, choker necklaces full plastic satin evening coat, |
the vogue this season, Most wo- or flowers. had contrasting turn-back cuffs |
men, who have refused to buy y : and long tuxedo fronts, and a}| cRNA, 38 6 Grae, ton
suits or coats with fur attached And talking of tartan, from theatre coat was in a satin with @ little better after the addition
becaused they will be outdated Paris comes news of gay tartan a delicate filigree ec

pattern.
long before outworn, will be in-

flannel invading the cocktail and
terested

of a simple box with a shelf,
evening scene. A tartan flannel —L.E.S.

| PAGEBOY CAP is in wool jersey | pyyallpapered inside. |
wear a border of rubies and } roe ‘a lok ora tates —
| gold braid, | (39s, 6d.), fitted with a ball.

London Express Service. | shade (around £1), gave
What’s Cooking In The Kitchen |

indirect lighting,
4 PAIR of wall
CROQUETTES

in Dorviile’s practical





brackets to match
(52s. 6d. each)—one each side
of the fireplace—completed

the fashionable woman wears

KAYS E FR nylon stockings









For PAINTS, VARNISHES
and the Useful Household Items
for the Coming Xmas Season

Call At
Establisned



Incorporated



es
specially
tml These easy croquettes can be
packed tin: served with cocktails or with meat
or fish, or as a main dish.
Croquettes of Omelettes

Eggs 3

Salt

Oil or margarine for frying

Butter 1 oz.

Flour 1 heaped tablespoonful

Milk 1 glass not too full

Pepper

Nutmeg

Breadcrumbs

1 beaten egg.

Beat the 3 eggs in a bowl and
add 1 pinch of salt. Put a tiny
bit of oil in a small frying pan
and add 1 tablespoonful of eggs

‘4 inch wide. Put 1 oz. of butter
in a saucepan and when melted
add the tablespoonful of flour, let
it fry for a few seconds then add
the glass of

milk, Let the
sauce thicken then add _ salt
and pepper and nutmeg (if

you like). Let it get even thicker
and do not forget to stir all the
time. When ready take off the fire
and when still warm add the
strips of the omelettes. Pour it out
on the kitchen table and let it get
completely cold. Then shape the
eroquettes, dip them in flour, in
the beaten egg, in the bread-
crumbs and fry with margarine,
Green Croquettes
Butter 2 oz.

Grated cheese 2 tablespoonsful
Breadcrumbs

Oil, margarine or lard to fry.

With the butter, the flour ‘and
the milk make a very thick
white sauce, season with salt and
peper and let it cool. Take the
ball of spinach, squeeze all the
water from it and sieve it. Add
the spinach puree to the white
sauce, add two egg yolks, two
tablespoonsful of grated cheese
and mix well. Take one table-
spoonful of the mixture at a time,
shape the croquettes, dip them
in flour, then in the beaten egg
(if you want to economise you
can use the white of the eggs)
and then in the breadcrumbs, Fry

Salt
A bit of lime skin

Sugar 1 tablespoonful

Butter 2 oz,

Egg yolks 2

Breadcrumbs

Oil or lard to fry the croquettes.

Put the milk in a saucepan and

when it starts to boil add the!
semolina, stirring all the time |
with a wooden spoon, Add 1

pinch of salt and a tiny piece of
lime rind. Let the semolina cook
thoroughly and when ready take

it off the fire, take off the skin
of the lime and add the sugar, |
the butter and the 2 egg yolks.

Mix well, pour the mixture in a

transformation like

|






busned ~T. HERBERT LTD

ROEBUCK 8ST, and MAG DANE First In Preference the World Over
Copr. 1950 Borden Co. Lnternat'l Copr. Reserved



SOROS RPO OOPS OOP POPP POPS, |

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Flour 2 tablespoonsful.

Milk 1 glass

Salt

Cooked spinach a big ball

Eggs 2 )

in margarine, lard or oil as you

at a time making small omelettes. like.

Make as many omelettes as you
can with the three eggs. When
cool cut in small strips

big dish and let it get cold. |
Shape some small croquettes dip |
them tin the breadcrumbs and |
fry them in oil or lard, or mar- |
garine.

Sweet Croquettes
Milk % pint
Thin semolina 4 oz.

them







SO
Satisfying
... this

Chase

‘e
“)\ “BB
| ¢ -








Sanborn.

The famous threefold action of PHENSIC
tablets RELIEVES PAIN, SOOTHES

NERVES, COUNTERACTS DEPRES- ce anne
SION. No matter how intense the pain, no ee area










matter how weary your nerves, how essed
you feel, PHENSIC tablets will hes you
relief and comfort, quickly and safely. Re-
member this ——- PHENSIC tablets neither
harm the heart nor upset the stomach.

Don’t accept substitutes. Keep a supply of
PHENSIC tablets by you! or

Phensic

FOR RHEUMATIC PAINS, LUMBAGO
HEADACHES, NEURALGIA



> OS

TWO TABLETS

BRING QUICK
RELIEF

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the heavenly flavor that makes every sip
@ satisfying experience. With Chase &
Sanborn you get all the flavor your cup can
hold. Ask for Chase & Sanbori; todays

» FLU, COLDS & CHILiS /








SUNDAY,



By ERIC C. HISCOCK

Susan and I had often thought
what a delightful and exciting
thing it would be to make a voy-
age around the world in our own
small sailing vessel, taking our
time and visiting on the way all
the places which we imagined
might be interesting or entertain-
ing. For a long time this had
seemed like an unlikely dream of
the Never-Never land; and then
last year we suddenly realised
that if we sold almost everything
we possessed we cuuld just raise
enough money to have a boat built
specially for that purpose, and to
fit her out and provision her for
such a voyage which might take
three or four years. The fact that
I make a precarious living by
writing about sailing and travel
naturally had something to do
with our sudden decisien to have
a 30-foot sailing yacht built and to
see how far we could get in her.

We chose a length of 30 feet not
beeause we consider that is the
ideal size for an oecean-going
vessel, but simply beeause we
could not afford anything larger.
Having owned two previous Wan.
derers, one of which called at
Barbados early this year, it was
natural that we should christen
the new boat Wanderer IM, She
was completed and launched in
March, since when we have lived
aboard her without spending one
single night ashore

Now, if you ever come to plan
your voyage around the world,
you will quickly find that you
need something more than an
atlas, for although on a map the
sea always looks calm and blue
and free from dangers, it is in

NOVEMBER 16,

WANDERER HT SAILS WEST



1952

can of course beat against a wind
her progress is then very slow
and uncemfortable. Se we decided

We would sail by way of the
north-east trade wind’ to the West
Indies and 6n through the Pana-
ma Canal to the Pacific where we
should have a large proportion of
fine weather and fair winds until
nearing Australia. Beyond that
we made no definite plans, but we
hoped to sail up inside the Great
Barrier Reef through Torres Strait
to the Duteh East Indies, Singa-
pere and Ceylon before heading
south to the Cape of Good Hope,
The south-east trade. wind in the
South Atlante wil) then bring us
to the West Indies again on our
way to New York, and from there
the great westerlies will carry us
home to England,

It is g@ long, long way. and of
fourse we May never succeed, but
our more immediate problems
‘were the notorious Bay of Biscay
and the, West Indian hurricane
season. The former decided our
time of departure from England
towards the end of July, so as to
be clear of the Bay before the
autumn gales set in; but as one
should not arrive on the western
side of the AYantic before Novem-
ber so as to avoid any risk of en-
countering a stray hurricane, we
would have plenty of time to cruise
along the Spanish and Portuguese
coasts and among the off-lying
islands.

Storing up the yacht for such
an undertaking as we had in mind
also needed a good deal of plan-
ning and forethought, Obviously
we could not carry enough tinned
provisions for the whole trip, but
we wished to take as much as we



ERIC HISCOCK, who has written several books on Cruising, types out
this article for the “Advocate” in the cabin of Wanderer III in Car-
lisle Bay.

veality very rarely smooth, in
places it is studded witn danger-
ous rocks and shoals, and there
are periods when it is unsafe to
sail in certain areas because of
hurricanes, cyclones, tornados and
other bad weather systems, So be-
fore laying your plans in any de-
tail, you will of course make a
careful study of the wind and cur-
rent charts of the oceans you
intend to cross, and of the Pilots,
as the books of sailing directions
for all seas and ceasts are called.
That is just what we did, and then,
having mapped out a rough route,
we got the large scale charts and
found out which of the countries,
islands and harbours we wished to
visit were suitable for a craft as
gmall as ours, and what dangers
we would haW: to circumnavigate.
It surely i$ a fascinating occupa-
tion, and it filled most of our spare
moments while Wanderer III was
taking shape in the builder's shed

We decidea 10 make our voyage
west about so as to keep as much
as possible in. warm latitudes and
fn the trade winds; there are of
an almost,permanent nature and,
blowing from an easterly
direction, would be fair for our
purpose, Although a sailing vessel




Healthy, happy
“ Fruit Salt”.
“ Fruit Salt” is the

could find room for because of the
foreign currency difficulties; our
minimum requirements should be
at least enough to take us to Bar-
bacdos, where we could re-provis-
ion for the passage to Panama and
on towards New Zealand, So be-
.fore leaving England we took
aboard tinned meat, fruit, vege-
tables, milk, biscuits and many
other things. When the cases con-
taining these came aboard at
Cowes it seemed at first impossi-
ble that we could ever fing room
for them; but Wanderer has good
storage space, and eventually
everything was disposed of, Each
locker, shelf, and spice was num-
bered, and in a book we made a
notg of the contents of each, then
as our stores were used we crossed
each tin off one by one so that at
any moment we might know
exactly how much remained, In
addition we carried as much fresh
‘rult and vegetables as we thought
would keep. together with flour,
rice, sugar, and other dry pro-
visions. We carried 70 gallons of
fresh water in three separate
tanks, each of which could be
filled or drawn from independently
of the others, so that if one were
to spring a leak or its contents

families take ENO’S
Pleasant, refreshing

gentle corrective

most of us need to keep the system regular. ENO’S is net

euitable for children—and for anyone with a delicate stomach.

EN!

relieves over-acidity, a most frequent cause of indigestion,

heartburn and flatulence.

unsuitable food or drink. A dash of ENO’S at any time of day

soothes and settles the stomach upset by

makes

a sparkling, invigorating health-drink. Keep ENO’S handy |



!



Eno’s

SPECIALLY
RECOMMENDED
2\ for IRREGULAR ACTION,
| SICK HEADACHE,
BILIOUSNESS,
INDIGESTION, ete

Sold in bottles for
lasting freshness.



52/ait

(a me a

SUNDAY



a eee ee mLCLC LUCTUS

ADVOCATE

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long-lasting service on any type
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the Vanguard offers you power,
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her every wish fulfilled—By Bet.
tinas of Greystone (ph, 4941).

A PAGE OUT OF SANTA'S
BOOK and there we were in his
own @®howreom — brimful with
fascinating variety of mechanical
Toys and amusing Novelties
Crackers and bulging Stockings,
while Xmas trees laden with
sparkling Decorations and a host
of delightful Children’s Books
lined the walls above Scoot-
ers and Mode] Cars — well, if it
isn’t the B'DOS CO-OP. COTTON











































PAGE SEVEN .

°

I dreamed I was a
fashion figure in

madenforms

SWEET INTERLUDE BY BLACK
MAGIC how time flies! No
gooner do you open a tin of won-
derful..no, delightfully delicious
Black Magic Chocs than one
eager mouthful leads to another..
and another .. and another. .and
then the tell-tale rustle of paper
—sorry, folks! did m®an to save
one for you. But then, someone's
sure to have you on-their Black
Magic (4%, 1 and 1% Ib. tins)
list for Christmas!
s * .
CANADA'S NEWEST IN ELEC-
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time and effort, extract fruit
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Dryers in this interesting range at
Central Foundry Ltd., ph,4200,
©

INTERESTING BOOKS TO READ
— amid holiday beauty, as an
escape from citified routine, as a
goodbye to a traveller, but above
all. the Advocate Stationery sug-
gests a book as the fascinating
Gift for Christmas! Come on in,
have a look — fact, fun, fiction,
books to match the mood and
manner of every man! While in,
check on Gift Stationery and














WANDERER IIL
were to go bad we

would not lose
the lot. We also loaded photo-
graphic films, bromide paper and

had come over the

hurrying clouds and

weather:
succession of depressions with low
rain swept

the Hiscock’s 30-foot yacht sailing home. They plan to sail around the world in her.

breaking
side, and the ceaseless, senseless
howling of the wind

a

against the windwara

in the rig-

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chemicals enough for three to jn from the Atlantic and “Wan- ging, coupled with the violent texture. .in choosy colour range, yrange of colours. Time, too, to Be true! Here’s the firm, flat-
four years. as well as a large qerer” had per first taste of bad motion, tend to lower the morale;}>),,Wide at $3.10. A ae bring sunshine right into the) tering support to give you a
supply of toilet and medical weather, For forty-eight hours after a few hours we longed far selection of beautiful Flow home for Christmas, add new dream :
necessities. she lay hove-to while a real Bay the return of better weather, aj#terials (lovely Silks, too) fresh charm and beauty with home- really y figure . . .to make
But that was only one side of of Biscay gale blew its hardest; gleam of sunshine and peace. But {QU of phe wreppinee ~ en sile brightening paints — from Plan- your silhouette truly fashion-
the stores problem. In addition put, apart from one great sea eventually that gale blew itself News by the Yard’ at Sahely’s! “ations Lt . ph.4400, 4534. able! Disco Ove “es lif
we had to carry spares of every which came aboard before she out as gales always do, and after ¥ ” , . . : ver Over-ture’s lift,

kind, for we did not know when
or where we might be able to re-
place anything worn or damaged.
Spare hemp and wire rope and
Canvas, twine, shackles and all
the other rigging necessities;
burners, prickers and nipples for
the paraffin cooking stove; chim-
neys and wicks for the lamps;
spare parts for the w.c. bilge and
galley pumps; paint and varnish
enough for three refits; carpen-
ters’ and engineers’ tools; nails,
screws and bolts of all sizes; bat-
teries for the wireless set; springs
and pawls for the sneet and hal-
yard winches... But there! I am
sure I need not continue with the
list, for you have only to imagine
for yourself the thousand and
one things you would have to buy
if you knew that all the shops
were yoing to be close for a
period of at least four months and
seme for perhans four years.

that for a moment

cowls could be seen

in the

repeat; the noise

li was a great day for us when
little “Wanqerer” slipped quiewy
away out of the Soient aimos:
unnoticed. We had done all we
ars could to prepare her for

er voyage, and now it was up to
us to make our dream come true,
Light, baffling winds retarded
our progress down the English
Channel for several days, and
then a fine strong northernly
came along to drive us on our
way to Ushant — the turning
point for ships off north-west
France, But there it died to leave
us wallowing in the grey, oily
swell; so, with the crisp bread
and cheap wine of France very
much in our thoughts, we drifted
and motored (“Wanderer” has a
tiny engine of 4 h.p. for just such
occasions) into the Rade de Brest
where we anchored off a_ little
white-washed village and_ the
only sound was the hum of insects
and the distant drone of a thresh-
ing machine.

For ten days
easy-going life in France
the anti-cyclone with its light
variable airs drifted away, and
then we put to sea determined to
reach Spain without further de-
jay. But a change for the worse

we enjoyed the

while

reached warm latitudes.
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was properly hove-to, filling the
cockpit and burying the deck so
only the up-
turned dinghy and the ventilating
above the
seething mass of green water, she
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cabin cooking, eating,
sleeping and reading. But riding
out a gale in a small yacht is not
an experience one would wish to
of the

- use cleverly

six days and nights at

reached El Ferrol on

west coast of Spain.
We stayed a

seemed very pleased to see us,
making day sails along the coast
towards Bayona with nearly

mile passage down the

@ On Page 12

inhospi-
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THE MID-DAY SUN was a bit of a problem when the Hiscocks

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PAGE EIGHT

BARBADOS aif ADVOCATE

== see Pave wee] €



(tinted oy ihe Advocate Co., Ltd., Bros@ ~.., Bridgetown.



Sunday, November 16, 1952

FANCY MOLASSES

THE slump in sales of Barbados Fancy
Molasses to Canada this year has been a
cause of anxiety to everyone engaged in its
production, packaging and marketing. It
is obvious that a total sale of approximate-
ly one half less than last year could not be
viewed with equanimity by those engaged
in the industry. The visit to Canada on
Thursday of three representatives of
B.E.M.A.—the marketing association of all
the island’s exporters of fancy molasses
will have surprised no one who was aware
of the falling sales in our exports of fancy
molasses. The representatives have gone
to Canada to survey the entire situation of
the Canadian market for fancy molasses
and they will report to B.E.M.A. on their
return on what steps should be taken to
ensure the retaining of the Canadian
market. The decision to send representa-
tives to Canada was hastened because the
normally greatest buyer of Barbados fancy
molasses not only made no purchases from
here this year but actually took in a tanker
filled with the equivalent of 2,000 pun-
cheons of Cuban fancy molasses. The ar-
rival of bulkshipped fancy molasses in
Canada from another Caribbean sugar
island could not but have a disquieting
effect on the exporters of Barbadian fancy
molasses. It would, however, be rash to
suppose that because Cuban bulk-shipped
fancy molasses are being bought in Canada,
the sales of Barbadian molasses in pack-
ages cannot continue for many years
longer. The representatives of BEMA, who
will make an extensive tour of Canada and
are expected also to visit the United States
are going to Canada with open minds. They
want to discover at first hand the reasons
for the extraordinary low sales of Barba-
dian fancy molasses in Canada this year.
It is possible that their findings will have
some reference to the need for bulk-
shipment from Barbados if some of the
Canadian market is to be retained. But it
is also possible that they will discover other
reasons for this year’s low sales. ,



So many factors operate in the market-
ing of fancy-molasses that it would be im-
prudent to suppose that bulk-shipment
‘and only bulk-shipment can guarantee the
maintenance of the Canadian market, for
Barbadian molassés: It is trae that’ ship-
ment in packages is much more expensive
than shipment in bulk. The Hon. H. A.

Cuke in’ a memorandum published as an —

appendix to the report of the committee
appointed to enquire into all aspects of
the fancy molasses industry in Barbados
revealed that whereas the cost at that time
of shipping 100 gallons of molasses in bulk
was $3.60, the cost of shipping 100 gallons
in vackages was $27.43. The cost of pro-
duction )f fancy molasses today is almost
double that of the price quoted f.0.b., to the
Canadian buyer in 1946 and the presert
f.o.b., price quoted today is almost three
times what it was in that year. Besides the
inereased price of Barbadian fancy molass-
es the Canadian importer has to consider
also the effect that a rising standard of
living in Canada has on the buyers of fancy
molasses. The Canadian retailer of fancy
molasses has to sell the product to the
Canadian housewife in attractive pack-
ages and has to advertise the product if
the housewife is not to buy sugar or some
other competitive syrup. The higher the
costs of the Barbadian fancy molasses to
the Canadian importer the more aggressive
will the salemanship of the Canadian re-
tailer have to be. The adoption of bulk ship-
ment would have a spectacular effect on

the cost the Canadian importer would have
to pay because $23.83 would be saved on

every 100 gallons shipped. On the other

hand bulk shipment could not be intro-

duced suddenly without creating much un-

employment locally. de ie

The future of the fancy molasses indus-
try is not a subject for idle speculation.

Those in in the industry particularly
those employed in the industry must be
aware of the changed conditions of the in-
dustry. They must realise that no action
taken locally can prevent unemployment
if the market for fancy molasses goes. The
low sales of this year’s production of fancy
molasses have given clear warning that
the market for fancy molasses is not what
it used to be. The reasons for these low
sales are to be discovered by the represen-
tatives of BEMA who left last week for
Canada on a fact-find’1g mission. While no
one can say in advance what reasons will
bé discovered and what recommendations
will be made, there can be no doubt that
the representatives’ first concern will be to
preserve as far as is possible the market
which Barbados fancy molasses has en-
joyed for many years in Canada. The very
fact that their mission has been necessary
is evidence enough that this is no time for

optimism or dogmatic assertions about
what must be done if the industry is to
maintain a high level of exports. The repre-
sentatives have gone to find out and every-

.



one must hope that their findings will lead
to an increase of fancy molasses exports
next year.

PUBLICITY

THERE are two kinds of publicity:
favourable and unfavourable. The public-
ity which Barbados spreads about itself
ought, if we want to attract capital or visit-
ors here, always to be favourable. As far
as visitors are concerned it can be said that
the publicity which Barbados is given by
the publicity committee, the hotel and club
proprietors and the Hotel Association is
always favourable. As far as attraction of
capital is concerned Barbadians need to be
much more reticent and to run down the
island less than they do among themselves.

In recent years Barbadians have been too

prone to give their island a bad name and
too reluctant to point out its advantages
over all other British Caribbean islands.
Some of the smear campaign which Bas-
badians spread unthinkingly abroad about
their own island has taken effect to such an
extent that the island is in danger of losing
capital investment at a time when it needs
it urgently. Fortunately not everyone takes
so pessimistic a view of the island and its
possibilities. The bank which is in process
of building a modern air conditioned
building in Broad Street would hardly have
incurred so large an expense if it consid-
ered that Barbados was as hopeless a place
to live in as many Barbadian detractors
make it out to be. Faith in oneself is neces-
sary before confidence can be communi-
cated to others and there have been several
instances in recent years of outsiders com-
ing into Barbados and running successfully,
enterprises which local Barbadians would
never have attempted because of their
fundamental lack of confidence in the
island and its potentialities.

The danger of swaying from one extreme
to the other is ever present and Barbados
still suffers from the influences of narrow-
minded persons whose standards and
knowledge are based on the limits of this
small island.

But while Barbados “know-allness” must
always be regarded with suspicion it is
quite different from the informed criticism
of those who criticise the island for not
following their advice and are almost pre-
pared to see the whole place go up in smoke
just to prove themselves to have been right.

Today the future of Barbados hangs
poised in the balance. If we can find a
formula for co-operation there is no doubt
that we can continue to maintain for Bar-
bados a name superior to that of any
neighbouring Caribbean island of equiva-
lent size. But if sectional or party interests
cannot be submerged in the interests of the
community as a whole: if on one hand there
is suspicion of motives and on the other an
ineradicable conviction that no progress
can be made there will undoubtedly be no
progress and there will be fertile ground
for breeding discontent.

The need for Barbadians to agree more
among themselves is perhaps easier to un-
jerstand if it is considered in the light of
unfavourable publicity from outside. Bar-
badians are by now acclimatised to the
cheap Trinidadian gibes about Barbadians
and themselves lose no opportunity to poke
fun at the “mudheads” of British Guiana.

But this is very healthy fun as between
cousins, whom we know will always come
and visit us for the simple reason that
neither Trinidad nor Britis: Guiana can
offer the holiday attractions which make
this island so popular with Trinidadians
and British Guianese.

It is quite another thing when a writer
and, traveller paints a picture of Barbados
in an influential trade publication of North
America which will not be regarded
locally as very favourable publicity for the
island as a tourist resort. In Travel Trade
for August-1952 an unnamed writer in an-
swer to an invitation from the Alcoa
Steamship Company describes Barbados
as “quite flat”. It has, he says a “formal and
rather circumscribed resort atmosphere.”
The hotels are “fairly expensive at all
seasons”. Social clubs are not easily access-
ible. “The island is singularly conservative
in its traditionalism and the visitor must
lend himself to a higher degree of acclim-
atization than elsewhere in the Caribbean.”
If this kind of commentary did not appear
in an American travel trade magazine op-
posite the advertisement of a luxury air
conditioned hotel in Panama, it might be
dismissed as the unfortunate impression of
a traveller and writer whom the Barbados
Publicity Committee appear to have missed.
But tourism is too valuable to the island
for this kind of publicity to go unchecked.

We will never of course be able to have
100 per cent. protection against the critic-
ism of those who form hasty i ions
and we ought never to ignore the exist-
ence of criticism. We would, however, find
it much easier to refute the propaganda of
those who dislike us at first sight if we
presented a united front to the outsider.
It matters very much to all of us what the
outsider will think of Barbados. If they
think of us as a happy collection of human
beings each pulling our weight and adding
to the achievements of the last three hun-
dred years, we will have no difficulty in
attracting capital and visitors. If we wear
our disunity on our sleeves and show visit-
ors how little we agree among ourselves we
shall give ourselves a bad name which will
stick for generations.

_ z

SUNDAY
Edueation

ADVOCATE

Notes










TO-DAY I’ve come to the end of a chapter which has
to me been extremely interesting and to say the least
enlightening. My contention that the Richmond Schools
were Elementary and not Secondary has been vindicated
by the subsequent circumstances; and I now let. readers
of this column know that Mr. G. D. Griffith, Headmaster
of Providence Boys’ School has been appointed to the
Richmond Boys’.

1 began by saying that the appajntménts at the Richmond
le was both interesting and Schools in order to “palm” them
in) from the off as Secondary.
goint of view of the cut and thrust Let me here invite those who
of public debate but more than have spoken to me to write to the
just that. It was to me the sup- Press and express their views be-
cort of a good cause, Theme can cause there is still the appoint-
_ little of greater value than the ment of a successor to Mrs. Griffith
“ aes education iven to at the Girls’ School next term.
dren = this island. thou- Again IT say it is an elementary
sands of them it is their only link school and a head@mistress or
— ee. he “ss oes from one of the elemen-
eka a peetean alin 4 tary schools should be appointed,
the Nursery School, the Kinder- Enlightening
What is enlightening to me is

garten School, the Junior School,

Ld ig School, the Senior

Schoo) @ Grammar School and to find that there are still thou-

ny University’ it might be easy sands of intelligent people in this
a the error made or to island who are afraid to express

nen up for the omission in a their opinions. Some who see
thild’s education, wrong only when it touches them

Need For Changed Outloo

;




















rsonally, urge others to fight on

In Barbados, many men and mut declare in the next breath
that it does net concern therm
Others feel that it is beneath them
to fight or to help fight for a good
system of elementary education.
Many of them applying for posts
are ashamed to let it be known
that they were once pupils of
elementary schools; others are in~
‘sulted if they are invited to send
their children there. Still a
‘smaller (thank heaven) number
classify themselves as being pri-
vately educated and judging by
the results it must have Sect
very private education because
only they know about it.
The same thing done in poli-
tics by Mr. Adams must be done
in education circles. This smug
complacent attitude must go and
people must realise that the edu-
eation of every other Barbadian
‘affects them. In the days to come
you will either employ them or
be employed by them, sell them

women who have the requisite
ability to achieve more but

as hewers of wood and
drawers of water, are victims of
errors in the handling of their
education because their only
shance in life lay in the elemen-
tary school. They lost it and so
‘ost everything. Can we afford to
‘rifle with so serious a matter?
“et people like Mr. Carter who
felt that my criticisms were un-
warranted and Mr. Adams who
said that they were utterly un-
ustified, reflect for one moment
and I know that they will join
ne. The fight has been interesting
and it promises to be even more
3%, , Those who have given me
moral support will share with me
the utmost satisfaction at seeing
he school managers of St. Leon-
irds put an end to this “tom-
‘oolery” of trying to get teachers

themselves by accepting

Every now and then
politician tells us tlt there are
thousands of people unemployed
m_ Barbados,
sasily from the tongue and is sure
to win a chorus of ayes and a
aandful of head noddings from
the gallery. But no one knows
how many unemployed persons
shere are in Barbados.

The live register of unemployed

note



‘rom Secondary Schools to de~

_



(By George Huante

The phrase trips olessed with a simple life in some

remote country district into-which

tne- benefits and evils of 20th

century atomic life have not yet
venetrated.

While however we must make

. allowance for those who enjoy the

simple life of the country unspoilt

look’ at

- future



" Unemployed

kept by the Department of Labour oy artificial desires and free from.
‘ecorded only 1,922 at the end of the ugly influence of greed, we
September. But this register does must realise that not all - the
not record all unemployed per- under-employed are . useful citi-
»ons, and some of those who reg- zens. There is po doubt that many
ster ought more properly to be persons who are attracted to the

recorded as under-employed or
mnemployables,

The hysterical approach to un-
employment which is made

who are trying to decrease unem-
ployment in Barbados.

situation as it exists today ani
't is likely to exist in future. This
rool appraisal of the situation
cannot be made so long as con-
fusion exists as to what is meant
hy unemployment,

What is
wanted is a cool appraisal of the these under-employed |
oY a as quent persuasion of a)

city fall by the wayside and fail-
ing to secure regular employment
discover ways and means »f earn-
ing something in. “uaoder-employ-

noliticians seeking to achieve pop- ed” jobs. There could be no more
ularity is not going to assist those

sanenrent occupation for social
welfare workers to follow than
the establishment of contact with

ghd subse=
many as

ible either to return wo the
and or to make use of any facili-

ties provided by the Evening In-

oer s for -learning a skilled
ade,



Some persons think that Barba-
Can unemployment for instance dos’ under-empioved position. is
be said to exist in Barbados at all, clearly connected with the lack of
when almost every person on thé a technical institute at which
live register could be employed in young men and women can be
san Domingo if arrangements be- trained for employment here and
‘ween the government of Barba- abroad. preoccupation with
des and San Domingo could be academic education has resulted
concluded and the unemployed already in the creation’ of top-
could pass the physical and othe heavy bureaucratic government
tests ‘which the Dominican em~ structures which are draining
ployers would require? It all away the revenues of the Carib-
depends as Professor Joad would bean governments at a time when
say, on what we mean by un only increased production. result-
employment. When the politicians {ng from: technical “know-how”
speak of unemployment they are.can provide greater employment
really describing under-employ- opportunities. The © growth of
ment, This arises from two main academic education has been fol-
causes: first, the nature of the Jowed by the inevitable growth.
work and secondly, the disposi- of demands from the academic
don of the worker. 4... .s®reducts of the schools for social
Some workers who are willing, security standards of life based on
to work for six days of the week that envied by university under-
cannot find work which wilk graduates in London and other
occupy them for six days of every erntres of learning.
52 weeks in the year. Other work- The fact that educational grants
ers do not want to work every and scholarships have been acces-
week in the year: they want part sible to all has prevented the
time employment or they do not majority of the “non-academic”
like work and know how to exist products of the schools from feel-
without it, g frustration or resentment at
Before we become ill-tempered the educational status, quo, Every-
and morally superior about tha one has a chance enjoy the
latter category we ought to realise. sweets of academic success. To-
that high material standards of day there is a welcome sign that
living which are obtained by hard the majority are. beginning to
work are not necessarily desired realise that the tration on
by saerrons “2 phd in hi le education has been de-
surroundings. ossessions do priving: th of ee niet for
bring happiness and there are” otiitiog Aebhiies skills without
many who count themselves which they cannot hope to achieve

- Sitting On The

airmen at the
Cranwell, met






assess what they called “units of ure per hour
pissmure Pg hour” enjoyed dur- ©

ng e ‘ - A

They agreed that if 100 units Walk out for refreshment, For
represented paradise on earth, Pleasure. anticipa award 20
20/25 units would mean suicidal » | For piteatce realised an-
misery, and 65/70 units a very 20 units. al now back to

happy day indeed;

Here is a record of your Uncle
Nat's units of pleasure di the
morning of one day last \

Believing it to be a day off with
nothing to do, wake feeling hap
and fit. So unusual, award se
90 plecten units ght away.

oment later it is ‘k
day. Not so happy. five
ts. Light

* - *
Well-known bore walks in,
Units drop to 60, Bore says “
morning.” Units drop to 50, Bore,
locking at rain on Windowpane
adds “if you cam call it a gdod
morning.” Units drop. back to 30.
Bore says “I think this will
~ eas oe ae, 25.
ys “It made me laugh,-any-
way?’ Units down to 20. ° Sore
agys “It seems there was an Irish-
an'with a very clever dog.” Units
tumble to five. (Beginning to
~~ gol like panic’ on Stock Ex-
Look forward to early morn- ¢’ ) Bore continues “Of

course, I can’t do the accent.”



ay. Find an idea.
self ten units. After one hour’s
work idea no good. Curse and
throw away. Subtract 20 units,
Total now 70.
Find another idea, After one
hour’s work, seems _ libellous.
Curse and throw away Subtract

20 units. Find ‘third idea. Two
hours” work. Seems indecent.
Curse and throw away. Subtract
20 units. Total now 30, near
suicidal misery point,

Units quiver at zero.
But bore says “I'll do my best.”
Units zero.

Tonic Talk

WHY are you glaring at the
man sitting opposite in the crowd-
ed train ‘taking you to the City?

You do not even know him, He
has never done you any harm.



goods or services or buy from
them, live or work near them or
jn some cases marry them. What
can be more annoying than to be-
compelled to communicate with or
to employ or to werk for or tc be
employed by an ignoramus? As it
is to-day in Barbados we are
afflicted with a type of youngster
whose only means of asserting
his: manhood or preserving his
right is by an aggressive attitude
indicated by. unprintable lan-
guage. Watch them sign their

Education alone can eradicate.
this. Let us Rave a working class
with a sound elementary training,
able to d between the

bly true and’ the obviously
alse to express themselves clearly
and to. calculate their earnings
without help. This is the basis for
the building of any progressive
and enlightened people. Age
grouping and its trappings are
not conducive to this happy state
of society. It was abandoned in
Trinidad. It should be abandoned
here.

Parents, teachers and employ-
ers should now join in approach-
ing the Government for an in-
vestigation into the system. A
the Certificate results
published in this newspaper ré-
cently will reveal that too many
pupils are wasting time and tak-
ing one subject. The foundation,
in such cases, was not good
enough or the teaching faulty. The
low figures of the Evening Insti-
tute passes and the absence of
any ‘from Codrington College
should serve as an eye opener.
I am going to suggest in the near
that the two - Island
Scholarships now tenable at Cod-
rington should be diverted to the
University College of the West
Indies where at least we would
get some passés. If this is not
suitable I suggest that S.P.G..
through the Lord Bishop, change
the whole staff.

y JEB.



the material standards which they
nave been encouraged to expect.

But teennical ectucation or tne
creation of a technical institute

cannot alone solve ' Barbados”
cnronic unaer-employment pos.-
tion. Only an imperial policy

based on utilization of the Em-
pire’s manpower wherever it can
be jound will ensure tnat barpa-
dians or other West Indians wii
be given employment opportuni-
és um other countries, ‘

So long as Barbadians retain
the good name which they sti
enjoy cutside the island, they can
contidenuy expect to find empivy~
ment opportunities in the United
States, San Lomingo, Surinam or
other countries where there are
insufficient supplies of labour. But
it would be unrealistic to imagine
that Barbados or the rest of the
fs ded acres could provide em-

oyment fo en s.
censors ea 5. a ethical
college “each year. Unless ‘the
United Kingdom and other coun-
tries aré prepared to recruit tech-
niciats ‘from
any discrimination, a~ technical
college ‘will become yet ‘another
burden for the taxpayer to sup-
port.

In.an address to the Cambridge
summer school Mr, Roy Lewis,
specifically spoke of the West
Indies in a general réview of the
“Man Power Requirements of the
Dominions”.

_ “The West Indies”, he said,
“probably have a surplus popula-
tion of 200,000. What are we to
do? We call them citizens. We
complain that we are short of
manpower. We find that unless
we can bring people into Britain,
we cannot send le out to
maintain those typical links which
fre summed up in the tendency
for men and women of British
origin . . . to speak of this island
as Home. Are we to allow

that link to weaken? But if we .

don’t—are we to refuse jobs to
those whose passports are marked
“citizens of U.K. and Colonies”
but whose skins are black or
brown?”

It is no good talking of a multi-
racial Commonwealth unless there
is freedom to move end work
within that Commonwealth. The
Unite ngdom~ cannot compel
other minions to do.what she
does but there is no doubt what-~
ever that she could if she wanted
to provide greater employment
Opportunities for trained West
Indians. No other solution to our
long term under-employment
problem is likely to be found.

Fence

8 competitive world, because you
have not been smart enough to
lift yourself out of the rut .and
leave the drudgery to others,

Perhaps you. hate the manager
at your office because he has been
smarter than you. Perhaps you
hate yourself for not taking ‘the
opportunities he has taken. Per-
haps for years you have been
wanting to tell him what think
of him, and hate youredl? for not
having the courage to de so.

If these are your thoughts, don’t

Good blame yourself for being a dunce,

It is not your fault. People are’
‘born that way. Don't blame the
manager for being smart. People
are born that way too. And how.

And if you are still glaring at
that poor man op ite, don't
‘blame him for putting his tongue
out at you. His patience is ex-

th this new, r e
on your troubles try giving him
your most winning ie. If he
hits you with his umbrella because

he thinks you are laughing at his

blame. ;

Someone like you must always '
be an ass, ’

Someone like you at the bot- |
tom of the class; }

Someone like you must always
take the blame;

Must always be the stepping
stone while others climb to
fame,

Then why do you glare at him? But clever.men, like managers,
It is not because you hate him. It who work by day and night,
is because y lf Get chronic indigestion . A

Perhaps you 3 if be- and it serves them damn

2ulse your work is distasteful, be- well right,
eause you have not succeeded in L.E.S,

Barbados without |

k DIARIES !! DIARIES !!

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SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1952 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGT NINE :

New Tasks For

Sugar Council
Big World Surplus:
More Advertising Needed

By BUTE HEWES



——

i
|

—_—-—— ee

A TRUE

HISTORY

Of the

BARBADOES.



& EXACT



Ifland of « ,





I Solemnly Say We Should
Kill More People

By F. TENNYSON JESSE

ia “Murder And Its Motives”*

I PUT forward in all seriousness
and with the most passionate con-
viction, as an experiment well
worth trying, the following
thesis:—

We should kill a
more people.

There is every reason why even
the most humane of us should

great many

Bit By Bit

IT has been a tendency for
years now to do away witn tn
pomp and
tal punishment. Bit by
things as the black flag

bit suct
and th

tolling of the bell have ceased to

be. Capitc] punishment is mere
retained as a practical m°asure
We are no longer of the opinio

circumstance of capi-

|
|

|





LONDON object to keeping alive danger- of Dr. Johnson, when he made hi
A full meeting of the International Sugar Council be- ous; anti-social creatures. complaint to Sir William Sco
xi i ber : RICHARD LIGON Gent, “The age is running mad afie:
pegs ae — Novem 24th, faced with one of the By : Safe rds innovations,” he eid, “A'l th
nost difficult problems it has ever had to deal with—a big —_ extinction of such people business of the world is to b« Apply the Cream gently to the burnt
world surplus of sugar. would be an act that would have done in a new way. Tyburn it-

Ths
meeting is to consider recommen-
dations made by the’ recent Lon-
don meeting of the Council’s
Special Committee, to bring about
a closer balance of sugar supply

cls i : z not the — seeing to be, that the old method drew t c
and demand. At this month’s meeting, how: Having been censured by some and continued our course to the “'® mere “going to sleep" which gether a number of spectators | ~ use ‘Cetaviex’ ron WOUNDS, CUTS, BURNS, SCRATCHES, ETC.

But far wider problems face the ever, the Council will vote on a —Whose judgements 1 enamak southwest, (with somewhat a ‘0 ™&"y innocent suffering peo- Sir, executions are intended :
Council and some of its members recommendation by its Special control and am therefore glad to scant wind) partly to avoid the ple have longed for; it is the fact draw spectators. If they do no ry

kre understood to be ready to urge
that it should now begin to, play a
more active part in promoting the
welfare of the world’s sugar
producers.

Other internationa] bodies con-

cerned with iti ‘ there, from smooth to rou , difference in the wa f ur But what we have, as citizens, be swept away?” r

are running wobivaite puddin, a oe hedae “ougucaeedinme —_ nae oe mt hich and ships—for in slack “winge our a perfect righ to judge is whether, a . OF Sole Agents and Distributors ¥
ing campaigns t ah eck igh ows (which are consort, the Nonesuch, would when people are too dark and too eeks o ear

product. a outstatineg: seat ore eee ae — haling to the Ins constitutions) I run us out of sight in four or five muddled, we ought to go as ae BUT there is more needed the: | A. S. BRYDEN & SONS (BARBADOS) LTD.

is the campaign by the Interna- sumption by importing countries ‘aliaeehaias ra ee of oe hours sail, but in strong and stiff ting up with them at all, though * rob capital punishment of its | SRIDGETOWN

tional Wool Secretariat, which That is a problem that will have from England to Barbados; and a Gero Taces tan habeal — we have no right to “punish” degrading pomp; let us rob it als: A broduct of ;

since the war has led the fight to
maintain markets for wool in the
face of

primary purpose of theternational Sugar Agreement, firs,

‘drafted in 1937 and extended sev-
eral times since then, This agree-
ment has regulated the produc-
tion and export of free market

Committee that the United Na-
tions be asked to call an Interna-
tional Sugar Conference next
Spring to draw up a new agree-
ment,

Such an agreement would call

to be tackled separately, if it is to
be tackled at all,

Ligon decides to go to Barbados 4
and an account of the first part of

his voyage thither.

INSTALMENT 1.

allow — for my weakness an
indiscretion, that having ia
made proof of the sea's opera
tion, and the several faces that
‘watery element puts on, and the
changes and chances that happen

truly I should without their
help conclude myself guilty of

high going billows of. the Bay of
Biscay, but chiefly to stand aloof
from pirates and = pickaroons,
which ave very frequent on the
coasts of Spain and Barbary, and
as we put along I perceived a

sails the swifter the way pro-

to be hedged about with safe-
guards, as will voluntary euthan-
asia when tlat mercy ceases te be
an offence against the law.

What is horrible about death

that a term has been set to one’s
life; that horribly, relentlessly.
day by day, hour by hour, death
comes nearer to someone in per-
fect health. No one should have
to suffer that.

anyone with death,
We have, however, the right to

self is not safe from change.’
Someone suggested ‘that migh*
be an improvement.
“No, sir,” said the doctor, “it i
not an improvement. They objec

‘draw spectators they don’t answe
their purpose. The old method
was most satisfactory to
parties. The public was gratif«
by a procession; the criminal
supported by it. Why is all this t

of those measured weeks of fe 1

for the condemned.

i i “ vided that they were alike built tec ivi , i re ¢ : it of

inereasin orotect the living. If And, above all, let us rob it o

from the new synthetic fbres. eeduota oa franpendens at an olde wie ne o we —— = — pn! 4 Alam. Herbert oak eles tas any horror in the meuied of ap-
Similar work may now be un- crop restrictions for next year’s Which is Néead makes the ol ide? Team Y Bill for bigger and better lethal plication.

dertaken by the International plantings, will be the main Sensi wife trot, For havin @ seamen; or that _ Admirable chambers he would probably have The one thing important abov!

lost (by

area. In addition to its soothing action,
*Cetaviex’ will effectively prevent
infection where the skin is broken.

‘Cetavlex’ cream |

Antiseptic and non-irritant

IMPERIAL CHEMICAL (PHARMACEUTICALS) LIMITED
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Sugar Council, if some of its try affected by a new agreement. barbarous riot) all that I had a a of Moving Here, Mr. been | howled down, not with punishment is that it should be a
members get their way. It will be So will many other leading gotten by the painful travels and About the ‘latitude of 45 de- laughter, but with horror, and yet certain. ’ ¢
expensive — but the alternative migar-produens naticns. a ¢ my youth by which grees we met with a ship coming it is a very sensible and v°ry —LE.S. | s
ar gus of suger ane possibly But eee Pact ; of. all I had. Toth deatitute 7. from Guinea’ but bound for inate ant th = epee “Murder and its Motives’ Neural la

r many unprotected pro- : it is leved that Brit- eubsist ? a London, The captain’s name was pee . PSS 30 ON ue published by Harrap (12s. 6d 5
ducers, ain will not subscribe to any Subsistence, and brought to such easy and that the leader thereto : }

scheme that would. limit Com+

an exigent as I must famish on

Blague, a very civil gentleman





Scope For Increase ; who hailed us, came aboard us “4S Hitler. *.58
Plenty of scope exists for such a meen mie production Sis cae ee ae eee are ahd invited divers gentlemen Far Better : euri IS
campaign to increase the world’s 4),°¥ Ge quotas Oy down saz 80 staggering a condition, round tat were aboard his ship, which THERE are many non-social Antigua Celebrates 3

consumption of sugar. In Spain, ‘A'ereement wrt sane none, or very few, whom griefs Was a frigate of about 400 tomns— human beings incapable of im- y an

for example, sales of suger average effective at th =< thie and afflictions had not depressed her lading gold and elephants provement (and not all of them Sciatica, Toothache

only 15 Ibs. per head of population year eo < . or worn out, banishment ab teeth. The man was exceeding murderers) who would be far Arbour Day

every year. In Italy, the average This agreement, signeq in Sented, or death devoured; sq Civil to us and gave to every better “put to sleep”; but that is - A generous application of

is 26 lbs, per head. There is room London To December after that instead of these near and gentleman of our company a the utmost that we have the right (From Our Own Correspondent)

for enormous improvement in the months of hard bargaining, has "ative comforters I found myself Present of such rarities as he to do, even to the most brutal _ ANTIGUA comforting, soothing

sugar consumption of these ccun- already ‘stimulated production of @ stranger in my own country, brought from Guinea and Binny. murderer. For the first time’ in mai

tries. sugar in the Commonwealth, 8%d therefore resolved to lay, We ares together almost a 1 should surely ‘be possible to Years Arbour Day has bee THERMOGENE Medica-
The main reasons for low con- notably in the West Indies, where hold of the first opportunity that whole day, the weather being ..fesuard » measure of this kind. celebrated in Antigua on the

sumption of sugar are economic
ones, often brought about by im-

acreage is expanding rapidly and
more modern equipment installed.

might convey me to any other
part of the world, how far distant

very calm, and almost no wind
at all. In the evening a fresh

Britain is full of people occupied
with good works; with mogis-

6th November.
The first part of the ceremony)



ted Rub to the painful

we c . > Recreatio In extra large rt will soon brin
i Govern- In other countries, however, S0€ver, rather than abide here. breeze began to blow, which ; ; ete, Ok place on the Recreatié pa g
a vectstoiline othe Spaniard, where sugar is not a traditional served us both in our several ro t: tain van take Grounds at 9.30 a.m. when H Jars and handy Tins lief. R
; : crop, some restricti - ,,{ continued not many weeks in ways, and so saluting each other “"@ '* world be lust as np Excellency, Sir Kenneth Black relief. Repeat the appli-
for example, pays more — o action may be ex a whens this expectation when a friend, as with our ordnance, we took our to safemiard a lethal chamber 9s purne addressed hundreds Head and Chest Solds, Coughs : .
It oe a oH hoe the Tavopenn coun- Wil'ing to shift his ground as I leave it should be to safeeuord lunatic school children, The Polic« cation as required until the
ali pays nea . .

In other countries, too, Govern-
mentssuse sugar aS an easy means
of collecting revenue, just as Bri-
tain imposes a high tax on tobacco
and cigarettes. In Turkey, for
instance, well over half the cost
of a pound of sugar is accounted
for by tax, This causes many
people in these countries to think

of sugar as a luxury that can be per cent and in Western Ger- not felt the like, and continued gooin an@ Barbary, the first land cattle, sheep, goats, hogs, poultry, Commissioners, Hon, 8, T, Chris-
done without if the household many by 90 per cent since bes £0 till we came to Falmouth Har. ws ‘aiscovered was the Isle of of all sorts, and the best sorts of tian, invited His Excellency ‘o Of all good Stores
budget will not run to it. fore the war. bour, where we put in and rested 5o+, Santo, which lies in 33 de- sea fish. These islands lie near 33 plant the first tree, The seconc

Prices
The importance of price in fix-

are mulaly
tries which have made enormous
strides in increasing their beet
sugar production in recent years.

In -Britain, for example, acre-
age under beet has increased by
20 per cent since before the war.
Beet acreage in Belgium has in-
creased by 30 per cent, in Hol-
land by 55 per cent, in Italy by
65 per cent, in Denmark by 70

All this, in countries which do
not base their economies on sugar
production, is contributing to the
of sugar and is

gave me an overture which [
accepted. And so, on the six-
teenth day of June 1647 we em-
harked on a good ship called the
Achilles, a vessel of 350 tons, the
master Thomas Crowder of Lon-
don, No sooner we were all aboard,
but we presently weighed anchor
and put to sea, in so cold weather
as at that time of the year I have

a@ night.

But in our passage thither we
were very uncertain upon what
coast we were, reason of the

About this thne our consort,
the Vonesuch, parted with us, the
directly of the Carabby Islands,
we for St. Jago, one of the Islands
of Cape Verde, where we were
to trade for Negroes, Horses and
Cattle; which wé were then to
sell at Barbados,

So, keeping our course about
Eighty Leagues from the coast of

grees to the Northward, which we
left on our starboard side, When
presently after, we had sights

esvlume — still always remem-
bering Hitler.

burned as now, and that the
leeward part of it was at other
times exceedingly fruitful and
pleasant, abounding with all sorts
of excellent fruits, corn, wine, oil
and the best sugars: with horses,

degrees to thes Northward.
Having pasved between these
teers the Madeiras on our

Band was in_ attendance an
played while children planted
number of crees along the we:
ern end of the grounds.

In the afternoon a_ cerémon)
took place at the small triang:
lar space near the bridge at the
eastern end of Michael's Villa;
After an adevess by His Excei-
lency, the Chairman of the Cil

tree was planted by Lady Black-
burne at another = trianguls
space near the lower bridge,









pain has disappeared.
Muscular Pains

Insect Bites and Stings

and Chemists

DOUBLE-ACTION



ing the level of consumption is world surplus b the Madeiras, which we s Starboard side) we found a con- Antigua, has had exception:
easily seen when the position in having a perious io me, et unsteadiness of | the (woe me close by and had a full view of stant trade — En gcd Pe ee Ferm i re, = 4 ar is
the high-price, low-consumption British “Gol aie ae arr is thht I perceived orme troubles the place; so rocky and mountain~ the southward. W A he Ee ; go 1g 30:0) an - and-w so effort
countries is contrasted with that in 6rius' olonies, where sugar ous, and the ground so miserably island came into view it was Bona to protect and care for thy
countries where sugar is regarded the economic mainstay. and doubts in the Seamen on ji og with the sun, as we could Vista, but at such a distance we hundreds of trees which hav

as a necessary part of everyday
life. Australia, for instance, has
the world’s highest sugar consump-

Nevertheless, it is in the dollar
area that the surplus of sugar
exists and sterling producers will
have no difficulty in finding a

that shoft passage than in all the
voyage after. But, the weather
clearing up, the master and the

perceive no part of it, either hill
or valley, that had the least
appearance of green, nor any tree

could hardly discern colours, but
the general landscape of the hills
seemed to us very beautiful, gently

been planted in all of the vy’
lages, Many of the old trees whic!
served as shades and well know:

MEDICATED RUB

mates drew out several plots and si d falling without rocks land marks were destroyed i ® i
tion, at about 130 Ibs. per head of Warket for their exportable sur- landscapes, which they had Digger than a small hawthorne, rising » an ta & r nd: mae warp -carmared | is In big glass Jars and handy Tins
population every year,,The retaih juses while the world is still formerly taken on the coast of and very few of those. or precipices, S332

price of sugar in Australia is only
314d. per Ib.

That is why some leading sugar
experts are now ready to urge the
International Sugar Council to
launch a world-wide offensive
against such artificial restrictions
on consumption as taxes and high

sharply divided into sterling and
dollar areas.

“OFFICIAL SECRETS”
ACT

All Jamaican Civil Servants are



France and England, (which are
of great use in the narrow seas)
by which they were well assured
where they were, for they seldom
use the Loggline or Backstaff,
but attend only the tides, com-
pass and card, nor is there any

Between this ana three incon-
siderable islands called the
Deserts, which appeared to us like
the tops of large buildings — no
uneveness or risings or fallings,
but level as the top of a
large church or barn, but burned
worse than the other so that

This island is famous for ex-
cellent salt and for horses, which
in one property excel all that
ever I have seen, their hooves be-
ing to that degree of hardness
and toughness that we ride them
at Barbados down sharp and
steep rocks without shoes, and no

revival of Arbour Day has prove
a wonderful success in
ing an interest for Trees.

MAIL NOTICES

Mails for St, Vincent, Grenada,
dad and British Guiana by the §

stimulat









now required to’ sign the “Official use of other directors in so eens other goats go surer upon the sides of Canadian Challenger will bo closed ot
import duties, coupled with a pro- Secrets Act” which prohibits the arrow a room. We were, as I elenae ce ae Yat this time rocks and hills than they, and Geveral Sims ati th Owen iit
motional campaign, aimed directly gisclosing of Government inform- Temember, about 10 days sailing o¢ the year, these were apparelled many of them very strong and Mail at 2 pm, and Ordinary Moi
at the consumer himself, to bring ation without authority, under a to Falmouth, and had with us a io, russets, or at the best clean limbed, 2.30 p.m. tomorrow A REAL DELIGHUIVUL
him to regard sugar as a neces- recent ruling of the Executive small — of about 180 tons call- pr iamorts. This island we left ten leagues yas. go p Sas e
sity rather than a luxury, Council, ed the Nonesuch of which Cap- “sit it fel! out that this year or thereabouts on our starboard pat Nevir mal St Kite ee Ee a SELECTION
Since the Council was estab- A Government spokesman said tain Middleton was owner, @ 4. simmer was there hotter than side, and next to it, the isle of Moneka will be closed at the Genes Se ee rm

lished, its main task has been to
deal with over-production prob-

that there was “nothing sinister”
in the requirement, since it was

very good seaman and a planter

of Barbados, but himself then

usual, and the seamen that were



May, famous for store of excellent



Tost Office as under

Parcel Mail at 12 (noon), Register



a with us gave us to understand salt. Mail at 2 p.m, and Ordinary Ma! Kent Hair & Shaving Yardley Shaving Bowls

lems“and market surpluses. It has ly required though not strict- ree} ot. ut to sea that they had never seen it so (To be continued.) 2.60 p.m, tonetiow. Brushes 2

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PAGE 1EN

ee ae

OLYMPIC STORY—IV |

A GRAND LITTLE TEAM

instalment will BY TREVOR GALE

also one» of*the most successful gone before, We therefore thought shoultier was forward while world record for this distance of
of the wack teams at the Olympic that he was still improving on his McKenley touched it with his !46.6 which means that it is
Games. In my opening paragraphs speed but losing on his stamina. left. The picture itself was a ‘till two and six tenth
I have already dealt with the A lot of people seem to have grand mix-up of feet, chests, faster than Whitfeld’s
gathering of the Jamaican Olym- jeard gome story that McKenley hands, shoulders and heads. It tecord which he set up in Lon-
pic team im London. It consisted saiq if Bailey could run in the would be interesting to know (on in 1948 again
of Arthur Wint as 100 metres so could he because he which played the most impor- in this pace in Helsinki, I would
could beat Bailey, This is a sort tant part in imfluencing the Cearly love to see in action the

Laing, of of half truth. What did happen judges. ; man who could beat Whitfield

the famous Lloyd), Miss Walters was that Bailey and Herb were To crown it all the first four and Wint by so many yards.

and Miss Russell. Ken Farnum training together and when Herb ‘runners were clocked in 10.4 by Two days after the 800 metre!
of course was included, but he sound he was doing extremely the electrical timing device whica final the first 400 metre heats
was on the cycling side, so for the well against the former, he decided ‘s synchronised with the camera. began. From the outset it was
moment details about that he might as well compete in While the hundred metre heats Clear that the litle Jamaican
mance nqust be excluded. the 100 metres in as much as he and finals were going on Arthus ee was to dpminate this
Â¥ was entered. it turned out thi int was busy with the 80 ent. hoden and

Herbert “jMacDonald brought dodiaaen Sas aaah wool up as one metres. He ran well within Wint all won their firs: 2nd
them oves sem _ Friday 1 <7 of the most outstanding athletes himself on the first day to come Second heats so that they ac-|
ae Jee Laney as of the entire game, But I still do second to H.G. Ring of Sweden counted for six heats in one
From the .New Mine ss not thiak he was ever as good @ but the next day he won his heat eee But while the first
Athietio cea Pee . aes “printer as MacDonald Bailey. fairly easily. see ty coviewsy taking ings
vee and Syeened. more Herb began his advance towards In the final Arthur took no ~ sy thur = Wint was busy
names “in the U.S.A. athletic world the 100 metre final by winning his chances and from the beginning accentuating his speed due to the!
than another coach in that first heat by about 3 te Nobody he was up front, He fact that he had already run a’
CO ee ne ae etover, Paid much attention fo this because Ulsheimer of Germany lena Save bee 3 teas & sa
Hetainty yee ee weight ‘etime of 10.7 was fairly slow. © Yun the shorter





;
must have been in his day. This |
ventleman is credited with the

and
Wolfbrandt of Sweden to pass

thut Joe, y him in the first lap but went races first. Athur therefore did |

we gS ees Sects a dav Ah Ino th ‘ena agin sty eas wow ee ne ter

him from v¥ to tion of hi A aonge ° down the back stretch. The 800 "0On in 47.3 and 46.9. Fifteen or

and more, ** 1 tewgl roe 7 ae ery the metres race I think is one of the twenty years ago these would
As Herbert MacDonald ° efeating Arthur Bragg o © prettiest to watch because it is have been world records.

US.A., and this time he did it in not jong enough to allow any-
10.5, Again it was an easy victory poy to settle down, and yet no-
because Bragg pulled a muscle and pody can attempt to sprint from
was not really in top form. Up to peginning to end.

In the Semi Final the next day |
Arthur turned in a 46.3 quarter,’
whieh incidentally was only a

wards contemplated what might
have happened had he obeyed
the inttructions sent in that now

ui 5 Jamaica tenth outside his Olympic recora
aad Hae, Yency ie London, that time he bad been regarded arthur Wint has one of the °f 1948. In the same race Karo
tke the twarwomen"; one esuid % the U.S.A.’s chief hope in the most magnificent’ strides ever Haas of Germany was second in

46.4 and Whitfield third in the
same time. McKenley and
Rhoden met in the other Semi-
Final finishing in this order in
46.4 and 46.5 respectively. Up
to this time the Jamaicans had
therefore given uway nothing
and were treating the 400 metres
as if they Owned it and had no
intention of giving it up.

The final was practically the
same and as I have already de-
seribed it in detail in
a. I shall concern niyeet
wit more details of George
Rhoden. He won this 400 metre
race in 45.9 seconds, only a

100 metres, On reflection there is 1 stretch his

a also every reason to believe that ee adae eager to be jog
the he would have brought it off. I trotting next to him when, in
was therefore not surprised to fact, they are all out. The sight
oe that Bnd ie it of Arthur going down thet sais
e hard way and s a few stretch in the 800 metre fin in
when it is tears. It is not often that 19-year- the Melsinki Olympic Stadium
a shams old lads get the chance to reach is one that will live long in the
His advie®to MacDonald Bailey the 100-metre final and Bragg memory. Grace and strength
on starting is a classic in sim~ might have been the youngest to were personified in this giant of
plicity.. that, went right to the go so. a man while lesser mortals fol-
heart of matter, Ou The next day Herb and Remi- lowed in his wake as best they
doing his 1 with °’ gino met in the semi-finals. They could. An onlooker from an-
and practising starting one after- both ran a hard race but Herb other planet might have turned
noon wheawhe discovered that he was clearly the winner and his away at this stage of the race to
was not doing as well as he time of 10.4 was, up to that time, enquire what pleasure we got
thought he should, He asked Joe equal to Bailey's first heat and from seeing such an unequal $
Yancy for sé6me advice. Said Joe: poth Remigino’s. The stage St™us:le. _ tenth over his world record, and
“your trouble is that you are try- therefore seemed all set for a He would have been quite he did it all on his own. That
ing t- beat the gun. Now just tussle between McKenley and mistaken of «ourse, fot presently is, he drew the outside lane ang
remember Mat the starter is not Bailey in the final although few Mal Whitfield began his run, therefore from the time the gun
coing tp let you go before he people in the stadium and, going through the field like went off he saw no one else in

doubted :
rs ‘ite tii a knife through cheese, he was the rave. McKenley on the
res that-gun, so just relax until that Bailey could improve on the other hand was two lanes away

a . . at Arthur’s heels as they began
[ou Meee bs hee ite emte tee earns Ae joint the last, end. | Whitfield | then inside of both, Rhoden and Mat~
; rane 7 passed Arthur on the bend and son, so at he could keep an
Bren ce eme a Ae Ryo cf 10.2, dnd it meant that he ee from there they ran home within eye on both of them. He also

‘ gun will ian a splendid race in the same |

‘ ‘ . have todo no more than 10.3, 2 few feet of each other, neither
oy tee gins _ between nse which, to him, should have been ,ajning or loosing ground. Ul- time as Rhoden but he was able!

forgive himrfor la at
_ thought of-such a ri

Joe nae ear aes
natural attributes

coach. Tight of lip at coal tes
but not hésita¥ing to give advice



as easy as 50 runs would be to/ sheimer of ‘ Germany ran on to judge his pace to the last by|
that two “starts and you will Bradman when he was looking gamely for third place but could aa Seam mate, a
be disqualifie | for good, for 100. make no impression on the first At this stage my space is run-|
“O.K", said dailley, “lets try But the final was a most ex-| two, sing out and therefore I must |
thai again, ' twaordinary race, A 100-metre I could not help reflecting postpone any further remarks on
“Oh no" said Yancy, “that’s dash needs little description and| after this race on the type of “eorge Rhoden for another in-|
enough for this afternoon” we'll it is enough to say that they were| rinner one Mr. Rudolf Harbig prakuse more tomorrow.” all very close throughout and that
Now the Jamaican team when they flashed past the tape ee:

went to Hélsinki with a week to

ao. 6 before the opened

Arthur Wint. was aut eithed ees it appeared that McKenley and

short of work while Mec ‘was Remigino were the two most like-

burning up the track at anything Jy to be picked by the judges, but

up to 300 yards but found it very { felt quite sure that Bailey and

diMcult to-stay on, for the. extra Smith were not first or second.

40 va wiake

ihe 440 yards or 400 metres, Lee , The story of the picture of the

Laing was mibre or less a 200 finish is of course well known.
Opinion was divided half and

metre man | Byron La Beach
was good ton 100 metre dash Dalf between MecKenley and

only the judges had any idea who

SASSO Z
was the winner. From my position BBO AAFFAS

AcTIVE KIDNEYS |
Keep You WELL

Noture’s filters may need help
Jt IS OFTEN SURPRISING
how backache, I



iu

and the common urinary |
disorders due to sluggish

can be overcome.

Remiginon. But my __ personal Ss active kidneys safeguard
only, big 4 ee ae opinion was that the judges your baakh by sursiaing note ext
no moines + wearer ith, should have given a dead-heat| acid and harmful wastes out of the
re'ay. Tigcouly man with any decision, I also thought that it system. When kidney action is |
pretensions" to fitness was George showed up a weakness in the| inadequate and fails to filter the |
Rhoden. > photo-finish camera to take fin-| blood properly, pain and discom-

In that~ Short week Wint, ishes of athletic events. Up to| for tly result.
MeKenley and Laing approached yjow nobody knows whether the]: Kidney Pills
concert piteh in a more emphatic judges decided that Remigino’: bring relief by aioe
manner than I thought possible. head was in front of McKenley’:| - stimulate the
The signs which McKenley gave, ciest, or if it was a matter of| Sf . ee Saeble preezeere
it must. be admitted, were decep- shoulders which decided the m good Doan’s ag
tive as he 4 showed up in the issue. I know that when they, @* 9 DOAN’S
108 metre + as he had never hit the tape Remigino’s right; ~~



SUNDAY ADVOCATE





























HILE personal cleanliness is part of our
everyday lives, it’s important to remember
that Inner cleanliness, too, is essential for our
general well-being. This is where sparkling
Andrews comes in!

When you wake feeling sluggish and “ out-
of-sorts ”, a glass of Andrews freshens the
mouth and tongue, settles the stomach and
tones up the liver. Fi , Andrews gently
clears the bowels, completing your Inner
Cleanliness.

And if you should feel the need of a
“ refresher ”, remember — a single teaspoonful
of Andrews in a glass of cold water makes a
cooling, “ fizzy ” drink for any time of day!

DO YOU KNOW that the mouth records "events
in your digestive system? If all is well the tongue is
clean, & mouth feels fresh: ~~ if your system's
sluggish the tongue is coated, there’s an

taste in your mouth. Sparkling Andrews is needed
— its cleansing action freshens the mouth and the
whole system.

8 oz. tin





i ——

ANDREWSiuver satr;

~

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 16,




1952















U/
i?
.\

Ud

~ INTERNATIONAL - HARVESTER
McCORMICK DEERING

FARMALL BMD
Diesel Wheel Tractor

Now available from England

This is one of the famous International”
Tractors which have been tried locally -
~ during a period of years and have proved |
themselves to be entirely dependable
and satisfactory. ‘

This is the ideal tractor for* the bet
cheapest method of haulage,

Orders placed now can be delivered

ex factory during January. em. .

COLE & CO... LED. Distributors.

K







SUNDAY, NOVEMBER



Appointments
And Transfers

THE following transfers and
appointments in the Clerical Ser-
vice have been made with effect
from the Ist November, 1952.

Customs Department.
r. G. M, Barnes, Long Grade
rk, Customs Department, to
Currency Department,
Mr. H. E. Walcott, Long Grade
Clerk, Seawell Airport, to the
stoms Department.
Mr. C. B. Corbin, Long Grade
, Customs Department, to the
avings Bank.
Mr. S, A. Jones, Long Grade
lerk, Public Trustee’s Depart-
mer+ to Seawell Airport.







Appointments

Mr. E. F, Belgrave, Temporary
lerk, to be Long Grade Clerk,
ttorney General’s Office, (and
ill remain attached to the Water-
‘orks Department until further
otice).

Mr. E, E. Callender, Temporary
Merk, to be Long Grade Clerk,
ivings Bank

. G. E, Clarke, Temporary
to be long Grade Clerk,
















Promotions
Mr. L. A. Deane, Long Grade

» Mr. C, M. Thorpe.
The ‘following have been ap-
‘pointed as Stenographer-Typists
‘in the General Service:—

Miss G. Chadderton.: to be a
» Stenographer-Typist. ‘Waterworks
Department. with effect from Ist
October, 1952.

Miss P. M. Riley, to be 2 ee
: her- ist, Income Tax @
Death Duties Department, with
‘effect from the Ist October, 1952.

Miss T. K. Riley, to be a Steno-
-Typist, Education Nepart-
ith effect from 1st Decem-
, (and will remain at-
tached to the Government Electric
Inspector’s Department until fur-
ther notice),

_ AmnualPrize-Giving
At Dayrell’s Road
The annual Prize-Giving .cere-

mony of the Gospel Hall took
place at Dayrell’s Road on Fri-



day night before a capacity
audience.

‘The programme consisted of
recitations and solos by the

children of the Sunday School
and a selection of sacred songs
rendered by a choir of 36 males
and females under the direction
of Miss Daisy Ashby.

At the conclusion of these
songs and recitafions, the prizes
were distributed for the year
1951 by Miss J. Watson, who was
presented with a bouquet by
Miss Maureen Yarde of the
Sunday School.

Days seem endless to
one who suffers from a
tired, aching back. Don’t
suffer from a backache!
Use A.1. White Liniment
Rub it on and let the magic
af its warmth do the rast.
Buy A.1. today! ‘

Have YOU test-d



luxury — the Five-Star CONSUL ?

16, 1952



Granted For
New School

ST, GEORGE'S, Nov, 5,

The Finance Committee of the
Legislative Council recently con-
sidered an application from the
Revd. Mother Superior of the St.
Joseph's Convent for remission of
duty on building materials — for
use in the construction of a Con-
vent in St. Andrew’s parish which
is estimated to cost $100,000 and
would cater for about 350 pupils.

Feeling too many, practical diffi-
eulties attendant on the grant of
this concession, the Committee
approved a grant of $2,400 in lieu
of remission of duty and
advised, that the Mother Superior
be informed that in view of the
present financial position of the
colony it must not be assumed that
the grant of this sum implies a
willingness to give favourable
consideration to any subsequent
application for a yearly subsidy
towards maintenance of the new

school.
a * s .

The death took place at Belmont
here last Monday afternoon of
Mrs. Ellen Gillespie, an aunt of
Mr. Jens Neilsen, owner of the
M.V.. “Daerwood.”

Canadian born, Mrs. Gillespie
took up residence here just over
two years ago and by her genial
disposition quickly became well
known and respected by people of
all classes. This was attested to in
the highly representative gather-
ing attending the funeral yester-
day afternoon at the Scot’s Kirk
with the Revd. Adam Thompson
officiating

* * a

Latest quitter from M.M.W.U,,
ranks has been Mr, Norris James,
former Senior Grievance Officer in
the organisation who had attended
‘the recent Trade Union course held
in Barbados under Colonia)
Development and Welfare aus-
pices. In a speech at Perdmon-
temps, Mr. James told a large
gathering that he did not want
it believed that he was against
the leader of the M.M.W.U., Hon.
_E. M. Gairy, but he strongly
opposed certain principles on
which the organisation was run.

Dealing with the funds of the
M.M.W.U., he pointed out that its
bulk was devoted to payment of
top officers and little was left for
payment of benefits and creation
of a “Strike Fund” which he
thought essential,

C.1.0. Chief Dies

SANFRANCISCO.
Philip Murray, immigrant
Scots mine boy head of C.I.O.
died of a heart attack. At 66 he
was a veteran worker for the

labour cause.
white-haired man



The thin
never lost the faint Scots burr,
likewise he never lost his ardour
for trade unionism,

Murray was born in Blantyre
Scotland in 1886 and was sixteen
when he immigrated to the bitu-
minous coal fields in western
Pennsylvania. (CP).

@ Simple, quick-handling
construction features




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@ Platform Structures

@ Scaffolding
@ Desks
@ Benches
@ Trestles

WHEREVER FINE CARS are gathered,
Ford products are discussed,

compared, and in the majority of
cases, accepted as the greatest

dollar value on wheels.

riven this low-cost

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UNIMET MAJOR you

@ Frames for light buildings



Promotions, 2,400Dellars U.S. Hope To

Sell More

To Colonies

NEW YORK.

U.S. exporters are hoping that
greater opportunities for them to
sell in British Colonial markets
will be one of the outcomes of the
Commonwealth Prime Ministers’
Conference, opening in London
this month.

The British West Indies and
other Colonial territories | are
known to be anxious to be allowed
to spend for themselves more of
the dollars they earn by their own
trade ‘and these Colonies are now
believed to be in a stronger posi-
tion than ever before to persuade
the United Kingdom to let them
oorhe siti
ne Position is summed up for
U.S. business men in an article in
the New York Journal of Com-
merce, which says:

“Colonial economic independ-
ence is increasing at a time of
rapid economic development. The
resultant higher standard of living
is increasing the market poten-
tialities. But at the same time,
the market is becoming more se-
lective,’

More than half the imports of
the British Colonial Empire came
from the non-sterling area in 1951
and thé proportion is thought to
be still higher this year. Colonial
exports to the non-sterling area
have increased to an even greater
extent, maintaining and even in-
creasing the trading surplus of
‘the Colonial Empire.

The Colonial contribution. to the
total sterling area trade with the
United States last year was a de-
cisive factor in maintaining the
Empire's favourable balance.
While all other sterling area
countries increased their imports
of U.S. goods, some by appreciable
amounts, the Colonies alone did
not. At the same time, they
achieved a much bigger increase
in their sales to the United States
than any of the independent mem-
bers of the sterling area,

Importing Spree

“What this means”, says the
Journal of Commerce, “is that the
importing spree in which many
sterling area countries including
the nited Kingdom, indulged
in 1951 was only made possible
by the restraint of the Colonies,
coupled with the expansion of
their dollar earnings.

“This is an aspect of sterling
area finance which has never been
faced by the independent sterling
countries in the past and which
the Colonial representatives in-
tend drawing to their attention at
the Commonwealth conference.

“The tendency to think of the
Colonial balance of payments as
a United Kingdom affair is being
discouraged in the Colonies,
Some of the Colonies, particularly
in Africa, but also in South East
Asia and the West Indies, are as-
suming increased responsibility for
the conduct of their own ecoao-
mic affairs.

“The warning is consequently
going out to the present self-
governing members of the ster-
ling area that they will have te
adjust their economic policies to
this new situation, 'They will have
to take account of the fact that
in Yuture the dollar earnings of
some of the present cclonial terri-
tories will not be .nade automati-
cally available to thein at the be-
hest of London.

“If the new ex-colonies agree
to exercise restraint in their dol-
lar import policy, iney will expect




oy












Speaking generally,
I would say...

. . » that the extremely wide application of UNIMET
MAJOR steel framework, made possible by its easy
construction methods, has made it an essential part of
the everyday functioning of construction firms and
business houses everywhere. But then it’s so very
economical — use it for one need, it’s there to use
again to meet a thousand, and one other requirements. tH
Ring 3713 today and ask for further information or ***
instructive leaflet on UNIMET MAJOR.

S. P. MUSSON,
a

Football :

Arsenal’s
Game Today’s
Highlight

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, Nov. 15.

A second-half sat, trick by
centre-forward Cliff Holton and a
couple of goals from deputy out-
side left Marden gave Arsenal a
tive-one win at Liverpool which
vanks as the day’s number one
performance. And that win shoots
Arsenal into fourth place only
four points behind Wolves over
whom they have a game in hand.
The leaders were indebted to
Nigel Sims the youngster who: put
Bert Williams out of the side. He
saved a second half penalty by
Frank Mountford to enable
Wolves to come away with both
points at Stoke.

Sheffield Wednesday's ten
matches without a defeat spell
came to an end before their own |
supporters at Hillsborough. Ports-
mouth were the boys to halt this
run but even they had to fight |
hard for their odd goal of seven |
victory.

Fastest Scoring |

Showpiece of the day was
Grimsby’s zeven-nil defeat of
Hartlepools.
Smith added to the honours with
the day’s fastest piece of scoring
—four goals in eight minutes.
This makes Grimsby promotion |
favourites again. Biggest Leices-
ter post-war crowd — 40,000 —
were at Filbert Street to see the
first away defeat of League lead-
ers Huddersfield.

Jack Grainger, Rotherham’s
much wanted centre-forward
added a few more thousands to
his value with a hat trick against
Brentford and Jesse Pye chipped
the edges off the big fee Luton
paid for him from Wolves with
three goals in the six-nil whip-
ping of Blackburn.

Notts County lost Jimmy Jack-
son taken to hospital with a
fractured jaw after only 18 min-
utes and were beaten three-ni!
by Sheffield United. Hull City,
beaten four-three at Birmingham
played the second half without
injured full back Neal.

Fog caused the game between
Notts Forest and Leeds to be
abandoned after only ten minutes
and caused the game between
Colchester and Crystal Palace to
be postponed.

In Scotland, League champions
Hibernian revenged their League
Cup defeat of a few weeks ago
by beating Dundee three-nil at
Easter Road. As a result of East
Fife’s defeat, Hibs are now only
three points behind them with two
games in hand.

NEW BOOKS

Twenty-two new books, ten
for children between the ages of
7 to 10 and twelve for adults,
will be going into circulation at
the Speightstown Branch Library
tomorrow.

These books are both me



and non-fiction,

proof that other members of the |
Sterling area are doing the same
thing and are als) vk}
maximum effort ww ier









—B.UP.







SON & Co. Ltd...
i hi eh hom.







RICH_ FLAVOR

REFRESHING



Centre-forward Fred }>

-





























et



ty eer ere ele errr emcermhlhc mC

SUNDAY

ADVOCATE

acne

























At your grocer’s in convenient size packages
also in improved filter tea balls aS

Where is the
root of your

Rheumatism P

—_—



ERE is wonderful news for Rheu-
matic sufferers! Doctors have a
new treatment bringing almost imme-
diate relief. Its secret is to apply a
revolutionary new massage cream, not
only where you feel the pain, but also
on what doctors call the myalgic or
‘Trigger’ spots, where lies the real
root of your trouble,
One Harley Street doctor has re-
ported remarkable results in over
1,000 cases of all forms of Rheu-
matism, including Fibrositis, Lum-
bago, Sciatica, etc. It has also been
tested and used by Hospitals and
Doctors all over the United Kingdom.
These diagrams show why you have ~ |
found relief so difficult by the old |
methods.






PAIN AND
STIFFNESS (6
SHOULDER



FiIBROSITIS


















,°
°

ae
MYALGIA

or ”
FOREARM

ak | A

PAINFUL TY

WRISTS &
FINGERS

PAINFUL
THIGH

How to get Relief from pain








sTiFe

For a long time this Cream was orily NECK

obtainable by the Medical Profession. paid ane

Now it is available for your own use Fiprosins 7) STIFFNESS IN

under the name of Lioyd’s Adrenaline © Swswourver :
Cream. If you massage i in, not only *s* >

where you feel the pain but also into e

these ‘Trigger’ spots, you can secure
almost immediate relief.

Make sure you get Lloyd's, the cream
originally developed to meet the require
ments of the Specialist who discovered





vonsa.-§ So @
FIBROSITIS@ @ /
PAIN IN
FRONT OF | MYALGIA OF
\ SHOULDER | FOREARM &)
waist

the importance of "Trigger spots in the SCIATICA LUMBAGO fe
treatment of rheumatism, and which is .
guaranteed to retain its adrenaline po

tency for at least 12 months, Without
this potency the cream cannot do its job.

Use the cream as directed in the
explanatory leaflet—it will be a reve-
lation to you. Only. Lieyd’s has this
essential leaflet with diagrams showing
the more importent ‘Trigger’ spots.

IMPORTANT WARNING ~~,

3 Be sure to insist on LLOYD'S,
the cream used in the clinical
tests upon which this treat-
ment is based. LLOYD'S is
the brand described in an
article in “The Lancet” (50.
11.395) as the “most satisfac-
tory .. .” Don’t be put off

3 with imitations.
SALLI ALD DD AAA AD DDD

HOWARD LLOYD & CO. LTD., TT WATERLOO PLACE, LONDON, ENGLAND
Makers of Fine Pharmaceuticals io the Medical Profession since #880




fe °
ee be 4
e TENNIS
‘ e.Bow
PAIN IN
RONT OF
THIGH

LLOYD’S

ADRENALINE

CREAM

FROM ALL CHEMISTS IN 4/- TUBES

4

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BEER, KING OF



LEDGE, ARI ROT VS




WHY ASPRO WAS A SPECIAL
APPEAL FOR WOMEN

ASPR

The Sate Way to Dispel

HEADACHE & PAIN

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MARHILL STREET, BRIDGETOWN

DRINKS, DRINK OF KINGS

(he eT TT

PAGE ELEVEN “—.

oo sn ce

sto, U6rgY

“-
.
a,

\f you feel worn out, depressed, or
generally run down a glass or two a day of
Buckfast Tonic Wine will quickly restore lost
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BEER STIMULATES THE APPETITE—TAKEN BEFORE
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AND DURING



MEALS, THIS HIGHLY

CARIB

z

Se





‘

a

PAGE TWELVE

Bill To Amend
Gambling
Ordinance

From Our Ow espondent

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Nov. 7



For the past few years the
Trinidad Government had been
besieged with requests from peo-
ple of all walks of life for in-
formation regarding results of
raffles, sweepstakes and other
forms of games promoted under
the Gambling Ordinance, There

had been many complaints that on
numerous occasions raffles had

been held and the results were
still unknown

All this was said by the Hon.
Roy Joseph, Minister of Educa-
tion and Social Servires in the

Legislative Council this morning
when he moved the second read-
ing of a Bill to amend the Gam-
bling Ordinance,

The Bill, which was passed,
makes provision for the Com-
missioner of Police or any Super-
intendent of Police to ask for
safeguards relating to raffles

which would not be left entirely”

to them. Suth conditions would
have to be prescribed by the
Governor-in-Council. The safe
guards will not interfere with the
freedom of the people, provided
that promoters have the consent
of the Commissioner of Police.

Government feels that in order
to protect thousands of people
who indulge in raffles, conditions
should be laid down so that the
Commissioner of Police could
call upon promoters for state-
ments so that the people could
be made well aware of what was
happening in regard to the raffles
mm which they took part

PLAN FOR SEISMIC STATIONS

This week the S.S. Colombie
brought two scientists — Dr
Willmore and Mr Geoffrey
Robson to Trinidad where they
will work in connection with a
plan to establish seismic stations
in eight of the Caribbean islands.

They came here in the first in-
6tance, because Trinidad will be
their base of operations in the
Caribbean. They plan to set up
the first station at the Imperial
College of Tropical Agriculture,
at St. Augustine, in about a
month,

From Trinidad they will pro-
ceed to St. Lucia, Grenada,
Dominica, Montserrat, St. Kitts,
Antigua and St. Vincent. It is
hoped that with the aid of these
Stations they would be able to
Eeesict eruptions in the Carib-

n.

te STARS: -

and YOU ~ 4



Your Individual Hoerosco
FOR SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1%

LOOK in the section in which your
birthday comes and find what your out-
look is, according to the stars,

MARCH 21 to APRIL % (Ariex)—Do,
don't, will, won't—they make up a
soundly determined mind, Don't hastily
decide; neither he hesitant, indecisive.
Start at church tq strengthen sou.

APRIL 21 to MAY 20 (Paurus)—Prayer
ig potent. Be strong in purpose, faithful
to trusts—-your innate way when you
are living up to your best

MAY 21 to JUNE 21 (Gemink)—Note
Aries. And be most careful in decisions,
but neither timid nor embarrassed. A
wise word said, an unwise one left
unsald

JUNE & to JULY 2 (Cancer) Top
success does not always bring inner con
tentment, peace of mind nor happiness
tc loved one. Strive toward real



success

JULY M to AUGUST & (Leo)—We are
not all alike in habit, reactions, attitudes,
and numeroug cther respects, so tolerance
should be our guide

AUGUST % to SEPTEMBER 28 (Virgo)
It's always a hetter world for the smal!

favours, the daily niceties, the good
things seid instead of being left unsaid
Don't forget church
SEPTEMBER 4 to OCTOBER &S (Libra)
Don't del plans fo ming groups
countering or any preliminaries that

could facilitate progress for the coming
week ay, of course



OCTOBER M& to NOVEMBER
(Seorpico)—-Is it time to fr rw such
things as how you have been getting
throigh tasks and whether methods used
are the most expedient. Attend chureb.



NOVEMBER % to DECEMBER 2%
(Sagittarius)—Habits are wonderful Ll
we have the right ones. Review your
own. Remember charity.

DECEMBER % to JANUARY @ (Capri
ecorn)--Some days we cannot seem to
“get off" on the right foot, as the saying
foes, But we can always change pace
and get back in step when we
try.

really

JANUARY @ te
(Aquarius)—-Think it. out, then confer
with wise heads. Den't belittle youth’
opinions. Go to your church

FEBRUARY “%1 to MARCH 2 (Pisces)
Mw your day is free, think before , 01
waste time dawdling, or with just an
companions. Better read a good book
hear some stimulating music or intelligent
cisenssion, Pray

YOU BORN TO-DAY are a combination
of talent, versatility and cor\tradictions
You also can waste time when you get
into a sullen mood. Seorpio sears to the

FEBRUARY %





SUNDAY





Why Mr. Eisenhower Won |

NEW YORK.

