Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
a



ESTABLISHED. 1895





BARBADOS, SEPTEMBER 28, 1952

ne





PRICE SIX CENTS

Naguib’s Demand To Oust Nahas Rejected

New Crisis Expected |peow ALL QUARTERS:

CAIRO, Sept. 27.
party rejected Sat-|
Premier Gencr
veteran leader Mustapha Ek}

EGYPT’S mest power‘ul px
urday the

utica

Man”



den “Streng

Mohammed Naguib that it

1and of



In His Heart |


















































h
1








o strategic

PRESENT NG CHALLENGE CUP











































nit crater or we wamy

d no direct strategic aspects and | Vv!

‘
lessons were learned! by a sudden tidal wave caused t

machinists AFL on Saturday to










U.S. President Asks
A.F.L. Te End Strike

WASHINGTON, Sept. 27
International Associat
call



RUMAN asked the





































off its strike
Nahas be ousted. it was open defiance of Naguib in his} Capetown: For the rest of his| Deuglas Aircraft Company the interest of 1
clean-up campaign and amounted to a devlaration’of politi-!lite Raward Williams, 19, a Cape- cexence
cal war. , itown co oured boy; witl go rouna Truman sent virtually identical tele ms to the ma
The next move is up *o the “strong man” and a new} With a bullet in his heart: A tort- agement of two firms and to union leade1 ir I f
crisis may result. migat £80 ne was sonited ing “Department of Defence advises that the labour dispu
‘ ‘hospital with a ;evolver slug wii ‘ nterfer i . pr. ; |
; interfering with the progr of nationa ‘
The constituent Committee of his heart after he had been ta nas fu tt a i ’ it hs 7 ; vA . ooae ao
the WAFD Party ich Nahas C D C I st . ,in a gam2 of cowboys and Indians tha irther loss of production will impair operations
1as led for many } reached e 2 e hnves S Surgeons decided not to operat military branches of gcovernms
the decision to defy Naguib but the boy must return to hos- Vegihion thsiiens
two-and-half-hourn, meetir Th es 500 000 pital periodically for examina- | nm. ge i MEE We
decision was unanTmou ‘ 8 s tions , r. ruman plant whieh iy tes ae
Crowds of Wafdist youth and 77 e ei Aviv: Israeli employ=: nates Walk Gh stethe on Sknian
memters of Parliament thronged I W I 1 i h refuved {o pay employee , * ; aun’ . ot } } ‘
around Nahas’ home where the n ® nec 1es an additional £6. 10s. cost ants pecial ee, it] I
meeting was held and _ yelled living bonus duc at the end ef | Galiforni pl
“Long live Nahas — no WAFD) (Prom Ovr Gwn Correspondent) the month, and have appealed | ; ti i | Se ! hal
‘ oo , “ING NS oie . » & é appes val ‘ September 8 ha
without Mahas—Nahas himself} Hiren eee R re sal g to the Goverument. they say that nv € S igalion of the air f
appeared dramatically before the ican Anderson. Regional Con~' 5.4 sing wages to meet th leeptor figt
" 1d at the end of the meeting| ‘troller C. D.C. in the West Indic re ae : oe 2 ets { & i
Chee ee tae ee ne meewng | anniunsed Jamaica yesterday Cost @ iiving, only elps in WASHINGTON 7 PAE a
and said “when the WAF'D’s una- sat ‘t Weet eae wa re ay Astin Mr Phi tbh direct The Presid -
+ 4 decision te elease rad é e 2st Indies ranch ¢ > ‘ ‘ ‘, i ie Oe “ete - "| terminati
aherE vill’ i : . f * * C.D.C. had already been committed Washington: Among the aes he Federal Trade Comm | th aii
nig at it will give you per ect sit~| yon at proximately £8,500,000 in- of thousands of patents filed in mak 1 unprecedented pe | ,
isfaction.’ My confidence in God s Sa irtclohs, Ne ah rie. | Washingtor 1 th? a ewe inves mn “te stermin jials of the ec
i the Beyoti: riaiten vestment. The capital of the Cor-; “45'geton 15 one or a new nee ‘ ition “to determine laeHl mneet teas
and the Egyptian people had al-| oration, he said, was £110,000,000|type version of the medieval Mr. Tlarold Bowen, Manager 6f Messrs. ¥Y. de Lima & Co. Ltd., presenting the Silver Challenge much of the consumer winink i, ReMi
ways — strengthened me against | oy of which so far only £40,000,000 |cross-bow. Cup to Mr. F. L. Griffith on behalf of his firm at the conclusion of the Small Bore Rifle Meeting yes goes for labour profits, mate: ily f the fe ote
Imperialists, Defeatisits pseudo-| i, gommitted : tlin: A “Society for the Pro- terday afternoon at the Garrison Savannah. The Gnp is for competition among the Leeward and and distribution,” [omctis te ra
7 . 2 : -tare | : ° Pes . c é se
Egyptians and their supporters} Anderson, s peaking at a|motion of Sharp-shooting” has Windward Islands. Mr. Truman said such inforn -| atation ser
everywhere.” The crowd shouted | y C.A. luncheon announced |been formed in t Germany Seen in the picture from left to right are: Mr. L. W. Hassell, Mr. H. Bowen, Capt. C. R. B, Warner, ation will be useful “in settlin
“no leader but Nahas,” that the latest C.D.C. commitment Its aim is to turn all able-bodied Capt. 8. C. Weatherhead, Mr. F. L. Griffith, Mr, K. 8, Yearwood, Major A. 8. Warren, Mr. T. A. L. labour disputes’ where Labout
nee a indication of what/in the W.I. had betn the agree-|youths and adulis into “snipers Roberts and Mr. M. Gy Tupi, ee ee, eae Breas Switek
aguib would do in the retort to| ment to finance Jamaica Industrial dangerous to all enemies of the their own figure He said data Ow ite
the ere ra nd _ been | Dev lopment Corporation with!people.” n ‘ Fat hl is also needed to show how much duties
in communication wi e In-| £500,000 and it was hoped to furth-! py fo: ° ‘ > YO of the consumer's dollar goes to 5
he eee a : | £900, and it was hoped to furth Pretoria: The Dutch Reformed , Ma 1a enge i & ’ ah al
igriog Minister Slime, Heya) r nance, the Corporation th |urch of Afskamuers ts pros|~ We” WW ee | as fe fier ing Coenen Nt yt ae ee ee
3 Ss ye las ancther £500, in its swaMp/t@sting against the Transvaal 7. sts are at work trying to ec wv é ;
days. The 45 members W.A.F.D.! reclamation and rice expansion Mohd at ; abs =| » » / vince the consumer that it is tt were accidentally switched in
; | maveeaeel & — Mttseum, Pretoria, for showin ar s / 4 su ? on “for
Parliamentary Group went on) scheme al os : ing OO / a. farmer who is responsible for hospital here three years age
record Friday night with a state- Anderson said that in five re- oe skulls er Rug a of prim- 5 sak high cost of living The head of weepingly clung to them on
ment that Nahas must remain |gions in which C.D.C, operations ea a ee t = we _ TOKYO, Sept 28 By Roberts the Agricultural Department \ rn — cae 7 wot
the party leader. were divided — the r East, East . acute - ere | ee THE U xd State , t ‘dé al kt *kade hy « figures which show that the fa hot give him up he baby
i st, E ards a? as nited States navy slapped a total blockade on th } , by
Junior leader of the W.A.F.D | Africa, West Africa, Central Afri- wards belief in man’s evolution : “pow a, 3) a and ‘d red a i shins wey mer gets only about half of the mixup, first on German records
Abdel Salam Fahmy Gomaa,/|ca, the Caribbean the Caribbean |Which is “only a theory”. entire Korean coast on Satur ay and ordered its warships Mr. T. A. L. Roberts won the| consumer's dollar for food and for over 30 years was unravel
himself once listed as a possible|had the highest investment with], Tel Aviv: The cost of a car} to patrol within range of Soviet and Red Chinese coasts. | grand aggregate and the F. L.| “far less” for other products lik ed only by the miracles of
successor to Nahas announced at|the sole exception of Central|licence in Israel is being raised} The new orders will send American warships within ne Cup and Mini-} land tobacco, “Let's get the full ee Se aettaearae —
the end of the meeting that the|Africa, The Far East is next to|by 250 per cent, Gwners of large} twelve miles of the Russian and Manchurian shore—close1 ore an “/ ta hy vs he be-| facts on where the rest of the Pera Peixndh Beater ‘ie
Constituent Committee’s decision|the Caribbean with other regions |¢@rs must pay £150 for a licence, to Soviet territory than they patrolled before. hada St th ay wd R a ce consumer’s dollar — goes Th only child ws involved in the
was unanimous. He said a formal| lower down and having regard to| Valetta, Malta: A film unit has General M rk Clark who announced the creation of Me t . fe i a t tifle Club! President said he has prepared \ switch and Frau Witwe Pied-
announcement would be issued|the population of the Colonial|been flown from Britain to Malta FORE A Nha ark who anno é € ati 4 = ; “i wa i it tie Garrison | Jeave on a coast to coast whistle ter saobhes of eight | ie. to
later Saturday (about 4.00 p.m.)|Empire, the Caribbean had by no/to make a colour film of the the new “sea defence zone on his return from a series of | Syrane . ones rday a pti stop trip. gether and agreed campormedte
Gomaa’s announcement was fol-|mieans been ignoréd. He added |is!and’s 18-month-old industry—! top level conferences with his operations chiefs in Korea | 4.0"). 0g Bose ws rer yester We need to know per unit of on Saturday that each should
lowed by a declaration by an-'!that out of 18 investments in the |cotton production. | warned that any ship in the ring of forbidden waters | took nach. These Gobo Portes > preduct how much of the cor keep tho child she reared be
other Wafd Big wig Ibrahim|Caribbean there had been only | Capetown: In the general rise; would be subject to search regardless of siationality 13 and 9, ten rounds deliberate at {17°TS eve ae incite cause the shock of the change
Farrag to the excited crowd of}three bad ones, the rest showing jin living costs in South Africa | - The terms of the strongly |25 yards COSSS, Ge owen). Cumel ame vn would be too great for the
supporters teeming around Nahas’ | good signs and paying their way. \the increase in the cost of one worded United Nations directive} Event No. 9 which was for Cad- | °°" profits ete, We should hav. infants.
house: “No Wafdist in Egypt|He hoped C.D.C woe aS vag +A item seems to have escaped | Del t , would apply to Russian craf(|ets was won by 2/Lt. L, K. Hinds | °\" : ee oe en taee ; die The local court officially re-
would accept Nahas’ withdrawal|more useful ways of helping the notice. Rings made of elephant | ega es attempting to operate off the |of Harrison College with 91 points, | POPPE In Me bucgets of bamuic vealed the baby mixup find-
from party leadership.” economic development of the West hair, which are supposed to bring | e Communist held North Korein |event No, 8—-opened to the Barba- No such comprehensive dav ings and said that there could
—s eran cae aN oe e je! lg SA ee 7 good luck to the wearer and! Arrive For coast, Clark said the blockade Boe seuinient was Won by Pte, J tikienk cae eo reek aan es ceneee Riper:
most critical in e .A.F.D's| believe the : St BS W' hic ‘ { : ; ‘tint Ne enemy }F f a cc ; TEMEeENt BEEN ' surements anc
: which a t s z t was det because nemy ard, B Compan
25-year parte of. Habas' eneane aot get tere fair share of the une Soagittes- eave ay eee Sem to saat eS sat Janded on the Capt. 5. G. catherhend ana) ~or Shgarpeto ls panied to the
smip., ina@guids folitica Tie ormjéxpendea paiance Of 1%, VOU three: . “ . W 4 ” Korean. shure “from small “boats Mr T. A. L. Roberts who hag) same inexorable conclusion.
: inh OO N had coatlaith 2pence pre-war to two oven, Shore ym Sime oats, re J , 7 s =
pores wares aie wake GRRE WEI C.D.C. had ayehepim, ~~ | guineas, Admittedly, the rings; Ss In air war, United Natioos hope saith 208 polnts for the roma {WARDED SCHOLARSIIIP UP.
defying carries a é y10~ | —nt/sB'e 1s es ; Thunder jets rained high ex-|Coenne rallenge Cup again sho . ns
: : + . t 5 ,op,
lation of possible disbandment of | {still DIESE and’ Ceter “but) TOKYO, Sept. 27. plosive bombs and flaming | Yesterday with Capt Weatherhead | KINGSTON, Jamaica, ‘ i
yo oon, core apc dteady | ; 3 pera . Delegates from east and west napalm on five Communist troop winning by 1 M ith his scare at 95 4,} 9 1 rh c m pt. 21 an a eC s
of its fund. “AP 2), 8 é ; my ‘have arrive : Seining m “ancentrat s . 7 lots i¢ conclusion of the meetingy} 1e niversity ollege an-'!
- 1 “ + ~ jhave arrived at Peiping for the; concentration: Returning pilot wig ? | Pa } ; . : i a
deposited. shout: Saiyes. rev-| Lebanon Has } Feye ‘Communist “peace conference for}said they left vital Red milita Mr of = L Ss pe is te t un of Glich ce ny. Ii Ww A rd SH roe mi %
DOE ERY ER rere —UP | Secret Military Asian and Pacific regions’? aimed, centres cnegbe of Dames anc port fter ‘ hich Mr “F iu. rif Cla ie His ‘Martin’ f Port t- | ( irl Hi | }
; according to Red propaganda moke and secondary explosion + " , tide, + G Claude Hollis Martin o ort-of~ | , ele J
\ oO Ov e j Talk To Be Held uniting all of Asia” for peace. Three of the Communist troop ae ons aes: ps aaa rs of (ae? Prinidad ¥ Pe will read
. . i ub p ented the priz or ¢ ree Z al s
Mr. Steel Will | | “The conference was scheduled! concentrations were socated at @ Mr. Harold Bowen of Messrs. ¥ " aa in atin Me nithtine vareks James Edward Slocomte (34)
Aceh e ; BEIRUT, LEBANON, | WASHINGTON, Sept. 27, |to begin “in late September” but san a tots ee, fe ae | ae date Co., Ltd, on behalf of |tg Wilfred St. Elmo Jessamy of |{TUit vendor, City, tabbed
r ° Sept. 27. A dirlomatic cfficial said on Sat- |Some representatives had already) 1NC* ass are ; is firm, presented a Silver Chal- | princess Town, Trinidad, who will} 28! Might around 9.20 leek
Lead Industrial This little republic continued] urday night that a highly secret|arrived, Communist Peiping rad o| Aner we lage a out hats lenge Cup to the club for competi-| read for the B.A, general d oe | Tudor Strest. He wa
¥ 5 to limp along without a Goverp-/| military conference on South East id. According to the Red broad rainar ea hit Soria ats HH wy ion at the Windward and —C.P. he General Hospital and
Mission To B. W.L ment as Opposition Deputies; Asia will be held in the Defence |cast, nine delegates, representing Hoten " Ta Changvong_-weces Peaward 1 lands, 1Up to the time of going to Pre
' blocked efforts to form a new)Department here early next/the United States arrived in the ea : ahat attnel Pe Ae Major A * W a rs nae YANKEE TIME vn re wh not Nene h mn
é 2SS ay he a ad- mt 2 sai > ¢ “re > sapite v oo ‘ ad i wens oat f the ( thanke Mr iriffith | dition, e¢ is alleged to be i
(From Our Own Correspondent) Cabinet unless they had an ad- month, He said the conference|Red capital. ling and were advised to get ou vis WASHINGTON, Sept. 27 ne See see ee en :
KINGSTON, Jamaica, Sept. 26 vance guarantee that social and] will discuss the entire military , ’ { the areas Hea clouds ¢ @ On page 4 Daylight "ing time ends f me ge I ae gl be ale Rigg
Mr. Lincoln Steel director of the| press reforms were being carried} situation in South-East and espe-| They incluaed Mr, Jonn Powell, 4 ‘ atch inte, tone Vania fal : S sf Te ond OOF ae ends on girl has been held in connectio
Imperial Chemical Industries Ltd.,| CUt. cially Indo-China, editor of the Leftwing magazine oe saeton of? Je addin But. vp, al wanes % a ieee Aachen conaaaiiaad , wih he. stabbing
. salt aies reside ami *hamoun > said it was chiefly the res s als 5 esti a valuatio amag 3 ' val daylig > § BYeh:
England, has been selected to 1pnes dent Chamille Cham : He said it w as chiefly the result Shanghai, and his wife, Mrs. Sy!- turning pilots said their targ = end . At that hour the clock goes back | The police are making invest
lead the British industrial mission | © ected to the executive post after/of a plan for such a review of the| via Campbell Powell. Wiad, entiins tit ond. eevarel M R I Is 4 NH¢ yW i R one hour.U.P tions
vis ting the British West Indies in| St week's bloodless overthrow | military situation which was laid| Another American named was dena ae ; Th rs Fifth Aivfocen |. + capers aa dead eine © cs sy -
November ss explore the possi-| of former President Beshra El) down by Marshal Qiphonse Juin|engineer Mr. Henry Willcox. Dele = {By we cal 4 og allied er sathds s ret tres 7 oon - emceeaatinte
bilities for industrial development | Khoury, ae Px mandate to Tri-)when he last visited here. At that/gates from Canada, Australia gute . the niet shot amen | sEST OR | ING U.S.
‘ J on Glas ; a > hecieaa aie "ae~ rer ar i? ‘at :
f Famial Trinidad ind Briti h poli deputy Saadi Elmounla fol-|time there was three-power mili-|Colombia, El Salvador, Ecuador ¢ ae | two MIG's without lc a =
y amaica, . ad &@ 5 . 5 *Ivafi'’s ee ltar sehe . new 2 7 , y 7 ’ amagec of ' itho S- 4 , , T 7 ~
Guians He replaces Sir Norman an nt eee sop any eae Fart Gananes Paes baeoe Gate Guatemala, India, Indonesia, Mex~!ing 4 plane. The weekly toil I GOREIGN POLICY ) if
Seer ee hey cee essful attempts to form a Gov-|East Asia and yas a at Alico, New Zealand, Nicarag end lvls .! : rh .
ipping head of Britain’s federa-} go, . Mvafi's twoeday tr vas | permane f ste . 7 ’ Cant , aragua and jraised Sabres bag of MIG’s to 112
Kipping . 1d af B "| ernment. Elyafi’s two- day try was | permane nt military staff commit-| pakistan Also. uarvived. in. sthel save, Re tT aaa rg by MERRIMAN SMIT
tion Industries who is not noW| blocked by the anti-El Khoury|tee of three powers on South- capital the radio said destroyed, proba } 1 y, Wan MAN SI ru
able to make the trip. opposition which despite its mere East Asia could be set up. apite ne radio said. a. dmnagee for the a h en| LOUISVILLE, Ken — ‘ns
12 seats in the 77-member cham- He said this meeting might re- | Wars above the previous high for ar eau ee Bept. ¢
3 SETS OF TRIPLETS j ber, commanded sufficient popu-|commend the setting up of such a | month since the war began Ks a lai Steven ne on 5 iturda RAI. SIGH-—Makers of the i
bt | lar support to insist that the new] committee but any decision on this - ) Hig accused ight tisen ()
BORN IN 5 DAYS | cab net obtain a Parliamentary | subject would have to be taken by | Joint St t l j i ver of ; ugly twisted distor. WORLD'S CHAMPION () Ht
| majority or pledge itself m ad-|the next United States adminis- C atemen , i Bese of q ted Sta f reign s ey
Foss aiid aoe » refor ati UP. ° 2 ‘ » | policy ve Jemoeratic presider WIE
vance to carry out the reform|tration, ? 7 . ° Wi ec a € 7
(From Our Own Correspondent, , 2 . . J 4 ut pee in a peech pre -
et Own Correypendenty | Togramme—U.P. | Ends Europe's !
KINGSTON, Sept. 26. | P'0sramm _ re . ared for delivery at the Memo-
This week three Jamaican SCOUTS EXECUTIVE e mh Wi . Mi Ja ) oal een rial Auditorium here poke more
women gave birth to triplets over war cals . On Ins yection Tour ar Manoeuvres ] w / harshly of Eisenhower than evet
lays. The first!) COMMITTEE MEETING NG sii secs ;
a period of five days rhe first AOFM! hy Wh a } . before in h campaign
oecurred in the parish of ‘St. | Qwing to circumstances beyond | NEW DELHI, Sept. 27. _ OSLO, Norway, Sept. 27 TOKYO, Sept. 27 Stevensor ised Eisenhower
Mary, Monday to Tuesday. Phe) our control the Executive Com- Air Force Secretary Mr. Thomas Gen. Matthew Ridgway and The wreckage of a Japanese f lifting mar out of th
second occurred in the same parish’ mittee, meeting which was|Finletter on a tour of inspection| Admiral Lynde McCormick {Coast Guard vessel believed sunk context” and of changes of ‘Re
on Tuesday and the third heppen-;| scheduled for Thursday last had| left for Korea Saturday He con- brought western Europe’s great- 1 underwater volcano or tidal publica: irresponsibl Hie |
ed in Hanover parish on Friday.|to be postponed. It will now take} ferred Friday with Indianjest post war manoeuvres to e has been sighted 200 mile aid tl Republ ha ii |
The mothers and babies at ll’ place to-morrow (Monday 29th)|Defence Minister Mr. Narahimajclose on Saturday night wit! outh of Tokyo the Maritime Se- carded theor of President ||
well. “at Scout Headquarters at 5 p.m. Popalaswami —UP. joint statement in which they curity Board reported Saturday. , Theodors toosevelt to e@ak
admitted several weaknesses in All 31 men aboard the Kaivu softi ind car the b
North Atlantic Treaty Organiza-|Moru which was on a Scientific No Ste nso! tid the Reput |
tion, but said none of them rejexpedition to study the new vol- can p« { i h |
* : ‘ : n pol
INVESTIN . MEMEERS insurmountable. ano were believed drowned. A carry the |
Operation Mainbrace which in- ig boat and another er iid Eisenhower +
. volved warships and planes of sel reported sight ‘tried not once but several tin |
fall nations in the North Sea and n ttir at
}Atiantie was officially concluded ne Board said re- icf ou Kores.— U.P \| |
| aboard the British aireraft carrier that the Kaiyr | |
agile anchored in O:lo. R way ive been ble toad |
jand MeCorm ci Said the operation, when ed ico close to tt
3 |
|
|



| Siorms Sweep.
























rom it.—U.P. jthe ¢ uption _ Yo are on a 4
} {| Patrol boats continued to cr | I £ cy ay | u :
| | cross the area ir irch of possible rance i{ : : j
7 | : Kaivu Maru carried a is S |
| Kents Leave Fer | 2 ine scien PARIS, Sept. 27. : WINNER when you ride a Raleigh! ~ |
| uD Kiyusuke of f yo t the whole 3 : |
’ %, Vive UP, during the night 8
Far East Tour a S vianadceeiasbinib POP A Negpicica vebleld abies Sat 3 A Raleigh was the choice of Reg Harris—World’s
ate pe. of | SAMTRY INSPECTORS fatal nts were reported $ Professional Sprint Champion for the second year in ; |
he Duct fs ee pep 1 DISCUSS GOVT. BILL Ithougl fev person were succession. Here is proof of the wisdom of buying : |
tr etn ae. aad 4 See . ey Tat) Inspec pure ' nt ! your bicycle from a Company with such great
irport on Saturc f a elof Queen's Perk and Jrerrand region , and built the record-breaking RALBIGH.
ek tour of r PCs ess or i length variot pias On th tern coast a violent
the Far I ev ii | Government, BJ tori on Road vere .
OAC. Argor airliner with thes Sanitary Inspector ried fallen tree ind
13 other far passenger r t was ‘telegraph O8t Train the
The t ent th oint ud e stopped fod
re tine r recom- } he
pend t THE ALL-STEEL BIC VCLE
De eum atk A eta Ee ‘ ee 2 env tierok mind it A Product of Raleigh Industries Listed, Notsingham, England.
Tues¢ The t will ter f I tell, M itt he ¢ i of th G I
{ t ; member ne Fler ; t ( “7 CAVE, SHEPHERD
WV ! iousre I . ”
29) G. H. Adar r | ‘ & CO., LTD.
4+} ‘ +} ‘ h t rir ” ¢ ~
will be. confined havees are the} Goverment 3 riggs Ace i 10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street.
€ ke of I ¢ t Tue Seine | n r .
€ tte t to kill or disc « r , NO CYCLE IS COMPLETE WITHOUT A STURMEY f
ite After natte ect b he ri r it | ARCHER } OR 4SPEED GEAR AND DYNOHUE ® ‘
will fi ' j ich. } r
Ma SE. Griffith, Island Scout Commissioner, investing-members of the Harrison College Scout Sa ; , i at 1 ‘ | _ a@ |
Trooy terday. In the background can be seen Mr. J, C, Hammond beadmaster of Harrison College —U.P j =P, eee — ——'













PAGE TWO











THEATRE



| Americans Are Missing |






























} I r » °
{ a]
| ee ae ¢ | Uhe Laundry Trimmings
‘ = ee oS = &
BRIDGETOWN BARBAREES OISTIN
(Dial 2816) ‘Dial 6476) (Dial #404) American tourists have com- fKalf times as much for his laun
TODAY to Tues Today & Tomorrow Today & Tomorrow pared British laundry methods dry as we do,” said Mr. J. 7.
i $45 & 620 p.m 143 & 830 poo 445 & 8.80 pm unfavourably with those in their Bolton, a laundry firm’s execu-
was . Thrill c tus ese RKO Musical own country In particular, they tive
Gee Coleen TWO TICKETS TO say that here their shirts do n Handling charges-—the cost of
BUGLES IN. THE jj Rai! GRAY in BROADWA get the delicate attention to whic» ciins, pins, rubber bamds and
AFTERNOON LL GET YOU Snes Y they are accustomed. wrappings—absorb about a quar-
T color) FOR THIS Tony ¥ ed But British firms reply that ter of the total cost of the Amer-
Ray sis om loon MARTIN ILLE: comparisons of U.S. and Britiso ican laundry. This compares with
At oa = laundering teehnique are unfair. one-ninth of the total in Britain's
an ——— T E: ; ; 7 ?
ims se be wae ae oe am a “An American pays two and 4 ‘wash.’
Po gh ae Larry Buster Crabbe [| STRANGE BARGAL
“PERFECT STRANGERS 1m i ee HOLD IT! DON’T MISS THIS!
Dennis Girlger BUCK ROGERS BUNCO SQUAD ; sis cigs
MORGA ROGERS sonstance Moore Rot t Sterlir “ tJ ”
iz & ROG Constance, Moo tg DUCHESS OF IDAHO °
urs. — Special 1.30 pm. ii SS urs. (only) 5 & ls ; aa one 2 > i s
ce Folk Se Sen tet 1 pe | 40 pm, : ve Johnson Lena Horne — Esther William
Ken Maynard & Errol FLYNN in ratear nah Eleanor Powell The Jubileers Quartet
“RANGE JUSTICE” “TYCOON” AND
Jo! Mack Brown CAPTAIN BLOOD y
Stee ee eee “MYSTERY STREET”













Ricardo Montablan —- Sally Forrest — Bruee Bennet
SIR WALTER SCOTT'S On Wednesday, Oct, ist, Thurs. 2nd, 4.45 & 8.30 pm.
IVANHOE Se
—eeeeaeaeaaeae
: with: ;
ROODAL THEATRES
Robert George Elizabeth Joan
TAYLOR SANDERS TAYLOR FONTAINE EMPIRE OLYMPIC way ae
To-d 445 To -da morn To-d dey
OPENS, FRIDAY OCTOBER 3RD, 5 and 8.30 C20 Je © S08 to-ctay & Rommmrowy To-day Me Sasser ¢ las SP Se 9.20
: Robert Sterling Columbia Pictures
G i oO B E Biean — wn Presents THE b
anor in .
at a aoteiheon Wiliam Molden Mon ER
. i Wiliam Wyler’ ‘XPERIMENT Richard Webb
With the kind permission of the Director ef Education, ead ting oa” ALCATRAZ | BOOTS MALONE and others
sperial school children shows \/ill start on TUESDAY, OCTO- Sidmey Kingsley's Starring am ~— _ Monday & Tues:day
BER 7TH to FRIDAY 17TH 1.30 p.m ‘ one Howasd Sgnies * eae ote sean a* wo
7 . i ; 5 , ae * DETECTIVE en S| and introd
Will all Schools (including Private Schools) that have not Tucsday & Wed 5a S| eee VIRGINIA
received Tickets please contact the Manager of THE GLOBE t STORY" 400 Be 8.15 oney eaten” ainnt allehis
THEATRE with vepublic All-Action | short Robert Lowers
Rouble FAMILY CIRCUS '
x Allen and his . sane
SSS William Bendix Horse Koko in Wed & Thurs PUE FAR
re | Cathy O'Donnell -yUNDER IN 430 & 8.15 FRONTIER
t— Pe ee GOD'S COUNTRY) oy ping 5 i
~ ~ “pc xtra j lo igan Poy c s
THE OFFICERS AND MEMBERS ale cur Mheee | Bt. | we
OF THE re een See C® MONTANA, i 1.0 & 8.30
' aa meee Starring Tito Guiza:
TEACHERS PEST) Allan ‘Rocky Lanc| HIDEOUT Virginie Meuce
’ . Coming Soon . | Rov_Bancsoft and in
vocate S Oocia u | “Thursday only | ‘ “TARS AND
Burt Lancast 430 & 8.15 GUITARS
inl aetat. WITHOUT SHOWDOWN nd
| A JURY Staerir SONS OF
invite you to their Fa ee ORR 1 OF f | william Eutiott aa
MEN MONTE CARLO Marie Windsor Russel Ho vder



_ .
SSNS Se

| JANETTA DRESS SHOP
|

DANCE

C. Gale, M.L.C

} Vader the Patronage of the Hon, \
AT TH=
f VOLUNTEER DRILL HALL
On

Monday Night. Gth Oct.
(Bank-Holiday)

Music by Percy Green's Orchestia atti,

SUBSCRIPTION oe. WINDSOR HOTEL i

Dancing from 9 p.m.
LIMITED |

(Next Door to Singer's)



Just opened newly Fashioned NYLON HOSE
New supply of EVENING GOWNS
DRESSES made to Order











Tickets not Transferable





WE TAKE GREAT PLEASURE of informing
} our Customers and Friends that after extensive
MAKE THIS A repairs and alterations our Hetel is now

re-open.

DATE oc |
40 ROOMS, all with their private baths, are
available. We recommend our Bar and Dining

BEACH CLUB

Room for those who desire the best in drinks

and food in pleasant surrcundings.

Tel. 2131 — 2182

PARADISE

Jass Bands Steel Bands

-O*

Prises

Admittance by Tichet only



COCKTAIL DANCE GINGER

IN AID OF

FUNDS ot the CONVENT
ORDER of the _
| GOOD SHEPHERD

HELP MAINTAIN THE WORK
MAINTAIN THE SCHOOL
COMFORT THE SICK

?












BOTTLER’S
(B’DGs) LTD.

MOBO for KIDDIES !

Scooters
&
(ialloping Horses ! !

Yes, MOPO means toys for girls and boys—
and we hive fun selling ‘em. So come on
in and join us. We'll show you Broncos &
Merr;-go-Rounds, ‘Tot-Cycies, Scooters—
more toys than a nursery dreams of !

And a word to Mum & Dad — they're strong
and inexpensive.... MOBO TOYS











JOIN THE THOUSANDS FOR

| COCKTAILS | CRANE HOTEL

MONDAY — 6th
Oct.

From 6.00 p.m.
SNACKS FREE

ADMISSION — $1.50

DRESS OPTIONAL.

TO THE TUNES OF

THE SOCIETY SIX

AND
ALL STEEL BAND

}














K. R. Hamte & Co., Ltd.

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 1952

a









® s Will Resume Duties
"> y t. E. JOHNSON I
bv I id after hi um-
é acat lea’ He will
ime his duties as P.M.O., St
‘ Joseph, as from Wednesday, Octo-
R, J. LOCHRIE, O.B.E., Cotton Barbados Bonniest Baby er 1. During his absence, Dr. |
Officer of Development and HE search f Barbados’ Bon- ©& Tappir P.M.O., acted as
Welfare who has been paying a siisent Sak ene & an PALO. Bt. Josmpl.
short visit, left the island for bine Cite "taoent aba ah aces ntransi
British Guiana by B.W-L.A. on oes tase caaaeaamiieiens ae je fn : ue > i
Friday last abies for this competition which M G. O'REILLY, Q.C., Bar-
2 ’ A Party is open to all babies who are fed risier-at-Law, Trinidad, was

A PARTY was held at the res-

idence of Mr. and Mrs; C. A.
Pickering “Vinroy”, Rockley on
Friday night in honour of their
daughter Juanita who celebratea
her eighteenth birthday.

Her many friends and relatives
who had an enjoyable evening all
joined in wishing her success and
happy days in her future years.

For U.C.W.I.
R. KEITH ASHBY, son of Mr,

and . Dunean Ashby of
Welches, C Church, returned
to Jamaica on Teareday afte
sper ‘4 the summer holidays
with relatives.
Keith is a student at the Uni-
versity Co! of the West Indies
and is now his second year

Also leaving for Jamaica by the
Same opportunity were Mr. O.
Walcott and Miss B. Payne who
will also enter the Uhiversity
College.

Musical Entertainment

. CECIL JACK, son of Mr.
R. N. Jack, Assistant Labour
Commissioner and Mrs. Jack will
entertain the members of Olympia
Club on Wednesday night at the

British Council.
Mr. Jack, a versatile
ist is now popular among
larbadian audiences and his pro-
goenne will consist,of works trom
hi .» Schuman and Schubert.
bers are reminded to invite

their friends.
For Belgium

M* “BILLY” GREEN whe
: arrived from Dominica dur-
ing the week where he had bee
spending a few weeks’ holiday
will be returning there tomorrow.

He will be leaving by the
“Colombie” for Belgium ‘where
he will enter the University of
Louvaine, to continue his studies
in Medicine, “Billy” did his pre
medical studies at the Loyola
College, Canada.

Enjoyed Stay
RS. TOCKER DE-OCHOA
who used to reside at Pine
Hill, St. Michael, left the island
by the “Colombie”’ on Wednesdé
last for Caracas, Venezuela, a
pending five weeks here,

Mrs. De-Ochoa had en enjoy-
oble stay and was happy to be
back again among her old friends
who all contributed to make her
stay a happy one.

your,





GalETY

The Garden—St. James
TODAY & TOMORROW 8.30 p.m. (QQ)
MAT, TODAY — 5 p.m. |
Bing CROSBY & Fred ASTAIRE
Irving Berlin's

i



on Cow & Gate Milk Food and

nok over 2 year



ser from Jamaica intran-
‘ov Trinidad on Friday.
Back to Trinidad
Me GUY O'REILLY and Miss
F. O REILLY were pasengers
Trinidad by B.W.LA. on Fri-
after spending a holid&y here.
Back to Curacao

M* HAROLD CARRINGTON,
a Berbadian who had been
workir.z in Curacao for the past
fve years. returned by B.W.LA.
during the week. During his holi-
day here he was married to Miss
Gwencplyn Roberts of The Ivy.
Spent One Week

R. MILLER YEE MOON, an

Accountant of, Port-of-Spain,
returned to Trinidad early this
week By B.W.LA. after spending

pas «
ola

The twelve leading babies will
be selected by a Board of Judges
for final judging and names of the
selected twelve will appear in the I
‘Sunday Advocate” of November
9. Final judging will take place
on Saturday, November 22.

Three attractive prizes will be
offered and entries close on Sep-
tember 30.

Returned
R. J. W. HARKNESS, C.M.G.,
O.B.E., Medical Adviser to
Development and Welfare, was an
arrival from Jamaica by B.W.LA.
on Friday last.

He went away

Lusiness visit.
Leaves Today

on a_ short

“We certai

nly need speeds
beyond the sound barrier
"Soe Gecltels came a ne week's holiday He was a
er” : . , one eek’s ay. yas
. (YAPTAIN R, W. P. REYNOLDS jest” at Silver Beach Guest
Lendam beore:: Service. “4 who arrived from England by House Rockley.
the S.S. “Colombie” on Wednesday
leaves the island today by B.W.1.A



Married at Cathedral

Also leaving by the same oppor-

for St. Lucia where he will take tunity_were Mr, Julian Pack and
N THURSDAY afternoon at over command of the Cable Ship, Mrs. Samuel Louis of San Fer-
4.00 o'clock at St. Michael's “Electra”. nando who had also been spend-

Cathedral, Mr. Eustace St.Clair
Welch, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edg-
erton St.Clair Welch and Sanitary
Inspector of St. Peter, took as hs
bride Miss Cynthia Anita Bruce,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Arnold
Bruce of Redman’s Village, St.
Thomas.

During his stay he was a guest

ing one week's holiday here as
at Ocean View Hotel. 1¢

ts at Silver Beach.

The cerem ny was performed by
the Very Rev. Dean Hezlewood
and the tride was given in mar-
riage by her father. The duties of
bestman were performed by Mr.
Edgerton Welch and those o
ushers fell to Mr. Joseph Welch,
Mr. Vernon Jones and Mr. Craw-
ford.

The bride’s dress was of slipper
satin and lace cut in a flowing
flare with a close fitting bodice
ond appliqued lace yoke, and her
head@ress was of illusion lace and
forget-me-nots with a_ fingertip
veil and she carried a bouquet of
anthurium /illies.

The bridesmaids were the Misse
Odlyn and Glendine Bruce, sisters
of the bride. The flower girls
were the Misses Coleen Best
Sonja Springer, Doreen and Hazel
Edy.

Tne bride was attended by Miss
Havel Mascoll as Maid-of-Honour.
Afier the ceremony a_ reception
was held at the residence of Mrs.
G. Mascoll, Raymoth Ville, Tudor
Bridge.



MR. AND MRS. BUSTACE 8T.6. WELOH

“TRINIDAD HERE Wk COME”

(By WILMA CLARKE)
AFTER TWO FALSE STARTS, Mrs. A. L.





ipplau the

rou

at end was thun-

Stuart's

‘lin’s Ls 3 ‘ ; Like all things of human d2-
BLUE SKIES | Daneing Troupe finally boarded the Canadian Constructor go, ) our m we 1 evening came
(Technicolor) .°, ‘ 4 > : Sie” usical evening came

—F0ES A WED ae ea} | «Ss for Trinidad. The ‘Revuedeville’ School of Dancing, com- to an end. That was after 11

bop HALEMON DROF KID" plete with stage hands, cook, seamstress and Capt. Raison ee. a ae ere to

0) ‘ ‘ a nadie 2 1ink of sleep. , it was o a:
"ahead MbsOURI RAID’ (Color) with 15 members of the Police Band. I am sure that jp olont for Me Sainte paaie helt
Wendell COREY everyone's thoughts were the same. “Trinidad, here we |jke it. We were too anxious to
| come... see the very first appearance of

The “Constructor” sailed out about eight o'clock, — the hip- cur destination Finally, around


















FILM SHOW

me ee
THE BARBADOS
AQUATIC CLUB.
(Local and Visiting Members
only).

Through the courtesy of
the British Council there
will be a FILM SHOW in
the Ballroom on. .
'WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER

Ist, at 8.30 p.m.

The Programme includes:
BRITISH NEWS; THE IL-
LUSIVE VICTORY (M.C.C.
Tour to Australia (1950-51);
THIS IS BRITAIN; PIC-
CADILLY ROUNDABOUT.

Members are cordially

Invited.

GLOBE

This Evening 8.30 P.M.
And Continuing 5 & 8.30 P.M.

KANGAROO

—with—
Peter LAWFORD
Maureen O'HARA







a

j interspersed with white roads r:

| few

of Carlisle Bay at four o'clock
Friday afternoon, After everyone
}had settled in, for only few of us

were sea-sick, we decided to ex-
; plore the deck. The sailors were

board show started. Capt. Ratson
nd his men struck up the music
everyone sang again and dancer;
those who hadn't the energy left
looked

three o'clock we did see it like a
grey cloud in the distance. As
the minutes crawled by, the three
peaks became clearer and we





| Pl on munching apples, en- realised where and how Trinidad
| friendly and courteous enough to joying themselves nevertheless. came by its name. We were se?-
j conduct us on a sight seeing tour. Just before Juliette Gaskin wes ing curselves By the time we
| We watched Barbados fade away put to bed, he entertained us entered the Bocas it was nearly
| into the distance; one moment it with songs The ailors were sunrise. Of course, by now the
| was a great mass of: buildings, thrilled at her excellent 1

@ On page 9.



people reduced to the size of an
on the Pierhead, then the build-
ings appeared ° smaller, with

vast hinterland of gresnery, and
then, just a mass of vegetation

sembling twisted macaroni and a
light houses diminisn«d to
cigarette size

Barbados, ‘the world” as it w
to the majority of us who he
; never travelled; Barbados, going
away from us, for it seemed mor
as if the land were moving than
the ship; like a big turtle with
moss, gravel and bits
matter on its back,
form of such a ycry pat-
tern, Then our island became just
a cloud, an outline, nothing stir-<





of waste
yet in the

pre*ty

ring on the surface Finally, it
was no more We were in the
middle of the ovcan, like a

island, the ship; completely sur-
rounded by water
Songs at Sea

By this time, everyone was
comfortable and feeling quite at
home. Then the singing started.
Led by our singers, Norma Gas-
kin and Neville Phillips, we sang
| songs old and yew, sentimental,
| calypsoes, mambos, even the good
‘old “Fiat Lux,” the Queen’s Col-
|lege School song. After dinn®r,





REVUEDEVILLE” Troupe at Piarco just before they left for home.





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PENDANTS, RINGS, EARRINGS, NECKLACES, BRACELETS
and BROOCHES

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AFTER STOCK-TAKING

WEDNESDAY OCT. Ist.

THROW-OUTS IN ALL DEPARTMENTS ... HALF PRICE
ENTIRE STOCK RIBBONS «+ HALF PRICT
COTTON, RAYON, SUITINGS, REMNANTS HALF PRICE
NEW DESIGNS PRINTED RAYONS storeseensene WO GIN



T. R. EVANS WHITFIELD’S BRANCH

‘PHONE 4220 YOUR SHOE STORE "PHONE 4220

~-—.



se



SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 1952



At The Cinema:

ADVENTU







RE DOWN UNDER

By G. Hs.

I HAVE often wondered why the more adventurous

and enterprising film directors have not realized the pos-

sibilities of picture-making

tance is no barrier nowadays

in Australia. After all, dis-

, and the vastness of that coun-

try together with its aborigines and fascinating anima!
life make a colourful background for adventure with a
flavour that is different. KANGAROO, now showing at the

Globe, filmed in Technicolor,

was shot entirely in Australia

and I, for one, found it extremely interesting.

Fundamentally,
an impressive drama of man
against nature, with the familiar
plot of criminal-posing-as-long-
lost-son superimposed. By con-
trast, the man-made plot seems
petty and at times, confusing
and rambling. It concerns twuo
criminals in Australia who, after
robbing and shooting the owner
of a gambling house, escape from
the police by joining forces with
a wealthy old ranch owner who
thinks one of them is his long.
lost son. Plotting to kill the old
man and divide his wealth, tbe
criminals’ plans go awry due to
a disastrous drought and saad.
storm, and the fact that the “son’
falls in love with his “sister.”

As you can see, it doesn’t amount
to much but the real interest and
power of the film lie in its por-
trayal of the vastness of the coun-
try itself. Through brilliant colour
photography, striking effects are
achieved of the barren, nakedness
ot the drought-stricken area, the
cracked earth and the parched
and brittle trees that look like
weird and evil skeletons against
the sky, There are rugged panor-
amic sequences of a cattle drive
that ends in a terrifying stampede,
shrouded in yellow dust; shots of
kangaroo, \wallabies ang dingoes
fleeing before a fire; a rain dance
executed by a group of aborigines,
decked out in nightmarish get-up

the picture



and finally a sandstorm, with a
wind velocity that threatens to
break the mill and cut off the

only source of water.

Maureen O’Hara, Richard Boone
and Finley Currie have the
principal roles, but the honours go
to Nature and the elements and
the dancing aborigines.

The descriptive musical score is
one of the most colourful I have
héard and at all times heightens
the action and the atmosphere of
the film. of

I am glad to be able to tell you
that I have been notified by the
manager of’ the Globe theatre that
the sound equipment has had a
complete overhaul and is in first-
class condition. 1 found this to be
the case when I saw KANGAROO

and IVANHOE last week, and
there is now no difficulty in un-
derstanding the dialogue,

BUGLES IN THE
AFTERNOON

Romance, adventure and a
smattering of history ride hand
in hand in BUGLES IN THE

AFTERNOON, a _ post-Civil War
Western, filmed in technicolor now
playing at the Plaza, Bridgetown.



MAUREEN OHARA

The story is based on the novel
by Ernest Haycox and deals with
the perils of a cavalry troop as-

to

protect the lives and







RAY MILLAND

property of the ear);
that time the Sioux Indians were
fighting against any further en-
croachment on their lands, and in
the film there are plenty of clash-

ettlers. At

es between the Cavalry and the
Redskins.
However, there is also a feud

between a captain and a sergean
who fas been stripped of his pre-

vious rank of captain, which be-
comes the main factor in the
larger hostilities, when the cap-

tain uses every means in his pow-
er to place the sergeant’s life in
danger. The climax comes when
both men fall in love with the
same girl and the captain delib-
erately sends the. N:C.O. into an
Indian ambush,

Ray Milland and Hugh Marlowe
head a highly efficient cast and
both are eminently suited to thei)
hard-riding, action roles, while
Helena Carter gives a charmingly
poised performance the girl
they both love,
Good production and deft direc-
tion together with magnificent
scenery and an all-round com-
petent cast lift this film above the
average Western, and it abounds
in hard action, bitter fighting and
some. of the fastest riding I have
seen,

PLL GET YOU FOR THIS

A continental thriller with
plenty cf action, (LL. GET YOU
Â¥OR THIS is based on the novel

as

by James Hadley Chase, with
George Raft in the leading role.
It is good to see Mr, Raft back

again, after a long absence, and
this time he plays a smooth, suave
Amercian gambler who goes to the
Italian Riviera for a holiday, and
is promptly framed for the murder
of a U.S. Secret Agent who. has
been making things difficult for
a ring of counterfeiters.

With him is Coleen Gray, a
young actress who played her
undemanding part well. Charles
Goldner, whom I have not seen
before, plays the mysterious
character of Massine, and it is not
until near the end that one is
quite sure on which side of the
fence he is sitting! Mr. Goldner
is a first-rate character actor and
skilfully avoids any overacting in
his role. An interesting‘ child
member of the cast is Enzo Staiola
who made his name in the Italian
film, “The Bicycle Thief”. Young
Enzo has a natural acting ability
that is out of the ordinary and be-
cause of his talent, his part was
specially written into the script.
He plays a shoe-shine boy with
mischievious impishness together
with warmth and loyalty for the
man who befriends him, George
Raft gives a good sound perform-
ance and just to remind us of the

ee









POULTRY
OTES

If you keep laying hens you
want eggs. You ought to get be-
tween 180 and 200 eggs from each
pullet in its first year of laying.
You should get a dozen eggs from
less than six pounds of feed. Ob-
viously you are not going to get
these results from ordinary hens,
These notes are not written for
these who keep hens without any
thought for management, feed, or

for any other reason than the
hope of getting something for
nothing. They are intended to
help those of you who are in-
terested in poultry keeping to
make a profit from keeping
poultry the right way. The sug-

gestions contained in these notes
are based on proper research and
are -not the individual ideas of
a private poultry man.

That is why the greatest stress
is laid on selection of birds, feed-
ing and management.

Your pullets must be selected
for bred-in ability to lay, not be-
cause you take a faney to any
particular type of bird. Keep
whatever type of bird you fancy

oe all means but do not expect
the

same results -you would get

from a bird with bred-in ability
5 to lay

Having obtained birds with

bred-in ability to lay and having
raised them on a_ proper feeding
programme as outlined last week,
you will need to house them com-
fortably.

The size of the house will de-
pend on the number of hens you
keep. A house of any size should
provide space for the hens to
scratch in the laying
compartments, water ar-
rangements for drop-
pings.

megasse,
roosts,
pit

and a



Each

pace

bird should have a_ roost
between 7 and 9 inches
depending on its variety, Obvious-
ly a light bird will require less
pace than a heavy bird. Cocks
of course are not kept with hens,
toost poles should be between 12
and 15 inches apart.

Pits ought to be provided under
the roosts. Some poultry keepers
put wire under the roosts to
isolate the droppings from the
remainder of the megasse

Others put the roosts in such
a position that the droppings fall
outside the house. This is ob-
viously the best system to adopt
since it keeps the house clean
and the manure can easily be
collected bagged and sold to gar-
deners.

Fowl manure is excellent for
vegetable or flower gardens.
One hundred hens will drink

between 5 and 8 gallons of water
daily. Their rate of consumption
depends on their output of eggs
and the weather. The hotter it
is the more water they will re-
quire,

Many types of nests are used.
Some poultry keepers build
simple open nest boxes inside the
house: others have covered nest
boxes projecting outside the
house. The latter are to be recom-
mended because the eggs can be
collected from outside without dis-
turbing the hens. Remember to
put sufficient straw or fibre to
avoid breakages: fibre from cocoa-
nut or palm trees makes a good
nest. One nest is necessary for
each seven hens but if trap nests
are used there should be one for
each four hens,



old days, he dances the tango with
Coleen Gray, and I can assure you
that he has lost none of the lithe
grace that characterized his danc-
ing in “Bolero.”

All the loeation scenes are shot

in Italy and the subterranean
dungeons under a prison are a
grim backdrop for the climatic

chase that results in the capture
of the counterfeiters.

|

Shaves can be
close and
notoriously
uncomfortable |

Whereas PAL’S HOLLOW GROUND BLADE with extra sharp

durable edge, gives a cleaner, smoother, more

comfortable and always closer shave - it fits
all popular double-edged safety razors.

PAL

Sole Agents:

K. R. Hunte & Co., Lid., Bridgetown 5°FOR 43 CENTS

HOLLOW GROUND BLADES i



SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Farm and Garden

By AGRICOLA

WE ARE in a critical
justifiably so, It

is frequently



AGAIN
mood to-day and, we think
said that the average

Barbadian abroad is alert and purposeful, with a natural

robustuess of spirit—all of

which usually make him or

her an asset in any community where action is needed
Are those who have helped to generate such desirable
qualities maintaining the output at the same high leve! at

home?

B. B. C. Radio
Notes

BBC SCHEDULES FOR
NEW QUARTER

Wavelength and Programme
Changes

28th. September
new quarter

changes in

On
the

Sunday,
BBC begins a
and there are a few
the current schedule; the main
difference for listeners in this
area will be in the wavelengths
beamed here, The 19 metre trans-
mission disappears and a new one
in the 49 metre band makes its
appearance. The complete list is
given below



4.00 p.m. to 6.15 p.m. (25.53
metres, 11.75 megacycles,

6.15 p.m. to 7.45 p.m, (31.32
netres, 9.58 megacycles.

5 p.m, to 11,00 p.m. (49.71
6.035 megacycles

Among the changes
grammes noticed is
Questions’ which will
the air at 10.30 p.m. on Wednes-
days but by and large the
chedule programmes remains

7
metres,
of pro-
‘Twenty
now be on

of

ve same though a few new ones
make their appearance includ-
ing Charlie Kunz at the piano

who will be heard on Tuesdays at

£.00 p.m. and on Fridays at 4.15
p.m. “In Town To-night” also
returns to the air and can be

heard on Saturdays at 6.15 p.m.

R. B. Cunninghame Graham

One of the feature programmes
from London in the coming week
is the story of Robert Bontine
Cunninghame Graham, the almost
legendary figure who was called
“the most picturesque Scot of this
time’—1852-1936. The programme
commemorating the centenary of
Cunninghame Graham’s birth, has
been written by a fellow Scot,
Robert Kemp, with James Mc
Kechnie as ‘Don Reberto.’ Don
Roberto, R. B. Cunninghame
Graham was a Scottish laird who
looked like a Spanish Grandee
He was also, says Robert Kemp,
‘an exquisite writer of the English
language, a peerless horseman, a
master among the fencers of
Paris, an intrepid voyager through
the forbidden lands of Islam,
Liberal Member at Westminster,
co-founder of the Labour Party
in Seotland, a South American
pioneer and later historian, and
Scottish Nationalist!’ The broad-
cast will be on the air at 9.00
p.m, on Monday, 29th. Sept, and
at 5.15 p.m. on Friday, 3rd. Oc-
tober.

Toscanini Concert

In the BBC’s G.O.S. in the
coming week Toscanini will con-
duct the Philharmonia Orchestra
in two all-Brahms concerts from
the Royal Festival Hall, London
Unfortunately only Part II of the
second concert will be beamed to
us. That you can hear at 4,20
p.m. on Wednesday October 1st.
preceded by a talk “Toscanini Re-
turns to Britain,’ The response in
Britain to the news that Toscanini
was to conduct in London was so
great that tickets were allocated
by ballot. By the closing day there
were 60,000 applications for the
5,844 seats in the Festival Hall,

Talk by U.C.W.1. Registrar

“Caribbean Voices” on Sunday
28th. Sept. will present an entire-
ly new type of broadcast—a
Script of a talk recently given on
Radio Jamaiea by Hugh Springer
ee

We pose this question since th
conditions generally obtaining i
Bridgetown in regard to the er-
posure and sale of a wide variety
et foods, including fruits ind
vegetables, make it appear that a
state of complacency afflicts the
public mind and permits accep-
tance of a set of conditions which
no modern State or City would
long tolerate

Last week-end, while the Agri-
cultural Society was making a
strong appeal for 1 system of
efficicnt marketing which would
climinate the bad _ features of
huckstering under the
set-up and which, at the same
time, would enable the display
ot foodstuffs under strictly san-
itary conditions, some disgusting
ights could be witnessed in the
open, uncontrolled market area
which .infest the City The un-
fortunate thing is that these
market sights are encroaching on

existing

every kerb or corner without any
suggestion of civic beauty Such
a Sige as now developing at the



fountain garden area, for example
where there is a bus stop and cai

park. Here, as elsewhere, there
are vendors of fruit, vegetables
and confections of one kind o1
another uncovered as usual

together with the custemary
unsightly paraphernalia nd in-
cluding hangers-o , un
employed and the |! « » are
fast becoming pul anee
Whatever effort is d y the

Civic Circle and its band ot
workers to maintain some measur
of the aesthetic is in danger otf
being spoiled or vitiated by ig
sort of crudeness, so thoughtles:ly
and needlessly pursued.

But, the conditions which we
saw with our own eyes on the
Friday afternoon in question ‘n
the theatre area, Probym Street
and vicinity were simply shock
ingy We stopped to collect some
fruit’and végetables amid refuse,

fruit skins, empty coconut shells.
insanitary drains and other eye-
sores Worse was yet to come
Open bread carts and cake trays,
packed high with bread and cakes,
were just thickly covered with
flies which were so numerous }r
some cases as to remind one of
the old fashioned currant loaves
long since passed into oblivion
The danger lies in the ease with

which we can get accustomed to
a state of affairs which may nut
only blur the vision of better
things, but operate unknowingly
to prejudice health and prevent
us from benefiting to the fullest
from those natural resources of

climate and other amenities with
which the island is so exquisitely
and generously blessed

What are we going to do about
it? There is a good deal of tal
ebout the tourist trade and its
value to the island, but, surely,
Bridgetown is no place to capture
the imagination of tourists
visitors under prevailing condi-
tions. Ifa Mayor and Corporation
could put an end effectively to the
existing laissez faire, let us make
the change as speedily as possible
The robustness of spirit that we
spoke about previously was never
more needed to re-inforce actively
and persistently th® jnitiative of
such bodies, working in the public
interest and welfare, as the Agri-
cultural Society, the Horticultura?!
Society, the Civic Circle, Health
Commissioners, the Tourist Com
mittee and the Advocate new
paper

of Barbados, Registrar of the
University College of the West
Indies. This is followed by re-
views of recent local publications.
It begins at 7.15 p.m.



and

eS

GARDENING
HINTS FOR
AMATEURS

The September rains have been
very welcome, for most gardens
were parched and dry.

Its astonishing what a differ-

ence a little rain will make to the
appearance of a garden. Plants
that looked peaky before the rain
eem to fill out in a magical way,
and grass that was brown, and
apparently dead turns green over-
night.

September is. an in-between
‘ime in gardening, and there is
little planting to be done. But beds
yust be weeded and turned up
as usual, grass cut, and the usual
routine jobs of a garden done,
for woe betide any slacking or
sitting back, for such an attitude

always dearly paid for, Noth-
ing gets out of order quicker than
a garden if it is neglected for
even a week. Yet a garden that
is in perfect order, needs the
minimum of daily work to keep
it always looking nice.

Zinnias are. still flowering in
full force in many gardens, and
lovely they are too, their clear
bright colours ave a joy to see,

The Flamboyant trees, that a
few weeks ago were a mass of
crimson flowers, are now in full
leaf again, and, with their grace-

ful feathery foliage look like
bunehes of lovely green ostrich
feathers, nearly as beautiful as

when they were flowering. These
trees certainly beautify the
island, and should be planted
wherever possible, especially in

ublic gardens or open = spaces.
They ar very quick growing, fou

three foot saplin will grow into

sturdy little tree at eighteen
nonths old, And when three years
cold it is giving shade and flower-
ing. These trees eventually grow
an immense size, and make
excellent shade trees,

Sometimes in a garden a barrier
is needed to divide one part from
another, or perhaps to edge one
level of ground from a lower
level, For this purpose a low
rubble wall is the answer and it
will be found simple and inex-
pensive to make. This type of
wall is left rough and unplastered,
and if liked it can be made with
pockets in which when they are

to

filled with earth verbena, little
daisy, or similar plants can be
planted,

fo make such a wall no cement
is needed, for the stones are put
together with lime mortar. Now
there are two kinds of lime, one
kind is used for washing walls,
and the other kind is called
builders lime. The kind to use for
your wall is Builders Lime. You
will need a quantity of broken
coral stone of different sizes,
Actual quantities of these two
materials depend of course on the
length of wall that is to be built.

Begin by digging out a shallow
foundation of a few inches deep.
Some people do not even do this
but place the stones on the ground,
providing of course that the
ground is reasonably flat, It is
wiser however to dig a shallow
foundation, Now mix tihe lime
with water until a thick mortar
is. formed,

Having done this select the
largest stones and place them in
the shallow foundation for the
bottom of the wall,

Proceed by building up the wall
with the rest of the stones, put-
ting them together and fitting
them together small and large
with dolops of the lime mortar
placed in between shaping the
wall with straight sides and flat
top, A wall of this kind should
be kept within the limits (more
or less) of two feet high by 1 ft.
wide,

To build a much higher wall
would be risky as it has not the
strength of cement

Yet a rubble wall, built with
jime mortar will last for many
years. After the staring white-
ness has gone, and the stones
have become weathered, it makes
a very attractive addition to a
garden



NOTICE |

WE BEG TO REMIND OUR

CUSTOMERS AND THE

th 4 |

GENERAL PUBLIC THAT

OUR HARDWARE DEPT.

SALES DEPT.

ELECTRIC SERVICE DEPT.

PIERHEAD
AND THE

CORNER STORE

WILL BE CLOSED FOR

STOCK - TAKING

WEDNESDAY Ist.

N.B.--Our Lumber Yard and Syrup Store
will be open as_ usual

i MANNING’

ON

AND

a& C€O..

TUESDAY 30th SEPT.

OCT.

LTD.








\f you feel worn ous, depressed, or
generally run down a glass or two a day of
Buckfast Tonic Wine will quickly restore: lost
energy and tone up the whole nervous system,
Giving new vitality it fortifies you against fever
and exhaustion and remember, Buckfast Tonle
Wine is especially valuable after iliness,

eeeatees %

BUCKFAST






You, too, can go i for

INNER
CLEANLINESS

There’s an easy way to achieve |
the fitness you admire so much in -
others. Just make sure of your /nner
Cleanliness by taking Andrews!

Sparkling Andrews dispels slug-
gishness, helps you not only to work
well, but to enjoy your leisure to the
full, Andrews acts by freshening the
mouth and tongue, settling the
stomach and toning up the liver.
Finally, Andrews gently clears the
bowels,

For a “ fizzy”, refreshing drink,
use one teaspoonful of Andrews in
a glass of water,

DO YOU KNOW why your head aches when your systewt’s
out-of-order ? Gases given off by fermenting food wastes are
absorbed by the blood-stream and carried to the brain. They
cause headaches, irritability and lassitude. Andrews keeps
your system free from harmful wastes, and general health ts
much improved, thanks to Inner Cleaniiness.

erreavescort

~ ——s

ANDRE Ws





DURING

ANNUAL
STOCK-TAKIN

; AT

THE BARBADOS CO-OP
COTTON FACTORY LTD.

The Lumber, Hardware, Plantation Supplies
and Oil Mill departments will be closed
on the dates shown:

LUMBER & PLANTATION SUPPLIES f
Monday, September 29th and Tuesday, 30th

HARDWARE

Monday, September 29th, Tuesday, 30th, and *
Wednesday, Ist Octoher

OIL MILL

Wednesday, Ist October, Closed Morning Only.
(Deliveries from 12.00 — 4.00 p.m.)

Our Office will remain OPEN over this period
for PAYMENT OF ACCOUNTS.

BARBADOS CO-OP.
COTTON FACTORY LTD.





PAGE FOUR

SUNDAY

ARE THE INDIANS KEEN
ON W.L. TOUR ?

Intercolonial Yachting And Table
| Tennis Soon
_ (By ©. S. COPPIN)

HE latest grape-vine news flash in
Indians to the West Indies is to the effect that
are now being made that, should these rur
| necessitate a complete reorientation of perspective
| tour itself,
It is claimed that the Indians, who in all their previous negotia-
have never mentioned the possibility of a tour to Pakistan, have
decided *o tour Pakistan before they leave for the West Indies
| There is no question that they Will now tour Pakistan before they
come to the West Indies, if this second tour materialises at’ all, since
| this information has been given in the Cricketer and in addition it
| states that Pakistan has been accorded Test match status.

| A TEST SERIES NOW
Good mornings begin: with Gillette

ALL OVER THE WORLD

connection with the visit of the
certain stipula-
nours be true, wil
with regard to the

| Lions

| tion
;now



VEN if the Indians considered the Pakistan visit in the light of

a goodwill tour for political and other reasons before, they will

now have to give it the importance and weight equal to that of a tour
to England, Australia, the West Indies or any other member of the
Imperial Cricket Conference.
We must now relate this information to the background that con-
tains the fact that the Indians have just fulfilled a six months’ tour
of England and will have to play another Test series before they
come to the West Indies and it also means that they will be undertak-
ing three tours in the course of less than a year
Two of these tours will take place under tropical conditions

is too much for even a team that comprises six Hercules
sons, minus of course the Delilahs, tar less ordinary

Though the Eskimo lives
in the cold all his days,
For Blue Gillette shaving
there’s warmth in his praise.

This
and five Sam-
normal mortals.

If the above is correct there is little cause for surprise at other
, * '
He knows when he’s using rumours contingent upon this assumption that the Indians have asked
first to be flown out if they are too late for the tentative steamship
the sharpest edge made, arrangements made because of their Pakistan commitment, and sti#pu-

late that there should be one day’s res

FEARING

t during ‘each

FATIGUE ?

Test match.
Gillette is the name

HIS last request is an obvious admission of possible fatigue and
for both razor and blade. is certainly a Be v departure from established custom. I do
not even know whether it is legal assuming that the West Indies
; ‘ | Cricket Board of Cont! ol was simple enough to allow it
With Gillette, coo! customers Should a Sunday intervene cricket in these parts will not be
over enjoy smooth, played but let us assume that the particular day, say the third, fourth
the world ' J . or fifth day of any Test match should be a rest day and it falls on a
money-saving shaves, There Thursday or Saturday, this would then play havoc with the gate
is no blade so sharp and receipts. a , To ih hci encsiateat
that taste 86 long 4s ARE THE INDIANS INTERESTED ?
ene THAt TASS ve THINK that at this stage we should ask ourselves, are the Indians

Blue Gillette. And they

genuinely interested in coming to the West Indies, this winter?
always use a Gillette Razor as

If so will they be able to give of their best? Can we afford to risk
$144,000 if there is a strong possibility that in the circumstances the



well. Because razor and blade tour might not be a success?
e or each other. These are questions which must be answered truthfully and
5 Blades 30 are made for eac promptly if the West Indies are to plan their programme for the

| future.
While they are dillydallying we might well be going ahead with

| making preparations for an Intercolonial tournament with Trinidad

| and for our tour of Canada next year.

|

NO REASON FOR DELAY

' PHERE is no justification for procrastination when delay might
result not only ir the cancellation of the Indian tour but might

make it impossible for us to make arrangements in time for our own

domestic Quadrangular tournamenis that must naturally constitute

the best means of assessing the merits of players who might be re-

quired for the tour of Canada.

} I see that there will be an official release this week rym the W.I

Cricket Board. We are looking forward to it in the hope that we are

| going to receive some authentic information concerning the present

position of West Indies cricket and commitments.

My congratulations this week go out to the members of the Carl-
ton Club for their magnificent effort in erecting a pavilion last week,
the like of which cannot be seen in any of the other British West
Indian colonies I have visited so far as a single club is concerned.

The pavilion is a monument to the combined effort, vision and
| enthusiasm of the Carlton members who have set a standard of team
| Spirit deserving of emulation by other clubs of the older standing.

MIGHT HAVE HAD HELP — BUT!!!

One cannot gainsay the fact that propitious circumstances might
have helped considerably to bring the Carlton hopes and plans to
;}such a happy fruition but they were certainly not content to wrap
| their pound in a napkin. They got going and the result must have
| gladdened the hearts of even the most confirmed pessimist among
them.

Modernity and utility are the outstanding characteristics of the
new pavilion that includes an excellent dance flogr and bar as well.
It is a self-contained unit that affords more facilities for its members
than any other club of its type in the island.

WEIGHTLIFTERS FOR TRINIDAD
HE Barbados Amateur Weightlifting Association is sending a team
to Trinidad to-morrow to compete with a similar
Trinidad.

The team has been selected after a series of elimination contests
and should therefore represent the best that we are able to put in the
field at present,

It includes experienced competitors in the persons of Jackman,
Webster and Rogers but they on the other hand will meet opposition
spearheaded with the recent Olympic Bronze medallists Wilkes and

Blue Gillette Blades

TRADE ENQUIRIES TO: T. GEDDES GRANT LIMITED







Your mair appears caressable
«kissable...




, Co : team in
with spettin cB
PALMOLIVE BRILLANTINE! __ppearne:

Be doubl! hhinie eoft,..cat 1 by | Whatever the results may be I think that it will be generally con-
e doubly sure your hair is ..-caressable...easy

} ceded that an Association which has only been formed two years ago

manarce by using Palmetive Brillantine the DOUBLE ean send away a team to compete with Trinidad is deserving of praise.
& 2

USE Way:



We can only wish them good luck and good lifting.

TRINIDAD TORNADOES COMING

The Trinidad team of three yachts with their skippers are expected

here by the M.V. Willemstad of the Royal Netherlands Steamship

Company who have again kindly consented to transport the tornadoes,
freight free.

There will ‘be a series of five Intercolonial races between the six

tornadoes representing the two colonies. The sixth and final race

will be open to all tornadoes.

| As soon as the dates of the Intercolonial races have been

| they will be published,

As an Oil for Massages: Before washing hair,
massage scalp briskly with Palmolive Brillantine.
Leave oil on scalp for 10 minutes and then wash,
‘This massage helps remove dandruff... prepare
scalp for perfect cleansing.






fixed

To Comb and Perfume Hair: Put






The present test series in preparation for the

. te 7 ont selection of the Barbados boats is still extremely interesting,
ak a little Palmolive Brillantine in the - Vamoose heads the list with 40 points and they follow in this
> palm of the hand, Rub hands 4 order Edril 36 points, Fury 31, Thunder 29, Comet 28. From the
r together; smooth over hair. And ‘NE y above it can be seen that Vamoose will definitely win the series ond

Edril will take second place.
The third place position with to-day’s race to go and the final
race next Sunday, might easily be taken by either of the three boats
and consequently it is safe to predict that there will be a keen tussle
in the last two races for third place on the team.
The seventh race takes place to-day at 10,30
race next Sunday at the same time,

TENNIS TEAM INVITED TO TRINIDAD
Barbados Table Tennis Association and members will be proud to
learn of the remarks which Dy, Noble Sarkar, captain of the Trinidad
team which recently visited Barbados, made on their behalf at the
Annual General meeting of the San Fernando Zone Committee of
the Trinidad and Tobago Amateur Table Tennis Association. He
said: ‘Me Barbados Table Tennis Association and the people gen-

comb! aN nA

Then, notice the dancing highlights...
the beautiful grooming of your hair!

PALMOLIVE
BRILLANTINE

a.m. and the final



ADVOCATE

YESTERDAY'S CRIC ‘KET:



SPARTAN W IN OUTRIGHT
AGAINST WANDERERS

SPARTAN secured their
defeated Wanderers by an

they

vesterday, the last day of

atch

third outright_victory when
innings and 104 runs
their First Division Cricket

at the Bay, Beckles Road. The small crowd which

went to witness the end, saw Frank King, Barbados pace

take

bowler,
sec

the last two

Frank King ended up with an
tt tive bowling analysis of 11

overs, three maidens, 35 runs and







six wickets in the Wanderers sec-
ond inni which ended at 112
runs. S. Griffith took two wickets
for 24 runs in six overs.

When play. began yesterday
Wanderers were 110 runs for the
loss of eight wickets in their
second innings at the end of play
on thesecond day with R. Lawless

out 20 and L, St. Hill not
26
I.. St. Hill who went at number
th Wanderers batting
s undefeated with 26 runs.
r rbs scored 23 while two
of the Wanderers batsmen failed
tc core in tt econd innings.

Lawless carried his seore to 22
before he was brilliantly caught by

rmie Smith behind the wicket off
the bowling of K and T. Peirce



who followed him
King for a duck

was bowled by
and the Wander-





ers second innings ended at 112
runs.

On the first day of play, Spartan
began their first innings on a per-
fect wicket and scored 288 runs
with th chie scorer being
L. F. Harris 63, Smith 49, and
K. Bowen 38. Louis St. Hill was
the most , impressiv bowler.
This slow left arm bowler took
six of the Spartan wickets for
73 runs in 25 overs and West
Indian test player Denis Atkinson

bowling medium to fast took two
tor 64 in 21 overs.

But on the second day of play
Wanderers were unfortunate to
find an impaired wicket and in

Wanderers wickets in their

nd innings in the first and only over of the day.

their first venture at the wicket
they were skittled out for 72 runs,
their collapse due mainly to some
steady bowling by pacer Phillips
who took four for 32 and Frank
King three for 28 in 11 overs and
three balls. ‘

Erie Atkinscn was the only
batsman that stood up to the at-
tack and he scored 27 while R.
Lawless got 13. Failing to save the
follow-on, Wanderers scored 110

runs for 8 wickets befcre an
appeal for light was successfully
supheild.

Yesterday Wanderers added two

runs to their overnight score of
110.

Scores :
partan’s Fest Innings one
Wanderers First Innings 73

WANDERERS-—2nd INNINGS



D. Evelyn c Atkins b F. King
J u run out a
E nson c Bowen b F. King 4
Dd kinson c Bowen b F. Phillips 8
W. Knowles 1.b.w. b F. King 2
G. Proverbs c King b S. Griffith 23
D. Lawless c L. Harris b F. King 18
D. Mayers b S. Griffith 4
R. Lawless c (wk. Smith) b F
King - «2
L. St. Hill not out 26
T. N. Firce b King °. )
Extras 0
Total 112

Fall of wickets, 1 for 4, 2 for 7, 3 for

12, 4 for 17, 5 for 19, 6 for 51, 7 for €3
8 for 65; 9 for 112
BOWLING ANALYSIS
° M R Ww

F. King 11 3 35 6
F. Phillips 8 1 34 1
S. Griffith 6 24 2
N. Harrison 1 1
L. F. Harris 1 3
K. Bowen i 15



Roberts Wins
Challenge Cup

@ From page 1
for presenting the prizes and Mr.
Bowen for having presented the

cup on behalf of his firm.
Presenting the report of the
Club, Mr. Roberts said: “As club
ain of the Barbados Small
Rifle Club I have much
pleasure in welcoming among us
this afternoon Mr, F. L. Griffith
who has kindly consented to pre-
nt the prizes, unfortunately Mr.
Griffith has been unable to take an
active part in this sport for some



time, but we shall look forward to
seeing him on the ranges in the

not two distant future. Mr, Grif-
fith has presented this Club with a
beautiful challenge cup which has
been competed for for the first
tirne during these competitions and
will be presented to the winner of
the Grand Aggregate.

At the beginning of this year
the new lighting system was in-
stituted and has proved to be a
complete success and I think that
every one will agree that it has
been generally conducive to better
scoring, Seven spoon shodts were
held during the year. An addi-
tional Rifve was purchased during
the year which has considerably
reduced the congestion with the
result that members are now able
to put in more practices. The 1951





Overseas Postal Match was shot
for during the latter part of the
year when we made a score of

1,524 points this score was very
much lower than was anticipated
1nd every effort must be made to
better it this year. The following
are the results which have just
been received
Ist Jamaica
medals,
2nd Trinidad-—1é
3rd Kenya—15
4th Falkland 1
5th Barbados—1,524.
The attendance during the year
was favourable but leaves room
for improvement and it is hoped

1,578 Cup and 8




that members will make every
effort to attend more regularly.
The annual competition start-

ed on Sunday the 21st and for the
first time in the History of the

Club a competition was held at
100 yards and judging from the
high scores and keeness of mem-
bers I feel sure that it will be
essential to have regular prac-
tices at this range in future.

The usual competition was
held for the regiment and was
won by Pte. J. F. Ward “B” Coy
with a score of 88 and the event
for the Cadets being won by
2/Lt. L. K. Hinds of Harrison
College with a score of 91 Capt.
S. G. Weatherhead is the winner
of Event No. 10 and will receive
the Col Connell Challenge Cup.
Mr. T. A. L. Roberts must be
congratulated on emerging cham-
pion shot of the Meeting by win-
ning the Grand Aggregate with
a creditable score of 488 and will
receive the F, L. Griffith Challenge
Cup and Miniature. The weather
throughout these competitions
has been favourable, scoring has
been on a very high standard re-
sulting in the keenest rivalry
amongst the competitors and I
may safely say that the meeting
has been a very successful one.

I would like to thank The Bai-
bados Regiment, the Press and
@ll those who have assisted in
making this meeting/a_ success
and last but by no means the
least — would like to mention our
old friend Cpl. Luke, our range
attendant, whose tiresome job it
is to change targets etc., and is
always willing to give a hand
when there is work to be done.

Before I ask Mr. F. L. Griffitn
to present the prizes I would like
to mention that at the cénclusion
of the presentation of prizes Mr.
Bowen of Messrs, Y. DeLima
will present this Club with a
Challenge Cup on behalf of his
firm for competition among the
Leewerd and Windward Islands.

Major Warren as Chairman of
the Council of the Barbados
Small Bore Rifle Club thanked
Mr. Griffith for attending that





erally, by the fine

unrivalled hospitality in the

arrangements made in the first instance and the
second,

made everyone feel most com-

fortable and gave his team a most enjoyable time.

The Committee decided to invite a Barbados tabl@ tennis team
to the South Trinidad in 1953 but have not yet fixed a date.













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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 1952

RACING NOTES

By BEN BATTLE

HE B.T.C. announced its Provisional Programme for the November

Meeting during the week. On the whole, it showed signs of
having considerably more thought devoted to it than was the case
with the August Programme, and the dilemma of having too few
horses for a four-day meeting but too many for a three was sensibly
met. The races are framed along lines similar to those suggested in
last week’s notes, and, considering the way the horses likely to run
are distributed among the various classes, there is really little ta

criticise.
THE D AND C CLASS RACES

HE weak point of the programme, as it was bound to be, is the
three races which have been framed for both the D’s and G's
As I pointed out last week to frame less was to make certain that no
outsiders would make the trip, but the alternative is that we may
find ourselves with 6 races on the card which will fail both as spec-
tacles and as mediums for attracting punters. The paucity of the
G class is of course beyond anyone's ability to control, but the D Class
situation has been aggravated over the years by the policy of promot-~
ing creoles into C. It may be thought that I am labouring this point
unduly, but it requires driving home repeatedly if the situation is
ever to improve.

The annoying thing about the whole question is the attitude of
those owners whose D and E class animals are not promoted. They,
without hesitation, rejoice at the promotion of their rivals into C
but that this is a shortsighted view can readily be demonstrated
The present programme in fact shows clearly what the outcome will
be. The three races framed for the D class cannot be justified by the
number of probable entrants, and unless the unexpected occurs, and
two or three horses from Trinidad are sent up, we shall find our-
selves, as we did in August, with three and four horse fields. Such
races apart from being disappointing to watch, cannot attract the
betting man and the Turf Club loses on them the amount represented
by diminished Pari and forecast turnover and by reduced numbers
of entrance fees. That the club is in no position to subsidise racing
of this kind is self evident, and the eventual result will be that D
class racing will be cut down to two races per meeting. When that
occurs the opportunity for those horses remaining in D will be small
no matter where their better rivals have been sent.

If indeed the Classifiers are going to cadntinue to set a limit io
the amount of races which they are prepared to allow a good creole
to win before it must be pushed into C class, then the only alterna-
tive would appear to me to be the demotion of the worst horses in
the C Class. No doubt this will cause a raising of eyebrows among
the old guard, but this system works tolerably well in B.G., and I?
for one doubt that much harm would be done to the prospect of
creoles where horses like Tiberian Lady, Embers, and Mabouya are

allowed to run in D class,
NO TROPHIES

S I have said the Provisional Pragramme calls for more compli-

ment than criticism. I was impressed for instance by the fore-
thought which had gone into the placing of G Class races at the head
of each day’s card. They are not likely to attract big fields and it is
proven to run them when attendance and betting tend to be low in
any case.

On the debit side of the ledger, is the lack of Trophies. With
the exception of the Trumpeter Cup, not a single one is offered and,
sympathetic as I am towards the difficulties with which those who
guide the financial affairs of the Turf Club are beset, I cannot believe
that it is impossible for them to provide a Trophy for the winner of
the South Caribbean Stakes at the very least. Even if this were to
be the case, it is incredible to me that not a single firm in Bridgetown
ean be found to whom the prestige and the advertisement of provid~
ing such a prize would not appeal. Failing this an approach might be
made to the various Bloodstock Agencies in the U.K. from whom so
many of our important horses are obtained. I should feel happier
if I knew that the Turf Club was at any rate actively exploring all
avenues. It is not a matter which deserves the complacency at
present accorded it.

THE TRINIDAD CLASSIFICATION

HE PUBLICATION of the T.T.C. official classification list serves

to emphasise both the enormous stride taken by racing in our
sister colony and the problems which must confront them. A total
of sixty-three horses are listed in C2 alone and it will obviously be
a most difficult task to discover stabling accommodation for even a
small proportion of the total number classified, The framing of a
programme in which starting will not be a nightmare, is another
problem and the current rumour is that five days will be needed to
accomplish this. In the circumstances there is little that the Barbados
stables who hope to make the trip down-at Christmas can do except
keep their fingers erossed.










afternoon and _ presenting the
prizes. He said that Mr, Griffith
nad been interested in rifle shoot-
ung all his life and he knew that

was sure the cup would go a
long way in creating that inter-
est. There were several of the
smaller islands who had started

one of his (Mr. Griffith's) regrets clubs recently and they were
was that he was unable to take hoping that by having competi-
un active part in shooting now- tion, they would reach the

a-days.

He also thanked Mr. Griffith
for presenting the cup which was
won by Mr. Roberts. He said that
that cup had a history behind it
because it was presented to Mr.
Griffith when he was a member
of the Barbados Miniature Rifle

standard of the bigger colonies
like Jamaica who seemed to win
everything in the Small Bore
Rifle Class.

Major Warren also regretted the
absence of Major Cave who had
promised to present the prizes,
but was unable to do so having



Club as far back as 1912, He as- to go to the Hospital through
sured Mr. Griffith that they would j!lness, He hoped that his condi-
treasure it and that it would be tion was nothing serious and
awarded to the winner of the that he would be out and among
grand aggregate at future meet- them soon again.
Angs.

Mr. Griffith thanked Major | e e
Warren for his kind remarks Auto Racing

and said that he would do every-
thing in his power to foster and
encourage rifle shooting in Bar-
bados.

He regretted very much that
Major Cave was unable to attend
due to illness and said that he
was very pleased when he was
asked to come and distribute the

Calendar

PARIS, Sept. 27.
The _ International Sporting
Commission of International Au-
tomobile Association today issued

the following calendar of eventa
of the 1953 season:—

prizes. He hoped everyone had January 18—Argentine Grand
an enjoyable evening ian again oe wk, 3—Lisbon Circuit.
promised that he would do every- Itix i re Grand
thing to further the interest of pyix’ ; Ay SGccdndiconmelis sete,
rifle shooting. June 7—Dutch Grand Prix.

Mr. Harold Bowen then pre- June 21—Belgian Grand Prix.
en. the De Lima Cup to Mr. july 18—British Grand Prix.

August 2—German Grand Prix
September 11 to 13—Norway’s
Viking Rally. September 13—
Italian Grand Prix. October 26
—Spanish Grand Prix. November
19 to 20 Mexico’s Pam-American
Race. —U.P.

Major Warren on behalf of tne
Club thanked Mr. Bowen for
presenting the cup and said that
members of the Small Bore Rifle
Club had been trying to awaken
éaterest in rifle shooting and he








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. e Gee ea

ne PRESERVATIVE





pte

a





FABLE TENNIS:

Greenidge,

Gill 1952

Finalists





na

one

Wwe € \
c ‘ ?
: j
i on

G iste

Ld pow i orehand smashes,
constantly pierced his opponent’
defene i th ighout the set
thefe were many ralli which
the I entertained to
sor spectacul retur by We
rel) Chopping wi cour cy,
Worrell red m beautiful
smashes, but Greenidge, ch anging
his tactics in the final gar pro-
duced something extra which

assured his victory

Norman Gill of Everton defeat-
ed his teamate Blair Murray in
the other semi-final. Murray was
brilliant in spells, but the relent-
less attack the ‘Everton
Smasher’ broke through his de-
fence.

of

Best Performance



Ruth Williams of Queen's Col-
lege, in what may be cons dered
as her best perf lane ated
Betty Carrington Her smashing
Was extiemely accurate Miss
Carrington is steady, and a]-
though she wor the hiy im
in fin tyle eemed unuble to
producy match-winni orm
gainst this relentiess attack

In the other semi-final Marion

Manning lost to Joyce Clarke in

cne of the hardest fought matches.
nus





M Manning who was suffering
from a leg injury, was unable to
play the fast half-volley game,
and Miss Clark realising this,
used this tactic to defeat her
Mixed Doubles

In the mixed doubles Miss N.

Hall and L. Worrell in a keenly

contested match defeated Miss M.



Manning and R. Herbert. Miss B.
Carrington and N. Gill easily de-
leated Miss R. Williams and R.
Philips, 3—). The Everton
player’s consistent smashi com-
pletely overwhelmed hi uppo-
nents. The Finals will be played
on Thursday October 2nd at 8.00
p.m. His Excellency the Govern-
or and Lady Savage will poe
present The Matches are as
follows:—

Ladies: R. Williams vs. J.
Clarke.

Men's; N. Gill \ ( Green-
idge

Men's Doubles M. R. Phillips
and L. Worrell vs. C. Greenidg
and E. Goodridge.

Mixed Doubles: Miss B. Car-
rington and Mr. N. Gill vs. Miss
N. Hall and Mr. L. Worrell, °
GOLF;



je if al
Mrs. Wilson Tops
‘ a 9 -

Ladies’ Ladder
Action at the Rockley Golf Club
during the week was confined to
challenge matches in the struggle
to climb the ladders, but there
were plenty of them. Outstanding
was the success of Mrs. Brenda
Wilson, who put in a spirited
drive, played and won two
matches and reached the top of
the Ladies’ ladder before the
week-end

Early in the week she conquered
Mrs, Cyril Beaseley and moved
into second place, then later she
took on the leader Mrs. R. Vidmer
turned in a sizzling 38 and deposed
the Ladies’ Captain at the top of
the list.

In a lower section Mrs, A.
Tempro made an effort to jump
Miss Faye Atwell, but after an up
and down effort the match ended

even and the players remained
in their original positions. A play
off match between the two has

been arranged for Tuesday.

Two Challenges
Two Challenges were issued in
the Men’s Class A section, but both
failed. Colin Bayley who has made
a spectacular rise in the last fort-
night, having reached the second
rung flung a challenge at R. Vid-
mer, but was turned back on
Thursday in a medal-play en-

counter by seven strokes.

On the same day William Atkin-
son who had accomplished some-
thing of an upset by beating John
Rodger last week, attempted to
move still farther forward against
5. ’OD. Egan, holding down the

third rung, but again the chal-
lenge failed as Egan won another
medal-play match by four strokes,

Tony Tempro defeated H. V.
King and moved up a step in the
Class B Division, then accepted a
challenge for a return match the
next day and successfully defend~
ed his new position.





— ai

Standing L. to R.

Kneeling L. to R.



Be ASKETS, AL i: :



Roy Goddard

{VLIFTING TEAM



Clement Jackman (166 1b. class) Edwin Rogers (181 1b.) Errol Douglas (198
lb.) Basil Grant (Mr. Barbados 1952;

H. H. Webster Coach-Manager)
(123 Ib). Glyne Jordan (132 1b.) George Nicholls (148 Ib.)





Carib Bears Expected Sunday







i TENNIS

Gonzales
Retains Title







An amazing reputation thas By CALVIN ALLEYNE Gibson, a really Peat playe!
preceded the arrival of the Trini- who yet sometimes gives you the
dad Basketball team, Carib Bears, Puerto Rico, Cuba, Illinois, and impression that he does not wish
which is expected here next Sun- done much for amateur basket- to seem to keep the ball too much
day. They won the Basketball ball in Trinidad. to himself and quickly passes it
Knock Out Competition in Trini- Lance Lashiey five feet, to a fellow-player. It is all very
dad the season just ended, they eleven inches and plays a good well to combme, but one cannot
were runners-up in the League g@me at forward. He is very ag- help feeling that if Gibson some-
Championship, and Barbadians Sressive on both defence and times dashed through somewhat
who have recently returned from @ttack, and probably has no peer nore like he did at the begin-
Trinidad and have seen them @5 far as “ball stealing” goes. He ning of the season and was not
play, say simply—they are good. } swift, too, and this with his to serupulously careful of passing

Local players who have been Knack of getting away the ball the bail he would give a lot more
asked to practice in preparation “®€P his team in a regular posi- t yuble Chere is also Y.M.E C.'s
for the tour, seem to appreciate “OD for scoring ift, accurate scorer, McKenzie,
this fully, and, but for times _“Shwyn Pierre, six feet, and and Carlton's Brickie Lucas. One
nek tae ge prevented practice, weighing 160 pounds, usually can safely say these are certain
haves hear hard at work puny _ oa : He eee vicks, but the other paves

s oe , . even when playing, and 5S £en- have been playing comparalively

ite 5 vee r+ sciousness of the possibility of Jess have difficult task selecting
ee > Burrell ae their breaking. He is a steady the team
making ne tour, na game ixe "a \ > ce ns n
this ty whieh height is very much one ee ee ear eee " t selecting

- accurate one-hand push shot. rhey do not intend selecting it

an asset, local players will have Cariton Stephenson, is five until the night before the first
an idea of what they will be up feet ten ind a half inches, match is scheduled to be played.
against when they learn that only
two of the eight are less than
five feet, eleven inches. The
other two are five feet, ten and

half inches and five feet, eight
inches respectively.

It was no easy work beating
their way through to win the
Knock Out Trophy and the run-
ners-up in the League Cham-
pionship, and with the end of the
season, they are fit, energetic and
confident of carrying off the hon-
ours from Barbados

Who's Who

Their cemre is Carlton “Doc”
Clarke, six feet, two inches and
weighing 180 pounds. I have
learnt through their coach that

since the game has become popu-
lar in Trinidad, Clarke has been
judged the most accomplished
player, This season he has been
the most prolific scorer in the
league. He has a variety of de-
pendable shots and uses them to
good advantage. He froin
well-judged bounces the
back-board,

Aldwyn. Hislop, the gua is six
feet, one inch, and weighs 175
pounds. Hislop is considered the
backbone of the club. As captain,
he has acquired a reputation fer
command and coolness when the
game is not going the way the
Carib Bears could wish it, He is
a steady and aggressive player
and is always alert for a rehound
from the back-board. He has a
reputation as a sprinter and this
ability enables him to elude
many a would-be defender,

Norman “Fox’’ Pierre is five
feet, eleven inches, weighs 165
pounds, and plays as forward.
Here is a player who has en-
deared himself to basketball ‘fans

scores
on

for his guile and elusiveness
This, actually, is how he gained
the nickname “Fox”. He is good

at a swift one-time twirl of the

ball into the basket, employs
effectively the two hand chest
shot from forward court, and

in a class by himself when it

comes to dribbling and ball cou-
trol.

The coach Jim Burrell (U.S.A.)
who plays as forward, is five feet



eleven and a half inches amt
weigas 190 pounds, He has been
playing the game some 12 years
now—at College and in_ the
Army. He has previously been
coach to several other teams, and
was captain of “Pirates”, a tearn
of the U.S. Naval Base in_Trini-
dad. He has played in Hawaii,
Japan, California, Florida, Mas~-

sachusetts, New York, San Juan,

We would like to inform
our friends and customers
that we will be CLOSING
ON MONDAY 29th and
TUESDAY 30th for —

STOCK-TAKING

and will reopen for busi-
ness on Wednesday Ist Oct.





CARIB BEARS who are expected to arrive here next Sunday to play
three matches against Barbados, one against Harrison College, and
one against Harrison College Old Boys and Carlton combined.

Front Row left to right are: A. Hislop (capt.), C. Bethelmy and
L. Lashley (standing), J. Burrell (coach), D. Martin, P. Samuel, C,
















2

a

8































NO. 243

The Topic
of











we Correspondent
‘LONDON, Sept, 26 | ast We k
ld Richard e
. Gonzale Lo-night
el that he is the
ennis profes-
lling two houry
elained for
‘ igies tithe in
i € ional cham-
hi fellow
i er But it
‘ lished a two set}
c ronzaies had to pull out)
ver) iw win the match. The ;
inal ‘ is & t j—b, 6—2
-4
W nl iivamer,+was fresh he set |
p sutt er tennis that the no-
ur 1 starting Gonzales
« ing swept off the 7" . ~ -
c he began to settle| jf", i] | The famous threefold action of | HENSIC tablets RELIEVES
a s speed slackened And boys the PAIN, SOOTHES NERVES,COU NTERACTS DEPRESSION.
e -ar ol Txwite sit ;
: Oe ir a aces uo ge No matter how intense the pain, no matter how weary your nerves,
r ages was & - . arc ? o-
nae’ § ee It was down at the Vestry how depressed you feel, PHENSIC tablets will bring you relief and
sate, ly ke those old “ e 9° -

When Kramer established a! When most parochial. matter comfort, quickly and safely, Remember this — PHENSIC tablets
four—one lead in the final set it | Passed through mysterious was | neither harm the heart nor upset the stomach. Don’t accept
looked though he would take. oy vestrymen will wrangh substitutes. Keep a supply of PILE NSIC tablets by you!
the me But Gonzales hitting: dis is the natural course
with great power broke his ser- And when the wrangling’s over
vice in the seventh game and then ' Things will still stand in force @e
—, — all 2 ame in the| S°™¢ Scholarships were offered

1€ Vilal point cé : | At the St. Michael's Schoo!
ninth game which went to seven And from the ‘aakaee fehaa
jeuces before Gonzales put away Some members were felt foole:
4 Winner After that all he had 1 twenty-one :were. @tiiins a
to do was to hold his own ore | To answer the *advert” TWO TABLETS BRING QUICK RELIEF
for the mat« . a did wi And tour were the prize ~winner FROM RHEUMATIC PAINS® LUMBAGO, NERVE PAINS,
some thunderous s u ‘ ;

Gonzales has thus completed his | Whistles he. the dinate HEADACHES, NEURALGIA, 'sF UENZA, COLDS & CHILLS
gecond hat trick of the Wembley | whether it's rash or mild
season, “Ror Thursday he won on K mber it is dangerou

» To disappoint a child |
Doubles championship for the
third time. Soe boys whether 4 walk ¢

For to-night’s victory he receiv- You must still play *he game |
‘ £350. Kramer gets £125, Ear- So next week wh you ws it
ier this evening Perry and Pails Things will be just vn
arned emselve £60 apiece If it’s in your opinic
vith 6-—~2, 6—2 victory over Something could have gone wrong
Honder Switzerland and Mo- This is one time you And t :
iarek of Egypt in the third place That wrong conquer stror
youbles match lrepare now for the futu &

To-day put ll things riz
So that by now and next ‘
FOOTBALL Feelll osteae’ ten uke vin |
Now sister, brother, wake '
~ Blackpool Beat This message is to you .
And see what 1 can do } t
y ; — j
Charlton & 4 The grand Cathedral orga } ” 7 ad Gmos
It's ¢ e to erhaul
(From Our Own Correspondent) oid. tera? eesti: Ghani
LONDON, Sept. ok Pete ould pay for Paul
f

Ste Matthews with on |

2 me in 84 league games until avire: Anes wf

pe eens gon led a twelve the. young people iW

oer riot at Bloomfield really a delight is

1 seorin i \ j

( g t Can
vad day d helped to ent The organ needs repairing
kpool on top of the firs | So girls make up your mind
i Blackpool beat Charlton} ‘To sell your ducks and cockre
+ and Matthews scoring again} And jump right in the line:
sistered his fourth goal of the | Remember at your wedding
You had the organ too
aso! |
And eve ft oure a

Husky Allan Brown got another | aie sa ah tad three and must now be coneeern |

certain starter for Scotland's When you get home to Heaver

: ae Free sic ll be there

international against Wales free music, witt be, ther

1 October 18 Now pay for it w here

Liverpool, the deposed le aders, .
were soundly beaten at west | ‘ will (be. a Gent, pisngure
Bromw for whom Ronnie Allen} <) iuip repair the organ
toned ith a second half goal] Ana don't start to recant
after 1 ims penalty Start sav i ke

Thousand were shut out at The time drawit
Stamfo Bridge where Chelsea You'll nee 1 proper
lost their unbeaten home record For the Coronation next year
to Wolverhampton in almost the
last minute of the game, Outside sponsored by
left Smith making his first ap-
pearance the eason hit the J & R BAKERIES
winnel

Transfer listed Hassall grabbed makers of

1¢ points for Bolton in their first
away victory of the season at ENRSCHED BREAD
Middlesborough ve

The best individual feat o! 1e £
day was five goals from the out- and the blenders of | ¢

» es " te i
ido, lett. position ee mene J&R RUM A) Brush your teeth with Ipana and you clean

; oi j > Egline- ; ; ;

e 7 Pa eT eaoisuais pa pnd them extra-white, And, because of the unique formula
on. e ac ) . . “fre j , j ent’? i

this season but was much too good | underlying Ipana’s “refre shingly different mint flavour,
for Doneaster's defence in a’ 7—1 | } you fight decay by reducing acid-forming bacteria. Massage
victory. | | Ipana into your gums and you help keep them firm and

Glarke, A. Pierre, ©. Stephenson and N. Pierre, (Samuei will not
make the trip).
weighs 155 pounds, is a compara- Arrangements have been made for
tive newcomer and plays as for- five games, three of which will
ward. He has a reputation as a be Tests. On Tuesday, October 7,
footballer, is fast and tricky, and the visitors will meet combined
is rapidly developing into a first Harrison College—Carlton team,
class forward. the following night will be the
Carlyle Bethelmy, five feet, frst colony match, the 10th the
eight, the shortest of the team, visitors will play College, and the
weighs 180 pounds. He is an old jacst two colony matches will be
and at the game, and a shrewd played on the llth and 14th.
player. He is a sound guard.
The Barbados Team Those who remember the visit
; of the Basketball team, Seigert
So much for the Trinidad team. pisers, jast year, may remember
The captain of the Barbados team their standard of play and how
will be Algy Symmonds, captain parpados won two of the three
of the Harrison College old Boys ¢ejgny matches and the visitors
team which won this season’s ,ne Seigert Tigers played a fair
Basketball Knock Out Competi- g.me, but the Carib Bears team |
tion. His choice as captain is @ jay jn a class quite above Seigert
popular one among players. He is ‘Tigers. and are much nearer
tall, an accurate scorer, and fnished player that the two|
ound up his good playing during teams cannot be compared, At any
the season by scoring more than rate, one thing we cam be sure
alf the goals College Old Boys ¢ js that will witness grand
cored against Y.M.P.C. to win playing it which no quarter will
the Knock Out Cup be given either wa;
The keen competition there was
throughout the season has been | may mention that Season |
responsible for a high standard Tickets are being sold at $1.50
of basketball. Among the out~ while 2/- is the admission price
standing players is College’s for a night. wt with) |



SUPER LUBRICATION
SERVICE

For the Convenience of our Customers we
have further equipped and extended the
facilities of our LUBRICATION Service
Department to take care of all needs.

We are now in a position to give prompt
attention to your Lubrication Service
Problems and Solicit your Patronage.

COURTESY GARAGE

(ROBERT THOM LIMITED)
White Park Road

Dial 4569



A Glazzard goal

enabled Hud- |





MoanincCoucHs










I eaten! healthy. In this way, Ipana acts as a safeguard against
cersfield to retain their unbeaten } a y of which “are caused %
record at Blackburn, and Oldham | on't ler morning and night cough- tooth-losses, more than half of which are caused by a
the only other unbeaten team| ine. attacks of ereeemis or aati troubles. For whiter teeth, healthier gums, follow the Ipana way
; 7 ruin sleep and energy another day
sradford jumped into first place} ithout trying MENDACO. ‘This ereat |
vith a 2 1 home victory over| mternal medicine works thru 6 j
. blood, thus reaching the bronchial
n the third division north, biged. ate, caeee, Caer ates, ae THE TOOTH PASTE..
The meeting in Scotland be-| !tmmediately to remove thiek, sticky ies
. ‘1 cus, UF Heviating coughing and
tween Cup holders —Motherwell | Mucus nue eee et in and nore eos REFRESHING LY DIFFERENT
ind league champions Hibernian | r sleep ae etna
resulted in a fine win for the| [fom 2 0ur cient eek guerantesd. PRODUCT OF _BRISTOL- MYERS, LONDON AND NEW _YO
hampions. Four up at halftime
they piled on another three after i Se *
the interval for a 7—3 victory. - 7 = a -—--—-—— oe
East Fife with a 1—0 away win ’
over Falkirk now have a point
lead over St. Mirren who beat |

Raith Rovers







l ¢



Which would you enti

similay



(Caladium Show

WHITEHALL, 8ST. PETER.
On view daily until October
12 (noon) till 6

20th

p.m.

