Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text


Renee

WHAT'S ON TODAY
Films for Children, B.C

Art Exhibition at the Museum 10,00 a

9.00 a

B.T.C. Races, Garrison Savannah 1.30 p

‘Cricket at ¥.M.P.C. 1.30 p.n

For the cause that lacks assistance,
inst the



t the future in the distance,
@ the good that 5 can do.

ESTABLISHED 1895



U. K. INDUSTRIA

Look Forward To

1

Work In Barbados |

SEAWELL, Nov. 7th :—The five-man mission of Brit-

ish Industrialists who are visiting the British Caribbean

Colonies of British Guiana

bados “to advise on future industrialisation” arrived at!
Seawell this morning by B.W.1LA. from Trinidad where |

they spent about 12 days.





C d Shi {Lincoln Steel, leader of the Mis- |

‘ound

By Gale

LONDON, Nov. 7
Qne of the -worst gales to hit
many parts of Britain for several |
years blew an 8,723-ton Cunard
liner ashore in the River Thames.
stood by to make their sec-~
attempt to pull her off the
mud bank.

She had discharge@ passengers
at Southampton and was on the
‘way to th land Dock, Lon-
don. Ano ship, the 19,930-ton
“Scytha” was unable to leave
Southampton for Canada on
schedule, and waited until the
winds died down.

A US. Air Force B50 Super-
fortress cras! during a gale
with 11 men aboard near Great
Dunmow, England. Seven bodies
were recovered and four miss-
ing. The cause of the crash was
not kn . ‘Winds fanned the
blazi wreckage for hours.

During the gusts of wind that
touched 64 M.P.H., trees were
blown down in London streets
during the night. At Shawbury,
Shropshire, a wind of 94 M.P.H.
was recorded,

Tracks Blocked

Railroad services from London
to the Midlands and Northern
England and Scotland were tem-
porarily disrupted by winds hav-
ing blocked the frack with piles
of rubbish. The overnight boat
from .Heysam, England to Belfast
was held up. -for-nours,

The 2,869-ton Finnish ship
“Mylykoski” was adrift from her
moorings at Swansombe in the
Thames and was secured by a tug
to a mew anchorage at Long
Beach. -Finemen throughout
Southern England were kept busy
most of the night answering calls

fanned

0 pus out fires by winds

to

sued houses:

were blown down into houses.
At “Merry Boys” pub at Tun-

bridge Wells, Kent, a man was

trapped two hours under a fallen

chimney stack. He was given

morphia while firemen cut him
free from the wreck.—U.P.

Run Agr

|



Groves Station
Impresses B.G.
SPA Chairman

SEAWELL, Nov. 7.—Mr. R. R.

Follett-Smith, Chairman of the
British Guiana Sugar Producers
Association, told the Advocate
today shortly before returning

‘home by BWIA that he was im-
pressed with the situation at
Groves Agricultural Station for
breeding purposes as well as with
the big collection of varieties of
sugar cane there. |

Mr. Follett-Smith came to Bar-'
bados to attend a meeting of the
Advisory Committee of the BWI
Central Sugar Cane Breeding
Station which was held under the
chairmanship of the Director of
Agriculture, in addition to an-
other meeting of the BWI Sugar
Cane _ Investigation Committee
held under the Chairmanship of
Sir John Saint. ’

He said that he was very me
terested to see the recent work
on “selfing’’ canes by Mr. G. C.
Stevenson, cyto-Geneticist of the
Central Sugar Cane Breeding
Station,

“This sort of work is going to
be vety useful to sugar people all
over the West Indies” he said,
and added that it was a long
range type of problem from
which one could not expect to get
results right away but he hoped
there would be adequate errene-
ments to make sure that e
scheme would be continued here.

Schemes of that sort were gen-
erally started and then faded out,
probably due to lack of funds.
But the present scheme was one,
which should go on and perma-|
nent arrangements should be.
made to make sure that they did’
not have to stop in the middle of
the scheme.

Mr. Follett-Smith who was a
guest at the Ocean View Hotel
said that he had a pleasant though |
short stay in’ Barbados and again
enjoyed the island’s sea-bathing.

Mr. Nehru Greets
Marshal Stalin

BOMBAY, Nov. 7,

Indian Premier Jawaharlal
Nehru told Soviet Premier Josef
Stalin Friday he hoped the “happy
co-operation of our two countries
will always be exerted in the in-
terest of peace and stability.”

Mr. Nehru sent greetings to
Marshal Stalin on the occasion
of the 35th anniversary of the
Bolshevik Revolution.—U.P.

2,660 FRENCH TROOPS
LEAVE FOR INDO-CHINA

MARSEILLES, Nov. 7.
The French liner “Pasteur”
left here Friday with 2,660 sol-
diers and officers
to-join the French Expeditionary
Corps in Indo China. —U.P.







; seven

on their way}

, Trinidad, Jamaica and Bar-

Comprising the Mission are Mr.

sion; Lt. Col H. E, Peiree, O.B.E.,
J.P., Mr, W. W. S. Robertson
O.BR.; Mr. Le Tose, wc; and
Mr. G. H. Spencer, They are!
accompanied by Mr. M. A, Willis,
a Principal from the Colonial
Office who is acting as Secretary

to the Mission. j

}
met at the airport)
J. Con-'

They were

by Sir John Saint, Col,

nell, Mr. D. G, Leacock, Hon.
F, C. Hutson, and Mr. M. E. Cox,
members of t he Committee

appointed by
Governor to prepare a programme

of visits and interviews, and Mr.|
R. N. Jack, Acting Labour Com-!
missioner, who is acting as Sec-|
and |

retary to the Committee,
Liaison Officer io the Mission.

At the airport shortly after
their arrival which was delayed
by about two hours, the Mission
was shown the programme which
had been arranged for them.
They afterward left for the
Marine Hotel. |

The Mission flew over from’
the United Kingdom on the 17th
October, arriving at British;
Guiana on the 19th of the same}
month. There, they spent a week
before flying over to Trinidad
where they spent the past twelve:
days.

Saw Nearly All

Mr, Steel, the leader told the}
Advocats shortly after their!
arrival that by splitting into
groups, the Mission had managed
to see practically every industrial
undertaking of any size in British
Guiana, and some fifty or more
factories

in Trinidad, In ad-
dition they met official and un-
official members of the Legis-
lature, and leading representa-

tives in trade, industry and com-
merce.
They also had the opportunity

of having discussions with a large
number of such as |
Shipping Association, Sugar Man-

ufacturers Association and so on.
In this way they managed to get
a general view of the industrial

conditions in the two colonies
they had already visited, and
they are hoping to follow the

same pattern in Barbados.

Mr, Steel said that “a very full
programme has been arranged,
and the Mission is looking for-
ward with great interest to the
work they will be doing here.

The Mission will report its
findings to the several Govern-
ments concerned, and to the;
Secretary of State for the Colo-
nies,

Petrol Blast
Victims Di
ictims Die
MONZA, Italy, Nov. 7
Four of 11 injured persons in
yesterday's explosion of 50,000
gallons of gasoline at a store plant

here died in hospital during the
hight. Two of the dead were



jfatally burned while Saal

gasoline from a storage tank to
their tanker truck preparatory to}
transport. Two others who died
of extensive burns were workmen
at the plant.
injured were still in a
serious condition.—U,P.



His Excellency the |

|
See Programme |







ST. LEONARD'S
CHURCH

PATRONAL FESTIVAL
SERVICES
Saturday, November, 8th.
7.30 a.m. Matins & Holy
Communion.
5 p.m. Evening Prayer.

U.S. Labour
Leaders Are
Apprehensive

WASHINGTON, Nov. 7.
Labour leaders were appre-
hensive about the reception they



‘DHhavbadvo

wrongs that need resistance,

FIRST CONFEHENCE



THE MEMBERS of the U.K. Industrial Mission at Seawell Airport pesterday where they were met
by a Committee headed by Sir John Saint. Their first conference was the discussion of their itinerary.



SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1952

ISTS



Republicans Will |
Discuss Plans

WASHINGTON, Nov. 7.

IT WAS LEARNED that President-Elect General
Eisenhower is planning to meet with Republican leaders
of Congress about December 1 to discuss the Republican
legislative programme,

Representative Joseph W. Martin, Junior, of Massa-
chusetts, the Republican who is slated to be Speaker of
the House in the next Congress, said he understood Mr.
Eisenhower wants to talk over legislative problems with
Congressional leaders in advance of the new session, start-
ing January 3.



Republicans won a_ hairline

will get at the White House after Mr S ‘ majority in both the House and
a meee és ay ae eet e tevenson Ran nowhig: pestis presi:

s w tenan : ’
Mr. Dwight Eisenhower, The : dency with the biggest vote ever
“Big Three” of Labour—A.F.L.. ot ow nea t given a Presidential candidate
re. mae Se United Mine Ss a Pa history of the United
workers—joined hands for the| SPRINGFIELD, Ill, Nov. 7 oA RMN sun
— time in this campaign to} Governor Adlai E. Steyenson’s} “fir. jower’s” victory was
tae ae x Proved toi campaign headquarters here was/not reflected in the majorities
Republican e ae bs artes th the/deluged with almost as many }that the Republicans won in Con-
itical pret ip i ur’s pol-/telegrams and letters as he might gress. The Senate will consist

Well ion th to a new low.|have received had he won the] or 4g Republicans, 37 Demo-
howe ee e Be Mr. Eisen- | Presidential election. erats and one Independent. The
his vi tag eta oh gg for! Miss Carole Evans, chief see indicated House line up is 221
Peaeeret nion officials nev- retary supervising four girls | Re ublicans 212 Democrats one
h se expressed the cautious | opening mail said the messages! 7 i anit ,
Soeroonn’ eink eke nat House! were “wonderful”. She said, *"@epencent,

y crosse e to ven~ .
: : 7 f imost of them urged Mr. Steven
Sear datirey, Seas = sae son to stay in national politics Personal Triumph
ye ofes . pral im * “ama ‘ ‘ ‘ :

not to be too worried ia indi- and many praised him “for cam-/ Mr. Martin said that the big

cated their belief that Mr, Eisen-
hower will not be an “anti-
labour president,

As AFL President Mr, William
Green, advised President-Elect—
“We have full and complete

confidence that you will do your

of fair and just

Americans in all walks of life.”
While hopeful about Mr. Eis-

enhower,

Senator Robert
pretty well dominate Congress,
Labour leaders have been bitter

opponents of Senator Taft as
co-originator of the Taft-Hartley
law in 1947,

_ These sources said they had
given up any hope of repealing
the Taft-Hartley and are fear-
ful now that attempts will be
made to push through even more
restrictive labour legislation.

Six of the other] They foresaw efforts to put la-

bour unions
laws.—U.P.

under anti-trust



U.S. And France Will
Discuss World Situation

UNITED NATIONS, Nov. 7

United States Secretary of State, Dean Acheson, and
French Foreign Minister, Robert Schuman, will meet at

11.00 a.m. on Saturday for
world situation. The Acheso

an exchange of views on the
n-Schuman conference will be

held at Waldorf Astoria Hotel in New York where Acheson

is staying.

Informed diplomats said the
questions of Tunisia and Morocco}
will be high on the agenda of the!
conference with Schuman ex-
pected to seek clarification’ from|
Acheson on how the United States
plans to act when the two con-
troversial issues come up before
the main political committee of
the United Nations General As-
sembly.

French sources said Schuman

would not necessarily attempt to
“change” Acheson's views on the
question, The United States has
taken the position that the North
African situation should be de-
bated here despite France’s stand.
They said Schuman would try
to give Acheson a roundup of the
French government's and parlia-
mentary views onthe matter.
{| Schuman is expected to be ad-
| vised during the talks by French
j ambassador to the United States
Henri Bonnet and French chief
lof United Nations delegation
Henri Hoppenot. In addition to
North Africa, the two ministers
are expected to discuss other
aspects of the world situation,
such as Korea and problems of
the North Atlantic Treaty Or-
ganization.

It is understood Acheson also
would seek to assure Schuman
| that the election of Dwight Eisen-



hower to the Presidency of the
United States would not deprive
‘American foreign policy of its

continuity between now
Eisenhower’s inauguration,

Schuman spent the afternoon
on Friday working on the policy
and preparing a speech he will
deliver before the plenary session
of the General Assembly on Mon-
day. In that speech diplomats
said Schuman would outline
France’s views on African prob-
lems, Schuman may see the Brit-
ish Foreign Secretary Anthony
Eden in private early next week,

UP.

and



_ Missionaries

Murdered

CHICAGO, Nov. 7
The Evangelical Allianve Mis-«
sion on Friday said that the State

; Department had notified it of the
death of two Mid-Western Mis-





would still talk the same.
both CIO and AFL campaigned

sources expressec| concern that Evans said Mr.
A. Taft will) “anything but downcast.”



paigning the .way he thought he| pice
should”,

Presidential
to be sticking by the passage he
once
fireside
be

utmost to carry out your plan) down and revile me and with
treatment to; me

tional Golf Club.

nhower majority showed his
personal popularity. He — said:
“Personally I don’t think we
iwould have won if Mr, Eisen-
|hower had not headed the ticket.
1 question whether any other Re-
publican could have won.

Mr. Eisenhower’s conference
I) with Congressional leaders appar-~
ently will take place after he has
a” White House “unity” meeting
Miss | with President ‘Truman.

And the defeated Democratic |

candidate seemed

into the television
“and if it should}
you cast me

/wrote
chat
the case that
the Democratic party,
His aides said he felt “that he
honestly”.
Stevenson was
The President Elect, now on ten
Be days vacation at Augusta,
Georgia announced yesterday that






he accepted Mr. Truman’s invita-

POCKET CARTOON tion to call at the White rye
TE Mr. Eisenhower suggested tha

by OSBERT LANGASTER the meeting be held during the

week of November 17.

The
parently has been arranged so
talk

— ee

legislative conference ap-!
that Mr. Eisenhower can
over with Congressional lead-
ers such major legislative pro-
blems as possible tax reduction, |
curtailment of Government spend-
ing, continuation of price and
wage controls, Taft-Hartley Act
amendments and foreign aid.

Mr. Eisenhower
trouble
through

(U.P.)

to have any serious
getting his programme

Senator Robert A. Taft said he
did not expect
the

Senate.

“Now when l was a very little
boy old men would say that
once upon a time there wasa
magic fluid-——’”

oe ieiadlinnihe intially: Ack
Mr. Eisenhower
Playing Golf
AUGUSTA, Georgia Nov. 7.
Warmed up, after a long lay-
off, President-Elect, Eisenhower

planned a serious assault today
on the links of the Augusta Na-



Shipment



SEAWELL, Nov. 7th :
will not be any future s

the Advocate today.

Mr. Kinch who is a
Vice Presiden, of the Barbados
Chamber of Confnerce arrived

,| here yesterday by B.W.LA. from
Before he can get out on the! Trinidad where he paid a visit

course however, Mr. Eisenhower}, er atte
must spend several hours at one eo 4 on Mn ioolaies Cone
f

of the first chores to face th€jbers of Commerce in British
newly elected chief executive—\ Guiana.

answer some of the thousands of

congratulatory messages that! After attending the Congress in
have inundated him since elec-'B.G., Mr. Kinch visited the
tion night. Mahaicony-Abary Rice Scheme
For at least one hole yesterday' and said that the rice industry
Mr. Eisenhower’ also had the| had been extended under the

company of more than 30 new supervision of the B.G. Rice Mar

| sionaries in the Netherlands New| Photographers. For the sake of keting Board,
Guinea. the pictures, Mr. Eisenhower Dea vanes 0 1 Stren: eared
They said “another source” re~| hit a succession of almost flaw-| |.) - ae ie deine a oP that ie
ported. that Walter Erikson. 35,| less sand blasting shots from a woul ai ee eae eee whres
and Edward Tripp, were mur-|'@p _putted repeatedly and parts of it cave already beer
dered by atives. — somewhat inaccurately and bang- ested he said 5 oe
The announcement said the|@4 outa. series of . whistling ae
State Department notified the; drives. Some of these long shot Mr. Kingh who stayed on in
Mission only that the bodies of} were in the neighbourhood of; British Guiana for one week ta
the two m were found nean| 230 yards or better. Mr, Eisen-|shoot wild pigeons, afterwards
Aisat in the rn part of Neth-|hower hoped for more seclusi went on to Trinidad to visit his
erlands New Guinea October | today Company’s head office in Port-of-
23.—U.P. ' U.P Spain

ee

Advocate



-| Expected From B.G.

British Guiana is expected shortly and from then on there

Assistant Manager of Messrs. T. Geddes Grant Ltd., told

Junior





"S WEATHER REPO
@edrington: Nu

1 ith to date: 1.00 ins
, a5 °F
P
95 =e? 2, «3 pm

x



To









Sunrisef * $4 an :

Sunset ae gn, tS

Moon: Last artery vernber 9.
Lighting: 6.00 p.m

High Tide: 8.35 a.m, 7.58 p.m
bow Tide: 1.34 am. 1.47 p.m



PRICE:

ARRIVE

U.N. F orces Smash |

FIVE CENTS

«



Mau Mau





Onion

° LONDON, Nov 7.
~ “The t ble poison’’ of Mau
inmnese ac Mau “teg®priem runs deeply
throughout the Kikuyu tribe in
1 i wi Kenya and it may be months
SEOUL, Nov, 7. before law and order is restored,

| UNITED NATIONS FORCES smashed Chinese Com-]Colonial Seeretary Oliver Lyttel-

munist attack between Triangle Hill and Sniper Ridge] ton said today.

nat ind ‘
early today in the first snowstorm of the season, Chinese}, onions ai ths pa ara =
Reds swarmed through the rocky valleys separating the | the Colony, Mi luyttaiton. sala:
two bitterly contested heights on the West Central Front|*Across the page, @f Kenya’s
at 3.40 a.m. (1.40 p.m. E.S.T. Thursday). histury has fallen thei. shadow

- - —~—- Shattering Allied artillery and | of witchcraft, SaVGRery ane
- |mortar bombardment forceci the|crime — im short Mos Manu,’
W lf \W k | Reds to retreat an hour later.|Mr. Lyttetton insisted \at under
e are or The Reds apparently are trying}|*!ith Administration there has

to move.into position for a mew] een progress on all fronts | in

Kenya since the war.
The picture which is sometimes

about
The

attack om Sniper Ridge
one mile east of Triangle.

On Sugar

push came at almost the same[painted of frustrated Africans
states spot where the Reds lost an esti-}5eing kept down from natural
mated 200 dead and wounded ir} idvance by grasping Europeans
SUAWRLL, Nov. 1 Side Boma e eeerTS TNE MEN ee it cleus Ot Jane tee
SE LLL, i s one t clear that Mau Mau
Ibberson, Social Welfare Ad- United Nations heavy guns not a child of economic Panes
viser to the Comptroller for]Jalso broke up that attack, I The t whie
ure The only point at which
Development and Welfare, left To the west 300 Chinese hit anf yay May impinges on the
today by BWIA for British Gui- advanced Allied position betwee | poonomies that “it promoters
ana on a routine visit. She ex-|"“Old Baldy” and “T Bone’ hills nake money out of it. A stib<
seo A ore to Barbados on} just before midnight. The Redifutintial fee charged for each
ove Y 5 fought until 2.30 a.m. (1250 p.m.foath administered and collected
Miss Ibberson has gone to havele or oT sday » ‘e ; r ae }
: “ E.S.T. Thursday) then withdrew .}. the man who administers the
a look at the Welfare work car- - née ae _ 4 sort ¥ os ‘ :
under heavy artillery and mortar th. In fact M M a
ried out on the sugar estates by fire . : Dash. sn sac BU Oe 32 on URS
the British Guiana Sugar Produ- ~ holy union of dark and ancient
cers Association and to discuss i Snow uperstition with the apparatus of
the training of their welfare offi- Light snow fell early today | mode ingsterism,” UP.
cers, along the central sector of th _—
She said that the reason for] battleline. Most of it melted al °
8 special examinati »{ th i rece Reconnais R i H Id
this special examination of the] though Fifth Airforce Reconnai ussians oO

work is that in the Social Welfare sance planes reported heavy snow















Training Course to be held injin the mountains and valleys er

Jamaica from January to July,|deep in North Korea. Cloud) U S 8 t

1953, special attention will be| weather halted most air opera \ 2 â„¢ ean

paid to the question of welfare’ tions. : a

work on the sugar estates. | Eighth Army Briefing Officer} [404 BERLIN, Nov. 7, —
The Sugar Industry Labour|said the tempo of Red patrol at i ok aa ene

are Boar is se ‘ - — ie sergea Ailen #4 ago fas Te-
Welfare Board is sending five of picked up sharply last night ane] )oscq in the hands of Russians in

their Welfare Officers and special early today.
lectures will be given and q
rangements made for those

Reds stabbed a

of.| tee points on the Eastern Fron’
oT-

he Soviet Zone after crossing the
yorder north of here at Fladun-



ficers to do their practical work caine Seeks ag ae er fen) ina jeep last night.
top a : ms ‘*| their attacking force, Sgt. Lagoy was reported by
on sugar estates under experi-/ ‘The 45,000 ton battleship Mis-| United States Army authorities
enced supervision. souri turned’ its mammoth guns {io have driven over the border
on Red targets in North Kore etween Bavaria in United States
Thursday destroying a trans-| Zone and Thuringia in the Soviet

Tanks Help

former plant with a sixteen inch} Zone in a radio equipped jeep.

shell. Other warships patrolled Set. Lagoy was a member of
the coast peppering Reds with }the 14th Armored Cavalry Regi-
roops 4 shellfire. —t.P. ment of the Second Battalion. He

was on a routine border patrol
‘through the hills of Franken For.
est

German Border Police said they
saw Set. Lagoy driving alone
straight ahead iito the Soviet
Zone.—-U.P. . \



Red Rebels

HANOI, Nov. 7.
Two tank su French
eaehente joined up in the Red
iver area today possibly trap-

U.S.Diplomacy
At Standstill



'

ping a substantial force of WASHINGTON, Novy, * Tw : t Kill
Vietminh Communist rebels in a The shattering impact of the en y
100 square mile wedge of terri-| Republican election victory al-

most immobilized United States
diplomacy, The atmosphere at the
State Department was one of in-
decision pending word from the
caller of President-

tory. One column advanced 20
miles in less than 36 hours from
Vietri, 33 miles north-west of
Hanoi and linked with the second

In Bus Crash

SAN JUAN DEL RIO,



one that moved through high|®@W signals ee eens Mexico, «Nov. 7
grass country in the area of the elect Bisehhower or his Forelgn Twenty persons were killed
captured rebel town of Phu Tho} Policy advisers. | ind 32 injured when a_ loaded
50 miles th-west of ; Secretary of State Acheson and magsenger bi erashed int a
miles north-west of Hanoi, scores of other Democratic ap- eerie m Baie aoe 3 sith
Loyal troops also captured| Pointees in upper echelon Diplo- at "the -entrance to this ait 120
Phu Ho 15 miles north of Phu|â„¢atic posts here and overseas} iio. north-east of Mexico City
Tho, At their junction point the} Were preparing to quit their jobs Survivors said the bus driver
two columns are a little more i. Sonne bang tory cage lost control of the speeding bus
ee ay Satine from the Saportant bana: on coe Ca and failed to negotiate - ures.
(pas yen Quang on Everyone in diplomatic business | They — said the bus rolled over
the Clear River which flows into|yook the view that it would ba| ‘Several times” before smashing
the Red River. U.P. foolhardy to commit the U.S. to}into the service station.
any new policy or important Some of the victims were
moves until it was certain that |ttapped in the wreckage more
udke Jars they would be fnderwritten by |than an hour before rescue crews
the new Republican Administra~ \extricated them.

tion.—U.P. —U.P.

Bakersfield

BAKERSFIELD,
California, Nov, 7
A sharp earthquake jarred

Bakersfield area at 12455 a.m. EST
and authorities said it was th@
strongest jolt felt here since the
quake of August 22 in whidh twa
persons were killed,

There were no immediate re-
ports of injuries or property
damage. The August 22 quake

caused property damage estimated
to run as high as $100,000,000 and
the city is still digging out from
it

Today's jolt was another in a
series of more than 200 after-
shakes which have rocked the
Bakersfield area since August 22.
Despite the sharpness of todfay’s
earthquake authorities reported no
panic,—-U.P,

Of Rice



--A SHIPMENT of rice from
hortages, Mr. Stanley Kinch,



Mr. Eden Leaves
For New York

LONDON, Nov. 7.

Foreign Secretary Mr. Anthony
Eden will leave tonight for
New York to attend the United
Nations General Assembly and
make his first contacts with the
“Eisenhower camp”,

Mr, Eden who will address the
UN. Assembly will partici-
pate in the Korea debate and was
expected to meet some of the
leading Republicans who are
the prospective members of the
new administration.
| Given the opportunity, he may
;also meet Mr. Eisenhower himseif |
{for a preliminary review of
; some of the most pressing inter-



IT’S THE TOBACCO THAT

mational issues before his returr |

at present cheduled for Novem-| he i ae
if eA EE GR OE i ae at ee s

ber 19 (U.P.) | WRB sls sis

—Unholy *



PAGE TWO





a SATURDAY, NOVEMBER &. 1959
BARBADOS ADVOCATE re Se eae ery ees

a tsp
SS Sees sss ee

| ADVOCATE BRIDGE Suffocating “Hot Flashes” stopped



















































































































| g by M. Harrison-Gray : ili ' ;
Dealer: West : or strikingly relieved
. } East West game. ; in 63-80% * of cases in doctors' tests!
} N. :
s on ne = 30 : e Are you going through you know what it has done
Te following were guests at To Tour Caribbean K 9632 : “change of life” suffer- for others!
Cocktail Party held at Gov Ss oe : NDIVIDt oroscore | @5 : ing the “hot flashes,” ner- But do you know +
akakianniek’: Wa ah hit D* Peter W. Branch, an old YOUR tor -aethis yro SK 9864 5 Yous tension, irritability, wilt do'tos gon? Seok tt ect
wi : the Unite Kinade Harrisor » 3 left Barba-] ror SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 58, 1952 | i w £ : weakness — other ty a ofan See ced tie reitef ;
a : B , ( 945 study Surgery ¢ ; Qi7i5s4 = {f functionally-caused dis- tension, “flashes” and leri-
Industr ts and H.M.S. Bigbur iy Colieee Los igh as Look in section in which § 3 . : ; $ S84 : tress of this difficult time? ao ae 80 often brings at
~ y Lleg amndon, - ri find what your «¢ _ . ‘ i . hn ea!
Ray Ml G. . Adams, M \ turned to the island to spend the rage ac « to ie | : eaaes : a4 ; : Then aes ee re Before another day has
whe Mr. fe Mr 1 I ristmas i New Year holl- | § @AQHS 5 yu *In tests by ‘S. " Passed, try Lyrdix Ptnkham's
mn Dr, & Mra W. I . 9 on OS} MARCH ¢1 to APRIL @ (Aries) 8. 3 ydia Pinkham's Com the Vegetable Corgpound,
G. 7. & Mrs. Barto & Mr soy at his home Newlands’Esightts generous aspects for financial, e@rsé2 = pound and Tablets gave or new, improved Tablets
Baki, Prof, & Mre Go G. Bensle ' : 3 . a pan Pine Hill professie general business endeav-| & ¥aws 5 relief from such distress... With added tron arid dis-
& My B. W. H. Belt, Mr. & M ; ‘ : . ; Be, Branch. wi eet Strict ‘attention to immediate affairs} & @¢) W987 : in 63. and 80% (Fespec- {over how much emster your lh
al Mr. & -M FA. Bishor } i f 5 7 ranch who ar¥ived OR], roves outiodk | j a? : tively) of the cases tested. ehange of life’ may be/
F Hiaek Verinesday, was one of the three : 2 i ¢ . tele s Complete or striking relief! Younger women and girlie Lydia Pinkham’s
G3. B ’ ws om the Saguenay Tepg-]| AKL %1 to MAY 2% (Taurus)— Ee) § Fhis dea! trom the Britain- 5 a ies suffering from fumetional a@tion t, ough
ares 32 : p Sa ¥ ¥ réasonable in demands and come through} § Deimark match in the W949 § | n pains and distress of men- sympatheh ner=
7 ’ reighter S.S. Spurt. Hef yin ying colours. May be a few dis-| $ aan Championships $ Surely you Snow Pha: tas struation—find Pinkham's vous system—re-
& M c p i D id that tl trip here ws quite§ quieting tendencies in early hours. Don't] & a t the lesson of $ Pinkham’s is scientijically wonderful too! It contains mo lieves distress of
Cato, M @ enjoyable and that he intends} oves-confident, nor hesitant 2 Senae second example modes i action! Surely pain-deadeniny drugay the"heat waves;
M ring ‘ +} . ° A : 2. Past
a ae ying most of the Caribbean may 2 to 28WR at (Gemini Yse} § Hand At boil table Pale ————————————————————
uM B. ¢ lands before returning to Lone keenest judgment, in investments, con-| ? openea One Diamond, North | E a
“, M LY fon for four vears to ndvance hig} “8. decisions. Perzonal affair heart | ' pid One Heart and East 3
\ Mey ( - Ss bis na ee Ms sts also need caution passed
; i n Surgery $ ‘The Danish South player i }
, (Cancer)—Bxtra| = a he principle |
p a also passed. on the Pp |
Voc atien Leave Figure on the ude cae Bg ; Lhat game was inet oe ; i oom: iB ARBARE i “nea }S
iM" and Mrs, Garth Southwell} i. prepared to cover the minimum North's te the biddin : | BRIDG ’ : "sued lee a. OISTIN
pie wn ah . West reopen : Dial a od (Diet 8404)
a lig ir three children ar- WLY 2 t© AUGUST 2 (Lee)—Ex- with a take-out double an : NOW 1 OPENING TODAY | Lust two Shows today
i lived here On Wednesday affersi -ciient pianctary says. You cam accom. reached a contract of Three § | 6 & 8 4.6 & 3.95 daity , 4:43 and 8.90 pm
‘ 00h =by B.W.LA. from British] plish mxach if you remain calm. Be what No-Trumpe Hearts being : and Cantiniting Dail J a catin g~% Bits Watner: Action Thriltet
fonduras om vacation leave ‘ou hope and preach. And be ready for unsupported oe yee : RKO’s THRILLER ae ie bn Tae een mcd
. , , gains, too t wi I ; , THE PB"
__Mr. Southwell, son of Mr. and . ee one ee sina 1 | hed als CHANDLER KEYES Frank Lovers
irs. V. A. Southwell of Chelsea] AUGUST % to SEPTEMBER 28 (Vireo) pricks before the attack was # | MInCHUM RUSSFLI TRON MARY lI Tedey soccer yg
Gard Cheise: ‘ Good rays for you conservative, care rici . : vee 11.30 pm
, ‘ardens, Chelsea Read has been , switched to Hearts $ | MACAO (* WITNESS
" ‘ & ™M D. F Hendersar oa ful natives. Just doen't be over-cautious 7 sh / an “ADE COO! Joh
+ \griculture ©; Room 2 our South Also: SPADE COOLEY hn BEAL and
Lt. R. T. Hlghett, Hon, K. R. & M teulture Officer in British} Advances for money ee ee In bid Two Hearts and } Also; Leon ERROL in and his Orchestra “OUTCAST OF BLACK
Hunt { K. N. R fu bags Honduras for the past four years. \¥ forceful you are will reflect in results, 3 a Swant's ‘Three No- 3 “OM WALD MIGHT = Secla 180 Baa maine ee
: : ‘ « T are @ ste . »-day's Special 1. : “har * ao
~~ etre te . They are guests at Chelseal seppemmzn 24 to octonam | | goubl for a penalty of 500 3 Today Special 9 20 & 1 30|] “Robinhood of Texas” |}—Chatles STARRETT
" 2 OR eR ee toad ; (ui —Prosperous day from many after Phe trad of hae? a & “GUNSLINGERS” Gene AUTRY Midnite Special Tonite
So angles. Brilliant star forecast. Toeettigoat total gain of 1100 j One hnoan aro PONGS ath ee “GLASS ALIBI"
= wa . , onduct and patience paramount to suc- illite “ sd My ES PRED of the PLAINS ‘oul KE ;
te * f of B pbiigs & Mrs. J. M Holiday In Ute Yiess. ‘Heart affairs hishly rated for hap- eT ee ” ____ Jimmy WAKELY Monte HALE “ABART OS wnt
Kidney, Mr pf Mes. 8. H. Kinch, Mr Mss Freida Carmichael, of : M [ ! : : | Leo GORCEY & th« ALIAS r . Oy :
ait bidet er Laly Leabobl Mb, Barbados Aquatic and a) gcTOER 24 to NOVEMBER 22 (Seor-| 3 ms Se “BOWERY BOYS. Robert ROCKWELL “Sun, & Mon. 44
irs, D. G, Leacock, Mr, A. B. $, Lew prominent member ef the s \-—-Squelch pessimistic —_ tendencies. ALETY “SMUGGLERS COVE’ and eS
& Mrs. D. A, Lucie-Smith Water Polo Team returned fr ee ot oS at ly me ie G | and DAYS OF BUFFALO “PAINTING THE
I J rs. Mahon, Rt. Re a ‘4 > U z covered. Continue mi y “SILVER TRAILS ry . _
ae Mat vite Miss "Mandeville Lo i’ is bc J ce the | has attained your objective. The Genas—S Hy ha” id Jimmy WAKELY t Sihest'e Anacat iad RY ie SUN
Mi v R. G. Mapp, Mr. & M ‘ ayiPe e ie been | s , Last Show jay s Moad tink) ca ; ae Te 3
ee Ae j Mrs. E spendir iday | NOVEMBER 2 (to DECEMBER 2 “TRIPLE TROUBLE & PANTHE Monday ank) 9.0 am. (B town) ‘TRIPLE TROUBLE & PANTHER ISLAN
a ar ike R ¢ Moke 1 bending a holiday. | (Sagittarius) —Unexpected gains possible ™ ISLAND” ONE BOTTLE OF CANADA DRY DRI NKS Produced at the Door and et
; rs. R. G. Michelin, Mr. & To See Son | with a shrewd attitude toward pyttvities. S aia a woadig an @ Moo Sit anywhere. DRINKS sold at the PLAZA Entrance.
. = Miller, Mr :. c ' 3 | Stabilize things first, then make ready| (Midnite Tc oun. _—
2. Miller, Mr. & Mrs, J. E AARS. M. PREVITE, wife of lor farther expansion. Ms UNGLE iS we Oe a = = er ———
; a : Major Previte Managi: ( STAMPEDE’ Mat. Sun. mn. eg ncmeremeetestiemmees al
SCS ar Fe Dirdet dad ‘Aap | Q¥CHAMER we sanyo cum] + | aati OODA v
Capt. & Mrs, F.C. Parris, Lt Col. H Director of the Trinidad Asphalt ee, LAU ees matters, [ap Jungle Thriller! CHEST’ R BD a T Hi E A R E §
. nit: Hon. G. D, 1 ile, Mrs Company, arrived in the island confine effort to essentials and you can Charlie Chan &
ain : Nis. C, EB. Raison, Mr, & M to morning by B.W.LA. Tie saeinio wadehtakines eee Oey 5 16 co | EMPIRE OLYMPIC ROXY ROYAL
HO. ‘Ramsey Miss D, Randall, Mr, W. mH short visit, | To-day 4:45 & 8.30) To-day to Monday | To-day to Tuesday |to-gay & Tomorrow
W. 8. Robertion, Hon. E. 8. & Mrs She has come over to sce her | JANUARY 22 to FEBRUARY 20 (Aqua- and continuing dails 4.30 & B15 4.30 & 8.15 | | 7 0k BoD
Robinson, Lt, Cdr. I. A. Rodger, Mr. & on Anthony who is a_ student} rius)—Be re enable, stray, progres Colin Pestiires Columbia Double Wa iversal Beanie.
Mrs. J. R. Rodger, Mr, L. Rose. it the Lodge School. She is a) ‘ively aggressive dvertising, : resents fe Donald. O'Connc Double Attraction
Hon. Sir John & Lady Saint Sir ceased wat + }tion work, personal business affairs un- Ke AGA IN Vs Hef zeorge Montgomery onald onnor
George & Lady Seei, Mr. C. C. Skeete, quest at Crane Hotel. jer. new favour, MER. Patricia Neal Karin Booth Jimmy Durante lyonn Howard Davie
Mr. & Mrs. BR. B. Skeete, Mr. & Mrs u > | in at! Se ee
Vv. sm h “M G. u Toons er, Mr. J. L BRIGADIER Sir Robert Arundes; Governor: Designate of Barbados Son And Heir | PERRUARY @l to MARCH 2 (Pisces) The famous | mo CRIPPLE CREEK e ‘as
Steel, Major & Mrs, BR. ‘A. Stouts and Lady Arundell who are expected to arrive in this island early he ae ‘i : |_wxereise a firm, stern attitude this | WEEK-END WITH “olor By Technieotor THE MILKMAN OLIVER ‘TWIST
Comdr, A. W. F. Sutton i next year. (CONGRATULATIONS to Mr. iiddie-of-road day. M you press a bit 3y ‘Technicol : ¥
Mr. & Mrs. J. P. Taylor and Mrs. Fred Gay on the could finish with more serene LL FATHER one A a oe
c , , } s g ice b pe 7
Mr & Mrs, KE. K. Walcott, Mz « Mrs. i " birth of @ son and heit which |" *- Don't miss out through foolis! The Week-End That\M¥ TRUE STORY es Pp jRIDE RYDER RIDE
2 arama Mae, a i, Views One Week Dolls Of All Nations took place on Monday afternoon. | | Shook The World | ,_, Statring | with Jim Bannon
7 te agcrep, § %. ’ ss . ait . , . auietiter elen Walker “EP E as Red Ryder
A. Way, Major & Mrs, C. B. P. Weath- . Mother ang babe are doing fine, YOU BORN TO-DAY, A great differ- POCKET vee Willard Parker © |SS"? EM, Oo oinai—ehes ae hes
erhead, Mr. & Mrs. D. W. Wiles Mrs. R und MRS, McLAUCHIN ARIB has been told that the > jonece in the developed "3: Weeever ‘i Extra ousltcdae RE Tae ITA SLUGGING Mon. & Tues
3. Wedel-Heinen, Mr, & Mrs J. M a . ns ; , the , ial a oped Scorpio person, Religion, family Short:—Fun At The T°- ‘ 30. por & 3
é. mene eto. ‘ ah ese of 3486 Peel Street, Mon. “ Ww inner of the aa ” All CO to Mr. | thekeround arid education whether and Zoo and Latest CALIFORNIA with __ \Double— ind
Mrs. H. H. Williams, Miss Bi.” Willams, treal, Canada, arrived in the Nations whieh was raf ed yes- and Mrs. “Bert” Teppin oa formal or self-attained) will put you in News Reel FIREBRAND Th Dead End Kids Jobo Mis:
Mr. M. A. Willis, Miss P. Wilson, Lt. J. iciond on Thursday last by TCA terday is Mrs. L. Carrington, . : aa > e fore of any endeavour, Y« ' WRIST WATCHES . and and Little Tough ;
Winterbotiom, Mr, & Mrs. S&S. Py. island on sda) s nar Ramsgat 3ay Street. She the birth of a son and heir | or jstreneth, subtlety. Direct will power To-day at 1.30 D.m.\.ownoy AND Guys in
Withnall, Hon, Campbell & Mrs, Wylie. and are spending a week's holi- "2! at ea “ + M; * 3 z Thursday, 13th November. Mrs. | wisely, avoid emotionalism, . oe OF ite wi mes ORITA, “Midnite Po-nlaht” | scorr or
‘ Cant. Ww: 4 R Bese. orange ‘apc). day as guests at Cacrabank eine i a ein ~ “yt = Toppin was the former Miss! ;.senaary Birthdate of: Nerve. Roman Obtainable only ‘ei Ray Rowers Monte Hale THE ANTARCTIC
a E eble ue mm, enston, B rac r e , " a . nd c Adrian Booth
Lt. C. Peterkin (Extra A.D.C.) Hotel. stm ’ Betty Mayers. Emperor. Richard Arlen Midnite To-night (Technicolor)
. : dolls. Bind: neacaliboblggiie = on ———— From in Wild Bill Elliott
The raffle was organised by a Fee aR aciponnti i and
band of social workers who are| TF 3 7 “ 9 UNKNOWN PLAINSMAN AND FIREBRAND ,..
donating». proceeds to variaus| By BEACHCOMBER ‘Your Jewellers Midnite "To-night PRE LADY : \DEADLY 18
Cherise GF the dal meet 4 20, Broad St. Phone 4644 (2. Musicals »nd ” TES FEMALE
wrilies. oO he sland ’ . % , a , 2 .
- 7 ; ALONG THE COWBOY AND Starring:
i ' ; AM sorry to have given C. Suet, by means of a short-circuiting of ~~ wet Ott NAVAJO TRAIL THE SENORITA Peggy Cummings
Holiday With Family I os O RAVe EVES Re cath BH: a
- ~ Bsq., the impre



“ esi ee n that I was potential exchange of permits al-
M": ROSS McKENZIE, wife confusing a necessary reimple- ready initialled for distribution to
of Mr. R. McKenzie, Resi-| mentation of co-ordinational allocation committees. It is when
dent Engineer for TCA, of ‘-| measures relative to the demands ‘he cumulative effects of redund-
lantic ‘View, Enterprise Road,|made by a thorough overhaul of ant applications threaten to bottle-
Christ Chureh, accompanied by | existing priorities with the devel- neck the various channels of allo-
her two children, returned home|ogpment of a basic schedulisation cation that the whole question
on Thursday by TCA after] already undertaken by the regis- becomes one of overall depart-
pending about four months’|tration authorities. mentalisationary revision,
holiday with her family in Eng- is 9 8 48
land. In these controversies it is im- 7 ;
Mrs. McKenzie had a_ very|portant not to lose sight of prime Kolex Watches
pleasant holiday and is glad tolfactors, Simultaneous duplication

Â¥. De LIMA | 2 ee ee
& CO. LTD. rx GLOBE apnsite

and

The Village A REAL RED HOT STAGE SHOW
e

Starring :

REX

he back home again. can never be anything but a ten- LOUIS L. BAYLEY HARRISON
7 tative expedient, with the object
Home After Four Years |}: reducing delay to a minimum Bolton Lane

Ae four years with the

Jamaica's Stunt
British-American Oil Com-













: Cyclist
——
bany in Canada, Mr. Gerald Tay- 4
lor Y atulaad here on Thursday GLOBE The Dare-devil on
last by B.W.LA. via Trinidad. TODAY, 5.00 & 8.30 AND CONTINUING Wheels. Feats that
He will be spending his holidays VICTOR HUGO'S... are guaranteed to
with his mother at 10 Graeme “LES MISERABLES” Michael RENNIE = : : ee ie leave you spell. .
Hall Terrace, Christ Church, Debra PAGET we eis ~~ bound

Ajso arriving from Canada by Se x i A uc ees



Dr. Barbara Lloyd-Still and Lieut.-Col. R, M. Lioyd-Still he same opportunity was Miss
Audrey Maksymec, of Winnipeg.









ALSO
i IEUT-COL. R. M. LLOYD- For Races She ‘will be spending a holiday in
* STILL, Medical Superin- R. K. VINCENT-BROWNE, ‘he island as a guest of Mrs.
tendent of the Mental Hospital

urd Taw * e . y
retired Senior Puisne Judge Muriel Taylor, also of Graeme

Y ,
accompanied by his wife Dr. of Trinidad and Steward of the Malt” Terrace, Christ Church E V ER ONE S
Barbara Lloyd-Still, Dental Sur- pyinigng Tuct C Faas ae

geon, returned to Barbados on gta A Me in the Business And Piousure
Monday last by BWIA via Puer- F

MR.
CALYPSO


















oe island by B.W.LA. yesterday, R. S. W, Pillersdorf, Manag- : :
eB accnag He has come over for the ing Director of the Royal ay Paap. . Poaeat
The Lioyd-Stills were away Races and is a guest at the Store, Swan Street, returned to A s
for five months on an extensive pote} Royal. the colony on Thursday by T.C.A. GOING fs Candleli ht SLIM JIM
bb ad of ee visiting such LSO arriving by the same after spending one month. 4 7 (Tap-Dancer)
errr “ om, ee opportunity was Mr. Deoraj He was away on business and / é
On aa England te a Samaroo, Aerated Water Factory pleasure combined, During his Ps AT SENORITA
Lieut “Col ” Lloyd-Still aiken Proprietor of San Fernando. He stay’ in New York he also saw) ¢ upper oon BELGRAVE
visited "Vienna where he aaa has also come over for the races Mr. S. Altman, his brother-in-| TO Pe PARADISE |
ved with leading Psychiatrists me ae at Indramer a, Fa a ee || 2 CONTINENTAL | (The Heat Wave
> was alsc rite serve ~ “yar at tia Me) Conran Seabees .
the oe aidan ea Visited Islands Mr. Pillersdorf told Carib th: t} UF. BEACH CLUB CUISINE =
treatment in the five biggest OL. A. WAKEFIELD SAUN- !U§ trip was an enjoyable one. oft 4. MUSIC | ;
Mental Hospitals in the United DERS of’ Leamington, St. Kennel Club 7 / SAT. Nov 15th by PANAMA ||| Music by The Count (C. B. Browne) Orchestra
States. Peter returned home yesterday : r a / 2 7 | Canada Dry Steel Band on Stage
Dr. Barbara also had the op- by BWIA. after paying visits to HERE will be a General 4 / Ch |
portunity of seeing the newest St. Vincent, Grenada and Trini- Meeting of the Barbados / MUSIC BY CURWIN | Free Iced Cold Canada Dry to First 300 Patrons.
treatments in Dentistry in Eu- dad. He was accompanied by Kennel Club at St. Winifred’s A | Free Samples of Phillips Cycle Pencils to all
rope after which she completed his wife. School on Tuesday next at 5 p.m. Po ¢ i Meee ? at Sh nn
working in the New York Uni- ee im ‘ GAMES at versity Dental Clinic. é ae. AD ' i “5 9
Ph. 4084 -:- Hastings | Pit 20c; Circle 30¢; House 40c; Baleony 60¢; Box 72c.

DON’T MISS IT!
DANCE & SUPPER



ant one although one of dual
purpose. They also say that gee sna’ NOVEMBER 8, 1952



News, 7.10 p.m. Home





o3M



that they Sip Wale ae, eee LISTENING HOURS s _|
| DU Sen Rep eeeeeaeee




they are indeed very happy to phatase
be back home. . 4 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m.

$1.00





49.71M



The Daily



















ome MnMand they proceeded 5% in maser Recbie Seabee BOG ak’ shore Woclee Noe ne. ee ween: | a Cut =
York and then Sew to Besbedte Gevie.s Sa: Sestak Waa efit WO Reke RIT ES Seta es a ; a
via Puerto Rico, BM. ustiyal of nemomberance. 48 p 10-19 pm. ‘he ebate Continues, 0 Mh ROX Y Equipment Costs
| ae 822 22S ee ee UOC To-Day to Tuesday, 4.30 & 8.15 p.m. = with a
; a UNIVERSAL DOUBLE ATTRACTION a a
| e e
oe as | 2 nimet Majors =
; JUST ARRIVED = = | i o
36” FLOWERED SHEER ....... hie Sivas: SiGe cheat ati é sid dy a a
WHITE SHARKSKIN ............... theses ay 08
36” EMB’ MORCAIN (in all shades) ......................, kes ae s 6 “ a. a
@ FAS TION
: IR RMD Res oa ies si oa bORRI Sc. ed Boeedaceans $5.75 ft a @ DURABLE FINISH a
ROO, MOO ci grle ooo Ney eo ecse¥y ears’ $6.50 @ ECONOMICAL
SEE EINE dey ys cde aed esih vets vias Gib'a > wow boos Cea Sl $7.72 a &
PILLOW CASES 18 X 30 ..... ccs. ces suues bs G4 Li vate tee 98 cts,
: BUTTER MUSLIN ................ ne = wae aE eaea ea 43 cts. a a
| A Supply of UNIMET
r ; MAJOR
LADIES SILK PANTIES |... 0ics......0. 000605 . 84 ets, to $147 i a enamelled Gang tYBrool sto ee =
CHILDREN’S COTTON PANTIES ................ 14 ets. to 53 ets, Rounded Corner Bo with the a
CHILDREN’S SILK PANTIES ................--. 52 ets. to 74 ets, £ Z and vow can’ make Pox-FOm Top,
CHILDREN’S COTTON VESTS |: .....0.0000000000. . | 44 cts, to 7 cts. ia ork Table or Bengeu” Wn Desk ‘
’ a ° ; easily mag Small hand a ’
) : ee "ws PIPER LAURIE + JOYCE HOLDER Se ea work sell, “Aaa this ste MEE
a wit . of : e -
| T. R. EVANS (WHITFIELDS) yan i iE) Msc wher Tecan gine! fain meee
. . AND le @
q YOUR SHOE STORE KEEP “EM SLUGGING o § p M § & (' it d
a Phone: Se 4220 Starring : me e Ee USSON. On 0.. y e is
\ Yee: Nee eee See Er haik 4 ae The Dead End Kids and The Little Tough Guys ® BB @ » Seegeoertas ws BBR e BBeaa





PO KS Ral a al

—:

sees sa

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1952

Hiscock Couple Cross Atlantic In Wanderer IL

Yacht Steered Herself
For 11 ConsecutiveDays

Yacht Wanderer III anchored off the Yacht Club yes-
terday after a 26-day crossing of the Atlantic from Las
Palmas to Barbados. Mr. Eric Hiscock and his wife, crew
of the yacht, told the Advocate; “We had a fine trip. The
boat steered herself for 11 consecutive days”.

Wanderer III was built at Burn-
ham -on- Crouch, Essex and
launched in March this year.
From that time the Hiscocks have
been living on board. “We have
no other home but Wanderer III,”
they told the “Advocate.”

The yacht is 30 feet long with
beam eight feet, six inches and a
draft of five feet six inches. Under
sail and in good wind she does
about seven and a half knots, The
trip to Barbados averaged about
100 miles a day.

Mr, Hiscock, author and pho-
tographer, calls Wanderer III “the
sailing caravan.” He hails from
Southampton and spent most of
his years in the Isle of Wight.

“J have been sailing around
since 1930 and d the war
years I was in the Navy,” Mr.

Hiscock said, His wife, too, is an
experienced sailor, Her parents
were boat owners.

In 1930 Mr. Hiscock owned
Wanderer I which he k
three years. He later sold it and
bought Wanderer II in which he
made a trip to the Azores,

Enthused by the success of his
trip to the Azores, >
decided that he must have a
larger boat in whieh to visit more
distant countries. He sold Wan-
derer II, whieh visited Barbados
during the year, and later built
Wanderer III.

On this voyage he has alreai
visited France, §
Porto Santo, Madeira and Las

Palmas.
Impressed

“I was very impressed with
Porto Santo which is a small vol<
eanic island,” Mr, Hiscock said.
He thought it to be much nicer
than Madeira although the ma-~
jority of people preferred to visit
the latter.

On board Wanderer III is a
dark room in which Mr, Hiscock
develops and prints his films, He
also has a very up-to-date library
on board and said; “Books are
very nice at sea, especially when
a vessel is steering itself for 11
days.”

Mr. Hiscock and his wife
worked in shifts of three hours
on deck and three hours below.
There is a compass on deck and a
small one in the cabin. When the
boat is steering herself, the His-
cocks can switch on a light, look
‘at the compass in the cabin and
tell if the boat is keeping her
course,

“We never sleep on land, It
is much nicer to be on sea,” the
Hiscocks said.

Britons Will
Open Schools
In Pakistan

By JAMES STUART

A British organisation, Air
Service Training, whose school is
at Hamble, Southampton, have
been given a contract by the
Pakistan Government to set up
two “public schools” in Pakistan.

At these schools, boys between
11% and 17%, who intend to
join the Royal Pakistan Air
Force, will receive their ordinary
education.



*

A number of young Saudi
Arabians are training at various
RAF schools in this country to be
pilots. They will be the nucleus
of the new Royal Saudi Arabian
Air Force.

Administrator
Came By Plane

(From Our Own Correspondent)
ST. VINCENT, Nov, 1.

His Honour W. F. Coutts, Ad-
ministrator, accompanied by his
wife and their two children arriv-
ed in this island on Wednesday
afternoon by plane after a six
months’ holiday in the United

gdom.

A representative gathering ex-
tended a cordial welcome at the
Villa airport, Among those present
were members of the Executive
and Legislative Councils, Govern-
ment Officers and their wives, the
Lord Bishop of the Windward
Islands, other Ministets of Relig-
ion representing the Roman Catho-
lie and the Methodist Church,
Members of the Kingstown Board
and several other members of the
community.

The Police Band under Mr.
W. H. Lewis played the National
Anthem as His Honour landed and
continued with lively tunes as he
shook hands with those who came
to welcome him.

His Honour will proceed to
Grenada some time this month as
Acting Governor of the Windward
Islands in place of His Excellency
Sir R. D. H. Arundell who is
transferred to Barbados.

—

Director Of Works
Leaving For J’ca

(From Our Own Correspondent)
DOMINICA, Nov. 2.

Colonel E. R. Rowbotham, who
was Director of Works since 1947,
leaves by the Colombie on Mon-
day for Jamaica. Col. Rowbotham
js replaced by Mr. G. A, Grant, of
St. Vincent, who took over on
October 3rd. Before coming to
Dominica, Mr, Grant held a similar
post in St. Vincent.

Last Saturday evening the staff
of the Public Works Department
held qa farewell party in honour of

the Colonel, at which they pre-
gented him with a gift and ex-
pressed regret at his leaving.

From Jamaica Col. Rowbotham
oes to British Honduras where
e has contracted to work with
he Public Works Department

| Cat-o*-Nine’
Tails Needed
In Trinidad

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Oct. 31.

_ The statement of the Hon. Jus-
tice E. R. L. Ward from the
Bench of one of the Port of Spain
Assize Courts last week regretting
that the use of the cat-o’-nine
tails had been removed from the
Statute Book of the Colony might
very well touch off another con-
troversy over the “cat.”

Mr. Ward made the statement
before sentencing David Roberts,
a San Juan Carpenter to seven
years’ imprisonment for attacking
his former sweetheart, Minnie
Harry, and cutting off her right
hand with a cutlass one night last
July.

The jury returned a guilty ver-
dict against Roberts withou: re-
tiring and Mr. Ward declared
that Roberts’ act was a deliberate,
cruel and wicked one. It was one
class of offence, he said, which
made him regret that the Colony
had done away with the cat-o'«

nine-tails. Then he said ta
Roberts: “If you had known that
flogging wo have been given

for this class ef offence you would
never have done it.
Pleaded Lunacy

Roberts, pleaded lunacy and
asked the jury: “Do you think
that my action towards Minnie is
consistent with that of a sane
man?” He went on: “I was out
of employment and I had many
worries and never caught myself
until I discovered that I was at
the Mental Hospital.”

After telling the jury that he
did not know anything about what
he had done on the night of
July 11, he said that if they be-
lieved that his act was that of a
sane man he should get a million
years in jail.

Dr. Roger de Verteuil of the
Mental Hospital testified that the
complaint from which Roberts
suffered was a mental illness by
which the present relationships cf
the world around him wer2 mis-
interpreted by what he saw and
heard. Answering a question put
to him by Mr. Ward, the doctor
said it was not a complaint whicin
would make a man lose contro}
to the extent of arming himself
with a cutlass and deliberately
cutting up people with it after
he had mage repeated thrests of
doing so.

Abolished in 1941

The Trinidad Legislature abol-
ished flogging in 1941, several
years before Britain did so. The
Ordinance for putting an end ta
flogging was piloted through the
Legislature by the then Attorney
General, The Hon, L. B, Gibson,
The motion for the second read-
ing was moved by the late Sir
Lennox O'Reilly.

This Ordinance abolished
imposition by the Courts
offenders above the age of i6
years of sentences of co.poral
punishment and to regulate the
imposition and carrying out of
such sentences on offender; not
above the age of 16 years.

Banana Bill
For Domini
or Vomunica
(From Our Own Correspondent)
DOMINICA, Nov, 2
_ A new Bill to consolidate ex-
isting Banana Legislation and to
permit the Governor-in-Council

to give directions to the Board
of Management of the Banana

the
on



Association in matters concern- far;

ing public interest has just been
gazetted. The new Bill is called
the Banana Consolidated Or-
dinance, 1952, and repeals the
previous Banana Ordinance and
all amendments.

By the Ordinance the Dom-
inica Banana Association is re-
cognised asa oc te body
with a .Seal, entitled to make
contracts and to sue,or be sued
in its same. The Association is
invested with the authority to
rehabilitate banana plantations
and stimulate production, and to
market and control the disposal
of all bananas produced in the
colony either intended for ex-
port or to be made into jams.
preserves, or canned locally.

The Association shall be gov-
erned by a Board of Manage-~
ment consisting of six elected
members and two to four mem~
bers nominated by the Governor.
There shall be an annual elec-
tion.

If in the opinion of the Gov-
ernor - in - Council fhe Board
makes default in the perform-
ance of its duties, or exceeds or

abuses its powers, it shall be
lawful for the Governor-in-
Council to dissolve the Board

and appoint one person to per-
form the duties of the Board
until the next yearly election.

The chief aims of the Bill are
to protect the interests of all
banana growers, especiajly the
small ones, and to amend and
consolidate the existing law re-
lating to bananas.

Man Drowns

(From Our Own



Correspondent)

ANTIGUA
Thirty-eight year old Edwin
West was drowned off Barbuda
last Tuesday. West was on a
fishing boat returning to Antigua
when they ran into a squall, In
attempting to lower the jib West
fell overboard and when a search
was made only his cap was seen
floating on the water. The body
has not yet been recovered. West
who came from English Harbour
leaves a wife and nine children,

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

NEXT YEAR'S CARS AT MOTOR SHOW \ 16-Bedroom Me. ©. V. H. Archer

Three hundred
more than $14 million (B.W.1.)
greeted visitors to the 1952
Motor Show, which was opened
on the 22nd October by Field
Marshal Lord Alexander at Earl's
Court, London.

The worldwide demand for
better performance and greater
roominess is reflected in both new
and modified models in the
“family-car” class, while new-
comers to the already impres-
sive range of sports cars pro-~
duced in Britain are aimed at the
younger motorist, particularly in
North America.

cars worth

A notable trend in design was
towards reduced fuel
with more powerful engines that
permit noiseless cruising at re-
duced throttle. A step forward in
brake design was seen in the use
bf a metal disc in place of the
normal brake drum, On many
ears the lugga boot had been
substantially enlarged, while new
refinements were improved lock
designs to make unattended cars
even more thief-proof, and
simpler window regulators, with
power operation of windows in



some of the more expensive
models.
Among the new cars a last-

minute surprise was the new
Triumph, a 9¢ m.p.h. sports car
with tuned-up Standard Van-
guard engine. The modified Hum-
ber Super Snipe is designed for
the world’s roughest roads — it
has the largest shock absorbers
ever fitted to a passenger car;
its four-litre Blue Riband engine
develops 113 brake power.
The Armstrong-Siddeley “Sap-
phire” with its 3.4 litre engine is
capable of between 90 and 95
m.p.h.

New on the Bentley stand was
the Continental sports saloon,
said to have a maximum speed
of around 120 m.p.h. Also in the
luxury class was the new Allard
2—3 seater Palm Beach open
tourer powered with the Ford
Consul or Zephyr engine and
destined for the U.S. market.

Both Healey and Frazer-Nash
show sports models fitted with
the 2.6 litre Austin A 90 engine.
The Healey Hundred, now to be
called the Austin-Healey Hun-
dred, is the cheapest 100 m.p.h.
car ever built, and cruises at 35



miles per gallon. It recently beat
two International Class D records
at 113 m.p.h, Vastly extended
production is planned by the
Austin company of this model,
A special display of cars that
won honours in_ international
events includes the Sunbeam-
Talbots that won the team prize
in the last Alpine Rally, the
Jaguar XK 120 that exceeded 100
m.p.h. over a continuous seven-
day run last August, Colonel
Goldie Gardner’s 144 m.p.h. M.G.
which now holds approximately a
hundred records in its class, the
Le Mans Aston-Martin and the
Frazer-Nash two-seater t h at
lately took the International
Class E 200-mile reeord at 120.16
m.p-h. from a standing start.

Eighty per cent of British car
production now goes abroad. The
industry provides about ten per
cent of the United Kingdom's
visible exports and is the coun-
try’s largest single exporting in-

dustr’. In 1938 British motor-car
exports were worth only $35
million (B.W.1.); last. year the

figure had risen to $476 million
(From London Press Service)



Govt. Should NEW RATES MA Y DISRUP7
GRENADA‘’S ECONOMY

With Busi
ith business
(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Oct, 31
The United Kingdom Industri-
‘alisation Mission which is at
present visiting the British West
Indies was welcomed to Trinidad
where it is spending 10 days, at
a public meeting in the Legisla-

tive Council Chamber last Mon-
day morning.

The Hon. Albert Gomes, Trini-.
dad’s Minister of Labour, Industry
and Commerce, who arranged
the meeting, declared he wanted
to make it clear that the welcome
‘was a very sincere one “and that
those of us who are concerned
with this industrialisation pro-
gramme suffer no illusions as
regards your talent and your
experience.”

Mr. Gomes went on record as
being against Government inter-
ference with business. Said he:
*It is my own conviction, and §
am very firm in that conviction,
that if there is one thing that the
State should have nothing to do
with, it is business.”

He went on: “We do not share
the view that appears to be very
popular in certain parts of the
West Indies that it is easy to in-
dustrialise. Indeed, some people
believe that you move from an
agricultural to an industrial econ-
omy in the same way that you
bring electricity into your home,
all you need to do is to turn tha
Switch. You will find that in this
country we do not share that
view.” '

Not Easy

Mr. Gomes said that the indus-
trialisation ‘programme was not ad
‘easy as it was considered to be
when the start was made, He wad
against embarking upon extrav-
agant sohemes that involved un-
due interference by the State. He
did not think they should indus-
trialise at the expense of indus-
tries already established.

He added: We know that our
raw material supply is limited
and we know further, that our
domestic marke, is small. f
assume that when you address
yourselves to this subject you will

ive special regard to this ques-
ion, that is, the size of our
domestic market,

At a Chamber of Commerce
luncheon the following day, Mr.
Lincoln Steel, a director of Im-

ial Chemical dustries and |
leader of the Mission, said suc-
cessful
a vast range of problems, and it

was worth while to look at some |

of them. One thing was clear;
the problems of Trinidad were not
Trinidad’s alone. There were
r countries in the world
which had their intricate prob-
lems in various ways and required
greater wisdom to solve.

Agriculture

If it was hoped, he said, to find
additional employment for a cer-
tain number of persons, it would
meed a certain sum of money to
do that out of capital investment

alone. It was a question that
would involve careful and de-
tailed investigations before it

could be embarked upon. It was
quite a simple thing to set u
factories if one had plenty of
money and did not know what to
do th it} but one had to view
‘with care the possibilities of go-
ing into such projects. One of the
roblems was finding out which

investments would be economical |

to avoid a waste of money.

Mr. Steel stressed the impor-
tance of considering agriculture
in any industrialisation pro-
gramme as it was the wealth on
which every territory depended.

Mr. Bevan Tries
For Deputy
Leadership

LONDON, Nov. 5

Mr. Aneurin Bevan, Leader of
the Leftwing pf the Labour Party
challen Mr.
for election as Deputy Leader and
Vice Chairman of the Party for
this Session of Parliament. It
was the first challenge in 20
years.

Mr. Morrison lost the last one
to Mr. Arthur Greenwood, but
later won the Deputy Leadership.



A secret ballot was taken and will |
Wednesday's |

be amnounced at
meeting of the Party.
Bevan is defeated as is forecast
he is expected to run for mem-

bership on the Parliamentary
Committee—the “Shadow Cab-
inet.”

Mr. Clement Attlee was re-|

elected Leader and Chairman of

the Party for this session without

opposition. —U.P.

industrialisation covered

Herbert Morrison ,

If Mr. |

(From Our Own

Correspondent)
ST. GEORGE'S, Oct. 29.

THAT PRESENT CONDITIONS of the industry as a
whole are not as healthy as at the time of the wage rates
negotiated in April last year ant allow no reasonable antici-
pation of ability to pay the proposed new rate without
seriously disrupting the economy of the island generally
summarises the facts presented by the Grenada Agricul-
turists’ Union in a memorandum to the Manual and Mental

Workers’ Union.

A 12-point list of proposals
from the M.M.W.U, Nave been
studied by the en ae Com-
mittee of the G.A.U, and aftes
approval by the general bedy last
Monday a memorandum contain-
ing its conclusions was yesterday
handed a_ delegation of four
M.M.W.U. members who met with
a similar number of G.A.U. rep-
resentatives under the chairman-
ship of the Labour Officer, Mr.
G. S. DaBreo.

While the Agriculturists’ Union
makes some concessions in a few
instances, such as agreeing to
time and a half on Sundays and
public holidays, tho contend-
ing that as regards watchmen and
stockmen these should in future
be placed on a monthly or othef
long-term basis, agrees on estates
having minimum first aid supplies
and supports the idea of an in-
surance scheme which would
cover illness, it takes an unequiv-
ocal stand on the proposed new
wage rates and certain other
demands,

Immediate Investigation

It says that in the event of tha
M.M.W.U. not conceding the im«
practicability of wages of $2 and
$1.56 for men and women respec-
tively, this should be a matter
for immediate investigation by 1
statutory body; it considers that
in the present complex state of
the industry, unlikg in say oil or
business, adoption of a bonus
system is premature and imprac-
ticable at the moment; in regard
to a request for retrospective pay
from April last, the G.A.U. sees
no real substance for the claim in
the event of a change in the exist-
ing wage structure, though along
with the M.M.W.U.’s other claims
it would abide by the decision of
an independent body; on a re-
quest for a 7-hour work period
the G.A.U. would agree to time
and a half over the‘8-hour day as
defined by law but beyond that
would also prefer this to be a
point for settlement by arbitra-
tion; the proposal that Union

officers be permitted to visit
estates “at all times” is held as a
pl sal clearly infringing on the
rights attacheq to the ownership
of private property” and that the
proper course would be that
application be made to the owner
stating the nature of the business
and the proposed time and righ
to grant or refuse the application
must remain inviolate; collection
of workers’ Union dues and pay-
ment for the day of Group Lead-
ers going to attend Union talks
are considered a matter strictly
for internal organisation of the
Union and is not a function of
management; despite unhappy ex
periences in the past _ the
G.A.U. would be prepared to give
a Reference Board another trial,
subject to the qualification tha:
a voting quorum of not more than
five members of each body be
considered sufficient; the proposal
of a closed shop is entirely un-
acceptable on all moral and
equitable grounds.

Another meeting has been fixed
for Monday, November 3, be-
tween G.A.U, and M.M.W,U_ del-
egations with the Labour Officer
presiding.

Attached to the memorandum
the G.A.U. gave comparative fig-
ures of prices ruling in the prin-
cipal agricultural crops in April

1951, and October, 1942, These
showed:
Drop in Price
Fine estates cocoa today fetches
87 cents per Ib., as against 60

cents; Nutmegs and by-products
cents as against 18 rents; and
in erops by no means considered }
ma,or and grown only on some
estates: Bananas $2,80 per count
bunch as against $2.40; Limes 60
cents as against 30 cents (an in-
crease at present) and Copra $300
per ton as against $216 (also an
increase today),

In the face of these facts the
G.A.U. expresses its readiness to
consent to submission of all the
issues for adjudication by a com-
petent arbitration tribunal.



1





| Cy, Minit euch

And what a soothing and comforting one it is!



“That Cow & Gate Baby Powder is really
delightful," says Mummy, “‘it seems to

| else."”

soothe and comfort Baby more than anything
“Yes, and it seems to soothe and

comfort other people too,’’ says Daddy,

{

|
|



}

|

4 B LESEIE & Co

looking up from his paper with a smile.

COW é GATE
aby lowe"

FOR COMFORT & CONTENTMENT

Ad —Agents

Hotel Opened

(From Gur Own Correspondent)
DOMINICA, Nov. 2.
On Thursday a new sixteen bed-
1oom Hotel, Lina Hotel, was open-
ed in Great Marlborough St.,
Roseau. There was the opening
ceremony in the afternoon and
dance later on till early morning.
The first floor of the three-story
hotel is a spacious and artistically
Hecorated ball-room. The second
floor contains some bedrooms and
general living room, and on the
third floor are other bedrooms.
The Lina Hotel is owned by Mr.
J. Jacob, proprietor of the “Hit
Parade” Hotel and restaurant.

New Trade Union
In Grenada

From Qur Own Correspondent)

GRENADA, Oct. 29.
A new Trade Union, the So-
ciety of Agricultural labourers,
with registered office at Plaisance
Estate, St. John’s, was registered
on October 24. It is founded by
Mr. F. D. Winslow, owner-pro-
prietor. It provides, among other
things, for Old Age Pensions.
The following day the Grenada
Agriculturists Union, which em-



bodies the former Agricultural
Association, Employers’ Society
ind Coconut Growers’ Assocta-

ion, was also registered,
* .

Visiting the colony for the an-
nual Missionary Meetings of the
Methodist Church here is Revd.
Deryck M. Lyder of Tobago. His

programme covers the period
October 29—November 5, Revd.
M. Lyder began his ministry

in Grenada in 1940,



s



36” wide at
$4c. and 94e.
per yard.

) At Sahely’s
| you find

) what

you want
when

you want it.

Ht)

These are from the Emerald Isle
in two very practical light
weights and colour lovely .. .







PAGE T



T | For a radiant shine

Acting Supreme |
Court Judge |

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Oct, 31.
This week Mr. C. V. H. Archer
Acting Solicitor General was given

an acting appointment as judge

of the Colony’s Supreme Cour’. | .

He will be assuming the duties of! _,,, é

his new office as from next Mon- The quality al
y for > ‘ : I

day for an indefinite period Metal Pol
His appointment to the Bench is | ? sm -_



the result of the departure on | .@@@o0@0«-

Thursday of His Lordship J. L. M. |

289-09 00OSOO7 CY,

Perez, the Chief Justice, for |

British Guiana to preside over 4 | ye

sitting of the West Indian Court uf ‘

Appeal. How long he will be away |

is not yet known. |

Mr. Archer’s appointment ha
caused seme shuffles in the Lega! .

Department in, which his substan-|/% POV AT BBIERIBY
CUL CRYSTAL

These have made Mr. Wilfred
At Your Jewellers ,

Fergusson, another Barbadian, act
Y. De LIMA

as Solicitor General, His substan-
tive is «assistant to the
Attorney-General.

\
The Hon. C. T. W. E. Worrell,
Solicitor General, has been acting
Attorney General since the ap-
pointment of Mr Perez to the post
®





& ¢€O.. LTD.
of Chief Justice a few months ago. roar
There ne be three ees ea a e
dians holding top posts im the Sey
Legal Department when Mr. C \ | Whisky,
deLisle Inniss, the new Attorney sf Port,
General takes up his duties in the 4 ’ Sherry,
near future, tg | ” D
Diamond Rings | ~ and a -
LOUIS L, BAYLEY Ks ea
|
Bolton Lane | 000000000.







fin .
‘Care for your skin as Ann Todd, lovely star of the J. Arthar Rank
Organisation, does—use Lux Toilet Soap regularly. A daily facial
“with Lux Toilet Soap will give you a clear fresh skin — the
foundation of beauty! Cover your face generously with its rich,
creamy lather, and work it in thoroughly. Rinse first with warm,
| then with cold water, and pat gently dry. Your skin will take on

. a new loveliness — the loveliness of the stars! St

LUX

TOILET SOAP

ot Ai The fragrant white soap of the film stars id
dithiade : ‘ini anaiglll

SSS

oy

IRISH RAYON
in colourful
floral designs

=







PAGE FOUR



ARBADOS gti ADVOCATE
> Beem etpe SPS sare os Bowe] ©

| (tinted oy the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad ~.., tridgetown
ee SSSSSee

Saturday, November 8, 1952



) GREAT HOPES

REACTIONS to the result of the Ameri-
can Presidentiai elections have depended
largely on whether individuals or groups
are accustomed to regard Democrats or
Republicans with especial favour. The
Daily Herald of London for instance which
is the organ of the British Trade Unions is
openly disappointed at Governor Steven-
son's failure because the Democratic Party

is associated in the minds of British Labour
supporters with a party of progress and

reform. General Eisenhower's victory on

the other hand has been welcomed by all

those who regard him as a great-hearted

man who sees the problems of the world

steadily and whole, the man in whom all

our hopes are placed to bring about the

peace for which a war-scarred world is

\oking.

There has been much comment made
since the new American President was
named: but simple ordinary people of the
world are hoping that the new President,
whatever else he does, will be able to
ensure peace in a world which is weary of
war and threats of war. Tio regard General
Eisenhower as a lone crusader doing battle
for world peace and using all the mighty
resources of America to ensure it would
however be unrealistic. The new President
of the United States must rely on the sup-
port of the Senate and of the House of
Representatives and he must be guided by
whatever will be the final programme of
the Republican Party.

Whereas too the world at large war
watching the result of the American
elections with bated breath, we must not
forget that the electors were citizens of
the United States and that the President's
first duty is to the citizens of the United
States. No other head of a state is better
equipped perhaps than the new President
of the United States to guide the course of
human destiny, but the President of the
United States can only play his role ir
world events with the limits permitted tc
him by the American constitution.

The heartfelt rejoicing and thanksgiving
which is still going on in many parts o!
the world because of the victory of Genera!
Eisenhower must be tempered by realisa-
tion of the fact that there are features of a
Republican programme which may not be
in the interests of say the British Common-
wealth. Fears have for long been ex-
pressed in British countries for instance
that. the Republicans, who by their whole
‘tra “are more protectionist than the
Democrats, will not look with favour on
British requests for lowering of American
tariffs.

The Republican platform also included
a direct threat to British Commonwealth
preferences. “We shall press” it was said
during the Presidential campaign “for the
elimination of discriminatory practises
against our exports, such as preferentia!
tariffs, monetary license restrictions and
other arbitrary devices.” The question
of American tariffs is, as the Financia!
Times of London comments, likely to be
one of the big international issues when the
new American policy is formulated.

The new Republican administration i
also likely to be intolerant of Britain’s hold-
ing aloof from greater participation in the
Schuman Plan and in the European De-
fence Community and General Eisen-
hower’s broadcast to the people of France
soon after his elections shows how concern-
ed he personally is to assure France of
American support. On the other hand
General Eisenhower must have a better
grasp of Britain’s position as the heart and
centre of a great Commonwealth of nations
and no one would know better than he the
value of Britain to Europe, to America and
to the whole free world.

The promised visit to Korea will raise
hopes, not only among American fathers
mothers and wives but among all those
who are weary of the disappointing Korean
war that an armistice will soon become
reality. No one wants the Korean war to
go on for one minute longer than necessary
and if General Eisenhower’s visit to Korea
should lead to a cessation of hostilities his
administration would begin under the most
favourable circumstances and in’ an at-
mosphere of international goodwill.

It is not for small dependent territories
like Barbados to raise a finger of reproach
at the corruption which has discredited
Democratic administration and which has
been widely publicised in the world’s Press:
but it is obvious that supporters of General
Risenhower here as in other countries of
the world are hoping that the new ad-
ee will be free from taints of this

ind.