So Dwight D. Eisenhower has
reached the climax oi one of the
greatest careers in world history,
lhe Supreme Commander of the
Allied Forces in the Second Worid
War, who went on to become the
Supreme Commander of the
world’s greatest peacetime defen-
sive alliance, has been elected to
the greatest office in the free
world.

Throughout the campaign, Eisen-
hower, an immensely popular
figure for more than a_ decade,
has been well ahead of Adlai
Stevenson, whose name was un-
known to most Americans less
than a year ago. As the campaign
went on, it became clear that
inree main causes wouid send
kisenhewer into the White House.

Corruption

i, The tanwsuc corruption in
Washington under te iruman
admunistration, and we vioient
pubiic reacuon against it.

Woereves 4 Wear in we United
States during the past three
months, | tound white-not anger
S¢euist Ulis corrupluon, ana a
fanatical desive to ciean up the
American capital. Young voters in
particular were tremenaousiy
eager to join Eisenhower's. “Cru-
Sade for Clean Government,”
Phere was no doubt about the
personal integrity of Stevenson,
out many voters felt that he could
not clean up what he himself
had described as “the mess in
Washington.” In addition, Steven-
son made the enormous mistake
ef having as chairman of his
meeting in Boston only nine days
before election day James M.
Curley, a prominent Democratic
politician who climaxed a career
of graft by being sentenced (in
January 1946) to 18 months’ im-
prisonment for a huge mail fraud
in connection with war contracts.
But Curley was said to control
100,000 votes, which were badly
needed by Stevenson,

Communist Threat
- The Communist threat,
the war in Korea.

The majority of American vot-
ers believed sincerely that Eisen-
hower was the man best qualified
to deal with Soviet » and
to bring the war in Ke to a
successful conclusion. Most Ameri-
cans felt that the Democratic

administration w itely
stalling in Toren” Gat Me es
States could dily win this
war, and that would

do just that, @ recent -
and Bison

and

munist offensive,
hower's pledge that he himself
would visit Korea, gained him
many votes.

Change

3. The tremendous desire for a
change—-any change away from
the Democratic administration.

The Democrats had been in
power uninterruptedly for twenty
years. Millions of Americans felt
that, if the party system was to
survive, a Republican had to be
elected President e,

Typical of the opinions of mil-
lions of Amevricans—particularly
young Americans—was that of a
young unskilled worker in a beer
brewery in Milwaukee, earning 2



lity EDWIN ROTH





During the past three
months, Edwin Roth has
toured the United States

from. the Atlantic to the
Pacific. He has travelied
with General Eisenhower,

an ident Harry
man, and has

numerous

walks of life. In article
he explains the reasons for
General Eisenhower’:

8 vie~
tory,
nesses

dollars 10 cents an hour. He was
stationed for two years in G#-
many and Austria the war.
To-day he has a security of em-
ployment, a fine home and a good
car.

“I'm for Ike”, he told me, “The
Democrats may be better for
labour. I would hate the Big Boys
getting their hands on the govern-
ment. But I have never yet
known a Republican administra-
tion. I like Ike, and I think we
should give the Republicans a
chance to show what they can do.”

Or take the 26 - year - old
mechanical engineer from Long-
beach, California,

“I voted Democratic in 1948,
but I will vote Republican this
time”, he told. me, “This whole
world is q military world, The
politicians know nothing. Eisen-
hower is a military man, and he
will keep us out of trouble, These
ere military times, and we need
to have a military man as Presi-
dent.”

Then there was the Oklahoma
City, 54-year-old German-Ameri-
can inventor of a stone-breaking
machine; who made a _ fortune
out of his invention why told me:
“If I voted for my business, I
would vote for Stevenson, The
Democrats have brought this
country great prosperity—a false
prosperity perhaps, but still pros-
perity. There is a lot of building
going on throughout this country,
and there may be much less un=
der the Republicans. But I've got
a boy out in. Korea, and if I voted
for my business, I'd be voting
against him, Eisenhower will clear
up this business, too. If we are
so weak that we couldn’t whip
the North Koreans, we'd better
start running now, because the
Russians could get us any time.
But I don’t believe we are so

weak.
Personality

Eisenhower gained countless
votes by his personality, He was
not only the world-famous Gen-
eral who had won the Second
World War, but his crowd sense
was terrific, and. vastly superior
to that of Stevenson. He attracted
enormous enthusiastic crowds in
every place he visited, and mil-
lions were delighted by his ebul-
lient personality, his cheerful
friendliness 4 the immense
eae he put i every wave of

is hands,
mer complete contrast with

even; . pr
lower Wee's lar promise,
He also gained votes in the
traditionally Democratic southern



states by his insistence that the!

ADVOCATE SUNDAY.

“WANDERER IIT’? SAILS WEST

NOVEMBER 16, 1952





@ From Page 7 and picturesque island. But the and nights the little vessel ram sea, and at times the motion cer-
rich oil deposits lying beneath] able Fo..uiguese coacs sich has cost of everything there was very steadily om her way unattended tainly was violent; sometimes she
America’s tide lands should be-|;:y good harbours to the river high, so we sailed away to La and that was a welcome change rolled 32° each way, and only
long to the state owning the/psgus, where we spent ten days Paima (one of the lesser known for us, for you will understand took 3 seconds for the roll from
coasts, and not to the whole!

nation,
The Communist danger
America was one of the

inside |
main

“issues of the campaign, and here

; risiti yachts are concerned, The
‘ ‘ , ) Visiting yachts z , r
tae Republicans scated heavily | foreigner’s* passport is seized and

the Gestapo trained “internation-
al”
enemy alien.

On leaving Lisbon we had the
the | sail of a lifetime, the kind of thing
fact that Stevenson had acted as | one buys or builds a boat for and

|so rarely gets. In the Portuguese

They worked day and night to
convince the American voters tha‘
Eisenhower was better qualified
than Stevenson to deal with this
Among their biggest
ammunition was



danger,
campaign

a character witness for Alger Hiss,
when Hiss was on trial for per- |
jury.

On October 27, a week before
election day, Senator Joseph
McCarthy drove his own cam-
paign to a peak with a nation-

visiting a number of smali ports
as well as Lisbon. The outlook of
he Portuguese is
rom that of the Spaniards where

trade, which is the early begin-
ning of the real north-east trade,
we had a glorious passage south to
the small, unspoilt island of Porto ag,
Santo, covering the 480 miles in
3 1/2 days. The wind was fresh
wide broadcast the cost of which |.nq we carried the whole main-

of the Canary Islands and_ which

that as there are only the two of
should not be confused with Las

iS us aboard we do get very tired
Palmas) to lay in a stock of fruit when steering is necessary, taking at noon on the 6th November
and vegetables for the Atlantic ji turn and turn about three your low, green island of Barba-
crossing at a price we could afford. hours at the tiller and three be- dos lifted slowly out of the sea
The little port of Santa Cruz there, low, by the time one has cooked ahead just about where and when
hemmed in as it is by 7,000 foot and eaten, navigated, and attend- the navigator had said (and
raountaims, was hot, humid amd eq to all the things that need secretly prayed) it would appear.
windless, so we were not really doing, there is not a lot of time Although navigation by observa-
sorry when after a stay there of jeft for sleep. But under the self- tions of celestial objects is an
one week Wanderer slipped away steering twins. our life became almost exact science, on a long
on the llth October bound for more jeisurely. In the daytime passage out of sight of land the
Barbados. Susan cooked elaborate meals, navigator has little or no_oppor-

To start with we steered in a baked bread and made cakes, tunity for checking the accuracy
west-south-west direction so a8 while I~was free to navigate to of his work, so I for one always
to get down into the heart of the my heart’s delight, and in our suffer from a feeling of appre-
north-east trade wind as quickly spare moments we worked about hension as the time for making a
possible. But although that the ship, attending to her gear landfall approaches, It is a thrill
wind is generally regarded as be- and improving the harbour awn- which never seems to lose its
ing constant we ran into a calm jing. We even found time to sit savour no matter how often one
area and there lay almost motion- together in the cockpit each eve- experiences it.

one side to the other.

It was a tremendous thrill when

very different

police make him feel like an

— 80,000 dollars—had been paid not the official Republican i). sun shone brilliantly over Wanderer lay gazing sadly at her ocean over ch we sailed so and Wanderer stormed along to-
Party, but by “private sources.” In| the vivid blue sea, and by night cwn reflectiori, Except for a long easily, and watching the sunset wards the island, Night was upon
this, McCarthy claimed that Ste-|the stars were clear and the low ocean swell the sea was SC with its usual accompaniment of her as South Point came abeam,
venson was surrounded by a stafl | yacht’s wake was a blaze of pale smooth that it had the appear- heaped up cumulus clouds all and there at last she ran out of
of pro-Communist sympathisers. | yreen phosphorescent light, Porto ance of oil, and the silence was ground the horizon, As the sun the ocean swell which had been
He also charged that Stevensov |Santo has no harbour, so we had profound; we noticed that par- went down we could see the her constant companion for so
during his official political missior |, Jand on the beach through the ticularly after lying in so many planet Venus ahead between the long, and at 8 o'clock that eve-
in Italy in 1943, had deliberately | surf in our 7-foot aluminium Spanish and _ Portugese ports luffs of the*staysails, while the uing she found an anchorage in

willing Italian government, anu
had brought the Communist Party
leader Togliatti back from Mos-
cow. The candidature of Stevenso
—said McCarthy—had been offi-
cially endorsed by the Communist
Party. According to McCarthy,
Stevenson had been closely associ-
ated with Alger Hiss, and hi
speech was interspersed with such
“slips of the tongue as “Alger-—I

mean Adlai,”

More Harm Than Good

Everyone wondered whether
President Truman’s immense cam-
paign trips throughout America
would do more good than harm.
The result of the election shows
that these trips; which were orig-
inally opposed by Stevenson, did
more harm than good, It tended
to identify Stevenson with some of
the corruption rampant under the
Truman regime. There was also
the sensational “revelation” by
columnist Walter Winchell that in
1922 Truman had belonged to the
Ku Klux Klan; this was, of course,
heatedly denied by Truman,

After twenty years, the iene. |
crats are now out of office. But we |
have not heard the last of that
bright mew star’ on the world’s
political firmament, Adlai Steven-
-on, During the past three months,
Stevenson has fought the presi-
dential campaign of 1956. He will
spend the next four years as un-
official Leader-of-the Opposition,
keeping a sharp eye on the Eisen-
hower administration, using his
si:perb oratofy and humour when-
aver possible to say “I told you
79,”"

The Battle for the White House
s over, and America breathes a
sigh of relief. But under its politi-
cal system, this nation will soon
begin to prepare for the congres-
sional election of 1954. Between
vow. and then, President Dwight
EKis@énhower will hear a lot more
‘rom Governor Adlai Stevenson.

—L.E.S.

NEW ESSO SERVICE— BARBAREES



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we managed it without capsizing.
Wine,
the
watched those things being loaded
through the surf into small sail-
ing craft for
near-by island of Madeira.
Captain of the Port (Captain of
he Beach might be a more appro-
priate title)
come,
Yclock of a hot afternoon when
we called on him,
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ily in the bay.

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Madeira where
dents
we have nothing but the happiest
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foistered Communists on the un- fer an exciting business, but





where the noise of motor horns, moon, nearly full
church bells and fiesta rockets is quickly up astern.
almost deafening and continues

then, rose Carlisle Bay. The 2,700 mile pas-
The risk of sage from La Palma had taken 20
collision out there clear of the days 8 hours.
well into the night. steamer tracks is very small, in’ Almost at once the police launch
But presently the wind re- fact we saw only one other ship came alongside, and out of the
turned; at first it was only the during the whole crossing, so darkness a’ soft musical voice
faintest whisper of an air, but after supper we used to hang a asked who we were and where
that was enough to fill the 330 white light in the rigging and we had come from, and concluded
square foot nylon genoa and to both turned into our bunks, look- by wishing us a pleasant stay at
send Wanderer ghosting silently ing out occasionally to see that the island. Soon the rising moon
over the still calm sea. Then it gj] was well. So the time sed illuminated the white’sandy beach
freshened a little, and we re-s€t quite quickly and although we that fringed our anchorage and
the mainsgil which we had low- were aware that Wanderer was a magnificent grove of palms.
ered during the calm to prevent probably the only floating object Friendly lights shone out, the first
chafe, and from that day »n our for hundreds of miles, and that we had seen for many a day, and
runs from noon to noon were we must depend entirely on our there came to us across the water
mostly well over 100 miles, the own resources for everything, we the warm, sweet-scented smell of
best being 130, The wind which were never conscious of a feeling the land. Slowly, as we moved
had started at north-east slowly of loneliness. about the strangely steady deck
worked round to east and we As ‘the sun shone brilliantly stowing the sails, we began to
were then able to set our special every day navigation presented no realise that the first part of our
twin staysails which, when their difficulties other than those con- adventure had succeeded. The
braces are connected to the nected with taking observations broad Atlantic lay astern. This
tiller, will make the yacht steer with the sextant when the yacht was our first tropic island, and
herself. For eleven wonderful days was being thrown about by the we felt we were going to like it.

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SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1952 SUNDAY ADVOCATE . PAGE THIRTEEN





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18 ,

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Usually NOW .
ST GOLDEN SYRUP—2 Ibs. ........00. cc ccceeedheveeees BB
GUAVAS—Tins 1 ff 40 Gee aeetee Gh eee ee ee

i E MMMMMy ial hacen cauwAde vende cies a sets rae
CHASE & SANBORN INSTANT bee oe a
COFFEE ne a “i 87 80 CAULIFLOWER — WHOLE ....,........ .. ge
ri BROKEN ............ ‘ 38
FRY’S HOT CHOCOLATE a 49 45 YOUNG FINE CARROTS “:........ . 40
: PEAR—CARROTS ........ uetaas 43
M’LADE ats de oe 42 36 SAUREKRANT ene ei peiake ; 33
UTCH APPLE SAUCE ; ; ‘ ;
STEAK — ONIONS e if 74 65 BOURNVITA ..... : 3
MARIE BISCUITS—pkgs. ......... j 32






BY DAN BARRY APRICOT PIE FILLING .. Ay 44 30

iy” FORGIVE US,O
MIGHTY LUCIFAN, FOR }s
THIS INTRUSION, BUT










D
HEEHEE! BRING HER ij

w =
A OR NL PR A A AE










|
H





For those who love the Sea !!
Here’s a Fine Xmas Gift

YACHT RACING
NEW REVISED EDITION
BY FRANK ROBBINS By MANFRED CURRY

i rina

={_fqjFHRFRHRFR oS

een
































=
soa ’ STATIONER :
iE THIS MESS IS GETTING LE BURNED BLACK AN? TORN AT Th ADV OCcATE TI i Y fs
COR’ COMPLICATE? / MAYBE 1 EDGES! THE BOMB was ci
THEN IT'S YOUR PLANTED A TIME BOMBIN| | GAN GET SOME ANSWERS IN THIS/...AN? THE MA SS SSssSsSSSS5855 SSS >
OPINION, CAPTAIN, THAT \\ HER PLANE! OBSERVE \F I... OH-OH... WHAT'S SCRAP... WHAT & STO Cl tee :
A DELIBERATE ATTEMPT } THE TINY MECHANISMS,4 | te 2 )
WAS MATE ON MISS PRECISION MATE ! rx} Hi |
R SHERMAN'S LIFE? |
|
Gu INNESS |
4 STOUT
camel FOR STRENGTH |
“ )
BY GEORGE MC. ee Yin i
\ Te i mies a ee 4 |
6HE WENT OUT EARLY- WHAT ARE \ 7 NO ETTER
DADDY - SHE'S VERY ANGRY Seas ae
AND _NOT SPEAKING TO YOU- h
SOMETHING YOU YOUR WIFE'S
SAID TO HER= >» RELATIVES |
LEFT YET ? |
»
i
))
\
yh?
je Lae = \
/ I WON'T PRETENO \ THE TROOPERS DID +»e AND NOW YOU'RE ALL SET... 7 T \
IM SORRY THE | ALL THEY COULD, | JON TOP OF YOUR PROFESSION,ANDA}) AND I AM }
PAGAN... THEY RE WORLD WITHOUT A WORRY IN IT... GRATEFUL... \\\
CERTAIN HE DIED e. LUCKY GIRL TOO, \
AN ENDING EVEN FOR HIM. 7 WHEN HIS CAR HIT I SUPPOSE, WITH ))
70 BE THIS / THE WATER. EVERY THING...CAREER , }
A MONEY, FAME. EVERYTHING i
+ EXCEPT WHAT A GIRL »
REALLY
i
}
) \
i a i
ew + ee
BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES }
HERE ARE THE CROOKG~AND “\ HMM~YOU CERTAINLY CAUGHT THEM THE | \
Sar iniee I HERE ARE THE JEWELS THEY~ WAR NAY AA BUT yoy ee A i}
MAKE OLE — T ;
FOOL OUTA ME AGAIN a al FACT! I C. F. HARRISON & CO. (BarBavos) Ltd.
OR ANYBODY ELSE? a a |
| X
S$
|
i
i i)
— FE i |
TOMORROW: TAE WAMBES)| i
, p ——— OSES —
; e ‘



+





«



PAGE FOURTEEN

CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE



DIED



ember,













MOORE — On “the 16th 1982 ;
James Richard Moore late re
Clerk of Saint Michael's Cathe
The funeral leaves his te residence
Count’y Road, St. Mic! t 4.15 this
evening for Saint Michael's Cathedral
Friends are invited

Wilhelmina Moore (Widow James
Moore, Sergt. Fitageraia Gill
16. t1.52—in
THANKS

BROCKLEHURS Mrs. Vida Brockie-
hurst and family gratefully return
thanks to ali who attended the funeral
sent wreaths or in a otner way as-
sisted on the occasion of the passing of
Mr, Duncar Brockict t late of
“Henley”, Upper Collymore Rock, St
Michael 16.11.52—I1n

GALL—The Family of the late Maizie
Gall of “Mayville”, Chelsea Road beg
to thank all those who attended th-
funeral, sent wreaths and cards and
in other ways expressed sympathy with
them in their recent bereavement

16.11,52—In

GIBSON — The “undersigned gratefully re.
turn thanks to all who attended the
funeral, sent wreaths or in any other
way expressed sympathy with them on
the occasion of the passing of Mrs.
Emma B. Gibson, late of “Emma Ville”
Pine Plantation, Rd., St. Michael.

Nathaniel (Husband), Michael, Dudley,

Hugh (Children) 16.9 .52—Ir

———

IN MEMORIAM

CARRING TON— 3 | jJoving memory of our
dear beloved Mother who was callec







to rest on the 7th of November, 1951
One year has passed since that sac
day

The one we loved has passed away
But only those who has loet can tell
The erie parting without farewell.
fver to be remembered by Edmond Car-
rington, her husband, Violet, Stella, Mac.,
Markie, Edson, Children, the Haynes
family and friends 16.11. 52—in.





Rawlins.
A year has gone beyond recall with
all its doubts and fears.
May the good Soul that onee breathea
the fragrance of leve here below rest
in peace.
Ever to be temembered by Clarence
Rawlins ‘Husband) Golda (Daughter)
The Rawlins family, The Ajleyne

family .

16.11,52—1n.

Sis ite tes ant

HOUSES ,
———
BUNGALOWS — Two Modern Bunga-
lows Bersford & Eunice, Maxwell's Road
fully furnished, all modern conveniences
en and silvers. Contact
Nurse , Maxwell's Coast, or Phone
S101. 14,11.52—3n

en,
“FPLODDEN”.-Culloden Road, 5 bed-
cooms, drawing, dining, breakfast rooms,









| "peas SALE



AUTOMOTIVE

BEDFORD VAN — 10/12 cwts. — lit-
tle used and in really good condition

Dial 4616, Courtesy Garage
14. 1) 52-6

—_
CAR-—Prefect Ford in good condition
Dial 8213 16.11 .52-—-3n



—_
CAR—Standard Vanguard 6,000 miles
$1,600. Smith's Engineering Works
Phone 4947 16.11.52—in.

CAR—One Vauxhall VELOX, practically
new, only done 4000 miles. Phone
REDMAN & TAYLOR'S GARAGE LTD.

15. 12.52—Gn



CAR—One Vauxhall Velox. 14,000 miles
Can be seen Eckstein’s Garage, Bay
Street, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

16.11.52—3n.

CAR—One Prefect Ford, late Model, in
A-1 Condition Rartly New. Price $650.00,
Apply to Smith's Garage, Roebuck St.

No. 1. 16.11.52—In.





later than Saturday 29th inst.

Lucy in straitened circumstances and not
less than eight and not more than twelve
years of age.

be obtained from the he
on office days.
must accompany each

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

PURLIC WN eee
NOTiIVLE

PARISH OF ST. LUCY
Tenders are invited for the

PUBLIC
REAL ESTATE







of
twenty-three (23) or mote pints of fresh
milk daily to the St. Lucy's Almshouse
as from Ist January, 1953.

Tenders will be received by the under;
signed up to and including Saturday 6th

op or Entrance
December, 1952.

a Dairy, Go!
AT FONTABELLE. =

May Suit
for oly £900. ATs
A Large

Oo. L. DEANE,
Clerk to Poor Law Guardians,
St. Luey.
15.11.52—3n Righ
t-of-
Going for Only. 22,100, Net
room (as Good as New) &

ton:
about 11,000 sq. ft., By NAVY

Going for Only £3,000 Net.

— A ve Desi
ay rable



NOTICE
PARISH OF st. LUCY
Applications for one or more vacant
Vestry Exhibitions, tenable at the Alexan-
dra School will be received by me not

must be daughters of Parishioners of St.

m (Partly Stone)
+» about 4.000 sq. ft, AT

must | Go Going for Only £1,250 Net SiN NELSON
3 Treseurer -A (Stone) panes. eremiow &

tlamal Certificate aede A-l Business Stand, Can Yield

oat $70.00 p.m., eles Going for Only

£2100 Net. IN ST.—A 3

Residence, Can Yi

00 p.m., Can also Mabe ts ‘Good

_ 5 Biand, wate, Light, Going for

at Maxwell Hill, a hoe bene

Forms of

A Baptlamal











about noe Acre, Going
for Only 13 cts. Net .
The Parisian Dress Shop Weil noah. P de Abeos Lens
SHEPHERD STREET SIRABLE “inchad

This is to notify my patrons that the | SIDE ni PERTIES including SEA-









CAR—One Citreon Car, excellent con- | above will be joo oy Wissinees from | Call at “Olive Bough”, en Y -
jition. Phone REDMAN & TAYLOR’S|to-morrow l4th Novem
GARAGE LTD. 16.11.52—3n ‘13.11.52—4n. |_| BUNGALOW — One roomy 3-bedroom
enn neate stone bungalow, large living room kitchen
CAR—Austin A-40 Devon, 12,000 miles. and bath, situated on sea, Welches,
Excellent condition, New battery. Can be Ch. Ch. Dial 8345. 16.11,52—2n.
seen at Eckstein Bros, Tel. 3387 or NOTICE ——_—_—_. .
R. G. Challenor Lid, Re sedi de si ocrer — Black Rock, standing on
. .|@HR west . * acres arable land, stone building with
NOTICE is hereby ‘given thar sppiicn: {2 eecreom™s, sitting” and dining rooms,

ELE

CAR--Wolseley. Perfect running order

5.243 miles. Contact Blow 95—273.
15. 11.52—Un.

CARS—Sedan Morris 8 me
ley 8. Apply to M, Farmer,

ring,
3t. Thomas. ee
CAR _ Morris-Oxford, good as new.
Mileage under 3,000. Telephone 2949.

4.11.52—t+.f.n.





MOTOR — One
3 phase 50 cycles George | Directors,
Harris, Spooners

.52—1n.

volts,
in, St.
16.1
OR Veer Austin 12 h.p. mec
saate sound, Owner leaving imand. re

ast
Garage,
Road.

offer .to $350.00. Apply:
Reed Street,
16.11.52—1n

opposite



oe
RADIO—One S. 38 Halicrafter Radio 6
tubes, wtih oe set. ly to EB.
Sealy, Edsville, Deacons’

16,11.52—In.

XMAS TREE \LIGHTS with Nursery
Rhymes (12 to set) — Dial ‘aot = Cour-









usual conveniences, servants rooms,
garage, ideably situated with grounds|tesy Garage. 11,.52—6n.
ani cree, all enclosed. Available
ist. Apply: C. BE, Clarke, LIVESTOCK
7 Swan Street. Dial 2631 or 3029,
0 filly by Vimiddad (wii tthe Ascot
ARA — Fully 3 bea. | filly by im winner © sco
room’ higuse, Bt. Philip ‘const, ‘Lighting Soe Gee. sad second £5 the Teer out
plant, Watermill supply. 2 :
Servant rooms. Monthly rent plus | »Y Royal, Remat ot pedigree
$3 cleansing charge, IN ADVANCE, Dial | Supplied if required. Apply: Hon. V. C.
4476 1,11,52—t.£n. | Gale: oe ee
GARAGE AND OFFICE, Jackson $t. MECHANICAL
Sao, Fuecentie: trun Deceiver ik CLS =. S SERLD Deabaa dale?
us ion from ember 1, on
Te installed. Apply Yonkers Bicycles (Green) twenty: 2. Tames,
Office. Dial 2550 for particulars. by ” ¢
Apply to Mrs, rts, St.
: 9.11,52-2n. | Lawrence. ~ 16,11,52—1n.
oo: een caigbamnsnetincesmioey
NEWHAVEN — Fully furnished 4-bed- MACHINE, i.
room house, Crane coast Double Garage} chine. Dial ore rapediad le,
3 Servant rooms, Lighting plant, a Victoria Street. 16.11. ee

mill gp lege rent ot ck on
4476, ite

ONE FURNISHED FLAT at Manhaten,
on sea, Welches, 3 bedrooms, servants
Toom and garage, enclosed yard,
ena all modern conveniences. are
B'dos Furniture Remover, Dial

5.10. sant. ‘fn

ROOM—Large room with all conveni-
ences. For experienced lady or couple.
Head of Chapman Street. 16.11,52—-1n

en
WINSLOW, CATTLE WASH—For last 2
weeks in December and en hi
March, May, June and July of 1953, Dia
3542, .- 16.11, aan

‘MISCELLANEOUS







IOUSEWIVES — You can now Rent a
JOHNBON'S Electric ‘“Beautiflor” Filoo;
Polisher at only $1,00 per day. Beautify
your Floors and Furniture in time for
Xmas by using JOHNSON’S Wax Products
and Floor Polisher. “Phone 4748. K. J.
Hamel-Smith & Co,, Ltd., Bridge Street.

9.11,52—5n,

ANNOUNCEMENTS

AT THE COTTAGE GIFT SHOP
TOYS Jig-Saw Puzzles, Animals, Xmas
Crackers, Decorations, No parking prob-





Jera, 19 Him. to 18 a.m, — 4 pan; to 6.30
pm 4.11.52—2n,

BROKEN DENTU: ‘The worst can
be skilfully repaired, fractured, and
pea Teeth replaced, slack and falling

a refitted with special imported

ma

TO) -- (Removed from Reed Street to

Roebuck Street) Opposite Coca Cola Co,
13.11.52--3n.

ee a

EXHIBITION of Paintings and Shell-
work by Mrs. J. M. Forster, paintings
by Nan Kendall, at Barbados Museum,
near Savannah, Nov. sth-—30th, daily
10 a.m.—6 p.m. Sundays 2.30 p.m. to
6 p.m. 2.11.52—13n.

FRENCH FASHION available now.

Covered Buttons, Buckles, Pleating, also



(ARE DEAL DENTAL LABORA-) [pp











three’ pepe it ub,
et "saa, : meal 11.
ae nee

in
Te Rei te anh Sy Tok oh
guson Tractor w ‘ac
other trailers $400.00 00 he e500 Smith's

Engineering Works, Phone sett.
16.11,52—In.
MISCELLANEOUS






AMERICAN .
styles. Tea-' $74, vi
$150 per pair, ie ern ‘ess

Broad Street. . ‘

Sees ott, See se. ee

graphs ete., at Gorringes Antique Shi
adjoining Royal Yacht Club. ee
3.2.52—t.f,n.







BRONKXLEY'S BATH SOAP — large
size — makes a nice ae pee
Reduced from 3/6 to 2/6 cake. rer
Scents, Knight's Ltd 14.11, “

CREPE — Printed Moroain . 4
very chretful shades. At Thani Bros.
Pr, Wm. Henry St, Great Autumn Sale.
Onky $1.20 a ya. Worth od

16, Ta



ae Gee ie
Sneene ne ak, two oz. $3.50, 6 oz.

18,
. 29, 10. 563—

DIARY—A_ useful Bi for a friend
abroad — ‘‘The B’'dos Engagement Diary”
With 12 au ow. ot fe. ey
and the price is only 2/ Gi

ls *14.11,52—3n

FOR THE HOUSEHOLD — Turkish
Towels, large size $1.43, Face Cloths 3Sc,
each, Wash 32. each, Yellow Dust-
ers 26c. each, Regular Size Pillow Cases
Bic. each, Linen Kitchen Towels 60c. each.
The Modern Dress Shoppe, Broad Street.

12.11,52—Jn.





HARDBOARD — Standard Hardboard.
Sizes ¥ x 4 end 30S Cd foe Ceilings a
partitions. cents per sq. i.
G. W. Hutehinson & Co., Ltd, — Dial



ready made Pleated Skirts.on sale. 22} 4292. 14.11, 52—3n.
Swan Street and Busby Alley. a

13.11.52—3n. | IND) LEATHER SANDALS — Host

of sha and patents all sizes. Just the

GIFT PARCELS—Let us send your}ining for Xmas. At reduced prices at

Candy GIFT PARCELS to_ the U.K.
Leave your order CANDY BOX (Cave
Ey, herd). 1-Ib tins 98c. G-Tb tins $5.96

ge and Postage included.
15.11.52—2n.





XMMAS TREES--Spray painted Green
or White. Dial 2496 for particulars.
15.11,52—2n.

Land For Sale |

(2) two acres of land at
St. Elizabeth. Village, St.
Joseph.

(2) two acres of land be-
low St. Joseph’s Church.
Both beside the main road.

(3) three spots of land at
Maxwell Road. Each spot
consists of 12,600 square feet.

8,000 square feet of land
at St. Michael’s Row next to
Alleyne, Arthur’s bond.

Pay a small deposit and
the balance on terms.

For
to



all particulars apply

D’ARCY A, SCOTT
Middle Street or dial 2645.

15.11.52.—3n.



TODAY'S NEWS FLASH

MODEL FACTORY
ENGINES

That Work By Steam

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY



diliekiennninanccacel

Thani Bros Great Autumn
16.11,52—1n.



MATS—Large Size Straw Mats Aetiatie
designs. Limited Quantity. reduced

Thani Bros. Great Autumn Sale to only
8%. Rush At Prince Wm. Henry St.
And Save the Difference. 16,11, 52—In.

MILLINERY ACCESSORIES—Crinolines,
veilings, flowers, feathers and hat straws.
‘the Modern Dress Shoppe, Broad Street

12,11 .52—sn.







“ " An ai
Xmas for convalescent Trloade.
Large and R~} in stock. Knight's

Ltd. 14.11,52—3n.
———————
OIL STOVES —Two Burner

Model Cookers. and White
84 each, G. W. Hutchinson &
as - +e oe G. Hul th

ROUND IRON AND SHEETS—%, 5/16,
We, ta. %4 and %. Sheets %, 5/16, ¥, 3/16,
= oh art ee x , = Auto

* Co., a.
Dhone 2696, Fe BAL SILL.

Carrier Rims, Brakes *Fit-

tings, Frames,*Three Speed

Parts,

CRESCENT CYCLE STORE
30 Tudor St.

Happy Days are here again “
This is Good News

Trumpeter Cigarettes

at OLTON’S No. 4 Tudor St.

$2.38 per Carton

and 12c. per Pack

the above named
pyre ad William G
Wolse- i
cate issued to the said Augustus Charles

ho claim
TAP. tric Motor be om ae ean in respect of


















kitchen breakfast and 2 store rooms Toile
and bath, Govt. water and electric pd

Fan Mill, Tank Pipes, stalls etc. reason.
of | ably priced and ry
re certificate for, four ‘Nos. | 2 and easy mortgage. Apply
17842, inclusive,” dated Fred Carmichael, Phone 2443
1943, upon the statement that the 16.11.52—1n





Newly built stcbsevall bun, alow with
6,788 square feet of land at Pine Hill, St.
Michael. The house contains three bed-
rooms, living rooms and conveniences,

The above property will be set up for
sale by public competition at our Office,

et

Solicitors. *

Wiliam Griffith has been lost and not
deposited with anyone as security or
otherwise, and notice is hereby given that
if within thirty days from date hereof

to the

‘ 14.1 i
LIQUOR JICENSE NOTICE

ND REMOVAL)

Serre anna
STRAITAN, Dalkeith Road, near the
Savannah, Apply to an G. ¥7

Boyce 9~4 p.m. daily. 1
16.11, 52—3n

emperors anh ities dieeneneehinsienireene oe
SEASIDE PROPERTY — With plenty
the purchaser of | Cocoanut trees. Situated in “Road View,
of 1952 granted | St. Peter”. Apply to Mrs. Olive Parris
to her in respect of a board and gal-|0n premises. 16.11.52-—1n

shop with shed attached at

Supers, St. Philip, to remove said -
to a board and galvanized shop with| The offer for sale by
shed attached at Blades Hill, St. Philip | public competition at their office, No. i.
and to use it at such last described prem- {High Street, Bridgetown, on Friday thi
ises. 28th Ny of November 1952 at a
Dated this 14th day of November, 1952. | as Coad concern: EDGEWATER
(Sgd.) GLADYS BROWNE, HOTEL, Bathsheba, St. Joseph, standing
Siete tet ncealld eT arpaee at ore 1 rood, 12 perches of
‘ hotel which commands a
4. yilies Magistrate, Dist. “C” view of the incomparable “pathsheba
.B,—This application will be consid-| Coast << is swept by the Atlantic
es ata as aS to be held on| breezes, contains a spacious lounge and
24th November, 1! at 11 o'clock a.m.|19 bedrooms, each with running water
at Police Courts, Dist. “Cc.” (12 with tollets and baths).

. W. HARPER, The com leetri
is. Satta te hea pany’s electricity and water
16.11,62—in. any day by appointment.



ulars and conditions

esp
epucationar_ |S:



,» CATFORD & OP
ANDRA SCHOOL pee
a Alexandre School has a staffing vacancy €.11.53--@a.
Ya a & Graduate —

preferably ly in Matlie-
for January 1953;
(b) a T fenaaiie in general subjects -—

a Geography — for April
“Applications should be made to the

lars may be obtained, or before, for:—









ot: Sheree
ee mM eo
OS, Enjoy life
An_ exam Mill be held ke on 0 the he You'll feel

ors 22nd November at 9 a.m, for candi-
ater tb a one ciara i Subjects:

rls, rien eligible. Winners
ners
will be ae 5 years ates

stationery and in necessitious cases asaint-
ce, transportation ex-

cmt” clothing ete, en e fee.
Scholarship tenable from January 1953.
employm

We ent on completion
of school course,

L. A. Lyme
.
16,11,52—1n

HELP
——
BOY—An Experienced House Boy

Bring References. Apply The Moorings,
Marine Gardens. 16,11.52—1n.

Se a

P. '0. Box 64, Rosea’ ay
“Tib2—t tn.

YEAST-PHOS

GENERAL TONIC









————_——$—$—$—

GUERNSEY COW—First Calf, fresh in
milk 26-30 pts. H, Rayside, No. 3, St.
Tohn. 15,11,.52—2n.

WANTED TO PURCHASE
One “Gent’s" Bicycle. Rudge; Raleigh







cool meglio "Abe to Lng c/s
condi pply to Li,
. H. Edwards. ie Bein

Is TOPS

when only the best can

Dial 4335

oy

STOVES — The famous
VALOR — 3 Burner on
& Ovens — DIAL 4391
GARAGE.
i
SANDALS — American Gold Sandals.
All sizes at Thani Bros. Pr. Wm. Henry
St. Great Autumn Sale only at $6.98



16,11.52-—1n. ‘
VACANCIES exist in the
few counter 5 feales. at
‘ . Gov-
pos on pel me Ww." wlutehinson = Cadets.

= Bia.
Passage Road, at 10 a.m. on












14.11.52—3n.
at Reduced
Toes 30 5. 650 Police Headquarters,
wie. ies ae hESC meee S as 2696 . 14th November, 1952.
52—t4tn,
— Band 1 — 6” Plan-
a aes See! atone
ine
=m ~ Y6.11,52—in.
USED BLOCK Y and 2 blocks
10007 used amber Pines Joist, Pine
Flooring, Win and Doles, aa

Boards. Dial ae
“avant OR SAL newly Re

Phone 4598.
Collymore Rock.

GENT'S Navy Bive Suit, medium
$10.

THE OLD L

HASTINGS, BARBADOS

Daily and Longterm Rates
quoted on request.

cena

_anedinreneeestteitenslh aan bates nae ere
ot

x,





Make this Blend of Rum Your Choice on occasions

blended and bottled by
JOHN D. TAYLOR & SONS LTD.



\
BARBADOS POLICE BAND
e

POLICE BAND
between the ages of 14 to 15% var fb tet nt
2, Applicants will be interviewed at St. Cecilia Barracks,

rn ee ee

The Ahi Bazaar

Under the Patronage of Mrs. Turner
WILL BE HELD AT
THE DRILL HALL
From 3 to 7 p.m.

and battery. Excellent On '
“So00, SATURDAY, 29TH NOVEMBER, 1952
PRAM, Tansad, as new — $62. IN AID OF

CHRISTMAS GIFTS of all description and to
Suit all Pockets
PUNCH & JUDY and A FILM SHOW
to Amuse the Children
THE POLICE BAND to delight and
Entertain Everyone
SWEETS, CAKES, ICES, TEAS AND A WELL-
STOCKED BAR

uJ

SALES
AUCTION
. an

On Tuesday 18th by order of Mrs.
Gerald Manning we will sell her Furni-
ture which is both antique and modern
a is in excellent condition at “Flod-
Y Culloden Road. It includ

2 very nice Tip Top. Oval Pedestal
Tables, Round Tip Top Table, Sheraton
Side Table, Serving, Ornament, , Cock-
tail, Pembroke and Card Tables, Plant
Stools Canterbury, Tall Plant Pedestals,
Electric Table Lamps (carved), Hepple-

faite and other Sideboards; Settee with
Boutle Ends, Revolving Book Case, ,Up-
Yight Arm and Easy Chairs; all in food
gid npuogese: Wicker Settee and Chairs,
Uphols, Arm China, San-
Bisies © De Barrell ‘Shade, Cc. G. Fruit

is



Decanters &c Glass and

; Dinner, Tea and_ Fruit Services;
Pictures, Engravings; Good Barometer
ing Clock; Single Mahog. Bedstead,
and Deep Sleep Mattress; 3-Wing
red Mahog. Press and Dressing
; Mirrors, Canvas Cot,

2-Burner Oil Stove and
Tables, Scales, Large
Iron Ladder, Garden
and other items.

11.30 O'CLOCK, TERMS CASH.





GOVERNMENT NOTICES

ATTENTION is drawn to os
Control of. Prices prjence
(Amendment) Order, 1
which will be published’ inthe

re Monday, 17th

ial G
Terni 1952. 16 1162—1n

PPE

WATERWORKS DEPART-

MENT

P of Water Rates
. CONSUMERS who have not yet
water rates in respect of the
rter ending 3ilst December,
2, are hereby notified that un-
less these rates are paid on or be-
fore the 29th of November, 1952,
the Department, as authorised by
section 46 of the Waterworks Act
1895-1, may stop the water from
flowing into the premises in re-
spect of which such rates are
payable, either by cutting off “
pipe to such premises, or Ue such

means as they may think fit.

take proceedings to recover po

amount due.
16.11.52—In.

FOR SALE

NEW CITROEN
CAR

OFFERED AT $300 BELOW

COST TO CLEAR.

JOHN M. BLADON & CO.
Plantations Building

Phone:

Thanksgiving Service
of the CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
CHURCH, Bay Street, will
be held on Thursday Evening,
November 2%th, at 8 o'clock.
18.11.52,—3n,



ake emmenmees tin
val

MAGNIFICENT
NEW

GASEL, REFRIGERATOR

“PERFECTION”

J.D. T. Special Rum

(with the distinctlve flavour)

do,

tt Roebuck Street

Saturday, November 22nd, 1952.
R. T. MICHELIN,
a of Police.

16,11.52.—2n.

ADIES HOME



Examina- |











s80U ‘THROUND

For further particulars, apply to—

GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents.










ADVOCATE
STATIONERY



GREYSTONE,
_—

Just the little shop in the village

where the Best Books, Stationery

and Xmas Cards are now on show.





REALTORS LIMITED
OFFERS

CHURCHILL
Situate at Maxwells Coast Road,
rooms _ Ww,
ition draw-
modern
The prop-

nt sea

prising three bedrooms with toilets
and baths attached, dining and
living rooms, kitchen, veranaieno
The West and a nice pi to the

‘on
acre of land.

East. The pr
approximately
EVANTON

Situate at Top Rock comprigtng
three bedrooms, two with adjgin-
ing toilet and wool
that can be
room or child ra hurtery,
and dining room, kitchen, toilet
and bath with hot and cold water,
verandah to the South and Patio
to the North. The outbuildings
comprise of servants' room with
toilet and bath, and a_ large
garage. Inspection by appointment
only,

Oat

COVE SPRING COTTAGE

A lovely cottage standing on 2
roods 27 perches of land situate
at St. James Coast having its
own private bathing beach, and
comprising three bedrooms, with
private toilet and bath to main
bedroom, drawing and dining
rooms, European bath with hot
and cold running water and
separate toilet, modern kitchen,
and a gallery on two sides.

WYNDOVER

Overlooking the very

Six Men's Bay, St. Peter.

ing on approximately 4% acres of
land having an extensive orchard
with specially selected fruit trees.
The house comprises three bed-
rooms, dining room, living room,
modern toilets and baths with hot
and cold water. Large verandahs.
Extensive outbuildings including 9
Jar age, two servants rooms,
laundry, workshop. This property
has been extensively renovated by
the present owner.

HOMEMEDE

in the Garrison,
comprising: four

Situate
Michael,
rooms, combination living and
dining rooms, separate toilet and
bath, kitchen with built-in cup-
boards, verandah the whole length
of the building. The outbuildings
comprise two servants rooms with
water toilet and a garage for two
cars. The above property stands
on approximately 7,500 square feet
of land. This house has gas and
no electric rationing. Inspection
by appointment only.

THURSISDON

Situate at Maxwells Coast Road.
comprising of four bedrooms all
with running water and one with
dressing room attached, livine sod
dining room, large kitchen,
Separate toilet and bath, open
verandah on two sides with one
facing the sea, Outbuildings,. 3
servants rooms, garage for two
55. The property stands on 3

ods, 18 perehes of land. Ly
spection by appointment only.

OCEAN SPRAY i

Situate at Hockley Road adjoin-
ing the famous Rockley Beach,
best sea bathing in the island.
Divided into three flats and bring
a very high monthly rental. There
will be many prospective pureh-
asers for this property. Do not
delay. .

KENILWORTH
Situate at Welches, Christ
Church, within 100 yards of the
sea. Very reasonably priced.
Please contact us as soon
possible,

St.
bed-

comprising three ith
running walehe comb ay
ing and ing rooms, e
kitchen, toilet and bath, Ti
erty is situated in good
residential area with excel
bathing. A sound investment at a
very low reserve price,
BUNGALOW

Situate in Rockley New Road
commanding a magnificent view of
the Golf Course unobstructed to
the sea. It comprises three bed-
reoms, one with built-in cup-
boards, drawing and dining rooms,
modern kitchen, toilet and bath.
Downstairs: Servants’ room witb
toilet and bath, garage for two
cars, and enough room for laundry
ete. The property stands on
approximately 19,000 square feet
of land.

BUNGALOW \

Situate at Graeme Hall Terrace

very attractively designed, com-.-

PARAGON

Situate near Seawell Airport,
Christ Chureh, comprising two
large bedrooms with dressing
rooms attached, two medium size
bedrooms with dressing rooms and
built-in cupboards, toilet and bath,
large Open verandah entire length
of house with a lovely view of
Chancery Lane Beach and the sea.
Downstairs: Entrance lobby, living
and dining Toons, breakfast room.
pantry, kitchen, large study, and #
loyely open patio to the South.
This property also has lovely
grounds and a portion of arable
land containing 7% acres. Inspec-
tion by appointment only,

LAND

Situate at St. James Coast, be-
tween Colony Club and Coral
Reef Club. Spots can be had with
or without a frontage to the sea,
but all spots have a right of way
to sea, et.

’
ee ee

s e : sie
sae Ig Help a Very Deserving Charlty and Spend REALTORS Limited
Dinner and Cocktail is a Pleasani Afternoon. REAL ESTATE AGENTS
Parties arranged } $ @ 2) AUCTIONEERS
1% x | VALUERS
J. H. BUCKLAND % ADMISSION me ‘ —_
Proprietor. at CHILDREN & NURSES 6d... J neietON Ns emanre te |









§ Salls Arrives — Sati:
Montreal Hatifax Barbados os
Canadian Challenger 4 Nov 7 Nov, 18 Nov, 18 Nov.
Sanadian Cruiser 25 Nov. 28 Nov + 8 Dec 6 Dec.
NORTHBOUND
Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives A
Barbados Barbados Boston 8. John Ee Monten
Lady Rodney -. 20 Nov 22 Nov. 1 Dec. 2 Dec, -—
Canadian Challenger 28 Nov 29 Nov. -- 6 Dec. coal
Canadian Cruiser ..19 Dec. 20 Dec. + 23 Dec. 27 3 Bes —



———————=

¢

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER i6,

| SHIPPING NOTICES
Canadian Na N ational nal Steamships











The M/V: “MONEKA" will
accept Cargo and Passengers for
Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing
Monday, 17th inst.

The M/Y. “CARIBBEE” wilt
aceept Cargo and Passengers for
Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing
Friday, 21st inst.

B.W.1. SCHOONER OWNERS’
ASSOCIATICN (INC.),
No, 4047.

Consignee. Tele.



” Selling oft :
GRAMOPHONE KECORDS
2 for $1.00
CENTRAL EMPORIUM

Cnr. Brond & Tulor Sits.


















FURNITURE
AUCTION

— Sto

“« L\YNCHBURGH ”’

‘

Sth Avenue, Belleville

r on —

MONDAY, 17TH NOVEMBER
at 11.30 a.m,

We are instructed by Mrs. %. M.
Barrera to dispose of her furniture
sand effects as listed below.

VIF WING MORNING OF SALE.
Hat Stand, Set 4 Morris Chairs

with Spring Cushions, Armchairs,
Berbice Chair, Several Occas,
Tables, Dining Table, Dining

Chairs, Sideboard, Dressing Table
with Full Length Mirror and Stool,
Dressing Table with¢small Mirror,
Double ‘Bed with Vono Spring,
Single Bed with Vono Spring (ALL
THE ABOVE IN MAHOGANY).

Cedar Wardrobe with Full Tange
‘Mirror,, Std, | Dressin, ,
Canvas Chairs, Coffee ‘Table,
‘Rush-and Cane ted Rockers,
English Electric ‘tor (6%
c. ft.) New ni , Singer

Model) Kitchen Table and Chairs, |
Large Round Mirror with 7.
Page, tron Bed and Fibre Mai 5
Double and § Fibre



reeses, Ptd. Chairs, Linen Basket,
td. Table, and other
AUCTIONEERS
Jona 4. Braden
& Co.
Phone 4640
Plantations Building.



~ FURNITURE
AUCTION

mavnes races
- John.

a High School)

ON

THURSDAY, 20th NOVEMBER
at 11.30 a.m.

AND FOLLOWING DAY
IF NOT CONCLUDED

We are favoured with instruc-
tions from Mrs. H. M, BLOW ta
sell by Auction the fine collection
ef valuable | SHERJTON
pou FURNITURE, a
qua’ Modern
and other Househo
HAYNES COURT, ST, JOHN.

VIEWING DAY AND
RL eo

PYE RADIGGRAM, Oval
Dining Table, Set of Dining Chairs,
Qceas. & Coffee Tables, Tip-Top

bles, Drop Leaf Table, Writing

8, Trinket Table, .Ornamentat
les, Armchairs, Upright Chairs
(various), Vanity Cabinet, Side-
board, Single & Double Ended
Settees, Fitted Cocktail Cabinet,
Bedside Table & Cabinets, Dress~

ing Tables, Chests of Drawers,
Bookshelves, Full-lei Mirror in
Adjustable Frame, jow-Fronted

Inlaid Dressing Table with Mirror,
Stools, Table Lamps. (ALL
ABOVE IN MAHOGANY).
ae Easy Chairs,
Inlaid _ Cabinet,
mitch ch’catinet Uphoistered 5
Grandfather Clock, Dining
Pining Tuble, Inlaid. Sid
Tea Table, Drop Leaf Table, Smalt
Oak Table, Ornamental Anes
Gilt Table, Double Bed ith
Spring Mattress, Single Bed wae
. Spring Mattress, Pr. Single =
with Box Springs, Inlaid Chest"
Drawers, Inlaid Serving ent
Corner Tables, Large Oak Chest,
Old Oak Table, Easy Chairs, Stan-
erd & Table Lamps, Carpets &
Rugs, Mosquito Nets, Decorated
Feed Bag, Oil Paintings, Water
Colours, Prints, Framed Maps,
Shoe Rack. Glassware, ‘T-
INGHOUSE Refrigerator, Falks 4
Burner Oil Stove with Oven,
large Electrically Operated Butter
Churn, Kitchen. Tables (Various),
Marble T d a een Chairs, Cup- i
boards & itchen Furniture,
Servants’ Beds, Chairs, & Tables,
Kitchen Utenstls, oe and many
other interesting item: .

CASH OR am ‘ALL OF

Auteoenie (
John 4. Biadon
& Ce.

A.F.S., F-Â¥.A.
PHONE 4640
PLANTATIONS BUILDING {

———————

; room;

1952

=

JOHN

M4.
BLABON

& ce.

AFS., F.V.A.

Extensive Listings of Good
Class Property and Land
Always Available



NEW BUNGALOW, LODGE
LAND, ST. MICHAEL. — We are
instructed to offer this very
sirable home constructed by a Jead-
ing firm of tullding contractors.
The accom ncdation provides *?
spacious bet'rooms, with built-in
wa! large drawing room,
separate dining room, kitchenette
with breakfast room, and large
pantry. The garage and servant's
quarters are detached. Mains
water and quota of electric light
This property is situated in a new
and select residential area from
which there are fine panoramic
views of Bridgetown and the har-
bour. The site is very cool and
ohiy 3% miles from town centre.
The property is available with from
approx, ‘4 to 1% acres as required
and the price asked is very fair
indeed. We can recommend this
listing very highly.

BRIGHTWOOD, St. Lawrence. A
pleasant and comfortable
which mellows nicely with its
surroundings. Own beach frontage
and excellent bathing facilities.
Three bedrooms, living room and
dining room, kitchen, separate
toilet and shower, wide L shaped
verandah looking sea-wards. Sep-
arate garage and servants’ r
Ideal seaside home in a
residential quarter.

RESIDENCE, THE GARDEN,
WORTHING — Modern coral stone
bungalow on corner site with
wide frontages. Pleasant garden
with flower beds, lawn, concrete
patio, and number of bearing fruit
trees. Accommodation comprises
large living room, covered gailery,
3 bedrooms with built-in ward-
robes, well fittet kitchen, garage
with covered wey to
vants’ uarters and
offices 11 public utility services.
one of the most attractive homes
aow available in the medium price
range.

MALTA, St, Peter—Extensively
re-modelled house of massive
stone construction with approx,
% aere flower gardens, lawns and
young fruit trees. There are
spacious verandahs on two. sides
with views over beach, large liv-
ing room, 3 double bedrooms, 2
bathrooms (both with, tubs), mod-
ern kitchen and butler’s pantry,
downstairs is the laundry, good
servants’ accommodation for 3, 2
garages and storerooms, Full pub-
lic services plus own deep well
with electric pump. Right of way
over beach with superb bathing.
Opportunity for~a discriminating
buyer.

LAND, TWEEDSIDE ROAD,—
Excellent factory or business site
of nearly %4 acre with frontage to
main road over 100 ft, One of thy
few available locations in such a
wee. position close to Town cen-
re.

COAST LAND, ST, JAMES,—
Approx, 2 acres in unspoilt resi-
dential part of this attractive
— Good beach frontage with

bea Owner abroad will
wipes of this property for the
low figure of 24 cents per sq. ft.
or near offer,

RAOrEe St. James’ Coast
- can noner a wide selection
of fine residences in this increas-
ingly popular district on oar
beach .and inland,

THE RISK, St. James——Large
stone and concrete 2 storey house
standing in grounds of approx,
1% acres. Cool position and ex-
cellent safe bathing from sandy
beach opposite, Extensive accom-
modation with 2 large reception
rooms, office, kitchen, pantry. 5
good bedrooms and garage. En-
quiries invited,

BUNGALOW, Pine Hill—Modern
bungalow constructed in 1939 with
18” stone walls and heayy asbes-
tos roof. There is a large L-shaped
living room, 2 double bedrooms
with built-in wardrobes, kitchen,
Pantry, genres kitchen, bath-
reom with fiilation, shower, solar
heating installation, garage and
2 servants’ rooms. The grounds
of about % acre are heavily
wooded with Mahog. and Flam-
boyant trees, lawns, and stone
flagged terrace are in secluded
Walled garden. Attractive location
close to town,

N BUNGALOW, BLUE
WA’ Recently built home of
good sound construetion, floor
level well raised off the ground,
large living room, 3 good airy
bedrooms all with built in sward-
robes, tiled bathroom and shower
pleasant and sizeable modern
kitchen, good garage and
Servants’ quarters. Paved drive-
way and walled garden on corner
Site. This property has our
recommendation and is a home
most people would be pleased to
own.

MODERN. HOME, ST. PETER—
A luxuriously appointed residerice
with four bedrooms, 3 tiled bath-
rooms with hot and cold water,
butler’s pantry, kitchen, store-
rooms, 2 garages. The grounds are
expertly laid out with a pro-
fusion of flowering shrubs, Own
right of way to sea,

LA CASITA, Rockley New Road
—oompast modern stone mii tine
we d with central liv:
sont, aitbee or bedroom, ane
main bedroom ek ae
bedroom or

peneoos wth aes sates ee ae

verandah, iptchen ah garage. T
grounds are about 1 acre well nia
out with. lawns, Fie nore of
scrubs, flower beds, table gar-
den and young frutt » Easy to
run with minimum = of domestic
help and very suitable for retired
people.

ABERGELDEE, Maxwell Road—
Very .soundly constructed stone
,bungalow erected in 1937 when
‘building material and workman-
ship were of a higher standard
Ahan is usually obtained today.
This property has a bef rece,

good hosreane, 2 A
llery runs on 3 sides and
complete privacy is obtained.
There is a two car garage and
ira atta tu an Sed

home je for
sonable figure

BENSAM — Sheringham Gar-
dens, Maxwells — Pleasantly situ-
ated modern stone built i aged
with about % acre and right of
way to the sea, The building is
conveniently planned with a large
living room, having access to a
covered front verandah; breakfast
kitchen and 3 bedrooms
with washbasins, The detached
garage is of good size and has
servants’ quarters adjoining.
Situated in a well developed semi-
private coastal residential area
and possesses many commend-
able features. Full main services.
A safe investment.

CASABLANCA, Maxwells Coast
-- An outstanding property em-
bodying the finest pre-war work-
manship. Well designed for easy
running with 2 reception rooms,
4 bedrooms, verandah, kitchen,
pantry, . garage, storerocoms, etc.
The land ts approximately 2 acres
with flower and vegetable gar-
dens, productive orchard and Coco-
nut grove One acre walled
garden may be sold separately as
a building site

Plantaticns Building
Phone 4640

_





Da re oe el | << 2 ~ ee * 7
























































a ~ , , . ne
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER ‘t6, 1952 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE FIFTEEN
. . ’ . e e ‘ ALLS ELE LLL errr ry ¢
CHURCH SERVIECS Listening Hours : ; | $
ST. LRONARD'S. cHUAC Company vagSUBPAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1952 % ADVOCATE STATIONERY :
a ectingy 7 pan. Salvation }j Was, 25.50M s,
8 a.m. Cheral Eucharist, 9 Meet } %
Eucharist and ‘Address. i a “ "Siatine.& Captain I. Staine. 4.00 p.m. The News. 5.15 p.m. United . %
Sermon. 3 p.m. Sunday Schoo! p.m. DIAMOND CORNER Nations General Assembly 430 p : ow’ % FOR THE BEST be roar ~
Bvensens & Sermon ia ci! a.m, Holiness Meeting; 3 p.m Sunday Halt Hour 500 pm Tehaiko. j } %
. PAUL'S ‘ompa: Meeti: , “ sky, 5 m_ Eduea ol
7.20 a.m. ‘HintyiCemmniasion, 9.90 a.m. Meutnat ing; 7 p.m. Salvation 6.00—7.15 Pam. Ts Name 49.91M “ ote sO tO AAA LE SOCIALE CSA AAA LIEN AA LDALAD
Solemn Mass & Sermon. 3 p.m. Sunday | Lieutenant C. Hinds, ——— wis a endl can he p yeu o success : 5 ———
Sehoo! & Children’s Service. 7 p.m. NEW TESTAMENT CHURCH OF GoD lei lis] { ot oe m From The Bible, 619 p m DO YOU REALISE THE NEED FOR ! MORE
‘olemn Evensong, rmon & Procession. 16th No ¢ ar nelis' agazine. 645 pm Progratn
Drescher’ Cann aries Announcing anew Gospel Broadcast ne Parade and Interlude. °7 00 pm | Po: through personal postal tuition QUALIFICATION ?
N SERVICES “Wor of Life” to . jews 710 pm. Home News
ROFBUCK: 11 a.m. Moming Service, Redifusion every Monday nicht at S taker’ 'Coaaa i \uhic,, Hariett Whit- Britain "7115 pm. Caribbean Voices. | ER A A FC RI |} or ARE YOU INTERESTED IN MAKING MORE MONEY?
preacher: Rev, E. E. New. 7_p.m. Eve. O'clock. Be sure ta ileten in Everdene, Franklyn D,R.. Philip, 1, 71049 Pam. - +s) SE aS ay Sevhis Seunctn Extalich Colman They Owe wheteaucecur te IF SO, ENROL NOW FOR ONE OF THESE COURSES.



ning Service, preacher: Rev. E. E. New. RIVER ROAD: 10 a.m. S Send" Micbaaos Aa mes
GRACE Hitt: 11 s.m, Morning Sem. Mam Divine Botin, va ay Seep: Revidees, Sunshine R.. Lady Steadfast, 7.45 pm Sunday Service 813 pm |

Raadalphe, Personal Postal Tuition—The Bennett College way. Now -you as Draughts-
vice, preacher: Mr. F. Deaney 7 p.m. selistic Setvice. Rev. L. R. Summers, M.. Rewecca x" Lewis Rainbow Radio Newsreel. 8 30 pm Tehaikovsk); |

Sanitary Inspector Course




























































































DANIEL, Captain, On Sale at all Drug Stores

are offered the'same chance to qualify for a fine career, higher manship Building and Genera! cultur.
Evening Service, her: S. Minister { 845 pm Why I Relieve. 900 pm | ’ 3e: 1 Agri e
Weekes ' preecher: Mr DANI wires ine, ‘anda indies amoter BA ‘Moneka, Jenkins BBC” Symphony ‘Gras. 19 00 oma pay"and social standing. Design Course. Course.
FULNECK: 11 Morni 4 ll am. Divi * B. Radar. e News 10610 pm _ From Eui- ¥
7 p.m. Evening Serv: ce, ae gelistic Service. Rev Ma B. » prett = S.S. Sundial, ‘esa toms from Montreal ohne toe ea er 2048) ete —, vei — — oe ee rae =~ ie By Reearabee Pray
FP. G. Downes. Minister in Charge. under Captain D. Cook. Consigned to" Music M 7 ' Auditing Architecture mane Salesmanship. |
MONTGOMERY: 7 p.m_ Evening Ser- ECKSTEiN: 10 a.m. Sunday School: Plantations Lid. MONDAY. NOV. 17 anges ' purmeeee Repairman’s
vige, ,preschen: Mr. A. —~ Pea Em. Diving Seevige: 7 Dm. Even: Sen Rainbow. M 35 tons from Trini. “°°? — *% »m =e comma Big Eine use Engineering Petroleum Technology
. m fen = . he ¢ eT ee ee eee »
yiDUNSCOMBE: 7 p.m. ing Ser- gelistic - Service haha R. Hi. Walkes, dad under der Captain” in G. Marks. Consigned 4.00 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m, The Artimetic §=— Salle Grose Veet We aati Installation and one
SHOP HILL: a Bm. sér COX . Divine ‘Service; Yacht 7 from "Las Dally Service, 4.15 p.m. Youth Hostels, Reonomiee Che School Certificate Course
viee; preacher: 3 pm. Sunday she, 7 pm. Evan- Palmas under Captain W. Pye m Las 4.45 p.m. Linger Awhile, 5.00 p.m. Lis- Modern Business Civil Engines ring ‘aginoering hs gaog 9 : , 3
pn Y suhvitan” Service. Rev. E, W. Weekes, DEPARTURES teners’ Choice. Methods Clerk of Wor xs Road Making General Electrical Engin- Accountancy.
Sunday. " omben ; in pares. . , i‘ Sch. Mary E, Caroline for Grenada. 6.00 — 7.45 p.m. SLM 40.71 M ‘i | soning. S Civil Service Entrance {H
11 am. Rev. K. E. Towers, BA oe School; eo am y AL. services, “Ope 600 p.m Welsh Diary, 6:15 p.m eo Certificate of Ed- Contec: ) |
3 pm _ Special Musical Programme by with Preacher Rev. J. B. Seawell Marching & Waltzing, 6.45 p.m. Sport ucation, Police Promotion Course. {
scholars and Pageant entitied “The el 7 pm. Revival gives Pound Up & Programme Parade, 7.00 . Telecommunications Wri ; ;
Most Import Things”; 7 pm. Rev. K. : Rev..L..R. Summers ARRIVALS BY BWIA. p.m, The News, 7.10 p.m. Home News Languages Enginesring Drawings Television | rite fer full particulars if cov rse is not mentioned
E. Towers, B.A., B.D. THE ST JAMES NATIONAL BAPTIST N THURSD From Britain, 7.15 p.m. Books to (Rea! Forestry Textiles | Write to the:
$y, Gil pm. Pageant by Sunday ma am, -ntiss and sermon, 7 Pym From British Guiana: ae zens Talk caer dle ie Poles Senjectâ„¢ Sad eee ae ene renereans } Cc ibbe E d ti |
GULL MEMORIAL: 11 am. Mr. D. services will be the Hey, SD Geaey Connelly Micha coeemal, Stephen 743 — 1090 pm ALM a _Short Story Writing Mechanica! Capineariog _sortenag brachee aribbean Cducationa POST COUPON TO P.O.
Roach; 7 pm Rev F. Lawrence. L-Th; Minister in Charge. Hunte, Louie Hunte, Patricia Hunte, _7,49 p:m. B.B.C. Singers, 8.15 p.m TO THE BENNETT COLLEGE, (Cepe. 158), SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND, pec a i psoas ice 2
WHITEHALL ; 9.30 a.m. Mr. G, Har- 5 pam: Monday; Wednesday; Friday; Helen’ Hunte, Allan’ Hunte. Frances Radio Newsreel, 20 p.m. Tehaikoysky — SCHOOL CenTinicATE nstitute Please send Free Book
per; 7. pm Mr G_ Perkins. training for the youths ‘of the Barbados Flower, Merry] Hutchinson Alvin 9-08 p.m. The Banning of the Mikado Please send me free your prospectus on GENERAL CERTIFICATE ase send me e BOOK.
BANK HALL; 9.30 a.m. Mr. G. McCal- Youth Movement this will be conducted Abrams, William Whyte, Eveltn Whyte, 9:35 p.m. The Casino Orchestra, 10.0 1 OF EOUCA P.O, Box, 307, v.0.8., Meee Rae ee ree
ister; 7 pm Mr J.T. Oxley. by» the Bruce-Clarke (Assistant Gregory Whyte, Cheryl Whyte, Joba Pe. The News, 10.10 p.m, From Th suByjBCT = seilihdptiltnansiencsnil ‘chia: eo oe ae She )
LETOWN : 8.30 a.m. Rev. G, Mar- bier and Mrs. Olga Brow. Browne. Dettmer, Agnes Jardin, Mervyn Ray. Editorials, 10.15 p.m. Science Review i EXAMS PORES os os i be bane Foe
shall; 7 pm Mr W_ St. Hil. ST NICHOLAS EPISCOPAL mond-Barker Doris Chapman, John, 10.50 p.m. Tip Top Tunes NAMBL a Agents for: ee d
BETHEL METHODIST CIRCUIT “ORTHODOX WELCHES ROAD Bradshaw, Reginald le. | Francis | TOORY a DISTITUTE OF ENG. euiaentok C <
Ba Sepeeve: Hoener tity tis: ail S28 Seite ind Sermon Breaches, \rthur-Wong, Doris Chee, Emily Gorins. | ae _ ees I Sore sige prospective om TUT Interest
ETH: : mm, . ws ‘ . coness Barrow, i + wants sublet. J mai wheoee
7 pm Mr V_ Pilgrim. charge, 7 p.m, Evensong i esedes a BY B.W.LA. t St Gettin U a= - aay F tele 2% Vos cera. ania me 0)|)0)0)”™”C«d:”*~«‘“‘é«éR EE, LODO FAR og ck ess cece cece neees
DALKEITH : 11 am. Mr. L. Mayers) preacher Rev. C. A. Ishmael; Sunday FRIDAY / ee a ee eee exe’ ;
1 Ae. Rev. T. J. Furley (Holy Com. oe. ei ie Fatronal Festival of the Prom. Trinidad: inde ;
union). ‘hure: e; = . m: X
: BELMONT: 11 a.m. Mr. C. Forde: ding inltea. and well- wives ete oar pl <, Bauinded, ut thomen W. A Nights a = — “ cheneesininbiins
ivian. ston, ompson, J. Forbes-Watson, R. ¥
STH. : 9 a m> Rev, F. Vivi= p.m. Tuesday Eventng Prayers and Qegpmbre, E. Ball, I. Ball, M. Ball. C 2 <§ Ca I weeds
“ERC ViDENCE: i sme Mr J. Clarke; | Cla the subject ewan be Ent ; ee up nights, ned ‘0 INDIGESTION hop r 9 for s*
: . J . » “ 0}
Exton en Battemnars, Sources” iBtee"H DEPAREURES BY pai. ait ne" Gage of pine Br We have Just opened a LOVELY SELECTION of
: a.m. ° : »
Broome, B.A.; 7 p m. Mr. G. Bascombe. Saint Pau will be ‘in, tue to ti For Trinidad: a ness and loss’ of manly vigour. ate ISTMAS CARDS
EBENEZER GIRCUIT Cor F. Battistin), 1. Battistini, A. Battis-| (used by « disease of the Prost (« -
3 Bi: sae Hews So WwW. Cc. erie cr ‘CHURCH, oe a Bh we Demonttirun, J, De- iden eee important sex glank 4
Crosse, -m. . ° . 5 looper, . » - . overcome t t bl
BEULAH: 11 a.m. Mr. N. Daniel, 7 K.P HANSEN” Pastor chetti, R’ Boschett,’ J. Bermuder, t.| 1 2 hours and quickly restore vise J INAS TN. in Boxes... ...and Loose... . os pas PAPER
> PAYNES BAY! 050 aan, Mr. D. Weld; Worship’ at 10a tine Syarecytorning Smith. McD. Rivers title dissavery’ called "Rassea Brand rs en ASTIC SERVIETTE BRINGS.
Pr. eid; Wors : b 7 2
7 pm Rev GM: Marshall, vice at eon Evangelistic Ser DEPARTURES BY B.W.LA. qatter how lckigtyow paves autleres \ Stomach | oun a BRUSH STAND...... etc. ete...
. . s vou DY To INDIGESTION
Lawrence; 7 pm.) Mr ae ‘McClean. People’s. Union ot ¥.20' Baptist Towns For British Osan rien reinvigorate your” Front us Nbstahant i e ' POTTER & MOORE GIFT SETS
SELAH: 9.30 a.m. Rev. G. Marshall, Wednesday night at 7.30 Praise and ..l: Reynolds, M. Bayle and wake you feel 10 to. 2 Try just ONE DOSE YARDLEY GIFT SETS...
MEE THESDA : 9.30 am. Mr. G. M. Prayer Meeting. ; meaeee, 8. Moore, A. Neda Writes, E. yeuneer oF money back Sau ef MACLEAN BRAND GIFT BOXES OF CHOCOLATES.
E a M. vor yO! chemis' The STOMACH WDER This
SHREWSBURY: 11 a.m. Mr, G,. Chrietion technicolor oes 3, P<: Fernandes, >. beeeu Sete R suarantes Grotects you. PO ! GOYA GIFT CRACKERS. = BOXES
eae, p.m - a Hovsers es con will be shown at the Egolf Bap- Zenon, A. Johason, ‘J. Camacho. E. eae OU GR a ee 3Y Swbrnes ARLY at
ICES: a.m, Vv ‘ ‘ si urch, ly. . Stomach Pains. YOU GET , i £ a
Crosse, 7 pm a E. Brathwaite. You are cordially invited to attend Select your Chocolates from Koaeen Heartburn, Nauses
Schools at 3 p.m. this friendly ch the following: ee Acidity d 66 9@?
(2) Evangelistic Campaign Services SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST CHURCH CAGE. MAGIC pobaen cn sig ;
during the week at Shrewsbury King Street, November 16, Pastor YESTE, ’ BLACK MAGIC
THE SALVATION ARMY F. 8 t of Caribbean RDAY’S POT-OF-GOLD
Sir eeshda etek iit Geeaeen ee mt Yall, Peo Ww Weith- , | CHERRIES in L. M. B. MEYERS & CO, LTD sae Foie’ mr P PHARMACY
11 am, Holiness Meeting; 3 p.m. ers, : WE POR MARASCHINO = a aera BROAD STREET, and HASTINGS (ALPHA )
Programme rendered by ‘Youns. People; Ag mt Subject: win Ealjan Come ATHER RE T WELCOME co *% ° P.O, Box 171, Bridgetown.
pm. Salvation. Meeting. tetisiminibiinnns-. HAPPINESS mi
paint, Malor, & Mrs. W. Morris, accom- FFs Chiweeh of Christ, Setemtist,, eee. 1m Riese cor = FRY’S HAZEL NUT | .
a B Sh fw eae Bridgetown, Upper Bay Street. date: 1.36 ins. FRY’S PEPPERMINT
am, Holiness Meeting; p.m, Sundays 21 2\m. and 7 p.m. : LUXURY | il
poeaeer Meeting; 7 p.m. Salvation Wednesdays: ® p.m. A. Service which Seereewe: 72.5 °F Also |
Snr. Gaptati W. Bishop re ee ar Saas pes eee ee YARDLEY'S | F ee
w IGTON STREET rf NOVEMBER 16, 1952 a (9 am.) 29.968 4711 COLOGNE BETS |
11 am. Holiness Meeting; 3 p.m. 8i of uote seeeta MORTALS F f : TTS |
Company Meeting; 7 p.m, Salvation ANI) IMMORTALS. - QT am.) 29.955 XMAS CARDS b f
Senate Geleew Tae t Cormthians is: 63 and Select these early before
Snr. Major T. Gibbs, This corruptible must put on incorrup- Sunrise; 5.68 a.m. Many Other XMAS GIFTS
ali iby ee ae: ont aoe this mortal must put on im- Sunset: 5.33 pa. Bg { “as
nm p.m. mo! vy : fF |
Company Meeting; 7 p.m. Salvation The following Citations are included in Moon: Last-Quarter. Novem- (. CARLTON BROWNE | it s too late.
Meeting. the Lesson-Sermon: The Bible: The Spirit ber 9
Snr. Captain §. Worrell itself Deareth witness with our spirit, | Lighting: 6.00 pm. Wholesale & Retail ae
w ce iren h . * ~
1a aie, Botthnes ” Mental 4 Sam Ree, 6) sak kee p: 2.40 am, 2.33 p.m, Druggist A SUGGESTION... o
Company Meeting; 7 p.m. Salvation af petesion ated. Meat with a to the, | Low Tide: 8.42 a.m., 9.27 p.m. 2813 Dial :-: 136 Roebuck St. Is everything when it comes to buying gifts.
Lieutenant N. Etienne. Man’ n's genuine selfhood is recognizable : The list given below should suggest many
11 am. Holiness Meeting; 3 p.m. aiid wen “ww. ee suitable items : SHELLED ALMONDS
Hair Brushes — Toilet Sets
PART ONE ORDERS Fountain Pens _ Perfumes & Cologne lb
ai By Pipes — Cigars — Cigarettes bi
jor C, E. P. WEATHERHEAD, ; i
"a eet ‘na Dolls — Toilet —
rl ios Regiment.
Iss . 42 f i : i |
ee 310 14 Nov. 62. An Inspection of Our Stock will suggest WALLNU S lb.
COMMAND—Resumption any vr Thines
Captain nS. F. L. Johnson resumes command of ““A" Coy, wet 6 Nov: $2. bad 7 <+-t re Bb — . 2 En)
jum)
Captain A, Gittens assumes command of H.Q, Coy. vice Lt. E. R, Goddard wa Come in at Your Convenience PERKINS “a CO LTD.
2. PARADES—Training e ‘oe -
All ranks will parade a @ Garrison at 1700 hours on Thursday, 20 Nov. 52. NEW CALYPSOS
Coys. Will be exercited ath pe drill in their assembly areas, COLLINS LTD BRO. AD ST Roebuck Street one Dial 2072 & 4502
Band practices will be held as usual on Mon. 17, Wed, 19! and Thurs. 20 Nov. 52 TONGUE TIE MO! me RE
at 1700 hours. ONE MORNING 9eeseeoed
a VOLUNTARY NIGHTS ‘ SOLIDERS' SONG ne
ere wil a Voluntary Class fe rh
10 hours, | Otlvers are Seren a for ai s and Sits. on Tuesday 18 Nov, 52 at eae MARKET
ubjec' apters IL
«mudi pte ‘and II of the 1951 Drill Pamphlet, DONRRY'C! TTEN TION
olunteers who have not fired the L.M.G., A.M.C. will give their names to the ROYAL WEDDIN!
RS M_ on Thursd
5. 1951 DRILL PAMPRLETS ME DONKEY WANT WATER
All ranks below tat of” Serjeant who have been, issued with the 1961 Dril NO MORE TAXI !
Pamphlets will return them by Thursday 20 Nov. 52 to the Orde: ; ° LL
C. ORDERLY OFFICER AND ORDERLY SERJEANT FOR WEEK ENDING 2 2¢ Nov.se | :
Onteny sheen ' . Lieut, C. G. Peverkin |
jean
~ Next for duty: O27 Springs, "W. In the November 1952
Orderly Officer A 3 Goddard EDIFFUS PROGR A M o
Orderly Serjeant . ae ihe 24 Sirittiane, Ez. D. | R ION ME'S





Aabutant, “Phe Barbados ‘esiment. renee 350cc ONY DELURE NOL NG and GRAND CHRISTMAS COMPETITION
SIGNAL PLATOON ee f KNIGHT'S Lam ; The following ‘Condition was omitted :
arin’ ara ie aoe eevee sea! BRADSHAW | Yecccneesesooes: : a ee (6) 10 taste tarroot saltions arp rebttvee,’ than Pets














elaine in in Sanusty. 1953, and names should be given to the Signal Officer.

There are a eo of vacancies in the Barbados Regiment Drum and Fife
Band. Applications are invited from suitable Persons.

PART Il ORDERS



available, a jury will draw the winners. The decision
of the Judges must be accepted as final and binding and
no correspondence will be exchanged.

Untii completion of Issue
we have available AT PAR







POCKET & DESK









1. STRENGTH DECREASE SERIAL NO. 39 5% e
OF SRAM PCR Ce eee ret ere of
645 Pte. Noel, R. B. “B" Coy. Cumulative 5% Preference REMINDER

511 Pte. Daniel, J. “B” Coy.
549 Pte. Haynes, J. S. “B” Coy.
623 Pte. Jones, L. “* Coy,
398 Pte. Collins,

DIARIES



Shares.
Full data on Request.

CLOSING DATE for sending in SOLUTIONS for the
Competition.: SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 22ND



to comers from the Regiment
| w $2.








amma isies |e * a DVERTISING CO
" BPed Rate Wy. Same mie teen wat Ber © AMINES & SO., ETD. Otc ea te |
art Pie Mure”. Granted 2 wis Bava wots Nev: a ROBERTS & CO. JAMES STREET i.



YOUR STATIONER — DIAL 3301







H. R. DANIEL, Captain,
Adjutant, The Barbados Regiment.

GREE TINGS!

Here We Bring You...

C,OO0D TIDINGS!

S.S. Alcoa Pegasus has” just-arrived from the U.S.A.
with a Big Consignment of Merchandise of all descrip-
tions for us.







eee ae
For a bright Christmas

All over Barbados, a in the countryside,
“ithe name LISTER means Electricity; and the LISTER
ii ALTERNATOR SET for generating your own current

or home or industrial use has proved a highly reliable
sand economical proposition.

e AC. Lighting
Plants driven by
the Lister Diesel
Engine are now
here-—in time to
light up for




















“HRISTMAS 1S JUST AROUND
THE CORNER

Have you got all of your .. .

DECORATIONS



















HERE For Youn
ENJOYMENT








































These goods were personally selected by our MR. N. E. THE NEW m cer rn
WILSON, who has made good use of his seventeen LOUIS L. BAYLEY e G-Matic | Plants,

years experience in selecting your requirements for the offers you a wide selection of . . . PROCEA BREAD 110 Volts A.C.
CHRISTMAS TREE DECORATIONS WITH 3 KW. 110 volt
fF xX tH | B | | | ©) N A DISCOUNT OF 25% FOR CASH. ’ © Aiton
We Have .. . ATTRACTIVE FLAVOUR 4 the turn of a

ASSORTED BALLS, MORE DIGESTIBLE 5 switeh,

DIFFERENT COLOURED STREAMERS MORE. NOURISHING | 4 a
SMALL TEA PUES AND. JUGS MAKES BETTER SANDWICHES : a ag ne
LITTLE BIRDS and a variety of other MAKES WONDERFUL TOAST’ { voltage . régerd-
Items for your Tree. @ ; ; less i of load

ge It’s fortified with DRI-CEA Wheat Protein eee

Therefore, for the Best, Shop Early and every day at






and Milk. |e @ Direct enquirie
Tt ° E * Ht ‘ a nee
0 ¥ te °
N. E. WILSON & CO. ff LOUIS L. BAYLEY 8) os one ron mn oe







~ y :
* of @. F. Z E P Ht a R 7 N | Hii The Barbados Foundry
Who lead the way while others merely follow. Bolton Lane & Aquatic Club Gift Shop x “YOUR BAKERS” 41 Tudor St WHITEPARK
x J AKERS” ¢ St. ; ;
31, SWAN STREET DIAL 3676 Phone 3909 & Phone £09! % Dial: : 3238
%

e ASS SS SSS SSS



}.



eo tte 2 ee ea



VP SPOCCOO OSPF O OOOO OOP OP FOO OPO PIO POOLEY



Be Med eS i I a i i ae al el nel a ee! i a li a i a el ee









. body because somebody had told

PAGE SIXTEEN



The Waterfront Was £4,000 Needed Sir George Seel To Be

Quiet Yesterday —
EXCEPT FOR unloading of the remainder of schooners’
cargoes, the waterfront experienced a comparatively quiet

day yesterday.

“There was only one steamship in the harbour the
Saguenay Terminals steamer Sundial, which arrived in port
from Montreal on Friday afternoon—while the auxiliary
schooner Rainbow M. was the only schooner to arrive and

this hailed from Trinidad under Captain Gilbert Marks.

Almdst a the — - 4, .
sels were i and eir crews
OAS obnbraty BF meseine Motion Pictur
salis 4nd cteaning decks, . e
Pioneer Dies

In His Sleep

GENERAL CARGO

Saguenay Terminals liner

The

Sundial arrived in port from

Montreal on Friday afternoon

with general cargo for the (COL, NATHAN LEVINSON,
island.

head of the Warner Bros. sound
department and a pioneer with the
Warner family in developing the
talking motion picture, died in his
sleep at his Toluca. Lake home.
He was 64,

Col, Levinson began his career
at the age of 14 as a wireless
telegrapher. At the time of his
death he was internationally fa-
mous for his work and innovations
in the field of sound,

With the late Sam Warner, he
worked to bring the first sound, a
musical score, to the motion pic-
ture screen in “Don Juan’, which
Marks, brought a mixed cargo was presented to a critical New
to the island. This cargo in- York theatre audience on August
cluded colas, charcoal, fruit and 6th, 1926.
vegetables, On ‘October 5th, 1927, the War-

The schooner ner Bros. Vitaphone Corporation
the Schooner released ‘The Jazz Singer”, star-
tion. ring Al Jolson and containing the
spoken words which electrified
the entire motion picture industry.

News of his death evoked con-
dolences from top leaders of the
entire industry, including Harry
M. Warner, President of Warner
Bros,, Jack L. Warner, Vice-Presi-
dent in charge of Production, and
Major Albert Warner, Vice-Presi-
dent in New York.

Trade Talks In

This cargo included a
shipment of lumber,
goods, pickled meat and
items of general cargo,

The vessel is under the eom-
mand of Captain Db. Cook and is
consigned to Plantations Ltd.

CARGO FROM TRINIDAD

large
canned
other

The 35 ton schooner Rainbow
M. arrived in the colony yester-
day from Trinidad.

The schooner which is under
the command of Captain Gilbert

is consigned to
Owners’ Associa-

Fined For
Inflicting
Bodily Harm

His Worship Mr. G. B. Griffith,
Acting Police Magistrate of Dis-



trict “A”, yesterday fined 29- s é 5
year-old labourer Alphonso Final Stage
Walkes of Bush Hall 40/- and

2/- costs for inflicting bodily

LONDON, November 14,

Reliable sources said the Anglo-
Argentine trade talks in Buenos
Aires have now entered their final
stage and the’ only outstanding
problem is the Argentine request
for credit facilities up to the
maximum of £20,000,000. In-
formed sources said the question
of amounts of meat deliveries to
Britain for the forthcoming year
and also the price have been
agreed upon.

harm on Ismay ae of Mili-~
tary Road, St. ichael on
November 4,

The fine is to be paid in seven
days of one month's imprison-
ment with hard labour, Ismay
Griffith appealed,

GriMfith told the court that
while she was on her way home
on Military Road, St. Michael on
November 4, the defendant beat
her with a bull’s pizzle on her

him that she had taken up one
of his ducks.

