Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text
ten

WHAT'S ON TODAY

Meeting, St. Philip Vestry ll a.n
Anchor Cup Shoot Government

Rifle Range .... . 13 (moon)
Meeting, Sanitary Commissioners,

Bt. Michael .os.eeseeer ess. (1,00 p.m.
Meeting, St. Peter Vestgy 2.0 pam
B.C. Films, St. Paul’s Shurch 7.30 p.m
Mobile Cinema, Crab Hill, Planta-

tidh, St. Luey . 7.30 p.m
Police Band Concert, Princess
Alice Playing Field 7.45 p.m

ESTABLISHED 1895

Increased Taxation
Is Taxpayers’ Burden

HEAVY CRITICISM was levelled at the Government
proposals contained in the five year development plan of
capital expenditure and taxation by opposition members
who took the lead given by government party member, Mr.
A. E. S. Lewis in labelling the plan “unambitious” when
consideration of the matter continued for another seven
hours last night.

Cubans Live
In Trees After
Hurricane

HAVANA, Oct.” 29.

The Cuban Army, air force and

Taking part in last night’s dis-
;cussion besides Mr. Lewis .were
Mr. J. E..T. Brancker, Mr. V. B.
|; Vaughan, Mr. W. A.. Crawford
jand Mr, O. T. Allder,

During the debate, members ac-
cused the Government Party of
‘incompetence” and charged them
'with “burdening the taxpayers
with increaséd taxation.” oe

After more than eleven hours of
|debate during the past two days’
| sitting, the: House adjourned until

|
}
i
}



Red Cross began an airlift of food, | next Tuesday at 3.00 p.m. follow-'

jing the defeat by a 10—6 majority
of a Government motion.to ad-
journ the Heuse until to-day at

medical supplies and clothes to
thousands of families isolateq at

the Cienega De Zapata area
swamplands and along the south-
west coast of Las Villas province
since last week’s hurricane caus-

ed heavy seas and rains which
inundated the coastal zone.
The Cuban navy dispatched

two small warships to the strick-
en area. It was doubted how-
ever whether the ships will be
able to reach the shoreline due
to the fact that the water was not
navigable.

Pilots who flew over the
stricken area said every hut and
house was destroyed and that
people were huddled together in
the open ground and even in
trees. They said the people
waved pieces of cloth in an ap-|
parent attempt to call for aid.

Meanwhile the whole _ sugar
crop of the Covadonga mill near
Cienega was destroyed and it}
was doubted that the mill will
participate in next year’s pro-
duction, At nearby Horquita
mill, more than 1,000 were left
homeless.—(U.P.)

Convicts Hold
Ten Hostages

CHESTER, Illinois, Oct, 29
Unruly convicts and _ taut-
nerved officials pressed an en-
durance contest in its third day
with the lives of ten hostages
depending on the outecome:—ee
In the second uprising in two
‘days at Menard State prison,
Psychiatric Division, most of the
300 inmates who stormed the
kitchen and dining room were sent
back to their cells but 38 armed
with the kitchen cutlery seized
three unarmed guards and barri-
caded themselves in the mess
hall. Seven other guards are
hostages of 332 east cell inmates.

—(C.P.)

Reds Bar Allied
Patrol Again

BERLIN, Oct. 29.
For the third straight day So-
viets barred. the western allied
“courtesy patrol” from 110 mile
autobahn highway linking Berlin
with the west. An official British
spokesman said the British army
patrol was presented this morn+
ing at-the Soviet highway check-
point outside Berlin but was re-
cy jected by Soviet guards manning
. the points. .A similar United
j States patrol yas rejected yester-
day and a British patrol the day
before.—-U.P,

RIVER DOES $32,000

DAMAGE

MILAN, Italy, Oct. 29.
The Serio river swollen by re-
} cent rain broke through its banks
| at six different places yesterday
in the province of Cremona near
here, causing estimated $32,000

damage.
| : —U-P.
j uaa Saloni







cg te nee



: YOUNG SOUTH KOREANS FLOCK TO ENLIST





a

5 SEEKING A CHANCE to fight against the North al
; South Koreans flock to recruiting stations as soon as they reach military age.
ing no other means of transportation, forms a walking parade.

cans in the United Nations forces



4.00 p.m,

Voting against the Government
motion were Mr, R. G. Mapp, Mr.
A. E. S. Lewis. Mr. L. A. Wil-
liams, Mr. E. W. Barrow, Mr.
Cc, E, Talma, Mr, W. A, Crawford,
Mr. V. B. Vaughan, Mr. O. T.
Alider, Mr. J. E. T. Brancker,
Mr. E. D. Mottley.

Voting for the motion were Mr. |

G. H. Adams, Dr. H. G. Cummins,
Mr. M. E. Cox, Mr. T.:O. Bry-
an, Mr. E. St.A. Holder and Mr.
F, E. Miller. .

@ On Page 3

New Aniti-Terrorist
Regulation Imposed
In Kenya Schools

KENYA, Oct, 29.

A new regulation aimed = at
preventing subversive activities in
Kenya's Independent schools was
authorized by Governor , Sir
Evelyn Baring as the biggest
anti-Terrorist manhunt in the
colony to get under way,

Schools may now be closed by
order of the Minister for Edu-
cation if he is satisfied:

1. That any member of the
management or teachirg staff is
associated with the activities
prejudicial to the maintenance 4of
public order,



2. That any teaching or
instruction imparted in such
school is prej to the main-

tenance of public order.

3. That any pupil attending
the school is or has been associ-
ated with such activities,

4. That the school premises
were used for such activities.

The order was made as nearly
300 British troops were rushed to-
day to spots outside Nairobi to
guard the isolated white settlers
after the murder yesterday of a
British farmer and his two African
servants.

The British Colonial Secretary
Oliver Lyttelton arrived here to-
day to solve Kenya's colonial ques-
tion where 47 natives and Europ-
eans were killed in a campaign
conducted by Mau Mau terrorists.

Mr. Lyttelton faced the demandg
from 100,000 members, the Kenka
African Union, which includes
measures to curb the terrorists
abolition of racial discrimination,
release or trial of arrested Afri-
cans, and distribution of land.

UP.

y °
Cheap Fighter
LONDON, Oct. 29.

A British company is preparing
a light utility supersonic fighter
plane which can be built cheap-
ly, the Slociety of British Aircraft
Constructors said.

Designers believe it will have
armament equipment and flying
qualities adequate to most opera~
tions which a single seater fighter
can perform, and equal or better
speed and climbing powers than
existing heavier types.—C.P.



battling in Korea.



UK Must Make |

\
|

Koreans and Chinese Communists,

fhavbados

/ Government Criticised ,Over Five Year

‘ Wins. Nobel Prize



DR. SELMAN A. WAKSMAN, 64, pic- |
tured at work in his Rutgers Uni-
versity laboratory, in New Bruns-
wick, N, J., was awarded the 1952
Nobel Prize for Medicine and
Physiology. The microbiologist
was cited for his work in the dis-
covery of streptomycin, the first
effective antibiotic fe- use against
tuberculosis. The prize is worth
$33,200 in cash, (International) |

|



For Red Thrust

m | toward

» Proposal .

YESTERDA’ = WEATHER REPORT

oll fron oan: n Nil

) Rainfall r 0 to date: 6.93 ins

Te t 5 °F

t T 5 °F

1 Velocity: 1 per hour

; ometer (9 a.m.) 29.987 (3 p.m.) 29.880
q TO-DAY
4 « 5.50 a.m
et: 5.48 p.m

i
M irst Quarter, Octeber 25
Lig 6.09 p.m

1.21 am.,
7.3 am,











1.3 p.m.
8.13 pam.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30,, 1952 PRICE: FIVE CENTS



Bn a a eR



I MARKSMEN AT THE 600 WANK

French Prepare

: ; : HANOI, Oct. 29. |
\ FRENCH and Commtnist Vietrrinh fcrees gingerly
| tested each other's defence§ along the narrow muddy Black

River today and’ poised for au expected all cut Red thrust
the south. ‘Reds continued to jab infiltration
lumns acrogs the river frorn Van Yen, their first bridge-
id point in what séemed reconnaissanee movements to

find out where the Sainte ey communications ¢c |



be cut before attackify indo

' _ %

| ‘sibie isolated outposts and guilt

— Sudanese hn eb sone ne

Black River and a second a few
miles back lining the ridge
hills that separate the

The French union headquarters
“eanwhile calleq ‘im all indefen-

| Men and guns are being assem.
bled by airlift at Sonla where the



| immediate

| CAIRO, t, 29.
Infermid sourees Said Naguib
,has accepted proposals, for an
home rule and even-
tual self-determination for Sudan,

Negotiations in the past two
weeks between Naguib and the
Sudanese Independence Party
\delegations were said to be suc-
jcessfully concluded and Naguih
expected to announce his decisio

on Thursday. ’

The ‘agreement covers thé
immediate election of Sudan
parliament as the first step ¢
home rule Which would last

three years. The Sudanese would
te entitled to determine the future
status of their country,



First Move |

CANBERRA, Oct. 29.

The Australian Government is
willing at any time to revert to
private trading in meat contracts
with the U.K. but it is up to
Britain to make the first moves
according to Minister of Com-
merce Mr. John McEwan,

He told a press conference that
the agreement provides that any
termination of the entire contract



must be mutually agreed and
that the Austra’ Government
had made no a to
Britain for cancellation of the

‘contract,

He said Government thought
most meat producers in Australia
were satisfied with the terms of
the present eontract despite much
criticism,

He said that the British Gov-
ernment as a matter of principle
probably prefers the trader to
tracer business but ‘is faced with
difficulties of rationing and may
not find it easy to make the
change.—U.P.



France Accuses
United States

PARIS, Oct, 29. ,
Defence Minister, Rene Pleven
accused the United States of go-
ing back on promises of aid to
France and said that unless the
United States fulfill their pledg-
es. The national defence budget
will be reduced by the corres-
ponding amount.—U.P.

In London this section of the
reported agreement was said
be in line with Eden’s statements
in parliament last week — that
Britain supported Sudan elections
as the first step towards gelf-
determination,

—U-P.



_ Accepted |












road cuts right and drops toward 2 ey
the river and Lai Chau 75 isloated
miles northwest near the Chinese
border,

These two key strong points in
the mountains of Thai country
contain regions of only airfields
and will be defended at all costs
French masséd eight battalions to
the Black River area faâ„¢g an
estimated communist division
lining the river banks and two
more moving down the moun-
tains in four columns from the
fallen bastion of N’Ghilao

—U.P.

of
vital
| colonial rowte from the river.

bank yesterday.





Mr. Adlai E

Stevenson

all important 32 electoral

Seek Supreme
Court Ruling

WASHINGTON, Oct, 29.
Five major United States oi!
companies today carried to the
Supreme Court their efforts to
bloek the Grand Jury investiga-

cratic Presidential aspirant

Mr. Stevenson boarded the
train for the crucial 48 hour trip
only a few minutes after he had
been given a noisy send-off by the

; crowd that packed New York's
on din Washington of an alleged Madison. Square Garden last
, esta * monopoly or cartel. The night.
1 ombanies asked the court to re- Police estimated that 18,000

U.N. Retake |
Pinpoint Hill
United See. x

Shot and way
back up Pinpoint Hill on Sni r |
Ridge in near freezing wedlber
at dawn to-day,

They reached the crest at 10.30
a.m. secured it, and blasted Com-
munist survivors down the North-
ern slopes with grenades, bay-
onets and rifle fire.

At last reports, Allied troops
had surrounded two platoons of
retreating Chinese,



To the east, other U.N, forces
repulsed five Chinese attacks
along the four mile front in the
Finger Ridge sector and plugged

the 75° yard gap torn by 400
Chinese in the Allied line on
Heartbreak Ridge,

Allied foot soldiers on the

western front recaptured the out-
post in Chorwon valley south Of
Iron Horse mountain. The
Korean Marine Corps also grab-
bed the Communist outpost west

of Munsan but withdrew aften
blowing up Red bunkers,
—U-P.



$729m. For Defence
Weapons From Europe

SOME $729,000,000 is b

PARIS, Oct. 29.

eing spent in Europe to buy

defence weapons and materials under the 1952 “off shore’
procurement programme according to U.S. Ambassador

Mr. William H. Draper junior.

young
This large group, find-

South Koreans now outnumber Ameri

(International Soundphoto)

He said the bulk of contracts

are for ammunition and explo-| Magistrate in the Eastern District |. 4" invitation eee ge Cow

sives with about $355,000,000]and the other for payment of sal- |Guiana was conveyed to | ill TUNIS, Oct. 29
being spent for some 12 different}ary to J S, Ross, an Assistant Agri- | some days ago. There he. ; A terrorist bomb wrecked a
types including shells’as well ae|cultural Officer during a C.D.W.|no details available at the MO0-) French owned bookshop in the
rockets. These contracts were | two-year Forestry. course in Eng- {ment of the exagt date of her de~} Arah Medina qfarters here last
placed in ‘even countrics with|land for which he had been select- | parture. t. No one Was hyrt.—U.P
France's $128,000,000 heading the{e¢ and already arrived in the

list. Six European countries got United, Kingdom—as well as a aa

contracts totalling
including nets, booms and other
equipment with France again
heading the list with $100,000,00(
worth,

Some $65,000,000 worth of air
craft contracts were placed
France got $46,600,000 worth of
orders for Vampire fighters.
‘taly got $13,900,000 t» mak:
spare parts for US. built Fa4
ighters and J35 jc! engines

Some $75,000,000 wort) of con-
tracts were placed for equipmen
such

as radar sets and. spar
carts. —U.P.
- ;
Ban On Reds
TOKYO, Oct, 9

A Japanese Foreign Office
spokesman said that Japan hag
losed. its :deors to cilizen ot
| ommunist Russia and its satel

‘ites and that the entry ban would
apply to all-Communist countrie}>
xcept Yugoslavia whic’) no long-
er is under Russian domination

Six Soviet citizens inelyelin«
correspondents for Tass News
j)Agency and the newspaper
Pravda were given orders last
week to leave within a month

The Foreign Office did not say
what will be done about othe
tussians already here. They in-
clude fifty members of an unre-
cognized Soviet Mission and about
200 in business,—U.P.



‘




| pany Said the grand ury included

22 ‘s, ie
te that they were entitled
, to be estigated, if at all, b: wa

$173,300,000} third motion in Mr. Gairy’s name
worth of ships and harbour craft}*mging the earliest possible re-

verse the decisions of the lower

courts refusing to discharge the
grand jury.

In their appeal paper, the com-

persons jammed the Garden, the
scene of success and defeat for |
fighters throughout the year, to}
see the pared» of Broadway and |
Hellyweed celebrities
Democrats ab, former
es }House first”
Roosevelt,
Mr, Stevenson
standing ovation as he was led
down the aisle of the great. in-
door arena to climax the evening

i4 government empl yees White
mem' ‘cor



te ' received a
vr and impartial jury, free from |

the inevitable bias of doverriment
employed jurors.” .

In earlier proceedings the Dis-{ which had brought fowh en- |
trict Federal Judge James Kirk-|dorsements from such personal- |
land denied the motions by com-fities as Richard Rodger and

panies to dismiss the grand jury
without prejudice and to transfer
the case to New York City where
government employees did not

Oscar Hammerstein I], Tallulu H.

Bankhead, Humphrey Bogart, |
James
Sandburg

Mea on juries, The Federal The partisan audience’ inter-|
eu specs | commrned Judge rupted Mr, Stevenson's speech so
Ce tee ents many times that he was unable
In papers filed with the Supreme 4° finish it before the time the |
Court todhy the five companies }Pemocrats had purchased on the
said they would show that the}Mational television network had
Federal Attorney General James |tU" out. He was cut off
eee picked Washington for Mr. Stevenson openly predict-}

grand jury proceedings “which it

‘ ; ed he would win the election |

pee ee ang untiecessary to November 4 saying the Republi-;
—U,.P. cans have “everything on their

° apeplieeeiensiahanelbidienes ne side but the people.” He again
described Gen. Dwight Eisen.

hower as a man who tailored his
speeches to blend with geogra-
| phical backgrounds and declared
‘that he Adlai Stevenson was a
| person who said the same thing
in the south that he would say in
the north.—(U.P.)



M.M.W.U. Bloc
Out*V oted

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GRENADA, Oct, 29.
Hon, T, A, Marryshow was un-
animously re-elected on the nom-
ination of Hon, J. B, Renwich,
seconded by Hon, D. A Henry, as
Deputy President when the Legis-
lature ied the second year of
the session today. A day of keen-





Princess Alice To
Visit B.G., T’dad

(From Our Own Correspondent)

ly contested debates saw the re- t. 29
du terlad Rite three times} 11 RH. tion Lite is to
Goverment ~ Afgan visit British Guiana as well as

motions—one over
government selection of a house to
urchase for a residence of the

Trinidad in the new year, it
learned here reliably tonight

|
Ww |
|

placemen! of Superintendent of
Public Works Clarence Renwick
because “the taxpayers are highly
lissatisfied with present irregu-
lnrities in the P.W.D.". Hon
® C. Noel. formerly of the Gairy
bloc in these instances voted con-
trary to his erstwhile confrerer
twice firmly declaring his reason:
for differing and unruffled by Mr
Gairy’s comments on his opposi-
tio: The Gairy totion recom- [
mending consure on Administra ‘or {
MacMillan for transmission to the
Secretary of State on the ground
hat irregularities in several gov-
syniment departments indicate very
weak and poor administration was
‘eferred to the next meeting of
the Council. .

The all-day ‘sitting was ad-
journed till tomortow to complete
certain unfinished business.

TRUCK OVERTURNS:
7 KILLED, 27 INJUKED

TAMPICO, Mexico, Oct, 29 |



Police sa'd seven persons were
killeqd and twenty-seven others

injred when a freight truck



loaried with 44 labourers weeny
tunied on a highway near here } Hon. C. WYLIE, Q.0.

The report said the majority ot |
the victims were fruit vendors Her Majesty the Queen |
who hired the truck to attend direction i appointm
traditional market day. Surviv- (Hornaa Ges " d of Mr. G
ors s@id faulty brakes caused the; 5h! fH ci : a
accident.—U.P. J dd er f 0

i
wars iS

MARKSMEN from British Guiana, Trinidad and
From (left to right) are:
G. Martin, Capt. Warner, Capt. St. Aubyn (British Guiana) and Mr, C

Gov. Stevens

reached today
biggest prizes in the Presidential contest
votes,
running out and every minute was priceless,
attached so much
to Pennsylvania as a “keystone state
decided to spend the next two days

prominent }

Pro Mrs wedi ye



Capt. Neblett, Capt. We

on Bids For

Pennsylvania’s Votes

EN ROUTE WITH GOVERNOR STEVENSON

Oct, 29.
for of the
Pennsylvania's
though time was
the Demo-
importance

one
Even

"jn the
within its borders

Gets Life Term

4 i
eI

h

} Hf

'
t
*

‘
AD SALEH LAMLUM, 23, scidn of
one of Egypt's wealthiest families,
is shown after he was sentenced to
life imprisonment for opposing
Egyptian land reform by force, He
was accused of storming into a po-

lice station at Maghagha, bran-
dishing a Tommy gun and shout-
ing that land reform would be en-
forced only “over my dead body.”
t.and reform legislation limits
of arricultural land in
00 asres, (international)

ownershi

Egypt to

BOOKSHOP WRECKED

Attorney General And
Mr. Adams Appointed QU’s



MR. G. H,

ADAMS, C.M.G., Q.0%
ly pleased ta

YW) Campbell

Wi





election that he

e ! oreat

Wylie,




arbados shot 10 rormds to count from the 600 yards

therhead, Mr. F. 8. Olton, Mr.
Wilson (Trinidad).

General
_ Kisenhower
In New York

NEW YORK, Oct. 29.
General Dwight D, Eisenhower
sounded down the home stretch
nh the race for the White House
idding for votes of the Federal
vorkers and refuting the Demo-
ratiec charges that he was to

lame for the Korean war.

The Republican presidential
indidate was in the second day.
of an intensive three day campaign
our ot the New York City area
quest of the state’s important
49 electoral votes. In an informal
juestion and answer programme
clevised nationally last night
reneral Eisenhower said:

|. That his proposed “clean
veep’ on the Federal Govern-
nent would not extend to “effi-
ient” civil service employees but
sould certainly include their

f | “political bosses”

wh 4Phat there
conneetion”
nilitary deeision
’ of Korea and
ic ion made two

| 3, That he did not advocate
| cutting soldiers’ pay and referred
jto the Report in which he sug-
ested an “additional Premium”
ice in the Far East.
| General Eisenhower’s vote hunt
jin New York City area to-day
| carried him to Westchester
} County, the Bronx and Queens
—U.P.
'
|
}
]
|
'
|

was’“no very
between the
1947 to get
the “political
years later”,

in



~~. *
€5mi Sale To Brazil
| ¥ . eee
Surprises British

nN . . .

| ‘Trading Circles

} LONDON, Oct, 29,

| The news of the sale to Brazil
£5,000,000 worth of
aircraft was received
in trading circles today with
surprises and some envy, and
exporters expressed the hope that
government would grant similar
tacilities for other commodities.

over
British jet





|
| For some time Brazil has been

jrunning short of sterling and
jexchange permits for sterling
|* xports have been difficult to

j obtain, The contract for the sale
of 70 meteor jet aireraft—is being
| offset by a “compensation” deal
lof a Substantial amount of Bra-
zilian to be purehased by
}the British raw cotton commis-

'
sion,
'

cotton

Commenting on the deal, the
Times in its “city notes’
[cota said today “quality of
compensation purchase is always
syne of the main anxieties over

deals but reports suggest that the

commission has haggled with
some persistence over the ques-
tion of quality so that it may be
jhoped that one side of the deal
jis as satisfactory as the other,
i “Whether the scope for such
mpcnsation deals is creat may
perhaps be doubted. But it seems
though the British aircraft
j try is hardpressed and

pee yn it
f!
|
|

must make up to some
the declines in ex-
other industries,
it some countries is

difficult that less
methods of making it
low innot be ignored.”

i
xt for
t of some

»x

UP.



Olympic Fencers

| To Tour Brazil
MILAN,

Oct. 29
| talian Olympie fencers ac-
| i the invitation of the Flu-
e Club of Rio de Janeiro
Brazil. Fencers are Olym-
pee champion, Eduarda
Olympic women foils
R. ¢ ber, and swords-
der Mengiarotti

iuardo Mangidrotti is the
ling Italian fencer of the
eyt generation in addition t4
ne at Helsinki the Epee
title, he finished second
ret Christian Dorila
irnament,—U.P.



|
| or










PAGE TWO

| habla OFFICER Percy
of the Port-of-Spain
1} e was am : the in nisi
engers on Tuesday by the De
Geasse for the U.K., where he
t special months’
in Fire Preve
Short Visit!

AND MRS, OTHO DOWD-

M*

will

tak six intens

NG were :mong the pass-

‘+ gers leaving the island by

.W.F.Ay on Monday fer Trini-
dea

They have gone on a short visit,

A Parts
A& PARTY was held at the resi-
v4 dence of Mr. and Mrs. J.

Taomas of Hothersal Turning on
‘‘nucgday in honour of the visiting
Trinidad Rifle Team.

Those attending the party had
an enjoyable evening. Mr. M
jiuater of the Trinidad Team was
frst im the aggregate with all
competitors and first in two
Class A Shoots while Mr. F. Bello
also on the Trinidad Team mace
a first place in one of the Class 4
Shoots.

Dancing was the order of th
evening and the party ended
shovtly after midnight,

vor B. T.C, Races
R. and Mrs. Cito Damtin wer
arrivals from Trinidad o»
Tuesday by the s.s, De Grasse.
They are guests at Hotel Royal.

Mr, Cito has come over for the
Barbados Turf Club Races which
begin early next month. He also
brought over the racehorse
“Careful Annie.’

Wed In Trinidad
ER many friends in Barbados
will be glad to hear of the
marriage of Miss Lucille Gor-
mandy to Mr. Anthony Mitchel)
which took place last Saturday at
St. Crispin’s Church, Port-of-
Spain, Trinidad.

Mrs. Mitchell is a former pupil
of Queen’s College and sister of
the Rev. Lionel Gormandy who is
at present in British Guiana, Mrs.
Gormandy was living in Barbados
for about ten years during which
time she established a music
school then known as the “Excel-
sior School of Music”.

To Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell,
Carib joing in extending sincere
wishes for many years of happi-

ness.
Two Weeks

Me COLIN WOODING ot
T.L.L., Pointe-a-Pierre, ar-
‘rived in the colony on Tuesday by
B.W.LA., from Trinidad on two
weeks’ holiday. He is staying with
his sister Mrs. Vincent Morris of
Reed Street, St. Michael.

First Anniversary
1 MALVERN SPORTS CLUB

will celebrate its first an-
niversary on Saturday night at
Halloway Guest House, The Ivy,
at 8 o'clock.

The Club was founded by Miss
Grace Cumberbatch a_ former
sprinter of Queen’s College and
the games played are netball,

asketball and table tennis.



x |
There will be speeches’ and He is a guest at the St. Law- the Sale at the Bay cect Girls’
music. rence Hotel. Club; tomorrow afternoon,
> r ,

BY THE WAY

LKLA MAW BAT AT, the
Burmese magnate, was taken
round a Government office yées-

terday. He was interested in the
baskets marked “In” and
“Out.”

He said, “Does everything th
come in go out, and everythir
that goes out come in?” The.
said, “No. But what comes in to
go out is put in the Out basket to
go out.” “I see”, said Ilkla, “and
what goes out to come in is put
in the In basket to come in.” “Not
quite,” they said. “Then,” said
Iikla, “why not have a_ third
basket for what doesn’t go out to
come in?” “It can’t go out until
it has come in,’ they said, “And
can’t it come in until it has gone
out?” he asked. “Yes,” they said,
“not necessarily.” “Don’t you
mean, no, not necessarily?” askead
Ilkla. “Well, yes," they said
Sulkily. “And why ‘not neces~
sarily’?” he asked, There wag no
reply.

Is it a new racket?
OME time ago a small para-
graph in the papers an-
nounced the sale of an old castle
to a syndicate, This is apparently
the Heavicote Castle which was
found to be the ancestral home
of Lord Stableham, and which,

during the summer, was thrown



One morning*in schoo! Rupert
and his pals are surprised to see

the Master leave the blackboard

and walk over to the window im

the middle of a lesson. Next

minute he calls them all round

him. “ There's a buttertly our-

side the window such as | have
ali h

_ 58
FOR EXHIB



LADIES’ ARCOLA SE

BLACK, BROWN,

BLACK, BROWN
NEW SHIPMENT OF

RED, MULTYCOLOUR, TAN & WHITE



DAUGHTER of Emperor Hirohito of Japan, Princess Yori is seen with
her husband, Takamasa Ideda, a wealthy land owner, after their mar-
riage in the Shinto shrine in Tokyo. The bride’s mother, Empress
Nagako, is at right. Marriage costs the princess many royal privi-
loges, including royal allowance and palace residence. (International)

Grenada Honeymoon
OW back from their Grenada
honeymoon are Mr. and Mrs.
George Nehaul who were married
on OctOber 18th, a} Providence
Methodist Church, Christ Church. |
They came in yesterday morn-
ing by B.W.LA. Mrs, Nehaul ss
the former Pat Bullen, daughter of
Mr, and Mrs, C. Bullen of Searles

Improving

M

ior
ere

medical
will be

reasons.
glad to

sut of Hospital soon,
Mr, O’Grady accompanied
his daughter came over



R. WHITFIELD O'GRADY of
Trinidad is now in, the island
His friends
learn that
» is improving and hopes to be

by
fram
Trinidad about three weeks ago

BARBADOS



“IT is hard to imagine a con-
plemporary woman who jis more
'wWorthy of being written about
rut le inclined for it, than the
| Countess Mountbatten of Burma,”
;}says Dennis Holman, at. the start
of his biography of her—LADY
LOUIS.

And the publishers say of her
the dust-jacket:—

“She is . one of, the most
significant and influential women.
; of her age... ”

| on

‘I’ve a Spare’
| BE that as it may, Edwina Cyn-
|thia Annette Mcur.tbatten-chris-
| tened Edwina after Edward VII, a
| godfather—acquired much of this
significance and influence from the
£1,400,000 left by her grand-
father, Sir Ernest Cassel, the
| financier,
| It was at the Claridges party ip
1921 that she met Lieutenan
Lord Louis Mountbatten. P
Later that year, at Cowes” Mrs
Cornelius Vanderbilt,
drum up friends for a cruise in
her yacht, said to Edwina: “Be
a darling and help me make tp the
party. I have a spare man. I think
you may have met him-—Dickie
Mountbatten.”

Borrowed Fare

SO they met again and sailed
away and fell in love, Then the
Prince of Wales took cousin
Dickie to India as his aide on a
tour. Edwina borrowed £100 from
her great-aunt (“He scunds a
nice young man. ... You shall
have the money, my dear’) and
followed him out, second class,

He proposed in Room 13 of the
old Viceregal Lodge (now the
registrar’s office of Delhi Univer-



Factory and an employee of tha and expects to remain here for @| sity), and they were married in
Barbados Publicity Committee. few weeks longer, Carmen is a|1922, biographer Holman noting
\ . r guest at Halloway Guest House,|that it took four men to lift the
Short Holiday The Ivy. huge wedding cake.

M* P. GREIG of Chez-Jean- Lucky Winners hy ij the wee, gay prectiae
Pierre was among the pas- - a penulss ara at|the Mountbattens “foun -
Senger leaving the island by aoe eae oot nied selves with £45,000 a year after
B.W.LA., on Monday for E : , taxation. . . It must be said

last m Saturday, October

Trinidad. now come to hand.

He has gone on a short holiday
visit and expects to be back in
Barbados some time next week,

Left Yesterday
M*: and Mrs. Ascot Michael
were among the departures
by B.W.LA., for Trinidad yester-
day evening. They had beef
spending a short holiday in the
island as guests at Hotel Royal.

for the Doll’s name
drawn the lucky winner was Mrs
Jack Murray.

The Train was won
John Wilkinson.

by

For French Guiana

Grasse was Mrs. Holleaux
French Guiana, who
spending a week’s holiday.
During her stay she was
gust atthe St. Lawrence Hotel.

Awaiting Passage

R. MIKE PRIEST of the

Cable Ship Electra arrived in
the island from St, Lucia by
B.W.LA., on Wednesday last .t
await the departure of the Oran-
jestad for England.

Qhening Sale

Welfare Officer,

18, have
There were three correct guesses
and when

Master

EAVING the island on Tues-

day morning by the s.s. De
of
had beer

a

ISS BEfTY ARNE, Social





for Mountbatten that a good time
was never allowed to interfere
with his career in the Navy even
if his ambitions did remain some-

TF



@ “I FOUND that my husband
in the Regular Army. was spend
ing most of his time with a wi-
dow. He gave her up just after
Christmas, and he has been frank
with me. But I feel bitter and
hurt, though I have forgiven him.

“I need affection, and that, he
says, he cannot give me. He

ts I have been the best mother
in the world to our six grown-up

By B h ae drifting along, companions, but no
€achcomber | | more, S' we go on?’
ee y Reply By CANON HUGH
3 oe WARNER
open to the public at a fee of 5s. IT is one up to you that you did
per person, The visitors were not lose your nerve, You took
shown che emmexe worn. by Sir the blow of his unfaithfulness
alph de Stablehome at Aginh-| ,, alas . 4 , [squarely on your, chin, You re-
court, various suits of armour, a] en tae ee ioe tused to run away from your
bed slept in by Drake, and so on. Look in the section tn which your| marriage. That needed courage.

Occasionally there was a glimpse |
of the present Lord Stableham, |
bearing a remarkable
blance to Captain Foulenough, |
accepting a glass of port from a

look js, according to, the stars, \
MARCH &! to APRIL 2

But. you enterprising,

in right mood

birthday comes and find what your out-

| (Aries)—
resem-' May look as if today is full of obstacles.

; quick-to-perceive
folk can conquer contention if you are

It is clear from your letter that
your husband respects you and is
doing his best to make amends.

You now carry a double burden,
The memory of his treachery will

butler on the terrace, The author-| APRIL. 41 to MAY 20 cTaurus)—| Stick. To forgive is always in our
ities grew ‘suspicious when at en, friendly atepeets Take sensible | power, to forget beyond it, though
lady, having exclaimed ‘That| out time-wasters, keoo work up te eae | time can be a kindly healer,

Jacobean chair must’ ‘be’ price-| 2nd ase only top ideos 7 perl Love has a way, however, of
less,” was told, “Qh, no, You can) < M*¥ 2t to JUNE - 21 (Gemin) —| taking in its embrace the bad as

Sort of day ‘to’ step right ahead if you
know what you should be about. Don’
indulge weaknesses. Keep on the ball!

have it for 50 quid, cash down.” ,













well as the good qualities of the

one we love. This is the mark





M
anxious mS

children. your
“We are back together, but just” Canty

ADVOCATE

The Girl Who Said
‘Yes’ In Room 13

What life on £900 a week has meant to Countess Mountbatten, godchild
of a King, and wife to an earl—By JAMES LEASOR

thing cf a joke to their saphisti-
rated, friends. .. .”

Lady Louis began to travel to
rag, Persia, Burma, Australia,
Tahiti, while her husband sailed
the seas. (“The Mountbattens even
picked the right generation in
which to live. They got the best
of the Century, .. .”)-

3ut it vas nearly closing time
im the pleasure gardens of the
Wet, War brought Lord Louis
new tasks. Lady Louis became
County President for London of
the St. John Ambulance Brigade.
‘She possessed what they require
of their leaders—position and en-
thusiasm.”

Biggest Job

‘TIRELESSLY she toured hos-

pitals in France and Burma and
india: later went!to P.o.W camps
in Malaya and Siam. Her cousin,
Harcld Cassel, who was a P.o,W.
in. Jap hands, wrote to her: “Your
visit was worth two companies of
wm"
With victory came her husband’s
most important job; Viceroy of
India, He was the prime surgeon
at the immense operation which
cut India free from the British
raj. “An incredible feat of diplo-
macy ... and ——— for
averting the bloodbath and
anarchy that would certainly have
followed our departure from In-
dia.”

But what of the chaos that did
result? Says Holman: “For a true
perspective of the Partition rioting
in the Punjab, the events and
numbers involved must be viewed
against the background of the en-
tire sub-continent,

“Responsible estimates (of those
killed) do not exceed 200,000, That
is one for every 2,000 of the popu-
lation, and far less than the death-
roll of a month of the Bengal
Famine in 1943... .”

As always, Lady Louis was
basy, doing “incalculable work
fostering better relations among
the different parties by getting the
Jeaders’ women together in a
friendly atmosphere. . . .”

The “most hopeful sign of the
Mountbattens'’ progress” during

“4 HUSBAND YOU FORGIVE
LOSES HIS LOVE ,

yond him, This is indeed a burden
for you to carry.
When her children, on whom
she has showered so much love,
are grown up and gone away a
mother hungers for emotional
fulfilment more than ever in her
husband. Your feelings are quite
normal,

Face the fact that you are not
likely to find what you need from

irage of yours, not
by vain regrets and moping, but
by sens your life with other in-
terests,

Serenity ...

WHY not try to throw yourself
into some of the social or charita-
ble. organisations in your town?

Go out, and befriend others
even more unhappy than your-
self. Then that vacuum inside you
we something satisfying to

it,

Once it dawns upon your hus-
band that you are no _ longer
turned in upon your own dis-
tress, what is now companionship
between you may blossom out into
something deeper. Even if this
should never come your way,

inner springs of serenity and joy’

will have a chance to flow again.














Snis . JUNE % to JULY 4&8 (Cancer)— § 2 | oO} rea love—t tes oO! its ireum: ni
Snibbo + > foutstanding issues that ied, eden atten: et it it . ; ore. - ORE 01D Fs Neve sain
: Ph tio re 9 = * ,
nm, You are capable when you put ee y Thay. DR EVER “Ty
HE problem of advertise- YO, Solder to task determinedly for many a man has been brought
cdista, lav cuvely & cussion, “ane ens face to face with his conscience Li
i et oe By i” Pt lane fo ae over a ae mee one wparn he a Bd one istening Hours
Y , tw maahineion, . laa ; | Gas rt ye S
design of ‘the advertisements) {iming ani’ wou ay MOK, "Bde Phe same nn eS 4.0081 p.m, — 26 Stem 81m
no should be ‘allowed in Tra-| rush; you may overlook fine lead.” ; ; “Ee pith. The hewn EM Pan he
algar Square.” T hg . : .m. e ws; 4. m.
3 ys al a a eee oe AU LUST 28 to SEPTEMBER $8 (Virgo) Your Burden Daily Service; 4.15 p.m. No Names; 4.45
: Apes fore the ban, Snibbo| —others are striving for many of same| | YOU long for affection and ex- Pm. Sporting Record: 5.00 p.m. Rugb:
ad ready a very tasteful and goals as you. Conrpetition is Reen, so| pressions of tendern He does Fwothe ll 1s pam. s Be Con-
appropriate advertis plan and work with this in mind, that bens cert Orchestra; 6.00 p.m. Welsh Miscel-
gh p roe: eer tis ement tO) You “van make headway. Especiaty | 48 best, but finds that this is be~ tany; 6.15 p.m. Variety Ahoy! 6.45 p.m
g er the facade of the} good midday rays Sports Round-up and Programme Parade;
National Gallery, It showed Nel-| SEPTEMBER 24 to OCTOBER #8 (Liprs) ; 7.00 p.m. The News; 7.10 p.m. Home
son saying good-bye to Emma [3h pine refreshingly on tiptep efforts new. From Britain,
A ‘ e a aaty our planet in generous aspect for you
Hamilton before — the battle Of} pest disposition. Personal affairs in’ fine | Me torists 7.15—10,30 p.m, — 471m
atelelmar. He is saying . “Don’t position: heart and family enero EE Er 1.45
orget to use Snibbo ni and | honoured ; euehr Rae Bb Sith. ‘taowevew,
Pettis aoe : night ey OCTOBER 4 to NOVEMBER 3 Perey French; 8.15 p.m. Radio Newsreel;
mprming. And she replies, | (scorpio) Hater no. dudms about! 8.20 p.m, Dvorak; 8.45 p.m. ial
You’re telling me, Horatio!” | achieving goals today if you go about! Ce Uu Despatch; 9.00 p.m. Gilbert and Sullivan;
| work i. true. Scorpio manner. Take | 10.00 p.m. The News; 10.10 p.m. From
| some fecreatién, too. It replenishes | é 72 Pan: 10,15 p.m. A ers a
energy , - * oO} e Governor of a 'o) yi .
NOVEMBER 28 t9 DECEMBER 23| AT U.S. AIR BASE {oe No Name.
(Sagittarius) Uplifting outlook, new ‘
posstibilitic Take a firm grip’ on self; | M
wold indecision, restlessness } otorists i und
DECEMBER. 23 to JANUARY 21] American f drivin ro the
(Capricorn) You may have certain B itai Orees est base in
authority, responsibilities put upon you} @" n—Burtonwood, near War-
You! .can “pvance through fri ;}ington, Lancs,-—are double:
superiors uit don’t take good thi in American and.
for granted .
JANUARY arto WaRCHs0erAqoartusy} Throughout the “base, covering
‘tre “appiten of your all-round | Several square miles, road signs
ability. urgen Make new friends,|have gone up in duplicate. Both
t rememb ed ones, old friends,} British and ican vers use
too
PERU UARY &t to MARCH 20 (Pisces)—| ¢ base, and now all 175 road
Smart firancial managing should show |Si8Ms are up twice—in American
gains; besiwess, professional endeavours | as well as itish

ffer frech incentive, Certain patronage

ind friends will assist you.
never come across’’ he = says ve o bl
" care y t YOU BORN TODAY; ery capadic,
Leak 3 aretully “at ae lor — have sound home training and follow
may mever see ar other. Ooo. ghert. principles. A more moderate
what a whopper cries Ferdy attitude in desires and pleasures, avoid-
Fox. ‘Let's catch it and. star: ing extremes advisable. Be careful with

a collection !"* ** Certainly not.” whom you associate, but be not too

critical of others. Sueeess ahead if you



‘ t’—'S) ,
One difference: Batian road
signs always order motorists to
: Halt.” American ones tell drivers
to, “Stop.” There are also differ-
ences in d

The duplicated road signs have








—“ROODAL





JANETTA DRESS SHOP

(Next Door to SINGER'S)

e
ENTIRE STOCK ON SALE
Re ny a ag
lg Ty ose Doshi



t

neg vtigtions was a photograph an
American took of her with Gandhi.
walking with his hand on her
shoulder as he used to lean on his
pre nd-niece when going to
prayer meeting.

“t .was a marvellous touch,
demenstrating in a gesture the
new spirit that nad entered into
Byitish-Indian relations and .
‘ihe photograph) made a

tune.”
Ritual Again

AND so an age
the Molntbattens returned to
England—tLady Louis still intent
on helping others (visits, TV
proadcasts in good causes, work
vith old people, and so on).

She is back in. the gracious
world—a countess now (her hus~
band was made an earl in 1947).
Dinner once more is “by candle-
light, a ritual of grace and
ineffable beauty, served by staff in
the navy-blue battledress uni-
forms now worn at Buckingham |
Palace and Clarence House.” 1

Yet, oddly, her biographer makes |
no mention of the private Bill}
she sought to introduce in 1949,
by which she would be able to
anticipate income from the trust
her grandfather left her and get
more money to finance her “pub-
lie duties.”

for-

Ahead

THIS she withdrew when the
Socialist Government of the day
introduced a Bill covering all
women in similar circumstances-—
but why no mention of it here?
After all, it is very important to
her, and a biographer’s duty is
surely to note happenings of such
importance to his subject.

Then the future. What of that?
Mr. Holman is vague here. “Her
achievements have to be consoli-
dated . .” he writes ponderously.
“With each new task there are
further responsibilities. With
every fresh problem her horizons
are extended. . . P

But in which direction and to





| crooner Bing Crosby and mother
jof four sons was

children were at her bedside, She
has been ill for several years,

ing star who gave up her own
film
suffered
while recuperating at home from
a serious abdominal operation a
month ago.

to recovery however and was
able to meet
at a railroad
returned from a trip.



what far view Mr. Holman does
not tell the reader.
—L.E.S.

*Out last week, Odhams, 25s.







spokesman said “on Sunday she
suffered a relapse

say her condition is highly criti- |g AA B TOWN
cal.” (DIAL 2310)

The four Crosby boys were OPENING FRIDAY 31ST
summoned from out of town

schools when their mother’s con-
dition became critical,





THURSDAY, OCTOBER 36, 1952

Diamond Rings

LOUIS L. BAYLEY
Bolton Lane

Following Ginger






AtESY























The Garden—St James,
TO-NITE 8.119

YOO YOUNG TO KNOW"
le

i
PM

MAN IN WI

at Nae

& #AT. & 2
I WANT FO."

GRANGER &

BANGERQUS GROUND

Rene

we

JACQUES BERGERCU is pictured*on
his arrival in Hollywood fro*
Paris. Linked romantically with
American film star Ginger Rogers
during her _recent vacation
abroad, the 24-year-old French-
man is in the U.S. on a two-fold
mission—first, to see Ginger and
second, to sign a film contract.



Bing Crosby’s
Wife In Critical
Condition

HOLLYWOOD, Oct, 29.
Dixie Lee Crosby, wife of
near death as
coma, Bing and

she lay in a

Mrs, Crosby, singing and danc-

raise a
a relapse

career to family,

on Sunday
















(WCILLE NORMAN
RAVHEOND MASSEY

She was considered on the road
Bing on Saturday
station when he
A family

and doctors



2.30, 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.

and continuing Daily, 445 &
















































































































—UP. 8.30 p.m.
at their mercy, You will have PP EAA i HEA a RES
taken a grip of life.

You will be no more dependent = we Se ES IN
upon others for your \peace of BRIDGETOWN || BARBAREES OISTIN
mind , {Btal 5819) | (Dial 5170) (Dial 8404)

J —L.E.S Last 2 Shows TO-DAY TO-DAY TO-DAY
met 2:09 Wee ee 4.30 & 8.30 p.m. 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
Sn rer - PANDORA & THE || “NIGHT UNTO NIGHT’ Brovsht Baek by Special
FLYING DUTCHMAN | jteuuas Lindfors | The, Famous Expedition
(Technicolor) andl Film:
J A “ ”
MOVING NIMES ||| See cattery Shadi ™] “KONI
aA os
TODAY'S Special 1.30 p.m. Dori
piace aces | BY me se

: . ene AU f & Reainte ts otkinrenrainieeers rere

3 by M. Harrison-Gray : PRINCE of the PLAINS || Today's Special 1.35 ps

: : Monte HALE | COWBOY CAVALIER FRI. & SAT.

: Dealer: East $ memmcopiereTee trae ee Jimmy Wakely 445 & § 90 p.m.

Game all : Opening Friday and BRAND NEW DOUBLE

i N : Randolph SCOTT -in SILVER RAIDERS & Action Packed Too

i # > i CARSON crry Whip Wilson “TRIFLE TROUMLES

“ey 4Warnercolor) ooo Le e

: ss 642 Opening FRIDAY owery Boys «also

: 3743 Sat. Special 9.30 & 1,30 “! sHOT \“BOMBA on PANTHER

: : “JUNGLE STAMPEDE & | JESSE JAMES” ISLAND”

i 3 10 chs 2° $ Agi63 i RENEGADES OF SONORA |} Preston Joh SHEFFIELD

, . || FOSTER — =
4 2 Watch Out For Sh cae ae lachaaee Sat. Special 1.30 p.m
| $4 7 ‘ 4 ¢ 10 ; MAbbott & ‘Costello in || SAT. Special 1.30 p.m || “MAN FROM TEXAS
109862 e ; Their First Color Picture ABILENE TRAILS Tex Ritter &
s 5 JACK & THE and “GUN LAW JUSTICE”
£92 BEAN STALK SEX GUN GOSPEL Jimmy Wakely
’ F, 975 =
3
gh i | GRAND OPENING FRIDAY, 31 Oct.
East at
both tal on this Gold Cup : 4.45 & 8.30 P.M. and Continuing Daily
hand, South made the : ‘ asco :
| stror pie avercall of j CHARGED WITH EXCITEMENT
carts. The est ft ms é
bid Three Spades, North:
Hearts and East Four :
S| doubled by South ¢ 7
an unlucky penalty of 3
Room 2 West jumpec }
straight to Four S$; anc }
ut North on spol. $
ing for a minor suit con- :
§ tract, he Lay sow ) :
3 could §
i only bid’ Five Hearts ;
3 tt doubled and West ec ;
A followed by @& WW j
i Piecing Bast with Qa xin vith PRESTON FOSTER - BARBARA BRITTON ;
i set th e n° a i JOHN IRELAND + REED HADLEY J, EDWARD BROMBERG - VICTOR KRIAN
por ng? wn Es He 3
then ¥ 10 to A anc }
i played on Diamonds losne | BARBAREES __ Extra Special
one \e Res
i aoote of BGO more than made : ee a A 7 A (Dial 5170) The Road Safety Short
up for the loss in Room 1}. | ‘IT MIGHT
fansnveonsescasuuessesvesssccseszesss sess eed BE YOU”

Condon Express Service







says the Master sternly, ** You |
shouted not kill a thing just because cocks. Birthdate of: John Adams, 2nd |80Ne€ up as a result of an idea of T E AT R E $
it is rare and beautiful I’ U.S..' pres, Richard Sheridan, | Captain Charles Goodson, the
eS statesman, dramatist, wit, USAF safety officer at Burton~ EMPIRE OLYMPIC | ROXY ROYAL
Me ‘ ag ; a ao wood, One advantage, he be-| Last 2 Shows To-day, To-day 4.20 @ 8.15 | To-day 4.20 & 8.15 day
a oemeienriemecom ———— rine lieves, is that GI i ‘ yr MAN PROM x oF oe
; aur Senin S : “a automati- 445 & 8.0 Basil RA’ MONTRE. Universal Doble
— = a ee) uae or | Sno” | seen | oeee cee com
” ; DAMASCUS TOWER OF |. “Andy Bovine bachole Ca
nicolor LONDON ard OE —
. 7 & MOB TOWN (4 RUN Audrey TOTTER
ITION @ OTHER OCCASIONS #50 YEARS AGO | ri'Gh “Bron, putiritines | qe a
’ Deadend
“ | From the Editorial of the Advo- ; Or a ‘Yerps ars Meradith wards Ps in. re
TOES he “+4 Seereeney Oct. 30th, 1902 THE VATICAN | To-day & Saturday ‘Temertow at 43074) KANSAS RAIDERS
as i Metis ial * eine | e es i e ‘ .
NAVY, WHITE LOW CUT COURTS $13.69 tie sates tale ate Nee | A Fecunicclor ” |£ND OF THE RUREEA cape, | Tomorrow at ti &
, WHITE BUCKLESS & TOELESS.>...... $15.04 fore us and has always ended in rere temerres, cad | scutgiMety | MAN rua
: ig noonshine”, is to be ho 4 “S, IDENTITY
LADIES AMERICAN SHOES ‘herefore, that the present applic |Wac#or Sheik ana UNKNOWN ont Gun —
ue $6.50 —~ $8.37 eants mean business, and that Bar- | Tals of Fiery Love &| Obenime Friday ““Richara Conte Bichard ABER
eta ? bados will not much | re-| High Adventure |, 438 & 815 | Audrey Totter | Andy DEVINE
|tain her invidious position of being | FLAME ef ARABY|Pepublic Double — | iT aasat 980 aam.| om Be
ijthe only civilised community of aa Technicolor! BAL TABARIN | praINSMAN AND ‘| “ AToUR MONEY
T i EVANS WHITFIELDS) jany pretensions, in which the Maureen O'HARA sated tae ioe THE LADY ~
e ° J jbenefits and advantages of elec- Jef! CHANDLER | William Ching IDENTITY | eae
Mm \tricity, both for supptying light | Saturday at 1.30pm and UNKNOWN +” * ea
YOUR SHOE STORE }and motive power, have not been } Pt AINSMAN AND) rHE PARULOUS Opening Saturda Mandy DEVINE
> 4 “i mm javailed of. And it would be cer- THR LADY SENORITA) 4. aie
PHONE: - 4220 tainly. most unwise to pl os | and Starring riren AND Fury “"""* pusners
}necessary obet ae Bs eee eae | ALONG THE Estellita Rodriquez With moe
ea ESS he ay ot] ERS rua Re ae tear comms _| sod Aoens

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: te eect iniereremaiaaaiiinten BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE THREE
S ee te anette AER SANSA ne Ha NES gece teem ee -
; ° * os e ° nothing else to look forward to |
; h ; P > F but the almshouse, and then they }
| e I ICise cn er ay or e = back and re-employed an as .
: officer over 65, at a high salary
e ane “ for filling a temporary office j When your BACK
» !
} @ From Page 1 had to pay 10% if he won the in a commercial way, and the, $2,500 he had to pay o ‘ E ee Cr th ised He fats ah. PAO | wes -S09 ACHES
; Continuing after the dinner ad big SWEED. should borrow their own money There was the oad = in n r 1 Cc much money for the post, Jon q ese
jouteaeet ea Eine. nner, act The Government were as from the Agricultural Aids Bank, the memorandum that the Comp- Memb : Said he would not vote for ey Backache is usually caused by lazy kidneys.
pie sola Mag ay nig ; anxious as the commercial com- rather than Government borrow troller of Customs would be Members on both sides of the House of Assembly on increase “which will be a burden | The kidneys are the blood’s filters. When
see pe ie. het in ree not munity to remove price controls, money to speng on them. given the authority to determine Tuesday criticized the proposed 20 per cent. increase asked to the people of the colony.” He | they get out of order, excess acids and
; thatthe haphazard wa toes where they served no useful pur- Speaking on the Medical Ser- what proportion of freight by for on the salary of the Chief Engineer, Water Works De- hoped that the warning was ee en ae the system,
' ie liowe be ae y wie mets a ny — - so = yene Be sete iL, - reading be- . ~oe be dutiable. For partment, whom Government hopes to re-engage for a puma sng wend “there is a disturbed = eee out’
use a when ry e es of me res Ww w it, he did not ’ grea ea controversy over S
oer amen pow -_ enough. were satisfied such action would ports, the medical part of the know that fre ht . plane was further contract period of 3 years. The officer’s present {his matter pene nied
ainod oan had’ decided yo a be in the general interest of the Plan should be improved. He felt more than feelgnt by si i agreement expires on the 19th of December. — : aoe Dedd'e Kidney Pills en oe
things they thought were veils community, that a T.B, Sanitorium should be and he did not know how much They said the officer made the demand in the light of , The tea adjournment was Sls sadehie dd rape enenation
things they thought prior” But there would be limitations. included in the plan that people that provision was but he recent indications given by Government that the Colony '#Xen, and om resumption further! oy C05 srids and wastes s0 thet pures
brought oe ticaiion en ME In times of plenty, they would could be cured of the disease. Two hoped. that people not be could afford t high salari fi “top” officials consideration of the matte; W2S; fresh blood flows to ovd
One of the criticisms he had Sut, controls, but only then. For things would be done at the allowed to get off since they were © pay hig aries to a few “top” officials postponed. | Tham you feel better—tnah hotter sed
| read was that they were bring- WSt#nce_ there was at preSent a same time. They would be doing going to er their method of | When they agreed to increase the salaries of the Heads of | rend cai t0 deen a
| } ing in certain tax proposals be- a Mel tt mem hee a i tae Page ge Be a collecting duties. Departments in the Civil Service. ; remov- y shoul Tasks semine Dodd ees
= that while thes woe’ takes ing the price control arose. But as Plan tg build more schools for 7 ‘wae ag erupt t th These criticisms were mad? They would have taxed the people Diamond Rings | . = a = — with the
% Ghe bece man’s tebecce sil moe soon as there was the suggestion Children who would stay in the were. mi being naked 2 during consideration of a Resolu- to the hilt, and by that time, he bands. ly 3,- at all drug stores. 324
they were not bringing in of exploitation after the removal School for a short time and approve in principle to the pla tion which seeks to authorise the supposed, Government would LOUIS L. BAYLEY j Kid Pills
F new income tax rates. Bi ul ie of a price control, it would be Spend the greater part of the 24 but a member sa 4 cae Governor to enter into an agree- have picked up sense. Bolt | ney
j wie be elementary thet e 2 re d. hours with parents affected with be approving of the other â„¢ent with a person to serve for Lane !
year’s incomes were not earned @ said that opposition against Tuberculosis, He thought that the things which he @id not sanction, three years as Chief Engineer, No Justification
yet, a deep water harbour was likely Government were letting them- were others wha felt Water Works Department, at a ie agreed that everybody
150,000 Tons of S to come from those associated geives down when they had to hice he would support an Salary of $11,520. Consideration Wanted to see the re-organisa- Kee oul
He sai, ons ugar with it for many years, Mer- Send and ask a sanatorium im gmendment that they approved Of the Resolution was however {on of the Water Works, and
e anid tat Sues had reached chants, exporters etc., were for Trinidad or Jamaica to accept the plan with reservation = postponed added that nobody wou!d object e
a stage = ere would be ome one reason or another - posing o es People who were “ire then moved that the House The agreement provides for ‘0 M®. Garrod’s getting an in-} i
a ron ag ae five years Testions. die a a oy Fatt it to into Committee on the Five Mr. Garrod’s further employ- ‘Tease. There was however no ¢ ren... @
to be below 150,000 tons of sugar. the Spneny moved the ov ; â„¢ment on t to be decided by jUStification for a jump in salary
i - the Five Year Plan of Deve enereal diseases and Tuber-~ in terms e dec by



ear Plan.

He did not think, in view of the m culosis took a great toll Mr. J, E. T. Brancker (L) said the Government, the officer has PY 20 per cent, at the end of 3)
sugar negotiations which had "°"' 8d Taxation. ple of the colony. Something that he ‘supposea the members of sisnified his desire to enter. into Yea except of course that it had)
been taking place in recent Mr, A. E. S, Lewis (L), said had been done about venereal the Executive must have shared a new agreement for a further been done in the case of other
years that the British Govern- that it was best for a Govern- : his disappointment when it was period of three years on the same ticials, and there was no reason
ment whether they liked it or ment to have some sort of plan _ On the matter of Overseas De-~ Observed in the Sunday Adve- conditions as in the former Y®Y Mr. Garrod should not de-
not could back down on the but if such a plan was detri- fence Contribution Mr. Lewis ®t that the plan was a triumph agreement, with the exception ™#24 his increase.

agreement, It was possible, mere mental to the interest of the tax- Said that he had got the im. Of the conservative elements of ‘that his salary be increased by ,,/f they had not sat in that
than possible that soon there payers, then they should not pression that the British Govern- the House. What caused him 99% that is, from $9,600 to Chamber a few months ago and
would be another world confer- proceed with it in such a hap- ment were willing to for it, most concern in connection with $11,820 per annum, tack on these abnormal inoreases
ence to regulate sugar. but he hazard manner as they had been He did not think that’ the Gov- the plan was not so mueh what on other salaries, the offiee|



FIT AND
STRONG -




NE ee en Ie we one tS A sre 2 2 CHIMING OE

thought it was reasonable to say doing, ernment should worry themselves Was included, but the th that t Too High would have asked for re-engage~
that from a sense of awakened “I think it is a good idea to about this item for much money Were omitted. The only encour- No ment on the same terms, or at Your children will always be full of tun
justice in the Colonial Empire or have a plan as a sort of frame has already spent on the agement ey, were given by the Moving the Resolution, Mr. the most, a 10 per cent, increase —full of ... have a real zest
from were not into which you can fit your Barbados Battalion and this Senior Member for St. Joseph M. E. Cox, reminded members He wag mystified that it had for work or ... if you give them
going to let down the sugar col- financial picture, allowing Hon. should not be provided for in the Was that there were only possible that “the services of experienced just been decided that the officer HALIBO) GE day. It is rich
onies in remect of they Members to know what to ex- Plan and he was not willing to two outstanding promises which engineers are extremely difficult Would be needed another three o every Gay, ot is Fi
had made. He t they were pect”, he said. “But the plan is contribute to it. were not contained in the memo- to obtain at present and the new years and not two. He would in the and protective vita-
right therefore to assume that one which we have been told was Mr. Lewis continued his critie- tandum, and that they hoped to salary is not considered exces- suggest that nothing could be lost mins A & D—ensures strong bones and
barring war and calam- taken out of the Labour Party’s isms of the five year plan yester- strike oil. He for one could hope give for the services of an out. by reducing the proposed term of muscles, increases resistance to illness.
ities in the West In and Bar- Manifesto,” day, reiterated some of the points that they would strike oil. standing officer @xtension, and» proposed in- Children love taking Haliborange —
bados_ in ’ ey could He felt however that it could he had made on the previous Under the head, Social Service © yo added that “in addition to crease from 20 per cent to 10 the halibut oil is blended with
look f to an average crop have been taken out of the night and said that there were and Education, the party had al- his duties as Officer-in-Char ¢ per cent. He moved that the pure , ‘cio
of 150,000 tons at a price not “Electors’ Association” Mani- certain items which should not Ways believed in the necessity of the W: oan oe a rer 9 Resolution be amended to read Beier reek stirs Caligiows I
below what they were then get- feste, because the only have been put in the plan. providing . children "with a bat 00° 1) ite Worgi, Department, Gnd tor a term of two yeare, at a adults too.
ting. mention he saw of the plan __He said that the Natural Gas midday meal. Indeed, that had OF tl) lls ondinaty | construction ory of $10560. ‘ a
| | “I ask anyone who has a being connected to the “La- Corporation was something he been one of the most extremely WO'k, the Chief Engineer will be Sait enquired whether it was not

better scheme to tell us. I bour Party” Manifesto was did not claim to understand very inviting items which they had Feculved te continue bis expuare- ‘tbl % in thi w ter‘
| begged this House in March in the Daily Press. well. If natural gas was being posed to the electorate before the tion for further water sources poral e for eqmenne is e Wa

several times . . . There was “The Labour Party, as a ‘0ld on behalf of the Govern. elections and which the elector- 49d to carry out all the work oe k eh ia ae wed

the Beasley Report, I said, get Party, has nothing to do with ment, he thought it shoula take ate had endorsed. Hecessary to implement the deci: 1h¢ ere ane iedinlonels hin THE way OF T, G

; it, study it, criticise it, and the ‘presentation of this care of itself, From what he had Could Not Benefit sions in the Five Year Plan in ‘0 go on giving individuals high NICEST WAY AKING
‘ help your Government to form plan”, he said. seen, there was no necessity for Children could not benefit Which a considerable sum of seldries af penslize the . opin HALIBUT OIL



ww the Mr, Lewis said that the Hon. including an amount towards it in fram the instructions which money has been included with unity.
have not had a Senior Member for St, Joseph the plan especially for compen- best teachers available ware able high priority for the improve- He counselled Government not
plan they had said that the plan could a as he felt that provision to give if they were under-nour. ™ent of the Island’s Water supply, ‘ try to exploit the taxpayers as
could improve conditions and ‘#*en from the Election Mani- should have been made for that ished, A considerable number Paying tribute to the services they had done during the past
that {esto of his party because he said from the time the natural gas of eleméntary children of Barba- rendered by Mr. Garrod during two years.
oi it is all there”, and yet they was being worked. If after that, dos were unable because of this his present term of office, Mr.
of Bee ane ae they wens unable fo find the under-nourishment to benefit Cox said he “is a very qualified Abnormal Salary
people of the colony.” J © put up schemes, money, then loan funds or some from the education provided. man who has done a good job Lewis , i
If you can find such a plan in other method of getting the They were labouring under the for the island during the three yates Ee Be the ead he






Actually they had had no plan Your Election Manifesto, what is money should be adopt To handicap of age - » ian )
put forward even to Senslien the use of asking Heads of De- make provision for it in the five they should ia Se er r = Tinndee eae ee on the tion with the staff was of the . Hee & paren *y
furthermore accept as a good Partments to put up schemes for year plan seemed unnecessary to der this other posed. inere: Mr. W. oA most cordial, but he thought that ALLEN & HANBURYS LTD., LONDON, E.2
one. your selection.” he asked. him, A free second ueation Brawto d, (C) "aid that in his he was getting an abnormal sal-
It was quite possible for them At this stage Mr. G. H, Adams, He said that one of the largest should be sale begets view. “ths ol -y belt * k ‘ary. He aceused Government off +
to haggle over a penny for rum °D a point of order, rose to refute if not the largest item in the plan every child in the island, for a ride roar se ng taken “encouraging the Comptroller of] (sa
and tobacco. and keep bad hous- Mr. Lewis’ last statement. was the spending of the Labour course he did not agree th m Customs of breaking his con-]{
ing. ete, pe ontinuing Mr, Lewis said that Welfare Fund. That was a fund everybody should be put in a The officer in question, he ‘act’ by increasing the emolu~|}
The ‘Government had had, Departmental schemes had to be which had been created, It was secondary school if that person recalled, came to Barbados in ent to the post to which he had/t Kor Wika





without any doctrinaire prejudice PUt up. “You had to take some being used as a revolving fund had no ability. Obviously there jou ree- greement #en bro on specfic terms. | }}

to consider indirect taxation in Pf the items which were put up and he did not see how it was would be no point in task, ie a ‘wesleinng, ealary "sete sc felt that the Chiet Engin-|{

disect’"axatign inne sense of, Nave othere slone®, he sad." tant"shany Part of the develop- | Ht is, Just suoh aD crmiasion. $ia00"a. yeur, apart from other MF at, the” Water Works had
. ; ’ “. . at would cause e@ taken t a i n

“Let us see how much we can . mn said that the plan itself : leader writer to say, a ae Now that the riod gr ele 8 | ious ae Ma ald

get out of direct taxation without included = things which were Revolving Fund triumph for the ‘conservative pitted nis Willi pnets tees not have been surprised if the |} .

squeezing people, adopting the already stated and to some of They already had a revolving clement.” Od his jwillingness to remain, Sicer had asked for a 50 per\{] FIRST with the Latest

principle that a bachelor can be diene hanes of them would fund for the fishing industry and He had thought that disendow- nd was asking for an increase by cent. increase, and he knew that{{\

hit harder than @ married man. (rage rere dig ueuing in they were now going to create ment of the church might have 20 ,D@6 cent. taking his salary to (0) Wroctns and be knew thatlt ,

Let us see with indirec: taxation * Ion is not require similar funds for ta pests 4 come into the Five Year ~ Ty 311,520 a year, mmarnbare” wh la into }%t in Ladies Smart Styled

how much we can put on in the implementing but the question {ot howe nae ng Was hard to look forward to the “OS juste hoe Oe

ings at sort,




RACING SEASON














smaller category without hitting W@S whether some of the items He was not for one moment the House to justify it, was |}

at people who have to eat, to Were suitable for such a plan. They had in the Estimates, os ob "iota? for dipendecement 5 os eee Geqods ipateny os ee : a ine wh

wear clothes and who form the Ridiculous about $53,000 as their contribu- The ministers were living off the fron " oO eo a Ww had not ae a ~ fe ng {

bulk of the taxation. “E go ae ne tion to the University College of fat of the land as it were, i iS rae bee ves he uae me remem, wee i
A : . furth oe winat the West Indies and in future ally, no one knew what became |" 4 position to say whether or dangerous practice.
So the House were being asked there are items in this plan which their contribution for the run- of the contents of the collection 2°t those services were as advan-







to accept the proposals in the are ridiculous”, he said, He ning expendit f th - tageous a5 might have He argued that at an early Fine f 3 8 3traws

ineuierendink: Alike deoponiie go. made zefevence “to such ariitem ta id a ae. + 4 ee Diates. sted seins tas Se as’ EO igh been 5 ge Government realised thst |} itting Velvets and Straws ...... $4.32 to
derlying the plan, without tying 88 the employment of someone ture of $55,000 and that was no- which had been made would re- three years were not enough for/§

themselves down specilically. | in. the Labour Commissioner's thing to be placed in the devel- ceive the consideration to which , He submitted that the officer the officer to complete his work,|f} Felt Hats for travelling ... ......, $8.50




When they came to deal with Office. He asked if a plan had ta opment plan. had heard from the lips of “high because when he arrived in the
the Bills and rational alternative be drawn up tq find employment Pe Ldtrie said that they pro- the La bg that when officials’ that the colony could colony, he had to “sit in his office
proposals were produced, the for someone. “It is ridiculous to vided scholarships and there the Honourable introducer re- °%0rd to pay salaries, Saw the for a considerable time without
Government were not so foolish ¥ me that you have been try- again he did not think those were ferred to the fact that no provis- /¢sislature itself increase the tools to do the job.” It was for
as to overlook them, tt on so long to have a plan things that should be in a plan ion had been made for a Gov- Salaries of those officials, and the Government then to ask him
An_ increase a company {aa > ae a job for one civil ser- of that sort. ; ernment printery, he had been therefore he felt there was no to remain for five years instead
wound not wee on at’ He siso vel Z So far as schemes under con- frankly dispirited. A Govern. Teason why he could not make of three,
out, It was not keeping y ieee re Tred to the item sideration were concerned he ment ‘printery should be estab- the demand which he had. Mr. Lewis urged Government
Trinidad with a 40% rate. From aid - thi nsemination” and thought that the planting com- lished in this island. Mr. Crawford asked ‘Can ‘to find somebody who will do
the information -they had had fos of the Live per at the munity seemed to be willing to ° Government afford to pay 20 per the work for the salary attache
from the Caribbean area, com- eee weet te ae , a net foree government into marketing Provision Made cent increase for 3 years?” He to the permanent post,” an
pany tax nragenels would not like Wak che call it an thing schemes. It was merely a case He saw that provision was was not blaming Mr. Garrod, be- added that they were creating
cause any undue pareenee ox Sat saees clan Sele bp & of private enterprise taking ad- made for office buildings and that cause the Government would sit the impression ‘that they “have
prevent companies from coming givi rtificial in: ination aoe vantage of the Government for it was decided to amar new par- down and give any pay asked too much money to give these |i
ba gtr bat ae: Finch had Sorte aby by calling it sahething the purpose of taking the res- liamentary buildings. That was for. people for doing their work.”
course wha . g & ponsibility of calling on planters all very good, but that coul that “one of these They had reduced the retiring

said in an interview with the new. to plant more foo d 7 1 te iorit d
ress was quite obvious, A child He said that those items he P and use up scarcely be termed a priority and Gays these ‘high falutin’ arrange- age in the Civil Service, thereby ||
oan have anid what Mr, Finch had mentioned could be described ‘¢, arable land to plant it in he hoped it would not be quickly ments will come to an end." burdening taxpayers who had





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had said, in the Plan as recurrent expendi~ ‘0° “r0PS: “Attention sould have been
’Bus Fares Hat ‘a “p Fhe ned. vo von Wrong given to providing a central post
jus Fa a “pu up” one, e With regard to government’s office for St. Lucy.

There was unwarranted talk of down in the ucts. - ba taxation proposals he said that In the early 40’s when he first

elt

bus fares going up. That was not rede he would prove that Government talked of a deep water harbour
true, ‘Any ‘member who saw the astamemet had” sage 7 less 28 wrong to do what they had and when the ouggeston for one!
necessity for raising bus fares heen pessimistic. The plan was (ne, at that particular time. Of was mooted, opposition to it was
might say so, but they had en- not a real ambitious one. He was ‘8¢, two million dollar loan, he from lighter owners who saw a
deavoured to put on taxation in unable to discover what were “derstood that half a million loss of revenue, but in this day
such a that it could not be tho details of some of the schemes would already be taken as against a deep water harbour was defin-
on to the consumer except put in the plan, schools built, another half a mil- itely needed.
in the ease of rum ang tobacco. ; lion would be against housing at When it was said that revenue
He would tell the public of Bar- He thought that there was the Bay and Pine Estates and a would be got out of spirituous
bados that they had no cause to divided opinion in many sections million would be against the ex- liquors, many of them thought
fear an increase in bus fares. of the community as to the ex- tension of the water services that what was meant was liquors

It was intended to introduce an pedieney of rushing into such which would include machinery other than those made here, He
entertainment tax as soon as schemes. and installation, etc. In consid- did not think they could justify
possible. The rates had not yet Immigration had been men- ering all those items, he thought any increases in the price of
been determined, but from the tioned in the lists of schemes that they should come under rum. Rum, unlike tobacco serv-
Beasley Report, it appeared that and they had been told about it. Capital Expenditure. ed a useful purpose, It was of
$50,000 a year could be obtained But he was sure that many mem- e said that he wanted to let medicinal value. Unless the in-
from that source, bers would like to know what co! es know that he did not comes of the people were in-

It was considered that no hard- progress was being made. They cot r that they should be creased the price of rum was at
ship wo be . imposed by in- had heard nothing from the Joint further. Subsidisation the highest possible limit already.
cre; es Com of the House of the should be reduced. As a means of raising revenue,
of the Barbados Club and legisla in regard to that There should be a purchase tax he had no hesitation in com-
in dening the “field” of the matter? on cars. The Government should mending a Government lottery.
(tax obtain in all a further He did not see the necessity collect one or two hundred dol- They did not know how much
$50, a year, He would also for inserting Dodds Plantation ag lars when a new car was bought was made by the Police lotteries.
ap At jae yet deat om of the schemes, If this a a ue quite sure that when one He could not see any ethical or
bers thou _ the ‘a, a tation was run on a commerc a new car, he would not mor, ounds for condemn
man_ should feel if he basis then it should be treated t too much whether it was "ae ‘ hd


















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PAGE FOUR



—

BARBADOS ef ADVOCATE

Bee a nt Ss Os Peet

ftinied by ihe Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad ..., aridgetown

Thursday, October 30, 1952

LABOUR FACTS

THE annual report of the Department
of Labour is a disappointing document.
This statement implies no critici§m of the
department but is the natural result of
reading a document which notes rather
than reports.

There is a statement in paragraph 34
that at sugar factories and syrup plants
“long hours continued to be worked vary-
ing from 72 to 100 hours per week of six
days.” Yet there is no further reference
to this matter and the reader is left to
reconcile this remarkable statement with
a table showing the average number of
days worked for one week in each month
from January to June 1951 as varying
from 5.38 to 6.63.

To work for periods of 72 and 100 hours
during a six-day week workers will have
to work for twelve hours and 16% hours a
day respectively. Surely something could
be done to alter circumstances which re-
quire workers to work for such long
periods. Even though these hcurs of work
may not be considered excessive by the
workers, ought such long hours of work
to be tolerated int an industry which is the
largest single employer of labour in the
island?

There is no mention anywhere in the
report of the Labour Department of any
action having been taken to prevent work-
ers from overworking in the manner des-
cribed.

Recording without explaining seems
eharacteristic of the document. Tables and
figures are quoted which although they

interesting in themselves leave out more
interesting information.
Of what value is it to know, for instance,

that the highest average week’s earning
of a lighterman was $44.15 and his lowest
$3.30 when the average hours worked per
lighterman are not known ?

Lacking this information one is unable
to appreciate the relative significance of
the fact that the overtime rate for lighter-
men can be as high as $41.92 per trip. Nor
is much light thrown on the subject by
the table which records the number of
persons employed as lightermen as rang-
ing between 322 and 427 in the space of
one month. Altogether it seems that little

is kKiiown by the Labour Department
about the hours of work and remunera-

tion of individuals whose hours of work
and rates of remuneration ought to be
known fully, since without that knowl-
edge attempts to reduce the high costs of
handling cargoes in the Port must inevi-
tably fail. The compilation of statistics
and information about dockworkers gen-
erally could, it seems, be very easily
obtained by the Labour Department if
only they are authorised to obtain it. The
collection, preparation and publication of
labour statistics which include wages,
hours of work and conditions of employ-
ment is indeed included by the depart-
ment in its own description of its duties.