The election of an American President is
primarily a matter of concern for the
citizens of America. But the role which
America now plays as the leader of the
free world has made the 1952 Presidential
elections perhaps the most important world
event of this century: It was time, most
people felt, that the long innings of the
Democratic administration of the United
States should end. It has ended and next
January one of the greatest citizens of the
world enters upon office in the White House
and takes up a burden, the weight and
responsibility of which are enough to
terrify the stoutest heart. Americans have
freely chosen General Eisenhewer to
shoulder this great burden and throughout
the free world men and women are hoping
that their choice will have been wise and
that under his leadership America and the
world will move into a period of prosperity
from which the menace of total war has
been removed farther than it is today



BARBADOS



| Our Common Heritage—(29)

HARRY GOODING

| His Academic Triumphs
Harry Beaujon Gooding was
born in 1887 at Seawell Plantation
in the parish of Christ Church.
He went to Lodge School when he
wan a little boy and there he be-
gan the study of Latin and Greek

another's orders and receive com-
munion at one another’s altars,

These proposals were considered
at the conference on reunion called
uy Headlam and Gooding en-
hanced his reputation by the part
he played at that conference.

which was to lead him later to a Gooding showed that he had a
notable career in classics and number of convictions which were
theology. He lived in those days none the less firmly held because
first at Mount Pleasant and then they were quietly expressed. He
at Congo Road and it is strange to did not share the view that vio-
relate that one unimaginative lence in religion was the same as
master at the Lodge seemed to earnestness and that extreme
think that he would never go very Opinions were identical with re-
far in Greek. ligious enthusiasm, He felt that

As a matter ‘of fact, there reunion could only be discussed
seemed little chance at one time M an atmosphere, of calm delib-
that Gooding weuld pursue the eration, completely free from par-
academic course that was to bring tY Spirit, and his approach to the
him renown in the world of schol. Subject was that of a man who is
arship and learning. He left suided by common sense and so-
school while he was still young °F logic.
and entered the profession with :
which his family had been con- From the time of the conference
nected for several generations, But 9" reunion, Gooding won increas-
an uncle of his realised that ha 'ng prestige and influence in the
would be wasting his talents if ha W0rld of scholarship. He had
remained a planter. Gooding was &stablished his reputation as a Lib-
therefore induced to return to @ral Evangelical, as one who was
school and, as the Lodge at the ot ashamed to be thought moder-
time did not have all the facilities ate in religious matters. His main
for a classical sixth, he decided to desire was to follow the path dic-
go to Harrison College and have tated by reason and to avoid emo~
a try at the Barbados Scholarship, tion and prejudice. He became
The confident opinion of his uncle Strongly attached to the movement
was not disappointed and in 1906 Which had brought new ideas of
Gooding won the prize which en- Personal religion, of philanthropic
abled him to pursue his studies, @ffort and missionary zeal, He saw
abroad. ,clearly the value af the modernist

Once again he was almost di- movement which sought to exam-
verted from the path that was to ine the eC een ah ce
lead him to the highest academic @*hanges in ee nae ho ama
hohours. It was his family’s wist@ Tied to reconcile p preys .
that he should study medicine ana science to Christian theology. It
he therefore entered Edinburgh
University for that purpose. Al-
though he did not have his heart
in medicine, he soon showed that
he possessed a first rate brain, He
gained all the prizes for which he
was eligible, won a bursary to the
value of £400 and gave every
promise of winning conspicuous
successes in the field of medicine.
But before long his love of the
humanities induced him to aban-
don his medical studies and he en-
tered Hertford College, Oxford, to
read for a classical degree. Here
began the brilliant career that was
to lead him from one triumph to
another. He won prize after prize
and was awarded an open scholar~
ship at Hertford. He gained the
distinction of winning three first
class honours—in Classical moder-
ations, in his Finals and in Theol-
ogy—-a feat performed by few
Barbadians.

His achievements were recog-
nised by the authorities who
extended his open scholarship
for another year. His awards up
to that time included the junior
Greek Testament prize, the
Denyer Johnson Theological Prize,
and a Liddon Studentship that
was worth £90 per annum for two
years, Hertford College had every
reason to be proud of its son and
accordingly he was appointed a
Tutor at the College and was |
later invited to accept a Lecture- |
‘hip. But Gooding decided to {
‘eave Hertford for a wider field |
and accepted the post of Vice- |
Principal of Wycliffe Hall, Oxford. | ~
Sy this time his reputation as a ©
scholar began to spread through
Oxford. He impressed all with
whom he came into contact by
the range and variety of his
learning, by the strength and
power that came from profound
knowledge. Such a man was
bound to attract attention and his
appointment at the post-graduate
theological college at Wycliffe Hall
—he was not even ordained at
the time —— showed that he had
won the respect and esteem of
those who were competent to
judge in matters of scholarship.

His Wide Culture
In spite of his advance in the
theological world, Gooding con-
tinued his classical studies with
the ardour and zeal worthy of the























































HARRY

was this phase of the search for
truth that had a special fascina-
tion for Gooding and it was his
scrupulous concern for the truth
that attracted the countless young
men who flocked to listen to the

great scholars of the Renaissance.
{n 1914 Oxford, well aware of his
wide culture and catholic mind.
appointed him one of its classical
examiners and honoured him with
the invitation to preach the Latin
sermon in St, Mary’s Church, the
great religious centre of the uni-
versity,

During the years of the first
World War, Gooding left Oxford
tc do parochial work in the Isle
of Wight where he thought he
coulda be of greater practical value
during a time of emergency. But
in 1919 he returned to the uni-
versity and to the life and work
he loved with an absorbing pas-
sion, Oxford, who seem lad
to receive him back in her fold, at
once appointed him Principal of
Wycliffe Hall and examiner in
theology. And Liverpool, as if
to proclaim its faith in the renown
he had won in two great branches
of learning, appointed him exter-
nal examiner in Hellenistic Greek,

Then began for Gooding one of
the most strenuous and fruitful
periods in his life. All the re-+
sources of his profound and subtle
mind were placed at the disposal
of the scholarly world. In 1920 he
became associated with Arthur
Headlam, who was appointed
gius Professor of Divinity at Ox-
ford in 1921, later becoming Bishop
of Gloucester, Both Headlam ond
Gooding belonged to a school of

words of wisdom that fell from
his lips at Oxford and in later
years at the Y.M.C.A. in Barba-
dos. It was perhaps on such
youthful seekers after truth that
Gooding exercised his profound-
est influence. He inspired them
with his passion for intellectual
exercise and urged them to follow
the path-of reason with unfalter-
ing confidence

His Learning And Simplicity

But, in spite of his profound
knowledge aud his critical
‘approach to every enquiry, there
was a simplicity about Gooding
that went to the hearts of his
students. He beiieved that Chris-
tianity would advance not merely
through efficient organisation but

the increased value of
the individual person. He was
convinced that outward forms
were not really important and
that the essential thing was to
have all over the world “Pray-
ing, ardent souls, who bind to-
gether our torn and_ struggling
humanity with invisible, but
effective chains of love.” He be-
lieved that Evangelical Chris-
tianity, with all its divisions, had
a remarkable degree of unity and
he wrote enthusiastically to sup-
port the cause of Liberal Evangeli-

calism. He was an Evangelical in.

thought that had to meet no little ‘the sense that he sought to estab-
opposition at the time. Their ap- lish the simplicity of Christian
proach to theology was intensely belief based on the spirit and doc-
critical, They were anxious to trine of the gospel and he was
discover the truth in every ques- Liberal in that he wanted to see
tion and they would accept no- Christian thought reconciled with
thing on trust. aang believed that the changed conditions of modern
4 university school of theology, times. On this basis he worked
where a critical and scientific earnestly for the unification of the
spirit prevailed, was eminently English Churches and if was a fit-
suited to turn out young men who ting recognition when he was
would put their hearts and souls appointed a member of the Oxford
in their work for the Church. To Branch of the. Bishop of Bombay's
some timid souls this emphasis on enquiry on reunion,
the intellect was too bold, but to Gooding’s prestige as a theolog-
|the majority of thoughtful people jan received still further recogni-
\it made their ‘work reasonable tion when he was appointed a
and understandable. In view of member of the Archbishop's Com-
| the great importance they both at- mission on Doctrine and’ invited
Fioched to university teaching, to help in the work of revising
Headlam and Gooding took the the Prayer Book. The need for
significant step of introducing the such revision was generally rec-
Diploma of Theology at Oxford ognised at the time. In its main
|end, appropriately enough, Good- features the, Prayer Book had
ling was appointed an examiner remained unchanged for nearly
| tor the Diploma. four hundred years, No changes
| In 1920 Headlam and Gooding had been made from time to time
|} began to work together on the to adapt it to the circumstances of
question of reunion, They were a changing age. It was felt that
of the opinion that the great body the Prayer Book should be made
of English-speaking Christianity to conform with existing use, that
should be united and thus made it should harmonise with the
a strong and rerful spiritual habits and thoughts of the day,
g powerful spiritua : “hep jifled to meet
force. Headlam advanced several that it should be modified to mee
proposals to bring about a union the fuller and richer life of the
betel os “th » Anglican and English twentieth century, that it should
| between Re nglican and Englis® ». adapted to the conditions of
| Free ¢ hurches As a basis for Te- modern thought. the advance of
| Whion ¢ iggested that thee science. the welfare of the people
2e frankly the problems of peace and war
the conflict of capital and lal



gr

nd eely t recognise one

ADVOCATE

fy F. A. Heyos

[he revision of the Prayer Book
‘was regarded as a crisis in the
history of the Church of England |
and it is @ source of great pride)
for Barbados that one of her sons
was selected to perform a mo-~
mentous task and meet a grave
crisis.

At the time of this signal honour
Gooding was still in his thirties.
Everything seemed to point to a
bright and Shining future if he
had been able to remain at Oxford
where his ial gifts made him
an oui g figure. After gain-
ing the degree of B.D., he pro-
ceeded to the thesis for Doctorate
of Divinity but, according to the
statutes of the university, he was
too young to have the degree
conferred. Two years later, tha
eareer that gave promise of so
many high achievements came ta
an end when Gooding was forced
to return to Barbados for reasons
of heaith.

In Barbados

When Gooding arrived in Bar-
bados, he atonce took up the post
of Rector of St. John. The follow-
ing year he was appointed Senior
Classical Master at Harrison Col-
lege and for six years the College
was to benefit from his vast
knowledge of the humanities.
Though Gooding was perhaps at
his best in deAling with the under-
graduate pa he felt he was
doing useful work in the Classical
Sixth. He imbued his pupils with
a love for*classical learning and
stimulated in them a keen desire
for free discussions. His learning



and simplicity made a deep im-






GOODING

pression on the boys who passed
through his hands and, besides
keeping the classical sixth at a
high level of attainment, he
encouraged the critical and scien-
tific spirit that led them to
cxamine the questions that have
agitated the mind of man since the
dawn of human history.

In 1932 he was appointed
headmaster of the Lodge School in
succession to Bill Emtage. The
Lodge had now produced its own.
headmaster and Gooding set about
to expand and _ strengthen the
work his predecessor had done
for the school, He was determined
like Emtage, to preserve the
character of the Lodge as essenti-
ally a boarding school, In this way,
he felt, the school could make a
unique contribution to the life
of the island. In addition, he re-
solved to raise the scholastic level
of the Lodge. He realised the
growing importance of science
and provided increased teaching
facilities for that subject, But he
was convinced that the scholar-
ship of the school could best be
strengthened through study of
the classics and for this reason
he re-introduced Greek on the
curriculum. To attain the high
standards he set for the schdol,
he worked on a carefully worked
out plan ‘end gradually his
efforts began to bear fruit in the
results of the*School and Higher
Certificate examinations, Though
he did not live to see it, the
success of the school in winning
the Barbados Scholarship in 1941
was the undoubted result of his
plan.

But Gooding did not concen-
trate all his efforts to improve
the achieveménts of the school
in scholarship and sport. To his
mind no education was complete
unless it looked after body, mind
and spirit. H@ believed that he
should impress the school with
the supreme importance of moral
end spiritual values. He believed
in the edifying influence. of work
and was convinced that the
whole tone of the school could
be improved by earnest and con-
scientious effort in nursuit of lofty
ideals. “Education,” he once said,
“should be that. Kind of enlighten-
ment which enables a man—to
develop his power of choosing for

himself and to live intelligently
and freely in. accordance with
the ideals which he is_ able,

through education, to decide on
as being worthwhile.”

When the headship of
Lodge was. offered him in
Gooding hesitated before
accepted it because of the un-
certain state of his health, After
six strenuous years, during which

the
1932,
he

the numbers of the school rose
from 105 to 151 and the boarders
from 37 to 80, he was forced to}
eek medical advice England. |
The strain of running a boarding |

@ On Page &

Monday

Wednesday

Saturday—My

NOBODY'S |

DIARY

papists really missed the point or
whether they were just glad of the
opportunity to say a few kind words.
Never mind: this is the age of the high-
ways and hedges and you can see the
agents of some of the North American
religions walking in the hot sun as far
afield as Mount Tabor.

In Trafalgar Square, on the other
hand, there is a man who objects to
people who wear white collars. If he
had his way, if all of his people thought
like him every church door would be
shut. He says so.

May I appeal to the anti-papists tc
shed their sectarian prejudices and
realise that the papists besides paying

the established church through taxation
are Christians?

I wonder whether the anti-}%

quite a fair whack of the expenses of |

Nobody questions the right of the

cathedral authorities to put any notices

it likes on its church doors, but the point
is that the highways and hedges seem to
be left for the strolling evangelists.
They don’t always succeed either, and
they are plenty who will lend a help-
ing kick to help the churches lose face.

Even those who live in make-believe
worlds can smell a rat from a distance,
if their noses are not stuffed up.

Q. What price Alice Through the
Looking Glass ?

A. Oh that’s different®

* * *

Tuesday—There is a man at the waterworks

who rides a bicycle and has a sweet face.
His job is to put washers on my cocks
and as my household responsibilities
(the hired ones) are always leaving my
qocks dripping, he comes home quite
often. The other day for the first time
I saw him in action, It seems that some-
one was too lazy to fit a master cock
on to my water system so the water can
only be blocked from the road, For
some reason my washer friend prefers
not to turn the master cock in the road.
Result? You never saw anything like
it except in New Zealand where the
geysers come from, All the time my
friend is searching for the washer the
water jumps up and souses him from
head to foot. I’m sure that if this is the
regular system of washering cocks
enough water to keep the fountain run-
ning for half an hour must be lost. It’s
funny though, isn’t it ?

* * *

appeared at my window with a tale o
woe, His wife (the man with the face)
had just had a baby. Would I lend hin
80 cents to buy medicine from the docto:
shop? I didn’t think much of the stor
but I gave him the eighty cents. This
little story is for the benefit of those
who say that it never pays to do good.
I lost the 80 cents because the man hac
cooked up this tale but you'll be a much
bigger mug than I was if you fall fo:
this soap, after what I’ve told you.

* * *

Thursday—Does anyone care whether th«

buses on the Leeward Coast overtakc
cars doing 30 m.p.h.? Or is_ the keer
death off the road campaign slowing uj
now that Christmas is coming. I scar
the Press daily for some report tha
will shed some light on the burnt boa’
at Crab Hill. They don’t build fishing
boats of self-igniting wood.

* * *

Friday—I’'ve got a new suggestion for the

Fire Boys to consider. Every year we
get lots of fires on the sugar plantations
The ashes make an awful mess of my
house and other peoples. Instead of
waiting for the day when an unusually
strong wind blows burning trash on tc
our houses, could the Fire Boys noi
think up an anti-cane fire plan and helt
us to have less fires each year? I know
the Fire Boys are a bit sore becaus¢
.they can’t get their Fire Palace cum
sliding poles ete. but perhaps if we hac
less cane fires we could afford to spend
a bit more on expanding the Fire Ser-
vice. Oddly enough the Fire Boys are
not expected to put out cane fires. Nor
is anyone else, it seems.

* * *

friend from Cochin-Chine
has sent me another communication
which has passed the censors (No*
everything that I receive is fit for you
innocent ears, gentle readers). He
wants to know: how come a barber ar
a hawker plank seats on the Chamber-
lain Bridge footpath to the great annoy
ance of us foot-walkers?

The best answer I can give to th
really probing question is to ask: hoy
come a fish shed built for the use of
fishermen has become the communit>
centre for the Paynes Bay fraternity’
The only fish I’ve ever seen on that slab
has got legs and arms like me and my
friend from Cochin China,

Keep trying brother. Some day they’l!
build us a statue. And where they’ll
put it? Brother in the middle of the
Chamberlain Bridge, Where else?

The other night a face







SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1952







DIARIES !! DIARIES !!
AT THE
‘ADVOCATE STATIONERY



—— SX





A Broom or Bru

sh for

Every Purpose

BROOMS BRUSHES

Bass or Yard Lavatory

Scrub Shoe '
Cobweb Wire

Hair (Floor) Hair (Head)
Straw Serub

Steel Paint

-- Also —
CLEANERS and POLISHES
At
WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD.

Successors To

Cc. S.

87




PITCHER |

& CO.

For sunshine .. .
Tootal colour
and design...

they harmonize!

ree rar

TOOTAL — or simply
Dress Material —
why say more ?

We're not . . . we're
just reminding you

of TOOTAL Week...

TOBRALCO _..... $1.31
LYSTAV ......ccccc GLAL
LOMBIA &





JUST ARRIVED



Milk Fed Chickens
Milk Fed Ducks
New Zealand Lamb

Ox Tail Soup
Cranberry Bauce Frozen Fish
Tobasco Sauce Frozen Peas
Cocktail Onions Frozen Sprouts
Red, ae Frozen Spinach
Carr's Cheese Crisps Fruit Puddings
t Pas! LIQUOR DEPT.

Eating Pears Dubonnet
Eating Apples Claret
Cooking Apples Sauternes

t Liebfraumilch
SPEcraRICES Bristol Sherry
Craven A 50’s—$1.08 tino”

Craven A 20’s—42c,
Capstan 50’s—$1.08
Capstan 20’s—42c.
Gold Flake 50’s—$1.08
Gold Flake 20’s—42c.



To-day’s Favourite - .

Creme de Menthe

Dom

Bass Ale—12-oz.
Goldentree—12-0z.
Canada Dry Drinks

Schweppes Tonic
Oranges—5 cents
Plantains—6 cents

GOLD BRAID PHONE
— GODDARDS
(3-Yr.-Old) We
DELIVER



EES
eee







SATURDAY,

Man Acquitted of House-Breaking and Larceny

. |Europe and Japan
month, when Air France put
a once-weekly flight,

NOVEMBER 8,



1952

Jury Returns Verdict
On C.J.’s Instructions

FOLLOWING the instructions of His Lordship the
Chief Justice Sir Allan Collymore, an assize jury yester-

day returned a verdict of not guilt

in a case in which

Charles Bennett a watchman, was charged with breaking
into the house of Itina Bowen, a hawker of Cave Hill, on
September 22 this year and stealing a purse containing $10.

‘Bicycle Thief
Placed On
Probation

James Belgrave a labourer of
St. George was put cn 18 months’
probation by His Lordship the
Chief Justice Sir Allan Collymore
yesterday when he withdrew his
plea of not guilty of stealing a
Raleigh bicycle the property of
Cladstone Clarke of Hastings.
Christ Church, on September 10
this year, and pleaded guilty to
committing the offence.

Belgrave changed his plea after
the Prosecution called four wit-
nesses.

He was represented by Mr. E
W. Barrow.

Mr. F. E. Field, Assistant At~
torney Gencral, prosecuted for
the Crown.

Gladstone Clarke said that he
bought the bicycle last year and
its serial number was DD44405.
On September 10 he lent it to a
friend called Peter Mandeville
about 7.30 am. He returned to
him in the evening and said that
it was lost.

Peter Mandeville said he bor-
rowed the bicycle and about 4 p.m.
he leaned it on the pavement in
front of the Office Equipment
Service building in Coleridge
Street and went into the building
for about 10 minutes. When he
returned, the bicycle was missing.

Cpl. Emerson Yearwood said
that Belgrave was brought to the
Central Police Station in a Police
ear on September 10 along with
the watchman of Lodge Plantation.
The watchman accused Belgrave
of trespassing on the plantation
grounds and refusing to give his

name or business there when
requested. ‘ :
At the Station, Belgrave said

that he had taken a bicycle from
near the Fire Brigade station,
ridden it to Christ Church and
left it under a dunks tree on a hill
near the beach road. '

They went in search of the
bicycle and when it was found
Belgrave was charged with steal-
ing it.

Cross-examined, he said that
Belgrave had not actually men-
tioned a dunks tree, but the
bicycle was found under one,

Belgrave had vaguely said “on a
hill along the beach road.”

P.C. Elliot Brewster said that he
was present when Belgrave told
Cpl. Yearwood about the bicycle.

At this stage His Lordship asked
the jury to retire and told counsel
for both sides that he wanted to
confer with them in his chambers.

Plea Withdrawn

When hearing resumed, Mr.
Barrow said that in the light of
the evidence given by the four
witnesses, and especially in the
light of the police evidence, he
had asked his client to withdraw
his plea of not guilty. At the same
time he would draw His Lord-
ship’s attention to Belgrave’s
strange behaviour in taking the
bicycle, riding it to Christ Church,
and abandoning it, straying about
the Lodge Plantation. ]

Belgrave then pleaded guilty to
the larceny of the bicycle.

His Lordship told the jury that
us they had been sworn to try the
case, he would ask them to give a
with the

verdict in accordance
plea. a
The jury returned a verdict 0
guilty.
His Lordship said that the

evidence showed that the accused
was a very extraordinary person.
He had left St. George and taken
the bicycle from Bridgetown and
after riding it to Christ Church
abandoned it and went off wander-
ing. The evidence given by the
police went to show that probably
at the time he was suffering from
some mental aberration.
. Mr. Barrow said that Belgrave
rormally used to work at a plan-
tation in St. George. It would
seem that his mother sometimes
suffered from occasional aberra~
tion also, and his Lordship could
get the Probation Officer to 29
iuto the history of the family,
His Lordship put Belgrave on
probation for 18 months in a
surety of £25



After all the prosecution wit-
nesses had given evidence, Mr.
F. E. Field Assistant Attorney
General who prosecuted for the
Crown said that the eyjdence
was not strong enough to jeopar-

dise Bennett's liberty by allow-
ing the case to go before the
jury.

His Lordship said that there

were too many lies and too many
discrepancies and askeq the jury
to return a verdict of not guilty.

Bennett was represented by
Mr, D. H. L. Ward.

Itina Bowen said she was a
hawker and on September 22

she left home about 6 a.m. and
went to the beach to buy fish.
Before leaving home she secured
the windows and doors of the
part of the house she rented from
a man called Cecil Grimes. The
other part of the house was occu-
pied by a woman named Louise
Griffith. Cecil Grimes lived
about 20 yards from the house
Griffith and she occupied.

She returned from the beach
about 9 a.m, and found the lock
of the door to her room broken.
After a search she discovered that
a purse she had containing $10
was missing.

The first time she had met
Bennett was on September 14
when she was carrying her baby,
and Bennett told her that the
baby looked a pleasant child and
he liked it. Some days later she
met him and he enquired after
the baby. He came to her home
the same night and after putting
a shilling in the baby’s hand,
suggested to her that she and he
could become friends. She re-
fused his offer.

Saved Money

The $10 were single @llar
notes and was money she had
saved from time to time.
Cross-examined, she said that
she began to rent the room from
Grimes about three weeks before
the money was stolen, and at
that time she had accumulated
six of the $10. She had paid
Grimes five ‘shillings the day he
gave her the key. She denied
ever telling the police that she
haq got the $10 as a meeting
turn, She and Bennett were
never friendly, nor had he ever
given her money besides the
putting of the shilling in the
aby’s hand, When she paid
Grimes the five shillings she did
so with five single shillings.
Re-examined, she said she had
never been in a “meeting” with
anyone.

P.O. «Elliot Brewster said | that
the matter was reported to tha
Police and he visited the house
and saw the door broken.

Louise Griffith said that she
rented part of the house occupied
by Bowen. On _ September 22
about 8.30 a.m. Bennett came to
the house and asked for Bowen.
He said he was looking for a lan-
tern he used on his job as watch-
man. He broke open the door
and after staying a short period
in the room came out without
anything.

He went at Grimes
saw them speaking. She had
seen Bennett visit Bowen on
nights previous to the incident.

Cross-examined, she said that
she did not go and tell Grimes
that Bennett had broken the door.

Cecil Grimes said that Ben-
nett came to him on September
22 and asked him whether he was
the owner of the house Bowen
occupied and whether or not she
had brought a lantern at him. He
told Bennett that Bowen had
brought no lantern at him. Some-
time after Bennett went on he
noticed that the door to the room

and she

Bowen occupied ,was broken
open, /
Cross-examined, he said that

Griffith had come and told him
Bennett had broken the door.

When Bowen came to rent the
room. she told him that she did
not have any money then and
the following week she paid him
five shillings, handing him a dol-
lar note and a shilling.

Mr. F. E. Field said that the
evidence was not strong enough

to jeopardise the accused liberty Peared for the petitioner. of e Govyernor-'n-Executive Bolton Lane
by putting the case before a jUTY. | 344¢6666466000696000060614006: . 04 ‘Gay
His Lordship instructed the} GVQOO 9 POCD LD YOGOGV OOOO 9-0 06-00 9V-E-8-19F0000G-9OSOOF OOO
a verdict of not}



BARBADOS



U.K.



INDUSTRIALISTS AT CENTRAL

ADVOCATE



FOU
s



. MR. W. W. 8. ROBERTSON, 0O.B.E. (centre), member of the U.K. Industrial Mission at present tour

ing the island is pictured above visiting the workshop of the Central Foundry Ltd.

With him are

Mr. P. A. Cheeseman, works engineer (left) and Mr. ©. G. Crawford, technical manager.



Application For A

Sales Granted

In. the Court of Chancery yes-
terday,. His Lordship the vice
Chancellor, Mr, Justice J. W. B.
Chenery granted the application
ior appraisement and saic¢ ot
the dweiling-house Mayville, Cod-
rington Hill, St. Michael, and one
acre one rood of land in the suit
C. B. Brooks plaintiff and Wil-
mer C. Cummins, defendant,

The Registrar's report of
were filed.

Mr W. W. Reece, Q.C.,_ in-
structed by Messrs. Yearwood &
Boyce, Solicitors, appeared for the
plaintiff.

The application for appraise-
ment and sale of qa dwellinghouse
and one rood 13 perches of land
at Six Mens, St. Peter in the suit
W. I. Griffith, plaintiff and J. |
Broome, defendant, was also
granted, The Registrar’s report of

liens

liens were filed.

Mr. E. W. Barrow _ instructed
by. Messrs Haynes & Griffith,
Solicitors, appeared on behalf of

the plaintiff.

In the suit L. E.
tiff, and C. H Marshall, detfen-
dant His Lordship granted the
application for appraisement and
sale of two parcels of land at
Sealy Hall, St John, the first be-
ing one acre, 10 perches. with
dwellinghouse and the other being
two acres.

The Registrar's report of
were filed.

His Lordship also granted the
application for appraisement and
sale of five acres, six perches of
land in the suit H. O. StC. Cum-

R. Gill, plain-

liens





berbatch, plaintiff, and T Dd
Sealy & Co Ltd. defendant.

MP. Bu bs Ome Brancker in-
structed by Messrs Haynes &
Griffith, Solicitors, appeared for

the plaintiff.



Becree Absolute

Mr. Justice J. W. B. Chenery
pronounced decree absolute in tie
suit of L G. Miller, petitioner and
Cc. O. Miller, respondent, in the
Court for Divorce and Matri-
monial Causes yesterday.

His Lordship also pronounced
decree absolute in the suit of O.
D. Ashby petitioner, and S. V.
Ashby, respondent.

Mr. W. W. Reece, @.C. .in-
structed by Messrs Hutchinson &
Banfield, appeared for the peti-
tioner,

Letters of Administration

In the Court of Ordinary His
Lordship granted the petition of
Vincent Burke of Bay Street, 6t.
Michael, for letters of adminis-

tration to the estate of his aunt
Etheline H. Harris, late of Bay
Street.

Mr. J. S. B. Dear, instructed
by Messrs Yearwod & Boyce ap-

This verdict was return- |

jury to return
culty,

ed.

Eee cone
Ch. Ch. Vestry Agree To Lease Land

The Christ Church Vestry at
their meeting on Thursday signed
the agreement for the lease from
Government of the land on which
the Sargeant’s Village pavilion




stands, i
The land was bought by i
rnment some years ago fr

Ce sans ed Sna0eseoe

a a
‘Ves
= af
OF
® 4°
% ma
IN TIME FOR THE
RACES TOO!
Cracker Jacks
Cashew Nuts
Salted Nuts

Pascall’s Barley Sugar
Pascall’s Marshmallows
Mackintosh’s Toffee De Luxe
% MacKintosh’s Quality St. Assort.
Sharpe's Toffee De Luxe

$366 66666666606608605

Y SOS FOPOOOOPOOSSS

HOLIDAYG

KNIGHT'S DRUG STORES

Kent

lishment of a playing field. Since

then a pavilion had been erected

and publicly opened on July 4

by Lady Savage.

Several of the social groups in
the area make use of the pavilion
once a week for their discussions.







SiON

wereld ts



Fry's Peppermint Cream ‘Ib
ie 1b

$OGSSSSS68%



SCO ood 4% 4 “ “



1



!







her on September 10 this year.
Mr. E. K, Walcott, Qy, appeared for Byer.

His Worship Mr, C
Police Magistrate of
had fined
to be

Ww
District “B”
Byer 40s and 3s costs
paid in 14 days or one
month’s imprisonment with hard
labour for the offence and Byer
appealed.

Applewhaite told the court that
on September 10 about 12.15 p.m.



she was walking along St, Judes S08, miepmly. takes — the form
road when the defendant rushed “Try and turn over a new extrachon or the timber: and. m
out of the canes and attacked her for if you come here again eral resources gold, diamona
with an iron stake. The defendant Will go to prison,” His Worship bauxite and Colombite,
hit her three times across the left Mr. G. B. Griffith, Acting Po~ This was not good enough, ar:
ear with the iron stake. lice Magistrate of District any proper planning for the are

Before the incident they had told Eric Lewis of Black Rock St. must therefore necessarily tal
a row and this was over a pig Michael, yesterday, when he plac- into consideration an all-roun:
which the defendant took away ©4 him on probation for industrial development based oi
from her. “ months for stealing cocoanuts on g diversified economy

: October 22. Commenting on ‘the situatio:

s Pan Constable Bovell said Lewis was seen picking cocoa- in Barbados as he conceived i
~~ w Mond a along St. Judes nuts from a tree, the property of during his “short stay.” Hon, D,
yi ig ad, St, eorge about Mr. R. N. Thani, on October 2) Jagan said “it is in a state o
f - p.m on ore. 10 and the matter was reported to flux.”

2 saw a man come out of a cane- 2 ol ce. water a warra Jas f
field and attack Applewhaite ‘with Ala for the defendant's anne He inenasht, that a tong-term

an iron stake, Applewhaite shout-
ed for murder and he ran towards
the canefleld but the man escaped.
He did not recognise fRe man or
he could not say if the defendant
was the man.

To Mr Walcott Bovell said
Applewhaite shouted for Archie
Byer when the man attacked het
He was about 40 feet from Apple-
whaite,

£3 FOR WOUNDING :

His Worship Mr
Acting Police M:
trict “A”, yesterday fined Henry
Clarke, a 40-year-old labourer of
Richmond Gap, St. Michael, £3
to be paid in 14 days or one
month’s imprisonment with hard
labour foi wounding Leotta
Harewood on November 3.

Harewood told the Court
while standing at the corner
James Street, St. Michael, 1
defendant came up to her
cuffed her in her mouth

G, B. Griffith

strate of Dis





that
of
ne

and

STOLE TABLE :

Harold Lorde of Nelson Street,
St. Michael and Clifton Morris of
Pa ze Road, St. Michael, were
each sentenced to seven days
mprisonment with hard labour by



His Worship Mr, E. A. McLeod,
wien they pleaded guilty yester-
day of stealing an iron table on
July 21 from the yard of the

Highways and Transp:

The table which is the property

Rudder, Committee was valued at

6d.

Investig

table was removed from the yard

ppeal Judges Dismiss
Charges Of Bodily Harm

IN THE ASSISTANT COURT OF APPEAL yesterday
Their Honours Mr. H. A. Vaughan and Mr. A. J. H. Han-
schell dismissed without prejudice the case in which 34-
year-old Miriam Applewhaite of St. Judes, St. George,
brought against 40-year-old Archibald Byer of Prerogative,
St. George, charging him with inflicting bodily harm on

ations showed that

of Highways & Transport,

Lorde had

ions and Morris four,

ON PROBATION :

Lewis said that a servant em-
ployed him to piek the cocoanuts

from the tree.

Sgt.
tock

was a

Howard attached to Black
Police

Station
of the

said
habit

cocoanuts,

“Lady Rodney” On
Last W.I. Voyage

The SS. Lady Rodney is
pected to call at Barbados
Sunday the 9th of November
When the Rodney calls here

be on

shores of the Caribbean after 24
service.

years’

On the Rodney will
members of the crew of the Lady
Nelson who were laid off
the ship had keen taken
the West Indies run. Some mem-
bers of the crew of the
will be laid off when
calls on Sunday; others
make the trip south and

when the ship returns from

islands,

Diamond Rings



returning from the islands, it wil

its last voyage to

LOUIS L. BAYLEY

LANVIN — Arpege, My Bin,

Scandal, Rumew

Plantation for the mn) p r R r U M ye S

OF DELIGHTFUL



JEAN PATON — Joy, Moment
Supreme, Amour Amour

SCHIAPURELLI — Shocking

CHANEL — No. 5

CAVE SHEPHERD & Co.,, Ltd

10: 11, 12, & 13, Broad Street,

= 1. ite,
Both men wese seen convey-
ng the table along Tudor Street.

1l previous convic-

that
defendant to
climb cocoanut trees and steal the

be those

afte:
fron:

Rodney
the ship

get off

+, 000060020000!

Irrigation

A Pressing

| Problem In BG)

SEAWELL, Nov. 7.—Hon. Dr.
Cheddi Jagan, M.L.C., British
Guiana, returned home by
B.W.LA this afternoon = aft
spending two week durin
which, together with other mem
bers of the C.L.C, he interviewed
Mr. G H. Adams, president
the Congress “with a view to pr¢
rerving West Indian unity in t!
Labour movement in the Caril
bean.”

Dr. Jagan told
just before his departure tha
British Guiana, with its tremen
dous land, timber and mineral re
rources, has great scope
development.

One of their major
however, was to make
available to the farmers.

He said that although Britis!
Guiana has a population densiv,s
of five persons to the squrre mile
they nevertheless were faced wit
the pressing problem of “lax
hunger.” The 1946 census hac
revealed that the average farme
had an average holding of 3
acres of land, Any developmen
of thet country must therefore
have as its basis
drainage and _ irrigation
with a view to making well
drained irrigated lands quickly
available, in addition to othe:
facilities, such as cheap credit an:
tractor and machine station
which would provide heavy equin

oO}

the Advocat

to.

problems,
the lar

projet

ment like bull dozers, harvest
pnd so on.

He thought that if those drain
age and irrigation projects we
embarked tipon immediately,
only would the British Gu
population be provided for, bh"

also the excess population in th
Caribbean territories. For th
reason, he considered the pre!
lem in British Guiana one of th:
entire Caribbean area

Agricultural develooment
that respect would also lay
basis for the provision of e>
for the develonment of heavy
secondary industries’ in tl
territories,

Extraction

At the moment, he said, indu
trial developmenc in Britush Gi

plan of development was a gov
thing for any country, but i
should be in relation to thi
available resources of the area

a whole, In the Caribbean the;
should be overall planning w
the several te Vitor es,

“Individual planning withor
due consideration to the area a
whole cannot solve the
problems, particularly
over-population.”

He edded “it is very urgen
that countries like Barbad
should plan for industrialisatior
but this again must be done wit!
careful thought to the demands
the area as a whole.”

It was for that reason that t!
People’s Progressive Party o
' British Guiana, while strugglin
‘for self-government in Britis!
Guiana, was fighting for a We
|Indian Federation with dominio
| Status,

|

press
that



Sport Shirts

ERDINE by “ELITE” in

Also the popular

to $6.72

For SPORTWEAKR
in White only “

For DRESSWEAR
in Cream, Grey
@



WOOO

PAGE FIVE



Direct Service To
Japan

service

opens

A new direct between

next

on

taking

Ove Air



hours. Britisn seas







are planning a Comet service
Tokio.
In just. over two years, the
RAF’s hoverplanes in Malaya WHITE. |}
have picked up more than 200
sick and wounded men from . Bl aa
the jungle and flown them to s
| hospital. —LE.S.

country-wide }



Including an exceptionally
ylaroon,
Beige, Cream, Maize and Tan @
“KOOLMUNE”
good range of plain shides

As well as a large assortment of other
Sport Shirts in fancy designs from $2.50

SEA ISLAND SHIRTS

$7.00 and $8.44





Gas apkin Rash

Apply ‘Cetavlex’ Cream to the affected
area when changing the napkin. The
be found

action of ‘Cetaviex’ will

both soothing and healing.

use ‘Cetavlex” ror WOUNDS, CUTS, BURNS, SCRATCHES, ETC

‘Cetaviex’ Cream

Antiseptic and non-irritant
Sole Agents and Distributors
A. §, BRYDEN & SONS (BARBADOS) LTD,
BRIDGETOWN
A product of

IMTTRIAL CHEMICAL (PHARMACEUTICALS) LIMITED
© sosiciary company of imperial Chemical Industries Limited





|
y PURINA. @

iLAYENA

eee
COMPLETE RATION







FOR THE RACES

NOW s
SELECT THE FINEST IN

SHIRTS

Dress Shirts

By “ARROW,” “ELITE”, “RENOWN,”
“NEW YORKER,” “RELIANCE”, ete.,
ete, in several qualities from $3.94 to

S749 *










smart GAB-
Bottle,
$6.03

in a









$6.67

Blue and White

|







PAGE SIx
TRIPLE



INSTALLED



THE TRIPLE (above) from Poole
installed ir Lemon Arbor Factory i
have amalgamated and are now cal’

Factory, St. John, is now being
» the same parish. These factories
d Uplands Factory.

Poole And Lemon Arbor

Sugar Facto

POOLE AND LEMON
sold to a new company knc

ries Merged
ARBOR factories have been
wn as Uplands Limited. It is

proposed to combine the two factories into one improved

factory “UPLANDS” on the

Since June, some 250 or 300 men and women have
been working in an effort to have the major works com-
ar, leaving only certain minor

pleted by the end of the ye
jobs to be done the last fe
of the 1953 crep which it is

The maehinery at Poole Fac-
tory has been dismantled, and
part of it Carried over to Upland

where it is being erected. Thi
includes a boiler, a triple and two
mills, making the new factory a
fifteen-roller plant

It is expected that with the
amalgamation, the grinding capac-
ity will be in the vicinity of 40
tons of cane per hour—an increase
of between 10 and 12 tons on the
output by Lemon Arbor,



Speaker Warns
Assemblymen

His Honour the Speaker Mr.
K. N. R. Husbands warned mem-
bers of the House of Assembly
last night that he “will be firm in
dealing with members who in-



i sides Gifing the course of a
lebvate. at

His Honewe issued this warn-
ing after Riad on a number of
occasions “Miping last night’s de-
bate callegthe House to order
so. that - could follow the
peeches made by members.

He said Sgt there is a standing
rule whic ys that a member

> on eet must not be in-

terrupted. & said that members
should learn to control their
aside and pointed out that the
chamber was not very large and
that such interruptions should not
be made particularly in the pfes-
ence of visitors.

He warned that in the near
future he will be very firm in
seeing that the rule be observed.



For B.T.C. Races





SEAWELL, Nov. 7.—Mr, Alex
Chin, provision merchant of Brit-
ish Gwianay and well known W.1.
turfite, arrived from Trinidad by
B.W.LA, to attend the B.T.C
Race Meeting which opens at the

Garrison Savannah to-morrow.



Mr, Chin told the “Advocate”
that has seven horses entered
for Christmas Race Meeting
in iidad, one of which is
Royal Windsor, a_ four-year-old
brown colt which has just come

down from England.
The colt is by Windsor Slipper
out of Lissaleen by Sir Cosmo
Mr, Chin, who is accompanied



by his wife, is a guest at Super
\iare Guest House,
Talking Point
You can never plan the

future by the past.—Burke,
They laugh that win,
Shakespeare.
Liberty is not merely a
privilege to be conferred; itis ,
a habit to be acquired. t
-—-Lloyd George.

One
‘Bank’ A

The woman of tomorrow may
lock searchingly into her mirro
on her 40th birthday ‘and decide

that the time has come to cover
her face with the spare complex-
jon she set aside when she was 17

Her plastic surgeon will take it
out of eeld storage and after a few
weeks in a nursing home the
wornan will emerge with a really
rejuvenated face.

This frightening

sity College, London,

Scientists there have found tt
skin removed for grafting opera

tions can be kept alive in a deep

freezer for at least four mont

and probably indefinitely if it has

first been soaked in glycerine.
A graft made with it looks ¢
actly the same as one made from

skin which-has been freshly re-

moved,

The exp€rin.ents-have been rr -

stricted to rabbits so far, but the

scientists believe that the results
cofld alsb be applied to human

pattents,

Emergency

Professor Peter

out thiseresearch for two imme-
diate purposes: -—
4 ee
hin-gragt “banks?” — reserves
which cOul@ be used immediate!
on badty~turned people to give
emergengy-eoverage.

A graft taken from another per











; Ge > fhiting’
son quickly dies. But while Column. As it ie Tre stilt woorktne
working h rabbits Medawat After experiments with guinea ‘ Mi

*found that the life of such a graft pigs, U.S. scientists are convinced British jet fighters and engine
can be prolonged if the ad prolonged exposure to jet- are being built in 12 factorie
cortisone_jig given at the same@engine noise will damage the in‘six different countries Bel-
time n ea whatev« Air Force gium, France, Holland, Italy,

ing this im ties may say swedéet iT Switzerland ;
t finding in human plasti L.E.s —L.E.S
°

upt other. members by mak- tinctiou,)

prospect is
opened up by astonishing experi-
ments now in progress at Univer-

Medawar and
Dr. R. E. Billingham bre carrying

peed the setting up of

Lemon Arbor site.

w weeks before the beginning
hoped will start in February

L.C.C. Exam Results

The
Londor
xan





following are the results of the
Chamber of Commerce summer
ations for 1952

ELEMENTARY STAGE

ARLENGTON HIGH SCHOOL
S. Mason—Arithmetic

BARBADOS EVENING INSTITUTE
FE. Aga'd—Typewriting.
T. Archer—Typewriting
E. I. Beckles—Arithmetic
R, Best—Mathematics
V. Da C. Best—Typewriting

G. Bynoe— Book-keeping

N. De V. Davis—Typewriting (Distine-
tion)

E. Estwick—Arithmetic
English
M. Franklin—Typewriting (Distinction),
. o. rnes—Arithmetic, English.
(Distinction,
—(Distine-

(Distinction

(Distinction),





fi ul—Typewriting
B. Greenidge—Arithmetic

tion), English.

Greenidge—Book-keeping
Harper—Mathemiatics.
Hayde—Arithmetic, English.
. A. Ince—Book-keeping (Distinction)
E. Kenn —Pook-keeping (Dis-
Typewriting (Distinction),
B. Lashley —Mathematies.




Cc. Lorde—Arithmetie.
D. Lucas-—Book-keeping (Distinction)
M. Mascoti—Arithmetic.

I, Mason—English.

M. Moore—English.

M. Newto English
Nicholis—Typewriting (Distinction)
S. Nurse—Typewriting (Distinction)
C. Parris—Typewriting.

FE. H. A. St. Bernard—Book-keeping

I

c

a

Skeete—Typewriting (Distinction)
Smith—Typewriting.
L. C. Walkes—Book-keeping, Type-
riting
Vv. E. Wood—Typewriting (Distinction)
Y. Dottin—Typewriting (Distinction),
PUPIL OF MISS CLINTON

E. Gonzalez—Shorthand (Distinction)
PRIVATE
K. A. Forde—Book-keeping (Distinc-

tlon).

P. E. Gibson—Arithmetic (Distinction),
English, Mathematies (Distinction).

W. A. Howell—Book-keeping

Cc. N. Smith—Geography,

CERTIFICATE STAGE
HIGH SCHOOL

ARLINGTON
A. DeC. Edwards
BARBADOS EVENT
R. Best—Arithmetic.
Cc... Farnum—Book-keeping Dis-
nection)
A. Harper-—English.
A. Ince—Typewriting.
O. Jones——-Typewriting
D. L. Lucas—Book-keceping
J. Sutherland—Typewriting
COMBERMERE SCHOOL
Austin——-Mathematics
Gregorie—French
Griffith—-Geography
.. Holder—Arithmetic,
(Maths. Distn.)
E.R. Warner—Mathematics
LYNCH'S SBCONDARY SCHOOL
H. J. Bourne—English (Distinction)
Mathematics
Vv. C. Clarke—English, Mathematics
E. E. Millar—English
V. E. Neblett—Arithmetic, Mathematic
MODERN HIGH SCHOOL
Allan Clarke—-English.
Aurie Clarke—English.
C. Gilkes—Shorthand,
M. Gill—English, Mathematics
M. Johnson—Arithmetic,
S. Lynton—Mathematies.
G Proverbs—English,
distinction)
BE. Thompson—-English




GC. -
M. C
L. K

Cau Geography,

iMatheratic



R. Thompson—English
K. Walrond—English, Mathematics
PUPILS OF MRS, BALLANCE
BR Husbands YpPwFitingy
T. A. King, Shorthand, Typewriting
L. L. Smith—Shorthand (Distinction)
PUPIL OF MISS CLINTON
E. Gonzalez—Typewriting
PRIVATE
E. O. Maxwell—Book-keeping
A. Milla Arithmetic



Day, Women May

Spare Face

urgery is now being investigated,
2. To provide a new way of
studying how and why the skin

grows old,

The scientists propose to remove
patches of skin from young rab-
bits, store it, and graft it back on

when they are older.

They will then be able to study
the difference between the skin
which has aged naturally and that
whieh has been in a state of sus-

pended animation,

It may be that
xperts will
irl without

plug the theme
—who knows?—the
sateh on,

Up to Scratch

When you scratch the palms of
your hands to satisfy an itch you
strokes than
of

shorter
scratch

vse much
when you
your neck,

The

the back

reason:—The body

centration to sensitive nerve
endings in the skin.
Where nerve endings are com-

paratively in the

law ue
few, as

velief.

On the face, hands, and back of

the ankle where nerve endings
are numerous, a short scratch is
enough.

Don’t Listen . . .

future fashion

a spare complexion
will later lose her man.” And then
idea might

is di-
vided into long and short seratch-
ing areas depending on the con-

middle
of the back and on the upper arm,
» long seratch is needed to give

M.V. Caribbee
Fresh Fruit
Brings More

Another busy day was experi-
enced along the wharfside yester-
day. Responsible for this was the
arrival of the motor vessel Carib-
bee which hailed from Dominica
early in the morning with its
usual cargo of fresh fruit,

There was also the usual bust-
ling activity which is associated
with the landing of fresh fruit
Hawkers, who missed the previ-
ous day's landing from the Daer-
wooed made certain that they
would not suffer a second setback
and as a result, they eagerly as-
sisted the crew in the unloading

Work on beard the Marion Belle
Wolfe was of the same nature as
the previous day's. There was even
number of vehicles
alon ie the berth of
: m Thursday
» lorries were seen tc
vessel's side
wood
Simi! progress on
the schooner Gita M.. which was
berthed. immediately above the
Marion Belle Wolfe. This schoon-
er, however, was unloading a cargo
of cocoanut of] and cot which
t brought from Grenada Dn
Wednesday

NEW POST BOX













coal or









Quite recently, 2 post box has
been placed in Beckles Road. This
box will serve the residents of
the district as well as those of
neighbouring area of Chelsea

R




Formerly, residents had to walk
long distances to Dalkeith or to
town in order to post their letters,
and this move will doubtlessly be
welcomed by them.

GENERAL CARGO



The Harrison line steamship
Herdsman arrived in port yester-
day morning from Liverpool. The
Herdsman which brought a general
cargo of foodstuffs and medicine
to the island is under the com-
mand of Captain T. Steel and is
consigned to Da Costa & Co., Ltd.

CARGO OF RUM
me Ten arrival yesterday was
e 1i6-ton motor vessel O.K.
Service VII which arrived from
Halifax. The vessel, which is
under the command of Captain
Fr. H. Strum is consigend to Mar-
tin Doorly & Co., and came to the
island to load a cargo of rum.

UNLOADING COPRA



The Daerwood which arrived in
port on Wednesday from St. Lucia
‘was yesterday unloading its cargo
of copra which it brought to the
island. This shipment of copra is
consigned to the Barbados Co-
operative Cotton Factory, The
Naerwood also brought a cargo of

resh fruit which it unloaded the
‘revious day. The vessel is con-

rigned to the Schooner Owners’
Association.

TIME FOR BG.

nl cs

The schooner Frances W. Smith
was yesterday loading a quantity
©: lime which is being shipped by

anning & Co, This schooner
came off dock three days ago after

ndergoing general all-round re-
airs and repainting. The schooner
'; expected to sail for British
“ulana during the day,

‘ARGO FOR ST. LUCIA

The motor vessel Lady Joy left
| ort yesterday afternoon around 4
‘clock for St. Lucia.

She took a cargo of rum, soap,
\argarine and various other items
© the same port. The Lady Joy
_under the command of Captain

. Parsons and its local agents
ere are the Schooner Owners’
-\ssociation.

Another departure yesterday
fternoon. was the auxiliary
‘hooner Cyril E, Smith which left
‘ort for Grenada,

The cargo which it is earrying

» Grenada includes rum, mar-
,arine, and soap. The Cyril FE
“mith is also consigend to the
chooner Owners’ Association.

COAL AND FIREWOOD.





The schooner Everdene which
rrived from British Guiana on!
Chursday was yesterday discharg-
ng its eargo which was made up

chiefly of charcoal and firewood.

The Everdene is under the com-
mand of Captain E. Phillips and is

’

consigned to the Schooner Owners
\ssociation,



e
Preparing
MOSCOW, Novy, 7
Marshal Semyon
25th Anniversary of the
Bolshevik Revolution

Soviet Union,”
Marshal Stalin mounted

He raised his arm in greeting t
the crowds and massed
below but did not speak.
‘It is true the warmongers ar
dreaming of another war an
preparing for it’, Timoshenko 7(
vear-old
Union said following the inspec
tion. “They are stepping up thei
rms drive. For almost three year
now they have been waging
barbarous war against the Korea
people and are trying to incit
certain states against the Sovie
Union. Warmongers should how
ever know that the people of th:



A Good Tip

myself, neither you nor lI

ances of




Warmongers

Timoshenko
reviewing Russian troops on the
1917
accused.
Western “warmongers” of “trying
to incite certain states against the

the
Red Square rostrum outside the
Kremlin in the first snowfall ofp
the season to watch the annua
«a display of Soviet armed strengtt

troop

Marshal of the Sovie

wotld do not want war.”——U.P

'WYING to repay a debt, I sug-

gested on Tuesday that Eddie
Arcaro, visiting American jockey
should risk a dollar or two on
Richer, winner of the Cambridge-
shire at 100-6. If I had backed it
need
have worried about future appear-

8




QUEEN ELIZABETH fl, followed by her

QUEEN ELIZASETH VISITS NEW D

_

&

q

fF

the Duke of Edinburgh,

is shown on her way to inaugurate the new Claerwen Dam, largest of
its kind in Great Britain. The project was planned by the Queen’s great
srandfather, King Edward VII, nearly 50 years ago. With the Queen
is the Lord Mayor of Birmingham, W. T. Bowen. The Duke accompanies

ihe Lady Mayoress and the Lord of Breceshire.





House Tribute

(international)

MEMO FOR



Mr. J. F. Brathwaite DECEMBER 1

The House of Assembly passed
a Resolution of Sympathy yes-
ter@ay in respect of the death of
Mr. J. F. Brathwaite, Official
Reporter of the House of Assem-
bly, who died at his residence,
Quaker Road, yesterday morning.

A copy of the resolution will
be sent to Mr. Brathwaite’s
relatives.

The House stood in silence as
a token of respect to his passing.
Mr. G. H. Adams in moving the
Resolution said that it was tragi¢
in that a short time ago Mr
Brathwaite had lost his wife.

Mr. Brathwaite was a man, 39
years of age and leaves six
children to mourn him. He was
sure that the House would wish
to place on record sympathy to
his family and espécially to the
children at this grievous loss of
both parents in a short space of
time,

Mr. V. B. Vaughan said that
he was not privileged to have
known Mr, Brathwaite for long
but for the little time he had
known him he had found him an
agreeable person. He desired to
express that the loss to them
would be felt and it would be
fitting to place on record this
regrettable loss.

Mr, E. D. Mottley said it was #
sad occasion. Just about six
months ago he received a tele-
phone message from Mr, Brath-
waite that his better half had
passed away leaving him with
the children. His association
with Mr, Brathwaite had been
long before he went to the
Advocate never mind to the
House of Assembly. It was less
than a year that Mr, Brathwaite
succeeded Mr, Maynard as re-
porter of the House. His manner
and conduct and devotion to his
cuty made Mr. Brathwaite res-
pected not only by members of
this House but by those who
came into contact with him.

He felt that it was their
bounden duty to see that some-
thing be done for the children
he has left behind to mourn him.







oi

we :
& RINSO for all your

f

oa r fcr
50 YEARS AGO
(From the ‘Barbades Advocate’
of November 8th 1902)

With the hard weather for the
ast two months it goes without
saying that the cane crop will be
seriously crippled and that a
hort crop of sugar must be ex-
pected . I understand, on good
suthority, that in those parishes
which have had the best rainfall,
ome good canes are to be seen,
put that no parish has a regular
crop of canes and that on the
whole the island’s output of sugar
will not exceed — tons. by - 3
with the ex v prices for
ugar and melodia cannot fail
o intensify the distress of the
gricultural body and have a
very serious effect on the labour-
ing class.

All persons concerned in the
vell-being of the country, from
llis Exeeliency the Governor and
the Legislature to the Merchant,
have done the best that may be
done to keep alive the main in-
dustry of the island till better
days come. But when these ex-
pected better days will come and
when the dark cloud will pass
away and a_ brighter scene be
unfolded, is the question, which,
i fear, involves a problem very
difficult of solution,

It is true that the abolition of
bounties on Beet Sugar from the
Continent has been decided on
for next year, but it would seem
that a large and influential sec-
tion of the British people are
strongly opposed to the abolition
of the bounties, and are power-
fully influencing public opinion

to upset the decisions of the
Brussels Conference on that
question . Whether there is

sufficient influence at work to
nullify the decisions of the Con-
ference or whether those decis-
ions will be steadfastly adhered
to is not possible to say with any
degree of accuracy. It is a fact,
however, that public opinion in
England on the question of the

WASHES
Brighter!) Quicker!
Easier! |



i canals

abolition of the bounties, is by
no means
owing to motives of self interest
a large and influential
are

(By CHAPMAN PINCHER)

Next time you see the full
moon* lift your hand in front of
your eyes and try to pinch the
moon between your finger and
thumb, It will immediately
appear to shrink to about half its
size.

Then look at it through a tube
made from a rolled-up sheet of
paper. Again it will shrink.

Looking at the moon through
i Mirror, or bending over so that
you see it through your legs,
produces the same result.

Dr. Edwin Boring, a U.S. scien-
tist, has carried out experiments
to explain these illusions after
centuries of argument have failed
to clear up the mystery.

He found that the size of the
moon you “see” depends on the
position of your eyes in their

sockets. The moon seems biggest
when it is viewed with the eyes

pecring straight ahead. Raising
or lowering the eyes results in
shrinking. {

This helps to explain why the|
moon looks bigg@st when it is low!
on the horizon. }

Automatic |
But it must be the brain, notj|
the eye, which is really the trick~}
ster. Think of it this way: |
If you look down at a street!
from a skyscraper, a passing car |
will look like a toy. Yet if you
look at the same car from the same |
distance on the ground, it will not
seem so small. 5
The image which the car makes
on your eye must be the same at
both distances, yet the brain alters
it to give you a sensation of height
when you are on top of a building.
It seems the brain automatically
makes this adjustment when your
eyes move up or down in their!
sockets, |
But there must be more to the
moon illusion than this. For the
explanation does not account for
the fact that people who have only
one eye see the moon the same
size whichever way they look at}
it. —L.E.S. '

use Rinso—always.

S P use in
=) Idee Ese hines
Ww 2 i
—a_ , = and for washing

dishes 00+

« .

_X-R 254-°225-50



there is
body
determined to contest the meas-
To which side the victory
will fall is not yet clear, but we
sincerely hope
bounties
British Government will see the
expediency of imposing counter-
on Beet Sugar
so come to the
rescue of the West Indian plant-
ers, There is no increase of cases
of small pox and that the epi-
abated

ure,

vailing
bounty fed and

demic
seems conclusive.

Your coloured clothes are so much brighter—
and whites whiter, too—when you use Rinso.
Rinso is so easy to use, and so gentle—its rich
lather floats out the dirt thoroughly, without
harm to the fabric. For better, brighter results

unanimous

of merchants who

that
not be abolished,

duties

has considerably



Rolex Watches

LOUIS L. BAYLEY
Bolton Lane



On cuts

or scratches

that may fester

apply
‘DETTOL

RRGD
ANTISEPTIC

Trusted by
Doctors.
The safe way
to safety

in every home!







=

wash /

Â¥

and that

should the
the





SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1952



| To keen















































Chech your requirements for
the following =-



Vittle busy bodies”
fit and active...

give them HALIBORANGE
every day

‘THERE'S NOTHING LIKE IT for building

up reserves of vital energy, promoting

healthy growth, strong bones and teeth
— and resistance to illness.

Made from purest halibut oil, cleverly blended

with the juice of ripe oranges, it is rich in

Vitamins A and D and ao delicious in taste that
the most finicky youngster takes
it with delight.
Incidentally, it’s fine for grown-
ups too!

-Haliborange

THE NICEST WAY OF TAKING HALIBUT OIL








Made in England by :

ALLEN & HANBURYS LTD., LONDON, E.2



F you’re really out to conquer a cough—to get to the root

I of it and destroy the germ—then ask for Famel Syrup.
Why? Because Famel Syrup does so much more than
ordinary cough mixtures. It contains soluble lactocreosote
which is carried by the bloodstream to the throat and lungs
and breathing passages, where it destroys the germs which
cause the trouble.
Once the germs are destroyed then it’s goodbye to the cough
or cold. Meanwhile, the soothing balsams in Famel Syrup
are vasing the irritated membranes and the tonic minerals
are keeping up your strength and powers of resistance.
Famel Syrup is a recognised medical product used for coughs,
colds, influenza and bronchial troubles. It is widely recom-
mended by Doctors. Hospitals and Sanatoria.

FAMEL SYRUP

Obtainable in two sizes—from ali chemasts or sores

Trade enquiries to :~-
Frank B. Armstrong Ltd.
BRIDGETOWN.



for
Inspection
time!

Tyres & Tubes (Goodyear)
Brake Lining Sets

Hydraulic Brake Parts
Decarbonising Gasket Sets
Main and Connecting Rod Bearings
Piston & Ring Sets °

Lighting & Ignition Cables
Duralife Batteries (6 & 12 Volt)
Lacquers & Thinners

Green Birkmyre Canvas

Rear View Mirrors

Radiator Hose

A C Sparking Plugs

A C Fuel Pump Diaphrams
NU-Swift Fire Extinguishers
Tyre Valves and Gauges

Ete., Etc., Etc,

Select your requirements now =

STOP AT
COURTESY GARAGE

(ROBERT THOM LIMITED)

> Dial 4391 White Park Road

;





| DISCUSSION

ad

‘
q

forces of Labour.



So far twelve members have

G. H. Adams, A, E. S. Lewis, J.

E. D. Mottley, J. C. Mottley,
L. A. Williams, R. G. Mapp, F.
E. Miller and C. E. Talma,

Consideration of the Plan con-
tinues next Tuesday,

; Mr. R. G. Mapp (L) who began
‘his speech on Thursday night
said that it had been admitted

on all sides that economic plan-

ning was a vital necessity if the

Government was to solve the

manifold problems confronting it.

_) There was no doubt that if they

~ were to carry out the various so-

A tim schemes promised at election

ab
i



time and advance the standard of
living of the people then they
ip had to develop the economic re-
sources of the people.
4 They had had some planning in
‘the past and there was the ten-
year plan, but nothing came out
of it. That plan contained some
‘admirable suggestions which, if
they had been implemented, would
have done much to strengthen the
_ Asland’s economy. The Committee
which issued the report had re-
commended such things as the
production of fertilisers, animal
feed and other products from
sugar factory waste. It had also
‘strongly recommended irrigation
measures topincrease production of
Bugar cane and food.

“Too Little, Too Late”

He qpoted from the «cport and
said that had those recommenda-
tions been implemented, the
Island would have benetited con-
siderably, Instead, all such ad-
vance had been spasmodic, and
it was simply a case of “too little
and too late” all over again.

He said that the Leader of the
House had said that the plan was
a consequence of the development
of the party system and was the
rl institution of the policy of the
; Labour party. He felt that the his-
j tory of this Island should lead
them to see that constitutional
Advancement and economic de-
velopment went hand in hand.
They should take, for example,
_the case of the pottery industry at
Lancaster. They had brought out
@n expert at great expense, and

had recommended that the
Tishea: industry could be estab-*

\

hed. The House had passed a
solution to set up such an in-
aestry. but it had been lost in
e Other Place. Recently, it was
Well known that a former local
Official had been sent to England
by some local businessmen so
that he could advise on the pos-
bilities of their establishing a
lant to make tiles etc., out of

clay.
Serious Matter
i. It was a serious matter that
the interest of the people of this
olony should be so sacrificed
ause of selfish interests. The
evelopment of a tile and brick
dustry would not only lead to
rther employment in the colony
it would be a means of utilising
local product and making them
dependent on imports. | He
no doubt that because such
industry might pose a serious
threat to commercial enterprise
every attempt was made to stifle
it.
‘ He said that to make jt clear
how necessary it was fr Gov-
_ ernment to use its power. or get
_ the necessary power so as to push
such schemes through, he hoped
that Government would make
clear to the Development Board
which it was proposed to set up
that that industry should be
given priority, and pushed for all
it was worth, It was one of the
schemes which the party had
promised they would carry out
if returned to power.

He pointed out that the plan
was partly one of development
and partly one which set out and

» made provision for certain capital
estimates which, would be on~
dinarily incurr for the next
’ five years by th@ several depart-

» ments. The proposals outlined on
_ page 3, paragraph 11 of the plan,

constituted the real economic

planning which the Government
was proposing. They were: de-
velopment of water resources and
- its distribution; experiments and
’ research in irrigation of sugar
and other crops; encouragement
of food production and develop-
ment of agricultural schemes; en-
couragement of the tourist indus~
try; and establishment of a Bar-
bados Development Board to as-
sist in development of secondary
industries

Value Obscured

It was indeeg unfortunate that
the other proposals, which were
mostly ordinary budgetary re-
current items, and the fiscal pro-
posals, which he would deal with
later, had to a great extent ob-
scured the value behind that part
of the plan, Those schemes he
would show followed closely the
suggestions for economic devel-
opment contained in the Beasley
Survey and were measures which
they had promis}d in their Elec-
, tion Manifesto to carry out. It
ak was a pity because it was only
through the carrying out of such
a development plan that this
Island could progress to the ex-









tent which they had promised ;
They could not build bricks
without straw, and it was ele-

mentary that Barbados could not
extend its social services unless







SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1952



CONTINUES

ON TUESDAY

As debate on Government’s proposals for a Five Year
Plan of Capital Expenditure and Taxation entered its fifth
day at the House of Assembly yesterday, Labour members
Mr. F. E. Miller and Mr. C. E. Talma said that though the
Plan was not as ambitious as it might have been, members Previous day, Mr, R. G. Mapp said it in parts.
who claimed that there was nothing in the Plan were only =
staging a political intrigue with a view to splitting the in

‘.

Mr. Talma accused the Conservative element of “trying
to obtain votes on false pretences, by putting up a similar
manifestu to that of the Labour Party,” and said that no misunderstanding about certain of try their only hope. They were in
conservative conspiracy could overthrow the Labour Gov-
ernment, which had enough brains to overcome any plot or
scheme by the Conservatives.

diture.

for the development of the

duction as among the most press-
ing and important of their needs.
He had already stressed the ne-
cessity for the greater production
of local foodstuffs and the less-
ening of imports in this respect.
It would strengthen their econo-
my and considerably cheapen the
cost of living. At present, it was
true to say that most of the
workingman’s wages was spent
on foodstuffs, and it was abso-
lutely necessary that such
schemes should be pushed to the
limit and at the earliest possible
time. The Marketing scheme of

course followed closely upon
greater food production,
Teurist Industry
He then referred to the en-

couragement of the tourist in-
dustry and said that the Memo-
randum did not mention any
specific proposals in this respect.
He hoped the Government would
watch carefully any schemes put
up by hotel owners and would
try to get a quid pro quo in giv-
ing them assistance. They were
assisting private enterprise and
pioneer industries, but the Island
was not benefiting to the extent
it should. After all, most of the
dollars and other currencies
brought in by tourists went into
the pockets of hotel owners and
merchants, Prof. Beasley had re-
commended that “luxury” items
in perfumery and cosmetics
should be taxed much _ higher
than they were at present. Those
were
tourists, and the Professor had
stated that “this item was re-
served owing to a difference of
opinion in the Commission
whether such goods should be
highly taxed as being luxuries or
lowly taxed to attract tourists.
If liquor duties are raised it
would be inconsistent to retain
low duties on perfumery”’.

He said he hoped the Govern-
ment had not decided against this
proposal because of the fear that
it would hurt the tourist indus-

try. Other countries tried to get Say they had free secondary edu- the masses, and he appealed to tpy,

the most out of visitors, and even
Trinidad, until businessmen pro-
tested, had imposed a head tax
on Venezuelang. These ‘tourists
found that such items were com-
paratively cheap in Barbados,
especially compared with similar
things in their homeland, and
the Government should get as
much revenue as possible from
them

Development Board

Speaking on the Development
Board proposal, Mr. Mapp said
he supposed it would be modelled
on the set-up in Jamaica. He
hoped that the personnel of the
Board would be carefully chosen.
There were many people with
little knowledge of industrial
know-how, who were tied to old
commercial lines as existed in
this colony whom they should
avoid putting on such a Board.

He felt however that they
coulqd not make much headway
with industrialisation until they
attended to their electric power.
Something must be done about
the Electric power and he
noticed that Grenada had recent-
ly floated a loan for just over 1%
million dollars for schemes, in-
cluded in which was the provis-
ion of electric power. It was
time that they made uv their
minds what they would do in
that respect. They had promised
their constituents, from St. Lucy
to St, Thomas to provide them
with electricity and lighten their
darkness, and it was a_ serious
thing that they could not yet
carry out their promises in that
respect. He hoped that the
Leader of the House would find

out something from the Colonial”

Office concerning the Control of
Public Utilities Bill.

With reference to New Offices
and Parliament Buildings, Mr.
Mapp said that while it was a good
idea to utilise the waste land at
Government House in arder to
provide offices, he did not think
that Parliament Buildings were a
priority. They could well wait
some years as they were quite
comfortable where the
he felt that such buildings would
not be ideally situated aback Gov-
ernment House. Parliament
Buildings should be situated near
the City. He would prefer to go
to Queen’s Park as he had soon
suggested. He agreed with mak-
ing use of some of the 10 or 14
acres of land at Government
House and they should start a
housing scheme there. The place
was really too large and really
suited the old colonial times, but
hardly these enlightened days.

Proposed Schemes

Mr. Mapp them made reference
to the proposed schemes which he
said were to be financed from
available funds, They were simply
five years of departmental schemes
brought up at this time and cut
down in accordance with the re-
current income which the Gov~-
ernment’estimated it could obtain
in that period. Most of these
schemes really should not enter
into a five-year’ plan and he
would comment briefly on some of
them.

Making reference to education,
Mr. Mapp said that all of the
schools in St. Thomas were in need
of playing-fields and he felt that
provision should be made for a
new school for Welches. There
was not one school in that parish
with proper provision for recrea-

productive schemes were insti- tion He felt that the Island was
© tuted from which revenue could pot getting the full returns it
© be obtained. should for the money being spent
% At that stage, Mr. Mapp education. Proper direction
he would deal briefly wit! , eriously lacking, and he pro-
of the schemes of cap posed later to show that such
a L's a clade . Bei tis

were and -



BARBADOS

ADVOCATE



things as the provision of a so- to 1948-49, If they really exam-
called modern secondary school— ine. the Plan they would see many
or what was really a post-primary f the tables had been brought up
school—at Richmond were absurd to date and some did not reach
and could not be defended. There 195¢
was no plan about the whole affair fhe Report was a work of a
at all. genius, but no Government could
_ Mr, Mapp then moved the ad- regard it other than as a guide.
journment of the House until yes- So it was for the reason that it
terday. was not up to date that the Gov-
Continuing his address from the ernment had been forced to ignore
Added to that, in pre-
at the plan went short of: what paring it, it was not for Beasky
embers of the Labour Party had to see any squalor there might be
ming when they wrote the in the back districts of the island.
Party’s manifesto, But what he was most concern-
But there was to his view a great ed about was the development
number of criticisms which were side, He wanted to see the Gov-
misleading and there was wide ernment seeing in the sugar indus-

the proposals, an awkward position with their
It was in the finances of the sugar when they considered the
an that they found that the Gov- situation with sugar in the world
ernment had departed from some at present. They could not but

He would say at the out- of the suggestions of the Beasley feel apprehension when when they
taken part in the debate; Messrs. set that he regarded the plans survey.

Cuba had to curtail

noticed that
That, he

Everyone knew that Barbados production of sugar.

- £. T. Brancker, V. B. Vaughan, Island water resources, irrigation was lacking in resources, had to thought, was a threat,
W. A. Crawford, O. T. Allder, amd encouragement of food pro- depend on one crop and there

Regrettable

Mr. Miller said that it was re-
be told that there

for the proposed
harbour. It was

should widen the basis of their
economy and produce a scheme so
that they could plan their budget
for future years for the things gsrettable to
they wished. That was element- was no hope
ary. But the economic side of the deep water
planning was not in keeping with necessary for the island to have
the Reasley suggestions, a deep water lage ee 9 but the
. Government was told that it was
Diestablishment of Church jmpossible to get the required
He said he agreed entire'y with joan to make tnis project possi-
the honourable member who said ple. The Leader of the House

that the Church should be dis- av sa .
established and revenue got from —— ra bstegg Mind ana
that source. The Church was noth- 585° o learn after year

ing but a privileged body. He dia Hoping that a loan was not
not think anybody would dispute Possible. i

the fact that there were leaders A deep water harbour would

of the Church like Bishop Hughes provide work for many and
who knew what he was talking Would also ease the unemploy-
about when he suggested disestab- ment which is so marked today.
lishment of the Church, Barbados would also become

If they disendowed the Church, important as regards to shipping.

they would have more money to Speaking about oil in the
better the conditions of the people island, Mr. Miller said that the
of the island, Gulf Oil Company was now

He was not speaking against the carrying out experiments in the
Church as a stablising influence in jsland. There is some induce-
the community, but the people ment, for this Company would
would get more out of it disestab- not be spending so much money
lished. He did not see why the . Ke

on drilling and other operations.
Church of England in Barbados Shoul il be struck, th the
should remain established, Bar- pula pe eee a a}
bados, as they had already been House should hold —
reminded, was the only colony â„¢eeting. ;
with an established Church, .Touching on pig breeding, Mr.

They would find that there Miller said that Barbados is a
would be a great spiritual ad- pig rearing country and this
vancement and social benefits to scheme should be developed fully.
be derived from disestablishment Wherever they go, they would
of the Church. see people — keeping pigs. Pig

As a previous speaker had said, breeding would do much for the

a

items bought chiefly by the priests were living off the fat island and he was convinced that has been called.”

of the land, and anybody who got if the scheme were developed,

in the habit of living on the fat aj) the needs of the island in this


sedate even to practise their ide- 3

ologies well, They should let these sstndiok’ aietan te ace

people awake to the facts. They t).6 p) aoe tempt a “political

should the more realise this when ; rd ep ae Sie ad Pe niente

they wanted to establish demo- itrigue,” and assured members

cratic socialism. of the opposition that there “is
He knew that everything had to ° split in the ranks of the

take its course, but he would look Labour Party.

forward to see disestablishment It was not true to say that by

with Ministerial status. increasing the price of rum and
He said that it was absurd to cigarettes they would pauperise

cation when in fact there was no honourable members to be very
free secondary education. There careful in their decisions.

was no secondary education atthe The Labour Party, he said,
cecil eat’ Waenecter daeitien would Stand or fall on the pro-
and thay should say 00, Tt was posals contained in the memor-

weet say it = sononsesy andum,

when it was not; it carrie e

same age limit and little change Full Agreement

in the te of Cumeenee. Mr. ©. E. Talma (L) said i!

He believed if Government re-
vised'their system, they would get
more benefits for the money they

was the fizét time in the history
of the island that a plan of any

sort had been tabled in that

Wee Spaeeins 08 Tet ee that Chamber, and it was for that
though the national income had Very good reason that he agreed
been better distributed due to With the principles contained in
the Labour Party, no great dif- the memorandum. Today, there
ference had been made in the was a new Government in power,
standard of living of the people and it was only natural that «
as a whole, plan of some nature’ should be
The Plan would help the masses framed and implemented as ex-
if the Government saw to it. peditiously as possible. He there-

fore hoped that the plan would
Government Plan not be shelved, but that it would,

Mr. F. E, Miller (L) said that us
= va teere he te, — it ae a er |
clear that he was never satisfied ile i oni
with the principles of the budget ,, While admitting that the plin |
in the past.and had since express- was not as ambitious as it might |
ed his dissatisfaction with the have been, Mr. Talma said that,
Plan before them. He would dub it was only natural with limited |
it conservative, resources that all the proposals

What was wrong with the Plan contained in the party’s mani-
as he saw it was that Government festo could not be included in
did not seem to be bold enough any one five year plan.
to bring what not only the mem- He asked what of the proposals
bers of the House but also the pub- contained in the memorandum
lic expected, It was hard to say could any member who went to
it, but it was very true—the Plan the House on the popular vote
was very conservative. disagree with, and added “if he

He said that he had repeatedly fails to agree with the proposals
suggested to the Government to set out in the. scheme, he was
create a bank. They should change voting against progress and ad-
the banking policy and provide a yancement. "
eae} aa ig A orenanet He thought that one of the
time they could aut hiean ei first Considerations in a plan of
ment. Actually, i¢ was. not too the sort should be a scheme for
mnueh 45 say that they could start land reform under which planta-
their harbour scheme on that “on owners might keep for
strength, themselves the first 100 or 200

There was too the question of @¢Tes of land, and the remainder
nationalisation and gas. be worked on a

The Beasley report was out of basis between the management
date and no Government in 1952 and labour.
could make any plans on that re- He referred

to the similarity

port. That report was restricted in the proposals contained in the











DRINK “PETER’S” COCOA HOT OR COLD
THE ONLY COCOA WORTH ITS WEIGHT IN GOLD
IT GIVES YOU SUCH LOTS OF ENERGY

TO BEAR THE ANXIETY AND STRAIN

OF WATCHING YOUR FAVOURITE HORSE
WHETHER IT BRINGS YOU LOSS OR GAIN
TAKE IT WITH YOU TO THE RACES TO-DAY _
IT WILL BRING YOU LUCK IN EVERYWAY



THIS IS A NESTLE’S PRODUCT

% Ib. tin only 24 certs

14 Ib. tin only 48 cents

og SSS

co-operative |



PAGE SEVEN



House Discuss Five Year Plan For 5th Day

j
manifesto of the two major The deep water harbour was a/
parties, and said that never until Scheme which the conservatives |
there was adult suffrage did one had never attempted. Although if}
find manifestos almost identical S¥ch a scheme were carried’ out,
in principle. it would provide employment for|



: people for a long time, yet it!
False Pretences would be more beneficial to the
He accused merchants and the hotel propri- |

\ the Conservatives etors
of trying to obtain votes ‘by “When Barbados
alse pretences by putting up a second Bermuda, the cost of living
oC similar to that of the will no doubt coe oF ae
our Party, and added that majority of the population in the
generally speaking, there were jsland will suffer.”
a points in the plan which He said that he was not against
they must necessarily agree with. a harbour scheme, but it did not
The only bone of contention was form part of his platform and the |
the question of taxation as a re- Government did not have it in|
sult of which the man in the its manifesto because the needs of
street was being asked to pay a the smaller man were thought of
little more for his rum and first.
cigarettes, and an increase ~ in Referring
the cost of living. He argued Road he said
however that now ‘that there was Conservative
adult suffrage, it was only
natural that with that privilege,
the public should share a little
of the responsibility of providing
the amenities of life and improv-
ing the social condition of the

becomes a

to the East Coast
that was another |
plan. There’ were|
dozens of tenantry roads all over |
the island which needed repair |
and he did not see the necessity |
for building the East Coast Road |
just for the benefit of one indivi- |
dual who owned land in that dis- |
‘trict.

masses. However, he was not in
Sal of any excessive increase. Duty On Rum
e agreed that there were With regard to the increase on
cn in the plan, but he the duty of rum, he felt that it
ught that such defects were was somewhat excessive. If ther¢
by of being too conservative, was not so much unemployment,
and was not a plan of real left- the people would not feet it so

wing specialists.