INJURED IN ACCIDENT’

Edward Taitt, a 17-year-old
mechanic of Jackman, St.
Michael was involved in an
accident with a motor car on
Westbury Road about 9.30 a.m.
yesterday, He was treated at the
Hospital for a cut on his fore-
head.

was the Argentine request for
eredit facilities, British Ambas-
sador Sir Henry Bradshaw Mack
requested assistance from the

negotiations. As a_ result the
government sent two officials
from the tredsury and board of
trade with late instructions.
The present talks regarding the
terms of a trade and payments
pact to succeed the one expiring

At the time of the incident Iast summer were initiated in
Taitt was riding a bicycle. mid July. Differences between
the two sides however were at

FELL FROM BICYCLE fivst so wide that progress

Winston Carter of Carrington
Village, St. Michael, sustained
an injury to the left foot yester-
day morning when he fell from
a bieycle which he. was riding on
Tweedside Road, St. Michael
about 10 o’clock.

He was treated at the General
Hospital and discharged,

een

11 Labourers
Back From US

Eleven Barbadians returned to
the island yesterday by B.W.1.A.
via Jamaica and Trinidad from
the U.S.A. where they were
employed as labourers, Some left
Jast year and a few this year.

ene sige y Arthur Apple-
whaite, Joseph Bascombe, mes Sica nacah
Barnes, John Belgrave, Shiver ae Cie Achat ead
oan Edwin Haynes, Joseph Al- gious > protester cee ee
ey’

Barker EMbcies “oalgiece the The general conference of 58 na-

Joseph King tions meanwhile continued debate
i : on last year’s U.N.E.S.C.O. report
The majority were satisfied

and plans for the future
with conditions in the U.S.A. | The drive against the global
and hoped to be able to return Agency's budget developed’ among
at some future date.

several delegations led by Britain

towards an agreement was ex-
tremely slow.

The first stumbling block was
the question of price, that Brit-
an should pay for future deliv-
©) ‘es of meat. It is understood
that the first price Argentine
quoted was about £192 per long
fon, Britain subsequently agreed
to the concessions but these were
too small to tempt the Argentine
negotiators.

French Protest
Admission Of
Spain To UNESCO

PARIS, Nov. 15.
The lively political debate over

Spain's candidature for the United
Nations Educational, Scientific and

Edwin Haynes, who worked in and _ Australia, The first open
Wisconsin, said. that in his case warning of the fight over
conditions were very unsuitable. U.N.E.S.C.O’s budget tentatively

He did not like the food and
conn was also very

ad. ¢

James Barnes, a worker from
Milwaukee, said that he enjoyed
very much his stay in the U.S.A.
He was allowed to cook for him-
self and he could choose where-
ever he liked to live.

set at $9,914,866 for 1953 and
$10,776,440 came Friday from Brit-
ain’s Minister of Education Miss
Florence Horsburgh. She _ said
her delegation had been instruct-
ed to “look critically’ at the
U.N.E.S.C.O. programme and bud-
get. The Australian delegate
claimed that U.N.E.S.C.O. had ex-
Other workers from Wisconsin panded its staff instead of reduc-
disagreed with Haynes. They said ing it in time of financial stress.
that they were well treated. —OUP.

WSS PLP TT;

ft Tk

TOWBERRY PUT AWAY A BIG

MEAL JUST BEFORE HE TOOK OFF
ON HIS CROSS-COUNTRY FLIGHT::++

GETS
AS SOON AS

admission.



To Save Golf’s
Walker Cup.

By Jares Goodfellow

International golf promotion is
now in the realm ¢f big finance.
U.S.A. visit of our Waiker Cup
and Ryder Cup téams every four
years jointly. costs» more than
£10,000.

Next year eight leading British
amateurs go to the i
Club in Marion, Mass, (Septem-
ber 4—5), while the U.S.A. pro-
fessionals come. to Wentworth
(October 2—3.)

Muyin cést is the Atlantic cross-
ing. Once our players reach the
otmer side they are the guests of
their rivals. When the U.S.A,
sides come here, we are the hosts.

The British Professionals Golf-
ers’ Association are striving to
put Ryder Cup finances on a
sounder basis. They hope that
Londoners in their ‘first oppor-
tunity to see this international
match, will pay £9,000 in gate
money at Wentworth,

Costs are estimated at £2,500
and £6,000 would be available for
the 1955 match in America.

If this budget works out, our
professionals would be the envy
of the amateur world,

_The Royal and Ancient Cham-
pionship Committee hve hinted
this week that, unless a substan-
tial contribution is made by golf
clubs, the Walker Cup matches
may cease. '

Abandonment would be de-
plored by the whole golf world,

‘The 2,000 clubs asked to help

in giving £4,000 will no doubt

make ready response. It seems |

to me that a scheme might be) 88 force but no tour.”
set up within the framework of |

the Golf

funds are always assured,

The Royal and Ancient com-
mittee can draw on funds from

e Amateur championship—
they are likely to allocate more
than £1,000—but profits from the
_ championship are not avail-
able,

No players have been nomi-
nated yet, Ronnie White, who cut
his big golf engagements this
season for business reasons, is to
play in more events next year,
no doubt with an eye on the
Walker Cup match.

Sunningdale Club can muster
one of the strongest teams in
amateur golf. In their side
against Cambridge, and Oxford,
they had three former English
champions—H, G. Bentley, L, G.
Crawley and G. H, Micklem,
all players on the plus one
mark. The others range from
scratch to four,

Cambridge have lost only ore

When it became apparent that °f their four engagements _this|
the main obstacle to agreement term. The captain, D. S. Blair,|

St. a

British Government to hasten With Oxford at Rye on March |
|

as six of last year’s team and
about a dozen new players of
good Standard to choose from,
Fixture list before the meeting

20—21 includes matches with
George’s Hill, Royal Worlington,
Walton Heath, Worplesdon,. West
Hili and Berkshire,

Paddy Hine, winner of the
Brabazon trophy three years
ago at 17, has to make golf sub-
sidiary to his career as a pilot-
officer, and for that reason is
not readily available for im-
portant events,

He tells me that he recentls
“fluked" a 61 when he won the
Hockey Club (near Winchester)

championship. A cut spoon shot |

at the 11th cost him his only five.

Details of his round on a course
with a scratch of 70:

Out.—1 (300 yds.) drive, wedge, . Sft.
putt 2; 2 (350 yds.) drive, 9-iron, 2 putts
4; 3 (342 yds.) drive, wedge, 15-ft. putt
3; 4 (445 yds.) drive S-iron, 2 putts 4:
5 (139 yds.) 8 iron, 6 ft. putt 2; 6 (25)
yds.) drive, 8ft putt 2; 7 (446 yds.) drive
S-iron 2 putts 4; 8 (181 yds.) 5-iron, 2
putts 3; 9 (375 yds.) drive. 9-iren, 2
putts 4.—Tetal 29,

In,—10 (300 yds.) drive, chip, 2 putts
4; 11 (511 yds.) drive, spoon, wedge, 2
putts 5; 12 (127 yds.) 9-iron, 2 putts 8

13. (243 yads.) drive, 2 putts 3;

yds.) drive, spoon, 2 putts 4; 15 (371
yds.) drive, 6-iron, 2 putts 4: 16 (16,
yds.) Giron. yard putt 2; 17 (346 yds.

drive wedge.
drive, 4-iron, 2 putts 4—Total we .
—L.E.8,

Police Band
At Esplanade

By me kind permission of Colo-
nel R, T.. Michelin, O.B.E., Com-
missioner of Police, the Police
Band conducted by Sgt. C, Archer
will render the following pro-
gramme of music at the Bay St
Esplanade this evening beginning
at 4.45 p.m.



1. MARCH—*Militaire” ..,... Schubert
2. OVERTURE—"Oberon” . . Weber
3. SELECTION

Finch

“Melodious Memories’ .....
N RMEZZO-—From the opera
“Cavallera Rusticana”’ ... ascagul
5. SUITE—"Water Music” .... Handel
6. TWO PIECES—Hymn to the sun
“Hear my prayer’ Rimsky Korsakev
. MEDITATION—"'Thias Massenct
8. ORATORIO
“The Heavens are telling’ .. Haydn
HYMNS 298 A & M —
Praise my soul the King of Heaven
The Lord is my Shepherd.
GOD SAVE THE QUEEN



SERVED FIRST, PRACTICAL
THE PLANE LEAVES THE

GROUND P CURP!) STOWBERRY,OF CUSS

e i
f, RING PRATURES SYNABCATE, tae, WORLD RIG!

URP! ves! THAN
I GOT TO CATCH

a eta
ALL, |







Unions, by which

14 (4% |

10ft, putt 3; 18 (470 yds.) |

SUNDAY ADVOCATI

—_——





Chairman | Fae he che \

za :

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER I6,

1952









Â¥
~)
, i a
WI. Conference H in | :
| Healed in 3 | :
} >
_@ From Page 1 addition to the ail vet its } $
at Hastings House will be with Chairman | and hence nal so badip shag thay ne >
Sit George at Montego Bay. are the Hon'ble W. A on | cragy? Dues the skin | x
Mr. C. A. Grossmith, O.B.EB,, mante of Jamaica and ee trenbh ci a Sethe has | %
Administrative Secretary to De- Hon’ble S. T. Christigg <| throughout the wortd, pad ' x
velopment and Welfare, who Antigua. Hon. §. shes | Yee each, Dhoby tech, You can't ‘
will act as a United Kingdom will act as substitute for Mr. | geterid of the! trvuble unin! vou tes ¥
Commissioner in the absence of Grantley Adams who will be at} Move ‘the seen enue. A new du
Mr. J. K. Thompson, Colonial the Commonwealth Economi +} Heehing in 7 mamnates, Kill, the cerns %
Attache in the British Embass) Conference in London. Ree atone cat last ink aire 4
in Washington, who is unable to _ Additionally, Dr. F. J Harlow Piet os ae eee neweatnt it TE meite 4
be present; Mr. Philip Hewit!- M.B.E., Ph,. Assistant Educa.) teed tv and the ite and heal the | x
Myring and Mr. David Percival, tional Adviser to the Secretary | ieee ee oene ee etme 8
Advisers; Mr. R. G. Roe of the of State for the Colonies ea Wee’ Rone, Bala aad ween of AND HE REPLIES ...
Secretariat at Hastings House, Mr. J. W. Vernon a BNnatoni ih | face or body or money back on return x
and ve att ae — the West Indian "Deuba a of empty carton Ask your chemist for | ;
Mr. Hewitt-Myring will be the Col sath aoe ol today The
leaving for Jamaica on Novem- Gelegation “at nacre jon yea Nixoderm protecte GO TO THE HOME x
party will aval with Sie George, “Ft 2 tevisers ee 3
on November 22. le









The two remaining United
Kingdom Commissioners, who
will be present at the Conference
and the Commission Meeting in









STEEL BANDS ................. eessusvhassees s
. . CAMBRIDGE SCHOOL & HIGHER SCH. CERT. COCONUT TREES .............00.00.. ; me
FROM ALL Wolsey Balt, Oxford can successfully prepare you by post for the above examina DOPMRBY CARES 0.50.00. ..ishiserteecccicdcn 1.92
tions; also for London University grees; A.C.P.; R.S.A.; Bar, and other FRUIT SELLERS
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QUARTERS Salton i hones Beatty ernie, Promocius (nevis mention MAUBY SELLERS 0... 96
eee WOODEN NOVELTIES
ome saa Brom Pate 1 WOLSEY HALL, OXFORD ian BOATS
pawnshop businéss. Its first 2 ? —- 5
State pawnshop will be opened in 7 SELLER ‘WOMEN
a suburb of Rangoon this month; DONKEYS

New York: Comments by th
“Seven Butchers of Broadway”—
New ‘York’s leading dramatic
critics — on Katherine Hepburn’s
performance in Shaw’s play “The
Millionairess” include the tollow-
ing: “Beautiful, radiant, vital and
not very good’”’ —‘‘A vivid, lively,
exuberant, one-woman show
played with humour and a curious
kind of beauty” — “Miss H®pburn

rd





|
| IN THE MAIL



22ND

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after baby’s bath and at every nappic
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The mildly medi

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PAGE SIXTEEN







The Waterfront Was £4,000 Needed Sir George Seel To Be Chairman | F nee fecie |

Quiet Yesterday
EXCEPT FOR unloading of the remainder of schooners’
cargoes, the waterfront experienced a comparatively quiet
day yesterday

“ There was only one steamship in thé harbour the
Saguenay Terminals steamer Sundial, which arrived in port
from Montreal on Friday afternoon—while the auxiliary
schooner Rainbow M. was the only schooner to arrive and

this hailed from Trinidad under Captain Gilbert Marks.
Almost alb the Temaining ves-
seis were idle and their crews

tuck the opportunity of mending
sails and cleaning decks,

Motion Picture
Pioneer Dies

GENERAL CARGO

The Terminals liner

Saguenay

e

Sundial arrived in port from In His Sleep
Montreal on Friday afternoon
with general cargo for th€ COL. NATHAN LEVINSON,
island. : head of the Warner Bros, sound

This cargo included a _ large department and a pioneer with the
shipment of lumber, canned Warner family in developing the
goods, pickled meat and other talking motion picture, died in his

items of general cargo,

The vessel is under the eom-
mand of Captain D. Cook and is
consigned to Plantations Ltd.

CARGO FROM TRINIDAD

The 35 ton schooner Rainbow
M. arrived in the colony yester-
day from Trinidad.

The schooner which is under
the command of Captain Gilbert
Marks, brought a mixed cargo
to the island. This cargo in-
cluded colas, charcoal, fruit and
vegetables,

Phe schooner
the Schooner
tion.

sleep at his Toluca Lake home.
He was 64.

Col. Levinson began his career
at the age of 14 as a wireless
telegrapner At the time of his
death he was internationally fa-
mous for his work and innovations
in the field of sound,

With the late Sam Warner, he
worked to bring the first sound, a
musical score, to the motion pic-
ture screen in “Don Juan’, which
was presented to a critical New
York theatre audience on August
6th, 1926.

On ‘October 5th, 1927, the War-
ner Bros, Vitaphone Corporation
released ‘The Jazz Singer”, star-
ring Al Jolson and containing the
spoken words which electrified
the entire motion picture industry.

News of his death evoked con-
dolences from top leaders of the
entire industry, including Harry
M. Warner, President of Warner
Bros., Jack L. Warner, Viee-Presi-
dent in charge of Production, and
Major Albert Warner, Vice-Presi-
dent in New York.

Trade Talks In
Final Stage

LONDON, November 14,

Reliable sources said the Anglo-
Argentine trade talks in Buenos
Aires have now entered their final
stage and the only outstanding
problem is the Argentine request
for credit facilities up to the
maximum of £20,000,000. In
formed sources said the question
of amounts of meat deliveries to
Britain for the forthcoming year
and also the price have been
agreed upon.

When it became apparent that
the main obstacle to agreement
was the Argentine request for
credit facilities, British Ambas-

is consigned to
Owners’ Associa-

Fined For
Inflicting
Bodily Harm

His Worship Mr. G. B. Griffith,
Acting Police Magistrate of Dis-
trict “A”, yesterday fined 29-
year-old labourer Alphonso
Walkes of Bush Hall 40/- and
2/- costs for inflicting bodily
harm on Ismay Griffith of Mili-
tary Road, St. Michael on
November 4.

The fine is to be paid in seven
days or one month’s imprison-
ment with hard labour, Ismay
Griffith appealed.

Griffith told the court that
while she was on her way home
on Military Road, St. Michael on
November 4, the defendant beat
her with a bull’s pizzle on her
. body because somebody had told
him that she had taken up one
of his ducks.





INJURED IN ACCIDENT sador Sir Henry Bradshaw Mack
— = requested assistance from the
Edward Taitt, a 17-year-old British Government to hasten
mechanic of Jackman, St. negotiations As a_ result the
Michael was involved in an government sent two officials
accident with a motor car on from the tredsury and board of
Westbury Road about 9.30 a.m. trade with late instructions.

yesterday, He was treated at the
Hospital for a cut on his fore-
head,

The present talks regarding the
terms of a trade and payments
pret to succeed the one expiring

At the time of the incident !ast summer were initiated in
Taitt was riding a bicycle. mid July, Differences between
the two sides however were at

FELL FROM BICYCLE first so wide that progress



salad nntet aes Diani towards an agreement was ex-
tremely slow.

The first stumbling block was



Winston Carter of Carrington
Village, St. Michael, sustained
an injury to the left foot yester- the question of price, that Brit-
day morning when he fell from an should pay for future deliv-
a bicycle which he. was riding on © ‘es of meat. It is understood
Tweedside Road, St. Michael tht the first price Argentine
about 10 o'clock, ouoted was about £192 per long

He was treated at the General !on. Britain subsequently agreed
Hospital and discharged. to the concessions but these were

sepetpcasiennineteeteiemmeeden too small to tempt the Argentine
negotiators .

11 Labourers -

Back From US — French Protest
Eleven Barbadians returned to Admission Of

the island yesterday by B.W.1.A. Spain To UNESCO

via Jamaica and Trinidad from
PARIS, Nov. 15.

the U.S.A. where they were
The lively political debate over

employed as labourers, Some left
last year and a few this year. Spain's candidature for the United

Returning were: Arthur Apple-

thai Y Nations Educational, Scientific and
‘seer —, jet esr Cultural Organizations was reviv-
Best, Edwin Haynes, Joseph Al- Cd Saturday with two French
leyne, Ralph ‘Bushell, Joseph SYOUPS protesting her admission.
Barker, Stephen Belgrave and The general conference of 58 na-
Joseph ‘Kin tions meanwhile continued debate
ee 8. on last year’s U.N.E.S.C.O. report

The «majority were satisfied and plans for the future
with conditions in the U.S.A. , The drive against the global

Agency’s budget developed among
sévera] delegations led by Britain
and Australia. The first open
warning of the fight over
U.N.E.S.C.O’s budget tentatively
set at $9,914,866 for 1953 and
$10,776,440 came Friday from Brit-
ain’s Minister of Education Miss
Florence Horsburgh. She _ said
her delegation had been instruct-
ed to “look critically” at the
U.N.E.S.C.O. programme and bud-
get. The Australian delegate
claimed that U.N.E.S.C.O, had ex-
panded its staff instead of reduc-
ing it in time of financial —
e,

and hoped to be able to return
at some future date.

é Edwin Haynes, who worked in
Wisconsin, said, that in his case
conditions were very unsuitable.
He did not like the food and
accom.cdation was also very
bad. ‘

James Barnes, a worker from
Milwaukee, said that he enjoyed
very much his stay in the US.A.
He was allowed to cook for him-
eelf and he could choose where-
ever he liked to live. i

Other workers from Wisconsin
disagreed with Haynes. They said
that they were well treated.



They'll Do It Every Tim

=



| So wuo cers
“2S SOON AS






Ore

Se





GROUND P RP!) STOWBERRY,OF cuss!

ovaenceneerenenecenapenstnctithiisttiatasn
ier, KING PHATUGES SYNJQCA:
p



To Save Golf’s
Walker Cup

By James Goodfellow

International golf promotion is
now in the reaim @f big finance.
U.S.A. visit of ur Waiker Cup
and Ryder = téams. every four
years jointly its more
Tho dbo: cos re than

Next year eight leading British
amateurs go to the Kittansett
Club in Marion, Mass, (Septem-
ber 4-5), while the U.S.A. pro-
fessionals come to Wentworth
(October 2—3.)

Main cést is the Atlantic cross-
ing. Onee our players reach the
other side they are the guests of
their rivals. When the U.S.A,
sides come here, we are the hosts.

The British Professionals Golf-
ers’ Association are striving to
put Ryder Cup finances on a
sounder basis, They hope that
Londoners in their first oppor-
tunity to see this international
match, will pay £9,000 in gute
money at Wentworth,

Costs are estimated at £2,500
and £6,000 would be available for
the 1955 match in America.

It this budget works out, our
professionals would be the envy
of the amateur world,

The Royal and Ancient Cham-
pionship Committee have hinted
this week that, unless a substan-
tial contribution is made by golf
clubs, the Walker Cup matches
may cease, i

Abandonment would be de-
plored by the whole golf world.

‘The 2,000 clubs asked to help

‘n giving £4,000 will no doubt

make ready response, It seems |

to me that a scheme might be)
set up within the framework of
the olf Unions, by which



funds are always assured, |

The Royal and Ancient com-

the Amateur championship—
they are likely to allocate more
than £1,000—but profits from the
Cyan championship are not avail-
able,

No players have been nomi-
nated yet. Ronnie White, who cut
his big golf engagements this
season for business reasons, is to
play in more events next year,
no doubt with an eye on the
Walker Cup match,

Sunningdale Club can muster
one of the strongest teams in
amateur golf,
against Cambridge, and Oxford,
they had three former English
champions—H, G. Bentley, L, G.
Crawley and G. H. Micklem,
all players on the plus

scratch to four,

Cambridge have lost only one;
of their four engagements this}
; eaptain, D, S. Blair,|
has six of last year's team and|
about a dozen new players of}

term, The

good Standard to choose from,
Fixture list before the meeting

with Oxford at Rye on March |

20—21 includes matches with St.
George's Hill, Royal Worlington,
Walton Heath, Worplesdon, West
Hill and Berkshire,

Paddy Hine, winner of the
Brabazon trophy three years
ago at 17, has to make golf sub-
sidiary to his career as a pilot-
officer, and for that reason is
not readily available for im-
portant events,

He tells me
“fluked”
Hockey

Club (near Winchester)

championship, A cut spoon shot ;

at the 11th cost him his only five.

Details of his round on a course
with a scratch of 70:

Out.—1 (300 yds.) drive, wedge,
4; 3 (342 yds.) drive, wedge, 15-ft. putt
3; 4 (445 yds.) drive 3-iron, 2 putts 4
5 (139 yds.) 8 iron, 6 ft. putt 2; 6 (25)
yds.) drive, 8ft putt 2; 7 (446 yds.) drive
3-lron 2 putts 4; 8 (181 yds.) 5-iron, 2
putts 3; 9 (375 yds.) drive. 9-iron, ?
putts 4.—Tetal 29.

In.—10 (300 yds.) drive, chip, 2 putts
4; 11 (511 yds.) drive, spoon, wedge, 2
putts 5; 12 (127 yds.) 9-iron, 2 putts 3
13. (243 yads.) drive, 2 putts 3; 14 (4
yds.) drive, spoon, 2 putts 4;
yds.) drive, 6-iron, 2 putts 4:
yds.) Giron. yard putt 2; 17 (246 yds
drive wedge. 10ft. putt 3; 18 (470 yds.)
drive, 4-iron, 2 putts 4—Total 22.

—L.E.8.

Police Band
At Esplanade

By the kind permission of Colo-
nel R, T.. Michelin, O.B.E., Com-
missioner of Police,

Band conducted by Sgt. C. Archer |
the following pro- |

will render
gramme of music at the Bay St

Esplanade this evening beginning |

at 4.45 p.m. }
1. MARCH—‘Militaire” Schubert
2. OVERTURE—*Oberon” Weber
3. SELECTION

“Melodious Memories" Finch |
4. INTERMEZZO-—From the opera

“Cavallera Rusticana”’ Mascagul
5. SUITE—‘Water Music” . Handel
6. TWO PIBCES—Hymn to the sun

“Hear my prayer’ Rimsky Korsakev
7. MEDITATION--"Thias Massenet
8 ORATORIO

“The Heavens are telling” Haydn
HYMNS 298 A & M
Praise my soul the King of Heaven
The Lord is my Shepherd.
GOD SAVE THE QUEEN

my Harlo |

SERVED FIRST, PRACTICALLY |
THE PLANE LEAVES THE



B

im












Ine, WORLD Bi



mittee can draw on funds from!

|

In their side |

one |
mark, The others range from |

that he recently |
a 61 when he won the |

Sft. |
putt 3; 2 (350 yds.) drive, 9-iron, 2 putts |

15 (376 |
16 «it. |

the Police |

SUNDAY ADVOCATI

—_——

_@ From Page 1
at Hastings House will be with
Six George at Montego Bay.

Mr. C. A, Grossmith, O.B.E,,
Administrative Secretary to De-
velopment and Welfare, who
will act as a United Kingdom
Commissioner in the absence of
Mr. J. K. Thompson, Colonial
Attache in the British Embassy
in Washington, who is unable to
be present; Mr. Philip Hewitt-
Myring and Mr. David Percival,
Advisers; Mr. R. G. Roe of the
Secretariat at Hastings House,
and Miss Joan Smith, clerk.

Mr. Hewitt-Myring will . be
leaving for Jamaica on Novem-
ber 20. The Remainder of the ;
party will travel with Sir George
on November 22.

The two remaining United
Kingdom Commissioners, who
will be present at the Conference
and the Commission Meeting in

FROM ALL
QUARTERS

@ From Page 1
the pawnshop business. Its first
State pawnshop will be opened in
a suburb of Rangoon this month,

LOEELLELVESELOL ASE LECEL ALLEL PCO L PCCP S
.
;
.
.
.
. %
is
WI. Conference H d : 3 Days §
| Mnealed ih :
addition to the British Co-| Dw your feet iteh, smart ant bura 8
Chairman .and Mr, Grossmith,| 9 badly that they ' you |
are the Hon'ble W. A. Busta:| Sitsis pes*rttt |
mante of Jamaica and .the| troubles is a gern: tha |
Hon'ble s. T. Christian of throughout the wort a as ai |
Antigua. Hon. S. T. Christian| Sineapore Itch, Dhesvby Itoh Yo }
will act as substitute for Mr. | set eld of the trouble until ve
Grantley Adams who will be at} pee ton .
the Commonwealth Economi itching ‘i : the eeent }
Conference in London. Dutt thas cet dear inthaye,
Additionally, Dr. F. J, Harlow Nixoderm is #0 successful it is guar- = |
M.B.E., Ph. Assistant Educa- anteed to end the itch and heal the =}
tional Adviser t th Se ce skin not only on the feet but the |
< ‘ £0 e Secretary |} most stubborn cases of i -
of State for the Colonies ‘and les, Acne, Boils, ar 12 AVD Hk REPLIES ...
Mr. J. W. Ver « Pr . } ace or body or mone r |
, West Ten mom a Principal ir of empty carton. Ask ye mist for |
the West Indian Department of si Nixoderm
the Colonial Office, will join Rs Nixoderm today The
delegation at ne guarantee
1 2










“Ssven Butchers of Broadway”—
New ‘York's leading dramatic
critics — on Katherine Hepburn’s
performance in Shaw’s play “The
Millionairéss” include the tollow-
ing: “Beautiful, radiant, vital and
not very good” —‘A vivid, lively,
exuberant, one-woman show
played with humour and a curious
kind of beauty” — “Miss H®pburn
has force but no tour.”







Wise mother uses Cuticura Ointment
after baby’s bath and at every nappic
change to keep him cool and comfortable. |
oS mee Mapes Mae a |
ti soothes c ne
tion, deals sweetly with nappie rash,

iticura:"':

OINTMENT?
reece






i

Norophyll Toothpaste



Now! The ull

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER I6,















Montego Bay and | protects

act as advisers, For Skin Troubles you.



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BALATA NOVELTIES

HOMMESTUDY COURSES FOR |










GENERAL CERTIFICATE of EDUCATION





. STEEL BANDS ................. aidina siVinstospocsstivaitonts r
CAMBRIDGE SCHOOL & HIGHER SCH. CERT. COCONUT KEARNS: wi Oxford, can successf ou st for the above exa: an
conn mie f ir Leoden Upbeertien Beasen ac P, RSA, en oad ‘ote ovre caertaie 1.92

1990-51, “Moderate Fees, iouaimens, Prospectus plone "merine 96

Peotone D Foie te th, aepepectas eS ee woleiar Mounties dee sbeeesens #0 tdNeeanersverseeebeaecanss 96
WOLSEY HALL, OXFORD sans MOATS esi
ce SELLER WOME
DONKEYS

e
we Children Delight in These Novelties

e
OAVE SHEPHERD & CO. LTD.
10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad St.

DON’T FAIL TO GET YOUR ENTRIES
FOR THE



CANADIAN HEALING OIL
PUZZLE CONTEST






IN THE MAIL BY NEXT SATURDAY,

THE LITTLE EXTRAS...
22ND NOVEMBER, 1952

; WHEN THE CONTEST CLOSES

YOU LOOK for them

{ Custom-Tailored SUIT . . .

fine

ROGERS & HOWE LTD. FOR NORTHROP .
materials .. . quality linings .. .

& LYMAN CO., LTD. easy drape and fit.

WE HAVE a wide choice of

Cloths, Coiours and Designs
in TROPICAL aad heavier
weights.

WON'T YOU COME in and

Here Is OY 'megie powed ~

qgeston heey Colgate

Chlorophyll ‘Toothpaste in most

cases acts quickly . . . acts thor-
the action

lasts

sweet

look around ?

C. B. Rice
& Ce.

of Boitom Lane

hours! K your breath
and fresh longer!

FIGHTS TOOTH DECAY!



“4 A424 40%
eo 5 OO



v
al




A MAFF
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MAKES A BIG
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ee :
very time you use Colgate
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ea’ ——you act agai:
Tore hab ate @onaee
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SHECKS
COMMON GUM DISORDERS!

re












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Now Colgate bri you wonder- That's why Colgaie’s experience help you care for sore, tender gums,. @
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and puts it in all green planta to For real help against bad breath WORTH
them to live and grow. But _ originating in the mouth... com-
| science must break downthisnatu- mon gum disorders . . . tooth de- op Se in
ral chlorophyll into a usable, effec- cay .. . use Colgate Chlorophyll op res.
| tive form (water-soluble yl- ‘Toothpaste after eating. It's the Tailoring’

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SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 1932 RJNDAV ADVOCATE PACE TIIIKTI I s m HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD .... BY ALAN STRANKS ft GEORGE DAVIES C-N 4AD .\*& i_OOOrV H9*\'Krt* AVOCfMT4Li.V i\rmitv rr> offices mxcerr moa rue TO* An*'*TK1E*JT L>T7i f \rnc>M Turr %  MT1 v '. %  BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG FLASH GORDON flW/AU Mr >OU 0fNG K I WXIX" T nAS AS-.SD (X/ CBS^AIN t C EC AN BOMS6VB* FOR MV._ f*n^t Hi CAS uiT BUT if IT MAS "0 BE ~$ l TMS *A'B& MAP FOU.C> rdMaH THC KOV... %  I ... AN? NOW VOJ RS A_t -... \--AN*-> -3 i3u.| CNT3POT %  OJPaOEP*ON,A>CJ AKD I AW I %  -5JT AWORKYINiT... / OffA-f = „ OIAn-V fOMETMMi TO *'*• > L-C-.' 5 ?L TJD *#0UT... --_— , --^ T ftuPPOSS WITI **"-i 1/ %  v>-n*NC.XAEa \ST %  C*fc >Qo O 10 CAN' '.-> A tJf?T J s^ Kta Gtori* Yl Gordons Stands' SuptetHJi IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL OFFE RS AVAILABLE MONDAY TO WED NESDAY_AT_ALL BRANCHES rMTAvs__Tin. Uiuiilly NO aotMM itni'P-j IK M liUAVAS—Tint _. .44 .40 GOLDEN YKHP—I-I CHASE 8. SANBORN INSTANT SSmOOT ' COFFEE .. .87 .80 c \ n: i '• IIKOKIN .M FRY'S HOT CHOCOLATE .48 .45 vorv; HM: CABBOTI 4 PEAIl-4 4KKI1TM .4 MLADE .. .42 .38 SAIR1KKAM 31 III mi Arri.i s\ii .44 STEAK — ONIONS .. .74 .86 RUIKSVITA l.M MAllll BUCUTS—*k|i .32 APRICOT PIE FILLING 44 .30 D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street Far ihoHf trha Inrv ihv fa // Nvrv's u Vinv Xman iiitt YACHT ll\f %  > MEW HEVMSKU IIHIIOX B> vwinn> ciaan ADVOCATE STATIONERY THE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK S RAY MOORES MEBE AS£ Iff C0OS-AN ME&E AB£ THE JEWS IUEVl MEAN WE SIOU *a UAEP WAV. UAI, BUI *u CTSWE A CftEC hCW WE MUCI ACT FACT" 4 ur 'CldOBec*, T^E VVAMBECM GUINNESS STOUT FOR STRENGTH _%  '._ C. F. HARRISON & CO. (BARBADOS) Ltd. P.O. BOX 304 BARBADOS



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MMiW VOVEMBIR n', l!M SVNDA1 ADVOCATE PACE SEVEN WANDERER III SAILS WEST m> about >*• By ERIC C. 1IIH< IKK Susan and I hurt often t'lowgh: W*aat delightful MI rwiwu thini. u would i ..fr ananad the world in our own MM II Milling ve>*r4 taking our lime and vis-ting on the wa> all 'h# place* which .' imagined might be interesting or eaterygning. Par ion* time this had eeemed Itkc an unlikely dream of the Never-Never land; and (hen Jut year we suddenly realised that if we wild almost everything we possessed wt could )u>t raise enough money to have boat built specially for that purpose, and to fit her oui and provision her (or such a voyage which might lako tnree or four years. Tin I make a precarious writing about sailing and travel naturally had something to do with our sudden decision to have a 90*foot sailing yacht built and to *•* how far wc could get in her. We chose a length of JO feet not because we consider that Is the Ideal ttxa for an oeean-go*ng vessel, but simply because we could not afford anything larger. Having owned two previous Wanderers, one of wrrcb called at Harhndos early thin y natural that we should christen the new boat Wanderer in She was completed and bunched in March, since when we have ltred aboard her without spending one single mght ashore Now. if yea. ever come to plan year voyage around the world, you will quickly und that you need something more than an atlas, for although on u map the sea always looks calm and bluet and free from danger*, it Is in line beat against a wild her progress is then verj stow uti unrerrJorttfisb-. ao g we s/OtAd of the north-east trade %  UM'.M Indies and on through the Panama Caasal to th< Pacific where we lire proportion of tine weather and fail winds until %  .earing Australia. Beyond that we made na definite plans, but we hoped to *ail up inside the tireal Barrier Iteef through Torres Strait lo the Dutch Eas; Idial Si nunI | Ceylon before south to the Cape of Good Hope. The south-eat t bark wind in the 1 .ig 4 long, long way. and o* eourse we may never succeed, but our mOM immediate problems notorious Day of Biscay and the Weat Indk.ii hurricane aeason. The fanner decided our time of departure from England towants the end of July, so as to be clear of (he Bay before 'he autumn gales set in; but as one should not arrive on the western ltd* of the AVantle before November so as to avoid any risk of encountering a stray hurricane, we would have plant* of time lo cruise along the Spanish :md IVirtutfueso coasts and among the off-lying Storing up the yacht for such an undertaking ah we had in mind also needed a good deal of planning and forethought Obviously we could not carry enough tinned provisions for the whole trip, but we wished lo mkr M much as we WANDERER IXL the Klaeeefc's 30 foot yseht tailing home. They plan to sail Around th* world in nei ERIC HI8COCK. whs bs* written several books on Cruising, typos out this art.rle for the "Advocate" in the caMB of Wanderer Hi in Car iwle Bay. reality vary rarel) smooth, in places U is studded with dangerous rocks and shoal*, and there are periods when it s unsafe to %  tall in certain areas because of hurricanes, cyclones, tornados mid other bad weaUier systems. So before laving your plans in any detail, you will of course make a careful Btlldy of the wind and current charts of the oceans you intend to cross, and of the Pilotspa the books of sailing directions for all seas and coasts are called. Thai Is just what wc did. and Bkeft, having mapped out a rough route we got the large scale charts and found out which of the countries. •stands and harbours wc wished to erg suitable for a crafi eg small as ours, and what dangers We would ha** 1 to circumnavigate. U surelv Is n fiij.cin.ding occupation, and it filled mast of our spare moments while Wand-rrr HI • 'liking shape hi the bin. We dec dea to make 0 west aboui so as to kgap .. nun." : : % %  HI warm lal In We trade winds; there are <* an iibnost a-rmanent aature an*, blowing aaoetly from an easterly direction, would be fair for our purpose Although a sailing veagtl could und room for because of tho foreign currenc) difluhiltiea: our minimum requirements should bo at least enough to take us to Barbados, where we could re-provislon tor the passage to Panama and on towards New Zealand. So bc. foic leaving England we took aboard tinned meat, fruit, vegernllki biscuits and many other things. When tlic eases cont.vnmg these came aboard at ('owes it seemed at first impossible that we rmild ever I n has good atom ge spac-, and D| was disposed Bach 1 Hf. riid space was numi | in book % %  '.' %  i the contents of each, then as our sti u • we crossed each tin off one by one so that at %  BJ moment we might kimw oxactly how much remaim-ii. [fl addition we carried as much fresh %  i thought would keep together with flour, rice, sugar, and other dry provisions. We earned 70 gallons of fresh water in three separate tanks, each of which could l>o filled or drawn from independently of the others, so that if one were to spring a leak or its contents were to go bad we would not lose tho tot. We also loaded photo%  P Iftti alms brom ui papei .mo irteaireil enough for three lo four years, as well as a large supply ul toilet and medical I l'tt*llABut that was only one side of the alure* probi for just soak %  -.• %  %  %  i. %  de Brest where we anchored off whitewashed village and the only sound a-as the hum • and the distant dronr of a threshan % % %  machine. For ten daywe enjo easy-going life in Irano the .inti-cyclone with It* light variable airs drifted then we put to sea determined to reach Spain without further delay. But a change for the ejarge bad come over tiie weuthcr. a succes s ion of depressions a ith Vow hurrying clouds and iain swept in from the Atlantt, and "Wanderer" had feer first taste of bad F %  '!!>-eight lour* •he lav hov<-to while a real Bay of Biscay gale blew its hardest; t from one great sea which came aboard befoi ,> aha v,as properly hove-to, filling the cockpit and burying Ihe deck so that for a moment only th" unturned dinghsand the ventilating cowls could be seen SSsSttfthg mass of green water. sh< %  e rematried in the cabin cooking, eating. sleeping und reading. B< out a gale in %  small racks! i ne an CxpericiKe OffM '' I repeat; the Bjeggg breaking against the egfggg side, and the ceaseless. seme howling of the win.i ?ing, coupled ilh tne \*/ motion, tend to lower the moiale; after a few hours we longed fur Ihe return of better weather. gleam of sunshine and peace. But ev.nm.dly that gale blew itself out as gales always do, and after six days and nights ut sea we reached El Ferrol on the northwest coast of Spain. We stayed a fortnight in that ouintry where everyone e met %  eemaa very pleased to see aJdng day saaV along the coast w i 1 h nearly • i> night in a snug port. From %  m.ide .t m>n-slop 2M'i ile pasaagw down the tnhospi# OB Page It I'll kl I KIR 141 BY VANliOAKll' Hum tn give reliable, ina baaing %  erytce OB any type rf wash .n an* type of eieathtp. Lkat Vasegasarel offers you power. luggado e e with EDI AKHY1NR CAPACITY at the same M.iatr Ring 4294 aasd let CHELSEA GAHAUfc ;.T1 prove b) .i demonstration .hat Vanguard is your best Pickup %  uy — for peaver, performance, .vonomy and durability' rAKTY-TTME CREATIONS BV ItrTTINAB creations for run and flattery, burn of a flair lor the future, and with an fase>f-care urigSBallty to whirl you hr>ugh Decembers formal te-aaou and confidence The fashion-wiae woman who loves .Ustuwtive linos plus all lha newest of fashion detailing will find her every wish fulfilled—By Bet. inas of Crttystooe tph MI>. A PAGE OUT OF SANTAS BOOK and there we were In his nvti aShowroum — brimful with taaeuiatlngi variety of rnechaiiical Toys and amusing Novelties crackers and bulging Stockuiga. -bile Xmaa trves ladru wiul %  parkUng Daeoratlotu and .i hogt %  deiixbtfui ChBdieja hurd the walls above Scooters and Model Curs — well, it |l -n't the HTX>S CO-OP COTTON FACTORY SHOWROOM! MWS BY THE YARD' brought lo you through the courtesy of George Sahely & Co. ill'ikis) Ud. 27 Broad and 19 Swan SheetOvaiantred pure Irisli Linen, line • arm woven into soft. m''l|ow tegture..in choosy colour range. Mf wide „t S3 10 A garden ^election of beautiful Flowered materials (lovely Silks too) trash out of the wrappings — ending •News by the Yard' at SahclvV M> I HIM, LIRE IT FOR PERSONAL FREHHNENH — FLORALINE, the Toilet Water that gives you the utmost pleesurh<>m rragrance This light version of The Bornn Bay Rum Co's. fine range of local products is meant to I* 1 used lavishly .to splash on ad %  lb to dash on after your bath. to gat pleasure from any way you e/fehl A modern idea in personal daintiness, Floralene makes a me*t appreciated C.ift SV*LT IVTLKLtm. Bi HI.Al h MAGIC how t me I sooner dO >ou open a tlD derful no, delightfully dlltiaW Black Magic Chocs than ona eager mouthful Kwds lo another. .md another . and another ana then the tall-tato rustle of paper —orry. folks! did mc>a to aave one for you. But then, someone'.sure to have you on their Black Magic t V 1 .ii.i li lb ikasf i :intmgfj a a e tANAIM-N NRHEHT IK ELECTRIC RANGES AT THE IYKTRAL KMPOR1I M — ntodjell W Superior to suit your part'culai needs! Two ($78) and three <$2 84) plate Table Models eejBRMi with Oven. Juet plug em in llki your iron! A handy Power Mis vSM.40) to halve youi nuxing lime and effort, extract fiuii JUKCB. at dick of switch* Han Dryers m this inter, sling ramie at Central Fuundiy Ltd. ph.42UU. • • • IKTERKHTING R4MIKA TO READ amid huhday beauty eicape fiom cltifled routine, as a soodbye lo a traveller, but above all. the Advocate Stationery sugnests a book as the fascinating Gift for Christmas! Come on In nave a look — fact. fun. fiction books to match the mood and manner of every man! Whilclieek on Gift Stationery and Room Decorations al Ad 1 Stationery. A LITTLE PAINT MARCH A LOT OF mi i i i:i M and Plantations Ltd. are prepared to nack that with an ample supply of fine paints, varm-hes. enamels and distempers in a pleasing i ange of colours. Time. loo. to brute, sunshine light Into the home for Christmas, add new ii.nin and beauty with horoohrighteninv paints from Ptanl.td iih 44(Hl. 4534 LISTERS ARE HERE AGAIN! It's the taster Lighting! plant. popular throughout Barbados and iiedaily in the countryside for 'he highly reliable and economical latter method of generating your own cur runt for home or industrial use Dnvn >% the Lister Diesel Engine the 2 t, K W StartO-Matle 110 Volts A C. and 3 KW "Ian Is aje supplied by THE it MitiMinuiiMim . jablllljl wggg JMV 1 — figure in maidenjprm's Orejg-ture* aVW arae! Hare's the firm. Hat taring support io give roaj %  really dreamy figure .. .to makr your ailhouetlr i ml* fa-hinnabls! Discovri Orel bsrVl lift. as lovellnrs* !•) %  >! In *oar ba.erk. fahn. %  ,. Geauaae Maidenform Uratsiasaaaraesadr onl* inllirl oiled taataa mi Ames ke ka • mm'i/r/i/f/rm for evary type ot hgure. To • keeP f it h Healthy, happy ramilies take BNO'S Fruit Salt Plcasani, refreshiaf Pnik Seat" is the gentle correcOve most of us need to keep the system regular. EN'O'S it P"*Jy auiuble for children-anJ fat anyone with adelicate stomach. ENO S aeseJy relieves over-acidity, a most frequent cause o( indigestJoo, hfartburn anal natulence. li soothes and settle* the stomach upset by unsuitable food or drink. A dash of'ENO'S at any tune of day soakes %  Bpgrtlipg, invigorating health-drink. Keep ENO'S bandy I Eno's Fruit Salt RgSMB LAI *TION. sn | in UbW its. an in. sstsv INDtGBSTiaM. •*• Sold in bottUa for lifting frtshnfM.



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I SDAV NOVEMBER 16. 1 SINIIAY ADVOCATE PARE FITS RACING RESULTS AT GAMMON SAVANNAH. SATUIDAT. NOVEMBER IS. III! WEATHER: Fine TRACK: Finr 53 SS : CRAVESENII HANDII IF Cba "Q" and Uwr-H tSIU. IM. $4it—5'i B.T.C. Autumn Meeting Prize List RESULTS OF 2' SWEEP 1 TWINKLE, h.b. bf. Dunusk-Whit Lady, 101 lbs., Mr. L. J Seah Jockey Crossley 2 EN PRIX. h.b. ch.g. Jetsam-Sun Maiden 128 lbs. Mr N L Nothnagel Jockey Singh 3 BLUE GRASS, h.b. ch.h. Roidan-Pet. 114 lb... Mr' George A Fordo Jockey Holder ALSO RAN: Poplin (Quested 110-2 lbs). Dynamite (Blades 97 lbs) Joan's Star (Belle 103*3 lbs.); Blue Diamond (.Newman 133 lbs> TIME: 1 091 PARI-MVTl'EL: Win: $3 12, Place: 1.36, $142.91.72 FORECAST $708. START: Fair FINISH Easy. i lengths, 1 length. TRAINER: Mr. S. Masaiah. The prize list I* " follow* — Ticket Ne>. Her*Ma. SS -2161 Cokimbu* .. li AA-9172 Ordinal 14 OO—1012 Super Jei 11 B — 4173 Fluffy Ruffles 10) QQ 2613 Twinkle 10) 134 Abu All 9 A — 9901 Apple tarn 81 PF— 9133 En Prm R — 2835 Landmark tii Place 4in Mm %  ft flft tn< kMn oividet nt,*. 90 nia 1 %  as iron It M MM NOV. 16 — NO. 250 TOPICS BY JOE & ROBERT 3.9I6.00J i . '8 no •it. Of'i %  HI !• % %  I W< MS* mm " tard Race : WORTHING HANDICAP—Claea "B" (9109. 1159. 945)—9 Farlenn •U Le wl l MM x-Dido. 113 lb*., Mr. S. A Blanchelte 1. FIRELADY bf The Phc Jockey Quested. 2 PEPPER WINE: b.m O T.C -Condiment, 107 lbs., Hon J. I) Chandler. Jockey Crossley 3 TIBERIAN LADY b.m. Tlberius-Wurtn Welcome, 108 • 6 lbs. Nt V. Chase. Jockey Singh) ALSO RAN: Castle in the Air. (Belle 128 lbs.): Nrfari (Hajal u~. lbs, Mrs. Bear (Holder 104-4 lbs.): Test Match (Yvonet 116 lb). Lunways (Newman 115 Ibs.j, Belle Surprise (Whlttaker 103-6 lbs.) Dashing Princess (O'Neil I0ft-t4 lbs.) TIME: 1.56 4/5. PARI-MUTUEL Win: $6.90; Place: $3.30: 55.18. $6.94 FORECAST: $184 80 START: Good. FINISH: Easy 1, lengths, 2 lengths. Mill Raee ; BtXLEVILLE HANDICAP Claaa T' and Lower (3 y-o. over)—87M. (8235. |llft. 849)—7, Farlani. 1 COLOMBUS br.c. Cobrose-Busy Woman. 130 lbs. Miss Roaemar> Boon. Jockey O'Neil. 2 FIRST ADMIRAL b.g. Admirals Fig-Flak, 117. 1 lbs. Mr. F. E. C, Bethell Jockey Yvonet. 3 APOLLO, b.g. Sun Plant Apronelle, 109-3 lbs Miss K. C Hawkins. Fletcher. ALSO RAN: March Winds (Hajal 08 lbs), Jolly Miller (Quested 100r2 lbs). Chutney (Crossley 122 lbs); Caprice (Blades 84 t-3 lbs TIME: 1.35 4/5. PARI-MUTUEL: Win: $188; Place $1.28. $1 40, FORECAST: $8.52 START: Good. FINISH: Easy II lengths, neck. TRAINER Mr. J. Fletcher. 25th Rare : JI'NIOR HANDICAP—Claaa "F" and Lawer (t >*> $790, (8335. $115. 540)—5' %  Fariosus 1 APPLE SAM, b.g. Jetsam-Apple Fritter, 128 lbs.. Mi J H Goddard Jockey Thirkell. 2 SUPER JET. chc. Jetsam-Wedding Gift, 115 lbs. Mr. F. E. C. Bethell. Jockey Yvonet. 3 ILLUSION, br.f Jim Cracker Jack-Will Olhe Wisp, 101 lbs, Mr C. A. Proverbs Jockey Holder. ALSO RAN: Battle Line (Hajal 92 lbs.); Jim La Rue (Blades). TIME: 1.M4-5. PARI-MUTUEL Win: $126; Place. $1.10.51.14 FORECAST. 8180 START: Good: TRAINER. Mr J. R. Goddard 72 other hor**s divide 527104 eacn. LIST OF IIOBSES MVWS BpsgM II. 9901—Apple Sam. B—2176 F-re Lady. 8844—Jim La Ru*>. 4173—Fluffy Ruffle* C—5352 Dashing princes*. 0998— Cartful Annie 1314— Darh-i Jane. 5525—iCons.) Jinx. D— 7888 Viceroy. 2081—Fuauxce. 1021—Caprice. 28": 1—Tnn'.rook 3095—Vectis. F—5341 Joan's Star. 8663— Devil's Symphony, 6224— Tert Mats 9421— Frederick The Great. H—9035 5>ench Flu irl ng Dawn. 'i Sea Foam. 5213—Vigilante J—6572 Blue Grass, 8752 \fa Pole K—4i: Meerschaum, 8189-Ctoss B-.* L—8147—Mary Arm. 1153 Q—6228 Yasim.ii. il86--Sln.ct Aub 6987 r.btrmi Lad.. M3.U R—2625 Landmark. BOSS—-Chutney. S—9953 Hopsy, 2942—Spear Orass. T—4003 Hi and Low. V—2470 Jolly MUtar. W—5426 Battle Line X—033? Aim Low. 4083-The Thing. /. 5358 Bell" Surprise 73W AA—5766 Mrs. Bear 2390-III iftwood, 8172 -C.irdmat. BB—8371 Contralto. 7983-Pni"-' Line. t20B—JeahHiav CC—8459 Castle in the Aii. 3011 I IIM a> U \ DD—9587 Apollo Mil % %  €> % % %  EE—4796 Nit Wit. FF—1710 First Admiral. GG—o;0 Rambler R> Wonderful. 11—8765 Diamond Queen. KK—7287 March W nds. 7586I'eppeWine LL^80I Nefari. 6803—Gavotte 6230— Magic Gaye. MM—8865 Galavhicl*. 3771' illusion NN—3801 Blue DtaflM HM fUa IVIian, 5172— Dynamite. %  Ng niji 'SS SS ll.k'l sMBJ nckou no* •....-I %  Ml 1SW Mrh M hohlri lit. J*. Sl*4. |H lie*. MSI ••) i And Itfh*bod k .".H • *.at in* .loot p, %  A -iilil Who laM ion n." ukrd And he ivpiiod lit Ji< BU lai %  '" %  laiaugn • %  • %  UaJ u*. il... ooiiiadM 1*11 .i* .. ,i r. ltt %  I ..... .. No* ChiWlnuu duv.ii>. n ar* %  Pray ,rt\ %  %  %  i'^pin 2011 i mnfclr, U784OO—2434 Abu Ah. 2012—Supri Jei I'P 2117—My Love II. 9133—Fn Prix QQ-58B4 -Collctoii tin— 7211 Mr Friendship SS— 2161—Colombus. 2512—Cavalier. "SS •oi, mm mi mi aw. %  S FINISH: Easy. 1| lengths. 5 length* Challenge Laddei Matches 26th Race : NOVEMBER HANDICAP—Ctaas "C" and Lawer—$BM. (BBB5, $135. $50)—7H Fnrteaga 1 F1.UTFY RUFFLES, bf. Pink Flower-Golden Fairy, 121 lbs Mr. J. R. Edward*. Jockey Holder. 2 TOPSY. ch.f Emir d'Iran-KUlocure. 125 lb*. Mr. K D Edwards. Jockey Newman. 3 Magic Gave, gr.f. Magic Red-Ecilace. 118 lbs. Mr M. E. R Bourne Jockey Belle ALSO HAN: Devil's Symphony (Blades 105 lbs .), High and Low (All 106 lbs.); Street Arab (Singh 110*4 Ibi.). Mary Ann (Yvonet 130 lbs-, Flleuvcc (Whittaker 115 lb*.); Aim Low 5) Durham Jane (Fletcher 115 lbs.) TIME: 1.35 4/5 PARI-MUTUEL: Win: $3.54; Place: 1 64; $264. $1.54. FORECAST: $27. START: Good FINISH: Close: i length, head. THATNIR: Hon. V. C. Gale. ?7lh Rare : R(M KLKV HANDICAP—Class "D" and l-awer S8M. ($265. $135. $451—9 Furlens* Durli.n UM lull taatOn DM UU Club House. Because of hi %  Mrdal Pl^y Champion OWtlOBal interest in then the President's Cup competitions. aiTairs, Mr Benjamin has been two of the major fixtures on the %  l.i ted i A regulai member nt golfing schedule which will be th Golf Commitieo oiling th< played simulUueously next vacancy left open b> In* Captan SJlurday anu 1 Sunday, the Reekie/ ami Vice-CapUin at the UjDM %  divot-digger.lumed llieir energie* the annual meeting in S to Challenge Ladder matches v.ith The results of the ChaJlansx K'ne spectacular rasulU. ladder maUhes during the pavt Among those to batter Uwll wtjffgi and the eliallenges, mdual petitions in the stiuggle to reach „\u the date thev wan polled the top twelve before Feu. I. lollow Players arc reminded tbV when the team which will ro, hallenges must be accep' pieseni Rockley in Trinidad will leq days of posting or a walkbe selected, were Colin Thomas, ovsjr conceded jumped victories over A. W. Tempro and Dorian Cole; Ted Henjuniin. wh< played binvseif intu the first vWo by beating Geoffrey huiiw. MEN'S i. \Dm K Kes tilts w Tempro lefeab Peter GLU dofaatgd V. Hufite. A Bcnjan in defe., I COLOMBUS br.c. Cobrosc-Bus> Woman, 122 lb*. Miss Rosemary Boon. Jockev O'Nol. ? CARDINAL b.g O.T C— Biretta 118 lbs Mr J W Chandler Jockey Crossley. i CROSS BOW. b.K. Burning Bow-Chivalry. 130 lbs. Mr. Cyril Barnard (Hon V C. Gale) ALSO RAN: Assurance (All 102-1 lbs); Colleton (Singh 109-3 lbs ): Seedling (Belle 106 lbs ) TIME: 1.571 PARI-MUTUEL Win $3 26; Place $170; $1.44 FORECAST: M 04 START: Good. FINISH Close I length, 1 length TRAINER: Mr. J. Fletcher 28th Race : FINAL HANDICAP—Claaa "A V B" Only— f 1.6*9. ($336. $185. $80)—71-1 Farlonc1 ABU-ALL ch.c. Pernan Gulf-Fair Witness. 122 lbs. Mr. F. E. C Bethell Jockey Yvonet. i. LANDMARK, ch.m. Pylon II-Esperance. 133 lbs. Mr. V. Chase Jockey Singh. 3 PEPPER WINE. b.m. O T.C -Condiment 104 lbs Hon J D Chandler. Jockey Crossley. ALSO RAN Castle in the Air (Belle 123 lbs); Demure (Whittak'i 105-. 2 lbs. Harroween (Quested 128 lbs); Yasmten (Newman 110 lbs); Fkrelady (Fletcher 113 lbs.) Sweet Rocket (Lewi* KJ5+4 lbs.) TIME: 1.331. PARI-MUTUEL Win: $3.54; Place $1.54; /I.74, $2 52) FORECAST: $18.92 START: Good. FINISH Close 1 head, I length TRAINER: Mr F E C Bethell Manning. P. D. McDennotl, who long and potentially s en sat i o n al climb by defeating Mai Cole. Keilh Murphy and William p. i> Grannum. Several others acceptCole ed chaliangaa from their pursuer* u Hinkwn defeated and successfully defended their FttzGerald, I.ADIKS I. \lilii i; INBM M it Wilson defeated Mis Mrs V Manning defeatad Mrs. Simtli Mrs. Wylu defeated Mrs. N. Mrs. E. Vidmer defeated Mrs. \. \l-iliity re. Mm. II KIIIK defeated Mrs. V. \ illlIHIK. Challengea Novemb-i II Mm Wylle chalengtd Miss Atwell. Mr.* King ehal% %  i Mrs Mnclntyre. NovtmbCl 12 Mrs. Vidmer i 'i.iilrnged Mrs. Beasley. bti 13 — Mrs. Grace i Mrs. Smith. %  lupin. Arid tutStUlutS II. I (i K( warm Urn Rul *|mia>lfK in.ii MUSI Hiflcr %  And Son I rWlM Ihrlr ml l.tka Ihc tin*.llcorvw tloWi*. Th*> %  hiiuld i: No mi 1 do I b< By Hotoril I— %  .1 1 iiahl mlo Hrll %  The poor than •-• ihli %  %  hi mi-' %  1 .... Ttin raa I apoatorcd by J & R BAKERIES makers of ENRICHED BREAD and the blenders of J & R RUM a .t/s:: %  ,, :u>* & fag Ll4 .P.O.B.'\ 1704 MASS A V, TI 1 sifrTi*H>'< TnTur-i'iTs %  firt Zo'TlVr.'vT**' mi 1 M. i"M,N 1 Vl.LAAD IHAIllOl The ladies were almost as active -,/ith Mrs. Bronda Wilson re£.iinnif No. 1 position by deleatin,; Mi lasnaal Beasley. while Mrs. Verj Manning moved upward with a victory over Mr*. Peggy Smiili in .i more is gtogted King .-xpected to have signed up before Novembe IBCole challennorl Thursday night, when the entries Tempro. < lose and n White Hat auction will Novembe: 11 Orannum chaV m tom UCtad i rd llenji.min nt '< ngod Grace We'll soon have that better with The collar for all occasions Vw, llllll Ifcl '<' %  vhtfh kk rllir wh,h vou *n hrmf run.-ritiion.! •x .> ,! Tfcm < ii U wo.ni on IBP curvf inc. fit ihc niiuial ihapr id ihr nk—n i. pirrpiinnally loin wraiint *<*A .1... Hnart and lomfcwiablr in an \\<* \xu>x*l nd pronon, I H womb> tarllilmW mrn ^^rvwherc Av^l.bkit, ... dtifcrnl • C OINTMENT Gcrmolene Oinlment soothe? and penetrates.' Ii protects skin injuries, rashes, scalds, and insect biles from the entry of harmful bacteria, and stimulates healing. Keep a tin handy for family use. SC.LDS.MSHEJ, VanHeusen C2 IMt Olid'**. SlHI-STiPf CCKL*" -BBBBBBBBB,!,--!o in Jen? Hercules 7he Finest Bicycle 8uUt To-day •MUSHMS, Itc. GBRMOLSNE i <* i at a touch k Qbtdinanu evervuhtrt. Sv Ihfin .IIIW m — Barbados Co-operative Cotton Factor/ Ltd. Auto Tyre Co. Trafalgar Store AND AT ALL LEADING DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE ISLAND



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PACK i li.ill SUNDAY ADVOCATL SUNDAY. NOVEMBER 1. 152 BAfpDOS,^ ADVOCATE r Sunday. November lb. 152 FA.\tl MOLASSES THE slump m MIM of Barbados Fancy Molasses to Canada this year has been a cause of anxiety to everyone engaged in if production, packaging and marketing. It is obvious that a total sale of approximately one half less than last year could not be viewed with equanimity by those engaged in the industry'The visit to Canada on Thursday of three representatives of B.E.M.A.—the marketing association of all the island's exporters of fancy molasses will have surprised no one who was aware of the falling sales in our exports of fancy molasses. The representatives have gone to Canada to survey the entire situation of the Canadian market for fancy molasses and they will report to B.E.M.A. on their return on what step* should be taken to ensure the retaining of the Canadian market. The decision to send representatives to Canada was hastened because the normally greatest buyer of Barbados fancy molasses not only made no purchases from here this year but actually took in a tanker filled with the equivalent of 2,000 puncheons of Cuban fancy molasses. The arrival of bulkshipped fancy molasses in Canada from another Caribbean sugar island could not but have a disquietinr effect on the exporters of Barbadian fancy molasses It would, however, be rash to suppose that iK-cause Cuban bulk-shipper: fancy molasses are being bought in Canada, the sales of Barbadian molasses in packages cannot continue for many yeai> longer. The representatives of BEMA. who will make an extensive tour of Canada and are expected also to visit the United Sta^ are going to Canada with open minds. They want to discover at first hand the reasons for the extraordinary low sales of Barbadian fancy molasses in Canada this year It is possible that their findings will hav< some reference to the need for bulkshipment from Barbados if some of Iht Canadian market is to be retained. But it is also possible that they will discover other reasons for this year's low tales. So many factors operate in the marketing of fancy-molasses that it would be imprudent to suppose that bulk-shipment and only bulk-shipment can guarantee the maintenance of the Canadian market for Barbadian molasses. It is true that shipment in packages is much more expensive than shipment in bulk The Hon. H. A. Cuke In' a memorandum published as an appendix u> the report of the committee appointed to enquire into all aspects %  >! the fancy molasses industry in Barbadr* revealed that wherens the cost at that time of shipping 100 gallons of molasses in bulk was $3.60. the cost of shipping 100 gallons in packages was $27.43. The cost of production >f fancy molasses today is almost double that of the price quoted f.o.b., to the Canadian buyer in 1946 and the present f.o.b., price quoted today is almost three times what it was in that year. Besides the increased price of Barbadian fancy molasses the Canadian importer has to consider also the effect that a rising standard of living in Canada has on the buyers of fancy molasses. The Canadian retailer of fancy molasses has to sell the product to the Canadian housewufe in attractive pack ages and has to advertise the product if the housewife is not to buy sugar or some other competitive syrup. The higher the costs of the Barbadian fancy molasses to the Canadian importer the more aggresMVt will the salemanship of the Canadian re-" tailer have to be. The adoption of bulk shipment would have a spectacular effect on the cost the Canadian importer would have to pay because $23.83 would be saved on every 100 gallons shipped. On the othi i hand bulk shipment could not be introduced suddenly without creating much unemployment locally. The future of the fancy molasses industry is not a subject for idle speculation. Those in in the industry particularly those employed in the industry must be aware of the changed conditions of the industry. They must realise that no action taken locally can prevent unemployment if the market for fancy molasses goes. The low sales of this year's production of fancy* molasses have given clear warning that the market for tancy molasses is not what it used to be. The reasons for these low • sales are to be discovered by the representatives of BEMA who left last week for Canada on a fact-findsig mission. While no one can say in advance what reasons will be discovered and what recommendations will be made, there can be no doubt that the representatives' first concern will be to preserve as far as is possible the market which Barbados fancy molasses has enjoyed for many years in Canada. The very fact that their mission has been necessary is evident.*enou h that this is no time for optimism or dogmatic assertions about what must be done ;f 'hiindustry* is to maintain a high level >i exports The representatives hav. gone to find out and everyone must hope that their findings will Lead to an increase of fancy molasses exports next year. PUBLICITY THERE are two kinds of publicity: favourable and unfavourable. The publicity which Barbados spreads about itself out-lit, if we want to attract capital or visitors here, always to be favourable. As far as visitors are concerned it can be said that the publicity which Barbados is given by the publicity committee, the hotel and club proprietors and the Hotel Association is always favourable. As far as attraction of capital is concerned Barbadians need to be much more reticent and to run down the island less than they do among themselves. In recent years Barbadians have been too prone to give their island a bad name and too reluctant to point out its advantages over all other British Caribbean islands. Some of the smear campaign which Barbadians spread unthinkingly abroad about their own island has taken effect to such an extent that the island is in danger of losing capital investment at a time when it needs it urgently. Fortunately not everyone takes ao pessimistic a view of the island and its possibilities. The bank which is in process of building a modern air conditioned building in Broad Street would hardly have incurred so large an expense if it considered that Barbados was as hopeless a place to live in as many Barbadian detractors make it out to be. Faith in oneself is necessary before confidence can be communicated to others and there have been several instances in recent years of outsiders coming into Barbados and running successfully, enterprises which local Barbadians would never have attempted because of their fundamental lack of confidence in the island and its potentialities. The danger of swaying from one extreme to the other is ever present and Barbados still suffers from the influences of narrowminded persons whose standards and knowledge are based on the limits of this small island. But while Barbados "know-allness" must always be regarded with suspicion it is quite different from the informed criticism of those who criticise the island for not following their advice and are almost prepared to see the whole place go up in smoke just to prove themselves to have been right. Today the future of Barbados hangs poised in the balance. If we can find a formula for co-operation there is no doubt that we can continue to maintain for Barbados a name superior to that of any neighbouring Caribbean island of equivalent size. But if sectional or party interests cannot be submerged in the interests of the community as a whole: if on one hand there is suspicion of motives and on the other an ineradicable conviction that no progress can be made there will undoubtedly be no progress and there will be fertile ground for breeding discontent. The need for Barbadians to agree more among themselves is perhaps easier to understand if it is considered in the light of unfavourable publicity from outside. Barbadians are by now acclimatised to the cheap Trinidadian gibes about Barbadians and themselves lose no opportunity to poke fun at the'"mudheads" of British Guiana. But this is very healthy fun as between cousins, whom we know will always come and visit us for the simple reason that neither Trinidad nor Britisl. Guiana can offer the holiday attractions which make this island so popular with Trinidadians and British Guianese. It is quite another thing when a writer and traveller paints a picture of Barbados in an influential trade publication of North America which will not be regarded locally as very favourable publicity lor the island as a tourist resort. In Travel Trade for August-1952 an unnamed writer in anIWtsto an invitation from the Alcoa Steamship Company describes Barbados as "quite flat", ft has, he says a "formal and tather circumscribed resort atmosphere." The hotels are "fairly expensive at all seasons". Social clubs are not easily accessible. "The island is singularly conservative in its traditionalism and the visitor must lend himself to a higher degree of acclimatization than elsewhere in the Caribbean." If this kind of commentary did not appear in an American travel trade magazine opposite the advertisement of a luxury air conditioned hotel in Panama, it might be dismissed as the unfortunate impression of a traveller and writer whom the Barbados Publicity Committee appear to have missed. But tourism is too valuable to the island for this kind of publicity to go unchecked. V\e will never of course be able to have 100 per cent, protection against the criticism of those who form hasty impressions and we ought never to ignore the existence of criticism. We would, however, find it much easier to ickite the propaganda of those who dislike us at first sight if we presented a united front to the outsider. It matters very much to all of us what the outsider will think of Barbados. If they think of us as a happy collection of human beings each pulling our weight and adding to the achievements of the last three hundred years, we will have no difficulty in attracting capital and visitors. If we wear pur disunity on our sleeves and show visitors how little we agree among ourselves we shall give ourselves a bad name which will stick for generations. KdWi.lion .Vt> Need For I hanged On I look TODAY I'\e come to the end of J chapter which ha* good* or wen/ict* or bu> from to me been extremely interesting and to say the le;i *" 'L"tt. r „, whit enlightening. My contention that the Richmond School* ^X'aSTJZSZ.^n Z !" were Elementary and not Secondary has been vindicated ^n^ned io communicate with or by the subsequent circumstances, and I now let readers .„ mtptoy or to *irk for or t-_ be of this column know that Mr G D. Griffith, Headmaster employed by an ignoramu.7 As it of Providence Boys' School has been appointed to the %  *-day "> Barb-do* we are Richmond Bovs' aaTucWd -with a type of youngster iI SESby ? %  , that th. .pp..: '.menu St the Richmond *J*~ <" l >' "%£ JST^i •ttuasl* wu both inter.iing and dt-hmU In order to "palmthem his manhood or P** 8 !" "* hl •mluhtc-ning interring from the off as Secondary. right ifi by an aggressive altitude joint of view of the cut and thrust Let me here invite Ihose who indicated by unprintable lan•>f public debute but mom than have spoken to me to write to the guage. Watch them sign their iiut that. It was to me in* .upPMM and express their view, benames. aort of a good cause. Then* can cius.mere ts> stilt the appointEducation alone can eradicate htile of greater value than the m ent of a successor to Mr*. Gnfntn this. Let us have a working class *S S M l 7 .^"f 000 £*• * •' *> Girls' School next lerm. with a sound elementary training. JXo? SL?!. l S 2i rn \ ^"J A f' ,n My ,l ,s ,n """""•'T able to distinguish between the nd, .?..* h r n .. 11 is their only link icnoot nd a hea<*m.Mre or ^ lbly lrue and the obviously ipress themselves clearly :a1culate their earnings without help. This is the bsls for th building of any progressive Ui civilisation. In assistant from one of the elornenfaUa i 0 community where the uu> schools should be appointed "rf i* %  durations! system provides for de Nursery School, the Kindergarten School, the Junior School, Kn lightening die Primary School, the Senior what School, the Grammar School and | 0 tind tho nlightenlng to me and enlightened people. Ago •^ %  nxay ihc Orammar School and m tind that there are .till Ihougrouping and 1U trapping* arc -ho University, it might be ea.y sands of intoHir,chi people in this not conducive to this happy state u> correct the error made or to island who are afraid to express of society. It was abandoned in make up for the omission :n a their opinions. Some who see TrlnWad. It should be abandoned -hiid. education. wrong only when it touches them here In Barbados many men and P cr * n *"yur ,< other, to fight on Parents, teachers and employ. women who have the requlslt %*\ ^'V* '" J h 'l 1 n *il. h £2~ ers shoul il now )oln ' •P 0 "**"Xt,on because "l£cir on? a^ashlrr^.^ •"# *'" rmtl *" " nmy -hanco in life lay in the Clemen?. r 'SE^laS !" rfumlsof u P lls an> w llnK tlm and Uk ary school. They lost it and KL22L V 1 "'~* '*"'"" ost everything. <5an we afford to V !" ." !? rifle with .0 serious a matter? !"' t d %  Jjg >i people like M elt that my criticisms were unsrranted and Mr. Adam* who tald that they were utterly usilncd. reflect for one moment irui I know that they will Join ne. The nehl has been interesting to be hoots; others "are in"<"*" " ub * t ""^ foundation^ mvited to send *" such cases, was not good their children there. Still a "bough or the teaching faulty. The h0 smaller (thank heaven* number low figures of the Evening Insti, lus.lt> themselves as being pritute passe* and the absence of vately educated and judging by any from Codrington College the results it must nave been should serve as an eye openT. vary private education because I rn going to suggest In the near Ki.owab-.ul it. future that the two Inland The same thing done in poliScholarship, now tenable at Cod1 Those who have •noral support will share with mo given me 1,cn b Mr Ada !" musl he ne rington should bo diverted to the educat nrcles This .mug University College of the West the utmost latisfaclion at seeing eomplaccnt attitude must go and Indie, where at lenst we would he r^hool managers of St. Leonpeople must realise thai the eduget some passes. If thl. is not •rdi put an end to this "tornnation of every other Barbadian suitable I suggest that S.P.G.. 'oolerv" of trying to get teachers effects them. In the days to come through the Lord Bishop, change •*m Secondary Schools to deyou will either employ them or the whole staff, note themselves by accepting be employed by them, sell tnem .T.E.B. The Unemployed Evcrv now and then some politician tell-s US tl|it there are Aousands of people unemployed .n Barbados, The phrase trips %  aslly from the tongue and is sure :o win chorus of aye* and a isndful of head nodding, from .he gallery. But no one know, low man) unemployed person." here are in Barbados. The live register of unemployed (fpt by the Department of Labour ecorded only 1.922 at the end of September. But this register does not record all unemployed perxm., and some of those who refister ought more properly to be recorded as under-employed or unemployable.. The hysterical approach lo unemployment which Is made by loliticlans seeking to achieve popularity 1. not going to assist those ho are trying to decrease unemployment In Barbados. What If vanted Is a cool appraisal of the situation as it exists today and a. 't is likely to ex'st in future* This -ocil appraisal of the situation -annul be made so long as confusion exists as to what i> mean' S> unemployment. Can unemployment for Instance M ild to exi.l In Barbauoa at all, *hcn almost every person on tho live register could be employed in ian Domingo if arrangement, between the government of Barbados and San Domingo could bv concluded and the unemployed could JWH th* physical and oUieD test, ^s-hich the Don in lean employer, would requ re" It all depends as Professor Joad would say, on what we mean by unemployment. When the politicians olesaed with a imple life in some remote cOUn:r> ustnet nto which ute benefits -:id evils of 20lh rentury atom:, life nave not yet ,. iietraled. While however we must make allowance for those wn enjoy the simple life of the country unspoilt u> artificial desires and free from the ugly influence of greed, we must realise that not .11 the under -employed are useful citi/• %  ns. There is oo doubt that many person, who ar.t attracted to the cily fall by the wayside and failing to secure regular emplov.nen' discover ways and .-neans if earning something in "underemployed" loot There cou.d be no more important ocrupallor 'or social welfare worker, to follow than the establishment of contact with these under-employed rind subseouent persuasion of si many as possible ntner to return to tho land or lo make use of any focilt' provided by ihe Evening In*tltote fur learning a sk'lled trade. Some persons think that Barbados* underemployed position i* clearly connected with ihe lack of a technical mstilute at which young men and women can bo trained for employment here and abroad. The preoccupation with %  tcsdemic education has resulted already In the creation of topheavy bureaucratic government structures which are draining away the revenues of the Caribbean governments at a time when only Increased production resulting from technical "know-hnw" can provide greater employment opportunities. The growth of academic education has been followed by the Inevitable growth of demands from the academic products of the schools for social aeeurity standards of life based on thai envied by university undereTBduntrs in London and other c-ntres of learning. The fact that educational grants and "holarships have been accessible 'o all has prevented the majority of the "non-academic" products ;>t the schools from feeling frustration or resentment at" the educational status quo Everyone has a rhsnee id enjoy the sweets of academic %  Uceess. Today there Is a welcome sign that the majority are beginning to realise that the concentration on acdcmlc education has been depriving 'hem of opportunities for otqiilrng technical skills without Vhleh the* cannot hope to achieve he material standards which they nave been encouraged to aspect But lecnmcal eaucauon or tm creation of a technical insunuicsnnot alone solve Barbados i.tome uiitier-employment pus.i Hon. Only an imperial policy based on utilization of the hmpiro's manpower wherever It can DO .otiiiu will ensure tnat Isaroaoians or o.ner West Inaans win t* given employment opportunities in other countries. So lung as Barbadians rcuun the good name wnich they sun enjoy outside the island, Uiey can coimdenuy expect to find employment opportunities in the UAftssJ States, 3-m Donungo, Surinam oi other countries where there are Insufficient supplies ol labour. Bui it would be unrealistic to imagine that Barbados or Ihe rest of the West Indies could provide cmpto/ment for Laraa numbers of (rchiiiciuns leaving a technical college each >ear. Unless tne United Kingdom and other countries are prepared to recruit technicians from Barbados withuut any discrimination, a technical college will become yet another burden for the taxpayer to support. In an address to the Cambridge Mimimv school Mr. Roy Lewis specifically spoke of the Went Indies in a general review of the "Man Power Requirements of Big Dominions". "The West Indies", he said, 'probably have a surplus population of 200,000. What are we io do? Wo call Ihem citizens. We complain thai we are shorl of manpower. Wo find that unless we can bring people Into Britain, we cannot send people out lo niamtain those typical links which arc Hummed up in the tendency for men and women of British origin ... to speak of this island MS Home. Are we to allow that link lo weaken? But if wi don't—are we to refuse jobs to those whose passports are marked "citizens of UMC and Colonies" but whose skins are black or hrown?" It is no good talking of a multiracial Commonwealth unless ihere Is freedom to move rnd work within Uml Common wealth. The l'iuted>Kingdom cannot compel other Dominion* to do what she does but there is no doubt whatever th.,t S hc could If ihc wanted to provide greater employment opportunities for trained Weal Indiam.. No other solution to our long term under-employnient problem is likely to be found. Sitting On The Fence lOUIJ I1AI.FOUR of Inchry*;'-, . %  MII m ,p*rch. ih.i .M.T !" units. Light cigarette before rising Stomach rebels. Cough. Not tit. Subtract another five units. Total now 80. ou can call it a good Units drop back to 30 wiys "I think this will .. .uu" Unit, down to 25. Ikwe-'ays "It mad me laugh, anywsyr Units down to 20. Bore X ys,"It seems there was an irlsh%  n with n very clever dog Units tumble to five. (Beginning to • least like panic on Stock KxLook forward to early mornchange.* liore continue. "Of >g tos. Add five pleasure units. t ., ur> e. I can't do the accent." While absorbed In new.paper.. Unit, quiver at uero forget to put tea In pot. nwn, Bui bore says "111 do my best." up of hot water and milk, i jbj -dtg zero. ract (toe units. Total stti: 00. Hooray Find an Idea. Award T n „' T.llr cir ten units After one hours lon,c lalk vork idea no good. Curse and W HY are vou glaring at the throw away. Subtract 20 units. ni-n s itUng opposite in the crowdToUl now 70 ,.,, *„„ taktng vou to lh rind another idea After one You do not even know him. Ife hour', work, seem, hbehou. has ncv „ donc you any harm Curse and throw w.v Subtract Then why tll) vou Urv at hlm? 28 units Find third idea Two it „ not because you hate him. It hours' work. Seems indecent. „ bseause you hate yourself Curse and throw away. Subtract Perhaps you hate yourself beTotal now 30, near cause your work is distasteful. h20 suicidal misery point. ause you have not succeeded in a competitive world, because you have not been smart enough to 1ft yourself out of the rut and leave the drudgery to others. Perhaps you hate the manager at your office because he bas been smarter than you. Perhaps voi, hate yourself for not taking "the opportunities he has taken Perhaps for years you have been wanting to tell him what vou think of him. and hate yourself for not laving the courage to do so. If these are your thoughts, don't Mame jourself for being dunce It Is not your fault. People are born that way Don't blame the manager for being smart. People are born that way too. And how And If you are still glaring at that poor man opposite, don'l blame him for putting hi. tongue out at you. Hi. patience is exhausted. With this new, refreshing angle on your troubles Iry giving him your most winning smile. If he hits you with his umbrella because he thinks you are laughing at his hat, you have only yourself to blame. Someone like you must alwayt b* an ass. Someone tike pou at the bottom of the class: Someone like yffu must alirays take the blame, Muif ohrous be Ihe stepping %  tone trhile ofhers climb in fame. Bur clrrer men. like manager*. who tcorfe by day and niohr. Get chronic indipestioa and If SMTr-es them damn well riB*f. LJT.S. CONGOLEUM In KOI.is f, Feet and t Feel Wide CUT TO VOl'R ll N< I ll MATS ''ll x 9 Ft and Ft. x IS Ft. — ALSO — FIBRE MATS PLAIN AND DKCOKATED I* 4 **lses and OIL CLOTH si WILKINSON HAYNEb CO.. LTD. Successors To C. S. PITCHER & CO. TbOB, 441!. 4487 BECKWITH 8TORES by HMV. Polygon, Colombia, MGM featuring top artists Sinatra .. Como ... Kckstein . Doris Day . Jo Stafford . Beneke . %  George Shearing ... Sylvester .. Artie Shaw. Da Costa & Co., Ltd. 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i w.i inn \ i SUNDAY mwilATE SI \I1A\ SUM ,1111.1! Ik. 1*32 Hill To Amend Gambling Ordinance Why Mr. Eisenhower Won "WANDERER III" SAILS WEST rr**r\ t>" Own OTrnMrtnn PORT-4 ff-SI UN, Hi v Ti with request: NtW YORK. .wght D. Eisenhower h' isues of the campaign, and here the Republicans scored heavily They worked day and night l the American voters th.. Eisenhower was better qualifr than Sli venson to deal Among their campaign ammun fact fhai I i witnes erben Miss was jury. dollars 10 cents an hour. He was " October 27. stationed for two veers in G#election d.iy. Senator Joseph many and Austria after til** war. McCarthy drove hi* own camhe ha* a security of emP<">ig* to a P* !" wUn nalionide broadcast the cost of whici M.000 dollars-had been pan ine violent %  I'm for Ike", be told me. "The not by the oflcial Kepublluii. Young that promoter, have the consent ihk-h Ot, Utok part. i r il lfcl g m lkton ..nlj nine i.j. rLAN FOR IIM1II STAnoNa ^f •**. .. prujnincbt Daniocrattc „C, "La lfc|C2. f """ 1 "„ b 1, """"W" ("> can involor of %  Hawbnadai IK"., StaJS; , h ST £ %  [ %  "•••'* 'l ' namlh.' In,,„rl„ n r. who made %  forlunr SSS^Sork il Annito, i,'h -, ,uon "" 1 a hu ml fraud oul ,.t hU invention h,. u,ld M oUn I^MbUah^arSaaE JClinna ."""'"''"> """ %  coulracu. • If 1 voUrd for my b.l.lnrs., I T^, !" t !" K Sr"2 !" n, WB. badly Orrnorra,, have brought Una auncr bocau...Trinidad will b,"" %  d " > >>venaon. country great proaparity—a false :he,r one ot operations in the I mmiuUl Threat proaperlty prrhapa. Init still proaCaribbean They plan to aat up 2Th. Communist threat, and t !" v T h" %  • %  lot of buildlnn !" . !" "'.""JJ !"!" Tvvi h MMTS the nnd station at UM linucnal the war ,t, Korea ""' on throughout this country. '? Identify Stevenson with some or College or Tropiol AgnrulltiP'. The majority or American vol. Iul """ %  %  •* much lM >"i?'' corruption rampanl under lag at St Augustine. In about a era believed sincerely that Risendrr "" Republicans Rut fve got rniman legtrae There lean up uiv lion. I like Ike. and 1 Hunk we dm urn his umcii I should give th* Republicans a in IUI, in l!M3 I IvliberaUll chance to show what tl.. ., l ,; l communatta on the unT ^a* the 26 year old willing Italian gov-rnm,nt. r i %  ii-rhaim..I englneairrom I^aig„„, br „ u ,ht the Communist Pn. '""''*• <-'llfoniUs. | Togllatt, back from Mos,.., V .m '. mo r."" c ...'' '*** %  ,ow.The"ndld.tureorSU...... to have a militorv man as Preal"* l P* ,f '"•*. "" t!w u M r ' ,t.„f god gecfasraaeaai taaand Bill ihr .mj mghu the little vessel ran sea, and at time* the motion cerwas very -teadlly on her way enattended tainly was violent; sometimes she high, go ''' • l "l that grai a welcome change tolled at' each way, and only Palma li "* for us. for you -ill understand took 3 seconds for the roll from of the c %  inch that as there are only the two of one side to the other. i with L-is us aboard we do get very tired It was a tremendous thrill when look oi fruit when steering is necessary, taking at noon on the eth November that"of Ihc Spaniards where and vegetable* for the Atlantic u turn and turn about with three your low. gr aa n Island of Barbaunl at a price wa -.uld afford, hours at the tiller and three bedos lifte-l slowly out of the sea Vnassealn Is^Ssfd Sl>d The UttW ; by the Ume one has cooked ahead lust about when, and when I J^aEi -tMaeMtMmhemmed in as it Is by 7.000 foot and eaten, navlgted, and attendthe n-vlgator had said (and .,hot. humid and ed to all the things that need secretly prayed) it would appear. windless, so we were not really doing, there is not a lot of time Although navigation by observarbjga after a stay there of left for sleep. But under the selftlons of celestiol objects Is an | VkaiMtrrrr appad away leering twins our life became almoet exact s el WW", on a long ilth October Ixtund foi rnor* ieisurely. In the daytime passage out of tght of land UM Susan cooked elaborate mania, navigator has little or no opporwith we steered In a baked bread and made cakes, tunity for checking the accuracy iaue. which ithe early beginwo i.. l4lu .n on * as while |-was free to navigate to of his work, o 1 for one alway. i i.. ran] north-east trad*, IO tmK down mtu the heart of the .,iy heart's delight, and in our suiter from a feeling of apprev..had a glorious passage south to north-east trade wind as quicaJy spare moments we worked about hension as the Ume for rnaking .. ihc small, unspoilt island of Porto as possible. But although that irte ship, attending to her gear landfall approaches. It is a thrill m the 480 miles in wind u, generally teiarded as beand improving the harbour awnwhich never seems to lose Us 1 2 day* The wind was fresh ID g constant we ran Into a calm n g. We even found time to sit savour no matter how often one ind we carried the whole mainarea and there lay almost motiontogether in the cockpit each eveexperiences It. sail and a small spinnaker; by day less for two sweltering days while ntiig. admiring the fine, empty The wind then freshened a lot h.sun shone brilliantly over Waadeear by gazing sadly at her ocean over which we sailed so and Wanderer stormed along toihe vivid blue sea. and by night own reflection. Exrept for a long easily, and watching the sunset wardthe i-land. Night was upon the stars were clear and the low ocean swell the sea was so W |t n K S usual accompaniment of her as South Point came abeam, '.month that it had the appearheaped up cumulus clouds all and there at last she ran oul pi nnce of oil. and the silence was round the horizon. As the sun the ocean swell which had been profound, ere noticed that parwent down we could see the her constant companion for so 0 nan anet Venus ahead between the HMS. -"id -.1 H o'clock that eveii.i 1'iiiiij. i „f the staysails, while the i.mg she found an anchorage m ne neeaa of BofsK horna, mo on. nearly full then, rose Carlisle Bay. The 2.780 mile paschurch bells and llcsla rockets • %  ,, U irkly up astern. The risk of sage from La Hidma bad taken 20 almost deafening and continues collision out there clear of the days 8 hours. well into the night. steamer tracks Is very small, in Almost at once the police launch But presently the wind rer uc t we saw only one other ship came alongside, and out of the turned; at llrst it was only th* di.ring the whole crossing, so darkness a' Mft musical voice faintest whisper of an air, but „fter supper we used to hang a asked who we were and where Adlal." Then there was the Oklahoma More Harm Than (.ood Kvei)i,iie WCkMlfTfld whether I Truman's immuw campaign trips throughout America would do more good than harm. The result of the election shows that these trips, which were orlglly opposed by Stevenson, did h> month Mower was thc~r %  weal wine i %  xtent th:.t mns from noon to iioatly well over 100 were H %  er managed to return safely to lst being 130. The wind which 'Wanderer** who lay rolling hWhad started at north-east slowly ily in the boy. worked round to vast and we "From Porto Snnto we went to were then able to set our special Madeira where the British resttwin staysails which, when their lents were so kind to us that brace: KM nothing but the happiest tiller. must depend entirely on our ihere came to us across the water rum resources for everything, we the warm, sweet-scented smell of weft) never conscious of a feeling the land. Slowly, as we moved I'liiiiius of thai mountalnoui %  • %  ell For raWMB %  eaflakfiu dayg if loneliness. As the sun shone brilliantly < very day navigation presented no Jimeulties other than those conre connected to the nected with taking observation* moke the yacht steer Mlh lhc sextant when the yacht stations they would be able to ist ration was deliberate), start running now, because the ciats are %  i out of office. But \ .' %  ....iniv WOUKI or aoie so ,.,,,,.,. .„ if-.^. iJ l ,.Ti l ii: i sia running now. because _. predict eruptions in the Carib^,,," 8 "ff 9 *' ~V *"• Unlt ~ Russians could get Us any Ume. have not heard the last of tho •" % %  SS^nS 0 *!. Si!LJ^ .' J Bu. 1 don', behevc *i. STARS nd that Elsenhower would do just that. Tho recent Communist offensive, and Eisen'lower's pledge that he himself would visit Korea, gained him many votes. Change so bright new star on the world's wean. political Armament, Adlal StevenPersorwlllv on. Ourinn UM past three months. Stevenson has fousht the presigamed eounuess dentlal can tie will vot-'s by hu personality lie was .„,,„, lhc nPXt Iour ytun „ un pot only the world-famous Oenomdal larader of the Opposition. %  .II who had the Second Your Individual Horoscope rm si'NDAr, NOVISUI M Hrn l-OOK In th* M>.-1ini, li wlilrti -,IIbirlhd., r ,tn (Irl-iiiiinrgl ni nd IJatnl M-lll' d*rtdr. n.ilhri lt> h a ii.iiii. md "-i.lv. Stsrt at chin rti to mn.irit.ni wu 1 %  r# Hvmi up (>> your bst • ,.' %  -HU inn MI unonuim -,„, Ji ill eve c World War. but his crowd *nse a dmlnk*trat'ion. -. was Urrlflc, and vastly superior ...~. rh ,, rM tne\ and humour to that of Stevenson. He attracted ^ J' %  ^t" fl ^ G enormous enthusiastic crowds in ie .' P OM,bl • IO %  ' ye on the Elsenuslng his hentold you 3. The tremendous desire for a change-any change away frnm the Democratic administration. The Democrats had been in every place he visited, and milpower uninterruptedly for twenty lions were delighted by his cbulvanra. Millions of Americans felt bent personality, his cheerful that. If the party system was to fncndlmcs* and the Immense sunrlee. a HapubUcan had to be charm he put into every wave of elected President this time his hands. Typical of the opinions of milIn complete contrast with lions of Americana—oaruYularlv Stevenson, EUe.il.awfr prornlsfld Jl ,w nd lne "1 P !" B 'dnt Dwig.it young Americans-was that of s lower taxation—u popular prom Ine Eisenhower will hear I lot more voung unskilled worker in a beer He also gained votes In the "> m Governor Adlal Stevenson. brewery In Milwaukee, earning 2 traditionally Democratic southern —L.B.S. The Battle for the WhiU MOV I over, and America breathes a igh of relief. But under its nolitial system, this nation will soon .'•gin to prepare for the oeskgraa sional election of 1954. Betwi wi-e wu>a %  aid m %  Jt NS at to Jl M" %  mseai ami aai %  !-. IHrtminl. pacp l XEW ESSO SERVICE— BARBAREES •i icaatsrl Vsa nlnS IVIH i Restore Youthful Vigour To Glands in 24 Hours Nw Discovary Bri ng Plaaiura* of Ufa to Man Who Saal Old Bofore Thair Tim* Da T— u eMar iijn a. Ms, Ar. um iMaias la i.^inrui iiaaiafl D. rsa J.'ss w6sriass: oinar Say trmm H* astaMsl n>i.iwm boasoaa UM SlnaiT •(>* aniUviBt pJijai tksa aaat tula M BMSW* lor )ea to r. Mas** raw r -s s iheal lt*ar aa4 aniau'ion J VMIMI Vksar Restored TIM aa—JUai ar adtintntf a. ind lb* I Yaflttnl faffrrsfi' gasssWs*! arassaji Daiiaia —>. Ih* vsilq o -.v K !" i !" .r u „i MirT.-lM-' or Nurn 'ti* Uta farlimipoti , %  ugn ot INananSmiair ••HIT* flaii I !" £. ,%  An aoUD.i.1 ph.OO.0. -lift -.-. '- t/ Q i;'. A 1 M rais O* Hi*"****. nM 1H per.,_,!,., fiH i(iMn>M * '"Sraewnj. thai I ,^P5jU, :..! tafi • •nraUH IK. tlaft*. ana* natniHI • ro" aiia %  ii*lll|i la in | n; %  .:, II 'Sl fii ja.ih., da] \t < i i i ...i | ,,... rid fn, the unalt %  %  asm n %  In intns, movip. IIMI t ooroaaa M M ieasvtoi b a tm. tuns%  • hoar you 1 %  so. I Mill I tfMtuia: -I. ua-., Annul church Miwl. I. HKSMaCR %  '•I !• iii. .„ atondarrrul I r hew UM right • I wn Ha-liirinbi-i t I, 111 • i Mm n a i> I*M AST M icaert rarsl -Soina days a.e camv.l aaaiin ti aret otTon th* nht fool, m ih* uylni VI SOB ailwara chsnas part nd •! bneS In ater SMI lataas-l aa l Think u aut, ihrn ennfa with wia* ha*da Daii'l brliuir >,nO. • % % %  • %  n i" your rhuirh I I I'M MIV I la M \m W N iFlnf.i 'ii,H. M v naaas aw •llmulatiiu,' musK M M • %  11 I'l..' xov HORN TO-DAV n asaastatn o! Ulvnl. vrruilllly and coetradlclion. YPM alao can waite limr wham you ITP: into a lullrn iraod Scorplu aoa.i> 10 the %  op. or i T h r-a blat. pntsfU .fi ir pet .now Vl.*. hav. Mil > SUnda. Utrif i, i \„ m -. H fliamrarr. Inn* at tasaJU Wtuiln M 'loar. nail asrn rt -r laaaZ ...ym.l uI a aaiets" U*i..w in MUJSr. M .;n ._ ._i Tai"aii' C a'a>aI. %  asf plj ,, *> %  ••*'*• %  Mi iapa Th. :ii in a ihart tana %  in. lha r.,iora (i-sBaa to aaaa* ir.n ia alo^ai a>l at rvar %i|*ar anal -nalln Doctor Prolsas VLTabs 1 n 0 qtt:mlnl %  a41->no*>i a^ifaan TS V-iSS? aaW Man* a rt a a .Mli ara i M •plnlaai ihat Uw toat Uma-i Um ainoa cuaianM* f VIraa %  *< -t ,a-jUVni TaS. (r*>m m<-' "•.u.i.f aaSar Baa laa IIajan> hurt an 11 St taun/i it-reufn *i Sa4i a,, — •*•>* %  ta .i, ir.i-rat in. Ua. |ritmn.r>a af lift ana *• •.>. • %  • in>tr.ji"-i TA-J.T.SJ ;S tyafitV" -vs. ?' % %  %  • nla linawn as VtUi, t-* U.lafta ratxaaanu IM mxn|M| aat. ant anal UW tsB >inHaa Ouarcuifced Results Guorontead Sa WHiiMir i_ nsw Wrn Iba lantii ar4(.."1 in Vela*, far •>ak anO ar-. WkWmt afcl wi in all saio af ina -..: ihU .. naa Itrrt -ndar as abaaKt. nf cnnip'iutiafncoati tr ... U-'lllg thru about by the .iboul the strangely steauy deck stowing tho snfls, we began to realise that the llrst pert ot our .-adventure had succeeded. The broad Atlantic lay astern. This wag our llrst tropic Island, and %  ., frl-.w ...i.fc .„i ,. '.„ linM.I' Your insuwlioji is invited "The ROVER h • very special type of car, the search for perfection has been unremitting . ." The ROVER has Style, Comfort, Finger-light Controls, Economy . . is simple to park. Built for versatility, this is a four-wheel drive all-purpose vehicle of high performance REDMAN "ii ii iiiin i 44)5 & TAYLOR'S GARAGE LIMITED Ph. 4365 IIIIII.S rot it finvti OK ltll.% X.V/AS OFFER tl PRESTC0LD REFRIGERATORS Starred lor Brilliance of Deiicn aad Flnial, Spangled with a calax> of New Features, Greater in Space. Greater in Grare. Sealed Units with a 9 Year Guarantee. 14, 5. 7 C.ft. All-Steel Body. I 1 ; Cub. It $347.00 I Cub. Ft. BeKular $ 4*5 Now 450.00 7 Cub. Ft. Regular S 575 Now 520.a0 THIS (II IKK 1 \STS TO END "I I>1 (TMBER Wm. F0GAR1T (/*,) Ltd.



