Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text


ee ee



ESTAB



NATO Armada Stage Bi

Nine Nations Combine To Repel
“Invasion” In Northern Norway

Aboard U.S.S. Franklin D.
THE WORLD’S mightiest peacetime naval armada] rom

steamed through the Nort}
whose two northernmost
overrun by an
“Operation Mainbrace”,
ever held, began officially <
of orders to N

vYaval Comman
Scandinavia from

provinces
“invading army”

the direction

LISHED 1895

Roosevelt. at Sea, Sept. 13.

1 the aid
already
from the East.

the biggest joint naval exercise
it midnight with the flashing
ders to repel an “invasion” of
of Russia. Orders sent

Sea to of Norway,

have been

|



160 vessels from nine nations and 80,000 men—half of them j



















BARBADOS



4li Ouarters:

U.S. Tourist
Pays 5’- For
€2.000 Stone

Tw hand @















































North Americans—into “action” The project wa SRC de s- |

First ' : - Melbourne: William Dooling, an } / a ‘ a ie tae cut ; Ro aa n

irst warhips to sail from ~ e American touring the Queensland W f B 1 empts by the Deputies who fea |
Scotland's Firths of Clyde and Gen Rid WAV |cesert five hundrea cake north | es ‘a Our ? that the plan is too daring, and | §
Forth where the vast armada had ° e jof Brisbane, bought a pretty stone | TI who do not we Pore national pat - |
assembled were a task force of T e ifrem a bearded old rospector liament to be deprived of their

§ é if z ar « prospecto A .
minesweepers and frigates. They W arns Russia Nast \ < for five shillings. A gem ruc s e C ; sovereign rights, — |
will clear the path for carriers ter in the city revealed it t ° Delegates voted 51 to 4 on the}
cruisers and battleships. SURESNES, France, Sept, 13. be a green star sapphire and worth B p S 9 of, } motion presented by a nited |

Fighter planes from the Royal General Matthew B. Ridgway,: £2,000, Now Dooling wants to A al l€ $ | Front” of French deleg cates wit a
Air Force Coastal Command were warned Russia that his Allied |stay in Australia and has applied a ie i the excepijon of memLer ws no '
scheduled to put an air umbrella armies will “crush to earth” any aan a 40-acre mining lease in the ; BERLIN, Sept. 13 | eral De Gaulle’ 8 igo § Fa &
over the armada for the first 50 aggression that the West’s grow-|4rea where the gem was found. SOME wx y west-bound truck rhe motion was al Hd DY a
miles. after which planes from ing power is unable to prevent. Washington: Hct meals from vere held up at Soviets’ Babel : i ide Guy Molle re
the carriers will take over. Dur- The Allied Supreme Comman- | lot machines are the latest thing. erg checkpol it on the Berlin en i of the Repu u on ‘opul oe as
ing the 13-day exercise, units of der issued the warning in a{The focd is pre-cooked, then f highway At _ Mariehbor | Franco me lenthon " ra . a
the huge flotilla will bombard solemn pledge to the Untied States | quick frozen, An electric tube in- ee police still he . eight lie cE ir ae a res
“occupied” areas of Norway, land dead of two world wars and to}ide the machine thaws out and sen Volk Wwagens (people's cat | Er . +) ’H ak ee cai
1,500 United States marines on “all prople of all lands to whom heats the dinner in seventy sec- zed “on hursday. Bape a Ve ou ms a: te
the Danish island of Jutland and life without freedom is worse than | °?9S after you put coins in the ane ae m ues Sian eraay t “RPF a a a Ai Mich i Debr :
send a task forve into the Baltic death.” slot nee gpa ST eee Tees i h thouah ‘ »proving the
Sea as far east as Denmark’ Three chaplains representing Melbourne; John Buller, form- | a’, . se Sea nae they Reeds sinciple. of po) cal federation
Bornholm island halfway between Jewish, Protestant and Catholic erly of London and now a nursing ¢ umber to 1 ake c ? se td eae the work of
the southern tip of neutral Swe- faiths held. brief services over! orderly in Brisbane, had a chance: {| Meanwhile East German com-} the "Sens titut se Assembly by a
den and Russian occupied eastern graves as former Secretary of | “ lephone conversation el iat munists placed five more anti-[ proposal to refer ‘the task to al

yermany. | State George C. Marshall formally | #80 19 pennire Wrtae ero ‘ommunists on trial, The city’s} commission of experts.—U.P. i
Sneak Attack dedicated the memorial. Roaciny aa Si aitatent He liked East Berlin communist press said Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower
Ridgway said “We speak to 4,- ~ FS higher ys | - tate i 57-year-old West Berline as i; ss

“Enemy” planes and submar- America but if our purpose here ne ge % eae eae ~ ad given two and a half years. in Jail rer ey gos ea ere es Bs
ines Jaunched a sneak attack on is noble, if our thoughts have henna ms ett H « ds tt | jfor “defaming the German demo- te} 1 { S| 1 ~ Aria i ¥ ym ‘ eta a me on
the powerful NATO fleet racing spiritual value, if our courage is fot the first time when “she ar- j [rable repubil Sovie m lps Phil nlatpin, avouses tne Adalat:

> rescue sleaguere a . rere ° : e : ‘ es : Saal ; . ade a, accuses -
to the rescue of be leaguered Nor high, then we stand not only on +iveq in Sydney this week and! KING FREDERICK of Denmark is shown ta Gopenhagen with his eldest __ Pre report said Wilhelm ran stration of bungling the nation
way Saturday in the first clash the soil of France but on the soil a her a few | rs later daughter, Princess Margrethe, 12, who williuc r Siebert fled from East Germany 4 ¢ Apert y
of the greatest peacetime naval cf freedom, and ou ‘ds g married her a few hours 2 aus , ee ne eee ene enes who willguceeed him to the throne to West Berlin two years ag id a e oOo “perilously ¢lose to World War
manoeuvre. not.46 Ase sn ° i ' ny 4 eRe | of Denmark if a constitutional amendmentis adopted by Parliament ; pi \ - 1 : , es Ago at : III.” He outlined a 10-point pro-
. 1Ot é eT . > mi ‘yf ao " was NCKEC up ” communis “ . : .
and approved by popular referendum. King Frederick has three daugli- y f y ld per
The mock attacks were appar-; people of all lands to whom life 19 t +p | * ‘ ee ee Caugi police when he visited East Berlin 4 gram for winning world peace.
1 € ag § s he posed a “e , a rise ry’s
ently aimed at Britain’s most; without freedom is worse than B.G. Ss Col. Sec. Was a ston tes re - om Dror sed amendment was introduced by Helga ,in June He was convicted of or n¢ la Fisenhower said the country’s
powerful fighting ship, Vanguard, death.”—U.P. | etersen, Denmark’s Woman Minister of Justice. (International) mak false statements about ultimate goal must oe “geni=
and at its most modern carrier | Yaw, . , Fast many when he fled to the LONDON, Sept. 13 eral disarmament” of all countries.
Eagle, the veteran Il'ustrious and | | Favourite F or ‘ e j west ‘ Russia announced that Soviet
the U.S. carrier Wright. } | R We y R Is S at One West Berliner ind three} Ships have sailed. for India with ig acee

Although they were not expect-— U. N. Disregard (FOV ernor’s ; Post e ugee eveda s OvLE ,East Berliners were sentenced toJfood for the famine _ stricken
ed with the fleet less than six 7 eo eS , Y e terms ranging from five to eight’ Madras state, The Russians said 1° ¢
hours out of Scottish ports the Malik’s Objections | (From Our Own Corresponder Intrigue A nd Corruption years for allegedly smuggling they had agreed to let the Kisenhower
eight-nation armada was ready. UNITED NATIONS ; GFORGETOWN, B.G., Sept, 13. . imachine ry from east to west/Indian Red C€ rose distribute it :

It had been escorted to 50 miles) Ricci delegate Jacob A Melik| ‘The Daily Chronicle's Londo Jerlin, Eastern Press reports said} India had objected on Septem Y

é see y anes f the RAF USSIa'S delegate Jacob A, Mali ; . ; TAS +r T Sente oy 12 Commit ts called riant rally | b 5 to an earlier Soviet an- S Lf ye
Sokseat Moan initia * plan suffered what may well be his | correspondent cabled to-day that LOVE FOR \ wv ASHINGTX DN, Se pte mber 13 | for ‘Sunday in ei ee cen j o imeement that the food and uppor ers
whereby the RAF took day pa-, final defeat in the United Nations ;Sir William Savage, Governor eo 1 : I R A GERMAN GIRL caused a Russian to | war and Fascism for peace uni y | con spanion cash gift would be

trols and the United States Air- en the Security Council dis-| Barbados, will be new B.G.’s Gov- flee into United States custody from the Soviet Zone of | nd socialism.” t ' turned over to the Communist sup- In Ma, iorit
force night vigil. { regarded his objections and voted ,ernor, Previous reports had men-| Germany Intelligence agents. said he was “extreme sly | “Free German youth communist} po ted “Joint Committee for Ly y

The first warning that the fleet OT pear } ve debate the|tioned Sir Andrew Wright— | intelligent” and by his own description very frank *\organization called on east and|aicing the starving” in the And-
was under “attack” came when a} eee ara “pp ications of |) Cyprus’s Governor, Sir John Arun but very crafty” west German youths to demon-|!ro region of Madras, The Indian NEW YORK, Sept.
coloured plume of smoke showed! Japan, Libyn, .Laos, Cambodia,}dell, the Windwards’ eee A ; | Direc strate against western allied and| government at the time said that| Dwight D. Eisenhower's a
that a torpedo had been fired. Two { ‘ and Vietnam, _ _ land Hon. John Gutch, B.G.s , An interview covered a wide Tanke of subjects includ- "the West German peace contract.) the food and money ghould beis<) ors “strengthened their control
more were quickly “fired” level Malik, who will be returning | Colonial Secretary, now O.A.G., as ing mtrigue and moral decadence in Stalin’s official family. - —UP. tributed either by the govern-/over the top positions of the
with the “Illustrious” and the! t® Moscow probably late next! probable successors to Sir Charles —_ Among the highlights were, merit itself or by the Indian Red} iepublican Party with a reshuffle
“Vanguard”. week, eae that the appli- | Woolley. In B.G. the newspapers} I y. statements that Joseph Beria, | Cross : of the National Executive Com-

—vu.p, | cation of the five states be refer-| 5. the past weeks have been | uss ia I re g head of the Russian secret nolice : e ¢ The Indians on September S| mittee. The Executive Commit-

| red to the Council's Committee on somata with letters urging the’ ' ordered arious women to be- New High Schoo also returned a relief donation of] tee, previously clonsidered

; membership Instead the 11 F op oS 84.000 f ( ist China minated t th f 1 f

i S$ 2a » =|. nf 7 Suter 4 ie . oO intimate W } a $ OO rom ‘ommunis ine ninate vy a riends o

nation ite Caeed In eee sepe| ER move re eS abe « or I ossible \ ar ihre te a the m ~ ge i & at [ ) ened hi Grenada bok ause the Chinese had specified Senator Robert Taft, is now made

Gen. Hauteclocque atone verse Capes ie, aileet petition Whitehall for hi: appoint- | WASHINGTON. §S 13 the efused ‘| . d that it should be distributed by }up of eight Eisenhower support-

4 ications without recourse to the : gt ban . é NG : »pt ‘ or aia . th ume Red tinged “Joint Com rs six Taft men and one

igi : f T is | Committee.-U.P, . ment, emphasising his he 2 J I P iring for “possible war” . it St 1 a ; me utal From Our Own Correspondent eattte a ( Painia ya pda Secor neuter: ine ri
Visits Bey Oo unIs | Noses ane og eee ee en eee United oe th euiiver pare ae i oe, GRENADA, Sept. 13. |tary of the All Union Central

Re edge of lecal conditions ommant theme in Russia tod: M1 A meen Persona ee A larg ‘presentative assembly} Trades Union Council, announced Governing Body
TUNIS, Sept. 13. Communist Gutch during the past two years a xetuges Soviet scientist has told ! detence and ite SECU~ 5 + Atlan n aie be : me t 7 . ten t Baylat .eKipe tor ' g Body

ee n Sane 4 tt | lar throughout the American intelligence official tte 7 : 2 — : 1 tals Pf -

The French Resident General} 2 became popu : 7 Wii ees he aes ; p opening of the Anglican High lodras with 10,000 ;ons of whe rhe 15 member committee
Jean de Hauteclocque called on} Surrenders colony, but it is feared that li Nene Departn Ht On SAtut © rugs sle for Power School at Tanteen last Thursday 000 tons of rice, and 5,000 cat h yp governing body of t
Friday on the Bey of Tunis and : , | Waitenall will not create a pre- ver 3s eased a report on extensive Ai outstar 1g characteristic of afternoon by Governor Arundetl,| of condensed m'lk.—U.P. party between national conven-

7 ee ae ahetia ‘ ‘ PANMUNJOM, Sept. 13 | cedent to promote a Colonial Sec- | intervie with an unidentified § f and politic is the following ble : by Arch ese lier ind nation or e
it was widely reported that he A Commilnist: soldier sneaked R G th ame | Russian who belies ys aan , ; gs fol ng lessing Ar . itional committee
ies, =| eta Mench ¢£ 5 é - a > > e same =? ‘ \ Americar « eat dog rucgle for rer- de nH. G, Pigott in the absenc¢ meeting The changes were an-
delivered a stern French answer | , fe retary to be Governor In Chances thie ve s = con % ate 4 ge
own the corridor from Panmun-} .o] hile governors in smaller in the rearmament Qn 7 ower that led t flict hs Bist ¢ the Windy is.) Tu Will Be Released jounced } Republic , a
» Bey’s rejection of the pro-| i colony, while gover test” are ery Poot ‘ | i to nflic of the jishop 0 i indwards unisians 2 © lOUNCE’ ry epublican nationa
pat. French eeaain programme. | joraste, the United Nations lines | colonies are entitled to promotion. ot very cotieanil c om ie ik mnt 1e and often to destruction delayed bee vse there was no B.G ie - Chairman Arthur Eummerfield
( ti rial ‘ir “les aintained how- | dast night and gare himself up to Sir Alfred Savage the Daily come of. this 7 Se “4 mh : petitor Airways flight from St. Vincent rur-.S, sep? _. Who denied reports that the new
Of cla eire nal ma . ee surely | ie same two United States M4-|onronicle’s London report says he Boviet este, eee since the fardhal Ghukov. Was recalled on the previous day ly 1s announced that the 46¢ lignment presented purge” of
CYCES vie . be hal ‘ slit cal ae movepied he surrender hav an impressive record in Bar= | ptyeetive m rah , 2 d tt * 2 Soviet Commander in Ger- The feature of the ceremon person arrested “during the the member who backed Taft
one of courtesy ant a ee of a truce driver 24 hours before. bados and has a reputation for long for the Aechities ea ae A pos rn for shipping a “trainload attended officials of the Gov troubles which swept the protec - against Eisenhower for Presi-
affairs were discussed. a ;Allicd authorities disclosed the being one of the best dressed ine the United sf 7 a 1 erie ef automobiles back to his friends ernment, members of the Legis-|torate last Wednesday, will be dential nomination at the July
known that the French answer | latest escape this morning. The Pel hhe 1 We tnsastracta Ste s to mobilize in Meéscow without a government lature, heads of all denominations] released on Monday.—W.P. onvention U.P.
arrived in Tunis on Friday after| renegade was the third Red tuo * I orde He had heard that ex- und the Board of Education, was
having been approved _ by the! make a break through the arm~ | The refugee scientist, trained) foreign Minister V ‘ a ae the unvcilings of inseriptions along | |=
French cabinet. —U.P. istice camp within a week,—U.P.; i las a geologist and. with wide ex-| 1 Andrei viens f ‘ ae five sections of the buildings, in
E IN N EGYPT'S 'S NEW CRISIS | Producer Leawes perience in military scientific | qu tly took Molotov ig lashed dicating donors to the or ro a )
| projects for Stalin Government 1 1948 over the « bi cluding the Society ‘or th
FIGUR lail Toda told his interviewer “It is a factl1 4 I '? conduct of In- pro yagation of the Gos pel, the |
nr ny that the Americans made a mis- Arto picid Funai sit Grenada Government, St. Georg
A + 5 take in not destroying the Soviet! ,, ] whe al by th ms eng Chureh Council and two familie
a HOLLYWOOD, Sept. 13 regime after having conquered |Z" Wo er 0. ae nited us
| Z re er wane ent Germany”. .But now it is to rn $3 . vin tale tig oul re- { RA! TIGH-—Makers of the
scheduled for release rom jail he aid. “Thi opportunit had ci oluntari the soviet .
O-day after shooting a man over’ bear tet slim nity had) zone a year later might have Leachers Adapt ‘ p
vamection of his actress wife, ay Jt alip.and will not retur Pie eee ee 5 “ WORLD'S CHAMPION
Joan Bennett The silver-haired ' the re + eaithatthat t Americar t { ASST als
es ‘ eport saying t Kt - an m of receiv- ' Sa ary raposa Ss
movie maker, 57, served 102 days qoes not necessarily refi Soviet defector -
nooeeet sf ms amen istie® his view of the - par am it ¢ T —U.P. The Assistant Teacher Unio 1
voun ig of Je lings v . Sig er on 0 } Inite ’ ie ee aonied aes amt
wife’s agent.—U.P, Government "—U.P ig jyesterday adoj ‘
; : es v ni of the Salary Com
va = proposa nel
Kast Europe Must Pros et vona them. on to|
| 4
. the Teacher Association |
B29 *s Bomb Nor th Liberate Itself These recommendations w il 1|
eventually be Lent on to the Con
. ANKFURT, Sept, 13 ioner Government ha v @|
ry _ of nie aaa appointed to consider the salarit |
f Foreign elations of the employee other than ad
k ore AL} Wy a r | j ii Tom Connally says istrative head nd technical
} la f 6. Uinther: Btotes ti ain min i i a t
ri ; - “7 officers
ending troops to lib- Tt Unions’ meeting was
‘ SEOUL, Sept. 13, erate Eastern Europe from Com- ei te bani aed hin’ te
Waves of United States planes defian tly carried the ™munism. — lid not begin after mid-day
Korean war to the doorsteps of both the Soviet Union and ie se ” iti ° ne would) nventy-eight members turned up
Red China. Thirty-five B29 Superfortresses struck first > se ih a e "ets a dni eee ie. and there was a discussion op
with 300 tons of demclition bombs at northwest Korea's! tiace democracy, parliamentary | the irregular attendance of mem-
EGYPTIAN PREMIER Aly Maher Pasha (left) has resigned in the { vital Suigho plant directly ACTOSS the Yalu River from! covernment, pnd indepefdence, | bers and their lack of punctuality
face of pressure from military leader Maj. Gen. Mohammed Neguib | Manchuria. They reported “good to excellent” results| 2ut some of them do not want to[in arriving, i ht
(right), according tq Cairo dispatches. Gen. Neguib declared he would | iin jioht navy att ; | be liberated. We are not prepar- The pre sid nt, } i +. Downe
form a government “mostly of civilians” to rule the troubled country. | ;,. tt tt navy attack-bombers , d to go in there with arms|w unable to be present on
Aly Maher became premier when King Farouk was deposed. His | opr one United — eae Grant Dies gainst their will—they must lib-|account of his having to attend ‘
¥. rinceton and “Bon omme ; ite themselve nother meeting
resignation coincided with a widespread political purge. | Richard” in ine geskn Bon erika! themsely i ; ; 1" You are ona :
—(International), | ie 7 vapan Sea smash- Fr Our Own Correspondent || { 3
ed at the Northeast Korean suppl; ‘DEN "e MEY R I DIES --- + | »\ >
é aly GRENADA, Sept, 13 ERSTEIN :
entre of ory with meee 3h, 2: G , Sex 3
“ re Ot Hoer ong within ight Victor Grant, 33, formerly of the WINNER when ou ride a Ralei h! =
Sh | R ffi Ss Hi 5 De we Sy alanine ont ok ie mae hone department here, re LONDON, Sept. 13 emonstrators ' :
irm Is Ss nly 40 miles west of the Soviet- pn partm i , re-| JONDON, Sey 2 §
;' ~ ¢ e ray =n late superintendent of S* Die he ovelist-poet F. H | 3 ’ ; 1 ;
a 1 ea epeesee frontier Navy pilots! 5 vas buried at "Olliasy : W. Meyorst rt : ead 63 a H Enter Brussels 8 A Raleigh was the choice of Reg Harris—World’s
® 4 : Said that they destroyed eight of} ve cterg following t death ot! novels lude Tece Duke 3 Professional Sprint Champion for the second year in
. : the 30 garracks in thé ce > of} follo : , - te wi 3% 7 F '
For Oil Dispute Solution | fe aeeen , ae ‘ — * h parents’ home after a long: “Seraphin Tom Tallion BRUSSELS, Sept, 13 4 succession. Here is proof of the wisdom of buying
| rest United Nations Comwis a | ailment here U.P The first trickle of an expected 3 your bicycle from a Company with such great
TEHERAN, Sept. 13. [ed the Shah “to intimate certain] described Hoeryong in the north-| aaa demonstrators called to ‘ technical experience and knowledge that designed
; “ern an ons . emier” ‘ test gain the lemency 2
A court official called on Prem- recommendations to the Premier”) ernmost corner of _Korei 1 as “the ye A painst the ¢ and built the record-breaking RALEIGH,
o } stor s pected ri > . : itec two ytorious war

ier Mohammed Mossadegh on Middletor pected to give} Manchurian border gateway fron ey m 2 es i ary ; te

Saturday re.terated the Shah’ Mossadezh an ial British re-| Russia ‘ Tur ve re Ss rimina previously death - 8° De z

desire for a solution to the oil ply next week it is bebeved South Korean infantrymen suc : : ; ; hj ,| tenced bes an arriving in the Be

question, informed sources re the reply would declare that Bri-| cessfully beat off fifth Chinese NEW YORK, Sep eant Frank Page or recent | giat ipital Saturday nigh

ported tuin cannot m2ke greater conces- | Communist ttempt to recapture rig How rd ne pay 1 m Europe talked r | But the ik of former concent

The meeting sions tl d “Capitol Hill on! edltoria f Ss i G T about t progr . =] tu ¢ f t re tance i

by the Britis _ William Alton Joné s of the Cities t centr front A fey M tthev Ridgw cae scribe t hi Gree} i t en ie ' , | her € eter in and far THE ALL-STEEL BICYCLE

George Middlet« } Service Oil Company of the United other R.O.K launch-; f nspection visi rurke i sayin r le abou ot lle in from all corners

on Thursday when Brita States was said t have fare, wot of hake ewe peut ee 8S Gat ae tet oe pnctaned | of the 7 oy A Product ef Raleigh Induserias Limssed, Netsingham, Fingland.

repeated eque M rer annot neip iran ing the crest of “Fin eve ad be use of ne pu ar e tour ; j the r t 5

ade it € th Britain « ell o it might fur ish A thunderous artil-) patri m id deep love W have here netr | : 5
. i Ar few for the refir.ery cked the entire are } ( t which w t bl hat n ‘ can buy | ‘ tratior me-} t “<7 CAVE, SHEPHERD
aa D Sx it frcr : aulte the e people eq y nd I ecr t r e | o i +i it f J & co., LTD.
5 * Mi Sim ee t € < ¢ Ss Kore W er S« ily r ttle cor derat ir inte bd. he
Re f VA s ( : f tir t ig tial oppositio the se] = ‘ ‘ :
ang, Oia. ENE 9 tack on. the, pre rs of a ae Goeskinhiek we Bie a 10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street.
a epor } , South Koréar eade / ‘ ( |Go ‘ ude a
a ¢ he prir oe of sre I } veel ) I Ar rurke i he} pal ti eche
‘ . 5 p her ie ] rs ¢ ; } 4 00 " ( I Turk nf the ir de I = NO CYCLE IS COMPLETE WITHOUT A STURMEY-
: 2 ms : - , th ARCHER 3. OR 4SPEED GEAR AND DYNOHUB
t > UP U.P aS - _
f U.P. \ UP. | i
of















































| NEW LAW WOULD Mi



SEPTE)



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19

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PRICE :



Plan Approved

STRASBOURG, Sept. 13,
The six-nation European Coal-Steel Pool Assembly }
decided to start immediate work on the constitution for!
political federation of France, Western Germany, Italy,

Holland, Belgium and Luxembourg
By a strong majority the 78-member House approved al

plan to convert itself into a pre-constitutional Assembly |
and prepare a charter for political unification of the six |
West European nations whose industrial and military |



potential outstrips that of Soviet Russia



































SIX CENTS



zest Peacetime Lxercise

| 6-Nation Federal crores sungiing































































PAGE TWO









































. SUNDAY ADVOCATE P SUNDAY. SEPTEMBER 14, 1952
' ve
= r ee > 9 e , ® e
JANETEA DRESS SHOP | €Ct ACR S ecita
(Next Door to Singer’s) CECIL JACK, young Vineent
| pianist, gave a Plane Recital at By KAY HOWELL most diffieult pieces of the
* aoa the British Council on Friday at Lammermoor’’— evening's entertainment. In Mr ADY -SAVAGE ) s
Just Opened : NYLON STOCKINGS 8.30 p.m. Incidentally, it is worthy grand opera ites ts ee teen, a, te Sue See Excellency th . a < Bee
With Black Arrows pice $1.59 of note that on the 12th Septem- and first produced at Ni acts Of The Mountain King” by Grieg 155, 4 4 a: dak Ee tae
ie ber, 195i—a ye I P ed at Naples—Mr. the Norwegiam Composer, which l0°%,4 40 minutes flight in “Miss
Cutlined Heels . 7 ee 2.25 5 ee ee ago—Mr. Jack ack must have been successful ia part of Anitra’s Dance in which Bim” on Saturday last, September
4 Sh 243 also treated an appreciative in learning the fundamentals 2 ae te oF ane ©
Pier Maha SSO eli sich cis fides ices cscctecod pi ceca who acclaimed him az which will further develop -h Peer Gat qutees th: Hall of the Saprag > Sp pater:
| ee young pianist whose technieaa technical abilit: » SEOGRCREY: Fe, SHE OU HOME a6 Sinton, ain 3 "Lady
} SE «=—(dzDrresses Made to Order for all occasions excellence surpasses that of a mer: Af he Soeate aaa one ae eseaeen Savage owas asaeenite ot ¥,
amateur is was his seeond S : oo ge Soe - % Deni / 7
} - NY ine Bie cE ayy After Bho Ratenvad Re and ove techried um we Mula Denis VAahim ADI
this time the recital only served sat in readiness knowin re ee j “toihs 7 . =
— PSSA, coe Soe onl) i. that the a he dos Light Aeroplane Club a letter
! ee to substantiate the opinion of the better half orgy. To my mind I thought the CO. 7 «
) { sama a was BP to ~ re ak ales . stating how much she enjoyed the
i GLoBpt en Brifiast Capabilities | Minor, “waits” A Mat and C What T considered the treat of the fight and especially seeing Barba-
(K{ This Evening $30 pam. Monday & Tuesday S & 8.30 p.m ‘The peogmamme whic was ‘Fantaisie bb and “Poloe programme was yet to. follow. 2 for the first time from Miss
i | divided into five groups was aise” in A Flat Major -— by 7 ote 5 :
i ROSE OF Cane ARRON Wi cleverly chosen 60 ae to bring out Fiedavie Chapin We saw whos Concerto Familiar Wedding At St. Matthias
i) Jack Beutel — ae ~— Bill Williams } he versatility of the pianist. No Was perhaps Mr. Jn~’s favourite 5 T ST. MATTHIAS on Thurs-
i vi |doubt, after hearing “Sarabande” —e handled his armeggios sue- , ae from the Ist Movement day aflernoon Miss Dorothy
) GLORY ALLEY |in D Minor by Handel, “‘Arioso” cessfully. With the \evboard a: © C Minor ‘“Coneerto” by Phillips, Nurse at the Mental
)} elie Garen Lows Armstrong — Jack Teagarden |by J, S. Bach and “Turkish his command he ecr*inly paster- tacbmaninoft though simple tothe Hospital and daughter of Mr.
i} FRE scenes ana oT See |March” by Mozart, one realised @¢ the technical parts => 2 ow great Robert Phillips of — Hindsbury
Wednesday and Thursday 4.45 & 8.30 pm. jthat Mr. Jack had within his ¥ Sis ” a "ine ~ Road became the bride of Mr.
‘ y Mkdh & CONGO LANGE |grasp the fundamentals that will, Relaxed And € vfident tiom was masterly To end the Keith Walrond, of Tudor Bridge
FARZAâ„¢N & HIS a with steady practice, blossom Now convinced that this was no PPoCramme Polichnielie bY and a Member of the Inspectorate
{ OUR PRICES forth to produce a pianist of ™ére amateur, the audience heard Wachmerinoft—a buffoon—left an of the General Board of Health.
Pit 12¢., Cirele 24c. House 36 Bal. GO., Boxes 72c., Kids }-Prite brilliant capabilities. This group Group 4 by Schuman, German indelible impression. The bride who. was given in MR. & MRS. EYAN ROSS
Me he played with tenderness bring- ae Traumeri (Dreaming) Ceci) Jack is a young pianist "arriage by her father was * MR. & MRS. o Os : : ;
SS = FEAF SE -|ing out the melodie genius in- Gamer yung (Soaring) 2.74 with a clearly defined approach attended by Miss Violet Walrond Second Lecture edding At St. Patricks
\ ten vy the Composers. ims) were han to his music. He masters varied 2S Maid-of-Honour with Misses R. LEFANU will give his
: smoothly and with deep tender- - ~ Patri Mins ; ; ; Pe N y a :
aR , tochwieal works and if he main- cia Phillips § and Naomi second lecture in the series N SATURDAY afternoon at
Th hats Sind Outy, ” tained one at ar< tains an unmereenary attitude Springer as Bridesmaids. The “Three Contemporary Novelists” O 4.30 o'clock at St. Patricks
ci Ah cpermehncancenenernnemtiisontseseicsinnammnceentnaneeiliinateiieinattoe. e second Group, “Sonata The e sty leces. +- wards his music he will, If am flower girls were the Misses lL. at the British Council, “Wake- Roman Catholic Church, Miss
EMPIRE OLYMPIC ROXY ROYAL Op. 49 No. 2 in G. Major featured The former gives the idea of .1.0 develop into a pianist of Walrond and Betty Daniel. field”, White Park, tomorrow at Joan Roach eldest daughter of
To-day 4.46°& G88) Today & Tomercaw | To-ca¥ to Tuesday Last Two Shows two movements by Beethoven and Tising and im Whims was h*ard high esteem. The bestman was Mr. Stanley 5.00 pm. The subject of the Mrs. Ina Roach of “Pilgrim
Ro-ce AT meing| O20 wh CIS DUP 4.45 & 8.15 Today 20 & «30 “Lucia di Lammermoor” by 4 wide range of expressions. His Piggot and the ushers were Mr. jecture will’ be “Graham Greene”. Place”, Christ Church w
daly, Univaneas Richard Basehart | ¢.,. ; Republic Donizetti arr. Leschetiazky for ihe “bility to interpret effectively ex- ‘Thanics is due to the Represent- Ralph Holder and Mr. Roy Si ns 20th to Mr. Evan Bnet, set i ae ann
Pctures Presents Vinvtiym Maxwelt C°! "NDIA Pic\ures Colossal) double left Rand only, brought forth actly what the composers intend- gtives of the Britise Council for Walrond. : upervisor i, eR ee ar. sing
John Lund —. s Allan ‘Recky) Lane rounds of applause from the ¢d, is indeed an achievement. making the programme possi)? The ceremony which was fully Century Fox ough”, Welches, St Michael. zea:
oa WALL’ Broderick Deva! cort popu, |audience who, sat enraptured. Effective Interpretation and also to the audiemee who choral was performed by Rev. M. R. EDWARD COHEN, Super- ses ‘
and John DEREK - STAMPEDE” | To be able to master with perfec- With the programme drawing availed themselves of the op- E—. Griffiths and the honeymoon cor of 20th C » Fox, The >
BATTLE AT m7 ii , ‘the : 2 i visor of 20 entury e ceremony was performed
AY SPOR AND THO in and | tion such a piece as “Lucia di to a close, we heard some of portunity of hearing it. is being spent at Bathsheba. who arrived here on Thursday by Father Parkinson, S.J., and the
APACHE PASS = SCANDAL THE FLAME For Ten Days evening from British Guiana left bride who was given in marriage



with

RS. SENORA DE CAVIC- by B.W.1.A. on Friday for Cara- by Mr. J. B. Field wore a gown of



































- . | *
In Glorious Erie Fortnran John Carroi! i i
Technicolor Nadia Grus SHEET j Vera Ralstor e CHIONI and tw aughters ©aS via Trinidad. He was accom- slipper satin with close fittin
aT ke en ee Tues and Wer te Thurs. | Monday a Tae oing oO arrived in the iaeke wi panied by Mr. Louis Milan, Man~ bedice buttoned to the waist ae
~Gaabem Friday waste ane Republic Double | hostile ) during the week for ten days’ 28!ne Director f 20th Century long close fitting _sleeves. Her
19th 2.30 & 8.30 “G@RBON OF John Wayne Republic Doub'e: | holiday. During their stay‘ here Fox. E _ ___.__ full skirt of chantilly lace over
Universal Pictures § GH@#T CITY” in ae ae. | lee they will be guests at St. Law- Mr. Cohen’s happy impressions the satin ended in a long flowing
Presents with Brick Janes WAKE OF THE Ei with | rence Hotel, of Barbados will undoubtedly train Her finger tip veil was
Laurence Olive Phiuzeday RED WITCH” | Allan (Rocky) Lane | Returned Pe and Med held = place by a beaded tiara
in at 4.29 Onby . Vv ‘edicine and she carried a bouquet of white
Repubite double and and 'S [i RS. FRANK THOMAS who One 4 vin pa ;
LET 2 NTOM ‘DOWN DAKOTA a in : , 1U st. gardenias, Queen Anne’s z
HAM Soon me ae “FAR FRONTER” way O L has been spending a few R BARRE . een ee hell pink roses, wr
Coming Soon sa Opening Saturdes Wet & Thur a tneeown asa lh months in the island returned * a aoe noite, winds na
: i 4.80 & 8.20 " - " nee Bp oe home to St. Vincent on Thursday WD }s at presen ay » was : ‘
ROCKING wages” “35 Lane sendin mancen| “THUMBS UP" haa energy in a good night’s | FOR SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1952 * afternoon by B.W.LA. She was the island, will be leaving by the (, aa ee eo by Miss Sheila
HORSE SONG OF NEVADA and " and sleep as he woud on a six-mile +” meh, =i * ; a guest of Mr. and Mrs, H. S, SS. De Grasse on the 16th Sep- 7 Mics , Se eee auch
Thursday At 8.30 rooruicur =| “UNDER nevay. | walk. Scientists reported this after | Look in the section im which your birthday comes and 4 | Eastmond. Upper Collymore Rock tember, for Ireland where he will 1) aael Sisal ‘ Dad Bench mee
WINNER “MADAM O'LINDY VARIETIES | SKIES” tasts in which they measured the} find what your outlcok is, aceording to the stars. Teacher Returns a eee a TOT, 18. Siieeee Gloria ye Jad
= a | ener output of five students 7 also holidaying with him, aathns WE a hn
‘wen AWA wens. SSSA | ver 13 “ag. | * ARIES —Faveurabie aspects honour charitable ISS OLIVE STEPHENS re- He is a guest of Mrs C. Selby, — Field were the flower-
|| They also .found that: Tun | March 21—Aprtl 20 deeds, seeking and granting favours, doing * 4% turned to British Guiana on Bay Street. girls,
| y e Friday last by B.W.LA. after ‘ He .
\ jemnmarere nae: spas. about oly Sas te oe serge orga oo spending two weeks’ tholiday in New Session at Housec raft The maid-of-honour wore a long
. P or ness. b : 3 ; :
Hines tes a day dressing and aa is . "e _ - " I | the island. She is a teacher and Centre deeee, of ace stamped = a
.wY > aN t : during her stay was a guest at St. NOTHER SESSION of Day stvapless ice and a stole while
BRIDGETOWN [Wat «Sac ~~ OISTAN || MAKING beds uses us energy | ® TAURUS “Moderation, accuracy important, Your Lawrence Hotel, a Evening Classes will (he bridesmaids wore dresses: of
Tocdny ab Roane to-day To-day & To-morrow }\\|*wiee as quickly as waching April 21--May zo Venus position stresses. patience, avoid- * For Nursing Course begin at the Housecraft Centre, blue stamped net cut on similar
tg po-m ’ 4.45 & 850 ; 8 & 8.30 min } | dishes. ance of excesses and a cheerful overall atti- i av roe » 15th Sep- lines. They all wore picture hats
4.45 & ¢.20 p.m | : : , ISS CICELY INNISS. eldest Bay Street on Monday 15th Sep ) ‘
Mss de tices ving BERLIN'S | HARRIET CRAIG 1 WASHING socks is more ex- tude toward family, neighbours. . é . "tember. Miss Ivy Alleyne, In- of the same material and carried
eect, acer BLUE SKIES j; Joan crawronp « bausting than peeling potatoes. | # * *« * Inni ove ee Mr, goat wn. 2. structress, assisted by Mrs. B. horse shoe bouquets of pink
THIS WOMAN (Technicolor) i A RUMBA takes almost as | —Be not careless im treatment of loved and a former upil of *. Dottin and Mrs. Edna Scott will coralita and gerberas.
HURRICANE hh out of 4 : sight- | GEMINI * r pupil of Queen's The flower. girl dresses of
Bing Fred }much out of a mn as an eigh ones, or others to whom you can bring ‘oll i i conduct the classes which are 1e flower.girls wore dresses ©
IS DANGEROUS CROSPY ASTAIRG ISLAND)(}{| some reel, | May 21—June 2) “ College will be leaning by the - December blue net with frilled skirts and
Billy DewOLFE || re ? : | pleasure. We should help make others S.S. De Grasse on Tuesday for scheduled to end in December. a Ss a
Joan CRAWFORD — (Super Gipecokes) | WHEN a big man sits listen- | happier, help better living. * incieel where she - aly. enter Two hundred and eighty-two hoed bonnets _ ene ——
Dennis MORGAN ew ; . Jon HALL i at.race he . ang ing gies i ; , j »s of : -
id BRIA NEXT ATTRACTION ee ON HALE _ ||| ing to the Boat-race he uses up | ; ; girls have registered and the sub- iam posies of pink and blue forget
“= exmQD WEEK) | a ae wea {energy faster than when he is | * * ’ a Nursing Course. ‘The Course is jects taught will include Assorted me-nots.
FOLLOWING FOR TWO " us OEE ae 4.6 & 8.20 p.m standing at ease. CANCER -——Bavourable day on whole, with your expected to last for about three Dishes, Cake and Pastry, Carib-
‘ mevoys ONLY “@REAT MISSOURI BRAVE BULLS The measurements were made June 22—July 23 genial cooperation it can be a more fruit- * pene , " bean Cookery, Advanced Cake The duties of bestman were
Paw MUNI in ‘ , Bar MEL FERRER” *) jby a team at Edinburgh Uni- | @ ful, interesting period than for some days. To Ve la Icing, Advanced Butlering, Simple performed by Mr. Bertrum
‘THE LIFE. OF Wend | COREY (Color) ee versity, led by Dr. R, Passmore. First attend church; then enjoy a healthy o Venezue Cutting and Sewing, Smocking, Banfield and thuse of ushers fell
EMULE ZOLA” Special 1) pam |} REVENUE AGENT {It was a test. of a_ portabie | pastime. + RS. N. RUBIO and her two Elementary Pattern Drafting, Sim- to Mr. Clayton Greenidge, Mr.
Thurs. Special 1.30 p.m Delle, RAMNEDY. 6 | Do SS itis. KENNEDY !machine which scientists hope to | * ‘ * children were among the ple Dressmaking, _—— Dress- a Se a ears a
“OUTLAW BICAND‘ “CARGO TO Thurs. only) 449 & #3) use to find out which industri! | LEO -~You are innately sumny folks honoured passengers leaving for Venezuela making and Handcrafts, cins an ir, aoe Aon oe é
3 ! ; CAPETOWN" Chane ST RERBIT job: tl} t i > ~ by B.W.ILA. yesterday morning. There will be a refund of two reception was held at the bride’s
immy WAKELY & me |Jobs are the most tiring. July 24--Ang. 22 now with your planet’s benefice aspect. "i eas : .
WEST GF Bott. ee oe \ Ideal. indications for a good Sund: % | They had been spending about shillings to each student attend- home and the honeymoon is being
Sk GF EL DORADO FRIDAY WERE WIN D AIDERS Get Stale * deal indications a go ungay, par ix weeks’ holiday here as guests ing 75% of the Classes at the end spent at Hide-a-way, Gibbs’
Johnny Mack BROWN |l "cin. te EVERY ‘and \ HOSE who look brked ticularly when you are truly charitable, pra ST nel ay gu aPihe Term Beach, St. Peter.
Porn’ al] BLAZING! ACROSS | who look on bread as 2 and cheerful. " ah Taste: . ‘ Nvisis '





—
WINNING TEAM—Fridwy

THE _PECOS’





“STRANGE BARGAINS i; starchy, fattening food will bs} Ms -* *

surprised to hear that it aso| a :

supplies the average family with | vireo --You can make this an encouraging day

Inearly one-third. of its muscle. | . Avg. 2%—Sept, @3 for many interests. Church, and useful E e « « By Beachcomber
building protein, according | affairs paramount. Don’t seek unneces-

t ;
ww ies dae sary issues that could be handled bette: ,
bread-baking expert Dr. A. J week days. dy ron USK was falling as a belated with one shot,” he said. “How

|
|
; r ay 4 Amos. +2 a na i * & * sportsman presented him- on earth did that happen?” asked
B 4 ; AQ 4 | Scientists are dc ag Cada LIBRA Heed! ‘adv - eee self at the stout oaken door of cld MeKippercailzie. “A lucky
| c
|





j}with chemicals which ean b advice to Taurus, your Venus Shrillwillie the seat of the chance,” replied Foulenough. “The
ladded to dough to delay the | + Sept. 24-—Oct, 25 aspeet similar now. You will find rave F NEWE Macaroon of Macaroon, who is tee heads were together, as they
‘ |staling of bread. | comfort, encouragement in prayer, spiritual rome + or doe also laird ef Kilcock robin. were all eating out of the same
DATE | Doctors are not yet satisfied reflection. Regard health, too. HOLLYWOOD hearts beat. a To the butler’s question he bucket.” Dead _ silence, The
[that the anti-staling chemicals + -* & * little faster today-—because honey- Teviied: “Say that Sir Archer ladies rose to leave the room
would be harmless if eateo BOORPIO ~Your Mars, again favourable, adds stimu- haired Hedda Hopper is bringing Tumult lesb his wax on the Poche i — ated ged vei
regularly. Oct. 24-—-Nov. 22 ‘Us to day; encourages healthy sports, out- out a book. moors.” At the same time he ts: the. ont %, aha th = aon
Hello, Cousin + . door activities, sponsors our military and For 62-year-old Hedda is one handed what looked like a rook 1°) {)@ Winds. sald loudly, “Sha
. E ! other U.N. agencies, of Hollywood's gossip queens. She rifle to the aged retainer, saying 7 ;
OCTOBER 4th Wo xo a ne 8 seen Terk Gee ecu eet 7
Your CudSius | You are excepuuuas i P . Hh igh ay n oh. Rea eo eee ft says hen. . ‘
: oe ; fore taxes) for chattering to room. The Macaroon himself -
auf you do, accordiig tO Wie fac.s * ~Miltd rays new going to very benefic after rail ms . - : ‘ t RT, : w , r
5 Fe ee SAGITTARIUS 40,000,000 radio listeners and came into the hall, to offer » art, how cruel you can
of pritisn tamuy lue reporcea N @3—_D. »o Uidnight, continuing tomorrow. Whatever readers of her column in more hospitality, “Lost vOur tv” be to your faithful ee a
the Briush Associalion in Belast ov. eo Mec. © your schedule, aim to appreciate it. Don’t » than 80 newspapers h a seed. “A a OL Tas W Bae haem sek ee ee
Few peopie fel any Kinsnip * forget God! ui f owe 3, ' ‘ e asked. Aye, mon, said the ave been reading about an
‘ida: Sbiad neue ttlike * cieiene Her subject: The deeds and stranger. “I followed a grouse too ®udience which © struck matches
perro ghiags — _ 7 lb * * * * misdeeds of Hollywood celebrities. qeep into the undergrowth and 4nd flicked cigarette-lighters to
side (whe tn ay cache ao a OAPRICORN -May not be a day, for much advancement She knows them all personally. missed my path.” “Can 1 get you see if their programmes coutd
( n ey provide some- *« Dec. 23 —Jan. 2] 2 Work but essential tasks can make some She has been there 30 years. She g drink?” asked the courtly laird. give any hint of what was suo.
vente to spend a oumny noliday) headway. No need to neglect God and $¢ ae woman the stars dare not «7 hope you can,” revlied the poced to be going on se ‘tha
i with cousins, and rarely botner your soul’s nouri 1 offend. ar. sini hae hia line » stag aaithe
PARADISE BEACH CLUB Dr. James Mogey said. *« -M ; wae Hedda’s book is called “From Stranger, smacking his lips loudly. stage. And a critic says of the
Mm: After a tireside quiz in Oxford AQUARIUS ; *% Under My Hat.” Hats are her i company: “They are best when
\ homes Dr. Mogel reported :— Jaa. 23 <= aks Oo —Day does not sanction sudden decisions 4g trademark. She spends nearly Foulenough slips up they use their art to. strike fresh
Hf | oT a * — = pet = moms xuaning catiagestentiy £1,800 a year on them. OULENOUGH (for it was he) , Serer ad old human situations.
. | MORE FAMILIES live in ut on whole it is friendly, will bless reli- And now from under her hat conducted himself admirabl en they try to be trees or io
Jass Bands i Steel Bands X | friction than in friendship. gion, charity, wholesome fun, children’s jg | Hedda Hopper has produced 2 all through an excellent aaeven illustrate the passage of man on
e , 2 = SOCREST ; people set * activities. ‘ * bookful of Bis E: like these:— untie the very pretty girl next to =, — we - understand-
Prises }, the most store by family ties. ars ; im said, during a lull in the ew fresh sparks struck
| But, they, too, ose interest in Feb a -Vibrations going to very benefic rays CLARK GABLE got his start general conversation, “Are you while they are trying to be trees
| their relations if they move to a , Marc! tomorrow. Spend day as Stinfiay should with his big ears pinned to his fond of stalking deer?” “You bet WOuld at any rate save the aud-
lite * o-wt x be spent. Church services first. Pleasant a with the make-up man’s I am, darling,” replied Foulen- (¢nce a number of matches.
= ‘ 2 Bi 3 is the linchpin ol family, social theri i putty. ough, off his r
J j | i | , gatherings, with children, ; ; ugh, guard. The girl A
Admittance by Ticket only most family circles. Her death | “T ver oldsters sponsored. * MAE Wee. interes on blushed and laughed, “I wasn’t Morginal note
breaks the main link peawene | ' BORN TODAY: Many fine attributes, includin marriage: “Money and success calling you dear,” she said. "
7 3 S, Z ; a j ,”’ she said. The EOPLE who compl
: s : oe : + ements nae 7 : ngaged a few , ees ; . plain about
children, and separate family | * i integrity, dependability, loyalty, devotion to family, first I've been engaged a guests drew in their breath. The P low-flying jet-planes are con-

. . : . ou T » sae 7 i 5 alwavs It.
groups quickly spring up around | country. Unusual talent for artistic work, writing times. Mother always found fau Macaroon frowned. Foulenough titiually being tok
the mothers of the new genera- | painting, sculpturing, decorating, designing fabrics, writing, She was. right. ‘ m io eke. their





















‘ , : . took a deep draught of wine.. “I "umbers as the fl
tion. for music, the stage. Also mechanica ability. Tend to work ak arte ee — - cnee brought down three stags better idea is deen meee yt.
4 MOST GIRES like to get a %% 0 hard, impairing health, disposition. Be sensible, take pe Nate fet it shell Guk an toptane by thumbing a lift. Or one might
home near their mothers when needed rest. ; fun aivorate.” . : —_————————- adc to'the general din and peril
they marry. Nearly 55 per cent. be Albrecht .Waldenstein (Wallenstein), famous MARLENE DIETRICH to!d me I feel like a horse” But | by employing “courtesy jet-police”
of the wives who live in the | 3 °Ohmnian gen'l. ; 4 | Ribbentrop in pre-war Londo»: picture with Clara made Neca to en run, vee the epee

IN AID. OF centre of Oxford were born there, +e Ke Ke Me MH M M = M”™ |T don't go out with strange men.” riding Cooper a star, He took all roa h ‘

vompared with only 25 per cent. | When Ribbentrop said surely she his, servants for a ride while she One the birds
of the husbands. | them because they have to dress, bridge University agriculturar ex- | knew him, she replied: “Only bY swam, wearing nothing but a ,, 1, became so intimate with
People who were asked why /UP, Dr. Mogey said. | perts claim, | reputation.” huge straw hat, the birds on the island that he
they did not mix with their | When is a Kipper? | CLARA BOW) said: “When called them by their Christian

FI J NDS of the velatives usually made the jour- | Money in Milk GOVERNMENT attetiate ea | |Gary Cuvoper put his arms round Handsprings pow
ons that people ae ote ‘in the | “a FARMER with a herd of ten by Dr. J. A. Lovern, are investi- | we TALLULAH BANKHEAD turn- ” rticle on birds
eres tae cukeae ana ines cows can save more than £40 4 gating exactly what goes on inside GA EVY \}| ed handsprings for a banker friend OR instance, he would say to a
of the PalaMune nt! See lee einine ro by using milking eshiogs a herring when wood smoke a his party at the Waldorf after gzannet, “Hello, Fred!” and to
ation; B instead of milking by hand. Cam turns it into a kipper. ‘ = sores Bary vangthing she ‘named. ane give her el female ——. or rete you,
‘0-day ‘o- marrow pom \4 ed he name ed lara , nbaptise pe is or
GOOD SHEPHERD a ae aig. | MaRS ee ence eget St =
s é ; i i i w s Technicolor Acti ochran i F: d ‘Sir” or “Me =
gned to simplify and streamline filing in your a eearty COOPER in |a stage job. ad promised Tallulah | ee ne



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SUNDAY,



AT THE CINEMA

SEPTEMBER



14, 1952

BLUE SKIES

i
4
By G

CASTING back over t!