ENTRANCE 1/-

from

to have,

Kheumatism

BRAITHWAITE
RHEUMATIC i,
REMEDY ?

away from home by |
margin.

|
}
—omee |

“mia ss

methods

overseas

28.8.52-—1n.

You caret have
both ?



fasii4n7

= WONDER WHEELS N° 4

Why Hercules cvetes
arrive in Barbados

in perfect condition

The ‘sata Hercules packing
-the result of 30 years
study of packing for countries
ensure this.
wrapped parts are placed carefully
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The well-



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PACKING AND
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hairstyling aft

Almond Oil Shz ) 1

3andbex Liquid Soapless wou
Becau ndbox

Now [ turt
Waves and cu
p acle Dressing. Jus

in your own shad
with a thousand ¢

. <
} > » i
a GLAMOUR!

Something else pleases Bobb
here. “It’s a cinch!” says» he
made the journey back to collegs
n the air and in my stride. NO
MORE AIRSICKNESS FOR ME
Took a couple of AIRSICK TAB-
LETS, before and during the flight
Arrived dead on time all ready f
classes. Try AIRSICK TABLETS,
boys, they’re swell !”









SLIMMING 1

self—if you're
paunch of your

‘Do I love my food? Sure I love my
food! Highly seasoned too with plenty
of garlic or onions, and I’m still taking
AN
AMPLEX TABLET a day, I can eat and
drink anything and get away with it. Not
breath
AMPLEX COMBATS ALL UNPLEAS-
ODOURS;

out the girl friend. Since taking

a vestige of an odour on my

ANT BREATH AND BODY
it is harmless yet effective.

pointing out the

Because a Spa



of reasons there are those who

spaced family, but



RENDEL FOAM as the safest, pures
on the market.

instead

reals
finest
woman



a > 1
No Baoan tetra oe You

too will look twice at the widest
range of WINES, LIQUEURS,
SPIRITS and SUNDRIES ever
gathered into one compact spot
THE LITTLE SHOP.

Here you'll find wines from the
sun-kissed slopes of every vineyard,
spirits from Bonny Scotland and
the island’s best—Cockspur Rum;

are






Ss “Do I need a sparring partner?

advantages
BRUSHES, HAIR BRUSHES AND BABY BRUSH- |}
ES TOO FOR THAT MATTER, Why buy avSpa?
brush
stands up to real hard
hard brushing harms a Spa

Mary here chats to many
versial subject of Family Planning. For a variety
against
for those who do believe
AMILY PLANNING, Marvy always recommends
t contraceptive

Vigorous as a young
lad is Dad these days.
Been taking Glucose D
sugar
beverages and on
Glucose
tonic

any
child
take but, it must be Savory & Moore

a oi y irs 18 Qi)‘
WHY BANDBOX

8 yftening ingre-

shlights put into my
v Bandbox Mir-
’ urnished powdet
vave and curl will dance

spells

ligh COLAIRE





ean +7

(ye
iy



‘

Listen to him. He has something to crow
about but so have I. Used to look like a sack tied
round the middl while ago, now I have a real
wild-bee waist love my food so hated diets;
loathed exercise but went on a course of SILF
SLIMMING T/ BLETS, and did 1 lose weight!
If you are o veight, just take a course of SILF

BLETS, THEY WILL GET YOUR
WEIGHT DOWN all right! Try them out for your-
heavyweight
too Pops

Applies to that



Oh no, I’m just

of our SPA TOOTH |

Bristle
Neither

or Nylon
water

in either
wear

wives
—™.
the

in

in
ce-
D is the
man,
can





And if YOU ARE BRIGHT, you'll buy from The Little Shop a bottle
of PERFUME—for the missus! Visit The Little Shop, Johnson’s Sta-

tionery

Building, Broad St., tomorrow,
Sole Agents covering this audacious column
TIONAL TRADING CORPORATION LTD

THE INTERNA-
Telephone 5009,



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’

HEADACHE
NERVE PAINS
NEURITIS - NEURALGIA
FEVERISHNESS
SORE THROAT

COLDS & ’FLU |

PRICES WITHIN
THE REACH OF ALL

om>that contro- |



away the
blues...

VERY cnlid—so suy ths
BE issenoionsi should nu ve

a rag doll as an outle: tor
his antagonism The tdeu is
that in fits of rage or frus t
tration ne can pummel! it. fliy
it, and tear it limb from limb ,
with a purging effect tha 5

eaves him agreeably normai

A friend who has studied 't

subject suggests that the su
theory aecounts for the temper OF some Nousew've

For they do envugt wet
ind pummelling to puree 4
respectably neurt "Narac’e

They beat They beat a
ind they beat well They bar
regularly and thoroughly

Open to sky
N Sweden

! uch

unr






which 0K afte
things
nfinite efficiencv—a modern fly
3 ulways. always equipped wit}
1 “beating balcony *
This is enclosed on tour sides
OV glass wails. at the top
Open tO the sky
by To it the nouse
. Wives retire
periodically with
their Nates ane
4 ‘nei mem
% wlans tha
went wrong ~-an
thei rugs. cur
tains clovhes an
vediclot hes
With vigoreu
whacks of
Deuter they sens
the agebris
daily life filterin

ROTH Op
| LINK
|
j

AWAY ZO The aStie

ot last night

party WHA}
—ano of tly the crumbs o
yesterday WHACK —ana a!

the week's irritations vunish
| Then when it ts over dow:
| go carpets. clothes housewite
and ull—cleunsed. purified and
in a lot better condition than
when the pummelling began.
A favourite Swedish joke
spout the man who went vis!
ne oat 1} a.m. and found



|

(By SYDNEY RODEN)

The news that butter is going
up 6d. to 3s. a Ib. next month
is only part of the story And
for those whe love the taste of
butter the story is not a happy
one

All over the world, except in a
very few countries, butter is a
diminishing commodity. No long-
er is there enough to go round te
give people all they want.

More and more is margarine
coming to take the place of
butter.

Those whose job it is to sur-
vey the food needs of all the
peoples of the globe — a globe
with 70,000 more mouths to
feed every day — can hold out
little hope that butter wilh, ever
be plentiful again.

No Hope

Little hope, then, that cur
two ounces a week in Britain
wil ever be substentially in-

creased so long as rationing lasts.
No hope at all that butter can
once again replace margarine

Ferguson Fabrics
bring beaut
‘Ss
into your life...
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teenies ; , gt
= FERGUSON FABRIC
= Obtainable from all leading stores,

#THE GUARANTEE carried by all Ferguson Fabrics—
satisfaction assured or the material will be replaced.
Always look for the name Ferguson on the selvedge.

SUNDAY

“ te
a> -~

=
eae

a.
fe.
Cie

a4

HANDY
hively

1ousewile 30
eaning that
dusted down

balcony ledge

adsorbed no
he was
ind hung
until sundown

ma

Busy breeze tas

HAT abdoyt ne
people t c



WwW





ADVOCATE




















nouses a post Goodness knows how many
from a bir Marrages nave been suved by
‘ eni-lnGen oreeze trons ime f aure After all tew
> flutters th io nes y 1 would have mucn
id dust mingles w.th 5 1gin left to nag their
4° and the rhythmic ve cusbands after spending :o9
the pulse or nut tuch energy in beating ‘ae

' ‘ blues “—and rhe dust— av ++



Madam

in
give

not merely on our bread but

so many cooked dishes to

them that pre-war flavour.
Only if we were allowed to buy

butter on a free market now at
about 5s. a Ib. could’ those
housewives with the money get

enough of it.
And, of course, the price might

then easily rise above the 7s.

44od. paid in Switzerland,

Europe’s current top figure.
‘Three Causes’

What has happened? Why have
the churns stopped turning?

World production of butter
has s.umped 16 per cent. below
the pre-war level for three main
reasons:

More milk is. being drunk.
More farmers have gone over to
producing meat instead of rear-
ing dairy eattle.

And 30 per cent. more che@se
is being made.

Beef production rather than
increased dairy products is the
order of the day in Britain. Our
farms, moreover are obliged (0












sell liquid milk rathex than make
it into butter. They are allowed
a higher profit that way. Two
gallons of milk bring the farmer
6s. 8d. but make only 1 lb. of
butter! Cheese also yields him
a better return than butter, and
the demand for cheese has gone
up.

In pre-war years every indi-
vidual in Britain ate, on the
average, 25 lb. of butter a year.
Only Irishmen and Swedes ate
more, Today the figure is down
to about 14% Ib.

New Zealand, which sends 40
per cent. of our ration is work-
ing hard to step un her «
but New Zealanders themselves
are eating more butter. Australia
sent us 66,000 tons of butter in
1950, only 34,000 tons last year,
and now, through drought and

shortage of labour, a bare 6,000
tons.
World Cry
Danish farmers make more
money out of cheese, so their

126,000-ton butter export to us

today. It is simpl
rubber. Its design and

lovely sandal.

‘Joyance' is probably the most
famous children's sandal in the world

strong, supple leather, and thick plantation crepe-

scientific survey of hundreds of children’s feet. It's a

SANDALS

MADE BY C. & J. CLARK LIMITED, STREET, SOMERSET, ENGLAND
LOCAL AGENTS: ALEC RUSSELL & CO., BARBADOS

London Expres: +



The Butter Is Melting Fast

two years ago is down to 90,000
this year.

Altogether we expect to im-
port 259,000 tons from all sources

this year as against 335,000 in
1950.
At home, our farmers. two

years ago made 16,000 tons of

butter. Now the output is 6,000
tons.
So the world is calling for
more margarine.
+ * s s

Nostalgically, a renowned chef
said to me yesterday; “I remem-
ber the time when we could use
butter for everything in the
kitchen — for sole meuniere, for
sauces, for cakes, for all the fin-
ishing touches. It has everything
taste goodness and the quali-
of L iding the ing adi€ its o:
ity of binding the ingredients of
a dish in cooking.

oy

“It is quite impossible to
achieve first class results with
margarine.’

—LE.S.

Be nit
crett Ey

,

OYA

y and sturdi#y made from

shape was the result of a

Ss



e





SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER

28, 1952

_. The STARS *

+

and
De Ds

*

| $c fina
| ARIES
| — 21—April 20

ming ahead
seul.

— Not

so

TAURUS

April 21 to May 20 Dey on

tarian and

GEMINI
%K May 21—June 21

blessings.

|
* CANCER
June 22—July 23 aspected
«x portunity
ecw
* i. 4
«x LEO
July 24—Ang. 22

careful of
Ask God’s

armed i

*«

VIRGO
* Aug. 23—Sept. 23

LIBRA

Sept, 24—Oct. 23 4,

*

*
SCORPIO
* Oct. 24—Nov. 22

-—Tops for

not

*

vocated,

x
SAGITTARIUS

MK Nov. 23—Dee, 22 FO

CAPRICORN
Dec. 23—Jan. 21

x
AQUARIUS
x Jan. 22—Feb. 20

Pleasant

cut a

ry -

Sunday, September 28, 1952

Look in the section in which your
what your outlook is, according to the stars,

* x
auspicious
particularly
whole

—No IFS or BUTS this benefic Sunday.
Be grateful to God and country for your
Pray, rest;

-——Your Moon
now.
for
ernment, children’s and

— Encouraging,

—Mercury’s aspect
all who must work, be
Prey for continued good health for self

end family, others, too.

As with Taurus today, be sensibly care-
patient.
church. Some relaxing fun, too.

—-Friendly
When duties permit, get needed
cutdoor exercise,

Start with

mance, homely affairs, religious services,
charity are on top. Fine period for study-
ing new interests.

Seal

es



birthday comes and

—Grand planetary day, all essential work
favoured; also rest,

recreation, and, plan-
think of God and your

* x

for personal wishes,
if they have a selfish tint.
is generous for humani-
other worthy causes,

rirst,

+
+

work if you should.

*
among planets favourably
This Sunday affords op-
true charity, aid to gov-
civie projects.

eH *

helpful influences. Be
health as you work or play.
special guidance be with our

rees.

*

gives stimulus, cheer;
of good heart.

*
*

needs, +
* *

your interests. Necessary work,

* *

First,, your soul’s

domestic problems share fine aspects. Do
neglect
deeds will bring blessings.

soul's needs. Prayer, good

+

ad-
co
+

ps

*

prospects. Extremes not
Enjoy family and good
church, of course.

* *

indications for your day, Ro-

—Today’s aspects favourable but do not 3
sunction changes for sake of change with-
proven

better alternative. Go to

church, pray.

*
PISCES

x Feb. 21—-March 20 tious folks

YOU BORN TODAY:

*

Meditative,

—Happy outlook for good living, consci-

Tabu needless anxi-

*

usually mild disposi-

worry,

ety. Trust in God, attend church; rest, too,

tion; with strong sense of justice and excellent mental bal-

ance.

Venus is your natal planet and it bespeaks lovd of

beauty, harmony, ability at farming, gardening, Libra has

given us many honourable judges,

lawyers, great physicians

and teachers. Love of humanity makes you highly respected *

and needed in civic ‘affairs, r
to extremes.

=<: 2 2 # ®

What's
In The

ORANGE SUFFLE
| For 6 people: Big oranges 6;
Milk } pint; Eggs 5; Sugar 4 oz.;
Flour 14 oz.; Orange rind; Apri-
ot jam,



Cut the top of the oranges and
take the oranges out with a tea-
spoon. Make a custard with the
5 yolks of the eggs, the flour and
the sugar. Put the yolks with the
sugar, mix well add the flour and
melt everything with boiling
milk, Put the saucepan back on
the fire and stir all the time
intil the custard is quite thick.
Grate a bit of orange rind in it.
Beat the egg whites until stiff
then add to the custard. Fill the
oranges with it and bake in the
oven for about 10 minutes. Take
he oranges out of the oven and
Serve with a few tablespoonsfw!
of apricot jam,

BANANAS IN FIRE

Bananas — Sugar — Flour —
beaten egg —Icing sugar — Rum.

Take the skin off some bana-
nas, put them ina dish and
sprinkle them with sugar and

liqueur (if you like). Shake then,

activities. But don’t go

ligious

Birthdate: George Clemenceau, famed statesman,

keexwrx *

Cooking
Kitehen

pass them in flour, in the beaten
egg and fry them. Put them on
sreaseproof paper so that all the
oil or lard will run off. Dust them
with icing sugar. Take a sharp
knife, put it on the fire and then
make an incision on each banana.
Put some rum, and with a match
light the bananas. Serve imme-
diately,

FRIED SWEET BANANAS

Bananas 1 or 2. per. person.
Sugar; Lime juice; Orange rind;
Rum 1 or 2 liqueur glasses; Bat-
ter Olive oil; Icing sugar.

Take a few bananas (one or 2
per person), take their skins off
and divide them in two. Put
these bananas in a dish, put some
sugar over each of them, a few
drops of lime juice, grate a bit of
orange rind on them and finally
add 1 or 2 liqueur glasses of rum.
Leave the bananas for a few
hours. A few minutes before you
are ready to serve them, take
them out of the dish, dry them,
pass them in light batter and
fry them. Serve them hot after
having sifted some icing sugar
them,

over



























the fashionable woman wears

a K AYN E Pe nylon enna







-










—"
FASHIONED IN

It’s never too soon to choose
and buy) the dress for the occa-
sion say the London designers,
so they are already well ahead
vith styles for next year’s coron-
ation occasions. Here, to illustrate
‘What you will wear” in Corona-
ion Year, is one of the first eve-
ning dresses to appear.

It is the dress that will set the
style for any reception or ball in

he world’s four corners where
shandeliers glitter and cham-
2agne sparkles. Its materials?

Srosgrain and duchesse satin, Tfhe
rolours? White and a new shade

f blue called Garter Blue.
It is starred for coronation occa-
sions because:
a It has a “regal” air but is
â„¢ glamorous it is simply styled but
becoming.



























“

It brings.a touch of fashion to
1 formal gown with its new on-

he-shoulder line and its skirt
with the contrasting coloured
nsow-tieing on the waist.

It has no fussy, cluttered orna-
entation, but just the right
mount of bead embroidery on
oe bodice, and long, above-elbow
oves,

Lastly, it is available on the
xport market.
Designer is Arthur Banks. 10

years in London, he has a double-
dged approach to dress designing.
e caters equally for the flock of
ebutantes who fall over each
ther every year to buy his
‘dream” ball gowns of brocade or
bink and white organdie, and for
is clientele of elegant women.
~ = *

From Head

“Rather early
anish-born ;
is new season's
ire thinking of
any time in th
it a cl
helmet or




All these styles appeag @ Erik’s
new collection, Colours include
bright lacquer red, white, and any
shade of green from _ bright
emerald to a dark Cyprus (dark
enough to be mistaken for black
in artificial light). Materials are
varied, Black velvet, mellousine,
black velvet embossed with col-
ours and long-haired felts head
the list.

Trimmings are few and far
between. They appear on cocktail
hats where bla¢k jet or black
braiding is all that is used.

Most hats have the pronounced
forward, down over-the-eyes look,
eminiscent of the 1920's, This is
created by a long piece of millin-
ery foliage curling round the
cheek, by an enlarg*d brim effec-

like a donkey’s blinker,
‘wo pheasant tails perching on the

a




these exquisi

FACE POWDER -
VANISHING CREAM -

ROUGE : PERFUME

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER

by BOURJOIS

EAU-DE-COLOGNE

28





CORONATION
STYLE-SETTERS

By DOROTHY BARKLEY
LONDON.

hat like two gigantic exclamation
marks.

Erik also carries out successfully
the idea of co-related accessories,
by matching a hat to a bag, a
scarf, or a pair of gloves, A black
velvet scarf trimmed with ermine
tails partners a black velvet pill-
box similarly trimmed, and acin-
namon felt hat with a matching
handbag add a touch of colour to
an all-black outfit.

. To Foot
And black velvet and green (a

dark shade called Pinedew) - are
as fashionable for shoes as for
hats, That is the news arising

from the first press preview ever
given by Edward Rayne (Chair-
man and Managing Director of
H. & M. Rayne). He should know.
His family have been in shoe bus-
iness for 60 years, and he is now
the Court shoemaker.

Other important colours for the
coming months are sherry, morel-
lo, (a deep cherry) and gun metal.
A new addition to the shoe ward
robe shown in the collection are
“bottines’—half court shoe, half
boot. Made of black suede, they
have a contrasting coloured cuff
on the ankle to match the heel| men
(in red or green). For evening
wear, the cuff is decorated with
brilliants.

Rayne’s collection has launched
the “jewelled look” for cocktail
and evening wear. Styles include
sandals with narrow straps, and
court shoes with a delicate net-
work of straps across the toes.
These are in black velvet, spat-

tered with brilliants. Pride of the |

collection is the Italian-inspired
“mule” type of shoe. A_ broad
band of elasticised velvet, fitted
across the instep, is guaranteed to

keep foot and the shoe’s_ sole
together.
Finally, comes an idea which

other shoemakers would do well
to copy. All the styles for day
are made in two heel heights, so
that those who cannot wear high
— are now able to buy a smart
shoe, .



Alanbrooke’s
Daughter

LORD ALANBROOKE’S daugh-
ter, 2l-year-old Miss Kathleen
Benita Brooke, has become éen-
gaged in Malta.

The man she is to marry is sta-|
tioned there: 24-year-old Lieu-
tenant Oliver Vesey Stoney.

He is tall and dark, son of Mrs.
Robert Stoney, of Rosturk Castle,
Co. Mayo. Mrs, Stoney tells me the
wedding will probably be next
year,

Miss Brooke is slight and dark-
haired, lives in South Kensington.
She will be in Malta another fort-



night. She studied geology at
Reading University, is now a civil
servant,

—L.ES.
eemrec vo CIOO DOOKIE SEW me

in

BATH AND TOILET SOAPS

You will enjoy the luxury of using

tely perfumed soaps.

LIPSTICK TALC
BRILLIANTINE

COLD CREAM
HAIR CREAM

1952



The Day the Queen Must Choose A Hat

By JOANNA PACE.
LQ.aswoman, & chojee of hats is
always important, ‘To a Queen,
on a great state occasion, it
vital
And.@p to the

1S

ee

uestion What

will Queen ED th wear when

rides in from Buck-

k ne to open Parlia-

nally for the first time?

purities ave long since given

up speculating when the new

| parliamentary, session will be-

| gin, but it is certain to be some

time before the Coronation next

June. And that is the point
which raises the problem.

Because she will not have been

crowned, the Queen will not be

able to wear the symbol of

monarchy. Yet custom demands

that she shoulg haye her head

covered when she reads the

| Queen’s Speech, outlining Gov-

} ernment policy for the coming

session.
King George VI did’mot have ‘this
problem His Coronation fol-

lowed rapidly after his acces-
sion. He opened his first Parli-



ONE SOLUTION







he

‘ Uudic
hand?”



In my
Edward's difficulties were
nally resolved when an expert
on protocol advise that he



should enter the House of Lords
carrying his admiral’s hat.
There is No such easy solution to

the Queen’s pr blem.

Would one of her lovely tiaras—
for instance, the one given her
by Queen Mary—be considered



ses

suitable? Peer attending a
state opening customarily wears

tiaras, and this might be con-
Sidered a leason for the Sover-
eign not to do so.

The Garter .

ANOTHER possibility is that the
Queen should wear the splendid |
cap and robes of the Order of
the Garter, It would be a fitting
dress, this costume of the most
ancient opder of chivalry, for
the Queen’s first appearance in,
Parliament,

For before she reads her speech
she has to carry out one of the
most solemn duties of her reign.
She makes her declaration of



Man About Town

EXCLUSIVE CHARLES Or
THE RITZ Beau lreatment
are amon the peciaities of
rTERESE B 3E AUTY SALON
McGregor St. You dial 5058 fou
your appointment and for mors
exciting informa tion about
CHARLES OF THE RITZ beauty
preparations pecially blended
powders, for instance, to match
complexions, and cream for
every use. Charles of the Ritz is
ja famous name why mot use

° 7

. * .

WELL — CONFOUND IT ....
no sOap, no blade and no shave.
But this never happens with
Phillips Electric PHILISHAVE
RAZOR at Mannings (Commn
Dept.) Can be used all over the
world, its perfect for travelling
and just as good. for regular
home use. You plug in and circle
the dial so to speak with a
few deft strokes Use it once
and all the time 1 beaut

ifuil
made produc t

ament in 1937, dressed in the ra presented to Protestant. faith, and swears to| _ WHERE'LL I ‘Go, WHO'LL
full panoply of “robes and 1 by Queen Mary do all in her power to maintain | PHONE — yes, of course Pitcher’s
crown, f “I decided to wear, in place of — the Protestant succession to the| 4t 4472 but hold it till Wednes-
One Solution the massive bejewelled head- Crown. day Oct, Ist. They're re-opening
THE Duke of Windsor, as mg gear of kingship, the cocked The opening of a Parliament is|*!ter stock-taking with a full-
Edward VIII, was the hat that went with the uniform one of the most splendiq sur-| Ouse of Hardware, Building Ma-
Sovereign to open Parliament of the Admiral of the Fleet. vivals of pageantry, eclipsed|teriais and Kitchenware. More
before his Coronation. In his “Even the detail of the cocked hat only by a coronation. Andj Often than not you get what you
book “A King’s Story,” he tells raised a weighty point. Should ev a hat becomes a Very} ant here, including Paints and
how he overcame vi difficulty. I enter the House of Lords with Impé6rtant Affair. —L.E.S.| Varnishes and numerous small
ond nee ——_—___—. oc ——- — a boat fittings (you Tornado own-
i e at OOK PO =- ==> <> SS OES ers). Remember, then, open on

Wednesday, October Ist,
. h ‘A ,

| DA with ¢ ONE MAN AND HIS DOG
EVA \ wouldn't have mowed any mea-
dow without PURINA DOG
CHOW. A splendid dog food from
Jason Jones & Co, Ltd, local
Purina dealers (ph, 4403). From
the puppy stage right on up,

AG

= OSS OS OE OOS OS OO KOKO

By PENSANT.

To be responsible for the run-
ning of a home in these days is
certainly an experience, but it is
inal an capers that many wo-

¥ ‘ould choose to go through
were they given the choice. Wo-
men of to-day are far removed
from the simpering affected fe-
males of a century ago. Their
emancipation, begun by the Suf-
fragette movement, was complet-
ed by two world wars, and the
jresult of the part women played
in the last war showed plainly
that under a superficial difference
of character the modern woman
can stand up to most things that
a man can In their war jobs
women showed courage, endur-

ance a initiative, and what's
more, ir certain specialised work
they did better than men. It is
certain that women will never

return to the secluded domestici-
ty of their grandmothers.

Yet im peace time a woman's
natural share of life’s work is do-
mestic, and it is on the woman
that the job of running the house
falls.

Never has her task been a hard-
er one than it is to-day, and she
finds that in tackling it she needs
every bit of the eourage and en-
durance, that. was demanded of
her durihg the war. She encoun-
ters difficulties and problems un-
known in her grandmother's time,
and as she fights her way amidst
the cost of living, red-tape, and
the exasperating result of con-
trols, she’ carinot help wondering,
| if, as during the war, women
might not be able to make a bet-
ter job of some things in Barba-
dos to-day.

The cost of living rises higher
and higher and, while she has
| more money with which to run
the house than ever before, yet,
to her dismay she finds that its
purchasing power is less than
half what it was formerly. And
| this not for luxuries, but for the
plain honest-to-goodness food
that a healthy husband and hun-
gry children expect to find on the
table.





|
_ TWICE

soap
scum.

goes to



FAB GIVES LONGER
LIFE “TO CLOTHES

| Because FAB Soaks
clothes clean without
hard scrubbing FAB-
washed clothes give
longer wear — stay
Tesh looking.




FAB SAVES YOU
MONEY

In hard water much
18
FAB forms no
wasteful

Every particle of FAB
active,

cleansing suds.



VELVESL

UARTET;:

e half hat,

with targe pearl

hatpin costs

bg tid., cravat,

STYLE AND SENSE: Calf 9s, itd are
shopping bag, tn black or red, brella cover,
with chrome studding, Price ! Lis. tid. choves,
39s. 11d. Note the matehing belt. with silk jersey
also in calf, . palms jis 4d,

OOOO OOS OOOO

Oh Pity The Poor Housewife

Had she even unlimited means,
she cannot find the essential foods
to buy. Meat, fish, and. salted
meats are in erratic supply, and
she never knows when she may
hear that there are none to be
purchased, and this situation may
continue for weeks, or months.

Yams, eddves, sweet potatoes
are non existent, and even Rice
has almost disappeared, There
are times when she cannot get
flour, and onions, and butter, like
the seasons, come and = go
Greens are above the price of the
average purse, and while they
are healthy, they hardly fill a
hungry family. Yet the groceries
are full of tinned luxury goods,
Bweet biscuits, tinned fruit, soups,
hams, Pate-de-fois-gras and cock-
tail foods of every kind! And, as
her hungry children ask for food,
she cannot help wondering why
such things are imported’ when
the necessities are in such short
supply. Are the quotas misman-
aged? And why seven years after
the war has ended are there still
controls and red-tape on every
side, measures which were ne-
cessary in a war, but which were
never meant for peace?

All this Mrs. Housewife pon-
ders over, for she is no fool,

But this is not all tnat the
housewife has to endure. The
hucksters, who used to be
her goodnatured friepds, nave
turned sour, and taking advan-
tage of the scarcity, use it as an
excuse for rudeness, and a dis-
play of “show-off” authority
which presumably gives them
some satisfaction, but which only
adds to the difficulties and irrita-
tion of the buyer. The qualities of
common politeness and respect,
with the personal ty with
which the exercise of these quali-
ties endows on those who exercise
them are gone, and their place is
usurped by a shameless rudeness
unknown in this island before,

This, and a “take what I say, or
go without” attitude is what the
housewife encounters as with her
heavy basket, she fights to find a
little food at the various market-



od

AS ECONOMIC ICAL

sherd

yy



wet



wasted as

soap scum.

make

I AE is safe for
est. fabrics,
yur hands.
eaves,
melling
lean,

FAB WASHES EVERYTHING BRIGHTER, WHITER.



SUNDAY



FASB IS MILD —

easy on
FAB
everything
fragrantly





}
(
}
\

OKO CO EOEOâ„¢=:

ing centres.

And remember, her job is noi
one she can leave at the office at
4 p.m, or forget for a quiet week-

end. Her work is recurrent and
never ending, for breakfast,
lunch, tea and dinner come

around each day with the regu-
larity of the rising sun, and must
be coped with. Families expect
meals to be produced, no matter
what,

And meantime, as she reads hey
daily paper, she cannot help not-
ing the warnings given by those
farsighted thinking people, who
having no axe to grind are con-
cerned only for the general wel-
fare of the island.

Warnings as to the cost otf
landed goods, higher in Barbados
then any other W.I, island, and
this she knows helps to make
everything she has to buy more
exrensive, Warnings that this
islend is being left behind other
co atries in modern amenities to
fauciliate trade, such as a Deep
Weler Harbour, facilities for the
bulk loading of sugar, encourage-
ment and practical help in Hotel
accommodation for .Tourist, en-
couragement for foreign capital.

All this and more Mrs. House-
wife notes, for, as has been said
before, she is no fool, and she
knows very well that the neglect
of these
her daily
harder.

life to make it even

She knows that business freed |

of senseless controls, and left in
the capable hands of the business
men of this island would serve
the island better than existing
conditions.
the hands of those accustomed to
govern, and who would

serving and without
tion would

remunera-

of the present day.
There is no shortage of food




warnings will reflect on |

That government in |

serve |
their country for the honour of |

pull us out of the}
muddle and “little man’’ attitude |

Purina Dog Chow is a staple diet

-and I'd suggest you drop in for

the highly informative booklet on
how to choose, feed and generally

manage your dog — from the
Checkerboard Store.

THIS GRAC EFU L SALON is
featuring the most exquisite
neglige of Nylon. Exclusive, of
course, to Bettina Ltd, in The
Village, Hastings and _ featured

among delightful imported Tropi-











for London University

in the supply countries, why then
is Barbados in the throes of prac-
tical starvation? |

Why, Mrs, Housewife asks,
WHY?




‘washes
everythingl

AS SOAP





FAB SAVES YOU
TIME AND WORK
No need tw boil,

| bleach, Pale, 8 scrub or
rinse with FAB. FAB
soaks even heaviest
work clothes clean in
half an hour.

daint-



ADVOCATE

under strictest

Ever

Dre



fectant

cfYensive
ndoor
Kullerobe
you may like ‘to make

Re

tut

vil

KIL
AND THE FAT

Spray





so
LIVE



th
L

KILI
AS

bution

ind
OW ¢

K

is

R

ALADS ..

Und t

1 this Wednesday’s Menu
\RLINGTON
round-
Barbados
and

Par

Y am

lready proved
ciation dinners and many more}
functions are
centre.

hese i

on, t

along!

SHARING THE PROFITS

more

practicable method of cele-

nat best

EM

me}!
$ and o

. SIRLOIN STEAK .

Snackette,

Dial 4730

I dreamed of a bra
ar
idual
el; priced
iply come

with firm support...

matdlenforms

Chansonette...

Indiv



ALL, THE SHORT
AND THE TALL
ROBE Insecticidal
imeon Hunte & Sor
available in pint
»~gallon tins, as well
1er form, As a disin-
ILLCROBE has 10
and is ideal for
ut. “Kill them with
a good suggestion
use of it
BROILED CALF'S

DESSERT ..

tems and many

you'l
more
at the
Marhill St
restaurant
Grill Room,
Cpen from
ARLINGTON has}
popular for As-|

in
the-clock
with

he

slated for this new]

and come on
. . |
1

is i}

brating an anniversary than to}
crink champagne — think you?
its the N. E. WILSON & Co.'s
17th. Anniversary in October,
Remember OCTOBER, when
ere’ll be a jamboree of good
things inchiding newly arrived}
Canadian and American merchan-|
vise. IVIL be new and wonderful}
nad an event not to be missed—
not for a moment!

t

HEINZ,
!'NT KINDS,
permitting Tet

HEINZ,

57 DIFFER-|
KINDS and _ space
me intreduce 17

+f them — all SOUPS! Distributed Circular stitching rounds those
by J. A, Marson & Son this ter- precious curves of yours...
ile variety is on every Grocer’s Lato . 1 i
shelf .First in quality, tops in spoked center cup design gives
value, a soup for every family’s wonderful accentuation. If you

yoyment .

HEINZ ENGLISH SOUPS are
it everyone

old
very

onvince

parce you) b
ares; A,



count
yo

HOMBSTUDY ‘COURSES FOR

GENERAL CERTIFICATE of EDUCATION
CAMBRIDGE SCHOOL & HIGHER SCH. CERT.

me Hall, Oxford, can i aceetthliy aes

Prospectus
rector of St





KLIM is supe eissn, owvaiaaaal
sanitary conditions. Yes, and the
specially-packed tin protects KLIM so that you
get milk as fine as the day it left the farm. Buy
KLIM—milk that you can always depend upon fos

| its wholesomeness and purity!

{3} KLIM quality is always uniform




pure safe

MILK

PIRST IN PREFERENCE THE WORLD OVER

| EV cum IS PURE, SAFE MILK

{2} KLIM keeps without refrigeration

{4} KLIM is excellent for growing children
[5} KLIM adds nourishment to cooked dishes
{6} KLIM is recommended for infant feeding
{7} KLIM is safe in the specially-packed tin

e
{8} KLIMis produced under strictest control

Take pure water, add KLIM, stir

and you have pure, safe milk

KLIM




Dat for the above examina
R.S.A.; Bar, and other
tance is no disadvantage. Stall of over 100 Graduate Tutors. 72,000

ag ee oe Y
WOLSEY HALL, OXFORD isciane

handy for family use.
spors, BRUISES, DR. ryt: LS
ABRASIONS, “Ete. ‘oor PILLS

for every occasion.

want a really firm lift, Chanson-
“tte”
fabrics.

— superior on is for you! In your favorite

And if that doesn’t
nothing will,

u,

Genuine Maidenform Brassi-






eres are made only inthe United
States of America.

There isa maridenform
for every type of figure.

lease mention
es, Dept. DL 9,

Orta. U8, PAT. OFF,








e e
— = 2 ae oe GP ee ee ee ee ee Ge ee ee ae:
~
t
FREE YOURSELF :
'
|
cs from the |
ASEPTIC OINTMENT = r {
*
Children’s accidents quickly re- = !
spond to the soothing and healing —— BONDS OF :
,) properties of Germolene which
’ draws out the dirt and stimulates CONSTIPATION !
the growth of new skin over i
the damaged area, Keep atin (




eee by irreg!

@ Dr, Morse's Pills contain six active
vegetable ingredients.

@ Gentle, effective 9-hour action will not
disturb your rest.

@ Special TONIC ingredient helps restore
normal bowel condition.

@ No discomfort, even for hemorrhoid
sufferers.

A TRUSTED REMEDY
FOR OVER 50 YEARS

BEWARE ofrwornms!

' Worms threaten old and young alike. Be
} ure your family is protected with Com-
atock’s Worm Pellets, Made by the

t makers of Dr. Morse's Pills. BWL-349. }

6 e

inish headache, backache, billousness
irregularity.

Cope, 1950

Borden Co,

Laternat'| Copr
Hesery

eae ae eee oe Be ae eee en ae ae a ee ae ae Oe ee,



OBO SSOP

JUST RECEIVED -

nee”.

332

POTTERS ASTHMA REMEDY
BRAND'S BEEF ESSENCE
LIVONAL
HORLICK MALTED MILK
(3 Sines)

MILLER'S WORM POWDERS
WARDONIA RAZOR BLADES

KAOLIN

POULTICR
ANTIPHLOGISTINE
VITAB
INFANTOL
LOKOL DROPS

333t

(, CARLTON BROWNE

Wholesale & Retail
Druggist

136 Roebuck St. Dial 2813

%
-





WHERE PAIN
ASSAILS...

SACROOL

PREVAILS

BUY A

BOTTLE

KLM

yaa
WHOLE MILK

AND KEEP



HANDY

—

On Sale at all Drug Stores
and

KNIGHT'S LTD.

POOSSSOOONS



PAGE SEVEN









Ae ten een es




























PAGE EIGHT 2 SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 1952
i “ijisisting on- wage inereases at a time oi r @ ; i
ADVOCATE when British manwmfactiirers cannot com- | ing ae . e€ enee }
Bese ce ae Bef pete against lower-priced Japamese~and “fF ~= --"" =" , . TE ag ees De ON: atl nae” on }
Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St, Bridgetown German products. Compared with the | HILE military ¢orrespond- el é Hotcha . ) > re R
Sunday " September™ 28 “1952 ~ problems facing the United Kingdom the , aa Coen’ are giving us "ea 4 Girl With a Problem ARA LANE, the film actress, emeunndee Cate NERY
7 § . . . goo av > 4 5 é j : 3 . . j
—-- Foe problems of Barbados seem quite trivial, |Casts of. ieait abe tke 1c, aaa te le ee | ce ee ee i Oa ae rs
RICH ES - missiles * plained at when Sp@tilagds) = SS
Ab

but to the persons who depend on this lee will travel half way round comes —

the world, there is ; making a pass at a girl? say}.
island’s prosperity for their livelihood jiand worrying. ~ a dante silly things like “If you were to

sv ecen

TP Oe ewes mr

THE only riches which can be distrib-
uted are the riches which have . been
produced. This cornerstone of economics
is neglected with peril by any commu-
nity, It is basic to the discussion of
national wealth but its significance is

vital to small islands in which live hun-
dreds of thousands who have been taught
to expect improvements in living stand-
ards.

It may be politically profitable to those
who gain by such propaganda to state that
the evils of property, mal-distribution of
riches and inequalities of opportunity are
due to the reactionaries who have selfishly
sought their own aggrandisement by un-
derpayment of their employees.

But such statements are not supported
by economic laws.

The exponents of laissez-faire, the lib-
eral economists do in fact err by paying
too little heed to the natural acquisitive-
ness and greed of individuals and their
contention that, if you leave everything
open to free enterprise, everyone will
have fair shares is not justified by the
experience of laissez-faire periods in his-
tory. But with all its faults the system
of competition in trade is the only ‘real
stimulus to progress and to an increase of
riches for distribution. Competition is
essential to remove laziness and inefficien-
cy which ‘increase costs and diminish
riches. But competition must be protect-
ed from developing inte. abuse. This is
best achieved by legislation and associa-
tion. The State exists to protect the
individual. Its legislative functions must
therefore be employed to guarantee. pri-
vate rights and to preserve the sense of
justice and honesty in society. The State
does not exist, as so many ignorant: per-
sons claim, to carry out the will of a mob.
Its first duty is to protect persons and to
guarantee the rights of the individual.
But the state can actively assist trade
and enterprise by lending its co-operation.

The state it has been said (and experi-
ence proves it) is a bad entrepreneur but
it can help enterprise in a number of
ways.

In highly industrialised countries the
State employs departments of commerce
equipped with ministers, collects statis-
tics and attaches consular or trade repre-
sentatives to other countries solely to
promote the interest of its own traders.
The formation of the Regional Economic
Committee and the opening of a Trade
Commissioners Service in London by the
British Caribbean Governments provide
an instance of local governments’ realisa-
tion of the’ ‘heed ‘to’ advance ‘the trading
interests of their own citizens, Yet despite
efforts of regional action and despite at-
tempts, in varying degrees of earnestness,
by individual British Caribbean govern-
ments to take action specifically aimed at
promoting the production of riches in
their own territories, there still regrettably
exists among representatives of some po-
litical parties a feeling of antagonism to-
wards those citizens who are engaged in
trade. This antagonism is supported in
some islands by a section of intellectuals
whose educational background has taught
them to despise persons engaged in trade
in pale imitation of English traditions in
this respect,

Fundamentally this anti-commerce atti-
tude is more dangerous to the future well-
being of British Caribbean society than
the activity of Marxist schoolteachers o1
propagandists of nationalisation or ex-
treme socialism. The West Indian peoples
may be said to share one characteristic
in common irrespective of their national
origins. They are all essentially individ-
ualists and they cannot easily be regi-
mented in consequence. But because of
their different racial origins they can
easily be incited to display antipathies to
associations of fellow citizens who differ
from themselves’ as to status, occupation
or even pigmentation.

Everyone in Barbados, knows how these
divergencies have been exploited by all
sorts of people to the detriment of Barba-
dian unity. ~ ‘

Indeed the very slogan “unity is
strength” has been used: gy one political
party as a rallyihg cry against’a class of
persons sometimes labelled “merchants”
and sometimes labelled “300 year old re-
actionaries.” , : ;

The damage which has been done to the
economic health of this island in conse-
quence cannot fully be appreciated by
this generation. But every day that passes
without an effort being made to inform the
people as to the real economic laws which
govern a nation’s prosperity is adding to
that damage.

Every country in the world today is
faced with the stern necessity of obtain-
ing greater production cf riches so that

they can be distributed among peoples
who are clamouring for greater riches.
Highly industrialised countries like the

United Kingdom are being sabotaged by
highly paid workers who are prepared to
sacrifice not only their own immediate
country’s prosperity but the prosperity of
the British dependent Empire by selfishly

our, needs are of primary importance to
ourselves.

That is why so much anxiety is fe]t by
those who have studied the economic
problems of Barbados (which in so small
an island-are net too difficult to assess)
free from the animosity and prejudice ex-
periencéd by those who seek to win poli-
tical popularity by easy promises.

These individuals have concluded that
too many promises have been too lightly
made by those who cannot perform them
and who are recommending policies,
which if implemented will further aggra-
vate the serious economic conditions
which threaten. To further expand the
business activities of the State in the mis-
taken view that this will add one cent to
national riches would be criminal folly
since the State already is faced with a
Bill for the upkeep of social services
which bear hardly on the community of |
direct and indirect taxpayers. The State’s
anxiety ought to be always, after the pro-
tection of the individual and his rights, to
promote a policy of production which will
lead to an expansion of riches.

A..policy of production can only he
effective if it aims at encouraging privace
initiative. i

State intervention other than for tne
protection of the individual from abuses
will decrease not add to the riches avaii-
able for distribution. ;



Children’s Museum

THE excellent work which is being
done for children at the Children’s
Museum is known to the schools. which
avail themselves of the facilities. offered
but deserves greater recognition © by the
public of Barbados. Ten years ago ne€go-
uations began between the Honorary Sec-
retary of the Barbados Museum and His-
torical Society and representatives of the
Comptroller for Development and Wel-
fare with regard to the establishment of
a children’s museum. :

In March 1944 the Society was inform-
ed that a scheme had been approved by
the Secretary of State for the Colonies by
which £2,100 would be made available to
the Society through the Development and
Welfare Organisation. Unfortunately this
grant had to be paid through the Govern-
ment of Barbados and had to be super-
vised by the Director of Education.

Owing to divergencies of opinion re-
sulting from this method of allocation
there was little progress made until Ist
August 1946 when Mrs. Frank Sweet was
appointed Guide Teacher. Classes on
maps$* were begun in February 1947 and
were attended by groups from eleven
schools. |During the spring term of 1946
one thousand ¢hildren attended 49 classes.

Mrs. Sweet resigned in September 1949
and since the Christmas Term 1949 Mr.
Neville Connell, M.A., Director and Secre-
tary of the Society has filled the position
ot Guide Teacher.

From the beginning lectures at the

Children’s Museum have been illustrated
by maps, pictures, plans, photographs and
drawings projected by an epidiascope with
a daylight screen, especially constructed
by Mr. Frank Sweet. A film strip machine
has also been used and full use is made of
maps, models and specimens in _ the
Museum.
_ Whenever possible emphasis is laid on
Barbados and the background of the
Caribbean is selected to illustrate the
teaching. A corollary of this type of in-
struction is the encouragement given to
children to collect their own specimens
and to make sketch maps, diagrams and
drawings. The subject matter of talks is
varied, The Guide Teacher has spoken
among other subjects on Arawak Indians
in Barbados, The Story of the Caribbeaii,
The Coral Reef, Some Insects which
Attack Man, How Plants Live, Life
through the Ages, Greece and the Roman
Empire.

From the summer term 1949 to the
Easter Term 1952 there have been 9,399
attendances and 2,349 children have been
attended each of four classes. Since June
1952, eight models have been purchased
out of an unspent balance of the . grant
from Development and Welfare. “Imported”
from Great Britain they illustrate the De-
velopment of the Wheel, the development
of bridges, the development of: ships, a.
Coral island, the House Fly, with eggs and
Larvae, the Bug, the Body Louse and iis
‘egy, the Flea and an anatomical chant of
the Human Body, Five prehistoric an
mals have also been obtained and will be
exhibited in a Diorama showing the vege-
tation of their age. All of these anda
valuable contour map of Barbados are tb
be on permanent exhibit and ought to Le
visited regularly by all school children.
Other models diagrams and charts will be
added whenever funds can be spared.

“This very brief account of the growth
from an idea in 1942 to the reality of
achievement ten years later ought to en-
courage the schools of Barbados to make
full use of the facilities provided at the
Children’s Museum and it is fiitting that
the community should recognise and ack-
nowledge their debt to those whase vision,
perseverance and ability have raised the
Children’s Museum to the high standards
it has already attained. As an, integral
part of the Barbados Museum and Histori-
cal Society the needs of the Children’s
Museum are no less than those of the
parent organisation.

As many parents therefore of schcoi-
children who can afford the very modest
subscription required by this excellent
cultural society annually ought to become
members and directly support an institu-
tion which is co-opérating with the gov-
ernment authorities to widen the scope of
education available in Barbados.

(little house in Tooting, S.W.

etiquette.

This is what she has written to
woman's magazine: —

I find that tea is a meal which
presents many small problems
when to use a tea knife, wheth-
er to raise the tea cup by itself
or with the saucer held beneath
and the correct way to deal with
scones and creamy cakes and
pastries.

a

Well, dear, let’s drop every-

thing to consider your problem.

We will assume that tea has

been provided for three guests sit-

ting on the edges of the best chairs

behind lace curtains in a dear
-W.

The first, with the easy assur-
ance of one who knows her drill,
takes the handle of the tea cup
between her thumb and forefinger
holding the little finger high in the
air, raises the cup to her mouth
leaving the saucer delicately bal-
anced on her knee, drinks noise-
lessly and replaces the cup in the
saucer without spilling a drop.

When the cake stand is brought
round, she takes a plate, a tea
knife and a tea fork, selects
a scone or a bun .or a creamy
cake. Before the rationed butter
is whirled out of her reach, she
manages to get a large lump of
that too.

This clever, self-assured woman
then balances the plate on her
other knee, eats the bun by hold-
ing it in her hand and taking deli-
cate little bites, or splits and but-
ters the scone with her tea knife,
or cuts small, easily negotiated
sections of creamy cake with her
tea fork.

* . *

The second, who is obviously a
neurotic, unsure of her place in
society, lifts cup and saucer to her
mouth with a trembling hand,
spills half the tea in her saucer,
makes a wild, panicky snatch at a
‘reamy cake, drops it on the car-
pet, tries to rub out the mess with
her squeaky new shoes, picks up
what is left, puts it in her saucer,
where it becomes a hideous mix-



The importance of a sense of
nationality to a federation -is
explicit. in the second condition
which Dr. Strong makes a requis-
ite for federal union, Because
whatever concerns the nation as
a whole becomes the responsibility
of the federal authority: while the
individual units continue to man-
age their own local affairs.

This division of power, says Dr.
Strong, is the essential character-
istic of the federal state,

Professor Wheare who agrees
substantially with Dr. Strong that
the mark of a federal government
is to be found whenever there is
a division of powers between
general and regional authorities,
each of which in its own sphere
is co-ordinate with the others and
independent of them also..warns
that “federal government is not
always and everywhere good gov-
ernment, It is only at the most
a means to good government, not
a good in itself.”

And he proceeds to consider
when federal government is ap-
propriate, He begins with the
communities, Unless they desire
to be under a single independent
government for some purposes at
any rate the question of federal
government does not arise. If they
are not prepared to submit to an
independent government but want
to control the federal authority
they ought to consider whether
an alliance, a league or a confed=
eralion is not more appropriate to
them. This dictum of Professor
Wheare, a recognised expert on
federal government, is especially
interestigg in view of Head 5 of
the Interim Report of the Select
Committee of the Barbados House
of Assembly.

The Barbados Committee re-
commend that “Members should
be able to serve in the local leg-
islatures concurrently with the
Federal Parliament)’ Not even
Bustamante went as far as this.
In one of his reservations to the
report of the Select Committee -f
both Houses of the Jamaican leg~
islature Mr. Bustamante stipulated
“that a member of the Legislature
or of the Executive Council of
any unit who has been elected to
the House of Assembly (Federal)
should be permitted to retain his
seat as a member of such unit’s
legislature or executive council
while a member of the House of
Assembly quring the first five
years of federal government,”

This proposal although contrary
to the federal principle of gov-
ernment is limited~to a term of
five years’ but thé Select Commit-
tee of the Barbados House of
Assembly apparently regards duat
service! ad no. impediment for
ever. {| } §& a 4 FS “

But wanting# to « be Aander a
single ‘independent government
does not necessarily mean want-
ing to be under.a. federal gov-
ernment. The South African
colonies for example wanted’ to
be under a_ single independent
government, wanted that is to
express their sense of — nation-
ality but they rejected inde-
pendent regional governments
and chose unitary government at
the centre and subordinate pro-
vincial governments in the re-
gions or units. !

Both Professor Wheare and
Dr. Strong insist that for federal

When Is ,
Government Likely ?

N. GUBBINS

swim the Atlantic the water would
melt away.”

Any Spaniards talking tpis- kind
of hoo-ha to a straight yard,
practical English girl would soon
be sorry he ever opened hig mouth.

*

ture of tea, cream, and pastry,
and pours the lot down her new
flowered summer frock and over
the best arm-chair.

s e >

The third a happy vulgarian, Atlantic?

who would be equally unselfcon- ;, pir Ben A ae ze Atlantic
scious in Tooting or in Bucking- But I am not going to swim the

ram Palace, sucks her tea noisily

sut of her saucer while her mouth “tantic.

. I say eef.
is crammed with buns, buttered oesn’t mel! . PE
sconrs, and creamy cakes. oettaalt t t-away

You must decide for yourself
which is the correct tea-time eti-
quette and which of the three will
be invited to Tooting again before
an atomic guided missile, fired
from China, knocks the tea cup
out of your hand.

Meet Dr. Blunt

Why worry your aoctor when .
all your silly questions about
health will .be answered from
ime to time in this refreshing
new feature?

? M awfully worried about my

husband,” said Mrs. Fussy-
breeches, when she called on out-
spoken Dr. Blunt.

“What's wrong with him now?”
asked the doctor.

“He feels sick after meals,” said
Mrs. Fussybreeches

Ho. K, then, Eevaporate.

Why should the Atlantic evap-
erate because I’m in it?

Because you are so desirable,
x0 exotic.

Water evaporates slowly at low
temperatures and quickly at high
temperatures. What are you get-

at
Getti
If yo

” little cad.
paying you ze compli-

it of here this
ng a fine for





but a nasty
But I am

ment. ‘
mime youll Bere
insulting behaviour.
Colonel’s Rash Act
“The woman with a very

“Then don’t give him any,” said pink, flushed complexion
Dr. Blunt. needs a greenish mauve

“But he has gone as yellow asa powder.”——From 3 beauty
dandelion, doctor. Do you think _ hints.

THE same may be said of re-
tired colonels. Green powder
liberally applied to the nose be-
fore tiffin gives it a faintly lumin-
“What causes jaundice doctor?” ous appearance, which is consid-
“[y you want to-know. things ered very smart in military circles
like that,” said Dr. Blunt, “why This reminds me of a: story,
don’t you sit for a medical degree which I have just invented myself,
and find out for yourself?” of a colonel whose face changed
“But what shall I do doctor?” colour so frequently that he was
“Keep him in bed and give him often mistaken for a Stop-Go traf-
plenty of water to drink.” fie signal. :
“And nothing to eat?” One evening he stepped into the
“No”, said Dr. Blunt, who had middle of the road, and the traffic
had once dined with the Fussy- stopped. But before he could
breeches. ‘A day or two off from reach the opposite pavement, his
your filthy cooking will do him face turned green and he was run
good whether he has jaundice or over bya ’bus. ies

he has jaundice?”
“Either that or he has turned
into a Japanese,” said Dr. Blunt,
& *

not.” :

cs dlhalidcsalibianebitibanceitiasabaiate ae ee rant

Federal

1e0 system of gavernment requir-
iy - Kui Hunte oa, That is the first factor whieh
union to be appropriate the units Professor Wheare lists as neces
must desire to be united, but not sary for the capacity to work a
to be unitary. But whereas Dr. federal government. : 5
Strong ieaves the issue here and Then there is community oO!
proceeds with descriptions of race, language, religion and ORS
existing federal types of govern- tionality, But where, will we fn
ment Professor Wheare insists these in the British Carrebens'

that units must not only desire Next, the factor which produces

federation; they must be able to best the capacity for »union is;

similarity of social and particu-
larly political institutions. Where
So he listed some of the factors are we going to find this similar-
which ought to be present before jty in the British Caribbean? —
states can be said to have the And what of ‘the factors: which
desire and capacity to form a give the capacity to remain dis-
tederal union. First he 1
factors which make communities seems to be the existence of a
desire union, A need for com- well-established government but
mon defence have never been the continuance of well-establish-
felt in the British Caribbean: at ed — regional governments —
is taken for granted that the federal government together won
United Kingdom or Canada wil! be more expensive than regiona
protect us. A desire to be inde- governments rae sista! sand
pendent of foreign powers wil) The “al ee tals at esas
Serdly Mains, WOH) | 8 Sense oe aerate Tt aaa te tae task”
nee a eee: me po rites Professor Wheare “of those
sh omeis See ea hs wide. Who frame and work a_ federal

spread as it used to be, In fact government to see that no unit

operate it,




































. What’s ‘that you said about the].

lists tinct and separate? The major one:

six European countries are right shall be too large
now making a bid to form 2
Federal European Union and
this initiative towards closer as
sociation for strength is typical
of a world in which sovereign
independence means less and less
as the scientists discover more
and more frightful weapons of
destruction. .

The units of the British Carib-
bean are all parts of the same
Empire and lie in the same geo-
graphical neighbourhood but
these two factors although listed
by Professor Wheare as condu-
cive to federal union stem (0
have less application to this r¢-
gion than to say Australian or
the United States. :

The strongest argument in fav-
our of federal union is the hope
of economic advantage but it is
noteworthy that the politicians of
the British Caribbean have shown
little resistance to Britain’s con-
trol of British Caribbean trade
during the period of consolidating
their political victories.

If the factors which promote
desire for uniting are not con-
spicuous what of those which
promote the desire to remain
separate in some matters?

Professor Wheare finds it hard
to generalise about these. He
notes divergence of economic in-
terest, and common subjection to
a possessing power, and distance.
But, he; is emphatic that .diver-
gence of’ nationality could pro-

some thifigs while uniting «in
others. This is interesting but
inapplicable to the British Carib-
bean where divergence of nation-
ality is not divergence according
‘to units but divergence within
units,

Similarly dissimilarity of social
and political institutions could
not be used as an argument in
favour of separation since these
are in a state of flux and rifts
exist within the units. If the de-
sire for union exists this will
provide some guarantee of the
capacity to form and work the



‘Our Readers Say:

Woodwork Classes

To, The Editor, The Advocate.

SIR,—Please allow me space to
enquire from Mr. Carter, the
Acting Principal of the B.E.I, if
the Director of Education and he
eannot find it possible to add a
Woodwork Class to the present
functioning Barbados Evening In-
stitute.

We have on the spot the Senior
Boys from the surrounding Ele-
mentary chools chiefly those who



have an aptitude for Woodwork.
The Director as
Committee who sat to study
vocational training and Techni-
cal education may know why
this Report has not beer pub-
lished. But with Trade Schools
in the West Indies, such as
Jamaica, British Guiana ang now

a Technical School in Trinidad,
we could start a, one-sided
innings until we get the neces-

Sary gear to play from both ends.
This would assist the boys from
St. Michael. Then we could make

sable t
duce a desire td be ‘separate in”

Chairman of

important none too small.”
On the basis of this warning I
can see a future only for a fed-

eration in which Jamaica was one

unit, Trinidad Tobago and the
Leeward and Windwards _an-
other, and Barbados and British
Guiana a third, Any other com-
binations would Tam convinced
violate the federal principle and
lead to the impasse foreseen by
John Stuart Mill of one being
master or two being irresistible.

The size of a unit will be re-
flected in the number of persons
it can produce with a capacity
to govern.

And finally there is the ques-
tion of finance.

Units must have adequate re-
sources to support the federal and
regional governments.

“It is not enough” says Pro-
fessor Wheare “that the general

government should be able to Sf
it is essential also,

finance itself:

that the regional governments

should be able to do likewise.” |

Will there be sufficient re-
sources to support both federal
and regional governments he
asks? And the answer he gives
is the one which most advocates
of federation have failed to stress.
“If there are not, then no matter
how much states desire a federal
union and no matter whether a
federal constitution is drawn up
in practice federal government
will not be possible. Soon the
regional governments will be un-
perform their functions
f. they ‘will be.able to perform

em only at the pfi¢e of finat-
cial, dependence upon the general
government, that is at the price
of financial unification.”

It is my contention that even
if the British Caribbean gcvern-
ments agreed to form a federal
union that the insufficiency of re-
sources will lead them almos:
immediately into a unitary form
of government. If the federal
government is financed in the be-
ginning by funds from the United

Kingdom treasury the process of

unification would be more speed,
than otherwise.



special arrangements for those
from other Parishes, the H. Craf
Inspector who sees to the Wend.
work for the Schools could be
consulted on this matter and. Mi):
Carter would be showing t)
public how useful he can be in
an acting capacity. If the ser-
vices of a praciical craftsman are
obtained these boys will derive
great benefits if they become
Bursuary apprentices, and part of
the school’s work could be done
in the Practical Block. Looking
for action, »

PUBLIC SPIRITED.

and equally





NOTICE

To Our CUSTOMERS & FRIENDS
we will be closing our

LUMBER YARD & HARDWARE

} SATURDAY 27th, MONDAY 29th, TUESDAY 30th
) SEPTEMBER for STOCKTAKING and opening again
} WEDNESDAY Ist OCTOBER

WILKINSON & HAYNES CO, LTD.
Successors to

C. 8. PITCHER & CO.



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Dress the







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Palette tinted Taffetas, brocaded and
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The Better the RUM —
The Better the DRINK



ONE BEST
AND THAT'S |
:

GODDARD'S
COLD BRAID





SUNDAY

Major

i, SEPTEMBER 28, 1952
ROGUES OF THE SEA:

Stede Bonnet: A

Gentleman of Barbados
By IAN GALE

Nobody ever quite knew why
Major Stede Bonnet turned pirate.
He is described as “a gentleman
of leisure and. wealth, living on
the island of Barbados.” Why
should a man in his position sud-
denly decide to become a buc-
canneer? Perhaps it was boredom,
in fact Stede Bonnet is said to have
explained that he adopted the
black flag because of a “craving
for excitement and adventure.”

Sailing away from Barbados in
the dead of night, th: Major head-
ed his vessel for the Cape of Vir-
ginia. His ship was a small sloop
of ten guns, carrying a crew of
seventy men, whom he paid in
regular fashion as if he were a
master making a cruise.

After plundering several ships,
he continued to sail northward and
eventually reached Gardiner’s
island, where he went ashore and
bought provisions as any honest
trader might have done. Soon
after leaving this island he vap-
tured two more ships,

But never having commanded a
ship before, Stede Bonnet was
having difficulty in deciding who
should navigate the vessel, since
he himself knew nothing of this
important science. However, he
soon met up with Edward Teach,
the notorious “Blackbeard”, who
was cruising in the area in his
mognificent ship “Queen Anne’s
Revenge”, and the two pirates
agreed to join forces, “A few days
afterwards” Says Esquemeling
“Teach, finding that Bonnet knew
nothing of a maritime life, with
the consent of his own men, put
another captain one Richards, to
command Bonnet’s sloop, and
took the Major on board his own
ship, telling him, that as he had
not been used to the fatigues and
care of such a post, it would be
better for him to decline it and
live €asy, at his pleasure, in such
a ship as his, where he would not
be obliged to perform the neces-
sary duties of a s@a-voyage,”

Great Terror
The two ships continued to
cruise together and pillaged a
great number of ships in the Ca-
ribbean before sailing to Charles-
ton in Carolina. Lying just out-
side the harbour they captured
four ships coming out of that port
in two days and “struck great
terror to the whole province of
Carolina, having just before been
visited by Vane, another notorious
pirate.” Indeed the people of
Charleston were so frightened that
although there were_eight ships in
port ready for the sea, none would
sail and the commerce of the town

was totally interrupted.

Teach then had the insolence to
send in one of his ships to demand
a chest of medicines from the
Governor of the Province, threat-
ening that if his men suffered any
harm he would hang All the pris-
oners he had taken and send their
heads to the Governor, The pirates
walked the streets openly while
the Council was holding a hurried
discussion of the matter. Those
gentlemen did not take long to
decide to fulfil Blackbeard’s de-
eae and the chest, at between
three and four hundr D
was delivered to the nee an

Soon after this adventure Teach
decided to take advantage of the
Royal Proclamation of amnesty.
Major Stede Bonnet held out a
bit longer, returning to his own
vessel, but eventually he too sailed
into Bath Town and put himself
at the mercy of the King’s magis-
trates.

A short time after getting his
royal pardon the Major went to
St. Thomas where he accepted a





Major Stede Bonnet steps out into eternity from the hangman's cart

with flowers in his manacled hands.
commission as a privateer against
the Spaniards, and while in this
area he found seventeen members
of Blackbeard’s crew whom Teach
had marooned on a lonely jsland,
and rescued them.

Later, while off the Virginia
Capes, the Major fell in with a
vessel from which he took twelve
barrels of pork and a large quan-
tity of flour, leaving in exchange
ten casks of rice and an old cable.
He was able to finish stocking his
larder a few days later when he
captured a ship carrying rum, and
removed several casks as well as
other items in the cargo that took
his fancy,

After this mild beginning Major
Stede Bonnet resumed his piratical

hundred pounds offered for the
Major’s capture, was searching for
Bonnet and Herriot. Late one
afternoon he found their hiding-
place and killing Herriot on the
spot he brought Stede Bonnet
back to Charleston to face trial.

The trial caused quite a stir,
for the Major was unlike any
other buccaneer that had ever
stood trial in that city. To quote
from Judge Nicholas Trott’s final
speech:

“You being a Gentleman that
have had the Advantages of a
Liberal Education, and being gen-
erally esteemed a Man of Letters,
I believe it will be needless for
me to explain to you the nature

activities, changing his name to iw and Faith in
Edwards and then to Thomas, He ©Tist. . . ‘ s .
had a_ “good season”, pillaging And therefore having now dis-

charged my duty to you as a Chris-
tian, by giving you the best Coun-
sel I can with respect to the Sal-
vation of your Soul, I must now
do my office as a Judge

many ships and collecting a great
store of wealth,

But when the pirates reached
Cape Fear River their ship de-
veloped a bad leak and they had
to haul her up for repairs. Final-
ly refitted, she sailed out only to
meet two vessels which had been
sent after her by the Council of
South Carolina. After a terrific
battle the pirates had to surrender
and, manacled, they were made
prisoners below deck.

Bonnet Escapes

Major Stede Bonnet and a pi-
rate called Herriot managed to
escape, however, but the other
members of the crew were taken
to Charleston and tried for piracy
on the high seas. Of the twenty-
six pirates only four were freed
while the others were sentenced
to be hanged,

In the meantime a Col. Rhet,
spurred on by a reward of seven

“The Sentence that the Law
hath appointed to pass upon you
for your offences, and which this
Court doth therefore award, is

That yuu the said Stede Bon-
net shall go from hence to the
Place from whence you came,
and from thence to the Place
of Execution where you shall
be hanged by the Neck 'til you
are Dead. And may the God of
infinite Mercy be merciful on to
your soul,”

So that was the end of Major
Stede Bonnet, the gentleman of
Barbadoes who chose to satisfy
his craving for adventure on
board a sloop flying the Jolly
Roger.



-«

People Of Barbados (XXV)/~

The Governor, Sir John Pope-
Hennessy and his party were
pushing all possible to get the Cori-
federation of the Windward
Islands to become an established
fact; but there was a very strong
opposition party, formed from the
leading merchants and planter:
which was augmented by most of
the middle class. These opposi-
tionists held an ‘Anti-Confedera-
tion’ meeting at which the Hon-
eurable Nathaniel Fodringhan
presided. An able and patriotic
speech against Conted‘vation wa
d.livered by a_ barrister-at-law,
Mr. Philip L. Phillips, who late:
became an Anglican parson, The
wovernor’s party had a supporter
present at this meeting in the form
wao spoke in favour of ‘Confed-
tration. These parties seem to
fave beccme furthtr separated for
the constrvatives formed a ‘De-



fence Association,’ and this Asso- 4

ciation sent two of its members as
c{clegates to the United Kingdon
to interview the Secretary of State
tor the Colonies; these members
vere the already mentioned Mr
Phillips and the Rev. Bruce Austin.
The liberal, Sir Graham Briggs,
was not idle, for he imported a
printing press and started a news-
paper called “The Barbados People
and the Windward Islands
Gazette,’ which puts the views ol
the Governor’s party bifore the
people of Barbados and the Wind-
ward Islands.

At this period there was no
adult suffrage, and only those
who were in receipt of a certain
salary or were owners of property
were entitled to vote for the elec-
tion of Members of the House of
Assembly, therefore, the lower
class of workers were unrepre-
sented. This class misunderstood
the attitude of the Governor, for
they thought that the. reason the
upper class Was so much against
Confederation was that it was for
the benefit of them, the unrepre-
sented class. Somehow, they got
the impression that under Con-
federation the land would be
divided amongst them, and that
the landowners were resisting
this. This attitude led to the riot
of 1876, At this period there were
regular soldiers stationed at Bar-
bados, and the Regiment was
called out to suppress this dis-
turbance, which was confined to
looting alone. This riot is com-
monly called the ‘Confederation
Riot,’ hence the origin of the
local word ‘federation’ meaning
a disturbance or riot.

Barbados Was fortunate in
having for one of her sons the
brilliant Conrad Reeves, a Negro
who from a humble beginning
thad risen to become Solicitor
General in 1874. So as to be able
to serve the Island and to be free
to act as he thought fit in the
House of Assembly without hav-

ing any official intervention, he
resigned this position during this
crisis. It was Reeves who advo-~

cated the formation of the Execu-
tive Council in 1876, but this took
five years to come into effect and
has been part of the constitution
since that date, The general pub-
lie appreciated his services and
expressed this by presenting him
with a purse of one thousand
suineas in 1877. He later became
Chief Justice of Barbados, and
was subsequently Knighted by
Queen Victoria,

World production of cane suget
was on the increase, and there
was a new and potent rival of
this commodity in the form of
beet sugar which was being pro-
duced in large commercial quan-

tities by the European countries.
By the close of the nineteenth
century Austria and Germany
were producing nearly three

million tons of this merchandise.
The different governments of
Europe were subsidising this pro-
duct, and the growers and manu-
facturers were receiving bounties



UNDAY ADVOCATE



By JOHN PRIDEAUN

on this commodity when it
exported, So this sugar produ
although more expensive to pro-
cuce than cane sugar, was, being
landed and sold in England at a
cheaper price than its competitor.
Thus the Barbadian planter was
faced with a far worse loss than

was

that of emancipation, for the W.I
ugar exports to the United
Kingdom had decreased from the
najor percentage of the sugar
imported into that country to a
very small percentage. There
were many protests from all the
British West Indian cao and
this led to the Royal Commission
of 1897. Many Barbadians will

remember when sugar was selling
at nine bits (90c.) per hundred-
weight ex wharf im Bridgetown.
With sugar at this price the Bar-
badian planters faced ruin, and
the standard of living was ex«
low
This low

tremely
price of sugar caused
the v.due of land to decline, for
cvery owner of property expects
decent return for the money
invested. Thus when plantations,
which had fetehed reasonable
prices In previcus years, were set
up fcr sale, only small sums were
offered for them; for the price of
sug¢r just about covered the cost
of production end marufacture,
ind there was no return on the
capital invested. This was the
period when Great Britain was
carrying out the experiment of
‘free trade,’ as it was considered
that to open her markets to all
products from all countries, with-
cut preferential duties or boun-
tues, would lead to general pros-
perity. This proved a fallacy and
ber colonies were the sufferers.
It was this policy of free trade
and its reaction in the colonies
which drove Barbadians, both
White and Coloured, to seek em-
ployment in larger countries.
Thousanas emigrated to the differ-
ent countries of the Americas,
especially the United States of
America, Fortunately at this
period there was a large scale job
being undertaken, this was the
construction of the Panama Canal,
and thousands of Barbadians
found employment of different
periods in the construction of this.
It is claimed that without the
Negro labourers this Canal would
never have been completed, Many
of these, Barbadians have returned

to their native land within re-
cent years.
Those who emigrated worked

hard and remitted money to their
families here, which helped to
raise the standard of living of
those who were fortunate enough
to receive assistance from their
connections abroad, The money-
order business between the Canal

Zone and Barbados started in
August 1906, and the amounts

paid at the General Post Office at
Bridgetown between this time and
1910 amounted to £245,341.16.2.
a

The Census of April 1911 bears
out the fact of this heavy emigra-
tion which took place between
1891 and 1911, The figures reveal
that the 1911 Census was 10,323
persons lower than the figure of
1891, Each Census prior to 1911
had shown an increase over the
preceeding one, thus taking the
figure of 11,592 as the average
flat inerease from 1851 to 1891

Mme the deficit of 10,323 from the
1911 Cénsus, this makes a rough

total of 21,915 persons below what |
therefore, |

it should have been,
this is a rough figure of the num-
ber of Barbadians who sought a

better way of life in other coun-
tries,

The system of education in the!
Island had gradually evolved
from the elementary schools—
founded by Bishop Coleridge,
which were run by the Church
and received donations from the

S.P.C.K. in England and the



‘TRINIDAD HERE WE COME’

@ From pave 2.

crowd was bubbling over with
excitement, devouring everything
with their «yes to remember in
detail later on. It was amusing to
hear the various arguments when
we were passing the Five Islancs
&s to on which the prison was
situated. For, having then b2en
dressed before dawn, we were
able to see everything cominy in.

In Trinidad

We docked at 7.30 a.m on
Saturday. Mrs. Stuart and her
Secretary, Rachael Evelyn who
had preceded us, Hon. Audrey
Jeffers and her neice Gloria
Gibbs and Mr. and Mrs. Albert
Moore were there to meet us.

The girls and boys who resided
at “Faith House,” Santa Cruz

Streets, Marine Square ete.
terrific! I believe we would have show, when he operated the spot-

easily lost our way if we had not light and tried to give us as much
niet Jim Marshall. Jim is a Bar- advertisement as possible in the

badian who is managing the “Guardian”.
Trinidad branch of The Genera)
Agency Co. (B’dos) Ltd, Hospitality
The City Other Barbadians who are re-
Port-of-Spain,

town, is so well laid out, the oq to make our stay a pleasant Trinidad, we were forced to come | i 4 tl oo ee
roads are broad with adequate one were Mr .and Mrs. Ashmore home; time was up. Anyway, we ese — are Messrs. Gar.
pavement, everything looks s¢ Wharton and family, Mr. John consoled ourselves with the fact “mer, Austin & Co. Ltd. It

So gave us much assistance with our Major Knaggs’ Zoo, The Ameri- } gp

can Base and Government House |
Gardens which are not too far
were visited, but unfortunately, |
time did not permit us to go to}
San Fernando, Maracas, Mayare
and other places in the country.
Then,

after a very wonderful

unlike Bridge- ciging in Trinidad and who help- week in a more wonderful place, Northern Islands.

‘Rodney’ To Arrive
Monday Morning

The Lady Rodney which

was

Monday.

This vessel is sailing from Brit-
ish Guiana, Trinidad, Grenada
ang St. Vincent, with cargo and
passengers, It is due to sail late
in the week for Canada via the

huge and enormous as compared wickham and family, Dr. Colin that we had crammed about two Caries a crew of 124, and’ ‘s
with the slow, easy going, quaint Tudor, Mr. Willis Bishop and Mr. weeks “fete”, as the Trinidadians under the command of Captain

Bridgetown. Everyone is always gang Mrs, Erskine Ward. Then of
furrying! It gave me an idea as the Trinidadians, there was
to what New York might be like. Bruce Procope who took over as
The Trolley buses fascinated me, our stage manager and. towards
although they moved so very the end of the tour entertained a
tlowly. One cf my friends just group of us at his house. Mr.

would say, into seven days.

ja Le Blanc,





ay i , ae lived for the ‘six cents taxis’, it Ajfonso B. Delima also aided us ,
sta 0 akfas J ,
while the others ‘went tp their Was all So new to us. by allowing the bookings to he ‘
respective homes. 3 Newsmen made at his Jewellery store. On

Four of us. stayed with iny Victor Hinkson, another Bar- the whole, we found the»Trini-
uncle and his family. Capt. badian who is a reporter on the, datiians extremely pleasan: and
Ormond Clarke, a Barbadian, Who “Trinidad Guardian” took us oM generous, ar { maybe tut a*counts

is skipper of the cargo and pas-
senger shfp “Tobago” plying, be-



thing we did after unpackin 8
visit the shopping centre. Cie
€rick, Edward and ~ Chacon



' HARRISON'S

_

IMPROVED SYNTH
Al THE SAME OLD



a tour of that building. We met for the fact that
V. C. Murray, yet another Barba-. troupe, parcicularly

most of

Weas® Their editorial staff rai can go ei dine Bei
luge, Hut then they have (a lof, Plaees “like ‘Belvedere, , Palm
of ps ‘to covert Victor ‘also Beach Aquatic Club, Blue Basin,







BROAD ST.



“ORIAC™

ETIC CHAMOIS LEATHERS ARE HERE AGAIN
PRICE - - -

ts B4 cents Each @I

The “ORIAC”

@ DOES NOT BECOME SLIMY
@ DOES NOT BECOME STIFF WHEN DRY

IS SOFT,

SMOOTH, AND PLIABLE WHEN. WET

LASTS LONGER AND BECOMES EVEN BETTER IN USE

IDEAL FOR POLISHING MOTOR CARS, WINDOWS, GLASSWARE,

CLEANING

WE RECOMME



HARRISON'S

HOUSEHOLD PAINT WORK Etc.
“ORIAC” WITH EVERY CONFIDENCE

ND





Hardware Department
Dial 2364 or 3142





the
niysel’, are
tween Trinidad and Tobago. First dian and Miss Smith, a lady re- just longing fof thie day when we

CAVE
SHEPHERD

&. CO.,: ep,





FOR CHILDREN
“DIADEM”

CHILDREN SLIPPERS

Also an attractive assortment of Childrens’ SLIPPERS
in Red and White, Blue and White

Sizes 6—10 i

Also Blue sizes 1I—1 @ $2.43 pair

. education is

| try
in twenty year periods, and add-| cries of her
Hansel

heduled to arrive on Tuesday |
is now arriving at day-break on |



Size range includes 4—6, 7—10, 11—1

SHOES for Children in White Buck,
Black Patent, Brown Calf
Prices from $5.77 to $7.74

i

numerous small private schools,
to the present day standard, This
still overwhelmingly

an education in the humanities,
wnicn is an “education founded
en the principles of the ancient
Greeks and divides the human
race into two classes. Firstly,
fiose of superior intelligence or
through positions of birth are

educated to a position of command
and secondly those of inferior in-
v\ellect or social position who are
the workers. This type of educa-
tion was originally designed for
the governing class, so it nas lea
te a society of educated coloured
people who are separated from
their own people by a tremendous
intellectual and emotional gulf

During the first World War, ine
people of Barbados tasted the
fruit of prosperity for the first
time in generations; but this did
not last long, for within a decade
the world wide slump was again
en, and plantations which had
been sola for small fortunes were
thrown back on their former
owners’ hands because the buyers
were unable to meet the balance
due. The business places of
Bridgetown were crippled by this
sudden and unexpected collapse
of the sugar market, and the
whole Island was on the verge of
ruin, so the working class of Bar-
bados was back in the same posi-
tion it was in pre-war days, Many
writers visited Barbados during
the late twenties and early
thirties of this century and re-
corded their impressions. All are
unanimous in their agreement
that those of the coloured race
who had received a higher edu-
cation held leading positions in
their chosen’ professions, while
those who had not received a
higher education but had
understanding than the

mechanics, engineers, sailors, and
policemen. But the striking part
of these visitors was the pathetic
condition of the Negro of mediocre
intelligence who had remained at
the bottom of the social ladder,
for they and their families were
in the starving condition, The
numerous beggars on the streets
was also largely commented on by
these visitors.

What a_e difference to that
recorded by Pére Labat during
the days of slavery; for he states
that the Negro was proud. He re-
lates about his Negro boy, that
the slightest word of contempt
was more painful to him than if
he had been And
further
poor
despair,
took

skinned
him to be called a '
negro boy drove him to |
He adds that this boy
the liberty

alive.
for

of telling him
that only the hites were poor,
and that no egro ever begged
for alms, for they had too much
heart for that Slavery accom-
panied with its concomitant evils
could not break the proud spirit
of the Negroes brought from
Africa, but one hundred years
of freedom and neglect . had
humbled them; for after liberation
they and their former masters
were left to work out their own
salvation on a one staple product,
the value of which was rapidly
declining, while the Mother Coun- |
turned a deaf ear to
children, who lke}
and Gretel, were left
a forest of financial worries,
(To be Continued),

1. ‘Handbook of Barbados,’
by E. G. Sinckler,

“DIGEN

MADE BY BOOTS
FOR

the

in)

page 36,!







7 99
jd

INDIGESTION.



Fresh Stock Just Received

Relieves Pain and Discom-

fort—Removes Toxic Fer-

ments and restores Appetite
Corrects Acidity.

| Price 4/6 each.

\ lso —

| HOO DOO ANT TAPE
54c. Each

| ROACH HIVES

} 1/- Each.



BRUCE WEATHERHEAD
LTD.

Broad Street







$2.99 pair

more

majority

of workers, had acquired a high-
er degree of proficiency and had
risen to-.be foremen of their
chosen trades, peasant proprietors.



|

: ¥ . . = ad
a a a eee

PAGE NINE






















A contlimtntl
le please men



The secret of a superb |
flavour with fish :

T's sivpik, and it’s economi- | | Perrins is as neces-

BOTTLE of Lea &

cal, to make fish deticious | |
by adding Lea & Perritts Sauce
as you cook, You only need to

| sary as a knife and fork
use two teaspoonfuls of Lea & |

| ona table. It improves
fried, baked or grilled

Perrins in fish-cakes, fish-pies fish, combines wonder-

and poached fish forfour people, . ri nd
ye

and what a difference Lea & fuBy with ne

Perrins makes! The secret of
the flavour that only Lea &
Perrins can give lies in the
recipe. For miore than 100
years, ever since it was brought f
to England from the Far East,
the recipe has been Lea &
Perrins’ closely-guardedsecret
—no other sauce makes such
| a difference to the simplest
food.

makes cheese — always a

favourite with men—bet-
ter than ever. Always
put out a bottle of Lea
& Perrins Sauce at meal
times—and please every-
one in your family!




LEA & PERRINS

Lhe criginal and genuine
WORCESTERSHIRE SAUCE









There is Nothing Better
THAN

“MUSTEROLE™

THE ALL PURPOSE RUB. - NON STAINING.

For Congestion MUSTEROLE gives Instant Relief,



MUSTEROLE:—Melts quickly away into the Pores. At first

there is a comforting, tingling warmth, followed in-
stantly by a Delicious coolness; and then swiftly comes
the longed-for relief,

is the modern Scientific home therapy for the Medival
condition known as “Congestion”.

REMEMBER—It’s) MIUSTEROLE

ss
MUSTEROLE: —Is not just another ointment—-MUSTEROLE }
}

tf

i}

The All Purpose Rub for :

Chest Colds, Coughs, Sore Throats, Lumbago,
Muscular Aches and Sprains.

OBTAINABLE AT:—

BOOKER'S (B'DOS) DRUG STORES LTD.

(Agents)
Broad Street & Hastings (ALPHA PHARMACY)

AND: at all other “good Drug Stores”

















QUALITY

DRUGS
and

LEADERS IN SERVICE.

When every minute is precious . ... When the time
factor is the most important . . When the highest
premium is placed on Quality be sure to send your
Doctor's prescription to us. OUR SERVICE IS
UNEQUALLED in Barbados,

KNIGHTS DRUG STORES

ALL BRANCHES




















ZT

When you select |
these Specials Mg. “Ses



vi)

~

Usually “. NOW
BARRY DRIED FRUIT SALAD...... $ 39 $ .32
COOMA 6 sa cep ee cseeetes ves ‘é 1 40 1.20
ONIONS—per 3 Ibs. ........6.55- 54 42
SARDINES—per tin ...... Pees i ek 18, 16
CONDENSED MILK—pe rtin ......... 32 30
CARR'S CREAM CRACKERS—per tin 1.64 1.20

"§~ The above Items for CASH & CARRY Customers Only!
re TE









HUNT’S YELLOW CLING PEACHES—30-oz. tin...... $ .83
HUNT’S FRUIT COCKTAIL—30-oz. tin.. ay 97
HUNT’S ASPARAGUS TIPS—per tin.. 63
DENMOR BONELESS HAMS—4-1b tin.. 5.65
DENMOR BONELESS HAMS—2'4-1b .tin 3.76
AYLMER'S TOMATO JUICE—16-02z. tin... .......660 39
CANADIAN SLICED BACON—per Ib ..... Lil
AYELMER'S TOMATO JUICE—10-oz. tin, .......4.- .28
ITALIAN ANCHOVEY FILLETS—per tin 60
MARZIPAN (Ground Almond Paste) per IH.......-... 1,14
HEINZ CHICKEN GUMBO SOUP—per tin.......... 49
KOO GUAVA JELLY—2-t tin KN 48
HEINZ CLAM CHOWDER—per tin.. ‘ 55
HEINZ CHICKEN NOODLE SOUPS—per tin 46
JAX ORANGE SEGMENTS—per tin... va : 53
“COCKADE” FINE RUM \
°

STANSFELD SCOTT & Co., Ltd.

.

Ne



By







WE HAVE IN STOCK
TERRAZZO Marble Chips

ITE Marble Finished Sheets
AD Cedar Boards

|
i



; . . ‘TUM Corrugated Sheets
mobbed, couldn't possibly be “. ” ” ?
/ ‘Ey ANTE kaneeeelt am ote an ALU M Guttering — 18’, 24”, 30,” 36
=MARGHANITA LASKI pated we cthes Seren GALVANISED Corrugated Sheets
Svery mother wants the best for aE SUTeAy- OAs “OUTS . SARBED WIRE
er children. The Queen and the judge even to tne eg :
Duke of Edinburgh must want, in public* When Royalty is, so to
joing the best for their own chil- peak, on show, we are expected
iren, to do the best for ours as crowd and stare and we do. Establisned T. HERBERT LTD {ncorporated
yell. But we do not lack the ordinary 1860
They know that the way they ccurtesies of life. Prince Charles ROEBUCK ST, and MAGAZINE LANE
ive, the mannérs they use, the sit mobbed when he is pushed
astes »y exercise, influence the out in his pram, nor the Queen-
ives of millions of people, and it Mother when she visits



1ust be their wish that this enor-
nous influence shall be exerted to
he greatest good.
What, then, is the greatest good
at the Queen and the Duke can
ow us in the manner in which
bring up and educate their







V
hildren?

privately
picture exhibition

And as for the schoolchildren
hemselves—well, children always
establish a pecking-order of their
own, and social prestige is the
jeost of things that determine it






SP.C.A. PHOTO COMPETITION

th
Photos of an animal or group of animals.

WITH HIGHLY MEDICATED BUCKLEY'S WHITE RUB

Mothers, now you can relieve the No other RUB has these

“i 5 t a: ys ; : . ize— White Only.

I believe that. this could best it may be argued that Royal misery of Kiddies’ colds so such Any size Black and

achieved by sending them tc t ee — learn a a faster with the Buckley White Rub 4 important Features CO Oe ee evans to reproduce any print
he ordinary State schools—the other children need not, and tha Tw treatment. Buckley's White Rub csow-wihite sociati rese : .
imary and the secondary mod- for this reason an ordinary edu- ne 1 sictelecn, aan-aniiaaie - Prizes awarded to the most attractive photo.

n, cation isn’t practicable. (1) At the first symptom, place « spoonful Entrance 1/-.








ot
of

But what are these things? Buckley's White Rub im o bowl or basie 9 © penetrates deeper, brings relief :
Inspiring Good manners should be learnt in noting Seren eee oe ee fenton, All Photos should be Post Card size sch
, any school, and the etiquette o* oe ty breath corries » . > ‘ol 3 ls more highly medicated, bence FST PRIZE oiecccccccscssssse sccsossssessssecesenrsenncccessrssesenenaneveneaers $15.
The effect would be tremendous the home taught by Royal parents coughing, loosening phlegm, easing breathing. Oe ie eR we gi iP Ae a a 8.00
d inspiring. For the country, as well as by others. te ing vapors carry
Srererel weer nae he See (2) Mew manage cis, back ead throat was 4 on the good werk tanger wie He TN Es tanietopennisosee 3.00
ould have stated, once and for Buckley's White Rub—vse & frealy. Ws patient sleeps.

After School








SNOW WHITE and POSITIVELY STAINLESS.







l, that the education intended Ths external treatment helps break vp Deeision of the Judges will be final.

or ordinary people’s children was AND if, in other ways that 1 congestion, ease sore chest mucies, and _

‘ood enough for hers, don't know, the education of emcourages restful sewp, fhe soothing eet prove faster and more effective _All photos to be sent to the BRC. Ome Heteton
It would dispose,-ence and for Royalty must differ basically vapors gives off keep om ine oper eny preparation you have ever used. Police Station, c/o Hon. Secretary and marked S.P.C.A. Photo-
1, of people’s - uncomfortable from the education of other taigs Se ig S08 graphic Competition.

eeling that the clever children people, are we not asking the ,

who go to grammar schools are in ¥ 16ng. things of our Royalty? £6 206 a .

ome way “better” than those who ™ There’s only one difficulty I . ae aa

jon't. 7 ‘ me dil >

Yes, they may be cleverer, she can gee that really does take} %

vould Bees § said in effect, and may via wae t mr eee ae. * Iss YouR ROOF IN ORDER

eed a special education intended Vould the Royal children be abiey &

or people who are going to, have to share their companions’ life} ¢ $ FOR THE HUBRICANE

ipecifically intellectual jobs. But
or the person who is to turn out a
ood all-rounder; who wants the
best education the country cap
brovide to enabie him or her to







ead 2n intelligent, happy life, the pRINCE CHARLES and his little sister; a pi other's homes for play and tea. ‘ga can r 7
3 § : ; a picture taken when Prin- 4"; is probably » nicest pi We Can Supply You With ...
Puce ‘would have made it clear coat Ane was one month old : ah ee ee ie BEPLACY ; eae
a ii ate Matin. tin think—

hat the ordinary school for the ae p Ne his gaia the fe eee a pepeceears and un joyal children sharing it GALVAN S
at ore oa ‘ n tha he example of the orthodox school where the already ~“ ; or 4h 4 ‘ > Te it i " ,
dinary children was the best a arnt a wend . otitis 'y , e ready gut is it impossible? Is it im- PIPES ote.
hate Goins ~ al, Peanily has proved to be low fees are graded according to possible to imagine Prince re * .

And how nice it would be for

Roval children themselves to
pend their childhood in the or-
inary rough-and-tumble of un-
elfconscious play, picking their
riends from the widest possible

seook satisfactory compromise. Though 5 ar , ible? 4 7

od aid BOS ied ae Ta Woolverstone Hall is intended for waa lie Aa IF it is Te und we, $ A e
wn children, vat gl ended tora ole Pe “a But 38 they? Let’s have a . ae aang: | ourselves} 9 30 Gauge 26 Gauge 24 Gauge
And how nice it might be for . Senge ue ‘ ook at them. whether it oug: o be? al $4.00 each
s, too, to have a Monarch who intellectual one “Well,” some people ‘might And if we answer that it is i oo M.aeeh a a h
new his people as a friend and By the same methods as the 4sue, “Royalty is by its nature impossible and that it ought to be ee ng _
ot only as a King. ider public-schools—the tie, the Sacrosanct. If it mixes with children should continue, as they 8 feet Long — $4.80each $5.50 each

Public School cap, ete —it still deliberately sets Oy ae ome on i eae ieee have at the past, * be educated e

. 7 its pupils apart from the rest, the wi Ose the very uality for privately, to miss the games in
Consiuer what else the Queen ordinary children who haven't which people venerate it.” parks, the explorations in the in 14”, 4", 1"; 14%4”, 14”, 2” and 4” Diameter
ight choose. made the grade, ‘On Show’ streets, the swimming and the ‘ "
She could send her son to one : v B a clubs, the bus rides and every- 0
f the traditional public schools. Gordonstown I can’t answer this objection. thing else that goes with ap faicpniscohcoaieecns es °
what, after all, is the normal edu- it Prince Coaries went to Wool inal Eset eink en,
ation of upper-elass English verstone Hall, all we'd have tote who tim nat soya ty and as y : 2 (THE HOUSE FOR BARGAINS)
oys. iearnt it that it wasn’t money or Veneration are instparable, such Poor little Royal children! $
but if Prinee Charles goes to birth that counted, but brains ae Bg obviously be unthink- (World copyright) ® No. 16, Swan Street A Phone 2109, 4406, 3534
ch school, then the poimt is ‘Ihe ordinary schools are still for © ‘ie, But to others, it may ap- Next Sunday ¢
mad. clear that for the “best” ihe also-rens. p-al for that very reason. THE QUEEN AND HER ®

beopic these are the. best schools,
very ambitious parent must

CHU

y
JOSEPH LINDLEY

The rich sciepust s.16 his
laboratory to become a power
ln politws ... NOW he Taces
a tig aecision













Should he go, perhaps, to the
L.C.C, public-school at Woolver-
stone Hall? I’ve heard this sug-
gested, but it seems a most un-

Then should he go to his father’s
old school at Gordonstoun in



income, and where the pupils are
encouragéd to share in the life
of the country-side around them?
This might be a good answer—

the disadvantages of send-
ing Royal children to ordinary

if

it

It will be objected
Royal cnilaren

that tne
would be stared



principles with dislike, even con-

empt,
T.V., Too
Being a bachelor, the Prof. lives
in college, and Christ. Church is
his real home. Thither he repairs







RCHILL’S PROFESSOR

{t wou.d be absurd io pretend
ibat the Prof. has any deep
«..owleage
ths Britush people.

ccuege and the English country

of the greamess of tude.
Hus world has
a@ivays been that of the Oxtoru

outside school hours?

Other children wander about
with their friends, go swimmin.,
go exploring, drop in at each

Charles and Princess Anne bring-
ing back friends to tea, dropping
in casually on their friends—yes,
friends of all classes?

ADVISERS
by J. Chuter Ede, M.P.

services for which the nation wi.:
ever owe a deep debt of grati
As for the Prof he has always
regarded Mr. Churchill with
veneration bordering upon idola-

a






WHAT sort of person is Lord most week-ends. house. Admittedly tnese are not try. Woe betide the untortunat
herweli, the mahrwho was Mr. Life for the resident fellow of = same—thougn perhaps they siranger who is rash enough to
purchiil’s closest adviser in the an Oxford or Cambridge college ° erlap more at the Proi’s col- :nake in his presence some Uun-
Feceut wat, amd who to-day a: is a curious mixture of discom- !¢;¢ than elsewhere—but they favourable or ill-informed re-
aymaster-General possesses fort and luxury, If the buildings hve in common a certain de- tnark about the Prime Minister
kuch vague, myst@sious, but re- are venerable, so, all too often, tcchment from the world in He will soon discover a_ shar]
uiedly iar reaching powers? is the plumbing. Rooms may be Wich the majority of men spend claw concealed bebind the Prof’
Professoy Lindemmenn, hig name spacious and dignified. They are ¥ sir days. velvet urbanity.
before Mi. Churcitll made him apt also to be damp = and ims remoteness would be a Th lis
p peer in 1941, has been for more iraughty, But the Prof's, own lous Gesect in sOMeone whos ! Fp e Kealist
han Protessor of Ex- feur-room set escapes these dis- s ugat to be a Nawuona, leade WHA'T are we rrof’s rea.
erim Philosophy » the “dvantages, He has seen to it that and to base his power upon mus» views on peoliucs? basy pan
Iniver of Oxiord. The title, ey do mot Jack reasonabl« support But it te brot., ever ceas, hign town ideas, exc
like most. Oxtord titles; ‘is. ar- amenities of life, even includin; Bica such ambitions they ihavé bis COmempl. He 1S essed,
chaic and misleading, The “Props” * ie ee set. bl x ag since vanisned, His one «a realist and a scepuc, Here
las he is always calied by his Tapia orn Mor sivase’ i venture in the teid of popuiar differs sharply from tnose aisuu
friends, is an eminent physicist, {2700 a oe g -ecuoneering —- an attempt io guisned scientisis whose enuu-

land controls the Clarendon Lab-
oratory, Oxford’s centre of phys-
ical research, Ilis salary is just

sollege. The college provides ser-
vice, and produces meals fron
the college kitchen, After a gooc
—and free—dinner in Hall, the





ailure.

siand in 193/ at 4 by-elecuuon foi
hne Universily—was a disastrous

ence in thelr own subject 1S Oily

surpassed by tneir puilibilily
uid OUners,










»@

SEASON ?
e




We have a limited quantity of - - -
BEST QUALITY ENGLISH

SHEETS

AT A BARGAIN PRICE CASH

LOODDOOLOOOHGHHOH HOOD















99O0HHHOO.99H994









On the whole the Prof beileves
in efficiency rather than liberiy.
authority rather than democracy.
if he hates Socialists it is not so
much because they menace iree-

over £2,000 a year.

His appointment is for life, and
he | not relinquished it by
joining the Cabinet. The univer-
sity has given him a year’s leave










ian lh a A | Mh Ba ae

ithe Prof’s career in politics
ous nothing to do with popular
upport, It is based on some-
uing Which ever since 1940, has

fellows retire to the Senior Com
mon Room where they enjoy th:
old fashioned pleasures of vin
tage port (which. they pay for
dessert and conversation.










ef absence, which is due to expire ween even more valuable, the aom as because they combine the
in the autumn, The Prof. seldom dines in Hal.gsupport of Mr. Churchil. two things that he most de.e%ts,

The Prof. is essentially a cos- but after dinner in his rooms hx = ad , c.oudy idealism and administra~
mopolitan, His family originated usually walks to the Seniog) Their friendship is of long tive inepiitude, They are right
from Alsace, He was cducatei Common Room, invariably car-élanding. Mr, Churchill greauy tg regard him as one of thei:
at ihe University of Berlin, He iyimg a roiled umbrella and a4 aamured the courage ald cOn- qeadlest and most uncompromis-
speaks French and German alike bow.er hat even for that shor, ppdence displayed by the Prof as ing foes, :
pertectly. journey. In these agreeable sur-—@2 experimental pilot in the The Prof has never been more

in his younger days, before voundings he is the best of com- ~i9l4-18 war. Convinced on theo- powerful than he is to-day. How
the 19/4-18 war, he was a first- pany. No one can converse scgretical grounds that the propel jong will it last?
class tennis player. His rooms casily ‘With guests, grand orgWay to counteract spin in’ alr ‘The university may well feel
are full of the silver trophies humble, draw them out so well¥eraft was the precise reverse 0! unable to fxtend his leave of
that he won. and give them the flattering sense;#hat preached by authority, th absence, If so, he will have tc

The Prof. is a man of very con- that what they say is importanirof took up an airplane, delib- ¢hoose, during the recess, be-

iderabe ivherited wealth, But and interesting. wrately put it into a spin, and tween politics and Oxford.

life, if not exactly Sparten, Oxford World ‘triumphantly demonstrated the ;

‘ould hardly be termed luxurious.. Apart from Socialism, affecta- ¢orrectness of his calcucations. The Prof accepted office last B bl )

itis rooms at Christ Church are’ iion and pomposity are the only Mr. Churchill has always October with real reluctance. ( y cable
some would say hid- things which the Prof. does not Fespected the Prof’s great ability Those 2, am ae nn
furnished. He is a teé= easily tolerate. A guest once — ‘are among scientists — of hard to believé, despre S) -
a vegetarian, and a -ententiously Shacrved? HA one expounding complicated techni- loyalty to Mr. Churchill, that the GRAN PRIX ACF. ROUEN FRANCE

non-smoker; although for him ghould not kick a man when he Cal subjects in terms intelligible Prof will prefer the fleeting and
this ebstinence is a matter, no: is down, “ On the contrary,” the to the layman, Mr. Churchill precarious joys aes por h
of morals, but of taste. Indeed, Prof. is said to have replied, has given ample testimony to the to the place whic as bee us) s Fi Poh
the Prof. regards those whe “it is the only time to do it, for services rendered by the Prof as real home for more than 30) j First. ASCARI driving FERRARI
mortify the flesh upon mors’ then he can’t kick you back.” his scientific adviser in the war, years. —LES. i



i Second. FARINA driving FERRARI
Third. TARUFFI driving FERRARI

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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 1952







bo







SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 2

EDUCATION NOTES:

Shufiling

LAST WEEK I comme





19:

‘Teachers

nted on the possibility of the

appointment of one lady to the headship of the Richmond

Girls’ School and later on her refusal.

I also pointed out

that the appointment of a headmaster of the Boys’ School |

should present no difficulty.

On Saturday an advertisement
appeared in tne Press calling for
applicants tor the post of Head-
master of the Boys’ School; and
qual adavertisement calls tor a
Graduate or qa non-Graduate to
fil the post which was not taken
up by Mr. Broome.