Long Speeches
He thought that the long
speeches made against the plan
ee ey aes playing te wiches for his midday meal. If
“omnis coindien i at they they increased the cost of rum
tueee, ond Glen Sie ae excessively, it would mean that
they should try to do something cheitere Were: wad oe lean

much, Very few middle class
people could afford two meals a
day and the average artisan would
have a drink or two in addition to
a smoke and a couple of sand-

4 @ therefore there would be less
constructive rather than just try ‘revenue. Pon eS a
o ris 7 ;

criticise, Mr. Talma said that he hoped

b = the question of education, it was not too late for the Leader
bs t oe that instead of having of the House if he realised that he
oe churches closed all through had made a mistake that the in-
© week, they might be opened crease on the rum was too excess-
to accommodate children for ive, to make a special note and
whom more schools were needed. have the price decreased, He
He said that the members who added that every rum shop in the
said they did not see the neces- island, was the poor man’s club
sity for increased taxation to as he usually visited such a place
finance the plan, did not want to to have a couple of drinks to for-
see anything progressive done, get his worries.
and were of the same old con- With regard to the question of
servative spirit. In his view, lotteries, he felt that if the Com-
nothing new could be done with- missioner of Police was allowed
out — taxation and increased to run one for the benefit of the
revenue. Boys’ and Girls’ Clubs, he saw no
He accused the opposition of reason why the Government could
trying to cause confusion in the not run one weekly as was done
ranks of the working class peo- in South America Such a scheme
ple, but added that “their bluff would be a good one whereby new
sources of revenue would be cre-

7 ‘i ated.
Conservative Conspiracy ‘
s Conservative Survey
e said that any one who had ; sasley’s
been associated with the Sabour As far as Professor Beasley's

Fiscal Survey was concerned, Mr.
'Talma said that it had not touched
on the problems of the island as
far as the Labour Party was con-
cerned, It was purely a conserv-
lative survey and had nothing on
which the Labour Party could base
their plans. Professor Beasley told
them in his report of the hard-
ships which were around the
corner and reminded them of their
one crop economy.

movement for the past 14 or 15
years would realise that no con-
servative conspiracy could over-
throw the Labour Government,
and added “the Labour Party has
enough brains and decency to
surprise the island and overcome
the plots and schemes of the con-
servative element of the coun-



" 7 ane eens not to
ac own from their promises still sneakin#
to provide more houses for work- ek ana = adiourned
ers, and suggested that instead of jintil Tuesday next at 3 o’e'gck in
spending money on a new Parlia- the afternoon when consideration
ment building, they should use| oF the plan would be resumed.
the money in housing schemes in
the parishes. just outside the
metropolitan area,

He was not satisfied with
efforts which were being

High Blood Pressure

the
made

in regard to the question of im- ©
migration, and said that a liaison Ki 5 en é& omen
officer should be appointed Twice as many women as men suf

Barbados to investigate the pos- lood Prescure, yon
sibilities of immigration. | about the time of Change of Life and
He had also hoped to see 4] jg thereal cause of muc east trouble
fishing industry and fish canning | and later on of paralytic strokes. Com-
industry in the plan, and in re-| Sieg SYODtEeND Me eeee eadaahes at
gard to the question of the deep | top and back of head and above eyes,
water harbour said that while it | pressure is mend dissinens, | eros
was a necessity, there was the | reath, paine ip near. Pade r

question of cost which had to be |

}

'

fer from High

|
by
| is a mysterious dise






easily excited, fear and worry. If you
suffer any of these symptoms, don't
delay treatment a single day, because
your ite mey be in near Semee
(former nown as Hynox),

medical discovery, reduces High Blood
Pressure with the firat dose, takes &

poor sleep, loss of memory and energy,
taken into consideration.

Mr. Talma said that it was all |
right to talk about a deep wate:
harbour, but where was the money



to come from. He did not think | 4 load off the heart, and makes
ihey should take six million dol- | ou feel years younger in a few days.
lars from the Treasury to build a | Get Nexce from your chemist y

deep water harbour and then close | baa '.

their eyes to the other schemes. |



eRe Oto Se

Shoes a

For the whole Family!



ROWN LEATHER
BLACK PATENT
WHITE SUEDE

$3.40
$3.95
$4.90



=> '

emcees

\

\






for Quality
and Value

BUY A BOTTLE TODAY!





from all points of view -

the worlds BIGGEST
small-car buy!

Morris Minor inside and out
aad you will agree that it ie big
beyond belief. Comfortable
seating for four and 7 cubic
feet of luggage space.

Here is a small car listing many
of the features that are “ high-
lighted” in big car specifica-
tions. Torsion-bar independent
front-wheel suspension; body
and chassis built as one enit on
the modern“ Mono-eonstruc-
tion” principle; Leckheed
hydrawlic brakes; four-speed

Avaliable in three modes:
Four-door, Two-door Saloon,
and Convertible, Let as take .

BIG — beyond belief !

FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD.

bay o “ Miner”—bhew auch &
Phone 2385 Sole Distributors





Phone 4504



BATTERIES

© Faster Starting
© Longer Life
© More Power

At your (Esso: serwice Station



PAGE EIGHT

CLASSIFIED ADS.|_*

piece ape





















































































by warned against
‘ to wife Kitchura
TELEPHONE 2506 Harewood 2ee McCollin) as 1 do not
oe ——$$——___— | hold myself responsible for her or any-
i . J 2 \< © else contracting an debt or debts
BIRTH FOR SALE me unless by a ‘written onder
quand - éignea by me
BOPPIN—On Thursda per 6h | PRINCE HAREWOOD,
19%, io M ice Topp i | Sealy Hall, ,
Maxwells, Christ er son ; St. Johr
7 AUTOMOTIVE #.11.52—2n
DIED a Eee - | The public are hereby warned against
ane der 4000. Pek good as new.! giving credit to my wife Rosie Thomas
et et ileage under 3y elephone 2949 (nee Powitt) as I do not hold self
BRATHWAITE— James Francis Brath. 4.11.52-—t.{.n. | responsible sor her os anyone tn oak
waite, late assistant offic ial_reporte of ~—— tracting any debt or debts in my mame
the House of Assembly. The funeral CAR--One standard 8 HL.P. 1947 model./uniess by a written order signed by
will leave his late residence Quakers’[ Tyres and Battery new. Dial 4465 on | me
Road, Carrincton's Village, st 4.30 p.m. J brid and 2582 Saturday and Sunday J THOMAS,
to-day for the Pilgrim Holiness Church, 7.11. 52—3n Pilgrim Seas,
Bridge Road, and thence to the West- al on name eemapeenepentebetea =e:
bury Cemetery, Friends are asked to ELECTRIC
ate aL :
Louis, Rudolph, Rawle, Harcourt BLECTRIC LIGHTING o— ANTS—2.7
(sons), Lendouise nd Do yb AG i 3,70
(daughters), Olga Asaill cm KVA complete 90/120 Volts 3 Phase AC Lost a FOUND
ip-taw), Violet Atkins and Fra $400) Petrol engine -Diat 4616, Courtesy
Brath waite (aunts) Garage 5.11,.52-—0n
8.12.52
ae at Np FRIGIDAIRE—One Canadian, 7 cubit LOST
IN MEMORIA Dial 3312 or Fmd fo On 7.11.52—3n
M SWEEPSTAKE TICKET Series V.88st.
ELEC TRIC LECTRIC REFRIGERATOR —Two (2) ~Two (2)|HH.7180_ Finder please return same to
BARKER — In treasured and fadeles osley Shelvador of U.S.A. Manufacture | Luther Pilgtim C/o Harrisons Hardware
memory of our beloved wife with 5 year guarantee 7.5 c, ft. capacity. "Dept. Dial 2384 8.11. 58—1n.
mother who passed to the great beyc urte Garage Dial 4616 {— oe ———
on November 8th 1950 5.11 .52—6n. TICKETS—Lost Tiekets Series V.2428-—
Always to be remembered by ———-- | 1962. Autumn Meeting. Series V 2428,
Vivian__Barke (husband), Tony “LISTER LIGHTING (ISTER LIGHTING PLANTS” 2.5| 2421952. Mrs. Hilda Dottin, Rockley
Pedro (sons), Rita (daughter 8.11.52—In mf , driven by “Lister Diese! Engines”
Senetiah a ly to
o MASE gn sacred memory of our Dear RE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LE&EMITED. . ¥ =
Mother Esther Maria Chase who de. «shite Park, Phone 4040, girs on |e LIC NOTICES
parted this life on 7th November 10 Somantaals ——
Loy ae they say, RADIOGRAM 1 H.M.V. Radio-
May be it does, ram. With 3 speed automatic Record 5
Memory liv on and so does love hanger. Sen at Manning Blectrical The enti NOTICE
Down Jn hearts you're living | Dept 8.12.52—6n. | pipe, entries for the Poultry and
t { ib abet ne noe ora, wa be taken by Mr.
We | PICK UP-—One Austin 12 h.p. 1940 a wards, Jones & Swin Pro-
odel, hanically sound Owner Guee bees Hinek Street
The Chase in [ aving island. Nearest offer to $350.00 UDLEY MB BamAr..
Apply: Jones’ Garage, opposite Reed St., Secretary.
— axters Road 8.11.52—1n 7.11.$2—2n
me manery of inst” ——————————————
dear beloved husband Emmanuel Chris ‘| bee TURAL RANK ACT oo a
tian, who died on November 8th 1960 | . .
I do not need a special day | LIVESTOCK Te a? creditors holding specialty liens
To bring you to my mind, against Haymans and Warleigh Planta-
The day | do not think of you a Chae Goa ARG. C.| OT tions, St. Peter.
Is very hard to find 1 HORSE, CART and HARNESS. ~ AKE NOTICE that we, the Trustees
Ever to be remembered by Lili Herbert, 55 Tudor St. City. of the above Plantations are about to



(wife) 8.11 9.11.52-2n. obtain a loan of £3,000 under the pro-

visions of the above Act against ie



Christian Goodridge

“CALVES—At Kingsland Dairy, Heifer





















To those you all loved both Poi

their best yo ee

Martin ia
ih. 52—2n



3 1 lov » of eur said Plantations, in respect of the Agri-
wi hasinae Mrs. Christina ie Calves 10 days old, Dial 6325 cultural year 1952 to 1956.
who fell asleep on Nov. 8, ine, $.21.52—2n £6,000 has been already borrowed)
“As long as life and memeory in respect of such year.
We shall remember thee COW--One Heifer Cow 90 pts, of milk, Dated this Ith day of November, 1952.
Eryl Heory, Myr! Redman, (doug resh, Apply: Israel Clark, St. Martins, T. A. GITTENS
ters), Doyle, Ebert, Alden, Granville 1. Philip 8.11.52-—2n and
Vernon Hinds, (Sens), Lincoln Henr) Rh. CHALLENOR
Eric Redman (sons-in-law), Violeta] ONB MULE and CART. Apply H. A —Trustees.
Hinds, Germaine Hinds (daughters-in Gulstone & Co., Lid., 37 Roebuck Street. per C. R. PACKER
law). 8.11.52--In. | Dial 3664, 6. 1. 52-3 —Attorney.
—— — ood 7.11.92—3n,
HOPE — In loving memory of our Dear en
father and mother Howard Aussie MECHANICAL NOTICE
Hope. Died on 8th of November FAN MILL-—8 ft. with Pu ly Neither the Master nor the Consignee
seein ibe en oe a Norman Alleyne, Green bien Wothing vot be responsible for any debt or
Sleep on ‘dear ones you both task View 8.11.52--2n M. v. ae can by am crew of the
is over, aa5 an anita rr rier Role eae service uring her stay in
You both hands can toll no more | .nie trom Stock im various carriage H. S. STRUM, Capt



























God grant ed''py: Vera eternal es ans 157 — $203.00
Ever remembere: iy a an
family. Tre ID. |» see ar te s. NOTICE
ta tees Oe eR & Co, THE PARISH OF ST. JOSEPH
—_ a . 28.9.52—t.t WHI those persons owing Taxes to the
FOR RENT we *.£.0. | Parish of St. Joseph, please pay same
: SEWING MACHINE —One Singer Sew- ee an a: aed
sai ing hand achine in good order, also i ?
one bs Vacuum Cleaner, very little Parochial Be Toni
used. al 4304, - §2—2n F ’
HOUSES a dabasinlllnnt ies 8.11.68—4n
““BROWNSLOWE’ — Black Rock Draw- f t 2
ing and Dining Room, 5 bedrooms oe MISCELLANEOUS PURLIC SALES
all other conveniences. Dial 01-21. D. , Rarer emreveeve?
Browne Prospect, St. James CAMERA One Zeins Ikon with 3.5















11.52—t.4.n. | Tessar Lens and Compur Rapid Shutter
: Phat cane With speeds from 1 sec. to 1/500th sec REAL ESTATE
FLAT . & HOUSE fully furnished in exeellent condition, with case. Price | ———————-
St. Lawrence On-Sea. Phone 03 £9.00 Contact Mr. Shannon, C/o Knights LAND-—Approximately 10 spots 50 x 60
29.5 fy I 7.11.52.3n.]} ft. No reasonable offer refused. For
na se ~ ——---_----- —--- oe — | further particulars apply: Norman
FARAWAY Fully furnished 3. bed CAMERA One Bell and Howell] Alleyne, Green Dykes, Worthing View
room house, St, Philip coast. Lighting |}® ™.M. Movie Filmo Sportster, With 8.11.52-—2n
plant, Watermill supply. Carport, 2.8 lens in. good condition, with case. |] —— bbecanet tie aaehterk
Servant rooms. Monthly rent $60 plus Price $200.00 or nearest. Contact Mr. LAND—(5) five spots of land for sale
$3 cleansing charge, IN ADVANCE, Dia’ Shannon, C/o Knights Ltd at Flagg Staff Rd, Clapham, St. Michael.
4476 1.11.52—t.f.n -7.11.52-3n. | Apply to C, St, Hill, Cosmopolitan Gar-



age, Magazine Lane. Dial 3915.

CANE PLANTS — 645151 and B4744, 6.11,52—3n

————
‘oO OR FLAT—Furnished House or
tle two (2) e Cane Plants at Gets. per

Plat with 2 or 3 Pedrooms for. long term












































































































































BARBADOS ADVOCATE





Fifty Tons erry Gooding RED COMRADE ACCUSED

From page 4

chool had begun
heart and he was
specialist whom he consulted to
hve in semi-retirement if he
wanted to prolong his life for any

OF STEALING WIFE

ZAGREB, Yugoslavia,
Nov. 5
One leading Yugoslav Commu-

to tell an his
advised by the

Of Dollars

By STEPHEN

(Prem the News =

ecuse Comrade
of stealing my wife.’

Mr. Stambolic is Premier

Britain’s dollar-earning tank— time. Gooding knew that by stay-| Pist aceused another of stealing the Republic of Serbia, Principal
the mighty, 48-ton Centurion — ing at the Lodge and conducting his wife and threw the Party Leader of the Serbian Communist
is not only the most powerfu! its many-sided activities he would Congress into uproar —- Party and a member of the Fed-
fighting machine of its kind yin Shorten his life. Yet he resisted) Wouné Zz with — aoe eral Party’s Central Committee
the world. It is almost foolproo!. ‘ne pleas of his family and] ¢ a Cor Ses as a worker ond of the’ Congress Inresidium.

In Korea Sir Guy Lowther’s ‘tiends and stuck to his post,|"°) Ne anomie

Ljubodrag Djuric who has held
the background post of “General
Secretary to the Government”
ever since the war, was at the
rostrum making rambling com-

preferring to spend the few years ron

that still remained to him in
active endeavour. The warning ol
the specialist proved only toe

8th Royal Irish Hussars — tre
Americans dubbed him “the
Knight in 50 tons of Armout—

ultati
showed the world a new kind oi als wing

Petar Stambolic

Djurich was cut off the
microphone as soon as he made
his accusation, After hurried con-
Politburo member
Milovan Djilas rushed to the ros-

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1952
Mr. Dijilas revealed that a
party Commission had investi-
gated Mr. Stambolic several

months ago on this and other ac-
cusations and found him guilty
of several minor actions which
merited him a party reprimand
but no mere severe penalty. He
proposed that a new Commission
look into the case to-day in-
eluding Mr. Djuric’s right to re-
main in the party and appealed
for calm and orderly procedure.
Mr. Djuric was expelled

from the Congress Session.
—UP.

FORMER CHAMPION DIES

of



hens welitade, true and in April 27, 1941, he] ments on previous speeches in @ ‘rum and attempted to calm the LONDON, Nov. 6.

They rammed their mounts up “ied after a severe heart attack. long orawn out “discussion” of excited, shouting delegates. Many French former eee,
craggy hills, one-in-one slopes. Gooding had th e8 to the Marshal Tito’s report to Congress of them loudly demanded that Champion Honore Praseti died
to gain seemingly impossible .4 then he bellowed including certain vague references \ir. Djuric be expelled from the in a London hospital this morn-
vantage points from which to slam jverything el above lto the morals of leading party party at once. ing. —UP.
flat-trajectory shelifire into °V¢rything else im conscientious | members.

endeavour. It is the lesson he
taught all who came under his
influence and his life had shown
ibundantly that he was not afraid

enemy bunkers.

I saw them do this. And
frankly I thought it likely that Sir
Guy’s enthusiasm for the “Cent.”

Urged on by ‘ironie comments
from the floor, Djuric suddenly
blurted out: ‘Seeing that you do
want me to go on—then I hereby

. to carry his own advice ipto
was a modest commander's .ffect. “A lesser man might have —_'





attempt his
prowess.

1 think his men would have
been just as aggressive armed

with pedal-driven biscuit tins.
Best Tanks

But now, after a visit te the
Royal Armoured Corps depot’ at
Bovington, I realise he spoke the
aimple truth when he said the

to discount own

retired to grieve over the glories
he had known at Oxford. Good-
ng missed the cloistered peace
of the university, the intellectual
ctimulus of academic life, the
-ompany of scholars who played
: notable part in the history of
the Chureh of England, the op-
portunities he had left behind to
make or! 1 contributions to
learning, But he was not the man
to pine over what might have

TODAY'S NEWS FLASH

LISTEN OVER
eee TO-NIGHT

PIANO RECITAL

Repeated by Special

Rheumatism
and Backache
Gone in 1 Week

Flush Kidneys With Cystex and
You'll Feel Fine

mene we roeth Atianise ‘Treaty been. ‘Though his special gifts| Syetex—the prescription ote fuiows | ager

. t find adequate scope in iaub Jon in double quick | ‘
armies (for dollars) was the Could no! aay action in downed |) JOHNSON'S STATIONERY
“pest tank in the world.” Barbados, he resolved to make} [ime 99 tt you eerie. “umbage

himself of maximum service to
the island and his work at Har-
rison College and the Lodge

And I can well understand
American tank men being willing

Backache, Nervousness. ceg Pains
Dizziness. Gircles under Eyes. Fre
quent Hea jaghes and_ Colds, Poo

to swap two of their more €X- school is an enduring monument Energy and Appetite, Putty Ankle:
pensive Patton M-46s. for one t, his memory, His colleagues Burning, "sma ee ok uns Raina

“Cent.” as he says they did. —
After five minutes’ instruction
I was able to drive one of these
monsters. It is simpler to steer,
by the two titler levers, than my
10 hp. car, and although 63

our chem Li moans for Cyste:
be cH and well next week

nod |
tex Helps Nature 3 Way:

The Gystex treatment is highly sc!
satee being specially compoundec
o Pett, tone and clean raw, sorc
Stok ineys and bladder and to re
move acids and poisons from your

and pupils knew that he was rich
in the scholar’s gift but, in the
words of the poet, they came to
prize even more the richness of
his heart, the cheerful humour
that remained undismayed, the

Vessel

this flatteringly
ee \joue wrecked truck nearly a

As one who can miss a croquet away—convinced me.

———

GOVERNMENT |! NOTICES

APPLICATIONS are ivited for two vacant non-pensionable
part-time posts of Assistant Visiting Surgeon on the staff of the

General Hospital.

“I have suffered for five years with Kid
and Bladder trouble, also Rheumatic
and Stiff Joints. I was not able +

raise my arms and spent nine weeks iy
@ hos; . They said I would not be able
to work, but after Cystex / feel years
jounger, well and strong.”’ (Sgd.) J. A. B.

u
.

Health Improved in 2 Days
“I had not felt vreau well for ages ©.
suffered continually from backeches an
headaches. I had tried almost everything
out I could not get lasting relie/. Finally
I decided to give Cystex a trial, anc
wish f had tried it long ago and saved
myself much pain and expense. It has
improved my health more in 2 or 3 days

mile

DA COSTA &

lan

STEAM









Applicants must be registered medical practitioners. them other Sunde have done for
The salary attached to the appointment is $240 per annum and Guoranteed to Put You Right SOUTHBOUND
the officer will be entitled to fees for services rendered to paying or Money Back KIM
Get Cystex from your chemise to- MONTREAL 28 Oct
patients in the Hospital. a day. Give it a therough test. Cystex HALF. 1 Nov
Further information may be obtained from the Director of is oneesgalees te oe ‘ ie:
Medical Services to whom applications should be forwarded by 15th younger, stronger, oS

etter jn every way,


































The M/V. “CARIBBEE” wili
accept Cargo and Passengers for
Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,

Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing Tues-
day llth inst.

The M/V. “MONEKA” will
t Cargo and Passengers for
tigua, Montserrat,

Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing







Friday 14th inst

B.W.I. SCHOONER OWNERS’
ASSOCIATION (INC.),





Consignee. Tele. No. 4047.

OUTWARLD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM

times as powerful sate is industry that never flagged — ocem ahi. spekiy and eurely From Leaves a
nothing harsh or ightening shirked, the hand ever outstr - 2 oes in | S.8.. MAN” dos
about the engine. ed to help, the brain ever ready thane Swaps te ena your troubles:— | Ss “TEMPLE BAR ie Secale : So: So.

The “Cent.” is just over 11 to understand the cares of others} 1. Starts killing the germs which are | S'S" «waYyFARER” Gh 26th Oct. 8th Nov.
feet wide and has five forward and to lighten thus the burden atteqee pee Seneee, Bia cds . AR <3 nes & ;
speeds, but neither feature proved that it shared. yet is absolutely harmless to hu | ¢s) “SCHOLAR” : lean 5th Nov. 17th Nov.
“che most. st _ gadget is Next Saturday — Concluding $ jE ere M/brough 15th Nov. 15th Dec.

Article—INNISS and WICKHAM. ' with whic! . Basasss

the an stabiliser gear on your m has become saturated HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDO
the turret. With this oa gq "Bes deat, the : Mi

yer Oot urate ven disease-attack on the ‘easel
— _ a a turehins ‘over hoop at six inches, my three out ¢ filter organism, and stitn For Closes in
w grinding a t fi direct hits with the 20- mite ne a S.S. “KALLADA” Barbados
broken, twisting cpunte potethenen ann a near miss which eeks in Hospital— a ‘s ve London 12th Nov.

iS - J ,
Again, after five minutes’ in puust, have rocked the target—a Now Well For further information apply to - - -

CO. LTD. — Agents

LCOA

SHIP



COMPANY

INC.

CANADIAN SERVICE (ronrvicutty)



PARTNER

7 Nov.

CORONA A STEAMER
21 Nov.



11 Nov. 25 Nov. 9 Dec, ”
23 Nov. 7 Dec. 21 Dec.

Limited Passenger Acommodation Available.











































































7 Weapenitor:, Ts : in 24 hours and t
tal im the district. of Worthing or] 100 plants. Book your requirements with | PROPERTY—One property containing December, 1952. A ror apie . ;
Hastings, Seaside preferable but not}Manager Kendal Plantation, St. John | drawing room, breakfast and dining 8,11,52,—2n, fe ae _ wate ge fue ation apply: Da COSTA & CO., LTD.; Phone 2122,
imperative. Write P.O. Box & e- [in writing. 7.11 52--6n. froom, 3 bedrooms, toilet and bath ‘> money back if yee |
town 8 n ’ : " acre of land, ovr@pard, Dial 3467 errr return th empt | .
fst CIRCULAR SAW Hore ix vour oppor 7.11. 52—an plike eine | 4 NEW YORK SERVICE (tveny Foun WEEKS)
LAURISTON-Lower Collymore Rock.| tunity to make and sell Coronation —______-____—__- -—— ST OFFICE NOTICE |
From December Ist, 3 bedroona 2 dress- arrrneentce You can buy 4 — saw, | STRA¥TON—Dalkelth Road, in threc PO ————
ing rooms, drawing, dining, circular saw jig saw, Sander, planing | Flats near the Savannah Apply 9-4 7 te | SOUTHBOUND
rooms, stil conveniences: Has machine all with mators, Phone S900. p.m. Mie G. §. T. Bayge, op oe ERECTION OF POSTING BOXES NOTICE | wet. of iets. datsne . aeutiven
e ” 8.11 —_— _ — nr _ n je
7 oa eee aa ; . \d NORFOLK 35 ; = om pe
WATISAWEN _. Pullip tana bee osGOMICS, & MAGAZINES —A Wonder- The undernoted Posting Boxes have been erected for public use BARBADOS. | BALTIMORE 7 x Oy he: id tak:
AER — Villy feeemias ee Sew CORN WAYNE AY. it the sites mentioned: aa Sheila Anita Spencer of i NEW sox 31 Oct. 28 Nov. 26 Dec. 23 Jan.
S’servant rooms, Lighting plant, Comic, Gene Autry, Lash Lak 1) Bank Hall Main Road in the outer wall of Bank Hall House,|{] Christ) Chureh, Barbados, |j| ij “*t Rec ace tT eee See barnes eee
mill supply, Monthly rent 87 ing, Wild and ‘Thrilling Wester (1) Ban . t he A Baynes heretofore called and known \
nleaning sharge, IN ADV. CE nany others at 18 cts. and 24 cts th, € r, & ay . , > ne > i i 4
= ABE Dis nae? others ot 16 ct, so ee Se coy Me wesidence of Mr. B Hewes. ¢ promises of ats. King |i] Baden of Shela Ants |! | NEW ORLEANS SERVICE (runrvcit1y)
. Detective, EF 30 cts each, Stanway Pp a . . .
ROOSEVELT Maxwell Goast isa Store, Lucas Street 7,11,52~3n (3) Beckles Road—near junction with Curwen's Avenue. NOTICE that on the 4th
Full furnished cluding Refrigerato - - ‘ ™ as . RCHAN.-
slephone, ‘Rediffusion. Phone 222 CHRISTMAS TREE DECORATIONS— These boxes will be cleared daily except on Sundays and Public Seccicanea cont aaatne Par BAGLE A STEAMER STEAMER STEAMER
8.11.5 A LARGE VARIETY 8 toe : eat
a ont kt ty ee Dr Sisk ah i SAM Miecount fot tanh ek lolidays, as follows:— a oi the use of my said surname @ Nov 30 Nov 4 tek
@1RATHALLAN-Rockley, for January, | Louis L. Bayley, Bolton Li In Carlisle Ba: MONDAY to FRIDAY—7.30 a.m, and 11.45 a.m, of Swammy and assumed in 8 Nov. 22 Nov. 6 Dec.
core and March, ey, ah a 2.11.52—1n y SATURDAY —7.30 a.m. lieu thereof the surname of a ner bh BY Ree
. Pu % 3 ei at : ~ . HER ; Dec. c.
DR (16) halt drums Schooners—Lynsid If, Lucille M, Smith ROBERT A, CLARKE Spence: AND FURT
suitable for plants and ton (drums D'Ortac, Frances Smith, C Til, E i . é such chang ame is } er information appl
OFFICES # y' Colonial Postmaster. that such change of ni For furth ) pply ROBERT THOM LTD., Phone 4424
fowl runs (Meahwire) | No reasonable Smith, Gita M., Rebecca B, Lewis, Mary i evidenced by a Deed Poll . :
store offers refused, none ne. \ - ; . 7 7
OFFIGES—Cool, Spacious and reason~ ' “9.11.52—2n, | Motor Vessels, H, Radar, Daerwooa, | General Post Office, dated the 4th day of No-
ably priced, Apply K. R. Hunte & Co, iebseni ———-—-_ | Caribbee, O. K. Service VIII 6th November, 1952. vember, 1952 duly executed .
Ltd, Lower Broad Street. Dial 4611 FULLER MOPS Water Mops and ARRIVALS } 8.11.52—I1n b d attested. }
2.11526 | polishing Mops. Apply: Chees- | M.V. ©. K. Service VIbI, 176 tons ae ; a ae ae MR. THERM Ann th
nagpnnan re. 4 aera TE man & Co, Ltd. Dial 3382 from Halifax under Captain H. F. Strum. Dated the 6th day of No- | , - Font ounces e
SPACIOUS OFFICES Exceptionally 2.11.52—7n, | Consigned to Martin Doorly & Go., Ltd smber, 1952. arrival of the
cool and in an excellent central position ee ebm ne M.V. Caribbee, 100 tons, from Germinic ; vem ’ MAGNIFICENT
Reasonable rental according to size FULLER FURNITURE POLISH—12 oz,] Under Captain B. Gumbs. Consigned t. POLICE TRAFFIC NOTICE NEW
Ring Mrs. Gooding, Telephone 8538 and 24 oz, Furniture Polish. Appl: HP, | the Schooner Owners’ Association
B.11.08—In. | cheemman-& Co, bed, Dini se S.S. Herdsman, 4016 t f : GASEL REFRIGERATOR
Mi ’ a a oe . ons, rom ot. . . 95°
it idan sas livepe ee Cie ae ST, MICHAEL’S CATHEDRAL, 9TH NOVEMBER, 1952 pee AAS
WANTED FULLER COMBS—Ladies and T Vecke Wandares te Drtee : A CABINETS It delivers the goods
JLER COMBS—Ladies and Gents yacht Wanderer II, 47 tons, from Las a
- Combs. Apply: H. P. Cheesman & Co, | Palmas under Captain E- Hiscock. | On Sunday 9th from 10.00 a.m. igi 30 a.m. CHIN NO motors, NO belts, NO brushes,
HELP Utd. Dial 3362 8, 0..6—sa pr conmenre © fhe chocner. Owners 1. Chauffeur:driven cars shall approach the Cathedral by way sntit ‘& ‘ORAM NO moving parts, NO interference
sociation
“YOUNG LADY—With thorough experi- | TULLER BRUSHES — Drain Pipe, Per- DEPARTURES of Queen’s Park and St. Michael’s Row only, set down their passengers PUT THESE iN your =a reas, NO rust. . . Nothing to
“ Mes bs ‘ “ le | culater, Milk Bottle, Baby Bottle, Toilet Sch. Amberjack Mac for Martinique Na i a Cy ae} ey . i CHRISTMAS
ence in Seneral mes eee, a Te xtile | Dan, Floor Scrub, Rug and Floor, Tooth, | via the Fishing Banks at the South Gate to the Cathedral and park in the Central Foundry cticet ste ‘a! cbnesilne WE HAVE WAITED TO GIVE
Advocate Advertising Department ae Complexion, Comb Cleaners, Parking site, Marhill Street and Rickett Street. Mahogany, ee cheganieaa Birch YOU THE BEST. |
6.112290 | Rrushea, Brushes and Household Seawell 2. Owner driven cars shall approach the Cathedral by way of and Deal, in veers ead “ed 18 Let Us Show it to You (Working)
scahissecnetiiebameianiamadaner b 5 " Pond ‘ ny
“YOUNG LADY — With knowledge in n | Begone. Pp. eae & o., h3t. Michael’s Row (either from Trafalgar Square or Queen’s Park i: Space saving at your Gas Showroom, Bay St.
on comieh Mell OM. ce Aatooun - - For Tria woe’ ide) and Spry Street, set down their passengers at the North Gate SIDE BOARD, Dining, Fancy and
Advertising Department @.11,03—2n.| eee Dee eth eet ce O ceeiggtOVEMBER OTH to the Cathedral and park as directed by the Police. oe ee ert nx te SS
"MISCELLANEOUS \anized sheets in Oft, 7ft, and Sft. Enquire | ynq oe re Mota 3. Spry Street shall be one-way from St. Michael’s Row. Bedroom Cabinets. Remember when you do your shenuieg with us
eed Streets. Phone 2o9e ra insa—ttn LEPARTURES BY B.W.LA Secaares Sige shall, De one weg Sem Church Square, FURNITURE Pg and we deliver to your door by Motor Van.
wanes "0 Be 0. Be “HOUSEHOLD EQUIPMENT of all ON FRIDAY Made under Regulation 2 of the Bridgetown and Speightstown other woods, “and Many Other °
ED ITTLES mpty or, Beer " : ; ies 2 ; .
Sine tte cartons, Stansteld Scott & feacriptian Owen T. Allder, 114 Roebuck - bs toe a gg fon, M. Brumel | | Traffic) (Amendment) Regulations 1943. Things. oS ae
Co., Ltd. —7,11.52—1.f.n. | Street jal 3299 10.5.52—t.f.n. | Jagan. R. Folle ec. Bernard i R. T. MICHELIN BUY NOW at joney-Sav:
> . ’ Prices.
WANTED TO BUY LASHLEY'S offer American CANNON |! Bacchus, VALE ¥ B.W.LA. Commissioner of Police. —_—- CENTRAL EMPORIUM
GAS RANGE--One gas three or two|bath towels, priced from 83c. to $1.82 baat Poliee Headquarters ’ |
bumer Range. Apply: CB. Brandford, | GANNON face towels at 2c CANNON | prom Teiniasde f me ae ’ S WILSON B & ae tine
Sen Bright, Hastings, Phone 4065, Beh cloths ai ° E. Vieira, GV , Win ‘idgetown, : Cnr. road Tudor
6.11,52-2n ese CANNON towels are obtainable ; . y T. PIAL 4069. *
ee aes si from LASHLEY'S Ltd., 20 Swan Street |i "yey. MB eer. Fee | 6th November, 1952. SURE RXERR
E—Unfurnished house. 3 ‘or 4 end Speightstown 8.11,.52—2n L. .
iboorse in. Tesidential distrfet. Apply = —— meaner ABRtY Ale BY RY: LA. 8.11.52—In,
Warren, ¢/o Messrs, K. R, Hunte & Co.] ONE PORCE -AIN BATH TUB—Appl)
' ‘ §. Watkins, Phone 3293 tom Trinidad:
Phone: 5136. 8.11.52—2n A, Willis, G. Spencer wi. Ghana
UPRIGHT PIANO in good condition —_ -- - - p Nos’ a pie, ts ¥. ,. ki Relex Watches
Telephone 95235 between 9.30 am and One ay large mea cage, (2) emailer Weithers, i. Vincent. aan i
236 p.m. or write Box No; C/o] oird cages, (1) merican rabit hutch. | i44 R. Previte, D. Sook A — YLEY
Dept 6.11,.52—3n i) echieken coop for 100 chicks, (1) 2 . ran, LOUIS L, BA
Nayacate Advig. Dev (merican kerosine incubator (6) ‘pairs | F Chin, J. De Gouveia, R. De ) Goan
igeons at $5.00 a pair, Call at Med- ranch, H. Brand, 8. Kinch Bolton Lane
nenham, Pine Hill, no information by / |
avis ms : a telephone 8,11.52—1n
i Paint and Shel)- § ——_{—_____—___—__ *
wont te ae r M. Fors eepaintings ROUND IRON AND SHEETS Ma, 5/16, RATES OF EXCHANGE i
by Nan Kendall, at Barbados Museum, | **. ‘2, %s and "%. Sheets %, 5/16, v4, 3/16, “CEDORA", FITZ y
near Savannah, Nov, 8th—20th, daily, one Tociein “ =< “gimduire Auto Tyre NOVEMBER 7, 1952 VOCATE Gh. Sampes t oas
10 a.m.—6 p.m, Sundays 2.30 p.m, to ot Renee San eee 8 11.52—t. one sole NEW YORK Buying “
6 p.m. 2.11.52—13n ‘ i og Te - 172 310% pr. Cheques on is 7 rey
STEEL STORAGE TANKS Beane 70 @/10% pr. | ~ N y vere iin NOVEMERR,
; , 1 be O xO xe OP Sight or STATIO ER 1952, a0. 30
One Se vO” Ste ae Se A UPR Demand Drafts 70 4/10% pr We Rave ; ae
1, Gins. approx. % € rece
‘ 7 sae ” . yor | 72 3/10% pr. Cable no Oc on ived instruction
Two (2) 13 6” x @ 0” % & 0° x 4" 190 Byiog pr. Curtency 69 1/ 10% pi vue soe of NEATH CHANDLER t
rick—2,440 Gins. rox - ’ ~ * or dispose of his ¢ oe _E 0
, re Ee Ona a) 0” 6 we & 0” deep x "tenes >» Coupons 68 4/10% ‘pr | GREYSTONE, BAS jas as listed Melee ture and effects
It § the A . hick—1,000 Glns. approx 0% pr Silver 20% pr | \ .
Two (2) & 0" dim: x 4 0” deep x 3/16” | 1. 5 49 sip Pie baggie ; ——— ane MORNING OF SALE
lic py “ mae + ound D
pe |S OO dine we O” deep ¥ 8/1077 Bankers |, 23 1/10% pr | Just the little shop in the village reus, Bins, Table, with ge
” ; and Drafts 75.55% pr. | j r lorris Cha e re!
poe k- 530, Glns. approx, Prices on " Sight Drafts 75 4/10 pr 1} where the Best Books, Stationery ort Cabinet cushions, Pine
o : . y , 77 5/10% pr. Cable na ae beseees . Tables, Sm, a Orcas
LAND FOR SALE |THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LIMITED. | 79.7’ bp Riesncy 44 Vide pe |) 8D@ Xmas Cards are now on show Tab ‘pamall, Mah Table,
| Telephone 1 ' Pe ae Sac i Coupons 73 5/10% pr. | and Cushions, Pilot? Mattresses
A few choice house spots | a 50% pr Silver 20% pr | ~ robe, Ftd. plows: Ptd. Ward.
to the South West of the ot ae _ se Mirror Dounie Mose and
Rockley Gelf Club, adjoin- A) Dominican “Mats, Asctnt” Coie?
ing Golf Club Road, on bus {ff! RYSTA W T RS ODGE 1 g RRO J HOUSE pop cutlery. WESTING.
route to town. ¢ L ATE NOTICE L OF SO W Pine Larder, sonar {4% cu. ft)
These spots look across GUEST HOUSE. e Stove and Oven, Kitchen Mable,
ie Golf aces ee wa Post Office Gap Worthing ro ve s. Ol YMPIA Type:
and over ue waters tO i) Desk ithe ge) pists
> : : x > » ers . . . of interest
Reckley Bay on the other. | Right on Sea excellent Sea STEPHEN ROGERS’ The Officers and Members of the €
Though you may not wish }{\| Bathing, Cool, Comfortable BARBER SALOON Fae. ak Sect eens AUCT e
to build immediately, the })}/|] Rooms. Regular Bus Ser- 1% and friends of Kindred Lodges to IONEERS
purchase of one of these | vice. Daily as well as per- Friends and Patrons of Mr |@ their Lodge of Sorrow Service o J as
spots is a good investment. manent Guest welcome. Rogers are reminded that Bi R Sn2der. (600 Ay Mocbuck Street chan - Biadon local Agut
Full particulars from— For Rates Phone 8264 you can now find him at the at 3.30 p.m. in memory of the HULL & SON
The Secretary, | or 8666 Plaza B’town where he car- . jate Bro. Percival I. Nurse ae Coe. Plantations Building
Rockley Golf & Country | Proprietress, ries on his business. Pe sites ee ole eae ota Tal Ss Ring 2458
Club. Wil DOROTHY CARMICHAEL Hours:-Daily 8.00 a.m. to B|$ ee ee ede a ee
| 3.00 p.m. $ 1.82 one 4640 115
SSSI OO! = =. %69099999669060960000008 |/-—— =












BLONDIE









{~ BLONDic, I INViTED] [Tt Wish You GETTING THE

(RA Y by DINNER TOMORROW] |HADN'T, DEAR- -) | CHILDREN FED
SHT-- HE LOOKS LIKE} |I LIKE RAY;

. HE COULD STAND] |AND ALL THAT,

ot A HOME-COOKED







FOR

BEEN DER 1

IMPRES3|ON THA am “2

THE GEST TIME TO ) ee

HAVE SOMEONE <> >2¢

FOR DINNER
WAS AT <

OINNERTIME

——

|BuT you KNOW

|HOW CONFUSING

Ee {S AROUND
HERE AT















LASH GORDON
ae se a VIEMTN Tene ee
TTT aS ete BY PLUTO, YOU ARE A STRANGE

SPECIMEN! THE KING WOULD
SURELY TAKE YOU FROM



i

a

JOHNNY









va

arene
Sh, he



YES..
HOW THAT COULD HAVE
HAPPENED? /

I CAN'T IMAGINE Y NEITHER CAN I,
WESTLEY... NEITHER

rte

haat

\\ iT a)
Yen

A 08 *

THE GAME Py tf y
WENT INTO \\
EXTRA INNIN
GOL Ly- WHat }
4,.T'MA











MUST Ge ‘Ove R

= CUSTOMER TO THE LONG Ai ‘
“BALL GAME - L- ve aS
ss id “yeah
= Fog VY Ny

ST
oS
2,

aod eh
m7

SoS
Sex

=
$23
cS

ROS
SSBSSSS
OS 25

&

aa ESI et a

TRIED SO HARD To














yg. :
Soe {ss



BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES

\ is 4 a 2 mi ios ; | bef he 4 * 4 . ;
3 . "Ta >» = TICKET, i _ Sie A
7 ~o— eS q Gi ‘a On ‘ he " pies ts. FE = K y
La s st ‘ 2 4
* ; [* a a a)
- yr P) Pr ‘ ot /,
: ' = i i
rae VE TRIED 1 YoU KNOW MAX? HE | | 1\'M GIVING YOU ONE LAST CHANCE To
. Z 1RE E THA NT BEFORE THE “BEAT i HELP YOURSELF AJAX. LEAD ME TO THE
See ee ee ee ani ee TuEDOGAT } G SOME HELP ME. I'M NO | | MEN WITH THE ge
Sete ene rt =p THE CARN eae 7 o Pe ——™, 600D. ut ONGO JEWELS
aadhan " ae = ! ‘TO ee A LA =|
{ Ney | oS) 4 lee) 3) Bie TS io |
Jag j F Aaa E ' % ; 4 ng — 0 2 c sag? '
£ : ” ie <2 wer i = = a : Po 7 . | “
, eZ, ios Y f I
AA i ein 2S Am itt RO or P g : /, UY py) \
k
j 4

BARBADOS



BY CARL ANDERSON |

Sen siiaiaiaatiaiis eee i ene







L ACTAOI’ MOTOR OIL





ADVOCATE Picp Vg

| aii those throboing “ates »
| your nqeetn at once! Apply

MOTORIST | seats

| You don’t rub in “Sloan's” yee cae

Do You Know That The Best | : f

MOTOR ¢ OIL



MR.

sad pi ot 4

TO-DAY !!

FOR YOUR
COPY OF THE

DAILY
TELEGRAPH

—with all the
latest World News

| AND ARRANGE

ADVOCATE
STATIONERY

Broad Street and
Greystone, Hastings

TO DEAL HERE

SPECIAL OFFERS AVAILABLE THURSDAY TO SATURDAY AT ALL BRANCHES

—— . -









IT PAYS YOU









Usually ‘NOW | ;

GOYA XMAS G GIFTS

KLIM — 5-lb. Tims .............. 6.14 5.75 Sets of Toilet Soap . ’ ' $1.60 per Box

Perfume in Hat Boxes ’ 1.20
, ” T Chest cas 1.68
CREAM CRACKERS—Large Tins 1.44 1.20 oll eireawete or net
GRAPE FRUIT JUICE .......... 26 24 . on Christmas Cards

» in Single Phial’s

VE EE eSB RwENy Fed cadies codes 30 .26 Perfumed Cologne .

Powder in Tins ...
SCOTT’S LIQUEUR RUM ....... 1.60 1.40 Christmas Stockings .

Big Assortment of Christmas Crackers
KINGS BEER ................5- .26 22 Christmas Paper ..................05.

Stationery Gifts
ALWAYS APPRECIATED

GIFT STATIONERY in Boxes
PEN & PENCIL SETS
LEATHER GOODS

BEAUTIFUL XMAS CARDS





ADVOCATE STATIONERY





SOLE AGENTS

INTERNATIONAL TRADING CORPORATION LIMITED tt. soos.
WE CAN GIVE YOU

NEW
BEAUTY!



»















Here's new hair glamour—
fn seconds. A complete
colour tone, Auburn,
Blonde and other lovely
effects without bleach, dye
or tint, Highlights for curls
and waves; contrasts —
streaks. Brushes or rinses
out in a jiffy.

In six glamour shades.

olatie
NEW HAIR
COSMETIC

MADE BY THE MAKES
OF BANDBOX SHAMPOO

LTT LANES NOAA RNAI PO OTROS



ALL DAY LOVELINESS CAN BE YOURS!

“THE LITTLE SHOP”

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY BUILDING, BROAD ST.

CARRIES THE ENTIRE RANGE OF BANDBOX PREPARATIONS FOR THE HAIR.









PAGE TEN







BARBADOS ADVOCAT



E



BACKGROUND TO THE RACE

Loudspeakers [n=

Stands

(By O. S.

THE SCHEDULED four-day Autumn Meet of the
Barbados Turf Club opens at the Garrison Savannah today

and when the tapes fly to

Maidens on their way for the $900 Autumn Stakes over
five and a half furlongs sometime around 1.30 p.m., the
Meet proper would have begun in earnest.





Few people, however, pause to
give a thought to the tremendous
amount of industry, precision and
planning that go into making a
Raca Meeting the « attraction it

admittedly is, with sideshows and
all thrown in for good measure

The Paddock

Yesterdey a visit to the pad-
dock would have revealed a
constant stream’ of horses to and
from the farriers who were oper-
ating on the spot. These were en-
gaged in changing the horses’
iro. shoes which they wear
al! through training 1o racing
plites, made of aluminum. These
explain themselves,

There was the constant whirr
or the lawn mower which was
clipping the saddling enelosure to
2 nicety and outside on’ the track
@ number of labourers were in-
specting it foot by foot and

leveling it off where necessary.
Stands Go Up

On the outskirts of the course

and within the enclosure of the
broad, Savannah itself Stands
were being erected from whicnr

the busy punter in the field cat:
buy lemonade, cakes, ginger beer,
black pudd'ng and souse, fried

fiving fish and salt fish cakes,
mauty, ice-cream and the like.
A’ some of the other elaborate

booths’ those people whose tastes
run in that direction can engage
in gemes of chance—the Wheel
of Fortune or the Lucky’ Dip.

From early morning the tablés
that run the Lucky Seven game
will begin to spring up like mush-
rooms all over the place and there
will be many an early and earn-
est group at the dite back-
ing a five or six or throwing
lucky seven and eleven,

More Tables

Other tables will appear at
which others wilt try their luck
at “brag” or poker while on the
very fringe of the road that line
the course the liquor stands will
appear, Many a stunned punter
that drew a “back” number to a
$1,000 prize has had to spend a
part of the $5 which he received
on_a modest nip from the liquor
stall to cushion the shock, while
winners have been correspond-
ingly prodigal and the large
bottles disappear in good num-
oers,

But what of the preparations
for ther actual racing? Early in
the morning, that is to-day,
trainers will give most of their
charges a “breeze” to clear their
wind and having satisfied them-
eelves tha they are iquite fit
they leave to return later in the
day for the great event,

Test The Gates

The Track Manager, Mr, K, Cor-
bin will start working at 6 a.m:
Each Starting Gate is checked
under his supervision and then
there is an ispection carried out
to ensure that the Stands and
Pari-Mutuels are spotlessly clean.

Then comes a detailed inspec-
tion of the track to see that it is
clear of any obstructions that
might cause damage to the horses
and their riders. This will take
up to midday to complete and
then there is a lull in activity
around the paddock.

In just under a half an hour’s
time those horses which are
stabled outside the official pad-
dock are brought im, since they
are required to be in the official
‘paddock at least an hour before
the starting of the first event,

From 1 p.m, pari-mutuel atten-
dants, owners, trainers and early
race-goers begin arriving
steady flow that increases in
momentum as the hour for the
starting of the first event draws
mearer and sets in motion a many
sided pageant, the stage for which
has been in patient preparation
long ago.

Loudspeakers

The Barbados Turf Club are
Â¥xp4~imenting to-day with re-
laying the Rediffusion description
of the race through loudspeak-
ers placed in the stands. There
fhas been ‘considerable demand
for this experiment for some years
now, since it has been rightly
claimed that most people are
unable to follow the race as it
progresses around the course
owing to the difficulty which the
layman finds in distinguishing
jockeys, horses and colours while
the race is being run, One hopes
that it will be a success.

The Barbados Turf Club have
made arrangements for the results
of the draw of the 2/- sweepstake
to be broadcast so that those peo-
nle with private sets can also
listen, The broadcast takes place
over Station ZNX 32 7.547
kilocyeles, 30.76, metres,



These Alterations

Would Improve .

Our Racing

Though Britain is the
lead and foundation for
throughout the world, there is
hardly any country where racing
is staged that we could not gain
some small item for the improve-
ment of conditions over here.

The South Africans have some-
thing to teach us, especially in one
of their chief races, the £10,000
Durban July Handicap,

The draw for positions for this
race is made 12 days before the
event. Writers and backers there-
fore know what they are talking
about in the days preceding the
race,

Thousands of words and thous-
ands of pounds were wasted on
Abraham’s Star in this year's
“Lincoln”, for which he started
favourite, but had his chance
ruined through a bad draw.

The owner of Capsize would not
have had a penny on his. horse
if he had khown it was going to
be drawn No. 1.

I cannot see anything against
drawing for positions in ante-post

natural

Today

COPPIN)

set the Class “C” and “C 2”



Pompee “May
Get Chance
At World Title

(By GEORGE WHITING)

1 offered here recently the sug-
gestion that Yolande Pompee,
inat dark young man with fire
in his Trinidad fists, might profit-
ubly oceupy his time in_ public '
punching against American
cruiser-weights Jimmy Slade
ereferred

Well, that is how it is going to
be. Pompee will fight Slade at);
darringway on November 18—
and, if good fortune attends cer-
iain back-stage manoeuvres, the
pennant of a world title elimina-
w will be flying over the con-
Lane.

Hence the contractual stipula-
tion that the 10-round argument
shall be at the strict champion-
Siip weight of 12st, 7lb.

Promoter Jack Solomons, mani-
pulator-in-chief of strings fistic,
is scheming might and main to
achieve w or1d championship
chances for both Pompee and
Randolph Turpin, without the
pair getting themselves involved
in a head-on collision. Pompee
versus Slade is the opening gam-
bit.

Turpin’s Future
The extent of Turpin’s oppor-
tunity as a middle-weight should
be known on November 15, when
Sugar Ray Robinson has to say
whether he prefers pugilism to
pirouetting as a floor-show celeb-

rity. On that decision depends
whether Turpin bids again for
another meeting with Robinson

or claims a world title tag for a
fight with Frenchman Charles
Humez

As a second string to his am-
bitions, Turpin has prior claims
on a world cruiser-weight clash
with the winner of the December
3 fight in America between cham-
pion Joey Maxim and the Ohio
negro, Archie Moore,

Meantime, the push-for-Pompee
begins with official requests to
the British Board of Control, the
National Boxing Association of
America and the New York State
Athletic Commission for his fight
with Slade to be recognised as
a final eliminator for world hon-
ours. If Pompee prevails, in goes

a further claim to meet the
Maxim-Moore winner.
No Power

None of the above-mentioned

authorities, of course, has any

syver to confer world cham-

pionship accolades but their

unanimous approval of Pompee
v. Slade will do no harm to the
box-office. :

In passing, if any American
thinks the slightly punch-worn
Jake LaMotta should be preferred
in the world cruiser-weight hier-
areny, let it be noted that Jake
hag twice found it inconvenient
to put such matters to the test
against Pompee, e

Supposing Slade improves upon
his performance at the White
City last June, and, instead of
drawing with Pompee, beats him?
That would indeed be awkward.

Perhaps it is as well for Pom-
pee that Prince Philip will not

e at Harringay to shake hands
with Slade, Last time that pleas-
ant little ceremony took place, it

N set such a spark in Slade that he

exploded our Don Cockell right
out of a world championship fight
with Joey Maxim, Once is quite
enough for that kind of eatas-
trophe.

Cloak-and-Dagger

Tommy Ryan, 18-year-old clerk,
was knocked out boxing for Lon-
don — of which city he is the
amateur featherweight champion
—against Berlin, On recovering
he immediately allowed it to be}
known that he was in future to
be regarded as a professional,

I knew, but could not have
proved, that Ryan had made_ his
professional “arrangements” long
before, Had anybody whispered
the dread tidings there would
have been a_ pontifical inquiry;
and, had Ryan admitted his
“guilt,” the London ABA would
have had no option but to with-
draw ‘him from the Berlin match.

—LES.
Solel aisha seinen aetna

races, some days before the event.
especially when the draw is of
profound importance, as it is at
Lincoln,

For the Durban July Handicap,
on which there is considerable
ante-post betting, there is a final
acceptance 11 days before the
racg, and no horse can be with-
drawn, without the permission of
the stewards, after noon on that
day. i

They send their own veterinary
surgeon to inspect any horse which

racing a trainer wishes to withdraw after

that time.

This is an attempt to save back-
ers from supporting a candidate in
the ante-post market which is
unlikely to run, and it is no doubt
a useful rule out there.

When I see 25 runners compet-
ing over here for a total prize of
£200 to which each owner has
paid £4 entrance fee, I am remind-
ed of South African racing

Throughout the ‘year on the
Durban and Clairwood race tracks
there is no race with under £550
in prize money, The entrance fee
for such a race is 30s. and these |
are the worst races of the day—

usually three-year-old maiden |
handicaps |
The top race of the day at Clair-|
wood is generally a £1,300 handi-|
eap, and the entrance fee is £2.}
I also note a £2,300 race for which
the entrance fee is again £2, and
only when the £3,500 mark 1s
reached does the entrance fee g¢

up to £5

Victory for Dover against
Notre vVame on saturday has
placed in the first bracket on the

championship table in the City
Division, Kangers, Dover and
Notre Dame. If Notre Dame had

won their game, they would have
been undisputed champions, With
this reversal it seems quite likely
that we will witness a thrilling
semi-final and final for the
Championship of this division,

In this division on Saturday
Rangers defeated Colts by 145
runs, Colts after losing four wick-
ets for 28 runs added .107 to bring
their second innings total to 135.
C. Reid was not out with 46 to
his credit; this was also the top
score for the team. For Rangers
H. Blackman and Pinder took 3
for 37 and 43 respectively. Ran-
gers’ first innings score was 206
and that of Colts was 71.

Belfield scored a victory against
Bordeaux. Belfield raised 139 and
Bordeaux replied with 128. Second
innings score of Bordeaux was 83
for 9 declared while Bordeaux
totalled 37. Skinner took 3 for 12
and Robinson 5 for 13.

Central Victories

Boys Club won their match in
the Central Division against Drax
Hall. The Boys Club added 18 to
their overweek score of 211 for
8, totalling 229 for 4. L. St. Hill
who had scored a century the
previous day added 17 to his total
to bring his score to 130 not out.

“AND IF THEY HAVEN'T
GOT REAL SWISS CHEESE
IN THAT STORE+-GO OVER

TO THE DELICATESSEN ON
| THe AVENUE~GET A COMBI-
NATION HAM AND SWISS ON








7

|



I DON'T LIKE THOSE GARD-
BOARD CONTAINERS=-GET
"EM TO PUT IT IN A JAR:
AND A PIECE OF RAISIN
CAKE BUT HAVE ’EM
TAKE OUT THE
RAISINS +++





HCATR, Ine, WOK



Mario Biscits

Only 32¢. per } th Pkg.

On Sale at all leading Shops & Groceries
Get Some Tosday, <<

e Cricket

they'll Do It Every




2 IT'LL BE TIME FOr A

LONGER THAN
ONE O' THEM TV
COMMERCIALS =;

CTS RES!

Leagu

By SCRIBBLER.

With a deficit of 108 Drax Hali
entered on their second innings
and scored 124, thus giving the.
opponents 17 for victory, &.
Deane and J. Inniss achieved thi
without loss, each scoring 14,

George Park added another to
their string of victories when
they defeated Ellerton. Ellerton
seored 54 and the Parkites replied
with 84. Ellerton knocked up 82
in their second innings and their
rivals took full points with a seore
of 55 for 3. S. Alleyne scored 27
in the George Park first innings
and Best took 6 for 31. In George
Park’s second innings Walcott
was responsible for 21.

Greens also added another six
to their total points when they
outplayed Sunset. Sunset had the
advantage of a first innings lead
when they scored 95 and dis-
missed Greens for 39. But failed
miserably in their second innings
and the total just reached double

figures. Greens replied with 67
for 2 to win the game. For
Greens, Harper took in Sunset’s

second innings 3 for 5 and Lorde
4 for 0. Brereton scored 42 not
out for Greens.

Union Globe took first innings
points from Invincible. Union
Globe scored 108 and Invincible
replied with 56. Union Globe col-
lapsed for 59 in their second in-
nings and at the close of play
Tvincible were 90 for 9.




bee |

Regivtered US >

lime

4 BY THE TWE Joey GETS) HES VERY PARTICULAR ABOUT ORDERING!

BUT WHEN HE GETS IT, HE SLOPS IT
A, AROUND LIKE HE WAS IN A CUSTARD-F
Zz PIE COMEDy*+-

FUSS YPANTS’ ORDER,
MIDNIGHT SNACK*HE

“TAKES

VED.





FRESH FROM THE. OVEN

DELICIOUS

THE WI. BISCUIT Co., Ltd.






















i

Notes |

Six For Cyclone \

In the Leeward Division
Cyclone stopped the threat of
Highland with a very convincing
victory. Cyclone enjoyed a lead
of 27 and proceeded to dismiss
Highland for 55. J. Dottin took
2 for 6, K. Gilkes 5 for 9 and J.
Russel 2 for 9.

Gyclone was given the easy
task of scoring 18 for victory and
totalled 20 for the loss of 1
wicket.

Barrows won against All Saints
in the game at Barrows. All Saints
had first knock and were dismiss-
ed for 79. E, Thompson scoring
34. Barrows replied with 125. E,
Welch top-scored with 55 and C.
Walker contributed. 34, All Saints
in their second innings collapsed
for 44, D. Lewis took 2 for 14
nnd R. Boyce 5 for 15. e

Standard notched another vic-
tory, when they met Welches.
Welches lost the toss and were all
out for 81. Standard replied with
74 for 7 at the drawing of stumps
on the first day. On the second
day Standard scored the runs to
obtain a lead, Welches in their
second innings were all out for
65, H. Goodridge took 4 for 14
and O. Denny 3 for 15. With 73
runs necessary for victory in
90 minutes Standard made a gal-
lant attempt to foree victory and
succeeded with 15 minutes to
spare.



"ByJiimmp Hilo













| ay THANX
A Ss eA Tree ne

C32) BAR HARBOR, |
4

>



|
|

SS: | 4







MAKING READY
FOR TODAY’S MEET

TOP LEPT:— One of to-
morrow’s candidates is being
groomed in the paddock at the
Garrison Savannah.

TOP RIGHT:—A stand in
process of erection. To-day
this will be the complete
product, fully stocked and
teady for trade.

BOTTOM:— A squad of
workers in action, These men
© over the track meticulously,
oot by foot, and level off
uneven patches where neces-
sary.



Kendal Defeated

Kendal went down to defeat
against White Rose in a match
in which. there was an exciting
end. White Rose batted first
to score 46 and Kendal replied
with 105. White Rose fought back
gamely and totalled 147 in their

‘second innings. This score proved’

too formidable for Kendal and
although they made a fight of it,
lost the game by 7 runs.

For White Rose Vaughn scored
37. Scott 26 and M. Haynes 34
not out.

C.M.P.C. gained first innings
points from G.1LS. C.M.P.C.
knocked up 62 and G.LS. replied
with 42. C.M.P.C. were all out
for 42 in their second innings and
the close of play found G.LS.
62 for the loss of 9 wickets.

Penrode took first innings points
from Rangers “B’” with scores of
Penrode 136 and 47 and Rangers
68 and 66 for 4.

Belfield “B” lost six points to
Chamberlain. Belfield were
given 74 runs to win but failed
by 8 runs. Chamberlain’s second
innings score was 69. For Belfield
E. Dyal took 4 for 20. S. Bel-
grave 4 for 12 and K. Davis 1
for 23. Belfield in their second
innings totalled 66. For Cham-
berlain S, Rowe took 5 for 27
and F. Howard 3 for 17.

Will Play B.C.L.

The following have been invited
by the selection committee of the
Barbados Cricket Association ta
oppose the Barbados Cricket
League at Kensington Oval on
December 6, 13, and 20.

C..L. Walcott (Capt.), H. Bar-
ker, R, C. Branker,,C. De Peiza,
G. N. Grant, C. C. Hunte, F. King,
R. E. Marshall, G. Sobers, C.
‘Smith, E. D, Weekes and C. B.
Williams,

Players are asked to notify the
Hony. Secretary of the B.C.A. in
the event of their being unable to
accept the invitation to play.



BOY! OH BOY!!

I've got something to say,
Not about Robert and Joe
but about
LIONEL & “LADO”
They are staging a

DANCE

«
At THE CHILDREN’S GOODWILL
LEAGUE (Shed)

TO-NITE NOVEMBER 8, 1952
(First Races Night)
Music by. Mr. P. Green's Orchestra
ADMISSION 2/-
—Refreshments — Rar

night. 8.11.52—1n.

GX
“Cina science P
CHRISTI 3
READING ROOM

)

“Pray that the divine presence
may still guide and bless our chief
magistrate, those associated with
his executive trust, our
netional judiciary; zg
congress wisdom, and uphold our
nation with the right atm of -
righteousness

In your peaceful homes remem-
ber our brave soldiers, whether
im camp or in battle. Oh, may
their love of country, and their
fajthful service thereof, be unto
them life-preservers! May the
divine Love succor and protect
Mairy Baker Eddy — Message 1808

This Room is open Tuesdays,
Wednesdays, Fridays, from 10 a.m.
to 2 p.m. and on Saturdays 10 a.m.

; to. 12 o'clock.

and

Fully Guaranteed
— only —

$29.50
See...

“Your Jewellers”
Y. De LIMA
& CO., LTD.

20, Broad St. Phone 4640

and ,
The Village -
Hastings



| others
| We find this result in the South.

SATURDAY,

Wales Have
Best Rugby
Players

The Welsh are the finest play-
ers of rugby football in Europe,
and considering the size of their
resources the best in- the. worid

| (writes Hylton Cleaver).

Now, so excellent is Weish un-
derstanding of those fine arts of
rugby, which seem beyond most
in the British Isles, that

The only player who can be
said to have enhanced his repu-
tation in front of a _ selector
recently, when Eastern
Counties beat Kent, was W. J.
Howells, a full-back from Guy’s
Hospital.. And. he is a Welsh-
man,

The only Cambridge University
outside who makes any impression
on the critics is their full-back,

| P. M. Davies, a Welshman.

The finest player of the game in
any position in Metropolitan rugby
is Gerwyn Williams, who, fortu-
nately, is available to Middlesex;
and the one full-back who would
almost certainly have been capped
by England. in recent times had
it been possible, was J. M. H.
Roberts, a Welshman like the
others.

Brian Boobbyer, staying behind
in the Far East to expound moral
rearmament, may coach the Jap-
anese at rugby. I only hope some-
body would come here and coach
us.

Who better than a select body
of Welshmen? ‘There are the
reople here to do it. Why did we
let Claude Davey slip right out of
the game because he was too old
to go on playing it? »

While he played for Berkshire
he not only inspired the side—hd
instructed it; and there is no one
now to fill*his place.

Through referee’s eyes
In London is H. M. Bowcott,

Cambridge Blue and a Cardiff man
with eight caps for Wales. At
the. elose of-+ts-eareer he was of
immense use to Wasps.

To-day he is a Middlesex
selector. But is he coaching a
club?) I doubt if he is even
coaching Middlesex; if he were
they would imspire more faith.
Three knowledgeable Welshmen

in London are showing’ first-class
gifts as referees. J. H. Darville,
K. H. John and A. M. Rees.

A referee has a much better idea
of all the folly going on jin the
scrum, and around it, than. any-
one sitting in the stand, and clubs
would be wise to get such as these
to go down to a club after they
have refereed a match and help
them to see the game through
Welsh eyes.

Lecturing is not enough. Prac-
tical exposition on grass is want-
ed.

The Wasps became a force in
the game as soon as they played
against the Welsh wizards. They
learned something from every
game, They play Newport, and
Cardiff twice in the season, and
Swansea once. And they get this
encouragement because the Welsh
like the way they have learned.

So it goes on

There were seven Welshmen in
the Devon side which has just
beaten Cornwall; goodness knows
how many there are in any police
fifteen; no public school compar-
able in size has anything like the
record in international honours of
Llandovery; and in town. London
Welsh have struck their flag only
once this season and then to
another Welsh side.

The last winners of the Army
inter-unit Rugby Cup were the
Welsh Guards; and it was to



ne

NOVEMBER - 8; 1952



Admission Prices
Increased For
Indiax Tour

The Board of Management of
the Barbados Cricket Association
at their meeting yesterday after-
noon at the eorge Challenor
Memorial Stang agreed to in-
erease the prices that have been
charged for admission to Kensing-
ton at International and Interco-
lonial fixtures recently for the
fixtures with India next year.

The admission to the Georgo
Challenor Stand that used to be
$1.20 goes to $1.44, Kensington
Stand from $1.00 to $1.20, Uncoy-
ered Seats from 48c. to 60c., while
Grounds and Schoolboy ‘Stand;
remain at 1/-. Season tickets far
the George Challenor Stand go
from $10 to $12 and for the Ken-
sington Stand from $8 to $10.

Committees

The Board appointed Messrs
J. M. Kidney, S. O’C. Gittens,
J. W. B. Chenery and the Sec-
retary. a committee to deal. with
matters arising out of prepara-
tions for the tour.

Messrs B. Del. Inniss, E. A, V.
Williams and E. L. G. Hoad wera
appointed a Grounds Committee.

Mr, F.-A, C. Clairmonte, Bar-
bados Selector on the West Indies
Cricket Board of Control, furnish-
‘ed the Board with a copy of a
letter to Mr C. A. Merry, Secre-
tary of the West Indies Cricket
Board of Control, informing him
that for various reasons he had
decided to resign as a West Indies

Selector.
Regret

Sir Alan Collymore, President,
said that they all regretted any
reasons that had led Mr. Clair-
monte to resign but as this matter.
had suddenly. been presented ta
them, they had found themselves
unable to make a definite decision
at that time. .He instrueted the
Secretary to summon a meeting
for November 21 at which the
matter would be discussed and a
sueccessor/-to Mr. Clairmonte ap-

pointed,
Will Act :
He further instructed the Sec-
retary to write to Mr. Merry in-
forming him that Mr. Clairmonte
had notified the Board of his re-
signation, which they all regret~
ted and that they would hold .a
meeting on November 21 to ap-
point a-_successor, meanwhile Mr.
Clairmonte had agreed to handle
any matters on behalftef Barba-
dos until November 2l. ,

Cardiff that the South Africans

awarded a Springbok’s head as

being the only club which deserv-

ed to beat them—and_ did not. *
‘No coach’

Of course Welshmen do. some-
times try to beat the referee; but
at least they know they are doing
so, and they’give it up as soon as
they realise the powers of gbser-
vation in the referee,

My point about half the rugby
seen by the clubs, the pountles
and even the universities is that
the players don’t know they aré
doing wrong.

And believe it or not, I asked
this week who *was_ coaching

Oxford University this season,

and received the answer: “No
one.”
That just about explains, I

think, why a South African only
has to appear there to be certain
of his place. They have all been
coached always.

The Springboks on their tour
here were coached from the day
they arrived to the day they left,
And who coached the opposition
we put up against them? ©The
same answer: “No. one.”

—L.E.S8,



THEY Painted Shirt Hangers at $1.00” *
Painted Dress Hangers at. .24
VERY each
USEFUL er Hangers at .66
AND Covered Hangers at .... .60
CAN BE ae
Covered Flowered
OBTAINED Hangets at .... 1.00
IN each
OUR HOME Will serve as Christmas Gifts

PropucTS ICAVE SHEPHERD & Co., Ltd.

10, 11, 12, & 13, BROAD STREET

DEPT.

«

% gin. tins

B
Sunshine in 31% lb.
' per lb.

} Rasy to use -

PHONE 4267. 1456 for

BIRKMYRE CANVAS for Tarpaulins
3’ wide @ $3.18 per yard a
ATLAS “A” WCOD PRESERVATIVE

WILKINSON & HAYNES CO. LTD.











4.46
2.62

SISCCLIN DISTEMPER

Supplied in Powder Form in White,
, Cream, Peach,

Green, Blue and
packages at 23c.

simply mix with water.