Le

B.

wee



d films shown during

the past few months, I see that we have been pretty lucky
in thatat least one or more, each week, have been new films
with definite box office appeal, and for a small place like

Barbados, that’s not bad

case, we Must expect

then, and this week-end would seem to fit

Not that the pictures are bad—
they're not—but of the ones |
have seen, I can’t say I was par-
ticularly impressed. However, I
did not see “BLUE SKIES” which

is at the Plaza, Barbare¢ This

is not a new film, but one look at
the e¢ast «which includes sing
Crosby, Fred Astaire and Joa

Caulfield, as well as Irving Ber-

lin’s song hits — “Some Sunny
Day”, “Putt’n On The Ritz”, “Thi
Is The Army, Mr. Jones White

Christmas,” and the title song, to
mention but a few, and I'd
say you have the ingredients for

a bang-up musical, to nfb
of the fact it is in Technicolor
Seems to me I saw it years ago

and thoroughly enjoyed
Glory Alley
THE Globe is running :
feature this week-end—
ALLEY” and “ROSE OF CIM:<
RON” but neither _of them i
to the standard of the films
have recently been shown at thi
theatre, though they
new pictures. “GLORY
has a first rate cast




are both

ALLEY

headed

by



BING CROSBY

Ralph Meeker, a new
actor, petite and charming Le
Caron, Kurt Kasznar, a Vienne
actor, trumpeter Louis Armstr
and Jack Teagarden and
orchestra. However, despite
stellar talent, the picture never
manages to get off the ground
This is probably due to the fact
that the director seems to have
been suffering from a_ certain
amount of indecision as to th
exact type the finished film should
be, with the result that what starts
out as a psychological melodrama,
flies off in several directions and
winds up as a curious mixture 0
psychological melodrama,
drama and musical. All very
fusing, and one or two sub-plots
don’t clarify the situation

Our principal character is a
young prize fighter, who f
reasons thet are not revealed
the last reel, walks out
biggest fight, and promptly ¢
on the skids. Helped back to
sobriety and decency by his sweet
heart and friends, he makes up
his mind to be a Korean hero—
just to prove he’s no coward, With
the ease and speed of Hollywood
he acquires the Medal of Honour
and there's a heck of a turn-out
when he comes marching home.
However, it’s still obvious that he
has a few psych@logical adjust-
ments to make, and with thes«
accomplished, there is a grand get-
together to the accompaniment of
some good old Basin St. jazz

With a background
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In
we get new pictures even before bermuda

fact, 1 have

been told tha
This being the

JOAN CRAWFORD

of opportu



while

irden,
contributes a

dance numbers.

few

inity
Leslie

The

ty for
by Louis Armstrong and Jack

t

a slough of despond every now and
into that category.



good

Caron

all-too-brief
acting

1s

good all through, with sound por-

Louis

r

trayals by

c cin I
sympathetic
but

and
respectively,
woefully
Rose of Ci
ROSE OF

natural colour is

the
overloaded.

Kasznar
blind

tne

and
judge

newspaperman,

story

marron

CIMARRON

story

the

itself

m

of a

white girl who is brought up by

Indians,

by th bank rob’

bers, she



and when they are killed

tracks

down the murderers gnd promptly

shoots two

of them. This lands her

n jail, but not for long as she is
released by the remaining robber
and unaware of his identity, she
teams up with him. There’s a

hold-up and a treasure hunt along

with

our

i lot

Rose he

gets

‘r man

of other confusion, but

in the

end, with the help of a love-stick

sheriff.

Powt play

Rose, and she

certainly ig a credit to her foster



neckline



inging
accent

Ss

arents, with plucked eye-brows,
and Eastern
all this out West in

1863!

The acting is wooden, the dialogue
is some magni-

yured, but ¢here
ficent riding, I wo
that the gun-play
standard of a
gallery!
This Woman

JOAN CRAWFORD

and diamo
of the

mink
role

ten-cent

uld like
isn’t up

nds,

to add
to the

shooting

is Dangerous
in ermine,
plays the
master-mind

to a

gang of hold-up thugs in “THIS

WOMAN
the Plazz
of robbing a



IS DANGEROUS,”
Bridgetown, On the eve
gambling house of

at

$90,000, she discovers she is going
blind and has to have an opera-

ti
she goes
fall

might

on, The robbery
to hosp.
le i

t
be

goes

through,
ital and of course,
\ 1e doctor. This
a way out of her diffi-

culties, but for the fact that one

f her
c 1e1

gun-crazy companions is in

love with her and swears to get

the doctor.
hen he
ing theatre and
However, the
their n
too, leaving Joan
the doctor.

F.B.I,

starts

free to

He nearly does, too,
breaks into the operat-
shooting.
always get
n and they do this time

marry

Miss Crawford is, as usual, glam-

orous,

slittering and sophisticated

to the Ninth degree and her ward-

robe will be

appreciated

by

feminine audiences, but what act-
ing honours there are go to David

Brian her
trigg
De

role

as





i lorgan
and
tely

p

qui

_ [mpr

THE TRUCK & BUS TYRE THAT WAS

jealous,
*-happy lover. For a change,
serious

acquits himself

brut
lays

a

al and

ade-

_—

Notes

JAMAICAN PROSE AND
POETRY
In ‘Caribbean Veices’

Today -

In the weekly B.B.C. pro-
gramme of West Indian prose
and poetry’which is broadcast on
Sundays under the title of ‘Car-
ibbean Voices’ the Eastern Carib-
bean usually is much better
represented than Jamaica al-
though this should not be the
case from a population standard.
However, of late this proportion
seems to be changing and this is
exemplified in next Sunday's
broadcast, ~—- 14th. inst. when
the half hour will be entirely
devoted to Jamaica with a prose
sketch ‘Walking in the Hill’ by
Claude Thompson and poems by
Ken Maxwell, both of whom have
recently been heard in this pro-
gramme. It behoves the writers
of Trinidad, Barbados, British
Guiana, as well as those of the
smaller islands, particularly the
prolific in terms of writing —
Grenada, not to allow Jamaica to
dominate the programme. Con-
tributions to this series are
always welcomed at the B.B.C.,
P.O. Box 408, Kingston, Jamaica

and the pay is good; details of
this can also be obtained from
this address. ‘Caribbean Voice:'

is on the air each Sunday fror
7.15 to 7.45 p.m. in the 25 and 31
metre bands, 11.75 and 9.58 mega-
cycles.

B.B.C. Wavelengths

Last week we gave details ct
the B.B.C. beams to this area.
Short-wave listeners to these
beams may find that reception is
marred by interference of morse,
particularly on the 31 metre ban
beam. If you have found thi:
trouble you may prefer to listen
to London on the beams to North
or South America which are now
eoming in very well although not
directly beamed to us. The
beams to North America are on
30.53 metres, 9.825 megacycles
from 5.15 p.m. onwards and on
48.43 metres, 6.195 megacycles,
from 8.15 p.m. onwards, the
former begin particularly free
from interference. The beams
to South America are on 25,38
metres, 11.82 megacyclés, from
6.15 p.m. onwards and 31.88
metres, 9.41 megacycles from
6.15 p.m, onwards as well as the
beams to the West Indies which
we listed last week. The four
beams mentioned above do not
earry the special West Indies
half-hours such as ‘Caribbean
Voices’ but for other programmes
from London in the General
Overseas Service you may find
one of these better than the
direct beams to. us.

Khama of the Bamangwato

The name of Seretse Khama of
the Bamangwato is now almast a
house-hold word. In a B.B.C
programme in the coming week
listeners ean hear about the orig-
inal Khama of the Bamangwato
who died in 1922. Lewis Hast-
ings who speaks about him first
met him when Khama was about
90 but he has this to say about
him ‘He was a great African and
something of a genius. Mr.
Hastings points out that when
Khama was born life in all those
territories north of the Orange
River was what it had been from
time immemorial, poor, brutisn
and short... ‘But when Khara
died the tide of European devel-
opment had swept far past the
kraals of Bechuanaland and in
scattered cattle posts the little
herd boys hardly bothered to
look up at four-engined passen-
ger planes rumbling peacefully
overhead.

From the Bronze Age
age of the aircraft! It’s as if one
man’s life has covered 3,000
years.’ The talk will be in ‘Mid-
Week Talk’ at 10.15 pm. om
Wednesday, 17th. September.

to the





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Comper cmt iecerimto Memoir
we
Bay

St. Distriputers

SUNDAY ADVOCATE





(By AGRICOLA)

ANIMAL

standard of local poultry
improvement.

IMPROVEMENT
THE SUCCESS of the recent P
the efforts by the Poultry

ultry Exhibition and
Association to improve the
suggest this note on anima!

But first, let us warmly congratulate the

organisers and the participants, especially those who ob

tained awards.

Animal breeding, selection and
the slow and tedious processes
involved in the production of im-
proved types are, in the nature
of things, a closed book to the
average layman concerned, ‘n
the main, with the quality and
availability of the products which

GARDENING HINTS
FOR AMATEURS

Gardeners in Barbados today
might be compared to a band of
pilgrims toiling to establish them-
selves against great odds.

Those natural enemies such as
slugs, caterpillars and blight are
of course to be expected, untrained
gardeners we are accustomed 10,
drought may be termed “an ict of
God,” but when it comes to turn-
ing off the garden water then tn«
long suffering gardener is justified
in feeling aggri ved

General water has already been
cut off at tim:s in some districts,
and the threat of cutting off all
garden water hangs like a cloud
over our heads.

Why in an island where sheet
water lies in unlimited quantities
beneath the surface, a few week:
drought should bring about a
water shortage is not understood
by the general public. What is
the use of gardeners going through
the toil of planting seeds, and
raising plants if every time there
is a slight drought the garden
water is to be eut off? It means
that weeks of hard work in th
garden is lost, and when the
water is allowed on once more the
garden has to be started all over
again.

In spite of all these trials garden
lovers persist in their efforts, and
persist with success as the recent
display of miniature gardens at
the Museum bears witness

This lovely show, and the splen-
did attendance which it received
shows plainly the island wide in-
terest in gardens, and the general
public’s love of flowers. Add to
ona the fact that well kept gardens

and surroundings raise the general
standard of the island, especially
in the eyes of our visitors, and iv
does seem a pity that this good
work should be hampered in a
totally unnecessary way an
erratic water supply

Every tiny garden, or beautiful
tree helps to beautify the island.
So the occupant of the smallest
house with a garden bed of flow-
ers, a shrub such as croton, or a
lovely vine, can feel, not only a
personal pride in the appearance of
their home, but a wider one in the
knowledge that each small garden
helps in the general appearance of
our island,

For the busy householder who
thas not a great deal of time or
money to spend on the garden,
permeate things such as shrubs
and perennials are best. Shrubs,
and there are a variety to choose
from, once established need little
attention. Most of them flower
off and on throughout the year,
and are gay and lovely to look at.

Here are a few. Exora, red or
white. Portlandia, Croton, Pride
of Barbados, Hibiscus, Ponsettia
and any of the different Bougain-
villaeas.

Vines are also a good investment
for the garden that cannot be
given a lot of care, although vines
do require more attention than
shrubs. The Coralitas are all
lovely, there is the Christmas
Coralita the various pinks both
single and double, besides the
vure white Coralita whieh looks so
much like the Lily of the Valley.
All of these are lovely vines. Thr
double pink Coralita is particular-
ly beautiful and is comparatively
rare. It is a pity that it is not

by

more generally grown.

Besides these there are Petrea,
Alanianda, Bemontia, and numer-
ous others to choose from.



@ Cool
@ Colourful
@ Covering



reach the. dinner table — whet
milk, meat or eggs, and the co
thereof. While much depends
Government leadership and sym
pathetic ehcouragement in the
matters, must be recognise
that without the aid and stead
fast wot of enterprising indi-
viduals, breeders’ association
and = = similar organisations b
products we enjoy to-day woul
searcely ve been pt ble
least im their present scope ar
extent. True, many of the
efforts have a commercial aim
object, but the fact remains t?
civilisatic owes the pioneer
stock breeding ! prove
a debt rat ic whic
never be (

The successful breedet
keep ir nd definit ain
objects plan his work acc«
dingly. Climate and enviornmen
are perhaps 1@ main tacto
whieh govern breeding policios
and Selection, since these tw
factors influence such questior
as choice of type or breed, pro-

ductivity, early or late maturin
tolerance to wet or dry condition
resistance to pests and disease
The theme can onty be dealt with
briefly and simply, for only those

who have had actual experien
of the problems» involved ca:
appreciate the difficulties anc

complications which are met wit

in the*evolution and dev *lopmen
of atiimals accept >» the
work-a-day farme stock
raiser, largely coscerned with

immediate economic resulis.
Now, of course, nature itself i

a marvellous selector let i

not under-estimate its. valu
Thus, throughout the world ther
are @xampiles of breeds or ty
whieh have specially adapted
themselves to the conditions
their origin. We may recall th
Indian breeds of cattle, general!
referred to-as Zebu or Brahm
and some of the native cattle
Central und South América; the
so-called rezor-back hog with
excessive snout development for
rooting and digging; the woolless
sheep; various native poultry
types, and so on. The hardine
of these different sorts is duc
the main, to their tolerance
heat and having to fend fo
themselves and collect their foo
wherever they can find it. Whik
they are of importance in the
particular areas and under the
natural conditions which hav
produced them, they are also
providing valuable foundation
stock round which improvement

work is taking place in the build-
ing up of higher producing and
better economic types under the
stress of increasing population
especially in those areas where
specialized’ "breeds of Buropean
origin do not thrive

But, here

is a

point that can-
not be over-emphasised: im
proved types need more, not
Jess, attention than the ordinary
run. And so, as a natural con-
comitant, improvements in for-
age and feedstuff production
have gone hand in hand with
animal improvement. This is the
stage at which both the plant
and animal breeder have com
bined forces in order to ensure
orderly, sustained and balanced
progress. There is still much to

be said in the West Indies for the

old fashioned six-pint family
cow where subsistence, unde
droughty conditions, may have
to be largely a matter of dried
cane tops and molasses; but
where farmers at interesied
in commercial milk production
and have invested in improved
stock, they must plan their feed
ing programme ahead In thi
connection, it is perfectly true to
say that half the breed is in the
feed. i nde

FOR ANY KIND OF FLOOR

TINTAWN

This entirely new FLOOR COVERING is long

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It

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@ee Available in all widths and in floor strips.

BARBADOS CO-OP.
COTTON FACTORY LTD.

, {BO Yo



B. B.C. Radio Karm And Garden

The Truth in
Your Horoscope

'

th

h

1

te

\

v

ome

ion If you forw
arth

itam ps



PAGE TIiRER



———





uxnow| We'll soon have
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with e

ASEPTIC GINTMENT



~why you get headaches when
j ystem’s out-of-
Gases given off by
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rbed by the blood-
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Sense ofenurhttian Aadicoun and penetrates. It protects skin
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Would you like to know without an |
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ir past experiences, your strong ard
eak points, etc? Here is your chance |
) test FREER the skill of Pundit Tabore,
dia’s most fam
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ho by applying
1 8 -



urpe
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is
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in
oroscope on

Specu
Finance
affairs
Enemies,
Trav
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usiness
ation,
ave
riends
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imes Sickne
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GEOL
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BANISH

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PAGE FOUR

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



‘Soaping’dulls hair_
Halo glorifies it!



HALO leaves your
hair wonderfully soft
and easy to manage

HALO makes your

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HALO REVEALS
THE HIDDEN BEAUTY
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WHAT'S GOING ON
LOCAL CRICKET
Amateur Boxing Making

Great Comeback

By O. S. COPPIN

diate and Second Divisions of the Barbados Cricket Association
competion reveals a very interesting situation at the end of the
fourth series of First Division games and the sixth series of Interme-
diate and Second Division games.

In the First Division we have Wanderers at the head of the table
| with sixteen points in four games played but they are separated from
| Carlton by a single point in as many games played.
| What makes the situation even more re:narkable is that Carlton

in turn are separated from Spartan by a single point in as many
games played as well.

Empire follow three points behind Spartan and therefore four
and five behind Carlton and Wanderers respectively. College (seven
points), Pickwick (five points), Police (four points), Lodge (0 points)
are the remaining teams in the order mentioned and I think that I
can safely say that they are out of the running for the championship
which closes with the plaSing of another three series one of which
opened yesterday.

CHAMPIONS AMONG THESE THREE
| AKING Wanderers, Carlton and Spartan as they are one will
come to the logical conclusion that the First Division champion
will be chosen from among these three. This being so, it will be in-
teresting to note that they are all three faced with three stiff fixtures
| that will require their best efforts to get the major points in each
| fixture.

Wanderers will meet Spartan, College and Carlton. Carlton will
} meet Police, Spartan and Wanderers and Spartan will meet Wander-
| ers, Carlton and Empire.
| Windward and Y.M.P.C. have established a not too considerable
| lead in the Intermediate Division, It is quite true that they are
| leading in the order mentioned but with five series remaining to be

played the issue is still a clearly open one,
| Windward have scored eighteen points in six games played and
| Y.M.P.C, fifteen points in five games, so that they have a possible
| twenty-one points for six games or even an equal eighteen with
| Windward in case they lead Wanderers on first innings in their fix-
| ture which opened yesterday at Beckles Road.

| ALL IN THE PICTURE

|

|

}

|

|

| 3 :

| SURVEY of the relative positions of the clubs in First, Interme-
i
|

MPIRE with twelve points in six matches played, Barbados Regi-

ment with eleven points in four matches played, Pickwick with

ten points in six matches played are all in the picture and possess

chances in varying degrees of carrying off the championship of this
division.

The Second Division competition is perhaps the closest. Leeward
| head the list with 27 points in six games played while five other teams
| all having played six games too follow in this order—Central 22,
Erdiston 18, Combermere 17, Empire 16 and Y.M.P.C. 15 and Empire
} 14.

} As I pointed out in my observation in connection with the posi-
tion in the Intermediate Division, five fixtures remain to be played
and that is still a long way to go so that all seven of these teams
| must be cofsidered as bona fide candidates for championship honours.
j THE UMPIRE INCIDENT
| ager y last Sunday’s column in which I expressed strong disapproval
| of the action of the crowd at Carlton the day before in beating
‘ an umpire after the Carlton-Empire fixture I have received a spate
| of explanations, congratulations and whatnot

One correspondent thought that E. A. V. Williams’ “lightheart-
| edness” did not help to improve the temper of the crowd. He claims
| that Williams after having been “no balled” ran about a foot past

the bowling crease and when the umpire called “no ball” he turned
| back and showed him the ball which he still held.

Another point which he claims was irritating to him was the
fact that Mr. Williams limped when a ball was struck to him if the
| batsman did not attempt to run but if he attempted there was a
lightning pounce and throw in.

He claims too that it was unfortunate that an 1.b.w. decision
oe was given in the last over of the day against a batsman who
did not know that he had been given out since he evidently thought
| himself well out of line, did not help the general state of affairs.

!
ANOTHER VIEW
A NOTHER correspondent states that the umpire, although the
crowd was hostile, invited attack because he stood on the field
and argued with the crowd.

I have seen Mr. Williams too and he admits‘holding the ball and
| deliberately making a foot fault but he did this since barrackers from
| the pavilion were shouting “tno ball” each time he bowled,

I have included the views of my correspondents because of cour-

!

tesy to them and since in a matter of this sort one shoulda hear all
views.
| The umpire is sole judge of “fair” and “unfair play” and he
| would have been failing in his duty if he thought Mr. Williams’
| tactics were not above board, and did not pull him up under this law.
Arguing with a crowd especially a hostile one is a suicidal action
by an umpire or referee and just as the Barbados Referees’ Associa-
| tion warns its referees against arguing with players far less crowds,
| the Barbados Umpires’ Association should instruct their members
along those lines as well.
A CRYING NEED 3
} B* and large there is need for a higher standard of sportsmanship
| when games and supporters allow their passions to dull their
| finer judgment. There can be no justification for boorish behaviour
be it from the field, the pavilion or from under the trees on the
grounds,

I am not singling out the Carlton ground because this incident
has happened there. I am only too aware of the partisan feeling
at some of the other grounds and this must cease otherwise what has
been a gradual deterioration in the standard of sportsmanship and

| fairplay might develop into something which will certainly not be

| “Cricket”,
AMATEUR BOXING REVIVED
ARBADOS Amateur Boxing has its best chance ever now of de-
veloping into a well organised and self-supporting form of sport.
No one who saw Friday night’s bouts of a programme put on by the
Barbados Amateur Boxing Association could convince me otherwise.
There has been no amateur boxing for many months now and I
was surprised to see the number and faces of well known local
sporting fans who turned out to see the bouts.
There was much action but it was obvious that although the
' spirit is there the need for expert coaching, training and application
| is necessary,
| The boys were all keen and some of them were remarkably fit.
| It is only necessary now that the schools and organised clubs whose
| members are interested, register with fe I have already
| mentioned that the Scouts could well add amateur boxing to their
| activities. They used to box when I was at They could
scarcely be recruiting “softies” now.
IMPRESSED
F the show itself I was impressed with young Keith Walters
(87 lbs.) who defeated Vitor Perriman (98 lbs.) on points. His
timing was as near perfect as any good amateurs can be. He hooked
to a nicety and sometimes brought off the old one-two punch,
| I was not surprised to hear that he is another Faster protege.
| R, Gittens (132 lbs) a southpaw scored a k.o. victory over N

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IN Yesterday’s Cricket

Vs,

CARLTON

POLICE

CARLTON IST INNINGS 264

CARLTON WERE ALL

OUT ten minutes before time

call yesterday for 264 in their first innings against Police
when their First Division fixture began at Queen’s Park.

C. McKenzie, 39 at number one, and C. B. Williams.
59 at number three, laid the foundation for the Cariton
score when they added 80 runs for the second wicket

partnership, taking

McKenzie was run out.

Three wickets fell for an addi-
tional 39 runs, but James Wil-
jiams, playing his last game _ pe-
fore leaving for the University
College of the West Indies, and
E. W. Marshall, going at number
6 and number 7 respectively,
added 92 runs for the sixth wicket

os to take the score to

James Williams played a really
fine innings for 54, and played all
types of bowling with easy confi-
dence. Marshall’s undefeated 60
was also a fine knock, aithough

at times he was unnecessarily
reckless.
Carlton lost their first wicket

with the score at 20 when G, So-
bers, a slow left arm bowler with
a short run up to the wicket and
an easy action, got R. Hutchinson
ibw. for 7, This same bowler had
“Boogles” Williams caught when
the latter drove one hard back,
and the ball struck Peppy Hutch-
inson the other batsman for Byer
to take a catch.

Lucas was caught off Mullins
by Farmer for 4, and “Peppy”
Hutchinson after playing a good
defensive innings at a_ critical
stage of the game was leg before
to Bradshaw.

Scoring Rate Advanced

Marshall and James Williams
by good running between the
wickets advanced the rate of the
scoring, and sent up 200 in 100
minutes after the 150 had gone
up in even time.

Williams was bowled by Mul-
lins in the last ball of the fourth
over with the second new ball,
and Edghill joined Marshall, and
started to carry on the good work.

To the consternation of every
one, skipper Farmer brought
himself on from the Weymouth

end late in the afternoon, and in
his first over, took the wickets of
Edghill who skied to mid off for
Bradshaw to take an easy catch,
and K, B. Warren who lifted one
to Sobers at mid-on for the field-
er to take a well judged catch.

C, Edghill was bowled in the
next over from Sobers for duck,
and in his next over, H. Cox was
bowled for 12 to bring the Carl-
ton innings to a close with the
score at 264.

G,. Sobers was the most success-
ful bowler for Police, taking 4
for 57 in 20 overs. Farmer took
2 for 11 in 2 overs, Mullins 2
for 64 in 23 overs, while Brad-
shaw tock 1 fon 46 in 15 overs.

LODGE vs EMPIRE
AT LODGE
First Innings

Lodge
Empire

Empire have already gained a
first innings’ lead over Lodge at
Lodge where they dismissed the
schoolboys for 60 runs in their
first innings and replied with 168
runs yesterday, the first day in
their First Division cricket match.

The wicket was perfect and the
only batsman for Lodge who
showed any resistance to the Em-
pire bowling was A. Walker who
was undefeated with 20 runs. The

the score

from 20 100 before

to

wicket when the score was 12 and
the second wicket fell at 20.
When Bynoe got to the wicket,
he quickly asserted himself and
never spared the loose balls.

The most successful bowler for
Lodge was N. Wilkie who took
three wickets for 23 runs in eight
overs one of which was a maiden.

The Lodge School pace bowler
K. Brookes and J, Farmer took
two wickets each.



PICKWICK vs HARRISON
COLLEGE
Harrison College ........... 92
Pickwick (for 3 wickets) 98
Harrison College, in their match
against Pickwick at the Oval
yesterday, were skittled out for
92 runs. Mr. “Sam” Headley,
who topscored with 39 runs, was
the only College batsman to defy
the attack of the Kensingtonians
E. Edwards was the most suc-
cessful bowler for the Pickwick
team. He sent down 17 overs, of
which ten were maidens, and took
five wickets for 19 runs, John
Goddard and W. Greenidge took
one each for 17 and 22 respectively.
Pickwick in reply have lost
three wickets for 98 runs, T
Birkett scored 49 before he was
bowled by G. Foster. E. Edwards,
who opened, contributed 26.
Bowling for College, G, Foster
sent down nine overs and took
two wickets for 34 runs. Mr.
Headley took the other wicket
for 25 runs.

SPARTAN vs WANDERERS
Spartan 288

Good knocks by Camie Smith
and “Shell’ Harris for 49 and 63
respectively, and last minute
stands by the tail batsmen, helped
Spartan to score 288 runs against
Wanderers at the Bay when they
batted the whole of yesterday,
the first day of their First Divis-
ion fixture.

Wanderers spinner St. Hill took
6 wickets for 73 .

Smith batted in his own flashy
style, scoring fluently all around
the wicket until he was caught
by the wicket keeper off St.
Hill’s bowling. L. F. Harris went
at the ball with but half a care
for caution, and made quite a
few queer strokes, but he quickly
and regularly sent the ball to the
boundary.

Spartan were off to a fair start
when their opening bats set up
a first wicket stand of 43, but a
second wicket fell eight runs later.
The opening bats, Atkins and
Griffith scored 20 and 27 re-
spectively.

Keith Walcott was out a
after Camie Smith when he
turned the ball to St. Hill.

G. N. Grant was hustled
the wicket at number eight im-
mediately he arrived just from
work, and after getting a chance
when he was dropped on the
boundary, he was adjudged l.b.w.
to St. Hill.

ball

re-

to

SEPTEMBER 14, 1952

SUNDAY,

RACING NOTES

By BEN BATTLE

FTCHE long awaited Autumn Classification list was made public this

week, a full month after the conclusion of the August meeting,
and only five days prior to the conclusion of the Santa Rosa Races.
The delay over what did not appear to be a very difficult task would
seem rather unnecessary, especially as it was not of sufficient dura-
tion to allow the conclusion of the Arima meeting to take place. One
can only hope that it was used by the classifiers in'a concerted effort
to a form and obviate mistakes, but even this is open to serious
doubt.

I will, before going into the Classification in detail, concede that
age old truth that “Criticism is easy, Art is difficult”. Nevertheless
it is impossible not to be critical of some aspects at least of the pres-
ent list, and to wonder once again at the inconsistency which appears
to be our Classifiers worst and most persistent sin.

Starting at the top and working downwards, I do not think that
anyone can cavil at the promotion of Landmark to Al, nor the reten-
tion in that class of Harroween and Rebate. Notonite remains in A2
in spite of some very mediocre performances, and again I agree since
his form was so far below his best that it ought to be ignored for
one meeting at least.

The B Class is not I am afraid such plain sailing. Heading the
list is Brgiht Light who has been thrust into Bl, apparently, on the
strength of having beaten Dashing Princess in the Bush Hill Stakes
when in receipt of 17 lbs. I would not make an issue of this but
should have preferred her to have been placed in B2. The promotion
of Pepper Wine from B2 however appears to me to be unnecessary
and is moreover a glaring example of the type of inconsistency which
so often and so annoyingly occurs. Pepper Wine started last meeting
classified B2. Her record was 6 starts 1 first, 1 second and 2 fourths.
Had this been the performance of a young, likely to improve animal,
and had there been any evidence of misfortune in her defeats I would
have had nothing to say, but it is in fact the performance of an (8)
eight year old mare who is but a shadow of her former self. Moreover
in what way is her performance to be considered better than that of
the young (4-year-old) promising Fire Lady who started 5 times
won once, was twice third and once fourth. Yet Fire Lady remains
in B2. This is all the more surprising when one considers that she
inet Pepper Wine on only two occasions, and beat her both times.
actually coneéding weight when doing so in the August Handicap.
Surely Classifiers have access to these facts, and surely these facts
make it impossible to consider the sub-class separation of these two
horses as a rational act.



Witn the remainder of the B Class Classification, I have very
little quarrel. Sweet Rocket undoubtedly merits her promotion, and
Red Cheeks, Lunways, and Demure remain where they belong. Per-
sonally I would have thought that Flying Dragon had done enough
to justify a sub-class demotion but it is always difficult to classify a
rogue. Dashing Princess, a horse that has always appeared to me to
be typically C Class may have been a trifle unlucky in that her lone
victory and a narrow one at that occurred in her weight for age
race, This being so the Classifiers were probably justified in pro-
moting her but I should imagine that she will be a bit out of her
depth in B Class. Abu-Ali’s promotion I consider thoroughly well
merited. He is one of the best prospects we have seen for some time.

New arrivals in C are Spear Grass and Vectis with whose demo-
tion no fault can be found. On the other hand the. promotion of
Mary Ann to C2 is one on which I cannot refrain from commenting
unfavourably. It is of particular interest since it demonstrates once
again that inconsistency which is my chief complaint against the
Classifiers and involves in addition the whole question of the promo-
tion of creoles beyond D class.

When Mary Ann went to Trinidad in June and won two races
against the strong opposition which prevails there our Classifiers per-
mitted her to remain in D. I refrain from joining in the chorus of
disapproval which this occasioned because I felt that good creoles
should be allowed to remain in D and that the D class should even-
tually be built up into the Creole A Class. Now we find Mary Ann
returning and winning one race against the most moderate opposition
and the same Classifiers immediately place her in C, and thereby
demonstrating that their treatment of her after her June perform-
ance instead of being, as I had hoped, a part of a new policy, was
merely an oversight.

I can imagine the comments that will be made on the above
opinion, They will all centre around the idea that if Mary Ann
is left in D she will so dominate that class that no other horse will
have any chance of winning. To these criticisms I would reply;
firstly, that I do not believe that such would be the case, and second-
ly, and more fundamentally, I will ask those who made them to look
at the Classification list with its total of ten possible and six probable
,starters in the D and E Class. Let them consider for how much longer
the public will put up with two or three horse races or how much
longer the Turf Club will be able to afford to frame them. Surely
for all concerned owners, spectators and everybody else it would be
better to aim at the building up of a strong D Class for which four
or five good races could be programmed every meeting even if it
did include a Mary Ann or two. The alternative which we are at
present pursuing is to deplete the D Class of both quantity and qual-
ity to the point where at most two races are all that can be justified
for them and the programme filled out with races for F2 Maidens.

The remainder of the Classification calls for little comment and
in conclusion let me say that any criticism which I have made are
intended to be constructive and will I hope be accepted in that spirit.

PADDOCK MYSTERY

Rumour had it that we are about to witness a new era in racing
in Barbados. It has been noised abroad that a certain prominent
stable has purchased the horse of such a calibre that unless a special
class is created for it racing will be lopsided indeed. No one knows
just what this super animal’s name is or has a clue to its form but
speculation.is rife and when I heard not long ago that the Aga Khan
might have parted with Tulyar, it gave me some indication of the
class of beast that we may expect.!

Knight Is British Junior



PR BE BEDE De De Se Se
|

The seventh wicket fell for 164
and it seemed as if Spartan wouid
not last much longer, but thea

Empire left arm bowler Horace
King took four of the Lodge
School wickets for nine runs in

eight overs while E. Grant and Frank King in a period of many
H. Barker—the two opening bowl- chances managed to score 25.
ers—took two wickets each for K. Bowen came next and hit

out at almost everything. He and
Phillips came together in a last
wicket stand which yielded 54.
Bowen was finally bowled by
D. Atkinson and Phillips was not
out with 19.

Wanderers mos t_ successful
bowler, St. Hill who took six for
73, in 25 overs was generally
accurate and demanded respect.
Pace bowler D, Atkinson took
two for 64 in 21.2 overs.

six and 11 runs respectively.

In the Empire
John Bynoe who went at num-
ber four in the batting order,
hit a breezy 84 to topscore. He
hit six fours and five sixes in
his 84 which enabled Empire to
score 168 runs in reply to the
Lodge first innings’ score of 60.

Empire started shakily in their
first innings and lost their first

first innings,

Holder 132. Someone must have instructed Holder to fight to the
southpaw’s left hand and counter with a right cross whenever the
southpaw attempted to loop but unfortunately he fought too
far away from the southpaw’s left hand and it was not entirely un-
expected that when the southpaw lured him into crossing his right
too soon that a looping left to mid section would bring on twilight
sleep and it happened.

These were the best bouts in my opinion and there should be
more entertainment next Friday night when the finals take place.





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Lawn Tennis Champion

From Our Own Correspondent
LONDON, Sept. 13

Billy Knight, 16-year-old red-
headed left hander from North-
ampton, became the British Junior
Lawn Tennig champion when he
bea* the holder Bobby Wilson of
Finchley 7—5, 3—6, 6—4 at Wim-
bledon this afternoon, The match
lasted an hour and a quarter,

Wilson looked the better stroke
player, but he lacked Knight’s
aggression and had no answer
whatever to the left hander’s
cross court passing shots which
were executed with a delicacy
that even Drobny would have
been hard put to surpass.

Knight went into an early three-
love lead, but Wilson coming in
to the net fought back to three-
all. Games went with service to
6—5 and then Knight broke ser-
vice to take the first set,

Second Set
The second set opened with four



successive service breaks, but
after Wilson had held his own to
make it 3—2, he crowded on the
pressure and Knight, whose net
reactions are slow, missed several
easy shots. Wilson took the sec-
ond set quite comfortably.

Knight broke Wilson’s second
service at the start of the final set
with two magnificent passing shots
and then, despite a double fault,
went to a 3—1 lead Both boys
were very good overhead, but as
the match neared the finish, they
fenced warily and there were
several protracted base line duels.
Knight’s steadiness in these mo-
ments of crisis was the deciding
factor and a net cord which Wil-
son reached but drove outside,
gave him a fully merited victory.

In the Girls’ Singles Finals, Miss
V. Pitt of Birmingham was much
too steady for Miss J. M, Boundy
of Winchmore whom_ she _ beat
6—2, 6—1,





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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER





Aga Khan’s Tulyar Wins St. L

(Queen Sees"

‘Gay Time’

Beaten

From Our Own Correspondent
LONDON, Sept. 13.

Tulyar; the 2 they sala was
jJazy, won the Leger at Don-
custer this ateueoh watched by
Her Majesty the Queen, and
treught the total he has earned
for hi pwney Aga Khan this
east 273 It was his
ulive. victory, the
g sixteenth English
fae sty Succes sian his’ sixth St.

pi

vei thé exita’ distance Tulyar
wok mpre eg$ily than at any time
this season, He ‘finished’ three
‘engths ahead of outsider Kings-
fold with the French Alcinus,
four lengths away third, Bob
Major was fourth.

Charlie Smirke rode a waiting
rece this time and lay about sev-
enth, while Alcinus ang Ker
Ardan made the rumning from
Gay Time, Bold Buccaneer and
Bob Major,

This. order remained until enter-
ing the straight where Alcinus
gave way to. Ker Ardan and
shortly afterwards Gay Time drew
up and took the lead from Bob
Major This was about three fur-
longs out,

Kingsfold then came through to
Jead with *Aletnus running on
again oh the far rails. Kingsford
produced a remarkable turn = of
speed about two furlongs out and
wént clear, but Smirke still had
not moved on Tuylar.

Mount Changed

He ‘then switched his mount out
to’ challén, cn up the centre of the
course and running on strongly it
was obvious that with a furlong
to go that the race was his.

Tulyar finished strongly ahead
of Kingsfold by about three
“lengths with Alcinus third. There
was then a gap of about three
lengths before Bob Major.

Gay Time, the Queen's horse,
was a moderate fifth after weak-
a g in the last two furlongs.

ide Harold, the Yorkshire
cdl ade no show at all and Boid
Buccaneer weakened or he was
unable to quicken after entering
the straight up to which point he
had run a good race.

The disappointment of the race
was the poor form of Gay Time
whom the Queen had journeyed
specially to see. Just as it looked
as if he would come on, he dropped
back and failed to stay.

Tulyar has proved himself a
great horse—-perhaps the greatest
there has ever been.

The Aga Khan plans to run him
in the Coronation Cup, Eclipse
Stakes, King George Sixth and
Queen Elizabeth Stakes next
season and possibly the Prix De
L'Are De Triomphe.

Tulyar started at 10.to 11, Kings-
fold was 66 to 1 and Alcinus 100
to.6.

Golf:

Match—Play
Championship
tor Bobby Locke

LONDON, Sept. 4.

The Professional}! Goifers’
Match-play Championship, spon-
sored by the News of the World,
and carrying a top prize of £750,
may go lo an overseas competitor
for the {rst time since its incep-
tion in 1903, Among a_ strong
entry lst for the event which
takes place at Walton Heath from
September 16—19 is the South
African, Bobby Locke, who won
the Open at Royal Lytham earlier
this year.

Locke is in his best form for a
couple of years. He should have
no difficulty with his first round
opponent B, G. Preston of Kings
Norton, whose appearances in
top class tournament golf are
omy infrequent.

The draw: keeps apart Locke
and Harry Wheetman, the de-
fending. Champion and it is con-
ceivable they will meet in the
Final. Whéetman has the harder
4ask of the two for in his half of
the draw are D. J. Rees and Fred
Daly who have both won the
eyent twice since the war. Max
Faulkner is also in the same half
put he and Rees will probably
meet in the third round.