I am left to wonder now why
an advertisement was necessary.
The School is still an Elementary
School because the= boys must
leave at fourteen and again be-
cause there are no fees. Ele-
mentary education is the only
one free in this island therefore
I am fortified in my view that al-
though it has been called a
Modern Secondary School it is
a continuation of e.ementary
education. Why then this adver-
tisement? In the case of the
Wesley Halil Boys’ School which
was vacant after Mr. Broome had
been promoted, there was no ad-
vertisement but Mr. Clarke who
had been head of the St. Leon-
ard’s Boys’ School was promoted
to the Richmond School, This is
as it should be if elementary
school masters should not be
robbed of the plum of their ser-
vice. I hope that a headteacher
of an elementary school wiil be
promoted although the mere fact
of my writing this might mili-
tate against such an appointment.
I do not see why a teacher who
has laboured in the small school
cannot be appointed to the plum
of the servite without all this
ado. And the Director himselt
has set a precedent because both
of the appointments made to
these new schools were ele-
mentary schoo! teachers and the
age-limit according to the same
Advertisement remains at four-
teen years. it must still be an
elementary school. This juggling
with personnel does the admin-
istration no good; and [| hope I
will be able to congratulate Mr.
Director on the promotion of one
of those members of the pro-
fession whom he says has been
labouring under great difliculties.
It would be an. inspiration to
many others to look forward to
being “top of his class.”

I should like to know

this Class IV in the
ment means if it is
created for the
stances.
‘ I might be wrong but I thought
that Class IV had been abolish-
ed. I should like to have this
information from any source and
I acknowledge my thanks be-
forehand.

Ancther Appointment

But I am ajiraid , shall have
to be as dissatisfied with the at-
titude of the administration to-
wards the Girls’ School. If Mrs.
Griffith is to retire shortly then
there is reason to suppose that
another headteacher of an ele-
mentary schoo] will succeed her,

what
advertise-
a new one
present circum-

This grabbing of teachers from
the Secondary Schools will do
no good and especially where

the appointee has never admin-
istereq a school before. This is a
new School of a new type, a new
departure in educational policy
and so the experience of a seas-
oned headteacher will be needed
to pilot the school through its
early and difficult stages. It i
true that Mrs. Griffith, capable
and efficient as she is, will begin,
but as soon as a new head is, ap-
pointed then the pupils and the
staff will have to adjust them-

| They'll Do It Every Time

G G77

ry AWAYP DID THAT BUNKHOUSE ©0. YZ

“fT SAY,VIC,OL’ Boy! WiLL
| YOU CHECK ON THIS RIGHT

ORDER GO OUT YET P I SEE

|| BY THE PS.ON THEIR LETTER :
-\ THEY WANTED LEFT-HANDED / WAS HERE.

\ BOTTLE OPENERS": WE'LL
HAVE TO OPEN THE,



MOSGUITOES
WITH NEW



seives to the new approach. A
school like every other institution
needs a good start and only ex-
perience can help it.

It is rumoured that Miss Dan
Inniss of the St. Michael’s Girls’
has been offered the appoint-
ment, I do not know if she will
accept. And let me here say at
once that I intend her no harm.
I do not desire to deny her the
fruits of long years of teaching
and the _ prospects of better
salaty. But Miss Inniss is too
useful at St. Michael’s to be re-
moved.

She has just sat her B.A, in
Trinidad and is the Spanish
Teacher at her school, In fact she
is the only one, As far as I under-
stand it she is the only Spanish
Teacher at St, Michael’s. Why
then move her to a school where
it is easy to get someone else
to do the same job, I made the
same comment in the case of the
first appointment and that of Mr.
Jarvis from Harrison College to
the Inspectorate of the Elementary
Schools. I hope that rumour in

this case will be proved to be the |

proverbial “lying jade.” ;

Other appointments this
school call for comment where
people who have never taught in
their lives are appointed perma-
nently on the staff when Supply
Teachers had their service term-
inated at other schools but I
shal] desist to-day from ‘aking
up the point

to

The point I want to make to-day
is that the removal of teachers
from the Secondary, schools to
take part in the elementary schools
1s not doing the service any good.
There has been a constant cry for
teachers in the Secondary Schools,
Harrison College, according to the
Report of the Director of Educa-
tion himself, had 19 appointments
in three years; and the new Coler-
idge Parry School needs many
teachers, to say nothing of equip-
ment, Queen’s College has been
spared the loss of members of its
staff and Combermere has no less
than four masters on leave.

I note that Mr. Bayne a most
efficient master at Foundation
School was not selected for the
post of Harrison College but Mr,
Davis and his wife were brought
fresh from the University and)
both put in the specialist class|
with their passages paid out and}
to be paid again in three years |
possibly, Mr. Bayne would have!
been here permanently. |

If Miss Inniss is taken from St.)
Michael’s and sent to Richmond}



MR. GEORGE LAMMING



The Child, The Parent
And The Teacher

The Second Series of the course
on “The Child, the Parent and
the Teacher organized by the
Extra-Mural Department of the
University College of the West
Indies, begun at Scout Head-
quarters at Beckles Road, on Fri-
day 26th, when Miss Betty Arne
Social Welfare Officer, took the
Chair and Mr. E. C. M. Theobalds
spoke on “The Development of
Moral Ideas in the Child,

Mr. Theobalds said “It would
not be inappropriate to begin our
study of this question by asking
ourselves what is man’s equip-
ment at birth for moral develop-
ment. Does he come into the
world equipped like the other
animals only with a_ bundle of
instincts which, but for the train-
ing which he will receive later,
have the power of making him
in words of Aristotle, “the most
unholy and the most savage of
all the animals, and the most full
of lust and gluttony?” Or is he a
thing of purity and _ innocence

Godwin. Rousseau’s position was
that original impulses are good
because they are natural, The
child cam do no wrong; its in-
stinets are lovable; it can never
misuse the period of childhood, Its
soul is always at peace and a
smile continually on its lips.
Men become evil only as they
leave uncontaminate Nature.

The opposite view may be at-
tributed to those who think in
terms of original sin, to be atoned
for by punishment inflicted either
by the Supreme Being or by an
earthly master, Punishment either
actual or imminent must be the
principal instrument for making
children good, The exponents of
this view sought support from a
passage from the Bible’ with
which we are all familiar, even
though the other side pointed out
that the son of its author (who
presumably applied it) turned
out very badly, losing his inheri-
tance as a result. At about the
same time that Rousseau was



then it will be necessary to look|
for another Spanish Mistress
whereas One appointment from
the ranks of the elementary}
schools would save all the)
shuffling of personnel, This exodus)
and replacement of teachers from}
the secondary schools is bound to
lower the standard of the schools}
because it disturbs the continuity |
and robs the school of the influ-|
ence of the teacher over a period |
of years, This is likely to bring
as great, if not greater, dissatis~|

faction to parents who now pay
high fees at these secondary
schools as the recent changes

have brought to the elementary
schools. I hope that it will not
be necessary for me to make any
further comment on this point and
that I can go on to make construc-

tive suggestions besides that of
having a commission of enquiry. |

dBase.

Registered U, $. Potent Office




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coming perfect from the hands
of the Creator but degenerating
in the hands of man, as Rousseau
claims? And supposing we take
the middle view that he is born
neither angel nor beast, but some-

preaching that force was mis-
chievous, that there is no com-
pulsion with anything but love,
that the only habit the child
should form should be the habit
of forming no habit, and God-

thing of each one, would it be win was expressing his firm
true to say that those amounts faith in the perfectibility cf
vary according to the stock from human reason, there were men
which he comes, in other words, as eminent as John Wesley who
that there 1s a hereditary moral could write words like these
endowment which is likely to ’

shape the whole course of his life ‘Break your child's will in
except in so far as it can be it may not perish

' j Break its will
modified by the various educé= pjiainiy—or ¢

rder that

as soon ¢
even before

it can speai
it can Fpea<

tive agencies in the environment, at all. It should be forced to do ws
of which’ the Home and the i ee, even if you have to whip it
a pec s ' en times running.”

School are the most important? freak its will te’ order that tts soul
Questions such as these have may live

been asked for centuries and the
answers have ranged from the These views are irreconcilable

and perhaps desire from the op-

the most eminent champions of posite temperaments of thei:
what might be called “the an- advocates, they show how human
gelic view" were Rousseau and temperaments can vary widely.
ye And tempt us to theorise thot

the native moral endowment of

children exhibits as great a vari-
ety as their native mental en-
dowment; that moral sensibiljis
is a varying trait, the measure
of which may be formed to bx

By Jimmy Hatlo











ViC AIN'T GOT ENOUGH
TROUBLE’ EVERY ORDER

7 TROUBLE ~E' TRAINS ARE distributed in accordance with

H SLOW AND THE CUSTOMERS the law of variation, forming a

DON’T KNOW WHAT THEY curve of chance in much the

WANTED IN THE FIR: same way as Intelligence o;
PLACE---- ‘d Height.”

BER ass SS WE OUGHTA After discussing how far moral

DUMP HIM IN quaiities may be considei eu

A BOX AN’ SHIP uereditary Mr. Theobalds weue

HIM TO SIAM :**~ on to say — “hus habits whicn

ITD SAVE THE | J are the core of character have

T] FIRM PLENTY their foundation in the instinc-

HEADACHES] | tive impulses with which we

were born. It may be true that
habits however good may grow
to such extent as to justify their
being described as unconscious
in which case they may cease 10
have any moral significance.
People who think with Pascal
that true morality consists in
“right thinking” will be inclined
to attract less importance to
habit and Plato has pointed out
that virtue which was a matte:
\pof habit only without philosophy
| }was not enough to the great mas:
of human beings, However the
road to right living seems to be
the. formation of wood habit
This is the practical objective of
the school and the = averare
parent. We will accordingly now



| Harey pays AND |
NIGHTS IN THE HURRY |
= DEPARTMENT=*-=



E
ED RADZINSKI.

812i BURHOLME AVE., |

PHILA. Il) PA.



if
/

TUESDAY

and Re-open

Foundry Lid.

WHITEPARK







SUNDAY ADV

‘Castle O

We will be closed for

STOCK-TAKING

MONDAY Sept:

Wednesday Oct:

A. BARNES & CO., LTD.

OCATI

In The



USED TO
DREAD
WORK

My Skin ~~

By GEORGE LAMMING




He Lost the Pains inhis Arms

No wonder this man dreaded |
going to work, for rheumatic |
pains in his arms made it torture |
to use them. Yet to-day he feels |
fitter than ever and work is @ |

|

A recent issue of The Times |
Literary Supplement devoted a}
lengthy article to a consideration |
of “a new generation of West In-
dian’ writers, which may well |
bring to English literature fresh |

and vital qualities.” There can| pleasure, as he tells in his letter 1
be no doubt about the fresh and “] had been suffering from
vital qualities displayed by IN| pyeumatism very badly and had

THE CASTLE OF MY SKIN, the
first prose book of a young man |
already known as a poet in his;
native West Indies and not un-
known here. George Lamming
was born of mixed African and
English descent twenty-four years

such pains in my erms I scarcely
knew how to use them. Then I
was told to try Kruschen Salts,
and after using one bottle I
found relief. So, of course, I have
kept on with it, am now thor-
oughly better and have never felt
so fit for years, I used to feel

ago in Barbados, whose inhabi- nd sluggish, but now
tants, whatever their colour, are Spy pogglomn instead |
proud to think of their island as| of 9 dread.”--S.B

“Little England”. “Little Eng-

wah +t stiffness of
land” is the subject of George ae ene eae. |
Lamming’s remarkable book, t

by deposits of excess uric acidin |
the muscles and joints, Kruschen
stimulates the kidneys and other
intestinal organs to regular |
healthy action so that all the
excess uric acid is expelled
through the natural channels,
When that goes, aches and pains
go too. Freshness and vigour
are restored

If you are troubled with rneu-
Kruschen a trial

which might perhaps be describ-
ed as something between a novel
and an autobiography. It is a
singularly rich book, rich in the
quality of its writing, in humour,
passion and compassion. George
Lamming recreates in all its sim-
plicity and—for us—its strange-
ness the whole life of a village
in Barbados during a period of



change, roughly from 1935 to| matism, give er

as: a village that, at the be- or i oe str
gimning of the book. is still liv- all Chemists and S .

ing in a feudal relation to the} —— i js {

white planter’s estate on the hill
but which, before the period
ends, is to know strikes and riots;
and change of ownership. Some
of the scenes of boyhood will ir-
resistibly recall HUCKLEBERRY
FINN; others may well remind
the reader of Mr, Dylan Thomas's
PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST AS
A YOUNG DOG. There is a
whole gallery of characters who




Rub away the pain-/

ful torment of muscu-
lar sprains and bruises.
A.l, ite Liniment 4
trates to the source of the
pain. Its soothing warmth

‘

SPDDDI-PPIPRORPPOOOODVGY HP OYE D-H

THE BARBADOS ELECTRIC SUPPLY

PAGE ELEVEN -

el





IMPORTANT NOTICE

Electricity Supply.

WE BEG to notify our Customers that a TOTAL

SHUTDOWN of the Supply will be necessary be-
tween 12 Noon and 3 p.m. on SUNDAY 28TH SEPTEM-
BER, to enable essential alterations to be carried out
en our Main High Tension Switchboard.

Further work will be necessary on subsequent
Sundays and Consumers will be duly notified.

CORPORATION LTD.

Vv. SMITH,

General Manager.

mos





THE






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SEA VIEW GUEST =}

insinuate themselves into the af-
fections: “Ma” and “Pa’, the old-
est inhabitants; the radical vil-
lage cobbler, whose oracle is Mr.
J. B. Priestley; Mr. Foster and
Miss Foster; the hero’s mother—
a most moving representation
this; and the boys Trumper and
Bob and Blue Boy. With a loving
detail that never sentimentalises






or falsifies, Mr. Lamming evokes y x
a way of life which had dignity YOUSE 3 |
and a turbulent humanity. It ¥4

BARBADOS %
%,

HASTINGS,
Daily and Longterm Rates

is
not until the end of the book,
when the hero meets a friend re-

turned from the United States, quoted en request.
that the problems of face and Permanent Guests
colour cast their shadows over welccme.

the scene. IN THE CASTLE OF

%
; Dinner and Cocktail
MY SKIN is at once poignant and

Parties arranged.
J. H, BUCKLAND
Proprietor.

LPL LEELA

delightful, and beautifully writ-
ten, “Little England” is fortu-
nate in having so gifted an in-
terpreter as George Lamming,
and “Big England” will recognise
in him as original and mature a

talent as has appeared for many
years.

T0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

1953
RAPHAELS ALMANAC









consider what the moral outfit

of the pre-school child might (Prophetic Messenger and
be, Weather Guide)
Mr. Theobalds dealt. sts i
* cneobalds dealt stage by Also the above combined

BARBADOS TELEPHONE COMPANY
LIMITED.

Registered 3 April, 1903.

The Company invites public subscriptions at par
for FIVE PER CENT CUMULATIVE PREFERENCE
SHARES of £1 each of an intended issue of £50,000.

This issue forms part of an authorised capital of
£100,000 of FIVE PER CENT. PREFERENCE SHARES
carrying a fixed cumulative preferential dividend at
the rate of five per cent. per annum on the capital
for the time being paid up thereon, and ranking both
as regards capital and dividend next after the 35,000
existing six per cent. preference shares but in priority
to the authorised capital of 200,000 ordinary shares of
£1 each, of which 150,000 shares have been issued.

Forms of application for shares and particulars of
the issue may be had on application to the Secretary.

The subscription list will open on the thirteenth
day of October 1952 and close at 12.0) noon on the
eighteenth day of October, 1952.

By Order of the Board,







stage with the development of 4 oPHEME
the moral sense in the child both | 2 sk rapa
in home life and school life. With =
the infant regularity was an im if

JOHNSON'S
STATIONERY

portant need, especially in cuce
matters of food and sleep. Witn
regard to obedience, Mr. Theo-
balds contrasted the views of
Rousseau, who = said Nobody
has a right, not even a father, to|
command a child to do a thing,
with the patria protestas of tic
Romans which gave the fatner
powers of life and death, at ieas! \
in theory, The parent who was
loving yet wise and firm, would
find that the child in the long run

was glad to have formed the
habit of obedience. At schoo!
the child becomes a member o!

a larger society; his social educu-
tion has begun and social educa-
tion is moral education, Teach -~
‘g at this stage was supplemen:-
ed by .eligious instruction, With-
out belief in the fatherhood of
God and its corollary the broth-
erhood of man, the child was leit
with a purely materialistic phil-
osophy. There should be discrim-
ination in selecting subjects fx

study from the Bible. Stories
like those of the friendship of
David and Jonathan, and the

fidelity of Ruth and Naomi, were
beautiful and valuable, but one
should be careful in introducing
stories like the sacrifice of Isaac

or the method by which Jaco
displays to Esau two young!
children,












Mr. Theobalds went on to sa)
that the teacher and pupil should
not regard each other as natural
enemies. The relationship should|
be rather that of a big and lit\le
Best results

brother, were
achieved where fear was ban-
ished from the school. An inte:
esting discussion followed and
Miss Arne thanked the lecture:

for his stimulating survey of the
problem The next meeting of |
the Study-Group will take place!
at Wakefield, at 5 o’clock on Fri-
day, October 3rd, when films wiil|
be.shown by the courtesy of thd
Britisty Council, oa

FOR

All sizes

Priced

29th

30th to





for business

lst.



BEAUTIFUL LAMPS ="

(Corner

T. G. McK INSTRY,
Secretary.

Registered Office,
James Street.



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se ere tne ERIC SOARS SOR 9 er A â„¢ ~









neem meron

B’dians Study ) Sugar Engineering In Glasgow

By PAUL FOSTER —



ley, who has fought and jeft her,













































































‘ 7 y f reappears years later, penniless,
om : he turns to help him too. Wil-|f 3 %g,
eyo her, whem she has served faith= ; : # es
Pai \ ; . - ‘uly for so many years, is about
-y {An abridged wersion of the Gary’s complete imaginative sym- to marry her, when his heirs
i z final lecture given by Mr. R yathy with his subject. There is have her arrested for robbing
tro i 4 { LeFanu at he British Council nO sentimentality. or cleverness him, The charee is: ‘Guineniney
Metal I ‘i [ a on Monday, 22nd Septenrber about it: Cary sees the primitive ver and Sara gets eighteen
tur ete African as heis, subject to violent- rnonths: . this is where the book
cou eft ir Joyce Cary was born oe Dor y alternating moods of depression pegins and ends. She bears little
jiand industry. gal, Ifeland, im 1888; he cor nd ecstacy, imertia and sudden maijice; when she is out, she will
li aA Devonshire fepuly brutality, credulity and cunning, set about making another nest,
indeed the West Indi gal - gma in those Pe and 4 cccepting injustice, tortures anc reereating her own personal
producing ¢ atric mt e custom in many Angkh , Lasgueres aS part of the natural world. In her own story, Sara is }f HURRICANE LANTERNS
close assoziation th the « families, he was = given ni inevitable order, Pagans, teyal, affectionate, ruled by her}
Glasgow. There is, however mother’s, name of Joyee. Ho hristians, Mohammedans, Dis- jeart, and. this, too, is Witcher’ ;
betwner aseow and the West in Cliake detent. mat adadienbn nict Officers and Missionaries picture of her. But she turns. up {J SHEET TIN
Nes closer together. in Edinburel ee Oe oa. pow, ee life in this again in ‘The Horse’s Mouth’, — : : ‘
ir easel wenecatiane: iiost shut caleaeeicnaaeeneesteatoaneens ve ed and y canvas, The older, larger, more used by life, SOLDER 19 per Ib
aoe 7 a ied ‘ a Montenegrin Dettalion for ine i : js COMENERy _— and vigo-ind Gulley pushes her down. the oe ra] ,~ >
f ? ; Balkan War of 1912/13; later fe tus, At the age of forty-two, cellar steps. To him, she seems SAD IRONS per Pair
omnes re oe ee was transferred to a British Red me a made = brilliant debut « cunning, vain, — self-deceiving BOX IRONS eo ant
cat ae hirt The ts - oe Cross Party and saw service at see sone OTE = man-chaser — and, of course, ' INS Ime COCR
epee wigion Veten Co the front. In 1913, he jgined the . able qualities, Johnson is Clerk in thelr contexts. ‘But Gulley} COAL POTS @ .. 3.37 each
age of 17, 01 thereabouts, they FRANK GRANNUM Nigerian Political Service, served c to a District “Officer: uite irre- ‘still sail a soft s ot for thea feel
serve as apprentices for five years in the Nigerian Regiment during 50MIN” CAREY. pressible, he drinks, Tiahits lies they have: be ie ude a le tg 8
during which time they attend Arts degree at Leeds University is the war and was: wounded in the pean Gh ie ileseictane ihe hemuand Tea nea te ne oe, antbiorr ed are really the same|]) a ms s
night school. Their aim is to obtain 2,present a theological student at Cameroons Campaign, Returning !'0 any 0° “WC Saat der in si é xtravagant Kind. of in their insatiable ji GENERAI HAR DW ARES PPTIFS
the Higher National Certificate in Mirfield College, Yorkshire. to political duty, he was sent as created: to involve the reader in sity, exuberant and extravagant = ni person in their ins | “ eh i sds ida Pui
Mechanical Engineering. With this George hopes to be ordained next magistrate and executive officer to 'bis transposition—as Cary does in prosperity. At length he over- 2st for life and in the courage |) queen ; om
7 ° ol : , ¢ z ; sat reaches i and truth of their imagination. fem RSP am
certificate, after taking a course rE ¥'G ; : Borgu, at that time a very remote Sichameeatkanees "ams meleonaieeils out 7 alan en and ant casi deca a >
in industrial administration and ‘rank Grrannum, whose parents district. $s 3 y ce ve ee in again 5 . a Pikgri is about Tom ell ne Pye a : og a
holdive a he ponsible position with Dr. and Mrs. F N Grannum are Ree sete aren ee degree of sympathetic insight and another brief spell of authority Wilcher a ee ane RICKETT STREET (Opposite Post Office) PHONE 4912
an engineéting firm, they then coming to England in October, left service and he was advised to !™aginative power. and good fortune before he is loved. Wileher suffers th® loneli+ | Bseese——————— TS
qualify and can apply at the age Barbados in September 1949, and jyetire from tropical Africa He The type of novel Cary writes, taken up on a murder charge. ness of age and is alrea
of 26, for entry to the Institute like Michael is with A. & W. Smith 4, ;

then began to write but was so ‘he novel dealing with the indi- He bears no ill-will at his exe- eccentric. He has been a man of
7 te Member en rr Monk sd certtheated Wares tule ‘higher dissatisfied with his work that he Vidval im relation to society, is cution: an artist in life, Johnson strong family affection and deep
cla nbers ‘+ I Mech v ales é S §







dni m tie ; a _ nowadays rather out of fashion. has had a good time while it religious faith; a liberal by con-
E.). iational and has two more years ‘ + hi Ry eee ee eee But it has a long and honourable lested. The same exuberance ani- viction bul at heart a sonservative, |.
Similarly, other West India: \pprenticeship to serve and about a a y ¢ th at tae ©~ pedigree—through Defoe, Fielding mates both style and subject: ‘or whom the ties of affection have
have passed through Geo Fletch- ‘three more years of night school. a e next tem years re and Dickens. The rapid successior Johnson almost bursts his sears been stronger than the drive to
er’s of Derbyshire, sugar machi ie will be 21 in January. Frank educating himself, and it was not (+ Goents in his novel?Wis also with ‘life os tect adventure, So instead of becom-
: , ’ a NA ee ; § $ sWis also with life and we tremble anc ; :
ry manufacturer: 1as a sister Nan, studying nursing until 1930 that he published — his reminiscent of these great write rejoice with him ing a missionary, he has become
i n Yorkshire, Dr. and Mrs. Gran- first novel; he has written twelve | ~. dMiingiis sbways es it ”, the A < f Cary’s 4 lawyer, and managed the estate
In Glasgow at the moment ar num will be coming to Scotland more since—his most recent will hile i+ 5, Sage = hl Ale ea second eg BEY. end the affairs of his more brill-
four Barbadians working with er n January, but he hopes to see appear this week—a@ book ol Oar . eee one puvels Geals with ‘another care- iant brother:and sister; for all this
gineering firms. They are Michael em on Christmas Eve for a fam~ poetry: and three books of politi- Cary ange s arge — too, i Bory of primitives — children he has received little thanks. Now,
Hatch, Frank Grannum, his cousin {ly reunion, thé first in three years. (21 theory. lot of characters, plenty of time ‘A House of Children’ (1941), hack im-the house he loves watch-
Herbert Grannum and Peter Frank’s cousin Herbert aged 19, ‘phis_ full and. variéd life is °¢ elbewfoom: his later novels; a scarcely veiled account of his j., put unable to stop his niece
Roach. op of Mr. and Mrs. William Gran- jefjectea in the exceptionally wid though nevet diffuse, all cover own youth in Ireland, seems to and nephew make 1 mess of their
inhne’ nto OE. Van re, "| ne if At ” " . C ‘ t ne a- : hi z , 12 4 é i ess
ot eine teh, 2A your old om aT Of MOR ROTA Cange of Cazyta. worms. Thane. iat Serie’! OE fo oF thiee genera ne tb very. duel of ehilbaod: ste tives: ties rooety ih the Part
St. Peter's Church, Speightstown, 4 September, 1950. He has got nothing superficial in his amazing It is therefore no‘ surprisins iacioutedivisiin the thaeed 'ox- es his eee Oe eres
and Mrs Hatch, has been in Scot- jhrough his first year certificate V@rsatility or in the quality of his... + the theme of change is 3 ee Ncashiel intuition, he is able to see his life
land since September 1946 with cxcept for one subject—science— thought an d= apprefiticeship. ckcarkstal atabat' tn Carv's ieee pectancy and forgetfulness. ‘n perspective: he recognises
2 ‘ 5 cai 2 : y 1, s a ‘ y's 2 ‘ ; ica “ESS

A. & W. Smith, sugar machinery hich he will take at this year’s. He has read widely and thought change in people, in institutions The Trilogy ne as a ni . areres id
nanwfacturers Michael has session of night school. Herbert Geeply in the fields of philosophy, a ut he does not e it an s




ae ; in society, in feeling: the necessi- In the same year was publish- Jone is ,
served his five years as an appren- bout two and a half more religion, art, politics and history: /" S0Clety 8 5 he year was pub lenely and frustrated. It is only |

7 he t hig eit 4 . ty, the inevita)ility and the trag- ed the tirst book ot tnat reimark- pecause he is still moved by his!
tice, obtained his Higher National sears here. His parents were in these subjects are not just dragged ~) ae eee acd! a : . ecause he 1s s moved . 0} |
Certificate in Mechanical Engin- Glasgow to spend the month of in for effect but form: with the °1Y, of change. People, Cary sug~ ab.e trilogy which seems ai ine faith that he is able to accept it






eering, and, as a Student of the August with him human personality the basic raw &°StS if they are to do more than moment to mark the hughes: as he aecepts his own: failures |
Institute of Mechanical Engineer: Herbert plans to join a Glasgow material of his art, The integra- meee , one : make their own point of F Cary’s r achievement, and | his unfulfilled hopes anid |
is now applying tor Graduate swimming club next year for the tion of his experience ana worlds by continuous acts of crea~ yhis was ‘Herself Surprised’; “1v ambitions, There is much more}
Membership. He has the necessary water polo summer season, He is knowledge with the traditions tive imagination: if they ave pe a Pilgrim’ appeared in 194z here than I have suggested, the
technical qualifications for hi former member of Bonitas water jeliefs and individualit of E *+ young in spirit, the urge is towards and ‘Ihe Horse’s Mouth’ in 1944. brilliant portraits of Wilcher’s
A.M.I. Mech. E., apart from ful- polo club, when as 2nd Sea Scouts, s i o, og-

yelty and change: their worlds * Ri if h h >hs family and friends. the mental
say . lish Protestantis aj = orveir nov 0 i ine im of these three novels . ’
filling the last part of “the con- they won the Barbados amateur sh Protes m gives his work

unity, ¢ Pp al *< will clash with the existing order, was, in Cary’s own words, to give end moral climate of the periods
tract”—a representative position water polo league in 1949. of ma pi orn gent od wholeness with other worlds, Much of the a picture of. English history through which he*has lived, the)
with an engineering firm. Michael Peter Roach, whose father Mr. 2 s wit " ich is extraordinarily tragedy and the injustice of life thro wah eyes duting: the deep love of the ish: country-
has already begun “this last lap” Yoel Roach, owns a drug store in '™pressive. With it are combined ugh En, En

; ‘ ; ' . : 3 has its rootg in this very conflict jast 60 years’. The three bvoxs ‘i4e- It’s a sad book but a beauti-
He is working with Smiths as a Speightstown has been with the imaginative gifts of a very high between the creative and the cre- aré se eat three separate ful ome and strangely moving.
draughtsman. However, he would Mirrlees Watson Co., since he ar- Order which not only give, Cary’s ation. For, as Cary shows us in chapters of autobiography, one

rather seek employment in rived here in June 1950, Peter is b90ks and people their tremendou ; ( i :



at fine 7 a Pilgrim’ , Oe . Two Later Novels ;
warmer clime. After six years of 19 years old and has obtained his Vitality but enable him, if he i sor Ren: tare ee, Sera te ih ag o Pence) . ; |
Scottish climate, he makes one first year certificate towards the wishes, to sink himself completely ,— Py i 't pan ve aie al characters. They can be read in- "The Moonlight’ (1946) is some-|
stipulation, his new job must be higher national. He has approxi- eee Ly ne Leek pe dependently but the reader who what similar in spirit and tech-|
somewhere in the tropics! tnately three more years ahead of tah eee ne Wit en tages ADE {BPC Maybe los has discovered one will rarely nique. Once again. this story |
» Michael is one of the few West him in Glasgow. ae ummer” at 6.45 a.m, is diffi- «long with the evil ovr may remain wish to forego the pleasure of moves forward. simultaneously in
®% Indians of the post-war group to An enginecring apprentice in ta pot and during the win- «nd be corrupted by it. But this, reading the others. the present and the past, andy +.
,. gain the higher national certificate Scotland is no easy task for these jets mae to be experienced before is the way life goes, and Cary’s Let us then take first the most ounce again it’s the present genem}: *:
“ and he can be justly proud of this poys accustomed@ to life in the can be adequately described. recognition of the true nature of

j Work begins g 5 . a) recent and best. known, ‘The ation who are the ‘deracines. B
accomplishment His brother warm weather of the tropics. Hav- finishes begins at 7.45 am. and change goes with his. feeling for fforse’s Mouth’. The narrator is it’s mainly about women, dnd in.
George, who took his Bachelor of ing to get out of bed into a “Scot- ter at 5.30, with approxim- two organic traditions which are 4 painter called Gulley Jimson particular three old sisters, Rose,
‘They porta ber aay ptrird : oo in a state of constant recreation— who has just finished a term in Pessie and Ella Venn. Rose, the

ith n ad- Eyglisn Protestantism and English Nric ned. ® “ap og: atte a
dition to. sometimes working Sat- Englisn Protestantism and English prison for demanding with men- Oldest has always tried to man

re 3 : When the curtair
urdays and Sundays at overtime Democracy, The second and equal- aces from a. former patron, Gul- “se the others—-she has seen her

: Fes ; te ry’ ames “s : ; i nora! é afraic | lied back to present

ragepakAs. 43 * ly important of Cary’s themes ‘: s an eccentric and a genius— ™oral duty and not been afral ro '

start at fel 2, ouMmeen wi the fascinating and infinitely mys- a a ciliate to Gane own ae Fagg oN ae re o ‘
: ising . ‘mately ‘erioug complexity of human fisa the is: hated by both of them, by z FF

PN me ah Be sent character. : " genius that we accept this: he is (1.0 has managed to break away! . ZEPHYR by Ford

also rowdy, cantankerous and

at the end of five years appren- from her, and by Ella who has

ticeship The African Scene dishonest — but unwavering in become increasingly dependent a Mate criBenriad din \N
Night school sessions begin in , His first group of books derives his complete integrity as an snd outwardly devoted to her. S
September and run throughant the {rom his experiences in Africa. artist. Gulley is an old man w — Only when Rose dies, does Ela, commenced — and a new
winter until March, ‘Aissa Saved' is about a young he comes out and we have in his who has nursed her through her
One official of a”company ems African girls who isya-canvert to racy) colourful idiom the story of illness, realise, her true feelings pleasure was introduced
pleying West Indian apprentices Christianity. She lapses when she the tricks and strategems to towards her. It is through Ella
has this to say:— After travelling goes with her fellow Christians to which he resorts in order to keep (hat the story is told; Ella is be~ to the roads of the world SS

all this way (approximately 4,000 take the gospel to a neighbouring himself alive and to raise the coming a little queer and she
miles) overseas apprentices are village. Out of sheer high spirits, money and find the space to paint thinks she is responsible for Rose’s
more determined to stick the long }owever, she insults the pagan the vast masterpieces which no- period of training. Another official pods and is hunted as a witch, body will buy.’ His final defeat auite clearly. Her weakness is
points out, “there is one major She escapes with a broken leg is really a triumph, [ don’t think ‘hat unlike Rose, but like her
problem, however and that is to. inq struggles back to the Mission i is claiming too much to sug- waughter, Amanda, she has not
gel an overall general attendance where she is reconverted and is gest that ‘The Horse’s Mouth’ is Known what she wanted—or when

t i sc T : 5 as ried
the big cy Sap teardhiattiawevand soon back in aétion, leading a one of thé comic masterpieces of She has known she has not t



’ $ ; A h nough to get it: for her, the
the bright lights “dazzle” them, ind of holy war which 8 Feey, CE ata s ised’ is the story rhein foagmation has been
But the majority soon realise the S00n transformed into an lun- Crse: UEpree is lie stillborn. *



= ‘ < has > ., holy massacre. Aissa lapses of Sara Monday, country girl.

PSL yar oa TUNA, “Gight) of Barbados “ork has to be done and they again, meets @ particularly horri- cook, widow, once Guiley’s a he coe

chattin gwith John Lanigan of Jamaica outside their home in Glas- papi ame ite Ns ig aan ble death, bit dies in the faith. model and mistress, later house- oe darn, $k Sho tonaneep the
gow. These are three of the West Indians who are working as working as an apprentice—“it’s a This first novel is remarkable both keeper and mistress to the old year. Although .

ne ee tough life, but we can take itt" for its terrific vitality and for lnwyer, Tom Witcher. When Gul- Moonlight’ is. as Soran anything

~— : Cary has written, one feels some-

Getting Up Nights a
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@ On Page 16

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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 1952 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE THIRTEEN
os ;













HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON | [ zHe ramcess wno } : : BRINGS A SMILE TO «|
WOULDN'T SMILE ; — I eal) a EVERYONE’S FACE

Just serve delicious Royal Puddings to
your family and friends—and then watch

the smiles of satisfaction. You'll smile, +
too—for Royal Puddings are so easy ip
prepare—and so economical, too. hy

one today.



in a far-off land lived a Princess who Close by lived a tailor and his son. Ong So he brought her a dish of Royal Pud
never smiled. Clowns and jugglers came day the son had an idea. “I know whal ding. And when she tasted it, her face
from all over, but not one could bring will make the Princess smile,’ he said, broke out into & big smile. In fact she
out even the tiniest smile “Royal Pudding!" gave him her hand and her kingdom



THIS FLOWER.



By Appointment
Gin Distillers
to the Late
King George VI



9
DIS THELEN |
iN LOND eon ae







BLONDIE

| AS a bee ONCE A BASKETBALL
| 7a DROP THIS IN THE PLAYER, ALWAYS A ~
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“ WAY QUT, DEAP







WHY DONT YOU PLAY
GOLF OR TENNIS
LiKE OTHER MEN
YOUR AGE @



BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES |
ll fo ponree ey | | aemerie ee a seers aac cats )| !
\ > \ os * \e, \ + ee | ee you | :
NW] SNK ec tintin OG Jee 4\/. * Poe a
\ PLENTY ROUND | om LN Ree A fy

THE COLGATE WAY
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(THAT'S IT... IKE
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— WEAVING A

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ULL BE LARNED!
IT'S WEAVING
ETHING/

COLGATE.

VCLEANS YOUR TEETH
aT ele LN
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Always brush your teeth
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BR

ROUND UP THE POLICE
| WE'RE NOT OUT OF THE PARADISE! I'LL TRY AN?
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BRINGING UP FAT

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ODNESS-HOW :

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\ YOU WERE (
'M



THEN THERE IS A CLICK...
AND MAYBE YOU CAN WIN

/ OUT OF -

Ga, TOWN +)



$40.00
IN THE
ADVOCATE |
CHRISTMAS CARD |
COMPETITION |

This year the ‘Advocate’ is running a Christmas Card Competition, the results
of which will be published in the Christmas number,

TT's REALLY FUNNY, PAGAN. THE LAST T'VE GOT TO... I NEED MEANWHILE, THE MANGLER GROWS UNEASY: |

THING ON EARTH FINGERS WANTS HIS HELP...BUT DON'T WHAT Goes over \ {II eek
TO DO IS HELP ME GET THAT RIFLE WORRY, TLL KEEP MY / Sv aaa ANY WANE 2 I BETTER
FROM THE MANGLER'S HOTEL..BUT EYES OPEN! < . SHOT PASAN...I SAW | DROP OVER
OH, RIPL | } HER FALL! BUT THE AND HAVE
S/ it WGHT BE | Fl ‘ P Li ye |
TRAP! DON'T | E T tS \ SJOINT'S TOO QuieT!
A euer mit | aI ent NO COMMOTION. ..NO

Fe , I}\ yy COPS... AN’ HER
‘ NAME'S STILL UP





Competitors should note the following points:—

The competition is open to all readers of the ‘Advocate’ and cards can be of
any size or shape.

Cards can be made by any process—painting, drawing, photographic, ete.



iAan=[===-"—0"0”"”—”—722—=2>=4—.8=—ETNEETE8E—qmE8008E00.080080. 0 aaaaaaaeaaaaaaaaaa666Nq00 eeeaeaaaaaaawuwwwwmnnev—v—_——<—aewrw_aerr
eee

ARE YOU TRYIN TO KID ME? IM A competitor can enter any number of cards, but all cards must be original work.
LITTLE. BUT | CAN HANDLE MV
DUKES! NOW TALK STRAIGHT!

WHO IS HES carrera

ae



Preference will be given to cards with a Barbadian or West Indian flavour and

to novelty cards,

— Tint au wit THe THAT SKULL MARKON ] IN BENGALI | |SEE THE GUY ‘C6 THE PHANTOM
| GOTTA Fila THAT GUY WITH THE DOG ) |My KID BROTHERS KNOWS THAT WHO IS HE? Lea THE GHOST WHO
+ POWN! NOBODY ELSE ,— aes ‘ RECOGNIZED J . vt -

EVER DID THAT++ rT £
| |

GAY= WHEN YOU SAW reenon |





The judging will be done by a judging committee which will include the Editor.
Their decision will be final

—

Prizes will be as follows: First—$40.00; Second—$20.00; Third—$10.00; and ¢t
consolation prizes of $5.00 each.

A selection of the cards will be displ d at the ‘Advocate’ Stationery and later
at the Barbados Museum

1 The closing date for the competition is 4.00 p.m.-on October 31st; but competit
ng in their entries now

All cards should be addressed to the Editor, The Adv te, Bridgetown











































































































ASSISTANT."A = Counter = Assistant
4 (lemale) for our store Apply by letter
* and in person to Geo, C. Ward & Co.,
St. e, Ch,

Lawrer Ch,



27.9, 52—2n

HOUSEKEEPER For Codrington Col-
Quarters provided. sr
the





John
may

lege, St.

tienlars be obtained from

Principal.

—~28.9.52—3n.













































CANE, CARTS without tyres and) pint:
form from $360.00. up to, $500.00 fr
Stock or can be. ordered for the comi
crop. Smith's Engineering W:
4947, Roebuck Street.

ks. Phone
9

OLIVETTI (M 44) Typewriters, “Avail:





































Mahogany Bureau, Breakfast Table and

*o notify the Secretary by Monday 13th | cna: mand green) Larder,
Qetoner. Kiteher SPinet, lwestcold, Refrigerator,
: 8S. GITTENS, in working order, Ware yss, Enamel

Honora) Becratany
7 28.9. 52—8n,

Top Table, Valor, and Perfection Stoves
and Ovens, Blectrie Washing Machine,
Pyrex W. , Saucepans, Glassware, Tes
Sets, Chdbbery. etc., Ga Tools, Ferns,
' Lillies, Palms and Congrete Pots ~
Sale 11.30 o'clock. ‘Terms cash
BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,

Auctioneers

. NOTICE

-S hereby given that all persons having
ny debt or claim against or affecting

































gallery, The outbuildings comprise





servants room and garage. The
property stands on app oximately
1,000 square feet of land within

100 yards of the famous Rockley
Beach.

BUNGALOW ‘

Situate in Rockley New Road
commanding a magnificent view fe
°

the Golf Cou”se unobstructed



















SIX MEN’S : 30th September
Ist and 2nd October

yae~ Kindly arrange your Shopping Accordingly !

R. & G. CHALLENOR LTD.























—Attractive house with verandah,
living room, 3_ bed , garage.
ROUMAIKA, DAYRELL’S ROAD
Imposing 2 storey house with Ss
reception, 6 bedrooms,
guest house or club.
VILLA ROSA, PASSAGE ROAD
—Spacious well planned bungalow
on 14,000 sq. ft. Dining,
:oum, 3 bedroms, outhouses
SRAFORT, PAYNES BAY, 8T.
JAMES Re-modelled 2 storey

suitable

sitting

PAGE FOURTEEN SUNDAY ADVOCATE __ SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 1952 _
sii ee pn aneneteense=n seccees— ss mmm ce
ape ” “J a>

CLASSIFIED ADS ee eee SHIPPING NOTICES |

. sacra JOHN
j
j
TELEPHONE 2508 Sndehtiagsee lt a ___BEAb! ESTATE a Ee LEP PPE POOLS SOGSDEHOL i |
2 R g “BYWAYS” eh. Si ’ venue
ETS ania KOM SALE ROCKLEY. New. Ro standing om appeoximately. 1088 aq. ft, NOTICE oe ee A; MOAR wu

CATWEIA—To Mr. and Mrs. Wilfred : ; AD, ; ; ; aT See : : 7 accept Cargo and Passenger for

Catwel) (nee Lolita Lashley) of No. 3 CHRIS® CHURCH gallery, drawing, dining and 3° bed- No appetite? No pep? The ace, ie i

iets apenas, Menthe este uit, This well and. substantially built stone |/00™S. large Kitchenette, garage; flower : 1 ildi . ® ‘ ar oe egg ge eee? gg ean

at “Fouls Avenue, Becklas. Fas me. reaidence stands on 19,260 sq. ft. of land|*24 kitehen gardens with bearing fruit rich, blood-building proper Nevis and st i Pes

a bi and o girl. Mo 4a abies UTO OTIVE ene apec . : sengers oF t la i

doing well oa 8 sir A Mi Rockley Gait Cones, teil traded cis oa Phone sno een CORP es ae of YRAST-PHOS wil Will all Customers hold- 4 ing Friday “yr October, 1952 B LAB@N

ie. P i - >
rani itan | SARs Hilimen Minx Cars. in vers taghtes Breaenatee. on iene, Saar. Sit- 9... pemare lon ee cng-om ing PREPAYMENT METER che Sa, CRN ai
ood dition. —0149-—8488, arge b tampa keep you
IN MEMORIAM | x00 condition. Phone, 3187-0140 9488. | Atzeg. with basins and running water, asa] LAST HOUSE. SPOT.— Blue Water REBATE NOTES present $/!} accept Cargo and Passengers for e ce
CARTER—in treagured and f8deleSS | egenpmeneeqeenneeeeeneeyetees, two of them with built-in cupboards, a| Terrace opposite Col. Vidmer enclosed same for payment on or 3) Dominica, Antigua, Monuperrat. .
memory of our beloved “Husband and} CAR—1950,Vauxhall, exectient condh: | AmHe WellSttes kitehen, and cenasatel by, wall on two sides, Phone Dennis E. dis before the last day of Sep- 3/{ Nevis ana St. Kitts, ne poner
father Gladstone.Carter (‘Papa’) whe |tion, very, reasonable, exchange and toilet. Worme—-8547. —28,9.52—In | tember at the Gas Com- 4 gers only for St. Lueta seen. A.F.S., F.V.A,.
passed to the Great Beyond on the 28th |'for smaller car. Williams Colas opposite | tp, e is a builtin Linen cupboard in| — TONIC | ne Office, Bay Street, Saturday 11th October,
September, 1947, Sayes Court, Government. Farm Christ au passageway, and all the rooms are) LAND—2% Acres of Land. at. Salters, s | pany’s , * a
Gone from us but leaving memories |Chureh (near Silver Sands), ited with extra power points, and the|*t. George. Going reasonable. Avply to 8.30 to 10.00 a.m. 2 BW sumOONER OWNE 1 FOR SALE
aad abe apeun bike, hte 20.9.52~1n, | W1P40ws are fitted, with hoods and. shut-| C!ifford W, Waterman, (Sanitary Inspee- | between ee oe ASSOCIATION (INC.) ; ceibieendll
Memories that will, always linger 5a ters, tor) Market Hill, St. George. | and 12.30 to 2.30 p.m. > Tele, Ne: 4047 } NEW BUNGALOW, LODGE
While upon. this earth. "we. stay? | “CRIN ORG Ga heen tena, Vauxhall, voxdelient bondi | .eO, B,SFound. floor thero is a large| 25.9, - i $ Consignae,, Tele. LAND, ST. MEOHAEL—3 bed-
What though in lonely. grief we. sigh | Lon, very. F nable, Will exe hee jar 8 ft high with cement floor and | ——————————————_ | : rooms, drawing & dining room:
For dear ones now no longer nigh walliens thes Wieaiberty age ar Tple room far storage, laundry. eto.| LAND—7300 sq, ft. Land. Nelson Road. |: SSS kitchenette, breakfast 2
Submissive wolld we still reply | aves Court Government farm, Ch. Ch ere is @ gatage and servant's room in|iiavy Gardens, wide frontage, pantry, garage, * t 7 ew
’ “Thy will done.’ Sesley's Street. the grounds, and servant's bath and|luilding site. Apply, dial 2047. R | BRIGHTWOOD. st. Me acres.
, Ever remembered by the Carter family. | Bay 7 s3—1n totlet-in the ground floor of the house.| Archer McKenzie 28.9.52—3n. Given by Beach ST. LAWRENCE,
% 28.90.5010, | se | Le under-mentioned will offer the prem-| —————_—— —— ERDISTON SPORTS CLUB teams 1 pel diene S Dadecoms, living
; = | CAR — 1 Chev. Master Six. 194? oan ‘*~" sale by public auction at their] PROPERTY — One Board House, gai ana ian d inna Bathing. ng rooms, gallery, garage
’ THANKS | odel | in Al eendiden. Reimen & “s Fiiday ae pg Bridgetown, | vanize roof, 2 bedrooms, ea —at— a CLARENDON, BLACK Ri ae
* MUNT—Dr. Shelburne Hunt and ~d ws tata cs 37.9.58—8n. | at 2 inspection to be arranged ty | sump 16.000 sq it. land, at Lower Weet-| gi THS GRIM, WALL, GARRISON Low priced house with about 1
Gwen Hunt, gratefully acknowledge y 7 3 e
, with deepest appreciation the assistance | CAR—1 Morris Car 10 H.P. 1948 Model ond ening Bias ae Saree particulars} bury Road, Marine Square, St. Michaol ea sourEnouNe Satis Satis Sat. Arrives a iti dining room,
rendered them during the illness of |‘ Perfect Condition. New Battery COnTeeR to; Apply Miss, Allen Siceate on Premises, FRIDAY OCTOBER 3RD, 1952 Montrea! Halifax Boston Barbados Barbad BUNGALOW, THE GARDEN,
the late Mrs. EDITH EVANGELENE | ontact Mallalieu, St. Joseph's Rectory on < or, Wallen Py, Beeets, Upper Bakar Music by Mr. Clevie Gittens WORTHING — Recently built with

HUNT, a loving wife and mother; and iz appointment to inspect Car. Going 24,9, 52— X Road 28.9.53—In. o a : a ‘ “ 25 Sept patio, verandah, living room,

thank all those who attended the | Cheap. 27.9.52—2n. en rehestra CANADIAN AU ENGER 12 Sept. Sept. ~*~ Sept. "

; funeral, sent wreaths and ktters of | ——_——_—_—-::———_——— FOR SALE SALE oF THE MOTOR VESSEL LADY om - ” 4 22-Sept. 25 Sept. 27 Sept. 6 Oct. 1 Oet REIEDING PLOTS. LODGE
4 sympathy on the occasion of her death | CAR—For Sale 1 Chevrolet car, Model BUSINESS PREMISES T. B. RADAR DANCING 9 — 3 LAND, ST. MICHAEL. “4 attcen
» -Bith September, 1952 28.9,52—I1n. | 1934 first class condition. 4 new | The undersigned. will offer tor sale by|, The appraised price cf $35,000.00 not Subseript:eh $1.00 NOKTHBOUND asrtéee Mm takiias se
| tyres, 1 new. battery, Apply to Mr.| Ublic competition at their office, No. 17|@ving been received for the Motor Arrives Sails Asttese. Assiees Mentreal BUNGALOW BLUE WATERS—
M@ORE The undersigned gratefully beg George Hoytey Merricks, St. Philip. Ligh Street, Bridgetown, on ‘Thursday| Verse! 7. BRAD AD ire invited. Barbados Barbados Oct 1s Ost. 1s Oct, Modern home ‘with 3 verandahs
through this medium to return thanks | 27.9,52—2n. e 2nd day of October 1952, at 2 o’clock LADY RODNEY .- 2 Sept. 4
be submitted in a ~ an 21 Oct. 24 Oct. reception, dining room, 3 bed-

> to all those who attended the funeral, « »m. ALL THAT certain parcel of land Such offers are to CHALLENGER 6 Oct. 8 Oct
i*> “Sefit. wreaths, cards, or in any other! CAR—Humber Hawk.Saloon Car. Per, | ituate in Milk Market and Chapel Streets,| Sealed envelopes to be Publie Build non {AY NELSON rk Wore 2 Ot Oe RSS Se COVE SPRING HOU SE. ST

way expressed their sympathy with us ‘fect Condition, Done only 1,500 miles. | 3"idgetown, containing 4,710 Square Feet| M@7shal in Admiralty, Pu i ings ea likin tier JAMES COAST— Draw .

i in our recent bereavement occasioned Uwner ieaving Island. Tel. 2961. with the buildings or stores thereon at| B@rbadose and are to reac a on or MITED dining room, 3 Reston or
; cea omar OS: my bee eHeybey Cee 38.9.53—3n. oe che wean, A. Rollock & Ca, Pcithar tet Oontber the csaled, envelopes . For further particulars, =pply to— workshop Bathing ooms, garage
May Moore oe ‘oice armacy, and Central COVER SPRING | J
| Phyllis Marshall (Dadghtér), Avstin Mar-| HILLMAN SALOONS — new ane | *9undry Limited penis te ON Ware by the GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD. —Agents. JAMES COAST—2 storey residence
+ shall (son-in-law) 28:9.52—-In. used. Austin Saloons — used Citroen Further particulars from the under-| he ae a. ee of the Chief OFFERS — = attractive location. Excellent bath-
: — Saloon. Cole & Co., Ltd. nermr) Sanieune - pa —— epee eer eree ee SOCOSSOSSSOSPOGSIISO> ing
' WALCOTT The family of the iate 26. 9. 52—4n. OTTLE, CATFORD & CO., j SS MODERN HOUSE, FINE HILL
; Benjeman Walcott wish to thank - Solicitors, | For further ik vcs oo tne er rns. Waters. EPPO OSPPPPEPEPPPIP SSPE, Giseda 40... Recently erected. Living room
kind friends who attended the fun-; MOTORCY a) 19.9.52—5n. : Snowe 8 TOR. ee tety ‘AR MECHANICS, PERSONAL breakfast room, 3 bedrooms.
CLE—One (1) 5 H.P. Ariel Marshal in ty : sximately FOR SALE c 3
eral, sent wreaths, cards and letters | Motorcycle in good condition, Reasonably — 13.9 ‘52—ur: end stanaing os eas d, com- CAR SERVICING and CAR garage.
in their recént bereavement. jpriced. Apply: Donald Holder, Hails “HILLRISE” -_ oe ao hao one. cae wells Just received Portable Gramo- DRIVING RESIDENCE, ST. JAMES
i Alice Walcott, Eileen Vaughn, I\y | Road. 21,9. 52—2n GRAEME HALL ene THE BOWER — a_ bungalow-tyre ea mt 4 toilet d bath hones Cabinet Gramophones, POLITICAL SCIENCE and COAST—Valuable and beautifully
: Grandison, Phyllis Walcott CHRIST CHU . dressing-room and toilet an P " “? UBLIC SPEAKING maintained property. Drawing and
: 28.9.52—1 OU a gana dwellinghouse situate at The Garrison, attached, combination drawing and Calypso Records, Sound Boxes, P 7 3
; n.| TRUCK—One V8 FORD TRUC:: with Tho residence lately harepied by Mrs. dl 7,444 uare feet of land. let a x Wednesday, Octo- dining rooms, verandahs, sun deck,

—_———_—_—— Patform, Dial 2523 or 4157, Jillicent’ Hawkins. Wrens Doce ane varendate | we dining room, separate toilet an Gramophone Springs, arid Bicy- % Commence ee 3 § teticams, ae.

; FOR RENT 27.9.52—2n.| This well and substantially built stan¢ peplic roars, two bedrooms, umual_con-| [fs Dash. modern Kickers Tee ee cle Accessories, New Market 9 Ask for detalls at 53 Swan MALTA, | 81.’ PETER — Solid
: esidence stands on 29,318 square feet of| venienc>, kitehen &c., garage, servants’ be: bought for Store, Cheapside Road % Street (Second Floor) modern home with every con-

i « ——— TRUCK-—One 1947 Chevrolet Truck | @%4 enclosed with a wall and has a fine soma and enclosed garden, Electricity he ee rcaaiable fyure, lense COCO OOO act Next door “The CIVIC” venience. Lounge deck, sitting

j HOUSES P--232 in A-one Condition. One 193.) ~%@W over the Christ Church coast. 5 Ned ey eee POSES PCPS ‘ , room, 3 bedrooms. Bathing.

i Ford lon. . The hou: and Government water insta contact us as soon as possible 24 HOUSE, "

“thindiaiehibde thal) saad cans ord Car. (P. 42) Apply to B. Clarke. se contains an open verafidah Inspection by appointment with Mri . ST, PETER — Lavishly

i COTTAGES Two Small cottages for Fyders Hill, St. Philip or G. Bolden rawing vend dining rooms, three bed- 3t. Cla : Dial 3229 * et - equipped home with lounge, din-
‘ / Sma ; 3t. Clair Hunte al 3229, SWREDPIELD ‘
‘ rent (2 bedrooms), from October 1st, Tweedside Road. 27.2, 52—3n Stake, — baths and toilets, pantry, The property will be set up for sale L stone: House comprising ing Yoom, 4 bedrooms, double
fully furnished, St. Lawrence Gap, on Kae ili ere Built-in cup-|»y public competition at our offic Wnetnh, chines Battiemel Inpae aerage, all services i
} sea. Key at Hollywood R. Lynch. ELECTRICAL Re the bhinthant bow e gape oe James Street, Bridgetown, on Friday, living: room, dining room, two ! bultk: at i BALL — Recently
: 28. 9, 5a—In oom, garage for two Bata wreith aoditten 10th -October, 1952, at 2 p.m. YC tolleta and baths, one with tub aioivie roam eanary.c9 bad aaa
} SiGnS “PLANTATION HousEcee. | pELECTRICAL SPRAYER — One (i)| tore-room and large cellars. ‘There are YEARWOOD & BOYCE. | 11) path and, hot and cold water, garage, laundry. Gentine bargain.
ABBS PLANTATION | Electric Sprayer. Complete with Spray] Jso three servants rooms, servant's bath Sete Aen le b gallery, Downstairs; three spare RESIDENCE, ST. JAMES’ COAST
+ Luoy, ideally situated. Apply: A. G.|Gun, Large Air Tank & Sunbeam Com-4 ind toilet and a fowl house. The lawn: The undersigned will offe for sale by rooms, Kitchen and shower room, Seats oi Gee s
} Husbands, Mt. Standfast, St. James Or] pressor, In good Order. Price $110.00, | and grounds are well laid out with iow, public competition at their Office No. 17, standing om approximately 2M Pe cing Rag 8 a cleanly
$ N. EB Husbands, Crab Hill, St, ey: Contact C, Arthur Mayhew, Phone 4748,| ering trees and shrubs and the whole | ‘li#! Street. on Friday ae ee 1 acres of land about 100 yards from tome Cone Sates: bedrooms,
i 17.9:52--4.4.n. 27.9.52—3n. property is in excellent repair and con- ert ue eevee om 2 Actes, 13 Gibbee Been ae Pree the WENDOVER’ st ioe
5, OPS ae. oo ano ooo CO son : . 7 " _ been extensively renoval y . Cc ae ‘ m7
| , FOR RENT: to an s»proved: tense NEW ARRIVALS from USA. include| The undersigned will offer the premises perches of land situate at Barbarees pe eest Cues: asic nasram HAciEOn Will Our Customers please note a. ee about 4% Sere
| fully furnished fat in Hotel district. | the famous Sumbeam Products, Auto | {or sale by public auction at their office, | Mill, St. Michael. | . Inid a very reasonable price. Inspecr and. dining? tote. 3 bedeooas
| near beautiful beach, 2 airy double | matic Mix masters, Toasters, afe| NO. 17, High Street, Bridgetown, on! Blectric and water services laid on tog by appointment on} ° f : 5 rooms,
| Bedrooms, English Bath Tub. Gas Stove, | i,ons & the new combination Steam auc | ©Tiday ihe 3rd October 1962 at 2 parm.) Ant ore (Ss BGK Weer. Pula that we will be closed for “PR” conneraren
‘ jectricity, ephone pec! terms | Dry Iron; Secure one of th fine | [nspection on application to Mr. c. “B for residence or a warehouse BUNGALOW , RIN
i es long tenancy. Write A. C/o Advo- eppliances from DaCOSTA & co. LTD Sisnett, C/o Messrs. Martin Doorley & eee eee apna At. Rockiey: New Road, compris- â„¢ MNEWTON LODGE, MAXWELL
cate. 2 a y Pr .
gr 9, stan, | BIE: Dept: Phone Te | Siac facinee matt aareet, BEagetOw™. “For further particulars and conditions|] ing gneve, badwporae, dining ana STOCK-FAKING Stlin Seetee tad ae:
tcl LLL » v ~ of sale apply to Vv ’ awing an ning

MANHATTAN—Flats on sea, Welches.| "REFRIGERATOR “Enalian Flectne | 17.9. ee ecm | COTTLE, CATFORD & CO. toilet and bath, all bedrooms have P roome,-3 leaves bedraoms, garages,

' Christ Church from October Ist, good|7 oy ¢ : pay, a Poe ygeentadied een 28.9. 52-—0n. built-in © rds as. well as the WINDY WILLOWS, PROSPECT,
{Seu beching” Fully turmibedy a modern | "ng fig Y°qvear? OU, evict, work Stet aaa pf Hlichen. OR APEPaRe yas verb On TUESDAY 30th SEPT. amy JAMER one burnwale on
| conveniences. Three 8 each. |; = a sith, hike — | “PHORNBURY COTTAGE — Situate at close to the Gott Course in very coast 3 bedrooms, good verandahs.

Refrig., Gar Servants’ Room, enclosed . . Thernbury. Hill, Christ Church, (part popular residentia area - HITE PARK
' yard, Phone 3309. 20.9.52—t.f.n. and, 7 p,m, 28% 9, §2—1 PUBLIC NOE ACS Wall and Wood) containing. three. bed~- mediate possession, e ROAD—Large 2 storey house and
| Sot, November | “EABIOG Se a a sumsrAn Serena Moe ence

PLYMOUTH—Crane Coast, ovember “, gallery, Draw reom, me st .
and from iSth Jan, to Jan. 3ist, 1953, fadiece ae an alae aciee NOTICE | Kitchenette, Toilet and Bath, running Situate at Navy Gardens, com- SWEETFIELD, ST. PETER — 2
Phone 2953, 20,9.52—t.£.m. | practically” new ‘on ng ofder. woeter throughout, standing on approx. prising three bedrooms, two toilets storey estate type house. Inter-

Baten "Walemenne C. Arthur | Sealed. tenders. for, the purchase of|1% acres land, Apply any day (except end baths, combination dining and esting possibilities. Good bathing.

“THVERTON” situate. in Strathelyde| Phone 4748 or 236d Dy 9 si Se, View trees at St Luke's| Sunday) to.owner (Mrs. E. St, ‘@. Burton) living rooms, pantry, kitchen and THORPES, ST, JAMES—Country

containing closed. gallery, ae . sad Vicarage, wi received by the Chair-j on premises. 28,9.52-4n. storeroom, two servants rooms in mansion. Low figure accepted.
+ drawing and dint rooms, bed- man, Vestry of George up to October} -— ~ — the yard with toilet and bath, BUNGALOW, ROCKLEY—Com-
separate ‘and oe smail POULTRY th 1952, laundry room and garage. This is fortable timber house main road.
rooms, sepa ee AUCTION
t hall and iitene, Garage: and, servants’ || ———_—__—_________ : full particulars apply to the a lovely house offered at a com- é 3 bedrooms
room, For particulars apply, to Carring-| PULLETS~12 (Twelve) purebred white,| —2Ufchwarden, Mr. Ws A, Yearwood, petitive price. LAND, TWEEDSIDE ROAD—
ton & Sealy, Solicitors, Tajoag, Strest leghorn pullets.& months. old. at $3.00 | A#280M% St George. The. Vestry does UNDER) THE SILVER . Main road frontage 101. Ares
; : . Phone D. C. Stoute, Lodge ot bind itself to accept the highest. or; R CHURCHILL 14,738 sq. ft. Ideal business or
: Paniaitions wny tender, HAMME Situate at Maxwells Coast Road, factory. site.

“VICTORIA” fully furnished the sea- 28, 9) PQHIny D. H. A. JOHNSON, comprising three bedrooms with —_— BUSINESS PREMISES, HOUSE
side, Worthings. 3 bedrooms, Clerk,’ Vestry. of St. George, ON THURSDAY: the 2nd October by running water, combination draw~- ROEBUCK STREET — Good shop
and Sitting Room, open Verandah, Govt. LIVES’ 28,9, 52—im, | order of Mrs. LL. Clyde Cozier we will ing and. dining rooms, modern = frontage. £2,000.

Water, Electric Refrigerator, go TOCK ora reall. hee Soeanennas wane ane effects kitchen, ver ane ar ene Lane oe ae Nr. SANDY
Garage & Servants’ Quarters 100 per = ™ - y St. onards’ Ave., con- property is situate mn a . a ‘Compact 5
{ohth, ‘The Landlord pays for telephone | COW—A Cow fresh in. Milk. Apply NOTICE | sisting. of; residential area, with. excellent sea ec our Customers and the General Public room bungalow with garage.
& Water. Dial 8150, Mr. Joseph Smith, Mannneeh ok Morris 2 Chairs and 2 Rockers bathing. -A sound investment at 1 be: thas Stores at SPEIGHTS- Lowest priced property in this
27.9.52—3n. . 62—In, ‘in Birch}, Morris Tables, Ornaments a very low reserve price please note at our area,

Tien TMERIARORAM: SOCIRTY. | |Tabies, Pian Stacie, Fictures. Tang TOWN and SIX MEN’S will be closed on the LYNCHBURG, 51M AVENUE
WANTED PUPPIES — Pure bred Bull Mastiff to}, here will be an Day at H.C. |Brimsmead & Sons) Sideboard Dining WYNDAL BELLEVILLE--2 storey house with
be. delivered Oct, 11th. Tel, ‘ov all Old Boys on iv. Oetober| able and Chairs (in Mahogany) Cordea xl site .. gon following dates: verandahs, drawing and dining
20.9:58—2n. ¥ Wi . Rugs, Blectric Clock, Dressing Situate -at oe, Peer rooms. study 3 bedrooms.
HELP era] Old, Boys Cricket, match, 12.30 Tew |Table, Press, Chest of Drawers, Bed |]} a ee snd lin SPEIGHTSTOWN : 30th September io, '

; * ‘ocktails 5, to ™m,. Al 1 (paint blue)
oe MECHANICAL Mi awho will be amending, sem, asked | Cnet hictas Breakiant te rooms, totlet and bath, and a large 1st and 2nd October. NEW BUNGALOW, ROCKLEY

a
'



MISCELLANEOUS.

—_—_—$—$—$—$— arora

SEY ON et Delivensh: lenaaie
TONS — Any eliv: .
ately to K. R. Hunte & Co., Ltd, Lower |

Price 10 Re:

Broad Street
7 28.9.52—t.£.n,



The MEMBERS of the
WEYMOUTH CLUB

request the pleasure of your
Company to their

DANCE

at QUEEN'S PARK
on
Saturday Night, 4th October, 1952
M .
“CLEVIE GITTENS Orchestra

SUBSCRIPTION — $1.00

Tickets not transferable




REDUCTIONS FOR THIS
WEEK
Usually Now
Bath Towels White
Indian Fabric $1.20 $1.08
Rath Towels Colour
Stripped Dutch $2.11 $1.44
Pmbroidery Spun 36
y wide per yard $1.64 $1.31
.. Bed Tick 56" wide i
Assorted Col f _ 83 2 $1.05
Whilte Pillow Casés 20x
with Flap $1.18 $1.67
Suggested not to miss these
Bargains
\ 52, Swan Street.

NOTICE

Readers and Subscribers
to the ADVOCATE NEWS-
PAPER in Bathsheba, Cattle-
wash and surrounding dis-
tricts are asked to note that
as from Wednesday, October
1, we have changed our
agency from Mr. Joseph

Jemmott, of St. Elizabeth
Village, to Mr. LLEWELLYN
CARTER of “Hiliswich”, St.
Joseph.

You are asked to contact
Mr. Carter at the Bathsheba
Sports & Social Club, for the
continuation of the delivery
of your Newspaper.

All accounts to the end of
October must be paid to Mr.
Jemmott.







able from Stock in various carriage
widths as follows:—
llr — $260.00
15/7 — $293.00
ee
oS, Pi: Musson, Son & Co.,
tid Dial 38
28.9.82—t.¢.n.
TYPRORITING, ING — Service,
Moderate Fee. See. Ay Top Pioor,







— Of every dese

Ginag Chine, old Jewels, fine
crap iat Early books, Maps, Auto.
A al Yacht Club. nit “Sh
3.2,62—t.f.n
Hi EQ’ all

description. Owen T.

Street. Dial 3299, 1 Seer



MENIER’S COCOA. Soild at all lead-
ing Grocers. “% Ib, Tins 25c. My Ib
Tins 47e. am some of this delicious
Cocoa teday 27.9. 52—3n

—————
MENTER'S COCOA, Shipment just ar-
rived. SO as not to be disappointed



wnone your Grocers today and get a
Tin, 9. 52—3n.
MENIER’S COCOA, Just
kids likes And: the beams abe hen!
exception. Health and energy in every
drop. 27.9. 52—3n
HEN OPe- Genuine Ri
Alfonse DeLima & dy a Ome
site Goddard's, 27.9. 52-

“SANTO TAPE WORM TABLETS'—
Safe, effective and harmless remedy for



“ape Worms, Round Worms, ‘Thread,
Worms, obtainable at Booker's, (Btdos)
Drug Stores Ltd. 28,9.52—1n.

ee
SUBSCRIBE now to the Dally Tele: h,
England's leading Daily pele Seernaee.
wriving in Barbados by Air only a few
tay: aie Dubloation in London, Contact
jan Gale c/o vocate Co., Loca
Representative, Tel, 3113 a ‘

‘17.4.52—t.t.n,

————$—
TANK—One (1) New 300 Gallon Galva-

ulze Tank one (1) Si
a ae for eshte Phone G. fase
‘34 or









U-ADJUST SUN GLASSES” — have
novable lenses and can be adjusted to
it conditions, and weather. On sale at
Knight's: Drug Stores.

ee ee

27. 9. 53—2n

DANCE

The Volunteer Drill Hall
in aid of
St, Paul’s Church Choir and
Organ Fund
on
Tuesday Sept. 30th 1952
Music by Percy Green's Ork
Subscription -o-



MR. LEAGUE CRICKETER!
Have you ever scored a Century?

Have you ever taken 50

wickets?
Has your Club ever won a Cup?
If so it’s recorded in..,,.

THE ANNUAL LEAGUE
: CRICKETER

Jompiled by J. M. Hewit

B.C.L. Secreta: aan

Buy a Copy today from

COLE'S PRINTERY, Middle

s Street
ADVOCATE CO. LTD, PRESS CLUB, 53 Swan Street
Cireulation Dept. (2nd. Floor)
Next to the “CIVIC”
28.9.52.—4n. ~ ~28,9.52—1n,

+ London, W.C.1. England.

he estate of CLARA ALSOP GALE
ate of Dalkeith Road in the parish ot
‘aint Michael in this Island, aay |

°8.9.52—2n.



UNDER THE SILVER

who died in this Islamd on the llth day

of Dec 1951, are hereby required HAMMER
to send particulars of their claiena, On, Tuesday 30th by order of Mr.
guy a , oe . RG. Cabral, we will sell nie furniture
: t. orto trathelyde, which includes
of the Will of tue nata Clara Alsup ” ee Battee for 3 and 2° Rockers
a , in care. of Yearwood | coffee Tables, Dining Table and Chairs
& Boyce, Solicitors, James Street,| 3); in Mahogany: Piano by Irmler., Con-
Bridgetown, on or bifore the 29th lay goleum, China, Ele:tr.c Table Lamp

of November 1952, after which date |

M White Painted Rush Arn
haji. proceed to. distrioute. the assets. o1| Vcl) Mirror, ’ .







a Rockers, Sivail Mird. Hat-
he. said. estate, attong: the parting Gon pra te Brugest. Sing.e Simmons Bed-
fale claims of See shall then oe sieads and Springs Single Metal Bed-
nave had notice, and that I shall not eee eee oe ee COO eee ane
bo» Hable. 105) aswpts so distributed '01 rable with triplet Mirrors 1n_Mahogaly
Keli tee than heak had’ notina. | |Dphols, Steel Chairs, -Bnam.

Tables with 4 chairs, Frigidaire,

And all persons indebted to the
estate are requested to settle
debtedness without delay.

Dated the 25th day of September 1952.

HAMPDEN ARCHIBALD CUKE,
Qualified Executor,
Estate Clara Alsop Gale,

said

Stove etc, ail in Poreciain & Enamel with
their in-

Chromium Fittings This Burniture 1
Modern, Practical.y nev~ and very ni¢es
Saie 11.30 o'clock Te'ms Cash
BRKANKER, TROTMAN & CQ.,
Auctioneers

38 US eee

Deceased, 26.9.52—2n,

26.9.52—3n,





GOVERNMENT NOTICE

Applications for Admission to Universities and Colleges in
the United Kingdom Session 1953—54

Every effort is being made by the Director of Colonial Scholars to
secure vacancies at Universities and Colleges in the United Kingdom
for recommended students. who are well qualified. Competition con-
tinues to be severe for admissions to the faculties of Medicine, Den-
tistry, Science and Engineering, where an exceptionally high standard
is required.

2, The British Council will be responsible for making arran
ments for meeting students and, for securing suitable accommodati
for them.

3. Students are advised that it is most undesirable for them to
proceed to the United Kingdom unannounced and unrecommended
in the hope of obtaining admission to Universities and Colleges,’ as
even tutorial colleges and polytechnies are overcrowded and it is very
difficult to gain admission to them without due notice in the proper
form,

4. Forms of application for admission to Universities and Colleges};

in the United Kingdom, to be completed in quintuplicate, may
obtained from the Secretary, Student Advisory Committee, c/o Office
of the Director of Medical, Services, Wharf, Bridgetown, and must be
| returned to him not later than Wednesday, 29th October, 1952.

| 5. FROEBEL COURSES. Private students desirous of entering
| the Froebel Teacher Training Colleges in the United Kingdom for
training during the academic year 1953-54 should communicate with
the Secretary, Student Advisory Committee, at once.

28.9. peren

The Meumenife + fe

Alphabet

uestions about Gas



LEARN TO EARN |
Thousands of L.S.C, Students |
throughout the British Empire }
have increased their salaries |
through studying our easy postal |
courses (n BOOK-KEEPING, SEC-

at Your Gas Showrooms.

RETARYSHIP, BUSINESS On- {{{ |
GANIZATION, | COMMERCIAL. {{( | uestions about Cookers
LAW, ECONOMICS, ete. Redviced {ft | uestions about Water
fees to overseas students. Diplo- | ls Heaters
mas ono co eearoe free.— } | ,
co ] ‘
COMMERCE. pe {| Answered with pleasure

(Dept B.A.5) 116, High Holborn }}!

(

y'





SEND US YOUR ORDERS FOR
GALVANISED MESH WIRE.

| CENTRAL EMPORIUM

Corner Broad & Tudor Streets


























the sea It comprises three bed-
jcoms, one with built-in cup-
boards, drawing and dining rooms,
modern kitchen, toilet and bath

Downstairs; Servants’ room with
toilet and “path, garage for two

ears, and enough room for laundiy
etc, The prope'ty stands or
approximately 19,000 square feet
of land

BUNGALOW

Situate at Graeme Hall Terrace
very attractively designed, com-
prising three bedrooms with toilets
and baths attached, dining and
living rooms, kitchen, verandah to
the west and a nice patio to the
east. The property stands on
‘approximately ‘2 acre of

EVANTON

Situate at Top Rock comprising
three bedrooms, two with adjoin-
ing toilet bath, spare room
that can used as a breakfast
room or children’s nursery, living
and dining room, kitehen, toilet
and bath with hot and cold water,
verandah to the south and patio

land

to the north. The outbuildings
comprise servants’ room with
toilet and bath, and a_ large
garage. Inspection by appointment
only 3
PARAGON
Situate near Seawell Airport,
Christ Church, comprising two
large bedrooms with dressing

rooms attached, two medium size
bedrooms with dressing rooms and
built-in cupboards, toilet and bath,
large open verandah entire lengthy
of house with a lovely view tot
Chancery Lane Beach and the sea,
Downstairs: Entrance lobby, livirg
and dining aaene breakfast room.
\pantry, kitchen, large study, and a
lovely open patio to the south
This property also has _ lovely
grounds and a portion of arable
land containing 7% acres In-
rpection by appointment only

COVE SPRING COTTAGE
A lovely cottage standing on &
roods 27 perches of land situate
et St. James Coast having its
own private bathing beach, and
scomprising three bedrooms, with
private toilet and bath to main
bedroom, drawing and dining
rooms, European bath with hot
and «cold running water ‘and
veparate toilet, modern kitchen,
and a gallery on two sides.

WYNDOVER

Overlooking the very beautiful
Six Mens Bay, St. Peter. Stand-
ing on approximately 4% acres of
land having an extensive orchard
with specially selected fruit trees
The house comprises three bed-
rooms, “dining room, living room,
modern toilets and baths with hot
and cold water. Large verandahs,
Extensive outbuildings including a
large garage. two servants rooms,
\dry, workshop. This property
been extensively renovated by
present owner







the

HOMEMEDE

in the Garrison,

comprising four bed-
combination living and
dining rooms, separate toilet and
bath, kitchen with built-in cup-
boards, verandah the whole length
of the building. The outbuildings
comprise two servants rooms with
water toilet and a garage for two
cars. The above property stands
on approximately 7,500 square feet
of land, Inspection by appoint-
ment only.

Situate
Michael,
rooms,

St

REALTORS Limited

REAL ESTATE AGENTS

AUCTIONEERS
VALOERS
151/12 Roebuck Street,

Bridgetown Phone 4900



DO YOU REALISE THE NEED FOR MORE

QUALIFICATION rf
or ARE YOU INTERESYED' IN MAKING MORE MONEY?
IF SO, ENROL NOW FOR ONE OF THESE COURSES.
Architectural Draughts- Sanitary Inspector Course-
manship Building and General Agriculture
Design Course. Course.
A.M.S-E., (Civil, Insurance Practice.
and Mech.)
Automobile Repairman’s Raion,
Course, ” Petroleum Technology
Course,
elect u
= — ao ion and School Certifi .
General Electrical Engin- Accountancy.
eering Course. Civil Service
Course,

General Certificate of Ed-
ucation. Police Promotion Course-

Write for full particulars if course is not mentioned.
Write to the: i _

alltnns Eibeationd Fost conem ZO FO.
nstitute

Please send me Free Book.
P.O. Box, 307, P.O.S.,

Trinidad ~—
Agents for: Address ...
BRITISH INSTITUTE OF ENG. Subject of enone of
TECH. & BRITISH TUTORIAL Interest
INBTIEUTE, DONDOM- (FARE. oo ccewccegscvcsere

Elec.,

Entrance



INTERNATIONAL
HARVESTER

McCORMICK — DEERING

GREEN CROP LOADERS
TRACTOR MOWERS

HAY RAKES

LITTLE GENIUS PLOUGHS
BRUSH BREAKER PLOUGHS

DYRR KU SUBSOIL PLOUGHS
a

I> Come in and Inspect these
*
























house with patio, lounges, 3 bed-
rooms, good beach frontage

BEMERSYDE, ST. LAWRENCE
—Stone bungalow with 3 bedrooms,
lounge and dining rooms. Beach
frontage

BEACH PROPERTY, ST. LAW-
RENCE-—4 bedrooms, living and
galleries. Sandy

dining room,
8T, JOSEPA

beach.
ESTATE HOUSE,
bedroom pieosty

—Spacious 5



sT.
PHILIP» — Carefully remodelled
property with every modern
convenience. Private tiled baths

to each bedroom.

MODERN COUNTRY HOME,
ST. JOHN—Recently built stone
property with 4 bedrooms and
private tiled baths, patio, picture
windows.

BUNGALOW, PINE HILL —
Strongly built house with 2 bed-
rooms. Private wooded grounds,

LAND (Rear of NEW PLAZA
—Approximately 30,960 sq. ft.
valuable building land with 16
ft. R_of W to main road,

BUILDING LOTS, ROCKLEY—

zane sites adjoining Golf
lub.
COUNTRY VILLA, CHRIST

CHURCH—3% miles town, Pleas-
ant house with beautifully laid

out grounds, £5,000.

BUILDING LAND, 8T. JAMES’
COAST—Prices from 24 _ cents
upwards several sites available.

BUILDING SITE, 8T. LAW-
RENCE—Approx. 10,000 sq. ft on
coast in developed area,

BUILDING SITES, CHRIST
CHURCH—3 miles from town, 24
cts. sq. ft.

BUILDING SITES—Overlooking
St. James’ Coast.

STRATHCLYDE -—- Imposing
home with 4 acres, 3 double
bedrooms, spacious main rooms,

DURHAM, WORTHING — Se-
cluded stone bungalow, 3 bed-
rooms. % acre.

NEW BUNGALOW, WORTH-
ING—Compact with 3 bedrooms,

walled garden, Main road,
THE RISK, ST. JAMES—2
storey house, 5 bedrooms, 1%

acres. Beach opposite,

STONE HOUSE & ANNEXE,
Fontabelle. 2 bedrooms anneex.
Roomy living rooms.

COUNTRY HOUSE, 8T.
JAMES—Attractive & comfort-
able old property with rustic
charm. Modernised.

SEASIDE HOUSE, WORTHING
—Stone construction, 3 bedrooms,
living and dining rooms, veran-

good beach frontage.

dah,

HILLCREST, BATHSHEBA —
Stone bungalow 3 good bedrooms,
living room, gallery, light and
water. 6 acres.

TOBRUK, CATTLEWASH —

Popular holiday home. Soundly
built with 3 lounge
and gallery.

BAY HOUSE, CATTLEWASH—
Timber construction, good order,
3 bedrooms, good bathing. % acre.

SILVERTON
storey stone house, 4
central location.

WINSDALE, CHEAPSIDE—Sin-
ale ener house, 3 minutes Town

bedrooms,

CHEAPSIDE— 2
bedrooms,

cen’ .
HOUSES —
Two
road.
BUNGALOW,
Stone built
living rooms
RESIDENCE, St. Lawrence
2 storey house with 3 bedrooms,
&
6 acres

Hastings Road

small properties

on main
Two Mile Hill—
with 3 bedrooms, 2

spacious main rooms. About
good building land
PROPERTIES IN
Grenada, Tobago, Trinidad,
Jamaica, St. Lueia, Bermuda and
Dominica.

Business properties,

Investments,

Sugar Estates.

Rentals.

House and Estate Management
Property Valuation and Dilapi-
dation Surveys.

e
Plantations Building
Phone 4640

a







'
a

fli

|



SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 238,



CHURCH

ANGLICAN
Michael's Cathedral
PATRONAL FESTIVAL
Eve of the Feast: SUNDA‘
September
7 Fesial Evensong
and Pro on Preacher The Revd.
K o Grannum Subject “Bringing
the teaching and example of Christ into
everyday life.’
MONDAY
The Feast of S
5.00 a.m Surg
Hol Comm nion

St



28th

” p.m Sermon



29th September
Michael & All Angels.
Eucharist. 7.30 a.m
7.30 pm Festal
Fveusong, Sermon and Procession.
Preacher; The Ven. The Archdeacon.
Subject The practice of private
prayer, Bible reading and self discip-
line.’
(Phe of the Cathedrel invited

wear Copes:

Canons
to

ST. LEONARD'S

8 ar tioiy Communion 9 am
Matins and Sermon 3 p.m Enrol-
ment of Church Army Members.
Preacher Rev. B. C. Uliyett. 3 p.m
Sunday School. 7 p.m. Evensong and
Sermon

METHODIST

JAMES ST. 11 am, Rev. K. E, Towers
BA BD; 3 p.m. Sunday School; 7
pum Rev G Marshall; 730 pm

Evangelistic Services during each night

of the week



PAYNES BAY: 9.30 9.m. Mr. D.) Reid.
7 pom Mr G. Garper

WHITE HALL; 9.30 a.m, Miss G. Ox
ley; 7 p.m. Mr. S. Phillips

GILL MEMORIAL: 11 a.m. Mr. M
Hall; 7 p.m. Reception Service for new
members. conducted by Revs. K. E.
Towers, B.A., B.D. and F. Lawrence

HOLETOWN: 830 am Rey G Mar-
shall; 7pm Mr W St Hill

BANK HALL: 9.30 am. Mr. G. L
McAlister; 7 p.m Rev. S. Payne

SPEIGHTSTOWN ll am Rev. G
Marshall; 7 pm Mr E L Bannister

SELAH: 9.30 a.m. Rev. F. Lawr 2.

BETHESDA: 9.30 am Mr. P De

BETHEI 11 a.m. Rev. T. J. Furley;
7 pm Rev. W. Crosse

DALKEITH 11 am Rev W..
Vivian; 7 p.m, Rev. T. J. Furley

BELMONT: 11 a.m Mr G Harris;
i pm Rev W F Vivian

SOUTH DISTRiCT 9 a.m Mr Cc
Ford nm Mr. € Jones

PROVIDENCE: 11 a.m, Mr. L. Warthe:

p.m Mr c Brathwaite

VAUXHALI 11 a.m, Mr G. Jones;
7 pm Mr. V. Pilgrim

EBENEZER—-11 a.m. Mr. E. Toppin
7 p.m, Mr. C. G. Reid

Reva. S. W. C

BEULAH—11

a.m
r Mr
SHREWSBURY -

Joseph Sargeant



é Revd
s w C Crosse per M: c
Brathwaite
RICES—11 a.m. Mr. J. C. Mottley,
M.C.P. 7 p.m. Mr. A. Lucas,

Sunday Schools at 3 p.m
ADVENTIST
GOVERNMENT HILL CHURCH
7.15 p.m Evange:isti Meer

THE







PEASANTS’





1952
] ¢ CMURISTIAN SOIENCE
Piest Church of Christ Selemtiat
kw ‘. Bridgetown. Upper Bay Street
Sundays 11 nd 7
inesdays & A Servic '
Speaker Pastor W Ww Weithe

tes Testimonies of Chr



tia



a Science
ect Christians, t! Atomic Bomb

Armageddon”

e 1ling
SUNDAY. SEPTEMBER
Subject of Lessen-Sermon
Geiden Text
© Lerd
and

28,
REALITY
1 Chronicles 29:11. Thine
the greatness, and the power,
the glory thine is the
kingdom, © Lord, and thou art exalted

1952
7
Speaker
ject: “God's Seven
World of Uncertainties head above all
COLLYMORE ROCK A. M. E. CHURCH the following Citations are included
11 am, Exposition, Exodus. X. 3.30 '» the Lessen-Sermon:
p-m. Sunday School; 7.15 p.m. Avan The Bible Acquaint now thyself with
gelistic Service. nm, and be at peace: thereby good shall
|

KING
p.m

st
EB.
Pastor M

CHURCH
ange
G

7.15 Meeting
ibhard. Sub-

Certainties in 2

is



The Annual Missionary Meeting takes
place om Monday evening (to-morrow?
at 7.30 p.m. Dr. H. G. Cummins, M.C P
will be the Chairman and the Speaker
will be Major S. Morris
Mr. Vivian.

A cordial invitation is extended to
Rev

come unto thee Job 22:21

Science and Health with Key te the
by Mary Baker Eddy
God fashions all things after His own
Life is reflected in existence,
truthfulness
their

Seriptures,

and the Hev ikene:

Truth In

which



God in goodness

au own

impart
permanence

peace and

E. A. Gilkes Page S16

Minister:



GOVERNMENT NOTICES
APPOINTMENT OF SUPERVISOR (FEMALE) MAIN KITCHEN
GENERAL HOSPITAL

; Applications are invited for the non-pensionable post of Super-
visor, Main Kitchen, General Hospital, at a salary of $480 rising by
annual increments of $48 to $912 per annum, plus temporary Cost of
Living Allowance at Government rates.

: Applicants should not be over 40 years of age, should have at-
tained a satisfactory standard of education, and should have had
some experience in housekeeping duties on a large scale.

Applications on forms obtainable from the Secretary, General

— should be forwarded to him not later than 30th September,
1952.



Vacant Post of Chemist, Department of Science and
Agriculture, Barbados
Applications are invited for th: post of Chemist, Department of
Science and Agriculture, Barbados
; Applicants should hold a good Honours Degree in Agricultural
Chemistry and preferably should have had
search experience in soil science

: a post is pensionable and the salary is in the scale $4,128 x 192
—5,280 x

some post graduate re-

240

5 7 i
' 5,760 per annum, plus such temporary cost of living
allowances as

may be payable by;
Point of entry in the salary Seale
and qualifications.

Government from time to time.
will be determined by experience

Applications stating age, qualifications and experience and men-
tic ning che names of two referees should be addressed to the Director
of Agriculture, Department of Science and Agriculture, Bridgetown
Barbados, and should reach him not later than 31st October, 1952 |

Further details will be supplied on request.

28.9.5

2—2n,







LOAN BANK ACT, 1936

To the Creditors holding liens against the Peasant Holdings
“TAKE NOTICE that the peasant owners mentioned in the First Column of the Table

hereto annexed are about to obt
ot money respectively set out in the Second C
of such peasant owners by way of loan ag.
tioned and described in the Third Column .

Names



St. Andrew
Benjamin, Mary



St. Michael
Alleyne, Julian
Green, Joseph N,
Hall, Etheline

Thompson, Lilian A.

St. James
Gibbons, Edwin A.

St. Andrew
Burke, Everson Dwell ....
Mullen, Laurence

St. Philip

Heckles, Joseph J,

Browne, Gertrude

King, Edwin L. .... :

Layne, Mabel & Brathwaite
Douglas ;

Newton, Ernestine A.

Pollard, Hilda A.

Smith, Olga Odessa

Weekes, Wilhelmina

Christ Church
Perkins, John E.

‘st. Gittens, Wm. E, Dec.
per Gittens, Thomas E
and Mayers, Bertie C.
Millar, Walter FitzD.

Amount Amount

granted | previously

granted

$ ¢. oe

155.00 72.00

APPLICATIONS FOR LOANS, PEASANTS’ LOAN BANK—“D”
; ae Tet 1011 | 120.00 80.00
; 1 ;

00 90.00
oo 208.00

00 _

|
00 36.00
00 36.00
00 );"*° =—

00 82.00

00 36,00
00 | 50.00

v0 72.00

150.00 90.00

2279.00

ain under the provisions of the above Act the sum

Column of the Table opposite the names
ainst the peasant holdings respectively men-
f that Table opposite such names,















Locality AR P









Walkers 1 0 00

o





Haggatt Hall 36.00
Friendship Lr, Bir-
neys 1

..|Haggatt Hall

14.00

72,00

00

50.
} 00

| 200.

.. | Carlton 1 120.00 82.00

| Nr. Friendship

ws 20
nN | Belleplaine

00

45.00
36,00

80.
80

17
03
06

.. | Six Roads 1
.| Marehfield & Kirtons
The Nursery

60
250.
500.

60.
70.
45.
200.
50

3

; 27
28
Ov
25
00

..| Penny Hole
... | East Point & Hill View
..|Nr. Well House
...|Church Village
. | Kirtons
|

RONNNY pr



. | Pilgrim 00 150

36
06

Bridge Cot l
Prerogative | 1

80

GRAND TOTAL $4,032.00



PART ONE ORDERS
B
Major C.F PrP. WEATHERHEAD
Commanding
THE BARBADOS REGIMENT
Issue No MM
. at: Ul

SUNDAY ADVOCATE :

GOVERNMENT NOTICES





4 Sep.
Major C. BE. P. Weatherhead is apponted to act as O.C. Barbados Regiment
viee Major O. F. C Waleott, ED om leave wef. 2% Sep. 52
Lieut E R Goddard assumes command of H.Q. Coy vice Major C & PF
Weatherhead who ts acting Command ng Officer, w.et. 25 Sep, 52

>? PARADES — TRAINING .
All ranks will parade at Regt HQ at 1700 hours on Thursday 2 Oct. 52 A
Coy begins ring the A.M.C. — Rifle at 0600 hours on Monday 29 Sep. 52, @
detailed. Volunteers of “A’ Coy who are not firing the A.M.C. on Thurscas

will continue bayonet training
Volunteers of “B" & HQ Coys whe have failed to qualify
A. Banfield

in their AMO.

will report to Captain 1 at the miniature Thursday
mme_ October

} VARIETY SHOW

There will be a variety show in
Sep, 58, for all Volunteers and their friends
collection will be taken at the end of the show.
ORDERLY OFFICER & ORDERLY SERJEANT FOR WEFK FNDING 6 OCT
G. Peterkin

N. B

range on

rit Hall at 2030 hours on Monday
There is

29th
no admission but @



Orderly Officer —

Lieut. ¢
Orderly Serjeant

Reid,

M. L. D. SKEWES-COX, Major
8.0.L.F. & Adjutant,
The Barbados Regiment
PART fl ORDERS
THE BARBADOS REGIMENT 26 Sep. &
1 LEAVE — Privilece ‘ ae
Major O. F. C. Walcott, E.D. Granted 9 weeks’ P/Leave with per
mission to leave the colony w.e.f.. 25]

ep. 52
568 Pte Heath, J.H Granted 3 months’ P/Leave w.e.f. 25 Sep



385 Pte Gibbs, G Pt 11 O Ser No. 21 D. 27 Jun 52 in

marginally named delet
3 months



espect of the

months’ and insert
2 TRANSFERS
521 Drmr. Cr

ichlow, ¢ Transferred from Band and posted t
B" Coy wef. 25 Sep 52
448 L/Sit. Rudder, G Transferred to Reserve Coy wef. %
Sep, 52

M. L, D) SKEWES-COX, Major,
§.0.L.F. & Adjutant,
The Barbados Regiment
DRUMS «& FIFRS
Band practices will be held on Mondsy 9 Sep
The Drum. and Fifes will give a dfpa
Tuesday 30 Sep, 52, at 8 p.m

Wed, 1 Oct. and Thurs
at Hastings Rocks on the

2 Oct, 42
evening ot

Vacant Post of Inspector (Income Tax)—Income Tax and
Death Duties Department

\pplication are invited by the Government of Barbados for the
post of Inspector (Income Tax), Income Tax and Death Duties De-
partment

2. The post is pensionable and the salary is in the scale of

$3,120 x 144—3,840.

3.
annum is payable.
drawal at any time

4. Appointment will be subject to medical fitness and
on probation for two years in the first instance.

5. The appointment will be subject to Celonial Regulations and
the local Civil Services Regulations and Instructions. Passage expenses
not exceeding $1,440 will be payable on first appointment
sages are provided

6.

illowance at the rate of $156 per
The allowance is subject to variation or with-

will be

Leave pas-

The successful candidate will be required to assist generally
in the administration of the Ineoms Tax Act and will be principally
eoncerned with the examination accounts and determination of
profits of business, professions aig wade. He will also perform such
other duties as the Commissioner of Income Tax and Death Duties
may require from time to time

7. Candidates should possess » high standard of general ecluca-
tion and a recognised accountaney qualification with some experience

of

in accounts or taxation. Member ship of a recognised accountancy
body would be an advantage.

8. Application, stating age, full details of qualifications and ex-
; D. A. HAYNES, perience, accompanied by two testimonials, should be submitted to the
Dated this 29th day of September, 1953. Manager, Peasants’ Loan Bank Colonial Secretary, Public Buildings Bridgetown, to reach him not
later than 15th November, 1952.
APPLICATIONS FOR LOANS, PEASANTS’ LOAN BANK REM.
x Amounts | |
ames granted | Locality A. R. P.
ee Lae
ee $e
eyne, Julian ..., 80.00 Ha
. ggatt Hall 1 O° St
mane ME cr N. 36.00 | Hegeatt Hall | 2 V1
Pa ” — rie 72.00 Friendship & Lr. Birneys 1 0 00
Tris, Bitte ...... hss iis 50.00 | Whitehall 1 3 20
Est. Thompson, Joseph Dec,
id Thompson, Theresa & |°
eorge ed se 64.00 ;Cave Hill 3 09
Worrell, Randolph B. 90.00 | Haggatt Hall hk Oe
St, James
Gibbons, Edwin A, sel 32.00 Carlton | 1 $2
St. Peter | |
Selman, Walter Bil 55.00 |Ashton Hall | 1 +2 08
St. Lucy
Brathwaite Miriam k ii 100 Checker Hall
Gilkes, Theodore & Fitz- | ue erate ie
Clarence hsp hed su} 50.00 |Bird Cottage & Crab Hill | 1 2 09
St. Andrew
Benjamin, Mary .... bic a 72.00 Walkers 1 0 00
Burke, Everson, Ewell . | 45.00 Nr. Friendship | 2 20
Est. Springer, Collis H. Dec. |
per Springer, Rosamund 60.006 'Cane Garden 5 1 30
St, Joseph |
Est. Brace, William H. Dec. | |
per Brace, Ellen 50.00 |St. Elizabeth Village 1 0 82
St. Philip
Alleyne, Lawrence C. 36.00 |East Point 3 15
Beckles, Joseph J. 90.00 |Six Roads + oe
Gooding, Carmen E, 36.00 |Bast Point 2 00
King, Edwin L. .... | 100.00 |The Nursery | 3 2 06
Newton, Ernestine A. 36.00 |East Point & Hill View | 2 28
Smith, Olga Odessa | 82.00 {Church Village | 1 0 2
Christ Church |
Perkins, John E. 50.00 | Pilgrim | 1 2 00
Pinder, Beryl FE. 50.00 Ventnor | 3 21
Prescott, Marion iis at 30.00 |Maxwell Hill 3 02
Rose, Leitha per Rose, Jona- } |
than i : 30.00 Ventnor 1 0 24
St. George
Est. Gittens, William E, Dec.
per Gittens, Thomas and
Mayers, Bertie C.__.... 72.00 |Bridge Cot 1 0 36
Millar, Walter Fitz D. .... 90.00 Prerogative 1 1 «06
St. Thomas
Marshall, Edith 40.00 Hillaby 3 00
1598.00
} qxgntatidiniogin /
SL
APPLICATIONS FOR LOANS, PEASANTS’ LOAN BANK—“B”
tree reentrant ie ee peeiestaceeeetheateeteneieememeintaiensereceenteinsienenantnenennentinnntisananaenigaaseescaieitaanacseimeneiaarntiia eT



A 40—“SOMERSET”

| sail



'

i

achoone
Philip H
M

Eme
Davidse
Gardenia W







SEA AND AIR
TRAFFIC

In Carlisle Bay



ainbow

PAGE FIFTEEN





oo

y

IN ORDER to reduce the delay occasioned in
purchasing SCHOOL TICKETS, it has been
found necessary to fix a minimum of TWENTY

e Enterprise 8
ril E. Smith, Gita
M., Wonder-





itaion Wessels: Blue’ Biae, 7. 1B. atts TICKETS for each sale. Smaller quantities
ee will only be sold towards the end of the school
ARRIVALS . term in order to finish out the term.

S.S. Sapho, 4,038 tons, from St. Cro c
under Captain ©. Corcasas. Agent gee The above arrangements are EFFECT
ane Puan mee IVE FROM MONDAY, 29TH SEPTEM-

DEPARTURES . BER, 1952.
M.V. Caribbee for Dominica x
MAIL NOTICE x
% .
% General Moior Omnibus

Mails for St. Lucia, Dominica, Mont
serrat, Antigua, St. Kitts, Bermuda % Let i
Roston, Halifax, and Montreal by the | \ Ou. e
R.M.S. Lady Rodney wif be closed at ss
the General Post Office as under .

Parcel Mail at 12 noon, Regi s
MeD OS 2 DM. oes ae >, BESOOS SOE SOOO FOO SGI GF OOOOS
p.m. on the 0th September $699660066666"

a

We cordially.



BARCLAYS BANK (DOMINION,
COLONIAL AND OVERSEAS)

announce that as from

TUESDAY 7th

during the rebuilding of their Premises. their offic

OCT.

es will be

situated in

TEMPORARY PREMISES
AT

Lower Broad Street — (opposite

Plantations Ltd. building}

where the full Banking service will be conducted.

Holders of Traveller's Letters of Credit and Traveller's
Cheques may present these to the small annexe which is
Leing established in Collins Ltd.’s building in Broad Street

where a limited Banking service will be provided.



oue

the

A 40—VAN

Public to. visit. our

where a
can be sven, including

the new successor to that

most popular of All Cars
“The Gustin Seven”

And remember...

AUSTI

—~You can depend on

ECKSTEIN BROS.— Bay Street.