Full Text



PAGE 1

^^ PAC.I llll It BARBADOS ADVUCATI SATIKUAV. NOVr.MBMt , 1H2 r **• aSssssBt Os, US. Bros* —. • %  %  • %  •• %  Saturday. November 8. 1952 Our • IIIIIIIMMI HVril.ii-c—(-?*( ll \ititi n* r. 1 CHEAT IIOIM s HEACTIONS to the result of the Ameri can Presidential elections h.ive depended Ufgely on whether individuals or groups are accustomed to regard Democrats or Republicans with especial favour. The Daily Herald <-i London for instance which hi the organ of the British Tiade Unions ll appointed at Obvernor Ota van : .: ... because the 1 %  i cratfc Party is associated in the minds of British Labour supporter* with a party of progress and reform General Eisenhower's victory on the other hand has been welcomed by all tbott who regard him as a great-hearted man who sees the problems of the world steadily and whole, the man in whom all oui hopes an placed to bring about the l*race lor which %  war-scarred world is looku. There has been much comment made %  unre the new American President was It simple ordinary people of the *oiid are hoping that the new President. Whatever else he does, will be able to ensure peace in a world which is weary of WU and threats of war. To regard General Eisenhower as a lone crusader doing battle for world peace and using all the might) 1 America to ensure it would however be unrealistic The new Presided ol the United States must rely on the support Of the Senate and of the House of Representatives and he must be guided by whatever will be the final programme of the Republican Party. His Academic triumphs Harry Uvaujor, Goodlng *•• %  born in I8". M Seawall piantaiK.fi in the parish of Chrui Church. '' the tonferonre on reunk 4 He weni to Lodge School when h< ''> H aad l a n a JT„ was a little boy and there he behanced hi* reputation by gun the *iudy of Latin and Green he played at that conference which was to lead him later U. . Goodlng thowed that he had i notable career in classics and nua Uoos which wen Iheologv. He lived In the* da% i non> the less flimly held bees us.Sari if Mourn pleasant and than ''"' '"' t m Prayer Book ll one another's altars. Was regarded as a crisis In tha nil .M. %  i., .. ... ...| I isii i > of u.e ( hurch > I BisJend d it is a source ol c r Barbados that ne of bsi selected, to perform a momentous task and, meet a grave At the time of this signal honour Guodii.a was riill In hi ng seamed to point to a hriKhi and *hn future if relate if...i one un.magm..liv lence in rrligiun was the same as had been abb; ... remain at Oxford '" %  where his apeciM sifts made him an outstanding figure. After galnn*t the degree of B.D., he proceeded to the thesis 1". of Divinity bit' according to the Ht.ttutes of th,UHIVSTPRJ he wee too young to have the degree conferred. Two years later, thu career that g.ve promise of so many high achievements came ta •'n-i when 'inoding was forced tu leiurn 1>> } %  i .. % %  of health. U Barbados When Ooashntj arrived In Barbados, he atonic took up the post of Rector of St. John The follow. *hich enslud € not disappointed Goodlng won the prtte i abroad. Once again he was almost cL-4 verted from Ike path tiiat was up lead him to the highest f It was his family's wlsl I Whereas too the world at twgt watching the result of the Ameucai elections with bated breath, we must not forget that the electors were citizens of the United States and that the President? first duly is to the citizens of the United States. No other head of a stale is bettei equipped perhaps than the now President of the United Slates to guide the course ol human destiny, but the President of the United States can only play his role ll world events with the limits permitted t< him by the American constitution Theheartfelt rejoicing and thanksgiving which is slill going on in many parts o! : 11. world because of the victory of Genera Eisenhower must be tempered by realisa tion of the fact that there are features of a Republican programme which may not b< In the interests of say the British Common wealth Fears have for long been expressed in British countries for instance that the Republicans, who by their whol* tradition are more protectionist than the Democrat*, will not look with favour Ol British requests for lowering of American tariffs. The Republican platform also include* a direct threat to British Commonwealth S references. "We shall press" it was sai" lo tr red Uie profession with „ .. • huh hifamll) had l-em conFrom the time of the conference • b .i In seven] gem rations. Bui ;"' "-"i <*'•" 'ncreasuncle ,.l Ui reuhMHl that h.l '"i; PI. IJg. aOd mflueiK,, in Ihe .. ..uld be u %  ,.,, Ins ,1. nt. if ho wor '*;, ,"', M-nolarshlp. He had remained a planter. Goodmg was fsta A -t,.iion m* Ubtherefore nuluccd to reSUTB to "> Ev-ngHical one who^was L.wh,cn had hrought new .dees of Though Gonding was perhaps at W personal religion, of philanthropic hi. best in dealing with 'lie undereffort and seal. He saw Kraduiite roaad. he (Hi he was loeriv n,. lue >M the modi ml • foing useful w>rtr, in the Classical Imovemenl which spugbt to eaams.x> 'i. I ,-i his pupils with line the problen i chf*cal learning and MuiUBM i" 'hought and ertVch stimulated In them a keen desire J cd to reconcile philosophy .did for free dbwuasicns His learning he Oierehne entered Edinburgh fn v.TMtv for Ibat purpose. Although he did not have hiheart UM. he soon showed th-t he possessed a tlrsi rate bTBUL He %  itied all the prizes for which he was eligible. wo n a bursary to the value oj not) and gave every promUe ol winning CO! luccesse* In |he rtcW of medicine. But baton long h i love of ih<* induced him to aband he aarord Collese, Qxtord, lo read for a classical degree. Hen began the brilliant career thai was lo lead him from one triumph to mother. He won prize after prze ind was %  warded an open acholarhip at Hertford. He g.un< this lime hi* repuUtlon as a cholar began to nprr.ul thruinrh ivfoirt He Invwaaasd all with A'honi he came Into contact by 'h* range and variety of hla loinim.: by the strength and Kiwi-i that I'iitnc from profourwl knowledge. Such n man was bound to attract attention and hi* ippolnlment at the post-gradua'e bSOSOglca] COUtS* .it Wyditfc If all -he was not even ordained at %  hi Matt showed that he had the respect and esteem of thoae who were competent to udgu in matters of scholarship. %  it u-ij fu %  %  ''"• phase ol the search for priaglnn on the boys who passed IIIS nine Vulture Iru(n tlial hMd i( spec ial fas*innthrough IILS hands und. besides. .J2i2Sifi f ,, ,n v n cc l the liu,, for Gouding and it was his keeping the rlassical sixth ,.t .. uteologlcal world, Goodlng conMrrupulous concern for the truth high level of attalnmssn, ha iinueu nis classical studies with Ui d t attracted th 0 countU*sa young encouraged the critical und scienUN arSour and ieul worthy of the „„.„ whll flocked to .i ti n to UM UflC I'liit BUM l-i ttttU t or the Renaissance. words of wls dom that fall from examine the questions that have 111 his lips at Oxford and in later Sgltatad the mind of BUB since the IIAKKY (iM>l)lN ^ !"!" V., St ^".r^'ir*!i" Goodinii exercised his prafoun perhaps on such In 1932 he was appointed youthful s eeke r i after truth that headmaster of the Lodge School in ,ndtuceasason to Hill Kmtage The Lodge had now produced its own with ills passion for Intellectual a) %  dDUSSS* and Goodmg set about Divine the SMM M the n or bis orotound -'"r boarding school. In thu way. 1919 he returned to the unlgnowleJgV a .. d hta wSlcal ^ **. the -chuol c-ould mak, versltj and to the life and work Approach to every enquiry, there unique contribution to th ; he loved with an absorbing pinWM „ alm pu tlly a ,. uul Gooding of the island. In addition smn Oxtonl who seemed glad Uut wcnl |u (ho hcJIIto of hls solved lo raiso the scholasln SJTS^b ,Ta wm nehTniiit 5 -tudenU. He believed that Chrisof the Lodge. He realised Iho •rlnclpal ol liimty wuuId ai | Vance nol merely growing importance of science through clllneM organiMtion but .md provided increased teaching through the increased value of facilities for that subject. But h< the individual person. He was was convinced that the scholarconvinced Ouit outward forms ship of the school could bast be •llcnUUc f Wyellffe Hall and examiner in UteolOD And Liverpool, as If : %  > proclabn Its faith in the renown hi had won in two great branches of Iciiining, appointed him external examine Then beg NOBODY'S DIARY Monday 1 wonder whether the anil papists really missed the point 01 whether they were just glad of the opportunity to y '" kind word Never mind: this is the age of the highways and hedges and you can see the agents of some of the North American religions walking in the hot gun as fa alield as Mount Tabor. In Trafalgar Square, on the other hand, there is a man who objects to people who wear white collars. If he had his way, if all of his people thought like him every church door would be shut. He says so. May I appeal to the anti-papists tc shed their sectarian prejudices ami realise that the papists besides paying quite a fair whack of the expenses ol the established church through taxation are Christians? Nobody questions the right of the cathedral authorities to put any notices it likes on its church doors, but the point is that the highways and hedges seem to be left for the strolling evangelists They don't always succeed either, and they are plenty who will lend a helping kick to help the churches lose face Even those who live in make-believe worlds can smell a rat from a distance, if their noses are not stuffed up. Q. What price Alice Through the Looking Glass ? A. Oh that's different? §H INI! s ! IHMIIhS I AT THE All\ Ol .VI I .MTATIOXEKV A Broom or Brush for Every Purpose BROOMS Rm or Yard Srrul, Cobweb Hmlr (Floor) Straw w !" ... ,i_ !._ %  _„„ \_ei um .ne %  -.auuoi'iii/ii'. 11 vuk i ^ S.M.": %  ;:;• ?B&5WiS£ %  ** %  • % %  , ,ve „"• ."* i S ir8 Wm. Ilewa.. an&-anl!Mlln.?- '•' %  "i"?"'J" w '"?iSf 'r oui torn and MruMUni nandardi ho et tor tho eb*>l mind were placed at Ihe ,li.|ioal hum inlta • Uh "'""W'. I>"t he worked on carefully worked .1.. larb world lii nao h eBovtive chalnj of love llelr ,„, p | on ,„d gradually hi becamo anociatod with Arthur ljevoal that anaUcal Chrisoffo,,, began Jo bear Irult in the Headlam. who was oppotnled Botlanlty, with all 1U divlalona. nad „ >ulls o( Ol ,., s< hool „,d Hlghei mil. Professor of Divinity at Oxa rein 'K.'i'li". %  '< "r m.u> .. nlnatwm, Though ,,,id,,.l21.llerlomh,gB hop h. wmt,„'n'...e.l vj. JU R ^ „,„ „„, ^ nt Gloucester. Both Headhim (tooding belonged to a schou S "T^ Te,e" „n','lo'u', MH .o ffif 2 .12 5S "'BU. Good,,,, did no, coneenllscovcr the truth In every quesLiberal in thu he wanted lo fee tralo all ail offoruj to improve tmn and they would accept noChristian thought reconciled with the achieve! f nl. of Ihe school thing on trust. They believed that Ihe changed conditions of modern in scholarihip and sport. To his university school of theology, limes. On this baaui 'ie worked mind no education was complete Oiere a critical and scientinc earncstl> for ir... umtuation of the unless it looked after bodv. mind .pirit prevailed, was eminently English Churches and If was a ntand spirit. Ho bcUevcl that 'Ulted to turn out young men who ting recognition when he wag ,.hould impress Ihe school w 1th ould put their hearts and souls apoomiiM amambai M ; %  ;"•' ,. importance of moral ,i. their work for the Church. To Branch of ihe Bishop of Bomba. Bial vahala He believed some) t.mld souls this emphasis on eii.iuii. on raWton ,„ „, e jdifymg InduODCS o work It was too bold but to Goodlng a pmtlge a a theolog, nd „.„, n vl „ reil nal the m, .vajorlty of thoughtful people ? „ rocei*. the; rc-op.1, the school could •. made their -work reasonable lion when he was appointed a KT lmn !" L tr Mraeit ami ,on. ,ml undexslaivlable In view of member of the Archbishop, Com\ !" P ,?!2o(.w^oU?,^ 1 S?, %  VeT Importance they both at„!„!„„ „„ l,o,„„„. >n3 u.vil.-.. %  •''' '" J.'" "l, n-^ ta !" c„ Z it %  i. heiT lo university leaching. 0 help In the work of revising d T" 1 f"'' 1 u ."*, !" J' „,d Ooodlng took the „.„ ,„,. "should be that kind of enllghlenluelngthe uch ,, ,.....,. I whichiimblH a man-! of Theolcgy at Oxfor.1 „gn,s,,l „i ihe um.In 111 main develop his power of choosing I. ind appropriately enough. Goodfenluies Ihe lT.ver Book had himself and I) live intelligently lng was appointed an examiner trained unchansjad for neailv and i.iv ll accordance with La Iho Dipli.m.i four hundred years. No change* ll %  uch he is able, In 1920 Headlam and Goodlng had been dine through education to decide on Itegan to v irk lljaelllat on the to adapt 11 lo the clrcumslan .slule nl reunion Thev were a changing frit lhat When the headship of the i ni-ii lhat Ihe great body Ihe Prayer Book -li. aid be made Lodge was offend him In 193:'. hpeaking Christianity t;' conform with exl-ting use, that tloodmg hesitated before ho lid launited and thus made I ii-monlse the acceptad ause of the un. strong and powerful spiritual *?>>," S,,f.,'i" n ^;: certain stale of his health. Afle lam'advanced arrant &&£?*}yg£$i. ", proposals to nrlng about a union the fuller nnd rieher h %  during wl:n! %  f the school rose hetween the Anglican and English {£*,.<,,,„;, ^ to !SI nd th <'dcrs /\s a basis for rem ooVtn thought the advance %  rc d to union. Churche* should agree frankly the prohlem> I : oardlng and Jtwlv %  i.Togise one the conflict labour, • On Page S Tuesday—There is a man at the waterworks who rides a bicycle and has a sweet face His jub is to put washers on my cocks and as my household responsibilities (the hired ones) are always leaving m> ojocks dripping, he comes home quite often. The other day for the first timi I saw him in action. It seems that someone was too lazy to fit a master cock on to my water system so the water can only be blocked from the road. Kui some reason my washer friend prefers not to turn the master cock in the road Result ? You never saw anything liki it except in New Zealand where th. geysers come from. All the time m; friend is searching for the washer tht water jumps up and souses him from head to foot. I'm sure that if this is tht regular system of washering cock> enough water to keep the fountain run ning for half an hour must be lost. It'-" funny though, isn't it ? • • • Wednesday — The other night a face appeared at my window with a tale o woe. His wife (the man with the (acei had just had a baby. Would I lend hin 80 cents to buy medicine from the doctoi shop? I didn't think much of the stort but I gave him the eighty cents. Thii little story is for the benefit of those who say that it never pays to do good. 1 lost the 80 cents because the man hat cooked up this tale but you'll be a much bigger mug than 1 was if you fall fo this soap, after what I've told you. • • • ThursdayDoes anyone care whether th< buses on the Leeward Coast overtak. cars doing 30 m.p.h.? Or is the keei death off the road campaign slowing U| now that Christmas is coming. I scat the Press daily for some report tha will shed some light on the burnt boa at Crab Hill. They don't build fishin, boats of self-igniting wood. Friday—I've got a new suggestion for thi Fire Boys to consider. Every year wt get lots of llres on the sugar plantations The ashes make an awful mess of my house and other peoples. Instead pJ waiting for Ihe day when an unusualh strong wind blows burning trash on t< our houses, could the Fire Boys no think up an anti-cane fire plan and hel[ us to have less [ires each year? I know the Fire Boys are a bit sore becaus; thev can't get their Fire Palace curr sliding poles etc. but perhaps if we hat less cane fires we could afford to spenc a bit more on expanding the Fire Service. Oddly enough the Fire Boys an not expected to put out cane fires. Noi i> anvone else, it seems. Sgtiirday-My friend from Oochin-Chim has sent me another communication which has passed the censors (Noeverything that I receive is fit for youinnocent eas. gentle readers). H> wants to know: how come a barber ani a hawker plank seats on the Chamber lain Bridge footpath to the great anno> aiKS Of us foot-walkers? The best answer I can give to tht really probing question is to ask: hov come a fish shed built for the use o' fishermen has become the community centre for the Paynes Bay fraternity' The only tish I've ever seen on that slab has got legs and arms like me and mv friend from Cochin China. Keep trying brother Some day Ihey'l build us a statue. And where they'll put it? Brother in the middle of tht Chamberlain Bridge. Where else? TOBBALCO I.YSTAV I.OMBIA & TOOTISWA TOOTAM A $1.99 $2.58 Da Costa & Co., Ltd. H 11;*-i xii PA it iv JT'ST ARRIVED Cranberry Sauce Tohaaeo Sauce ( ... hull Onions Red, Yellow, (ire-n Marnhmallowi fair's ChNse Crtap* Kraft Pastry Mis F.atls.1 Pears i .IIIIIK Aplr C eekl n g Apples SPFCIAL CIGARETTE PRICES Craven A ST—$1.08 fravrn A 20's—42r Capstan 50V—S1.08 Capstan 20's—42c. (.old Flake M's—$1.08 Gold Elakr 20's^—4tc. To-Say Favourite K0*ri* it it un MM IV Yr -Old % FINE MEATS Milk Fed Chickens Milk Fed Durks New Zealand Lamb OK Tall Soup I rii/t-n Fish Frozen Peas Frozen Sprouts Frozen Splnarh 1 ruU Puddlucs LIQCOR DFPT llubsnset Claret Sauternes l.iebtraumllrh BerncssUe BrUtol Sherry Vlene Cure Cointreau i i.-in. de Menthe Dan Bass Mi % %  tioldentree— 12-oe. Canada Dry Drinks Srhweppe* Tonic Oranges—5 eenla Plantains—6 rents G0DDARDS



PAGE 1

SATIHDAT, NOVEMBER 8, U5l BARBADOS ADVOCATE Hiscock Couple Cross Atlantic In Wanderer III I'M.I. r I'fir II rmliiinl shine Yacht Steered Herself M&T YEAR'S CARS A T MOTOR SHOW For 11 Consecutive Days Three hundred car* worth some of the inure expensive mi: per gallon. Ii recently beet more than $14 in MM (It WJ.) models. Iw* %  ,*.ernation..l Class I) records greeted visitor* 10 the 1M2 Among the new can a la*!at : 13 m.p.h. Vastly extet.ded Motor Show, whuh was opened MI mute surprise was the new production it planned M ;he 22nd October by Field Triumph, a M m.p.h, sports car Austin company of this model. Yacht Wanderer 111 anchored ofl the Yacht Club yesMap *hal Lord Alexander at Earl's with tuned-up Standard VonA special display of cars that ^ourt. Lcmdon. miard engine The modified Humwon honour" In international The worldwide demand for her Super Snipe Is designed for event* include* thSunbeamr backus. Mr. Eric Ht&c<>ck and his wife, crew better performance and greater |he world's roughest roads — It Tslbot* that won the team prise 16-Hedmom Mr. C. V. H. Archer Hotel Opened ******?— '>iuni< refinements were impr Southampton and spent most of !" *** ^* 1 J*\ c _5^_"" n ^ aZUZ ,„ .i,„ „„.,,Y. ilneaa Is rejected in both new has the large*, shock absorbers In 'he lnt Alpine Rail and modified models in the ever fitted to a passenger car: J**^" XK 1rl tn.it exceeded 100 %  Tamilv-car" class, while newt' four-litre Blue Riband enasne RLB *i DVOf a continuous %  evencomers to the already impresdevelups IIS brake hoeae-power. day run last August. CoignfJ s!ve range of sports cars proThe Ann-t:..iia-Maeley "SapGold,. Gardner's 144 m.p.h. NO. duced in Britain are aimed at the phi re wii its 3.4 litre engine is whirlnow holds approximately a younger motorist, particularly In .apabte of between 00 and 95 hundred records in its class, the North America. m.p.h. Le Vans Aston-Martin and the New the Bent lev stand was Prar-Nash two-seater that A notable trend in design was the Continental sports saloon, Intel took the International toward* reduced fuel rnnsi—pM '-' %  > % %  < to have ., maximum speed Clas> V. MO-mile record at I2l with more powerful engines that Esf around 120 m.p.h Also tn the m .p.i, from a standing permit noiseless cruising at reluxurv class was the new AUard duced throttle. A step forward In 3—S sealer Palm Beach open aavtv per cent of British car brake design waa seen in the use tourer powered with the Ford ptssaVtion now goes abroad. The Southampton and spent hia years in the Isle of Wight. metal disc in place of the Consul or Zephyr engine and Indu* iho normal brake drum. On many destined for the r S market. rent rs the luggage boot had been Both Healev and Frazer-Nash visit' 1. while new show sports models fitted with try"! proved lock the 2 A litre Austin A M engine, dustt tails had been removed from the designs to make unattended cars The Henley Hundred, now to be expo. more thief-proof. and called the Austln-Healev Hunmill' lth dred. i* the cheapest 100 m.p.h ngu power operation of windows In r *r ever built, and cruises at S3 %  | X Tu7T heir.dtalTTround BUtut, Book of tho colony rrnshl "", Mi Ward made the statement before sentencing David HoberO., a San Juan carpenter to seven .mprisonment for v..akni; his lormer sweetheart. Minnie Harry, and cutting off her right hand with a cutlass one night hut provides about ten pet %  I the United Kingdomexport* and is the counjrgest single exporting inln IBM British togOse 001 were worth onlv 3" ittWI). last year the _. hod risen to *47 million (From t***K Tr.ym Brrvtcel H .,,,| II wife, too. is experienced sailor. Her paras were boat owners In 1930 Mr. Hiscock owned Wanucrer 1 which he kept for three years. He lat*r sold It and bought Wanderer II in which he Juiy ""^V ^V 0 .^* ^T# hi. T"'* i urv returned a mjil*y verEnthused by We success ofhj olct ,„„ Roberts J| fc *T>P. *o the Azores. Mr. rUacock t|rlng „ n(1 Mr Ward d ,. ( iri ki Govt. Should mWRATESMAYMSRUPl Not Meddle With Business irroni Oiir Owp CorrMpondent POHT-Or-SPAIN, Oct. SI The United Kingdom Industri„.,d..d >„.. ^ ^" .•[• %  in.;uooVr,,-.;;, „„ .aJESE lirger bo.t In which to vuit men CIUel Bnd wicked onc „ .Itotant counlrmi. He .ld Wjnto of ollenoe he Mid. which SS^a-sr*a &&&&£ SBBaBJ.?*' Porto Santo. Madeira %  •almas. Impressed "I was vary Impressed with Porto Santo which la a small volcanic island," Mr. Hiscock said. He thought It to be much nicer than Madeira although the majority of people preferred to the latter. On board Wapderer III Is a dark room in which Mr. Hiscock ^as S^h?* i*? h J Ve been ***?? P" 6 0 "**" *n" the I^glsla class d offence you would live Council Chamber last Monti a ve done It Pleaded Lunacy Huberts, pleaded lunacy and asked the jury: "Do you think that my action towards Minnie i.i cum.-stcnt with that of a sane man?" He went on: "t was out tsit of %  ever caught myself until I discovered that I Mental Hospital develops and prints his films. He After telling 'the jury that he also has a very up-to-date library did not know anything about what on board and said; "Books are he had done on the olftrf "1 very nice at sea, especially when July II, he said that if they be. || is steering itself for 11 beved that his act was that of sane man he should get a •nilin Mr Hiscock and his wife years in Jail The Hon. Albert Gomes. Trinidad's Minister of Labour. lnduT> and Commerce, who arranged the meeting, declared he wanted to make It clear that the welcome employment and I had many JT" Vf, ""^1^ ""** "-* mea and never caueht and tno8e or Us *"" are coni"erncd with this mdustr.Rlm.tl..,, prohanded gramme suffer no illusions as regards your talent and your experience." GREAAJXi'S ECONOM) (Kroiu Our Own Correspondent) ST. GEORGE'S, Oct. 29. THAT PRESENT CONDITIONS of the industry as a whole are not eg healthy as at the time of the wage rates negotiated in April last year and allow no reasonable anticipation of ability to pay the proposed new rate without seriously disrupting the economy of the island generally summarises the facts presented by the Grenada Agriculturists' Union in a memorandum to the Manual and Mental Workers' Union. A 12-polnt list of proposals officer-, be permitted to vlsu from the M.M.W.U. nave been estates "at all times' is held as a lud ad by DM M-inagernent Comproposal clearly infringing on lh# : the (i.A.O. and aftet refits attached to the ownershu npproval By the general body last -f pi vate property" and that the Monday a memorandum containBCuyai course v*Mtld bs Ihal ns; its conclusions was yesterday .ippliention be made to the uwtu-i landed a delegation of four •tali..* the nature of Uu M.M.W.U. members who met with and th> proposed time nnd rigli a similar number of Cl.A.I' repto grant or refuse the %  ppUcatlu resentalives under the chairmanmust M-maut Inviolate; collection ship of the Labour Omeer. Mr "f woi. ers' Union dues and pa* C. S. OaBreo. meni 1* the day of Group Lean While the Agriculturists' Union ers gg *•• attend t'nion talkmakes seme cmcessions In a few are c .-idered a matter itrtctij Instances, such ns agreeing to for m'enial organisation PORT-dK-SI'AIN This Week Mr C. V. 1Y(*T1 O-ir tfwn i irt-tHHl>nil< DOMINICA. Nov. 2 t On Thursday a new sixteen bedom Hotel, Una Hotel, was openI In Oreat Marlborough St.. Roseau. There was the opening Acting Solicitor General was give' eremony in the afternoon and n acUng appointment as )Udg lance later on till early morning, of the Colony* Buprami The first flo.., of the three-story Ha will be assuming 'he nd on th,„. H "^^''S^L' l *.. ** i fT* Ji thud floor .re other bedrooms jK 1""","?,, '!"' """","' 9 The l.m. Hotel ,. o*nl b, Mr J^ ,y J H ''""fJ. J.eob. prounetor ot the Hit *',". ,'."' '"' Appeal How long he will be away is not yet known. Mr Archer's %  Sspoisst caused seme shuffles m the Legal Kvpartmenl in which his substantive post is i*g-ii DraugMsman, These hsvr mad.M Wdii. i V'crgusson, .mother lljtb.idian, net Solicitor Oeneral II live post Is nsatstant to the / If quality Mvtal Polish &f • &f&f ••• &f < Mr. Gomes wenl on record as being against Government interference with business. Said he* •'It Is my own conviction, and I iho s, i? r j h e're T, :,'o'„e h ih,jj';hS ,, s SSLiS? s£?su& ^^'^JZZ?~ I 10 do ||lg Uta M ra^pj. walchmen and periet 11 in the past the fdockmen these should In future G A.l would be prepm-,1 : %  • gp • 3 He went on: "We do not .hare be placed on monthly or othes a Reference Board another trial. around him wer; misthe view that appears to be very long-term basis, agrees on estates at the compass In "the cabin and n,er P ret ed ^ wh at he -aw :.nd popular l n certain parts of the kreoing her heard Answering a quesiloi put West Indies thut it is easy to mpeople wnrKiii in stint* M %  * --c —%  __ m ii —1 — m — iii.il M inert' i~ mil iriifig k and three hours below. Mental Hospital 'fll that the state should have nothl. There is a compass on deck and a comp Jv ni tTOm ** h Rubens wit h. it U business." small one in the cabin. When the %  u/Nrs aJ, was a mental illn bo;.t is steering herself, the HUwhich the present rel.t, cocks can switch on a light, look J !" W ""— IK. i.*hi n ond Interyretml tell course. •We never sleep on land. It is much nicer to be on sea," the Hlsrncks said. subject to the qualification tha having minimum first aid supplies a votlnn <|uorum of not mora thai and supports the idea of an infive members of each body bs uranee scheme which would fonsldei>d sufficient; the proposit! iid It was not a complain' i hi. Britons WU1 Open Schools In Pakistan would make a man lose control agricultural to an industrial to the extent of arm ng Himself omy in the same way that you with a cutlass and deliberately bring electricity Into your home cutting up people with It ;.fter all you need to do is to turn tha he had tn&4e repeated threat of switch. You will (Ind that uuati must. iiiut.v\i, BMiir uvtiuir — _. l*1ieve lhat you move froVn an cover Uneas. it take, an unetprvnf a oral stand on the proposed new wage rates and certain other demands. Imrnediate Inveatigation -ed shop is entlrelv ill ill djolng so Abolished In 1MI The Trinidad Legslatur.ibolshed flogging In I04i, sevaral years before Britain did to The Ordinance for putt ng an end to logging was piloted throuph the Legislature by the then Attorney General, The Hon. L. B Gibson country we do not share that No* Easy A British oi^aruaatlon. Air The motion for the second re^ci•B' is t asPbsgtdng upon exl Service Training, whose school is ln g waB novtt bv We late Sir gon J ?fL em f* "V" ,nv lY^, at Hambla, Southampton, havo Lennox OTteilly bean given a contract by the Thii Pakistan Government to set up imposition by the Cou two "public schools" in Pakistan, offenders above the age of 16 At these schools, boys between years of sentences of co.poral IIV* and 17 V* who Intend to punishment and to regulate the Join die Royal Pakistan All Imposition and carrying out of rorce. will receive their ordinary ^ h n ,p r lenwi n offendert r.ot education. n,ove the aw ot ,8 >'" It suyn thai n M M W.U. not c S rncticaDllity of I.A0 for men and women reaperI trgfar. this should be a matter Mr Gomes wild that the indu*for Immediate investigation by a trialisation programme was not a statutory body; it considers thai easy as it was considered to bo in the present complex statS Dt when the start was made. He wa-t the .ndustiv. unlik/ in sav oil or extrsvI ualness adoption of a bonus \in%  ySVkfn is piemalure and InsprSClull Aiv'hrt mei'ling has lieen fixe the Ordinance the DomBanana Associauon is redomestic market It small. f assume that when you address yourselves to this subleet you will f ive special regard to this quesion. that is. the sixe of our domest'c market. At a Chamber of Commerce luncheon tiu> following day, Mr. Lincoln Steel, u director of Imperial Chemical industries and leader of the Mission, said successful rndustfialisation covered a vast range of problems, and it was worth while to look at som* of them. One thing was dear, SUTFA the problems of Trinidad were not Board Tririid,.,!* alone. There were the world whTch had their Intricate probktns in various ways and required greater wiidom to solve. ,.ith the M.M.W.IT.' cither claims I ui" as against $2 4H. I.i It would abide by M dec-sion of %  "'% %  against 10 cents (an inan independent body; m a re"ease at present) and Copru S(K quest for a 7-hour work period pet ton as against $218 (also an the O.A.TJ. would agree lo time. lncr< ist today). and a half over th.-8-hour day a In 'he face of these facts the denned by law i at bev.nd thai 0-A.U expresses Us readiness to would also prefer this to be consent to submission of all the point for settlement by arbltrsissues for adjudication by a comllon: Ihe proposal that Union petent arbtration tribunal. Kingdom. A representative gathering ex"iBk^V tended a cordial welcome at the Villa airport. Among those present were members of the Executive and Legislative Councils. Government Officers and their wives, the If It was hoped, he said, tn find additional employment for a certain number of persons. It would corporate body need 0 certain sum of money to lth a Seal, entitled to make do that out of capital investment, contracts and to MM or be sued alone. It was a question that In its same. The Association Is would Involve careful and deinve'ted with the authority to tailed investigations before i| rehabilitate banana plantations could be embarked upon. It was iiil stimulate produ Lord Bishop of the Windward m rket and control U 1 and to quite a simple disposal factories if thing to set up had plenty of Islands, other Ministers of R*"*G f all bananas produced in the moneyand did not know what to ith it; but one had to view 1 representing the Roman Catholic and the Methodic Ch*V< h. Members of the Kingstown Board and several othei members of th > 'immunity. The Police Band under Mr W. H. Lewis played the National olony either Intended for exsj_ port or to be made Into Jams, with care the possibilities of gopreserves, or canned locally. ing Into such proleets. One of the The Association shall be govproblems was finding out which erned by a Board of ManageInvestments would be economical ment consisting of six elected to avoid a waste of money. nembers and two to four memMr. Steel stressed the imporAnthem as His Honour landed and hers nominated by the Governor, tance of considering agriculture continued with lively tune* as he There shall be an annual elseIn any Industrialisat-.on pmshook hands with those who camr tton. gramme as It was the wealth o,| to welcome him If In the opinion of the Govwhich every territory depmdeo His Honour will proceed to ernor In Council (he Board __^_—— Grenada some time this month a mokes default in the performActing Governor of the Windward ance of it* duties, or exceeds or Islands in place of His %  xeellencv anuses Its power] Sir R D H Arundell who Is lawful transferred to Barbados Director Of Works Leaving For J'ca. %  rrtxn Our Ovn Corrnpor^enlDOMINICA. Nov. 2 Colonel K. K Rowbothsm, who I...:, I Wttrks since 1947. 1 leaves by the Colomble on Monday for Jamaica. Col. Rowbothsm : replaced by Mr. G. A Grant, of St, Vincent, who took over on 'Jetober 3rd. Before coming to IVwninica. Mr. Grant held a similar iMsst In St. Vlncnt Last Saturday evening the staff the Public Works Department .hall be for the Governor-lnCouncil to dissolve the Board and appoint one person to perform the duties of the Board until '.he next yearly election. The chief aims of the Bill are to protect the Interests of all banana growers. especisUy the the Leflwing^f the Ubour Paris small ones, and to amend and chaH e*ireA Mr 1|rTbert Morrison Mr. Bevan Trie* For Deputy Leadership LONDON, Nov. ."> Mr. Aneurin Bevan, leader of lidate the existing luting to bananas. Man Drowns Ml for election ss Dfputv Leader and Vice Chairman of the Party for this Session 0/ Parliament. It 1 was the flrst challenge in 20 vears. Mr. Morrison lost the last 00*1 to Mr. Arthur Greenwood, but later won the Deputy Leadership. Own Cnrrvipondcri ANTIGUA Thirty-eight year old Edwin A secret ballot was taken and will West was drowned off Barbuda be announced at Wednesdays last Tuesday. West was on a meeting of the Party. If Mr. t fishing boat returning to Antigua Bevan is defeated as Is forecast held s farewell party In honour of whe „ |hty rm n 0 „ ^^ ,„ ^ (J PiprctM to nin for m#rn the Colonel. ^ 'bieh they pre, (lCTT p lr to lower the jib West barshlp en the parliamentary I ,ented him with a gift and exfel! ( VPtboan | „ d ^^ ,,„ % Commlttee-the "Shadow Cabpggssjsad regret at his leaving. Wi(1 madp on |y n|(1 cap wa ,„,„ From Jamaica Cot Rowbotham Roating on the water. The body Mr. Clement Atllec was r oes to RriUuh Honduras where has not yet been recovered. West elected Leader and Chairman of he has contracted to work with who came from English Harbour the Party for this session without lie Public Works Deoartrnent leaves a wife and nine children, opposition—I' f C^/ie C/lVtOf C-OMC/I And what a soothing and comforting one It Is "That Cow S Gate Baby Powder Is really delightful," says Mummy. It '.eems to soothe and comfort Bsby more than anything else." "Yes. and It seems to soothe and comfort other people too." says Daddy, looking up from his paper with a smile. COW V GATE G FOR COMFORT t CONTfHTMIMT New Trade Union In Grenada GRENADA. Oct. 10. A new Trade Union, the Solely of Agricultural labourers. .vlth registered office at Plaisanev Kst.de. St. John's was reghrtarstd Attorney-General on October 24. It Is founded by Mi r I> Winslow owner-proThe Hon C. T W. E Worsell. riStor It provides, among other Solicitor General %  ihlngs. for Old Age Pensions. Attorney General Slnct the apChc following day the Grenada poinlment of Mr Pen %  1.. ih< r> \guculturlst* Union, which een• f Chief Justice ;i few m '•exiles the former Agricultural There will be three BarbaYssoclalion. Employers' Society dlans holding top posts in the md Coconut Growers' Assocla'. -A siasr/ras* sais /. ihAaasts g aa of basaiy. Csvsj*W yoars a* I ds," aayi A** fbda; "MM Lum UiUl 5MJMfsuWiyr Care foe your skin as Aon Todd. lowly star of the J, Arthnr Rank Orsanisad.ui. does use Lux Toilcl **-nr.gul.ilr. A daily racist with Lux ToUet Soap will give you a OMSg fiob %  kin — Uw foundation ot*beauty! GflfSg your (>•• BSSasffOOSl] *ilh M ri> h. creamy lather, sad *ork it in thoroaglily. Rinse lir-t with warm, then with cold water, snd pat g"Dtly dry. Y our -Ln. will take uu a new UseluMss ~ the loveluiess of th* stars t LUX TOILET SOAP .TAe fragrant white soup of ththim start ^ IRISH RAYON in colourful floral designs I IICMare from the Emerald Islfi in two vtry praclical liirht wel(bli snd colour lovely . % %  : wide si Mr. and 'H. per yard. Al -...1,-1. you find what you want when you want it. x a iimr 1. Geo. Sahely & Co., (B'dos) Lid.


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EEFJL5GR5_JOI5KS INGEST_TIME 2011-10-12T16:24:42Z PACKAGE UF00098964_03033
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES



PAGE 1

rAc.r. six BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATtrKDAY. NOVEMBER s. l*5i TR.P. E nmutt M y Caribbw Fresh Fruil Brings More Aawessa? easa* <**.y was exp--i. <"> HovonaiMv for this was the i of the motor vessel Cartebee which hailed from Dominica early m the morning with r uaual cargo of fres*. frun There was also the usual bust*hnh u associated • iih the landum of fresh frui! Hawkerwho mkaed the previous day's landing from the Danv nnd ~iadr certain that thev would not suffer a f ro n d setback and as • result, the* fagerly as One by one lorries >n man to nsove away from the vmmT* side, laden with nee rhaTVoal or wood. Similar work wan in a* ogr e ss on *ie aehrveer (Ml la\. which was POOLS AND LEMON ARBOR factories have been SSHfr? J >TO JP g -_i T ff y -n'^*** %  a MW company km wn as Uplands Limited It is 55is**Kr. ..* proposed to combine the tw factories into one improved of roroanut efl and eorbvfactory "UPLANDS** on tr, I*roon Arboi lit* % %  *-ea*ght from Grenada on Since June, some 250 rr 300 men and women have Wrdneadav been woikinp; in an effort i i have the major works comvrw rosy aox end of the war, leaving 1 only certain minor .""-. %  w h nr the last iW week* before the besnnmn* tJE £*£$?„%££%£*-/ft. r the? IW3 crop which it is hoped will start in February iox win serve the reabb at Pool* Far^——————————— the district at well a* those of neighbouring area of Chelsea QUEEN ELIZABETH VISITS NEW DAM THE TFJTT.E labovrl from Foal rctory. SL John, la BO* bains Installed br Lemon Arbor Factory l the *aanr pariah Thaaa factor!** hare aanalgaaiated and ara new ear 4 t'plaad* rartary Pottle And Lemon Arbor Sugar Factories Merged tery has been dismantled, and rr to I*pi and where it is being .reeled. Thi* Inch I -:.plrand two mltls. making the new factory fifteen-roller plant It is expected that with the jm iltfatnation the grinding capecviclnlty of 4< f card per hour—an Increase II ton? on the output by 1/mon Arbor Speaker Warns Assemblymen lin Honour the bpeaftor Mr. K. N. ft, HuaUuiiLia u^iuod mombent ol tn House of Assembly :> %  Will be lirm in jaluiH with member. 'to 111' '.ur mrmwn by maki iioes OiT •*. U" courao of a -mr usued id liut after a P ud on a nun*; ol occasions Oplnf last night's debate i.lied-jli'' House to order 10 thai becould fot!or the aaa rtV bj memben. Bar ru'" whldtaaiji tha* a memb> : Ma-leet must rot be li itrnipted.XK snld thai member* 'hould learn to control thru polntad oul th-it the rriBinbrt was net very large and tha* ich interruption* should not be male pariculatly In the presth .: In tho near fvitf Inn i" v+etui' Ihn' the ruta !< iVMrrveri L.C.C. Exani ResulU R~" rormly. re>,deTit* had : artm itrxuiu oi lh long distance* to Dalknth or to in order to poal their letters, and this move will dnunt1e**iv hr w-elcomed by them. c^ffNliiraafTH n '..flowed by Barr tiiabamd, thr Duka of Edinburgh, ^^ T^ W * lna,J VMt ,,% ***** Claajrwan Da !" largest of amu Bntain. The proiect was planned by the Queen's gnat rr.,,.-father, King Edward VII, near-y M years ao. With the Quean is the Lor J Mayor of Birmingham. W. r Bowen The Duke accompaiataa vne Lady Mayoraaa and the Lord of lareceshli-e. (JsMcrnorioahaW ;•-_• I I I -It 1 M > -I *..l ARUMOTUN HIGH SCHOOL , MwAHIm'f BABaSADOa rVENINO ISeTTTITT T An a T>ovwtiUng. T Airkar—TyavwrWna iDMinrtlan' I I Brrhlr* A'iir-mt'i H IV1 MBUMIT • \* r*. i O. BvnoeBook-brrplns S D* V Davb— Typ-*-rlUi>* iDliintB r.i-vaAnthmti* .t>tMi !" uoo, fraafctk rnswi a ama-Arnh ;. Ti-filir,l r.rNFRAL CARGO lloik-t Tribute Mr. J. F. Brathwaite MEMO FOR DECEMBER I T *h'' Harn*on hne ateamshm Ifertimaai arrived in port vesterrtav morning from Liverpool. The Herdsman which brought n general cargo of foodstuff* and medicine The House of A&senibl) i>a*ii u Resolution of Sympathy yesterday in respect of the death of Mr. J. F. Brathw-nle, Official wnm pv . nd (rv to ninch the l,4Hl of m erchanU who mmi nf_r,pt,in T Sl am) Is L i^.r h SJi" I .i ..i.':.'!S2?riS: "" !" b " m.mcdi.t.1. (By CHAPMAN PINCHKK) Next time you see the full %  .ton" lilt your hand In front of 50 YEARS AGO I n.ni the Barbadaa Advurate ..i .\avember Stb IMS) bkV (or Use I Sj| tuu niuuUia u goes without ->,ng in >v win b,. •erlouab crippled and that a hurt ciup of *UK-" mi I-acted 1 uiiu ui-jid, oaj guwu lUlhority. tlut in thoae pariah* A huh kwve ii.id the beat rainfall, ome good ctuiea are to be seen. >ut that no pariah haa a reguiar i rop of canea and thai on the wbola the island's output of lusar A ill not exceed 40.UUU tons. This.I g claaa. All persons concerned in use vcll-being of the country, froSD Excellency the Uovaruor and -islalure to the Merchant, | haraw done the beat that may be M* ID keep alive the mam ln. • s of the island till better. n -"me But when these em-! i Letter days will come and) ban ihe dark cloud will po* I a i] and -> brighter scene be .infolded, la the question, which, p (ear. involves a problem very i itncult of solution It Is true that the nbolltran of' lounlles on Beet Sugar from the, i iinlment has been decided on i tor next year, but il would aesxn that a large and influential sec-{ %  the British people arc ttrabgtl opposed to Ihe abolltloh of the buuntiea, and are powerfully influencing public opinion' to upset the decisions of the Conference on that ii Whether there Is I rtt influence at work lo 1 nullify the decision* of the Con-' or whether those decisions Mill be steadfastly adheredl to is not possible to say with anj degree of accuracy It is a fact, i however, that public opinion in I England on the question of the, %  boUUon of the bounties, is b> j no means unanimous and that < ig to motives of self interest I there Is a large and Influential are | ff.lMt), "M& Aw 6op*rili(ig D I Lad %  H %  assaBBBS C Lor<*Arli*mrt*. D Uir— Book-'%  • oil—AT-fimrlir on*igned to I>a Co*ta It Co.. Ltd. CARG O OF RIM Another arrival yesterday was the l.q-ton motor vessel O.K. ?*??** VFTI which arrived from HMif;i* The vessel, which is UP !" ** the commnnd of Captain I H Strum i* eonslgend to Mar'm Doorly & Co. and rame to the l*lnnd to load a cargo of rum. t'NLOADINC. COPRA in.ikT Road A copy of mi — Mr. Brathwaite'* n lalivei i %  ise stood in silence M g token of respect to his passing. Mr. Q. II. Adams in moving the i'csolution said that It was tragic in that a abort time ago Mr Brathwaite had lost his wife. Mi BnUiwan. of age and ihrink to about half lt< letermined to contest the mcas-! ure. To which side the victory I will fall is not yet clear, but we, inccrely hope that should the bounties not be abolished, the rhen look at it through a tubs Brlllsh Government will see the m de from a roir d-up sheet of vxpvd 9acy of impasiiig counter-, paper Again it will shrink. %alUm dllll , „ n j^, sugar i Looking at the moon through bounty fed and so come to the mirror, or bending over so that rescue of the West Indian plant-1 sou see it through your leg*. %  r* There is no increase of cases j I'OducAS the same result. of small pox and that the epl-! ,„ Dr. Edwin Boring, a U.S. sciennemic has considerably abate> i rthand FRrVATS roia*--Bo->k-kep.rig n .i MI ..... DliUru Floe Q. T.C. llrtces P E OlbMe—Arlthmm" Diiincii"Fngllth. M-t-'Tlle. iDUIInrtVw W A H-wi:—Boeh-hr*plng C N Sm.Ui—GMetiapl-iy i anru \Tr *r.\u* mi moron \ \rrn-rr C Ci ranMUn Il'-nk kcrptr.d DI-Wclnesday from St. Lucia was yesterday unloading its cargo of copra which it brought to the Island This shipment of copra is -"n'jRned to tho Barbfldost Cooperative Cotton Factory The 'Vterwsksd also brought | cargo nf resb fruit which It unloaded the "'•v'ious day The vessel l conTned to the Schooner Owner*' Association. "ME FOR RO. %  xplain these Illusions after nturies of argument have failed dear up the mystery. He found lh;il Ihe size of ihe .i In -u .k.. *'hen il Is viewed with the eves JilnessM to ha?e 9 "V nt >,rai ,t ahw,d IU ,in KilSflt }1 h £Z •? y1ng the eye, result, in ^ehoon r Franeeaw. *mHh ^Stable tST bm7\vh' h ,,ir ld '.'^ • fiuantlty Mr K o. Mottle • ,li!m* i ,. ^'I'S "hipped by ^.j occasion. Ju SKAWI %  Alex chant i n W.I. ii Trim.: %  nan lo-morrow, rj lli • Advocate'• % %  :. ... i i enter i. Race Meeting of which i. %  %  : % %  'i h 5 Just come \ < V %  N The i laor SUppei M 1 %  'i, who is accomnfiied • %  s %  • llnuse. Harper—Vhgliah. toice TXpewrlUng I Bool ...lint* i Typewntlng coMBrsussmr. SCHOOL II A i.lin -fclaU.iriUci C G:Horlf—Ftr*h K liifTtlh— Oaograpfty 1. Htildet—AtlthinMic. flioin ._ DIM.. n W*.nar—MaihamalM?* I HBCONDABV SCHOOL Uoume-B>a1M> iDtitim-tloi.. Talking Point I i-tni ncr--r plun (he inturi* by the pajr.—Burke. Tfien loii)i mol urti -.I'speare. Liberty is nof merely a ;. fo be con/erred,' if Is %  • *>,' a. quired. Lloyd George. ke—Bnglk E r. Millar—Bnli"h v Habkrti—AnUiniatw, Maiaasaaue* . HIOH acHOOI. ..•ko-'Bnll.h. AurlClatkeBit1l-li Shorthand. % %  %  M .1. nn*or, Anthmrtlr S Ufnlon MaUwmatvr< v gUah •MaOirmitMI ISaajiai aMtn %  sghsli BMBBS bits IIAUANCF i.'.ng) %  1 lNTi*N OuiKJlM TJiTMiitltig ATE ldrcn to mourn him. He was ^ure that the House would wish d which arrived in to place on record sympathy lo family and sg p d ct al l y to the v ."""^ : a^rX ', time. hjg was not known Mr. Brathwaite for long S hrtnkinu A fo, the little time he had Th „ M( |Q n ^ known him he had twiidjxun an niuon lookB blUHt whpn i% ,, %  %  greeable person. He deaixsd to on tne hoii2on express that the loss to them ould be felt and it would be Automatic record this lint It must be the brain, not i Ihe eye, which Is really the gkt* lev aald it was ft . Think of it this way: — sad occasion. Just about si* you look down at a street This schooner months ago he received a teb''*m a skyscraper, a passing car me off dock three days ago after """?" m --*age from Mr. BrathWBB took like a toy. Yet if you iidcrgoing genen.1 all-round reJ^ thT^hTs better half had l.wk at the same car from the same ^iSUfV&lL^SSl -^ --y '^'"/ hlrrTwilh nisunoaon the ground, it will not ^utarufdwlni th? dav E children. Kb associaUon seem so malL utana aurmg the day. jjj^*Mf 0iathwaUe had been The im-ge which the car makes \RGO FOR RT. LUCIA long before he went to the on your e>e must be the same at Advocate never mind to the both dlstanc-s, yet the brain alters House of Assembly. It was less It to give you LI sensation of height than a year that Mr. Brathwaite when you are on top of a building. •icceeded Mr. Maynard as reIt seems the nrain automatically the House. His manner makes this adjustment when your luct and devotion to nil eyes move up or down in their uty made Mr. Brathwaite ressockets. pected not only by members of But there must be more to the House but by those who moon illusion than this. For the ana Into contact with him. explanation does not account for It, ( %  •li that it was their the fact that people who have only U-unden duty to see that someone eye see the moon the fur the < hildren t'ze whichever way they look HolVx %% air IMS LOUIS L BAYLET Ballon Lane %  nning The motor vessel Lady Joy left %  it yesterday afternoon around -1 %  lock for St. Lucia. Sho took o cargo of rum. soap. irgnrine and various other Items n the same port. The Ladv Jnv under the commmd of Captain Parsons and its local agents ere are the Schooner Owner*' octattbo. Another departure vesterdav fternoon was the nuxlllarv rll F. Smith which left thing be done On cuts or scratches that may fester apply DETTOL ANTISEPTIC Used in hospitals. Trusted by Doctors. The safe way tO BBSBty in every home! ii!" u i m n %  • >i %  %  OmDay. Women May "Batik' A Spare Face Ti.e worn n ol loinortcM ms ufsjary is now being investigsti*< look se^ M t. To provide a new uaj, < %  decide t!udv*il how and why ihe ski that the Um has come to COV.T irrows old. her face *itli the spare complexion he .( ie was i rin Uke il .tiler a few vckl in l lo home I r %  te with a real.• i(;uvenated face. >rt for Grenada. The cargo which It Iearrvinw i Grenada in.-ludes mm. mar•orlne. and snap. The Cyril F mlth Iv nl*o conslgenri to the rhonncr Owners' Association. C OAL AND F1R KWOOD. The schooner Cvrrdrne which fropa Urilish Guiana on iliursday was yesterday dischargig Its cargo which was HMdo up > (wefly of charcoal nud firewood. The Rverdene i> undei 'h. SOBV .) of Cnpuiln E. Phillips and i* > "ii'ignrd to the Sehoonci OwnCI \*M iciallun. he has left behind to mouin him __ Riiiso Warmongers Preparing WASHES Quicker! Easier! The scientist--, propose to remove .itches of akin from young labIts, store it, and graft it back on hen the> are older. ill i .ur lose her i —who fcnou'S''—the .tch on. ." And the idea might This fklgtatcn.ni pi'ienect I opened up* by astonbhing expe. ments now in progiess st Univei sity College. Le found II skin removed lor grafting opei.. Uons can b" key. aUvsj in a de 'cur ntont 1 %  bty in-t-finitelv if hi Hist been soaked in glycerine with It looks < made frobeen freshly n -..hen you scratch the back _. i he ''' %  '"' *n i ,. ur neck %  .. '>it-t so tmr, but r lentiskt believe that the results The reason:—The ody is dlt I i.; 1 into long and -hort scratchtrl .rig art-as depending on the concent tat ion to aanatuve assTva i in rgency inrllngs in thskim. MOSCOW. Nov 7 Marshal Sernyon Timoahenko viewing Russian troop SSth Anniversary of the 1!U7 l"-v k Revolution accused They vtll thsn \able to stud. w f t *f n w-ymongsra" of "trying he jMllllMI bc-ween the akin '" >hlch haa aged naturally and thai hlch has been In n state of susctided animatiou. incite certnni states against the Met Union." M.nshal Stalm mounted tho Red Square rostrum outside tho Kremlin In the flrst snowfall o' It mav be that future fashion 'he season to watch the annua .11 plug the theme A $&& ^_ VI 5i_ irm '*l^f_ n _nl rl %  uhout a spare complexion Up lo Scratch Me raised his arm in greeting t he crowd* and massed troop below but did not speak. 'It I' true the warmonger* n re n ng of another war ..: I reputing for It". Tlmophenko 7i r-olo Marshal of the Sov I When you scratch the palms of I "" i" ,d knowing the Ufcsps* your hand, to satisfy an .tch you 2S?,£? ^"."f 2 ' u. much shorter st-oke. than .^ ^ ^ been l .irhirous war against Ui' trying to inch" certain states agaJnsl the S"\ t Warmongers slumlil h"*ever know that QM peopla t th .^-Id do not want war." I'.f Peter M'-dawar an.1 %  out this research for two Imrne"u-poses: — rased I I "ig up <' •i-'rt-fcjT "bonksT — reser lAtld be used tmswds %  '.rxed people fo JHH-re :r. Where nerv.endings sre cornIn the middle if the hack and on the upper arm. long scratch Is needed to give ellef. On the fa\un,n. As ir II rM Still worklno I A graM taken from another perdles. But workinwith rabl After experiments with guinea itlsts are convinced British jet tighter' and l t prolonged exposure to Jetnre being built In 12 fi tlie same engine noise will damage the )n 'six different i rurruui ear whatevej Air For-e glum. France, Holland. ingthisimluthortUes may say. %  ling li. .nnan plastic igdngi M give thorn HALIftOftANGI •very day THEM'I IOIHING UMM rr tar buildaag up mcrrea of viul energy, promoting healthy growth, itrong boon and teeth — and irsMuaaKc lo illocss. Made from purest halibut oil, cleverly blended with the juice of ripe oranges. It is neb in Vilamina A and D and so delicious In taste that the most fenksrr youngsur takes k with delight. Inaocotallv, n't fine for grown. taps tool Haliborange. IMl NIC1ST WAV Of TAKIMC HAIWUI OIL g-"L~J§^/i OOODl IT" *H hUtU m Upland by: ALLEN HANBURYS LTD.. LONDON. F..I gslgfjsVsBBSBBBBMB* ^mfwe I T you're really out to conquer a cough—to get to the root of it and destroy the germ—then ask for Famcl Syrup. Why? Because Fame) Syrup does so much more than ordinary cough mixture It contains soluble Uctocreosote which is earned by the bloodsticam to the throat and lung) and breathing rtassagn, where it destroys the germs which •IUVC the trouble. Once the germs are destroyed then it*! goodbye to the cough or cold. Meanwhile, the scothing balsams in Famcl Syrup are vjasmg the irritated membranes and the tonic minerals are keeping up your strength and powers of resistance Famcl Syrup is s recognised medical product usec* for coughs. cold*, influenza and bronchial troubles. It is widely recomTid-d lv, Doctors. Hospitals and Sanatoria. FAMEL SYRUP Frank B. Armstrong Ltd. BRIDGETOWN A\\M'//// Your coloured clothes are so much brighter— and whites whiter, too—when you use Rinso. Rinso is so easy to use, and so gentle—its rich lather float* out the din thoroughly, without harm to the fabric. For better, brighter results use Rinso—always. *&•£? RINSO for all your wash I $m for Inspection time! t'hfrk /four r,-,,„irrm-nt* for the Mlmmimti Tyra & Tube, (Goodyeer) Brake Lining Set, Hydraulic Brake Part, Decarbonising Gaslut Sets Main and Connecting Rod Bearings Piston & Ring Sets Lighting & ignition Cables Duralife Batteries (6 A 12 Volt) Lacquers & Thinner, Green Blrkmyre Canvas Rear View Mirrors Radiator Hose A C Sparking Plugs A C Fuel Pump Diaphrama NU-Swift Fire Extinguisher* Tyre Valve* and Gauges Etc.. Etc.. Etc. SaSaari .• STOP AT COURTESY GARAGE (ROBERT THOH LIMITED) Dial 43tl White Fark Road %  iiiiimiiiiiiii i iiii i mi i ii ii




Renee

WHAT'S ON TODAY
Films for Children, B.C

Art Exhibition at the Museum 10,00 a

9.00 a

B.T.C. Races, Garrison Savannah 1.30 p

‘Cricket at ¥.M.P.C. 1.30 p.n

For the cause that lacks assistance,
inst the



t the future in the distance,
@ the good that 5 can do.

ESTABLISHED 1895



U. K. INDUSTRIA

Look Forward To

1

Work In Barbados |

SEAWELL, Nov. 7th :—The five-man mission of Brit-

ish Industrialists who are visiting the British Caribbean

Colonies of British Guiana

bados “to advise on future industrialisation” arrived at!
Seawell this morning by B.W.1LA. from Trinidad where |

they spent about 12 days.





C d Shi {Lincoln Steel, leader of the Mis- |

‘ound

By Gale

LONDON, Nov. 7
Qne of the -worst gales to hit
many parts of Britain for several |
years blew an 8,723-ton Cunard
liner ashore in the River Thames.
stood by to make their sec-~
attempt to pull her off the
mud bank.

She had discharge@ passengers
at Southampton and was on the
‘way to th land Dock, Lon-
don. Ano ship, the 19,930-ton
“Scytha” was unable to leave
Southampton for Canada on
schedule, and waited until the
winds died down.

A US. Air Force B50 Super-
fortress cras! during a gale
with 11 men aboard near Great
Dunmow, England. Seven bodies
were recovered and four miss-
ing. The cause of the crash was
not kn . ‘Winds fanned the
blazi wreckage for hours.

During the gusts of wind that
touched 64 M.P.H., trees were
blown down in London streets
during the night. At Shawbury,
Shropshire, a wind of 94 M.P.H.
was recorded,

Tracks Blocked

Railroad services from London
to the Midlands and Northern
England and Scotland were tem-
porarily disrupted by winds hav-
ing blocked the frack with piles
of rubbish. The overnight boat
from .Heysam, England to Belfast
was held up. -for-nours,

The 2,869-ton Finnish ship
“Mylykoski” was adrift from her
moorings at Swansombe in the
Thames and was secured by a tug
to a mew anchorage at Long
Beach. -Finemen throughout
Southern England were kept busy
most of the night answering calls

fanned

0 pus out fires by winds

to

sued houses:

were blown down into houses.
At “Merry Boys” pub at Tun-

bridge Wells, Kent, a man was

trapped two hours under a fallen

chimney stack. He was given

morphia while firemen cut him
free from the wreck.—U.P.

Run Agr

|



Groves Station
Impresses B.G.
SPA Chairman

SEAWELL, Nov. 7.—Mr. R. R.

Follett-Smith, Chairman of the
British Guiana Sugar Producers
Association, told the Advocate
today shortly before returning

‘home by BWIA that he was im-
pressed with the situation at
Groves Agricultural Station for
breeding purposes as well as with
the big collection of varieties of
sugar cane there. |

Mr. Follett-Smith came to Bar-'
bados to attend a meeting of the
Advisory Committee of the BWI
Central Sugar Cane Breeding
Station which was held under the
chairmanship of the Director of
Agriculture, in addition to an-
other meeting of the BWI Sugar
Cane _ Investigation Committee
held under the Chairmanship of
Sir John Saint. ’

He said that he was very me
terested to see the recent work
on “selfing’’ canes by Mr. G. C.
Stevenson, cyto-Geneticist of the
Central Sugar Cane Breeding
Station,

“This sort of work is going to
be vety useful to sugar people all
over the West Indies” he said,
and added that it was a long
range type of problem from
which one could not expect to get
results right away but he hoped
there would be adequate errene-
ments to make sure that e
scheme would be continued here.

Schemes of that sort were gen-
erally started and then faded out,
probably due to lack of funds.
But the present scheme was one,
which should go on and perma-|
nent arrangements should be.
made to make sure that they did’
not have to stop in the middle of
the scheme.

Mr. Follett-Smith who was a
guest at the Ocean View Hotel
said that he had a pleasant though |
short stay in’ Barbados and again
enjoyed the island’s sea-bathing.

Mr. Nehru Greets
Marshal Stalin

BOMBAY, Nov. 7,

Indian Premier Jawaharlal
Nehru told Soviet Premier Josef
Stalin Friday he hoped the “happy
co-operation of our two countries
will always be exerted in the in-
terest of peace and stability.”

Mr. Nehru sent greetings to
Marshal Stalin on the occasion
of the 35th anniversary of the
Bolshevik Revolution.—U.P.

2,660 FRENCH TROOPS
LEAVE FOR INDO-CHINA

MARSEILLES, Nov. 7.
The French liner “Pasteur”
left here Friday with 2,660 sol-
diers and officers
to-join the French Expeditionary
Corps in Indo China. —U.P.







; seven

on their way}

, Trinidad, Jamaica and Bar-

Comprising the Mission are Mr.

sion; Lt. Col H. E, Peiree, O.B.E.,
J.P., Mr, W. W. S. Robertson
O.BR.; Mr. Le Tose, wc; and
Mr. G. H. Spencer, They are!
accompanied by Mr. M. A, Willis,
a Principal from the Colonial
Office who is acting as Secretary

to the Mission. j

}
met at the airport)
J. Con-'

They were

by Sir John Saint, Col,

nell, Mr. D. G, Leacock, Hon.
F, C. Hutson, and Mr. M. E. Cox,
members of t he Committee

appointed by
Governor to prepare a programme

of visits and interviews, and Mr.|
R. N. Jack, Acting Labour Com-!
missioner, who is acting as Sec-|
and |

retary to the Committee,
Liaison Officer io the Mission.

At the airport shortly after
their arrival which was delayed
by about two hours, the Mission
was shown the programme which
had been arranged for them.
They afterward left for the
Marine Hotel. |

The Mission flew over from’
the United Kingdom on the 17th
October, arriving at British;
Guiana on the 19th of the same}
month. There, they spent a week
before flying over to Trinidad
where they spent the past twelve:
days.

Saw Nearly All

Mr, Steel, the leader told the}
Advocats shortly after their!
arrival that by splitting into
groups, the Mission had managed
to see practically every industrial
undertaking of any size in British
Guiana, and some fifty or more
factories

in Trinidad, In ad-
dition they met official and un-
official members of the Legis-
lature, and leading representa-

tives in trade, industry and com-
merce.
They also had the opportunity

of having discussions with a large
number of such as |
Shipping Association, Sugar Man-

ufacturers Association and so on.
In this way they managed to get
a general view of the industrial

conditions in the two colonies
they had already visited, and
they are hoping to follow the

same pattern in Barbados.

Mr, Steel said that “a very full
programme has been arranged,
and the Mission is looking for-
ward with great interest to the
work they will be doing here.

The Mission will report its
findings to the several Govern-
ments concerned, and to the;
Secretary of State for the Colo-
nies,

Petrol Blast
Victims Di
ictims Die
MONZA, Italy, Nov. 7
Four of 11 injured persons in
yesterday's explosion of 50,000
gallons of gasoline at a store plant

here died in hospital during the
hight. Two of the dead were



jfatally burned while Saal

gasoline from a storage tank to
their tanker truck preparatory to}
transport. Two others who died
of extensive burns were workmen
at the plant.
injured were still in a
serious condition.—U,P.



His Excellency the |

|
See Programme |







ST. LEONARD'S
CHURCH

PATRONAL FESTIVAL
SERVICES
Saturday, November, 8th.
7.30 a.m. Matins & Holy
Communion.
5 p.m. Evening Prayer.

U.S. Labour
Leaders Are
Apprehensive

WASHINGTON, Nov. 7.
Labour leaders were appre-
hensive about the reception they



‘DHhavbadvo

wrongs that need resistance,

FIRST CONFEHENCE



THE MEMBERS of the U.K. Industrial Mission at Seawell Airport pesterday where they were met
by a Committee headed by Sir John Saint. Their first conference was the discussion of their itinerary.



SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1952

ISTS



Republicans Will |
Discuss Plans

WASHINGTON, Nov. 7.

IT WAS LEARNED that President-Elect General
Eisenhower is planning to meet with Republican leaders
of Congress about December 1 to discuss the Republican
legislative programme,

Representative Joseph W. Martin, Junior, of Massa-
chusetts, the Republican who is slated to be Speaker of
the House in the next Congress, said he understood Mr.
Eisenhower wants to talk over legislative problems with
Congressional leaders in advance of the new session, start-
ing January 3.



Republicans won a_ hairline

will get at the White House after Mr S ‘ majority in both the House and
a meee és ay ae eet e tevenson Ran nowhig: pestis presi:

s w tenan : ’
Mr. Dwight Eisenhower, The : dency with the biggest vote ever
“Big Three” of Labour—A.F.L.. ot ow nea t given a Presidential candidate
re. mae Se United Mine Ss a Pa history of the United
workers—joined hands for the| SPRINGFIELD, Ill, Nov. 7 oA RMN sun
— time in this campaign to} Governor Adlai E. Steyenson’s} “fir. jower’s” victory was
tae ae x Proved toi campaign headquarters here was/not reflected in the majorities
Republican e ae bs artes th the/deluged with almost as many }that the Republicans won in Con-
itical pret ip i ur’s pol-/telegrams and letters as he might gress. The Senate will consist

Well ion th to a new low.|have received had he won the] or 4g Republicans, 37 Demo-
howe ee e Be Mr. Eisen- | Presidential election. erats and one Independent. The
his vi tag eta oh gg for! Miss Carole Evans, chief see indicated House line up is 221
Peaeeret nion officials nev- retary supervising four girls | Re ublicans 212 Democrats one
h se expressed the cautious | opening mail said the messages! 7 i anit ,
Soeroonn’ eink eke nat House! were “wonderful”. She said, *"@epencent,

y crosse e to ven~ .
: : 7 f imost of them urged Mr. Steven
Sear datirey, Seas = sae son to stay in national politics Personal Triumph
ye ofes . pral im * “ama ‘ ‘ ‘ :

not to be too worried ia indi- and many praised him “for cam-/ Mr. Martin said that the big

cated their belief that Mr, Eisen-
hower will not be an “anti-
labour president,

As AFL President Mr, William
Green, advised President-Elect—
“We have full and complete

confidence that you will do your

of fair and just

Americans in all walks of life.”
While hopeful about Mr. Eis-

enhower,

Senator Robert
pretty well dominate Congress,
Labour leaders have been bitter

opponents of Senator Taft as
co-originator of the Taft-Hartley
law in 1947,

_ These sources said they had
given up any hope of repealing
the Taft-Hartley and are fear-
ful now that attempts will be
made to push through even more
restrictive labour legislation.

Six of the other] They foresaw efforts to put la-

bour unions
laws.—U.P.

under anti-trust



U.S. And France Will
Discuss World Situation

UNITED NATIONS, Nov. 7

United States Secretary of State, Dean Acheson, and
French Foreign Minister, Robert Schuman, will meet at

11.00 a.m. on Saturday for
world situation. The Acheso

an exchange of views on the
n-Schuman conference will be

held at Waldorf Astoria Hotel in New York where Acheson

is staying.

Informed diplomats said the
questions of Tunisia and Morocco}
will be high on the agenda of the!
conference with Schuman ex-
pected to seek clarification’ from|
Acheson on how the United States
plans to act when the two con-
troversial issues come up before
the main political committee of
the United Nations General As-
sembly.

French sources said Schuman

would not necessarily attempt to
“change” Acheson's views on the
question, The United States has
taken the position that the North
African situation should be de-
bated here despite France’s stand.
They said Schuman would try
to give Acheson a roundup of the
French government's and parlia-
mentary views onthe matter.
{| Schuman is expected to be ad-
| vised during the talks by French
j ambassador to the United States
Henri Bonnet and French chief
lof United Nations delegation
Henri Hoppenot. In addition to
North Africa, the two ministers
are expected to discuss other
aspects of the world situation,
such as Korea and problems of
the North Atlantic Treaty Or-
ganization.

It is understood Acheson also
would seek to assure Schuman
| that the election of Dwight Eisen-



hower to the Presidency of the
United States would not deprive
‘American foreign policy of its

continuity between now
Eisenhower’s inauguration,

Schuman spent the afternoon
on Friday working on the policy
and preparing a speech he will
deliver before the plenary session
of the General Assembly on Mon-
day. In that speech diplomats
said Schuman would outline
France’s views on African prob-
lems, Schuman may see the Brit-
ish Foreign Secretary Anthony
Eden in private early next week,

UP.

and



_ Missionaries

Murdered

CHICAGO, Nov. 7
The Evangelical Allianve Mis-«
sion on Friday said that the State

; Department had notified it of the
death of two Mid-Western Mis-





would still talk the same.
both CIO and AFL campaigned

sources expressec| concern that Evans said Mr.
A. Taft will) “anything but downcast.”



paigning the .way he thought he| pice
should”,

Presidential
to be sticking by the passage he
once
fireside
be

utmost to carry out your plan) down and revile me and with
treatment to; me

tional Golf Club.

nhower majority showed his
personal popularity. He — said:
“Personally I don’t think we
iwould have won if Mr, Eisen-
|hower had not headed the ticket.
1 question whether any other Re-
publican could have won.

Mr. Eisenhower’s conference
I) with Congressional leaders appar-~
ently will take place after he has
a” White House “unity” meeting
Miss | with President ‘Truman.

And the defeated Democratic |

candidate seemed

into the television
“and if it should}
you cast me

/wrote
chat
the case that
the Democratic party,
His aides said he felt “that he
honestly”.
Stevenson was
The President Elect, now on ten
Be days vacation at Augusta,
Georgia announced yesterday that






he accepted Mr. Truman’s invita-

POCKET CARTOON tion to call at the White rye
TE Mr. Eisenhower suggested tha

by OSBERT LANGASTER the meeting be held during the

week of November 17.

The
parently has been arranged so
talk

— ee

legislative conference ap-!
that Mr. Eisenhower can
over with Congressional lead-
ers such major legislative pro-
blems as possible tax reduction, |
curtailment of Government spend-
ing, continuation of price and
wage controls, Taft-Hartley Act
amendments and foreign aid.

Mr. Eisenhower
trouble
through

(U.P.)

to have any serious
getting his programme

Senator Robert A. Taft said he
did not expect
the

Senate.

“Now when l was a very little
boy old men would say that
once upon a time there wasa
magic fluid-——’”

oe ieiadlinnihe intially: Ack
Mr. Eisenhower
Playing Golf
AUGUSTA, Georgia Nov. 7.
Warmed up, after a long lay-
off, President-Elect, Eisenhower

planned a serious assault today
on the links of the Augusta Na-



Shipment



SEAWELL, Nov. 7th :
will not be any future s

the Advocate today.

Mr. Kinch who is a
Vice Presiden, of the Barbados
Chamber of Confnerce arrived

,| here yesterday by B.W.LA. from
Before he can get out on the! Trinidad where he paid a visit

course however, Mr. Eisenhower}, er atte
must spend several hours at one eo 4 on Mn ioolaies Cone
f

of the first chores to face th€jbers of Commerce in British
newly elected chief executive—\ Guiana.

answer some of the thousands of

congratulatory messages that! After attending the Congress in
have inundated him since elec-'B.G., Mr. Kinch visited the
tion night. Mahaicony-Abary Rice Scheme
For at least one hole yesterday' and said that the rice industry
Mr. Eisenhower’ also had the| had been extended under the

company of more than 30 new supervision of the B.G. Rice Mar

| sionaries in the Netherlands New| Photographers. For the sake of keting Board,
Guinea. the pictures, Mr. Eisenhower Dea vanes 0 1 Stren: eared
They said “another source” re~| hit a succession of almost flaw-| |.) - ae ie deine a oP that ie
ported. that Walter Erikson. 35,| less sand blasting shots from a woul ai ee eae eee whres
and Edward Tripp, were mur-|'@p _putted repeatedly and parts of it cave already beer
dered by atives. — somewhat inaccurately and bang- ested he said 5 oe
The announcement said the|@4 outa. series of . whistling ae
State Department notified the; drives. Some of these long shot Mr. Kingh who stayed on in
Mission only that the bodies of} were in the neighbourhood of; British Guiana for one week ta
the two m were found nean| 230 yards or better. Mr, Eisen-|shoot wild pigeons, afterwards
Aisat in the rn part of Neth-|hower hoped for more seclusi went on to Trinidad to visit his
erlands New Guinea October | today Company’s head office in Port-of-
23.—U.P. ' U.P Spain

ee

Advocate



-| Expected From B.G.

British Guiana is expected shortly and from then on there

Assistant Manager of Messrs. T. Geddes Grant Ltd., told

Junior





"S WEATHER REPO
@edrington: Nu

1 ith to date: 1.00 ins
, a5 °F
P
95 =e? 2, «3 pm

x



To









Sunrisef * $4 an :

Sunset ae gn, tS

Moon: Last artery vernber 9.
Lighting: 6.00 p.m

High Tide: 8.35 a.m, 7.58 p.m
bow Tide: 1.34 am. 1.47 p.m



PRICE:

ARRIVE

U.N. F orces Smash |

FIVE CENTS

«



Mau Mau





Onion

° LONDON, Nov 7.
~ “The t ble poison’’ of Mau
inmnese ac Mau “teg®priem runs deeply
throughout the Kikuyu tribe in
1 i wi Kenya and it may be months
SEOUL, Nov, 7. before law and order is restored,

| UNITED NATIONS FORCES smashed Chinese Com-]Colonial Seeretary Oliver Lyttel-

munist attack between Triangle Hill and Sniper Ridge] ton said today.

nat ind ‘
early today in the first snowstorm of the season, Chinese}, onions ai ths pa ara =
Reds swarmed through the rocky valleys separating the | the Colony, Mi luyttaiton. sala:
two bitterly contested heights on the West Central Front|*Across the page, @f Kenya’s
at 3.40 a.m. (1.40 p.m. E.S.T. Thursday). histury has fallen thei. shadow

- - —~—- Shattering Allied artillery and | of witchcraft, SaVGRery ane
- |mortar bombardment forceci the|crime — im short Mos Manu,’
W lf \W k | Reds to retreat an hour later.|Mr. Lyttetton insisted \at under
e are or The Reds apparently are trying}|*!ith Administration there has

to move.into position for a mew] een progress on all fronts | in

Kenya since the war.
The picture which is sometimes

about
The

attack om Sniper Ridge
one mile east of Triangle.

On Sugar

push came at almost the same[painted of frustrated Africans
states spot where the Reds lost an esti-}5eing kept down from natural
mated 200 dead and wounded ir} idvance by grasping Europeans
SUAWRLL, Nov. 1 Side Boma e eeerTS TNE MEN ee it cleus Ot Jane tee
SE LLL, i s one t clear that Mau Mau
Ibberson, Social Welfare Ad- United Nations heavy guns not a child of economic Panes
viser to the Comptroller for]Jalso broke up that attack, I The t whie
ure The only point at which
Development and Welfare, left To the west 300 Chinese hit anf yay May impinges on the
today by BWIA for British Gui- advanced Allied position betwee | poonomies that “it promoters
ana on a routine visit. She ex-|"“Old Baldy” and “T Bone’ hills nake money out of it. A stib<
seo A ore to Barbados on} just before midnight. The Redifutintial fee charged for each
ove Y 5 fought until 2.30 a.m. (1250 p.m.foath administered and collected
Miss Ibberson has gone to havele or oT sday » ‘e ; r ae }
: “ E.S.T. Thursday) then withdrew .}. the man who administers the
a look at the Welfare work car- - née ae _ 4 sort ¥ os ‘ :
under heavy artillery and mortar th. In fact M M a
ried out on the sugar estates by fire . : Dash. sn sac BU Oe 32 on URS
the British Guiana Sugar Produ- ~ holy union of dark and ancient
cers Association and to discuss i Snow uperstition with the apparatus of
the training of their welfare offi- Light snow fell early today | mode ingsterism,” UP.
cers, along the central sector of th _—
She said that the reason for] battleline. Most of it melted al °
8 special examinati »{ th i rece Reconnais R i H Id
this special examination of the] though Fifth Airforce Reconnai ussians oO

work is that in the Social Welfare sance planes reported heavy snow















Training Course to be held injin the mountains and valleys er

Jamaica from January to July,|deep in North Korea. Cloud) U S 8 t

1953, special attention will be| weather halted most air opera \ 2 â„¢ ean

paid to the question of welfare’ tions. : a

work on the sugar estates. | Eighth Army Briefing Officer} [404 BERLIN, Nov. 7, —
The Sugar Industry Labour|said the tempo of Red patrol at i ok aa ene

are Boar is se ‘ - — ie sergea Ailen #4 ago fas Te-
Welfare Board is sending five of picked up sharply last night ane] )oscq in the hands of Russians in

their Welfare Officers and special early today.
lectures will be given and q
rangements made for those

Reds stabbed a

of.| tee points on the Eastern Fron’
oT-

he Soviet Zone after crossing the
yorder north of here at Fladun-



ficers to do their practical work caine Seeks ag ae er fen) ina jeep last night.
top a : ms ‘*| their attacking force, Sgt. Lagoy was reported by
on sugar estates under experi-/ ‘The 45,000 ton battleship Mis-| United States Army authorities
enced supervision. souri turned’ its mammoth guns {io have driven over the border
on Red targets in North Kore etween Bavaria in United States
Thursday destroying a trans-| Zone and Thuringia in the Soviet

Tanks Help

former plant with a sixteen inch} Zone in a radio equipped jeep.

shell. Other warships patrolled Set. Lagoy was a member of
the coast peppering Reds with }the 14th Armored Cavalry Regi-
roops 4 shellfire. —t.P. ment of the Second Battalion. He

was on a routine border patrol
‘through the hills of Franken For.
est

German Border Police said they
saw Set. Lagoy driving alone
straight ahead iito the Soviet
Zone.—-U.P. . \



Red Rebels

HANOI, Nov. 7.
Two tank su French
eaehente joined up in the Red
iver area today possibly trap-

U.S.Diplomacy
At Standstill



'

ping a substantial force of WASHINGTON, Novy, * Tw : t Kill
Vietminh Communist rebels in a The shattering impact of the en y
100 square mile wedge of terri-| Republican election victory al-

most immobilized United States
diplomacy, The atmosphere at the
State Department was one of in-
decision pending word from the
caller of President-

tory. One column advanced 20
miles in less than 36 hours from
Vietri, 33 miles north-west of
Hanoi and linked with the second

In Bus Crash

SAN JUAN DEL RIO,



one that moved through high|®@W signals ee eens Mexico, «Nov. 7
grass country in the area of the elect Bisehhower or his Forelgn Twenty persons were killed
captured rebel town of Phu Tho} Policy advisers. | ind 32 injured when a_ loaded
50 miles th-west of ; Secretary of State Acheson and magsenger bi erashed int a
miles north-west of Hanoi, scores of other Democratic ap- eerie m Baie aoe 3 sith
Loyal troops also captured| Pointees in upper echelon Diplo- at "the -entrance to this ait 120
Phu Ho 15 miles north of Phu|â„¢atic posts here and overseas} iio. north-east of Mexico City
Tho, At their junction point the} Were preparing to quit their jobs Survivors said the bus driver
two columns are a little more i. Sonne bang tory cage lost control of the speeding bus
ee ay Satine from the Saportant bana: on coe Ca and failed to negotiate - ures.
(pas yen Quang on Everyone in diplomatic business | They — said the bus rolled over
the Clear River which flows into|yook the view that it would ba| ‘Several times” before smashing
the Red River. U.P. foolhardy to commit the U.S. to}into the service station.
any new policy or important Some of the victims were
moves until it was certain that |ttapped in the wreckage more
udke Jars they would be fnderwritten by |than an hour before rescue crews
the new Republican Administra~ \extricated them.

tion.—U.P. —U.P.

Bakersfield

BAKERSFIELD,
California, Nov, 7
A sharp earthquake jarred

Bakersfield area at 12455 a.m. EST
and authorities said it was th@
strongest jolt felt here since the
quake of August 22 in whidh twa
persons were killed,

There were no immediate re-
ports of injuries or property
damage. The August 22 quake

caused property damage estimated
to run as high as $100,000,000 and
the city is still digging out from
it

Today's jolt was another in a
series of more than 200 after-
shakes which have rocked the
Bakersfield area since August 22.
Despite the sharpness of todfay’s
earthquake authorities reported no
panic,—-U.P,

Of Rice



--A SHIPMENT of rice from
hortages, Mr. Stanley Kinch,



Mr. Eden Leaves
For New York

LONDON, Nov. 7.