14, 1952 * SI NDAY \Dvoc ATE



SCENES FROM CRICKET 1CCER

Plymouth Beat
Rotherham 4—3

ONDON, Sept, 13

e Bu

ave ther
of seve

who will soon &t

losing 2—1 at ha

level on points wit















































Now the onl





$

l i OEE z ad Saturday
le ed and Shef-
te ipporters. Bott
12a their first victor-

5

y

oven-

t

o

e

he transfe market

if

a couple of goals in
ite by Chilean born
Robledo ended Preston’s

ten record,
Dooley back in Sheffielc’s
tie scoring = five goal in
ve games, was well held
ce Tottenham's centre
goals by Sewell and
lar, Finney gave them their frst
rhc est performance of the
yu i Plymouth who pulled
3-1 half time deficit to
“at Rotherham by the odd goal
even Plymoutt promoted

eason from the third

h

eld cond division lead-
i have the game in hand.



PAGE FIVE —

SEPT. 14 NO. 241 a ee



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TOP LEFT: Williams and Reynold Hutchinson on their way to resume the Carlton innings after tea. . — sed. There | ¥! dayt
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Spartan 2a8 =606WN Wilkie $ 1 2 he I d ! lor outh if starwed ration ee a
SPARTAN t Innings J. Farmer ? 0 32 2 is is accounted for by today’s it’s bad fe . Aa
(From Our Own Correspondent) \. At b Lawless 20 K. Riley an) 0 1 1 vietesy at Shrewsbury o FIRST IN PREFERENCE THE WORLD OVER
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Sept. 13. 5. Gi rbs b St. Hill 27 A. Deane 2 0 oe ae th Se eacan tk Meeks Le onsider all the teachers meson aed
nasal ; g «+ C. Smit Keeper. b St, Hill 49 HARRISON COLLEGE vs, PICKWICK Oonsto ew Clos os c Who work in sehook ann out
Scoring top points in the econ Ha Lbw., b St. Hill 14 Hs ARRISON COLLEGE—Ist Innings h ming,—got four, And Novr- ,at hi ©
three days of the Santa Rosa n. ita b D. Atkinson Mr, Gitter Greenidge b Jordan 0 ich played the second half with] 4nd what they" re all about?
four-day race meeting this after- D. Atkinson, b B. E. Hope « whp Outta 2 oddard 2 only 10 men—left half Pickwick oe
noon, Hope Dawns easily won the , b St. Hill 0 Mr. Headley c Birkett b W. Green vas injured! Who w rough stress and pee
ae va c lub’s sweep. ‘She c orb ast Hill 4 idge i Saal 39 Hat tricksters were O’Donnel| Lou says give these more money
“he ¢ its b ating » St i 25 Simmons > W » Edwards 7 . ‘ eg i aad Don't “throw it down the drain “a
one a at cee By Rs aune b D. Atkinsor 38 Hewitt c Birkett b Edwords 18 af rthampton Park of Newport . 5 t |
class horses in each even illips not out 19 GriMith ¢ J. Greenidge b Edwards 4 including two penalties and Mo-} rhose calling for the coppers ee
entered, but did not run today Extra 18 Har ell c wkpr. Wood, b C 1 f Stockport pve the treasury a blow ‘
In June she won the Trinid ; € 7 1 Scottish League Cup Semi-]! gust nt two hundred dollars
man ; : Tote 388 OD s ¢ Greenidge b Edwards wre ip va td
Turf Club’s Mid-summer sweep : c idee ee = Finalists look Like being Hiber- For myina — A tonic i
New Rocket was second with 11 Fa f wickets: 1-43, 2—51, 3—89, ¢ mut 0 hn, Third Lanark Stirling and] Protest it boys! protest it!
points Turfites screamed with ‘7116. 5—148, 6—148, 7-164, 8-210, 9 8 Kil nock, Hibs got six today,| Show them the island's, ne ed 4
delight when Al Trestrail’s Drury m BOWLING ANALYSIS Total o2 Tt Lanark prevented Rangers| Te!) them a ee _
Lane, a rank outsider, beat the o sm 2's Fall of wickets: 1—0 2—6, 3—12, 4 oring at Hampden, Stir- ° oO ion
Stag aka . a At ‘or 2.2 2 64 2 27 71. 6—97, %—~77, 8—01, 0—02 : ae inte state ‘
favourites to make the pari pay }) “'\\ ter Teo BOWLING ANALYSIS | irprised the Cup holder i know we're not amis
nearly $75, the highest dividend | Hill 3% 6 #7 6 oO 1 Rw Dundee cracking three in tt af those in agreement
of the meetin é ,167, the ‘ Pierce 11 i 56 0 H. Jor il 6 14 1 econd half and Kilmarnock got 1 & KR on this a
biggest forecast’ aa Cons. he. Atiinson 7 oes oe 1 6 © three at St. Johnston - en that rooms ar eeds our hair!
’ LODGE vs. EMPIRE at. LODGE 1. Goddard 10 1 17 1 . < f " d b g iu y y
RESULTS LODGE—l\st Innings E. Edwards 7 0 om (OS rhe second leg will be played sponsore y
OQnOUT FIVE FURLONGS. Ir. Wilkes Lb.w., b Barker 0 W. Greenidge 12.1 = Wednesday
Gs. L. Murray Robins t ‘ 1 T. Hoad 0 7 i ae idl ate. edie jan . . “
Class G1 Only Farwet'c Ck De Pelzay s teine @ -Greeninns 8 ating League leaders are Liverpool J&R BAKERIES Silvikrin Lotion with Oil is a complete hair treatment in itself. 1
i, New Rocket... K. Brookes b Grant 6 PICKWICK —ist Inning rics DN sign: BS eld ie Sec 4
2, Pepper Wine. ©. Deane 1.b.w., b King ©. Edwards Lbav. G. Foster 26 ond; wall, rd—South anc \ supplies the natural oils wh ry hair lacks; it acts as a dressing
3. Ben Har, R Goddard stpd. (wk, De Peiza) . M. Worme c & b 2 Headley 1 Oldham Third North makers of SUPPHES the gatural cils Meh dry _ ¥ _ :
RASTAFFARE HANDICAP. b King 9 TT. 8. Birkett b G ‘oster “9 pits he: t ; ‘ ~ P Si/vikvin, the
ABOUT NINE FURLONGS C. Grant c Rudder b Holder 1 J. Goddard not o 9 ENRICHED BREAD as well as a health-giving lotion; it contains Pure Si/vikrin, the
- Class D1 aoa es and El N. Wilkie b Barker 1 1. Fo not out 6 Rifle Shooti | ail h Silvik
and \y. K. St. Hill ¢ Holder b King 6 2k ng | hair's natural food. A few minutes’ daily massage with Silvikrin
1, Battle Song, \. Walker not out 2 of j c
2, Buddha. Riley b Rudder 0 (for wkts 98 4 and the blenders i 1 h Oi it » new life, health 1 vitality to your
Princess Hasiyys ten 2 THE following are the eight otion with Oil wall bring new lite, health and vital 0 yout
JETSAM HANDICAP ABOUT BOWLING ANALY: best score’s recorded at last J&R RUM ,
Omee alse as B) me me, rele ge er “ M KW Wednesday's practice of the Bar- hair, and will keep it perfectly groomed throughout the day,
C1 nd ©8 only. iste otieatet’ 24 0l4- Ss 4 i pinion 0 2 17 dos Small Bore Rifle Clut 3 i |
Geleen Fieses. ‘ 13, 6~—17, 7—~-18, 8 53 J. Grimtt ‘ 1 14 H.P.S .
* Natari BOWI mo 4 ANALYSIS 5 G. Foster Doe ale me 100 - slemishes | = «-
8. SF Friar V POLICE vs, CARLTO 7 =wse
ou URSERY HANDICAP H. Barker MD Ge CARLTON—Ist | Inning Major : : Lp o. Cleared 1 Vi r I in
ABOUT FIVE FURLONGS I “A ll « Mc, Kenzie run out , Capt. .« t, Jordan f ‘ ‘
a Two-Year-Olds Only ‘ 2 2 R, Hutchinson Lb.w. G, Sober z. Webste 9 ins An 665
‘ a wo-Year 8 : " : ¥ Wills a ves tsts Benias Mir e 5 ~ — 4 De 400 have « ki j oe
2. Der Runner « . 4 5 2 2 1 N. S, Lucas ec Farme b C. Multix : healing ntisepti ! OTION ITH oOo
PIPPIN HANDICAP Cicctne Sae Tene G. Hutchinson 1b.w. C. Bradshaw ke ¥ Has a gs of Cuties Ointment Lo w
3. Goodyear Grant b Brooke ae amy is ’ ' 1 1. G. Marsha 96 ‘and see how quick! t
ABOUT SEVEN AND A HALF FURS c’ Sunte b Walker 5: out RO. Browne 95 7~~ill bring felief to eczema, sores ' ly wing hale
Class Fi and F2—Three-Year-Olds On!» DePeiza 1.b.w., b Brooke 1 OF Bradshaw W H. W. Webster 94 irritating heat rash, cuts and pimple |
1. Cavalier J. Bynoe b Deane 4 es a Don’t suffer the misery of tired, achiny |
2. Meditation 0. Fields stpd., (wk. Grant) b 3 ii, I I ember ire reminded to pay feet — massage wthern nightly — wit |
3. Daisy Brown Farmer e «K ‘ Sobers b Farmet t r entrance fee for the Annual Cuticura Ointment and step ov
gaoGr Cte one W. Drayton b Wilkie ah Ss Tb Sobers ) Competition which closes on comfort, Buy your Cuticura to-day a)
S. Rudder 1.b.w., b Wilkie 4 “x tras 7 - 417 ¢
Class Gl and G2—Three-Year-Olds \. Holder stpd. (wk. Grant) b Total 204 September 17th, 1952 o
\ c stpd. ; i
and Over Farmer 0 anata ticura*"
1. Drury Lane ing ¢ Walker t ; 1 Fall of ts: 1-20; 2—100; 3—10' bills
& New mocket il. Barker c Wilkie b Riley 7 4 (aa, Fat 8a, JORDAN WINS SPOON Tie
3. Ge z i 5 9-250 .
GLENEAGLE HANDICAP Pea. “A SNe io BOWLING ANALYSIS SHOOT |
ABOUT SEVEN AND A HALF FURS : oO M R WwW
Class Fl and F2 Only—Four-Year-Olds Total 16a i 46 1 : H Shoe
and Over rr = c 23 «(C4 64 i tit POO! ndicap hoot
i. My Own Fall of wickets: 1—12 2~—83, 2-2, @ aoe 57 4 Which took place at the Small Bore
2. Stella Solaris ‘—84 5—105. 6-110 7~113, 8-116, 9 J. Byer a. @ 21 nge yesterday was won by Capt. | }
3. China Doll di a. P Cc, Blackman 7 } 3 ° Jorda vith a gun score of 98|
ABOUT NINE FURLONGS BOWLING ANALYSIS. | fone » o 6 . points and a handicap score ot
ner cae Cl and C® Only <. . icine ll 1 64 2 W. Farmer 2 0 il er pons nel
. Mon n the_ practice 1001 the eigh
. Hot Bread - best score Mr. F. A. Browne
3. Nefari a 7 7 2 corte ere Mr , ro
— 51 Horses Enter For Race Meeting $2 yo woo) © Gunn oF
: points, Capt. J. R. Jordan 97
Danger man to Locke could ! From Our Own Correspondent Distinction, Also entered are n points, Capt, ¢ E. Neblett 97|
the little Ashton professions! GEORGETOWN, B.G. Sept. 13 new thoroughbreds locally own« points, Mr. M. G. Tucker 97 point
Charlie Ward, who was a semi- Fifty one horses have been en viz: Gainest, Gold Dust Bileel Capt. S. T. Weatherhead 97 points, |
finalist in 1948. If Ward and tered for the Demerara Tur® Folly Hill, Explosive, Kin Mr. L. W. Hassell 96 points, Mi | —WONDER WHEELS N
Locke are to meet it will be in Club’s October meeting, in- Woodworker, Sandcrack and Cle H. Marshall 96 points | ‘
one of the semi-finals. uding from Trinidad Golden erach. Drawing for post positic The conditions were good an¢ W hy Hercule:
The final will be over 36 holes. Quip, Red Velvet, Goblin and will take place on Monday the wind was steady |
——— “ —T- »
ae the finest bicy
aun A-ASLIKE built to- day
The best designers and eng ycie
| ¥
| industry use the finest mat to build your \
Hercules. Even the small parts are tested
} = many time 1d each Hercules
| we
’ t bic '
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WHEN WE Win
DE SWEEP 15
TIME ENOUCH TO
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By GARIB NOT
BEFORE /






4 yo
“anil
FINEST








F O.K.
rSTABLE Boy

BUT AH STILL
Tuink CARIB
BEER 1s a 1002

FAVOURITE AT










Adi 4 brilliant finish of




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' ESTING ANQ
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THE HERCULES CYCLE & MOTOR COMPANY LTD.
BIRMINGHAM ENGLAND

AE ke Dh OE ik 0S A PY

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SOLD BY ALL LEADING DEALERS



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BLO See COT Se Ta





PAGE SIX





For Women Only!



Oh no! AMPLEX IS FOR THE ENTIRE You too can
drink anything—eat anything, even raw AN
if you take an Amovlex tablet a da AMPLEX COMBATS ALL
UNPLEASANT BREATH AND BODY ODOURS. Follow this happy

family by taking an Amplex tablet every day |

FAMILY |
onions and get away with it,

No,‘this isn’t the Flying Dutchman sé ion
Just a nightmare of ae
around a weathervane.
even in my dreams?

me swinging
Was I airsick



No! The last time I really flew I took
AIRSICK tablets by Savory & Moore
MARVELLOUS! Take Airsick tablets

before and during the journey

and you
will always FLY IN COMFORT,

candies. What did Judy do? JUDY TOOK
SILF SLIMMING TABLETS. Look at her
now. Still fair and forty, still relaxing

TRY SILF—a course of Silf WILL SLIM YOU



BUT NOT FAT.
DOWN.

Jack here needed no slimming, but he
did need a laxative. Always tired, forever
with" a grouch, Jack was a nuisance to
everybody. As a salesman Jack needed
energy and drive, Look at him any morning
now—the early bird catching all the buyers
MEDILAX, the safe, gentle LAXATIVE
fixed him up. MEDILAX ensures that
INNER CLEANLINESS which spells health
and SUCCESS,



No wonder Mrs,
Noted for
white as
in either,

|
4 |
A SPA TOOTHBRUSH gently, yet firmly,
penetrates every tiny crevice between the teeth
A SPA TOOTHBRUSH POLISHES AS IT
CLEANSES, and in Nylon or Bristle is YOUR
BEST BUY. SPA carries a name known the
world over. Take a hint from Mrs. Smith here,
and ALWAYS USE A SPA.
Here is another little lady well pleased with
herself. A young married with a family of thre«
sturdy- youngsters let’s hear what Marjory has to *
say about Family Planning. What is YOUR «:
opinion, Marjory? og #
“Well, now I think Family Planning, for those 2 |
who believe in it of course, is one way of creating Rsz ( ~'
happiness and security in the home, Confident at % dys
all «times in the safe, sure _ contraceptive, , i
RENDELL-FOAM, a wife and mother can relax ‘sean’
and do justice to her family. I believe in, and highly recommend
R ELL-FOAM, the safest contraceptive on the market,”

SURE IT’S LEAP YEAR, and Jimm<
still comes around. He’s made up his
own mind, partly thanks to Suzv’s
wisdom in always using BANDBOâ„¢
PREPARATIONS for her HAIR
Bandbox shampoos leave the hair

Smith

here looks superior.
her sparkling smile, her teeth are ¢

her table linen, No tattle-tale

grey
smiles Mrs. Smith

a,

*

softer, lovelier than before whilst
COLAIRE, highlighting Suzy’s silken
tresses draw Jimmy’s eyes towards
her, Lost in admiration, Jimmy
thinks Suzy possesses the LOVELI-
EST HEAD OF HAIR IN THE
WORLD.




Try BANDBOX for yourself, girls,

Sole agents covering this column:
INTERNATIONAL TRADING CORPORATION LTD

Telephone 5009

. STOCKISTS:~—
J. Li: LINTON, High Street. HINDS & CO., Roebuck Street.
E. C.GILL, Olympia Pharmacy. P.@A, CLARKE, Cosmopolitan

EMPIRE PHARMACY, Tudor
Street.

A. F.. JONES, High Street.

H. C; WALKES, Tudor Street.

H. L. HUTSON, Tudor Street.

ROCK’S DRUG STORE,

Pharmacy,

K. V. WORM, Roebuck Street.
STOUTE’S DRUG STORE, Roe-
buck Street. es
Cc, C, BROWNE, Roebuck Street.

Tudor A. A. BROWNE, Eagle Hall.

Street H. E. Pilgrim, Progressive
F. S, OLTON, Swan Street, Pharmacy, Nelson Street.
BRUCE WEATHERHEAD, Broad STANDARD PHARMACY,

Street.
INTERCOLONIAL PHARMACY,
12 Swan Street.

Tweedside Rd,

COLLINS DRUG STORE, Broad
Street.

KNIGHT'S LTD.



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& S,

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Here is coffee with the inviting aroma,

the heavenly flavor that makes every sip

© satisfying experience. With Chase &
Sanborn you get all the flavor your cup can
hold. Ask for Chase & Sanborn today,

L |

“No fiying for me,” says Judy, “I
believe in RELAXING.” Now Judy used
to be “fair forty AND FAT” Wante |
to slim but hated exercise, and loved





CLLEEE pik

ite ¥

4 2



‘
(By DRUSILLA BEYFUS)

THE things they
pretty Paris frock
dress business . .
last week,

I canvassed the tough fashion
triumvirate, the dress manufac-
| turers, the buyers, and the sales-
women who control what is

about a
British
all

say
in the
| . I heard it
|
|

|known as the bread-and-butter
| Side of the business.

To each of them I put the
pictures you see here and the
question “Why can’t we hav
copies of these—-to my eye attrac-
tive Paris clothes,

The picture shows four of the
most wearable, simple, and easy

to copy designs picked from the
latest autumn Dior collection.

1, THE SUIT has a plainly
tailored jacket with small,
sharply cut revers, a rounded hip-
line without padding, and five
plain bone buttons to fasten, The

skirt is straight, but “movable
around in.”

2, THE DAYDRESS is made in
caramel-coloured flannel, with a
cross-over tunic top, double-
breasted buttoning, a plain, collar-
less neckline, three-quarter-length
sleeves, and a slim skirt. With it
a scarf tucked in at the neck.

3. THE TOPLESS DRESS AND
JACKET is made in fine black
woollen material, with a boned
fitted bodice edged in black silk
and tying in two bows, one at
the shoulder, the other at the hips
The skirt is slim. The detachable
jacket—the Dior version of the
bolero - ig a curl of matching
material that takes the topless-





relieve stuffy, congested feeling
nerves and counteracting depres

BER
;

-
*

SUNDAY

mee
cs

able for copying at a price cus-
tomers can afford.
. *

The felt beret (2): A small cara-
mel beret, elegantly squashed.

The black pancake (4)3 A
small platter of a hat in black vel-
vet, worn plumb on top of the
head.

The velvet sidedip cap (below):
A small cap that fits skin-tight on
one side of the head,

They Say

WHAT did they say, the people
who could have these Paris out-
fits copied and on sale in the
shops within a few months?

The British dress business turn-
ed down Mr. Dior pretty well to
the last button.

“No” to the suit, said Mr. Man-
ufacturer. “There’s nothing to it:
no sleeve or collar effects, It’s
much too plain for us. Customers
wouldn’t touch anything with a
button below the waist: it might
gape on fat people.”

Said the buyers: “My custom-

won't take anything without
pocket. I’d never stock it.”

ers

“No” to the day dress, said
Mr, Manufacturer. “The dropped
shoulder is hopeless; we can't sell
anything without pads. And the
top doesn’t look as if it fits. The
sleeves aren’t roomy enough;
that panel over the tummy is
most unflattering to our trade.”

And the buyer added: “The
neckline kills it stone dead
unless we sold it complete with

ness out of a topless dress. the scarf, But the scarf depart-
THE DINNER DRESS i ment is downstairs. I'd never
4 THE NNER tESS S stock it.”
made in black velvet with . Tengu to the topless dress and
low-cut Sia naires Oana jacket, said Mr. Manufacturer.
sleeves, - eee "eal! ballet length “We don’t make cocktail dresses
in a bow, and a full be - in wool. The jacket might be
skirt. worth a try in taffeta, but I
shan’t bother, We can sell as much
as we make already.”
THE HATS.—There are thre¢ Said the buyer once again: “I'd
jof them in the photograph ,suit- never stock it.”



PHENSIC tablets clear the head and dispel tightness
and pain behind the eyes. They bring down high temperature,

s, at the same time soothing the

sion. The aches and pains of ’Flu
disappear in no time. PHENSIC tablets act quickly and safely.
They neither harm the heart nor upset the stomach. Keep a

supply of PHENSIC tablets by you always.

RPhensic

TWO TABLETS BRING QU/CK RELIEF

w FROM RHEUMATIC PAINS, LUMBAGO, NERVE PAINS,
HEADACHES, NEURALGIA, INFLUENZA, COLDS & 2:.1!'5 )



ADVOCATE






Why Paris gets the Snub

i=I1°S OFFICIAL .... from the people who
| make and sell the clothes

Britain wears

“No” to the velvet dress, said
Mr, Manufacturer. “If our design-
ers came up with a design like
that we’d turn it down. Buyers
would say: “You don’t expect me
to get a good price for a dress
like that; it’s far too simple.’”

Said the buyer:Our customers
would say it looked like a chemise,
it was so plain. Besides, you
could never wear it in the after-
noon. I’d never stock it.”

The Hats

TWO of the three Paris hats fell
as flat as only a simple idea can
in the fashion business.

No one I saw liked the beret.

“That’s not a fashion hat, it’s
a shopping hat,” said one leading
milliner indignantly.

Nobody much cared for
black pancake.

“We'd never sell a hat like that,”
said an important hatter, eyeing
it with chilly disapproval.

“Well, we might sell it with
some gold scatterpins on top,”
said a buyer.

the

And then at last, at last some-
one I saw liked something in the
pictures. It was the velvet side-
dip cap (below). ‘I’d try it as it
is,’ said one of London’s top hat-
ters,

But did you ever see a dream
fading?

For
tw ce

would sell
feather.”

“it
with a

added:
many

he

us



—L.E.S.

Supplies of Old Cottage Lavender —
perfume, soap and talcum — are
available at your beauty-counter now !

Nowhere will you find truer,
exciting Lavender than that

which comes to you direct from

England in the famous
Grossmith green bottle.

og
Sealed and packaged
in England by distillers
famous since 1835




SOLE DISTRIBUTORS:
B. A. BENJAMIN LTD., P.O,



BOX 97, BRIDGETOWN,

—_—

Strange
New World

By «PENSANT”

IN THIS strange new world in
which we of the older generation
find ourselves to-day, the sayi
that “the onlooker sees most
the game” is very applicable to
us.

We old ones, by fotce of cireum-
stances become “onlookers of a
life as it passes us by, a position
not sought, but which is gained
by a series of more or less pain-
ful processes,

The first of these, which seems
to descend on us almost overnight,
and for which we are totally un-
prepared, is by far the most pain-
ful, It comes on us when by some
odd remark or blunt intonation,
we find ourselves shoved into the
position of “onlookers” at a time
when we are certain, in our own
minds at any rate, that not only
could we still be in the game, but
could tell those young uns a thing
or two!

Mercifully this phase soon
passes, to be succeeded by others,
until finally, when we find we
don’t care a hoot who knows we
have a “top plate,” or that the
bald peteh on the back of our
head is growing larger, and when
quite unselfconsciously “we can
drop off to sleep with our mouth
comfortably open for a pre-dinner
snooze, then we know the last
stage has been reached, and we
have qualified for the “Onlookers
Diploma.”

Having reached this stage, we
take up a comfortable position on
the side line and watch the game!

And what do we see?

From this vantage point of “on-
looker” we see passing before us
a world so strange, so different,
that we are totally at a loss.

All the old land-marks are gone.
Modesty betrayed, has flown, Im-
mortality, out from hiding walks
abroad unashamed. Honesty and
devotion to duty have lost in a
fight with money grabbing (and
get it,how you can) and clock
watching.’ Manners respect and
courtesy are but memories of us
“onlookers! Pleasure and self-in-
dulgence are the Gods that are
worshipped. Truly an astonishing
spectacle! The very foundations
on which life was formally built
no longer exist, and we find our-
selves in danger of shouting from
the side-line “beware, look out
you're heading for disaster’! For,
can any age afford to despise and
discard these qualities and sur-
vive?

And it really is amusing, when
shopping to be told we must buy
peas if we want okras! This
wielding of petty authority is
funny, when it is not’ pathetic,
and after all it does save us the
trouble of deciding if we should
buy one, or both,

And the sight of so many “little
people” trying so strenuously to
‘be big people’ is as good as the
“Funnies” and can really help to
brighten life if looked at in the
right way.

Then again, who would but get a
laugh out of modernistic paint-
ing? What fun to recognise and
pick out the odd eyes, toe-nails
etc., from the canvas! Quite a
game might be evolved from it, so
many points for guessing what the
various objects are, say three
points for an eye, four for an ear
and so. Why it might become al-
most as absorbing as Canasta ! But
where we oldtimers really get a
genuine laugh of pure delight is
when, after feeling rather depress-
ed over our own figure, we look
at some modern sculptor. Then
we can really draw ourselves up,
paunch and all, and feel that,
according to modern standards the
old figure is not so bad after all!
Bad? Why by Epstienes standards
we are positively slim!

Yes, in spite of its grim reality,
life to-day has its amusing side,
and until time brings its readjust-
ment we, who have known differ-
ent days, prefer to be amused,
rather than to despair.

For those standards on which
the foundations of any society
must be built, if it is to survive,
will return, because they have
been proven to be the only sound
qualities, and, without a sound
foundation nothing can survive.

And with life’s slow adjustment
toward sanity again, the arts,—
which are after all but the ex-
pression of the mood of easy
ohrase of life,—will discard those
travesties of painting and sculp-
ture, the distortions of so called
music, which are only the abor-
tions of an unhappy age, and re-
vert. once again to the beauty of
sight and sound of former days
and which are necessary to feed
the spirit of our world.

So, although we old ‘“onlook-
ers” may not be here to see the
world sane once again, we know
it will be so for those who follow
on, '










more





SUNDAY

Something a bit

, SEPTEMBER

14, 1952



LAST CORONATION

NEXT CORONATION

more feminine

FOR THE WELL-GROOMED SOUVENIR

By EVE PERRICK
THE Crown which is Correct—correct in Style, Taste,
Dignity, and Protocol—is now off the drawing-board and
selling at £1 a pattern (371 so far) to the better-intention-
ed Coronation souvenir manufacturers who are anxious

to do the right thing.

The man who designed the “correctest crown of all,”
however, was looking rather sad when I called on him in

his office.

“The wind blew .it over,” ex-
plained Mr. Milner Gray, point-
ing dejectedly to a broken flow-
er-p@t containing a shaken in-
door-ivy plant.

It was one of many leafy plants
which, with some abstract pic-
tures, knobbly curtains, and shiny
kitchen-white walls, formed the
decor motif of the room in the
Design Research Unit office-suite
in Mayfair.

There was also a cheering dis~
play of tinned food anq_ beer
bottles— “All empty, merely my
designs.”

Mr. Milner Gray, a little man
in blue tweed suit and turquoise
socks, waved away the charge of
on-the-side refreshments, and
waved me into a low, undulating,
modern chair,

No Copy |

He handed me a “schnapps’*
in a pretty glass, and a folder
showing three different crowns.

“These are only suggested em-
blems for the manufacturers who
want a really good crown, but
who might otherwise make do
with something ugly.

“To be correct it must be a
symbolic crown, but though it
has to be a royal British crown
—not a foreign or civic one—it
must not be a copy.of any par-
ticular crown in existence.” ,

To achieve all this Mr. Gray
had been doing some _ intensive
research into the symbolic crowns
of Queen Elizabeth I, He had been
happy in his work, and rather
pleased with the result,

“It looks a little more feminine
than George VI’s crown, don’t
you think?” he asked,

I didn’t have the heart to say
that it looked like any old crown
to me,

* Very strong spirit which
everyone drinks in Mittel Europe
and the intellectual set sips here.

Out Of Place

I HAVE NOTED with interest,
but no admiration, the latest
photographs of Capri’s new
recruit to the ranks of “the
shirtless ones.” ‘

I have scanned the recently
issued list of the Ten _ Best-
Torsoed male stars (Marlon
Brando in the lead; Alan Ladd,
Burt Lancaster, Kirk Douglas also
mentioned).

Iam reminded of a_ vintage
Groucho Marxism: “Anatomy is
something: we all shave —but it
looks better on a girl.”

Out Of Sight

AT THIS TIME of the year
American film stars come and go.
And most of them. say they’re
only here on holiday and really
would appreciate it if they could
go around unhonoured, unsung,
unphotographed, and, perhaps,
even unrecognised.

Well, it can be done, and the
man who did it says the trick is
to arrive in Europe in a cargo
boat, ;

But Ralph Bellamy—you do re-
member him, don’t you? says it
also helps if you haven’t made a
picture for seven years.

Mr. Bellamy was here for just
six days I tried to find him, I
telephoned several well-known
show-business organisations.

“Whom did you say?” inquired
the switchboard operator at each
place. “Would you mind spelling
the name, please? And is he an
actor?’’,

I traced him to his hide-out—
at the Savoy Motel. Said the tiny
page who was helping me search:
“Would you know him by sight,
Miss?” I said: “But of course.”

After all, I had seen Mr. Bel-
lamy in at least half of the 60
films he has made and in the flesh









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HERE’S one of the latest tn hat
fashions turned out by designer



Achille of Paris It is called
“Hola” and is made of blue vel-
vet trimmed with navy blue veil-
‘se and a spray of fine feathers.



he was just as I remembered—

tall, husky, curly-haired, gentle-

faced, and very light-eyed,
Broadway, Now

He has been doing all right
since we last saw him—in “Guest
in the House’—in 1945. It is just
that he is now a Broadway star.
And Hollywood is seven years
four stage plays, and 47 TV de-
tective dramas back.

Hollywood, though, would like
him to return, “I get offers, but
the right sort of pictures. aren’t
made so often these days,

“The studios are sort of stuck
with Westerns and _ musicals,
Everything else is supposed to be
controversial. So while I’m not
prepared to ride a horse or take
singing lessons, I guess I’ll have
to stick to the stage.”

Mr. Bellamy’s personal political
opinions are, however, self-evi-
dent. On the shiny satin, low-
rolled rever of his dinnner-jacket
an elegant pin spelled out “IKE”
in. letters of 22-carat gold. He
explained that he was yet another
of those “registered Democrats”
who are Eisenhower Republicans
this season,

I said I disapproved of loyalty-
switching; pointed out somewhat
smugly that I had remained a
Bellamy fan through a series of
films in which he had played
either the nasty man or the stuffy
fiance.

Mr. Bellamy thanked me for my
devotion, and added: “It seems to
me that loyalty is a particularly
British quality, Perhaps that is
why the English are the most
contented, cheerful people I’ve
met in Europe this trip.”

No Ambition

STREET SCENE: The chocolate-
brown carriage and pair which
the “By Appointment” hatters use
as a delivery van made its spec-
tacularly dignified way along
Regent’s Park, carrying the for-
mally dressed, top-hatteqd coach-
man and one passenger—a young
man in casual sports-jacket. And
no hat.—L.E.S.





:

seersuckers, cambrics, voiles,
stay unchanged through

are the lovely crisp Ferguson

beautifully into clothes

and yourself.

rial will be re



pear OLE





INDAY, SEPTEMBER

14,

1952



LEFT.—Top: A sleeveless
Unlined. Rose & Blairman.
Centre: Five rows

Bottom: Black and

this black wool evening sweater.
CENTRE:

Black day shoe shown has
IGHT:

Delman.

1 vening skirt of fine black lace banded with black
moire. The blouse stresses this season’s sleeve-line. Price & Sons.
hich have diamante embedded in the fabric. H. M. Rayne.

piping and bow of black and white stri silk.
Cocktail suit of charcoal coloured shot poult. oe
collar are of narrow bands of poult mounted on net.
the ankle with a bow. H. & M. Rayne.

Evening mule design with rolled leather

Rose & Blairman.

Price & Sons

thong from heel encircling the ankle on a

evening jumper of black plaited silk ribbon. This is obtainable lined or

of silk fringe decorate this evening jersey.

Rose & Blairman.
gold embroidery outline stiff white lawn flowers

which are lightly stitched to

taffeta and lined with rose-coloured
Here worn with black

satin shoes

Note dropped shoulder line. The yolk and

... Phe silk shoe is fastened round

slip knot.

AFTER SIX O’ CLOCK

The evening skirt together with
blouse or sweater provides the
answer to a dress problem:
whether to choose a garment
suitable for cocktail and dinner
parties in town or one wearable
during country-week-end eve-
nings.

It is easier to pack into a holi-
day suitcase than an _ evening
gown, And one can ring the
changes with two or three ‘tops’.

The sleeveless sweater is prov-
ing the most popular, though a
modified bat wing and the raglan
line is also fashionable. Black
wool models are often trimmed
on thei seams. One model on
show this week has_ two-inch
bands of black silk braid, woven
with gold thread in a check pat-
tern. Another has braid hung
with pear-shaped pearls.

Plunging necklines are trim-
med with large loops in the gar-
ment’s own fabric.

There are silver and gold
thread and wool mixture jerseys
in a wonderful variety of colours
shown this week too; One in silver
and flamingo pink has a minute
collar and front buttoning;
another, a. collarless design in
violet wool with a wide yolk in
silver, has cap sleeves; and there
is a cross-over style of the same
weave but in lemon yellow and
graduated stripes of pale gold.

FASHION PARADE

> look

The loose
cuts out
the curves

from EILEEN ASCROFT

WOMANS
A will reveal tew curves,

whim for the loose louk

figure

One of the few gestures to feminine form
mace by Pierre Baimain was hip-draping
All clothes are slightly longer,



: Paris,

will
imagination this auturin,

(By MERCIA SNOW)
_ Blouses have certainly come
into their own this year.» Their

elaborate outlines save the eve+
ning skirt and blouse idea from
becoming slightly tawdry. « They
are mostly in white lawn, broderic
Anglaise, nylon or finest fragile
organza in the Edwardian style
with ballooning or leg o’mutton
sleeves, and high, prim collars.
The most original is in yellow and
black plaid.

Ballet length evening ~ skirts,
very wide, made of taffeta faille
and velvet, are the present fav-
curites of the designers. Many
are displayed with matching fit-
ted jackets, minute capes or bol-
eros if desired, They carry also
the motif distinguishing the skirt.
Thus the gqlaborately embroid-
ered skirt with a deep floral or
bird, outlined in gold thread (re-
miniscent of the Japanese bird
design), is matched with the em-
broidered cape. Rays of purple
pailettes down the wide skjrt of
enother model has a bolero or-
namented in the same way. And
an enormously full black taffeta
skirt with graduated quilting all
over and narrowing at the waist,
has a finely tailored matching
jacket with a full peplum,

Purple pailettes are ,used again
in a 3 inch band at the hem of
a wide silk model and they gleam

be left to the
Her clothes

with fashion's néw

including star. RIGHT

cocktail dressés. whith have wide V-neck lines

A Yictoritl. hdté ead ct
Siced TROT AHR AOE Wee TES tor day: and ebades of beige
Gleagatry caps in fur or velvet, Sand and grey. but all flecked
tiny pillbox hats swathea wiin With black. There is also a siaie
enormous veiling. bows and ue and a green with @ grey
fringed Wool shawis worn with ‘one For evening colours are
day jackets vibrant — black white. ruby
sapphire amethyst

Evening dresses, too, nad bustle

and for the



younger models rose

bows and velvet fur-trimmed 4nd aquamarine

tippets Evening coats of hairy wool
Mannequins teetered by on were fur trimmed and had

ve've: pin-point heels. many in frothy feminine linings of

Shoes 0 mach ‘her stockings pies'ed tulle or ruffies of
Poo-nain showed a fot of Dlack oC pce

o

FACE POWDER

for glamour that becomes you



ROUGE
VANISHING CREAM

BRILLIANTINE e«

URJOIS

HAIR CRFA

IN NEW YORK Venus veils trim the autumn hats
style has a folded crown

unexpectedly..as the skirt swings
in walking. There are a few nar-
row skirts shown this season also.
One is in velvet and slit at the
front. But the wide skirts carry
the day.

GOING TO THE FEET

It seems as if we may look for-
ward to a return of the elegant
shoe—thanks to Paris. For the
French have introduced the
“spindle heel’—so narrow that it
is searcely half an inch wide at

the base and only little more at|

the top—and the more

vamp.

The English shoemakers are
being more cautious and conser-
vative, But they have been forced
to adopt at least a modified ver-
sion. It» is an improvement on
the thick, clumsy heels they have

pointed

foisted on the market in recent
years. And it is a big change
from platform soled shoes, which

started oltt_as an exotic whimsy
of finest leather and craftsman-

ship, for small Italian feet and
ended up in England in their
millions, uncouth, and mass pre-
duced,

So it is refreshing to find the
shoemakers’ craft is reappearing
in England. The flat heel is
banished to the country or to bal-
let style shoes, and the high heel
is fining down,

CENTRE: the head-hugging

LEFT




























SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN
eee CTL tl ett es a lea a
| > . y “Ty 2 et < .
| Paris Newsletters -_
I dreamed
' al fa j I ;
Vi { emphasizead
adame i eclere LIQUID GOLD A‘ WARTUN ‘ ‘ _—
” DOORLY! SOA | my curves it
‘ Y | J
re ada—3,400 »F
(The Marshal’s Widow) : . .
why, Rt Ss Sut le oe ad ‘
st | : . why, RUM Te ves Sue | JMULENYOTM
» t t » | | | t f the W I t "
o € ‘ oO RT
OLE ps nto the Lime 1g WU ieeribtcan. ms: 1 och
branded MACAW, WINDMILA Text Be Allo-ette
(From EVELYN IRONS) asioffilly to her imposing third J@nd LIQUER MOUN Y i n think
j PARIS floor flat in the dignified Avenues §¢onstitute from t |
| The eyes of Paris have been fo- Kleber when official business {gm r ° .
‘
brs ia week ~ spn, —. brings her to Paris. Senowned and equ ally m COMPLEXION SOAP w
Be. Oman in & beautifully tail- r - ‘3 @2 Barbados or t ’ é for }
| Ored black suit and a sm mart No Feminist next alr gallor i, ae
| black She is e Lia Madame La Marechale has aug} (providit a : t . 7
Mi rech Leciere{ of enermets daily mailbag whien ‘cunerio: RUM) A} nv ia)
e's 2st popular war hero, she ‘ with herself. She is DOW IRLY ia .
wf eral Lecter wi texed ie f the organisatior :
Patis 6n Liberation Day in 1944 ich for France wat ne aCe Gt S CASTLI
a the head of the 2nd Armoured Widow i also works for tl * - ‘ i
ivisior vas : ’ t met bhi
anh Ate le ee) he rm oe her hus- a THE VIBRANT COL KNI t's
Recen! : ; re as second armoured division. f S OF THE TROPI : ace :
1947 Recently “an off Her hobbies—music and books, [brought under on ears E COMPLEXION SOAP
was published conferrir On 1 She is feminist, believes that m4 : yu y solid} nt
| tt posthumous honour Mar- Geter ie ert he He: onlooker > myri ol
shal of France round : ; weve to he We lr more ‘
It was people who forced at f STRA ind . ‘
that ue, Public clamour broke The Detective RAFFLA vt a ome a ee BAL. vee
out when the title of Marshal Just urhed to Paris after hats, s 1 designs a Mal occasions (O'§
wa best wed on the dead De lightnir sit to the seene of the humerou ve \\ era ,
| Lattre de TaSsigy. De Lattre was Drummor murder is France's | !0ors, table ounte , . ;
| a great general, but so was St famous detective ex-Stipe of the town’s most exciting st 1 i OUIS }
} Lae a A id Leclere was warmly ndent Jean Belin, formertyv THE DOMINICA HANDI- ~"2.” ee st
egarded by his men the National Security police in {CRAFT CO, Bridge S ’ : aN
Today M l M Paris ’ : ‘ ’ . * Platinum or Gold. ‘I
oday Mme, 4a Marechal - th ERS 4
back at the family place. ti He is:a tough, 66-year-old Bur- HOW'S YOUR EGG PRO ms ANNIVERSARY
Chate f iw onthe Mor undian =with a face deeply | DUCTION? interesting hen that not
nateau of Tailly on the Somme med wit , r B +4 AY é
after tz par the ane aa med h wrinkles and thin, }@re availal PURIN :
monies marking the eighth’ ann etermined lips. In the old days} Poultry Book x I
’ arKIng wie eign a us dangling cigarette was his | heldful advi JAS NI ” Phere
versary of the Liberation of Pay trademark . SF Be TOS BOVi( HAS JONES ‘ -
People noted her quiet elegance oR tT . . CHECKERBOARD ’ é ‘
her calm self-control; throughou® epi} a é "h ie yoke now, "he plocal PURINA F D P =e
| the moving mass for her husband I a S apes: trouble PLIERS the : ble 5
in the Cathedral of Notre Dame + “e130 policeman in egg prov feeds amor DOLLAR FOR DOLLAR
when she t pt ently near the ,, ve c i a month. His |LAYENA j Rina saeetiss bintniin wh ;
{ altar beside an empty arm-ch So he supt eared 1 + ial th Point you get RESULTS rid! Mmmm
- which lay great sheaf of ac crime a ivise ek 5 a Kin® | Phone if you like to 4403 but I » “cause you
flowers emetatorks eee ee oo my better get a supply on Mor ZEPHYR Well, man alive! that
tive lage t i ri
t t wa n account his wife nen Magawne, and add you Sirs to mil 1 I'l The car of .the century |
that the general, whose namo 1 : e ' I | por |
3 : cal Killer more pa eee
ws yINt > inpe > tee " | A t !
was Count Philippe de Haute ‘Superintendent Sebeille is d r ‘ ciou eX | The accent’s on your
clogue when he escaped {OM ing everythir Hos 1 ‘. ; ° * at home in ar | ; '
pceon to join the Free French in {4° traee’ dik urdaree” — ; AMONG THE FAMOUS nttle SF | but definitely! Allo-ett dels
ondon, called himself by the un~ «pine pin F te yn, (HELENE CURTIS PR
3 ike mm eb Me SCLENE t PRODUC! Je 1 i } »s sleck! eur
remarkable French surname of killer am A ene mee i Sauve Haircrean present 7 me gst HOME OF | your curve leek uraly
Lae cada site a rt é F an. 1 ah seu Vic earney MLE
pata ’ eines a Pe ae people of that tegion are pecu-|!Y available in Barbados. SAUVE FIVE STAR MOTORING by gives them a mos! breat! ion
re wee ea © feate? jiarly dour and obstinate for Ladies and Men has the gt ! you read these j ~ =
aha thle tion teat ordinary “Most of them are Communists dvantage of new mirac e phone 4493 oe” . c
fiamme which her husband made ce ¥ . 5 "ee, ae me sreniens oe Ere the fam he vient favorite fabrics ~~
t afraic ot ‘re must liar oily fee rom cond “ YGDOM ‘oO } ,
pare ‘ r . many of them who know the gun /ing ols. SAUVE definitely make peve ‘ . . “ i R i
zike her husband Mme. Lecier: that kill oe 1] Bun ; Ss : finitely ces HORSE wa never spoken in Genuine Maidenform Braget
comes of the old French nobility, ; a Med " a ummonds. I hair softer and more manage warmth of Bridgetow:
was born Therese de Gargan. aohy i Tho e giving ( able and gives a natural ‘ iy un Personally I'd eres are made only inthe | nites
Married jin 1925, now in her late watt wi of su ell t a kn a few drop ch mornin thing for a FAN, A top St fA
40’s she has six children. nda difficult ‘in Se vents dryne ensure \ ng-lasting G.E.C, ELEC ates of America
The younger of the two girls “"q (ye Se eae as head all day, At | RIC FAN. An exeellent variets , "
Binhedidle ja a. Geeicede.” achobla a bel DON rie I seeacde ht Ot ores tt the CITY GARAGE There isa W011 nforn ,
|} girl. The eldest son, Lieus: Henri if hh mt : ad ae re ice, x . * * * ‘ sia: they're ‘ality models! \ {
Leclerc, was taken prisoner in Pat ‘* Sdrete inder Belin at PEN AND PAPER. INK RENCE OL. STOVES and] or every type of figuiti,
jthe war in Indo-China last Jan- “ “Bolin has sent 17 murderers to |ERASER ne yl ce? OVENS with the asbestos kind | eames mr.ce :
uary. His mother has had no c 1 ‘ ce wh ror : et es ; a “ as
7 ; the guillotine. Most celebrated was | Best thing is to go to Robe ! (replaceable for omy 18c.) -
word from him since : * | .
She lives quietly at Tailly with Landru, the French blue-beard,|Co.. on High St und ve also come in and ire z
|her other children, returning oc- Thiet ne ake ted soon after the |SCHOOL REQUIREMENTS | ar rthwhile your seeing
g we |
sit koi a meas atiataneharperannepebaiaetcae
Ms ' lee No Angels bed
1e mule shoes—with 10 be Cc NEWSNAPS—An i ld church }
support — have proved neither | jn the Pa iburbs display e | IS YOUR
practical nor suitable for outdoors. | notice “Those worshipping herve
They are too reminiscent of the!) gre not necessarily angels » | ;
bedroom. Nowadays they are take care of your handbags and | â„¢
seen almost invariably in gold or | cameras.” | |
: |
ilver mesh and kid, or with A convicted thief who stole | | Backache is usually the first sign of Kidney
vamp and heel of nylon mesh cheque book spent the money | | Trouble. The kidneys are the blood’s filters.
Narrow grosgrain ribbon is used|a picture by French artist Mar N Stomach y | When they get out of order, instead of pure,
for V-shaped 2 imming on ae Laurencin, N 4 DUE TO INDIGESTION | fresh blood flowing to every nerve aid
uede courts. The vogue for col- Health authorities have assure: | > j 5 | cle blood hb h
7 é s he ‘ | r ust ONE DOSE | muscle, your blood stream is heavy wit
oured shoes for special occasions | Parisians that meat from animal of MACLEAN BRAND | waste poisons and acids, Then you feel rotten.
continues; fashionable are red | suffering from the severe foot and STOMACH POWDER! This | Half a century's experience and scientific
models cuffed with black, and | mouth epidemic that has affect: 1 | ecient balanced formula | tests by doctors in famous clinics prove that
caramel coloured kid piped in many thousands of cattle in an, Stomach Pains. | Dodd's Kidney Pilla quickly rid Ther blood
white. France, is not harmful to humar nce, Heartburn, Nausea of excess acids and poisons. your
Following a series of attacks on or Acidity due to Indigestion. blood is clear—your backache disappears
| faxi-drly ers, the men’s. union and your tired feeling is replaced by
have demanded the right to [- Atse tn Tablet Fore | health and energy. You feel years ounger,
| cart irms and the suppression Insist on Dodd's Kidney Pills. 3/e
|} of gangster films L. M. B. MEYERS & CO, LTD, for large bottle at all chemists, U4
(World Copyright Reserved) P.O, Box 171, Bridgetown



the square, forward tilted
cap, finished with a jewelled

the large cartwheel model is in platinum grey iridescent parlour plush

with a darker veil.

i Cay dresses and suits were
Jumper aot worn with tweed or knitted
Maggy Routf teams fur-lined wool shawls, With evening

capes with town suits and gives models we saw shawls of woo!

them tailored coat collars She lace.

shows many. versions of the Silk organza, used double in

jumpet suit wiih cow! necklines. blue over black and black over

sometimés waisted, sometimes gold. is enchant for small

traced, gathered into a hip belt evening dresses. It has the
In the prettiest collection to sheen of a mixture of satin.