Besides the general incompleteness ,of
most of the tables in the report some state-
ments made therein would not automati-
cally be accepted by everyone. Would
everyone agree, for instance, with the
statement that increases in prices during
1951 were “consequent on the devaluation
of the. pound sterling” alone?

If, however, these and other criticisms
may be made about the report they ought
not to be interpreted as criticisms of the
department but rather as appeals to the
government to make the work of the
department better known to the commun-
ity. So many matters of importance raised
in the report are left without answers and
Taany statements are made without ex-
planation, when explanation might have
helped employers to co-operate more read-
ily with the department.

There are still some people who are not
aware of the services which are rendered
by the department of labour and it would
be easier for the public to be educated as
to the role of the department if a more
inspiring report were issued annually,. It
might even be suggested that half yearly
reports should be issued and that short
monthly statements of activities of the
department should be made to the Press,
as is done by the department of agricul-
ture and other government departments.
It should by now be obvious to everyone
that no progress is going to be made in
Barbados unless there is greater trust be-

tween those in authority and the people
whose co-operation is invited. It is pleas-

ant to read in the annual report of the
department that relations betWeen man-
agement and labour in the sugar industry
were good last year, but might not a bit

more. be said about the few instances in
which port workers did not use the depart-
mental machinery to settle disputes ?

The labour department is perhaps the
most important department of government and
as it becomes better known it may be expected
that much greater use will be made of its ser-

vices, but the information provided in its report
for 1951 is inadequate to give the public more
than a‘ glimmer of its usefulness

































BARBADOS ADVOCATE

A Visitor In New York’





I went to Harlem on Saturday , ‘ night”. Yes Sir! even the weather
nd saw and heard President By Barney Millar clerk was a baseball fan and held |
Truman in his campaign efforts, off his showers so as not to inter- |

on behalf of Democratic Presi- He hoped, he said, that the peo- fere with the World Series, Well, |
dential Candidate Adlai Steven- ple would remember that and to make the story short, the)
son. I had seen the man many vote against him. His mother, yankees won the sixth game to)
times on television but he had now dead, he said, used to tell make it three all. Then you met
ilways appeared a little taller him as a youngster — “Better to people on the bus and subway |
than he actually is and I must vote for what you want and don’t with their portable radios as they |
vonfess to a bit of disappoint- .et it, than to vote for what you just had to listen in to the broad- |
ment in my first — and probably don’t want and get it.” cast, and every store ee
— glimps an

last glimpse of the man, wee The sponker kept. his audience with a television set attrac
is head of the United States o' 3 all afternoon crowd.
A ica. which had just listened to the this game
i President, engrossed for an hour .,28@ Yankees won

This is obviously, a personal 4, more and made many excur- after a tussle — their fourth
ypinion, but coming into line sions into recent history, he~said World Series win in a row and
“ter a leader like the late tg prove that in spite of the re- life in New York returned to nor-
erent. D. Roosevelt, whose peated claims by the Administra. â„¢#! once again.
personality was apparent to ;;
.riend and foe alike, Harry Tru- aa? Nid —_ a a Nearly 500,000 actually watch-
nan must forgive those who ven- Givil Righ o improve the ed the game and untold millions
ure comparison. He is a small eae ghts of his people in followed every ball on television,
nan, but I was confirmed in my Each player of the winning team
dready expressed view that he got over $6,000 and each of the

ertainly seems to be enjoying losers $4,000. | i .

iimself, in whatever he is doing,
And he certainly enjoyed him- _ Did you know that every ——
elf in one of his ‘give-em-hell’ in America must register €a
peeches. He describes one of the time there is an election? And he
Jlanks in one of the Republican must pass a literacy test or pro-
latform as “lousy”, and said he duce evidence of having attended
lid not give a “hoot” about some school for eight years. There has
spect of some matter. been a record registration for the
His daughter, Margaret, was November election and all evi-
, : dence point to the possibility of

vith him and shared in the rous- otin
ng welcome which was accorded Oa oy ca heat ee

er father. She joined lustily in
These literacy test for first

he singing of the “Star Spangled
panner” and seemed to. be oters held in th b-
horoughly enjoying her last in teen . aad tee polling
noments as one of the occupants places throughout registration
f the White House: week. They were administered
Harlem, is of course, the centre = — br 1 egg pe

f the negro community in New
ork and the President sought to a oa ae ~ eaure and
hip up the all important negro Saturday “The Y taanaee. ees

ome for Adlai. The importance
paid $6.50 a session with Satur-
¢ this vote has been conceded on day. counted as’a double session.

it wre mas the President's
ooing. e recounted the To be eligible to vote you must
rts we Desnesrens be a 21-year-old citizen by birth
hs ‘ ed years they have or naturalization — have lived a
cen ih ‘power, and, compared the year in the state, four months in
the county and 30 days in the

resent period of prosperity
election district,

yhich the nation enjoys with
wagon, fittea And the election is not only of

ae great depression which pre-

re ; Nearby, th .

eded it under the Republican Tak Shemaas and loud @ President and a Vice-President.
thus: To be

»gime. And, he offered, Steven- UP With phonograph : i

on as the man to carry on this speaker played records extolling cei: ee Vice-Presi-
9d work, He hit out again and the virtues of Adlai Stevenson, Gant. 2 Senator; F tatives;
gain at the Republican candi- but neither of the shows seemed -ariners of the State Legislature:
ite “Ike” Eisenhower, and has t interfere much with the other. jj4¢es of the various courts. —
nee admitted that he was mis+ oe +7 their listeners, many of * * * a
aken when he said some time Whom listened to each side for a terest: locum:
go, that “Ike” would othe" time before proceeding on their uae nut been Eran a ~

America,



BARNEY MILLAR

ood President. business. It is the re :

‘ port of a Committee
And he ended with an appeal i . . : ; ‘ which investiga‘ the working
» his audience to register, and but even this all important of the Police rs noes of New

te for tke Democratic ticket — business of politics was forgotten
itevenson for President and during last week, when the Base- Seine < ee
enator Sparkman for Vice- Pall finals or World Series as it is above the marie'et Ca en hould
resident, known, was played. This brought }00" te eae
together, the Brooklyn Dodgers, OM ed results of examinations, as
Freedom of Speech champions of the National â„¢ vhmeaad in the Fire Depart-
About half an hour after the League and the Yankees, champ- Trent. Apparently at the moment,
aeeting was over, 1 had a good ions of the American League. “'° ~~ halos does the up-
imple of the freedom of speech The World Champions are de- Pie on the advice of his coun-
yoyed in this community, A cided by the winner of the first S.0rs along with his own ob-
overed wagon drew up at a four games and the interest in servations. {
eet corner about two blocks this event clouded out every Another one is that the entry
way and qa quiet looking man other, The newscaster the night age be lowered to 18 instead of
2t up some loud speaking equip- before the series was due to open, 20, as is now the case. There are
ent, He mounted his low plat- started this way: “Politicians also many terse criticisms of the
orm and proceeded as he said, can now stop talking, teachers personnel of the Force and con-
) carry on from where the Presi- stop teaching and _ soldiers stop ditions are suggested with the ob-
ent had left off. He wanted to fighting....... the World Series ject of attracting a better type of
-now why the President had not is on, individual,
tempted to say anything at all B
»out Sparkman beside mention- _ How right he was! The Dodgers strength of the force is recom-
1g his name at the close of the Won the first game and the mended with the full conscious-
veech. He would tell them. Yankees the second. The third ness of the present increase in
‘oarkman was a representative game went to the Dodgers and crime in the city. In short, there
' what was called the “White the fourth to the Yankees. When are drastic suggestions for the
upremacy Group”, in. the south the Dodgers copped the fifth overall improvement of an organ-
id the ballot ticket of the state game, the question was would jsation which has a very difficult
Alabama still carried the they win the sixth — the series, job to do.
voster and words “White another first world championship? This report — which _ cost
ipremacy” as was the case in The weather announcement that $86,000—come not a moment too
‘e old Klu Klux Klan days, morning promised rain in the soon, and competent judges al-
nat was why Sparkman could afternoon, but a ten _ o’clock ready predict an uplift in the
xt be mentioned in Harlem.amendment said “No rain until morale and work of the Police.

ut to crown it all a cut in the

Our Readers Say; 23.03% (22
© tradition and law enabled this
by-law to be annulled since the
down the cost of living in this court’s judgment was based on
little island, an old English law which had
H, BOTTAL. passed into Canadian law when

Hastings, Christ Church,

Five Year Plan

), The Editor, The Advocate.
vr, I have read.with dismay the

thode adopted” b eanraant Canada adopted the English Code
ea wan ry called, five year October. 20th. in 1867. Yours f. neki

in, e firs int one ques- : . a y;

is is the morality of making Make Believe. Wiorld PROTESTANT.

sepia pay TODAY co benefits £% iM patton, 7 AM ities

hich may, or may not, accrue IR,—The author o ‘0 ‘a

r many years panne. Diary makes the rather naive Tr

The second shock is the repre- statement that the only temporal 7% The Editor, The Advocate,
isible one, under present con= power enjoyed by the RC SIR,—A correspondent in your

‘ions. of charging custom duties Church is that over the very Raper has suggested that the
CIF values. With the U.K. small territory known:as Vaticar Barbados Plantation Owners

‘vernment forcing these islands City in Rome, It must be won- should give a Coronation gift to
purchase most of their essen- derful to live in the make- the Island by relinquishing own-

believe world of the author of ©Tship of lands bordering high-

m the other end of the world Nobody’s Diary. With such a Ways to a depth of 100 yards in

\ save dollars, we are already mentality we could believe that from the road, for the planting

ving to pay exhorbitant prices Czechoslovakia is not under the Of ornamental trees,

‘yy our very existence, as_ is Iron Heel of Moscow. The Nortk This would amount to very
»wn by the cost of living index. Koreang are a peace loving na- nearly 200 million square yards
great deal of this high cost is tion who of their own volition Or 64 square miles 6f land—much

‘ve to the heavy transportation: savagely attacked their brothers, more than one-third of the

‘varges over long distances to Pekin jis not the political serf of Island — representing a loss of

this port, plus in some cases, I Moscow — the Chinese are mere some 64,000 tons of sugar in a

believe, a surcharge on freight agrarian reformers. In the same good year worth probably Two

chirges to this particular port vein, Spain is not the abject pol- Million Pounds Sterling of
cus to the delay ships experience jtical meniat of the Vatican and, revenue. ~

‘ving to the slow unloading rate. in this phantasy, there is no mod- Perhaps your correspondent has

ith government standing to ©? inquisition: in Colombia, . wipers of an tate isle, tended

»dfit b: h freigh - d utifie yan expanded

supanee y shi & ee =m. in May I suggest that the author (and expensive) Depnrtnens of

Com “and “swith 1 of Nobody’s Diary, as an experi- Agriculture, depending for its

prices based on a mark Mp ment, take a trip to Colombia economy on the sale of coloured

PERCENTAGE on landed costs in Observing the following condi picture posteards of Flamboyant

most tases, a cancint expect i aerate ° fave ns oe Bo trees. Or would he suggest that

find any. effo eing ma yt . %
either Soyernunent or me Contry He we Ng de ia tae ceackn, ohaal the supply of Mahogany?

m=: 1

Nbtalin: ae ce cae of some country town in the Seriously, the idea of lining

but the most expensive sources. State of Antioquia and affirms highways with shady trees is a

In fact one can almost see the reasonably loudly several times good one. India is, distinguished

smug. smiles on the faces of (in Spanish) that he is a Pro- for such avenues planted to give

government and commerce at this testant and invite those listening shade to marching soldiers in

latest method of milking the to subscribe to his views, I the last century and you hav

ultimate consumer. I can guarantee -that he will example here on the South ade
The third shock is that in spite only have to pay for a one way of the Savannah.

Coronation Gift

eal foods and’ other imports

we compete with Honduras in

of the Beasley Report advising’ passage and this would put paid Yours ete,
that individual income, tax rates to any fatuous — reinarks about COL, R. W. OLIVER
were already at their limit, being scientists travelling in Colombia sR. WAR. ,

much higher than most places in The return passage money could 24th Oct., 1952. er

these parts of the wae and be employed in saying masses for
with the cost of living being a poor gullible soul that could . we
boosted still higher by the new believe that the only temporal Rifle Shooting
indirect taxes, yet we are adviseG power enjoyed by . the R.C. SIR,—I have an
that income taxes are to be Church is over the Vatican. of research: in ae a ee
inform to write a book on"Rifle Shooting
some months and among the ii I require is

reised right from the lowest jt may be a propos.to
brackets, your readers that

Then comes the increase in 28° the R.C.. dominated Montreal the winning scores each year for
petrol tax, which brings the price ype ee enacted a by law of the Martinez Ch : Shield. I
cf this essential commodity up to + ng all homes. close. their haye not been to trace the
the highest in this hemisphere, Stores on R.C.- Holy days. *Cer= score made by Barbados in 1909

b i ind that B: dos*tain of these stores stayed open
pee Gaby ne ae nok on the Feast of the. Immaculate 224 the Secretary of the Barbados

Fmpire whith uses the LITTLE Conception (December 8) d o_o has ener
American, or wine, gallon for Made a test case in the courts. 9, ty ae endl oping that
measuring petrol sales. This in- Letters were produced in court te 8 oe readers will be able
creased price has to be added to from the R.C. hierarchy to the oe Dane or me. It seems that
the .cost of local transportation, City Council ‘ordering the pas- ©8rados shot for it sometime
which adds that much more to Sage of the by-law. The by-law during February 1909, Any help
the cost of living, was declared ultra vires by the Will be gratefully received.
In view of all this I hope we Superior Court. The above is a L. F. EDMONDS,

shall not be) reading any more typical example of what happens Hon, Sec.
hypocrisy from government that wien the ‘politicians are dom- B G. Rifle Assoc,
they are interested in keeping inated by the R.C, hierarchy, British Guiana.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER - 30, 1952

nen

CURRENT EVENTS

By JOHN GORDON

YOUNG men, I read, don’t want to go to
sea nowadays because it takes them away
from the tennis club. What an age we live,
in!

Shopgirls want the shops shut inconveni-
ently early, so that they can go out on the



WINDSOR WEEKLY BARGAIN BUYS
SEEDS, both Vegetable and Flower
AUTOGRAPH AND PHOTOGRAPH ALBUMS
SEWING AND MANICURE SETS
DECORATIVE PAPER DOYLEYS, SERVIETTES and
Waxed Delicatessen Cups for Jellies and Ice Cream.

THE WINDSOR PHARMACY LTD.
Broad St—Tel. 2292



























TAKE YOUR CHOICE

razzle-dazzle. Elizabeth Allan withdraws i No, 6 and 7 WOOD and COAL
is se she VALOR 2 and 3 Burner Large
her glamour from television because VALOR 1. 2 and 3 Burner Table

finds Sunday work tiresome.

I hope if ever she has to carry her luggage
to a train on a Sunday, as I so often see
tired, weary women doing, she won't
grumble because the porters now prefer to
withdraw their services on Sundays from
the public which pays them, just as it pays
her.

And I hope neither she nor the porters will
grouse if the electricians who make it pos-
sible for them to cook their meals, keep
their Homes lit and warm, and even switch
on the radio, the telephone operators, the
police who protect their homes and their
lives, the busmen, the barman in the pub,
and the little girl in the teashop decide that
Sunday is to be their day off as well.

TURN 1 and 2 Burner Table

2 Burner Table
BEATRICE Single and Double Burner

, AND
PRESSURE Stove: by COLEMAN,
PRIMUS & MONITOR
AT

WILKINSON & HAYNES CO. LTD.

Successors to

C. 8. PITCHER & CO.

Phone 4472, 4687

THE SAD FACT is that we are becoming
so fond of the soft life that a job is now
merely something you do to get money to
spend in your spare time. It must never be
allowed to interfere with your comfort.

I suppose there is some sort of happiness
in that kind of existence, but I am glad I
was born before the idea developed.

For I was lucky enough to learn that the
greatest joy in life is doing a job with all
your heart—better if you can than anyone
else has ever done it — even if it involves,
as it often will, applying yourself to it while
others play.

I THINK Field-Marshals Alexander and
Montgomery are in for.a shock.

Every time they open their mouths nowa-
days they demand bigger and better con-
scription. If they come out of their ivory
towers they will find opinion growing in this
country that we have had just about enough
of conscription, and that we ought to end
it before it ends us.

It is a gross and costly misuse of the
nation’s manpower. It is disrupting our
economy, It is pulling men away from the
production of goods vital to our existence at
a critical time when the Germans and Japs,
unhampered by such burdens as we are
attempting to carry, are launching attacks
to drive us out of ‘our markets.

It perpetuates the dangerous folly of
keeping British troops on the Continent to
become pawns in international brawls and
jealousies and by so doing is a peril to our




(UTZ ZS
= SUGGESTIONS

Lattern

security rather than a guarantee of peace.) E.P.N.S.
\ A.1, Quality
“AH, BUT what of the Russians?” tle :
generals say. There is more fear of the Rus- 53 Piece Canteen
sians in Chicago today than there is in for Table of Six...............,.. $ 81.65
Europe. 79 Piece Cante
Open war has too many perils now for the anteen
Kom iin’ to take the gamble, That doesn’: for Table of Eight................. $168.83
mean peace of course. It means a new 117 Piece Canteen f
Kremlin plan. To divide us from America for Table of Twelve.............. $219.57

by subtle propaganda. To go underground.
To burrow into our foundations. To rock
our structure and bring it down from within.

As so many strikes, go-slows and similarp}
skulduggeries are showing, there are still}!
enough dupes in this country to give Stalin
the hope that he can’ achieve his malignant
purpose without challenging fate by setting
his armies on the march.

That sort of war won’t be won by soldiers }it
strung out across Europe with rifles in their
hands but by good honest men in workmen’s
dungarees with sense in their heads and
national pride in their hearts.

THE WEAPONS they need aren't tanks,
guns or atom bombs, but comfortable homes,
good wages, less taxation, plenty in the
shops to buy.

Give them those and Stalin will soon have
as few worshippers in this country as a cat
has fleas.

ak



71 Piece Dinner Service—$67.53
110 Piece Dinner Service—$81.61
24 Piece Tea Set........ $13.47

* * ok }
;
NEXT June we crown a new Queen. A | en Pee eo

Queen of youth as lovely as a rose, as bright
as a spring morning. Sold in Services, Sets or Individual Pieces
Far more than any other monarch in our
history she will be the People’s Queen. ‘
And for the first time in all our history, a 0S a
by the miracle of television, not merely 9 e
those privileged by birth or precedent but
all her people can be with her in the Abbey SSS FFF :
on that solemn day.
But some of those old moss brains, who
can never see good in anything new, are try-[Â¥
ing to put their foot on that.

THEY SAY how shocking to suggest that
the Queen shall be ‘televised at the solemn
moment of Communion, To be seen by
people standing at bars!. Or sitting in carpet}t
slippers, smoking cigarettes, perhaps even]})

having a glass of beer. What a desecration J}
of religion ! {

I suggest they consult the Pope, whom—although )
I am not among his flock—I accept as an authority |
on religious standards. When he officiates at]
Mass, he has the ceremony televised and filmed.}}}

His view is that it does not matter in the}{
slightest whether the solemn ceremony is seen|}}
by a lounger at a bar or a man sprawling in
comfort in his home. What matters is that
somewhere a soul may be touched,

I RECOMMEND that view to our obstructionists.



ROUND the cgub dinner-table we picked unhesi- DESSERTS FOR PARTIES
tantly as the. most fascinating news of the week Ice Cream Mix Start party with }
‘ your off
the announcement that the Scottish woman doctor|j) Tapioca in Pkg. a Du per bot. {
who became a man has married. \ —aoeertt FROZEN FRUIT
We discussed the mystery of such transforma- ——. Powder ”
tions, “oyal Puddings Pineapple
“The strangest thing,” said the doctor among Ln. deen ae OZEN ABLE
us, “is that no such change has ever been known wee dicuiee + thing _— .
to take place in any animal, although . birds, -irape Nuts Small size .64 each
insects, and oysters change their sex, as well as jalt Salmon 3-1 size $2.25 each
an occasional human being.” Salt en Brussel Sprouts
“May such a person marry with the expectation bon ane mall size .64 each
of having children?” he was asked. pice tyson aoa Ore aah
Paice, MElnate teh tnee —Small sise

MEATS
Milk Fed Chickens
Milk Fed Ducks

“THERE HAVE been cases,” he replied, “of
women whose transformation towards male has
been reversed by medical treatment marfying, and

3-â„¢ size $2.00 each



having children. eat g — for. sour
“But there are no records of any woman who Ox Tail CANADA DRINKS

changed into a man and married ever becoming | Minced Steak Early.

a father.”—L.E.S,

DRESSES







FHURSDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1952
pietebabeindideepunsteadiaainenummniiminn



Board Of Health Reject

Joes River

THE General Board of

Application

Health at their meting yester-

day rejected an application of Messrs. Joes River Sugar
Estates Ltd., which asked that the Board substitute an-
other plan for the plan approved in connection with land
at Horse Hill Plantation, St. Joseph.

The Board decided to advise
Joes River Ltd. to withdraw the
plan already approved and sub-
mit-the new plan.

The Board approved of the fol-
lowing:

In re Division and sale of 16
Acres, 2 Roods 21 Perches of land
in lots at Highgate, St. Michael,
by Wilkinson & Haynes Co., Ltd.

Alteration of approved plan by
dividing lots numbered 39, 40, 41
cad 42 into 7 lots numbered 39 to
4

Division and sale of 47,404 sq.
ft. of land in lots at Fairfield,
Bridge Road, St. Michael, by Mrs.
Meta St. Clair Edwards.

Application of Mr. E. D. Rogers
on behalf of Messrs. Barbados
Co-operative Bank Ltd. for ap-
proval and amendment of altera-
tions of approved plan of land at
Maxwell, Christ Church, so as to
allow reversion to the original
gaa in respect of certain

Application of Messrs, Year-
wood & Boyce, on behalf of Mr.
D. E. M. Webster, for approval of
amendment of approved plan for
division of land for sale at Gibbes
Plantation, St, Peter.

Division and sale of 17 Acres
0 Roods 9 7/10 Perches of land
at _Friendshi Plantation, St.
Andrew, by Mr. J. A. Haynes.

Approved Lots

The Board approved of lots
one to 75 in the application for
division and sale of 411,693 square
feet: of land in lots at Deighton
Road, St. Michael, by Mr. W. T.
Gooding et al and approved of
one ‘part of the plan for the divis-
jon and sale of 20 acres, three
foods and six perches of land in
ots at New Castle, St. John, by
New Castle Estates Ltd.

..An application was made for
the division and sale of 34,453
sguare feet of land in lots at
eae Christ Church, by Mn
¢. St. Hill, The Board decided

ask Mr. St. Hill to widen the
road to 14 feet.

\The Board postponed until
March approval of the division
and sale in lots of 238,142 square
feet of land at Pine Hill, St. Mi-
chael by Mr. Neville William
Mountjoy Carter.

The following were deferred:

Division and sale of 265,572 sq.
ft. of land in lots at Green Hill,
St. Michael, by Mr. L, L. Toppin.

Division and sale of 195 Acres,
3 Roods 26 Perches of land in lots
at Walkers Plantation, St. An-
drew, by Mr. G. L, Farmer and
postponed the application for Di-
vision and sale of 317,451 sq. ft. of
land in lots at Grazettes Planta-
tion, St. Michael, by the Barbados
Co-operative Bank Ltd.

Present were Dr. E. B. Carter,
Chairman, Hon. V. C, Gale, M.L.C.,
Mr. J. M, Kidney, Dr. J. P.

"Mahony, Dr. H. G. Cummins,

.C.P., and Mr. W. Abrams, Gov-
ernment Chief Sanitary Inspector
whose report for the month of
August was received and circu-
lated.



Licences To Be
Issued For Milk

Licences are to be issued for

the importation of condensed and
evaporated milk to arrive in the
eolony between November and
January next year. Ceiling prices
will be fixed for both of these
items.
‘Importers have also been noti-
fied that consideration will be
given to the issyance of licenced
covering the importation of ap-
proximately 500 barrels of pickled
beef to arrive between January
and June, 1953. This commodity
will be imported from Australia
or New Zealand.

JOOS OOO00O00004



Three Houses
Residents Use
Spring Water

People of the Three Houses
district who have no pipes at
their home are more. fortunate
than many people in country dis.
tricts who have to walk long dis-
tances for water. There is a
spring in the district from which
clear water gushes and flows in
a narrow ,

An old woman told an Advo-
cate reporter yesterday that she
knew the spring ever since she
was a little girl, and her grand-
mother used to tell her how
children in her grandmother's
time bathed in its waters.

Yesterday about two dozen
women were at work by the
spring Washing their families’
clothes, as they chatted from one
conversation to another. The line
of them on either side of the
Stream about four feet deep
which flowed from the spring
was about thirty yards. As the
mothers washed the clothes a
number of little children played
lower down the stream.

At the side of the stream is u
stretch of pasture land, anq here
the women spread their clothes
to bleach. It was interesting to
watch how each woman had her
allocated spot for hanging’ her
clothes, and how a pathway ran
between them.

The old woman said that the
pipe is nearly a mile from_ her
home, and it is a blessing that
she has not got to trudge all that
distance for all the water she
needs,

BRITISH COUNCII, BOOKS
AT SPEIGHTSTOWN

An extensive selection of Brit-
ish Council Publications will be
on view at the Speightstown
Branch Library for two weeks
from Friday, 7th November. It
includes the most recent addi-
tions to the series “The Art in
Britain,” “British Life and
Thought.” and “Writers and their
Work.” These authoritative inex
pensive and admirably produced
little publications make an at-
Yractive and highly ‘intdresting
exhibition, which is well worth 2
special visit,

In Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

CABLE AND WIKELESS (West indies!
Ltd., advise that tney can now communi.
cate with the following ships througn
their Barbados Coast Station:—

S.S. Peter Jebsen, S.S. Sirena, 5.S.
Rosario, S.S. Ampac California, 8.8.
Alcoa Polaris, 8.S. Giulia, 8.8. Tindra,
8.8. Guif Victor, 8.8. Hah us , MLV.
Avgasta, SiS.'' Argentina, SS. Trya
S.S. Kallada, 8,S. Melrose, $.S. Gerona,
S.S. DeGrasse, S.S_Logans Fort, S8.S
Balaklava, S.S. Lillohus, M.V. Katrine
Marsk, S.S. Caraibe, 5S. Ciudad De
Bargulsimeto, S.S Loide Guatemala
..S. Florentia, S.S. Cazador, S.S.
S. Paula, S.S. Malmanger, S8.S. Auriga,
S.S. Peter Jebson, S.S. Polyglory, 8.8.
Aslaug Rogenas, S.S._ Strategist, S.S.
Ibis, S.S. Argentan, S.S. P. and T
Trade", S.S. Patuca, S.S. Stad Leiden,
S.S. Hoegh Hood, S.S. Steelore, 8.5
Ogna, S.S. 8S, Monica, 8.S. Durango,
S.S. Sunwalt, S.S. Empire Patrai, S.S
Drott, S.S. Westchester, S.S. Scherpen-
drecht, S.S. Kongsstein, S.S. Dundrum
Bay, S.S. Stentor.





MAIL NOTICES

Mails for Madeira, United Kingdom,
Antwerp. and Amsterdam bv the 8 §
jestad will

“Oranj closed at the General
Post Office as under:—

Parcel Mail at 12 (noon), Registered
Mail at 3 p.m., on the 3ist of October,
1952. Or ry Mail at 8.30 a.m., on
the Ist Nov

. .
Mails for St. John N.B., Montreal,
Charlottetown P.E.I,, by the M.V
“Canadian Cruiser” will be closed at the
General Post Office as under:—

Parcel and Registered Mail at 2 p.m..
Ordinary Mail at 2.30 p.m. Today.



A



BARBADOS

14 Lighters Loaded
Molasses F



or Canada

THE shipping of molasses was the main activity on

the watertront yesterday morning.

Fourteen lighters were

drawn up alongside the wharf opposite Prince William
Henry Street from where the loading was taking place.
Two cranes were put into operation to assist in the load-

ing. .

Two firms are shipping the
molasses. They are S. P. Musson,
Son & Co., Lid. and H. Jason
Jones & Co., Ltd. S, P. Musson,
Son & Cl. Lid. are shipping
224 puncheons, 50 barrels and

. 8 half-barrels. This shipment is

going on the Canadian Cruis.r
for Charlotte Town and Quebec.
The shipment by Jason Jones &
Co., is to be completed this morn-
ing, but yesterday the 286 ton
Molasses tanker Athelbrook le:t
port for Trinidad with a quan-
tity of 103,000 imperial gallons of
molasses. The vessel arrived on
Tuesday evening.

Spiders, handcarts and lorries
were employed in transporting the
molasses to the wharf-side, and as
‘a result, traffic found it difficult
to manoeuvre.

Meanwhile,’ the unloading of
artificial. manure and empty
drums was in progress on the
lower vortion of the wharf near
the warehouse of Messrs, Gardi-
ner Austin & Co,

SCHOONER OVERDUE

The Harbour Master’s Office is
in receipt of the following cable,
which was intercepted from North
Post Radio, Trinidad. Quote:

“To all ships—Schooner Lady
Sylvana left Trinidad for St.
Kitts via Carriacou on October
15th and has not yet arrived at
either of these two places.



Description:— Single mast grey
hull with markings W 32
painted on sides, On board six
crew and one passenger. Ships
are advised to keep lookout for
this vessel.

GENERAL CARGO

The schooner Emeline arrived
in port yesterday morning from
British Guiana with general cargo
for the island.

The cargo included 80 tons of
firewood, 700 bags charcoal, 30
wallaba posts, one bicycle and 750
bags of rice bran, The schooner
is under the command of Captain
G. Sealy and is consigned to the
Schooner Owners’ Association.

CANADIAN CRUISER HERE

The Canadian Cruiser which
arrived in the colony on Tuesday
evening from Trinidad brought a
mixed cargo to the island, This
ca... wiclided 50 cases of limacol,
17 cartons of glassware, 30 car-
tons of Angostura bitters, 15
tierces of oranges, 75 cartons of
toilet paper, 103 carcasses of veal
‘and 7 cases of shirts. The vessel
is consigned to’ Gardiner Austin
& Co,



PASSENGERS AND CARGO

Besides the 14 passengers which
it brought to the colony, the
French liner’ De Grasse also
brought 26 cases of apparel, 65
bales of hard board and 35 cases
of cream, The liner which is un-
der the command of Captain FP.
Prigent, is consigned to R. M.
Jones & Co., Ltd.

CANNED FRUIT

The Harrison line steamer Bio-
grapher which arrived in port on
Monday brought a quantity of 200
tons of cargo to the island. This
cargo consisted of 67 cases of
canned fruit, 61 containers of
canvas shoes, 54 chests and 225
packages of tea, 36 loose stoves,
100 cases of smoked herrings, 25
cases of whiskey and 25 cases of
shoe polish.

The 4,073-ton vessel also
brought a quantity of stationery,
footwear, cycle accessories, paint,
cement, glassware and motor car





WALK-OVER

SHOES

WORN BY MORE
‘MEN FOR THE

_ MOST

‘COMFORT MILES”

These fine SHO
one of the most
in England,
material,

in all sizes.








, manufactured in
p-to-date factories
of specially selected
are now obtainable in
Black and Brown Willow Oxfords

’ WALK-OVER
FCR

COMFORT

WALK-OVER
FCR

QUALITY



Now $20.17 a pair



WALK-OVER TO -

WALK-OVER
FCR

STYLE

10, 11, 1

CAVE SHEPHERD & (0. LID.

2 & 13 Broad Street

parts. The Biographer has a crew
of 51 and is under the command





cf Captain R. F. Longster.
COPRA

Besides its cargo of copta, 350
bags in number, the schoone

Lady Steadfast which arrived in
port on Monday from St, Luela
also brought 37 packages of fres!.
fruit, 66 bags of peanuts, 29 bags
of coconuts and 50 bales of cotton
The schooner is under the com-
mand of Captain L. A. Marks and
is consigned to the Schooner Own-
ers’ Association.

Another Communal
Bath For
St. Michael?

At the meeting of the Commis
sioners of Healt of the parish
of St. Michael which is fixed for
1 o'clock to-day, members will
consider the erection of an addi-
tional communal bath.

The Commissioners are also ex-
pected to consider a motion by
Mr, E. D. Mottley, M.C.P., deal-
ing with remuneration for extra
hours of work put in by the Ine
spector supervising the labour of
the Sanitary Department

Workers Scrub
Mossy Gutters

Workmen were busy yesterday
along St. Mary’s Row scrubbing
and washing the mossy gutters.
For a long time these gutters were
in a bad state with moss and
people complained about them ag
being dangerous.

The work is near completion
and the workmen have turned
along Mason Hall Street carrying
out the same process,

SEATS PAINTED.

The seats placed in Trafalgar
Square around the fountain were
scraped and painted yesterday
by workmen.

For. a long time people com~
plained about the seats needing
repairs and painting, and now
the opportunity has come which
makes the place look tidier.

nD

VESTRY TO DISCUSS
COKONATION PLANS

The St. Philip Vestry is expect-
ed to meet to-day at 11.00 o’clock
to consider among other things,
a circuler from His Lordship tie
Bishop relative to plans for the
Coronation Celebration and a
motion by Mr. R. S,. Weekes that
the number of exhibitions at
Combermere School be increased
by two.

DR. JAGAN VISITS
HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY

Hon. Dr, Cheddi Jagan, M.L.C..
Britis) Guiana, was among the
large audience which attended
Tuesday's meeting of the House
of Assembly

It was one of the largest crowds
ever to attend a meeting. Every-
one was interested in the discuss-
iéns on the Government's Five
Year Development Plan of Cap-
ital Expenditure and Taxation

Another large crowd was pres-
ent last night to hear further dis-
cussions of the Plan.

Corner Stone Laid

On Sunday evening last at 3.30
o'clock the corner stone of the
St. Nicholas Episcopal Orthodox
Church, Welches Road, was laid,

The Church was filled to capa-
city to witness the ceremony.











Styles include

Two Tone Oxfords in
Brown and White
Brown and Tan
Brown Susde and Brown

CASUALS in
Brown and White



SUEDE BROGUE OXFORDS in
Brown, Navy and Black

NO STYLE
Priced higher than

$12.52

a Pair

JOHN WHITE

Box and Willow Calf Oxfords

Willow

ADVOCATE

MEMBERS



CRITICISE

FIVE YEAR PLAN

@ From Page 3
state lotteries, so long as
country stayed to benefit.

the

V.H.F. Equipment

He noticed that there was p-o-
pored provision for V.H.F. equip-
ment for the Police—to complete
the requiremerits of the Police
Department, He would say that
what was necessary for the
American Police Department or
Scotland Yard was not necessar-
ily necessary for Barbados.

As. to entertainment tax, the
most should be taken from the
high-priced seat of the theatres.

He said that one should be
lad to win even the amount
sovertnment suggested might be
taken from the big sweep, fur-
thermore grudee that amount for
a beneficial purpose.

Mr. V. B. Vaughn (I) said that
plans began with Russia, and
there followed many other plans,
but the one hefore them was a
most extraordinary plan, There
was) much wrong with that: so-
called plan; so much wrong with
what the Leader said in intro-
ducing it, that he did not know
from where to begin his con-
demnation.

He would, he said, quote from
several documents to establish
his contention that the proposed
taxation was entirel unneces-
sary, a taxation to be tinposed on
an already hard pressed people.
The Honourable member when
introducing the plan could
searcely have realised how ironi-
cal he was when he invited any-
body to put up alternative

schemes for the plan,
He could not put forward any
because he personally did not

feel that additional taxaticn was
necessary regardless of the high
sounding name which the Gov-
ernment had given to that wick.
ed document. The purpose ‘be-
hind it was purely for the pur-
pose of increasing the revenue of
a rapidly growing bureaucracy.

They had to face the fact that
Barbados with its present econo-
my and even its potential econo-
my could not afford the expens-
ive machinery of administration
which Government was planning
The Government could only
afford the type of Civil Service
that was absolutely essential,
and not the type desirable to suit
the designs of themselves. If
they continued to burden the
people with expensive adminis-
tration, their present standard of
living would remain static.

They had been in the habit of
comparing their conditions with
backward places, but they should
compare them with places like
Puerto Rico and the American
Virgin Islands.

Mr. Vaughan absolved Profes-
sor Beasley from any blame
“for this crime” adding that the
Government had “preferred to
follow its own feelings.”’ He said
that as soon as it was known
that the plan was the result of
the programme advocated in the
Labour Party’s Manifesto, they
could no longer fail to recognise
“the unpardonable ignorance
committed in the plan submitted
by the Government for ratifica-
tion by the House,

Referring from Professor Beas-
ley’s report on the Fiscal survey
of the island, Mr. Vaughan said
“Professor Beasley analysed the
economy of this country and its
fiscal practices, giving a histori-
eal rev'ew of the revenue for lpng
years past until quite recently,
and he came to the conclusion
that if Government is to meet its
commitments seven years from
now, with its present Civil Ser-
vice, it will have to raise ad-
ditional revenue of the order of
$1,300,000."

$13,000,000

That meant that they would
have to collect thirteen million
dollars by 1958 if they were to
carry on with the present estab-
lishment. Professor Beasley ad-
mittedly told them that he came
to those conclusions on the as-
sumption that the colony would



continue its present commitments

without further undertakings.
mowever, Government did
accept those conclusions.

Professor Beasley
counted recent aevelopments in
the sugar industry, and although
Government did not
them, it still ignorantly came to
the same conclusion,
more, Government also ignored
the pertinent facts of the recent
sugar agreement.

Mr Vaughan quoted from an
issue of the Caribvean Commis-
sion Bulletin in which it is stated
that “the Commonwealth Sugar
Agreement signed on the 2ist
December, 1951 constitutes one
of the most important landmarks
in the whole economic history of
the British West Indies; its pur-
pose as set out in the Preamble
is for a long term agreement for
supplying sugar to the United
Kingdom, etc....” and said that
it meant that the Imperial Gov-
ernment had departed from its
traditional economic policy to-
wards primary producers of
sugar, and had given a guarantee
to the British West Indies anc
Commonwealth countries, there-
by protecting the sugar producers
from the competition in the world
market,

Historical Departure

He hailed this step as “an
historical departure from Im-
perial economic policy,” and said

that “because of this new sugar
agreement and the recent scienti-
fic development in the production
of sugar, the colonies are as-
sured of the revenue which Pro-
fessor Beasley felt we would
have to institute taxation for, and
which the Government had insti-
— more than he had suggest-
ed.”

Mr, Vaughan quoted a_ long
list of figures for the past seven
years to demonstrate the im-
portance of the price of sugar to
the revenue of the colony, an
branded the Government as be-

ing “hopelessly poor at fisca:
forecasting.” He saiq there was
no justification whatever in the

light of the facts he had given, for
raising taxes and burdening peo-
ple in order to meet the commit-
ments of the Civil Establishment

If beyond those facts, at some
future date the colony experi-
enced a recession in the price of
sugar, Government should adopt
a policy of retrencl.ment rather
than burden the taxpayers in or-
der to maintain the Civil Service
on its present establishment. He
urged that in such a case the ory
remedy was entrenchment. anc
run the administration of the
colony on the “minimum. skele-
ton” staff.

Economic Development

He said that all the develop-
ment plans by the various gov-
ernments of the world meant eco-
nomic development — permanen
employment for thousands in the
case of Barbados,—-But what did
one find. Out of a propoved Capi-
tal Expenditure of 16% million
dollars, Gevernment had only
earmarked $389,000 to be spen‘
on agriculture,

“The plan,” Mr. Vaughan said
“ig self condemned,” and _ he
charged, “the Leader of this gov-
ernment is unpardonably ignorant
ef the elementary principles of
economics.”

A Development Plan for this
country, Mr. Vaughan said,
“should mean a plan in agricul-
ture principally.” He quoted from
various documents — the Report

bv Sir Frank Stockdale, the
Flood Committee — and the Ter
Year Plan — to show the em-

phasis which was always laid or
the Development of the agricul-
ture of the island, by means of

@ On parce 6
Rolex Watches
LOUIS L, BAYLEY
Bolton Lane

——— ESS
As a Result of very Heavy and Opportune
Buying, We are able to Offer

THE BEST SELECTION AT
THE VERY BEST PRICES ON

| JOHN WHITE SHOES

















means made just right

snc i iat att iat aati Nii leit ins inti i i i a itl



HARRISONS — DIAL 2664



}
not

further dis- |

discoun:

What was |













ve



PAGE FIVE





To prevent the spread of infection, ©
apply ‘ Cetaviex ' Cream to the skin
surrounding the boil. Also use on

the hands when changing dressings.

use ‘Cetavlex’ ror wounds, CUTS, BURNS, SCRATCHES, ETC.

‘Cetaviex’ cream
The all-purpose antiseptic

Sole Agents and Distributors
A. S. BRYDEN & SONS (BARBADOS) LTD.
BRIDGETOWN

A product of
WAPERIAL CHEMICAL (PHARMACEUTICALS) LIMITED
@ subsidiary compony of imperio! Chemical Industries Limited

rpying

N

Ana”, x age sie
HIS’ WEEK:

SEED TIME
AT LAST!!

ZINNIAS—GIANT MIXED—Phlox
ZINNIAS—GIANT DAHLIA—Asters
ZINNIAS—LILLIPUT—Petunias
CALLIOPSIS—SALVIA-—Cosmos
CANDY TUFT—DIANTHUS

AGE RATUM—SNAF ~~ 2AGON
BATCHELOR BUTTONS

N.B.—These will be in full bloom for the Horti-
cultural Show.

KNIGHTS DRUG STORES

ALL BRANCHES
8-99-999-O4- VP DGO1-GDOGHDHG




FOR THRIFTY
HOUSEWIVES

30c. per 3 Ibs. ONIONS—per 3



ibs.





80c. per 10 Ibs. POTATOES—per 10 Ibs. .. B00.
96c. per tin CRAWFORDS CREAM CRACKEKS—per tin 960
16c. per tin SARDINES—per tin .. 16e,
32c. per pkt. HUGOS FRUIT SALAD—per pkt. B2e.
The above Items for Cash and Carry Customers Only

GALANTINE VEAL, HAM, & TONGUE—per tin ....., 89e.
SMEDLEYS DESSERT CHERRIES—per tin .......... 900,
SMEDLEYS STRAWBERRIES—per tin . PO ir
SMEDLEYS BLACKBERRIES—per tin .............5- oa

c.

QUAKER MACARONI—per pkt.





CAMPBELLS PEPPER POT SOUP—per tin wee be,
CAMPBELLS CREAM OF M IROOM SOUP—per tin 46e.
CAMPBELLS CREAM OF CHICKEN SOUP—per tin.. 46¢.
MAXAM CORNED BEEF HASH—per 1 Ib. tin < cpne
MAXAM STEAK & KIDNEY PUDDING—per 1 Ib. tim 69¢.
SALISBURY CORNED MUTTON—per tin ......... 68ce.
DENMOR BONELESS HAMS—4-lIb. tin $5.65
DENMOR BONELESS HAMS—2', Ib. tin 3.76
AYLMERS PORK & BEANS—per tin 38e.
LYNN VALLEY GOLDEN CORN—per tin on

Cc.

B.G. CASSAREEP—per bottle

COCKADE FINE RUM

STANSFELD SCOTT & Co., Ltd.











PAGE SIX



Calvert Fishing Boats
Near Completion

the stern) holds a rope while the spar comes slowly down. In the
to lower a spar.

LOCAL fishermen and boat-
owners alike are anxiously look-
ing forward to the launching of
the new type Calvert Fishing boats
which are being mass produced
at the Reef Grounds. There are
those who-are waiting to criticise
the design while others will
praise the performance,

The Calvert boats will replace
those ch were completely
destroyed during the heavy seas
and high Winds along Lee

rope and conveniently lowers at
whatever speed he likes. This
vope runs from the stern, through
& block on the tip of the bowsprit,
and is attached to the spar.

A bolt through the bottom part
of the spar forms an axis on which
the spar pivots. This bolt is kept
in place by a split pin, A pipe
i Shreve the apes. forms a sleeve to
ward Pre wear of the wood.

ward and parts of t

coast of the island the night When the bolt is removed, the
of x 2 and the morning end of the spar ean be raised from
ot a 3, 1951, the base to the deck. It is a very

boat building pro-

simple system, needing only a man
gramme, first of its kind ever

and a small boy to operate it.

to take place in Barba was These spars weigh ap-
started x the paypal of prosteantely’ 180 pounds, and with
Assembly Passed a resolution for #0 tional twenty-five pounds
$70,000 and the Legislative Coun- i one can imagine the in-

in

conveniences caused when in an
ordinary fishing boat three men
have to raise and low@r a spar.

cil coneurned.

Crews ofthe boats which were
damaged gr destroyed received
subsist@ne@allowances; funds were
provi iy the Government of

amaica t@isend a small quantity
of canvageee Barbados t assist
with the amme and the Gov-
ernment of British Honduras sent
Barbados 14 shipment of Santa
Marin harttwood which was most
useful for-equipping the interiors
of the boats.

Barbadigns everywhere sym-
pathised with the fishermen that
morning df December 3 when the

vast damage was reported and
everyone ¥ealised how seriously
the local ‘fishing industry would
be affected;

Mr. R, A, Calvert came to the
industry’s Assistance with a de-
sign of boat which would not only
be easier te-handle, but more at-
tractive, comfortable and better
equipped.

When the keels of the first few

Calvert boats were laid, many
hosat-owners doubted their ability.
They could be overheard saying:
“Wo prefer thr dolphin how; we
nrefer thie: we prefer that.” but
today, now that twenty-four of the
bests are nearing completion,
wnother story is haénrd, They are
singing praises of the Calvert boat
even before seeing her perform-
ance.

My. Calvert has desiened a vast-
ly iniproved typeof local fishing
boat which will earry a fixed keel,
weighing about 1,760 pounds, of
iron cast in conerete. Crews will

“ escap® ome of the present hum-
burt of shifting large poundages of
babllest as is at-nresent done in
tr Jinary type ofef chine hoat,
Tho inboard ballast of this boat
is estimated to be around 1,800
pounds only, compared with about
3,300 pounds in the ordinary fish-
ing hent, -

'‘Cwo men cango to sea in a

Calvert’ boat. This was made
} ible by Mr. D. W.. Wiles,
Fisheries Officer, who improved
on (h@-structure of the spar. This
boat takes only one man to lower
the spar while another removes the
wedge, With the ordinary fishing
boat it is often necessary to have
three men to lewer the spar, mak-
ing it essential for three to make
every trip in the larger boats.

With this new “spar lowering
system”, one Inman goes into the
bottom of the boat and removes
» wedge, while the other, sitting
comfer’ably in the stern, holds a

time is lost.

The majority of sails have so
far been made. Only about two
suits remain to be completed.








can easily be installed,

THE KEEL sections of many of the boats are now be prepar
ing touches to the keel section of boat. The keels w of iron



Plenty energy is wasted and much «
b

ir

0.

SPAR LOWERING SECTION



THE SYSTHM for lowering and raising the spar is a very simple one. Here a boat builder (sitting in

type of boat it takes three

By TONY VANTERPOOL

A motor can easily be installed
1 one of the Caivert boats.

Keel sections have been placed
n about six boats so far and it

is hoped to start casting the keels

bt

Cc

b

1 a short time?

So far, twenty-four boats are
ompletely planked, one has just
een started and the keels for the

remaining five, making a total of

t

hirty, are being prepared,

Most of the Calvert boats will

¢o to the west coast of the island.

The men to whom these boats

will go should be more than satis-

fi

c

t}

p

si
w

CALVERT BOAT

PREPARING KEEL

ed with them,” a_ boat-builder

sid recently. “But they are more

dinary type of boat.”

The Calvert boat is 22 feet long,
e average length of the present
hing boat. The mainsail is
actically the same size and shape

hog of the Ordinary fishing
oat.

it carries a deck and is far more
fe for boat crews during bad
vather,

Tm
: J

|

x ¥

THE OALVERT FISHING BOAT is 22 feet long, the average length
of the ordinary fishing boat. It has been designed so that an engine

SECTION





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Members Criticise

5 Year Plan

@ from page 5

irrigation and otherwise, and the
sums recommended to be spent
in its development, and said that
if the five year plan meant em-
ployment for a few more thou-
cand Barbadians, the people
would “have no grudge at pay-
ing a few extra cents in tax-
ation.”

He labelled the irrigation pro-
posals in the Memorandum as
“tomfoolery and not planning,”
end said that “there is the possi-
bility of a dairy industry as an-
other industry to sugar.” This
would mean much to the colony.

He asked, “what is a develop-
ment plan without ensuring the
means of t t

for people who have not got it
to-day?”

Expressed Doubt

Mr. Vaughan expressed “pro-
found doubt that the Government
coufd raise a five-million dollar
toan in any market in the world,
and said that while Barbados
could obtain a big loan, it could

ot with the t Government
at the head affairs,
He accused Government of

over taxing invested money, and
said that in following the policy
of taxation adopted by the
British Government after the
war for the creation of the Wel-
fare State, the local Government
were not providing the ameni-
ties provided by the British
Government.

He challenged the Government
to carry out their threat of “going
back to the people of the country
for a mandate,” and turning to
the Leader of the House charged
“you are not fit to be in charge
ef any government.” He added
“the political party running the
present Government are incom-
petent to be in charge of any
Government, and they are hope-
lessly incompetent to be in charge
of a Colonial People where there
is backward economy straining
the people.”

Mr, W. A, Crawford (C) who
also criticised the Plan, said that
t was an unjust and unfair
burden on the people of Barba-
dos and they were not deserving
of such treatment,

He said that Mr. Vaughn had
said that the Labour Party was
returned to power because of the
nope the people had in them but
he could say that they were re-
turned because there was no
alternative at the time.

{t was significant that in those
constituencies with no _ proper
al'ernative the people had to take
them but it was not because the
people had confidence in them.

He felt that the memorandum
only spoke categorically of the
policy of the Government Party.
It was said that these proposals
before the House represented in
fact what the Government Party
had put before the people and
uow they were being implement-
od ie House,

ut he thought that to say that
the proposals of this memoran-
dum were those which the Gov-

ernment Party had put before the th

people for a number of years
were completely false,

Mr, Grawford said that if those
proposals had been put before
the people at the last election,
the Labour Party would not have
been put in power but would
have been “run into the sea”.

He felt that the memorandum

epresented a five-year budget
and that was all,

As Mr. Vaughn had pointed out,
it was not a development plan as
they had known development
plans, And, as Mr, Lewis had said.
these proposals were intended
merely as proposals from Depart-
mental Heads.

Mr, Crawford next referred to
the Beasjey Fiscal Survey, and
said that it was true that they
had opposition on the side of the
Government for “a tax holiday of
five years” for new industries. He
felt that five years was a relatively
short time end gi could not be ex-
pected that a pany in a guar-
anteed market with’ a higher
labour foree, would leave that
market to’ come to this island’s

@e said that if the Government
had its confidence in Beasley the
least it should have done was t«
pay considerable importance to
such a recommendation,

Mr. Crawford referred to Trini-
dad and British Guiana and said
that if you look at those colonies
carefully, you would see that for
the last five or six years they had
been attracting new industries
while nothi nad been happen-
ing in Barbados,

He said that the only single new
industry considered of importance
in Barbados within the last five
years was the Textile Comp
and they nearly lost it throug
income.

In the memorandum it was
proposed to get more enue
from three main soi I t
Taxation, Indirect Taxation and
Miscellaneous Fees etc, He felt that
Mr. Vaughn had dealt most ex-
haustively with income tax and in
certain remarks had aceused Gov-
ernment of gross incompetence.

Speaking of Customs and Excise
he ae that Government

duties on C.LF,
cost.
that














ex-facto
proposals 1 we tale

ese nm the were
those which ‘he Lar rory, e
before the people did they tell the
people that what they were doing
in this country was going to in-
crease the eost of living, Mr,
Crawford asked.

He said that the proposals meant
thot every edible item which was
no subsidised had to go up in a
country where the cost of living
wes among the highest in the
world.

Mr, Vaughn, had quite to the
satisfactory of every intelligent
member, pointed out that it was
cheaper to live in England than
it was to live in Barbados. Only
a few weeks ago he heard a wo-
man from England remafk that
she wondered how the people
were living in Barbados.

Me said in spite of the fact that |
im this country the cost of living
was so high and jn spite of the
fact that a yard of flannel er
71 cents, the elected Government, |
which had been put there in the/
nterest of the people, now pro-/;



posed to raise even more by in-
creasing. the duties on C.LF.
values. d ;

He felt that there was no justi-
fication, in is country at the
present time, on the basis of these
proposals to impose such a bur-
den on the people. Was it fair to
say that they should reap more
Government Revenue from -
er duties on C.LF. values, he
asked, He said that it was pro-
fiteering, especially in the in-
crease of goods,

In addition to getting revenue
in this unjust manher, the duty
on tobacco and rum had been in-
reased.

c

He said that these drastic ste
were necessary because e
Treasury was nearly dry and

there was no money to finance
those schemes mentioned. The
average worker had to toil until
he was 68 before he could get old
age pension but they could afford
to retire a civil servant at 50.

If they looked around the coun-
try they would see many strong,
able bodied Government servants
at 50 entering private employment
and drawing handsome salaries.



Women And The
Colour Bar

A TORY MP SPEAKS OUT
By ROBERT BLAKE

THERE are few subjects upon
which more rubbish is regularly
written than that of Africa, This
is particularly unfortunate, since
African affairs have been so

change to read a book as stimu-
lating and free from the usual
prejudices as Mr. C. J. M. Alport’s
“Hope in Africa’”*

Mr. Alport a young Conserva-
tive MP, has tried to examine in
a dispassionate spirit a most
difficult problem, What part can
and should be played by British
imperialism in Africa to-day?

It is a subject which Conser-
vatives have far too often in the
Past abandoned to the tender
mercies of the Left. Indeed, the
whole generation brought up
after 1918 has been inclined

mind,” writes Mr, Alport, “Em-

pire for all Lord Beaverbrook’s

passionate 4

a mass of ancient
Mr. Alport’s boo

nothing else, should
is

it does
elp to dispel
error. Although
gold and diamonds were often
the magnet that drew men to
Africa, there was a most im-
portant element of idealism, too.
The impulse behind British
exploration in West and East
Africa was two-fold a desire to
convert pagans to c

hristianity,
and a desire to abolish the Slave
Trade, an _ institution whose

brutality has only been paralle-
led in modern times by Nazi con-
centration camps and the forced
labour colonies of Soviet Russia.

The Slave Trade could only
have been destroyed by the
British; its abolition has been an
unqualified boon to the Africans.

;



AT
Broad Street

t

es

to the arrival of

CATCH UP ON YOUR









THURSDAY, OCTOBER 36, 1952

o to the people and get four “Hf you want money to support

Sate. a plan like this get it by increas:
He also suggested that hon. ed production,” he said.

| members who disagreed with the Mr. Crawford referring to Page

memorandum should act like two of the memorandum, said that
men, + on their feet and do Government had the affron'
something to justify the eonfl- to say that it was a plan to give

.

confidence to investors. He asked
how were they going to get back
their money with the already high
taxation and the colony at satura-
tion point.

“This Five Year Plan is mere-
ly a little legitimate of the former
Ten Year Plan”, Mr. Crawford
said.

dence which was put in them.

He said that imagine with a
five year plan before them and
the country in such a financial
position, that even although it was
proposed that the Harbour Scheme
would be self-supporting, they
might not get funds to go on with
it,

“That is why we have to charge
the people of this country so much
for their rum ,’ he said.
“That is why the p om. tobac-
co has been increased. That is
why we have to tax the country
to the very limit. Squeeze every
red cent out of every man, wo-
man and child.”

He asked if just to get a few
roads and a little water you have
to tax the country to saturation
} int, it was deplorable.

He said that they talk about
scecial welfare but nobody can
drink rum; nobody can smoke;
nobody can pay bus fare and the
majority of the cars will be off
the road.

He felt that the gramme
represented the m um the
Government could do in the face
of the promises which they made
Bnd in the face of what one ex-
pects of it.

He said that the Five Year Plan
was no use. It was a Plan by in-| _
fants and squeezed every cent)
out of the taxpayers ts. He
suggested that with the Civil Ser-
vants pro} and this present
plan no Government would now

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63

GUE Pear

Misieading

The idea that the history of
the British in Africa has been
one of gross exploitation for
enormous profits is most mis-
leading.

In fact, although great indi-
vidual fortunes were made, great
risks were taken and great losses
incurred. Mr. Alport points out
that over a long period of years
the average rate earned by the
colonial investor in Africa was
no more than he would have
obtained if he had put his capital
in gilt-edged securities at home.

Of the immense economic ad-
vantages which this investment
has brought to the Africans there
can be no shadow of doubt.

Mr. Alport deals candidly with
the colour bar, a question which
has received great publicity be-
cause of the marriage of Seretse
Khama. He points out that it has
only reached its present form since
‘uropean women
in Africa and Asia. The early
Dutch settlers in the Cape had
no hesitation in taking Hottentot

wives.
The Gulf
The psychological basis of the
colour bar, in Mr. Alport’s| SWI. “SNOPSE) Sestes.
opinion, comes from the vast

gulf dividing the African from
the European women,

It is a deep-seated fear that
any relaxation of the social bar-
rier will ultimat lead to
mixed marriages and lower the
status of the European women
to that of the African women, a
status characterised by poly-
gamy, bride price, and other
sexual usages of a_ repellent
nature described by Mr. Alport.

As long as this gulf exists —
and it is really the gulf between
barbarism and clvilisation — the
colour bar will continue. Only
a revolution in the habits and
mentality of African women, and
men, could end it,

Yet the colour bar is one of the
most dangerous weapons of Com-

@ On page 8



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ADVOCATE STATIO



PPDIDTH OG



THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1952



FIVE YEAR

Water Supplies

THE programme is a continuation of the reorganisation
and improvement, of the water supplies of the Island. The
Department’s estimate of full requirements was an addi-

tional $1,767,752 including
Capital Estimates 1952-53,

VIII—$12,000 and $198,952 in the Supplementary Estimates

1952-53, No. 19,

The amount of $1,083,000 in-
cluded for re-organisation should
be sufficient to meet require-
ments in the five year period;
and the $200,000 included for ad-
ditional mains and _ standposts
would provide about 50 stand-
posts, The amount of $17,000 for
the development of water re-
sources is for the continuation of
the drilling scheme started with
funds provided under the Colon-
ial Development and Welfare Act.

A proper water supply for Dis-
trict “F” Police Station is essen-
tial. The capital cost is esti-
mated at $12,100.

Housing — Government

Estates Ete.

The estimates put forward by
the Housing Board contemplated
expenditure totalling $1,835,183,
including an amount of $104,543
in the Capital Estimates, 1952-53,
Head II and $36,000 in Supple-
mentary Estimates, 1952-53, No.

$25,000 under Head VI and
$14,881 under the authority
of Resolution No. 67 of 1952

(Supplementary Estimates,
1952-53, No. 19);
(b) Rehabilitation of Fishing

Industry—a revote of $10,-
000 under the authority of
Resolution No. 67 of 1952
(Supplementary Estimates,
1952-53, No, i9).

_ Boat Building
It is proposed to continue the
emergency boat building pro-
gramme now being carried out at

the amounts provided in the
Head IV—$347,000 and Head

technical and vocational training
estimated the cost of equipment
at $80,000 The maximum annual
recurren i ;
ore 200 t — was estimated at the Reef Experimental Station as
,400. e maximum capital g routine boat buildin ri
expenditure which it has been sponsored by Government. The
possible to include for this project Fishery Officer is of the opinion
is $200,000 and the recurrent ex- that boats of a better type and
penditure has been placed at workmanship can be built with the
$40,000 (including the cost of aid of machine tools, Inasmuch as
staff and maintenance). it is unlikely that mare than one
Elementary ar two boats would be under con-
The D tor of Education put struction at the same time, it is es-

timated that labour might be kept
forward a programme for capital to g minimum of five men and four

expenditure on the erection and Bursary boys. It is contemplated
conversion of schools totalling that the cost of operating this boat
$2,068,786, including an amount building yard would be largely
of $150,246 in the Capital Esti- borne by the purchaser or party
mates, 1952-53, Head I and for which the boat is being con-
$3,460 in Supplementary Esti- strected. The amount of $15,000
mates, 1952-53, No. 4. would be advanced for the pur-

It was estimated that the maxi- Chase of materials etc., and the an-
mum additional annual recurrent a cost is estimated at

cost would be $391,062. . ‘ "
Cultivation of Treec

The Director also recommend-
ed that the ratio of pupils per provision has already been made
reduced, and for this service under Capital

24.

The Board suggested that 60 that 23 additional teachers be
new houses be built in the city appointed to the existing schools.
and urban areas and 28 in the This would be an increase of
rural areas each year. about 342% in the teaching estab-

The Government floes not con- lishment,
sider that the housing problem | In the programme
can be solved in this manner been possibley because of cther
with the means at its disposal, meeds, to include a figure of
and the Housing Board is exam- $848,000 for Capital Expenditure
ining methods of providing On elementary education, $147,-
cheaper houses. Capital expendi- 358 being shown as the maximum
ture of $530,000 is included in additional annual recurrent ex-
the programme, and thee is the penditure which should provide
Self Help housing scheme under for reconstruction and enlarge-
the heading “Loan Funds”. There ment of nine schools and the
is also the Organisation for hous- rection of three new schoois.
ing from Labour Welfare Funds, Secondary
which it is expected will expend The estimated capital cost of the
about $3,500,000 on housing dur- proposals first put forward by the
ing the period. Director of Education was $498,-

An amount of $25,000 is in- 221, including the amount of
cluded to cover the cost of land $8,300 in the Capital Estimates,

it has only

teacher should be
Estimates 1952-53, Head VI.
Dairy and Stock Breeders’
Association Prizes, Agricul-
tural Exhibition Purchase

of Livestock
Provision has already been
made for these services under
Colonial Development and Wel-
fare Scheme D.217, Agricultural
Development (See Capital Estim-

ates 1952-53, Head VIII).

Livestock Insemination

Artificial insemination is at
present carried out at the Central
Livestock Station on a small and
experimental scale. The immedi-
ate proposals are to extend this
work to the District Agricultural
Stations; but, in the event of a
more intensive daigy industry be-
ing developed in e Island, the
demand for this service will in-

which it may be desirable to ac-
quire.

The amount of $3,000 is a re-
vote in the Capital Estimates,
1952-53, Head VI for Windows in
Bay Street.

MEDICAL SERVICES
Health Centres

The amount of $117,000 is made
up of the cost of erection of a
Health Centre for the
town and St. Michael’s area, esti-
mated at $100,000, and a revote
of $16,894 under Capital Esti-
mates, 1952-53, Head I, to cover

the cost of completion of the
building and_ the purchase of
equipment for the Centre

1952-53, Head I, and the maximum crease and a distribution centre
additional recurrent cost was cal- will be needed, The Director of
culated to be $62,820, In the pro- Agriculture has suggested that, in

gramme $250,000 has been includ-
ed as Capital Expenditure and
$30,000 for maximum additional
recurrent expenditure. The pro-
posals to be adopted have not yet
been finally examined,
Erdiston Training College

It is proposed to institute a two-

ton Training College, only one year
of which would be residential.
The cost of erecting an additional
lecture room and an additional
common room as well as provid-
ing additional dining and kitchen
equipment is estimated at $42,300.

the first place, an attempt should
be made to ascertain whether the
Centre could be operated as a pri-
vate organisation of cattle produc-
ers. Since, however, small cattle
owners may be a large proportion
of those who would use the Centre,
it may be difficult to raise the ini-

Bridge- year course for teachers at Erdis- tial capital privately, and perhaps

Government could assist by means
of a loan. Under this Scheme, the
bulls would remain the property
of Government and be housed at
the Central Livestock Station (the
present number at the Station is
sufficient for the first 3—5 years),

at The maximum annual recurrent from whence semen would be

Speightstown. The maximum an- cost-of the additional staff and supplied to the Centre at a price

nual recurrent costs of the Cen-
tre for the Bridgetown and St.
Michael’s area is estimated at
$21,000,

The capital cost of the Depart-
mental proposals, \which included
the establishment of 4 Rural
Health Centres, was estimated at
$282,654. ¥

General Hospital

The Director of Medical Ser-
vices submitted proposals for the
General Hospital totalling $1,081,-
395 (including the amount of

other is
$9,028,
AGRICULTURE

Farm _Institute—Trinidad
This Government has already
‘greed to the ent of a
arm Institute in Trinidad. The
contribution towards the initial

capital cost is estimated at $20,520
and maximum recurrent costs are

charges estimated at

to cover recurrent costs, and there-
after distributed by the manage-
ment of the Centre at a reason-
able insemination fee, The initial
capital expenditure is estimated at
$25,000, and $5,000 would be re-
quired for working capital, The
cost of additional bull pens and
other. equipment at the Central
Livestock Station is estimated at
$10,000, and annual maintenance

estimated at $9,225. at $250.
Sugar Cane Manurial Markets

Investigations It is proposed that-Government
In 1951, investigational work on should provide the initial cost of

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



cost per mile An of
$480,000 of which »$128,000 ap-
pears in the Capital Estimates for
1952-53, Head II], has been in-

cluded,

Parish Roads
Highways—Reconstruction
East Coast Road
The Director of Highways and
Transport put forward a pro-
gramme for the expenditure of
$800,000 on parish roads, $1,475,-
348 on the reconstruction of high-
ways and $622,059 on the construc-
tion of the East Coast Road. It has:
however, only been possible to
provide half a million dollars for
these purposes (and $19,848 of this
amount has already been provided
under the authority of Resolution
No, 42 of 1952 (Supplementary

Estimates 1952-53, No, 8).

Suck Wells
The amount of $5,000 is a revote
under Capital Estimates, 1952-53,
Head VI for the construction of

amount

suck-wells. The annual upkeep
is estimated at $1,000.
Harbour
Water Boat
The amount of $42,000 is made

up of:—

(a) a sum of $38,527 to meet
the cost of the new water
barge and tug in excess of
the amount to the credit of
the Water Boats Renewal
Fund, ($26,527 of this
amount is included under
Head VI in the Capital Es-
timates for 1952-53).
provision of $3,000 in the
Capital Estimates, 1952—-53
Head VI to meet the cost
of installing machinery in
the new water craft.

(b)

Buoys c
The amount of $4,000 is a re~
vote in the Capital Estimates,
1952—53, Head VI to purchase

Navigational Buoys,
Wharf Walls

The cost of renewal of the
wharf piling in the inner
Careenage is estimated at
$124,400. It is proposed to do
more than half of this work in

the 5 year period and a sum of
$75,000 is therefore included, The
annual maintenance is estimated
at $1,000,
Bar to Careenage

The Harbour and Shipping
Master recommends that the
existing coral and sand bar of 12
feet at the entrance to the
Careenage be deepened to 16 feet
to enable all intercolonial craft
to enter and leave at any state of
the tide, thus reducing the con-
gestion in the Careenage. The
capital cost of this project is
estimated at $10,200.

Airport

Runway
The amount of $72,000 has
already been provided as fol-
lows .—

(a) a revote of $47,177 under
the authority of Resolution
No, 27 of 1952 (Supple-
mentary Estimates, 1952—
53, No. 2) for urgent
repairs to the runway at
Seawell Airport,

(b) a revote of $24,000 under
the authority of Resolution
No, 42 of 1952 (Supple-

mentary Estimates, 1952
53, No. 8) for resealing
the runway at Seawell
Airport,

Roads, Parking Spaces, etc.
The amount of $82,000 is ‘made

$41,415 revoted under the author- the sugar cane leaf analysis tech- establishing district markets, al- up of:—

ity of Resolution No. 42 of 1952
(Supplementary Estimates 1952-
53 No. 8) to complete the pur-
chase of “Avalon”). The’ figure of
$950,000 included in the pro~
gramme would cover the cost of
various improvements and ex-
tensions including the provision
of 100 additional beds, a new
kitchen and laundry, equipment,
a new mortuary, etc. The maxi-
mum additional annual recurrent
costs are estimated at $267,771.
Education ’
Final figures of the potential
cost of the University College of
the West Indies in the next five
years are not available, but from
calculations made at the recent
conference in Jamaica on the
subject of the finances of the
University College of the West
Indies, it is estimated that the
Barbados share of the deficit to
date in the finances of the Unt-
versity College will be $32,000
and that the additional annual
recurrent expenditure to be
borne by Barbados in the next
five years will be $55,000.
Technical

The departmental estimate of

the cost of erecting a building for
a technical college was
committee on

use as
$204,400 and the

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nique was initiated in a small way lowing local authorities to build,
in the Government laboratory. maintain and control them, An
Preliminary results have been area of land has already been ac-
promising enough to make it ad- quired at Eagle Hall and Govern-
visable to continue this work fur- ment has recently received from
ther. No capital expenditure is the Vestry of St. Michael an estim-
anticipated but it will be necessary ate of the cost of erection of a mar-
to provide $1,100 yearly if the ket thereon,
ey an Fish Market, Speightstown
Central Livestock and Dis- The Legislature has recently
trict Stations approved the compulsory _acquisi-
The amount of $76,000 has al- tion of an area of land in Speights-
ready been provided as follows:— town for the site of a new fish
(a) a revote of $10,438 under market. | The total’ capital cost of
the authority of Resolution this project is estimated at $30,000,
No. 42 of 1952 (Supplement- but $15,000 of this amount is avail-
ary Estimates, 1952-53, No. able under Head VI, Item I—De-
8) for the purchase of cer- velopment of Fisheries Production
tain equipment for the Cen- of the Capital Estimates for 1952-
tral Livestock Station; 53. Recurrent costs are already
an amount of $65,375 to be provided in the Current Estimates,
expended from the Colonial but it will be necessary to make
Development and Welfare provision for a maximum annual
D.217 (Suspense) Account maintenance cost of $460 for build-

under the authority of Re- ings. COMMUNICATIONS
Roads

(b)

solution No, 43 of 1952 to
meet the cost of capital im-
provements and alterations
at the Central Livestock and
District Stations.
Fisheries Development
The amount of $50,000 has al-
ready been provided in the 1952-
53 Capital Estimates and Supple-
mentary Estimates as follows: —
(a) Development of Fisheries
Production — revotes of *

Tenantry Roads .

The programme of repairing and
reconstructing tenantry roads has
not yet been completed, The Di-
rector of Highways and Transport
put forward estimates for further
work totalling $1,386,000. It is,
however, anticipated that some
eduction can be effected in the



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(a) a revote of $65,113 in the
Capital Estimates, 1952—53
Head VI.

(b) a revote of. $6,187 under

the authority of Resolution

No. 42 of 1952 (Supple-

mentary Estimates, 1952—-

53, No. 8); provision of

$4,000 for Fire hydrants

and hose, standposts etc.
for the Airport and $2,159
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ete, under the authority of

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(Supplementary Estimates,

1952—53 Nq. 19).

an amount of $4,500 which

is required for further

road work in the adminis-
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Airport.
Runway Lig’ hting

$7,201 was re-

voted under the authority of

An amount of
Resolution No. 42 of 1952 (Sup-
plementary Estimates 1952—53,
No. 8) to meet the final payment
for the beacon.
Electrical Installations
This is a revote of $26,000 in
the Capital Estimates 1952—53
Head VI.
Toilet Accommodation
The number of persons

(c)

who

by

Unimiet Major °

‘



’

at Da Costa & Co. Lid.

DA COSTA & CO., LTD. is one of the Bridgetown
firms that have used
constwucting Storage Fixtures, The time and
cost of building cumbersome wooden shelves is

easily avoided with

MAJOR steel framework, which can be easily
and used again.
MAJOR is durably finished in a rust-proof stove

dismantled

enamelled green.

S. P. MUSSON, SON & CO, LID.

v.sit the Airport is increasing and
as the use the toilets primarily
providex for passengers, the
Airport Manager recommends
that additional toilet accommoda-
tien be constructed. It is proposed
that) such accommodation should
provide three water closets and
one wash basin for females,
threeiewater closets, one urinal
range and one wash basin for
males, The capital cost is esti-
matedâ„¢at $3,000, and the annual
recurrent expenditure at $1,020.

GENERAL

Fire Station

The estimates of the cost of the
new Bridgetown fire station are
being revised and it will be
necessary to restrict the expendi-
ture to $200,000. The amount in
the} Resolution presently before
the Legislature was $305,700,

Post Offices

The Colonial Postmaster put
forward proposals the capital
cost of which would have been
$72,660. It has been possible onlv
to jnclude $36,000 of this amount,
including the revote of $18,000
under Capital Estimates 1952—53,
Heqd I.

In addition to the new Post
Offiee at Christ Church, it is pro-
posed to build post offices at St.
Lawrefice and St. John,

Police Stations etc,

The capital expenditure -recom-
mended by the Commissioner of
Polite was $144,700. It is, how-
ever, not possible to carry out all
of his recommendations. It is
proposed to erect a new Police
Station on the existing site at

Hastings and to provide addi-
tional accommodation at the
Holetown Police Station. The

capital cost of these projects is
estimated at $75,000 and maxi-
mum annual maintenance of
buildings at $2,000.
Land Acquisition
The amount of $50,000 has been

included to cover the cost of
purchase of land (suitable for
schools and other Government

purposes) which, during the next
five years, may become available.
Library Equipment ete,
Provision has been made in the
1952-63 Capital Estimates for the
erection of a building at Oistins



i
view of the increasing number of
enudren wo are in needa ot Wwe
care and training which can be
received at this Home. A contri-

bution of $10,000 is included in
je programme.

triendly Societies’ Officer

The extensive operations
friendly societies in
and the social work involved,
make it advisable that there
should be a whole-time Govern-
ment Inspector of friendly
societies. The recurrent expendi-
ture is estimated at $3,600.