Foreign Secretary Mr. Anthony
Eden will leave tonight for
New York to attend the United
Nations General Assembly and
make his first contacts with the
“Eisenhower camp”,

Mr, Eden who will address the
UN. Assembly will partici-
pate in the Korea debate and was
expected to meet some of the
leading Republicans who are
the prospective members of the
new administration.
| Given the opportunity, he may
;also meet Mr. Eisenhower himseif |
{for a preliminary review of
; some of the most pressing inter-



IT’S THE TOBACCO THAT

mational issues before his returr |

at present cheduled for Novem-| he i ae
if eA EE GR OE i ae at ee s

ber 19 (U.P.) | WRB sls sis

—Unholy *
PAGE TWO





a SATURDAY, NOVEMBER &. 1959
BARBADOS ADVOCATE re Se eae ery ees

a tsp
SS Sees sss ee

| ADVOCATE BRIDGE Suffocating “Hot Flashes” stopped



















































































































| g by M. Harrison-Gray : ili ' ;
Dealer: West : or strikingly relieved
. } East West game. ; in 63-80% * of cases in doctors' tests!
} N. :
s on ne = 30 : e Are you going through you know what it has done
Te following were guests at To Tour Caribbean K 9632 : “change of life” suffer- for others!
Cocktail Party held at Gov Ss oe : NDIVIDt oroscore | @5 : ing the “hot flashes,” ner- But do you know +
akakianniek’: Wa ah hit D* Peter W. Branch, an old YOUR tor -aethis yro SK 9864 5 Yous tension, irritability, wilt do'tos gon? Seok tt ect
wi : the Unite Kinade Harrisor » 3 left Barba-] ror SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 58, 1952 | i w £ : weakness — other ty a ofan See ced tie reitef ;
a : B , ( 945 study Surgery ¢ ; Qi7i5s4 = {f functionally-caused dis- tension, “flashes” and leri-
Industr ts and H.M.S. Bigbur iy Colieee Los igh as Look in section in which § 3 . : ; $ S84 : tress of this difficult time? ao ae 80 often brings at
~ y Lleg amndon, - ri find what your «¢ _ . ‘ i . hn ea!
Ray Ml G. . Adams, M \ turned to the island to spend the rage ac « to ie | : eaaes : a4 ; : Then aes ee re Before another day has
whe Mr. fe Mr 1 I ristmas i New Year holl- | § @AQHS 5 yu *In tests by ‘S. " Passed, try Lyrdix Ptnkham's
mn Dr, & Mra W. I . 9 on OS} MARCH ¢1 to APRIL @ (Aries) 8. 3 ydia Pinkham's Com the Vegetable Corgpound,
G. 7. & Mrs. Barto & Mr soy at his home Newlands’Esightts generous aspects for financial, e@rsé2 = pound and Tablets gave or new, improved Tablets
Baki, Prof, & Mre Go G. Bensle ' : 3 . a pan Pine Hill professie general business endeav-| & ¥aws 5 relief from such distress... With added tron arid dis-
& My B. W. H. Belt, Mr. & M ; ‘ : . ; Be, Branch. wi eet Strict ‘attention to immediate affairs} & @¢) W987 : in 63. and 80% (Fespec- {over how much emster your lh
al Mr. & -M FA. Bishor } i f 5 7 ranch who ar¥ived OR], roves outiodk | j a? : tively) of the cases tested. ehange of life’ may be/
F Hiaek Verinesday, was one of the three : 2 i ¢ . tele s Complete or striking relief! Younger women and girlie Lydia Pinkham’s
G3. B ’ ws om the Saguenay Tepg-]| AKL %1 to MAY 2% (Taurus)— Ee) § Fhis dea! trom the Britain- 5 a ies suffering from fumetional a@tion t, ough
ares 32 : p Sa ¥ ¥ réasonable in demands and come through} § Deimark match in the W949 § | n pains and distress of men- sympatheh ner=
7 ’ reighter S.S. Spurt. Hef yin ying colours. May be a few dis-| $ aan Championships $ Surely you Snow Pha: tas struation—find Pinkham's vous system—re-
& M c p i D id that tl trip here ws quite§ quieting tendencies in early hours. Don't] & a t the lesson of $ Pinkham’s is scientijically wonderful too! It contains mo lieves distress of
Cato, M @ enjoyable and that he intends} oves-confident, nor hesitant 2 Senae second example modes i action! Surely pain-deadeniny drugay the"heat waves;
M ring ‘ +} . ° A : 2. Past
a ae ying most of the Caribbean may 2 to 28WR at (Gemini Yse} § Hand At boil table Pale ————————————————————
uM B. ¢ lands before returning to Lone keenest judgment, in investments, con-| ? openea One Diamond, North | E a
“, M LY fon for four vears to ndvance hig} “8. decisions. Perzonal affair heart | ' pid One Heart and East 3
\ Mey ( - Ss bis na ee Ms sts also need caution passed
; i n Surgery $ ‘The Danish South player i }
, (Cancer)—Bxtra| = a he principle |
p a also passed. on the Pp |
Voc atien Leave Figure on the ude cae Bg ; Lhat game was inet oe ; i oom: iB ARBARE i “nea }S
iM" and Mrs, Garth Southwell} i. prepared to cover the minimum North's te the biddin : | BRIDG ’ : "sued lee a. OISTIN
pie wn ah . West reopen : Dial a od (Diet 8404)
a lig ir three children ar- WLY 2 t© AUGUST 2 (Lee)—Ex- with a take-out double an : NOW 1 OPENING TODAY | Lust two Shows today
i lived here On Wednesday affersi -ciient pianctary says. You cam accom. reached a contract of Three § | 6 & 8 4.6 & 3.95 daity , 4:43 and 8.90 pm
‘ 00h =by B.W.LA. from British] plish mxach if you remain calm. Be what No-Trumpe Hearts being : and Cantiniting Dail J a catin g~% Bits Watner: Action Thriltet
fonduras om vacation leave ‘ou hope and preach. And be ready for unsupported oe yee : RKO’s THRILLER ae ie bn Tae een mcd
. , , gains, too t wi I ; , THE PB"
__Mr. Southwell, son of Mr. and . ee one ee sina 1 | hed als CHANDLER KEYES Frank Lovers
irs. V. A. Southwell of Chelsea] AUGUST % to SEPTEMBER 28 (Vireo) pricks before the attack was # | MInCHUM RUSSFLI TRON MARY lI Tedey soccer yg
Gard Cheise: ‘ Good rays for you conservative, care rici . : vee 11.30 pm
, ‘ardens, Chelsea Read has been , switched to Hearts $ | MACAO (* WITNESS
" ‘ & ™M D. F Hendersar oa ful natives. Just doen't be over-cautious 7 sh / an “ADE COO! Joh
+ \griculture ©; Room 2 our South Also: SPADE COOLEY hn BEAL and
Lt. R. T. Hlghett, Hon, K. R. & M teulture Officer in British} Advances for money ee ee In bid Two Hearts and } Also; Leon ERROL in and his Orchestra “OUTCAST OF BLACK
Hunt { K. N. R fu bags Honduras for the past four years. \¥ forceful you are will reflect in results, 3 a Swant's ‘Three No- 3 “OM WALD MIGHT = Secla 180 Baa maine ee
: : ‘ « T are @ ste . »-day's Special 1. : “har * ao
~~ etre te . They are guests at Chelseal seppemmzn 24 to octonam | | goubl for a penalty of 500 3 Today Special 9 20 & 1 30|] “Robinhood of Texas” |}—Chatles STARRETT
" 2 OR eR ee toad ; (ui —Prosperous day from many after Phe trad of hae? a & “GUNSLINGERS” Gene AUTRY Midnite Special Tonite
So angles. Brilliant star forecast. Toeettigoat total gain of 1100 j One hnoan aro PONGS ath ee “GLASS ALIBI"
= wa . , onduct and patience paramount to suc- illite “ sd My ES PRED of the PLAINS ‘oul KE ;
te * f of B pbiigs & Mrs. J. M Holiday In Ute Yiess. ‘Heart affairs hishly rated for hap- eT ee ” ____ Jimmy WAKELY Monte HALE “ABART OS wnt
Kidney, Mr pf Mes. 8. H. Kinch, Mr Mss Freida Carmichael, of : M [ ! : : | Leo GORCEY & th« ALIAS r . Oy :
ait bidet er Laly Leabobl Mb, Barbados Aquatic and a) gcTOER 24 to NOVEMBER 22 (Seor-| 3 ms Se “BOWERY BOYS. Robert ROCKWELL “Sun, & Mon. 44
irs, D. G, Leacock, Mr, A. B. $, Lew prominent member ef the s \-—-Squelch pessimistic —_ tendencies. ALETY “SMUGGLERS COVE’ and eS
& Mrs. D. A, Lucie-Smith Water Polo Team returned fr ee ot oS at ly me ie G | and DAYS OF BUFFALO “PAINTING THE
I J rs. Mahon, Rt. Re a ‘4 > U z covered. Continue mi y “SILVER TRAILS ry . _
ae Mat vite Miss "Mandeville Lo i’ is bc J ce the | has attained your objective. The Genas—S Hy ha” id Jimmy WAKELY t Sihest'e Anacat iad RY ie SUN
Mi v R. G. Mapp, Mr. & M ‘ ayiPe e ie been | s , Last Show jay s Moad tink) ca ; ae Te 3
ee Ae j Mrs. E spendir iday | NOVEMBER 2 (to DECEMBER 2 “TRIPLE TROUBLE & PANTHE Monday ank) 9.0 am. (B town) ‘TRIPLE TROUBLE & PANTHER ISLAN
a ar ike R ¢ Moke 1 bending a holiday. | (Sagittarius) —Unexpected gains possible ™ ISLAND” ONE BOTTLE OF CANADA DRY DRI NKS Produced at the Door and et
; rs. R. G. Michelin, Mr. & To See Son | with a shrewd attitude toward pyttvities. S aia a woadig an @ Moo Sit anywhere. DRINKS sold at the PLAZA Entrance.
. = Miller, Mr :. c ' 3 | Stabilize things first, then make ready| (Midnite Tc oun. _—
2. Miller, Mr. & Mrs, J. E AARS. M. PREVITE, wife of lor farther expansion. Ms UNGLE iS we Oe a = = er ———
; a : Major Previte Managi: ( STAMPEDE’ Mat. Sun. mn. eg ncmeremeetestiemmees al
SCS ar Fe Dirdet dad ‘Aap | Q¥CHAMER we sanyo cum] + | aati OODA v
Capt. & Mrs, F.C. Parris, Lt Col. H Director of the Trinidad Asphalt ee, LAU ees matters, [ap Jungle Thriller! CHEST’ R BD a T Hi E A R E §
. nit: Hon. G. D, 1 ile, Mrs Company, arrived in the island confine effort to essentials and you can Charlie Chan &
ain : Nis. C, EB. Raison, Mr, & M to morning by B.W.LA. Tie saeinio wadehtakines eee Oey 5 16 co | EMPIRE OLYMPIC ROXY ROYAL
HO. ‘Ramsey Miss D, Randall, Mr, W. mH short visit, | To-day 4:45 & 8.30) To-day to Monday | To-day to Tuesday |to-gay & Tomorrow
W. 8. Robertion, Hon. E. 8. & Mrs She has come over to sce her | JANUARY 22 to FEBRUARY 20 (Aqua- and continuing dails 4.30 & B15 4.30 & 8.15 | | 7 0k BoD
Robinson, Lt, Cdr. I. A. Rodger, Mr. & on Anthony who is a_ student} rius)—Be re enable, stray, progres Colin Pestiires Columbia Double Wa iversal Beanie.
Mrs. J. R. Rodger, Mr, L. Rose. it the Lodge School. She is a) ‘ively aggressive dvertising, : resents fe Donald. O'Connc Double Attraction
Hon. Sir John & Lady Saint Sir ceased wat + }tion work, personal business affairs un- Ke AGA IN Vs Hef zeorge Montgomery onald onnor
George & Lady Seei, Mr. C. C. Skeete, quest at Crane Hotel. jer. new favour, MER. Patricia Neal Karin Booth Jimmy Durante lyonn Howard Davie
Mr. & Mrs. BR. B. Skeete, Mr. & Mrs u > | in at! Se ee
Vv. sm h “M G. u Toons er, Mr. J. L BRIGADIER Sir Robert Arundes; Governor: Designate of Barbados Son And Heir | PERRUARY @l to MARCH 2 (Pisces) The famous | mo CRIPPLE CREEK e ‘as
Steel, Major & Mrs, BR. ‘A. Stouts and Lady Arundell who are expected to arrive in this island early he ae ‘i : |_wxereise a firm, stern attitude this | WEEK-END WITH “olor By Technieotor THE MILKMAN OLIVER ‘TWIST
Comdr, A. W. F. Sutton i next year. (CONGRATULATIONS to Mr. iiddie-of-road day. M you press a bit 3y ‘Technicol : ¥
Mr. & Mrs. J. P. Taylor and Mrs. Fred Gay on the could finish with more serene LL FATHER one A a oe
c , , } s g ice b pe 7
Mr & Mrs, KE. K. Walcott, Mz « Mrs. i " birth of @ son and heit which |" *- Don't miss out through foolis! The Week-End That\M¥ TRUE STORY es Pp jRIDE RYDER RIDE
2 arama Mae, a i, Views One Week Dolls Of All Nations took place on Monday afternoon. | | Shook The World | ,_, Statring | with Jim Bannon
7 te agcrep, § %. ’ ss . ait . , . auietiter elen Walker “EP E as Red Ryder
A. Way, Major & Mrs, C. B. P. Weath- . Mother ang babe are doing fine, YOU BORN TO-DAY, A great differ- POCKET vee Willard Parker © |SS"? EM, Oo oinai—ehes ae hes
erhead, Mr. & Mrs. D. W. Wiles Mrs. R und MRS, McLAUCHIN ARIB has been told that the > jonece in the developed "3: Weeever ‘i Extra ousltcdae RE Tae ITA SLUGGING Mon. & Tues
3. Wedel-Heinen, Mr, & Mrs J. M a . ns ; , the , ial a oped Scorpio person, Religion, family Short:—Fun At The T°- ‘ 30. por & 3
é. mene eto. ‘ ah ese of 3486 Peel Street, Mon. “ Ww inner of the aa ” All CO to Mr. | thekeround arid education whether and Zoo and Latest CALIFORNIA with __ \Double— ind
Mrs. H. H. Williams, Miss Bi.” Willams, treal, Canada, arrived in the Nations whieh was raf ed yes- and Mrs. “Bert” Teppin oa formal or self-attained) will put you in News Reel FIREBRAND Th Dead End Kids Jobo Mis:
Mr. M. A. Willis, Miss P. Wilson, Lt. J. iciond on Thursday last by TCA terday is Mrs. L. Carrington, . : aa > e fore of any endeavour, Y« ' WRIST WATCHES . and and Little Tough ;
Winterbotiom, Mr, & Mrs. S&S. Py. island on sda) s nar Ramsgat 3ay Street. She the birth of a son and heir | or jstreneth, subtlety. Direct will power To-day at 1.30 D.m.\.ownoy AND Guys in
Withnall, Hon, Campbell & Mrs, Wylie. and are spending a week's holi- "2! at ea “ + M; * 3 z Thursday, 13th November. Mrs. | wisely, avoid emotionalism, . oe OF ite wi mes ORITA, “Midnite Po-nlaht” | scorr or
‘ Cant. Ww: 4 R Bese. orange ‘apc). day as guests at Cacrabank eine i a ein ~ “yt = Toppin was the former Miss! ;.senaary Birthdate of: Nerve. Roman Obtainable only ‘ei Ray Rowers Monte Hale THE ANTARCTIC
a E eble ue mm, enston, B rac r e , " a . nd c Adrian Booth
Lt. C. Peterkin (Extra A.D.C.) Hotel. stm ’ Betty Mayers. Emperor. Richard Arlen Midnite To-night (Technicolor)
. : dolls. Bind: neacaliboblggiie = on ———— From in Wild Bill Elliott
The raffle was organised by a Fee aR aciponnti i and
band of social workers who are| TF 3 7 “ 9 UNKNOWN PLAINSMAN AND FIREBRAND ,..
donating». proceeds to variaus| By BEACHCOMBER ‘Your Jewellers Midnite "To-night PRE LADY : \DEADLY 18
Cherise GF the dal meet 4 20, Broad St. Phone 4644 (2. Musicals »nd ” TES FEMALE
wrilies. oO he sland ’ . % , a , 2 .
- 7 ; ALONG THE COWBOY AND Starring:
i ' ; AM sorry to have given C. Suet, by means of a short-circuiting of ~~ wet Ott NAVAJO TRAIL THE SENORITA Peggy Cummings
Holiday With Family I os O RAVe EVES Re cath BH: a
- ~ Bsq., the impre



“ esi ee n that I was potential exchange of permits al-
M": ROSS McKENZIE, wife confusing a necessary reimple- ready initialled for distribution to
of Mr. R. McKenzie, Resi-| mentation of co-ordinational allocation committees. It is when
dent Engineer for TCA, of ‘-| measures relative to the demands ‘he cumulative effects of redund-
lantic ‘View, Enterprise Road,|made by a thorough overhaul of ant applications threaten to bottle-
Christ Chureh, accompanied by | existing priorities with the devel- neck the various channels of allo-
her two children, returned home|ogpment of a basic schedulisation cation that the whole question
on Thursday by TCA after] already undertaken by the regis- becomes one of overall depart-
pending about four months’|tration authorities. mentalisationary revision,
holiday with her family in Eng- is 9 8 48
land. In these controversies it is im- 7 ;
Mrs. McKenzie had a_ very|portant not to lose sight of prime Kolex Watches
pleasant holiday and is glad tolfactors, Simultaneous duplication

Â¥. De LIMA | 2 ee ee
& CO. LTD. rx GLOBE apnsite

and

The Village A REAL RED HOT STAGE SHOW
e

Starring :

REX

he back home again. can never be anything but a ten- LOUIS L. BAYLEY HARRISON
7 tative expedient, with the object
Home After Four Years |}: reducing delay to a minimum Bolton Lane

Ae four years with the

Jamaica's Stunt
British-American Oil Com-













: Cyclist
——
bany in Canada, Mr. Gerald Tay- 4
lor Y atulaad here on Thursday GLOBE The Dare-devil on
last by B.W.LA. via Trinidad. TODAY, 5.00 & 8.30 AND CONTINUING Wheels. Feats that
He will be spending his holidays VICTOR HUGO'S... are guaranteed to
with his mother at 10 Graeme “LES MISERABLES” Michael RENNIE = : : ee ie leave you spell. .
Hall Terrace, Christ Church, Debra PAGET we eis ~~ bound

Ajso arriving from Canada by Se x i A uc ees



Dr. Barbara Lloyd-Still and Lieut.-Col. R, M. Lioyd-Still he same opportunity was Miss
Audrey Maksymec, of Winnipeg.









ALSO
i IEUT-COL. R. M. LLOYD- For Races She ‘will be spending a holiday in
* STILL, Medical Superin- R. K. VINCENT-BROWNE, ‘he island as a guest of Mrs.
tendent of the Mental Hospital

urd Taw * e . y
retired Senior Puisne Judge Muriel Taylor, also of Graeme

Y ,
accompanied by his wife Dr. of Trinidad and Steward of the Malt” Terrace, Christ Church E V ER ONE S
Barbara Lloyd-Still, Dental Sur- pyinigng Tuct C Faas ae

geon, returned to Barbados on gta A Me in the Business And Piousure
Monday last by BWIA via Puer- F

MR.
CALYPSO


















oe island by B.W.LA. yesterday, R. S. W, Pillersdorf, Manag- : :
eB accnag He has come over for the ing Director of the Royal ay Paap. . Poaeat
The Lioyd-Stills were away Races and is a guest at the Store, Swan Street, returned to A s
for five months on an extensive pote} Royal. the colony on Thursday by T.C.A. GOING fs Candleli ht SLIM JIM
bb ad of ee visiting such LSO arriving by the same after spending one month. 4 7 (Tap-Dancer)
errr “ om, ee opportunity was Mr. Deoraj He was away on business and / é
On aa England te a Samaroo, Aerated Water Factory pleasure combined, During his Ps AT SENORITA
Lieut “Col ” Lloyd-Still aiken Proprietor of San Fernando. He stay’ in New York he also saw) ¢ upper oon BELGRAVE
visited "Vienna where he aaa has also come over for the races Mr. S. Altman, his brother-in-| TO Pe PARADISE |
ved with leading Psychiatrists me ae at Indramer a, Fa a ee || 2 CONTINENTAL | (The Heat Wave
> was alsc rite serve ~ “yar at tia Me) Conran Seabees .
the oe aidan ea Visited Islands Mr. Pillersdorf told Carib th: t} UF. BEACH CLUB CUISINE =
treatment in the five biggest OL. A. WAKEFIELD SAUN- !U§ trip was an enjoyable one. oft 4. MUSIC | ;
Mental Hospitals in the United DERS of’ Leamington, St. Kennel Club 7 / SAT. Nov 15th by PANAMA ||| Music by The Count (C. B. Browne) Orchestra
States. Peter returned home yesterday : r a / 2 7 | Canada Dry Steel Band on Stage
Dr. Barbara also had the op- by BWIA. after paying visits to HERE will be a General 4 / Ch |
portunity of seeing the newest St. Vincent, Grenada and Trini- Meeting of the Barbados / MUSIC BY CURWIN | Free Iced Cold Canada Dry to First 300 Patrons.
treatments in Dentistry in Eu- dad. He was accompanied by Kennel Club at St. Winifred’s A | Free Samples of Phillips Cycle Pencils to all
rope after which she completed his wife. School on Tuesday next at 5 p.m. Po ¢ i Meee ? at Sh nn
working in the New York Uni- ee im ‘ GAMES at versity Dental Clinic. é ae. AD ' i “5 9
Ph. 4084 -:- Hastings | Pit 20c; Circle 30¢; House 40c; Baleony 60¢; Box 72c.

DON’T MISS IT!
DANCE & SUPPER



ant one although one of dual
purpose. They also say that gee sna’ NOVEMBER 8, 1952



News, 7.10 p.m. Home





o3M



that they Sip Wale ae, eee LISTENING HOURS s _|
| DU Sen Rep eeeeeaeee




they are indeed very happy to phatase
be back home. . 4 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m.

$1.00





49.71M



The Daily



















ome MnMand they proceeded 5% in maser Recbie Seabee BOG ak’ shore Woclee Noe ne. ee ween: | a Cut =
York and then Sew to Besbedte Gevie.s Sa: Sestak Waa efit WO Reke RIT ES Seta es a ; a
via Puerto Rico, BM. ustiyal of nemomberance. 48 p 10-19 pm. ‘he ebate Continues, 0 Mh ROX Y Equipment Costs
| ae 822 22S ee ee UOC To-Day to Tuesday, 4.30 & 8.15 p.m. = with a
; a UNIVERSAL DOUBLE ATTRACTION a a
| e e
oe as | 2 nimet Majors =
; JUST ARRIVED = = | i o
36” FLOWERED SHEER ....... hie Sivas: SiGe cheat ati é sid dy a a
WHITE SHARKSKIN ............... theses ay 08
36” EMB’ MORCAIN (in all shades) ......................, kes ae s 6 “ a. a
@ FAS TION
: IR RMD Res oa ies si oa bORRI Sc. ed Boeedaceans $5.75 ft a @ DURABLE FINISH a
ROO, MOO ci grle ooo Ney eo ecse¥y ears’ $6.50 @ ECONOMICAL
SEE EINE dey ys cde aed esih vets vias Gib'a > wow boos Cea Sl $7.72 a &
PILLOW CASES 18 X 30 ..... ccs. ces suues bs G4 Li vate tee 98 cts,
: BUTTER MUSLIN ................ ne = wae aE eaea ea 43 cts. a a
| A Supply of UNIMET
r ; MAJOR
LADIES SILK PANTIES |... 0ics......0. 000605 . 84 ets, to $147 i a enamelled Gang tYBrool sto ee =
CHILDREN’S COTTON PANTIES ................ 14 ets. to 53 ets, Rounded Corner Bo with the a
CHILDREN’S SILK PANTIES ................--. 52 ets. to 74 ets, £ Z and vow can’ make Pox-FOm Top,
CHILDREN’S COTTON VESTS |: .....0.0000000000. . | 44 cts, to 7 cts. ia ork Table or Bengeu” Wn Desk ‘
’ a ° ; easily mag Small hand a ’
) : ee "ws PIPER LAURIE + JOYCE HOLDER Se ea work sell, “Aaa this ste MEE
a wit . of : e -
| T. R. EVANS (WHITFIELDS) yan i iE) Msc wher Tecan gine! fain meee
. . AND le @
q YOUR SHOE STORE KEEP “EM SLUGGING o § p M § & (' it d
a Phone: Se 4220 Starring : me e Ee USSON. On 0.. y e is
\ Yee: Nee eee See Er haik 4 ae The Dead End Kids and The Little Tough Guys ® BB @ » Seegeoertas ws BBR e BBeaa


PO KS Ral a al

—:

sees sa

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1952

Hiscock Couple Cross Atlantic In Wanderer IL

Yacht Steered Herself
For 11 ConsecutiveDays

Yacht Wanderer III anchored off the Yacht Club yes-
terday after a 26-day crossing of the Atlantic from Las
Palmas to Barbados. Mr. Eric Hiscock and his wife, crew
of the yacht, told the Advocate; “We had a fine trip. The
boat steered herself for 11 consecutive days”.

Wanderer III was built at Burn-
ham -on- Crouch, Essex and
launched in March this year.
From that time the Hiscocks have
been living on board. “We have
no other home but Wanderer III,”
they told the “Advocate.”

The yacht is 30 feet long with
beam eight feet, six inches and a
draft of five feet six inches. Under
sail and in good wind she does
about seven and a half knots, The
trip to Barbados averaged about
100 miles a day.

Mr, Hiscock, author and pho-
tographer, calls Wanderer III “the
sailing caravan.” He hails from
Southampton and spent most of
his years in the Isle of Wight.

“J have been sailing around
since 1930 and d the war
years I was in the Navy,” Mr.

Hiscock said, His wife, too, is an
experienced sailor, Her parents
were boat owners.

In 1930 Mr. Hiscock owned
Wanderer I which he k
three years. He later sold it and
bought Wanderer II in which he
made a trip to the Azores,

Enthused by the success of his
trip to the Azores, >
decided that he must have a
larger boat in whieh to visit more
distant countries. He sold Wan-
derer II, whieh visited Barbados
during the year, and later built
Wanderer III.

On this voyage he has alreai
visited France, §
Porto Santo, Madeira and Las

Palmas.
Impressed

“I was very impressed with
Porto Santo which is a small vol<
eanic island,” Mr, Hiscock said.
He thought it to be much nicer
than Madeira although the ma-~
jority of people preferred to visit
the latter.

On board Wanderer III is a
dark room in which Mr, Hiscock
develops and prints his films, He
also has a very up-to-date library
on board and said; “Books are
very nice at sea, especially when
a vessel is steering itself for 11
days.”

Mr. Hiscock and his wife
worked in shifts of three hours
on deck and three hours below.
There is a compass on deck and a
small one in the cabin. When the
boat is steering herself, the His-
cocks can switch on a light, look
‘at the compass in the cabin and
tell if the boat is keeping her
course,

“We never sleep on land, It
is much nicer to be on sea,” the
Hiscocks said.

Britons Will
Open Schools
In Pakistan

By JAMES STUART

A British organisation, Air
Service Training, whose school is
at Hamble, Southampton, have
been given a contract by the
Pakistan Government to set up
two “public schools” in Pakistan.

At these schools, boys between
11% and 17%, who intend to
join the Royal Pakistan Air
Force, will receive their ordinary
education.



*

A number of young Saudi
Arabians are training at various
RAF schools in this country to be
pilots. They will be the nucleus
of the new Royal Saudi Arabian
Air Force.

Administrator
Came By Plane

(From Our Own Correspondent)
ST. VINCENT, Nov, 1.

His Honour W. F. Coutts, Ad-
ministrator, accompanied by his
wife and their two children arriv-
ed in this island on Wednesday
afternoon by plane after a six
months’ holiday in the United

gdom.

A representative gathering ex-
tended a cordial welcome at the
Villa airport, Among those present
were members of the Executive
and Legislative Councils, Govern-
ment Officers and their wives, the
Lord Bishop of the Windward
Islands, other Ministets of Relig-
ion representing the Roman Catho-
lie and the Methodist Church,
Members of the Kingstown Board
and several other members of the
community.

The Police Band under Mr.
W. H. Lewis played the National
Anthem as His Honour landed and
continued with lively tunes as he
shook hands with those who came
to welcome him.

His Honour will proceed to
Grenada some time this month as
Acting Governor of the Windward
Islands in place of His Excellency
Sir R. D. H. Arundell who is
transferred to Barbados.

—

Director Of Works
Leaving For J’ca

(From Our Own Correspondent)
DOMINICA, Nov. 2.

Colonel E. R. Rowbotham, who
was Director of Works since 1947,
leaves by the Colombie on Mon-
day for Jamaica. Col. Rowbotham
js replaced by Mr. G. A, Grant, of
St. Vincent, who took over on
October 3rd. Before coming to
Dominica, Mr, Grant held a similar
post in St. Vincent.

Last Saturday evening the staff
of the Public Works Department
held qa farewell party in honour of

the Colonel, at which they pre-
gented him with a gift and ex-
pressed regret at his leaving.

From Jamaica Col. Rowbotham
oes to British Honduras where
e has contracted to work with
he Public Works Department

| Cat-o*-Nine’
Tails Needed
In Trinidad

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Oct. 31.

_ The statement of the Hon. Jus-
tice E. R. L. Ward from the
Bench of one of the Port of Spain
Assize Courts last week regretting
that the use of the cat-o’-nine
tails had been removed from the
Statute Book of the Colony might
very well touch off another con-
troversy over the “cat.”

Mr. Ward made the statement
before sentencing David Roberts,
a San Juan Carpenter to seven
years’ imprisonment for attacking
his former sweetheart, Minnie
Harry, and cutting off her right
hand with a cutlass one night last
July.

The jury returned a guilty ver-
dict against Roberts withou: re-
tiring and Mr. Ward declared
that Roberts’ act was a deliberate,
cruel and wicked one. It was one
class of offence, he said, which
made him regret that the Colony
had done away with the cat-o'«

nine-tails. Then he said ta
Roberts: “If you had known that
flogging wo have been given

for this class ef offence you would
never have done it.
Pleaded Lunacy

Roberts, pleaded lunacy and
asked the jury: “Do you think
that my action towards Minnie is
consistent with that of a sane
man?” He went on: “I was out
of employment and I had many
worries and never caught myself
until I discovered that I was at
the Mental Hospital.”

After telling the jury that he
did not know anything about what
he had done on the night of
July 11, he said that if they be-
lieved that his act was that of a
sane man he should get a million
years in jail.

Dr. Roger de Verteuil of the
Mental Hospital testified that the
complaint from which Roberts
suffered was a mental illness by
which the present relationships cf
the world around him wer2 mis-
interpreted by what he saw and
heard. Answering a question put
to him by Mr. Ward, the doctor
said it was not a complaint whicin
would make a man lose contro}
to the extent of arming himself
with a cutlass and deliberately
cutting up people with it after
he had mage repeated thrests of
doing so.

Abolished in 1941

The Trinidad Legislature abol-
ished flogging in 1941, several
years before Britain did so. The
Ordinance for putting an end ta
flogging was piloted through the
Legislature by the then Attorney
General, The Hon, L. B, Gibson,
The motion for the second read-
ing was moved by the late Sir
Lennox O'Reilly.

This Ordinance abolished
imposition by the Courts
offenders above the age of i6
years of sentences of co.poral
punishment and to regulate the
imposition and carrying out of
such sentences on offender; not
above the age of 16 years.

Banana Bill
For Domini
or Vomunica
(From Our Own Correspondent)
DOMINICA, Nov, 2
_ A new Bill to consolidate ex-
isting Banana Legislation and to
permit the Governor-in-Council

to give directions to the Board
of Management of the Banana

the
on



Association in matters concern- far;

ing public interest has just been
gazetted. The new Bill is called
the Banana Consolidated Or-
dinance, 1952, and repeals the
previous Banana Ordinance and
all amendments.

By the Ordinance the Dom-
inica Banana Association is re-
cognised asa oc te body
with a .Seal, entitled to make
contracts and to sue,or be sued
in its same. The Association is
invested with the authority to
rehabilitate banana plantations
and stimulate production, and to
market and control the disposal
of all bananas produced in the
colony either intended for ex-
port or to be made into jams.
preserves, or canned locally.

The Association shall be gov-
erned by a Board of Manage-~
ment consisting of six elected
members and two to four mem~
bers nominated by the Governor.
There shall be an annual elec-
tion.

If in the opinion of the Gov-
ernor - in - Council fhe Board
makes default in the perform-
ance of its duties, or exceeds or

abuses its powers, it shall be
lawful for the Governor-in-
Council to dissolve the Board

and appoint one person to per-
form the duties of the Board
until the next yearly election.

The chief aims of the Bill are
to protect the interests of all
banana growers, especiajly the
small ones, and to amend and
consolidate the existing law re-
lating to bananas.

Man Drowns

(From Our Own



Correspondent)

ANTIGUA
Thirty-eight year old Edwin
West was drowned off Barbuda
last Tuesday. West was on a
fishing boat returning to Antigua
when they ran into a squall, In
attempting to lower the jib West
fell overboard and when a search
was made only his cap was seen
floating on the water. The body
has not yet been recovered. West
who came from English Harbour
leaves a wife and nine children,

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

NEXT YEAR'S CARS AT MOTOR SHOW \ 16-Bedroom Me. ©. V. H. Archer

Three hundred
more than $14 million (B.W.1.)
greeted visitors to the 1952
Motor Show, which was opened
on the 22nd October by Field
Marshal Lord Alexander at Earl's
Court, London.

The worldwide demand for
better performance and greater
roominess is reflected in both new
and modified models in the
“family-car” class, while new-
comers to the already impres-
sive range of sports cars pro-~
duced in Britain are aimed at the
younger motorist, particularly in
North America.

cars worth

A notable trend in design was
towards reduced fuel
with more powerful engines that
permit noiseless cruising at re-
duced throttle. A step forward in
brake design was seen in the use
bf a metal disc in place of the
normal brake drum, On many
ears the lugga boot had been
substantially enlarged, while new
refinements were improved lock
designs to make unattended cars
even more thief-proof, and
simpler window regulators, with
power operation of windows in



some of the more expensive
models.
Among the new cars a last-

minute surprise was the new
Triumph, a 9¢ m.p.h. sports car
with tuned-up Standard Van-
guard engine. The modified Hum-
ber Super Snipe is designed for
the world’s roughest roads — it
has the largest shock absorbers
ever fitted to a passenger car;
its four-litre Blue Riband engine
develops 113 brake power.
The Armstrong-Siddeley “Sap-
phire” with its 3.4 litre engine is
capable of between 90 and 95
m.p.h.

New on the Bentley stand was
the Continental sports saloon,
said to have a maximum speed
of around 120 m.p.h. Also in the
luxury class was the new Allard
2—3 seater Palm Beach open
tourer powered with the Ford
Consul or Zephyr engine and
destined for the U.S. market.

Both Healey and Frazer-Nash
show sports models fitted with
the 2.6 litre Austin A 90 engine.
The Healey Hundred, now to be
called the Austin-Healey Hun-
dred, is the cheapest 100 m.p.h.
car ever built, and cruises at 35



miles per gallon. It recently beat
two International Class D records
at 113 m.p.h, Vastly extended
production is planned by the
Austin company of this model,
A special display of cars that
won honours in_ international
events includes the Sunbeam-
Talbots that won the team prize
in the last Alpine Rally, the
Jaguar XK 120 that exceeded 100
m.p.h. over a continuous seven-
day run last August, Colonel
Goldie Gardner’s 144 m.p.h. M.G.
which now holds approximately a
hundred records in its class, the
Le Mans Aston-Martin and the
Frazer-Nash two-seater t h at
lately took the International
Class E 200-mile reeord at 120.16
m.p-h. from a standing start.

Eighty per cent of British car
production now goes abroad. The
industry provides about ten per
cent of the United Kingdom's
visible exports and is the coun-
try’s largest single exporting in-

dustr’. In 1938 British motor-car
exports were worth only $35
million (B.W.1.); last. year the

figure had risen to $476 million
(From London Press Service)



Govt. Should NEW RATES MA Y DISRUP7
GRENADA‘’S ECONOMY

With Busi
ith business
(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Oct, 31
The United Kingdom Industri-
‘alisation Mission which is at
present visiting the British West
Indies was welcomed to Trinidad
where it is spending 10 days, at
a public meeting in the Legisla-

tive Council Chamber last Mon-
day morning.

The Hon. Albert Gomes, Trini-.
dad’s Minister of Labour, Industry
and Commerce, who arranged
the meeting, declared he wanted
to make it clear that the welcome
‘was a very sincere one “and that
those of us who are concerned
with this industrialisation pro-
gramme suffer no illusions as
regards your talent and your
experience.”

Mr. Gomes went on record as
being against Government inter-
ference with business. Said he:
*It is my own conviction, and §
am very firm in that conviction,
that if there is one thing that the
State should have nothing to do
with, it is business.”

He went on: “We do not share
the view that appears to be very
popular in certain parts of the
West Indies that it is easy to in-
dustrialise. Indeed, some people
believe that you move from an
agricultural to an industrial econ-
omy in the same way that you
bring electricity into your home,
all you need to do is to turn tha
Switch. You will find that in this
country we do not share that
view.” '

Not Easy

Mr. Gomes said that the indus-
trialisation ‘programme was not ad
‘easy as it was considered to be
when the start was made, He wad
against embarking upon extrav-
agant sohemes that involved un-
due interference by the State. He
did not think they should indus-
trialise at the expense of indus-
tries already established.

He added: We know that our
raw material supply is limited
and we know further, that our
domestic marke, is small. f
assume that when you address
yourselves to this subject you will

ive special regard to this ques-
ion, that is, the size of our
domestic market,

At a Chamber of Commerce
luncheon the following day, Mr.
Lincoln Steel, a director of Im-

ial Chemical dustries and |
leader of the Mission, said suc-
cessful
a vast range of problems, and it

was worth while to look at some |

of them. One thing was clear;
the problems of Trinidad were not
Trinidad’s alone. There were
r countries in the world
which had their intricate prob-
lems in various ways and required
greater wisdom to solve.

Agriculture

If it was hoped, he said, to find
additional employment for a cer-
tain number of persons, it would
meed a certain sum of money to
do that out of capital investment

alone. It was a question that
would involve careful and de-
tailed investigations before it

could be embarked upon. It was
quite a simple thing to set u
factories if one had plenty of
money and did not know what to
do th it} but one had to view
‘with care the possibilities of go-
ing into such projects. One of the
roblems was finding out which

investments would be economical |

to avoid a waste of money.

Mr. Steel stressed the impor-
tance of considering agriculture
in any industrialisation pro-
gramme as it was the wealth on
which every territory depended.

Mr. Bevan Tries
For Deputy
Leadership

LONDON, Nov. 5

Mr. Aneurin Bevan, Leader of
the Leftwing pf the Labour Party
challen Mr.
for election as Deputy Leader and
Vice Chairman of the Party for
this Session of Parliament. It
was the first challenge in 20
years.

Mr. Morrison lost the last one
to Mr. Arthur Greenwood, but
later won the Deputy Leadership.



A secret ballot was taken and will |
Wednesday's |

be amnounced at
meeting of the Party.
Bevan is defeated as is forecast
he is expected to run for mem-

bership on the Parliamentary
Committee—the “Shadow Cab-
inet.”

Mr. Clement Attlee was re-|

elected Leader and Chairman of

the Party for this session without

opposition. —U.P.

industrialisation covered

Herbert Morrison ,

If Mr. |

(From Our Own

Correspondent)
ST. GEORGE'S, Oct. 29.

THAT PRESENT CONDITIONS of the industry as a
whole are not as healthy as at the time of the wage rates
negotiated in April last year ant allow no reasonable antici-
pation of ability to pay the proposed new rate without
seriously disrupting the economy of the island generally
summarises the facts presented by the Grenada Agricul-
turists’ Union in a memorandum to the Manual and Mental

Workers’ Union.

A 12-point list of proposals
from the M.M.W.U, Nave been
studied by the en ae Com-
mittee of the G.A.U, and aftes
approval by the general bedy last
Monday a memorandum contain-
ing its conclusions was yesterday
handed a_ delegation of four
M.M.W.U. members who met with
a similar number of G.A.U. rep-
resentatives under the chairman-
ship of the Labour Officer, Mr.
G. S. DaBreo.

While the Agriculturists’ Union
makes some concessions in a few
instances, such as agreeing to
time and a half on Sundays and
public holidays, tho contend-
ing that as regards watchmen and
stockmen these should in future
be placed on a monthly or othef
long-term basis, agrees on estates
having minimum first aid supplies
and supports the idea of an in-
surance scheme which would
cover illness, it takes an unequiv-
ocal stand on the proposed new
wage rates and certain other
demands,

Immediate Investigation

It says that in the event of tha
M.M.W.U. not conceding the im«
practicability of wages of $2 and
$1.56 for men and women respec-
tively, this should be a matter
for immediate investigation by 1
statutory body; it considers that
in the present complex state of
the industry, unlikg in say oil or
business, adoption of a bonus
system is premature and imprac-
ticable at the moment; in regard
to a request for retrospective pay
from April last, the G.A.U. sees
no real substance for the claim in
the event of a change in the exist-
ing wage structure, though along
with the M.M.W.U.’s other claims
it would abide by the decision of
an independent body; on a re-
quest for a 7-hour work period
the G.A.U. would agree to time
and a half over the‘8-hour day as
defined by law but beyond that
would also prefer this to be a
point for settlement by arbitra-
tion; the proposal that Union

officers be permitted to visit
estates “at all times” is held as a
pl sal clearly infringing on the
rights attacheq to the ownership
of private property” and that the
proper course would be that
application be made to the owner
stating the nature of the business
and the proposed time and righ
to grant or refuse the application
must remain inviolate; collection
of workers’ Union dues and pay-
ment for the day of Group Lead-
ers going to attend Union talks
are considered a matter strictly
for internal organisation of the
Union and is not a function of
management; despite unhappy ex
periences in the past _ the
G.A.U. would be prepared to give
a Reference Board another trial,
subject to the qualification tha:
a voting quorum of not more than
five members of each body be
considered sufficient; the proposal
of a closed shop is entirely un-
acceptable on all moral and
equitable grounds.

Another meeting has been fixed
for Monday, November 3, be-
tween G.A.U, and M.M.W,U_ del-
egations with the Labour Officer
presiding.

Attached to the memorandum
the G.A.U. gave comparative fig-
ures of prices ruling in the prin-
cipal agricultural crops in April

1951, and October, 1942, These
showed:
Drop in Price
Fine estates cocoa today fetches
87 cents per Ib., as against 60

cents; Nutmegs and by-products
cents as against 18 rents; and
in erops by no means considered }
ma,or and grown only on some
estates: Bananas $2,80 per count
bunch as against $2.40; Limes 60
cents as against 30 cents (an in-
crease at present) and Copra $300
per ton as against $216 (also an
increase today),

In the face of these facts the
G.A.U. expresses its readiness to
consent to submission of all the
issues for adjudication by a com-
petent arbitration tribunal.



1





| Cy, Minit euch

And what a soothing and comforting one it is!



“That Cow & Gate Baby Powder is really
delightful," says Mummy, “‘it seems to

| else."”

soothe and comfort Baby more than anything
“Yes, and it seems to soothe and

comfort other people too,’’ says Daddy,

{

|
|



}

|

4 B LESEIE & Co

looking up from his paper with a smile.

COW é GATE
aby lowe"

FOR COMFORT & CONTENTMENT

Ad —Agents

Hotel Opened

(From Gur Own Correspondent)
DOMINICA, Nov. 2.
On Thursday a new sixteen bed-
1oom Hotel, Lina Hotel, was open-
ed in Great Marlborough St.,
Roseau. There was the opening
ceremony in the afternoon and
dance later on till early morning.
The first floor of the three-story
hotel is a spacious and artistically
Hecorated ball-room. The second
floor contains some bedrooms and
general living room, and on the
third floor are other bedrooms.
The Lina Hotel is owned by Mr.
J. Jacob, proprietor of the “Hit
Parade” Hotel and restaurant.

New Trade Union
In Grenada

From Qur Own Correspondent)

GRENADA, Oct. 29.
A new Trade Union, the So-
ciety of Agricultural labourers,
with registered office at Plaisance
Estate, St. John’s, was registered
on October 24. It is founded by
Mr. F. D. Winslow, owner-pro-
prietor. It provides, among other
things, for Old Age Pensions.
The following day the Grenada
Agriculturists Union, which em-



bodies the former Agricultural
Association, Employers’ Society
ind Coconut Growers’ Assocta-

ion, was also registered,
* .

Visiting the colony for the an-
nual Missionary Meetings of the
Methodist Church here is Revd.
Deryck M. Lyder of Tobago. His

programme covers the period
October 29—November 5, Revd.
M. Lyder began his ministry

in Grenada in 1940,



s



36” wide at
$4c. and 94e.
per yard.

) At Sahely’s
| you find

) what

you want
when

you want it.

Ht)

These are from the Emerald Isle
in two very practical light
weights and colour lovely .. .







PAGE T



T | For a radiant shine

Acting Supreme |
Court Judge |

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Oct, 31.
This week Mr. C. V. H. Archer
Acting Solicitor General was given

an acting appointment as judge

of the Colony’s Supreme Cour’. | .

He will be assuming the duties of! _,,, é

his new office as from next Mon- The quality al
y for > ‘ : I

day for an indefinite period Metal Pol
His appointment to the Bench is | ? sm -_



the result of the departure on | .@@@o0@0«-

Thursday of His Lordship J. L. M. |

289-09 00OSOO7 CY,

Perez, the Chief Justice, for |

British Guiana to preside over 4 | ye

sitting of the West Indian Court uf ‘

Appeal. How long he will be away |

is not yet known. |

Mr. Archer’s appointment ha
caused seme shuffles in the Lega! .

Department in, which his substan-|/% POV AT BBIERIBY
CUL CRYSTAL

These have made Mr. Wilfred
At Your Jewellers ,

Fergusson, another Barbadian, act
Y. De LIMA

as Solicitor General, His substan-
tive is «assistant to the
Attorney-General.

\
The Hon. C. T. W. E. Worrell,
Solicitor General, has been acting
Attorney General since the ap-
pointment of Mr Perez to the post
®





& ¢€O.. LTD.
of Chief Justice a few months ago. roar
There ne be three ees ea a e
dians holding top posts im the Sey
Legal Department when Mr. C \ | Whisky,
deLisle Inniss, the new Attorney sf Port,
General takes up his duties in the 4 ’ Sherry,
near future, tg | ” D
Diamond Rings | ~ and a -
LOUIS L, BAYLEY Ks ea
|
Bolton Lane | 000000000.







fin .
‘Care for your skin as Ann Todd, lovely star of the J. Arthar Rank
Organisation, does—use Lux Toilet Soap regularly. A daily facial
“with Lux Toilet Soap will give you a clear fresh skin — the
foundation of beauty! Cover your face generously with its rich,
creamy lather, and work it in thoroughly. Rinse first with warm,
| then with cold water, and pat gently dry. Your skin will take on

. a new loveliness — the loveliness of the stars! St

LUX

TOILET SOAP

ot Ai The fragrant white soap of the film stars id
dithiade : ‘ini anaiglll

SSS

oy

IRISH RAYON
in colourful
floral designs

=




PAGE FOUR



ARBADOS gti ADVOCATE
> Beem etpe SPS sare os Bowe] ©

| (tinted oy the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad ~.., tridgetown
ee SSSSSee

Saturday, November 8, 1952



) GREAT HOPES

REACTIONS to the result of the Ameri-
can Presidentiai elections have depended
largely on whether individuals or groups
are accustomed to regard Democrats or
Republicans with especial favour. The
Daily Herald of London for instance which
is the organ of the British Trade Unions is
openly disappointed at Governor Steven-
son's failure because the Democratic Party

is associated in the minds of British Labour
supporters with a party of progress and

reform. General Eisenhower's victory on

the other hand has been welcomed by all

those who regard him as a great-hearted

man who sees the problems of the world

steadily and whole, the man in whom all

our hopes are placed to bring about the

peace for which a war-scarred world is

\oking.

There has been much comment made
since the new American President was
named: but simple ordinary people of the
world are hoping that the new President,
whatever else he does, will be able to
ensure peace in a world which is weary of
war and threats of war. Tio regard General
Eisenhower as a lone crusader doing battle
for world peace and using all the mighty
resources of America to ensure it would
however be unrealistic. The new President
of the United States must rely on the sup-
port of the Senate and of the House of
Representatives and he must be guided by
whatever will be the final programme of
the Republican Party.

Whereas too the world at large war
watching the result of the American
elections with bated breath, we must not
forget that the electors were citizens of
the United States and that the President's
first duty is to the citizens of the United
States. No other head of a state is better
equipped perhaps than the new President
of the United States to guide the course of
human destiny, but the President of the
United States can only play his role ir
world events with the limits permitted tc
him by the American constitution.

The heartfelt rejoicing and thanksgiving
which is still going on in many parts o!
the world because of the victory of Genera!
Eisenhower must be tempered by realisa-
tion of the fact that there are features of a
Republican programme which may not be
in the interests of say the British Common-
wealth. Fears have for long been ex-
pressed in British countries for instance
that. the Republicans, who by their whole
‘tra “are more protectionist than the
Democrats, will not look with favour on
British requests for lowering of American
tariffs.

The Republican platform also included
a direct threat to British Commonwealth
preferences. “We shall press” it was said
during the Presidential campaign “for the
elimination of discriminatory practises
against our exports, such as preferentia!
tariffs, monetary license restrictions and
other arbitrary devices.” The question
of American tariffs is, as the Financia!
Times of London comments, likely to be
one of the big international issues when the
new American policy is formulated.

The new Republican administration i
also likely to be intolerant of Britain’s hold-
ing aloof from greater participation in the
Schuman Plan and in the European De-
fence Community and General Eisen-
hower’s broadcast to the people of France
soon after his elections shows how concern-
ed he personally is to assure France of
American support. On the other hand
General Eisenhower must have a better
grasp of Britain’s position as the heart and
centre of a great Commonwealth of nations
and no one would know better than he the
value of Britain to Europe, to America and
to the whole free world.

The promised visit to Korea will raise
hopes, not only among American fathers
mothers and wives but among all those
who are weary of the disappointing Korean
war that an armistice will soon become
reality. No one wants the Korean war to
go on for one minute longer than necessary
and if General Eisenhower’s visit to Korea
should lead to a cessation of hostilities his
administration would begin under the most
favourable circumstances and in’ an at-
mosphere of international goodwill.

It is not for small dependent territories
like Barbados to raise a finger of reproach
at the corruption which has discredited
Democratic administration and which has
been widely publicised in the world’s Press:
but it is obvious that supporters of General
Risenhower here as in other countries of
the world are hoping that the new ad-
ee will be free from taints of this

ind.

The election of an American President is
primarily a matter of concern for the
citizens of America. But the role which
America now plays as the leader of the
free world has made the 1952 Presidential
elections perhaps the most important world
event of this century: It was time, most
people felt, that the long innings of the
Democratic administration of the United
States should end. It has ended and next
January one of the greatest citizens of the
world enters upon office in the White House
and takes up a burden, the weight and
responsibility of which are enough to
terrify the stoutest heart. Americans have
freely chosen General Eisenhewer to
shoulder this great burden and throughout
the free world men and women are hoping
that their choice will have been wise and
that under his leadership America and the
world will move into a period of prosperity
from which the menace of total war has
been removed farther than it is today



BARBADOS



| Our Common Heritage—(29)

HARRY GOODING

| His Academic Triumphs
Harry Beaujon Gooding was
born in 1887 at Seawell Plantation
in the parish of Christ Church.
He went to Lodge School when he
wan a little boy and there he be-
gan the study of Latin and Greek

another's orders and receive com-
munion at one another’s altars,

These proposals were considered
at the conference on reunion called
uy Headlam and Gooding en-
hanced his reputation by the part
he played at that conference.

which was to lead him later to a Gooding showed that he had a
notable career in classics and number of convictions which were
theology. He lived in those days none the less firmly held because
first at Mount Pleasant and then they were quietly expressed. He
at Congo Road and it is strange to did not share the view that vio-
relate that one unimaginative lence in religion was the same as
master at the Lodge seemed to earnestness and that extreme
think that he would never go very Opinions were identical with re-
far in Greek. ligious enthusiasm, He felt that

As a matter ‘of fact, there reunion could only be discussed
seemed little chance at one time M an atmosphere, of calm delib-
that Gooding weuld pursue the eration, completely free from par-
academic course that was to bring tY Spirit, and his approach to the
him renown in the world of schol. Subject was that of a man who is
arship and learning. He left suided by common sense and so-
school while he was still young °F logic.
and entered the profession with :
which his family had been con- From the time of the conference
nected for several generations, But 9" reunion, Gooding won increas-
an uncle of his realised that ha 'ng prestige and influence in the
would be wasting his talents if ha W0rld of scholarship. He had
remained a planter. Gooding was &stablished his reputation as a Lib-
therefore induced to return to @ral Evangelical, as one who was
school and, as the Lodge at the ot ashamed to be thought moder-
time did not have all the facilities ate in religious matters. His main
for a classical sixth, he decided to desire was to follow the path dic-
go to Harrison College and have tated by reason and to avoid emo~
a try at the Barbados Scholarship, tion and prejudice. He became
The confident opinion of his uncle Strongly attached to the movement
was not disappointed and in 1906 Which had brought new ideas of
Gooding won the prize which en- Personal religion, of philanthropic
abled him to pursue his studies, @ffort and missionary zeal, He saw
abroad. ,clearly the value af the modernist

Once again he was almost di- movement which sought to exam-
verted from the path that was to ine the eC een ah ce
lead him to the highest academic @*hanges in ee nae ho ama
hohours. It was his family’s wist@ Tied to reconcile p preys .
that he should study medicine ana science to Christian theology. It
he therefore entered Edinburgh
University for that purpose. Al-
though he did not have his heart
in medicine, he soon showed that
he possessed a first rate brain, He
gained all the prizes for which he
was eligible, won a bursary to the
value of £400 and gave every
promise of winning conspicuous
successes in the field of medicine.
But before long his love of the
humanities induced him to aban-
don his medical studies and he en-
tered Hertford College, Oxford, to
read for a classical degree. Here
began the brilliant career that was
to lead him from one triumph to
another. He won prize after prize
and was awarded an open scholar~
ship at Hertford. He gained the
distinction of winning three first
class honours—in Classical moder-
ations, in his Finals and in Theol-
ogy—-a feat performed by few
Barbadians.

His achievements were recog-
nised by the authorities who
extended his open scholarship
for another year. His awards up
to that time included the junior
Greek Testament prize, the
Denyer Johnson Theological Prize,
and a Liddon Studentship that
was worth £90 per annum for two
years, Hertford College had every
reason to be proud of its son and
accordingly he was appointed a
Tutor at the College and was |
later invited to accept a Lecture- |
‘hip. But Gooding decided to {
‘eave Hertford for a wider field |
and accepted the post of Vice- |
Principal of Wycliffe Hall, Oxford. | ~
Sy this time his reputation as a ©
scholar began to spread through
Oxford. He impressed all with
whom he came into contact by
the range and variety of his
learning, by the strength and
power that came from profound
knowledge. Such a man was
bound to attract attention and his
appointment at the post-graduate
theological college at Wycliffe Hall
—he was not even ordained at
the time —— showed that he had
won the respect and esteem of
those who were competent to
judge in matters of scholarship.

His Wide Culture
In spite of his advance in the
theological world, Gooding con-
tinued his classical studies with
the ardour and zeal worthy of the























































HARRY

was this phase of the search for
truth that had a special fascina-
tion for Gooding and it was his
scrupulous concern for the truth
that attracted the countless young
men who flocked to listen to the

great scholars of the Renaissance.
{n 1914 Oxford, well aware of his
wide culture and catholic mind.
appointed him one of its classical
examiners and honoured him with
the invitation to preach the Latin
sermon in St, Mary’s Church, the
great religious centre of the uni-
versity,

During the years of the first
World War, Gooding left Oxford
tc do parochial work in the Isle
of Wight where he thought he
coulda be of greater practical value
during a time of emergency. But
in 1919 he returned to the uni-
versity and to the life and work
he loved with an absorbing pas-
sion, Oxford, who seem lad
to receive him back in her fold, at
once appointed him Principal of
Wycliffe Hall and examiner in
theology. And Liverpool, as if
to proclaim its faith in the renown
he had won in two great branches
of learning, appointed him exter-
nal examiner in Hellenistic Greek,

Then began for Gooding one of
the most strenuous and fruitful
periods in his life. All the re-+
sources of his profound and subtle
mind were placed at the disposal
of the scholarly world. In 1920 he
became associated with Arthur
Headlam, who was appointed
gius Professor of Divinity at Ox-
ford in 1921, later becoming Bishop
of Gloucester, Both Headlam ond
Gooding belonged to a school of

words of wisdom that fell from
his lips at Oxford and in later
years at the Y.M.C.A. in Barba-
dos. It was perhaps on such
youthful seekers after truth that
Gooding exercised his profound-
est influence. He inspired them
with his passion for intellectual
exercise and urged them to follow
the path-of reason with unfalter-
ing confidence

His Learning And Simplicity

But, in spite of his profound
knowledge aud his critical
‘approach to every enquiry, there
was a simplicity about Gooding
that went to the hearts of his
students. He beiieved that Chris-
tianity would advance not merely
through efficient organisation but

the increased value of
the individual person. He was
convinced that outward forms
were not really important and
that the essential thing was to
have all over the world “Pray-
ing, ardent souls, who bind to-
gether our torn and_ struggling
humanity with invisible, but
effective chains of love.” He be-
lieved that Evangelical Chris-
tianity, with all its divisions, had
a remarkable degree of unity and
he wrote enthusiastically to sup-
port the cause of Liberal Evangeli-

calism. He was an Evangelical in.

thought that had to meet no little ‘the sense that he sought to estab-
opposition at the time. Their ap- lish the simplicity of Christian
proach to theology was intensely belief based on the spirit and doc-
critical, They were anxious to trine of the gospel and he was
discover the truth in every ques- Liberal in that he wanted to see
tion and they would accept no- Christian thought reconciled with
thing on trust. aang believed that the changed conditions of modern
4 university school of theology, times. On this basis he worked
where a critical and scientific earnestly for the unification of the
spirit prevailed, was eminently English Churches and if was a fit-
suited to turn out young men who ting recognition when he was
would put their hearts and souls appointed a member of the Oxford
in their work for the Church. To Branch of the. Bishop of Bombay's
some timid souls this emphasis on enquiry on reunion,
the intellect was too bold, but to Gooding’s prestige as a theolog-
|the majority of thoughtful people jan received still further recogni-
\it made their ‘work reasonable tion when he was appointed a
and understandable. In view of member of the Archbishop's Com-
| the great importance they both at- mission on Doctrine and’ invited
Fioched to university teaching, to help in the work of revising
Headlam and Gooding took the the Prayer Book. The need for
significant step of introducing the such revision was generally rec-
Diploma of Theology at Oxford ognised at the time. In its main
|end, appropriately enough, Good- features the, Prayer Book had
ling was appointed an examiner remained unchanged for nearly
| tor the Diploma. four hundred years, No changes
| In 1920 Headlam and Gooding had been made from time to time
|} began to work together on the to adapt it to the circumstances of
question of reunion, They were a changing age. It was felt that
of the opinion that the great body the Prayer Book should be made
of English-speaking Christianity to conform with existing use, that
should be united and thus made it should harmonise with the
a strong and rerful spiritual habits and thoughts of the day,
g powerful spiritua : “hep jifled to meet
force. Headlam advanced several that it should be modified to mee
proposals to bring about a union the fuller and richer life of the
betel os “th » Anglican and English twentieth century, that it should
| between Re nglican and Englis® ». adapted to the conditions of
| Free ¢ hurches As a basis for Te- modern thought. the advance of
| Whion ¢ iggested that thee science. the welfare of the people
2e frankly the problems of peace and war
the conflict of capital and lal



gr

nd eely t recognise one

ADVOCATE

fy F. A. Heyos

[he revision of the Prayer Book
‘was regarded as a crisis in the
history of the Church of England |
and it is @ source of great pride)
for Barbados that one of her sons
was selected to perform a mo-~
mentous task and meet a grave
crisis.

At the time of this signal honour
Gooding was still in his thirties.
Everything seemed to point to a
bright and Shining future if he
had been able to remain at Oxford
where his ial gifts made him
an oui g figure. After gain-
ing the degree of B.D., he pro-
ceeded to the thesis for Doctorate
of Divinity but, according to the
statutes of the university, he was
too young to have the degree
conferred. Two years later, tha
eareer that gave promise of so
many high achievements came ta
an end when Gooding was forced
to return to Barbados for reasons
of heaith.

In Barbados

When Gooding arrived in Bar-
bados, he atonce took up the post
of Rector of St. John. The follow-
ing year he was appointed Senior
Classical Master at Harrison Col-
lege and for six years the College
was to benefit from his vast
knowledge of the humanities.
Though Gooding was perhaps at
his best in deAling with the under-
graduate pa he felt he was
doing useful work in the Classical
Sixth. He imbued his pupils with
a love for*classical learning and
stimulated in them a keen desire
for free discussions. His learning



and simplicity made a deep im-






GOODING

pression on the boys who passed
through his hands and, besides
keeping the classical sixth at a
high level of attainment, he
encouraged the critical and scien-
tific spirit that led them to
cxamine the questions that have
agitated the mind of man since the
dawn of human history.

In 1932 he was appointed
headmaster of the Lodge School in
succession to Bill Emtage. The
Lodge had now produced its own.
headmaster and Gooding set about
to expand and _ strengthen the
work his predecessor had done
for the school, He was determined
like Emtage, to preserve the
character of the Lodge as essenti-
ally a boarding school, In this way,
he felt, the school could make a
unique contribution to the life
of the island. In addition, he re-
solved to raise the scholastic level
of the Lodge. He realised the
growing importance of science
and provided increased teaching
facilities for that subject, But he
was convinced that the scholar-
ship of the school could best be
strengthened through study of
the classics and for this reason
he re-introduced Greek on the
curriculum. To attain the high
standards he set for the schdol,
he worked on a carefully worked
out plan ‘end gradually his
efforts began to bear fruit in the
results of the*School and Higher
Certificate examinations, Though
he did not live to see it, the
success of the school in winning
the Barbados Scholarship in 1941
was the undoubted result of his
plan.

But Gooding did not concen-
trate all his efforts to improve
the achieveménts of the school
in scholarship and sport. To his
mind no education was complete
unless it looked after body, mind
and spirit. H@ believed that he
should impress the school with
the supreme importance of moral
end spiritual values. He believed
in the edifying influence. of work
and was convinced that the
whole tone of the school could
be improved by earnest and con-
scientious effort in nursuit of lofty
ideals. “Education,” he once said,
“should be that. Kind of enlighten-
ment which enables a man—to
develop his power of choosing for

himself and to live intelligently
and freely in. accordance with
the ideals which he is_ able,

through education, to decide on
as being worthwhile.”

When the headship of
Lodge was. offered him in
Gooding hesitated before
accepted it because of the un-
certain state of his health, After
six strenuous years, during which

the
1932,
he

the numbers of the school rose
from 105 to 151 and the boarders
from 37 to 80, he was forced to}
eek medical advice England. |
The strain of running a boarding |

@ On Page &

Monday

Wednesday

Saturday—My

NOBODY'S |

DIARY

papists really missed the point or
whether they were just glad of the
opportunity to say a few kind words.
Never mind: this is the age of the high-
ways and hedges and you can see the
agents of some of the North American
religions walking in the hot sun as far
afield as Mount Tabor.

In Trafalgar Square, on the other
hand, there is a man who objects to
people who wear white collars. If he
had his way, if all of his people thought
like him every church door would be
shut. He says so.

May I appeal to the anti-papists tc
shed their sectarian prejudices and
realise that the papists besides paying

the established church through taxation
are Christians?

I wonder whether the anti-}%

quite a fair whack of the expenses of |

Nobody questions the right of the

cathedral authorities to put any notices

it likes on its church doors, but the point
is that the highways and hedges seem to
be left for the strolling evangelists.
They don’t always succeed either, and
they are plenty who will lend a help-
ing kick to help the churches lose face.

Even those who live in make-believe
worlds can smell a rat from a distance,
if their noses are not stuffed up.

Q. What price Alice Through the
Looking Glass ?

A. Oh that’s different®

* * *

Tuesday—There is a man at the waterworks

who rides a bicycle and has a sweet face.
His job is to put washers on my cocks
and as my household responsibilities
(the hired ones) are always leaving my
qocks dripping, he comes home quite
often. The other day for the first time
I saw him in action, It seems that some-
one was too lazy to fit a master cock
on to my water system so the water can
only be blocked from the road, For
some reason my washer friend prefers
not to turn the master cock in the road.
Result? You never saw anything like
it except in New Zealand where the
geysers come from, All the time my
friend is searching for the washer the
water jumps up and souses him from
head to foot. I’m sure that if this is the
regular system of washering cocks
enough water to keep the fountain run-
ning for half an hour must be lost. It’s
funny though, isn’t it ?

* * *

appeared at my window with a tale o
woe, His wife (the man with the face)
had just had a baby. Would I lend hin
80 cents to buy medicine from the docto:
shop? I didn’t think much of the stor
but I gave him the eighty cents. This
little story is for the benefit of those
who say that it never pays to do good.
I lost the 80 cents because the man hac
cooked up this tale but you'll be a much
bigger mug than I was if you fall fo:
this soap, after what I’ve told you.

* * *

Thursday—Does anyone care whether th«

buses on the Leeward Coast overtakc
cars doing 30 m.p.h.? Or is_ the keer
death off the road campaign slowing uj
now that Christmas is coming. I scar
the Press daily for some report tha
will shed some light on the burnt boa’
at Crab Hill. They don’t build fishing
boats of self-igniting wood.

* * *

Friday—I’'ve got a new suggestion for the

Fire Boys to consider. Every year we
get lots of fires on the sugar plantations
The ashes make an awful mess of my
house and other peoples. Instead of
waiting for the day when an unusually
strong wind blows burning trash on tc
our houses, could the Fire Boys noi
think up an anti-cane fire plan and helt
us to have less fires each year? I know
the Fire Boys are a bit sore becaus¢
.they can’t get their Fire Palace cum
sliding poles ete. but perhaps if we hac
less cane fires we could afford to spend
a bit more on expanding the Fire Ser-
vice. Oddly enough the Fire Boys are
not expected to put out cane fires. Nor
is anyone else, it seems.

* * *

friend from Cochin-Chine
has sent me another communication
which has passed the censors (No*
everything that I receive is fit for you
innocent ears, gentle readers). He
wants to know: how come a barber ar
a hawker plank seats on the Chamber-
lain Bridge footpath to the great annoy
ance of us foot-walkers?

The best answer I can give to th
really probing question is to ask: hoy
come a fish shed built for the use of
fishermen has become the communit>
centre for the Paynes Bay fraternity’
The only fish I’ve ever seen on that slab
has got legs and arms like me and my
friend from Cochin China,

Keep trying brother. Some day they’l!
build us a statue. And where they’ll
put it? Brother in the middle of the
Chamberlain Bridge, Where else?

The other night a face







SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1952







DIARIES !! DIARIES !!
AT THE
‘ADVOCATE STATIONERY



—— SX





A Broom or Bru

sh for

Every Purpose

BROOMS BRUSHES

Bass or Yard Lavatory

Scrub Shoe '
Cobweb Wire

Hair (Floor) Hair (Head)
Straw Serub

Steel Paint

-- Also —
CLEANERS and POLISHES
At
WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD.

Successors To

Cc. S.

87




PITCHER |

& CO.

For sunshine .. .
Tootal colour
and design...

they harmonize!

ree rar

TOOTAL — or simply
Dress Material —
why say more ?

We're not . . . we're
just reminding you

of TOOTAL Week...

TOBRALCO _..... $1.31
LYSTAV ......ccccc GLAL
LOMBIA &





JUST ARRIVED



Milk Fed Chickens
Milk Fed Ducks
New Zealand Lamb

Ox Tail Soup
Cranberry Bauce Frozen Fish
Tobasco Sauce Frozen Peas
Cocktail Onions Frozen Sprouts
Red, ae Frozen Spinach
Carr's Cheese Crisps Fruit Puddings
t Pas! LIQUOR DEPT.

Eating Pears Dubonnet
Eating Apples Claret
Cooking Apples Sauternes

t Liebfraumilch
SPEcraRICES Bristol Sherry
Craven A 50’s—$1.08 tino”

Craven A 20’s—42c,
Capstan 50’s—$1.08
Capstan 20’s—42c.
Gold Flake 50’s—$1.08
Gold Flake 20’s—42c.



To-day’s Favourite - .

Creme de Menthe

Dom

Bass Ale—12-oz.
Goldentree—12-0z.
Canada Dry Drinks

Schweppes Tonic
Oranges—5 cents
Plantains—6 cents

GOLD BRAID PHONE
— GODDARDS
(3-Yr.-Old) We
DELIVER



EES
eee




SATURDAY,

Man Acquitted of House-Breaking and Larceny

. |Europe and Japan
month, when Air France put
a once-weekly flight,

NOVEMBER 8,



1952

Jury Returns Verdict
On C.J.’s Instructions

FOLLOWING the instructions of His Lordship the
Chief Justice Sir Allan Collymore, an assize jury yester-

day returned a verdict of not guilt

in a case in which

Charles Bennett a watchman, was charged with breaking
into the house of Itina Bowen, a hawker of Cave Hill, on
September 22 this year and stealing a purse containing $10.

‘Bicycle Thief
Placed On
Probation

James Belgrave a labourer of
St. George was put cn 18 months’
probation by His Lordship the
Chief Justice Sir Allan Collymore
yesterday when he withdrew his
plea of not guilty of stealing a
Raleigh bicycle the property of
Cladstone Clarke of Hastings.
Christ Church, on September 10
this year, and pleaded guilty to
committing the offence.

Belgrave changed his plea after
the Prosecution called four wit-
nesses.

He was represented by Mr. E
W. Barrow.

Mr. F. E. Field, Assistant At~
torney Gencral, prosecuted for
the Crown.

Gladstone Clarke said that he
bought the bicycle last year and
its serial number was DD44405.
On September 10 he lent it to a
friend called Peter Mandeville
about 7.30 am. He returned to
him in the evening and said that
it was lost.

Peter Mandeville said he bor-
rowed the bicycle and about 4 p.m.
he leaned it on the pavement in
front of the Office Equipment
Service building in Coleridge
Street and went into the building
for about 10 minutes. When he
returned, the bicycle was missing.

Cpl. Emerson Yearwood said
that Belgrave was brought to the
Central Police Station in a Police
ear on September 10 along with
the watchman of Lodge Plantation.
The watchman accused Belgrave
of trespassing on the plantation
grounds and refusing to give his

name or business there when
requested. ‘ :
At the Station, Belgrave said

that he had taken a bicycle from
near the Fire Brigade station,
ridden it to Christ Church and
left it under a dunks tree on a hill
near the beach road. '

They went in search of the
bicycle and when it was found
Belgrave was charged with steal-
ing it.

Cross-examined, he said that
Belgrave had not actually men-
tioned a dunks tree, but the
bicycle was found under one,

Belgrave had vaguely said “on a
hill along the beach road.”

P.C. Elliot Brewster said that he
was present when Belgrave told
Cpl. Yearwood about the bicycle.

At this stage His Lordship asked
the jury to retire and told counsel
for both sides that he wanted to
confer with them in his chambers.

Plea Withdrawn

When hearing resumed, Mr.
Barrow said that in the light of
the evidence given by the four
witnesses, and especially in the
light of the police evidence, he
had asked his client to withdraw
his plea of not guilty. At the same
time he would draw His Lord-
ship’s attention to Belgrave’s
strange behaviour in taking the
bicycle, riding it to Christ Church,
and abandoning it, straying about
the Lodge Plantation. ]

Belgrave then pleaded guilty to
the larceny of the bicycle.

His Lordship told the jury that
us they had been sworn to try the
case, he would ask them to give a
with the

verdict in accordance
plea. a
The jury returned a verdict 0
guilty.
His Lordship said that the

evidence showed that the accused
was a very extraordinary person.
He had left St. George and taken
the bicycle from Bridgetown and
after riding it to Christ Church
abandoned it and went off wander-
ing. The evidence given by the
police went to show that probably
at the time he was suffering from
some mental aberration.
. Mr. Barrow said that Belgrave
rormally used to work at a plan-
tation in St. George. It would
seem that his mother sometimes
suffered from occasional aberra~
tion also, and his Lordship could
get the Probation Officer to 29
iuto the history of the family,
His Lordship put Belgrave on
probation for 18 months in a
surety of £25



After all the prosecution wit-
nesses had given evidence, Mr.
F. E. Field Assistant Attorney
General who prosecuted for the
Crown said that the eyjdence
was not strong enough to jeopar-

dise Bennett's liberty by allow-
ing the case to go before the
jury.

His Lordship said that there

were too many lies and too many
discrepancies and askeq the jury
to return a verdict of not guilty.

Bennett was represented by
Mr, D. H. L. Ward.

Itina Bowen said she was a
hawker and on September 22

she left home about 6 a.m. and
went to the beach to buy fish.
Before leaving home she secured
the windows and doors of the
part of the house she rented from
a man called Cecil Grimes. The
other part of the house was occu-
pied by a woman named Louise
Griffith. Cecil Grimes lived
about 20 yards from the house
Griffith and she occupied.

She returned from the beach
about 9 a.m, and found the lock
of the door to her room broken.
After a search she discovered that
a purse she had containing $10
was missing.

The first time she had met
Bennett was on September 14
when she was carrying her baby,
and Bennett told her that the
baby looked a pleasant child and
he liked it. Some days later she
met him and he enquired after
the baby. He came to her home
the same night and after putting
a shilling in the baby’s hand,
suggested to her that she and he
could become friends. She re-
fused his offer.

Saved Money

The $10 were single @llar
notes and was money she had
saved from time to time.
Cross-examined, she said that
she began to rent the room from
Grimes about three weeks before
the money was stolen, and at
that time she had accumulated
six of the $10. She had paid
Grimes five ‘shillings the day he
gave her the key. She denied
ever telling the police that she
haq got the $10 as a meeting
turn, She and Bennett were
never friendly, nor had he ever
given her money besides the
putting of the shilling in the
aby’s hand, When she paid
Grimes the five shillings she did
so with five single shillings.
Re-examined, she said she had
never been in a “meeting” with
anyone.

P.O. «Elliot Brewster said | that
the matter was reported to tha
Police and he visited the house
and saw the door broken.

Louise Griffith said that she
rented part of the house occupied
by Bowen. On _ September 22
about 8.30 a.m. Bennett came to
the house and asked for Bowen.
He said he was looking for a lan-
tern he used on his job as watch-
man. He broke open the door
and after staying a short period
in the room came out without
anything.

He went at Grimes
saw them speaking. She had
seen Bennett visit Bowen on
nights previous to the incident.

Cross-examined, she said that
she did not go and tell Grimes
that Bennett had broken the door.

Cecil Grimes said that Ben-
nett came to him on September
22 and asked him whether he was
the owner of the house Bowen
occupied and whether or not she
had brought a lantern at him. He
told Bennett that Bowen had
brought no lantern at him. Some-
time after Bennett went on he
noticed that the door to the room

and she

Bowen occupied ,was broken
open, /
Cross-examined, he said that

Griffith had come and told him
Bennett had broken the door.

When Bowen came to rent the
room. she told him that she did
not have any money then and
the following week she paid him
five shillings, handing him a dol-
lar note and a shilling.

Mr. F. E. Field said that the
evidence was not strong enough

to jeopardise the accused liberty Peared for the petitioner. of e Govyernor-'n-Executive Bolton Lane
by putting the case before a jUTY. | 344¢6666466000696000060614006: . 04 ‘Gay
His Lordship instructed the} GVQOO 9 POCD LD YOGOGV OOOO 9-0 06-00 9V-E-8-19F0000G-9OSOOF OOO
a verdict of not}



BARBADOS



U.K.



INDUSTRIALISTS AT CENTRAL

ADVOCATE



FOU
s



. MR. W. W. 8. ROBERTSON, 0O.B.E. (centre), member of the U.K. Industrial Mission at present tour

ing the island is pictured above visiting the workshop of the Central Foundry Ltd.

With him are

Mr. P. A. Cheeseman, works engineer (left) and Mr. ©. G. Crawford, technical manager.



Application For A

Sales Granted

In. the Court of Chancery yes-
terday,. His Lordship the vice
Chancellor, Mr, Justice J. W. B.
Chenery granted the application
ior appraisement and saic¢ ot
the dweiling-house Mayville, Cod-
rington Hill, St. Michael, and one
acre one rood of land in the suit
C. B. Brooks plaintiff and Wil-
mer C. Cummins, defendant,

The Registrar's report of
were filed.

Mr W. W. Reece, Q.C.,_ in-
structed by Messrs. Yearwood &
Boyce, Solicitors, appeared for the
plaintiff.

The application for appraise-
ment and sale of qa dwellinghouse
and one rood 13 perches of land
at Six Mens, St. Peter in the suit
W. I. Griffith, plaintiff and J. |
Broome, defendant, was also
granted, The Registrar’s report of

liens

liens were filed.

Mr. E. W. Barrow _ instructed
by. Messrs Haynes & Griffith,
Solicitors, appeared on behalf of

the plaintiff.

In the suit L. E.
tiff, and C. H Marshall, detfen-
dant His Lordship granted the
application for appraisement and
sale of two parcels of land at
Sealy Hall, St John, the first be-
ing one acre, 10 perches. with
dwellinghouse and the other being
two acres.

The Registrar's report of
were filed.

His Lordship also granted the
application for appraisement and
sale of five acres, six perches of
land in the suit H. O. StC. Cum-

R. Gill, plain-

liens





berbatch, plaintiff, and T Dd
Sealy & Co Ltd. defendant.

MP. Bu bs Ome Brancker in-
structed by Messrs Haynes &
Griffith, Solicitors, appeared for

the plaintiff.



Becree Absolute

Mr. Justice J. W. B. Chenery
pronounced decree absolute in tie
suit of L G. Miller, petitioner and
Cc. O. Miller, respondent, in the
Court for Divorce and Matri-
monial Causes yesterday.

His Lordship also pronounced
decree absolute in the suit of O.
D. Ashby petitioner, and S. V.
Ashby, respondent.

Mr. W. W. Reece, @.C. .in-
structed by Messrs Hutchinson &
Banfield, appeared for the peti-
tioner,

Letters of Administration

In the Court of Ordinary His
Lordship granted the petition of
Vincent Burke of Bay Street, 6t.
Michael, for letters of adminis-

tration to the estate of his aunt
Etheline H. Harris, late of Bay
Street.

Mr. J. S. B. Dear, instructed
by Messrs Yearwod & Boyce ap-

This verdict was return- |

jury to return
culty,

ed.

Eee cone
Ch. Ch. Vestry Agree To Lease Land

The Christ Church Vestry at
their meeting on Thursday signed
the agreement for the lease from
Government of the land on which
the Sargeant’s Village pavilion




stands, i
The land was bought by i
rnment some years ago fr

Ce sans ed Sna0eseoe

a a
‘Ves
= af
OF
® 4°
% ma
IN TIME FOR THE
RACES TOO!
Cracker Jacks
Cashew Nuts
Salted Nuts

Pascall’s Barley Sugar
Pascall’s Marshmallows
Mackintosh’s Toffee De Luxe
% MacKintosh’s Quality St. Assort.
Sharpe's Toffee De Luxe

$366 66666666606608605

Y SOS FOPOOOOPOOSSS

HOLIDAYG

KNIGHT'S DRUG STORES

Kent

lishment of a playing field. Since

then a pavilion had been erected

and publicly opened on July 4

by Lady Savage.

Several of the social groups in
the area make use of the pavilion
once a week for their discussions.







SiON

wereld ts



Fry's Peppermint Cream ‘Ib
ie 1b

$OGSSSSS68%



SCO ood 4% 4 “ “



1



!







her on September 10 this year.
Mr. E. K, Walcott, Qy, appeared for Byer.