Gate Ma eens de RRueh wool and silk

features = high olo necke

collars, on Buk” dresses and WORLD ‘YRIGHT RESERVED

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PAGE EIGHT

oil ADVOCATE

fixe ltw ade eee Bc
Printed by the



Advecate Co., Ltd,, Broad St. Bridgetown.



Sunday, September 14,

WATER

THE availibility of water for irrigation
purposes in Barbados was the subject of a
question put to the late Dr. Senn by the late
Sir Frank Stockdale and the then Dr.
Saint (now Sir John) in January 1941.

As a result of that question the British
Union Oil Company carried out a survey
of the ground water resources of Barbados
free of charge. The report of that survey
was published in March 1946.

Since that date the subject of irrigation
has been discussed by many persons not
all of whom have studied the Senn report.
In view of the importance which irrigation
would have in maintaining a high average
sugar output it is not surprising that the
possibility of irrigation has been consistent-
ly kept in the foreground during recent
years. It is also therefore not surprising
that Professor Beasley in A Fiscal Survey
of Barbados should have included irriga-
tion in a proposed full economic pro-
gramme set against the deep-water harbour
project.

In view of Professor Beasley’s recom-
mendation and in view of the reports
which are circulating to the effect that the
government has earmarked a large sum of
money for irrigation purposes in its five
year development plan, the views of the
late Dr. Senn on a future water policy for
Barbados ought to be recalled.

Dr. Senn began his suggestion for a
water» policy ‘with the remarks: “It is
obvious that the public water supply must
have priority, as on it the health and wel-
fare of the entire population depend to a
considerable extent. In any planning it
must be considered that with the rise of
civilization the water consumption per
head will increase and in Barbados allow-
ance has also to be made for a steadily
increasing population.” For this reason
not all the water unused at present could
be utilized for a planned system of irriga-
tion, but certain quantities have to be re-
served for future extensions of the Public
Water Supply.”

If Dr. Senn’s advice is to be followed it
would appear essential for the public water
supply to be assured and improved before
embarking on any experiments with irriga-
tion,

Has the public water supply been im-
proved?

That question is’ best answered by the
Chief Engineer of the Waterworks.

In a talk given to Members of the Bar-
bados Museum and Historical Society on
June 9, 1952 Mr. Garrod, the Chief
Engineer of the Waterworks Department
said; “the water system is probably at the
present time at its lowest ebb. The old
pumping machine is giving out, the new
is not in full harness and the distribution
pipes are too small.

Let us hope that from now on improve-
ment will manifest itself”. Had these
statements been made by some professional
journalist or politician seeking to make an
impression they might have been overlook-
ed and certainly would have been checked
by reference to the expert. But when they
are made by the expert they cannot be
dismissed. “Subterranean water” Mr. Gar-
rod continues during the same talk which
has recently been published in the Journal
of the Society “is vitally important to this
island’s water supply and we cannot allow
anyone to lift it in excess, to the ultimate
detriment of the public.”

If the expert recognises the priority of
the public water supply over irrigation, it
may be asked, why should a newspaper be
concerned about a question which is in
good hands? Normally such a rebuke would
be well-merited but the history of water
development in Barbados as traced by Dr.
Senn shows that the right opinion was not
always followed: and recent happenings
in Barbados tend to show that when the
expert’s opinion conflicts with the dominant
political wish that the expert’s opinion is
disregarded or some weak eompromise is
decided on.

Water is too important to daily life to be
trifled with.

Much development has taken place since
Dr. Senn’s report was written and Barba-
dos is fortunate indeed to have acquired
just the very person recommended by the
late Dr. Senn “a qualified water engineer
who is specially keen on fundamental re
search”, to plan a future water policy.

Already many improvements in the pub-
lic water supply have been experienced.
In May 1951 a new well at Haymans
capable of yielding a million gallons of
water a day came into production. Ex-
ploratory Boring which is now being
carried out at Sweet Vale may result in
another source of supply which may per-
mit of the closing of existing sources which
are not entirely satisfactory.

In this connection Dr Senn’s views on the
main sources of the island’s water supplies
are important and it is very disturbing to
note that Harrison Cave, Bakers Cave and
Coles Cave streams in St.

1952

Thomas, which

he considered to be very unsatisfactory
and even dangerous are still, according to

the Chief Engineer’s statement in June
1952, being used.
Besides concentration on necessary im-

provements in water supply as to quantity
and quality the Chief Engineer is planning
for an increased consumption of water of
some 9 million gallons daily by 1980.

Reorganisation of the water supply is
going on and in 1949 a million dollars -was
sanctioned for work over the whole island.
In actual fact, according to the Chief
Engineer, the expenditure may eventually
go to double that amount.

With so much to be done for the public
water supply of the island it seems in-
credible that schemes of irrigation should
be contemplated at this moment and it is
earnestly to be hoped that in a matter of
such vital importance to the future genera-
tions of Barbados that no political pressure
will be used to counteract the decision of
the expert.

Insufficient attention too seems to be paid
to the warning which was given to the
members of the Historical Society by the
Chief Engineer when he spoke of City
mains which have insufficient pressure to
centrol fire. “We cannot connive at the
fire hazard”, he said. We cannot.

Before embarking on schemes of irriga-
tion the authorities responsible for the de-
velopment plan which is soon to be
announced may be counselled to spend a
quiet day reading the report of the late
Jv. Senn and then to compare it with the
1eport on “our water supply” delivered by
the Chief Engineer at the Barbados Museum
mn 9th June 1952.

It is impossible when this has been done
not to regard schemes for irrigation, how-
ever desirable and however necessary .in
the future, as premature at this stage of
cur water supply development, ‘The
water system” says the one man in Barba-
clos best qualified to speak “is probably at
the present time at its lowest ebb”. It is
obvious said Dr. Senn that the public
water supply must have priority.

Who would ainngree?

FOWL-COCK TIME

THE historian of the future may find it
profitable to speculate on the reasons why
of the two experiments from which Sir
Grattan Bushe will always be remembered
in this island only one took root.

Why was it he may ask, did “Bushe rule”
capture the imagination of the politicians
who supported it, whereas “Bushe time”
soon expired?

Of the two experiments the historian,
freed from the prejudices and slogans of
the present will perhaps consider the in-
auguration of Bushe time as far more suit-
able to the needs of a tropical island than

the settling upon 166 square miles of coral
of a form of government which is today

working with great difficulty in its West-
minster Home ?

Why, he must ask, did Bushe time ex-
pire when Bushe rule survived ?

The historian of the future may search
and search amid the masses of paper and
files which might survive some future fire
or hurricane (which may solve all Barba-
dian problems in a manner quite unfore-
seen by our present-day planners) without
finding a clue to that most interesting
sociological question: Why did Bushe
time die?

Should his eye light by chance on these
words if they are available to posterity
(perhaps in the vast newspaper storeroom
of the British Museum where all British
newspapers are preserved) he might find
the clue for which he may be looking.
Bushe time died of ridicule. Bushe rule
survived because no one thought of ridi-
culing it. Politics in Barbados, like educa-
tion, is a subject of veneration. Those who
make fun of politics make fun of the
people. And the will of the people is sov-
ereign. Surely that is the clue to the suc-
cess of a political experiment which had
nothing to recommend it except a very
eighth-hand resemblance to a British cab-
inet system which itself 1s in need of
revision ? ;

Politics are taken too seriously here and
the leg-pvlling and cartoons and political
satire which reduce parliamentary gov-
ernment to the level of a national pastime
in Great Britain are not appreciated local-
ly, Politicians take themselves very seri-
ously because the people take them seri-
ously.

Politics is bread and butter and nobody

laughs at the means of livelihood, Lest»

the historian of the future should regard
this interpretation as being somewhat
‘anciful and unsupported by the evidence
f the orthodox, he is to be requested in
polite terms to consult page 119, Vol. XIX,
No. 3 of the Journal of the Barbados
Museum and Historical Society. :
There he will read how Bushe time was
always fated to die, because it had a rival.
In the words of a venerable headmaster
of Harrison College: “We were glad when
the Bushe experiment ceased, and we
went back tu ordinary time, or as the
wags termed it, ‘Fowl Cock Time.’”
If there were wags in politics, Bushe
e been swept out before.
As it is, it may remaijg as long as “bush-
tea”. And that has had a very long innings,
and is still soing strong.

|

laughing on

So far as I am aware no cook-
ery book has ever been written for
chaps who live alone, or chaps
whose wives are away on holiday.

‘this long-felt want will now be
satisfied by Uncle Nat’s Cook Book,
written by that distinguished
gcurmet whose identity is some-
times thinly disguised under the
pseudonym of Mal Manger.

Here are some extracts from ~
book, to be published shortly b
Burp and Hicecup at 18s., or what-
ever we can get for it:—

SARDINES
\ON TOAST

Ingredients:



Sardines, toast.

Method: Put a slice of bread
under the grill. Light gas over
grill. Take a tin of sardines, and
look. for the key.
| As most tins of sardines have
no key, try the opener. If you
jmiss the tin with your first jab,
wrench the opener out of the table
and have another go.

If you are lucky you will hit
the tin about a quarter of an inch
from the edge. If not, you will hit
it smack in the middle. As you
can’t open a tin this way wrench
the opener out and try again.

Next time you may hit the tin
on the extreme edge and spin it
on to the floor. If so, pick it up,
try again, and stop using that dis-

gusting language.
By now your toast is in
flames, so cut another slice

of bread, put it under the
grill, and return to your tin,

Unless you were born under’ an
evil star your next jab should
|hit the tin somewhere between
| the middle and the edge. If so,
| Saw away until you come to the
| corner. As you won't be able to
| negotiate the corner because you
|are too far from the edge, turn



| the tin round and start on the
' other side.
} And stop using that dis-

gusting language,

As the top surface of the tin
will now be like the plank of
nails Indian fakirs sleep on, turn
it over and start on the unpunc-
tured surface.

Oil will pour over the table;
the tin will be difficult to hold
on the slippery wood, your second
piece of toast will be in flames.

Cut another slice of bread,
put it under the grill; and
return to your tin.

Jab it, stab it, slash it, bash it,
stick it, prick it, kick it, stamp on
it, jump on it, and sling it out of
the window.

And stop using that disgust-
ing language

‘The man who

keeps Barbados

Sundays

NATHANIEL GUBBINS

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Cookery Book for men whose
wives are on holiday.

By N. GUBBINS





Ss
AND MASH
Ingredients:
potatoes. 1

Method; If there are no cold
potatoes in the larder, peel some,
and boil them.

The best way to boil potatoes
is to,put them in a_ saucepan,
cover them with cold water, add
salt, put the saucepan over a
lighted gas-ring, and wait for the
water to boil.

You then prod the potatoes with
a leg to see if they are hard or
soft.

Sausages; mashed

If they are hard, they are
not done; if soft, they are;
if very soft, overdone,

While the water is coming to
the boil, take two alleged pork
sausages (or six if you're a glutton
for punishment) and prick them
all over with a fork. This is sup-
posed to stop them bursting, but
it doesn’t,

Put the sausages in a frying-pan
over another gas ring. As the
modern sausage, though full of
bread, soya beans, dried milk,
paper, string, and small rubber
bands, has little fat in it, add a
lump of margarine the size of a
walnut—or two walnuts if you're
fond of the stuff.

As the sausages will burst
almost at once, you will soon

have a_ sizzling mess of
bread, soya beans, dried
miik, paper, string, ‘small

rubber bands, and sausage

skins,

Now take potatoes off the gas,
strain, put on a plate, and start
mashing with a fork. If the pota-
toes are all the same size or if
you've had enough gumption to cut
the big ones in half, this will be
easy, because they will all be
cooked evenly. If not, the hard,
underdone bits will fly off in all
directions.

If you press hard enough
with your fork you will
break the plate and never
hear the last of it.

Add to the potatoes left on the
plate a little milk and a lump of
margarine the size of a walnut
(or the size of a coconut for all
I care), mash well, sling into the
pan and duck. . before you are









blinded by
fat.

When there is a smell of burn-
ing, serve hot to anyone who will
eat it, to any starving dog, o:
throw out of the window.

And stop using that dis-
gusting language.

Paws Across The Sea

a shower of boiling

A letter from Manhattan
Mouser, American tough cat,
to his English sweetheart,
Lottie.

HIYA Sugar Puss.
To say hello from New York
and to thank you for your hospi-

tality last time I wasin your
home town,
The more I travel, the more I

think of England as my second
home and the more T ufderstand
that everything they say-about the
English is a lot of hooey.

For one thing they say the chow
stinks, but shall I ever forget the
jellied leg of rabbit and saucer of
Jersey milk you handed me in
your kitchen when the folks was
out for the evening? _ No, sister, I
certainly won't.

For another, they say the
English are stiff necked and
snooty. if taking a suy for a walk

on the beach with the harvest
moon shining on the sea, and no
holds barred, is stiff--necked and
snooty, you can call me the Sultan
of Zanzibar.

* * Ba

All the same, Honey Cat, I
must say my eyes popped when
I saw the difference in your chas-
sis since the summer cf 1951, At
that time it was the swellest little
chassis in the English speaking
world, Now I would say it is just
swell in the way you understand
the word.

Over here, in America, we
award a dame higher points for
her chassis than for anything,
including _ brains whieh don’t
count much on Broadway, even if
she has any.

My ex-girl friends Pep Puss
and Cutie Cat never had brains
for anything except horning in on
a free meal, but each had a chassis
that would give a guy a tempera-
ture high enough to bust a ther-
mometer.

Then they dipped their noses
too often into the ash cans for
fried chicken leftovers, put on
weight, and that’s why they’re
“ex”

So, lay off the hog’s helpings of
jellied rabbit and Jersey milk,
Sugar Puss, if you don’t want to
be ex-Sugar Puss, ex-Honey Cat,
and Ex-English | sweetheart of
yours truly

Manhattan Mouser.
LONDON Express SERVICE.



Oe

Sentiment Versus Reason

The great evil of political par-
ties is their need for something to
oppose, Inevitably, party politics
provoke social tensions. In large
countries with large electorates,
the heat of political controversy
is somewhat dissipated by the
presence in almost all parties of
men and women from similar
walks in life.

In the British Labour Party, for
instance, are to be found repre-
sentatives of all the social classes
of Great Britain and the possess-
ion of great wealth has never been
a bar to Labour Party member-
ship.

In a colonial society such as
Barbados, other conditions pre-
vail. Barbados’ parliamentary gov-
ernment which began with the
rights of Englishmen to govern
themselves, was suddenly compli-
cated after 1833 and re-modelled
to allow for the rights of all
other Brabadians to a voice in
running their affiairs, This re-
modelling has been streamlined in
recent years and was brought
right up to date only last year
when all adults (except those who
refused) were registered as
voters,

The significant result of the first
elections under adult suffrage was
the liquidation or, more accurate-
ly, the reduction to ineffectiveness,
of the only political party which
could claim to be descended from
earlier traditional Houses of
Assembly.

That political party the Electors
Association had consistently op-
posed party government as being
unsuitable in Barbados for the
excellent reason that party gov-
ernment divides and does not
unite a country and they believed
that Barbados for historical and
other reasons was already divided
more than was good for political
health.

Yet, dé@spite its fundamental op-
position to party government, the
Electors Association did produce
a sufficient number of candidates
to have secured a majority in the
House of Assembly at the last
elections, if the electors had sup-
ported them,

But the electors for the most
part gave their support to the
Barbados Labour Party and in
such a way that no effective op-
position exists in Barbados House
of _Assembly today.

Valence Gale

|To the Editor, the Advocate,

| SIR,—While writing may i turn
jfor a smal] space to a very dif-
ferent subject and say that I was
|much interested in Mr. Hoyos
vivid description of Mr. Valence
Gale and the founding of the
Advocate newspaper, which has



Our Readers Say:

iy George Hunte

This obviously is a bad thing for
Barbados because parliamentary
government must necessarily lose
force and viguor when it is re-
duced to a routine meeting of
delegates who can express any
opinion on almost any subject un-
der the sun but whose opinions
count for little since the votes of
the majority are on all major
issues cast for the party in power.
The party in power has no need
of any votes from other than their
own members except on occasions
when the party rebels decide to
vote independently.

The question to be asked then
is what can be done to ensure the
working of party government in
the House of Assembly?

There can only be one answer.
Find a political party which can
recapture power at the next elec-
tions.

On paper this looks very easy,
But few persons are willing to un-
dertake all the efforts which is
involved in producing a _ political

party capable of obtaining a
majority in the next elections.
Why?

A few days ago I tried to get
an answer from an ex-politician
whom the voters rejected at the
last elections because in his own
words he “had refrained from sen-
timent and become a realist”,

“Suppose” I said to him “you
and I were to go to the people and
tell them the truth—do you think
they would vote for us?” He made
a noise which is best expressed by
the sound STUPES!

“You've got” he said “to use
sentiment, The people are not in-
terested in reason or truth. They
want promises. You've got to be
a demagogue if you want them to
vote for you. Make promises and
they'll follow you. But appeal to
reason? No.

This hit me hard because I had
always mdintained in private con-
versation that if you could con-
vince people in Barbados that you
were genuinely interested in their
welfarr and were trying to help
them they would. support you at
electign time.

My views were theoretical,
ased on wishful thinking, what F
would like to believe about my
fellow Barbadians.

My friend's views—tke expoli-
tician who must be nameless in so
small an island—were based on

grown into such a flourishing and
influential organ. (Will these
biographical articles, by the way,
be brought together in a small
vook when completed?)

I think I have mentioned before
that I was stationed in Barbados





in 1895 as the Junior minister at
James Street Church and asso-
ciate congregations, anc i so had

what actually happened. He had
oecome a realist he said and he
did not make any sweeping prom-
ises. Result he was swept out and
the House lost one of its most col-
ourful personalities. But what
about education I asked him?

You tell me that it’s no good
appealing to reason and that only
the demagogue has a chance to
get the votes. Can you tell me
then I asked, why Barbados
spends more per head of popula-
tion on education than any other
territory in the British Caribbean,
if only the demagogue can win
the people’s votes? Why not take
this money and spend it on houses
or something like that?

This thought, I think was new
to him,

“May be” he smiled “there’s
something wrong with the educa-
tion”; adding as an after thought
“perhaps after a long time the
effect of education will be felt”.

Meanwhile I said: how about
the people who are already edu-
cated? Would they give us their
vote?”

“They’re afraid” said my friend
“Once the local schoolmaster was
a power in the land. To-day he
likes to be careful. If he stays out
of politics he feels safer somehow:
at any rate he is less afraid of
having his fowls stolen or his
bicycle punctured.”

So that the more people
educate the less people we will
have interested in politics? As so
often happens the vital question
did not occur to me until after-
wards but I’ve been thinking of it
ever since and I’m sure my friend
(if he still. reads. his Sunday
paper now that he is once more
a private citizen) will give it much
thought,

P.S. In case you think that my
ex-politician friend was rejected
on the Electors’ Association plat-
form ticket let me hasten to in-
form you that he is a loyal sup-
porter of Mr, Grantley Adams and
“doesn't know what would hap-
pen to Barbados if Mr. Adams
went”,

Somebody has got to form a
political party which will contest
the next elections with a reason-
able chance of winning, but if my
ex-politician friend is right and
only demagogues can do the trick
what a grey prospect lies ahead.

No wonder more people are

we

lIcmking to federation to save us
from the demagogues my friend
fcresees.

the privilege of a slight acquaint-
ance with Mr. Gale and some little
knowledge of the starting of the
paper. Also that the first article
I ever wrote for the press Was &

sketch for the Advocate of Bishop

Swaby when he was about to be
transferred from B.G. to Barba-
dos, a year or two later. We lived
opposite to each other in the
c ton Ward of Georgetown



anks for
FRANCIS GODSON

space







SUNDAY SEPTEMBER . 14, 1952
|THE GOLDEN VOICE.
i NURSERY RECORD BOOK ;
Sy tells the vith Songs and Music on a gramophone recor

tu

i

to help you rez ad it in the Book

ADVOCATE STATIONERY

: ee SSS
>, =, ~,
PLLLLLEP FSIS SOO CSO Ne FOOT TTT POPPE OPIS ACSA












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SUNDAY,









































town a separate constituency, ang fessonable bounds, While staunch- Sir Charles Spey. The Bread-

| LEAS PERRINS | | |

Sir Henry Morgan: Black

SEPTE t 52 > PYRY ; now‘ aie
EPTEMBER 14, 1952 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE NINE
en eee — +. }
7} 2 7 7 '
| F €opie { arbados—XXIfi
: KR
-—4 ‘ae
In 1842 a society was formed (By : } hat the pr P i
. Q : as y JOHN PRIDEAUX that the prefere ‘ , ’
in Barbados to assist with the , ) Coionies for their sugar over tha 4 | e “gl :
extinction of the Slave Trade; thig /irst two representatives of manufactured in foreign places } ]
vas called “The Barbados Auxil- br ‘town. At this time Prescod’ would be lost , , ‘ ‘
jary to the Society in Great w tditor of the “Liberal”, the The type of sugar planted in Ah YOU" OOMY
Britain for the extinction of the *nly ratieal Newspaper in tne Barbados had been undergoing a a j Z Z
| Slave Trade and the Civilisation Islana, and nad a reputation as a change over the last fifty years PIP enue
* Africe.” The Committee of the putlicist in the West Ind:es, also for the old cane introduced from ee eh i? ‘ s
| local Branch of tris Society con- We enjoyed the sr.endship of Lord Brazil in 1640 or thereabout, had | : Ta A BOTTLE of Lea $
sisted of many prominent persons “arougeans and Lorg John Russell. .et_riorated until there was hardiy ; Perrins Sauce work
in this community. It was as Freseod occupied a special posi- any return. One planter made the : “le Ae
.ollows:—Hon. T. J. Cummins, tion in the House, but did not following entry in his diary in <; j magic in the kitchen
Revds. C. C. Cummins, and T. ¢xplo't it, for he showed his true September 1792 How to acu isle teensoonten a
Ellis: Messrs J. Crichlow, J, R. greatness in his ability and will- : subtlety to salad Gee ee oe ee
Bispham, E. W. Archer, F Bilgy, ingness to plan for society as a “The price of sugar very low ‘ and savouries, meat ayd
C Phillips, B. W. Massiah, b.,whole, and net for sectional or and the Brazil Cane giving but ,aL\ns taste so imuch hetter . eae
Bourne, Joseph Thorne, JOhn mere personal ends. He did’ not little return Have begun to ih 4 Gressing — and ¢ per- fish, turns simple fare into a
Horsham, Joseph Kennedy, Israel Sicritice any po'nt of principle but plant the Bourbon Cane, having fect salad dressin ua 6 tT connoisseur’s delight. The
Bowen, Byran T, Young, W. S, took a broad view. By h’s pres- purchased 1,300 plants—only | make with Lea & Perrins aanece Es
Wilkey, A. Stronarech, J. Bovell, ence he broadencd the humanity one eye to a plant-——from Wil- It pives the flavour of oll the secret of that wonderful
Treasurer, and the Secretaries Of the House, and his activities liam Fernhill for £32 10. 0 * vapeitsn eer ee A lies i
| were James T, Rogers and Joseph gut i check on elass legislation, which were brought from the have the titme und far flavour fies in the recipe,
Hamilton, — hus the laws with regard to em- Island of Martinique. These ree im : area : J Eo ois Fh which has remained Lea &
After admiss‘on to the franchise ‘8ration, landlord ind tenants act, were first imported from the tablespoonsule of salad ott. f. Se ae z
the freed coloured people com- #4 some others were much Jess Island of Mauritius by order of : tablespoonfuls of yp Perrins’ alone for more than
plained of being excluded from MVidious than they might have Louis XVI to the Cape of Good a eee enero eae RA ey eS
office. This movement was led by been because of his presence, He Hope, and from thence to Cay- 4 - reer gn taiagp ee As 00 years. Len & reine api
A | Samuel Jackman Prescod, an i ried tremendous influence with enne with instructions for them ' races rh Bay , wer ee 2 most certainly the aristo- |
THE SPANISH FLEET destroyed by Morgan. ‘ustrious character in the history “ie masses while inspiring them to be disseminated. among all the} ts oh ‘aognetb¥om thet, Mica t eeace
: ¢ 7 v v 8 of this Island. By the Act of 183], W.'h a love of ‘representative in- French Colonies Le es ete ee ee that, Rural crat of sauces,
7 ihe ‘Jews and the Free Coloured stitutions. ca & Perrins can give! [i %
3 ihe Je anc n€ ree ired . on . ‘ demetan % . qeoeapanewspninnemnttneiie
ROGUES OF THE SEA . People were admitted to the fran- __ Prescod was a temperate far- * “The inhabitants of this Island +
chise, By the Franchise Act of S&e!l tatesman well verséd in nad but little know ledge of the
1840, the middleclass were ad- P0iticai knowledge; and he kept Plant until the capture of Mar
mitted. This Act made Bridge- the coloured movement within linique by Sir John Jarvis and
the number of members of the |) contending for the civil rights fruit, Clove and Cinnamon wer i a 2 : ‘
| House of Assembly was inereased Of the coloured, he recognised imported “ins SaySnns = ne Whe etgcnal and genuine
‘from twenty-two to twenty-four, that, for a long time at any rate, Same time by the same ship, oo

| The Act came into force in 1843, the whites must remain the pre-

By 1845 this type of cane was) y

Flag and Union Jack

By IAN GALE

It would be impossible to write
about pirates without mentioning
Sir Henry Morgan, the buccaneer
who began. as a bond servant in
Barbados and eventually became
Lieutenant Governor of Jamaica.

Esquemeling sums up his origin
and beginnings thus “Captain
Henry Morgan was born in Great
Britain, in the principality of
Wales; his father was a rich yeo-
man, or farmer, of good quality,
even as most who bear that name
in Wales are known to be. Mor-
gan, when young, had no inclina-
tion to the calling of his father,
and therefore left his country, and
came towards the seacoasts to
seek some employment more
suitable to his aspiring humour;
where the found several ships at
anchor, bound for Barbadoes.
With these he resolved to go in
the service of one, who according
to the practice of those parts sold
him as soon as he came ashore.

After serving his time in this
island—and the life of a white
bond servant was hard—Morgan
made this way to Jamaica. There
he soon joined the buccaneers and
after a few trips he managed to
save enough money to buy a ship
in partnership with some of his
comrades. He was unanimously
elected captain of this vessel and
on leaving Jamaica he met an
old pirate called Mansfield who
was busy equipping a fleet to
harass the Spaniards. Mansfield
appointed Morgan his Vice Ad-
miral and the expedition was
successful in capturing the island
of Providence or Santa Catalina.
The old pirate, Mansfield, was
killed .by the Spaniards shortly
afterwards, however, and Morgan
became the Admiral of the
buccaneers,

Governor’s Commission

Two years later, in 1668, Mor-
gan was actually commissioned
by Sir Thomas Modyford, Govern-
or of Jamaica, to capture some
Spanish prisoners in order to
question them about a threatened
attack on that island. Collecting
ten ships and 500 men he landed
in Cuba and marched to Puerto
Principe, which he took and pil-
laged; and afterwards accom-
plished the almost impossible feat
of taking by storm the fortified
and well garrisoned town of Porto
Bello on the mainland.

Esquemeling gives a_ graphic
description of the taking of Porto
Bello. The pirates approached the
city by night, he says, and cap-
tured a guard, who they com-
manded to tell the soldiers within
the walls to surrender or they
would be cut to pieces. The sol-
diers began firing, however, and
aroused the city. After a sharp
fight Morgan and his men cap-
tured that fort and after blowing
it up, continued to advance into
the city. The battle was furious
and raged for many hours

The Governor retired to one of
the Castles. Morgan realised that
if he was going to win the day
he would have to take the castles,
where the chief citizens had taken
refuge, taking their plate and
jewels with them. “To this effect,”
says Esquemeling, “he ordered ten

or twelve ladders to
all haste, so broad that three or
four men at once might ascend
them; this being finished, he com-
manded all the religious men and
women, whom he had taken pris-
oners, to fix them against the walls
of the castle.” Morgan thought
that the Governor would not fire
on the monks and nuns, but he
did, and it was only after a great
many of them had been kiiled
that the ladders were placed
against the walls. Then “the pi-
rates mounted them in great num-
bers, and with not less valour,
having fire-balls in their hands,
and earthern pots full of powder;
all which things being now at the
top of the walls, they kindled
and cast in among the Spaniards.”
The fight did not last much longer,
Soon the Spaniards surrendered—

be made in

oxcer the Governor who died had taken Porto Bello, and keep

ighting. them for a twelvemonth; after

which time he promised to come

As Usual to Panama and fetch them away’.”’

The battle won, “the pirates Although these exploits shad

fell to eating and drinking, as considerably exceeded the terms of

usual; that is, committing in both Morgan’s commission and _ had

all manner of debauchery and been accompanied by frightful
x ere = Tis S





Samuel Jackman Prescod,
coloured man, who was entirely

self taught, and who had been a

q dominant

; party. His services as
« mediator and harmoniser be-
tween the two races were invalu-

cabinet maker, was one of the ®ble, although detested or viewed

with suspicion by neerly all

Nerina planters, he was supported by

sacked Maracaibo and then Gib- Aureied 7 a r Ret tens

citizens, In the meantime the ralter, rewurning to Jamaica WN} Hossessed mk ee ia nee
governor of Panama was advane- Much oot, to be reproved is gok oy -more liberal ‘alee
ing towards Porto Bello with an ot punished by Modytord for his| Slavery had been abolished but
army. Instead of. leaving, how- Piracy. The Spaniards on their) five years previously, and Prescod
ever, the pirates went out and side were adopting the samme; carried on in the House the work
ambushed the army killing a great tatics, so Morgan was given aj of parliamentary reform from
many men. The Governor then new commission as Commander=| where Sir John Gay Alleyne,
decided to let them remain there in-chief of all the ships of war} Bart., had left it, and tried to

to collect their ransom, and being
astonished that so small a band of
men could have captured Porto
Bello he sent a message to Mor-
gan” desiring some small pattern
of those arms wherewith he had
taken with such vigour so great a
city. Captain Morgan received
this messenger very kindly and
with great civility; and gave him
a pistol and a few small bullets,
to carry back to the president his
master; telling him, withal. ‘he
desired him to accept that slender
pattern of the arms wherewith he



CAPTAIN
excess; these two vices being
followed by many insolent actions
of rape and adultery...Thus they
gave themselves up to all sorts
of debauchery that fifty courage-
ous men might easily have re-
taken the city, and killed the
pirates,”

After spending fifteen days in
Porty Bello the pirates began to
make preparations for their de-
parture. But before they would
leave they demanded a ransom
of 100,000 pieces of eight from the

MORGAN

cruelties and excesses, Governor
Modyford endeavoured to cover
the whole under the necessity of
allowing the English a free hand
to attack the Spaniards when-
ever possible.

Another Expedition

On his return to Jamaica Mor-

gan was almost immediately
entrusted with another expedi-
tion against the Spaniards and

proceeded to ravage the coasts of
Cuba. In the next year, 1669 he



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in Jamaica, to levy war against
the Spaniards, the booty gained
on the expedition to be the only
pay.

Accordingly, atier ravaging the
coasts of Cuba and capturing
Santa Catalina, Morgan deter-
mined to take Panama. This he
did after overcoming perils and
obstacles of all kinds and defeat-
ing a force much larger than his
own, The fame of this brilliant
exploit was, however, again ob-
scured by abominab’e scenes of

cruelty and debauchery, during
which a_ galleon containing a
considerable part of the booty

escaped. Moreover, Morgan cheat-
ed a party of his men that he had

revise the powers of the House of
Assembly so as to bring them in
harmony with the altered state of
society. He was instrumental in
the auditing of the _ public
accounts by an independent audi-
tor, and the introduction of the
annual estimates of revenue and
expenditure, He claimed that
appropriation of the public money
should lie in the House and its
administration in the Executive,
“where it properly belongs,” and
j advecated the formation of what
is not the Public Works Depart-
ment, The great constiutional
reforms of the last century can
be traded to him, for he was
responsible for the ceration of the
post of Auditor General, the for-
mation of the Executive Commit-

left further down the river of | tee, and the Franchise Act of 1884
their share of the spoil, and “For one thing,” one historian
returned to Jamaica, leaving} writes, “he thought it distinctly
them to get back as best they | retrograde for a colony which had
could, igenjoyed the privilege of self-
government for so long to be

On his return he received the, politically d@israted: for another.
tcranks of the Governor and the he entirely depreciated the idea
Council, but in the meantime a]of throwing upon the Crown the
treaty had been signed between | whole duty of thinking anu. act-
England and Spain and Mody-~ | ing for the emancipated classes as
ford and Morgan were ordered { though they were unworthy of the
back to England to answer for political freedom which is the

their conduct.

“Sir Henry”

Morgan, however, soon succeed-
ed in gaining the King’s favour,
and in the Autumn of 1674 he
was appointed lieutenant govern-
or of Jamaica and was knighted,

leaving England in Decernber.
After such a career as he had
had it was not. surprising that

Morygan’s conduct as asresponsib e
oMciai was not very creditable,
He was charged by the Governor,
Lord Vaughan, soon after his
appointment with encouraging
privateering. He intrigued against
his colleagues and_ successive
governors of Jamaica in the hope
of superseding them; and sup-
ported the outrageous conduct of
his brother Captain Charles Mor-
gan, a terrible ruffian and his
kinsman Col, Byndlos, taking
part in their
orgies,

Finally, in 1683, he was suspen-
ded in Jamaica from all his posts:
a decision which was confirmed
by the Government in England
after hearing Morgan’s defence;
but he was restored to his place
on the Council in July 1688, »
month before his death,

Morgan’s career is perhaps the
best example of the English
ability to compromise. “If
cannot beat a rouge, flatter him,
henour him and get him to fight

on your side” is a policy whici
the English have followed from
that day to this, and with re-
markable success, both in the

West Indies and elsewhere.

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proud boast of Anglo-Saxondom.
To him, the highest citizenship
war based on a sense of respon-
sibility, and it was simply wrong
and foolish for any state to limit
the number of its citizens or
cramp their opportunities for
responsible civic effort.’(1)

It was natural that Preseod did
excite antagonism in certain quar-
ters of the community, especially
as the planter element was. still
of the opinion that it had been
unjustly treated by being deprived
of so much of their capital
Slaves—and had only received
small recompense from the hands
of the British Government, But
for all this it must be admitted
that Prescod had some strong and
staunch parliamentary allies. The
Attorney General, Hon. John
Sealy, Messrs, B, L. Trimmingham,
Bryan T. Young, Nathaniel Forte,
and James Holligan were very
open in their co-operation with
him. There is a striking proof of
the high respect which the House
and the Community held for
Samuel Jackman Prescod is shown
by the voluntary and Unanimous
vote of censure which the House
of Assembly passed on Dr. Bas-
com, Senior Member for St.
Thomas and a very senior Meinbér
at that, for using unparliamentary
language to Mr. Prescod.

The history of the British West|
Indies is closely linked with the,
history of Great Britain, for it is
from this point that all progressive
| or retrogressive movements eman-
| até. The price of sugar has always
| been the controlling factor in the
}economy of the Island of Barba-
;dos, and as the United Kingdom
| was gradually moving towards a
policy of free trade, this meant

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well. established and showing
definite increase in the output of
manufactured sugar; and as the
West Indies enjoying a preferen-
tial system of duty—that the
sugar manufactured by foreign
countries Was subject to a heavier

is



duty than that manufactured in
the British Colonies—were look
ing forward to better condition

However, it was claimed that the
people of the United Kingdom had
become more sugar minded, and
that as the output of the British
colonies could not supply the re-
quired amount, the consumer ir
the United Kingdom had to pay
more for his sugar than was ther
considered necessary, so it wa
proposed to reduce the duty on
foreign sugar from 63/- to 36/-
but the duty on the sugar from the
British Colonies was not to be
reduced, It was claimed that the
sugar from the foreign countries
in which slavery still existed could
even at the preferential duty
63/+ compete with the sugar from
the British Colonies, It was fur
ther claimed that this measure
would afford a direct encourage-
ment to the continuance of slavery
and the extension of the slave-
trade, thus nullifying all their
previous efforts to put an end to
this horrid trade.

(TO BE CONTINUED)

of

1 H. A. Vaughn, Esq., in the Barba
dos Advocate, June Mth, 1930

2. “The Barbadian Diary of Ger
Robert Haynes 1787-1836, Edited
by Everil M. W. Cracknell, 1934



Ships Will Quest
For Tourist ‘Gold’
On Spanish Main
A warship will leave England

next month with her engine-room
sealed, and not a soul on board

The vessel—a river transport |
yas been bought by the Royal
Siam Navy, and will be towed
9,450 miles to Bangkok

She wil! take a famous name
baek across the world-—Chindit. |

The name, which was given to
her before it was known that ‘
would form part of the Siam
navy, will be changed as soon
as she reaches Bangkok

For the tow, which being
undertaken by a Du.” tug. the
Chindit has been « ‘mpletely
changed ‘n appearanc.:

A false steel “nose’ has beet
fitted, and timber les added
above the low river iterline

“Long - burning navigat on
lights haye been fitted into the
ship whieh will only need atten
tion once a_ fortnight,’ said a)
spokesman today of the London
firm, Allied National Corporation, |
Ltd. who have arranged the tow

“The rudders have been locked





and the vessel will be a “de ad”
tow. There will be calls at Gi-
hraltar, Port Seid, Aden and

Singapore.—L.E.S.

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COATES PLYMOUTH GIN 2.75

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MONIG SPAGHETTI 4-t pkt 24
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PALETHORPES MEAT ROLL per tin -64
vA PHORPES STEWED STEAK per tin 67
HUNT'S SWEET CORN WHOLE KERNEL per tin 41
HUNT'S YOUNG ASPARAGUS TIPS per tin 63
POTATOES per Ib 15
ONIONS per th 24
SWIFTS POTTED MEAT per tin 26
SWIFT'S PATE DE FOIE per tin 26
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PAGE TEN

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

SUNDAY,

SEPTEMBER 14, 1952 .



TH 1 hibition at the
eu f “View f Barbados”
t from the view
¢ hy al

«VIEWS OF BARBADO

re t interes
pograpt
y of the scenes depicted
longer familiar owing to
of new buildings

tion of old ones
disappeared from
th ; iging andscape, gone too
;aetons and carts drawn by
costumes of figures
have greatly altered Time has
a sieve which has reject-
he bad and preserved what
t nany of the paint-

r e of hi standard artis-





. even the

one of Car-
of a shir

view 1

he deck
ye 707. It is an unfa-
endering of a well known

he buildings which
» one another and then
arated by roads and trees
rely absent. This has the
of shortening the space be-
n the sea shore and the rising
so that Carlisle Bay ap-
Surrounded by low

scene,
now
are







are



twe
terrain
pears to be
hills
Views Increase
From the mid 19th century on-
vards, view the island are
more numerous: this was to be ex-
pected. Three paintings by W. S
H make one wish that he had
f more of the island. His
Savannah atter the
ef-b831 shows the deso-
use which necessitated
r hive of tents on the
Ss I 4o house homeless sol-
I 1EClard House—now the 4
nnah =@tlut dominates thi
é n & gayer ngood is “Races

of



“REAPING CANES” by 8. W. Poyer.

en the Savannah”; horse drawn

vehicles take the place of grand
tands and are drawn up alongside
ihe rails. Racegoers are better
iressed then than now, men in top
hats and stove-pipe trousers,
lelies rustling in_ taffetas and
bombazines, A mflitary band in
red coats whiles away the wait
between the races and there are
refreshments to be had in a near-

by marquee. Then the scene on
the Savannah changes again to
a match race between “High-

lander” ridden by John Poyer and



Lent by Mrs, A. L, Goddard

“Lady of the Loon” with Major
Macintosh, an officer of the Gar-
rison, in the saddle. “Lady of the
Loon”, however, lacked the speed
of “Highlander” on this June
afternoon of 1847. ‘The back-
ground of this painting showing
the environs of the Savannah is
particularly ee Dy”

To this period also belongs the
work of W. H. Freeman M.D.,
who is represented by two water-
colours One of a Review of
troops in red coats on the Savan-
nah—the original of E. Walker’:



“RACES ON THE SAVANNAH” by W. 8. Hedges.





it a curious fact that long

the : ent universities of

é ambridge had been

- london, the pital

r $ without a universily of

iis ¢ lt is impossible to find

2 abtory expianation, All we

kno isytuat in the distant past
variou proposais create

University in London were made

without -any final success,

In the middle ayes there weic
n Scholastic ies in Lon-
. They were associaied to some



extent but they never ceveloped
ittly become a Single
Phen the sixteenth cen-
a Certain plan was formed,
unlike previous schemes it
h 2 modicum of success, The

xv Of the plan was Sir Thoma:



Gresham, When he died he be-
uevthed the rents of the Royal
i ige and of his town feési-
, Gresham House, to the
( Opt of London and thé
‘ Company. ‘They were

ippeint lecturers in
tronomy, geometry,
icine and rhetoric.’
ham College came
Unfortunately the
troyed the Roya!
» the college lost th













rt ef its income. There
resham College in the City
{ London today, ‘the only sur-
: link with Sir Thomas
m yhle plan.’
t until 1627 that
rt i iceessfully made
as d o tl oris of the
thomas Cam s, Two years
p iy tie had advocated in u
6 Tie ; the founde-
t reat udiversity 14
de t ppeal met with a
yesponse £160,000 "wat
an e foundation stone
y ] ¢ in Gower Streei
tel T uildit is no
: ty Coilege, the
f the famous educations!
to form part of Lond
A few years later a
t nst ion called
C ce was Opened on a
: in the $ nd. In 1836 a char-
r ‘ granted by William IV ana
“ renewed a year later by
Gq nv . creating the uni-
. Gegree-~giving bod
Ine dentally; the university was
t first academic hody in the
United Kingdom to edmit women
{ eandidates for degrees. P
early As 1867 a special examin:-





t O88 phe PPE EESPIEREFSOS 2
* >
0» Y 7 T s
* SBA vinw Guest 3
% ] »
$ HOUSE :
4 ¥
$ HASTINGS, BARBADOS x
‘. Daily and Longterm Rates 4
. quoted cn request. x
s Permanent Guests 4
> welecome, £ ‘
. Dinner and Cocktail ‘
* Parties arranged. ‘
g J. U, BUCKLAND .
\ Proprietor
y 4,

SLRS A LAI SEELELSOLSEOO.