Weights and Measures

The Commissioner of Police
has drawn attention to the neces-
sity of replacing certain weights
and measures which have been
in use for a long period of years

ot
the Island,

and are becoming inaccurate
through wear and tear, The cost
of new equipment is estimated
at $7,000.

V.H.F, Equipment
The amount of $23,000 is made
up as follows:—
(a) a revote of $10,784 under
the authority of Resolution
No. 42 of 1952. (Supple-
mentary Estimates, 1952-
53, No, 8) to purchase cer-
tain V.ELF, Equipment. }
(b) an amount of $11,700 to|
provide further V.HLF.
Equipment to complete the
requirements of the Police
Department, The maximum
annual recurrent cost is
estimated at $1,000.
Mechanization of Accounts
In view of the increase in
volume of Government expendi-
ture during recent years, it has
been found that much additional
time has had to be spent on the
accounting procedures of the pre-
audit system, thus causing delay
in the passing for payment of
expenditure vouchers. It is there-
fore proposed to introduce a sys-
tem of mechanical posting to
facilitate the work of the Audit
Department. The capital cost of
equipment is estimated at $10,000,
The maximum annual recurrent
cost of upkeep is estimated at
$1,000.
Department of Statistics
A department is needed to col-
late and distribute information

—_____——

DEVELOPMENT PLAN —

to house a Post Office and a about population, employment
Branch Library. It will be neces- and migration; production, sec-
sary however to provide furni- Ondary industries and construc-
ture, etc., for this branch library tion; distribution (especially of
at a cost of $1,000. The maximum f0°0d supplies), shipping and
annual recurrent cost of staff and Other transport; domestic and ex-
incidental expenses is estimated ternal trade; wages and prices;

at $2,226, national income and finance, It

The Trustees of the Public would also be able to advise the
Library have recommended the Secretariat and other Govern-
establishment of a Book Van Ser- Ment Departments in the inter-

vice to meet the needs of the pretation of economic and social
many people who live in the Statistics. It is proposed that the
country districts, but who find it Services of an expert should be
inconvenient or impossible to Pbtained to advise and assist in
come to the Public Library for the setting up of the Department;
their reading matter ‘The estj- and that a Barbadian should be
mated capital cost of a van to- Selected for training, possibly at
gether with the erection of a the Canadian Bureau of Statis-
garage is $5,480. The maximum tics with a view to his appoint-
annual recurrent cast of this ser- Ment to the post of Government
vice is estimated at $2,749. Statistician. The capital cost of

equipment is provisionally esti-
“Youth Employment mated at $10,000 and recurrent

Every year in this Island near- costs at $30,000,
ly three thousand children leave Overseas Defence
school, About a third of these do Contribution

not find employment and of those
that do, some are not fitted for
the occupations upon which they
enter, others could do better in
other occupations. There are no

proper arrangements for the
guidance of these boys and girls.
In view of these conditions the
Labour Commissioner has recom-
mended that a Youth Employ-

ment Service should be started.
The chief function of such a ser-
vice is to help boys and girls
when they leave school to find the
work which they are best fitted
to do; in such work they can
develop their abilities to their
own benefit and to the benefit of
the [sland. It would be nects-
sary’to set up a Youth Employ-
ment’ Office with a Youth Em-
ployment Officer in charge, under
the general supervision of the
Labour Commissioner, A special
room would be required for this
purpose, as it is essential that
school leavers should be treated
separately from adult members
of the community who are seek~-
ing work. The estimated capital
cost of establishing this service
is $1,000 and the maximum an-
nual recurrent cost is $3.466.

Nightengale Home
Sometime ago, the Vestry of
St. Michael approached Govern-
ment for financial assistance to
erect additional buildings at the
Nightengale Memorial Home in

BEB eBeBeeeeeee|) 8
¢ Storage Fixtures

UNIMET MAJOR for

quick-handling UNIMET
And UNIMET

The question of the Island
making a contribution towards
the cost of defence of the region
is under consideration, and a
token figure for this is therefore
included in the programme,

Cc. LABOUR WELFARE
FUNDS

On the assumption that the

terms of the agreement of 30th
@ On Page 8

een





PAGE SEVEN



“
Mu mmy —voO u

are a tease ! -

—| know quite well what you've got behind
your back, so hurry up and let me have that >.
nice comforting drink of Cow & Gate—
it’s doing me such a lot of good — and I
love it.” ‘‘All right, Baby,’’ says Mummy,
“‘we don’t always agree — but you're right.
this time. Every time | look at you | bless = =
the day | put you on Cow & Gate—so =
here you are, darling — steady now !!””

4

COW &é GATE P85

he FOOD of





































FOR THE RAINY SEASON
We Can Supply You with...

GALVANISED CORRUGATED
SHEETS

AT A BARGAIN CASH PRICE
30 Gauge 26Gauge 24 Gauge

6 feet long oo... ee $3.00 _ $4.00
T feet TOME oo... cccceceeceeeeeerene — ~ 4.50
8 feet LOMB... ..cccccccccsecseeecereeees — $4.80 5.40

GALVANISED NAILS

30c. per Ib. nett.

BARBADOS HARDWAREo., Ltd.

(THE HOUSE FOR BARGAINS)
No. 16, Swan Street ’Phone 2109, 4406,

— ce me
== res SOE
s See.
eee anv a cee aes eae
== 0 ee Na EE
pee “ aay svic nape ae cena eee
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—oo ys ste nee gpie™ a ow y \an ee,
Ca vai "S rt Y a’ ae ata
SS 1A. we \ SES
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SS \s reals WW n and preven conn SOOO
SSN edt spne2â„¢ GroUP ond yor Se
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S—— toasted} oS Se
— aie sterrough a orn jess Nipate DAR
Se uu! n a SSEes
aaa A e Gro of 4o a ence ie nia alll
Re ee ee yn! ir $ et ' ares SO
SS BBA grown roses rip 1 ——————
} ===. entitle | rave mat 7 0° Sa
. ee eae
See Poros! i, on ™, valid ee’ pe co™ ne ns
eee ’ re m a
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————oe ye. yney Sa
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SSS petwrn retutD Vor 15 SSE
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Se ei awas





PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1952
LD LL et TOILE DLL LLL LL LLL LLL cccicienateeencattatttitacesiatitaaastit ia etiencarties LL

CLASSIFIED ADS. ae cee aie | Sir Ralph Fin d S The English—Are They Musical’

YOU stagger me Ruth Link.tion.” You could not be more
} The undermentioned properties will be set up for sale at the Registration Office, That was a real haymaker you right.





























} », + Public Buildings, Bridgetown, between 12 noon and 2 p.m. for the respective sums lended at the end of your column, The English audience wants
; DIED i FOR SALE when you charged: “The English- only to relive the part. oe
RING—Onr: Grecber 98, t86. At her ie man has no ear for music.” music fills the Albert Hai








residence, Ealing Grove, Chret
Anne Maria, Aged & ¥ funera
leaves the above residence at 4.15 p m
to-day for the Christ Charch FPatish



As a feliow-American’ I ought Thrice-familiar staples by Mozar'
) support your view. But I can- Beethoven and Brahms—pretfer-
not. You have been ably concertos, involving such



and on the date specified below H not then sold they will be set up on each ee *
suceeeding Friday at the same place and during the same hours until sold Ful
particuiars on application to me ry
AUTOMOTIVE | PLAINTIFF: ENA MAY GALE ] eee

——— — and
TRUCK—¥V-@ Ford. Newly Overhauied. DEFENDANT: CLARA ALSOP GALE (by original action)























































J ; here four
y AA Condit Dia ; weeks thrice-familiar i
Carl ee ee indent. Dany a eee OS oe to an. | MAMPDEN ARCHIBALD CUKE (Pers Rep of Clara Alsop Gale, seni C days. I have been here six weeks (hrice-t =. a
~ z cm ee. S. —" ome USED CARS—A fine selection inctuding | PROPERTIES: reat Aid EAT certain messuage or dwelling house © By GE wv in the US. ery Ses a book Poe «
Stoute (daughters) Harold Bain JP 0"C eer, Austin As, Vi aa) thereto. be = ioe and whersen oe stands | “ about American life. The English musical public
Strak: \nephe , Morus Oxtord, belonging situa . bn r 4 - i
Vivienne “4 gutece) Cort Rees OS aes Dotaeed, Ren Gen GEE we ‘ced one aus “aémcamur een a ate 4-4-~ moan +s eh bee eee] ee English sedate ware nage Se nenne Withe for tne Suse of
z one qua: square t or bs urray. ar ‘ da few - j ;
ome 30. 20.88—1n thereabouts Butting and Ming on» piace called or known ®) 259 pages, , 1 to say in the v: ” deaf I should know it by now. day, for the up-coming —
| oa a ie eee i fa ee |, Miter tate, Mawnan Cenbi emeciid oa me seeeepe ee ang enmrts Ing tnd Soong
PERSO FURNITURE — At Janetta Shop Sant os bower a a atolls, whic’ le so little a to . ; ;
aN furniture ond Steines inchusing, Seser tad pareal of land erected and built standing and being with theirg (re, Gilbert and Group, litt Voice-of-the-Tide, brought him| nd operas in London than any- England is the home of goes
Rae, Chat, Beeien, Seen aes EARNS. their palm fronds above the Paci- his most remarkable experience.| “ere else on earth. A 6,000- ae ers Why Hoes the
The public are hereby warned spainst 5 tee ae fy Seale UPSET PRICE: "£3,500. 0. 0. , | fle surf. A Gilbertese friend prescribed |5¢4t auditorium like the Albert public display so little
cs — >. a, as se t aA Machi (1) Singer Tredle Machine— ee ae ae {Sreinin_memuage dwellinghouse or stare They are by a hand- porpoise-meat as a cure for this Hall would be a white elephant] of this quality toward new musi~
not hold myself responsible for her or }™* OE | re sa and numbered 15 in the said crag sedelleae ate ton nd whee te’ ee ed race. From misfortune and engaged the ser-|'” New York. The 3,000- oS San vr

the same stands and thereto belonging containing by admeasurement | 2" island vast quantities of vices of his cousin, a hereditary | @rnesie Hall is big enough. ties? —L.E.S.














by one thousand one hundred ad sixteen square feet or thereabouts | 2hosphates are exported, with rpoise-caller. six orchestras FOSS FOF . ”
» out Po . This symphony play
order signed by me. i MECHANICAL butting and bounding on the premises known as Numbers 196 Roe-] which the pastures of the Southern went into a swoon, which ended| "ularly in London, four in Paris, ; ;
WIS LABAN BRADSHAW, ee buck Street and 14 High Street on the premises known as N Homisnhase Ata in New York, EVERY HOTEL KITCHEN
, AGRICULTURAL BQUIPMENT — in- 16 High Street and on High Street aforesaid or however else the D! d fail. only when he , “They| three in New : hould have
St. Philip. |sading Grass Mowers & & 6 cutting same may butt and bound, together with the messuages @welling.| They are administered by a come! Our friends from the| TWO opera companies perform i
29.10.5220} er, Rakes, Loaders (Crop collectors) houses and buildings and all other erections and bufldings on the} andful of devoted British colonial ‘west . they come.” And there,}*i7ultaneously in London. The
nae delivery. Rakes, us et mis pares! of land erected and built standing and being with thelr officers, who were joined not long out in ‘the lagoon approaching New York City (parafiel aun Ascot ater ter
u“ urtenan: ‘3 ° _
WANTED 316 30.10,52—6n | UPSET PRICE: £4,000. 0. 0 vefore the 1914-18 war by a and finally flapping gently on to} — Wells) closes) when Hot Water



ALL. THAT certain piece or parcel of land with the} "OMantic, inquisitive and skinny the beach, was a whole flotilla of
admeasure-

the etropolitan (parallel to
dwelling house thereon called “BARTICA” containing by young cadet named Arthur ting

1 kes such 4
BICYCLES — A full range for Ladies, Covent G en) is . a Washing up ma a

, Clean and shining





. po f c
ents and Youths. DIAL 4616.. ment nine Y and sixt 4 - y with |
HELP 30. 10.52—6n. merly part of two acres ina aan eae et ae Sab: Grimble, “The men leaned dowm to| But one_of your other otnes- crockery and cutlery with less
eat Sas | Gere gh $$ handel Gaul Sesty Gates: feet Of See Seblie cond sitemte. in te Nearly 40 years after his first throw their arms around the great }V*tions, Ruth, does fit See the Ascot at your Gas Show-
GOOK—A good experienced Cook} EARTH. SCRAPER AND SCOOP — For the ‘district called Hastings in the said parish ot christ Churen pq glimpse Of the Pacific, Grimble, barrels and ease them over the|m™usical scene. The Englishman, |% oom, Bay Street
with long service character—easy hours, | “oving wash mould and making Cart this Island butting and bounding on lands now or late of one .*yow immensely experienced but ridges. They showed not the least}/¥°U S&y, “has no sense of direc-
good wages.—Apply “HY c/o A. L. ds, ete. Dial Se nee: eae. yore a tag Bag Beery —_ or ae Marcus Grararum et lho less romantic than in 1913, puts Miata oc Abnscom, TE Wea OE Sar a eaten eneecees
ee . -10,52—6n, or however else the same m butt " > i
Mayers, Esa. on . | together with the messuages Swalitnaouees — buildings ,cOWN OM Paper some recollections single | wish was to get to the
ee eae iis Agi att Wee anereae tics see = a oe ae on the said parcel of 1p | . his eae ht the islands and oe é
LADY — Young lady for ~ bbe: f merous attachments for cultivation ae eae ee eee their peo! 4 is in no sense an chief's portion of the meat
pumel C UP: PRICE: £. . Oo. o. : : rs
Hotel Royal. Apply to the Manager [0 nsport purposes. Your- enquiry [DATE OF SALE OF ABOVE-MENTIONED PROPERTIES: pologia for British colonial rule. Was set aside for Grimble. He

w.ll be welcome. COURTESY GARAGE







7th November 1958 |’ Grimble (who was knighted in could not bring himself to eat it.














MISCELLANEOUS 1 Ot ic ROE 2 tl H. wu.sams, * | 1938) is mainly concerned to pass Nor does he attempt to explain a
—_—_— a | MASSEY-HARRIS Wheel Tractors meen eee. Y ws to readers his own admiration She strange gg
WA D Shipment arriv in t for your selec- sn of the islanders, and at e all to rimble tel how a bankr t
OTR, SOLD COMES, Seale: Disservices, [sive aveliable, g9noas—6n convey the beauty the comedy and ‘rading concern perenne ttn Bree Atte Belling" Friday
Salvers, Paper Weights, Spice & Snuff} —————______-—____ - | the magic of island life, even if Wealthy and beneficent British F Don't ncul: = a deep ane ‘ . ng jay
Boxes, Enamels, Curios, | OLIVETTI (M 44) ‘Typewriters. Avail- 5: Ve Pla. ‘the “magie” has at times a hard Phosphate Company because a seated couch! Rub the oo
a a ae - rear n OMEN * | dant against insect piagues, tedious sharp-eyed young man thought chest with A.l. White

eee ee 28.10.5260 li” — $260.00 » | food, scanty medical services and that a piece of rock looked like Liniment. The penetratine ) The M/V “CARMBBEE” will

pa 15” — $393.00 heat stimulates blood circu- | I} accept Cargo, and Passengers for







18/7 — $325.00

Y usson, & Co.
PUBLIC NOTICES | eers se’ ™ aval

) Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat
) Nevis and St. Kitts Sailing Friday
ii 7th November, 1952.

lation and promptly relieves
congestion Thousands have

From 7 other afflictions. phosphate. It was almost pure
e page A n ad Th phosphate. The Phosphate Com-
September, 1951, witl continue in e Gentlefolk pany has been one of the most












—————SSS=S==sSswss

















Large Sives @ $3.88 each, Misses’ Plustic

, But the de: i enlightened enterprises in the found relief with A.1t.
28.9.52—t.f.n, and that during the five reader will, neverthe- d .
——— rene the crop ee ‘on the average less, carry away from this World and a prime factor (says Why not you? OWS noe er |
LIVESTOCK Ps memorable book an indelible im- Grimble) in saving the Gilbertese ae sponrcy
be 150,000 tons, it is estimated * Consignee Phone 4047
TAKE WNCTICE a | nak Ghcus Mem: out & aa oe pression of the boon conferred on from the disintegrating effects of Sill Mo. > oth Oct. 1962,
CALF — One Guernsey Helfer at about a fine race by Britain’s rule “The Japanese invasion and American a VE hee
CHARM Pine Strain, Hill's Dairy Farm, Dial|lion dollars will be available in from | Gilbert ba 3 ~ a aN 3 2
3723. the Labour Welfare Fund. it is e Page 6 . ese,” says Grimble in a occupation. - ARAL
That SOAP Oe Roe * 2. t million dol- ™unism in Africa |significant sentence, “had few The Pattern
LTD., a cgmpany incorporated - proposed that three. million doo’ if Bay | waterside villages before the A Pattern of Islands is, inevit-
the jaws of Jamaica, Manufacturers, MISCELLANEOUS lars be expended on housing t's existence is inevitable,| British protectorate” (of 1892) ably the Evening Stand vd Book y | ae
easen trade of ‘basineet address 16 ee. |---| loams and half a million dollars W can at least avoid its unneces_{ Until then, each house must be a of the Month for tember i 1 if
moe Sertich, West Indies, has ap-), TUASTEC RAINCOATS Mor tee | on, amenities in rural areas. “@ty extension. Mr. Alportdn-yfrt; clan feuds were deathless: In the British Em were to : la | Ne
\ 7 =

a f rad i
Buled fo Ne TF neeiter th Yerpeee Raincoats 0.60 each, Children’s Plastic

ignore refunds of stan ‘an extreme casé where| 8! Was ferocious and unceasing. be wiped





























































club tried out to-mo'
a | Rana, © een," eT Ze 2 ue | i to ban} The islanders love oratory, fine other relic of it survived. A Pat-
ations for laundty pu meena per- | Dress Shoppe, Broad Street a balance in one of its residents from enter-}™25ners, noble . “We tern of Islands would enable STEAMSHIP COMPANY, INC
rations for the teeth and a rs nd per £ 29,10.52—3n taining a member of the Egypt- dwell among gentlefolk in these future readers to say: “So t
rations for the teeth an air. and pe

parts.” said Grimble’s superior. it what the Empire was like; such
Before long, Grimble was adopt- were the men who manned its
ed into one of the clans, The outposts’—and to regret the

), and will be entitled te SUBSCRIBE now to the Dafly Telegraph,
aaa ‘he skuie after one month from | ingland’s leading pany ree _
L 29th. { October, 1952, unless sore | arriving in Barbados by r only a few - most +
Persea thal fn the meantime give notice | days after publication tn London. Contact formed this Government that Her Europeans,

CANADIAN SERVICE (Ffo0atvicHTty)



: cer , solemn and painful, in- ing of a unique, even if ible
“Ra duplicate to me at my office of oppo- |len Gale c/o Advorate Co, Ltd. Local) Majesty's Governmest has made Mr. Alport is an optimist. Claded toe tatoeies Gf s wake on instrament for the dissemination | #4] SOUTHBOUND ites = xm pe, © CORONA
» sition of such memeaaton. ae Pe! Represent: +7.4.50—t.t.n, | available the fortuitous accum- points out that the He his arm. As tradition dictated, of hi i and civilisation
5 > 2 seitie egg ee citi ———___________—— | ulation of the benefit of exchange Africa of the Bette es Ubon | two little girls wept and screamed throughout the world MONTREAL $8 Oct a it = oo hb
s 28th day of October, 1952 Twos (2) NEW DUNLOP CAR TYRES the actual and has been r > HALIFAX 18 Oct. 1 Nov 11 Nov 25 Nov.
se A ‘a. WILLIAMS, 00 "x 16. No reasonable offer refused. ae om 2 - mane as if men from the Iron oa ; ee eae the ao OS ae Arr. B'DOS. 31 Oct. 13 Nov. 23 Nov. 7 Dec
Registrar of Trade Marks. | Apply to Mr. E. C. Field. Shine Oe, sugar to Canada in the Calender dys and hea Ge a = gard smile kept enaniaring how Limited Passenger Acommodation Available
alps ceo eee ES
TROPICAL FISH — Marble Hatchets,| years 1950, 1951 and 1952. The suddenly into the cht Plage 0 agreeable it all was. OTHER NEW BOOKS

For further info: a : Da COSTA & CO., LTD.; Pi 2122.
CTICE Rosy Tetras, Head and Tail light tetras,}amount accruing to Barbados is bustle of the twe rmation apply hone
TAKE Pearl Danios, Zebras and Corydora cat- likely to be of the order ; tieth century.
fish. All 48 ents each. White Clouds 000 in of oo
MIL-KO Festivum, and three spot Gourami at 72 respect each r
-, | cents each. Discount for lots of one dozen] years, H.M. Government in ad- surprising is the imm, b
That VI-TONE PRODUCTS LIMITED | oy more, Telephone Warden 3406 or this unexpected windfall achi ense pro-

Octopus Div: SPARK OF LIFE. By Erich Maria
». Remarque, Hutchinson, 12s, 6d.

It was not his only Pacific 368 a.
ordeal. The young Gilbertese As determined that never,
jhunt the giant octopus in pairs never shall we forget the horrors

i

ALE AE SL ET TS TTI a I
NEW YORK SERVICE (Eveny FOUR WEEKS)







an Ontario Company, Manufacturers | 4190 29.10.52 SOUTHBOUND ALCOA —ALOOA A A
oo ‘bose ‘dd: Tek ota aa __ *\has stated its intention that the under-water, f camps like and ' , ,
whose trade or, bus Cia ot inom ap net bo gasted en. One smost’ Minpertene’ the all bert be Gee aon aoe ro de ps b . ee PEGASUS PLANTER STEAMER STEAMER
\ Province of Ontario, Dominion | © to producing companies or agso- the African problem i inion him. Western Front has distilled into NORFOLK 35 Oct. —" os ar
Canada, has applied for the registration s brought | P His partner dives,
| of a trade mark in Part “A” of Register i ciations and growers, but that it out in the book—the ‘all|Prises the octopus from its rock one dreadful broth all that has) Naar feo bP 2 os: 2
in respect é copemngee Ee a ee / r roe a applied in omy, He ‘too . Left-wing bod vee Py fe eyes. ben aes or whispered about) @ arr. B'DOS. 12 Nov. 12 Dec. 7 Jan. 4 Feb.
f ingred foods, — capit white caus in iy er concentration . oe
_eattte te tae bol day at og! ver | iy cA DADS |tmeton Sr ase Seana ee Ym peters See Any cher the ies teenaged ine, Sige
@ © 1962, uniem orate person shall te DEC ry try. ‘ Fe POM Ap TEER one ‘would be regarded as unsports- {ful events together on the per-
pce vopnet ‘of such pot “i r i ; In Kehya, Rhodesia and the | manlike. sonal st of prisoner 509, |a
at my office Fer mack ph gg ban eg b The Sugar Producers Associa~ Union, the European settler beat Grimble showed an incautious living eton who refuses to
traeplication at my. office. tion has suggested, and the Gov- a title to: the Jand as valid| interest in the hunt, its amusing ‘ie. The result is a novel un-
Dated this 28th day of Senator. 1952. ernment has agreed that the morally and legally as that fe was explained. He was Speakably sombre, undeniably

money should be divided equally African tribes which themselves | °‘Tered the role of decoy. Retreat powerful,

between the Labour Welfare may have wandered there only! #5 impossible, “Remember, one Some will shrink from it; those
Fund, the Rehabilitation Fund and « generation before. jhand for your eyes,” said some- who open it will be torn between
a special fund for research and ‘one, as Grimble dived. A credit- fascination and repulsion; those

Registrar of Trade Marks

as |CALYPSOS





experimental work on irrigation. ‘Our Duty iad veers, oe horror and > — it oo realise me
7 umour whi Os! s pi e
Last Train to San Fernando These white minorities, en-'his telling. “ rove has been to exhibit man’s dig-



ie
REAL ESTATE In a Calabash

eee | I Don’t want no woman ern-! nity. not his degradation,
:

couraged by past British gov i
SRA AND AR ae _ anes . Africa, and. Snares TWENTY GREAT TALES OF
Lrogress that hes ost all the) Native customs are a snare for MURDER, Edited Helen Mc-
*

SHARES — 383 shares -n The Berpedce Brown Skin Gal
Shipping & Trading Co.,ltd. Aspe” | Woman Police ‘am
Cottle, Catford & Co,, No, 17, Histo” been made, i ; i
: 3 Samson and Delilah ‘ the young officer. Grimble was coly and Brett Halliday. Ham-
Street, Bridgetown 29.10.5260. | Hora. § cannot be abandoned. Yet taught the important rite of mond Hammond, 10s. 6d. 286

ae ie ele to or oe a belching by a little girl as charm- Pages. A score of offeri by the

on e

SE Country | Jamaica Hurricane

THE HOUSE Country
Road, St” Michael standing on 4 Acres,| Xmas Melodies-Charlie Kunz
PoMcods, 33 Perches of land. Apply.] All by yourself in the moonlight

COTTLE, CATFORD — CO, 14 sy ay. | Caroline

ing as her name, which was Cream of contemporary ican
British model, would Movement of Clouds. Unfortunate. thriller-writers—if cream is the:

have precisely this effect. The|ly, on a ceremonial occasion, his W0rd.

problems of multi le Ow. S FIDELITY, B
In Carlisle Bay oe base at me belch was twice as loud as that of _ TOWARD: TD) y



: his superior officer, who could Hugh L’A. Fausset, Gollancz, 15s.’
Diamond Rin Scheuhersinc Pincetice Evcitanuel, Mary 2°08 CNM be Solved in this only with difficulty be persuaded 237 pages. The philosophy of &
M. Lewis, Mary. E. Caroline, Turte ™@nner. It would lead stra \4hat this was the trick of an ail- °°”sitive modern man expounded
LGUIS L. BAYLEY Lady’ Mosieen, Bel Gueen. K Bpetac’ NY Sind Derbariom ing stomach an act of God $s en Poe eee ot ee
» as ' . R. D’prtac ; ; : ‘ ; ‘
Bolton Lan Pr W. Smith. ‘| A graver situation arose when her belief in the re of hu-
fe MMetet Viet. 2 Radar, Jenkins “,, Mr. Alport has no doubt t

Grimble’s wife, Missis, expecting ™anity.
Roberts

it is the duty of the Bri
ARRIVALS to stay in ica, that British

Schooner Lucille M. Smith, 74 tons, °2Pital (spent on sensible pro-
from British Guiana under Captain EF. jects and not absurd gambles
zg me 4 Sa to the Schooner like the groundnuts scheme) is

ners SOC! nm.

Schooner Emeline, 73 tons, from British SSential if Africa is ever to pro-
Guiana under Captain G. Sealy. Con- S8ress,
sieved to the Schooner Owners’ Associa- “Hope,” he concludes “ies

jon, ‘

M.V. Jenkins Roberts, 204 tons, from With us and with us alone. By
Trinidad upeer Captain G. Fergusson. our patience, statesmanship and

a baby, chanced to give a scent —LES.

hottle to a village girl, Voice-of- ae a i

\the-Tide, who later called on the

Grimbles, in tears. After halfan RAYES OF EXCHANGI

hour, the matter was cleared "e.
A high-born Gilbertese lady, in OCTOBER 29, 1952

the. Segk Sanathe of perecire. ciel ca Cee 4 e108 Pre PEACOCK & BUCHANS PAINTS

NEW SHIPMENT — AT LOWER PRICES






TODAY'S NEWS FLASH

MODEL STEAM ENGINES

GANS. coaves i] BRADSHAW & CO.

BUBBLE SETS
ALS



the ‘comfort of her husband, hand- Bankers | 707/10% Pr.
ing over some sweet-scented ob-



Cheques on
Sight or Demand (Over 100 years’ experience of Paint making)
Drafts 70 .5/10% Pr ioe







ANNU. Consigned _E. Harris & Co., Ltd. ¢ ject as the sign of her choice. ie
LLS TUITION. S/S. Canadian Crutser, 3.985 tons. success in Africa we can write 72 4/10% Pr. Cable WHITE — CREAMS — urs
ff Gtiesr ExPANDERS Lmany DIESEMAKNG, aiten, fH} THnidad- under Cantu Mt QHm Con FMR greater chapter in the! Votive ae dhe was of the honour” "Cotes de avane Br BATTLESHIP GREY — "RED ROOFING
te. Ete. Signe Gb world atplas, Maar r pres ona a Sp history of the contribution of|},:q a sweetheart 50% Pr. Siiver. 20% Pr. and MARINE PAINTS — VARNISHES
In The Toy Department rapid course of U.K. experts, M.V.Athelbrook, 286 tons, from Trini- the British people to world CANADA — STAINS — ANTI-FOULING PAINT
“ Y Write: Academy, P.O, Box 3 dad under Captain G. Williams. Con- {Civilisation than anything that “And if you had not had a 7 8/10% Pr. Cheques on
JOHNSON’S STATIONER San Fernando, Tefntag, B.W. signed to H. Jason Jones & Co ‘has gone before.” sweetheart?” asked Mrs. Grimble ue anit FOREST GREEN — $8.29 per gal
62—2n. t " . 8 ° ' be man rafts . z ts *
SSS : DEPARTURES It was painfully evident that 7» 9/10% Pr. Cable (Specially prepared for the Tropics)
== ” i S.S. De Grasse, for Southhampton World Copyright Reserved Voiece-of-the-Tide would not have 77 3/10% Pr. Currency 15 5/10% Pr.
: S.S. Strategist, for Montserrat ! —LES 50% Pr. Silver 20 Pr.
Schooner Laudalpha, for Dominica, m*
Schooner Confident. I.G., for St HOPE IN AFRICA, by C. J. M.

Lucia Alport (Herbert Jenkins 15/-),

Seawell ie

From GRENADA

GENERAL HARDWARE Sorecics

\
i RICKETT STREET (Opposite Post Office) — PHONE 4918

REALTORS LIMITED Leelee

AUCTION SALE STATIONERY




— SS a




















t OCTOBER, 29
{ L. Curtis, D. Hirst, K. Ablack, G.! MIX
Thursday, 30th, October (and it At pele P. Bullen, C. Wathey 4 wt ss
Jet. 105%, rom TRINIDAD ‘
not saneingen) Re, s GREYSTONE, HASTINGS J. Youkeles, M.. Newton EB,
On Thursday, 30th October, ri sy ‘iets ‘hee ee ETTER ne | y
order of Mr. Gordon Cole, we wil Just the little shop in the village {f ont 5
sell the furniture and household t » OCTOBER, 2 ,
ry “> Black Rock, ) A Walker, L Charlemange, P . %
St aichael, whats ‘staan Draw- where the Best Books, Stationery ' Canali, V. Brereton, W. Grace. DRINKS N See = before going elsewhere "
ing verge Longe pg rth ee and Xmas Cards are now on show. : 7
orris airs, tw o : 4 : ,
| and settee to, seat three, 18 spring : with Our aim is to please and we do it with ease. Q
ii bs jes, mirror sta . . |
Gining room table and six chairs, : weg y
nysta goblet an eprings, eressing We have the finest Selections of
eds with spr . 3
table and stool, weree ore. oe ° ® CARIBEE x
le, ti ack, .& ie ) ¥, :
table. ahogany: child's tall chair, For Perfect lean cids Xt + >) We are pleased to advise our Customers and
ce tale wedy oreeeiae’ an pee ' Fe inine Y body el out oes K{ SILKS
painted ‘press bureau, ‘cradle "ee : BITTERS . 4 te a ; i
send bureau, cradle 4 polsono! ’ riends that Mr. David MacKen
ot boas core. ipattressbe, rusts Mygiene thru oan ty | btai le i Bridget zie and Mr. Norman
bott rock and standing ubes 0 in. e in . ‘ ‘ 3 oe u
Bottom rockers, and standing nea o Bl ab getown ¥ Archer who both received a special training with the
burner and two muses hoe platen Bertin oles | :
7 Ss re cooker, electric
wear ever pressure cooker, electric USE Aching Jatnts a a a ae Flowered Crepe Satins $3.80—$5.00 per yard x Ford Motor Company Ltd. at Dagenham, England
Perfection stove with built in cines, Fight such é J ) x
even, medicine cabinet, paintings, th the doctor's of CARIBEE BITTERS are Flowered Crepe -_ $2.82—$4.00 ~ ha returned ae
Yinoleum, rugs, rubber mat, lats- Cystex start so. outstanding that they ‘os " nat a ie iin S have to Barbades and have joined the staff
ware, lemonade sets. cocktail sets, GY NOMIN must prove ent instantly improve the ap- ohoma Fabrics obtainable in the most exclusive ”
fake turtaine saa “went money hme ts , petite and add a zest to life. i She inst a > of our Company and are attached to our Service De-
crockery and cultery, decanters, chemist tex. S \9 des igns @ olours 2 —$2. per yard x :
flee percolator, vases, glass ice Gear. iy : ’ artment. Together with our present St: , av
pal, il lamps| with chimneys, TA LETS ® . Cystex alas ON SALE AT ALL 40 Inches wide % P 8 Pp uff you may
“| carrier, ¢ ing set, brea te > : i a
hoard and ienife, cut lass vases. B — bea “e GROCERS % be assured that you will receive efficient and satis-
ware ndwic ets, silve 3 ® > - -*
ariion ware sandwich sete, silver Nes ; Mss And don't FORGET 5% discount on all goods which 3 i . :
dish, silver: butter dish and toast py ve mo me Re Medical ES = = = makes it 5 cents less in everv dollar than any other % factory service.
ack. ive erving dishes an ess 25 years. i : ;
ce Gishts “mre, fruit stand, ee Remember when you do your shopping with us Store in Barbados.
pyrex plates an ishes 00K, Effective— Safe.
azines, ik buckets, milk iffective—and Safe— - :
siebasines, | aeamers, oelle, we deliver to your door hy Motor Van. | eer
kitchen utensils, 8 flower drums, ‘ =! :
fowl pens oS et shed a” af KNIGHT’S DRUG { ~
hose, lawn crib, room, shovel,
ete. and many other items A E. TA YZOR LIVUPD
Inspection on day of Sale from O | es e = Ch | M ER
otis STORES CENTRAL EMPORIUM aries Mc Enearney o.. Lt
TERMS CASH. : COLERIDGE STREET — Dial 4100 , © :
REALTORS LIMITED Sole Distributor Cnr. Broad & Tudor Sts. |
ee en 304 Bou OOS4-04 ~ pn !
mare — So” POO OS @ on ak ae —













A \ ‘










LET'S GET UP ON THIS RISE
HERE! WE CAN GET A BETTER
VIEW OF THE SURROUNPING




. BIG STAR!

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1952



circus |

GROUNDS |

CALLING NUM SER OWE.
MARE YOU MECE VING ME >
Over... f- eae

'0 BETTER



NZ

«
H

STAMINA OF AN
ox!

NOW THAT THEY'RE





BIG STAR, ARE Your] [WHERE'S MISS L
ma ie :
a's





|S SHOULD BE



DAY << WAS \
OUR. WEDDING} \







= HASN'T RETURNED,
MR. KIRBY.10 1SN'T
_ SHE STILL ON
STAGE?




{TLL GO WITH YOu
TAKE ME WITH

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





———————










BY CARL ANDERSON



NUMGER ONE HEAE.,.
RECEIVING YOU LOUD AND CLEAR.



Prevent tooth decay! Use refreshing LisreRIN® Tooth Paste
which checks cavity formation these 3 important ways.
1, LISTERINE Tooth Paste helps remove destructive
bacteria.
2. LISTERINE Tooth Paste attacks dull filra which
holds bacteria against tooth surfaces.
3. LISTERINE Tooth Paste even helps to remove
Sect
Brushing with LisTsRINE Tooth Paste after every meal helps
reduce tooth decay, polishes your teeth whiter, brighter chan
ever, CHILDREN LOVE ITS FRESH, MINTY FLAVOR.

ee

Especially important for children!

THATS THE

Check Tooth Decay
LAST STRAW )° ig

This Pleasant Way!






\ wail
Made by the make




rs of famous LISTERINE,





<2 — a. rn ee



Usually NOW Tins Libbys Evap: Milk ....







Tins Mortons Oatmeal ..
Tins Farex ...........

Tins Semolina .
Pkgs. S, B. Crys.



ANP...ON THE NEXT RIOGE, A PATHET!C, WORN
FIGURE STRUGGLES TO KEEP MOVING!

ee", Phd

ENTRIES CLOSE ON
FRIDAY, THIS WEEK AT 4 P.M.

WIN $40.00 rst prize

IN ADVOCATE XMAS CARD COMPETITION

any size or shape

to novelty card

Their decision wi)! be final.







ENTRY consolation prizes of $5.00 each.

A selection of the cards will be displayed at the
at the Barbados Museum.

can start sending in their entries now.

All cards should be addressed to the Editor, The





SO

SCOT SEE PFOOOLOO DS



_ ee
5) 4
PLEA

OOOO SLOP ELLIO EIS










Tins Ovaltine (Large) ...00......c0000. $1.22 — $1.10 Tins Oak Pow: Milk (3 Ib
Bottles Chiver's Mincemeat... . 123 — 62 — Tieeoep sess ws
Tins Imperial Ox : Sausage. 69 — 58 Nag Mile i.....oon., as
Tins Lym Valley Sweet Corn..... 40 — 36 Tins Tono feet
Tins Craw: Ufillit Biscuits .. . 144 — 118 Tnis Cow & Gate Milk Foo
Bottles Carib Beer .........0...0:ccc5 24 — 20 Tins Birds Custard Powder .......

Tins Larsie Rolled Oats ..........

Preference will be given to cards with a Barbadian or West Indian flavour and
YOUR The judging will be done by a judging committee which will include the Editor.
Prizes will be as follows: First — $40.00; Second—$20,00; Third—$10.00; and two
Advocate’ Stationery and later

The closing date for the competition is 4.00 p.m, om October 31st: but competitors

A

SSS SSS

Good News

for Women

Especially those who
Are Married

IT’s plain common sense to
be cautious about new ideas,
until they’re proved to be
good as well as new. But
mee you know that thous-
ands and thousands of wo-
men have tried out a new
idea, and found it better in
ere way, it’s sheer preju-
dice to cling to the old-
fashioned method

Undreamed of Comfort

TAKE Tampax, for example.
This new completely differ-
ent form of monthly sanitary
protection has brought un-
dreamed of comfort to

countless women, who hesi-
tated at first about testing
it. Designed by a doctor,
with specialised knowledge
vf women's problems on

‘those difficult clays’, Tampax
is worn internally, It's dain-
lier, safer, simpler. It’s quite
invisible and cannot. cause
embarrassment chafing or
discomfort. Easily dispos-

IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE

ee ess e_———S
BY DAN, .BAgRY SPECIAL OFFERS AVAILABLE THURSDAY TO SATURDAY AT ALL BRANCHES _
. SS = a

. $ 30
3.35





SEND FOLLOW THESE RULES CAREFULLY

The competition is open to all readers of the ‘Advocate’ and cards can be of

IN Cards can be made by any process—painting, drawing, photographic, ete.

A competitor can enter any number of cards, but all cards must be original work.

lvocate, Bridgetown.



PAGE NINE

.
»

[COCOA APPAR?

we

*

PLES

POLE LEPC LEET

> able, too,

®

‘

g A Personal Test

Sa

x Wuy not test Tampax your-

ss self? Write or call at the
address below and ask for a

% free sample of either Regu-

x lar Tampax No. 1 (suitable >
% for all normal needs) or
% Super Absorbent Tampax ¢$
|S No. 2, which givés 40% S
% more absorbency for those ¢
% who need more than average 3
x protection, Samples will be \
sent under plain cover, s
X »
*. ‘
g KNIGHT'S Lb, *
x No, 33 Broad Street. x
s x
.

OPO POOOE LOAVES %



E

a
ie

on

ar

3;

Zi 83

Meswauge)

fll a |

SMEESPESESSY wwa Oo

thi

UC

irsday
t con:

in Th
er of

1 the
ects a
Miche
| Roor
rris C}
i sette
shions,
ing ro
fet, ca
gle be
le and
le, tor
> mahe
uble la
ht ct
inted £
d bed,
ttom
pirs, 7
rner ar
ar ever
ister, Pp
rfectior
Ph, me
oleum,
re, len
nplete
ard, ©
yokery
Yee pe
il, oil
amel ¢
ard om
rlion Ww
lis, sity
sily
sils
t dit
x pl
azinet
5 r
tchen i
wl pen

sh







Inspect!
a.m

EAL’

PAGE TEN

—_——





RICHER WINS CAMBRIDGESHIRE



SUNNY BRAE SECOND
GARRISON HACK THIRD

(From Our Own Correspondent)







Mr, Greville Bayliss’ th
t £.affingham at He

Gethin wom the Cambridge
«Xeiting race here. this aft
Garrison Hack for second p
‘There vere adverse rumours
abecut Richer yesterday and he
eased in betting to 100 to 6
despite his trainer de ng the
rumours, Sunny Brae s ed at 66
to 1 and Garrison Hack at 50 to

1,

There was a last n samble
on Antrycide who came down to



vw to] illover and
\ hen kea t course
down to W to 1 wt = co-
evournt with Cap of Gold.

, the hela ¢ mo the dip
there were only four horses with

ehance—HVC , Garrison
Hack on the fat side and Richer
and Brunetto on the stands side.

Richer had been tracki the

racemaking Brunnetio at the





bushes and as soon as Gethin be-
gan to ride him there was im-
mediate response. He took
leod in the dip and then
up the pill in fine style

Garr'son Hack mastered HVC
on the fay side and then int

3rae, Sialina and Fleeting Mon
put in strong finishing eff«
these were all just too late

Diflicult To Train
Mr.,Bayliss and his friends hav
wor a lot of money Richer
who proved difficult to train while
the ground was hard, Richer
great progress when the rain came
but it was a fine feat on the part
©! trainer Staffingham to win this

race with him.

HVC ran a fine race until the
last furlong but failed Jo stay.
Last year’s winner Fleeting Mo-
ment came with a very

over

and only narrowly missed a
place.

Garrison »-Hack appeared the
likely -winner a_ furlong out.

Brunetto ran his usual race and
found few to beat him again,

Hilltop who had been well be-
hind throughout put in a strong
late run to take eighth place be-
hind Fleeting Moment,

Kriss Kringle showed up well
early on, but then finished last
and Valdesco was never seen with
a chance.

Nicky Nook was another who
was never in the race but Long-
stone ran well for a‘ long way
and Was still not far behind
coming into the dip.



“

Two Farmers
W. MURRAY WOOD, 35-year-
old farmer, is to captain Kent
County Cricket Club again next
season, Another farmer, 41-year-
old TOM CRAWFORD, will again
lead the second XI.

late run a,

NEW MARKET, Oct. 29
ree-year-old colt Richer trained
near Epsom and ridden by Ken

ire by two lergths after an
ernoon. Sunny Brae just beat
lace by a short head.

How The
Indians

Will Play

The full itiner

ket tournament

the
tne

for
petwee,

ary
chi





We Indies and the Indians wa
released here yesterday.

I'he visitors will play five test
matches against the West Indies.
One Test will be played in
Jainaica, Barbados and Britivh
Guiana, and two in Trinidad. In
iddition there will be a Colony

in each of the major

and Aworday matches

iga t the local Indian commu-

iy Both in British Guiana and
Trinidad

The tourists are expected to

England in the Golfito on

wwe 26th of December, arriving

* Trinidad between Janauary 4th
nd 6th

After a few days in which to
get off their sea legs, the team
open their with a two-day
game against a team of East In-
South Tyinidad on the
2th of January, fol-

tour

dian in

10th and

lowed by the Colony Match
against Trinidad beginning on the
14th January and continuing un-
til the 19th.

The First. Test Match will com-
mence in Trinidad on the 22nd
Ta and continue for six

The team fly over to Barbados

ni play Barbados between the
3ist January and the 5th of
February, and the second Test

will commence two days later on
the 7th February.

‘Tne tourists travel to British
Guiana for their match against
an East Indian-team om the 17th

and 18th February, and then play
British Guiana from the 20th un-

til the 25th.
The Third Test Match opens
in British Guiana on the 28th

February, continuing until the

6th March, and on the 11th

March, the Fourth Test opens at

Trinidad continuing until — the

17th.

At the conclusion of the match,
visitors fly on to Jamaica for
fourth Colony. game begin-

ning on the 20th March, and

the Fifth and Fin&l Test will be-
gin on or about the 28th March
and end on April 3rd when the
visitors sail for the United King-

dom,

i}

the



OIL TANK TOWN WILL GROW
IN THE BUSH
From JOHN REDFERN

NAIROBI.
Kenya is to have a new oil re-
finery. It will cost £50,000,000
and produce 6,000,000 tons a Yea
To house the storage tanks and
workers, a new town will be
built where today there are palm
trees, scrub, swamps, coral, fish-
ermen’s huts, and a few solid
houses put up for holiday-makers.
This site is on the mainland
south of the Likoni ferry to the
island*of Mombasa.
Kenya was surprised

by. the

announcement of thcSnew refin-
ery. The surprise was arranged
for in’ preparatioris for the new
town.

Six months ago, when the big
oil companies were looking

round for new refinery sites, one
eompany chose Aden,

“Why don’t some of you com?
to East Africa?” said Mr. Arthur
Hope-Jones, in charge of Kenya’s
commerce and industry.

Soon after that Shell
man to explore sites. On his
advice the oil company almost
made up its mind. But two things
had to be fixed: plenty of water;
no land profiteering.

Kenya officials speeded
planning of a 150-miles pipeline
from Mzima Springs, a_ hippo
drinking point, to Mombasa towa
and port. This has reached the
stage of advertising for tender:.

sent a

the

At the same time, secrecy
descended on the tank tows
talks. The purpose was to stop

site values from jumping.
Quietly, arrangements wer

made for the Kenya Gover
ment to secure the neces
land — about 34 square mil

under its Land Acquisition Acts,



~—

| They Do It Evers

ILA GOT |
MORTICE ATA |
WEAK MOMENT |
AND TALKED
HIM INTO GOING
FOR TWO EXTRA

ROOMS it
THE NEW
ABODE dees






which prevent anyone holding out
for exaggerated prices,

Land values are now “frozen”

‘nd a colleetor will be appointed
to control payments.
_ Publication of the land acquisi-
tions in the official Gazette broke
the secret—and meant that the
project was firm,

The building of the tank town
will employ ahout 300 Europeans
and 3,000 @frieans, as well as
Sikh artisans, More Africans will
be brought in to build roads, staff
houses, guest houses, canteens,
and clubs,

Cement made
be their material.

Mr. H, L. Adams. secretary for
commerce and industry, told me
recently: ‘This is the biggest thing
~ has happened to us industrial-
y.

“Apart

from corel will

from the essential

safeguarding of oil supplies, a
large amount of the investment
will come back to us in Kenya.

There will be a new demand for
cur products, and increased local
spencing.” .

The Kenya
anxious to balance
agricultural development
en industrial counterweight,

Government is
the Colony’s
with

Up

to now the largest industrial
unit has been a soda works em-
pioying 1,500 Afr’eans.

Mombasa has seen a lot. For



centuries Arab dhows took slaves

hrough its port. Now oil brings
ew end weleome traffic to heart-
en the people. who far months
have been pre-occuvied with
lowleseness and agitation,

FOOTNOTE: Mz'ma, the name

star scherpe. is the Swa-
“heolthy.”

London Express Service

«he v

‘Time

Aepinered US Patent Ofee





AND A
BE





; Low! ah
~~? "hh
wea / =
° S s ~ ks



at WE NEED A DINING ROOM

GUEST ROOM
ONLY $6,000 MORE”,



BARBADOS





ADVOCATE



WINNER of 10 consecutive races in his homeland defore being flown to the U.S., Wilwyn, English-
owned four-year-old colt, cops the first running of the $50,000 Washington, D.C., international race at
the Laurel, Md., track. Ruhe (on outside), the U.S. hope, finishes second and Zucchero, another Eng-
lish-owned, is third. The race was run over the mile-and-a-half distance on the turf. (International)

SHOOTING :





Major Warren
Wins N.R.A.
Silver Medal

Major A. S. Warren won th>
N.R.A. Silver Medal with a total
of 257 points out of a possible 29)
as the Intercolonial Rifle Shcoting
Competition continued at the Gov-

ernment Rifle Range yesterday
evening.

Mr. F, D. Davis and R.S.M.
H. B. G. Marshall tied for the

first place in the number two open
event shoot from the 300 yard:
bank with competitors firing two
sighter and seven rounds to count.
They scored 34 pcints each out ot
a possible 35 points,

In Class B, Mr., E. J. Parry
secured first place by secring 33
points out of a possible 35.

Captain D. B. St. Aubyn. visiting
marksman from British Guiana
scored 46 points out of a possible
50 in the No. 7 open event from
the 600 yard. bank with ccmpeti-
tors firing ten rounds. This com-
petition was in Class A, while in
Class B, Mr. G. Lewis of the
Trinidad team scored the same
awn of points out of a possible
vu.

Mr.
totalled

M. Hunter
234 ~=points
H.P.S. total of 255
secure first place in the Grand
Aggregate in Class A. while in
Class B, Mr. R. O. Browne totalled
221 points for Barbados to secur
first place.

of Trinidad
out. of an
points, to

‘, No. 2 Event shoot at 6.30 a.m,
oe ‘the 300 yards bank, H.P.S.

CLASS A, PRIZE LIST

Pls. $ c.
Mr. F. D. Davis (B’dos) a“ 8.00
R.S.M. H. Marshall (B’dos) 34 8.00
Maj. A. S. Warren (B'dos) 33 4.00
Mr. N. J. Driver (B.G.) 33 3.40
Maj. J. E. Griffith (B'dos) 33 2.00
Mr. J. Crooks (T’dad) a 1,00
CLASS B. PRIZE LIS? 9
Mr. E. J. Parry (B'dos) 33 5.00
Mr H. C. Boyce (B’dos) 32 3.60
Mr. D. Yearwood (B'dos) 32 2.00
Lt. E. Goddard (B'dos) 32 1.50
Mr. R. O,. Browne ‘B’dos) 31 1.00
Mr. L. F, Hasse'! (B'dos) 21 SO
No. 7 event from 600. yards bank
H.P.S. 60
CLASS A. PRIZE LIST
Pts. $c
Capt. D. E. St. Aubyr
(B'dos) 46 10.00
Mr. J. Crooks (T'dad! 45 6.00
Capt K Gittens (T’dad) 44 4.00
Mr. V. O'Neil (T’dad) a4 3.0
Maj, A, Warren (B'dos) a4 2,00
Capt. C Warner (B'dos) 43 100
CLASS B.
Mr. G. Lewis (Tdad) 6 5.00
Set F. Edwards (B'dos) 42 3.00
Mr. &. J. Parry (B’dos) a 2.00
Mr. L.. Hassell (B’dos) a2 1.00
Lt. E. Goddard (B'dos) 41 1.00
Mr. K. S. Yearwood (B’dos) 39 50
Grand Aggregate H.P.S. 255.
CLASS A. PRIZE LIST
Pits, $ ©.
Mr. M. Hunter (T’dad) 234 15.00
Mr. J. Sutton (B.G.) 232 12.00
Capt. D. St, Aubyn (B.G.) 231 9.00
Maj. E. Manley (B.G.) 229 6.00
Mr. J, Crooks (T’dad) 28 3.00
Col. J. Connell (B'dos) 228 2.00
CLASS B,
Mr. R. O. Browne (B'dos) 221 7.50
Mr. ©, J. Parry (Bdos) 216 6.0
Mr. G. Lewis (T’dad) ..., 24 4.50
Lt. E. Goddard (B'dos) .. 213 3.00
P.C. QO. Shepherd (B'dos) 213 1.50
Mr. L. Hassell (B'dos) 100 1,00



Anchor Cup
Shoot Today

The following have been chosen

to represent Barbados in the
shoot for the “Anchor Cup™
against Trinidad and_ British

Guiana at 12 noon today,

Maj A S. Warren (Capt,).. Col.
J. Connell, Capt, C, FE. Neblett,
Mr, T. A. L, Roberts, Mr. M. R.
De Verteuil. Mr, F. D. Davis;
Extra—Capt. C. E. Warner,

ie. o8
lo

By Jimmy Harlo |











+sANO THAT'LL














SOCCER ON

THE INSIDE

Contributed by:
DESMOND HACKETT
ROBERT FINDLAY.

HENRY ROSE

TERENCE ELLIOTT
VICTOR RAE
Edited by:
MARSHALL FALLOWS

Korean referee Duk Chun Khim
(pronounced Kim), an Olympic
Games official now staying at the
Korean Legation in London, would
bke to “guest” at an English
match before he returns.

Khim is doing the rounds of the
London grounds—as a Is, 9d.
spectator,

. °

Spurs are not the only people
who are hoping that George Robb,
Iinchley amateur outside left, will
play regularly for Tottenham.

Says Walter Winterbottom, the
England team manager: “If Robb
continues in First Division foot-
ball and gets that little extra ex-
perience he needs, he will almost
certainly get an England cap.”

Which means that Robb is on
the short list for the problem posi-
tion in our international side,

te * Me

Barnsley’s Angus Seed, the man
who made the Robledo brothers
and sold them to Newcastle for
£27,500, is still working on the
“football in the family” theory.

He took Bill Anderson, Silks-
worth Juniors (Durham) half
back, on to the Oakwell pay-roll
and now is giving trials to brother
Ron, a back from the same club,

Arthur Jefferson pleaded with
Aldershot manager Gordon Clarke
to give 20-year-old right-back
Stanley Jefferson a trial. Now the
brothers are playing together at
back for Aldershot.

Soon the Jeffersons will form a
new partnership—Stan (just out
of the R.A.F.) is expected to join
Arthur’s fish and chip business
near the Q.P.R. ground.

* + *

Two 20-year-old starlets on the
Wanted List are Stan Keery,
Shrewsbury inside right who “has
everything” and Jim Kelly, Wat-
ford’s attacking wing half with a
colossal throw,

Keery is a Sammy Crookes dis~
covery; went on the Derby ground
staff on leaving school. West Ham
are watching him.

Daily Dunean thinks Kelly
would fit in well at Luton.

* * He

The goal-getting feats of Black-
pool wing wizard Stanley Mat-
thews—three this season—have
raised the inevitable question:
What is the maestro’s post-war
total? The answer is more thaty
you think—12,

* * *

Soccer fans don’t forget—fans
of the Queen’s Park Rangers
variety. Club directors and the
Supporters Club combined to raise
a fund (standing at £750) for the
welfare of eight-year-old Stanley
Hudson, son of the late Q.P.R
player, :

*

Crack amateur who wouldn't
mind a game or two with a pro.
club is Walthamstow’s Jim Lewis,
man of many caps, member of
Britain’s Olympic XI., and hold-
er of an Amateur Cup medal.

Says Jim: “I played a few
games for Orient last season, No
one wants me this year.”

Yet centre forward Lewis can
rightly claim to be the best marks-
man in the amateur business,

* * *
Don’t write finis to the Dev
Dooley episode now that he i
back in the Sheffield Wednesday
team—and scoring goals.

Resentment over the club's su
gestion that bustling Derek (6ft.

3ins. 18st. 8lb.) was being vic-
timised by referees is still
strong.

Next move: A protest to the
Football Association from the

Referees Ppspeiation.

Two Grimsby men who don't shy
at the how-old-are-you question
are George Tweedy,
class goal-keeper for |:
inside forward Bilis
George admits to 3; Billy is 37

; , :





Points to pitits switch has been,
made by George Stephenson
(brother of the famous Clem) who
akes over a public house at Hali-

‘anager of Huddersfield.
° e ©

rate Gt.
soldier a

Liverpoal
Arnell, 18-year-old



ward, one of their best captures.
. . e

Portsmouth think
forward Maurice Owen, who r?*-
fused to leave Swindon earl
in the season, will soon change
his mind. Director Harry * Wain

has been keeping .an eye on
Maurice.

Other names being whispered
it Pompey are Cliff Holton
(Arsenal) and Johnny Morris
(Derby).

Newcastle United won't se

much of director Stan Seymour

came

‘ax following his resignation as.

NETBALL :
Arthurs,

former Sussex Youth cenire fore

that centreâ„¢

match days until he finds that
inside forward. Says Stan: “I’m
just a worker willing to learn it
our Way.”

—L.E.S.

Jean Borotra
‘LONDON

In 1926 the crowds at Wimble-
don were captivated by the tena-
cious play of a little Frenchman.
He was forceful. He was fast. His
enthusiasm was enormous and his
energy was such that he used to
bounce around the courts like a
little rubber ball, In faet, he be-
known as the “Bounding
Basque”.

Jean Borotra’s victory, for such
was he, in the men’s singles was as
popular this side of the channel
is it was in France. One of the
people in England, though, to
whom it mattered little was a five-
yesr-old boy. He was Anthony
John Mottram, whose interests lay
in Comie Cuts and sticky toffees.

But 26 years later the same Tony
Mottram, now Britain’s No, 1 lawn
tennis player, had good reason to
recognise the sxili oi the Bounding
Basque. For when they met in the
International Indoor Lawn Tennis
match at Queen’s Club last month,
Borotra despite his 54 years,
proved too good for the English-
man,

These matches between England
and France have taken place, ex-
cept for the wartime interruptions,
every year since 1929. And in
every one the fabulous Jean Bor-
otra has played his part. He cap-
tained the first team in 1929 and

.he has captainéd France every

succeeding year.

In his younger days he won the

imbledon title twice, in 1926
and 1928. In addition he won the
doubles title three times in part-
nership with Brugnon (twice) and
Lacoste, and the mixed doubles
title with the amazing Mm? Leng-
lea.

While he was at the height of
his fame, he and his colleagues
Lacoste and Cochet enabled France
to win the Davis Cup six years in
succession, beating the United
States in the final five times and
Great Britain once. And as in the
Davis Cup, so at Wimbledon did
France reign supreme, with suc-
cessive championships from 1926
going te Borotra, Lacoste, Jorotra,
Cochet, Lacoste and Cochet.,

Quick Eye

The years have dealt lightly
with Jean Borotra. The quickness
of eye is still unimpaired, the
yolleying is still as delicate, The
thinning hair and the slightly
quicker breathing indicate the
passing time.

Age too has curtailed his stay-
ing power and has limited his
mobility at the net. But for all
that he is still a great player and
capable for short periods of play-
ing all the shots which he pro-
duced so well when at the height
of his fame.

Against Mottram it was indeed
almost as if the clock had been
turned back. Borotra, supposedly
hard-put to last a three-setter, not
only turned the tables on_ his
younger opponent but finished in-
finitely the stronger.

Mottram took the first set 6—3
and appeared on his way to a com-
fortable win, He made a bad mis-
take in the second to lose his ser-
vice in the terth game and Borotra,
anplying pressure with the skill
ofa master, had quickly pulled up
to one set all.

For most people of his age, and
‘c@rtainly as far as. the spectators
were concerned, honour was satis-
fied. But Borotra was making no
gesture. He was after victory and
as he continued to crowd on the
pressure it was the younger player
who cracked, leaving Borotra with
yet another victory for France.

This little man with the secret
of cternal youth has been playing
tennis for so long now that he
seems like a legend, But on the
nislay at Queen's he is still very

1 Peal, .

A couple of vears ago he was
asked what his ambition was. For
a man who has won every honour
the game has to offer the question
could have proved difficult to
answer, But Borotra was ready
with-his reply: “to continue to en-

the game for a few years yet”.



Malvern Defeat
Notre Bame 18—3

Malvern Netball team contin-
ued their unbeaten performanced
by defeating Notre Dame 18-—-3
at Culloden Rad yesterday af-
ternoon.

For Malvern, H. Springer scor-
@? 13 and N. Cumberbatch 5,
while G. Ostourne scored Notre
Dame's 3

Malvern
matches.

On Friday afternoon Malvern
will oppose a team at St. Michael’s
Girls’ School,

have played eight



Sportsman’s Diary:

£25,000 FOR
FULL-BACK?

NO club could be more cofi-
cerned about their fullbacks than
Chelsea. They have three out of
action, JOHNNY , HARRIS, SID
TICKRIDGE and JIMMY LEE. So
Il asked manager TED DRAKE
whether he would join the biddin:
for England’s left back BI
ECKERSLEY, of Blackburn.

The idea of paying a big fee for
a back appalled this old player,
whose exploits as a centre-forward
so often made headlines in the
"thirties.

“£25,000 for a full-back?” he
questioned, as though this would
be the height of folly. “For an
inside-forward, yes.”



® Not So Easy Now \

So we sorted out the players |
for whom Mr. Drake would think |
of paying such a fee. “Goalkeep- |
ers’ You can pick them up on any |
common—although even that’s not
so #asy now.”

And so we went on, until we
agreed on the conclusion that only
wing-halves and inside-forwards
were worth that much, Oh, yes,
and centre-forwards, The glamour
boys, in fact.

Still, seriously, Chelsea must be
worried about their backs, They
have been looking for one, They
considered JACK MANSELL, the
Brighton left-back, now more like-
ly to go to Cardiff,

“There is nothing available that
appeals to me,” Drake says. It
looks as though he will have to
try to get a player who is not
supposed to be “available.”

Sedgman’s Service

FRANK SEDGMAN, undisputed
champion of amateur jawn tennis,
began work to-day after a seven
months’ honey-moon tennis tour,
during which he won the Wim-
bledon and United States men’s
singles titles.

And what is the 24-year-old
Australian doing for a “living”?
He is serving petrol’from the
pumps of his motor service sta-"
tion near Kooyong tennis stadium,
Melbourne,

This from-baseline-to-pumpline
transformation is one of the
means by which it is hoped to
keep Sdgman in the amateur ranks.
Another was a £5,000 wedding,
gift from Australian sportsmen. |
One Thing Certain!

The Victorian manager of the!
oil company for whom Sedgman |
operates his station said the com-
pany had not given it to him.
‘They had “merely helped with the |
negotiations and lent him some
money.”

One thing is certain, Sedgmcen
will help Australia defend the
Davis Cup later this year.

Not until after this will Sedg-
man decide what to do with his
service—give it to the Australian
motoring public or apply it, with
the rest of his shots, to the show-
manship of the professional tennis
circus.







More Boxing

As newly elected president of
the Amateur Boxing Association,
Mr, EDWARD BOOTH, a retired
factory welfare superviser now
living in the Cotswold village of
Upper Brailes, faces a _ longer-
than-usual-season,

Reason is that the amateur box-
ing season, which normally closes.
at the end of May will next year
be extended to June 6 to enable
clubs to promote Coronation tour-
naments,

The ABA have also decided to
sergd a team to Wroclaw, Western
Poland for the European cham-
pionships next year (May 17-24)
despite a minority move urging
the ABA to keep out of interna-
tional affairs.

Popular

On holiday here is Mr. L. L.
McKANE from Guernsey. He is
secretary of the Channel Islands
committee which arranges tours

Heolex Watches



for English amateur soccer clubs.

Mr. McKane tells me that dis-
appointment awaits some clubs.
“You’d be surprised at the num-
ber of clubs asking to come over,”
he says. ‘

The Channel Islands may send
a team here this season, “We have
been invited but I cannot say
whether we are accepting,” says
McKane,

‘No,’ To Chelsea

NEIL TURNER, 23-year-old
left-half who plays for Eastern
Transvaal and is expected to be
included in the South African
team to tour Britain next year,
has turned down an offer to join
Chelsea as a professional.

Turner wanted Chelsea to pay
the passage for his wife and
seven-month-old daughter to go to
England,

Chelsea’s agent in South Africa
refused to c » so.

2,000-A-Year
STANLEY PARLETT, a eae |

old opening batsman and vice-
captain of “Wembley Cricket Club, |

scored more than 2,000 runs in 53°

jmnings this season—L.E.S. |





-

: COMFORT

WE OFFER
LADIES’ NYLON VESTS

Small, Medium, Large



THURSDAY,




acanfitus-

i
;

“One half of the mind
urges restraint, the other
demands more — hence

; schizophrenia — which
afflicts trades union
' leaders in purticular!’ .

London Express Service.

LOUIS L. BAYLEY
Bolton Lane



| strides

OCTOBER 30, 1952

Man Makes 6ft.
Boots To Walk
On Thames

Mr. Dave Pegram, of Streatham,

| an expert canoeist. made two six-

foot “water-boots,” in which he
over the Thames as a

week-end pastime.

The boots, which are boat-
shaped and made of wood, took
him 18 months to make and test

He saw water-boots used by
touring canoeists in Austria, and
made his pair to resemble them.

“They are excellent on fast-
flowing water,” he said to-day,
“and are useful in rescue work.”

—L.E.S.

see

DANCE

NEXT SATURDAY NIGHT
at the “SHED”
with the B.C.L. CRICKETERS and
and their friends
Music by “Campbell's
ADMISSION —;



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Full Text

PAGE 1

HAKIIAIMis ADVOCATt llll KSIIAV. OCTOBKR 30. 1*5? RICHER WINS CAMBRIDGESHIRE SVNNl BRAE SECOND GARRISON HACK. TIIIRIl dr. in Our Own I %  %  p IMSaSaswAl I art. 29 Mi I %  liter an .hart head. %  Ootttl |. %  1 nnd Garrts in Hack How The Indian* Will Play %  %  %  n • nan. i will lw pi -idad. In i t>e%  %  d la U %  \. INN tilt i,l In con-nitlv# iic> ID hU homeland wfore being flown to the U.fl.. Wtlwyn. English owned fo.u nal old colt, copthe tint ruimlni of the SA0.000 Washington. DC, lntemaUonal race at I. Md., track. Kuhe (on oittalde), the U.B hope, finishes snood and Eacchero, another Ens h-,li owned. Ithird. The race *a* i over the mile .Mid a half dlsiJ i the turf. Jnh'rnaiioiii SIIIMmW: %  %  : I l Dimnilt T.i t ain while Major \\ arren WinsN.R.A. Silver Metlal %  .: Indlai I I lath G I %  U;.l.aiaio on ii. Llltli .irnvinc 1 niauary 4th *" % %  %  h,, ; h '" Major A S. Wuicn Won .lithe tm N II A Silver Medal with a t.ital ' %  %  "' ' %  • l! M l-i|. id on iht Comp-iiiion osatlnui ..IKI 12th of Januaiy. folcrnmont Rifle Range y< %  pi-ogrcs* when tin he O lecur Match evening. % %  mug on the Mr. F. D. Devi) B M ind cntinulnii unH. It G lifer hall I d for the 19th. hr-r ; HVC ran %  line raea until tieI. t Match will romevent shoot from the 30 ,, u( continue for %  mrni l * %  H fly over to Barbadi place. Tilt I .-.ii r v Rod Ihe 51 h of % %  rani dayi later on I ,;,-v. %  ',u SOCCER ON THE INSIDE sighter and seven rounds to count. i d ;ii p mbj each a possible 35 pOmlS I %  % %  I i V 1)1 .MdMl II \1 Kf.iT ft OBI Ul FINDL \\ HK.NRV ROSE II RBNCE I.LLIOTT VICTOR RAE i i l>\ MARSHALL FALLOW* Korean referee Duk Chun Khim ed Kim), an Olympic Cnmn official now staying .l ihe Koraan Legation in London, would like to "gueat" at an English match before he returns. Khim is doing the round-, <.f the 1 .on don grounds—a* a Is. M. ii he finds that Saya Stem "I'm /riling in learn It Jean Borotra q n,i t'limii Ihnry : £25,000 FOR FULL-BACK ? NO ciub could be more cofTcerned about lhir fullbacks than Chelsea. They h.ivc three out of %  Ction. JOHNNY HARMS. SID TICRrllDGE and JIMMY LEE. So I asked manager TED DRAKE whether he vvould Join the bidding for England's left back BILL ECKERSLEY. of Blackburn. The Idea of paying a big fee for a back appalled this old player, whose exploit* as a centre-for.. .j g so often made headlines in the 'thirties. "£25.000 for a full-back?" he n.cs iioned, as though this would be the height of folly. Tor an Inside'forward >cs." Nut So Easy Now So we sorted out the player-, for whom Mr. Drake would think of paying such a fee. "Goalkecporai You can pick them up on any "ommon—although even that's not so easy now." And KO we went cot. until wo .(greed on the conclusion that only wing-halve* and inside-forwards were worth that much. Oh. yes, .nd c* ntre-forwards. The glamour bom, in fuel. Still, seriously, Chelsea must be WOfrsg d BDOUt their backs. They n lorfting for one. They ronsidcred JACK MANSF.l.I.. UM Bilghlon loft-back, now more likely to go to Cardiff • There is nothing available that appeals to me." Drake says.. It looks as though he will have to try to get a player who is not supposed lo be "available." One half o/ the mind urges restraint, the other demandM mere — henct tchuoph.rn'.a — which afflict* trades union leader; amateur outside left, will sacured %  sj£ jilav regularly for Tottenham. ill of a possible 35. Says Walter Wlntrrbottom. the Captain D. B St Aubyn visiting England team manager: m;irksrnan from British Guyana continues in First Division footto British K" ed tfi points-out of a possible i>:ill and gets that little extra exSO In the No 7 open vi "nt from per lance he needs, he will 17th tn 6C '* y ard bank with crmpetiiert,ilnlv get an England cap." rig ten rounds This comWhich means that H WsU u) ll.s A. whllg in the sr...rt list for the problem poj-iClass B. Mr. G. Lewis of the lion in our International side, i Mutch ntiMi. Tr nl, ld l'm scored the same -;J n £ number of potnta out of a possible ilng S. ;l-ru.in s Service FRANK SEDGMAN, undisputed -hamplon of amateur lawn tennis, n were captivated by the lenabegan work to-day after a seven IOUS play of a little Frenchman, months' honey-moon tennis tour, was forceful. He was fast. His during which he won the Wimenthuslasm was enormous and his bledon and United States men's area such that he used to singles titles. i %  ounce around the courts like a And what IB the 24-year-old little rubber ball. In fact, he beAustralian doing for a 'iivlna"? in. known as the "Bounding He is serving petrol from the) %  -iue" pumps of his motor service sta' .lean Borotr.Vs victory, for such u<>n near Kooyong tennis stadium,; lf"Hoht> w -' l,p -" • men's singles was as Melbourne. popular this side of the channel This from-baseline-to-pumptine I is it was in France. One of the transformation is one of the' itiple In England, though, to means by which It Is hoped to i horn it mattered liul, was a livecee p sdgman in the amateur ranks. ;-"ll boy. He was Anthony Another was a £5,000 wedding John Mottram, whose interests lay ifi from Australian sportsmen. I m Comic Cuts and sticky toffees. Bul 26 years later the same Tony 0ne Xhinj! Certain The Victorian manager of the I Children grow up strong and healthy on Virol lue run to take cirzh"' place \*-Gu rot their match aajaJntt hind Pleating M I rnttlan teem on th. Krlngle shoui %  1 .iy. and then play t.ui\ on, but then nnished last British Qulaag frogn the lOtta unnnd Valdi seer with til the 25th. %  i h we. The third la Nicky N<-k wai was never in ihe race but LongFebruary, continuing until th %  tone ran well for ;i long ,.„, m Ihl ,, ln M .. ____-_ _, TrmM ri and was still not fa. bel ,.. Fourlh TpM 0|l( Ils .,, : ,^„ ^'^^ "[ .„ Trinidad continuing until ihe j| p s tofgj .r Us points, b rb tBO* Hill Anderson. SilksBorolra despite his 54 years. — aecun vrortfc Junlort iDurhaml half pioved too good for the Englishnno'iHin* ta eortnin Selumr- I Ihe match. Aggreau In Class A while In back, on to the Oakwell pay-roll San. wilhcu Aist a ,-fm^ fly on lo Jam.,. BM I i B Ml B 0 Browne totalled and now is giving trials to brothel These matches between England nLvis Cuu lXr this vear fourth Colony gme begin221 points fur Barbados to •ecui Ron, %  back from the same club. nni Fiance have taken place, exSri Um T (l nfler (hjs wU1 soUg,ng on the 2Utn March, and nrtt place. cept for the wartime interrupllons. ^ decide what to do with his mng im. Moltram. now Britain's No. 1 lawn Barmlry's Angus Seed, the man I( n nis player, had good reason to ho made the Hoblcdo brothers i, cognise the SKU. o ilie Bounding :''",;:'{,;,' t n tloriisii'd the eom; ,nd sold them 10 Newcastle foK Ba5qU(l For when they met in the '^"^.i „S Cven it to Z £27,500. is still working on the international Indoor Lawn Tennis ^. Sari "merelv^held with the the family" theory. ;il Q U ce„ s Club las. month. SS^^S lenWim' m e %  fm.tljall Virol provides all the essential ingredient, that growing children need. It is a highly concentrated health food that helps build strong bones, good teeth and sturdy limbs. Children love the flavour of Virol gad because they always take it willingly they get the utmost benefit from Its sjoodness. Tiro Farmer* W MURRAY WOOl old farr-. I '''1 Test will beCountjr Cricket Club P| '" about the 28th March season. AnotV.r fanaei d 0K April 3rd when the ol.i TOM t'KAWFORD, will again Wtors tall for ihe Unlied Xlngle iM t the taeo-irl XI ^W OIL TANK TOWN WILL GROW IN THE IWSir From JOHN REDFERN No. 2 Event shoot at 6.30 iTum the 35. I I V s 300 yards bank. H.P.S. Arthur Jefferson pleaded with every year since 1928 And !;*"• Aldershol manager Gordon i'l iko every one the fabulous Jean BorD oVv:. .|ldii H MMHll iH'tlo.' %  I I. ... give 20-year-old right-bacli otra has [laved his part. He caps-.mlrv Jefferson a trlsl Now the laUMd the nrst team in 1929 and hrnthers are playing together nt.hu has captained France every back for Aldershot. succeeding yet. Soon the Jeffenmnr, will form a In his younger days he won the new par:nershiD-Stan Oust out Wimbledon tftftwtcsj, in 1928 „( the R.A.F.l is expected to Join and 928. In addtUon he won the BSrvie) give it lo the Australian motoring public or apply it, with the rest of his shots, to the showmanship of the professional tennis (*(. r.i.,i. NAIROBI. iv m a "ii ref< i: 50.000,000 .ind produce g.OOO.OUd To hi..: %  and i< town built where today then h preveol snyooa holding out u & %  rices. m I it values Bra) now "frozen" %  B collector will be appointed * rol ii.iMiients. itlon .f Miin nd ssmrial %  %  ipalm ions in the official Cazctlc broke i i ^-^ N rsn/K ut Mr T. J P.r .B'do> Sir M C BOM Yn.i-.--l iBfloOoddsrd .B'ai arawna Arthur's ilsh and chip busine* near 'he Q.P.R. ground. TWO B^nssW-ald starlets on the Wiiiite, Shrew-bury Inside right I Hi : sveal -_, % %  .. =1 S22*!H JSi Klf J5, i L.iortlKlCochenabll France ,1 in. m. y.,d. b.r> lord'. allarkllW win half With ;. , h Davls Cu llx M '„ ln \ .x#b.r%l ll,L,„tll M I ',|l l> I trees, scrub, swamps, coral, BahIhe lecre.—and meant that thi ermen's h I lUd Project wa houses put UD for holldaj mal el iilldtna of the lank lowi This site Is on the mainland will employ nlwut 300 Europeans M v south "f the Likonl rerrj to the •"><< i.000 Vrioana, as well as JSS, island'of Mombasa s ^i' I n Africans will CLABS a Kenya was surprised by thi be brought In lo build roads, staff Mr o Li announeemenl ol th* gueal houses, ca n tea n a, J* 1 r en. The anrprlae wa i clubs. Ml „ f..i in preparatwms lor tht coral will town. be tht Mi ii i, Adnms secrafan f<'r industir. told me recently: Thli i Ch bugast thlna lhat has happened to us I rai/.i i i %  n ,i craea iT"i K Q ivm Bran r IVsi i .' ii.i,, Six months ago, arhen ihe big "it comp.une.\ii,. looking r. und for pau refinery sites, on %  nmlMIIV Hi%  %  •Why don't Some • ( t( Baal A-1 i'iinineice and Induatrj Soon after that Sh man to I •: : (>" ' %  advice |j a) almoai had to le Bxed plent) no land proliti I BUI sieeded the planning of a IM-mu 'rom Munis Bpringa, a hlpi drinking point, to Mombasa tow.. and port This has n stage of advertising hw tendei A* Ihe i im Un ,i on the tank to 1 .* i'i %  site values from funs] i mi tij mnde lot the Kenya cure l %  *l Mr 1 n-..*ll •B'da< I t (,,-!,1.1,1 iUIIlH> 41 Mr. SL a VasrsMSd in-ao*. as -i.'lid.-, ni II %  nil 21* ... (lod.Li.rd lctoi ItJ pi 0 s,.ph. iii iBdO.. 11J Mr I. Hn.ll %  i laefiad praaldanl ihe Amateur Boxing Associati douMea ntle three times n partM| EDWARD BOOTH, a retired ncrship with Brugnon (twice) and factory welfare supervlser now l-icoste and the nuxid doubles hvl *,„ lnr CoIsw ^ d vinae c of Ittl -with the amazing Mm. I.engUpp . ^uU**, faces a longer"while he was a, the height of ^K.^'^a^he amateur boxmg season, which normally closes, at the end of May will next year be extended to June 6 to enable lubs to promote Coronation tourii.iTucnts The ABA have also decided U ; scad a team to Wroclaw, Western | Poland for the European chain. plonsnlpa next year (May 17-241 despite a minority move urging the ABA to keep out of international affairs. Popular On holiday here Is Mr. L. L. j McKANE from Guernsey. He Is secretary of the Channel Islands Toll.-Mog is rtill as deUcate.' The eostirnittee which arranges tours thinning hair and the slightly n ^ & 'fl'S m '^u !" Th.,f dlT BO fans dont forget-fans quicker breathing indicate the Mr McKa netills inclhat disI the Queens Park Ranger, p^ng iimv %%"A^IJ£,J5 LTthe numAge loo has curtailed his stayYou d be surprised nt the numIng power and has limited his ber of clubs asking to come over. mobil.O. SI Uu net But for nil ^ T J* Ch niw u|-nd may wml succession, beating the United oloi -.ii Uirow Keen i covary; wenl on the Derby Pund Cri aX nmain once. And 1 ft on leaving school. West Ham j^yi, cup, so at Wimbledon did are watching him, France reign supreme, with sueDaily Duncan thinks Kelt( es I).F.xtrn—">l C 1 Warner. Thcvll !)•> Ii (3 -A SOT MOKT1CE AT A WEAK AiavtSMT AkO TALKED > soiNe FO? TV.. M6 N THE 90 c SOT THC MOI SJEST ROO"-BUT see 0= S'JE_ %  '•' %  "• %  '•.•, ". '7*to ^ lU. % I club's suiyDerek tFt I uk in Hie Sli. tram—and scortni foalfl itmi nt over th restlun that bustling •lins. 13st. Blbi was !>eing UsTdasd ,-i rsfi n ss i could turvo proved dim-ult t 0j 1 public h.msr at Hahwith hi-replv: "to continue loetvx followln^lua Mslm.,1lon .e-loflr the game for a few year. >et anager ol HUdd \ A 7'fli/,/. ; i NYLON FOR NEATNESS NYLON FOR COMFORT WE OFFER LADIES' NYLON VESTS $3.87 Small, Medium, Large in White and Peach.,. FRENCH NYLON BRIEFS Small, Medium, Large f-j ir o 0 7'% hi While .nd Pink >af./3 Of 93.1J a\l SHEPHERD & CO.. LTD. 10, 11, 12 & 13, Broad S...el Liverpool r.ne on. -\rtnui.BT, vmeu 1* Walrorn uefeat for' % %  ". "j %  > %  "•:" '" %  %  Notre lliimv 18 — 3 Portsmouth think that forward MainUc Owen. in the SS actor' Han has !>cer, ke'|ine Maurice. %  ne 18—3 at Cull, .i ti : Sx. 13 an.) N. Cumherbatch S, Oth-r names t n Pomp. Holton r>,,... (Arsenal) and Johnhave played eight (Derby). matches. On Friday afternoon Malvem Newcastle United wont much of director Stan S ';ool, Onfoi CHRISTMAS CARPS /HSIajj. NOT LATER NOW prw \% the time to select ni lehure, uhx-ii the stuck W brand new and fresh and thc variety all yours to i lioose from. Thc great day is only weeks away and last year ypu said thit vear would he different! S make it different by shopping now. at your slow pleasure and among un nil neu slock;.ig-ftill of Xmas ideas. k. . Haaaate If Co.. Ltel.