His Worship Mr, C
Police Magistrate of
had fined
to be

Ww
District “B”
Byer 40s and 3s costs
paid in 14 days or one
month’s imprisonment with hard
labour for the offence and Byer
appealed.

Applewhaite told the court that
on September 10 about 12.15 p.m.



she was walking along St, Judes S08, miepmly. takes — the form
road when the defendant rushed “Try and turn over a new extrachon or the timber: and. m
out of the canes and attacked her for if you come here again eral resources gold, diamona
with an iron stake. The defendant Will go to prison,” His Worship bauxite and Colombite,
hit her three times across the left Mr. G. B. Griffith, Acting Po~ This was not good enough, ar:
ear with the iron stake. lice Magistrate of District any proper planning for the are

Before the incident they had told Eric Lewis of Black Rock St. must therefore necessarily tal
a row and this was over a pig Michael, yesterday, when he plac- into consideration an all-roun:
which the defendant took away ©4 him on probation for industrial development based oi
from her. “ months for stealing cocoanuts on g diversified economy

: October 22. Commenting on ‘the situatio:

s Pan Constable Bovell said Lewis was seen picking cocoa- in Barbados as he conceived i
~~ w Mond a along St. Judes nuts from a tree, the property of during his “short stay.” Hon, D,
yi ig ad, St, eorge about Mr. R. N. Thani, on October 2) Jagan said “it is in a state o
f - p.m on ore. 10 and the matter was reported to flux.”

2 saw a man come out of a cane- 2 ol ce. water a warra Jas f
field and attack Applewhaite ‘with Ala for the defendant's anne He inenasht, that a tong-term

an iron stake, Applewhaite shout-
ed for murder and he ran towards
the canefleld but the man escaped.
He did not recognise fRe man or
he could not say if the defendant
was the man.

To Mr Walcott Bovell said
Applewhaite shouted for Archie
Byer when the man attacked het
He was about 40 feet from Apple-
whaite,

£3 FOR WOUNDING :

His Worship Mr
Acting Police M:
trict “A”, yesterday fined Henry
Clarke, a 40-year-old labourer of
Richmond Gap, St. Michael, £3
to be paid in 14 days or one
month’s imprisonment with hard
labour foi wounding Leotta
Harewood on November 3.

Harewood told the Court
while standing at the corner
James Street, St. Michael, 1
defendant came up to her
cuffed her in her mouth

G, B. Griffith

strate of Dis





that
of
ne

and

STOLE TABLE :

Harold Lorde of Nelson Street,
St. Michael and Clifton Morris of
Pa ze Road, St. Michael, were
each sentenced to seven days
mprisonment with hard labour by



His Worship Mr, E. A. McLeod,
wien they pleaded guilty yester-
day of stealing an iron table on
July 21 from the yard of the

Highways and Transp:

The table which is the property

Rudder, Committee was valued at

6d.

Investig

table was removed from the yard

ppeal Judges Dismiss
Charges Of Bodily Harm

IN THE ASSISTANT COURT OF APPEAL yesterday
Their Honours Mr. H. A. Vaughan and Mr. A. J. H. Han-
schell dismissed without prejudice the case in which 34-
year-old Miriam Applewhaite of St. Judes, St. George,
brought against 40-year-old Archibald Byer of Prerogative,
St. George, charging him with inflicting bodily harm on

ations showed that

of Highways & Transport,

Lorde had

ions and Morris four,

ON PROBATION :

Lewis said that a servant em-
ployed him to piek the cocoanuts

from the tree.

Sgt.
tock

was a

Howard attached to Black
Police

Station
of the

said
habit

cocoanuts,

“Lady Rodney” On
Last W.I. Voyage

The SS. Lady Rodney is
pected to call at Barbados
Sunday the 9th of November
When the Rodney calls here

be on

shores of the Caribbean after 24
service.

years’

On the Rodney will
members of the crew of the Lady
Nelson who were laid off
the ship had keen taken
the West Indies run. Some mem-
bers of the crew of the
will be laid off when
calls on Sunday; others
make the trip south and

when the ship returns from

islands,

Diamond Rings



returning from the islands, it wil

its last voyage to

LOUIS L. BAYLEY

LANVIN — Arpege, My Bin,

Scandal, Rumew

Plantation for the mn) p r R r U M ye S

OF DELIGHTFUL



JEAN PATON — Joy, Moment
Supreme, Amour Amour

SCHIAPURELLI — Shocking

CHANEL — No. 5

CAVE SHEPHERD & Co.,, Ltd

10: 11, 12, & 13, Broad Street,

= 1. ite,
Both men wese seen convey-
ng the table along Tudor Street.

1l previous convic-

that
defendant to
climb cocoanut trees and steal the

be those

afte:
fron:

Rodney
the ship

get off

+, 000060020000!

Irrigation

A Pressing

| Problem In BG)

SEAWELL, Nov. 7.—Hon. Dr.
Cheddi Jagan, M.L.C., British
Guiana, returned home by
B.W.LA this afternoon = aft
spending two week durin
which, together with other mem
bers of the C.L.C, he interviewed
Mr. G H. Adams, president
the Congress “with a view to pr¢
rerving West Indian unity in t!
Labour movement in the Caril
bean.”

Dr. Jagan told
just before his departure tha
British Guiana, with its tremen
dous land, timber and mineral re
rources, has great scope
development.

One of their major
however, was to make
available to the farmers.

He said that although Britis!
Guiana has a population densiv,s
of five persons to the squrre mile
they nevertheless were faced wit
the pressing problem of “lax
hunger.” The 1946 census hac
revealed that the average farme
had an average holding of 3
acres of land, Any developmen
of thet country must therefore
have as its basis
drainage and _ irrigation
with a view to making well
drained irrigated lands quickly
available, in addition to othe:
facilities, such as cheap credit an:
tractor and machine station
which would provide heavy equin

oO}

the Advocat

to.

problems,
the lar

projet

ment like bull dozers, harvest
pnd so on.

He thought that if those drain
age and irrigation projects we
embarked tipon immediately,
only would the British Gu
population be provided for, bh"

also the excess population in th
Caribbean territories. For th
reason, he considered the pre!
lem in British Guiana one of th:
entire Caribbean area

Agricultural develooment
that respect would also lay
basis for the provision of e>
for the develonment of heavy
secondary industries’ in tl
territories,

Extraction

At the moment, he said, indu
trial developmenc in Britush Gi

plan of development was a gov
thing for any country, but i
should be in relation to thi
available resources of the area

a whole, In the Caribbean the;
should be overall planning w
the several te Vitor es,

“Individual planning withor
due consideration to the area a
whole cannot solve the
problems, particularly
over-population.”

He edded “it is very urgen
that countries like Barbad
should plan for industrialisatior
but this again must be done wit!
careful thought to the demands
the area as a whole.”

It was for that reason that t!
People’s Progressive Party o
' British Guiana, while strugglin
‘for self-government in Britis!
Guiana, was fighting for a We
|Indian Federation with dominio
| Status,

|

press
that



Sport Shirts

ERDINE by “ELITE” in

Also the popular

to $6.72

For SPORTWEAKR
in White only “

For DRESSWEAR
in Cream, Grey
@



WOOO

PAGE FIVE



Direct Service To
Japan

service

opens

A new direct between

next

on

taking

Ove Air



hours. Britisn seas







are planning a Comet service
Tokio.
In just. over two years, the
RAF’s hoverplanes in Malaya WHITE. |}
have picked up more than 200
sick and wounded men from . Bl aa
the jungle and flown them to s
| hospital. —LE.S.

country-wide }



Including an exceptionally
ylaroon,
Beige, Cream, Maize and Tan @
“KOOLMUNE”
good range of plain shides

As well as a large assortment of other
Sport Shirts in fancy designs from $2.50

SEA ISLAND SHIRTS

$7.00 and $8.44





Gas apkin Rash

Apply ‘Cetavlex’ Cream to the affected
area when changing the napkin. The
be found

action of ‘Cetaviex’ will

both soothing and healing.

use ‘Cetavlex” ror WOUNDS, CUTS, BURNS, SCRATCHES, ETC

‘Cetaviex’ Cream

Antiseptic and non-irritant
Sole Agents and Distributors
A. §, BRYDEN & SONS (BARBADOS) LTD,
BRIDGETOWN
A product of

IMTTRIAL CHEMICAL (PHARMACEUTICALS) LIMITED
© sosiciary company of imperial Chemical Industries Limited





|
y PURINA. @

iLAYENA

eee
COMPLETE RATION







FOR THE RACES

NOW s
SELECT THE FINEST IN

SHIRTS

Dress Shirts

By “ARROW,” “ELITE”, “RENOWN,”
“NEW YORKER,” “RELIANCE”, ete.,
ete, in several qualities from $3.94 to

S749 *










smart GAB-
Bottle,
$6.03

in a









$6.67

Blue and White

|




PAGE SIx
TRIPLE



INSTALLED



THE TRIPLE (above) from Poole
installed ir Lemon Arbor Factory i
have amalgamated and are now cal’

Factory, St. John, is now being
» the same parish. These factories
d Uplands Factory.

Poole And Lemon Arbor

Sugar Facto

POOLE AND LEMON
sold to a new company knc

ries Merged
ARBOR factories have been
wn as Uplands Limited. It is

proposed to combine the two factories into one improved

factory “UPLANDS” on the

Since June, some 250 or 300 men and women have
been working in an effort to have the major works com-
ar, leaving only certain minor

pleted by the end of the ye
jobs to be done the last fe
of the 1953 crep which it is

The maehinery at Poole Fac-
tory has been dismantled, and
part of it Carried over to Upland

where it is being erected. Thi
includes a boiler, a triple and two
mills, making the new factory a
fifteen-roller plant

It is expected that with the
amalgamation, the grinding capac-
ity will be in the vicinity of 40
tons of cane per hour—an increase
of between 10 and 12 tons on the
output by Lemon Arbor,



Speaker Warns
Assemblymen

His Honour the Speaker Mr.
K. N. R. Husbands warned mem-
bers of the House of Assembly
last night that he “will be firm in
dealing with members who in-



i sides Gifing the course of a
lebvate. at

His Honewe issued this warn-
ing after Riad on a number of
occasions “Miping last night’s de-
bate callegthe House to order
so. that - could follow the
peeches made by members.

He said Sgt there is a standing
rule whic ys that a member

> on eet must not be in-

terrupted. & said that members
should learn to control their
aside and pointed out that the
chamber was not very large and
that such interruptions should not
be made particularly in the pfes-
ence of visitors.

He warned that in the near
future he will be very firm in
seeing that the rule be observed.



For B.T.C. Races





SEAWELL, Nov. 7.—Mr, Alex
Chin, provision merchant of Brit-
ish Gwianay and well known W.1.
turfite, arrived from Trinidad by
B.W.LA, to attend the B.T.C
Race Meeting which opens at the

Garrison Savannah to-morrow.



Mr, Chin told the “Advocate”
that has seven horses entered
for Christmas Race Meeting
in iidad, one of which is
Royal Windsor, a_ four-year-old
brown colt which has just come

down from England.
The colt is by Windsor Slipper
out of Lissaleen by Sir Cosmo
Mr, Chin, who is accompanied



by his wife, is a guest at Super
\iare Guest House,
Talking Point
You can never plan the

future by the past.—Burke,
They laugh that win,
Shakespeare.
Liberty is not merely a
privilege to be conferred; itis ,
a habit to be acquired. t
-—-Lloyd George.

One
‘Bank’ A

The woman of tomorrow may
lock searchingly into her mirro
on her 40th birthday ‘and decide

that the time has come to cover
her face with the spare complex-
jon she set aside when she was 17

Her plastic surgeon will take it
out of eeld storage and after a few
weeks in a nursing home the
wornan will emerge with a really
rejuvenated face.

This frightening

sity College, London,

Scientists there have found tt
skin removed for grafting opera

tions can be kept alive in a deep

freezer for at least four mont

and probably indefinitely if it has

first been soaked in glycerine.
A graft made with it looks ¢
actly the same as one made from

skin which-has been freshly re-

moved,

The exp€rin.ents-have been rr -

stricted to rabbits so far, but the

scientists believe that the results
cofld alsb be applied to human

pattents,

Emergency

Professor Peter

out thiseresearch for two imme-
diate purposes: -—
4 ee
hin-gragt “banks?” — reserves
which cOul@ be used immediate!
on badty~turned people to give
emergengy-eoverage.

A graft taken from another per











; Ge > fhiting’
son quickly dies. But while Column. As it ie Tre stilt woorktne
working h rabbits Medawat After experiments with guinea ‘ Mi

*found that the life of such a graft pigs, U.S. scientists are convinced British jet fighters and engine
can be prolonged if the ad prolonged exposure to jet- are being built in 12 factorie
cortisone_jig given at the same@engine noise will damage the in‘six different countries Bel-
time n ea whatev« Air Force gium, France, Holland, Italy,

ing this im ties may say swedéet iT Switzerland ;
t finding in human plasti L.E.s —L.E.S
°

upt other. members by mak- tinctiou,)

prospect is
opened up by astonishing experi-
ments now in progress at Univer-

Medawar and
Dr. R. E. Billingham bre carrying

peed the setting up of

Lemon Arbor site.

w weeks before the beginning
hoped will start in February

L.C.C. Exam Results

The
Londor
xan





following are the results of the
Chamber of Commerce summer
ations for 1952

ELEMENTARY STAGE

ARLENGTON HIGH SCHOOL
S. Mason—Arithmetic

BARBADOS EVENING INSTITUTE
FE. Aga'd—Typewriting.
T. Archer—Typewriting
E. I. Beckles—Arithmetic
R, Best—Mathematics
V. Da C. Best—Typewriting

G. Bynoe— Book-keeping

N. De V. Davis—Typewriting (Distine-
tion)

E. Estwick—Arithmetic
English
M. Franklin—Typewriting (Distinction),
. o. rnes—Arithmetic, English.
(Distinction,
—(Distine-

(Distinction

(Distinction),





fi ul—Typewriting
B. Greenidge—Arithmetic

tion), English.

Greenidge—Book-keeping
Harper—Mathemiatics.
Hayde—Arithmetic, English.
. A. Ince—Book-keeping (Distinction)
E. Kenn —Pook-keeping (Dis-
Typewriting (Distinction),
B. Lashley —Mathematies.




Cc. Lorde—Arithmetie.
D. Lucas-—Book-keeping (Distinction)
M. Mascoti—Arithmetic.

I, Mason—English.

M. Moore—English.

M. Newto English
Nicholis—Typewriting (Distinction)
S. Nurse—Typewriting (Distinction)
C. Parris—Typewriting.

FE. H. A. St. Bernard—Book-keeping

I

c

a

Skeete—Typewriting (Distinction)
Smith—Typewriting.
L. C. Walkes—Book-keeping, Type-
riting
Vv. E. Wood—Typewriting (Distinction)
Y. Dottin—Typewriting (Distinction),
PUPIL OF MISS CLINTON

E. Gonzalez—Shorthand (Distinction)
PRIVATE
K. A. Forde—Book-keeping (Distinc-

tlon).

P. E. Gibson—Arithmetic (Distinction),
English, Mathematies (Distinction).

W. A. Howell—Book-keeping

Cc. N. Smith—Geography,

CERTIFICATE STAGE
HIGH SCHOOL

ARLINGTON
A. DeC. Edwards
BARBADOS EVENT
R. Best—Arithmetic.
Cc... Farnum—Book-keeping Dis-
nection)
A. Harper-—English.
A. Ince—Typewriting.
O. Jones——-Typewriting
D. L. Lucas—Book-keceping
J. Sutherland—Typewriting
COMBERMERE SCHOOL
Austin——-Mathematics
Gregorie—French
Griffith—-Geography
.. Holder—Arithmetic,
(Maths. Distn.)
E.R. Warner—Mathematics
LYNCH'S SBCONDARY SCHOOL
H. J. Bourne—English (Distinction)
Mathematics
Vv. C. Clarke—English, Mathematics
E. E. Millar—English
V. E. Neblett—Arithmetic, Mathematic
MODERN HIGH SCHOOL
Allan Clarke—-English.
Aurie Clarke—English.
C. Gilkes—Shorthand,
M. Gill—English, Mathematics
M. Johnson—Arithmetic,
S. Lynton—Mathematies.
G Proverbs—English,
distinction)
BE. Thompson—-English




GC. -
M. C
L. K

Cau Geography,

iMatheratic



R. Thompson—English
K. Walrond—English, Mathematics
PUPILS OF MRS, BALLANCE
BR Husbands YpPwFitingy
T. A. King, Shorthand, Typewriting
L. L. Smith—Shorthand (Distinction)
PUPIL OF MISS CLINTON
E. Gonzalez—Typewriting
PRIVATE
E. O. Maxwell—Book-keeping
A. Milla Arithmetic



Day, Women May

Spare Face

urgery is now being investigated,
2. To provide a new way of
studying how and why the skin

grows old,

The scientists propose to remove
patches of skin from young rab-
bits, store it, and graft it back on

when they are older.

They will then be able to study
the difference between the skin
which has aged naturally and that
whieh has been in a state of sus-

pended animation,

It may be that
xperts will
irl without

plug the theme
—who knows?—the
sateh on,

Up to Scratch

When you scratch the palms of
your hands to satisfy an itch you
strokes than
of

shorter
scratch

vse much
when you
your neck,

The

the back

reason:—The body

centration to sensitive nerve
endings in the skin.
Where nerve endings are com-

paratively in the

law ue
few, as

velief.

On the face, hands, and back of

the ankle where nerve endings
are numerous, a short scratch is
enough.

Don’t Listen . . .

future fashion

a spare complexion
will later lose her man.” And then
idea might

is di-
vided into long and short seratch-
ing areas depending on the con-

middle
of the back and on the upper arm,
» long seratch is needed to give

M.V. Caribbee
Fresh Fruit
Brings More

Another busy day was experi-
enced along the wharfside yester-
day. Responsible for this was the
arrival of the motor vessel Carib-
bee which hailed from Dominica
early in the morning with its
usual cargo of fresh fruit,

There was also the usual bust-
ling activity which is associated
with the landing of fresh fruit
Hawkers, who missed the previ-
ous day's landing from the Daer-
wooed made certain that they
would not suffer a second setback
and as a result, they eagerly as-
sisted the crew in the unloading

Work on beard the Marion Belle
Wolfe was of the same nature as
the previous day's. There was even
number of vehicles
alon ie the berth of
: m Thursday
» lorries were seen tc
vessel's side
wood
Simi! progress on
the schooner Gita M.. which was
berthed. immediately above the
Marion Belle Wolfe. This schoon-
er, however, was unloading a cargo
of cocoanut of] and cot which
t brought from Grenada Dn
Wednesday

NEW POST BOX













coal or









Quite recently, 2 post box has
been placed in Beckles Road. This
box will serve the residents of
the district as well as those of
neighbouring area of Chelsea

R




Formerly, residents had to walk
long distances to Dalkeith or to
town in order to post their letters,
and this move will doubtlessly be
welcomed by them.

GENERAL CARGO



The Harrison line steamship
Herdsman arrived in port yester-
day morning from Liverpool. The
Herdsman which brought a general
cargo of foodstuffs and medicine
to the island is under the com-
mand of Captain T. Steel and is
consigned to Da Costa & Co., Ltd.

CARGO OF RUM
me Ten arrival yesterday was
e 1i6-ton motor vessel O.K.
Service VII which arrived from
Halifax. The vessel, which is
under the command of Captain
Fr. H. Strum is consigend to Mar-
tin Doorly & Co., and came to the
island to load a cargo of rum.

UNLOADING COPRA



The Daerwood which arrived in
port on Wednesday from St. Lucia
‘was yesterday unloading its cargo
of copra which it brought to the
island. This shipment of copra is
consigned to the Barbados Co-
operative Cotton Factory, The
Naerwood also brought a cargo of

resh fruit which it unloaded the
‘revious day. The vessel is con-

rigned to the Schooner Owners’
Association.

TIME FOR BG.

nl cs

The schooner Frances W. Smith
was yesterday loading a quantity
©: lime which is being shipped by

anning & Co, This schooner
came off dock three days ago after

ndergoing general all-round re-
airs and repainting. The schooner
'; expected to sail for British
“ulana during the day,

‘ARGO FOR ST. LUCIA

The motor vessel Lady Joy left
| ort yesterday afternoon around 4
‘clock for St. Lucia.

She took a cargo of rum, soap,
\argarine and various other items
© the same port. The Lady Joy
_under the command of Captain

. Parsons and its local agents
ere are the Schooner Owners’
-\ssociation.

Another departure yesterday
fternoon. was the auxiliary
‘hooner Cyril E, Smith which left
‘ort for Grenada,

The cargo which it is earrying

» Grenada includes rum, mar-
,arine, and soap. The Cyril FE
“mith is also consigend to the
chooner Owners’ Association.

COAL AND FIREWOOD.





The schooner Everdene which
rrived from British Guiana on!
Chursday was yesterday discharg-
ng its eargo which was made up

chiefly of charcoal and firewood.

The Everdene is under the com-
mand of Captain E. Phillips and is

’

consigned to the Schooner Owners
\ssociation,



e
Preparing
MOSCOW, Novy, 7
Marshal Semyon
25th Anniversary of the
Bolshevik Revolution

Soviet Union,”
Marshal Stalin mounted

He raised his arm in greeting t
the crowds and massed
below but did not speak.
‘It is true the warmongers ar
dreaming of another war an
preparing for it’, Timoshenko 7(
vear-old
Union said following the inspec
tion. “They are stepping up thei
rms drive. For almost three year
now they have been waging
barbarous war against the Korea
people and are trying to incit
certain states against the Sovie
Union. Warmongers should how
ever know that the people of th:



A Good Tip

myself, neither you nor lI

ances of




Warmongers

Timoshenko
reviewing Russian troops on the
1917
accused.
Western “warmongers” of “trying
to incite certain states against the

the
Red Square rostrum outside the
Kremlin in the first snowfall ofp
the season to watch the annua
«a display of Soviet armed strengtt

troop

Marshal of the Sovie

wotld do not want war.”——U.P

'WYING to repay a debt, I sug-

gested on Tuesday that Eddie
Arcaro, visiting American jockey
should risk a dollar or two on
Richer, winner of the Cambridge-
shire at 100-6. If I had backed it
need
have worried about future appear-

8




QUEEN ELIZABETH fl, followed by her

QUEEN ELIZASETH VISITS NEW D

_

&

q

fF

the Duke of Edinburgh,

is shown on her way to inaugurate the new Claerwen Dam, largest of
its kind in Great Britain. The project was planned by the Queen’s great
srandfather, King Edward VII, nearly 50 years ago. With the Queen
is the Lord Mayor of Birmingham, W. T. Bowen. The Duke accompanies

ihe Lady Mayoress and the Lord of Breceshire.





House Tribute

(international)

MEMO FOR



Mr. J. F. Brathwaite DECEMBER 1

The House of Assembly passed
a Resolution of Sympathy yes-
ter@ay in respect of the death of
Mr. J. F. Brathwaite, Official
Reporter of the House of Assem-
bly, who died at his residence,
Quaker Road, yesterday morning.

A copy of the resolution will
be sent to Mr. Brathwaite’s
relatives.

The House stood in silence as
a token of respect to his passing.
Mr. G. H. Adams in moving the
Resolution said that it was tragi¢
in that a short time ago Mr
Brathwaite had lost his wife.

Mr. Brathwaite was a man, 39
years of age and leaves six
children to mourn him. He was
sure that the House would wish
to place on record sympathy to
his family and espécially to the
children at this grievous loss of
both parents in a short space of
time,

Mr. V. B. Vaughan said that
he was not privileged to have
known Mr, Brathwaite for long
but for the little time he had
known him he had found him an
agreeable person. He desired to
express that the loss to them
would be felt and it would be
fitting to place on record this
regrettable loss.

Mr, E. D. Mottley said it was #
sad occasion. Just about six
months ago he received a tele-
phone message from Mr, Brath-
waite that his better half had
passed away leaving him with
the children. His association
with Mr, Brathwaite had been
long before he went to the
Advocate never mind to the
House of Assembly. It was less
than a year that Mr, Brathwaite
succeeded Mr, Maynard as re-
porter of the House. His manner
and conduct and devotion to his
cuty made Mr. Brathwaite res-
pected not only by members of
this House but by those who
came into contact with him.

He felt that it was their
bounden duty to see that some-
thing be done for the children
he has left behind to mourn him.







oi

we :
& RINSO for all your

f

oa r fcr
50 YEARS AGO
(From the ‘Barbades Advocate’
of November 8th 1902)

With the hard weather for the
ast two months it goes without
saying that the cane crop will be
seriously crippled and that a
hort crop of sugar must be ex-
pected . I understand, on good
suthority, that in those parishes
which have had the best rainfall,
ome good canes are to be seen,
put that no parish has a regular
crop of canes and that on the
whole the island’s output of sugar
will not exceed — tons. by - 3
with the ex v prices for
ugar and melodia cannot fail
o intensify the distress of the
gricultural body and have a
very serious effect on the labour-
ing class.

All persons concerned in the
vell-being of the country, from
llis Exeeliency the Governor and
the Legislature to the Merchant,
have done the best that may be
done to keep alive the main in-
dustry of the island till better
days come. But when these ex-
pected better days will come and
when the dark cloud will pass
away and a_ brighter scene be
unfolded, is the question, which,
i fear, involves a problem very
difficult of solution,

It is true that the abolition of
bounties on Beet Sugar from the
Continent has been decided on
for next year, but it would seem
that a large and influential sec-
tion of the British people are
strongly opposed to the abolition
of the bounties, and are power-
fully influencing public opinion

to upset the decisions of the
Brussels Conference on that
question . Whether there is

sufficient influence at work to
nullify the decisions of the Con-
ference or whether those decis-
ions will be steadfastly adhered
to is not possible to say with any
degree of accuracy. It is a fact,
however, that public opinion in
England on the question of the

WASHES
Brighter!) Quicker!
Easier! |



i canals

abolition of the bounties, is by
no means
owing to motives of self interest
a large and influential
are

(By CHAPMAN PINCHER)

Next time you see the full
moon* lift your hand in front of
your eyes and try to pinch the
moon between your finger and
thumb, It will immediately
appear to shrink to about half its
size.

Then look at it through a tube
made from a rolled-up sheet of
paper. Again it will shrink.

Looking at the moon through
i Mirror, or bending over so that
you see it through your legs,
produces the same result.

Dr. Edwin Boring, a U.S. scien-
tist, has carried out experiments
to explain these illusions after
centuries of argument have failed
to clear up the mystery.

He found that the size of the
moon you “see” depends on the
position of your eyes in their

sockets. The moon seems biggest
when it is viewed with the eyes

pecring straight ahead. Raising
or lowering the eyes results in
shrinking. {

This helps to explain why the|
moon looks bigg@st when it is low!
on the horizon. }

Automatic |
But it must be the brain, notj|
the eye, which is really the trick~}
ster. Think of it this way: |
If you look down at a street!
from a skyscraper, a passing car |
will look like a toy. Yet if you
look at the same car from the same |
distance on the ground, it will not
seem so small. 5
The image which the car makes
on your eye must be the same at
both distances, yet the brain alters
it to give you a sensation of height
when you are on top of a building.
It seems the brain automatically
makes this adjustment when your
eyes move up or down in their!
sockets, |
But there must be more to the
moon illusion than this. For the
explanation does not account for
the fact that people who have only
one eye see the moon the same
size whichever way they look at}
it. —L.E.S. '

use Rinso—always.

S P use in
=) Idee Ese hines
Ww 2 i
—a_ , = and for washing

dishes 00+

« .

_X-R 254-°225-50



there is
body
determined to contest the meas-
To which side the victory
will fall is not yet clear, but we
sincerely hope
bounties
British Government will see the
expediency of imposing counter-
on Beet Sugar
so come to the
rescue of the West Indian plant-
ers, There is no increase of cases
of small pox and that the epi-
abated

ure,

vailing
bounty fed and

demic
seems conclusive.

Your coloured clothes are so much brighter—
and whites whiter, too—when you use Rinso.
Rinso is so easy to use, and so gentle—its rich
lather floats out the dirt thoroughly, without
harm to the fabric. For better, brighter results

unanimous

of merchants who

that
not be abolished,

duties

has considerably



Rolex Watches

LOUIS L. BAYLEY
Bolton Lane



On cuts

or scratches

that may fester

apply
‘DETTOL

RRGD
ANTISEPTIC

Trusted by
Doctors.
The safe way
to safety

in every home!







=

wash /

Â¥

and that

should the
the





SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1952



| To keen















































Chech your requirements for
the following =-



Vittle busy bodies”
fit and active...

give them HALIBORANGE
every day

‘THERE'S NOTHING LIKE IT for building

up reserves of vital energy, promoting

healthy growth, strong bones and teeth
— and resistance to illness.

Made from purest halibut oil, cleverly blended

with the juice of ripe oranges, it is rich in

Vitamins A and D and ao delicious in taste that
the most finicky youngster takes
it with delight.
Incidentally, it’s fine for grown-
ups too!

-Haliborange

THE NICEST WAY OF TAKING HALIBUT OIL








Made in England by :

ALLEN & HANBURYS LTD., LONDON, E.2



F you’re really out to conquer a cough—to get to the root

I of it and destroy the germ—then ask for Famel Syrup.
Why? Because Famel Syrup does so much more than
ordinary cough mixtures. It contains soluble lactocreosote
which is carried by the bloodstream to the throat and lungs
and breathing passages, where it destroys the germs which
cause the trouble.
Once the germs are destroyed then it’s goodbye to the cough
or cold. Meanwhile, the soothing balsams in Famel Syrup
are vasing the irritated membranes and the tonic minerals
are keeping up your strength and powers of resistance.
Famel Syrup is a recognised medical product used for coughs,
colds, influenza and bronchial troubles. It is widely recom-
mended by Doctors. Hospitals and Sanatoria.

FAMEL SYRUP

Obtainable in two sizes—from ali chemasts or sores

Trade enquiries to :~-
Frank B. Armstrong Ltd.
BRIDGETOWN.



for
Inspection
time!

Tyres & Tubes (Goodyear)
Brake Lining Sets

Hydraulic Brake Parts
Decarbonising Gasket Sets
Main and Connecting Rod Bearings
Piston & Ring Sets °

Lighting & Ignition Cables
Duralife Batteries (6 & 12 Volt)
Lacquers & Thinners

Green Birkmyre Canvas

Rear View Mirrors

Radiator Hose

A C Sparking Plugs

A C Fuel Pump Diaphrams
NU-Swift Fire Extinguishers
Tyre Valves and Gauges

Ete., Etc., Etc,

Select your requirements now =

STOP AT
COURTESY GARAGE

(ROBERT THOM LIMITED)

> Dial 4391 White Park Road

;


| DISCUSSION

ad

‘
q

forces of Labour.



So far twelve members have

G. H. Adams, A, E. S. Lewis, J.

E. D. Mottley, J. C. Mottley,
L. A. Williams, R. G. Mapp, F.
E. Miller and C. E. Talma,

Consideration of the Plan con-
tinues next Tuesday,

; Mr. R. G. Mapp (L) who began
‘his speech on Thursday night
said that it had been admitted

on all sides that economic plan-

ning was a vital necessity if the

Government was to solve the

manifold problems confronting it.

_) There was no doubt that if they

~ were to carry out the various so-

A tim schemes promised at election

ab
i



time and advance the standard of
living of the people then they
ip had to develop the economic re-
sources of the people.
4 They had had some planning in
‘the past and there was the ten-
year plan, but nothing came out
of it. That plan contained some
‘admirable suggestions which, if
they had been implemented, would
have done much to strengthen the
_ Asland’s economy. The Committee
which issued the report had re-
commended such things as the
production of fertilisers, animal
feed and other products from
sugar factory waste. It had also
‘strongly recommended irrigation
measures topincrease production of
Bugar cane and food.

“Too Little, Too Late”

He qpoted from the «cport and
said that had those recommenda-
tions been implemented, the
Island would have benetited con-
siderably, Instead, all such ad-
vance had been spasmodic, and
it was simply a case of “too little
and too late” all over again.

He said that the Leader of the
House had said that the plan was
a consequence of the development
of the party system and was the
rl institution of the policy of the
; Labour party. He felt that the his-
j tory of this Island should lead
them to see that constitutional
Advancement and economic de-
velopment went hand in hand.
They should take, for example,
_the case of the pottery industry at
Lancaster. They had brought out
@n expert at great expense, and

had recommended that the
Tishea: industry could be estab-*

\

hed. The House had passed a
solution to set up such an in-
aestry. but it had been lost in
e Other Place. Recently, it was
Well known that a former local
Official had been sent to England
by some local businessmen so
that he could advise on the pos-
bilities of their establishing a
lant to make tiles etc., out of

clay.
Serious Matter
i. It was a serious matter that
the interest of the people of this
olony should be so sacrificed
ause of selfish interests. The
evelopment of a tile and brick
dustry would not only lead to
rther employment in the colony
it would be a means of utilising
local product and making them
dependent on imports. | He
no doubt that because such
industry might pose a serious
threat to commercial enterprise
every attempt was made to stifle
it.
‘ He said that to make jt clear
how necessary it was fr Gov-
_ ernment to use its power. or get
_ the necessary power so as to push
such schemes through, he hoped
that Government would make
clear to the Development Board
which it was proposed to set up
that that industry should be
given priority, and pushed for all
it was worth, It was one of the
schemes which the party had
promised they would carry out
if returned to power.

He pointed out that the plan
was partly one of development
and partly one which set out and

» made provision for certain capital
estimates which, would be on~
dinarily incurr for the next
’ five years by th@ several depart-

» ments. The proposals outlined on
_ page 3, paragraph 11 of the plan,

constituted the real economic

planning which the Government
was proposing. They were: de-
velopment of water resources and
- its distribution; experiments and
’ research in irrigation of sugar
and other crops; encouragement
of food production and develop-
ment of agricultural schemes; en-
couragement of the tourist indus~
try; and establishment of a Bar-
bados Development Board to as-
sist in development of secondary
industries

Value Obscured

It was indeeg unfortunate that
the other proposals, which were
mostly ordinary budgetary re-
current items, and the fiscal pro-
posals, which he would deal with
later, had to a great extent ob-
scured the value behind that part
of the plan, Those schemes he
would show followed closely the
suggestions for economic devel-
opment contained in the Beasley
Survey and were measures which
they had promis}d in their Elec-
, tion Manifesto to carry out. It
ak was a pity because it was only
through the carrying out of such
a development plan that this
Island could progress to the ex-









tent which they had promised ;
They could not build bricks
without straw, and it was ele-

mentary that Barbados could not
extend its social services unless







SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1952



CONTINUES

ON TUESDAY

As debate on Government’s proposals for a Five Year
Plan of Capital Expenditure and Taxation entered its fifth
day at the House of Assembly yesterday, Labour members
Mr. F. E. Miller and Mr. C. E. Talma said that though the
Plan was not as ambitious as it might have been, members Previous day, Mr, R. G. Mapp said it in parts.
who claimed that there was nothing in the Plan were only =
staging a political intrigue with a view to splitting the in

‘.

Mr. Talma accused the Conservative element of “trying
to obtain votes on false pretences, by putting up a similar
manifestu to that of the Labour Party,” and said that no misunderstanding about certain of try their only hope. They were in
conservative conspiracy could overthrow the Labour Gov-
ernment, which had enough brains to overcome any plot or
scheme by the Conservatives.

diture.

for the development of the

duction as among the most press-
ing and important of their needs.
He had already stressed the ne-
cessity for the greater production
of local foodstuffs and the less-
ening of imports in this respect.
It would strengthen their econo-
my and considerably cheapen the
cost of living. At present, it was
true to say that most of the
workingman’s wages was spent
on foodstuffs, and it was abso-
lutely necessary that such
schemes should be pushed to the
limit and at the earliest possible
time. The Marketing scheme of

course followed closely upon
greater food production,
Teurist Industry
He then referred to the en-

couragement of the tourist in-
dustry and said that the Memo-
randum did not mention any
specific proposals in this respect.
He hoped the Government would
watch carefully any schemes put
up by hotel owners and would
try to get a quid pro quo in giv-
ing them assistance. They were
assisting private enterprise and
pioneer industries, but the Island
was not benefiting to the extent
it should. After all, most of the
dollars and other currencies
brought in by tourists went into
the pockets of hotel owners and
merchants, Prof. Beasley had re-
commended that “luxury” items
in perfumery and cosmetics
should be taxed much _ higher
than they were at present. Those
were
tourists, and the Professor had
stated that “this item was re-
served owing to a difference of
opinion in the Commission
whether such goods should be
highly taxed as being luxuries or
lowly taxed to attract tourists.
If liquor duties are raised it
would be inconsistent to retain
low duties on perfumery”’.

He said he hoped the Govern-
ment had not decided against this
proposal because of the fear that
it would hurt the tourist indus-

try. Other countries tried to get Say they had free secondary edu- the masses, and he appealed to tpy,

the most out of visitors, and even
Trinidad, until businessmen pro-
tested, had imposed a head tax
on Venezuelang. These ‘tourists
found that such items were com-
paratively cheap in Barbados,
especially compared with similar
things in their homeland, and
the Government should get as
much revenue as possible from
them

Development Board

Speaking on the Development
Board proposal, Mr. Mapp said
he supposed it would be modelled
on the set-up in Jamaica. He
hoped that the personnel of the
Board would be carefully chosen.
There were many people with
little knowledge of industrial
know-how, who were tied to old
commercial lines as existed in
this colony whom they should
avoid putting on such a Board.

He felt however that they
coulqd not make much headway
with industrialisation until they
attended to their electric power.
Something must be done about
the Electric power and he
noticed that Grenada had recent-
ly floated a loan for just over 1%
million dollars for schemes, in-
cluded in which was the provis-
ion of electric power. It was
time that they made uv their
minds what they would do in
that respect. They had promised
their constituents, from St. Lucy
to St, Thomas to provide them
with electricity and lighten their
darkness, and it was a_ serious
thing that they could not yet
carry out their promises in that
respect. He hoped that the
Leader of the House would find

out something from the Colonial”

Office concerning the Control of
Public Utilities Bill.

With reference to New Offices
and Parliament Buildings, Mr.
Mapp said that while it was a good
idea to utilise the waste land at
Government House in arder to
provide offices, he did not think
that Parliament Buildings were a
priority. They could well wait
some years as they were quite
comfortable where the
he felt that such buildings would
not be ideally situated aback Gov-
ernment House. Parliament
Buildings should be situated near
the City. He would prefer to go
to Queen’s Park as he had soon
suggested. He agreed with mak-
ing use of some of the 10 or 14
acres of land at Government
House and they should start a
housing scheme there. The place
was really too large and really
suited the old colonial times, but
hardly these enlightened days.

Proposed Schemes

Mr. Mapp them made reference
to the proposed schemes which he
said were to be financed from
available funds, They were simply
five years of departmental schemes
brought up at this time and cut
down in accordance with the re-
current income which the Gov~-
ernment’estimated it could obtain
in that period. Most of these
schemes really should not enter
into a five-year’ plan and he
would comment briefly on some of
them.

Making reference to education,
Mr. Mapp said that all of the
schools in St. Thomas were in need
of playing-fields and he felt that
provision should be made for a
new school for Welches. There
was not one school in that parish
with proper provision for recrea-

productive schemes were insti- tion He felt that the Island was
© tuted from which revenue could pot getting the full returns it
© be obtained. should for the money being spent
% At that stage, Mr. Mapp education. Proper direction
he would deal briefly wit! , eriously lacking, and he pro-
of the schemes of cap posed later to show that such
a L's a clade . Bei tis

were and -



BARBADOS

ADVOCATE



things as the provision of a so- to 1948-49, If they really exam-
called modern secondary school— ine. the Plan they would see many
or what was really a post-primary f the tables had been brought up
school—at Richmond were absurd to date and some did not reach
and could not be defended. There 195¢
was no plan about the whole affair fhe Report was a work of a
at all. genius, but no Government could
_ Mr, Mapp then moved the ad- regard it other than as a guide.
journment of the House until yes- So it was for the reason that it
terday. was not up to date that the Gov-
Continuing his address from the ernment had been forced to ignore
Added to that, in pre-
at the plan went short of: what paring it, it was not for Beasky
embers of the Labour Party had to see any squalor there might be
ming when they wrote the in the back districts of the island.
Party’s manifesto, But what he was most concern-
But there was to his view a great ed about was the development
number of criticisms which were side, He wanted to see the Gov-
misleading and there was wide ernment seeing in the sugar indus-

the proposals, an awkward position with their
It was in the finances of the sugar when they considered the
an that they found that the Gov- situation with sugar in the world
ernment had departed from some at present. They could not but

He would say at the out- of the suggestions of the Beasley feel apprehension when when they
taken part in the debate; Messrs. set that he regarded the plans survey.

Cuba had to curtail

noticed that
That, he

Everyone knew that Barbados production of sugar.

- £. T. Brancker, V. B. Vaughan, Island water resources, irrigation was lacking in resources, had to thought, was a threat,
W. A. Crawford, O. T. Allder, amd encouragement of food pro- depend on one crop and there

Regrettable

Mr. Miller said that it was re-
be told that there

for the proposed
harbour. It was

should widen the basis of their
economy and produce a scheme so
that they could plan their budget
for future years for the things gsrettable to
they wished. That was element- was no hope
ary. But the economic side of the deep water
planning was not in keeping with necessary for the island to have
the Reasley suggestions, a deep water lage ee 9 but the
. Government was told that it was
Diestablishment of Church jmpossible to get the required
He said he agreed entire'y with joan to make tnis project possi-
the honourable member who said ple. The Leader of the House

that the Church should be dis- av sa .
established and revenue got from —— ra bstegg Mind ana
that source. The Church was noth- 585° o learn after year

ing but a privileged body. He dia Hoping that a loan was not
not think anybody would dispute Possible. i

the fact that there were leaders A deep water harbour would

of the Church like Bishop Hughes provide work for many and
who knew what he was talking Would also ease the unemploy-
about when he suggested disestab- ment which is so marked today.
lishment of the Church, Barbados would also become

If they disendowed the Church, important as regards to shipping.

they would have more money to Speaking about oil in the
better the conditions of the people island, Mr. Miller said that the
of the island, Gulf Oil Company was now

He was not speaking against the carrying out experiments in the
Church as a stablising influence in jsland. There is some induce-
the community, but the people ment, for this Company would
would get more out of it disestab- not be spending so much money
lished. He did not see why the . Ke

on drilling and other operations.
Church of England in Barbados Shoul il be struck, th the
should remain established, Bar- pula pe eee a a}
bados, as they had already been House should hold —
reminded, was the only colony â„¢eeting. ;
with an established Church, .Touching on pig breeding, Mr.

They would find that there Miller said that Barbados is a
would be a great spiritual ad- pig rearing country and this
vancement and social benefits to scheme should be developed fully.
be derived from disestablishment Wherever they go, they would
of the Church. see people — keeping pigs. Pig

As a previous speaker had said, breeding would do much for the

a

items bought chiefly by the priests were living off the fat island and he was convinced that has been called.”

of the land, and anybody who got if the scheme were developed,

in the habit of living on the fat aj) the needs of the island in this


sedate even to practise their ide- 3

ologies well, They should let these sstndiok’ aietan te ace

people awake to the facts. They t).6 p) aoe tempt a “political

should the more realise this when ; rd ep ae Sie ad Pe niente

they wanted to establish demo- itrigue,” and assured members

cratic socialism. of the opposition that there “is
He knew that everything had to ° split in the ranks of the

take its course, but he would look Labour Party.

forward to see disestablishment It was not true to say that by

with Ministerial status. increasing the price of rum and
He said that it was absurd to cigarettes they would pauperise

cation when in fact there was no honourable members to be very
free secondary education. There careful in their decisions.

was no secondary education atthe The Labour Party, he said,
cecil eat’ Waenecter daeitien would Stand or fall on the pro-
and thay should say 00, Tt was posals contained in the memor-

weet say it = sononsesy andum,

when it was not; it carrie e

same age limit and little change Full Agreement

in the te of Cumeenee. Mr. ©. E. Talma (L) said i!

He believed if Government re-
vised'their system, they would get
more benefits for the money they

was the fizét time in the history
of the island that a plan of any

sort had been tabled in that

Wee Spaeeins 08 Tet ee that Chamber, and it was for that
though the national income had Very good reason that he agreed
been better distributed due to With the principles contained in
the Labour Party, no great dif- the memorandum. Today, there
ference had been made in the was a new Government in power,
standard of living of the people and it was only natural that «
as a whole, plan of some nature’ should be
The Plan would help the masses framed and implemented as ex-
if the Government saw to it. peditiously as possible. He there-

fore hoped that the plan would
Government Plan not be shelved, but that it would,

Mr. F. E, Miller (L) said that us
= va teere he te, — it ae a er |
clear that he was never satisfied ile i oni
with the principles of the budget ,, While admitting that the plin |
in the past.and had since express- was not as ambitious as it might |
ed his dissatisfaction with the have been, Mr. Talma said that,
Plan before them. He would dub it was only natural with limited |
it conservative, resources that all the proposals

What was wrong with the Plan contained in the party’s mani-
as he saw it was that Government festo could not be included in
did not seem to be bold enough any one five year plan.
to bring what not only the mem- He asked what of the proposals
bers of the House but also the pub- contained in the memorandum
lic expected, It was hard to say could any member who went to
it, but it was very true—the Plan the House on the popular vote
was very conservative. disagree with, and added “if he

He said that he had repeatedly fails to agree with the proposals
suggested to the Government to set out in the. scheme, he was
create a bank. They should change voting against progress and ad-
the banking policy and provide a yancement. "
eae} aa ig A orenanet He thought that one of the
time they could aut hiean ei first Considerations in a plan of
ment. Actually, i¢ was. not too the sort should be a scheme for
mnueh 45 say that they could start land reform under which planta-
their harbour scheme on that “on owners might keep for
strength, themselves the first 100 or 200

There was too the question of @¢Tes of land, and the remainder
nationalisation and gas. be worked on a

The Beasley report was out of basis between the management
date and no Government in 1952 and labour.
could make any plans on that re- He referred

to the similarity

port. That report was restricted in the proposals contained in the











DRINK “PETER’S” COCOA HOT OR COLD
THE ONLY COCOA WORTH ITS WEIGHT IN GOLD
IT GIVES YOU SUCH LOTS OF ENERGY

TO BEAR THE ANXIETY AND STRAIN

OF WATCHING YOUR FAVOURITE HORSE
WHETHER IT BRINGS YOU LOSS OR GAIN
TAKE IT WITH YOU TO THE RACES TO-DAY _
IT WILL BRING YOU LUCK IN EVERYWAY



THIS IS A NESTLE’S PRODUCT

% Ib. tin only 24 certs

14 Ib. tin only 48 cents

og SSS

co-operative |



PAGE SEVEN



House Discuss Five Year Plan For 5th Day

j
manifesto of the two major The deep water harbour was a/
parties, and said that never until Scheme which the conservatives |
there was adult suffrage did one had never attempted. Although if}
find manifestos almost identical S¥ch a scheme were carried’ out,
in principle. it would provide employment for|



: people for a long time, yet it!
False Pretences would be more beneficial to the
He accused merchants and the hotel propri- |

\ the Conservatives etors
of trying to obtain votes ‘by “When Barbados
alse pretences by putting up a second Bermuda, the cost of living
oC similar to that of the will no doubt coe oF ae
our Party, and added that majority of the population in the
generally speaking, there were jsland will suffer.”
a points in the plan which He said that he was not against
they must necessarily agree with. a harbour scheme, but it did not
The only bone of contention was form part of his platform and the |
the question of taxation as a re- Government did not have it in|
sult of which the man in the its manifesto because the needs of
street was being asked to pay a the smaller man were thought of
little more for his rum and first.
cigarettes, and an increase ~ in Referring
the cost of living. He argued Road he said
however that now ‘that there was Conservative
adult suffrage, it was only
natural that with that privilege,
the public should share a little
of the responsibility of providing
the amenities of life and improv-
ing the social condition of the

becomes a

to the East Coast
that was another |
plan. There’ were|
dozens of tenantry roads all over |
the island which needed repair |
and he did not see the necessity |
for building the East Coast Road |
just for the benefit of one indivi- |
dual who owned land in that dis- |
‘trict.

masses. However, he was not in
Sal of any excessive increase. Duty On Rum
e agreed that there were With regard to the increase on
cn in the plan, but he the duty of rum, he felt that it
ught that such defects were was somewhat excessive. If ther¢
by of being too conservative, was not so much unemployment,
and was not a plan of real left- the people would not feet it so

wing specialists.

Long Speeches
He thought that the long
speeches made against the plan
ee ey aes playing te wiches for his midday meal. If
“omnis coindien i at they they increased the cost of rum
tueee, ond Glen Sie ae excessively, it would mean that
they should try to do something cheitere Were: wad oe lean

much, Very few middle class
people could afford two meals a
day and the average artisan would
have a drink or two in addition to
a smoke and a couple of sand-

4 @ therefore there would be less
constructive rather than just try ‘revenue. Pon eS a
o ris 7 ;

criticise, Mr. Talma said that he hoped

b = the question of education, it was not too late for the Leader
bs t oe that instead of having of the House if he realised that he
oe churches closed all through had made a mistake that the in-
© week, they might be opened crease on the rum was too excess-
to accommodate children for ive, to make a special note and
whom more schools were needed. have the price decreased, He
He said that the members who added that every rum shop in the
said they did not see the neces- island, was the poor man’s club
sity for increased taxation to as he usually visited such a place
finance the plan, did not want to to have a couple of drinks to for-
see anything progressive done, get his worries.
and were of the same old con- With regard to the question of
servative spirit. In his view, lotteries, he felt that if the Com-
nothing new could be done with- missioner of Police was allowed
out — taxation and increased to run one for the benefit of the
revenue. Boys’ and Girls’ Clubs, he saw no
He accused the opposition of reason why the Government could
trying to cause confusion in the not run one weekly as was done
ranks of the working class peo- in South America Such a scheme
ple, but added that “their bluff would be a good one whereby new
sources of revenue would be cre-

7 ‘i ated.
Conservative Conspiracy ‘
s Conservative Survey
e said that any one who had ; sasley’s
been associated with the Sabour As far as Professor Beasley's

Fiscal Survey was concerned, Mr.
'Talma said that it had not touched
on the problems of the island as
far as the Labour Party was con-
cerned, It was purely a conserv-
lative survey and had nothing on
which the Labour Party could base
their plans. Professor Beasley told
them in his report of the hard-
ships which were around the
corner and reminded them of their
one crop economy.

movement for the past 14 or 15
years would realise that no con-
servative conspiracy could over-
throw the Labour Government,
and added “the Labour Party has
enough brains and decency to
surprise the island and overcome
the plots and schemes of the con-
servative element of the coun-



" 7 ane eens not to
ac own from their promises still sneakin#
to provide more houses for work- ek ana = adiourned
ers, and suggested that instead of jintil Tuesday next at 3 o’e'gck in
spending money on a new Parlia- the afternoon when consideration
ment building, they should use| oF the plan would be resumed.
the money in housing schemes in
the parishes. just outside the
metropolitan area,

He was not satisfied with
efforts which were being

High Blood Pressure

the
made

in regard to the question of im- ©
migration, and said that a liaison Ki 5 en é& omen
officer should be appointed Twice as many women as men suf

Barbados to investigate the pos- lood Prescure, yon
sibilities of immigration. | about the time of Change of Life and
He had also hoped to see 4] jg thereal cause of muc east trouble
fishing industry and fish canning | and later on of paralytic strokes. Com-
industry in the plan, and in re-| Sieg SYODtEeND Me eeee eadaahes at
gard to the question of the deep | top and back of head and above eyes,
water harbour said that while it | pressure is mend dissinens, | eros
was a necessity, there was the | reath, paine ip near. Pade r

question of cost which had to be |

}

'

fer from High

|
by
| is a mysterious dise






easily excited, fear and worry. If you
suffer any of these symptoms, don't
delay treatment a single day, because
your ite mey be in near Semee
(former nown as Hynox),

medical discovery, reduces High Blood
Pressure with the firat dose, takes &

poor sleep, loss of memory and energy,
taken into consideration.

Mr. Talma said that it was all |
right to talk about a deep wate:
harbour, but where was the money



to come from. He did not think | 4 load off the heart, and makes
ihey should take six million dol- | ou feel years younger in a few days.
lars from the Treasury to build a | Get Nexce from your chemist y

deep water harbour and then close | baa '.

their eyes to the other schemes. |



eRe Oto Se

Shoes a

For the whole Family!



ROWN LEATHER
BLACK PATENT
WHITE SUEDE

$3.40
$3.95
$4.90



=> '

emcees

\

\






for Quality
and Value

BUY A BOTTLE TODAY!





from all points of view -

the worlds BIGGEST
small-car buy!

Morris Minor inside and out
aad you will agree that it ie big
beyond belief. Comfortable
seating for four and 7 cubic
feet of luggage space.

Here is a small car listing many
of the features that are “ high-
lighted” in big car specifica-
tions. Torsion-bar independent
front-wheel suspension; body
and chassis built as one enit on
the modern“ Mono-eonstruc-
tion” principle; Leckheed
hydrawlic brakes; four-speed

Avaliable in three modes:
Four-door, Two-door Saloon,
and Convertible, Let as take .

BIG — beyond belief !

FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD.

bay o “ Miner”—bhew auch &
Phone 2385 Sole Distributors





Phone 4504



BATTERIES

© Faster Starting
© Longer Life
© More Power

At your (Esso: serwice Station
PAGE EIGHT

CLASSIFIED ADS.|_*

piece ape





















































































by warned against
‘ to wife Kitchura
TELEPHONE 2506 Harewood 2ee McCollin) as 1 do not
oe ——$$——___— | hold myself responsible for her or any-
i . J 2 \< © else contracting an debt or debts
BIRTH FOR SALE me unless by a ‘written onder
quand - éignea by me
BOPPIN—On Thursda per 6h | PRINCE HAREWOOD,
19%, io M ice Topp i | Sealy Hall, ,
Maxwells, Christ er son ; St. Johr
7 AUTOMOTIVE #.11.52—2n
DIED a Eee - | The public are hereby warned against
ane der 4000. Pek good as new.! giving credit to my wife Rosie Thomas
et et ileage under 3y elephone 2949 (nee Powitt) as I do not hold self
BRATHWAITE— James Francis Brath. 4.11.52-—t.{.n. | responsible sor her os anyone tn oak
waite, late assistant offic ial_reporte of ~—— tracting any debt or debts in my mame
the House of Assembly. The funeral CAR--One standard 8 HL.P. 1947 model./uniess by a written order signed by
will leave his late residence Quakers’[ Tyres and Battery new. Dial 4465 on | me
Road, Carrincton's Village, st 4.30 p.m. J brid and 2582 Saturday and Sunday J THOMAS,
to-day for the Pilgrim Holiness Church, 7.11. 52—3n Pilgrim Seas,
Bridge Road, and thence to the West- al on name eemapeenepentebetea =e:
bury Cemetery, Friends are asked to ELECTRIC
ate aL :
Louis, Rudolph, Rawle, Harcourt BLECTRIC LIGHTING o— ANTS—2.7
(sons), Lendouise nd Do yb AG i 3,70
(daughters), Olga Asaill cm KVA complete 90/120 Volts 3 Phase AC Lost a FOUND
ip-taw), Violet Atkins and Fra $400) Petrol engine -Diat 4616, Courtesy
Brath waite (aunts) Garage 5.11,.52-—0n
8.12.52
ae at Np FRIGIDAIRE—One Canadian, 7 cubit LOST
IN MEMORIA Dial 3312 or Fmd fo On 7.11.52—3n
M SWEEPSTAKE TICKET Series V.88st.
ELEC TRIC LECTRIC REFRIGERATOR —Two (2) ~Two (2)|HH.7180_ Finder please return same to
BARKER — In treasured and fadeles osley Shelvador of U.S.A. Manufacture | Luther Pilgtim C/o Harrisons Hardware
memory of our beloved wife with 5 year guarantee 7.5 c, ft. capacity. "Dept. Dial 2384 8.11. 58—1n.
mother who passed to the great beyc urte Garage Dial 4616 {— oe ———
on November 8th 1950 5.11 .52—6n. TICKETS—Lost Tiekets Series V.2428-—
Always to be remembered by ———-- | 1962. Autumn Meeting. Series V 2428,
Vivian__Barke (husband), Tony “LISTER LIGHTING (ISTER LIGHTING PLANTS” 2.5| 2421952. Mrs. Hilda Dottin, Rockley
Pedro (sons), Rita (daughter 8.11.52—In mf , driven by “Lister Diese! Engines”
Senetiah a ly to
o MASE gn sacred memory of our Dear RE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LE&EMITED. . ¥ =
Mother Esther Maria Chase who de. «shite Park, Phone 4040, girs on |e LIC NOTICES
parted this life on 7th November 10 Somantaals ——
Loy ae they say, RADIOGRAM 1 H.M.V. Radio-
May be it does, ram. With 3 speed automatic Record 5
Memory liv on and so does love hanger. Sen at Manning Blectrical The enti NOTICE
Down Jn hearts you're living | Dept 8.12.52—6n. | pipe, entries for the Poultry and
t { ib abet ne noe ora, wa be taken by Mr.
We | PICK UP-—One Austin 12 h.p. 1940 a wards, Jones & Swin Pro-
odel, hanically sound Owner Guee bees Hinek Street
The Chase in [ aving island. Nearest offer to $350.00 UDLEY MB BamAr..
Apply: Jones’ Garage, opposite Reed St., Secretary.
— axters Road 8.11.52—1n 7.11.$2—2n
me manery of inst” ——————————————
dear beloved husband Emmanuel Chris ‘| bee TURAL RANK ACT oo a
tian, who died on November 8th 1960 | . .
I do not need a special day | LIVESTOCK Te a? creditors holding specialty liens
To bring you to my mind, against Haymans and Warleigh Planta-
The day | do not think of you a Chae Goa ARG. C.| OT tions, St. Peter.
Is very hard to find 1 HORSE, CART and HARNESS. ~ AKE NOTICE that we, the Trustees
Ever to be remembered by Lili Herbert, 55 Tudor St. City. of the above Plantations are about to



(wife) 8.11 9.11.52-2n. obtain a loan of £3,000 under the pro-

visions of the above Act against ie



Christian Goodridge

“CALVES—At Kingsland Dairy, Heifer





















To those you all loved both Poi

their best yo ee

Martin ia
ih. 52—2n



3 1 lov » of eur said Plantations, in respect of the Agri-
wi hasinae Mrs. Christina ie Calves 10 days old, Dial 6325 cultural year 1952 to 1956.
who fell asleep on Nov. 8, ine, $.21.52—2n £6,000 has been already borrowed)
“As long as life and memeory in respect of such year.
We shall remember thee COW--One Heifer Cow 90 pts, of milk, Dated this Ith day of November, 1952.
Eryl Heory, Myr! Redman, (doug resh, Apply: Israel Clark, St. Martins, T. A. GITTENS
ters), Doyle, Ebert, Alden, Granville 1. Philip 8.11.52-—2n and
Vernon Hinds, (Sens), Lincoln Henr) Rh. CHALLENOR
Eric Redman (sons-in-law), Violeta] ONB MULE and CART. Apply H. A —Trustees.
Hinds, Germaine Hinds (daughters-in Gulstone & Co., Lid., 37 Roebuck Street. per C. R. PACKER
law). 8.11.52--In. | Dial 3664, 6. 1. 52-3 —Attorney.
—— — ood 7.11.92—3n,
HOPE — In loving memory of our Dear en
father and mother Howard Aussie MECHANICAL NOTICE
Hope. Died on 8th of November FAN MILL-—8 ft. with Pu ly Neither the Master nor the Consignee
seein ibe en oe a Norman Alleyne, Green bien Wothing vot be responsible for any debt or
Sleep on ‘dear ones you both task View 8.11.52--2n M. v. ae can by am crew of the
is over, aa5 an anita rr rier Role eae service uring her stay in
You both hands can toll no more | .nie trom Stock im various carriage H. S. STRUM, Capt



























God grant ed''py: Vera eternal es ans 157 — $203.00
Ever remembere: iy a an
family. Tre ID. |» see ar te s. NOTICE
ta tees Oe eR & Co, THE PARISH OF ST. JOSEPH
—_ a . 28.9.52—t.t WHI those persons owing Taxes to the
FOR RENT we *.£.0. | Parish of St. Joseph, please pay same
: SEWING MACHINE —One Singer Sew- ee an a: aed
sai ing hand achine in good order, also i ?
one bs Vacuum Cleaner, very little Parochial Be Toni
used. al 4304, - §2—2n F ’
HOUSES a dabasinlllnnt ies 8.11.68—4n
““BROWNSLOWE’ — Black Rock Draw- f t 2
ing and Dining Room, 5 bedrooms oe MISCELLANEOUS PURLIC SALES
all other conveniences. Dial 01-21. D. , Rarer emreveeve?
Browne Prospect, St. James CAMERA One Zeins Ikon with 3.5















11.52—t.4.n. | Tessar Lens and Compur Rapid Shutter
: Phat cane With speeds from 1 sec. to 1/500th sec REAL ESTATE
FLAT . & HOUSE fully furnished in exeellent condition, with case. Price | ———————-
St. Lawrence On-Sea. Phone 03 £9.00 Contact Mr. Shannon, C/o Knights LAND-—Approximately 10 spots 50 x 60
29.5 fy I 7.11.52.3n.]} ft. No reasonable offer refused. For
na se ~ ——---_----- —--- oe — | further particulars apply: Norman
FARAWAY Fully furnished 3. bed CAMERA One Bell and Howell] Alleyne, Green Dykes, Worthing View
room house, St, Philip coast. Lighting |}® ™.M. Movie Filmo Sportster, With 8.11.52-—2n
plant, Watermill supply. Carport, 2.8 lens in. good condition, with case. |] —— bbecanet tie aaehterk
Servant rooms. Monthly rent $60 plus Price $200.00 or nearest. Contact Mr. LAND—(5) five spots of land for sale
$3 cleansing charge, IN ADVANCE, Dia’ Shannon, C/o Knights Ltd at Flagg Staff Rd, Clapham, St. Michael.
4476 1.11.52—t.f.n -7.11.52-3n. | Apply to C, St, Hill, Cosmopolitan Gar-



age, Magazine Lane. Dial 3915.

CANE PLANTS — 645151 and B4744, 6.11,52—3n

————
‘oO OR FLAT—Furnished House or
tle two (2) e Cane Plants at Gets. per

Plat with 2 or 3 Pedrooms for. long term












































































































































BARBADOS ADVOCATE





Fifty Tons erry Gooding RED COMRADE ACCUSED

From page 4

chool had begun
heart and he was
specialist whom he consulted to
hve in semi-retirement if he
wanted to prolong his life for any

OF STEALING WIFE

ZAGREB, Yugoslavia,
Nov. 5
One leading Yugoslav Commu-

to tell an his
advised by the

Of Dollars

By STEPHEN

(Prem the News =

ecuse Comrade
of stealing my wife.’

Mr. Stambolic is Premier

Britain’s dollar-earning tank— time. Gooding knew that by stay-| Pist aceused another of stealing the Republic of Serbia, Principal
the mighty, 48-ton Centurion — ing at the Lodge and conducting his wife and threw the Party Leader of the Serbian Communist
is not only the most powerfu! its many-sided activities he would Congress into uproar —- Party and a member of the Fed-
fighting machine of its kind yin Shorten his life. Yet he resisted) Wouné Zz with — aoe eral Party’s Central Committee
the world. It is almost foolproo!. ‘ne pleas of his family and] ¢ a Cor Ses as a worker ond of the’ Congress Inresidium.

In Korea Sir Guy Lowther’s ‘tiends and stuck to his post,|"°) Ne anomie

Ljubodrag Djuric who has held
the background post of “General
Secretary to the Government”
ever since the war, was at the
rostrum making rambling com-

preferring to spend the few years ron

that still remained to him in
active endeavour. The warning ol
the specialist proved only toe

8th Royal Irish Hussars — tre
Americans dubbed him “the
Knight in 50 tons of Armout—

ultati
showed the world a new kind oi als wing

Petar Stambolic

Djurich was cut off the
microphone as soon as he made
his accusation, After hurried con-
Politburo member
Milovan Djilas rushed to the ros-

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1952
Mr. Dijilas revealed that a
party Commission had investi-
gated Mr. Stambolic several

months ago on this and other ac-
cusations and found him guilty
of several minor actions which
merited him a party reprimand
but no mere severe penalty. He
proposed that a new Commission
look into the case to-day in-
eluding Mr. Djuric’s right to re-
main in the party and appealed
for calm and orderly procedure.
Mr. Djuric was expelled

from the Congress Session.
—UP.

FORMER CHAMPION DIES

of



hens welitade, true and in April 27, 1941, he] ments on previous speeches in @ ‘rum and attempted to calm the LONDON, Nov. 6.

They rammed their mounts up “ied after a severe heart attack. long orawn out “discussion” of excited, shouting delegates. Many French former eee,
craggy hills, one-in-one slopes. Gooding had th e8 to the Marshal Tito’s report to Congress of them loudly demanded that Champion Honore Praseti died
to gain seemingly impossible .4 then he bellowed including certain vague references \ir. Djuric be expelled from the in a London hospital this morn-
vantage points from which to slam jverything el above lto the morals of leading party party at once. ing. —UP.
flat-trajectory shelifire into °V¢rything else im conscientious | members.

endeavour. It is the lesson he
taught all who came under his
influence and his life had shown
ibundantly that he was not afraid

enemy bunkers.

I saw them do this. And
frankly I thought it likely that Sir
Guy’s enthusiasm for the “Cent.”

Urged on by ‘ironie comments
from the floor, Djuric suddenly
blurted out: ‘Seeing that you do
want me to go on—then I hereby

. to carry his own advice ipto
was a modest commander's .ffect. “A lesser man might have —_'





attempt his
prowess.

1 think his men would have
been just as aggressive armed

with pedal-driven biscuit tins.
Best Tanks

But now, after a visit te the
Royal Armoured Corps depot’ at
Bovington, I realise he spoke the
aimple truth when he said the

to discount own

retired to grieve over the glories
he had known at Oxford. Good-
ng missed the cloistered peace
of the university, the intellectual
ctimulus of academic life, the
-ompany of scholars who played
: notable part in the history of
the Chureh of England, the op-
portunities he had left behind to
make or! 1 contributions to
learning, But he was not the man
to pine over what might have

TODAY'S NEWS FLASH

LISTEN OVER
eee TO-NIGHT

PIANO RECITAL

Repeated by Special

Rheumatism
and Backache
Gone in 1 Week

Flush Kidneys With Cystex and
You'll Feel Fine

mene we roeth Atianise ‘Treaty been. ‘Though his special gifts| Syetex—the prescription ote fuiows | ager

. t find adequate scope in iaub Jon in double quick | ‘
armies (for dollars) was the Could no! aay action in downed |) JOHNSON'S STATIONERY
“pest tank in the world.” Barbados, he resolved to make} [ime 99 tt you eerie. “umbage

himself of maximum service to
the island and his work at Har-
rison College and the Lodge

And I can well understand
American tank men being willing

Backache, Nervousness. ceg Pains
Dizziness. Gircles under Eyes. Fre
quent Hea jaghes and_ Colds, Poo

to swap two of their more €X- school is an enduring monument Energy and Appetite, Putty Ankle:
pensive Patton M-46s. for one t, his memory, His colleagues Burning, "sma ee ok uns Raina

“Cent.” as he says they did. —
After five minutes’ instruction
I was able to drive one of these
monsters. It is simpler to steer,
by the two titler levers, than my
10 hp. car, and although 63

our chem Li moans for Cyste:
be cH and well next week

nod |
tex Helps Nature 3 Way:

The Gystex treatment is highly sc!
satee being specially compoundec
o Pett, tone and clean raw, sorc
Stok ineys and bladder and to re
move acids and poisons from your

and pupils knew that he was rich
in the scholar’s gift but, in the
words of the poet, they came to
prize even more the richness of
his heart, the cheerful humour
that remained undismayed, the

Vessel

this flatteringly
ee \joue wrecked truck nearly a

As one who can miss a croquet away—convinced me.

———

GOVERNMENT |! NOTICES

APPLICATIONS are ivited for two vacant non-pensionable
part-time posts of Assistant Visiting Surgeon on the staff of the

General Hospital.

“I have suffered for five years with Kid
and Bladder trouble, also Rheumatic
and Stiff Joints. I was not able +

raise my arms and spent nine weeks iy
@ hos; . They said I would not be able
to work, but after Cystex / feel years
jounger, well and strong.”’ (Sgd.) J. A. B.

u
.

Health Improved in 2 Days
“I had not felt vreau well for ages ©.
suffered continually from backeches an
headaches. I had tried almost everything
out I could not get lasting relie/. Finally
I decided to give Cystex a trial, anc
wish f had tried it long ago and saved
myself much pain and expense. It has
improved my health more in 2 or 3 days

mile

DA COSTA &

lan

STEAM









Applicants must be registered medical practitioners. them other Sunde have done for
The salary attached to the appointment is $240 per annum and Guoranteed to Put You Right SOUTHBOUND
the officer will be entitled to fees for services rendered to paying or Money Back KIM
Get Cystex from your chemise to- MONTREAL 28 Oct
patients in the Hospital. a day. Give it a therough test. Cystex HALF. 1 Nov
Further information may be obtained from the Director of is oneesgalees te oe ‘ ie:
Medical Services to whom applications should be forwarded by 15th younger, stronger, oS

etter jn every way,


































The M/V. “CARIBBEE” wili
accept Cargo and Passengers for
Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,

Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing Tues-
day llth inst.

The M/V. “MONEKA” will
t Cargo and Passengers for
tigua, Montserrat,

Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing







Friday 14th inst

B.W.I. SCHOONER OWNERS’
ASSOCIATION (INC.),





Consignee. Tele. No. 4047.

OUTWARLD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM

times as powerful sate is industry that never flagged — ocem ahi. spekiy and eurely From Leaves a
nothing harsh or ightening shirked, the hand ever outstr - 2 oes in | S.8.. MAN” dos
about the engine. ed to help, the brain ever ready thane Swaps te ena your troubles:— | Ss “TEMPLE BAR ie Secale : So: So.

The “Cent.” is just over 11 to understand the cares of others} 1. Starts killing the germs which are | S'S" «waYyFARER” Gh 26th Oct. 8th Nov.
feet wide and has five forward and to lighten thus the burden atteqee pee Seneee, Bia cds . AR <3 nes & ;
speeds, but neither feature proved that it shared. yet is absolutely harmless to hu | ¢s) “SCHOLAR” : lean 5th Nov. 17th Nov.
“che most. st _ gadget is Next Saturday — Concluding $ jE ere M/brough 15th Nov. 15th Dec.

Article—INNISS and WICKHAM. ' with whic! . Basasss

the an stabiliser gear on your m has become saturated HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDO
the turret. With this oa gq "Bes deat, the : Mi

yer Oot urate ven disease-attack on the ‘easel
— _ a a turehins ‘over hoop at six inches, my three out ¢ filter organism, and stitn For Closes in
w grinding a t fi direct hits with the 20- mite ne a S.S. “KALLADA” Barbados
broken, twisting cpunte potethenen ann a near miss which eeks in Hospital— a ‘s ve London 12th Nov.

iS - J ,
Again, after five minutes’ in puust, have rocked the target—a Now Well For further information apply to - - -

CO. LTD. — Agents

LCOA

SHIP



COMPANY

INC.

CANADIAN SERVICE (ronrvicutty)



PARTNER

7 Nov.

CORONA A STEAMER
21 Nov.