Redeconated Showroom
Gt Bay Strool,

display of












wad



SN cca
% %
+ . *
‘, r , ‘
$ NOTICE %
s
e
3
+ —_—.
&
+
Hg ec TICKETS
' » 4 4 ~



A 70—“PICK-

JOU Baus tO eee ei aT
> — . oy EL,

5 TON LW.B. TRUCK






















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__ PAGE SIXTEEN SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY. SEPTEMBER 28. 195

9











A

46454
SOO POSER SSO SOS ESS SO SOLS POPP SPOOFS

Inquiry Into Cyclist’s Methodist LISTENING ¥<

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= = LPL PE SS SSOOS TS




























3 Remem 4D Fr & “
. ‘er an on't Forget y % = ‘ : .’
Â¥, > ~ =. *
Evancelical HOURS % i} Si. CECILIA Boys 8 A SACRED CONCERT 3
" > 4¥ ange ica | | CLUB CONCERT g é. x
ea f ( ournec a % at ST. CECILIA BARRACKS ae > 3: MNRee ae gee onee ht
Cam a n SUNDAY. SEPTEMBER ¢s, 1952 % MONDAY, 29TH SEPTEMBER } SIR GEORGE & LADY SEEI *
THE INQUIRY into the circumstances surroundin; I 1s 1.00-—7.15 p.m 2h.5IML. 81. SOM % Calypsoe 5, ee a Pre ea se »
the death of 23-year-old Kenneth Springer of Flat Roch, For t..e next three weeks the 4 p 4.15 p.m. Couneil Fe cident x %
St. George, was furthet adjourned until Saturday, October Meh Churehe f the City aes % Poling BAA: in Adtendiiiien ae pe. Ce eae *
yesterday by His Worship Mr. G. B. Griffith. Acting ©f Bridgetown » ill be holding an 6 p.m : Admittance : Codrington College) »
we ~ “ Fete ate ap Pp. re ; s © Evangelical Campaign centred in 615 p.m. English x Adults 1/6 — Children 9a, | 7 s
P 3 Magistrate of District “A Jarves Street and Bethel Church- i.) Dreques Sas _ Refreshments. on Sale Pe ereNs Wa eerwarcss. fe
Kenneth Springer was detained at the General Hos- « The Can n which starts * ee ae : Tickets on Sale Wey oon 1% “At 4 p.m. in ald of charity x
pital on September 18 after he was involved in an acci- ©2 Monday the 29th will run until 192M, 0.7m & " “93.9.52—2n. {| & PROGRAMME 1/6 26.9.52-2n. »
5 ; : Sian ati ; c } .
dent on Haggatt Hall Road, St. Michael, with a car. He oe _ aie w? eae F a i Voiczs, 7.45 p.m. | ) UE TE DSLR
o ; ; - . lorning Of tne ampaign in , s ay Service, 815 p.m. Radio News- AAA AAA AIM A AMIE
died at the Hospital five days deter. fla the churches there will be morn) peel, 6 30 > ‘” Napan. 8.45 p aa, aloes x ’
r ’ ree itmesses gave evidence ing prayer meetings 1enci in Haggerston, 9 p.m. Charles Vitliersi &
PARTSH ROUND-UP: yesterday in the inquiry snd .on at " ‘ es CEO ing | Stanford. 10 p.m. The News, 10.10 p.m. 1g
- Tuesday September 30 the jury” ~~ ' the Eahorials, 10.06 Dm. Lancew sae
° nd Coroner will visit the spot During the first wee ctingktf tet ek ee eee x
I vi the po iring ne st kK meetings ae
ice 16rlage where the accident occurred. Mr will be held in the two Churches. f BONDS’ SEPTEMBER =. eet x
Nas D.H. L. Ward and Mr F. G Shorus singing from 7 p.m. and 4-7?) p.m ition nase Pet %
Still Aeute Smith are appearing for interested then the service from 7.30 p.m The News. 4.10 p.m. The Daily 1%
‘ parties. From Tuesday October 7th to | Sev ce, 4.15 p.m. The Case of the Night |<
Dr. A. S. Ashby who performed Tu2sday October 14th meetings “* Friend, 4.45 p.m. Harold | 9%

The rice. problem is still the : will : og
centre of discussion in St. Philip, ‘he Post mortem examination on Will be held in the open air in
The Advocate correspondent paid S«ptember 23 said that there wera Various parts of the City, Details and Waltzing

m. Listeners’ Choice, 6 p.m. |
lany. 6.15 p.m. Marching | @
6.45 p.m. Sports ‘Round- | s$



IS A SUIT

| OF STYLES



A VARIETY :
























a visit to that: parish yesterday 8D*asions on the left shoulder, Of that will appear later, On uP and Eiht poe Home wies trom |
nda was to k in some dis. 4k’, hp and nose. He attributed Monday October 13th at 7.30 p.m. Beital %
vas told that in some @i ; y : ; . ,
tr.cts rice was not obtained {o> death to a fractured skull produe- ae tee Ade ta ee eS ee YOU LL BE
the past seven wecks. Ing shock and haemorrhage, ea colony wide: gathering of > 775 5m. Books to Read and Balleut®
- Maud Burrowes of Flat Rock, Methodists. We take this oppor= | talk. 745 p.m, Charles Villiers Stanford, % ° }
One housewife said that the St, George said that the decease. tunity of calling all people to ral- 2.15'p.m. Radio” Newsree!, 8.30 p.m $
number of persons in her home wes her "con She bet sea) to us at that meeting Haydn, &4 p.m. European Sutvey, | } DELIGHTED
ie é r Psi e st sav n " ; 2 s 5 ar
circle is thirteen, (all eating), bu‘ a‘ive on September 18 when h Tr P te itayert anethnnt Rebomble, 10 Fr iS In Aqua, Rose, Maroon,
the amount of rice allowed to Je‘t home riding a motor cycle ne campaign will conclude | phe News, 10.10 p.m. From the Editorials ie Gold, Grey, Black, )
her by her grocef* for the past how 7.45 am. tor work e +... With special services in the James 10.15 p.m. Science Review, 10.30 p.m. | ¢ Navy and White
three months was three pints thes as son Ms ; ee + ster : re : and — tone on D nce Music. 10.45 p.m. Tales from the i% TO WEAR. ¢ i
L the sé lay re hea ne was Sunday night ctobe Ot “6.7, oe 1
4 : be involved in an aceiéent with per , scheilit tabaci, i x e i
” : } car cn Haggatt Hall ro-d nea eee ie arr aD ?
Shelled Seemp and corn-flous Harold Lynch of Reberts Ten- ‘Tomorrow 7 a.m. James Street 1g i
be stainec ; flip an-r + Mir cs 4 yet} - SSD
on, Macha St, Pl eye t. Michael lt ine cour get Bete: " “Morting” Heep : MAFFEI & CO., LTD PRICES
ith litte difficulty, Both item i n Septemt ‘ j \ ting — —_ : *. é . a ”
ei Sd ee a ae Te ee Sey b 3 i, Meeting, { 11 YEARS — 11 YEARS \f ¥ $5.24 & $4.48 ty
fol plentiful and are sey at tho «!. 5 am. he was criving a car 7 p.m. James Street and Bethel: (1941-1952) ‘ oT : i
folowing» prices:; shelled corn !2 alo Hi gat Hall road going Gospel service ; *horus ‘ Wnt } ~ ="
> per pint and corn-flour 2) towa'ds the country, He reacned : ing. ssi and chorus sing- { LABOUR DAY! ! PRINCE WM. HENRY ST. {
$s per pint : ma‘or road and stopped the car. y tre
29 * ee * , Moving from the major road he { LABOUR DAY!!! DDDODOOGHGOGGH FDO HGHOOGGHGOOHOH SOD
Bain Peet in St. John is ive; signalled and looked through the Jo : Ca The Workers’ Day Suitable for Evening or {)
coming ¢ avour . fous’ jiear window nut sav nothing ‘ | 7 ;
On Thursday night a aumber c¢! behind him and turned to the right. yce rey } e celebrated with a morning wear i
perrons from St. Joseph were seen ‘sh° reeched to the right side « )

i h beach enjoying a “mo

)

: ; : )

8 a “moon- th read his car was struck and .,,..,,@ From Page iz {

ligh seabathing picnic They or getting out he notice rmin *ensly enough, while Ella is too



will t
remained until 4.33 a.m, Friday. under a tunnel and a motor cycle ldclerminate a character to hold
Yesterday the beach was agaili against a wall. He went to the the book together,






crowded with holiday-makers and took eed ‘A Feartul Joy’ (1949), the iast Under the Avuspices of

The Barbados Workers’
Union
And

Yi . Pa ”
A dog was killed Biv a lorry ii i more intelligent, is less dynamic a er ar ee say | 10, n, 12 & 13, Broad Street
Burke’ : Village, St. “Joseph, on DEVOTIONAL SERVICE ind less resilient than Sara. She Monday, 6th October, 1952 Made in these New

aeeaes en me "7 AT Y.MC. starts by marrying anq being (Bank-holiday) :
Friday night last, Up to 11.80 M.C.A, prompily @esivted be ws rune ont | At all Wool Tropicals

vide » him up and carried him , . : ;
are Bs sarnes ape St. vee qo to the General Hospital, “s kee ee oy pubiee® ae]
tne halilae nak e Dante a@ine At this stage the inquest was gtions, It bears a cantante eae}
bol 1olida) akers we SWim- adjourned until October 4, blance to “Herself Surprised ” but.

& ‘ * . middle-class Tabitha Baskett, if







a.m. yesterday the dog was stil)



Me SAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LID.





“ 1 on the roadside of the Barbados Y.M.C.A. wil] leck courage and chart fe a i d i - oe
% * * s Hg ae 2 surage and charm; she has i = SSS

be held at the Headquarters this Bonser’s child and is taken up price reduction in

Since the recent rains the crops evening at 4.30 o'clock. first by a literary dilettante and
in St. Philip are green again,. !1 The speaker will be Mr. V. B. many years later by a wealthy
Christ Church the crops seem St. John. A cordial invitation is manufacturer who marries her.
badly in need of rain, At some .extended to members and the Tabitha is a conservative by |
plantations, labourers are e:- general public including ladies. nature and resists change: but she|
gaged in watering some of thi |--—————-— cannot resist. Dick Bonser who |
crops. The water used on such | turns up periodically to borrow |

occasions is drawn from wells. > >y or vy her 3onser
Residents ‘of St. Philip wb WEATHEK REPORT eivea bots aa eee ees

gives her life and floats her off

Include :
The Famous Bee Show
Donkey Races

i
,
years ! () LTD
eg .
ser yramia’ Ballding @ GREY $52 00
Hand Balancing @ BROWN , up

Outstanding Events will |



Muscle Control, Etc,

* Will our Customers please note
Beauty Contest ti

an that our

ay





+
®

went to the Crane Beach yester- ES > the sandbanks: she realises this
day hoping to get relief from the YESTERDAY instinctively and even aii n she |

heat by sea-bathing found tic Rainfall from Codrington: is quite an old woman, she still}

See the Crowning of

Coie Footbal Cadies) ff Pho slggern Hggals AR “= LUMBER YARD & HARDWARE DEPT.
















sea choppy Oe ynleryitiogs. They |< Nil. cannot resist him. ) Spinsters vs,
did not risk going in ‘and went’! otal rainfall ¢ This is another excelle vel: Women saving in th st of
f r ‘or S is another excellent novel A 2 | saving in the cost of your
away somewhat disappointed. date: 4.91 ins, month to if it fails to satisfy completely, it Cricket Match — Stevedores finished suit. WILL. BE CLOSED FOR
‘Temperature: 170,5° is only perhaps because with a vs. Lightermen
Wind SF. writer lik Cary t
Vv i 4 river e ary one expects, . "
Postponed For | "ae tiem | aie See Il gs mae gaan fl | STOCK -TAKING
Soe iifferent ; better ee : si rize : $25. |
S , d Ti Parsnester: (9 am.) 29.928 Eee etidee. Se ehaseet Gutls 2nd Prize : $10.00 | a
.m. K thirteentt rel. appears this Vaudeville and Calypso | |
econ ime a ehivigenth | Dovel, |, *ppeare his!) Cempetition—Twe Shows {i| e BD. ce | On TUESDAY 30th SEPTEMBER
The Programme of ° Sacred not stop short, tantalising us, at 7 ae and Mid-Night ’ | $ | AND
Music which Was to Have been }| Sunrise: 5.47 am 1939, but will take us right up to pecially So lak | ;
given by the Police Band at S¢ Sunset: 6.06 p.m, the present day. The novel which Workers ! Celebrate Your WEDNESDAY 1st OCTOBER.
Peter’s Church. to-day (Sun- Moon: New, September 20 Fives us the peculiar ‘feel’. of this Da “0 Do not miss it ! BD.
day) 28th Sept. has been post- | Lighting: 6.00 p.m. ies te cocent seas iab Saahe ‘MEMBERS FREE —_—
. & =f ne pce rears as > * - . |
poned this Pee ee pA i dies ry Ta, oy ae 5.38 v'sion and in their true historical Adults 1/- :: Children 6d. of Bolten Lane |
engagement whic’ shou nave . , . a! verspective: this rel he y d N & HAYNES C0 LID
taken place last Sunday, 2\st om iw ela cer % iat Ott think that | Gates Open at 12 Noon WILKINSO 9 r
ah and must be fulfilled to- | Joyce Cary will be the man wa | 28.9.52.—4n.
ay. ———cn"_ed_ " Will write it. | So SSS | >

















8



> : BQ BAAD AON ON AONB BBP PDP PBN Bo Be Bw BP BN BN BD BY PDO Ze
BABEEFA - FABAAF FAAP FFAFAAFAFAFFA oo

ZA0
x






§ Lawes Shoes Hercules

Bicycles

Clearing!
2 Roadsters @
$60.00 ea.

1 Carrier @
$86.00,



In as much as we find it impracticable to serve all our Customers with CHAMPAGNE
in celebration of our 17th anniversary, we are adopting a more profitable means of celebra-
tion, and that is to share our profits with all our Customers during the month of OCTOBER.





Here is merely an idea of some of the Bargains which will make this anniversary an
unforgettable one:-—



Bags! Bags!



Ladies” Mall Stips
OOO 2568 5 iy 3 0 5 phases ata ac aie $2.00 each
eset me ee by cant a $1.00, Bentwood





Dress

Materials
Art Silk, Rayon & Spun

loveliest assortment in Town

Costume Jewellery Chairs

Costume Jewellery—Breoches, Ear-rings, Necklaces .
ete. At Gift Prices — $16.00 per pair

é 3 PLY CHAIRS
Cotton Blankets — $12.00 per. pair

Oe OO ae ee Gis Bpice cl nate a REED $4.00. ea.

; esp! tk abniy ‘ a \
BUY iss ea cae $2.88 ,, MEN'S S i GE: | 2
' And still more Bes for ‘. ” K

every occasion from Cycle Tyres “



S BPBRABAAAEAAES AAA ABD A AAA AA
FR AFA FAFA AFF AFF FPP FFF FF FPA FPP PFS F



Prices as low as .... 64c. yd.



Za



Cottons

\merican Pereales in beauti-

48ec. up a x i SEMI ss visicissssdvoedenese ;
i dedteinsiiaemiinnneesiosselsgh els edi Be S LVS Ss ie. aca

: ful designs as low as 69e. yd.







,
Gentlemen »
‘



\ - adies” Cycle Tubes





; NN
5 We
: CGR 19 ses, e8 {EOE yi Va pa phates Nace $1.26 ea. ; A
? Seorsucher Pange €&PSs We BAR et is Bo a Oe Ae aut $1.26 .. strongly advise you » x
replenish your ward-
— colours: . 69e. yd. A iine assoriment to choose gy Rg = PES ce au

ws @ltra Modern Sewing Machines











% Flowered & Polka Dots irom. Pvices from 60. up Special Price during October oo. .e. $59.00 each 5 = aes aoe will >
et 7 savy reductions in
4 from 72e. te 90c. per vd. em ream e reg ° 2 hte’ alll Khaki SM
y Wer Rod Tiel Plastic Tabling ‘ ae co a
PP i :
» ea pare eons Attractive patterns . a weeeee @ 9c. per yd 4 Belts, Hats, Vests,
x Genuine Erisk Lines Vosrels Beautiful patterns, good quality. 56” wide . from $1.42 yd.-up Creara pisanal, Serge & ?
E pens — “ fees Garbardine, also S‘i-es.
REPRE i 74 5 a56 18 sMaased wceueee @ T6e, euch “7 o ye 7 J Wise men Will Shop »
$— “| FOR BARGAINS GALORE, See.... .





now for Christmas. W\

: a= Gi : Ra '
» lurkish Bath Towels from $1.00 up ; y
ss Seeing is believing so accept our invitation to come \
M4 naa ERSTE ersten ee @ e in and see for yourself and join in the spree of keen \

% Anklets in White & colours all sizes from 36c, to 50¢ ul r Y %] \ ae prices in honeur of our 17th Anniversary W
« Gah ee ete. SWAN STREET. )



A Oe ae Pw. 2 DrEOEPPBEABAA AIA D-D-D-D-P-P-D-PAPP-P-PDPDA-PPPPDPPD DDD DD PPB PPP PP APPA FARRAR AF FFF BFF FFE BABS 20
OZR ZEEE SESS ESS EEF AIFF RA EE LBBBFBL OFFA FFF FEF FFB EE ESB EAE EEE FEES EEF FE EF AA FEF FFF APF FFF FFP PD PA PPP FFF FS



Full Text

PAGE 1

i/ w /Mr n lovooy The Day the Queen Must Choose A Hat Afan A6ortUt. To yun. great ela!< ha H STYLE-SETTERS B iHii.u in BARKLKY LONDON. %  II r too soOtl to ihooee rid buy) the dress foj U> OPCe* ion lay the LoodOO desi.nei:. they are already well ahead vith styles Tor next year's corooition occasion*. Here, to il What you will wcai" m Coron.ilOB Year, ll niie of the :. linn dresses to eypeaa It is the dress that will set the style for any remptlon or bail lu he world's four UQtuefl where handellers slitter :ind chumtagne sparkle*. Its materials? .rosgraln and duchesse satin. TJic .olours? White and a new shade >f blue called Garter Blue. It Is starred for coronation occaions because: It has a "regal" air but Is 'Clamorous it k] simply styled bul becoming. It brings a touch of fashion to i formal gown with its new onhe-jhouU I us skirt vi:li i'ie contrasting coloured %  (•w-tieing on the waist. DO fussy, cluttered ornamentation, but just the right imount of bead embroidery on he bodice, and long, above-elbow lovaa Lastly. It is available on the xport market. %  %  is A:ihur Dante. 10 rears hi London, h.' has a doubledeed approach to dre" designing. la eatarg equally for the flock of lebut.nntes who fall ove r each >thcr every year to buy his dream" ball gowns' of brocade or link and white organdie, and fer is clientele of elegant women. What .... when riU* in state from BuckP:>laea to i formal}} foi the flm have long M Lilal ng when the new parliament*!;. *.ese*on will begui, but it is certain to be some lime before the Coronation next June. And that u the point which raises the problem. i -i : fie .ill noi have been Uu Queen will not be able to wear the symbol of moBjUch) Yet custom demand* ihat she siiould have her head !<-jds the yueen's Speech, oujtltning Govfnimiin poUry for the coming *evtoe. King Qeorg. VI did not baviuu* prohliii' His Cerunatioti followed rapidly after his accession He opened tabs first Parliament in 1937. ftf—SSil in the full panoply of rotes and On* Solution THE Duke <>f Windsor, as Kin* Edward VIII. waa the last pi to open Parliament before his Coronation. In hi* book "A King's Story he tell* how he overcame the difficulty. ONE SOLUTION ,,r | B| d ', Qsjaai afar* •ejewelled haadgcar of Kingship, the cocked hat that went w Ih ihe uniform of the Admiral of the Fleet. Kven the detail of ih,cocked hat ralaed a weag h ty point. Should I enter the House of Lord* with %  t ti, my Ji-od?" fnculUea wera I h.4i ha :.ii his admiral's hat. There is no sue': %  the Queen', pr Mem. ei lu*ely liares— roi instance, the one %  '. nding a I ily wears iiarn.', and that might be eonCIKI. not in dp so. The Garter... ANOXlfBI that the Queen < ap and lobet. of the Order of the Qairtor. it would be a fining drou. this ctatume of the moat %  order of chivalry, for I lie Qll< l*axlUnaanx Foi u-fore -he read! her speech she has to carry out one or the %  %  .< % %  .i % % %  I.nation of Ptote.Unt '.nth and -wearto do ill m l'ii power to maintain the Protcs' int suoccssion to toe Crown. The opening | .. Parliament i one of the most splendid survivals of pageantry eclipsed only by coro n ation. And %  vvn %  hi-t becomes a Vary ImpoVtaie Affan. -LE.S. iOAr IJV rowi\ sal hat like two gigantic exclamation marks. Erik also tarries out succeesfuUy of co-related accessories. by matching a hat to a bag. a scarf, or a pair of gloves. A black .i"f trimmed with ermii tails partners a black velii* pillbox similarly trimmed, and acinnamon felt hat witn n matching handbag add a touch of colour to an nil-black outfit. .... To Foot And black velvet and green la dark shade called Plnedew) are as fashionable for shoes as fi hats. That is the news arising from the first press preview ever given by Edward Rayne (Chairman and Managing Director of H. fc M. Rayne). He should know. Hi family have been In shoe business for 60 years, and he is now the Court shoemaker. Other important colours, for the coming months are sherry, morello. (a deep cherry) and gun metal. | A new addition to the shoe war-i robe shown in the collection are "hotlines"—half couit shoe, half, boot Made of black &u"de, they have a contrasting coloured cuff, on the ankle to match the heel (in red or green). For evening' wear, the cuff tr decorated with brilliants. Raync's collection has launched I the "jewelled look" for cocktail and '-veiling wear. Styles, include sandals with narrow straps, and court shoes with a delicate network of straps across the toes. These are in black velvet. spftU tarad with brilliants, pride of the collection Is the Italian-inspired "mule" type of shoe. A broad band of elasticise.1 velvet, fitted across the instep. Is guaranteed to keep foot and the shoe'sole together. Finally, comes an Idea which other shoemaker* would do wall to copy. All the style, for day are made In two heel height*, so that those who cannot wear high heel* atnow able to buy a s t N > t LaU •rmppuu bog in l IIM.III. oiuddiiit I'MIIWX 111 Sou thr mfltcbnw helt *hu> in •••ll. te I \< l I ^|\| H will ^ i TMk sUl/ %  SAti.N McGregoi rxctuna about HE HIT/, beau'y %  i powder*. Hnpaaxi WkLI. 1 ONFOI Ml |1 no soap, : o Wl-Nl Hut this never hapm | PhiUHw El.ttric PHM.IftHAVE RAZOR at M.i. ivpt.i ran he u world. .1 parfct and just as good for regular home use. You plug n I the dial Ui!h j Tewdeft strokes Use h once and all the •duel ntiFRti i i QO MM i i i PBON1 • d 447? hiil hold il till Wednesday Oct 1st They're re-coenlng Ith a full Hardware, llu terials and Kitchenwaie \ier, %  il ^et what you it hare Inctudtng paints and and numerous small boal fitting* tynu Tornado own•r*>. Remeiidw-r. ihtn I I frag ui ONf M*N AN1 IIIS IHMi imldn't h %  * maa %  w artthoui ITK1NA H.H; EMOW \ pU adJ t..-..o ,i. rtaa A Co I Pttrtaa Beaton (ph W I on up. Purina Ho* Chew is %  staple diet and I'd iuaj1 you ilrop In for the hlghh infoin.ttivi bookltl on how to cru>ose. f.H-il and gi nerallv manage your dog from the Chockerba ird store ran i;\ iit t -SALON |i taaturtag th* ni o I %  gqui Nylon r.. I llettm.i Ltd in Th" Hastings BDd featured imonfl dehkhtfui Imported TropfV t L fe, o i urer Thr bir hit with UK i|iv*rl h.ii.o, i ...is •*. Ml • ratal, IB. I*. itw. fcrrll. .r. Us lid tlmca, Willl silk %  -rf P-lms .•# : %  =c = %  %  : ^xoacoa Oh Pity The Poor Housewife All these style, appoaf •" Erik's lew collection. Colounf include right lacquer red, white, and any hade of green from bright merald to a dark Cyprus (dark nough to be mistaken for black in artificial light). Materials are t aried. Black velvet, mellousine. black velvet embossed with eoljurs and long-haired fellhead the list. Trimmings are few and far between. They appear on cocktail hats where black Jet or black aiding iall that Is used. Most hats hav e the pronounced foiward, down over-the-eyes look, frcmlnlscent of thr 1920**. Thla la created by a long piece of millinry foliage curling round the heck, by an enlarg d brim effec lively concealing half the face like a donkey's blinker, or by two pheasant tails perching on the Alan brooke 9 $ Daughter LORD ALANBROOKE'S daughter, 21-ycar-old Miss Kathleen Uenita Brooke, has become engaged in Malta The man she is to marry Is stationed there: ^4-year-old Lieutenant Oliver Vcsey Stoney He is tall and dark son of MJ> Robert Stoney, of Itosturk Castle, Co. Mayo. Mrs. Stun. 1 f Hi nuth' wedding will probably be next >eai. Miss Brooke Is slight and darkbalrod, lives in Boutn Kensington. Sin will be in Malta another forti Ight She studied geology at heading University, is now .. civil servant. —L.E.S. By PILN'SANT. To be rckpunsible fur the running Of a home in the certainly an experience, but It Is not m experience that many women would choose to go through were they given the choice. Woman of to-day are far removed from the simpering affected female* of a century ago. Their emancipation, begun b> the Suffragette movement, wag coupteted by two world wars, and the result of the part women played in the last war showed plainly that under a superficial difference of character the modem wom-m can stand up to most things ihni a man can In their war Jobs women showed courage esuuiraiue arad initlal've, and what's more, Inj certain specialised work they did better than men. It is certain Khat women will never return to the secluded domest'city of their grandmothers. Yet m peace time a woman's natural share of life's work is domestic, and it is on the woman that the Job of running the house | uD Never has her task been %  haidet one than it is to-day, and she Unds that n tackling it ; he Pgadl every bit of the courage and env funded of her during the war. She encounters difficulties and problems unknown io her grandmothers time, and as she fights her way aftviosi the cost of living, red-tape, and the exafpcratfng result of controls, she cannot help wondering, if, as during the war. women might not be able %  > n. .ke a U-i ter job of some things In Barbados to-day. The cost of living rises higher and higher and, while she has ; more money with which to run I the house than ever befoie. yet, | to her dismay she finds that Its I purchasing power is less than half what il waa formerly. And | Ibis not for luxuries, but for the plain honeet-to-goodncsa food th.it a healthy husband and hungry children expect to find on tho i able BATH AND TOILET SOAPS r a B You will enjoy the luxury of uting .-**-.. thnr r*ouuiiHy perfumed toap^ Had she even unlimited she cannot llnd the essential foods lo buy. Meat, fish, and salted meats are In erratic supply, and %  he never knows when she ma'y hear that there are none to b purchased, and this situation ma\ continue for weeks, or month*. Yams, eddtM-.s. sweet potatoes ore non existent, and even lice, lias almost disappeared. There when ,,he cannot gel thair, and onions, and butter, like the seasons, come and go Grcciib .ire wBOVe the price of the average purse, and while they are healthy, they hardly fill a hungry family Yet the groceries are full of turned luxury goods, Vweut h scull; tinned trU IU hama, Pato-de-fois-gras and cockUtll foods of every kind' And. us her hungiy children ask fur food, shp cannot help wondering why such things are import*^ when Hie necessitlOH arc in such short supply. Are the quotas mismanaged'.' And why seven > i controls and red^bUM on every aide, measure which an i cessary in a war. but which were never meant for peace' All this Mrs Hn*eife punriels over, for she is no fool. But this Uj not all ln.it ttiv liningwlla has to endure. T*ie huckster*, who used to be her goodnature) friends, nave turned sour, and taking advan• ire of the %  oarolty, use (1 m an excuse for rudeness, nnd a d;splay of "show-off" authority which presumably gives them some satisfaction, but which only adds to the dimcuitici. and irritation of the buyor. The qualities of common politeness and respect. with the personal dignity with which the exercise of these qualities endows on those who exercise them are gone, and their place la usurped by a shameless rudeness unknown in this island before. This, and a "take what I say, or go without" atUtude Is what the housewife encounters as with her heavy basket, she fights to find %  little food at the various marketPhone you te that best: KILL KM ALL. U'l MHHU M. Mil 1 XI AND IW 1 \l.l ll -ctieidal 1 >imroii Monte St Son ,n pint as Mel I Ml I l ROW has n. ideal for mdoors an i out Kill I K -xt suggestion >eu miv like to make '>l t nkiMl.1.11 CAIJ^H I IVBI sIRIOIN MHIl \l \lx |IRI and many more Ft aieeda) Menu at the in Marhill St restaurant .11 Room, I'ar and Snacketta t:pen from :a in on. the ARLINGTON has provi I popular for As-' %  HIand m.inj nn re in atated Bet this new, centre Dial iT3o and come on along' SIIA1IM, till I'Hdllls oMthod ooela) rating an anni%*ersaiy th.n to (•rulk champagne think you %  | th,N I WILSON & Co.'s rroS Aiimvers.iry in Uctober, OCTOUER, when • %  rc'U be %  lamboree) <>t good .iiidHiK aavani %  nd Anvark an ineechanand wondertul .1 n !' nii-s,d *aogaegall HNS/ III1N/. N IMIIIi M KIMls. hlMls Hid space Tre^luce 17 all SOUPS! Distributed I v J. A Mai son & Son Ihal tarnelf Kirst in quality. lOpa u. hH every family's fa every occasion NOI ISM BOWS ..r. ii ii i-veryonc — superior OB nt And if that doesn't nvince you. nothing will I ilrranirii of a hra tailh firm MBMIi • •. toms I IPI-nlu'lU. . mg centres And remember, her job Ig i one -he can leave at the office at 4 pm. or forget for a quiet weekend, Her wont i recurrent and iever ending, for breakfast lunch, tea and dinner corm aruund ear' lay with the regularity of fte i-ing a uu. ami muM !• coped with. Families expect meals to tie produced, no mallei what. And MantUM, as she reads im daily paper, she CaWWt help noting the warnings given (>> lhea> i uoighted thinking people-, who having no axe lo grind, Bjrg COD omul only for the general wel* i -.f the Hland. Warmnjgs as to the cost ol landed noods. highei in ltarl"d>s thitn any ontvr vf.l. Island, and this she knows, help* lo make it .1' she lias to buy more -si.nslve. Warnings that this hdrnd I* be ng left iwiund othei n i-ii %  .inicnities to I. ih te ir idr nil i Ih. | w : i Harbour, I lilt eg for the bulk loading of sugar, en* ment and praebeal help ba Howl accon, modal ion for Tom courage merit for foreign capital All this and more Mrs Housofg m las, for. as has been said heruii', she Is no fool, and -he i %  well thnt Ihe neglect v irnlngs will reflect on her daiU life to make It even harder. She knowi that iniMiioas freed (1 f -i iseb%  eontrol.s. an.) left In the i ipabhhands of the business men of tii s Island would serve U TO MILI* — HANDS ; AF is sale for dalott fabrics, easy on ui hands FAB *wtaeverything nc.ilng fragranl.v MB IUI fomiiK hOUOl nhWUall LrrsTK* ) •' unalBNQ I "i *al LAL.ULK.OLOO.NL aau4.i.\MiM. HAIR < UtAM FAB WASHFS EVERYTHING BRIGHTER, WHITER. HOH*41UU( U>UI GENERAL CERTIFICATE of EDUCATION CAMBRIDGE SCHOOL & H IGHER SCH CERT a o-i'.' !" r OH''','.C'FVUAI IW. "iJ atta mJiitlaiimr 1. I oivi IW (tradiui. TiMo>* '2.UU) MixMiaia >•. io1 iu rran*"n a?i %  *" MCD r*n M.A i i r> nhwi MrfnlmMI • WOLSEY HALL, OXFORD •"-" We'll soon hai a that better Wtlll ^"~ ^k i luldirn't Hscidcnii quickly ref^aa/ \u ffpaenanaai %  >) Gen>aenM e*s \ .' Jj.' Jrawi out the dm lod stimulates ^* tin growth ol new nhiu over die damaged 'it Keep %  no imndy tor laouly usr. n ulai -lit' Man rogenli dsOM ii erveal ol fMUTt. %  spoki %  ) i enter nan deahm gi\i*> lerfol an enhsatioii. If von ant a i.-ulh lirm iift.Chan.in%  ii.*" is lor veejl In roan ta v u t g ai fabrica. Geaalnc Msidrnlorm Btaaai.ti-amiij'li'ooli igtbel mlej "Malr-ol \uieries. lii.r,-., maitfen/hrm lot mr) ijpp ol ligure. FOR IPOTS, BRUISES, MShES, hARUiOMS, Etc GHRMOLKNK %  '•• %  at a iUy it left the farm. Buy K! IM ii'ilk ilt.u aeaj Can alwsv* depend upou Ida it\ wholesome nets and |unty! KLIM IS PURE. SAFE MILK J2j KLIM keeps without refrl 9 erelea [3 KLIM quality is always uarferm [4] KLIM Itaicellcnt for orowinqchltdrM [T] KLIModds nourishment to cooked dlskes [gTj KLIM U recommended for Infant feeding [7 KUMiafainthesaeclally-pockee1t*ei ; 8 KLIMis produced under strictest central Take pur* waier. add KLUA, %  ind fou ha>e pore, lafe milk I e %  ..-.,', 1.-.-,-. ....... I ..-..b,............ I OB. M.. '. ...i*. .1. I %  %  %  '-S-O.1.. I e fjsfSh> •*•*•.• *•— -t" I K. ... wBBBW* TRUSTED IfMEOT ^rOI OVER SI TUtJ BEWAREOFWORMSI I Mum lbnu a ..1,1 B nd ,.-,! altk* 11* I .- ,-,. Iu...l W j..,-ll ..III. (iI •MMJe'a Worm IM'"I. M*l. IV UM I OMSWIUII'I Mi— r IW] M A*#-iVW/.V,V#V/,W/^VJUST liHUVHi rorraas ASTHMA BBMFUY imANtia ntrr msrNit UVONAL MORI II K MM tri MII.K 11 ftlwai •111 1 IKRuns IIIUIIIH KAOLIN ronra C. CARLTON BROWNE WbalMale Retail DraggM 1S Roebeek St. D*al Ulg v KLIM aare seft MILK BUT IN rilMIINCI THI WOULD OVII WHERE PAIN ASSAILS... SACROOL PREVAILS I KNIGHTS LTD. | 5T-VDAY srrtrMnrR 28. 132 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PACE SEVEN


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ttttftau Aeaoe FSTAHI.1SHKD 1895 BARBADOS. SKI' l'HR I. SIX I I Naguib's Demand To Oust jNahas Rejected tHOH \U. Ol XRTKKS: New Crisis Expected Follow ing Wafclist Move Roy Living With Bullet In If is Heart IMU SI.M \. i IIAI 11 \4.i nr CAIRO. Sept. 27. ; r*S m.st po i I %  Nahas be eustec). It WSJ OlSMaaSWBi it the % % % %  % %  cat wu The next move is i; ''i 'hi' "v his Clistl may result. Tincons) %  %  %  lwo-aiwl-1 %  id around '• meeting was held and yell-^dj "Long live Nahai — no WAFDI .-. %  appeared dramatically bofort ha %  %  %  and isirt "when I bar wai s< with .( bu %  hMOUtwl with %  .-. %  and Indlaiu Si furor. D to BU %  %  %  i at the and • f .:n. and have .%  .. C.D.C. Invests <:il..~>oou : %  ^faction.' My enoAdane and the Egyptian peon ways strengthened rmperUlista, Defeat! o m nVd Egyptians and their supporters TSFrSi „ %  •very u here" The crowd shouted Y .M C.A. luncheon 'no leader but Nahas. There la no Indication <>f what Nacuib would do In the retmt to the Wafdi.t defiance Ha in communication with th? Interior Minister BoUman HafCf and Army leaders within try Itsi l>v ; .p. u t days. The 45 members W.A.Fn Parliamentary Ciroup went on record Friday night witei a statement that Nahas must remain the parly leader. Junior leader of the W A F.D Abritl Sii!,irr K.ih-ny Com an, limseir onca UsXed as a possible succeasm nounctd -it the end of the meeting that the %  %  %  %  waa unanimous. He said %  f< rraal i ooamant would be issued luter Saturday (about 4.0u p.m ) Gomaa's announcement waa follOWad by a declar-Mirn bv anotnas v. r fa bean than had been Farrag to the excited crowd of!three OIK! cnes. -ii r B %  Washington: Among ttcntl i.eH .'i I tha e P %  %  %  V! lO.Oon.OOO'type ven.mii 01 the medieval cross-bow. Bern* I • the Promotion of Sharp-shooting" has been formed in E^ist German v. %  out dassstroui to all anamV paopla.* 1 ;*rrUirUr Tfl Dutl h I .. A Afi. 00 m .1* awamp| t dgttn against Pretoria, for showing the skulli and foslU of prim'^,'J' Ith* man. It .f tha partv concernad and seizure, of Its fund. W.A.F.D. already r ?_, __ _ wr iiooooo ****\LelkSnon fins which is "only %  theory" Tel Avtvi The cost of a car -v J'iU |>er cent. Owners Of Uu 01 tara must pay £1M for a licence. falatta, MalU: A Aim unit has been flown from Britain lO Malta 10 make a colour lllm of the is'and'* 18-month-old industry— cotton production. Capetown: In the general rise in living costs in South Africa] the increase in the cost of on-' i CDC would find many 1(em tmi1k 1o have escaped more useful ways of helping tho notice. Ring* made of elephant economic developm-nt of thWest h3 r wnicn ,„, lipposed to brm nd he had no reascn.to ^^ v ,. ,-.,.--, n 3 IwUaawould "^! h B „ „ J„ !n n „T/. •!' aotietih %  im,^' c ,V rc h blg ,"Jl m ,,. (oun-tB. hnve increavti r...m I I D.C hadavaa I .S. President Asks A.F.L.To End Strike i "IRI'MAN asked the i % %  ; i the internal i •,.'" Trui "Department ol I f< m t %  II at loaa n| pi oductitui wi I %  ,.i brancdatni ol \fi* IViieiiii at I"'" til • I I III IM |i l P L Wants Special I::,:; Envesagatioa t L o! M .'•Ml B.VMlii Mi TTsieM Bn*-ii cup u> Mr f i. and trrday afternoon nt tl Windward I-land". 8>n in tlm picture from left t-i Capt. a. C W-*thcihrd. Mr. I" I. Robert, and Mi M O. Tnokoi fuu ai tin' ft. Tha Owp right .* Mi 1. W ll. (iiiatfa. Mr. K 8 Tea i 'fiallriigr I Bor Kiflf Merlliut yan. uioiirf tin' Li" 1 I i -II. Mi 11 lowfi wood. Major A. I New Sea Defence Zone In Far East Ordered CKaltenge Cup Won By Roberts %  %  ill be ueeful 'In %  nanantenl man own B| in it i %  ;b, farmei adding p> %  lab.. and %  i %  tei ruination I : the will mei i nient in dilation who %  TOKYO, Sept 28 THE United Stales navj ilapped a ttal blockade %  intire Korean roast on Saturday and ordered its wai h'p MI T A I. n tn patrol within rani'.r ol Soviet and Red CWfH %  ihe K Tiie naw orders will senq American wrai hlpi within Ornnti i i , twelve miles ol the Russian ami Maiirliurian bl : i ?I^f? ". to ..'•" %  on when tha tha Aarteultural Dei Bguraa which ihow nlj about hall i );.r li: %  s, vie\ territory than they patrolled I %  General Mark Clark who announced ths creation >l the new MM detetiee /.ne" on hi! return from a wi I ip level conferences with his operations chiefs in ; %  lit any ihip In the I forb lei tot would he Mibjeet to search regardless ofl nationality %  %  Jni United llhreepent-e pre-war lo two! irulneas Admittedly, the rings | I are bigger and b#Mr r but | Delegates Arrive For Peace Talks TOKYO. S-.pt IT. apply ntT hi i h.M Nor'h K Cl.uk . mtUiw.1 beciuM II I i Rin. el,,,, ,., %  %  lop trip. IV %  M IIIM! lucl h .„ murti I %  %  lo i ..I ro.l. ill.lril.iih. •.,.., Wi %  %  i. !" withi..; %  " "" %  %  < % %  Wai i < In Thunder pi war, United Nalio.e. jets rn n bombs and Homing ttan in Egypt'* state l>ank. -1 I' Mr. Sled Will Lead Industrial Mission To It. W.I. II i.m Our (I" KINGSTON .1 Mr. Lincoln Steel director -it the i iicmual lOChl has been sel' lead the B 1al mission R the poji*l%  of Jamaica, Trinidad and Brltlatl Guianai Ha roplaoai Sir Norman Ktpphuj hoad of BriUln'a federation Indtl not now able to make the Uip. No Govt. 3 StTS OF TRIPLETS BORN IN 5 DAYS ["ON, Sept. 26. Tali women gave birth lo trl] %  :i eart) out the reform I i ngrammf.^l*'P. well 9Cot rs exgci TIVE cotnams wssmc (!wini! t<> • iroumatancaa beyond the 1 mitt.-.i meeting wl : Khodulad (-M Tnursday last had T to be postponed It will now luke rrow (Monday 29th) i ten .'t 5 p-m. Secret Military Talk To lie tfeld I WASHINGTON, Sept. 27. A dil lomatlc i fflctal said on Satghl thai .i highly secret • nil South East i %  e held in the Defence ben i-.i lj next ::<.iiU.. Hi "Tifcrtnce will dlseUM UN entire military in South-East and cspecliilly Indo-China. Ho said i! wai ihioflv the result of a plan for such I review of the military situation which was laid down by Marshal t)iphnH< Ju' when he last visited here At that time there was three-power milii n SrmthEast Asia and It waa liopad that a permanent military staff commilil.iee powers on South%  A %  e aid be set up. He said this meeting might rei nunend the scttins up of such a % % %  <• tiut any decision on thin subfael would havo lo be taken by Stall administration. 0.F, DatSgStas bran east and wpst napalm on live Commuin have arrived at IVij>m>: foi . Communist "psaea confan oca ft Asian and Puif, ragJona' 1 i a* antraa ".i mass of Sao i.ccording to Re-f ; % %  uniting all of A': "Thr confe'. : %  i | %  .! %  %  %  CBlod L, U'.ll r 'some representatives h rlv idf the %  Red capital. tie i IUI 1 v. %  " %  "" '" %  They Inrluaed Mr, .ii """ ; %  ': %  Anolh.. Anirri,..,. ,..„,„., ,'„''', ''n, 1 !" f: n "-; M r %  ; %  ZEES, ^ sates 1 from Canada, Australia, Colombia. B B Guatemala. India, Indoili >( %  •>. Ne .' Pakistan also irrlvcd In the capital tha —t'.P. On Iii-|H-t tioii.Tmir NEW DELHI, S-pt. 27. Air Fttri > I M il %  Mr Tin ma. Finlctter on a tour of inspection leu ii Korea Baturdai) Ha efiferred Friday with Indian Defence Minister Mr. Narahlma Popalaswami. —l.P. i N % i;vi ivis >ii >iiti 11s Joint Statement EntIs Europe's If.n/* Manoeuvres OSI/J Nnr %  .-. Gen. KMUs w R dgway and Admiral Lyi.de Met brought western Emope's greateat povt %  %  Mfi | I itrsnanl In arhlch thai odmitteu .i North A1 tion, but said nonof them an insiirmonr I Oper.itlrm Mainbrate which mall natlorfi in the North Sen and Atiatitic was officially i Cagto %  : %  reel u itatk a>petu ann i ra learned f.P. during Ihiv aek h"t thoul lOi mg U plane. The MI I pl %  i• %  l for the n. I %  i ii i tha i %  Wai in (*pt n ; w'l .\ l Itn :';;;,';;;!,. in tjtut.o .SC/IOI. tKsnw ,i KINGSTON, Jamaica, .ipt ft'i 1 M tl — Captain df . %  the R< port aftai which Mr f I I (rlf%  08BMAJ Two heart •i than ctdani WMyinaly tbin to them im Katuiday and aSCh al Wltwa Fiedler. IHOtlli'l ot t'lllht BOt to nether and agreed temporarily on Saturday that Heeu tho child e too groat for the Infanta. The lo<-al court officially revesUd the baby mliup bud IIISI and said that there could %  >e no doubt horftute blood U-t-, akull mraaiiiemenu and UnnerprluU uulnted to tho ~mm IM.o.-tile coacluaUw v.r si'pt a nouncas the award GUchrlsl Bcholarabip itiirtti f I 1 p Min.id who will read %  i adbur) aahlbtth v. i . | 1 I %  % %  %  ..:... and ,. aa —*T \ s Warrei .' GrlflHh Miin Stabbed Girl Wr\d Wreckage Of Jap Boal Seen kvr.ts Leave For Far Fast Tour rOKYO ].' 27. %  go of I %  %  200 mil* %  %  Ml :n men .,I.<..M U %  K ihra M ,i %  %  %  %  .. en %  ..-. nad A %  %  i %  "• %  %  i Hmv, ml %  > us. | — .. %  i. %  ly a sudden lldnl wavi t'lion. boata eonttnuad %  %  %  SJ (In pile 1 tVfR.E19ENHOWEB jisroKTCSG r.s. KiliKKiN PQLIC1 B MHHEDaAN SMIIII LOUISVILLE i. %  21 %  %  .light occu %  %  p .in. n %  an i %  %  t .,. %  rontexi of IK ..." liepubl %  dam %  . H %  • •on p.u | ... i r YANKEL TIML M ^SHINGTl UN i Dayluiht ivini t i daylight tana Bund a Jair fruit I clock K-> 1 I %  I %  %  %  tlti Ii II i ..! %  Ing from %  i ftUbbtag %  i. Storms Sweep France RA .*' IOH '.' -. of ihe WORLD'S CHAMPION CYCLE i .1-. M.W H\ f\8P£X lnit* DiSCISS GOVT. 11111. Major / E Orifldh I*l*nd Scout Commi^touei, luve-Ung uicwberof the Harnson College Scout Troop yesterdayIn ths background can be seen Mr. J. C. UaouDood, beadoisitsr of Harrison College. LONDON, B. > %  .. 1 K I id I" 1 % %  "' %  %  p I loul p.ias| .< % % %  i Argonniit alrllnei with %  p The i %  %  k t-. L Oil %  M %  I Althoui <• ill b*confti %  %  %  1 to I %  it I Malay Kong ga 1 -tr i -i i" PAHl %  %  %  %  %  %  P %  . i ppfng at %  %  %  i %  %  You are on a WINNER when you ride a Raleigh! A Raleigh was the cbo.ee of Reg Harri~W KaTl Professional Sprint (Siampion for thr am aid suLceiiioo. Hmh proof


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PAOF. TWO SUNDAV ADVOCATE -.1 NDA1 --I I'll >ll M I '" %  PIAZA THIATREi K HCI I VIM tui BUGLES IN THE AFTERNOON UUA1U8 .M.I HMI T* A T.nta... ILL SET YOU FOR THIS TWO TICKETS TOJ %  ROADWAY * %  Ml MAHT1N MI LLtH %  %  Mil (.. • * I J. STRANGE BARGAIN BUNCO SOUAD SIR WALTER SCOTTS IVANHOE George KHiabeth Joan 'AYLOR SAN'DKCs TAYLOR FONTAINE OPPNS. FRIDAY OCTOBER BD 5 and Ml •t 1.1 O III d nsisfllgglfiii i r UM D i III start on TOTBDAV OCTOlo miDAY ITfH I 30 pm Will nil Schooli includin | Pi that hflVt i->l taati ui HK < ;i i ! %  THEATRE Americans Are Missing The Laundry Trimmings American tourisU have rumhair timea as much DM i pared British laundry methi %  i Ho," said Mr. J. C unfavourably With 'hoe HI their Boltnu. a laundry ilrm's exccu* own countr>. In particular, t) • My thai here thffr shirts do not %  Handling hanf*—the coal or get the delicate ailenlton w nrhtM rilga, pn.j. rubber baaft. and they are accustomed, wrappings—abaorta about a quarBut British, Arms reply thai ier of the foul coat of the Amcreornparisou'' of U.S. and Bn* etui laundr? Thai compares, wild laundering technique arc unfau wic-ninth of the total in Mtain'l "An American pay* I u a/ah' HOLD IT I IMJNT MISS THIS "DUCHESS OK IDAHO" Vafl JofeBMM — Lena Home Esther N III .1 MI Powell The Jubilee r* Qu-r'it AND MYSTKRY STRKKr* Idi.iKiu Moulabian Sally Porreat — Bruce Beunei (In Wednesday. Oct. LI. Than Bad. . A LM was %i 4-1 OIII niitiNi II o o II A I %  H I4IREI %  OTAT BOXY %  • i iJf wT .„ (vlunku PHu>a g^thr wuhM^hwac, uoCtTr BOOTS MALONE MciuS*** TW.L-4 so a i ., uaaar o RoWii AMII.l ItttlCahib Calling D W R.J. LOCHRlE.O.Bf: Officer of Development and Welfare who has been paying a short visit, left the island for British Ouiana by B.W.I.A. on 1 Parly A PAHTV idence of Mr. and Mra. C. A. Pickariuri | CMBJ on I iM in honour of their daughter Juanita who I her eighteenth b'rthday. Her many friends and relative* who had an enjovabtr evening all jolneu in wishing her success and happy drtys in her ftjltW For V.C.W.L M R. KEITH ASHBY, son of Mr. and Mrs. Duncan Ash by •.'. Welchaa, Christ Church, returned c Jamaica MI Thuisday .It. spending the summer holiday* with h ida lives. Keith is a student at the I'n winty Cullcge of the Waal In'iiea und Is now doing his second }ear in Arts. Also leaving for Jamaica by thsj aame opportunity t Mr. O. Walcott and Misa B. Payne who will also .n UT the Uhivei.itv College \tu>it nl I niirtumnu ni ACK. son or Mr Assistant Labt^ui .-(Jininuau.on.er and Mrs. Jack will vi.tertaiii the luembers of Olwn-jK' Club on Wednesday mght %  British Council. Mr. Jack, a versatile youi j pianist U now populai Barbadian -uii.in. Il.ul>,.I.. 1 Uift Bmmm Huh— %  %  %  %  Joseph, as from Wednesd.. Htmniv*! ttuby D" During his absence Dr. L i %  is open to all rabc who are fed 1 Oat* M;lk r"oo,l and %  und ubies will r Judge* fn llnal luuiksj and ii*ine5 at the selected %  :ir in tfca \ %  .adttinn will take place Thi| %  on Sep%  30. Itt hir /HI/ IIABK: Joaeph. fnlnitfif \| ORETLLY. QC. Bar%  D' "tPacet-faluli) nt<*0 fpa*'d-> beyond fftc sound harr(r to make up for delays at the Customi barrier O.B I Adviser %  arrival fi' %  j B W l.A. if. '.u %  • ..ay on a short I.i ai>' I'mlir. -.IT-L-IW Trinidad, wag • Jamaica latranaOTSlCTrf M V OmXkVJt and Mis* o KfcllXY were pasenger* it M B W l.A. on Fri%  SM | i holidhy hcie. lUivk In Curacao HAROLD CARRINGTON. badlaa who had been ti Curacao for %  returnad bar B.W.I. A .i irw hi' hoi %  ... heir he was 'Hurried h> Mis< i .:. Robert* of The IV) <;iml OnR'CPA MR MILLFJS YEE MOON, an M ttajH ( (.I'oi'-of-Sp i n. returned to Tnni.'i..d rarly thi* ll.W.I.A. after spending apAPTAINR. W 1 HEYNOI : h-SoSt* B^^R CECIL JA i !" K. N. Jack, J yfarrivd ul Cathi-ilml O N %  .:i..i:m, ( s.ili C"IIM,I ; „ wos-ks Irom Chopin. Sthunian and Schui-'ii Members are leniiiuled m ln\ te their mends. Fur Hi licium \|K BILLY GREEN aWl srrivad from Durotuit.. ining the week •mere' he had bee i (.pending .. te wmtaf holiday will IH 1 returninn ts.i. | He will he leaving by the TlIt'KSOAV .(Ktnuuii at lock at St. Michael'' Cathedral. Mr. Eustace St.Clair Welch, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edscrton St.Clair Welch and Sanitaiy Inrpector of St. Peter, took as h •= [las Cynihia AftN daughter of Mr. and Mi \i B Brute or Redman'* Villnge. Si ru inpi r •!.ind by v.vdnosdav leaves the Island today by B.W.I.A foi sI ibi"Shi;>. I During his itay he was a guest H -' %  ii" .-i r c-kley. by me same oppori ra U>. Julian Pack and I Ikna of Sun FerlU had also been speiid.>ck's holiday here as S Iii Tteach. rormed bv Dean 11 Trie L the Very Rev and the tride wai given in i nage by her tattwr. The dutlfl Leslmaii were performed by EuKerlon W.k'i ana 'hote a tssfaerg fell to Mr JOM-; \1I \'l IIM-I ford. : Idt's dress was sctin and lace cut in a flown "Colombie" far Belgium wheie flLre with a close titling bodice he will enter the Umversitv of tnd appliqued lace yoke. gsM b> r Louvaine. lo continue his studies headesress was of UUiatow in Medicine • HilK T did hi* pnv forset-me-nnis fjfith 0 :itcii( .ti stud e : ei the Loyota veal and she can.. Cnlleee. Canadit. imthurium lilies. f'iijuv< •Ocbosj ii;i I % %  • i :• and **M happy to he nj her niii Brltod Who all c ninbuled U nuke her ; %  ; % %  %  >%  bnde. The fthwei he Misses C>, Sonj.i EprinSJBT, Dora**) nrl lla.el T.ie bnde was attended by Mi** H;i el Mascwll a* Maid-of-Honour. AI..T the ceremony a receplion held at the residence of Mrs. r; Maseoll. Ravmoth Ville. Tudor BMosJB. MR ANb MRK EUSTACE 8T.0. WSfrtl "TRINIDAD HERE WE COME • < (Bv WII-MA ri.ARKK) AFTER TWO FALSE STARTS Mrs Stuart's I).mi in,; Troupe Anally boarded the Canutliun Cunsirucior for Trinidad. The 'Revuedcville* School of Dancing, complete with stage hands, cook, seamstress and Cap!. Raison with 15 members of the Police Band. I am BUN ttuil everyone'* thoughts were ihe same. "Trinidad, ban w come !". The %  Construitor'' sailtd out about eight o'clock, th ,-\ OseAsfts By ui f..u. ovi... i.,-,, Fndny afiernooti Ailei ...^ the musli had ni. ,i ii f i UT .1 s few ol u> everyoi were sea-sick, wo decided io exi'„. plOre the deck The Sailors weie lurked on RHissCl friendly and eourfous enuugii to laying 'I. lonHiul us on a sighl s'r ing l!... h . ,!.,( M it Hare a ltd in Hie distance. AH '.he minutes trawled by. the thr-.> peaks become clearer and we here Dn pas-9. va*l htnierland ol grC nary, Ih'.n, jul %  mass ol vegetal' %  interspcrsi'i with white roads r< scinbling I few light houses dlmottsn i %  ( ,* %  ..( stb t Barbados. "Ihe world" as it i "iajority of ui who bat never travelled. Barbados. RDtng away from us, for il secmeo n as If the land were movlnj; the ship, like ,i br; IUI I moss, gravel gnd bhs i matter on its back, yet |n thfl loriii of such a \ : lorn. Thfn our U land bSH a cloud, an outline, nothing stirring on Ihe nartaoS Final'y. .1 was no more. We w-re in th.middle of Ihe BBtan, likv U I'land. the ship; completely surrounded by water Songs at Seas By this lime, everyone was : comfortable and feeling quitf ;it Then the singing started Led by our singers, Norm. Gas kin and NcvlllPhillips, we s.o iga old and uew. sentimental. ilypsoes. mambos, even the So-'-' d "Flat Lux." the Queen's Collegc School song. After dum'r. — — REVUKDrVlI.LE SENSATIONAL GENUINE BOHEMIAN GARNETS MOOMtSB OB SOLID c.iii i) PENDANTS. RINGS. EARRINGS. NECKLACES. BRACELETS and BROOCHES III LIMA A LO.. LI II. OPPOS1TK (.IIIIDAKI) S .,*imm i nm (i MM* i j i i M I M I \IIO\SO B. AFTER STOCK-TA-K1V WEDNESDAY OCT. 1st. THKdWOUTS IN Al.l. nEPABTMKNTS HA1.K PRICE ENTIRE STOCK RIBBONS . HALF PR1C COTTON. RAVON. SCITINGS. REMNANTS HALF PRICE BBSS) DF.SIC.NS PRINTED BATONS M CENTS T. R. EVANS WHITFIELDS BRANCH PHONE 4220 YOUR SHOE BTOBE PHONE 1220



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%  —— B'dians Study Sugar Engineering In Glasgow H i. %  1 JOYCE CARE\ I Mr. It L-'fan % %  ...I. %  Ireland. o* closer togarther. i lUtl b CO \ Ltd. Coming lot! %  serve uai durlBI which time Uli night school Their aim Is lo obtain the High* ir in indu %  I Irannum. who* Hi F N Grai i I InOctob; larUdOS in Sei.temuvr 149. and .-,,-_ f r !" tr/tnli-ul Afro H< „i i, iih A t. w smith : !" r ul r _.T l "?.!i".'. ^.V c !!:_. %  of Mechanical Encinrrrs ns Asa* % %  M. AMI Me. I I Similarly, other Wi I TBAKK URANNUH %  %  ,i theological student at Yorkshire be ordained next in IHM • •• %  %  ll %  I i-im. nl Ji.yi %  College), • ixford, %  %  • .-I • (-. i 11 ii Mnntene Balkan w part) and ... ervlci The fr-wit In IU13. h Joimoii tin • I in the NlajBrtao Kfgimeni ,1111111the war ;ind wu wounded In the Canavoona Campaign. Returning tc !iliUi'.il duty. In 1 wag sent as luagistTntr and executive officer to ltor&u. ;it thai time a vi-ry u-.n-.u(tistn.i llii health. however. covarad from garvtce anal he was adwsed •e. HTIT* ( ~\v*.\ ley, who ha* fought and left hrr • ppaan peai %  % %  '• %  : pan ii a inturn-s in nelp him I win lite ha* served fallho many year*. merry her. when his hem %  *t'y • %  %  :' v. iier arrested for robbing The charge i> vwrseho%  bout It aax eighteen mths ihtt is where the book depression ll#tutl and ends. She bears little t*?y inerti and snideii nnliee, when she l out. she will about making another net epttng Um .rating her own personal 'Id In her own story, Sara hi "" il. affectionate, ruled by kar Wilcher's %  '' .. sure of her. But shr turnup f Il laW agifc) .n The llnrs.\ Mouth'. ivtkM ..i-i bloody canvas. Th. jjfer-, :il g t more used by life, ..no vftaaM ind Cullev pu'he* her down the %  "* fuggy two, < ..I) ii coming to Bcotland more since—hi* m.*t recent will anj nl the characters he has and s.esus: wretched m advarcreated: to invclve the reader la MIV, exuberant and extravagant this transposition in prOapi my. At length he over., •nuin;itiaiitiy ID his grvif rag* hca himself and is sacked. ML', .ngues an <-x(raoidin.n > but he bobs up again and enjoy wer. nd good fortune before he k Tha type of novel Cary writ*-* taken up on a murder charge the novel dealing with the indiHe bears no ill-will at his exellar stepa nmninR, vain. -tan-chaaer and. iheM pictures are both n their contexts. But Oulley till has a soft spot for Sara, for 'hev have been through %  lot t'Kether and are really th^ same I ind of person in their insatiable zea| for life and in the courage •nd truth of their imaginnti rldUal in i-elation I nowadays rather OUl B it ft has i padnpaa t> i i), %  ulion an artist in life, Johnsot^ ias had a good time while II long and rs ough Uefoe. Fieldin mates Uoth style and nibjacl i'n rapM %  yee a i I AM BO ilmoal b uwa i his seamr. tremi A t W B nanilfai.1.. gal ha-, tice, obtained his Hiuli. i the fir l In thn %  %  ; um ut "Ashton**, WortMnsj ..ned th. 150. 1 i ."' %  i i %  this week—a book i thrr.NtokN of poljtlCertiflcate in Meih.tni eerlng. and. as .. Si ident nf th. Institute i is now Applying for Oraduah Membership He has Ihi technical quallflcatioos %  hi A.M.I. Mi' i E apart I rilling th< fK>titiu; with an %  has alitait, begun thl He Is artaWng; with s draughtsmai. However, he would rather seek employment in warmer < iScottish climate, he sUpulattoe, hinew )ub must t" Eomavi I Michael ione of Iba few Weal %  gain the tufhei national and he can (%  ]tH U] proud of toll eo rnpUihi lenl H tieorge, who took hi?. BacbaSoi "f Glasgow I iheor This full and varied life :eflected in the eXiepflrmally sfMl %  .•lite of Caqrlg work. There II i othiii superficial in his ama/Jng rsattlity o r in Hie quality of his in -light and apprenticeship 11 lake ii this -ear's ''* %  h ,s **** wideiv ,ind thoii^* %  •Ply in the Held* of philosophy two and a half more roHglon, art. politu and ars he>la 'hese subjecU are not just drugKed ,i . I T a'* with life and I -ice with him A second group of C.irv %  item is perpetually changing, novel, deals with anotha i ry likes i lai • gory of pi mitivei children lol of charaetei plrnt) v Ifousf of Children illHli and elhowroom: his later novel, ; scarcely veiled nrcount of hithouajh ncA-er diffuse all cove own youth in Ireland, seems t" parlod "f hro or thrao Benaratie the very stuff <.f ch.ihu-i liOOS. unaccountable fears and joys, 11 it is Uiarefore ntf urpri ki uawloudar] vision, its blessed ex... iiectancy and forgelfuln^-. 6 thmi lib ea a a n tial elemc.,people, in institutions ii. society In feelini; th* l> Iht* inevit.il iht tnd • edy of change. People. Cary sugHerberl plans to )oin a Glaagow .1 lor the %  nitaa water olo club '-' 8 "id-. the Burbados amateur lo HMgtM in IMS. I'.-tei Roach, whOM falher Mr. 1 drill store In palgMStOWn has t.een With the Mirrlee-i WattM < %  '<>., since he pests, if they are to do rAOra 'I' I exist, make I iii%  i'i %  .i iglnatiou if thai nth of in for effect but form with the* human personality Ihe basic raw %  terktl ..t bla toi. The Intaapa. 'ii knowledge with the :i.idn*ons t ,-l.ers and IndJ %  "' P '"' Kit clash with Uh %  i pCn i wbolenest %  f vision which is evti jioniin.'ti ih irapnaatva. With it ir* combtnex imaginative gift, of H very rtigl order which not onlv gtve.l Ihe lriloj[> In the Mintjc ,'i the iirai booK u mat iuc irdogj WbaCO seems 1950. Petei is "^"jf .itallti old and has obtained his I'i'ieate towards tha wishes, t national. He has approxl,^^^__ %  in ahead of • pprenlici k lor thiw m dj l" n'e in tinwarm weiitiiiL .f the tropks. Hav1 nd people their tremeudui bul enable him. If k himself eomidet isii Siiininei" .,: ti.*., ,, ,,, ,.. .hdiilong ' ugh and dunlin the winter it ha;, to be •Jperlcnci II . )n Cary s own wuios, lo givu ..rli olhei WOTlda. Much of the p picture ol English history tragedy and the injustice of life imougii English eyes during the has its io.it* m this ver> conflict hurt f years'. The three bunk betweefl *hc creative and the ereUIP written ai utrsa i hOWi i ,n dh^itefs of autobiogr..t'b>, 0O( thai novel, To be a Pilgunr. ..j each "t Ihe rhree prtncipal ttH i i o cm \H ,-ie.r. ciiaiacleis. They can uc read illnouiinJie.1 ly Ihe anaginatioti: dependent!> but the i-cader who 11b ohan ha discovered one will rarely irsoy rematn w ish lo forego To be a Pilgrim' is about Tom Wilcher whom Sara but i tsaarl %  vonservntivi lor whom the lies of afreet been strong*i '.hn.^ iie drive to dventure So iruiti ad e( bee teg a mlaslonary. he bai a l.iwver. uid man ags try a ite nd the affairs of hP mote brilliant brother anei sisler for all '-hi race ted Uttk tha pack in the house he level .rig but unable to stop : d nepkeyaj make . mess of their lues, he lives mostly m ih.past With h;s lelivious and pol'tical ntUltlOn, he iable t> ii [i-i peetfvi .i 'hange as %  rilatai %  I lit ht' dtoes not like il and 'eels pubiwblonely and frustrated. It is only 1 "L i c a u ea he Ii tUll moved i>v hw faith thai ne U gbei lo aaaapl rtn. I w/esi frtdlun apprentice la: in lo say: After travelling i, [approxirnateh, no, %  iveraskM iBg*MMtOM an 1 -..^... ,,iiu .. ..." Uraimuta. Tdght) of Barbados coattin awlth Jotin Lanlgan of J.imnlra oiit*lde their home In Olas gow. These are three or the Waal Indians who aro working %  appreiitlcen with Glasgow eiiglnctliig firms. ilh the b tupted I But this, reading the i the v..v life go.and Cary'i Ui ... Ihi %  biki Qi I Uu must n of HM true nature >f recent .niu beat known, The (linnge goes with hi^ feeUiig l. r (forse's Moulh' The narrator i, approxin:two o lK anie t ad.t.on. whien .,i. ( Jll u | ^i,^ Qulley Jimsoi. v"wik in Iri L? V t,M ton • ll ,, recreation whu u ^ usl „ nteil ed a term in %  ind Sundara ai werUnv V \ tht l £ POIK 1 -V. K, s ,lo,n a or,ner P"!' 01 *' Gulate* As Jjnior apprentices thev Imi-rtant or Cary. themea i ^ u on back In netlon. leading a ^Mof the comic masterpicie. f holy war which i very soon iransfornieit into an unhob %  -'' %  '"" \ % %  %  h Ht again, meet* £ particularly horrtlile death, hut dies in the faith. This first novel is remarkable both keeper and ml-tr. Tor Its terrific vitality and for lawyer, Tom Wllche: "there is one major i however ind that is to i ovi rail general attendance hi school. The Intla come to ihi big i ll i foi Ike lirst Una ai • lie" them !hll th.iK.tjol ll .i ..ii M-.ill-.. Hi' work has lo be done and the) make an earnest -tTort. And what do the boys themselves think about working as an apprentice—"it's %  t.niifh life, but we can take IU" a ir time. Herself Surprteed* is the storv of Sara Mondny. country girl. I ..k. widow. on i e Gu lev' indel and mistress, later houseto the old Setting Up Nights Makes Men Old ('•ellinr up l|liia, i.utDlii| aanu lli.n u utiaaa, liliith dla.-l.>if*. dull acl^r .M l.vt tpln*. poln *i'l !•> lutlim. narvou^Hi waU!>••• MIX! at rnanb*Urour r CBU.ed |>y dliMu*. ol Ih* ProfUM Oiinl |a aiomt ImporUuil ••> aUnit in men). To avfi-coma Ui Uoublw in 14 boun uid y,iK-ni rNloi* viBour IM liMillh. Ik tha %¡ •• .*?:amin vmn .r or I erulc^ta ioonlight' (i46, what simUai bn iptrti and teciiraqtai Once again uu lor) Hie pleasure of moves lol ward • inuill.iiC"imsU ir. the present and the pus I, and unco a gait' It's the present gcnePInodJ £iut %  %  niain K about women, ind in (articular three old siter*. Hose, I'essie and EUa Venn. Hose, the oldest has always tiled lo map* .•ge the others—she hag aPM her niorat duty and not be* l • bo unjust. A* a result she rated by both of them; by Bessie who has managed to break aw ijf from her. and by Ella who lias become increasingly dependent .ii* outwardly devoted to her. ild man when r^iy wh en ROMdies, does Ella. "" who has nursed her through her illness, realise her true feet'ng!* towards her. It is through Ella thai the story is told; Ella is be.lining a little queer and she dunks she is responsible for Hose's oeath; but at times she can see %  u:le clearly. Her weakness ihtt unlike Rose, but I'^e her .iiitfhtcr. Amanda, she has not known what she wanted—or when she has known she has not tried liard enough to gel it: for her. the creative Imagination has been lillburn. The background is ihe countrywide, the decay-ng villa, the adjoining farm and the seasons of fie year Although much of The When GulMoonlight' Is as good as anything __i ..%  has written, one feels someTTK.W that ii does not quite 'add IT': Rose does not come across • On Page U Charles Mc Enearney & Co., Ltd. I •mttx tsJB>H mples Go Cause Killed in 3 Days r N.nJtrponilM %  akin 6a. I elm %  Nio %  N ,tnoMr(li.n'r. .r> rear k.4-. — DulafMdVr II..III,.. artrte k.dn-.. htlar txHtonawi aiiir > and ..'. Mah I. an. ihe hlMd Whta ih. hi, ih* mksa • woraca iW|rl wall paiana and jou lacl main and mia-i.U* Then it thr UM to uka th-kl'i Kidat. Pdls. al I hvar Dedd'i iurt u h-lp the k.a>%  Imii a"i. lliaia liaonlul waalai Sa*.i >ur din.' bcl-ni .. raala.-d bj !•*' iiradaal anarit and pap. But b* tura M ( at th* aamana (lodd • KW> IMIi I lo. Isrgi bflUkat *U *"* •<"'• %  IMI Iba r*al vial el MUi %  •-> .I Staaki ,n T""-* ***Tpaftlatilatu U 1M •WS1-. u- ••• •"•—> a* UM* daalai i n* Ian IMI M naa parlaaM4 a U.alWjt. ol l-.W a^d aatdl* aaaaa lol* aHnpla Bad aa -io <••' "*'-' aT7i BaS Tni. Infi lll. M V.To**. U lavoUt* and *a>. >.> laU. >.l u -.,.. -IU aaualna ward In a.iin ' %  .trUr upon ll* Jland.. kiood. uakMf %  uaoVf hoaw naaunart aad a la at. If ina ml plaMiaa *J 111' Don't Be o Weok Maw aj 1!1 fln ll %  T*T— larcai IMiaata '•nl nni~.a." raJi i^^SdJJSj to-mna DurtSfai po*a. m inn aasifrrr. %  hi.li buil^i n*n fBirt elood am IHI.I !-•• -' aodr *inla "I"! •'• %  *"•',*' aad alUja. Doe • • •••*•" •!" %  • n,. n u4iw<> !> and %  *•***•• no.ii n T asiMii'oil claratalt or* a( Ika Piion la>ai Hit trwa .<•! M *a**hn.l i i.in. i.. in MM alaoda %  %  i\\ so ip. laaia o( ananaati, ata|t ,i i piacllra. J. la -pl" '"" " %  id ol loimula kno'n ai Vi-Toaa i.i>'> ...U ino IMII .. % %  [••il and .ci-ollft Inlo. ..I oralmani ol a*lo-iiUllnc am liivl* puralUal mo tlinda and tliui land) M foit'tjodihM irooi and •ilalili lo Iho Feel Results in 1 Dsry laca.at Vi-Ta*. aro aonainoaM* COMI' waJaaMeTl Si !" and i m, miti a n lent etui ""."MITJ'*. too. a inn ina* laol on JOOM tounatr oiini ca> %  • ThM* to*a>ita Oat* *lml |i..i I i IB* of • %  •, i -iri iirona. fl. and ..ijraoaa*ain Results Guoranteed IU ewUlajMUni ho* Man Ui* IU*M t v. Iat In rlditlnl s.jlllul aiioauo-i i.oa ofltcd uodar %  paaHra* ,^-ian'f. lotoal %  oUlH 1 S ***l ll u aiti.-l. MUalacioir in -WIT / Oal Vl; isxs vaxnsnsvss rffrjs itMurines ^ M too did -nan • **ra OB TO prlaaa, pi) i>l>..n Ui> oropdr.,*** %  •* a,.u ii* lull pmrnao pOo* will to r*-* %  > %  Oal VI-ToO. Irooi n economical age iheae tiles (which are resilient and quite unlike --tone tUea). The) are ot only damp-resistant hut resistant to fire and vermin too. What is more, they can be laid throughout the* l:ouse on any solid bate. %  *y Ortr linn" plain and marhleil -nadra. %  fiiiuriiiu. lo irtilfc upon. *• taty lo clean. •jg Dump .Jirm-vvrtitinrmmistmnl. it f OHM Iti'tirti'. ir i „,, be -a-ilv insiaMed. Here i coffee with the inviting the heavenly flavor thot make, every sip a satisfying experience. With Chose & Sanborn you get all the flavor your cup can hold. Aik for Chase & Sanborn today. SEMITIC DECORATIVE FLOORING TILES 4 MODI ( r Oi I J -tOP ( OVFAMY Supplied anil laid by :— DOWDIN'f. KKTATKS A; TKAIIINti CO^ LTD Phone 5t07 or gM Slretl


a



ESTABLISHED. 1895





BARBADOS, SEPTEMBER 28, 1952

ne





PRICE SIX CENTS

Naguib’s Demand To Oust Nahas Rejected

New Crisis Expected |peow ALL QUARTERS:

CAIRO, Sept. 27.
party rejected Sat-|
Premier Gencr
veteran leader Mustapha Ek}

EGYPT’S mest power‘ul px
urday the

utica

Man”



den “Streng

Mohammed Naguib that it

1and of



In His Heart |


















































h
1








o strategic

PRESENT NG CHALLENGE CUP











































nit crater or we wamy

d no direct strategic aspects and | Vv!

‘
lessons were learned! by a sudden tidal wave caused t

machinists AFL on Saturday to










U.S. President Asks
A.F.L. Te End Strike

WASHINGTON, Sept. 27
International Associat
call



RUMAN asked the





































off its strike
Nahas be ousted. it was open defiance of Naguib in his} Capetown: For the rest of his| Deuglas Aircraft Company the interest of 1
clean-up campaign and amounted to a devlaration’of politi-!lite Raward Williams, 19, a Cape- cexence
cal war. , itown co oured boy; witl go rouna Truman sent virtually identical tele ms to the ma
The next move is up *o the “strong man” and a new} With a bullet in his heart: A tort- agement of two firms and to union leade1 ir I f
crisis may result. migat £80 ne was sonited ing “Department of Defence advises that the labour dispu
‘ ‘hospital with a ;evolver slug wii ‘ nterfer i . pr. ; |
; interfering with the progr of nationa ‘
The constituent Committee of his heart after he had been ta nas fu tt a i ’ it hs 7 ; vA . ooae ao
the WAFD Party ich Nahas C D C I st . ,in a gam2 of cowboys and Indians tha irther loss of production will impair operations
1as led for many } reached e 2 e hnves S Surgeons decided not to operat military branches of gcovernms
the decision to defy Naguib but the boy must return to hos- Vegihion thsiiens
two-and-half-hourn, meetir Th es 500 000 pital periodically for examina- | nm. ge i MEE We
decision was unanTmou ‘ 8 s tions , r. ruman plant whieh iy tes ae
Crowds of Wafdist youth and 77 e ei Aviv: Israeli employ=: nates Walk Gh stethe on Sknian
memters of Parliament thronged I W I 1 i h refuved {o pay employee , * ; aun’ . ot } } ‘
around Nahas’ home where the n ® nec 1es an additional £6. 10s. cost ants pecial ee, it] I
meeting was held and _ yelled living bonus duc at the end ef | Galiforni pl
“Long live Nahas — no WAFD) (Prom Ovr Gwn Correspondent) the month, and have appealed | ; ti i | Se ! hal
‘ oo , “ING NS oie . » & é appes val ‘ September 8 ha
without Mahas—Nahas himself} Hiren eee R re sal g to the Goverument. they say that nv € S igalion of the air f
appeared dramatically before the ican Anderson. Regional Con~' 5.4 sing wages to meet th leeptor figt
" 1d at the end of the meeting| ‘troller C. D.C. in the West Indic re ae : oe 2 ets { & i
Chee ee tae ee ne meewng | anniunsed Jamaica yesterday Cost @ iiving, only elps in WASHINGTON 7 PAE a
and said “when the WAF'D’s una- sat ‘t Weet eae wa re ay Astin Mr Phi tbh direct The Presid -
+ 4 decision te elease rad é e 2st Indies ranch ¢ > ‘ ‘ ‘, i ie Oe “ete - "| terminati
aherE vill’ i : . f * * C.D.C. had already been committed Washington: Among the aes he Federal Trade Comm | th aii
nig at it will give you per ect sit~| yon at proximately £8,500,000 in- of thousands of patents filed in mak 1 unprecedented pe | ,
isfaction.’ My confidence in God s Sa irtclohs, Ne ah rie. | Washingtor 1 th? a ewe inves mn “te stermin jials of the ec
i the Beyoti: riaiten vestment. The capital of the Cor-; “45'geton 15 one or a new nee ‘ ition “to determine laeHl mneet teas
and the Egyptian people had al-| oration, he said, was £110,000,000|type version of the medieval Mr. Tlarold Bowen, Manager 6f Messrs. ¥Y. de Lima & Co. Ltd., presenting the Silver Challenge much of the consumer winink i, ReMi
ways — strengthened me against | oy of which so far only £40,000,000 |cross-bow. Cup to Mr. F. L. Griffith on behalf of his firm at the conclusion of the Small Bore Rifle Meeting yes goes for labour profits, mate: ily f the fe ote
Imperialists, Defeatisits pseudo-| i, gommitted : tlin: A “Society for the Pro- terday afternoon at the Garrison Savannah. The Gnp is for competition among the Leeward and and distribution,” [omctis te ra
7 . 2 : -tare | : ° Pes . c é se
Egyptians and their supporters} Anderson, s peaking at a|motion of Sharp-shooting” has Windward Islands. Mr. Truman said such inforn -| atation ser
everywhere.” The crowd shouted | y C.A. luncheon announced |been formed in t Germany Seen in the picture from left to right are: Mr. L. W. Hassell, Mr. H. Bowen, Capt. C. R. B, Warner, ation will be useful “in settlin
“no leader but Nahas,” that the latest C.D.C. commitment Its aim is to turn all able-bodied Capt. 8. C. Weatherhead, Mr. F. L. Griffith, Mr, K. 8, Yearwood, Major A. 8. Warren, Mr. T. A. L. labour disputes’ where Labout
nee a indication of what/in the W.I. had betn the agree-|youths and adulis into “snipers Roberts and Mr. M. Gy Tupi, ee ee, eae Breas Switek
aguib would do in the retort to| ment to finance Jamaica Industrial dangerous to all enemies of the their own figure He said data Ow ite
the ere ra nd _ been | Dev lopment Corporation with!people.” n ‘ Fat hl is also needed to show how much duties
in communication wi e In-| £500,000 and it was hoped to furth-! py fo: ° ‘ > YO of the consumer's dollar goes to 5
he eee a : | £900, and it was hoped to furth Pretoria: The Dutch Reformed , Ma 1a enge i & ’ ah al
igriog Minister Slime, Heya) r nance, the Corporation th |urch of Afskamuers ts pros|~ We” WW ee | as fe fier ing Coenen Nt yt ae ee ee
3 Ss ye las ancther £500, in its swaMp/t@sting against the Transvaal 7. sts are at work trying to ec wv é ;
days. The 45 members W.A.F.D.! reclamation and rice expansion Mohd at ; abs =| » » / vince the consumer that it is tt were accidentally switched in
; | maveeaeel & — Mttseum, Pretoria, for showin ar s / 4 su ? on “for
Parliamentary Group went on) scheme al os : ing OO / a. farmer who is responsible for hospital here three years age
record Friday night with a state- Anderson said that in five re- oe skulls er Rug a of prim- 5 sak high cost of living The head of weepingly clung to them on
ment that Nahas must remain |gions in which C.D.C, operations ea a ee t = we _ TOKYO, Sept 28 By Roberts the Agricultural Department \ rn — cae 7 wot
the party leader. were divided — the r East, East . acute - ere | ee THE U xd State , t ‘dé al kt *kade hy « figures which show that the fa hot give him up he baby
i st, E ards a? as nited States navy slapped a total blockade on th } , by
Junior leader of the W.A.F.D | Africa, West Africa, Central Afri- wards belief in man’s evolution : “pow a, 3) a and ‘d red a i shins wey mer gets only about half of the mixup, first on German records
Abdel Salam Fahmy Gomaa,/|ca, the Caribbean the Caribbean |Which is “only a theory”. entire Korean coast on Satur ay and ordered its warships Mr. T. A. L. Roberts won the| consumer's dollar for food and for over 30 years was unravel
himself once listed as a possible|had the highest investment with], Tel Aviv: The cost of a car} to patrol within range of Soviet and Red Chinese coasts. | grand aggregate and the F. L.| “far less” for other products lik ed only by the miracles of
successor to Nahas announced at|the sole exception of Central|licence in Israel is being raised} The new orders will send American warships within ne Cup and Mini-} land tobacco, “Let's get the full ee Se aettaearae —
the end of the meeting that the|Africa, The Far East is next to|by 250 per cent, Gwners of large} twelve miles of the Russian and Manchurian shore—close1 ore an “/ ta hy vs he be-| facts on where the rest of the Pera Peixndh Beater ‘ie
Constituent Committee’s decision|the Caribbean with other regions |¢@rs must pay £150 for a licence, to Soviet territory than they patrolled before. hada St th ay wd R a ce consumer’s dollar — goes Th only child ws involved in the
was unanimous. He said a formal| lower down and having regard to| Valetta, Malta: A film unit has General M rk Clark who announced the creation of Me t . fe i a t tifle Club! President said he has prepared \ switch and Frau Witwe Pied-
announcement would be issued|the population of the Colonial|been flown from Britain to Malta FORE A Nha ark who anno é € ati 4 = ; “i wa i it tie Garrison | Jeave on a coast to coast whistle ter saobhes of eight | ie. to
later Saturday (about 4.00 p.m.)|Empire, the Caribbean had by no/to make a colour film of the the new “sea defence zone on his return from a series of | Syrane . ones rday a pti stop trip. gether and agreed campormedte
Gomaa’s announcement was fol-|mieans been ignoréd. He added |is!and’s 18-month-old industry—! top level conferences with his operations chiefs in Korea | 4.0"). 0g Bose ws rer yester We need to know per unit of on Saturday that each should
lowed by a declaration by an-'!that out of 18 investments in the |cotton production. | warned that any ship in the ring of forbidden waters | took nach. These Gobo Portes > preduct how much of the cor keep tho child she reared be
other Wafd Big wig Ibrahim|Caribbean there had been only | Capetown: In the general rise; would be subject to search regardless of siationality 13 and 9, ten rounds deliberate at {17°TS eve ae incite cause the shock of the change
Farrag to the excited crowd of}three bad ones, the rest showing jin living costs in South Africa | - The terms of the strongly |25 yards COSSS, Ge owen). Cumel ame vn would be too great for the
supporters teeming around Nahas’ | good signs and paying their way. \the increase in the cost of one worded United Nations directive} Event No. 9 which was for Cad- | °°" profits ete, We should hav. infants.
house: “No Wafdist in Egypt|He hoped C.D.C woe aS vag +A item seems to have escaped | Del t , would apply to Russian craf(|ets was won by 2/Lt. L, K. Hinds | °\" : ee oe en taee ; die The local court officially re-
would accept Nahas’ withdrawal|more useful ways of helping the notice. Rings made of elephant | ega es attempting to operate off the |of Harrison College with 91 points, | POPPE In Me bucgets of bamuic vealed the baby mixup find-
from party leadership.” economic development of the West hair, which are supposed to bring | e Communist held North Korein |event No, 8—-opened to the Barba- No such comprehensive dav ings and said that there could
—s eran cae aN oe e je! lg SA ee 7 good luck to the wearer and! Arrive For coast, Clark said the blockade Boe seuinient was Won by Pte, J tikienk cae eo reek aan es ceneee Riper:
most critical in e .A.F.D's| believe the : St BS W' hic ‘ { : ; ‘tint Ne enemy }F f a cc ; TEMEeENt BEEN ' surements anc
: which a t s z t was det because nemy ard, B Compan
25-year parte of. Habas' eneane aot get tere fair share of the une Soagittes- eave ay eee Sem to saat eS sat Janded on the Capt. 5. G. catherhend ana) ~or Shgarpeto ls panied to the
smip., ina@guids folitica Tie ormjéxpendea paiance Of 1%, VOU three: . “ . W 4 ” Korean. shure “from small “boats Mr T. A. L. Roberts who hag) same inexorable conclusion.
: inh OO N had coatlaith 2pence pre-war to two oven, Shore ym Sime oats, re J , 7 s =
pores wares aie wake GRRE WEI C.D.C. had ayehepim, ~~ | guineas, Admittedly, the rings; Ss In air war, United Natioos hope saith 208 polnts for the roma {WARDED SCHOLARSIIIP UP.
defying carries a é y10~ | —nt/sB'e 1s es ; Thunder jets rained high ex-|Coenne rallenge Cup again sho . ns
: : + . t 5 ,op,
lation of possible disbandment of | {still DIESE and’ Ceter “but) TOKYO, Sept. 27. plosive bombs and flaming | Yesterday with Capt Weatherhead | KINGSTON, Jamaica, ‘ i
yo oon, core apc dteady | ; 3 pera . Delegates from east and west napalm on five Communist troop winning by 1 M ith his scare at 95 4,} 9 1 rh c m pt. 21 an a eC s
of its fund. “AP 2), 8 é ; my ‘have arrive : Seining m “ancentrat s . 7 lots i¢ conclusion of the meetingy} 1e niversity ollege an-'!
- 1 “ + ~ jhave arrived at Peiping for the; concentration: Returning pilot wig ? | Pa } ; . : i a
deposited. shout: Saiyes. rev-| Lebanon Has } Feye ‘Communist “peace conference for}said they left vital Red milita Mr of = L Ss pe is te t un of Glich ce ny. Ii Ww A rd SH roe mi %
DOE ERY ER rere —UP | Secret Military Asian and Pacific regions’? aimed, centres cnegbe of Dames anc port fter ‘ hich Mr “F iu. rif Cla ie His ‘Martin’ f Port t- | ( irl Hi | }
; according to Red propaganda moke and secondary explosion + " , tide, + G Claude Hollis Martin o ort-of~ | , ele J
\ oO Ov e j Talk To Be Held uniting all of Asia” for peace. Three of the Communist troop ae ons aes: ps aaa rs of (ae? Prinidad ¥ Pe will read
. . i ub p ented the priz or ¢ ree Z al s
Mr. Steel Will | | “The conference was scheduled! concentrations were socated at @ Mr. Harold Bowen of Messrs. ¥ " aa in atin Me nithtine vareks James Edward Slocomte (34)
Aceh e ; BEIRUT, LEBANON, | WASHINGTON, Sept. 27, |to begin “in late September” but san a tots ee, fe ae | ae date Co., Ltd, on behalf of |tg Wilfred St. Elmo Jessamy of |{TUit vendor, City, tabbed
r ° Sept. 27. A dirlomatic cfficial said on Sat- |Some representatives had already) 1NC* ass are ; is firm, presented a Silver Chal- | princess Town, Trinidad, who will} 28! Might around 9.20 leek
Lead Industrial This little republic continued] urday night that a highly secret|arrived, Communist Peiping rad o| Aner we lage a out hats lenge Cup to the club for competi-| read for the B.A, general d oe | Tudor Strest. He wa
¥ 5 to limp along without a Goverp-/| military conference on South East id. According to the Red broad rainar ea hit Soria ats HH wy ion at the Windward and —C.P. he General Hospital and
Mission To B. W.L ment as Opposition Deputies; Asia will be held in the Defence |cast, nine delegates, representing Hoten " Ta Changvong_-weces Peaward 1 lands, 1Up to the time of going to Pre
' blocked efforts to form a new)Department here early next/the United States arrived in the ea : ahat attnel Pe Ae Major A * W a rs nae YANKEE TIME vn re wh not Nene h mn
é 2SS ay he a ad- mt 2 sai > ¢ “re > sapite v oo ‘ ad i wens oat f the ( thanke Mr iriffith | dition, e¢ is alleged to be i
(From Our Own Correspondent) Cabinet unless they had an ad- month, He said the conference|Red capital. ling and were advised to get ou vis WASHINGTON, Sept. 27 ne See see ee en :
KINGSTON, Jamaica, Sept. 26 vance guarantee that social and] will discuss the entire military , ’ { the areas Hea clouds ¢ @ On page 4 Daylight "ing time ends f me ge I ae gl be ale Rigg
Mr. Lincoln Steel director of the| press reforms were being carried} situation in South-East and espe-| They incluaed Mr, Jonn Powell, 4 ‘ atch inte, tone Vania fal : S sf Te ond OOF ae ends on girl has been held in connectio
Imperial Chemical Industries Ltd.,| CUt. cially Indo-China, editor of the Leftwing magazine oe saeton of? Je addin But. vp, al wanes % a ieee Aachen conaaaiiaad , wih he. stabbing
. salt aies reside ami *hamoun > said it was chiefly the res s als 5 esti a valuatio amag 3 ' val daylig > § BYeh:
England, has been selected to 1pnes dent Chamille Cham : He said it w as chiefly the result Shanghai, and his wife, Mrs. Sy!- turning pilots said their targ = end . At that hour the clock goes back | The police are making invest
lead the British industrial mission | © ected to the executive post after/of a plan for such a review of the| via Campbell Powell. Wiad, entiins tit ond. eevarel M R I Is 4 NH¢ yW i R one hour.U.P tions
vis ting the British West Indies in| St week's bloodless overthrow | military situation which was laid| Another American named was dena ae ; Th rs Fifth Aivfocen |. + capers aa dead eine © cs sy -
November ss explore the possi-| of former President Beshra El) down by Marshal Qiphonse Juin|engineer Mr. Henry Willcox. Dele = {By we cal 4 og allied er sathds s ret tres 7 oon - emceeaatinte
bilities for industrial development | Khoury, ae Px mandate to Tri-)when he last visited here. At that/gates from Canada, Australia gute . the niet shot amen | sEST OR | ING U.S.
‘ J on Glas ; a > hecieaa aie "ae~ rer ar i? ‘at :
f Famial Trinidad ind Briti h poli deputy Saadi Elmounla fol-|time there was three-power mili-|Colombia, El Salvador, Ecuador ¢ ae | two MIG's without lc a =
y amaica, . ad &@ 5 . 5 *Ivafi'’s ee ltar sehe . new 2 7 , y 7 ’ amagec of ' itho S- 4 , , T 7 ~
Guians He replaces Sir Norman an nt eee sop any eae Fart Gananes Paes baeoe Gate Guatemala, India, Indonesia, Mex~!ing 4 plane. The weekly toil I GOREIGN POLICY ) if
Seer ee hey cee essful attempts to form a Gov-|East Asia and yas a at Alico, New Zealand, Nicarag end lvls .! : rh .
ipping head of Britain’s federa-} go, . Mvafi's twoeday tr vas | permane f ste . 7 ’ Cant , aragua and jraised Sabres bag of MIG’s to 112
Kipping . 1d af B "| ernment. Elyafi’s two- day try was | permane nt military staff commit-| pakistan Also. uarvived. in. sthel save, Re tT aaa rg by MERRIMAN SMIT
tion Industries who is not noW| blocked by the anti-El Khoury|tee of three powers on South- capital the radio said destroyed, proba } 1 y, Wan MAN SI ru
able to make the trip. opposition which despite its mere East Asia could be set up. apite ne radio said. a. dmnagee for the a h en| LOUISVILLE, Ken — ‘ns
12 seats in the 77-member cham- He said this meeting might re- | Wars above the previous high for ar eau ee Bept. ¢
3 SETS OF TRIPLETS j ber, commanded sufficient popu-|commend the setting up of such a | month since the war began Ks a lai Steven ne on 5 iturda RAI. SIGH-—Makers of the i
bt | lar support to insist that the new] committee but any decision on this - ) Hig accused ight tisen ()
BORN IN 5 DAYS | cab net obtain a Parliamentary | subject would have to be taken by | Joint St t l j i ver of ; ugly twisted distor. WORLD'S CHAMPION () Ht
| majority or pledge itself m ad-|the next United States adminis- C atemen , i Bese of q ted Sta f reign s ey
Foss aiid aoe » refor ati UP. ° 2 ‘ » | policy ve Jemoeratic presider WIE
vance to carry out the reform|tration, ? 7 . ° Wi ec a € 7
(From Our Own Correspondent, , 2 . . J 4 ut pee in a peech pre -
et Own Correypendenty | Togramme—U.P. | Ends Europe's !
KINGSTON, Sept. 26. | P'0sramm _ re . ared for delivery at the Memo-
This week three Jamaican SCOUTS EXECUTIVE e mh Wi . Mi Ja ) oal een rial Auditorium here poke more
women gave birth to triplets over war cals . On Ins yection Tour ar Manoeuvres ] w / harshly of Eisenhower than evet
lays. The first!) COMMITTEE MEETING NG sii secs ;
a period of five days rhe first AOFM! hy Wh a } . before in h campaign
oecurred in the parish of ‘St. | Qwing to circumstances beyond | NEW DELHI, Sept. 27. _ OSLO, Norway, Sept. 27 TOKYO, Sept. 27 Stevensor ised Eisenhower
Mary, Monday to Tuesday. Phe) our control the Executive Com- Air Force Secretary Mr. Thomas Gen. Matthew Ridgway and The wreckage of a Japanese f lifting mar out of th
second occurred in the same parish’ mittee, meeting which was|Finletter on a tour of inspection| Admiral Lynde McCormick {Coast Guard vessel believed sunk context” and of changes of ‘Re
on Tuesday and the third heppen-;| scheduled for Thursday last had| left for Korea Saturday He con- brought western Europe’s great- 1 underwater volcano or tidal publica: irresponsibl Hie |
ed in Hanover parish on Friday.|to be postponed. It will now take} ferred Friday with Indianjest post war manoeuvres to e has been sighted 200 mile aid tl Republ ha ii |
The mothers and babies at ll’ place to-morrow (Monday 29th)|Defence Minister Mr. Narahimajclose on Saturday night wit! outh of Tokyo the Maritime Se- carded theor of President ||
well. “at Scout Headquarters at 5 p.m. Popalaswami —UP. joint statement in which they curity Board reported Saturday. , Theodors toosevelt to e@ak
admitted several weaknesses in All 31 men aboard the Kaivu softi ind car the b
North Atlantic Treaty Organiza-|Moru which was on a Scientific No Ste nso! tid the Reput |
tion, but said none of them rejexpedition to study the new vol- can p« { i h |
* : ‘ : n pol
INVESTIN . MEMEERS insurmountable. ano were believed drowned. A carry the |
Operation Mainbrace which in- ig boat and another er iid Eisenhower +
. volved warships and planes of sel reported sight ‘tried not once but several tin |
fall nations in the North Sea and n ttir at
}Atiantie was officially concluded ne Board said re- icf ou Kores.— U.P \| |
| aboard the British aireraft carrier that the Kaiyr | |
agile anchored in O:lo. R way ive been ble toad |
jand MeCorm ci Said the operation, when ed ico close to tt
3 |
|
|



| Siorms Sweep.
























rom it.—U.P. jthe ¢ uption _ Yo are on a 4
} {| Patrol boats continued to cr | I £ cy ay | u :
| | cross the area ir irch of possible rance i{ : : j
7 | : Kaivu Maru carried a is S |
| Kents Leave Fer | 2 ine scien PARIS, Sept. 27. : WINNER when you ride a Raleigh! ~ |
| uD Kiyusuke of f yo t the whole 3 : |
’ %, Vive UP, during the night 8
Far East Tour a S vianadceeiasbinib POP A Negpicica vebleld abies Sat 3 A Raleigh was the choice of Reg Harris—World’s
ate pe. of | SAMTRY INSPECTORS fatal nts were reported $ Professional Sprint Champion for the second year in ; |
he Duct fs ee pep 1 DISCUSS GOVT. BILL Ithougl fev person were succession. Here is proof of the wisdom of buying : |
tr etn ae. aad 4 See . ey Tat) Inspec pure ' nt ! your bicycle from a Company with such great
irport on Saturc f a elof Queen's Perk and Jrerrand region , and built the record-breaking RALBIGH.
ek tour of r PCs ess or i length variot pias On th tern coast a violent
the Far I ev ii | Government, BJ tori on Road vere .
OAC. Argor airliner with thes Sanitary Inspector ried fallen tree ind
13 other far passenger r t was ‘telegraph O8t Train the
The t ent th oint ud e stopped fod
re tine r recom- } he
pend t THE ALL-STEEL BIC VCLE
De eum atk A eta Ee ‘ ee 2 env tierok mind it A Product of Raleigh Industries Listed, Notsingham, England.
Tues¢ The t will ter f I tell, M itt he ¢ i of th G I
{ t ; member ne Fler ; t ( “7 CAVE, SHEPHERD
WV ! iousre I . ”
29) G. H. Adar r | ‘ & CO., LTD.
4+} ‘ +} ‘ h t rir ” ¢ ~
will be. confined havees are the} Goverment 3 riggs Ace i 10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street.
€ ke of I ¢ t Tue Seine | n r .
€ tte t to kill or disc « r , NO CYCLE IS COMPLETE WITHOUT A STURMEY f
ite After natte ect b he ri r it | ARCHER } OR 4SPEED GEAR AND DYNOHUE ® ‘
will fi ' j ich. } r
Ma SE. Griffith, Island Scout Commissioner, investing-members of the Harrison College Scout Sa ; , i at 1 ‘ | _ a@ |
Trooy terday. In the background can be seen Mr. J, C, Hammond beadmaster of Harrison College —U.P j =P, eee — ——'










PAGE TWO











THEATRE



| Americans Are Missing |






























} I r » °
{ a]
| ee ae ¢ | Uhe Laundry Trimmings
‘ = ee oS = &
BRIDGETOWN BARBAREES OISTIN
(Dial 2816) ‘Dial 6476) (Dial #404) American tourists have com- fKalf times as much for his laun
TODAY to Tues Today & Tomorrow Today & Tomorrow pared British laundry methods dry as we do,” said Mr. J. 7.
i $45 & 620 p.m 143 & 830 poo 445 & 8.80 pm unfavourably with those in their Bolton, a laundry firm’s execu-
was . Thrill c tus ese RKO Musical own country In particular, they tive
Gee Coleen TWO TICKETS TO say that here their shirts do n Handling charges-—the cost of
BUGLES IN. THE jj Rai! GRAY in BROADWA get the delicate attention to whic» ciins, pins, rubber bamds and
AFTERNOON LL GET YOU Snes Y they are accustomed. wrappings—absorb about a quar-
T color) FOR THIS Tony ¥ ed But British firms reply that ter of the total cost of the Amer-
Ray sis om loon MARTIN ILLE: comparisons of U.S. and Britiso ican laundry. This compares with
At oa = laundering teehnique are unfair. one-ninth of the total in Britain's
an ——— T E: ; ; 7 ?
ims se be wae ae oe am a “An American pays two and 4 ‘wash.’
Po gh ae Larry Buster Crabbe [| STRANGE BARGAL
“PERFECT STRANGERS 1m i ee HOLD IT! DON’T MISS THIS!
Dennis Girlger BUCK ROGERS BUNCO SQUAD ; sis cigs
MORGA ROGERS sonstance Moore Rot t Sterlir “ tJ ”
iz & ROG Constance, Moo tg DUCHESS OF IDAHO °
urs. — Special 1.30 pm. ii SS urs. (only) 5 & ls ; aa one 2 > i s
ce Folk Se Sen tet 1 pe | 40 pm, : ve Johnson Lena Horne — Esther William
Ken Maynard & Errol FLYNN in ratear nah Eleanor Powell The Jubileers Quartet
“RANGE JUSTICE” “TYCOON” AND
Jo! Mack Brown CAPTAIN BLOOD y
Stee ee eee “MYSTERY STREET”













Ricardo Montablan —- Sally Forrest — Bruee Bennet
SIR WALTER SCOTT'S On Wednesday, Oct, ist, Thurs. 2nd, 4.45 & 8.30 pm.
IVANHOE Se
—eeeeaeaeaaeae
: with: ;
ROODAL THEATRES
Robert George Elizabeth Joan
TAYLOR SANDERS TAYLOR FONTAINE EMPIRE OLYMPIC way ae
To-d 445 To -da morn To-d dey
OPENS, FRIDAY OCTOBER 3RD, 5 and 8.30 C20 Je © S08 to-ctay & Rommmrowy To-day Me Sasser ¢ las SP Se 9.20
: Robert Sterling Columbia Pictures
G i oO B E Biean — wn Presents THE b
anor in .
at a aoteiheon Wiliam Molden Mon ER
. i Wiliam Wyler’ ‘XPERIMENT Richard Webb
With the kind permission of the Director ef Education, ead ting oa” ALCATRAZ | BOOTS MALONE and others
sperial school children shows \/ill start on TUESDAY, OCTO- Sidmey Kingsley's Starring am ~— _ Monday & Tues:day
BER 7TH to FRIDAY 17TH 1.30 p.m ‘ one Howasd Sgnies * eae ote sean a* wo
7 . i ; 5 , ae * DETECTIVE en S| and introd
Will all Schools (including Private Schools) that have not Tucsday & Wed 5a S| eee VIRGINIA
received Tickets please contact the Manager of THE GLOBE t STORY" 400 Be 8.15 oney eaten” ainnt allehis
THEATRE with vepublic All-Action | short Robert Lowers
Rouble FAMILY CIRCUS '
x Allen and his . sane
SSS William Bendix Horse Koko in Wed & Thurs PUE FAR
re | Cathy O'Donnell -yUNDER IN 430 & 8.15 FRONTIER
t— Pe ee GOD'S COUNTRY) oy ping 5 i
~ ~ “pc xtra j lo igan Poy c s
THE OFFICERS AND MEMBERS ale cur Mheee | Bt. | we
OF THE re een See C® MONTANA, i 1.0 & 8.30
' aa meee Starring Tito Guiza:
TEACHERS PEST) Allan ‘Rocky Lanc| HIDEOUT Virginie Meuce
’ . Coming Soon . | Rov_Bancsoft and in
vocate S Oocia u | “Thursday only | ‘ “TARS AND
Burt Lancast 430 & 8.15 GUITARS
inl aetat. WITHOUT SHOWDOWN nd
| A JURY Staerir SONS OF
invite you to their Fa ee ORR 1 OF f | william Eutiott aa
MEN MONTE CARLO Marie Windsor Russel Ho vder



_ .
SSNS Se

| JANETTA DRESS SHOP
|

DANCE

C. Gale, M.L.C

} Vader the Patronage of the Hon, \
AT TH=
f VOLUNTEER DRILL HALL
On

Monday Night. Gth Oct.
(Bank-Holiday)

Music by Percy Green's Orchestia atti,

SUBSCRIPTION oe. WINDSOR HOTEL i

Dancing from 9 p.m.
LIMITED |

(Next Door to Singer's)



Just opened newly Fashioned NYLON HOSE
New supply of EVENING GOWNS
DRESSES made to Order











Tickets not Transferable





WE TAKE GREAT PLEASURE of informing
} our Customers and Friends that after extensive
MAKE THIS A repairs and alterations our Hetel is now

re-open.