PAGE 1

THURSDAY. OCTOBER M. list BARBADOS ADVOCAR PAGE THREE Members Criticise Plan Higher Pay For chief Engineer Criticised • From r*r I Continuing at\ Adams Mid that m receut years it hud become apparent thai the haphazard way of i had to pa> 10', il he won ths la a commercial way, and ih*.. *2,SOu he hud to puy or 12 000. big sweep, annul u borrow thclf 0*11 inoiicy There was the 'succrMian in r, iimto " ,gh, Thc Government wa. M hm, lb. Agricui.ur.1 AM, Bank. ,he !" m !" Zum,JTrl * %  anxious as the commercial comrather than Government borrow trailer ol Culon would be mo,illy lo remove price contrail, mum to spend on Ibcm. given the authority lo determine utaful purSpeaking on The Medical herwhat proportion o( freight by 3oat, aed they would do ao pro* vices he laid that in reading bepjane should be dutiable For ancT' theC h^d Their ~Z SncJ UW hid deSSSd STS "* '" "S """" ""'"" "' "" 5*" TP J" "l>"— • " ""' ""> freight by 'ilMmrtu. thing, the, thought wtre^rlot' 'TT' ... ... "",' I TJ) s t a """ m ~" 1 > "1 "' did "ot know how trruca ities" Ihcv ai the earn. u£c B "' U re wo ul<1 M "" %  %  "a" 1 ,B " d f m the plan that people that provision was worth, but he broulhin lax.lton proP^ale '"," %  "•• ' enl. the, would could be cured ot the diieeee Two bopf that paopl. would not b. nothing else t look forward to I but the aUushetwc ceo> sack MMI re-employed an | "(!.(-<• r mi 05. at <. bifj tor nllnui i ifi:ith.it S9.0T0 was tcoj much money for the post, and said he would not vote for any 1 .ncrease "which will t>,a burderi l He 11 in Uw — of pU'nt... they would could be cured of "thc disease. Two ola, but only then. For things would be done 11 Members on bulh sides og the House of Assembly TutsaeUr criticized the proposed 20 per cent, increase asked to the people ol the ceases* fur on the salary of the Chief Engineer, Water Works De* "*£*?__ ,n * the warning WM partment, whom Govenimeni hopes lo re-engage for a y !" ***. "* aaded "thenu a further contract period of 3 years. The officer's present ? !" mane, "' atntr vere > OWT agreement expires on the 19th of December. They said the officer made the demand in the light of he '*" recant Indications given by Government that the Colony l ?,?*! d J!r. d could afford to pay high salaries to a few "top" officials Doatponed when they agreed to increase the salaries of the Heads of IVpertments in the Civil Service. then. For things would U present a same time. They would be doing going to alter their method • and they fUra ,v * %  <• preventive medicine collecting duties, wa. hfina ~" i""" ,,,c %  %  * tw removHe failed to kee why they should Ouit* Ti fh ing the price control arose. But aplan t 9 build more schools for t, WB T*T„" !" ,,., aw..r "e criticisms were mad J Tbcy would have taxed the pefpkwon as there was the suggestion children who would stay in the ^Jl "*-^?* iSSad to durln ^n.ideraUoa of ^ lteluto the hilt, and by that lime, he -5 rp^ ssr r-ssrs £*asSy b rrm.£^„Hii*3 s^rur&xrrar asrsr*"' wou "' b.'Sn^TSi.'-s.£Essr*tSi w w e iL"cbin.5e^ xr •""'" •>-' Wo,k ^~*•• %  • "j *^ adjournment wa* resumplion further of the malt.*, wsg film he would support an S*T oi 11.5W. Consideration wntd to are the re-organUahamaavi i Ho of the Water Works, iind lidded that nobody wou'd object lo Mr. Qarrodn getting an Infore income tax said that while they were taxing the poor man's tobacco and they were not bringing in any ; ri new income tax rates. But ft „, should be elementary that next year's incomes were not earned tninT y^SFS-K^Sr 1 r ""^ -^nTjTu^^^ss^ P-v,d M for average sugar crop of flvo years He then moved the naasin. of *>* an d pread the dnasase i m Committee on the Five atCiarrod, further nployfgffi .There was however to beVlow 190.006 tons of sugar the Five Year PUrV^f^S^tiVem-rcaF diseases andTuberYe ^l IT. nt on term, to be decided by ustillcaUon lor a Jump In salary He did not think, in view of the ment and Taxation Devek *culosi* took a great toll of die -J?!* E T ~har raa*on| ment whether they liked it or ment to have some sort of plan On the matter of Overseas Deobserved in the Hoeeaj Mveconditions as in the fornuv y !" r Q,rrod hou, d not de-l not could back down on the but if such a plan was detrifence Contribution Mr. Lewis ***, lna "e plan was a triumph agreepMnt. wlih the fxcaotiun "". ud J"* lncr T 8C agreement. It waa possible, mere mentnl lo the interest of the tax*"'d that he had got the imOI ,he conservative elements of .h-. M, M irv be tncreased bv lh y bjKl not B 1 "* *"** %  %  ^uaed huw 2Q, that i* from ja.joo Io Chamber a few montha age and • tack oq these abnormal mcreasea., on other salaries, the oAteerl ould have asked for re-engage-f ment on the same terms, or the moat, a 10 per cent, increase than possible that soon there payers, then they should not pression that the British tiovern,ne House. What would be another world conferproceed with it in such a hapment were willing to par for it Ui "* x concern in connection with j|i,Jjo per annum ence to regulate sugar, but he hazard manner as they had been He did not think that the Gov'he plan was not w miwh what th.-ught it was reasonable to say doing ernment should worry themselves was included, but the things that \,,i Te High that from a sense of awakened I think it is ;i good idea to about this Item for much money *• omitted. The only encourjustice in ths Colonial Empire or have a Plan u a wrt of frame has already been spent on the agement they were given by the Moving the Reaoluti from shame, the British were not into which you can Ot your Barbados Battal and this Senior Member foe St Joseph M E Cox, reminded im-mu, He was mystined that It had .— • ^ — — van—a ** J vwi — ^ -.-. ,,Bj.^a —i.,%J 1'ri^ ^^^ .^B— -^-^^^^ HW * *— — *^, e^ *J ^-w. p a a.i,iii.ivv aaaafcaa.ie^. i .* •._ —.— ./>—**-v ^— mm m m ^ w— going to let down the sugar colfinancial picture, allowing Hon. should not be provided for in the was that there were only possible that 'the services of experienced just been decided that the officer 1 *>niss in respect of promise* they Members to know what to exPl*n and he was not willing to two outstanding promises which engineers are extremely difficult would be needed another three had made He thought they were pert he said. "But the plan is contribute to it were not contained in ths memow „buin at present and the new years and not two He would right therefore to snsunv that one which we have been told was r Lewis continued his criticrandum, and that they hoped to paJ 1IV .. no t considarad exceauggest that nothing could be lo barring war_ a nd .physical calamtsken out of the Labour Party's isms of the five year plan yesterstrike oil. He for one couldhope itie, in the West Indies, and BarManifesto.* (or ths services bados In particular, they could look forward to an average cro,) of 150.000 tons at a price not below what they were then netting. "I aak anyone who baa a better scheme to tell as. 1 begged this House in March %  everal times . There waa the Beealay Report, I said, get st, study It. criticise It, aaul help yoar Government to form better plan. Up to now the Government have not had a better plaa by walna they reule Improve riindllion-. and Asal taxation la a way that weald sneet with the approval of — e m be rs and the people of the colony." H fell however that II ronld have been taken out of the "Electors' Association" Manlfeate. b s e s a e a ttw only mention he saw ef the plan being connected to the "Laboar PartyManifesto waa In thr Dally Press. "The Labour Party, as a Party, haa nsthlag to do with the s*eaeniatlon 0 f this plan", he said. Mr. Lewis said that ihe Hon an outby reducing the proposed term of •xtenslon, and the proposed inday, reiterated some of the" points 'hat they would strike oil. -Handing officci he had made on the previous Under ths head, Social Service rirJ', „.'"iuJ*"' I"*. 1 "!. m W,r l %  'L E £K^!• uWSl. -„"'; ni """" •" OfflCM-ln^aiMe 01 P" CW.I. He ni.ved that Ihe A3X'JSBt a i K^-ne^the'^feSrer^e'l W^JS&SSmW "'' V' Tiif'i eth ., being poaed to the electorate bafore the Mid on behalf of the Govern^ elections and which the elector•" •• ""> •"! all Ihe work "rt> Dopartmenl to Miry on ment, ho thought It ahoula lake '• *•<< do !" d. necr> to implement Ihe deci"<• rk. The, could not arlord care ol llseK. From what he had Could Not llenelil ••""• "' ">• • VK PUn In '<" %  •> '' %  > IndlvlduaU high •Mn ther. waa no nec^l, l„. Children could not h.nt '= conudwabte ,un. ol '"; "d IXm\il. Ih, com..„ ..„. Including an amount toward, it in from the lnatructlon. which the * %  ha. been Include wltli munlty. Senior Member for St. Joseph Ih. plan especially for compel!be.1 leather*, av.iuihlc were abl. H*" Priority for the Improve eoun^lled Qovernniuit nol had Mid that the plan could be Mtlon. a. h. fall that provision to give If they were under-nournwl of the Island's Water supply. lo ,rv to exploit Ihe taxpayers as Election Man!should have been mad. for that rahed. fi eoluld.rabk. number I'-ylng trlbulo to Ihe services '"V had don during Ih. past taken from the fesln of his party becauK he sold from the lime Ihe natural gas of eleme'iilar, : children of "iurbal r.did by Ml Qarrod durinTi n is all there'. and yet they waj being worked. • —r, *•• .—-v .T— — %  -— %  ". -fler that. do. ware unable becauM of this hi* prtawnt term of office, M lTv,„ IT," T k H '" d W W "J "!" b '' '" '""' "" "nder-nourUhment lo bi.m Cos uld b. "ta a very nualllliil K?T ^ i! p • cl """'? "I" 1 ""' "> !" Mn ,und ' "me from Ihe education provided tn.., who h.s don. a good lol .„„.„,, v „„' f a?", !" 12" rS3f "i 3 '" 0, r m 0u f ' c,,ln ">< Th 01 Eltion Manlleato whut I. money should be .doRt.J. To handicap of ag. grouping and y !" ., he ho tan here" it forward even to consider. "><• "*?"' "'"""B Heads of Demak, provmon for It In Ihe flv. thshould no longer lib?ur un. Lading off m, allack on ,oM y^ur^KScHon^ h UP 'tod""* IS *">< unnecessary lo d.r this otlwr buiUoaav wCSaed increie, Mr W quit, ptmible for Ihen, At jZftoEitto. C. H. Adams. "Si said that one of the 1„ gesl ^uld"^. ^irlJ l r ,vjJbl B ."''to Z!,'f"',t { SL?i Stf. "? J"" " %  He ~""^> Osv.rnm.nl ol to haggle ov pnny for rum a point o ontar. ro~ lo refute if not Ihe largest item In the plan every child In Ihe Kind. Of £, -IH! •' ' k -"couraglng Ih. CUnpf.-l I and tobacco and k.cp bad hous"' •j !" last statment waa the spending ol the LaboUr coure. he did not agree th.t CuMonis of bieaklng hu i Inf. out. ni2S i ^ .SI "? Wlllm '"" d That was a fund .rybody should b. put In • Tn. offlcr in aus-linn he"" 1 > iwiMalng thc in> The UovenuMiH had had, *'"" m !" '' •f 1 !" •' %  '' to be which had In,, cnaUd. It wu secondary school if thit pereon ret, Irt ciSk. Vo rs^tasd.. in •""• '" t h "' lt lo which h. without any doctrinaire prejudice PJ up You had to lake some being ud u revolving fund had no ability. Obviously (here SS a tnrct-vmT^uniSTnJS """ W"ught on specn.ten: con.lder indirect Uutta In ^Jtr>'^rdch were put up and h did not !" how ,1 ,. would be no point In tail. J g-ahSS ggLf*!!i"!l H. fell th.l th, l-.hiel Kn put ii.nh' i tnora. one. Abnormal Saltwy Mr. A. t 8. Lewi* (LI said h< understood th.it the i>uV>*r\ nU lion with the staff was of ttilth e mot vordlal, but he thought thut A he was getting an abnormal -..lithe same way they considered fi v Heads of Deportment direct taxation in thc sense of >ve others alone", he ssld. 'Let us sec how much we can '• "f ,d that the plan itself gel out of direct taxation without ""eluded things which were squeezing people adopting the nlredy stated and lo some of those things none of then* forming any part of the develop"It U Just" such an omission so Mia ment plan that would cause thc particular *^, ,,. 1 !" ^ mad ^'',0; .r-.a*Hn ars ^;^ They already had volving Hiet. Isliied salary rsttu ywr. apart from othr, "•' •'."• W v" Warka had iilloiu. Now that ih. varloil l k.n llu. a. a l.-l in asking li h. bid alg' 20 K r c ""t. lacrwue lie would npw. to mnaln "1 h *" > wrpriHd if tha He h.d thought that dlMadowmr^JSPSE! '" n.nt ol Ih. cnurch might have S,^, 0 "'" Jn h im Into the Flv. Year Plan. It •' 1,5 * *•"• re.aa by his salary to ; OHIcai had asked lor a &0 per .nL increase, and he knew that n then th.r. would b. aom %  mbers who would come Int^ not for on. moni.nt tha llous. to Jiurtlfy It. It was us to .ay that Mr. (larrod's lanlumount to lauding a man In Ylcs to the coluny h.d not 'he hlghct peak for doing hi. principle lh.1 a bacheloi can be "lose thing, none of them would fund for the ilshing InduMrv and hit harder than • married man. disagree. There was nothing in may were now going to cre.tr Let us see with indirect taxation die plan that did not require similar funds for civil aervaat. come now much we can put on in tha !" 'J'"'"'!;",'£"' lx *"• auMtion for houMng, gn.nl housing arid was bard lo u ,k forward .< > •m.ller category without hilling """ wB "thf, r f !" ""•, It* !" thing, of that sort next five year, with nathunl a. pecrple who have ... eal. ,., were suitable for such a plan Th hjd In the Eatlmates. CJimj doneT? SZJESt. bWatlnTtlSlU? 0 "•"" "" BldlcfloU. ?'SS&Z2S? cX^oi S 'T^'l^iU'il '^"LZ <*< < ^ >*"*U no, *„ k < W. th... h. W.H, „ „ , UJ2 " ?**",' .;" d ay th*t th" *tsl IndlM and in future illy no oi^knlw whit bacima '" I"*"'"" to uy whether or dangerous practice So the House were being asked there are item. J„ th„ plan which lh .ir contribution for the run" the co !" nU o" th. coSacUOT "• " !" "*' """ -! %  • „ _ t lo accept tha proposals In th. are ridiculous-, he raid. Ho ning expenditure of the Inslito. plati c m "' a "' '" %  ~"*tn |<|M1 dJ m(jhl ^^ He argued that at an early memorandum, th. proposals unmade reference to such an Hem lion waa going to be In Iba na. IItrusted that ihe comments desired •'•t* Oov.rnm.nl i.'.llsad that darl7.nl th, plan, wiliout tyim as the employment of .meor,e hu-. of lifjwo and thai wa* !" w c h had be... made wo"d re .. ""*" "'" "'" nM nou 1 '" themsclve. down specll.cally. In the L.bour Commualoner's thing .o b. placed ,n the devel, eve th^i>5radd. !" thVn ^^ which "'' ubmltled thai Ih. officer .he offlcer to !" mple his work Whra they came to deal with Office. He asked If a plan had to opment plan! ,?."' J.1 SKSsd h d heard from the lips of "high becauM when he arrived In th the Bills and rational alternative he drawn up to find employment Mr. Lewis said lhal they prolie hid to ronf... that what. "*nel"ls" thai the colony couul colony, he had to '.It In his offle. proposal, were produced tha for someone "it Is ridiculous to vidl scholarship, and .hero ih,. Honourable Inlroducar n. """< '" W al"rta., Saw tha for a considerable lime wlthoul Cov.rnmcnt were nol so foolhu. ten m. thai you have bm tryaM | n h did not think .hose w.r. irred to h. fact £"\ noTrovi." '"•'"<'••' '""I Increase the tools to do the Job." It was for An" ?ncre irTcomoanv 1.x S'find Tlab for"oaVStrn Sr" '.'T ""' • h0U d •• %  > %  >"•" ton had bin mid. for. P Oov>"at .ho*, officials, ana Ihe Govern,,,,,,, than lo a* him would Sot ^OMD reSSS MO." van"" ' *"" 'e ,h "J ~ rt a. "" !" nt primary h, hu been herefore he felt there w.s no to remain for flv. year. Install out It ,nT.cenln. It "it f He u 0 referred tn th. ilerr, .a 80 Jf r ** "hn.s undar confrankly dispirited. A Co.arn. '*m why he could nol make of thra.. Trinidad withII SS rH* From ••Livestock iZSSi^. !" £S '?"'?"", """ !" hc.rned he m ent prlnt.ry should be ~t.bth. demand which he had Mr LcwU urgad OavemmMit , ,„i„r,„i,u, trL hl had >>ld ll^l this wai mrt of th. ,hou . M th *' ""' P>anlln comli,h.d in this Island Mr. Crawford asked -Car, " nd somebody who will the mfntmation, Ihey hrt had JW^' this was part of u,„ munHv „, aMt ,„ „, „.,,„„, ,„ riovernnwil .fiord to pay JO per 'he work for the salary attached £5.*' p'ro'po^i." "would no. Hr? W,r r .l,S',„ L '^uSS5,'2:' J ,?SS; .SSn^^l? !" !" rSS,l?"a k "^ Ha IT'SS?' nlvf.uin was'"" 'SVfUOP..* %S£ 5* 'L.^^JTV^' %  """" ., ciiui. any unSuiThardslilps or like that and call It som.thin. „, VrriMl. .ntonrl^ takin. H rj£ ir n m£ L.MZ ,'^d SJS "?.M !" "* >•' %  G.rrod. baI'dded that Ihey were creating prevent companies from canilnf >ha. you could put In a plan was .',„!. T S..12 %t wt. d_i?L E^ —f nil? !" !*"*• '"• O" !" '""""! uld ait th. Impression lhal thjy -h.v, to Barbados. giving artlllclal Insemination 1m,„r rfurnoL. of SSgSTt? ,.? KJS^S^SJLS^* 9SL K. down na lv ""' "" "*" a ""* "'""' """"' '" "" '"*" Of couree what Mr Finch had porUnce by calling it something oonsibnuTfif c.llin. 7L „i.nn..' STSL?.Sr*Wi a£*J!B '" V !" *' "" doln th r "" k %  aid in an intenlew with tha new. m maii'mor. fond* n?i "^ .1 i*V? !" .J~ „ li.v. ^ H h "^ a thai "one of thea. Tnay had reduced th. retlrlrui pre., was quite obvious. A child He uld that thoa, item. h. S, r *R 1 ? t gJ W S ZL, i, ,S h h,ei.^l leofd iK ISick i. ''' U "" 0 nl h 'a'utlnarrania-go In Ih. Civil Service, Ihereby could have .aid what Mr. Finch had mentioned could be described H£. on e nd ln Unl ,n hl ht 'f*l!i wou L d ol "" %  > uloU mant. will come lo an .rrrl" burd.nlng l.xpay.i. who had had said In th. plan as recurrent expend i*^' tin**. The plan looked to htm lik. a "puffed up" one. There Bur. Firm With but that id use up scarcely be termed a priority to plant 11 in he hoped it would not be quickly m ," n (, hrougnt before them. w Attention could have been ron K given to providing a c.ntr.1 post nanieniar outlook "nit nt> re 8rd to gov.rnmenl's ..(nee for 8t. Lucy. There was unwarranted talk of rtmV n f"^'. T..-—g g"; laxation proposals he said that In th, airly UT* whn he first bus fires going up. That waa not ,h,t .„ DrothlcuV. tKT olan the ne m "' a *""' ""' vemment talked of a deep water harbour true. Any member who saw Ihe novrmment b.d more or S "," ,ron ,0 do wh ""> ""' nd • ,h€ " %  • .ulgeatton for one necMs.ly lor raising bus fares £„ !" .?mktic Th? nC ,vE dM,% ""' ParUciuir tun.. Of w.s mooted. oppoHtlon to II wu might say so. but they had en'"" JJJ lm ''J oi !" p „, _?, th. Iwo million dollar loin, he from llghler owner, who saw a devoured to put on taxation in Cn„ble to rSSir! ^h.t .SI uadmatood thai half a million loss of revenue, but In this day auch a way that It could not be he detail, of som. of Ihe schen^i •""' ld lr d • t k an a. against a daap w.t.r harbour was deflnpossed on it. tha coniumar except l" 0 Z. ,il nl.n schnnas „ hool bulll ,„„„,„ „, u „,,. ,„. S Md d in the aaaa of ruin and tobacco. ^ lion would be against housing at whan it was said that rev.nu. He would tell the public of BarH • thought that there was the Bay and Pine Estates and a would be lot out of spirituous bados that they had no cause to divided opinion ln many sections million would be against the exliquors, many of them thought fear an Increase in bus fares. of the community as to the extension of the water services thai what was meant was liquor. It was intended to Introduce an pedlency of rushing Into such which would include machinery other than thoa. triad, bar*. H, %  ri.erlmnmcnt tax as soon as schemes and installation, etc. In considdid not think Inly could Justify possible The ratas hid not yet Immigration had been mencring all those items, he thought any increasu In the price of i-een delermlned. but from ih, tioned in the lists of scheme, that they should come under rum. Rum, unlike tobacco raw Bcaalcy Report, It appeared that and they had barn told about It Capital Expenditure. ed a useful purpose. It waa of SAO.000 a year could ba obtained Hut he was sure that many mamHe said that he wanted to let medicinal value. Unlea* Ih. from that source. bar. would like to know what companies know that he did nol come, of In. people were It was considered that no hardprogress w.s being made. They conilder that thoy should be creased th. price of rum was a. .h.p would be Impnaad by inhid heard nothing from the Joint uutad further. Subsidisation th. highesl possible limit already reasing Us. lax on awaapstake. Conuirll.ee of the House of the should be reduced As a means of raising revenue of the B.rbdo. Turf Club and legislature In regard to that Ther. should be a purchase tax he had no hesitation In cornin widening the "field" of the malter* on care. Th. Government should mending a Govarnro.nl lottery. tax to obtain in all o furthc. He did not see the nccnglty collect on. or two hundred dolTh.y did nol know how much S.W.tOO .yew. He w-ould aUo for inserting Dodds Plantation II lars when a new car was bought was made by the Police lotteries throw out lo hejr what memone ol the schemes If this planHe was quite sure that when one II, could not ee any ethical o, ber. thought of the idea, that a tation was run on a commercial bought a new car, he would not moral .rounds for condemning iTian should leel no grous. if h. bssis then II should be treated thin k too much vdurlh.r it was m Qe rage j For extra power Si longer life :-V Hxibt BATTERIES FOR CARS TRUCKS & BUSES CITY GARAGE TRADING CO., LTD. DISTRIBUTORS VICTORIA ST. for Inspection time! ,.... GETtfAW .\^'///// '*•" •>"• r-t/tiirvrnm-mtii for Tyre* & Tafcw (Goodyear) Brake Lining Hell Hydraulic Unite Pirla Decnrbonl.UiK Gasket Sals Main ind Connecting Rod Hearine* Phtlon Ring Set. I.lghtine m Ignition Cables Durilite Balleraei (li ft II Vail) Lacquer, ft Thinner, Green Birkjnyre Canvaa Beir View Mirror, Radiator Haee A C Sparking Plug! A C Fuel Pump Diiphraana .SL-Swifl Fire Extinguisher, Tyre Valves and Oaugr-s El... Etc., El.. Sflifl gear rvqu <>e>M <••( nowa STOP AT COURTESY GARAGE (ROBERT THOM LIMITED) Dial M1 White Park Road i Ma.*" LOUIS L. IIA I I v %  eltoa LIB. When your BACK ACHES... tW.av h* ii OMMII, rtn m4 h. I.„ ktaWr*. Tr-k.*^... ( ,.f*.>W. tbW. WhM Wm I•• • %  -*M. mumm •. mk !—. %  .-. .ulfi Sli B Da >TI1MTWn U'k^r-. h-aavlH, itiiirilaw. *-^W) ..u m ih.) -ijMd ^ uJa%  Mt. MbT. a. ••ur k-fc... w& -••l. .Iln.ka B |lmin(->dF*V IWav. kw. PilU. Il-a-. gtaassr IMh nmcklj rJ ,wu, %  *—liii..ai. sasal ol wru ftr>d> —4 VMIM %  *> fkat faaa, n>.k ti ..i*M..~n-r~m.*mKk. n-i)NMb-srf lass bsSM. wmk i- >-,{ ran ars -•-. t. aWwas mh-i-l n iW *~*m. 0*H. gTaSss* Ml X Ih. Marw iHKi.fr .lib bSt rU bafexk. Oalr I al .11 arac atam. us Dodds Kidner Pills Keep your children.... FIT AND STRONG Your children will alwan be full oi luo —full of aasrgy . bs*c s real st (6c work or pCy . ii you srvc i-.rn HAL1BORANGE evcrr dsy. It nt rich m the body-building and protective vitainsBs A at D—ensures strong booe* and musciea, increases resistance to illoess. Children love taking Hsliboran. c — the pure bslibui oil is blende! wuli oraoge juice to aiakc it extra dcltcio> grsnd for adults too Haliborange THt NICEST WAY Of TAKINCHALIBUT OIL mio*U ,. vvclmj a. ALLEN HANBUHVS LTD, I (INDON. I' • #V>r Ih.. n %  !# %  # \i.atuumjv FIRST with the Latest in Ladies' Smart Styled HATS Fine lining Velvets anil Slraws Fell Hills fu, tiavellini; ( $4.32 to S8.50 NEW DRESSES Selected from hundreds of American and Canadian beautiful LADIES UHESStS MH.IHI each THE MODERN DRESS SHOPPE Broad Street. EIVA MEL WARE SAUCEPANS ROASTERS FUNNELS LADLES PLATES CUPS JUOS BOWLS li'FAST SETS PIE I1ISIIKS CIIAM/IERS COMMODE PANS PAILS II VSINs Crttam Grwn Hi tm it BARBADOS (-/'. rOTTON FACTORY LIB.


ten

WHAT'S ON TODAY

Meeting, St. Philip Vestry ll a.n
Anchor Cup Shoot Government

Rifle Range .... . 13 (moon)
Meeting, Sanitary Commissioners,

Bt. Michael .os.eeseeer ess. (1,00 p.m.
Meeting, St. Peter Vestgy 2.0 pam
B.C. Films, St. Paul’s Shurch 7.30 p.m
Mobile Cinema, Crab Hill, Planta-

tidh, St. Luey . 7.30 p.m
Police Band Concert, Princess
Alice Playing Field 7.45 p.m

ESTABLISHED 1895

Increased Taxation
Is Taxpayers’ Burden

HEAVY CRITICISM was levelled at the Government
proposals contained in the five year development plan of
capital expenditure and taxation by opposition members
who took the lead given by government party member, Mr.
A. E. S. Lewis in labelling the plan “unambitious” when
consideration of the matter continued for another seven
hours last night.

Cubans Live
In Trees After
Hurricane

HAVANA, Oct.” 29.

The Cuban Army, air force and

Taking part in last night’s dis-
;cussion besides Mr. Lewis .were
Mr. J. E..T. Brancker, Mr. V. B.
|; Vaughan, Mr. W. A.. Crawford
jand Mr, O. T. Allder,

During the debate, members ac-
cused the Government Party of
‘incompetence” and charged them
'with “burdening the taxpayers
with increaséd taxation.” oe

After more than eleven hours of
|debate during the past two days’
| sitting, the: House adjourned until

|
}
i
}



Red Cross began an airlift of food, | next Tuesday at 3.00 p.m. follow-'

jing the defeat by a 10—6 majority
of a Government motion.to ad-
journ the Heuse until to-day at

medical supplies and clothes to
thousands of families isolateq at

the Cienega De Zapata area
swamplands and along the south-
west coast of Las Villas province
since last week’s hurricane caus-

ed heavy seas and rains which
inundated the coastal zone.
The Cuban navy dispatched

two small warships to the strick-
en area. It was doubted how-
ever whether the ships will be
able to reach the shoreline due
to the fact that the water was not
navigable.

Pilots who flew over the
stricken area said every hut and
house was destroyed and that
people were huddled together in
the open ground and even in
trees. They said the people
waved pieces of cloth in an ap-|
parent attempt to call for aid.

Meanwhile the whole _ sugar
crop of the Covadonga mill near
Cienega was destroyed and it}
was doubted that the mill will
participate in next year’s pro-
duction, At nearby Horquita
mill, more than 1,000 were left
homeless.—(U.P.)

Convicts Hold
Ten Hostages

CHESTER, Illinois, Oct, 29
Unruly convicts and _ taut-
nerved officials pressed an en-
durance contest in its third day
with the lives of ten hostages
depending on the outecome:—ee
In the second uprising in two
‘days at Menard State prison,
Psychiatric Division, most of the
300 inmates who stormed the
kitchen and dining room were sent
back to their cells but 38 armed
with the kitchen cutlery seized
three unarmed guards and barri-
caded themselves in the mess
hall. Seven other guards are
hostages of 332 east cell inmates.

—(C.P.)

Reds Bar Allied
Patrol Again

BERLIN, Oct. 29.
For the third straight day So-
viets barred. the western allied
“courtesy patrol” from 110 mile
autobahn highway linking Berlin
with the west. An official British
spokesman said the British army
patrol was presented this morn+
ing at-the Soviet highway check-
point outside Berlin but was re-
cy jected by Soviet guards manning
. the points. .A similar United
j States patrol yas rejected yester-
day and a British patrol the day
before.—-U.P,

RIVER DOES $32,000

DAMAGE

MILAN, Italy, Oct. 29.
The Serio river swollen by re-
} cent rain broke through its banks
| at six different places yesterday
in the province of Cremona near
here, causing estimated $32,000

damage.
| : —U-P.
j uaa Saloni







cg te nee



: YOUNG SOUTH KOREANS FLOCK TO ENLIST





a

5 SEEKING A CHANCE to fight against the North al
; South Koreans flock to recruiting stations as soon as they reach military age.
ing no other means of transportation, forms a walking parade.

cans in the United Nations forces



4.00 p.m,

Voting against the Government
motion were Mr, R. G. Mapp, Mr.
A. E. S. Lewis. Mr. L. A. Wil-
liams, Mr. E. W. Barrow, Mr.
Cc, E, Talma, Mr, W. A, Crawford,
Mr. V. B. Vaughan, Mr. O. T.
Alider, Mr. J. E. T. Brancker,
Mr. E. D. Mottley.

Voting for the motion were Mr. |

G. H. Adams, Dr. H. G. Cummins,
Mr. M. E. Cox, Mr. T.:O. Bry-
an, Mr. E. St.A. Holder and Mr.
F, E. Miller. .

@ On Page 3

New Aniti-Terrorist
Regulation Imposed
In Kenya Schools

KENYA, Oct, 29.

A new regulation aimed = at
preventing subversive activities in
Kenya's Independent schools was
authorized by Governor , Sir
Evelyn Baring as the biggest
anti-Terrorist manhunt in the
colony to get under way,

Schools may now be closed by
order of the Minister for Edu-
cation if he is satisfied:

1. That any member of the
management or teachirg staff is
associated with the activities
prejudicial to the maintenance 4of
public order,



2. That any teaching or
instruction imparted in such
school is prej to the main-

tenance of public order.

3. That any pupil attending
the school is or has been associ-
ated with such activities,

4. That the school premises
were used for such activities.

The order was made as nearly
300 British troops were rushed to-
day to spots outside Nairobi to
guard the isolated white settlers
after the murder yesterday of a
British farmer and his two African
servants.

The British Colonial Secretary
Oliver Lyttelton arrived here to-
day to solve Kenya's colonial ques-
tion where 47 natives and Europ-
eans were killed in a campaign
conducted by Mau Mau terrorists.

Mr. Lyttelton faced the demandg
from 100,000 members, the Kenka
African Union, which includes
measures to curb the terrorists
abolition of racial discrimination,
release or trial of arrested Afri-
cans, and distribution of land.

UP.

y °
Cheap Fighter
LONDON, Oct. 29.

A British company is preparing
a light utility supersonic fighter
plane which can be built cheap-
ly, the Slociety of British Aircraft
Constructors said.

Designers believe it will have
armament equipment and flying
qualities adequate to most opera~
tions which a single seater fighter
can perform, and equal or better
speed and climbing powers than
existing heavier types.—C.P.



battling in Korea.



UK Must Make |

\
|

Koreans and Chinese Communists,

fhavbados

/ Government Criticised ,Over Five Year

‘ Wins. Nobel Prize



DR. SELMAN A. WAKSMAN, 64, pic- |
tured at work in his Rutgers Uni-
versity laboratory, in New Bruns-
wick, N, J., was awarded the 1952
Nobel Prize for Medicine and
Physiology. The microbiologist
was cited for his work in the dis-
covery of streptomycin, the first
effective antibiotic fe- use against
tuberculosis. The prize is worth
$33,200 in cash, (International) |

|



For Red Thrust

m | toward

» Proposal .

YESTERDA’ = WEATHER REPORT

oll fron oan: n Nil

) Rainfall r 0 to date: 6.93 ins

Te t 5 °F

t T 5 °F

1 Velocity: 1 per hour

; ometer (9 a.m.) 29.987 (3 p.m.) 29.880
q TO-DAY
4 « 5.50 a.m
et: 5.48 p.m

i
M irst Quarter, Octeber 25
Lig 6.09 p.m

1.21 am.,
7.3 am,











1.3 p.m.
8.13 pam.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30,, 1952 PRICE: FIVE CENTS



Bn a a eR



I MARKSMEN AT THE 600 WANK

French Prepare

: ; : HANOI, Oct. 29. |
\ FRENCH and Commtnist Vietrrinh fcrees gingerly
| tested each other's defence§ along the narrow muddy Black

River today and’ poised for au expected all cut Red thrust
the south. ‘Reds continued to jab infiltration
lumns acrogs the river frorn Van Yen, their first bridge-
id point in what séemed reconnaissanee movements to

find out where the Sainte ey communications ¢c |



be cut before attackify indo

' _ %

| ‘sibie isolated outposts and guilt

— Sudanese hn eb sone ne

Black River and a second a few
miles back lining the ridge
hills that separate the

The French union headquarters
“eanwhile calleq ‘im all indefen-

| Men and guns are being assem.
bled by airlift at Sonla where the



| immediate

| CAIRO, t, 29.
Infermid sourees Said Naguib
,has accepted proposals, for an
home rule and even-
tual self-determination for Sudan,

Negotiations in the past two
weeks between Naguib and the
Sudanese Independence Party
\delegations were said to be suc-
jcessfully concluded and Naguih
expected to announce his decisio

on Thursday. ’

The ‘agreement covers thé
immediate election of Sudan
parliament as the first step ¢
home rule Which would last

three years. The Sudanese would
te entitled to determine the future
status of their country,



First Move |

CANBERRA, Oct. 29.

The Australian Government is
willing at any time to revert to
private trading in meat contracts
with the U.K. but it is up to
Britain to make the first moves
according to Minister of Com-
merce Mr. John McEwan,

He told a press conference that
the agreement provides that any
termination of the entire contract



must be mutually agreed and
that the Austra’ Government
had made no a to
Britain for cancellation of the

‘contract,

He said Government thought
most meat producers in Australia
were satisfied with the terms of
the present eontract despite much
criticism,

He said that the British Gov-
ernment as a matter of principle
probably prefers the trader to
tracer business but ‘is faced with
difficulties of rationing and may
not find it easy to make the
change.—U.P.



France Accuses
United States

PARIS, Oct, 29. ,
Defence Minister, Rene Pleven
accused the United States of go-
ing back on promises of aid to
France and said that unless the
United States fulfill their pledg-
es. The national defence budget
will be reduced by the corres-
ponding amount.—U.P.

In London this section of the
reported agreement was said
be in line with Eden’s statements
in parliament last week — that
Britain supported Sudan elections
as the first step towards gelf-
determination,

—U-P.



_ Accepted |












road cuts right and drops toward 2 ey
the river and Lai Chau 75 isloated
miles northwest near the Chinese
border,

These two key strong points in
the mountains of Thai country
contain regions of only airfields
and will be defended at all costs
French masséd eight battalions to
the Black River area faâ„¢g an
estimated communist division
lining the river banks and two
more moving down the moun-
tains in four columns from the
fallen bastion of N’Ghilao

—U.P.

of
vital
| colonial rowte from the river.

bank yesterday.





Mr. Adlai E

Stevenson

all important 32 electoral

Seek Supreme
Court Ruling

WASHINGTON, Oct, 29.
Five major United States oi!
companies today carried to the
Supreme Court their efforts to
bloek the Grand Jury investiga-

cratic Presidential aspirant

Mr. Stevenson boarded the
train for the crucial 48 hour trip
only a few minutes after he had
been given a noisy send-off by the

; crowd that packed New York's
on din Washington of an alleged Madison. Square Garden last
, esta * monopoly or cartel. The night.
1 ombanies asked the court to re- Police estimated that 18,000

U.N. Retake |
Pinpoint Hill
United See. x

Shot and way
back up Pinpoint Hill on Sni r |
Ridge in near freezing wedlber
at dawn to-day,

They reached the crest at 10.30
a.m. secured it, and blasted Com-
munist survivors down the North-
ern slopes with grenades, bay-
onets and rifle fire.

At last reports, Allied troops
had surrounded two platoons of
retreating Chinese,



To the east, other U.N, forces
repulsed five Chinese attacks
along the four mile front in the
Finger Ridge sector and plugged

the 75° yard gap torn by 400
Chinese in the Allied line on
Heartbreak Ridge,

Allied foot soldiers on the

western front recaptured the out-
post in Chorwon valley south Of
Iron Horse mountain. The
Korean Marine Corps also grab-
bed the Communist outpost west

of Munsan but withdrew aften
blowing up Red bunkers,
—U-P.



$729m. For Defence
Weapons From Europe

SOME $729,000,000 is b

PARIS, Oct. 29.

eing spent in Europe to buy

defence weapons and materials under the 1952 “off shore’
procurement programme according to U.S. Ambassador

Mr. William H. Draper junior.

young
This large group, find-

South Koreans now outnumber Ameri

(International Soundphoto)

He said the bulk of contracts

are for ammunition and explo-| Magistrate in the Eastern District |. 4" invitation eee ge Cow

sives with about $355,000,000]and the other for payment of sal- |Guiana was conveyed to | ill TUNIS, Oct. 29
being spent for some 12 different}ary to J S, Ross, an Assistant Agri- | some days ago. There he. ; A terrorist bomb wrecked a
types including shells’as well ae|cultural Officer during a C.D.W.|no details available at the MO0-) French owned bookshop in the
rockets. These contracts were | two-year Forestry. course in Eng- {ment of the exagt date of her de~} Arah Medina qfarters here last
placed in ‘even countrics with|land for which he had been select- | parture. t. No one Was hyrt.—U.P
France's $128,000,000 heading the{e¢ and already arrived in the

list. Six European countries got United, Kingdom—as well as a aa

contracts totalling
including nets, booms and other
equipment with France again
heading the list with $100,000,00(
worth,

Some $65,000,000 worth of air
craft contracts were placed
France got $46,600,000 worth of
orders for Vampire fighters.
‘taly got $13,900,000 t» mak:
spare parts for US. built Fa4
ighters and J35 jc! engines

Some $75,000,000 wort) of con-
tracts were placed for equipmen
such

as radar sets and. spar
carts. —U.P.
- ;
Ban On Reds
TOKYO, Oct, 9

A Japanese Foreign Office
spokesman said that Japan hag
losed. its :deors to cilizen ot
| ommunist Russia and its satel

‘ites and that the entry ban would
apply to all-Communist countrie}>
xcept Yugoslavia whic’) no long-
er is under Russian domination

Six Soviet citizens inelyelin«
correspondents for Tass News
j)Agency and the newspaper
Pravda were given orders last
week to leave within a month

The Foreign Office did not say
what will be done about othe
tussians already here. They in-
clude fifty members of an unre-
cognized Soviet Mission and about
200 in business,—U.P.



‘




| pany Said the grand ury included

22 ‘s, ie
te that they were entitled
, to be estigated, if at all, b: wa

$173,300,000} third motion in Mr. Gairy’s name
worth of ships and harbour craft}*mging the earliest possible re-

verse the decisions of the lower

courts refusing to discharge the
grand jury.

In their appeal paper, the com-

persons jammed the Garden, the
scene of success and defeat for |
fighters throughout the year, to}
see the pared» of Broadway and |
Hellyweed celebrities
Democrats ab, former
es }House first”
Roosevelt,
Mr, Stevenson
standing ovation as he was led
down the aisle of the great. in-
door arena to climax the evening

i4 government empl yees White
mem' ‘cor



te ' received a
vr and impartial jury, free from |

the inevitable bias of doverriment
employed jurors.” .

In earlier proceedings the Dis-{ which had brought fowh en- |
trict Federal Judge James Kirk-|dorsements from such personal- |
land denied the motions by com-fities as Richard Rodger and

panies to dismiss the grand jury
without prejudice and to transfer
the case to New York City where
government employees did not

Oscar Hammerstein I], Tallulu H.

Bankhead, Humphrey Bogart, |
James
Sandburg

Mea on juries, The Federal The partisan audience’ inter-|
eu specs | commrned Judge rupted Mr, Stevenson's speech so
Ce tee ents many times that he was unable
In papers filed with the Supreme 4° finish it before the time the |
Court todhy the five companies }Pemocrats had purchased on the
said they would show that the}Mational television network had
Federal Attorney General James |tU" out. He was cut off
eee picked Washington for Mr. Stevenson openly predict-}

grand jury proceedings “which it

‘ ; ed he would win the election |

pee ee ang untiecessary to November 4 saying the Republi-;
—U,.P. cans have “everything on their

° apeplieeeiensiahanelbidienes ne side but the people.” He again
described Gen. Dwight Eisen.

hower as a man who tailored his
speeches to blend with geogra-
| phical backgrounds and declared
‘that he Adlai Stevenson was a
| person who said the same thing
in the south that he would say in
the north.—(U.P.)



M.M.W.U. Bloc
Out*V oted

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GRENADA, Oct, 29.
Hon, T, A, Marryshow was un-
animously re-elected on the nom-
ination of Hon, J. B, Renwich,
seconded by Hon, D. A Henry, as
Deputy President when the Legis-
lature ied the second year of
the session today. A day of keen-





Princess Alice To
Visit B.G., T’dad

(From Our Own Correspondent)

ly contested debates saw the re- t. 29
du terlad Rite three times} 11 RH. tion Lite is to
Goverment ~ Afgan visit British Guiana as well as

motions—one over
government selection of a house to
urchase for a residence of the

Trinidad in the new year, it
learned here reliably tonight

|
Ww |
|

placemen! of Superintendent of
Public Works Clarence Renwick
because “the taxpayers are highly
lissatisfied with present irregu-
lnrities in the P.W.D.". Hon
® C. Noel. formerly of the Gairy
bloc in these instances voted con-
trary to his erstwhile confrerer
twice firmly declaring his reason:
for differing and unruffled by Mr
Gairy’s comments on his opposi-
tio: The Gairy totion recom- [
mending consure on Administra ‘or {
MacMillan for transmission to the
Secretary of State on the ground
hat irregularities in several gov-
syniment departments indicate very
weak and poor administration was
‘eferred to the next meeting of
the Council. .

The all-day ‘sitting was ad-
journed till tomortow to complete
certain unfinished business.

TRUCK OVERTURNS:
7 KILLED, 27 INJUKED

TAMPICO, Mexico, Oct, 29 |



Police sa'd seven persons were
killeqd and twenty-seven others

injred when a freight truck



loaried with 44 labourers weeny
tunied on a highway near here } Hon. C. WYLIE, Q.0.

The report said the majority ot |
the victims were fruit vendors Her Majesty the Queen |
who hired the truck to attend direction i appointm
traditional market day. Surviv- (Hornaa Ges " d of Mr. G
ors s@id faulty brakes caused the; 5h! fH ci : a
accident.—U.P. J dd er f 0

i
wars iS

MARKSMEN from British Guiana, Trinidad and
From (left to right) are:
G. Martin, Capt. Warner, Capt. St. Aubyn (British Guiana) and Mr, C

Gov. Stevens

reached today
biggest prizes in the Presidential contest
votes,
running out and every minute was priceless,
attached so much
to Pennsylvania as a “keystone state
decided to spend the next two days

prominent }

Pro Mrs wedi ye



Capt. Neblett, Capt. We

on Bids For

Pennsylvania’s Votes

EN ROUTE WITH GOVERNOR STEVENSON

Oct, 29.
for of the
Pennsylvania's
though time was
the Demo-
importance

one
Even

"jn the
within its borders

Gets Life Term

4 i
eI

h

} Hf

'
t
*

‘
AD SALEH LAMLUM, 23, scidn of
one of Egypt's wealthiest families,
is shown after he was sentenced to
life imprisonment for opposing
Egyptian land reform by force, He
was accused of storming into a po-

lice station at Maghagha, bran-
dishing a Tommy gun and shout-
ing that land reform would be en-
forced only “over my dead body.”
t.and reform legislation limits
of arricultural land in
00 asres, (international)

ownershi

Egypt to

BOOKSHOP WRECKED

Attorney General And
Mr. Adams Appointed QU’s



MR. G. H,

ADAMS, C.M.G., Q.0%
ly pleased ta

YW) Campbell

Wi





election that he

e ! oreat

Wylie,




arbados shot 10 rormds to count from the 600 yards

therhead, Mr. F. 8. Olton, Mr.
Wilson (Trinidad).

General
_ Kisenhower
In New York

NEW YORK, Oct. 29.
General Dwight D, Eisenhower
sounded down the home stretch
nh the race for the White House
idding for votes of the Federal
vorkers and refuting the Demo-
ratiec charges that he was to

lame for the Korean war.

The Republican presidential
indidate was in the second day.
of an intensive three day campaign
our ot the New York City area
quest of the state’s important
49 electoral votes. In an informal
juestion and answer programme
clevised nationally last night
reneral Eisenhower said:

|. That his proposed “clean
veep’ on the Federal Govern-
nent would not extend to “effi-
ient” civil service employees but
sould certainly include their

f | “political bosses”

wh 4Phat there
conneetion”
nilitary deeision
’ of Korea and
ic ion made two

| 3, That he did not advocate
| cutting soldiers’ pay and referred
jto the Report in which he sug-
ested an “additional Premium”
ice in the Far East.
| General Eisenhower’s vote hunt
jin New York City area to-day
| carried him to Westchester
} County, the Bronx and Queens
—U.P.
'
|
}
]
|
'
|

was’“no very
between the
1947 to get
the “political
years later”,

in



~~. *
€5mi Sale To Brazil
| ¥ . eee
Surprises British

nN . . .

| ‘Trading Circles

} LONDON, Oct, 29,

| The news of the sale to Brazil
£5,000,000 worth of
aircraft was received
in trading circles today with
surprises and some envy, and
exporters expressed the hope that
government would grant similar
tacilities for other commodities.

over
British jet





|
| For some time Brazil has been

jrunning short of sterling and
jexchange permits for sterling
|* xports have been difficult to

j obtain, The contract for the sale
of 70 meteor jet aireraft—is being
| offset by a “compensation” deal
lof a Substantial amount of Bra-
zilian to be purehased by
}the British raw cotton commis-

'
sion,
'

cotton

Commenting on the deal, the
Times in its “city notes’
[cota said today “quality of
compensation purchase is always
syne of the main anxieties over

deals but reports suggest that the

commission has haggled with
some persistence over the ques-
tion of quality so that it may be
jhoped that one side of the deal
jis as satisfactory as the other,
i “Whether the scope for such
mpcnsation deals is creat may
perhaps be doubted. But it seems
though the British aircraft
j try is hardpressed and

pee yn it
f!
|
|

must make up to some
the declines in ex-
other industries,
it some countries is

difficult that less
methods of making it
low innot be ignored.”

i
xt for
t of some

»x

UP.



Olympic Fencers

| To Tour Brazil
MILAN,

Oct. 29
| talian Olympie fencers ac-
| i the invitation of the Flu-
e Club of Rio de Janeiro
Brazil. Fencers are Olym-
pee champion, Eduarda
Olympic women foils
R. ¢ ber, and swords-
der Mengiarotti

iuardo Mangidrotti is the
ling Italian fencer of the
eyt generation in addition t4
ne at Helsinki the Epee
title, he finished second
ret Christian Dorila
irnament,—U.P.



|
| or







PAGE TWO

| habla OFFICER Percy
of the Port-of-Spain
1} e was am : the in nisi
engers on Tuesday by the De
Geasse for the U.K., where he
t special months’
in Fire Preve
Short Visit!

AND MRS, OTHO DOWD-

M*

will

tak six intens

NG were :mong the pass-

‘+ gers leaving the island by

.W.F.Ay on Monday fer Trini-
dea

They have gone on a short visit,

A Parts
A& PARTY was held at the resi-
v4 dence of Mr. and Mrs. J.

Taomas of Hothersal Turning on
‘‘nucgday in honour of the visiting
Trinidad Rifle Team.

Those attending the party had
an enjoyable evening. Mr. M
jiuater of the Trinidad Team was
frst im the aggregate with all
competitors and first in two
Class A Shoots while Mr. F. Bello
also on the Trinidad Team mace
a first place in one of the Class 4
Shoots.

Dancing was the order of th
evening and the party ended
shovtly after midnight,

vor B. T.C, Races
R. and Mrs. Cito Damtin wer
arrivals from Trinidad o»
Tuesday by the s.s, De Grasse.
They are guests at Hotel Royal.

Mr, Cito has come over for the
Barbados Turf Club Races which
begin early next month. He also
brought over the racehorse
“Careful Annie.’

Wed In Trinidad
ER many friends in Barbados
will be glad to hear of the
marriage of Miss Lucille Gor-
mandy to Mr. Anthony Mitchel)
which took place last Saturday at
St. Crispin’s Church, Port-of-
Spain, Trinidad.

Mrs. Mitchell is a former pupil
of Queen’s College and sister of
the Rev. Lionel Gormandy who is
at present in British Guiana, Mrs.
Gormandy was living in Barbados
for about ten years during which
time she established a music
school then known as the “Excel-
sior School of Music”.

To Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell,
Carib joing in extending sincere
wishes for many years of happi-

ness.
Two Weeks

Me COLIN WOODING ot
T.L.L., Pointe-a-Pierre, ar-
‘rived in the colony on Tuesday by
B.W.LA., from Trinidad on two
weeks’ holiday. He is staying with
his sister Mrs. Vincent Morris of
Reed Street, St. Michael.

First Anniversary
1 MALVERN SPORTS CLUB

will celebrate its first an-
niversary on Saturday night at
Halloway Guest House, The Ivy,
at 8 o'clock.

The Club was founded by Miss
Grace Cumberbatch a_ former
sprinter of Queen’s College and
the games played are netball,

asketball and table tennis.



x |
There will be speeches’ and He is a guest at the St. Law- the Sale at the Bay cect Girls’
music. rence Hotel. Club; tomorrow afternoon,
> r ,

BY THE WAY

LKLA MAW BAT AT, the
Burmese magnate, was taken
round a Government office yées-

terday. He was interested in the
baskets marked “In” and
“Out.”

He said, “Does everything th
come in go out, and everythir
that goes out come in?” The.
said, “No. But what comes in to
go out is put in the Out basket to
go out.” “I see”, said Ilkla, “and
what goes out to come in is put
in the In basket to come in.” “Not
quite,” they said. “Then,” said
Iikla, “why not have a_ third
basket for what doesn’t go out to
come in?” “It can’t go out until
it has come in,’ they said, “And
can’t it come in until it has gone
out?” he asked. “Yes,” they said,
“not necessarily.” “Don’t you
mean, no, not necessarily?” askead
Ilkla. “Well, yes," they said
Sulkily. “And why ‘not neces~
sarily’?” he asked, There wag no
reply.

Is it a new racket?
OME time ago a small para-
graph in the papers an-
nounced the sale of an old castle
to a syndicate, This is apparently
the Heavicote Castle which was
found to be the ancestral home
of Lord Stableham, and which,

during the summer, was thrown



One morning*in schoo! Rupert
and his pals are surprised to see

the Master leave the blackboard

and walk over to the window im

the middle of a lesson. Next

minute he calls them all round

him. “ There's a buttertly our-

side the window such as | have
ali h

_ 58
FOR EXHIB



LADIES’ ARCOLA SE

BLACK, BROWN,

BLACK, BROWN
NEW SHIPMENT OF

RED, MULTYCOLOUR, TAN & WHITE



DAUGHTER of Emperor Hirohito of Japan, Princess Yori is seen with
her husband, Takamasa Ideda, a wealthy land owner, after their mar-
riage in the Shinto shrine in Tokyo. The bride’s mother, Empress
Nagako, is at right. Marriage costs the princess many royal privi-
loges, including royal allowance and palace residence. (International)

Grenada Honeymoon
OW back from their Grenada
honeymoon are Mr. and Mrs.
George Nehaul who were married
on OctOber 18th, a} Providence
Methodist Church, Christ Church. |
They came in yesterday morn-
ing by B.W.LA. Mrs, Nehaul ss
the former Pat Bullen, daughter of
Mr, and Mrs, C. Bullen of Searles

Improving

M

ior
ere

medical
will be

reasons.
glad to

sut of Hospital soon,
Mr, O’Grady accompanied
his daughter came over



R. WHITFIELD O'GRADY of
Trinidad is now in, the island
His friends
learn that
» is improving and hopes to be

by
fram
Trinidad about three weeks ago

BARBADOS



“IT is hard to imagine a con-
plemporary woman who jis more
'wWorthy of being written about
rut le inclined for it, than the
| Countess Mountbatten of Burma,”
;}says Dennis Holman, at. the start
of his biography of her—LADY
LOUIS.

And the publishers say of her
the dust-jacket:—

“She is . one of, the most
significant and influential women.
; of her age... ”

| on

‘I’ve a Spare’
| BE that as it may, Edwina Cyn-
|thia Annette Mcur.tbatten-chris-
| tened Edwina after Edward VII, a
| godfather—acquired much of this
significance and influence from the
£1,400,000 left by her grand-
father, Sir Ernest Cassel, the
| financier,
| It was at the Claridges party ip
1921 that she met Lieutenan
Lord Louis Mountbatten. P
Later that year, at Cowes” Mrs
Cornelius Vanderbilt,
drum up friends for a cruise in
her yacht, said to Edwina: “Be
a darling and help me make tp the
party. I have a spare man. I think
you may have met him-—Dickie
Mountbatten.”

Borrowed Fare

SO they met again and sailed
away and fell in love, Then the
Prince of Wales took cousin
Dickie to India as his aide on a
tour. Edwina borrowed £100 from
her great-aunt (“He scunds a
nice young man. ... You shall
have the money, my dear’) and
followed him out, second class,

He proposed in Room 13 of the
old Viceregal Lodge (now the
registrar’s office of Delhi Univer-



Factory and an employee of tha and expects to remain here for @| sity), and they were married in
Barbados Publicity Committee. few weeks longer, Carmen is a|1922, biographer Holman noting
\ . r guest at Halloway Guest House,|that it took four men to lift the
Short Holiday The Ivy. huge wedding cake.

M* P. GREIG of Chez-Jean- Lucky Winners hy ij the wee, gay prectiae
Pierre was among the pas- - a penulss ara at|the Mountbattens “foun -
Senger leaving the island by aoe eae oot nied selves with £45,000 a year after
B.W.LA., on Monday for E : , taxation. . . It must be said

last m Saturday, October

Trinidad. now come to hand.

He has gone on a short holiday
visit and expects to be back in
Barbados some time next week,

Left Yesterday
M*: and Mrs. Ascot Michael
were among the departures
by B.W.LA., for Trinidad yester-
day evening. They had beef
spending a short holiday in the
island as guests at Hotel Royal.

for the Doll’s name
drawn the lucky winner was Mrs
Jack Murray.

The Train was won
John Wilkinson.

by

For French Guiana

Grasse was Mrs. Holleaux
French Guiana, who
spending a week’s holiday.
During her stay she was
gust atthe St. Lawrence Hotel.

Awaiting Passage

R. MIKE PRIEST of the

Cable Ship Electra arrived in
the island from St, Lucia by
B.W.LA., on Wednesday last .t
await the departure of the Oran-
jestad for England.

Qhening Sale

Welfare Officer,

18, have
There were three correct guesses
and when

Master

EAVING the island on Tues-

day morning by the s.s. De
of
had beer

a

ISS BEfTY ARNE, Social





for Mountbatten that a good time
was never allowed to interfere
with his career in the Navy even
if his ambitions did remain some-

TF



@ “I FOUND that my husband
in the Regular Army. was spend
ing most of his time with a wi-
dow. He gave her up just after
Christmas, and he has been frank
with me. But I feel bitter and
hurt, though I have forgiven him.

“I need affection, and that, he
says, he cannot give me. He

ts I have been the best mother
in the world to our six grown-up

By B h ae drifting along, companions, but no
€achcomber | | more, S' we go on?’
ee y Reply By CANON HUGH
3 oe WARNER
open to the public at a fee of 5s. IT is one up to you that you did
per person, The visitors were not lose your nerve, You took
shown che emmexe worn. by Sir the blow of his unfaithfulness
alph de Stablehome at Aginh-| ,, alas . 4 , [squarely on your, chin, You re-
court, various suits of armour, a] en tae ee ioe tused to run away from your
bed slept in by Drake, and so on. Look in the section tn which your| marriage. That needed courage.

Occasionally there was a glimpse |
of the present Lord Stableham, |
bearing a remarkable
blance to Captain Foulenough, |
accepting a glass of port from a

look js, according to, the stars, \
MARCH &! to APRIL 2

But. you enterprising,

in right mood

birthday comes and find what your out-

| (Aries)—
resem-' May look as if today is full of obstacles.

; quick-to-perceive
folk can conquer contention if you are

It is clear from your letter that
your husband respects you and is
doing his best to make amends.

You now carry a double burden,
The memory of his treachery will

butler on the terrace, The author-| APRIL. 41 to MAY 20 cTaurus)—| Stick. To forgive is always in our
ities grew ‘suspicious when at en, friendly atepeets Take sensible | power, to forget beyond it, though
lady, having exclaimed ‘That| out time-wasters, keoo work up te eae | time can be a kindly healer,

Jacobean chair must’ ‘be’ price-| 2nd ase only top ideos 7 perl Love has a way, however, of
less,” was told, “Qh, no, You can) < M*¥ 2t to JUNE - 21 (Gemin) —| taking in its embrace the bad as

Sort of day ‘to’ step right ahead if you
know what you should be about. Don’
indulge weaknesses. Keep on the ball!

have it for 50 quid, cash down.” ,













well as the good qualities of the

one we love. This is the mark





M
anxious mS

children. your
“We are back together, but just” Canty

ADVOCATE

The Girl Who Said
‘Yes’ In Room 13

What life on £900 a week has meant to Countess Mountbatten, godchild
of a King, and wife to an earl—By JAMES LEASOR

thing cf a joke to their saphisti-
rated, friends. .. .”

Lady Louis began to travel to
rag, Persia, Burma, Australia,
Tahiti, while her husband sailed
the seas. (“The Mountbattens even
picked the right generation in
which to live. They got the best
of the Century, .. .”)-

3ut it vas nearly closing time
im the pleasure gardens of the
Wet, War brought Lord Louis
new tasks. Lady Louis became
County President for London of
the St. John Ambulance Brigade.
‘She possessed what they require
of their leaders—position and en-
thusiasm.”

Biggest Job

‘TIRELESSLY she toured hos-

pitals in France and Burma and
india: later went!to P.o.W camps
in Malaya and Siam. Her cousin,
Harcld Cassel, who was a P.o,W.
in. Jap hands, wrote to her: “Your
visit was worth two companies of
wm"
With victory came her husband’s
most important job; Viceroy of
India, He was the prime surgeon
at the immense operation which
cut India free from the British
raj. “An incredible feat of diplo-
macy ... and ——— for
averting the bloodbath and
anarchy that would certainly have
followed our departure from In-
dia.”

But what of the chaos that did
result? Says Holman: “For a true
perspective of the Partition rioting
in the Punjab, the events and
numbers involved must be viewed
against the background of the en-
tire sub-continent,

“Responsible estimates (of those
killed) do not exceed 200,000, That
is one for every 2,000 of the popu-
lation, and far less than the death-
roll of a month of the Bengal
Famine in 1943... .”

As always, Lady Louis was
basy, doing “incalculable work
fostering better relations among
the different parties by getting the
Jeaders’ women together in a
friendly atmosphere. . . .”

The “most hopeful sign of the
Mountbattens'’ progress” during

“4 HUSBAND YOU FORGIVE
LOSES HIS LOVE ,

yond him, This is indeed a burden
for you to carry.
When her children, on whom
she has showered so much love,
are grown up and gone away a
mother hungers for emotional
fulfilment more than ever in her
husband. Your feelings are quite
normal,

Face the fact that you are not
likely to find what you need from

irage of yours, not
by vain regrets and moping, but
by sens your life with other in-
terests,

Serenity ...

WHY not try to throw yourself
into some of the social or charita-
ble. organisations in your town?

Go out, and befriend others
even more unhappy than your-
self. Then that vacuum inside you
we something satisfying to

it,

Once it dawns upon your hus-
band that you are no _ longer
turned in upon your own dis-
tress, what is now companionship
between you may blossom out into
something deeper. Even if this
should never come your way,

inner springs of serenity and joy’

will have a chance to flow again.














Snis . JUNE % to JULY 4&8 (Cancer)— § 2 | oO} rea love—t tes oO! its ireum: ni
Snibbo + > foutstanding issues that ied, eden atten: et it it . ; ore. - ORE 01D Fs Neve sain
: Ph tio re 9 = * ,
nm, You are capable when you put ee y Thay. DR EVER “Ty
HE problem of advertise- YO, Solder to task determinedly for many a man has been brought
cdista, lav cuvely & cussion, “ane ens face to face with his conscience Li
i et oe By i” Pt lane fo ae over a ae mee one wparn he a Bd one istening Hours
Y , tw maahineion, . laa ; | Gas rt ye S
design of ‘the advertisements) {iming ani’ wou ay MOK, "Bde Phe same nn eS 4.0081 p.m, — 26 Stem 81m
no should be ‘allowed in Tra-| rush; you may overlook fine lead.” ; ; “Ee pith. The hewn EM Pan he
algar Square.” T hg . : .m. e ws; 4. m.
3 ys al a a eee oe AU LUST 28 to SEPTEMBER $8 (Virgo) Your Burden Daily Service; 4.15 p.m. No Names; 4.45
: Apes fore the ban, Snibbo| —others are striving for many of same| | YOU long for affection and ex- Pm. Sporting Record: 5.00 p.m. Rugb:
ad ready a very tasteful and goals as you. Conrpetition is Reen, so| pressions of tendern He does Fwothe ll 1s pam. s Be Con-
appropriate advertis plan and work with this in mind, that bens cert Orchestra; 6.00 p.m. Welsh Miscel-
gh p roe: eer tis ement tO) You “van make headway. Especiaty | 48 best, but finds that this is be~ tany; 6.15 p.m. Variety Ahoy! 6.45 p.m
g er the facade of the} good midday rays Sports Round-up and Programme Parade;
National Gallery, It showed Nel-| SEPTEMBER 24 to OCTOBER #8 (Liprs) ; 7.00 p.m. The News; 7.10 p.m. Home
son saying good-bye to Emma [3h pine refreshingly on tiptep efforts new. From Britain,
A ‘ e a aaty our planet in generous aspect for you
Hamilton before — the battle Of} pest disposition. Personal affairs in’ fine | Me torists 7.15—10,30 p.m, — 471m
atelelmar. He is saying . “Don’t position: heart and family enero EE Er 1.45
orget to use Snibbo ni and | honoured ; euehr Rae Bb Sith. ‘taowevew,
Pettis aoe : night ey OCTOBER 4 to NOVEMBER 3 Perey French; 8.15 p.m. Radio Newsreel;
mprming. And she replies, | (scorpio) Hater no. dudms about! 8.20 p.m, Dvorak; 8.45 p.m. ial
You’re telling me, Horatio!” | achieving goals today if you go about! Ce Uu Despatch; 9.00 p.m. Gilbert and Sullivan;
| work i. true. Scorpio manner. Take | 10.00 p.m. The News; 10.10 p.m. From
| some fecreatién, too. It replenishes | é 72 Pan: 10,15 p.m. A ers a
energy , - * oO} e Governor of a 'o) yi .
NOVEMBER 28 t9 DECEMBER 23| AT U.S. AIR BASE {oe No Name.
(Sagittarius) Uplifting outlook, new ‘
posstibilitic Take a firm grip’ on self; | M
wold indecision, restlessness } otorists i und
DECEMBER. 23 to JANUARY 21] American f drivin ro the
(Capricorn) You may have certain B itai Orees est base in
authority, responsibilities put upon you} @" n—Burtonwood, near War-
You! .can “pvance through fri ;}ington, Lancs,-—are double:
superiors uit don’t take good thi in American and.
for granted .
JANUARY arto WaRCHs0erAqoartusy} Throughout the “base, covering
‘tre “appiten of your all-round | Several square miles, road signs
ability. urgen Make new friends,|have gone up in duplicate. Both
t rememb ed ones, old friends,} British and ican vers use
too
PERU UARY &t to MARCH 20 (Pisces)—| ¢ base, and now all 175 road
Smart firancial managing should show |Si8Ms are up twice—in American
gains; besiwess, professional endeavours | as well as itish

ffer frech incentive, Certain patronage

ind friends will assist you.
never come across’’ he = says ve o bl
" care y t YOU BORN TODAY; ery capadic,
Leak 3 aretully “at ae lor — have sound home training and follow
may mever see ar other. Ooo. ghert. principles. A more moderate
what a whopper cries Ferdy attitude in desires and pleasures, avoid-
Fox. ‘Let's catch it and. star: ing extremes advisable. Be careful with

a collection !"* ** Certainly not.” whom you associate, but be not too

critical of others. Sueeess ahead if you



‘ t’—'S) ,
One difference: Batian road
signs always order motorists to
: Halt.” American ones tell drivers
to, “Stop.” There are also differ-
ences in d

The duplicated road signs have








—“ROODAL





JANETTA DRESS SHOP

(Next Door to SINGER'S)

e
ENTIRE STOCK ON SALE
Re ny a ag
lg Ty ose Doshi



t

neg vtigtions was a photograph an
American took of her with Gandhi.
walking with his hand on her
shoulder as he used to lean on his
pre nd-niece when going to
prayer meeting.