SSE

ee

AY'S NEWS PLASH

an en ace



| 16D
5

4 Arrivals to...
JOHNSON'S
}, STATIONERY






tion was held for female candi-
dates, and eleven years later men
and women could compete for
degrees, honours, and prizes on
qual terms, So at a time when
ve are apt to think that women’s
r.etivities were confined to their
1omes some were already emerg-
ing into public life.

We should remember that un-
ilke Oxford and Cambridge the
University of London is a feder-
ation of educational bodies, each
working independently, yet under
the one main authority which is
the university itself. In this out-
Jine of the subject it is impossible
to give in detail the names and
activities of all these ‘bodies’ or
‘schools’—there are thirty-six in
all, They include twelve medical
schools or colleges, and such well-
known places of learning as Uni-
versity and King’s Colleges, Hall-
oway and Bedford Colleges for
women, Imperial College, and the
London School of Economics.

The supreme governing body of
the university is the Senate, con-
sisting of the Chancellor, Vice-
Chancellor, the Chairman of Con-
yvocation, the Principal and others;
and Senate House, which is the
central office for administration
and finance, is one of the most
significant modern buildings to be
seen in London. It stands in
Russell Square, an immense struc-
ture of Portland stone, designed
by the architect Charles Holden.

The full-time students working
the university naturally ‘form a
iting population, but the aver-~
age number for any given year
is well over 18,000. Of these, be-
tween 2,000 and 3,000 students
come from Commonwealth and
foreign countries and represent
as many as seventy countries
outside Britain: in other words a
‘world-coverage,’





Among all the countries repre-
sented the greater numbers at
the present time come from India
and Pakistan, from America (in

most cases to the London School

from Burma
Canada, and New

of Economics),
Australia,

EEE

|





Lent by Hon, J. D. Chandler

THE UNIVERSITY OF LONDON

79

lithograph. It is artistically a
very satisfying picture for the
grouping is beautifully arranged.
Also by Dr. Freeman is a view of
Welchman’s Hall Gully, which
reminds us how tropical this
island must once have looked

Unknown

Little or nothing is known of
some of the artists responsible for
views of the island—many were
probably tourists with more leis-
ure than, those who travel today
on luxury cruises or by air lines
These early tourists painted the
picturesque and tropical scenes to
show their friends at home, for
this was before the popularity of
the Kodak. One of the “Country-
side near Joe’s River” by J. B.
Kidd, painted in 1842, is not only
fresh in colour but remarkably
modern, for tme scene has changed
little since that date, “Washer-



*women—Beccles Spring is a scene

unfamiliar to us. When nearly a
century ago W. Carpenter paint-
ed this picture it was a scene of
busy activity. Beccles Spring rose
ta the surface between “Bay Man-
sion” and “Bay Cottage” and ran
down to the sea between the sites
of the Ice Factory and Gas Com-
pany. where a benevolent Public
Works Department has recently
opened a window. The spring has
disappeared and so have the pic-
turesque garbs of washerwomen
Here we see them in gay ban-
danas, their skirts hitched up
neurly to the knee so that these
garments began in an enormous
roll around the waist like an in-
flated motor tyre. This garb has
not long disappeared for we catch
a glimpse of it again in S. W.
Poyver’s charming painting of
“Washerwomen at the Hole.” It
is much to be regretted that this
beautiful, gay and _ distinctive
head-tie has been replaced by
British or American hats of cheap

taste.
S. W. Poyer

Of the more modern painters
by far the best represented is
S. W. Poyer. His contemporaries
Ernest Bowen and Felix Haynes
were not so given to painting the
local scene for both essayed the
field of portraiture which finds no
place in this exhibition. Poyer
was an Impressionist, and in many
of his pictures he has employed
the pointillist technique of apply-
ing small dabs of colour. This
mode of painting is particularly
successful in his large canvas of
“Coconut Palms” and “Reaping
Canes”, of the latter picture there
is also an interesting water colour
sketch. Poyer had, evidently, a
great love for the waving fronds
of the coconut, which he often de-
picts sometimes with the delicacy
of a Chinese scroll-painting. His
‘View from the Pine Hill” is
painted before the advent of Belle





Unlike Oxford and Cam-
bridge the University of
London is a_ federation of

educational bodies, but to the
floating population of 18,000

full-time students from home
and overseas who attend its
various ‘schools’ it is one of
the most stimulating places in
the world.

By JAMES LANGHAM



Zealand. All academic subjects
are covered, the standard for
English being a high one, but

many students from abroad ap-
pear to have a special wish to
learn political science, economics,
medicine, and engineering of al}
cinds.

The average age ol tnese youns,
men and women on arrival from
verseas is twenty or twenty-one,
In general terms they, like all
students, must have passed an en-
trance examination of matricula-
tion standard, The average length
of the course is three years, but in
some subjects a longer course is
needed—particularly in medicine,
which takes six years.

The normal method of appliga-
tion to attend a school of the
university is through the Colonial
Office or Foreign Office and the
Minister of Education of the coun-
try concerned. But this does not

always occur in practice, a fact| University

which brings one to some
problems that must be met net
enly by the students themselves,
but by those responsible for them
in this country.

At
student will arrive in London én-
tirely on his own initiative, com-
pletely ignorant of what is re-
quired of him—and almost penni-

‘SS.

There was a recent case, by no
means rare, of a young African
from the West Coast who stowed
away in a fruit-boat, eventu®]ly
arrived in London, entered the

offices of the university’s Adviser |

to Overseas Students, and said: “}
have ambition,’



—

He also had ten!



shillings only in his pocket. What
was to be done with him?

This is a frequent problem for
hard-working and _ conscientious
cfficials, and helpers of ‘stray’ ar-
rivals in London, It cannot be too
strongly emphasised that no stu-
cent should come from overseas
unless he has been guaranteed a
place in the university, and has
adequate funds for his support
during his degree course.

Many legitimate students bring
with them only just enough money
for the period of their residence
in Britain: adequate, perhaps, it
their academic career runs smooth-
ly, but a reason for hardship and
embarrassment if they should tail
in examination and cause a delay
in the time factor. For this reason
many of them seek for and a few
cbtain evening employment aftcr
their day’s work, and so eke. cut
the small weekly allowance.

But in spite of difficulties the
of London can con-

its policy, Thé
majority of students from abroad
have the courtge t face th

“WASHERWOMEN -~ BECCLES

Lent
.
Ville, and is a panoramic view of
the town heightened by a brilliant

sunset. “Mending a Net” reveals
Poyer’s ability as a portrait
painter.

Sir Eyare Hutson’s prospect of
“Codrington College” shows the
efficiency of the Victorian ama-
teur, as does also the painting of
Hastings House by an unknown
hand.

Ernest Bowen’s work lacks the
virility of Poyer’s, true many of
his scenes are little more than
sketches, and it is in his seascapes
that we must look for his finest
vork in capturing the movement
and colour of both sea and sky
Felix Haynes is represented by
only One work “Cotton Pickers” a
strong painting of a scene which
has now disappeared.

A beautiful water colour of a
“Flamboyant at Bishop’s Court”



“CODRINGTON COLLEGE” by Sir Eyare Hutson

various problems of living and
working in foreign. land, The
majority are interested and happy,
acquiring useful ideas and know-
ledge about our world, and making
frieridship that last. And many
have astonishing records of suctess
during the period they have de-
voted to learning. There is for
instance, the true story of the
Sikh from Dar Es Salaam, who
after twenty years as a clerk tried
for and won a law degree.

a

The problem of loneliness can be
and frequently is lessened by the
action taken by many British
students in London. Often they
will hear of a student from Africa
or India or elsewhere who is due





SPRING” by W. Carpenter, 1859.
by Hon. & Mrs, J.D. Chandler

by Maude A. Law makes one wish
that this artist had concestrated
more on the local scene. She
treats her subject broadly and on
a grand scale which is seldom
found among watercolour artists
today. Smaller paintings reveal
that Miss Law was also capable
of compréssing a e without
loss of colour, her “Pertect Day”
a beautfiully balanced compo-
sition.

A remarkably magnificent
patchwork quilt of about 1860 has |
been loaned for this exhibition by
Mr. Jack Warmington, and it is
not out of place amid suth str- |
roundings. It is unique not only
in the materials used but the skill
in which strips have been em-
ployed to obtain delicately shaded
contrasts.

The exhibition
September.

is

ends on 26th

Lent by Harold Connell, Esq.

founded by, the university i elf
when a suitable London site has
been chosen. Within its walls,
young men and women of all
nations will be able to meet and
spend their leisure hours as they
do to-day, om a smaller scale, in
Student Movement House.

But the main impression left
upon any observer who goes a
little way off the beaten track to
look at another side of life is
that the University of London,
although by mo means the oldest
of our universities, is one: of the
most stimulating in the world.

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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER

.

14, 1952



THE QUEEN AN.

HER CONSORT (| The Sun Does Not Shine Brightly

HE IS NO MERE PUPPET—AND NEVER COULD BE) «

(By ROGER FULFORD)

Historian and authority on Court affairs.

» “YOU will be
making a great ,
sacrifice”. These

were the words
used by a fam-
ous jueen «sof
England, shortly
before her mar-
riage, to her hus-
and.

She meant that
it was a sacrifice
because no man
likes: to depend

his wife for
his career.

Even >in these
enlightened days,
husbands have
been heard to
grumble if they
are left to mind
tHe baby or wal-
low’ in the sink
so that the wife
can shine in her
profession.

This | will not,
of course, be the
fate ‘of Prince
Philip, but it is
right to empha-
sise that his life’s
work is that of
an auxiliary to
his wife. How-
ever much he
wy, be the con-
trolling partner
in the private,
domestic circle of
the Queen, his
authority is sub-
ordinated to hers
the moment they
pass into public.

ine Queen will



fact by showering their husbands
with honours and dignities — by
elevating them to the title of
King or Prince Consort.

I hope the Queen will crown
her husband with no such misty
halo. In such matters simplicity
is-always best, and true distinc-
tion is surely to be found in the
unadorned title of The Prince or
The Duke.

Both the Queen and the Duke
of Edinburgh have been com-
: pared ad nauseam with Queen
ey Victoria and Prince Albert. But
ie when precedents of what Queen
Victoria said or what Prince
Albert did are paraded before
the Queen and Prince Philip,
they might well say: “1852 is not
1952.” No nation can live on
centenaries and historical paral-
lela.

But one thing about Prince
Albert may be recalled. He laid
down three rules which should
t govern the life of the consort of

a queen: “Aim at no power for
« yourself. Assume no_ separate
responsibility. Sink your own
individual existence in t! of
your wife.”



at



naturally, feel

that this is PRINCE PHILIP, DUKE OF EDINBURGH
wrong and in-
congruous, and this is why
female sovereigns in the past have
sought.to hide this unpleasant

suffered hardships not dissimilar
frcm those endured by hapless
thousands of Europeans during the
last terrible decades.
Their Work

This gives him the opportunity

possibly by occasional informa]
visits with the Queen—to keep
the British Monarchy more in
touch with Continental feeling
than has been possible during
recent years,

That Prince Philip has a mind
to do and see things his own way

is shown by the trouble he took '

over his speech to
Association last year.

the British
He worried

out his own speech, working on |
on the |

it in moments of leisure
Magpie, and at one stage his cabin

was knee-deep in books and manu- |

scripts, |
The political and ceremonial |
side of the Monarchy must be

largaly faced by the Queen alone, |

but in the larger business of re-
presenting this country and the
Commonwealth the task before
the Prince is of first importance.

His job is not (and with his
characttr never could be) to act
as a mere puppet of the Queen.
Without descending into the lush
pastures wf flattery, the British

people can congratulate them-
selves On having so near the

throne a man of action who is in

3 ust In Passing os

THE Medical Superintendent
waiting a few minutes.
voiced Matron offered me a chair
and I sat down in an office where
the atmosphere was not obviously
—but subtly — connected with
patients and sickness and wards.
Typewriters clicked and a_ tele-
phone rang softly, while far away
down a corridor a white coated
nurse ghosted by. From a nearby
window I looked down into a long
room where people were lying on
beds. There were many s—
and people.

Outside the sun shone brightly
but only filtered rays of it came
into the room where I waited for
permission to talk to one or two
of the inmates of this gaunt, grey
building—where the work of heal-
ing goes on endlessly day and
night.

Yes, the superintendent thought
maybe this man in ward three
might have something to say, And
this one, Then wasn’t there a
Miss Marshall in ward nine? The
nurse attendant said there was
and that she would take me
through the Hospital. So I col-
lected my official pass and passed
from the company of the adminis-
trative personnel to that of re-
cumbent patients lining the walls
in rows, their pajama clad figures
striking bizarre colour accents
against the ward’s all-white.

We stopped at one of the beds
and spoke to Clifford Sergeant.
His heavily plastered leg was en-
sased in a metal support, holding
it high off the bed.



SUNDAY

By William Forres Stewart

I said that was good

“Well,” he said, “I've a few vis-
iters who come
very often, though.
But I can't do much of that be-
cause of my eyes
two y'know!”

to see me

I asked Sergeant what

“Davs at sea, mostly

behind by
*know.”

“Aye, these were the days,” and
the old eyes lit up. “I was a cook
and waiter ashore, too for a while
Then back to sea with the Booth
Line — New York, Brazil, West
Indies. But the war stopped it in
1914 and I didn’t go to sea again
Aye, these were the days!”

I rose and said I was glad to
know him and to hear it wouldn’t
be long before he would be allow-
ef home,
aniff of the sea again and hear
the voice of it—speaking to Clif-
ford Sergeant, R.N.

when he could get

Gladstone Leacock was

white head bowed.

he said from time to time but

“Hello there!” I said, “I’ve come
to talk to you for a little while,
d’you mind?” I sat down and we
looked at each other.

“No, reckon’s I don't,” he re-
plied slowly.

I asked him how long he had
been in hospital and he told me
twelve weeks. “I'll be glad to be
out—the doctor says I’m doing
fine and I'll be out soon.”



WHAT are the thoughts

of the
Coronation Day? An extract
from the 1911 diary of King
George V,in a book published
today, giges an answer which
is a part of history—and,
possibly, an insight into the
mind of Queen Elizabeth on
her Coronation Day next year.

‘MAY AND |
LEFT B.P.
AT 10.30...





haven't much heart
this
fact, it isn’t for you at
I’m writing this.
stone Leacock who, in
or so years, hasn't seen his name
in print, I guess.

Sovereign on It

Darling Ma

We

On

Worked all the

interview in dialogue

It’s for

You'll remember, Gladstone, we
sort of figured things out together
and you told me what was on your
mind and how you'd like to do



most beautiful, but it
terrible ordeal

was grand, yet simple and
most dignified and went with-
out a hitch. I nearly broke
down when dear David [now
Duke of Windsor} came to do
homage to me, as {it reminded
me so much when I did the
same thing to beloved Papa, he
did it so well.
looked lovely, and
it was indeed a comfort to me
to have her by my side, as she
has been ever to me during
these last 18 years

On the balcony

left Westminster Abbey at

2.15 (having arrived there

before 11) with our crowns on

and sceptres in our hands
reaching B.P. just before

3, May and I went out on

the balcony to_show ourselves

to the people. Had some lunch

with our guests here.

afternoon with
Bigge (his private secretary,
later Lord Stamfordham) and
others answering telegrams and
letters.

Our guests dined with us at 8.20
May and I showed _ ourselves
again to the people. Wrote and
read. Rather tired. Bed at
11.45.

was a







What
as engaged and‘ would I mind @o you do during the day,” I ask-
The quiet ed him

Not
And I read

I'm seventy-

he
thought about, just lying there in
his bed.
when I was Clifford Sergeant R.N.
That was in 1907 when I was Cap-
tain’s cook aboard H.M'S. Scylla
I have R.N. name
He looked at me and |
said that was okay and 1 would
cemember to write it that
Clifford Sergeant, R.N.

way,

quite
close in the same ward, sitting on
the edge of his bed, his prema-
turely
looked at me out of sad eyes and
we just sat together for a while
and said very little.

He

I heard what

to give you
In
all that
Glad-
his forty

ADVOCATE PAGE ELEVEN







ae

tor STUBBORN hang-on Bronchial

COUGHS
COLDS

The W ay To
Make Dollars

off the



Southampton with
ymething for yourself — some- | message for all Britain
ir earn a penny? Well now, The man: 47-year-old Arch R
the way I look at it is you've real- | Martin, who threw up an execu
done something. You've got | tive job with a British motor

your name in the papers and not} last January to go to America







everyone gets as far as that—even | his own expense as a free-lance
if they’ve got two legs, And al-|calesman of British good
though sometimes you don’t feel The message: “Unie we
so good, like when I saw you. and } jcsh get org ed in Ar
you think back on all the times] a selling force we are on y
you've been in and out and in| way out.” THERE S$ NOTHING
again over the past two near-hos- Tough words, Mr Martin
pitalized years, I think you're | but words he feels he can justify |
pretty wonderful and don't let | from his own experience of thest CURES AS SWIFTLY
anyone tell you different. And I] jest eight months.
hope you remember to read this When he went to New Yor
the way you told me you would. | he took some kits to make mode! AS
cabin cruisers, but toyshop:
“I'm just longing co get home] ridiculed the gear American | CANADA'S LARGEST
again to Black Rock” was the} boys, it seems, like the sand
greeting I got from Miss owe papering and sawing done for SEI j ING COUGH
Marshall, a nine weeks patient. | them in a factory.
“My sight is none too good—I’m At last, in the room Martin AND COLD REMEDY
sixty-six you know—but it'll get] rented for a dollar day ir
better as I grow stronger. I’m a} Greenwick Village, he sat dow
seamstress and dressmaker by | and assembled one of these toy 7
trade.” cruiser himself and took
round to the buyer of once oO
I asked if she had many visi- |New York’s largest toy tores
tors Yes, a few that come “Too crude,’ said the buyer
regularly but I'd like to see my Martin added a pin nd-
siste igain. She's in the States,| thread rail, a radio aerial, anc
in Ohio, and we haven't seen each, tiny lifebelt costing only 85} M X
other for over forty years, I get) cents. | | TURE
a letter usually at Christmas. oh Ranisthe Se biieids all: ides
“It’s my weight that’s holding This week Martin goc North
me back. If I could just put on ui Glasgow to discu hes¢
weight I'd soon be home again.” small alerations with the mak-
‘ : ers, who are delighted with his
“Well, you're a young looking success He will also tell then
sixty,” I said to Miss Marshall} |, “americanise” the directions








(and she is). I picked up a book) ;5. making these toys.
lying on the bed. “This has an ' Sempie . They should write | rN I L ad O if I A) a
interesting title, ‘A Very Present) «sy it? instead of “glue it” anc Pm «.
Help’.” use snappier phrasing such Ae
“Yes, it's quite a comfort and ecu nee Sarath warntanne | ~
very well written.” I looked at} , ee ee Sorin
- ion Glue part marked No, |
the author's name, Lieut-General to the underside of No: 3. mat
Sir Wm. Dobbie, D.S.O. It was ing sure tnat tre glue tacky
apparent from the closely printed | the jam-buying habits af the
text that Miss May Marshall liked | }.4. cewife jn ‘the he ip yourself
reading matter that contained) gore, came under Mr, Martin’
body. serutin His advice: Make yout
“Anyway,” she said, “if you're | ee Pow a ate. it cab
putting anything in the paper I brand of marmalade: 5,000 cases IN THE AMAZING BOTTLE ,
hope I'll be home to read ite! op i, dozen jars each from
Mind you, we get the Advocate Washington firms; and 10,000
here but—I’d rather be home! cases from New York—but only You'll be amazed by the convenience of
A . if the quiet English labe! is al the “Spillprut’ bottle and thrilled by the
“Well it wouldn't surprise me | tered. beauty of this new nail polish! No need to
if you are,” 1 looked at her wiry The shopkeepers’ comment worry abour spilling! A revolutionary new
frame and half expected her toO| wore caustic “Make tne labe design gives you plenty of time to right
say, ‘In fact, I think PU get along) pore British (not just English the upset bottle before any damage is
right now!’ .. many people dislike the Eng done co your clothing or furnicure
Not quite yet, Miss Marshall, | jjcn), Professional-looking manicures at homet
but very soon, I’m sure, And I Show a Britisn scene the The sensational Nail-Measute” neck
hope this will be your fourth and| Guards marching down the Mall measures Out avfomatically just the right amount
last visit as a hospital patient, Windsor Castle, the Houses of of polis 1e nail perfectly!
Parliament so that people re New CUTEX Nail Polish contains Eng )
I went out into the sun and member it and wussociate it i ther o-wear ingredient ntalog Roaeaie ey
looked back at the gaunt mass of their minds with Britain.” outshines all other polishes! Ask co see the
building reclining in shade, de- You want enother il cason's smartest, fashion-right shades!
ceptively quiet; _ ea point? If only the Queen would
passages and wards embracing) ailow her face and those of her
manifold ailments; its medical} children to be used on British
and nursing staff imparting new | produc IT am sure sales would
health and new hope—and com- | improve Americans almost re
fort, t is well that we remem-| gard them their own, They
ber.... are red-hot n there.’ a







Saas SRS



The present Queen’s father and addition exceptionally alert and | th R d D
grandfather, owing to the two intelligent. " ow e e ean
mee were more cut off from “IT would not have his job,” runs oA. 2M o é

rope than any of our kings fer the old cliché, Possibly not. But
centuries, if the life is exacting, it is also s became a dean

Prince Philip was brought up stimulating A terrib e
as a boy on the Continent, knows WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED ean 7HO first set the Red Dean of
it well and has relations who have —L.ES. Wo Canterbury, Dr. Hewlett



THE CORONATION ROUTE

Johnson, on the road to high
Office in the Church ?
Mr. Ramsay MacDonald
usually been given the responsi-

nas

ordeal’





ility. He was Prime Minister |
By GEORGE SCOTT 1 : és |
TIN ? TPR 9 in 1924 when Dr. Johnson
KNOW ANYONE WITH A WINDOW HERE ? - ING GEORGE V headed after 16 years as a Cheshire
eace vicar — was made Dean of

[EE you want \ the entry in his diary ; Manchester. He was Prime

to pick a ‘Thursday, June 22. Our Minister, too. in 1931 when Dr.
good spot for oO Coronation Day, Bucking- Johnson’ was appointed Dean
watching the XFORD ham Palace.” He wrote :-- of Canterbury.

Coronation
procession on
June 2 next

STREET , Today was indeed a great and
wf memorable day in our lives and

one we can never forget, but it

But the new book about King
George V gives the names o!
others who had « hand in that



















|

year you brought back to me many sad 1924 appointment,
should study memories of nine years ago, Lord Stamfordham, the King’s
this map. when the beloved Parents were private secretary, wrote to Mr.
It shows crowned. MacDonald and to the Arcn-
the routes to May and I left B.P. in the bishop of Canterbury, Dr.
and from Coronation coach at 10.30 with Randall Davidson. giving a list
Buckingham eight cream-coloured _ horses. of possible successors to the
Palace, as There were over 50,000 troops previous dean.

officially
announced
The route
covers about
seven tiles
The proces,
sion rom

lining - eet hones the ‘

command o: r itchener, ‘ i

There were hundreds of Wholly suitable
Lord Stamfordham told the

; archbishop the Prime Minister

would like to suggest Dr. John-
son, “if there were no other
speciai candidate.”
4
'



The archbishop consulted Dr.
William Temple, then Bishop
of Manchester (later Lo become
Archbishop of Canterbury).

“ Both
Temple.”






the archbishop and Dr.
the




VI

> book
Last

Says

Fromm Buckingham Palace







time “thought tne Prime Minister's

in Ps
taking in Vic- From Westminster Abbey <==ss-2==5+ Nonnson: “He always carries a
tort oa ae ‘ i i houghtful people.”
m ent wus In the Abbey—“ ordeal.” _weight with thoug peor 6
oe em ie *King George V, by Harold ue
wreeuares THE SEVEN-MILE ROYAL DRIVE trounnds ot people who gave "ill 2UL0 i Ma Lig At
longer. in offices. in shops, in exclusive clubs — now the | Le 5 ee ia rae aber was London Express Service

rush will be on to book window-space




IT’S TIME
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LEADERSHIP IN LUBRICATION



LET LS AE ak ER a ES,

ee





PAGE TWELVE ~'









| So You Think| Ty: .
i . orewns 0 You Thin .
E. M. FORSTER me this West Indian Culture
o
. , ee It’s Hot? |
y . so sehool mean The first 46 @ sort
(An abri version of the lectu iven by Mr. R. LeFanu ; “ WHAT we ny 4 e ae a 2 = en f West Of personul Pilgrim's Progress, in-
} Ai Coi Mon n Septempbe By IAN GALE India 4 ~ arching for 1s a typica rm 0 es teresting no doubt, to biographei
ndian art; something that expresses our own peculiar and te the literary poets, b
EDWARD MORGAN FORSTER occupies the para-| So you thought it hot last character and temper (so far as we have a peculiar character hardly to enyone else. Now you
doxical position of being a contemporary novelist whose | Wee**. Well se I until 4 read and temper); something that affects West Indians person- couldn’t say this of people like
| 1 : - jthis new u Dateluned : ; B . P By nd Shei ey: u simp
last nevel appeared nearly thirty vears ag it was his} nie Ir at org De : lke this? ‘Ps aity Men aa of art thet they can think of as their very own. couldn't. aicine rr on pens h a:
. 7 eae " 2 ore Amm I g : ike s hs bh > 5 7 2 : ‘ . - i
fifth. ‘A Passage to India’, published in 1924. The remain-| week Jor had. ide sadeee heat Failing to find a typical form of art, we are searching for take notice of them,.even if only
ing four were all published before the World War] wave foi years. Temperatures the old forms, but handled with a different touch. to contradict “what they said
7 S “2 » z i : ’
in the period 1905-1910. This curious state of affairs is| reached 122°F in the sun, and We can’t be angry, with our is extremely interesting. “Henri Christophe” is a better
accentuated by the fact that Forster has continued to|1046 uh Mt hade, One esuit artists because they use palat It is perfectly suited to satire and more mature work than
wiedee Res 3 hu f is esse lect . d broadcast lwas that ar xplosion occurred like all other artists, nor wita and many of the current songs the former one, but the funds-
WEARS SWo VOMIMES OT: Dis CSSayS, TOCIUTes Al POBECASTS, | a consignment of chi.dren’s|OUF Movelists because they Write have a very pungent tinge. While mental short-coming remains. !t
farnered from the last thirty years, cover a wide rang explosive toys which kill ,|in the English language; but we many of them are simply rhyth- doesn’t express a single idea that
of literary and political topics, scholarly, witty, graceful | ang wounded five porters carrys|WOUld like to see our jsfiiers mital tomfoolery, a few of them a West Indian would be willit
and often extremely outspoken. ing them.” In Barbados the|®andle their materials as omiy are shrewd witty and amusing. to fight for or sacrifice himself 10.
But st is fore st Sait cog ighest temperature last weex|#ose who were born and have And of course, they are a very So far, as it has any intellectual
aaa > oF s aan a Ms ive | : 88.5°. Reed —_ islands could hanc’e publie form of criticicm and ridi- significance at all, it is simply a
remarkable 1ovels that ‘orster | : : » . them. e want our novelists to cule r s i f the Mflic
t his ass » a ae 4h | it i iid that the Red Sea, : representation o e tonfl)
out tandiing re er ae jthe warmer part of the yeur | capture the typical flavour that : It anybody manages to ge. which divides us, not only into
F ; |}(June to September) is the ho . | life in these parts has. The sane bimse.f into a calypso he can be islands, but into separate raci
Forster was born on ganuary |test region in the world. Certain- for our poets, playwrights, Scul>- sure that the rest of his lite will communities, and the sometim
Ist, 1879.’ His backgrouad as ly the combination of ‘high tem- tors, and musicians. This, of be prefectly miserable. His popu- maddening hatred that one group |
that of the Liberal cultured lot: | peratuces and humidity recorded at course, means that they must all larity would soon rival that. >! feels for the other
19th Century upper middle cla } is very oppressive. For in- look at things realistically and Bing Crosby. That, no doubt, is “Who are thy founders of our country-
He was educated at Tonbridge |stance the average daily tempera-{|Tecord either what they see or, why the personal songs are why, Dis Whites, a Aner climate
School and at King’s . Coleg ture i a for August is 98 Perhaps, what they sce as a pos- banned, The calypso in the hawi awume |
po ners where he read classin witt umidity of 70, while in|sible future. We want no con- of skilled artists would put the The white divinity of the swan; and all |
i average Cimperas ventional art, For” inetance, % satire of Byron to shame, and 1: "Iie! iorecnus, murderers
tation of the “Fable Schock os 5 = , but the humidity is is assumed by certain people that is certain that this wil. soon be- dispossessed
Sn” lakelloctush”” trace . ee 15, O e other hand the aver-|poets must talk about ‘ovely bhie gin to oecur to people. Already Voy sty Ser, foune af Stile country. “Wh
University formed the first. tern ige temperature in April imn|skies and verdant pastures and there are a few cCUrreNtâ„¢ SOULS pontatdhdods whos existence they 4
of a series of antitheses whic Bangkok 97 ith a humidity babbling brooks and breezes sing- which *¢an™ be said to approach denied” ete. f
were to be the ‘Leitmotiv’ of p of 62 ing through the leaves: Tha! this type, but they are so genera! a it is a mon -
early novels. For Cambridge gave As far a erage anual tem- {novelists must make use of onerot that they Jose their effect. “The ment of akespearean pessim-
Forster a shining vision ern ait peratures are concerne Mus-|the six or eight customary !9ve Dollarsand the Pound” is a goocl ism and intellectual barrenness |
in contrast to the chaos, pretence }sawa in the south of the Africa. plots; and that artists of al! softs example. “My Landlady” is an one epee: elendhes
and dreary muddle of most of life |side of the Red Sea is shown by \must not vary the slightest from even better one The careles*, ally anc z 4 i
outside. “Cambridge” — as lates instrumental records to — be i- | the conventional] romantic norm. unscrupulous, rioney-grobbliny The only philosophical conclus-
ate a, ee = vanes ally ‘the hottest place in * the |Clearly, however, we ene PE- jandlady who has no concern for en to Ms eis oe an.
S$ Symbo! for a truth and a way orld, The average annual tem-/duce art that is quite differéit her tenant provided that she 44 rd over anc r ain.
of life, almost, we might say, a |perature of Massawa 86 f thi r else we won't find ’ eekly rent, 2-1 This world Pr ike a *-ar-drop poised
State of grace. His early stories Mr. E. M. FORSTLR aries ao wis re si i meee Fath en! < "gaan ; He Ba dasa ee = In the evelid of eternity, then droppin:
reflect the aesthetic classicism of . a Say : a: Vine Cel Ae Apts chghmcoplagrs eee ae ' —
the period: most of them are set It was followed in the next year |! â„¢idsummer, Greenland Ran The West Indian And because she knows that houses He is, however, hitting a nail |
in Modern Greece but fauns and bY ‘A Room with a View’, a gay)!” Death Valley, California, ha: His Calypso are hard to get, is hardly an ex- on. its, head wine a he exclaims :
dryads make frequent appear- ad brilliant comedy. The scene|* July average temperature of Mogt noticeable’ among typic: aggeration, In British Guiana, of their lives ee
ances. This awareness of the /§ again in Italy, this time in Flor-| 1s , ind a recorded extreme ©! |wegt Indian form of art is the for instance, housing conditiows Clay gods. and in a dusty room |
a * . where ( “ve . 1 ‘ ie . “ Db syyi- Half-broken faiths that falsify
supernatural foreshadows ence where Lucy Honeychurch| !Â¥% : calypso. It really came origit- are so terrible that the govera- 1 Ae et a sites i
strongly ‘mystical element of his and hei dismal companion iy The Meteorological Office in |ajly from Trinidad, but we can ment has to intervene to protect eee co m yi i
ll work, ae people and cones ee ES oath gal cee a = Ag pee a. ‘0 \think of it as characteristic of the eae! ~— being wove But I am almost contain a>
n e liable to assume a sym- es ki Ss trom @ young man) cxamination of ship's weatht; |the West Indies as a whole, for out of his ging more ofte™ himself doesn’t believe this
bolic guy transcending their pees Cones Emerson and Bis okt | observations that the highest aii lal the other islands have adopted than he can bear, or from haying which points up to the fact the!
a a her his peor witht a wiew’ ap temperature recorded on ship |jt with a deep and personal love. the stairs or the roof of his house many artists mistrust their own
basic themes af his Savgiet® Re tects her in a brawl ana finally | Unde? Wey was 100° in the Rel |They are composed and sung in removed to convince him thut jnspiration because it tells them}
s emes: oe Ss: | checaiboa Mah withrie kien *|Sea. Incidentally, the highest |pritish Guiana, Dominica, St. he had better come out as quickly things which they were taught
truth, nature, gaiety and youth, P hte rat ft th ate : ; as ssible. Th ment con-
against unreality, convention. _ The second half of the book|'©mperature of the water surface /Lucia, and St. Vincent, When- AS possible. © als goyeeies the 7eeard as heresy.
pomposity and sham. finds Lucy back at her homein}recorded on a ship in motion was leyer ‘something of importance tol, of course, infuriates the But all this doesn’t help the
: Surrey, The Emersons come by 06 in the Persian Gulf—-water happens, there is certain to be landlords, and we have the trasi~ wect Indian nation. We want
The first novel, ‘Where Angels chance to live in the same village. | D0J!s at 212 F. The lowest tem-|csome comment upon it by the Comical situation of a man UN- ¢hinkers, and above all thinke:
Sear to ieee, wes published in Lucy is aware enough of her feel- a pecances by a ship uo- |ealypsonians, particularly if it is able to throw a ee eur: = o with a taste for politics, not
and is set in Italy for which ings to break her engagement to) der way was 40° below near the | humorous. They spare no one, OWN house, even if he wants }° diterary’ men who write because
Forster had a deep but not un- her fiance. Cecil, an outrageous|Great Horne Reef, Alaska. Verk- | not even a governor, and the sohgs for @ good reason, without givin’ they enjoy tricking up phrase
critical admiration. Here the main intellectual snob, but not enough |hoyansk, Siberia, is the coldest ¥ very many months’ notice and :

conflict is between English respec-
tability and Italian paganism. The
English middie -ciass is represent-
ed by the Herritons of Sawston,
domineering mother, bigoted
daughter Harriet, and the son
Philip, a eynical aesthete
The widowed daughter-in-law,
Leila, always rather unsatisfac-
tory, is touring Italy with a friend
and sends the horrifying news that
she intends to marry an Italien
Philip is dispatched post-haste to
stop the match but arrives too
late and is laughed at for his pains.
The husband, Gino, turns out to
be a cheerful and conventional
young tough: the marriage is not
a success: Leila is miserable and
finally dies in giving birth to a
son. The Herriton females decide
that the child must be brought to
them away from the corrupting
pir ce of its father. Philip,

arriet and Caroline, Leila’s
original companion, all foregather
therefore at Monteriano. Philip
and Caroline are soon converted
by the atmosphere of the place and
by Gino’s unabashed good humour
and obvious devotion to the child
and prepare to abandon their
mission. They reckon, however,
without the half-crazed Harrie!
who kidnaps the child with the
help of the local idiot: the coach
overturns on the way to the sta-
tion and the child is killed, Philip
with a broken arm has to break
the news: Gino, in an outburst of
animal savagery, very nearly kills
him. He is saved by the timely
arrival of Caroline who succeeds
in reconciling the two men. As
Philip and Caroline return to
Sawston, we- learn that Caroline
herself has . fallen in .love. with
Gino,

A synopsis is always unsatisfac-
tory and misleading. I have only
attempted this one because it helps
to bring out certain essential char-
acteristics of Forster’s novels a
strong plot, brilliantly taut con-
struction, a marked interior
rhythm—with passion, sensuality
and violence lurking in the back-
ground. I should add that the
book contains some superbly comics
scenes and shows an absolutely
astonishing maturity.

The next novel, “The Longest
Journey’, appeared two years later
and is perhaps the most personal
of all Forster's works. It is the
story of a sensitive, civilized but
weak young man who makes a
dreary and disastrous marriage,
undergoes a spiritual deterioration
and is finally rescued, only to die
in disillusionment and remorse.

The book is divided into three
parts, Cambridge, Sawston and
Wiltshire. Cambridge is the gar-
den of Eden—from which Rickie
is spiritually expelled when h
married a -werldly-and eommon-
place young woman called Agnes
and is forced to take a job at her
brother’s school at Sawston. Res-
cued by his half-brother and a
friend, he finds a little happiness
before the violent and symbolic
climax. S

This novel is bitter and passion-
ate, often extremely funny—but
the ironic comment cuts very near
the quick and the final effect i:
on the whole a distressing one.

A Long WAY





a

















to admit her love for George

therefore passes into a kind
limbo from which she is only |
awakened by old Mr. Emerson
and the book ends with Lucy and

She
of

George together again in Flor-
ence. i
The happy ending is rare

Forster's work, Here it rey

sents a spiritual victory- -but r-
mally he treats passion with ifi-
dence and mistrust—at th best,

he suggests, it is only onc of the} 70 is the ideal, It is very difficult | cricket:

many wa
establish its kingdom.



Indeed, it is characteristic of
Forster that people who ear his
disapproval are invariably tho
who in some degree despise other
human beings. Harriet, the Pem-
brokes, Cecil, and later the Wil-

coxes and the Anglo-Indians al | would be




















place in the world however, and
while the thermometer registe:
as low as 80° below nearly every
year, the lowest of record there

s 90° Below zero

Extensive tests have been
made to determine the most fav-
ourable temperature for Ameri-
can workers and the results have
shown that a temperature of
68° with a humidity of around

however. For instance, Vienno
in summer would be nearly ideal,

with temperatures varying be-
tween 65° and 70° and humidity

SUNDAY





are frequently banned at carni-
vals for this reason. Some of the
lealypsoes are ~condemned ~ase in-
tdelicete, mostly” by ~the™tmocent
priestly people who still believe
in original sin and who are un-
|speakably shocked when they
|meet somebody who ‘isn’t a puri-
tan. But in spite of the si ly
‘preaching of these moral hum-
bugs the West Indian loves lh
\ealypso as much as he loves his
his carefree style ol

in which Love will} to find these conditions in nature | playing cricket and his carefree

style of composing music are
/both characteristic of “him; and
those who want to rob him of the
only form of art that he can

around 70, but the average tem-|really call his, ought to be killed

nerature for a January night

without any hesitafion, for they

there is 28°. Barcelons in Spring |are among our greatest enemies.

nice too—indeed Bar-

No one can heip noticing thot

have this cardinal vice,..It-is-true | Clon’ and the Azores have" per- ithe type of rhythm found in the

that Forster lays on his colours
darkly, but he is too fine an artist
and too much aware of the exist-
ence of good-and-evil to paint

this particular vice, is, as far’as
he is concerned, to be among the
damned,

It is not easy
any succinctness
novel ‘Howards End’, which ap-
peared in 1910. One may say that
it is about two conflicting ways of
life, the inner and the outer
world, and their reconciliation
that it’s about people and a house |
in the country that it’s about |
self-knowledge and the supremacy
of personal relations. The people
are the Schlegels, two sisters,
Margaret and Helen, who are for
the inner life, and the Wilcoxes,

to describe
Forster's next

with

efficient men of the world: there
are also the Basts, the eternal
underdogs. As bridges between

the two worlds stand Mrs. Wilcox
who really belongs to neither, and
Margaret, who appreciates the
particular Wileox Virtues and mar- |



ries the widowed Henry Wilcox |}
in order to reconcile his way of
life and hers Helen sees in the

Wilcoxes only ‘panic and em) ti-
ness’ and in a fit of anger and pity
at life’s injustices becomes the
mother of Leonard Bast’s child

One is aware of a new emphas
in ‘Howards End’ In his earlier
novels, Forster opposed the pagan
joy of life to cenventional pro-
priety, honesty to muddled mean-
ness, real feeling to pretended feel-
ing. Here the darkness is the
failure to ‘connect’, the refusal to
accept moral responsibilities and
the implications of personal rela-
tionships. ‘Howards End’ is a dif-
ficult book and possibly the great- |
est of all Forster’s novels, It con-
tains some of his finest writii
has an extraordinary beauty of |
texture-and shows the most pro-/
found observation of the mind and
heart. '

There is now a long gap of
fourteen years. Forster spent the
First War in Egypt; he made two
visits to India; one in 1912 and a
second ten years later. At last,
in 1924, he produced his final mas-
terpiece—‘A- Passage to India’.









The scene is laid in Chandra-
pore, a dismal town in British In-

GINGER

BOTTLER’S
(BDOS) LTD.





| great a gulf

| Sympathy

@ On Pace if

dia, The story

tre Marabar caves.

Floods of vio-
jent racial feeling

are unloosed.

At the trial the girl suddenly re-

tracts her accusation. One Eng-

lishman, Fielding, has proclaimed

his belief
cence,

in the doctor's inno-
But even here the prover.

friendship between him and Aziz

is undermined by suspicion and

~ | misunderstandnig, It cannot flour-

ish and when finally they meet
again on the neutral ground of an
indian State, they realise that too
has. been fixed be-
tween them,

Here then is a tragedy of mass
misunderstanding; personal rela-
tionships are not enough, for there

are tog many people and tensions
invol¥ed and there is not enough

love to go round, With more and

more kindness, understanding and ;
| affection, something may perhaps | and austerity,

be saved from the wreckage.

india broods mysteriously over
this book and Forster is fascinated
by its strange elusiveness. ‘A
Passage to India’ is memorable for
an enthvalling narrative, for a
remarkable understanding and
for a strange race and
country and for passages of im-
pressive lyrical beauty. It also
completes his work as a novelist
Henceforth his passionate belief in
liberty and truth and his hatred
of tyranny and sham in any form
are expressed in other ways. We
can only regret there are no more
novels and be grateful for what we
have,

I have tried to give some hint of
the superb craftmanship, the
knowledge and understanding, the
beauty of the style, the special
Forsterian charm, the irony and
the wit, . But there’s more> to. it
than that. Forster is essentially
a philosophical novelist concerned
passionately with life’s meaniny,
with eternal values, with
knowledge of good-and-evil. It is

this preoccupation which gives his |

later
intensity

makes
such a dis-
and mem-

novels, especially the two
ones, their tremendous
and power and = which
the reading of them
turbing, illuminating
orable experience,





revolves around an
) ) > alleged assault by a Mohammedan
exclusively in blacks and whites: jedoctor on an English girl

whom
oll the same, to be tainted wita] be is conducting round the sinis-

the |



Galvanised
- Mesh

West Indies can be found in only
two other areas in the world,
namely Spain and her original
colonies in Latin America. The
samba, rhumba, tango, bolero,
and calypso is completely foreign
to all other people. And it isnt
difficult to see the reason why.
They have all come originally
from Africa. The Moors, who
}long ago overran Spain, left the
|rhythm of their music behind.
And of course they left many
other things too. Their influence
jhas been strong, persistent, and
\indestructible. The gaiety and
|colour, the splendor and light-
|hearted romance that we associ¢~
ted with everything, Latin js
really African in origin. We find
much that can be called Latin in
the West Indies, and here again
the reason is the predomipant
negro influence.