DATE oc |
40 ROOMS, all with their private baths, are
available. We recommend our Bar and Dining

BEACH CLUB

Room for those who desire the best in drinks

and food in pleasant surrcundings.

Tel. 2131 — 2182

PARADISE

Jass Bands Steel Bands

-O*

Prises

Admittance by Tichet only



COCKTAIL DANCE GINGER

IN AID OF

FUNDS ot the CONVENT
ORDER of the _
| GOOD SHEPHERD

HELP MAINTAIN THE WORK
MAINTAIN THE SCHOOL
COMFORT THE SICK

?












BOTTLER’S
(B’DGs) LTD.

MOBO for KIDDIES !

Scooters
&
(ialloping Horses ! !

Yes, MOPO means toys for girls and boys—
and we hive fun selling ‘em. So come on
in and join us. We'll show you Broncos &
Merr;-go-Rounds, ‘Tot-Cycies, Scooters—
more toys than a nursery dreams of !

And a word to Mum & Dad — they're strong
and inexpensive.... MOBO TOYS











JOIN THE THOUSANDS FOR

| COCKTAILS | CRANE HOTEL

MONDAY — 6th
Oct.

From 6.00 p.m.
SNACKS FREE

ADMISSION — $1.50

DRESS OPTIONAL.

TO THE TUNES OF

THE SOCIETY SIX

AND
ALL STEEL BAND

}














K. R. Hamte & Co., Ltd.

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 1952

a









® s Will Resume Duties
"> y t. E. JOHNSON I
bv I id after hi um-
é acat lea’ He will
ime his duties as P.M.O., St
‘ Joseph, as from Wednesday, Octo-
R, J. LOCHRIE, O.B.E., Cotton Barbados Bonniest Baby er 1. During his absence, Dr. |
Officer of Development and HE search f Barbados’ Bon- ©& Tappir P.M.O., acted as
Welfare who has been paying a siisent Sak ene & an PALO. Bt. Josmpl.
short visit, left the island for bine Cite "taoent aba ah aces ntransi
British Guiana by B.W-L.A. on oes tase caaaeaamiieiens ae je fn : ue > i
Friday last abies for this competition which M G. O'REILLY, Q.C., Bar-
2 ’ A Party is open to all babies who are fed risier-at-Law, Trinidad, was

A PARTY was held at the res-

idence of Mr. and Mrs; C. A.
Pickering “Vinroy”, Rockley on
Friday night in honour of their
daughter Juanita who celebratea
her eighteenth birthday.

Her many friends and relatives
who had an enjoyable evening all
joined in wishing her success and
happy days in her future years.

For U.C.W.I.
R. KEITH ASHBY, son of Mr,

and . Dunean Ashby of
Welches, C Church, returned
to Jamaica on Teareday afte
sper ‘4 the summer holidays
with relatives.
Keith is a student at the Uni-
versity Co! of the West Indies
and is now his second year

Also leaving for Jamaica by the
Same opportunity were Mr. O.
Walcott and Miss B. Payne who
will also enter the Uhiversity
College.

Musical Entertainment

. CECIL JACK, son of Mr.
R. N. Jack, Assistant Labour
Commissioner and Mrs. Jack will
entertain the members of Olympia
Club on Wednesday night at the

British Council.
Mr. Jack, a versatile
ist is now popular among
larbadian audiences and his pro-
goenne will consist,of works trom
hi .» Schuman and Schubert.
bers are reminded to invite

their friends.
For Belgium

M* “BILLY” GREEN whe
: arrived from Dominica dur-
ing the week where he had bee
spending a few weeks’ holiday
will be returning there tomorrow.

He will be leaving by the
“Colombie” for Belgium ‘where
he will enter the University of
Louvaine, to continue his studies
in Medicine, “Billy” did his pre
medical studies at the Loyola
College, Canada.

Enjoyed Stay
RS. TOCKER DE-OCHOA
who used to reside at Pine
Hill, St. Michael, left the island
by the “Colombie”’ on Wednesdé
last for Caracas, Venezuela, a
pending five weeks here,

Mrs. De-Ochoa had en enjoy-
oble stay and was happy to be
back again among her old friends
who all contributed to make her
stay a happy one.

your,





GalETY

The Garden—St. James
TODAY & TOMORROW 8.30 p.m. (QQ)
MAT, TODAY — 5 p.m. |
Bing CROSBY & Fred ASTAIRE
Irving Berlin's

i



on Cow & Gate Milk Food and

nok over 2 year



ser from Jamaica intran-
‘ov Trinidad on Friday.
Back to Trinidad
Me GUY O'REILLY and Miss
F. O REILLY were pasengers
Trinidad by B.W.LA. on Fri-
after spending a holid&y here.
Back to Curacao

M* HAROLD CARRINGTON,
a Berbadian who had been
workir.z in Curacao for the past
fve years. returned by B.W.LA.
during the week. During his holi-
day here he was married to Miss
Gwencplyn Roberts of The Ivy.
Spent One Week

R. MILLER YEE MOON, an

Accountant of, Port-of-Spain,
returned to Trinidad early this
week By B.W.LA. after spending

pas «
ola

The twelve leading babies will
be selected by a Board of Judges
for final judging and names of the
selected twelve will appear in the I
‘Sunday Advocate” of November
9. Final judging will take place
on Saturday, November 22.

Three attractive prizes will be
offered and entries close on Sep-
tember 30.

Returned
R. J. W. HARKNESS, C.M.G.,
O.B.E., Medical Adviser to
Development and Welfare, was an
arrival from Jamaica by B.W.LA.
on Friday last.

He went away

Lusiness visit.
Leaves Today

on a_ short

“We certai

nly need speeds
beyond the sound barrier
"Soe Gecltels came a ne week's holiday He was a
er” : . , one eek’s ay. yas
. (YAPTAIN R, W. P. REYNOLDS jest” at Silver Beach Guest
Lendam beore:: Service. “4 who arrived from England by House Rockley.
the S.S. “Colombie” on Wednesday
leaves the island today by B.W.1.A



Married at Cathedral

Also leaving by the same oppor-

for St. Lucia where he will take tunity_were Mr, Julian Pack and
N THURSDAY afternoon at over command of the Cable Ship, Mrs. Samuel Louis of San Fer-
4.00 o'clock at St. Michael's “Electra”. nando who had also been spend-

Cathedral, Mr. Eustace St.Clair
Welch, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edg-
erton St.Clair Welch and Sanitary
Inspector of St. Peter, took as hs
bride Miss Cynthia Anita Bruce,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Arnold
Bruce of Redman’s Village, St.
Thomas.

During his stay he was a guest

ing one week's holiday here as
at Ocean View Hotel. 1¢

ts at Silver Beach.

The cerem ny was performed by
the Very Rev. Dean Hezlewood
and the tride was given in mar-
riage by her father. The duties of
bestman were performed by Mr.
Edgerton Welch and those o
ushers fell to Mr. Joseph Welch,
Mr. Vernon Jones and Mr. Craw-
ford.

The bride’s dress was of slipper
satin and lace cut in a flowing
flare with a close fitting bodice
ond appliqued lace yoke, and her
head@ress was of illusion lace and
forget-me-nots with a_ fingertip
veil and she carried a bouquet of
anthurium /illies.

The bridesmaids were the Misse
Odlyn and Glendine Bruce, sisters
of the bride. The flower girls
were the Misses Coleen Best
Sonja Springer, Doreen and Hazel
Edy.

Tne bride was attended by Miss
Havel Mascoll as Maid-of-Honour.
Afier the ceremony a_ reception
was held at the residence of Mrs.
G. Mascoll, Raymoth Ville, Tudor
Bridge.



MR. AND MRS. BUSTACE 8T.6. WELOH

“TRINIDAD HERE Wk COME”

(By WILMA CLARKE)
AFTER TWO FALSE STARTS, Mrs. A. L.





ipplau the

rou

at end was thun-

Stuart's

‘lin’s Ls 3 ‘ ; Like all things of human d2-
BLUE SKIES | Daneing Troupe finally boarded the Canadian Constructor go, ) our m we 1 evening came
(Technicolor) .°, ‘ 4 > : Sie” usical evening came

—F0ES A WED ae ea} | «Ss for Trinidad. The ‘Revuedeville’ School of Dancing, com- to an end. That was after 11

bop HALEMON DROF KID" plete with stage hands, cook, seamstress and Capt. Raison ee. a ae ere to

0) ‘ ‘ a nadie 2 1ink of sleep. , it was o a:
"ahead MbsOURI RAID’ (Color) with 15 members of the Police Band. I am sure that jp olont for Me Sainte paaie helt
Wendell COREY everyone's thoughts were the same. “Trinidad, here we |jke it. We were too anxious to
| come... see the very first appearance of

The “Constructor” sailed out about eight o'clock, — the hip- cur destination Finally, around


















FILM SHOW

me ee
THE BARBADOS
AQUATIC CLUB.
(Local and Visiting Members
only).

Through the courtesy of
the British Council there
will be a FILM SHOW in
the Ballroom on. .
'WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER

Ist, at 8.30 p.m.

The Programme includes:
BRITISH NEWS; THE IL-
LUSIVE VICTORY (M.C.C.
Tour to Australia (1950-51);
THIS IS BRITAIN; PIC-
CADILLY ROUNDABOUT.

Members are cordially

Invited.

GLOBE

This Evening 8.30 P.M.
And Continuing 5 & 8.30 P.M.

KANGAROO

—with—
Peter LAWFORD
Maureen O'HARA







a

j interspersed with white roads r:

| few

of Carlisle Bay at four o'clock
Friday afternoon, After everyone
}had settled in, for only few of us

were sea-sick, we decided to ex-
; plore the deck. The sailors were

board show started. Capt. Ratson
nd his men struck up the music
everyone sang again and dancer;
those who hadn't the energy left
looked

three o'clock we did see it like a
grey cloud in the distance. As
the minutes crawled by, the three
peaks became clearer and we





| Pl on munching apples, en- realised where and how Trinidad
| friendly and courteous enough to joying themselves nevertheless. came by its name. We were se?-
j conduct us on a sight seeing tour. Just before Juliette Gaskin wes ing curselves By the time we
| We watched Barbados fade away put to bed, he entertained us entered the Bocas it was nearly
| into the distance; one moment it with songs The ailors were sunrise. Of course, by now the
| was a great mass of: buildings, thrilled at her excellent 1

@ On page 9.



people reduced to the size of an
on the Pierhead, then the build-
ings appeared ° smaller, with

vast hinterland of gresnery, and
then, just a mass of vegetation

sembling twisted macaroni and a
light houses diminisn«d to
cigarette size

Barbados, ‘the world” as it w
to the majority of us who he
; never travelled; Barbados, going
away from us, for it seemed mor
as if the land were moving than
the ship; like a big turtle with
moss, gravel and bits
matter on its back,
form of such a ycry pat-
tern, Then our island became just
a cloud, an outline, nothing stir-<





of waste
yet in the

pre*ty

ring on the surface Finally, it
was no more We were in the
middle of the ovcan, like a

island, the ship; completely sur-
rounded by water
Songs at Sea

By this time, everyone was
comfortable and feeling quite at
home. Then the singing started.
Led by our singers, Norma Gas-
kin and Neville Phillips, we sang
| songs old and yew, sentimental,
| calypsoes, mambos, even the good
‘old “Fiat Lux,” the Queen’s Col-
|lege School song. After dinn®r,





REVUEDEVILLE” Troupe at Piarco just before they left for home.





LODO’ DODOHOCSHDGHSOIGGGHHGOHOE OOO?

.
-
4
28 22994000000"

' SENSATIONAL |

| GENUINE BOHEMIAN

GARNETS

MOUNTED ON SOLID GOLD
PENDANTS, RINGS, EARRINGS, NECKLACES, BRACELETS
and BROOCHES

ALFONSO B. DE LIMA A CO... LTD.
OPPOSITE GODDARD'S
: : PODGE PDO GGGDODVOPDODOP POOP P PS POODOOG D+










AFTER STOCK-TAKING

WEDNESDAY OCT. Ist.

THROW-OUTS IN ALL DEPARTMENTS ... HALF PRICE
ENTIRE STOCK RIBBONS «+ HALF PRICT
COTTON, RAYON, SUITINGS, REMNANTS HALF PRICE
NEW DESIGNS PRINTED RAYONS storeseensene WO GIN



T. R. EVANS WHITFIELD’S BRANCH

‘PHONE 4220 YOUR SHOE STORE "PHONE 4220

~-—.



se
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 1952



At The Cinema:

ADVENTU







RE DOWN UNDER

By G. Hs.

I HAVE often wondered why the more adventurous

and enterprising film directors have not realized the pos-

sibilities of picture-making

tance is no barrier nowadays

in Australia. After all, dis-

, and the vastness of that coun-

try together with its aborigines and fascinating anima!
life make a colourful background for adventure with a
flavour that is different. KANGAROO, now showing at the

Globe, filmed in Technicolor,

was shot entirely in Australia

and I, for one, found it extremely interesting.

Fundamentally,
an impressive drama of man
against nature, with the familiar
plot of criminal-posing-as-long-
lost-son superimposed. By con-
trast, the man-made plot seems
petty and at times, confusing
and rambling. It concerns twuo
criminals in Australia who, after
robbing and shooting the owner
of a gambling house, escape from
the police by joining forces with
a wealthy old ranch owner who
thinks one of them is his long.
lost son. Plotting to kill the old
man and divide his wealth, tbe
criminals’ plans go awry due to
a disastrous drought and saad.
storm, and the fact that the “son’
falls in love with his “sister.”

As you can see, it doesn’t amount
to much but the real interest and
power of the film lie in its por-
trayal of the vastness of the coun-
try itself. Through brilliant colour
photography, striking effects are
achieved of the barren, nakedness
ot the drought-stricken area, the
cracked earth and the parched
and brittle trees that look like
weird and evil skeletons against
the sky, There are rugged panor-
amic sequences of a cattle drive
that ends in a terrifying stampede,
shrouded in yellow dust; shots of
kangaroo, \wallabies ang dingoes
fleeing before a fire; a rain dance
executed by a group of aborigines,
decked out in nightmarish get-up

the picture



and finally a sandstorm, with a
wind velocity that threatens to
break the mill and cut off the

only source of water.

Maureen O’Hara, Richard Boone
and Finley Currie have the
principal roles, but the honours go
to Nature and the elements and
the dancing aborigines.

The descriptive musical score is
one of the most colourful I have
héard and at all times heightens
the action and the atmosphere of
the film. of

I am glad to be able to tell you
that I have been notified by the
manager of’ the Globe theatre that
the sound equipment has had a
complete overhaul and is in first-
class condition. 1 found this to be
the case when I saw KANGAROO

and IVANHOE last week, and
there is now no difficulty in un-
derstanding the dialogue,

BUGLES IN THE
AFTERNOON

Romance, adventure and a
smattering of history ride hand
in hand in BUGLES IN THE

AFTERNOON, a _ post-Civil War
Western, filmed in technicolor now
playing at the Plaza, Bridgetown.



MAUREEN OHARA

The story is based on the novel
by Ernest Haycox and deals with
the perils of a cavalry troop as-

to

protect the lives and







RAY MILLAND

property of the ear);
that time the Sioux Indians were
fighting against any further en-
croachment on their lands, and in
the film there are plenty of clash-

ettlers. At

es between the Cavalry and the
Redskins.
However, there is also a feud

between a captain and a sergean
who fas been stripped of his pre-

vious rank of captain, which be-
comes the main factor in the
larger hostilities, when the cap-

tain uses every means in his pow-
er to place the sergeant’s life in
danger. The climax comes when
both men fall in love with the
same girl and the captain delib-
erately sends the. N:C.O. into an
Indian ambush,

Ray Milland and Hugh Marlowe
head a highly efficient cast and
both are eminently suited to thei)
hard-riding, action roles, while
Helena Carter gives a charmingly
poised performance the girl
they both love,
Good production and deft direc-
tion together with magnificent
scenery and an all-round com-
petent cast lift this film above the
average Western, and it abounds
in hard action, bitter fighting and
some. of the fastest riding I have
seen,

PLL GET YOU FOR THIS

A continental thriller with
plenty cf action, (LL. GET YOU
Â¥OR THIS is based on the novel

as

by James Hadley Chase, with
George Raft in the leading role.
It is good to see Mr, Raft back

again, after a long absence, and
this time he plays a smooth, suave
Amercian gambler who goes to the
Italian Riviera for a holiday, and
is promptly framed for the murder
of a U.S. Secret Agent who. has
been making things difficult for
a ring of counterfeiters.

With him is Coleen Gray, a
young actress who played her
undemanding part well. Charles
Goldner, whom I have not seen
before, plays the mysterious
character of Massine, and it is not
until near the end that one is
quite sure on which side of the
fence he is sitting! Mr. Goldner
is a first-rate character actor and
skilfully avoids any overacting in
his role. An interesting‘ child
member of the cast is Enzo Staiola
who made his name in the Italian
film, “The Bicycle Thief”. Young
Enzo has a natural acting ability
that is out of the ordinary and be-
cause of his talent, his part was
specially written into the script.
He plays a shoe-shine boy with
mischievious impishness together
with warmth and loyalty for the
man who befriends him, George
Raft gives a good sound perform-
ance and just to remind us of the

ee









POULTRY
OTES

If you keep laying hens you
want eggs. You ought to get be-
tween 180 and 200 eggs from each
pullet in its first year of laying.
You should get a dozen eggs from
less than six pounds of feed. Ob-
viously you are not going to get
these results from ordinary hens,
These notes are not written for
these who keep hens without any
thought for management, feed, or

for any other reason than the
hope of getting something for
nothing. They are intended to
help those of you who are in-
terested in poultry keeping to
make a profit from keeping
poultry the right way. The sug-

gestions contained in these notes
are based on proper research and
are -not the individual ideas of
a private poultry man.

That is why the greatest stress
is laid on selection of birds, feed-
ing and management.

Your pullets must be selected
for bred-in ability to lay, not be-
cause you take a faney to any
particular type of bird. Keep
whatever type of bird you fancy

oe all means but do not expect
the

same results -you would get

from a bird with bred-in ability
5 to lay

Having obtained birds with

bred-in ability to lay and having
raised them on a_ proper feeding
programme as outlined last week,
you will need to house them com-
fortably.

The size of the house will de-
pend on the number of hens you
keep. A house of any size should
provide space for the hens to
scratch in the laying
compartments, water ar-
rangements for drop-
pings.

megasse,
roosts,
pit

and a



Each

pace

bird should have a_ roost
between 7 and 9 inches
depending on its variety, Obvious-
ly a light bird will require less
pace than a heavy bird. Cocks
of course are not kept with hens,
toost poles should be between 12
and 15 inches apart.

Pits ought to be provided under
the roosts. Some poultry keepers
put wire under the roosts to
isolate the droppings from the
remainder of the megasse

Others put the roosts in such
a position that the droppings fall
outside the house. This is ob-
viously the best system to adopt
since it keeps the house clean
and the manure can easily be
collected bagged and sold to gar-
deners.

Fowl manure is excellent for
vegetable or flower gardens.
One hundred hens will drink

between 5 and 8 gallons of water
daily. Their rate of consumption
depends on their output of eggs
and the weather. The hotter it
is the more water they will re-
quire,

Many types of nests are used.
Some poultry keepers build
simple open nest boxes inside the
house: others have covered nest
boxes projecting outside the
house. The latter are to be recom-
mended because the eggs can be
collected from outside without dis-
turbing the hens. Remember to
put sufficient straw or fibre to
avoid breakages: fibre from cocoa-
nut or palm trees makes a good
nest. One nest is necessary for
each seven hens but if trap nests
are used there should be one for
each four hens,



old days, he dances the tango with
Coleen Gray, and I can assure you
that he has lost none of the lithe
grace that characterized his danc-
ing in “Bolero.”

All the loeation scenes are shot

in Italy and the subterranean
dungeons under a prison are a
grim backdrop for the climatic

chase that results in the capture
of the counterfeiters.

|

Shaves can be
close and
notoriously
uncomfortable |

Whereas PAL’S HOLLOW GROUND BLADE with extra sharp

durable edge, gives a cleaner, smoother, more

comfortable and always closer shave - it fits
all popular double-edged safety razors.

PAL

Sole Agents:

K. R. Hunte & Co., Lid., Bridgetown 5°FOR 43 CENTS

HOLLOW GROUND BLADES i



SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Farm and Garden

By AGRICOLA

WE ARE in a critical
justifiably so, It

is frequently



AGAIN
mood to-day and, we think
said that the average

Barbadian abroad is alert and purposeful, with a natural

robustuess of spirit—all of

which usually make him or

her an asset in any community where action is needed
Are those who have helped to generate such desirable
qualities maintaining the output at the same high leve! at

home?

B. B. C. Radio
Notes

BBC SCHEDULES FOR
NEW QUARTER

Wavelength and Programme
Changes

28th. September
new quarter

changes in

On
the

Sunday,
BBC begins a
and there are a few
the current schedule; the main
difference for listeners in this
area will be in the wavelengths
beamed here, The 19 metre trans-
mission disappears and a new one
in the 49 metre band makes its
appearance. The complete list is
given below



4.00 p.m. to 6.15 p.m. (25.53
metres, 11.75 megacycles,

6.15 p.m. to 7.45 p.m, (31.32
netres, 9.58 megacycles.

5 p.m, to 11,00 p.m. (49.71
6.035 megacycles

Among the changes
grammes noticed is
Questions’ which will
the air at 10.30 p.m. on Wednes-
days but by and large the
chedule programmes remains

7
metres,
of pro-
‘Twenty
now be on

of

ve same though a few new ones
make their appearance includ-
ing Charlie Kunz at the piano

who will be heard on Tuesdays at

£.00 p.m. and on Fridays at 4.15
p.m. “In Town To-night” also
returns to the air and can be

heard on Saturdays at 6.15 p.m.

R. B. Cunninghame Graham

One of the feature programmes
from London in the coming week
is the story of Robert Bontine
Cunninghame Graham, the almost
legendary figure who was called
“the most picturesque Scot of this
time’—1852-1936. The programme
commemorating the centenary of
Cunninghame Graham’s birth, has
been written by a fellow Scot,
Robert Kemp, with James Mc
Kechnie as ‘Don Reberto.’ Don
Roberto, R. B. Cunninghame
Graham was a Scottish laird who
looked like a Spanish Grandee
He was also, says Robert Kemp,
‘an exquisite writer of the English
language, a peerless horseman, a
master among the fencers of
Paris, an intrepid voyager through
the forbidden lands of Islam,
Liberal Member at Westminster,
co-founder of the Labour Party
in Seotland, a South American
pioneer and later historian, and
Scottish Nationalist!’ The broad-
cast will be on the air at 9.00
p.m, on Monday, 29th. Sept, and
at 5.15 p.m. on Friday, 3rd. Oc-
tober.

Toscanini Concert

In the BBC’s G.O.S. in the
coming week Toscanini will con-
duct the Philharmonia Orchestra
in two all-Brahms concerts from
the Royal Festival Hall, London
Unfortunately only Part II of the
second concert will be beamed to
us. That you can hear at 4,20
p.m. on Wednesday October 1st.
preceded by a talk “Toscanini Re-
turns to Britain,’ The response in
Britain to the news that Toscanini
was to conduct in London was so
great that tickets were allocated
by ballot. By the closing day there
were 60,000 applications for the
5,844 seats in the Festival Hall,

Talk by U.C.W.1. Registrar

“Caribbean Voices” on Sunday
28th. Sept. will present an entire-
ly new type of broadcast—a
Script of a talk recently given on
Radio Jamaiea by Hugh Springer
ee

We pose this question since th
conditions generally obtaining i
Bridgetown in regard to the er-
posure and sale of a wide variety
et foods, including fruits ind
vegetables, make it appear that a
state of complacency afflicts the
public mind and permits accep-
tance of a set of conditions which
no modern State or City would
long tolerate

Last week-end, while the Agri-
cultural Society was making a
strong appeal for 1 system of
efficicnt marketing which would
climinate the bad _ features of
huckstering under the
set-up and which, at the same
time, would enable the display
ot foodstuffs under strictly san-
itary conditions, some disgusting
ights could be witnessed in the
open, uncontrolled market area
which .infest the City The un-
fortunate thing is that these
market sights are encroaching on

existing

every kerb or corner without any
suggestion of civic beauty Such
a Sige as now developing at the



fountain garden area, for example
where there is a bus stop and cai

park. Here, as elsewhere, there
are vendors of fruit, vegetables
and confections of one kind o1
another uncovered as usual

together with the custemary
unsightly paraphernalia nd in-
cluding hangers-o , un
employed and the |! « » are
fast becoming pul anee
Whatever effort is d y the

Civic Circle and its band ot
workers to maintain some measur
of the aesthetic is in danger otf
being spoiled or vitiated by ig
sort of crudeness, so thoughtles:ly
and needlessly pursued.

But, the conditions which we
saw with our own eyes on the
Friday afternoon in question ‘n
the theatre area, Probym Street
and vicinity were simply shock
ingy We stopped to collect some
fruit’and végetables amid refuse,

fruit skins, empty coconut shells.
insanitary drains and other eye-
sores Worse was yet to come
Open bread carts and cake trays,
packed high with bread and cakes,
were just thickly covered with
flies which were so numerous }r
some cases as to remind one of
the old fashioned currant loaves
long since passed into oblivion
The danger lies in the ease with

which we can get accustomed to
a state of affairs which may nut
only blur the vision of better
things, but operate unknowingly
to prejudice health and prevent
us from benefiting to the fullest
from those natural resources of

climate and other amenities with
which the island is so exquisitely
and generously blessed

What are we going to do about
it? There is a good deal of tal
ebout the tourist trade and its
value to the island, but, surely,
Bridgetown is no place to capture
the imagination of tourists
visitors under prevailing condi-
tions. Ifa Mayor and Corporation
could put an end effectively to the
existing laissez faire, let us make
the change as speedily as possible
The robustness of spirit that we
spoke about previously was never
more needed to re-inforce actively
and persistently th® jnitiative of
such bodies, working in the public
interest and welfare, as the Agri-
cultural Society, the Horticultura?!
Society, the Civic Circle, Health
Commissioners, the Tourist Com
mittee and the Advocate new
paper

of Barbados, Registrar of the
University College of the West
Indies. This is followed by re-
views of recent local publications.
It begins at 7.15 p.m.



and

eS

GARDENING
HINTS FOR
AMATEURS

The September rains have been
very welcome, for most gardens
were parched and dry.

Its astonishing what a differ-

ence a little rain will make to the
appearance of a garden. Plants
that looked peaky before the rain
eem to fill out in a magical way,
and grass that was brown, and
apparently dead turns green over-
night.

September is. an in-between
‘ime in gardening, and there is
little planting to be done. But beds
yust be weeded and turned up
as usual, grass cut, and the usual
routine jobs of a garden done,
for woe betide any slacking or
sitting back, for such an attitude

always dearly paid for, Noth-
ing gets out of order quicker than
a garden if it is neglected for
even a week. Yet a garden that
is in perfect order, needs the
minimum of daily work to keep
it always looking nice.

Zinnias are. still flowering in
full force in many gardens, and
lovely they are too, their clear
bright colours ave a joy to see,

The Flamboyant trees, that a
few weeks ago were a mass of
crimson flowers, are now in full
leaf again, and, with their grace-

ful feathery foliage look like
bunehes of lovely green ostrich
feathers, nearly as beautiful as

when they were flowering. These
trees certainly beautify the
island, and should be planted
wherever possible, especially in

ublic gardens or open = spaces.
They ar very quick growing, fou

three foot saplin will grow into

sturdy little tree at eighteen
nonths old, And when three years
cold it is giving shade and flower-
ing. These trees eventually grow
an immense size, and make
excellent shade trees,

Sometimes in a garden a barrier
is needed to divide one part from
another, or perhaps to edge one
level of ground from a lower
level, For this purpose a low
rubble wall is the answer and it
will be found simple and inex-
pensive to make. This type of
wall is left rough and unplastered,
and if liked it can be made with
pockets in which when they are

to

filled with earth verbena, little
daisy, or similar plants can be
planted,

fo make such a wall no cement
is needed, for the stones are put
together with lime mortar. Now
there are two kinds of lime, one
kind is used for washing walls,
and the other kind is called
builders lime. The kind to use for
your wall is Builders Lime. You
will need a quantity of broken
coral stone of different sizes,
Actual quantities of these two
materials depend of course on the
length of wall that is to be built.

Begin by digging out a shallow
foundation of a few inches deep.
Some people do not even do this
but place the stones on the ground,
providing of course that the
ground is reasonably flat, It is
wiser however to dig a shallow
foundation, Now mix tihe lime
with water until a thick mortar
is. formed,

Having done this select the
largest stones and place them in
the shallow foundation for the
bottom of the wall,

Proceed by building up the wall
with the rest of the stones, put-
ting them together and fitting
them together small and large
with dolops of the lime mortar
placed in between shaping the
wall with straight sides and flat
top, A wall of this kind should
be kept within the limits (more
or less) of two feet high by 1 ft.
wide,

To build a much higher wall
would be risky as it has not the
strength of cement

Yet a rubble wall, built with
jime mortar will last for many
years. After the staring white-
ness has gone, and the stones
have become weathered, it makes
a very attractive addition to a
garden



NOTICE |

WE BEG TO REMIND OUR

CUSTOMERS AND THE

th 4 |

GENERAL PUBLIC THAT

OUR HARDWARE DEPT.

SALES DEPT.

ELECTRIC SERVICE DEPT.

PIERHEAD
AND THE

CORNER STORE

WILL BE CLOSED FOR

STOCK - TAKING

WEDNESDAY Ist.

N.B.--Our Lumber Yard and Syrup Store
will be open as_ usual

i MANNING’

ON

AND

a& C€O..

TUESDAY 30th SEPT.

OCT.

LTD.








\f you feel worn ous, depressed, or
generally run down a glass or two a day of
Buckfast Tonic Wine will quickly restore: lost
energy and tone up the whole nervous system,
Giving new vitality it fortifies you against fever
and exhaustion and remember, Buckfast Tonle
Wine is especially valuable after iliness,

eeeatees %

BUCKFAST






You, too, can go i for

INNER
CLEANLINESS

There’s an easy way to achieve |
the fitness you admire so much in -
others. Just make sure of your /nner
Cleanliness by taking Andrews!

Sparkling Andrews dispels slug-
gishness, helps you not only to work
well, but to enjoy your leisure to the
full, Andrews acts by freshening the
mouth and tongue, settling the
stomach and toning up the liver.
Finally, Andrews gently clears the
bowels,

For a “ fizzy”, refreshing drink,
use one teaspoonful of Andrews in
a glass of water,

DO YOU KNOW why your head aches when your systewt’s
out-of-order ? Gases given off by fermenting food wastes are
absorbed by the blood-stream and carried to the brain. They
cause headaches, irritability and lassitude. Andrews keeps
your system free from harmful wastes, and general health ts
much improved, thanks to Inner Cleaniiness.

erreavescort

~ ——s

ANDRE Ws





DURING

ANNUAL
STOCK-TAKIN

; AT

THE BARBADOS CO-OP
COTTON FACTORY LTD.

The Lumber, Hardware, Plantation Supplies
and Oil Mill departments will be closed
on the dates shown:

LUMBER & PLANTATION SUPPLIES f
Monday, September 29th and Tuesday, 30th

HARDWARE

Monday, September 29th, Tuesday, 30th, and *
Wednesday, Ist Octoher

OIL MILL

Wednesday, Ist October, Closed Morning Only.
(Deliveries from 12.00 — 4.00 p.m.)

Our Office will remain OPEN over this period
for PAYMENT OF ACCOUNTS.

BARBADOS CO-OP.
COTTON FACTORY LTD.


PAGE FOUR

SUNDAY

ARE THE INDIANS KEEN
ON W.L. TOUR ?

Intercolonial Yachting And Table
| Tennis Soon
_ (By ©. S. COPPIN)

HE latest grape-vine news flash in
Indians to the West Indies is to the effect that
are now being made that, should these rur
| necessitate a complete reorientation of perspective
| tour itself,
It is claimed that the Indians, who in all their previous negotia-
have never mentioned the possibility of a tour to Pakistan, have
decided *o tour Pakistan before they leave for the West Indies
| There is no question that they Will now tour Pakistan before they
come to the West Indies, if this second tour materialises at’ all, since
| this information has been given in the Cricketer and in addition it
| states that Pakistan has been accorded Test match status.

| A TEST SERIES NOW
Good mornings begin: with Gillette

ALL OVER THE WORLD

connection with the visit of the
certain stipula-
nours be true, wil
with regard to the

| Lions

| tion
;now



VEN if the Indians considered the Pakistan visit in the light of

a goodwill tour for political and other reasons before, they will

now have to give it the importance and weight equal to that of a tour
to England, Australia, the West Indies or any other member of the
Imperial Cricket Conference.
We must now relate this information to the background that con-
tains the fact that the Indians have just fulfilled a six months’ tour
of England and will have to play another Test series before they
come to the West Indies and it also means that they will be undertak-
ing three tours in the course of less than a year
Two of these tours will take place under tropical conditions

is too much for even a team that comprises six Hercules
sons, minus of course the Delilahs, tar less ordinary

Though the Eskimo lives
in the cold all his days,
For Blue Gillette shaving
there’s warmth in his praise.

This
and five Sam-
normal mortals.

If the above is correct there is little cause for surprise at other
, * '
He knows when he’s using rumours contingent upon this assumption that the Indians have asked
first to be flown out if they are too late for the tentative steamship
the sharpest edge made, arrangements made because of their Pakistan commitment, and sti#pu-

late that there should be one day’s res

FEARING

t during ‘each

FATIGUE ?

Test match.
Gillette is the name

HIS last request is an obvious admission of possible fatigue and
for both razor and blade. is certainly a Be v departure from established custom. I do
not even know whether it is legal assuming that the West Indies
; ‘ | Cricket Board of Cont! ol was simple enough to allow it
With Gillette, coo! customers Should a Sunday intervene cricket in these parts will not be
over enjoy smooth, played but let us assume that the particular day, say the third, fourth
the world ' J . or fifth day of any Test match should be a rest day and it falls on a
money-saving shaves, There Thursday or Saturday, this would then play havoc with the gate
is no blade so sharp and receipts. a , To ih hci encsiateat
that taste 86 long 4s ARE THE INDIANS INTERESTED ?
ene THAt TASS ve THINK that at this stage we should ask ourselves, are the Indians

Blue Gillette. And they

genuinely interested in coming to the West Indies, this winter?
always use a Gillette Razor as

If so will they be able to give of their best? Can we afford to risk
$144,000 if there is a strong possibility that in the circumstances the



well. Because razor and blade tour might not be a success?
e or each other. These are questions which must be answered truthfully and
5 Blades 30 are made for eac promptly if the West Indies are to plan their programme for the

| future.
While they are dillydallying we might well be going ahead with

| making preparations for an Intercolonial tournament with Trinidad

| and for our tour of Canada next year.

|

NO REASON FOR DELAY

' PHERE is no justification for procrastination when delay might
result not only ir the cancellation of the Indian tour but might

make it impossible for us to make arrangements in time for our own

domestic Quadrangular tournamenis that must naturally constitute

the best means of assessing the merits of players who might be re-

quired for the tour of Canada.

} I see that there will be an official release this week rym the W.I

Cricket Board. We are looking forward to it in the hope that we are

| going to receive some authentic information concerning the present

position of West Indies cricket and commitments.

My congratulations this week go out to the members of the Carl-
ton Club for their magnificent effort in erecting a pavilion last week,
the like of which cannot be seen in any of the other British West
Indian colonies I have visited so far as a single club is concerned.

The pavilion is a monument to the combined effort, vision and
| enthusiasm of the Carlton members who have set a standard of team
| Spirit deserving of emulation by other clubs of the older standing.

MIGHT HAVE HAD HELP — BUT!!!

One cannot gainsay the fact that propitious circumstances might
have helped considerably to bring the Carlton hopes and plans to
;}such a happy fruition but they were certainly not content to wrap
| their pound in a napkin. They got going and the result must have
| gladdened the hearts of even the most confirmed pessimist among
them.

Modernity and utility are the outstanding characteristics of the
new pavilion that includes an excellent dance flogr and bar as well.
It is a self-contained unit that affords more facilities for its members
than any other club of its type in the island.

WEIGHTLIFTERS FOR TRINIDAD
HE Barbados Amateur Weightlifting Association is sending a team
to Trinidad to-morrow to compete with a similar
Trinidad.

The team has been selected after a series of elimination contests
and should therefore represent the best that we are able to put in the
field at present,

It includes experienced competitors in the persons of Jackman,
Webster and Rogers but they on the other hand will meet opposition
spearheaded with the recent Olympic Bronze medallists Wilkes and

Blue Gillette Blades

TRADE ENQUIRIES TO: T. GEDDES GRANT LIMITED







Your mair appears caressable
«kissable...




, Co : team in
with spettin cB
PALMOLIVE BRILLANTINE! __ppearne:

Be doubl! hhinie eoft,..cat 1 by | Whatever the results may be I think that it will be generally con-
e doubly sure your hair is ..-caressable...easy

} ceded that an Association which has only been formed two years ago

manarce by using Palmetive Brillantine the DOUBLE ean send away a team to compete with Trinidad is deserving of praise.
& 2

USE Way:



We can only wish them good luck and good lifting.

TRINIDAD TORNADOES COMING

The Trinidad team of three yachts with their skippers are expected

here by the M.V. Willemstad of the Royal Netherlands Steamship

Company who have again kindly consented to transport the tornadoes,
freight free.

There will ‘be a series of five Intercolonial races between the six

tornadoes representing the two colonies. The sixth and final race

will be open to all tornadoes.

| As soon as the dates of the Intercolonial races have been

| they will be published,

As an Oil for Massages: Before washing hair,
massage scalp briskly with Palmolive Brillantine.
Leave oil on scalp for 10 minutes and then wash,
‘This massage helps remove dandruff... prepare
scalp for perfect cleansing.






fixed

To Comb and Perfume Hair: Put






The present test series in preparation for the

. te 7 ont selection of the Barbados boats is still extremely interesting,
ak a little Palmolive Brillantine in the - Vamoose heads the list with 40 points and they follow in this
> palm of the hand, Rub hands 4 order Edril 36 points, Fury 31, Thunder 29, Comet 28. From the
r together; smooth over hair. And ‘NE y above it can be seen that Vamoose will definitely win the series ond

Edril will take second place.
The third place position with to-day’s race to go and the final
race next Sunday, might easily be taken by either of the three boats
and consequently it is safe to predict that there will be a keen tussle
in the last two races for third place on the team.
The seventh race takes place to-day at 10,30
race next Sunday at the same time,

TENNIS TEAM INVITED TO TRINIDAD
Barbados Table Tennis Association and members will be proud to
learn of the remarks which Dy, Noble Sarkar, captain of the Trinidad
team which recently visited Barbados, made on their behalf at the
Annual General meeting of the San Fernando Zone Committee of
the Trinidad and Tobago Amateur Table Tennis Association. He
said: ‘Me Barbados Table Tennis Association and the people gen-

comb! aN nA

Then, notice the dancing highlights...
the beautiful grooming of your hair!

PALMOLIVE
BRILLANTINE

a.m. and the final



ADVOCATE

YESTERDAY'S CRIC ‘KET:



SPARTAN W IN OUTRIGHT
AGAINST WANDERERS

SPARTAN secured their
defeated Wanderers by an

they

vesterday, the last day of

atch

third outright_victory when
innings and 104 runs
their First Division Cricket

at the Bay, Beckles Road. The small crowd which

went to witness the end, saw Frank King, Barbados pace

take

bowler,
sec

the last two

Frank King ended up with an
tt tive bowling analysis of 11

overs, three maidens, 35 runs and







six wickets in the Wanderers sec-
ond inni which ended at 112
runs. S. Griffith took two wickets
for 24 runs in six overs.

When play. began yesterday
Wanderers were 110 runs for the
loss of eight wickets in their
second innings at the end of play
on thesecond day with R. Lawless

out 20 and L, St. Hill not
26
I.. St. Hill who went at number
th Wanderers batting
s undefeated with 26 runs.
r rbs scored 23 while two
of the Wanderers batsmen failed
tc core in tt econd innings.

Lawless carried his seore to 22
before he was brilliantly caught by

rmie Smith behind the wicket off
the bowling of K and T. Peirce



who followed him
King for a duck

was bowled by
and the Wander-





ers second innings ended at 112
runs.

On the first day of play, Spartan
began their first innings on a per-
fect wicket and scored 288 runs
with th chie scorer being
L. F. Harris 63, Smith 49, and
K. Bowen 38. Louis St. Hill was
the most , impressiv bowler.
This slow left arm bowler took
six of the Spartan wickets for
73 runs in 25 overs and West
Indian test player Denis Atkinson

bowling medium to fast took two
tor 64 in 21 overs.

But on the second day of play
Wanderers were unfortunate to
find an impaired wicket and in

Wanderers wickets in their

nd innings in the first and only over of the day.

their first venture at the wicket
they were skittled out for 72 runs,
their collapse due mainly to some
steady bowling by pacer Phillips
who took four for 32 and Frank
King three for 28 in 11 overs and
three balls. ‘

Erie Atkinscn was the only
batsman that stood up to the at-
tack and he scored 27 while R.
Lawless got 13. Failing to save the
follow-on, Wanderers scored 110

runs for 8 wickets befcre an
appeal for light was successfully
supheild.

Yesterday Wanderers added two

runs to their overnight score of
110.

Scores :
partan’s Fest Innings one
Wanderers First Innings 73

WANDERERS-—2nd INNINGS



D. Evelyn c Atkins b F. King
J u run out a
E nson c Bowen b F. King 4
Dd kinson c Bowen b F. Phillips 8
W. Knowles 1.b.w. b F. King 2
G. Proverbs c King b S. Griffith 23
D. Lawless c L. Harris b F. King 18
D. Mayers b S. Griffith 4
R. Lawless c (wk. Smith) b F
King - «2
L. St. Hill not out 26
T. N. Firce b King °. )
Extras 0
Total 112

Fall of wickets, 1 for 4, 2 for 7, 3 for

12, 4 for 17, 5 for 19, 6 for 51, 7 for €3
8 for 65; 9 for 112
BOWLING ANALYSIS
° M R Ww

F. King 11 3 35 6
F. Phillips 8 1 34 1
S. Griffith 6 24 2
N. Harrison 1 1
L. F. Harris 1 3
K. Bowen i 15



Roberts Wins
Challenge Cup

@ From page 1
for presenting the prizes and Mr.
Bowen for having presented the

cup on behalf of his firm.
Presenting the report of the
Club, Mr. Roberts said: “As club
ain of the Barbados Small
Rifle Club I have much
pleasure in welcoming among us
this afternoon Mr, F. L. Griffith
who has kindly consented to pre-
nt the prizes, unfortunately Mr.
Griffith has been unable to take an
active part in this sport for some



time, but we shall look forward to
seeing him on the ranges in the

not two distant future. Mr, Grif-
fith has presented this Club with a
beautiful challenge cup which has
been competed for for the first
tirne during these competitions and
will be presented to the winner of
the Grand Aggregate.

At the beginning of this year
the new lighting system was in-
stituted and has proved to be a
complete success and I think that
every one will agree that it has
been generally conducive to better
scoring, Seven spoon shodts were
held during the year. An addi-
tional Rifve was purchased during
the year which has considerably
reduced the congestion with the
result that members are now able
to put in more practices. The 1951





Overseas Postal Match was shot
for during the latter part of the
year when we made a score of

1,524 points this score was very
much lower than was anticipated
1nd every effort must be made to
better it this year. The following
are the results which have just
been received
Ist Jamaica
medals,
2nd Trinidad-—1é
3rd Kenya—15
4th Falkland 1
5th Barbados—1,524.
The attendance during the year
was favourable but leaves room
for improvement and it is hoped

1,578 Cup and 8




that members will make every
effort to attend more regularly.
The annual competition start-

ed on Sunday the 21st and for the
first time in the History of the

Club a competition was held at
100 yards and judging from the
high scores and keeness of mem-
bers I feel sure that it will be
essential to have regular prac-
tices at this range in future.

The usual competition was
held for the regiment and was
won by Pte. J. F. Ward “B” Coy
with a score of 88 and the event
for the Cadets being won by
2/Lt. L. K. Hinds of Harrison
College with a score of 91 Capt.
S. G. Weatherhead is the winner
of Event No. 10 and will receive
the Col Connell Challenge Cup.
Mr. T. A. L. Roberts must be
congratulated on emerging cham-
pion shot of the Meeting by win-
ning the Grand Aggregate with
a creditable score of 488 and will
receive the F, L. Griffith Challenge
Cup and Miniature. The weather
throughout these competitions
has been favourable, scoring has
been on a very high standard re-
sulting in the keenest rivalry
amongst the competitors and I
may safely say that the meeting
has been a very successful one.

I would like to thank The Bai-
bados Regiment, the Press and
@ll those who have assisted in
making this meeting/a_ success
and last but by no means the
least — would like to mention our
old friend Cpl. Luke, our range
attendant, whose tiresome job it
is to change targets etc., and is
always willing to give a hand
when there is work to be done.

Before I ask Mr. F. L. Griffitn
to present the prizes I would like
to mention that at the cénclusion
of the presentation of prizes Mr.
Bowen of Messrs, Y. DeLima
will present this Club with a
Challenge Cup on behalf of his
firm for competition among the
Leewerd and Windward Islands.

Major Warren as Chairman of
the Council of the Barbados
Small Bore Rifle Club thanked
Mr. Griffith for attending that





erally, by the fine

unrivalled hospitality in the

arrangements made in the first instance and the
second,

made everyone feel most com-

fortable and gave his team a most enjoyable time.

The Committee decided to invite a Barbados tabl@ tennis team
to the South Trinidad in 1953 but have not yet fixed a date.













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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 1952

RACING NOTES

By BEN BATTLE

HE B.T.C. announced its Provisional Programme for the November

Meeting during the week. On the whole, it showed signs of
having considerably more thought devoted to it than was the case
with the August Programme, and the dilemma of having too few
horses for a four-day meeting but too many for a three was sensibly
met. The races are framed along lines similar to those suggested in
last week’s notes, and, considering the way the horses likely to run
are distributed among the various classes, there is really little ta

criticise.
THE D AND C CLASS RACES

HE weak point of the programme, as it was bound to be, is the
three races which have been framed for both the D’s and G's
As I pointed out last week to frame less was to make certain that no
outsiders would make the trip, but the alternative is that we may
find ourselves with 6 races on the card which will fail both as spec-
tacles and as mediums for attracting punters. The paucity of the
G class is of course beyond anyone's ability to control, but the D Class
situation has been aggravated over the years by the policy of promot-~
ing creoles into C. It may be thought that I am labouring this point
unduly, but it requires driving home repeatedly if the situation is
ever to improve.

The annoying thing about the whole question is the attitude of
those owners whose D and E class animals are not promoted. They,
without hesitation, rejoice at the promotion of their rivals into C
but that this is a shortsighted view can readily be demonstrated
The present programme in fact shows clearly what the outcome will
be. The three races framed for the D class cannot be justified by the
number of probable entrants, and unless the unexpected occurs, and
two or three horses from Trinidad are sent up, we shall find our-
selves, as we did in August, with three and four horse fields. Such
races apart from being disappointing to watch, cannot attract the
betting man and the Turf Club loses on them the amount represented
by diminished Pari and forecast turnover and by reduced numbers
of entrance fees. That the club is in no position to subsidise racing
of this kind is self evident, and the eventual result will be that D
class racing will be cut down to two races per meeting. When that
occurs the opportunity for those horses remaining in D will be small
no matter where their better rivals have been sent.

If indeed the Classifiers are going to cadntinue to set a limit io
the amount of races which they are prepared to allow a good creole
to win before it must be pushed into C class, then the only alterna-
tive would appear to me to be the demotion of the worst horses in
the C Class. No doubt this will cause a raising of eyebrows among
the old guard, but this system works tolerably well in B.G., and I?
for one doubt that much harm would be done to the prospect of
creoles where horses like Tiberian Lady, Embers, and Mabouya are

allowed to run in D class,
NO TROPHIES

S I have said the Provisional Pragramme calls for more compli-

ment than criticism. I was impressed for instance by the fore-
thought which had gone into the placing of G Class races at the head
of each day’s card. They are not likely to attract big fields and it is
proven to run them when attendance and betting tend to be low in
any case.

On the debit side of the ledger, is the lack of Trophies. With
the exception of the Trumpeter Cup, not a single one is offered and,
sympathetic as I am towards the difficulties with which those who
guide the financial affairs of the Turf Club are beset, I cannot believe
that it is impossible for them to provide a Trophy for the winner of
the South Caribbean Stakes at the very least. Even if this were to
be the case, it is incredible to me that not a single firm in Bridgetown
ean be found to whom the prestige and the advertisement of provid~
ing such a prize would not appeal. Failing this an approach might be
made to the various Bloodstock Agencies in the U.K. from whom so
many of our important horses are obtained. I should feel happier
if I knew that the Turf Club was at any rate actively exploring all
avenues. It is not a matter which deserves the complacency at
present accorded it.

THE TRINIDAD CLASSIFICATION

HE PUBLICATION of the T.T.C. official classification list serves

to emphasise both the enormous stride taken by racing in our
sister colony and the problems which must confront them. A total
of sixty-three horses are listed in C2 alone and it will obviously be
a most difficult task to discover stabling accommodation for even a
small proportion of the total number classified, The framing of a
programme in which starting will not be a nightmare, is another
problem and the current rumour is that five days will be needed to
accomplish this. In the circumstances there is little that the Barbados
stables who hope to make the trip down-at Christmas can do except
keep their fingers erossed.










afternoon and _ presenting the
prizes. He said that Mr, Griffith
nad been interested in rifle shoot-
ung all his life and he knew that

was sure the cup would go a
long way in creating that inter-
est. There were several of the
smaller islands who had started

one of his (Mr. Griffith's) regrets clubs recently and they were
was that he was unable to take hoping that by having competi-
un active part in shooting now- tion, they would reach the

a-days.

He also thanked Mr. Griffith
for presenting the cup which was
won by Mr. Roberts. He said that
that cup had a history behind it
because it was presented to Mr.
Griffith when he was a member
of the Barbados Miniature Rifle

standard of the bigger colonies
like Jamaica who seemed to win
everything in the Small Bore
Rifle Class.

Major Warren also regretted the
absence of Major Cave who had
promised to present the prizes,
but was unable to do so having



Club as far back as 1912, He as- to go to the Hospital through
sured Mr. Griffith that they would j!lness, He hoped that his condi-
treasure it and that it would be tion was nothing serious and
awarded to the winner of the that he would be out and among
grand aggregate at future meet- them soon again.
Angs.

Mr. Griffith thanked Major | e e
Warren for his kind remarks Auto Racing

and said that he would do every-
thing in his power to foster and
encourage rifle shooting in Bar-
bados.

He regretted very much that
Major Cave was unable to attend
due to illness and said that he
was very pleased when he was
asked to come and distribute the

Calendar

PARIS, Sept. 27.
The _ International Sporting
Commission of International Au-
tomobile Association today issued

the following calendar of eventa
of the 1953 season:—

prizes. He hoped everyone had January 18—Argentine Grand
an enjoyable evening ian again oe wk, 3—Lisbon Circuit.
promised that he would do every- Itix i re Grand
thing to further the interest of pyix’ ; Ay SGccdndiconmelis sete,
rifle shooting. June 7—Dutch Grand Prix.

Mr. Harold Bowen then pre- June 21—Belgian Grand Prix.
en. the De Lima Cup to Mr. july 18—British Grand Prix.

August 2—German Grand Prix
September 11 to 13—Norway’s
Viking Rally. September 13—
Italian Grand Prix. October 26
—Spanish Grand Prix. November
19 to 20 Mexico’s Pam-American
Race. —U.P.

Major Warren on behalf of tne
Club thanked Mr. Bowen for
presenting the cup and said that
members of the Small Bore Rifle
Club had been trying to awaken
éaterest in rifle shooting and he








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. e Gee ea

ne PRESERVATIVE





pte

a


FABLE TENNIS:

Greenidge,

Gill 1952

Finalists





na

one

Wwe € \
c ‘ ?
: j
i on

G iste

Ld pow i orehand smashes,
constantly pierced his opponent’
defene i th ighout the set
thefe were many ralli which
the I entertained to
sor spectacul retur by We
rel) Chopping wi cour cy,
Worrell red m beautiful
smashes, but Greenidge, ch anging
his tactics in the final gar pro-
duced something extra which

assured his victory

Norman Gill of Everton defeat-
ed his teamate Blair Murray in
the other semi-final. Murray was
brilliant in spells, but the relent-
less attack the ‘Everton
Smasher’ broke through his de-
fence.

of

Best Performance



Ruth Williams of Queen's Col-
lege, in what may be cons dered
as her best perf lane ated
Betty Carrington Her smashing
Was extiemely accurate Miss
Carrington is steady, and a]-
though she wor the hiy im
in fin tyle eemed unuble to
producy match-winni orm
gainst this relentiess attack

In the other semi-final Marion

Manning lost to Joyce Clarke in

cne of the hardest fought matches.
nus





M Manning who was suffering
from a leg injury, was unable to
play the fast half-volley game,
and Miss Clark realising this,
used this tactic to defeat her
Mixed Doubles

In the mixed doubles Miss N.

Hall and L. Worrell in a keenly

contested match defeated Miss M.



Manning and R. Herbert. Miss B.
Carrington and N. Gill easily de-
leated Miss R. Williams and R.
Philips, 3—). The Everton
player’s consistent smashi com-
pletely overwhelmed hi uppo-
nents. The Finals will be played
on Thursday October 2nd at 8.00
p.m. His Excellency the Govern-
or and Lady Savage will poe
present The Matches are as
follows:—

Ladies: R. Williams vs. J.
Clarke.

Men's; N. Gill \ ( Green-
idge

Men's Doubles M. R. Phillips
and L. Worrell vs. C. Greenidg
and E. Goodridge.

Mixed Doubles: Miss B. Car-
rington and Mr. N. Gill vs. Miss
N. Hall and Mr. L. Worrell, °
GOLF;



je if al
Mrs. Wilson Tops
‘ a 9 -

Ladies’ Ladder
Action at the Rockley Golf Club
during the week was confined to
challenge matches in the struggle
to climb the ladders, but there
were plenty of them. Outstanding
was the success of Mrs. Brenda
Wilson, who put in a spirited
drive, played and won two
matches and reached the top of
the Ladies’ ladder before the
week-end

Early in the week she conquered
Mrs, Cyril Beaseley and moved
into second place, then later she
took on the leader Mrs. R. Vidmer
turned in a sizzling 38 and deposed
the Ladies’ Captain at the top of
the list.

In a lower section Mrs, A.
Tempro made an effort to jump
Miss Faye Atwell, but after an up
and down effort the match ended

even and the players remained
in their original positions. A play
off match between the two has

been arranged for Tuesday.

Two Challenges
Two Challenges were issued in
the Men’s Class A section, but both
failed. Colin Bayley who has made
a spectacular rise in the last fort-
night, having reached the second
rung flung a challenge at R. Vid-
mer, but was turned back on
Thursday in a medal-play en-

counter by seven strokes.

On the same day William Atkin-
son who had accomplished some-
thing of an upset by beating John
Rodger last week, attempted to
move still farther forward against
5. ’OD. Egan, holding down the

third rung, but again the chal-
lenge failed as Egan won another
medal-play match by four strokes,

Tony Tempro defeated H. V.
King and moved up a step in the
Class B Division, then accepted a
challenge for a return match the
next day and successfully defend~
ed his new position.





— ai

Standing L. to R.

Kneeling L. to R.



Be ASKETS, AL i: :



Roy Goddard

{VLIFTING TEAM



Clement Jackman (166 1b. class) Edwin Rogers (181 1b.) Errol Douglas (198
lb.) Basil Grant (Mr. Barbados 1952;

H. H. Webster Coach-Manager)
(123 Ib). Glyne Jordan (132 1b.) George Nicholls (148 Ib.)





Carib Bears Expected Sunday







i TENNIS

Gonzales
Retains Title







An amazing reputation thas By CALVIN ALLEYNE Gibson, a really Peat playe!
preceded the arrival of the Trini- who yet sometimes gives you the
dad Basketball team, Carib Bears, Puerto Rico, Cuba, Illinois, and impression that he does not wish
which is expected here next Sun- done much for amateur basket- to seem to keep the ball too much
day. They won the Basketball ball in Trinidad. to himself and quickly passes it
Knock Out Competition in Trini- Lance Lashiey five feet, to a fellow-player. It is all very
dad the season just ended, they eleven inches and plays a good well to combme, but one cannot
were runners-up in the League g@me at forward. He is very ag- help feeling that if Gibson some-
Championship, and Barbadians Sressive on both defence and times dashed through somewhat
who have recently returned from @ttack, and probably has no peer nore like he did at the begin-
Trinidad and have seen them @5 far as “ball stealing” goes. He ning of the season and was not
play, say simply—they are good. } swift, too, and this with his to serupulously careful of passing

Local players who have been Knack of getting away the ball the bail he would give a lot more
asked to practice in preparation “®€P his team in a regular posi- t yuble Chere is also Y.M.E C.'s
for the tour, seem to appreciate “OD for scoring ift, accurate scorer, McKenzie,
this fully, and, but for times _“Shwyn Pierre, six feet, and and Carlton's Brickie Lucas. One
nek tae ge prevented practice, weighing 160 pounds, usually can safely say these are certain
haves hear hard at work puny _ oa : He eee vicks, but the other paves

s oe , . even when playing, and 5S £en- have been playing comparalively

ite 5 vee r+ sciousness of the possibility of Jess have difficult task selecting
ee > Burrell ae their breaking. He is a steady the team
making ne tour, na game ixe "a \ > ce ns n
this ty whieh height is very much one ee ee ear eee " t selecting

- accurate one-hand push shot. rhey do not intend selecting it

an asset, local players will have Cariton Stephenson, is five until the night before the first
an idea of what they will be up feet ten ind a half inches, match is scheduled to be played.
against when they learn that only
two of the eight are less than
five feet, eleven inches. The
other two are five feet, ten and

half inches and five feet, eight
inches respectively.

It was no easy work beating
their way through to win the
Knock Out Trophy and the run-
ners-up in the League Cham-
pionship, and with the end of the
season, they are fit, energetic and
confident of carrying off the hon-
ours from Barbados

Who's Who

Their cemre is Carlton “Doc”
Clarke, six feet, two inches and
weighing 180 pounds. I have
learnt through their coach that

since the game has become popu-
lar in Trinidad, Clarke has been
judged the most accomplished
player, This season he has been
the most prolific scorer in the
league. He has a variety of de-
pendable shots and uses them to
good advantage. He froin
well-judged bounces the
back-board,

Aldwyn. Hislop, the gua is six
feet, one inch, and weighs 175
pounds. Hislop is considered the
backbone of the club. As captain,
he has acquired a reputation fer
command and coolness when the
game is not going the way the
Carib Bears could wish it, He is
a steady and aggressive player
and is always alert for a rehound
from the back-board. He has a
reputation as a sprinter and this
ability enables him to elude
many a would-be defender,

Norman “Fox’’ Pierre is five
feet, eleven inches, weighs 165
pounds, and plays as forward.
Here is a player who has en-
deared himself to basketball ‘fans

scores
on

for his guile and elusiveness
This, actually, is how he gained
the nickname “Fox”. He is good

at a swift one-time twirl of the

ball into the basket, employs
effectively the two hand chest
shot from forward court, and

in a class by himself when it

comes to dribbling and ball cou-
trol.

The coach Jim Burrell (U.S.A.)
who plays as forward, is five feet



eleven and a half inches amt
weigas 190 pounds, He has been
playing the game some 12 years
now—at College and in_ the
Army. He has previously been
coach to several other teams, and
was captain of “Pirates”, a tearn
of the U.S. Naval Base in_Trini-
dad. He has played in Hawaii,
Japan, California, Florida, Mas~-

sachusetts, New York, San Juan,

We would like to inform
our friends and customers
that we will be CLOSING
ON MONDAY 29th and
TUESDAY 30th for —

STOCK-TAKING

and will reopen for busi-
ness on Wednesday Ist Oct.





CARIB BEARS who are expected to arrive here next Sunday to play
three matches against Barbados, one against Harrison College, and
one against Harrison College Old Boys and Carlton combined.

Front Row left to right are: A. Hislop (capt.), C. Bethelmy and
L. Lashley (standing), J. Burrell (coach), D. Martin, P. Samuel, C,
















2

a

8































NO. 243

The Topic
of











we Correspondent
‘LONDON, Sept, 26 | ast We k
ld Richard e
. Gonzale Lo-night
el that he is the
ennis profes-
lling two houry
elained for
‘ igies tithe in
i € ional cham-
hi fellow
i er But it
‘ lished a two set}
c ronzaies had to pull out)
ver) iw win the match. The ;
inal ‘ is & t j—b, 6—2
-4
W nl iivamer,+was fresh he set |
p sutt er tennis that the no-
ur 1 starting Gonzales
« ing swept off the 7" . ~ -
c he began to settle| jf", i] | The famous threefold action of | HENSIC tablets RELIEVES
a s speed slackened And boys the PAIN, SOOTHES NERVES,COU NTERACTS DEPRESSION.
e -ar ol Txwite sit ;
: Oe ir a aces uo ge No matter how intense the pain, no matter how weary your nerves,
r ages was & - . arc ? o-
nae’ § ee It was down at the Vestry how depressed you feel, PHENSIC tablets will bring you relief and
sate, ly ke those old “ e 9° -

When Kramer established a! When most parochial. matter comfort, quickly and safely, Remember this — PHENSIC tablets
four—one lead in the final set it | Passed through mysterious was | neither harm the heart nor upset the stomach. Don’t accept
looked though he would take. oy vestrymen will wrangh substitutes. Keep a supply of PILE NSIC tablets by you!
the me But Gonzales hitting: dis is the natural course
with great power broke his ser- And when the wrangling’s over
vice in the seventh game and then ' Things will still stand in force @e
—, — all 2 ame in the| S°™¢ Scholarships were offered

1€ Vilal point cé : | At the St. Michael's Schoo!
ninth game which went to seven And from the ‘aakaee fehaa
jeuces before Gonzales put away Some members were felt foole:
4 Winner After that all he had 1 twenty-one :were. @tiiins a
to do was to hold his own ore | To answer the *advert” TWO TABLETS BRING QUICK RELIEF
for the mat« . a did wi And tour were the prize ~winner FROM RHEUMATIC PAINS® LUMBAGO, NERVE PAINS,
some thunderous s u ‘ ;

Gonzales has thus completed his | Whistles he. the dinate HEADACHES, NEURALGIA, 'sF UENZA, COLDS & CHILLS
gecond hat trick of the Wembley | whether it's rash or mild
season, “Ror Thursday he won on K mber it is dangerou

» To disappoint a child |
Doubles championship for the
third time. Soe boys whether 4 walk ¢

For to-night’s victory he receiv- You must still play *he game |
‘ £350. Kramer gets £125, Ear- So next week wh you ws it
ier this evening Perry and Pails Things will be just vn
arned emselve £60 apiece If it’s in your opinic
vith 6-—~2, 6—2 victory over Something could have gone wrong
Honder Switzerland and Mo- This is one time you And t :
iarek of Egypt in the third place That wrong conquer stror
youbles match lrepare now for the futu &

To-day put ll things riz
So that by now and next ‘
FOOTBALL Feelll osteae’ ten uke vin |
Now sister, brother, wake '
~ Blackpool Beat This message is to you .
And see what 1 can do } t
y ; — j
Charlton & 4 The grand Cathedral orga } ” 7 ad Gmos
It's ¢ e to erhaul
(From Our Own Correspondent) oid. tera? eesti: Ghani
LONDON, Sept. ok Pete ould pay for Paul
f

Ste Matthews with on |

2 me in 84 league games until avire: Anes wf

pe eens gon led a twelve the. young people iW

oer riot at Bloomfield really a delight is

1 seorin i \ j

( g t Can
vad day d helped to ent The organ needs repairing
kpool on top of the firs | So girls make up your mind
i Blackpool beat Charlton} ‘To sell your ducks and cockre
+ and Matthews scoring again} And jump right in the line:
sistered his fourth goal of the | Remember at your wedding
You had the organ too
aso! |
And eve ft oure a

Husky Allan Brown got another | aie sa ah tad three and must now be coneeern |

certain starter for Scotland's When you get home to Heaver

: ae Free sic ll be there

international against Wales free music, witt be, ther

1 October 18 Now pay for it w here

Liverpool, the deposed le aders, .
were soundly beaten at west | ‘ will (be. a Gent, pisngure
Bromw for whom Ronnie Allen} <) iuip repair the organ
toned ith a second half goal] Ana don't start to recant
after 1 ims penalty Start sav i ke

Thousand were shut out at The time drawit
Stamfo Bridge where Chelsea You'll nee 1 proper
lost their unbeaten home record For the Coronation next year
to Wolverhampton in almost the
last minute of the game, Outside sponsored by
left Smith making his first ap-
pearance the eason hit the J & R BAKERIES
winnel

Transfer listed Hassall grabbed makers of

1¢ points for Bolton in their first
away victory of the season at ENRSCHED BREAD
Middlesborough ve

The best individual feat o! 1e £
day was five goals from the out- and the blenders of | ¢

» es " te i
ido, lett. position ee mene J&R RUM A) Brush your teeth with Ipana and you clean

; oi j > Egline- ; ; ;

e 7 Pa eT eaoisuais pa pnd them extra-white, And, because of the unique formula
on. e ac ) . . “fre j , j ent’? i

this season but was much too good | underlying Ipana’s “refre shingly different mint flavour,
for Doneaster's defence in a’ 7—1 | } you fight decay by reducing acid-forming bacteria. Massage
victory. | | Ipana into your gums and you help keep them firm and

Glarke, A. Pierre, ©. Stephenson and N. Pierre, (Samuei will not
make the trip).
weighs 155 pounds, is a compara- Arrangements have been made for
tive newcomer and plays as for- five games, three of which will
ward. He has a reputation as a be Tests. On Tuesday, October 7,
footballer, is fast and tricky, and the visitors will meet combined
is rapidly developing into a first Harrison College—Carlton team,
class forward. the following night will be the
Carlyle Bethelmy, five feet, frst colony match, the 10th the
eight, the shortest of the team, visitors will play College, and the
weighs 180 pounds. He is an old jacst two colony matches will be
and at the game, and a shrewd played on the llth and 14th.
player. He is a sound guard.
The Barbados Team Those who remember the visit
; of the Basketball team, Seigert
So much for the Trinidad team. pisers, jast year, may remember
The captain of the Barbados team their standard of play and how
will be Algy Symmonds, captain parpados won two of the three
of the Harrison College old Boys ¢ejgny matches and the visitors
team which won this season’s ,ne Seigert Tigers played a fair
Basketball Knock Out Competi- g.me, but the Carib Bears team |
tion. His choice as captain is @ jay jn a class quite above Seigert
popular one among players. He is ‘Tigers. and are much nearer
tall, an accurate scorer, and fnished player that the two|
ound up his good playing during teams cannot be compared, At any
the season by scoring more than rate, one thing we cam be sure
alf the goals College Old Boys ¢ js that will witness grand
cored against Y.M.P.C. to win playing it which no quarter will
the Knock Out Cup be given either wa;
The keen competition there was
throughout the season has been | may mention that Season |
responsible for a high standard Tickets are being sold at $1.50
of basketball. Among the out~ while 2/- is the admission price
standing players is College’s for a night. wt with) |



SUPER LUBRICATION
SERVICE

For the Convenience of our Customers we
have further equipped and extended the
facilities of our LUBRICATION Service
Department to take care of all needs.

We are now in a position to give prompt
attention to your Lubrication Service
Problems and Solicit your Patronage.

COURTESY GARAGE

(ROBERT THOM LIMITED)
White Park Road

Dial 4569



A Glazzard goal

enabled Hud- |





MoanincCoucHs










I eaten! healthy. In this way, Ipana acts as a safeguard against
cersfield to retain their unbeaten } a y of which “are caused %
record at Blackburn, and Oldham | on't ler morning and night cough- tooth-losses, more than half of which are caused by a
the only other unbeaten team| ine. attacks of ereeemis or aati troubles. For whiter teeth, healthier gums, follow the Ipana way
; 7 ruin sleep and energy another day
sradford jumped into first place} ithout trying MENDACO. ‘This ereat |
vith a 2 1 home victory over| mternal medicine works thru 6 j
. blood, thus reaching the bronchial
n the third division north, biged. ate, caeee, Caer ates, ae THE TOOTH PASTE..
The meeting in Scotland be-| !tmmediately to remove thiek, sticky ies
. ‘1 cus, UF Heviating coughing and
tween Cup holders —Motherwell | Mucus nue eee et in and nore eos REFRESHING LY DIFFERENT
ind league champions Hibernian | r sleep ae etna
resulted in a fine win for the| [fom 2 0ur cient eek guerantesd. PRODUCT OF _BRISTOL- MYERS, LONDON AND NEW _YO
hampions. Four up at halftime
they piled on another three after i Se *
the interval for a 7—3 victory. - 7 = a -—--—-—— oe
East Fife with a 1—0 away win ’
over Falkirk now have a point
lead over St. Mirren who beat |

Raith Rovers







l ¢



Which would you enti

similay



(Caladium Show

WHITEHALL, 8ST. PETER.
On view daily until October
12 (noon) till 6

20th

p.m.

ENTRANCE 1/-

from

to have,

Kheumatism

BRAITHWAITE
RHEUMATIC i,
REMEDY ?

away from home by |
margin.

|
}
—omee |

“mia ss

methods

overseas

28.8.52-—1n.

You caret have
both ?



fasii4n7

= WONDER WHEELS N° 4

Why Hercules cvetes
arrive in Barbados

in perfect condition

The ‘sata Hercules packing
-the result of 30 years
study of packing for countries
ensure this.
wrapped parts are placed carefully
in strong cases so that they can be
simply, safely and correctly as-
sembled on arrival at destination



The well-



Vig OF HERCULES
PACKING AND
OBSPATCH DEPARTMEN




> ae

‘Hercules

HERCULES CYCLE & MOTOR m conan] ive
S/R MINCHAM @NOLAWO

—.-



) SOLD BY ALL LEADING DEALERS

REPRESENTATIVE

GRANT

Fi

GEDDES LTD BRIDGETOWN


SIX

PAGI



For Women

Only !

And please ex






hairstyling aft

Almond Oil Shz ) 1

3andbex Liquid Soapless wou
Becau ndbox

Now [ turt
Waves and cu
p acle Dressing. Jus

in your own shad
with a thousand ¢

. <
} > » i
a GLAMOUR!

Something else pleases Bobb
here. “It’s a cinch!” says» he
made the journey back to collegs
n the air and in my stride. NO
MORE AIRSICKNESS FOR ME
Took a couple of AIRSICK TAB-
LETS, before and during the flight
Arrived dead on time all ready f
classes. Try AIRSICK TABLETS,
boys, they’re swell !”









SLIMMING 1

self—if you're
paunch of your

‘Do I love my food? Sure I love my
food! Highly seasoned too with plenty
of garlic or onions, and I’m still taking
AN
AMPLEX TABLET a day, I can eat and
drink anything and get away with it. Not
breath
AMPLEX COMBATS ALL UNPLEAS-
ODOURS;

out the girl friend. Since taking

a vestige of an odour on my

ANT BREATH AND BODY
it is harmless yet effective.

pointing out the

Because a Spa



of reasons there are those who

spaced family, but



RENDEL FOAM as the safest, pures
on the market.

instead

reals
finest
woman



a > 1
No Baoan tetra oe You

too will look twice at the widest
range of WINES, LIQUEURS,
SPIRITS and SUNDRIES ever
gathered into one compact spot
THE LITTLE SHOP.

Here you'll find wines from the
sun-kissed slopes of every vineyard,
spirits from Bonny Scotland and
the island’s best—Cockspur Rum;

are






Ss “Do I need a sparring partner?

advantages
BRUSHES, HAIR BRUSHES AND BABY BRUSH- |}
ES TOO FOR THAT MATTER, Why buy avSpa?
brush
stands up to real hard
hard brushing harms a Spa

Mary here chats to many
versial subject of Family Planning. For a variety
against
for those who do believe
AMILY PLANNING, Marvy always recommends
t contraceptive

Vigorous as a young
lad is Dad these days.
Been taking Glucose D
sugar
beverages and on
Glucose
tonic

any
child
take but, it must be Savory & Moore

a oi y irs 18 Qi)‘
WHY BANDBOX

8 yftening ingre-

shlights put into my
v Bandbox Mir-
’ urnished powdet
vave and curl will dance

spells

ligh COLAIRE





ean +7

(ye
iy



‘

Listen to him. He has something to crow
about but so have I. Used to look like a sack tied
round the middl while ago, now I have a real
wild-bee waist love my food so hated diets;
loathed exercise but went on a course of SILF
SLIMMING T/ BLETS, and did 1 lose weight!
If you are o veight, just take a course of SILF

BLETS, THEY WILL GET YOUR
WEIGHT DOWN all right! Try them out for your-
heavyweight
too Pops

Applies to that



Oh no, I’m just

of our SPA TOOTH |

Bristle
Neither

or Nylon
water

in either
wear

wives
—™.
the

in

in
ce-
D is the
man,
can





And if YOU ARE BRIGHT, you'll buy from The Little Shop a bottle
of PERFUME—for the missus! Visit The Little Shop, Johnson’s Sta-

tionery

Building, Broad St., tomorrow,
Sole Agents covering this audacious column
TIONAL TRADING CORPORATION LTD

THE INTERNA-
Telephone 5009,



4:08 BARBADOS 8x33-4 No, 712 RA2778

AS2eP } ropay |

Then youve got tie QUICK answer to



‘ASPRO’ loses no time—it ACTS

—quickly, effectively, yet

leaves

you fresh and free from barmful

after-effects. More than ever,
these high-pressure times,

should
because of its SAFE action.

All Trade Enquiries to:

in
you
insist on using ‘ASPRO'

W. B. HUTCHINSON & CO.
MARHILL STREET, BRIDGETOWN



Made in England by

ASPRO LIMITED, Slough, Bucks



’

HEADACHE
NERVE PAINS
NEURITIS - NEURALGIA
FEVERISHNESS
SORE THROAT

COLDS & ’FLU |

PRICES WITHIN
THE REACH OF ALL

om>that contro- |



away the
blues...

VERY cnlid—so suy ths
BE issenoionsi should nu ve

a rag doll as an outle: tor
his antagonism The tdeu is
that in fits of rage or frus t
tration ne can pummel! it. fliy
it, and tear it limb from limb ,
with a purging effect tha 5

eaves him agreeably normai

A friend who has studied 't

subject suggests that the su
theory aecounts for the temper OF some Nousew've

For they do envugt wet
ind pummelling to puree 4
respectably neurt "Narac’e

They beat They beat a
ind they beat well They bar
regularly and thoroughly

Open to sky
N Sweden

! uch

unr






which 0K afte
things
nfinite efficiencv—a modern fly
3 ulways. always equipped wit}
1 “beating balcony *
This is enclosed on tour sides
OV glass wails. at the top
Open tO the sky
by To it the nouse
. Wives retire
periodically with
their Nates ane
4 ‘nei mem
% wlans tha
went wrong ~-an
thei rugs. cur
tains clovhes an
vediclot hes
With vigoreu
whacks of
Deuter they sens
the agebris
daily life filterin

ROTH Op
| LINK
|
j

AWAY ZO The aStie

ot last night

party WHA}
—ano of tly the crumbs o
yesterday WHACK —ana a!

the week's irritations vunish
| Then when it ts over dow:
| go carpets. clothes housewite
and ull—cleunsed. purified and
in a lot better condition than
when the pummelling began.
A favourite Swedish joke
spout the man who went vis!
ne oat 1} a.m. and found



|

(By SYDNEY RODEN)

The news that butter is going
up 6d. to 3s. a Ib. next month
is only part of the story And
for those whe love the taste of
butter the story is not a happy
one

All over the world, except in a
very few countries, butter is a
diminishing commodity. No long-
er is there enough to go round te
give people all they want.

More and more is margarine
coming to take the place of
butter.

Those whose job it is to sur-
vey the food needs of all the
peoples of the globe — a globe
with 70,000 more mouths to
feed every day — can hold out
little hope that butter wilh, ever
be plentiful again.

No Hope

Little hope, then, that cur
two ounces a week in Britain
wil ever be substentially in-

creased so long as rationing lasts.
No hope at all that butter can
once again replace margarine

Ferguson Fabrics
bring beaut
‘Ss
into your life...
vith the loveliest, most colourful
designs you've ever seen... in
printed seersuckers, cambrics,

voiles and haircords that wear









with an air of freshness



| without changing
for clothes for

¢




hs



OBTAINABLE EVERYWHERE




and wash
colour.. wonderful
yourself or the children.

teenies ; , gt
= FERGUSON FABRIC
= Obtainable from all leading stores,

#THE GUARANTEE carried by all Ferguson Fabrics—
satisfaction assured or the material will be replaced.
Always look for the name Ferguson on the selvedge.

SUNDAY

“ te
a> -~

=
eae

a.
fe.
Cie

a4

HANDY
hively

1ousewile 30
eaning that
dusted down

balcony ledge

adsorbed no
he was
ind hung
until sundown

ma

Busy breeze tas

HAT abdoyt ne
people t c



WwW





ADVOCATE




















nouses a post Goodness knows how many
from a bir Marrages nave been suved by
‘ eni-lnGen oreeze trons ime f aure After all tew
> flutters th io nes y 1 would have mucn
id dust mingles w.th 5 1gin left to nag their
4° and the rhythmic ve cusbands after spending :o9
the pulse or nut tuch energy in beating ‘ae

' ‘ blues “—and rhe dust— av ++



Madam

in
give

not merely on our bread but

so many cooked dishes to

them that pre-war flavour.
Only if we were allowed to buy

butter on a free market now at
about 5s. a Ib. could’ those
housewives with the money get

enough of it.
And, of course, the price might

then easily rise above the 7s.

44od. paid in Switzerland,

Europe’s current top figure.
‘Three Causes’

What has happened? Why have
the churns stopped turning?

World production of butter
has s.umped 16 per cent. below
the pre-war level for three main
reasons:

More milk is. being drunk.
More farmers have gone over to
producing meat instead of rear-
ing dairy eattle.

And 30 per cent. more che@se
is being made.

Beef production rather than
increased dairy products is the
order of the day in Britain. Our
farms, moreover are obliged (0












sell liquid milk rathex than make
it into butter. They are allowed
a higher profit that way. Two
gallons of milk bring the farmer
6s. 8d. but make only 1 lb. of
butter! Cheese also yields him
a better return than butter, and
the demand for cheese has gone
up.

In pre-war years every indi-
vidual in Britain ate, on the
average, 25 lb. of butter a year.
Only Irishmen and Swedes ate
more, Today the figure is down
to about 14% Ib.

New Zealand, which sends 40
per cent. of our ration is work-
ing hard to step un her «
but New Zealanders themselves
are eating more butter. Australia
sent us 66,000 tons of butter in
1950, only 34,000 tons last year,
and now, through drought and

shortage of labour, a bare 6,000
tons.
World Cry
Danish farmers make more
money out of cheese, so their

126,000-ton butter export to us

today. It is simpl
rubber. Its design and

lovely sandal.

‘Joyance' is probably the most
famous children's sandal in the world

strong, supple leather, and thick plantation crepe-

scientific survey of hundreds of children’s feet. It's a

SANDALS

MADE BY C. & J. CLARK LIMITED, STREET, SOMERSET, ENGLAND
LOCAL AGENTS: ALEC RUSSELL & CO., BARBADOS

London Expres: +



The Butter Is Melting Fast

two years ago is down to 90,000
this year.

Altogether we expect to im-
port 259,000 tons from all sources

this year as against 335,000 in
1950.
At home, our farmers. two

years ago made 16,000 tons of

butter. Now the output is 6,000
tons.
So the world is calling for
more margarine.
+ * s s

Nostalgically, a renowned chef
said to me yesterday; “I remem-
ber the time when we could use
butter for everything in the
kitchen — for sole meuniere, for
sauces, for cakes, for all the fin-
ishing touches. It has everything
taste goodness and the quali-
of L iding the ing adi€ its o:
ity of binding the ingredients of
a dish in cooking.

oy

“It is quite impossible to
achieve first class results with
margarine.’

—LE.S.

Be nit
crett Ey

,

OYA

y and sturdi#y made from

shape was the result of a

Ss



e





SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER

28, 1952

_. The STARS *

+

and
De Ds

*

| $c fina
| ARIES
| — 21—April 20

ming ahead
seul.

— Not

so

TAURUS

April 21 to May 20 Dey on

tarian and

GEMINI
%K May 21—June 21

blessings.

|
* CANCER
June 22—July 23 aspected
«x portunity
ecw
* i. 4
«x LEO
July 24—Ang. 22

careful of
Ask God’s

armed i

*«

VIRGO
* Aug. 23—Sept. 23

LIBRA

Sept, 24—Oct. 23 4,

*

*
SCORPIO
* Oct. 24—Nov. 22

-—Tops for

not

*

vocated,

x
SAGITTARIUS

MK Nov. 23—Dee, 22 FO

CAPRICORN
Dec. 23—Jan. 21

x
AQUARIUS
x Jan. 22—Feb. 20

Pleasant

cut a

ry -

Sunday, September 28, 1952

Look in the section in which your
what your outlook is, according to the stars,

* x
auspicious
particularly
whole

—No IFS or BUTS this benefic Sunday.
Be grateful to God and country for your
Pray, rest;

-——Your Moon
now.
for
ernment, children’s and

— Encouraging,

—Mercury’s aspect
all who must work, be
Prey for continued good health for self

end family, others, too.

As with Taurus today, be sensibly care-
patient.
church. Some relaxing fun, too.

—-Friendly
When duties permit, get needed
cutdoor exercise,

Start with

mance, homely affairs, religious services,
charity are on top. Fine period for study-
ing new interests.

Seal

es



birthday comes and

—Grand planetary day, all essential work
favoured; also rest,

recreation, and, plan-
think of God and your

* x

for personal wishes,
if they have a selfish tint.
is generous for humani-
other worthy causes,

rirst,

+
+

work if you should.

*
among planets favourably
This Sunday affords op-
true charity, aid to gov-
civie projects.

eH *

helpful influences. Be
health as you work or play.
special guidance be with our

rees.

*

gives stimulus, cheer;
of good heart.

*
*

needs, +
* *

your interests. Necessary work,

* *

First,, your soul’s

domestic problems share fine aspects. Do
neglect
deeds will bring blessings.

soul's needs. Prayer, good

+

ad-
co
+

ps

*

prospects. Extremes not
Enjoy family and good
church, of course.

* *

indications for your day, Ro-

—Today’s aspects favourable but do not 3
sunction changes for sake of change with-
proven

better alternative. Go to

church, pray.

*
PISCES

x Feb. 21—-March 20 tious folks

YOU BORN TODAY:

*

Meditative,

—Happy outlook for good living, consci-

Tabu needless anxi-

*

usually mild disposi-

worry,

ety. Trust in God, attend church; rest, too,

tion; with strong sense of justice and excellent mental bal-

ance.

Venus is your natal planet and it bespeaks lovd of

beauty, harmony, ability at farming, gardening, Libra has

given us many honourable judges,

lawyers, great physicians

and teachers. Love of humanity makes you highly respected *

and needed in civic ‘affairs, r
to extremes.

=<: 2 2 # ®

What's
In The

ORANGE SUFFLE
| For 6 people: Big oranges 6;
Milk } pint; Eggs 5; Sugar 4 oz.;
Flour 14 oz.; Orange rind; Apri-
ot jam,



Cut the top of the oranges and
take the oranges out with a tea-
spoon. Make a custard with the
5 yolks of the eggs, the flour and
the sugar. Put the yolks with the
sugar, mix well add the flour and
melt everything with boiling
milk, Put the saucepan back on
the fire and stir all the time
intil the custard is quite thick.
Grate a bit of orange rind in it.
Beat the egg whites until stiff
then add to the custard. Fill the
oranges with it and bake in the
oven for about 10 minutes. Take
he oranges out of the oven and
Serve with a few tablespoonsfw!
of apricot jam,

BANANAS IN FIRE

Bananas — Sugar — Flour —
beaten egg —Icing sugar — Rum.

Take the skin off some bana-
nas, put them ina dish and
sprinkle them with sugar and

liqueur (if you like). Shake then,

activities. But don’t go

ligious

Birthdate: George Clemenceau, famed statesman,

keexwrx *

Cooking
Kitehen

pass them in flour, in the beaten
egg and fry them. Put them on
sreaseproof paper so that all the
oil or lard will run off. Dust them
with icing sugar. Take a sharp
knife, put it on the fire and then
make an incision on each banana.
Put some rum, and with a match
light the bananas. Serve imme-
diately,

FRIED SWEET BANANAS

Bananas 1 or 2. per. person.
Sugar; Lime juice; Orange rind;
Rum 1 or 2 liqueur glasses; Bat-
ter Olive oil; Icing sugar.

Take a few bananas (one or 2
per person), take their skins off
and divide them in two. Put
these bananas in a dish, put some
sugar over each of them, a few
drops of lime juice, grate a bit of
orange rind on them and finally
add 1 or 2 liqueur glasses of rum.
Leave the bananas for a few
hours. A few minutes before you
are ready to serve them, take
them out of the dish, dry them,
pass them in light batter and
fry them. Serve them hot after
having sifted some icing sugar
them,

over



























the fashionable woman wears

a K AYN E Pe nylon enna







-







—"
FASHIONED IN

It’s never too soon to choose
and buy) the dress for the occa-
sion say the London designers,
so they are already well ahead
vith styles for next year’s coron-
ation occasions. Here, to illustrate
‘What you will wear” in Corona-
ion Year, is one of the first eve-
ning dresses to appear.

It is the dress that will set the
style for any reception or ball in

he world’s four corners where
shandeliers glitter and cham-
2agne sparkles. Its materials?

Srosgrain and duchesse satin, Tfhe
rolours? White and a new shade

f blue called Garter Blue.
It is starred for coronation occa-
sions because:
a It has a “regal” air but is
â„¢ glamorous it is simply styled but
becoming.



























“

It brings.a touch of fashion to
1 formal gown with its new on-

he-shoulder line and its skirt
with the contrasting coloured
nsow-tieing on the waist.

It has no fussy, cluttered orna-
entation, but just the right
mount of bead embroidery on
oe bodice, and long, above-elbow
oves,

Lastly, it is available on the
xport market.
Designer is Arthur Banks. 10

years in London, he has a double-
dged approach to dress designing.
e caters equally for the flock of
ebutantes who fall over each
ther every year to buy his
‘dream” ball gowns of brocade or
bink and white organdie, and for
is clientele of elegant women.
~ = *

From Head

“Rather early
anish-born ;
is new season's
ire thinking of
any time in th
it a cl
helmet or




All these styles appeag @ Erik’s
new collection, Colours include
bright lacquer red, white, and any
shade of green from _ bright
emerald to a dark Cyprus (dark
enough to be mistaken for black
in artificial light). Materials are
varied, Black velvet, mellousine,
black velvet embossed with col-
ours and long-haired felts head
the list.

Trimmings are few and far
between. They appear on cocktail
hats where bla¢k jet or black
braiding is all that is used.

Most hats have the pronounced
forward, down over-the-eyes look,
eminiscent of the 1920's, This is
created by a long piece of millin-
ery foliage curling round the
cheek, by an enlarg*d brim effec-

like a donkey’s blinker,
‘wo pheasant tails perching on the

a




these exquisi

FACE POWDER -
VANISHING CREAM -

ROUGE : PERFUME

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER

by BOURJOIS

EAU-DE-COLOGNE

28





CORONATION
STYLE-SETTERS

By DOROTHY BARKLEY
LONDON.

hat like two gigantic exclamation
marks.

Erik also carries out successfully
the idea of co-related accessories,
by matching a hat to a bag, a
scarf, or a pair of gloves, A black
velvet scarf trimmed with ermine
tails partners a black velvet pill-
box similarly trimmed, and acin-
namon felt hat with a matching
handbag add a touch of colour to
an all-black outfit.

. To Foot
And black velvet and green (a

dark shade called Pinedew) - are
as fashionable for shoes as for
hats, That is the news arising

from the first press preview ever
given by Edward Rayne (Chair-
man and Managing Director of
H. & M. Rayne). He should know.
His family have been in shoe bus-
iness for 60 years, and he is now
the Court shoemaker.

Other important colours for the
coming months are sherry, morel-
lo, (a deep cherry) and gun metal.
A new addition to the shoe ward
robe shown in the collection are
“bottines’—half court shoe, half
boot. Made of black suede, they
have a contrasting coloured cuff
on the ankle to match the heel| men
(in red or green). For evening
wear, the cuff is decorated with
brilliants.

Rayne’s collection has launched
the “jewelled look” for cocktail
and evening wear. Styles include
sandals with narrow straps, and
court shoes with a delicate net-
work of straps across the toes.
These are in black velvet, spat-

tered with brilliants. Pride of the |

collection is the Italian-inspired
“mule” type of shoe. A_ broad
band of elasticised velvet, fitted
across the instep, is guaranteed to

keep foot and the shoe’s_ sole
together.
Finally, comes an idea which

other shoemakers would do well
to copy. All the styles for day
are made in two heel heights, so
that those who cannot wear high
— are now able to buy a smart
shoe, .



Alanbrooke’s
Daughter

LORD ALANBROOKE’S daugh-
ter, 2l-year-old Miss Kathleen
Benita Brooke, has become éen-
gaged in Malta.

The man she is to marry is sta-|
tioned there: 24-year-old Lieu-
tenant Oliver Vesey Stoney.

He is tall and dark, son of Mrs.
Robert Stoney, of Rosturk Castle,
Co. Mayo. Mrs, Stoney tells me the
wedding will probably be next
year,

Miss Brooke is slight and dark-
haired, lives in South Kensington.
She will be in Malta another fort-



night. She studied geology at
Reading University, is now a civil
servant,

—L.ES.
eemrec vo CIOO DOOKIE SEW me

in

BATH AND TOILET SOAPS

You will enjoy the luxury of using

tely perfumed soaps.

LIPSTICK TALC
BRILLIANTINE

COLD CREAM
HAIR CREAM

1952



The Day the Queen Must Choose A Hat

By JOANNA PACE.
LQ.aswoman, & chojee of hats is
always important, ‘To a Queen,
on a great state occasion, it
vital
And.@p to the

1S

ee

uestion What

will Queen ED th wear when

rides in from Buck-

k ne to open Parlia-

nally for the first time?

purities ave long since given

up speculating when the new

| parliamentary, session will be-

| gin, but it is certain to be some

time before the Coronation next

June. And that is the point
which raises the problem.

Because she will not have been

crowned, the Queen will not be

able to wear the symbol of

monarchy. Yet custom demands

that she shoulg haye her head

covered when she reads the

| Queen’s Speech, outlining Gov-

} ernment policy for the coming

session.
King George VI did’mot have ‘this
problem His Coronation fol-

lowed rapidly after his acces-
sion. He opened his first Parli-



ONE SOLUTION







he

‘ Uudic
hand?”



In my
Edward's difficulties were
nally resolved when an expert
on protocol advise that he



should enter the House of Lords
carrying his admiral’s hat.
There is No such easy solution to

the Queen’s pr blem.

Would one of her lovely tiaras—
for instance, the one given her
by Queen Mary—be considered



ses

suitable? Peer attending a
state opening customarily wears

tiaras, and this might be con-
Sidered a leason for the Sover-
eign not to do so.

The Garter .

ANOTHER possibility is that the
Queen should wear the splendid |
cap and robes of the Order of
the Garter, It would be a fitting
dress, this costume of the most
ancient opder of chivalry, for
the Queen’s first appearance in,
Parliament,

For before she reads her speech
she has to carry out one of the
most solemn duties of her reign.
She makes her declaration of



Man About Town

EXCLUSIVE CHARLES Or
THE RITZ Beau lreatment
are amon the peciaities of
rTERESE B 3E AUTY SALON
McGregor St. You dial 5058 fou
your appointment and for mors
exciting informa tion about
CHARLES OF THE RITZ beauty
preparations pecially blended
powders, for instance, to match
complexions, and cream for
every use. Charles of the Ritz is
ja famous name why mot use

° 7

. * .

WELL — CONFOUND IT ....
no sOap, no blade and no shave.
But this never happens with
Phillips Electric PHILISHAVE
RAZOR at Mannings (Commn
Dept.) Can be used all over the
world, its perfect for travelling
and just as good. for regular
home use. You plug in and circle
the dial so to speak with a
few deft strokes Use it once
and all the time 1 beaut

ifuil
made produc t

ament in 1937, dressed in the ra presented to Protestant. faith, and swears to| _ WHERE'LL I ‘Go, WHO'LL
full panoply of “robes and 1 by Queen Mary do all in her power to maintain | PHONE — yes, of course Pitcher’s
crown, f “I decided to wear, in place of — the Protestant succession to the| 4t 4472 but hold it till Wednes-
One Solution the massive bejewelled head- Crown. day Oct, Ist. They're re-opening
THE Duke of Windsor, as mg gear of kingship, the cocked The opening of a Parliament is|*!ter stock-taking with a full-
Edward VIII, was the hat that went with the uniform one of the most splendiq sur-| Ouse of Hardware, Building Ma-
Sovereign to open Parliament of the Admiral of the Fleet. vivals of pageantry, eclipsed|teriais and Kitchenware. More
before his Coronation. In his “Even the detail of the cocked hat only by a coronation. Andj Often than not you get what you
book “A King’s Story,” he tells raised a weighty point. Should ev a hat becomes a Very} ant here, including Paints and
how he overcame vi difficulty. I enter the House of Lords with Impé6rtant Affair. —L.E.S.| Varnishes and numerous small
ond nee ——_—___—. oc ——- — a boat fittings (you Tornado own-
i e at OOK PO =- ==> <> SS OES ers). Remember, then, open on

Wednesday, October Ist,
. h ‘A ,

| DA with ¢ ONE MAN AND HIS DOG
EVA \ wouldn't have mowed any mea-
dow without PURINA DOG
CHOW. A splendid dog food from
Jason Jones & Co, Ltd, local
Purina dealers (ph, 4403). From
the puppy stage right on up,

AG

= OSS OS OE OOS OS OO KOKO

By PENSANT.