“t .was a marvellous touch,
demenstrating in a gesture the
new spirit that nad entered into
Byitish-Indian relations and .
‘ihe photograph) made a

tune.”
Ritual Again

AND so an age
the Molntbattens returned to
England—tLady Louis still intent
on helping others (visits, TV
proadcasts in good causes, work
vith old people, and so on).

She is back in. the gracious
world—a countess now (her hus~
band was made an earl in 1947).
Dinner once more is “by candle-
light, a ritual of grace and
ineffable beauty, served by staff in
the navy-blue battledress uni-
forms now worn at Buckingham |
Palace and Clarence House.” 1

Yet, oddly, her biographer makes |
no mention of the private Bill}
she sought to introduce in 1949,
by which she would be able to
anticipate income from the trust
her grandfather left her and get
more money to finance her “pub-
lie duties.”

for-

Ahead

THIS she withdrew when the
Socialist Government of the day
introduced a Bill covering all
women in similar circumstances-—
but why no mention of it here?
After all, it is very important to
her, and a biographer’s duty is
surely to note happenings of such
importance to his subject.

Then the future. What of that?
Mr. Holman is vague here. “Her
achievements have to be consoli-
dated . .” he writes ponderously.
“With each new task there are
further responsibilities. With
every fresh problem her horizons
are extended. . . P

But in which direction and to





| crooner Bing Crosby and mother
jof four sons was

children were at her bedside, She
has been ill for several years,

ing star who gave up her own
film
suffered
while recuperating at home from
a serious abdominal operation a
month ago.

to recovery however and was
able to meet
at a railroad
returned from a trip.



what far view Mr. Holman does
not tell the reader.
—L.E.S.

*Out last week, Odhams, 25s.







spokesman said “on Sunday she
suffered a relapse

say her condition is highly criti- |g AA B TOWN
cal.” (DIAL 2310)

The four Crosby boys were OPENING FRIDAY 31ST
summoned from out of town

schools when their mother’s con-
dition became critical,





THURSDAY, OCTOBER 36, 1952

Diamond Rings

LOUIS L. BAYLEY
Bolton Lane

Following Ginger






AtESY























The Garden—St James,
TO-NITE 8.119

YOO YOUNG TO KNOW"
le

i
PM

MAN IN WI

at Nae

& #AT. & 2
I WANT FO."

GRANGER &

BANGERQUS GROUND

Rene

we

JACQUES BERGERCU is pictured*on
his arrival in Hollywood fro*
Paris. Linked romantically with
American film star Ginger Rogers
during her _recent vacation
abroad, the 24-year-old French-
man is in the U.S. on a two-fold
mission—first, to see Ginger and
second, to sign a film contract.



Bing Crosby’s
Wife In Critical
Condition

HOLLYWOOD, Oct, 29.
Dixie Lee Crosby, wife of
near death as
coma, Bing and

she lay in a

Mrs, Crosby, singing and danc-

raise a
a relapse

career to family,

on Sunday
















(WCILLE NORMAN
RAVHEOND MASSEY

She was considered on the road
Bing on Saturday
station when he
A family

and doctors



2.30, 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.

and continuing Daily, 445 &
















































































































—UP. 8.30 p.m.
at their mercy, You will have PP EAA i HEA a RES
taken a grip of life.

You will be no more dependent = we Se ES IN
upon others for your \peace of BRIDGETOWN || BARBAREES OISTIN
mind , {Btal 5819) | (Dial 5170) (Dial 8404)

J —L.E.S Last 2 Shows TO-DAY TO-DAY TO-DAY
met 2:09 Wee ee 4.30 & 8.30 p.m. 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
Sn rer - PANDORA & THE || “NIGHT UNTO NIGHT’ Brovsht Baek by Special
FLYING DUTCHMAN | jteuuas Lindfors | The, Famous Expedition
(Technicolor) andl Film:
J A “ ”
MOVING NIMES ||| See cattery Shadi ™] “KONI
aA os
TODAY'S Special 1.30 p.m. Dori
piace aces | BY me se

: . ene AU f & Reainte ts otkinrenrainieeers rere

3 by M. Harrison-Gray : PRINCE of the PLAINS || Today's Special 1.35 ps

: : Monte HALE | COWBOY CAVALIER FRI. & SAT.

: Dealer: East $ memmcopiereTee trae ee Jimmy Wakely 445 & § 90 p.m.

Game all : Opening Friday and BRAND NEW DOUBLE

i N : Randolph SCOTT -in SILVER RAIDERS & Action Packed Too

i # > i CARSON crry Whip Wilson “TRIFLE TROUMLES

“ey 4Warnercolor) ooo Le e

: ss 642 Opening FRIDAY owery Boys «also

: 3743 Sat. Special 9.30 & 1,30 “! sHOT \“BOMBA on PANTHER

: : “JUNGLE STAMPEDE & | JESSE JAMES” ISLAND”

i 3 10 chs 2° $ Agi63 i RENEGADES OF SONORA |} Preston Joh SHEFFIELD

, . || FOSTER — =
4 2 Watch Out For Sh cae ae lachaaee Sat. Special 1.30 p.m
| $4 7 ‘ 4 ¢ 10 ; MAbbott & ‘Costello in || SAT. Special 1.30 p.m || “MAN FROM TEXAS
109862 e ; Their First Color Picture ABILENE TRAILS Tex Ritter &
s 5 JACK & THE and “GUN LAW JUSTICE”
£92 BEAN STALK SEX GUN GOSPEL Jimmy Wakely
’ F, 975 =
3
gh i | GRAND OPENING FRIDAY, 31 Oct.
East at
both tal on this Gold Cup : 4.45 & 8.30 P.M. and Continuing Daily
hand, South made the : ‘ asco :
| stror pie avercall of j CHARGED WITH EXCITEMENT
carts. The est ft ms é
bid Three Spades, North:
Hearts and East Four :
S| doubled by South ¢ 7
an unlucky penalty of 3
Room 2 West jumpec }
straight to Four S$; anc }
ut North on spol. $
ing for a minor suit con- :
§ tract, he Lay sow ) :
3 could §
i only bid’ Five Hearts ;
3 tt doubled and West ec ;
A followed by @& WW j
i Piecing Bast with Qa xin vith PRESTON FOSTER - BARBARA BRITTON ;
i set th e n° a i JOHN IRELAND + REED HADLEY J, EDWARD BROMBERG - VICTOR KRIAN
por ng? wn Es He 3
then ¥ 10 to A anc }
i played on Diamonds losne | BARBAREES __ Extra Special
one \e Res
i aoote of BGO more than made : ee a A 7 A (Dial 5170) The Road Safety Short
up for the loss in Room 1}. | ‘IT MIGHT
fansnveonsescasuuessesvesssccseszesss sess eed BE YOU”

Condon Express Service







says the Master sternly, ** You |
shouted not kill a thing just because cocks. Birthdate of: John Adams, 2nd |80Ne€ up as a result of an idea of T E AT R E $
it is rare and beautiful I’ U.S..' pres, Richard Sheridan, | Captain Charles Goodson, the
eS statesman, dramatist, wit, USAF safety officer at Burton~ EMPIRE OLYMPIC | ROXY ROYAL
Me ‘ ag ; a ao wood, One advantage, he be-| Last 2 Shows To-day, To-day 4.20 @ 8.15 | To-day 4.20 & 8.15 day
a oemeienriemecom ———— rine lieves, is that GI i ‘ yr MAN PROM x oF oe
; aur Senin S : “a automati- 445 & 8.0 Basil RA’ MONTRE. Universal Doble
— = a ee) uae or | Sno” | seen | oeee cee com
” ; DAMASCUS TOWER OF |. “Andy Bovine bachole Ca
nicolor LONDON ard OE —
. 7 & MOB TOWN (4 RUN Audrey TOTTER
ITION @ OTHER OCCASIONS #50 YEARS AGO | ri'Gh “Bron, putiritines | qe a
’ Deadend
“ | From the Editorial of the Advo- ; Or a ‘Yerps ars Meradith wards Ps in. re
TOES he “+4 Seereeney Oct. 30th, 1902 THE VATICAN | To-day & Saturday ‘Temertow at 43074) KANSAS RAIDERS
as i Metis ial * eine | e es i e ‘ .
NAVY, WHITE LOW CUT COURTS $13.69 tie sates tale ate Nee | A Fecunicclor ” |£ND OF THE RUREEA cape, | Tomorrow at ti &
, WHITE BUCKLESS & TOELESS.>...... $15.04 fore us and has always ended in rere temerres, cad | scutgiMety | MAN rua
: ig noonshine”, is to be ho 4 “S, IDENTITY
LADIES AMERICAN SHOES ‘herefore, that the present applic |Wac#or Sheik ana UNKNOWN ont Gun —
ue $6.50 —~ $8.37 eants mean business, and that Bar- | Tals of Fiery Love &| Obenime Friday ““Richara Conte Bichard ABER
eta ? bados will not much | re-| High Adventure |, 438 & 815 | Audrey Totter | Andy DEVINE
|tain her invidious position of being | FLAME ef ARABY|Pepublic Double — | iT aasat 980 aam.| om Be
ijthe only civilised community of aa Technicolor! BAL TABARIN | praINSMAN AND ‘| “ AToUR MONEY
T i EVANS WHITFIELDS) jany pretensions, in which the Maureen O'HARA sated tae ioe THE LADY ~
e ° J jbenefits and advantages of elec- Jef! CHANDLER | William Ching IDENTITY | eae
Mm \tricity, both for supptying light | Saturday at 1.30pm and UNKNOWN +” * ea
YOUR SHOE STORE }and motive power, have not been } Pt AINSMAN AND) rHE PARULOUS Opening Saturda Mandy DEVINE
> 4 “i mm javailed of. And it would be cer- THR LADY SENORITA) 4. aie
PHONE: - 4220 tainly. most unwise to pl os | and Starring riren AND Fury “"""* pusners
}necessary obet ae Bs eee eae | ALONG THE Estellita Rodriquez With moe
ea ESS he ay ot] ERS rua Re ae tear comms _| sod Aoens

.

GLOBE
Last Shows TODAY 4.45 and 8.30 p.m.

PICTURE OF DORIAN
GRAY

George SAUNDERS — Donna REED
AND

(| SLATTERY’S HURRICANE

Richard WIDMARK



Opening FRIDAY 5 and 8.30 p.m.






turned into the
world’s foremost
nincompoop, says
Prof. Sayre of
Underhill College.
20.

Century-Fox's

REAMBOAT









CLIFTON

se GINGER
WEBB -ROGIRS

7a

























: te eect iniereremaiaaaiiinten BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE THREE
S ee te anette AER SANSA ne Ha NES gece teem ee -
; ° * os e ° nothing else to look forward to |
; h ; P > F but the almshouse, and then they }
| e I ICise cn er ay or e = back and re-employed an as .
: officer over 65, at a high salary
e ane “ for filling a temporary office j When your BACK
» !
} @ From Page 1 had to pay 10% if he won the in a commercial way, and the, $2,500 he had to pay o ‘ E ee Cr th ised He fats ah. PAO | wes -S09 ACHES
; Continuing after the dinner ad big SWEED. should borrow their own money There was the oad = in n r 1 Cc much money for the post, Jon q ese
jouteaeet ea Eine. nner, act The Government were as from the Agricultural Aids Bank, the memorandum that the Comp- Memb : Said he would not vote for ey Backache is usually caused by lazy kidneys.
pie sola Mag ay nig ; anxious as the commercial com- rather than Government borrow troller of Customs would be Members on both sides of the House of Assembly on increase “which will be a burden | The kidneys are the blood’s filters. When
see pe ie. het in ree not munity to remove price controls, money to speng on them. given the authority to determine Tuesday criticized the proposed 20 per cent. increase asked to the people of the colony.” He | they get out of order, excess acids and
; thatthe haphazard wa toes where they served no useful pur- Speaking on the Medical Ser- what proportion of freight by for on the salary of the Chief Engineer, Water Works De- hoped that the warning was ee en ae the system,
' ie liowe be ae y wie mets a ny — - so = yene Be sete iL, - reading be- . ~oe be dutiable. For partment, whom Government hopes to re-engage for a puma sng wend “there is a disturbed = eee out’
use a when ry e es of me res Ww w it, he did not ’ grea ea controversy over S
oer amen pow -_ enough. were satisfied such action would ports, the medical part of the know that fre ht . plane was further contract period of 3 years. The officer’s present {his matter pene nied
ainod oan had’ decided yo a be in the general interest of the Plan should be improved. He felt more than feelgnt by si i agreement expires on the 19th of December. — : aoe Dedd'e Kidney Pills en oe
things they thought were veils community, that a T.B, Sanitorium should be and he did not know how much They said the officer made the demand in the light of , The tea adjournment was Sls sadehie dd rape enenation
things they thought prior” But there would be limitations. included in the plan that people that provision was but he recent indications given by Government that the Colony '#Xen, and om resumption further! oy C05 srids and wastes s0 thet pures
brought oe ticaiion en ME In times of plenty, they would could be cured of the disease. Two hoped. that people not be could afford t high salari fi “top” officials consideration of the matte; W2S; fresh blood flows to ovd
One of the criticisms he had Sut, controls, but only then. For things would be done at the allowed to get off since they were © pay hig aries to a few “top” officials postponed. | Tham you feel better—tnah hotter sed
| read was that they were bring- WSt#nce_ there was at preSent a same time. They would be doing going to er their method of | When they agreed to increase the salaries of the Heads of | rend cai t0 deen a
| } ing in certain tax proposals be- a Mel tt mem hee a i tae Page ge Be a collecting duties. Departments in the Civil Service. ; remov- y shoul Tasks semine Dodd ees
= that while thes woe’ takes ing the price control arose. But as Plan tg build more schools for 7 ‘wae ag erupt t th These criticisms were mad? They would have taxed the people Diamond Rings | . = a = — with the
% Ghe bece man’s tebecce sil moe soon as there was the suggestion Children who would stay in the were. mi being naked 2 during consideration of a Resolu- to the hilt, and by that time, he bands. ly 3,- at all drug stores. 324
they were not bringing in of exploitation after the removal School for a short time and approve in principle to the pla tion which seeks to authorise the supposed, Government would LOUIS L. BAYLEY j Kid Pills
F new income tax rates. Bi ul ie of a price control, it would be Spend the greater part of the 24 but a member sa 4 cae Governor to enter into an agree- have picked up sense. Bolt | ney
j wie be elementary thet e 2 re d. hours with parents affected with be approving of the other â„¢ent with a person to serve for Lane !
year’s incomes were not earned @ said that opposition against Tuberculosis, He thought that the things which he @id not sanction, three years as Chief Engineer, No Justification
yet, a deep water harbour was likely Government were letting them- were others wha felt Water Works Department, at a ie agreed that everybody
150,000 Tons of S to come from those associated geives down when they had to hice he would support an Salary of $11,520. Consideration Wanted to see the re-organisa- Kee oul
He sai, ons ugar with it for many years, Mer- Send and ask a sanatorium im gmendment that they approved Of the Resolution was however {on of the Water Works, and
e anid tat Sues had reached chants, exporters etc., were for Trinidad or Jamaica to accept the plan with reservation = postponed added that nobody wou!d object e
a stage = ere would be ome one reason or another - posing o es People who were “ire then moved that the House The agreement provides for ‘0 M®. Garrod’s getting an in-} i
a ron ag ae five years Testions. die a a oy Fatt it to into Committee on the Five Mr. Garrod’s further employ- ‘Tease. There was however no ¢ ren... @
to be below 150,000 tons of sugar. the Spneny moved the ov ; â„¢ment on t to be decided by jUStification for a jump in salary
i - the Five Year Plan of Deve enereal diseases and Tuber-~ in terms e dec by



ear Plan.

He did not think, in view of the m culosis took a great toll Mr. J, E. T. Brancker (L) said the Government, the officer has PY 20 per cent, at the end of 3)
sugar negotiations which had "°"' 8d Taxation. ple of the colony. Something that he ‘supposea the members of sisnified his desire to enter. into Yea except of course that it had)
been taking place in recent Mr, A. E. S, Lewis (L), said had been done about venereal the Executive must have shared a new agreement for a further been done in the case of other
years that the British Govern- that it was best for a Govern- : his disappointment when it was period of three years on the same ticials, and there was no reason
ment whether they liked it or ment to have some sort of plan _ On the matter of Overseas De-~ Observed in the Sunday Adve- conditions as in the former Y®Y Mr. Garrod should not de-
not could back down on the but if such a plan was detri- fence Contribution Mr. Lewis ®t that the plan was a triumph agreement, with the exception ™#24 his increase.

agreement, It was possible, mere mental to the interest of the tax- Said that he had got the im. Of the conservative elements of ‘that his salary be increased by ,,/f they had not sat in that
than possible that soon there payers, then they should not pression that the British Govern- the House. What caused him 99% that is, from $9,600 to Chamber a few months ago and
would be another world confer- proceed with it in such a hap- ment were willing to for it, most concern in connection with $11,820 per annum, tack on these abnormal inoreases
ence to regulate sugar. but he hazard manner as they had been He did not think that’ the Gov- the plan was not so mueh what on other salaries, the offiee|



FIT AND
STRONG -




NE ee en Ie we one tS A sre 2 2 CHIMING OE

thought it was reasonable to say doing, ernment should worry themselves Was included, but the th that t Too High would have asked for re-engage~
that from a sense of awakened “I think it is a good idea to about this item for much money Were omitted. The only encour- No ment on the same terms, or at Your children will always be full of tun
justice in the Colonial Empire or have a plan as a sort of frame has already spent on the agement ey, were given by the Moving the Resolution, Mr. the most, a 10 per cent, increase —full of ... have a real zest
from were not into which you can fit your Barbados Battalion and this Senior Member for St. Joseph M. E. Cox, reminded members He wag mystified that it had for work or ... if you give them
going to let down the sugar col- financial picture, allowing Hon. should not be provided for in the Was that there were only possible that “the services of experienced just been decided that the officer HALIBO) GE day. It is rich
onies in remect of they Members to know what to ex- Plan and he was not willing to two outstanding promises which engineers are extremely difficult Would be needed another three o every Gay, ot is Fi
had made. He t they were pect”, he said. “But the plan is contribute to it. were not contained in the memo- to obtain at present and the new years and not two. He would in the and protective vita-
right therefore to assume that one which we have been told was Mr. Lewis continued his critie- tandum, and that they hoped to salary is not considered exces- suggest that nothing could be lost mins A & D—ensures strong bones and
barring war and calam- taken out of the Labour Party’s isms of the five year plan yester- strike oil. He for one could hope give for the services of an out. by reducing the proposed term of muscles, increases resistance to illness.
ities in the West In and Bar- Manifesto,” day, reiterated some of the points that they would strike oil. standing officer @xtension, and» proposed in- Children love taking Haliborange —
bados_ in ’ ey could He felt however that it could he had made on the previous Under the head, Social Service © yo added that “in addition to crease from 20 per cent to 10 the halibut oil is blended with
look f to an average crop have been taken out of the night and said that there were and Education, the party had al- his duties as Officer-in-Char ¢ per cent. He moved that the pure , ‘cio
of 150,000 tons at a price not “Electors’ Association” Mani- certain items which should not Ways believed in the necessity of the W: oan oe a rer 9 Resolution be amended to read Beier reek stirs Caligiows I
below what they were then get- feste, because the only have been put in the plan. providing . children "with a bat 00° 1) ite Worgi, Department, Gnd tor a term of two yeare, at a adults too.
ting. mention he saw of the plan __He said that the Natural Gas midday meal. Indeed, that had OF tl) lls ondinaty | construction ory of $10560. ‘ a
| | “I ask anyone who has a being connected to the “La- Corporation was something he been one of the most extremely WO'k, the Chief Engineer will be Sait enquired whether it was not

better scheme to tell us. I bour Party” Manifesto was did not claim to understand very inviting items which they had Feculved te continue bis expuare- ‘tbl % in thi w ter‘
| begged this House in March in the Daily Press. well. If natural gas was being posed to the electorate before the tion for further water sources poral e for eqmenne is e Wa

several times . . . There was “The Labour Party, as a ‘0ld on behalf of the Govern. elections and which the elector- 49d to carry out all the work oe k eh ia ae wed

the Beasley Report, I said, get Party, has nothing to do with ment, he thought it shoula take ate had endorsed. Hecessary to implement the deci: 1h¢ ere ane iedinlonels hin THE way OF T, G

; it, study it, criticise it, and the ‘presentation of this care of itself, From what he had Could Not Benefit sions in the Five Year Plan in ‘0 go on giving individuals high NICEST WAY AKING
‘ help your Government to form plan”, he said. seen, there was no necessity for Children could not benefit Which a considerable sum of seldries af penslize the . opin HALIBUT OIL



ww the Mr, Lewis said that the Hon. including an amount towards it in fram the instructions which money has been included with unity.
have not had a Senior Member for St, Joseph the plan especially for compen- best teachers available ware able high priority for the improve- He counselled Government not
plan they had said that the plan could a as he felt that provision to give if they were under-nour. ™ent of the Island’s Water supply, ‘ try to exploit the taxpayers as
could improve conditions and ‘#*en from the Election Mani- should have been made for that ished, A considerable number Paying tribute to the services they had done during the past
that {esto of his party because he said from the time the natural gas of eleméntary children of Barba- rendered by Mr. Garrod during two years.
oi it is all there”, and yet they was being worked. If after that, dos were unable because of this his present term of office, Mr.
of Bee ane ae they wens unable fo find the under-nourishment to benefit Cox said he “is a very qualified Abnormal Salary
people of the colony.” J © put up schemes, money, then loan funds or some from the education provided. man who has done a good job Lewis , i
If you can find such a plan in other method of getting the They were labouring under the for the island during the three yates Ee Be the ead he






Actually they had had no plan Your Election Manifesto, what is money should be adopt To handicap of age - » ian )
put forward even to Senslien the use of asking Heads of De- make provision for it in the five they should ia Se er r = Tinndee eae ee on the tion with the staff was of the . Hee & paren *y
furthermore accept as a good Partments to put up schemes for year plan seemed unnecessary to der this other posed. inere: Mr. W. oA most cordial, but he thought that ALLEN & HANBURYS LTD., LONDON, E.2
one. your selection.” he asked. him, A free second ueation Brawto d, (C) "aid that in his he was getting an abnormal sal-
It was quite possible for them At this stage Mr. G. H, Adams, He said that one of the largest should be sale begets view. “ths ol -y belt * k ‘ary. He aceused Government off +
to haggle over a penny for rum °D a point of order, rose to refute if not the largest item in the plan every child in the island, for a ride roar se ng taken “encouraging the Comptroller of] (sa
and tobacco. and keep bad hous- Mr. Lewis’ last statement. was the spending of the Labour course he did not agree th m Customs of breaking his con-]{
ing. ete, pe ontinuing Mr, Lewis said that Welfare Fund. That was a fund everybody should be put in a The officer in question, he ‘act’ by increasing the emolu~|}
The ‘Government had had, Departmental schemes had to be which had been created, It was secondary school if that person recalled, came to Barbados in ent to the post to which he had/t Kor Wika





without any doctrinaire prejudice PUt up. “You had to take some being used as a revolving fund had no ability. Obviously there jou ree- greement #en bro on specfic terms. | }}

to consider indirect taxation in Pf the items which were put up and he did not see how it was would be no point in task, ie a ‘wesleinng, ealary "sete sc felt that the Chiet Engin-|{

disect’"axatign inne sense of, Nave othere slone®, he sad." tant"shany Part of the develop- | Ht is, Just suoh aD crmiasion. $ia00"a. yeur, apart from other MF at, the” Water Works had
. ; ’ “. . at would cause e@ taken t a i n

“Let us see how much we can . mn said that the plan itself : leader writer to say, a ae Now that the riod gr ele 8 | ious ae Ma ald

get out of direct taxation without included = things which were Revolving Fund triumph for the ‘conservative pitted nis Willi pnets tees not have been surprised if the |} .

squeezing people, adopting the already stated and to some of They already had a revolving clement.” Od his jwillingness to remain, Sicer had asked for a 50 per\{] FIRST with the Latest

principle that a bachelor can be diene hanes of them would fund for the fishing industry and He had thought that disendow- nd was asking for an increase by cent. increase, and he knew that{{\

hit harder than @ married man. (rage rere dig ueuing in they were now going to create ment of the church might have 20 ,D@6 cent. taking his salary to (0) Wroctns and be knew thatlt ,

Let us see with indirec: taxation * Ion is not require similar funds for ta pests 4 come into the Five Year ~ Ty 311,520 a year, mmarnbare” wh la into }%t in Ladies Smart Styled

how much we can put on in the implementing but the question {ot howe nae ng Was hard to look forward to the “OS juste hoe Oe

ings at sort,




RACING SEASON














smaller category without hitting W@S whether some of the items He was not for one moment the House to justify it, was |}

at people who have to eat, to Were suitable for such a plan. They had in the Estimates, os ob "iota? for dipendecement 5 os eee Geqods ipateny os ee : a ine wh

wear clothes and who form the Ridiculous about $53,000 as their contribu- The ministers were living off the fron " oO eo a Ww had not ae a ~ fe ng {

bulk of the taxation. “E go ae ne tion to the University College of fat of the land as it were, i iS rae bee ves he uae me remem, wee i
A : . furth oe winat the West Indies and in future ally, no one knew what became |" 4 position to say whether or dangerous practice.
So the House were being asked there are items in this plan which their contribution for the run- of the contents of the collection 2°t those services were as advan-







to accept the proposals in the are ridiculous”, he said, He ning expendit f th - tageous a5 might have He argued that at an early Fine f 3 8 3traws

ineuierendink: Alike deoponiie go. made zefevence “to such ariitem ta id a ae. + 4 ee Diates. sted seins tas Se as’ EO igh been 5 ge Government realised thst |} itting Velvets and Straws ...... $4.32 to
derlying the plan, without tying 88 the employment of someone ture of $55,000 and that was no- which had been made would re- three years were not enough for/§

themselves down specilically. | in. the Labour Commissioner's thing to be placed in the devel- ceive the consideration to which , He submitted that the officer the officer to complete his work,|f} Felt Hats for travelling ... ......, $8.50




When they came to deal with Office. He asked if a plan had ta opment plan. had heard from the lips of “high because when he arrived in the
the Bills and rational alternative be drawn up tq find employment Pe Ldtrie said that they pro- the La bg that when officials’ that the colony could colony, he had to “sit in his office
proposals were produced, the for someone. “It is ridiculous to vided scholarships and there the Honourable introducer re- °%0rd to pay salaries, Saw the for a considerable time without
Government were not so foolish ¥ me that you have been try- again he did not think those were ferred to the fact that no provis- /¢sislature itself increase the tools to do the job.” It was for
as to overlook them, tt on so long to have a plan things that should be in a plan ion had been made for a Gov- Salaries of those officials, and the Government then to ask him
An_ increase a company {aa > ae a job for one civil ser- of that sort. ; ernment printery, he had been therefore he felt there was no to remain for five years instead
wound not wee on at’ He siso vel Z So far as schemes under con- frankly dispirited. A Govern. Teason why he could not make of three,
out, It was not keeping y ieee re Tred to the item sideration were concerned he ment ‘printery should be estab- the demand which he had. Mr. Lewis urged Government
Trinidad with a 40% rate. From aid - thi nsemination” and thought that the planting com- lished in this island. Mr. Crawford asked ‘Can ‘to find somebody who will do
the information -they had had fos of the Live per at the munity seemed to be willing to ° Government afford to pay 20 per the work for the salary attache
from the Caribbean area, com- eee weet te ae , a net foree government into marketing Provision Made cent increase for 3 years?” He to the permanent post,” an
pany tax nragenels would not like Wak che call it an thing schemes. It was merely a case He saw that provision was was not blaming Mr. Garrod, be- added that they were creating
cause any undue pareenee ox Sat saees clan Sele bp & of private enterprise taking ad- made for office buildings and that cause the Government would sit the impression ‘that they “have
prevent companies from coming givi rtificial in: ination aoe vantage of the Government for it was decided to amar new par- down and give any pay asked too much money to give these |i
ba gtr bat ae: Finch had Sorte aby by calling it sahething the purpose of taking the res- liamentary buildings. That was for. people for doing their work.”
course wha . g & ponsibility of calling on planters all very good, but that coul that “one of these They had reduced the retiring

said in an interview with the new. to plant more foo d 7 1 te iorit d
ress was quite obvious, A child He said that those items he P and use up scarcely be termed a priority and Gays these ‘high falutin’ arrange- age in the Civil Service, thereby ||
oan have anid what Mr, Finch had mentioned could be described ‘¢, arable land to plant it in he hoped it would not be quickly ments will come to an end." burdening taxpayers who had





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Selected from hundreds of American and Canadian
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had said, in the Plan as recurrent expendi~ ‘0° “r0PS: “Attention sould have been
’Bus Fares Hat ‘a “p Fhe ned. vo von Wrong given to providing a central post
jus Fa a “pu up” one, e With regard to government’s office for St. Lucy.

There was unwarranted talk of down in the ucts. - ba taxation proposals he said that In the early 40’s when he first

elt

bus fares going up. That was not rede he would prove that Government talked of a deep water harbour
true, ‘Any ‘member who saw the astamemet had” sage 7 less 28 wrong to do what they had and when the ouggeston for one!
necessity for raising bus fares heen pessimistic. The plan was (ne, at that particular time. Of was mooted, opposition to it was
might say so, but they had en- not a real ambitious one. He was ‘8¢, two million dollar loan, he from lighter owners who saw a
deavoured to put on taxation in unable to discover what were “derstood that half a million loss of revenue, but in this day
such a that it could not be tho details of some of the schemes would already be taken as against a deep water harbour was defin-
on to the consumer except put in the plan, schools built, another half a mil- itely needed.
in the ease of rum ang tobacco. ; lion would be against housing at When it was said that revenue
He would tell the public of Bar- He thought that there was the Bay and Pine Estates and a would be got out of spirituous
bados that they had no cause to divided opinion in many sections million would be against the ex- liquors, many of them thought
fear an increase in bus fares. of the community as to the ex- tension of the water services that what was meant was liquors

It was intended to introduce an pedieney of rushing into such which would include machinery other than those made here, He
entertainment tax as soon as schemes. and installation, etc. In consid- did not think they could justify
possible. The rates had not yet Immigration had been men- ering all those items, he thought any increases in the price of
been determined, but from the tioned in the lists of schemes that they should come under rum. Rum, unlike tobacco serv-
Beasley Report, it appeared that and they had been told about it. Capital Expenditure. ed a useful purpose, It was of
$50,000 a year could be obtained But he was sure that many mem- e said that he wanted to let medicinal value. Unless the in-
from that source, bers would like to know what co! es know that he did not comes of the people were in-

It was considered that no hard- progress was being made. They cot r that they should be creased the price of rum was at
ship wo be . imposed by in- had heard nothing from the Joint further. Subsidisation the highest possible limit already.
cre; es Com of the House of the should be reduced. As a means of raising revenue,
of the Barbados Club and legisla in regard to that There should be a purchase tax he had no hesitation in com-
in dening the “field” of the matter? on cars. The Government should mending a Government lottery.
(tax obtain in all a further He did not see the necessity collect one or two hundred dol- They did not know how much
$50, a year, He would also for inserting Dodds Plantation ag lars when a new car was bought was made by the Police lotteries.
ap At jae yet deat om of the schemes, If this a a ue quite sure that when one He could not see any ethical or
bers thou _ the ‘a, a tation was run on a commerc a new car, he would not mor, ounds for condemn
man_ should feel if he basis then it should be treated t too much whether it was "ae ‘ hd


















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PAGE FOUR



—

BARBADOS ef ADVOCATE

Bee a nt Ss Os Peet

ftinied by ihe Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad ..., aridgetown

Thursday, October 30, 1952

LABOUR FACTS

THE annual report of the Department
of Labour is a disappointing document.
This statement implies no critici§m of the
department but is the natural result of
reading a document which notes rather
than reports.

There is a statement in paragraph 34
that at sugar factories and syrup plants
“long hours continued to be worked vary-
ing from 72 to 100 hours per week of six
days.” Yet there is no further reference
to this matter and the reader is left to
reconcile this remarkable statement with
a table showing the average number of
days worked for one week in each month
from January to June 1951 as varying
from 5.38 to 6.63.

To work for periods of 72 and 100 hours
during a six-day week workers will have
to work for twelve hours and 16% hours a
day respectively. Surely something could
be done to alter circumstances which re-
quire workers to work for such long
periods. Even though these hcurs of work
may not be considered excessive by the
workers, ought such long hours of work
to be tolerated int an industry which is the
largest single employer of labour in the
island?

There is no mention anywhere in the
report of the Labour Department of any
action having been taken to prevent work-
ers from overworking in the manner des-
cribed.

Recording without explaining seems
eharacteristic of the document. Tables and
figures are quoted which although they

interesting in themselves leave out more
interesting information.
Of what value is it to know, for instance,

that the highest average week’s earning
of a lighterman was $44.15 and his lowest
$3.30 when the average hours worked per
lighterman are not known ?

Lacking this information one is unable
to appreciate the relative significance of
the fact that the overtime rate for lighter-
men can be as high as $41.92 per trip. Nor
is much light thrown on the subject by
the table which records the number of
persons employed as lightermen as rang-
ing between 322 and 427 in the space of
one month. Altogether it seems that little

is kKiiown by the Labour Department
about the hours of work and remunera-

tion of individuals whose hours of work
and rates of remuneration ought to be
known fully, since without that knowl-
edge attempts to reduce the high costs of
handling cargoes in the Port must inevi-
tably fail. The compilation of statistics
and information about dockworkers gen-
erally could, it seems, be very easily
obtained by the Labour Department if
only they are authorised to obtain it. The
collection, preparation and publication of
labour statistics which include wages,
hours of work and conditions of employ-
ment is indeed included by the depart-
ment in its own description of its duties.

Besides the general incompleteness ,of
most of the tables in the report some state-
ments made therein would not automati-
cally be accepted by everyone. Would
everyone agree, for instance, with the
statement that increases in prices during
1951 were “consequent on the devaluation
of the. pound sterling” alone?

If, however, these and other criticisms
may be made about the report they ought
not to be interpreted as criticisms of the
department but rather as appeals to the
government to make the work of the
department better known to the commun-
ity. So many matters of importance raised
in the report are left without answers and
Taany statements are made without ex-
planation, when explanation might have
helped employers to co-operate more read-
ily with the department.

There are still some people who are not
aware of the services which are rendered
by the department of labour and it would
be easier for the public to be educated as
to the role of the department if a more
inspiring report were issued annually,. It
might even be suggested that half yearly
reports should be issued and that short
monthly statements of activities of the
department should be made to the Press,
as is done by the department of agricul-
ture and other government departments.
It should by now be obvious to everyone
that no progress is going to be made in
Barbados unless there is greater trust be-

tween those in authority and the people
whose co-operation is invited. It is pleas-

ant to read in the annual report of the
department that relations betWeen man-
agement and labour in the sugar industry
were good last year, but might not a bit

more. be said about the few instances in
which port workers did not use the depart-
mental machinery to settle disputes ?

The labour department is perhaps the
most important department of government and
as it becomes better known it may be expected
that much greater use will be made of its ser-

vices, but the information provided in its report
for 1951 is inadequate to give the public more
than a‘ glimmer of its usefulness

































BARBADOS ADVOCATE

A Visitor In New York’





I went to Harlem on Saturday , ‘ night”. Yes Sir! even the weather
nd saw and heard President By Barney Millar clerk was a baseball fan and held |
Truman in his campaign efforts, off his showers so as not to inter- |

on behalf of Democratic Presi- He hoped, he said, that the peo- fere with the World Series, Well, |
dential Candidate Adlai Steven- ple would remember that and to make the story short, the)
son. I had seen the man many vote against him. His mother, yankees won the sixth game to)
times on television but he had now dead, he said, used to tell make it three all. Then you met
ilways appeared a little taller him as a youngster — “Better to people on the bus and subway |
than he actually is and I must vote for what you want and don’t with their portable radios as they |
vonfess to a bit of disappoint- .et it, than to vote for what you just had to listen in to the broad- |
ment in my first — and probably don’t want and get it.” cast, and every store ee
— glimps an

last glimpse of the man, wee The sponker kept. his audience with a television set attrac
is head of the United States o' 3 all afternoon crowd.
A ica. which had just listened to the this game
i President, engrossed for an hour .,28@ Yankees won

This is obviously, a personal 4, more and made many excur- after a tussle — their fourth
ypinion, but coming into line sions into recent history, he~said World Series win in a row and
“ter a leader like the late tg prove that in spite of the re- life in New York returned to nor-
erent. D. Roosevelt, whose peated claims by the Administra. â„¢#! once again.
personality was apparent to ;;
.riend and foe alike, Harry Tru- aa? Nid —_ a a Nearly 500,000 actually watch-
nan must forgive those who ven- Givil Righ o improve the ed the game and untold millions
ure comparison. He is a small eae ghts of his people in followed every ball on television,
nan, but I was confirmed in my Each player of the winning team
dready expressed view that he got over $6,000 and each of the

ertainly seems to be enjoying losers $4,000. | i .

iimself, in whatever he is doing,
And he certainly enjoyed him- _ Did you know that every ——
elf in one of his ‘give-em-hell’ in America must register €a
peeches. He describes one of the time there is an election? And he
Jlanks in one of the Republican must pass a literacy test or pro-
latform as “lousy”, and said he duce evidence of having attended
lid not give a “hoot” about some school for eight years. There has
spect of some matter. been a record registration for the
His daughter, Margaret, was November election and all evi-
, : dence point to the possibility of

vith him and shared in the rous- otin
ng welcome which was accorded Oa oy ca heat ee

er father. She joined lustily in
These literacy test for first

he singing of the “Star Spangled
panner” and seemed to. be oters held in th b-
horoughly enjoying her last in teen . aad tee polling
noments as one of the occupants places throughout registration
f the White House: week. They were administered
Harlem, is of course, the centre = — br 1 egg pe

f the negro community in New
ork and the President sought to a oa ae ~ eaure and
hip up the all important negro Saturday “The Y taanaee. ees

ome for Adlai. The importance
paid $6.50 a session with Satur-
¢ this vote has been conceded on day. counted as’a double session.

it wre mas the President's
ooing. e recounted the To be eligible to vote you must
rts we Desnesrens be a 21-year-old citizen by birth
hs ‘ ed years they have or naturalization — have lived a
cen ih ‘power, and, compared the year in the state, four months in
the county and 30 days in the

resent period of prosperity
election district,

yhich the nation enjoys with
wagon, fittea And the election is not only of

ae great depression which pre-

re ; Nearby, th .

eded it under the Republican Tak Shemaas and loud @ President and a Vice-President.
thus: To be

»gime. And, he offered, Steven- UP With phonograph : i

on as the man to carry on this speaker played records extolling cei: ee Vice-Presi-
9d work, He hit out again and the virtues of Adlai Stevenson, Gant. 2 Senator; F tatives;
gain at the Republican candi- but neither of the shows seemed -ariners of the State Legislature:
ite “Ike” Eisenhower, and has t interfere much with the other. jj4¢es of the various courts. —
nee admitted that he was mis+ oe +7 their listeners, many of * * * a
aken when he said some time Whom listened to each side for a terest: locum:
go, that “Ike” would othe" time before proceeding on their uae nut been Eran a ~

America,



BARNEY MILLAR

ood President. business. It is the re :

‘ port of a Committee
And he ended with an appeal i . . : ; ‘ which investiga‘ the working
» his audience to register, and but even this all important of the Police rs noes of New

te for tke Democratic ticket — business of politics was forgotten
itevenson for President and during last week, when the Base- Seine < ee
enator Sparkman for Vice- Pall finals or World Series as it is above the marie'et Ca en hould
resident, known, was played. This brought }00" te eae
together, the Brooklyn Dodgers, OM ed results of examinations, as
Freedom of Speech champions of the National â„¢ vhmeaad in the Fire Depart-
About half an hour after the League and the Yankees, champ- Trent. Apparently at the moment,
aeeting was over, 1 had a good ions of the American League. “'° ~~ halos does the up-
imple of the freedom of speech The World Champions are de- Pie on the advice of his coun-
yoyed in this community, A cided by the winner of the first S.0rs along with his own ob-
overed wagon drew up at a four games and the interest in servations. {
eet corner about two blocks this event clouded out every Another one is that the entry
way and qa quiet looking man other, The newscaster the night age be lowered to 18 instead of
2t up some loud speaking equip- before the series was due to open, 20, as is now the case. There are
ent, He mounted his low plat- started this way: “Politicians also many terse criticisms of the
orm and proceeded as he said, can now stop talking, teachers personnel of the Force and con-
) carry on from where the Presi- stop teaching and _ soldiers stop ditions are suggested with the ob-
ent had left off. He wanted to fighting....... the World Series ject of attracting a better type of
-now why the President had not is on, individual,
tempted to say anything at all B
»out Sparkman beside mention- _ How right he was! The Dodgers strength of the force is recom-
1g his name at the close of the Won the first game and the mended with the full conscious-
veech. He would tell them. Yankees the second. The third ness of the present increase in
‘oarkman was a representative game went to the Dodgers and crime in the city. In short, there
' what was called the “White the fourth to the Yankees. When are drastic suggestions for the
upremacy Group”, in. the south the Dodgers copped the fifth overall improvement of an organ-
id the ballot ticket of the state game, the question was would jsation which has a very difficult
Alabama still carried the they win the sixth — the series, job to do.
voster and words “White another first world championship? This report — which _ cost
ipremacy” as was the case in The weather announcement that $86,000—come not a moment too
‘e old Klu Klux Klan days, morning promised rain in the soon, and competent judges al-
nat was why Sparkman could afternoon, but a ten _ o’clock ready predict an uplift in the
xt be mentioned in Harlem.amendment said “No rain until morale and work of the Police.

ut to crown it all a cut in the

Our Readers Say; 23.03% (22
© tradition and law enabled this
by-law to be annulled since the
down the cost of living in this court’s judgment was based on
little island, an old English law which had
H, BOTTAL. passed into Canadian law when

Hastings, Christ Church,

Five Year Plan

), The Editor, The Advocate.
vr, I have read.with dismay the

thode adopted” b eanraant Canada adopted the English Code
ea wan ry called, five year October. 20th. in 1867. Yours f. neki

in, e firs int one ques- : . a y;

is is the morality of making Make Believe. Wiorld PROTESTANT.

sepia pay TODAY co benefits £% iM patton, 7 AM ities

hich may, or may not, accrue IR,—The author o ‘0 ‘a

r many years panne. Diary makes the rather naive Tr

The second shock is the repre- statement that the only temporal 7% The Editor, The Advocate,
isible one, under present con= power enjoyed by the RC SIR,—A correspondent in your

‘ions. of charging custom duties Church is that over the very Raper has suggested that the
CIF values. With the U.K. small territory known:as Vaticar Barbados Plantation Owners

‘vernment forcing these islands City in Rome, It must be won- should give a Coronation gift to
purchase most of their essen- derful to live in the make- the Island by relinquishing own-

believe world of the author of ©Tship of lands bordering high-

m the other end of the world Nobody’s Diary. With such a Ways to a depth of 100 yards in

\ save dollars, we are already mentality we could believe that from the road, for the planting

ving to pay exhorbitant prices Czechoslovakia is not under the Of ornamental trees,

‘yy our very existence, as_ is Iron Heel of Moscow. The Nortk This would amount to very
»wn by the cost of living index. Koreang are a peace loving na- nearly 200 million square yards
great deal of this high cost is tion who of their own volition Or 64 square miles 6f land—much

‘ve to the heavy transportation: savagely attacked their brothers, more than one-third of the

‘varges over long distances to Pekin jis not the political serf of Island — representing a loss of

this port, plus in some cases, I Moscow — the Chinese are mere some 64,000 tons of sugar in a

believe, a surcharge on freight agrarian reformers. In the same good year worth probably Two

chirges to this particular port vein, Spain is not the abject pol- Million Pounds Sterling of
cus to the delay ships experience jtical meniat of the Vatican and, revenue. ~

‘ving to the slow unloading rate. in this phantasy, there is no mod- Perhaps your correspondent has

ith government standing to ©? inquisition: in Colombia, . wipers of an tate isle, tended

»dfit b: h freigh - d utifie yan expanded

supanee y shi & ee =m. in May I suggest that the author (and expensive) Depnrtnens of

Com “and “swith 1 of Nobody’s Diary, as an experi- Agriculture, depending for its

prices based on a mark Mp ment, take a trip to Colombia economy on the sale of coloured

PERCENTAGE on landed costs in Observing the following condi picture posteards of Flamboyant

most tases, a cancint expect i aerate ° fave ns oe Bo trees. Or would he suggest that

find any. effo eing ma yt . %
either Soyernunent or me Contry He we Ng de ia tae ceackn, ohaal the supply of Mahogany?

m=: 1

Nbtalin: ae ce cae of some country town in the Seriously, the idea of lining

but the most expensive sources. State of Antioquia and affirms highways with shady trees is a

In fact one can almost see the reasonably loudly several times good one. India is, distinguished

smug. smiles on the faces of (in Spanish) that he is a Pro- for such avenues planted to give

government and commerce at this testant and invite those listening shade to marching soldiers in

latest method of milking the to subscribe to his views, I the last century and you hav

ultimate consumer. I can guarantee -that he will example here on the South ade
The third shock is that in spite only have to pay for a one way of the Savannah.

Coronation Gift

eal foods and’ other imports

we compete with Honduras in

of the Beasley Report advising’ passage and this would put paid Yours ete,
that individual income, tax rates to any fatuous — reinarks about COL, R. W. OLIVER
were already at their limit, being scientists travelling in Colombia sR. WAR. ,

much higher than most places in The return passage money could 24th Oct., 1952. er

these parts of the wae and be employed in saying masses for
with the cost of living being a poor gullible soul that could . we
boosted still higher by the new believe that the only temporal Rifle Shooting
indirect taxes, yet we are adviseG power enjoyed by . the R.C. SIR,—I have an
that income taxes are to be Church is over the Vatican. of research: in ae a ee
inform to write a book on"Rifle Shooting
some months and among the ii I require is

reised right from the lowest jt may be a propos.to
brackets, your readers that

Then comes the increase in 28° the R.C.. dominated Montreal the winning scores each year for
petrol tax, which brings the price ype ee enacted a by law of the Martinez Ch : Shield. I
cf this essential commodity up to + ng all homes. close. their haye not been to trace the
the highest in this hemisphere, Stores on R.C.- Holy days. *Cer= score made by Barbados in 1909

b i ind that B: dos*tain of these stores stayed open
pee Gaby ne ae nok on the Feast of the. Immaculate 224 the Secretary of the Barbados

Fmpire whith uses the LITTLE Conception (December 8) d o_o has ener
American, or wine, gallon for Made a test case in the courts. 9, ty ae endl oping that
measuring petrol sales. This in- Letters were produced in court te 8 oe readers will be able
creased price has to be added to from the R.C. hierarchy to the oe Dane or me. It seems that
the .cost of local transportation, City Council ‘ordering the pas- ©8rados shot for it sometime
which adds that much more to Sage of the by-law. The by-law during February 1909, Any help
the cost of living, was declared ultra vires by the Will be gratefully received.
In view of all this I hope we Superior Court. The above is a L. F. EDMONDS,

shall not be) reading any more typical example of what happens Hon, Sec.
hypocrisy from government that wien the ‘politicians are dom- B G. Rifle Assoc,
they are interested in keeping inated by the R.C, hierarchy, British Guiana.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER - 30, 1952

nen

CURRENT EVENTS

By JOHN GORDON

YOUNG men, I read, don’t want to go to
sea nowadays because it takes them away
from the tennis club. What an age we live,
in!

Shopgirls want the shops shut inconveni-
ently early, so that they can go out on the



WINDSOR WEEKLY BARGAIN BUYS
SEEDS, both Vegetable and Flower
AUTOGRAPH AND PHOTOGRAPH ALBUMS
SEWING AND MANICURE SETS
DECORATIVE PAPER DOYLEYS, SERVIETTES and
Waxed Delicatessen Cups for Jellies and Ice Cream.

THE WINDSOR PHARMACY LTD.
Broad St—Tel. 2292



























TAKE YOUR CHOICE

razzle-dazzle. Elizabeth Allan withdraws i No, 6 and 7 WOOD and COAL
is se she VALOR 2 and 3 Burner Large
her glamour from television because VALOR 1. 2 and 3 Burner Table

finds Sunday work tiresome.

I hope if ever she has to carry her luggage
to a train on a Sunday, as I so often see
tired, weary women doing, she won't
grumble because the porters now prefer to
withdraw their services on Sundays from
the public which pays them, just as it pays
her.

And I hope neither she nor the porters will
grouse if the electricians who make it pos-
sible for them to cook their meals, keep
their Homes lit and warm, and even switch
on the radio, the telephone operators, the
police who protect their homes and their
lives, the busmen, the barman in the pub,
and the little girl in the teashop decide that
Sunday is to be their day off as well.

TURN 1 and 2 Burner Table

2 Burner Table
BEATRICE Single and Double Burner

, AND
PRESSURE Stove: by COLEMAN,
PRIMUS & MONITOR
AT

WILKINSON & HAYNES CO. LTD.

Successors to

C. 8. PITCHER & CO.

Phone 4472, 4687

THE SAD FACT is that we are becoming
so fond of the soft life that a job is now
merely something you do to get money to
spend in your spare time. It must never be
allowed to interfere with your comfort.

I suppose there is some sort of happiness
in that kind of existence, but I am glad I
was born before the idea developed.

For I was lucky enough to learn that the
greatest joy in life is doing a job with all
your heart—better if you can than anyone
else has ever done it — even if it involves,
as it often will, applying yourself to it while
others play.

I THINK Field-Marshals Alexander and
Montgomery are in for.a shock.

Every time they open their mouths nowa-
days they demand bigger and better con-
scription. If they come out of their ivory
towers they will find opinion growing in this
country that we have had just about enough
of conscription, and that we ought to end
it before it ends us.

It is a gross and costly misuse of the
nation’s manpower. It is disrupting our
economy, It is pulling men away from the
production of goods vital to our existence at
a critical time when the Germans and Japs,
unhampered by such burdens as we are
attempting to carry, are launching attacks
to drive us out of ‘our markets.

It perpetuates the dangerous folly of
keeping British troops on the Continent to
become pawns in international brawls and
jealousies and by so doing is a peril to our




(UTZ ZS
= SUGGESTIONS

Lattern

security rather than a guarantee of peace.) E.P.N.S.
\ A.1, Quality
“AH, BUT what of the Russians?” tle :
generals say. There is more fear of the Rus- 53 Piece Canteen
sians in Chicago today than there is in for Table of Six...............,.. $ 81.65
Europe. 79 Piece Cante
Open war has too many perils now for the anteen
Kom iin’ to take the gamble, That doesn’: for Table of Eight................. $168.83
mean peace of course. It means a new 117 Piece Canteen f
Kremlin plan. To divide us from America for Table of Twelve.............. $219.57

by subtle propaganda. To go underground.
To burrow into our foundations. To rock
our structure and bring it down from within.

As so many strikes, go-slows and similarp}
skulduggeries are showing, there are still}!
enough dupes in this country to give Stalin
the hope that he can’ achieve his malignant
purpose without challenging fate by setting
his armies on the march.

That sort of war won’t be won by soldiers }it
strung out across Europe with rifles in their
hands but by good honest men in workmen’s
dungarees with sense in their heads and
national pride in their hearts.

THE WEAPONS they need aren't tanks,
guns or atom bombs, but comfortable homes,
good wages, less taxation, plenty in the
shops to buy.

Give them those and Stalin will soon have
as few worshippers in this country as a cat
has fleas.

ak



71 Piece Dinner Service—$67.53
110 Piece Dinner Service—$81.61
24 Piece Tea Set........ $13.47

* * ok }
;
NEXT June we crown a new Queen. A | en Pee eo

Queen of youth as lovely as a rose, as bright
as a spring morning. Sold in Services, Sets or Individual Pieces
Far more than any other monarch in our
history she will be the People’s Queen. ‘
And for the first time in all our history, a 0S a
by the miracle of television, not merely 9 e
those privileged by birth or precedent but
all her people can be with her in the Abbey SSS FFF :
on that solemn day.
But some of those old moss brains, who
can never see good in anything new, are try-[Â¥
ing to put their foot on that.

THEY SAY how shocking to suggest that
the Queen shall be ‘televised at the solemn
moment of Communion, To be seen by
people standing at bars!. Or sitting in carpet}t
slippers, smoking cigarettes, perhaps even]})

having a glass of beer. What a desecration J}
of religion ! {

I suggest they consult the Pope, whom—although )
I am not among his flock—I accept as an authority |
on religious standards. When he officiates at]
Mass, he has the ceremony televised and filmed.}}}

His view is that it does not matter in the}{
slightest whether the solemn ceremony is seen|}}
by a lounger at a bar or a man sprawling in
comfort in his home. What matters is that
somewhere a soul may be touched,

I RECOMMEND that view to our obstructionists.



ROUND the cgub dinner-table we picked unhesi- DESSERTS FOR PARTIES
tantly as the. most fascinating news of the week Ice Cream Mix Start party with }
‘ your off
the announcement that the Scottish woman doctor|j) Tapioca in Pkg. a Du per bot. {
who became a man has married. \ —aoeertt FROZEN FRUIT
We discussed the mystery of such transforma- ——. Powder ”
tions, “oyal Puddings Pineapple
“The strangest thing,” said the doctor among Ln. deen ae OZEN ABLE
us, “is that no such change has ever been known wee dicuiee + thing _— .
to take place in any animal, although . birds, -irape Nuts Small size .64 each
insects, and oysters change their sex, as well as jalt Salmon 3-1 size $2.25 each
an occasional human being.” Salt en Brussel Sprouts
“May such a person marry with the expectation bon ane mall size .64 each
of having children?” he was asked. pice tyson aoa Ore aah
Paice, MElnate teh tnee —Small sise

MEATS
Milk Fed Chickens
Milk Fed Ducks

“THERE HAVE been cases,” he replied, “of
women whose transformation towards male has
been reversed by medical treatment marfying, and

3-â„¢ size $2.00 each



having children. eat g — for. sour
“But there are no records of any woman who Ox Tail CANADA DRINKS

changed into a man and married ever becoming | Minced Steak Early.

a father.”—L.E.S,

DRESSES




FHURSDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1952
pietebabeindideepunsteadiaainenummniiminn



Board Of Health Reject

Joes River

THE General Board of

Application

Health at their meting yester-

day rejected an application of Messrs. Joes River Sugar
Estates Ltd., which asked that the Board substitute an-
other plan for the plan approved in connection with land
at Horse Hill Plantation, St. Joseph.

The Board decided to advise
Joes River Ltd. to withdraw the
plan already approved and sub-
mit-the new plan.

The Board approved of the fol-
lowing:

In re Division and sale of 16
Acres, 2 Roods 21 Perches of land
in lots at Highgate, St. Michael,
by Wilkinson & Haynes Co., Ltd.

Alteration of approved plan by
dividing lots numbered 39, 40, 41
cad 42 into 7 lots numbered 39 to
4

Division and sale of 47,404 sq.
ft. of land in lots at Fairfield,
Bridge Road, St. Michael, by Mrs.
Meta St. Clair Edwards.

Application of Mr. E. D. Rogers
on behalf of Messrs. Barbados
Co-operative Bank Ltd. for ap-
proval and amendment of altera-
tions of approved plan of land at
Maxwell, Christ Church, so as to
allow reversion to the original
gaa in respect of certain

Application of Messrs, Year-
wood & Boyce, on behalf of Mr.
D. E. M. Webster, for approval of
amendment of approved plan for
division of land for sale at Gibbes
Plantation, St, Peter.

Division and sale of 17 Acres
0 Roods 9 7/10 Perches of land
at _Friendshi Plantation, St.
Andrew, by Mr. J. A. Haynes.

Approved Lots

The Board approved of lots
one to 75 in the application for
division and sale of 411,693 square
feet: of land in lots at Deighton
Road, St. Michael, by Mr. W. T.
Gooding et al and approved of
one ‘part of the plan for the divis-
jon and sale of 20 acres, three
foods and six perches of land in
ots at New Castle, St. John, by
New Castle Estates Ltd.

..An application was made for
the division and sale of 34,453
sguare feet of land in lots at
eae Christ Church, by Mn
¢. St. Hill, The Board decided

ask Mr. St. Hill to widen the
road to 14 feet.

\The Board postponed until
March approval of the division
and sale in lots of 238,142 square
feet of land at Pine Hill, St. Mi-
chael by Mr. Neville William
Mountjoy Carter.

The following were deferred:

Division and sale of 265,572 sq.
ft. of land in lots at Green Hill,
St. Michael, by Mr. L, L. Toppin.

Division and sale of 195 Acres,
3 Roods 26 Perches of land in lots
at Walkers Plantation, St. An-
drew, by Mr. G. L, Farmer and
postponed the application for Di-
vision and sale of 317,451 sq. ft. of
land in lots at Grazettes Planta-
tion, St. Michael, by the Barbados
Co-operative Bank Ltd.

Present were Dr. E. B. Carter,
Chairman, Hon. V. C, Gale, M.L.C.,
Mr. J. M, Kidney, Dr. J. P.

"Mahony, Dr. H. G. Cummins,

.C.P., and Mr. W. Abrams, Gov-
ernment Chief Sanitary Inspector
whose report for the month of
August was received and circu-
lated.



Licences To Be
Issued For Milk

Licences are to be issued for

the importation of condensed and
evaporated milk to arrive in the
eolony between November and
January next year. Ceiling prices
will be fixed for both of these
items.
‘Importers have also been noti-
fied that consideration will be
given to the issyance of licenced
covering the importation of ap-
proximately 500 barrels of pickled
beef to arrive between January
and June, 1953. This commodity
will be imported from Australia
or New Zealand.

JOOS OOO00O00004



Three Houses
Residents Use
Spring Water

People of the Three Houses
district who have no pipes at
their home are more. fortunate
than many people in country dis.
tricts who have to walk long dis-
tances for water. There is a
spring in the district from which
clear water gushes and flows in
a narrow ,

An old woman told an Advo-
cate reporter yesterday that she
knew the spring ever since she
was a little girl, and her grand-
mother used to tell her how
children in her grandmother's
time bathed in its waters.

Yesterday about two dozen
women were at work by the
spring Washing their families’
clothes, as they chatted from one
conversation to another. The line
of them on either side of the
Stream about four feet deep
which flowed from the spring
was about thirty yards. As the
mothers washed the clothes a
number of little children played
lower down the stream.

At the side of the stream is u
stretch of pasture land, anq here
the women spread their clothes
to bleach. It was interesting to
watch how each woman had her
allocated spot for hanging’ her
clothes, and how a pathway ran
between them.

The old woman said that the
pipe is nearly a mile from_ her
home, and it is a blessing that
she has not got to trudge all that
distance for all the water she
needs,

BRITISH COUNCII, BOOKS
AT SPEIGHTSTOWN

An extensive selection of Brit-
ish Council Publications will be
on view at the Speightstown
Branch Library for two weeks
from Friday, 7th November. It
includes the most recent addi-
tions to the series “The Art in
Britain,” “British Life and
Thought.” and “Writers and their
Work.” These authoritative inex
pensive and admirably produced
little publications make an at-
Yractive and highly ‘intdresting
exhibition, which is well worth 2
special visit,

In Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

CABLE AND WIKELESS (West indies!
Ltd., advise that tney can now communi.
cate with the following ships througn
their Barbados Coast Station:—

S.S. Peter Jebsen, S.S. Sirena, 5.S.
Rosario, S.S. Ampac California, 8.8.
Alcoa Polaris, 8.S. Giulia, 8.8. Tindra,
8.8. Guif Victor, 8.8. Hah us , MLV.
Avgasta, SiS.'' Argentina, SS. Trya
S.S. Kallada, 8,S. Melrose, $.S. Gerona,
S.S. DeGrasse, S.S_Logans Fort, S8.S
Balaklava, S.S. Lillohus, M.V. Katrine
Marsk, S.S. Caraibe, 5S. Ciudad De
Bargulsimeto, S.S Loide Guatemala
..S. Florentia, S.S. Cazador, S.S.
S. Paula, S.S. Malmanger, S8.S. Auriga,
S.S. Peter Jebson, S.S. Polyglory, 8.8.
Aslaug Rogenas, S.S._ Strategist, S.S.
Ibis, S.S. Argentan, S.S. P. and T
Trade", S.S. Patuca, S.S. Stad Leiden,
S.S. Hoegh Hood, S.S. Steelore, 8.5
Ogna, S.S. 8S, Monica, 8.S. Durango,
S.S. Sunwalt, S.S. Empire Patrai, S.S
Drott, S.S. Westchester, S.S. Scherpen-
drecht, S.S. Kongsstein, S.S. Dundrum
Bay, S.S. Stentor.





MAIL NOTICES

Mails for Madeira, United Kingdom,
Antwerp. and Amsterdam bv the 8 §
jestad will

“Oranj closed at the General
Post Office as under:—

Parcel Mail at 12 (noon), Registered
Mail at 3 p.m., on the 3ist of October,
1952. Or ry Mail at 8.30 a.m., on
the Ist Nov

. .
Mails for St. John N.B., Montreal,
Charlottetown P.E.I,, by the M.V
“Canadian Cruiser” will be closed at the
General Post Office as under:—

Parcel and Registered Mail at 2 p.m..
Ordinary Mail at 2.30 p.m. Today.



A



BARBADOS

14 Lighters Loaded
Molasses F



or Canada

THE shipping of molasses was the main activity on

the watertront yesterday morning.

Fourteen lighters were

drawn up alongside the wharf opposite Prince William
Henry Street from where the loading was taking place.
Two cranes were put into operation to assist in the load-

ing. .

Two firms are shipping the
molasses. They are S. P. Musson,
Son & Co., Lid. and H. Jason
Jones & Co., Ltd. S, P. Musson,
Son & Cl. Lid. are shipping
224 puncheons, 50 barrels and

. 8 half-barrels. This shipment is

going on the Canadian Cruis.r
for Charlotte Town and Quebec.
The shipment by Jason Jones &
Co., is to be completed this morn-
ing, but yesterday the 286 ton
Molasses tanker Athelbrook le:t
port for Trinidad with a quan-
tity of 103,000 imperial gallons of
molasses. The vessel arrived on
Tuesday evening.

Spiders, handcarts and lorries
were employed in transporting the
molasses to the wharf-side, and as
‘a result, traffic found it difficult
to manoeuvre.

Meanwhile,’ the unloading of
artificial. manure and empty
drums was in progress on the
lower vortion of the wharf near
the warehouse of Messrs, Gardi-
ner Austin & Co,

SCHOONER OVERDUE

The Harbour Master’s Office is
in receipt of the following cable,
which was intercepted from North
Post Radio, Trinidad. Quote:

“To all ships—Schooner Lady
Sylvana left Trinidad for St.
Kitts via Carriacou on October
15th and has not yet arrived at
either of these two places.



Description:— Single mast grey
hull with markings W 32
painted on sides, On board six
crew and one passenger. Ships
are advised to keep lookout for
this vessel.

GENERAL CARGO

The schooner Emeline arrived
in port yesterday morning from
British Guiana with general cargo
for the island.

The cargo included 80 tons of
firewood, 700 bags charcoal, 30
wallaba posts, one bicycle and 750
bags of rice bran, The schooner
is under the command of Captain
G. Sealy and is consigned to the
Schooner Owners’ Association.

CANADIAN CRUISER HERE

The Canadian Cruiser which
arrived in the colony on Tuesday
evening from Trinidad brought a
mixed cargo to the island, This
ca... wiclided 50 cases of limacol,
17 cartons of glassware, 30 car-
tons of Angostura bitters, 15
tierces of oranges, 75 cartons of
toilet paper, 103 carcasses of veal
‘and 7 cases of shirts. The vessel
is consigned to’ Gardiner Austin
& Co,



PASSENGERS AND CARGO

Besides the 14 passengers which
it brought to the colony, the
French liner’ De Grasse also
brought 26 cases of apparel, 65
bales of hard board and 35 cases
of cream, The liner which is un-
der the command of Captain FP.
Prigent, is consigned to R. M.
Jones & Co., Ltd.

CANNED FRUIT

The Harrison line steamer Bio-
grapher which arrived in port on
Monday brought a quantity of 200
tons of cargo to the island. This
cargo consisted of 67 cases of
canned fruit, 61 containers of
canvas shoes, 54 chests and 225
packages of tea, 36 loose stoves,
100 cases of smoked herrings, 25
cases of whiskey and 25 cases of
shoe polish.

The 4,073-ton vessel also
brought a quantity of stationery,
footwear, cycle accessories, paint,
cement, glassware and motor car





WALK-OVER

SHOES

WORN BY MORE
‘MEN FOR THE

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‘COMFORT MILES”

These fine SHO
one of the most
in England,
material,

in all sizes.








, manufactured in
p-to-date factories
of specially selected
are now obtainable in
Black and Brown Willow Oxfords

’ WALK-OVER
FCR

COMFORT

WALK-OVER
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QUALITY



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WALK-OVER TO -

WALK-OVER
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STYLE

10, 11, 1

CAVE SHEPHERD & (0. LID.

2 & 13 Broad Street

parts. The Biographer has a crew
of 51 and is under the command





cf Captain R. F. Longster.
COPRA

Besides its cargo of copta, 350
bags in number, the schoone

Lady Steadfast which arrived in
port on Monday from St, Luela
also brought 37 packages of fres!.
fruit, 66 bags of peanuts, 29 bags
of coconuts and 50 bales of cotton
The schooner is under the com-
mand of Captain L. A. Marks and
is consigned to the Schooner Own-
ers’ Association.

Another Communal
Bath For
St. Michael?

At the meeting of the Commis
sioners of Healt of the parish
of St. Michael which is fixed for
1 o'clock to-day, members will
consider the erection of an addi-
tional communal bath.

The Commissioners are also ex-
pected to consider a motion by
Mr, E. D. Mottley, M.C.P., deal-
ing with remuneration for extra
hours of work put in by the Ine
spector supervising the labour of
the Sanitary Department

Workers Scrub
Mossy Gutters

Workmen were busy yesterday
along St. Mary’s Row scrubbing
and washing the mossy gutters.
For a long time these gutters were
in a bad state with moss and
people complained about them ag
being dangerous.

The work is near completion
and the workmen have turned
along Mason Hall Street carrying
out the same process,

SEATS PAINTED.

The seats placed in Trafalgar
Square around the fountain were
scraped and painted yesterday
by workmen.

For. a long time people com~
plained about the seats needing
repairs and painting, and now
the opportunity has come which
makes the place look tidier.

nD

VESTRY TO DISCUSS
COKONATION PLANS

The St. Philip Vestry is expect-
ed to meet to-day at 11.00 o’clock
to consider among other things,
a circuler from His Lordship tie
Bishop relative to plans for the
Coronation Celebration and a
motion by Mr. R. S,. Weekes that
the number of exhibitions at
Combermere School be increased
by two.

DR. JAGAN VISITS
HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY

Hon. Dr, Cheddi Jagan, M.L.C..
Britis) Guiana, was among the
large audience which attended
Tuesday's meeting of the House
of Assembly

It was one of the largest crowds
ever to attend a meeting. Every-
one was interested in the discuss-
iéns on the Government's Five
Year Development Plan of Cap-
ital Expenditure and Taxation

Another large crowd was pres-
ent last night to hear further dis-
cussions of the Plan.

Corner Stone Laid

On Sunday evening last at 3.30
o'clock the corner stone of the
St. Nicholas Episcopal Orthodox
Church, Welches Road, was laid,

The Church was filled to capa-
city to witness the ceremony.











Styles include

Two Tone Oxfords in
Brown and White
Brown and Tan
Brown Susde and Brown

CASUALS in
Brown and White



SUEDE BROGUE OXFORDS in
Brown, Navy and Black

NO STYLE
Priced higher than

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a Pair

JOHN WHITE

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Willow

ADVOCATE

MEMBERS



CRITICISE

FIVE YEAR PLAN

@ From Page 3
state lotteries, so long as
country stayed to benefit.

the

V.H.F. Equipment

He noticed that there was p-o-
pored provision for V.H.F. equip-
ment for the Police—to complete
the requiremerits of the Police
Department, He would say that
what was necessary for the
American Police Department or
Scotland Yard was not necessar-
ily necessary for Barbados.

As. to entertainment tax, the
most should be taken from the
high-priced seat of the theatres.

He said that one should be
lad to win even the amount
sovertnment suggested might be
taken from the big sweep, fur-
thermore grudee that amount for
a beneficial purpose.

Mr. V. B. Vaughn (I) said that
plans began with Russia, and
there followed many other plans,
but the one hefore them was a
most extraordinary plan, There
was) much wrong with that: so-
called plan; so much wrong with
what the Leader said in intro-
ducing it, that he did not know
from where to begin his con-
demnation.

He would, he said, quote from
several documents to establish
his contention that the proposed
taxation was entirel unneces-
sary, a taxation to be tinposed on
an already hard pressed people.
The Honourable member when
introducing the plan could
searcely have realised how ironi-
cal he was when he invited any-
body to put up alternative

schemes for the plan,
He could not put forward any
because he personally did not

feel that additional taxaticn was
necessary regardless of the high
sounding name which the Gov-
ernment had given to that wick.
ed document. The purpose ‘be-
hind it was purely for the pur-
pose of increasing the revenue of
a rapidly growing bureaucracy.

They had to face the fact that
Barbados with its present econo-
my and even its potential econo-
my could not afford the expens-
ive machinery of administration
which Government was planning
The Government could only
afford the type of Civil Service
that was absolutely essential,
and not the type desirable to suit
the designs of themselves. If
they continued to burden the
people with expensive adminis-
tration, their present standard of
living would remain static.

They had been in the habit of
comparing their conditions with
backward places, but they should
compare them with places like
Puerto Rico and the American
Virgin Islands.

Mr. Vaughan absolved Profes-
sor Beasley from any blame
“for this crime” adding that the
Government had “preferred to
follow its own feelings.”’ He said
that as soon as it was known
that the plan was the result of
the programme advocated in the
Labour Party’s Manifesto, they
could no longer fail to recognise
“the unpardonable ignorance
committed in the plan submitted
by the Government for ratifica-
tion by the House,

Referring from Professor Beas-
ley’s report on the Fiscal survey
of the island, Mr. Vaughan said
“Professor Beasley analysed the
economy of this country and its
fiscal practices, giving a histori-
eal rev'ew of the revenue for lpng
years past until quite recently,
and he came to the conclusion
that if Government is to meet its
commitments seven years from
now, with its present Civil Ser-
vice, it will have to raise ad-
ditional revenue of the order of
$1,300,000."

$13,000,000

That meant that they would
have to collect thirteen million
dollars by 1958 if they were to
carry on with the present estab-
lishment. Professor Beasley ad-
mittedly told them that he came
to those conclusions on the as-
sumption that the colony would



continue its present commitments

without further undertakings.
mowever, Government did
accept those conclusions.

Professor Beasley
counted recent aevelopments in
the sugar industry, and although
Government did not
them, it still ignorantly came to
the same conclusion,
more, Government also ignored
the pertinent facts of the recent
sugar agreement.

Mr Vaughan quoted from an
issue of the Caribvean Commis-
sion Bulletin in which it is stated
that “the Commonwealth Sugar
Agreement signed on the 2ist
December, 1951 constitutes one
of the most important landmarks
in the whole economic history of
the British West Indies; its pur-
pose as set out in the Preamble
is for a long term agreement for
supplying sugar to the United
Kingdom, etc....” and said that
it meant that the Imperial Gov-
ernment had departed from its
traditional economic policy to-
wards primary producers of
sugar, and had given a guarantee
to the British West Indies anc
Commonwealth countries, there-
by protecting the sugar producers
from the competition in the world
market,

Historical Departure

He hailed this step as “an
historical departure from Im-
perial economic policy,” and said

that “because of this new sugar
agreement and the recent scienti-
fic development in the production
of sugar, the colonies are as-
sured of the revenue which Pro-
fessor Beasley felt we would
have to institute taxation for, and
which the Government had insti-
— more than he had suggest-
ed.”

Mr, Vaughan quoted a_ long
list of figures for the past seven
years to demonstrate the im-
portance of the price of sugar to
the revenue of the colony, an
branded the Government as be-

ing “hopelessly poor at fisca:
forecasting.” He saiq there was
no justification whatever in the

light of the facts he had given, for
raising taxes and burdening peo-
ple in order to meet the commit-
ments of the Civil Establishment

If beyond those facts, at some
future date the colony experi-
enced a recession in the price of
sugar, Government should adopt
a policy of retrencl.ment rather
than burden the taxpayers in or-
der to maintain the Civil Service
on its present establishment. He
urged that in such a case the ory
remedy was entrenchment. anc
run the administration of the
colony on the “minimum. skele-
ton” staff.