It separates us inevitably from
|conventional Europe with its’ iee
Those parts of the

lcontinent that have the Latin
temper are not typical of Europe
at all. We must go to Ger-
many and Scandinavia if we
| want a true impression. And
what could be more different than
\their folk music and ours? Be-
sides, can we imagine future
West Indian composers writing

like Sibelius or Tchaikovsky or
|Schumann? No: our music will
{be not only more emotional, but
}emotional in a different ways I
| will be more warm-blooded. And
there is nothing more truly char-
acteristic of a people than their
music. ;

We can take Euro-British music
las summing up the influence that

has civilised these parts, and
this has little real connection
with us, except that of ‘the
/southefn-romantic “com and

even that affects us only a@"ittle.
What can be a clearer illustration
that Nordic European culture, is a
perversion of our own tempe:
cather than a fulfilling of it?

The Satire of the Calypso

It can hardly be doubted that
future West Indian composes
will absorb the calypso flavou
into serious music Besides th?
calypso





Wire

Just what you

Poultry





GENERAL FLA RD W ARE sopptics



RICKETT STREET (Opposite !
Au



need for
Keeping

ost Office) PHONE 4912

ADVOCATE





spending all his reserves of
patience in the meanwhile, and

a tenant who, though absolutely Results Of.Pitman’s

honest and virtuous, cannot earn
enough money to buy a house for
himself and leave his landlord
with his own property. And we
can well imagine that th. situa-
tion would be a thousand times
worse if the tenant had to deal,
not with a landlord, but a land-
lady. Determined and unscrupu-
lous women can certainly be a
nuisance. To have one of these
over you, with powers to take
your roof from over your head
or your floor from under your
feet as soon as you displease her,

must be quite unbearable.
“An’ every Monday
Mistah gi’ me mah rent!”

sali Rowek ert a

me e BH. . an rit-
fish Press, I havent yet mentioned
Derek Walcott, I am not at all cer-
tain, however, that Walcott exerts
a major force in shaping the Wes:
Indian nation, He seems to be out
of touch with reality, He may
quite possibly be remembered in
future years as a unique literary
technician; in fact, if his develop-
ment continues at its present rate
he is certain to be. However, ne
will hardly be remembered as 4
major prophet, like Shelley, He
doesn't seem to know what life
actually is; he is too literary, Hse
is, of course, young (like myself)
but this is hardly an excuse for
his academic approach to art
When one thinks of Shelley hirm-

self; the boy who got into trouble Howell), Avelyn | Pilgrim
at school because of his chemical Graham),

experiment and his determination
to know the true nature of the
universe,— the undergraduate who

was called “mad” because he was Joan







and verses,



Typewriting Exam.

THE following candidates were
successful at_ the last Pitman’s
Typewriting Examination held at
Combermere under the supervision



SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1952







need give you no anxtettes

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if you have Ashton & Parsome Infants’ Powders handy.
Mothers all over the world have found them soothing and
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they are ABSOLUTELY SAFE.

IPlaBla



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New Discovery Brings Pleasures *



of Life to Men Who Feel Old
Before Their Time

. you feel than you are? Are you
eg caine saint oot BS
ze er oes of vigour, mem-
tickly skin, lepr = a sep? In

v aman
If your pody is devitalized xhaust+
there is no need for you sutler an-



of Mr. C. B. Rock, F.I_P.S.:
ELEMENTARY

First Class

Etheline Elliott, Geraldine
Blenman, Frances Skeete, Blise E.
Jones, Mona Harper, Vashti Lovell,
Elma Grant (Miss M. Linton);

Lilian Norris, Ena _ Richards,
Grace Cumberbatch, G. Roberts,
Patricia Hope (Miss M. Howell);

Muriel Bellamy, Violet Baird
(Mr. L. S, Richards); Gloria F.
Pilgrim, Mary Clarke (Mr, C, F
Rock); Avélyn Pilgrim (?*
Graham), John Ki (Moa. a
High School), Doriel Lovell (Mr.
O. Boyce), Ronald Daniel (Miss
Carol Yearwood), Jean Barrow
(Mrs. R. Barrow), Lucine Burke
(Miss Y. Rollins) and Gwendolyn
Roberts,

Second Class

Marlene Carter (Mr. L_ F,
Nurse), Muriel Murray (Mr. C. B,
Rock), Eudell Blackett (St. John’s

E. I.)
INTERMEDIATE

First Class
Eileen Roach, E,. Weatherhead.
(Miss Linton), Jean Arthur (Miss
M, Inniss), Joan Peterson (Miss
(Mrs
Glendene Harewood
(St. John’s E. 1.)

Second Class
Elizabeth Gay (Mt. Tabor E. I ),
Phillips (Miss Linton),

pleased to think otherwise than Agnella Armstrong (Miss Howell),
the mentally insignificant major- Barbara Alleyne,

ity, and who was “sent down”
from Oxford because he dared to
challenge the ministers to a ration-
al discussion of their religious
views,— the young author of
“Queen Mab”, a poem expressing
judgements on everything in heav-
en and earth (many of them im-
mature, no doubt, but the im-
portant thing is that he capable of
thinking about them),—the young
man who crossed the Irish Chan-
nel to deliver a political harangue
to the people on the other side,
—the revolutionary poet who was
inspired almost solely by things of
the intellect and who was deter-
mined to see political sense in the
world, — when we think of how
intimately concerned the young
Shelley was with real life, it is
impossible to explain away Derek
Walcott’s literariness as the re- .
sult of his youth, ;

No Ideas ‘

No one disputes that he has « her salvaged,



+

Another Attempt At

Salvaging “Potick”

DIVERS will make another at-

tempt at raising the French yaw!
Potick from the sea bed of the
inner basin. During last week,
divers
went down on several occasions
and secured the hull of the vessel
as part of the preparation for the
operation.

wearing oxygen masks

More than two years ago the

Potick sank at the cross berth of
the inner basin after she sprang
a leak some hours earlier. Sub-

sequent attempts at salvaging her
failed. é

While under water, she fell at
1uction to James Murray, a local

dealer in charcoal who then took

»ver the responsibility of having
Divers removed

fine literary gift and a pretty and parts of the yawl from time to
flexible way of handling his verse, time leaving a skeleton hull on
as well as something approaching the sea bed.

dramatic technique, but he is an

The local Harbour and Shipping

“art-for-art’s-sake” man, and the Master told the Advecate that the
West Indies needs prophets. His sunken yawl is a menace in the

two most reputable works, “Epi- i
taph for the young” »
Christophe”, both highly acclaim-





as an art form in itself ed in Britain stamp him as a it,









‘FOR

COTTON TWILL

BELTINGS

VICES

WHITEPARK

and Henri may

nner basin. A small schooner
be able to use the. berth,
ne said, but no big boats can use

—$———

GALVANISED PIPE
A full range with Fittings

FILTER PRESS CLOTH
in Leather, Rubber, Hair

both Pipe and Bench

The Barbados
Foundry Ltd.



store your oa vigour ad EBmat on.
2 Youthful Viaor Restored ;
of advancing age and the| Youthful |
Gad Sca'peantePcatat et ats: | Vicourow
to your body through this | Men
new gland discovery.

Captivate
Beautiful
Women

Doctors throughout the world now say

te vs orld men who have

— on dear gy endurance, brav-
hb ) Cnesa:

real ving force of life, youth,
it in our glands. Tt is now ‘
id fam:

Li a
ourating the glands, and thus tends to re-
store youthful vigour and vitality to the
body. Every one needs a treatment such
as Vi-Tabs at some time in his life. some
sooner than others—but no one will 1 ‘
&@ mistake in putting this treatment to the
test when in need of help to regain youth-
ful animation.”

24-Hour Results |

Because Vi-Tabs are scientifically pire -

Napoleon, Mt ‘ex
such as BA! T. Mar " ny,
and Victor Hugo, were the fortunate pos-
sessors of tremendously active glands.
ie seinen’ Brysician. with Pate than
ears xperience, has at last per-
fects $ gombiration of oacenans hat
work with amaz! speed to build new
rich red blood, strengthen the nerves, an
most important of all, to activate, stimu.
late, and fortify the glands. This great
prescription, therefore, acts in s natural







manner to restore vig and yout! ful pares to act directly upon and stimulate
vitality to men whose glands have grown | the glands. there is no long waiting for
old too soon, This discov nown as| results. Within 24 hours most men report

Vi-Tabs, is in pleasant, easy-to-
let form, and may be used secr
so desire, so that you can amaze your
iriends in # short time with the restora-
tion of your vigour and vitality

Doctor Praises Vi-Tabs

Dr. N. G. Giannini, well-known surgeon
end European physi-
cian, Teopbtly stated;
“Many scientists are of
the opinion that the
true secret of youthful
jf; vigour and vitality lies

in the glands. on
, my many years of ex~
perience, study and

tice, it is my opin-

that the medical
ula knOWn 4S %

mi
ae method of
a ting and invig-

Guaranteed

@ surprising increase in vitality, and with«
in one week's time most users find that
they feel and look ten years younger. The
change in some men is almost miraculous.

Results Guaranteed
So outstanding have been the results
produced by Vi-Tobs for weak and pre-
maturely old men in all parts of the world
that i is now offered under an absolute
guarantee of complete satisfaction or no
cost. Under this written guarantee get Vi-
Tobs from your chemist today. See for
yourself the new strength and vitality that
will be coursing through your body. See
how you take an interest in the pleasures
of life and how you are able to enjoy them
as never before. And if for any reason you
do not agree that Vi-Tobs is easily wort)
ten times the small cost, merely returr.
the empty package and the full purchase
price will be refunded without question or
argument. Get Vi-Tabs {rom your chemist

today. The guar-ntee protects you

2 To Restore
Manhood. Vitalitv







¢
Well now, who
would think he

was doing this for the pleasure of it? But it is all part
and parcel of the weekly outing and this vehicle is, in
the owner’s eyes, the absolute last word in horseless

transportation.
Ree

And so it was!



Similarly, today,
there is the owner
who considers himself
fortunate to drive the

best automobile —
dollar for dollar —
highwhy in

on any the
world,
The extraordinary fact is that more and _ more

owner/drivers on Continents and Islands are classified as
Five Star motorists—the reason being their preference
for the entirely new standard introduced in 1952 by
CONSUL and ZEPHYR.

You are invited to test-drive both at - - -

Charles Me Enearney & (o., Ltd.

ee





SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1952 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE THR TEEN
——— LT oo - Neen enn ee eee ne cece ee mmm!



You can't resist that
wonderful flavor

Se smooth. So delicious! And se good for
you, too. No trouble to

prepare . . . just follow
the simple directions
on the package. 3
wonderful flavors
vanilla, chocolate
and butterscutch.












HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON | {sack OUTSMARTS THE GIANT




“AEE
n >,
Ve | SZ
Once upon a time Jack planted a seed, until he reached the top. Suddenly a and said, ““Why eat me, sir, when
a very powerful seed, that grew into a giant cried, “Here's a tasty morsel for you can have Royal Butterscotch Pud
tall bean stalk. So tall that Jack decided my dinner.” But Jack was smart. He ding.”’ So the Giant tried it and liked
to climb it. Up and up he went... pulled out some Royal Pudding it so much he gave Jack all his gold




























FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD.... ©

gu
¢
the.

By Appointment
Gin Distillers







SPRING'S IN THe AIR

EVEN FOR TAXIS.
LOOK AT THOSE

BA LOVELY FLOWERS,

WELL - THAT S FIXED, FLINT.

YOU ANDO MISS LOVAT UAKE

AN MMERCOVER CHECK
aT fa JONGS'S

THE G/FIL’S NAME iS

LAUR LOVAT-AND

THE CLOSEP! YOU GET

| THe BOT TER SHE LOOKS.)

, 1 WONDER WHERE SHE
FITS IN TO THIS











to the Late
King George VI



BY CHIC YOUNG





~@Po._| AS LONG AS WE HAVE TO
me a LIVE RIGHT NEXT DOOR
> TO THEM, ITLL BE MORE
(PLEASANT IF WERE ALL
(Sone AT EACH OTHER

L Sdn | |AND WHATS MORE, ) & BUT DAGWOOO TOOTSIE IS
— MeN I DONT WANT wed MY DEAREST FRIEND --WHY
YOU TO SPEAK xt DOI HAVE TO
TO HIS WIFE < oases

ANY MORE ) t
Ne
SE
















EITHER! ——~
il eel
SS




“>.

CROs

THE COLGATE WAY
TO COMPLETE
HOME DENTAL CARE






_—$______
. GOSH /.. WHAT A MESS !
Nos :

2 7 ’ —— ra LOOKS LIKE THERE WAS
7 { mn A FIGHT HERE — HUH,
* te\ } . se v
> \ h - : @ : a3
oP =f Le | a <- ji i =
7



FIND
SOMETHING,
FLASH ?






CAPE TORN ; Nees ; ¢ re] i KS A i E :
= — . . = )

STAINED...
wi ¥CLEANS YOUR TEETH
Â¥CLEANS YOUR BREATH /
Always brush yeur teeth

Naa | dae) sd dA a DECAY NG right after eating with .
, COLGATE DENTAL CREAM

‘i QS wy
)

rr
\
rm







PT cy! Bf Jounny Ani S Pach... 600N FER FOOLS Vil
ae et ERS 4€ E SILHOUETTED AGAINST CE

LF 5 BOS EXIT...A PERFECT TARGET! yell
. a ¥ cam) Gy ay i Ne es oe ud
goa (Dae ea ic Wi . ; he VY 7 a

= : te HEINEKEN’S
“44 Sh ATA nae (> \ EGO ait 4; ‘ee "

| ee A BEER
wD ; » %
vie 5

Because It's i
* Mellower!

* Lighter!

® Dryer!



7
rs ‘ | BY GOLLY-MAGGIE'S
| Ge oe Or pe | ( sea AFTER ME TO BEAT }| * Smoother!
| } a . THIS RUNNER-SO - TO
| $s BO. ‘a. | | \ PREVENT ANY )
Ds rh > or . FIGHTING






BY ALEX RAYMOND

FOR YOUBR.....

SCHOOL
SUPPLIES

as CALL AT o_









GO AWAY? ALL YOU RUBES
WANNA PICK A FIGHT

WITH ME. YOU WANNA
GET FAMOUS.

BESIDES, | PROMISED MAX | WOULDN'T
FIGHT OR GET IN TROUBLE,SO TAKE
OFF WHILE YOU CAN STILL WALK.

ADVOCATE STATIONERY





PAGE FOURTEEN

CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508

FOR SALE





DIED |

SARGEANT — On September 13, Laurie























Parker Sargeant of ae ge His | eee,
funeral will lesve the above address ,
at 4.20 p.m. to-day for St ar AUTOMOTIVE
(hepa, “BOND MINICAR—“3 wheeler” in per-
nee Sgt. Sg emage er), Wat fect condition less than 3,000 miles,
P 149.52—1n. | owner leaving isiand, for information
" dial 2838 12.9. 52--3n
THANKS BEDFORD COMMERCIAL VEHICLES-
atiiniiaaaanaitetl “ - Just received a new shipment including
BATSON — Nurse Miriam Batson ack-}2 to 3, 5 ton Trucks, Vans Pickups
jliowledges with srateful apprecia.] Courtesy Garage. Dial 4616.
tion the kind expressions of sym 11,9. 52—fn
pathy tendered her on the F = nedeencicnatiensecttenanenenc
of her late sister Regina more CAR-—-1950 Ford Prefect. Phone 4002 or
Batson of Ruby, St. Philip, office 3248. 14.9. 52—in.
4952—In.J — aa —
ee oe — - CAR—One (1) Austin Car. 8 H.P. in
RELLAMY—The undersigned gravefuliy{ good working order. Dial 3495
beg through this mediur to return 14.9.52—1n

thanks to all tose who attended the



funeral, sent wreaths, card., of in ary CAR—One Hillman Minx O-149. At

other way expressed their sympathy} Springhead Pitg. Phone 91-74
with us in our recent horeavement, 13.9.52—3n
occasioned by the death of our mother c>
Martha. Elizabeth Bellamy CAR — Hillman Convertible owner
Thé Bellamy Family driven. Only done 4,000 miles. Call
14,9.52—In, Kasson, 8496. 11.9.52—6n.

saat

BECKLES—We the undersigned beg to| GAR—Wolseley 10 H.P., in good aoe
thank those who sent enna Saeed hs tion. Nearest offer to $1,200.00, Cou:

in ahy -way expressed sympathy w i ,

us im the death of our dear moter —- bot =peronste 11.9.53-—-§n.

Jane Beckles of Brittons Hill, ich: MORRIS OXFO!

took place on the Ist September, 1952. than 2,500 miles. py og Sadat Tocwes

Wife of the late Winston Beckles. ‘car. Dial Courtesy Garage 4616
Ortie, een, Clanse. Winston, Ervin | 11.9.6
‘ehildren) and 15 grand children. ' rey

14,9.52-—1n,









MORRIS OXFORD—197 Model in







COLLEMORE Through this, medium | C*Celent condition, $1,800.00. Dial 4616
we bee to thank all those who in| _ 13,9 90-0
any way sympathised with us in | “MOTORCYCLE: One (1) 5 H.P. twin

\
the bereavement of our dear mother | oviinder B.S.A. Motorcycle, Good condi-











Mfs. Albertine Collymore, late of |tion. Apply N. Gibbs, Croydon, Hast-
Brighton, St. George | ings. Phone 3492. " MA ares
mes and John (sons), |
jorace, Myriene, Lione: and} TRUCH-dhisenaiaenss Gee aoaed axle aon «
i peed axle
Emanuel (erangebiieren), ; | truck with hydraulle holst, M702, Phone
ear Ane oa a “Ip. 3050. J. N. Farnum, George St
HINDS — Mrs. Aletha Hinds a amily 6.9.52—4n
acknowledge with grateful apprecia- —
tion the kind expressions of sym- .
pathy and assistance rendered her ELECTRICAL
on the passing of the late Joseph EE



GARRARD PICKUP ARMS -— 6,000
OHMS. Just received a limited quantity,
cell early, R. C. Maffei & Co. Ltd.

11.9. 92—t.f.r.

Augustus Hinds of Baxters Road, St.
Michael, 14.9.52—1n.

JORDAN—We, the undersigned beg to
thank those who sent wreaths, cards
or ahy way expressed sympathy with 1
us of our dear father, Charles Jordan,





“SWAN” brand electric kettle and

automatic Ivon and one double burner





2ipporah (wife) Iris, Helen, Edwatd,| hot plate. Phone 3430. 14.9.52—In

El€iza and Dorothy (childien:, SS
14.9.52—In. | ONE (1) Electrical Spraying Machine

————____— Complete with SUNBEAM Generator

VAUGHN — We bee through this) Aluminum Air Tank & Aluminum Spray

medium to return thanks to all/Gun, In good working order. Price

those kind friends who sent wreaths, | :easonable. App! Cc. Arthur Mayhew
letters of condolence or in an¥ W&a¥|ec/o K. J, SMITH & CO
expressed their sympathy in oOUr || {MITED, Bridge Street. Phone 4748.

recent bereavement caused by the 9.9.52—sn





da of Con Leona Vaughn, on 29th
A st.
Harold and Cecily (children), Jan- FURNITURE
nett, Roslyn, (nieces), Edith Clark | ——————~——- aoe ete inesentee
(sister) . 14.9.52—In. FURNITURE—Large Mahogany bedstead
with spring $50. Phone 3900,
13.9.52—in

FURNITURE—1 Mahogany Morris Suite
roe with maces Boring Cushions
ewly covered — $425.00 and 1 ny
Wardrobe with iull length mirror inside
—$180.00. All hullt by BR. A. Griffith.
Phone 3430, 14.952—1n.

ee

POULTRY

COCKRELS — Pure Leghorn imported
Stook 5, 3, 2% months old. Dial 3619
after 5 p.m, 14.9.52—2n.

POULTRY Trap-nested Minorcas,
Barred Rocks & Sex-Link Cross (Minorca
x Barred Rocks), Booking Sittings now
for delivery Nov: — March: December
chicks; spring pullete. Some stock
cockerels and table fowls Inspection
by appointment, Howe

14.9,52—2n

Et
YOUNG RHODE ISLAND COCKERELS

~ bred from ish Stevenson Strain.
A brood of 12 Guinea Chicks 3 weeks
old, Phone 2424, O. Fitzpatrick,
14.9.5



IN MEMORIAM zi

LAYNE — In loving memory of my

dear mother Estell Layne who died

on September, 1948.

“She gave so much, and received s6
little in return;

We think of you in memory still,

Not only to-day, but always will,

God granted her rest to suffer no
more.”









‘AN APARTMENT at “O’cetta’™ on-the-
sea, near Woodside, no children, Apply
on premises to Miss Douglas. 14.9.52—In,





A FLAT ~— on the seaside, at the
Moorings, Nr. Prospect, St. James.
Partly furnished, Apply on premises.

rf 52—-2n.


































BEACH VIEW — Purnished sea-side
house at Maxwell. For months of Octo-
ber, November and December, iy
to Mrs. M, H, Graham, Phone vs
ie by 4 52—1n.| “GRASS CUTTBERS—9 cutting blade.
CALAIS —- Seaside house, Maxwell, | Courtesy Garage. Dial ns 8
For months of October, grovensiae aoe -9,52—6n.
December, Apply to Mrs. | Graham.| “Grass LOADERS—A_new shipment
Phone 8400, 14.9521. ue on 19th inst (Sept,) Dial 4613,
CULDUNE, Cattlewash. St, _Soseph 11,9,52—6n.
u nished including Refrigerator. | “3477 orem
i Bedrooms, For , November,| BICYCLE — Ladies’ 3 speed Hercules
Deceribet 1952. Phone 8810 Mrs. H. S.|#$ new, hardly used. Best offer, over
Bynoe 10.9.52—8n. | $50.00, Ring 9189. 10.9,52—3n
———$—$—————
FURNISHED FLAT — Palm Beach
Hastings. Availabie immediately to an MISCELLANEOUS
approved tenant All conveniences
Own garage Near clubs. Reasonabl a
rental, Dial 2167 14.9.52—In. AMERICAN PRAM, Bath and Scale,
————___—_————_—, new Christening Dress with Slip, lovely
HILLSIDE—Bathsheba, four bedrooms.| Baby Shawl Blanket. Call 4145.
water and electricity throughout, Frig. 14.9,62—1n
&c. From December onwards. Apply:; — ot a eee
The Rector, St. Joseph 13.9.52-—3n. ANTIQUES — Of every description
“INahOUT” Gibb’s h. St. Peter. Glass, China, old Jewels, fine Silver

Watercolours. Early books, Maps, Auto-

Modern Bungalow, fully furnished, suit- gtaphs ¢éte., at Gorringes Antique Shop









able for a couple, from October 1952.) sajoin Royal Yacht 6.
Phone 2618. 169-52+-3r, bh om . 3.9.52—t.£.n
FFICES BALLOONS, Assorted colours nd
90 CE —_« | Shares, from 3c.—12e. Knight's Ltd.
OFFICES—In our Buheing an Lowel 11,9. 32—jn
Broad Street. Available from | ff | COMICS and MAGAZINES — Just re-
Qarsii a a a ® Sites: ceived your latest favourite Westerns,
OY ee s ret gubnewoingiipem Ties Romance, etc. our inspection
TOP FLOOR — Synagogue Building, | 'nvited.
off James Street, Suitable for offices STANWAY STORE,
Ground Floor tenanted by Barbados Lucas Street.
‘Turf Club, Apply Hutchinson & Ban- 14.9.52—1n,
field, Solicitors. Dial 5097, 14,9.52—3n, aaa

FAREX~—The comprehensive cereal food
with Vitamin D. added. Farex should
| be given to infants during teething and

le

THORPE'S HOUSE, Holders Hill, St.

Jam oP? ly, Grannum & Co., Trafal-
‘Binet!





Tel. 2652 or 2492. weaning. Ask your grocer or druggist

me 14.9.52—1n. | for FAREX. Price 88. tin.
— 10.9.52—5n

“VENTNOR” ist Ave, Belleville, °

Bedrooms esch with funning water,| GLUCOLIN Glucose
Garage ete 14.9.52—1n Vitamin D. at all lead-
ing stores. Insist on Glucolin for Glucose
WANTED iS its best. 10.9.52—5n
; .GUAVA CHEESE -—- Fresh, delicious

—_—_———— Guava Cheese,

suitable for sending to



HELP your friends abroad. Mrs. Worrell, St
Matthews Vicarage. Phone 3025.
ssdetiecnpanimaaet 7.9.52—3n

LADY STENOTYPIST with knowledge
of bookkeeping and previous office expe-
rience, good salary to experienced lady
Apply by letter C. A. c/o Advocate Ad-
vertising Dept 14.9.52—3n.

CASABLANCA

Maxwell Coast
Road

Extremely well kept 4 bed-
rooms house of modern de-
sign. Combination living and
dining room. 2_ kitchens.
Breakfast Room, Toilet and
bath. Lovely verandah fac-
ing the sea to which there



PIANO
Phone 8435.

STOVE—Florence Oil Stove 2-burner.
nine months old, perfect condition, $60
Phone 3900. 13.9.52—I1n

SUBSCRIBE now to the Daily
Telegraph, England’s leading Datly News.
paper now arriving in Barbados by At
only a few days after publication in
London, Contact Inn Gale, C/o, Advo-
cate Co., Ltd., tative

Tel. 3118. 47.4.523—t.f.0

nr nnrn =

SAMPLES—A few pairs of Men's shoes.
‘ze 7 only, apply: The Barbados Import
& Export Co., Ltd. Room 308 Plantations
| Building 11.9,52—%
|
| TANKS—2 Galvanised Tanks & x # x ¥
i Iron Tanks 6%’ x 4/ x 3% 3 Galvanised
| Cylindrical Tanks 6447 x 4%’ dea. 600 w
alvs. 2 Galv. Cylindrical Tanks x 40’
| deam with 2 ft. Conical Bottoms; capacity

wine gallons 700. Apply:

In first class condition.
1.9.52—3n,



























’ Manager,

is a right of way. 2 servants | Bruce Vale Factory 31.8,52—3n

rooms, washroom and gar-}))'

age in yard which is com- ee
ae

pletely tarred. Well laid out
Gardens, 55,573 square feet
land, A spacious and com-
fortable yet very compact

The Housewife's

Alphabet

property. FREE with every
— ALSO — Gas Cooker:
sot reedom from smoke
An orchard comprising
28,743 square feet land ad- reedom ae soot
joining the above -property. reedom from ashes

reedom from smells—

FREEDOM from worry if
Cook doesn’t turn wu

Numerous cocoanut trees.
Fruit trees of every descrip-
tion,
Inspection every day ex-
cept Sunday between 4—6
.m. on application to Mrs.
Eckstein, Phone 8213,

ee Sale by public auc-
on Friday 19th at
1.30 p.m. at the office of
the undersigned from
whom further particu-

lars may be obtained.







Messrs. EDWARD DURANT and
DUNCAN TROTMAN,
(well known Shopkeeper of
Baxters Road)

Pequest the pleasure of
your company to their

ANNUAL DANCE

CHILDREN'S GOODWILL
LEAGUE

Constitution Road

On MONDAY NIGHT.

September, 1952

ADMISSION 1/6

Masic by C. B. Browne's Orchestra
Please extend this invitatio

BAR SOLID



R. 8. NICHOLLS & CO,,
Solicitors,

151/152 Roebuck Street,
Phone 3925.

15th









































VIEWS of Barbados f
Exhibition at the
—6 Week-days

ANNOUNCEMENTS | REVIVAL CRUSADE

Sunday
52



Muse

10--6 7.9

PERSONAL

The publi
giving credit to my wi
Harding (nee Ber
If responsible fo



, against
hleen Marva
s 1 go not hold









one else
contracting any debt iebt 1 my neme
unless by a writte 1 ened by me
Sed. COLERIDGE MOSES HARDING,
Perfectic Road, Bush Hall,
St. Michael
14.9. 52—2n

PUBLIC SALES



REAL ESTATE

ALOw, at













Hastings on t) 23
always a breeze, Dial 5
11,9.52 ~dn
BUILDING SI at Brighton,
Black Rock and at Bayswater, Deacons
ree Bory ‘ Mr. Hutchinson, ,Hutchin-
son anfield, Solicito: D 509
Thy Saige an Pastor M. G. NEMBHARD
BE Ww Ise D. F. de Abren,| A BIG REVIVAL. CRUSADE
s rainec uctioneer and Real Estale] ¢ i , i eet
Broker, ust and Will always Leat ae = se ping oe
with Attractive Prices, Re-Sale Values and Se venth-day ‘ Adventist Church
Satisfaction. Best These Six 1. ar|Sunday evening, September 14, at
RAYSWATER. NEAR SEA—Almost New| 7.15 p.m, with Pastor M. G, Nemb-

3 Bedroom (with Basins) Stone Bungalow

Aluminum Roof, 2 Toilets, Stone Gar age hard, late of Kingston, Jamaica,















& Servant’s Room, about 7,000 sq. ft.,| 2nd Port-of-Spain, Trinidad as
Pare Sor sbout 2 a8 2 AT woevrs- guest speaker. There will be ser-
i pe ight-o rice eac Ve “xce

Way to Sea, A 3 Bedroom Bungalow Type.t Vice Sach evening except Thurs-

Very Good Condition, Garage & Ser-|@ay and Saturday. ;

vant s Room, over 6,000 gs ft Going Pastor W. W. Weithers, district
§ . I N Y ne . Ie r ,

GARDENS — A 3 Bedroom (with Basins (pos of Bridgetown, will be con-

& Cupboards) Stone Bungalow, about|@ucting a similar revival at the

6 yrs. Old. Everite Roof, 2 ‘Tailets,|Government Hill S.DA. church

Garage & Servant’s Room, about 11,000 t >» st j ae a i

noth, Goins for abort Bader 6, ee the same time. You are cordi-

GOVT! HILL — Almost New 3 Bedtoom ally invited to attend.

‘Partly Stone) Bungalow, Stone Garage 14, —-

000 sq. ft., Going for abo £1,200

SIN BELLEVILLE Ove-tiorey ‘rans | EDUCATIONAL

Stone) 3 Bedroom, all Modern Conveni- — — -





erces, Very Good Condition, Going about




















£2,000. ‘6. OFF COUNTRY RD 2 QUEEN'S COLLEGE
Bedroom House with Land. Shop attach Parents and guardians are asked to
ed, Good Condition, House Only Yields| note that Queen’s College will not be
£°4.00 p.m., Going about $1,500 IN | r¢ opened before Tuesday 23rd. Septem
LIGHTFOOT’S X LANE — A Desirable | ber f 13.9, 52—2n
; a eaeare Cottage, Light, Water, Going | ——— — —
or nder $2,300 AT HASTINGS LYNCH'S SECONDA Mae
SEASIDE “OLIVE BOUGH.” IN | SPRY STREET rere
TUDOR ST.—Business Fwemises & Resi-| Next Term begins on Tuesday, 15th
derce, IN NELSON ST. — A 3 Bedroom | September, 1952 at 9.15 a.m i
Cottage, also ‘a Business Premises & A. McD, FORDE.
Residence. Please C Me when U require | Headmaster
Alu.cst Anything in Real Estate and Near- | 14.9.52—in
ly Anywhere. DIAL 3111 Call at “Olive — sa r Sanaa,
ough,” Hastings, Near Pavilion Court MICHAEL'S LS’ ;
LOOK FOR MY SIGN | BARHADOe Re aoe
aati A Next Term will begin on Tuesday, 16th
LAND FOR SALE | September 1952 at 9.15 a.m. punctually
(1) 7,812% sq. ft, Rogers Road, 50 ft,| The School will be in session from 9.00
frontage m. to 12.15 (noon) :
(2) 1/8 acre land at Eagle Hall. NORMA FE. MASCOLL,
(3) I acre at Rockley, Ch. Ch | (Acting) Secretary/Treasurer,
(4) Several House Spots at Worthing | Governing Body, St. Michael's
View, Ch. Ch, Girls’ School
(5) 3 acres at Maxwell Main Road, Ch, | 14.9.52—1n.
Ch. Dial 2947. R, Archer MeKenzie,| ——————-—~— ine
Victoria Street. 14,9,52-—-2n. FORESTERS’ SCHOLARSHIP

COURT 8ST. MICHABL’s DIAMOND
The above scholarship his been award-
jed to Elsworth Me Clarren Reid, son of
| Bertram M_ Reid of Salters, St. George.

The secholorth'p is tenable at Harrisun
College for five years

“CRANE HOUSE" situate in the parish
of Saint Philip standing on 12 acres
1 rood and 22 perches of land

The Houee contains six bedrooms. draw-
aa and living rooms and usual





The above will be set wp for sale at mA?
Public Conipetition on Friday the 26th Th QUEEN S COLLEGE
day of September 1952 at 2 p.m. ut the © Wezt tee ab Syueen'e Cellege way

begin on Twesday, the Mird of September,
“, at #15 am. and the School will be
n session from ? 1 am — 12.30 p.m
D. E. M. MALONE
Seeretary-Treasurer,
Governing Body,
Queen's College.




office of the undersigned.
CARRINGTON & SEALY, :
Laicas Street.

7.9.52

——_———_
HOUSE SPOT containing 16,990 square
feet, with option of further 5,400 sq. ft



situated on Pine Hill, enclosed by wall 14.9.52—3n
on one side and hedge on another. STEEn DUE RE REDUERESUESDGARERE STEERED URES
Electricity and Water available. Apply HARRISON. COLLEGE

Gerald Hudson, Pine Hill The

Tel, 3862 next term at. Harrison College will
n on Tuesday, the 16th of September,
and -the Serool will be in session
9.15 am—11,00 a.m.

D. E. M. MALONE



“KINNOUL” at BANK HALL MAIN
ROAD, (at corner of entrance to Year-
wood’s Land), Saint Michael, standing on

1952,

trom

15,282 square feet of land, a part of Secretary-Treasurer,
which is used as an orchard Governing Body,
The Dwellinghouse contains Gallery, Harrison College.

~ Breakfast
with dressing

Drawing and Dining
Room, 3 bedrooms

rooms,

a

BARBADOS ACADEMY

room and running water) Pantry and (Bstd, 1985)
Kitchen &c., and usual conveniences A day Sthool for BOYS offering a
Government water and electricity instal-| carefully graded course from College

led — Bervants room in Yard

to the General Certificate of Educa-
tion on application to the Tendnt

prep
tion











Mr, Chas. Field. Next Term (Michaelmas) begins Tues:
The Property will be set up for sale} i6th Sept., 1952 at 9.15 a.m.
by Public Competition at our Office W. D. RUDDER,
James Street, Bridgetown, on Friday 19th Principal.
September at 2 p.m. 14.9.52—1n
eee & BOYCE, | .. atte
olicitors . =e
ton | OURLIC NOTICES
SALE OF THE MOTOR VESSEL
“T. B. RADAR" NOTICE
The appraised price of $25,000.00 not It is in the interest of Mrs. Lilian
having been received for the Motor] Princess Lemonsaid that she should con-
Vesse) “T. B. RADAR", OFFERS for the] tact the firm of R. T. Ashby & Co., No.
purchase of the same are invited } Swan Street, Bridgetown, as soon 14s
Such offers are to be submitted in | possible, 14.9.52--1n.
sealed envelopes to be addressed to The -——— ————-—— -——_—_—__ -——
Marshal in Admiralty, Public Buildings, | \ NOTICE
Barbados and are to reach fir on OT) Applieations for the vacant posts of

before the 30th September,

‘On the Ist October the sealed envelopes | 3°Xtons at St

Saviours Chapel and at St.

Simons Chapel will be received by the







, vill be take
spot ours ‘and. opened. there by. the | uidersined up to Wednesday Sept. 24th
Registrar in the presence of the Chieg|~"'"'Y 2°8,00 per month Applications
Justice SN be ena by Birth and
. Y pa culs , > Health certificates
For further one ae efi So ALAN ‘Speen.
an Adam Vestry Clerk,
Marshal in ‘oe Ae ew
oe 14.9.52—4n
AUCTION NOTICE

PARISH OF CHRIST CHURCH
Applications for the post of Qualified
Nurse and Midwife will be received by
the Churchwarden, Mrs. MH. A. Talma,































‘ “
Under the Diamond Hammer |\elches. Ch. Ch. Markea “Applica
ton” up to 3 p.m. on the 16th Septem-
ave bee ict by} Jose yer, 1952
a are eae rere, pig asink Term of appointment obtainable from
Road on Thursday next 18th beginning} ‘%e Parochial Treasurer. 6.9.52-—4n
at 12,30 ah the unde tmentioned
Several 6 ft. galvanize sheet sash MISCELLANEOUS
windows, galvanize buckets, several front -
door locks with nobs, saucepans, break-| "FURNISHED SEASIDE HOUSE, for
fast carriers, large striking clock, rum] sany February and March, 1953, at
casks, 2 Phillips radios (5 & 7 tubes) 4/31 Lawrence, Worthing or’ Rockley
burner oil stove (Valor) Pine and tron} jjstriet. Please write Denis Hart, ¢/o
bedsteads, glass cases, cups and saucers,| > 1, 7 Polnté-a-Pierre, Trinidad
bowls, (1) Chevrolet truck and other} °~°"*’’ 11.9.52—5n
items, also (1) shop 20 x 11 x 9 with shed ; rate
Terms cash “aa
3 ras ryrer HOUSE~To Buy or Rent House in
D'ARCY A. ie Me r, ither Hastings or Garrison District twe
ore 8. bend: 2) Bedrooms or perhaps three (3) with
wou we sual conveniences, Reply “S’ c/o No
ee bak pa Gaal eee. cae 10 Plantations New Buildings, Lower
UNDER THE SILVER jroad Street 6.9.52—Sn
HAMMER WANTED 10 RENT
ON TUFSDAY i6th by order of the} yoUSE—Couple require Small Unfur-
Fxecutors to the Estate of the late Mis shed House or Flat — Town or Country.
M. A Bradshaw we _ will sell the fro October First. Phone 4358
Furniture at Strathelyde which includes: | eg ana 12,9, 52-—3n.
Wagons, Couches, Morris Chairs (with - ~
cushions), Folding Chairs, Bookcase, "a PP DOHDDOGHHOOSHOD
Ornament Tables ail in Mahogany: Pine | °oC@SOOOe
Dining Table, Cedar Book-shelves and
Book Cafes (glass doors), M Table .
Lady's Desk, ckers, Clock naa and | ®
China, Dinner and Tea Serv Dieu bic
Pedatead, Spring ond Mird at
I #, Bureau, Chest of all in} ¢ 7





ogany: Cedar Presses,

Presse The Volunteer Drill Hall

ond



Dressing Tables ids cat
Springs and Beds; | Filing Cabinet in aid of
Verandah Chairs, Kitchen Tables and St Paul’s Church Choir and
Utensils; Oil Stoy> and other items 7

Organ Func
5 on
Tuesdiy Sept. 30th 1952
Music by Perey Green's Ork.
Subscription -o- 60c.
14.9.52—3n.

Sale 11,30 o'clock. Terms ¢
BRANKER, TRO'TMAN

Auctioneers
12.9. 52

aah

& ©O.,

2n



|

UNDER THE SILVER





HAMMER ebdetbecccsescosncoseet
SALES IN SEPTEMBER 7 fr
TUESDAY 23rd The late Mrs. J. W L PDDOEOH OOOOOOE O- ..DO<
Hawkins’ sale. Hill Rise, Graeme . Oe
Hall Terrace ha
THURSDAY Miss Evelyn Seale's|@ TRC Officers and Members
sale. No. 3, Lady Meade Gardens of the
TUESDAY ott Mr. G. R. Cabral’s
sale, Twepton, Strathclyde
BRAN TROTMAN & CO., Under the Patronage of _
Auctioneers the Hon, V. C. Gale, M.L.C.
14.9,52—11

invite you to their

DANCE

at the
VOLUNTEER DRILL
on

MONDAY NIGHT, 6TH |



|
|
|
ADVOCATE’S SOCIAL CLUB |
}
|

ve

2 REVIVAL
¢ FLAMES |

HALL

oxen

»



> OCTOBER, 1952 |

; At the Pentecostal Tabernacle of is (Bank-holiday) |

Worthing View, Christ Church | 2 Music by

Revival. begins on Sunde Sept. $| & Percy Green's Orchestra j

14, 1952, and en n Sept. 26. All | 2 SUBSCRIPTION: —::— 3/-

re invited. The 1} c F aif

I : : g\% Dancing from 9 p.m.

t é ° Tickets not Transferable

Formal D1

ess Optional

~ three bedrooms,

SUNDAY



|
|
|

ADVOCATE










Helio Folks! Remember the

ANNUAL DANCE

given by
Messrs. KITTY BEST and
FITZGERALD SOBERS
{known as Pepsie)

oe" ae
Tuesday Night, 16th September,
oe

at QUEEN'S PARK HOUSE
Admission — 2/-
Music by - - -
CLEVIE GITTENS ORCHESTRA
Refreshments on Sale
Please invite your Friends

OFFERS

NEW BUNGALOW

Known as No. 10, Blue Waters,
and standing on approximately
14,000 square feet of land com-
Prising three bedrooms, one with
dressing-room and toilet and
bath attached, combination draw-
ing and dining room, separate
toilet and bath, modern kitchen
two servants’ rooms with toilet
and bath, garage. This property
ean be bought for a very reason-
able figure. lease contact us as
soon as possible.

SWEETFIELD
stone house comprising
tairs three bedrooms large
ing room, dining room, two
toilets and baths, one with tub
bath and hot, and cold water,
@allery. Downstairs: three spare
rooms, kitchen and shower room,
standing on approximately 2%
acres of land about 100 yards
from Gibbes Beach. This prop-
erty has been extensively reno-
Vated by the present owner, and
@an be had for a very reasonable
» Inspection by appointment

Large

BUNGALOW
At Rockléy New Road, com-
prising three bedrooms, dining
room and living room, modern
Kitchen toilet and bath, all bed-

rooms have built in cupboards as

Well as the kitchen. This prop-
etty is very close to the Golf
Course in a very popular resi-
dential area. Immediate posses-
ston.
SYBSTAN

Situate at Navy Gardens, com-
prising three bedrooms, two
toilet and baths, combination

dining and living rooms, pantry,
kitchen and storeroom, two ser-

vants rooms in the yard with
toilet and bath, laundry room
and garage. This is a_ lovely

house offered at a competitive

CHATSWORTH

tuate at Codrington Hill,

ichael, comprising two
Teoms, one small spare room,
Drawing and Dining ~ rooms,
Toilet and bath, closed gallery.
Standing on approximately 2
rodds 7% perches of land. This
property is going at a very rea-
sonable price.

St
bed-

CHURCHILL

Situate at Maxwell Coast Road,
comprising three bedrooms with
running water, combination draw.
ing and dining rooms, modern
kitchen, toilet and bath. The
property is situate in » good resi-
dential area with excellent sea
bathing. A sound investment at
a very low reserve price

WYNDAL

Situate at Rockley, partly stone
and lath and plaster, comprising
dining and liv-
ing rooms, toilet and bath, and
a large gallery, The outbuildings
comprise _ servants’ room and
garage. The property, stands on
approximately 1,000 square feet
‘of land within 100 yards of the
famous Rockley Beach,

. BUNGALOW

Situate in Rockley New Road
commanding a magnificent view
of the Gold Course unobstructed
to the sea. It comprises three
bedrooms, one with built-in cup-
boards, Drawing and Dining
rooms, Modern kitchen, totlet and

bath. Downstairs: Servants’ room
with toilet and bath. Garage for
two cars, and enough room for
laundry etc. The property stands
on approximately 19,000) squar
feet of land.
BUNGALOW

Situate at Graham Hall Terrace
very attractively designed, com-
prising three bedrooms, with

toilets and baths attached, Dining
and Living rooms, Kitchen, ver-
andah to the west and a nice
patio to the east The property
stands on approximately ‘. acre
of land.