To be responsible for the run-
ning of a home in these days is
certainly an experience, but it is
inal an capers that many wo-

¥ ‘ould choose to go through
were they given the choice. Wo-
men of to-day are far removed
from the simpering affected fe-
males of a century ago. Their
emancipation, begun by the Suf-
fragette movement, was complet-
ed by two world wars, and the
jresult of the part women played
in the last war showed plainly
that under a superficial difference
of character the modern woman
can stand up to most things that
a man can In their war jobs
women showed courage, endur-

ance a initiative, and what's
more, ir certain specialised work
they did better than men. It is
certain that women will never

return to the secluded domestici-
ty of their grandmothers.

Yet im peace time a woman's
natural share of life’s work is do-
mestic, and it is on the woman
that the job of running the house
falls.

Never has her task been a hard-
er one than it is to-day, and she
finds that in tackling it she needs
every bit of the eourage and en-
durance, that. was demanded of
her durihg the war. She encoun-
ters difficulties and problems un-
known in her grandmother's time,
and as she fights her way amidst
the cost of living, red-tape, and
the exasperating result of con-
trols, she’ carinot help wondering,
| if, as during the war, women
might not be able to make a bet-
ter job of some things in Barba-
dos to-day.

The cost of living rises higher
and higher and, while she has
| more money with which to run
the house than ever before, yet,
to her dismay she finds that its
purchasing power is less than
half what it was formerly. And
| this not for luxuries, but for the
plain honest-to-goodness food
that a healthy husband and hun-
gry children expect to find on the
table.





|
_ TWICE

soap
scum.

goes to



FAB GIVES LONGER
LIFE “TO CLOTHES

| Because FAB Soaks
clothes clean without
hard scrubbing FAB-
washed clothes give
longer wear — stay
Tesh looking.




FAB SAVES YOU
MONEY

In hard water much
18
FAB forms no
wasteful

Every particle of FAB
active,

cleansing suds.



VELVESL

UARTET;:

e half hat,

with targe pearl

hatpin costs

bg tid., cravat,

STYLE AND SENSE: Calf 9s, itd are
shopping bag, tn black or red, brella cover,
with chrome studding, Price ! Lis. tid. choves,
39s. 11d. Note the matehing belt. with silk jersey
also in calf, . palms jis 4d,

OOOO OOS OOOO

Oh Pity The Poor Housewife

Had she even unlimited means,
she cannot find the essential foods
to buy. Meat, fish, and. salted
meats are in erratic supply, and
she never knows when she may
hear that there are none to be
purchased, and this situation may
continue for weeks, or months.

Yams, eddves, sweet potatoes
are non existent, and even Rice
has almost disappeared, There
are times when she cannot get
flour, and onions, and butter, like
the seasons, come and = go
Greens are above the price of the
average purse, and while they
are healthy, they hardly fill a
hungry family. Yet the groceries
are full of tinned luxury goods,
Bweet biscuits, tinned fruit, soups,
hams, Pate-de-fois-gras and cock-
tail foods of every kind! And, as
her hungry children ask for food,
she cannot help wondering why
such things are imported’ when
the necessities are in such short
supply. Are the quotas misman-
aged? And why seven years after
the war has ended are there still
controls and red-tape on every
side, measures which were ne-
cessary in a war, but which were
never meant for peace?

All this Mrs. Housewife pon-
ders over, for she is no fool,

But this is not all tnat the
housewife has to endure. The
hucksters, who used to be
her goodnatured friepds, nave
turned sour, and taking advan-
tage of the scarcity, use it as an
excuse for rudeness, and a dis-
play of “show-off” authority
which presumably gives them
some satisfaction, but which only
adds to the difficulties and irrita-
tion of the buyer. The qualities of
common politeness and respect,
with the personal ty with
which the exercise of these quali-
ties endows on those who exercise
them are gone, and their place is
usurped by a shameless rudeness
unknown in this island before,

This, and a “take what I say, or
go without” attitude is what the
housewife encounters as with her
heavy basket, she fights to find a
little food at the various market-



od

AS ECONOMIC ICAL

sherd

yy



wet



wasted as

soap scum.

make

I AE is safe for
est. fabrics,
yur hands.
eaves,
melling
lean,

FAB WASHES EVERYTHING BRIGHTER, WHITER.



SUNDAY



FASB IS MILD —

easy on
FAB
everything
fragrantly





}
(
}
\

OKO CO EOEOâ„¢=:

ing centres.

And remember, her job is noi
one she can leave at the office at
4 p.m, or forget for a quiet week-

end. Her work is recurrent and
never ending, for breakfast,
lunch, tea and dinner come

around each day with the regu-
larity of the rising sun, and must
be coped with. Families expect
meals to be produced, no matter
what,

And meantime, as she reads hey
daily paper, she cannot help not-
ing the warnings given by those
farsighted thinking people, who
having no axe to grind are con-
cerned only for the general wel-
fare of the island.

Warnings as to the cost otf
landed goods, higher in Barbados
then any other W.I, island, and
this she knows helps to make
everything she has to buy more
exrensive, Warnings that this
islend is being left behind other
co atries in modern amenities to
fauciliate trade, such as a Deep
Weler Harbour, facilities for the
bulk loading of sugar, encourage-
ment and practical help in Hotel
accommodation for .Tourist, en-
couragement for foreign capital.

All this and more Mrs. House-
wife notes, for, as has been said
before, she is no fool, and she
knows very well that the neglect
of these
her daily
harder.

life to make it even

She knows that business freed |

of senseless controls, and left in
the capable hands of the business
men of this island would serve
the island better than existing
conditions.
the hands of those accustomed to
govern, and who would

serving and without
tion would

remunera-

of the present day.
There is no shortage of food




warnings will reflect on |

That government in |

serve |
their country for the honour of |

pull us out of the}
muddle and “little man’’ attitude |

Purina Dog Chow is a staple diet

-and I'd suggest you drop in for

the highly informative booklet on
how to choose, feed and generally

manage your dog — from the
Checkerboard Store.

THIS GRAC EFU L SALON is
featuring the most exquisite
neglige of Nylon. Exclusive, of
course, to Bettina Ltd, in The
Village, Hastings and _ featured

among delightful imported Tropi-











for London University

in the supply countries, why then
is Barbados in the throes of prac-
tical starvation? |

Why, Mrs, Housewife asks,
WHY?




‘washes
everythingl

AS SOAP





FAB SAVES YOU
TIME AND WORK
No need tw boil,

| bleach, Pale, 8 scrub or
rinse with FAB. FAB
soaks even heaviest
work clothes clean in
half an hour.

daint-



ADVOCATE

under strictest

Ever

Dre



fectant

cfYensive
ndoor
Kullerobe
you may like ‘to make

Re

tut

vil

KIL
AND THE FAT

Spray





so
LIVE



th
L

KILI
AS

bution

ind
OW ¢

K

is

R

ALADS ..

Und t

1 this Wednesday’s Menu
\RLINGTON
round-
Barbados
and

Par

Y am

lready proved
ciation dinners and many more}
functions are
centre.

hese i

on, t

along!

SHARING THE PROFITS

more

practicable method of cele-

nat best

EM

me}!
$ and o

. SIRLOIN STEAK .

Snackette,

Dial 4730

I dreamed of a bra
ar
idual
el; priced
iply come

with firm support...

matdlenforms

Chansonette...

Indiv



ALL, THE SHORT
AND THE TALL
ROBE Insecticidal
imeon Hunte & Sor
available in pint
»~gallon tins, as well
1er form, As a disin-
ILLCROBE has 10
and is ideal for
ut. “Kill them with
a good suggestion
use of it
BROILED CALF'S

DESSERT ..

tems and many

you'l
more
at the
Marhill St
restaurant
Grill Room,
Cpen from
ARLINGTON has}
popular for As-|

in
the-clock
with

he

slated for this new]

and come on
. . |
1

is i}

brating an anniversary than to}
crink champagne — think you?
its the N. E. WILSON & Co.'s
17th. Anniversary in October,
Remember OCTOBER, when
ere’ll be a jamboree of good
things inchiding newly arrived}
Canadian and American merchan-|
vise. IVIL be new and wonderful}
nad an event not to be missed—
not for a moment!

t

HEINZ,
!'NT KINDS,
permitting Tet

HEINZ,

57 DIFFER-|
KINDS and _ space
me intreduce 17

+f them — all SOUPS! Distributed Circular stitching rounds those
by J. A, Marson & Son this ter- precious curves of yours...
ile variety is on every Grocer’s Lato . 1 i
shelf .First in quality, tops in spoked center cup design gives
value, a soup for every family’s wonderful accentuation. If you

yoyment .

HEINZ ENGLISH SOUPS are
it everyone

old
very

onvince

parce you) b
ares; A,



count
yo

HOMBSTUDY ‘COURSES FOR

GENERAL CERTIFICATE of EDUCATION
CAMBRIDGE SCHOOL & HIGHER SCH. CERT.

me Hall, Oxford, can i aceetthliy aes

Prospectus
rector of St





KLIM is supe eissn, owvaiaaaal
sanitary conditions. Yes, and the
specially-packed tin protects KLIM so that you
get milk as fine as the day it left the farm. Buy
KLIM—milk that you can always depend upon fos

| its wholesomeness and purity!

{3} KLIM quality is always uniform




pure safe

MILK

PIRST IN PREFERENCE THE WORLD OVER

| EV cum IS PURE, SAFE MILK

{2} KLIM keeps without refrigeration

{4} KLIM is excellent for growing children
[5} KLIM adds nourishment to cooked dishes
{6} KLIM is recommended for infant feeding
{7} KLIM is safe in the specially-packed tin

e
{8} KLIMis produced under strictest control

Take pure water, add KLIM, stir

and you have pure, safe milk

KLIM




Dat for the above examina
R.S.A.; Bar, and other
tance is no disadvantage. Stall of over 100 Graduate Tutors. 72,000

ag ee oe Y
WOLSEY HALL, OXFORD isciane

handy for family use.
spors, BRUISES, DR. ryt: LS
ABRASIONS, “Ete. ‘oor PILLS

for every occasion.

want a really firm lift, Chanson-
“tte”
fabrics.

— superior on is for you! In your favorite

And if that doesn’t
nothing will,

u,

Genuine Maidenform Brassi-






eres are made only inthe United
States of America.

There isa maridenform
for every type of figure.

lease mention
es, Dept. DL 9,

Orta. U8, PAT. OFF,








e e
— = 2 ae oe GP ee ee ee ee ee Ge ee ee ae:
~
t
FREE YOURSELF :
'
|
cs from the |
ASEPTIC OINTMENT = r {
*
Children’s accidents quickly re- = !
spond to the soothing and healing —— BONDS OF :
,) properties of Germolene which
’ draws out the dirt and stimulates CONSTIPATION !
the growth of new skin over i
the damaged area, Keep atin (




eee by irreg!

@ Dr, Morse's Pills contain six active
vegetable ingredients.

@ Gentle, effective 9-hour action will not
disturb your rest.

@ Special TONIC ingredient helps restore
normal bowel condition.

@ No discomfort, even for hemorrhoid
sufferers.

A TRUSTED REMEDY
FOR OVER 50 YEARS

BEWARE ofrwornms!

' Worms threaten old and young alike. Be
} ure your family is protected with Com-
atock’s Worm Pellets, Made by the

t makers of Dr. Morse's Pills. BWL-349. }

6 e

inish headache, backache, billousness
irregularity.

Cope, 1950

Borden Co,

Laternat'| Copr
Hesery

eae ae eee oe Be ae eee en ae ae a ee ae ae Oe ee,



OBO SSOP

JUST RECEIVED -

nee”.

332

POTTERS ASTHMA REMEDY
BRAND'S BEEF ESSENCE
LIVONAL
HORLICK MALTED MILK
(3 Sines)

MILLER'S WORM POWDERS
WARDONIA RAZOR BLADES

KAOLIN

POULTICR
ANTIPHLOGISTINE
VITAB
INFANTOL
LOKOL DROPS

333t

(, CARLTON BROWNE

Wholesale & Retail
Druggist

136 Roebuck St. Dial 2813

%
-





WHERE PAIN
ASSAILS...

SACROOL

PREVAILS

BUY A

BOTTLE

KLM

yaa
WHOLE MILK

AND KEEP



HANDY

—

On Sale at all Drug Stores
and

KNIGHT'S LTD.

POOSSSOOONS



PAGE SEVEN






Ae ten een es




























PAGE EIGHT 2 SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 1952
i “ijisisting on- wage inereases at a time oi r @ ; i
ADVOCATE when British manwmfactiirers cannot com- | ing ae . e€ enee }
Bese ce ae Bef pete against lower-priced Japamese~and “fF ~= --"" =" , . TE ag ees De ON: atl nae” on }
Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St, Bridgetown German products. Compared with the | HILE military ¢orrespond- el é Hotcha . ) > re R
Sunday " September™ 28 “1952 ~ problems facing the United Kingdom the , aa Coen’ are giving us "ea 4 Girl With a Problem ARA LANE, the film actress, emeunndee Cate NERY
7 § . . . goo av > 4 5 é j : 3 . . j
—-- Foe problems of Barbados seem quite trivial, |Casts of. ieait abe tke 1c, aaa te le ee | ce ee ee i Oa ae rs
RICH ES - missiles * plained at when Sp@tilagds) = SS
Ab

but to the persons who depend on this lee will travel half way round comes —

the world, there is ; making a pass at a girl? say}.
island’s prosperity for their livelihood jiand worrying. ~ a dante silly things like “If you were to

sv ecen

TP Oe ewes mr

THE only riches which can be distrib-
uted are the riches which have . been
produced. This cornerstone of economics
is neglected with peril by any commu-
nity, It is basic to the discussion of
national wealth but its significance is

vital to small islands in which live hun-
dreds of thousands who have been taught
to expect improvements in living stand-
ards.

It may be politically profitable to those
who gain by such propaganda to state that
the evils of property, mal-distribution of
riches and inequalities of opportunity are
due to the reactionaries who have selfishly
sought their own aggrandisement by un-
derpayment of their employees.

But such statements are not supported
by economic laws.

The exponents of laissez-faire, the lib-
eral economists do in fact err by paying
too little heed to the natural acquisitive-
ness and greed of individuals and their
contention that, if you leave everything
open to free enterprise, everyone will
have fair shares is not justified by the
experience of laissez-faire periods in his-
tory. But with all its faults the system
of competition in trade is the only ‘real
stimulus to progress and to an increase of
riches for distribution. Competition is
essential to remove laziness and inefficien-
cy which ‘increase costs and diminish
riches. But competition must be protect-
ed from developing inte. abuse. This is
best achieved by legislation and associa-
tion. The State exists to protect the
individual. Its legislative functions must
therefore be employed to guarantee. pri-
vate rights and to preserve the sense of
justice and honesty in society. The State
does not exist, as so many ignorant: per-
sons claim, to carry out the will of a mob.
Its first duty is to protect persons and to
guarantee the rights of the individual.
But the state can actively assist trade
and enterprise by lending its co-operation.

The state it has been said (and experi-
ence proves it) is a bad entrepreneur but
it can help enterprise in a number of
ways.

In highly industrialised countries the
State employs departments of commerce
equipped with ministers, collects statis-
tics and attaches consular or trade repre-
sentatives to other countries solely to
promote the interest of its own traders.
The formation of the Regional Economic
Committee and the opening of a Trade
Commissioners Service in London by the
British Caribbean Governments provide
an instance of local governments’ realisa-
tion of the’ ‘heed ‘to’ advance ‘the trading
interests of their own citizens, Yet despite
efforts of regional action and despite at-
tempts, in varying degrees of earnestness,
by individual British Caribbean govern-
ments to take action specifically aimed at
promoting the production of riches in
their own territories, there still regrettably
exists among representatives of some po-
litical parties a feeling of antagonism to-
wards those citizens who are engaged in
trade. This antagonism is supported in
some islands by a section of intellectuals
whose educational background has taught
them to despise persons engaged in trade
in pale imitation of English traditions in
this respect,

Fundamentally this anti-commerce atti-
tude is more dangerous to the future well-
being of British Caribbean society than
the activity of Marxist schoolteachers o1
propagandists of nationalisation or ex-
treme socialism. The West Indian peoples
may be said to share one characteristic
in common irrespective of their national
origins. They are all essentially individ-
ualists and they cannot easily be regi-
mented in consequence. But because of
their different racial origins they can
easily be incited to display antipathies to
associations of fellow citizens who differ
from themselves’ as to status, occupation
or even pigmentation.

Everyone in Barbados, knows how these
divergencies have been exploited by all
sorts of people to the detriment of Barba-
dian unity. ~ ‘

Indeed the very slogan “unity is
strength” has been used: gy one political
party as a rallyihg cry against’a class of
persons sometimes labelled “merchants”
and sometimes labelled “300 year old re-
actionaries.” , : ;

The damage which has been done to the
economic health of this island in conse-
quence cannot fully be appreciated by
this generation. But every day that passes
without an effort being made to inform the
people as to the real economic laws which
govern a nation’s prosperity is adding to
that damage.

Every country in the world today is
faced with the stern necessity of obtain-
ing greater production cf riches so that

they can be distributed among peoples
who are clamouring for greater riches.
Highly industrialised countries like the

United Kingdom are being sabotaged by
highly paid workers who are prepared to
sacrifice not only their own immediate
country’s prosperity but the prosperity of
the British dependent Empire by selfishly

our, needs are of primary importance to
ourselves.

That is why so much anxiety is fe]t by
those who have studied the economic
problems of Barbados (which in so small
an island-are net too difficult to assess)
free from the animosity and prejudice ex-
periencéd by those who seek to win poli-
tical popularity by easy promises.

These individuals have concluded that
too many promises have been too lightly
made by those who cannot perform them
and who are recommending policies,
which if implemented will further aggra-
vate the serious economic conditions
which threaten. To further expand the
business activities of the State in the mis-
taken view that this will add one cent to
national riches would be criminal folly
since the State already is faced with a
Bill for the upkeep of social services
which bear hardly on the community of |
direct and indirect taxpayers. The State’s
anxiety ought to be always, after the pro-
tection of the individual and his rights, to
promote a policy of production which will
lead to an expansion of riches.

A..policy of production can only he
effective if it aims at encouraging privace
initiative. i

State intervention other than for tne
protection of the individual from abuses
will decrease not add to the riches avaii-
able for distribution. ;



Children’s Museum

THE excellent work which is being
done for children at the Children’s
Museum is known to the schools. which
avail themselves of the facilities. offered
but deserves greater recognition © by the
public of Barbados. Ten years ago ne€go-
uations began between the Honorary Sec-
retary of the Barbados Museum and His-
torical Society and representatives of the
Comptroller for Development and Wel-
fare with regard to the establishment of
a children’s museum. :

In March 1944 the Society was inform-
ed that a scheme had been approved by
the Secretary of State for the Colonies by
which £2,100 would be made available to
the Society through the Development and
Welfare Organisation. Unfortunately this
grant had to be paid through the Govern-
ment of Barbados and had to be super-
vised by the Director of Education.

Owing to divergencies of opinion re-
sulting from this method of allocation
there was little progress made until Ist
August 1946 when Mrs. Frank Sweet was
appointed Guide Teacher. Classes on
maps$* were begun in February 1947 and
were attended by groups from eleven
schools. |During the spring term of 1946
one thousand ¢hildren attended 49 classes.

Mrs. Sweet resigned in September 1949
and since the Christmas Term 1949 Mr.
Neville Connell, M.A., Director and Secre-
tary of the Society has filled the position
ot Guide Teacher.

From the beginning lectures at the

Children’s Museum have been illustrated
by maps, pictures, plans, photographs and
drawings projected by an epidiascope with
a daylight screen, especially constructed
by Mr. Frank Sweet. A film strip machine
has also been used and full use is made of
maps, models and specimens in _ the
Museum.
_ Whenever possible emphasis is laid on
Barbados and the background of the
Caribbean is selected to illustrate the
teaching. A corollary of this type of in-
struction is the encouragement given to
children to collect their own specimens
and to make sketch maps, diagrams and
drawings. The subject matter of talks is
varied, The Guide Teacher has spoken
among other subjects on Arawak Indians
in Barbados, The Story of the Caribbeaii,
The Coral Reef, Some Insects which
Attack Man, How Plants Live, Life
through the Ages, Greece and the Roman
Empire.

From the summer term 1949 to the
Easter Term 1952 there have been 9,399
attendances and 2,349 children have been
attended each of four classes. Since June
1952, eight models have been purchased
out of an unspent balance of the . grant
from Development and Welfare. “Imported”
from Great Britain they illustrate the De-
velopment of the Wheel, the development
of bridges, the development of: ships, a.
Coral island, the House Fly, with eggs and
Larvae, the Bug, the Body Louse and iis
‘egy, the Flea and an anatomical chant of
the Human Body, Five prehistoric an
mals have also been obtained and will be
exhibited in a Diorama showing the vege-
tation of their age. All of these anda
valuable contour map of Barbados are tb
be on permanent exhibit and ought to Le
visited regularly by all school children.
Other models diagrams and charts will be
added whenever funds can be spared.

“This very brief account of the growth
from an idea in 1942 to the reality of
achievement ten years later ought to en-
courage the schools of Barbados to make
full use of the facilities provided at the
Children’s Museum and it is fiitting that
the community should recognise and ack-
nowledge their debt to those whase vision,
perseverance and ability have raised the
Children’s Museum to the high standards
it has already attained. As an, integral
part of the Barbados Museum and Histori-
cal Society the needs of the Children’s
Museum are no less than those of the
parent organisation.

As many parents therefore of schcoi-
children who can afford the very modest
subscription required by this excellent
cultural society annually ought to become
members and directly support an institu-
tion which is co-opérating with the gov-
ernment authorities to widen the scope of
education available in Barbados.

(little house in Tooting, S.W.

etiquette.

This is what she has written to
woman's magazine: —

I find that tea is a meal which
presents many small problems
when to use a tea knife, wheth-
er to raise the tea cup by itself
or with the saucer held beneath
and the correct way to deal with
scones and creamy cakes and
pastries.

a

Well, dear, let’s drop every-

thing to consider your problem.

We will assume that tea has

been provided for three guests sit-

ting on the edges of the best chairs

behind lace curtains in a dear
-W.

The first, with the easy assur-
ance of one who knows her drill,
takes the handle of the tea cup
between her thumb and forefinger
holding the little finger high in the
air, raises the cup to her mouth
leaving the saucer delicately bal-
anced on her knee, drinks noise-
lessly and replaces the cup in the
saucer without spilling a drop.

When the cake stand is brought
round, she takes a plate, a tea
knife and a tea fork, selects
a scone or a bun .or a creamy
cake. Before the rationed butter
is whirled out of her reach, she
manages to get a large lump of
that too.

This clever, self-assured woman
then balances the plate on her
other knee, eats the bun by hold-
ing it in her hand and taking deli-
cate little bites, or splits and but-
ters the scone with her tea knife,
or cuts small, easily negotiated
sections of creamy cake with her
tea fork.

* . *

The second, who is obviously a
neurotic, unsure of her place in
society, lifts cup and saucer to her
mouth with a trembling hand,
spills half the tea in her saucer,
makes a wild, panicky snatch at a
‘reamy cake, drops it on the car-
pet, tries to rub out the mess with
her squeaky new shoes, picks up
what is left, puts it in her saucer,
where it becomes a hideous mix-



The importance of a sense of
nationality to a federation -is
explicit. in the second condition
which Dr. Strong makes a requis-
ite for federal union, Because
whatever concerns the nation as
a whole becomes the responsibility
of the federal authority: while the
individual units continue to man-
age their own local affairs.

This division of power, says Dr.
Strong, is the essential character-
istic of the federal state,

Professor Wheare who agrees
substantially with Dr. Strong that
the mark of a federal government
is to be found whenever there is
a division of powers between
general and regional authorities,
each of which in its own sphere
is co-ordinate with the others and
independent of them also..warns
that “federal government is not
always and everywhere good gov-
ernment, It is only at the most
a means to good government, not
a good in itself.”

And he proceeds to consider
when federal government is ap-
propriate, He begins with the
communities, Unless they desire
to be under a single independent
government for some purposes at
any rate the question of federal
government does not arise. If they
are not prepared to submit to an
independent government but want
to control the federal authority
they ought to consider whether
an alliance, a league or a confed=
eralion is not more appropriate to
them. This dictum of Professor
Wheare, a recognised expert on
federal government, is especially
interestigg in view of Head 5 of
the Interim Report of the Select
Committee of the Barbados House
of Assembly.

The Barbados Committee re-
commend that “Members should
be able to serve in the local leg-
islatures concurrently with the
Federal Parliament)’ Not even
Bustamante went as far as this.
In one of his reservations to the
report of the Select Committee -f
both Houses of the Jamaican leg~
islature Mr. Bustamante stipulated
“that a member of the Legislature
or of the Executive Council of
any unit who has been elected to
the House of Assembly (Federal)
should be permitted to retain his
seat as a member of such unit’s
legislature or executive council
while a member of the House of
Assembly quring the first five
years of federal government,”

This proposal although contrary
to the federal principle of gov-
ernment is limited~to a term of
five years’ but thé Select Commit-
tee of the Barbados House of
Assembly apparently regards duat
service! ad no. impediment for
ever. {| } §& a 4 FS “

But wanting# to « be Aander a
single ‘independent government
does not necessarily mean want-
ing to be under.a. federal gov-
ernment. The South African
colonies for example wanted’ to
be under a_ single independent
government, wanted that is to
express their sense of — nation-
ality but they rejected inde-
pendent regional governments
and chose unitary government at
the centre and subordinate pro-
vincial governments in the re-
gions or units. !

Both Professor Wheare and
Dr. Strong insist that for federal

When Is ,
Government Likely ?

N. GUBBINS

swim the Atlantic the water would
melt away.”

Any Spaniards talking tpis- kind
of hoo-ha to a straight yard,
practical English girl would soon
be sorry he ever opened hig mouth.

*

ture of tea, cream, and pastry,
and pours the lot down her new
flowered summer frock and over
the best arm-chair.

s e >

The third a happy vulgarian, Atlantic?

who would be equally unselfcon- ;, pir Ben A ae ze Atlantic
scious in Tooting or in Bucking- But I am not going to swim the

ram Palace, sucks her tea noisily

sut of her saucer while her mouth “tantic.

. I say eef.
is crammed with buns, buttered oesn’t mel! . PE
sconrs, and creamy cakes. oettaalt t t-away

You must decide for yourself
which is the correct tea-time eti-
quette and which of the three will
be invited to Tooting again before
an atomic guided missile, fired
from China, knocks the tea cup
out of your hand.

Meet Dr. Blunt

Why worry your aoctor when .
all your silly questions about
health will .be answered from
ime to time in this refreshing
new feature?

? M awfully worried about my

husband,” said Mrs. Fussy-
breeches, when she called on out-
spoken Dr. Blunt.

“What's wrong with him now?”
asked the doctor.

“He feels sick after meals,” said
Mrs. Fussybreeches

Ho. K, then, Eevaporate.

Why should the Atlantic evap-
erate because I’m in it?

Because you are so desirable,
x0 exotic.

Water evaporates slowly at low
temperatures and quickly at high
temperatures. What are you get-

at
Getti
If yo

” little cad.
paying you ze compli-

it of here this
ng a fine for





but a nasty
But I am

ment. ‘
mime youll Bere
insulting behaviour.
Colonel’s Rash Act
“The woman with a very

“Then don’t give him any,” said pink, flushed complexion
Dr. Blunt. needs a greenish mauve

“But he has gone as yellow asa powder.”——From 3 beauty
dandelion, doctor. Do you think _ hints.

THE same may be said of re-
tired colonels. Green powder
liberally applied to the nose be-
fore tiffin gives it a faintly lumin-
“What causes jaundice doctor?” ous appearance, which is consid-
“[y you want to-know. things ered very smart in military circles
like that,” said Dr. Blunt, “why This reminds me of a: story,
don’t you sit for a medical degree which I have just invented myself,
and find out for yourself?” of a colonel whose face changed
“But what shall I do doctor?” colour so frequently that he was
“Keep him in bed and give him often mistaken for a Stop-Go traf-
plenty of water to drink.” fie signal. :
“And nothing to eat?” One evening he stepped into the
“No”, said Dr. Blunt, who had middle of the road, and the traffic
had once dined with the Fussy- stopped. But before he could
breeches. ‘A day or two off from reach the opposite pavement, his
your filthy cooking will do him face turned green and he was run
good whether he has jaundice or over bya ’bus. ies

he has jaundice?”
“Either that or he has turned
into a Japanese,” said Dr. Blunt,
& *

not.” :

cs dlhalidcsalibianebitibanceitiasabaiate ae ee rant

Federal

1e0 system of gavernment requir-
iy - Kui Hunte oa, That is the first factor whieh
union to be appropriate the units Professor Wheare lists as neces
must desire to be united, but not sary for the capacity to work a
to be unitary. But whereas Dr. federal government. : 5
Strong ieaves the issue here and Then there is community oO!
proceeds with descriptions of race, language, religion and ORS
existing federal types of govern- tionality, But where, will we fn
ment Professor Wheare insists these in the British Carrebens'

that units must not only desire Next, the factor which produces

federation; they must be able to best the capacity for »union is;

similarity of social and particu-
larly political institutions. Where
So he listed some of the factors are we going to find this similar-
which ought to be present before jty in the British Caribbean? —
states can be said to have the And what of ‘the factors: which
desire and capacity to form a give the capacity to remain dis-
tederal union. First he 1
factors which make communities seems to be the existence of a
desire union, A need for com- well-established government but
mon defence have never been the continuance of well-establish-
felt in the British Caribbean: at ed — regional governments —
is taken for granted that the federal government together won
United Kingdom or Canada wil! be more expensive than regiona
protect us. A desire to be inde- governments rae sista! sand
pendent of foreign powers wil) The “al ee tals at esas
Serdly Mains, WOH) | 8 Sense oe aerate Tt aaa te tae task”
nee a eee: me po rites Professor Wheare “of those
sh omeis See ea hs wide. Who frame and work a_ federal

spread as it used to be, In fact government to see that no unit

operate it,




































. What’s ‘that you said about the].

lists tinct and separate? The major one:

six European countries are right shall be too large
now making a bid to form 2
Federal European Union and
this initiative towards closer as
sociation for strength is typical
of a world in which sovereign
independence means less and less
as the scientists discover more
and more frightful weapons of
destruction. .

The units of the British Carib-
bean are all parts of the same
Empire and lie in the same geo-
graphical neighbourhood but
these two factors although listed
by Professor Wheare as condu-
cive to federal union stem (0
have less application to this r¢-
gion than to say Australian or
the United States. :

The strongest argument in fav-
our of federal union is the hope
of economic advantage but it is
noteworthy that the politicians of
the British Caribbean have shown
little resistance to Britain’s con-
trol of British Caribbean trade
during the period of consolidating
their political victories.

If the factors which promote
desire for uniting are not con-
spicuous what of those which
promote the desire to remain
separate in some matters?

Professor Wheare finds it hard
to generalise about these. He
notes divergence of economic in-
terest, and common subjection to
a possessing power, and distance.
But, he; is emphatic that .diver-
gence of’ nationality could pro-

some thifigs while uniting «in
others. This is interesting but
inapplicable to the British Carib-
bean where divergence of nation-
ality is not divergence according
‘to units but divergence within
units,

Similarly dissimilarity of social
and political institutions could
not be used as an argument in
favour of separation since these
are in a state of flux and rifts
exist within the units. If the de-
sire for union exists this will
provide some guarantee of the
capacity to form and work the



‘Our Readers Say:

Woodwork Classes

To, The Editor, The Advocate.

SIR,—Please allow me space to
enquire from Mr. Carter, the
Acting Principal of the B.E.I, if
the Director of Education and he
eannot find it possible to add a
Woodwork Class to the present
functioning Barbados Evening In-
stitute.

We have on the spot the Senior
Boys from the surrounding Ele-
mentary chools chiefly those who



have an aptitude for Woodwork.
The Director as
Committee who sat to study
vocational training and Techni-
cal education may know why
this Report has not beer pub-
lished. But with Trade Schools
in the West Indies, such as
Jamaica, British Guiana ang now

a Technical School in Trinidad,
we could start a, one-sided
innings until we get the neces-

Sary gear to play from both ends.
This would assist the boys from
St. Michael. Then we could make

sable t
duce a desire td be ‘separate in”

Chairman of

important none too small.”
On the basis of this warning I
can see a future only for a fed-

eration in which Jamaica was one

unit, Trinidad Tobago and the
Leeward and Windwards _an-
other, and Barbados and British
Guiana a third, Any other com-
binations would Tam convinced
violate the federal principle and
lead to the impasse foreseen by
John Stuart Mill of one being
master or two being irresistible.

The size of a unit will be re-
flected in the number of persons
it can produce with a capacity
to govern.

And finally there is the ques-
tion of finance.

Units must have adequate re-
sources to support the federal and
regional governments.

“It is not enough” says Pro-
fessor Wheare “that the general

government should be able to Sf
it is essential also,

finance itself:

that the regional governments

should be able to do likewise.” |

Will there be sufficient re-
sources to support both federal
and regional governments he
asks? And the answer he gives
is the one which most advocates
of federation have failed to stress.
“If there are not, then no matter
how much states desire a federal
union and no matter whether a
federal constitution is drawn up
in practice federal government
will not be possible. Soon the
regional governments will be un-
perform their functions
f. they ‘will be.able to perform

em only at the pfi¢e of finat-
cial, dependence upon the general
government, that is at the price
of financial unification.”

It is my contention that even
if the British Caribbean gcvern-
ments agreed to form a federal
union that the insufficiency of re-
sources will lead them almos:
immediately into a unitary form
of government. If the federal
government is financed in the be-
ginning by funds from the United

Kingdom treasury the process of

unification would be more speed,
than otherwise.



special arrangements for those
from other Parishes, the H. Craf
Inspector who sees to the Wend.
work for the Schools could be
consulted on this matter and. Mi):
Carter would be showing t)
public how useful he can be in
an acting capacity. If the ser-
vices of a praciical craftsman are
obtained these boys will derive
great benefits if they become
Bursuary apprentices, and part of
the school’s work could be done
in the Practical Block. Looking
for action, »

PUBLIC SPIRITED.

and equally





NOTICE

To Our CUSTOMERS & FRIENDS
we will be closing our

LUMBER YARD & HARDWARE

} SATURDAY 27th, MONDAY 29th, TUESDAY 30th
) SEPTEMBER for STOCKTAKING and opening again
} WEDNESDAY Ist OCTOBER

WILKINSON & HAYNES CO, LTD.
Successors to

C. 8. PITCHER & CO.



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Dress the







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Palette tinted Taffetas, brocaded and
plain, present with Nylon materials a
thrilling colour fiesta.

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The Better the RUM —
The Better the DRINK



ONE BEST
AND THAT'S |
:

GODDARD'S
COLD BRAID


SUNDAY

Major

i, SEPTEMBER 28, 1952
ROGUES OF THE SEA:

Stede Bonnet: A

Gentleman of Barbados
By IAN GALE

Nobody ever quite knew why
Major Stede Bonnet turned pirate.
He is described as “a gentleman
of leisure and. wealth, living on
the island of Barbados.” Why
should a man in his position sud-
denly decide to become a buc-
canneer? Perhaps it was boredom,
in fact Stede Bonnet is said to have
explained that he adopted the
black flag because of a “craving
for excitement and adventure.”

Sailing away from Barbados in
the dead of night, th: Major head-
ed his vessel for the Cape of Vir-
ginia. His ship was a small sloop
of ten guns, carrying a crew of
seventy men, whom he paid in
regular fashion as if he were a
master making a cruise.

After plundering several ships,
he continued to sail northward and
eventually reached Gardiner’s
island, where he went ashore and
bought provisions as any honest
trader might have done. Soon
after leaving this island he vap-
tured two more ships,

But never having commanded a
ship before, Stede Bonnet was
having difficulty in deciding who
should navigate the vessel, since
he himself knew nothing of this
important science. However, he
soon met up with Edward Teach,
the notorious “Blackbeard”, who
was cruising in the area in his
mognificent ship “Queen Anne’s
Revenge”, and the two pirates
agreed to join forces, “A few days
afterwards” Says Esquemeling
“Teach, finding that Bonnet knew
nothing of a maritime life, with
the consent of his own men, put
another captain one Richards, to
command Bonnet’s sloop, and
took the Major on board his own
ship, telling him, that as he had
not been used to the fatigues and
care of such a post, it would be
better for him to decline it and
live €asy, at his pleasure, in such
a ship as his, where he would not
be obliged to perform the neces-
sary duties of a s@a-voyage,”

Great Terror
The two ships continued to
cruise together and pillaged a
great number of ships in the Ca-
ribbean before sailing to Charles-
ton in Carolina. Lying just out-
side the harbour they captured
four ships coming out of that port
in two days and “struck great
terror to the whole province of
Carolina, having just before been
visited by Vane, another notorious
pirate.” Indeed the people of
Charleston were so frightened that
although there were_eight ships in
port ready for the sea, none would
sail and the commerce of the town

was totally interrupted.

Teach then had the insolence to
send in one of his ships to demand
a chest of medicines from the
Governor of the Province, threat-
ening that if his men suffered any
harm he would hang All the pris-
oners he had taken and send their
heads to the Governor, The pirates
walked the streets openly while
the Council was holding a hurried
discussion of the matter. Those
gentlemen did not take long to
decide to fulfil Blackbeard’s de-
eae and the chest, at between
three and four hundr D
was delivered to the nee an

Soon after this adventure Teach
decided to take advantage of the
Royal Proclamation of amnesty.
Major Stede Bonnet held out a
bit longer, returning to his own
vessel, but eventually he too sailed
into Bath Town and put himself
at the mercy of the King’s magis-
trates.

A short time after getting his
royal pardon the Major went to
St. Thomas where he accepted a





Major Stede Bonnet steps out into eternity from the hangman's cart

with flowers in his manacled hands.
commission as a privateer against
the Spaniards, and while in this
area he found seventeen members
of Blackbeard’s crew whom Teach
had marooned on a lonely jsland,
and rescued them.

Later, while off the Virginia
Capes, the Major fell in with a
vessel from which he took twelve
barrels of pork and a large quan-
tity of flour, leaving in exchange
ten casks of rice and an old cable.
He was able to finish stocking his
larder a few days later when he
captured a ship carrying rum, and
removed several casks as well as
other items in the cargo that took
his fancy,

After this mild beginning Major
Stede Bonnet resumed his piratical

hundred pounds offered for the
Major’s capture, was searching for
Bonnet and Herriot. Late one
afternoon he found their hiding-
place and killing Herriot on the
spot he brought Stede Bonnet
back to Charleston to face trial.

The trial caused quite a stir,
for the Major was unlike any
other buccaneer that had ever
stood trial in that city. To quote
from Judge Nicholas Trott’s final
speech:

“You being a Gentleman that
have had the Advantages of a
Liberal Education, and being gen-
erally esteemed a Man of Letters,
I believe it will be needless for
me to explain to you the nature

activities, changing his name to iw and Faith in
Edwards and then to Thomas, He ©Tist. . . ‘ s .
had a_ “good season”, pillaging And therefore having now dis-

charged my duty to you as a Chris-
tian, by giving you the best Coun-
sel I can with respect to the Sal-
vation of your Soul, I must now
do my office as a Judge

many ships and collecting a great
store of wealth,

But when the pirates reached
Cape Fear River their ship de-
veloped a bad leak and they had
to haul her up for repairs. Final-
ly refitted, she sailed out only to
meet two vessels which had been
sent after her by the Council of
South Carolina. After a terrific
battle the pirates had to surrender
and, manacled, they were made
prisoners below deck.

Bonnet Escapes

Major Stede Bonnet and a pi-
rate called Herriot managed to
escape, however, but the other
members of the crew were taken
to Charleston and tried for piracy
on the high seas. Of the twenty-
six pirates only four were freed
while the others were sentenced
to be hanged,

In the meantime a Col. Rhet,
spurred on by a reward of seven

“The Sentence that the Law
hath appointed to pass upon you
for your offences, and which this
Court doth therefore award, is

That yuu the said Stede Bon-
net shall go from hence to the
Place from whence you came,
and from thence to the Place
of Execution where you shall
be hanged by the Neck 'til you
are Dead. And may the God of
infinite Mercy be merciful on to
your soul,”

So that was the end of Major
Stede Bonnet, the gentleman of
Barbadoes who chose to satisfy
his craving for adventure on
board a sloop flying the Jolly
Roger.



-«

People Of Barbados (XXV)/~

The Governor, Sir John Pope-
Hennessy and his party were
pushing all possible to get the Cori-
federation of the Windward
Islands to become an established
fact; but there was a very strong
opposition party, formed from the
leading merchants and planter:
which was augmented by most of
the middle class. These opposi-
tionists held an ‘Anti-Confedera-
tion’ meeting at which the Hon-
eurable Nathaniel Fodringhan
presided. An able and patriotic
speech against Conted‘vation wa
d.livered by a_ barrister-at-law,
Mr. Philip L. Phillips, who late:
became an Anglican parson, The
wovernor’s party had a supporter
present at this meeting in the form
wao spoke in favour of ‘Confed-
tration. These parties seem to
fave beccme furthtr separated for
the constrvatives formed a ‘De-



fence Association,’ and this Asso- 4

ciation sent two of its members as
c{clegates to the United Kingdon
to interview the Secretary of State
tor the Colonies; these members
vere the already mentioned Mr
Phillips and the Rev. Bruce Austin.
The liberal, Sir Graham Briggs,
was not idle, for he imported a
printing press and started a news-
paper called “The Barbados People
and the Windward Islands
Gazette,’ which puts the views ol
the Governor’s party bifore the
people of Barbados and the Wind-
ward Islands.

At this period there was no
adult suffrage, and only those
who were in receipt of a certain
salary or were owners of property
were entitled to vote for the elec-
tion of Members of the House of
Assembly, therefore, the lower
class of workers were unrepre-
sented. This class misunderstood
the attitude of the Governor, for
they thought that the. reason the
upper class Was so much against
Confederation was that it was for
the benefit of them, the unrepre-
sented class. Somehow, they got
the impression that under Con-
federation the land would be
divided amongst them, and that
the landowners were resisting
this. This attitude led to the riot
of 1876, At this period there were
regular soldiers stationed at Bar-
bados, and the Regiment was
called out to suppress this dis-
turbance, which was confined to
looting alone. This riot is com-
monly called the ‘Confederation
Riot,’ hence the origin of the
local word ‘federation’ meaning
a disturbance or riot.

Barbados Was fortunate in
having for one of her sons the
brilliant Conrad Reeves, a Negro
who from a humble beginning
thad risen to become Solicitor
General in 1874. So as to be able
to serve the Island and to be free
to act as he thought fit in the
House of Assembly without hav-

ing any official intervention, he
resigned this position during this
crisis. It was Reeves who advo-~

cated the formation of the Execu-
tive Council in 1876, but this took
five years to come into effect and
has been part of the constitution
since that date, The general pub-
lie appreciated his services and
expressed this by presenting him
with a purse of one thousand
suineas in 1877. He later became
Chief Justice of Barbados, and
was subsequently Knighted by
Queen Victoria,

World production of cane suget
was on the increase, and there
was a new and potent rival of
this commodity in the form of
beet sugar which was being pro-
duced in large commercial quan-

tities by the European countries.
By the close of the nineteenth
century Austria and Germany
were producing nearly three

million tons of this merchandise.
The different governments of
Europe were subsidising this pro-
duct, and the growers and manu-
facturers were receiving bounties



UNDAY ADVOCATE



By JOHN PRIDEAUN

on this commodity when it
exported, So this sugar produ
although more expensive to pro-
cuce than cane sugar, was, being
landed and sold in England at a
cheaper price than its competitor.
Thus the Barbadian planter was
faced with a far worse loss than

was

that of emancipation, for the W.I
ugar exports to the United
Kingdom had decreased from the
najor percentage of the sugar
imported into that country to a
very small percentage. There
were many protests from all the
British West Indian cao and
this led to the Royal Commission
of 1897. Many Barbadians will

remember when sugar was selling
at nine bits (90c.) per hundred-
weight ex wharf im Bridgetown.
With sugar at this price the Bar-
badian planters faced ruin, and
the standard of living was ex«
low
This low

tremely
price of sugar caused
the v.due of land to decline, for
cvery owner of property expects
decent return for the money
invested. Thus when plantations,
which had fetehed reasonable
prices In previcus years, were set
up fcr sale, only small sums were
offered for them; for the price of
sug¢r just about covered the cost
of production end marufacture,
ind there was no return on the
capital invested. This was the
period when Great Britain was
carrying out the experiment of
‘free trade,’ as it was considered
that to open her markets to all
products from all countries, with-
cut preferential duties or boun-
tues, would lead to general pros-
perity. This proved a fallacy and
ber colonies were the sufferers.
It was this policy of free trade
and its reaction in the colonies
which drove Barbadians, both
White and Coloured, to seek em-
ployment in larger countries.
Thousanas emigrated to the differ-
ent countries of the Americas,
especially the United States of
America, Fortunately at this
period there was a large scale job
being undertaken, this was the
construction of the Panama Canal,
and thousands of Barbadians
found employment of different
periods in the construction of this.
It is claimed that without the
Negro labourers this Canal would
never have been completed, Many
of these, Barbadians have returned

to their native land within re-
cent years.
Those who emigrated worked

hard and remitted money to their
families here, which helped to
raise the standard of living of
those who were fortunate enough
to receive assistance from their
connections abroad, The money-
order business between the Canal

Zone and Barbados started in
August 1906, and the amounts

paid at the General Post Office at
Bridgetown between this time and
1910 amounted to £245,341.16.2.
a

The Census of April 1911 bears
out the fact of this heavy emigra-
tion which took place between
1891 and 1911, The figures reveal
that the 1911 Census was 10,323
persons lower than the figure of
1891, Each Census prior to 1911
had shown an increase over the
preceeding one, thus taking the
figure of 11,592 as the average
flat inerease from 1851 to 1891

Mme the deficit of 10,323 from the
1911 Cénsus, this makes a rough

total of 21,915 persons below what |
therefore, |

it should have been,
this is a rough figure of the num-
ber of Barbadians who sought a

better way of life in other coun-
tries,

The system of education in the!
Island had gradually evolved
from the elementary schools—
founded by Bishop Coleridge,
which were run by the Church
and received donations from the

S.P.C.K. in England and the



‘TRINIDAD HERE WE COME’

@ From pave 2.

crowd was bubbling over with
excitement, devouring everything
with their «yes to remember in
detail later on. It was amusing to
hear the various arguments when
we were passing the Five Islancs
&s to on which the prison was
situated. For, having then b2en
dressed before dawn, we were
able to see everything cominy in.

In Trinidad

We docked at 7.30 a.m on
Saturday. Mrs. Stuart and her
Secretary, Rachael Evelyn who
had preceded us, Hon. Audrey
Jeffers and her neice Gloria
Gibbs and Mr. and Mrs. Albert
Moore were there to meet us.

The girls and boys who resided
at “Faith House,” Santa Cruz

Streets, Marine Square ete.
terrific! I believe we would have show, when he operated the spot-

easily lost our way if we had not light and tried to give us as much
niet Jim Marshall. Jim is a Bar- advertisement as possible in the

badian who is managing the “Guardian”.
Trinidad branch of The Genera)
Agency Co. (B’dos) Ltd, Hospitality
The City Other Barbadians who are re-
Port-of-Spain,

town, is so well laid out, the oq to make our stay a pleasant Trinidad, we were forced to come | i 4 tl oo ee
roads are broad with adequate one were Mr .and Mrs. Ashmore home; time was up. Anyway, we ese — are Messrs. Gar.
pavement, everything looks s¢ Wharton and family, Mr. John consoled ourselves with the fact “mer, Austin & Co. Ltd. It

So gave us much assistance with our Major Knaggs’ Zoo, The Ameri- } gp

can Base and Government House |
Gardens which are not too far
were visited, but unfortunately, |
time did not permit us to go to}
San Fernando, Maracas, Mayare
and other places in the country.
Then,

after a very wonderful

unlike Bridge- ciging in Trinidad and who help- week in a more wonderful place, Northern Islands.

‘Rodney’ To Arrive
Monday Morning

The Lady Rodney which

was

Monday.

This vessel is sailing from Brit-
ish Guiana, Trinidad, Grenada
ang St. Vincent, with cargo and
passengers, It is due to sail late
in the week for Canada via the

huge and enormous as compared wickham and family, Dr. Colin that we had crammed about two Caries a crew of 124, and’ ‘s
with the slow, easy going, quaint Tudor, Mr. Willis Bishop and Mr. weeks “fete”, as the Trinidadians under the command of Captain

Bridgetown. Everyone is always gang Mrs, Erskine Ward. Then of
furrying! It gave me an idea as the Trinidadians, there was
to what New York might be like. Bruce Procope who took over as
The Trolley buses fascinated me, our stage manager and. towards
although they moved so very the end of the tour entertained a
tlowly. One cf my friends just group of us at his house. Mr.

would say, into seven days.

ja Le Blanc,





ay i , ae lived for the ‘six cents taxis’, it Ajfonso B. Delima also aided us ,
sta 0 akfas J ,
while the others ‘went tp their Was all So new to us. by allowing the bookings to he ‘
respective homes. 3 Newsmen made at his Jewellery store. On

Four of us. stayed with iny Victor Hinkson, another Bar- the whole, we found the»Trini-
uncle and his family. Capt. badian who is a reporter on the, datiians extremely pleasan: and
Ormond Clarke, a Barbadian, Who “Trinidad Guardian” took us oM generous, ar { maybe tut a*counts

is skipper of the cargo and pas-
senger shfp “Tobago” plying, be-



thing we did after unpackin 8
visit the shopping centre. Cie
€rick, Edward and ~ Chacon



' HARRISON'S

_

IMPROVED SYNTH
Al THE SAME OLD



a tour of that building. We met for the fact that
V. C. Murray, yet another Barba-. troupe, parcicularly

most of

Weas® Their editorial staff rai can go ei dine Bei
luge, Hut then they have (a lof, Plaees “like ‘Belvedere, , Palm
of ps ‘to covert Victor ‘also Beach Aquatic Club, Blue Basin,







BROAD ST.



“ORIAC™

ETIC CHAMOIS LEATHERS ARE HERE AGAIN
PRICE - - -

ts B4 cents Each @I

The “ORIAC”

@ DOES NOT BECOME SLIMY
@ DOES NOT BECOME STIFF WHEN DRY

IS SOFT,

SMOOTH, AND PLIABLE WHEN. WET

LASTS LONGER AND BECOMES EVEN BETTER IN USE

IDEAL FOR POLISHING MOTOR CARS, WINDOWS, GLASSWARE,

CLEANING

WE RECOMME



HARRISON'S

HOUSEHOLD PAINT WORK Etc.
“ORIAC” WITH EVERY CONFIDENCE

ND





Hardware Department
Dial 2364 or 3142





the
niysel’, are
tween Trinidad and Tobago. First dian and Miss Smith, a lady re- just longing fof thie day when we

CAVE
SHEPHERD

&. CO.,: ep,





FOR CHILDREN
“DIADEM”

CHILDREN SLIPPERS

Also an attractive assortment of Childrens’ SLIPPERS
in Red and White, Blue and White

Sizes 6—10 i

Also Blue sizes 1I—1 @ $2.43 pair

. education is

| try
in twenty year periods, and add-| cries of her
Hansel

heduled to arrive on Tuesday |
is now arriving at day-break on |



Size range includes 4—6, 7—10, 11—1

SHOES for Children in White Buck,
Black Patent, Brown Calf
Prices from $5.77 to $7.74

i

numerous small private schools,
to the present day standard, This
still overwhelmingly

an education in the humanities,
wnicn is an “education founded
en the principles of the ancient
Greeks and divides the human
race into two classes. Firstly,
fiose of superior intelligence or
through positions of birth are

educated to a position of command
and secondly those of inferior in-
v\ellect or social position who are
the workers. This type of educa-
tion was originally designed for
the governing class, so it nas lea
te a society of educated coloured
people who are separated from
their own people by a tremendous
intellectual and emotional gulf

During the first World War, ine
people of Barbados tasted the
fruit of prosperity for the first
time in generations; but this did
not last long, for within a decade
the world wide slump was again
en, and plantations which had
been sola for small fortunes were
thrown back on their former
owners’ hands because the buyers
were unable to meet the balance
due. The business places of
Bridgetown were crippled by this
sudden and unexpected collapse
of the sugar market, and the
whole Island was on the verge of
ruin, so the working class of Bar-
bados was back in the same posi-
tion it was in pre-war days, Many
writers visited Barbados during
the late twenties and early
thirties of this century and re-
corded their impressions. All are
unanimous in their agreement
that those of the coloured race
who had received a higher edu-
cation held leading positions in
their chosen’ professions, while
those who had not received a
higher education but had
understanding than the

mechanics, engineers, sailors, and
policemen. But the striking part
of these visitors was the pathetic
condition of the Negro of mediocre
intelligence who had remained at
the bottom of the social ladder,
for they and their families were
in the starving condition, The
numerous beggars on the streets
was also largely commented on by
these visitors.

What a_e difference to that
recorded by Pére Labat during
the days of slavery; for he states
that the Negro was proud. He re-
lates about his Negro boy, that
the slightest word of contempt
was more painful to him than if
he had been And
further
poor
despair,
took

skinned
him to be called a '
negro boy drove him to |
He adds that this boy
the liberty

alive.
for

of telling him
that only the hites were poor,
and that no egro ever begged
for alms, for they had too much
heart for that Slavery accom-
panied with its concomitant evils
could not break the proud spirit
of the Negroes brought from
Africa, but one hundred years
of freedom and neglect . had
humbled them; for after liberation
they and their former masters
were left to work out their own
salvation on a one staple product,
the value of which was rapidly
declining, while the Mother Coun- |
turned a deaf ear to
children, who lke}
and Gretel, were left
a forest of financial worries,
(To be Continued),

1. ‘Handbook of Barbados,’
by E. G. Sinckler,

“DIGEN

MADE BY BOOTS
FOR

the

in)

page 36,!







7 99
jd

INDIGESTION.



Fresh Stock Just Received

Relieves Pain and Discom-

fort—Removes Toxic Fer-

ments and restores Appetite
Corrects Acidity.

| Price 4/6 each.

\ lso —

| HOO DOO ANT TAPE
54c. Each

| ROACH HIVES

} 1/- Each.



BRUCE WEATHERHEAD
LTD.

Broad Street







$2.99 pair

more

majority

of workers, had acquired a high-
er degree of proficiency and had
risen to-.be foremen of their
chosen trades, peasant proprietors.



|

: ¥ . . = ad
a a a eee

PAGE NINE






















A contlimtntl
le please men



The secret of a superb |
flavour with fish :

T's sivpik, and it’s economi- | | Perrins is as neces-

BOTTLE of Lea &

cal, to make fish deticious | |
by adding Lea & Perritts Sauce
as you cook, You only need to

| sary as a knife and fork
use two teaspoonfuls of Lea & |

| ona table. It improves
fried, baked or grilled

Perrins in fish-cakes, fish-pies fish, combines wonder-

and poached fish forfour people, . ri nd
ye

and what a difference Lea & fuBy with ne

Perrins makes! The secret of
the flavour that only Lea &
Perrins can give lies in the
recipe. For miore than 100
years, ever since it was brought f
to England from the Far East,
the recipe has been Lea &
Perrins’ closely-guardedsecret
—no other sauce makes such
| a difference to the simplest
food.

makes cheese — always a

favourite with men—bet-
ter than ever. Always
put out a bottle of Lea
& Perrins Sauce at meal
times—and please every-
one in your family!




LEA & PERRINS

Lhe criginal and genuine
WORCESTERSHIRE SAUCE









There is Nothing Better
THAN

“MUSTEROLE™

THE ALL PURPOSE RUB. - NON STAINING.

For Congestion MUSTEROLE gives Instant Relief,



MUSTEROLE:—Melts quickly away into the Pores. At first

there is a comforting, tingling warmth, followed in-
stantly by a Delicious coolness; and then swiftly comes
the longed-for relief,

is the modern Scientific home therapy for the Medival
condition known as “Congestion”.

REMEMBER—It’s) MIUSTEROLE

ss
MUSTEROLE: —Is not just another ointment—-MUSTEROLE }
}

tf

i}

The All Purpose Rub for :

Chest Colds, Coughs, Sore Throats, Lumbago,
Muscular Aches and Sprains.

OBTAINABLE AT:—

BOOKER'S (B'DOS) DRUG STORES LTD.

(Agents)
Broad Street & Hastings (ALPHA PHARMACY)

AND: at all other “good Drug Stores”

















QUALITY

DRUGS
and

LEADERS IN SERVICE.

When every minute is precious . ... When the time
factor is the most important . . When the highest
premium is placed on Quality be sure to send your
Doctor's prescription to us. OUR SERVICE IS
UNEQUALLED in Barbados,

KNIGHTS DRUG STORES

ALL BRANCHES




















ZT

When you select |
these Specials Mg. “Ses



vi)

~

Usually “. NOW
BARRY DRIED FRUIT SALAD...... $ 39 $ .32
COOMA 6 sa cep ee cseeetes ves ‘é 1 40 1.20
ONIONS—per 3 Ibs. ........6.55- 54 42
SARDINES—per tin ...... Pees i ek 18, 16
CONDENSED MILK—pe rtin ......... 32 30
CARR'S CREAM CRACKERS—per tin 1.64 1.20

"§~ The above Items for CASH & CARRY Customers Only!
re TE









HUNT’S YELLOW CLING PEACHES—30-oz. tin...... $ .83
HUNT’S FRUIT COCKTAIL—30-oz. tin.. ay 97
HUNT’S ASPARAGUS TIPS—per tin.. 63
DENMOR BONELESS HAMS—4-1b tin.. 5.65
DENMOR BONELESS HAMS—2'4-1b .tin 3.76
AYLMER'S TOMATO JUICE—16-02z. tin... .......660 39
CANADIAN SLICED BACON—per Ib ..... Lil
AYELMER'S TOMATO JUICE—10-oz. tin, .......4.- .28
ITALIAN ANCHOVEY FILLETS—per tin 60
MARZIPAN (Ground Almond Paste) per IH.......-... 1,14
HEINZ CHICKEN GUMBO SOUP—per tin.......... 49
KOO GUAVA JELLY—2-t tin KN 48
HEINZ CLAM CHOWDER—per tin.. ‘ 55
HEINZ CHICKEN NOODLE SOUPS—per tin 46
JAX ORANGE SEGMENTS—per tin... va : 53
“COCKADE” FINE RUM \
°

STANSFELD SCOTT & Co., Ltd.

.

Ne
By







WE HAVE IN STOCK
TERRAZZO Marble Chips

ITE Marble Finished Sheets
AD Cedar Boards

|
i



; . . ‘TUM Corrugated Sheets
mobbed, couldn't possibly be “. ” ” ?
/ ‘Ey ANTE kaneeeelt am ote an ALU M Guttering — 18’, 24”, 30,” 36
=MARGHANITA LASKI pated we cthes Seren GALVANISED Corrugated Sheets
Svery mother wants the best for aE SUTeAy- OAs “OUTS . SARBED WIRE
er children. The Queen and the judge even to tne eg :
Duke of Edinburgh must want, in public* When Royalty is, so to
joing the best for their own chil- peak, on show, we are expected
iren, to do the best for ours as crowd and stare and we do. Establisned T. HERBERT LTD {ncorporated
yell. But we do not lack the ordinary 1860
They know that the way they ccurtesies of life. Prince Charles ROEBUCK ST, and MAGAZINE LANE
ive, the mannérs they use, the sit mobbed when he is pushed
astes »y exercise, influence the out in his pram, nor the Queen-
ives of millions of people, and it Mother when she visits



1ust be their wish that this enor-
nous influence shall be exerted to
he greatest good.
What, then, is the greatest good
at the Queen and the Duke can
ow us in the manner in which
bring up and educate their







V
hildren?

privately
picture exhibition

And as for the schoolchildren
hemselves—well, children always
establish a pecking-order of their
own, and social prestige is the
jeost of things that determine it






SP.C.A. PHOTO COMPETITION

th
Photos of an animal or group of animals.

WITH HIGHLY MEDICATED BUCKLEY'S WHITE RUB

Mothers, now you can relieve the No other RUB has these

“i 5 t a: ys ; : . ize— White Only.

I believe that. this could best it may be argued that Royal misery of Kiddies’ colds so such Any size Black and

achieved by sending them tc t ee — learn a a faster with the Buckley White Rub 4 important Features CO Oe ee evans to reproduce any print
he ordinary State schools—the other children need not, and tha Tw treatment. Buckley's White Rub csow-wihite sociati rese : .
imary and the secondary mod- for this reason an ordinary edu- ne 1 sictelecn, aan-aniiaaie - Prizes awarded to the most attractive photo.

n, cation isn’t practicable. (1) At the first symptom, place « spoonful Entrance 1/-.








ot
of

But what are these things? Buckley's White Rub im o bowl or basie 9 © penetrates deeper, brings relief :
Inspiring Good manners should be learnt in noting Seren eee oe ee fenton, All Photos should be Post Card size sch
, any school, and the etiquette o* oe ty breath corries » . > ‘ol 3 ls more highly medicated, bence FST PRIZE oiecccccccscssssse sccsossssessssecesenrsenncccessrssesenenaneveneaers $15.
The effect would be tremendous the home taught by Royal parents coughing, loosening phlegm, easing breathing. Oe ie eR we gi iP Ae a a 8.00
d inspiring. For the country, as well as by others. te ing vapors carry
Srererel weer nae he See (2) Mew manage cis, back ead throat was 4 on the good werk tanger wie He TN Es tanietopennisosee 3.00
ould have stated, once and for Buckley's White Rub—vse & frealy. Ws patient sleeps.

After School








SNOW WHITE and POSITIVELY STAINLESS.







l, that the education intended Ths external treatment helps break vp Deeision of the Judges will be final.

or ordinary people’s children was AND if, in other ways that 1 congestion, ease sore chest mucies, and _

‘ood enough for hers, don't know, the education of emcourages restful sewp, fhe soothing eet prove faster and more effective _All photos to be sent to the BRC. Ome Heteton
It would dispose,-ence and for Royalty must differ basically vapors gives off keep om ine oper eny preparation you have ever used. Police Station, c/o Hon. Secretary and marked S.P.C.A. Photo-
1, of people’s - uncomfortable from the education of other taigs Se ig S08 graphic Competition.

eeling that the clever children people, are we not asking the ,

who go to grammar schools are in ¥ 16ng. things of our Royalty? £6 206 a .

ome way “better” than those who ™ There’s only one difficulty I . ae aa

jon't. 7 ‘ me dil >

Yes, they may be cleverer, she can gee that really does take} %

vould Bees § said in effect, and may via wae t mr eee ae. * Iss YouR ROOF IN ORDER

eed a special education intended Vould the Royal children be abiey &

or people who are going to, have to share their companions’ life} ¢ $ FOR THE HUBRICANE

ipecifically intellectual jobs. But
or the person who is to turn out a
ood all-rounder; who wants the
best education the country cap
brovide to enabie him or her to







ead 2n intelligent, happy life, the pRINCE CHARLES and his little sister; a pi other's homes for play and tea. ‘ga can r 7
3 § : ; a picture taken when Prin- 4"; is probably » nicest pi We Can Supply You With ...
Puce ‘would have made it clear coat Ane was one month old : ah ee ee ie BEPLACY ; eae
a ii ate Matin. tin think—

hat the ordinary school for the ae p Ne his gaia the fe eee a pepeceears and un joyal children sharing it GALVAN S
at ore oa ‘ n tha he example of the orthodox school where the already ~“ ; or 4h 4 ‘ > Te it i " ,
dinary children was the best a arnt a wend . otitis 'y , e ready gut is it impossible? Is it im- PIPES ote.
hate Goins ~ al, Peanily has proved to be low fees are graded according to possible to imagine Prince re * .

And how nice it would be for

Roval children themselves to
pend their childhood in the or-
inary rough-and-tumble of un-
elfconscious play, picking their
riends from the widest possible

seook satisfactory compromise. Though 5 ar , ible? 4 7

od aid BOS ied ae Ta Woolverstone Hall is intended for waa lie Aa IF it is Te und we, $ A e
wn children, vat gl ended tora ole Pe “a But 38 they? Let’s have a . ae aang: | ourselves} 9 30 Gauge 26 Gauge 24 Gauge
And how nice it might be for . Senge ue ‘ ook at them. whether it oug: o be? al $4.00 each
s, too, to have a Monarch who intellectual one “Well,” some people ‘might And if we answer that it is i oo M.aeeh a a h
new his people as a friend and By the same methods as the 4sue, “Royalty is by its nature impossible and that it ought to be ee ng _
ot only as a King. ider public-schools—the tie, the Sacrosanct. If it mixes with children should continue, as they 8 feet Long — $4.80each $5.50 each

Public School cap, ete —it still deliberately sets Oy ae ome on i eae ieee have at the past, * be educated e

. 7 its pupils apart from the rest, the wi Ose the very uality for privately, to miss the games in
Consiuer what else the Queen ordinary children who haven't which people venerate it.” parks, the explorations in the in 14”, 4", 1"; 14%4”, 14”, 2” and 4” Diameter
ight choose. made the grade, ‘On Show’ streets, the swimming and the ‘ "
She could send her son to one : v B a clubs, the bus rides and every- 0
f the traditional public schools. Gordonstown I can’t answer this objection. thing else that goes with ap faicpniscohcoaieecns es °
what, after all, is the normal edu- it Prince Coaries went to Wool inal Eset eink en,
ation of upper-elass English verstone Hall, all we'd have tote who tim nat soya ty and as y : 2 (THE HOUSE FOR BARGAINS)
oys. iearnt it that it wasn’t money or Veneration are instparable, such Poor little Royal children! $
but if Prinee Charles goes to birth that counted, but brains ae Bg obviously be unthink- (World copyright) ® No. 16, Swan Street A Phone 2109, 4406, 3534
ch school, then the poimt is ‘Ihe ordinary schools are still for © ‘ie, But to others, it may ap- Next Sunday ¢
mad. clear that for the “best” ihe also-rens. p-al for that very reason. THE QUEEN AND HER ®

beopic these are the. best schools,
very ambitious parent must

CHU

y
JOSEPH LINDLEY

The rich sciepust s.16 his
laboratory to become a power
ln politws ... NOW he Taces
a tig aecision













Should he go, perhaps, to the
L.C.C, public-school at Woolver-
stone Hall? I’ve heard this sug-
gested, but it seems a most un-

Then should he go to his father’s
old school at Gordonstoun in



income, and where the pupils are
encouragéd to share in the life
of the country-side around them?
This might be a good answer—

the disadvantages of send-
ing Royal children to ordinary

if

it

It will be objected
Royal cnilaren

that tne
would be stared



principles with dislike, even con-

empt,
T.V., Too
Being a bachelor, the Prof. lives
in college, and Christ. Church is
his real home. Thither he repairs







RCHILL’S PROFESSOR

{t wou.d be absurd io pretend
ibat the Prof. has any deep
«..owleage
ths Britush people.

ccuege and the English country

of the greamess of tude.
Hus world has
a@ivays been that of the Oxtoru

outside school hours?

Other children wander about
with their friends, go swimmin.,
go exploring, drop in at each

Charles and Princess Anne bring-
ing back friends to tea, dropping
in casually on their friends—yes,
friends of all classes?

ADVISERS
by J. Chuter Ede, M.P.

services for which the nation wi.:
ever owe a deep debt of grati
As for the Prof he has always
regarded Mr. Churchill with
veneration bordering upon idola-

a






WHAT sort of person is Lord most week-ends. house. Admittedly tnese are not try. Woe betide the untortunat
herweli, the mahrwho was Mr. Life for the resident fellow of = same—thougn perhaps they siranger who is rash enough to
purchiil’s closest adviser in the an Oxford or Cambridge college ° erlap more at the Proi’s col- :nake in his presence some Uun-
Feceut wat, amd who to-day a: is a curious mixture of discom- !¢;¢ than elsewhere—but they favourable or ill-informed re-
aymaster-General possesses fort and luxury, If the buildings hve in common a certain de- tnark about the Prime Minister
kuch vague, myst@sious, but re- are venerable, so, all too often, tcchment from the world in He will soon discover a_ shar]
uiedly iar reaching powers? is the plumbing. Rooms may be Wich the majority of men spend claw concealed bebind the Prof’
Professoy Lindemmenn, hig name spacious and dignified. They are ¥ sir days. velvet urbanity.
before Mi. Churcitll made him apt also to be damp = and ims remoteness would be a Th lis
p peer in 1941, has been for more iraughty, But the Prof's, own lous Gesect in sOMeone whos ! Fp e Kealist
han Protessor of Ex- feur-room set escapes these dis- s ugat to be a Nawuona, leade WHA'T are we rrof’s rea.
erim Philosophy » the “dvantages, He has seen to it that and to base his power upon mus» views on peoliucs? basy pan
Iniver of Oxiord. The title, ey do mot Jack reasonabl« support But it te brot., ever ceas, hign town ideas, exc
like most. Oxtord titles; ‘is. ar- amenities of life, even includin; Bica such ambitions they ihavé bis COmempl. He 1S essed,
chaic and misleading, The “Props” * ie ee set. bl x ag since vanisned, His one «a realist and a scepuc, Here
las he is always calied by his Tapia orn Mor sivase’ i venture in the teid of popuiar differs sharply from tnose aisuu
friends, is an eminent physicist, {2700 a oe g -ecuoneering —- an attempt io guisned scientisis whose enuu-

land controls the Clarendon Lab-
oratory, Oxford’s centre of phys-
ical research, Ilis salary is just

sollege. The college provides ser-
vice, and produces meals fron
the college kitchen, After a gooc
—and free—dinner in Hall, the





ailure.

siand in 193/ at 4 by-elecuuon foi
hne Universily—was a disastrous

ence in thelr own subject 1S Oily

surpassed by tneir puilibilily
uid OUners,










»@

SEASON ?
e




We have a limited quantity of - - -
BEST QUALITY ENGLISH

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AT A BARGAIN PRICE CASH

LOODDOOLOOOHGHHOH HOOD















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On the whole the Prof beileves
in efficiency rather than liberiy.
authority rather than democracy.
if he hates Socialists it is not so
much because they menace iree-

over £2,000 a year.

His appointment is for life, and
he | not relinquished it by
joining the Cabinet. The univer-
sity has given him a year’s leave










ian lh a A | Mh Ba ae

ithe Prof’s career in politics
ous nothing to do with popular
upport, It is based on some-
uing Which ever since 1940, has

fellows retire to the Senior Com
mon Room where they enjoy th:
old fashioned pleasures of vin
tage port (which. they pay for
dessert and conversation.










ef absence, which is due to expire ween even more valuable, the aom as because they combine the
in the autumn, The Prof. seldom dines in Hal.gsupport of Mr. Churchil. two things that he most de.e%ts,

The Prof. is essentially a cos- but after dinner in his rooms hx = ad , c.oudy idealism and administra~
mopolitan, His family originated usually walks to the Seniog) Their friendship is of long tive inepiitude, They are right
from Alsace, He was cducatei Common Room, invariably car-élanding. Mr, Churchill greauy tg regard him as one of thei:
at ihe University of Berlin, He iyimg a roiled umbrella and a4 aamured the courage ald cOn- qeadlest and most uncompromis-
speaks French and German alike bow.er hat even for that shor, ppdence displayed by the Prof as ing foes, :
pertectly. journey. In these agreeable sur-—@2 experimental pilot in the The Prof has never been more

in his younger days, before voundings he is the best of com- ~i9l4-18 war. Convinced on theo- powerful than he is to-day. How
the 19/4-18 war, he was a first- pany. No one can converse scgretical grounds that the propel jong will it last?
class tennis player. His rooms casily ‘With guests, grand orgWay to counteract spin in’ alr ‘The university may well feel
are full of the silver trophies humble, draw them out so well¥eraft was the precise reverse 0! unable to fxtend his leave of
that he won. and give them the flattering sense;#hat preached by authority, th absence, If so, he will have tc

The Prof. is a man of very con- that what they say is importanirof took up an airplane, delib- ¢hoose, during the recess, be-

iderabe ivherited wealth, But and interesting. wrately put it into a spin, and tween politics and Oxford.

life, if not exactly Sparten, Oxford World ‘triumphantly demonstrated the ;

‘ould hardly be termed luxurious.. Apart from Socialism, affecta- ¢orrectness of his calcucations. The Prof accepted office last B bl )

itis rooms at Christ Church are’ iion and pomposity are the only Mr. Churchill has always October with real reluctance. ( y cable
some would say hid- things which the Prof. does not Fespected the Prof’s great ability Those 2, am ae nn
furnished. He is a teé= easily tolerate. A guest once — ‘are among scientists — of hard to believé, despre S) -
a vegetarian, and a -ententiously Shacrved? HA one expounding complicated techni- loyalty to Mr. Churchill, that the GRAN PRIX ACF. ROUEN FRANCE

non-smoker; although for him ghould not kick a man when he Cal subjects in terms intelligible Prof will prefer the fleeting and
this ebstinence is a matter, no: is down, “ On the contrary,” the to the layman, Mr. Churchill precarious joys aes por h
of morals, but of taste. Indeed, Prof. is said to have replied, has given ample testimony to the to the place whic as bee us) s Fi Poh
the Prof. regards those whe “it is the only time to do it, for services rendered by the Prof as real home for more than 30) j First. ASCARI driving FERRARI
mortify the flesh upon mors’ then he can’t kick you back.” his scientific adviser in the war, years. —LES. i



i Second. FARINA driving FERRARI
Third. TARUFFI driving FERRARI

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seven induce maurcry bedeee erpuesst HAMS GELATINE $ M
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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 1952




bo







SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 2

EDUCATION NOTES:

Shufiling

LAST WEEK I comme





19:

‘Teachers

nted on the possibility of the

appointment of one lady to the headship of the Richmond

Girls’ School and later on her refusal.

I also pointed out

that the appointment of a headmaster of the Boys’ School |

should present no difficulty.

On Saturday an advertisement
appeared in tne Press calling for
applicants tor the post of Head-
master of the Boys’ School; and
qual adavertisement calls tor a
Graduate or qa non-Graduate to
fil the post which was not taken
up by Mr. Broome.

I am left to wonder now why
an advertisement was necessary.
The School is still an Elementary
School because the= boys must
leave at fourteen and again be-
cause there are no fees. Ele-
mentary education is the only
one free in this island therefore
I am fortified in my view that al-
though it has been called a
Modern Secondary School it is
a continuation of e.ementary
education. Why then this adver-
tisement? In the case of the
Wesley Halil Boys’ School which
was vacant after Mr. Broome had
been promoted, there was no ad-
vertisement but Mr. Clarke who
had been head of the St. Leon-
ard’s Boys’ School was promoted
to the Richmond School, This is
as it should be if elementary
school masters should not be
robbed of the plum of their ser-
vice. I hope that a headteacher
of an elementary school wiil be
promoted although the mere fact
of my writing this might mili-
tate against such an appointment.
I do not see why a teacher who
has laboured in the small school
cannot be appointed to the plum
of the servite without all this
ado. And the Director himselt
has set a precedent because both
of the appointments made to
these new schools were ele-
mentary schoo! teachers and the
age-limit according to the same
Advertisement remains at four-
teen years. it must still be an
elementary school. This juggling
with personnel does the admin-
istration no good; and [| hope I
will be able to congratulate Mr.
Director on the promotion of one
of those members of the pro-
fession whom he says has been
labouring under great difliculties.
It would be an. inspiration to
many others to look forward to
being “top of his class.”

I should like to know

this Class IV in the
ment means if it is
created for the
stances.
‘ I might be wrong but I thought
that Class IV had been abolish-
ed. I should like to have this
information from any source and
I acknowledge my thanks be-
forehand.

Ancther Appointment

But I am ajiraid , shall have
to be as dissatisfied with the at-
titude of the administration to-
wards the Girls’ School. If Mrs.
Griffith is to retire shortly then
there is reason to suppose that
another headteacher of an ele-
mentary schoo] will succeed her,

what
advertise-
a new one
present circum-

This grabbing of teachers from
the Secondary Schools will do
no good and especially where

the appointee has never admin-
istereq a school before. This is a
new School of a new type, a new
departure in educational policy
and so the experience of a seas-
oned headteacher will be needed
to pilot the school through its
early and difficult stages. It i
true that Mrs. Griffith, capable
and efficient as she is, will begin,
but as soon as a new head is, ap-
pointed then the pupils and the
staff will have to adjust them-

| They'll Do It Every Time

G G77

ry AWAYP DID THAT BUNKHOUSE ©0. YZ

“fT SAY,VIC,OL’ Boy! WiLL
| YOU CHECK ON THIS RIGHT

ORDER GO OUT YET P I SEE

|| BY THE PS.ON THEIR LETTER :
-\ THEY WANTED LEFT-HANDED / WAS HERE.

\ BOTTLE OPENERS": WE'LL
HAVE TO OPEN THE,



MOSGUITOES
WITH NEW



seives to the new approach. A
school like every other institution
needs a good start and only ex-
perience can help it.

It is rumoured that Miss Dan
Inniss of the St. Michael’s Girls’
has been offered the appoint-
ment, I do not know if she will
accept. And let me here say at
once that I intend her no harm.
I do not desire to deny her the
fruits of long years of teaching
and the _ prospects of better
salaty. But Miss Inniss is too
useful at St. Michael’s to be re-
moved.

She has just sat her B.A, in
Trinidad and is the Spanish
Teacher at her school, In fact she
is the only one, As far as I under-
stand it she is the only Spanish
Teacher at St, Michael’s. Why
then move her to a school where
it is easy to get someone else
to do the same job, I made the
same comment in the case of the
first appointment and that of Mr.
Jarvis from Harrison College to
the Inspectorate of the Elementary
Schools. I hope that rumour in

this case will be proved to be the |

proverbial “lying jade.” ;

Other appointments this
school call for comment where
people who have never taught in
their lives are appointed perma-
nently on the staff when Supply
Teachers had their service term-
inated at other schools but I
shal] desist to-day from ‘aking
up the point

to

The point I want to make to-day
is that the removal of teachers
from the Secondary, schools to
take part in the elementary schools
1s not doing the service any good.
There has been a constant cry for
teachers in the Secondary Schools,
Harrison College, according to the
Report of the Director of Educa-
tion himself, had 19 appointments
in three years; and the new Coler-
idge Parry School needs many
teachers, to say nothing of equip-
ment, Queen’s College has been
spared the loss of members of its
staff and Combermere has no less
than four masters on leave.

I note that Mr. Bayne a most
efficient master at Foundation
School was not selected for the
post of Harrison College but Mr,
Davis and his wife were brought
fresh from the University and)
both put in the specialist class|
with their passages paid out and}
to be paid again in three years |
possibly, Mr. Bayne would have!
been here permanently. |

If Miss Inniss is taken from St.)
Michael’s and sent to Richmond}



MR. GEORGE LAMMING



The Child, The Parent
And The Teacher

The Second Series of the course
on “The Child, the Parent and
the Teacher organized by the
Extra-Mural Department of the
University College of the West
Indies, begun at Scout Head-
quarters at Beckles Road, on Fri-
day 26th, when Miss Betty Arne
Social Welfare Officer, took the
Chair and Mr. E. C. M. Theobalds
spoke on “The Development of
Moral Ideas in the Child,

Mr. Theobalds said “It would
not be inappropriate to begin our
study of this question by asking
ourselves what is man’s equip-
ment at birth for moral develop-
ment. Does he come into the
world equipped like the other
animals only with a_ bundle of
instincts which, but for the train-
ing which he will receive later,
have the power of making him
in words of Aristotle, “the most
unholy and the most savage of
all the animals, and the most full
of lust and gluttony?” Or is he a
thing of purity and _ innocence

Godwin. Rousseau’s position was
that original impulses are good
because they are natural, The
child cam do no wrong; its in-
stinets are lovable; it can never
misuse the period of childhood, Its
soul is always at peace and a
smile continually on its lips.
Men become evil only as they
leave uncontaminate Nature.

The opposite view may be at-
tributed to those who think in
terms of original sin, to be atoned
for by punishment inflicted either
by the Supreme Being or by an
earthly master, Punishment either
actual or imminent must be the
principal instrument for making
children good, The exponents of
this view sought support from a
passage from the Bible’ with
which we are all familiar, even
though the other side pointed out
that the son of its author (who
presumably applied it) turned
out very badly, losing his inheri-
tance as a result. At about the
same time that Rousseau was



then it will be necessary to look|
for another Spanish Mistress
whereas One appointment from
the ranks of the elementary}
schools would save all the)
shuffling of personnel, This exodus)
and replacement of teachers from}
the secondary schools is bound to
lower the standard of the schools}
because it disturbs the continuity |
and robs the school of the influ-|
ence of the teacher over a period |
of years, This is likely to bring
as great, if not greater, dissatis~|

faction to parents who now pay
high fees at these secondary
schools as the recent changes

have brought to the elementary
schools. I hope that it will not
be necessary for me to make any
further comment on this point and
that I can go on to make construc-

tive suggestions besides that of
having a commission of enquiry. |

dBase.

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coming perfect from the hands
of the Creator but degenerating
in the hands of man, as Rousseau
claims? And supposing we take
the middle view that he is born
neither angel nor beast, but some-

preaching that force was mis-
chievous, that there is no com-
pulsion with anything but love,
that the only habit the child
should form should be the habit
of forming no habit, and God-

thing of each one, would it be win was expressing his firm
true to say that those amounts faith in the perfectibility cf
vary according to the stock from human reason, there were men
which he comes, in other words, as eminent as John Wesley who
that there 1s a hereditary moral could write words like these
endowment which is likely to ’

shape the whole course of his life ‘Break your child's will in
except in so far as it can be it may not perish

' j Break its will
modified by the various educé= pjiainiy—or ¢

rder that

as soon ¢
even before

it can speai
it can Fpea<

tive agencies in the environment, at all. It should be forced to do ws
of which’ the Home and the i ee, even if you have to whip it
a pec s ' en times running.”

School are the most important? freak its will te’ order that tts soul
Questions such as these have may live

been asked for centuries and the
answers have ranged from the These views are irreconcilable

and perhaps desire from the op-

the most eminent champions of posite temperaments of thei:
what might be called “the an- advocates, they show how human
gelic view" were Rousseau and temperaments can vary widely.
ye And tempt us to theorise thot

the native moral endowment of

children exhibits as great a vari-
ety as their native mental en-
dowment; that moral sensibiljis
is a varying trait, the measure
of which may be formed to bx

By Jimmy Hatlo











ViC AIN'T GOT ENOUGH
TROUBLE’ EVERY ORDER

7 TROUBLE ~E' TRAINS ARE distributed in accordance with

H SLOW AND THE CUSTOMERS the law of variation, forming a

DON’T KNOW WHAT THEY curve of chance in much the

WANTED IN THE FIR: same way as Intelligence o;
PLACE---- ‘d Height.”

BER ass SS WE OUGHTA After discussing how far moral

DUMP HIM IN quaiities may be considei eu

A BOX AN’ SHIP uereditary Mr. Theobalds weue

HIM TO SIAM :**~ on to say — “hus habits whicn

ITD SAVE THE | J are the core of character have

T] FIRM PLENTY their foundation in the instinc-

HEADACHES] | tive impulses with which we

were born. It may be true that
habits however good may grow
to such extent as to justify their
being described as unconscious
in which case they may cease 10
have any moral significance.
People who think with Pascal
that true morality consists in
“right thinking” will be inclined
to attract less importance to
habit and Plato has pointed out
that virtue which was a matte:
\pof habit only without philosophy
| }was not enough to the great mas:
of human beings, However the
road to right living seems to be
the. formation of wood habit
This is the practical objective of
the school and the = averare
parent. We will accordingly now



| Harey pays AND |
NIGHTS IN THE HURRY |
= DEPARTMENT=*-=



E
ED RADZINSKI.

812i BURHOLME AVE., |

PHILA. Il) PA.



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TUESDAY

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STOCK-TAKING

MONDAY Sept:

Wednesday Oct:

A. BARNES & CO., LTD.

OCATI

In The



USED TO
DREAD
WORK

My Skin ~~

By GEORGE LAMMING




He Lost the Pains inhis Arms

No wonder this man dreaded |
going to work, for rheumatic |
pains in his arms made it torture |
to use them. Yet to-day he feels |
fitter than ever and work is @ |

|

A recent issue of The Times |
Literary Supplement devoted a}
lengthy article to a consideration |
of “a new generation of West In-
dian’ writers, which may well |
bring to English literature fresh |

and vital qualities.” There can| pleasure, as he tells in his letter 1
be no doubt about the fresh and “] had been suffering from
vital qualities displayed by IN| pyeumatism very badly and had

THE CASTLE OF MY SKIN, the
first prose book of a young man |
already known as a poet in his;
native West Indies and not un-
known here. George Lamming
was born of mixed African and
English descent twenty-four years

such pains in my erms I scarcely
knew how to use them. Then I
was told to try Kruschen Salts,
and after using one bottle I
found relief. So, of course, I have
kept on with it, am now thor-
oughly better and have never felt
so fit for years, I used to feel

ago in Barbados, whose inhabi- nd sluggish, but now
tants, whatever their colour, are Spy pogglomn instead |
proud to think of their island as| of 9 dread.”--S.B

“Little England”. “Little Eng-

wah +t stiffness of
land” is the subject of George ae ene eae. |
Lamming’s remarkable book, t

by deposits of excess uric acidin |
the muscles and joints, Kruschen
stimulates the kidneys and other
intestinal organs to regular |
healthy action so that all the
excess uric acid is expelled
through the natural channels,
When that goes, aches and pains
go too. Freshness and vigour
are restored

If you are troubled with rneu-
Kruschen a trial

which might perhaps be describ-
ed as something between a novel
and an autobiography. It is a
singularly rich book, rich in the
quality of its writing, in humour,
passion and compassion. George
Lamming recreates in all its sim-
plicity and—for us—its strange-
ness the whole life of a village
in Barbados during a period of



change, roughly from 1935 to| matism, give er

as: a village that, at the be- or i oe str
gimning of the book. is still liv- all Chemists and S .

ing in a feudal relation to the} —— i js {

white planter’s estate on the hill
but which, before the period
ends, is to know strikes and riots;
and change of ownership. Some
of the scenes of boyhood will ir-
resistibly recall HUCKLEBERRY
FINN; others may well remind
the reader of Mr, Dylan Thomas's
PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST AS
A YOUNG DOG. There is a
whole gallery of characters who




Rub away the pain-/

ful torment of muscu-
lar sprains and bruises.
A.l, ite Liniment 4
trates to the source of the
pain. Its soothing warmth

‘

SPDDDI-PPIPRORPPOOOODVGY HP OYE D-H

THE BARBADOS ELECTRIC SUPPLY

PAGE ELEVEN -

el





IMPORTANT NOTICE

Electricity Supply.

WE BEG to notify our Customers that a TOTAL

SHUTDOWN of the Supply will be necessary be-
tween 12 Noon and 3 p.m. on SUNDAY 28TH SEPTEM-
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Further work will be necessary on subsequent
Sundays and Consumers will be duly notified.

CORPORATION LTD.

Vv. SMITH,

General Manager.

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insinuate themselves into the af-
fections: “Ma” and “Pa’, the old-
est inhabitants; the radical vil-
lage cobbler, whose oracle is Mr.
J. B. Priestley; Mr. Foster and
Miss Foster; the hero’s mother—
a most moving representation
this; and the boys Trumper and
Bob and Blue Boy. With a loving
detail that never sentimentalises






or falsifies, Mr. Lamming evokes y x
a way of life which had dignity YOUSE 3 |
and a turbulent humanity. It ¥4

BARBADOS %
%,

HASTINGS,
Daily and Longterm Rates

is
not until the end of the book,
when the hero meets a friend re-

turned from the United States, quoted en request.
that the problems of face and Permanent Guests
colour cast their shadows over welccme.

the scene. IN THE CASTLE OF

%
; Dinner and Cocktail
MY SKIN is at once poignant and

Parties arranged.
J. H, BUCKLAND
Proprietor.

LPL LEELA

delightful, and beautifully writ-
ten, “Little England” is fortu-
nate in having so gifted an in-
terpreter as George Lamming,
and “Big England” will recognise
in him as original and mature a

talent as has appeared for many
years.

T0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

1953
RAPHAELS ALMANAC









consider what the moral outfit

of the pre-school child might (Prophetic Messenger and
be, Weather Guide)
Mr. Theobalds dealt. sts i
* cneobalds dealt stage by Also the above combined

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LIMITED.

Registered 3 April, 1903.

The Company invites public subscriptions at par
for FIVE PER CENT CUMULATIVE PREFERENCE
SHARES of £1 each of an intended issue of £50,000.

This issue forms part of an authorised capital of
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carrying a fixed cumulative preferential dividend at
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for the time being paid up thereon, and ranking both
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Forms of application for shares and particulars of
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The subscription list will open on the thirteenth
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eighteenth day of October, 1952.

By Order of the Board,







stage with the development of 4 oPHEME
the moral sense in the child both | 2 sk rapa
in home life and school life. With =
the infant regularity was an im if

JOHNSON'S
STATIONERY

portant need, especially in cuce
matters of food and sleep. Witn
regard to obedience, Mr. Theo-
balds contrasted the views of
Rousseau, who = said Nobody
has a right, not even a father, to|
command a child to do a thing,
with the patria protestas of tic
Romans which gave the fatner
powers of life and death, at ieas! \
in theory, The parent who was
loving yet wise and firm, would
find that the child in the long run

was glad to have formed the
habit of obedience. At schoo!
the child becomes a member o!

a larger society; his social educu-
tion has begun and social educa-
tion is moral education, Teach -~
‘g at this stage was supplemen:-
ed by .eligious instruction, With-
out belief in the fatherhood of
God and its corollary the broth-
erhood of man, the child was leit
with a purely materialistic phil-
osophy. There should be discrim-
ination in selecting subjects fx

study from the Bible. Stories
like those of the friendship of
David and Jonathan, and the

fidelity of Ruth and Naomi, were
beautiful and valuable, but one
should be careful in introducing
stories like the sacrifice of Isaac

or the method by which Jaco
displays to Esau two young!
children,












Mr. Theobalds went on to sa)
that the teacher and pupil should
not regard each other as natural
enemies. The relationship should|
be rather that of a big and lit\le
Best results

brother, were
achieved where fear was ban-
ished from the school. An inte:
esting discussion followed and
Miss Arne thanked the lecture:

for his stimulating survey of the
problem The next meeting of |
the Study-Group will take place!
at Wakefield, at 5 o’clock on Fri-
day, October 3rd, when films wiil|
be.shown by the courtesy of thd
Britisty Council, oa

FOR

All sizes

Priced

29th

30th to





for business

lst.



BEAUTIFUL LAMPS ="

(Corner

T. G. McK INSTRY,
Secretary.

Registered Office,
James Street.