Economic Development

He said that all the develop-
ment plans by the various gov-
ernments of the world meant eco-
nomic development — permanen
employment for thousands in the
case of Barbados,—-But what did
one find. Out of a propoved Capi-
tal Expenditure of 16% million
dollars, Gevernment had only
earmarked $389,000 to be spen‘
on agriculture,

“The plan,” Mr. Vaughan said
“ig self condemned,” and _ he
charged, “the Leader of this gov-
ernment is unpardonably ignorant
ef the elementary principles of
economics.”

A Development Plan for this
country, Mr. Vaughan said,
“should mean a plan in agricul-
ture principally.” He quoted from
various documents — the Report

bv Sir Frank Stockdale, the
Flood Committee — and the Ter
Year Plan — to show the em-

phasis which was always laid or
the Development of the agricul-
ture of the island, by means of

@ On parce 6
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LOUIS L, BAYLEY
Bolton Lane

——— ESS
As a Result of very Heavy and Opportune
Buying, We are able to Offer

THE BEST SELECTION AT
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| JOHN WHITE SHOES

















means made just right

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not

further dis- |

discoun:

What was |













ve



PAGE FIVE





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use ‘Cetavlex’ ror wounds, CUTS, BURNS, SCRATCHES, ETC.

‘Cetaviex’ cream
The all-purpose antiseptic

Sole Agents and Distributors
A. S. BRYDEN & SONS (BARBADOS) LTD.
BRIDGETOWN

A product of
WAPERIAL CHEMICAL (PHARMACEUTICALS) LIMITED
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96c. per tin CRAWFORDS CREAM CRACKEKS—per tin 960
16c. per tin SARDINES—per tin .. 16e,
32c. per pkt. HUGOS FRUIT SALAD—per pkt. B2e.
The above Items for Cash and Carry Customers Only

GALANTINE VEAL, HAM, & TONGUE—per tin ....., 89e.
SMEDLEYS DESSERT CHERRIES—per tin .......... 900,
SMEDLEYS STRAWBERRIES—per tin . PO ir
SMEDLEYS BLACKBERRIES—per tin .............5- oa

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QUAKER MACARONI—per pkt.





CAMPBELLS PEPPER POT SOUP—per tin wee be,
CAMPBELLS CREAM OF M IROOM SOUP—per tin 46e.
CAMPBELLS CREAM OF CHICKEN SOUP—per tin.. 46¢.
MAXAM CORNED BEEF HASH—per 1 Ib. tin < cpne
MAXAM STEAK & KIDNEY PUDDING—per 1 Ib. tim 69¢.
SALISBURY CORNED MUTTON—per tin ......... 68ce.
DENMOR BONELESS HAMS—4-lIb. tin $5.65
DENMOR BONELESS HAMS—2', Ib. tin 3.76
AYLMERS PORK & BEANS—per tin 38e.
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COCKADE FINE RUM

STANSFELD SCOTT & Co., Ltd.








PAGE SIX



Calvert Fishing Boats
Near Completion

the stern) holds a rope while the spar comes slowly down. In the
to lower a spar.

LOCAL fishermen and boat-
owners alike are anxiously look-
ing forward to the launching of
the new type Calvert Fishing boats
which are being mass produced
at the Reef Grounds. There are
those who-are waiting to criticise
the design while others will
praise the performance,

The Calvert boats will replace
those ch were completely
destroyed during the heavy seas
and high Winds along Lee

rope and conveniently lowers at
whatever speed he likes. This
vope runs from the stern, through
& block on the tip of the bowsprit,
and is attached to the spar.

A bolt through the bottom part
of the spar forms an axis on which
the spar pivots. This bolt is kept
in place by a split pin, A pipe
i Shreve the apes. forms a sleeve to
ward Pre wear of the wood.

ward and parts of t

coast of the island the night When the bolt is removed, the
of x 2 and the morning end of the spar ean be raised from
ot a 3, 1951, the base to the deck. It is a very

boat building pro-

simple system, needing only a man
gramme, first of its kind ever

and a small boy to operate it.

to take place in Barba was These spars weigh ap-
started x the paypal of prosteantely’ 180 pounds, and with
Assembly Passed a resolution for #0 tional twenty-five pounds
$70,000 and the Legislative Coun- i one can imagine the in-

in

conveniences caused when in an
ordinary fishing boat three men
have to raise and low@r a spar.

cil coneurned.

Crews ofthe boats which were
damaged gr destroyed received
subsist@ne@allowances; funds were
provi iy the Government of

amaica t@isend a small quantity
of canvageee Barbados t assist
with the amme and the Gov-
ernment of British Honduras sent
Barbados 14 shipment of Santa
Marin harttwood which was most
useful for-equipping the interiors
of the boats.

Barbadigns everywhere sym-
pathised with the fishermen that
morning df December 3 when the

vast damage was reported and
everyone ¥ealised how seriously
the local ‘fishing industry would
be affected;

Mr. R, A, Calvert came to the
industry’s Assistance with a de-
sign of boat which would not only
be easier te-handle, but more at-
tractive, comfortable and better
equipped.

When the keels of the first few

Calvert boats were laid, many
hosat-owners doubted their ability.
They could be overheard saying:
“Wo prefer thr dolphin how; we
nrefer thie: we prefer that.” but
today, now that twenty-four of the
bests are nearing completion,
wnother story is haénrd, They are
singing praises of the Calvert boat
even before seeing her perform-
ance.

My. Calvert has desiened a vast-
ly iniproved typeof local fishing
boat which will earry a fixed keel,
weighing about 1,760 pounds, of
iron cast in conerete. Crews will

“ escap® ome of the present hum-
burt of shifting large poundages of
babllest as is at-nresent done in
tr Jinary type ofef chine hoat,
Tho inboard ballast of this boat
is estimated to be around 1,800
pounds only, compared with about
3,300 pounds in the ordinary fish-
ing hent, -

'‘Cwo men cango to sea in a

Calvert’ boat. This was made
} ible by Mr. D. W.. Wiles,
Fisheries Officer, who improved
on (h@-structure of the spar. This
boat takes only one man to lower
the spar while another removes the
wedge, With the ordinary fishing
boat it is often necessary to have
three men to lewer the spar, mak-
ing it essential for three to make
every trip in the larger boats.

With this new “spar lowering
system”, one Inman goes into the
bottom of the boat and removes
» wedge, while the other, sitting
comfer’ably in the stern, holds a

time is lost.

The majority of sails have so
far been made. Only about two
suits remain to be completed.








can easily be installed,

THE KEEL sections of many of the boats are now be prepar
ing touches to the keel section of boat. The keels w of iron



Plenty energy is wasted and much «
b

ir

0.

SPAR LOWERING SECTION



THE SYSTHM for lowering and raising the spar is a very simple one. Here a boat builder (sitting in

type of boat it takes three

By TONY VANTERPOOL

A motor can easily be installed
1 one of the Caivert boats.

Keel sections have been placed
n about six boats so far and it

is hoped to start casting the keels

bt

Cc

b

1 a short time?

So far, twenty-four boats are
ompletely planked, one has just
een started and the keels for the

remaining five, making a total of

t

hirty, are being prepared,

Most of the Calvert boats will

¢o to the west coast of the island.

The men to whom these boats

will go should be more than satis-

fi

c

t}

p

si
w

CALVERT BOAT

PREPARING KEEL

ed with them,” a_ boat-builder

sid recently. “But they are more

dinary type of boat.”

The Calvert boat is 22 feet long,
e average length of the present
hing boat. The mainsail is
actically the same size and shape

hog of the Ordinary fishing
oat.

it carries a deck and is far more
fe for boat crews during bad
vather,

Tm
: J

|

x ¥

THE OALVERT FISHING BOAT is 22 feet long, the average length
of the ordinary fishing boat. It has been designed so that an engine

SECTION





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Members Criticise

5 Year Plan

@ from page 5

irrigation and otherwise, and the
sums recommended to be spent
in its development, and said that
if the five year plan meant em-
ployment for a few more thou-
cand Barbadians, the people
would “have no grudge at pay-
ing a few extra cents in tax-
ation.”

He labelled the irrigation pro-
posals in the Memorandum as
“tomfoolery and not planning,”
end said that “there is the possi-
bility of a dairy industry as an-
other industry to sugar.” This
would mean much to the colony.

He asked, “what is a develop-
ment plan without ensuring the
means of t t

for people who have not got it
to-day?”

Expressed Doubt

Mr. Vaughan expressed “pro-
found doubt that the Government
coufd raise a five-million dollar
toan in any market in the world,
and said that while Barbados
could obtain a big loan, it could

ot with the t Government
at the head affairs,
He accused Government of

over taxing invested money, and
said that in following the policy
of taxation adopted by the
British Government after the
war for the creation of the Wel-
fare State, the local Government
were not providing the ameni-
ties provided by the British
Government.

He challenged the Government
to carry out their threat of “going
back to the people of the country
for a mandate,” and turning to
the Leader of the House charged
“you are not fit to be in charge
ef any government.” He added
“the political party running the
present Government are incom-
petent to be in charge of any
Government, and they are hope-
lessly incompetent to be in charge
of a Colonial People where there
is backward economy straining
the people.”

Mr, W. A, Crawford (C) who
also criticised the Plan, said that
t was an unjust and unfair
burden on the people of Barba-
dos and they were not deserving
of such treatment,

He said that Mr. Vaughn had
said that the Labour Party was
returned to power because of the
nope the people had in them but
he could say that they were re-
turned because there was no
alternative at the time.

{t was significant that in those
constituencies with no _ proper
al'ernative the people had to take
them but it was not because the
people had confidence in them.

He felt that the memorandum
only spoke categorically of the
policy of the Government Party.
It was said that these proposals
before the House represented in
fact what the Government Party
had put before the people and
uow they were being implement-
od ie House,

ut he thought that to say that
the proposals of this memoran-
dum were those which the Gov-

ernment Party had put before the th

people for a number of years
were completely false,

Mr, Grawford said that if those
proposals had been put before
the people at the last election,
the Labour Party would not have
been put in power but would
have been “run into the sea”.

He felt that the memorandum

epresented a five-year budget
and that was all,

As Mr. Vaughn had pointed out,
it was not a development plan as
they had known development
plans, And, as Mr, Lewis had said.
these proposals were intended
merely as proposals from Depart-
mental Heads.

Mr, Crawford next referred to
the Beasjey Fiscal Survey, and
said that it was true that they
had opposition on the side of the
Government for “a tax holiday of
five years” for new industries. He
felt that five years was a relatively
short time end gi could not be ex-
pected that a pany in a guar-
anteed market with’ a higher
labour foree, would leave that
market to’ come to this island’s

@e said that if the Government
had its confidence in Beasley the
least it should have done was t«
pay considerable importance to
such a recommendation,

Mr. Crawford referred to Trini-
dad and British Guiana and said
that if you look at those colonies
carefully, you would see that for
the last five or six years they had
been attracting new industries
while nothi nad been happen-
ing in Barbados,

He said that the only single new
industry considered of importance
in Barbados within the last five
years was the Textile Comp
and they nearly lost it throug
income.

In the memorandum it was
proposed to get more enue
from three main soi I t
Taxation, Indirect Taxation and
Miscellaneous Fees etc, He felt that
Mr. Vaughn had dealt most ex-
haustively with income tax and in
certain remarks had aceused Gov-
ernment of gross incompetence.

Speaking of Customs and Excise
he ae that Government

duties on C.LF,
cost.
that














ex-facto
proposals 1 we tale

ese nm the were
those which ‘he Lar rory, e
before the people did they tell the
people that what they were doing
in this country was going to in-
crease the eost of living, Mr,
Crawford asked.

He said that the proposals meant
thot every edible item which was
no subsidised had to go up in a
country where the cost of living
wes among the highest in the
world.

Mr, Vaughn, had quite to the
satisfactory of every intelligent
member, pointed out that it was
cheaper to live in England than
it was to live in Barbados. Only
a few weeks ago he heard a wo-
man from England remafk that
she wondered how the people
were living in Barbados.

Me said in spite of the fact that |
im this country the cost of living
was so high and jn spite of the
fact that a yard of flannel er
71 cents, the elected Government, |
which had been put there in the/
nterest of the people, now pro-/;



posed to raise even more by in-
creasing. the duties on C.LF.
values. d ;

He felt that there was no justi-
fication, in is country at the
present time, on the basis of these
proposals to impose such a bur-
den on the people. Was it fair to
say that they should reap more
Government Revenue from -
er duties on C.LF. values, he
asked, He said that it was pro-
fiteering, especially in the in-
crease of goods,

In addition to getting revenue
in this unjust manher, the duty
on tobacco and rum had been in-
reased.

c

He said that these drastic ste
were necessary because e
Treasury was nearly dry and

there was no money to finance
those schemes mentioned. The
average worker had to toil until
he was 68 before he could get old
age pension but they could afford
to retire a civil servant at 50.

If they looked around the coun-
try they would see many strong,
able bodied Government servants
at 50 entering private employment
and drawing handsome salaries.



Women And The
Colour Bar

A TORY MP SPEAKS OUT
By ROBERT BLAKE

THERE are few subjects upon
which more rubbish is regularly
written than that of Africa, This
is particularly unfortunate, since
African affairs have been so

change to read a book as stimu-
lating and free from the usual
prejudices as Mr. C. J. M. Alport’s
“Hope in Africa’”*

Mr. Alport a young Conserva-
tive MP, has tried to examine in
a dispassionate spirit a most
difficult problem, What part can
and should be played by British
imperialism in Africa to-day?

It is a subject which Conser-
vatives have far too often in the
Past abandoned to the tender
mercies of the Left. Indeed, the
whole generation brought up
after 1918 has been inclined

mind,” writes Mr, Alport, “Em-

pire for all Lord Beaverbrook’s

passionate 4

a mass of ancient
Mr. Alport’s boo

nothing else, should
is

it does
elp to dispel
error. Although
gold and diamonds were often
the magnet that drew men to
Africa, there was a most im-
portant element of idealism, too.
The impulse behind British
exploration in West and East
Africa was two-fold a desire to
convert pagans to c

hristianity,
and a desire to abolish the Slave
Trade, an _ institution whose

brutality has only been paralle-
led in modern times by Nazi con-
centration camps and the forced
labour colonies of Soviet Russia.

The Slave Trade could only
have been destroyed by the
British; its abolition has been an
unqualified boon to the Africans.

;



AT
Broad Street

t

es

to the arrival of

CATCH UP ON YOUR









THURSDAY, OCTOBER 36, 1952

o to the people and get four “Hf you want money to support

Sate. a plan like this get it by increas:
He also suggested that hon. ed production,” he said.

| members who disagreed with the Mr. Crawford referring to Page

memorandum should act like two of the memorandum, said that
men, + on their feet and do Government had the affron'
something to justify the eonfl- to say that it was a plan to give

.

confidence to investors. He asked
how were they going to get back
their money with the already high
taxation and the colony at satura-
tion point.

“This Five Year Plan is mere-
ly a little legitimate of the former
Ten Year Plan”, Mr. Crawford
said.

dence which was put in them.

He said that imagine with a
five year plan before them and
the country in such a financial
position, that even although it was
proposed that the Harbour Scheme
would be self-supporting, they
might not get funds to go on with
it,

“That is why we have to charge
the people of this country so much
for their rum ,’ he said.
“That is why the p om. tobac-
co has been increased. That is
why we have to tax the country
to the very limit. Squeeze every
red cent out of every man, wo-
man and child.”

He asked if just to get a few
roads and a little water you have
to tax the country to saturation
} int, it was deplorable.

He said that they talk about
scecial welfare but nobody can
drink rum; nobody can smoke;
nobody can pay bus fare and the
majority of the cars will be off
the road.

He felt that the gramme
represented the m um the
Government could do in the face
of the promises which they made
Bnd in the face of what one ex-
pects of it.

He said that the Five Year Plan
was no use. It was a Plan by in-| _
fants and squeezed every cent)
out of the taxpayers ts. He
suggested that with the Civil Ser-
vants pro} and this present
plan no Government would now

ARE tee...

%
g
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me.



























































63

GUE Pear

Misieading

The idea that the history of
the British in Africa has been
one of gross exploitation for
enormous profits is most mis-
leading.

In fact, although great indi-
vidual fortunes were made, great
risks were taken and great losses
incurred. Mr. Alport points out
that over a long period of years
the average rate earned by the
colonial investor in Africa was
no more than he would have
obtained if he had put his capital
in gilt-edged securities at home.

Of the immense economic ad-
vantages which this investment
has brought to the Africans there
can be no shadow of doubt.

Mr. Alport deals candidly with
the colour bar, a question which
has received great publicity be-
cause of the marriage of Seretse
Khama. He points out that it has
only reached its present form since
‘uropean women
in Africa and Asia. The early
Dutch settlers in the Cape had
no hesitation in taking Hottentot

wives.
The Gulf
The psychological basis of the
colour bar, in Mr. Alport’s| SWI. “SNOPSE) Sestes.
opinion, comes from the vast

gulf dividing the African from
the European women,

It is a deep-seated fear that
any relaxation of the social bar-
rier will ultimat lead to
mixed marriages and lower the
status of the European women
to that of the African women, a
status characterised by poly-
gamy, bride price, and other
sexual usages of a_ repellent
nature described by Mr. Alport.

As long as this gulf exists —
and it is really the gulf between
barbarism and clvilisation — the
colour bar will continue. Only
a revolution in the habits and
mentality of African women, and
men, could end it,

Yet the colour bar is one of the
most dangerous weapons of Com-

@ On page 8



AND SEND YOUR
FRIENDS A USEFUL
PERSONAL GIFT.... WE
SUGGEST -—- —

FT STATIONERY

IN HANDY. BEAUTIFUL BOXES



NERY

Greystone Hastings

ADVOCATE STATIO



PPDIDTH OG
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1952



FIVE YEAR

Water Supplies

THE programme is a continuation of the reorganisation
and improvement, of the water supplies of the Island. The
Department’s estimate of full requirements was an addi-

tional $1,767,752 including
Capital Estimates 1952-53,

VIII—$12,000 and $198,952 in the Supplementary Estimates

1952-53, No. 19,

The amount of $1,083,000 in-
cluded for re-organisation should
be sufficient to meet require-
ments in the five year period;
and the $200,000 included for ad-
ditional mains and _ standposts
would provide about 50 stand-
posts, The amount of $17,000 for
the development of water re-
sources is for the continuation of
the drilling scheme started with
funds provided under the Colon-
ial Development and Welfare Act.

A proper water supply for Dis-
trict “F” Police Station is essen-
tial. The capital cost is esti-
mated at $12,100.

Housing — Government

Estates Ete.

The estimates put forward by
the Housing Board contemplated
expenditure totalling $1,835,183,
including an amount of $104,543
in the Capital Estimates, 1952-53,
Head II and $36,000 in Supple-
mentary Estimates, 1952-53, No.

$25,000 under Head VI and
$14,881 under the authority
of Resolution No. 67 of 1952

(Supplementary Estimates,
1952-53, No. 19);
(b) Rehabilitation of Fishing

Industry—a revote of $10,-
000 under the authority of
Resolution No. 67 of 1952
(Supplementary Estimates,
1952-53, No, i9).

_ Boat Building
It is proposed to continue the
emergency boat building pro-
gramme now being carried out at

the amounts provided in the
Head IV—$347,000 and Head

technical and vocational training
estimated the cost of equipment
at $80,000 The maximum annual
recurren i ;
ore 200 t — was estimated at the Reef Experimental Station as
,400. e maximum capital g routine boat buildin ri
expenditure which it has been sponsored by Government. The
possible to include for this project Fishery Officer is of the opinion
is $200,000 and the recurrent ex- that boats of a better type and
penditure has been placed at workmanship can be built with the
$40,000 (including the cost of aid of machine tools, Inasmuch as
staff and maintenance). it is unlikely that mare than one
Elementary ar two boats would be under con-
The D tor of Education put struction at the same time, it is es-

timated that labour might be kept
forward a programme for capital to g minimum of five men and four

expenditure on the erection and Bursary boys. It is contemplated
conversion of schools totalling that the cost of operating this boat
$2,068,786, including an amount building yard would be largely
of $150,246 in the Capital Esti- borne by the purchaser or party
mates, 1952-53, Head I and for which the boat is being con-
$3,460 in Supplementary Esti- strected. The amount of $15,000
mates, 1952-53, No. 4. would be advanced for the pur-

It was estimated that the maxi- Chase of materials etc., and the an-
mum additional annual recurrent a cost is estimated at

cost would be $391,062. . ‘ "
Cultivation of Treec

The Director also recommend-
ed that the ratio of pupils per provision has already been made
reduced, and for this service under Capital

24.

The Board suggested that 60 that 23 additional teachers be
new houses be built in the city appointed to the existing schools.
and urban areas and 28 in the This would be an increase of
rural areas each year. about 342% in the teaching estab-

The Government floes not con- lishment,
sider that the housing problem | In the programme
can be solved in this manner been possibley because of cther
with the means at its disposal, meeds, to include a figure of
and the Housing Board is exam- $848,000 for Capital Expenditure
ining methods of providing On elementary education, $147,-
cheaper houses. Capital expendi- 358 being shown as the maximum
ture of $530,000 is included in additional annual recurrent ex-
the programme, and thee is the penditure which should provide
Self Help housing scheme under for reconstruction and enlarge-
the heading “Loan Funds”. There ment of nine schools and the
is also the Organisation for hous- rection of three new schoois.
ing from Labour Welfare Funds, Secondary
which it is expected will expend The estimated capital cost of the
about $3,500,000 on housing dur- proposals first put forward by the
ing the period. Director of Education was $498,-

An amount of $25,000 is in- 221, including the amount of
cluded to cover the cost of land $8,300 in the Capital Estimates,

it has only

teacher should be
Estimates 1952-53, Head VI.
Dairy and Stock Breeders’
Association Prizes, Agricul-
tural Exhibition Purchase

of Livestock
Provision has already been
made for these services under
Colonial Development and Wel-
fare Scheme D.217, Agricultural
Development (See Capital Estim-

ates 1952-53, Head VIII).

Livestock Insemination

Artificial insemination is at
present carried out at the Central
Livestock Station on a small and
experimental scale. The immedi-
ate proposals are to extend this
work to the District Agricultural
Stations; but, in the event of a
more intensive daigy industry be-
ing developed in e Island, the
demand for this service will in-

which it may be desirable to ac-
quire.

The amount of $3,000 is a re-
vote in the Capital Estimates,
1952-53, Head VI for Windows in
Bay Street.

MEDICAL SERVICES
Health Centres

The amount of $117,000 is made
up of the cost of erection of a
Health Centre for the
town and St. Michael’s area, esti-
mated at $100,000, and a revote
of $16,894 under Capital Esti-
mates, 1952-53, Head I, to cover

the cost of completion of the
building and_ the purchase of
equipment for the Centre

1952-53, Head I, and the maximum crease and a distribution centre
additional recurrent cost was cal- will be needed, The Director of
culated to be $62,820, In the pro- Agriculture has suggested that, in

gramme $250,000 has been includ-
ed as Capital Expenditure and
$30,000 for maximum additional
recurrent expenditure. The pro-
posals to be adopted have not yet
been finally examined,
Erdiston Training College

It is proposed to institute a two-

ton Training College, only one year
of which would be residential.
The cost of erecting an additional
lecture room and an additional
common room as well as provid-
ing additional dining and kitchen
equipment is estimated at $42,300.

the first place, an attempt should
be made to ascertain whether the
Centre could be operated as a pri-
vate organisation of cattle produc-
ers. Since, however, small cattle
owners may be a large proportion
of those who would use the Centre,
it may be difficult to raise the ini-

Bridge- year course for teachers at Erdis- tial capital privately, and perhaps

Government could assist by means
of a loan. Under this Scheme, the
bulls would remain the property
of Government and be housed at
the Central Livestock Station (the
present number at the Station is
sufficient for the first 3—5 years),

at The maximum annual recurrent from whence semen would be

Speightstown. The maximum an- cost-of the additional staff and supplied to the Centre at a price

nual recurrent costs of the Cen-
tre for the Bridgetown and St.
Michael’s area is estimated at
$21,000,

The capital cost of the Depart-
mental proposals, \which included
the establishment of 4 Rural
Health Centres, was estimated at
$282,654. ¥

General Hospital

The Director of Medical Ser-
vices submitted proposals for the
General Hospital totalling $1,081,-
395 (including the amount of

other is
$9,028,
AGRICULTURE

Farm _Institute—Trinidad
This Government has already
‘greed to the ent of a
arm Institute in Trinidad. The
contribution towards the initial

capital cost is estimated at $20,520
and maximum recurrent costs are

charges estimated at

to cover recurrent costs, and there-
after distributed by the manage-
ment of the Centre at a reason-
able insemination fee, The initial
capital expenditure is estimated at
$25,000, and $5,000 would be re-
quired for working capital, The
cost of additional bull pens and
other. equipment at the Central
Livestock Station is estimated at
$10,000, and annual maintenance

estimated at $9,225. at $250.
Sugar Cane Manurial Markets

Investigations It is proposed that-Government
In 1951, investigational work on should provide the initial cost of

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



cost per mile An of
$480,000 of which »$128,000 ap-
pears in the Capital Estimates for
1952-53, Head II], has been in-

cluded,

Parish Roads
Highways—Reconstruction
East Coast Road
The Director of Highways and
Transport put forward a pro-
gramme for the expenditure of
$800,000 on parish roads, $1,475,-
348 on the reconstruction of high-
ways and $622,059 on the construc-
tion of the East Coast Road. It has:
however, only been possible to
provide half a million dollars for
these purposes (and $19,848 of this
amount has already been provided
under the authority of Resolution
No, 42 of 1952 (Supplementary

Estimates 1952-53, No, 8).

Suck Wells
The amount of $5,000 is a revote
under Capital Estimates, 1952-53,
Head VI for the construction of

amount

suck-wells. The annual upkeep
is estimated at $1,000.
Harbour
Water Boat
The amount of $42,000 is made

up of:—

(a) a sum of $38,527 to meet
the cost of the new water
barge and tug in excess of
the amount to the credit of
the Water Boats Renewal
Fund, ($26,527 of this
amount is included under
Head VI in the Capital Es-
timates for 1952-53).
provision of $3,000 in the
Capital Estimates, 1952—-53
Head VI to meet the cost
of installing machinery in
the new water craft.

(b)

Buoys c
The amount of $4,000 is a re~
vote in the Capital Estimates,
1952—53, Head VI to purchase

Navigational Buoys,
Wharf Walls

The cost of renewal of the
wharf piling in the inner
Careenage is estimated at
$124,400. It is proposed to do
more than half of this work in

the 5 year period and a sum of
$75,000 is therefore included, The
annual maintenance is estimated
at $1,000,
Bar to Careenage

The Harbour and Shipping
Master recommends that the
existing coral and sand bar of 12
feet at the entrance to the
Careenage be deepened to 16 feet
to enable all intercolonial craft
to enter and leave at any state of
the tide, thus reducing the con-
gestion in the Careenage. The
capital cost of this project is
estimated at $10,200.

Airport

Runway
The amount of $72,000 has
already been provided as fol-
lows .—

(a) a revote of $47,177 under
the authority of Resolution
No, 27 of 1952 (Supple-
mentary Estimates, 1952—
53, No. 2) for urgent
repairs to the runway at
Seawell Airport,

(b) a revote of $24,000 under
the authority of Resolution
No, 42 of 1952 (Supple-

mentary Estimates, 1952
53, No. 8) for resealing
the runway at Seawell
Airport,

Roads, Parking Spaces, etc.
The amount of $82,000 is ‘made

$41,415 revoted under the author- the sugar cane leaf analysis tech- establishing district markets, al- up of:—

ity of Resolution No. 42 of 1952
(Supplementary Estimates 1952-
53 No. 8) to complete the pur-
chase of “Avalon”). The’ figure of
$950,000 included in the pro~
gramme would cover the cost of
various improvements and ex-
tensions including the provision
of 100 additional beds, a new
kitchen and laundry, equipment,
a new mortuary, etc. The maxi-
mum additional annual recurrent
costs are estimated at $267,771.
Education ’
Final figures of the potential
cost of the University College of
the West Indies in the next five
years are not available, but from
calculations made at the recent
conference in Jamaica on the
subject of the finances of the
University College of the West
Indies, it is estimated that the
Barbados share of the deficit to
date in the finances of the Unt-
versity College will be $32,000
and that the additional annual
recurrent expenditure to be
borne by Barbados in the next
five years will be $55,000.
Technical

The departmental estimate of

the cost of erecting a building for
a technical college was
committee on

use as
$204,400 and the

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Holt’s Wonder Wax
Dunlop Patching Outfits
Rubber Solution
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Schrader Metal Tyre
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Tyre Pressure
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ECKSTEIN BROTHERS

BAY STREET



WE ARE OFFERING A VARIETY OF
AUTO ACCESSORIES.





nique was initiated in a small way lowing local authorities to build,
in the Government laboratory. maintain and control them, An
Preliminary results have been area of land has already been ac-
promising enough to make it ad- quired at Eagle Hall and Govern-
visable to continue this work fur- ment has recently received from
ther. No capital expenditure is the Vestry of St. Michael an estim-
anticipated but it will be necessary ate of the cost of erection of a mar-
to provide $1,100 yearly if the ket thereon,
ey an Fish Market, Speightstown
Central Livestock and Dis- The Legislature has recently
trict Stations approved the compulsory _acquisi-
The amount of $76,000 has al- tion of an area of land in Speights-
ready been provided as follows:— town for the site of a new fish
(a) a revote of $10,438 under market. | The total’ capital cost of
the authority of Resolution this project is estimated at $30,000,
No. 42 of 1952 (Supplement- but $15,000 of this amount is avail-
ary Estimates, 1952-53, No. able under Head VI, Item I—De-
8) for the purchase of cer- velopment of Fisheries Production
tain equipment for the Cen- of the Capital Estimates for 1952-
tral Livestock Station; 53. Recurrent costs are already
an amount of $65,375 to be provided in the Current Estimates,
expended from the Colonial but it will be necessary to make
Development and Welfare provision for a maximum annual
D.217 (Suspense) Account maintenance cost of $460 for build-

under the authority of Re- ings. COMMUNICATIONS
Roads

(b)

solution No, 43 of 1952 to
meet the cost of capital im-
provements and alterations
at the Central Livestock and
District Stations.
Fisheries Development
The amount of $50,000 has al-
ready been provided in the 1952-
53 Capital Estimates and Supple-
mentary Estimates as follows: —
(a) Development of Fisheries
Production — revotes of *

Tenantry Roads .

The programme of repairing and
reconstructing tenantry roads has
not yet been completed, The Di-
rector of Highways and Transport
put forward estimates for further
work totalling $1,386,000. It is,
however, anticipated that some
eduction can be effected in the



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Yellow Polishing Cloth:
Miracle Black Adhesive
Miracle Tub Caulk
Sealer
Durex Masking Tape
Shaler Hot Patches
Sparton 6 & 12 Volt
Horns

Clear Hooter 12 Volt
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Chrome Rim Embellish-

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Expanding Reamers
Extra Cutters for

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ING TIME

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@ MINIMUM BUILD-

(a) a revote of $65,113 in the
Capital Estimates, 1952—53
Head VI.

(b) a revote of. $6,187 under

the authority of Resolution

No. 42 of 1952 (Supple-

mentary Estimates, 1952—-

53, No. 8); provision of

$4,000 for Fire hydrants

and hose, standposts etc.
for the Airport and $2,159
for Roads, Parking Spaces
ete, under the authority of

Resolution No, 67 of 1952

(Supplementary Estimates,

1952—53 Nq. 19).

an amount of $4,500 which

is required for further

road work in the adminis-
trative area of Seawell

Airport.
Runway Lig’ hting

$7,201 was re-

voted under the authority of

An amount of
Resolution No. 42 of 1952 (Sup-
plementary Estimates 1952—53,
No. 8) to meet the final payment
for the beacon.
Electrical Installations
This is a revote of $26,000 in
the Capital Estimates 1952—53
Head VI.
Toilet Accommodation
The number of persons

(c)

who

by

Unimiet Major °

‘



’

at Da Costa & Co. Lid.

DA COSTA & CO., LTD. is one of the Bridgetown
firms that have used
constwucting Storage Fixtures, The time and
cost of building cumbersome wooden shelves is

easily avoided with

MAJOR steel framework, which can be easily
and used again.
MAJOR is durably finished in a rust-proof stove

dismantled

enamelled green.

S. P. MUSSON, SON & CO, LID.

v.sit the Airport is increasing and
as the use the toilets primarily
providex for passengers, the
Airport Manager recommends
that additional toilet accommoda-
tien be constructed. It is proposed
that) such accommodation should
provide three water closets and
one wash basin for females,
threeiewater closets, one urinal
range and one wash basin for
males, The capital cost is esti-
matedâ„¢at $3,000, and the annual
recurrent expenditure at $1,020.

GENERAL

Fire Station

The estimates of the cost of the
new Bridgetown fire station are
being revised and it will be
necessary to restrict the expendi-
ture to $200,000. The amount in
the} Resolution presently before
the Legislature was $305,700,

Post Offices

The Colonial Postmaster put
forward proposals the capital
cost of which would have been
$72,660. It has been possible onlv
to jnclude $36,000 of this amount,
including the revote of $18,000
under Capital Estimates 1952—53,
Heqd I.

In addition to the new Post
Offiee at Christ Church, it is pro-
posed to build post offices at St.
Lawrefice and St. John,

Police Stations etc,

The capital expenditure -recom-
mended by the Commissioner of
Polite was $144,700. It is, how-
ever, not possible to carry out all
of his recommendations. It is
proposed to erect a new Police
Station on the existing site at

Hastings and to provide addi-
tional accommodation at the
Holetown Police Station. The

capital cost of these projects is
estimated at $75,000 and maxi-
mum annual maintenance of
buildings at $2,000.
Land Acquisition
The amount of $50,000 has been

included to cover the cost of
purchase of land (suitable for
schools and other Government

purposes) which, during the next
five years, may become available.
Library Equipment ete,
Provision has been made in the
1952-63 Capital Estimates for the
erection of a building at Oistins



i
view of the increasing number of
enudren wo are in needa ot Wwe
care and training which can be
received at this Home. A contri-

bution of $10,000 is included in
je programme.

triendly Societies’ Officer

The extensive operations
friendly societies in
and the social work involved,
make it advisable that there
should be a whole-time Govern-
ment Inspector of friendly
societies. The recurrent expendi-
ture is estimated at $3,600.

Weights and Measures

The Commissioner of Police
has drawn attention to the neces-
sity of replacing certain weights
and measures which have been
in use for a long period of years

ot
the Island,

and are becoming inaccurate
through wear and tear, The cost
of new equipment is estimated
at $7,000.

V.H.F, Equipment
The amount of $23,000 is made
up as follows:—
(a) a revote of $10,784 under
the authority of Resolution
No. 42 of 1952. (Supple-
mentary Estimates, 1952-
53, No, 8) to purchase cer-
tain V.ELF, Equipment. }
(b) an amount of $11,700 to|
provide further V.HLF.
Equipment to complete the
requirements of the Police
Department, The maximum
annual recurrent cost is
estimated at $1,000.
Mechanization of Accounts
In view of the increase in
volume of Government expendi-
ture during recent years, it has
been found that much additional
time has had to be spent on the
accounting procedures of the pre-
audit system, thus causing delay
in the passing for payment of
expenditure vouchers. It is there-
fore proposed to introduce a sys-
tem of mechanical posting to
facilitate the work of the Audit
Department. The capital cost of
equipment is estimated at $10,000,
The maximum annual recurrent
cost of upkeep is estimated at
$1,000.
Department of Statistics
A department is needed to col-
late and distribute information

—_____——

DEVELOPMENT PLAN —

to house a Post Office and a about population, employment
Branch Library. It will be neces- and migration; production, sec-
sary however to provide furni- Ondary industries and construc-
ture, etc., for this branch library tion; distribution (especially of
at a cost of $1,000. The maximum f0°0d supplies), shipping and
annual recurrent cost of staff and Other transport; domestic and ex-
incidental expenses is estimated ternal trade; wages and prices;

at $2,226, national income and finance, It

The Trustees of the Public would also be able to advise the
Library have recommended the Secretariat and other Govern-
establishment of a Book Van Ser- Ment Departments in the inter-

vice to meet the needs of the pretation of economic and social
many people who live in the Statistics. It is proposed that the
country districts, but who find it Services of an expert should be
inconvenient or impossible to Pbtained to advise and assist in
come to the Public Library for the setting up of the Department;
their reading matter ‘The estj- and that a Barbadian should be
mated capital cost of a van to- Selected for training, possibly at
gether with the erection of a the Canadian Bureau of Statis-
garage is $5,480. The maximum tics with a view to his appoint-
annual recurrent cast of this ser- Ment to the post of Government
vice is estimated at $2,749. Statistician. The capital cost of

equipment is provisionally esti-
“Youth Employment mated at $10,000 and recurrent

Every year in this Island near- costs at $30,000,
ly three thousand children leave Overseas Defence
school, About a third of these do Contribution

not find employment and of those
that do, some are not fitted for
the occupations upon which they
enter, others could do better in
other occupations. There are no

proper arrangements for the
guidance of these boys and girls.
In view of these conditions the
Labour Commissioner has recom-
mended that a Youth Employ-

ment Service should be started.
The chief function of such a ser-
vice is to help boys and girls
when they leave school to find the
work which they are best fitted
to do; in such work they can
develop their abilities to their
own benefit and to the benefit of
the [sland. It would be nects-
sary’to set up a Youth Employ-
ment’ Office with a Youth Em-
ployment Officer in charge, under
the general supervision of the
Labour Commissioner, A special
room would be required for this
purpose, as it is essential that
school leavers should be treated
separately from adult members
of the community who are seek~-
ing work. The estimated capital
cost of establishing this service
is $1,000 and the maximum an-
nual recurrent cost is $3.466.

Nightengale Home
Sometime ago, the Vestry of
St. Michael approached Govern-
ment for financial assistance to
erect additional buildings at the
Nightengale Memorial Home in

BEB eBeBeeeeeee|) 8
¢ Storage Fixtures

UNIMET MAJOR for

quick-handling UNIMET
And UNIMET

The question of the Island
making a contribution towards
the cost of defence of the region
is under consideration, and a
token figure for this is therefore
included in the programme,

Cc. LABOUR WELFARE
FUNDS

On the assumption that the

terms of the agreement of 30th
@ On Page 8

een





PAGE SEVEN



“
Mu mmy —voO u

are a tease ! -

—| know quite well what you've got behind
your back, so hurry up and let me have that >.
nice comforting drink of Cow & Gate—
it’s doing me such a lot of good — and I
love it.” ‘‘All right, Baby,’’ says Mummy,
“‘we don’t always agree — but you're right.
this time. Every time | look at you | bless = =
the day | put you on Cow & Gate—so =
here you are, darling — steady now !!””

4

COW &é GATE P85

he FOOD of





































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(THE HOUSE FOR BARGAINS)
No. 16, Swan Street ’Phone 2109, 4406,

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PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1952
LD LL et TOILE DLL LLL LL LLL LLL cccicienateeencattatttitacesiatitaaastit ia etiencarties LL

CLASSIFIED ADS. ae cee aie | Sir Ralph Fin d S The English—Are They Musical’

YOU stagger me Ruth Link.tion.” You could not be more
} The undermentioned properties will be set up for sale at the Registration Office, That was a real haymaker you right.





























} », + Public Buildings, Bridgetown, between 12 noon and 2 p.m. for the respective sums lended at the end of your column, The English audience wants
; DIED i FOR SALE when you charged: “The English- only to relive the part. oe
RING—Onr: Grecber 98, t86. At her ie man has no ear for music.” music fills the Albert Hai








residence, Ealing Grove, Chret
Anne Maria, Aged & ¥ funera
leaves the above residence at 4.15 p m
to-day for the Christ Charch FPatish



As a feliow-American’ I ought Thrice-familiar staples by Mozar'
) support your view. But I can- Beethoven and Brahms—pretfer-
not. You have been ably concertos, involving such



and on the date specified below H not then sold they will be set up on each ee *
suceeeding Friday at the same place and during the same hours until sold Ful
particuiars on application to me ry
AUTOMOTIVE | PLAINTIFF: ENA MAY GALE ] eee

——— — and
TRUCK—¥V-@ Ford. Newly Overhauied. DEFENDANT: CLARA ALSOP GALE (by original action)























































J ; here four
y AA Condit Dia ; weeks thrice-familiar i
Carl ee ee indent. Dany a eee OS oe to an. | MAMPDEN ARCHIBALD CUKE (Pers Rep of Clara Alsop Gale, seni C days. I have been here six weeks (hrice-t =. a
~ z cm ee. S. —" ome USED CARS—A fine selection inctuding | PROPERTIES: reat Aid EAT certain messuage or dwelling house © By GE wv in the US. ery Ses a book Poe «
Stoute (daughters) Harold Bain JP 0"C eer, Austin As, Vi aa) thereto. be = ioe and whersen oe stands | “ about American life. The English musical public
Strak: \nephe , Morus Oxtord, belonging situa . bn r 4 - i
Vivienne “4 gutece) Cort Rees OS aes Dotaeed, Ren Gen GEE we ‘ced one aus “aémcamur een a ate 4-4-~ moan +s eh bee eee] ee English sedate ware nage Se nenne Withe for tne Suse of
z one qua: square t or bs urray. ar ‘ da few - j ;
ome 30. 20.88—1n thereabouts Butting and Ming on» piace called or known ®) 259 pages, , 1 to say in the v: ” deaf I should know it by now. day, for the up-coming —
| oa a ie eee i fa ee |, Miter tate, Mawnan Cenbi emeciid oa me seeeepe ee ang enmrts Ing tnd Soong
PERSO FURNITURE — At Janetta Shop Sant os bower a a atolls, whic’ le so little a to . ; ;
aN furniture ond Steines inchusing, Seser tad pareal of land erected and built standing and being with theirg (re, Gilbert and Group, litt Voice-of-the-Tide, brought him| nd operas in London than any- England is the home of goes
Rae, Chat, Beeien, Seen aes EARNS. their palm fronds above the Paci- his most remarkable experience.| “ere else on earth. A 6,000- ae ers Why Hoes the
The public are hereby warned spainst 5 tee ae fy Seale UPSET PRICE: "£3,500. 0. 0. , | fle surf. A Gilbertese friend prescribed |5¢4t auditorium like the Albert public display so little
cs — >. a, as se t aA Machi (1) Singer Tredle Machine— ee ae ae {Sreinin_memuage dwellinghouse or stare They are by a hand- porpoise-meat as a cure for this Hall would be a white elephant] of this quality toward new musi~
not hold myself responsible for her or }™* OE | re sa and numbered 15 in the said crag sedelleae ate ton nd whee te’ ee ed race. From misfortune and engaged the ser-|'” New York. The 3,000- oS San vr

the same stands and thereto belonging containing by admeasurement | 2" island vast quantities of vices of his cousin, a hereditary | @rnesie Hall is big enough. ties? —L.E.S.














by one thousand one hundred ad sixteen square feet or thereabouts | 2hosphates are exported, with rpoise-caller. six orchestras FOSS FOF . ”
» out Po . This symphony play
order signed by me. i MECHANICAL butting and bounding on the premises known as Numbers 196 Roe-] which the pastures of the Southern went into a swoon, which ended| "ularly in London, four in Paris, ; ;
WIS LABAN BRADSHAW, ee buck Street and 14 High Street on the premises known as N Homisnhase Ata in New York, EVERY HOTEL KITCHEN
, AGRICULTURAL BQUIPMENT — in- 16 High Street and on High Street aforesaid or however else the D! d fail. only when he , “They| three in New : hould have
St. Philip. |sading Grass Mowers & & 6 cutting same may butt and bound, together with the messuages @welling.| They are administered by a come! Our friends from the| TWO opera companies perform i
29.10.5220} er, Rakes, Loaders (Crop collectors) houses and buildings and all other erections and bufldings on the} andful of devoted British colonial ‘west . they come.” And there,}*i7ultaneously in London. The
nae delivery. Rakes, us et mis pares! of land erected and built standing and being with thelr officers, who were joined not long out in ‘the lagoon approaching New York City (parafiel aun Ascot ater ter
u“ urtenan: ‘3 ° _
WANTED 316 30.10,52—6n | UPSET PRICE: £4,000. 0. 0 vefore the 1914-18 war by a and finally flapping gently on to} — Wells) closes) when Hot Water



ALL. THAT certain piece or parcel of land with the} "OMantic, inquisitive and skinny the beach, was a whole flotilla of
admeasure-

the etropolitan (parallel to
dwelling house thereon called “BARTICA” containing by young cadet named Arthur ting

1 kes such 4
BICYCLES — A full range for Ladies, Covent G en) is . a Washing up ma a

, Clean and shining





. po f c
ents and Youths. DIAL 4616.. ment nine Y and sixt 4 - y with |
HELP 30. 10.52—6n. merly part of two acres ina aan eae et ae Sab: Grimble, “The men leaned dowm to| But one_of your other otnes- crockery and cutlery with less
eat Sas | Gere gh $$ handel Gaul Sesty Gates: feet Of See Seblie cond sitemte. in te Nearly 40 years after his first throw their arms around the great }V*tions, Ruth, does fit See the Ascot at your Gas Show-
GOOK—A good experienced Cook} EARTH. SCRAPER AND SCOOP — For the ‘district called Hastings in the said parish ot christ Churen pq glimpse Of the Pacific, Grimble, barrels and ease them over the|m™usical scene. The Englishman, |% oom, Bay Street
with long service character—easy hours, | “oving wash mould and making Cart this Island butting and bounding on lands now or late of one .*yow immensely experienced but ridges. They showed not the least}/¥°U S&y, “has no sense of direc-
good wages.—Apply “HY c/o A. L. ds, ete. Dial Se nee: eae. yore a tag Bag Beery —_ or ae Marcus Grararum et lho less romantic than in 1913, puts Miata oc Abnscom, TE Wea OE Sar a eaten eneecees
ee . -10,52—6n, or however else the same m butt " > i
Mayers, Esa. on . | together with the messuages Swalitnaouees — buildings ,cOWN OM Paper some recollections single | wish was to get to the
ee eae iis Agi att Wee anereae tics see = a oe ae on the said parcel of 1p | . his eae ht the islands and oe é
LADY — Young lady for ~ bbe: f merous attachments for cultivation ae eae ee eee their peo! 4 is in no sense an chief's portion of the meat
pumel C UP: PRICE: £. . Oo. o. : : rs
Hotel Royal. Apply to the Manager [0 nsport purposes. Your- enquiry [DATE OF SALE OF ABOVE-MENTIONED PROPERTIES: pologia for British colonial rule. Was set aside for Grimble. He

w.ll be welcome. COURTESY GARAGE







7th November 1958 |’ Grimble (who was knighted in could not bring himself to eat it.














MISCELLANEOUS 1 Ot ic ROE 2 tl H. wu.sams, * | 1938) is mainly concerned to pass Nor does he attempt to explain a
—_—_— a | MASSEY-HARRIS Wheel Tractors meen eee. Y ws to readers his own admiration She strange gg
WA D Shipment arriv in t for your selec- sn of the islanders, and at e all to rimble tel how a bankr t
OTR, SOLD COMES, Seale: Disservices, [sive aveliable, g9noas—6n convey the beauty the comedy and ‘rading concern perenne ttn Bree Atte Belling" Friday
Salvers, Paper Weights, Spice & Snuff} —————______-—____ - | the magic of island life, even if Wealthy and beneficent British F Don't ncul: = a deep ane ‘ . ng jay
Boxes, Enamels, Curios, | OLIVETTI (M 44) ‘Typewriters. Avail- 5: Ve Pla. ‘the “magie” has at times a hard Phosphate Company because a seated couch! Rub the oo
a a ae - rear n OMEN * | dant against insect piagues, tedious sharp-eyed young man thought chest with A.l. White

eee ee 28.10.5260 li” — $260.00 » | food, scanty medical services and that a piece of rock looked like Liniment. The penetratine ) The M/V “CARMBBEE” will

pa 15” — $393.00 heat stimulates blood circu- | I} accept Cargo, and Passengers for







18/7 — $325.00

Y usson, & Co.
PUBLIC NOTICES | eers se’ ™ aval

) Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat
) Nevis and St. Kitts Sailing Friday
ii 7th November, 1952.

lation and promptly relieves
congestion Thousands have

From 7 other afflictions. phosphate. It was almost pure
e page A n ad Th phosphate. The Phosphate Com-
September, 1951, witl continue in e Gentlefolk pany has been one of the most












—————SSS=S==sSswss

















Large Sives @ $3.88 each, Misses’ Plustic

, But the de: i enlightened enterprises in the found relief with A.1t.
28.9.52—t.f.n, and that during the five reader will, neverthe- d .
——— rene the crop ee ‘on the average less, carry away from this World and a prime factor (says Why not you? OWS noe er |
LIVESTOCK Ps memorable book an indelible im- Grimble) in saving the Gilbertese ae sponrcy
be 150,000 tons, it is estimated * Consignee Phone 4047
TAKE WNCTICE a | nak Ghcus Mem: out & aa oe pression of the boon conferred on from the disintegrating effects of Sill Mo. > oth Oct. 1962,
CALF — One Guernsey Helfer at about a fine race by Britain’s rule “The Japanese invasion and American a VE hee
CHARM Pine Strain, Hill's Dairy Farm, Dial|lion dollars will be available in from | Gilbert ba 3 ~ a aN 3 2
3723. the Labour Welfare Fund. it is e Page 6 . ese,” says Grimble in a occupation. - ARAL
That SOAP Oe Roe * 2. t million dol- ™unism in Africa |significant sentence, “had few The Pattern
LTD., a cgmpany incorporated - proposed that three. million doo’ if Bay | waterside villages before the A Pattern of Islands is, inevit-
the jaws of Jamaica, Manufacturers, MISCELLANEOUS lars be expended on housing t's existence is inevitable,| British protectorate” (of 1892) ably the Evening Stand vd Book y | ae
easen trade of ‘basineet address 16 ee. |---| loams and half a million dollars W can at least avoid its unneces_{ Until then, each house must be a of the Month for tember i 1 if
moe Sertich, West Indies, has ap-), TUASTEC RAINCOATS Mor tee | on, amenities in rural areas. “@ty extension. Mr. Alportdn-yfrt; clan feuds were deathless: In the British Em were to : la | Ne
\ 7 =

a f rad i
Buled fo Ne TF neeiter th Yerpeee Raincoats 0.60 each, Children’s Plastic

ignore refunds of stan ‘an extreme casé where| 8! Was ferocious and unceasing. be wiped





























































club tried out to-mo'
a | Rana, © een," eT Ze 2 ue | i to ban} The islanders love oratory, fine other relic of it survived. A Pat-
ations for laundty pu meena per- | Dress Shoppe, Broad Street a balance in one of its residents from enter-}™25ners, noble . “We tern of Islands would enable STEAMSHIP COMPANY, INC
rations for the teeth and a rs nd per £ 29,10.52—3n taining a member of the Egypt- dwell among gentlefolk in these future readers to say: “So t
rations for the teeth an air. and pe

parts.” said Grimble’s superior. it what the Empire was like; such
Before long, Grimble was adopt- were the men who manned its
ed into one of the clans, The outposts’—and to regret the

), and will be entitled te SUBSCRIBE now to the Dafly Telegraph,
aaa ‘he skuie after one month from | ingland’s leading pany ree _
L 29th. { October, 1952, unless sore | arriving in Barbados by r only a few - most +
Persea thal fn the meantime give notice | days after publication tn London. Contact formed this Government that Her Europeans,

CANADIAN SERVICE (Ffo0atvicHTty)



: cer , solemn and painful, in- ing of a unique, even if ible
“Ra duplicate to me at my office of oppo- |len Gale c/o Advorate Co, Ltd. Local) Majesty's Governmest has made Mr. Alport is an optimist. Claded toe tatoeies Gf s wake on instrament for the dissemination | #4] SOUTHBOUND ites = xm pe, © CORONA
» sition of such memeaaton. ae Pe! Represent: +7.4.50—t.t.n, | available the fortuitous accum- points out that the He his arm. As tradition dictated, of hi i and civilisation
5 > 2 seitie egg ee citi ———___________—— | ulation of the benefit of exchange Africa of the Bette es Ubon | two little girls wept and screamed throughout the world MONTREAL $8 Oct a it = oo hb
s 28th day of October, 1952 Twos (2) NEW DUNLOP CAR TYRES the actual and has been r > HALIFAX 18 Oct. 1 Nov 11 Nov 25 Nov.
se A ‘a. WILLIAMS, 00 "x 16. No reasonable offer refused. ae om 2 - mane as if men from the Iron oa ; ee eae the ao OS ae Arr. B'DOS. 31 Oct. 13 Nov. 23 Nov. 7 Dec
Registrar of Trade Marks. | Apply to Mr. E. C. Field. Shine Oe, sugar to Canada in the Calender dys and hea Ge a = gard smile kept enaniaring how Limited Passenger Acommodation Available
alps ceo eee ES
TROPICAL FISH — Marble Hatchets,| years 1950, 1951 and 1952. The suddenly into the cht Plage 0 agreeable it all was. OTHER NEW BOOKS

For further info: a : Da COSTA & CO., LTD.; Pi 2122.
CTICE Rosy Tetras, Head and Tail light tetras,}amount accruing to Barbados is bustle of the twe rmation apply hone
TAKE Pearl Danios, Zebras and Corydora cat- likely to be of the order ; tieth century.
fish. All 48 ents each. White Clouds 000 in of oo
MIL-KO Festivum, and three spot Gourami at 72 respect each r
-, | cents each. Discount for lots of one dozen] years, H.M. Government in ad- surprising is the imm, b
That VI-TONE PRODUCTS LIMITED | oy more, Telephone Warden 3406 or this unexpected windfall achi ense pro-

Octopus Div: SPARK OF LIFE. By Erich Maria
». Remarque, Hutchinson, 12s, 6d.

It was not his only Pacific 368 a.
ordeal. The young Gilbertese As determined that never,
jhunt the giant octopus in pairs never shall we forget the horrors

i

ALE AE SL ET TS TTI a I
NEW YORK SERVICE (Eveny FOUR WEEKS)







an Ontario Company, Manufacturers | 4190 29.10.52 SOUTHBOUND ALCOA —ALOOA A A
oo ‘bose ‘dd: Tek ota aa __ *\has stated its intention that the under-water, f camps like and ' , ,
whose trade or, bus Cia ot inom ap net bo gasted en. One smost’ Minpertene’ the all bert be Gee aon aoe ro de ps b . ee PEGASUS PLANTER STEAMER STEAMER
\ Province of Ontario, Dominion | © to producing companies or agso- the African problem i inion him. Western Front has distilled into NORFOLK 35 Oct. —" os ar
Canada, has applied for the registration s brought | P His partner dives,
| of a trade mark in Part “A” of Register i ciations and growers, but that it out in the book—the ‘all|Prises the octopus from its rock one dreadful broth all that has) Naar feo bP 2 os: 2
in respect é copemngee Ee a ee / r roe a applied in omy, He ‘too . Left-wing bod vee Py fe eyes. ben aes or whispered about) @ arr. B'DOS. 12 Nov. 12 Dec. 7 Jan. 4 Feb.
f ingred foods, — capit white caus in iy er concentration . oe
_eattte te tae bol day at og! ver | iy cA DADS |tmeton Sr ase Seana ee Ym peters See Any cher the ies teenaged ine, Sige
@ © 1962, uniem orate person shall te DEC ry try. ‘ Fe POM Ap TEER one ‘would be regarded as unsports- {ful events together on the per-
pce vopnet ‘of such pot “i r i ; In Kehya, Rhodesia and the | manlike. sonal st of prisoner 509, |a
at my office Fer mack ph gg ban eg b The Sugar Producers Associa~ Union, the European settler beat Grimble showed an incautious living eton who refuses to
traeplication at my. office. tion has suggested, and the Gov- a title to: the Jand as valid| interest in the hunt, its amusing ‘ie. The result is a novel un-
Dated this 28th day of Senator. 1952. ernment has agreed that the morally and legally as that fe was explained. He was Speakably sombre, undeniably

money should be divided equally African tribes which themselves | °‘Tered the role of decoy. Retreat powerful,

between the Labour Welfare may have wandered there only! #5 impossible, “Remember, one Some will shrink from it; those
Fund, the Rehabilitation Fund and « generation before. jhand for your eyes,” said some- who open it will be torn between
a special fund for research and ‘one, as Grimble dived. A credit- fascination and repulsion; those

Registrar of Trade Marks

as |CALYPSOS





experimental work on irrigation. ‘Our Duty iad veers, oe horror and > — it oo realise me
7 umour whi Os! s pi e
Last Train to San Fernando These white minorities, en-'his telling. “ rove has been to exhibit man’s dig-



ie
REAL ESTATE In a Calabash

eee | I Don’t want no woman ern-! nity. not his degradation,
:

couraged by past British gov i
SRA AND AR ae _ anes . Africa, and. Snares TWENTY GREAT TALES OF
Lrogress that hes ost all the) Native customs are a snare for MURDER, Edited Helen Mc-
*

SHARES — 383 shares -n The Berpedce Brown Skin Gal
Shipping & Trading Co.,ltd. Aspe” | Woman Police ‘am
Cottle, Catford & Co,, No, 17, Histo” been made, i ; i
: 3 Samson and Delilah ‘ the young officer. Grimble was coly and Brett Halliday. Ham-
Street, Bridgetown 29.10.5260. | Hora. § cannot be abandoned. Yet taught the important rite of mond Hammond, 10s. 6d. 286

ae ie ele to or oe a belching by a little girl as charm- Pages. A score of offeri by the

on e

SE Country | Jamaica Hurricane

THE HOUSE Country
Road, St” Michael standing on 4 Acres,| Xmas Melodies-Charlie Kunz
PoMcods, 33 Perches of land. Apply.] All by yourself in the moonlight

COTTLE, CATFORD — CO, 14 sy ay. | Caroline

ing as her name, which was Cream of contemporary ican
British model, would Movement of Clouds. Unfortunate. thriller-writers—if cream is the:

have precisely this effect. The|ly, on a ceremonial occasion, his W0rd.

problems of multi le Ow. S FIDELITY, B
In Carlisle Bay oe base at me belch was twice as loud as that of _ TOWARD: TD) y



: his superior officer, who could Hugh L’A. Fausset, Gollancz, 15s.’
Diamond Rin Scheuhersinc Pincetice Evcitanuel, Mary 2°08 CNM be Solved in this only with difficulty be persuaded 237 pages. The philosophy of &
M. Lewis, Mary. E. Caroline, Turte ™@nner. It would lead stra \4hat this was the trick of an ail- °°”sitive modern man expounded
LGUIS L. BAYLEY Lady’ Mosieen, Bel Gueen. K Bpetac’ NY Sind Derbariom ing stomach an act of God $s en Poe eee ot ee
» as ' . R. D’prtac ; ; : ‘ ; ‘
Bolton Lan Pr W. Smith. ‘| A graver situation arose when her belief in the re of hu-
fe MMetet Viet. 2 Radar, Jenkins “,, Mr. Alport has no doubt t

Grimble’s wife, Missis, expecting ™anity.
Roberts

it is the duty of the Bri
ARRIVALS to stay in ica, that British

Schooner Lucille M. Smith, 74 tons, °2Pital (spent on sensible pro-
from British Guiana under Captain EF. jects and not absurd gambles
zg me 4 Sa to the Schooner like the groundnuts scheme) is

ners SOC! nm.

Schooner Emeline, 73 tons, from British SSential if Africa is ever to pro-
Guiana under Captain G. Sealy. Con- S8ress,
sieved to the Schooner Owners’ Associa- “Hope,” he concludes “ies

jon, ‘

M.V. Jenkins Roberts, 204 tons, from With us and with us alone. By
Trinidad upeer Captain G. Fergusson. our patience, statesmanship and

a baby, chanced to give a scent —LES.

hottle to a village girl, Voice-of- ae a i

\the-Tide, who later called on the

Grimbles, in tears. After halfan RAYES OF EXCHANGI

hour, the matter was cleared "e.
A high-born Gilbertese lady, in OCTOBER 29, 1952

the. Segk Sanathe of perecire. ciel ca Cee 4 e108 Pre PEACOCK & BUCHANS PAINTS

NEW SHIPMENT — AT LOWER PRICES






TODAY'S NEWS FLASH

MODEL STEAM ENGINES

GANS. coaves i] BRADSHAW & CO.

BUBBLE SETS
ALS



the ‘comfort of her husband, hand- Bankers | 707/10% Pr.
ing over some sweet-scented ob-



Cheques on
Sight or Demand (Over 100 years’ experience of Paint making)
Drafts 70 .5/10% Pr ioe







ANNU. Consigned _E. Harris & Co., Ltd. ¢ ject as the sign of her choice. ie
LLS TUITION. S/S. Canadian Crutser, 3.985 tons. success in Africa we can write 72 4/10% Pr. Cable WHITE — CREAMS — urs
ff Gtiesr ExPANDERS Lmany DIESEMAKNG, aiten, fH} THnidad- under Cantu Mt QHm Con FMR greater chapter in the! Votive ae dhe was of the honour” "Cotes de avane Br BATTLESHIP GREY — "RED ROOFING
te. Ete. Signe Gb world atplas, Maar r pres ona a Sp history of the contribution of|},:q a sweetheart 50% Pr. Siiver. 20% Pr. and MARINE PAINTS — VARNISHES
In The Toy Department rapid course of U.K. experts, M.V.Athelbrook, 286 tons, from Trini- the British people to world CANADA — STAINS — ANTI-FOULING PAINT
“ Y Write: Academy, P.O, Box 3 dad under Captain G. Williams. Con- {Civilisation than anything that “And if you had not had a 7 8/10% Pr. Cheques on
JOHNSON’S STATIONER San Fernando, Tefntag, B.W. signed to H. Jason Jones & Co ‘has gone before.” sweetheart?” asked Mrs. Grimble ue anit FOREST GREEN — $8.29 per gal
62—2n. t " . 8 ° ' be man rafts . z ts *
SSS : DEPARTURES It was painfully evident that 7» 9/10% Pr. Cable (Specially prepared for the Tropics)
== ” i S.S. De Grasse, for Southhampton World Copyright Reserved Voiece-of-the-Tide would not have 77 3/10% Pr. Currency 15 5/10% Pr.
: S.S. Strategist, for Montserrat ! —LES 50% Pr. Silver 20 Pr.
Schooner Laudalpha, for Dominica, m*
Schooner Confident. I.G., for St HOPE IN AFRICA, by C. J. M.

Lucia Alport (Herbert Jenkins 15/-),

Seawell ie

From GRENADA

GENERAL HARDWARE Sorecics

\
i RICKETT STREET (Opposite Post Office) — PHONE 4918

REALTORS LIMITED Leelee

AUCTION SALE STATIONERY




— SS a




















t OCTOBER, 29
{ L. Curtis, D. Hirst, K. Ablack, G.! MIX
Thursday, 30th, October (and it At pele P. Bullen, C. Wathey 4 wt ss
Jet. 105%, rom TRINIDAD ‘
not saneingen) Re, s GREYSTONE, HASTINGS J. Youkeles, M.. Newton EB,
On Thursday, 30th October, ri sy ‘iets ‘hee ee ETTER ne | y
order of Mr. Gordon Cole, we wil Just the little shop in the village {f ont 5
sell the furniture and household t » OCTOBER, 2 ,
ry “> Black Rock, ) A Walker, L Charlemange, P . %
St aichael, whats ‘staan Draw- where the Best Books, Stationery ' Canali, V. Brereton, W. Grace. DRINKS N See = before going elsewhere "
ing verge Longe pg rth ee and Xmas Cards are now on show. : 7
orris airs, tw o : 4 : ,
| and settee to, seat three, 18 spring : with Our aim is to please and we do it with ease. Q
ii bs jes, mirror sta . . |
Gining room table and six chairs, : weg y
nysta goblet an eprings, eressing We have the finest Selections of
eds with spr . 3
table and stool, weree ore. oe ° ® CARIBEE x
le, ti ack, .& ie ) ¥, :
table. ahogany: child's tall chair, For Perfect lean cids Xt + >) We are pleased to advise our Customers and
ce tale wedy oreeeiae’ an pee ' Fe inine Y body el out oes K{ SILKS
painted ‘press bureau, ‘cradle "ee : BITTERS . 4 te a ; i
send bureau, cradle 4 polsono! ’ riends that Mr. David MacKen
ot boas core. ipattressbe, rusts Mygiene thru oan ty | btai le i Bridget zie and Mr. Norman
bott rock and standing ubes 0 in. e in . ‘ ‘ 3 oe u
Bottom rockers, and standing nea o Bl ab getown ¥ Archer who both received a special training with the
burner and two muses hoe platen Bertin oles | :
7 Ss re cooker, electric
wear ever pressure cooker, electric USE Aching Jatnts a a a ae Flowered Crepe Satins $3.80—$5.00 per yard x Ford Motor Company Ltd. at Dagenham, England
Perfection stove with built in cines, Fight such é J ) x
even, medicine cabinet, paintings, th the doctor's of CARIBEE BITTERS are Flowered Crepe -_ $2.82—$4.00 ~ ha returned ae
Yinoleum, rugs, rubber mat, lats- Cystex start so. outstanding that they ‘os " nat a ie iin S have to Barbades and have joined the staff
ware, lemonade sets. cocktail sets, GY NOMIN must prove ent instantly improve the ap- ohoma Fabrics obtainable in the most exclusive ”
fake turtaine saa “went money hme ts , petite and add a zest to life. i She inst a > of our Company and are attached to our Service De-
crockery and cultery, decanters, chemist tex. S \9 des igns @ olours 2 —$2. per yard x :
flee percolator, vases, glass ice Gear. iy : ’ artment. Together with our present St: , av
pal, il lamps| with chimneys, TA LETS ® . Cystex alas ON SALE AT ALL 40 Inches wide % P 8 Pp uff you may
“| carrier, ¢ ing set, brea te > : i a
hoard and ienife, cut lass vases. B — bea “e GROCERS % be assured that you will receive efficient and satis-
ware ndwic ets, silve 3 ® > - -*
ariion ware sandwich sete, silver Nes ; Mss And don't FORGET 5% discount on all goods which 3 i . :
dish, silver: butter dish and toast py ve mo me Re Medical ES = = = makes it 5 cents less in everv dollar than any other % factory service.
ack. ive erving dishes an ess 25 years. i : ;
ce Gishts “mre, fruit stand, ee Remember when you do your shopping with us Store in Barbados.
pyrex plates an ishes 00K, Effective— Safe.
azines, ik buckets, milk iffective—and Safe— - :
siebasines, | aeamers, oelle, we deliver to your door hy Motor Van. | eer
kitchen utensils, 8 flower drums, ‘ =! :
fowl pens oS et shed a” af KNIGHT’S DRUG { ~
hose, lawn crib, room, shovel,
ete. and many other items A E. TA YZOR LIVUPD
Inspection on day of Sale from O | es e = Ch | M ER
otis STORES CENTRAL EMPORIUM aries Mc Enearney o.. Lt
TERMS CASH. : COLERIDGE STREET — Dial 4100 , © :
REALTORS LIMITED Sole Distributor Cnr. Broad & Tudor Sts. |
ee en 304 Bou OOS4-04 ~ pn !
mare — So” POO OS @ on ak ae —













A \ ‘







LET'S GET UP ON THIS RISE
HERE! WE CAN GET A BETTER
VIEW OF THE SURROUNPING




. BIG STAR!

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1952



circus |

GROUNDS |

CALLING NUM SER OWE.
MARE YOU MECE VING ME >
Over... f- eae

'0 BETTER



NZ

«
H

STAMINA OF AN
ox!

NOW THAT THEY'RE





BIG STAR, ARE Your] [WHERE'S MISS L
ma ie :
a's





|S SHOULD BE



DAY << WAS \
OUR. WEDDING} \







= HASN'T RETURNED,
MR. KIRBY.10 1SN'T
_ SHE STILL ON
STAGE?




{TLL GO WITH YOu
TAKE ME WITH

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





———————










BY CARL ANDERSON



NUMGER ONE HEAE.,.
RECEIVING YOU LOUD AND CLEAR.



Prevent tooth decay! Use refreshing LisreRIN® Tooth Paste
which checks cavity formation these 3 important ways.
1, LISTERINE Tooth Paste helps remove destructive
bacteria.
2. LISTERINE Tooth Paste attacks dull filra which
holds bacteria against tooth surfaces.
3. LISTERINE Tooth Paste even helps to remove
Sect
Brushing with LisTsRINE Tooth Paste after every meal helps
reduce tooth decay, polishes your teeth whiter, brighter chan
ever, CHILDREN LOVE ITS FRESH, MINTY FLAVOR.

ee

Especially important for children!

THATS THE

Check Tooth Decay
LAST STRAW )° ig

This Pleasant Way!






\ wail
Made by the make




rs of famous LISTERINE,





<2 — a. rn ee



Usually NOW Tins Libbys Evap: Milk ....







Tins Mortons Oatmeal ..
Tins Farex ...........

Tins Semolina .
Pkgs. S, B. Crys.



ANP...ON THE NEXT RIOGE, A PATHET!C, WORN
FIGURE STRUGGLES TO KEEP MOVING!

ee", Phd

ENTRIES CLOSE ON
FRIDAY, THIS WEEK AT 4 P.M.

WIN $40.00 rst prize

IN ADVOCATE XMAS CARD COMPETITION

any size or shape

to novelty card

Their decision wi)! be final.







ENTRY consolation prizes of $5.00 each.

A selection of the cards will be displayed at the
at the Barbados Museum.

can start sending in their entries now.

All cards should be addressed to the Editor, The





SO

SCOT SEE PFOOOLOO DS



_ ee
5) 4
PLEA

OOOO SLOP ELLIO EIS










Tins Ovaltine (Large) ...00......c0000. $1.22 — $1.10 Tins Oak Pow: Milk (3 Ib
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Preference will be given to cards with a Barbadian or West Indian flavour and
YOUR The judging will be done by a judging committee which will include the Editor.
Prizes will be as follows: First — $40.00; Second—$20,00; Third—$10.00; and two
Advocate’ Stationery and later

The closing date for the competition is 4.00 p.m, om October 31st: but competitors

A

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IN Cards can be made by any process—painting, drawing, photographic, ete.

A competitor can enter any number of cards, but all cards must be original work.

lvocate, Bridgetown.



PAGE NINE

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PAGE TEN

—_——





RICHER WINS CAMBRIDGESHIRE



SUNNY BRAE SECOND
GARRISON HACK THIRD

(From Our Own Correspondent)







Mr, Greville Bayliss’ th
t £.affingham at He

Gethin wom the Cambridge
«Xeiting race here. this aft
Garrison Hack for second p
‘There vere adverse rumours
abecut Richer yesterday and he
eased in betting to 100 to 6
despite his trainer de ng the
rumours, Sunny Brae s ed at 66
to 1 and Garrison Hack at 50 to

1,

There was a last n samble
on Antrycide who came down to



vw to] illover and
\ hen kea t course
down to W to 1 wt = co-
evournt with Cap of Gold.

, the hela ¢ mo the dip
there were only four horses with

ehance—HVC , Garrison
Hack on the fat side and Richer
and Brunetto on the stands side.

Richer had been tracki the

racemaking Brunnetio at the





bushes and as soon as Gethin be-
gan to ride him there was im-
mediate response. He took
leod in the dip and then
up the pill in fine style

Garr'son Hack mastered HVC
on the fay side and then int

3rae, Sialina and Fleeting Mon
put in strong finishing eff«
these were all just too late

Diflicult To Train
Mr.,Bayliss and his friends hav
wor a lot of money Richer
who proved difficult to train while
the ground was hard, Richer
great progress when the rain came
but it was a fine feat on the part
©! trainer Staffingham to win this

race with him.

HVC ran a fine race until the
last furlong but failed Jo stay.
Last year’s winner Fleeting Mo-
ment came with a very

over

and only narrowly missed a
place.

Garrison »-Hack appeared the
likely -winner a_ furlong out.

Brunetto ran his usual race and
found few to beat him again,

Hilltop who had been well be-
hind throughout put in a strong
late run to take eighth place be-
hind Fleeting Moment,

Kriss Kringle showed up well
early on, but then finished last
and Valdesco was never seen with
a chance.

Nicky Nook was another who
was never in the race but Long-
stone ran well for a‘ long way
and Was still not far behind
coming into the dip.



“

Two Farmers
W. MURRAY WOOD, 35-year-
old farmer, is to captain Kent
County Cricket Club again next
season, Another farmer, 41-year-
old TOM CRAWFORD, will again
lead the second XI.

late run a,

NEW MARKET, Oct. 29
ree-year-old colt Richer trained
near Epsom and ridden by Ken

ire by two lergths after an
ernoon. Sunny Brae just beat
lace by a short head.

How The
Indians

Will Play

The full itiner

ket tournament

the
tne

for
petwee,

ary
chi





We Indies and the Indians wa
released here yesterday.

I'he visitors will play five test
matches against the West Indies.
One Test will be played in
Jainaica, Barbados and Britivh
Guiana, and two in Trinidad. In
iddition there will be a Colony

in each of the major

and Aworday matches

iga t the local Indian commu-

iy Both in British Guiana and
Trinidad

The tourists are expected to

England in the Golfito on

wwe 26th of December, arriving

* Trinidad between Janauary 4th
nd 6th

After a few days in which to
get off their sea legs, the team
open their with a two-day
game against a team of East In-
South Tyinidad on the
2th of January, fol-

tour

dian in

10th and

lowed by the Colony Match
against Trinidad beginning on the
14th January and continuing un-
til the 19th.