PAGE 1

ESTABLISHED 1895 BARBADOS, NOVEMBER 1*. 19M PRICE : SIX CENTS B.T.C. AUTUMN RACE MEETING ENDS Gen. Clark Columbus Wins Sweep: Asks far More Holder Of Ticket \o. l/c/,/ Wa SS 2161 Gets $33,280 MIAMIIO\ IIOHM CHICAGO, Nov. 15. Chicago Ham Times sand on Saturday that Central Mark Clark has asked for three or four more i.r:ik'd SUU'< divisions to prepare ;i new major offensive in Korea. f in the despatch signed u> Frederick Kyh. the newapapei said Clark, Commander-in-Chief in the Far East, requested addi' tlonal forces from the Defer: partment It said "according to reliable source* he made n clciu i that his arm la to prepar* new major offensive asaaMt the | Chinese and North Korean Communists. KM d prelude to his nroooaal Clark told recent An.' In Tokyo that he belfctVM the staiemutc in Komi is severely damaging United Stale* oreMiee. Clark, it ts understood. In*< put the same request to President ] elect Eisenhower, when he later visits Korea I -.Thow.-r would than |. | with an extreme) v awkward deI isinn. On the one hand he I'urtomed to fighting and winning j war the tough way. Clark's pi ns would rormally anpeal to thai Unoulse. On the other hand | howerV .speeches In the recent elMttor campaign stressed the, need to reduce thnuirbcof Arrwrlcn troons in Knrr-n. Th-.t i" why the Pnatdenl el*t cmr.Vi*lie-* his orolec' to train more South Korean* who would re pjarw AMled soldiers. Th m Hid OvV raoviMl me* son." support "in h>h places %  Pn1 m inrl'idi'" th i* %  < th'i>* %  --* tnr>rx>*ed to dtocual the .-n•• ...,ib %  <•!• %  • %  %  o'SiHi. i.fallaal i t.^la. f IM n.. \l„ I MS I U lbs was again BsM the large).t ling. West Indians Will Gel Work In Florida Sir George Seel To He Chairmen W.L Conference A negotiating ilttif of th. Hoard ha* had The biggest upset foi III till VT0ffttalB| H over nine furlong? which *H %  wn t.y Mi S A Hl.irn hctle's Old b 13 fillv F.tvlady The i\.ii-mutuel paid M.BO to I win and the Forecast paid $184.80 on UM nratedj-Pvppar Wine combination. Th. Field-Sweep abas ptid some I gnoo prizes having re chert th.' 1(1,000 mark on one occasion and the *00.00 mark on th %  SI,000 m >rk eil m the last race of the Meet %  i H mdlcM Six Win* Ci Mfu] 0*Ao* fur the meeting was Mr F | I With six wins. He incident ll\ headed the lit of trniners with •even wins to his credit Hon'sV V C. Rale and Mr J T. Fletcher tnlnad rour winners em-h while ihe most su-eful Jeofces ara| Yvonet wdh Big wins. Frank O'Neil rime rcxt with The Police R.>nd po'*'unities of work during ihe been taken down by D mc< un;: ind the rhatnnana.np -l) 1 ***?"}: „ who h a reduced the lead held rwnj the 'our memt. It !• probtJWe that the numlwra by Ihe rest nf 1hHeld. • CommaMOOJ**"f*tt ?* %  Un * States will There were some qua* exNetherlands, the 'c inaufnci.nt to meet the full rechanges of positions a: I um and the UnlUM 'H'.remeiiLN of ih, Honda growand coming into the home era and this may well giv.opporatfOtch, Twinkle ,h„!i.nged Blue The ilrst aaOBlOg, of the Con, •" > t* ">• I took over mid way ferenc* M .' livid in Barbados fn : IM1 uiMer the chairmanship of itv b.. Htj Frank Btodbl i tiiiil %  a turn of a British .-i Br.tsM lulrrni ll. The foil .vi lg Ofnoei i nf ihe Ceve' • Welfar-tnfT • On Page 16 te %  %  Hori i Students In Cairo Riot Announcement On I!-llomb Expected WASHINGTON. Nov 15. [nfo, nod aouro ai s^id offtci nmtlrin^'.iMi of history's lii hyi.rogni iKimb explosion i: pecttd shortly — porhapi I>residni Truman ly c lii.miiivst Tho iiimonslralion* ended with rival f Lieut. Colonel OaaaaJ Abdel Nasser, key member ><'. the army headqunlegated by Premier Mohammed —II'. CAIKO. Nov. IS. Ifioting broke out among scvera i Cairo University student congregating for Martyr's Das were reported m)iin.i. The hght started when a Moslem Brotherhood raemb-r Haasan Don UjrUag that Bfypuaiai who fought m Palrat estine agrflitil the Jtw& and in Hit "• Canal Zone against ihe British i %  aii open war % *t on "Red Communism Energy torndred Communmt youths rottod In mission dee. not do u (irst reply no re etionau %• no FaaThe souicc sugK-,tcd that Mr C |„. wt demand the rel. DTruman mur wta Tuwdaya rol of ^micai meeting with President-elect B0i ahoo ihe occasion for the anticipated announcement. Many in this .it Fniwetok proving |TOU UB H I Pol illc already hav; reported in NugXiih t0 -tlend the cr nm c. letters home that an H-bomb ''** h h .. _, h ,. r.ovemmem was detonated on or .i Novemh r 1st. Ever s.nce the first of thev lofters wapublished in 'Los Angeles Daily" %  we*' has been under ircmenoous pro*-j sure (o say something. So far it j has refused, relying on the past custom of issuing announcements I about Ei.iwitok testonly th %  tests were concluded. As sorr.f official obscroi this autumn's test series are now bock home, it may be inferred that operation. %  !* %  OVW Mad lhal oxocufl minent— U.F. 44 Servicemen Die In Crash TOKXCX N"v. U I Far E.st Air Forces a,d servicemen most of them n ing from rest leave in Janji kill-d when .• I'.S. Air Pttroa C 119 "FlyiiiR Boxcar" crasi.r. a mountain near Seni:l T^ne '.win engined plane ran into the 2.000 foot mountui Mrday only a few minut.from its destination, an airport m the Saoul area. A ground mid there were %  The toll was the largest in any military pi...-. the Korean war started. Thirty seven of those aboard wore military personnel returning to the war Zone after a five day : rest and rehabilitation KaBW Japan. The other seven were I crewmen. -U.F. 'hstretch to Unttfa llrst and egirter her second win of the %  Pn Prix who hn.l eomo from rushed through %  Ii at A On Page 4 Vietminlis Renew Attacks HANOI. Indo-China. Nov. 15. Communist-led rebels opened a' 'third front" in the rapidly expanding Indo-China war with hree bloody but agaMoaaoafiii attacks against Hungyen, 28 miles %  unilheast of Hanoi. The French and native garrison < in the lower Ited Itiver to.vn m.nsged to beat back screaming Vtetniiih attackers with artillery and mortar before they re.i i boroad win < nlaiipann at BBwn'i outskirts. Losses on both aides were undisclosed There were mounting indications that Frcneh t.tnk raiders. | who pierced 43 milrs thrmigh Vielminh lines norihwetl of Hanoi towards their Hed River fortress uf | Yenhay may lie jrepanng to pull • I F. UNITKD NATIONS, Nov. 15. THE UNITED STATES declared to-dav that it was "seriously concerned" over ihe racial conflicts in South Afnca rid favoured a fulLdisruraion on the issue Charles A. Sprasu*.; "... m* at a special Political .Camrruttor said ihe United Shite* would oppose a move by the Union of South Africa lo declare that the United Nations are not competent evon to consider" charges that M of Indiah origin are beiiiH diseriniinaled. James Street Harvest Festival Ths Harvest Faattvsl Her Vices Of the J.me fltre.-i HuUiodi t Ciurch ari to he h-ld today, Sunday, No*. 16th The morning sarvice tn .1 ut!l be broadcast will commence at 11 a.sn. and the preacher will be the Rev. K. E Tower-. B A h II In tha afternoon at I p.m Uiere will he a Harve*t DtinooitraUon. "The Things EasenUal'* and alto n prenltlon ceremony nf Flower Basket*. The eve nlng service at 7 p.m will )>e conducted by the Rev. Tower* On Mo.ioay evening at 7 30 p in there Will be a repetition nf the song service "The Tknig< Essential" together Witt) other lUmo. Ton are cordially invited to %  teams] JJ taoat %  arvlai. DETAINS FLYWEIGHT CHAMPiONSHiP TOKYO Vov. is. t fifteen %  %  Marino to-night to retain the' world BFWOtafal 1K>\ :., ploruf-ip. i t'.F. i in \ in II i\ mi HOMi: sunn II Till KIII.O or MORSFS aa Usej bunched ui the heane stretch "Fluffi Huflli-.". Mr. J. R. Edwards' bar flll>, eventoall* woo b* towards -Taoor" aeeood. n the November Handicap, half a l-ngth. with Mr. at. D. Hlaid 'we do not feel therr •on lo any lasting solution for racial pn Mems short of full par* iclpaiion of all races in the life >f a nation. Yesterday we heard vi eUiTjuent delea!e ..i I %  end from our Declaration of Indepondeaei l hat was and Is a .charter of our liberty." Spragut said the United State* I has "grnv. i ,rrnlnn the uaflia and Paktstati to set %  up a 'G>c.i Olflees' Commission |'II .study the South African raco roolern %  tal I %  %  i tnrnlaalon would not be j.i "pra"tical means of ulng our nfluooce." i The United States strongly (avours the "proposal ofTered by Iceland. Denmark. Sweden and j Norway which would rail upon jail, member Stales to bring iheir policies Into eonformlty with (heir lihliKnbon under the charter lo mi %  te the nl.scrvancc of human f ;i!.'!:ui.enl.il fret doms —U*. English Girl Shot In Kenya NAIROBI, Kenya. Nov. 1. AuahoritaM laid an English K.rl was shot und wounded in tUe with ihrec Alt ...i Ught creeping out IrODRI of a home where :he aval vlalUBJ m Nycn. Miss Barbara Barclay, 21, shot i"i.idei rushed to her l I i>ers of the fam ly In the housi 'lso seized iirearms and opened | lira at the fleeing Ad .. daughter of Huah Bar.rla.. well known British farmer of .Mi fining..! near Nakuru was tjken to hospital and was reu> he comfortable. I ho was staying with the family of Charles M. Fe,nan dot Secretary of the Kenya Ro.al Agricultural Society. —u.r. Antigua Celebrates Prince'* Hirthday 'riom fn\i rrwn *• nvapqucirnit ANTIGUA I'tince Charles' birthday. 14th N\ %  mhcr. was celebrated by a public holiday. A "dockyard re|OW' wiih a magnificent historic soffanl i n ored by ttS-K-M-IV ,f Rnglish Harbour was nan nf the day %  % % %  %  peopti ourneyed to Nelson's Dockyard hoy taw the peiind of ladies, genUemen and i the lfHh century. V Iscn himself wag portrayed in throeacaneo In his late I v tailed Antigua, secondly his meeting with I.v1\ Hamilton and thirdly Neb.*. leaving his dockyard in 1*05 for of Tvafalgar. %  .'ist time in history %  boat the Retreat at the dPchy ar d grounds In the C ro aenco of His KxceUency and u dy gUackburne. 300 Dollar HO1IVM. I Iiunudlu London Aliporl waa ,|eed :'in>iifhnul the nlghl -vr. I Democrats Broke Promise Mr. Dewev^*r*3iUc3t Cabinet Post Presidenf-eltH-t Kisenh rule in tic l()rlhc('nlln^ AiliiunisiiiiiK n after a lengt B Dowoj ol N. m Y..rk. [Mirlanl %  or Thomas A Tru<> And txart History |..d., on piae mnih. .hdvjcale besins Mrlalku. lion of Ike Bl-tl MiaUrv er. OrlblM a/ UIK rsiano — K i hard Llgan's "Trise *nd I \.n lli.ir. of ih isiinrl of Barbados. The serlallmatluii af a hlsI *| published as long ago as liS7 la %  r-lher unu<.ul %  tep for a nruspaper l like, but we believe that • h* r-ubllr uf B.rbado* is anloas la knnu the hislot) uf II-. .HI. id Hal .i.„ I.latan his nai been r 'pruned for over iwu hui.died and liH* goafg few 11,. ,<. duns ha\e had Ihe |iaerlunltv lo read Ihls buok To make It easier fur Ihe modern reader lo read Ugoaft Hi which u %  un %  11> wrlllen In somewail outdated i II ii %  Mr. I. II i.ilInmodernised ih.spellli.a .xiept wherr iillilnha ll would spell the %  1I.-I ol errt.in paaaages I i Mr %  Ipency of %  ..: %  The eunfereii• Ute yesterday, led M hower's four remaining days here dear of any announced top vVashln K lon Tuer-.i Mr Truman and Cabinet members %  four hours at hi•eat with H [Hililic.ni %  | 1,10 playod %  larta irlnatni rtorninatHii leef Mr Eisenhower aald nfleiw ; .rds tli.it he found Mr "availability" as advisor bt .|. %  tun more than gratlf! r.ie." # In disclosing Ihe |>art lhal Mr llrwey hsri agreed to tat Kisenhnwer Admintstr. %  lOOt imph kj l v.t the U S spent 42.O00.fi00.0IHl m Kurope —u.r, PO| I '-Of SI'AIN. Nov. 15 Thi Legislative Coumil iftei .iting for several hours. i N by Honourable T. U ll il r.ler calling for the removal of i !•' William Savory. from his office on i it Adoptkd was the amendment b) Honourabla Roy Joseph. Minister ol Kdueatinn and Sncinl Serviee i hie* tiui |ht i i % %  hitvtni Donftdeivo in "tin m| i if iot|iartiaMv ..I Mi n.e sp^.kei who vewofad in. 0 .1 III favoui of his deputy h \ tlford Slnanan and ddsiri :!" afobabl was applaude< majority of ll elun ll a unplooaanl dloi u (lie DWU H bj nlao ggraad to | t| n i months ui in %  %  %  I. blo A Fl Jamas, mrmliei | ing appointment of %  eon ii i the changes in ih %  %  • 'ui i %  . bora MI i i ment was tht had um elapsed for a test of th IMMi constitution. Jon* mont waa moved to ;. motio-i h> lion Itutler whi'li < i IConslitlltloi i elle. preeentai Besides rc-opct.i •an Mi KN. naowei Cacnnei choices ihe aanouncoment on Mr. Dewey's unovailabUlty for the cabinet opened g m •t .-iMiul-tion about the part he %  %  vill play in Republican polio lei r IOCH %  di.iwer tor Mr. Dew | u ie preI.TH-ele, ,'s .ijn" had innounced befoiehand P i ohoerar*! f<>rt)i< ., % %  ,,. %  n (! .,, K"rc„ would be broaehe.1 It was emphasized in advance h-l Mr. Dewey's advice would oacarn "peUcj Butten" rather ban details regarding this trip. One such "policy matter" subheavy speculative arag % %  qtieatloa of fon Ibb i H id prisoners in Korea. Dip','" '' %  """' I hnvi riiinon will ask Mi Risenhow.-, %  i f \A'JO Qtm Reavh Defence Goah I.ISllON. .Nov. 14. Hattnoo a lew i,ek t. Paris lodaj af.e.I'oituiauese [hat what w found IT. Lasboa ore N A I < coul I %  •• Com%  lueh a spin", of %  •fortunl'i NATO mi %  ( full paj ta o g a f i have complele con6dCl.ee that the task assigned to the Portumii-e i IP.O.S. Council Say No One Good For Mayor PORT-Or-SI'AIN, Nov 15. I Hlggnt local news here this week has been the Inabilltv ol ih. Peri-of-Spam fity Council tc. •l*ct a Mayor lor the 1952-53 tarn The QeunU met tht% morn"g for the purpose of electing M.iw,, „nd Deputy but In the process of the election, attain aed every member includniK Ihe present Mayor of the 20-rnemb i body, who is willing to accept r'.< lure to choose .. | largely due to the fact that most or DM members with u foUowuig on the Council are deteiirnneu i "' the lily's chief CXreutiVe foi Uoa yar. This poses a legal question whether ihe Council can hold another meeting for Ihe election of m Mayor. The matter was adjourned to I %  order to obtain the legal opinion of Hon I,. C. Hannav for the Cor.sorat.on. %  I ;oi*hile. in accordance with the Corporation ordir.ane<\ thn Mayor remain. ,n office until successor is elected COUIK illgi George Cabral, of Portuguese descent continues to hold the office. There is considerable speculation In political circles whether he can continue *• the city's Mayor for the next six months because of the argument that the Council has made a decision to-day that nooe of IU members were fit and proper" to hold office and can only rescind IU own resolution within six months by unanimous vote at %  mooting at which not less than 5 osansbera are present. DEVONSHIRE Trade Rapraaental.y, I C. L. Glbb, Co .Ltd.. P.O. lo, U. .,d,.l„.n • %  rb.do.aw I



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PACK SIXTEEN MAIiAV ADVOCATI SUNDAY NOVEMBER It. 1M2 The Waterfront Was Quiet Yesterday £4^000 Needed To Save Golfs Walker Cup Sir trSO/gV 8*J To Be Chairmrtn W.I. Cmifrrvnce By James Goodfellow 1 Ki KIT KOH unloading of the remainder of schooners cargoes, the waterfront experienced a comparatively quiet Only „n, MMU. .n the tarbotn Ihe ngZHSTSjFm'ZrSZS Saguenav Terminals steamer Sundial, which arrived in poll UA* I of ur w.uker Cui> from &.< I %  I Pi ifteniooii while thr auxiliary and Hyde, cup teatm every (our schooner Rainbow M was the only achooner to arrive and jJJ^SJjo *"• % %  ' " iron Tiimdad u nder Captain Gilbert Mark-. ...,, mght i^,,,^ UrltlBh matturs no i 0 ihe Kilt-i mttt WMm with chat the • FI-MH Pace l %  t Hastings llouw will b* S U George niNWitego B. y are "".} | A Grossmith. O.B.E., mania Admln'striitive Secretary to DeHon'bUvi-lopmenl and Welfare. who AMIRO;. will Ml ;.s n United Kingdom will -., missiontr in the absence of GnaUcy AdamV •o the British C'oHon'tl. Jamaica. m substitute for Mi I] :he remaining vwa % %  r idle and their rrewa llf^lmti Pi ( .|.|,, irtunity of mending X1IAFUUII %  Ittlllt Least* 01 H I \L 0AAOO %  .HI,. ( V r.'iminals linar in port from Montreal on Friday afternoon with general cargo for the Island. .* I K T ,lom P w>n Colonial th c Co..-.. Attach.in the Hntish EmhHtA ConfereiHv in Wah ngton, who is unable to Add be present; Mr. Philip HewfrMB*... Pt,'' Mvrtng and M Y Pioneer Dies In His Sleep COL. NATHAN LEV1NSON. Club in Marion, Maaa. (September A —6). while the U.S.A proftisionals come to Wrni worth | i I-IM coal U thc Atlantic crossing. Once our players reach the DUMf Mdt iney *i e Uie guests of their rivals. When the U.S.A. sides come here, we are the hosU. The Hrituh Professionals Golfers' Association are striving to J. Hallow. AuiiUnt EducaM.,nlr[„ II... .,„,, Foot Mth Healed in 3 Days %  %  %  4 .l .5 %  ie.il to %  '/-','/,'.v,' / ',v,'.*,',',',v,v,*,'--,-,-,v-v/,v,',*,','.'.'.',;','.',',; GIVE SANTA A RING! *<'o head of the Warner Bros, sound put Ryder Cup finances or ThU cargo included a largo department and a pioneer with the sounder basis Thev hone that luinbf. canned Warner family In developing the Londoners ,n their flnl wSrMckM MM >no other laikinp motion picture, died in his tunny to see thin mtema^iuii .1 01 general CVga. sleep nt his Toluca Lake home n.alch. will pay MMflinTj under (he comHe was W. oo#9 ;it Weutwortl. raand ol Cook and is Cot I,evinsnn began his cam(unsigned to Plantations Ltd. at thc age of 14 as a wireless and {6,000 would be avnilahlc'fi.r •clegrapiter At the time of his th.1955 match in America CARGO FROM TRINIDAD death he was International!) faif llm budget works out our mous for his work and innovations urofauionaU would h*. IK. 'MM The W ton schooner Roiabou; i n the Held of sound. ^ ,' ri( nm atour world •starWith thr late Sam Warner, ne Thc HOV.IL a nd Anrient rhsm *. T.tnidad, worked .0 bnng the first sound, pionshipTimUtef have hSK The schooner which Is under musical score, to the mrtlon picfins week tla unle,, ...^V.n ,f Captain Gilbert ture screen ..1 "Don Juan', which !,"l omlrVutim, S md. h^^J ..-. resented to a critical Nes. Xbs^ the WaTker rT. .Mil.. theatre audience on August m .y%ea CUP m,t|ent in charge of Production, and Major Albert Warner, V 'lent in New York. Abandonment would be deplored by the whole golf world.: 'Hie 2,000 clubs asked to help 10 giving £4.000 will no doubt I make ready response. It seems to me that a scheme might be set up within the framework of the Golf Unions, by which funds are always assured The Royal and Ancient commillC can draw on funds from the Amateur championsh i p~ Ihey ire likely to allocate more I than £1,000—but profils from the j >poi, < hampionship are not available leaving for Jamaica on Noveaark ier 20 Th. Itemainder of the r.ariv will travel with Sir George on November 22. The two remaining United Kingdom Commissioners, who v/lll be present at the O and the Commitision Meeting i n FROM ALL QUARTERS a> 1 r..:,. Page 1 the pawnshop business, lu first State pawnshop will be opened in a suburb of Rangoon this month. New Vaefc: Comments by th*V 'S.ven Butchers of Broadway"— Nc* York's leading dramatic errlKa — on Kothenne Hepburn's peifurmance in Shaw's play "TIK Million a iress" Include the following: "Beautiful, radiant, vital and not very good" —"A vivid, lively, one-woman show played with humour and a curious id of beauty" — "Mrs ll-pburn Mr* n K A.itNlxoderm W9W Skin TrouM HOHMIU&. COUUU >OI GENERAL CERTIFICATE o) EDUCATION CAMBRIDGE SCHOOL A HIGHER SCH CERT. % WOLSEY HALL. OXFORD ^5= IM>NT KA1I. TO OBT YOl K r \TR1KS FOR THE hn Ion but tour." •NoNappie r I Rash/ ^ r T'_„ J„ nPa.11-— I- N 'plajrera have been nomlI raae l alks in %  "••". %  afw* wwi.. ho !" t Final Stage big golf engagements this I %  aaa->n for business reasons, Is to I'lay m more events next year, no doubt wifh an eye on the! Walker Cup match Sunningdale Club can muster one of the strongest teams in I amateur golf, in their side; against Cambridge, and Oxford, 1 they had three former Knglish champions—H. G. Bent ley, L. G C*rawl and G H .Micklem, I all players On the plus one 1 mark. The others range from scratch to four, LONDON. NovcmbT 14. Reliable sources said the AnfloArgcntine trade tolks in Buenos now entered their final The Hue is to 00 paid in seven sli ^ p nm lne onl ouunonaing days or one month s Imprison, lloh | cm u he Arger.tire request rnont with hard labour. Ismay fnr rIOUlt f JC n ltkB up to the OnfrHh appealed. nuximum of £20.000,000 In Griffith tol.! thc court that formed sources said the luestion while she w.u* on her way honr 1 of amounts of meat deliveries to on Military Ruud. St. Michael on Britain for thc forthcoming year Kovemher 4. the defendant beat and also the price have been (h T hull's plzzlc on her agreed upon. 1 Jinbridge ha\e lost only one body because umet>ody had t..M When it became apparent that or ln ,|r 'our engagement t this him that she had taken up one the main obstacle to agreement rm ""e captain, D S. Blair, cf his ducks. was the Argentine request for nas lx of last year's tatta ggdj credit facilities, British Ambasabout a dozen new players of r. 1 i .:i 11 IN ACCIDENT ador Sir Henry Brartshaw Mack ' standard to choose from. > requested assistance from the r.xiure list before the meeting Rdward Taut, a 17-year-old British Government to hasten w,lh Oxford at Rye on March mechanic of Jnckman. St. negotintions As a result the *"— 2l include* matches with Si Michael was involved in an government sent two officials George's Hill. Royal Worlington. accident with a motor car on from the treasury and board of Walton Heath. Worplesdon. West Wcstbury Ro;d about 930 a.m. trade with late instructions. ,l and Berkshire. !• was treated al the The present talks regarding the faddy lime, winner Hospital for n rut on his foreterris of a trade and payments head. %  M I to MOCOad the one expiring At the time of the Incident laf! summer were initialed in TaJtl was riding a bicycle. n .i July Differences hetween Ihe two sides however were at FULL FROM MCTffOU %  -t so wide that progresa 'owardi nn ngreem"nt was exWimton Carter of Carringtnn Iremely slow Village, S". Michael. .irl.iiiie ft lost yoar and n few this year Returning were: Arthur ApplcFreiich Frotosl \''.mission Of Spain T-•! dnv.. chip. I tMtlt. 4. 11 <5II idi 1 ult S. II 'in >d> • S-lion. I putU 3 11 iSU yndi 1 dlrva. 1 putt, ]. 14 it. • i{' • iii artvas a-iro. s puiu 4 in |H< vdi.i airon >ard pull 1. II drivr o*d(* ion pull 1. IS i*W yd. i tStm *-iio. l puiu 4--a*Mai st. •v."MARt-H "HlHtair* OVtHTfWE-oarrmiBtaXsjCTsOM -MflrMtkmi MrffiartM'' INTtCHMIXZO -rrom lh* i "Cavallrra MuMlrana" •Um 'W.UT MuMr TWO nr< ra Mjmn i IM mm II.m ,., pnrtl ai-Mh. Kua*. MTDITATION "Thin .•••> %  I ORATOHIO Tli* Hr.miH -r* IPIIII. Hd HYMNS • A M IVBIM mv wul ihe Kir* Ti l-.ru !• nn SI OOD SAW TUB SjVKBM rheylt Dp It E ve | mm % % %  .JTO'.'.BEI\R> PUT AWAY A Pl<3 VIAL. JUST BEFORE HE TOOK OFF C-4 HIS CfSS-COUNTRy FU6HT — %  IV. (iinm y HalloJ ..% %  — --;.--.-;; %  —, SO VJUO ACTS SERVED PWST, Fty.CTICAuy AS SCO-J AS THE PLAHE LEAVES THE SKOyJC ?CURP!) STD\V3EKKy,C= CUSS.' VIM nvuhw KM l'mlcw (Mmn>r.-< BTICf batn • baO< and M rv(T j h*n. 4>Wf iMta >'* indj < • %  % ..%  : .1. '..:.:.:. (uticura OINTMENT' B.W.I. B.W.I eaNABlAN III VilM, OIL IM /./.I I III.MI.SI IN THK MAIL UY NEXT SATURDAY'. 22NI) \OVKMBi:lt. I9S2 WHEN THE CONTEST CLOSES %  OOSafl 4 HOWE I.TK. FOR NORTHROP & I.YMAN CO.. LTD. v\n m: KBPUES GO TO THE HOME PRODUCTS DEPT. for BAI.ATA NOVELTIES STEEL BANDS COCONUT TREES DONKEY CARTS FRUIT SELLERS MAUBY SELLERS WOODEN NOVELTIES .'.'OATS SELLER WOMEN DONKEYS S3.no \M 1.92 lb <)6 $1.20 72 1.44 mr '-l,.!,!,,,, ;,,,,,,, %  „,... v „ ,,,„. CAVE SHEPHERD & CO. LTD. 10. II. 12 & 13 Broad St. woww w in iit u WA*w*M's,v.:w.:v.y Colgate Chlorophyll Toothpaste DESTROYS BAD BREATH lltstaMttftl In *• iDsMth. Police Band At Esplanade By the kind permission of ColoPARIS, Nov 15. Tho lively political debate over Spain's candidature for tho United whalte. Joseph Ltaaoombe. Juntos Nations Bducatlonal. Sri* ntnir ,,,-..i Karnes. John BelBrave. flliwr ''l'ur-1 Org.n.iatlons wjrvivllest. Edwin lliiynes. Joseph Al"* S'urday with iu rrrmn leynt. lUlpb Bu h-ll. Joseph gl protesting her adm.HSion Stephen llelgrave nnd ?. he ^neral tconference of 58 inaJoscph King-. '^ m n *;h. 1c ceoUnued debate llv tn klmi |(inlllfMon of C oio,n 1 1 1 yea / p U.N.E.SC.O rnx>rt nf R< ^ M (hllm o.B K. Com ; Th. Hiaiorny mere saiisdrd i"t plans lor the future misMoner of Police the i'nliic with conditions in the USA The drive against the global g^ 0 ond ledIbv Sat V Archand hoped lo be able to return Ageno's budget developed amon K S?lI icndcl the f*mwin or" at -me future date. Ifftl delegations led by Hrit.in B r i mme n 0 i r m usrc a? the Day St Edwin Hnynes who worked In and Australia The first open Cfc p !a nade this .Mning beginnitn, said thot in his case warning of tlufight over a t 4 45 D m ttanl Wr renr unsuitable UNESCO's builgel tentatively Mrdid not like the food and t at 19,014.866 for 1953 and accom.r.cdalion was also very $10,776,440 came Frida> from IlrllbM aln's Minister of Education M.S.* James Barnes, a worker from Florence Horsburgh She said Milwaukee, said that he enjoyed her delegaUon had been Insnrnetvcry much his stay In the USA ed to "look critically"' at tho I: ... %  Howe i to rook ( % %  himI'N DEACO pt 'r.niiii, lud BUd • elf :ind he could choosr wher get The Australn n .Irlegate ever he liked to live. claimed that U.N.E.S.C.O hod exOther workers from Wisconsin landed itr staff initeaO of reduedtiagrccd with Haynes They said ing it in time of financial stress. th:it they were well treated l'i* r^P^J Hf >^r A ssssfiDaossflLKl %  %  i. Nara Is Iha'taagla pewar of 4ssBMa)kjyR to destroy had braatb orltciruiliu? ia Ilia mouth I Colgate Chlorophyll Toothpaste in moat osaaa acts quickly . acts IMoroughly.. .nod the purify ing net inn UuU for hours' Keeps your brratb sweat and fnssh lunger! FIBHTS TOOTH DECAY! Kvery time JOB an Collate Chlorophyll TWhpasta —•specially nght a/U* anlinrynu act nfalnat tho J as Uu ctivB ackla (hat ara a cauas of tooth daosy . anuaUy kelp re* *-rd tbair formation: CHECKS COMMON GUM DISORDERS! Now! Tho FuH Benefits of o Chlorophyll' Toothpaste in o New, Exclusive Colgate Formula! IVI LITTLE EXTRAS . YOC LOOK for them in a Custom-Tailored SI'DT ... fine materials . qaallty linings . rasv drape and fit. WE HAVE a wide rholee of ODBSBSBS, CeillsMI and Itraign* M\ m TROPICAL and heavier I weights. i WON'T VOr COMf In Uti loik around ? *" r n n BSV^f X A MAFFEI I ^5 SUIT ? MAKES A BIG DIFFERENCE. New Colgate buna* *ou %  ondar>orkis chaxopLvU ka lha Rnfart ohtorosthyU loolhpaata that 14 yaara of • %  partaBoa tan ctaata . ColgaW Chlofophyll Toothpaatal Nalura 1-ra.lf mak. .Uorophyll aad puU It In all grseo plaaU to •nablo them to live and grow. But acianotrnuittmakdown thai nat lira) GhlorophyUaalo a uaabW, rfTi cUvaformtiaalrr-atWuWi'cA/aroj^ySB)— before It can help you •fainat bad braatb, loolb daaay. BSlSaBsoa gum disonlara. TL 11' wliv "•>!>" ri|*Tirnrai ajxl skill in rraatma u n>ltuva formula k uapon.oii lo you. Ia Colgaia t'liloT<>i>l)v'.l Tooihpaala you gl ihe hanaflta of I hoar wat*r•olubla .-Klor.'phvUim In a aafa, la-aa-al farm! for *ni Wp %  (.in.i had braath i"i|i".iiiatg %  > dtp mouth . comMann giun dianrnVra . tool Ii Vcay ... law ColgaW Ct^ueopbyll TootD tp aata aftar oaiing. Il'a the fi-r* faroropVv/. foolapaif* I la. wiarlar* larajaat makar tif quably l' ntifrioaa* can produce! Taala ohow ehlorophvll promoiad healthy gum llaaueo. Now ColraU* Cl>l->ni|)li)llTa*iill ic help you car* for sore, lender guma. NEW GREEN TOOTHPASTC Tested and Guaranteed bv COLGATE! GIANT SIZE — 79e LARGE SIZE — 47c. YOU LOOK YOUR BEST YOU FEEL YOUR BEST AM> THE PRICE YOU PAV IS THE PRICE ITS WORTH "Top Scores In Tailorine" P.C.S. MAFFEI & CO.. LTD. Variely too...! A whole thrilling shopful of Xmns ideas. f.ir yoti. Sir!... for ynu, Madam! And very definitely for ymi. Kiddies' K. R. HUNTE & CO., LTD LOWER BROAD STREET Ph 5136 ManeSoan <;ifl Typr\iri.ciI'omh & Brush Sols Walckaa & chinn Elprtriral Appli TONS' — Toys! — T...-' fin OJi&s — £co/tomiAe . USE . BOWRANITE wTicoititosm: P\I\T The Relentless Enemy of Rust The Proved Protector ol Iron and Steel QOH FARTHEST -:LASTS LONGEST One Ration will caver 700—1,000 sq. feet, one coat. Stocked In KF.L>. OFIFY, BLACK m tin, ol imperial I THONG 44.",B AGENTS: WILKINSON & HAYNES CO LTD. >>aaaaii n a<,aaaa iiii ii iii iiii i fi i m



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PAGE FOUR SUNDAY ADVOCATE stMlAV. NOVEMBER U. 1S8 BROOKLAX CHOCOLATE LAXATIVE C os^' M, : ^& ^^L w\ OrXW :co. aS^*i Here Is the idol Uunve for adults and children. Ur,.*Us locta tad tastes like JCIKIXU* chocolate and relieve* even lbs %  MM ttubbifn constipation quickly, pleasantly and irH-rvHjghly. Banishes Constipation Overnight Chosen without question by the world's most fashionable women B.C.L. FACE THEIK STIFFEST OPPOSITION EVER By a S. CWPIX TKIMDAI) COLUMNIST WOULD DROP BARBADIAN PROS. T I,E Barbados Selectors havechosei. a very strong team to meet the Barbados Cricket League learn in the annual B.C.A -H C L. flslure They could have p-ld the League no greater compliment, and I must express profound disagreement with a brother scribe of mil 1' ."'l.•!'*'*.. £ .'"*, vl w lhmt ,nJ PPrtunitv ahould have bcci. >TU*d by the B.C.A. for experimenting with promising talent in my view the object of this fixture is to te-t thr relative strength A in.Barbados Cricket League and although it might give rtee to ible f crime of some fru. trot ion on the part of those who '-ve been for acme yean now on thr vcrv threshold of selection In in inland XI yet the main purpose of the fixture must be served. 7 hose who have followed the progress of League Cricket over the past ten yi ars with some attention to detail will no doubt agree it the very composition of the Barbados team constitutes an out tiding monument of achievement and fruitful industry on the Dart ndcrTeview P'""""* 1 n d played League Cricket for the period B.C.L. SHOULD BE PROUD \VT"AT Association would not feel proud to have nnaved against \ C ? C .* lP i'u f H w J* pU u U li? n and "P*rtive talent of Everton kes. Conrad Huntc. Frank King, C. De Petza .tut O sw*t, 7. {e Bartakj, Cricket League" hai.done" ffii an ASCI?: tion had given this Ulent to Barbados Cricket Association cricket? The fact that the B.C.L. ha, been able to do twTii55 pondingly weaken their team but their contribute will not be gauged by the results of this match. I have already advocated two of these fixtures per season and then one of such fixtures could be earmarked for experimenting with KIEV... 1 ** 11 ^ %  . '' Xam P 1 *' must *Ve* that players like Tranl. 1 hiUips and Keith Bow en of Spartan, Brickie Lucas of Car lion and young players in that category would then have been provided with the scope for establishing any claims which they undoubtedly have for inclusion in an island eleven. A LOOK AT THE ISLAND XI W ITH regard to the island eleven itself It Is obvious that this Is not the best available island xi that can be put Into the field or should l be more explanatory and say that seasoned players like Wilfred Farmer of Police who performed with commendable individual credit against Jamaica. Horace King and Adzil Holder of Empire and Gordon Proverbs. Denis and Eric Atkinson of Wanderers have all staked their strong claims for Inclusion, not only on their form for thp season but on their performances in recent Intercolonial fixtures. i to senior cricket AUTUMN MEETING AA/AS ft Free* Page I ga\< • Lght of the second place N igfl lbs. Coluni! %  Itlue (iia by %  a length, and pounds I • md Coll'i lengths bed leton e..< %  I and five TH'KNTY-TlilKli RACE pounds ovarweighl .V,.,tLulH.-Uira*. ***" ''' %  *•* Bew Croag Bow Vt..r thing rla-tetcaa. was left hat-footed, and Three ware scratched from fcl UUs furlong event for Class B and Co i umDU s leading that order, and lower, leaving a Bil I ,1 m,. ,„,),.. l( WM stBJ Assur[n-The-Air, who won ance and Columbus, but up the over this distance on Thursday stretch past the in run away style, was liven a ,,., ., top weight of 1281b. Tiberian positions were. Assuram-. Lady carried !b overweight, followed I S--edllng. Nefari 1. Mrs. Bear A. Belle SurCross Bow and Coll prise 6 and Dashing Princes*. 4TB. There were some quick oxCatlc-In-The-Alr lefused to ,h.ifige* around the tui It the Others K>t <>ff ... Ih,. Held went with Mrs. Ben Beiq down aha back stribfa, it followed by Dashing Princess. Columbus. Cardinal. Cross Bow, Tiberian Lady. Coming into the Assurance. CoUeton and Seedling straight approaching the stands. At the half mile it was still it was Fire Lady foDowvd by Columbus follow* Tiberian Lady, Mrs. Bear, and and at the three furlong pole Dashing Princess all bunched Columbus pulled away from the beautifully. field, racing down the Drill Hall Dashing Princess however stretch at a tnundenng pace, went past the Judges for the In hot pursuit were Cardinal first time leading the Held as a and Cross Bow. and turning into result of brisk exchanges. Fire the home stretch. Cardinal chalLady went back into the lead k-nged. but his efforts were futile around by the five, and carried and Columbus raced home the the field down the stretch, pullwinner by half length to register inn away after reaching 111 %  v ctory of the Meet. (u T .1 finished sectT Pepper Wine moved up at the away from Cross Bow. S d challenged, but uesti brought the hUy around the bend, into the home stretch and past the winning pole Pi KngUis ahead of Pepper Wine who beat Tiberian Lady Into third place bv two lengths. TWENTY-FOURTH RACE Belleville Handicap Six Held of seven. New Parker \M is llie choice people all over tin WOflW IH.HI for perv.nnl uv, and also a.i -i-tiai gift. Fslgeeas -ti.i. gas ii leaden In huMi.es* ami SO set the Inlor Us Norld all an !•" %  Bd n BgaJ use it; with It trcntic* ansinned, and famous boohSSM .vrittoii. Foff saaMoasi oteal affeciiou you value, a I'arker SI' would make a im-i ili<-ruing present. F-r goui ""ti >"• no comparable I -I'Hiiti.t luu ever been made. • Ntv titroriu VIIJJU tNiffviHiuiuii'.r fci sssal aansfsfjaai .^Im.in-j .rfA ,„w >.„/>,' %  %  -.1 . W> 1 -ll>U. t.MOl M>IOPLt Prices: ROLLED GOLD CAP: 124 05; LL'STRAI.OV CAP $10.77. Distributors /or Barbados; A 8 BBYDBN ft SONS (BARBADOS) LTD. P.O. Box 403, BridfHOWfi. Yenr* ahead of any other ... la tuner i aiHhaS ./ ilrawlu as, SIM -ad r*l<*Mii Ink. U* Bnlqw tSWSsSllll l -wl-n. < %  / inhrtM WHITE PAINT! WHY. Of OOU; EVERYBODY WHITE PAINT i BEATS ALL OTHERS. GENERAL HARDWARE SUPPLIES rlionr 4918 — Kl.krlt HI. WE ARE OFFERING A VARIETY OF AUTO ACCESSORIES. I'cri.iitfx Gukel Shellac w Form-a-GMskel „ Fabric Cleaner ., Auto Top Scalar „ Transparent Glaia Sealer Black Top Droaalnir ., Radiator Liquid Cement „ Radiator Ban Praventor „ Engineer'! Prussian Blue Holt'i Wonder Was Dunlop Patching Outfits .. Rubber Solution French Chalk „ Insulation Tape Ribbed Maatiag Radiator Hose All Sixes ,. Car Truck Jacks l 4—5 I'ly Air Hoso Schrader Metal Trro Valves n Tyre Pressure Gauges ECKSTEIN BAY STREET — Chamois Leathers Yellow Polishing Cloth. Miracle Black Adhesive Miracle Tub Caulk Scalar Durcx Masking Tape Shaler Hot Patches Spsrton & 12 Volt Horns Clear Hooter 12 Volt Horns Chrome Rim Embellishers Kxpsndlng Reamers Extra Cutters for Reamers Auto Eugine Valves Fan Mills all Models Rear View Mirrors insulation Tape Pram Tyring 1 %  111 %  in 1 in METAL CYCLE PUMPS Schrader Air Line Blow Gun Lionlde Leatherette All Shade Birkmyre Canvas BROTHERS DIAL 4269 TWl \TV I ir.HTM RACE Final Handicap Dashing Princess, Lunwtyi, n-j ag Di Belle Surprise iran 9 horses came nndai DM I %  111 of U.i tka1oB| tched leaving a distance Of these. First The Held got off to o good start Admiral, jolly Miller, Caprice and with Aim Ah. Id each carried 1, 2, 3 and I A pull. lbs. overweight As the gate* ll.ii I IW. ilHVlivclv. riuvmc (ii-.\:. I: flew, Apollo tSIaiut 11 that < The-Air bad %  < latS i'.imp, and The Barbados Selector, with such a strong nucleus of players (Fletcher upt got off first and was TJie ." A l e obviously able to experiment in the case of R. C. Branker of ,„ .his position when the field ""'['^ im "'''" the Combermere Intermediate team ami G. Sobers, recently of thci.,, !" ,! the stands f* the first JSSl i Wl re mJ "? '? POl, w, B K > ir'., Club ** m anrt now of ,hP Po,k0 team mTFirs Adimral .Yvonet) was ^* Ah n.amti.h'' r !" 1 ^" 1 8 ""'-T 1 o"^ Und Wertcs Walcott Ma "h*" t Hunte, ^ nA with March Winds (Hajal) Sit toe thSr SSSSSSSSSS "Ss-3 Jowe, -edium men y arm **** Bf*ar, the B.C.L. w,l. Jff £ k (i( ld P JB W..M tlie jfc'fflj lation they have encountered in hrCf rurlotlJI pole. In the mennhaneU and P he meeting their entire existence. MUM III J: WKST INDIES CRICKET V17IIAT of West Indies cricket? The latest news from tuna March Winds had moved up lo second pdtltlon UN Colombus who was lying in the fifth po-i•l^n made a challenge coming around the benil fn-m the ouUide. Tlie brown CoJl p-isscd the field going up the triiight to win comfortably by one and a half lengths from First Admiral who beat Apollo In* '"-• by a TWENTY-fritTM RACE Junior Handicap This wus Inc %  the Trinidad Prcks. the unofficial mouthpiece of the West Indies Cricket ^ 9 om ? 0, • ta o tfl< "f*<^ that one Trinidad Journalist has found Clyde Walcott unfit This news, untrue a* It Is, still intrigues me, becaur-c in the fir t Place It is news to Clyde Walcott himself and secondly it rmfct haw o-en obl-.in.ct DO Boorcot dour t.. the supernatural. 1 ' ' <-.' mads to say or mean anything but it is putting it a bit thick to be able To stay all the way in Trinidad and examine Walcott in Barbados and then pronounce him unlit just i>ecause Guillen in so brilliant and llinns onl> Might). U brilliant, Trini(lfl of course. f ,n %  ' %  ' wntt-i ,,f the article who has more wrJ!H? n £u i!*. H ,p ? 1 I**" *'" hcr thc "fpre^ntat'ves of toe hall furlong We sl Indies Cricket Board of C.ntrol here or the Barbados Cricket K, vc„ were ri^fi £ ^^"^ ^"K lhc Wttrt ,nd,ei Cricket Board of field of live of whj . 'w 66. The Past replied wilh 84 excluding Roy Marshall. Ken Rickards lllu-.|on and Super Jet each car'or at close of play. ed 5, 7 and 3 lbs. overweight ret Id Boy pf Old Boys Beat Present Boys The first Pnst vs I*rescnt cricket rnskfa of the Coleridge and Parry .School, played at the school grounds on Wednesday, resulted, in for th<> Old Bovs. The Present. I ivtn| WOQ thc vent for the y "cheek." thi' EZSiJL rT C S W ". \ X M % "" d P" ,n ul| y obvious thit the writer is foreign to West Indies Cricket history but certainly this earns him no extenuation for making a nonsense of West Indies cricket ^ ., ., h ^ knOW lhat Walco !" n "lake a West Indies team on hh be bsttUlg in the West Indies tour to New Zealand at thi the Australian lour? Whom would he substitute f..i Hoy Marshall spaettVOiy. Coleridge, made the day's highest Super Jet ridden by Yvorn-t got f^ of 37 W-usa C BEiDI IT to a flying start and was !olf* nf PTry. dominated In thc nwed by Apple Sam mid Illusion, fowling department taking 5 im U Rue and Battle U •Wan -ill runs In 7 overs eft flat-footed at the ga "• M Griffith of Present top The Held singled out in Indian co !" 1 f '" "* 22 and end of mo by the three furlong pole h ,'''"' %  %  • "' Pwatnl lmwlcd • with Sui>er Jcl still in thc lead S !" J '" lilk< '"K^SSiWSi^^^^SS^ffSS ?#; ; .-.6 laSoMaUSiw %  "" the bend to enter the -i U ^ll k C to pom L'V t ,hjl iitr..ght when Apple Bam (TWr( *f:,S r J ffllh ,f '' iter quotas would have to ; teU up) challenged and took over following are the scoreseven if the figures of $8,000 be paid the professional to paa Lt. vhich the i that this would be all sum nsure that West Indies cricket which people Uk> Walcott %  Sl.alnin! RST I'"I ^ ^'^ 5 lhe w rldcrtelJ"ladcleMn Blighty in 1950. at least remains there. ,. T u, WHA T Dll> TIIK PROS CONTRIBUTE? W rf/J 0 £30000 p,.„n fa, tuc 1950 tourNot the Wot % T Indies Cricket Board of Control Ixit included in the liM of •rnrfcen were Walcott (remember his I^ird 1 Wt.Mii Marshall. Valentine and Ramadhin The Tests against India will be International riescvT novsi* T ISNJS,., li b centuryi, Wcekc: Baa&5ce&afi&5t&&Z nonsensical esperimcnllnn should be duly"recontol"'lo 'Z'^Za the plo.le., .mm,, w.,t Indie, cricket pnSvie.~--.~-seany juKKlins e used up for i try ludgmen! DafcrirIksi bjr of West Indian crlckei op~lnlee. U, Open Cn.mpjonsH.p .J .^.Ytffv'cTlpfiJKp'.S. Pr-fSSS,-! 1 '"?.' "-*--""• "•' Canadian GoU Ihls winter, lhe Colonel who Is strictly nn amateur lhe,i: ,"o ,Tu''. d b,',r.,'" 1 ,h """"—''• %  "" S The Colonel admitted at once that he was taking the Job wilh some misgivings but he has had considerable experience In teaching and the Open Championship and the Medal Play Championship which he has won are tho only events not played off handicap and therefore are thc only real championships in the true sense of the word. Members of the Roekley Club who were so disappointed at the news of Mr. Wakclam's inability to come will no doubt be glad to learn that they will still be provided with the opportunity for having their games hecked and polished. cot.. vtMia by the seven furlong pole lo win comfortably by one and a half s lenghts. Illusion wan third flv< lengths behind Super Jet. TWENTY-SIXTH RACE This event was run ova. VSffl ,' and a half furlongs with a SaU of twelve, ten being scratched. "''' %  *' %  * kpr iiuaaand^ b Of those going. Street Arab. The r. i-SgTk B Thlnj and Vectts each carried 4. 8 snd S lbs. overweight reJ 1 "," specbvcly "J" Aim L*ow tCrossley up) I'd thc field followed by Mary Ann rid""•" den by Yvonet. Vectis (guested). Magic Gaye and Topsy, The field raced past the five furlong pole £ In this order. Aim Low kept the < lead all thc way until they reach[| ed the two furlong pole when there were some exchanges coming around the bend, they bunched and Fluffy Ruffles piloted by Holder came through with a driving finish to win by half a length from Topsy who beat Magic flaw Into second place by a head. %  .<• %  %  -i in PAS1 BOI %  • !--l KMM.. %  • - Hunundi Mpd iC M c; E i_ Tlvom-taii b Pbllllpi i>l i.p* ipd. kpr. bl-hillii^ %  %  TWENTY-SEVENTH RACE Roekley llandicup Seven were scratched bom unoriginal 13 antrtas for this event, thc one but last of the Meeting. *• B !" -' It was run over a distance of 9 2 ,S,7, ,';!1 furlongs, and toe handicappers R ,T,^ \ ihanija lbI X % %  I %  %  OWU.Ni; ANALYSIS <> M Denny j 3 RACING NOTES Han St. Kitls Produced A Champion ? By BOOKiE W ITH Ufcraa days of r-cmg to be ai'cussed it is uiinculi lo pick on sriy special event tor la* fhiaf n.p... tnara u nu..>.i vaai epetiai IMN ary buoy is uliung about. 1 no nurse la Miss Koasfnary ItOOni Loiomous. A blacs coil suanuing .. unit uiuier sixteen hanus, ne did not m-K mi asaattag until last Monuy. Tnis wag in toe nine lusogtfl Wk Lass horses and slier tying in tne r--r LBS ..my Mj.is. eoioinuu^ CBBM iniough at ue unisn to win in a gC] K"i\iiiuiin ntannsg BOOB caiuinal. m uie lime 11 was inougnt 1* Aouai niaae A goou norse in UM luiure. Uut no one, except pvtapa ins uaiii-i. knew just now near mat future was. An n turned 'in loiornuu? came oul IM winner of tne sweep wiUi no Mss Hiau %  MB amg lo Hal eradtt. Tne nature ol his wins is quite inothM sloiy. % %  liu. weignt was 1.gm enough 111 UM BXgl itf oeuJavc. nui only was ne a tmee-ycar-uia, but a maiaen us wm .11 ..iv moo(i luce nuwever. over "•'.1 furlongs, he was moved i.sot up .0 Ui lbs. .>na once again he defeated tne same carainai, tnis untv, Uiougnt. snowing mucn rnore dasn and speed. \.nere fte looKeu .UN I DBOy iii ru nr.si race be now luokeu lite a precocious two0O nuj oil. Aluiougii Carainal was siul allowing mm J 10s. 11 BM inn ,ii tAa race 11 was -tear that it snouia have Deen an OUJM #jy louiid. lay t'oloinbui not only b*w* MBB T .lav hora*. over 7 V liulonga once again, but went up into D class, and over nine furlongs, red a sound defeat to a n old stayer like Cross bow. Cross HUM be said, allowed him four more pounds than weigm-or age auu In addition made a bad start. But at the DnisA he wus ..ml if lengths behind Colombus who apparently had a lit He to spare. mem. once again, came the consistent Cardinal. I| 11 dUflsCUkl to Mud past three-year-olds with which we mtg-V coaipare. cuiumbus. Aionuc II Immedlutcly sprung 10 everybouy 1 mind, for he too did not come into prominence until toe August meei%  11 all he did was to win one F class race with irarj UfDl watafit from u G clasj. horse. At the end of that momn ne .\1111 to Anmi and a/001 two rnccs. On the face of H therefore, M Bra that Colombus must be even better than Atomic 11 i-.. age. Ling indeed because here we are In November with only live weeks to go before the Trinidad Derby and it is not um 1 tms eleventh hour mat we iind sometning capable of giving •fright Light a run for her money in Ijie Trinidad Derby. Up to Uie I Colombus won his third race at the Meeting 1 was still prepared lo make Bright Ught a firm favourite. But the manner of 1 win over u furlongs leaves mc in considerable doubt. It is now a race worth going to see. Nexi I BUM say that I htm never enjoyed s race more than 1 Mitt. Ct tli b baan Stake*. Alter years of campaigning for the %  ail I to uur programme here, and in TnniLfad, BDd receiving the proverbial brick wall opposition, It was not '-.int. but downright astonishing, to return to toe Island ittsence of only live months, to hnd a complete metamorphosis m the attitude o( the most militant objectors lo a race of d %  Mr. Cbaswi Landmark is a stayer of a high order and 1 can think of taw mile and half races that were ever run at such a warm cup. Castle in lhe An .^eein to nave bolted with Johnny Belle in this race, and 11 was not surprising that when he passed toe judge box for toe Bret Unto to see that he had done ihe5H furlongs In 1.09. I thought wc .••ore gouig to witness another rae like the famous affair with Alwin ran off with Fred Thirkell, ncve r looked back, and won in louvinemn Myle lioin Haven. %  previous Governor's Cup winrx r I; .' I. ii..irk, who was always well up. took his measure at tne Hu caught and passed him at the foot of the stretch .iid Ihtn came home in a bcnutilul driving finish, much as I have iftin Been h Bnisfa I .V, or T'r furlong race. Young Whittaker. making bis debut as a Jockey, rode a good race to bring Flieuxce 1 it mile and a half races I think have been instigated a little iatc for poor Flieuxce. Two years ago when she was waiting her %  niter distances with formidable miers like Elizabethan and Rebate, she might well have won quite a number of them. 1 also noticed thai Belle Surprise, formerly thought to be a sprinter by ner over S furlongs at exercise, ran third not very far beh'.nd. Mr Fred Bet hell's Abu All accounted for two races in class A. Much cracked up before the meeting opened, he must havo ocgun a bil short for ho wus beaten pointlessly on thc first day. ,1 had hiile horse but 1 can nee nothing extraordinary Yvottft, whose average at winning the first and last races it a meeting must be very high indeed, set him off at break-neck he Final Handicap and I found It much to the credit of ne horse that he stayed on so well. But he did not have the tough which others have had in this race in the past. top classes who deserve mention are Castle in the .if and Fur Ltd?, who were both winners over B furlongs. Castle n the An won a MH an.,i.ing race. Over the ldst three furlongs inning away from them with ridiculous ease. Ills run in thc mile and n half had apparently made him fighting fit. Two Brno ware not winners but who did not fail to impress were .nid Pepper Wine. The former gave Abu Ah a taste of real speed in the Sprinters Stakes which he could not match over Hires furlong*. Ii i> clear that if she could be properly he would be much better by far. Thc latter, now n mare .-•.iiihoerad M much speed, at the end of the Final Handicap that one wonders what she would hove done with them .11 haa prune. It is against a crook like this, long past her best, that' we can judge our standard 0* it was. when she and Atomic II were ruling the roost, against the present day lot. The r.iniii; in C clasc produced some mixed results. Of the in the three days there were four winners. Mr. "Bunny" &i wards* newly imported filly Fluffy Ruffles was the double Rtenat and well deserved this honour. She had shown promise from exercise and with only two months in the tropics to acclimatise I ihink xhe did more than is usual for horses who have been here for such 0 short time. Spoor Grass and Test Match were two others who won. I find ndlar In the respect that they mav win a race Just as easily as they will loose one and so they keep us In the dark most of the time. The other winner in this class was the mare Mary Ann. She was thc only other crcole. besides Pepper Wine, racing in the niported classes at this meeting and when she defeated them over :>'j furlongs giving weight to all except Careful Annie it was another victory for the late great O.T.C. Will the sires of to-day keep up the standard of crao l BB as this horse maintained It throughout toa war wars and just after. Comparing their racing form with his they should be streets above him. But that U left to be seen. FROM 86 YEARS EXPERIENCE Socony-VscutUB has produced "Tlit World's Largest Sailing Motec Oil", with sack records as: — M0BIL0IL was in the engine of tat Spirit of St Lenin when Lindbsrg spanned the Atlantic from New York to FarK Admiral Byrd. gttr Hubert Wllklns and aUngford Smith, all used MOBILOIL. MOUIXOIL lubricated John Oobb'n "RailWn Special" holder of the land speed record of 403 miles per hour. 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PAGE 1

PAGE SIXTEEN SUNDAY ADVOCATI SUNDAY. NOVEMBER 1, i52 The Waterfront Was Quiet Yesterday EXCEPT FOR unloading of the remainder of schooners M, the waterfront experienced a comparatively quiet day yesterday Tin re was only onesteamship in the harliour — the Saguenay Terminals steamer Sundial, which arrived in port iiom Montreal on Friday afternoon while the auxiliary schooner Rainbow M. was the only schooner to arrive and 'his hailed from Trinidad under Captain Gilbert Marks. £ r -, %  .i.ulna vei0 - %  irt Idle and ihoir nw> llf/ktl^n Pinf ni£i i i>pport unity of molding iTjAJlllfll I JCllII I -i.mlng decks. %  "*• T"k Pioneer Dies £4000 Needed To Save Golf's Walker Cup By Jw m Coodfellow Sir Georgv Semi Jo Be Chairmnn W.I. Confrrrnce 01 HI n\L c-Atr.o The Saaucnay Terminals liner .iirivxl In port from on rVd.iv afternoon With general carKG IllTlfl ThU cargo Included ahipment of lumbei In His Sleep for mo cou NATHAN LEVINSON. head of the Warner Bros. Bound a large department and a pioneer with the cawwd Warner family In dovelopinit the goods, picKled meat and other talking motion picture, died ] scneral cargo. The vessel is under the command of Captain D. Cook and is I tu riantatious Lid. CARGO FIOM TRINIDAD .., hia tlcep at his Toluca Lake home. II,,.,r.i COL t^vinon began his career at the age of 14 ,,s a wireless 'tlcataphcr At the time of his death he was internationally famous for hia work and in nova lion-; The i5 ton achoonei Rainbow i n the Held of wind. H. irrrrad in the colony yesterWith the late Sam Warner, he d:.y from Trinidad. worked to bring the first sound, n The schooner which %  under musical score, to the mction picn and at Captain Gilbert lure icreen m "Don Juan', which Marks, brought a mixed cargo WM, resented to a critical Nes. iiiid This cargo inYork theatre audience on August eluded cola*, charcoal, fruit and 6th, 1926. %  gv tables. On October 5th, 1927. the War.liioner in consigned to ner Bros. Vitaphone Corporation tha Schooni tion Fined For Inflicting Bodily Harm His Worship Mr. G. B. Griffith. Acting Police Magistrate of Dis (rid "A", yesterday fined 29> car-old labourer Alphon* Walke* of Ruy '<* """l facilities up to the ^,,m.w P PT. 1 V i L maximum of £20,000.000. Inf.rtmth told the court that f (>rn ,ed sources said the question while she was on her way horn 1 0 f amounts or meat deli* on Military Bond. St. Michael on BnUin for the forthcoming year November 4. the defendant beat „ n d also the price have been her with a bull's pirzle on her agreed upon. body because somebody had told When It became apparent that him that she had taken up one the main obstacle to agreement of his ducks. was the Argentine request for credit facilities, British AmbasINJVRED IN ACCIDENT ador Sir Henry Bradshaw Mack ^1 ~~ ,— — -— requested assistance from the Edwar* Taltt, a 17-year-old British Government to hasten mechanic of Juekman, St. negotiations As A result the Michael was Involved in an gnfenunent sent two officials accident with a motor car on from the treasury and board of westbury Road about 9.30 a.m. trade with late instructions. >esterriay. He was treated al the The present talk* regarding the if '.pit.il for a cut on his foreterms of a trade and payment* head. met to succeed the one expiring At the time of the Incident las*, summer were initiated in n :-> July Differences between Hi two sides however were at ii it so wide that progress U ngrecm'nt was extremely slow. The first stumbling block was the question of price, that Brita II should pay for future ddivti'es of meat. It is understood II 'I the first price Argentine MI '< made by golf clubs, the Walher Cup matches I may cease. Abandonment would be deplored by the whole golf world. Toe 2,000 clubs asked to help la giving £4.000 will no doubt I make ready response. It seems to me that a scheme might be set up within the framework of the Golf Unions, by which funds are always assured. The Royal and Ancient committee can draw on funds from the Amateur championship— they are likely to allocate more than £1.000— but profits from the open ehampionshlp are not available N, players have been nominated yet, Ronnie White, who cut Ms nig gol( engagements this season for business reasons, is to play in more events next year. no doubt with an eye on the Walker Cup match Sunningdale Club can muster ana of the strongest teams in amateur golf, in their side against Cambridge, and Oxford, they had three former KngUlh champions— H. G. Bentley, U C Crawley and G H Micklem, all players on the plus one mark. Th c others range from scratch to four. Cambridge have lost only on* of their four engagement* this term. The captain, D S. *Blair, has six of last year's team ana about a dozen new players ot good standard to choose from. fixture list before the meeting lth Oxford at Rye on March *i> —ZI includes matches with St. George's Hill. Royal Worlington, Walton Heath, Worplesdon, Wesl Hill and Berkshire. I'iiddj lime, winner of the Brabazon trophy three years ago at 17. has to make golf subsidiary to his career as a pilotofficer, and for that reason i* But readily available for important events. He tells me that he recently "fluked" a 01 when he won the Hoekcv Club (near Winchester! championship. A cut spoon shot at the 11th cost him his only five. Details of his round on a course with a scratch of 70: 0l— 1 %  :* vcH, dftVS, Hr. an pull 1. a (ISO vdt dtiv*. SI ran. 1 pulta 4: 3 'Ml yd. i <1i.v-. nl|>, IB-fl put*. Si 144* da> drive Vlroti a pulii 4 "ISO rd... B iron. • n. pull S: S d* I dt.v*. ipoon. a pull* 4. IS ITII yd* • dnv. S-iran. a putt. 4: ID ill! vdi.i a-lron yard putt I: 11 (MS vd drive *vAt* IMI puti 3. IS IIM yd. iitiv*. 4-"o". a pmu 4— %  ! at. ... .,• FrOW **** l -xirtiti.,:, at Hastings House will be *uii Cnairm*. Su: George ai Mnntego Bar. are the Mr. C. A. Grpssmith, O.B.B., mante Admin'strative Secretary to DeHon'bi'velopmcnt and Welfare, who Antigu,. will act as a United Kingdom will act as sui Commissioner in the abeence of Grant ley Adam* Mr. J. K. Thompson. Colonial tVAttache in the British Emh.s Cohferen.. in Washington, who U unable to Additionally. Dr. r j HarasM be present; Mr Philip HewifM B E.. ptT Jtggtttani riS' Myrlng .nd_ Mr. Davicf Perclval. t.ona, Adviser fo the SecrelarC S |"w r ; J. v.. VarncH ,^.V*Li. K Ul'.' "T-rtrneiit '" 'he BritishCo-1 ami Mr. Grosamith. Hon'bie W. A Jamaica and iht \ Hon. & T Christian for Mr IOO will he at' %  Foot Itch Healed in 3 Days "-'•''-'-'-'-'•'%  -'--'----.-.•.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.•.-.-.-.-.•.-.-.-,-,-.-.-.--•.-,-.--.-.-,-,-. I GIVE SANTA A RING! 23 IIU— I Advisers; Mr R. G. Roe of th. Secretarial .,t Hastings Houee, and Miw Joan bmitn estrk. Mr. Hewtt-Myring will be leaving for Jamaica on November 20. Thc Remainder of the part* will travel with Sir George on November tt. The two remaining United Kingdom Com miss oners. w hi v/ill be present at the Conference and the Commission Meeting m Mr. nlal Office, will jo'n tm ttclegation at Montego tt as advisers. By and nngaparItN 4 .l rid ..' -I. f %  • ... %  •Ii.m %  (). % %  IIU.I"! >> IKM4 I" '-""I •'•• '• %  %  -".I h*. l%  %  ...-. ACB-. I (.1 . 4eav>i % %  "'." %  '" %  "" N ';. ,,.„ Nlxoderm Ter IfcU Troubiei ," FROM ALL QUARTERS m Freaa Page I the pawnshop business. Its first State pawnshop will be opened in a suburb of Rangoon this month. New York: Comment* by thai "Seven Butchers of Broadway"— Nix York's leading drumatarri'ies — on Kothertne Hepburn > performance in Shaw's play "Tin Millionairess" include the following: "Beautiful, radiant, vital and not very good" —"A vivid. lively. exuberant, one-woman show played with humour and a curious kind of beauty" — "Ml*s H*pburn lorce but no tour." HOMS-STUOT COURSES ro. GENERAL CERTIFICATE of EDUCATION CAMBRIDGE SCHOOL & HIGHER SCH CERT. WMay Mall OUwfl. c a „ e—i; *hi k>< Ur4 I %  am, a i*, issw" Uosn. .. HaaSaauoafK**franco Fartti Ul..r.u r p.,,..,, A.d> i R.SA.J S.,, n j um a^r!5t. **' l l*>2 du-, "" -'J.<*i OPartoMA LL.D.l>'*c*o>ft "J^D^DL! % WOLSEY HALL, OXFORD • I DON'T I B.W.I. ."T KAIL TO GOT YOIK FNTRIKS FOR THE Best. Edwiq Haynes. Joseph Al"* *"urday with WS French 1-vno. Raip h Bushell, Joseph nJU P s protesting her admission. B.irker. Stephen Belgrave and Thc Wneral conference of 58 naJovnh Kin* dons meanwhile continued debate P Ring. ^ Ust year 8 UNESCO | AS SCOKJ AS TM£ PLAWE LEAVES TWE CWOND ?0lRP.') STOVSERfcy.OCUSS.' .NoNappiefJ Vu %  *!. u. Cudnaa i>m"f.%  ftct babii b*th and ii rreiv %  apjtu •huiK M krtp lum .i-il iJ ,,m.!.i.r>k. Th. milJIy nirliL>iiil. mlc •moBMat, < uiik.at*. •uilirchafins l *Of(. Inf1mmticn. vufdMU *worU)r with ntppM rath. futicura OINTMENT.' B.W.I I VVIIHW III VI IM. OIL IM //.I.I iiivri.si IN THK MAIL BY NEXT SATURDAY. HMD NOVKMBKH. 1952 WHEN THE CONTEST CLOSES KOC.KRS & HOWE LTD. FOR NORTHROP & I.YMAN CO., LTD. Colgate Chlempln/ll loothpostt DESTROYS BAD BREATH Ortfiewtiaf in tha MMHI. Police Band At Esplanade By ihe kind permission of Colo~ nel R. T Mlchelln. O.B.E., Com| missioner of Police, the Police Band conducted by Sgt. C. Archei will render the following programme of music at the Bay St Eaplauade this evening beginning at 4 45 p.m. 1 MAWK "HllltalM" 4r*itirl 2 OVSKTVR>; "IHITKHI *•*•• I S;rlJ;CT10N "Mvlndlmn Mnnorlw" rimwh INTSHMKZKO -Frvm Ihr opvra "Cavallvra RtiHInWM>mil 5 SUITE-"W-U-Muflr" Bkad'l 6 TWO PirtlS hymn to Ihe auii "lltxtr " tmyrf H\tl. Kar*ah< : MEDITATION -'Ttiln Slaawnrl S ORATORIO The Hr.vrni -•* lelliii* H*M HYMNS M A lr II llatap my aoul Ihe Kin, ol Mf.,vci Th Lwd I. m> SKn>h*irt GOD SAVr. THE QUrr.s Mere Is tke'asagla po*r ef efcisraphytl to destroy bad bntatb originnting in the mouth! Colgate Chlorophyll Toothpaste in moat caste acts quicHy . acts thoroughly ... and the purifying action last* for hours! Keeps your breath sweet and fresh longtrl FIGHTS TOOTH DECAY! vi'o n/> /// KEPLIKS GO TO THE HOME PRODUCTS DEPT. for ... S3.no BAI.ATA NOVELTIES STEEL BANDS COCONUT TREES ~TM MONKEY CARTS |" I'RL'IT SELLERS ,„" MAUBY SELLERS q 6 WOODEN NOVELTIES •BOATS j|.2o SI I I ER WOMEN 72 DONKEYS ''.'""' ,' 44 10''l,,v,/,,n peUgkl in Tbiti v..,-.//i>.. GAVE SHEPHERD & CO. LTD. 10, II, 12 & 13 Broad St. I .W,-.V.V/,1WM MWV MMW< 'ss,v.'s,'*',','?; THR LITTLE EXTRAS . YOlLOOK for ilirm In %  CiMtom-T.llorrd Sl'lT . An, niAl.riuK . qnillty lining* . .a.v drape and HI. WE HAVE a wMr choir* of Cloths. ( II ind Dmlcna in TROPICAL and *tt nrlthu. WONT YOC COME in and In ik arsund ? C. B. Race V Co. of Bsallon I eaaae> .•.•.•ssss,'.;'.'.*.'.' _ yno DM Collate Chlorophyll T<>othpaste —espectslly rl|ht aflar cm I ing you act ncainat tba li ss tou ctlva t.cfcl that ar a cauaa of tooth decay . actually blp raH Ihair fortnaUon! CHECKS COMMON SUM DISORDERS) Now! Tha full Benefits of o Chlorophyll' Toothpaste in a New, Exclusive Colgate Formula! %  Coital* briaga joo -orvH. I chiorupbyll ia lb* Bnaat workiof thkwupb^l chloruphyU toolhp. yaaas of •xpariaao* can crsats ... Colgate CblorabyU 'I oothpawt*! e r ai ai w iaiiaafiaii Nature baraalf maira chlorophyll and puta It In all gnea planln I" aoabW Iheaa to Uva and fro-. Bui sdaooa muat braak down Ihk oatuSalaaeil t h>U Into a M Mo.rirerUra foraa {aaa-rr-ao/^^rA/^v^y. Ilm$)— before II can balp yea •gainst bad brMta. lootb daasy, conunoa rum dasardara. TbiawhCnIiaii.ri|ierbiis and *.ill in rnaiinr aa aiduaivai formula ia .mporrniit to you. In Celesta nuomphyll Toothpaata you a* 11 in-1 IBIIHI I a of I hew *>a teraolubtf i Klorvplivllina in a aafa. uli-an nit form I I'.ir -aaj *Wn •."" %  bad bntaih OMfiti.Uag in ihmouth .. common run dbmrdara . tooth decny . g*Colgata Chlurafnayll TootapaaU after aa.Ung, Ii'a lha linetl chlorophxil loothpait* tha wotL*a larfoat makor of quably n> atiarioaj can pcodura! Taala allow chl hMlihy turn 11*^ Cha0COpliTUTDOtbpSatabHnfv<>utba aflV-iiva baseflU of chlorophyll ic l*J(> you car* for sore, lendar sumav • l .j.ui u a-.i.i t .,. J :.'i M.fM.i'tBi NEW GREEN TQ0TNMST[ Testa, and Guaranteed bv COLGATE! GIANT SIZE — 79c. LARGE SIZE — 47e. A MAFFEI SUIT % eaea)eaaae.e*eeaeeeea*aaeaaas f *eee*^ aa>eeaeea>iaaeae>eaaeaiaaeaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa Variety loo...! A whole thrilling ahopful if Xmns ideas. fur you. Sir!... lor you, MuiUnr And vcrv deflnilely for you, Kiddies' K. R. HUNTE & CO., LTD. 1 LOWER BROAD STREET Ph 5136 Mill veil.ms < % % %  "( T>pr\vri,er* Caamh cv Bnish s,is Watahaa & China Klectrkal Appli Toya! — Taya! — T< WAKES A BIG DIFFERENCE. VOU LOOK YOUR BEST YOU FEEL YOUR BEST AND THE HRICE YOU PAY IS TriE PRICE ITS WOBTH "Top Scores In T.ilorla" P.C.S. MAFFEI & CO.. LTD. (Be U)IM — £cononuM psej ... USE BOWRANITE A-vn-eoKKosim P.VVT The Rrlrnllrss Enemy of Runl The Proved Proleetor ol lrtm and Sleel COtS FARTHEST LASTS LONCEST One yillon will cover 700—1.000 sq. feel, one coat. I BED. GREY, BLACK in lins ot Imperial measure. THONB44M AGENTS: WILKINSON & HAYNES CO.. LTD. H I MHIt lllll l l