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neem meron

B’dians Study ) Sugar Engineering In Glasgow

By PAUL FOSTER —



ley, who has fought and jeft her,













































































‘ 7 y f reappears years later, penniless,
om : he turns to help him too. Wil-|f 3 %g,
eyo her, whem she has served faith= ; : # es
Pai \ ; . - ‘uly for so many years, is about
-y {An abridged wersion of the Gary’s complete imaginative sym- to marry her, when his heirs
i z final lecture given by Mr. R yathy with his subject. There is have her arrested for robbing
tro i 4 { LeFanu at he British Council nO sentimentality. or cleverness him, The charee is: ‘Guineniney
Metal I ‘i [ a on Monday, 22nd Septenrber about it: Cary sees the primitive ver and Sara gets eighteen
tur ete African as heis, subject to violent- rnonths: . this is where the book
cou eft ir Joyce Cary was born oe Dor y alternating moods of depression pegins and ends. She bears little
jiand industry. gal, Ifeland, im 1888; he cor nd ecstacy, imertia and sudden maijice; when she is out, she will
li aA Devonshire fepuly brutality, credulity and cunning, set about making another nest,
indeed the West Indi gal - gma in those Pe and 4 cccepting injustice, tortures anc reereating her own personal
producing ¢ atric mt e custom in many Angkh , Lasgueres aS part of the natural world. In her own story, Sara is }f HURRICANE LANTERNS
close assoziation th the « families, he was = given ni inevitable order, Pagans, teyal, affectionate, ruled by her}
Glasgow. There is, however mother’s, name of Joyee. Ho hristians, Mohammedans, Dis- jeart, and. this, too, is Witcher’ ;
betwner aseow and the West in Cliake detent. mat adadienbn nict Officers and Missionaries picture of her. But she turns. up {J SHEET TIN
Nes closer together. in Edinburel ee Oe oa. pow, ee life in this again in ‘The Horse’s Mouth’, — : : ‘
ir easel wenecatiane: iiost shut caleaeeicnaaeeneesteatoaneens ve ed and y canvas, The older, larger, more used by life, SOLDER 19 per Ib
aoe 7 a ied ‘ a Montenegrin Dettalion for ine i : js COMENERy _— and vigo-ind Gulley pushes her down. the oe ra] ,~ >
f ? ; Balkan War of 1912/13; later fe tus, At the age of forty-two, cellar steps. To him, she seems SAD IRONS per Pair
omnes re oe ee was transferred to a British Red me a made = brilliant debut « cunning, vain, — self-deceiving BOX IRONS eo ant
cat ae hirt The ts - oe Cross Party and saw service at see sone OTE = man-chaser — and, of course, ' INS Ime COCR
epee wigion Veten Co the front. In 1913, he jgined the . able qualities, Johnson is Clerk in thelr contexts. ‘But Gulley} COAL POTS @ .. 3.37 each
age of 17, 01 thereabouts, they FRANK GRANNUM Nigerian Political Service, served c to a District “Officer: uite irre- ‘still sail a soft s ot for thea feel
serve as apprentices for five years in the Nigerian Regiment during 50MIN” CAREY. pressible, he drinks, Tiahits lies they have: be ie ude a le tg 8
during which time they attend Arts degree at Leeds University is the war and was: wounded in the pean Gh ie ileseictane ihe hemuand Tea nea te ne oe, antbiorr ed are really the same|]) a ms s
night school. Their aim is to obtain 2,present a theological student at Cameroons Campaign, Returning !'0 any 0° “WC Saat der in si é xtravagant Kind. of in their insatiable ji GENERAI HAR DW ARES PPTIFS
the Higher National Certificate in Mirfield College, Yorkshire. to political duty, he was sent as created: to involve the reader in sity, exuberant and extravagant = ni person in their ins | “ eh i sds ida Pui
Mechanical Engineering. With this George hopes to be ordained next magistrate and executive officer to 'bis transposition—as Cary does in prosperity. At length he over- 2st for life and in the courage |) queen ; om
7 ° ol : , ¢ z ; sat reaches i and truth of their imagination. fem RSP am
certificate, after taking a course rE ¥'G ; : Borgu, at that time a very remote Sichameeatkanees "ams meleonaieeils out 7 alan en and ant casi deca a >
in industrial administration and ‘rank Grrannum, whose parents district. $s 3 y ce ve ee in again 5 . a Pikgri is about Tom ell ne Pye a : og a
holdive a he ponsible position with Dr. and Mrs. F N Grannum are Ree sete aren ee degree of sympathetic insight and another brief spell of authority Wilcher a ee ane RICKETT STREET (Opposite Post Office) PHONE 4912
an engineéting firm, they then coming to England in October, left service and he was advised to !™aginative power. and good fortune before he is loved. Wileher suffers th® loneli+ | Bseese——————— TS
qualify and can apply at the age Barbados in September 1949, and jyetire from tropical Africa He The type of novel Cary writes, taken up on a murder charge. ness of age and is alrea
of 26, for entry to the Institute like Michael is with A. & W. Smith 4, ;

then began to write but was so ‘he novel dealing with the indi- He bears no ill-will at his exe- eccentric. He has been a man of
7 te Member en rr Monk sd certtheated Wares tule ‘higher dissatisfied with his work that he Vidval im relation to society, is cution: an artist in life, Johnson strong family affection and deep
cla nbers ‘+ I Mech v ales é S §







dni m tie ; a _ nowadays rather out of fashion. has had a good time while it religious faith; a liberal by con-
E.). iational and has two more years ‘ + hi Ry eee ee eee But it has a long and honourable lested. The same exuberance ani- viction bul at heart a sonservative, |.
Similarly, other West India: \pprenticeship to serve and about a a y ¢ th at tae ©~ pedigree—through Defoe, Fielding mates both style and subject: ‘or whom the ties of affection have
have passed through Geo Fletch- ‘three more years of night school. a e next tem years re and Dickens. The rapid successior Johnson almost bursts his sears been stronger than the drive to
er’s of Derbyshire, sugar machi ie will be 21 in January. Frank educating himself, and it was not (+ Goents in his novel?Wis also with ‘life os tect adventure, So instead of becom-
: , ’ a NA ee ; § $ sWis also with life and we tremble anc ; :
ry manufacturer: 1as a sister Nan, studying nursing until 1930 that he published — his reminiscent of these great write rejoice with him ing a missionary, he has become
i n Yorkshire, Dr. and Mrs. Gran- first novel; he has written twelve | ~. dMiingiis sbways es it ”, the A < f Cary’s 4 lawyer, and managed the estate
In Glasgow at the moment ar num will be coming to Scotland more since—his most recent will hile i+ 5, Sage = hl Ale ea second eg BEY. end the affairs of his more brill-
four Barbadians working with er n January, but he hopes to see appear this week—a@ book ol Oar . eee one puvels Geals with ‘another care- iant brother:and sister; for all this
gineering firms. They are Michael em on Christmas Eve for a fam~ poetry: and three books of politi- Cary ange s arge — too, i Bory of primitives — children he has received little thanks. Now,
Hatch, Frank Grannum, his cousin {ly reunion, thé first in three years. (21 theory. lot of characters, plenty of time ‘A House of Children’ (1941), hack im-the house he loves watch-
Herbert Grannum and Peter Frank’s cousin Herbert aged 19, ‘phis_ full and. variéd life is °¢ elbewfoom: his later novels; a scarcely veiled account of his j., put unable to stop his niece
Roach. op of Mr. and Mrs. William Gran- jefjectea in the exceptionally wid though nevet diffuse, all cover own youth in Ireland, seems to and nephew make 1 mess of their
inhne’ nto OE. Van re, "| ne if At ” " . C ‘ t ne a- : hi z , 12 4 é i ess
ot eine teh, 2A your old om aT Of MOR ROTA Cange of Cazyta. worms. Thane. iat Serie’! OE fo oF thiee genera ne tb very. duel of ehilbaod: ste tives: ties rooety ih the Part
St. Peter's Church, Speightstown, 4 September, 1950. He has got nothing superficial in his amazing It is therefore no‘ surprisins iacioutedivisiin the thaeed 'ox- es his eee Oe eres
and Mrs Hatch, has been in Scot- jhrough his first year certificate V@rsatility or in the quality of his... + the theme of change is 3 ee Ncashiel intuition, he is able to see his life
land since September 1946 with cxcept for one subject—science— thought an d= apprefiticeship. ckcarkstal atabat' tn Carv's ieee pectancy and forgetfulness. ‘n perspective: he recognises
2 ‘ 5 cai 2 : y 1, s a ‘ y's 2 ‘ ; ica “ESS

A. & W. Smith, sugar machinery hich he will take at this year’s. He has read widely and thought change in people, in institutions The Trilogy ne as a ni . areres id
nanwfacturers Michael has session of night school. Herbert Geeply in the fields of philosophy, a ut he does not e it an s




ae ; in society, in feeling: the necessi- In the same year was publish- Jone is ,
served his five years as an appren- bout two and a half more religion, art, politics and history: /" S0Clety 8 5 he year was pub lenely and frustrated. It is only |

7 he t hig eit 4 . ty, the inevita)ility and the trag- ed the tirst book ot tnat reimark- pecause he is still moved by his!
tice, obtained his Higher National sears here. His parents were in these subjects are not just dragged ~) ae eee acd! a : . ecause he 1s s moved . 0} |
Certificate in Mechanical Engin- Glasgow to spend the month of in for effect but form: with the °1Y, of change. People, Cary sug~ ab.e trilogy which seems ai ine faith that he is able to accept it






eering, and, as a Student of the August with him human personality the basic raw &°StS if they are to do more than moment to mark the hughes: as he aecepts his own: failures |
Institute of Mechanical Engineer: Herbert plans to join a Glasgow material of his art, The integra- meee , one : make their own point of F Cary’s r achievement, and | his unfulfilled hopes anid |
is now applying tor Graduate swimming club next year for the tion of his experience ana worlds by continuous acts of crea~ yhis was ‘Herself Surprised’; “1v ambitions, There is much more}
Membership. He has the necessary water polo summer season, He is knowledge with the traditions tive imagination: if they ave pe a Pilgrim’ appeared in 194z here than I have suggested, the
technical qualifications for hi former member of Bonitas water jeliefs and individualit of E *+ young in spirit, the urge is towards and ‘Ihe Horse’s Mouth’ in 1944. brilliant portraits of Wilcher’s
A.M.I. Mech. E., apart from ful- polo club, when as 2nd Sea Scouts, s i o, og-

yelty and change: their worlds * Ri if h h >hs family and friends. the mental
say . lish Protestantis aj = orveir nov 0 i ine im of these three novels . ’
filling the last part of “the con- they won the Barbados amateur sh Protes m gives his work

unity, ¢ Pp al *< will clash with the existing order, was, in Cary’s own words, to give end moral climate of the periods
tract”—a representative position water polo league in 1949. of ma pi orn gent od wholeness with other worlds, Much of the a picture of. English history through which he*has lived, the)
with an engineering firm. Michael Peter Roach, whose father Mr. 2 s wit " ich is extraordinarily tragedy and the injustice of life thro wah eyes duting: the deep love of the ish: country-
has already begun “this last lap” Yoel Roach, owns a drug store in '™pressive. With it are combined ugh En, En

; ‘ ; ' . : 3 has its rootg in this very conflict jast 60 years’. The three bvoxs ‘i4e- It’s a sad book but a beauti-
He is working with Smiths as a Speightstown has been with the imaginative gifts of a very high between the creative and the cre- aré se eat three separate ful ome and strangely moving.
draughtsman. However, he would Mirrlees Watson Co., since he ar- Order which not only give, Cary’s ation. For, as Cary shows us in chapters of autobiography, one

rather seek employment in rived here in June 1950, Peter is b90ks and people their tremendou ; ( i :



at fine 7 a Pilgrim’ , Oe . Two Later Novels ;
warmer clime. After six years of 19 years old and has obtained his Vitality but enable him, if he i sor Ren: tare ee, Sera te ih ag o Pence) . ; |
Scottish climate, he makes one first year certificate towards the wishes, to sink himself completely ,— Py i 't pan ve aie al characters. They can be read in- "The Moonlight’ (1946) is some-|
stipulation, his new job must be higher national. He has approxi- eee Ly ne Leek pe dependently but the reader who what similar in spirit and tech-|
somewhere in the tropics! tnately three more years ahead of tah eee ne Wit en tages ADE {BPC Maybe los has discovered one will rarely nique. Once again. this story |
» Michael is one of the few West him in Glasgow. ae ummer” at 6.45 a.m, is diffi- «long with the evil ovr may remain wish to forego the pleasure of moves forward. simultaneously in
®% Indians of the post-war group to An enginecring apprentice in ta pot and during the win- «nd be corrupted by it. But this, reading the others. the present and the past, andy +.
,. gain the higher national certificate Scotland is no easy task for these jets mae to be experienced before is the way life goes, and Cary’s Let us then take first the most ounce again it’s the present genem}: *:
“ and he can be justly proud of this poys accustomed@ to life in the can be adequately described. recognition of the true nature of

j Work begins g 5 . a) recent and best. known, ‘The ation who are the ‘deracines. B
accomplishment His brother warm weather of the tropics. Hav- finishes begins at 7.45 am. and change goes with his. feeling for fforse’s Mouth’. The narrator is it’s mainly about women, dnd in.
George, who took his Bachelor of ing to get out of bed into a “Scot- ter at 5.30, with approxim- two organic traditions which are 4 painter called Gulley Jimson particular three old sisters, Rose,
‘They porta ber aay ptrird : oo in a state of constant recreation— who has just finished a term in Pessie and Ella Venn. Rose, the

ith n ad- Eyglisn Protestantism and English Nric ned. ® “ap og: atte a
dition to. sometimes working Sat- Englisn Protestantism and English prison for demanding with men- Oldest has always tried to man

re 3 : When the curtair
urdays and Sundays at overtime Democracy, The second and equal- aces from a. former patron, Gul- “se the others—-she has seen her

: Fes ; te ry’ ames “s : ; i nora! é afraic | lied back to present

ragepakAs. 43 * ly important of Cary’s themes ‘: s an eccentric and a genius— ™oral duty and not been afral ro '

start at fel 2, ouMmeen wi the fascinating and infinitely mys- a a ciliate to Gane own ae Fagg oN ae re o ‘
: ising . ‘mately ‘erioug complexity of human fisa the is: hated by both of them, by z FF

PN me ah Be sent character. : " genius that we accept this: he is (1.0 has managed to break away! . ZEPHYR by Ford

also rowdy, cantankerous and

at the end of five years appren- from her, and by Ella who has

ticeship The African Scene dishonest — but unwavering in become increasingly dependent a Mate criBenriad din \N
Night school sessions begin in , His first group of books derives his complete integrity as an snd outwardly devoted to her. S
September and run throughant the {rom his experiences in Africa. artist. Gulley is an old man w — Only when Rose dies, does Ela, commenced — and a new
winter until March, ‘Aissa Saved' is about a young he comes out and we have in his who has nursed her through her
One official of a”company ems African girls who isya-canvert to racy) colourful idiom the story of illness, realise, her true feelings pleasure was introduced
pleying West Indian apprentices Christianity. She lapses when she the tricks and strategems to towards her. It is through Ella
has this to say:— After travelling goes with her fellow Christians to which he resorts in order to keep (hat the story is told; Ella is be~ to the roads of the world SS

all this way (approximately 4,000 take the gospel to a neighbouring himself alive and to raise the coming a little queer and she
miles) overseas apprentices are village. Out of sheer high spirits, money and find the space to paint thinks she is responsible for Rose’s
more determined to stick the long }owever, she insults the pagan the vast masterpieces which no- period of training. Another official pods and is hunted as a witch, body will buy.’ His final defeat auite clearly. Her weakness is
points out, “there is one major She escapes with a broken leg is really a triumph, [ don’t think ‘hat unlike Rose, but like her
problem, however and that is to. inq struggles back to the Mission i is claiming too much to sug- waughter, Amanda, she has not
gel an overall general attendance where she is reconverted and is gest that ‘The Horse’s Mouth’ is Known what she wanted—or when

t i sc T : 5 as ried
the big cy Sap teardhiattiawevand soon back in aétion, leading a one of thé comic masterpieces of She has known she has not t



’ $ ; A h nough to get it: for her, the
the bright lights “dazzle” them, ind of holy war which 8 Feey, CE ata s ised’ is the story rhein foagmation has been
But the majority soon realise the S00n transformed into an lun- Crse: UEpree is lie stillborn. *



= ‘ < has > ., holy massacre. Aissa lapses of Sara Monday, country girl.

PSL yar oa TUNA, “Gight) of Barbados “ork has to be done and they again, meets @ particularly horri- cook, widow, once Guiley’s a he coe

chattin gwith John Lanigan of Jamaica outside their home in Glas- papi ame ite Ns ig aan ble death, bit dies in the faith. model and mistress, later house- oe darn, $k Sho tonaneep the
gow. These are three of the West Indians who are working as working as an apprentice—“it’s a This first novel is remarkable both keeper and mistress to the old year. Although .

ne ee tough life, but we can take itt" for its terrific vitality and for lnwyer, Tom Witcher. When Gul- Moonlight’ is. as Soran anything

~— : Cary has written, one feels some-

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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 1952 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE THIRTEEN
os ;













HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON | [ zHe ramcess wno } : : BRINGS A SMILE TO «|
WOULDN'T SMILE ; — I eal) a EVERYONE’S FACE

Just serve delicious Royal Puddings to
your family and friends—and then watch

the smiles of satisfaction. You'll smile, +
too—for Royal Puddings are so easy ip
prepare—and so economical, too. hy

one today.



in a far-off land lived a Princess who Close by lived a tailor and his son. Ong So he brought her a dish of Royal Pud
never smiled. Clowns and jugglers came day the son had an idea. “I know whal ding. And when she tasted it, her face
from all over, but not one could bring will make the Princess smile,’ he said, broke out into & big smile. In fact she
out even the tiniest smile “Royal Pudding!" gave him her hand and her kingdom



THIS FLOWER.



By Appointment
Gin Distillers
to the Late
King George VI



9
DIS THELEN |
iN LOND eon ae







BLONDIE

| AS a bee ONCE A BASKETBALL
| 7a DROP THIS IN THE PLAYER, ALWAYS A ~
GARBAGE CAN ON YOUR
“ WAY QUT, DEAP







WHY DONT YOU PLAY
GOLF OR TENNIS
LiKE OTHER MEN
YOUR AGE @



BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES |
ll fo ponree ey | | aemerie ee a seers aac cats )| !
\ > \ os * \e, \ + ee | ee you | :
NW] SNK ec tintin OG Jee 4\/. * Poe a
\ PLENTY ROUND | om LN Ree A fy

THE COLGATE WAY
TO COMPLETE
HOME DENTAL CARE

(THAT'S IT... IKE
A HUGE CATERPILLAR
— WEAVING A

cocoon!










ULL BE LARNED!
IT'S WEAVING
ETHING/

COLGATE.

VCLEANS YOUR TEETH
aT ele LN
Dee eA

Always brush your teeth
right after eating with

COLGATE DENTAL CREAM

BR

ROUND UP THE POLICE
| WE'RE NOT OUT OF THE PARADISE! I'LL TRY AN?
JOHNNY... YOU PIP NOOVS YET! YOU...KEEP
Tex YOU GOT HIM! THIS DOOR LOCKED TIGHT
ad UNPERSTANG? I'LL
EXPLAIN LATER!










LET A ? MAN TAKE T
GAPGET FOR A SPIN













BRINGING UP FAT

~ - ae
ae

—





5 - ~
NOW - WHAT
FATHEAD |S
Baer] AT THE FRONT
j \\_ 200R ?

PGA








ODNESS-HOW :

IT iS THE AH! YOU'RE HOME! \-

IT WAS SO QUIET

I THOUGHT — ~~
NO =

\ YOU WERE (
'M



THEN THERE IS A CLICK...
AND MAYBE YOU CAN WIN

/ OUT OF -

Ga, TOWN +)



$40.00
IN THE
ADVOCATE |
CHRISTMAS CARD |
COMPETITION |

This year the ‘Advocate’ is running a Christmas Card Competition, the results
of which will be published in the Christmas number,

TT's REALLY FUNNY, PAGAN. THE LAST T'VE GOT TO... I NEED MEANWHILE, THE MANGLER GROWS UNEASY: |

THING ON EARTH FINGERS WANTS HIS HELP...BUT DON'T WHAT Goes over \ {II eek
TO DO IS HELP ME GET THAT RIFLE WORRY, TLL KEEP MY / Sv aaa ANY WANE 2 I BETTER
FROM THE MANGLER'S HOTEL..BUT EYES OPEN! < . SHOT PASAN...I SAW | DROP OVER
OH, RIPL | } HER FALL! BUT THE AND HAVE
S/ it WGHT BE | Fl ‘ P Li ye |
TRAP! DON'T | E T tS \ SJOINT'S TOO QuieT!
A euer mit | aI ent NO COMMOTION. ..NO

Fe , I}\ yy COPS... AN’ HER
‘ NAME'S STILL UP





Competitors should note the following points:—

The competition is open to all readers of the ‘Advocate’ and cards can be of
any size or shape.

Cards can be made by any process—painting, drawing, photographic, ete.



iAan=[===-"—0"0”"”—”—722—=2>=4—.8=—ETNEETE8E—qmE8008E00.080080. 0 aaaaaaaeaaaaaaaaaa666Nq00 eeeaeaaaaaaawuwwwwmnnev—v—_——<—aewrw_aerr
eee

ARE YOU TRYIN TO KID ME? IM A competitor can enter any number of cards, but all cards must be original work.
LITTLE. BUT | CAN HANDLE MV
DUKES! NOW TALK STRAIGHT!

WHO IS HES carrera

ae



Preference will be given to cards with a Barbadian or West Indian flavour and

to novelty cards,

— Tint au wit THe THAT SKULL MARKON ] IN BENGALI | |SEE THE GUY ‘C6 THE PHANTOM
| GOTTA Fila THAT GUY WITH THE DOG ) |My KID BROTHERS KNOWS THAT WHO IS HE? Lea THE GHOST WHO
+ POWN! NOBODY ELSE ,— aes ‘ RECOGNIZED J . vt -

EVER DID THAT++ rT £
| |

GAY= WHEN YOU SAW reenon |





The judging will be done by a judging committee which will include the Editor.
Their decision will be final

—

Prizes will be as follows: First—$40.00; Second—$20.00; Third—$10.00; and ¢t
consolation prizes of $5.00 each.

A selection of the cards will be displ d at the ‘Advocate’ Stationery and later
at the Barbados Museum

1 The closing date for the competition is 4.00 p.m.-on October 31st; but competit
ng in their entries now

All cards should be addressed to the Editor, The Adv te, Bridgetown








































































































ASSISTANT."A = Counter = Assistant
4 (lemale) for our store Apply by letter
* and in person to Geo, C. Ward & Co.,
St. e, Ch,

Lawrer Ch,



27.9, 52—2n

HOUSEKEEPER For Codrington Col-
Quarters provided. sr
the





John
may

lege, St.

tienlars be obtained from

Principal.

—~28.9.52—3n.













































CANE, CARTS without tyres and) pint:
form from $360.00. up to, $500.00 fr
Stock or can be. ordered for the comi
crop. Smith's Engineering W:
4947, Roebuck Street.

ks. Phone
9

OLIVETTI (M 44) Typewriters, “Avail:





































Mahogany Bureau, Breakfast Table and

*o notify the Secretary by Monday 13th | cna: mand green) Larder,
Qetoner. Kiteher SPinet, lwestcold, Refrigerator,
: 8S. GITTENS, in working order, Ware yss, Enamel

Honora) Becratany
7 28.9. 52—8n,

Top Table, Valor, and Perfection Stoves
and Ovens, Blectrie Washing Machine,
Pyrex W. , Saucepans, Glassware, Tes
Sets, Chdbbery. etc., Ga Tools, Ferns,
' Lillies, Palms and Congrete Pots ~
Sale 11.30 o'clock. ‘Terms cash
BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,

Auctioneers

. NOTICE

-S hereby given that all persons having
ny debt or claim against or affecting

































gallery, The outbuildings comprise





servants room and garage. The
property stands on app oximately
1,000 square feet of land within

100 yards of the famous Rockley
Beach.

BUNGALOW ‘

Situate in Rockley New Road
commanding a magnificent view fe
°

the Golf Cou”se unobstructed



















SIX MEN’S : 30th September
Ist and 2nd October

yae~ Kindly arrange your Shopping Accordingly !

R. & G. CHALLENOR LTD.























—Attractive house with verandah,
living room, 3_ bed , garage.
ROUMAIKA, DAYRELL’S ROAD
Imposing 2 storey house with Ss
reception, 6 bedrooms,
guest house or club.
VILLA ROSA, PASSAGE ROAD
—Spacious well planned bungalow
on 14,000 sq. ft. Dining,
:oum, 3 bedroms, outhouses
SRAFORT, PAYNES BAY, 8T.
JAMES Re-modelled 2 storey

suitable

sitting

PAGE FOURTEEN SUNDAY ADVOCATE __ SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 1952 _
sii ee pn aneneteense=n seccees— ss mmm ce
ape ” “J a>

CLASSIFIED ADS ee eee SHIPPING NOTICES |

. sacra JOHN
j
j
TELEPHONE 2508 Sndehtiagsee lt a ___BEAb! ESTATE a Ee LEP PPE POOLS SOGSDEHOL i |
2 R g “BYWAYS” eh. Si ’ venue
ETS ania KOM SALE ROCKLEY. New. Ro standing om appeoximately. 1088 aq. ft, NOTICE oe ee A; MOAR wu

CATWEIA—To Mr. and Mrs. Wilfred : ; AD, ; ; ; aT See : : 7 accept Cargo and Passenger for

Catwel) (nee Lolita Lashley) of No. 3 CHRIS® CHURCH gallery, drawing, dining and 3° bed- No appetite? No pep? The ace, ie i

iets apenas, Menthe este uit, This well and. substantially built stone |/00™S. large Kitchenette, garage; flower : 1 ildi . ® ‘ ar oe egg ge eee? gg ean

at “Fouls Avenue, Becklas. Fas me. reaidence stands on 19,260 sq. ft. of land|*24 kitehen gardens with bearing fruit rich, blood-building proper Nevis and st i Pes

a bi and o girl. Mo 4a abies UTO OTIVE ene apec . : sengers oF t la i

doing well oa 8 sir A Mi Rockley Gait Cones, teil traded cis oa Phone sno een CORP es ae of YRAST-PHOS wil Will all Customers hold- 4 ing Friday “yr October, 1952 B LAB@N

ie. P i - >
rani itan | SARs Hilimen Minx Cars. in vers taghtes Breaenatee. on iene, Saar. Sit- 9... pemare lon ee cng-om ing PREPAYMENT METER che Sa, CRN ai
ood dition. —0149-—8488, arge b tampa keep you
IN MEMORIAM | x00 condition. Phone, 3187-0140 9488. | Atzeg. with basins and running water, asa] LAST HOUSE. SPOT.— Blue Water REBATE NOTES present $/!} accept Cargo and Passengers for e ce
CARTER—in treagured and f8deleSS | egenpmeneeqeenneeeeeneeyetees, two of them with built-in cupboards, a| Terrace opposite Col. Vidmer enclosed same for payment on or 3) Dominica, Antigua, Monuperrat. .
memory of our beloved “Husband and} CAR—1950,Vauxhall, exectient condh: | AmHe WellSttes kitehen, and cenasatel by, wall on two sides, Phone Dennis E. dis before the last day of Sep- 3/{ Nevis ana St. Kitts, ne poner
father Gladstone.Carter (‘Papa’) whe |tion, very, reasonable, exchange and toilet. Worme—-8547. —28,9.52—In | tember at the Gas Com- 4 gers only for St. Lueta seen. A.F.S., F.V.A,.
passed to the Great Beyond on the 28th |'for smaller car. Williams Colas opposite | tp, e is a builtin Linen cupboard in| — TONIC | ne Office, Bay Street, Saturday 11th October,
September, 1947, Sayes Court, Government. Farm Christ au passageway, and all the rooms are) LAND—2% Acres of Land. at. Salters, s | pany’s , * a
Gone from us but leaving memories |Chureh (near Silver Sands), ited with extra power points, and the|*t. George. Going reasonable. Avply to 8.30 to 10.00 a.m. 2 BW sumOONER OWNE 1 FOR SALE
aad abe apeun bike, hte 20.9.52~1n, | W1P40ws are fitted, with hoods and. shut-| C!ifford W, Waterman, (Sanitary Inspee- | between ee oe ASSOCIATION (INC.) ; ceibieendll
Memories that will, always linger 5a ters, tor) Market Hill, St. George. | and 12.30 to 2.30 p.m. > Tele, Ne: 4047 } NEW BUNGALOW, LODGE
While upon. this earth. "we. stay? | “CRIN ORG Ga heen tena, Vauxhall, voxdelient bondi | .eO, B,SFound. floor thero is a large| 25.9, - i $ Consignae,, Tele. LAND, ST. MEOHAEL—3 bed-
What though in lonely. grief we. sigh | Lon, very. F nable, Will exe hee jar 8 ft high with cement floor and | ——————————————_ | : rooms, drawing & dining room:
For dear ones now no longer nigh walliens thes Wieaiberty age ar Tple room far storage, laundry. eto.| LAND—7300 sq, ft. Land. Nelson Road. |: SSS kitchenette, breakfast 2
Submissive wolld we still reply | aves Court Government farm, Ch. Ch ere is @ gatage and servant's room in|iiavy Gardens, wide frontage, pantry, garage, * t 7 ew
’ “Thy will done.’ Sesley's Street. the grounds, and servant's bath and|luilding site. Apply, dial 2047. R | BRIGHTWOOD. st. Me acres.
, Ever remembered by the Carter family. | Bay 7 s3—1n totlet-in the ground floor of the house.| Archer McKenzie 28.9.52—3n. Given by Beach ST. LAWRENCE,
% 28.90.5010, | se | Le under-mentioned will offer the prem-| —————_—— —— ERDISTON SPORTS CLUB teams 1 pel diene S Dadecoms, living
; = | CAR — 1 Chev. Master Six. 194? oan ‘*~" sale by public auction at their] PROPERTY — One Board House, gai ana ian d inna Bathing. ng rooms, gallery, garage
’ THANKS | odel | in Al eendiden. Reimen & “s Fiiday ae pg Bridgetown, | vanize roof, 2 bedrooms, ea —at— a CLARENDON, BLACK Ri ae
* MUNT—Dr. Shelburne Hunt and ~d ws tata cs 37.9.58—8n. | at 2 inspection to be arranged ty | sump 16.000 sq it. land, at Lower Weet-| gi THS GRIM, WALL, GARRISON Low priced house with about 1
Gwen Hunt, gratefully acknowledge y 7 3 e
, with deepest appreciation the assistance | CAR—1 Morris Car 10 H.P. 1948 Model ond ening Bias ae Saree particulars} bury Road, Marine Square, St. Michaol ea sourEnouNe Satis Satis Sat. Arrives a iti dining room,
rendered them during the illness of |‘ Perfect Condition. New Battery COnTeeR to; Apply Miss, Allen Siceate on Premises, FRIDAY OCTOBER 3RD, 1952 Montrea! Halifax Boston Barbados Barbad BUNGALOW, THE GARDEN,
the late Mrs. EDITH EVANGELENE | ontact Mallalieu, St. Joseph's Rectory on < or, Wallen Py, Beeets, Upper Bakar Music by Mr. Clevie Gittens WORTHING — Recently built with

HUNT, a loving wife and mother; and iz appointment to inspect Car. Going 24,9, 52— X Road 28.9.53—In. o a : a ‘ “ 25 Sept patio, verandah, living room,

thank all those who attended the | Cheap. 27.9.52—2n. en rehestra CANADIAN AU ENGER 12 Sept. Sept. ~*~ Sept. "

; funeral, sent wreaths and ktters of | ——_——_—_—-::———_——— FOR SALE SALE oF THE MOTOR VESSEL LADY om - ” 4 22-Sept. 25 Sept. 27 Sept. 6 Oct. 1 Oet REIEDING PLOTS. LODGE
4 sympathy on the occasion of her death | CAR—For Sale 1 Chevrolet car, Model BUSINESS PREMISES T. B. RADAR DANCING 9 — 3 LAND, ST. MICHAEL. “4 attcen
» -Bith September, 1952 28.9,52—I1n. | 1934 first class condition. 4 new | The undersigned. will offer tor sale by|, The appraised price cf $35,000.00 not Subseript:eh $1.00 NOKTHBOUND asrtéee Mm takiias se
| tyres, 1 new. battery, Apply to Mr.| Ublic competition at their office, No. 17|@ving been received for the Motor Arrives Sails Asttese. Assiees Mentreal BUNGALOW BLUE WATERS—
M@ORE The undersigned gratefully beg George Hoytey Merricks, St. Philip. Ligh Street, Bridgetown, on ‘Thursday| Verse! 7. BRAD AD ire invited. Barbados Barbados Oct 1s Ost. 1s Oct, Modern home ‘with 3 verandahs
through this medium to return thanks | 27.9,52—2n. e 2nd day of October 1952, at 2 o’clock LADY RODNEY .- 2 Sept. 4
be submitted in a ~ an 21 Oct. 24 Oct. reception, dining room, 3 bed-

> to all those who attended the funeral, « »m. ALL THAT certain parcel of land Such offers are to CHALLENGER 6 Oct. 8 Oct
i*> “Sefit. wreaths, cards, or in any other! CAR—Humber Hawk.Saloon Car. Per, | ituate in Milk Market and Chapel Streets,| Sealed envelopes to be Publie Build non {AY NELSON rk Wore 2 Ot Oe RSS Se COVE SPRING HOU SE. ST

way expressed their sympathy with us ‘fect Condition, Done only 1,500 miles. | 3"idgetown, containing 4,710 Square Feet| M@7shal in Admiralty, Pu i ings ea likin tier JAMES COAST— Draw .

i in our recent bereavement occasioned Uwner ieaving Island. Tel. 2961. with the buildings or stores thereon at| B@rbadose and are to reac a on or MITED dining room, 3 Reston or
; cea omar OS: my bee eHeybey Cee 38.9.53—3n. oe che wean, A. Rollock & Ca, Pcithar tet Oontber the csaled, envelopes . For further particulars, =pply to— workshop Bathing ooms, garage
May Moore oe ‘oice armacy, and Central COVER SPRING | J
| Phyllis Marshall (Dadghtér), Avstin Mar-| HILLMAN SALOONS — new ane | *9undry Limited penis te ON Ware by the GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD. —Agents. JAMES COAST—2 storey residence
+ shall (son-in-law) 28:9.52—-In. used. Austin Saloons — used Citroen Further particulars from the under-| he ae a. ee of the Chief OFFERS — = attractive location. Excellent bath-
: — Saloon. Cole & Co., Ltd. nermr) Sanieune - pa —— epee eer eree ee SOCOSSOSSSOSPOGSIISO> ing
' WALCOTT The family of the iate 26. 9. 52—4n. OTTLE, CATFORD & CO., j SS MODERN HOUSE, FINE HILL
; Benjeman Walcott wish to thank - Solicitors, | For further ik vcs oo tne er rns. Waters. EPPO OSPPPPEPEPPPIP SSPE, Giseda 40... Recently erected. Living room
kind friends who attended the fun-; MOTORCY a) 19.9.52—5n. : Snowe 8 TOR. ee tety ‘AR MECHANICS, PERSONAL breakfast room, 3 bedrooms.
CLE—One (1) 5 H.P. Ariel Marshal in ty : sximately FOR SALE c 3
eral, sent wreaths, cards and letters | Motorcycle in good condition, Reasonably — 13.9 ‘52—ur: end stanaing os eas d, com- CAR SERVICING and CAR garage.
in their recént bereavement. jpriced. Apply: Donald Holder, Hails “HILLRISE” -_ oe ao hao one. cae wells Just received Portable Gramo- DRIVING RESIDENCE, ST. JAMES
i Alice Walcott, Eileen Vaughn, I\y | Road. 21,9. 52—2n GRAEME HALL ene THE BOWER — a_ bungalow-tyre ea mt 4 toilet d bath hones Cabinet Gramophones, POLITICAL SCIENCE and COAST—Valuable and beautifully
: Grandison, Phyllis Walcott CHRIST CHU . dressing-room and toilet an P " “? UBLIC SPEAKING maintained property. Drawing and
: 28.9.52—1 OU a gana dwellinghouse situate at The Garrison, attached, combination drawing and Calypso Records, Sound Boxes, P 7 3
; n.| TRUCK—One V8 FORD TRUC:: with Tho residence lately harepied by Mrs. dl 7,444 uare feet of land. let a x Wednesday, Octo- dining rooms, verandahs, sun deck,

—_———_—_—— Patform, Dial 2523 or 4157, Jillicent’ Hawkins. Wrens Doce ane varendate | we dining room, separate toilet an Gramophone Springs, arid Bicy- % Commence ee 3 § teticams, ae.

; FOR RENT 27.9.52—2n.| This well and substantially built stan¢ peplic roars, two bedrooms, umual_con-| [fs Dash. modern Kickers Tee ee cle Accessories, New Market 9 Ask for detalls at 53 Swan MALTA, | 81.’ PETER — Solid
: esidence stands on 29,318 square feet of| venienc>, kitehen &c., garage, servants’ be: bought for Store, Cheapside Road % Street (Second Floor) modern home with every con-

i « ——— TRUCK-—One 1947 Chevrolet Truck | @%4 enclosed with a wall and has a fine soma and enclosed garden, Electricity he ee rcaaiable fyure, lense COCO OOO act Next door “The CIVIC” venience. Lounge deck, sitting

j HOUSES P--232 in A-one Condition. One 193.) ~%@W over the Christ Church coast. 5 Ned ey eee POSES PCPS ‘ , room, 3 bedrooms. Bathing.

i Ford lon. . The hou: and Government water insta contact us as soon as possible 24 HOUSE, "

“thindiaiehibde thal) saad cans ord Car. (P. 42) Apply to B. Clarke. se contains an open verafidah Inspection by appointment with Mri . ST, PETER — Lavishly

i COTTAGES Two Small cottages for Fyders Hill, St. Philip or G. Bolden rawing vend dining rooms, three bed- 3t. Cla : Dial 3229 * et - equipped home with lounge, din-
‘ / Sma ; 3t. Clair Hunte al 3229, SWREDPIELD ‘
‘ rent (2 bedrooms), from October 1st, Tweedside Road. 27.2, 52—3n Stake, — baths and toilets, pantry, The property will be set up for sale L stone: House comprising ing Yoom, 4 bedrooms, double
fully furnished, St. Lawrence Gap, on Kae ili ere Built-in cup-|»y public competition at our offic Wnetnh, chines Battiemel Inpae aerage, all services i
} sea. Key at Hollywood R. Lynch. ELECTRICAL Re the bhinthant bow e gape oe James Street, Bridgetown, on Friday, living: room, dining room, two ! bultk: at i BALL — Recently
: 28. 9, 5a—In oom, garage for two Bata wreith aoditten 10th -October, 1952, at 2 p.m. YC tolleta and baths, one with tub aioivie roam eanary.c9 bad aaa
} SiGnS “PLANTATION HousEcee. | pELECTRICAL SPRAYER — One (i)| tore-room and large cellars. ‘There are YEARWOOD & BOYCE. | 11) path and, hot and cold water, garage, laundry. Gentine bargain.
ABBS PLANTATION | Electric Sprayer. Complete with Spray] Jso three servants rooms, servant's bath Sete Aen le b gallery, Downstairs; three spare RESIDENCE, ST. JAMES’ COAST
+ Luoy, ideally situated. Apply: A. G.|Gun, Large Air Tank & Sunbeam Com-4 ind toilet and a fowl house. The lawn: The undersigned will offe for sale by rooms, Kitchen and shower room, Seats oi Gee s
} Husbands, Mt. Standfast, St. James Or] pressor, In good Order. Price $110.00, | and grounds are well laid out with iow, public competition at their Office No. 17, standing om approximately 2M Pe cing Rag 8 a cleanly
$ N. EB Husbands, Crab Hill, St, ey: Contact C, Arthur Mayhew, Phone 4748,| ering trees and shrubs and the whole | ‘li#! Street. on Friday ae ee 1 acres of land about 100 yards from tome Cone Sates: bedrooms,
i 17.9:52--4.4.n. 27.9.52—3n. property is in excellent repair and con- ert ue eevee om 2 Actes, 13 Gibbee Been ae Pree the WENDOVER’ st ioe
5, OPS ae. oo ano ooo CO son : . 7 " _ been extensively renoval y . Cc ae ‘ m7
| , FOR RENT: to an s»proved: tense NEW ARRIVALS from USA. include| The undersigned will offer the premises perches of land situate at Barbarees pe eest Cues: asic nasram HAciEOn Will Our Customers please note a. ee about 4% Sere
| fully furnished fat in Hotel district. | the famous Sumbeam Products, Auto | {or sale by public auction at their office, | Mill, St. Michael. | . Inid a very reasonable price. Inspecr and. dining? tote. 3 bedeooas
| near beautiful beach, 2 airy double | matic Mix masters, Toasters, afe| NO. 17, High Street, Bridgetown, on! Blectric and water services laid on tog by appointment on} ° f : 5 rooms,
| Bedrooms, English Bath Tub. Gas Stove, | i,ons & the new combination Steam auc | ©Tiday ihe 3rd October 1962 at 2 parm.) Ant ore (Ss BGK Weer. Pula that we will be closed for “PR” conneraren
‘ jectricity, ephone pec! terms | Dry Iron; Secure one of th fine | [nspection on application to Mr. c. “B for residence or a warehouse BUNGALOW , RIN
i es long tenancy. Write A. C/o Advo- eppliances from DaCOSTA & co. LTD Sisnett, C/o Messrs. Martin Doorley & eee eee apna At. Rockiey: New Road, compris- â„¢ MNEWTON LODGE, MAXWELL
cate. 2 a y Pr .
gr 9, stan, | BIE: Dept: Phone Te | Siac facinee matt aareet, BEagetOw™. “For further particulars and conditions|] ing gneve, badwporae, dining ana STOCK-FAKING Stlin Seetee tad ae:
tcl LLL » v ~ of sale apply to Vv ’ awing an ning

MANHATTAN—Flats on sea, Welches.| "REFRIGERATOR “Enalian Flectne | 17.9. ee ecm | COTTLE, CATFORD & CO. toilet and bath, all bedrooms have P roome,-3 leaves bedraoms, garages,

' Christ Church from October Ist, good|7 oy ¢ : pay, a Poe ygeentadied een 28.9. 52-—0n. built-in © rds as. well as the WINDY WILLOWS, PROSPECT,
{Seu beching” Fully turmibedy a modern | "ng fig Y°qvear? OU, evict, work Stet aaa pf Hlichen. OR APEPaRe yas verb On TUESDAY 30th SEPT. amy JAMER one burnwale on
| conveniences. Three 8 each. |; = a sith, hike — | “PHORNBURY COTTAGE — Situate at close to the Gott Course in very coast 3 bedrooms, good verandahs.

Refrig., Gar Servants’ Room, enclosed . . Thernbury. Hill, Christ Church, (part popular residentia area - HITE PARK
' yard, Phone 3309. 20.9.52—t.f.n. and, 7 p,m, 28% 9, §2—1 PUBLIC NOE ACS Wall and Wood) containing. three. bed~- mediate possession, e ROAD—Large 2 storey house and
| Sot, November | “EABIOG Se a a sumsrAn Serena Moe ence

PLYMOUTH—Crane Coast, ovember “, gallery, Draw reom, me st .
and from iSth Jan, to Jan. 3ist, 1953, fadiece ae an alae aciee NOTICE | Kitchenette, Toilet and Bath, running Situate at Navy Gardens, com- SWEETFIELD, ST. PETER — 2
Phone 2953, 20,9.52—t.£.m. | practically” new ‘on ng ofder. woeter throughout, standing on approx. prising three bedrooms, two toilets storey estate type house. Inter-

Baten "Walemenne C. Arthur | Sealed. tenders. for, the purchase of|1% acres land, Apply any day (except end baths, combination dining and esting possibilities. Good bathing.

“THVERTON” situate. in Strathelyde| Phone 4748 or 236d Dy 9 si Se, View trees at St Luke's| Sunday) to.owner (Mrs. E. St, ‘@. Burton) living rooms, pantry, kitchen and THORPES, ST, JAMES—Country

containing closed. gallery, ae . sad Vicarage, wi received by the Chair-j on premises. 28,9.52-4n. storeroom, two servants rooms in mansion. Low figure accepted.
+ drawing and dint rooms, bed- man, Vestry of George up to October} -— ~ — the yard with toilet and bath, BUNGALOW, ROCKLEY—Com-
separate ‘and oe smail POULTRY th 1952, laundry room and garage. This is fortable timber house main road.
rooms, sepa ee AUCTION
t hall and iitene, Garage: and, servants’ || ———_—__—_________ : full particulars apply to the a lovely house offered at a com- é 3 bedrooms
room, For particulars apply, to Carring-| PULLETS~12 (Twelve) purebred white,| —2Ufchwarden, Mr. Ws A, Yearwood, petitive price. LAND, TWEEDSIDE ROAD—
ton & Sealy, Solicitors, Tajoag, Strest leghorn pullets.& months. old. at $3.00 | A#280M% St George. The. Vestry does UNDER) THE SILVER . Main road frontage 101. Ares
; : . Phone D. C. Stoute, Lodge ot bind itself to accept the highest. or; R CHURCHILL 14,738 sq. ft. Ideal business or
: Paniaitions wny tender, HAMME Situate at Maxwells Coast Road, factory. site.

“VICTORIA” fully furnished the sea- 28, 9) PQHIny D. H. A. JOHNSON, comprising three bedrooms with —_— BUSINESS PREMISES, HOUSE
side, Worthings. 3 bedrooms, Clerk,’ Vestry. of St. George, ON THURSDAY: the 2nd October by running water, combination draw~- ROEBUCK STREET — Good shop
and Sitting Room, open Verandah, Govt. LIVES’ 28,9, 52—im, | order of Mrs. LL. Clyde Cozier we will ing and. dining rooms, modern = frontage. £2,000.

Water, Electric Refrigerator, go TOCK ora reall. hee Soeanennas wane ane effects kitchen, ver ane ar ene Lane oe ae Nr. SANDY
Garage & Servants’ Quarters 100 per = ™ - y St. onards’ Ave., con- property is situate mn a . a ‘Compact 5
{ohth, ‘The Landlord pays for telephone | COW—A Cow fresh in. Milk. Apply NOTICE | sisting. of; residential area, with. excellent sea ec our Customers and the General Public room bungalow with garage.
& Water. Dial 8150, Mr. Joseph Smith, Mannneeh ok Morris 2 Chairs and 2 Rockers bathing. -A sound investment at 1 be: thas Stores at SPEIGHTS- Lowest priced property in this
27.9.52—3n. . 62—In, ‘in Birch}, Morris Tables, Ornaments a very low reserve price please note at our area,

Tien TMERIARORAM: SOCIRTY. | |Tabies, Pian Stacie, Fictures. Tang TOWN and SIX MEN’S will be closed on the LYNCHBURG, 51M AVENUE
WANTED PUPPIES — Pure bred Bull Mastiff to}, here will be an Day at H.C. |Brimsmead & Sons) Sideboard Dining WYNDAL BELLEVILLE--2 storey house with
be. delivered Oct, 11th. Tel, ‘ov all Old Boys on iv. Oetober| able and Chairs (in Mahogany) Cordea xl site .. gon following dates: verandahs, drawing and dining
20.9:58—2n. ¥ Wi . Rugs, Blectric Clock, Dressing Situate -at oe, Peer rooms. study 3 bedrooms.
HELP era] Old, Boys Cricket, match, 12.30 Tew |Table, Press, Chest of Drawers, Bed |]} a ee snd lin SPEIGHTSTOWN : 30th September io, '

; * ‘ocktails 5, to ™m,. Al 1 (paint blue)
oe MECHANICAL Mi awho will be amending, sem, asked | Cnet hictas Breakiant te rooms, totlet and bath, and a large 1st and 2nd October. NEW BUNGALOW, ROCKLEY

a
'



MISCELLANEOUS.

—_—_—$—$—$—$— arora

SEY ON et Delivensh: lenaaie
TONS — Any eliv: .
ately to K. R. Hunte & Co., Ltd, Lower |

Price 10 Re:

Broad Street
7 28.9.52—t.£.n,



The MEMBERS of the
WEYMOUTH CLUB

request the pleasure of your
Company to their

DANCE

at QUEEN'S PARK
on
Saturday Night, 4th October, 1952
M .
“CLEVIE GITTENS Orchestra

SUBSCRIPTION — $1.00

Tickets not transferable




REDUCTIONS FOR THIS
WEEK
Usually Now
Bath Towels White
Indian Fabric $1.20 $1.08
Rath Towels Colour
Stripped Dutch $2.11 $1.44
Pmbroidery Spun 36
y wide per yard $1.64 $1.31
.. Bed Tick 56" wide i
Assorted Col f _ 83 2 $1.05
Whilte Pillow Casés 20x
with Flap $1.18 $1.67
Suggested not to miss these
Bargains
\ 52, Swan Street.

NOTICE

Readers and Subscribers
to the ADVOCATE NEWS-
PAPER in Bathsheba, Cattle-
wash and surrounding dis-
tricts are asked to note that
as from Wednesday, October
1, we have changed our
agency from Mr. Joseph

Jemmott, of St. Elizabeth
Village, to Mr. LLEWELLYN
CARTER of “Hiliswich”, St.
Joseph.

You are asked to contact
Mr. Carter at the Bathsheba
Sports & Social Club, for the
continuation of the delivery
of your Newspaper.

All accounts to the end of
October must be paid to Mr.
Jemmott.







able from Stock in various carriage
widths as follows:—
llr — $260.00
15/7 — $293.00
ee
oS, Pi: Musson, Son & Co.,
tid Dial 38
28.9.82—t.¢.n.
TYPRORITING, ING — Service,
Moderate Fee. See. Ay Top Pioor,







— Of every dese

Ginag Chine, old Jewels, fine
crap iat Early books, Maps, Auto.
A al Yacht Club. nit “Sh
3.2,62—t.f.n
Hi EQ’ all

description. Owen T.

Street. Dial 3299, 1 Seer



MENIER’S COCOA. Soild at all lead-
ing Grocers. “% Ib, Tins 25c. My Ib
Tins 47e. am some of this delicious
Cocoa teday 27.9. 52—3n

—————
MENTER'S COCOA, Shipment just ar-
rived. SO as not to be disappointed



wnone your Grocers today and get a
Tin, 9. 52—3n.
MENIER’S COCOA, Just
kids likes And: the beams abe hen!
exception. Health and energy in every
drop. 27.9. 52—3n
HEN OPe- Genuine Ri
Alfonse DeLima & dy a Ome
site Goddard's, 27.9. 52-

“SANTO TAPE WORM TABLETS'—
Safe, effective and harmless remedy for



“ape Worms, Round Worms, ‘Thread,
Worms, obtainable at Booker's, (Btdos)
Drug Stores Ltd. 28,9.52—1n.

ee
SUBSCRIBE now to the Dally Tele: h,
England's leading Daily pele Seernaee.
wriving in Barbados by Air only a few
tay: aie Dubloation in London, Contact
jan Gale c/o vocate Co., Loca
Representative, Tel, 3113 a ‘

‘17.4.52—t.t.n,

————$—
TANK—One (1) New 300 Gallon Galva-

ulze Tank one (1) Si
a ae for eshte Phone G. fase
‘34 or









U-ADJUST SUN GLASSES” — have
novable lenses and can be adjusted to
it conditions, and weather. On sale at
Knight's: Drug Stores.

ee ee

27. 9. 53—2n

DANCE

The Volunteer Drill Hall
in aid of
St, Paul’s Church Choir and
Organ Fund
on
Tuesday Sept. 30th 1952
Music by Percy Green's Ork
Subscription -o-



MR. LEAGUE CRICKETER!
Have you ever scored a Century?

Have you ever taken 50

wickets?
Has your Club ever won a Cup?
If so it’s recorded in..,,.

THE ANNUAL LEAGUE
: CRICKETER

Jompiled by J. M. Hewit

B.C.L. Secreta: aan

Buy a Copy today from

COLE'S PRINTERY, Middle

s Street
ADVOCATE CO. LTD, PRESS CLUB, 53 Swan Street
Cireulation Dept. (2nd. Floor)
Next to the “CIVIC”
28.9.52.—4n. ~ ~28,9.52—1n,

+ London, W.C.1. England.

he estate of CLARA ALSOP GALE
ate of Dalkeith Road in the parish ot
‘aint Michael in this Island, aay |

°8.9.52—2n.



UNDER THE SILVER

who died in this Islamd on the llth day

of Dec 1951, are hereby required HAMMER
to send particulars of their claiena, On, Tuesday 30th by order of Mr.
guy a , oe . RG. Cabral, we will sell nie furniture
: t. orto trathelyde, which includes
of the Will of tue nata Clara Alsup ” ee Battee for 3 and 2° Rockers
a , in care. of Yearwood | coffee Tables, Dining Table and Chairs
& Boyce, Solicitors, James Street,| 3); in Mahogany: Piano by Irmler., Con-
Bridgetown, on or bifore the 29th lay goleum, China, Ele:tr.c Table Lamp

of November 1952, after which date |

M White Painted Rush Arn
haji. proceed to. distrioute. the assets. o1| Vcl) Mirror, ’ .







a Rockers, Sivail Mird. Hat-
he. said. estate, attong: the parting Gon pra te Brugest. Sing.e Simmons Bed-
fale claims of See shall then oe sieads and Springs Single Metal Bed-
nave had notice, and that I shall not eee eee oe ee COO eee ane
bo» Hable. 105) aswpts so distributed '01 rable with triplet Mirrors 1n_Mahogaly
Keli tee than heak had’ notina. | |Dphols, Steel Chairs, -Bnam.

Tables with 4 chairs, Frigidaire,

And all persons indebted to the
estate are requested to settle
debtedness without delay.

Dated the 25th day of September 1952.

HAMPDEN ARCHIBALD CUKE,
Qualified Executor,
Estate Clara Alsop Gale,

said

Stove etc, ail in Poreciain & Enamel with
their in-

Chromium Fittings This Burniture 1
Modern, Practical.y nev~ and very ni¢es
Saie 11.30 o'clock Te'ms Cash
BRKANKER, TROTMAN & CQ.,
Auctioneers

38 US eee

Deceased, 26.9.52—2n,

26.9.52—3n,





GOVERNMENT NOTICE

Applications for Admission to Universities and Colleges in
the United Kingdom Session 1953—54

Every effort is being made by the Director of Colonial Scholars to
secure vacancies at Universities and Colleges in the United Kingdom
for recommended students. who are well qualified. Competition con-
tinues to be severe for admissions to the faculties of Medicine, Den-
tistry, Science and Engineering, where an exceptionally high standard
is required.

2, The British Council will be responsible for making arran
ments for meeting students and, for securing suitable accommodati
for them.

3. Students are advised that it is most undesirable for them to
proceed to the United Kingdom unannounced and unrecommended
in the hope of obtaining admission to Universities and Colleges,’ as
even tutorial colleges and polytechnies are overcrowded and it is very
difficult to gain admission to them without due notice in the proper
form,

4. Forms of application for admission to Universities and Colleges};

in the United Kingdom, to be completed in quintuplicate, may
obtained from the Secretary, Student Advisory Committee, c/o Office
of the Director of Medical, Services, Wharf, Bridgetown, and must be
| returned to him not later than Wednesday, 29th October, 1952.

| 5. FROEBEL COURSES. Private students desirous of entering
| the Froebel Teacher Training Colleges in the United Kingdom for
training during the academic year 1953-54 should communicate with
the Secretary, Student Advisory Committee, at once.

28.9. peren

The Meumenife + fe

Alphabet

uestions about Gas



LEARN TO EARN |
Thousands of L.S.C, Students |
throughout the British Empire }
have increased their salaries |
through studying our easy postal |
courses (n BOOK-KEEPING, SEC-

at Your Gas Showrooms.

RETARYSHIP, BUSINESS On- {{{ |
GANIZATION, | COMMERCIAL. {{( | uestions about Cookers
LAW, ECONOMICS, ete. Redviced {ft | uestions about Water
fees to overseas students. Diplo- | ls Heaters
mas ono co eearoe free.— } | ,
co ] ‘
COMMERCE. pe {| Answered with pleasure

(Dept B.A.5) 116, High Holborn }}!

(

y'





SEND US YOUR ORDERS FOR
GALVANISED MESH WIRE.

| CENTRAL EMPORIUM

Corner Broad & Tudor Streets


























the sea It comprises three bed-
jcoms, one with built-in cup-
boards, drawing and dining rooms,
modern kitchen, toilet and bath

Downstairs; Servants’ room with
toilet and “path, garage for two

ears, and enough room for laundiy
etc, The prope'ty stands or
approximately 19,000 square feet
of land

BUNGALOW

Situate at Graeme Hall Terrace
very attractively designed, com-
prising three bedrooms with toilets
and baths attached, dining and
living rooms, kitchen, verandah to
the west and a nice patio to the
east. The property stands on
‘approximately ‘2 acre of

EVANTON

Situate at Top Rock comprising
three bedrooms, two with adjoin-
ing toilet bath, spare room
that can used as a breakfast
room or children’s nursery, living
and dining room, kitehen, toilet
and bath with hot and cold water,
verandah to the south and patio

land

to the north. The outbuildings
comprise servants’ room with
toilet and bath, and a_ large
garage. Inspection by appointment
only 3
PARAGON
Situate near Seawell Airport,
Christ Church, comprising two
large bedrooms with dressing

rooms attached, two medium size
bedrooms with dressing rooms and
built-in cupboards, toilet and bath,
large open verandah entire lengthy
of house with a lovely view tot
Chancery Lane Beach and the sea,
Downstairs: Entrance lobby, livirg
and dining aaene breakfast room.
\pantry, kitchen, large study, and a
lovely open patio to the south
This property also has _ lovely
grounds and a portion of arable
land containing 7% acres In-
rpection by appointment only

COVE SPRING COTTAGE
A lovely cottage standing on &
roods 27 perches of land situate
et St. James Coast having its
own private bathing beach, and
scomprising three bedrooms, with
private toilet and bath to main
bedroom, drawing and dining
rooms, European bath with hot
and «cold running water ‘and
veparate toilet, modern kitchen,
and a gallery on two sides.

WYNDOVER

Overlooking the very beautiful
Six Mens Bay, St. Peter. Stand-
ing on approximately 4% acres of
land having an extensive orchard
with specially selected fruit trees
The house comprises three bed-
rooms, “dining room, living room,
modern toilets and baths with hot
and cold water. Large verandahs,
Extensive outbuildings including a
large garage. two servants rooms,
\dry, workshop. This property
been extensively renovated by
present owner







the

HOMEMEDE

in the Garrison,

comprising four bed-
combination living and
dining rooms, separate toilet and
bath, kitchen with built-in cup-
boards, verandah the whole length
of the building. The outbuildings
comprise two servants rooms with
water toilet and a garage for two
cars. The above property stands
on approximately 7,500 square feet
of land, Inspection by appoint-
ment only.

Situate
Michael,
rooms,

St

REALTORS Limited

REAL ESTATE AGENTS

AUCTIONEERS
VALOERS
151/12 Roebuck Street,

Bridgetown Phone 4900



DO YOU REALISE THE NEED FOR MORE

QUALIFICATION rf
or ARE YOU INTERESYED' IN MAKING MORE MONEY?
IF SO, ENROL NOW FOR ONE OF THESE COURSES.
Architectural Draughts- Sanitary Inspector Course-
manship Building and General Agriculture
Design Course. Course.
A.M.S-E., (Civil, Insurance Practice.
and Mech.)
Automobile Repairman’s Raion,
Course, ” Petroleum Technology
Course,
elect u
= — ao ion and School Certifi .
General Electrical Engin- Accountancy.
eering Course. Civil Service
Course,

General Certificate of Ed-
ucation. Police Promotion Course-

Write for full particulars if course is not mentioned.
Write to the: i _

alltnns Eibeationd Fost conem ZO FO.
nstitute

Please send me Free Book.
P.O. Box, 307, P.O.S.,

Trinidad ~—
Agents for: Address ...
BRITISH INSTITUTE OF ENG. Subject of enone of
TECH. & BRITISH TUTORIAL Interest
INBTIEUTE, DONDOM- (FARE. oo ccewccegscvcsere

Elec.,

Entrance



INTERNATIONAL
HARVESTER

McCORMICK — DEERING

GREEN CROP LOADERS
TRACTOR MOWERS

HAY RAKES

LITTLE GENIUS PLOUGHS
BRUSH BREAKER PLOUGHS

DYRR KU SUBSOIL PLOUGHS
a

I> Come in and Inspect these
*
























house with patio, lounges, 3 bed-
rooms, good beach frontage

BEMERSYDE, ST. LAWRENCE
—Stone bungalow with 3 bedrooms,
lounge and dining rooms. Beach
frontage

BEACH PROPERTY, ST. LAW-
RENCE-—4 bedrooms, living and
galleries. Sandy

dining room,
8T, JOSEPA

beach.
ESTATE HOUSE,
bedroom pieosty

—Spacious 5



sT.
PHILIP» — Carefully remodelled
property with every modern
convenience. Private tiled baths

to each bedroom.

MODERN COUNTRY HOME,
ST. JOHN—Recently built stone
property with 4 bedrooms and
private tiled baths, patio, picture
windows.

BUNGALOW, PINE HILL —
Strongly built house with 2 bed-
rooms. Private wooded grounds,

LAND (Rear of NEW PLAZA
—Approximately 30,960 sq. ft.
valuable building land with 16
ft. R_of W to main road,

BUILDING LOTS, ROCKLEY—

zane sites adjoining Golf
lub.
COUNTRY VILLA, CHRIST

CHURCH—3% miles town, Pleas-
ant house with beautifully laid

out grounds, £5,000.

BUILDING LAND, 8T. JAMES’
COAST—Prices from 24 _ cents
upwards several sites available.

BUILDING SITE, 8T. LAW-
RENCE—Approx. 10,000 sq. ft on
coast in developed area,

BUILDING SITES, CHRIST
CHURCH—3 miles from town, 24
cts. sq. ft.

BUILDING SITES—Overlooking
St. James’ Coast.

STRATHCLYDE -—- Imposing
home with 4 acres, 3 double
bedrooms, spacious main rooms,

DURHAM, WORTHING — Se-
cluded stone bungalow, 3 bed-
rooms. % acre.

NEW BUNGALOW, WORTH-
ING—Compact with 3 bedrooms,

walled garden, Main road,
THE RISK, ST. JAMES—2
storey house, 5 bedrooms, 1%

acres. Beach opposite,

STONE HOUSE & ANNEXE,
Fontabelle. 2 bedrooms anneex.
Roomy living rooms.

COUNTRY HOUSE, 8T.
JAMES—Attractive & comfort-
able old property with rustic
charm. Modernised.

SEASIDE HOUSE, WORTHING
—Stone construction, 3 bedrooms,
living and dining rooms, veran-

good beach frontage.

dah,

HILLCREST, BATHSHEBA —
Stone bungalow 3 good bedrooms,
living room, gallery, light and
water. 6 acres.

TOBRUK, CATTLEWASH —

Popular holiday home. Soundly
built with 3 lounge
and gallery.

BAY HOUSE, CATTLEWASH—
Timber construction, good order,
3 bedrooms, good bathing. % acre.

SILVERTON
storey stone house, 4
central location.

WINSDALE, CHEAPSIDE—Sin-
ale ener house, 3 minutes Town

bedrooms,

CHEAPSIDE— 2
bedrooms,

cen’ .
HOUSES —
Two
road.
BUNGALOW,
Stone built
living rooms
RESIDENCE, St. Lawrence
2 storey house with 3 bedrooms,
&
6 acres

Hastings Road

small properties

on main
Two Mile Hill—
with 3 bedrooms, 2

spacious main rooms. About
good building land
PROPERTIES IN
Grenada, Tobago, Trinidad,
Jamaica, St. Lueia, Bermuda and
Dominica.

Business properties,

Investments,

Sugar Estates.

Rentals.

House and Estate Management
Property Valuation and Dilapi-
dation Surveys.

e
Plantations Building
Phone 4640

a




'
a

fli

|



SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 238,



CHURCH

ANGLICAN
Michael's Cathedral
PATRONAL FESTIVAL
Eve of the Feast: SUNDA‘
September
7 Fesial Evensong
and Pro on Preacher The Revd.
K o Grannum Subject “Bringing
the teaching and example of Christ into
everyday life.’
MONDAY
The Feast of S
5.00 a.m Surg
Hol Comm nion

St



28th

” p.m Sermon



29th September
Michael & All Angels.
Eucharist. 7.30 a.m
7.30 pm Festal
Fveusong, Sermon and Procession.
Preacher; The Ven. The Archdeacon.
Subject The practice of private
prayer, Bible reading and self discip-
line.’
(Phe of the Cathedrel invited

wear Copes:

Canons
to

ST. LEONARD'S

8 ar tioiy Communion 9 am
Matins and Sermon 3 p.m Enrol-
ment of Church Army Members.
Preacher Rev. B. C. Uliyett. 3 p.m
Sunday School. 7 p.m. Evensong and
Sermon

METHODIST

JAMES ST. 11 am, Rev. K. E, Towers
BA BD; 3 p.m. Sunday School; 7
pum Rev G Marshall; 730 pm

Evangelistic Services during each night

of the week



PAYNES BAY: 9.30 9.m. Mr. D.) Reid.
7 pom Mr G. Garper

WHITE HALL; 9.30 a.m, Miss G. Ox
ley; 7 p.m. Mr. S. Phillips

GILL MEMORIAL: 11 a.m. Mr. M
Hall; 7 p.m. Reception Service for new
members. conducted by Revs. K. E.
Towers, B.A., B.D. and F. Lawrence

HOLETOWN: 830 am Rey G Mar-
shall; 7pm Mr W St Hill

BANK HALL: 9.30 am. Mr. G. L
McAlister; 7 p.m Rev. S. Payne

SPEIGHTSTOWN ll am Rev. G
Marshall; 7 pm Mr E L Bannister

SELAH: 9.30 a.m. Rev. F. Lawr 2.

BETHESDA: 9.30 am Mr. P De

BETHEI 11 a.m. Rev. T. J. Furley;
7 pm Rev. W. Crosse

DALKEITH 11 am Rev W..
Vivian; 7 p.m, Rev. T. J. Furley

BELMONT: 11 a.m Mr G Harris;
i pm Rev W F Vivian

SOUTH DISTRiCT 9 a.m Mr Cc
Ford nm Mr. € Jones

PROVIDENCE: 11 a.m, Mr. L. Warthe:

p.m Mr c Brathwaite

VAUXHALI 11 a.m, Mr G. Jones;
7 pm Mr. V. Pilgrim

EBENEZER—-11 a.m. Mr. E. Toppin
7 p.m, Mr. C. G. Reid

Reva. S. W. C

BEULAH—11

a.m
r Mr
SHREWSBURY -

Joseph Sargeant



é Revd
s w C Crosse per M: c
Brathwaite
RICES—11 a.m. Mr. J. C. Mottley,
M.C.P. 7 p.m. Mr. A. Lucas,

Sunday Schools at 3 p.m
ADVENTIST
GOVERNMENT HILL CHURCH
7.15 p.m Evange:isti Meer

THE







PEASANTS’





1952
] ¢ CMURISTIAN SOIENCE
Piest Church of Christ Selemtiat
kw ‘. Bridgetown. Upper Bay Street
Sundays 11 nd 7
inesdays & A Servic '
Speaker Pastor W Ww Weithe

tes Testimonies of Chr



tia



a Science
ect Christians, t! Atomic Bomb

Armageddon”

e 1ling
SUNDAY. SEPTEMBER
Subject of Lessen-Sermon
Geiden Text
© Lerd
and

28,
REALITY
1 Chronicles 29:11. Thine
the greatness, and the power,
the glory thine is the
kingdom, © Lord, and thou art exalted

1952
7
Speaker
ject: “God's Seven
World of Uncertainties head above all
COLLYMORE ROCK A. M. E. CHURCH the following Citations are included
11 am, Exposition, Exodus. X. 3.30 '» the Lessen-Sermon:
p-m. Sunday School; 7.15 p.m. Avan The Bible Acquaint now thyself with
gelistic Service. nm, and be at peace: thereby good shall
|

KING
p.m

st
EB.
Pastor M

CHURCH
ange
G

7.15 Meeting
ibhard. Sub-

Certainties in 2

is



The Annual Missionary Meeting takes
place om Monday evening (to-morrow?
at 7.30 p.m. Dr. H. G. Cummins, M.C P
will be the Chairman and the Speaker
will be Major S. Morris
Mr. Vivian.

A cordial invitation is extended to
Rev

come unto thee Job 22:21

Science and Health with Key te the
by Mary Baker Eddy
God fashions all things after His own
Life is reflected in existence,
truthfulness
their

Seriptures,

and the Hev ikene:

Truth In

which



God in goodness

au own

impart
permanence

peace and

E. A. Gilkes Page S16

Minister:



GOVERNMENT NOTICES
APPOINTMENT OF SUPERVISOR (FEMALE) MAIN KITCHEN
GENERAL HOSPITAL

; Applications are invited for the non-pensionable post of Super-
visor, Main Kitchen, General Hospital, at a salary of $480 rising by
annual increments of $48 to $912 per annum, plus temporary Cost of
Living Allowance at Government rates.

: Applicants should not be over 40 years of age, should have at-
tained a satisfactory standard of education, and should have had
some experience in housekeeping duties on a large scale.

Applications on forms obtainable from the Secretary, General

— should be forwarded to him not later than 30th September,
1952.



Vacant Post of Chemist, Department of Science and
Agriculture, Barbados
Applications are invited for th: post of Chemist, Department of
Science and Agriculture, Barbados
; Applicants should hold a good Honours Degree in Agricultural
Chemistry and preferably should have had
search experience in soil science

: a post is pensionable and the salary is in the scale $4,128 x 192
—5,280 x

some post graduate re-

240

5 7 i
' 5,760 per annum, plus such temporary cost of living
allowances as

may be payable by;
Point of entry in the salary Seale
and qualifications.

Government from time to time.
will be determined by experience

Applications stating age, qualifications and experience and men-
tic ning che names of two referees should be addressed to the Director
of Agriculture, Department of Science and Agriculture, Bridgetown
Barbados, and should reach him not later than 31st October, 1952 |

Further details will be supplied on request.

28.9.5

2—2n,







LOAN BANK ACT, 1936

To the Creditors holding liens against the Peasant Holdings
“TAKE NOTICE that the peasant owners mentioned in the First Column of the Table

hereto annexed are about to obt
ot money respectively set out in the Second C
of such peasant owners by way of loan ag.
tioned and described in the Third Column .

Names



St. Andrew
Benjamin, Mary



St. Michael
Alleyne, Julian
Green, Joseph N,
Hall, Etheline

Thompson, Lilian A.

St. James
Gibbons, Edwin A.

St. Andrew
Burke, Everson Dwell ....
Mullen, Laurence

St. Philip

Heckles, Joseph J,

Browne, Gertrude

King, Edwin L. .... :

Layne, Mabel & Brathwaite
Douglas ;

Newton, Ernestine A.

Pollard, Hilda A.

Smith, Olga Odessa

Weekes, Wilhelmina

Christ Church
Perkins, John E.

‘st. Gittens, Wm. E, Dec.
per Gittens, Thomas E
and Mayers, Bertie C.
Millar, Walter FitzD.

Amount Amount

granted | previously

granted

$ ¢. oe

155.00 72.00

APPLICATIONS FOR LOANS, PEASANTS’ LOAN BANK—“D”
; ae Tet 1011 | 120.00 80.00
; 1 ;

00 90.00
oo 208.00

00 _

|
00 36.00
00 36.00
00 );"*° =—

00 82.00

00 36,00
00 | 50.00

v0 72.00

150.00 90.00

2279.00

ain under the provisions of the above Act the sum

Column of the Table opposite the names
ainst the peasant holdings respectively men-
f that Table opposite such names,















Locality AR P









Walkers 1 0 00

o





Haggatt Hall 36.00
Friendship Lr, Bir-
neys 1

..|Haggatt Hall

14.00

72,00

00

50.
} 00

| 200.

.. | Carlton 1 120.00 82.00

| Nr. Friendship

ws 20
nN | Belleplaine

00

45.00
36,00

80.
80

17
03
06

.. | Six Roads 1
.| Marehfield & Kirtons
The Nursery

60
250.
500.

60.
70.
45.
200.
50

3

; 27
28
Ov
25
00

..| Penny Hole
... | East Point & Hill View
..|Nr. Well House
...|Church Village
. | Kirtons
|

RONNNY pr



. | Pilgrim 00 150

36
06

Bridge Cot l
Prerogative | 1

80

GRAND TOTAL $4,032.00



PART ONE ORDERS
B
Major C.F PrP. WEATHERHEAD
Commanding
THE BARBADOS REGIMENT
Issue No MM
. at: Ul

SUNDAY ADVOCATE :

GOVERNMENT NOTICES





4 Sep.
Major C. BE. P. Weatherhead is apponted to act as O.C. Barbados Regiment
viee Major O. F. C Waleott, ED om leave wef. 2% Sep. 52
Lieut E R Goddard assumes command of H.Q. Coy vice Major C & PF
Weatherhead who ts acting Command ng Officer, w.et. 25 Sep, 52

>? PARADES — TRAINING .
All ranks will parade at Regt HQ at 1700 hours on Thursday 2 Oct. 52 A
Coy begins ring the A.M.C. — Rifle at 0600 hours on Monday 29 Sep. 52, @
detailed. Volunteers of “A’ Coy who are not firing the A.M.C. on Thurscas

will continue bayonet training
Volunteers of “B" & HQ Coys whe have failed to qualify
A. Banfield

in their AMO.

will report to Captain 1 at the miniature Thursday
mme_ October

} VARIETY SHOW

There will be a variety show in
Sep, 58, for all Volunteers and their friends
collection will be taken at the end of the show.
ORDERLY OFFICER & ORDERLY SERJEANT FOR WEFK FNDING 6 OCT
G. Peterkin

N. B

range on

rit Hall at 2030 hours on Monday
There is

29th
no admission but @



Orderly Officer —

Lieut. ¢
Orderly Serjeant

Reid,

M. L. D. SKEWES-COX, Major
8.0.L.F. & Adjutant,
The Barbados Regiment
PART fl ORDERS
THE BARBADOS REGIMENT 26 Sep. &
1 LEAVE — Privilece ‘ ae
Major O. F. C. Walcott, E.D. Granted 9 weeks’ P/Leave with per
mission to leave the colony w.e.f.. 25]

ep. 52
568 Pte Heath, J.H Granted 3 months’ P/Leave w.e.f. 25 Sep



385 Pte Gibbs, G Pt 11 O Ser No. 21 D. 27 Jun 52 in

marginally named delet
3 months



espect of the

months’ and insert
2 TRANSFERS
521 Drmr. Cr

ichlow, ¢ Transferred from Band and posted t
B" Coy wef. 25 Sep 52
448 L/Sit. Rudder, G Transferred to Reserve Coy wef. %
Sep, 52

M. L, D) SKEWES-COX, Major,
§.0.L.F. & Adjutant,
The Barbados Regiment
DRUMS «& FIFRS
Band practices will be held on Mondsy 9 Sep
The Drum. and Fifes will give a dfpa
Tuesday 30 Sep, 52, at 8 p.m

Wed, 1 Oct. and Thurs
at Hastings Rocks on the

2 Oct, 42
evening ot

Vacant Post of Inspector (Income Tax)—Income Tax and
Death Duties Department

\pplication are invited by the Government of Barbados for the
post of Inspector (Income Tax), Income Tax and Death Duties De-
partment

2. The post is pensionable and the salary is in the scale of

$3,120 x 144—3,840.

3.
annum is payable.
drawal at any time

4. Appointment will be subject to medical fitness and
on probation for two years in the first instance.

5. The appointment will be subject to Celonial Regulations and
the local Civil Services Regulations and Instructions. Passage expenses
not exceeding $1,440 will be payable on first appointment
sages are provided

6.

illowance at the rate of $156 per
The allowance is subject to variation or with-

will be

Leave pas-

The successful candidate will be required to assist generally
in the administration of the Ineoms Tax Act and will be principally
eoncerned with the examination accounts and determination of
profits of business, professions aig wade. He will also perform such
other duties as the Commissioner of Income Tax and Death Duties
may require from time to time

7. Candidates should possess » high standard of general ecluca-
tion and a recognised accountaney qualification with some experience

of

in accounts or taxation. Member ship of a recognised accountancy
body would be an advantage.

8. Application, stating age, full details of qualifications and ex-
; D. A. HAYNES, perience, accompanied by two testimonials, should be submitted to the
Dated this 29th day of September, 1953. Manager, Peasants’ Loan Bank Colonial Secretary, Public Buildings Bridgetown, to reach him not
later than 15th November, 1952.
APPLICATIONS FOR LOANS, PEASANTS’ LOAN BANK REM.
x Amounts | |
ames granted | Locality A. R. P.
ee Lae
ee $e
eyne, Julian ..., 80.00 Ha
. ggatt Hall 1 O° St
mane ME cr N. 36.00 | Hegeatt Hall | 2 V1
Pa ” — rie 72.00 Friendship & Lr. Birneys 1 0 00
Tris, Bitte ...... hss iis 50.00 | Whitehall 1 3 20
Est. Thompson, Joseph Dec,
id Thompson, Theresa & |°
eorge ed se 64.00 ;Cave Hill 3 09
Worrell, Randolph B. 90.00 | Haggatt Hall hk Oe
St, James
Gibbons, Edwin A, sel 32.00 Carlton | 1 $2
St. Peter | |
Selman, Walter Bil 55.00 |Ashton Hall | 1 +2 08
St. Lucy
Brathwaite Miriam k ii 100 Checker Hall
Gilkes, Theodore & Fitz- | ue erate ie
Clarence hsp hed su} 50.00 |Bird Cottage & Crab Hill | 1 2 09
St. Andrew
Benjamin, Mary .... bic a 72.00 Walkers 1 0 00
Burke, Everson, Ewell . | 45.00 Nr. Friendship | 2 20
Est. Springer, Collis H. Dec. |
per Springer, Rosamund 60.006 'Cane Garden 5 1 30
St, Joseph |
Est. Brace, William H. Dec. | |
per Brace, Ellen 50.00 |St. Elizabeth Village 1 0 82
St. Philip
Alleyne, Lawrence C. 36.00 |East Point 3 15
Beckles, Joseph J. 90.00 |Six Roads + oe
Gooding, Carmen E, 36.00 |Bast Point 2 00
King, Edwin L. .... | 100.00 |The Nursery | 3 2 06
Newton, Ernestine A. 36.00 |East Point & Hill View | 2 28
Smith, Olga Odessa | 82.00 {Church Village | 1 0 2
Christ Church |
Perkins, John E. 50.00 | Pilgrim | 1 2 00
Pinder, Beryl FE. 50.00 Ventnor | 3 21
Prescott, Marion iis at 30.00 |Maxwell Hill 3 02
Rose, Leitha per Rose, Jona- } |
than i : 30.00 Ventnor 1 0 24
St. George
Est. Gittens, William E, Dec.
per Gittens, Thomas and
Mayers, Bertie C.__.... 72.00 |Bridge Cot 1 0 36
Millar, Walter Fitz D. .... 90.00 Prerogative 1 1 «06
St. Thomas
Marshall, Edith 40.00 Hillaby 3 00
1598.00
} qxgntatidiniogin /
SL
APPLICATIONS FOR LOANS, PEASANTS’ LOAN BANK—“B”
tree reentrant ie ee peeiestaceeeetheateeteneieememeintaiensereceenteinsienenantnenennentinnntisananaenigaaseescaieitaanacseimeneiaarntiia eT



A 40—“SOMERSET”

| sail



'

i

achoone
Philip H
M

Eme
Davidse
Gardenia W







SEA AND AIR
TRAFFIC

In Carlisle Bay



ainbow

PAGE FIFTEEN





oo

y

IN ORDER to reduce the delay occasioned in
purchasing SCHOOL TICKETS, it has been
found necessary to fix a minimum of TWENTY

e Enterprise 8
ril E. Smith, Gita
M., Wonder-





itaion Wessels: Blue’ Biae, 7. 1B. atts TICKETS for each sale. Smaller quantities
ee will only be sold towards the end of the school
ARRIVALS . term in order to finish out the term.

S.S. Sapho, 4,038 tons, from St. Cro c
under Captain ©. Corcasas. Agent gee The above arrangements are EFFECT
ane Puan mee IVE FROM MONDAY, 29TH SEPTEM-

DEPARTURES . BER, 1952.
M.V. Caribbee for Dominica x
MAIL NOTICE x
% .
% General Moior Omnibus

Mails for St. Lucia, Dominica, Mont
serrat, Antigua, St. Kitts, Bermuda % Let i
Roston, Halifax, and Montreal by the | \ Ou. e
R.M.S. Lady Rodney wif be closed at ss
the General Post Office as under .

Parcel Mail at 12 noon, Regi s
MeD OS 2 DM. oes ae >, BESOOS SOE SOOO FOO SGI GF OOOOS
p.m. on the 0th September $699660066666"

a

We cordially.



BARCLAYS BANK (DOMINION,
COLONIAL AND OVERSEAS)

announce that as from

TUESDAY 7th

during the rebuilding of their Premises. their offic

OCT.

es will be

situated in

TEMPORARY PREMISES
AT

Lower Broad Street — (opposite

Plantations Ltd. building}

where the full Banking service will be conducted.

Holders of Traveller's Letters of Credit and Traveller's
Cheques may present these to the small annexe which is
Leing established in Collins Ltd.’s building in Broad Street

where a limited Banking service will be provided.



oue

the

A 40—VAN

Public to. visit. our

where a
can be sven, including

the new successor to that

most popular of All Cars
“The Gustin Seven”

And remember...

AUSTI

—~You can depend on

ECKSTEIN BROS.— Bay Street.



Redeconated Showroom
Gt Bay Strool,

display of












wad



SN cca
% %
+ . *
‘, r , ‘
$ NOTICE %
s
e
3
+ —_—.
&
+
Hg ec TICKETS
' » 4 4 ~



A 70—“PICK-

JOU Baus tO eee ei aT
> — . oy EL,

5 TON LW.B. TRUCK






















UP”

ae


__ PAGE SIXTEEN SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY. SEPTEMBER 28. 195

9











A

46454
SOO POSER SSO SOS ESS SO SOLS POPP SPOOFS

Inquiry Into Cyclist’s Methodist LISTENING ¥<

aol



= = LPL PE SS SSOOS TS




























3 Remem 4D Fr & “
. ‘er an on't Forget y % = ‘ : .’
Â¥, > ~ =. *
Evancelical HOURS % i} Si. CECILIA Boys 8 A SACRED CONCERT 3
" > 4¥ ange ica | | CLUB CONCERT g é. x
ea f ( ournec a % at ST. CECILIA BARRACKS ae > 3: MNRee ae gee onee ht
Cam a n SUNDAY. SEPTEMBER ¢s, 1952 % MONDAY, 29TH SEPTEMBER } SIR GEORGE & LADY SEEI *
THE INQUIRY into the circumstances surroundin; I 1s 1.00-—7.15 p.m 2h.5IML. 81. SOM % Calypsoe 5, ee a Pre ea se »
the death of 23-year-old Kenneth Springer of Flat Roch, For t..e next three weeks the 4 p 4.15 p.m. Couneil Fe cident x %
St. George, was furthet adjourned until Saturday, October Meh Churehe f the City aes % Poling BAA: in Adtendiiiien ae pe. Ce eae *
yesterday by His Worship Mr. G. B. Griffith. Acting ©f Bridgetown » ill be holding an 6 p.m : Admittance : Codrington College) »
we ~ “ Fete ate ap Pp. re ; s © Evangelical Campaign centred in 615 p.m. English x Adults 1/6 — Children 9a, | 7 s
P 3 Magistrate of District “A Jarves Street and Bethel Church- i.) Dreques Sas _ Refreshments. on Sale Pe ereNs Wa eerwarcss. fe
Kenneth Springer was detained at the General Hos- « The Can n which starts * ee ae : Tickets on Sale Wey oon 1% “At 4 p.m. in ald of charity x
pital on September 18 after he was involved in an acci- ©2 Monday the 29th will run until 192M, 0.7m & " “93.9.52—2n. {| & PROGRAMME 1/6 26.9.52-2n. »
5 ; : Sian ati ; c } .
dent on Haggatt Hall Road, St. Michael, with a car. He oe _ aie w? eae F a i Voiczs, 7.45 p.m. | ) UE TE DSLR
o ; ; - . lorning Of tne ampaign in , s ay Service, 815 p.m. Radio News- AAA AAA AIM A AMIE
died at the Hospital five days deter. fla the churches there will be morn) peel, 6 30 > ‘” Napan. 8.45 p aa, aloes x ’
r ’ ree itmesses gave evidence ing prayer meetings 1enci in Haggerston, 9 p.m. Charles Vitliersi &
PARTSH ROUND-UP: yesterday in the inquiry snd .on at " ‘ es CEO ing | Stanford. 10 p.m. The News, 10.10 p.m. 1g
- Tuesday September 30 the jury” ~~ ' the Eahorials, 10.06 Dm. Lancew sae
° nd Coroner will visit the spot During the first wee ctingktf tet ek ee eee x
I vi the po iring ne st kK meetings ae
ice 16rlage where the accident occurred. Mr will be held in the two Churches. f BONDS’ SEPTEMBER =. eet x
Nas D.H. L. Ward and Mr F. G Shorus singing from 7 p.m. and 4-7?) p.m ition nase Pet %
Still Aeute Smith are appearing for interested then the service from 7.30 p.m The News. 4.10 p.m. The Daily 1%
‘ parties. From Tuesday October 7th to | Sev ce, 4.15 p.m. The Case of the Night |<
Dr. A. S. Ashby who performed Tu2sday October 14th meetings “* Friend, 4.45 p.m. Harold | 9%

The rice. problem is still the : will : og
centre of discussion in St. Philip, ‘he Post mortem examination on Will be held in the open air in
The Advocate correspondent paid S«ptember 23 said that there wera Various parts of the City, Details and Waltzing

m. Listeners’ Choice, 6 p.m. |
lany. 6.15 p.m. Marching | @
6.45 p.m. Sports ‘Round- | s$



IS A SUIT

| OF STYLES



A VARIETY :
























a visit to that: parish yesterday 8D*asions on the left shoulder, Of that will appear later, On uP and Eiht poe Home wies trom |
nda was to k in some dis. 4k’, hp and nose. He attributed Monday October 13th at 7.30 p.m. Beital %
vas told that in some @i ; y : ; . ,
tr.cts rice was not obtained {o> death to a fractured skull produe- ae tee Ade ta ee eS ee YOU LL BE
the past seven wecks. Ing shock and haemorrhage, ea colony wide: gathering of > 775 5m. Books to Read and Balleut®
- Maud Burrowes of Flat Rock, Methodists. We take this oppor= | talk. 745 p.m, Charles Villiers Stanford, % ° }
One housewife said that the St, George said that the decease. tunity of calling all people to ral- 2.15'p.m. Radio” Newsree!, 8.30 p.m $
number of persons in her home wes her "con She bet sea) to us at that meeting Haydn, &4 p.m. European Sutvey, | } DELIGHTED
ie é r Psi e st sav n " ; 2 s 5 ar
circle is thirteen, (all eating), bu‘ a‘ive on September 18 when h Tr P te itayert anethnnt Rebomble, 10 Fr iS In Aqua, Rose, Maroon,
the amount of rice allowed to Je‘t home riding a motor cycle ne campaign will conclude | phe News, 10.10 p.m. From the Editorials ie Gold, Grey, Black, )
her by her grocef* for the past how 7.45 am. tor work e +... With special services in the James 10.15 p.m. Science Review, 10.30 p.m. | ¢ Navy and White
three months was three pints thes as son Ms ; ee + ster : re : and — tone on D nce Music. 10.45 p.m. Tales from the i% TO WEAR. ¢ i
L the sé lay re hea ne was Sunday night ctobe Ot “6.7, oe 1
4 : be involved in an aceiéent with per , scheilit tabaci, i x e i
” : } car cn Haggatt Hall ro-d nea eee ie arr aD ?
Shelled Seemp and corn-flous Harold Lynch of Reberts Ten- ‘Tomorrow 7 a.m. James Street 1g i
be stainec ; flip an-r + Mir cs 4 yet} - SSD
on, Macha St, Pl eye t. Michael lt ine cour get Bete: " “Morting” Heep : MAFFEI & CO., LTD PRICES
ith litte difficulty, Both item i n Septemt ‘ j \ ting — —_ : *. é . a ”
ei Sd ee a ae Te ee Sey b 3 i, Meeting, { 11 YEARS — 11 YEARS \f ¥ $5.24 & $4.48 ty
fol plentiful and are sey at tho «!. 5 am. he was criving a car 7 p.m. James Street and Bethel: (1941-1952) ‘ oT : i
folowing» prices:; shelled corn !2 alo Hi gat Hall road going Gospel service ; *horus ‘ Wnt } ~ ="
> per pint and corn-flour 2) towa'ds the country, He reacned : ing. ssi and chorus sing- { LABOUR DAY! ! PRINCE WM. HENRY ST. {
$s per pint : ma‘or road and stopped the car. y tre
29 * ee * , Moving from the major road he { LABOUR DAY!!! DDDODOOGHGOGGH FDO HGHOOGGHGOOHOH SOD
Bain Peet in St. John is ive; signalled and looked through the Jo : Ca The Workers’ Day Suitable for Evening or {)
coming ¢ avour . fous’ jiear window nut sav nothing ‘ | 7 ;
On Thursday night a aumber c¢! behind him and turned to the right. yce rey } e celebrated with a morning wear i
perrons from St. Joseph were seen ‘sh° reeched to the right side « )

i h beach enjoying a “mo

)

: ; : )

8 a “moon- th read his car was struck and .,,..,,@ From Page iz {

ligh seabathing picnic They or getting out he notice rmin *ensly enough, while Ella is too



will t
remained until 4.33 a.m, Friday. under a tunnel and a motor cycle ldclerminate a character to hold
Yesterday the beach was agaili against a wall. He went to the the book together,






crowded with holiday-makers and took eed ‘A Feartul Joy’ (1949), the iast Under the Avuspices of

The Barbados Workers’
Union
And

Yi . Pa ”
A dog was killed Biv a lorry ii i more intelligent, is less dynamic a er ar ee say | 10, n, 12 & 13, Broad Street
Burke’ : Village, St. “Joseph, on DEVOTIONAL SERVICE ind less resilient than Sara. She Monday, 6th October, 1952 Made in these New

aeeaes en me "7 AT Y.MC. starts by marrying anq being (Bank-holiday) :
Friday night last, Up to 11.80 M.C.A, prompily @esivted be ws rune ont | At all Wool Tropicals

vide » him up and carried him , . : ;
are Bs sarnes ape St. vee qo to the General Hospital, “s kee ee oy pubiee® ae]
tne halilae nak e Dante a@ine At this stage the inquest was gtions, It bears a cantante eae}
bol 1olida) akers we SWim- adjourned until October 4, blance to “Herself Surprised ” but.

& ‘ * . middle-class Tabitha Baskett, if







a.m. yesterday the dog was stil)



Me SAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LID.





“ 1 on the roadside of the Barbados Y.M.C.A. wil] leck courage and chart fe a i d i - oe
% * * s Hg ae 2 surage and charm; she has i = SSS

be held at the Headquarters this Bonser’s child and is taken up price reduction in

Since the recent rains the crops evening at 4.30 o'clock. first by a literary dilettante and
in St. Philip are green again,. !1 The speaker will be Mr. V. B. many years later by a wealthy
Christ Church the crops seem St. John. A cordial invitation is manufacturer who marries her.
badly in need of rain, At some .extended to members and the Tabitha is a conservative by |
plantations, labourers are e:- general public including ladies. nature and resists change: but she|
gaged in watering some of thi |--—————-— cannot resist. Dick Bonser who |
crops. The water used on such | turns up periodically to borrow |

occasions is drawn from wells. > >y or vy her 3onser
Residents ‘of St. Philip wb WEATHEK REPORT eivea bots aa eee ees

gives her life and floats her off

Include :
The Famous Bee Show
Donkey Races

i
,
years ! () LTD
eg .
ser yramia’ Ballding @ GREY $52 00
Hand Balancing @ BROWN , up

Outstanding Events will |



Muscle Control, Etc,

* Will our Customers please note
Beauty Contest ti

an that our

ay





+
®

went to the Crane Beach yester- ES > the sandbanks: she realises this
day hoping to get relief from the YESTERDAY instinctively and even aii n she |

heat by sea-bathing found tic Rainfall from Codrington: is quite an old woman, she still}

See the Crowning of

Coie Footbal Cadies) ff Pho slggern Hggals AR “= LUMBER YARD & HARDWARE DEPT.
















sea choppy Oe ynleryitiogs. They |< Nil. cannot resist him. ) Spinsters vs,
did not risk going in ‘and went’! otal rainfall ¢ This is another excelle vel: Women saving in th st of
f r ‘or S is another excellent novel A 2 | saving in the cost of your
away somewhat disappointed. date: 4.91 ins, month to if it fails to satisfy completely, it Cricket Match — Stevedores finished suit. WILL. BE CLOSED FOR
‘Temperature: 170,5° is only perhaps because with a vs. Lightermen
Wind SF. writer lik Cary t
Vv i 4 river e ary one expects, . "
Postponed For | "ae tiem | aie See Il gs mae gaan fl | STOCK -TAKING
Soe iifferent ; better ee : si rize : $25. |
S , d Ti Parsnester: (9 am.) 29.928 Eee etidee. Se ehaseet Gutls 2nd Prize : $10.00 | a
.m. K thirteentt rel. appears this Vaudeville and Calypso | |
econ ime a ehivigenth | Dovel, |, *ppeare his!) Cempetition—Twe Shows {i| e BD. ce | On TUESDAY 30th SEPTEMBER
The Programme of ° Sacred not stop short, tantalising us, at 7 ae and Mid-Night ’ | $ | AND
Music which Was to Have been }| Sunrise: 5.47 am 1939, but will take us right up to pecially So lak | ;
given by the Police Band at S¢ Sunset: 6.06 p.m, the present day. The novel which Workers ! Celebrate Your WEDNESDAY 1st OCTOBER.
Peter’s Church. to-day (Sun- Moon: New, September 20 Fives us the peculiar ‘feel’. of this Da “0 Do not miss it ! BD.
day) 28th Sept. has been post- | Lighting: 6.00 p.m. ies te cocent seas iab Saahe ‘MEMBERS FREE —_—
. & =f ne pce rears as > * - . |
poned this Pee ee pA i dies ry Ta, oy ae 5.38 v'sion and in their true historical Adults 1/- :: Children 6d. of Bolten Lane |
engagement whic’ shou nave . , . a! verspective: this rel he y d N & HAYNES C0 LID
taken place last Sunday, 2\st om iw ela cer % iat Ott think that | Gates Open at 12 Noon WILKINSO 9 r
ah and must be fulfilled to- | Joyce Cary will be the man wa | 28.9.52.—4n.
ay. ———cn"_ed_ " Will write it. | So SSS | >

















8



> : BQ BAAD AON ON AONB BBP PDP PBN Bo Be Bw BP BN BN BD BY PDO Ze
BABEEFA - FABAAF FAAP FFAFAAFAFAFFA oo

ZA0
x






§ Lawes Shoes Hercules

Bicycles

Clearing!
2 Roadsters @
$60.00 ea.

1 Carrier @
$86.00,



In as much as we find it impracticable to serve all our Customers with CHAMPAGNE
in celebration of our 17th anniversary, we are adopting a more profitable means of celebra-
tion, and that is to share our profits with all our Customers during the month of OCTOBER.





Here is merely an idea of some of the Bargains which will make this anniversary an
unforgettable one:-—



Bags! Bags!



Ladies” Mall Stips
OOO 2568 5 iy 3 0 5 phases ata ac aie $2.00 each
eset me ee by cant a $1.00, Bentwood





Dress

Materials
Art Silk, Rayon & Spun

loveliest assortment in Town

Costume Jewellery Chairs

Costume Jewellery—Breoches, Ear-rings, Necklaces .
ete. At Gift Prices — $16.00 per pair

é 3 PLY CHAIRS
Cotton Blankets — $12.00 per. pair

Oe OO ae ee Gis Bpice cl nate a REED $4.00. ea.

; esp! tk abniy ‘ a \
BUY iss ea cae $2.88 ,, MEN'S S i GE: | 2
' And still more Bes for ‘. ” K

every occasion from Cycle Tyres “



S BPBRABAAAEAAES AAA ABD A AAA AA
FR AFA FAFA AFF AFF FPP FFF FF FPA FPP PFS F



Prices as low as .... 64c. yd.



Za



Cottons

\merican Pereales in beauti-

48ec. up a x i SEMI ss visicissssdvoedenese ;
i dedteinsiiaemiinnneesiosselsgh els edi Be S LVS Ss ie. aca

: ful designs as low as 69e. yd.