The First. Test Match will com-
mence in Trinidad on the 22nd
Ta and continue for six

The team fly over to Barbados

ni play Barbados between the
3ist January and the 5th of
February, and the second Test

will commence two days later on
the 7th February.

‘Tne tourists travel to British
Guiana for their match against
an East Indian-team om the 17th

and 18th February, and then play
British Guiana from the 20th un-

til the 25th.
The Third Test Match opens
in British Guiana on the 28th

February, continuing until the

6th March, and on the 11th

March, the Fourth Test opens at

Trinidad continuing until — the

17th.

At the conclusion of the match,
visitors fly on to Jamaica for
fourth Colony. game begin-

ning on the 20th March, and

the Fifth and Fin&l Test will be-
gin on or about the 28th March
and end on April 3rd when the
visitors sail for the United King-

dom,

i}

the



OIL TANK TOWN WILL GROW
IN THE BUSH
From JOHN REDFERN

NAIROBI.
Kenya is to have a new oil re-
finery. It will cost £50,000,000
and produce 6,000,000 tons a Yea
To house the storage tanks and
workers, a new town will be
built where today there are palm
trees, scrub, swamps, coral, fish-
ermen’s huts, and a few solid
houses put up for holiday-makers.
This site is on the mainland
south of the Likoni ferry to the
island*of Mombasa.
Kenya was surprised

by. the

announcement of thcSnew refin-
ery. The surprise was arranged
for in’ preparatioris for the new
town.

Six months ago, when the big
oil companies were looking

round for new refinery sites, one
eompany chose Aden,

“Why don’t some of you com?
to East Africa?” said Mr. Arthur
Hope-Jones, in charge of Kenya’s
commerce and industry.

Soon after that Shell
man to explore sites. On his
advice the oil company almost
made up its mind. But two things
had to be fixed: plenty of water;
no land profiteering.

Kenya officials speeded
planning of a 150-miles pipeline
from Mzima Springs, a_ hippo
drinking point, to Mombasa towa
and port. This has reached the
stage of advertising for tender:.

sent a

the

At the same time, secrecy
descended on the tank tows
talks. The purpose was to stop

site values from jumping.
Quietly, arrangements wer

made for the Kenya Gover
ment to secure the neces
land — about 34 square mil

under its Land Acquisition Acts,



~—

| They Do It Evers

ILA GOT |
MORTICE ATA |
WEAK MOMENT |
AND TALKED
HIM INTO GOING
FOR TWO EXTRA

ROOMS it
THE NEW
ABODE dees






which prevent anyone holding out
for exaggerated prices,

Land values are now “frozen”

‘nd a colleetor will be appointed
to control payments.
_ Publication of the land acquisi-
tions in the official Gazette broke
the secret—and meant that the
project was firm,

The building of the tank town
will employ ahout 300 Europeans
and 3,000 @frieans, as well as
Sikh artisans, More Africans will
be brought in to build roads, staff
houses, guest houses, canteens,
and clubs,

Cement made
be their material.

Mr. H, L. Adams. secretary for
commerce and industry, told me
recently: ‘This is the biggest thing
~ has happened to us industrial-
y.

“Apart

from corel will

from the essential

safeguarding of oil supplies, a
large amount of the investment
will come back to us in Kenya.

There will be a new demand for
cur products, and increased local
spencing.” .

The Kenya
anxious to balance
agricultural development
en industrial counterweight,

Government is
the Colony’s
with

Up

to now the largest industrial
unit has been a soda works em-
pioying 1,500 Afr’eans.

Mombasa has seen a lot. For



centuries Arab dhows took slaves

hrough its port. Now oil brings
ew end weleome traffic to heart-
en the people. who far months
have been pre-occuvied with
lowleseness and agitation,

FOOTNOTE: Mz'ma, the name

star scherpe. is the Swa-
“heolthy.”

London Express Service

«he v

‘Time

Aepinered US Patent Ofee





AND A
BE





; Low! ah
~~? "hh
wea / =
° S s ~ ks



at WE NEED A DINING ROOM

GUEST ROOM
ONLY $6,000 MORE”,



BARBADOS





ADVOCATE



WINNER of 10 consecutive races in his homeland defore being flown to the U.S., Wilwyn, English-
owned four-year-old colt, cops the first running of the $50,000 Washington, D.C., international race at
the Laurel, Md., track. Ruhe (on outside), the U.S. hope, finishes second and Zucchero, another Eng-
lish-owned, is third. The race was run over the mile-and-a-half distance on the turf. (International)

SHOOTING :





Major Warren
Wins N.R.A.
Silver Medal

Major A. S. Warren won th>
N.R.A. Silver Medal with a total
of 257 points out of a possible 29)
as the Intercolonial Rifle Shcoting
Competition continued at the Gov-

ernment Rifle Range yesterday
evening.

Mr. F, D. Davis and R.S.M.
H. B. G. Marshall tied for the

first place in the number two open
event shoot from the 300 yard:
bank with competitors firing two
sighter and seven rounds to count.
They scored 34 pcints each out ot
a possible 35 points,

In Class B, Mr., E. J. Parry
secured first place by secring 33
points out of a possible 35.

Captain D. B. St. Aubyn. visiting
marksman from British Guiana
scored 46 points out of a possible
50 in the No. 7 open event from
the 600 yard. bank with ccmpeti-
tors firing ten rounds. This com-
petition was in Class A, while in
Class B, Mr. G. Lewis of the
Trinidad team scored the same
awn of points out of a possible
vu.

Mr.
totalled

M. Hunter
234 ~=points
H.P.S. total of 255
secure first place in the Grand
Aggregate in Class A. while in
Class B, Mr. R. O. Browne totalled
221 points for Barbados to secur
first place.

of Trinidad
out. of an
points, to

‘, No. 2 Event shoot at 6.30 a.m,
oe ‘the 300 yards bank, H.P.S.

CLASS A, PRIZE LIST

Pls. $ c.
Mr. F. D. Davis (B’dos) a“ 8.00
R.S.M. H. Marshall (B’dos) 34 8.00
Maj. A. S. Warren (B'dos) 33 4.00
Mr. N. J. Driver (B.G.) 33 3.40
Maj. J. E. Griffith (B'dos) 33 2.00
Mr. J. Crooks (T’dad) a 1,00
CLASS B. PRIZE LIS? 9
Mr. E. J. Parry (B'dos) 33 5.00
Mr H. C. Boyce (B’dos) 32 3.60
Mr. D. Yearwood (B'dos) 32 2.00
Lt. E. Goddard (B'dos) 32 1.50
Mr. R. O,. Browne ‘B’dos) 31 1.00
Mr. L. F, Hasse'! (B'dos) 21 SO
No. 7 event from 600. yards bank
H.P.S. 60
CLASS A. PRIZE LIST
Pts. $c
Capt. D. E. St. Aubyr
(B'dos) 46 10.00
Mr. J. Crooks (T'dad! 45 6.00
Capt K Gittens (T’dad) 44 4.00
Mr. V. O'Neil (T’dad) a4 3.0
Maj, A, Warren (B'dos) a4 2,00
Capt. C Warner (B'dos) 43 100
CLASS B.
Mr. G. Lewis (Tdad) 6 5.00
Set F. Edwards (B'dos) 42 3.00
Mr. &. J. Parry (B’dos) a 2.00
Mr. L.. Hassell (B’dos) a2 1.00
Lt. E. Goddard (B'dos) 41 1.00
Mr. K. S. Yearwood (B’dos) 39 50
Grand Aggregate H.P.S. 255.
CLASS A. PRIZE LIST
Pits, $ ©.
Mr. M. Hunter (T’dad) 234 15.00
Mr. J. Sutton (B.G.) 232 12.00
Capt. D. St, Aubyn (B.G.) 231 9.00
Maj. E. Manley (B.G.) 229 6.00
Mr. J, Crooks (T’dad) 28 3.00
Col. J. Connell (B'dos) 228 2.00
CLASS B,
Mr. R. O. Browne (B'dos) 221 7.50
Mr. ©, J. Parry (Bdos) 216 6.0
Mr. G. Lewis (T’dad) ..., 24 4.50
Lt. E. Goddard (B'dos) .. 213 3.00
P.C. QO. Shepherd (B'dos) 213 1.50
Mr. L. Hassell (B'dos) 100 1,00



Anchor Cup
Shoot Today

The following have been chosen

to represent Barbados in the
shoot for the “Anchor Cup™
against Trinidad and_ British

Guiana at 12 noon today,

Maj A S. Warren (Capt,).. Col.
J. Connell, Capt, C, FE. Neblett,
Mr, T. A. L, Roberts, Mr. M. R.
De Verteuil. Mr, F. D. Davis;
Extra—Capt. C. E. Warner,

ie. o8
lo

By Jimmy Harlo |











+sANO THAT'LL














SOCCER ON

THE INSIDE

Contributed by:
DESMOND HACKETT
ROBERT FINDLAY.

HENRY ROSE

TERENCE ELLIOTT
VICTOR RAE
Edited by:
MARSHALL FALLOWS

Korean referee Duk Chun Khim
(pronounced Kim), an Olympic
Games official now staying at the
Korean Legation in London, would
bke to “guest” at an English
match before he returns.

Khim is doing the rounds of the
London grounds—as a Is, 9d.
spectator,

. °

Spurs are not the only people
who are hoping that George Robb,
Iinchley amateur outside left, will
play regularly for Tottenham.

Says Walter Winterbottom, the
England team manager: “If Robb
continues in First Division foot-
ball and gets that little extra ex-
perience he needs, he will almost
certainly get an England cap.”

Which means that Robb is on
the short list for the problem posi-
tion in our international side,

te * Me

Barnsley’s Angus Seed, the man
who made the Robledo brothers
and sold them to Newcastle for
£27,500, is still working on the
“football in the family” theory.

He took Bill Anderson, Silks-
worth Juniors (Durham) half
back, on to the Oakwell pay-roll
and now is giving trials to brother
Ron, a back from the same club,

Arthur Jefferson pleaded with
Aldershot manager Gordon Clarke
to give 20-year-old right-back
Stanley Jefferson a trial. Now the
brothers are playing together at
back for Aldershot.

Soon the Jeffersons will form a
new partnership—Stan (just out
of the R.A.F.) is expected to join
Arthur’s fish and chip business
near the Q.P.R. ground.

* + *

Two 20-year-old starlets on the
Wanted List are Stan Keery,
Shrewsbury inside right who “has
everything” and Jim Kelly, Wat-
ford’s attacking wing half with a
colossal throw,

Keery is a Sammy Crookes dis~
covery; went on the Derby ground
staff on leaving school. West Ham
are watching him.

Daily Dunean thinks Kelly
would fit in well at Luton.

* * He

The goal-getting feats of Black-
pool wing wizard Stanley Mat-
thews—three this season—have
raised the inevitable question:
What is the maestro’s post-war
total? The answer is more thaty
you think—12,

* * *

Soccer fans don’t forget—fans
of the Queen’s Park Rangers
variety. Club directors and the
Supporters Club combined to raise
a fund (standing at £750) for the
welfare of eight-year-old Stanley
Hudson, son of the late Q.P.R
player, :

*

Crack amateur who wouldn't
mind a game or two with a pro.
club is Walthamstow’s Jim Lewis,
man of many caps, member of
Britain’s Olympic XI., and hold-
er of an Amateur Cup medal.

Says Jim: “I played a few
games for Orient last season, No
one wants me this year.”

Yet centre forward Lewis can
rightly claim to be the best marks-
man in the amateur business,

* * *
Don’t write finis to the Dev
Dooley episode now that he i
back in the Sheffield Wednesday
team—and scoring goals.

Resentment over the club's su
gestion that bustling Derek (6ft.

3ins. 18st. 8lb.) was being vic-
timised by referees is still
strong.

Next move: A protest to the
Football Association from the

Referees Ppspeiation.

Two Grimsby men who don't shy
at the how-old-are-you question
are George Tweedy,
class goal-keeper for |:
inside forward Bilis
George admits to 3; Billy is 37

; , :





Points to pitits switch has been,
made by George Stephenson
(brother of the famous Clem) who
akes over a public house at Hali-

‘anager of Huddersfield.
° e ©

rate Gt.
soldier a

Liverpoal
Arnell, 18-year-old



ward, one of their best captures.
. . e

Portsmouth think
forward Maurice Owen, who r?*-
fused to leave Swindon earl
in the season, will soon change
his mind. Director Harry * Wain

has been keeping .an eye on
Maurice.

Other names being whispered
it Pompey are Cliff Holton
(Arsenal) and Johnny Morris
(Derby).

Newcastle United won't se

much of director Stan Seymour

came

‘ax following his resignation as.

NETBALL :
Arthurs,

former Sussex Youth cenire fore

that centreâ„¢

match days until he finds that
inside forward. Says Stan: “I’m
just a worker willing to learn it
our Way.”

—L.E.S.

Jean Borotra
‘LONDON

In 1926 the crowds at Wimble-
don were captivated by the tena-
cious play of a little Frenchman.
He was forceful. He was fast. His
enthusiasm was enormous and his
energy was such that he used to
bounce around the courts like a
little rubber ball, In faet, he be-
known as the “Bounding
Basque”.

Jean Borotra’s victory, for such
was he, in the men’s singles was as
popular this side of the channel
is it was in France. One of the
people in England, though, to
whom it mattered little was a five-
yesr-old boy. He was Anthony
John Mottram, whose interests lay
in Comie Cuts and sticky toffees.

But 26 years later the same Tony
Mottram, now Britain’s No, 1 lawn
tennis player, had good reason to
recognise the sxili oi the Bounding
Basque. For when they met in the
International Indoor Lawn Tennis
match at Queen’s Club last month,
Borotra despite his 54 years,
proved too good for the English-
man,

These matches between England
and France have taken place, ex-
cept for the wartime interruptions,
every year since 1929. And in
every one the fabulous Jean Bor-
otra has played his part. He cap-
tained the first team in 1929 and

.he has captainéd France every

succeeding year.

In his younger days he won the

imbledon title twice, in 1926
and 1928. In addition he won the
doubles title three times in part-
nership with Brugnon (twice) and
Lacoste, and the mixed doubles
title with the amazing Mm? Leng-
lea.

While he was at the height of
his fame, he and his colleagues
Lacoste and Cochet enabled France
to win the Davis Cup six years in
succession, beating the United
States in the final five times and
Great Britain once. And as in the
Davis Cup, so at Wimbledon did
France reign supreme, with suc-
cessive championships from 1926
going te Borotra, Lacoste, Jorotra,
Cochet, Lacoste and Cochet.,

Quick Eye

The years have dealt lightly
with Jean Borotra. The quickness
of eye is still unimpaired, the
yolleying is still as delicate, The
thinning hair and the slightly
quicker breathing indicate the
passing time.

Age too has curtailed his stay-
ing power and has limited his
mobility at the net. But for all
that he is still a great player and
capable for short periods of play-
ing all the shots which he pro-
duced so well when at the height
of his fame.

Against Mottram it was indeed
almost as if the clock had been
turned back. Borotra, supposedly
hard-put to last a three-setter, not
only turned the tables on_ his
younger opponent but finished in-
finitely the stronger.

Mottram took the first set 6—3
and appeared on his way to a com-
fortable win, He made a bad mis-
take in the second to lose his ser-
vice in the terth game and Borotra,
anplying pressure with the skill
ofa master, had quickly pulled up
to one set all.

For most people of his age, and
‘c@rtainly as far as. the spectators
were concerned, honour was satis-
fied. But Borotra was making no
gesture. He was after victory and
as he continued to crowd on the
pressure it was the younger player
who cracked, leaving Borotra with
yet another victory for France.

This little man with the secret
of cternal youth has been playing
tennis for so long now that he
seems like a legend, But on the
nislay at Queen's he is still very

1 Peal, .

A couple of vears ago he was
asked what his ambition was. For
a man who has won every honour
the game has to offer the question
could have proved difficult to
answer, But Borotra was ready
with-his reply: “to continue to en-

the game for a few years yet”.



Malvern Defeat
Notre Bame 18—3

Malvern Netball team contin-
ued their unbeaten performanced
by defeating Notre Dame 18-—-3
at Culloden Rad yesterday af-
ternoon.

For Malvern, H. Springer scor-
@? 13 and N. Cumberbatch 5,
while G. Ostourne scored Notre
Dame's 3

Malvern
matches.

On Friday afternoon Malvern
will oppose a team at St. Michael’s
Girls’ School,

have played eight



Sportsman’s Diary:

£25,000 FOR
FULL-BACK?

NO club could be more cofi-
cerned about their fullbacks than
Chelsea. They have three out of
action, JOHNNY , HARRIS, SID
TICKRIDGE and JIMMY LEE. So
Il asked manager TED DRAKE
whether he would join the biddin:
for England’s left back BI
ECKERSLEY, of Blackburn.

The idea of paying a big fee for
a back appalled this old player,
whose exploits as a centre-forward
so often made headlines in the
"thirties.

“£25,000 for a full-back?” he
questioned, as though this would
be the height of folly. “For an
inside-forward, yes.”



® Not So Easy Now \

So we sorted out the players |
for whom Mr. Drake would think |
of paying such a fee. “Goalkeep- |
ers’ You can pick them up on any |
common—although even that’s not
so #asy now.”

And so we went on, until we
agreed on the conclusion that only
wing-halves and inside-forwards
were worth that much, Oh, yes,
and centre-forwards, The glamour
boys, in fact.

Still, seriously, Chelsea must be
worried about their backs, They
have been looking for one, They
considered JACK MANSELL, the
Brighton left-back, now more like-
ly to go to Cardiff,

“There is nothing available that
appeals to me,” Drake says. It
looks as though he will have to
try to get a player who is not
supposed to be “available.”

Sedgman’s Service

FRANK SEDGMAN, undisputed
champion of amateur jawn tennis,
began work to-day after a seven
months’ honey-moon tennis tour,
during which he won the Wim-
bledon and United States men’s
singles titles.

And what is the 24-year-old
Australian doing for a “living”?
He is serving petrol’from the
pumps of his motor service sta-"
tion near Kooyong tennis stadium,
Melbourne,

This from-baseline-to-pumpline
transformation is one of the
means by which it is hoped to
keep Sdgman in the amateur ranks.
Another was a £5,000 wedding,
gift from Australian sportsmen. |
One Thing Certain!

The Victorian manager of the!
oil company for whom Sedgman |
operates his station said the com-
pany had not given it to him.
‘They had “merely helped with the |
negotiations and lent him some
money.”

One thing is certain, Sedgmcen
will help Australia defend the
Davis Cup later this year.

Not until after this will Sedg-
man decide what to do with his
service—give it to the Australian
motoring public or apply it, with
the rest of his shots, to the show-
manship of the professional tennis
circus.







More Boxing

As newly elected president of
the Amateur Boxing Association,
Mr, EDWARD BOOTH, a retired
factory welfare superviser now
living in the Cotswold village of
Upper Brailes, faces a _ longer-
than-usual-season,

Reason is that the amateur box-
ing season, which normally closes.
at the end of May will next year
be extended to June 6 to enable
clubs to promote Coronation tour-
naments,

The ABA have also decided to
sergd a team to Wroclaw, Western
Poland for the European cham-
pionships next year (May 17-24)
despite a minority move urging
the ABA to keep out of interna-
tional affairs.

Popular

On holiday here is Mr. L. L.
McKANE from Guernsey. He is
secretary of the Channel Islands
committee which arranges tours

Heolex Watches



for English amateur soccer clubs.

Mr. McKane tells me that dis-
appointment awaits some clubs.
“You’d be surprised at the num-
ber of clubs asking to come over,”
he says. ‘

The Channel Islands may send
a team here this season, “We have
been invited but I cannot say
whether we are accepting,” says
McKane,

‘No,’ To Chelsea

NEIL TURNER, 23-year-old
left-half who plays for Eastern
Transvaal and is expected to be
included in the South African
team to tour Britain next year,
has turned down an offer to join
Chelsea as a professional.

Turner wanted Chelsea to pay
the passage for his wife and
seven-month-old daughter to go to
England,

Chelsea’s agent in South Africa
refused to c » so.

2,000-A-Year
STANLEY PARLETT, a eae |

old opening batsman and vice-
captain of “Wembley Cricket Club, |

scored more than 2,000 runs in 53°

jmnings this season—L.E.S. |





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OCTOBER 30, 1952

Man Makes 6ft.
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PAGE 1

mi KMIW III mini: :i, IM2 rlMUlAIIOS ADVOCATE KINK \ ) HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON BE KINO TO OUB LITTLB FlATweiiED PaiENO* CIBCUS H eaouKos RJNT OF THE FLYING SQUAD .... BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES I Bflf i BLONDIF BY CHIC YOUNG FLASK GORDON BY DAN BARRY BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS .'BUT MX*? WiCE'j, IXLE AHO ALUT PUOWED / TWAT THC THEV AOOfVBO a*. „• tM*T NBWS> TCw*j AMD APS > VOWVG BBQX-4T CCM U S TO _V MB fiMCB MXCVg v*S#T SOU* f-~\ BEEN WOBK*J' %  THE PHANU.M RY LLE FALK ft RAY MOORES :.;^l V "^"t W E WITH s J 'HI' 1 %  *'A*A" i "VMBEL. KNO WOT lo SIT / wiwwe MM CUT OF MV VIUJUiE' P He.p PREVENTrooth DECAY %  %  --.','.','.-.-,•,-,-,'.-.-. -,-. -,-.-.-.'.$ /or Women t'.tftei tally i/mic* iWro An Married •Vevea* '•>•*•> atoeoyf tW nAoaMog II-IUM l.-nd •* *buh ihcvk. .*m liirniatiixi ike.. > mi, ri.i i ., v 1. inrtmiNI Tnolh t*aitr htlp. trn.nr .1. i i i<\a MM 2. nvriaihi louih %  •Mr ait*.k dtdl l.ii.i riKh bold) batwrw nftmil tuoU. iiirtataa. 3. LUTiaiNl TiMMh Haitieven turlpt to ipan %  uouib acMb. BVwf*!** wtra UiraaiNl Tuoch hula in,%  *] niaal h.lp* (• %  fee* couch dara>, polialtM puiiiorib biirr. h itif iU <-• %  ( CJULDB1N LOVB in llbH. ms, IU.I %  h paajajghj ImawrMM fa* UUrf>nl — w OTx,e tool* i Decoy Mudr I,, >>,.• makers ol lames LISTERINE i.TISIPTIC I he cautious abcnil nt" until thev're prrivgd to be oood as well M new. Rut >rce vou know that tl *n-i and thousand.* < men have tried out a neu, idea, and tout. . i | %  ling in thf. method r, ,,-, fi.i % % %  of I TAKK Tampax. for example 1 Thinew eompArcH|i ctip*r. H| f.:lll. I,| (I.. T • %  ii haa brought un. %  ho hfci,. • Dt-u .. doctor, with %  .' Mdgc n., n I %  lAi %  %  %  • %  I tier, tafl i rjuiti* : lo r.iid i-mnot rau<•'inhirasffiTipnr vhattng or .i|-.-i>Mifpnt ii'i'ler plain BOVM KNIGHT'S LTft No 33 Drood Street ." %  ,',*,*,** :%'.'*','.*''>* %  :;'•'*'''•'•'< IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL OFFERS AVAILABLE THURSDAY TcTsATURDAY AT ALL BRANCHES^ Tim OvalliiM (Large) Bullies Chiver'i Mincemeat Tina Imperial Ox : Sauiair Tln Lym Valley Sweet Corn Tina Craw: ITillit BiaelliU Bottle* (aril, Beer J1.22 .73 — Uraally NOW $1.10 .12 .58 .36 1.18 M .40 — 1.44 — .24 Tins Quaker Oala ran. Qaak-r Oala raea. Qaaker Oau .an Tina l.lbt>> r.vap: Milk Tina Oak Pow: Milk (3 1*1 Tin. II.,,,. Tina VIU-CMP Tina Mil.. Tina Teae .. Tnla few aV Dale Milk T—i, Tina Blrda .„.!....I %  ...!..Tina Larale Rolled OaU Tina Mnriona Oalmral Tina Faree I'lna Hemollna Pkra. . B. Crra. SUrrh 1I.U I M 3.SS 1.34 J4 1.14 1.13 lie .SI .57 a M .80 M D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street 1 MORE DAY ENTRIES CLOSE ON FRIDAY, THIS WEEK AT 4 P.M. WIN $40.00 FIRST PRIZE IN ADVOCATE XMAS CARD COMPETITION SEND IN YOUR ENTRY TO-DAY I OI.I.U II THESE III IIS I 1 Hill II. 1 The rompet.ti >n i %  nidging lominnii. wfiii.ii will include U Tiieir iocatlotl II he final. Prtm ivlll MOT ni I N*** B it m i Ji oaaMt i Tllid ' UM at the BoibadoM.f-um The closing date lor the competition is 4.00 p Hi on October 3l3t: but competitors eon itart (tending HI their entrie* now. All cards should be addressed to the Editor. The Advocate. Bridgetown.



PAGE 1

WHAT'S ON IO0AY *#*unt. at rtniip VMn II AlKtU Cup Stun RlS. bMf ... 11 U Meeting. IMHry OnajaiaMenaia. M*um. HI r*"< \ < st. iv.r. Pi ,T, \f.>,u CW ii, Crak H p tush. tW I l.SBp I p n tH p.* Abtroratr II .TERDA' .*IAIHIKK>I ESTABI/SHFD 1895 THURSDAY, O'TUBER 30. 1962 PRICK HVE i I Government Increased Taxation Is Taxpayers' Burden HEAVY CRITICISM was levelled at the Cov.i.m„ni proposals contained in 'lie five year development plan of capital expenditure and taxation by opposition members Who took the lead given by government party member, Mr. %  A. E. S. Lewis in [abetting the plan "unambitious" when COnatderaUoa <>f the matter continued for another seven hours last night. 1 ikii.t part in last night's discussion besides Mr. Lewis were Mr J. E. T Hr.mcker Mr V B I Vaughan, Mr W A Crawford and Mr. O T AILlei. During the debate, member* -it-' cucd the Government Party "I incompetence" imd charged them with "burdening the taxpayer* sed taxatioij | Criticised Over Five Year Wins Nobel Prize Cubans Live In Trees Afler Hurricane %  than eleven hoars of debate during the past two days' The Cuban Army, air foreand ""'""i ll House adjourned unUl Hed Cross began an uirlift of Ibod, lit,XI Tuesday at 3.00 p.m. followHAVANA. Oe; 29 medie.il supplies and clothes to thousands ul families isolated at the Ciencgj He Z ipat.i area -.wsmpland. and along the southwest coast of Las Villas province since last week's hurricane caused heavy seas and rains which inundated the coastal zone. The Cuban navy dispatched two small warships to the stricken area. It was doubted however whether the ships will be able to reach ll.< to the fact that the wntoi navigable. Pilots who gsya awm ine stricken area said eveiy hut and nous liams. Mr. E. W Barrow. Mr C. E Talma. Mr W. A Crawford. Mr. V. B Vaughan. Mr. O. T. Allder. Mr. JET. Branckei. Mr I I> Mottley. Voting for the motion were Mr. fl II Adams. Dr. H. G Cummin.. Mr M E. Cox. Mr. T O. Bryan, Mr E St.A Holder and Mr. F. E Millei i., Page S French Prepare For Red Thrust HANOI. Ocl < mmg '. i, : | CI uirgertv I defence! long the narrow muddv Black ioday and* poued for ao expecied all out Red thrual i trW nOUUl Kifts nntmued 10 'ah infiltration %  a Iht rivi %  in Van Yen o eir . fin -d I i>C • The Ptench union headuuarte Meanwhile call~| In ..11 Ind-fen* %  lnlateu outpugtl and built s strong double waU—asw •li>fssr fm* south Uifik ol Black River and a second %¡ miles back lining the nil* rills that separate the olonial route from the rive Sudauege Proposal Aceepted CAIRO, Oct 29. tat r-.d Naguib accepted proposals far an Immediate home tual self-de term i i ition lot Sudan. h.iNew Artti-T*rrorit*t Convicts Hold Ten Hostages i HKSI'ER. III no,,. Oct. 29 Unruly convicts and luutnerved officials prcx-ed Ul endurance content in its third day with the livenf ten hostages >me. - %  In llic second ueriatna in two 1 days at Menard State prison. Psychiatric Division, most of the 300 inmates who stormed the kitchen and dining room were sent back to 'heir cells but 3a armed with the kitchen cutlery erieed ..um,i guards and barricaded themselves in the mess hall. Seven other guards are hostages of 332 east cell inmates. — (C.P.) Reds Ha r A Hied Patrol Again BDtUMi Out M For the third iralght day Sobarred the western allied "courtesy patrol" from 110 mile autobahn highway linking Berlin with the west. An official British spokesman said the Bu' patrol was presented this morning at the Soviet highway checkpoint outside Berlin out was jected b> Soviet guards manning the points. A similar United States patrol yas rejected yesterday and %  British patrol the day l fore —t'.P. RIVER DOES $32,000 DAMAGE MILAN. Italy, Oct. 29. The Serio river swollen by recent rain broke through its banks at six different pines yesterday in the province of Cremona near here, causing estimated S32.OO0 damage. _t.P. D* SILMAN A. WAKSMAN. 64. p'ctured at work in bin H-.\ vsrsity laboratory, in Ne %  wick. N. J., was awarded the 1952 Nobel Priaa for Medicine sn.l Physiology. The mlcrobiologM was citad for his work In the discovery of streptomycin. Ihe gist „ i .w J •ffective antibiotic fr-use against K<'"IllatlOn llllIH>SI*a tuberculosis. The prl/e is worth ** 1 s l •M^OOlncasb. flnrerttofinnai' In kaya N'hools KENYA. Oct. 29. A new regulation aimed i preventing subversive activities in Kenya's independent schools was Islheriaad by Governor Sli Evelyn Baring as the biggest ..Tili-Tei lunst manhunt in the lony to get under way. Schools may now be closed by .I'lei of the Minister for Eduitlon if he is satisfied: I, That any member of the nUUatgSjaMgrt or teaehuk stall is associated with the activities prejudicial to the maintenonce if public order. That any teaching instruction imparted In such .tuoui is pivjudHiai u> in. maintenance of public order. 3. That any p alrflawi and will be defended at all tfl PVench massed ght battalions to th.. Black Rivei area fafttg estimated communist division lining the river banks and two more movhuj down UM mountains in four columns from the raUan bastion ol N'Ohlteo. —W.P. Oil Companies Seek Supreme Court Ruling (BHF.N troai BniL-li Uui.ui.i. Tn>,idad >nd axbados shot 10 ronuSto count from Uta 600 yuas bank yenteiday. rrutu f foot soldiers on tinfront recaptured the out imst in Chmwon valley south ot Iron Horse mountain The Koiean Marine Corps also grabbed the Communist outpost west nl Munsan but withdrew aftea blowing up Red bunkers —U.P. In papers filed with the gupjp mi Court indfcy the fiva %  aid they would show that the Fed.,.,! Attorney c.naral James Mctirancry picked Washington for grand Jury proceedings H wMch it was unfair and unnecessary to do so." —i\r. • >ff bv the %  >w,i thai i night. PoUoa e Umatad that IMOIHI pei nm laoiraed the < i..i i< ^ in %  lighters throughout the • •• tin pai d "f gnu 1 11.... e fli Itnosevall. Mi. Steveoeon %  stunding ovation as lo down ihs aisle if the door arena to climax thi which had broughl i %  .., itiea as Richard Oarer Namn ei %  n n T illulu H. Rankhead, Hun phrej .liiine \ I %  I The parti upted Mi Steven on pi eeh so many tin %  %  r hi to nnl"h it before thi Mtnot rat had pun hated on thi atlnnal '"lev i uon netw ,. o %  He rul off %  %  RapubliSi'le M.M.W.L.Blons ami othoi .quii,:nerit with Franca agau he...linn the |.si with fl00.000,0n worth: S m < %  So5.tl00.00n worth of an craft contract* were place'i France got S46.600.000 woith ol irderi for Vampire llfhler'lal> got (13.900.000 t. mak •pare pnru 1 %  i S built I Ighters and J;n %  'racta were ol i 'uch as radai i .r /ton On Reds SEEKING A CHANCE to light against th* North Korsanx and Chinese OornnninbktH, young South Korean* flock to recruiting staUons as soon as they reach military age This Urga group, lad ing no other means of transportaUon, forms a walk .ng parade. South Koreans now outnumber Asserl can* in the United Nauotu forces battling la Korea. (International SotmdphotoJ TOKV' I. 0 rwii." i .pan ha u doi> lo aihM Russia and its satel bin woul njDunifli rountrw ie|it VuK"slav flrhii V I %  : I: .1 %  I l| Six S, intltdlo correspondent & fi^r Tass Hew v and the ncwspapei Pravda were given orders lanf week to leave %  Mice did not aav what will lie done about othc Russians already' Mre They In-lude fitly members of an unre%  taj nla ad lovasl MMOB gas] iba % %  200 In business,—C.P. %  i' %  i>-''i OKENADA. Oct 29. lion X A. Marryrhow wax unanimously re-Hectcd on the nornnation of Hon. J. It. Renwieh, lecoiuled by Hon. D. A Henry, as Deputy President when the I,egLslature upsneel the second vear of the session today. A day of koeni | contested debates saw the renced MM.W.U. bloc thrcitime-. oot-votul nine to four on two Governn ant motions—one over gOV< i /HI., nl selection of a house to S uchase for u residence oi UM agistmte In the Eastern Di.stnet and thother for pnvfnent of salai v lo J S. Ross, an Assistnnt AgriciaTOaral f>moei during a C D.W. r->restry course In Eng.. rri an'i Ircady arrived in the L'ntlad Kingdom—as well as a third mofi-if. in Mr. Oalry's nami mgi la* earliest po of Superintendent of gugdit Werhi CJaveoee Renwlcfi bte.iuss | are highly ilsnatisfed •ith present liregut ritles u. .h. l-Wlj.-. Hon C Nici fi.rmcrl> of thi Oalrj bloc in these Instances voted eoneratwhll %  '. ruH i tn. Th. Oalri motion recom,. 1i inssnueion to tin gtcretai lute on the ground i in several gov, .. %  goor administration w.e '. > red to the next meeting of • The (ill-day sitting I lourned till tomorrow to complew imfla bated bunni-1RUCK OVERTU.1NS: 7 KILLED. 27 INJURED Mi gtevi %  d he would win Hi. ..... ana have ''everything Hit the pas pt< Hi bad k i %  %  luiv.-'i .i mei %  %  tailored h to Mend wilh geogrn phieal IsjwfcaTOIini that he Adlai Stevenson was person who ntU tfai Mrni thin in the oti'h thai hi '*ould say i th.aorU e.P.| Genesal Eiaenhoumt in IVetv York NV.W VOHK. O-t M. lwight 1. Eisenhower down the himie stretch tor the White House %  l the Kederal nd rel itlruj the ih*mothat he was to Kenan war. %  i oiiiic.o presidential i UM cond day ii.... Vork City area I the stale's important in an informal iwei programsne %  i naUonally last night %  %  i.ii Elsenhower said: i That Ul proposed "clean 1 thi Kederal Governlild not extend to -efllont' civil senne employees hut rtaintj include their nal boases" • 'H*4 thi.. .VJIS--IIO yy between ths in IM47 to git of Korea and the political rears later". [fiat he did not advocate lv and referred M m .-Inch he sugdJUOOal Premium" ni the Par East. I i.houer's vote hunt Vorh 'itv .ire,i to-day him to Wcstehester m tv HI. Bronx and Queens —U.P. IViiici'ritAliff To Vibit .(r.. I ilitl !! % %  CH |/>NI>N. (ht 11 1( II l'imcc*s Alice • '" visit British Guiana as well ai Trinidad in the m 'ear, it * leeroed I %  lontghi An invitation Horn Brluatl Guiana was con rhere are still no deta.U available al ment Of thi \ I I %  AOff SAIIH IAMIUM. 23. scion of one of Egypt's wealthiest fniiiillea. Is sliown after ho was sentenced to life imprisonment for opposing l nd reform bv torOi Me IVBI accused of stormlnp Into %  porl I laghagha, bnn. R\in ind shoul'slibeerv.. %  -. i mv dead body." i .i d rol rn It glal itlon limits I (JntcniotionaO BOOKSHOP WRECKED i TAMPK-O. Mexico. Ocl. 29 ran "Iher-i-ht truck loaileci with 44 labourI highway ft The report said thi p IM were fru.t vendoiv Who hlre.| the truck to attend %  %  %  accident l 4 A ttoftiny Genttfltd %  w // Mr. Adkons Appointed QG*s WYI.ir. Q.C. g ADAMS. 0 Mil QO*. U If Mr. i '. • C.JhT.t E5m Srjde To Brazil Surpri&rs Britinh Trading Curios LONDON, Oct. 20. The news of the sal* u< Miaul 15,000,000 worth of BrlUah jet .aircraft was received Ing circles tedi} iti and BOOM envy, and i xpiesbvd the hope that it would grant slmllai [Off other commodities. Iiraajl ha* been sterling and i oit. for sterling I exports have l*en difficult to ..i.'.... t for the sale i DMteer jet aircraft—is being r .i nsation' deal i I tantlal .unount of Brato bi purchased by line llrlli.sh iaw cotton commisIhfJ deal, tht Hi city notes" id today -quality of i Ithaca Is aiway> ne oi th. main aiuuetii deals but teporti suggest th..-. the i has haggled with some perststenctover th.rjue-ilion .if quahlj no that It may b-i d one Min of the rie.j i.i ...mfaetetj M ^h^ other. 'or such Ml aaaj bid. But it >eein ai though the BnUafa atrcraf" I irdpressed and ip to somaj I'iduitrles, %  i difficult %  method oi maluag .\ %  i be ignored."' IP Olympic Fencers To Tour lirazil MILAN Oct 29 %  :-.cers acl 'he Fltlmmensa Club of Rio de Janeiro %  i champion, Eduard.i Ol; i k women foils i.iottl. is the er of the i lion in addition tU %  an ooni.i at.— V*T.



PAGE 1

PAC.r >!\ BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY. OCTOBE* 1*. 1M1 Calvert Fishing Boats Near Completion Members Criticise 5 Year Plan SI' All LOWERING MMION ai. ~ P**r 5 posed to raise mn mote by inThai U why we have to charg matini the duties n C.U. the P-P *>* this country so much iiiigauon and ulUciwuv, and to* y^^,, lor their rum todav.' he said, tunu recommended U> be ..pent He j rll Iht there wu no juatlThat l why the price on tobacm ilk development, and Mid that ncsMdn In this country at the 00 ha* been increased. Thai u if u*e five year plan meant emnnsent'time, on the basis of these v.hy we have to tax the country pjoysoeal feea tew more thou„, >p<*aU to Impose such a buru the very limit. Squeeze every •snta Barbadians, lbs people ^^ ^ xttr people. Was il fair to red cent out erf every man, wowould 'have no grudge at payfMy itM lh# sn ould reap more man and child." ir.K a few extra cents in UGovernment Revenue from high"e asked if just to jet few ation." er duties on C.I.F. values, he roads and a little water you have He labelled the irrigation prou ?,ked. He said that it was proto tax the country to saturation posals In the Memorandum as Meeting, especially in the In| int. It was deplorable. tomfoolery and not planning," crease of foods. He said that they talk about •nd said that "there Is the poaslin addition to setting revenue .-.rial welfare but nobody can bility of a dairy Industry as anIn this unjust manner, the duty dunk rum; nobody can smoke; other industry to sugar.'' This on tobacco and rum had been Inn.body can pay bus fare and the would mean much to the colony, created. majority of the cars will bo OB He asked, "what u a developHr said that these drastic slaps the road. nicnt plan without ensuring the were necessary because the Ha fell that the programme -ans of permanent employment Tieaury was nearly dry and represented the mln mum the lie who have not got it iW* %  " ""** to "nance Government could do in the face ihos. scheme* meotioned. The the promises which they made average worker had to toil until and in the face of what one exExnreMed Doubt he was 68 before he could get old pects of it. r.*.p. -* is* !" .. ^ pension but they could afford He said that the Five Year Plan Mr. Vaughan expressed "proto retire a civil servant at 50. was no use. It was a Plan by iolound doubt that the Government If they looked around the counf.uita and squeezed ovary cans rouM raise a five-million dollar try they would see many strong, out oi the taxpayers pockets. He Ljan in any market in the world, flb.e bodied Government servants suggested that with the Civil seri nd said that while Barbados ..t M) entering private employment vonts proposal i ould obtain a big loan, it oould Opd drawing handsome salaries. pU ,uh the present Government go to the people and get four He abo lum aliuuio act like men. art OB their feat and do Ki.mething to justify the eooftdence which was put in them. He said that imagine with a live year plan before them and 'he country in such a financial puattlon, that even although it was p.oposed that the Harbour Scheme would b* self-supporting. tha> iright not get funds to go on with "If you want mone> to support a plan Uke tbj* gel it by laorea* that hoc*, ed production," he said, greed with thr Mr Crawford referring to^Pnge two of the memorandum, sai d _tha t Government had the aitr*aHr> to say that It was a plan to give confidence to investors. He asked how were they going to get back li.eir money with the already high laxsuoo and the colony at saturation point. "This Five Year Plan is merely a little legitimate of the tormei fen Year Plan". Mr. Crawford said. : III laajr __ and this present i Government wuuld now Tiifc BY8TBM for lowarlug sad i the steru) holds a rope wails Iks to luwft s spar. >lng the spar la %  very niplt out. Here s boat bu'ldar (sitting in pr cones slowly down In ifc* ordinary typo oi boat it takes tares By TONY VAJVTERPOOL Women And The Colour Bar A TORY MP SPEAKS OUT By ROBERT BLAK£ THERE are few subjects upon IXX'AL flsherm-i. and boaloHiicra alike are ...ixioiuly look .ng forward to the Liuuching of _ „„ ,__.,_ ,,„_ •ho new type Calvert Fishing OOau. ">9* * Conveniently Joweiy.at which era being mass produced *"•** speed he Uhea. Thja lUflt Cstounda. There are "• run Tom the SUB.., through n .e who are walilnn to orrtkise I*** on the tip uf the bowsprit, others will ,d s attached to tha spar. *hil pet toi iiiance. The Calvert boots will replace %  hicl. were completely "i adoltional twenty-five pounds 17J i JO and the Ugisl..uvo Coun> tackle, one can Imagine the inctl ^^uiurrad. tonvanlen es causas] when n. in at, tne boats which were "rdlnary fishing boat three men d received haM to raise and lower a spur. -• &f llowauces; funds srere lienty energy h wasted and much 11 .u -j u llie Government of time Is lost. Jumiwa tej'send a small quantity The majority of -alb have s ".iiba.fos lo asnisl fur been made Onlv about lo with the pagr.iinine and lli G en.men: of British Hond i ment of Sanl Marl harrlw'O'id whi-li was mo-st u>.o:ul for-equipping the interior 1 of Mi boats* i"i .uliere lym-'!i the nsti< rmen that .nailing ',' when thr % %  r d l m fte was reported and %  d how seTlouslv the local fl'iiiiiK industry would bo tfT\ %  I ima to the ii ttanre ndth a do• | Irh would not only % %  ' handle but more attmct'ee, comfortable and) bellet ecmlpi>ed. the keels .if the first few I ea i %  lnd. mnn> I %  • I i h] %  i 'heir nhilltv. -W prefer 'nr* r"lt>hln N: we fee 'hut" bn' IV, i that 'v-'nur uf thr M d nr cmipIeUon. They are f the Calvert boat ".itr perform,eH n vastI "• d i at )•" %  >i (idling II G irryo fixed keel. 7t0 pounds, of Crews will I On • %  humnresaM dona In %  ..) h n-" %  ' Tl inbo d 1 of thi< boat is estimated to be around t.BQu i | i pounds in the orrilnory fishi gf to sea In e hopi T 1 -" WAS made D W Wlle^ %  ho improvrt' ^ strvcrurTj of th i i r. Thii oat takes onlv one man to lowe • e tpar while another removes the edge. Wt"> Ihe 1 ordinnry fishing '.out ii k ofutn t to hnv< nen o le-WOf Ihe. sunr. makli.M it es*en'i:.l for three to mak* trip in the larger boats. With this nw ''spar lowering I m", o'ie man goes Into the m of thebout and remove-. irhite the othtr, siniu.. mf'i blv hi the stern, hnlds a U remain to be completed. .AI.VKIIl UOAT %  I tha head of affalm He accused Government of over taxing invested money, and said that in following the policy of taxation adopted by the British Government after the var for the creation of the WeJlaic State, tha local Government were not providing the amenlles provided by the British Government. Ha challenged the Government 'o carry out their threat of "going hack to the people of the country for a mandate." and turning to the Leader of the House charged "you are not fit to be In charge of anv government." He added THEKJS are few subjects upon Misleading "tha political parly running the which more rubbish is regularly The idea that the history of pr-swnt Government are inconiwritten than that of Africa. This the British in Africa to be In charge of any is particularly unfortunate, since one of gross exploitation for Government. •" n 1 they are hopeAfrican affairs have bean so enormous profits Is most ndaIsesly Incompetent to be In charge prominent in recant times — leading. of a Colonial People where there Scretse Khama. Dr. Malan, j n f lc t_ although great indli backward economy straining ">eleration in Rhodesia, the vldual fortunes were made, great 'ho people." Orotsndnuts Disaster. risks were taken and great losses i > *,„.,.„. ir, _h rt ll therefore a most welcome incurred. Mr. Alport points out J.:~.?Z, .llOrZ „.!, ,>,,, change to read a book as stimu( h u t over a long period of years %  " a,r Urdus' S,JTuuui laUn d free from the uud h e .vanuie rite eaVned by the burdS "thT2pl.fS ^a-P^^-J^^.J.M.Alport's „, ]onial inve-tor in Africa w dag and they were not deserving ""P* fj Africa no more than he would have ol such tre-unent Mr M V** • " Conservaobtained if he had put his capital He said that Mr. Vaughn had uVe MP < hu trt d to tmin* In | n gilt-edged securities at home. said that the Labour Party was dispassionate spirit a most of the Immense economic adleiurned to power because of the difficult problem. What part can vantages which this Investment pe tha people bad in them but and should be played by British has brought to the Africans there could say that they were reImperialism in Africa to-day? ran be no shadow of doubt, to whom these boats turned because there was no Mr. Alport deals candidly with I go should be more than satisiltemaUv* at the time %  suhjact which Lonaar, n< ^lour ber a question which t with them.'' a boat-buildoit was significant that In those vatlves have far too often in the j, JS received great publicity beid recently "But they are morr > %  ustituencies with no proper past abandoned to the tender raU se of the marriage of Serctse dinaiy type of boat." "' ernatlvo the people had to take mercies of the Left. Indeed, the Khama. He points out that it has hem. but d was not because the whole generation brought up only reached Its present form since fhe Calvert boat i> 22 feet long, '-pie had confidence in them, after 1918 has been inclined to the arrival of European women < average length of tinpre>eiU He felt that the memorandum regard the very existence of the in Africa and Asia. Tne early niig boat The mainsail Is only spoke categorically of the British Kmpire in Africa and Dutch settlers in the Cape had xtlcally the same sue and shape xiiicy of the Government Party elsewhere with s strong, if unno hesitation In taking Hottentot that of the ordinary flshinj. it was said that these proposals defined rente of guilt wives Ufote the House represented In To t h a evens* Poet-war Th* ttulf nut he thoujht Unl to HI urn "* % %  f "?• %  " %  •. piU dividing Uio Aftliam from lhP''l' behind Britlah .utus characterised by polySS&KSEBi ES&VUFB onr.i^.u^.^1 and thai was .11. "^ "^ hr,uHrv ^.. iSl £" Wh ,r* ""' " re,ll "^ u M,WMn \s Mr Vaughn had pointed out, f ',' ,„ TmJS. ^JL^'VI"*.""'" b ti im •"" dvilUatlon the aev,l„oment plan M W XW*M *— by..""! colour b. PARTYo^PICNIC pleasure Delicious... convenient HEINZ Sandwich Spread makes the tutiest taitdwichee you evertried. Chopped pickles, olives, onions, pimientna. egg and other spicy ingredients are combined in a smooth-apreading sandwich delicacy that's perfect for to many occasions. Next time you shop, be sure to ask for HEINZ Sandwich Spread! •*v *>' Cw. A motor can easily be installed %  M of Um i-iivi.i beats. Kcul aoclious have been placed n. about six boats so far arid it Hoped to start casting the keels . .iiort time! tweniy-four boats are "tiipletcly plfinked, one has Just • d and the keels for the live. makiitK u total ul ne being prepared. Most of the Calvert boats will • •; lliu west coast of the island. T ^S&m •?/*%' %  lit tt csrrles a deck and 1 %  tKNit crewd %  ather. i not ; rvill contii M* l! ttvKW S ^D SP wen/ Wo "f*zc Only had known''development f' ontr Uan osnipe and the forced a revolution In the habits and ti. K... „w 'nbour colonies of Soviet Russia i l.ms. And, as Mr. Lewis had said 'hese proposals were Intended merely as proposals from Depirtnental Heads Mr Crawford next referred to Iha Heasiey Fiscal Survey, and said that it was true that they had opposition on the side of the Government for "a tax holiday of live years" for new industries. He fell thst five years was a reietively she rt time .md it could not be expected that a company In a guarantaek) market w th a higher labour force, would leave that market to come to this i-luid's g"e said that If the Government hud Its confidence In Baasle.v the least it should have done was U pa} considerable importance to such a recommendation. Mr Crswford referred to Trinidad and British Guiana and said that if you look at those colonies irefully, you would see that fi the lat five or six years they had n attractina new Industn lute nothing nad been happenin in Barbados. Ho said that the only slngl industry considered of Impoi in Barbados within the last five ears was the Textile Company nd they nearly lost It through The Slave Trade could only hay* been na-troyed by the British: Its abolition has been an unqualified boon to the Africans. %  — MM lentallty of African women, and ien, could end it. Yet the colour bar is one of the iost cuuigerous weapons of Comgs Oa pace t HEINZ ANDWICH SPREAD eeeaeeeeeee. CATCH UP OH yo(/e the memorandum It VM THE OATvTTRr risHTHO BOAT I of the ordinary 0ah!ng boat. It lis tn eaetly be instailsd. IMll I'MIIVi. Kill feet lontf. tks svsrafls Isngtb iu ilp-.imi.ti *o that an sntine Mino> THE XI1L sections of many of the boats an now be ing loach M to ths kid aectlaa of s boil. Tbt kssls wi i adds the finishproposed to get more revenue from three main sour C OS—Direct Taxation. Indirect Taxation and Miscellaneous Fees etc. He felt thst Mr. Vaughn had dealt most exhaustively with Income tax and In %  ':nn remarks had accused Oovernment of gross Incompetence Speaking of Customs and Excise duties, he said thst Government proposes to charge duties on C I.F. wines Instead of ex-factory cost. Wncn Mr Adams claimed that •.Ii -se proposals In the msln were thnesj which 'be Labour Party pu' hefore the people did they tell the pc >ple that what they were doing in this country was going to increase the coat of living, Mr. lord asked !le said that the proposal*, meant .1.." every edible item which was il to to up in a Ahere the cost of living wag among the highest in the Mr. Vauithn. had quite to tha s ..ti'faclory of every intelligent tin mber. pointed out that it waa i b -;.per to live In England than It -vas to live In Barbados. Only i ks ai(o he heard a woman from England remark that ih.wondered how the people living in Barbados. i m sjna *.f the fact that • -i.*t of living. i high and |n spiuof the ., vard of flaiuial coat* iected Government. bad been put there in thai interest of the people, now pro„ AND SEND YOUR FRIENDS A USEFUL PERSONAL GIFT SUGGEST WE GIFT STATIONERY! IN HANDY. BEAUTIFUL BOXES ^^A(s^ c ^y§i^ 0SZ& AT ADVOCATE STATIONERY Broad Street Greystone Hastings MI M M e M I





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IHIBSOAY. (KTOBUt 3U, 1S2 HARR.UKIs ADVOCATE I V. I IIVK Board Of Health Reject Joes River Application THE General Board of Health at then meting yesterday rejected an application of Messrs. Joes River Sugar Estates Ltd., which asked that the Board substitute another plan for the plan approved in connection with land at Horse Hill Plantation. St. Joseph. The Board decided to advise %  Three Houses Residents Use Spring Water People of the Three Houses district who have no pipes at their home are more fortunate Division and sale of 47.404 sq. ?•< m *"v P !" l'l m country dis ft. of land in lots at Fairneld, ,rlcu h ,o h,v 1O %  "> >ni •"•Bnde Road. St. Michael, by Mm. < %  '"' w *' r T >">" • MetM St Clair Edwards spring in the district from which Application of Mr. S. D. Roger. cl " w ,tr pushes and flows In on behalf of Messrs. Barbados """'" ""£• Co-operative Bank Ud. for apAn old oman told an Advoproval and amendment of alurri!" lc "porter yesterday that she EHcrt&rjs." ST^MS srAsz S!ow W "rivemo„ ITS orlSnal >"?£ *? • "" J *~ divisions in respect of certain •*£*"•** J*t £&?"**' Joes River Ltd. to withdraw the plan already approved and submit thenew plan. The Board approved of the following In re Division and sale of 16 Acres. 2 Rood* 21 Perches of land In lots at Hlghgatr. St. Michael. by Wilkinson & Haynes Co.. Ltd. Alteration of approved plan by dividing lots numbered 39, 40. 41 and 42 Into 7 lots numbered 39 to 45. 14 Lighters Loaded Molasses For Canada THE shipping of molasses was the main activity i i the waterfront yesterday morntraj rVurteen l.fht. drawn up alongside the wharf opposite Prince WilUatu Hniy Street from where the loading was taking place Two cranes were put into operation to assist In the loading. Two linos ate shipping the pari. The BSs-graplirr has a i* molasses. They are S. P. Musson. ,f .M trad la under the cuminaa* ii .I.ISD.1 i Cap-tab H F iC Ltd %  P. Musson. |gl CC Ltd.. are shipp.ng < OFEA 22* puricheuns. 50 barrel* jiul MEMBERS CRITICISE FIVE YEAR PLAJS state lotteri %  S> From Page 3 IM. so Iona* bsmaffi half-turrvls. Thti. shtpim-nl .. going on ttM ri on Monday from B also trough! 37 packages ol frev fruit. M bags of peanu* of coconuts and 50 bale* of CottOI lichooner is W***ri lota Application of Messrs. Yearwood It Boycc. on behalf of D E M. Webster, for approval of amendment of approved pla division of land for sale at Glbbes "V"^h.-m" Plantation. St. Peter. Division and sale of 1' 0 Roods > 7/10 Perches of land at Friendship Plantation, Andrew, bv Mr. J. A. Haync Approved Lot*. time bathed in Its waters. Yesterday about two dozen women were at wink i> fig spring washing their families' clothes, as they chatted from one conversation to another. The line either side uf the stream about four feet deep !" which flowed from the spring was about thirty yards. As the mothers washed the clothes a number of little children played lower down the stream. At the side of the stream is n The Board approved of lots '' re,cn of P"ture %  "< %  nn d here one to 75 in the application for H*. wo,n#n %  P rMd ,n *' r *&*** divlilon and sale of 411.693 square to b e h !l *'•" >"i"*t.ng to feet of land in lots at Deighton u> ;f lch |"> w each woman had hei Road St. Michael, by Mr W T •located spot for hanging her Goodlng et al and approved of f'oihes. and how a pathway ran one part of the plan for the divisD*iween them. ion and sale of 20 acres, three The old woman said that the roods and six perches of land M P 1 ** 1S ne *"Y ndle from her lots at New Castle. St. John, by home, and it is %  blessing that New Castle Estates Ltd. h haa no < *<> rudw al1 thal An application was made for distance for all the water she the division and sale of 34.453 w 1 ^^^_^_^_ square fast of land In lota at Clapham Christ Church, by Mr. BRITISH COUNCIL BtHfhS C St. Hill. The Board decided ,„, ww ,., m 1v nA to ask Mr. St Mill to widen the * Orr.IOm^IOU > road to 14 feet. An extensive selection of BritThe Board postponed until ish Council Publications will he March approval of the division on view at the Spcightstown and sale in lots of 238.142 square Branch Library for two weeks ftet of land at Pine Hill, St. Ml'rom Friday. 7th November U chael by Mr. Neville William includes the most recent addiport for Trinidad with quart'"" ,' 1 ","'. "' ."'T* .•"", Tuesday mnlm. A '__ Vuotln-r Com inn n ul Bath For St. Mkhad? Spiders, handcarts and lorries were employed in transporting the molasses to the wharf-side, and as o result, traffic found it diltnult to manoeuvre. Mle, the unloading of artificial manure and empty drums wns in nrocress on the lower oortion of Ihe wharf near the warehouse of Messrs. Gardiner Austin & Co. SCHOONER iiVIKlit I lions to the series "The Art in Britain," "British Life and Thought and 'Writers and their Work These authoritative inexpensive and admirably produced little publications make an ut. Q-acUve and hliftly IntSfattllH lots exhibition, which Is well worth %  Anspecial visit. Mounljoy Carter. The following were deferred: Division and sale of 265.572 sq. ft of land in lot* at Green Hill, St. Michael, by Mr. L L. Topptn. Division and *ule of 195 A 3 Roods 26 Perches of land in St Walkers Plantation. St. drew, by Mr. G. U Farmer and postponed the application for Dii m a. iif;,L n.-U.J-.. vUion and sale of 317.451 sq. ft. of ln l " ch With Barbados land in lots al Grazettes PlantaCoastal Station lion. St. Michael, by the Barbados CABM: AMI IKS-U-BB .W !" .•*• Co-operative Bank Ltd. '-f Sf^JSSLE ^!L*^S2!!S Present were Dr. E. B. Carter. Vwr^TrtJd.. CC su l T-" U ^' Chairman. Hon. V. C. Gale. M.L.C., s s PI*T jabun. s a air!" a i Mr. J. M. Kidney. Dr. J. P. Jarii. s S Mahony. Dr. H. G. Cummins. £'£ .C.P., and Mr. W. Abrams, GovAV>. mm n>i"ii>" a.a. Try, ernmeni Chief Sanitary Inspector whose report for the rronth of August was received and circulated. The Harbour Master's Office i< in receipt of the following cable, which was intercepted from North Post R:.dio. Trinidad. Quote: "To all ships—Schooner Lady Sylvan* left Trinidad for St. Kitts via Carrlacou on October 15th and has not yet arrived at either of these two places. Description:— Single mast grev hull with markings W 32 painted on sides. On board six crew and one passenger. Ships are advised to keep lookout for this vessel. (.1 M i; \l CARGO The schooner Esnellae arrived in port yesterday morning from British Guiana with general cargo for the island. The cargo included 80 tons of firewood, 700 bags charcoal. 3l> wallabn posts, one bicycle and 750 bags of rice bran. The schooner is under the command of Captain G. Sealy and is consigned to the Schooner Owners' Association. CANADIAN CRl'ISER HERE Polarii. S S Guild). B H Tlnol... %  tarfaw*M v a H >1rl,. 8 8. A'lauf Boganaa. 8 8 Stiat-.i.i 8 8 Ibli 8 S Arfenli. 8 8 P. and T li.illrS g iMI.i— S S Sll.l 1. Kiel S S llo<|h Hood. 8 8 SUatorr. 8 8 OSna. 88 8 MtMiira. B 8 Durango. 8 8 Sunwatl. as gmplie Polral. 8 8 Drolt, S.S. Walthalrr 8 8 Kchoipeu" Kongaalrlii. S S rAKMirum ksssatst The Canadian Crulaer which arrived in the colony on Tuesday evening from Trinidad brought a mixed cargo to the island. This ca._ • i.:c...ded 50 cases of limacol, 17 cartons of glassware. 30 cartons of Angostura bitters, IT. tierces of oranges. 75 cartons of toilet paper. 103 carcasses of veal tond 7 cases of shirts. The ves*vl is consigned to Gardiner Austin it Co. PASSENGERS AND CARGO Besides the 14 passengers which it brought to Ihe colony, the French liner De Graaae also brought 20 cases of apparel. 65 bales of hard board and 35 casrs of cream. The liner which is under the command of Captain F. Prigent, is consigned to R. M. Jones & Co.. Ltd. CANNED FRITT Licences are to be issued for oiwhi the Importation of condensed and Bay. s evaporated milk to arrive in the colony between November and January next year. Ceiling prices will be fixed for both of these Items. Importers hsvc also been notified that consideration will be given to the issuance of licences %  0r dK' aui ra a covering the importation of aput m Kovamsar. isss. C xlmately 500 barrels of pickled Maiu i '*•!>' t i B ^""il*! t to a^.ve between January ^^^"c^" win ff.&.? arid June, 1933 This commodity r^STli r*ii oave .. un d will be imported from Australia p re ei and rWitri Mail st > m or New Zealand. Ordinary Mail at P m Today I HIMH II M aaaaaa MAIL NOTICES Mall) for Madeira. Unilad Kl n giafn. %  OranJMad will ba'cloiwd at Uw Q-nml Poat OnV aa under — Patel Mail at IS mooni, IttfUUnd Ihe J1H of Orto-r. tesM-M The Harrison line steamer Woirapher which arrived in port on Monday brought quantity of 200 tons of cargo to the Island. This cargo consisted of 67 cases of canned fruit, 81 containers of canvas shoos. 54 chests and 225 packages of tea. 36 loose stoves. 100 cases of smoked herrings. 23 cases of whiskey and 25 cases of shoe polish. The 4.073-ton vessel also brought a quantity of stationery. footwear, cycle accessories, paint, cement, glasswsre and motor car + &f&f + &f&f&f &f ••>•# &f ; &f&f At the meeting <•( lln CoflUTI ** 1 Mi-..!* i ul l| of St. Michael which is fixed for 1 o'clock to-day. mtnil i wUI consider the cn-ciiv >i of an additional communal bath The Commissioner* are also ea> rected to eonalder a motion by Mr E D. Mottley, M.C.P dealing with remuneration for extra hours of work put n. B4 >he Inspector supervising the labour <* %  •' the Sanitary Department Workers Scrub Mossy Gutters Workmen were l:us> > i-.tentav %  lODg Si Mary> Row scrubbing and washing the mossy nutters For a long time these gutters were In a bad state with moss and C ple eomplaincd about them as ng dangerous. The work is near CO 0] %  II. -i ."iikmi'ii h.ivi> turnel along Mason Hall Street i.n. m; oul the siimc process. PEATS PAINTF.D. The seats placed in Trafulgar Square around the fountain werc scraped and painted yesterday by workmen. For a long time people complained about the seat.needing repairs and painting, and now the opportunity has COT I makes the place look llei ai VESTRY TO DISCUSS CORONATION PLANS The St Philip Vestry If expected to meet to-day at 11.00 o'clock to consider among other 'hunr. a iireiil; %  fnmi II l^ndship I "' Bishop relative to plan f"r "**• Coronation Celebration and a motion by Mr P. S. Woekes that the number of exhibitions St Comtermere School I* increased by MM DR. JAGAN VISITS HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY Hon Dr. Cheddi Jagan. M.l.C. Bf nsh '.uianit, was among the large audience which atiendod Tuesday's meeting of tin rtoura* uf A'-i'ii,|il% It was one of the bBrV ever to attenil n meetiru* I one was interested in IM ion* on the Government's Five Year Development F'lui of Capital Expenditure and Taxation Another large crowd was present last night to hear further ay thai vh'al was necessary for the American Police Denarlmcnt or r lland Yard was not nec-ssar. necessary for Bubadot As to entertaimneiit lax. the ni'st should be takse frssai the r-i seat of the theatres. IIle y further discounted recent nevelopiiiciiis la .he sugar industry, ana althousn Government did not discoun. them, it still ignorantly came to the same conclusion. What egg more. Government also ignorea ihe pertinent (acts of the recent sugar agreement Mr Vaughan quoted from an issue of the Caiibuean Commission Bulletin in which It is state.) thai "the Commonwealth Sugar Agreement signed on the 21st December. I Ml constitutes one of the moat important Undm.irk> in the whole economnhistorv of the British West Indiev pose as set out in the Preamble is for a long term agreement for supplying sug.tr to Ihe United Kingdom, etc. ." and said that it meant that ihe lhipcri.il OOVernmeni had departed from its tiadltional econotm,' pnlle) t<> wards primary producers of aUter. and had given a guarantee to the British West Indies am 'i.niinoiiwe.ilth iMIIllltaa. thereby protecting the sugar psssassean from the competition In the world market. Historical D.-p.ii iiir,lle hailed this step as "a historkal departure from Imperial economic policy,'' and said that "because of this new sugar agreement and the recent scientifk development in the production •of sugar, the colonies are aimed of the revenue which "Professor Beasley felt we would h.ivi it instituti which the Oovernment had instituted more than he hud suggested." Mr Vaughan i-uuted a long '1st of figures for the past seven • I-.i tn demon 'i .lie Ihe importance of the price of sugar It the levenuc of Ihe colony. IB> branded Ihe Government u being "hopelessly poor at llsrai forecasting." He said there %  no justification whatever In the light of the facts he had given, fm raising taxes and burdening people In order to meet the commitments of the Civil Establishment If beyond those facts, at some I.I'UIIdate the colony experienced a recension In the price ol sugar, Government should adopt a policy of retrencl.ment rather than burden the taxpayers In order to maintain the Civil Service on Us present eatablishmen*. Hi' urged that in such a case the Ot&y remedy was entrenchment, am run the administration of the colony on the "minimum skeleton" staff. I t oil.null III \el earmarked SM9.000 to lie spen' on agriculture The plan," Mr Vaujfhan said "is self condemned." and he eharired. "the leader of this govsrnmtni is iinpartionabiy Ignoranl • f the elementary principles of rronomlcs." A Develonment Plan for this country. Mr. Vaughan said, "should mean a plan In ngricul•ine prlneipally He quoted from ".'irious documents the Report !> %  Sir Frank Storkdale. the %  load Committee and the TeYear Plan — to show 'he emnhnU which was always laid o'he Development of the agrlculic of the island, hv "lel K \l Kf.H*. p-r sin toe lc. per tin SARUINKS—prr tin 16c. Mr. per pkt. Hl'CiOS l mil BALAD—PS* pkl*• The abovr Ilnm. for < *sh uid (jrr. OBBsksaBSfl thslr GALANTINE Vt.AI.7HAM A TONCil'r:—pr tin §•* BUMtHMtt KIssUl I (IIIHItlfs -prr lln ...... ••. SMMHIV< -.lit WWII Kit II >prr (in *•< %  SMIIIIIV* BI.Af KISMtmi-:*— prr lln •*. IM Vhlll MAI \IUIM p.r phi r. ( AMIRIIIS II I'll K Hil sort*—per lln 4e. ( AMFHI1.I.S I KIAM Ol MI>MK(HIM sol T—pe-r tin 46e. ( AMPBBLLS Ul \M oi ( lilt KIN SOI P -per tla **e. MAXAM (OKMIl BEEF HASH r"-f I lb. tin ^Mm. MAXAM STEAK i KIliM V M lilHNO—per I lb. lln 6e. SAL1SBIRV COENED Ml HON-pr tin We. Ili.NMOK BCIMII'S HAMS—4-lb. ill. "•" iiivMni: IIOM I i >s HAMS n> tla S.T AYLMEBS PORK A BEANS—per tin *•> %  LYNN VALLEY OOLMN CORN—per tin 3fe. B.O. CASSAKEEP—per botllr Tte. COCKADE FINK Kl'M STAJVSFELD SVOTT A To.. #-#.