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Sl-SDAY. NOVEMBER It. 1K2 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAOI HI II I N CHURCH SERMECS BT LION4UI • MIU N %  %  1" Chcral EUrharlat .. m Crmril Ruenartat and AOdiw. 1| a IT Matin* K SuNav Brlbaol T p m %  T. r*m 7 30 a m Hal. Cimmaalon. JO a m tatann H*> Ulnmon 3pm Sunday ***** ft < hlldrar. B*TVK* T p m Rnlomn Kvertaonft knnon Proreaalon Pr*.*-rr Canon Bar!** *<"*'VU> •IIVK|> nOEUICK Man. Ma.ri.lna SWrvie-. prwarR*r R*v t C New 7 pa Ev*r I Nr. <,RA F a Downr, MONTGOMERY 1 p m Bvamna S*r *" C**I.*Mr A Phllllp. DUNSCOMU 7 p m (v.m( S*rVJ wtaehti M> O C La**)SHOP II1U 7 p m BaaMnc tar vkra. praaabar Mr P G flvntlri mnoDi.T aMl JAMS* mttrt: .Hava.1 Fa.nr*.. II am R*v K. E Tnwer.. BA 3pm Special Muural Pmarami •rhoUi. and Pasra. Moat Import TMiigt r To..r%  Radir1u.„m .„> Mandt> "rloch Ba . nilX MEMORIAL: II am Mr. D Roarti. : p m Rav P Lawranr* rVHlTIIIAIJ. BM a.m. Ml. a. Hr par; 7 p pa Mr O P*rfcln. HANK HALL fl M a -• Mr O MeCal. later. 7pm Mr J T. 0*l* MOtJTows 130 a.m. Rav a Mar -hall; 7 p ITI Mi W St, HUl Hllllll MtTRODlMT I IB. I IT Bandar. fca**aib* la*. •* IIETIIII II am Rav T J PwHa*, T p m Mr V Pllanni DALKEtTH II .m. Mr L. Mayan; praachar Rav. J Furl*v iHoly CamOae. Ti*. Tba Pairooai PaaMval ^ Churrh la.*, plar.. Mlnl.tarlal Brafb %  '-*" %  *•• %  *• aaranon J --^ .-rvica.ill br IV Ra. j l .;..,-, I TV Mim.tar m Ckarajr. ft PA Monday Waamaadav. PnaMy; ,' 1^*..''" "* *^ l a ol •* "--badp, >iilh Mnvpimi ttna w ui K, canduitorl PIPS "*. i "*' %  'Ctart 'A-otiTi |P "'*" %  M" Olai Brawn* !" tS* NaVMOlAS IFtWOPAl li OBT "? DO wnXTJU ROAD 11 ain Ma I in.anil HaniuMi. praacmTC " Daaoanapa t> afcarraw. mlAbPaaTtfr Ae. 7 p.m. Cvanaona; „.,, laKmaal. Simdav BILMONT :l 7 p m Hrv I *TH mariturr PHOVIDEMCB I p m Mr J VAIXHALL PAYNES BAY *. C Pordat ran. Pihrnd dlalUr mvllad Rrv. r Vivl7JB pm Tuada> *-rnaj Prayrra >M '" '•** %  • Addraaa pnaahai in* p-% L rfc.,.*, II a-m. M. J Clark*. CUakw. Ih. aubjacl will b* S-im r. tf | l-valL Tkird Miaamna ir Jaumay %  irvtp II -ni. Mf\ C P. A*1a tkap II v 3> nrxi „, tb U( _<. A ipm Mr. G Ba stircwsBURY Bralbwaii*. 7 p n MtClS II an i. Hall I Mr. s C Cruaaa to a.m. Mr D. Raid; Wotihlp at 19, „ Manhail. vleo al IN pm ISO am R*v. P. Monday Niahi r c MfClaan. Paopla a Union R*\ G Marahall. Wcdn**aa> nlht a i 7 30 Praia* and am Mr Q M Pray.. Maatlna !" "~ ""* On Monday ajhlbi. Novamfcar M. ># c t'-t "huirt "^ w 1 ,n * -D Bap Yon ara cordially mvllad Io allaaal Hit. Iiiandly chorch. VEMT "B ** AOTBHTfiT mil'! KiM bOW. Sovambar If, I'a.taa %  Tl^rnpaon. Ivaaidani ni Canbb*-. Mr A Holdar iwvd s w ( L ioaa*. i p m Mr. K. Brath.alt* • li AU Kunday Srhaola at 3 p m ill Kvanlalutlc Campaldn Sriva. .luring n,<. -*fc B t Shrr-.l..!, THE HALVATION ARMY PIE CORNER H..--.I rU>ai "I.K, II am. iinimrMaetlne; 'pi I'roarainm* rrndrrad by YDUHI Proplr. AMmT 7pm BaKatimt Mi,na dnr Major a> Mra W Mornpantad by Tha Plyad o naJ Band RRirXIE'lOWN CINTRAI. II am. Holinaaa Maolind: 3 pm Hiadui :< %  ." and" 7~p*m" Company Maatlna 7 pm SMvatlo* WaabMadaya: %  p m A 3*rvli I.Mdaa T**Unu,n*a of ChrMllar SEA & AIR TRAFFIC In Carlisle Bay ..£** ? — ~ ,9 ,u u Ha**Mt Whit itiVi Lf" II. Marion Ball* Wnlfr E*,rdn*. Pranklyn D R i^,,| l( ,, Damdjaai tha na h awi R. Lady Siaadfax ""S=l,. 0 u-^ ,uw "•""-Mom* Vaaaal. %  Mon*k Jrnkn. Rnbrrta T R Radar ARRIVAL* S Sundati. iMl a. (roan MorrtraaJ %  ifidat Captain n Cook '.'inn I—ml ... Planiatm.it LM. *rn Rambow M M Ion. from Trm. nad ^inoa* Capia.n O. Marti. CaaaHanad yar*t Mnunrakar. 7 law. rt*m Lai Polmaa undo* Captain W P,r __ nirARiiRr%  rt. Ma.v t Carolm. lor Oranada SMWtll l • Ml A ON THURSDAY E>*m RrMMh U.lau Jark Connolly Mary Connnlh Sl.ph. „ Connnlly. Mlcha*! CaRMaaRJa lUlSLl Hunt*. Luiuo Hunt*, l-arn... iiu,,,, *ww*r. Matryl Hulcninana Ahrln Abram. w, ^r- u x wriyt*. cn*iyl Whyl*. Jofn U*lim*r. Ain*. Jardln. Marvyp KM%  %  nond Hark*r Don. Chapntan j ol „ ll.ad^a* Hrnnald Good. r^,, Xitlnir-Worui. Doru Cha*. Emil< OotirtRRIVAL* li |M ON PTUDAY rraaa TrMldad, I. Smith. K Smith. H. paorbr M Damtly J Smd*|t. j Thoma. W AI^X I Tbompjon. J rortm--Wal..m. H DCk"mra E Ball 1. Rail \| nan C DEPARTIiREs BT %  LW.LA, ... ON PIUDAY la. Tilaldad F ItatuitbU. L rU.Uat.ni. A lUIIHoi. X. Coat*-. M. D*montb*uii J, O*. ntpiilbriui. G Coop*r. A. RMi, P Dot!" RU. R Boacmyiti j B*rmiad*r L Smith. MrD It.vn' DEPARTIIBtH BT B.W.1.4 ON FRIDAY Fa* BrlUah Oalaaa; I. Raynolda. M Btjl.), W Baylor < Maora. s Moor*. A N*dd T Miln*. K lU*.. A MHn. H Miln*. T Gi, n J rarnand*-. p Pvraaud. I. OunraJ R Jotinaon. A. Jo ra aa w p. J. Camarho. E Listening Hour* r-rom TmPltbW a 19 %  i-***uw e *s a> Radi.. %  AS p m hi I rtalirv* • tt D •> I BBC SympAmny dnnwi. IDH p m. Ta* N*o10 |0 p m Prom Tha RUi i torial. II 13 y London Poium 10 O P Hiiot MadmMa* MONDAY Mtn %  M a.Cd p.m . RAill 4 00 B m Thr Now 4 10 p m T* Yootli Hoat*U 4 M p m l.n.B*. A-h > 5 00 p m LM•OP — : ii am a.at M op.il M .m T*# N**-a. 7 10 p m Horn* N*w mm Britain I IS p m Book* M Itu. nd Tnoali* Talk GBvrram.nl Hill. J'aainr W. W. WtAlaV • '. BpMkar. itublact: Will Elijah Co*a in. i II am Holliaraa M*rt Cnmpajiy Moatini; 7 pi Moonaaj Snr Malor T Glbb. SI'EIGIITSTOWN II am Holm*.. M*otmi. J p.m Compan> Maatlna. 7 p m Salvation MooOBM Snr Captain S. Worroll. SEA VIEW II am Holinam Mratinr ) pm Company M**llnf 7 pm Salvation M**tin|. KaaUnf. SUNDAY. NOVEMBER 10. 10U I p ii' kj** a* UIH. ••". MORTAIJi Salvation AM) IMMORTALS UaUan TI| ('oimthian. U U Thla corruptll .lif thai Tba lallawlM IIUIMM ai* la. in*-* In lb* Laaaaa-Sarw,.., n %  „,,,. Tnf ^ |m it^lf bramUi wttnaaa with our tCflrH, that w* an tha rhildron of God Romani B H ""•• %  • 4 MralMl wtAft Bay la U>a *'!".** %  *" %  — %  % %  ••' BoBor >*4 CARLTON M**ting. ) ,,, i t*n U what dfbood I. i* Rood and IruTRINJTY O otmubla P..* 304 PART ONE ORDERS By Major I. E P. TVrATHIRNf Ml Commaindlno. Tor Barbados Radlmanl lU>N\Ml-l.,Ml Certain B, r L J,.t,„.,, AwampUaa Captain T A. Oltlani a.-n M1 ol "A" Coy. mnwutd pf HO Coy -i %  Near. tJL Lt. %  R Ooddard PANADES-TralBlna All rankwill par-da at ih* Oaniaon a) ITOO hour* on Thuradav. Coy. will b* *)i*rcla*d In -quad drill In thalr atvmbly at call. W*d IB and Tbui id Sit. on Tuoada* i NoM al Krama aad Fllai Hand pradloaa will b* hold a. urual on M at 1700 hour* I. VOI.1NTART NIGHTS Th*r* will b* a Voluntary CMaa (or W.Oi 1700 hour. Omen. ar. ..k*d u atiarvd. I MIBKVTIIT' "'"" • nd '" * lh "" DrlU ''•mPhl*' voluntwr. wbo hjva not Srad th* L M G A M.C will tlv* th*.. nam*. to tha R a M on Thursday SO Nov. U IBM mill i j-. Mini > r21 !" '^*.' b S?" ,h Sf ****^!} ** >*• BOOB laavad with th* IMI Drill Ord*r y OmVar Liaui. C O. P*\*rb|n N.,?vi: ^ d r •* n, B '"*' ordarly OAWr Ordrly S*r)*ant -1UNAL PLATOON Thar* ar* winl varanrm |p tram Mombara or II.* R*a;lm*nt irainind in January. 1003. and i nRI'MM AND I'll *<• Th*r* ar* a numbar of vacant Band Application* ar* invitrd th* Suinal Platoon Applirationi i 0 till lh*a* vat-anrw. with a vl*w to 1-ii.ru >:: %  an*.nould ba iv*n to th* Rurnal Offlc*r. %  > i l i s-. I il DICREANL PART II ORBBBS BVRIAL NO. Bt 645 PI* NaM. It B. flCot ill Pt*. Dankrl, J. *'B" Cor M0 Pt* Nayn*., J R %  %  *• Coy. on Pia Jon... L -BCoy. 3BB Pt* Collin. V. L. "A" Coy BM Pur Taylor, L "A" Coy 309 Dim. Smith. C N HQ Co* LEAVH Capt. J. H. Roar M.C A 1 411 Pta Vaaxwood. H. M HQ Ml Pi*. LKnrlih. L %  R' Jf7 PI* Nurar II HQ Graotod I wk. P Laav* waf 18 Nov. SI Graniad 3 mtha.' p/L*av* waf I Ort 51 Graotad a wki. %  S, L*av* w** 0 Nov. U Giantad I wka • P'L*oia *f 15 Nov M YESTERDAY'S WEATHER REPORT BainroJI from Codnugtoii ml TotaJ Rainfall for month to dsU: 1.36 ins. remparonirt: 7J_8 os* Wind Velocity. 7 miles per hour Baiomoter <9 m.) 29.1*31 (12 *.m) 29.B66 TO-DAY Hunnad .'1.M am. Hunaat: 5.3S pjB. Moon Ldurt Qnartn Nnveni bwr 9 Iaghtlnw: 6.00 pm Hlfb Tlda. 2,40 RJB.. 2.33 p.m. Low Tide: *At B.Bk, 917 pjL 7 4ft p m H n c Raauo Nrw.r-*l MSB pm Tthaikov.lo • 00 p m Th* Bann.ua ol th* M.k>i< 0 SO p m Th* Caalno Orvh*atra 1" p m Th* N*>. I I > p m From Th i %  .i IS i, iv Srt*r-r* B*v .10 30 p m Tip Top TMI>*Slop Gelling Up Nights *** %  %  up nlthta. bumlrwooom lion of ortana. whtllah dla> har, i5l l df ,M %  %  % % % % % % % %  *'• %  M and k>. of manly vlaour ajs uaad by a diaoauat of IfmProaiati and in u..l Important m -... n rnan. T oT*r*..m r lhaaa rroul'lw II II h..ura and qukhly roOtoro via; %  %  %  and h.altli. lak* th* i.wati'ii • rr.i.r.-..l to ., %  11.. • laM and n ... .,.,. i, r | [| • .r or t6 B ana f.om yopr OBMUBBM %  %  |.i"i. ii -•I" i your < iin .il.iir. from the follow 1B:— BLACK BUGBT POT*or-OOLO rHERKIES In M M: \~< IIIM I UllinMi HAPPINESS FRY'S IIAZFL NITT FRY S H III i:MI\ I i.r.xmv AIM IAHDIKVS SETS 4711 ( 'U.tM.M SETS XMAS ( ARDS and MBB* ru|bt 2811 DUI :-: LM KudBOjrfc St. ^'.OO^^VXi' v are oRtered th* taw chancr m ^—lif> ft* a fine aarecr. hiffhdr poVAtuI *ociaJ triiiJing One of these COUPOCO will icBil Co jour BAlvancrmcni •M'tiaf O^-aVrST 1 -' ^rcsr.. eaaamtr, .. I-; • ., C'..t .1 w. C:*a*l-i %  t e a p T .'^ ***ai R a (ia.it >| r-cwom, BjajO* Mataa (•(•a*, ni '-.taa. wart Paaapmi %  aH.-.r, O.aat.t, larPjB M t aa wi paa ta.rl aj.ul Want '"" %  •f-mmx ni,.,, BoriBnOMat "a.aakaaP .,m. 10IHlMRRtlICSi.lrai.iCw iMi HtMHiO LdlaaO PJMW *al -*/ %  *. vaa. araaawiw m ,.'i.|*l: ,ntn.. I /M*.... I— • beatdi NEW CALYPSOS TONCUS TIE MOPSIE ONE MORNING .SOMDERS' SONG I.INSTEAD MARKET K.ITCH DONKEY CITY ROYAL WEDDING ME DONKEY WANT WATER NO MORE TAXI WHERE PAIN ASSAILS.. SACROOL PREVAILS BRAIWHAVV'S On Sale at ait D*uv Slorfl and LID. POCKET & DESK DIARIES FOR 1953 ROBERTS & CO. YOUR STATIONER — DIAL Mil! SUGGESTION . U everj Ihiny when il cumc^. 1.1 huyinu i|ill>. 'Phi* Hut ijivcn bolow should uuftgm man\ suitable Itam. Hi." Hi -"-.III Tollrl Rat. Kountnln Prn^ — Prrfunieh & Cologne Pipes — t'iijars — i n-.n.DaB. — Toili'i S**. '.'.'S.'s. ;:-*•,: %  -. '*SS.*SSM \ FOR THE BEST IN BOOKS .-.-.-.•-•.--*,*--,-,-,-..-.---.-.-.-.-.-,-.-.-.-,-.*--.'.'.-.-.DO YOU REALISE THE NEED FOR MOllE QUALIFICATION? r ARK YOr INTKREHTSI' IN MAK1SC. MM. MMtaaTI Vt BO. KNROL SOW rOIf ONI OF IHr; ( OIRSEH. \rt lilt*, tural IlrButht*msJMlUp BwlHlnc and IlpBlffn CoBrae. VMS*. (Civil. II.. and Meeh.) • tatowMbtie ReBBlrBtanN MoaTB*. Kleetrlcal loaUlUHoa and WlrtBf ('BBTBP. L.rnrral Fl-rlrir*l tHlIn i-erlnj Lourae. i iroeral (Yrtiliral* of Education. Wr.te far full partteuh%  rita 'hf sanitary lnpetair Coara* ( %  rner.il AcrieBHure COBfBP. Itrniranr* Pr^etire. i Itama nthlR. PrtrnleBm Tecbnalogt COB POP srliool < eritfirat* Camrae '. tinlJim tivU TTlee riiiniH. tsaBrr. I 1 ..li.proRtotlon Couroe not mentioned Caribbean Educational Institute P.O. Box 307. i-.OB, Trinidad Af aiiu for 1 AaUTXAH INBTITUTE OP BMO TECH. B BBUTlBll TTJTOaUAL ATfaTTITOTB, LONDON THERE IS NO TOklORKOrV PORT COI'PON TO P.(1 BOX 107. PO.R. Please send me Fro* Book. .Same Addrt-BB Subject ul Carver ot IrrBproarl Ago POBV TODAY! STOMACH PAINS DUI TO INDIOBSTION Try <%  • OKIDOSB •t MACLBAN BRAND STT)MACMPODr4*t! ThiB B^BBraBTBlry TtRRRfirrl (OriuuU OROkBrr relWoei SttRTUfcch l'B!;:i PUrukiwr, lleanbum, NRutea or Aadlrr due to Indigetuoa. I Aaaa aa taOaat raa— | i M n uaiiu a co lti I'O Ha> ill. nt'ii-i'T' "Shwp 1'iirlfi for Xmtts" > have i.i.l ..pn..-.l 4 LOVELY SELECTION of tMMBSMMAJS rut us hi BflRea and Uoar \M\S WKAPPINC. I'\1TR I n' Heala ele etf LOVELY I'LASUt SIKYII.lll RINtis (UMB A nut sii STAND .etr.. ole POTTKH A M(MHtl>. (ilPT SFPR YAKULLY tiltT SKI s tllrT BOXES *ll t IKK (ILATP.K OOYA OlFT C'RACKKHS HAT BOXER tilFT SOAP BtC. rte YOl' fJF.T THE BET SKLH I ION (Y SHOPPrNfl KAR1.Y al "BOOKER'S BHUAU STIIUT. ll ir l..mll> Slorr HASTINC.S IAI.PIIA I'HABMACl MRS. HOUSEWIFE!! Select these early before its too late. &f SHELLED ALMONDS lb. WALLNUTS lb. #*#;*'/VV A CO.. LTD. Roebuck Street Dial 2072 & 4502 .... Mr*. • %  % % %  H ATTENTION ALL REDIFFUSION SUBSCRIBERS! in ii.. NmoM. IMt KEIH1 I ISION PROGRAMME'S GRAND CHRISTMAS COMPETITION "rhe fnllowlnn Condition was omitted mt If iniir.rwrreet aolullona are reeelvPd. Ihan Prfie* arallBble. a Jury will drawthe >\ liiaera. The deeUUn •f the ludrea ntu-l he areoptrd aa flasl and blndlnf aad im rwrraapamdenee will be rKrJiaBfed. • ICKM1NDKR ( I.OHINO DATE far edlnr la KOLlrTIONR far ibr i ..nipetittna : MATIROAY. NOVEMBER ND COLONIAL ADVERTISING CO J \Ml.s siRl.r.l (HIIOS) LTD. rutiNE -i ;i GOO& III III I Oil YOIH *;.v./w %  •..##•;. vr THE NEW PROCEA BREAD Bollon Lane Phnnr .10 A Aquatic Club (lift Shop A Phonr 4817 #£*& ATTRACTIVE FLAVOUR MORE DIGESTIBLE MORE NOURISHING STAYS FRESH FOR DAYS '.'AKF.S BETTER SANDWICHES MAKES WONDERFUL TOAST a l\ inrtitiril ilh DRI-CF.A Whfai Protein and Milk. r. r. J i t* II i H 11\ -Mil II BAKERS" II Tudor SI. Dial: .'l£IX IT-. %  ffl m m m m mm m m i Lister For a bright Christmas All t-ver Uoirbadiih i ipecially in ihe cutinti ho narn a LISTCT maani F.U't-irniity : and the USTER KLTERNATOH WET tor ncneralinK your own current or hnmp or uxtustrial use has proved a highly reliable iintl pc-onmmcuI prufRisition. #> AC I.iitlitinK I • I PInnts driven b. the Lister Dleaal EnRine are now n il tun* to InlM up fot Chn*tmn H 2 i KVV StartO-Mali. I'lantb | 110 Volla A.C. # a KW II i Ar •*"• # Automatically stail and alop nt B thf (urn of a J switrh. H # Autonidtn Vi,U age Refulatoi maintains fixed I villiitregardlets of load variation*. H %  "*> Uirett enyuitieto The Barbados uhon. 4M6 W Tbr Brbiad-*. Foundrs Lid. ^ {fl! WHITEPARK



PAGE 1

1 NDA1 NOVrMBEK It, 1152 Sl'SDAV ADVOCATE I'M New Tasks For Sugar Council Big World Surplus: Wore Advertising Needed By BL'TK HKWKS A full meeting of the International Su*rar CouacA bata London on November 24th. faced with one of the 'lillkuh problems it has ever had to deal with— bitf %  I surplu* of sugar. Thft primary purpose of theternational Sugar Agreement fln>. meeiins u to consider recommen-drafted in 1937 and extended sevdations made by lhe recent Lonoral timw since (hen This tggmSV,'?^ **• Council', moot has regulated the producPe f !" Con ; m,,t **'<• *"na about Uon and export of free market a closer balance of sugar supply sugar, and demand At this month's meeting, howHui far wider problems tace the ever, the Council will vote on a Council and some of its members recommendation by Its Special are understood to be ready to urge Committee that the United Nathal It should now begin to ploy s tlons be asked to call an Intcrnamore active part in promoting the llonal Sugar Conference next welfare of the world's sugar Spring to draw UD a new asreepndnoaa< ment. Other international bodies conSuch an agreement would call cerned with other commodities for curtailment of crops in roo-t are running world-wide advestlsof the leading sugar-producing nig campaigns t„ pnunole their territories. It would make no proproduct. An outstanding example vision tor any Increase In coni* the campaign by the Internssumption by importing countries tional Wool Secretariat, which That is n problem that will have since the war ha* led the fight to to be tackled separately. |f it H to maintain markets for wool to tho be tackled at all face of increasing competition Cuba. which' has already Infrom the new synthetic fibres. traduced Its ow n independent similar work may now be uncrop restrictions for next year's dertnken by the International plantings, will be the main counSugar Council, If some of its try affected by a new agreement. members get their way. It will be So w' 1 many other leading expensive — but the ; lternative ausar-producini natlcns. Is a glut of sugar and possibly Sugar Pact ruin for many unprotected proBut it is believed that Britain will not subscribe to any A TRUE Jc EXACT HISTORY Of the Ifland of BARBADOES. By RICHARD LIGON, Gene. l.ijton drcidrs to yo lo Barbados and an aicouni of the tint pan of his voyagr thither l\ST\IMt:M /Having been censuicd by some and continued our course to the —whose judgements 1 cannot southwest, (with somewhat control and am tnerefore glad *o scant wind) partly to avoid the allow — for my weakness and high going billows of the Bay .il Indiscretion, that having never Itisray. but chiefly to stand a) 4 made proof of the sea's operafrom pirate and plckaii, lion, and the several face* tost which are very frequent on the watery element put* on, and tbo coaau of Sp-m and Barbery, „nd changes and chances that happen i we put along I pereatvud a tnere, from smooth to rough, difference In the waj of our from rough to raging was and ships—for in slack winds our h Kh going billows (which are consort, the Nonesuch, would when people are too dark hi* 15 %  ifc* me conrt,lullon I run us out of sight in four or five muddled, we ought to ,. on putBUT Iherj is more %  ^^y 1 1 ""I/!"*? of my V f r hour Ml1 but ,n " %  <">< and siifT ting up with them at all. though * rob rapiiai pieialhnianl of It' %  £., i n r5 %  S windt "• dw lhe hke wl,h ***• He %  %  no rt*ht to "imnishdegrading pomp; let us rob it il ?Ko,,td iSlEi f*\h *" that "*" tne Utsar lM *">-<">-' ' %  • death. of those measure.) wesfa af '.. SsTMSssr aartatetS H \ lh ,wlfter th *# ">" We have, however, the tight M *•' .*• .Hill— %  had 7 not fSftfeS ^S th, L ,hCy .^!" ? a Uk r b ^'i 1 "" ,ct < ,hp !" ,f •*• Sir And. Am all. let .,. rob it nf llgln ,n %  ny hom,r ,n th **** r which Is Need makes the old Lj^f ^l \£ ""aSuJ.^ Bl ,ur ***** and bc,tcr U,nBl P''^" 00 wife Irot. For having lost (by JJJJJJJJJJ^ ? M ^I!--, chambers he would probably have The one Thing Important abr il I Solemnly Say We Should Kill More People II) F. TKNNVMIN JF.SM la Mur.i.-. And Ila Me4WeV* Bit By Bit 1 PUT forward in all senoukntsB IT has ben a baao) -nil arttta the most oasmionale i to -lo .... > .i* an experiment wo many innocent suffering peoSir, axacutatMM are In* %  kaujad tor; it hi the fact draw spectators If torn that a tetm has been set u. OM I dnw anai nt an*e !1 ; J U J hornb, V air puipose. The old mcth.* day by day. hour by hour, death w „ mftft ssusfsctory to snw n -rvr U> xneone in i*rpiirtici %  „,* p^c w „ „,.;,, feet heath. No one should have bv „ pr^Mto,,, jh,. rr t m inal %  ittci lhrtU PupporU i bj 11 Whj But what we have, as cillxens. Ve swept away*" a perfect rlgh to Judge Is whether. I too Weeks of Fear from truly help conclude that censure barbarous riot) all that I had gotten by the painful travels and carea of mv youth by which Pett. About iv:ng Horses. Mr. latitude of 45 de--; green we met with a ship coming I %  • V.'^Jl„*r.?. r l^ from Uulnn bul boSnd to. been howled down, not with pimlshmenl l that it should b laughter, but with horror, and yet certain. duoan Sciine For Increase Pleiitv of scope exists for smh a campaign to increase the world's consumption of sugar. In Spam, for example, sales of sugar average only 15 lbs. per head of population every year. In Italy, the average rcheme that would limit Commonwealth sugar production below the quota* laid down In the Commonwealth Sugar Agreement. which becomes effective at the end of this year. This agreement. signed In l lVrr*"iMlirT "7*"" rrom Guinea but bound an exigent as I must famish or fly; and looking about for friends who are the best supporten staggering a condition. It is a very sensible and v ry humane Idea — always keeping In mind that the slope to hell is easy and that the leader thereto was Hitler. Far Better T1IKHF are many non-w "Mtirdei aim %  published by Hartap Antigua (Vlohrut Arborur l)av e* is 26 lbs. per head. There is room London last December after for enormous Improvement In the months of hard bargaining, has augar consumption of tho^e ti unalready stimulated production of •rnsugar in the Commonwealth. The main reasons for low connotably in th,> Wcsl Indies, where sumption of sugar ore economic acreage is expanding rapidly and ones, often brought about by immore modern equipment installed. port tariffs and other GovernIn other countries, however, ment restrictions. The Spaniard, where sugar is not a traditional for example pays more than 2s. crop, some restrictions on proper lb for YlLs sugar, while the duct ion may be expected These l,.:.,.. ,,.,.., naarlv tm fid '"' '' -" nl y tWJ B u rope M cuunmentseing* incapable of imand afflictions had not depressed her d l ' ld and elephants provement (snd not all t.f than or worn out banishment ab- we h '"* m n WB > exceeding murderers) who would be far sented, or death devoured; sq clvU to "* %  "• ** v **> every letter "put to sleep"; but that is that instead of these near and 8nUeman of our company a the utmost that we have the right 'rn. !" our >.. native comforters 1 found myself present of such rarltiea a* he to do. even to the most brutl ANTIGUA a stranger in mv own country, brought from Guinea and BUrny. murderer. F "" lh *' llrs| ,m "' ,n '"* and therefore resolved to lav We stayed together almost a „ thouW surely be oWbl|o e " Arlwur Day has beei hold of the first opportunity that whole day. the weather be ig ^ tM „ ATti „ measure of thai kind V. u u Mrd ln Antigua on H • might convey me to any o(her very calm, and almost no wind n. T t m ls fuII of ^tfc (xrupi ^ th November. part of the world, how far distant at all. In the evening a fresh h "^ M ^! l|h aSSH The llrst part of the ceremoi.: soever, rather than abide here breeze began to blow, which ^.'", 7p, Dr i,on vi.lt-^ "V ' t *Pj''"' "" ,h served us both in our seversl !" H S^TZTZM^ Grounds at 8 30 un. when II I continued not many weeks in ways, and so saluting each other !" *">"' •> %  7" dlf i %  i th Blart. this expectation when a friend, as with our ordnance, we took out '" *'' tf '"'•'"•• le*hal ehamtier ss uurne addressed hundn-ds i wil'ing lo -hift his ground as I leave N hoiild be In s*.'*-"i rd lunatic arhool children. The PoB gavme an overture which C About thia Unit our consort, %  *' ,,m — %  ''" always renvmn aiu | M IM %  ttaadanei accepted. And so. on die sixthe Nonesuch, parted with us, the I'e'fniF Httler. played vrnUa cbtldran planted teenth day of June 1947 we emdirectly of the Parabbu Island* numbet of rreaa al'"• '•'" "' ,r grounds. AchlHes. a vessel of 350 tons, the ot Q^OC Verde where we were 'irned as now, and that the | M ,)„. %  fternootl master Thomas Cmwder of Lonlu i ra d e f ur Negroes Horses and leeward part of il waa at other x„„ k ptaea at lha mall Wail don No sooner we were all aboard, cattle whlcK we were then to '""es exceedingly fruitful and i ar 5|(H) .,. Itvat tr)C bridge at lb* bul we presently weighed anchor ,,,, at Barbados pleasant, abounding with all sorts oastertl end of Michael's Villa^ nnd put to sea, In i U %  >ather So, keeping our course about aapwfj are now ready to urge the International Sugar Council to launch a world-wide offensive against such artificial restrictions i consumption a, taxes and high "OFFICIAL SECRETS" ACT All Jamaican Civil Servant, are required lo Blfn the "Omclal lien! Irulti. corn, wine, oil After an a,_ n { v i^an,,!, from the t-oalt of ,ul lne l '*' ,l *n>ara: with horsei. |,.iuy, UM Chairman "f lha not felt the like and continued • i..:^,.. lh „ .._. %  ,_„ cattle, aheep, foat, ho. poultry. CotnmlaUonara, lion s I I I so till we came to Talrnouth HarJ^ di, !" vered w.V the Iala ^3 "' •" '""• " d "" •*" """' "' "" n l "> 1 "" '' "" bour. where we put In and reeled Kri^amU. which lie" In MI deaea Hah. Theae lelanda lie near 33 plant the ilr.t Ire.' The I anllht. S£e\?The Northward1 wh?h wc der.. lo the. No.thward. planted 1>> I But In our pauaje thither we tK",. !" '„ S„b7nid side When H '""P*"" 1 hetwecn theae burnr at another lil.n.i.l were very uncertain upon what ., ,, h . ,, ^ (leuvlnit the Madelraa on our apace near the coatt we were by reaaon.of lhe ?£*$%, -*'„ win,,, te .au3 btarljoard atda) we found a e.iAMltua ha ha unsteadiness of the wind, and '" %  •. ,. r „.„, lr i,de wind to carry in to rainfall this yen. and %  cloudiness of lhe weather, so h .„.' .V, __* „ n ,i „„ IU ntaln. th'' southward When the next oln to be an ialand-wlde elton that I perceived erme troubles ""• "'" • %  rt „, _|„, Ul i, i-l.ind came into view It was tlniui to pmlc. I and foi and doubts In the Seamen on E£i5 „., I, „'. !" !" „r„\,,S Vita, but at such a distance %  • hundreds ..f Iran arhkfl h that shoM p....e than In .11 the Sr^e n. lirt T\t eHtor h 5 could hardly discern colour.. Mil been plant. I of ,l„. , voyaje .Bar. But. the weather "%  ^r" RJ" "' "• ^L, ',,„, lhe lenctnl landscape of UN hill Uujaa. Mirny of lha 0 clenrin, up. the muter and lhe "' ""''• £"1J? "'"' ,'f_J seemed to u. very beautiful. ..-Ml, -rved .. >h I ,ll mates drew out aever.1 plou .nd hu J^. r "!' r ;' d !" ail liaw-thorn? '"'" "" lu " ' IU !" ** %  "'"" '"" ,k "" d landscape.. which they had b tL •"•"^„*,"" n !LL "wthorna, ^ a hurricane, of IP80 II formerly taken on the eoaat of ""S-jJ"!. ''TL,, '".Tth_, |„ con Thl. i.land la famoua fur erevival of Arbour Day haFrance and England, (which are ? hu 7" ,"1,^, ^.llT.1 th. cellenl salt and for hones, which a wondciM: iinulal of great uIn the narrow seas) n^u whlrh .nrL-ai^ to... llkli I" """ prolK-rly excel all 1I...I ma an Irdar by which they were well aaaurad Phe^^'u J"3Sno no -ver I have n. their hoove, beut'TheX-p-nV^r^actilaT. ?Z^XttlttrtuZ %  " P --TSSf,. but attend only the tides, cornimport duties, coupled with aiprosecreU Act" which prohibits the motioniil campaign, aimed dn*cUy disclosing of Government informat the consumer himself, to bring A tion without auihorily, under a him to regard s ugr as a neccsrecent ruling of the Executive slty rather than a luxury. Council. Since the Council was estabA Government spokesman said llshed. Its main ta,k haa been to that there was -nothing sinister" deal with over-production probjn the requirement, since It was lems'and market surpluses. It has always required though not strictdone this through the current Inly imposed. ror they seldom !" ££f £*&£? ^firS. '"T but level ss the lop at a "< l"Ughes that we ride them large church or barn, but burned %  Barbados down sharp and worse than the other so that steep rock* without shoes, snd no instead of the lively greens other goals go surer upon the countries put on at this lime rocks and hills than they, and of the year, these were apparelled many of them veiy strong i.i.d with russets, or at the best clean limbtd. i unui 1W .MII cauPhy n a „ ior1a This island we left ten leagues But It fell out that this year or thereabout* on our slarboaro the summer wathere hotter than side, and next to it, tin for store of excellent MAIL NOTICES pass and card, nor is there any use of other directors in ao narrow a room. We were, as I remember, sbout 10 days sailing to Falmouth. and had with us a small ship of about 180 tons called the iVna| Offli-r ,irr.l Hall ..I II UMWI %  aMaU at 1 p n> and OrdMary Han 'FUSUrSl "hfm^S'Thel uTuat and tnV ^am' !" th re May. fain %  •I. N..I. n( | HI loi.aH* will b slownl I iindai 1-niv.l Mall al IJ >t AJ i.i aining In England. The next day we put to aea that they had never seen contlnurd.) HARRISONS FOR FJNB3T MEN'S SUITS %  on Should Select tke%e — FINE Ul IS I OK A MAN! STUPED TROPICAL SUITS in Fawn & Brown (a. S43.M PLAIN WORSTED SUITS in Fawn and Brown Shaft, Breasted (!? %  $41.87 Double Breasted (a $42.72 PIN STRIPED WORSTED SUITS in Navy & Brown IS S43.84 Blue and Grey (it $48.86 GABARDINE SUITS in Fawn 4 Brown @ Ml.53 SPORTS COATS in Blue. Grey, Fawn and Brown — eeveral design. front S18.M to *228 PANTS in Worsted, Garbardine and Linen from SI0.24 to $27.75 HARRISON'S Dial: BH BATH ROBES AND DRESSING GOWNS LADIES WEEK-END CASES CAVE SHEPHEKD 4 (0.. LTD. It. 11. It. 13 HKlitli -Mil I I Sunburn Apply the Craam |ently to the burnt area. In addition to itt toothing action, Cetavlex will effectively prevent infection where the .kin is broken. UM 'Cetavlex* no* WOUND* cun. auN tcsATCrn.. tie. 'CetavleX* Cream Antiseptic and non-irritant Sole Agents and Dutnbuton A. S. 6RYDEN SONS (BAftBADOS. LTD. BRIDGETOWN /ICP to fit'D Jefft /Jn and hondr Tm MM* ma CKW MM. CMIM Neuralgia, Neuritis, Sciatic.1, Toothache A gtneroui application of comforting, toothing THERMOGENE Met*lcated Rub to the painful part will won bring relief. Repeat che application a required until the pain h disappeared DOUBLE-ACTION THERMOGEIE MEDICATED RUB /n big g/os$ jars and handy hn% W*'ifamu 1 m\i 0H EEJ t uniit i SELWTM0\ AddU llru-h NeU .rnls l.r^thpr ffhavinf NeU (.Hi ili:.i/"is \\ .ul... i Kaion Nffctf 51 I'rm U it.un.n, l.iir.wil! I'riia Virdlry Shavinc llowb AlklnaoR Nhavlm Mlis* Alklninn Travclllnt ^rli Mornr Shavlnr Html. Chromium t'Utarelte t'ssrs Dunhlll. t'ornov and tirand%  Ism Plpet I'rewalalton Tin. of IKITT SALAI1 prr t, !1 i' in ii III* HUMII p-r Tin HI II II 4 \lT.lfT.O.VEK—Whole pi-r Tin •" III T< II ( AI'l.lFMmrR—B-okr prr Tin 3Hr DITCH M'l'l t N\KI prr Tin ' rNSTANI l-nvil M Mf J*r %  •!*• •IM.M'-ll I'lM MCI t -UfKR per Tin 3r. mNQAFO' I'M iPPU i I MEN per Tin %  Mr. Ht'NT'H PABAOta Til's |*,-r Tin Mr. IIU.IW iiMlin PA8TE laatK .We., SMBII 0 • i HlVtlfni.ltlN l-l.l Ms -per 50e. IIAIJAN MM I-un .hf-IU) per lb. 99c ROO (.1 .' \ III I V .*r -ia Tin <•. ARABIAN HATES lib Pht. c. M mE09 r-irh CLOVES DT nunrr lie. 11LVER BALM (MLftOatES) per oMr 1*>. PRCNU p~r lb. tic. IM h \ll I IM Itl'M STANSFELD, SCOTT & CO., LTD.



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PAGE lttO ^mmm fa SUNDAY ADVOCATE s| Mill NOVEMBER 1. 1*K The Only Pain believer containing Vitamin B, %  '"IM VI.A:, i VII I ON< B. VwwiUly oyexjuy d it the dufcrrnt* ii "*WT Ye.ssPvnn.Cold, < lull v/mptorm .. . appear, and you'll led ever much 'vn.t MUEvl'. *OUH PAIN and MAX£', TOU f£U Wfctt KEME PINI >2Si Y JK! """ %  COLDS, CHILLS > LSTt! ERA • %  '?l>4 <•" I1.UMATIC (TO-DAY I That', ike < ktHd M hrtirr, tool YEAST-VITE Mil WoodMdc Lawn Tenon jmrnent wlU opae. eaMar> BOTTLE* You'll be MW b T il (he speUpuf' bonlr >ad (A*4/1*/ b* the L-ss.it* of dM. ne* nad pali.li I No nrd ti worry about tpilLnx* A rtvolutunarv new ')cMri give. *ou [Irniy < %  time to tight th* ttpMt hontebrttaKanvdamafcM done to rov clothing or luniicuie' Prn(nt.wMl-li>okiiic mas*, urn 11 hosstl la* KBunonal Nad-Mumirc'' neck meaium out n-ii-*.. kitl rats "gat .noufii ol poli.ii to to*CT one nail petfcilil New CUTEX Sail Poli.li cc*sfai 1 EMRWJOO, the n.it*L!-.( ingredient. OJIWM asd othet pohihei? Aik to sat tbc • Mr(t. laih.on-njrht .hides t P I A Z I ..* Mil' J\(K A THE HI ANKTALK" l Kl" IN IH HARM Jan* l>VMl %  ..MAN NlVtJI•sl 1 I H'.(> A I *<-. %  1 SO M M.I I si i IP 1,1 %  A JUNSTII • HI VI i. I T.I %  at BRIDGETOWN NOW PLAYING .*..-. %  „ ... ft to T Art Kin Hit' RATON L-ASS" Patnru %  %  CothMP %  I \IMIM, Ik' I lit l>. llll .1 S-ltlNl rttnri v if am < %  ICOaOAM MAVt) hi-l"ii"i>" • %  •MionTE Jitnei Harbet<( ItQim PAVTON in .i. H...I I till I I HHI M.I PtrlNCC Or PEACE %  (•ton .. %  ., i Tt.ee. A Was). 4 1 11 JO 1 II. Ill I.I till %  OR IMI Ucorir liAI-1 A %  ntortw .1 th. IIOIIIII II link I 'II • rtfTTKH t ' A *• |, Who| in Ml I K (III. *tflKTIN for STUBBORN hang-on Bronchial COUGHS not row evening at "Wo Hay Street. In their drive lo .<>ll*rt fund* lor Christinas CkaxKie* Use Irdies have o§*janised a seiies of tennis gams when some of the test local players will take part. Tomorrow evening "I*one;''' E will mwt Denis Worna Men'* Single* and the follow ng evening Erie Tavir nnd Dr. OMrii* Manning will A eppO"!* O-irrpli Trlrnuigh J ^Louis bi Hii: Doubles. Enroulv i'n &l. kill* M R. and MRS. C. B. C CONNEU. and Mrv Connell's sinter. MrW S. I). II Shaphrrd. rriv-d from England ycerday b> inn Geiflla. They arc PQ routa 10 Si. KilU wnrre Mr. Conncll If • 'niof Engineer. St Kitts Sugar f % %  ItjBBJ Mr gad \1r. Connell arereturning from loog U'-iVf. M< 1 Shepherd who hrtd bein residing n England for several vear* with %  neither silAT Mr Wfdlake. plans to lake up residence once main in that colony. VUiton M R. R. MYER and HON. MRS. MYER—regular VIMtors to BarbAdos—were among the pAAACnger* .irriving from England yesterday by the OvWo, Vtwmtng Sotitn rot n %  un.v I' winter" they are guests at thr 1 Hotel Royal. gcurib Qaltinq HOODAl I III tIKIi I.IOBI "PlMSt. riHAI COLDS THERE'S NOTHING CURES AS SWIFTLY AS CANADA'S LARGEST SELLING COUGH AND COLD REMEDY .in* dail> Unda Daifll Tail Hi * HUM I>>I. v* ISLAND Of .ooitMi^riirtAt \IVI MI'KI.N or CAM". FABIAN DESIRE 1 .' (•lor) t Thrill*' Raw* l't"< H *^_ %  *•' OpMtnj rildav ifu! A it m. 1 1 -,.. I ll-IM in COMIN' ROUND THL MOUNTAIN SAMSON AND DEXIAH i it 11 01—1 t1>id Oeaagi 1 1 %  I THC GREEN GLOVE ROYAL To-IMo >-o I llnin'ul IMulH* I .AIIPF-I M IS 0<.table Atu.it,,,, (;".rr Brvnt Vra I WtMlnradW A Ttiuraaa* 4 A • II 1 pJjtani Th. AruHt^BMOTI till ktAOH Mof.d.1 A Tuda. I K A :-i DHIBto -J.m Hull Mania M m (A ill IIIII\ AMI mr. roan Mill ft lIRtM.I toxfjrim Wrd. A Ttlllri 4 m /. THAT NHIMT HUH till RIVm I \Tiy BUCKLEY'S MIXTURE r •.•• %  %  "•l'>77,Tiiirii MRMIH oooo t.i n ga lle i i GLOBE TO-NKIHT Sin P.M. LAST SHOWS OF OUICttl* (II l-IIKIIt riAl I1AI.E IIOBEKTSON ANNK 11AXTEH and < % %  • > %  IS III I lilt IHAN l>IKI UUU BJZAHETH TAYLOR III MOIIKIIH IMIINIIAVI A TI'ERDAT 111 A a Jo (III VIM II 111 III! IHI/is tcurroN WEBB. so aMi>iio> VKI IIARIIY SULUVAN—AHI.ENI DAIII. !•••> %  ^.-< .-. MM %  11 i V.ViV/ i WttttVtf^AwAiAyA^ 'w: use Palmolive Soap at Dotton advised tor a Brighter, Fieiher Complexion I 0. .... „.,. ., hkah, | M ... ,.„„„ ,,,i.„^ '* R ...h J b<, kl !" >O^F *|t Oay .*,.. I.Mi leta eUi-Ji.ll. *M .... ....,i„n, b .,,Mr hiMai iMe .,,.„, .... 2 '" %  %  %  %  1111 M A*-*-.-, -A. Wee, Mm. ef ^ Fxrili'im>ni: . AarpeaaM" j llurdir ! at the EMPIRE THEATRE I till A I2lh lire, ml.,, when J --.-\RBADOS PLAYERS present •-Till: IIIIHD VISITOR" mtbei I loa,-mluuslv successful Thriller the Duke ol Yurks Theatre. London Produced by ANNETTE DANOAM ;. Cnn Yim Solve the Mvsterv? C.'iiie und See ! THE ANNUAL POPPY DANCE Under the Patronage of The Acting Governor and Mrs. Turner will be held at The MARINE HOTEL Kindly loni by the Management SATURDAY. NOVEMBEB 22ND By kind permission ol Col. Mlchelln THE POLICE BAND DANCE ORCHESTRA Ball Room Tables may be raettrved. "Phone Mm. I CONNELL. H7 LOOK! SANTA offers -vrn inrlillliiifl tlfstinir/liiiiirii/ • TELEPHONES • IMSTOI.S • I'AKS • BOATS • DOLLS • S( ALES • PRAMS Dancing 9 p.m. lo 2 a.m. Admualon SI 00 (Ac Hiapimti ml-The Corner I^RSRlM To Ifumlu,.: K EN CASTON. od 25 of Sur%  ..how father Is with the Evening Standard's Advertising •:it. was an Intramit piisacnger through Barbados yesterday by the Getflto. He is on hi* way to Spanish Honduras to join the United Fruit Company. In 147'48. Ken was at Heading University with John Sainl and Ernest Moll of Barbados. Ken was studying agriculture. They were members of Reading's rowing team and represented this university at one of Henley's annual regattas. Old LortgP Boy rjEFORE 21-year-old Charlie %  O Alexander joins Com pant n Aiucarera Dominica no, sugar estate in the Dominican Republic he promised his father he would visit hit "old school." He was a passenger arriving from En>U:inn Mil Tnd.-\ \IMIS(. Illl t Mil -I S-IIIM Motir.AN THE BAOOAUE WAREHOUSE WAS crowded with visitors yesterday -ftaruoou. Tltey cani to welcoatr frlsnd* and relatives who arrlyed by Ue BS. -Uelflto". Bested (loft to right) H*. Mrs Arthur oWerW, Mrs. Florsncs Day-lb, MiK. L. Alone. Mr>>. Blca-rd Packer and Mrs. Geoffrey ssBBseat. Mr. Arthur Bkecte. Mr Neville Howell and Mr John Martui are In the back groand. InlraiiHit T HIN1DADS | Police, Col. K. H. f i II u by his v. fc and l*o I'tililnii srssM iiiLransit passengers lo Trinidad, by the GeHius ygsrtardBy aflav four months' holiday m Englnnd, spent mostly in DsjieiL M R. A. J. BEUX, who Is attached to the C.I.D. department of the Trinidad Police Force J DM MtM ship, He had been in England for seven months on a triuning course. M RS. C1.F..MMIE HETTENCOURT GOMES of Georg town. British Guiana and lirr d..ught(r Terry were intransit on ilie GoHlte y.sterday. At, Trimdad they will change ships for British Guiana. Terry, who had been at ichoo' xl vear. -.hnrtlv after the Coronation ttoliifay l.mfi'il M BS WILFRED wool) %  i vtt> i 1). A Wh. Building Development Adviser. .i .-inothoi .irrival from EngLq the Gelflto. She had been spendinK the sumln with her two sons l ,hool there B ACK In Barbados after an abstnee of over six months are Mr. and kbi C A. Potter. Mr Mat of the Directors ol %  3 Club. St. James. M R. DAVID RICE of Messrs C. B. Rice and Co., Ltd.. accompanied by his wife and son Michael returned from England yesterday by the Oolltle after .-.penning almost four months in the u K France, Switzerland and a couple of days in Italy. R ETURNING by the same gUp were Dr and Mrs. H. E Rkeete. They had also been ovet I r four months' holiday in the I' K .inn mi the Continent Part of then holiday was spent with then daughter and son-inIsnr, Kr and Mrs. Ritchie Packir who returned to Barbados askWd ot them via New York and Mrs Packer was on hand to meet them on their return Buck Home R. and MRS MICHAEL GREAVES of Belmont." St. John, who had been in England since the middle of May on holiday returned home yesterday bv the GeMto. Mrs. Greaves Is a sister of Sir Allan Collymore, Chief Justice of the island, and Mr. Greaves is a brother of Hon. Mrs. M. Hanschcll, M.L.c. who was also at the Baggage Warehouse to meet I hem. HirthiFay Today M RS. NOOTT. wife of Ma; ( B Noott. Headmaster of %  T en Sfhimi. .leromponicd by tleir little daughter, were passengers from England yesterday by the Gelftte. Mrs. Noott and her daughter s hud been in the U.K. for nvei three months on holiday and the Noott family will celebrate Jacqueline's flrst birthday .mniversaiy today. M Fifty Trnlay /CONGRATULATIONS to Mr. Guy Adams on his fiftieth birthday. Guy, who is u younger brother of Mr. OH. Adams. C.M.G.. still retains his boyish sr.alle. Many happy returns of "the day 3 ffest Withe* B EST wishes lo Mr. "Tom" Went, M.B.E on his 58th %  These include wishes for a complete recovery to good health. Mr. Went is now on leave, prior to retiring from the post of Colonial Engineer IAMTTV DRESS SHOP Next Door lo Sinner FROCKS lor nil occasions Irom SHORTS and BLOUSES *s.oe S3.M FLOWERED LINEN I.UA1 AIM; FLOWERED LINEN ....... CEPEA PRINTS PLAIN CHAMBRA 3i" WIDE FLOWERED ill MIIKIK. SILK KMBOISSED MORCAIN (in ,11 shades! S1IEKTS : 100 80 100 N ioa PILIAIW CASKS IIXH BUTTER MUSLIN S .t .X .HI 1.44 1.18 M.75 SH 7.7J M .4:1 Also a New Selection ol Toy, PRAMS. DOLLS. (iUNS. (RANKS. CARS. KTI Store T. R. EVANS (WHITFIELDS) YOUR SHOE STORF. Phone: 4220 I I I I I I \



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SUNDAY N'OVhMRr.K l. 1932 gl'KDA. AhVoi m PAf.E Tlllt£F. AT THi: IYK1HA HH 6. II. MIXED GRILL THIS WEEK seems In Bv outdone nself with ftie number of films seen, and to be written up! Five in all. of which two are comedies, one a tropical adventure and two melodramas, so there is plenty of choice and since most people prefer CdBMdlM Let's start with them. end to accept her In this role tin ..nation—to lay nothmK of her suceo-'iul amputation with t -> much nan than ttt ID thi w.iv "f mrdlcal Howev**, he Is ', to look al and prove* .'. at making hat* Ih! Donald Gray makes %  UaT but his K Lb d and hfs accent too B BJC. 1 under-sea A i'h p shark— hi between the on the whole acting are uished. And ti <]odrama*. At the Placa, ITCASTS OF l-OKER FLAT II ptaln K at Both the*e films are nut of different type*. RATON ventional in while d in th. tig UM aocM of the with the human emotions. Dennis Morgan and RATON PASS Is I of an ambitious and unscrupulous adventuress who %  young ranchot voices a range war in (tie |\iss. Pilled with thuddini; hoove*, clashing flats ng guns, the action pro%  %  i k 'peed in this •weeping melodrama which is background of mountains of Colorado and New Mexico. playi the mcrfcinine Fntale" who links up with a to do her Halsad i i. whose characterization is one of menacing brutality and violence. I to Bay they both come %  i.v end. Morgan i? the Invsadb|a ranch*) arho finally restorer law and order while Basil Ruys<'.iil playhifiither—a grand with more guts and than the rest put toGantaing Hints Farm And Garden tor Amateurs By ACKICOLA \ MWIKIAI CONTRUVEBST IT 1% *rz THINK I. ihe priitlcftli foetal. economic. iiMuttac and < u sphere*—would be a lot mnn peaceful. In li (lysis, war is tied in tlic mlnda of rxtri .albi.v All this i* riot to say that there is nothing Rood m \ ^reasoned argument itnce it often halra anH< thereby enables those on whom final dec .' %  Uci .. i pi middle .: ti'gajrd to tinevidence on both sides Thi B en often ask (or ad-lco a.< to what can be planted to grow and flower •jntchly. The truthful answer to that one is NS4MB. Some plants do mature and lower sooner titan others, yet none can tie hurried beyond their appointed time, for you •0*1*1 hurry nature. N.'t that nature can't hurry herself. Th* Mahogany trees urn ITCHING INFLAMED H P M l next ihanare covered m a greeti sheen of delicate new leaves. Gra !• how nature itn.iiu i example of hurry, for alter Lot Ceaartlo Bug Abbott JACK *ND Till STALK is at the Pla.-town. With Abbot anri ODMUU and the two of them roar through the old fairy tale and turn it into a boisterous burlesque, Filmed. In Technicolor, it bulges with songs and dances and the antics of the two c o m e d ia n *. Starting off in sepia, • i Coatcllo as a baby-sitter who falls asleep and visualises his Ion of "Jack" while the child reads the story. I life in magic world of colour la enlivened by explosive eggs, catapulting trees, a sinning harp, the giant's Unaacnlap house keeper and the giant hunaalt Though the picture fsequently runs away with itself, it has Its moments and will appeal to Abbott and Cottello fans. LOVE IS BETTER THAN LVER is the other comedy, which can be seen at the Globe. In this we have Elizabeth Taylor, who seems to get prettier with each lilm. and IJHTV Parkf in a tenuous romantic comedy of "girl chase* boy and eventually %  ** %  boy!" Miss Taylor pintown dancing teacher who attends a convention in New York and falls head over heels in love with a Theatrical agent. Mr. Parks is the agent with • strong allergy to najfr. Horae-raclng. baseball, the 2! Club and the Copacabana are the backgrounds for the dizzy romance which finally culminate* in a false engagement annouacement and backstage goings-on of u dancing exhibition with two hundred children. Both stars do their best and the Br. theatrical dialect is amusing and flippant. ISLAND OF DESIRE, base:! on Hugh Brooke's novel "Satutuay Island" is playing at the Empire. It is one of these exotic. but highly improbable South Sea Island adventures that is long 00 gorgeous settings. I flora and fauna, sunsets and good photography, but short on and direction. The northern coast of Jamaica is the local* fOI a romanlic interlude ind th of a young marine Corporal and o prim and proper army nurse who have been shipwrecked. All goes well in their idyllic pal until the crash-landiim of an RAJ. flier whose arm has to be amputated with the natural follow-up that he and the nurse fall In love, and the marine— not without a struggle—bows out. In this triangle arc Linda Darnell. Tab Hunter and Donald Gray. Youthful Mr. Hunter is definitely a credit to the Marine Corps as he provides food, clothing and shelter for the nurse with unbelievable speed. He's a nice looking kid and wilh more experience should do well. As it la, he gives the part freshness and vitality, but is inclined to be wooden. Linda Darnell 1* the %  plnsterish nurse (to begin with) domain of ma %  It is t!" '. the natural vtrsUg the una shower of rain the brown grass natural (art will turn green overnight. Naturo or again, mlm l can certainly hurry, but she canminerals, or, yet again, dung -^ not be hurried. versus chemicals. First. we ij x should remind ourselves that .,... But a knowledge of the differfrom the imt of view ol oil times the various plants take plant there can be no strict line *, from seed planting to flowering ( ,f demarcat what",'. Will help, and from among these aver four. %  ement* ,'" S mes some plants may be found must be work < lat are quick, enough in flowerS(ll i organisms to log to satisfy those gardener chemical formPOULTRY NOTES PHOSFERINE to relieve DEPRESSION If you art fcakaa aervy pondent — lake PHOSFERlNh 1 imi nervea toad to an urm dtgntion, loss of appetite and of exhaustion Wherever atiaic vcr y ou do, you wil niosFERiNF ispaead who are in a hurry. TJi*> (nii !" iii| It.l hatbeen taken from that excellent little S irdcning book "Gardening in arbados for Amateur*". Any of th* seeds on this list *urceof our fcodssq n bu planted at this time, and U J "?>"* I 4 "" a new word' n use. have hoard that If you feed .i poultry antirvlll that penicillin, terr.m and %  .mtUnoti.v ara i>eing used u n with Vitamin mg pigs and gains. certain of these mSg inin hwe MM; •* •*"• "*J thg* i !• %  '; tt "^. f 1 ^ r importancv In tl >' %  "• !*" ..nnual about 10'. lastei of ugly Kpoti f IhouanJ have hcslcd thoir kkm m>uh)n fur with DD l> l'rci,Tiption \l'h.i.-vi v 4 :: ikiC antl-biotics. mn cu m\ DII> unit. jn>i • from (he U It wUl be Btiulble i"i/>'> to u Ito ralrulaf caactlr wh thej natural or artificial In will start to fl FEUOD OF Tlalt BETWEKN KDW1NC. OF BBP AND SFTTING OF FLOWFRK Zinnias ftiapdragon 6 Weeks 8 >t Cosmos 6 Yellow Pea S Bachelor's Button s Candytuft • Cynoglossum Petutila 12 .. 12 Marigold 1 Geranium 12 „ Dahlia 12 ,. Uidv % %  !! %  8 Tlthoiua 10 Nasturtium 12 H3 with fertilizers. iginal state, most of then products of nature — mined Bd nflned fo, aas* of hai trade purposes Even I the principal fertll • ent in sulphate of nnunontrt %  << industrial by-pr. I obtamabM iTotn th* i %  colly unlimited aupotM Tliere i> no space bara to the %  ubttances which propel fall into each group—the natural | n g en and the artificial, or tho organic which ond the Inorganic, terms are us*d We dlscuas the subject braCfly in work" 1 frankly that they It is said that down harmful l i.tcria In the intestinal tract. U is also said .that the) hav. a direct stlinu. ffed or, the growth pi<>;. i. We do i"i> k TI o w. Hut whatever t h c workeri are flndii which ones an animals, at which levels hOUld D* used In the ration optimum remits, what commi are most effective and broad aspects. Itoth aid. admit h : ... ,,,muu quantities requirond, of course. It is common [x#d evaojy In feeds ,. *mm u.t. U that * ow J*"**, *l organic matter H ,. unsound a.nd often costly to %  SB rJu„ Ire to ht! of prlmp ^V^Wlnrt '*'' ply l>ecaua It con\ A rilli vii,^, r21 ."I sK„h?I loM ot nUlmM " ,hUri 1 ,h "" start to flower m flv. w*ek.' fTiA^SL ^aST! I %[•£.£ ?JE time from th. %  moment of planting ( lflTlpM ; M the seeds. Zinnia... Cosmos, and lialuri rrsounr thai £' Balaam come next as they_ each ^^ ,, M|Ulot f(1 nmmmbi) ex £ take si, w-e^cs^rigoUis^oUow ^^ hat ^^ m DUD, You'll be delighted h B mcklr it rclio.-s and hcab 'D.D. riean up all ikjc Blsiait— lUicms, Malaria Sores, hobi luh. Hwcfl BS CUD aod minor inn sasyoiitaaassiogiuiaL'Uc D D.D. acts fail hcc*u it pcnctraic* deep m'. 1 ess, dcsiroyif hsfabdous germ* For yuL.k. ifi.i' beahna u I1.PP Buy %  bottle tola* DD PRESCRIPTION arm THE GREATEST CF ALI HXS It will be i tiking seven weeks to mature. ??,,_.„ nll hi Z„ n ,. lM w^ i i 1 "" Snapdragon eight weeks. Candy u 'w " !" , ,,J' "' tufiTtnrwhTe the rest on the ^ !" v o t i'Sn ' %  %  ' list t..ke ten to twelve weeks trough heavy croj ping und< i tt)l Bn tibiotic roapcctlvely. m.jdwn. intensive metho,.. the farmer. The kind i ..i poultry beinn their stage of and most of all Uie OUTCASTS OF l"OKEit FIAT lj iMsed on a famous story by Brett Hart in which a h;id> t h.naeters find .i~mnd In a hut In the High Bwrraj. It appears that the activities of l murdcroui bank robbti -who makes a getaway—have so enraged the people of Poker Flat that th* to run their undesirable out of town. These ini robbers wife, a progambler, an elderly drunkard and a prostitute, all of whom juft mike the cabin before the storm, Th*) *n joined egnant girl ami her • i of course, by the bank robber. This cosy little party is at the mercy of the gunman, portrayed by Cameron Mitchell as one of the most desadistic, half-crazed and brutal characters I have ever encountered. Anne Baxter, as his wife, is on the receiving end for her fair share of assault and battery while Dale Robertsen. the gambler whom she loves, eventually kills the bandit, who In the meantime has bashed in Bsi head of the old "dipso*' and shot the prostitute for good BMt uie. The only redeeming. H Itm La acting which Is uniformly good with a special mention for Comeron Mitchell. [i He. larms are providing %  new ingredients. of |K>ultry und U' nuHl*rn. mtatuiive mctt But now the prut Another list, taken from the organic Held have m.de extruvaumo garden book is also very gant claims. Among thcsi useful, for it gives the names of statement that clu r , _.„„-....„._. those plants whose seeds can Luducos poor health in pi run d , '": ^ l u r ( disiasnse with a wed-box and renders them pron* can be planted directly into the Further, that the quality of ngrtground. Here it Is. cultural produce is oomproti 1 •SEEDS OF THE FOLLOWING ^iSS S^^^^S, .". i.'S, **^ PLANTS MAY BE SOWN sumption of such produce h. led k WHERE THE PLANTS ARE "" increase In eerta Tr* caOW" disca-**, notably cancer TO GROW. ailments. Still forth... it Is Zinnia, Yellow Pea. Bachelor's ed that prop—anil a by ' |urtmeni bllilj that ilnds them in the feeds %  tjiet ttutd (b the Ball gnd a 47ir Genuine Ecu dc Cologne JI youf I ait !i I a! partner f o kcrp you (rjf rant and cooll Just a dab behind your cart, on wrim or tcmplc>>and you will led gntclully rclreihed. ration to which idded, determines lunation IS needed and the I required mi maximum I nueal growth. the used by what it will prndiH. rather than whether it *.• in Ihi ,.i ti-biotic or that ei> reliable feed grow is a great saving In time 0 f Agriculture for the W< ,-t Indies and trouble, and has the advanC ]ai m ed in Ida "Agricu'tui tage that there is no check In amcnr thnt ,h c increasln L growth from Uie seedlings being cm n iical (. itili/.-i^ .-aused the transplanted. breakdown of sugar-camThere is howev.r, the danger ,h ' 9 "nriering their fMOJMl reof^Kt. carrying them away, and gSTSLTSSTta aVT-wer t' this must be watched out for. West Indies know the answer t. Also it Is difficult to get an even |!' miist m m ce t(1 ft y in conclurran K eemOT d t or^some^Tthc HtSe I,on lhMt aU xhc "'Ideneo' poiol j -, n ,|" neceawg "to'promite foal. pl !" U nS L !" ZX£$. But in the opposite-direction • ,, „, v wlU most Sis is quicxly dpne and doe, not ^S^^^L^^i wiR ''" My ^ tlle k tp C '" disturb Uie majority of the plants. w, agricuIturM. ^^e. if almost r of .n-Litdic* cannot make a ifm-i .i pool one. They n.ust Uadded to feed which •vntain a balance of all the nutlon known to be neei-S..I %  .. Itut added tit such feeds -.iiblnations and levels GENUINE 15LlJn& GOLD EAllutCOLOGNE Apart from that, it is continue W iiiiiow a imuunet—husbandlnR his •mir-r%  • __4,j ganlc nmttcr but supplementing %  %  a-.—, its. ny Judicious u'e of rerUTlzei The world, InDOlf!) for the discovery and debt of grati'' M-lopmcnt of commercial f*rUlc of viotent —. WlU. S^S,,,. too much accent on violence, d UD Hably. owe, sadism and downright brutality. ude to British brains 'not "MOStillxeri' %7/l H COLOGMF. on Rhine.Germany %  miutr nfiou/tiy ti> [fit i>u'yma6 •bttUt /btmut'i t//7!>'J. Hi:; ii H n m n %  i m .,. SAHELY'S Welure you in IDEAL FAMILY ANTACID-LAXATIVE FOR YOUNG AND OLOI Al on alMixer lor nautrolizinfl axcail rtomath acidity ond relieving lha pain, ond diKomfort, of ocid-indigailion. Milk ol Magnesia, o product ol Phillip,, ii one ol the loitetf, moil effective known. A, a lonative. Phillip, act, gentl/ and thoroughly, without griping or diMomfort, ond wilhout embarrassing urgency. Phillip, ton*, up th* entire digestive system ... is the ideal ontocld-loxativ* (or all the family I Get Phillips today I You II like Ih* new | runuf of Fabric for Dexembrr . dci.ilin.cd j|jij for liiilorini; tu'w lull!! Ural Suits lo Pcrfccffiij All Waal I'i" snip.' Wni-lril ill Navy ||| Black niitl llrown Si.l.! W> All WIKSI •MMn (ire. %  %  All Wool (,r,-> Woraled S.IM 11 Liquid or Tablets MILK OF MAGNESIA A PRODUCT OF P |-| | LLI PS







ESTABLISHED 1895



B.T.C. AUTUMN R

Asks for More’
Men In Korea

Holder Of

}
|
CHICAGO, Nov. 15. |

Chicago Sun Times said on Sat-
urday that General Mark Clark
has asked for three or four more
United States divisions to prepare |
a new major offensive in Korea.

In the despatch signed by
Frederick Kyh, the newspapei
said Clark, Commander-in-Chief
in the Far East, requested addi-
tional forces from the Defence De«
partment, It said “according to
reliable sources he made it clear |
that his aim is to preparé a new

yesterday afternoon.

Results At



major offensive against . the

Chinese and North Korean Com-

munists, A Gi i
As a prelude to his vrovosal | ance

Clark told recent American visitors

in Tokyo that he believes the! 22ND RACE

stalemate in Korea is severely | 1. twinkle (Cressley)
damaging United States prestige. | 2 En Prix (Sinebi.
Clark, it is understood. intends <9 ene ae Race :
put the same request to President | 1. Firelady (Quested)
‘elect Eisenhower; when he later | 2. Pepper Wine (Crosstey)

visits Korea | & Tibor'an Lady (Singh)

, 3 20M RACE

Eisenhower would then be faced | 1. Colombus (O'Neil)
with an extremely awkward de- | 2. First Admiral (Yvonet)

Apollo (Fletcher)
2TH RACE
Apple Sam (Thirkell)
Super Jet (Â¥vonet)

Llusion (Holder)
26TH RACE
Fluffy MufMies

cision. On the one hand he is ac- | "
customed to fighting and winning | 2
war the tough way. Clark’s plans | 2
would rormally appeal to that im- | 3%
vulse. On the other hand Fisen-

. : 1. (Holden)
hower’s speeches in the recent 2. Topsy (Newman)
election campaign stressed the | 8. Magic Gaye (Belle)
need to reduce the number of | TH RACE
American troovs in Korea. That! L. Colombus (O'Neil)

e : 2. Cardinal (C ley)

is why the President elect em- 3. Cross Bow (vider)

nhasize? his project to train more

“STH RACE
South Koreans who would re- 3. Abu AC (Â¥vonst)
piace Allied soldiers |p RRS alas
' The s‘orv said Clark's reouesi , ? : :

met some support “in high places
at Pentecon includire that of the
Neputy Defence Secretary William
FPocter ond momhbers of the ioint
Chiefs of Staff.” It said. the latter
grain are svopased to discuss the |
reanest within the next week, but
WA daniging te ev santsa otil after |
Risenho'ver’s visit.—T_P.



| West Indians
Will Get Work
In Florida

A negotiating committee of the
Regional Labour Board has had
}talks in Kingston, Jamaica this
| week with representatives of the
| British West Indies Employers
|Committee in the United States
K.C.M.G.,| with a view to arranging terms
under which British West Indies
workers will be employed in cit-
rus and other crops in Florida
during the next few months.

Mutually — satisfactory arrange-



Sir George Seel
To Be Chairmen
W.L Confererce

S:r George Seel,
Comptroiler tor Development and
Weltare and British Co-Chair-
man of the Caribbean Commis-
sion, will leave Barbados on
November 22 for Montego pay,
Jamaica, where he is to act as ; y 5
Chairman of. the Fifth Session oO one erie been agreed .
the West Indian Conference and|* result large numbers of work~
attend the Fifteenth Meeting of /®S now employed in other States
the Caribbean Commission, under |in the United States of America
whose auspices hnatiaateduiet
sessions are held. frene ‘ 2 $

"ay sry | their present contracts will have
ton aa eee a ‘ opportunities of work during the

baer 3 mene? i sip winter season,

a, eeark tne peeve = ai It is probable that the numbers
ames ae “the Commission— ®Vailable in the United States will
pole ae Netherlands, the | ¢ imsufficiunt to meet the full re-
ieee: itinadinnn ana the United Guirements of the Florida grow-
ee wet ers and this may well give oppor-
ima bcak wee .'tunity for the recruitment of
Pn Mea eee. 6 2ddiuonal workers from Britist
1944 under the chairmanship of} Caribbean territories.



the laie Str Frank Stockdale; |
and it is again the turn of a
British territory and a British

Students In

chairmen.

The following oo of ne 4 ‘

Levelooment and Welfare staff, {i R :

@ On Page '16 _Laro kKiot

t | CAIRO, Nov. 15.
7 yen Rioting broke out among severa.
Annour:ce thousand Cairo University student
congregating for Martyr’s Day
On H-Bomb celebration today and 12 youth:

ny’ | were reported injured,

Kxpected | The fight started when a Moslem
| Brotherhood member Hassan Doh
WASHINGTON, Nov. 15, | delivered a speech declaring that
Inio.med sources said official (he Egyptians who fought in Pal-
confirmaticn of history’s. first) estine against the Jews and in the
hycrogen bomb explosion is ex-'!Canal Zone against the British

pected shortly perhaps byjnow should deciare an open war
President Truman early next|on “Red Communism”. Two hun-
week, if the Atomic Energy Com-! dred Communist youths yelled in
mission does not do it first. | reply “no re:ctionarizs! no Fas-

The source suggested that Mr. | cist! we demand the release of the
Truman may make Tuesday's) rest of political privoners’” (most-
meeting with President-elect Eis- |!

and as|

ce | and who would ordinarily be re-|
the )Cantepsote the conclusion of)

Seen anEeeniemed

Gen. Clark Columbus Wins Sweep:

Ticket No.

SS 2161 Gets $33,286

MISS ROSEMARY BOON’S brown cuit Lo.wiious oot
of Colrose-Busy Woman, secured sixteen points and raced
unbeaten to win the Big Sweep as the Barbados Turf Club's
four-day Autumn Meeting ended at the Garrison Savannah

The three-year-old colt brings to the lucky holder of
Ticket No, SS 2161 the sum of

$33,286.00.
")..1be .wweather
; and although there were no
|eora@: broken yesterday,
| Very keen racing was witnessed
by the crowd — the largest that
| attended the meeting.
The biggest upset

} was in the

was -again
re-

for the day
Worthing Handicap
; over nine furlongs which was
}won by Mr. S,. A. Blanchette’s
| four-year-old
| The Pari-mutuel paid $6.90
| win and the Forecast paid $184.80
}on the’ Firelady-Pepper Wine
combination,

gooa prizes having
$1,000 mark on one occasion and
the $900.00 mark on three occa-

fine

some



bay filly Firelady, |
to,

The Field-Sweep also paid some |
re-ched the |

sions. The $1,000 mark was reach- ,

ed in the last race of the
the Final Handicap,
Six Wins *

| Most successiu] Ow®er for the
|meeting was Mr. F. E. C. Bethell
| with six wins. He incidentelly
{headed the lict of trainers with
|seven wins to his credit. Hon'ble

Meet.

V. C. Gale ‘and Mr, J. T, Fletcher |

}trained four winners each while;

[the most successful Jockey was |

|Â¥Yvonet with six wins. Frank
|O’Neil came next with five,

| The Police Band under Capt.
'C. E. Raison was again in attend-
ance and rendered some lively
airs.

TWINTY-SECOND RACE
Gravesend Handicap

Eight horses out of an original
field of 15 faced the ‘starter in
| this event—the first of the day—
| over the 5% furlong distance,
| Of the eight going
|} Diamond piloted by Newman
| carried the top weight of 133 Ibs.
| while Poplin, Joan Star and
Wonderful each carried 2, 3 and
| 5% overweight respectively.
| Dynamite (Blades up) was left
flatfooted when the gates fiéw,
and Holder pushed Blue Grass to
the fore, Twinkle; Poplin and
Blue Diamond followed in that
order up to the four when Blue
Diamond took over: from Poplin.
Going past the three, Poplin
now trailed in the rear, having
been taken down by Dynanite
who had reduced the lead held
by the rest of the field.

There were some quick ex-
changes of positions at the two,

|
|
}



and coming into the home
tech, Twinkle challenged Blue
rass and took over mid way up
stretch to finish first and
‘register her second win of the
meeting.
Fn Prix who had come from

the fifth position rushed through
with a driving finish to snatch
@ On Page 4



Vietminhs
Renew Attacks

HANOI, Indo-China, Nov. 15.

Communist-led rebels opened a
“third front” in the rapidly ex-
panding Indo-China war with
hree bloody but unsuccessful
attacks against Hungyen, 28, miles
southeast of Hanoi,

The French and native garrison

in the lower Red River town man- |

aged to beat back screaming Viet-
minh attackers with artillery and
mortar before they reached the
barbed wire entanglements on the

|
{

|
|

Blue,

'

|
|
}

}

|

|

|

MISS ROSEMARY BOON leading in Colombus (Jockey Frank

|

onde

O'Neil up) after winning the Rockley Handicap over nine fur- |
tongs. Colombus raced unbeaten at the B.T.C. Autumn Me.t to

win the big sweep.

US. Concerned Over Racial
Confliets In

}

South Africa

UNITED NATIONS, Nov, 15.

THE UNITED STATES declared

“seriously concerned” o
Africa and favoured a ful

Charles A.
mittee said the:

yee that it was
acial conflicts in South

the
cussion on the issue,

Sprague. sp" ning!atea special Political. Cqm-
United States would oppose a move by the
Union of South Africa to declare that the

United Nations

“are not competent’ even to consider” charges that persons
of Indian origin are being discriminated,
reine atom Stade

James Street
Flarvest
Festival

The Harvest Festival Ser-
vices of the, James Street
Methodist Church are to be
held today, Sunday, Nov. 16th.
The morning service which
will be broadcast will com-
mence at 11 a.m. and the
preacher will be the Rev. K. E.
Towers, BA. B.D. In the
afternoon at 3 p.m. there will
be a Harvest Demonstration,
“The Things Essential” and
also a presentation ceremony
of Flower Baskets. The eve-
ning service at 7 p.m. will be
conducted by the Rev. Towers.

On Monday ovening at 7.30
p.m, there will be a repetition
of the song service “The
Things Essential” together
with other items.

You are cordially invited to
attend all these services.



KETAINS FLYWEIGHT

He said ‘we do not feel there
‘an be any lasting solution for

{racial problems short of full pars
Ucipation of all races in the life
of a nation. Yesterday we heard
an eloguent delegate of Pakistan
read from our Declaration of In-
;dependence, That was and is a
|charter of our liberty.”

Sprague said the United States
|has “grave doubts’
|move by India and Pakistan to set
jup a “Goed Offices’ Commission
to study the South African race
| problem The establishment of

uch a Commission would not be
a “practical. means of using our
influence,”

The United States strongly fa-
| ieee the “proposal offered by
jl!celand, Denmark, Sweden and
Norway which would call upon
all, member States to bring their
policies into conformity with their
obligation under the charter to
promote the observance of human
rights and fundamental freedoms.”

—U.P.
!

_ English Girl
Shot In Kenya

NAIROBI, Kenya, Nov. 15.
| Aushorities said an English





| From All Qua ae | M J D s we Vy.

|

and a

i
\

‘Red

| Governor

| Paulo
concerning the |

| promises to
| said Brazil

| elect

U.S





300 Dollar
Hollywood |
Doll Fancied |

{

\

Hollywood: At the first preview |

of Christmas toys a new Holly-'

wood-typs doll took everyone's

fancy, li was wearing sun glasses

mink coat, The doll—16
dollars and 95 cents; the coat

298 dollars plus 20 per cent Gov-

! forth receive State aid,

Sydney : Ninety-nine thousand
full grown cattle and 62,000
calves’ have died in the great
Northern Territory drought, ac-
cording to official estimates. They
were worth more than £1,700.000

Jerusalem: Any family with ten
children which settles in Isreel’:
Sea outpost of Eilat wil)
be given £500 by the Israeli Gov-
ernment,

New York: A carpet manufac-
Surer has bought a theatre net-
work TV programme cov: ring 15
cities 3,000 miles apert. Into 15
theatres will go deal®rs, salesmen
and shareholders to listen to a

| sales talk by the company's head

Joseph L, Bactwick, and see him
as he speaks.
R-ngoon; The Burmese
ernment has decided to go
@ On Page 16

Fog Blankets |
|

Gov-
into





London

LONDON, Nov. 15.
A. thick white fog blanketed
London early today reducing visi-
bility to a tew yards and forcing |

traffic to a crawl. In some arcas
of _the city, fog was so_ thick!
policemen guided automobiles

through intersections with flasn-}
lights, as parties-goers in evening
dress tried to find their way home. '
Early morning bus services were
jelayed and commuter trains ran
late. The fog was expected to
last until early in the afternoon, |

The Air Ministry said the fog |
was caused by a change in tem-
perature, lack of wind and a one

hundred per cent increase in

humidity.

London Airport. was. closed

throughout the night. |
—U.P,



!

Democrats
Broke Promise

MIAMI, Florida, Nov. 15,

Senct Adhemar De Barros
Brazilian industrialist and former
of the state of Sao
accused the Truman Ad-
ministration of failing to keep |
South America, but
will take new hope
the advent of President-|
Eisenhower De Barros, |

three week

study of |
election procedures (and
vamp ugn

methods, Icft by air |
|last night for Brazil
|. He said the Truman adminis-!

with

nding

[tn fulfilling “promises to South |
America. He said “the Latin- |
American countries were prom-|
ised $600,000,000 under Point
|Four Programmes and half of!
}that was to go to Brazil but the |
Truman administration did not!
even get started in keeping that |
promis Yet the U.S. spent|

$42,000,000,000 in Europe.”
—U-P.



P.O.8. Council



“Tnment tax.
Rongoonf Triplets, quads and
quins born in Burma will hence-

a

PRICE : SIX

Cabin

Al

President-elect Eisenhc

role in th» fortheeming

Administration after a lengt
E. Dewey of New York.