,
Gentlemen »
‘



\ - adies” Cycle Tubes





; NN
5 We
: CGR 19 ses, e8 {EOE yi Va pa phates Nace $1.26 ea. ; A
? Seorsucher Pange €&PSs We BAR et is Bo a Oe Ae aut $1.26 .. strongly advise you » x
replenish your ward-
— colours: . 69e. yd. A iine assoriment to choose gy Rg = PES ce au

ws @ltra Modern Sewing Machines











% Flowered & Polka Dots irom. Pvices from 60. up Special Price during October oo. .e. $59.00 each 5 = aes aoe will >
et 7 savy reductions in
4 from 72e. te 90c. per vd. em ream e reg ° 2 hte’ alll Khaki SM
y Wer Rod Tiel Plastic Tabling ‘ ae co a
PP i :
» ea pare eons Attractive patterns . a weeeee @ 9c. per yd 4 Belts, Hats, Vests,
x Genuine Erisk Lines Vosrels Beautiful patterns, good quality. 56” wide . from $1.42 yd.-up Creara pisanal, Serge & ?
E pens — “ fees Garbardine, also S‘i-es.
REPRE i 74 5 a56 18 sMaased wceueee @ T6e, euch “7 o ye 7 J Wise men Will Shop »
$— “| FOR BARGAINS GALORE, See.... .





now for Christmas. W\

: a= Gi : Ra '
» lurkish Bath Towels from $1.00 up ; y
ss Seeing is believing so accept our invitation to come \
M4 naa ERSTE ersten ee @ e in and see for yourself and join in the spree of keen \

% Anklets in White & colours all sizes from 36c, to 50¢ ul r Y %] \ ae prices in honeur of our 17th Anniversary W
« Gah ee ete. SWAN STREET. )



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I'u.i SIX SINDU NI\I>\\ SEPTFJHSEft For Women Only! I %  Bandbox Liquid Soapl* %  %  l! dame i ol.AIRE spells GLAV %  lag | !,,,.. %  rmsds iho journey back lo college n the air and in nn MORE AIRSICKNESS FOR ME rook a coupli of AIRSICK TABLETS, before ;ind during UM ftlghl Arrived dead on : classes Try AIRSICK % %  H ", ; i rw i a | in Ha DM MM %  aboul bul I I have I t'sed to look like a sa< k roun.l wiln*\^>^ lost! %  %  I SILK > *^S1.1MMINH I I lose weUht! %  I i MI V WILI 01 r YOI H WEIGH1 I i >WN .ill right! *oui %  selft l>> I love my food' E light? seasoned I %  of prlk or onions, and I'm Mill taking Since i.iking AN I can eel drink anything and get away ith It No* %  i vestijce of BO OOOUI AMI'LEX I (.MB.V1S ALL INPLEASANT BREATH IKlCHS it is harmless yet effective Whack away th blues.. E VER) lii.t: psychologists a ran doll u his ..ni in ii in rh. if,.' that in fitol tag. ii | Tit inn if can pummel n it. and LMi it limb iron, ii with j purging %  i %  lugs***** thai I inti • %  itu • mi %  F tta %  •>! Piimmr'litnK lablt nrai Tin besl r i %  ind ihei beat wall . Open to sky illlnile % %  <• %  II MIWHIA ,il.< equipped %  /. %  %  mi SI'A TOOTH I! Mi; BRUSHES AND BABY BRUSHi *ATTEH %  iiy a Spa" Because a Bpa bruah In i or N>h.n stands up to hard bin Bpa Mary here chats In many wi\ .1 subject of Fan %  I ra aa o ni then ara those who are agmi. spaced family, i>ui for I FAMILY PLANNING, Mar; always recommend! • xt that i RXNDEL FOAM UM us as a young '.id these days. Been laJdi of sugar in real 01 man, or child can laki but, ll mu t \ %  -...>. N toe no IK*' Idyl H^lS^ HI III I.I XI, iih aim Mhai w i OPrfiei the n< 1all> lid IMC* WIIAI 1 %  Ol oariv WHAi I ~tOO oil Hi 1:1. .ruiiiOt II yesterday WHAI K-H. 1952 Look In the section in UM-. Praj H you should. Soon among punetj favourablj aspected now. This Sunday affords opportunity toi trua cnanty, aid to guvja pntjecu. ~ * -. — Encouragin. hclprul itilluences. B*f 1 careful you anch or play. A-K <. ;-. W nh our „ • • L IK* l' R up r.t oirti.rcn inBusy brccxai W HAI IHA1 %  %  %  %  %  I %  I 'at (HI l n .. % %  %  % %  I -i Bti riarriii"! nan i>erii .iven oy in AH. %  i Aft* ..ulrt nn.i left r;,!-I).n im eonUnuad pood aoaiui for seit I too. • • * As with Ti %  'II!. patV .nr. II. tda, (iiurcti. Bona raiasXng fun. too. &f • • -Top* f..; '-. Necessary work, j domestic problem-s ihan : Do % DOl Mgtoot BOul I naadt. Prayer, gocul deeds will bring blessings. • • • + --Fricn : Extremes not advooatod. wi.i-n dutii permit, st) needed ^v K^"~QiTTw".>9 "UWOOI .111,1 I"-" !" um trtonda, start with church, or course, &f OAPRIOOSN -Pleasant irdications for your da v. R%  23—Jan. 91 maneo, homely affairs, religious services. on top. h %  rtudyJcf^ Ihg nev. ti'iI • • • ^ AQJJABIUB —Today's aspects favourable but do not ^ Jr Jan 22—Feb 20 l Hot] -hanges for sake of ch s n sa wilh^ out a proven better l'u native Go to ('lurci ] %  ^ • • • .w J?*??*^^ mn — H PPy outlook fi>r goid living, conscijL &f Tab. zi-Marc* so lous ,,, lks Ti ,,, u 1V( rr>> nggdleeg anxi. Ti.. D God %  '. inch; rest, too. M ^ YOU BORN TODAY Meditative, usually mild disposition; with strong sci and excellent mental bal^^ ance. Venus is you andj it bespeakv love* of t\Y ^K beauty, harmony, ab lity at tormutf, BSldanlng. Libra has fcjvcn us many iKatourOnk era, great physicians and teachers. Love of hunt %  ou highly ropvUed ) %  > ^(snd needed fcivi. (Tali Hut don't go ~to extremes. Blrthdate; Gi '.atesman. !!•••*••*••• fok twice i.f W7NES, LIQUKIJItS, SPIRITS and SUNDRIES ' Mori inot a happv i i %  i the world, except in %  ry few countries, butter is a • nlnishing commodity. No long. i'then enough to go round to • pim ;ill ih.y want. kOd more is margarl'-o ( %  lining lo take the pleee 01 buttei Thr*e whose job it is to surv< y the food needs of all the |xe that butter will ever be plentiful again. No HopeLittlfl BODS, then, thai (Air two ounces a week in Britain wi 1 ever be .substantially increased so long as rationing lasts. No hope at all that butter can once again replace margarine not merely on our bread but In so many cooked dishes to give them that pre-war flavour Only if we were allowed to bu;. butter on a free market about Si. a lb. could those housewives with the money get enough of it. And. of course, the price might %  i rise above the 7s. 4^d. paid In B* I Europe's current top tigure. 'Three Cms. Wh.tt has happened? Why have the Churna stopped turning.' World production of butter rUU humped 10 p 1 end. brkr.v the pre-war level Cat three msln ilk is being drunk. nan bars sane otrsi to producing meat Inetoad of n "ing dairy cattle. And 30 per cent, mote chSOsa is being made. Bssf production rather than 1 lairy products Is the order of tin' tto] In Britain. Our farm*, moreover are obliaed ,t sell liquid milk rathe* than make it into butter. They ore allowed i higher profit that way. Two gallons .if milk bring the farmer &f is. 8d. but in.ike only 1 lb. of buttei Chasto also yields him u better return than butter, and the tnd for cheese has gone up. In pre-war years every individual in Britain ate, on th>* averts*, 25 lb. of butter a yea/. Only In-hmen and Swedes ate more. Today the figure is down 10 about 14', lb. N.w Zealand, which sends 40 per cent of our ration jg working hard to step uo 'i-niit New Zealanders thernselve' m more buttei. Australia sent us 66.000 tons of butter in 1050. only 34.000 tons last yea,. .ind now, through drought and %  hostage i-f labour, a bare 6000 tone. World Cry Danish farmers make more money out of cheese, *u their 126.000-ton bulter export lo us two years ago is down to 90,000 this year. Altogether we expect lo import 259,000 Ions from all sources this year as against 335,000 1950. At home, our farmers two years ago made 16.000 tons of bulter. Now the output is 6.000 tons. So the world is calling for more margarine. • • • %  Nostalgically, a renowned chef said to me yesterday. "1 remember the time when we could use butter for everything In the kltchtn — for sole mcuniere, for sauces, for cakes, for all the flni-hmg touches. It has everything t iste goodness and the quali•<• of t idmg UK ing >dli Us >• ity of binding the ingredients of a dish in cooking. It is quite impossible achieve llrst class results wtO margarine.* —L.E.S. Cooking In The Kitchen ORANGE St'FIXE For 6 people; Big oranges 6; Milk i pint; Bugs 5, Sugar %  ) of. Flour lj oz.; Orange rind; Apricot jam. Cut the top of the oranges and take the oranges out with a teaipoon. Make a custard with the 5 yolks of the eggs, the Hour and the sugar. Put the yolks with the %  ugar, mix well ado the flour and melt everything with boiling nilk. Put the saucepan back on the fire and stir all the lime intil the custard is quite thick. Grate a bit of orange rind in it. deal tho egg whites until .-till then add to the custard. Fill th* oranges with it and boko in the iven f.,r about 10 minutes. Take he oranges out of the oven and serve with a few tablespoonsfi'l jf apricot jam. BANANAS IN FIRE Bananas — Sugar — Flour — beaten egg -Icing sugar — Rum. Take the skin off some bananas, put them In a dish and sprinkle them with sugar and liqueur (if you like). Shake UKQI, HI Hour, in the beaten cgn an) fry them. Put them on greaseproof paper so that all tho oil or lard will run off. Dust them with icing sugar. Take a sharp : nn the fire and then iKhUon on each banana. Put some rum, and with a match bananas. Serve imme' rllllB SWEET BANANAS I oc I pec person. Sugar; Lm.e luieSj Orange rind; Bum I or 2 liqueur glasses; Bat%  %  :!; Icing sugar. inanas (one or 2 i i, take (heir skins oft and mvide them in two. Put HUM in a dish, put some %  M i uf •hem, | lew drops of lime juice, grate a bit <>f l on them and finally add I or 2 liqutur glasses of rum. Leave the bananas for a few tew minutes before you are reed) to serve them, take them nut ol the dish, dry them, pass them in light batter and fry them Serve them hot after having sifted some icing sugar ***#> __ GET A PACKET OF JASPRO'TODKY T/UK yotive got tie QWCK tuuaMt to ASPRO' loses no time—it ACTS —quickly, effectively, yet leaves you fresh and free from harmful after-effects. More thin ever, in these high-pressure times, you should Insist on using 'ASPRO' because of Us SAFE action. AS ''-'• f %  i %  (• W. B. HUTCHINSON & CO. MARHILL STREET, BRIDGETOWN HEADACHE NERVE PAINS NEURITIS NEURALGIA FEVERISHNESS SORE THROAT COLDS A 'FLU PfilCES WITHIN THE REACH OF ALL oirsmiiii ivitrni!if I'ARANIII ijfrirJhy ,,', Atwiys kvkfi# iht name l\vg\ fjif.l JOYANCC 'Joyance is probably the most famous children's sandal in the world today. It is simply and sturdfy made from strong, supple leather, and thick plantation creperubber. Its design and shape was the result of a scientific survey of hundreds of children's feet, it's a lovely sandal. (^JXXAMI SANDALS MADE 8Y C. I I. CLARK LIM1TBD, STRtST, SOMERSET, ENGLAND j LOCAL AGtNTS. >.IC j -. .r.'. S C O tA MADO*



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PAGI i ii. in SCUD \S M)\oi v 11 Sl'NDA. M I'll MBKH . IMS VNjP^affk AD\Or,,\TI: l-TlaUS hi i*a *J.If < 114 IHN4 1W2 SunHav September 2S. HiniKS TIU winch can be disliibuted air the riches which have produced. Tins cornerstone of MODUS I fleeted willi p<-i 1! hy .u,\ lummumly. Ii Is bii.suto the dJacUMtoa <>( national wealth but its algnttcaiice vital to small laUnda In which Uvi hundreds of thousands who have been taught to expect Improvement! in living stand.mis. It may be politically profitable to thus. who yam by such propaganda to state that the evils of property, tnal-distribution of riches and inequalities of opportunity are due to the N I pbo have selfishly sought their own nKH>'andLsemont by underpayment of their employees. But such statements are not supported by economic laws. The exponents of laisseft-fairc, the liberal economists do in fact err by paying loo little heed to the natural acquisitiveness and creed of individuals and their contention that it you leave everything open to free enterprise, everyone will have fair shares is not justified by the experience of laissez-faire periods in history. But with all its faults the svstem of competition in trade is (he only real stimulusU progress and to an increase of nches for distribution. Competition is essential to remove Lsjineai and inrlliciency which increase costs and diminish riches. But competition must be protected from developing into abuse. Tins i beat achieved by legislation and association. The State exists to protect the individual. Its legislative functions must therefore be employed to guarantee private right! and to preserve the sense of justice and honesty in society. The Slate does not exist, as so many IgnONtlt persons claim, to carry out the will Of a mob. Tts tirst duty is to protect persons and W guarantee the rfgMl of the individual. But the stale can actively assist trade and enterprise by lending i's 00-Operatftof] The state it has been said (and experi ence proves it) is a bad entrepreneur but it can help enterprise in a number ot ways In highly industrialised countries the State employs departments of commerce equipped with ministers, collects statistics and attaches consular or trad* raprt sentatives to other countries solely 1 I promote the interest of its own trader The formation of the Regional EconomicCommittee and the opening of a TradCommissioners Service in London by the British Caribbean Governments provide an instance ot local governments' realisation of fmV'hcetf "to advance the trading Interests of their own citizens. Yet despite efforts of regional action and despite attempts, in varying degrees of earnestness by individual British Caribbean governments to take action specifically aimed at promoting the production of riches in their own territories, there still regrettably exists among representatives of some political parties a feeling of antagonism towards those citizens who are engaged in trade. This antagonism is supported in some islands by a section of intellectuals whose educational background has taught them to despise persons engaged in trade in pale imitation of English traditions In this respect. Fundamentally this anti-commerce atli tude is more dangerous to the future v all being of British Caribbean society than the activity of Marxist schoolteachers oi propagandists of nationalisation or extreme socialism. The West Indian peoples may be said to share one character! ti In common irrespective of their national origins. They are all essentially individ ualists and they cannot easily be regimented in consequence. But because of their different racial origins they can easily be incited to display antipathies to associations of fellow citizens who dtffei from themselves as to status, occupation or even pigmentation. Everyone in Barbados knows how these divergencies have been exploited bj a I soits of people '• the detriment of Barbadian unity. Indeed the very slogan "unity is strength" has been used by one political party as a rallying cry against'a class ot persons s/metimcs labelled "merchants" and sometimes labelled "SOO year old reactionaries The damage which has been done to the economic health of this island in consequence cannot fully be appreciated by this generation. But every day that peases without an effort being made to inform Unpeople as to the real economic laws which Warn a nation's pro sp erity ll adding to that damage. Every country in the world today ll faced with the Stem necessity of obtaining greater production r*f riches so that they can be distributed among pi who are l Highly industrialised countries like the TJnlted Kingdom are being sabotaged by highly paid workers who are prcpa%  rlflce not only their own mm.. counti\ pro parity but the prosperity of the British dependent Empire bj selfishly time British manatactorer? cannot campete against lower-priced Japanese-and" German product!, Compared with the i; the problem* oi Barbados seem quite trivial. but to the persons who depend on thai island's prosperity for their livelihood our needs are of primary importance lo ourselves. That is why so much anxiety is fejt by those who have studied the economic problem* of Barbados (which IB so small an islam! are not UK difficult to assess) free from the animosity and prejudice experienced by those who seek to win political popularity by easy promises. These individuals have concluded that too many promises have been top lightly made by those who cannot perform them and who are recommending policies. which if implemented will further aggravate the serious economic conditions winch threaten. To further expand the business activities of the State in the mistaken view that this will add one cent to national riches would be criminal folly since the State already is faced with a Bill for the upkeep of social services which bear hardly on the community of direct add indirect taxpayers. The State's anidSty ought to be always, after the pi faction oi the individual and his rights, to promote a policy of production which will [tad to an expansion of riches. A policy Of production can only '* effective U it aimj at encmwagjlng p v %  initiative. State intervention other than for tn protection of the individual from abu,; s will decrease not add to the riches available for distribution. Sitting On The Fence IITMII.E tflUNht) correapood** i art giving us some good huIHJav reading, v Morale guided mlssilo thai will travel half way round the world, there is n girl "in England worrying; about tea-time etiquette. %  %  i is a meal which A l.irl With a Problem .... and to the Re\< income* — N. GUBBINS \ I | LANB. the til actress, Spain, has coSa-i ,1 *h< n K,.t..BjH are making %  pass at a Sir', the* sa silly things like "If you were lo Atlantic Ihe water would melt away." Anv Spaniards talking n^. k.n.! ... %  '! %  " n faiat ia h strl mold soon (US IllOUlli lure of U-a. cream, and pastr>. ,.„ Msd poors the lot down her new presents many soul] problem* lowered summer rrock and over uHitM knife whethth hn a 11 -' '' ,l1 IT to raise the lea cup by itself nf with ihe saucer held beneath Th ,turd bappy vulgarian. and the correct way to deal with who would be equally unselfeonscones and creamy ca'tes and scious in Tooting or In BuckingpastriM r n Palace, sucks her tea noisily >ut of her saucer while her mouth Well, dear, lets drop everyis crammed with buns, buttered thing lo consider your problem, scon'. and creamy rakes. We will assume that tea h.< Y,lU niusl decide for yourself hern provided for three guest. sirwtstcb Is the correct tea-lime SB•ing on the edges of the best chairs quUe and which of the three will hehind lace curtains in a dear be invited to Tooting again before little house In Tooting, S W an atomic guided missile, fired • • • from China, knocks the tea cup The first with the easy assurout of your hand. ince of one who knows her drllt. ... n ,„_. the handle of the tea cup Meet I>r. Hlitnt £^{Si5£^2^"^s~ her knee, drinks noise4" !" to l n lessly and replaces the cup In the litw I***" !" 7 saucer without spilling a drop "f M awfully woi rled about m> When the rake stand is brought *husband." said Mrs. .Fussy"" I( "y, iu dQ#1 i %  out of here th round, she take a plate, a tea breeches, when she called on outm nul0 youll be'paying a tine f. and a lea fork, se'ects spoken Dr. Blunt. insulting behaviour, a scone or a bun .or a creamy "What'$ wrong u-ilh him note?" cake. Before the rationed butter asked the doctor. is whirled out of her reach, ahe "He feels sick after meals," said manages to get a large lump of Mrs_ Fussybreeehes that too. %  "Then don t give him any. said Dr. Blunt. Thifc clever, Mlf-assurcd woman "But ho has gone as yellow as a he plate on her dandelion, doctor. Do you think other knee, sail the bun by holdhehas taundl niK it in her hand and taking dell"Eifrwrr thai or he has turned can little hiles, or splits and butinto a Japan,-*-." said Dr Blunt tffs the sroiu* with her tea knife, • • • i ruts small, easily negotiated "What causes jaundice doctor^" „-%  f creamy cake with her "/y vou u*ant lo know thingt ered very smart in ira fork uke thai." said Dr. Blunt, "u-hy This remind; whei ..nun* from nraat'i that you said about the Atl.mli, / aav *f you rwat • %  Atimmic if i,-ill "tell away. Bui I am not going to iwim the Atlantic. I wan cc/. Water doeanl melt away. It evaporates. H.i K, then. Eewopomle Whv should ihe Atlantic evapnrate because I'm in it? Because you are to desrraol\ ;o exoric Water evaporates slowly at lo* lemperatures and quickly at high •emperutures. VThal are you getting at' . Getting at* I do "' undersf If vou're trying to say I m i Dig rafreahing *' *'' 1 H7 but a nasty-mind But I am papi ment. Atlanta Swim It, you'n d little cad : %¡ you ze comp 1933 I'rirtH ermltt ii < in: si.tiioMiin \ouri: To Our CUSTOMERS & FRIENDS we v.ill be closing our LUMBER YARD &. HARDWARE on SATURDAY J7lh. MONDAY 2Slh, TUESDAY 30lh SEPTEMBER tor STOCKTAKING and opening again WEDNESDAY 1st OCTOBER WILKINSON & HAYNES CO. LTD. Successors to PITCHER & CO. t hildrcn'tt Museum THE excellent work whictt is being done for children at the Children a Museum is known to the schools which avail themselves ot the facilities offered out deserves greater recognition by the public of Barbados. Ten years ago negotiations began between the Honorary Secretary of the Barbados Museum and Historical Society and representatives of the Comptroller for Development and Weltaie with legaxd to the establishment ot a children's museum. In March 1944 the Society was informed that a scheme had been approved by the Secretary t State for the Colonies by which £2,100 would be made available to the Society through the Development and Welfare Organisation. Unfortunately this grant had to be paid through the Government of Barbados and had to be supervised by the Director of Education. Owing to divergencies of opinion resulting from Ulil method of allocation there STSS little progress made until 1st August I94ti when Mrs. Frank Sweet was appointed Guide Teacher. Classes on map.-: were begun in February 1947 and weir attended by groups from eleven schools. During the spring term of 194(5 line thousand children attended 49 classes. Mrs, Sweet resigned in September 1949 i i since the Christmas Term 1949 Mr. Neville Ctmnell. M.A., Director and Secretary ii the Society has filled the position <>f Guide Teacher. From the beginning lectures at the Children*! Museum have been illustrated by map... pictures, plans, photographs and drawings projected by an epidiascope with a daylight screen, especially constructed by Mr. Frank Sweet. A film strip machine has %  '''**> been used and full use is made of maps, models and specimens in the Museum. Whenever possible emphasis is laid nn Barbados and the background of the Caribbean is selected to illustrate the teaching. A corollary of this type of instruction is the encouragement given to children to collect their own specinu as and to make sketch maps, diagrams and drawings. The subject matter of talks is varied The Guide Teacher has spoken among other subjects on Arawak Indians In Barbados, The Story of the Caribbean, The Coral Reef, Some Insects which Attack Man, How Plants Live, Life through the Ages, Greece and the Roman Empire. From the summer term 1949 to the Easter Term 1952 there have been 9,199 attendances and 2,349 children have been attended each of four classes. Since June 1952, eight models have been purchased out of an unspent balance of the grant from Development and Welfare. Imported from Great Britain they illustrate the Deu lopment of the Wheel, the development of Bridges, the development, of ships,.a Coral island, the House Fly with c^g* ''" Larvae, the Bug. the Body Louse and Its the Was and an anatomical chart >i the Human Body Five prehistoric ^nmuU have also been obtained and will t>exhibited in a Diorama showing the v< \ don'l unu ilf for a medical' dearer which I "have just invented mySSU Tho wrond, who is obviously a and find out for yourself?" f colonel whose face chang.i neurotic, unsure of her place in But what shall I do doctor?" colour so frequently thai ne •<• Hfts cup and saucer to her -Keep him IN bed and give hivi often mistaken for a siop-oo iraimouth with :• tumbling hand, plenty of water to drink." nc signal. pills half the tea In her saucer, "And nothing to eat?" One evening he steppedI into m. nakes a wild, panicky snatch at a "No", said Dr. Blunt, who had middle of the road, and mr iranii reamy cake, drops It on the carhad once dined with the Fussystopped But before " coul l pet. tries to rub out the mess with breeches. "A day or tiuo off from reach the opposite Pve m *n her squeaky new shoes, picks up your filthy cooking will do him face turned green and he what is left, puts it In her saucer, good lehether he has faundire or over by a 'bus. .hare It becomes a hideous n ixnot.'' When Is Federal t Government Likely ? portance of a sense of |Ev ( %  •'4riH' lllllll*' *n> f government reu nationality to a federation is * ,J, !" r r % %  % %  c(j Tha ls lne h t facW r txpUcH in the second cond'.tiun union to l>v appropriate the units Professor Wheare lists as which Dr. Strong makes a rcqub„ ius i de*e to ue united, but not ,ary for the capacity to v iv for federal union. Because to ^ unitary. But whereas Dr. federal government, whatever concerns the nation as strong ie al -/-,;: "l*" 1 "• iariy poiilical institutions. Where So he listed some of the factors H re we going to (Ind this simllarwhich ought to bo present before itv in irfie British Caribbean, states can be said lo have the And what of the tacW*v desire and capacity to form a give ihe rapaci y to rema n d federal union. First he UsU lincl and separate? The major of the fedei Indtvtdiial units continue to manuge their own local affairs. This division of power, says Dr. Strong. If the essential characteri>lic t^f tinfederal slate. Profwaur Wheare who agrees %  Ubatantialb with Ur. Strong lhat the aiark of .federal government is lo !*• found whenever there is division of powers between (hat -fcde.al govcriunenl -Tnot felt in the British CaribU-an. .1 ^ dt ._\ ^Vn-nen toge-hi Dd tverjrWBare good govll taken for granted that the !" ri >" "„?." -i !" eminent. It Ig wily at the most United Kingdom or Canada wit' ^..p rnmen ual a means to good government, not protect us. A desire to be indc* good Ul i' if' pendent of foreign powers wl' And he proceeds to consider hardly exist until a sense hen radercl government is apftat OI1 ality Is achieved and itw 5^^-jp^e^rWheare -ot the* lis UnfiVv desire W,Sh f r inde P cndcncC "' " who feme and work h immunities. Unless they desire Trinidad Tobago and Ihej ought to consider whether <>' a world in which sovereign inward and Windwards an alliance, a league or a confedIndependence means les^ and less 0 iher. and Barbados and British eraUon is not more appropriate to (is the scientists discover more Guiana a third. Any other comthem. This datum of Professor and more frightful wenpons w lunations would I am convinced Wheare, a recognised expert on destruction. violate the federal principle and federal government, is especially _,,.._ ,. lead to the impasse foreseen by /,! in view of Head 5 of The units of Ihe BrMisn CanbJohn Stuarl yi\\\ 0 f o n e being the Interim Report of the Select bean are all parts ot the same masler „,. two being Irresistible. Cotnmlltee of Hie Barbados House Empire and lie In the same geoThe „ lz( of a un | t Wl |j pe tl .. of Assembly. graphical neighbourhood but Up^tpj m the number of person^ The Barbados Committee rethese two factors although lLsted lt can p rfK t urc w [th a capacit;eODUnand that "Members should bv Professor Wheare as condul( KoV prn. be able lo serve in the local legc j VP to federal union seem lO Aj,d llnnlly there U UM HUSSjSblturea concurrently with the naV( !„, application to this relum „f nnance. Federal Parliamenir Not even gion tnan ^ ^y Australian uC Uniu must have adequate reL'u.vi.iin-ine went s far as this. lne United State. sources to support the federal and In one of his reservations to tho Th( sU „ ngOT t argument in fnvri K ional governments, report of the Select Cornrrutlee .1 wr of tcderaX union is the hope -H U not enough" says Proloih Houses of the Jamaican legof „,„„„,!, advantage but it i fesnor Wheare "that the general islature Mr. liustamante stipulated nntPU .„ t i hy that the politicians of uovernment should be able to b.moriexpensive than rofljional ; alone. The size of the units Is as 1 %  nentiontd last week of prime Imthc portance. "It must be the task" anGorKeous Satin Anejaise is an invitation to the Bride or to Kvemnij Dre^s Moire Faille in dancing green, pink, blue, fawn, gold and bronze. ihal o mi-rabcr ot Ihe UcmI.iturj Bnlljh Cnnl>bMin have shown fl nnn cc lu.clf: It Is cSKntlol al: .., 01 UH Exocutwe Council of „ ,!,„„„ to BrlLIn'.. conlh al ihe relonal govenune, a £iS. , W !yrSliS!I!fcSlK 53 01 BCish Caribbean trade .,„„„„, t, aMo ,„ „„ U kewl 8 e. during the period of consoltdatinK their political vletortes. Will there be sufficient If the factors which promote sources to support both federal Ihe House of Assembly tFederal) should be permitted to retain his seat as a member of such unlfs 5Ru' U L^r X £ U th'rH^ n rf deVire" "ror""uniirn '.re not conand renlonal Bovernment, while II member or the House of , hl of h !" which asks? And the answer he give. Av-cn.blv Au;>g t .e rlr.,t five P ; t „, ,.„„„„ h ,„,. „„,. whlch mMt iyocaU f tmn of feJer. 1 (oyernmenl • ^. Mralc ln ,o mc mallcrsf .,f fedetsnon have failed to stress. This proposal olthouih contrary sep""" '" some ^ gj" ^ ^ ^^ ^ mMoi ZJ2L?tr to be -und* single independent gDVc under ; lerest. and common subjection to in practice federal governmen'. artn not i>^' possible. Boon ttw ISiil lie Is emphatic that (liverregional governments Hi Ci'iire .r" nationality could proj\,Ut lo perfbrrn their functleni duce a il.-ii.' '<> Useparate in or they will J>e.ablo to ftetfecrri some things unite unltniR in tii'-m only at the pftce of fuiunothers. This Is interesting but clal depeiKienec upon the general "\t 7e*o" '" %  PP ,icaD l e * he British Catibgwemment, that Is at the price ben where divergence of nationof financial unification. (.*anum wanurj o alUv „ nnt n.veTgenee according It is my contention that even aingii inacpenrie'il ,„ UTllU (||t ,( lv p rt r K ., within if the British Caribbean gc.erngovemment. wanted that ,, to ,„,,,. men s aJ(rrcd „, form .espreas their sense of nationBlmilarb -lisMmilantv of social union that the InstlllViency of rralily but they rejected indean d political inaUtutions could source* will lead them almopendeot regional governments n ot l>e used as an argument in immediately into a unitary torn and chose unitary govcrnmer.t ,.t favour of separation ilnce these of government. If the federal the centre and subordinate proare In %  state of fiux and rifts government Is financed in the bcvincial governments in the reexist within the units. If the deginning by funds from the Unite. Kions or units. I M iv for union exists this will Kingdom Ircasury Ihe process Of Both Professor Wheare and provide some guarantee of the unification would be more speed. IJr. Strong insist that for federal capacity lo form and work the than otherwise. Our Readers Say; %  fffsae Ja aort Ctaeea special arrangements for those from other Parishes, the H. Ciat Ch,^. M Inspector who see. to the Wo,i may know not bee stuily whv work for the Schools ilted on this matter Carter would be shewing it> have an aptitude Tha Dtrectog %  To, The Editor, The Advocate. Committee who^ S1H,—Please allow me space *o vocational training and Technianquire from Mr. Carter, tha "I educm AcUnS Principal of the B.E.T. if I*"' Rep.rt h the Director of Education and ... cannot find tt possible to adj a in the Waal Indies, such Woodwork Class to the prcstnt Jamaica, British Guiana a-id rjjw ea| bpncfiU if" they bcom functioning Barbados Evening inI Technical School in Tnndad fi ur8uar y apprtntices. and part of stitute. we could start a one-s,d-d hr ^ h)KlVs wnrk co|lld ^ ll(M „ innings until we get the neess|n hr VljrUL ,^ mock unking We have on the soot the Senior % %  * t,eai i" play from !" " "" public how useful he can be ting ca of o pri obtained these boys will da chools chiefly thoi Palette tinted Taffetas, brocaded and j plain, present with Nylon materials n { thrilling; colour fiesta. Da Costa & Co., Ltd. The Better the RUM The Better the DRINK THERE CAN ONLY BE ONE BEST AND THATS GODDARDS (.01 Ii BRAID .v.io St. Michael. Then wc could make PUBLIC SPIRITED.





PAGE 1

I"\(.r FOl'RTFFN SUNDAY ADVOCATF. M'SII.IV. M.i'TI.MIII H • \*:<1 CLASSIFIED ADS. mrpwoNt no* BIRTH • M-IH .. loi.ta UWI-.I of No. s Mi-nue Beetles Roe.1-twine. a bov and it SB*. Mother. ei,d liable* arc ? %  •'' %  : IN MKMOK1AM I l,i,,m~. %  hB-lfcMI.Va> Hie. Wi" MHMII li-mi l ourt. ncapOalii %  l"iupm mn **'• 'we U>What Ir-uarh in l.-el* B'-f *. > (MM notm longer nle;h %  II reply L. T7r "^ r ~ %  a** ion. if, ru %  pm ^iid Ivr r*-newibered M THANKS "I'NT Dr Shelbume Hunt and Mle. I I. aratef.illv acknowte-dapnun decpeal appneiation ihe IUIIUWT rendered Ihnn during the lllr.ea. ol rmni FVANOEI B\F in Mi fad inot* I ..(i M .mi %  no attended Ihe CAN i GkH Muui Si . 1M1 ; lode1 n A 1 raatlUa Rod nan r ""' Oarage Lid r SI3i. CAH1 MwM tai 1 1 r m Mudti • In PH CM %  *• i -... i ii-.i, %  M*UaHeu. al .1 leapt.t Car 1 "•** IT I la CAMrr Sale 1 Ch .s.j c ia Mi elaan new ballery. Thr uiMlrnlinN gratefully be (MM lloyl*. Uirouah IhM medium In HI HT lhanha 19 all Ihoee who attended the l-inetel. ataa. rank, or lr any oUter -.r*l then .imp-lb. lth u. Ill our recent beic.iniinil .Kcauoned deal mother LottK Ma, Moore Phyll.* Marahall .ll-j^Wi', A"l. Ui %  Jwi SBO M li MAX (ill Tli. family ol flat UU Henlrniah Waleoll wlah in thank kind I... a*, -i-nded Ihf lun11 a I -ni wreath. CaiaVa and brlte,* Apply lo Mr SI Phuip IT • .**-In CAR-llun-.ber Haw* Saleea CAT. POT-I Condition Don* only 1MB mile* -id island Tel Ml S.OJIn KILLMAN aAuiass rw ana —d Auitlp, salee-i* OUoer M in 1 .... a> Co. LU a s M—in Vaualui. MOM MtyPUHTVCl-aV OM 111 SUP Ami ainlorevcle MI food condition Re.,0,1 priced) Apply: Donald Holder, KalU Hood II • M I MM RENT HOUSES 11 %  %  Two Small cottage, fe, oomai. I'om Oct.-her I.' %  d Si La*rtic Gap. a 1 !'l ANTATION HOUSE—Bl l\*f. Idaally altuatad Applj A U HiHbtnd. Ml Standfast. St. Jamaa 01 I a-ndv Ct.b Hill. St. Luoy HI*'. *OH HFST t. .. %  %  a'-iv*d Unait*— IJII) (vi"i.nm fl-.t 111 Holrl dlilrict. naar twauiifui Leach. I air) double bedroom.. r-nlih Rath Tub. OM Sadv*. Hati-.rit TrlfpMoni Spaciai term* lot lona HrMkn WrrH A C'„ Adv..ial 17 % %  Si—Zn MANHATTAN—rial! on •• %  Walchd*. 1 ,r .1 < 1. arch from Orlobvr Irt. mod • -a bat in nil Fullv lumUhM. all modern Three todiDottu ancri. I,dill (iaraj. Sr*iiU' Room, •ncloaod jard Phone DOS >Q 111-11 n pLTHOUn CnaM % % %  .!. Hovcnib*>i and Irnm 15th Jan. 10 Jan lift. 11U 1'hona BU. SO B U—I f n ,W In tWalbrlydc ,:.d l -<,.i -l. lojr bodTlvrHTONrontalnnig l di.iHinn ana ilmin* IOMM. loyr bodloomi, ..[u-lo tolWt and balk. >i*U ball and kitchen. OaMda and Mrvanta' loom. For paitloulara appl* 10 carrincton Si %  *..*!. Snlwilerv l.uroa Slroat. H litSjkV VK-ni|tlA I illv I rhi.hed aide. Wdrthln. :i W-tniomi, and K)IUna H00111. open Vamndan. OCrvi Wator. felr.in< Refrii'atnr. Trlrphone aarage A ScnanU guarlera WOO poi inanUt Tbr landrofd pay. I irirplioni A, Mai.. Ihal SIM WANTED TRfc-K On. va ruHb TStVCai v 1 tiHoim Dial IflSJ o* 4|M TIlUCK OM IIMT Cbevt r Oi in A-onr tonuilion Ford Ca' >P tj %  Apply tn ridera Hill. Si Itilllp nr r-'dn* Hoad ELECTRICAL ill' rnK'AL sritAVKK One H %  Metric Sprayer Complete *itb Sprai Cm. Larga Air Tank a. Sunbeam Com preaaor t n aood Order Pnca II10 U C ulact C Arthur Maynew Phun4T*I 27 • S3In rw ARRIVAL* from USA tncli.dt famoui niankoam Prodoci-. Aulo malic Mix maaftar, ToMOra, WaSW < Athe new eomblnasion Saeam .... Iron. Sacur* ono ol Iheee Rae lanre. from Da COSTA A CO. L Til t Dept Phone IBTa Ml IM.I4 SALBS KI \i, ivnii "aMtWATaV *<" kl" MS %  > v |. •* INIt.ll Mba|aja|ftll> bwtil rsera wetb The well and reoldenee atanda _. <-loi*d by Kedae wkaty Oolf Courao Tnr hcnaaa contatiat us and DtMn room, :l-d-i1" >-.*. ai -t oi r-— <" %  • Soar, situ^bMrda. *'d MffMtM cupfeaaaid 1 %  ' %  v.i:_atto< Llkatjitt, Hal" %  %  1 There U a bait In |_kaaj_ 'he paaaagawu. and .U ih. !" '-. and the winooM aS RUad iih !... Bll d -rant. ?JZL* El*? *iUi'.''iTi.."rW U .'nd %  nipie ronni l,„ .lorae. Uund eat. T-he.e I. a aa'.ae a.,J .er.j,,. room In lie around., and Hrv.nl. baM and 'OUM In the a n;inH Ri> r ol tne hnuae rrw u-ider-manl(ned anil ,,rt. <" '" % % by pub "ice. No IT. Hill, SjtrMf, llMdget..-., r, Friday in. mix d-v a. miobe, 1HJ •> I p m Irupaetlon lo be arranged by e.ejMaonina IlkS F.w f 1 |Kn pgajtaSuLan ind conditiom of •aah, apply l; CUTTIW. fATKiKO 4 CO HI LAST HOVSK SPOT TerraaM opppalla Col ""Vidmer earianad) by wall on two >Mee I'IMM DonnM %  RnM BftM H.S.M—In 1 Uaorsa. Gaong r. %  lord Walaeorf a*| Maiaat MUI. 81 [ .. i M -all.ioi.-na Anpw •Sanitary Inapec :.ania. li v .. 1. I ulo by N. IT nir*da> FOR HAL* HI HINtSs P*UM A Co. % % %  wian is s LAJaO ;-' aq It Land. Nelaan Road avy Ontdena -Ida Inantaae. good Apply, dial BUT R Centre *• • SS_Sa rROPSUtTY — One Sk-ard Houae. gaaV l um raaat, I WOMHHU. diawina: mm inutg room, and out orhcea. well with ump, 10.000 >q fl land, al Lower WeetNa a'l Maiine Square, St Michael Appt) Ml-. AI.en Skeete an Premlaa. Wilhaii. F. Skeete t'ppe. Bank Hall S. It. a.) SSB5S in • ALB U TMI MI1TOR VIIIIL -T aV RAIIASThe apaeaiaad price cf SSB.OOO0O not having been received fo r th e Motor el T. B RADAR". OPPEHS lor Ihe puichaae of the aame are Invllad Such odeii a** to be aubmllted in a ad envelopea to be ag dr aaaeO to The Maranal In Admirally. Public BuUdlruSi U krOd U lO and are to reach hirr l-f..ra Ihe 3*th September. 1SU in tha Ul October the .tainlna thi "HIU-RISC" GIATMr MALI. IIIHIU. < imi-i i 111 n< 11 reatdanre lately occupied y Mr liriTIIOERATOJ* Thu well and aubatanll-i; eaidcnnd dining ro"'"" u 0 ualha _rtd i..ilet. paalry. nchen um] itore-room. Boill-in cup. . %  Nevia and ft* Km awd % % %  gam oatly for St I ucta Sal-"" Saturda) llth October. 1PW Mi a.uoma nSNIM' ASSOCIATION lINC.I COSJatJOWO. " %  N M1 JHN M. •tl 1HOS ar CO*. UJ., r.vj*. FOR SALE Canadian Nalinnal Slnamships Sail. Salk *f 1 T** %  > %  ll... Bertea Barkag.. aWkada. CANADIAN CHAUaiT. LADY NBIJMJN NOhTHBOIND LAUV CAKADIAN CHALIENCJtfl LADY NILSON M BO-*.B*pt ,e t l S OCL 1 OCl I 1.1 lepL iaa Salla Arrteaa Arrteaa Arrleea II P.././Beeten Baalf.a Maa.ai moSu II Oct. 11 o. 10 £J %  On ' 9* *£2 • oat 11 Oct. %  *" aartUaawa aptf aa— GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTO.-Ag-mU. V*.'e***'*'''*-*'''''''''*'''*''*' V '''*'*'*'*5 :• FOR SALE ^AaT"B!rMAHlCS. PSJS^ON* 1 CA M3IVICINO and CAB DRIV1NC. POUT1CA1, SCltTtCS: and IC WKAKINO Wediieadey, OcloBl s,. M in. I HI MOKIMIMi Recent la| Itl II I. IN,, 11 OTS. "" D. HT 'Mi 11 i I kgjgMj 1 lllr. RADIOGRAM — One >li Hi 'MdlogtrlM, In good workin Practically new. Contact c Ma>hew. Wallabrutk" Hive l-honc T4g ... em 17 IMB1.II POULTRY i'L'l IXT12 iTwnKei puie >ghorn nullata g ,„ontha ol .-oh l*hone D. C Stou* r.antalioiL. LIVESTOCK Pure bred Bull Mantirl la Hftxr ASSISTANT Counter Aaltnl MS Apply by letter ;e.. C War A Co %  i-.r~-hi:i;pKHFar Codrmglan CnlIcgr *t John Quarter* prnvlded Pnr Iksilaia may be obtained from the *<** lP %  SOitSn MISCKI.I.ANEOUS EMPTY CoNnnNSED MILK CAJSTOK Any kind DelivaranJ w a n aJi„tal) lo K R Hunie k Co %  toad Street Price MECHANICAL CANS, I'All I'M .,11.., lyrea not nlai p 10 (MMIuO f,oi ..I l,.r 11 comini ring Won.. Pnora oi.IVETTl M 44i able from Slock I -Idlh. a. follow* II" -SSOTIIKI iv — ssnao IS" sassoo Fnquiiiaa lo S. P. Muaaon. Ltd. Dial MM. NOTICE Sealed lenders lor tha p nahugany liaoa at %  > will bq leoeanea. b> -•-. TVPEWRITINQ lodorala Paq. fl, Jamaa A Colaridac Efficient Service. a Ma. Top Floor. St*-. E, A Hoa.i. JS.B.JIin MISCELLANEOUS viiqlL '• % %  *. chin — O* every deacrlpuon old Jewell, line Sllvt. larooloura. Early book a, Mapa. Auto apha etc., al Qorrlngea AnUque Sho, I Royal Yachl Club. wrvMoiiH n.i B DANCE M Ul FFN* PARK 1. Mill Ilk Oelekrr tJlTtTKB Orche.11 t BIPTIHV — 0I.0" rla eel uaaelerafclr Ms) r0>0>0> MOHSEHOLD KUUIPMXKT ,1 aac.ii.Uon Owen T AUdkw. Ua Roabu.l -traet Dial US*. ll.l.SS—t In UvvW-V.W''' w '' // *'' V > THIS ji -RFHow I SI SO l 1 HUnit'TIONS FOE WFF.K Hath Towel* Whir 1 1 iiniK lewato Colour iUlppOd , Spill gftj Drd Z II (I 04 1 M SI SI LSJ 1 %  I I M li II H 1 oi M aajji inaaa $ KIRPALANI Sold al .11 lead Tina Uc i, >b ol true delicion 1 MCNIFH < COCOA nfd So aa not 1 %  nine your Grocer* Shipment ju.l ... > be disappointed loday and art 1 IT S SI In Vr'.irilH COCOA. id* Ilka. And tha g vception Health and of ihe Wit H oaaogsL k Boyca IlldOelown. I No,, KiNOawOenmne ntamang Hindi. tr Ooddarda IT S SI TT ANTO TAP! WORM tABI-l T' OgooUlO and harmleramedy for Weraaa. h,....,i Worm*. Thrwad on la inn ble al Dnokrr'a laTdOai arOS Ud ;n S..J ], HI'IISCPUIE now to the Dally Trleitiak l.nglandi leading Dally Newepapnr now rrivmg m Bar bad m by Al' only a Iaa ran after publication In London Contact in Oalg t < %  Advocate Co, I,|d Laoal eprraenlaliva. Tel, III] IT I Sg-t f n ) Ni Gallon Ualvn. Small Patent. Anchor Pfvona Cl Mai hew .• ft! In ADJUST BUN ill 1 %  mdltlona. and w 1 Kntahta Drug Starea — hav I.tdlu.le.l T.. her On aale at BI'NtiALun BILtr WATIBSModern home with 1 verandah., reception, dining room. ) badm.ma. tiled bath, hitchei.. garage COVE iniM. NOISE. St JAMES COABT-Dra.ing room m. 3 bedroom 1 garage lUtli.oa ...li. I,!-., not s. at ... UacUve l-callon Kic.ll.nl belli I Cl.alineii. vaatrv 01 a*. Oeorgw up Ul I0SS, Pal lull Mitu oUra apply to ihe nuKhwevetea, Mr W, A Year laruaan. St. Oeurae. The Vealry .In .ut band luwif t.. aeeapt Ihe i.taUie.i ny lender D It. A JOHNSUN. C*rk. Veau., id 1 BM.SS. 1. OLD HARHIHONIA.N Theca will be or all Old nny. Mh. OM liova C'tikrl match II JO 15—4 IB Corkiu.i* 1 %  in : a LI II who will he aMn -n.i* ara aa a notily lie He.-rvti.ry by Monday ny debt or claim a % % %  oalale of CLARA Al.-H' QALB %  le of Dalkrith Road in I"-e painui ol ami Michael in thi* l*land. Widow,! %  ho glad In thi. Llaad on lha llth day f Decrinbai IBSI. are hereby irqulied o aend In parUculara of ihatr i l alahi., duly altantad, lo lha uraSnraiauad Heanp. j „ hihaM Cuke, uuallflaal I^aaotiiot ill I'lara Alaup Oaue. ToSSrBSMd Soucetore, Jamaa HUeal, on or bviore the BOlli lay which data 1 >0M al II pioceed to dlatriouta the .1 .wine laid ratals .11 on* Ihe i-eitie* ... Hied thereto, iia.iraa re**are dabt or 1 %  hall not than haw had notice. And all pcraoua nidi bte.t lo Ihe .aid i-aiale ara requastad tu nellla tiieir 1, lakladnoaa with.nit delay Dated Ihe lith day ol Bepleinber IK HAMI'DKN ARCIHI1AIJ) CUKJI. Qualirled %  :•.'< utoi. Eat ale Clara A leap Hale. Deceased. ZgJLtt J. HKANKLK. 1ROTMAN A CO.. .\U, ll.HH 1 1?G.S SI-In NOTICE K..il.-r - and Subscriber* to the AliVOtVATE NtWSI'AfKR in Balhsheba, Catu>waab and lurrnundlng dhstrirts arc asked to note that aa from We-dnrsday. Ocle*er 1. vte have changed our nmri from Mr. Joseph JrmmoU. of St. Hiiabrlh \IIUac, t.> Mr LLLWEIXYN :It % %  %  'HlliNwich'. St. Joseph. Sou are asked hi iuni.ni Mr. t'arU-B al the Bathsheba Sports ASocial Club, foe the continuation of the dcllvrr> of jour Newspaper. Ml iiniiinii to the end of Ociober must be paid to Mx. JemmoU. AUVOCATF CO. LTD. 1 ir 1 ul.ill"ii Dept. DANCE Thr Volonlrrr llrlll 11-11 in aid of -I P-ul'i Chiireh Choir ul Organ Fund Turra.r Ban J"* HN M~lc h, prw, Una', ork. i SubwrlpUon ••c. 14 Ml— 3D (.IIII.IIMIIM Mlill I \pplicntioiih for Admihsion lo I'liivt'rsilies and CuHri,cs in Ihe 1'nilt'il Kin^doni Session 1953—54 Evert effort is beinii mmlc by UM Director of Colonial Scholars tQ secure vucancles at Universities iiml Colleges in the United Kinfiriom for recommended students who an well i|u;tliliiil Competition continues lo rM severe lur udmlsslom to the faculties of Medicine, Dentistry, Sciciue mid Eiijjlnc. iiiitf. win roj Ul exceptionsTIv hih standard is ros^ulrt-il 2. The British Council will l ragrjonslblo fuimaking iiiTsngo>inenlB for meellng rtudoml ccurlng suitable iiccomnuxiatlori (Or them. 3. Student<• ,ire ,nivi.et Hint it Is most undesirable for tlmr proceed to the UldtaeJ Kingdom unannounced and unrecommended In the hope uf obtaining %  dlTllssii>! t.. 1'iiivn -mi s and Collegeg, a* even lulorlul colleges ami i*iKtei*htiii-BTOJ uveiiriiwdetl and it is vei %  difficult |0 gain admission ti UeTaTI Mih-ntl dlM nullce in Ihe proper furin. 4. Forms of aupUcalMm fur admission to UtuviTMiin. ..ml CoUaArSa ln the Culled Kingdom. In DO) rompaOUd in i|iiiniuplicatt. my bo oblainnd from the S"n"..n. Kuidcnl Advisory Committee, c/o Office i-f the Director of Madical BojrVklaa, Wharf, Urlduetown. and must be returned tu him not later Hum Wednesday. I'Hli Ortohcr I'I.I ; .1. I Kin HI l COI'KHFs. I'm ii student.-, ucsirou* of entering the Froebel Tearher Training Colleges in the United Kingdom for training during the academic year UtSS-M should communicate with the Secretory, Student Advisory Committee, at once 28 9 52—3 and b..'i • .II b> appointment only PAKAUOS SltuaU near Seaacll Aiiport, bedioonn with dreaalng attached, two medium BBM .„.. wiih .tiei-lna r.->m. arid %  pen ve-andah entire length ,. i. ua* sllh a MOII view Hrt ChaiKerN Lane Heaa*l. 1 bcdior ua. good M-raiuLih-.. IP..Ill, O I. I |. I I Mil HM> I ni'. 1 : houae and SB, -..rehouic. sHiETFiri.B. ST rrrtB i type houae Intertlra Good bathing i i i -i i SANDT AMI. ST. IAMBS' Compact S rxan himralosv wilh garogr NEW in Si. M ,,V, I:,M KI I Attr ictiv. houae with verandah, bedroom*, garage. %  •A TRIM'S ROAD ton. '0 bedroom*, -..liable house or club A ROSA, i> M.I in M. i-l.iined bungalow %  • %  Q ft Dining, anting ...'li.MB Ml RSI HE. <*T. LAWBIMCE lafcuw wtlh JhnlMomi. dining mom* Beech '. ST. I-AWllving and galierlr* Sandy ESTATE HOI'SR. ST. JOSEPH Spaciou* ^ badrooia proper!) with well aoodecl arouad*. COI'NTBT ROME. ST. I millC.uel.illi lemod.ilrd properly wilh every modern convenience Private tiled bolh> lo each bedroom. MODERN COrVTSY BOMB. ST. JOHN—Hecentiv built alone property with 4 bed room* and 'led balha, polio, pictuie weaSSO" RINIIALOW. PINI HILL — vale wooded around*. (ear af NgW i I •• I lately 3.M0 n go^ ea*>aj>oooooc*a I B-SOX and aim i lei and bath drawing and %  name Burupean .id running water 'and .lollet. modern kitchen, and a gallery BR t*o aide* MINDOfIR Overlooking 1 %  Hay. Irg on eppioaimalcly 4*s acres or Land having an caienrive orchard v-.th < pec tally *-.lected frull traaa BBBBBMBM three bedi.i..m. "Wining aoon-.. living room. %  BOBVarn loibrU and halha v.in, >u-t i Aier large ve-andah*. ,11ns a -i.rkahnp Thi* nroperlv rat] i.-"'.v.iad by miM><4ii> Siluale in Ihe C.ariiaon. SI • umpiuing four bedlion living and dining room., -eparate tmlet and lunen wilh bum %  Kurd, verandah the whole length ol Ihe buUding M compriae two %  aevanla room* with BtaSel t.illrt and a garage for two car* ITia above properi -ei apprnslmalelv ;wi at] %  Slan.1 REALTORS Limited RIAL SeTTATB AOENTS AUCT.'UM-F.ltS VALtlEHB MI-MS R-ebark Street. INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER a McCORMICK DEERING GREEN CROP LOADERS TRACTOR MOWERS HAY RAKES LITTLE GENIUS PLOUGHS BRUSH BREAKER PLOUGHS DYRR KU SUBSOIL PLOUGHS a IT* Come in and Inspect these a Cole & Co., Ltd. in II in-.-. SITES St Jam.. Coaal. Li". > I III I > HI RI'NOALOW ...kin* TBE RISK. BT, JAMES 1 acraa. Ilaarh nppo.it r STONE BOISE a AMMBKE. %  % %  • %  aheiie I liedroom. annaes COl'NTRY BOtSE. ST. IASIXS Attractive A comfortable old property with rustic charm Modtmiied SEASIDE BOI'SE. WORTMlMi Slone comlructlon. 3 hedrool living and dlnlna room*, van dah. food beach linniw HILLCRFBT RATH-NIB A Slune bungalow 3 aood brdr^o' Hvtrur. reera. aaltary, light a lonRIK f-ATTUWASfl Popilar holiday home Soundly built with I be-drorn*. lounge and sallery BAT iiui-i CAtTIEWASBTimlier conalrui-tlon. aood ordei i bedroom., aood balhlng. ', sen MLVSBTON t MEAPSIDE— %  lorey alone houae. 4 bedroomi central location. . I M.I, .1 CBHAPRIDE—S .„ al* alorey houae. 3 minute* Towi NOISFg HaatlBi. Bead Two %  mall prnpertlr. on mai i areg-a good building land i Kuri Mill.. IN r..iT.*da. Tobaao. Trinidad. Jamaica, St Lucia, Bermuda Bad nuslneaa proportlaa. inveatmrnu Suaar Eatataa. Rental*. House and E.tate Minnr-.f Proparty Valuation and DllaplrisBUuswis Building l'hone 4M0



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I" W.I SIXTEEN SINDW ADVOCATr. SUNDAY SF.PTF.MBIR 2S. 1132 Inquiry Into Cyclist's Methodist Death Adjourned I'lK/SIt HOI YD-l'P: W'wv ShorUuu Still Acute THE INQl'iKY iniD the cirt-urnsUinces surrounding the death of 23-year-old Kenneth Sprin^.T of Fl*1 %  as furthef adjourned until Saturday. < I by His Worship Mi i; li Griffith n trate nl District A' i Ih Springer wai detained at the General HsS j .ember IK after he was Involved In ai dent on Hagfatt Hall Road, St Micha-d He died at the Hospital five days later. Three wimaaa* %  i yesterday in the Inqulrj ruesday Septemi.i M the Jury lac -,>..• •.vheie the iJ. Mr D (I L Ward and Mi V U %  .opearing Tor Interested •he J* A S A hl % %  %  n st. Philip %  l -" 5 on The Ad vac ale or respondent pu-<' s PmwT 23 s-ld thni thcrs were i thai parU "' %  ln leri shoulder. that %  | •Mribtite-i Eracturad iku DCk and haemorrhage. Maud Bu rowfi ot I O-* %  tald that U %  number of persons in hei boa saw h.m rircie thirteen uii eating) 1 %  Unt .,1 nco allon-1 I htl l ;—'f for dM ,., i DDhtha was three ptnl .. "ic Bi-e day the I enrd he wan Ivfrt in nn ted car tn li iggotl II, ii %  com-flou. H roM Lynch of B itl itei s >i %  | ore plentiful aim antolif U \. nff rf ( .,', Hi'gal Hall road smtia %  pint and eorn-l country. If I %  pint and ftt i Ibl major mad he Beach in M John i.1 I looked 1 1 "tug>, the 1 urita rendeiv..Ot U lay nlghi a auMbtl 1 -fund hurt and turned to the nsit 1 %  %  tncrial beach anj-oy Ing a "moon *i. n picnic Hi • until s 33 n.m Fnd:i;. unrfet .1 tui QIQtor rrele 1 beaehwu agaui against I H. went 1. then . win, holiday-mahn and too* : m up and carried him >x James and St Pel*. T to ,„ |ht Oeneraj Ho.pit.1 *.*" At Ihis %  tea* ihe |M Evangelical Gunp*igD %  eeks ttM '. % %  < -. ,11 be holding an 1 %  1 ChurchMh itarts II un until Sunday October ltHh. Eaob b mom•n'Ks nmtmrncinar DjrmK 1 will be held In Itv p.m. and From Tuesday October 7th to %  Will ba hrld In the open air in vartoua parti of the city. Details of tnat will iii I • 7.30 p.m. in the Qi (hire will fearing; of OPfKM calling all people to raltna; meeting:. "ip.n^n will '..IK'ludr Sr.c'. and lU'th.-i Churches pn 1 letober lath at I • Marnli aff*ting v 7 DA Jam Kraatand uethel%  Ing. LISTEMNG I HOURS 1 ; %  9 n> SulMlav Hall How. S p ... H*y*n. 1 St p m rUnrallng A'*hl • p IPI > (t..m ihc Piblr %  It p if. fntMaa M>a-ti< I U p r ProVMn> l'-I>4r I .lr 1 p m Th# N.*I !• 'mi' a*uifi 1 i-n p. ti wen. mum %  '*' %  '''*' %  %  *'*'*' %  '':-,%'.%'.-.'.-,',;'.•.'.'.%'.;'.'. 15 p I %  %  II p n. KMIMI MaMft, %  *i P .1 i. • : II 10 p r ~ MMMKi -iniMHia *. im '^ • — 1.1a pa> tsaa 11 atM %  1 1 %  : %  %  i|. ml ituframm* ; 11— 1* tl pip ii tl .. rat Dam %  U pa %  %  .*. • %  ) %  li i> 11. Man MM P MI Spoilt Houndpi 1.-1-. 1 i. ... in,. Itnm. N*. (rot., 11 am. -:IM 7 li p I:. %  • Io red and Hi. 11*1 p m Curpr^i 9 p in Do. Howno • 41 1 tlHInBll. II P III It p n PTotT, IH* Bdll-ilMll 10 II p ID Sr lance Ravir*. 10 HI pin .. m TaPf*inm tlta lii* | MAFFEI MADE SUIT IS A SUIT YOU'LL BE DELIGHTED TO WEAR. •*T. CECILIA BOYS' < i in COMTLM M -1 Mllll. KIPII Ra IONDAV ami SPITCMBIM l-ll. I t k.'fl. a*lnr>lunnH on I A SAU1HI I0MFK1 | %  H pal o.. M M S -'. %  Mil a i vai -in ;* %  III b J tlOCIBT^' CHAPTt *T J.IIS *I „. o. J C-edilnfon CM*. ,* %  aanpAi HI OIIOHI Ma. S[ %  >"•%  • '•• — LADIES I'MIHMi Ml and iikcn se* was c-aln the h minp A dog arai lulled h\ :, lorry i Viila:e. St. Jornph. on Friday night !., t L'p t 113" :.-rdny the don wag (fill %  nd)otirned until October 4, DKVOTIOVAI, slinil |. AT Y.M.C.A. aaJ svi of the Barbados Y M C A will be held ,it tho Headquarters thl" Since the recent rams the cr.p cvenmj. at 4 30 %  Up ara green again. !i< The speakar will be Mr V B. I Lurch the crop, MO.H st John A cordial invitation Is badly in need of rain At pom x ti rated t-. members and the pUnUtieae, labourers are atgeneral public including ladle* IB watering lonMj of th' I "* %  crop*. The wilier used on nick | oecaatoni is drawn from wells. Raildanti of st. Philip wb went to the Crane Beach yesterday hoping to gel relief from th? heat by sea-bathing found i-hoppy and uninviting. Thy dul not risk HOIIIR tn and war ^mewhat disappointed Postponed For Second Time The Programme of SacnH Music whleS tfaJ %  inve batn I h n by the Police Band at S" Peter*! Church to-day (Sunday) 28th Sept.. has been postI s Dad thla time due to a preriOUl eneaeetnent which should Barm taken place last Sunday. 21 .t Sc|it. and must be fulfilled to* WEATHER REPORT VESTERBAY Kainfall from HM : NU. Total rainfall for month to the man who rlta a. i.xmit K u\\ i\norK The Workers will be cegebratad %  GKANI) FAIH i DdJvr 0M naaai The li.ii I*.nli>'. Workers' t Faaaa And The M .id.nil.s i .II... in I'arly On Moada>. 6lh Orlober. %  • %  : iiIanK-holin.ivi At QUEEN'S PARK Outstanding Event*! will Include The Famous Bee Shew Donkey Race* Arrobatle Display pyramid Buildlni Hi.ill Datajichijt Mii'ili Control, Etc. !'• %  H %  Contest See the Crowning of "MlBarhados" t'onur Football i I^KIICSI len vs. Married .' %  Cricket Match StOYi n. Lightermen Steel BsBaal Ciimprtlllon 1st Prise I 123.00 2nd Prlie : $10.00 Vaudeville and Calypso Competition—Two Shown 1 p.m. and Mid-Night Free j MM HMO ftee Worker, I Celebrate Your Day Do not miss It MEMBERS FREE Vilnli. |/. || Children 6d Gales Open al 12 Seen 28.9.52—411. P. C.S. MAFFEI & CO., LTD PRINCE WM. HENRY ST. Sie i eeeieeeeeeeeeeeeeaee c Made in the**e New sail Wool Tropicals slum in the first price reduction in years! HATS A VARIETY OF STYLES In Aquu. Rose. Muromi. Gold, Ore y. BI.KK. Navv and While PRICES S5.24 & SI IS Suitable for Evenui i r morning wear Cm SHEPHERD & CO., LTD. 10, 11. 12 & 13. Broad Street GRKY BKIIIIV III II.I Plain culourh nnd stripr drsi|£ns willi a conscqufnl saving in Ihe nul ..1 your linished suit. $52*UILKINSIIN & IUVMS CO.. LTD. c. Hice I..II .... I ..r Will our Customers please note that our LUMBER YARD &. HARDWARE DEPT. WILL BF. CLOSED FOR SklMk-i \IAI\-* 1 On TUESDAY 30lh SEPTEMBER AND WEDNESDAY 1st OCTOBER. WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD. 1935 ZZ$ZZZ4$6Z21Z it 2 ZZ4Z22ZZZlZ$ZZZZ2Zt2Z'imZ2ZZZ2 Z ZZ 2&ZZZ?-22 O #-#.. .V StuH'S 1952 In as much as we find it impracticable to serve all our Customers with CHAMPAGNF. in celebration of our 17th anniversary, we are adopting a more profitable means of celebration, and that is to share our profits with all our Customers during the month of OCTOBER. Here is merely an idea of some of the Bargains which will make this anniversary an .unforgettable one. \ initu ... latest styles from S3.IKI per u-.'ir Itri'ss %lat4'ritits Arl Silk, Kavon & Spun I luseliesl SfaOTtlMat in Town 1 IMces as low as 64c. yd. t Inn ricnn Perralrs in brauliI nil de..iiis as low us fi9e. yd. $S V<'*'f.v#rA/^I'l^M. to'.l ITS (,!, yd. g Flea re.l & Polka Hots %  fr.Mii 72c t^ SO,-. p, r .,| Cmmmimm Irish Llmmn #"•. %  /. I -I" (i 7*c. ea.h I inkish H.-.di Towel:, from tl.1 \:'klrls in White & rolsMsffl nil si/.", froiii :ifie. to Sllr. pr. HtMffs! Itni/s! And vtill more II ;s for .\ery orrusion fMm I iiup stJasafJcT*" IIa If Slips I'allelii Jersey 52.11(1 each SI.IMI I 'itstunii' Jciri'llvrfj Costume Jewellery—Brooches. Kar-rings, Necklaces etc. At GUI Prices I ntiim llliiiiln'i.s 60" x 80" 55" x 18" M.* ea. .HX .. lll'I'Vllll'S HieyrlfH Clearing! 2 Roadsters @ Mi" II" 10. 1 Carrier (ii 886.10 .. Itl'llllltttfll 1 It ii iis — SI6.(IA per pnir 3 PLV CHAIRS — S12.IHI jier pair f p/rlf I'/fri's f. onlii's f^iiicfii's gfc^J A line assorlnii'llt Io choose .":in. PrkM from (ill.-, up * %  # Tirlt I' I'.itl'ni. "ood i,iliil>. all wide 13 s l'. :< s i'j S2.6J ea. $2.64 .. I'ifrlit Tutu's %  : % %  s i U \ 11 -.. SI.26 en. SI.26 .. I'llru .'.'.. Sfiriiifi ll.i./ii'iir. S;i...'i.ll Trice ilurinu tlclober >:,!!."II each ,-. I'liistiv 1'u hiin f[ Attr.iedvc patterns from $1.42 yd. up 79c. per \ d. '* I OH IlllH.llXS GALORE. Se N. E. WILSON & GO. SWAN STHI:I:I MEN'S IHOLfiS: 1*<*tHil4>M


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THE QUEEN AND HER CHILDRE\ B> M UIGH WITA LASKI 1 mo: i i children. Thr Queen ind the } own chili do the best for ours a* [now tl>nT the way thev •h manncrt they use. the lurnce the it minimw o' people, and it ll rnor•;.>rted to rcotest good. |< =t good i the Duke can Up nnrt cdur.iti* ihdi |hlldr. n? N 'hai thus could besi achieved by sendinc them U man I—the j % %  ins ih1 secondary modIns|iiriui: The elTe %  %  '-imcndim< \ For the country. mean th.it the Queen Aid t -v. silted, once and for thai II intended Ordinary peopss*l children WB5 mough for hen. II would dispose, once and foi ft'.. >f peoptal ut> omfortablc ellng ilia; Ihe clever children .ho go to grammar schools arc ir belter" than those who ont Yes. they may be cleverer, she irouldhnvr%  ; mdmay leed a special education Intended people who are going to have riflcnlly Intellectual Jobs. But the person who Is to turn out :• who wants the e-iticHtion the country can Mm or nor t" un in'eUicent. happy life, the j r made it clear hat she ttiought—* every' mother I 1 %  • > thinke ordinatv school for the liPi.rv children was ihe best .... nice it would be for children themselves to I Ihood In the or.. rough.ud-limiHe of unplfconscioui play, picking their rtends from the widest possible ange and enjoying all the pleaures we take for granted for our iwn children. And how nice It might be for too. to have a Monarch who Inew hi* people as a friend am' as a King | Const i night c E %  .. tot. on Public School uer what else the Queen :hoose. uuid fil hex son to one iradltional public schools. the normal euuoi uppcr-alass English it Prince Charles goes to thin ihe t-u.iii u ;. .,r :hjt lor tne "best'' ig i Ute best schools, ambitious parent must PRINCE CHARLES and his little c- Anne was one month old. wive to give hi* child the edu*ton that (be example of th W'.yal Family has proved to D** ihe U'st. Should he to perhaps, to the UCC pubUc-achool at WoolverBlaoa nfclli I've heard this sugeatod, bill n %  • agej a aioaj ia< %  y compromise. Though WOdrventone Hafl is intended for '.i king-class boys, it l >tSI 1 mlendad fo r an elite, albcil an intellectual one same methods as the iir public-schools—the lie, the tap. etc—it still deliberately sets I'S pupils np.u t from the rest, the i rdanarj children who bavtn'l mads the grade. Gordons town It Prune Civarkl went to Woolllull, all we'd have Want it that it wasn't money or Liiui inai counusd, oui Drama ine ordinary schools are still for mo also-n n.-.. Tnen should he go to his father's -iii school at (joruoiutuuu in I taken when PrlnScotlnnd, a progressive and un orthodox achool a ra andad accordiiii io %  MI wiicii tin.' pupils are encouraged to ibsX* ir. n. I... : UH D ,.;tij-:IRMUd tiicm? t, it be B good answer— .1 Ihe disadvantages i insj Royal children to .-. condary modern schools seam overwhelming. but ;.re they' 1 Let's have a look i't them. Well." some people might argue, "Royalty is by its nature If It mixes with ordinary ptopleon ordin u : U EBtta, it wlil lose tne very uaMy for '.. h i %  i it. %  'On Show' 1 cant answer this objection. I'm not going to try ti>. Jroi tliu&u who think that Roy it., and I %  i %  i^ule, su.i. .i plan will obviously be unthinkable, Hut to Others, It may opp il for Uial very reason. It will be objected Uiat tenIt yal cnilurcn woulu be stared il moid" treated as other children. %  %  %  %  %  Uit we do not lack Uk f lit. Prl, H,1 mobi*-d srbsM ha out in his pram, nor the QueenMother SrbSB IBM pnv.itclv\isit* picture exhibition And as for the echo h enaalvw—well, cbttdn pa Id %  r.,: %  octal pffoatl ( things that deti it may uarsjuad Ihad Rojn i i hildren . i'-.n N UUgfeBB thai ,.:.u-en naasd not, for this reason an ordinary cdun'l practicable. Mul whal are liiese things' tli od manners should bi i nv school, and the <' taugiit i>\ Royal pavaaft wi-n a* ha After School AND If, In oth-r ways that I ...,,*i know, the education td Royalty must differ basically fiom the education >f ottMl ..re we not Baking the \.iong things of our Royalty? There's only one difficulty I ran see thai really doaa take %  Wt I" Would the Royal children bo ai.: la share their companions' life • ii sitde school hour*? other children wander about i ith their Menus, go swlmml I %¡ exploring; drop In i..inc. for play and M i pii-bably the nicest pa; i an ordinary i u difficult today to imagina l.oyal ciniuieii ihaxing it. un I it intposaiblu'.' Is it impossible to Imagine Prince Charles and Princess Anne brlngIflg buck Crlendl to tea. drupplns in casually on their friends—yes. i : nds of all classes? liupoakible? >F it Is impossible, should we, II liap-. be asking ourselves .. ncthei it ought to be.' And if we answer that it h ,i possible and that 11 ought to be %  hildren should continue, as lhe> l ave In the past, to be educated I rivolely. to mis* the games hi padKS, the explorations in the Use awinunlna and the i bibs, the bus rides and everyii.ng alaa that goes with an .. Unary child's life. !Pe^ AWAY NASTY COUGHS COLDS LIKE MAGIC WIT1 HIGHLY MEMCATEI BICILETS WHI1£ MU No other RUB has these 4 Important Feature* lisMn. now pw %  reB*r tha mt*,, ot UdelM' cold, so swdi hM ** %  1-ckWy Whtta Bub TWO-WAY trvotmari. 11/ HAVE I* >7VK'A . IFKKl/./ii Marble Chips I II KM 11 Marble FlBfesbed SheeU IKIMOAll T*dar Board* \l t MIMI M (orru gated Bheeu ALl'MIMI M <;ulu-rhr — ll", Z" ". i. \l.V.WISED Corragated ShrrU WIRE TtlPLE YOUI MONEY SACK %  ""liS" T. HERBERT LTD ^"^..ed ROEBIXK ST. and MAGAZINE LANS. S.P.C.A. PHOTO COMPETITION RULES Photos of fin animal or group of animals. Any size— Black and White Oaly Closing Dale—4th October. Association reserves the right tu reproduce any print. Prizes awarded lo the most attractive photo. Entrance 1/-. 1ST PRIZE 2ND PRIZE 3RD PRIZE .. All Photos should be Post Card size S15.M 8.M 3.S0 %  WUOfMACB tot II uon.x Poor little Royal children: (World nonvrtfntj Next Sunuay THE QUEEN A.ND 11EH AUVISElto by J. Chutskc sAie. M.P. We Iwivc a limiled quiinlily f BKST QUALITY ENGLISH GALVANISED PIPE Y. I". 1'4'. IWJ 2" and 4" Diumeter Dcekdon of the J edges will be Anal. ~* AH photos to be sent to the S.P.C.A.. Office. Harbour Police Station, c/o Hon. Secretary and marked S.P.C.A. Photographic Competition. #A 1 orM HOOF IX OHOKH FOH TUK III ItllUWISEASON V • GALVANISED CORRUGATED SHEETS AT A BARGAIN PRICE CASH 6 feet Long 7 feel I-ong K feet Long 30 Gauge 26 Gauge 24 Gsage It* each — S4.00 each _ S4.50 each — $4.80 each S5.50 each CHLKCHILLS PROFESSOR By JOSEPH IslMDLESE II.. II II %  i hb i..in r..;"i. iu baowna a power III IHIill... .>-. i>! 1 DM .ii... uithi.i i i .•;in Uio I iiami ;iat rei ij % %  I.I mn, bU aado bim i ioi mar* | %  %  % %  • trs..y of Oxford, rha uUe, %  rha "Props" ... .i ii or pnd oontrob lha Clarendon L-.b ii.nciplei with dl D0O%  'WOlWl W prolvuu i-uipt. U >t %  < %  i'rui. baa anj X.VToo ft OWleugo ol Ine fcj'i:auie* o. Being a bachelor, the Prol. i.. *Hh>p.. H *o.iu n. t „ m college, and Uinst Cliuich U ; • %  •>•• to*" ti.at ol iha Oxloru '. real home. Tbiuier be repaln %  %  • u.u UM u,gii a i. oauntrj moat week-eiios, %  Adodtui dj UM I aza ''" %  LAI* tor lh resident felluw ol %  %  **m*—thougn peihapa Way < rd or Cambridge college l -P nvn ul • Prwt a coi.-. ., curious mixiure of discom lllJJ siaswhafe—out mey ,u f"< rt mid luxury. If the buildings t' va m common J OfTtain n„ are venerable, so. all too often, 0 BDgosnt from ine world in ;i is the plumbing. Rooms may bo ucb tho majority of ni-n spenj pacious and dlgnlfted. They are U Ur days. also to be damp and vices for which the nation rl T owe a deep debt of gratl iraughty. But the Prol s. own capes these disidvsntasaa. He has asan io it that bey 'li> not luck ivusonabii nrnanitHM of life, even includln, u sat. The servant problem is no existent for a bachelor living fOtMkfS. The college provides ser-1 vice, and produi .... i ciuotuncss v> uuiu toua Basset m itirnsnifls %  UKI to be a naudnaj isaosH i id lo buav iu* power uui. masa %  ppui. liui ii UM lioi. aval uesi ai % %  I uluio J' h? Ol phy^lhf 'college kitchen. After a goo. |. %  1 • J' 1 1 -nnd fret;—dinner in Hull, th. i--.uo upport of Mr. Churcnil lwo things that he mosi c ouuy idealism and admnustraTheir frienuslup ia of lou 11VB inspdtude. They are right iuiicuiig. Mr. CftUfChtU grSsUj )0 regard him as one of insii ireu tne courage and eondeadliest and most uncompromiiico digplayad by ihe Prol as m g foes. experuneiital piloi In Uu xhe Prof has never been mot* HI4-1U war. convinced on Uicopowerful than he is to-day. How leucul giuunds thai the proper lonK w m n | a> tr The university may well feel ible lo fxtend his ll > PLAiNTATIONS Ltd. %  > > a ssssisssss o ssaasaaassssis ^^ BARBADOS HARDWARE Co., Ltd. (THE HOUSE EOK BARGAINS) No. 16. Swan Sire*! A Phone 2109. 441)6, 3534 FIRST AGAIN! ,: .i roiled umbrella and i.iw.er hat even tor Uiat shot uurney. In these agteeable sur-' inmuings he is the nest of con %  any. No one can converge • .^ily wllh gueau, grand orfc^Vay to couiiteraci spu lumble, drnw them out so wellVrafi wa the preciaa ravsras mat ho won -"I give Uiem the flattering sensei;'-'t preached by authority, tM man of very conthai what they say Is imporUun 2*rof took up an airplane, delibarltod wealth. But uid interesting. F.nciypui It Into %  4>ln an life, if not exactly S| Oxford World 'iriumnhanlly demonstrated in luxurious. Apart from Socialism. afTecUcorrectncsii of his calcu-attons. Bl Christ church arc ion and pompoity are the only Mr Cn rc ?i ,1 „ "** _j[H^ ^L'"T* .*.'"Wno... him find %  would say hidthings which the Prof, doss not respected the Prof's great ability Those who ^ h m Hs is a teee...Uy tolerate. A guest once rare j among scientists of hard j 0 ,^'^^ 1 e n.tentiously observed that on* ^P 0 !" 0 "mphcated leehi.i -Joy-Ity to ".>^ n ^ n n ^,, nc .,,, %  ,!. for him ahould not kick a man when he "I subjects In terms IntslUglblo Prof will prefer ,' he "'"* his bsl matter, no .s down. On the contrary.the "• the layman. Mr. Churchill Jf^JJjaJJ^^'^'S f morals, bo' f taste. Indec I Prof. Is said lo have replied, hai given ample tesl.mony to th,to ^ place !" JJ" gj? '.. Prof, reaarris those whe 'H Is the only time to do It. for services rendered by the Prof as res' • fv tho 1c?h upon mor then he cenVt hick you back." absence. If *o, he will ha (hoose, during the recess, between politics and Oxford. The Prof accepted office Us i October with real reluclanc mhrt know him aU hi m-:itjftc advlgsr In 'lie ara rsjsxs home for more ths SELECT TMMESE BEFORE LATE. (By cable) GRAN PRIX ACF. ROUEN FRANCE First. ASCARI driving FERRARI Second. FARINA driving FERRARI Third. TARUFFI driving FERRARI *•• %  %  . ,".!*.*• — Soolr, (t4|iFAi U i>li; So .nd Star.. -.,o-.: HKNnSMI ftrmmSh iiiaii a fcasfSi iTwin/ocA LOOSE LEAF SYSTEMS ItOICICIITS A 'o.-Aurnt. Ili4h Si. GUAVAS ., Tin, QUAKER OATS (Cup & Saucer) ... Pkss. SWEET CORN FRUIT SALAD %  PUTTED WHEAT TOMATO SAUCE .. Tins FRUIT COCKTAIL GRAPES GELATTNl HAMS (Cooked) MSLBA SAUCE Bot. PRUNE (in Srnip) .. Bow. SANDWICH SPREAD .. OUVES GOLDEN ARROW RUM I'lUKtxs A to., i.rn. Roebuck Street — Dial 2072 & 4502 SHELL X-100 ^OTOR Oil LEADERSHIP IH LUBRICATI0I" PACE TKK Sl'NDAY ADVOCMr SUNDAY. SF.PTKMRI R 28. 152



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-1 Ml AY SEPTEMBER 2s. I9M Sl'SDAY ADVOCATE I'M.I IlllKI'l I S HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON J3L ^LINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD .... BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES 16* (T Jl"/T XOUA/O %  arrn-ACTJ ^0 BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG ^ DROP THIS IN THE ^> GAPflAGE CAN ON VCUP •— WAV OUT DEAF %  ' FLASH GORDON BY DAN BARRY £1 THAT'S IT -M tuM CATCRPHL*C I JOHNNY HAZARD LL !" BY FRANK ROBBINS BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS %  3 MB --./ AH'VOU'BS MOMG NW -.. 3 gu >CJ WEffE ,V **_>'OUT OP ->f "M %  > TOWN) V tt-E' %  i am %  RIP KIRBY BY ALEX RAYMOND -. \K GCT-rQ.,.1 D AO03V : L_ *EEP "* 6SS GEM =• PHANTOM :• ^& BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES M3TT4 Bl.iTHAl GUV WITH THE KX. %  -THE ONE WHO KNOCKED AJA ; %  :. % % %  : %  ; %  i ,-E EEB DIP '"AT-r^fj'> SAN-WMEKVOUW/ I EVEBVONE M SrOlU K1AWCN / IN KN6AU Mv k'lD 6&C*^ECS V ^NOWS TMA 1 JAW m -it awar. t>"t < •>'< *MW &** • Mkjndh..H.n On. I UHM -II.II •ill MII ihc Piwcau %nuk." he MK). H.OJI PudJin< S%  he runught her j dull of Rovml P iliiid. And when ihe UMOJ n, bee ( broke out into a A.* miula (M BRINGS A SMILE TO EVERYONE'S FACE JnM Wit •rlkkxn Rural PvMMp M yar fatally and fritad* and (hot % %  " %  Iw %  **• e> aailrfactloa. YoaTI !" .ik. ilic^ to the Lai* Mn. Co.. VI n Stands SuptetKA MIUMHS Of MMUK eqif with scififi< find.ngi tfiof I /T„, i.itc' tod irdi wn be of any size or sii.'i' 1 Card! ear. I I Dtadi by %  %  !>> A F ;,. U< H nn enter any number of mr


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SI NDAY, M I'll Mini: Js IK] Bl M"\Y ADVOCATE PAcr Tioira: .%• Tlw 4 Snrma: ADVENT!RE DOWN UNDER H 6. . 1 HA\ I d .vhy Ihe more adventurous and .'n'erpriwng lilm directors have not realized trie possibilities of picture-making in Australia. After all. distance is no barrier nowadays, and the vastness of thai try tonether with its aborigines and fascinating amma: life make a colourful DM ntur with .. flavour thai KANGABOO ; at il • lilmed in Techme.il. ir. M Australia and I. toe ona, found '' aartrajroaly intarasstsiig. Fuucl.inii.-i. tally, the ptotva POULTRY Farm and Garden B> A<1RI< (il \ impressive drama against nature, with tha laimlio: plot at criminal-posina-a*-loniiloat-son superimposed. By coi, Hast. the man-made plot Men:; party and at tlmci, eOBaattnaj and rambling;. It concerns l\w criminals in Australia who, after robbing and %  bootliu] tl Ol | gambling NOUN, I'Scapv frum Hie police by joining forces wftta a iraallli) uU raaata own*, wl %  thinks one of them ki hm ion,' lost son. Plotting to kill -.lie utd man and divide his am criminals' plans go awry dug t a disastrous drought tad storm, and the (act that I falls in love will As you can **c. :• desii't jjnount to much but the real in ;. ita POT" trayal i tha vaataaaio. ihecounnurougb brttlj %  p h otography, gtruang efl achieved "I 'he iMrren. nakedness %  i tba drougbt-gUkfcan area, the cracked earth and the parched and brittle Irees that look l:kc Notes H \ MILL AMI : hang ou ..< You oo^bl 10 twecn Ifkl and 900 eggs %  .1* tlrst year of laying. You should gvt a dozen tags from less than six pounds of feed. Obrtot going to get these results from ordttwr* lien-. These notes ggg tho-e who keep b**M for an> other reason than the Hhing for nothing. iiended to help ilvw -if jrou who are interested In poultry keeping to rnatfet *> prottt from keeping B* right way. Tha sug> >mainrd In these notes are based mi pi oner research god ara not the individual Ideas of ixxi.tr> vrhj :he greatest stress id read%  row i ujd la abllttar to ia\, not baW-C i*.*gins kr .i fatKi to an. .mil there are a f*M particular type Of bird. Keep tha itule; the main in this lean IHII do not expect area will bg nt thg wavtongtaa Baa same ri L ulta you would cvl beamed here. The 19 mat %  ..ippvai* and a ne >ne In the 49 metre band make* its Waviiig nutaiaad itimv WUA appearance The template list i bred-in ability to lay and having S'ven below It"! !" lhem on %  Propei feeding 4.OT Btfl proRTamme as oullined laat week, netres 11 75 megso com6.15 p.m. to 7.45 p.m. I MARKETS AGAIN WE ARE m a critical mnml to-day and. %  justifiably so. \\ 15 frequently said that the avacagp Barbadian abroad is alert and purposeful, with a natural %  nt'ss of spirit—all ol which usually make him or her an asset in any community where action is needed An thoaa who have helped :o generate such tieurnblc qualities maintaining the output at the same high %  home? — %  -— % % % %  \g> pose U B wa, -i - aa R I If-lflira ^rtdsr'""' • IJe l_Je IIUUIU ,,. fbodSi including fruit ll %  %  •> would %  aratg while the Agi.•MSCIIMH LEA Kilt NEW QI'MtTFR Winclrngth and l*riij:r:tiiitne Chances day. 28th. Will nont hi ',. %  It urn 1 Has gam! wr s,,,,n K .ppeal for .rite, log 1 did msbl fT* under %  Mght* eoulti tx* %  rhe unthing is ms'lobt sights .,ie encroaching <*i %  k< %  i. i. i A (unit an> (31 32 sugffMti' TI . i-tng iakln R %  whv h wi BM %  i I and ev!i iksietong ggali the sky. There -.. rugged panor*££l !f5f.a2 aoilc sequences of a cattle drive '""' 7' 'I-.and in -tampede, ""' %  "'" '" shiuudm In yelli U of 0 VJ !" wwn thl ktngftroo. wallabies and dingoes "*"lleeing b. i | „n daAOg ,,, *" r Fl nea, "Jween %  i decked out in nightmarish get-up ,sh %  • : 45 pm. to 11 00 p.m. 149 71 fountain garden ..; bar of h.-ns you metroa S.0S8 meg.:.. ^ize shoulo Amoni tha changes of propar* ere. the. SruY.3? ,P *^t r ,hc h *'" '' amines noticed is Tweiitj • %  <• ", m thff megasse, laying Questions' which will now be on %  "" iwiata. water aithe air at 10.3O n m -m Wexiiwano0ar uneov -nta and a pit f^ r droninne. and flnaU) a sanditon '.MTKI vataoiu ti break the mill and tut oR the only source -,i water, 1 comea ihe main factor in the % %  "*'•< nflgtOH l ei .vti„. %  nt In his powM. %  ..... %  ., o-ii.ua. i:„i,. liu ikK-i.e %  ;' ; ;' ^ %  -''•K"^nf s Ufa in and Finley Currie have the Si V ,\ 1,m x r,,n lirlneipal roleg. but tne hunouis %  rT? "' lov w,,h m to Nature and aid :"! r *"' ^ :h .lancing aborigines. EX 01 *' vtKta ttl# N r '' The desn.ptnemu.. "" ^rnbuah. one of the most colourful 1 have ncard and at oil times heigntens ;"' die action and %  d produ-jlion and d ft dim-complete overhaul god la in llrstl "" Mlh magnificent mri ..ti all-roi %  : %  JMGAROO and IVAHHOI "d Vl "•"•' wcatern, and I now no d faculty In uti'" bird action, bitter lighting and demanding the dialogue. *rne of the raategl ridhli I Bl til KS IN TIIK wn AFTERNOON M.L GKT YOL KOK THIS Romance. adventure and I ng i>f butory ride hand A .oiiiiiienial UViUgJ ivUl) In band in fHJGLES IS THE plenty ..: ocUOD, 1'U. | IOON %  i w i %  ma Jamaa tlaaii %  i tj playing g| the Plaza, Bridgetown CJeoraa BafJ lq the ; adini rola. It is gixiu i | tauTi back "iig absence, and ttm tune be pi... i i;ambler who goes to the H.dian Hivieia lor ., holiday, and promptly framed for the murdor of a U.S. Sociel Agent win. h* • %  mn things difficult for a ring of counterfeiters. With him is Coleen Gray, a .. io I ling part well. Charles (.oldncr. whom I have not seen %  n i nyatarloui Od it is not until near tha end th i1 %  UlU -.ore on which • fano ttlngl Mr. Goldner la ,i Rort-rata charactar actor and ikUfully avoidany overacting lii his role. An interesting' child member of the caat is En no Stalola who made his name In the Italian film. "The Bicycle Thief". Young Enao h;is a natural aci i that is out of 'he ordinary ami i>ecausa of his talent, hia part was specially written Into the script. lxy with miachM'vmuN Impiahnaai The stgr>is based on the novel w 1h wanrrth and lovaltj for the I Hayrox and de.ii> witai man who befrlandg hia the perils of a cavalo* troop asp.afl gives %  good sound performloprotett the llvei days but by and large le of programmaa nan nee though a few ne ones chidtne. hangw make the., appcurmie • InclUOV SWPloyed and thg I I ing Charlie Kunr at the piano who vill be heurd on I %  1 "%  %  pin "fn Tbwii To-night' ;.!" work* is to maintain son:kind unn'tu id i the air ual < in !•< Saturday, al 8 15 o in. btaiuj I %  ..! ihould ban t depending ,>n its vttlety. >h\ OUSII .. buhl bird wUl na,uit. leal apace 'hap a heavy bw K. R. Immii'li.ii". l.i.ili.it.. agrl i aedaaniy pursued One of ihe feature programmes But. thg %  huh we iic,.i London in UM oocntng week s.v with our own eyeg on ihe %  %  i> ..( Robert Bontlne Fiajaj afternoon in question ti < unninghame <;rsaam. tl, ( .,! .,, siu-.i not kept with hi im P*y ^hock MaiM (%  hetween IS lh r "" M P"etuiegque Scot ..f his •n^ 15 mchea an M I : """ '*'M >*he I and vegetable, the roosts i poultry kei-peni put %  IIV under the roosts to -late tl.i : i S w. itopiri .1 • olln and vegetables tea u of fndl dtins, ami x %  ocoa rl CunnlrUfBejne Graham'notary drains and i l|gf| a*l bean written b> a Mloa Scot, sores Worv Robart Rampi ..%  bran Kechnta ga ixn Kobei-to.' i)..n parked high with bread and cakSS, U. B. I'unninghamo wen just IhlckJj COVtl "i o numerous in linked like a Spanish Grandee soine cast remind '" %  '' ol ,"'" He was alao, says Uobert Kemp, the Mil ? loam 1 ..n,..|o : the Fnuhsh loI1 K st ^ c "** %  •< Into ObUvlOlt remainder of the meiniage. ipSCnej fall outside the house. This |g obi'in I • keep* the hou-e clean .„ I raanura can easily be ''"S" 8 ''•. p ** rl ;* l,, t trM '" The danajar Hi maaaer among the fencers of whn h cruaiOBned I agged and sold to garp, rK fln Inlrepld voyuil „ Uwaaja V. 1 •""•l" anUn %  xrellent for vegetable or flower gardens. Undked hens Wtl] drink iietween 5 and 8 gallons of water daily. Then rate ..( %  •iiKumpllon depends on their output of eggs and the weather. The hotter il is the more water they will rehlch %  %  uiden lands "of Islam, llv Mui Liberal Memlier at Westminster. UUOfa, bUl op-rat*, uiiknowinglv to-founder of tho Labour Party l prejudice rutaltri ind p anl in S.-otland a Smith American .netiting •,< %  the fullesr .ltd later historian, and ""ae natural reaourc. Sootaati Nationaiiai!' The broadcinn.it.' and otnei amanitiei with IU ba on tha air at 9 oo wh,lh the I wnd at 5.15 \u> nd generously bl day. .'('th Sept, and on Friday. 3rd Oe.Many types of nests are used. ||f Then il g go.Kl deal ol LaU Sumo poultry kMparx linUd Toaeanlnl Cimrm '"" "" lourlil tradg and U* simple opeii nest boxes inalde the m value Io Ihi Island, but, house; of hen. h.v, ooegead nest In the BBC's O.O.S. in tha Bridgetown la no place to captain •**• Projecting outside the eominu week T,eanini will eonthe Imagination i %  house. The latter aie to be recomduet the 1'hilharmonia Oiehestrs visitors under prevailing condlmended because the eggs can be m two all-Brahma concerts fro'i tlona. If i cIlected from oubude without dmthe Royal Festival Hall l/.ndon OOUW put in end %  trteUvafy to the tUriaUal tttfl hens. Remember to Unfortunately only Part'II of th, XUTtlna Ulwa r fatre M .,. make put sullleient straw or flbro to second roncert will be beamed %  heilum^ avid bieukages: ilbre from cocoaus. That you can hear .,! 4 ••< • "bi.stnrof spirit that we nut or palm trees makes a good p.m. on Wednosdav October 1 i' %  '"usl> *' never nest, one ne: gegy for irecedcd by a talk "Toacanlni Re'"" naedad to ravblforce aottvely earh xevan hens but if trap nests I r hl reapODaa are used trM-re -houlrt he one for BrUaJn to the n->ws that Toucan il i each four h ens. was to cc.ndtut in l~>ndon wa, fU "~ great that tickets were allocated old day.v b tanas wiin hy n ,ly ',( v the closing day theie • >le. ii f.ray. ,,nd I can assure you w £ r '' fl0 00 *' applirati..n (Ol the hat he has lost none of ihe lithe s 8 ? • 0f,, • %  n 'he Ke-'iv..| Hall. M.UKtlN OIIARA grace thai i bai mc_ ,n ,n ;'B T lk h> t.t.U.I. RcRistrar .Mil. %  i. %  in Holy and the subterranean „„, '"''''"" VOlcea" on Sund.i / dungifinx under .. prison are a f B '"Sept will present un entin grim back) " %  i.vpe of broadcast a chase that results in the capture ""I 1 Of a uik receoll} given on % %  \^,J^j^jJJJ_ ; • --_ % % %  Uti.-'i Si-nut:. i. i itanUj Inflj inlUaUvt of IH h I^Klle*. worklin. In the public interest and welfare, i| the Agrliiilturnl Society, the Hortlcultun..' %  %  Commissionerthe Touri-t OBTf" i ittae ind ih< pai "t ll.ubados. Hegistrai t/niversltv College of tinWe* I Indies. This is followed by i-view >f leccnl Ual publications It begin-, at 7 I p.m. (..4RDENING HINTS FOR AMATEURS tember rains have been VOfy welcome, for most gardens were parched and dry. .nothing what difl*.appearance .>f a garden Hanta i hat looked peaky befoi. i .n | rnagn-al way. amt was brown, and apparently dead turns green overSeptember gfl in-between ...irdening. and there is lUhg to be done Hut bad ,..t b weeded and turned up as usual, grass cut. and the usual •outine jobs of a garden done, lor woe b> ..king or •ittlng back, for such go aWtUda % %  v ing gets out of order quicker than if it is neglected for oven a week. Yet I naiden thai Is m perfect order, needs tho tnlnunURI at daily work to keep looking niee %  !<• -'dl BOW. l fares, in many gardens, and ., %  %  tMs ira too. their clear %  i mht %  : The Flamboyant trees, that %  (| m weeks ago were a mass of ilmaot\ flowers, are now in full leaf again, and. with then maceful feather> Malta sOOtl Ilk' .1. graen ostric f.atneinearly as beautiful ii when they were Bowaring' rhaaa irees certainly beautify, thi-land. and Shi Laid !• plantetl pOSnlbli. e-i'.ially n %  up. n -paces rowing, foi three foot -aplin will ighteen tha "Id. And when %  ing. ThCf-i ... -in. illy SRTW •,i an iMiinens,M/e, out .it.. hade trees. Sometimes in 11 garden i needed Uj divide OBg l^rt frORI gggssBBsn or perhaps to edge one level <>t ground from a lower level, For this purpose %  low .hide v .ill is the nswei ..ml 1 will be found simple ami inexptnstve to make. Tnai typt of .i lefl tough and ui i lered and if liked it ran be made with I %  '.ll 'I %  % %  TT ih.1 Wltk ehl1h vell>en... Uttla mil.. plants gg i- To make such a wall no cement t needed, for the stones are put Mb lime ma I i here are two kinds of lime, on kind la used for washing walls, and the other kind la railed builders lime. The kind to use for wr wall is Builder* /.,,.., ytaaj %  ill need a quantity of broken i.d stone i>f difrerci Actual quantities. ..f these two •ii..tetig|s deiierul of course on the length of wall that Is to le built. Beitn B3 digging oat %  shallow tonndatiiMi of a few inches deep Some people do nol even do this : M ph., e ihe atones on (ho ground. of i-ourse that tha ground is reasonably flat. It l b) dig a shallow foundation. Now mix Has lime wlih water until a thlek mortar i. formed. Hoeing, done Ihla select the larssat stones nnd place them I 1 Ihe shallow foundation for th i Horn of the wall. d by building up the wall With the rest of the stones, putting them together and fitting. them togclher Miiall and large v ith >f thl. kind should b kepi within the limit %  Of less) of two feel high by 1 ft. ft ide. I" build %  much higher wall Id < risky as it *MB not tho strength of %  euwnt Vet | nibble wall, built with llms mOfftar will last for many years. After the staring whitegone, and the stones Utaa weathered, il makea a very attractive addition to a If r*a '•• wera out. degrenad. i • down %  flass or tee %  awekfut Tome Wlna wtll quickly i Ua whole i Glvfig new viuuty it 'orioles r< •od shawt<'0n and reieemaer. Buckhwt Tei Wlae a etpeciuir valuable after You, ho, cavqo iff &r INNER CLEANLINESS There'a an easy way to iichicvc ihe luncv> you admire so much in others. Just make sure of your Inner y i 'Icanlincaa by laking Andrews! Sparkling Andrews dispels slug' gishncs 1 ., helps you not ontv to work well, bui to cri(oy your leisure io the lull. Andrews act* by Ircshcning the mouth and tongue, settling the !.iiM!>ti and toning up the liver. I mallv, Andrews gcntlv clean the bMeeS For a fury ", refreshing drink, use one teaapoonful ol Andrcwi in a glass of wna. DO YOU KNOWu*yyomkMdactmwlimya*v*mti %  %  '•t ./-•rJfr <>\iu-< vi (CM i>tf by ftrmmliag food tnxiass or* a/'i.Trv./ fry ihe blood-itream and aarted Io the oratat, Tkrv rdustieadaelm, imiubibiv and lassitude. Amdrmt keeps wtur system free from harm/id waste*, and general health at mack unproved, IhunJn l.< Inner l.unlmeu. ORINK XOTICE Shaves can be close and notoriously uncomfortable! Whereas PAL'S HOLLOW GROUND BLADE with extra sharp durable edge, gives a cleaner, smoother, more comlorlsble and always closer shave il fits all popular double-edged safety razors. PAL HOLLOW GROUND BLADES < (aMrlC..Uf. loaeeo.n 5 *OR 13 CINTS WE BEG TO REMIND OUR CUSTOMERS AND THE . GENERAL PUBLIC THAT OUR HARDWARE DEFT. SALES DEFT. ELECTRIC SERVICE DEVI. PltRHFJVD AND THE CORNER STORE WILL BE CLOSED FOR STOCK-TAKING ON TUESDAY 30th SEPT. AND WEDNESDAY 1st. OCT. N.B.--Our Lumber Yard and Syrup Store will be open as usuaL iM.vvf.Vf/ A CO.. LTD. tor INMSB 'CtfANUNESS DURING ANNUAL STOCK-TAKING THK BARBADOS CO-OP COTTON FACTORY LTD. The Lumber, llardwarr, Plantation SuppUea and Oil Mill dipannu-nts will he cloacd on the dales shown : l I Mill l: PLANTATION SUPPLIES Monday, September 29lh and Tuesday, 30th HAKDVYARK. m Monday, Scptamber 29th, Tuesday. 3*th. and Wednesday. lt October OIL MILL Wrdneedoy. 1st Oetober, Cloaed Mominii Only. (Deliveries from 12.00 — 4.00 p.m.) Our Ofllee will remain OPEN over thU period (or PAYMENT OF ACCOUfTTS. BARBADOS CO-OP. COTTON FACTORY LTD.



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M \l>\\ M I'l I Ml'.l R -l\l>\Y \I>W>( Ml PAGE I I I \l \ better Is loo lo be reI.III i i lln\ WIBi Shuffling Teachers LAST WEEK 1 commented on the possibility A the appointment of one lady to the headship of the Richmond Glrta 1 School and later on her refusal. I also pointed out that the api < ; of the Boys' School N* no difficulty. new gods >d *ti.ri and only ** %  master o( the I. " J __, (..ai u.. Il is rumoured that MIM oa.i Gradual* or non-Graduate to UUUSS ol the'St. Mu-Jacl'i Girb flj the post whfeta wee not tal %  *J*f] lhe -PP im : uu by iU liiuumi'. merit. I do iiol know if ... lha only useful al St. Michael' DM n. in mown. I am fortified in m> vwi thai ;nSne nas JuM M t her BJV. in ihuum u Hat aIld u the Modern Secondary* School it II XoachST .it bet school.In fact she a continuation of e.mentniy ,. thc on ly one. A* far a I undfeducation. Why then this .uive:. la i,(i it she Is lhe onl> B] tisemenf h. jhs I %  %  ,.r tinT ,, (C ,„. r „ t St. Michael's. Wh Wesley Hall it.,,.School Which u ,.,. %  ____ ncr lw a school when waa vacant -ft. to gc Fomc oiueL,e been promoted, there w no adu llo lhe „,„<. ]ob I made the vertlsement but Mr. Clarke who same ^mmem ,„ the case of the had been head of the St. Leon|irst appointment ami that of Mr. awls Boys' School was promof.i j. (lv ri >m Harrison College to to the Richmond School. This i.s he inspectorate of the Elementary as it should be if i | hope that rumour in school masters should DM ,-ill inprovni to be the rubbed of the plum ,.f their setproverbial "lytni jade." ... I hope that a h—dtOQ Cher Other iippointments to thlj . imntiiry p*hp*Ol wld be acbool iall for comment wlu 'e promotei tad |>cople who have never tauaht in of my writing thta might nuhtheir lives an icpointed pernwtate sejflnfl such an appointment, nently on the .'*3lT when Supply. 1 do not tea wbj .i '< bad their service termbai laboured In tb< small school muted at other schools but l cannot be lbs plum %  hall desist to-day from taking o' lhe service wtttfcOllt ill ttdfl lip the point 221 JUS?" •i-.„n til* Secondary MUOl agi—limn advertisement remains at fourteen years. it must elementary school. This juggling "•""• *-"^. -w*' • %  — inday 2 ,': ,s ^"" MMied the loss of members of IU tubuted to those who think m S^SSS r ?• 3 and Combermcre has no ItSI Mr Theobalds said -It woul I Lflnal sin. to bs stoned tour musters on leave. (not be inappiopiiate to begin our for by punishment inflicted afthei I note that Mr. Bayne a most study of this question by asking by the Supreme Being or by an eflclent master at "foundation.> lts, > v, s hal is man's equipearthly master. PtinlshfTWnl either ichools i doing the service any good. There has been a constant cry for .i. the Secondary School: The Child, The Parent And The Teacher The Set I the ooum Godwin. Rous*eau\ poattksi M on 'Tlie Chlkt 'in' Parent and that original impulse* are good the Teacher orgmhnd by the bscauta they are natural. Tin Extra-Muial Department Of the child can do no wrong; its inUniversity College of the West slincls are lovable, it can nevct if.".Nature and lips. thaj 1 School was not selected for many other* to look forward ;-> being "top of his class." I should like to know what 5" ,V "' "" I ',".. !" of H"rr,'n CoTIw bo'i M." ment means if it is a new one 5avls !JT !" f '" *• : '' m '"'""fresh from the University and stances. Lotn ( m |h( ,^,.,-,1,^ c i aM i might be wrong bu* 1 thought Wllh lhl lr pungas pajj out and that Class IV had been abolishu bt plul again in three y .,, manl %  isctusl M Imminent must be the It. Does he come into the principal Instrument for making ,nd his wife were brought, worl l equipped like the other rhlldien good. The axpoo only with a bundle of this view sought support from a in.stmrt* which, but for the trampassage front the Bible with M inn whuh be 'Mil receive later, which we are all familiar, even „, have the power of making Mm though the other side pointed out I should like to Have this possibly* Mr"*SayiuV would' have %  U1 words ,,f ArtXoOe, "the moM that trie information from %  tUd Uen here permanently. my thanks be]t t.iken from St. I acknowledge forehand. Another Appoiiilmnt then it will be DBO But I am aii nd si all Imvu !OT :,nolne r Spanish Mistress to be as dftsaUsBed with the at*"freas one .n.pointmenl iron, tltudu of the administration to">? runks < lhe ,,5f ,rt S warda the Girls 1 Scnool. If Urg. h 22ft wmUd ** VI aU \ h0 Gnillth is to retire shortly then shuffling of personnel. ThU exodus there Is reason to suppose S3 S another hcadteaclur of u eiel M s?ndary schools is> bound to nientary school will su ceed her. Thi^ grabbing of the Secondary Schools will do %  a* !" SLiy SFUSTS ".-e„ C o 22 i war the standard of the K looli B It disturbs the continuity I lobs the school of the influ.• ..i the teachor ov r period nf its nuihor (wh^unholy and the most savage of presumably applied it > turned all the animals, and the most full out very badly, losing his Inherlas a result. At ubout the time that Rousseau was coming perfect from the hands preaching that force was mlsof the Creator but degenerating chlevoua, that there is i nds of man, as Itousseau pulsion with anything but love, claims' And supposing we take that the only habit the chill the middle view that be is bom should form should be the hab t neither angel nor beast, but someof forming no habit, and G0.1tnlngOl each one. would H he win was expressing his firm true to say that those amounts f m th in the perfectibilItv ( Stock from human reason, there were inc.. 11 eminent as John W departure in educational policy and so the experience of a scastdteacher will be needed gh %  It fftlh. ci nd emeu 1 %  pointed th*n the pupils and the staff will have to adjust the n • n l %  n 1. told Jh^'aSoire h'^'nevef .mn.n"' *•" V* h h ^ '" "'"^ ^"the whole course of his life Ti7.-^r.^ u ^JT.r?*.y r *:„ m M ss greet, 11 no) greater, dlssatisexcept In sn far as it f.ction to parents who now pe> modlAed t>\ lh< rlronment, schooU Home and the have brought to the element ,,,,,.. tentf i mi ,.,. „ Khools. 1 hope that it will not Quest! nn " i?.rlv nd d.nvub ,1. itoinakeaiu nd the rn^i ib M %  o-'n M further comment on thl points .. ,,.„,, the Those views) are Irreca rs. orinitn capable h;il | ( ;(ll ,.„ „„ .„ n .. llu ,.,,., 1UI ,.,. Ul .. )|r v Ides that ol thi lamptoni of posite temperanuots of their having a commission of enquiry. (wi oM called "the anadvocates, they show how human Bells ill Rousseau and temperaments can wary a lei And tempu to th.nrlse th.'t rre moral endowment r children exhibits as great a vai,ety as their native mental SI dowment; that mural sensibib,.' is n varying trait, the measure of which may be formed lo b) distributed In sccordance will ihe law of variation, fa n CUTTI "f chance in much Ihe same way as inteMn. Height" They'll Do It Every Time %  By Jir ll.llln I SAy,V!C.CX.'80>'. 1 WILL. KXJ CHECK ON TUS WSMT AWY? C>0 TUAT 9JMW0USE CO ORCCR GO CUT VET ? r SEC By "WE RS. CN TUE'R LETTER %  mey WA>.TZO LEFT-M/WDED BOTTLE OPE*JeR£ SLOW A^O THE CUSTOMER^ COWT KOW WHAT TUEy t WANTED IH THE FiRST, PiAce—• %  I REMEMBER /•IUAT mocAGe-iT iws > 1 AKUT THE 5ZE OF A W05 PEHC L BOX -HIS COMM55.0-. WILL BE ARXTT 0 KUPECS %  7>, BEFORE TAXES TT At O ;-.'. DUMP HIM thi 'A BOX AM'SH.P HIM TO S!AM— IT*D SAvt THE FIRM PLEHTy %  L-' V^-L5OUTGO/MB ^ M ~y< •:/S? HAPPY DAYS AHD NlSHTS IU THE HURRy DERARTA1ENT'." 2t&*1UA-ix AMOA-DPOF THE HATLO HAT TJ "W. niter discussing how Jar moral may %  „< %  ."imuu .1 uerednary Mr. Taeobaiioa .1'^. on to sa