11 Nov. 25 Nov. 9 Dec, ”
23 Nov. 7 Dec. 21 Dec.

Limited Passenger Acommodation Available.











































































7 Weapenitor:, Ts : in 24 hours and t
tal im the district. of Worthing or] 100 plants. Book your requirements with | PROPERTY—One property containing December, 1952. A ror apie . ;
Hastings, Seaside preferable but not}Manager Kendal Plantation, St. John | drawing room, breakfast and dining 8,11,52,—2n, fe ae _ wate ge fue ation apply: Da COSTA & CO., LTD.; Phone 2122,
imperative. Write P.O. Box & e- [in writing. 7.11 52--6n. froom, 3 bedrooms, toilet and bath ‘> money back if yee |
town 8 n ’ : " acre of land, ovr@pard, Dial 3467 errr return th empt | .
fst CIRCULAR SAW Hore ix vour oppor 7.11. 52—an plike eine | 4 NEW YORK SERVICE (tveny Foun WEEKS)
LAURISTON-Lower Collymore Rock.| tunity to make and sell Coronation —______-____—__- -—— ST OFFICE NOTICE |
From December Ist, 3 bedroona 2 dress- arrrneentce You can buy 4 — saw, | STRA¥TON—Dalkelth Road, in threc PO ————
ing rooms, drawing, dining, circular saw jig saw, Sander, planing | Flats near the Savannah Apply 9-4 7 te | SOUTHBOUND
rooms, stil conveniences: Has machine all with mators, Phone S900. p.m. Mie G. §. T. Bayge, op oe ERECTION OF POSTING BOXES NOTICE | wet. of iets. datsne . aeutiven
e ” 8.11 —_— _ — nr _ n je
7 oa eee aa ; . \d NORFOLK 35 ; = om pe
WATISAWEN _. Pullip tana bee osGOMICS, & MAGAZINES —A Wonder- The undernoted Posting Boxes have been erected for public use BARBADOS. | BALTIMORE 7 x Oy he: id tak:
AER — Villy feeemias ee Sew CORN WAYNE AY. it the sites mentioned: aa Sheila Anita Spencer of i NEW sox 31 Oct. 28 Nov. 26 Dec. 23 Jan.
S’servant rooms, Lighting plant, Comic, Gene Autry, Lash Lak 1) Bank Hall Main Road in the outer wall of Bank Hall House,|{] Christ) Chureh, Barbados, |j| ij “*t Rec ace tT eee See barnes eee
mill supply, Monthly rent 87 ing, Wild and ‘Thrilling Wester (1) Ban . t he A Baynes heretofore called and known \
nleaning sharge, IN ADV. CE nany others at 18 cts. and 24 cts th, € r, & ay . , > ne > i i 4
= ABE Dis nae? others ot 16 ct, so ee Se coy Me wesidence of Mr. B Hewes. ¢ promises of ats. King |i] Baden of Shela Ants |! | NEW ORLEANS SERVICE (runrvcit1y)
. Detective, EF 30 cts each, Stanway Pp a . . .
ROOSEVELT Maxwell Goast isa Store, Lucas Street 7,11,52~3n (3) Beckles Road—near junction with Curwen's Avenue. NOTICE that on the 4th
Full furnished cluding Refrigerato - - ‘ ™ as . RCHAN.-
slephone, ‘Rediffusion. Phone 222 CHRISTMAS TREE DECORATIONS— These boxes will be cleared daily except on Sundays and Public Seccicanea cont aaatne Par BAGLE A STEAMER STEAMER STEAMER
8.11.5 A LARGE VARIETY 8 toe : eat
a ont kt ty ee Dr Sisk ah i SAM Miecount fot tanh ek lolidays, as follows:— a oi the use of my said surname @ Nov 30 Nov 4 tek
@1RATHALLAN-Rockley, for January, | Louis L. Bayley, Bolton Li In Carlisle Ba: MONDAY to FRIDAY—7.30 a.m, and 11.45 a.m, of Swammy and assumed in 8 Nov. 22 Nov. 6 Dec.
core and March, ey, ah a 2.11.52—1n y SATURDAY —7.30 a.m. lieu thereof the surname of a ner bh BY Ree
. Pu % 3 ei at : ~ . HER ; Dec. c.
DR (16) halt drums Schooners—Lynsid If, Lucille M, Smith ROBERT A, CLARKE Spence: AND FURT
suitable for plants and ton (drums D'Ortac, Frances Smith, C Til, E i . é such chang ame is } er information appl
OFFICES # y' Colonial Postmaster. that such change of ni For furth ) pply ROBERT THOM LTD., Phone 4424
fowl runs (Meahwire) | No reasonable Smith, Gita M., Rebecca B, Lewis, Mary i evidenced by a Deed Poll . :
store offers refused, none ne. \ - ; . 7 7
OFFIGES—Cool, Spacious and reason~ ' “9.11.52—2n, | Motor Vessels, H, Radar, Daerwooa, | General Post Office, dated the 4th day of No-
ably priced, Apply K. R. Hunte & Co, iebseni ———-—-_ | Caribbee, O. K. Service VIII 6th November, 1952. vember, 1952 duly executed .
Ltd, Lower Broad Street. Dial 4611 FULLER MOPS Water Mops and ARRIVALS } 8.11.52—I1n b d attested. }
2.11526 | polishing Mops. Apply: Chees- | M.V. ©. K. Service VIbI, 176 tons ae ; a ae ae MR. THERM Ann th
nagpnnan re. 4 aera TE man & Co, Ltd. Dial 3382 from Halifax under Captain H. F. Strum. Dated the 6th day of No- | , - Font ounces e
SPACIOUS OFFICES Exceptionally 2.11.52—7n, | Consigned to Martin Doorly & Go., Ltd smber, 1952. arrival of the
cool and in an excellent central position ee ebm ne M.V. Caribbee, 100 tons, from Germinic ; vem ’ MAGNIFICENT
Reasonable rental according to size FULLER FURNITURE POLISH—12 oz,] Under Captain B. Gumbs. Consigned t. POLICE TRAFFIC NOTICE NEW
Ring Mrs. Gooding, Telephone 8538 and 24 oz, Furniture Polish. Appl: HP, | the Schooner Owners’ Association
B.11.08—In. | cheemman-& Co, bed, Dini se S.S. Herdsman, 4016 t f : GASEL REFRIGERATOR
Mi ’ a a oe . ons, rom ot. . . 95°
it idan sas livepe ee Cie ae ST, MICHAEL’S CATHEDRAL, 9TH NOVEMBER, 1952 pee AAS
WANTED FULLER COMBS—Ladies and T Vecke Wandares te Drtee : A CABINETS It delivers the goods
JLER COMBS—Ladies and Gents yacht Wanderer II, 47 tons, from Las a
- Combs. Apply: H. P. Cheesman & Co, | Palmas under Captain E- Hiscock. | On Sunday 9th from 10.00 a.m. igi 30 a.m. CHIN NO motors, NO belts, NO brushes,
HELP Utd. Dial 3362 8, 0..6—sa pr conmenre © fhe chocner. Owners 1. Chauffeur:driven cars shall approach the Cathedral by way sntit ‘& ‘ORAM NO moving parts, NO interference
sociation
“YOUNG LADY—With thorough experi- | TULLER BRUSHES — Drain Pipe, Per- DEPARTURES of Queen’s Park and St. Michael’s Row only, set down their passengers PUT THESE iN your =a reas, NO rust. . . Nothing to
“ Mes bs ‘ “ le | culater, Milk Bottle, Baby Bottle, Toilet Sch. Amberjack Mac for Martinique Na i a Cy ae} ey . i CHRISTMAS
ence in Seneral mes eee, a Te xtile | Dan, Floor Scrub, Rug and Floor, Tooth, | via the Fishing Banks at the South Gate to the Cathedral and park in the Central Foundry cticet ste ‘a! cbnesilne WE HAVE WAITED TO GIVE
Advocate Advertising Department ae Complexion, Comb Cleaners, Parking site, Marhill Street and Rickett Street. Mahogany, ee cheganieaa Birch YOU THE BEST. |
6.112290 | Rrushea, Brushes and Household Seawell 2. Owner driven cars shall approach the Cathedral by way of and Deal, in veers ead “ed 18 Let Us Show it to You (Working)
scahissecnetiiebameianiamadaner b 5 " Pond ‘ ny
“YOUNG LADY — With knowledge in n | Begone. Pp. eae & o., h3t. Michael’s Row (either from Trafalgar Square or Queen’s Park i: Space saving at your Gas Showroom, Bay St.
on comieh Mell OM. ce Aatooun - - For Tria woe’ ide) and Spry Street, set down their passengers at the North Gate SIDE BOARD, Dining, Fancy and
Advertising Department @.11,03—2n.| eee Dee eth eet ce O ceeiggtOVEMBER OTH to the Cathedral and park as directed by the Police. oe ee ert nx te SS
"MISCELLANEOUS \anized sheets in Oft, 7ft, and Sft. Enquire | ynq oe re Mota 3. Spry Street shall be one-way from St. Michael’s Row. Bedroom Cabinets. Remember when you do your shenuieg with us
eed Streets. Phone 2o9e ra insa—ttn LEPARTURES BY B.W.LA Secaares Sige shall, De one weg Sem Church Square, FURNITURE Pg and we deliver to your door by Motor Van.
wanes "0 Be 0. Be “HOUSEHOLD EQUIPMENT of all ON FRIDAY Made under Regulation 2 of the Bridgetown and Speightstown other woods, “and Many Other °
ED ITTLES mpty or, Beer " : ; ies 2 ; .
Sine tte cartons, Stansteld Scott & feacriptian Owen T. Allder, 114 Roebuck - bs toe a gg fon, M. Brumel | | Traffic) (Amendment) Regulations 1943. Things. oS ae
Co., Ltd. —7,11.52—1.f.n. | Street jal 3299 10.5.52—t.f.n. | Jagan. R. Folle ec. Bernard i R. T. MICHELIN BUY NOW at joney-Sav:
> . ’ Prices.
WANTED TO BUY LASHLEY'S offer American CANNON |! Bacchus, VALE ¥ B.W.LA. Commissioner of Police. —_—- CENTRAL EMPORIUM
GAS RANGE--One gas three or two|bath towels, priced from 83c. to $1.82 baat Poliee Headquarters ’ |
bumer Range. Apply: CB. Brandford, | GANNON face towels at 2c CANNON | prom Teiniasde f me ae ’ S WILSON B & ae tine
Sen Bright, Hastings, Phone 4065, Beh cloths ai ° E. Vieira, GV , Win ‘idgetown, : Cnr. road Tudor
6.11,52-2n ese CANNON towels are obtainable ; . y T. PIAL 4069. *
ee aes si from LASHLEY'S Ltd., 20 Swan Street |i "yey. MB eer. Fee | 6th November, 1952. SURE RXERR
E—Unfurnished house. 3 ‘or 4 end Speightstown 8.11,.52—2n L. .
iboorse in. Tesidential distrfet. Apply = —— meaner ABRtY Ale BY RY: LA. 8.11.52—In,
Warren, ¢/o Messrs, K. R, Hunte & Co.] ONE PORCE -AIN BATH TUB—Appl)
' ‘ §. Watkins, Phone 3293 tom Trinidad:
Phone: 5136. 8.11.52—2n A, Willis, G. Spencer wi. Ghana
UPRIGHT PIANO in good condition —_ -- - - p Nos’ a pie, ts ¥. ,. ki Relex Watches
Telephone 95235 between 9.30 am and One ay large mea cage, (2) emailer Weithers, i. Vincent. aan i
236 p.m. or write Box No; C/o] oird cages, (1) merican rabit hutch. | i44 R. Previte, D. Sook A — YLEY
Dept 6.11,.52—3n i) echieken coop for 100 chicks, (1) 2 . ran, LOUIS L, BA
Nayacate Advig. Dev (merican kerosine incubator (6) ‘pairs | F Chin, J. De Gouveia, R. De ) Goan
igeons at $5.00 a pair, Call at Med- ranch, H. Brand, 8. Kinch Bolton Lane
nenham, Pine Hill, no information by / |
avis ms : a telephone 8,11.52—1n
i Paint and Shel)- § ——_{—_____—___—__ *
wont te ae r M. Fors eepaintings ROUND IRON AND SHEETS Ma, 5/16, RATES OF EXCHANGE i
by Nan Kendall, at Barbados Museum, | **. ‘2, %s and "%. Sheets %, 5/16, v4, 3/16, “CEDORA", FITZ y
near Savannah, Nov, 8th—20th, daily, one Tociein “ =< “gimduire Auto Tyre NOVEMBER 7, 1952 VOCATE Gh. Sampes t oas
10 a.m.—6 p.m, Sundays 2.30 p.m, to ot Renee San eee 8 11.52—t. one sole NEW YORK Buying “
6 p.m. 2.11.52—13n ‘ i og Te - 172 310% pr. Cheques on is 7 rey
STEEL STORAGE TANKS Beane 70 @/10% pr. | ~ N y vere iin NOVEMERR,
; , 1 be O xO xe OP Sight or STATIO ER 1952, a0. 30
One Se vO” Ste ae Se A UPR Demand Drafts 70 4/10% pr We Rave ; ae
1, Gins. approx. % € rece
‘ 7 sae ” . yor | 72 3/10% pr. Cable no Oc on ived instruction
Two (2) 13 6” x @ 0” % & 0° x 4" 190 Byiog pr. Curtency 69 1/ 10% pi vue soe of NEATH CHANDLER t
rick—2,440 Gins. rox - ’ ~ * or dispose of his ¢ oe _E 0
, re Ee Ona a) 0” 6 we & 0” deep x "tenes >» Coupons 68 4/10% ‘pr | GREYSTONE, BAS jas as listed Melee ture and effects
It § the A . hick—1,000 Glns. approx 0% pr Silver 20% pr | \ .
Two (2) & 0" dim: x 4 0” deep x 3/16” | 1. 5 49 sip Pie baggie ; ——— ane MORNING OF SALE
lic py “ mae + ound D
pe |S OO dine we O” deep ¥ 8/1077 Bankers |, 23 1/10% pr | Just the little shop in the village reus, Bins, Table, with ge
” ; and Drafts 75.55% pr. | j r lorris Cha e re!
poe k- 530, Glns. approx, Prices on " Sight Drafts 75 4/10 pr 1} where the Best Books, Stationery ort Cabinet cushions, Pine
o : . y , 77 5/10% pr. Cable na ae beseees . Tables, Sm, a Orcas
LAND FOR SALE |THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LIMITED. | 79.7’ bp Riesncy 44 Vide pe |) 8D@ Xmas Cards are now on show Tab ‘pamall, Mah Table,
| Telephone 1 ' Pe ae Sac i Coupons 73 5/10% pr. | and Cushions, Pilot? Mattresses
A few choice house spots | a 50% pr Silver 20% pr | ~ robe, Ftd. plows: Ptd. Ward.
to the South West of the ot ae _ se Mirror Dounie Mose and
Rockley Gelf Club, adjoin- A) Dominican “Mats, Asctnt” Coie?
ing Golf Club Road, on bus {ff! RYSTA W T RS ODGE 1 g RRO J HOUSE pop cutlery. WESTING.
route to town. ¢ L ATE NOTICE L OF SO W Pine Larder, sonar {4% cu. ft)
These spots look across GUEST HOUSE. e Stove and Oven, Kitchen Mable,
ie Golf aces ee wa Post Office Gap Worthing ro ve s. Ol YMPIA Type:
and over ue waters tO i) Desk ithe ge) pists
> : : x > » ers . . . of interest
Reckley Bay on the other. | Right on Sea excellent Sea STEPHEN ROGERS’ The Officers and Members of the €
Though you may not wish }{\| Bathing, Cool, Comfortable BARBER SALOON Fae. ak Sect eens AUCT e
to build immediately, the })}/|] Rooms. Regular Bus Ser- 1% and friends of Kindred Lodges to IONEERS
purchase of one of these | vice. Daily as well as per- Friends and Patrons of Mr |@ their Lodge of Sorrow Service o J as
spots is a good investment. manent Guest welcome. Rogers are reminded that Bi R Sn2der. (600 Ay Mocbuck Street chan - Biadon local Agut
Full particulars from— For Rates Phone 8264 you can now find him at the at 3.30 p.m. in memory of the HULL & SON
The Secretary, | or 8666 Plaza B’town where he car- . jate Bro. Percival I. Nurse ae Coe. Plantations Building
Rockley Golf & Country | Proprietress, ries on his business. Pe sites ee ole eae ota Tal Ss Ring 2458
Club. Wil DOROTHY CARMICHAEL Hours:-Daily 8.00 a.m. to B|$ ee ee ede a ee
| 3.00 p.m. $ 1.82 one 4640 115
SSSI OO! = =. %69099999669060960000008 |/-—— =









BLONDIE









{~ BLONDic, I INViTED] [Tt Wish You GETTING THE

(RA Y by DINNER TOMORROW] |HADN'T, DEAR- -) | CHILDREN FED
SHT-- HE LOOKS LIKE} |I LIKE RAY;

. HE COULD STAND] |AND ALL THAT,

ot A HOME-COOKED







FOR

BEEN DER 1

IMPRES3|ON THA am “2

THE GEST TIME TO ) ee

HAVE SOMEONE <> >2¢

FOR DINNER
WAS AT <

OINNERTIME

——

|BuT you KNOW

|HOW CONFUSING

Ee {S AROUND
HERE AT















LASH GORDON
ae se a VIEMTN Tene ee
TTT aS ete BY PLUTO, YOU ARE A STRANGE

SPECIMEN! THE KING WOULD
SURELY TAKE YOU FROM



i

a

JOHNNY









va

arene
Sh, he



YES..
HOW THAT COULD HAVE
HAPPENED? /

I CAN'T IMAGINE Y NEITHER CAN I,
WESTLEY... NEITHER

rte

haat

\\ iT a)
Yen

A 08 *

THE GAME Py tf y
WENT INTO \\
EXTRA INNIN
GOL Ly- WHat }
4,.T'MA











MUST Ge ‘Ove R

= CUSTOMER TO THE LONG Ai ‘
“BALL GAME - L- ve aS
ss id “yeah
= Fog VY Ny

ST
oS
2,

aod eh
m7

SoS
Sex

=
$23
cS

ROS
SSBSSSS
OS 25

&

aa ESI et a

TRIED SO HARD To














yg. :
Soe {ss



BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES

\ is 4 a 2 mi ios ; | bef he 4 * 4 . ;
3 . "Ta >» = TICKET, i _ Sie A
7 ~o— eS q Gi ‘a On ‘ he " pies ts. FE = K y
La s st ‘ 2 4
* ; [* a a a)
- yr P) Pr ‘ ot /,
: ' = i i
rae VE TRIED 1 YoU KNOW MAX? HE | | 1\'M GIVING YOU ONE LAST CHANCE To
. Z 1RE E THA NT BEFORE THE “BEAT i HELP YOURSELF AJAX. LEAD ME TO THE
See ee ee ee ani ee TuEDOGAT } G SOME HELP ME. I'M NO | | MEN WITH THE ge
Sete ene rt =p THE CARN eae 7 o Pe ——™, 600D. ut ONGO JEWELS
aadhan " ae = ! ‘TO ee A LA =|
{ Ney | oS) 4 lee) 3) Bie TS io |
Jag j F Aaa E ' % ; 4 ng — 0 2 c sag? '
£ : ” ie <2 wer i = = a : Po 7 . | “
, eZ, ios Y f I
AA i ein 2S Am itt RO or P g : /, UY py) \
k
j 4

BARBADOS



BY CARL ANDERSON |

Sen siiaiaiaatiaiis eee i ene







L ACTAOI’ MOTOR OIL





ADVOCATE Picp Vg

| aii those throboing “ates »
| your nqeetn at once! Apply

MOTORIST | seats

| You don’t rub in “Sloan's” yee cae

Do You Know That The Best | : f

MOTOR ¢ OIL



MR.

sad pi ot 4

TO-DAY !!

FOR YOUR
COPY OF THE

DAILY
TELEGRAPH

—with all the
latest World News

| AND ARRANGE

ADVOCATE
STATIONERY

Broad Street and
Greystone, Hastings

TO DEAL HERE

SPECIAL OFFERS AVAILABLE THURSDAY TO SATURDAY AT ALL BRANCHES

—— . -









IT PAYS YOU









Usually ‘NOW | ;

GOYA XMAS G GIFTS

KLIM — 5-lb. Tims .............. 6.14 5.75 Sets of Toilet Soap . ’ ' $1.60 per Box

Perfume in Hat Boxes ’ 1.20
, ” T Chest cas 1.68
CREAM CRACKERS—Large Tins 1.44 1.20 oll eireawete or net
GRAPE FRUIT JUICE .......... 26 24 . on Christmas Cards

» in Single Phial’s

VE EE eSB RwENy Fed cadies codes 30 .26 Perfumed Cologne .

Powder in Tins ...
SCOTT’S LIQUEUR RUM ....... 1.60 1.40 Christmas Stockings .

Big Assortment of Christmas Crackers
KINGS BEER ................5- .26 22 Christmas Paper ..................05.

Stationery Gifts
ALWAYS APPRECIATED

GIFT STATIONERY in Boxes
PEN & PENCIL SETS
LEATHER GOODS

BEAUTIFUL XMAS CARDS





ADVOCATE STATIONERY





SOLE AGENTS

INTERNATIONAL TRADING CORPORATION LIMITED tt. soos.
WE CAN GIVE YOU

NEW
BEAUTY!



»















Here's new hair glamour—
fn seconds. A complete
colour tone, Auburn,
Blonde and other lovely
effects without bleach, dye
or tint, Highlights for curls
and waves; contrasts —
streaks. Brushes or rinses
out in a jiffy.

In six glamour shades.

olatie
NEW HAIR
COSMETIC

MADE BY THE MAKES
OF BANDBOX SHAMPOO

LTT LANES NOAA RNAI PO OTROS



ALL DAY LOVELINESS CAN BE YOURS!

“THE LITTLE SHOP”

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY BUILDING, BROAD ST.

CARRIES THE ENTIRE RANGE OF BANDBOX PREPARATIONS FOR THE HAIR.






PAGE TEN







BARBADOS ADVOCAT



E



BACKGROUND TO THE RACE

Loudspeakers [n=

Stands

(By O. S.

THE SCHEDULED four-day Autumn Meet of the
Barbados Turf Club opens at the Garrison Savannah today

and when the tapes fly to

Maidens on their way for the $900 Autumn Stakes over
five and a half furlongs sometime around 1.30 p.m., the
Meet proper would have begun in earnest.





Few people, however, pause to
give a thought to the tremendous
amount of industry, precision and
planning that go into making a
Raca Meeting the « attraction it

admittedly is, with sideshows and
all thrown in for good measure

The Paddock

Yesterdey a visit to the pad-
dock would have revealed a
constant stream’ of horses to and
from the farriers who were oper-
ating on the spot. These were en-
gaged in changing the horses’
iro. shoes which they wear
al! through training 1o racing
plites, made of aluminum. These
explain themselves,

There was the constant whirr
or the lawn mower which was
clipping the saddling enelosure to
2 nicety and outside on’ the track
@ number of labourers were in-
specting it foot by foot and

leveling it off where necessary.
Stands Go Up

On the outskirts of the course

and within the enclosure of the
broad, Savannah itself Stands
were being erected from whicnr

the busy punter in the field cat:
buy lemonade, cakes, ginger beer,
black pudd'ng and souse, fried

fiving fish and salt fish cakes,
mauty, ice-cream and the like.
A’ some of the other elaborate

booths’ those people whose tastes
run in that direction can engage
in gemes of chance—the Wheel
of Fortune or the Lucky’ Dip.

From early morning the tablés
that run the Lucky Seven game
will begin to spring up like mush-
rooms all over the place and there
will be many an early and earn-
est group at the dite back-
ing a five or six or throwing
lucky seven and eleven,

More Tables

Other tables will appear at
which others wilt try their luck
at “brag” or poker while on the
very fringe of the road that line
the course the liquor stands will
appear, Many a stunned punter
that drew a “back” number to a
$1,000 prize has had to spend a
part of the $5 which he received
on_a modest nip from the liquor
stall to cushion the shock, while
winners have been correspond-
ingly prodigal and the large
bottles disappear in good num-
oers,

But what of the preparations
for ther actual racing? Early in
the morning, that is to-day,
trainers will give most of their
charges a “breeze” to clear their
wind and having satisfied them-
eelves tha they are iquite fit
they leave to return later in the
day for the great event,

Test The Gates

The Track Manager, Mr, K, Cor-
bin will start working at 6 a.m:
Each Starting Gate is checked
under his supervision and then
there is an ispection carried out
to ensure that the Stands and
Pari-Mutuels are spotlessly clean.

Then comes a detailed inspec-
tion of the track to see that it is
clear of any obstructions that
might cause damage to the horses
and their riders. This will take
up to midday to complete and
then there is a lull in activity
around the paddock.

In just under a half an hour’s
time those horses which are
stabled outside the official pad-
dock are brought im, since they
are required to be in the official
‘paddock at least an hour before
the starting of the first event,

From 1 p.m, pari-mutuel atten-
dants, owners, trainers and early
race-goers begin arriving
steady flow that increases in
momentum as the hour for the
starting of the first event draws
mearer and sets in motion a many
sided pageant, the stage for which
has been in patient preparation
long ago.

Loudspeakers

The Barbados Turf Club are
Â¥xp4~imenting to-day with re-
laying the Rediffusion description
of the race through loudspeak-
ers placed in the stands. There
fhas been ‘considerable demand
for this experiment for some years
now, since it has been rightly
claimed that most people are
unable to follow the race as it
progresses around the course
owing to the difficulty which the
layman finds in distinguishing
jockeys, horses and colours while
the race is being run, One hopes
that it will be a success.

The Barbados Turf Club have
made arrangements for the results
of the draw of the 2/- sweepstake
to be broadcast so that those peo-
nle with private sets can also
listen, The broadcast takes place
over Station ZNX 32 7.547
kilocyeles, 30.76, metres,



These Alterations

Would Improve .

Our Racing

Though Britain is the
lead and foundation for
throughout the world, there is
hardly any country where racing
is staged that we could not gain
some small item for the improve-
ment of conditions over here.

The South Africans have some-
thing to teach us, especially in one
of their chief races, the £10,000
Durban July Handicap,

The draw for positions for this
race is made 12 days before the
event. Writers and backers there-
fore know what they are talking
about in the days preceding the
race,

Thousands of words and thous-
ands of pounds were wasted on
Abraham’s Star in this year's
“Lincoln”, for which he started
favourite, but had his chance
ruined through a bad draw.

The owner of Capsize would not
have had a penny on his. horse
if he had khown it was going to
be drawn No. 1.

I cannot see anything against
drawing for positions in ante-post

natural

Today

COPPIN)

set the Class “C” and “C 2”



Pompee “May
Get Chance
At World Title

(By GEORGE WHITING)

1 offered here recently the sug-
gestion that Yolande Pompee,
inat dark young man with fire
in his Trinidad fists, might profit-
ubly oceupy his time in_ public '
punching against American
cruiser-weights Jimmy Slade
ereferred

Well, that is how it is going to
be. Pompee will fight Slade at);
darringway on November 18—
and, if good fortune attends cer-
iain back-stage manoeuvres, the
pennant of a world title elimina-
w will be flying over the con-
Lane.

Hence the contractual stipula-
tion that the 10-round argument
shall be at the strict champion-
Siip weight of 12st, 7lb.

Promoter Jack Solomons, mani-
pulator-in-chief of strings fistic,
is scheming might and main to
achieve w or1d championship
chances for both Pompee and
Randolph Turpin, without the
pair getting themselves involved
in a head-on collision. Pompee
versus Slade is the opening gam-
bit.

Turpin’s Future
The extent of Turpin’s oppor-
tunity as a middle-weight should
be known on November 15, when
Sugar Ray Robinson has to say
whether he prefers pugilism to
pirouetting as a floor-show celeb-

rity. On that decision depends
whether Turpin bids again for
another meeting with Robinson

or claims a world title tag for a
fight with Frenchman Charles
Humez

As a second string to his am-
bitions, Turpin has prior claims
on a world cruiser-weight clash
with the winner of the December
3 fight in America between cham-
pion Joey Maxim and the Ohio
negro, Archie Moore,

Meantime, the push-for-Pompee
begins with official requests to
the British Board of Control, the
National Boxing Association of
America and the New York State
Athletic Commission for his fight
with Slade to be recognised as
a final eliminator for world hon-
ours. If Pompee prevails, in goes

a further claim to meet the
Maxim-Moore winner.
No Power

None of the above-mentioned

authorities, of course, has any

syver to confer world cham-

pionship accolades but their

unanimous approval of Pompee
v. Slade will do no harm to the
box-office. :

In passing, if any American
thinks the slightly punch-worn
Jake LaMotta should be preferred
in the world cruiser-weight hier-
areny, let it be noted that Jake
hag twice found it inconvenient
to put such matters to the test
against Pompee, e

Supposing Slade improves upon
his performance at the White
City last June, and, instead of
drawing with Pompee, beats him?
That would indeed be awkward.

Perhaps it is as well for Pom-
pee that Prince Philip will not

e at Harringay to shake hands
with Slade, Last time that pleas-
ant little ceremony took place, it

N set such a spark in Slade that he

exploded our Don Cockell right
out of a world championship fight
with Joey Maxim, Once is quite
enough for that kind of eatas-
trophe.

Cloak-and-Dagger

Tommy Ryan, 18-year-old clerk,
was knocked out boxing for Lon-
don — of which city he is the
amateur featherweight champion
—against Berlin, On recovering
he immediately allowed it to be}
known that he was in future to
be regarded as a professional,

I knew, but could not have
proved, that Ryan had made_ his
professional “arrangements” long
before, Had anybody whispered
the dread tidings there would
have been a_ pontifical inquiry;
and, had Ryan admitted his
“guilt,” the London ABA would
have had no option but to with-
draw ‘him from the Berlin match.

—LES.
Solel aisha seinen aetna

races, some days before the event.
especially when the draw is of
profound importance, as it is at
Lincoln,

For the Durban July Handicap,
on which there is considerable
ante-post betting, there is a final
acceptance 11 days before the
racg, and no horse can be with-
drawn, without the permission of
the stewards, after noon on that
day. i

They send their own veterinary
surgeon to inspect any horse which

racing a trainer wishes to withdraw after

that time.

This is an attempt to save back-
ers from supporting a candidate in
the ante-post market which is
unlikely to run, and it is no doubt
a useful rule out there.

When I see 25 runners compet-
ing over here for a total prize of
£200 to which each owner has
paid £4 entrance fee, I am remind-
ed of South African racing

Throughout the ‘year on the
Durban and Clairwood race tracks
there is no race with under £550
in prize money, The entrance fee
for such a race is 30s. and these |
are the worst races of the day—

usually three-year-old maiden |
handicaps |
The top race of the day at Clair-|
wood is generally a £1,300 handi-|
eap, and the entrance fee is £2.}
I also note a £2,300 race for which
the entrance fee is again £2, and
only when the £3,500 mark 1s
reached does the entrance fee g¢

up to £5

Victory for Dover against
Notre vVame on saturday has
placed in the first bracket on the

championship table in the City
Division, Kangers, Dover and
Notre Dame. If Notre Dame had

won their game, they would have
been undisputed champions, With
this reversal it seems quite likely
that we will witness a thrilling
semi-final and final for the
Championship of this division,

In this division on Saturday
Rangers defeated Colts by 145
runs, Colts after losing four wick-
ets for 28 runs added .107 to bring
their second innings total to 135.
C. Reid was not out with 46 to
his credit; this was also the top
score for the team. For Rangers
H. Blackman and Pinder took 3
for 37 and 43 respectively. Ran-
gers’ first innings score was 206
and that of Colts was 71.

Belfield scored a victory against
Bordeaux. Belfield raised 139 and
Bordeaux replied with 128. Second
innings score of Bordeaux was 83
for 9 declared while Bordeaux
totalled 37. Skinner took 3 for 12
and Robinson 5 for 13.

Central Victories

Boys Club won their match in
the Central Division against Drax
Hall. The Boys Club added 18 to
their overweek score of 211 for
8, totalling 229 for 4. L. St. Hill
who had scored a century the
previous day added 17 to his total
to bring his score to 130 not out.

“AND IF THEY HAVEN'T
GOT REAL SWISS CHEESE
IN THAT STORE+-GO OVER

TO THE DELICATESSEN ON
| THe AVENUE~GET A COMBI-
NATION HAM AND SWISS ON








7

|



I DON'T LIKE THOSE GARD-
BOARD CONTAINERS=-GET
"EM TO PUT IT IN A JAR:
AND A PIECE OF RAISIN
CAKE BUT HAVE ’EM
TAKE OUT THE
RAISINS +++





HCATR, Ine, WOK



Mario Biscits

Only 32¢. per } th Pkg.

On Sale at all leading Shops & Groceries
Get Some Tosday, <<

e Cricket

they'll Do It Every




2 IT'LL BE TIME FOr A

LONGER THAN
ONE O' THEM TV
COMMERCIALS =;

CTS RES!

Leagu

By SCRIBBLER.

With a deficit of 108 Drax Hali
entered on their second innings
and scored 124, thus giving the.
opponents 17 for victory, &.
Deane and J. Inniss achieved thi
without loss, each scoring 14,

George Park added another to
their string of victories when
they defeated Ellerton. Ellerton
seored 54 and the Parkites replied
with 84. Ellerton knocked up 82
in their second innings and their
rivals took full points with a seore
of 55 for 3. S. Alleyne scored 27
in the George Park first innings
and Best took 6 for 31. In George
Park’s second innings Walcott
was responsible for 21.

Greens also added another six
to their total points when they
outplayed Sunset. Sunset had the
advantage of a first innings lead
when they scored 95 and dis-
missed Greens for 39. But failed
miserably in their second innings
and the total just reached double

figures. Greens replied with 67
for 2 to win the game. For
Greens, Harper took in Sunset’s

second innings 3 for 5 and Lorde
4 for 0. Brereton scored 42 not
out for Greens.

Union Globe took first innings
points from Invincible. Union
Globe scored 108 and Invincible
replied with 56. Union Globe col-
lapsed for 59 in their second in-
nings and at the close of play
Tvincible were 90 for 9.




bee |

Regivtered US >

lime

4 BY THE TWE Joey GETS) HES VERY PARTICULAR ABOUT ORDERING!

BUT WHEN HE GETS IT, HE SLOPS IT
A, AROUND LIKE HE WAS IN A CUSTARD-F
Zz PIE COMEDy*+-

FUSS YPANTS’ ORDER,
MIDNIGHT SNACK*HE

“TAKES

VED.





FRESH FROM THE. OVEN

DELICIOUS

THE WI. BISCUIT Co., Ltd.






















i

Notes |

Six For Cyclone \

In the Leeward Division
Cyclone stopped the threat of
Highland with a very convincing
victory. Cyclone enjoyed a lead
of 27 and proceeded to dismiss
Highland for 55. J. Dottin took
2 for 6, K. Gilkes 5 for 9 and J.
Russel 2 for 9.

Gyclone was given the easy
task of scoring 18 for victory and
totalled 20 for the loss of 1
wicket.

Barrows won against All Saints
in the game at Barrows. All Saints
had first knock and were dismiss-
ed for 79. E, Thompson scoring
34. Barrows replied with 125. E,
Welch top-scored with 55 and C.
Walker contributed. 34, All Saints
in their second innings collapsed
for 44, D. Lewis took 2 for 14
nnd R. Boyce 5 for 15. e

Standard notched another vic-
tory, when they met Welches.
Welches lost the toss and were all
out for 81. Standard replied with
74 for 7 at the drawing of stumps
on the first day. On the second
day Standard scored the runs to
obtain a lead, Welches in their
second innings were all out for
65, H. Goodridge took 4 for 14
and O. Denny 3 for 15. With 73
runs necessary for victory in
90 minutes Standard made a gal-
lant attempt to foree victory and
succeeded with 15 minutes to
spare.



"ByJiimmp Hilo













| ay THANX
A Ss eA Tree ne

C32) BAR HARBOR, |
4

>



|
|

SS: | 4







MAKING READY
FOR TODAY’S MEET

TOP LEPT:— One of to-
morrow’s candidates is being
groomed in the paddock at the
Garrison Savannah.

TOP RIGHT:—A stand in
process of erection. To-day
this will be the complete
product, fully stocked and
teady for trade.

BOTTOM:— A squad of
workers in action, These men
© over the track meticulously,
oot by foot, and level off
uneven patches where neces-
sary.



Kendal Defeated

Kendal went down to defeat
against White Rose in a match
in which. there was an exciting
end. White Rose batted first
to score 46 and Kendal replied
with 105. White Rose fought back
gamely and totalled 147 in their

‘second innings. This score proved’

too formidable for Kendal and
although they made a fight of it,
lost the game by 7 runs.

For White Rose Vaughn scored
37. Scott 26 and M. Haynes 34
not out.

C.M.P.C. gained first innings
points from G.1LS. C.M.P.C.
knocked up 62 and G.LS. replied
with 42. C.M.P.C. were all out
for 42 in their second innings and
the close of play found G.LS.
62 for the loss of 9 wickets.

Penrode took first innings points
from Rangers “B’” with scores of
Penrode 136 and 47 and Rangers
68 and 66 for 4.

Belfield “B” lost six points to
Chamberlain. Belfield were
given 74 runs to win but failed
by 8 runs. Chamberlain’s second
innings score was 69. For Belfield
E. Dyal took 4 for 20. S. Bel-
grave 4 for 12 and K. Davis 1
for 23. Belfield in their second
innings totalled 66. For Cham-
berlain S, Rowe took 5 for 27
and F. Howard 3 for 17.

Will Play B.C.L.

The following have been invited
by the selection committee of the
Barbados Cricket Association ta
oppose the Barbados Cricket
League at Kensington Oval on
December 6, 13, and 20.

C..L. Walcott (Capt.), H. Bar-
ker, R, C. Branker,,C. De Peiza,
G. N. Grant, C. C. Hunte, F. King,
R. E. Marshall, G. Sobers, C.
‘Smith, E. D, Weekes and C. B.
Williams,

Players are asked to notify the
Hony. Secretary of the B.C.A. in
the event of their being unable to
accept the invitation to play.



BOY! OH BOY!!

I've got something to say,
Not about Robert and Joe
but about
LIONEL & “LADO”
They are staging a

DANCE

«
At THE CHILDREN’S GOODWILL
LEAGUE (Shed)

TO-NITE NOVEMBER 8, 1952
(First Races Night)
Music by. Mr. P. Green's Orchestra
ADMISSION 2/-
—Refreshments — Rar

night. 8.11.52—1n.

GX
“Cina science P
CHRISTI 3
READING ROOM

)

“Pray that the divine presence
may still guide and bless our chief
magistrate, those associated with
his executive trust, our
netional judiciary; zg
congress wisdom, and uphold our
nation with the right atm of -
righteousness

In your peaceful homes remem-
ber our brave soldiers, whether
im camp or in battle. Oh, may
their love of country, and their
fajthful service thereof, be unto
them life-preservers! May the
divine Love succor and protect
Mairy Baker Eddy — Message 1808

This Room is open Tuesdays,
Wednesdays, Fridays, from 10 a.m.
to 2 p.m. and on Saturdays 10 a.m.

; to. 12 o'clock.

and

Fully Guaranteed
— only —

$29.50
See...

“Your Jewellers”
Y. De LIMA
& CO., LTD.

20, Broad St. Phone 4640

and ,
The Village -
Hastings



| others
| We find this result in the South.

SATURDAY,

Wales Have
Best Rugby
Players

The Welsh are the finest play-
ers of rugby football in Europe,
and considering the size of their
resources the best in- the. worid

| (writes Hylton Cleaver).

Now, so excellent is Weish un-
derstanding of those fine arts of
rugby, which seem beyond most
in the British Isles, that

The only player who can be
said to have enhanced his repu-
tation in front of a _ selector
recently, when Eastern
Counties beat Kent, was W. J.
Howells, a full-back from Guy’s
Hospital.. And. he is a Welsh-
man,

The only Cambridge University
outside who makes any impression
on the critics is their full-back,

| P. M. Davies, a Welshman.

The finest player of the game in
any position in Metropolitan rugby
is Gerwyn Williams, who, fortu-
nately, is available to Middlesex;
and the one full-back who would
almost certainly have been capped
by England. in recent times had
it been possible, was J. M. H.
Roberts, a Welshman like the
others.

Brian Boobbyer, staying behind
in the Far East to expound moral
rearmament, may coach the Jap-
anese at rugby. I only hope some-
body would come here and coach
us.

Who better than a select body
of Welshmen? ‘There are the
reople here to do it. Why did we
let Claude Davey slip right out of
the game because he was too old
to go on playing it? »

While he played for Berkshire
he not only inspired the side—hd
instructed it; and there is no one
now to fill*his place.

Through referee’s eyes
In London is H. M. Bowcott,

Cambridge Blue and a Cardiff man
with eight caps for Wales. At
the. elose of-+ts-eareer he was of
immense use to Wasps.

To-day he is a Middlesex
selector. But is he coaching a
club?) I doubt if he is even
coaching Middlesex; if he were
they would imspire more faith.
Three knowledgeable Welshmen

in London are showing’ first-class
gifts as referees. J. H. Darville,
K. H. John and A. M. Rees.

A referee has a much better idea
of all the folly going on jin the
scrum, and around it, than. any-
one sitting in the stand, and clubs
would be wise to get such as these
to go down to a club after they
have refereed a match and help
them to see the game through
Welsh eyes.

Lecturing is not enough. Prac-
tical exposition on grass is want-
ed.

The Wasps became a force in
the game as soon as they played
against the Welsh wizards. They
learned something from every
game, They play Newport, and
Cardiff twice in the season, and
Swansea once. And they get this
encouragement because the Welsh
like the way they have learned.

So it goes on

There were seven Welshmen in
the Devon side which has just
beaten Cornwall; goodness knows
how many there are in any police
fifteen; no public school compar-
able in size has anything like the
record in international honours of
Llandovery; and in town. London
Welsh have struck their flag only
once this season and then to
another Welsh side.

The last winners of the Army
inter-unit Rugby Cup were the
Welsh Guards; and it was to



ne

NOVEMBER - 8; 1952



Admission Prices
Increased For
Indiax Tour

The Board of Management of
the Barbados Cricket Association
at their meeting yesterday after-
noon at the eorge Challenor
Memorial Stang agreed to in-
erease the prices that have been
charged for admission to Kensing-
ton at International and Interco-
lonial fixtures recently for the
fixtures with India next year.

The admission to the Georgo
Challenor Stand that used to be
$1.20 goes to $1.44, Kensington
Stand from $1.00 to $1.20, Uncoy-
ered Seats from 48c. to 60c., while
Grounds and Schoolboy ‘Stand;
remain at 1/-. Season tickets far
the George Challenor Stand go
from $10 to $12 and for the Ken-
sington Stand from $8 to $10.

Committees

The Board appointed Messrs
J. M. Kidney, S. O’C. Gittens,
J. W. B. Chenery and the Sec-
retary. a committee to deal. with
matters arising out of prepara-
tions for the tour.

Messrs B. Del. Inniss, E. A, V.
Williams and E. L. G. Hoad wera
appointed a Grounds Committee.

Mr, F.-A, C. Clairmonte, Bar-
bados Selector on the West Indies
Cricket Board of Control, furnish-
‘ed the Board with a copy of a
letter to Mr C. A. Merry, Secre-
tary of the West Indies Cricket
Board of Control, informing him
that for various reasons he had
decided to resign as a West Indies

Selector.
Regret

Sir Alan Collymore, President,
said that they all regretted any
reasons that had led Mr. Clair-
monte to resign but as this matter.
had suddenly. been presented ta
them, they had found themselves
unable to make a definite decision
at that time. .He instrueted the
Secretary to summon a meeting
for November 21 at which the
matter would be discussed and a
sueccessor/-to Mr. Clairmonte ap-

pointed,
Will Act :
He further instructed the Sec-
retary to write to Mr. Merry in-
forming him that Mr. Clairmonte
had notified the Board of his re-
signation, which they all regret~
ted and that they would hold .a
meeting on November 21 to ap-
point a-_successor, meanwhile Mr.
Clairmonte had agreed to handle
any matters on behalftef Barba-
dos until November 2l. ,

Cardiff that the South Africans

awarded a Springbok’s head as

being the only club which deserv-

ed to beat them—and_ did not. *
‘No coach’

Of course Welshmen do. some-
times try to beat the referee; but
at least they know they are doing
so, and they’give it up as soon as
they realise the powers of gbser-
vation in the referee,

My point about half the rugby
seen by the clubs, the pountles
and even the universities is that
the players don’t know they aré
doing wrong.

And believe it or not, I asked
this week who *was_ coaching

Oxford University this season,

and received the answer: “No
one.”
That just about explains, I

think, why a South African only
has to appear there to be certain
of his place. They have all been
coached always.

The Springboks on their tour
here were coached from the day
they arrived to the day they left,
And who coached the opposition
we put up against them? ©The
same answer: “No. one.”

—L.E.S8,



THEY Painted Shirt Hangers at $1.00” *
Painted Dress Hangers at. .24
VERY each
USEFUL er Hangers at .66
AND Covered Hangers at .... .60
CAN BE ae
Covered Flowered
OBTAINED Hangets at .... 1.00
IN each
OUR HOME Will serve as Christmas Gifts

PropucTS ICAVE SHEPHERD & Co., Ltd.

10, 11, 12, & 13, BROAD STREET

DEPT.

«

% gin. tins

B
Sunshine in 31% lb.
' per lb.

} Rasy to use -

PHONE 4267. 1456 for

BIRKMYRE CANVAS for Tarpaulins
3’ wide @ $3.18 per yard a
ATLAS “A” WCOD PRESERVATIVE

WILKINSON & HAYNES CO. LTD.











4.46
2.62

SISCCLIN DISTEMPER

Supplied in Powder Form in White,
, Cream, Peach,

Green, Blue and
packages at 23c.

simply mix with water.




PAGE 1

ill'KDAV. NOVtMBER S. 1IK2 1: \i(ii\l><. AitVUCAl't. raci FIVE Man Acquitted of House-Breaking and Larceny Jury Returns Verdict I .K. IMII SIHIAIISIS AT IIMIIAI MIIMlin On CJ.'s Instructions FOLLOWING ihe instructions of His Lordship the Chief Justice Sir Allan Collymore, an assize jury yop| a a> day returned a verdict of not guilty in a case in which Charles Bennett a watchman, was charged with breaking into the house of Itina Bowen, a hawker of Cave Hill. on September 22 this year and stealim: ,t purse containing $10. Alter all (lie piuwvu'iun witRinvnLk r riai' Uv *"<* lo many St George WM put m 18 months' discrepancies and asked the jury irubatlon bv Hi* Lordship the '> return a verdict ol not guilty. Chief Justice' Sir Allan CoUymera ,, Br nnc '' w £ 1 ^e ^ ,rc sen,0,, l he withdrew hi* Mr • H. I.. Ward. Ik i of not guilty of stealing a |n Bowen said she was a Oakrifh bicycle the property of hawker and on September CladslOM Clarke of Hastings. sh r '' i hrM Church, on September 10 went to this year, and pleaded guilty to Heron committing the offence. the i Belgrave changed his plea after MTI •>* me house she re Il.e PrOMeUtlon ll*d four wita man called Cecil Or. about 6 the beach to buy fl*h • leaving home she secured windows and doors of the she rented from The neon i represented by Mr. E other part of the house was occupied by a woman named Louise Griffith. Cecil Grimes lived Mr. F." E. Field. Assistant Athout 20 yards from the house torney General, prosecuted for Griffith and she occupied. t*ie Crown Sne returned from ihe beach Gladstone Clarke sud that ho about 9 a.m and found the lock l-ought the bicycle last year and of the door to her room broken. its serial number was DD44403. After a search she discovered that On September 10 he lent it to a purse she had containing $1(1 !i.,nd called Peter Mandevllle *• missing abcut 7 30 am He returned to „ The first lime she had met him in the evening and said th -t Bennett was on September 14 u ., ,. |, n when she was carrying her baby. in ,n Court of i nancerj >• Peter Mandevllle said he borand Bennett told her that the Jday His Lora.,n. P UM via i, w.^l .lie bicvclc and about 4 p.m. babv looked a pleasant child and Chancellui. J \\ u lv l. Dad it "ii the pavement in be liked it. Some days later she Cheneiy pi front of ihe Office Equipment met him and he enquired aftService building in Coleridge the baby. He came to her home the awniing-iinuse Hayvil Street and went into the building the same night and after putting i ington H.n for about 10 minutes. When he a shilling in the baby's hand, acre one rood >f l.md in tinsuit returned, the bicycle was missing, suggested to her that she and he c. B. Brooks plaintiff and WilCpl. Emerson Yearwood said could become friends. She remar C. Cui that Belgrave was brought to the fused his offer. The Kcgi5tr.it Central Police Station m a Police c-...j — *• ft| ed. or on September 10 along with „„_ .ft'** W 1 AJ1 „ Mr W. Vf RM VI QIC the watchman of Lodge Plantation. UK. W W 8 ROBERTSON. O.BE. (mitre). BMBihor M the UK. Indn-tnal Ml*on -t present tout nig the ihlaiid ipictured above vi-iting the work-hop ol ihe Centriil Foundry Lid With him are Mr P A Chee*eion. workaftftMgf (left) and Mi O. O Crawfonl technical manager. Irrigation A Pressing Problem In BG KAWI U N. v I -lion Dr lagai M L C British returned home b\ n v. i \ thai aftamooB ah* spending twu week mm.. .;.llier with other mem UM C l-> tie interviewed \; Q II A4BBM president Ol :e*a "with a vi. a | serving West Indi.m unity in II %  Dr. Jag.m told the Advof.t ual bafora his drpartmc lha • dm-, land, timber and mineral re lources. has gu-.n development. tnett ma jot prtbaaa K owaea r arfji u< main the Ian avallabla to lha tenaan He i ltd thai although Brntsl Guiana ha' m population deim • ol liw pSM %  | m %  %  faced w U the preantni proMan of "la H hunger." The 1MB census hat %  %  had ar average holding of 3 i. raa ol i end Anj di of tli t country must IhatefOfl have as its basis country** drainage and Irrlfatli with a view to making well llin-ri Serviee To Japan Europe and Japan o\* month, when Air Fran.ia once-weekly flight, uking il boura. Bntisn Uveraaa urr pl-nning a Cumet service W' Toaio. %  just over | .RATS hoverplanes have picked up more than 200 tick and wounded the jungle and flou %  hospital. —UE.S. lnii/iA)ifi.i L' A 1 " %  I"\ • • drained irngated land qi Implication tor \|l|H k ;i[ Ilin^f^S I llSllim< avalUbl* In addition oaten Oranlea *^ a machine itati^ Charges Of Bodily Harm Saved Money Tlu110 were ..ngle Ul.r „ ructod „, nntsc pit ii'K miiiuv IM> li:iit n _..'.. hlch would provuli* hi men) tlko bull I %  nd so on. ii" thought th it if tboai IN THE ASSISTANT COURT OK APPEAL yestnrdav 'two prolecU i ouri Mr H A Vaunhan and Mr. A. J. H. Hanschell dismhtaed without prejudice the cut in which .'HId Miriam Applewhaiic of St. Jiules. St. GeorKc brought car-old Archihald H\>-i . he constdevod the her on Septanbw 10 thu year. Mr K K. Walcott, Q.A, apj>earexl for Byer. i mbariaad iipon Inune II %  tilv would the BHtlah Ou population bo provMad for. i %  i %  UM r\m* population in *'' q territories For >r The walchm of trespassing on the plantat giounds and refusing to give Ml mime or business there when "At the Station. Belgrave siid the money „" h rf —• ^ ^ s., Hm "' %  'V'^F^Mg^rtuiS? 5? o tne *10 She ^ had paid £ I Oriim ptotntlfl S .? Chr?.7'cnli^ ind Grimes five sh.lhngs the day he Broom,, dafendail 3 WtiVSS rCP n hlU — XTii&JterSS — were Hied. "'Tne'y^w^nfin^earch of the had .at tfi. .10 as a ineetrng !.,v.i;. and *hen II wag found him. She and Bennett Belgrave was churged Hi, uSd Brlsravo note, and w. mony she had „„ s ,, .K.>i„t u .i.. saved from time to time. ..iKi^.a. ^_J '"'^.-examined, he ~.id that £'" ' the ihdling in the i> i,.... .,i -.Hi t.riuiiUv menbaby s hand. When >he p^id Belgrave hJdJOt attuaUy^ men Gr(mos (hp ^ ^ ^ ^ so with five single shilling. Worship M M.mitlee was valued at 11 I la. cToU-e"mmed she said that pl l 1 m T l ^ **• %  ""• %  !• along Tudo. ^ie began to rent the room from The application for .PI HdlnH days or .*>e ,lon. showod that the Giimes about three weeks before mvnt and alfo( %  dwaUlngJiouse months imprisonment with hard removed from the yard was stolen and at and onc lood U perches Of land Bl BOB and Byer %  HlgllVl IV| v Transporl. Lorda had 11 previous eonvlcII .1 Mnrrs four. Iliat %  mr rushed "Try and turn ovaa a out of the cant and attacked her ll VIUI •*•* ton %  I ,,,i i go h i rieon," His Worship hit her tIK -ft ,; QrlfBOl, Actmn POnr with U i ,h -' M ig irate of Dlstrlel "A ll.niii' A QrinUk by Me ith sTealn vcr friendly, nor had he ever Solicitors, appeared on behalf of given her money besides the the plaintiff. enllre Cwrtbl Agricultnr:ii d^velnomoM 'hat rei UM dovol inmeni of heavy srertn.lr.rI,.M, %  ,, bl ternt-l*l CMIMfCAl *! a" %  > -' ihorofOre ,„•,< ..n.u .. tifr, and C. II Marshall. dOfen* ., i,,^ and this m over a pig Michael hoi i m %  itiiiii ..t. aU-roui dant His lordship granted the which the defendant uk away fl1 n,m n,, probation for II industrial development ii.i-..i application for appraisement ami f,„ m her. leallng cticoanuts OR it drVOratftOd MOBOmS sale of two parcels of land ( mnwnfJng OB the situali. Sealy Hall. St Join,, the ftrsl bePollet' < on table Hovell said U'wiv%an picking coconin Barbados as he ooncelved Ing one acre. 10 ix-rchew with 8 Judeg iU \ : i i n> %  %  pi soart) Ol during hal ''short BtB] klon PC Elliot Urewster said that dwcllinghouse ..mi U : s '9 rr l r i '. """V, Mr u N Thanl, on October IS Jagan said "U is in a state tee was reported U> tha wo acres. £"_"... P" m _"_ •."._'!" reported to flux." r<-i-nf Police and he visited the house The Registrar and saw the door broken. were filed Louise Griffith said that she His lordship also granted UH rented part of the house occupied application for appraiser: %  by Bowen. On September II .sale of Ova rCTM ol about 8.80 a.m. Bennett came to land in the [ H. O. the house and asked for Bowen. berbntch. plaintiff, and T D f"i % % %  i %  as watchMI Structed by lit. \ %  tiff. light of the police evidence, ho man. He broke open the door had asked nil client to withdraw and after staying a short period Q I Iplea of not guilty. At the same in the room came out without tune he would draw His laOrdanything. %  hip*! attention U> Belgrave a He went at Crimes and she mange behaviour in taking the saw them speaking. She had r iding it lo Christ Church, seen Bennett visit Bowen on ,nd abandoning it. straying about nights previous to the incident. the Lodge Plantation. CfOta agamHwd, she said that Mi. Jli Belgrave ihcn pleaded guilty to she did not go and_ tell Grimes pronoune the Ltrceny of UM blcjat. Hi-, Ixirdship told the jury that ao they had been sworn to try th IKM.-S UVll ibout Mr 12 10 p.m 0f| Sejife nil he saw a man coma out <>f .< Held and • %  I Ipp awhalti with %  Jta Applovrnaite shouted for murder and he ran towards Ho did not levogni.e fRe man or %  if IhO defendant %  i %  I vol) i d Api Inayi 'i Appl.whalte. %  anoihe POJ %  LolOr for the de.'endant %  rrosi Brancker Lewis said lhal .i .i v.n em i loyod h a lo ph k the i Iroi Sgl Howard attached to Black Hock Pol re Stal said lhal ll '. Id. lit %  trota and steal Ihe %  %  Decree Absolute I I I (fit V\(lt MUM. ll G M. Griffith DI Pollca Uaglatrate at Di %  > trie! "A", yesterday fii I ihatlkmnetl had broke., the iloor. iuit ..f L G. .Mil;Cat 1 Grimes said that Benft). M.lle.. npunu.-:it. in it,. t nelt came to him on September Court for Un %  n-iitwllh hard he would ask them to give a 22 and asked him whether he was niONI .,| r ., u ( ,,,.. ndmg Leotla ^Th, ,uoreturne., a vcr.i,., o. JbrgjM *..**** D^A fb ,,,,,,,, lordship said that the hroujht no lantern at h,m. Some"fP i thiit the acruaed time after Bennett went on he "Lad) ltinlne\" On Ijust W.I. Voyage T^'^.oVdU^^r^ nouced J^ = 'iZ^XX?^ H ovid) He had lett StGeorge and' taken Bo the bicycle from Bridgetown and open after ruling it to Christ Church abandoned it and went off ing. The tvtdenco police went to show at the time he WM Mr. W. W. Raoe Hutch ID broken Da 'i*ld. appeared t tioner. Cross-examined, he said that Letters of Administration _nderGriffith had come and told him r n |h <" oult „f ()1(] . by the Bennett had broken the door. Lordship granted the petition i I that probably When Bowen came to rent the •(,,,,„; | llllk( ,, r ^y Street( g t ffering from room she told him_ that_she did Michael, for letters of admlnlrtr.-iti-.il t' the eitUite of his aunl Ethrlitie H. Ham late of B] Street. Mr. J. S. B. Dea ll ' 4d the Court that ll HW • up to Her and cuffed iiei in in i mouth. Ihe SS I.ad* Rodney i. h.iibados the 1Mb <-I N H i Radnei rails hen ictuillllig fit.iii the islandil he on Its last voyage t-i ^orne of the Coi M Guiana. STOI.I TABU Harold I Ifolaon street, Ml s '.I., r;... i and i lllton M %  i L wen mprlaonment with hard F A %  %  ulll< planlive .hilhn,.; h.nd.n. hln, a dol|£"£ %  %  "" %  • -r ,,.,, ,,n !" ,n SI Cleorac. 11 would lar note and a ahllllnf. v. I s n n... i........ i .. uly "'"'" ""' '" "' "" %  '.!..,-..,„ uiinclima Mr F. E. Field laid that the M r ,J s ;, B CK ".'" ,",,,„ ccon.r.ber !" ev"ence was not st.onj enough Si," 0 !" ^~' W ^ ,f mm ,Ti Sd hULoVSahlp could to >eopardi the accord Ubert, Pred for the pel.Uone.. %  cet Ihe Probation Oflleer to ,n by puttlns Ihe case before a Jury. ( ,..1 n!,„ The HUlorJ -I • I that hi ^m..~ merit .il nl. i: ..t on not have any money then Mr ll.irrow said that Belarave the following week .lie paid DOnkllj t'^cd to work at Mh Lordship lo rcluin Instructed ihe %  His Lordship put Belgrave on jury 1" re irobaticn 5? i month. In a guiftv. TH ,.. .: -... ' Ch. Cli. Vestry Agree To Leae lauml The Christ Church Vestry at Kent Plantation for the eftabihad rMSrUng on Thursday signed llshm.-nt of j playing field. Since Z. ",g^m.."lTor lh lease from then pavilion had been erected !" verru. enl of thr land on which and publicly opened on July 4 tha. SIC*lllt'i Village pavilion by Lady Savage .rands Sewral of the social groups In The land was bought by Covtha are. make use of the pavilion crnment some year, ago from once a week for their ducuMWns PERFUMES r>wv Aovy// ' potHtonor. M I MMMI 1-0000 0000 aarvli i • in the stadnry will he thoas membem <>f the crew <.f ihe LedNelson whO wen l:ii v. ill le laid .lf when the ship ealll nn Sunday: other" will trip south and uet ir when lie ihip returns from the Islonds. Iliamoiid lliniln I.Ol'lS 1,. BAYI.KY 11.1 ton Lane oo>aeoeo-ooaoo He thought that g l.mg-tei plmi '.f dotnlopraonl was a gac thing ft.i any couno/r, mil should bo HI relation t<> i n nuree ol Iho area wh.-le In |h i irll thOUld I %  "\< mil planning v tet-M i %  dual plannlni erith. due con ktoraUon t<> Iho area %  portk ularl] thai r. poptl lie ddkad lhal countrtoi like Borbad ihOUld pUHl fur iiiflu u >ut tins .ni.iKi mual bo done orl1 i-areful thought tn the di i %  twia %  it ant tor lhal reaaon that U i'., %  British Guiana, while vtruggll' I In Bliti fighting for Indian P< t) ith domjr I MI I MUMH OF DELIGHTFUL THAT LINGER LONGER ; /\ inn: tint rut: tXAGBS TOtn Cracker Jacks (-h.NuU Silled NuU Paaeall'a Barley Sugar Paacall'a Manhmallowi Markintoxh'B TufTee De Luge MarKlntonh'i Quality St. Aasort. Sharped Toffee De Lose Fry'i Peooermlnt Cream '-I* S HMUHT-S DIM; STONES H. JASON JONES & CC. LTD.-Distributon FOR THE RACES NOW! SELECT THE FINEST IN SHIRTS Dress Shirts I.ANVIN Arpege. Mv tin, 8eandal. Rnmeui JEAN PATON Jov, Moment Supreme. Amour Amour SCHIAPURELLI — Shocking CHANEL — No 5 CAVE SHEPHERD & Co.. Ltd 10: 11. 12, & 13. Broad Street. I!) "ARROW." %  Uiir, HINtlUN* %  M \\ VORKCR." -RKUANt E". elc.. .ir. in %  ovoral walBJai f"m SS.M to ii i luiiiiii; an enae p lliaall) sntartl <;ABBBDfNI b> "UJll in dareoo, Bolile. B'lp (ream. Mal/e 4111I I ; i. '• Alao Ihe popular "K1MH.MI \K' In a good range of plain -1 U Mill an a lane ans 1 tin nt of olhrr Sport ShlrU In fanr iaalgni from I! :. to tt.n SEA ISLAND SHIRTS ,r SPORTWKAR In While 0Bl| M II ,1 OKI v


PAGE 1

f? PAC.l n\ BARBADOS ADVOCATE MTl'RDAY. NOVEMBER . 1M BACKGROUND TO THE RACES Loudspeakers In Stands Today O, %  COPPIN) THE SCHEDULED four-day Autumn Meet of the .rf Club opens at the Garrison Savannah today lie tapes fly lo N*-I the Claas "C" and then way (or the $.400 Autumn Stak< five and a half furlongs aomottine around ISO p.m.. the proper would have begun in earnest. paui 1 -ught in the tnmendoi i • %  : UK U | %  6 |o ni %  %  etlng the atti %  11} i" with sideshow* ami all '.frown HI fbr food meaeure The Paddock %  la) a vtaii *o %  dock v ccutan. tin % %  tarriei srbo i i i i . gag?d in cn.ngina the dorses' .r > i shoes wh,*-. the> wcai al' th; ug] .lumlnum. Th?i nselvTi. There WM the constant whin T ms.r-weights — o the !in in.i.m whii h wai tslstrad enclosure i. WHJ, that i how tt i going to the track /, e rompoc will fight Slade at rfarrtafwaj on Novemaei IS Pompee May Get Chance AI World Title (By GBCHMB WHITING) Bd her* recently the tug leatlon trial Ynlanric mat dark young mun wll I > •2?"* ln nU Trinidad tints, might pTOl I %  bl> ocrupy his UBM IB puul: ,-unching i|ilml Amrn>:i Slt.dc BB i Of I il-.nri-r %  •jpaoUhg it root reasoned) cakes, gtnger beer. Haeta mtdd i anH sou I ""• %  HIHI. If good fortune attends cc ;< r > mi hack-stage manoeuvres, the pennon) of %  world title cllmlnav will be flying over the conlea contractual stlpulalio:i thtit the 10-round arnument shall be at the strict championI i.ii weight of lZst. 71b. l'rmnnter Ji.ck Solomon*, mant;ali fish cake*, rmlator-ln-ehief of string* fistic. I the likr. %  acbamtog might and main to A .-me of thf other elaborate achieve world championship 'hoie people whose taster honces for both Pompee and toucan engage iaiuiolph Turpln, without the in games of chime, tinWheel nu> petting themselves Involved of Fortune or the Luckv Dip '0 : %  head-on collision. Pompee early morning the table* versus Slade is ihe opening gamV*lBt run the Lucky Seven game bit. will b?gtn to spring up like mushTurpill's Future rooms ail over the place anil tin a i -i.nl of Turpm's opporwlO be many nn early nnd earntunitv us a middle-weijtht MIUUI.I en CTOUD at tin ,,.-.,> backhf known on November 15. when Ing a five or six or throwing Sugar Hav Robinson has to say luekv seven and eleven. whoihtr he prefers pugilism to .! T LI pirouetting a* a floor-show celebV! la ,f "* ntv. On that decision depends (Mher tsbl.s will appear at whether Turpin bids again for which others will try their luck ^miicr meeting With Hobinson claims a world title tag for a Wales Have Best Rugby Players Admiaeiofi Pxk'*?8 hu ra-i. trainers will give most of their charges a "breerc" lo clear their wind and having satisfied them%  ulves that rOicy "re quite fit they leave t<> return Inter in the day for the great event Teat The Gale* The Track Manager. Mr. K. Cor„„ihor'iUi bin will start working at 8 a.m. -. urr t Each Starting Oate i* checked i %  .UKI then %  tare kt n ispection carried "ti; to ensure that 'hi Stands and P.m-MuiueU are spotlessly clean. Then comes a detailed mspeci no! "ii 1 tr.'i k tD aaf that It la • .my obgtrucUong ilitu might causa damage to the horse* and their riders. This will t;ik> up to midday to complete and then there is a lull In activity armmri the paddock. In Just under a half an hour's time those hordes which are nght with Frenchman Charles Hume* As a second string to hi Intions. Turpin has prior DM I World i Tinser-weiKht ith tinwinner of the Dec n figiit in America between chamuiat wc pion Joey Maxim and the Ohio negro. Archie Moore. Meantime. Ihe push-for-Pompee i).-11111!. with official requests to be Itntish Board of Control, the Boxing Association of lea and the New York State Athletic Commission for his light with Slade to be rccoitniM'd U 1 eliminator tor world honViclor>' tr Dover agair Notre uame on Saturday hak placed in the lirst bracket on the With deficit of IW( Dr-x Hal. championship table in the City -"lercd on their second inmti* Division, hangeis. Dover and dl "i scored 124, thus giving Uic. amNotre Dame. If Notre Dame had opponents 17 for victory, t.. laims won their game, they would have Deane and J. ituii^s achieved th. clash been undisputed champions. With without loss, each scoring 14. ber this reversal It seems quite likely George Park added another to III witness a thrilling 'beir string of victories whr -final and rlnal for the they defeated Ellerton. Ellerton Championship of this division. scored 54 and the Par kite* replied In this division on Saturday with 84. Ellerton knocked up 82 Rangers defeated Colts by 145 m their second Innings and theli mi.Coll attci lucuig four wick vals took full potnti with ggeoca its for 28 runs added 107 to bung of 55 for 3. S. Alleyne acortd Tl their second innings total to 13.1. m the George Park first innings C. Held was not out with 4G to and Best took 6 for 31. In Oeorgc his credit; this was also the top Park's second Innings ... 'if'ponVpee'prVvaiiV'in goes score for the team. For Range further claim to meet the H. Blackman nnd Finder took Six For i \ el..ii. In the Leeward Divuion 'ycUiiie stopped the Uireat of Highland with a very convincing victory. Cyclone enjoyed a lead of 27 and proceeded to dismiss Highland for 55. J. Dottln took 2 for 8, K. Gilkcs 5 for 9 and J. Ru^el 2 for 9 (Cyclone was given the easy task of scoring 18 for victory and totalled 20 for the loss of 1 wicket. Barrows won against All Saints m the game at barrows. All Saints had nrs| knock and were dismlssWolcott ed lor 79. E. Thompson scoring us resi-wislble tor 21. 34. Barrows replied with 125. E. also added *othr sx Welch top-scored with 55 and C. Walker contributed 34. All Saints in their second Innings collapsed lot 44, D. Lewis took 2 for 14 • nd R. Boyce 5 for 15. Standard notched another vicQgy when they met Welches. -tabled outside the offlclnl pad,| raw tng with Pompee. beats him? dock are brought In. since they TnR would indeed be awkward. are required lo be in the official Perhaps it Is as well tor Pom1 uldock at least an hour before -^ hHl p,mcv Philip will not the starting of the first event. ll4 „, Haninga> to shake hand* From 1 pm. pail-mutuel nttenw] h slade List UnM that pleasdafltS, owners, trainers and enrly linl i|ujg ceremony took place, it •-ace-goers begin arriving in 5Cl (l( n a npark m Slade that he gteadv flow that Increases in ,. X p|oded our Don Cockoll right n omentum ns the hour tor the i((ll nf ., W))t [d championship fight Btartlng nf thp first event draws wtth JoPV Maxim. Once is quite nearer and sets in motion a many enoUK h for that kind of oatassided pageant, the stage for which trop he haj been in rotlent preparation Cloak-and-DagK*"' long ago Tommy Ryan, 18-year-old clerk. I .un.|spr-. 1 k. WM knocked out boxing for LonThe Barbados Turf Club are a:on of which city he is UM 4)xp|iinejiting U>-day with re„ malcuI feathcrweigbl champion laying the Rediffusion descripti"n aaainst Berlin. On rcco\'ering of the race through loudspeak^e immediately allowed it t" '" ers placed in :he stands Then* known that he was in future to Ihas been eonsioenMa demand | (C regarded as a professional, for this experiment f No Power gcrs' first innings score was 2fu> outplayed Sunset. Sunset had the N'one of the above-mentioned and that of Colts was 71. advantage of a first innings lend of course, has any belfield scored a victory against when they scored 95 and di*conlor world chamBordeaux. Belfield raised 139 and missed Greens for 19. But failed pionship accolades but their Bordeaux replied with 128. Second miserably in their second innings paroval of Pompee innings score of Bordeaux was 83 and the total just reached double Welches lost the toss and were all d" no harm to the f nr 9 declared while Bordeaux figures. Greens replied with 67 out for 81. Standard replied with totalled 37. Skinner took 3 for 12 for 2 to win the game. For 74 for 7 at the drawing of stumps md Robinson 5 for IS. Greens, Harper took in Sunset's on the first day. On the second econd innings 3 for 5 and Ixrde day Standard scored the runs to Central Vtctoriea i for 0. Brereton -cored 42 not obtain a lead. Welches in their Boys Club won their match in out for Greens. second innings were all out for the Central Division against Drnx Union Globe took first inning* M, H. Goodridge took 4 for 14 Hall. The Boys Club added 18 to points from Invincible. Union and O. Denny 3 for 15. With 73 their overweek score of 211 for Globe scored 108 and Invincible runs necessary for victory In I, totalling 229 for 4. L, St. Hill replied with 36. Union Globe col90 minutes Standard made a galwho had scored a century the lapsed for 59 in their second InInnt attempt to force victory and previous day added 17 to his total nlngs and at the close of play succeeded with 15 minutes to lo bring his score to 130 not out. 'nvmcible were 90 for 9. spare. %  nadfl 1 hox -office. In passing, if any American the slightly punch-worn J..ke 1-aMottn should be preferred ir the world cruiser-weighl hierarchy, let It be noted that Jake has twice found it inconvenient to put such mutters to the lest against Pompee. Supposing Slade improves upon hia performance at the While City last June, and. instead of ..Is. ea g g*S listen. The broadcast takes place protounn nee* Station ZNX 32 7 547 Lincoln. Kileeyclcs, 30 78. metres. nport 1 It Is at These Alterations Would Improve Our Racing Km the Durban July H.tiuli in which there is cotudderabM ante-post beunu-. loere is a final Keptanea tl days before the nee, and no horse can be with. .11 wiL. IthOUt ' peimlwor tht stewards, after noon on that day. They send their own veterinary Though Britain i:. the natural surgeon lo Inspect ai\y horse whu i >id and foundation for racing a trainer wishes to withdraw after '.hroughout the world, there Is that tune. hardly any Country where racing la staged that we could not gain era from supporting i can d id ate in some small item for the improve:hl the game by 7 runs. For White Rose Vaughn scored .17. Scott 26 and M. Haynes 34 not out. C.M.P.C. gabled first innings points from G.I.S. C.M.P.C knocked up 62 and G.I.S. replied with 42. C.M.P.C. wore all out for 42 In their second innings and the close of play found G.I.S. 62 for the loss of 9 wickets. Penrode took first innings points from Rangers "B" with scores of Penrode 130 and 47 and Rangers 66 and 66 for 4. Belfield "B" lost six points to Chamberlain. Belfield were given 74 runs to win but foiled by 8 runs. Chamberlain's second innings score was 89. For Belfield E Dyal took 4 for 20. S. Belgrave 4 for 12 and K. Davis I for 23. Belfield in their second innings totalled 66. For Chamberlain S, Rowe look 5 for 27 and F. Howard S for IT. Will Play B.C.L. The following have been inv ted by the selection committee of the Barbados Cricket Association tn oppose the Barbados Cricket League at Kensington Oval on December i, 13. and 20. C. LWalcott (Capt.). H. Barker, R. C. Branker. C. De PsUa, G. N Grant, C. C. Hunte F. King, R. E. Marshall. G. Sobers, C. %  Smith. E D. Weeke* and C. B. Williams. Players are asked to notify the Hony. Secretary of the B.C.A. in the event ol llieir being unable t'. %  pt the invitation lo pliy. SOY' OH BOY.'! DANCE TO-NITE NOVEMBER 8.1932 1 Baeas mifeV P Crenrt Orclietlri r iel I > I ... Hle.prMervarv My lh* W V aivin* Lova succor BIKI proieci ( them" 1 WMT iu*r r.asr — *<*•• isaaB* This Room 1* opan Tuaaday> i h Wr< FrldSV*. fiom IS a.BV %  %  to S B-m and on Salura' 19 a m ar 1. 1* ->. k The Board of Management of l.e Barbados Cncket Association 1 The Welsh are the finest playat their meeting yesterday after1 ers of rugby football in Europe, noon at the George C ...lie !" and considering the size Jt iheir Memorial Stand agreed to m: resources the beat in the wori.i crease the price* thai have bss.11 ; (writes Hylton Cleaver) charged for admission lo KenaingNow. so excellent is Welsh un ton at International and Interco, derstanding of those fine arts of lonlal fixtures recently (or the '. rugby, which seem beyond most fixtures with India next year. : .then in the DTttMl Isles, thi.1 The admission to the Georgo < we find this result m the South. Challenor Stand that used to l w The only player who ran be *l-20 goes to 1.44. Kensington said to have enhanced hi repuStand from tl.00 to f 1.20 Uncmtation 'n front of a selector "ed Seats from 48c. to 60c., whih; recently. when Eastern Grounds and Schoolboy Stand: Counties beut Kent was W. J. remain at 1/-. Season tickets for How ell*, a full-back from Guv'the George Challenor Stand go Hospital. And he is a Welshfrom $10 to |)2 and for the Kenm m> singrnn Stand from 38 to $10 The only Cambridge University Coansntttees i-uuide who makes any impression The Board appointed Messrs on the critics is their full-back. j. M Kidney, S. 0*C. GiUens P. M. Da vie*, a Welshman. J W B Chenery and the Sec The finest player of the game in reUry. a committee to deal with .nv pusitu.,, in Metropolitan rugby matters arising out of preparais Gerwyn Williams, who. fortulions for the tour, nately is available to Middlesex; Messrs B. DeL [nnisE A V. and the one full-back vsho would Williams and E. L. O. lined *ei(i almost cenainly have been capped appointed a Grounds Committee. by England in recent times had Mr. F. A. C. Clalrmonte, BarIt been possible, was J. M. H. bados Selector on the West Ind e* Roberts, a Welshman like the Cricket Board of Control, furnishBthara, ed the Board with a copy of a Brian tloobbyer, staying behind letter 10 Mr C. A. Merry Secrc:n the Far Fas', to expound moral tary of the West Indla-t CTlrkf'. rearmament, mav coach the JapBoard of Control, informing him gnese at rugby. I only hope somethat for various reasons he had body would come here and coach deeded to resign as a West Indies us. Selector. Who better than a select body Regret of Welshmen? mere are the Slr Mu „ C ollymore. President, people here to do .. Ww did we Mtd (ha XM aU regretted any let Claude Davey slip right out of rwuttm> ha had M Mr ,,,„,* the game necause he was 100 old mon te to resign but as this matter to ,R on P'* y g "; „ ^u' <• suddenly been presented to While be played for Berkshire ,„,.,„_ ln had oun ^ &„**&£ he nOtOUW inap-red the s.de-he unablf „, make deflnile decUlun Instructed it. and there is no one at ,j, a hme> Hc instmeted tfle nowto tin -HL %  Secretary to summon a meeting Through referees eyes f„ r November 21 at which the In Lonuon is II. M. Bowcotl. matter would be discussed and a Cambridge Blue and a Cardiff-man i^ocwos' to Mr. Clalrmonte ape ght caps for Wales. At pointed. the close of-ftt. immense use tn Wasp To-day he is a selector. But is he club? I doubt if coaching Middles*--. ne was of Middlesex .aching a even if he be Will Act He further instructed the Secretary to write to Mr. Merry informing him that Mr. Clairmonte had notified the Board of his re. si gnat ion, which they all regretted and that they would hold a to spile Mr. they would inspire more faith. I T hr ^L kn ^^,^Vi^^a -"•"" %  on November 21 I L?^?^fereex y i l7?r* Z P"" "ssor. mewwhil K H ITJ^A M R.S Clalrmonte had agreed to handle Vref J e^hVmuchoeTer,dea f ~T5*&}r*Sf* **of all the folly gomg on m the dos until November 21. scrum, and around it. than any— — one sitting in the stand, and clubs Cardiff, that ihe South Africans would be wise to get such as these awarded a Springbok's hegd as to go down to a club after they being the only club which deservhave refereed a match and help ed to beat them—and d*d not. them to see the game through 'No coach' Welsh eyes. Of course Welshmen de someL^cturing is not enough. Prctimes try to beat the referee; but tical exposition on grass Is want9l least they know they sre doing ed. so. and they give it up as soon as The Wasps became a force in they realise the powers of ebserthe game as soon as they played vation 111 the referee. against the Welsh wizards. They My point about half the rugby learned something from every een by the clubs, the counties, game. They play Newport, and and even the universities is fhat Cardiff twice in the season, and !>,. players don't know they ore Swansea once. And they get th' doing wrong. encouragement because the Welsh And believe it or not. I asked like the way they have learned. this week who -was coaching So it goes on There were seven Welshmen In the Devon hide which has jut beaten Cornwall; goodness knows how many there are in any police fifteen; no public school eomparOxford University this season, and received the answer: "No That )ust about explains, I think, why a South African only ppear there in be certain able In size'lu's anything like tho of his place. They have all been record in international honours of coached always. Llandovery; and in town Londi Welsh have struck their flag only once this season and then to another Welsh side. The last w inner* oi the Army inteT-unit Rugby Cup were the Welsh Guard--; and it was to The Spiingboks on their tour here were coached from the day they arrived to the day ihey left. And who coached the opposllon we put up against ihemT The) same answer: "No one." UE.fl. iudin0" si*a U> £ur LtMom. and uprtaM Oi %  he n'iarm at V r paacafL whataer Oh. may ol country, and Utaar aaaaatoaasssss set H** 5 P" Vsiia S the* 6 V0i FRESH FROM THE OVEN n*:n.u IOVS OMI.T Wiv p<-r .' lb Pk. On Sale at all leading Shops & Groceries tirt Samr To^lat. 'CJ THE W.I. BISCUIT Co.. Ltd. THEY ARE VERY USEFUL AND CAN BE OBTAINED IN OUR HOME PRODUCTS DEPT. PtMcd Skin lluiftn x Sl.M %  MB PaiaUd Drtn Hanpn at .24 each Pointed Pitin.jt llaapr. M .M rack Covrrrd HaaKrr% at A0 each Covered Flowered Ilancrn al 1.00 Will rrrve 0. Chrlmno. Otl CAVE SHEPHERD & Co.. Ltd 10. 11. 12. & 13, BROAD STREET MHOJVE 4267. 44.76 tor BIRKMYRE CANVAS for Tarpaulins 3' wide (a) $318 par yard ATLAS "A" WOOD PRESERVATIVE S ( lii. drama 30 00 1 fin. tin. 4.M Vt fl. Una I. SISCGLIN DISTEMPER Supplied in Powder Form in White, Buff, Cream, Peach. Oreen. Bine and 8unhine in 3" 2 lb package! at 83c. par lb. Bong lo Ma aimpl Htf "ith water. WILKIMSON & HAYNES CO.. LTD.