EVANTON

Situate at Top Rock compris-
ing three bedrooms, two with ad-
joining toilet and bath, spare
Toom that can be used as a
breakfast room or _ children’s
nursery, living and dining room,
kitchen, separate toilet and bath
with hot and cold water, veran-
dah to the south and patio to
the north. The outbuildings com-





prise servants’ rooms with toilet
and bath, and a large garage. In-
spection by appointment.
PARAGON

Situate near Seawel! A\lrport,
Christ Church, comprising two
large bedrooms with dressing rooms
attached, two medium e bed-
rooms with dressing rooms and
built-in cupboards large open

verandah entire length of house
with a lovely view of Chancery
Lane Beach and the sea. Down-
stairs: Entrance lobby, living and
dining rooms, breakfast room,
pantry, kitchen, large study, and
a lovely open pation to the
south. This property also has
lovely grounds and a portion of
arable land containing 742 acres.
Inspection by appointment only

COVE SPRING COTTAGE

A lovely cottage standing on
2 toods 27 perches of land, situ-
ate at St. James Coast, having
its own private bathing beach,
and comprising three bedrooms,
with private toilet and bath to
main bedroom, drawing and
dining rooms, European bath with
hot and cold running water and
separate toilet, modern kitchen,
and a gallery on two sides.

WYNDOVER
Situate at Mile and Quarter,
St.. Peter, another lovely house
comprising three bedrooms, din-
room, living room, modern
ts and baths with hot and
cold water, large verandahs. Out-
standing view to the sea. Exten-
sive outbuildings including a
large garage, two servants’ rooms,
Jaundry, workshop. Extensive
orchard with specially selected
fruit trees. The property has
been well cared and is in excel-
lent condition. Immediate pos-

session, Very low price

HOMEMEDE

Situate in the Garrison,
Michael, comprising four bed-
rooms, combination living and
dining rooms, separate toilet and
path, kitchen with built-in cup-
boards, verandah the whole
length of the building. The out-
buildings © mprise two servants
rooms witn water tdilet and a
garage for two cars, The above
property stands on approximately
7,500 square feet of land In-
spection by appointment only

CHATTEL HOUSE
Situate at Ist Avenue, Alleyne's



St

Land, Bush Hall, 1l6ft. x Qt
chattel house, with shedroof 16ft
x ft. and kitchen &ft. x 6ft.

partly enclosed with wood pal
ings. The above property can be
had for a very reasonable price

REALTORS Limited

REAL ESTATE AGENTS
AUCTIONEERS
VALUERS
151/12 Roebuck Street,

Bridgetown Phone 4900





REALTORS LIMITED |



| SHIPPING NOTICES









Consignee, Tele. No. 4047

§ OSS SUF ee
r
. The M/V “CARIBBEE” will
R Hurricane Precaution Y]% ccc. eile SSP FREE ees Yar
4 Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
} T 7 Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing Frida:
A MINT No. 17 seen :
The M/V “MONEKA”" wiil
| aecept Cargo and Passengets for
DURING A STORM Nevis and St Kite, Salling Friday
i Be sure that a window or 18th inst
\ door on the lee side opposite B.W.1. SCHOONER OWNERS’
the one facing the wind can i ASSOCIATION (INC.)
|
i

be opened. 13.9.52—3n,

|







Canadian National Steamships





SOUTHBOUND







Satis Satis Salle Artives Satls
Montresi Halifax Boston Barbados Barbados
LADY RODNEY , J 3 Sept. 6 Sept. 8 17 1 it.
CANADIAN CHALLENGER i2Sept. 6 Sept. = 24 <= 25 Siot.
LADY NELSON . : 22 Sept. 25 Sept. 27 Sept. 6 Oct. 7 Oct
NOKTHBOUND
Areives Salls Arrives Arrives Arrives
Barbados Barbados Bostes Halifax Mentres!
CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR 1 Sep. 19 Sep — 9 Oct 12 Oct.
LADY RODNEY * 30 Sept. 2 Oct. 11 Oct. 12 Oct. 16 Oct.
CANADIAN CHALLENGER f Oct 8 Oct, a 21 Oct. 24 Oct
LADY NELSON : 19 Oct 21 Oct 20 Oct. 31 Oct. 4 Nov









For further particulars, apply to—

GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents.

WSOOISSSODHFFIIISOIGOOSISS SIS IIS SSTSVSSIISOO OOO”
x



‘ HURRICANE PRECAUTION HINT NO. 60

FALLING TREES are very likely to disrupt the Electric
Supply. Keep a couple of Hurricane Lanterns filled with
oil and a box of Matches in a handy place.

All these are obtainable at...

CENTRAL EMPORIUM

Corner Broad & Tudor Streets
“SFSSOVSOSSSNGOSSOOSSOSES |











CLEARING ITEMS FOR THIS WEEK !
Usually NOW

HEAVY CREPE BACK SATIN
Ribbed back Marshal fabric ................ $2.97 $2.11

COTTON SEERSUCKER

CUE Oe PRO. ke eet eneunay ope $1.12 90c,
COTTON PLAID ... See asad <5 <% ado ws gle aoe 91c, 69c.
ITALIAN BORDERED SPUN ........... $1.86 $1.33

a ——————

(Over 25 Designs)

Also Plenty More at

KIRPALANI

52 Swan Street









BARBADOS FOOD PRODUCTS

A PIONEER INDUSTRY

Announces

| The Opening of its

Sales Branch

In Speightstown

On Munday, Sept. 15
Offering ...
HAM — BACON — LARD
PICKLED PORK — OFFAL
FRESH PORK, BEEF, MUTTON

All Locally Produced



There will be in store for you, your family, your friends and
all Visitors to the Island, a SURPRISE, and a great one too.
If you know what it's all about, then it will not be a surprise.

You sre cordially invited to this “BIG SURPRISE” which

be — Seer at your popular leading Store—N. E. WILSON

Any and everything you see or do will certainly surprise you.
The large package containing quality merchandise of your
selection for the very few cents you will have paid, will be a
feature of “Great Surprise.”

Our sincere advice to you is . . . “Be calm, don’t rush, don’t
fight, don't jostle, don’t block traffie at the counter and entrance
of the store; our efficient and courteous staff will take care of
everything and will despatch you quickly, and please leave
after you have'been served so that others will have the same
advantage which you enjoyed.



_ Our Store is air-conditioned, and there is no likelihood
of discomfort. Our door opens at 8 a.m. daily and closes at
4.30 P.M. So, now then, off to - - - -

N.E. WILSON & CO.

The merchant who leads the way while others merely follow.

Dial: 3676



Swan St =:





SUNDAY,



SEPTEMBER l4, 1952



ae

Advocate Stationery
FOR BOOKS

FILM §S
AT
THE BARBADOS
AQUATIC CLUB
(Local and Visiting Members
Only)
Through the courtesy of the
British Council there will be
a FILM SHOW in the Ball-

room on WEDNESDAY, Sep-
tember 17th, at 8.30 p.m.

The Programme includes :
BRITISH NEWS
HOUSE OF WINDSOR

(The Royal Family)
CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY
COUNTRY TOWN
COLOUR IN CLAY

(Pottery Making)



BLABON

se ce.

AF5S., F.V.A.

Extensive Listings of Good
Class Property and Land
Always Available

FOR SALE

—-———

NEW BUNGALOW, LODGE
LAND, ST. MICHAEL, — We are
instructed to offer this very de+
sirable home constructed by a lead-
ing firm of building contractors.
The accommedation provides %
spacious becrooms, with built-in
wardrobes, large drawing room,
separate dining room, kitchenette
with breakfast room, and large
pantry. The garage and servant's
quarters are detached. Mains
water and quota of electric light
This property is situated in a new
end select residential area from
which there ane fine panoramic
views Bridgetown and the har-
bour, he site is very cool and
only 34 miles from town centre.
The property is available with from
approx. % to 1% acres as required
and the price asked is very fair
indeed. We can recommend this
listing very highly.

BUILDING PLOTS, LODGE
LAND, St. Michael. We offer 4
attractive lots in this new devel-
opment area, varying in size from
10,000 to 18,000 sq. ft. geal all
with excellent views. ‘ater and
light available.



BRIGHTWOOD, St. Lawrence. A
pleasant and comfortable property
which mellows nicely with its
surroundings. Own beach frontage
and excellent bathing facilities.
Three bedrooms, living room and
dining room, kitchen, separate
toilet and shower, wide L_ shi
verandah looking sea-wards. Se
arate garage and servants’ rooms.
Ideal seaside home in a g
residential quarter,

RESIDENCE, THE GARDEN,
WORTHING — Modern coral stone
bungalow on corner site with
wide frontages. Pleasant garden
with flower beds, lawn,
patio, and number of bearing fruit
trees. Accommodation comprises
large living room, covered gallery,
3 bedrooms with built-in ward-
robes, well fitte? kitehen, garage
with covered way to house, ser-
vants' quarters and all usual
offices. All public utility services
one of the most attractive homes
now available in the medium price
range.

MODERN HOME, St. Peter —
A luxuriously appointed residence,
with four bedrooms, 3 tiled bath-
room, verandah & kitchenette up-
stairs, with garage, | servants’
In our opinion this property ts
3 bedrooms, dining and_ living
rooms with hot and cold, butler’s

pantry, kitchen, storerooms, 2
gerages. The grounds are expert.
ly laid out with a profusion of

flowering shrubs. Own right of

way to sea.

RESIDENCE, BLACK ROCK —
Soundly constructed property with
3 bedrooms, 2 living rooms, dining
room and gallery. On land of ap-
prox. 1 acre.

BUILDING LAND, ST. LAW-
RENCE COAST — Excellent plot
‘n good position with wide sea
frontage. Ideal site for sea-side
bungalow. One of the few vacant
lots available on this popular
coast.

11, GRAEME HALL TERRACE
—2 Storey coral stone house with
quarters and laundny below. This
house is set well back in its
grounds of about 1/3 acre, is not
overlooked and has unobstructed
view seawards. Open to offers

LAND, TWEEDSIDE ROAD—On
main road with 101/ frontage.
ideal situation for — business
premises, Total area 18,738 sq, ft.

BUSINESS PREMISES—-DWELL-
ING HOUSE, ROEBUCK STREET.
Good situation for retail shop in
this busy part of town, £2,000.

SWEETFIELD, St. Peter — An
estate type house built of stone.
Contains large living room with
French windows leading onto
covered verandahs with view of

sea. 3 bedrooms, kitchen, store~
rooms and usual outbuildings,
garage and servants’ quarters.

Approx 2% acres well laid out
grounds with right of way over
beach,

COVE SPRING HOUSE, ST.
AMES — One of the few prop-

NEW en ee ROCKLEY—
Commodious hi with 3 bed-
rooms, large living room, wide
verandah with good view, kitchen,
pantry, servants’ quarters and
storerooms. Good situation near
Golf Course £4,300.

BUNGALOW — ST. JAMES. A
three bedroom residence with liv-
ing room, Kitchen, pantry, veran-
dahs and garage. Excellent posi-
tign on coast with good beach
frontage and safe bathing. Bar-
gain at £4,000



RENTALS

NEW HOUSE—ROCKLEY
ROAD. Near
furnished .

NEW
Golf Course. Un-

Ww FLATS — Cod-
rington Hill. Choice of 4

11, GRAEME HALL TERRACE—
Furnished

NEWTON LODGE, MAXWELL’S
COAST Furnished or unfur-
nished with rmmediate possession.

Plantations Building
Phone 4640







SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER

CHURCH SERVICES

ee
AD ACAN
ST. LEONARD'S CHURCH
Sunday, Sept. 14th



8 ar Holy Communion 9 am
Matins and Sermon; 3 p.m Sunday
School; 7 p.m. Byensong and Sermon,

_ ST. MARY'S CHURCH
Within the Octave of B.V.M.
TRINITY XIV









} a.m. Mating; #00 a.m. Low Mase:

' Procession, Solemn Mass and

i preacher: The Ven. Archdeacon

chineo $0 pm. Sunday School;

p.m, Children’s Vesper; 7.00 p.m

ean Evensong Sermon and proces-

preacher: Fthr. Jenson, Vicar of

our Anthem by Choir—"Im-
Invisible’ by Erie Thiman,



METHODIST SERVICES
ith September
JAMES STREET: 11 om. Preacher:
Nev. G. Marshall; 3 p.m, Sunday School;



E 5 pee: Rev. K. EB. Towers,
- PAYNE’S BAY: 9.20 am, Preacher:
Mir. J. Layne: 7? p.m. Mr. F. Moore.

WHITE HALL: 9.30 am, Preacher:
Mr. M. Bhint; 7 p.m. Rev, PF. Lawrence
is)

ae Al 9,30 a.m, Preacher:
tev awrence; 7 p.m. x
HOLETOWN: 8.20 ‘am. ;
Morris: 7 p.m. Mr. D. Reid. ”
BANK HALL: 9.30 a.m. Preacher: Mr.
G. Sinckler; 7 p.m. Mr. H. Grant. 7
SPEIGHTSTOWN: if a.m. Preacher:

Rev. K. E. Towers, B.A.. B.D: 7

Rey G_ Marshall : Ne eee
SELAH: 9.30 a Pp : ov

a Tove Bay fF eecber: Rev. K.
B TESDA: 9,20 Preac :

vB) ae oe a.m Preacher: Mr.
BETHEL: 11 a.m. Mr. L. Mayers:

P.m. "Rev. T. J Furey. a
DALKEITH: 11 a.m. Rev J

Purley; 7 p.m. Mr. G. Marville
BELMONT: 11 a.m. Mr. G Harpe.

7pm Mr. J

Lovell

_SOUTH DISTRICT: 9am. Rev. T. J
Furley, Holy Communion; 7 p.m. Miss
Bryan

PROVIDFNCE: 11 a.m, Mr. I. Black-
man; 7 pm. Mr. St. Hill
: VAUXHALL: 9a.m, Mr. I. Blackman:

p.m rs

E. Browne
EBENEZER CIRCUIT

EBENEZE®: 9 a.m. Mr. O, Millar, 7
p.m. Revd. S. W. C. Crosse

BEULAH: 9 a.m Revd s ¥. c
Crosse, 7 p.m, Mr. R. Garnes

SHREWSBURY; 11 a.m. Revd S. W. C.
Crosee, Sacrament of the Lord’s Supper,
7 p.m. Mr. Arthur Clarke,

RICES: 11 a.m

Mr. C. G. Reid, 7 p.m.

Mr. G. Brathwaite
All Sunday Schools at 3 p.m
MORAVIAN
ROEBUCK STREET: 1! am Mornins
Service, preacher: Mr. E. C. Hewitt;
7 p.m. Evening Service, preacher Rev

E. E. New
GRACE
vice (followed by Holy
preacher: Rey. E, E. New;
ning Service, preecher:
FULNECK; 11

HILL: 11 a.m, Morning Ser-
Communion),
7 pm = Eve-
My, W. Hayde.

a.m. Morning Service,

preacher; Mr. W. St, Hill; 7 p.m Eve-
ning Service, preacher: Mr, W. Swire.
MONTGOMERY: 7 p.m. Evening Ser
vice, preacher: Mr, A_ Phillips.
DUNSCOMBE: 7 p.m. Evening Ser-
vies, preacher: Mr. S| Weekes

SHOP HILL: 7 p.m. Evening Service,
preacher: Mr. W. S, Arthur.
SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST
KING 8T. CHURCH
7.15 pan, Evangelistic Meeting. Speak-
er: Pastor M,
“Christ's Appointments
GOVERNMENT HILL CHURCH
7.15 p.m, Evangelistic
er: Pastor W. W
“The Certainiy of
ment."
IPP ST NICHOLAS EPISCOPAL
ORTHODOX, WELCHES ROAD
11 a.m., Matins and Sermon, 7 p.m
Evensong and Sermon, preacher for bots
services the Rev
Minister-in-Charge
7.20 p.m

G. Nembhard Subject:
With You’.

Meeting, Speak-
Weithers
the

Subject:

Advent Move-

Deaconess C. Barrow,



Tuesday, Evening Prayers
ard Addr-ss, preacher the Rev L
Pruce-Clarke, The subject will be: “The
Boyhood and Youth of Saint Peul; Gale
tians Chapter 1, verse 15,
THE ST. JAMES NATIONAL BAPTISE

ll a.m,, Matins and Sermon

7 p.m. Evensong and Sermon. Preach-
er for both services the Rev. J. B.
Grant 1.. Th., Minister-in-Charge.

> p.m. Monday, Wednesday, Friday
training for youths; this will be conduct-
ed by the Rev. L. Bruce-Clarke (Assistant
Pastor) and Mrs. Qh; Browne

EGOLF BAPTIST CHURCH
Tudor Street
Rev. K. P. Hansen — Pastor

Sunday — 9.30 a.m. Sunday School --
Classes for all ages. 10.30 a.m. Morning
Worship — Studies in the Book of Acts.
7.30 p.m. Evangelistic Service — Lively



song service, special music, soul-stirring
message

Monday — 7.30 p.m. Baptist Young
People’s Union — A meeting by and

for the young with the dramatic reading
of “hock of Life,”

Wednesday -
Prayer Meeting

Listen every Tuesday and Thursday at
9.460 p.m. to “Echoes of Heaven" under
the auspices of the Fundamental Baptist
Churehes of Barbados, You are cordially
invited to attend the services of the Bap-
tist Churches

7.30 p.m. Praise and



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
First Charch of Christ, Scientist,
Bridgetown, Upper Bay Street

Sundays 11 a.m. and 7 p.m

Wednesdays 8 p.m A Service which
includes Testimonies of Christian Science
Healing

SUNDAY,
September la 1052

Subject ©f Kessan-Sermonm: SUBSTANCE

Golden Text: Hebrews i: 1. Faith ts
the substaenee of things hoped for, the
evidence of things not seen

Tho following Citations aye inetuded in
the Lesson-Sermon: The Bible: I lead in
way of righteousness, That I may
cause those that love me to inherit sub-
stance; Proverbs 8: 20, 21

Science and Health with Key to the
Seriptures, by Mary Baker Eddy.

Until belief becomes faith, and faith
becomes spiritual understanding, human
thought has little relation to the actual
or divine. Page 297



PART ONE

4,

1952





{|

SEA AND AIR |

| TRAFFIC

Seawell

ARRIVALS
From Antigua—!2.a.5%
Cyrit Taylor, Michael Ber:
lag@i, Donald Maggi, James Chaliner
Howard Reid, Florence Myers.
From Puerto Rico—12.9.62
D. Agnew, E. Barrows, P.
M. Alleyne, G. Beckless,
E. Rogers, D. Compbeil

Moegi

Black map

From 9.52
R. Bieknell, H. Champion, G. baer
mond 4

From = Trinidad—i2.9.52
§. Chrichlow, O. Crichlow, H.
H. Gooding, G. Gooding, ¥
L. Inniss a Millan, M. Villa-
ba as . Galati, G. Al
R_ Pinedo, L. Pinedo, D. Pinede
. RR. Stolk, H. Stolk, G

P, O'Reilly.
DEPARTURES

For Trinidad—12.9.52

L. Burr, A. Burr, G. Burr,
J, Burr, N. MacGregor,
R. Skinner, P. Connell, G. Chan,
Simpson, M. Mahon, J. Deboehmler, D
Deboehmier, K. Debochmlér L. Craw
ford, M. Scantlebury, ‘
Marshall, E. Cohen, L. Millan,

In Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

Balfour
Williams

O'Reilly

A. Burr
G. MaeG

T. Crawford, J.

Murr gE

Cable and Wireless (W.I.) Lid. advise

that they can now communicate with

the following ships through thei: Bar-

bados coast station:—
S.S, Texas, s.s.
Constructor, s.s

Scholar, s.s
Queenston Heights, s.s.

Canatian |

Brazil, s.s. Punta Plaia, s.s. Alcoa ‘
Pioneer, s.s. Folke Bernadotts, s.s
Buccaneer, s.s, Archangelos, s.s. Tibe
rius, $.s. Marco Foscarini, s.s. Barbara

Ann, 5.8. Stavik, ss. De Grasse, s.s
Imperial Toronto 5.3 Quirigua es
Alcoa Puritan, s.s. Parismina, s.s. Sun-
dale, s.s. Sun Victoria, s.s. Hgra, M.T
Bahia, s.s. Tartar, s.s Uruguay. s.s.
Riomar, s.s. Mormackite, s.s. Kallada,
5.9, Rochester Cactle, s.s. Cape Hawke,
M.V. Neasera, ss, Pathfinder, s 5
Maracaibo, M.V. Atlantic Hunke. s.s.
Vianna Lianna, s.s. Linga, s.s- Sundial,
8.8. Kern Hills, s.s. Dragon, s.s. Bay-
ano, s.8. Salte ‘57, ss. Scorton, ss
Alcoa Pennant.



Listening Hors

SUNDAY, I4TH SEPTEMBER, 1952
1OO—7.45 pm — If m., 25.53m









400 pm. The News, 410 p m. Inter-
lude, 415 pm Council of Europe Con-
sultative A 430 pm. Sunday
Half Hour, 50@ pm. From The Bible,
510 pm Interlude, 5.15 pm _ Com-
poser of the Week, 5 45 pm
Inn, 6.15 pm English Magazine, 6 45
pm. Programme Parade and Interlude,
700 pm Home News From Britain.
715 pm Caribbean Voices.

745-1015 pam — 2.5%m., 31.32m

t

Esso |

}
j

|

Arthur's ;

745 p m The Feast of the Holy Cross, |

815 pm. Radio Newsreel, 8 30 p.m

A Visit to the Wellington Museum, 8.50 !
From The °

pm, Interlude, 4.55
Editorials, 900 p m
enade Concerts,
1010 p m. News Talk, 10 15 p.m. Lon

pm
From The Prom-



don Forum,

MONDAY, ISTH SEPTEMBER, 1952
4.00—+.1, pom — Wm, 6 53m
400 p.m, The News, 410 p.m, The

Daily Service, 415 pm. The Case of
the Night Watchman’s Friend, 4 45 p.m.
Variety.
ball, 5.05 p.m. Composer of the Week,
515 pm Souvenirs of Music, 6.00 p.m.
Welsh Miscellany, 6.15 pm. Listeners’
Choice, 6 45 pm = Sports Round Up and
Programme Parade, 7.00 p.m.*The News,
7.10 p.m Home News From Britain
715—10.30 pm, — 25.5%m., 31.32m
715 pm Books To Read, 7 30 pm
Film Review, 745 pm. Ballads and
Songs, 815 pm Radio Newsreel,
p.m. European Survey, 8 45 p m
ferlude, 855 pm From The Editorials,
9.00 pm_ Listeners’ Digest, 9 30 p.m.
London Light Concert Orchestra, 10.00
p.m, The News, 10.10 pm. News Talk,
10.15 pom, Seience Review,
Tip Top Tunes.

In-

10 30 pm



Gracie Fields Says
Farouk’s All Right

LONDON, Sept. 13.

Gracie Fields discussed in Lon-
don on Saturday, one of her cus-
tomers at her luxury eating,
swimming, and dancing hostelry
on Dream Island, Capri, the ex-
King Farouk. Gracie spoke not
as a Lancashire comedienne who
holds her big British audiences by
unabashed sentimentality or broad
humour, but as the owner of the
Canzone Del Mar.

She said ‘“Farouk’s alright. He
is a customer of mine at Canzone
Del Mar.” Was it true that he
spent mueh of his time swimming
at the exelusive and expensive
Canzone Del Mar? Gracie said:

He has never swum in my pool”

She added he prefers the sea,
“Farouk has been to her place
pnly three times, she explained.

10,00 p.m. The News, |

|

5.00 pm Rugby League Foot- |

|

|

|

His daughters were there often !
and “they are wonderful girls.
Very nice indeed” On his first

visit to England with Gracie was
her husband Boris Alperovic. *
—U.P.

ORDERS



By
Majer O. F. C. WALCOTT, E.D.,
Commanding,
THE BARBADOS REGIMENT

Issue No. 3,
3X. All ranks
“A" Coy. is allotted the open and min:



the range, Nos. 2 and 3 Platoons will do bayonet training.

will carry out weapon training with a

members of HQ Coy. who have not ye

in toueh with the R,S.M, immediately,
Band

Band practices will be held on Mon, 1

Orderly Officer
Orderly Serjeant

M. L. D,
S8.0.L.F.



12 Sep. 62.

will, parade at Regt, HQ at 1700 hours on Thursday 18 Sep, 52

No. 1 Platoon will be on

HQ and “B" Coys.

lature ranges.

view-to firing the A.M.C.—L.M.G. Those
t been allotted a time to fire should get

5, Wed, 17 and Thurs. 18 Sep. 52.

ORDERLY OFFICER & ORDERLY SERJEANT FOR WEEK ENDING 2 SEP. 5?

2/Lt. L. G. Quintyne
23 L/Sijt. Turney, D. G
SKEWES-COX, Major,
& Adjutant,
The Barbados Regiment.



PART TL ORDERS

THE BARBADOS REGIMENT

i. STRENGTH INCREASE

2/Lt. M. S, Conliffe “A” Coy.
2, TRANSFERS
483 Pte. Toppin, E. N
201 CSM Mandeville, W HQ Coy
%. PROMOTION
204 CQMS Hall, F. B i
M. L

SERIAL NO. 36

Granted a commission in the rank of

2/Lt. by H.E. the Governor and posted

to “A” Coy, w.ef. 3 Sep, 52.

Transferred from Reserve to Active

strength w.e.f. 28 Aug. 52.

Transferred to “B” Coy. w.e4, 12 Sep.

52.

Promoted CSM HQ Coy. w.ef. 12 Sep.

52.

D. SKEWES-COX, Major,

S.0.L.F. & Adjutant,

The Barbados Regiment.

14.9.52—In.

cients atm

POLICE

NOTICE



THE BAHAMAS POLICE :

RECRUITS

Twenty recruit:

The following a
British subject by birth.
Age: 22 to 27 years,

WANTED

re required for the Bahamas Police.
the MINIMUM requirements:—

Education: not less than Standard VII.

Height: 5’ 9” in bare feet.

Chest: not less than 36” expanded.
Single men only will be considered.
Applicants will be seen at the Police Training Senool, District
“A” at 10.00 a.m. on Thursday, 18th September. /

It is no use applying unless you
Police Headquarters,
Bridgetown,
10th September, 1952

satisfy all the above requirements.

R. T. MICHELIN,
Colonel,
Commissioner of Police.

}
|
|

F 12.9.52—3n, '



SUNDAY ADVOCATE

MEETING OF THE SHAREHOLDERS
OF
JOES RIVER SUGAR ESTATES LTD.

\t





‘ At The First Ordinary General Meeting of the Shareholders of Joes River
Sugar Estates Limited which was held at the Hall of the Children’s Goodwill Leaguc |
at 5 p.m. on Thursday last, the 11th instant, Messrs. A. A. Guiler, J. B. Beckles, M.B.E.. |
G. C. Ashby, Dr. E. W. Roberts, C. A. Coppin B.A.Se., and G, G. Medford were re-

elected as Directors of the Company along with M. D, Symmonds, the Managing Di-
rector.

; Before the Meeting commenced the Chairman, Mr. J. B, Beckles. M.B.E., asked |
Members present to stand for a moment in silent respect to the memory of the late |
Adam Straughn Husbands J.P. who had served the Company in the capacity of a Direc- |
tor and ome as its ing Agricultural Attorney.
n moving the adoption of the Report of the Directors, the Managing Director |
Mr. M, o a a a as lans for establishing a coconut and yr |
in-suitable undeveloped areas of the estates, were well umderway and al
thousand dwarf coconuts had been planted. " — ee
ea Steps were being taken to set up a Welfare Department for the Children of |
abourers.
: The shares of the Company were being rapidly taken up, 125,053 shares of)
£1. each having been sold during the period under review, while a Dividend of 8% was!

recommended by the Directors to be payable on the l€th day of December next to| ing

Ordinary Shareholders.

The Report as adopted follows:— | aaa.



GOVERNMENT NOTICES



WAR DAMAGE PAYMENTS (FAR EAST)

Notification has been received the Secretary of State

he Colonies that —
(1) the 31st of October, 1952,

rom

has been fixed as the

Extended Far Eastern Private Chattels Scheme, 1949,

the Burma Business, 1919;

(2






panies Department) Lacon !!ouse, Theobalds Road, London i
W.C.1., before the final dace Cause Ki led in 3 Nays
14.9.52-—1n The very first appiidation WoW c
derm begins to clear qwas qdien
Nike ningic.. Use Nixogerne 1»
nr and you will soon seu vour air
DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE & AGRICULTURE cpining 90 smooth ast ete
vA new diycovery thal

The Department of Science & Agriculture will have

| rainfall areas only.

DIRECTORS’ REPORT | variety should apply

it

|

FIRST ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTORS FOR THE PERIOD 16TH MARCH,
1951 TO 30TH JUNE, 1952





The Directors have the honour to present the Annual Report on the working
of the Company and the Financial Statement with the Auditor’s Report thereon for the
he above mentioned and inelusive also of the crop period 1st January to 15th March

SHARES:—During the period under review 125,053 shares of £1 each were sold.

GENERAL.—The new Roads built at. Horse Hill,.Vaughns, Mt». D'acres, Joes!
River, Frizers and Springfield have considerably enhanced the value of these estates,

The Gulf Oil Company has been carr ying out tests in the area.

The question of land surveys contin ues to engage the attention of the Directors.

Several thousand coconut trees have been planted in suitable areas in accordance
ig our plans for the establishment and developed of a coconut and citrus industry in
the area.

PROFIT AND LOSS ACCOUNT:— From the Net Profit of $40,414.70 the Directors
recommend the following payments and allocations:-~

Transfer to General Reserve .... as ies ik ve $ 5,000.00 }

6’; Preference share Dividend $20,851.00 less $7,818.95 Income

Tax eis ayy rs ae a a eu $13,032.05
8) Ordinary share Dividend $9,134.46 less $3,425.42 Income Tax $ 5,709.04
Transfer to Income Tax Reserve ae es os aay $15,155.34
Transfer to Labourers’ Children’s Welfare or Scholarship Fund $ 108.00
Transfer to Labourers’ House Repair or Improvement Fund $ 408.00
Transfer to Profit and Loss Account $ 1,002.27

AUDIT:—Mr. E. H. Bohne was appointed as Auditor for the period, and is now
eligible for election.

OFFICERS:—It is with deep regret that the Directors record the passing of the
late Adam Straughn Husbands J.P. who rendered outstanding service to the Company as
its Agricultural Attorney and also served in the capacity of a Director.

During the year Messrs. G. G. Medford, C. A. Coppin and Dr. E, W. Reberts have
been appointed to hold office until the next Ordinary General Meeting. At the first
Ordinary General Meeting all of the Directors except the Managing Director retire auto-

matically and are eligible for election.
J. B. BECKLES,—Chairman

M. D. SYMMONDS,—-Managing Director
O. E. MILLINGTON,—Seeretary.

REVENUE ACCOUNT, PERIOD 1ST JANUARY, 1951 TO 30TH JUNE, 1952.

———$—$—$—$—$—$$—$—$$$$$$ SSS
EXPENDITURE REVENUE

$291,318.02 | Property and Produce Account:
349,496.95 Sales of Produce &



Cane Purchase... 4
Cost of Plantation Canes :







PROFIT AND LOSS ACCOUNT

ee ee

General Expenses, Land Sales and Property .. $1,132,513.75
Commission des ie s 31,949.26) Less Cost of Prop-
Licence of Vehicles 252,24 erty Sold 60,000.00 $1,072,513.75
Appraisement 13.64
Interest ‘ ée ed 29,351.75
Transportation and Freight 21,549.16
Rent we “4 mA 67.60
Sugar Bags : 78,119.75
Factory Supplies .. te Repairs to machinery & Vehicles of
Transportation 64,108.81
Stationery -, 532.16
Taxes and Insurance 3,908.93
Wages ard Salaries 92,826.37
Salaries Payable .. AH 1,062.00
Auditor’s Salary Payabl 960.00
Fuel ae ; eg a 52.31
Water Mills and Water Rates .. 22.41
Building Repairs . . si i i 333.59
Depreciation on Motors & Tractors 20% 6,408.80
986,049.05
Contribution to Govt. Reserve Fund 46,050.00
Profit 40,414.70
$1,072,513.75 $1,072,513.75





























Dividend on 6% Prefer- Balance Brough Down . £40,414.70
ence Shares . $20,851.00
Less Income Tax 7,818.95 $13,032.05
Dividend of 8% on e
Ordinary Shaves $ 9,134.46
Less Income Tax 3,425.42 5,709.04
Income Tax Reserve i 15,155.34
General Reserve ie” ne 5,000.00
Labourers’ Children’s Welfare or
Scholarship Fund es a ais 108.00
House Repair og Improvement Fund 408,00
Profit and Loss % yg ‘ 1,002.27
$40,414.70 X sai
BALANCE SHEET, PERIOD 1ST JAN UARY, 1951 TO 30TH JUNE, 1952 t
LIABILITIES & CAPITAL ASSETS
AUTHORISED CAPITAL: Property Purehsse Price $951,482.29
120,000 Prefer- Legal Expenses, Roads,
ence Shares Surveying Improvements 11,349.36 |
@ £1 each £120,000 = $576,000.00 oo carteneatmeierers
40,000 Ordinary 1 012,781.65
Shares @ £1 Less Cost of Property
each £ 40,000=$192,000,00 Sold 60,000.00 $952,781.65
£160,000 $768,000.00 Bank Balance !icyal Bank
eee of Canada a 2,352.93 |)
ISSUED CAPITAL: Bank Balance B'dos, Co-
$6,261 Ordinary op. Bank Limited 2 3,889.61
Shares at £1 Loans on Property Sales: :
each . $174,062.80 Horse Hill Receivable $ 64,427.88
86,792 eee Loans on .Property Sales:

ence Shares Mt. D’Acres &

@ £recch 426,201.60 ere eceivable 16,720.00 81,147.88
nlahiaoeponesiliniaten Preliminary Fxvenses 3
$600,254.40 jonne Plantations ear es

es and Tractors $ 32,041.80 :
PAID UP CAPITAL: Depreciatio ,
14.546 Ordinary preciation $ 6,408.80 25,633.00

Shares y Stock of Factory Supplies

ie aed $ 69,820.89 Roce of Manurent tet rane ae

% rdinary 1953 ©

Shares Partly — 50,707.88

paid 44,360.00 $114,180.80

79,117 Prefer-
ence Shares
Fully paid $379,761.60
9,675 Prefer-
ence Shares
Partly paid 20,824.65 400,586.25
Paid up Capital $514,767.05
Agricultural Bank ' 376,372.29
Other Cash Loans Payable ‘ 8,600.00
Reserved to meet Government Fund . 46,050.00
Manure 1953 i 30,797.28
Accounts Payable 95,578.69
Salaries Payable Ey 5 2,022.00
Profit and Loss .. 40,414.70
$1,114,602.01 $1,114,602.01



AUDITOR’S REPORT
I hereby certify that I have examined the foregoing Balance Sheet with the Books of
the Company, | have obtained all the information and explanetions I have required and that in my
opinion the above Balanee Sheet is properly dfawm wp so as to exhibit @ true and correct view of the
state of affairs of the Company, according to the best of my information and the explanations given
te me, and as shown by the Books of the Company
EDWARD H. BOHNE,

Auditor.

3. Those persons desirous of obtaining planting material of this
in writing to the Director of Agriculture not
Applicants will be in-
formed in due course when they should send for planting material.
2n

ater than Tuesday, 30th September, 1952.

24.8.52

TENDERS FOR THE SUPPLY OF GROUND PROVISIONS

Tenders are invited for the supply of ground provisions for the

three months beginning on the ist October, 1952, to the following your health and weaken your heart.
BP acres In 2 minutes MENDACO—the pre-

Government Departments : scription of a famous doctor—circu-
Glendairy Prison: Sweet potatoes approximately 9,000 lates through the blood, quickly eurb-

ing the attacks. The very first day the

lbs. a month as governed by the number
of prisoners, to be delivered twice week-
ly at the prison in proportionate amounts
5,000
Ibs, a week, to be delivered at the Men-
tal Hospital twice weekly in proportion-

Mental Hospital: Sweet potatoes —- approximately

ate amounts.
Yams —- as available.
Eddoes —~ as available.

Lazaretto: Sweet potatoes — approximately 250 lbs. Rhamist “the guarantee protege you.
a week, delivered twice weekly as
ordered
Yams as available. R H E U M A Tis fi
Edadoes as available.
Breadfruit — as available

2. Tenders should show the price per 100 Ibs.

to the 3lst of December, 1952.

3. Tenders should be forwarded
to the Colonial Secretary (and not to any officer by name) so as
reach the Colonial Secretary's Office not later than (4 p.m.
Wednesday, 24th September, 1952)
marked — “Tenders for ground provisions.”

4, Further information is obt
tal Hospital and the Lazaretto.

5. The Government does not bind itself to accept the lowest
any tender.





TENDERS FOR SUPPLIES

SEALED TENDERS will be received at the Hospital up to
o'clock noom on Wednesday, |7th September,
articles in the following lines for a period of six months from
October, 1952:—

(1) FRESH BREAD
(2) ALCOHOL

(3) COFFINS, and providing HEARSE for the burial of

the dead at the Westbury Cemetery.

(4) PURE FRESH MILK, between 200 and 250 pints a

day only.

Forms for the respective tenders will be supplied on application
to the Secretary of the General Mospital and tenders will not be en-
tertained except they are on forms supplied by the General Hospital
at the time of tendering letters
ota property, expressing their
of the

Persons tendering must submii
from two other persons known to poss
willingness to become bownd as sureties for the
contract,



fulfilment

Terms of contract and any further particulars may be obtained





on application at the General Hosvital. 10.9.52—-3n organs, stimulates them nor-
mal healthy action thus
=| restores freshness and vigour.
411 Chemists and Stores sel)
N. AC. ° ( i) LEARN TO EARN
Thousands of L.8.C al
. th hout the British’ Empire
RULES haver® thoreseed their salaries
th b studying ov asy post.4
Photos of an animal or group of animals. ‘sae th HOOK KEEPING, a
Any size—Black and White Only. RETARYSHIP, BUSID P.
Closing Date—4th October. Croce ce Hoaecs
Association reserves the right to reproduce any print, fees to oversens students. Piplo
4 » f . ractive ed. ‘08 tus —
a aa to the most attractive photo, mas eerie 7unee oF
r , COMMERES | pe
(Dept B.A.5) 116, ‘olborn
IST PRIZE $15.00 *FEondon, W.C.1 Englands
2ND PRIZE . 8.00 SSS
SRD PRIZE 3.00 PRGOSOSS EPO

Decision of the Judges will be final.

All photos to be sent to the S.P.C.A., Office, Harbour

Police Station, c/o Hon. Secretary and marked S.P.C.A. Photo-
graphic Competition.



“YATES” SEEDS

The Seeds that grow .

Fresh Supplies of—

“YATES”

Flower and Vegetable Seeds

Also
“YATES BULBS”
SPREKELIA FORMOSISSIMA ..ee @ 4/6 each
TABEROSE (Double large Clumps) @ 2/6 each
CRYTHANTUS (Alfafa Lily) wa @ 4/- each

Obtainable at:—

BOOKER’S (B'DOS) DRUG STORES LTD.

Broad Street, and Hastings (ALPHA PHARMACY)

|
iil il lenin lelaaalaal



final date for
the receipt of Claims in respect of the United Kingdom Far
Eastern Private Chattels Scheme, 1946, the United Kingdom
and

any United Kingdom British subjects now resident in Barba-
dos who may be eligible to submit a claim under one of these
schemes, but who have not clready done so should obtain an
application form from and make the necessary declaration
the Assistant Secretary, Board of Trade, (Insurance and Corn-

a limited
| quantity of planting material of the variety B.45151 available for
distribution later in the year.

2. This variety has relatively thin canes, but is capable of giv-
very heavy yields of plant and ratoon cane, and has an excellent
It is recommended for trial on a commercial scale in the high

at which each
of the abovementioned commodities will be delivered at the institu-
| aon concerned during each month of the period from the Ist October

in sealed envelopes addressed

The envelope should be clearly

inable from the Prison, the Men

14.9,62—-1n,

1952, for supplying















Don't neglect a d
seated cough! Rub t
chest with A.l, White
Liniment. The etrating
heat stimulates b: cireu-
lation and promptly relieves
congestion. Thous: have
found relief with A.!.













































imples G













gerins and parnsites on the kit th
cause Plnples., B Red Plot
Kozema, Ringworm, wud a

You can't get vid of » .
until you re:nove the'gerne that hide
in the tiny pores of your skin. So
get Nixoderm from your chemitlet to-

day under the positive guarantee that

Nixederm will banish pimple aod
clear your skin soft and smooih or
money

hack on

Nixoderm ©)":
’

Wer Skin Troubles jackuse

ASTHMA MUCUS

Dissolved First Day

Choking, gasping, wheezing
Asthma and Bronehitis poison
your system, sap your energy, ruin



trangling mucus is ftagolved, thus
iving free, easy breathing and rest-
ul sleep, No dopea, no smokes, no
‘njoetions, Just take pleasant, taste-
fosa MENDACO tablets at meals and
be ontirely free fcom Asthma and
Bronchitia im next to no time, even
though you may have suffered for
years, MENDACO is. so successful
Yhat it la cuavanteed to give you free,
euwy breathing in 24,hour® and to
completely stop your Asthma in 8 days
or jon back on raturn of empty

ge. Get MENDAGO: from your





and agonising
BACKAGHE

=v








to
on

or

Sufferers from
rheuma will
be interested in
the experience
related in this
man's letter ;-—

relleved by
“Some years
ago L began to

KRUSCHEN
* feel rheumatism

in my arms and shoulders, Then
a started in the small of my
, increasing until they were
reuly severe, I hought a bottle
of Kruschen and was surprised to
find that I got a little relief. I
bought another and before it was
fi ed all my pains had gone
sproarsDagain MY pains were
appea again.
Obstinat and the relief really
au me."—T.R. a ‘ .
Rhe tic pains and backache
are woually the result of poisons

1 oigons which lazy
wols and. tired kidneys are

hasnts Bors { 4 er
com! ere 16
treatment than Kruschen Salts
treatin cleanses all the intern

Obstinate

ig | complaints



ist





JUST RECEIVED

suns

POTTERS ASTHMA REMEDY
BRAND'S BEEF ESSENCR
LIVONAL
HORLICK MALTED MILK
(3 Steen)

MILLER'S WORM POWDERS
WARDONIA RAZOR HADES
KAOLIN rourare
ANTIPHLOGISTINE
VITAB
INFANTOL
LOKOL DROPS

PEERS OC CSN A

(. CARLTON BROWNE

Wholesale & Retail
Druggist

136 Roebuck St. Dial 2815

PRAMS

%
.





No Visit to Barbados is eom-
plete without visiting the
famous terrace of

CACRABANK HOTEL

(a short ride from Town)
Overlooking and command-
ing the whole of

WORTHING BEACH

Here sitting over the sea, in

all the breezes that blow,

you can drink its famous

Planters Punch — or have

LUNCH—TEA—or DINNEK
or TEA or COFFEE

at 11 a.m,
After a hot shopping speil
take a Bus or Taxi to

CACRABANK
and bring your costume for
a swim to enjoy its coolness.
Ask for a leaflet of rates,
and look at its rooms,
Parties for Luneh and
Dinner arranged,
Dining Room on Terrace
Telephone 8148 and 8613

ooo









PAGE

AGRICULTURAL NOTES:

SIXTEEN

Cane Root Infesting Mealy

By R. W. E.



TUCKER

N the first place this Cane Root Infesting Mealy Bug
must not be confused with the Cane stem mealy bug which
has been known for a long time in Barbados and is under

control,

The root infesting mealy bug was first noticed on twe
widely separated plantations in the hillier red soil areas
in 1951, when some third or fourth ratoon fields which had
previously given good tonnages started to fail either com-

pletely or in patches.
At about the same time reports
which have since been published





were received from Trinidad
i i} inhabitant ant wa)
associated with a small white
cane ot infesting mealy bug
iv me cane growing areas,



The sudden decline in ratoon
capacity of some plantation fields
Bayvbados could not be attri-
buted in 1951 to lack of rainfall





or to pver soil tilth, but appeared
to be a direct outcome of the
destruction of the cane root sys-
tem due to the continual sucking
of their juice by the small
white mealy bug.
Survey

A survey was made and is
being continued to find out
whether the root mealy bug is

ent in all areas of the





pres
is Apparently it is not,
neither is its attendant ant, a
C jicuous golden yellow ant,



1 heneycombs the soil in

frected







fields, and farms out the

ealy bug onto the cane roots
‘his ant ACROPYGA rears both
y bugs and ants in cells
and in tunnels which it makes in
the soil and carries the mealy



bugs around from place to place
the

in its jaws, Also when ants
swarm in their flying stage,
each ant carries a mealy bug or

one of its own young, in its Jaws

and thus spreads’ infestation
Infestation was also found to
extend in some areas to grass

roots in sour grass pastures and
cane (races,

The next step taken was to
collect numbers of the ants and
the root infesting mealy bugs
and to send them for identifi-
cation by experts in Lordon and
in Washington, The identifications
were the same in both cases,
namely that the golden yellow
ant was ACROPYGA MAR-
SHADLI and that the cane
root infesting mealy bug was
NEORHIZOECUS, new _ species,
but nearest in identification to
N. COLOMBIENSIS.