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THURSDAY, OCTOBKR 30, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PACE SEVEN FIVE YEAR DEVELOPMENT PLAN Water Supplies THE programme is a conttMMtlon of itu raannlsMlon and improvement of the water supplies of the Island. The tment.. estimate of full requirements was an additional $1,767,752 including the amounts provided m the Capital Estimates 1952-53, Head IV—$347,000 and Head VIII $12,000 and $198,952 in the Supplementary Estimates 1952-53, No. 19. The amount of (1,063,000 inIn-hiudl and vocational tr-Ming cluded for %  reorganisation snould estimated the coat of equipment be sufficient to meet requireat $S0,000, The maximum annual menu in the live year period; recurrent coat was estimated at and the $200,000 included lor aaS4~,400. The maximum capital ditional mains and standposts expenditure which it ha* been would provide about 30 standpossible to include for this project posts. The amount of $17,000 foi is $200,000 and the recurrent exthe development of water rependiture has been placed at sources is for the continuaUon of $40,000 (including the cost of the drilling scheme started with staff and maintenance) funds provided under the ColonKlementary ial Development and Welfare Act. The Director of Eauc-uoii put A proper water supply for Disforward a programme for capital trict "F" Police Station is easenexpenditure on the erection and Ual. The capital cost Is esuconversion of schools totalling mated at $12,100. $2,068,786, Including an amount Housing — Government of $150,246 in the Capital EsllI -i a. Etc. mates, 1932-53, Head 1 and The estimates put forward by W.460 in Supplementary Estithe Hou'in*. Board contemplated mates, 1932-53, No. 4. expenditure totalling $1,835,183, It was estimated that the max iincludlng an amount of $104,543 mum additional annual in the Capital Stlmates, 1952-53, con would bo $391,062. Head II and $36,000 in Supple">* Director also recommendmentary Estimates, 1952-33, No. * that the ratio of pupils pet 24. teacher should be reduced, and The Board suggested that 60 that 23 additional teachers be new houses be built m the city appointed to the existing schools. and urban areas and 28 in the Jn* would be an increase of rural areas each year. about 3^% in the teaching estabThe Government floes not conHshment. aider that the housing problem *n the programme it has only can be solved in this manner been possible, because of ether with the means at It* disposal, ne ds to include a figure of and the Housing Board Is exam$848,000 for Capital Expenditure inlng methods of providing 9 elementary education. $147.cheaper houses. Capital expendi358 being abown as the maximum ture of $530,000 is included in additional annual recurrent exthe programme, and thee is the penditure which should provide Self Help housing scheme under for reconstruction and enlorgethe heading "Loan Funds". There ment of nine schools and the $ %  also the Organisation for houserection of three new schoois. lng from Labour Welfare Funds, Secondary which It i* expected will expend The estimated capital cost of the about $3,500,000 on housing durproposals first put forward by the ing the period. i r ct f r of E,,UfBlloi > was $498.An amount of *23.000 is inl*'i M lud I ng the amount of eluded to cover the cost of land JfjX* l * Capital Estimates. which it may be desirable to ac'Sf:, 53 '.'V^t 'flnd the maximum addition.!] recurrent cost was calq -ST .,., %  .. f OOMI. r*cula, ed to be $62,820. In the proThe amount of $3 !" > J* gramme $250,000 has been incfud7&£ , thr J S P U H^T^n ed M Ca P' tal Expenditure and 1952-53. Head VI for Windows in $3Q000 for maximum additional Buy Street recurrent expenditure. The proMKDICAL SERVICES posals to be adopted have not yet Health Centres heen finally examined. The amount of $117,000 is made Erdislon Training' College up of the cost of erection of a is proposed to institute a twoHealth Centre for the Bridget y ar T 5^ 1 *.'2 r 1 ,eacner8 fll Erdis lown and St Michael's area, estl^n Training Co lege only one year ,~A 7 innnnn MUI -, devote of wh ich would be residential. "i e?a £L m'JS' Sal Ml! The cost of erecting an additionul f $ 8 ^ d lwl i t Tv lecture room nnd nn Additional mates. 1952-53, Head I. to coyer Mmn)on room aa we „ as provld the cost of completion of the ,,.,, addlllonal d i n | ng an<1 la^hco building and the purchase of equipment is estimated at $42,300 equipment for the Centre at The maximum annual recurrent Speightstown. The maximum ancost of the additional staff and nual recurrent costs of the Ceoother charges is estimated at tre for the Bridgetown and St. $9,028. Mehaels area is estimated St AGRICULTURE $21,000. Fann Institute—Trinidad Ine capiUl cost of the DepartThiB Government has already mental proposals. wtticU Include** agreed to the establishment of a the establishment of 4 Rural Farm Institute in Trinidad. The Health Centres, was estimated at contribution towards the initial $282,654. capital coat Is estimated at $20,520 funeral ilosoital an d maximum recurrent costs are The SrSo? o7ffeXai Serestimated at $9,225 vices submitted proposal* for the Sugar Cane Manunal General Hospital totalling $1,081.Investigations 395 (including the amount of In 1951, investlgatlonal work on $41413 revoted under the authorthe sugar cane leaf analysis techity of Resolution No. 42 of 1952 nlque was Initiated in a small way (Supplementary Estimates 1952in he Government laboratory. M No 81 to "complete the purPrelim nary results have been „£.,. „r "Avainn"! The flume of promising enough to make il adgglg ^2SM' i,V the oroUsable to continue this work tur$930,000 included in the-pro |hw NQ a 4Xpe nditure Is gramme would ?W ttajostrf anticipated but it will be necessary $25,000 under Head VI and $14,881 under the authority or Resolution No. 81 (Supplementary Estimates, 1952-53. No 19); (bl Rehabilitation of Industry—a revolr of $10,000 under the authority of Resolution No. 67 of 1932 (Supplement r; Estimates 1952-53, No. 19). Boat Bui la in e H is proposed u> continue the emergency boat building programme now being carried out at UM if' f Experimental Station as a routine boat building service tronsored by Government. The Fishery Officer is of the opinion that boats of a better type an<* workmanship can be built with the aid of machine tools. Inasmuch as it is unlikely th;it more than one or two boats would be under construction at the same time. It U eiUmated that labour might be a*pt to a minimum of five men and four Bursary boys. It is contemplates that the cost of operating this boat building yard would be largely borne by the purchaser or party for which the boat is being constructed The amount of $15,000 would be advanced for the purchase of materials etc., and the annual recurrent cost is estimated at $8,550. Cultivation of Tree; cost per mile. An amount of v.sit the A f the Increasing number eg $480,000 of which $128,000 apas 11n-; %  us* the toiU'.s primuriK .miu.un MM an at a**M ^ % %  •> pean* >}' -'imates for pnx.de. for passengers, th? can and training which can uI heen inSJn rt Manager rccominenniscatM -it IBM Home. A BOtttfi" eluded. ^ UUonal toUM i tMlUoa of $lo,uoo is included la Pari>h KOBKIS .cted. It la proposed uM programme. Ilithwuvs—Ken.iistrmtion 'hsrt Men accommodation ibould rriendly NocietisMi' iHticrr provide three water closets m The extensive opera twin ol one wash basin BBf females, (nendly societies in Uic Islana, il.rea water BBaSfAs, one urtnal -n d me social work involved, -nge and one wash basin fo. m a h a it advisable that there East Coast Road The Dtrsctoi of Highways and Transport put forward a pro%  raitVaM lot the expenditure of $800,000 on parish roads. $1,475.^*e* Th capital coat is esti,hould be a whole-linu G 348 on the reconstruction of highways and $633,059 on the eonsti aolion of the E*st Coast Road. It has lowever, only been possible to iiovldi half a million dollars tor these purpose* (and $19,848 of this amount has already been provided under the authority of Resolution No 42 of 1952 (Supplementary Estimates 1952-53. No. 81. Suck Wells The amount of $a.Uuu is a rcvole under Capital Esuinates. 1V52-53, (or tne eonsti uclion ol suiK-well*. The annual upkeep U estimated at $1,000. Harbour Water Boat The amount ol $42,000 is made up of: — iled at $3,000, and the annual ment Inspector of friendly eeunmt expenditure at $1,020. wlstles. The recurrent cxpendi< .1 \ I K W ture is estimated at $3,6iKi. lire Station Height-, ansl Measures Ihr estimates of the coat of the The Commissioner of iviii-e w Uridnelown Are station are has drawn attention to the neces•inj J irltM Bad it will be sity of replacing certain weights i 'cassary to restrict the cxpendiand measures which have been ma to $300,000. The amount in in use for a long period of jpoari e' Resolution presently before and are becoming inaccurate he legislature was $303,700. through wear and tear. The coat Post Offices 01 new equipment Is estimated The Colonial Postmaster p-tt at $7,000. V.H.K. Kquipmcnt <> Lfl-'^i 0 ^ ""it addition proposals the capital ooafl f which would hsve been $723060. it has been possible onlv to Hi' .lie $36,000 of this amount. including the revote of $18,000 ifn Capital Estimates 1952—53. the I'oat various improvements and extensions including the provision of 100 additional beds, a new kitchen and laundry, equipment. cost* are estimated at $267,771. (fl) a ^^ nf ||n Education Final figures of the potential cost of the University College of the West Indies In tho next five years are not available, but from calculations made at the recent conference in Jamaica on the subject of the finances of the University College of the West Indies, it is estimated that the Barbados 'hare of the deflcir to date In the finances of the University College will be $3P.0OO and that the additional annual recurrent exoenditure to be borne by Barbados in the next five year* will be $55,000. Technical nasH %  :II -Y t-> mtfwim $1,100 yearly if the work is to continue. Central Livestock and District Stations The amount of $76,000 has alfollows:-438 under the authority of Resolution No. 42 of 1952 (Supplementary Estimates, 1952-53. No. 8) for the purchase of certain, equipment for the Central Livestock Station; (b) an amount of $65,375 to be expended from the Colonial Development and Welfare D.217 (Suspense) Account under the authority of Resolution No. 43 of 1952 to meet the cost of capital improvements and alterations at the Central Livestock snd District Stations. Fisheries Development The amount of $50,000 has Already been provided in the 1952The departmental estirmte o' 53 Capital Estimates and Supplethe .-. use n a technical eolleee 8204.400 and the committee on Production — revotcs of Provision has already been made for this service under Capital Estimates 1952-53, Head VI. Dairy and Stock Breeders' Association Priies, Agricultural Kxhibition Purchase Of Livestock Provision has already been made for these services under Colonial Development and Welfare Scheme D.217, Agricultural Development (See Capital Estimates 1952-53. Head VIII). Livestock Insemination ArilAcial insemination is at nresent carried out at the Central Livestock StaUon on a jtmall and experimental scale. The immediate proposals are to extend this work to the District Agricultural Stations; but. in the event of a more intensive dairy industry being developed in the Islana, the demand for thus service "ill increase and a distribution centre will be needed. The Director of Agriculture has suggested that, in the first place, an attempt should be made to ascertain whether the Centre could be operated ai a private organisation of cattle producers. Since, however, small cattle owners may be a large proportion of those who would u-e the Centre, it may be difficult to raise the Initial capital privately, and perhaps Government could assist by means nf a loan. Under this Scheme, the bulls would remain the property nf Government and be housed at the Central Livestock Station (the present number at the Station is sufficient for the first 3—5 years), from whence semen would be supplied to the Centre at a price lo cover recurrent costs, and thereafter distributed by the management of the Centre at a reasonable insemination fee. The Initial capital expenditure is estimated at ?\000, and $5,000 v->uld be required for working capital. The cost of additional hull pens snd ithcr. equipment at the Central Livestock Station is estimated at $10,000, and annual maintenance at $230. Markets It is proposed lhat Government -Imuld provide the Initial cost of establishing district markets, allowing 'ocal authorities to build. maintain and control them. An area of land has already been acquired at Eagle Hall and Government has recently received from the Vestry of St. Michael an estimate of the cost of erection of a market thereon. Fish Market, Speightstown The Legislature has recently approved the compulsory' acquisition of an area of land in Speightstown for the site of a new fish msrket. The total capital coat of this project is estimated at $30,000, but $15,000 of this amount is aviilablc under Had VI. Item I—Development of Fisheries Production of the Capital Estimates for 195253. Recurrent costs are already provided in the Current Estimates. but it will be necessary to make provision for a maximum annual maintenance cost of $480 for buildm COMMUNICATIONS Roads Tenantry Roads The programme of repairing %  M reconstructing tenantry roads has not yet been completed The Director of Highways and Transport out forward estimates for further work totalling $1,388,000. It is. however, anticipated that some reduction can be effected in the the cost of the new water fM -^ ... h... t.4 ma m firm nf '-'rnc.' nt (.hint i much, It is prothe Water Boats Renewal ls*iefiie snd 8t. John. Fund, ($26,527 of Uus Police Stations etc. amount is included under The capital expenditure recomHead VI in the Capital Esmended by the Commissioner of Umatts for 11152-33). police was $144,700. It is, howlb) provision of $3,000 in uu; ever, not possible to carry out all \,pHal Estimates, 1952—53 o( hls recommendations. It is Head VI to meet the cost proposed to erect a n w Pattc* of installing machinery In station on the existing site at the new water craft. ar ,*, to pmvid.ltui>\s anal m >mmodation The amount of $23,000 hi made p a< follows.|a) a revote of $10,784 under the authority of Resolution No 42 of 1052 mentary Estimates, 105253. No. 0) to purch-> tain V .11 K. Kquipmaiil (b> an amount ..f $11,100 to I provide further V.H.F. Equipment to complete the requi remanta of the Police Department. The maximum annual recurrent cost is estimated at $1,000 Mechanization of Accounts In Slaw of the increase in olumc of Government expendiaddilure during recent years, it has the been found that much additional The .iii.nunt of $4,000 Is a reMolcumii Palla) Station. The time has had to be spent on the vote in the Capital EatimuU-. capital cost of these projects Is accounting procedures of the pre;,.,.' ...(. Hood vi M pen %  ii-,.:. i M |7B,ooa llul Inaxi aU()l , vslcmi thu asBjatai dalai Navigational Buoys. mum ..imual maintenance of | n the passing 'or payment of Wharf Walls buildings at $2,000. axpenditure vouchers. It i* thsreThc cost of wharf ptUnl Cs rssjpQgs; is $124,400. It Is more than half the 5 yeai peri the renewal of In the inne estimated .i proposed to d' ..l thai work d and I..iiul Acquisition 'ore proposed to introduce a sysThe amount of $50,000 has been tern of mechanical posting to included to cover the coat of facilitate tho work of the Audit piarchasc of bind (suitable for Department. The capital cost of %  chools and other Government equipment is estimated at $10,000. sum of purposes) which, during the i ... The maxim $75,000 la ther. fore included. The live years, may becotna available, cost of upkeep is estimated at annual maintenance Is estimated IJbrary Kuuipment etc, ' 00 at $1,000. P| nrtstdn IKI* been made in the Oepartment of Statistics Bar to Careenage i-'2-*S Capital Estimates for the A department ii needed to colThe Harbour and Shippliti crCeiain of a building at Oiutins 'it* nd distribute information Master recommends that the to house a Post Office and a about population. asaSSsBBngganl existing "d bar of 1J llraaci. Library. It will be Haassand migrUr>n; production, set feet at the entrance to the M ry i.wover to provide furniondsry Industries and construcCareenage be deepened to 10 feel t U ra, etc, for this branch library <">: di-iribiiiion (aspacJallj ol to enable all Intercolonial craft a t a c-i of $1,000. The maximum food supplies), shipping and lo enter and leave at any stale of annual recurrent coat of staff and other transport; dome ami ex the tide, thus reducing the conincidental expenses Is estimated ternal trade; wages ami nation in the Careenage. TbS at $3,22fl. national income and finance. It capital cost of this project is The Trustees of the Public would ah>o IK* able to adviMthe estimated at $10,200. Library have recommended the Secretariat and other GovernAirport cstablihment of a Hook Van Ser'*t DepartmentIn UM inteiKunway v,c '" meet the need* of the pretatlon of economic and social The amount of $72,000 has many i-cople who live in the •tstlstics. It Is proposed lhat the already been provided as lotcountry districts, but who find it wrvices Of sn expert should I* 1 lows inconvenient or Impossible to Pbtained to advise and assist in (a) a revote of $47,177 under come to the Public Library for 'ho setting up of th.Department the authority of Resolution their reading matter The oilnn d t No. 27 of 1952 (Supplemated eapital cost of a van tomentary Estimates, 1052— tether with the erection of n 53, No. 2) for urgent garage Is $9,480. The maximum repairs to the runway it annual recurrent cna of this serSeawcll Airport. vice Is estimated at $2,740. lb) a revote of $24,ooo under vii*h the authority of Resolution Fl)1 !" h r !\" f\' ^ ., No 42 of 1952 (Suppleh -\' r > *<*' "> fLSSSSt rnentsrv Eslimatc, 1P52 I> tlus* too^nd ch.ldren k-vo 53 No. 8) fo,reseallng *1. About a third of Uxr* do the runway at Scawcll "."*_ n d *"nployment and of tt0 ^lllttmntv —uon are a tease! — I know quite well what you've got behind your back, so hurry up and let me have that nice comforting drink of Cow & Gate— lt'$ doing me such a lot of good — and I love it." "All right. Baby," says Mummy, "we don't always agree — but you're right this time. Every time I look at you I bless the day I put you on Cow & Gate — so here you are. darling — steady now ! COW & GATE m& ^FOODo/ L J B LESLIE & Co., Lid f Oaf' ROYAL BABIES Agents Airport. lhat do, lumo aro not fitted for _. W i u -i !" 'he occupations upon which they Ko.d>. Frkin|( Spaces, etc. ,.„„., J~ lou id do betl-, ,„ "' ''' $82u00 '' """' olhcr occupation.. Th.ro arc no ,.# BMH I., tto ^"tw arrangemenU for Hi* ,VL,?,;'m V? "'ano of tlwe bo,, and rls itlmates, la-i—a.i ,._„ „„ai,„„ r ,i„. The amount of $82,o0 la made of: — ;i) a revote Capilal Estl Head VI. : %  vote of $6,18* under the authority of Resolution No. 42 of 1952 (Supplementary Estimates. 105253, No. HI. rsrovsolofl •>( $4,000 for Kire hydrants and hose, stand posts etc. for the Airport and $2,159 for Koads, Parkin, 1 etc. under the authority of Resolution No. 67 of IB52 In view of these condluou I >ur ('unmlisioncr has recotn%  I lhat a Youth Employment Service should be started iss*nU Tin chief function of -w h .. service bt to help boy* and girls ' i Iliey leave school In Had IhO MrorR which they are best tilted to to; In such work Uiey ran de.-lop their abilities to their nwi benefit and to the benefit of the (aland. 11 would be necesroad work in the adminlsLh,mr CoaMla Ol nri a r A special Irative area of Seawell llarbadian shniil I ted for trainiiiK. |ioslbly the Canadian lluie.m of BtaUa-| ties with a view to his apix m.m lo the post of (iin-iiii SUtisticlan. The eapital cm %  -•luipmeni i p covasks n al ty ^uate.1 at $10,000 and roeu (usls ai $30,000 Oversea* l>clciice Coiilrihtitioii The quooMon of the m.ikmi a contribution towards tbt cost of defence of the region i' under consideration, and a token iiaure for this in uWafora included in the programme. < I A IK 11 It Ulil.KAKi: ruNOfi On the as-umpiion Ih.il the, f the agreement of 30th at On fas%  blai FOR THE RAINY SEASON GAlVAisED CORRUGATED SHEETS AT A BARGAIN CASH PRICK >• flaaft U Omuar U tlmmet Rfcrtlonc SI mi ion 7 feel long — — 4.50 II feel lone — PUI IM OALVANUD NAILS .10c. per lb. ncll. — AT BARBADOS HARDWARE Co., Ltd. (THE HOUSE FOR BARGAINS) No. 16, Swan Street Thonc 2109. 44041, 3534 Airport. Runway Ushtinit An amount of $7,201 was reveled under the authority of (Resolution No. 42 of 1052 (Supplementary Estimates 1952—53 No. 8) to meet the final payment for the beacon. Electrical Installations Ni K htentfalc Home This Is a revote of $20,000 In sometime ago. the Vetry of the Capital Estimates 1952—53 st Michael approached GovernMend VI ment for fmimcial assistance to Toilet Accommodation ereri additional buildings at the The number of persons who Ni^.tengale Memorial Home in would be required for this II cose, a* It Is essential that i i il leavers should be treated i .irately from iidult members tlie communily who are wekI work. The estimated rapital i < of establishing this service


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PAGE EIGHT •BABBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY. OCTOBER 3*. UM CLASSIFIED ADS. ILLCfHOML Idea MB Ann.. ItaiUf >** a> a*s iwnwal tn-d*. Bar •• c***a Clw saa **•? %  > Oivtvh teat SAI.I: '•'TIY I CHANCERY SALE Th* iimWiMti illll (irupMl PuBikI":iil(t1ni. Hd| !" i-. B. •nd an IM •a*avaS*d BrAl'IOMOTIVK &^s^ I'IHSOWI At pubHc ana .w m V warn ed assJsa f. nvinc crnS* In WO * YA pXADSHAW law lAHCTOrT! 1 *• not hold ntyarU Mpsssi MU arder ( in my nwma Jnw-. BsnrtrH*-.in MWMM. it. SanaTtwBl*,.,Bar TMW MMM AOMTiri.TT RAI MiSCKIXANEOUS WAVTSn OLD GQ1.I> %  company M*annratad undar tunwrr Uu"natT> MPM -.hiding tnllrt arUelaa, JM*V-' ..,. Ilia tealh M hair and 1"' Sn ih, um attar CM m Inn tr,' w d d oetobai iiw '^i— %  *.. 1 peratm rtil n un gfiimiiwiw* twi % %  %  in dupll. •AllTIl M'HAIYJt AND SCOOP — •vwf wash mnnkl and makans Cart *> 11. %  ... %  "•fu.. ..11 -ppllcaUun MAtWTTT* CNA H Hi Up 'M *>!• • U* •*> tBBn OdBiB, nwwn ll noon and 1 a in lor Ow ra-naetiva M I H M tnan -OM "•wW %  # iiu am X* pint* and dunn* tha aasna nnuta until Mid Pah WAY OALR and CLARA ALStUF CAJJ ib> •fdliul and HABfPtTEN AJHTHlkAIA l CUE, iSVri fte Ihr.aabawta nutllnf and haunrtiaa on a 1 %  M Vita Hadal on fcanda Saran-rly of Matai. of Prank Oats and an lha nnbiir 1 %  ana may bnU and bound loa<-ilr un inr %  > mi 11 aw %  d< .. %  >• and wulldlnaa and an Mhar nnruona and nuiidir^. i€t bunt •landng and baUf • Sir Ralph Finds A Magic Life... By GeOMGX MAUOl.M TUOVStf \ l (SIT IIIKI ONDI.V A1J. THAT rrrtaxi nnaiMi dlll|h BtTMl M Uw Clll of Utld|. and numbMfd IS In (no —td lh* timr rtnnd* and Iheirl.i brioncind conUitiina n> on* imtim on* himdrrd an •l.lm aauaia laal buttinc and nanndlng on Iha [irnrnan kimr aa N> i.ihk SUnrt and 14 Mlfk Bunrl -r. la* ptamlar. kn I Hlh Hntl and on Hi#h Mtrvat aforraaM with UM I bulldinii uparr PRICK <. trar •wciiitdi a> on* aald paraai ol land rrattcd and buill Mandmt and baln *un Ihdli apaurtananex TlllllDl.Y Aid. THAT cum ntnaa nnmtl al kandl idil lfcH houao thaman i-alird BAKTILA MMabMnl fc* adanaaaurnniant .Una In Bua an d and .i.irati anuanr font ot UxraaboMU MABSCV-IIAHIU.S Wh-. %  1,'nii I Ml Had %  li!"< I' m llydrauluUnkaaa U ..-i.l.,. Trattora an —i.i %  bnaarrnanU idina a* loHowi:.< %  K l.n. UV^STOCK MIsn.I.IAM (Ms LAPTIC HAINCOATH Tad Modom m !• Sl-an rki MtMSntWI now to tb• %  TlatB|b ,.l*nd't ldmg Dallv N>wrpapai now iruvtnc i" Parbadaa b Alonly a law 1 v, a lu. (,ubl itlnn In Inndon Contact t-Ti Qa't r o Advotata r RrnraaanlaUva Ta) I'll Incal araaboMU ifar and ah., Hpftl 1 lindrad and lorty atuarr i.n of MM naMtc rand aWnata in or %  t*a dlauwt cailad Haaunaa in iba aatd partab of Chun . hurra thta bland buaUni and aoundU>B •" land* now oi irnr ••! u l a n d* now at lauat Marru* G>i rand or howavar ana lha t wn tha arm % %  aa %  *Ut alandin. n* botan with than apntnt. ,-HtT itiauK fi-li differently. I Veil Ucm \rtkur GrfcaMr. Murrmf. ISn. ^ht>ir laughter 1 bad tew words ZM pscen, U> u> in ibc viilagc—alone." Midway D e l wen t 1 Hawaii aiin Giimble's emanatdd frame. AuatTwUa a atrtod; of coral atolls, -which mad*w> litile lh .. nand:-" poin-meal aa a cure for thu un.iand dieiuncd race. Prom misfortune and engaged the aerm* inland TBdt quantities of vices of his cousin, a hereditary >h<*phates are exported, without porpoise-caller. This functionary wtiirh the pairtures of the Southern wnt into a swoon, which ended Hemisphere would fall. only when ha abouted. "Tbty They are admlnUtered 1 mdful of devoted British colonial itncers, who were joined not long x-fore the 1014-18 war by a • % % %  antic. Inquisitive and *kli young citdct named Grtmble. Neurtv 0 vears after bis first ^ilmpl• ol the Pacihc. Orlmble. ive*t M WIIJiAM-. Hanutr m .( %  • %  Chnnt-nr > M Id M 5-Year Plan Women And The Colour Bar .ow i m tna wa wh* experienced but ridges 1 no hi* romantic than In 1913. pats town im paper snmr recollect ton if his life amonit the Islands anH 'heir people. It is in no sense an i|>olifta for Uritish colonial rule "'• ] Grtmble fwho was knighted In I laSS) is mainly concerned to pas* MI to re a darg his own admiration 'f the Islander-, and above all to -onver the beauty the comedv and lie magic of islam* hfi Our friends from the they come." And Usere. it ui the lagoon, approachlnK "'I finally flapping gently on to he beach, wan a whole flotilla of Arthur %  poises. "The men leaned down in i>w thenarms around the great iMUTatts and ease them over the tnr aglc" has at tin They showed not the li Mgn or alarm. It was as if thei %  inch' wish was to get to the t-each." A chiefs portion of the mea; .. %  sat aside for Grtmble. He inuld not bring himself to eat It. Nor does he attempt to explain the atragaai oocurrence firamble sells how a bankrupt idinir concern became thr ilthy and beneficent British The English—Arr They Mod? YOU M.||f. me Mull. I.H.H.I-I (W ,unn y~r • w. Bui I cutT hov '"J£" ^i^^S, A You !. b~n Mr. (our Mi """T" JS.*,""!^., JSS m l"ra M mo anglWhmfn alojo in* and •ONOkoo. i Ihr VS. hof.Hi writing %  book -,J, AraerKTufe The ^fnglusb mu--l puU ; < • a has hardly any buau? of curiosity If ,he English people were tataaU carasllltUe for the muauof to ;, ,f l should know it by radar, day, for the up^imag artu %  The evidence pomU the other way. *0 may be to-naorrow s (naaex HORK PBOFLE attend conca-rU -"A* d boloowns operas ,n I>d,don than a**^gAaiid * h^-ji "?T uhera else on earth. A 4.000r;p.)ryunfaodiup Why -.it auditorium like the Albert H.ill would be white elephant New York. The 3,000seat < .traegie Hall Is nig enough SIX *.vmphoii* orchestras play > i:ularly in London, four In Paris, tl'ree in New York. rWO upeta companies perform .nultaneoiisly in London. The New York Cttj Opera (gHBOal %  ;. Sadler's Wells I closes when I Iba Metropoltt...i (parallel to I t vonl Garden) is operating. Hut one of your other observations, Ruth does fit the I .nuslcal scene. The EngUshsnaji. iti say. "has no sense of dlrecEnglish public display so MtU of this quality toward newmusi ail experiences and paraonBliUas*—UK.S. o' i ')^^aiaa>* .-v'^ FVWY MOTnt KITCHtN an Aval Water Heatrr SHIPPING NOTICES light against Insect plaguea. tediou' food, scanty medical services oUiar .ifriictlons. hard I'hosphate Company UVSUM%  nark '1 4 l tin, day of Ortobar. law H WDJOAMS lanrlauar of Trad* Marks TAKE NOTICE MIL-KO That VI-TONB PllODlni aa. Onurio C W npati). ninntaai ** %  %  provincr ol OnUrlo Dominion oi c-nada hss -in.had '^r tba latutratmr of • trada m.rlc In Perl A ! >;'"" m rrapacl dora | aa.it, anr*> WhH* Cloud* and Ihiaa apot Ooiiraml al Tl Din-aunt tiir loU o( ona rloan TVIanfton* Wardan *" at MM arV< %  nlim* atri'r.oilca In duplseata U, trad* mark oan tw i DECC fratlon Tba on anpUcallon ai Daiad thiBMh 0 | (1,1.4.. i IBS) J. WIUXVM" lUfUtrar or Trad* Marbd HI Kill BKUOt REAL ESTATE ORDS CALYPSOS l i-i Train to Han Fernando In a Calabash I nn't want no woman Rrnwn Sala Gal %  Vaanan pnllre Stmaon and Ivelllah II.... Samba JUKIHI tlurrlranr \maa Meladlea-t'harlkKani All by jaaraelf In thr moonlutlil t irollnr .Septuinbcr, laol, will conUnue forca and that during the five years the crop will on the average Da 150,000 torn., it estimate.! that about three and a half million dollars wiU be available In # **,,, _. ,. the Labour Welfare Fund. It Is r^csoaeed that three million dotmun ^ m Alr,c lars be expended on housing " exlsieooe is inarviuble lu.ins and half a million dollars wp c " > least avoid its unixycatin rural aiaaa. '">' eaicnsuio. Mr. AJport toThese figures ignore refunds of "-•ncea an extreme can* where loans made whkh will maintain • ,n E"' Alrican club tried to ana a balance In the fund. one of iu realdents from en*., •iinmg a n*ernber of the Earni. D. SPFXIAlFUNDS an royal family ulthougT h,a The Sacreur, ol State ha. in^ EJL*** = lormed thu Government that Her %  "*"* %  *' r opearu. Majesty* Government has made fcij Alport is an optimist. He iavaalable the fortuitous accumjoints out that the impact upon uUuort of the benefit of exchange \f nca „g ^ 0^^^ nkJ> TJ^ UrLvlog from the actual and [ather as if man from the saaal potential sales of Coinmonweallh Age were to awake from a Igruz >>us;ar to Canada in the Calender ..(nop ni.d Qod tbemselvaa thrust yoars I960, 1841 and 1952. The suddenly into the whirl and ..mount accruing to Barbadea is bustle of the twentieth centurj likely to be of the order of $500,it is not %  urprtsing that thaie 000 In respect of each of tbe three ta streaaes and .tr^n, y^^ ., *?!!?• Si? 1 a T!2nC? 0 L^aiSi ur ,r Bin " ^ immense pfo. vistng this undKpected windfall l>rfMB .rhieved has sUled Its Intention that the money ilaould not be passed on One most Important feature io producing companies or aasothe African problem is brought 11 unions and growers, but that it ..ut in tba book—the claims, all should be applied hi some way too often forgotten in Left-win^ to capital Improveiiasnts or re<-irclad, of use white minorities m hablUtatlon at taw sugar tnrtuaAarlca. UT In Kenya. Hhodaatn and the The Sugar Producers AisociaI'nion. the European netUer IIHK lion has suggested, and the Gov%  title to the land as valid crnment has agreed thai the morally and legally as thai of money should be divided equally African tribes which themselve? between the Labour Welfare nay ha' d, the Rehabilitation Fund and Keneration before. Geatlefolk Hut the reader will, nevertheless, carry away from this memorable book an indelible imP.'cssion of the boon conferred .. tine race by Britain's rule '.ilbertese." says Gnmble In a .-'Knlflcant sentence, "had few u .terside village before t h C Hntish protectorate'' (of 1892) L'ntll then, each house must be a fort, elan feuds were deathless •**r was ferocious and unceasing. The islanders love oratory, fine manners, noble gestures dwell among gentlefolk in these parts." said Orlmble** superior Before long. Grtmble was ad opteH Into one of the elans. The %  emony. .solemn and painful, ln1: jrled the tattooing of a snake or. his arm. A tradition dictated little girls wept and screamer. ii behalf during the opera110*. le Grtmble. with a rather hagi smile kept murmuring how reable It all was. harp-eyed young man thought that a piece of rock looked like phosphate It was almost pare l'hosphste. The Phosphite Company has been one of the most enlightened enterprises In thi world and a prime fictor (say Grtmble) in aavtng thr Gllbertese from the disintegrating effects of The Japanese invasion and American 1 "i-i 1 pa lion The Paltent A Pattern of Islands i.-i. Inevitably the Evening Standard Book t.f the Month for .September In the British Empire were to be wiped out to-morrow and no other relic of It survived. A PatWe tern of Islands would nnable ear future readers to say ""So that It what the Empire was like: suetwere the men who manned lb ctitposts"—and to reeret the passing of a unique, even If fallible instrument for the disseminatvvOf happiness and rivflhwtlnr, throughout the world WORLD COPYRIGHT RESFRVTD Octopus Dive 1 special fund for research and %  xperimental work on Irrigation ll was not his onlv Pacific ordeal. The young Gilbcrtem hunt the giant octopus In painunder -water. One man acts as bait, allowing the morarter to n him. His partner dive* 1 the octopus from its rock Mid bite* 11 between the eyes, causing instant death. Any othei method of killing a bis; ortopm %  ould be regarded a* unsportsmanlike. I'mnlile showed an Incautious 1'itcrvst In the hunL Its am us in u simplicity wii.r explained. He was (iffered the role of decoy. Retre.r wandered there mtv ;'•''* impossible. %  Remember, n hadnan I H tor your eyes." said soroeone. as GrlmMe dived. A credit Our Duty '. n,r eptsode, the horror and Ibninour of which l< 1%  %  llitm These while minor IUCS, en-'h >>urageu by past Uriuah gov. indents to settle in Africa, and %  spoiuible lor aimeat all the l rogxaas Uutt has been m.iuc, 1 unnot be aboiwoned. Yet to ve the vote i all Africans, and up parliamentary democracy ( ln „ aB her nam e which w^ n the British model, would Movement of Clouds Unfortunate iae precisely thu effect. The I U, on a ceremonial occasion hi 1 loblems of multi-racial (.uunI elch was twice as loud as that ot iries coaspoacd largely of miter-! h.superior rrfTlcer. who cmiM lea cannot be solved in tidy I only e/ith dilnculty be persuaded manner. It would load nraiakj lih.it this was the trick of an ail10 anarchy and barbarism. < 1* stomach an act of God „ .. I A graver situation Mr. Alport has no doubt that GrimMe's wife. Missis expecting it is UM duty of the Biitish|:> liaby. chanced to give a aeent 10 slay in Africa, that British N.nle to a village girl. Voicc-of%  ipital (spent on sensible proJthe-Tide, who later called on the ects and not absurd gambles 1 ,; imbles. in tears. After half an like the groundnuu. .scheme) la I aour, the matter was rtearred up A high-hom Gilbertcse lady, in to pro'elllnt 1 nothing i' Snares %  Listoms are a snare fen e voung officer Gnmble wl ughi the important rite ching by a lltUe girl as charm OTHER NFW BOOKS SPARK OF LIFE By Erich ataris bemarqur. Hutrhlnson. 12s 8d 368 pages As if determined that never never shall we forget the horrors ef camps like Belaen and Dachau, the author of All Quiet on the Western Front has distilled Into •me dreadful broth all that has been written or whispered about lha Nad concenUauon aaexdm He has threaded those frightful events together on the personal story of prisoner 509, living sh a le ton who refuses die. The result is a novel un:>i>c.kably sombre. undeniably iKwerful. Some will shrink from it; those who open it will be lorn between fascination and repulsion; those who lints*. It will realise that "cmArpueV purpose throughout has been to exhibit mar' t.ity not his degradation TWENTY GREAT TALES OF H'RDER Edited by Helen Mreoly and Brett Halliday Ham1 mond Hammond. 10s. 6d 2B6 I ages. A score of offeriiurs by the ^ream of contemporar>' American thriller %  -if cream is nreTOWARDS KIDB-ITY. By Hugh L*A Faussct. Oollancz. 15s. 237 page*. The philosophy of a .oderr. man expounded friend who has lost 1 -he future of huOS 14 Ort ISOet 11 Can Si Ort 11 Wev pan H No. S3 No. II So\ %  mm 1 Dae ait tad Pwaaanarr Aeommodatloi Por furthar liiforrnaUon apply Da COSTA 1 CO LTD P tana list VGW YORK SERVICE TVEH mi A STFAfNl P %  WEEKS) SorTMBOOICD AXOOA rrr; \n\"' ALCOA M.AWTV.B A -II AMIS have? the fine*! SeJrction^ of FRENCH SILKS NEW SHIPMENT AT LOWER PRICES PEACOCK & BUCHANS PAINTS (Over 109 yeara' experience ef Paint maktau) WHITE — CREAMS — all type colours BATTLESUIF GREY — RED ROOFING and AflAHJNE PAINTS — VARNISHES — STAINS AMI KM 1 IM. PAINT FOREST GREEN — g8. per gal. i^peetaUy prepared for the Ironic. > obtainable in Bridgetown. yard Flowered Crepe? Satins M.89—$5.l per 1 lowered Crepe — S2.S2—$4.(HI Ciiheania Fabric, obtausakle in the moat exclusive de-iem. and COHIIII* S2.I7— tlM per yard 40 Inches wide Ad a..nt FORCaET 5', .h-cnunt on all (-.'""I* wbirh anwR W M B fartatg le* in every dollar than ;iiiy other Sttre tn Barbados. A.E. TAYLOR LTB. COIIKII.I.I STKKET — Dial 4IU0 H HARDWARE lf^KETT STREET tOppndtr Pnat OHlee) — ANNOUNCEMENT We arc pleased lo advise our Customers and Friends that Mr. David MaeKenzie and Mr Norman Archer who both received a special training with the Ford Motor Company 1-td. al Dunenham, England have returned to B arbados and have joined the slal! of our Company and are attached to our Servn % %  Dl partmeni Together with cair present BtftR you may be assured thai VOU will receive tsfiictent %  ] factory lervice. Charles Mc Enearney & Co., Ltd.



PAGE 1

t'AGt 1VIO ll\l:ll\IM>s AllMll 111 } JOAL6 Callinq %  S TATION OFFK \ %  %  1 . .. HI %  A Farl\ IMITV v..-. MM If U %  u dm.-of Mi and Mr*J %  Mil., m boa T.niKtad Rine Team Trii.se attending the puri> nan ,i vabk evening. Mr. M Trinidad Tram wai IOMM with ill i-mprtitoia -mi IWfci in twi Clw A Shoot* .chile Mi F BaO :n. Pimid-d laaua one of the Claw \ Shoots. I>ncins was the ordei ,.i iinparly 1'iKlMt nadnlgni r it.r.t. ISOM M R. and Mra. ('" Damiin *n arrivals from Trinld Tuesday by the a.*. Wr OtaaaeTOaf ir IUMU "i Hold itov.i Mr. CIIO has .ome over for IM Barbados Turf Club (laces which begin early next month. He al Iwouafit over the rsa> "Careful Annie." WW in Triuiihul H ER many friends in Barbado* will he glad to hear of In* marriage of Mm Lucille Gotinandy to Mr. Anthony Mitchell which took place last Saturday at St. Crispin's Church, Port-of Spain. Trinidad. Mrs Mitchell is a former pupil of Queen's College and sister of the Hrv Lionel On at present ui Britn.h liuiana. Mrs. Gormandy was living in B: for about ten years during whu-h time she established a musii school then known a< me "RXCFIttor School of Mug* To Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell, Carib joint in extending sincere wishes for many years of happiness. Two Wmk* M R. COLIN WOODING ol T.L.L.. Pointc-a-I'il rived in the colony on Tuesday by B.W.I .A., from TrlnkUd on two weck.s' holul:i. H. his sister Mrs. Vincent Idol Reed Street. St. Mirhacl. Fir$t Annitir*ar\ Following Ginger 1Ml agP Av. OCTOME a\ %m 5 : SB ri Nrl. V • V M *J\ 9 '' I" 1 •&?£* %  H tj -JH E -*> oom What life on €900 a week has meant to Countess Mountbatte.t. godchild of a King, and wife to an eait—By JAMCS LIASCR ird I., im-itine a con<\ %  %  twins written ahmit "1e<* i it R 'f a joKf i, then i i uan to travel to %  '" %  li. ihun thr"* Pel la Burma. Australia. MourUbaKaa <.f liurma.' 1.... husband sailed us Holman. .it the start ihe seas. rThe Mounlba liens even -f his biography of In M" kod Iho right generation In LOUIS *hicb. u. live. They S o. the IMSI tin publishe:* ray o( her ,( the century. ."). Rut n *^as nearly cloving lime BSUra gardens of the War brought l^trd Louis Of her age. ..." lark* Lastly Liuil* became .',. Bdenl far Ixuvi.-n of 'I've a Spare' I John Ambulance Brtgatta posse sed what they require Mcuitbatten-chJl ...ui : poafocm and anu i %  i -. V: i ... i at ii ; ophlsUA(| ,.,.„ Gandhi *SlSlrH< with luiaan on hn DfaaJ t<> I • %  %  tt a aii .1 was u marvellous toucr i-nic:istiHMig in a gesture th n?uspirit lhat nad entered int hr.Llsh-lndian raUtklM and he phot( graph) made for lua HfflfaM J :I.K.SSI v ha I Job loon godfathoj K* "f thas • lUience from the £1.400,000 left DJ her gi.ind. %  i | B %  1 %  Rnanclai it was at the Claridic* party In ,. 1921 tl:at lie m#1 U< "-U ... .p h-ind>. wrote to h' lib Mountbain-n. r ,-• *o. worth two companies of Later that year, at Cowos Mrf_ M r, iCoine'ULs VhraserbUt, anxtoug t.P wnn vi.iuiy came her hunbami idiunj up friends for n cruise in ,, M imporUnt job: Viceroy of TIRBJESSLY hi loun-d rntf,.,i: In IVBnce and Burma and ;,. i o.W earnpa it. Malav .Mid Siaro. Her cousin. ..l.o was a PAW. . ._ fc __. -your i;nn.il Again AND so -it age paaaad by and ir-c Mount iMtteiiii raturnad to FjlllOnrt— \~+y l—U attlt '""*"' on helping others fvlaiis. TV ,f..adca>U in good causes, work wiin old people, utid .o mi). She is hack m the gracious wu rld—a ci>unte now (her husband was made an earl in 1*47). Dlnnar oaaaf mure Is "by candielighi. a rilual of grace and .neifahle Iwauty. -ervad by sUff In the navy-blue lialtledress unifurms now worn al Buckingham Palace and Clarence House." Yet, oddly, her biotrapher makes illon of the private Bl I or IS L BAYLEY llollen Lane —--—---'-j r i*u * i %  " r.jrrf^i— *i '^"i"*. i MI* %  ' ." i . 1 %  p > ..... %  .IAN. ..ii.il 1 ..' > 10 v fcRVi rut>i or K FILM I ()\i TO RUtBADOS RANDOLPH JACOUISMSOHCU. his arrival In Holly weeal faaan Paris. Linked ron American film star Girasse Baajars during her recent abroad, the 24-year-old Franctiman Is In the U. S. on I I mission— (Int. to see Ginger and second, to sln • film contract. DAUOHTER ol Cmperur Hirolnto ol Japan. Prince** Yen Is -n with her husbsnd. Takania>H Idsda. %  ..ltay land owner, aftar thalr mar. rtiuj* in the Shinto -Urine In Tokyo. The brldo's mother, Empress Nsiako. i' i right Marriage oat*a tha princess many royal prtrtIcit*. inchidliig raynl .Uoiuir-> .mil palace residence. i/iiienialionaJ) 1,1 • mil In //nil'' yminm N ow haah hum ttv li Gran horn liitjirnrini; M R. WHITK1ELD OC.HADY of Trlnii he Island Mehaul who wei'i Mai friends and an mpieyea of WO i n expects to remain here for a B illtePubflcll Sh"if lfuliilu\ mjH p <;nr.ia > II W.I A .|.i; %  . %  !, /'•nlny \ fot I I mid:id yr tcrwoeks longer. Carmen Is butlloway On. • Hotan l.urky W nun i 4 ItM winners at I i Mi heUI at St. Gabriel's ^ j.-tober 18, ha ana to hand. There were three correct gu ess e s i >.>irs MUM and when IraVm th4 lutkv winner was Mrs. J icft Murray. Tha Ti.m wag woo John Wdklnaori the prime .urgtjnr. • Q nlroduce in 1MB. I MMrnMB WHICH riX .tIH ha ahli. tit her "v.r'hi. MM u. Edwins "B* :ndi. He ;, darling and helu me make up Ik. ,. ln mmtra, operation mcn -••-7^",.,. would bt ble 10 p>n> I have a .par* man. I Ihtak tul [„„!. tree Irom the BritUh -J f lhe lru „ you may have me. hlm-DtekU ,..,. An Incredible leal otdlplo_„'.^(.u^r |.n her and get Mountbauan." „,„ . and .£-'* 'mo^'rnone" to flnance he, •pubhVirrimril Virr averting the bloodbath a an 1(< iaUm ..' Looking Ahead Hing Cruaby's 11 ifv //i Critical Condition HOIJ.YWOOU, Oct. Dixit L Crosby. J3 THIS the withdrew when Iholcioouer Bmg Cri rnmvnt of tha day ol lour s~Blll covering all she lay by and moUier near doath as King line bloodbath SO they met again and tailed a-.archy that would certainly bav.ay and fell in love. Then lhe I .Unwed our departure from InHrincc of Wales took cousin dii/' h . u sociallal Government of lhe day of four sons l)i. kic to India as hli aide on a Hut what i|f the chaos that dul %  "" %  % %  ' covering all hhe lay m %  o. Edwin, borrowed £ IOClimn .. su U7 Sjy.• HbhnjJ^,^^ 0 !" J '^rf,„ slmlUr clrcumslances-, lu.dron wore al her bedside. She he. (real-aunt ("He •"• I'^"pf,"' "'!1 „~Z nd but why no mention of It hereTlhaa been ill lor several years, nice young man. You ataU u the P"i.b lhe evenuuui y ^ lmnorl n ,„ M r. Crosby, singing and have the money, my dear ) and n %  .., b. i^"^^ n "*J "J XTZl her .nd • biographer's duty la'ing star who gave up her own lolbswed htn,i out cond cU-. %  ; ^ n b ^* u "d of the en W. ^ Z !" *^ „, ,uch nm, career ,„ r.l. family. llr niuiwri if " l> "• '' !" 3 !" J| m .„ .JH,,,. imaSlsm lo Mi isbUcl. suffered arelape* on Sunday ld ,y'rl",'mc.^? Delhi UnlvS kll c,""n "no .Slrf iS.000. Tnal Sen the future. Wha. of Ih.l' whlle racuperalloT home from ,'? *"".?„ f. ,Z ^erv -IMO of the popuMr. Holman Is vague here. "Her. a ,erlous abdominal operation a .. -h i *, .i %  % %  %  '"' lu a j gafail bottai rilgtkM aaaoBf are ux lt loa It must be said the d.fTerent parties by getting the BilbaUan that a god time raders' women together In a was ncvar allowed to Interfere fuendjy aimosphere. ... Mth hia career In the Navy even The most hopeful sign of the f l>is ambitions did remain -omeM-intbailtns progress T HE MALVEKN SPOKTS CLUB spending a short holiday wUl celebrate its first an" niversary on Saturday night al Halloway Guest House. The Ivy. at 8 o'clock. The Club was founded by Miss Grace Cumberbatch a former sprinter of Queen's College ami Jhe games played are netball. kisketKill and table tennis. There will be speeches and fnuslc. Uiin the island aa guests g| Motel A'ttmUfns /*--n( M R. M1KF. I RIBT of Cable Ship Kleelra orrived i, the island from St. Lucia b] I1W.I.A.. on Wednesday last t. %  wall the departure of HM Oran iestad tor England. He Is a guest at thi rrnce Hotel. For Fr*nrh Guiana L EAVING the island on Tuesii.,v ravrnlng fan iv s.. D" ttraaae was Mrs. Holleaux of PTtfteh Guiana, who had been tig .i week's holiday. During her stay she was a i ifejil at 1he St. I*wren'e Hotel tljH-niiii HahM ISS KEi-TY ARNE. Social Welfare Officer, will open Lawrha Sale at the Buy Street Girls' i*lub; tomorrow afternoon. during [tended. But In which direction and to what far view Mr. Holman does not tell the reader. —LfJ 'Out las! u'cek. Odhams, ?5i. able to meet Blnu on Saturday at a railroad station when he returned from a trip. A family spokesman said "on Sunday she suffered a relapse and doctors her condition is highly critiBY THE WAY a • By Beachcomber the public .it a fee of 5s raon. The visitors were the armour worn by Sir terday. He was interested in th.basket. %  marked "In" and Out." He said, "Does everything th rome in go out. and everythli that goes out come in?" TV. said, "No. But what comes In to 10 nut la put In the Out basket tn accepting a glass of port from a en out." "I see", said Ilki.i. ind butlar on the terrace. The authorwhat goes out to come In U put MM grew suspicious when a In the In basket to come in." "Ni-t l.iriy, having exclaimed Thai quita," they ald. -Then." said Jmobean chair must be prlcellkla, "why not have a third less'' was told. "Oh. basket for what doesn't go out 50 quid, come in?" "It can't go out unlll it has come in," they said. "And Snib/w cant It coma In until it has gone out?" he asked. "Yes." they -aid. "not necessarily." "Don't you mean, no. not necessarily?" askc.1 llkla. "Well, yag," they said 'ulkily. "And whv not noceawrily'*" he asked. There reply. 7i. STARS %  1 .^VOt/ i toa rMi H-II\ in Minn: %  '.; sh down." sttar in -i I r „i„l •lnd ,I,.,| i.^tk w. m-diri lo. ih* atara maiii :i i.. A run >. May look U a li UtdSg .. lull al nbMacI*,. %  %  Wrprttiaa, quu. i" i-n. '<" %  %  •" \rail. ;i i. MAI .<• ITM*II %  111.n* ii ... iiNf ii louafan l?p rlsht ..in-d i( you ,.w .II.I row *hn>ild IHnlMitt Don I %  "I-"*' Ketp oil Ili .11 MSI t i<) ..„..,. a I MUM dMH nrnt flOM -II. I IF A HUSBAND YOU FORGIVE LOSES HIS LOVE ( •/ FOUND inal rriw husband yond him. This is indeed a burden at their y vain regrets and moping, but itl r,>. Should we go on?" ly filling your Ufa with other indvertlse\'^, queslii Is it a MM) ravkrl? S OMF. lime ago a small paragraph in the papers announced the sale of an old i to a syndicat'v This is apparently Hamilton befbf he Heavieote Castle which was Ttalalgai II -pHK |i,i)iem ol incut. i> -iu.lv MI uf ;iii or 'iiiriniig. bm of tba dkaafn ol lhe advertisetnen'.s Wham should be nllowcd In Traralgai Snuaie. Thug • letter to DM ban. Snlbbo ly a very tasteful and iipt>Poprlalr inivertisemcnt lo of the Itgtional Oallary n ihowad Neigood-b>e to Kmma the b %  aylnrj "Dmrt ihSl found to be the ancestral homo loreet to uat Bnlbbo night and 1 Lord Stableham, and whim, miimilig." And ^he replieurmg thsummer, was thrown 'You'n tellinj ma, i %  i -• • %  Ml. %  lnpdl> .i i.i -i a i -i i ir Mm a a .\,t, (Mh>ri jr. %  invmii lor nmi.v ol mn c I'sah M .. i.n,l lkhl>1 irx, Reply By CANON HIGH oraata. IT Is one up to you that you did Serenity . not lose your nerve. You took WHY not try to throw yourself the blow of his unfallhiulnea* into some of the social or charlta?.quaiely on your chin. You reble organisations In your town? fused to run away from your Go out. and befriend other* marriage. That needed courage, iven more unhappy than yourII is clear from your latter that >, : ,|. Then that vacuum Inside you your husband rc.-pects you and i will find something satisfying to [ doing hia bast to make amends, nil it. You rn>w carry a double burden. Once it dawns upon your husI The memory of his treachery will band that you are no longer %  tick. To forgive Is always in our turned in upon your own digI power, to forget beyond it. though tress, what Is now companionship time can be a kindly healer. between you may blossom out Into Love has a way, however, of scmethlng deeper. Even if this takint in Us embrace the bad as should never come your way. well t$ the good qualities of the Inner springs of serenity and Joy one we love. This is the mark will have a chance to Bow again. of real love—the test of Its Circumstances will not have you It may be even more. lor many a man has been brough'. lace to face with his conscience when one whom he respects and i.a.> hurt yet goc* on loving all Your Burden YOU long for affection and eapicsslons of tenderness. Me d.e. his oast, but rind* that this Is beADVOCATE BRIDGE by M. Harrison-Cray Dealer: goal Listening Hours ; ii %  > si % %  • OS p m Th* Ni.-.. Illpm Thr> Da||) Atrvica, 4 It p m No Nam*.. 4 • i in Sporting Reco'd; SOSa.ra RIKI I %  -aur POMball: I p m iC Coi. n OitriMtra. ft p m Walsh MIMXI I.-U.. %  IS m VarleMY Ahoy' 8 45 p m Si hMi III | worti In I P %  ook cirtlullr *• K> ir w' isvn -r u rMh si .' Ooo. irhai .,<-.(>* i %  "I i;' cj-^ri II i roiitcnen " Cartajahj ao*.' iiyi ilw Mstt-r ii.rnl. Yoa thobld not k 11 < thuij IU.I tteuut* kll 4 Ihiisa |u.l s,,. I 'II. I %  l. HI IHNIII saSMMlMi i i %  r!,V. .. H.m t~llet.i.. oil I.HRIN n i* MM \m\ .1 I .r"1rn. >'...iHhoriU-. ir-or>*li> Vou can Jvaorr Hirnush frlw^h, •>iprior> Mm .!~ii < % %  %  • %  '• oiiiAf* i \-.i 41 I %  ll-roufl %  al"* iliould lio i IM ofrMtotiai •naaaveurs .,'ivo. Cal'i" p.ti.eii.fc i i pm hi %  and loll'iw -nd p)M*urrt. • % %  oiai'*inn advlMblr Sta cai^ful wiUl vou iftlr" but *• Ml ,0 %  lrtMra Sue*— -Mod U you llnllillall ol. Joftn Adama. hut suchara rti.Jy Shorldaa. ^nimall-t. il FOR EXHIBITION & OTHEC OCCASIONS LAMBS' ABCOU SIKIKS I BLACK. BROWN. NAVY. WHITE LOW CUT O i BLACK, BROWN. WHITE BI'CKLESS %  Ti iKl.i'.SS.' \i:w smr.MiNT or LAons AMERICAN SHOES RED, MULTYCOL0UR. TAN & WHITE $1130 E T. R. EVANS (WHITFIELDS) STOCK SHOE STORE PHONE: 2(l J13.BS I1S.M $8.37 I i I 1 Motorists See Double AT U.S. MR BASF Moiurists driving round the American forces' biggest base In ilnialn—Burtonwood, near Warungton. Lanes.—re seeing double, in American and English. Throughout the base, covering leverul square miles, road signs ii.ive gone up in duplicate Both i". tia.ii and American drivers us" the baae, and now all 175 road signs are up twice—In American m well us British pattern. Half—Stop" One diiTerence: British road : igns always order motorists to Halt." American ones tell driver* to 'Stop. 1 There are also differences In desyjn. The duplicated road signs have K'-ne up as a result of an idea of Captain Charles Goodaon, the USAF safety officer at Burtonwood. One advantage, he believes is that GIs will automatically learn what British signi ts. -M.SS • — •* Urn 1 | T IS f r Wo oe Bnlair. l-.rev rirnch: B IS p m Radio Nrxran. %  %  [i ii U-.ornk. S 45 p m Ifwrial n-ojMUh. Otp m Otlbrri and Sullivan. 10 00 p m Tlvo hm. 10 10 p m tam rtto Bdu.viaU. 10 IS p m A Day In T"Ul* of Th Oov^.nor ol a Colony. 10 JP %  i. No Namo #AS1 • EIH 4 nu ti'"" S AIl I Ug2 IW one gpada at '.his Oold Cup nand and BouUi made me -.ironr vulnerable overcall ol Two Bsarta. Tha Drat West bid Three Spades. NorUi Pour Hearts and East four Spadaa, doubled by Sou:!for ao unlucky oenaiLy (H In Room i w.t lunipo.; >;rslght to Four Spades anc put North on tba spot Hoping tor a minor suit con tract be bid four No Trumps out. South :ou % %  only bid Plva Haarta. Eksi doubled and West .tc • A followed by in Placing Bast with ii i %  m Hearts south oashad a k and set up the suit m rulflng 4 with f a. H. then led ay |g ro •> A m plared on ptunog %  one more trick to A. T. K score of ISO more than md< up for lhe loss in Room t PLAZA THEATRE* m; I IK. i i OWN PANDORA & THE FLYING DUTCHMAN (Tothoieolori lODAIi sprflal l.aa p.m. IIOIIIS ii mi II ..i II EAg Gone AUTHY (rsivi i or u> rLAtMS rhnr rinrt Color Plelur JA(h a nit: 11 \HH \ It l-1 S %  t'l-l SI1) TO UAT "IU. asa Tor n* MY IIII4SI" Danny DAY THOMA5 T-Sar a Spa*UI 1JU *M COW no 1 lAVAUW Jnnm, W.krl> and .ii \ i II miiimWhip Wllaon II,!-,...., t Kill .1 I SBOT 4BKBr JAMI John ravm IRB-ANI I N .M-ll I 6TST1N in.] S4MI TO U V I ..-.. %  p.m. i'. -.M l*a*h fcy SpoUl ii--....a Thranioua Espoditlon %  K ON-TIKI" %  MD ROAD BLOCK Charlos McCRAW rat a SAT. 4.W a %  S p m IIIIAND NEW DOIDIJ Action Pacfcrtl TOo %  TRiri.s ffaomu* 1 l^j G*>M'gY *i Thf H..W..Boyi^Uo • nnsint on FAMTBia ISLAND Johnnv SHKHieiJJ *ii Spr-rlai I p m MAN l It". TBXAa Tex Hlilrr /• OI'N LAW u -IKK j.im.o Wakiy f.#M.v#> oi'i-:.xixi. WtUBAY. .11 Oct. 4.45 A 8.30 P.M. and Conltnulng Dallv CHSIKMD WITH 1SIIIIMINII *&*> nil PRESTON FOSTER %  BARBARA BUTTON JOHN IHIAND %  HID MADtIT J. fOWARO tl OMWO -VKTOa tOgWH 1*1 A/ A %  %  r. \KI i •• I .ir. Speelal I Dial ,171.. T Read Naletr Short •IT MIGHT BE YOU" JA-VETTA DRESS SHOP iNnl Deer le STNOBBI) ENTIRE STOCK ON SALE AT HIST MICE AND DKDU COST. DRESSES fee aU eccaaleau. %  I i m ie, aUrta. Uaatts. jeans. N.I..U I ndrraear ana gleekliifs. Hil >m far lyealni aa4 arirmoan. PsnUr Girdles, Baakrl*. 10 YEAR.S \GO from the Editorial of the Advocate of Thursday. Orl. Stth. IMS rha quaaUon tji tiectrle lighting has been for a long time before us and has always ended in moonshine". It li to be hoped. hercfore. that the present applifiints mean business, and IhatBarhinios will not much longer relaln her invidious position of being 'hr* onl> etvtUied lominunity o\ m which the Ud adv-miag-s of cleetnriiv. i>oth tor tuppu-lni iixiit and motive power, have not been .vailed of And it would be certainly most unwise to place unnecessary obstacles in tn iuch an enterprijc %  •• %  AL IHI4IKM THIEF OF DAMASCUS In faclimi OLTMPIO BOXT EOTAL ft-aa> 4.• a yg JT*'t-i2 *1Ta^^ *• a aaa ii..Mi MATTrtMRrT *"' r Mt>irrBaAil Univorwti Do-bw %  %  %  %  rwoaa twa cix WIU aurrliuj mrhaia Arion nA> Dnlnr THE ,0 "" 0 iw.o ~"~^r"' |...om a ISO. TOWN .raj roa A..S !" TOTrki wrmrol.aioa.. race rofiAN *....i. a-ai. MURPHY *"* V,rS"""' a J5SS. *CS5. •*•*" DO L v VATICAN r. ....i...... !" ~ !" ; i !""*i !" ." SAII,,, "'-aZm —*£-— •— %  %  ••— atamng: l-mit Haniuxi I *n Sutlon GLOBE I ...I Shows TOIIAY 4.45 and 8.3U p.m. PICTURE OF If OMAN CRAY Cleorne SAUNDERS — Donna REED AMD SI ii 11 It. S HURRICANE Richard WIDMARK Openins FRIDAY 5 and 8.30 p.m. taa — i T.e..,il II" s HI t 'WKOW j ".' %  IK rr4W. rtor Sboih and -.1 rto-.il> in A %  i of nt> UT*I> a i vise ./'ABASVT a-uau* Doubw oasr br T-*hni*ofc>iBAL TABABII %  i.iiln* IfclHIIUl iretn O HARA MUTMI IJ, ,-,„ MANDIJtR Wttli.m China •JBS.SL. 0 ""! Auarsr Totlar l-iiuiaiy .1 •SP4H1 IMis-.lN AND HI LABV | raon MONTaaAi. with .rrl AIUXN nr\'iNT 1 MiMI. -. -,„. Ovrnlnc Hdilurday A .a> MM a.ts LBA< Fir\rtu pints WUh rtnma KKSH %  < a % %  ••••I a a SM ,Td AKIi.N I Obaxt If (Ma) lumtd int* rhe wtrid'i .0ftflrl nefHgfnpoajp, sgys Pfil. Ssyrg if IfetfCio WtBB 0 : R< ^REAMBOAT



PAGE 1

I'.i.l Mil i: BAJtBAlMJS ADVOCATt Thursday OrC.ih.-r M, l52 I .MUM it FACTS THE annual report of the Department of Labour is a disappointing document. Thi.s statement implies no criticiikrn of tindepartment but is the natural n-sull ->l reading a docunH-nl which novgf rather than reports. There is a statement in paragraph 34 that at sugar factories and syrup plants •Mong hours continued to be worked waving from 72 to 100 hours per week <>l rix days." Yet there is no further reference to this matter and the reader is left to reconcile this remarkable statement with a table showing the average number of days worked for one week in each month from January to June 1951 as varying from 5.38 to 6.63. To work for periods of 72 and 100 hours during a six-day week workers will have to work for tvveJve hours and I6| hour* a day respectively. Surely something could be done to alter circumstances which re quire workers to work for such long periods. Even though these hrurs of work may not be considered excessive by the workers, ought such long hours of w<>rk to be tolerated in an industry which is Die largest single employer of labour in the island? There is no mention anywhere in the report of the Labour Department of any action having been taken to prevent workers from overworking in (he manner described. Recording without explaining seems characteristic of the document. Tables and figures are quoted which although they interesting in themselves leave out more interesting information. Of what value is it to know, for instance. that the highest average week's earning of a lighterman was |44 15 and his lowest $3.30 when the average hours worked per lighterman are not known ? Lacking this information one is unable to appreciate the relative significance of the fact that the overtime rate for lightermen can be as high as $41.92 per trip. Nor is much light thrown on the subject by the table which record* the number of persons employed as lightermen as ranging between 322 and 427 in the space of one month. Altogether it seems that little is known by the Labour Department about the hours of work and remuneration of individuals whose hours of work and rates of remuneration ought to be known fully, since without that knowledge attempts to reduce the high costs of handling cargoes in the Port must inevi tably fail. The compilation of statistics and information about dockworkers generally could, it seems, be very easily obtained by the Labour Department if only they are authorised to obtain it. The collection, preparation and publication of labour statistics which include wages, hours of work and conditions of employment is indeed included by the department in its own description of its duties. Besides the general incompleteness .of most of the tables in the report some statements made therein would not autom.tu cally be accepted by everyone. Would everyone agree, for instance, with the statement that increases in prices during 1951 were "consequent on the devaluation of the pound sterling" alone? If, however, these and other criticisms may be made about the report they ought not to be interpreted as criticisms of the department but rather as appeals to the government to make the work of the department better known to the community. So many matters of importance raised in the report are left without answers and r.iany statements are made without explanation, when explanation might have helped employers to cooperate more read 1 ily with the department. There are still some people who are not aware of the services which are rendered by the department of labour and it would be easier for the public to be educated as to the role of the department if a more inspiring report were issued annually. It might even be suggested that half yearly reports should be issued and that short monthly statements of activities of the department should be made to the Press, as is done by the department if agriculture and other government departments. It should by now be obvious everyone that no progress is going to be made in Barbados unless there is greater trust between those in authitiiv and the people whose cooperation is Invited. It is pleasant to read in the annual report ol the department that relation* Lei ween management and labour in tin sugar industry west? good last year, but might not a bit more be said about the few instances in which port workers did not use the departiiHiiial machinery to settle disputes 7 The labour department n perhaps the most important department of gi i-inmei.t und as it becomes better known it nu be expected that much greater use will be ma I* of | but UV Information provided n for 1851 Is inadequate to give the pub than a glimmer of its usefulness. A Visitor In i\w York CURRENT EVENTS I 1 went tn Harlem OP Saturday -,.. night". Yes Sir! even the weather td saw and heard Presick-nl M ItUiriie* Yllllur derk was baseball tan and held Truman In his campaign efforts, off his showers so a* not to irterbehalf of Democratic Pr.-i"e hoped, he said, that the peofrn with the World Series. Well. dtntla) Candidate Adlai StevenP'* would remembe. that and lo nuke the story abort. ihi> . H..os* •' • Nearly 400,000 actually watch.rMnd and lew auto, Harry Tmh d bcr „ doni ,„ mvTt>ye ,„, — th. mmu Bd untold muuous .Ircady expressed view that he ertalnly seems lo be enjoying uniself, in whatever he is doing. Uid he certainly enjoyed liimelf in one of hu 'give-etn-bell' peeches. He describes one ot the .limit* in one of the Republican latform as "lousy", and said be id not give a "hoot" about aome 'pert of some matter. His daughter, Margaret, was .ith him and shared in the rous%  ii! welcome which was accorded ST father. She joined lustily in M singing of the "Star Spangled lamier" and seemed to be i (trough Iv enjoying her last noments as one of the occupants f the White House. Harlem, is of course, the centre I* the negro community in New ork and the president sought lo hip up the all important negro 0t< fur Adlai. The importance .' this vote has bee:, conceded on II sides, hence ihe President's o o i n g. Ha recounted the hit-vemenu of the Democrats in mg the 20 years they have ret. In power, and compared the resent period of prosperity hich the nation enjoys with le great depression which pre'od work. He hit —a. im d the Republican candibut n *g* r -uIke" Eisenhower, and has lo interfere much with the other. nee admUtad that he was misBo" 1 had their listeners, many of %  ken whan he said some time whom " u ned to < h slde ,or go, that "lke' would make a lune tiftorv proceeding on their ^od President. businass. ...... th an appeal BARNKY MILI.AK Nearby, another wagon, fitted ith phonograph and loud to rVoT5us -P**T played records extolling T^Ji"^^ d hhoSTg," InS "virtues of Adlai Stevens^ ££* SlaStSr Rei ^---,n a.. but neither ot the shows seemed _..'',.._. .7^. \^ And he ende-l hu audience o for ike Den vensoa for iitor .*ip;irhit sldent. got over $6,000 and each of the losers S4.000 • • %  • Did you know that every voter in America muM register each time there is an election* And he must pass a literacy test or produce evidence of having attended school for eight years. There has been a record registration for the November election and all evidence point to the possibility of the heaviest voting ever in the history of America. These literacy last for first time voters were held in the public schools anu other polling places throughout registration week. They were administered by regular and substitute teachers from 5.00 p.m to I0.8O pjn. from Monday tn Friday and from 7.00 ain. to 10.S0 p.m. on Saturday. The teachers were paid 90.50 a session with Saturday counted as a double session. To be eligible to vote you must be a 21-year-old citiien by birth or naturalization — have lived a year In the state, four months ln the county and 30 days in the election district, And the election is not only of President and a Vice-President. thus: Ta be 'id Vice-I'resiarj R epre sen tatives. ^ members of the State legislature; ludges of the various courts. A very Interesting document has just been released in part. It is the leport of a Committee which investigated the working %  ,oW,,„, and l-m . M. .11 important — !" STBS^Z, TrES Prid.nt .nd ''''"" 'V; 1 ""* "ll 1 "."!'. "T.. .ncndatlon, I. that promoUon VlcoW.itld Spric* mendationa Is that promotion known7wa."pi.'y. TniiVrouiht |^" iL11" rk 0 L < ,,p ,'* l 5 hOU d r.>. t l in this community. A cided by the winner of the first SSlTui. >vered wagon drew up ut a 'our games and the interest m ^rv"'* 0 !" 1 reet corner about two blocks this event clouded out every Another one la that the entry HM a quiet looking man other The newscaster the night age be towered to IB instead of •t up some loud speaking equipbefore the series was due to open, 20, as is now the case. There are tent He mounted his low platstarted this way: "Politicians also many terse criticisms of the Tin and proceeded as he said, can now stop talking, teachers personnel of the Force and con> carry on from where the Presistop teaching and soldiers stop dltlons are suggested with the obant had left off. He wanted to fighting the World Series ject of attracting a better type of now why the President had not Is on tempted to .say anything at all >. ut Sparkru.m beside mentionHow right he K his name at the close of the won ihe flxst game and the mended with the full consciousleaeh. He would tell them. Yankees the second. The third ness of the present increase In rtanaa was a representative B an >* went to the Dodgers and crime ln the city. In short, there what was railed the "White the fo rt h t .. ,he YanKe0! *When are drastic suggestions for the %  r.-iiiacy Group" in the south the Dodgers copped the fifth overall improvement of an organid the ballot ticket of the state gme. the question was would isation which has a very difficult Alabama still carried t h e they win the sixth — the series, job to do. K-.rter and words "While anothe* first world championship? This report — which cost ipremacy" as was the case in The weather announcement that 986.000—come not a moment too i old Klu Klux Klan days, morning promised rain in the soon, and competent Judges ali it was whv Sparkman could afternoon, but a ten o'clock ready predict an uplift in the H be mentioned in Harlem.amendment said "No ruin until morale and work of the Police. individual. But to crown it .11 a cut m the The Dodgers strength of the force Is recomOur Readers Say; little the C island. wt of living In Only a background of Protestant tradition and law enabled thi by-law to be annulled since the this court's judgment was baaed an old English law which had passed Into Canadian law wh< Canada adopted the English Code in 1867. Yours faithfully, PROTESTANT. Coronation Gift u\ M.t.. heni-c Diary makes the rather naive he second shock is the represtatement that the only tempera' ',\.i/' c "ifor. '" %  Adoocsre, under present ronpower enjoyed by the R.C R.-A correspondent in your paper hui Barbados suggested that the Plantation Owners Five l"ar Plan , Tfic Editor, The Advocate r. I have reed with dismay the „,,„,„.,. nKrin rwJSr thods adopted by government S^^Sh nnnnce the so called, five year UcU, her m m Tinfirst point one ques. r ., .. n%  > the „i,lily of making Makt ffPlirre.Wvrld iplc pay TODAY for benefits To, The Editor, Thr Advocate. %  iel. may. or may not. accrue SIR,—The author of Nobody the rather naive The present conpow 'ions of charging custom duties Church is that over the very C1F values. With the U.K. small territory known as Vatiear tnunent forcing these Islands City in Rome. It must be wonf" 0 "' 0 -, *"* %  Coronation gift to purchase most of their essenderful to live In the makethe Island by relinquishing ownil roods and other Imports believe world of the author of !" ftlp of lands u-rderlng highill.other end of the world Nobody's Diary. With suoh a *""J* Jo s depth ot lOO yards save dollars, we are already mentality we could believe that from the road, for the planting i ing to pay exhorbitant prices Czechoslovakia is not under the of ornamenul tree*. r our very existence, as Is iron Heel of Moscow. The Nortr This would amount to very >wn by the tost of living index. Koreans are a peace loving n,inearly 200 million square yards urea! deal of this high cost is tlon who of their own volition or 64 square miles of land—much • %  to the heavy transportation' savagely attacked then brothers, more than one-third of the irges over long distances to Pektn is not the political serf of laland — representing a loss or N i>nrt. plus in some cases, I Moscow — the Chinese are mere some 64.000 tons of, sugar In a biheve, a surcharge on freight agrarian reformers. In the same t.ood year worth probably Two :h irges to this particular port vein. Spain is not the abject polMillion Pounds Sterling of i' 1 *<> the delay ships experience itlcal menial of the Vatican and, revenue. > Ing to the slow unloading rate. j n mis phantasy, there is no modPerhaps your correspondent has With government standing to ern ">1""" '" Colombia. visions of an idyllic isle, tended m KNTAKE on landed coat. In f"*rvlii! en guarantee that he will example here on .he South .,,|c The third ahock is that In aplte only have to pa% for a one way of the Savannah ..; the Beaaley Report advising paaatag* and this would put paid Yours ate. individual income tax rates to any fatuous remarks about cOI. R W H OI IVFR •vera already at their limit, being searamgtl iravelUni In Colombia '"iRetd t isher than moat places In The iclurn passage money could 24th Oct., 1052 i'.eaa parts ol the world, and be employed in saying masses lot v 1 *.h the cost nt living being a poor gullible soul that could %  I still higher by the new believe that the only temporal ...infiS .:' "arc'.roe {Jnurch •h^Va ,,ca„. RC "£&?£ ATL'JS" ,..;,, ih, „om the .owe, „ ,„ ^ormt'ow^^bo^c^rSsrroo'n: your n-ader, that mme•month, and among the itera. I require U Then come. th. Increase in %  " %  .'';• "•<. '1".'"•f'J ",?*'*? <• winning scores each year for ,. ,r,.l lax. which bring, the price C.t> Cour,ell enactcd a by law oro, c Marlines Challenge Shield. 1 I this essential commodity up to o>rlnl aP. """ %  < %  • £-J *• have not been able to Uacc the 'ho highest In this hemisphere. ""•" or. KC. Holy days. Cer. Ba rb ,_ai 1. ,ano mmmMr : 3smm^m < re.ised pn e has to be added to '' om 'he R C. hierarchy to the J 0 .! !" ^." fjL"!*?. mm > ,hi „f loesl transp-rtaUon. City Council ordering ihe pas**$*<$ '•*"• rj etlme which adds that much more to "ge of the by-law The by-Vw 1^"* rhruary 1900. Any help ths cost of living. w * declared ultra eires by th* w "' he gratefully eceived. In view of all this I hope we Superio. Court. The above Is a I*. P. 11DMONDS. reading any more typical example of what happens Hon. Sec. hypocrisy from government that v-'ien tho politicians are domB G. Rifle Assoc.. Ki/I* 5*ool*V %  are interested in keeping lifted by the R.C. hierarchy. lint;.-!. Gu.ana. By JOHN GORDON YOUNG men, I read, don't want to go to .•ca nowadays because it takes them away from the tennis club. What an age we livt, in! Shopgirls want the shops shut incx-iiven ently early, so thai they can go cut on the razzle-dazzle. Elizabeth Allan withdraws her glamour from television because she tinds Sunday work tiresome. I hope if ever she has to carry her luggage to • train on a Sunday, as I so often see tired, weary women doing, she won't grumble because the porters now prefer tu withdraw their sen-ices on Sundays from the public which pays them, just as it pays her. And I hope neither she nor ihe porters will grouse if the electricians who make it possible for them to cook their meals, keep their Homes lit and warm, and even switch on the radio, the telephone operators, the police who protect iheir homes and their livi's. the busmen, the barman in the pub. and the little girl in the Icashop decide that Sunday is to be their day off as well. THE SAD FACT is that we are becoming so fond of the soft life that a job is now merely something you do lo get money to spend in your spare time. It must never be allowed to interfere with your comfort. I suppose there is some sort of happiness in that kind of existence, bul I am glad I was born before the idea developed. For 1 was luckv enough lo learn lhat the greatest joy in life is doing a job with all your heartbetter if you can than anyone else has ever done it — even if il involves, as it often will, applying yourself to it while others play. I THINK Field-Marshals Alexander and Montgomery are in for .a shock. Every time they open their moulhs nowadays Ihey demand bigger and betler conscription. If they come out of their ivory towers they will rind opinion growing in this country lhat we have had just about enough of conscription, and that we ought to end it before it ends us. It is a gross and costlv misuse of the nation's manpower. It is disrupting oui economy. It is pulling men away from Ihe production of goods vital to our existence at a critical lime when ihe Germans and Japs, unhampered by such burdens as we are attempting to carry, are launching attacks to drive us out of tour markets. II perpetuates the dangerous folly of keeping British troops on the Continent to become pawns in international brawls and jealousies and by so doing is a peril to our security ralher than a guarantee of peace. "AH. BUT what of the Russians?" t!is generals say. There is more fear of the Rus stans in Chicago today than there is in Europe. Open war has too many perils now for the Kremlin lo take the gamble. That doesn't mean peace of course. It means a new Kremlin plan. To divide us from America by subtle propaganda. To go underground. To burrow into our foundations. To rock our structure and bring it down from within. As so many strikes, go-slows and similar skulduggeries are showing, there are still enough dupes in this country to give Stalin the hope that he can achieve his malignant purpose without challenging fate by setting his armies on the march. That sort of war won't be won by soldiers strung out across Europe with rifles in their hands but by good honest men in workmen's dungarees with sense in theii* heads and national pride in their hearts. THE WEAPONS they need aren't tanks, guns or atom bombs, but comfortable homes, good wages, less taxation, plenty in the shops to buy. Give them those and Stalin will soon have as few worshippers in this country as a cat has fleas. • • • NEXT June we crown a new Queen. A Queen of youth as lovely as a rose, as bright as a spring morning. Far more than any other monarch in our history she will be the People's Queen. And for the first time In all our history, by Ihe miracle of television, not merely those privileged by birth or precedent but all her people can be with her in the Abbey on that solemn day. But some of those old moss brains, who can never see good in anything new, arc trying to pul Iheir foot on that. THEY SAY how shocking to suggest thai the Queen shall be televised at the solemn moment of Communion. To be seen by people standing at bars? Or sitting in carpet slippers, smoking cigarettes, perhaps even having a glass of beer. What a desecration of religion I suggest they consult the Pope, whoan—although 1 am not among his flock—I accept as an authority on religious standards. When he officiates at Mass, he has the ceremony televised and filmed. Mis view la that It dees net matter In the slightest whether Ihe solemn ecreaaaay Is seen by a loanirr at a bar sr a man sprawling In romfort In his home What matters b that Mmrwhcrr a MI ma> be teached. 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