PAGE 1

^r p„ <-i. mu BARBADOS ADVOCUE #**# Calling *THIE following were gucaU a: • u il Gov%  la bur i H Mi. i I Gale Mr a Ml i G • HtMtlMi MI STK B I-..-Mr A Ml • Jar* a, MiJ %  Mix Mmd-M MM Mr. I i M M.K.-I I Mra. It C Mlch-I.n. Mi J Mi. r K Milter, Mr Mr* J F % %  %  Cap. a Mu r C Peri". 1 CM. %  It 1. *lte Mr. 11 Phillip. Hn r rRaieon. Mr. & M. II ft.iHl.ll Mr W W. B. Ifci!-i s MrI • > %  I A HIMUW. Mr Mra. J H tt.Hai Mr 1.. Flrar Mon *it Mi K lady Saint Sir Uaui-ar A Lady San. Mr fc C HlMf. Mr M L Mi. • Mr J. L Bterl MMBT Mia. a A Stetito f"l A W r Button Mr A Mr. I P T.% .< Ml A Mi. | K W.I,,.11. M| Mn r I. Walaati. Mi A, M. ii w.ta-op M. %  Mi. i* a P WaaMV I) i %  Suraary i > MM .aland la -.prim tne I iyi at his hoi Branch, who I one QT the thi %  %  hie, is -.p-n. He jt* %  %  • in.) thai h* mlends %  vi v after. Bl .liah -"thwali, aon ul Mi 4 ChCM*. •'•irojeaw, CticUM H-aad haa MM \.:r .culture OaVcr In liiiliah for the PMI four years. TlMrJF rc gl*-l' at Chelsea I I to MA* • rtsat %  m i lt .a dWand. and aa-a*> ta-ru.** '-arl h".irDon' ivn (unBBanl. run M*r :l I. %% %  il i(.aaal-0>— V" 1MB*, In Bill BUHIUI. M%  ..%  BJ HLI U MM <-*aXf > i • *" n %  I*.I-I. %  Yaw ran IIM -.in n Ba wba Has* and araavh And ar.Mi fo ii i.i • Bl i. iiMUMi ta itiriai Onud rajra (of Tou nidtit all.v. ear a il naiivaa Jual da* t M <*ai BBM *•"'— •" "n. .,-Ma H-v a a. M Holiday /„ / A . *** maamh-w -/ Uaa> laa^-Laa-i-Sqi .iirraur* i ftta PI i nat, Riiil.am i day hom man %  %  BRIGADIER Hlr Robert and Lady AruBdcll wha next year indrlL UovernorDaaiinat* of Harbaa> aipr-rled to ntrlc in thin UUud aarly K ..i, Wcdnc-Kja-by thai s (akfliblr where ihe had been ; ,> ttding .i holiday. To &r. AH, %4ikK paaalnUalM landenctaa dat in waja yal la ba un%  O.I'apiP a IIIIIMMDKB i.im*imn-UM. )l lad aalaa poa.lbl* I -d illKiHlr t.,*ard arllvl i il>iiik. Aral, man inaHa rt in i IXMI I* la !..,.>_ Biinunala . Itoll % %  .-. >rodwM much Yu hi m >analbl* HPBttail laNI'ABT 1 la-Vav"; l\*il All 11 n ol %  jpeuad On* D .niond Sorih D-d On Henri and FaM i i I M l • auu DB>*1 "•> •<> %  k'w.u.< .iai n v.*.uri MofihV limilBl ovrrcall Weat reopened tht *ddin| %  IIB lafca-caji a' o %  rcafhad oPtrai! <>' Ttire* MoTrumia> Hearu Bern* S iqaportid noru. .rl a iib lead ami Watt *a* allowed lo dee'Of) otn trlcia beiore trai'.aca wa.' d '0 lle-iri? In Room • our ttouu. uiav-r bid To Hearu and IBMlblM Waal "a Threa So Tr- w tor a o>-naliv of BOB $x srn's*.Iai•-*.. %  • SATIKDAV. SDM.MBEa . 1U Suffocating "Hot Flashes" stopped or strikingly relieved In 63-10% •' catas n doit 0 „ i**M • Are }u n^unc '.hrouh you know what i( ha dona "chance of Ufa MM. I r of/ierj/ ': >SS AWm. '•: weaknr.o and inner tjpa* Ji>*eit liaatreaa of this ul::' Then JriT-'a hope for C m I • In teala By Oottora. ydli. Pn. Klin:. pounn and Tabina Have relief frmn nuh ill In IJ and so-; ir#*i)ecUTBT,' of Uie caaea lasted CoBipfefe or tlriktng relief I aurrly yuu know that Lydta Plnkluim's U acieiflHcaiiy %  aWJarfi, at acmml burely I -ttiaam.. I'lOBCXIH a/Hi. ad iBaa| KHAKI %  .in.i aaisi %  ID ii a BJ p ia II ..II*dlit> I Jad ~i \ y %  Res MIS raj \i L % %  la* PLAIN HA1X MlBaMa apaaaai r.nii-. "i* i'ii iiAMr Hnlift-l IIIM KEI "ISTIM !" k ivtgov in.. ** BJITMKBI "" "'••"• -.-'.I k aotmr. n> Bixiue "•ea. A Wa... in, PAINIIM, mi I mm, HUM ,| N I PANTH UNI IIOOI.1I Mil 1IHIS %  i in: i I Pit... I In. 11-./. />.>//. O/ Ml -Mftffou AB* II W 'I M" II %  • a arm. -I>m altn ,.!• IBI> iidl<*-oI-Kutd Ba* W y-u ptaaa a bit tauld flai* with ra-ea lavo naklr uMa, Dan'I ml., out Ihrauali l.mll.h Ml %  \M i; MiOinall. Man >ampall a, Mia Wjln Capt W. H It Ainv-trwa* 'A D f i • Batra A D C i > .\ n i %  aiui are day a. HotBl. MM Peel anada, arrived in Qu i Thuradav last bg TCA uending %  wctka hoti•mesta at C.irruhnnk Dr. I' i..r Unvd Sill I COL H M. IXOYI>sni.l. Mninal Supcnn'*'" %  '•"' '•' the Mental Hospital iiccompanled by hta wife Dr Marbara Lloyd-SUII, Denial Sm coon, returned to BarbadtMt on Monduy la.t by HW1A 10 Rf Mi, i.liMt-stilU wore away for ftv* months on an extenalviof Europe, vtnltln| places as UelKiuin, Swilxerhinn. V' in.,. Italy, France, and then %  Lavul -Col Llojd-Sttll also I %  coolwr. th leading IN.vrhi.ilrLsr H. v.. ,! lnvi'i.) I,, nhw-lvithe most modern mot hods of BtUnaoJ in UW live IIIKK-1 Mental HoBpitals In tho United Itatai Hi* Itarbaru -Ito had the opportunltj of see-Ins thi MWffaM iraffdmontl in Dentiatry In Euiope after which the complete*! worklnR In the New York UntiVntal Clinic. [rN Uoyd-SUIu told Caxlb i trip BAM Vciv pi,-.!ant OB* .iHhuiiRh on I .v thai IndMd very happy to hotn*. Iliov proceeded in ihc N'ew ABDBlerdant to Now UMri f)ew in Hnrbadox via Puerto Rico I Ueul ( o| it M UajyaJ Si.II For Kutv* M lt K. VINCENT-BROWNE. retired Senior Puisne Jinl-jc •i nf the 'Fiimddd Tuif Club wa.*. :itnnna the pasKcngen arriving in the talnnd by B.W.I.A. yesterday. Hi '. tOfM orot f.'i l|M BMOJ and i% .i guent at theHotel Rny-ri A l^O arriving hy *he BUM opportunity wa* Mi. Ihiiiaj s.ii ,-. \rr.,ted Wat* rCton f Sn Fernando. He i'1'i and la a Hue*! at Indramer Qaja-g M YhHid htand* C OL. A. WAKKFIELD SAUNI1EHS i.f l^Hminjiton. St. 'iirned homo b) BWIA Rfun i-ivnitf VIBRB to Sl Viiinnt (Innadii nnd Trtnlndi Ho wni accompanied hv hiwife i. McLAl'CHIN r 1 ^!!! h..> boon told that the -1 Street. Mon**"' %  • '>* %  -%  "t AU i %  nc.ir Ramsuate. I is aiked to call at lira. A. Burton, Ptne Road l"t Ukfj dolls. "le 'M oraanlaed by I %  Hi, u ifoiiiiay KM nmtfy M l of M' H <. Heatdent %  iiidn-.-ei I lime \ low, Kntcrpr ( in tii t i her Mvo on fawndu is 1CA Mfa |.>ndliit annul foul iioiui.'v a rtn hoi t II) % % %  .i ; homo unain. tfontv \jlvr t'uur teaftV* A rm lour yoori with th* B-AlDO] HI Coiiii niv ui Caaado, Mi. (, %  : by II W I '. %  Hall Tt'ti.K'e. i i,ust church. AlBO aliu ill, lion. ( .. 'A'innipeg. Bho will i of Mr<. M rW Tayloi ilso of Graemo i %  Ituuiiu-s* in I i'il-u^.ir-M R. S. W l IH| M .., SH. .-i. rot 1hioulotiy mi ThuiMiay b> T.CA after spe-ndiBg ons DWaUh. away on tuisinOBs and uleaiure combined. Ilmui, li.lay in Now Ymk ho also taw Mr. S. Alimaii. his brulhor-lnJw, PropiHtoi ,.i UMJ Bargain -. i.f Swan Street. Mr. PlUaawdOf-f b.ld Carib thai %  i trip tanu an *'*#• .!(/ llvir i (UTULATIONS to Hi. fired Gay uo the .irth o( it no,, )Ma nelr w K| tn took pleo ..fternoon. .ui elojaui nnc. 4 LATUI^TKaWa ,„ ^^^^ff'^JSKS^^^ VToppul lyalf^ i;l r .rltilt.ir.ra. -ill wiwk the birth of BOB BDd hoir • ISUt NovB-nbar. Mr: Toiipin wa* the former Mil '..•yara. BY THE \\ AY y mumemm 'hifnra p| kn) PBdeaei Dir-rvi am wwn a-wall avaia friaticinatk-m. Lad-Malar* MrHMiata ol: Naiva. Bn-nai 1 AM i ... Esq. tho impression that I wa* ooBftBawg .i necessary r implementation of .. %  made by a '-ttoiough ovt oxlstlng priorlUea with the deel' a haic icheduhsatloii already urvdertaheti by the regittation authorttlas. controveraleB It is importanl not to IOMI siglu of pflnM tanur*. Slmultanoous duplwation fan never hi..riyilung but a tenBtJee expedient, with the object M M'duiing delay to a minimum %  ,f .. -I..| :-nrt:uiting of %  % %  mial exchange of permits alIMailed for diftrlbutlnn tn .ommitteea. It Ii when .he %  •umulative eflect*. o( redund.itions threaten to bottle%  teck the various channels of allo...ii.>n that the whole question i-i.>me*i one of overall departi i-'niallaalionarv revision. Mill. AGAIN The famous INGERSOLL POCKET tmd WRIST WATCHES Obtainable only From . "Yanr J.w.ll.r. 211. llr..nd Si. Phone 1M V. De LIMA A tO. LTD. -• MB D %  IIOXT BOTAL I ily A Tnmorro-v %  '" %  • %  ] a i %  I %  Jimmy Hoiantt I'-I.u II ,. q II.. WEEKENDWITH FATHER (Birpiai I.MK i *a rai t ITOB1 Mhn,> Tl.l wiui La aMMa %  tan r.in At rha 7t> and Nrwa B*l TN. ox-nu. mllytt mm A PUii-Plllr^l Boff nd .„.**,,.. „„, .,„,. .,„, 1 with Jim Bamion I-. i i ii 1 aw a d aa-dar -I i QOINO B5a f I To-day al I no sun i MKNOII v %  1 Mualralli nio\ ANli nit -i vimn v Ti.-nil Wild Bin rjnr.ii II Uf -M IN SI. -i mi or %  •II I". IM. I I' ...II, T-'.-inU-o.-i-ri |NU in* S \V MO I. I '.. II. .iH-lliV Wll I ill -IMlll.l .11 It. iv lt..-* Starr III laaBBTJ < piaaptni JoJui Dahi IO--.II i (U LOBE % %  aaM T t t A KKAI. KKD HOT STACK SHOW Starring : REX HARRISON lanwlr-'. Mlunl rvrlwil Thr llarr-d.vH mi \\l,..lI..I. lh.il %  re gaatialiai !• lrj\r ... .IM-II hounH ::ii U.OH KKUI SHEEK $1.44 WHITK SIIAKKSKIN 11.74 A $2,113 •X" t.MB' MOKCAIN (In nil -haaM) S1.2H SHEETS 7* ion $S.7S SHEETS so I (Hi ... -,„ SHEETM mi 100 $7.72 PILLOW CASKS IK M $ env HI TTKK MUSLIN 43 cl. I MIILS SILK PANTIES II n, |o ll.li I MILIIRLN'S roTTON PANTIES II K. la B rlt. ( Hll.nHEN'S SILK PANTIES 52 rim. I.. 11 i( IIII.DIU S S COTTON VESTS II c |a |„ 7, i, ZZZX ",." >*!*'** *~ ""M-d


PAGE 1

1 IIMHt \lins \H\IH\TF HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON zs FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD .... BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES -"eNOk-V, BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG JOHNNY HAZARD BY FRANK ROBBINS F THep can I, n BRINGING UP FATHER /fiEVSN O0£ 1 : N OP Jl&SS -SOOOJEt IS ALMOST CVEB RIP KIRBY UY ALEX RAYMOND ; KF tuAr &; %  IM GIWW3 VJXONE lACTCMAN'CE 10 IMK. MOTORIST Do You Know That The Best MOTOR OIL CASTRIH. it vm I •, Ml'l LlniMat lifktly fa* iwir YN aaaVl n. "Stoaa**" raw da n aaa>ei.iii l^inmlr-" —' wr -I f HM'II BBS33l_ Sells at ONLY 23m. per pint ; r.-u.i. i it-it A 17/ AND ARRANGE POk YOUR COPY OF THE DAILY TELEGRAPH with .ill the UtMt World New ADVOCATE STATIONERY Broad Street and Orryslone. Hastings IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL OFFERS AVAILABLE THURSDAY TO SATURDAY AT ALL BRANCHES Ulll.lly NOW KLIM — 9 lb. Tint .I4 5.75 i III AM I HAI KtKS-bi::, Tin* 1.44 1.211 GRAPE FRUIT JUICE 2 24 VI STOUT 3H .2. SCOTT'S LIQUEUR RUM \M 1411 KINGS BEES 26 .22 GOYA AIMS VIPTS Nrla of Tollrt Soap Perfume III Hal Bonn Treasure C'heol with Kerehlefa In It ... on hrUliii.lv I r .1 ,. la Shade rl.l.r. I'rrlumed Calaane Powder In TIIM rhebtma* Sloekina* Bit A*ortment of I lin-un. I'rarker* (hrlatmaa Paver ftl.eo per Baa I .to .. .. 1.6a 1.10 .. i.os 71 n M ill II eenla per sheet D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street Stationery Gifts A L WA YS A I I'I'll 11 1 .1 T BD %  OIPT STATIONERY in Bom* im A PENCIL SETS LEATHER O00DB BEAUTIFUL XMAB CARDB i it i or i TB STA miMit v ht BY GEORGE MC. MANUS gS SOLE AGENTS INTERNATIONAL TRADING CORPORATION LIMITED TIL WE CAN GIVE YOU NEW BEAUTY! ll'-f %  lie-li.,r f ll hi 4WMRd>. A r-4.iapl.rte • i.lour tour, Auburn, blend*arid olhr-r lovely iWrr, • Vallhoilt \Ar*. I, .,,.. ortiut. lindilishiI..I. i.il. •ad ivri. r*iilra>t* — •titi-t SruiWt *r riam out in %  jiffy. U tu lUnour -I...... NEW HAIII COSMETIC %  IV mi HANDIOX o, **!> ALL DAV LOVII.IVF** CAN BF VOIRS-THE LITTLE SHOPJOHNSONS STATION'FRV Bl II.OINCI. BBOAII SI llllllh Tilt: IMIII RANOF. OF BANDBOX FRFPARATIOVS FOR fill HAIR



PAGE 1

PACK EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATURDAY. NOVKMBr.R S, 1SJ2 CLASSIFIED ADS. ILLimONl *0e I oil MLE U*l rri>„r'. of %  • ill HBV to* IMa faldaora **-'"" %  ".l. Can Villaaa -i 4 J" to-day *aa U.. %  IfuUr 1IM. M bury Ciw'm rilia*. anahn hMM Bee* %  ,a-*>*. V-aat I *<•• • I. %  .HI*... It.,. I. IN MrMOKl AM b> INMnrad rid l.or, m— > %  •' Ml bolsveJ *MV rnothat a ho p n i l M thr srrat brv. on Novnnber BUi 1MB In be remrmbrrrd b> — VlViMt llftWl ihuU.anei. Tony l %  VOL. i.n. %  u iM0M>ri ii .%  i %  IMftfHl "OS t 41 111. %  I lhr> %  *>. U I1IM.II l\ I .sifMjtarfcs:: \hV On* il*nl %  kVT mi n.udrl • — and BalMry aa* Dial *SS on i. M BBJ I *unda. IMHSIIV VI \HiKib Bra I. Hall. : '"ins %  % %  : Hoa* • *.•**. •• I .!• IMM Md HUaoW ?,, MtVF A MMMI Fifty Tons Of Dollars Harry Goading RED COMRADE ACCUSED OF STEALING WIFE swrrPM-AKF TICKBT a, .uthrr P; .. UtfTTJl llfJM. O Malta aim 1 K liu v l,i,i %  l.-lrr Inraei Bktgka ,.1:1 I \S Van. aha d*ed a* Novrmbor Mb I*" I do M tiaed a apai-i-i To brine >ou tc. my mind. Th* dn I -n i Eryi Menu Ui.i r.(d*M Aw... ...In llrni i Hind*. Oernaaar 11 awl. daughtria-u law) a II I. Hurt in I mm (aUin .md raeUtei Hop* D*rd .>n •"• of Notraila-i <•* and Mary R Hopr died 111*, ol October, i Mo Uod stanl >ou uoUi %  Br*r iwMMBrf By Vai lamUy I.IVKSTIHK UU I-. %  ". La) Co* %  > PU of mm Mh Appu iMnri Clark HI MUM. H 11 U .'r TICK FT* L...I TWh-U larM* VJ I'l HI l Mil M KS NOTICE loi the. Poultry and Una .in , ukaN u. Mr K Edward. Jonr. A Swan ProWnrrhuaw. HM> atrrrl ntrnirv M %  ONKAI. S,.l-l , • INK MI'U .ii.l CART Apply II A ..i.bina to Lid 31 RuoBurk *•... %  Ml -I .. %  IM.I II IU HANK • t*a rrrdllar. halain* • a* .1*11, Ida %  I'"" %  •I"*" ana Wail-li* riant*. tasaa, HI r*\*t I \hl MiTUR. Ih.l or Iha Tl.iMoai il Iha abota Plantation, am *bOMl H ibUin a loan l CXAOO ui,.i< I % %  • M Hiabovp PtaaM ^ ,i, nj nlK.ral >.-.r IU1 In mono ha, bran alrrady borrowodl n raapact ol math yr.u 1th ita> ol Novrmbar, HU T A arrntNs and ii eiiAUdWOK %  par C K PACKKH K.I I< I •aainat Ihi t -t Vtt A.i MECHANICAL M 4i r*i-.'i!.n A mi io*a "'> m yarloua tir.ar Ifc" — Hi NOTICE M %  i .. %  -! %  I* roaBfinilbta |M ndaM or • l andjadt H as Ihr .raw of tha OK larvtaa iiurmg hai Xat in H %  STHMM Tapt MB'UI. U.-.ny (fc Co.. Lad Til M Jn I OK HIM IIOTISFS ItHOWNSI/OWK 1 %  lack %  *• l>ta,w ,, 9 b-droonu and l a i 01-11 D A FAHAWA1 I iMWd j t*a m si Philip i plant. Wnlarmlll "uii\ Carui-rt Vvni.l room Monthi* irnt •P' t'l>K •laanainn .h.u(a. IN ADVANCE Dla „„, I II 11 Hi. %  %  i.ht-d *-brd %  %  l S %  prvaal rOORH Udhtla* i.lanl. "•. nslll • %  *41f, AttVANCB Dial Tally I MRATHAI LAN ' %  pui RDH ling ftat'igtr.t't HUM I r I OFFUKS fS r P 2w% A iP --'dV^ nui •a. *B Co %  .IM-ir.n. KtWINii MACHINr I>na -lodar S" .. >va..( V .ida.. alv %  i Padwum CIMntr, yanr inn* -.0 Dial 4JM (IIU in MIS( F.I.I.ANKOUS CAM'-KA Una ZaiM U | Taaaar Laria and Compur K.u With -*--i*i> % %  '"" I -< la I v.iii n m, wltn caor l'ru. I Mr llluinnon. C Knl.hu -1 II U in %  Irll .md llnwall !..• Pllmo IfKirtatar With %  odd 4 dll % %  !. -illi tnar PTH-O Udci M i onlart Mr i R ghi I 7 II M 'n C'AKr PLAMTH IUU-.I and Ita4 |wo (i E Our 1'l.nU al Ohou ^t . -.ml. -Id hUu-KM Kandai PWniaiwn. SI John in *iillna T II II an cilW'l'ljlil SAW lara 'i ^ MM) — %  (Id MW. k.. ..china all %  N COH1CI A MAOAZtNCfl A *T i i" JOHN WAVM1 AHU'i I mid M rt* Tin. ftO, | I |i HT-1 i. .UtATIONS. | i IRIil VAKIITV %  2S~. dl.cn.int I. -nil* L Baylay. Bolton Lanr Smtr.li IWI hall II' mil lout II Ura Miahwlral I' %  NOTKF. mi i .*i !i >r it A T KI..I. iprooa i*. N.-. IkixMri Uriiaui.a tMrildt-cdJ-ninii Unit— i:-' mijlhty, 46-lon i:HtUir un LS not unJ> the UKWI jKjw*r1 ::yiUiiK macnine of it, kind ui Iht world It u almost foolpns. In Koffi get (iu> Low'.liajr'Dtn Hotrai Iruth HuaMf. own prow w in think hit m*n would hnv< been luat aa anroaclva irm"* with prdal-drlvpn biicult tin* Beet TaaJu Bui now, orU'i a Vttl K-j-I Armouiod, Cosy* Ui.vnijitou. 1 raaluo he apoki Ui aiitu-lc tiu'.Ji when lie -. the machine we aro now gou^j w ataypjy lo tiie Noith AtUiiln: Tieat> armies |for doliaraj waa in. oesi lauik in tha world." Aiid 1 can wail under*uiiU"i< 1 wao able to drive one of Uieae monatern. 11 1* sunnier to steer. by the two iitler leveis, than Da) 10 h.p. car, and alihough 88 time* aa yuwerful there la noUiuui harsh or fjIfTalentrui about the engine. The "Cent." ii juat over H faet wide and has five forward •pceda. but neither feature prove.! as alarming as It sounded. The roost aatoniahuig gami-i • the automaUc stablllaer ' %  on the turret. With this the gui layer can shoot accurately *ven when grincllng and lurchln, bvea broken, twisting country. Again, after five mlnut* ..ttuctlon. I found Ihli nWtt %  nmple to operate. As one who can ml" a eroquei ehooi had begun t teii on his •rl by the specMlist whom he 'oniulterl to live In if ha wanted to prolong hi* life for any time. Hooding knev.that by ttayI it* many-*ni'o actlvttlei he would horoan hit life. Yet he resisted 'he pleas of hi.* fam!l> and; wends and stuck lo hi* poet, 1 %  rffemng lo spend the few year* •-t till remained to h.m in •ctive endeavour. Th warning ol 'he ssaeclaUaa proved only toe Urea and m April 27, IftHl, be t'ssd nfler a severe heart attack. (•onowng had Ihua proved to tie* >i that he believed above .'verythlag else in ronscM-ntiou. ndeavour It U the leaaon he ';iught all who came under Ms i fluenee and hia life had shown ihundantly thai he was not afraid "o carry his own egh %  rTect. A lesner man miK"' IssJrl -etired to grieve nver the gtorie*. he had known at Oxford. Ooodng missed the cloistered pear-' %  f the university, the intellectual timulua of academic life, the nmp.iiiv of scholars who played notable part In the history of f. Course of arigland. the op(KHiuiulia* he had left behind t make original contributions to learning. But he was not the mai. to pine over what might hav.batB Though hl5 special gttXcould nui find adequate scope in Barbadv. he resolved to make hinisBl( of maximum service to the Island and his work at Harrakao College and the lytdge School U an enduring monument to his mTnory. His .-olleague %  rat pupils knew that he wee rich ID the -choler"* gift btrt. in the words of the poet, they came to prize even more the richness of his heart, the cheerful humour that remained undismayed, the industry that never flagged nor shirked, the hand ever outstretched to help, the brain ever ready to understand the cares of other and to lighten thus the burden thai it shared. Mm Saturday — Cencladlng \rtlcle-lNNISS and WirtlHAM ZAUKKii V/ugi Nov. 5 One leading Yugoslav mat auaed another of steeling ha. Wife and thrri* the PBW*J Corggreaa esto upr with Maralial Trn> labellmk: tn e theni loudly driuanded that .lr. OJurlc be i-xpeUed front the r.irty at once. Mr Djiia. revealed that partL'asiiMiMUon had larvestiK.ited afr. Stambolic eevurai months ago on this and other accusations and found him guilty of scvcial minor action* which merited him a party iepruna* lui no mere severe penalty. H* pjupoaed thai a new Commis^iini look into the case to-day including Mr. Djunc'i right to It main in the party and aypeale.; for calm and orderly procedure. AIi L)juri< wa* then expelle.' from the Congress Session. -I r rOVHt:* CUAMMOS HU LONDON. Nov ti French former r. ( iiampion HutKirr praseti died Iti a London hospital th ing. — CF. SHIPPING NOTICES hoop at six inches, my three of four direct hiU with the 20..under, plus a near mi** wnu'i must have rocked the target—a wrecked truck nearly a mile away—convinced me. IM III II SAMS REAL ESTATE IAM Apprwlinataly IS ipot. Ml a an I No raawiaael* oar rrlu.ad Ftw ui thr r paitKiilara *ppl> Norm." illayna. lirrrn Dykoi. Worthlna Vlr* S II SS-Sr. 1AND ill lUv ipoU <•( land for %  *!• I Flagg Btafl Bd. CI.iStn.in, St Ma-liar I ipglv lo C. St Hill C'oamoaelilan Oar. m. Magaal** l..nDial lt -a.ll.a-3n PHOPEHTV—Onapropaity t.mlalniiia irasrlng n-mi uraaHlait and dlninr nan 1 brd'nomi. loilri and bain '. ifof land, ia>aid Dial MSI J II M In STIIA.TilN l>,l II-.ail. thm GOVERNMENT NOTICES APPLICATIONS r. invil.d IW "• non-pen.ton.bfcpriMMM PMB o( A-W.nt aUl Sur,~on th. .Ulf ol Ihe (K-IKI •! Moipllal. Applicu.ls n^u.1 b. !— %  % % %  '' '"' lc -' l"""" !" >" Th. lurv aiuetod to in„pomlmenl i. J2o per .nniua Mid Iha DOatf WO! be MlU Se ^o ler, (or wreiew rendered lo p.yln|! i III. lluspH.il rrtbat information nuo be obtained from the Director ui Medical Serviceto whom applicaliofia ahould be forwarded by IHh Dw n,t r ,M8 8.1..32.-M POST OFFICE NOTICE an) TION OF POdTDIG BOXtS iwen i cled for public use sivv. I%  i HMaonablr rrntal ...-rotalng to r Mnf Mi* (JI0IIIII Til-piiorio SSU HA.vri HELP %  %  Boa K a C'< %  .virUilal -'i' -'"' r>P'n .Irtttra po-lt">i> l"'" LM C > Advartl.ina Drpiirlmrnl %  II H MIS. KI.l^NKOUS BJQCR nOTTl-RN llnplv lt or Bar liottlr* with carton. b>naaald Srolt a .. Ml -'" %  WAhTKD TO ai r (|AS BANCK (hia gai Ihl buMSl h>"*' APptl C B Br-niHorg Sra ll.isti' Haalinea, 1" ""a *** %  „ I hou*r lUatrlrt Appi%  %  UPfUQHT PIANO in lii-dd eoodilWn rrlaphona M betwean • n. " %  ANNM)NCBMBrrS t.SimiM vq(k by Mr. J M raratrr. p-mtms. by Nan Randall ,.t Itarbadoa Muarorn M saxsoth. oally a m -* P m Paavaan so vm.v, Fur lilllin llllllliS It's tin\n\in: \ 11" LAND FOR SALE A few choice hoUM spots to lln Of 'he RocUei ..ijuin. U Club Hoad, on bus route to town. These ipota 1 K the Golf Course en one side and over Bli Heckley Hay on g other Though you may not win to build immediately, the purchase of one of the Full particulars Iron The Secretary. Rockley Oolf & Country Club. rVtXaW ktOPO itaa Mae* an -oliahing Mop. Api>l. II I' 11.. % %  an Co I .id Dial SJSI 1 11 St Tn iwmma i-ouan—u o. IMI H oi. Punnturr Polun Apply, gf. •irraoiitn A %  ',< I t.| ln.i USS rfl.I.CII ClTUfal Ladlra omba AppQ II 1' CneM M, Dial SMa liRrsites ptaia p,p,. p, t IN lint UIBsb) Moltlr. Tollrl Floor Scnib. Hug and P1O.IT Tooth. -BssassBSaa, Oosab ~ Wall Snaba LaatJaa and I'.iidhaa. Btaarssg.InsbM l.M Dial Mr aiaead TliXB While, link, aiua and -.Tn' MOt'SaJl.il ii IrQUllMXNT of I - rtpUon ilwrn T Alldrr. Ill Rorbullrrt Dial USt 11 '1 I ( i A-IIL1^ ..Tin Ainukl CANNON niicrd from SSr lo 1 J i lowrla .( II. CANNON ., cloth, al lie. Tl... CANNON ..—I. an ol.ULnall.(i..,. I IMIItVn I'll ?i San Sir..' 11 '.; fen imcn MN ii III n i w .11. %  itionr san BUM tl .'.I: i ., bird saga '' amallrr Hi Aawrvran r.ibit Inn." i> rhiekm coop nr IDS chirk. Ill i to i ISI pan> a U.o a pair. Call al MrdPlBS HOI i>.' informal Ion b* .. |.( .,.S,ll U In KOl'NI) I1UIN AND HIirgTS '.. S 111. Keeu S i •.. i m d M, airaa *' N •*, SBtq u |r# Auto Tyrr Co. Tralalgsr and ftp*? 80*0' %  ant an -mi -losiAOg TANKS .r^ K V • %  SSa '." ihu-a 1 ••an Oliu .iiiprnx i i' a•••%  v i x 1M Ulna, appro* One 'li ** 0dlaa a0eaap s '. a i IHXI Olna. appro. r*o 'i' andM • odeep a JVtaa (Una iippnift .' ndlaiVP eeepx fl'<" I'Irk SBO Olna. apprae. Prlcoa ->i\ CRYSTAL WATERS l.\ IT HOI x| I'oat Ogtce flap Warthlng Might OH S. sflDDeilaBi Sea ; Comfortable Hooms. Regular Bus Serllaily as well as permanenl Guest w H264 or B6d6 Proprietress. DOROTHY CARMICHAEL SEA AND AIR TRAFFIC In Carliald Bay %  rhOO Ii ers l.ynaM 11 Lucille M Bmilh orlar Prai^-.. W Smith, Cyril I ulth. Olla M lU-hrci. R. 1**1.. H-Carolina. Motai Vr.rU T II Hailar. DariM— %  ."IWI*. 0 K grrvir,. VII! AMtVAL* M V o K aarvMa VIU IN to... SSI Hullfaa undrr CapUlii II P Strum '^".f"!?* 1 V' **""> Oaotly at Co. Ltd MV Cartbeaa. urn t.„. iroai Damini... iinrti-r !'..(.i.,i ( i II . 8ehnnn.KH.nrr. A.*laUon i Hmlwi.il *t IS ton*. from l.urriMnl undrr Captain T tlari %  %  -mnrd lo Da Co-la a Co l i l\iuna. undrr CapUin t. Ilia-oak lo Ihr sehaonrr Owsen %  ll.l'AKII KfeS -MI. Anibviliick Ma.lor Mai tin pa j. nil Ilaiih. Seawell llRPAaTI'BBB H. H.WIA. Iiliilaad NOVRMIUCK OTH U i.iiuM 0 •>. %  %  ae v, Maiouk 'I'MUIII' BT I* I I QM FRIDAY ar HrlU-b l.alaaa II Ibbrraox T riatloa M llruinrli I .1 SWilh C Itrrnai. .. Kirlaa RklV IIS HI aw I A ON rtUDAY i Triniaaa VMIra. q Van. I VlairT Wi. ••anlay, M P-imar Chlwola, E Paatli T Burnrlt. L Fork. A Park. MI iv .i III ii n i \ ON FRII1AV '"'• rnaia.s X Williv Q Mnanoar W Robortaoi. I Ihua. II ivii.,1. Starl. O Muna> J Na.h A WakrflrM F. WakresW W W.llhrr.. K VmirnlHrnwi. I" 'inn r- B, Pravita. D Sookran A Chin Chin, J iw oeueau] u D< i Ass* I llranah II llianvl. S QM The unii.-ini.t.-: Pa Hn| Box-I the sites mentioned: — ,1) Bunk Hall Mam Road in Uw outei wall of Bank Hall House. icsidemo of Mr. %. Hay-nag. ,2) UgfMO Bank Hall ssOad OH th.pi. %  > Ol NUTS King. (S) Heckle* Road -near June'..,, i with Cnrwens Avenue. in.-,, b xei -A ill Di claaTed I I aeapl Sundays and Publi-%  MONDAY to FRIDAY—T (i a.m. and 11.45 am 3ATURDAV —"! %  •%  %  "" KOUEK'l A. CLARKE. Colonial Postmaster. • ooice, th November, IBM. POLICE TRAFFIC NOTICE ST. MH'HAEL'H CATHUHt \l.. VIII N'll\I.MBI.Il H.Y! On Suudnv 9lh (rum KMH) a.iu —11.3* a.m. 1 ChaurTeui flrlven earl ibal ..pproach the Cathedral by waj : (feeaan'i Patk and St. Michael's Row only, set down then passengers it the South Oata to the dihedral and paik in the Central Foundry '.liking site. Mai lull Street and Rickett Strevl 2 Owner driven cai shull %  Pp rO asBp the Cathedra! by way of K, Michael's Row (either Iroin Trafa]fjBy Square 01 Quaas/a. Pgrk Bd Spry Street, set down their passengers at the North Gate ,o the Cathedial and park as directed by the Police. .1 Sprv Street shall be eM-WV from St. Michael's Row. 4 Church Street i-hall be one-way front Church Square. Made under Regulation 2 oi Kridg.-luwn and Speights to wr> Trafnc) (Amendinenti Regulation* 1949 R. T MICHELIN, Committioiier of Police. i'olkoa Headquarters. I %  rtdgctown. •Ah November. 1852 B.ll.52—In. KATES Or EXCHANGE NOVKMUUI j. itaa -lllaa NBW TOBK i i -• rilk pr Choquaa ,. Rank*!. 10 t 10 pr SlShl or IVm.ind Dfafl, .'i UJ %  TJ i 10 pr Cabla '" a 1(1 in C-inriM', *S I IB". ••! Coupo n SB lif. p. '. pr n pr CAN AIIA II Chrquaa on Sal-n pi Dwnand Iiinfi. Biflhl Drnm TS 10-S m, T M* pr Cable : %  pr Cunanc. Ta 10* v>i Ooupon* IS Vie* or p. mi ,.NOTICE STEPHEN ROtaKRSlt\mtn: S\|. c*. Rheumatism and Backache Gone in 1 Week I PIANO Inn TODAY'S NEWS HASH LISTEN OVRR Kt lllKrtiHaON TO-N'K.MT flu.h Kid.it,> W.ih Cyil. Yau ii Feel 9tm yla thru.ri eBwsfafa flMB i a alts kldnay an % %  • na, aa. If >ou t am Sdai.ea. Net. an.a..**. Narv'uanaaa. -a Pain. Jiumc. Cirataa ano-i aya* Fri .lasnt Haadaahta ana Colds. Po. itnaroy and Apaatiia P, An** Bormng, Sniarlina Paa.agra. IIIV* fraouaiitiy U oat UP NIHI. ,t vom ch.i. .< -.U Ct*>' •odM fl t and **l> nasi rV Cyatei Helps Noture 3 Wayr gnd %  yainm HTaly. IJIU • %  irt eonlaini no harih. n. daiigarou. dnaiCyaltft worka i rhraal —V. t,..nd yOOl I. aiartakilllna ikgrrni.ahl.-knr. attack! .' %  k.-n %  aad rrtii-r Bysla ret to aseohitaly harml^-r 10 hu itoadiy palanimai < da a Tim ayaenn h ,. %  %  r > i • siraiigtbana gad im. kldnay-. prot* ravsvgaa ol dl.—ar--i: %  dallcala llltrr |.oliin. and -lim lUatff Ihaaallii 9 Weeks m Hoip.tol Repealed h> Special Request JOHNSONS STATIONERY HARRISON LINE OITWARLD FROM THE Veaaal mm I'NITEU KlN't.lHtM HF.HUSMAN" .. TEMPLE BAR" WAYFARER" SS "SCHOI^R" Liverpool London Glasgow \ Uvarpool London & M/brough 25th Oct 26th Oct 5th Nov. 15th Nov. Hue B'doa 7th Nov. 8th Nov 17th Nov. Uth Dec. .'*.(.-.. IIM ISplM Now Well •I In. nff*4 /or BSfJ on i WI OI/| i %  %  i.ff*rrd ,..((-..iflv I'VIn-•. -i' aa. MadaiAri I hid frwdalawir %  ar / caald aol art Uitiaa sssWJ PakSN .' ofi'dra in rut Cyatai a (rial, analaA I Sad frWd U foa mt—lt %  .. %  ft pain ad aipraar. fl **. i-iproMd n r ftaalfft -.ara la 1 • I gaa. raea <>i" IA>OI :r d ,* a.. run•%. % %  Mr*. B. G'*"raet Is Pat Yaw Riht •r Meacy let* ,.0t Cy.taa lr... day. (Ji..Cola. ini-.ii u Mm ror THE SS "KAL1AUA" UNIT1D r London CIMM. In Bubda 12th Nov. For further tnformaUoa .pply to DA COSTA CO. LTD. — Ag.nts I CANADIAN SERVICE (lBsnastlUI ^'UTHBOiaro A s:i \.-i : iNTRgAi, HALIFAX Aai B-Doa. aa. IlT-llrd I For luithof In ir-nfrr Acommodatlon Available aalloa apply Da COSTA CO LTD ; Phom M \\ VOIIh SERVICE I:VI:HI FOUR WEEKS) MM M i: BARBADOS. 1 Sheila Atula Spencer of Christ Church. Burbaclo*. heretofore called and known ., id.i .:..ol Sheila Anita lil.HKHY GIVE NOTICE that on ine 4lh day ol November. 1952, 1 renouiicvtl and iibaiidoiied %  nf mj said *ui:.'ini of Swaiiiinv and assumed in lieu thereof the surname of VND FURTHER mat such change of name is . kdag OOd De"l gsal da led the 4th day o( November, 1V52 uuly executed u-sled. Dated the 6th day ol No11*52 VOHFOUK IIM.TIWJRE VT.W YORK An B-DOB S3 Oct. 51 Oct. It Oci M Nov M ffov 11 Drc qeB AMga STFAMF n Dec It Jan M Dae a* Jan T Jan 4 Fab M1V ORLEANS SERVICE nun MI.H.I ii III III'... I Ml NEW ORLEANS MOBILE JAMAICA i B-Doa B Oet n Oct a Oet a NOV apply H..HKIU riloM LTD '—' I B gBrJJeaaasaaafjl 4-M iHMM' a a t CHINA CABINETS NEW OBAN' ri r rmsr IN rota < iiHi-rsjAa ra-AN CHINA rARrMITfl in Cbmahad Ma*o.nv in-1 U-hoSaniard nirr'. ..,.d lirui In .-ilou. h*lgu and In apaie-aa'inS hi apafloui a* wldlha MUE BOARD Diniiis. F-ncy and Kll.hr.1 T.ilO.-. f —" 11^ to Big Wagona. Laidri* Kiiehm and t'adyoem c-bmn. IIRAWINI-. ."d IIEDHOOW in.TKMrrVa* in Mahogany and othar waeos. -"id Many Olaai Thlnga UY NOW ..t Moia-y-BavHW L S. WILSON ml sraiFT PIAL aae* MR. THERM Announces the arrival of the MAGNIFICENT MBW GASEL REFRIGERATOR It has "THE NEW LOOK" It dsllvsrs the goods . NO motors, NO belta, NO brushes, NO moving parts, NO interfera&ca wttk radio. NO nut . %  Noising to wear oat. WE HAVE WAITfiD TO GIVE TOO THE REST. Let UB Show It to You (Working) at your Oas Mr/srrooin, Bay St. Kcmemhcr when you do your shopping with us we deliver lo your door by Motor Van. CENTRAL EMPORIUM :-"•" to,, "* <**; aS 4*2 Leeal Agent* HELL A SON llaaUUons Build in. Rbig t4IS •



PAGE 1

WHAT'S ON TODAY lh. for CMMrOTl Bl • M Art SmMbiuw, •( lite H M i I.IUM h: Gunard Ship Run Aground By Gale LONDON. Nov. 7 Oue of t*ic worst galeto hit many part* of Britain (or several years blew an %  ,723-ton Cunnrd Unar ashore In the River Thames. Tug* stood by to make their second attempt to pull her off the rrud bank. She had disonarged) passengers' at Southampton and was on ihc l" t .,„_ ret*i Tip! way to the Greenland Dock London Another ship, the 19.830-ton • %  Scytha" w unable to leave Southampton for Canada schedule, and waited until tha wind* died down. A U.S. Air Force B50 Superfortress crashert during a gale with 11 men aboard near Great Dunmow. England Seven bodies were recovered and four miss. Ing. The cause of the crash was not known. Winds fanned trio. bla/mg wreckage for hours. During the gusts ol wind thai touched 64 M.PH.. trees were blown down in London streets during the night. At Shawbury Shropshire, a wind of 94 MPII was recorded. Tracks Blocked Railroad services from London to the Midlands and Northern England and Scotland were temporarily disrupted by winds h'ivnut blocked the track with piles of rubbish. The overnight boat from Heysam, England to Belfast was held up tor hours. The 2.869-ton Finn sh ship Mylykoski" was adrift from her mooring" at Swansombc in the Thames and was secured by a tug to a new anchorage at Long Beach. Firemen throughout Southern England were kept busy most of the night answering calls to put out Urea fanned by winds ... I paopie from dtomhouses. Many chimneys were blown down Into houses. At "Merry Boys" pub at Tunbridge Wells. Kent, a man was trapped two hours under a fallen chimney stack. He was given morphia while firemen cut him free from the wreck.—tl.F. Groves Station Impresses B.G. SPA Chairman SEAWEIX. Nov. 7.—Mr. B. R. Follett-Smith. Chairman of Uu British Guiana Sugar Producers Association, told the Advocate today shortly before returning home by BWIA that he was imS ressed with the situation at roves Agricultural Station for breeding purposes as well as with the big collection of varieties of sugar cane there. Mr. Follett-Smith a-. !" !" .bados to attend a meeting of the[ -a | Advisory Committee of the BWI n Central Sugar Cane Breeding |n^... Station which was held under the .fatally burned chairmanship of the Director of, gasoline from Comprising the Mission are Mr Lincoln Steel, leader of the Mis-, %  Ian; Lt Col H. E Peiroe, ORE .' J.P.. Mr., W. W S Robertson. I o u.u xt. L. no—>1 < .in.-' Mr G. H Spencer. They areavcompanied by Mr M A. Willis, a Principal from the Colonial Office who Is acting a* Secretary to the Mission They were met at the airport by Sir John Saint, Col J. Con-' nell. Mr D. G. Leacock. Hon., F. C. Hutson. and Mr. M. E. Cox, I member* of the Committee; appointed by His Excellency the Governor to prepare a programme of visits and interviews, and Mr. R. N Jack, Acting Labour Com-> n.lssioner. who is acting as Seeto the Committee, and Liaison Offlcr to the Mission. See Programme At the airport shortly afler their arrival which was delayed by about two hours, the Mission was shown the programme which had been arranged for them They afterward left for the Marine Hotel. The Mission flew over from the United Kingdom on the I7th October. arriving at British Guiana on the IBth of the samemonth There they spent a week before flying over to Trinidad' where ihey spent the past twelve days. i i U.N. Forces Smash Chinese Attack SBOUL, Nov. 7. UNITED NATIONS FORCES tmggbed Chine e Co* muiiibt attack between Triangle Hill and Sniper Ridifc *arly today m the first snowstorm dl tl Rgsjg gw M Bstd through the r<*'k\ \.ili\. teMratlDff the two bitterly conttstM hejfjfhta on the W< I O ti il Front at 3.40 am' (l 40 p.m E.S.T. Thursday) Shattering Allied *r1ltt>ry mortar botnbardment for Kr.i to atre I The Reds Mpparontlj. j U> move into position M I attack on Snfpei H I | tins mile east of Triangle The 'push came at alme-* %  c the Reillo I mated 200 dead and a a similar inanoamu 1 .Mtin Mau —Lnhol) LONDON le poison of Mau \\ elfare Work On Sugar Estates IEAWH I V, THE MEMBERS of th Social Welfare A lat lo the i-iiinplnillcr for Vv.Upmenl and Welfaip. left Iota) lw HWIA fOI British Gui ana on %  routtna i Igft She %  x pnts to return la aanrbados oi November 20. Miss Ibbarson has vonc lo have a look ai ihc Welfare work e • '-tales by Nw 11111 Oil %  igai Produ%  I IBM tnUsln| el thetl ,v,-1fare offlSPRINGFIELD. Ill Nov. Governor Adlai E. Stevenson's cMinitalgn headquarters here was m captures the Proaiden with the biggest vote evei gl'%  a praaldentlal candidate In i'!f hlstm\ of the United S<• 'Mr. Rl-enhowi'r'A victory was not reflected in the majorities deluged with almost as many lhat ihe Republicans won In Contclegrams and letter, as he might g^,, -n,,. Senate will consist i 48 Republicans, 37 Demohave received had he won 'he Presidential election. Miss Carole Evans, chief sec%  % %  i"K four glrU Stall said the messages *cr, wonderful". She said drawn entirely, They professed not to be too worried and indiciitcd their lielicf that Mr. Eisenhower will not be an "antilabour president. As AFL President Mr. William Gieen advised Presldent-Elect— We have full and complete nd many praised nim "for campaigning the .way ho thought he should". And the defeated Democratic Ual cardldate seemedlo be sticking b> the passage hoi once mote inu> the television fireside chat "and if %  should oniideiu-e that you will do your, be lh e ci.se thM you cast me utmost to carry out your plan, down und revile me and with of fair and just treatment to mr the Democratic party, I there would he adequate arrangements to make sure that the scheme would be continued he Schemes of that sort were generally started and than faded out. probably due to lack of funds. But the present scheme was one which %  nent Americans in all walks of life. While hopeful about Mr. Eisenhower, both CIO and AFL I Ukreaaodi concern that Senator Robert A. Taft will G "tty well dominate Congress, hour leaders have been bitter oppone n t of Senator Taft co-originator of the Taft-Haii law In 1W7. These sources said thev had given up any hope of repealing the Tan-Hartley and are fearful now that attempt* will be made to push through even more labour legislation. They foresaw efforts to put labour unions under anti-trust lawa._I'.r. U.S. And France Will Discuss World Situation would still talk the same. Hi.-, aides *ald he felt "that he campaigned honestly". Miss Evans said Mr. Stevenson was "anything but downcast." UNITED NATIONS, Nov. 7 United Stales Secretary of State. Dean Acheson. and French Foreign Minister. Robert Schuman, will meet at 11.00 a.m. on Saturday for an exchange of views on the world situation. The Acheson-Schuman conference will be held at Waldorf Astoria Hotel in New York where Acheson is staying. Informed diplomats said the continuity betveen now and j,. !" ... q ^ITV on r0 f Turu,iu and Morocco] Eisenhower's imputation should go on and perma-;*"' * high on the ogenda of the Schuman spent the afternoon arrangements should be conference with Schuman exon Friday working on ihe policy maae to make sure that they did P ** !" to "*** cianncntion from I and preparing a speech he wlU not have to stop in the middle of Acheson on how the United States aeliver before the plenary session the scheme. plans to art when the two conof the General Mr. Follelt-Sm!th who was a troverslal issues come up before day In that .paech guest at the Ocean View Hotel J|* main political committee of said Schuman would outline said that he had a pleasant Ihough,^^""" Nations General AsFrance^ views on African probshort stay in Barbados and again enjoyed the island's sea-bathing. Mr. Nehru Greets Marshal Stalin BOMBAY. Nov. 7. General AsFrance 1 „.mbly I'm!. Schuman may s*e French sources said Schuman fsh Foreign Serretarv Anthunv would not necessarily attempt to Bdei ,, V eett "change" Acheron's views on the question The United States has taken the position that d African Mtuation should be debated here despite France's stand. They said Schuman would try to give Acheson a roundup of the •k. Indian Premier Jawaharlalj French government's and" par InNehru told Soviet Premier Josef j n entaiy views on* the matter. Stalin Friday he hoped the "happy I Schuman is expected to be adro-opera lion of our two countries will always be exerted in the interest of peace and stability." Mr. Nehru sent greetings to Marshal Stalin on the occasion of the 33th anniversary of the Bolshevik Revolution.—f.F. 2.660 FRENCH TROOPS LEAVE FOR INDOCHINA MARSEILLES. Nov. 7. The French liner "Pasteur" lef: h9re Friday with 2.W0 soldiers and officers on their way to Join the French Expeditionary Corps in Indo China. —U.P. ised during the talk* by Fn Missionaries Murdered POCSXT CARTOON (.> osBERr uNCAsrm %  II-I aid men %  on.rwponat; I a I'n.'.llfr ..fj an that • mt, and one Independent. Tha Indicated HOUM line up is 22t Republicans. 212 Di-morrabi Indeuendeii'. Personal Triumph Mr. Martin said that the big Fi*i*nhower majority showed his personal popularity. He sold: illy I don't think we Id have won if Mr. HrasB* bower had nol headed the Ucket 1 quosUon whether any other Itei ublloan could have won. Mr. Elsenhower's conference witii Congressional leaden apparently will Uke place after he lm> si 'White House "umtv wita. President Truman. The President FJccl, now on ten iys; Mention at Augusts, Georgia announced yesterday that accepted Mr Truman's invltum to call at the White House. Mr. Eisenhower suggested that the meeting be held during the %  eek of November 17. United Natt • ivy guns also broke up that ill To the west J"" Clnnc-e ml .o advanced Allhsd "Old Ualdy" and i' BOM bill Just belore anldnlght Ok Rod might until 2 30 .i in i | liT llwrsdajl Ihea ft re Snow Lilllil -now f.ll Bgrl along die centrnl "eetor of Uk She said that lhe reason fin battlcltne. Most of i n, %  this special examination ..( the though Fifth AlrJores Iteconn.n*ihal in ihe SmHni Welfare %  anes patties reporlad > I., bf held III 'in Ihe mountaliM and fTOm Iamiar> t, ( July.;decp In North Korea (loud.1 ll attent will be we.illi.r hattitl paid to Iha quaatloa of welfare' lions ork on Ihe sugar estates Eitfhlh Anns MaOn| OAVei The Sugar Industry labour.aaid the tempo "_-** %  %  um 'PWlThe 45.000 [on bal i*ifi .uperviSiOf Tanks Help Iroops Tra}p Red Rebels sour! lurncd its mammoui guru ylng a transfonnet plant with ii -ii.' %  hell. Other war Quake Jars linkersfield IIAKEHSKIKIJ) ('.ilifnrnlH, Nov. 7 A nharp earthquake jam Rakersfleld area at 12*55 a.m. EST ait.l authorities said it was the, The legislative conference up-' rtripioitic posti bore .01,1 ani preparing io imn HUM J^I, %  ant itlon of the Republ can II.II-I' < Ii'.inltig' I me ill Jangjvei rone In dlplontaU looh tha view Inal U foolhard) U s %  1"., %  11. intrnit II poUcj n moves until it sftt eertab Ih they would he y,id/-i wi .Me,, \ |h new Hepublu tion — v.r. deepl> Klkuyu tribe in ind it m*> be 1 i'i>" is ipstored. %  ton said today. Mouse of ige 01 hisi-ay Isaa ..lien then*aasaaaw Mi l.-Mcrl" ". 1 .i.dim A routine Nuder patrol hroujgh the bulls nf Franl l lorder Police said they .aw Sgt I-ssoy driving alone traight aiie.i I Into lhe S-ivirt v r. V IVenty Killed In Bu8 Crush SAN JUAN DEL RIO, Mexico,, Nov. 7 pajnMal WBfB killed line.! A heii a loaded anger bus crashed into a %  Inn stetson "i the highway %  t the ontranci b I ds city 120 bortli >enat of Maodi aid the i'iiiinvei trol of the speeding bus ml failed to negotiate a curve. 1 lhe bus rolled over I',ire smashing II-',. the ervue tation SOIM. ol the victim* were trapped in the wreckage DsOfB than an hour uet"r' rescue crews n A'lniini-tiaiestneated them II.P. such major legislative |,|i>blems as possible tax reduction, irtailrnent of (Jovarnmeiit fcpendng, continuation of price and wage cnptroH Tafl-Hartley Act %  meadnaanti and foreign aid. sen..-.,, Beberl A fail %  xpect Mr. F-i!enhower to have any serious trouble getting his programme through the Senate. (L'.F.) Therpor's were killis;! %  "' BO immediate n—| Injuries or property The August 22 quake %  e I to um as high as $um.0W.uou imd -tin digRiug oul frora I Today's Jolt was another In a I man than 20O aftera <• ch have natksd Dag i %  Id area since A fiespile lhe gbaiyMBl of totSfey's er,nh'|uake authorities reported no panic.-VT Mr. Eisenhower Playing Golf AUGUSTA. Georgia Nov. 7. Wanned up, after a long layoff, President-Elect, Elsenhower planned a M 1 ions assault today on the links of the Augusta Nati-.fial Golf Club. lief ore he can get out of ConjfisSrce arrived H.W.I A. fro Tha %  HICAGO. Nov. Evangelical Alliance Misambs-aador to the Untied States .,, —,Vrlday -a sh.7u H Cnr !.^ ne, v!T. f^22 ' "d noUfled HL H^l !" T ^,'"';" death of two Mid-Wesler,, MsHenri Hoppenot In addition lo ssooanei in the Netheri %  North Africa, the two ministerj-;,, ir l„. e,,P ^ IC ? h "' 6 \^ U i ^ T \ '' '•'"•' source" reaspecU of the world situation p< irlert lria Wll ., such as Korea and problems of itml Kdwsrd Tnpo ^ere. murgankiation jh,. nn cuncement said the It is understood Acheson also State Department notified the would seek to assure Schuman] Mission onlv thai the bodies of lhat the election of Dwight Eisenthe twr> %  md nees the Presidency of the| Aisat In the.western part of NethUnited States would not deprive 1 erlands New Guinea o n October American foreign policy of its 23 —C-P. ^1 •h. en -., answer some of Ihe thousands of congratulatory messages that After attending the Congress in hOVS inundated him : il Kinch visited the tion night. leony-Abary Rice Schema For at least one hole yeterda> ann said that the rice industry Mr. Elsenhower Uo had 'Johad been extended under the company of more than 30 new supervsiou of the B.G. Rice Marphotographers. For the uke of ketlng Boord, the pictures. Mr Eisenhower _., __ ... hit a succession of almost flawTh I,PW tro P J* ***?!* a DC ^ less sand blaming *hots fro.., ""w and it Is expected that It trap Dulled reoeatedlv and wouUl *** record one. Three Lom P ewturmtcurXy ,?,S bangP"' ^ %  ldy been ed out a aerte, of whistling h -v ~"" d h "W. drives. Some of these long shot Mr K. noh who stayed on ui were in the neighbourhood of ft. % %  for one week to 210 yards or belter. Mr Risenlhoot vM pigeons, afterwards hower hoped for more seclusi. today. Shipment Of Rice Expected From B.G. SEAWELU Nov 7th A SHIPMENT of rice from British Guiana is expected shortly and from then on there will not he any future shortages, Mr. Stanley Kinch, Assistant Manager of Messrs. T. Geddes Grant Ltd., told the Advocate today. Mr. Kinch who Is auo Junior President of the Baibadoft Mr. I ill'11 Leaves For New York t'F Spain. LONDON, Nov. Foreign Secretary Mr. AntnOOS Eden wdl leave tonight fjM New York to attend na Nations General Assembly and make his first contacts witn the "Elsenhower camp". Mr. Eden who will address the UN. Assembly will participate in the Korea debate and was expected to meet some of the leading Republicans who are the prospective members of the new administration. Given the opportunity, he may also meet Mr. FJsenhowtr himself for a preliminary net some of the mo*t pressing hi*'national Issues before h Company's head office In Port-ofat present scheduled for Nov ber 19. d-Pi IT'S THE TOBACCO THAI COUNTS i



PAGE 1

SATIRKAY, \0\ KMBKR S, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE l'\(.l -,1V l\ House Discuss Five Year Plan For 5th Day DISCUSSION CONTINUES ON TUESDAY in the 1 thin*.,> -h, proilojnjj of u so<" l9*8-4i>. K they really examm.. ifestn of the two major Thr OBMB omttfl lurbour raited n i Plan the} would gee mans parties, and said that HOV01 until %  •'" conservatives %  ,, ,; '' *nd some did not reach no,! manifestos almost identical *"*'h a whmvr were tatned .ut. and. There IW mciple. "" u,a l""v.ie enial was no plan about the whole affair n Report was %  work of a pooplc for a long time As debate on Government's proposals for a Five Year ai all nment could False Prricnce* would be more beneficial to the Plan of Capital Expenditure and Taxation entered ita ftfth M < M ^PP then moved the adregaid it othe, -than at a guide ^ acru>ed lhr ronaatiatleai SET* 1 1 Jnd ,hf ho,cl prop "day .1 the House of Assembly yesterday. Libour memrx-.s ^SST "' ,hp !" unUI >~ & tt J"VS dS.^"^Cov" ^" tnr,n f l h obtt, M "*' by ^Wh Barbados become. Mr. r K. Miller and Mr C. E. Talma said that though thr C< minuing hU address from the %  .nment h-H . Ignore • J t p ,"^f, P uB n "P second Bermuda, the cot) Plan was not as ambitious as it mii-M have been, members previous day, Mr. H. G Mapp *std m paru Added t.. that, m premai-ursio wmiiar to that or toe Wl n Ml rt(HJbl jncrtw nd |hc who claimed lb., there w„ S new... m .he Plan were only 5 * M^SKM. -*. ,* tt^JSgE S^^W? St? J faStf*'*' slaRinK a political intrigue with a view to spbttinR the „, ,„ lnd .„,„ the> wr „,, lhl ,„ ,„, b CK d , o( lh uund man; point, m in* plan win. 11 riJw M forces of Labour. Pajy. mjnit.no But' what he •• ""• !" ""' n ; '"• ",„,, neeruartl, ..r„ with, a harbour .chem., bu. n Mr. Talma accused the Conservative element of "Iryinn U A""7 w *; V^ ""?• "*' !? H .*^1 nw*%.CBg scheme by the Conaer\a! ItT-iatrl had departed from some at present They could nol but !" L" ,M <* '•• %  *ue,i "~^ r r,," ld h a " ann,ncr So far iwelvt members have .liture He would say at Ihe out0 f the .uantiom of ihc Beasley feel apprehension when when they "•""'• %  ">at now lhal there w.. L^n?!^.-^" rJiSTtM ^! !" taken part m the debate; Messrs. set that he regarded the plans survey noticed that Cuba had to curtail -dull suffrage It was onl, ri """; ,f tenantry roads all 0. II Adams. A. E. S. Lewis. J. for the development of the Everyone knew that Barbados production of sugar That, he natu'ai^that with that pnvuege. '" E. T Bruncker, V B. Vaughan. Island water resources, irrigation was lacking in resources, had to thought, was a threat. W. A. Crawford, O. T. Allder. and encouragement of food prodepend on one crop and there E D. Mottley. J C. Mottley. duction as amoog the most pressshould widen the basis of their KeurriiaDle L. A Williams, R G. Mapp, F ng and important of their needs economy and produce a scheme so Mills-.irt that tt was reFa Miller and C, E Talma He had already stressed the nethat they could plan their budget ' M "J !" d ',"' JLJ tJZi Consideration uf u>.Pin eOOOMeslv for the greater production for future years for the things grettable to b tinues next Tuesday of local foodstuffs and the less, they wished. That was elementwas no hope Mr. It. fl. Mapp (lO who began ening of imports in this i.-spect. ary. But the economic side of the deep his speech on Thursday night lt would strengthen their cconoplanning was not In keeping that il li >d Ix-cu aiiuulied m / un<1 considerably cheapen the the iteasley suggestions, on ""all sld^itud eo.nosnlc plan?* ol XivU> *. At present •• ity .: Untrue lh. for the proposed ater harbour. It ws* .__.y for the island to have deep water harbour, but the Government WHS told that it wa. r., irue to say that" most of the IsieMablwhmeiit ol (Lurch tmpiNialble Ut net the required r£S.L., %  ,,',. ..,^^T^,a... ,1,;. workingman'l wages was spent He said he agreed entire'y with loan to make Ion project pos*i5wS5S^LKr„. !" . 'oO*'un\ and n was abiothe honourable member who said blc The Leader of the ll manifold problems confronting^It. Iutel neC eMary that such that the Church should be disinu5 have been very embarThere was no doubt that if the*' Ktttmm should be pushed to the established and revenue got from tawd Ut LJZ ar te, years were to carry out the various aolimlt in() al u,^ w \i fst possible -ht source. The Church was noth:ial schemes promised at eMcUon time. The Marketing scheme of ,n but a privileged body. He did time and advance the stondaid ol course followed closely upon not <'nk anylNtdv would dispute Uvlng of the people then they greater food production hc ,. f c i ,h,t th, T< "'"' [••* %  had to develop the economic reTcurist luduslrv "' ,hr Cnu "' n llkl "'shop Hugh.* They had had some planning in couragement of the toun.t inu,h„* *t of the Cntrch d,SM, h Barbados would also become EL'S m t?Si WHS "' l ' rn ; dU,t i ry an 5r ,d lhal SI McnU StSV diSdowed C ?he Church. mJpotTam a. regards to shipping year plan, but nothing came out randum did not. mention any tncj wo ld hflVfl more money ln Slic kmr ab out oil in the P^ 1 better the conditions of the people Island, Mr. Miller said that the f the island. Gulf Oil Company was now He was not speaking against the carrying out experiments in the w nom watt hopinc possible. A deef provide woi would also rticnt which iu batsM 1 harbou island There ^ it. That plan contained some Bpecinc proposals In thi admirable suggestions which, if He hoped the Government would they had been implemented, would watch carefully any schemes put have done much to Mreogvtbe i the U P by hotel owners and would Church as a MHtsUg influence in Island's economy. The Commit ceo lrv '" *"' %  *•'* l" !" • which issued the report hud rem l,,em assistance, commended such things as the %  %  ""• P" !" ** production of fertilises*, animal P'ne^r lrjdustrie*, feed and other product* from .hi,4!1 !irji X#'C" "'" u,u %  "" %  "' eviisnwa. DM., auaar facintv sv-ista it hri -i. '' "hould. After ail. most of the bados, as they had already been " ,,. „ alron^lv T^J^^LJ ,V5 !" ?!S! dulla and xhrt cu "^ ci reminded, was the only colony m tin *l !" .. !" r . i^TT^ \ ^ brought in by tourist, went into with an established Church. .. 1 ToUtnin ^ me-sures to inerease pun..., :a.:, of „„. SSkta -I botal OWUeXI and Th.s would find that there M'l'er saul merchants. Prof. Beasley had rewould be a great spiritual ad(• faring "Too Li I lie, Too in.!". -lulhc natural that with that privilege xtie ''*'nd which needed repai 'he | ublle should share a little i ; i l h *. J ? ,d I? 1 "T lh ,!L!' ,C ^ ,,l J "f Ihe reanowlbUlty ol providing r '"", ; u,,, l m £?J** x ( masf--s. However, he was not in t\..,.. it, %  ...„ teVOur of any excessive increase. l>Ul > Chl RuiM H. agreed th-t there were With n-n-rd i<> the increase OB dene* i" the plan, but he the dutv uf rum. he fell that it ihoujht that .urh defects were was somewhat excessive. If then by way of being loo conservative, was not so much ujiggnploymenl nikwas not g plan uf real leftthe pgejgtke WMM rstf MH H M mg steclallsts. much VtrJ fe>middle clas' I-oni; Speeches people could afford iwo meals He thought that the 1. speeches made against ihe plan v ere rnfely mean* of playing lo ma£' !1P ^wh n es lo^J^f '' J * ,h "^ ,lf "' lous, tnlh 1 !". lhc excessively. II would mix... that "S 1 "^ trv w to *> •omethin., ho ,efnu. than wwE be kefj i onstructtvc ralher than Just try rcveinnto criticise. U| Talma said that ha hoped On the question of education, it was not too late for th> he thought that instead of having of the House if he realised that he the churches closed all through had made a mistake that the ,ithe week, they might be opened crease on the rum was too excessaccommodate children for ive. to make a special note and lore schools were needed, hnve the price decreased. He .iiul (hi .m would | have a drink Off tWO m addition to his midday meal I! ouU speci.ii .„j wpn ,, r ne sam(> olf| con Wlth „ Kmr a t 0 ,he quasi servatlve spirit. In his view, lotteries, bfl felt that if the CornIB pig breeding. Mr nnrsU|l| new could be done wtlhmlsiloner if Police was gUowi I lhal Barbados i. out Taxation and increased *" PUB OM for the bfJlNI 0* UM augar cane and food. merchanU. Prof. Beasley had rewould be a great spiritual adPUT rearing country and mis revesa Boys' and Oiruf Clubi ha iw no .. commended that "luxury" Hems vanrement and social benefits lo scheme should be developed fully. He %  etruatd Ihe oppositi.m of reason whv ihe Government could _. ,n perfumery and cosmetics be derived from disestablishment Wlterevar they go, they would liylBi to rause confusion in the not run one weekly as was done Me quoted i^m tin .u ^orl and should be taxed much higher of Ihe Church, see people — keeping pigs. Pig ranks of Ihe working class peo'" S""h America Stich a scheme said that had Ihosc recommendslnan (hey were at present. Those As a previous speaker had said, breeding would do much for the pie. bul added that %  th.-ir bluff would he n good one wh tions been implemonted, tho were items bought chiefly by lhc priests were living off the fal island and he i i convinced lhal has bee if the scheme were developed, all the needs of Ihe island in this respect could be met. Mr. Miller called the Ion/-. speeches against the proposals in ^tfislZZZ 'be plan an attempt at "political this wnen ,„,_.„..., ,,_,, -„„, demo Tv-thing had to intrigue.'* and assured memhei of the opposition that there split in the ranks of Island would have benefited contourists, and we"'Professor' had of the land, and anybody who got slderubly, Instead, all such ad•.tated that "this item was rein the habit of living on the fal Vance had been spasmodic, and served owing to a difference of of the land would become too It was simply a case of "too little opinion In tho Commission sedate even to practise their idcand loo late" all over again. whether such goods should be ologles well. They should let th He said that the Leader of Ihe highly taxed as being luxuries or people awake to the facts. They House had said thai the plan was lowly taxed lo attract tourists, "hould the more real a consequence of the development I' liquor duties are raised il they wanted to establish Of the party system and was the would be inconslsleni to grtjgjjMg wlitfSffifes 'SSv&SSaSSA ir^.w .. „, tory of this Island should lead ^^^ !"!" ffi£!?xh£ *'<" Ministerial status. increasing the price of rum and them to see that constitutional ( (l J. ould "JJ^ %hc lourls( inrfui H e said that it was absurd to cigarettes ihey would pauperise advancement and economic de( Other countries tried to gel sav thpv ht "l rr * secondary eduthe maws, and he appealed to Telopment went hand in hand. ( np most out of visitors and even cation when in fact there was no honourable members lo be very They should lake, for example. Trinidad until businessmen pro' re secondary educauon. There careful In their decisions. the case of the pottery Industry at tented, had Imposed a head tax was no iecondary education at the The Labour Party, he said. Lancaster. They had brought out on Venezuelans. Theao tourists St Leonard s School. It was would Stand or fall on the proOn expert at great expense, and found thai such items were comreally post elementary education posn ]j. contained in the manorailed." Conservative Conspiracy tiled. of would b. eta ni'v had recommended that the pnratively cheap in Barbados, Mtery Industry could Ive estab-'especially compared with similar ~*~ed. The House had passed a things In their homeland, and lolutlon to set up such an inthe Government should get as 4ustry, but It had been lost in much revenue as possible from trie Other Place. Recently, il was them Well known that a former local Official had been -ent to England llevelopmenl Board by some local businessmen so Speaking on lhc Development lhal he could advise on the posBoard proposal. Mr. Mapp said bililie of iheir establishing a he supposed it would be modelled ant to make tiles etc.. out of on the sel-up clay. s-i-iou. Matter ,i It wa* a serious matter that 7 h * w !" ****** P* 0 ? 1 • the interest of the people of this "tile knowledge of industrial Ipolony should be so sacrificed ^Because of selllsh interests. The ^peyelopment of a tile and brick id Ihey should say BO. It absurd to say It was secondary when It was not; It carried the same age limit and little change ln the type of curriculum. He believed if Government revised their system, they would get more benefits for the money they pending on education |Qd I Full AiI % % %  in. nl lit* SFH-MU.ilJ, "M tUwl.HUil Beasley had pointed out that chamber, ough the national income had *•*? a* 00 better distributed doe to with the Party. Mr. 0. K, Tslms (LI said n was the fl^t lime in UM rdstoi of the Island that a plan of iny sort had been tabled In lhal and It was for thnt He lid that Qy one who had boon oeJatod with the labour movert nit for Ihe past 14 or 15 years *ould realise that no conservative conspiracy could overthrow the Labour Government, and added "Ihe Labour Party has enough brains and decency to surprise the island and ovn %  ,<• %  and % %  iii-tin-s .f tho lon%  n ••letnenl of UM OOUaV try. He urged Government not to Lack down from their pnmnses fa) provide more houses for workers, and suggested that instead of spending money %  nent building, Ihey .should use Ihe money in housing gghomOs In metropolitan area. He was not satisfied with the %  ffOfti Which were being .nade In regard to tho BUO st lon Ol ""• mlsp ir i. .ii. and said Ihut Conservnlive Siirvev As far as Professor Fiscal Survey was eonceim d Hi Talma said lhal it hud not touched Ul the problems id Ihe island o< f;ir as Ihe I^ilxiur Part* ecrncd II WHS purclv a CO) tn ,,i ro] also i>"i iwitnlng on which the labour Prt\ could hasiIholi plan rVofwjaoi them In his repoit ot tinhardships which were around Ihe corner u %  "' "' 1 '' 11 one crop economy. Mi Talmi was 1l ..aakl-v WhOrt the House was ioio.oin.1 until Tuesday nexl al S oc .'Ck m t arlia,,,,, ,,f( rr nooii wliei r tho plan would bo -esumed. thou, U-.'i know-how, who were lied lo old commercial lines as existed In ^.v.,0.,0.,,.. „, .... t his colony whom the,_ should Industry would not only lead to vo J d p f ul ."" l h 0 " Uch further employment in the colony but would be a means of utilising a local product and making them lot dependent on imports He had no doubt that because such •iin industry might pose a -i uw threat to commercial enterprise every attempt was made to stifle It. He said that to make it clear how necessary it was for Government to use its power or get the necessary power ** such schemes throu_ that Government would maki AVer should be appoint..* reason that he agreed Barbados to investigate tinposprinciplecontained In BlblUUoa of immigrati.n h the Ubour Party, no great diftl" 1 memorandum Today, there II. had also ho|N-d hoped that ihe personnel ol the ce ha ,i beC n made In the was a new Government in DOW. fishing industry and llsh canning Board would be carefully chosen s ondard of Uvlng of the people M nd il was only natural that industry in the plan, and In % %  ss a whole. plan of some nature should b. gai | UOs U OB of UM 00*0 The Plan would help the masses framed snd Implemented as r\water harbour said that while il if lhc Government saw to it. peditlously as possible. He therewas a necessity, there was UN fore hoped that the plan would ..overnment I Ian not be shelved, hut that it wou'-l. ,wever that thev Ur i F E M "T ^l "W.^-t be implemented as quickly in He fen however 'nat ifij f or f our ye „ t ^ he had made it .aOKihie ...ended ,0 0i, .toctrl. power. XV^I^'fo ISifgS?. £'"?'" TS?^S-" JLT22A Something musl be done about -^ his dissallsfaction with the "•** ** n Mr Talma said that the Electric power and he S,Xlo !" ihcm H^ouUUub WM ftnl > n ,ur -' wllh l,m11 "' noticed that Grenada had recentj t conservative lesourccs that nil the propose ly floated a loan for just over lMi y/hat was wrong with the Plan '"ntained in the party's msnmillion dollars for schemes, in„ he saw It was thai Government h-sto could nol be included m eluded in which was Ihe provism< j not w rm lo be bold enough any one five year plan, ion of electric power. It was to bring what not only the memHe asked what of the proposals time thst they made uo their bers of the House but also the pubcontained JII the memorsndui" minds what they would do in i, c expected. It was hard to say could any member who went lo omised u. but it was very true—the Plan the House on the popular VQtfl Lucy was very conservative. disagree wllh. and added "If h %  to St. Thomas to provide them He said that he had repeatedly fail, to sgrce with the proposal^ ith electricity and lighten Iheir suggested to lhc Government to set out in tho-scheme, he was reate a hank. They should change voting against progress and adneement. High Blood Pressure Kills Men & Women r i 1.IU t-bl t cost wfalofa had %  lake into consideration Mr. Talma said that it ,...-. ..II .ight to talk about a deep wain harhoui. bul where was tho Stone* to come frrpm. He did iml think they should take six million dol1 us from the Treasury to build %  deep waler harbour sod then close 'li.iteyes lo the other %  ah)" • poor -!•* i>. !"%  i ...... %  %  • %  • %  < i of II. h atooil nil lawsseaSi KasdarhM si r h>-d • %  • < I...1. dllll MSI. • %  "• haarl. and mild ,ou faai >.-.. > %  -..... m a '-efse, rial N.. rrm four i It ii auavraniaaS i* "" fmi latta.-aw.* I""",", . h mind! what th.y would do in X he hoSd •"*' "^" Th h,d P'"""'" 1 RL.CT "K2 their eonrti.uenh. ttom St. Lucy to the Development Board KirSS: r.sr on? Sf & .-S*w% schemes which the party had not yet the banking policy and provid panse for commerical promised they would carry out if returned lo power. He pointed out that the plan was partly one of development and partly one which set out and made provision for certain capital estimates which, would be ocldea to utilise the dinarily incunei, for the next Government House respect. He hoped that the use of ihe"bank. At the present Loader or the House would find time Ihey could get mgch investout something from the Colonial" menl Actually, it was not too Office concerning the Control of much to say that they could start Public Utilities Bill. their harbour scheme on that With reference to New Offices strength, and Parliament Buildings, Mr. There was too the questi Mapp said that while It was a good nauonallsaUon and gas nakGovernment t'asle land at „ in order to ftve years l>y '.i* several departpPOV ide offices, he did nol think ments. The proposals outlined on i nat Parliament Buildings were a page 3. paragraph 11 of the pun, priority. They could well wait constituted the real economic some years as Ihey were quite planning which the Government comfortable where Ihey were and was proposing. They were: dehe felt that such buildings would velopment of water resources and not be ideally situated aback GorIts distribution; experiments and crnment House. Parliament research in irrigation of sugar Buildings should be situated near and olher crops, encouragement the City. He would prefer to go of food production and developto Queen's Park as he had soon ment of agricultural schemes; ensuggested He agreed with vouragemenl of the tourist Indusing use of some of trv and establishment of a Baracres of land hados Development Board to as-4 House and Ihey should atari lb. tin only 24 ceiili 3 lb Iin only 4R cenli 5400 iTom all points of view the worlds BIGGEST small-car buy! Paaw .aa*. !•.*-s.-_^ BSSSSaOBl^tO'rgl %  Maraii kMaab laMia) BjaiafW S.aSr."-"'-" BIG beyond helimfj FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD. Phone 2385 Sole Distributor. Phone 4504 ATLAS BATTERIES fcL^TlAS • Faster Starting • Longer life • More Power wtMWC&^z. fcfw($**2 '£toiaStation,