A True Ard
Exact History

‘Today on page pine the
Advocate begins serialisa-
tion of the first History ever
written of this islang —
Rchard Ligon’s “True and
Exact History of ine isiand
of Barbados.” |



}

The serialisation of a his-
tory published as long ago
as 1657 is a rather unusual
step for a newspaper to
take, but we believe that
she public of Barbados is
anxious to know the his.
tory of its island, and since
Ligon his nol been reprint.
ed for over two hundred
and fifty years few Barba-
dians have had the oppor-
tunity to read this book



To make it easier for the

modern reader to read
Ligon’s History, which is
naturally written in some-

what outdateq English, Mr.
Tin Gale has modernised ||
the spelling except where |
h» thinks it would spoil the
effect of certain passages,



Speaker Given
Confidence Vote |

(Fiom Qur Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Nov. 15

The Legislative Council, afte:
debating for several hours, «4
n Jticn by Honourable T. U. B
Butler calling for the removal of
Henourable William Savary,
Speaker from his office on
F.iday evening rejected it. Adopt-
ecl instead was the amendment by
Honeurable Roy Joseph, Minister
of Education and Social Services
whieh put the Council on record
as having confidence in “the
complete imypartialjty”. af Mp
Speaker,

The Speaker who vacated the
seat in favour of his deputy,
Honourable Ashford Sinanan and
during the debate was applaude:
by the majority of the Hous:
when he returned at the end of|
the “unpleasant discussion’

The Council by a majority vote
also agreed to postpone for si
months consideration ot ar
amendment by Honourable A. P. I

James, member for Tobago seek
ing appointment of a committe
to consider the changes in the

colony's new constitution,

Chief reason advanced by mem
bers in favour of the postpone
ment was that sufficient time
had not elapsed for a test of th
1950 constitution, James’ amend-
ment was moved to a motion by
Hon. Butler which criticised the

traticn “did not even get started’ | constitution and called for ‘effec-

ive representation.”

| announced

CENTS

_

EETING END










¢

» Post
ARG AGIA, Nov. 15
ready for his important

ence with, ‘ outgoing
ith CoSveBwor Thomas

named Mr
Dewey S standby advisor on
matters of “emergency of a tem-

porary character" after meeting
with him in the final important
conference slated for the Presi
lent-elect's vacation here

The conference with Mr. Dewey
late yesterday, left Mr. Eisen-
hower’s four remaining days

here clear of any announced top
visits before he flies to Washing-

ton Tuesday for a m eting with
Mr. Truman and Cabinet mem-
bers

Mr. Eisenhower
four hours at

conferred
his golf courve re-
treat with Republican Governor
who played a large part in
winning nomination for President-
elect.

Mr. Eisenhower said afterwards

fo



that he found Mr. Dewey’s
“availability” as advisor in »p
policy matters of an urgent na-
ture more than gratifying to
me.”

In disclosing the part that Mr.
Dewey had agreed to take in

he

Eisenhower Administration, the
Prevident-elect implied he had
been unable to persuade Mr
Dewey to ace*pt a Cabinet post

Speculation

Besides re-opening speculation

about Mr, Eisenhower's Cabinet
choices the announcement on
Mr, Dewey’s unavailability for

the cabinet opened a new field

of speculation ‘about the part he:

will play in
decisions,
While neither Mr, Eisenhower
ior Mr. Dewey revealed the pre-
cise topics of their conversation
the President-elect’s staff had
beforehand that Mr
Eisenhower's forthcoming trip to
Korea would be broached,

It was emphasized in advance
hat Mr, Dewey's advice would
‘oncern “policy matters” rather
han details regarding this trip.
One such “policy matter” sub-
lected to heavy speculation was
he question of forcibly repatria-
ing Red prisoners. in Korea, Dip-
fomatic sources have said Mr
‘ruman will ask Mr, Risenhower
o make public his views on this
tuestion,

Republican policy

U.P.

NATO Can Reach
Defence Goals

LISBON, Nov.
General Matthew Bb, Hidgway
lew back to Paris today af.er
elling the Portuguese that what
1@ found in Lisbon in othe:
Vest Kuropean capitals—made him



15.

ure N.A.T.O. could reach its de-~
ence goals,

Tne European Supreme Com-
nander said “I am heartened and





couraged to find such a spirit of
Mplote co-operation as I found
ere Portugal’s N.A.T.O. role
is one of full partnership and I

have complete confidence that the
task assigned to the Portuguese

» cee if in fine hands.— U.P.






7,

(4



mnie







7 i v
; ly Communist). town’s outskirts. Losses on both CHAMPIONSHIP girl was shot and wounded in a

Seteaies eksemane bag Fieve " The demonstrations ended with -—— were ere er gun battle with three Africans Say No One Easy on the purse and on the eye,
ticipated announcement. Many » arriv f Lieut: Colonel here were mounting indica- TOKYO, Nov. 15. whom she caught creepin out Y 7 Ae : SEVONSHIRES ole:
servicemen involved in this Geist Abacl Weatear key member |tions that French tank raiders, | vou} aoe & tact ag lof the be aenais of a henke Sire Good For Mayor none" weer * H ~ 2 ea
autumn’s atomic tests at Eniwe- ie ice ACY headquarters dele- } who pierced 45 miles through Viet- shio Shirai won a , Hite aD cha was visiting in Nyeri, wonderful styling, in exqui its
tok proving ground in the Pac- gated by Premier Mohammed }minh lines northwest of Hanoi to- round decision over Hawaii § Dado | Miss Barbara Barclay 21. shot Irom Our Own Correspondert colours at reasonable prices which
ific already have reported IM/\Noguin to attend the ceremonies | wards their Red River fortress of | Marino p-siets tp Setaan “Sh0 li, the. wheiider rushed td her PORT-OF-SPAIN, Nov. 15. | will astonish you. And their snug,
letters home that an H-bomb| |) "hanalf of the Government. | Yenbay may be preparing ‘to Oe eee vee POxn ep | kedroom and picked up a pistol] Biggest local news here this | caressing fit is a sheer joy... a
rte. cn. Oe See Pi. ree PN se Pad ie anon eae | and a ae Mad jouneer Mem-~! week has been the inability of the| ‘ m of poise. DEVONSHIRES
Giver since the first of these ete | “—- BUNCHED IN THE HOME STRETCH Iso seized firearms and openes |Port-of-Spain City Council to | giv

ilso seized firearms and opened give a real boost to the morale ;
ters was‘ published in’ “Los »Ah-)|"'



























{fire at the fleeing Africans, The |°!®ct £ Mogor for the 1952-53 |, they're irresistible .. . the shoes
geles Daily” a week ago, A.E.C.| girl, the daughter of Hugh Bar-|*¢!™. The Council met this morn- you've longed for.
has been under wemenavous pres~ j¢lay, well known British farmer of }‘"% for the purpose of electing | Meg See them ... feel them ... try
sure to say something. So far it Menmingai near Nakuru was)! Mayor and Deputy. but in the | them on . . . at any good shoeshop.
has refused, relying on the past taken to hospital and was ré«| Process of the election, elimin- | Go w-davi. Go nowt
custom of issuing announcements | Deortae to be comfortable. ated every rember includiny the | Fh
about Eniwetok tests only when} 1” She) was staying with the| present Mayor of the 20-memb.. |
the tests were concluded. of! family of Charles M. Fernan-|body, who is willing to accept
hse dehictes test soctan ere sanw| Ger. Secretary of the Kenya | office.
s s } y or
back home, it may be inferred that | Royal Agricultural wr... Failure to choose a Mayor is |
operations are over and that an| “" Tlargely due to the fact that most |
executive amnounccment is im-| ' ° of the members with a following
minent.—U.P. | Antigua Celebrates on the Council are determined to | W. who value poise
Jervis | | Prince’s Birthday | Corousion voi! Executive for | choose DEVONSHIRES
sronation year, This poses a| on ae =
44 Servicemen { Mish its Biiitiatled ray — gore eer the gl
2 a facie ° nder cil can ho another meeting for
Die In Crash | Prinee Charles’ ANIA the election of a Mayor, The mat-
TOKYO. Nov. 15. I Nove ate rnelaee eaeaey? 14th | ter was adjourned to Tuesday in
; ’ : ce 1 mer, was celebrated by a@lorder to-obtain the legal opinion
Far East Air Forces said 44 publie holiday, A “dockyard re- of Hon. L. C. H 8, counsel
servicemen most of them return- jview’’ with a magnificent historic for the Cor aoe gabe is)
ing from rest leave in Japan were | {pageant sponsored by the Society E ,
killed when a US. Air Force C} cf Friends pf English Harbour was Meanwhile, in accordance with
119 “Flying Boxcar” crashed into | ithe great attraction of the day|the Corporation ordinance, the
a mountain near Seoul, Korea. when over a thousand people|Mayor remains in office until a |
The twin engined plane rammed | journeyed to Nelson’s Dockyard | successor is elected. Councillor
into the 2,000 foot mountain yes- | where they saw the period |George Cabral, of Portuguese des-
terday only a few minutes away) jcostumes of ladies, gentlemen and {cent continues to hold the office. | .
from its destination, an airport in sailors of the 18th century. There is considerable speculation
the Seoul area. A ground pariy Nelson himself was portrayed | jy political circles whether he can D EVO ha §
said there were “no rurvivors.” jin three scenes. In his » late continue as the city’s Mayor for | Cf 1
The toll was the , largest in any} jtwenties when he first visited he nett six months hadaute of Nay every pair guaranteed
ilitary plane crash since the} Antigua, secondly his meeting with ay ‘nanainhiven ical waa Council AYE
meearer DS padres i Lady Hamilton and thirdly Neilson |" argument that you hf ‘
ve ee f aboard leaving his dockyard in 1805 for }has made a decision to-day that| THE MANSFIELD SHOE CO., LTD., MANSFIELD, NOTTS., ENGLAND
Basie Rte socie Mapeiae Fc igre ithe battle of Trafalgar. none of its members were “fit and One of the NORVIC group of companie
were ae pers Pieigglh gt “wor We frst time in history |Proper” to hold office and can only | Trade Representative: C.L. Gibbs & Co., Ltd.,
to the ‘wer outiie tion leave in| lhe police beat the Retreat at the |Tescind its own resolution within} P.O. Box 56, Bridgetown
to ae omar seven were| THE FIELD OF HORSES as they bunched in the home stretch in the November Handicap. historic dockyard grounds in the |8ix oo by unanimous vote “ Barbados, B.W.|1.
vapen. od ae ” , , r , y 4 o ; resence of His Excellency and |@ meeting at which not le in ve aeameeineneeiaainiiea
crewmen, ee eS ee Edwards’ bay filly, eventually won by half a length, with Mr. K. D Lady biiithurne, 116 members are present } cn gn
—Ue- wards’ “To; .




PAGE TWO SUNDAY ADVOCATE

SUNDAY. NOVEMBER 16, 1952
—————



: ‘HE Woodside Lawn Tennis , oe &
48 usnament will open to-

morrow evening at “Woodside”,
| Bay Street.

In their drive to. colleet funds
for Christmas Charities the
ledies have organised a series of
tennis games when some of the
best local players will take part.

Tomorrow evening “Pone”
Hyn will meet Denis Wor:ne
in he Men’s Singles and the
| following evening Eric Taylor
‘and Dr. Charlie Mannmg will













a} oppose Darrell Trimingham and
SjLouis St. Hill in the Mer’s
| Doubles,

7 En-route fo St. Kitts
- R. and MRS. C. B. C. CON-
BOTTLE , NELL. and Mrs. Connell’s
L sister, Miss S. D. H. Shepherd,
arrived from England yesterday
by the Golfite. They are en routa
to St. Kitts where Mr. Connell is
Chief Engineer, St. Kitts Sugar

Factory.

Mr. and Mrs, Connell are
| returning from long leave. Miss
,_ Sh rd who had been residing

~ In England for several years with
|another sister Mrs. Wedlake,
plans to take up residence once

| again in that colony,

Visitors
mY Ge R. MYER and HON.
MRS. MYER—regular visi-
| tors to Barbados—were among

di j f x \
4 a J Es OTA |the passengers arriving from
ee | k= reg yesterday by the
zr }
) = | |
, ‘

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NERVE PAINS
COLDS, CHILLS







Get yourself a supply of | to,
and 5 YEAST-VITE Tablets Ble ieeerhaticeenwiie--ceeeseuseneee ;
=e eae DAY! That’s the | “winter” they are guests at the sade en
YEAST-WITE St way to get quick re- Hotel Royal.
a eee cccal PAINS __ PAINS lief and feel betean, too! nn nce == _ - E









rae ; THE BAGGAGE WAREHOUSE was crowded with visitors yesterday
afternoon. They came to welcome friends and relatives who arrived
To Honduras by the 8,8. “Golfito”. WR ANeny “i
N- CASTON, aged 25 of Sur- Seated (left to right) are: Mrs. ur Skeete, Mrs. rence
ra — Me sit a Daysh, Mrs. K. L. Alone, Mrs. Richard Packer and Mrs, Geoffrey
; , igi Skeete.
Tom eee eo Mr. Arthur Skeete, Mr. Neville Howell and Mr. John Martin are

or STUBBORN fang an Bronchial GLOBE

VEAST-VIT ees
ey ee, joes] COUGHS

NOW PLAYING












» Hei pm &) 445 & 630 om passenger through Barbados yes- ™ the background.
OP tan ear aay tiaiiei ts, Fats ; terday by the Golfito. He is on ‘ :
and continuing daily | Continuing to Tues also on Monday ~——ey ‘ a Intransit ACK in Barbados after an ab-
“na “RATON PASS” PRINCE OF PEACE ||| q AND or “he See eee went e sence of over six months are
“JACK & THE | penis Patricia (Cater) | ‘COUGHS: In 1947/48, Ken was at Reading RINIDAD'S Commissioner oi Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Potter. Mr.
"| MORGAN NEAL Fine Eee and ‘ i < feats Police, Col. E. H. F. Beadon Potter. is one of the Directors of
BEANSTALK and Steve Cochran ® Modern Story of University with John Saint and RCS, Oh eek aa the Colony Club, St. James
Sere ee st Alireetion” | 2Ut_ Saviour (Christ) 0 COLDS Ernest Moll of Barbados. Ken eccompaniied by his wife and two } b, St. James.
Buc a etior . a i i P re’ Jere rans. assen=
Abbott Costello PAINTING ae Tues. who bark 4G de on lt Weice wane ee Read- en oe Trinidad, eS "ahs PGolfite R. DAVID RICE of Messrs.
pS ‘THE be am. USUNSIINE YLL GET YoU { ing’s rowing team and represent- yesterday after four months’ C. B. Rice and Co., Ltd.,
Aa DARK es i ee Pow ed this university at one of Hen- holiday in England, spent mostly accompanied by his wife and son
ay Dennis irginia eorge & - 7 aS Bakes mf
vfikaog a | MORAG MANO | Maser ot the +n, THERE’S NOTHING ors anauel reamisee. bees ventas te ties Gua ae
nee LARGO. o. KIS TOMORROW NOR saree | f aan odage +f - M®* A. J. BELIX, who is spending almost four months in
Thurs. Special 1.90] James Barbara _Tex RITTER 0 0 Y nr E 21-year-old Charlie attached to the C.i.D, de- the U.K., France, Switzerland
JUNGLE See Thurs. ‘onk/) lexander joins Compania partment of the Trinidad Police @%d a couple of days in Italy.
STAMPEDE. Thor en 4.45 & 8.30 p.m — Azucareta . Dominicana, — sugar force was intransit by the same : 2 :
(A. Jungle Thriller) 1.30 Whole Seris! estate in the Dominican’ Repub- shi te had be: in England ETURNING by the same ship
{tunes ey TRIPLE. TROUBLE olen r o) AS Tigge agg hn his father he Stip. He had been in Englan R t
SONORA ng a abl + oe. = ae mised ® seer for seven months on a training were Dr. and Mrs. H. E
Packy. Lu PANTHER ISLAND | Larry Buster Crabie Ss would visit his ‘old school.” He course. Skeete, They had also been over
BRIDGETOWN BARBAREES | OISTIN CANADA LARGEST was a passenger arriving from ea
‘Dial 2310) (Dial 6170) {Dial 8404)





_———————
EMPIRE OLYMPIC ROXY ROYAL ie
os To-day & Tomorrow, , aie tae 2 To-Day 4.30 & 6%
To-day 449 & 8.20) 1.30 && BAS To and continuing daily! Republic Action SSP Laer e.19 (Attraction:
daDarnen =| Double Glenn Ford Maureen O'Hara
Tap "Hunter Brian Donlevy George Macready Paul Christian
in Forre m aac ker in AGOAD
B
ISLAND OF LOODLUM EMPIRE THE a aaa
GL
DESIRE | ADVENTURES MADELEINE
(Technicolor) OF CAPT, The Most Exeiting With
Excitement . . Thrills! FABIAN Picture =r Year Ann Todd
preg | eel tee Latest News Reel Monday & Tuesday
xtra 3 )

. —————ns | 4,80 Ae 8.90
Latest News Reel | Micheline Prelle |" Wednesday & |Double —

b)
Opening Friday 2ist.| | Monaiy & Teneday | ‘Thursday 4.30 & 8,18) Jon Hall
30 & 8 Maria My
ABBOTT and Doule ok

Double Attra: ms .
COSPELLO| “George Brent” | Tht Anarew Miatare



eke in ALL BABA AND
COMIN’ ROUND iy ston | MOONLIGHT AND THE FORTY
a | UMS ALONG wee eee
THE, MOUNTAIN TNE AMAZON and i and
Coming Seon = | Tum AVENGER | ra emeAneCongiinut
Oren With Coming Soon Wed. & Thurs
as tr c John Carrol THE SNIPER — 4.30 & 8.20
renner SNIPE THAT NIGHT
a en Lost FATROL va Tere il
4 ar
DELIAH id rE MAGIC RIVER LADY
(Technicolor) WHIPHAND CARPET (Rod Cr '
TO-NIGHT 8.30 P.M. LAST SHOWS OF
OUTCASTS OF POKER FLAT
DALE ROBERTSON — ANNE BAXTER
and
“LOVE i$ BETTER THAN EVER’
LARRY PARKS—ELIZABETH TAYLOR



TO-MORROW (MONDAY) & TUESDAY 4.45 & 8.30

CHEAPER BY THE DOZEN

(CLIFTON WEBB)
and

NO QUESTIONS ASKED
BARRY SULLIVAN—ARLENE Meu k





BUCKLEY'S ©

MIXTURE



use Palmolive Soap as Doctors advised
for a Brighter, Fresher Complexion!

Do-tors prove thot Palmolive Soap can improve complexions
femarkably in many ways. Oily skin looks less oily—dull, drab
tkin wonderfully brighter, Coorse- -looking skin appears finer














So, do as 36 skin specialists









England yesterday by the Golfito
His old school is Lodge.

Charlie left the Lodge School
in 1946, and shortly afterwards
went to study engineering at
Fletchers, Derbyshire. He has
just got through the Higher Na-
tional Certificate in Mechanical
Engineering, which is a big step
towards the degree of A. M. I.
Mech. E. (Associate Member of
the Institute of Mechanical En-
gineers) .

He plans to spend about five
days here before flying to British

other relatives for Christmas.
He leaves British Guiana early in
January 1953 for Santo Domingo,

HE engagement was an-

nounced last night between
Mr. Gerald Taylor, son of the late
Mr. Maleolm Taylor and Mrs.
Muriel Taylor of No. 10 Greame
| Hall Terrace and Miss Audrey
Maksymec, daughter of Mr. and
| Mrs. John Maksymec of Winnipeg,
| Manitoba, Canada,
| Miss Maksymee is also a
| graduate in arts of the University
of Manitoba,
| Home After Holiday
} R. J. DAVEY of the Colonnade
| Stores, accompanied by his
| wife and two children who had
| been in England for over three
; months’ holiday returned yester-
| day by the Golfito. * :

They are in residence at Pine
Hill.

2 fu, 60 ween: cotmntae woth + Moravian Minister _
=e EV. DUNCAN MOORE tf

Sharon Moravian Church
left yesterday for St. Kitts to at-
tend a Meeting of the Board of
} Directors to be held in that island.

From Curacao

M®. ELLIS GALL, who for the
past few years has been em-
ployed with Shell Oil Company of
Curacao, returned to the island
yesterday morning by B.W.1LA,
He will be staying with his rela-
tives at “Mayville”, Chelsea Road,



Guiana to be with hig father and |

RS. CLEMMIE BETTEN-

COURT GOMES of Georgy-
town, British Guiana and her
daughter Terry were intransit on
the Golfite yesterday. At Trim-
dad they will change ships for
British Guiana.

Terry, who had been at schoo!
in England and Switzerland, is
a former student of the Ursuline
Convent, Collymore Rock. This is
her first visit home in six years.

R. PERCY KING, another

passenger for Georgetown
by the same ship had been in
England for medical attention,
He is a brother of Mr. Joseph
King, formerly with Messrs.
Wm. Fogarty Ltd., here and now
with their branch in Port-of-
Spain, Trinidad.

R. ‘WILNOT HADAWAY of
Kingstown, St. Vincent, was
intransit home from Trinidad
yesterday by B.W.LA.
Mr. Hadaway spent about
three weeks’ holiday in Trinidad.

® 4 rn
NTRANSIT passenger from
England by the Gedlfito yes-
terday was Mrs. William Lam-
bert, whose husband Major
Lambert was a former Private
Secretary to Sir Alfred Savage
when he was Governor of Bar-~-
bados. Mrs. Lambert’s destination
is Trinidad where she will join
her two sons Gordon = and
Michael,

Major Lambert and their
daughter Pat, who are at present
in England, will be coming out
te Trinidad during the middle of
next year, shortly after the
Coronation,

Holiday Ended

RS. WILFRED WOOD-

HOUSE. wife of C.D. & W’s.
Building Development Adviser,
was another arrival from Eng-
land yesterday by the Golfito.
She had been spending the sum-
mer holidays with her two sons

for four months’ holiday in the
U.K and on the Continent.
Part of their holiday was spent
with their daughter and son-in-
law, Mr. and Mrs. Ritchie Pack-
er who returned to Barbados
ahead of them via New York and
Mrs, Packer was on hand to meet
them on their return.

Back Home

R. and MRS. MICHAEL

GREAVES of “Belmont,” St.
John, who had been in England
since the middle of May on hol-
iday returned home yesterday by
the Golfito.

Mrs, Greaves is a sister of Sir
Allan Collymore, Chief Justice of
the island, and Mr. Greaves is
a brother of Hon. Mrs. M. Han-
schell, M.L.C., who was also at

the Baggage Warehouse to meet
them.

a

Birthday Today
RS. NOOTT, wife of Ma).
C. E. Noott, Headmaster of
Cembermere School, accompan-
ied by their little daughter, were
passengers from England yes-
terday by the Golfite,

Mrs. Noott and her daughter
Jacqueline had been in the U.K.
for over three months on holiday
and the Noott family will cele-
brate Jacqueline’s first birthday
anniversary today.

Fifty Today

@‘ONGRATULATIONS to Mr,
Guy Adams on his fiftieth
birthday.

Guy, who is a younger brother
of Mr. G. H. Adams, C.M.G,, still
retains his boyish srnile.

Many happy returns of “the

day”.
Best Wishes
EST wishes to Mr, “Tom”
Went, M.B.E., on his 58th

birthday.

These include wishes for a com-
plete recovery to good health.

Mr, Went is now on leave, prior
to retiring from the post of
Colonial Engineer.

2-900965.060066-6- 4
/

St. Michael. who are at school there.



seeeeecee He expects to spend a month =
* seen SOS OOOO NOE OOO POOP OOP OOS PCP ESS SOOTE FOTOS 4; Soe es a, inte, xpects to, spend. a month
Excitement!

Curacao, " | AN ETT A: DRESS SHOP
“titty
THE onaeiadt JAMES

Today & ‘Tomorrow 8.30 p.m.

at the EMPIRE THEATRE

iLook!

Suspense !!

Murder!! Eth & 12th December %

Next Door to Singer



















Sa
%
D4
: : - ieee ie ates
x + y ‘olor
: when St SANTA offers Benen Seine wks Maro
% THE BARBADOS PLAYERS present x y) Gpeplel Notice euP em FROCKS for all occasions from . $5.00
x NO SHOWS ON | ALWAYS in
» ¥ HEAR’
: “THE THIRD VISITOR” : W TUESDAYS | | cioria‘Warven SHORTS and BLOUSES ................-..+- $3.98
% . ONTIERSMAN
* Gerald Anstruther’s tremendously successful Thriller > i THURSDAYS y Eaee MoRAE |
* 4 SaaS SSS?
* ‘om the Duke of York’s Theatre, London . Hu :
. Produced by ANNSTTE DANGAN “LOWER RN ete eG vcitis Tee $ .9%6
, oduc by x i FLO ED LINEN ........ pa
S Can You Solve the Mystery? } GRAFAINE FLOWERED LINEN ....,........--- ‘
x Come and ‘See! ! : CEPEA PRINTS ...............6--.00ceeeneeee es 69
\ "POR CBSSOS46O8 EMAL ALSO OSS EPR PLAIN CHAMBRA 36” WE eee ins ks vance 84
THE ANNUAL FLOWERED BEMBERG SILK ................-: 1.44
7 : 5 i shades) ...,...... 1.28
POPPY D A NC KE including these mechanical EMBOISSED MORCAIN (in all shades)
Ss TO RO eis hk cea iw ti eee’ $5.75
Under the Patronage of The Acting Governor 80 > 100 eos UT Rk 6.50
and Mrs, Turner | @ TELEPHONES BOD TT, :
wane pee ot ‘ MN Se ts 7.72
The MARINE HOTEL Te PRELIOW CASRS:18-% 30 oo ocseee ccs scceceeee 8
@ CARS St, a a eae AR
Kindly lent by the Management © BOATS ;
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER? 22ND le ies ciasseediiliesl-alethiees
* PRAMS, DOLLS, GUNS, CRANES, CARS, ETC.
By kind permission of Col, Michelin | © SCALES i
THE POLICE BAND DANCE ORCHESTRA @ PRAMS
e
T. R. EVANS (WHITFIELDS)
Ball,Room Tables may be reserved. see the display ateun
‘Phone Mrs, J. CONNELL, 2067 r YOUR SHOE STORE
e : ° “ ‘>
The Corner Store Phone: 4220
Dancing 9 p.m. to 2 a.m, Admission $1.00 1)
i



- a EEE
a



te
—_
-
os



ee ee ee ee ee ee Se pe




rm

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1952

AT THE CINEMA

ity G. it.

MIXED

THIS WEEK seems to

number of films seen, and to be written up!
of which two are comedies,

GRILL

have outdone itself «with fhe
Five in all,
one a tropical adventure and

two melodramas, so there is plenty of choice and since
most people prefer comedies, let’s start with them.



Lou Costello & Bud Abbott

JACK AND THE BEAN-
STALK is at the Plaza, Bridge-
town, with Abbot and Costello
and the two of them roar through
the old fairy tale and turn it into
a boisterous burlesque. Filmed in
Technicolor, it bulges with songs
and dances and the slap-happy
antics of the two comedians.
Starting off in sepia, we see Lou
Costello as ~a_ baby-sitter who
falls asleep and_ visualises his
own version of “Jack” while the
child reads the story, However,
life in magic world of colour is
enlivened by explosive eggs,
catapulting trees, a singing harp,
the giant’s amazonian house-
keeper and the giant himself.

Though the picture fxequently
runs away with itself, it has its
moments and will appeal to Ab-
bott and Costello fans.

LOVE IS BETTER THAN
EVER is the other comedy, which
can be seen at the Globe, In this
we have Elizabeth Taylor, who
seems to get prettier with each
film, and Larry Parks in a tenu-
ous romantic comedy of “girl
chases boy and eventually gets

boy!” Miss Taylor plays a small
town dancing teacher who
attends a convention in New

York and falls head over heels in
love with a Theatrical agent.
Mr. Parks is the agent with a
strong allergy to matrimony!

Horse-racing, baseball, the 21
Club and the Copacabana are the
backgrounds for the dizzy
romance which finally culminates
in a false engagement announce-
ment and backstage goings-on of
a dancing exhibition. with two
hundred children. Both stars do
their best. and the Broadway
theatrical dialect is amusing and
flippant.

ISLAND OF DESIRE, based
on. Hugh Brooke’s novel “Satur-
day Island” is playing at the
Empire, It is one of these exotic,
but highly improbable South Sea
Island adventures that is long
on gorgeous settings, tropical
flora and fauna, sunsets and good
photography, but short on acting
and direction. The northern
coast of Jamaica is the locale for
a romantic interlude ind the lives
of a young marine Corporal and
a prim and proper army nurse
who have been shipwrecked. All
goes well in their idyllic paradise
until the crash-landing of an
R.A.F. flier whose arm has to be
amputated with the natural
follow-up that he and the nurse
fall in love, and the marine—
not without a struggle—bows out.

In this triangle are Linda
Darnell, Tab Hunter and Donald
Gray. Youthful Mr. Hunter is
cefinitely a credit to the Marine
Corps as he provides food, cloth-
ing and shelter for the nurse
with unbelievable speed. He's a
nice looking kid and with more
experience should do well. As
it is, he gives the part freshness
and vitality, -but is inclined to be
wooden. Linda Darnell is the
spinsterish nurse (to begin with)





Soothes baby's colic pains, upset
stomach and discomfort due to con-
stipation. or acid-indigestion!
wile



Overcomes liverish feeling, bilious,
\headechy upset . . . makes’ you fee!

better_ia ‘proctically no time!

and to accept her in’ this role
imposes considerable strain on
the imagination—to say nothing
of her successful amputation with

rot much more than a bowie
knife in the way of medical
equipment. However, she is

yery lovely to look at and”proves
to: be very adept at making hats
and weaving cloth! Donald Gray
makes a handsome flier, but his
portrayal is stilted and his accent
just too, too B.B.C,

There is the usual under-sea
battle—this time with a. shark—
and a good fight between the
two men, but on the whole
script, direction and acting are
undistinguished.

And now for the melodramas.
At the .. Plaza, Barbarees is
RATON. PASS while OUTCASTS
OF POKER FLAT ‘1s playing: at
the Globe. Both these films are
Westerns, but of different types.
RATON PASS is_ conventional
in treatment and action while
OUTCASTS, though laid in the
West during the period of the
Gold Rush, deals with the con-
lict of human emotions,



(rardening Hints Farm And Garden

AGRICOLA

For Amateurs

Gardeners often ask for advice
as to what can planted to grow
and flower q ly.

The tru l answer to that
one is Ni b

Some plants do mature and
flower sooner than others, yet
none can be hurried beyond
their appointed time, for you
can't hurry nature,

Not that nature. can’t hurry
herself. The Mahogany trees ara
example of that, for one day they
appear as bare sticks, and the
next t are covered in a green
sheen of delicate new leaves.

Grass is another example of
how nature can hurry, for after
a rte of rain the ine w grass
w urn overnight. Nature
can cdtaibey Burry, but she can-
not be hurried,

But a kno’ of the differ-
ent times the yarjous plants take
from seed planting to flowering

ill help, and from among these
times some plants may be found

at are quick. enough in flower-
ing to satisfy those gardeners
who are in a hurry.

The foilo

list has been
taken from that excellent little
rdening. book “Gardening in

arbados for Amateurs”.

Any of the seeds on this list
can be planted at this time, and
from the list it will be possible
to calculate exactly when they
will start to flower.

Starring Dennis Morgan and ERIOD OF TIME BETWEEN
Patricia Neal, RATON PASS is OWING OF SEED AND SET-
the mati of a ambitious and G OF FLOWER
unscrupulous adventuress who ,,
marries a young rancher and by innias *s *¢ 6 Weeks
her perfidy, provokes a range & apdragon .. + Boon
war in the Pass. Filled with ey *3 ay 6 ”
thudding hooves, clashing fists Se hel ro. itt +f; : ”
and roaring guns, the action pro- Car me tuft utton Be
ceeds at breakneck speed in this Cc rea hy sf 1 ”
sweeping melodrama which is Petunia ae 4 ig y
filmed against a background of Marigola t a 7 ?
mountains of Colerado and New Gecaniurs he "49 ”
Maxie. Dahlia ran cae te he

Patricia Neal plays the mer- 7. ne a S ee
cenary and treacherous “femme Nasturtium a i"
Fatale” who links up with a +

murderer and his gang to do her
husband out of his lands. Help-

ed by Steve Cochran, whose
characterization is one of men-
acing brutality and _ violence, I

am glad to say they both come
to a sticky end.

Dennis Morgan is the invinci-
ble rancher who finally restores
law and order while Basil Ruys-
dael plays his father—a grand
old man, with more guts and
character than the rest put to-
gether.

OUTCASTS OF POKER FLAT
is remotely based on a. famous
story by Brett Hart in which a
group of shady characters find
themselves snowbound in a hut
in the High Sierras. It appears
that the activities of a murder-
ous bank robber—who makes a
getaway—have so_ enraged the
people of Poker Flat that the
decide to run their un@esirable
elements out of town, These in-
clude the robbers wife, a ro=
fessional gambler, an_ elderly
drunkard and a prostitute, all of
whom just make the cabin be-
fore the storm, They are joined
by a pregnant girl and her
fiancé and, of course, by the
bank robber. This cosy little
party is at the mercy of the gun-
man, portrayed by Cameron
Mitchell as one of the most de-
spicable, sadistic, half-crazed
and brutal characters I have
ever encountered. Anne Baxter,
as his wife, is on the receiving
end for her fair share of assault
and battery while Dale Robert-
son, the gambler whom _ she
loves, eventually kills the bandit,
who in the meantime has bashed
in the head of the old “dipso”
and shot the prostitute for good
measure,

The only redeeming feature in

the film is the acting’ which is
uniformly good with a_ special
mention for Cameron Mitchell.

MY FAMILY COULDN’‘T GET ALONG
> WITHOUT GENTLE, DEPENDABLE

As an alkalizer for neutralizing excess stomach acidity and re-

lieving the pains and discomforts of acid-indigestion, Milk of

Magnesia, a product of Phillips, is one of the fastest, most effective

known. As a laxative, Phillips acts gently and thoroughly, wifhout
griping or discomfort, and without embarrassing urgency. Phillips
tones up the entire digestive system . . . is the ideal antacid-laxative
for_all the family! Get Phillips today!

liquid or Tablets I i}
MILK OF MAGNESIA
ane oe

A PRODUCT OF



It will be seen from this list that
the quickest returns are to be
had from Yellow Pea, and Bache=
lor’s Button, both of which will
start to flower in five weeks’
time from the moment of planting
the seeds. Zinnias, Cosmos, and
Balsam come next as they each
take six weeks, Marigolds follow
taking seven weeks to mature.
Snapdragon eight weeks, Candy-
tuft nine, while the rest on the
list take ten to twelve weeks
respectively.

Another list, taken from the
same garden book is also very
useful, for it gives the names of
those plants whose seeds can

with a seed-box and
can be planted directly into the
ground. Here it is.

“SEEDS OF THE FOLLOWING
MAY BE _ SOWN
E THE PLANTS ARE
TO GROW.”
Zinnia, Yellow Pea, Bachelor’s
Button, Ragged Robin, Marigold,
asturtium, Balsam, Canna,
olly Hock, Tithona, Cut and

Come Again, Cosmos, Candytuft,
Sun Flower.

To be able to plant seeds direct
into the place where they are to
grow is a great coving in time
and trouble, and has the advan-
tage that there is no check in
growth from the seedlings being
transplanted,

There is however, the danger
of Ants carrying them away, and
this must be watched out for.
Also it is difficult to get an even
spring, and sometimes a_re-
arrangement of some of the little

Jants may be necessary. But
this is quickly done and does not
disturb the majority of the plants.



Apart from that, it is a sordid
tale of violent emotions, with
too much accent on _ violence,
sadism and downright brutality.




Taken ot bedtime, Phillips helps
you wake up next morning feeling
grond, wonderfully refreshed!



Gentle, dependable laxative action
keeps young ond old feeling fit,
ready for work or play!









SUNDAY

By

ADVOCATE



A MANURIAL CONTROVERSY

IT IS, WE THINK, true to
whether in the political, social,

extremists, life in general

ay that if there weré no

economic, scientific and even religious spheres—would be

a lot more peaceful.

spawned in the minds of extre
that there is nothing good in w
it often helps to ventilate issue

Indeed, in the last analysis, war is

ts. All this is not to say
med argument, since
ind theréby enables those

on whom final decisions rest in practice to adopt a sane,
middle course, having regard to the evidence on both sides

This apples particular
force to a_ controversy which
flares up from time to time in the
domain of manures and fertilizers.
There is one now.

Tt is the old question
ganie versus inorganic manures;
or, the natural versus the un-
natural (artificial), as some say;

with

of or-

or again, minerals versus non-
minerals; or, yet again, dung
versus chemicals. First, we
should remind ourselves that
from the point of view of the

plant there can be no strict line
pf demarcation since, in what-
ever form applied, the elements
must be worked over by

soil organisms to the simple
chemical forms which the plants
can use. Such changes are ac-

c jished faster in the case of
quick acting fertilizers, hence
they have become of increasing
importance in the production of
annual crops — the _ principal
source of our food supply. There
is a second point: it is not strictly
correct to use the term un-
natural or artificial in connection
with fertilizers, since, in the or-
iginal state, most of them are the
products of nature — mined and
refined for ease of handling and
trade purposes. Even nitrogen—
the principal: fertilizing ingredi-
ent in sulphate of ammonia, an
industrial by-product -— is also
obtainable from the air, a fact
which gives ‘us ‘access to practi-
cally unlimited supplies.

There is no space here to list
the .substances which properly
fall into each group—the natural
and the artificial, or the organic
and the inorganic, . whichever
terms are used. We _ can only
discuss the subject briefly in its
broad aspects. Both sides admit
and, of course, it is common
knowledge that organic matter is
of prime importance; indeed, the
loss of humous material through
mismanagement of soils has be-
come a matter of grave concern
te governments and authoritics
charged with the conservation of
natural resources. On the other
hand, it cannot be reasonably ex~
pected that organic matt®r can
supply all the deficiencies caused
by removal of plant nutrients
through heavy cropping under
modern, intensive methods.

But now, the protagonists in the
organic field have made extraya-
gant claims, Among these is the
Statement that chemical fertilizer
induces poor health in plants and
renders them prone to disease,
Further, that the quality of agri-
cultural produce is compromised
by the use of chemicals and con-
sumption of such produce has led
to an increase in certain human
diseases, notably cancer and heart
ailments, Still further, it is elaim-
ed that by the: ferti) -

izer industry together with its hold,

on investigators afraid to speak
the truth are the root causes of
the trouble. We recall that the
late Sir Albert Howard (knighted
for his work in India) who was,
in the oy, part of his career, at-
tached to the Imperial Department
of Agriculture for the West Indies,
claimed in his “Agricultural Tes-
tament” that the increasing use of
chemical fertilizers caused the
breakdown of sugar-cane seed-
lings, rendering their frequent re-
placement necessary. We in the
West Indies know the answer to
that.

It must suffice to say, in conclu-
sion, that all the evidence points
in the opposite direction to the ex-
travagant claims mentioned, The
wise agriculturist, therefore, will
continue to follow a middle course
--husbanding his sources of or-
ganic matter but supplementing it
by judicious use of fertilizer under
expert guidance. The world, in-
dubitably, owes a debt of grati-
tude to British brains (not Mos-





«











g i ye ca
ve CORATING i ca)

We carry a large stock of best
quality imported’ Paints, as well
as Dry Colours, Linseed Oil,
Turpentine and Floor Varnish.

BARBADOS CO-OP.
COTTON FACTORY Ltd.

POULTRY
NOTES |

Today there is a new word]
anti-biotie which farmers use. |
They have heard that if you feed |
livestock and poultry anti-bioties
ye will get extra profits. It is!
truce that penicillin, terramycin, |
streptomyein, aureomycin and |
ot! antibiotics are being used |
in onjunction with Vitamin
B-1 to help young pigs and

chickens to
Turkeys fed
“miracle growth | promoters”
t per levels have made
early Wins as much as 25% faster
tham previously. Gains for
chickens average about 10% faster

make faster gains.
by certain of these
at

than without any anti-biotics.
How’ do anti-biofics work?
Scientists say frankly that they
do not know. It is said that
anti-bioties cut down harmful

bacteria in the
intestinal tract.
It is also said
that they have
a direct stimu-
lating effect on |
the growth pro-
cess. We do nap
know. But

' whatever the
reason, research workers are find-
ing out which ones are best for
which animals, at which levels
they should be used in the ration
to get optimum results, what com-
binations are most effective and
how the minute quantities requir-



ed can be mixed evenly in feeds.
Tt is unsound and often costly to
buy a ration simply because it con-

tains one or another of the won-
ce ngredients. The use of the
intibiotic in a feed is no guar-

antee that it will make a greater

profit for the farmer. The kind
ef livestock and poultry being |
fed, as well as. their stage of |
growth and most of all the
quality of the ration to which

anti-bioties are added, determines
which antibiotic or combination
of anti-biotics is needed and the

amounts required for maximum
economical growth,

Reputable feed manufaeturers
with research laboratories and
reféarch farms are providing

feeds with these new ingredients,
Keepers of poultry and live-
Stock should measure the value of

tie feed used by what it will
Pepeuce rather than whether it
c@ntains this anti-biotic or that
one, »

Mang facts about @uti-biotios

be discovered tested

are yet to
but their future is

and, proven

assured. In less than two years
they have been brought from
the stage of “none available for

commercial use’ to an

bility that finds them in the feeds

of almost every reliable feed
manufacturer.

Anti-bioties cannot make a good
ration out of a poor one. hey

must be added to feeds which
centain a balance of all the nut-
ritive factors known to be nec-
essary. But added to such feeds
in . the conbinationgs and levels
foufid necessary to promote fast,
profitable gains, they ‘will most
certainly help the k eper of pigs
and poultry to make extra
prolits,

af

the. discovery and
of commercial fer-

cow!) for
development
tilizers,

Sunshine
Right
Into
Your Home
This Christmas





availa- |



PAGE THREE



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PAGE FOUR





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SUNDAY

B.C.L. FACE THEIR
STIFFEST OPPOSITION
EVER

By O. S. COPPIN

TRINIDAD COLUMNIST WOULD DROP
BARBADIAN PROS.

HE Barbados Selectors have choset. a very strong team to meet

the Barbados Cricket League team in the annual B.C.A.-B.C.Ik
fixture. They could have puid the League no greater compliment, and
I must express profound disagreement with a brother scribe of mine
who subscribes to the view that this opportunity should have been
seized by the B.C.A. for experimenting with promising talent.

In my view the object of this fixture is to test the relative strength
of the Barbados Cricket League and although it might give rise to
a pardonable feeling of some frustration.on the part of those who
have been for some years now on the very threshold of selection in
an island XI, yet the main purpose of the fixture must be served.

Those who have followed the progress of League Cricket over
the past ten years with some attention to detail will no doubt agree
‘hat the very composition of the Barbados team constitutes ‘an out.
standing monument of achievement and fruitful industry on the part
of those who have planned and played League Cricket for the period

under review,
B.C.L. SHOULD BE PROUD

wrt Heremnay gy pon not feel proud to have arrayed against
it cricketers of the reputation and respecti t

Weekes, Conrad Hunte, Frank King, C. De Peiza = 6. Salen
as the Barbados Cricket League has done, such an Associa-
tion had given this talent to Barbados Cricket Association cricket?

The fact that the B.C.L. has been able to do this must corre-
spondingly weaken their team but their contribution to senior cricket
will not be gauged by the results of this match.

I have already advocated two of these fixtures per season and
then one of such fixtures could be earmarked for experimenting with
non regulars. For example I must agree that players like ank
Phillips and Keith Bowen of Spartan, Brickie Lucas of Carlton and
young players in that category would then have been provided with
the ‘scope for establishing any claims which they undoubtedly have
for inclusion in an island eleven.

A LOOK AT THE ISLAND XI

Witt regard to the island eleven itself it is obvious that this
is not the best available island xi that can be put into the field

or should I be more explanatory and say that seasoned players like
Wilfred Farmer of Police who performed with commendable individ-
ual credit against Jamaica, Horace King and Adzil Holder of Empire
and Gordon Proverbs, Denis and Eric Atkinson of Wanderers have
all staked their strong claims. for inclusion, not only on their form
we! the season but on their performances in recent Intercolonial fix-
ures, ee

The Barbados Selectors with such a strong nucleus of players
were obviously able to experiment in the case of R. C. Branker of
the Combermere Intermediate team and G. Sobens, recently of the
Police Boys’ Club team and now of the Police team,

With batting centred around Weekes, Walcott, Marshall, Hunte,
Grant, Williams, Smith, Sobers and De Peiza and the bowling in

the capable hands of pace bowlers Barker and Frank King, and the
spinners C. B. Williams, Roy Marshall, Cammie Smith and the
slower medium men left arm Sobens and Branker, the B.C.L. will
be meeting with the stiffest combination they have encountered in
their entire existence.
WHITHER WEST INDIES CRICKET

HAT of West Indies cricket? The latest news from the Trini-

dad Press, the unofficial mouthpiece of the West Indies Cricket
Board of Control, is to the effect that one Trinidad journalist has
found Clyde Walcott unfit,

This news, untrue as it is, still intrigues me, because in the first

place it is news to Clyde Walcott himself and secondly it must have
been. obtained by sources close to the supernatural,
d It is true that words can be made to say or mean anything but
it is putting it a bit thick to be able to stay all the way in Trinidad
and examine Walcott in Barbados and then pronounce him unfit just
because Guillen is so brilliant and Binns only slightly less brilliant,
in Trinidad of course.

In a maze of figures the writer of the article who has more
information at his disposal than either the representatives of the
West Indies Cricket Board of Control here or the Barbados Cricket
Association itself, points out that the West Indies Cricket Board of
Control could save $3,000 by excluding Roy Marshall, Ken Rickards

and Clyde Walcott.
SHEER “CHEEK”

Of all the consummate misinformed and clumsy “cheek,” this
takes the cake. It is true and painfully obvious that the writer is
foreign to West Indies Cricket history but certainly this earns him
no extenuation for making a nonsense of West Indies cricket.

Does he know that Walcott can make a West Indies team on his
batting, flelding and bowling? Does he know that Walcott dominated

the batting in the West Indies tour to New! Zealand at the end of
the Australian tour?

Whom would he substitute for Roy Marshall and Ken Rickards? |

Does he know that Simpson Guillen has gone off to New Zealand and
could hardly pow help to justify his effusion under reference?
: Why not tell the West Indies Board how they can save $144,000
instead of the $3,000 he mentions? I should like to point out that
even if the figures of $8,000 which the writer quotes would have to
be paid the professionals is correct, that this would be a small sum
— a Sek nadene ato ee eee which people like Walcott
a arsha elped to place higher on the world cric
“Blighty” in 1950, at least remains there, ae aie
WHAT DID THE PROS CONTRIBUTE?
HO made the £30,000 profit for the 1950 tour? Not the West
Indies Cricket Board of Control but included in the list of
workers were Walcott (remember his Lord’s century), Weekes
Worrell, Marshall, Valentine and Ramadhin, 5 .
The Tests against India will be International
results will be ‘as important as those to be obtaine
Australia or any other Imperial Cricket member a
or nonsensical experimenting should be duly r

games and the
d against England,
ind so any juggling
ecorded to be used
rogress come up for

judgment before the bar of West Indian cricket opinion.

COLONEL VIDMER IN NEW ROL

VT HAVE LEARNT that Colonel (Dick) Vidmer wae won both
the Open Shemp any end = pant Play Championship com-
ons a e Rockley P
+ mete beeen Golf Club is about to try

Since Ernest Wakelam,
Professional will not be comi
this winter, the Colonel who i
has volunteered to fi
the best of his ability.

The Colonel admitted at once that he was tak-
ing the job with some misgivings but he has had
considerable experience in e
Championship and the Medal Play Championship
which he has won are the only events not played
off handicap and therefore are the only real cham«
pionships in the true sense of the word. 4

Members of the Rockley Club who were so dis-
appointed at’ the news of Mr. Wakelam’s inability
to come will no doubt be glad to learn that they

the Canadian Golf
ng out to Barbados
s strictly an amateur
Il the professional’s place to



will still be provided with the opportunity for having their games

checked and polished.

VIDMER


















eaching and the Open‘

ADVOCATE



AUTUMN MEETING ENDS

|
@ From Page 1
the second place away
3lue Grass by % a length,
1% lengths behind Twinkle.
TWENTY-THIRD RACE
Worthing Handicap
Three were scratched from
this 9 furlong event for Class B
and lower, leaving a field of ten.
Castle-In-The-Air, who won
ever this distance on Thursday
in run away Style, was given a
top weight of 128%. Tiberian
Lady carried 61 overweight,
Nefari 1, Mrs. Bear 4, Belle Sur-
prise 6 and Dashing Princess 416.
Castle-In-The-Air refused to
start, but the others got off well
with Mrs. Bear leading the field
followed by Dashing Princess,
Tiberian Lady. Coming into the

from
and

straight approaching the stands,
it was Fire Lady followed by
Tiberian Lady, Mrs. Bear, and
Dashing Princess all bunched
beautifully.

Dashing Princess however
went past the Judges for the

first time leading the field as a
result of brisk exchanges. Fire
Lady went back into the lead
around by the five, and carried
the field down the stretch, pull-
ing away after reaching the
x Ww d up at the
i moved u >
s Pepoer. V1 1PS, JOP but Pouestea
brought the filly around the
bend, into the home stretch and
past the winning pole 14% lengths
ahead of Pepper Wine who beat
Tiberian Lady into third place
by two lengths.
TWENTY-FOURTH RACE
Belleville Handicap

Six were scratched jeaving a
field of seven. Of these, First
Admiral, Jolly Miller, Caprice ana
Apollo each carried 1, 2, 3 and 3
Ibs. overweight respectively,

As the gates flew, Apollo
| (Fletcher up) got off first and was
in this position when the field
| passed the stands for the first
time. First Admiral (Yvonet) was
second with March Winds (Hajal)
third, On nearing the five furlong
pole, First Admiral challenged’
land took over from Apollo and
led the field until well past the
three furlong pole. In the mean-
time March Winds had moved up
to second position and Colombus
| who was lying in the fifth posi-
| tion made a challenge coming
| around the bend from the outside.
| The brown Colt passed the field
going up the straight to win com-
fortably by one and a half lengths
from First Admiral who beat
Apollo into second place by a
neck,

TWENTY-FIFTH RACE

Junior Handicap

This was the second five and a
half furlong event for the day.
| Eleven were scratched, leaving a
j field of five of which Battle Line,
| Illusion and Super Jet each car-
ried 5, 7 and 3 lbs. overweight re-
spectively.

Super Jet ridden by Yvonet got
off to a flying start and was tol-
lowed by Apple Sam and Illusion.
Jim'La Rue and Battle Line were
left flat-footed at the gates.

The field singled out in Indian
file by the three furlong pole
with Super Jet still in the lead
} closely followed by Apple Sam.
, Yvonet kept the chestnut colt
‘to the fore until the field came
|around the bend to enter the
straight when Apple Sam (Thir-
kell up) challenged and took over
by the seven furlong pole to win
| comfortably by one and a half
‘Jenghts. Illusion was third
| lengths behind Super Jet.
| TWENTY-SIXTH RACE
| This event was run over s¢ven
jand a half furlongs with a field
|of twelve, ten being scratched.
Of those going, Street Arab, The
Thing and Vectis each carried 4,
8 and 5 lbs. overweight re-
spectively.

Aim Low (Crossley up) led the
field followed by Mary Ann rid-
den by Yvonet, Vectis (Quested),
Magic Gaye and Topsy. The field
raced past the five furlong pole
in this order. Aim Low kept the
lead all the way until they reach-
ed the two furlong pole when
there were some exchanges com-
ing around the bend, they bunch-
ed and Fluffy Ruffles piloted by
Holder came through with a driv-
ing finish to win by half a length
from Topsy who beat Magic Gaye
into s¢econd place by a head.

TWENTY-SEVENTH RACE
Rockley Handicap

Seven were scratched from the
original 13 entries for this event,
the one but last of the Meeting.

It was run over a distance of 9
furlongs, and the handicappers



five



gave Cross Bow a top

130 lbs. Columbus carried 122
pounds. while Assurance and Col-
leton each carried one and five

pounds overweight respectively.

When the gate flew, Cross Bow
was left flat-footed, and the field
got off with Cardinal, Seedling
and Columbus leading that order

At the mile, it was still Assur-
ance and Columbus, but up the
stretch past the stands, Cardinal
took over from Columbus, and the
positions were, Assurance leading
followed by Cardinal, Seedling,
Cross Bow and Columbus.

There were séme quick ex-
changes around the turn by the
Paddock, and when te field went
down the back stretch, it was

Columbus, Cardinal, Cross Bow,
Assurance, Colleton and Seedling
At the half mile it was still
Columbus followed by Cardinal,
and at the three furlong pole
Columbus pulled away from the
field, racing down the, Drill Hall
stretch at a thundering pace.

In hot pursuit were Cardinal
and Cross Bow, and turning into
the home stretch, Cardinal chal-
lenged, but his efforts were futile,
and Columbus raced home the
winner by half length to register
his fourth victory of the Meet.

Cardinal finished second a length
away from Cross Bow.

TWENTY-EIGHTH RACE
Final Handicap

Dashing Princess, Lunways
Mrs. Bear, Flying Dragon and
Belle Surprise were scratched and
9 horses came under the starter’s
orders in the final event of the
Meeting, run over the 744 furlong
distance

The field got off to a good start
with Abu Ali, Yasmeen, Harrow-





een, Firelady and Pepper Wine
moving ,down the stretch past the
Stand h that order. Castle-In-
The-Air had a late jump, and
trailed the field.

There were many quick ex-
changes down the back stretch

but Abu Ali maintained the lead
past the three, down the Hastings
stretch, and into the home stretch
to win by a head from Landmark
who had all along taken the
better of the hard tussle between
herself and Pepper Wine.

Old Boys Beat
Present Boys

The first Past vs Present cricket
match of the Coleridge and Parry
School, played at the school
grounds on Wednesday, resulted in
a victory for the Old Boys.

The Present, having won the
toss, elected bat on a good
wicket and were all out at lunch
for 66. The Past replied with 84
for 5 at close of play.

H, O. Husbands, Old Boy of
Coleridge, made the day’s highest
score of 37 while C. Skinner, Old
Boy of Parry, dominated in the
bowling department taking 5
wickets for 16 runs in 7 overs,

R. M. Griffith of Present top
scored for his team with 22 and
F. Phillips also of Present bowled
well to take 4 wickets for 22 runt
in 6 overs.

- Other good scores were 19 by
E. L. Thompson of Old Boys, 18 by



to

G, Rock of Present and 14 by
C. M. Griffith of Present.
Following are the scores .—

PRESENT BOYS’ 1ST INNINGS

S. Goodridge l.b.w. b
Cumberbatch









L. O'B. Thompson 1.b.w ¥

E. L. Thompson 0
R. M. Griffith b S. Yearwood 22
G, Rock b C, Skinner 18
Cc. M. Griffith b C. Skinner . 14
D. Denny*c Campbell, b R, Chase 5
R, Brome stpd. wkpr. Husbands b

C. Skinner i?" 1
F, Phillips b R. Chase 1
V. Worrell b C. Skinner 0
N. Reeves b C, Skinner 0
M. Jordan not out 1

n.b 3

Total ‘b6
BOWLING ANALYSIS
oO M R y
E. L. Thompson 4 2 7 ¥
B. Cumberbatch 3 0 11 1
C. Greaves 3 0 "8
R. Chas $3 2 12 2
R. A. Yearwood . 4 1 8 1
C. Skinner 7 1 16 5
PAST BOYS’ 1ST. INNINGS
H. O. Husbands stpd wkpr,

C. M. Griffith, b Phillips 37
E. L. Thompson b Phillips 19
R, Chase c Griffith, b Phillips.....; 2
C. Campbell stpd. wkpr. b Phillips.. 7
C, Skinner not out 12
L. Husbands l.b.w. Griffith. i
S. Yearwood not out, 2

b2, Lb. 1, n.b. 1 4

Total (for 5 wickets) 84

BOWLING ANALYSIS

o M R. W

D, Denny 5 3. Oo
L. O'B. Thompson + e bey 0
R. Brome ..,...+.. 5 o 19 60
F. Phillips . ; 6 1 22 4
R. Griffith .,... 2 1 9 1









ent of} Has St.



SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1952
———————————

RACING NOTES
Kitts Produced A Champion ?
By BOOKIE



TH three days of racing to be discussed it is
difficult to pick on any special event for tas
chief topic. 1nere is however a very special LO1se
which everyboay is talking about. ‘Innis horse is Miss
Kosemary Boon’s Coiombus, A black colt stauaing
a litue unaer sixteen hands, he did Not makes his

«ppearance at the meeting until last Monday, Tnis was in the nine
-ucong Snot Hail Stakes .or & class horses and afver lyimg in the rear

» We early stages, Colombus Came trough at We nnisn te wih in a
very convincing manner trom Cardinal. At ne ume It Was Wought
ae woud make a good norse in the future. But no one, ¢xcépr per-
waps his trauncr, knew Just how near that future was. As it wurned
vur Colompbus came Out tne winner of the sweep With No jess tnan
.our wins to his credit, The nature of his wins is quite anoth®r story.

1 cannot remember any horse who ran in only 7% and 9 tuclong

-aces al one meeung aNd nmished up unbeaten, Xe iis xs JUSL WHat
~momous las gone. His weight was lignt enough in tne rst cace be-
ause, not only was he a tWree-year-old, bul a Maiaen aS Wel, in
wi second race however, over 742 furlongs, he was Moved ligut up
v lz/ ibs. and once again he deteated the same Cardinal, ifis ume,
« thougnt, snowing much more dash and speed. Where he iooxea
uke @ baby in his first race he now lookea like a precocious two-
year-oia snowing off, Although Cardinal was sui allowing nim 4 ips.
.¢ the end of the race it was clear that it should have been we ower
way round, p

xesterday Colombus not only beat the F class horses over 742
tiwlongs once again, but west up into D class, and over nine furlongs,
uumetered a sound defeat to an old stayer like Cross Bow. Cross
oow, it must be said, allowed him four more pounds than weignt-
sor age and in addition made a bad start. But at the finish he was
sull 4 lengths behind Colombus who apparently had a litile to spare.
#etween them, once again, came the consistent Cardinal.

It as difficult to find past three-year-olds with which we might
compare Colombus. Atomic II immediately sprung to everyboay's
mind, for he too did not come into prominence unti] the August meet-
ing of his third year. Then all he did was to win one F class race with
very lignt weight from a G class horse. At the end of that montn
he went to Arima and won two races. On the face of it therefore,
appearamces are that Colombus must be even better than Atomic II
was at his age.

This is very interesting indeed because here we are in November
with only five weeks to go before the Trinidad Derby and it is not
until this eleventh hour that we find something capable of giving
Bright Light a run for her money in the Trinidad Derby. Up to the
ume that Colombus won his third race at the Meeting I was still
prepared to make Bright Light a firm favourite. But the manner of
ais fourth win over 9 furlongs leaves me in considerable doubt, It
is now a race worth going to see. ,

Next I must say that I have never enjoyed a race more than |
did the South Caribbean Stakes. After years of campaigning for the
return of mile and a half races to our programme here, and in Trini-
dad, and receiving the proverbial brick wall oppositfon, it was not
only pleasant, but downright astonishing, to return to the isiand
after an absence of only tive months, to find a complete metamor-
phosis in the attitude of the most militant objectors to a race of this
distance,

Mr. Chase’s Landmark is a stayer of a high order and I can think
of few mile and half races that ‘were ever run at such a warm clip.
Castle in the Air seem to have bolted with Johnny Belle in this race,
and it was not surprising that when he passed the judge box for the
first time to see that he had done the 54% furlongs in 1.09. I thought we
were going to witness another race like the famous affair with Alwin
when she ran off with Fred Thirkell, never looked back, and won in
convineing style from Haven, a ptevious Governor’s Cup winner.

But Landmark, who was always well up, took his measure at the
three furlong. She caught and passed him at the foot of the stretch
and then came home in a beautiful driving finish, much as I have
often seen her finish a 5% or 7 furlong race. Young Whittaker,
making his debut as a jockey, rode a good race to bring Flieuxce
second. But mile and a half races I think have been instigated a little
ate for poor Flieuxce. Two years ago when she was wasting her
time ‘on shorter distances with formidable milers like Elizabethan and
Rebate, she might well have won quite a number of them. I also
noticed that Belle Surprise, formerly thought to be a sprinter by her
fast times over 5 furlongs at exercise, ran third not very far behind.

Mr. Fred Bethell’s Abu Ali accounted gor two races in class
A. Much cracked up before the meeting opened, he must have
begun a bit short for he was beaten pointlessly on the first day.
le is not a bad little horse but I can see nothing extraordinary
n him. Yvonet, whose average at winning the first and last races
it a meeting must be very high indeed, set him off at break-neck
peed in the Final Handicap and I found it much to the credit of
he horse that he stayed on so well, But he did not have the tough
»pposition which others have had in this race in the past.

Others in the top classes who deserve mention are Castle in the
Air and Fire Lady, who were both winners over 9 furlongs, Castle
n the Air won a very amazing race. Over the last three furlongs
ne seemed to be running away from them with ridiculous ease.
His run in the mile and a half had apparently made him fighting
fit.

Two who were not winners but who did not fail to impress were
Yasmeen and Pepper Wine, The former gave Abu Ali a taste of
real speed in the Sprinters Stakes which he could not match over
the first three furlongs. It is clear that if she could be properly
prepared she would be much better by far. The latter, now a mare
~~ eight years showed so much speed at the end of the Final
Handicap that one wonders what she would haye done with them
in her prime, It is against a creole like this, long past her best, that’
we can judge our standard as it was, when she and Atomic IIL
were ruling the roost, against the present day lot.

The racing in C class produced some mixed results. Of the
five races in the three days there were four winners. Mr. “Bunny”
Edwards’ newly imported filly Fluffy Ruffles was the double
winner and well deserved this honour. She had shown promise
from exercise and with only two months in the tropics to acclimatise
{ think she did more than is usual for horses who have been here
for such a short time.

Spear Grass and Test Match were two others who won. I find
them similar in the respect that they may win a race just as
easily as they will loose one and so they keep us in the dark
most of the time,

The other winner in this class was the mare Mary Ann. She
was the only other creole, besides Pepper Wine, racing in’ the
imported classes at this meeting and when she defeated them over
542 furlongs giving weight to all except Careful Annie it was
another victory for the late great O.T.C. Will the sires of to-day
keep up the standard of creoles as this horse maintained it through-
out the war years and just after. Comparing their racing form

with his they should be streets above him. But that is left to be
seen.



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SUNDAY,



NOVEMBER 16, 1952

RACING RESULTS B.T.C. Autumn Meeting

AT GARRISON SAVANNAH, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1952
WEATHER: Fine

22nd Race : GRAVESEND HANDICAP—Class “G” and Lower—$500

TRACK: Firm

($165, $80, $40)—51¢ Furlongs



1. TWINKLE, h.b. b.f. Dunusk- Whit Lady, 101 lbs., Mr. 3s. J. Sealy
Jockey Crossley.

o wo

. EN PRIX, h.b. ch.
Nothnagel.
. BLUE GRASS, h.b. ch.h, Roidan-Pet, 114 Ibs.,

Jockey Singh

Jockey Holder.

ALSO RAN: Poplin (Quested 110+2 lbs); Dynamite (Blades 97 Ibs)
Joan’s Star (Belle 103+3 lbs.); Blue Diamond (Newman 133 lbs.).
EL: Win: $3.12; Place:

FINISH: Easy, 1 lengths, I length,

TIME:

irae sue -08.

SE
28rd Race : WORTHING HANDICAP—Ciass “B” and Lower—$900

($300, $150, $55)—9 Furlongs
1, FIRELADY bf. ~~ Phoenix-Dido, 113 lbs., Mr. S. A. Blanchette
Jockey Quested
2. PEPPER WINE: b.m. 0.T.C. -Condiment, 107 lbs., Hon. J. D.
Chandler. Jockey Crossley

3. TIBERIAN LADY b.m. Tiberius- Warm Welcome, 108+6 Ibs., Nr.

Vv. Ch

ALSO RAN; Castle in the Air, (Belle 128 lbs.
1, Mrs, Bear (Holder 1044-4 lbs.) ;
unWw;

5 lbs.)
TIME: 1.5

START.

1.09}. a MUTUE

ase. Jockey Singh)

ashing Princess (O'Neil 109+4 Ibs.
5 4/5.

Test Matc

Jetsam-Sun Maiden 128 lbs., Mr. N. L.
Mr’ George A. Forde

; Nefari (Hajal 97

mais PARI-MUTUEL: Win: $6.90; Place: $3.30; $5.18
RECAST: ft. 80.

Goo FINISH: Easy 1} lengths, 2 lengths.

24th Race : BELLEVILLE HANDICAP—Class “F” and Lower
(3 y.o, & over) —$700, ($235, $115, $40)—74¢ Furlongs

. COLOMBUS br.c. Cobrose-Busy Woman, 130 Ibs. Miss “Rosemary

n.

wo nw

Jockey O'Neil.

Jockey Yvonet.
. bg. Sun Plant Apronette,

Hawkins. Fletcher.

109+-3 Ibs,

. FIRST ADMIRAL b.g. Admiral’s Fig-Flak, 117+1 lbs, Mr. F. E. C.
Bethell.
. APOLLO.

Miss K. C.

ALSO RAN: March Winds (Hajal 98 lbs); Jolly Miller (Quested

100+2 lbs); Chutney (Crossley 122 lbs); Ca
PARI-MUTUEL: Win: $1.8

TIME:

FO AST: $8.
START: Good. FINISH: Easy 14 lengths, neck.
TRAINER

1.35 4/5.

52
Mr, J. Fletcher.

a (Blades 84+-3 lbs.

Place: $1.28, $1.40,
e

CO
25th Race : JUNIOR HANDICAP—Class “F” and Lower (2 y.0.)
$700, ($235, $115, $40)—5% Furlongs

1. AP AM,
area Yocnes

eo w

Yvonet.,

A. Proverbs. Jockey Holder.
ALSO RAN: Battle Line (Hajal 92 Ibs.); Jim La Rue (Blades).

TIME: 1.09 4/5,
FORECAST: $1.80

TRAINER: Mr. J. R. Goddard.

26th Race

2. ToRSY. chi

FINISH: Easy:

B- igisam-Apple Fritter, 128 lbs., Mr. J.B,

SUPER JET, che Jetsam-Wedding Gift, 115 lbs, Mr. F. E. C.
Bethell. “ Jocke

. Tver, bet. Jim Cracker Jack-Will O'the Wisp, 101 Ibs, Mr.

PARI-MUTUEL: Win: $1.26; Place: $1.10, $1.14.
14 lengths, 5 lengths.

: NOVEMBER HANDICAP—Class “C” and Lower—$800,

($265, $135, $50)—744 Furlongs
Te nate b.f. Pink Flower-Golden Fa Fairy, 121 lbs. Mr.
war

Jockey Holder.

Jockey naar

3.

Jock

Emir d’Iran-Killocure, 125 lbs, Mr. K. D. Edwards.

Magic Gaye, +t, Magic Red-Ecilace, 118 lbs. Mr. M. E. R.
urne,



A RAN: Devirs Symphony (Blades 105 lbs.); High and Low
130. 1s, pate
S. ss dls
3. The Thi
Darham Sas" {
TIME: R



27th Race :

etcher 115 lbs.
1.35 4/5.

ood. FOS SH: Close:
Hon, V. C.

)
PARI-MUTUEL: Win:

‘ab (Singh 110+-4 lbs.), Mary Ann (Yvonet
ittaker 115 lbs.); Aim Low (Crossley 109
(James 97+8 ibs.); Vectio (Quested 106+5)

$3.54; Place: 1.54;

4 length, head,

ROCKLEY HANDICAP—Class “D” and Lower—$800,

($265, $135, $45)—9 Werteney



~

y Crossley.
3. BOW, b.g. Burning Bow-Chivalry,
Gale)

Jockey O'Neil.

‘ ‘COLOMBUS br.c, Cobrose- Busy Woman, 122 “Tbs. Miss Rosemary

DINAL b.g. O.T.C.—Biretta 118 lbs. Mr. J. W. Chandler

Banos (Hon. ¥. G&

ALSO

: Assurance (Ali 1021 lbs); Colleton (Singh 109+5

(Belle 106 Ibs.)

'B1 . PARI-MUTUEL: Win $3.26; Place:
04.
FINISH: Close } length,

TRAINER: Mr. J. Fletcher.

28th Race : FINAL HANDICAP—Class “A & B” Only—$1,000,

2. LANDMARK, ch.m. Pylon II-Esperance,

130 lbs. Mr. Cyril
lbs.) ;
$1.70; $1.44.

1 length.

($335, $165, $60)—714 Furlongs

1. ABU-ALI, ch.c. Persian Gulf-Fair Witness, 122 lbs. Mr. F. E. C.
Bethell Jockey Yvonet.

Jockey Singh.

3. PEPPER WINE,
Chandler.
ALSO RAN: Castle in the Air (Belle 123 lbs); Demure (Whittaker
105+2 lbs, Harroween (Quested 128 lbs.);

120 lbs);. Firelady (Fletcher 113 lbs.) Sweet Rocket (Lewis
105+4 Ibs.) .

TIME: 1.33%. PARI-MUTUEL: Win: $3.54; Place $1.54; /1.74;
$2.52

FORECAST: $16.92

START: Good. FINISH: Close 1 head, 1 length.

Jockey Crossley.

TRAINER: Mr. F. E. C. Bethell.

133 Ibs. Mr.
bm. O.T.C.-Condiment

104 lbs. Hon, J. D.

1.36, $1.42, $1.72

’ (Yvonet 118 2),
s (Newman 115 lbs.); Belle fm (Whittaker 102+

Vv. Chase

Yasmeen (Newman



Prize List vs

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

RESULTS OF
2¢ SWEEP

FOURTH Day
TWENTY-SECOND RAC!

PAGE: FIVE







NOV. 16 —

NO. 250

TOPICS













Prize Ticket. No. SMSh
2nd 2189 : 264.00 |
~ 0857 132.00
The prize list is as follows:— wn 338 ’ 86.00 | JOE & ROBERT
Ticket No. Horse Place Amoun' 5th = 19.00)
SS —2161 Colombus 16 Ist $33,286 vo ah -) a5aa 10.00 |
AA—9172 Cardinal 14 2nd 16,648.00 0739 10.00 |
OO—2012 Super Jet li 3rd 8,811.00 «eh holders ooh, tickets nos.
B — 4173 Fluffy Ruffles 10) 4th & Sth( i 1259 , |
GG—2613 Twinkle 10) divide ( 3,916.09 TWENTY-THIRD RACE |
OO—2434 Abu Ali 9 6th 1,958.00 prize Ticket. No Amount |
A — 9901 Apple Sam 8) ith, 8th¢ ae ar a This sovereign Whisky pOssesses that distinction of fevwas
PP— 9133 En Prix 8) and ( 1,958.50 3h 1432 172.99 which will claim your allegiance from the firs: sip.
R — 2625 Landmark 8) yth divide’ ath 3387 86.49 .
, - is BS
72 other horses divide $271.94 each. oth en 39.00 IisHL Ni D
LIST OF HORSES DRAWN se 230 10.00
10th 013 10.00
Baie Fire Lads, Bead timn Le Mus, a173—Fiutty Rufies, gdm lMaglg BEM lakers, no UEEN
C—5352 Dashing Princess, 9998—Careful Annie. 1314—Darham ..38 Pode gtacal
Jane, 5525—(Cons.) Jinx. , rie Amenst | The waters boys are troubled
D—7888 Viceroy, 2061—Flieuxce, 1021—Caprice, 2831—Trim- *T! ‘ee $260.58 And Tehabod le siamoed SCOTCH WHISKY
brook, 3095—Vectis. 2ad 1780 434.62 _Up outside the door post
i 4179 217.31 A split is in the camp lel
F—5341 Joan’s Star, 8663—Devil's Symphony, 6224—Test Match, +"! * a Mp0 | Who told you so? asked Robert w. $. owRac a CO. LID., BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS
9421—Frederick The Great. ih 4383 10.00 And he replied to Joe |
H—9925 Erench Flutter, 3582—Stirling Dawn. 7h 3073 10.00 One of the vary comrades MAC HONATD & SNM TO OUSTHLERS CRIT
I—-2799 Sea Foam, 5213—Vigilante $5.00 cach to holders of tickets nos n Friday ni sald sc . merry a
seers Soe Coes, Wee ee Dole ee 0 re OE ins wtietestersce andindl and hot: onan IN CUBA MEN WEAR
—6417 eerschaum, —Cross Bow. ‘ wTH RACE The hottest Joe have seen
L—6147—Mary Arn, 1153-—Harroween. Poize rweNryen No Amount Twas then Lou ise tae ant
Q—6228 Yasmeen, 0986—Street Arab, 6987 Tiberian Lady, 03382— st Be y ee, Upon the European
Betsam. gra 2161 258.82 | 1t really was untimels
0084 5 © give a friend “the slide |
R—2625 Landmark, 9028—Chutney. oh 0109 10.00 | Because we were all consciou | mm OYGAS HM € L
S—9953 Tlopsy, 2942—Spear Grass. oe a0 seth se neigere. of Genet a It's getting cold outside tee
T—4003 Hi and Low. eee

V—2470 Jolly Miller.





0085. Can it be fair dear comrades
Right in the dead of night





TWE -SIXTH RACE
W—5426 Battle Line. Prige at hs et, ne Aageens | To throw one through a window linen—
X—9339 Aim Low, 4093—The Thing. i Gar Ses a8 Can you say this is right
Z—5356 Belle Surprise, 7296—Blue Nelly. ue : 3rd 4084 282.71 ‘Tell us, Gea eambades tel! us |
AA Bear, 2390—Driftwood, $172—-Cardinal! h 2828 141.35 Can you ali call it fair
BB—8371 Contralto, 7983—Pepper Line, 4208—Jealousy h om) ee To “sack” Your year-round girl friend the n’s
CC—8459 Castle in the Air, 3011—Lunways, 2353—Street Arab, {i} ors 10.00 | Now Christmas drawing near } ma es
8863— Assurance. 8th 6790 10.00 { Where is that patty spirit |
‘ 9h 3903 10,00 ay ell us comrades, pray
DD—9587 Apollo, 8051—Seedling, oth 3590 Oe | seehes of man's canvictior
EE—4796 Nit Wit. th 3360 10,00, "Must be banished? Nay f b i
FP—1110 Furst Admiral ee ge aR, PR. SRO | ody. abric
GG—9290 Rambler Rose, 8765—Poplin, 2613--Twinkle, 8784- 18, 6121 2086, 2088, 4083, 405, 2827 SR rite et Lomamuaion
Wonderful. 8.29 TWENTY-SEVENTH RACY And substitute the same time
‘ . Lukewarm Democracy”
II—8765 Diamond Queen. Prise ee Arvount | . . |
KK—7287 March Winds, 7586—Pepper Wine. gna 5086 56774 Freedom of speech and action
LL—0801 Nefari, 6803—Gavotte, 6220--Magic Gaye. ted 1524 283,87 | se aa . aieura. beantes |
MM—8865 Galashiels, 3772—-l\lusion, : bs 4th roe 0.0" | \Thap any five year plan
NN—3801 Blue Diamond, 7968—Demure, 8143 Fils D'Iran, 5172-+ on 4980 10.00 | “aha
Dynamite. $5.00 each to holders of tickets tos.) Mut spineless men must suffer



positions in the struggle to reach
the top twelve before Feb. 1
when the team which will re-
present Rockley in Trinidad will
be selected, were Colin Thomas,
who jumped two rungs with
victories over A. W. Tempro and
Dorian Cole; Ted Benjamin, who
played himself into the first
division by beating Geoffrey
Manning; P. D, McDermott, who
started a long and potentially
sensational climb by defeating
Cole; Keith Murphy and William
Grannum,. Several others accept-
ed challenges from their pursuers
and successfully defended their
positions.

The ladies were almost as active
with Mrs, Brenda Wilson regaining
No. 1 position by defeating Mrs.
Doreen Beasley, while Mrs. Vera
Manning moved upward with ‘a
victory over Mrs, Peggy Smith in
an extra-hole match.

White Hat Thursday

While more than a dozen
challenges remain outstanding,
attention next week will be center-
ed on the Medal Play Champion-
ship and President’s Cup events,
which will be played over 36
holes, eighteen on Saturday and
eighteen on Sunday. The Cham-
nionship will go to the low gross
score as it is one of the two
cratch events contested annually,
and the President’s Cup will go
to the low net score for the two-
round effort.

With nineteen entries already
filed, a field of thirty or more is

expected to have signed up before
Thursday night, when the entries
close and a White Hat auction will
be conducted by Ted Benjamin at



Final Proof



The collar

for all occasions

Van Hevsen—the collar which looks right
whether you are being conventional

or casual. There's never a crease because
it is woven on the curve in one piece to
fit the natural shape of the neck—it

is exceptionally long wearing and stays
smart and comfortable in any climate
This practical and economic al collar

is worn by well dressed men everywhere.
Available in six different styles.

Van Heusen



We'll soon

that better

with 1) 6

ASE








GERMOL EN 4 southe

h al a 4





Germolene Ointment soothes
and penetrates? It protects skin
injuries, rashes,

mm en ae ecneame

1133, 1135, $985, S987, 1523, 1525, 4354 And sometimes stand defeat }







OO—2434 Abu Ali, 2012—Super Jet, 7262—Flying Dragon. 356 They should like giants cry, “No!” |
PP—2117—My Love IT, 9133—En Prix, ¥ TWENTY-RIGHTH RACE fae Peete See Shey eee
QQ—5884—Colleton. co 7 groasz3| Like the three Hebrew children
RR—7211 Mr. Friendship. ond 2212 "585.85 i be should say t ep can’t do’
3S . . : ‘o-day they would be honoured
SS—2161—Colombus, 2612—Cavalier. ith be ‘ae By Robert, Joe and Lou | Yes, more and more
ath ue iO | They've jumped out of the fry. par | men are demanding
' | But in the fire fell ee
ae hor 10.00 And boys riuiit out the: fire ‘ Moygashel ’ fabries for
GOL Le 9th 2928 10.00 They've jumped right into he their clothes. These
$5 m. ape” to holders of tickets nos ' .
ei 3, 2211, 2213, 4853, 4855, 2503, Riad “ye sane wares seat Guayaberas are made in
2a nan s Ts wor |
Hig Dee Det ment Sh ee this famous pure, crease-resisting
an never quenc 6 thirs
id enge aa ey ‘Ma tech es. : linen that is ideal for both casual
wi must be dene dear cor ade
The issue jou must fa | ind formal wear, It tailors well,
The poor man’s consolation |
During the lull before the the Club House. Because of his “> in the Qther Place | washes well and wears well and is
{Medal Play Championship and promotional interest in these LADIES’ LADDER } - uite ; sli
‘ ; ae a Brest s It Denice cele shad Bids tints teenies | ideally suited to the Cuban climate
the President's Cup competitions, affairs, Mr. Benjamin has been Results | hey ray ody “No” -t0 this
two of the major fixtures on the selected as a regular member of _ M's: B. Wilson defeated wen Wns havboae nabene golfing schedule which will be the Golf Committee, filling the Beasley, The five-year plan dismiss
played _ simultaneously next vacancy left open by the Captain Mrs. V, Manning defeated Mrs. vedi = se eosiaght pail
Saturday and Sunday, the Rockley and Vice-Captain at the time of ! Smith. _ | “Toast now with J & R ah
divot-diggers turned their energies the annual meeting in September. ,, M's. Wylie defeated Mrs. N.} ang when you “try the new plan f
to Challenge Ladder matches with The results of the Challenge !°™Pr0- Give it “five years’ from the pa SHEL
* some spectacular results, Ladder matches during the past _ Mrs. E. Vidmer defeated Mrs, sored b PURE CREASE-RESISTING LINENS R£GD,
Among those to better their week and the challenges, indicat- ‘VY. MacIntyre, sponsore y





ing the date they were posted, ..Mrs. H. King defeated Mrs, v.|
follow, Players are reminded that ’@™"ine. |

J&R BAKERIES



challenges must be accepted. within Challenges f A. S. ’ den & Son (Barbados) Lid.
ten days of posting or a walk- WNovember 11—Mrs. Wylie chal | makers o Sales West Indies:—
over conceded, ienged Miss Atwell, anal | ENRICHED BREAD Stevenson & Son Ltd., P.O. Box 1704 NASSAU, Bahamas.
MEN’S LADDER November 12—Mrs, King | *
‘, jlenged Mrs, MacIntyre. th blend f et od a fat
4. W. Tears’ deltas. cate a aaa Sr) AOS Ae ennaee 6 sear Ee eae me Nan
. . Y sfeatec . cha ged ‘Ss. . D 6

Inniss, November 13 — Mrs, Grace} J&R RUM

Peter Greig defeated V. Hunte. challenged Mrs, Smith,

me Oe Benjamin defeated G,
Manning.

P. D. McDermott defeated D,

Cole.

D. Hinkson
FitzGerald.

Keith Murphy
King.

W. Grannum defeated S,

Colin Thomas
Tempro,

Colin Thomas defeated D, Cole.

A. W, Tempro defeated D, Cole.

Challenges

November 4—Daysh challenged
Maskell.

November
ed Norris,

November 8—-Atkinson challeng- |
ed Bayley.

Noy, 9. Greig challenged Inniss. |

November 11—Murphy chal-
lenged Lisle Smith.

Nevember 11—MecDermott chal-
lenged Kellman,

defeated G A.
defeated H. V }

Toppin, |
defeated A. W

)-—-Osborn challeng- |

November 11—Benjamin chal-
lenged Niblock |
November 11 — Hinkson chal-
lenged Lord Dangan. |
Novembtr 12 — Eastham chal-
lenged King. }
November 18—Cole challenged |

Tempro.

November
lenged Grace

13—Grannum chal-

have

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scalds, and
insect bites from the
entry of harmful bacteria,
and stimulates healing.
Keep a tin handy for

The Finest Bieycte Butt To-day

i\| See them now at =
Barbados Co-operative
Cotton Factory Ltd.
Auto Tyre Co.

| Trafalgar Store

AND AT ALL LEADING DEALERS
THRCUGHOUT THE ISLAND

at a touch
Obtuinabie everywhere.









Fad
i

A
=
j
PAGE SIX

The Truth in |
‘Your Horoscope

Would you like to know without an:
cost what the Stars indicate for you, som
of your past experiences, your strong ar.d



























weak points, ete Here is your chance
i » test FREE the skill of Pundit Tabore,
India’ r- ost
| Astrologer
' plying
the ancient sci
art ‘ }
€ ace }
is prec |
a t sound
ractical advice |
mtained in his '
oroscope on ;
Business. Specu-
jation, Finances,
cp , ics Love -_ affairs,
Ferguson Fabrics Lave = nmaies,
Lotteries. Trav-
bring beauty els, Changes, Lit-
me | igation, Lucky
into_ your life... Times Sickness |

| ete., have astounded educated people the |
world over. GEORGE MACKEY of New |
York believes that Tabore must pox+ some sort of second-sight. |
To popularise his system Tabore wili
send you FREE your Astral Interpreta
tion if you forward him your ful! nanmv

vith the loveliest, most colourful
design you've ever seen... in

prineil seersuckers , cambrics ,

(Mr. Mrs. or Miss, addresses and date o
voiléand haircords that wear birth all clearly written by yourself. No|
money wanted foi Astro’ogical work

i ir 0} postage etc., but send 1/- tn B.P.O. ‘(No

with ae of freshness | Stamps or Coins) for stationery. testi

i moniais and other interesting Iterature
without changing You will be amazed at the remarkable
accuracy of his statements about you
and your affairs. Write now as tnis offer
may not be made again Address
PUNDIT TABORE, (Dept. 213-E:, Uppe:
| Forjett Street, Bombay 26.. India. Postage
to India is 4 cents

|

|
|



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#THE GUARANTEE ¢arried by «ll Ferguson Fabrics—
satisfaction assured or the material will be replaced.
Always look for the name Ferguson on the selvedge.

stm eta aT

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SUNDAY ADVOCATE

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1952

HISTOR Y | Children Get The

goes to | World Talking
$a PEC AT) nx canon avon wanmne





—_—



OXFORD.

Tre Coronation begins to |THE woman from Bagdad had

have an influence on flown to see the dreamy spires
United States fashions. of Oxford.
Jewels emphasise crowns, | Rlaring at us were the raucous
velvet is becoming one of the sounds of the hurdy-gurdy; the
most popular fabrics, and shrieks from the giant dipper.
Cooma Feta omens | Oxtord wa" having is, ant
Some designers,’ Looking St. Giles Fair bang in the mid-

further, have found ideas in dle of the city.

A ; ; My c anion was vice-president

ish histor ¥ companion p
oe Serie hat of her country’s National Coun-
here: cil for Social Welfare.

Twenty countries have sent 200
delegates here to the conference
oi the International Union of
Family Organisations.

It is = significant sign of the times.
A proof of the importance
attached internationally to three
things: the stability of marriage.
the function of the family, and
the happiness of children.

Dr. David Mace, pioneer of mar-
riage guidance, links the three:
“A couple. unhappily married
find compensation for their

| frustration by over-mothering
their children. A happy couple
will leg their children free.”

And these are the messages the
nations have brought:—

BELGIUM: “Every mother here
I | with ten or more children gets
lersey, | a medal. A League of Large

| Families helps all Belgian
| parents with four or more chil-
dren,”

LEFT: Ballerina-length evening dress in velvet. It has a crinoline skirt quilted in a diamond pattern

and trimmed with matching bows. By Dorter’ neck. By Dorville.
Cocktail dress in fine black wool with “bolsville.

Focus On The Neckline

RIGHT:



KING ARTHUR'S COURT inspired |
this hat in ruby red felted
the chin

fastened under

LONDON, By DOROTHY BARKLEY cues damson, almond ae and | en vee 3 ery the

, » ple ; 7 : . »lack mixture is suggeste or yore coal i
ait Wena Pie wodime po suggestion. Fur collars are at- afternoon wear. The dress has a som bail aateeabal family by
here abs two suggestions from tached not to the suit collar, but high neck, slender skirt, and a An MP. frots TYALY ins K
the current Dorville collecticn $a". individual crepe “vest” flaring side panel. | ah oo

showing two up-to-date styles of which is worn beneath the suit so Chesterton: “A child is sent to

i oe { | schoo ly when
: that the fur overlaps the suit A second, more original used school for instruction only w
eens “ fi collar. In this way, the suit will for tartan flannel is for a full} wan too late fo ee oe:
First comes the “bolster” col- stil] be wearable long after the length hostess or dinner gown.| : at s ont has kage o~
lar, illusjrated here on a dress Of fur fashion has died out. The plaid here is in bottle green eo oe gg at ’
fine black wool. Obviously taking ; fitted bodice and full skirt, with always by his mother.
‘ts inspiration from the ruff, it As a postscript to their collec- the fullness springing from the | And AMERICA and BRITAIN
adds an unusual touch to an tion, Dorville have designed a

. . hip yoke,
otherwise completely plain dress
end makes the perfect foil for

jewellery. Although shown here

|} are teaching the Continentals
in this cenference a good deal
about giving children sound

complete section for the young
working girl, or as she is usually

J New Ideas in Plastics
termed these days, the “Budget”

| sex education and preparing
on a wool dress, it could be made girl. ‘These clothes have shed With the British Plastics Ex- adolescents for marriage.
in a wide variety of materials to much of that “utility” look dur- hibition in London, plastics are |
suit different climates,



ing the past year and now show a
mose faithful reflection of cur-
rent fashion, Suits here follow
the “middy” line, dresses have
flat, all-round pleated skirts, and

—L.E.S.
once more in the news. One of the
newest developments is the use of |
“electric welding” for making the |
seams. This makes the traditional

way of sewing seams on plastic |



CRUSADER HELMET is in white | - _

velour, circled with jewels. Flaps may | i >
FROM SMALL .

By way of contrast is the sim-
plicity of the neckline suggested
for evening, This latest variation,

be worn over the ears or tied |
in showing the trend away from







: fashionable fringe trimmings are materials olq fashioned. Chief
ihe completely strapless top, on suit pockets. Colours include advantages of the new method are } Wy "tS Vt 4
Available favours not the halter-neck, but tobacco brown, and shades of blue longer wearing and absence of | 4
narrow matching straps, thin as varying from sky to blueberry perforation marks. f ’
at most good shoelaces. The short ballerina- ; . he i
stores length dress has firmly establish- Selected for special mention are One of the main features of the } ,

ed itself as an evening fashion, a pinafore dress in a grey and exhibtion was the fashion parade

SS particularly amongst those who white flecked tweed, which is arranged to show the wide use of | fore

1 P a , " prefer to wear evening dress for worn with a matching stole and plastics in clothing. Raincoats in tewil ,
Hell | real | S the theatre. This design, in black white polo-necked sweater, and a plastic materials are intended for | n ‘
be velvet, is quilted all over in a middy-line jumper suit in Black evening as well as day wear. The Tash x

LIQUID SILVER POLISH diamond pattern, trimmed with Watch tartan. It has a flat-pleat- glamorous evening coats are far

bows, and had a crinoline skirt.
For day wear, Dorville offered
the fur-trimmed



ed skirt, and a low V-neckline 1

moved from their prosaic ser-
which can be dressed up with

viceable ancestor, the “mae.” A}

; »
BEGINNINGS



suits so much either scarves, choker necklaces full plastic satin evening coat, |
the vogue this season, Most wo- or flowers. had contrasting turn-back cuffs |
men, who have refused to buy y : and long tuxedo fronts, and a}| cRNA, 38 6 Grae, ton
suits or coats with fur attached And talking of tartan, from theatre coat was in a satin with @ little better after the addition
becaused they will be outdated Paris comes news of gay tartan a delicate filigree ec

pattern.
long before outworn, will be in-

flannel invading the cocktail and
terested

of a simple box with a shelf,
evening scene. A tartan flannel —L.E.S.

| PAGEBOY CAP is in wool jersey | pyyallpapered inside. |
wear a border of rubies and } roe ‘a lok ora tates —
| gold braid, | (39s, 6d.), fitted with a ball.

London Express Service. | shade (around £1), gave
What’s Cooking In The Kitchen |

indirect lighting,
4 PAIR of wall
CROQUETTES

in Dorviile’s practical





brackets to match
(52s. 6d. each)—one each side
of the fireplace—completed

the fashionable woman wears

KAYS E FR nylon stockings









For PAINTS, VARNISHES
and the Useful Household Items
for the Coming Xmas Season

Call At
Establisned



Incorporated



es
specially
tml These easy croquettes can be
packed tin: served with cocktails or with meat
or fish, or as a main dish.
Croquettes of Omelettes

Eggs 3

Salt

Oil or margarine for frying

Butter 1 oz.

Flour 1 heaped tablespoonful

Milk 1 glass not too full

Pepper

Nutmeg

Breadcrumbs

1 beaten egg.

Beat the 3 eggs in a bowl and
add 1 pinch of salt. Put a tiny
bit of oil in a small frying pan
and add 1 tablespoonful of eggs

‘4 inch wide. Put 1 oz. of butter
in a saucepan and when melted
add the tablespoonful of flour, let
it fry for a few seconds then add
the glass of

milk, Let the
sauce thicken then add _ salt
and pepper and nutmeg (if

you like). Let it get even thicker
and do not forget to stir all the
time. When ready take off the fire
and when still warm add the
strips of the omelettes. Pour it out
on the kitchen table and let it get
completely cold. Then shape the
eroquettes, dip them in flour, in
the beaten egg, in the bread-
crumbs and fry with margarine,
Green Croquettes
Butter 2 oz.

Grated cheese 2 tablespoonsful
Breadcrumbs

Oil, margarine or lard to fry.

With the butter, the flour ‘and
the milk make a very thick
white sauce, season with salt and
peper and let it cool. Take the
ball of spinach, squeeze all the
water from it and sieve it. Add
the spinach puree to the white
sauce, add two egg yolks, two
tablespoonsful of grated cheese
and mix well. Take one table-
spoonful of the mixture at a time,
shape the croquettes, dip them
in flour, then in the beaten egg
(if you want to economise you
can use the white of the eggs)
and then in the breadcrumbs, Fry

Salt
A bit of lime skin

Sugar 1 tablespoonful

Butter 2 oz,

Egg yolks 2

Breadcrumbs

Oil or lard to fry the croquettes.

Put the milk in a saucepan and

when it starts to boil add the!
semolina, stirring all the time |
with a wooden spoon, Add 1

pinch of salt and a tiny piece of
lime rind. Let the semolina cook
thoroughly and when ready take

it off the fire, take off the skin
of the lime and add the sugar, |
the butter and the 2 egg yolks.

Mix well, pour the mixture in a

transformation like

|






busned ~T. HERBERT LTD

ROEBUCK 8ST, and MAG DANE First In Preference the World Over
Copr. 1950 Borden Co. Lnternat'l Copr. Reserved



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Flour 2 tablespoonsful.

Milk 1 glass

Salt

Cooked spinach a big ball

Eggs 2 )

in margarine, lard or oil as you

at a time making small omelettes. like.

Make as many omelettes as you
can with the three eggs. When
cool cut in small strips

big dish and let it get cold. |
Shape some small croquettes dip |
them tin the breadcrumbs and |
fry them in oil or lard, or mar- |
garine.

Sweet Croquettes
Milk % pint
Thin semolina 4 oz.

them







SO
Satisfying
... this

Chase

‘e
“)\ “BB
| ¢ -








Sanborn.

The famous threefold action of PHENSIC
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member this ——- PHENSIC tablets neither
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Don’t accept substitutes. Keep a supply of
PHENSIC tablets by you! or

Phensic

FOR RHEUMATIC PAINS, LUMBAGO
HEADACHES, NEURALGIA



> OS

TWO TABLETS

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RELIEF

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hold. Ask for Chase & Sanbori; todays

» FLU, COLDS & CHILiS /





SUNDAY,



By ERIC C. HISCOCK

Susan and I had often thought
what a delightful and exciting
thing it would be to make a voy-
age around the world in our own
small sailing vessel, taking our
time and visiting on the way all
the places which we imagined
might be interesting or entertain-
ing. For a long time this had
seemed like an unlikely dream of
the Never-Never land; and then
last year we suddenly realised
that if we sold almost everything
we possessed we cuuld just raise
enough money to have a boat built
specially for that purpose, and to
fit her out and provision her for
such a voyage which might take
three or four years. The fact that
I make a precarious living by
writing about sailing and travel
naturally had something to do
with our sudden decisien to have
a 30-foot sailing yacht built and to
see how far we could get in her.

We chose a length of 30 feet not
beeause we consider that is the
ideal size for an oecean-going
vessel, but simply beeause we
could not afford anything larger.
Having owned two previous Wan.
derers, one of which called at
Barbados early this year, it was
natural that we should christen
the new boat Wanderer IM, She
was completed and launched in
March, since when we have lived
aboard her without spending one
single night ashore

Now, if you ever come to plan
your voyage around the world,
you will quickly find that you
need something more than an
atlas, for although on a map the
sea always looks calm and blue
and free from dangers, it is in

NOVEMBER 16,

WANDERER HT SAILS WEST



1952

can of course beat against a wind
her progress is then very slow
and uncemfortable. Se we decided

We would sail by way of the
north-east trade wind’ to the West
Indies and 6n through the Pana-
ma Canal to the Pacific where we
should have a large proportion of
fine weather and fair winds until
nearing Australia. Beyond that
we made no definite plans, but we
hoped to sail up inside the Great
Barrier Reef through Torres Strait
to the Duteh East Indies, Singa-
pere and Ceylon before heading
south to the Cape of Good Hope,
The south-east trade. wind in the
South Atlante wil) then bring us
to the West Indies again on our
way to New York, and from there
the great westerlies will carry us
home to England,

It is g@ long, long way. and of
fourse we May never succeed, but
our more immediate problems
‘were the notorious Bay of Biscay
and the, West Indian hurricane
season. The former decided our
time of departure from England
towards the end of July, so as to
be clear of the Bay before the
autumn gales set in; but as one
should not arrive on the western
side of the AYantic before Novem-
ber so as to avoid any risk of en-
countering a stray hurricane, we
would have plenty of time to cruise
along the Spanish and Portuguese
coasts and among the off-lying
islands.

Storing up the yacht for such
an undertaking as we had in mind
also needed a good deal of plan-
ning and forethought, Obviously
we could not carry enough tinned
provisions for the whole trip, but
we wished to take as much as we



ERIC HISCOCK, who has written several books on Cruising, types out
this article for the “Advocate” in the cabin of Wanderer III in Car-
lisle Bay.

veality very rarely smooth, in
places it is studded witn danger-
ous rocks and shoals, and there
are periods when it is unsafe to
sail in certain areas because of
hurricanes, cyclones, tornados and
other bad weather systems, So be-
fore laying your plans in any de-
tail, you will of course make a
careful study of the wind and cur-
rent charts of the oceans you
intend to cross, and of the Pilots,
as the books of sailing directions
for all seas and ceasts are called.
That is just what we did, and then,
having mapped out a rough route,
we got the large scale charts and
found out which of the countries,
islands and harbours we wished to
visit were suitable for a craft as
gmall as ours, and what dangers
we would haW: to circumnavigate.
It surely i$ a fascinating occupa-
tion, and it filled most of our spare
moments while Wanderer III was
taking shape in the builder's shed

We decidea 10 make our voyage
west about so as to keep as much
as possible in. warm latitudes and
fn the trade winds; there are of
an almost,permanent nature and,
blowing from an easterly
direction, would be fair for our
purpose, Although a sailing vessel




Healthy, happy
“ Fruit Salt”.
“ Fruit Salt” is the

could find room for because of the
foreign currency difficulties; our
minimum requirements should be
at least enough to take us to Bar-
bacdos, where we could re-provis-
ion for the passage to Panama and
on towards New Zealand, So be-
.fore leaving England we took
aboard tinned meat, fruit, vege-
tables, milk, biscuits and many
other things. When the cases con-
taining these came aboard at
Cowes it seemed at first impossi-
ble that we could ever fing room
for them; but Wanderer has good
storage space, and eventually
everything was disposed of, Each
locker, shelf, and spice was num-
bered, and in a book we made a
notg of the contents of each, then
as our stores were used we crossed
each tin off one by one so that at
any moment we might know
exactly how much remained, In
addition we carried as much fresh
‘rult and vegetables as we thought
would keep. together with flour,
rice, sugar, and other dry pro-
visions. We carried 70 gallons of
fresh water in three separate
tanks, each of which could be
filled or drawn from independently
of the others, so that if one were
to spring a leak or its contents

families take ENO’S
Pleasant, refreshing

gentle corrective

most of us need to keep the system regular. ENO’S is net

euitable for children—and for anyone with a delicate stomach.

EN!

relieves over-acidity, a most frequent cause of indigestion,

heartburn and flatulence.

unsuitable food or drink. A dash of ENO’S at any time of day

soothes and settles the stomach upset by

makes

a sparkling, invigorating health-drink. Keep ENO’S handy |



!



Eno’s

SPECIALLY
RECOMMENDED
2\ for IRREGULAR ACTION,
| SICK HEADACHE,
BILIOUSNESS,
INDIGESTION, ete

Sold in bottles for
lasting freshness.



52/ait

(a me a

SUNDAY



a eee ee mLCLC LUCTUS

ADVOCATE

PICKUP FOR 1953 BY VAN-
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the Vanguard offers you power,
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Crackers and bulging Stockings,
while Xmas trees laden with
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PAGE SEVEN .

°

I dreamed I was a
fashion figure in

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WANDERER IIL
were to go bad we

would not lose
the lot. We also loaded photo-
graphic films, bromide paper and

had come over the

hurrying clouds and

weather:
succession of depressions with low
rain swept

the Hiscock’s 30-foot yacht sailing home. They plan to sail around the world in her.

breaking
side, and the ceaseless, senseless
howling of the wind

a

against the windwara

in the rig-

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chemicals enough for three to jn from the Atlantic and “Wan- ging, coupled with the violent texture. .in choosy colour range, yrange of colours. Time, too, to Be true! Here’s the firm, flat-
four years. as well as a large qerer” had per first taste of bad motion, tend to lower the morale;}>),,Wide at $3.10. A ae bring sunshine right into the) tering support to give you a
supply of toilet and medical weather, For forty-eight hours after a few hours we longed far selection of beautiful Flow home for Christmas, add new dream :
necessities. she lay hove-to while a real Bay the return of better weather, aj#terials (lovely Silks, too) fresh charm and beauty with home- really y figure . . .to make
But that was only one side of of Biscay gale blew its hardest; gleam of sunshine and peace. But {QU of phe wreppinee ~ en sile brightening paints — from Plan- your silhouette truly fashion-
the stores problem. In addition put, apart from one great sea eventually that gale blew itself News by the Yard’ at Sahely’s! “ations Lt . ph.4400, 4534. able! Disco Ove “es lif
we had to carry spares of every which came aboard before she out as gales always do, and after ¥ ” , . . : ver Over-ture’s lift,

kind, for we did not know when
or where we might be able to re-
place anything worn or damaged.
Spare hemp and wire rope and
Canvas, twine, shackles and all
the other rigging necessities;
burners, prickers and nipples for
the paraffin cooking stove; chim-
neys and wicks for the lamps;
spare parts for the w.c. bilge and
galley pumps; paint and varnish
enough for three refits; carpen-
ters’ and engineers’ tools; nails,
screws and bolts of all sizes; bat-
teries for the wireless set; springs
and pawls for the sneet and hal-
yard winches... But there! I am
sure I need not continue with the
list, for you have only to imagine
for yourself the thousand and
one things you would have to buy
if you knew that all the shops
were yoing to be close for a
period of at least four months and
seme for perhans four years.

that for a moment

cowls could be seen

in the

repeat; the noise

li was a great day for us when
little “Wanqerer” slipped quiewy
away out of the Soient aimos:
unnoticed. We had done all we
ars could to prepare her for

er voyage, and now it was up to
us to make our dream come true,
Light, baffling winds retarded
our progress down the English
Channel for several days, and
then a fine strong northernly
came along to drive us on our
way to Ushant — the turning
point for ships off north-west
France, But there it died to leave
us wallowing in the grey, oily
swell; so, with the crisp bread
and cheap wine of France very
much in our thoughts, we drifted
and motored (“Wanderer” has a
tiny engine of 4 h.p. for just such
occasions) into the Rade de Brest
where we anchored off a_ little
white-washed village and_ the
only sound was the hum of insects
and the distant drone of a thresh-
ing machine.

For ten days
easy-going life in France
the anti-cyclone with its light
variable airs drifted away, and
then we put to sea determined to
reach Spain without further de-
jay. But a change for the worse

we enjoyed the

while

reached warm latitudes.
umbrella.



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was properly hove-to, filling the
cockpit and burying the deck so
only the up-
turned dinghy and the ventilating
above the
seething mass of green water, she
lay quite safely while we remain-
cabin cooking, eating,
sleeping and reading. But riding
out a gale in a small yacht is not
an experience one would wish to
of the

- use cleverly

six days and nights at

reached El Ferrol on

west coast of Spain.
We stayed a

seemed very pleased to see us,
making day sails along the coast
towards Bayona with nearly

mile passage down the

@ On Page 12

inhospi-
crests







THE MID-DAY SUN was a bit of a problem when the Hiscocks

Here Busan Hiscock makes use of a golf

~







>,

sea we
the north-

fortnight in that
country where everyone we met

every night in a snug port. From
there we made a non-stop 220-




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PAGE EIGHT

BARBADOS aif ADVOCATE

== see Pave wee] €



(tinted oy ihe Advocate Co., Ltd., Bros@ ~.., Bridgetown.



Sunday, November 16, 1952

FANCY MOLASSES

THE slump in sales of Barbados Fancy
Molasses to Canada this year has been a
cause of anxiety to everyone engaged in its
production, packaging and marketing. It
is obvious that a total sale of approximate-
ly one half less than last year could not be
viewed with equanimity by those engaged
in the industry. The visit to Canada on
Thursday of three representatives of
B.E.M.A.—the marketing association of all
the island’s exporters of fancy molasses
will have surprised no one who was aware
of the falling sales in our exports of fancy
molasses. The representatives have gone
to Canada to survey the entire situation of
the Canadian market for fancy molasses
and they will report to B.E.M.A. on their
return on what steps should be taken to
ensure the retaining of the Canadian
market. The decision to send representa-
tives to Canada was hastened because the
normally greatest buyer of Barbados fancy
molasses not only made no purchases from
here this year but actually took in a tanker
filled with the equivalent of 2,000 pun-
cheons of Cuban fancy molasses. The ar-
rival of bulkshipped fancy molasses in
Canada from another Caribbean sugar
island could not but have a disquieting
effect on the exporters of Barbadian fancy
molasses. It would, however, be rash to
suppose that because Cuban bulk-shipped
fancy molasses are being bought in Canada,
the sales of Barbadian molasses in pack-
ages cannot continue for many years
longer. The representatives of BEMA, who
will make an extensive tour of Canada and
are expected also to visit the United States
are going to Canada with open minds. They
want to discover at first hand the reasons
for the extraordinary low sales of Barba-
dian fancy molasses in Canada this year.
It is possible that their findings will have
some reference to the need for bulk-
shipment from Barbados if some of the
Canadian market is to be retained. But it
is also possible that they will discover other
reasons for this year’s low sales. ,



So many factors operate in the market-
ing of fancy-molasses that it would be im-
prudent to suppose that bulk-shipment
‘and only bulk-shipment can guarantee the
maintenance of the Canadian market, for
Barbadian molassés: It is trae that’ ship-
ment in packages is much more expensive
than shipment in bulk. The Hon. H. A.

Cuke in’ a memorandum published as an —

appendix to the report of the committee
appointed to enquire into all aspects of
the fancy molasses industry in Barbados
revealed that whereas the cost at that time
of shipping 100 gallons of molasses in bulk
was $3.60, the cost of shipping 100 gallons
in vackages was $27.43. The cost of pro-
duction )f fancy molasses today is almost
double that of the price quoted f.0.b., to the
Canadian buyer in 1946 and the presert
f.o.b., price quoted today is almost three
times what it was in that year. Besides the
inereased price of Barbadian fancy molass-
es the Canadian importer has to consider
also the effect that a rising standard of
living in Canada has on the buyers of fancy
molasses. The Canadian retailer of fancy
molasses has to sell the product to the
Canadian housewife in attractive pack-
ages and has to advertise the product if
the housewife is not to buy sugar or some
other competitive syrup. The higher the
costs of the Barbadian fancy molasses to
the Canadian importer the more aggressive
will the salemanship of the Canadian re-
tailer have to be. The adoption of bulk ship-
ment would have a spectacular effect on

the cost the Canadian importer would have
to pay because $23.83 would be saved on

every 100 gallons shipped. On the other

hand bulk shipment could not be intro-

duced suddenly without creating much un-

employment locally. de ie

The future of the fancy molasses indus-
try is not a subject for idle speculation.

Those in in the industry particularly
those employed in the industry must be
aware of the changed conditions of the in-
dustry. They must realise that no action
taken locally can prevent unemployment
if the market for fancy molasses goes. The
low sales of this year’s production of fancy
molasses have given clear warning that
the market for fancy molasses is not what
it used to be. The reasons for these low
sales are to be discovered by the represen-
tatives of BEMA who left last week for
Canada on a fact-find’1g mission. While no
one can say in advance what reasons will
bé discovered and what recommendations
will be made, there can be no doubt that
the representatives’ first concern will be to
preserve as far as is possible the market
which Barbados fancy molasses has en-
joyed for many years in Canada. The very
fact that their mission has been necessary
is evidence enough that this is no time for

optimism or dogmatic assertions about
what must be done if the industry is to
maintain a high level of exports. The repre-
sentatives have gone to find out and every-

.



one must hope that their findings will lead
to an increase of fancy molasses exports
next year.

PUBLICITY

THERE are two kinds of publicity:
favourable and unfavourable. The public-
ity which Barbados spreads about itself
ought, if we want to attract capital or visit-
ors here, always to be favourable. As far
as visitors are concerned it can be said that
the publicity which Barbados is given by
the publicity committee, the hotel and club
proprietors and the Hotel Association is
always favourable. As far as attraction of
capital is concerned Barbadians need to be
much more reticent and to run down the
island less than they do among themselves.

In recent years Barbadians have been too

prone to give their island a bad name and
too reluctant to point out its advantages
over all other British Caribbean islands.
Some of the smear campaign which Bas-
badians spread unthinkingly abroad about
their own island has taken effect to such an
extent that the island is in danger of losing
capital investment at a time when it needs
it urgently. Fortunately not everyone takes
so pessimistic a view of the island and its
possibilities. The bank which is in process
of building a modern air conditioned
building in Broad Street would hardly have
incurred so large an expense if it consid-
ered that Barbados was as hopeless a place
to live in as many Barbadian detractors
make it out to be. Faith in oneself is neces-
sary before confidence can be communi-
cated to others and there have been several
instances in recent years of outsiders com-
ing into Barbados and running successfully,
enterprises which local Barbadians would
never have attempted because of their
fundamental lack of confidence in the
island and its potentialities.

The danger of swaying from one extreme
to the other is ever present and Barbados
still suffers from the influences of narrow-
minded persons whose standards and
knowledge are based on the limits of this
small island.

But while Barbados “know-allness” must
always be regarded with suspicion it is
quite different from the informed criticism
of those who criticise the island for not
following their advice and are almost pre-
pared to see the whole place go up in smoke
just to prove themselves to have been right.

Today the future of Barbados hangs
poised in the balance. If we can find a
formula for co-operation there is no doubt
that we can continue to maintain for Bar-
bados a name superior to that of any
neighbouring Caribbean island of equiva-
lent size. But if sectional or party interests
cannot be submerged in the interests of the
community as a whole: if on one hand there
is suspicion of motives and on the other an
ineradicable conviction that no progress
can be made there will undoubtedly be no
progress and there will be fertile ground
for breeding discontent.

The need for Barbadians to agree more
among themselves is perhaps easier to un-
jerstand if it is considered in the light of
unfavourable publicity from outside. Bar-
badians are by now acclimatised to the
cheap Trinidadian gibes about Barbadians
and themselves lose no opportunity to poke
fun at the “mudheads” of British Guiana.

But this is very healthy fun as between
cousins, whom we know will always come
and visit us for the simple reason that
neither Trinidad nor Britis: Guiana can
offer the holiday attractions which make
this island so popular with Trinidadians
and British Guianese.

It is quite another thing when a writer
and, traveller paints a picture of Barbados
in an influential trade publication of North
America which will not be regarded
locally as very favourable publicity for the
island as a tourist resort. In Travel Trade
for August-1952 an unnamed writer in an-
swer to an invitation from the Alcoa
Steamship Company describes Barbados
as “quite flat”. It has, he says a “formal and
rather circumscribed resort atmosphere.”
The hotels are “fairly expensive at all
seasons”. Social clubs are not easily access-
ible. “The island is singularly conservative
in its traditionalism and the visitor must
lend himself to a higher degree of acclim-
atization than elsewhere in the Caribbean.”
If this kind of commentary did not appear
in an American travel trade magazine op-
posite the advertisement of a luxury air
conditioned hotel in Panama, it might be
dismissed as the unfortunate impression of
a traveller and writer whom the Barbados
Publicity Committee appear to have missed.
But tourism is too valuable to the island
for this kind of publicity to go unchecked.

We will never of course be able to have
100 per cent. protection against the critic-
ism of those who form hasty i ions
and we ought never to ignore the exist-
ence of criticism. We would, however, find
it much easier to refute the propaganda of
those who dislike us at first sight if we
presented a united front to the outsider.
It matters very much to all of us what the
outsider will think of Barbados. If they
think of us as a happy collection of human
beings each pulling our weight and adding
to the achievements of the last three hun-
dred years, we will have no difficulty in
attracting capital and visitors. If we wear
our disunity on our sleeves and show visit-
ors how little we agree among ourselves we
shall give ourselves a bad name which will
stick for generations.

_ z

SUNDAY
Edueation

ADVOCATE

Notes










TO-DAY I’ve come to the end of a chapter which has
to me been extremely interesting and to say the least
enlightening. My contention that the Richmond Schools
were Elementary and not Secondary has been vindicated
by the subsequent circumstances; and I now let. readers
of this column know that Mr. G. D. Griffith, Headmaster
of Providence Boys’ School has been appointed to the
Richmond Boys’.

1 began by saying that the appajntménts at the Richmond
le was both interesting and Schools in order to “palm” them
in) from the off as Secondary.
goint of view of the cut and thrust Let me here invite those who
of public debate but more than have spoken to me to write to the
just that. It was to me the sup- Press and express their views be-
cort of a good cause, Theme can cause there is still the appoint-
_ little of greater value than the ment of a successor to Mrs. Griffith
“ aes education iven to at the Girls’ School next term.
dren = this island. thou- Again IT say it is an elementary
sands of them it is their only link school and a head@mistress or
— ee. he “ss oes from one of the elemen-
eka a peetean alin 4 tary schools should be appointed,
the Nursery School, the Kinder- Enlightening
What is enlightening to me is

garten School, the Junior School,

Ld ig School, the Senior

Schoo) @ Grammar School and to find that there are still thou-

ny University’ it might be easy sands of intelligent people in this
a the error made or to island who are afraid to express

nen up for the omission in a their opinions. Some who see
thild’s education, wrong only when it touches them

Need For Changed Outloo

;




















rsonally, urge others to fight on

In Barbados, many men and mut declare in the next breath
that it does net concern therm
Others feel that it is beneath them
to fight or to help fight for a good
system of elementary education.
Many of them applying for posts
are ashamed to let it be known
that they were once pupils of
elementary schools; others are in~
‘sulted if they are invited to send
their children there. Still a
‘smaller (thank heaven) number
classify themselves as being pri-
vately educated and judging by
the results it must have Sect
very private education because
only they know about it.
The same thing done in poli-
tics by Mr. Adams must be done
in education circles. This smug
complacent attitude must go and
people must realise that the edu-
eation of every other Barbadian
‘affects them. In the days to come
you will either employ them or
be employed by them, sell them

women who have the requisite
ability to achieve more but

as hewers of wood and
drawers of water, are victims of
errors in the handling of their
education because their only
shance in life lay in the elemen-
tary school. They lost it and so
‘ost everything. Can we afford to
‘rifle with so serious a matter?
“et people like Mr. Carter who
felt that my criticisms were un-
warranted and Mr. Adams who
said that they were utterly un-
ustified, reflect for one moment
and I know that they will join
ne. The fight has been interesting
and it promises to be even more
3%, , Those who have given me
moral support will share with me
the utmost satisfaction at seeing
he school managers of St. Leon-
irds put an end to this “tom-
‘oolery” of trying to get teachers

themselves by accepting

Every now and then
politician tells us tlt there are
thousands of people unemployed
m_ Barbados,
sasily from the tongue and is sure
to win a chorus of ayes and a
aandful of head noddings from
the gallery. But no one knows
how many unemployed persons
shere are in Barbados.

The live register of unemployed

note



‘rom Secondary Schools to de~

_



(By George Huante

The phrase trips olessed with a simple life in some

remote country district into-which

tne- benefits and evils of 20th

century atomic life have not yet
venetrated.

While however we must make

. allowance for those who enjoy the

simple life of the country unspoilt

look’ at

- future



" Unemployed

kept by the Department of Labour oy artificial desires and free from.
‘ecorded only 1,922 at the end of the ugly influence of greed, we
September. But this register does must realise that not all - the
not record all unemployed per- under-employed are . useful citi-
»ons, and some of those who reg- zens. There is po doubt that many
ster ought more properly to be persons who are attracted to the

recorded as under-employed or
mnemployables,

The hysterical approach to un-
employment which is made

who are trying to decrease unem-
ployment in Barbados.

situation as it exists today ani
't is likely to exist in future. This
rool appraisal of the situation
cannot be made so long as con-
fusion exists as to what is meant
hy unemployment,

What is
wanted is a cool appraisal of the these under-employed |
oY a as quent persuasion of a)

city fall by the wayside and fail-
ing to secure regular employment
discover ways and means »f earn-
ing something in. “uaoder-employ-

noliticians seeking to achieve pop- ed” jobs. There could be no more
ularity is not going to assist those

sanenrent occupation for social
welfare workers to follow than
the establishment of contact with

ghd subse=
many as

ible either to return wo the
and or to make use of any facili-

ties provided by the Evening In-

oer s for -learning a skilled
ade,



Some persons think that Barba-
Can unemployment for instance dos’ under-empioved position. is
be said to exist in Barbados at all, clearly connected with the lack of
when almost every person on thé a technical institute at which
live register could be employed in young men and women can be
san Domingo if arrangements be- trained for employment here and
‘ween the government of Barba- abroad. preoccupation with
des and San Domingo could be academic education has resulted
concluded and the unemployed already in the creation’ of top-
could pass the physical and othe heavy bureaucratic government
tests ‘which the Dominican em~ structures which are draining
ployers would require? It all away the revenues of the Carib-
depends as Professor Joad would bean governments at a time when
say, on what we mean by un only increased production. result-
employment. When the politicians {ng from: technical “know-how”
speak of unemployment they are.can provide greater employment
really describing under-employ- opportunities. The © growth of
ment, This arises from two main academic education has been fol-
causes: first, the nature of the Jowed by the inevitable growth.
work and secondly, the disposi- of demands from the academic
don of the worker. 4... .s®reducts of the schools for social
Some workers who are willing, security standards of life based on
to work for six days of the week that envied by university under-
cannot find work which wilk graduates in London and other
occupy them for six days of every erntres of learning.
52 weeks in the year. Other work- The fact that educational grants
ers do not want to work every and scholarships have been acces-
week in the year: they want part sible to all has prevented the
time employment or they do not majority of the “non-academic”
like work and know how to exist products of the schools from feel-
without it, g frustration or resentment at
Before we become ill-tempered the educational status, quo, Every-
and morally superior about tha one has a chance enjoy the
latter category we ought to realise. sweets of academic success. To-
that high material standards of day there is a welcome sign that
living which are obtained by hard the majority are. beginning to
work are not necessarily desired realise that the tration on
by saerrons “2 phd in hi le education has been de-
surroundings. ossessions do priving: th of ee niet for
bring happiness and there are” otiitiog Aebhiies skills without
many who count themselves which they cannot hope to achieve

- Sitting On The

airmen at the
Cranwell, met






assess what they called “units of ure per hour
pissmure Pg hour” enjoyed dur- ©

ng e ‘ - A

They agreed that if 100 units Walk out for refreshment, For
represented paradise on earth, Pleasure. anticipa award 20
20/25 units would mean suicidal » | For piteatce realised an-
misery, and 65/70 units a very 20 units. al now back to

happy day indeed;

Here is a record of your Uncle
Nat's units of pleasure di the
morning of one day last \

Believing it to be a day off with
nothing to do, wake feeling hap
and fit. So unusual, award se
90 plecten units ght away.

oment later it is ‘k
day. Not so happy. five
ts. Light

* - *
Well-known bore walks in,
Units drop to 60, Bore says “
morning.” Units drop to 50, Bore,
locking at rain on Windowpane
adds “if you cam call it a gdod
morning.” Units drop. back to 30.
Bore says “I think this will
~ eas oe ae, 25.
ys “It made me laugh,-any-
way?’ Units down to 20. ° Sore
agys “It seems there was an Irish-
an'with a very clever dog.” Units
tumble to five. (Beginning to
~~ gol like panic’ on Stock Ex-
Look forward to early morn- ¢’ ) Bore continues “Of

course, I can’t do the accent.”



ay. Find an idea.
self ten units. After one hour’s
work idea no good. Curse and
throw away. Subtract 20 units,
Total now 70.
Find another idea, After one
hour’s work, seems _ libellous.
Curse and throw away Subtract

20 units. Find ‘third idea. Two
hours” work. Seems indecent.
Curse and throw away. Subtract
20 units. Total now 30, near
suicidal misery point,

Units quiver at zero.
But bore says “I'll do my best.”
Units zero.

Tonic Talk

WHY are you glaring at the
man sitting opposite in the crowd-
ed train ‘taking you to the City?

You do not even know him, He
has never done you any harm.



goods or services or buy from
them, live or work near them or
jn some cases marry them. What
can be more annoying than to be-
compelled to communicate with or
to employ or to werk for or tc be
employed by an ignoramus? As it
is to-day in Barbados we are
afflicted with a type of youngster
whose only means of asserting
his: manhood or preserving his
right is by an aggressive attitude
indicated by. unprintable lan-
guage. Watch them sign their

Education alone can eradicate.
this. Let us Rave a working class
with a sound elementary training,
able to d between the

bly true and’ the obviously
alse to express themselves clearly
and to. calculate their earnings
without help. This is the basis for
the building of any progressive
and enlightened people. Age
grouping and its trappings are
not conducive to this happy state
of society. It was abandoned in
Trinidad. It should be abandoned
here.

Parents, teachers and employ-
ers should now join in approach-
ing the Government for an in-
vestigation into the system. A
the Certificate results
published in this newspaper ré-
cently will reveal that too many
pupils are wasting time and tak-
ing one subject. The foundation,
in such cases, was not good
enough or the teaching faulty. The
low figures of the Evening Insti-
tute passes and the absence of
any ‘from Codrington College
should serve as an eye opener.
I am going to suggest in the near
that the two - Island
Scholarships now tenable at Cod-
rington should be diverted to the
University College of the West
Indies where at least we would
get some passés. If this is not
suitable I suggest that S.P.G..
through the Lord Bishop, change
the whole staff.

y JEB.



the material standards which they
nave been encouraged to expect.

But teennical ectucation or tne
creation of a technical institute

cannot alone solve ' Barbados”
cnronic unaer-employment pos.-
tion. Only an imperial policy

based on utilization of the Em-
pire’s manpower wherever it can
be jound will ensure tnat barpa-
dians or other West Indians wii
be given employment opportuni-
és um other countries, ‘

So long as Barbadians retain
the good name which they sti
enjoy cutside the island, they can
contidenuy expect to find empivy~
ment opportunities in the United
States, San Lomingo, Surinam or
other countries where there are
insufficient supplies of labour. But
it would be unrealistic to imagine
that Barbados or the rest of the
fs ded acres could provide em-

oyment fo en s.
censors ea 5. a ethical
college “each year. Unless ‘the
United Kingdom and other coun-
tries aré prepared to recruit tech-
niciats ‘from
any discrimination, a~ technical
college ‘will become yet ‘another
burden for the taxpayer to sup-
port.

In.an address to the Cambridge
summer school Mr, Roy Lewis,
specifically spoke of the West
Indies in a general réview of the
“Man Power Requirements of the
Dominions”.

_ “The West Indies”, he said,
“probably have a surplus popula-
tion of 200,000. What are we to
do? We call them citizens. We
complain that we are short of
manpower. We find that unless
we can bring people into Britain,
we cannot send le out to
maintain those typical links which
fre summed up in the tendency
for men and women of British
origin . . . to speak of this island
as Home. Are we to allow

that link to weaken? But if we .

don’t—are we to refuse jobs to
those whose passports are marked
“citizens of U.K. and Colonies”
but whose skins are black or
brown?”

It is no good talking of a multi-
racial Commonwealth unless there
is freedom to move end work
within that Commonwealth. The
Unite ngdom~ cannot compel
other minions to do.what she
does but there is no doubt what-~
ever that she could if she wanted
to provide greater employment
Opportunities for trained West
Indians. No other solution to our
long term under-employment
problem is likely to be found.

Fence

8 competitive world, because you
have not been smart enough to
lift yourself out of the rut .and
leave the drudgery to others,

Perhaps you. hate the manager
at your office because he has been
smarter than you. Perhaps you
hate yourself for not taking ‘the
opportunities he has taken. Per-
haps for years you have been
wanting to tell him what think
of him, and hate youredl? for not
having the courage to de so.

If these are your thoughts, don’t

Good blame yourself for being a dunce,

It is not your fault. People are’
‘born that way. Don't blame the
manager for being smart. People
are born that way too. And how.

And if you are still glaring at
that poor man op ite, don't
‘blame him for putting his tongue
out at you. His patience is ex-

th this new, r e
on your troubles try giving him
your most winning ie. If he
hits you with his umbrella because

he thinks you are laughing at his

blame. ;

Someone like you must always '
be an ass, ’

Someone like you at the bot- |
tom of the class; }

Someone like you must always
take the blame;

Must always be the stepping
stone while others climb to
fame,

Then why do you glare at him? But clever.men, like managers,
It is not because you hate him. It who work by day and night,
is because y lf Get chronic indigestion . A

Perhaps you 3 if be- and it serves them damn

2ulse your work is distasteful, be- well right,
eause you have not succeeded in L.E.S,

Barbados without |

k DIARIES !! DIARIES !!

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SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1952 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGT NINE :

New Tasks For

Sugar Council
Big World Surplus:
More Advertising Needed

By BUTE HEWES



——

i
|

—_—-—— ee

A TRUE

HISTORY

Of the

BARBADOES.



& EXACT



Ifland of « ,





I Solemnly Say We Should
Kill More People

By F. TENNYSON JESSE

ia “Murder And Its Motives”*

I PUT forward in all seriousness
and with the most passionate con-
viction, as an experiment well
worth trying, the following
thesis:—

We should kill a
more people.

There is every reason why even
the most humane of us should

great many

Bit By Bit

IT has been a tendency for
years now to do away witn tn
pomp and
tal punishment. Bit by
things as the black flag

bit suct
and th

tolling of the bell have ceased to

be. Capitc] punishment is mere
retained as a practical m°asure
We are no longer of the opinio

circumstance of capi-

|
|

|





LONDON object to keeping alive danger- of Dr. Johnson, when he made hi
A full meeting of the International Sugar Council be- ous; anti-social creatures. complaint to Sir William Sco
xi i ber : RICHARD LIGON Gent, “The age is running mad afie:
pegs ae — Novem 24th, faced with one of the By : Safe rds innovations,” he eid, “A'l th
nost difficult problems it has ever had to deal with—a big —_ extinction of such people business of the world is to b« Apply the Cream gently to the burnt
world surplus of sugar. would be an act that would have done in a new way. Tyburn it-

Ths
meeting is to consider recommen-
dations made by the’ recent Lon-
don meeting of the Council’s
Special Committee, to bring about
a closer balance of sugar supply

cls i : z not the — seeing to be, that the old method drew t c
and demand. At this month’s meeting, how: Having been censured by some and continued our course to the “'® mere “going to sleep" which gether a number of spectators | ~ use ‘Cetaviex’ ron WOUNDS, CUTS, BURNS, SCRATCHES, ETC.

But far wider problems face the ever, the Council will vote on a —Whose judgements 1 enamak southwest, (with somewhat a ‘0 ™&"y innocent suffering peo- Sir, executions are intended :
Council and some of its members recommendation by its Special control and am therefore glad to scant wind) partly to avoid the ple have longed for; it is the fact draw spectators. If they do no ry

kre understood to be ready to urge
that it should now begin to, play a
more active part in promoting the
welfare of the world’s sugar
producers.

Other internationa] bodies con-

cerned with iti ‘ there, from smooth to rou , difference in the wa f ur But what we have, as citizens, be swept away?” r

are running wobivaite puddin, a oe hedae “ougucaeedinme —_ nae oe mt hich and ships—for in slack “winge our a perfect righ to judge is whether, a . OF Sole Agents and Distributors ¥
ing campaigns t ah eck igh ows (which are consort, the Nonesuch, would when people are too dark and too eeks o ear

product. a outstatineg: seat ore eee ae — haling to the Ins constitutions) I run us out of sight in four or five muddled, we ought to go as ae BUT there is more needed the: | A. S. BRYDEN & SONS (BARBADOS) LTD.

is the campaign by the Interna- sumption by importing countries ‘aliaeehaias ra ee of oe hours sail, but in strong and stiff ting up with them at all, though * rob capital punishment of its | SRIDGETOWN

tional Wool Secretariat, which That is a problem that will have from England to Barbados; and a Gero Taces tan habeal — we have no right to “punish” degrading pomp; let us rob it als: A broduct of ;

since the war has led the fight to
maintain markets for wool in the
face of

primary purpose of theternational Sugar Agreement, firs,

‘drafted in 1937 and extended sev-
eral times since then, This agree-
ment has regulated the produc-
tion and export of free market

Committee that the United Na-
tions be asked to call an Interna-
tional Sugar Conference next
Spring to draw up a new agree-
ment,

Such an agreement would call

to be tackled separately, if it is to
be tackled at all,

Ligon decides to go to Barbados 4
and an account of the first part of

his voyage thither.

INSTALMENT 1.

allow — for my weakness an
indiscretion, that having ia
made proof of the sea's opera
tion, and the several faces that
‘watery element puts on, and the
changes and chances that happen

truly I should without their
help conclude myself guilty of

high going billows of. the Bay of
Biscay, but chiefly to stand aloof
from pirates and = pickaroons,
which ave very frequent on the
coasts of Spain and Barbary, and
as we put along I perceived a

sails the swifter the way pro-

to be hedged about with safe-
guards, as will voluntary euthan-
asia when tlat mercy ceases te be
an offence against the law.

What is horrible about death

that a term has been set to one’s
life; that horribly, relentlessly.
day by day, hour by hour, death
comes nearer to someone in per-
fect health. No one should have
to suffer that.

anyone with death,
We have, however, the right to

self is not safe from change.’
Someone suggested ‘that migh*
be an improvement.
“No, sir,” said the doctor, “it i
not an improvement. They objec

‘draw spectators they don’t answe
their purpose. The old method
was most satisfactory to
parties. The public was gratif«
by a procession; the criminal
supported by it. Why is all this t

of those measured weeks of fe 1

for the condemned.

i i “ vided that they were alike built tec ivi , i re ¢ : it of

inereasin orotect the living. If And, above all, let us rob it o

from the new synthetic fbres. eeduota oa franpendens at an olde wie ne o we —— = — pn! 4 Alam. Herbert oak eles tas any horror in the meuied of ap-
Similar work may now be un- crop restrictions for next year’s Which is Néead makes the ol ide? Team Y Bill for bigger and better lethal plication.

dertaken by the International plantings, will be the main Sensi wife trot, For havin @ seamen; or that _ Admirable chambers he would probably have The one thing important abov!

lost (by

area. In addition to its soothing action,
*Cetaviex’ will effectively prevent
infection where the skin is broken.

‘Cetavlex’ cream |

Antiseptic and non-irritant

IMPERIAL CHEMICAL (PHARMACEUTICALS) LIMITED
@ subsidiary compory of Imperial Chemical Industries Limited





Sugar Council, if some of its try affected by a new agreement. barbarous riot) all that I had a a of Moving Here, Mr. been | howled down, not with punishment is that it should be a
members get their way. It will be So will many other leading gotten by the painful travels and About the ‘latitude of 45 de- laughter, but with horror, and yet certain. ’ ¢
expensive — but the alternative migar-produens naticns. a ¢ my youth by which grees we met with a ship coming it is a very sensible and v°ry —LE.S. | s
ar gus of suger ane possibly But eee Pact ; of. all I had. Toth deatitute 7. from Guinea’ but bound for inate ant th = epee “Murder and its Motives’ Neural la

r many unprotected pro- : it is leved that Brit- eubsist ? a London, The captain’s name was pee . PSS 30 ON ue published by Harrap (12s. 6d 5
ducers, ain will not subscribe to any Subsistence, and brought to such easy and that the leader thereto : }

scheme that would. limit Com+

an exigent as I must famish on

Blague, a very civil gentleman





Scope For Increase ; who hailed us, came aboard us “4S Hitler. *.58
Plenty of scope exists for such a meen mie production Sis cae ee ae eee are ahd invited divers gentlemen Far Better : euri IS
campaign to increase the world’s 4),°¥ Ge quotas Oy down saz 80 staggering a condition, round tat were aboard his ship, which THERE are many non-social Antigua Celebrates 3

consumption of sugar. In Spain, ‘A'ereement wrt sane none, or very few, whom griefs Was a frigate of about 400 tomns— human beings incapable of im- y an

for example, sales of suger average effective at th =< thie and afflictions had not depressed her lading gold and elephants provement (and not all of them Sciatica, Toothache

only 15 Ibs. per head of population year eo < . or worn out, banishment ab teeth. The man was exceeding murderers) who would be far Arbour Day

every year. In Italy, the average This agreement, signeq in Sented, or death devoured; sq Civil to us and gave to every better “put to sleep”; but that is - A generous application of

is 26 lbs, per head. There is room London To December after that instead of these near and gentleman of our company a the utmost that we have the right (From Our Own Correspondent)

for enormous improvement in the months of hard bargaining, has "ative comforters I found myself Present of such rarities as he to do, even to the most brutal _ ANTIGUA comforting, soothing

sugar consumption of these ccun- already ‘stimulated production of @ stranger in my own country, brought from Guinea and Binny. murderer. For the first time’ in mai

tries. sugar in the Commonwealth, 8%d therefore resolved to lay, We ares together almost a 1 should surely ‘be possible to Years Arbour Day has bee THERMOGENE Medica-
The main reasons for low con- notably in the West Indies, where hold of the first opportunity that whole day, the weather being ..fesuard » measure of this kind. celebrated in Antigua on the

sumption of sugar are economic
ones, often brought about by im-

acreage is expanding rapidly and
more modern equipment installed.

might convey me to any other
part of the world, how far distant

very calm, and almost no wind
at all. In the evening a fresh

Britain is full of people occupied
with good works; with mogis-

6th November.
The first part of the ceremony)



ted Rub to the painful

we c . > Recreatio In extra large rt will soon brin
i Govern- In other countries, however, S0€ver, rather than abide here. breeze began to blow, which ; ; ete, Ok place on the Recreatié pa g
a vectstoiline othe Spaniard, where sugar is not a traditional served us both in our several ro t: tain van take Grounds at 9.30 a.m. when H Jars and handy Tins lief. R
; : crop, some restricti - ,,{ continued not many weeks in ways, and so saluting each other “"@ '* world be lust as np Excellency, Sir Kenneth Black relief. Repeat the appli-
for example, pays more — o action may be ex a whens this expectation when a friend, as with our ordnance, we took our to safemiard a lethal chamber 9s purne addressed hundreds Head and Chest Solds, Coughs : .
It oe a oH hoe the Tavopenn coun- Wil'ing to shift his ground as I leave it should be to safeeuord lunatic school children, The Polic« cation as required until the
ali pays nea . .

In other countries, too, Govern-
mentssuse sugar aS an easy means
of collecting revenue, just as Bri-
tain imposes a high tax on tobacco
and cigarettes. In Turkey, for
instance, well over half the cost
of a pound of sugar is accounted
for by tax, This causes many
people in these countries to think

of sugar as a luxury that can be per cent and in Western Ger- not felt the like, and continued gooin an@ Barbary, the first land cattle, sheep, goats, hogs, poultry, Commissioners, Hon, 8, T, Chris-
done without if the household many by 90 per cent since bes £0 till we came to Falmouth Har. ws ‘aiscovered was the Isle of of all sorts, and the best sorts of tian, invited His Excellency ‘o Of all good Stores
budget will not run to it. fore the war. bour, where we put in and rested 5o+, Santo, which lies in 33 de- sea fish. These islands lie near 33 plant the first tree, The seconc

Prices
The importance of price in fix-

are mulaly
tries which have made enormous
strides in increasing their beet
sugar production in recent years.

In -Britain, for example, acre-
age under beet has increased by
20 per cent since before the war.
Beet acreage in Belgium has in-
creased by 30 per cent, in Hol-
land by 55 per cent, in Italy by
65 per cent, in Denmark by 70

All this, in countries which do
not base their economies on sugar
production, is contributing to the
of sugar and is

gave me an overture which [
accepted. And so, on the six-
teenth day of June 1647 we em-
harked on a good ship called the
Achilles, a vessel of 350 tons, the
master Thomas Crowder of Lon-
don, No sooner we were all aboard,
but we presently weighed anchor
and put to sea, in so cold weather
as at that time of the year I have

a@ night.

But in our passage thither we
were very uncertain upon what
coast we were, reason of the

About this thne our consort,
the Vonesuch, parted with us, the
directly of the Carabby Islands,
we for St. Jago, one of the Islands
of Cape Verde, where we were
to trade for Negroes, Horses and
Cattle; which wé were then to
sell at Barbados,

So, keeping our course about
Eighty Leagues from the coast of

grees to the Northward, which we
left on our starboard side, When
presently after, we had sights

esvlume — still always remem-
bering Hitler.

burned as now, and that the
leeward part of it was at other
times exceedingly fruitful and
pleasant, abounding with all sorts
of excellent fruits, corn, wine, oil
and the best sugars: with horses,

degrees to thes Northward.
Having pasved between these
teers the Madeiras on our

Band was in_ attendance an
played while children planted
number of crees along the we:
ern end of the grounds.

In the afternoon a_ cerémon)
took place at the small triang:
lar space near the bridge at the
eastern end of Michael's Villa;
After an adevess by His Excei-
lency, the Chairman of the Cil

tree was planted by Lady Black-
burne at another = trianguls
space near the lower bridge,









pain has disappeared.
Muscular Pains

Insect Bites and Stings

and Chemists

DOUBLE-ACTION



ing the level of consumption is world surplus b the Madeiras, which we s Starboard side) we found a con- Antigua, has had exception:
easily seen when the position in having a perious io me, et unsteadiness of | the (woe me close by and had a full view of stant trade — En gcd Pe ee Ferm i re, = 4 ar is
the high-price, low-consumption British “Gol aie ae arr is thht I perceived orme troubles the place; so rocky and mountain~ the southward. W A he Ee ; go 1g 30:0) an - and-w so effort
countries is contrasted with that in 6rius' olonies, where sugar ous, and the ground so miserably island came into view it was Bona to protect and care for thy
countries where sugar is regarded the economic mainstay. and doubts in the Seamen on ji og with the sun, as we could Vista, but at such a distance we hundreds of trees which hav

as a necessary part of everyday
life. Australia, for instance, has
the world’s highest sugar consump-

Nevertheless, it is in the dollar
area that the surplus of sugar
exists and sterling producers will
have no difficulty in finding a

that shoft passage than in all the
voyage after. But, the weather
clearing up, the master and the

perceive no part of it, either hill
or valley, that had the least
appearance of green, nor any tree

could hardly discern colours, but
the general landscape of the hills
seemed to us very beautiful, gently

been planted in all of the vy’
lages, Many of the old trees whic!
served as shades and well know:

MEDICATED RUB

mates drew out several plots and si d falling without rocks land marks were destroyed i ® i
tion, at about 130 Ibs. per head of Warket for their exportable sur- landscapes, which they had Digger than a small hawthorne, rising » an ta & r nd: mae warp -carmared | is In big glass Jars and handy Tins
population every year,,The retaih juses while the world is still formerly taken on the coast of and very few of those. or precipices, S332

price of sugar in Australia is only
314d. per Ib.

That is why some leading sugar
experts are now ready to urge the
International Sugar Council to
launch a world-wide offensive
against such artificial restrictions
on consumption as taxes and high

sharply divided into sterling and
dollar areas.

“OFFICIAL SECRETS”
ACT

All Jamaican Civil Servants are



France and England, (which are
of great use in the narrow seas)
by which they were well assured
where they were, for they seldom
use the Loggline or Backstaff,
but attend only the tides, com-
pass and card, nor is there any

Between this ana three incon-
siderable islands called the
Deserts, which appeared to us like
the tops of large buildings — no
uneveness or risings or fallings,
but level as the top of a
large church or barn, but burned
worse than the other so that

This island is famous for ex-
cellent salt and for horses, which
in one property excel all that
ever I have seen, their hooves be-
ing to that degree of hardness
and toughness that we ride them
at Barbados down sharp and
steep rocks without shoes, and no

revival of Arbour Day has prove
a wonderful success in
ing an interest for Trees.

MAIL NOTICES

Mails for St, Vincent, Grenada,
dad and British Guiana by the §

stimulat









now required to’ sign the “Official use of other directors in so eens other goats go surer upon the sides of Canadian Challenger will bo closed ot
import duties, coupled with a pro- Secrets Act” which prohibits the arrow a room. We were, as I elenae ce ae Yat this time rocks and hills than they, and Geveral Sims ati th Owen iit
motional campaign, aimed directly gisclosing of Government inform- Temember, about 10 days sailing o¢ the year, these were apparelled many of them very strong and Mail at 2 pm, and Ordinary Moi
at the consumer himself, to bring ation without authority, under a to Falmouth, and had with us a io, russets, or at the best clean limbed, 2.30 p.m. tomorrow A REAL DELIGHUIVUL
him to regard sugar as a neces- recent ruling of the Executive small — of about 180 tons call- pr iamorts. This island we left ten leagues yas. go p Sas e
sity rather than a luxury, Council, ed the Nonesuch of which Cap- “sit it fel! out that this year or thereabouts on our starboard pat Nevir mal St Kite ee Ee a SELECTION
Since the Council was estab- A Government spokesman said tain Middleton was owner, @ 4. simmer was there hotter than side, and next to it, the isle of Moneka will be closed at the Genes Se ee rm

lished, its main task has been to
deal with over-production prob-

that there was “nothing sinister”
in the requirement, since it was

very good seaman and a planter

of Barbados, but himself then

usual, and the seamen that were



May, famous for store of excellent



Tost Office as under

Parcel Mail at 12 (noon), Register



a with us gave us to understand salt. Mail at 2 p.m, and Ordinary Ma! Kent Hair & Shaving Yardley Shaving Bowls

lems“and market surpluses. It has ly required though not strict- ree} ot. ut to sea that they had never seen it so (To be continued.) 2.60 p.m, tonetiow. Brushes 2

done this through the current In- ly imposed. y P' ‘ale Atkinson Shaving Mugs
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PAGE 1EN

ee ae

OLYMPIC STORY—IV |

A GRAND LITTLE TEAM

instalment will BY TREVOR GALE

also one» of*the most successful gone before, We therefore thought shoultier was forward while world record for this distance of
of the wack teams at the Olympic that he was still improving on his McKenley touched it with his !46.6 which means that it is
Games. In my opening paragraphs speed but losing on his stamina. left. The picture itself was a ‘till two and six tenth
I have already dealt with the A lot of people seem to have grand mix-up of feet, chests, faster than Whitfeld’s
gathering of the Jamaican Olym- jeard gome story that McKenley hands, shoulders and heads. It tecord which he set up in Lon-
pic team im London. It consisted saiq if Bailey could run in the would be interesting to know (on in 1948 again
of Arthur Wint as 100 metres so could he because he which played the most impor- in this pace in Helsinki, I would
could beat Bailey, This is a sort tant part in imfluencing the Cearly love to see in action the

Laing, of of half truth. What did happen judges. ; man who could beat Whitfield

the famous Lloyd), Miss Walters was that Bailey and Herb were To crown it all the first four and Wint by so many yards.

and Miss Russell. Ken Farnum training together and when Herb ‘runners were clocked in 10.4 by Two days after the 800 metre!
of course was included, but he sound he was doing extremely the electrical timing device whica final the first 400 metre heats
was on the cycling side, so for the well against the former, he decided ‘s synchronised with the camera. began. From the outset it was
moment details about that he might as well compete in While the hundred metre heats Clear that the litle Jamaican
mance nqust be excluded. the 100 metres in as much as he and finals were going on Arthus ee was to dpminate this
Â¥ was entered. it turned out thi int was busy with the 80 ent. hoden and

Herbert “jMacDonald brought dodiaaen Sas aaah wool up as one metres. He ran well within Wint all won their firs: 2nd
them oves sem _ Friday 1 <7 of the most outstanding athletes himself on the first day to come Second heats so that they ac-|
ae Jee Laney as of the entire game, But I still do second to H.G. Ring of Sweden counted for six heats in one
From the .New Mine ss not thiak he was ever as good @ but the next day he won his heat eee But while the first
Athietio cea Pee . aes “printer as MacDonald Bailey. fairly easily. see ty coviewsy taking ings
vee and Syeened. more Herb began his advance towards In the final Arthur took no ~ sy thur = Wint was busy
names “in the U.S.A. athletic world the 100 metre final by winning his chances and from the beginning accentuating his speed due to the!
than another coach in that first heat by about 3 te Nobody he was up front, He fact that he had already run a’
CO ee ne ae etover, Paid much attention fo this because Ulsheimer of Germany lena Save bee 3 teas & sa
Hetainty yee ee weight ‘etime of 10.7 was fairly slow. © Yun the shorter





;
must have been in his day. This |
ventleman is credited with the

and
Wolfbrandt of Sweden to pass

thut Joe, y him in the first lap but went races first. Athur therefore did |

we gS ees Sects a dav Ah Ino th ‘ena agin sty eas wow ee ne ter

him from v¥ to tion of hi A aonge ° down the back stretch. The 800 "0On in 47.3 and 46.9. Fifteen or

and more, ** 1 tewgl roe 7 ae ery the metres race I think is one of the twenty years ago these would
As Herbert MacDonald ° efeating Arthur Bragg o © prettiest to watch because it is have been world records.

US.A., and this time he did it in not jong enough to allow any-
10.5, Again it was an easy victory poy to settle down, and yet no-
because Bragg pulled a muscle and pody can attempt to sprint from
was not really in top form. Up to peginning to end.

In the Semi Final the next day |
Arthur turned in a 46.3 quarter,’
whieh incidentally was only a

wards contemplated what might
have happened had he obeyed
the inttructions sent in that now

ui 5 Jamaica tenth outside his Olympic recora
aad Hae, Yency ie London, that time he bad been regarded arthur Wint has one of the °f 1948. In the same race Karo
tke the twarwomen"; one esuid % the U.S.A.’s chief hope in the most magnificent’ strides ever Haas of Germany was second in

46.4 and Whitfield third in the
same time. McKenley and
Rhoden met in the other Semi-
Final finishing in this order in
46.4 and 46.5 respectively. Up
to this time the Jamaicans had
therefore given uway nothing
and were treating the 400 metres
as if they Owned it and had no
intention of giving it up.

The final was practically the
same and as I have already de-
seribed it in detail in
a. I shall concern niyeet
wit more details of George
Rhoden. He won this 400 metre
race in 45.9 seconds, only a

100 metres, On reflection there is 1 stretch his

a also every reason to believe that ee adae eager to be jog
the he would have brought it off. I trotting next to him when, in
was therefore not surprised to fact, they are all out. The sight
oe that Bnd ie it of Arthur going down thet sais
e hard way and s a few stretch in the 800 metre fin in
when it is tears. It is not often that 19-year- the Melsinki Olympic Stadium
a shams old lads get the chance to reach is one that will live long in the
His advie®to MacDonald Bailey the 100-metre final and Bragg memory. Grace and strength
on starting is a classic in sim~ might have been the youngest to were personified in this giant of
plicity.. that, went right to the go so. a man while lesser mortals fol-
heart of matter, Ou The next day Herb and Remi- lowed in his wake as best they
doing his 1 with °’ gino met in the semi-finals. They could. An onlooker from an-
and practising starting one after- both ran a hard race but Herb other planet might have turned
noon wheawhe discovered that he was clearly the winner and his away at this stage of the race to
was not doing as well as he time of 10.4 was, up to that time, enquire what pleasure we got
thought he should, He asked Joe equal to Bailey's first heat and from seeing such an unequal $
Yancy for sé6me advice. Said Joe: poth Remigino’s. The stage St™us:le. _ tenth over his world record, and
“your trouble is that you are try- therefore seemed all set for a He would have been quite he did it all on his own. That
ing t- beat the gun. Now just tussle between McKenley and mistaken of «ourse, fot presently is, he drew the outside lane ang
remember Mat the starter is not Bailey in the final although few Mal Whitfield began his run, therefore from the time the gun
coing tp let you go before he people in the stadium and, going through the field like went off he saw no one else in

doubted :
rs ‘ite tii a knife through cheese, he was the rave. McKenley on the
res that-gun, so just relax until that Bailey could improve on the other hand was two lanes away

a . . at Arthur’s heels as they began
[ou Meee bs hee ite emte tee earns Ae joint the last, end. | Whitfield | then inside of both, Rhoden and Mat~
; rane 7 passed Arthur on the bend and son, so at he could keep an
Bren ce eme a Ae Ryo cf 10.2, dnd it meant that he ee from there they ran home within eye on both of them. He also

‘ gun will ian a splendid race in the same |

‘ ‘ . have todo no more than 10.3, 2 few feet of each other, neither
oy tee gins _ between nse which, to him, should have been ,ajning or loosing ground. Ul- time as Rhoden but he was able!

forgive himrfor la at
_ thought of-such a ri

Joe nae ear aes
natural attributes

coach. Tight of lip at coal tes
but not hésita¥ing to give advice



as easy as 50 runs would be to/ sheimer of ‘ Germany ran on to judge his pace to the last by|
that two “starts and you will Bradman when he was looking gamely for third place but could aa Seam mate, a
be disqualifie | for good, for 100. make no impression on the first At this stage my space is run-|
“O.K", said dailley, “lets try But the final was a most ex-| two, sing out and therefore I must |
thai again, ' twaordinary race, A 100-metre I could not help reflecting postpone any further remarks on
“Oh no" said Yancy, “that’s dash needs little description and| after this race on the type of “eorge Rhoden for another in-|
enough for this afternoon” we'll it is enough to say that they were| rinner one Mr. Rudolf Harbig prakuse more tomorrow.” all very close throughout and that
Now the Jamaican team when they flashed past the tape ee:

went to Hélsinki with a week to

ao. 6 before the opened

Arthur Wint. was aut eithed ees it appeared that McKenley and

short of work while Mec ‘was Remigino were the two most like-

burning up the track at anything Jy to be picked by the judges, but

up to 300 yards but found it very { felt quite sure that Bailey and

diMcult to-stay on, for the. extra Smith were not first or second.

40 va wiake

ihe 440 yards or 400 metres, Lee , The story of the picture of the

Laing was mibre or less a 200 finish is of course well known.
Opinion was divided half and

metre man | Byron La Beach
was good ton 100 metre dash Dalf between MecKenley and

only the judges had any idea who

SASSO Z
was the winner. From my position BBO AAFFAS

AcTIVE KIDNEYS |
Keep You WELL

Noture’s filters may need help
Jt IS OFTEN SURPRISING
how backache, I



iu

and the common urinary |
disorders due to sluggish

can be overcome.

Remiginon. But my __ personal Ss active kidneys safeguard
only, big 4 ee ae opinion was that the judges your baakh by sursiaing note ext
no moines + wearer ith, should have given a dead-heat| acid and harmful wastes out of the
re'ay. Tigcouly man with any decision, I also thought that it system. When kidney action is |
pretensions" to fitness was George showed up a weakness in the| inadequate and fails to filter the |
Rhoden. > photo-finish camera to take fin-| blood properly, pain and discom-

In that~ Short week Wint, ishes of athletic events. Up to| for tly result.
MeKenley and Laing approached yjow nobody knows whether the]: Kidney Pills
concert piteh in a more emphatic judges decided that Remigino’: bring relief by aioe
manner than I thought possible. head was in front of McKenley’:| - stimulate the
The signs which McKenley gave, ciest, or if it was a matter of| Sf . ee Saeble preezeere
it must. be admitted, were decep- shoulders which decided the m good Doan’s ag
tive as he 4 showed up in the issue. I know that when they, @* 9 DOAN’S
108 metre + as he had never hit the tape Remigino’s right; ~~



SUNDAY ADVOCATE





























HILE personal cleanliness is part of our
everyday lives, it’s important to remember
that Inner cleanliness, too, is essential for our
general well-being. This is where sparkling
Andrews comes in!

When you wake feeling sluggish and “ out-
of-sorts ”, a glass of Andrews freshens the
mouth and tongue, settles the stomach and
tones up the liver. Fi , Andrews gently
clears the bowels, completing your Inner
Cleanliness.

And if you should feel the need of a
“ refresher ”, remember — a single teaspoonful
of Andrews in a glass of cold water makes a
cooling, “ fizzy ” drink for any time of day!

DO YOU KNOW that the mouth records "events
in your digestive system? If all is well the tongue is
clean, & mouth feels fresh: ~~ if your system's
sluggish the tongue is coated, there’s an

taste in your mouth. Sparkling Andrews is needed
— its cleansing action freshens the mouth and the
whole system.

8 oz. tin





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~

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 16,




1952















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McCORMICK DEERING

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Now available from England

This is one of the famous International”
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This is the ideal tractor for* the bet
cheapest method of haulage,

Orders placed now can be delivered

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COLE & CO... LED. Distributors.

K




SUNDAY, NOVEMBER



Appointments
And Transfers

THE following transfers and
appointments in the Clerical Ser-
vice have been made with effect
from the Ist November, 1952.

Customs Department.
r. G. M, Barnes, Long Grade
rk, Customs Department, to
Currency Department,
Mr. H. E. Walcott, Long Grade
Clerk, Seawell Airport, to the
stoms Department.
Mr. C. B. Corbin, Long Grade
, Customs Department, to the
avings Bank.
Mr. S, A. Jones, Long Grade
lerk, Public Trustee’s Depart-
mer+ to Seawell Airport.







Appointments

Mr. E. F, Belgrave, Temporary
lerk, to be Long Grade Clerk,
ttorney General’s Office, (and
ill remain attached to the Water-
‘orks Department until further
otice).

Mr. E, E. Callender, Temporary
Merk, to be Long Grade Clerk,
ivings Bank

. G. E, Clarke, Temporary
to be long Grade Clerk,
















Promotions
Mr. L. A. Deane, Long Grade

» Mr. C, M. Thorpe.
The ‘following have been ap-
‘pointed as Stenographer-Typists
‘in the General Service:—

Miss G. Chadderton.: to be a
» Stenographer-Typist. ‘Waterworks
Department. with effect from Ist
October, 1952.

Miss P. M. Riley, to be 2 ee
: her- ist, Income Tax @
Death Duties Department, with
‘effect from the Ist October, 1952.

Miss T. K. Riley, to be a Steno-
-Typist, Education Nepart-
ith effect from 1st Decem-
, (and will remain at-
tached to the Government Electric
Inspector’s Department until fur-
ther notice),

_ AmnualPrize-Giving
At Dayrell’s Road
The annual Prize-Giving .cere-

mony of the Gospel Hall took
place at Dayrell’s Road on Fri-



day night before a capacity
audience.

‘The programme consisted of
recitations and solos by the

children of the Sunday School
and a selection of sacred songs
rendered by a choir of 36 males
and females under the direction
of Miss Daisy Ashby.

At the conclusion of these
songs and recitafions, the prizes
were distributed for the year
1951 by Miss J. Watson, who was
presented with a bouquet by
Miss Maureen Yarde of the
Sunday School.

Days seem endless to
one who suffers from a
tired, aching back. Don’t
suffer from a backache!
Use A.1. White Liniment
Rub it on and let the magic
af its warmth do the rast.
Buy A.1. today! ‘

Have YOU test-d



luxury — the Five-Star CONSUL ?

16, 1952



Granted For
New School

ST, GEORGE'S, Nov, 5,

The Finance Committee of the
Legislative Council recently con-
sidered an application from the
Revd. Mother Superior of the St.
Joseph's Convent for remission of
duty on building materials — for
use in the construction of a Con-
vent in St. Andrew’s parish which
is estimated to cost $100,000 and
would cater for about 350 pupils.

Feeling too many, practical diffi-
eulties attendant on the grant of
this concession, the Committee
approved a grant of $2,400 in lieu
of remission of duty and
advised, that the Mother Superior
be informed that in view of the
present financial position of the
colony it must not be assumed that
the grant of this sum implies a
willingness to give favourable
consideration to any subsequent
application for a yearly subsidy
towards maintenance of the new

school.
a * s .

The death took place at Belmont
here last Monday afternoon of
Mrs. Ellen Gillespie, an aunt of
Mr. Jens Neilsen, owner of the
M.V.. “Daerwood.”

Canadian born, Mrs. Gillespie
took up residence here just over
two years ago and by her genial
disposition quickly became well
known and respected by people of
all classes. This was attested to in
the highly representative gather-
ing attending the funeral yester-
day afternoon at the Scot’s Kirk
with the Revd. Adam Thompson
officiating

* * a

Latest quitter from M.M.W.U,,
ranks has been Mr, Norris James,
former Senior Grievance Officer in
the organisation who had attended
‘the recent Trade Union course held
in Barbados under Colonia)
Development and Welfare aus-
pices. In a speech at Perdmon-
temps, Mr. James told a large
gathering that he did not want
it believed that he was against
the leader of the M.M.W.U., Hon.
_E. M. Gairy, but he strongly
opposed certain principles on
which the organisation was run.

Dealing with the funds of the
M.M.W.U., he pointed out that its
bulk was devoted to payment of
top officers and little was left for
payment of benefits and creation
of a “Strike Fund” which he
thought essential,

C.1.0. Chief Dies

SANFRANCISCO.
Philip Murray, immigrant
Scots mine boy head of C.I.O.
died of a heart attack. At 66 he
was a veteran worker for the

labour cause.
white-haired man



The thin
never lost the faint Scots burr,
likewise he never lost his ardour
for trade unionism,

Murray was born in Blantyre
Scotland in 1886 and was sixteen
when he immigrated to the bitu-
minous coal fields in western
Pennsylvania. (CP).

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Promotions, 2,400Dellars U.S. Hope To

Sell More

To Colonies

NEW YORK.

U.S. exporters are hoping that
greater opportunities for them to
sell in British Colonial markets
will be one of the outcomes of the
Commonwealth Prime Ministers’
Conference, opening in London
this month.

The British West Indies and
other Colonial territories | are
known to be anxious to be allowed
to spend for themselves more of
the dollars they earn by their own
trade ‘and these Colonies are now
believed to be in a stronger posi-
tion than ever before to persuade
the United Kingdom to let them
oorhe siti
ne Position is summed up for
U.S. business men in an article in
the New York Journal of Com-
merce, which says:

“Colonial economic independ-
ence is increasing at a time of
rapid economic development. The
resultant higher standard of living
is increasing the market poten-
tialities. But at the same time,
the market is becoming more se-
lective,’

More than half the imports of
the British Colonial Empire came
from the non-sterling area in 1951
and thé proportion is thought to
be still higher this year. Colonial
exports to the non-sterling area
have increased to an even greater
extent, maintaining and even in-
creasing the trading surplus of
‘the Colonial Empire.

The Colonial contribution. to the
total sterling area trade with the
United States last year was a de-
cisive factor in maintaining the
Empire's favourable balance.
While all other sterling area
countries increased their imports
of U.S. goods, some by appreciable
amounts, the Colonies alone did
not. At the same time, they
achieved a much bigger increase
in their sales to the United States
than any of the independent mem-
bers of the sterling area,

Importing Spree

“What this means”, says the
Journal of Commerce, “is that the
importing spree in which many
sterling area countries including
the nited Kingdom, indulged
in 1951 was only made possible
by the restraint of the Colonies,
coupled with the expansion of
their dollar earnings.

“This is an aspect of sterling
area finance which has never been
faced by the independent sterling
countries in the past and which
the Colonial representatives in-
tend drawing to their attention at
the Commonwealth conference.

“The tendency to think of the
Colonial balance of payments as
a United Kingdom affair is being
discouraged in the Colonies,
Some of the Colonies, particularly
in Africa, but also in South East
Asia and the West Indies, are as-
suming increased responsibility for
the conduct of their own ecoao-
mic affairs.

“The warning is consequently
going out to the present self-
governing members of the ster-
ling area that they will have te
adjust their economic policies to
this new situation, 'They will have
to take account of the fact that
in Yuture the dollar earnings of
some of the present cclonial terri-
tories will not be .nade automati-
cally available to thein at the be-
hest of London.

“If the new ex-colonies agree
to exercise restraint in their dol-
lar import policy, iney will expect




oy












Speaking generally,
I would say...

. . » that the extremely wide application of UNIMET
MAJOR steel framework, made possible by its easy
construction methods, has made it an essential part of
the everyday functioning of construction firms and
business houses everywhere. But then it’s so very
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Ring 3713 today and ask for further information or ***
instructive leaflet on UNIMET MAJOR.

S. P. MUSSON,
a

Football :

Arsenal’s
Game Today’s
Highlight

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, Nov. 15.

A second-half sat, trick by
centre-forward Cliff Holton and a
couple of goals from deputy out-
side left Marden gave Arsenal a
tive-one win at Liverpool which
vanks as the day’s number one
performance. And that win shoots
Arsenal into fourth place only
four points behind Wolves over
whom they have a game in hand.
The leaders were indebted to
Nigel Sims the youngster who: put
Bert Williams out of the side. He
saved a second half penalty by
Frank Mountford to enable
Wolves to come away with both
points at Stoke.

Sheffield Wednesday's ten
matches without a defeat spell
came to an end before their own |
supporters at Hillsborough. Ports-
mouth were the boys to halt this
run but even they had to fight |
hard for their odd goal of seven |
victory.

Fastest Scoring |

Showpiece of the day was
Grimsby’s zeven-nil defeat of
Hartlepools.
Smith added to the honours with
the day’s fastest piece of scoring
—four goals in eight minutes.
This makes Grimsby promotion |
favourites again. Biggest Leices-
ter post-war crowd — 40,000 —
were at Filbert Street to see the
first away defeat of League lead-
ers Huddersfield.

Jack Grainger, Rotherham’s
much wanted centre-forward
added a few more thousands to
his value with a hat trick against
Brentford and Jesse Pye chipped
the edges off the big fee Luton
paid for him from Wolves with
three goals in the six-nil whip-
ping of Blackburn.

Notts County lost Jimmy Jack-
son taken to hospital with a
fractured jaw after only 18 min-
utes and were beaten three-ni!
by Sheffield United. Hull City,
beaten four-three at Birmingham
played the second half without
injured full back Neal.

Fog caused the game between
Notts Forest and Leeds to be
abandoned after only ten minutes
and caused the game between
Colchester and Crystal Palace to
be postponed.

In Scotland, League champions
Hibernian revenged their League
Cup defeat of a few weeks ago
by beating Dundee three-nil at
Easter Road. As a result of East
Fife’s defeat, Hibs are now only
three points behind them with two
games in hand.

NEW BOOKS

Twenty-two new books, ten
for children between the ages of
7 to 10 and twelve for adults,
will be going into circulation at
the Speightstown Branch Library
tomorrow.

These books are both me



and non-fiction,

proof that other members of the |
Sterling area are doing the same
thing and are als) vk}
maximum effort ww ier









—B.UP.







SON & Co. Ltd...
i hi eh hom.







RICH_ FLAVOR

REFRESHING



Centre-forward Fred }>

-





























et



ty eer ere ele errr emcermhlhc mC

SUNDAY

ADVOCATE

acne

























At your grocer’s in convenient size packages
also in improved filter tea balls aS

Where is the
root of your

Rheumatism P

—_—



ERE is wonderful news for Rheu-
matic sufferers! Doctors have a
new treatment bringing almost imme-
diate relief. Its secret is to apply a
revolutionary new massage cream, not
only where you feel the pain, but also
on what doctors call the myalgic or
‘Trigger’ spots, where lies the real
root of your trouble,
One Harley Street doctor has re-
ported remarkable results in over
1,000 cases of all forms of Rheu-
matism, including Fibrositis, Lum-
bago, Sciatica, etc. It has also been
tested and used by Hospitals and
Doctors all over the United Kingdom.
These diagrams show why you have ~ |
found relief so difficult by the old |
methods.






PAIN AND
STIFFNESS (6
SHOULDER



FiIBROSITIS


















,°
°

ae
MYALGIA

or ”
FOREARM

ak | A

PAINFUL TY

WRISTS &
FINGERS

PAINFUL
THIGH

How to get Relief from pain








sTiFe

For a long time this Cream was orily NECK

obtainable by the Medical Profession. paid ane

Now it is available for your own use Fiprosins 7) STIFFNESS IN

under the name of Lioyd’s Adrenaline © Swswourver :
Cream. If you massage i in, not only *s* >

where you feel the pain but also into e

these ‘Trigger’ spots, you can secure
almost immediate relief.

Make sure you get Lloyd's, the cream
originally developed to meet the require
ments of the Specialist who discovered





vonsa.-§ So @
FIBROSITIS@ @ /
PAIN IN
FRONT OF | MYALGIA OF
\ SHOULDER | FOREARM &)
waist

the importance of "Trigger spots in the SCIATICA LUMBAGO fe
treatment of rheumatism, and which is .
guaranteed to retain its adrenaline po

tency for at least 12 months, Without
this potency the cream cannot do its job.

Use the cream as directed in the
explanatory leaflet—it will be a reve-
lation to you. Only. Lieyd’s has this
essential leaflet with diagrams showing
the more importent ‘Trigger’ spots.

IMPORTANT WARNING ~~,

3 Be sure to insist on LLOYD'S,
the cream used in the clinical
tests upon which this treat-
ment is based. LLOYD'S is
the brand described in an
article in “The Lancet” (50.
11.395) as the “most satisfac-
tory .. .” Don’t be put off

3 with imitations.
SALLI ALD DD AAA AD DDD

HOWARD LLOYD & CO. LTD., TT WATERLOO PLACE, LONDON, ENGLAND
Makers of Fine Pharmaceuticals io the Medical Profession since #880




fe °
ee be 4
e TENNIS
‘ e.Bow
PAIN IN
RONT OF
THIGH

LLOYD’S

ADRENALINE

CREAM

FROM ALL CHEMISTS IN 4/- TUBES

4

LILDLS.
SPPDLPSSSS PLES LILI ILS

All Trade Enquiries to:

BEER, KING OF



LEDGE, ARI ROT VS




WHY ASPRO WAS A SPECIAL
APPEAL FOR WOMEN

ASPR

The Sate Way to Dispel

HEADACHE & PAIN

W. B. HUTCHINSON & CO,
MARHILL STREET, BRIDGETOWN

DRINKS, DRINK OF KINGS

(he eT TT

PAGE ELEVEN “—.

oo sn ce

sto, U6rgY

“-
.
a,

\f you feel worn out, depressed, or
generally run down a glass or two a day of
Buckfast Tonic Wine will quickly restore lost
energy and tone up the whole nervous system,
Giving new vitality it fortifies you against fever
and exhaustion and remember, Buckfast Tonle
Wine is especially valuable after illness,

Take homeo bottle today

a

BUCKRAST
TONIC WINE

The modern woman, living as she
does an almost non-stop existence,
demands TRUE relief whenever pain
comes. She must have a pain-reliever
which not only acts quickly but does
not have after-effects which prevent
her from-going aboyt.things as usual
—harmful after-effects such as dizzl-
ness, depression, or ‘‘ slowing up."*
That is why “ASPRO” has a special
appeal forwomen. ‘ASPRO’, free from
harmful drugs, leaves you fresh and
fit again after the pain has gone.
THE PURITY OF ‘ASPRO’
The purity of ‘ASPRO' conforms
to the standard laid down by the
British Pharmacopceia.

OBTAINABLE EVERYWHERE
PRICES WITHIN THE REACH OF ALL

Made in England by ASPRO LTD., Slough, Bucks



TT °

“AND RIGHTLY SO,” CLAIMS BREWER HUMLE, “BREWER OF THE FINEST OF ALL BEERS,” FOR

BEER STIMULATES THE APPETITE—TAKEN BEFORE
PALATABLE BEVERAGE RELAXES THE
STRAINS AND TENSIONS WHICH ARE
A DETERRENT TO THE FULLEST EN-
JOYMENT OF GOOD FOOD—IT IS THE
PERFECT DRINK OF MODERATION.

AND DURING



MEALS, THIS HIGHLY

CARIB

z

Se


‘

a

PAGE TWELVE

Bill To Amend
Gambling
Ordinance

From Our Ow espondent

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Nov. 7



For the past few years the
Trinidad Government had been
besieged with requests from peo-
ple of all walks of life for in-
formation regarding results of
raffles, sweepstakes and other
forms of games promoted under
the Gambling Ordinance, There

had been many complaints that on
numerous occasions raffles had

been held and the results were
still unknown

All this was said by the Hon.
Roy Joseph, Minister of Educa-
tion and Social Servires in the

Legislative Council this morning
when he moved the second read-
ing of a Bill to amend the Gam-
bling Ordinance,

The Bill, which was passed,
makes provision for the Com-
missioner of Police or any Super-
intendent of Police to ask for
safeguards relating to raffles

which would not be left entirely”

to them. Suth conditions would
have to be prescribed by the
Governor-in-Council. The safe
guards will not interfere with the
freedom of the people, provided
that promoters have the consent
of the Commissioner of Police.

Government feels that in order
to protect thousands of people
who indulge in raffles, conditions
should be laid down so that the
Commissioner of Police could
call upon promoters for state-
ments so that the people could
be made well aware of what was
happening in regard to the raffles
mm which they took part

PLAN FOR SEISMIC STATIONS

This week the S.S. Colombie
brought two scientists — Dr
Willmore and Mr Geoffrey
Robson to Trinidad where they
will work in connection with a
plan to establish seismic stations
in eight of the Caribbean islands.

They came here in the first in-
6tance, because Trinidad will be
their base of operations in the
Caribbean. They plan to set up
the first station at the Imperial
College of Tropical Agriculture,
at St. Augustine, in about a
month,

From Trinidad they will pro-
ceed to St. Lucia, Grenada,
Dominica, Montserrat, St. Kitts,
Antigua and St. Vincent. It is
hoped that with the aid of these
Stations they would be able to
Eeesict eruptions in the Carib-

n.

te STARS: -

and YOU ~ 4



Your Individual Hoerosco
FOR SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1%

LOOK in the section in which your
birthday comes and find what your out-
look is, according to the stars,

MARCH 21 to APRIL % (Ariex)—Do,
don't, will, won't—they make up a
soundly determined mind, Don't hastily
decide; neither he hesitant, indecisive.
Start at church tq strengthen sou.

APRIL 21 to MAY 20 (Paurus)—Prayer
ig potent. Be strong in purpose, faithful
to trusts—-your innate way when you
are living up to your best

MAY 21 to JUNE 21 (Gemink)—Note
Aries. And be most careful in decisions,
but neither timid nor embarrassed. A
wise word said, an unwise one left
unsald

JUNE & to JULY 2 (Cancer) Top
success does not always bring inner con
tentment, peace of mind nor happiness
tc loved one. Strive toward real



success

JULY M to AUGUST & (Leo)—We are
not all alike in habit, reactions, attitudes,
and numeroug cther respects, so tolerance
should be our guide

AUGUST % to SEPTEMBER 28 (Virgo)
It's always a hetter world for the smal!

favours, the daily niceties, the good
things seid instead of being left unsaid
Don't forget church
SEPTEMBER 4 to OCTOBER &S (Libra)
Don't del plans fo ming groups
countering or any preliminaries that

could facilitate progress for the coming
week ay, of course



OCTOBER M& to NOVEMBER
(Seorpico)—-Is it time to fr rw such
things as how you have been getting
throigh tasks and whether methods used
are the most expedient. Attend chureb.



NOVEMBER % to DECEMBER 2%
(Sagittarius)—Habits are wonderful Ll
we have the right ones. Review your
own. Remember charity.

DECEMBER % to JANUARY @ (Capri
ecorn)--Some days we cannot seem to
“get off" on the right foot, as the saying
foes, But we can always change pace
and get back in step when we
try.

really

JANUARY @ te
(Aquarius)—-Think it. out, then confer
with wise heads. Den't belittle youth’
opinions. Go to your church

FEBRUARY “%1 to MARCH 2 (Pisces)
Mw your day is free, think before , 01
waste time dawdling, or with just an
companions. Better read a good book
hear some stimulating music or intelligent
cisenssion, Pray

YOU BORN TO-DAY are a combination
of talent, versatility and cor\tradictions
You also can waste time when you get
into a sullen mood. Seorpio sears to the

FEBRUARY %





SUNDAY





Why Mr. Eisenhower Won |

NEW YORK.

So Dwight D. Eisenhower has
reached the climax oi one of the
greatest careers in world history,
lhe Supreme Commander of the
Allied Forces in the Second Worid
War, who went on to become the
Supreme Commander of the
world’s greatest peacetime defen-
sive alliance, has been elected to
the greatest office in the free
world.

Throughout the campaign, Eisen-
hower, an immensely popular
figure for more than a_ decade,
has been well ahead of Adlai
Stevenson, whose name was un-
known to most Americans less
than a year ago. As the campaign
went on, it became clear that
inree main causes wouid send
kisenhewer into the White House.

Corruption

i, The tanwsuc corruption in
Washington under te iruman
admunistration, and we vioient
pubiic reacuon against it.

Woereves 4 Wear in we United
States during the past three
months, | tound white-not anger
S¢euist Ulis corrupluon, ana a
fanatical desive to ciean up the
American capital. Young voters in
particular were tremenaousiy
eager to join Eisenhower's. “Cru-
Sade for Clean Government,”
Phere was no doubt about the
personal integrity of Stevenson,
out many voters felt that he could
not clean up what he himself
had described as “the mess in
Washington.” In addition, Steven-
son made the enormous mistake
ef having as chairman of his
meeting in Boston only nine days
before election day James M.
Curley, a prominent Democratic
politician who climaxed a career
of graft by being sentenced (in
January 1946) to 18 months’ im-
prisonment for a huge mail fraud
in connection with war contracts.
But Curley was said to control
100,000 votes, which were badly
needed by Stevenson,

Communist Threat
- The Communist threat,
the war in Korea.

The majority of American vot-
ers believed sincerely that Eisen-
hower was the man best qualified
to deal with Soviet » and
to bring the war in Ke to a
successful conclusion. Most Ameri-
cans felt that the Democratic

administration w itely
stalling in Toren” Gat Me es
States could dily win this
war, and that would

do just that, @ recent -
and Bison

and

munist offensive,
hower's pledge that he himself
would visit Korea, gained him
many votes.

Change

3. The tremendous desire for a
change—-any change away from
the Democratic administration.

The Democrats had been in
power uninterruptedly for twenty
years. Millions of Americans felt
that, if the party system was to
survive, a Republican had to be
elected President e,

Typical of the opinions of mil-
lions of Amevricans—particularly
young Americans—was that of a
young unskilled worker in a beer
brewery in Milwaukee, earning 2



lity EDWIN ROTH





During the past three
months, Edwin Roth has
toured the United States

from. the Atlantic to the
Pacific. He has travelied
with General Eisenhower,

an ident Harry
man, and has

numerous

walks of life. In article
he explains the reasons for
General Eisenhower’:

8 vie~
tory,
nesses

dollars 10 cents an hour. He was
stationed for two years in G#-
many and Austria the war.
To-day he has a security of em-
ployment, a fine home and a good
car.

“I'm for Ike”, he told me, “The
Democrats may be better for
labour. I would hate the Big Boys
getting their hands on the govern-
ment. But I have never yet
known a Republican administra-
tion. I like Ike, and I think we
should give the Republicans a
chance to show what they can do.”

Or take the 26 - year - old
mechanical engineer from Long-
beach, California,

“I voted Democratic in 1948,
but I will vote Republican this
time”, he told. me, “This whole
world is q military world, The
politicians know nothing. Eisen-
hower is a military man, and he
will keep us out of trouble, These
ere military times, and we need
to have a military man as Presi-
dent.”

Then there was the Oklahoma
City, 54-year-old German-Ameri-
can inventor of a stone-breaking
machine; who made a _ fortune
out of his invention why told me:
“If I voted for my business, I
would vote for Stevenson, The
Democrats have brought this
country great prosperity—a false
prosperity perhaps, but still pros-
perity. There is a lot of building
going on throughout this country,
and there may be much less un=
der the Republicans. But I've got
a boy out in. Korea, and if I voted
for my business, I'd be voting
against him, Eisenhower will clear
up this business, too. If we are
so weak that we couldn’t whip
the North Koreans, we'd better
start running now, because the
Russians could get us any time.
But I don’t believe we are so

weak.
Personality

Eisenhower gained countless
votes by his personality, He was
not only the world-famous Gen-
eral who had won the Second
World War, but his crowd sense
was terrific, and. vastly superior
to that of Stevenson. He attracted
enormous enthusiastic crowds in
every place he visited, and mil-
lions were delighted by his ebul-
lient personality, his cheerful
friendliness 4 the immense
eae he put i every wave of

is hands,
mer complete contrast with

even; . pr
lower Wee's lar promise,
He also gained votes in the
traditionally Democratic southern



states by his insistence that the!

ADVOCATE SUNDAY.

“WANDERER IIT’? SAILS WEST

NOVEMBER 16, 1952





@ From Page 7 and picturesque island. But the and nights the little vessel ram sea, and at times the motion cer-
rich oil deposits lying beneath] able Fo..uiguese coacs sich has cost of everything there was very steadily om her way unattended tainly was violent; sometimes she
America’s tide lands should be-|;:y good harbours to the river high, so we sailed away to La and that was a welcome change rolled 32° each way, and only
long to the state owning the/psgus, where we spent ten days Paima (one of the lesser known for us, for you will understand took 3 seconds for the roll from
coasts, and not to the whole!

nation,
The Communist danger
America was one of the

inside |
main

“issues of the campaign, and here

; risiti yachts are concerned, The
‘ ‘ , ) Visiting yachts z , r
tae Republicans scated heavily | foreigner’s* passport is seized and

the Gestapo trained “internation-
al”
enemy alien.

On leaving Lisbon we had the
the | sail of a lifetime, the kind of thing
fact that Stevenson had acted as | one buys or builds a boat for and

|so rarely gets. In the Portuguese

They worked day and night to
convince the American voters tha‘
Eisenhower was better qualified
than Stevenson to deal with this
Among their biggest
ammunition was



danger,
campaign

a character witness for Alger Hiss,
when Hiss was on trial for per- |
jury.

On October 27, a week before
election day, Senator Joseph
McCarthy drove his own cam-
paign to a peak with a nation-

visiting a number of smali ports
as well as Lisbon. The outlook of
he Portuguese is
rom that of the Spaniards where

trade, which is the early begin-
ning of the real north-east trade,
we had a glorious passage south to
the small, unspoilt island of Porto ag,
Santo, covering the 480 miles in
3 1/2 days. The wind was fresh
wide broadcast the cost of which |.nq we carried the whole main-

of the Canary Islands and_ which

that as there are only the two of
should not be confused with Las

iS us aboard we do get very tired
Palmas) to lay in a stock of fruit when steering is necessary, taking at noon on the 6th November
and vegetables for the Atlantic ji turn and turn about three your low, green island of Barba-
crossing at a price we could afford. hours at the tiller and three be- dos lifted slowly out of the sea
The little port of Santa Cruz there, low, by the time one has cooked ahead just about where and when
hemmed in as it is by 7,000 foot and eaten, navigated, and attend- the navigator had said (and
raountaims, was hot, humid amd eq to all the things that need secretly prayed) it would appear.
windless, so we were not really doing, there is not a lot of time Although navigation by observa-
sorry when after a stay there of jeft for sleep. But under the self- tions of celestial objects is an
one week Wanderer slipped away steering twins. our life became almost exact science, on a long
on the llth October bound for more jeisurely. In the daytime passage out of sight of land the
Barbados. Susan cooked elaborate meals, navigator has little or no_oppor-

To start with we steered in a baked bread and made cakes, tunity for checking the accuracy
west-south-west direction so a8 while I~was free to navigate to of his work, so I for one always
to get down into the heart of the my heart’s delight, and in our suffer from a feeling of appre-
north-east trade wind as quickly spare moments we worked about hension as the time for making a
possible. But although that the ship, attending to her gear landfall approaches, It is a thrill
wind is generally regarded as be- and improving the harbour awn- which never seems to lose its
ing constant we ran into a calm jing. We even found time to sit savour no matter how often one
area and there lay almost motion- together in the cockpit each eve- experiences it.

one side to the other.

It was a tremendous thrill when

very different

police make him feel like an

— 80,000 dollars—had been paid not the official Republican i). sun shone brilliantly over Wanderer lay gazing sadly at her ocean over ch we sailed so and Wanderer stormed along to-
Party, but by “private sources.” In| the vivid blue sea, and by night cwn reflectiori, Except for a long easily, and watching the sunset wards the island, Night was upon
this, McCarthy claimed that Ste-|the stars were clear and the low ocean swell the sea was SC with its usual accompaniment of her as South Point came abeam,
venson was surrounded by a stafl | yacht’s wake was a blaze of pale smooth that it had the appear- heaped up cumulus clouds all and there at last she ran out of
of pro-Communist sympathisers. | yreen phosphorescent light, Porto ance of oil, and the silence was ground the horizon, As the sun the ocean swell which had been
He also charged that Stevensov |Santo has no harbour, so we had profound; we noticed that par- went down we could see the her constant companion for so
during his official political missior |, Jand on the beach through the ticularly after lying in so many planet Venus ahead between the long, and at 8 o'clock that eve-
in Italy in 1943, had deliberately | surf in our 7-foot aluminium Spanish and _ Portugese ports luffs of the*staysails, while the uing she found an anchorage in

willing Italian government, anu
had brought the Communist Party
leader Togliatti back from Mos-
cow. The candidature of Stevenso
—said McCarthy—had been offi-
cially endorsed by the Communist
Party. According to McCarthy,
Stevenson had been closely associ-
ated with Alger Hiss, and hi
speech was interspersed with such
“slips of the tongue as “Alger-—I

mean Adlai,”

More Harm Than Good

Everyone wondered whether
President Truman’s immense cam-
paign trips throughout America
would do more good than harm.
The result of the election shows
that these trips; which were orig-
inally opposed by Stevenson, did
more harm than good, It tended
to identify Stevenson with some of
the corruption rampant under the
Truman regime. There was also
the sensational “revelation” by
columnist Walter Winchell that in
1922 Truman had belonged to the
Ku Klux Klan; this was, of course,
heatedly denied by Truman,

After twenty years, the iene. |
crats are now out of office. But we |
have not heard the last of that
bright mew star’ on the world’s
political firmament, Adlai Steven-
-on, During the past three months,
Stevenson has fought the presi-
dential campaign of 1956. He will
spend the next four years as un-
official Leader-of-the Opposition,
keeping a sharp eye on the Eisen-
hower administration, using his
si:perb oratofy and humour when-
aver possible to say “I told you
79,”"

The Battle for the White House
s over, and America breathes a
sigh of relief. But under its politi-
cal system, this nation will soon
begin to prepare for the congres-
sional election of 1954. Between
vow. and then, President Dwight
EKis@énhower will hear a lot more
‘rom Governor Adlai Stevenson.

—L.E.S.

NEW ESSO SERVICE— BARBAREES



THE NEW STATION owned by Mr. P. G. Stewart will be opened tomorrow, 17th November, at
8.00 a.m. by The Very Reverend The Dean, G. V. Hazelwood, who has kindly consented to give

his blessing.

A new Esso

top, or drops ow, wake ex ee at 8 a.m. tomorrow.

in the mediocre m ie 5) God s

guidance always, Birthdate of: Jobn , Be ae _ motorists

Bright, Brit. statesn_an, and many famous %O call at the new so Serv!

ruusicians end orafors Station” at Barbarees, and re-
4



%

: More Miles
More Smiles

WITH

BRITISH

BERGOUGNAN

TYRES

We have the following

sizes in stock

30 x §
v2 x 6
Pew. 7
35 x 7%
525 x 16
550 x 16
600 x 1

O-D-O~d

$e 9O9SO9 OOOO HHO 9G0OO9O4

PLANTATIONS LIMITED

PODDDDODOOGHSOSHOSOG.0.0O«



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Service Station ceive free, an Esso Plastic Bank. Se
will be opened at Barbarees Road i ic Bank. Se

At the same time you will be
given a chance of entering a
competition for a five ube Mul-
lard Radio} So. remember _ to
make a date with the new Bsso






Make your
‘Heme more

Attwactive

WITH

CONGOLEUM

We Have a Full Range of:—
CONGOLEUM SQUARES:— 3 yds. x 4 yds.

CONTINUOUS LENGTHS : 9’, 6’, 3’

All At Attractive Price }

BARBADOS HARDWARE Co.,Ltd.

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No. 16, Swan Street ete ‘Phone 2107, 4406, 3534 }

rvice Station at Barbareeg to-}
morrow where you will receive
the usual friendly courtesy,
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world over.

3 yds. x 3 yds.
3 yds. x 2% yds.
3 yds. x 2 yds. )

27” & 2242” Wide







we managed it without capsizing.
Wine,
the
watched those things being loaded
through the surf into small sail-
ing craft for
near-by island of Madeira.
Captain of the Port (Captain of
he Beach might be a more appro-
priate title)
come,
Yclock of a hot afternoon when
we called on him,
local wine upon us to
extent that it
ever managed to return safely to
“Wanderer” who lay rolling heav-
ily in the bay.

From Porto Santo we
Madeira where
dents
we have nothing but the happiest
memories of

foistered Communists on the un- fer an exciting business, but





where the noise of motor horns, moon, nearly full
church bells and fiesta rockets is quickly up astern.
almost deafening and continues

then, rose Carlisle Bay. The 2,700 mile pas-
The risk of sage from La Palma had taken 20
collision out there clear of the days 8 hours.
well into the night. steamer tracks is very small, in’ Almost at once the police launch
But presently the wind re- fact we saw only one other ship came alongside, and out of the
turned; at first it was only the during the whole crossing, so darkness a’ soft musical voice
faintest whisper of an air, but after supper we used to hang a asked who we were and where
that was enough to fill the 330 white light in the rigging and we had come from, and concluded
square foot nylon genoa and to both turned into our bunks, look- by wishing us a pleasant stay at
send Wanderer ghosting silently ing out occasionally to see that the island. Soon the rising moon
over the still calm sea. Then it gj] was well. So the time sed illuminated the white’sandy beach
freshened a little, and we re-s€t quite quickly and although we that fringed our anchorage and
the mainsgil which we had low- were aware that Wanderer was a magnificent grove of palms.
ered during the calm to prevent probably the only floating object Friendly lights shone out, the first
chafe, and from that day »n our for hundreds of miles, and that we had seen for many a day, and
runs from noon to noon were we must depend entirely on our there came to us across the water
mostly well over 100 miles, the own resources for everything, we the warm, sweet-scented smell of
best being 130, The wind which were never conscious of a feeling the land. Slowly, as we moved
had started at north-east slowly of loneliness. about the strangely steady deck
worked round to east and we As ‘the sun shone brilliantly stowing the sails, we began to
were then able to set our special every day navigation presented no realise that the first part of our
twin staysails which, when their difficulties other than those con- adventure had succeeded. The
braces are connected to the nected with taking observations broad Atlantic lay astern. This
tiller, will make the yacht steer with the sextant when the yacht was our first tropic island, and
herself. For eleven wonderful days was being thrown about by the we felt we were going to like it.

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mineral water and lime are

island’s exports, and we

shipment to the
The

made us very wel-
and although it was 3
pressed the
such an
was a miracle we

went to
the British resi-
were so kind to us that

that mountainous



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a
e
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let form, and may be in one week's time most users find that
Ricci. so that

nds in # short

| they feel and look ten years younger. The |
fee w SRP Reced! change in some men is lmoah miseculous: | ie
tion of your vigour and vitality Results Guaranteed | eet
Doctor Praises Mi-Tabs outstandin have been Rad reaelts |
.N. GO. nown su y Vi-Tobs for weak ani i
be. ounniny wasaoae eames | ane A wa tra Aa
cian, recentl : now offered under an absolute
ames Eres ctr |
citi YS Tebs from your chemist today See tor |
na A = seca i the Ry strength and veality that
nS Sid ex- .

of
ne ie, coursing through your body See
2 take an interest in the pleasures
iy and how you are to enjoy them
7 not wares iat Wire WPeanity worth

\s i wort
aaa as t the small wely reiurz.
full purchase
. jon or
ist
et re

used secretly if you



Built for versatility, this is a
four-wheel drive all-purpose
vehicle of high performance.

REDMAN & TAYLOR'S GARAGE
Ph. 4435 LIMITED px. 4365






HERE'S YOUR
CHANCE

XMAS OFFER !!

~~ PRESTCOLD
~ REFRIGERATORS

Starred for Brilliance of
Design and Finish














* for the Coronation
splendour, brilliant

try
al to
wil ‘op easy to reach by BO.A.C.
airliner. y in ee perfect
service and delicious and no
Gonsult your Travel Agent or
BWA. Lower Broad St, B’town, Barbados

\

Spangled with a galaxy
of New Features, Greater
in Space, Greater in Grace.

Seated Units with a 5
Year Guarantee.

3%, 5, & 7 C.ft. All-Steel
Body.



3% Cub. Ft piss. . ee eee eee coe
5 Cub. Ft. Regular ............. . $495 Now 450.00
7 Cub, Ft. Regular .............. $575 Now 520.00

THIS OFFER LASTS TO END OF DECEMBER

Win. FOGARTY (/dos) Ltd.

BRITISH OVERSEAS AIRWAYS CORPORATION














SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1952 SUNDAY ADVOCATE . PAGE THIRTEEN





HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON

18 ,

By Appointment
Gin Distillers
to the Late
King George VI





BAAME YOU THYVING |

“« TO FRUGHTEN ME ?,

> —
D\lascae
,. LTHOVeHT
a) REPELS ME.. |
44! (AM MERELY
OFFERING YOU
THE USE OF A
TELEPHONE -
Y AND A GLASS



~ IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE _

SPECIAL OFFERS AVAILABLE MONDAY TO WEDNESDAY AT ALL BRANCHES











Usually NOW .
ST GOLDEN SYRUP—2 Ibs. ........00. cc ccceeedheveeees BB
GUAVAS—Tins 1 ff 40 Gee aeetee Gh eee ee ee

i E MMMMMy ial hacen cauwAde vende cies a sets rae
CHASE & SANBORN INSTANT bee oe a
COFFEE ne a “i 87 80 CAULIFLOWER — WHOLE ....,........ .. ge
ri BROKEN ............ ‘ 38
FRY’S HOT CHOCOLATE a 49 45 YOUNG FINE CARROTS “:........ . 40
: PEAR—CARROTS ........ uetaas 43
M’LADE ats de oe 42 36 SAUREKRANT ene ei peiake ; 33
UTCH APPLE SAUCE ; ; ‘ ;
STEAK — ONIONS e if 74 65 BOURNVITA ..... : 3
MARIE BISCUITS—pkgs. ......... j 32






BY DAN BARRY APRICOT PIE FILLING .. Ay 44 30

iy” FORGIVE US,O
MIGHTY LUCIFAN, FOR }s
THIS INTRUSION, BUT










D
HEEHEE! BRING HER ij

w =
A OR NL PR A A AE










|
H





For those who love the Sea !!
Here’s a Fine Xmas Gift

YACHT RACING
NEW REVISED EDITION
BY FRANK ROBBINS By MANFRED CURRY

i rina

={_fqjFHRFRHRFR oS

een
































=
soa ’ STATIONER :
iE THIS MESS IS GETTING LE BURNED BLACK AN? TORN AT Th ADV OCcATE TI i Y fs
COR’ COMPLICATE? / MAYBE 1 EDGES! THE BOMB was ci
THEN IT'S YOUR PLANTED A TIME BOMBIN| | GAN GET SOME ANSWERS IN THIS/...AN? THE MA SS SSssSsSSSS5855 SSS >
OPINION, CAPTAIN, THAT \\ HER PLANE! OBSERVE \F I... OH-OH... WHAT'S SCRAP... WHAT & STO Cl tee :
A DELIBERATE ATTEMPT } THE TINY MECHANISMS,4 | te 2 )
WAS MATE ON MISS PRECISION MATE ! rx} Hi |
R SHERMAN'S LIFE? |
|
Gu INNESS |
4 STOUT
camel FOR STRENGTH |
“ )
BY GEORGE MC. ee Yin i
\ Te i mies a ee 4 |
6HE WENT OUT EARLY- WHAT ARE \ 7 NO ETTER
DADDY - SHE'S VERY ANGRY Seas ae
AND _NOT SPEAKING TO YOU- h
SOMETHING YOU YOUR WIFE'S
SAID TO HER= >» RELATIVES |
LEFT YET ? |
»
i
))
\
yh?
je Lae = \
/ I WON'T PRETENO \ THE TROOPERS DID +»e AND NOW YOU'RE ALL SET... 7 T \
IM SORRY THE | ALL THEY COULD, | JON TOP OF YOUR PROFESSION,ANDA}) AND I AM }
PAGAN... THEY RE WORLD WITHOUT A WORRY IN IT... GRATEFUL... \\\
CERTAIN HE DIED e. LUCKY GIRL TOO, \
AN ENDING EVEN FOR HIM. 7 WHEN HIS CAR HIT I SUPPOSE, WITH ))
70 BE THIS / THE WATER. EVERY THING...CAREER , }
A MONEY, FAME. EVERYTHING i
+ EXCEPT WHAT A GIRL »
REALLY
i
}
) \
i a i
ew + ee
BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES }
HERE ARE THE CROOKG~AND “\ HMM~YOU CERTAINLY CAUGHT THEM THE | \
Sar iniee I HERE ARE THE JEWELS THEY~ WAR NAY AA BUT yoy ee A i}
MAKE OLE — T ;
FOOL OUTA ME AGAIN a al FACT! I C. F. HARRISON & CO. (BarBavos) Ltd.
OR ANYBODY ELSE? a a |
| X
S$
|
i
i i)
— FE i |
TOMORROW: TAE WAMBES)| i
, p ——— OSES —
; e ‘



+


«



PAGE FOURTEEN

CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE



DIED



ember,













MOORE — On “the 16th 1982 ;
James Richard Moore late re
Clerk of Saint Michael's Cathe
The funeral leaves his te residence
Count’y Road, St. Mic! t 4.15 this
evening for Saint Michael's Cathedral
Friends are invited

Wilhelmina Moore (Widow James
Moore, Sergt. Fitageraia Gill
16. t1.52—in
THANKS

BROCKLEHURS Mrs. Vida Brockie-
hurst and family gratefully return
thanks to ali who attended the funeral
sent wreaths or in a otner way as-
sisted on the occasion of the passing of
Mr, Duncar Brockict t late of
“Henley”, Upper Collymore Rock, St
Michael 16.11.52—I1n

GALL—The Family of the late Maizie
Gall of “Mayville”, Chelsea Road beg
to thank all those who attended th-
funeral, sent wreaths and cards and
in other ways expressed sympathy with
them in their recent bereavement

16.11,52—In

GIBSON — The “undersigned gratefully re.
turn thanks to all who attended the
funeral, sent wreaths or in any other
way expressed sympathy with them on
the occasion of the passing of Mrs.
Emma B. Gibson, late of “Emma Ville”
Pine Plantation, Rd., St. Michael.

Nathaniel (Husband), Michael, Dudley,

Hugh (Children) 16.9 .52—Ir

———

IN MEMORIAM

CARRING TON— 3 | jJoving memory of our
dear beloved Mother who was callec







to rest on the 7th of November, 1951
One year has passed since that sac
day

The one we loved has passed away
But only those who has loet can tell
The erie parting without farewell.
fver to be remembered by Edmond Car-
rington, her husband, Violet, Stella, Mac.,
Markie, Edson, Children, the Haynes
family and friends 16.11. 52—in.





Rawlins.
A year has gone beyond recall with
all its doubts and fears.
May the good Soul that onee breathea
the fragrance of leve here below rest
in peace.
Ever to be temembered by Clarence
Rawlins ‘Husband) Golda (Daughter)
The Rawlins family, The Ajleyne

family .

16.11,52—1n.

Sis ite tes ant

HOUSES ,
———
BUNGALOWS — Two Modern Bunga-
lows Bersford & Eunice, Maxwell's Road
fully furnished, all modern conveniences
en and silvers. Contact
Nurse , Maxwell's Coast, or Phone
S101. 14,11.52—3n

en,
“FPLODDEN”.-Culloden Road, 5 bed-
cooms, drawing, dining, breakfast rooms,









| "peas SALE



AUTOMOTIVE

BEDFORD VAN — 10/12 cwts. — lit-
tle used and in really good condition

Dial 4616, Courtesy Garage
14. 1) 52-6

—_
CAR-—Prefect Ford in good condition
Dial 8213 16.11 .52-—-3n



—_
CAR—Standard Vanguard 6,000 miles
$1,600. Smith's Engineering Works
Phone 4947 16.11.52—in.

CAR—One Vauxhall VELOX, practically
new, only done 4000 miles. Phone
REDMAN & TAYLOR'S GARAGE LTD.

15. 12.52—Gn



CAR—One Vauxhall Velox. 14,000 miles
Can be seen Eckstein’s Garage, Bay
Street, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

16.11.52—3n.

CAR—One Prefect Ford, late Model, in
A-1 Condition Rartly New. Price $650.00,
Apply to Smith's Garage, Roebuck St.

No. 1. 16.11.52—In.





later than Saturday 29th inst.

Lucy in straitened circumstances and not
less than eight and not more than twelve
years of age.

be obtained from the he
on office days.
must accompany each

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

PURLIC WN eee
NOTiIVLE

PARISH OF ST. LUCY
Tenders are invited for the

PUBLIC
REAL ESTATE







of
twenty-three (23) or mote pints of fresh
milk daily to the St. Lucy's Almshouse
as from Ist January, 1953.

Tenders will be received by the under;
signed up to and including Saturday 6th

op or Entrance
December, 1952.

a Dairy, Go!
AT FONTABELLE. =

May Suit
for oly £900. ATs
A Large

Oo. L. DEANE,
Clerk to Poor Law Guardians,
St. Luey.
15.11.52—3n Righ
t-of-
Going for Only. 22,100, Net
room (as Good as New) &

ton:
about 11,000 sq. ft., By NAVY

Going for Only £3,000 Net.

— A ve Desi
ay rable



NOTICE
PARISH OF st. LUCY
Applications for one or more vacant
Vestry Exhibitions, tenable at the Alexan-
dra School will be received by me not

must be daughters of Parishioners of St.

m (Partly Stone)
+» about 4.000 sq. ft, AT

must | Go Going for Only £1,250 Net SiN NELSON
3 Treseurer -A (Stone) panes. eremiow &

tlamal Certificate aede A-l Business Stand, Can Yield

oat $70.00 p.m., eles Going for Only

£2100 Net. IN ST.—A 3

Residence, Can Yi

00 p.m., Can also Mabe ts ‘Good

_ 5 Biand, wate, Light, Going for

at Maxwell Hill, a hoe bene

Forms of

A Baptlamal











about noe Acre, Going
for Only 13 cts. Net .
The Parisian Dress Shop Weil noah. P de Abeos Lens
SHEPHERD STREET SIRABLE “inchad

This is to notify my patrons that the | SIDE ni PERTIES including SEA-









CAR—One Citreon Car, excellent con- | above will be joo oy Wissinees from | Call at “Olive Bough”, en Y -
jition. Phone REDMAN & TAYLOR’S|to-morrow l4th Novem
GARAGE LTD. 16.11.52—3n ‘13.11.52—4n. |_| BUNGALOW — One roomy 3-bedroom
enn neate stone bungalow, large living room kitchen
CAR—Austin A-40 Devon, 12,000 miles. and bath, situated on sea, Welches,
Excellent condition, New battery. Can be Ch. Ch. Dial 8345. 16.11,52—2n.
seen at Eckstein Bros, Tel. 3387 or NOTICE ——_—_—_. .
R. G. Challenor Lid, Re sedi de si ocrer — Black Rock, standing on
. .|@HR west . * acres arable land, stone building with
NOTICE is hereby ‘given thar sppiicn: {2 eecreom™s, sitting” and dining rooms,

ELE

CAR--Wolseley. Perfect running order

5.243 miles. Contact Blow 95—273.
15. 11.52—Un.

CARS—Sedan Morris 8 me
ley 8. Apply to M, Farmer,

ring,
3t. Thomas. ee
CAR _ Morris-Oxford, good as new.
Mileage under 3,000. Telephone 2949.

4.11.52—t+.f.n.





MOTOR — One
3 phase 50 cycles George | Directors,
Harris, Spooners

.52—1n.

volts,
in, St.
16.1
OR Veer Austin 12 h.p. mec
saate sound, Owner leaving imand. re

ast
Garage,
Road.

offer .to $350.00. Apply:
Reed Street,
16.11.52—1n

opposite



oe
RADIO—One S. 38 Halicrafter Radio 6
tubes, wtih oe set. ly to EB.
Sealy, Edsville, Deacons’

16,11.52—In.

XMAS TREE \LIGHTS with Nursery
Rhymes (12 to set) — Dial ‘aot = Cour-









usual conveniences, servants rooms,
garage, ideably situated with grounds|tesy Garage. 11,.52—6n.
ani cree, all enclosed. Available
ist. Apply: C. BE, Clarke, LIVESTOCK
7 Swan Street. Dial 2631 or 3029,
0 filly by Vimiddad (wii tthe Ascot
ARA — Fully 3 bea. | filly by im winner © sco
room’ higuse, Bt. Philip ‘const, ‘Lighting Soe Gee. sad second £5 the Teer out
plant, Watermill supply. 2 :
Servant rooms. Monthly rent plus | »Y Royal, Remat ot pedigree
$3 cleansing charge, IN ADVANCE, Dial | Supplied if required. Apply: Hon. V. C.
4476 1,11,52—t.£n. | Gale: oe ee
GARAGE AND OFFICE, Jackson $t. MECHANICAL
Sao, Fuecentie: trun Deceiver ik CLS =. S SERLD Deabaa dale?
us ion from ember 1, on
Te installed. Apply Yonkers Bicycles (Green) twenty: 2. Tames,
Office. Dial 2550 for particulars. by ” ¢
Apply to Mrs, rts, St.
: 9.11,52-2n. | Lawrence. ~ 16,11,52—1n.
oo: een caigbamnsnetincesmioey
NEWHAVEN — Fully furnished 4-bed- MACHINE, i.
room house, Crane coast Double Garage} chine. Dial ore rapediad le,
3 Servant rooms, Lighting plant, a Victoria Street. 16.11. ee

mill gp lege rent ot ck on
4476, ite

ONE FURNISHED FLAT at Manhaten,
on sea, Welches, 3 bedrooms, servants
Toom and garage, enclosed yard,
ena all modern conveniences. are
B'dos Furniture Remover, Dial

5.10. sant. ‘fn

ROOM—Large room with all conveni-
ences. For experienced lady or couple.
Head of Chapman Street. 16.11,52—-1n

en
WINSLOW, CATTLE WASH—For last 2
weeks in December and en hi
March, May, June and July of 1953, Dia
3542, .- 16.11, aan

‘MISCELLANEOUS







IOUSEWIVES — You can now Rent a
JOHNBON'S Electric ‘“Beautiflor” Filoo;
Polisher at only $1,00 per day. Beautify
your Floors and Furniture in time for
Xmas by using JOHNSON’S Wax Products
and Floor Polisher. “Phone 4748. K. J.
Hamel-Smith & Co,, Ltd., Bridge Street.

9.11,52—5n,

ANNOUNCEMENTS

AT THE COTTAGE GIFT SHOP
TOYS Jig-Saw Puzzles, Animals, Xmas
Crackers, Decorations, No parking prob-





Jera, 19 Him. to 18 a.m, — 4 pan; to 6.30
pm 4.11.52—2n,

BROKEN DENTU: ‘The worst can
be skilfully repaired, fractured, and
pea Teeth replaced, slack and falling

a refitted with special imported

ma

TO) -- (Removed from Reed Street to

Roebuck Street) Opposite Coca Cola Co,
13.11.52--3n.

ee a

EXHIBITION of Paintings and Shell-
work by Mrs. J. M. Forster, paintings
by Nan Kendall, at Barbados Museum,
near Savannah, Nov. sth-—30th, daily
10 a.m.—6 p.m. Sundays 2.30 p.m. to
6 p.m. 2.11.52—13n.

FRENCH FASHION available now.

Covered Buttons, Buckles, Pleating, also



(ARE DEAL DENTAL LABORA-) [pp











three’ pepe it ub,
et "saa, : meal 11.
ae nee

in
Te Rei te anh Sy Tok oh
guson Tractor w ‘ac
other trailers $400.00 00 he e500 Smith's

Engineering Works, Phone sett.
16.11,52—In.
MISCELLANEOUS






AMERICAN .
styles. Tea-' $74, vi
$150 per pair, ie ern ‘ess

Broad Street. . ‘

Sees ott, See se. ee

graphs ete., at Gorringes Antique Shi
adjoining Royal Yacht Club. ee
3.2.52—t.f,n.







BRONKXLEY'S BATH SOAP — large
size — makes a nice ae pee
Reduced from 3/6 to 2/6 cake. rer
Scents, Knight's Ltd 14.11, “

CREPE — Printed Moroain . 4
very chretful shades. At Thani Bros.
Pr, Wm. Henry St, Great Autumn Sale.
Onky $1.20 a ya. Worth od

16, Ta



ae Gee ie
Sneene ne ak, two oz. $3.50, 6 oz.

18,
. 29, 10. 563—

DIARY—A_ useful Bi for a friend
abroad — ‘‘The B’'dos Engagement Diary”
With 12 au ow. ot fe. ey
and the price is only 2/ Gi

ls *14.11,52—3n

FOR THE HOUSEHOLD — Turkish
Towels, large size $1.43, Face Cloths 3Sc,
each, Wash 32. each, Yellow Dust-
ers 26c. each, Regular Size Pillow Cases
Bic. each, Linen Kitchen Towels 60c. each.
The Modern Dress Shoppe, Broad Street.

12.11,52—Jn.





HARDBOARD — Standard Hardboard.
Sizes ¥ x 4 end 30S Cd foe Ceilings a
partitions. cents per sq. i.
G. W. Hutehinson & Co., Ltd, — Dial



ready made Pleated Skirts.on sale. 22} 4292. 14.11, 52—3n.
Swan Street and Busby Alley. a

13.11.52—3n. | IND) LEATHER SANDALS — Host

of sha and patents all sizes. Just the

GIFT PARCELS—Let us send your}ining for Xmas. At reduced prices at

Candy GIFT PARCELS to_ the U.K.
Leave your order CANDY BOX (Cave
Ey, herd). 1-Ib tins 98c. G-Tb tins $5.96

ge and Postage included.
15.11.52—2n.





XMMAS TREES--Spray painted Green
or White. Dial 2496 for particulars.
15.11,52—2n.

Land For Sale |

(2) two acres of land at
St. Elizabeth. Village, St.
Joseph.

(2) two acres of land be-
low St. Joseph’s Church.
Both beside the main road.

(3) three spots of land at
Maxwell Road. Each spot
consists of 12,600 square feet.

8,000 square feet of land
at St. Michael’s Row next to
Alleyne, Arthur’s bond.

Pay a small deposit and
the balance on terms.

For
to



all particulars apply

D’ARCY A, SCOTT
Middle Street or dial 2645.

15.11.52.—3n.



TODAY'S NEWS FLASH

MODEL FACTORY
ENGINES

That Work By Steam

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY



diliekiennninanccacel

Thani Bros Great Autumn
16.11,52—1n.



MATS—Large Size Straw Mats Aetiatie
designs. Limited Quantity. reduced

Thani Bros. Great Autumn Sale to only
8%. Rush At Prince Wm. Henry St.
And Save the Difference. 16,11, 52—In.

MILLINERY ACCESSORIES—Crinolines,
veilings, flowers, feathers and hat straws.
‘the Modern Dress Shoppe, Broad Street

12,11 .52—sn.







“ " An ai
Xmas for convalescent Trloade.
Large and R~} in stock. Knight's

Ltd. 14.11,52—3n.
———————
OIL STOVES —Two Burner

Model Cookers. and White
84 each, G. W. Hutchinson &
as - +e oe G. Hul th

ROUND IRON AND SHEETS—%, 5/16,
We, ta. %4 and %. Sheets %, 5/16, ¥, 3/16,
= oh art ee x , = Auto

* Co., a.
Dhone 2696, Fe BAL SILL.

Carrier Rims, Brakes *Fit-

tings, Frames,*Three Speed

Parts,

CRESCENT CYCLE STORE
30 Tudor St.

Happy Days are here again “
This is Good News

Trumpeter Cigarettes

at OLTON’S No. 4 Tudor St.

$2.38 per Carton

and 12c. per Pack

the above named
pyre ad William G
Wolse- i
cate issued to the said Augustus Charles

ho claim
TAP. tric Motor be om ae ean in respect of


















kitchen breakfast and 2 store rooms Toile
and bath, Govt. water and electric pd

Fan Mill, Tank Pipes, stalls etc. reason.
of | ably priced and ry
re certificate for, four ‘Nos. | 2 and easy mortgage. Apply
17842, inclusive,” dated Fred Carmichael, Phone 2443
1943, upon the statement that the 16.11.52—1n





Newly built stcbsevall bun, alow with
6,788 square feet of land at Pine Hill, St.
Michael. The house contains three bed-
rooms, living rooms and conveniences,

The above property will be set up for
sale by public competition at our Office,

et

Solicitors. *

Wiliam Griffith has been lost and not
deposited with anyone as security or
otherwise, and notice is hereby given that
if within thirty days from date hereof

to the

‘ 14.1 i
LIQUOR JICENSE NOTICE

ND REMOVAL)

Serre anna
STRAITAN, Dalkeith Road, near the
Savannah, Apply to an G. ¥7

Boyce 9~4 p.m. daily. 1
16.11, 52—3n

emperors anh ities dieeneneehinsienireene oe
SEASIDE PROPERTY — With plenty
the purchaser of | Cocoanut trees. Situated in “Road View,
of 1952 granted | St. Peter”. Apply to Mrs. Olive Parris
to her in respect of a board and gal-|0n premises. 16.11.52-—1n

shop with shed attached at

Supers, St. Philip, to remove said -
to a board and galvanized shop with| The offer for sale by
shed attached at Blades Hill, St. Philip | public competition at their office, No. i.
and to use it at such last described prem- {High Street, Bridgetown, on Friday thi
ises. 28th Ny of November 1952 at a
Dated this 14th day of November, 1952. | as Coad concern: EDGEWATER
(Sgd.) GLADYS BROWNE, HOTEL, Bathsheba, St. Joseph, standing
Siete tet ncealld eT arpaee at ore 1 rood, 12 perches of
‘ hotel which commands a
4. yilies Magistrate, Dist. “C” view of the incomparable “pathsheba
.B,—This application will be consid-| Coast << is swept by the Atlantic
es ata as aS to be held on| breezes, contains a spacious lounge and
24th November, 1! at 11 o'clock a.m.|19 bedrooms, each with running water
at Police Courts, Dist. “Cc.” (12 with tollets and baths).

. W. HARPER, The com leetri
is. Satta te hea pany’s electricity and water
16.11,62—in. any day by appointment.



ulars and conditions

esp
epucationar_ |S:



,» CATFORD & OP
ANDRA SCHOOL pee
a Alexandre School has a staffing vacancy €.11.53--@a.
Ya a & Graduate —

preferably ly in Matlie-
for January 1953;
(b) a T fenaaiie in general subjects -—

a Geography — for April
“Applications should be made to the

lars may be obtained, or before, for:—









ot: Sheree
ee mM eo
OS, Enjoy life
An_ exam Mill be held ke on 0 the he You'll feel

ors 22nd November at 9 a.m, for candi-
ater tb a one ciara i Subjects:

rls, rien eligible. Winners
ners
will be ae 5 years ates

stationery and in necessitious cases asaint-
ce, transportation ex-

cmt” clothing ete, en e fee.
Scholarship tenable from January 1953.
employm

We ent on completion
of school course,

L. A. Lyme
.
16,11,52—1n

HELP
——
BOY—An Experienced House Boy

Bring References. Apply The Moorings,
Marine Gardens. 16,11.52—1n.

Se a

P. '0. Box 64, Rosea’ ay
“Tib2—t tn.

YEAST-PHOS

GENERAL TONIC









————_——$—$—$—

GUERNSEY COW—First Calf, fresh in
milk 26-30 pts. H, Rayside, No. 3, St.
Tohn. 15,11,.52—2n.

WANTED TO PURCHASE
One “Gent’s" Bicycle. Rudge; Raleigh







cool meglio "Abe to Lng c/s
condi pply to Li,
. H. Edwards. ie Bein

Is TOPS

when only the best can

Dial 4335

oy

STOVES — The famous
VALOR — 3 Burner on
& Ovens — DIAL 4391
GARAGE.
i
SANDALS — American Gold Sandals.
All sizes at Thani Bros. Pr. Wm. Henry
St. Great Autumn Sale only at $6.98



16,11.52-—1n. ‘
VACANCIES exist in the
few counter 5 feales. at
‘ . Gov-
pos on pel me Ww." wlutehinson = Cadets.

= Bia.
Passage Road, at 10 a.m. on












14.11.52—3n.
at Reduced
Toes 30 5. 650 Police Headquarters,
wie. ies ae hESC meee S as 2696 . 14th November, 1952.
52—t4tn,
— Band 1 — 6” Plan-
a aes See! atone
ine
=m ~ Y6.11,52—in.
USED BLOCK Y and 2 blocks
10007 used amber Pines Joist, Pine
Flooring, Win and Doles, aa

Boards. Dial ae
“avant OR SAL newly Re

Phone 4598.
Collymore Rock.

GENT'S Navy Bive Suit, medium
$10.

THE OLD L

HASTINGS, BARBADOS

Daily and Longterm Rates
quoted on request.

cena

_anedinreneeestteitenslh aan bates nae ere
ot

x,





Make this Blend of Rum Your Choice on occasions

blended and bottled by
JOHN D. TAYLOR & SONS LTD.



\
BARBADOS POLICE BAND
e

POLICE BAND
between the ages of 14 to 15% var fb tet nt
2, Applicants will be interviewed at St. Cecilia Barracks,

rn ee ee

The Ahi Bazaar

Under the Patronage of Mrs. Turner
WILL BE HELD AT
THE DRILL HALL
From 3 to 7 p.m.

and battery. Excellent On '
“So00, SATURDAY, 29TH NOVEMBER, 1952
PRAM, Tansad, as new — $62. IN AID OF

CHRISTMAS GIFTS of all description and to
Suit all Pockets
PUNCH & JUDY and A FILM SHOW
to Amuse the Children
THE POLICE BAND to delight and
Entertain Everyone
SWEETS, CAKES, ICES, TEAS AND A WELL-
STOCKED BAR

uJ

SALES
AUCTION
. an

On Tuesday 18th by order of Mrs.
Gerald Manning we will sell her Furni-
ture which is both antique and modern
a is in excellent condition at “Flod-
Y Culloden Road. It includ

2 very nice Tip Top. Oval Pedestal
Tables, Round Tip Top Table, Sheraton
Side Table, Serving, Ornament, , Cock-
tail, Pembroke and Card Tables, Plant
Stools Canterbury, Tall Plant Pedestals,
Electric Table Lamps (carved), Hepple-

faite and other Sideboards; Settee with
Boutle Ends, Revolving Book Case, ,Up-
Yight Arm and Easy Chairs; all in food
gid npuogese: Wicker Settee and Chairs,
Uphols, Arm China, San-
Bisies © De Barrell ‘Shade, Cc. G. Fruit

is



Decanters &c Glass and

; Dinner, Tea and_ Fruit Services;
Pictures, Engravings; Good Barometer
ing Clock; Single Mahog. Bedstead,
and Deep Sleep Mattress; 3-Wing
red Mahog. Press and Dressing
; Mirrors, Canvas Cot,

2-Burner Oil Stove and
Tables, Scales, Large
Iron Ladder, Garden
and other items.

11.30 O'CLOCK, TERMS CASH.





GOVERNMENT NOTICES

ATTENTION is drawn to os
Control of. Prices prjence
(Amendment) Order, 1
which will be published’ inthe

re Monday, 17th

ial G
Terni 1952. 16 1162—1n

PPE

WATERWORKS DEPART-

MENT

P of Water Rates
. CONSUMERS who have not yet
water rates in respect of the
rter ending 3ilst December,
2, are hereby notified that un-
less these rates are paid on or be-
fore the 29th of November, 1952,
the Department, as authorised by
section 46 of the Waterworks Act
1895-1, may stop the water from
flowing into the premises in re-
spect of which such rates are
payable, either by cutting off “
pipe to such premises, or Ue such

means as they may think fit.

take proceedings to recover po

amount due.
16.11.52—In.

FOR SALE

NEW CITROEN
CAR

OFFERED AT $300 BELOW

COST TO CLEAR.

JOHN M. BLADON & CO.
Plantations Building

Phone:

Thanksgiving Service
of the CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
CHURCH, Bay Street, will
be held on Thursday Evening,
November 2%th, at 8 o'clock.
18.11.52,—3n,



ake emmenmees tin
val

MAGNIFICENT
NEW

GASEL, REFRIGERATOR

“PERFECTION”

J.D. T. Special Rum

(with the distinctlve flavour)

do,

tt Roebuck Street

Saturday, November 22nd, 1952.
R. T. MICHELIN,
a of Police.

16,11.52.—2n.

ADIES HOME



Examina- |











s80U ‘THROUND

For further particulars, apply to—

GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents.










ADVOCATE
STATIONERY



GREYSTONE,
_—

Just the little shop in the village

where the Best Books, Stationery

and Xmas Cards are now on show.





REALTORS LIMITED
OFFERS

CHURCHILL
Situate at Maxwells Coast Road,
rooms _ Ww,
ition draw-
modern
The prop-

nt sea

prising three bedrooms with toilets
and baths attached, dining and
living rooms, kitchen, veranaieno
The West and a nice pi to the

‘on
acre of land.

East. The pr
approximately
EVANTON

Situate at Top Rock comprigtng
three bedrooms, two with adjgin-
ing toilet and wool
that can be
room or child ra hurtery,
and dining room, kitchen, toilet
and bath with hot and cold water,
verandah to the South and Patio
to the North. The outbuildings
comprise of servants' room with
toilet and bath, and a_ large
garage. Inspection by appointment
only,

Oat

COVE SPRING COTTAGE

A lovely cottage standing on 2
roods 27 perches of land situate
at St. James Coast having its
own private bathing beach, and
comprising three bedrooms, with
private toilet and bath to main
bedroom, drawing and dining
rooms, European bath with hot
and cold running water and
separate toilet, modern kitchen,
and a gallery on two sides.

WYNDOVER

Overlooking the very

Six Men's Bay, St. Peter.

ing on approximately 4% acres of
land having an extensive orchard
with specially selected fruit trees.
The house comprises three bed-
rooms, dining room, living room,
modern toilets and baths with hot
and cold water. Large verandahs.
Extensive outbuildings including 9
Jar age, two servants rooms,
laundry, workshop. This property
has been extensively renovated by
the present owner.

HOMEMEDE

in the Garrison,
comprising: four

Situate
Michael,
rooms, combination living and
dining rooms, separate toilet and
bath, kitchen with built-in cup-
boards, verandah the whole length
of the building. The outbuildings
comprise two servants rooms with
water toilet and a garage for two
cars. The above property stands
on approximately 7,500 square feet
of land. This house has gas and
no electric rationing. Inspection
by appointment only.

THURSISDON

Situate at Maxwells Coast Road.
comprising of four bedrooms all
with running water and one with
dressing room attached, livine sod
dining room, large kitchen,
Separate toilet and bath, open
verandah on two sides with one
facing the sea, Outbuildings,. 3
servants rooms, garage for two
55. The property stands on 3

ods, 18 perehes of land. Ly
spection by appointment only.

OCEAN SPRAY i

Situate at Hockley Road adjoin-
ing the famous Rockley Beach,
best sea bathing in the island.
Divided into three flats and bring
a very high monthly rental. There
will be many prospective pureh-
asers for this property. Do not
delay. .

KENILWORTH
Situate at Welches, Christ
Church, within 100 yards of the
sea. Very reasonably priced.
Please contact us as soon
possible,

St.
bed-

comprising three ith
running walehe comb ay
ing and ing rooms, e
kitchen, toilet and bath, Ti
erty is situated in good
residential area with excel
bathing. A sound investment at a
very low reserve price,
BUNGALOW

Situate in Rockley New Road
commanding a magnificent view of
the Golf Course unobstructed to
the sea. It comprises three bed-
reoms, one with built-in cup-
boards, drawing and dining rooms,
modern kitchen, toilet and bath.
Downstairs: Servants’ room witb
toilet and bath, garage for two
cars, and enough room for laundry
ete. The property stands on
approximately 19,000 square feet
of land.

BUNGALOW \

Situate at Graeme Hall Terrace

very attractively designed, com-.-

PARAGON

Situate near Seawell Airport,
Christ Chureh, comprising two
large bedrooms with dressing
rooms attached, two medium size
bedrooms with dressing rooms and
built-in cupboards, toilet and bath,
large Open verandah entire length
of house with a lovely view of
Chancery Lane Beach and the sea.
Downstairs: Entrance lobby, living
and dining Toons, breakfast room.
pantry, kitchen, large study, and #
loyely open patio to the South.
This property also has lovely
grounds and a portion of arable
land containing 7% acres. Inspec-
tion by appointment only,

LAND

Situate at St. James Coast, be-
tween Colony Club and Coral
Reef Club. Spots can be had with
or without a frontage to the sea,
but all spots have a right of way
to sea, et.

’
ee ee

s e : sie
sae Ig Help a Very Deserving Charlty and Spend REALTORS Limited
Dinner and Cocktail is a Pleasani Afternoon. REAL ESTATE AGENTS
Parties arranged } $ @ 2) AUCTIONEERS
1% x | VALUERS
J. H. BUCKLAND % ADMISSION me ‘ —_
Proprietor. at CHILDREN & NURSES 6d... J neietON Ns emanre te |









§ Salls Arrives — Sati:
Montreal Hatifax Barbados os
Canadian Challenger 4 Nov 7 Nov, 18 Nov, 18 Nov.
Sanadian Cruiser 25 Nov. 28 Nov + 8 Dec 6 Dec.
NORTHBOUND
Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives A
Barbados Barbados Boston 8. John Ee Monten
Lady Rodney -. 20 Nov 22 Nov. 1 Dec. 2 Dec, -—
Canadian Challenger 28 Nov 29 Nov. -- 6 Dec. coal
Canadian Cruiser ..19 Dec. 20 Dec. + 23 Dec. 27 3 Bes —



———————=

¢

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER i6,

| SHIPPING NOTICES
Canadian Na N ational nal Steamships











The M/V: “MONEKA" will
accept Cargo and Passengers for
Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing
Monday, 17th inst.

The M/Y. “CARIBBEE” wilt
aceept Cargo and Passengers for
Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing
Friday, 21st inst.

B.W.1. SCHOONER OWNERS’
ASSOCIATICN (INC.),
No, 4047.

Consignee. Tele.



” Selling oft :
GRAMOPHONE KECORDS
2 for $1.00
CENTRAL EMPORIUM

Cnr. Brond & Tulor Sits.


















FURNITURE
AUCTION

— Sto

“« L\YNCHBURGH ”’

‘

Sth Avenue, Belleville

r on —

MONDAY, 17TH NOVEMBER
at 11.30 a.m,

We are instructed by Mrs. %. M.
Barrera to dispose of her furniture
sand effects as listed below.

VIF WING MORNING OF SALE.
Hat Stand, Set 4 Morris Chairs

with Spring Cushions, Armchairs,
Berbice Chair, Several Occas,
Tables, Dining Table, Dining

Chairs, Sideboard, Dressing Table
with Full Length Mirror and Stool,
Dressing Table with¢small Mirror,
Double ‘Bed with Vono Spring,
Single Bed with Vono Spring (ALL
THE ABOVE IN MAHOGANY).

Cedar Wardrobe with Full Tange
‘Mirror,, Std, | Dressin, ,
Canvas Chairs, Coffee ‘Table,
‘Rush-and Cane ted Rockers,
English Electric ‘tor (6%
c. ft.) New ni , Singer

Model) Kitchen Table and Chairs, |
Large Round Mirror with 7.
Page, tron Bed and Fibre Mai 5
Double and § Fibre



reeses, Ptd. Chairs, Linen Basket,
td. Table, and other
AUCTIONEERS
Jona 4. Braden
& Co.
Phone 4640
Plantations Building.



~ FURNITURE
AUCTION

mavnes races
- John.

a High School)

ON

THURSDAY, 20th NOVEMBER
at 11.30 a.m.

AND FOLLOWING DAY
IF NOT CONCLUDED

We are favoured with instruc-
tions from Mrs. H. M, BLOW ta
sell by Auction the fine collection
ef valuable | SHERJTON
pou FURNITURE, a
qua’ Modern
and other Househo
HAYNES COURT, ST, JOHN.

VIEWING DAY AND
RL eo

PYE RADIGGRAM, Oval
Dining Table, Set of Dining Chairs,
Qceas. & Coffee Tables, Tip-Top

bles, Drop Leaf Table, Writing

8, Trinket Table, .Ornamentat
les, Armchairs, Upright Chairs
(various), Vanity Cabinet, Side-
board, Single & Double Ended
Settees, Fitted Cocktail Cabinet,
Bedside Table & Cabinets, Dress~

ing Tables, Chests of Drawers,
Bookshelves, Full-lei Mirror in
Adjustable Frame, jow-Fronted

Inlaid Dressing Table with Mirror,
Stools, Table Lamps. (ALL
ABOVE IN MAHOGANY).
ae Easy Chairs,
Inlaid _ Cabinet,
mitch ch’catinet Uphoistered 5
Grandfather Clock, Dining
Pining Tuble, Inlaid. Sid
Tea Table, Drop Leaf Table, Smalt
Oak Table, Ornamental Anes
Gilt Table, Double Bed ith
Spring Mattress, Single Bed wae
. Spring Mattress, Pr. Single =
with Box Springs, Inlaid Chest"
Drawers, Inlaid Serving ent
Corner Tables, Large Oak Chest,
Old Oak Table, Easy Chairs, Stan-
erd & Table Lamps, Carpets &
Rugs, Mosquito Nets, Decorated
Feed Bag, Oil Paintings, Water
Colours, Prints, Framed Maps,
Shoe Rack. Glassware, ‘T-
INGHOUSE Refrigerator, Falks 4
Burner Oil Stove with Oven,
large Electrically Operated Butter
Churn, Kitchen. Tables (Various),
Marble T d a een Chairs, Cup- i
boards & itchen Furniture,
Servants’ Beds, Chairs, & Tables,
Kitchen Utenstls, oe and many
other interesting item: .

CASH OR am ‘ALL OF

Auteoenie (
John 4. Biadon
& Ce.

A.F.S., F-Â¥.A.
PHONE 4640
PLANTATIONS BUILDING {

———————

; room;

1952

=

JOHN

M4.
BLABON

& ce.

AFS., F.V.A.

Extensive Listings of Good
Class Property and Land
Always Available



NEW BUNGALOW, LODGE
LAND, ST. MICHAEL. — We are
instructed to offer this very
sirable home constructed by a Jead-
ing firm of tullding contractors.
The accom ncdation provides *?
spacious bet'rooms, with built-in
wa! large drawing room,
separate dining room, kitchenette
with breakfast room, and large
pantry. The garage and servant's
quarters are detached. Mains
water and quota of electric light
This property is situated in a new
and select residential area from
which there are fine panoramic
views of Bridgetown and the har-
bour. The site is very cool and
ohiy 3% miles from town centre.
The property is available with from
approx, ‘4 to 1% acres as required
and the price asked is very fair
indeed. We can recommend this
listing very highly.

BRIGHTWOOD, St. Lawrence. A
pleasant and comfortable
which mellows nicely with its
surroundings. Own beach frontage
and excellent bathing facilities.
Three bedrooms, living room and
dining room, kitchen, separate
toilet and shower, wide L shaped
verandah looking sea-wards. Sep-
arate garage and servants’ r
Ideal seaside home in a
residential quarter.

RESIDENCE, THE GARDEN,
WORTHING — Modern coral stone
bungalow on corner site with
wide frontages. Pleasant garden
with flower beds, lawn, concrete
patio, and number of bearing fruit
trees. Accommodation comprises
large living room, covered gailery,
3 bedrooms with built-in ward-
robes, well fittet kitchen, garage
with covered wey to
vants’ uarters and
offices 11 public utility services.
one of the most attractive homes
aow available in the medium price
range.

MALTA, St, Peter—Extensively
re-modelled house of massive
stone construction with approx,
% aere flower gardens, lawns and
young fruit trees. There are
spacious verandahs on two. sides
with views over beach, large liv-
ing room, 3 double bedrooms, 2
bathrooms (both with, tubs), mod-
ern kitchen and butler’s pantry,
downstairs is the laundry, good
servants’ accommodation for 3, 2
garages and storerooms, Full pub-
lic services plus own deep well
with electric pump. Right of way
over beach with superb bathing.
Opportunity for~a discriminating
buyer.

LAND, TWEEDSIDE ROAD,—
Excellent factory or business site
of nearly %4 acre with frontage to
main road over 100 ft, One of thy
few available locations in such a
wee. position close to Town cen-
re.

COAST LAND, ST, JAMES,—
Approx, 2 acres in unspoilt resi-
dential part of this attractive
— Good beach frontage with

bea Owner abroad will
wipes of this property for the
low figure of 24 cents per sq. ft.
or near offer,

RAOrEe St. James’ Coast
- can noner a wide selection
of fine residences in this increas-
ingly popular district on oar
beach .and inland,

THE RISK, St. James——Large
stone and concrete 2 storey house
standing in grounds of approx,
1% acres. Cool position and ex-
cellent safe bathing from sandy
beach opposite, Extensive accom-
modation with 2 large reception
rooms, office, kitchen, pantry. 5
good bedrooms and garage. En-
quiries invited,

BUNGALOW, Pine Hill—Modern
bungalow constructed in 1939 with
18” stone walls and heayy asbes-
tos roof. There is a large L-shaped
living room, 2 double bedrooms
with built-in wardrobes, kitchen,
Pantry, genres kitchen, bath-
reom with fiilation, shower, solar
heating installation, garage and
2 servants’ rooms. The grounds
of about % acre are heavily
wooded with Mahog. and Flam-
boyant trees, lawns, and stone
flagged terrace are in secluded
Walled garden. Attractive location
close to town,

N BUNGALOW, BLUE
WA’ Recently built home of
good sound construetion, floor
level well raised off the ground,
large living room, 3 good airy
bedrooms all with built in sward-
robes, tiled bathroom and shower
pleasant and sizeable modern
kitchen, good garage and
Servants’ quarters. Paved drive-
way and walled garden on corner
Site. This property has our
recommendation and is a home
most people would be pleased to
own.

MODERN. HOME, ST. PETER—
A luxuriously appointed residerice
with four bedrooms, 3 tiled bath-
rooms with hot and cold water,
butler’s pantry, kitchen, store-
rooms, 2 garages. The grounds are
expertly laid out with a pro-
fusion of flowering shrubs, Own
right of way to sea,

LA CASITA, Rockley New Road
—oompast modern stone mii tine
we d with central liv:
sont, aitbee or bedroom, ane
main bedroom ek ae
bedroom or

peneoos wth aes sates ee ae

verandah, iptchen ah garage. T
grounds are about 1 acre well nia
out with. lawns, Fie nore of
scrubs, flower beds, table gar-
den and young frutt » Easy to
run with minimum = of domestic
help and very suitable for retired
people.

ABERGELDEE, Maxwell Road—
Very .soundly constructed stone
,bungalow erected in 1937 when
‘building material and workman-
ship were of a higher standard
Ahan is usually obtained today.
This property has a bef rece,

good hosreane, 2 A
llery runs on 3 sides and
complete privacy is obtained.
There is a two car garage and
ira atta tu an Sed

home je for
sonable figure

BENSAM — Sheringham Gar-
dens, Maxwells — Pleasantly situ-
ated modern stone built i aged
with about % acre and right of
way to the sea, The building is
conveniently planned with a large
living room, having access to a
covered front verandah; breakfast
kitchen and 3 bedrooms
with washbasins, The detached
garage is of good size and has
servants’ quarters adjoining.
Situated in a well developed semi-
private coastal residential area
and possesses many commend-
able features. Full main services.
A safe investment.

CASABLANCA, Maxwells Coast
-- An outstanding property em-
bodying the finest pre-war work-
manship. Well designed for easy
running with 2 reception rooms,
4 bedrooms, verandah, kitchen,
pantry, . garage, storerocoms, etc.
The land ts approximately 2 acres
with flower and vegetable gar-
dens, productive orchard and Coco-
nut grove One acre walled
garden may be sold separately as
a building site

Plantaticns Building
Phone 4640

_


Da re oe el | << 2 ~ ee * 7
























































a ~ , , . ne
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER ‘t6, 1952 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE FIFTEEN
. . ’ . e e ‘ ALLS ELE LLL errr ry ¢
CHURCH SERVIECS Listening Hours : ; | $
ST. LRONARD'S. cHUAC Company vagSUBPAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1952 % ADVOCATE STATIONERY :
a ectingy 7 pan. Salvation }j Was, 25.50M s,
8 a.m. Cheral Eucharist, 9 Meet } %
Eucharist and ‘Address. i a “ "Siatine.& Captain I. Staine. 4.00 p.m. The News. 5.15 p.m. United . %
Sermon. 3 p.m. Sunday Schoo! p.m. DIAMOND CORNER Nations General Assembly 430 p : ow’ % FOR THE BEST be roar ~
Bvensens & Sermon ia ci! a.m, Holiness Meeting; 3 p.m Sunday Halt Hour 500 pm Tehaiko. j } %
. PAUL'S ‘ompa: Meeti: , “ sky, 5 m_ Eduea ol
7.20 a.m. ‘HintyiCemmniasion, 9.90 a.m. Meutnat ing; 7 p.m. Salvation 6.00—7.15 Pam. Ts Name 49.91M “ ote sO tO AAA LE SOCIALE CSA AAA LIEN AA LDALAD
Solemn Mass & Sermon. 3 p.m. Sunday | Lieutenant C. Hinds, ——— wis a endl can he p yeu o success : 5 ———
Sehoo! & Children’s Service. 7 p.m. NEW TESTAMENT CHURCH OF GoD lei lis] { ot oe m From The Bible, 619 p m DO YOU REALISE THE NEED FOR ! MORE
‘olemn Evensong, rmon & Procession. 16th No ¢ ar nelis' agazine. 645 pm Progratn
Drescher’ Cann aries Announcing anew Gospel Broadcast ne Parade and Interlude. °7 00 pm | Po: through personal postal tuition QUALIFICATION ?
N SERVICES “Wor of Life” to . jews 710 pm. Home News
ROFBUCK: 11 a.m. Moming Service, Redifusion every Monday nicht at S taker’ 'Coaaa i \uhic,, Hariett Whit- Britain "7115 pm. Caribbean Voices. | ER A A FC RI |} or ARE YOU INTERESTED IN MAKING MORE MONEY?
preacher: Rev, E. E. New. 7_p.m. Eve. O'clock. Be sure ta ileten in Everdene, Franklyn D,R.. Philip, 1, 71049 Pam. - +s) SE aS ay Sevhis Seunctn Extalich Colman They Owe wheteaucecur te IF SO, ENROL NOW FOR ONE OF THESE COURSES.



ning Service, preacher: Rev. E. E. New. RIVER ROAD: 10 a.m. S Send" Micbaaos Aa mes
GRACE Hitt: 11 s.m, Morning Sem. Mam Divine Botin, va ay Seep: Revidees, Sunshine R.. Lady Steadfast, 7.45 pm Sunday Service 813 pm |

Raadalphe, Personal Postal Tuition—The Bennett College way. Now -you as Draughts-
vice, preacher: Mr. F. Deaney 7 p.m. selistic Setvice. Rev. L. R. Summers, M.. Rewecca x" Lewis Rainbow Radio Newsreel. 8 30 pm Tehaikovsk); |

Sanitary Inspector Course




























































































DANIEL, Captain, On Sale at all Drug Stores

are offered the'same chance to qualify for a fine career, higher manship Building and Genera! cultur.
Evening Service, her: S. Minister { 845 pm Why I Relieve. 900 pm | ’ 3e: 1 Agri e
Weekes ' preecher: Mr DANI wires ine, ‘anda indies amoter BA ‘Moneka, Jenkins BBC” Symphony ‘Gras. 19 00 oma pay"and social standing. Design Course. Course.
FULNECK: 11 Morni 4 ll am. Divi * B. Radar. e News 10610 pm _ From Eui- ¥
7 p.m. Evening Serv: ce, ae gelistic Service. Rev Ma B. » prett = S.S. Sundial, ‘esa toms from Montreal ohne toe ea er 2048) ete —, vei — — oe ee rae =~ ie By Reearabee Pray
FP. G. Downes. Minister in Charge. under Captain D. Cook. Consigned to" Music M 7 ' Auditing Architecture mane Salesmanship. |
MONTGOMERY: 7 p.m_ Evening Ser- ECKSTEiN: 10 a.m. Sunday School: Plantations Lid. MONDAY. NOV. 17 anges ' purmeeee Repairman’s
vige, ,preschen: Mr. A. —~ Pea Em. Diving Seevige: 7 Dm. Even: Sen Rainbow. M 35 tons from Trini. “°°? — *% »m =e comma Big Eine use Engineering Petroleum Technology
. m fen = . he ¢ eT ee ee eee »
yiDUNSCOMBE: 7 p.m. ing Ser- gelistic - Service haha R. Hi. Walkes, dad under der Captain” in G. Marks. Consigned 4.00 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m, The Artimetic §=— Salle Grose Veet We aati Installation and one
SHOP HILL: a Bm. sér COX . Divine ‘Service; Yacht 7 from "Las Dally Service, 4.15 p.m. Youth Hostels, Reonomiee Che School Certificate Course
viee; preacher: 3 pm. Sunday she, 7 pm. Evan- Palmas under Captain W. Pye m Las 4.45 p.m. Linger Awhile, 5.00 p.m. Lis- Modern Business Civil Engines ring ‘aginoering hs gaog 9 : , 3
pn Y suhvitan” Service. Rev. E, W. Weekes, DEPARTURES teners’ Choice. Methods Clerk of Wor xs Road Making General Electrical Engin- Accountancy.
Sunday. " omben ; in pares. . , i‘ Sch. Mary E, Caroline for Grenada. 6.00 — 7.45 p.m. SLM 40.71 M ‘i | soning. S Civil Service Entrance {H
11 am. Rev. K. E. Towers, BA oe School; eo am y AL. services, “Ope 600 p.m Welsh Diary, 6:15 p.m eo Certificate of Ed- Contec: ) |
3 pm _ Special Musical Programme by with Preacher Rev. J. B. Seawell Marching & Waltzing, 6.45 p.m. Sport ucation, Police Promotion Course. {
scholars and Pageant entitied “The el 7 pm. Revival gives Pound Up & Programme Parade, 7.00 . Telecommunications Wri ; ;
Most Import Things”; 7 pm. Rev. K. : Rev..L..R. Summers ARRIVALS BY BWIA. p.m, The News, 7.10 p.m. Home News Languages Enginesring Drawings Television | rite fer full particulars if cov rse is not mentioned
E. Towers, B.A., B.D. THE ST JAMES NATIONAL BAPTIST N THURSD From Britain, 7.15 p.m. Books to (Rea! Forestry Textiles | Write to the:
$y, Gil pm. Pageant by Sunday ma am, -ntiss and sermon, 7 Pym From British Guiana: ae zens Talk caer dle ie Poles Senjectâ„¢ Sad eee ae ene renereans } Cc ibbe E d ti |
GULL MEMORIAL: 11 am. Mr. D. services will be the Hey, SD Geaey Connelly Micha coeemal, Stephen 743 — 1090 pm ALM a _Short Story Writing Mechanica! Capineariog _sortenag brachee aribbean Cducationa POST COUPON TO P.O.
Roach; 7 pm Rev F. Lawrence. L-Th; Minister in Charge. Hunte, Louie Hunte, Patricia Hunte, _7,49 p:m. B.B.C. Singers, 8.15 p.m TO THE BENNETT COLLEGE, (Cepe. 158), SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND, pec a i psoas ice 2
WHITEHALL ; 9.30 a.m. Mr. G, Har- 5 pam: Monday; Wednesday; Friday; Helen’ Hunte, Allan’ Hunte. Frances Radio Newsreel, 20 p.m. Tehaikoysky — SCHOOL CenTinicATE nstitute Please send Free Book
per; 7. pm Mr G_ Perkins. training for the youths ‘of the Barbados Flower, Merry] Hutchinson Alvin 9-08 p.m. The Banning of the Mikado Please send me free your prospectus on GENERAL CERTIFICATE ase send me e BOOK.
BANK HALL; 9.30 a.m. Mr. G. McCal- Youth Movement this will be conducted Abrams, William Whyte, Eveltn Whyte, 9:35 p.m. The Casino Orchestra, 10.0 1 OF EOUCA P.O, Box, 307, v.0.8., Meee Rae ee ree
ister; 7 pm Mr J.T. Oxley. by» the Bruce-Clarke (Assistant Gregory Whyte, Cheryl Whyte, Joba Pe. The News, 10.10 p.m, From Th suByjBCT = seilihdptiltnansiencsnil ‘chia: eo oe ae She )
LETOWN : 8.30 a.m. Rev. G, Mar- bier and Mrs. Olga Brow. Browne. Dettmer, Agnes Jardin, Mervyn Ray. Editorials, 10.15 p.m. Science Review i EXAMS PORES os os i be bane Foe
shall; 7 pm Mr W_ St. Hil. ST NICHOLAS EPISCOPAL mond-Barker Doris Chapman, John, 10.50 p.m. Tip Top Tunes NAMBL a Agents for: ee d
BETHEL METHODIST CIRCUIT “ORTHODOX WELCHES ROAD Bradshaw, Reginald le. | Francis | TOORY a DISTITUTE OF ENG. euiaentok C <
Ba Sepeeve: Hoener tity tis: ail S28 Seite ind Sermon Breaches, \rthur-Wong, Doris Chee, Emily Gorins. | ae _ ees I Sore sige prospective om TUT Interest
ETH: : mm, . ws ‘ . coness Barrow, i + wants sublet. J mai wheoee
7 pm Mr V_ Pilgrim. charge, 7 p.m, Evensong i esedes a BY B.W.LA. t St Gettin U a= - aay F tele 2% Vos cera. ania me 0)|)0)0)”™”C«d:”*~«‘“‘é«éR EE, LODO FAR og ck ess cece cece neees
DALKEITH : 11 am. Mr. L. Mayers) preacher Rev. C. A. Ishmael; Sunday FRIDAY / ee a ee eee exe’ ;
1 Ae. Rev. T. J. Furley (Holy Com. oe. ei ie Fatronal Festival of the Prom. Trinidad: inde ;
union). ‘hure: e; = . m: X
: BELMONT: 11 a.m. Mr. C. Forde: ding inltea. and well- wives ete oar pl <, Bauinded, ut thomen W. A Nights a = — “ cheneesininbiins
ivian. ston, ompson, J. Forbes-Watson, R. ¥
STH. : 9 a m> Rev, F. Vivi= p.m. Tuesday Eventng Prayers and Qegpmbre, E. Ball, I. Ball, M. Ball. C 2 <§ Ca I weeds
“ERC ViDENCE: i sme Mr J. Clarke; | Cla the subject ewan be Ent ; ee up nights, ned ‘0 INDIGESTION hop r 9 for s*
: . J . » “ 0}
Exton en Battemnars, Sources” iBtee"H DEPAREURES BY pai. ait ne" Gage of pine Br We have Just opened a LOVELY SELECTION of
: a.m. ° : »
Broome, B.A.; 7 p m. Mr. G. Bascombe. Saint Pau will be ‘in, tue to ti For Trinidad: a ness and loss’ of manly vigour. ate ISTMAS CARDS
EBENEZER GIRCUIT Cor F. Battistin), 1. Battistini, A. Battis-| (used by « disease of the Prost (« -
3 Bi: sae Hews So WwW. Cc. erie cr ‘CHURCH, oe a Bh we Demonttirun, J, De- iden eee important sex glank 4
Crosse, -m. . ° . 5 looper, . » - . overcome t t bl
BEULAH: 11 a.m. Mr. N. Daniel, 7 K.P HANSEN” Pastor chetti, R’ Boschett,’ J. Bermuder, t.| 1 2 hours and quickly restore vise J INAS TN. in Boxes... ...and Loose... . os pas PAPER
> PAYNES BAY! 050 aan, Mr. D. Weld; Worship’ at 10a tine Syarecytorning Smith. McD. Rivers title dissavery’ called "Rassea Brand rs en ASTIC SERVIETTE BRINGS.
Pr. eid; Wors : b 7 2
7 pm Rev GM: Marshall, vice at eon Evangelistic Ser DEPARTURES BY B.W.LA. qatter how lckigtyow paves autleres \ Stomach | oun a BRUSH STAND...... etc. ete...
. . s vou DY To INDIGESTION
Lawrence; 7 pm.) Mr ae ‘McClean. People’s. Union ot ¥.20' Baptist Towns For British Osan rien reinvigorate your” Front us Nbstahant i e ' POTTER & MOORE GIFT SETS
SELAH: 9.30 a.m. Rev. G. Marshall, Wednesday night at 7.30 Praise and ..l: Reynolds, M. Bayle and wake you feel 10 to. 2 Try just ONE DOSE YARDLEY GIFT SETS...
MEE THESDA : 9.30 am. Mr. G. M. Prayer Meeting. ; meaeee, 8. Moore, A. Neda Writes, E. yeuneer oF money back Sau ef MACLEAN BRAND GIFT BOXES OF CHOCOLATES.
E a M. vor yO! chemis' The STOMACH WDER This
SHREWSBURY: 11 a.m. Mr, G,. Chrietion technicolor oes 3, P<: Fernandes, >. beeeu Sete R suarantes Grotects you. PO ! GOYA GIFT CRACKERS. = BOXES
eae, p.m - a Hovsers es con will be shown at the Egolf Bap- Zenon, A. Johason, ‘J. Camacho. E. eae OU GR a ee 3Y Swbrnes ARLY at
ICES: a.m, Vv ‘ ‘ si urch, ly. . Stomach Pains. YOU GET , i £ a
Crosse, 7 pm a E. Brathwaite. You are cordially invited to attend Select your Chocolates from Koaeen Heartburn, Nauses
Schools at 3 p.m. this friendly ch the following: ee Acidity d 66 9@?
(2) Evangelistic Campaign Services SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST CHURCH CAGE. MAGIC pobaen cn sig ;
during the week at Shrewsbury King Street, November 16, Pastor YESTE, ’ BLACK MAGIC
THE SALVATION ARMY F. 8 t of Caribbean RDAY’S POT-OF-GOLD
Sir eeshda etek iit Geeaeen ee mt Yall, Peo Ww Weith- , | CHERRIES in L. M. B. MEYERS & CO, LTD sae Foie’ mr P PHARMACY
11 am, Holiness Meeting; 3 p.m. ers, : WE POR MARASCHINO = a aera BROAD STREET, and HASTINGS (ALPHA )
Programme rendered by ‘Youns. People; Ag mt Subject: win Ealjan Come ATHER RE T WELCOME co *% ° P.O, Box 171, Bridgetown.
pm. Salvation. Meeting. tetisiminibiinnns-. HAPPINESS mi
paint, Malor, & Mrs. W. Morris, accom- FFs Chiweeh of Christ, Setemtist,, eee. 1m Riese cor = FRY’S HAZEL NUT | .
a B Sh fw eae Bridgetown, Upper Bay Street. date: 1.36 ins. FRY’S PEPPERMINT
am, Holiness Meeting; p.m, Sundays 21 2\m. and 7 p.m. : LUXURY | il
poeaeer Meeting; 7 p.m. Salvation Wednesdays: ® p.m. A. Service which Seereewe: 72.5 °F Also |
Snr. Gaptati W. Bishop re ee ar Saas pes eee ee YARDLEY'S | F ee
w IGTON STREET rf NOVEMBER 16, 1952 a (9 am.) 29.968 4711 COLOGNE BETS |
11 am. Holiness Meeting; 3 p.m. 8i of uote seeeta MORTALS F f : TTS |
Company Meeting; 7 p.m, Salvation ANI) IMMORTALS. - QT am.) 29.955 XMAS CARDS b f
Senate Geleew Tae t Cormthians is: 63 and Select these early before
Snr. Major T. Gibbs, This corruptible must put on incorrup- Sunrise; 5.68 a.m. Many Other XMAS GIFTS
ali iby ee ae: ont aoe this mortal must put on im- Sunset: 5.33 pa. Bg { “as
nm p.m. mo! vy : fF |
Company Meeting; 7 p.m. Salvation The following Citations are included in Moon: Last-Quarter. Novem- (. CARLTON BROWNE | it s too late.
Meeting. the Lesson-Sermon: The Bible: The Spirit ber 9
Snr. Captain §. Worrell itself Deareth witness with our spirit, | Lighting: 6.00 pm. Wholesale & Retail ae
w ce iren h . * ~
1a aie, Botthnes ” Mental 4 Sam Ree, 6) sak kee p: 2.40 am, 2.33 p.m, Druggist A SUGGESTION... o
Company Meeting; 7 p.m. Salvation af petesion ated. Meat with a to the, | Low Tide: 8.42 a.m., 9.27 p.m. 2813 Dial :-: 136 Roebuck St. Is everything when it comes to buying gifts.
Lieutenant N. Etienne. Man’ n's genuine selfhood is recognizable : The list given below should suggest many
11 am. Holiness Meeting; 3 p.m. aiid wen “ww. ee suitable items : SHELLED ALMONDS
Hair Brushes — Toilet Sets
PART ONE ORDERS Fountain Pens _ Perfumes & Cologne lb
ai By Pipes — Cigars — Cigarettes bi
jor C, E. P. WEATHERHEAD, ; i
"a eet ‘na Dolls — Toilet —
rl ios Regiment.
Iss . 42 f i : i |
ee 310 14 Nov. 62. An Inspection of Our Stock will suggest WALLNU S lb.
COMMAND—Resumption any vr Thines
Captain nS. F. L. Johnson resumes command of ““A" Coy, wet 6 Nov: $2. bad 7 <+-t re Bb — . 2 En)
jum)
Captain A, Gittens assumes command of H.Q, Coy. vice Lt. E. R, Goddard wa Come in at Your Convenience PERKINS “a CO LTD.
2. PARADES—Training e ‘oe -<