It was next ascertained that
the golden yellow ant had been
recorded many years ago in

Barbados and that planters had
seen it and fhought it was some
sort of wood ant.

No one however had ever seen
the small white mealy bug before,
nor had they seen the flying
form of the ant carrying the
mealy bug in its jaws

Failure
The failure of ratoon crops in
some fields or areas was not new

but had always been traceable
to damage by the cane root
borer BEETLE DIAPREPES

ABBREVIATUS. It is possible,
but not very probable, that when
searching cane ratoon roots for
root borer grubs, the white mealy
bugs on the roots had been over-
looked and not seen. The fact
that it is a new specie of mealy
bug and that lailures of ratoons

had appeared in a season of
excellent rainfall, and ih areas
not usually affected by root

borer, points to its being a new
pest of sugar cane, or one which
for some reason had suddenly

become a menace to ratoons and
had been noticed for the first

time in 1951.

Whatever the reasons for its
first having been notic?d in 1951
there seems no doubt that in
Barbados it is a primary pest to
cane root systems and that it is
on the increase and that it is
injurious to successful ratooning,

One other point that must be
noticed is that modern field cul-
tivation methods break up and
reduce the mealy bug association
in the soil, but do not destroy it;
hence plant canes are seldom
affected to a _ serious extent
though a few tons of canes per
aere may be lost. The ant mealy
bug association, however, built up
during first and second ratoons,
during which tonnage is also lost
may ‘also b2 reinforced by
migrations "by flying ants carry-
ing mealy bugs or from sour grass
pastures with the result that
third or fourth ratoons start to
lose tonnage so rapidly that they
are not worth keeping, which is
a serious matter,

Control

The steps which are being taken
to control this damave are, first,
to ascertain what soil insectoxi-
eant will kill the ants and mealy
bugs, how to apply it so that its
application can be fitted into the
plantation routine, and at what

They’

B-B-BUT OUR NEW A
HOUSE ISN’T FINISHED )’
YET“WE CAN'T MOVE YOUR
OUT--WE AIN*T GOT
NO PLACE TO GO---

THE CONTRACTOR
» PROMISED IT'D
BE READY-:+
BUTITLL BE
A FEW MORE>:




















DID OR DION’T DO! THIS Is
A LEASE EFFECTIVE TODAY!) (
WE'RE MOVING INAS OF _/

Now, SAVVY P

tic Sperts
cvent

bers cf the

Mr. R. W. TUCKER
rate of application it will be
effective and yet economic and
will be able, at the same time
to control other cane rot pest
such as root borer, brown hard
back and wood ants in the soil

The experiments must aiso
cause no damage to the soil or to
the growth of the first crop
canes,

As a proportion of each plan
tation canefie'ds is only pre-
pared and planted in cane once
a year, and as fields which are
to be planted in provision crops
are not considered suitable, and

as thrown out jields are also not
suitable, it is possible to carry
out only a limited range of tar







ge
scale expe iments once in every
year. Re ults from these experi-
ments are not expected to
in first crop yields for re
already given and are unlike
show until third or fourth
ratoon crops; that is in some
years’ time.

Nevertheless experiments must
be carried out, both on a imall
scale in block of ranadumised
plots and on a large scale on

plantations; for if ratoons fail in
years of good rainfall due to
insect pests damaging and even-
tuslly destroying the cane root
ystem the loss will be far more
severe should a period of real
drought come along.

For these reasons the Govern-
met:t has provided funds for the

tmportation of soil insectoxicants
(the one now being used is a
high gamma _ isomer content of

gammexame) machinery for dis-
tributing it on plantation fields
and personnel for continuing the
experiments which have already
been started, ;

Roads In DaCosta
Land Repaired

Quite recently, repairs have been
mé de to the te nantry roads in the
DaCesta Land area, ‘This move on
the part of the Highways &
Transport has provided the “resi-
dents of this area with roads suit-
able for any type of weather It
has also provided motorists with
a short-cut from Deighton Road
Dalkeith.



PIPE LINES LAID
Pipe lines have recently been
laid at the Villa Road, Brittons
Hill, This district has been witn-

out water for sometime now and
residents will surely welcome this
move On the part of the Water
Works Department
TURTLE MAN”

A new feature has been added tw
the city of Bridgetown, that i
cry of the “turtle man”, This gen
tleman can be seen around the
streets of Bridgetown with his
trade on a push-cart, This includes



the flesh, shell, and eggs of the
turtle
y . ‘ .
Devotional Service
~
At Y -M.C.A,
THE Weekly Devotional Ser-
vice of the Barbados Y.M.C.A.,
will be held this evening at 4.30

p.m. at the Associat'on Headquart-
ers. Mr. J. G. A. Pile will be the
Speaker.

A cordial invitation is extend-
‘4 to all Members and the gen-
ral public,

1 Do It Every Time seinen il

LOOK, BUD“sIT'S NO SKIN }7/ AND ALL
OFF MY NOSE WHAT /

LEAN=TO CONTRACTOR

LIVE IN
peer el
an eliemnne a
{ THEY COULD MOVE )
( INTO Te F
OF THE









Cumberbatch closely,

S of the sys

ARE FILLED! soy
THING TELLS ME
THE EIGHTBALLS

WILL HAVE TO \

CELLATI
L Xs )

THAT 1S, IF THEY'VE «4. gp
GOT DIVING suits joe
sy OR A ROW BOAT. 7 |









Scout Votes:

3RD SEA SCOUTS HOLD

AQUATIC

On Monday, 8th September,
Third Sea $couts held their Aqua-
at Speightstown, ‘Tine
ill open to all mem-
Group and Rover Ed.



d Cumberbatch gained most
points, Outstanding, however, was
th performance of fifteen-year-
old Howard Reid, who, competing
against many older boys, rivalled

The jetty at Plantations Ltd.
wes made available through the
courtesy of the manager, Many
well-wishers watched the Sports
from this jetty, among whom were
Commissioner L, B, Waithe and|
Mr. Basil King, Secretary of the}
Local Association, |
The results were
25 YARDS FR

as follows:—
(Ee STYLE |
Reid 3.|




1. Cumberbatch 2
Waithe
NEAT DIVE
1. Reid 2.Chandler 3, Corbin |



25 YARDS BACKSTROKE |
1, Cumberbatch 2. Waithe2
Reid,
BOAT RACE
1. Scouts (Reid,
Waithe) 2. Rovers
LONG DIVE
1, Cumberbatch 2, Chandler
Waithe, |
50 YARDS FREE STYLE |
1, Cumberbatch; 2. Reid; 3. |
|

Chandler

Goodridge

100 YARDS FREE STYLE
Waithe 3. Chandler
SCOUTS |

1, Reid 2
CATHEDRAL

HIKE

On Thursday, September 11th

15 Scouts of the 3rd Bridgetown

Cathedra! Group with their Grou)





” r
Capt. Armstrong To
oa a) ‘

Falk On 999 Systeni |

On Thursday night next Capt
W. H.R. Armstrong will give a
talk over Rediffusion Ltd. on the
use of the 999 system, This talk
will be followed by a recording
stem in operation.

The whole programme will last
about 15 minutes.



So You Think |
It’s Hot?

@ From Page 12

haps the best all-year-round)

|
climates, though it rains rathe;
a lot in winter in Ponta Deigada.

How does Barbados stand in
comparison with these places?
Not too bad at all. Our average

temperature in the day in Janu-
ary, for instance, is 83°, with

night temperature of 70° and a
humidity of 68. It gradually
gets warmer until May and June
—which have the highest aver-
age day temperatures of the year
—show 87° on the thermomete?
in the day, 73° and 74° at night
and humidities of 64 and 69.
August, September and October
have average day temperatures
of 86° and night temperatures of
between 74° and 73° but it seems
hotter because the average
humidity varies between 71 and
72. So, in fact, what we call
the hot months are not real'v the

hot months at all, but the humid
months,
These average temperal ures
; and humidity readings compare
more than favourably with Kins-
ton, Jemaica In Kingston \he
temperature on an average Jan-,
uary day is 86°, and while thi

falls to 67° at night the humidity |
is high at 78 July and August}
are grim in Kingston with day |
temperatures of 90° and the}



nidity varying between 76}
nd 79. In October the humid- |
is as much as 84,
Barbadians will be surprised t
learn that never since recoras |
i.ve been taken has it been as |
hot in Bridgetown as it has been |
n Moscow! The highest record-
ed temperature in Barbados
92°, whie in Moscow one August |
he thermometer was reading |
100°. It can get hotter in London
too in Summer than in Barbados,
and temperatures of 94 have
been recorded there ‘in August.
In New York heatwaves are}
common With temperatures |
which have recched 102°, and|
even in Paris the thermometer |
hs reached 101 |
So next time you feel hot re- |
member the poor devils in Am- |
man, Death Valley or for that
matter, foscow! |

By Jimmy Hatlo



THE HOTELS \74 ~G
Fie I KNOY Ve
4 THAT CONTRACTOR, |.



THE JOINT BE
READY FOR THE
A TREEâ„¢, \ VISITORS










3







} 4.9% THE ONLY’ \ |
® +{ THING THAT \t |
KEEPS GOING \

UP IS THE |

BUILDER'S

ESTIMATE: } |







Tae . }
S i |
sal iy

DREAM HOUSE IT
WAS ++sNOW IT’S
MORE OF A
NIGHTMARE =



Scoutmaster
left Bridgetown at 8.30 a.m. for u
hike across the country.
ject of this hike was to train ihe
youngsters in methods of Observa-
tion, Pathfinding and Mapping.

fore the start

scouts were left
up the trail”, This was only suc-
cessful up to a certain point as the
heavy rains in the country washed
away the
G.S.M, Otherwise the hike was a
success



SUNDAY ADVOCATE









BUILDING

“|

x 6 1, x6

:s.s 145 x 8 2x

1x 10 1) x 10 =z

SPORTS 1x12 2x 10 2x
4x4 4x6

Mr. George Spencer 1} x 12 2x3
The ob 13 x12 2x6

GALVANISED RIDGING

The route was not indicated be-
and two senior
behind to “Pick

signs placed by the

It took six hours,





FOR THE KIDDIES
CALLS FOR A

SUN SUIT

e

in our Millinery Dept. we offer —

JERSEY DRESSES



in Pink, Blue, Cream and White in various Styles.

CAVE
MIEPHERD
& Co. Ltd.

at $3.00 Each

PLAIN COTTON DRESSES
in Pink and White from Madeira. Prices from $3.75—$5.00

SUN SUITS
$2.07 — $3.50

10, 11, 12 & 13

ROMPERS
$3.75 — $4.50

Broad Street



BIG HEADLINE NEWS...



€



Z R SF
LADIES SHOES smallsizes from $2.00 to $4.99 _ }}} SHOP EARLY

& Children’s Shoes—From $1.00 per
pair to $3°99 pair.

NYLON STOCKINGS—Black Heels,
Black Arrows—Prices from $1'36

THE MODEL











LARGE STOCKS OF

include

PITCH PINE in the following sizes:

DOUGLAS FIR in the following sizes:-

GauVANISED CORRUGATED SHEETS
GALVANISED EAVE GUTTERS & DOWN PIPE

RED & BUFF colorcrete cement
WHITE SNOWCRETE CEMENT

Phone 4267

Wilkinson & Haynes Co., Ltd.





Prices from $1.90 — $2.40

FLOWERED COTTON DRESSES





pon

oa Al

Some Merchants are Protesting and CUSTOMERS

From all over the Island are Rejoicing for the

WONDERFUL



SEPTEMBER 14, 1952

SUNDAY,

a


















LZ Attractive Swim Shorts

in a variety of materials,
|many colours and brand-
ed tops in quality.

|
MATERIALS |

x3 3x4
4 3x6
6 3x8
8 2x 12





Smooth, well tailored
Slacks are a pleasure to
wear when made to your
| exact needs, and in mate-
rials from our tropical
stock.





~

| Cc. iB. Rice de Co.

of Bolton Lane
































ae

Consider all the

Features
We offer!

STYLE
WORKMANSHIP

QUALITY
SUITINGS

You Surely Must

Decide cn

P. ¢. 8. MAFFEL
& CO. LTD.

as the “TOP” SCORERS
IN TAILORING.





THIS WEEK





==



PRINTED MORCAINS — 95c° yd.

WHITE CREPE — 77c yd.

AVOID THE
CROWD.

AND |
i} }
} | New Styles in LADIES’ DRESS
saad | HATS — From $3.00 to $4:00

STORE — Corner Broad & Tudor Sts.

.











te



Full Text

PAGE 1

SINDU -) I'll Mill. It II. 1952 St'NT) VY ADVOCATE PAGE TURTEKN HENRY You cant resist that wonderful flavor So unuMtl. So drlN HMJ> ,.-,. M V. Iro-M* lq |IH pall . (ml l.illim lb* >ii*t>tr tl.ttvImiH -..^..lul tla*..n >..,II. ,li .l-t, Mfk, "7v'i3 > ? FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG TLASH GORDON BY DAN BARRY JOHNNY HAZARD BY FRANK ROBBINS I ~LP TM£ K %  | *J9 ^m-af-iS^*r .V ..--JMi BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS RIP KIRBY BY ALEX RAYMOND THE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES Mires i KCMISED MAX i IKXKWT KGHT OQ G€T IN !COUBlE,^0 TAKE at WHILE WU CAM STILL WALK. 7. : .'.V V : (,' .' %  BAlLEV^ ILL PULV£PI2EJ I g %  *V\ie ^ I i. |i,.i,l ... to th Lair Kln r.N.rcr VI Gordons Stands Supte4K& MIUmS Of nmiM S agrtt ivM sdMftfc finding, (hot : fefei -•ft ht.h •. iarh r %  ( K I .It.. Ml'1 with COLGATE DENTAL CREAM EINEKEN'S BEER Because It's • Mellower! • Lighter! • Dryer! • Smoother! FOR YOUR.... SCHOOL SUPPLIES — CALL AT — ADVOCATE STATIONERY



PAGE 1

I'M.I TWO JAM In inn ss snor .In-! <)|i.-m-d Wins BtOCKHNU Witt Mack tmn *I..VJ 1 'ullinrd Heels N'.lMIe Sheer 243 l)rt--:-. Made t„ loiter fur all otruiMW -.: I Sl'ND.W ADVOCATE si M>\\ -1 I'll MIIKK II. 1932 . I • u I k.1 KTMlng .M p-Bi V'lid.y Tne-d.y I ft I HUM • %  I IS. VllllON Jck BeoMI — Mill P Wn Bill William. 1.1 U 4,1 111 Lam* Oiiroa LoMa Atfn.troilg J.i<"k Trnardcn W f V y UMI TnurwUy 4.4.'. R.:ui p ni k>#lSlVllltmil KltM.OI USI nit oat i I III \ I III *> MMK mixv I'.IIVII .J^Tj .. I o • ii r-.>.. intii £35 £22.' %  1W1V*. w >* Composer* lasts Hand Only The second Group. "Sonata" Op. 49 No. 2 In O. Major featured two movements by Beethoven and "Lucia di Ismm. i moor" by Donr/ent sir. I-caclietiakv for ihe I'-ft hand only, brought f..rth rounds of applause from the mdlenre who sat enraptured. To be able to mailer vith pi r'cclion such u piece as Luc:.. EAT IfOWIII Lammrrmoor"S. %  %  irand opera written in ihr, meU and (Irst produced at **apM-a-~Mi Jack must have been surcaB&fi.I in learntnf the fundarr.-nt;.:' v*.nh will further d %  After The hneevn. Aft r the interval in. sat in readme** knowing better half wn yet to gumc "Prelud-s" HI A Majoranu C Mit...i Walt*" ,„ B Minor F.uilaiMe Imprmu'v" and "pololaise" m A Flat vlainr -rv Frederie Chopin W.saw what wan perhaps Mr h-handled he usafullv With 'hr ;ev I mwiat lo ^ r" n 1 e.t the feetmieal uail Relaxed ted C irffaVnt Now convinced rh^t h %  • ajgg M "'"'• amateur. Use asasieivkearo Croup 4 by Seh'jre *n. German liianUt. "Trum-ei iDr-amrpii Auf-rh'vunsT f the Mount.-tin King the nm %  •ird I^'-I though coingara'l^efcQjajet It laktr becariie more and mare fr n7ia> until. >n MM' end. it ln-eairm alraaai an> oagy. To my mind 1 thought theiMn pr. '.ition BMast effeetrve l>u' •i-idered Ihe It ul "I l"e BM ami vet to follow. t'oitrerio Familiar T.ietne from 'he I Movemen* Minor C v mnt vr hv P irmnaninnrT 'hotiafi ontple to h i. in LtMtf . woaft of r ;it i"ebnia wa Mr. Jfek* inten>rentiiw> was mawterlv To end tff m^imn. rVrfltbaaStar** bv o ...<.m'inort ,t bufTonn—left an irviHfble jnar^wiioo. CaMll Jack is with i .lerly detlmnl to ins mutwr. He 1 •ehsneal w-aand -1 he msnntnina an unmercenar* attataale t. warda his music hv %  •ill. f -rnur--. develop 'ntn a wanist Of bign esteem. Thanks 141 due to the Represen! Jtives of the British Council fi>i aaakkaa Eh| ir>griimme poaaibl and! also lo the audience wb<< availed themavlves of the opportunrtv of hearing it. Cohib QcdUnq -W., KM. II.. 1 !" i ri.avn \nu > \K1 or TB* Hh !'• II Will H %  Going To Sleep Is HAMLET < ...T 1.* Seon ROCKING HORSE .-. INNER mt n %is. -. I*-Hf. La > \a (sossiaa >>p .-nine a %  M KaaasMfJ %  aMH on.* iton, INI Mn. tair11m PiAXA "THrAfLlH KumcrrowN iiii inn %  ni'.f Mti > %  rHTN To d a To-inoiiai BLUE SKIhb i %  n i Ml hi THIS .1 iPATE OCTOBER 4th PIRATES DANCE %  Mil HUM: IU A H leep as he wou.u on .1 six-mue walk. Scientists reported this after : lasts In which they mrasured the leneigy output of ii<< students ovu 13 day* They ..]>,. found Uial. TUfe average mm spendabout 40 .1 day dressing and shavmg. MAKlNii bad) IV.IT ..-. lUsghaJ .1* wa'hiiis dishes. WASHING socks it. nsOrt . lau.-tini: lhan peeling potatoes. A Rt-'MBA take., .dmost as mm ti out of 1 m 11 u in eightsome re*L WHEN 11 big man gfti UMtrting to the ftogUESOt lie uses up energy 1-stei lhan ffnl .laiiii %  J 1 .. %  The measuremefit^ were made r:y a team at Edinburgh Urn|M| by Dr. E. Pa*sa*arr. ; Has i>i .1 portable machine whirh selenti'l* hope • %  Use tn find out vhii-h mdn*tn I jobs are the most tiring. Celling Stale THOSE who look on bread as a starchy, fattening food will b.' surprised lo hear thai it so supplier the average family with ii-jily i.nc-third of its muacl"building protein, according la broad-baking expert Dr. A. J } ^e STARS *; n ^.VP^ mi; Sl'NDAY. SEPTEMBER 14. 1952 %  Look in the saetsun lind what your oudcek %  L:I Ahich your '•-.rthday comas .11 curding to the stars. TAUKI April Eft M* -f %  AEUsM —a'aveurable asaecu Donour >Daritabte ^ March fl— A art! 'JO ared>. seeking and granting favours, doing 9 • vwnttaf work c h e erfully. Other contlgura* linns warn against pettiness-. Pray. * * ration atcuiac.v important. YOUJ w.,-.iliori itrcsso patiencw, avoidj^ -\|i intent in ; With chemicals which can I)addod to dough to delay the %  taJjaig of bread. Bnrtors are ool >• %  MtatfUal that Ihe antl-staling etMimWall -A on Id be harmless if aafal 1 regularly llellu. Cousin IH) *(ll K gp HI |J you do, %  %  tuinifc 10 !.., 1... ad onuan lfiumi bm rapurMu tin* Uruisli Associaiion til DaUaM r"> %  pi'up., 1 13 Kiiisu y with them unlean ttu.. ip|ien live in ,ni' euuniiy m at uir BSM" aide penu a cneap DOlJdBj 1 ntn eouotna, ajui raeMy burner IH*. Jaate* .Magey .*aid. After a ilreside quiz in Oxford home* l>r. Mog-i reported 1 MORI FAMILIES live !n fiiction lhan 111 frieiuuhiu. 2 THE POOREHI ,.,opl, .. tin* moat stoie uy lainilj He*. 1 But, they, too. toag interest in I.11I0US if they move to ,1 %  >,ctter-cla*s houwe. :i MOTHER u the linchpin .l most family eu.le -. II-1 deti'.h break, the main link between ihiklutt. and separate family groups quickly spring up around |ha iimlhcTs of the nc LEO Jaly 4—Aag ts VIIUO : !! %  .A %  apt. H4--Oet 23 aCOElMO Oct. 4—Rev 78 %  AlilTTARlU* 1 DNka honoured beneftr aspect. t. ///*/. / f* 1 / vr 1 / \ / ///: u f JIM HAIXT.Ai\ TIIF. SCtHHtl. COMFORT rm: JOIN THE THOUSANDS FOR SICK 4 MOST OIRI.S hkc to got a home miir their mothers when thrv marry Nearly .15 p*T cent of the wives who live in Ihr uHlie of Oxford were burn ther--. onipnred with only 2S per cent of "i. husbands. l*rople who were asked why ihev did not mix with Uagfi nnalfrrH usually made the juurne-.* i\n eeuse. Tho rent reason w c tbaj iwnpre who go up in the world get snooty, and their poot relation do not like visiting * -You are innately sunn now with your planet'; Ideal indications for i good Sunday, particularly when you art trulv charitable and iheerful. -ft* * %  iwiu You i".'ii make this an encouraging day Ahg 23-Bspt OS for many interests. Church, and useful J% 1 1 inaajrt Don't seek unnecesB17 IggUM tba* could be handled better on af> vactl days. ^^ • si Heed I'ivii'c t. Taurus, your Venus tailor BOW. Vou will find great oinfort. t-ncourugement hn pravei. *pirilual Kegard health, too. j*. %  &f - ^ Your Mars. agHin fnvourablc, adds stimuUS to day: encourages healthy sports, outat* loor activities, spons>irs our military and .ih.i I! N agencies. • * Mile 1 > IMTN going t loo hard. Impairing health, davaoatlioii. Be sensible. tafccaV needeti n-r ^ aWrUaaate: Albm-ht Walden.stein (WaUenatehn. fantotis J*. "heinian gen'l. ^ &f &f ^ a KJXJAjEaKJKJ-;* L ADY SAVAGE. wife Excellency the Got 1 miles flight In "Miss Bim" on Saturday last. September The aeroplane was miet •' b) Mr StiBdi.n Toppm and) latdy Sav^iaawaa a> <<>inraiiial b. Mai.* DaniVaughfk A.D.C Uia* S.ivar •*• %  '!* the B..r.ido! Light Aeroplane Out %  1. ting how much she an flight and especially seeing Barbados foi the first tin* li-om MlM Bam m-tlitim? U SI. Hntthia* A T ST. MATTHIAS on Thursday afleinoon Miss I Phillip.*. Nurse at the Mental HospUnl and daughtei of Mr. Robert Phillip* of Hindsbury Road became the bride of MiKeith Walrond. of Tudor Bridge iind a Member of the Inspectorate of the General Board of Health The bride who was given in %  Ti.irriage by her father was at'.ended by MisViolet Walrond as Ma id-of-Honour with MassePatricia Philllraand Naomi Spnngei as Hri.Mwnatds. The flower girls were the Misses 1. Walrond and Betty Daniel. The bestman was Mr. Stanley Piggot and the uahers were Mr. Ralph Holder and Mr. Kov sYgfrond The cereii.ony w hn>i was fully choral was performed by Rev. M E. Griffith* and the honeymoon Is being soent at Bathsheba. fnr Ten Day* M RS SENORA DE CAVICCHIONI and two daughters arrived in the island bv BWIA during the week for ten Csstya' holiday. During their stay hero :hev .viM be guests at St. \MWrrn-e Hotel. WaVaWa) M RS. fHANK THOMAS wfio has been spending a few months In the island returned home to St. Vincent on Thursda> afternoon bv B.W.I.A. She was praK of Mr. and Mrs H. S Enstrnond. Upper Collymore ROCK MMff* Krturn* M ISS OLIVE STEPHENS n turned to British Guiana on Friday last by BW.I.A. after %  oraaaTUj two week* etoliday In the island. She is a teacher aim during bar stay was a guest at St. Lawrence Hotel. For \ur*ing Cour*v M ISS CICELY INNISS. eldest daughter of Mr and Mrs. G. i ( St I.eonard's Avenue. 11. %  a former pupil of Queen's College will be Leaving by the S.S De Grasse on Tuesday for tofffsfal where she will enter No.th Middlesex Hospital to lake I Nursing Course. The Course is expected to last f.ir about three yeai* To Vpnozueki M RS. N. RUBIO and her two children were among the pa**engers leaving for Venezuela by B.W.I A. yesterday morning They bad been spending about six weeks' holiday herf as guest" 0 Motel Royal VI MK Shrttml LgfeJaaVH M R LEFANU will give sccoori Iwture 1 Three Contemporary Novelists" ni ihe British Council. "Wakcrleld". White fnrtt. uimorruw at '1 00 pin The subject of tba lecture will bO "Graham Greene". SupiTvi*tpr 201 h Century fox R. EDWARD COHEN. Supvivutor of 20th Century "*ox. who arrived here on Thursday evening from British Guiana left l.y BWIA .-1 Friday for Caracas via Trinidad. He was accompaaafld bj Mi Loukl Milan. Managing Diicl,M' f 20th Centurv Fox. Mi Cohen's happy impressions of Barbados will undoubtedly Li mg htm back soon. To Slwrfv Widitinv M R BARRY AUGUSTE. St Liicinn Island Scholar 1M2. who % %  prtotnt hoUdaytaai in • will 1* leaving by tho S.S I> Gm-sie on the 16th September for Ireland wboro he will dn Mad* in. H incAnog is also holidaying with him He at %  guOat l C Selby. Ikaat. Wt .Se-ssion ul flnuwrtift C-nlre A NOTHER SESSHiN of Day and Eveinn: CtMoSg will Centre. Bay sum r lBhn s*-ptember Miss lw Au-vne. Instiu.-ie--. assisted bv Mrs B. • %  1 1 Boon win conduct the classes I scheduled |0 OTsd III >> Two huudrud and %  %  i K '>' %  %  " HIIIhaw iegi-trre'1 and the aub> ictU lauglit NS. til include Assorted ..Ke and Pastry. Carlb,!.!!>. idvucod Cake s t'utting an,i Bowing Smocking, Elementary Pattern Drafting. Simple Dressmaking, Advanced Dressmaking and Handcrafts. There will bo a refund of two shillings to each student attending li% of the Classes at the end of the Term. MRS. EVAN EOSS VMAgy If ftt PnlrirksO N SATURDAY afternoon at 1 M o'clock : %  • Si Patricks (toman Catholic Church. Miss JMB EOWn eldest daughter of Roach of Pilgrim I'lae.-". Cftnft Church was married to Mr. Evan Ross, son of Mr. and I Rofg of •GainsborWolchM St Michael. Tft,ceremony was performed PirhlgnWU, S J and the bride who was given in marriage by Mr J. B, Field wore a Bnwn < Beachcomber COCKTAILS AND DANCING TO THE TUNES OF THE SOCIETY SIX AND ALL STEEL BAND CRANE HOTEL MONDAY 6th Gel. From 6.00 p.m. WHAS nUBB AIIMISSION — $1.50 DRCSS OPTIONAL them because they have Ho dress,bridge Un.. up. Dr. Mogvy said. I parts claim Money in Milk A FARMER with .. wows can save Time fgafl I M !vear by using inilk!ii8 machim %  '""" ad of milking bv hand. Carl *ity aajricultui.ir xWhen is a Kipper." liOVKRNMFNT ............. ..leutists, led, J. A. Levern. are Inves'ignting exactly what goes on inside a herring when wood smoke tm-ns it Into a kipper. SAYS... Fram NErVELI. KtHiF.RS NEW YORK HOLLYWOOD hearts bent a little faster *il:* r-rc.iu.e hone\ hatred Hedda Hopper is bringing out a biKife. For 62-yenr-old Hedda is one of Hollywood's gossip uueens. She %  HITS nciirly egO.OOO a year (before taxes) for chattering 10 tO.uOo.nuo radio lis-leners and read rs of her column in more th.m 811 newspapers Her viihiect: The r Cahioet -I Dnwttf ('jiiiiui'i .vi2 II7.BB Slnlionerv Pri*s>r\ s' :i sihs.rhi Personal. portaLUFiling Smnll Card Filing Cabinets ^^ cwnpfe|e with (mulliple rirusAcrst SK.3S Filri *JI OS JJBF" t'uinparl Storage Saves Time and Spare k It HUM. Mo. Il loner BroMcl %•D USK WH MUni as .1 belated sportsman present. > self ;it tl .1. do .1 ,.' Shrillwlllle the IMI ,,f the M U 1* O, who Ii rd <*' KllCOCg robin. To the butler's question he I %  thai Si. A:i-' •. Tumult <• on ih n M %  '1. time he russalod wh.it i<>,ik.fi Uka 1 rook rifle to the aged retainer, saying "Shove this weapon In the gunrooni "' nil IfaMroen I CEBM Into the hall, to offer hi.'pitiiht v 1..rOui party he BIjBBd Aye. mon sti.ihger I roDoWOd | gTOUH BOO deep into the imdMgTOWU) and missed rru path." "Can I a drink" 1 ashed the cou 1 hop.rou can," n stranger, smncklnif his :.. fouhnough slip* up POULENOUGH (for it wa* liel JT conducled himself admirably all through an excellent dinner. until the very pretty girl next to bim said, during a lull in the gooei.il conversation. Are vou t -ii l -Miking deer You bet 1 am. darling." replied Foulenough. off his guard The gi.l blushed and laughed. I w;i>n't (idling you dear.'* she al I PI quests drew in their breath The Macaroon frowned Foulenough took a deep draugh.1 %  i-ght damn ihra. nie I feel like a horac Hut nr picture with (laia m.1.1. horaa riding Cooper a star. He toOM ..II hl| servants for I ride while she -swam, wearing nothing huhuge straw h.it. llhiMagfiliiBi TALLl LAH BANKIIKAD turned handsprings for %  banker mend at his party at the Waldorf .ifa. he carelessly promised to give her anything she named Sh %  tuunad the price of a passage to Engbiii Coch ren had promised T.illulali *, The prom; %  passage led directly to HF.IHlA HOPPER .,., ,„.,<,.[( | left home to fM'iipe being a %  butcher's daughter, and it does seem ironical that [ was to inaaal the res' of mv life dealing in ham." — I. I .s with one slmt." he aMd, "HOW m oaTtta did that hiipper"" a-ked Id MeKippercitilzie "A lucky chance." repllod Foulenough. 'The M-I c ii. elm 1. J: they were all eattBa] out of me nni bucket.'* Dead ifianae. The i.Ktie: raw 10 leave Ik room Befoie they could get to ilic gtoor, Foulenough. throwing gU < lUttoS U Is. saia loudh Si .11 1 logo M,. toJfaf •ll fjnaj hen..." A RT. art. how CTOOl | %  v your falthf I aadtag aboul m .iinheiire which itrUCft anil flfeked cigarette-lighters o see if their programme t ami of what v. po-ed to be going on on the stage. And .1 mile Mj| of ihe company "Thc y are bast when they use their art to strike fresh spark* off old human situation:;. When they try to be trees or :o illustrate the passage of man 00 earth, they are less understandable" A few fresh sparks stru'.-k while they .ire trying 10 be trees would at any rate save tho audience a number of matches Wnr/riaal tint.DEOPLE who complain about 3 low-rKing jet-planes are conliuuMUy Ccmg told to lake their they Rash bv. A belter loan is to slow them down ry thumbing a lift. Or one might On to Mie general din and peril by employing "courtesy let-police" to pursue thim over the rooftops. tffin/r Ihe bird* hTe ftrcaaM . Inttmatr aakj| the birds o<. aha island that he tailed them hp their Christian Irlirtr on birth pOR trunsneo, he would say to a *v c .nnet. "Hello. Fred'" and to .1 fetu.ilr MMgull. •'Him I Clara "* Unbuptised petrel? or -hi-nrwater* he would address n••MBdam. %  I'.ilkinjPoint Ererv wotnaM f icronq ustil afce rries. Then she ll riohi—insrnr r\U Thomas Hah burton (ITM-lMf,, SUMMER MUSS GOODS PLAIN BEMBERCI SHF.KRS Ivory. Peach Blue sue PRINTED BEMBERHS exclusive DisigM


PAGE 1

SUND4V. MHHlnt.lt 14, 152 SINIm UAOCATI PACI l People Of Barbado8-XXIlI (By JOHN PRIDI \l \. In 1842 a ncM) was formed in Bartados I rtW; IhU i.isl l wo representatives of vas called "The Bart.,doAuxilI.I A•• time Prascou ItMl", ih* Britain for ihe ext net. %  (Heal newspaper In the i II.i Civilisation 1,1-ni ami nnd it iepul %  v : v.. %  moaufacturi would be lost. The lyie of sugar planted in Barbados had i> i %  ndslup i Lord Braall In ie*' i i I led < %  '. until there ; octal posian> lOllowi Hon. T. J. Cunimbvs, l,:i m 'he M mac, i „ i wpl 0> bowed inirua geptewbei eaa in his abililv and \itl%  I mere poiiaii.l ends llr dtd not '. <>t principle but %  .1 the hum nitty i his activities KlhMMirt Bis] %  V Phillip*. It Vt I -i .. ; Morshem. Joseph Kennedy. Israel Byran T Young w s wo* VluV ih, TME SI'AKISH FLEET destroyed by Morgan ROGUES OF THE SEA: Sir Henry Morgan: Black Flag and Union Jack fly FAN GALE .. 1 lai i Aft r .ill%  .Milord .M,I irnmli art. %  ht* (it*,! eoloui .. .„.„ |,.v %  being e luded afBea Tim movement u < %  tag beea be< i % %  ot bat ana) Samuel J.ukman Preecod, an ,v i %  • itmuanca with tar in 1 while inspiring thorn re this island it. tin Act of 1131 %  -" %  ontaUva In% %  r i %  tad vac a aantpi i \ IBM well versed %  1840, ",. %  „,,. pmd he kc nutted r A movwnani with. i w iu itaunefttha numbei ing loi inn eivtl rights \ or coloured ho i i kpi ItMn that, fo l"i>|[ time al pat) rate from twenty-two to • The A.t eama into force in ima. "" hl "^ •" "-mam lha preSamuel Hl "ervlcea an coloured man win. w.,. .ntti.U rnacUntoi and haniimiwer teself taught. .,„,i s/ho bad baan \ r< :i u '' ,w " %  •• %  %  •• 'nvalu%  abnn'i maker v. .is ni' of th, MCkcd Mui.u.iiti,, .uu f'ni (ii 1 the ralter. returning to Jrimaica with It would be Impossible to write about pirates without mentioning: Sir Henry Morgan, the buccaneer who begun as u bond servant in Of twelve ladders t,> bo made In BttsBeta In lha meantime -. Barbados and eventually became all haste, so broad that three or governor of Panama was advancmuch .oot, to be Lieu tenant Governor of Jamaica, four men i.t once might ascend ing towards Port , Bell.with an '<' %  • % %  Esquemeling tumi up his origin them; this being finished, he comarmy. Instead of leaving, howpiracy, m on their and beginiungs triu*: "Captain manded all the rellglmis men and ever, the plntdf Wtltt out and side war* adopting f %  Henry Morgan was born m Oraal woman, whom he had taken pnsambushed the army killing a great tatics. so Morgan ran l Britain, in the principality of oners, to fix them against the walls many men. The Governor then "ew commission as CommanderWales: his fats. ,.-..: the castla." Morgan thought decided, to let them remain there in-chief of all the ships of war man, or farmer, of good quality, that the Governor would not fire to collect their random and being ln Jamaica, to levy wai -gain*! even u most who bear that name on the monks and nuns, but he aitonlahed that so small a band o' ,e s P anlat ds. the booty gained In Wales anknown to ba Mordid, and R was onlv after a great men could have capture*! Porto nn lht expedition to be the only gan, when young, had no In Unamany of them had been killed BU 0 he wnt „ m awge to MorP^Xtion to the 'ailing <.f hU father. lh;i th e laddera were placed .. d „ irln _, sume SIUjll !" lleTn Accordingly, a!.or ravaging Iho and therefo,-e left his country, and .galnA the wails. Then "the piZt\h££ aims^Jrewdh K had ''-* u of Cuba a d PUrmg came towards the meoMU k> rtte mounts hm in pnt num ^^1^ ?uch v Z w Urata S*"'" Caulina. Morgan dataraule. with although detestinJ or VlaWad -K2? su puion by nerrly all ,V., "The elm m*; but i. Havi iiant the Bourbi' purchased I.30U plants—only i ru m b %  lat • ': n \v Han KeirrnH "huh were in might from the [ %  land of Martini iuc These wore rii-.t Inaportad from the Itland oj Mau l^iuls XVI lo the Cai I Hope, an.1 DNM enna with initrui I E .11 the Franch Colonk "The inhabitants <>i ti %  td hut little knowledge nf thi J Plant until the i unti|U( I Fruit Ckiva and Cinn imon wen imported into same lima bj lha Bv itn* this t.|H.( caw wai vail aatabUahad nTlmte DH'MMM|R tl I OUtpul of facture .is (lii ..rly ba vv..npobrtad bj white men o( the com • "I I n d other classes possessed „f u broader outloek >r more liberal views. Slavery had teen abolished but live >ears previously, and Ptaacoo n in the House the amrk ii.ntsry reform from seek some employment more \ >cr9i suitable to his aspiring humour; where he found vlth not less valour. city. Captain Morgan W ncalvad ^ lncd J ,akP t at *van* nra^toaallai In their hands, thif inettengcr Very kindly and gj %  ? overcoming perils and anchor, bound for %SSoS. I^JKS^WJK! SLTTK "*th great civility, and gavehim &&2J? ^JXtlJPJ***: With these he resolved to go the service of one, who according to the practice of lliose parts sold him as soon as he eama ashore. After nerving his tbna m this island—and the life of a white bond servant was hard—Morgan m.ide nil army to Jamaica. Ttiara he toon )"inl the htHCaiMaVI nnd after a few trips lie managOd DO save enough money to buy a ship in partnership with BOnta Of his comrades. He waa uitaninaousty elected captain of thivessel and on leaving Jamaica he met an old pirate callad Mani laid who was busy equipping a fleet to harass the Spaniards M appointed Morgan his Vice Admiral nnd the expedition was successful in capturing the Island of Providence -r Santa Catahna. The old pirate. M.m-iUld. was killed by ibe Spaniards shortly afterward*, however, and '>' became the Admiral of the Lucca nee rs. Governor's CoWanaWgiOB Two years later, in 1668. Morgan was actually commissioned by Sir Thomas Modyford, Govornor of Jamaica, lo capture some Spanish prisonei-s in onler to question them about a threatened attack on that laland. Collecting ten ships and BOO n in Cuba and marched t< l*uert< Principe, which he took and pillaged; and after.' plished the almost impos.-'ible feat of taking by storm the fortified and well g'trrlsoned town of Porto Bello on th^ mainland. all which things being now at the ( ,„-, and u fpw mM buUl Ui l T! 1 ^ Z.^,^ !" rry bark lo the president his S. d aJS. "J ,f B t.Sl^!'r marf tfllln. him, withal, he The fight did not last much longer d w to accept that slender %  %  ' ; '" ,-att. %  %  the arm whwwwtth hi "^ had Uken Porto Belln. and keep dig except the Governor who died As Usual much larger than his own. The fame if tin* brilliant exploit was, however, again obscured i>> abominab'a scenes of cruelly and ricbaucheiy. during arnica a gaUaon containing %  it .f the booty aped Moreover. Morgan .heated %  party .if hi. men thai he n.nl left further down the rival Ol The battla won. "the pirates Although these exploits had h eir share of the spoil, and fell lo eating and drinking, as considerably exceeded the tenm .>f ,,.| Un „.,j 1( Jamaica laavtni il; that la, n.mmiiung In l-
accounts by an independent .udiI 01 *'*" u ar .,"" tor. and the introduction of the but the duty on the sugar from the annual estimates of rev.nue and Bitlsh Colonies was not to b.expend ture. He claimed that reduced, it was claimed that the .Dpi..pi ustion of the public money su " r '""' ,h '' t iv "" 1 .euiii lie in the House and, its lb which slaver) still existed could nn tratlon In the F-X.eutlve tVtP at the pi. t.ietit i;d dUt) %  >' %  %  properly U-loi.g.," ,„id rt eoim-ete with I aflvoeatcsl the fonnatlon of what ""' British Coloniaa, Il is nut the Public Works Departthar cUlmad that this nwnt. The great eonstlulional would nfton raforms of the last eentury can mgnt to thtr COnUni M lad to him. for he was "Htl the vxtanslan ot Ihe tlayi MI h fa the eeration of Ihe Hade, thlls lUllUfylng ill 'hen post of Auditor General, the forprOV I •storl UJ ptfl %  '" nd 10 mat: ii „f Hie Executive Ioniumthll hOTTld trade. tee, and the Franchise Act of 1B84 "Sir llanry" Morgan, however, soon ling the King's i-dI I v i %  i i nnd in the Autumn of 1674 ho was appointed lieutenant governor of Jamaica and was knighted, leaving England in Dtcambai Aficr auch a raraai i I %  bad had it was not sui prising that Morn' official was not v.iv cradiuble, He was charged by the Qovernor, Lord Vaughan, soon after his appomtnaant with encouraging privateering. He intrigued again.I his colleagues and governors of Jamaica in the hope) of superseding UavU; and >u'poried tne outrageous conduct hi.s brother Captain C gan, a terrible nifRan klnsmnn Col Byndlos, taking part in their brawl' and rlrunke.i orgies. Esquemelin | gives a graphic description of the taking of Porto Bello. The pirates approached the city by night, he says, and captured a guard, who they commanded to tell the soldiers within the wall, to surrender or they would be cut to piece:. The soldiers began tiling, however, and „.-,,. %  . aroused the city. Alter a sharp CAPTAIN MOBOAN fight Morgan and his men capWCOU; these two vices being cruelties and excesses. Governor tured that for* ml lib ('.lowed bv many insolent actions Modyford endeavoured to cover it up, continued to advance Into of rape and adulter> Thus they the whole under the necessity of the citv The battle was furious gva themselves up to all sorts allowing the English a free hand and raged for manv hours of debauchery that fifty courageto attack the Spaniards whenous men might easily hav e reever possible. The Governor retired to one of taken the citv, and killed the the Castles. Morgan lenllsed that pil Another Expedition ...mint beat a n.uge. flatter h If he was going tc. win the day After spending fifteen days in On his return to Jamaica Moi h< noul him and gat him to light he wouhl have t takthe castles. p,,rh, Bello the pnates b?gan to gan was almost immediate'-, Ofl your Blda" i, .. policy which where the ch.ef citi'ens had taken ,,iake preparation, for their deentrusted with another expedithe English have lollowed from refuge, taking thCir plate and [ arture. But before they would tion against the Spaniards and that day to this, and Jewels with them. "To this eaTacV 1 leave they demanded n ransom proceeded to ravage Ihe coasts of markable stacosna, iioih l-Squemelnik', he ordered ten of 100,000 pieces of eight from the_Cuba. In the next year. 1W he West Indies and P> %  one thing," ona historian e thought It distinctly Pttrograda for a colony which had %  %  UW privilege of elfgove, r.,,„.,,, for Ml | on Xu b,. pohtu ill, ,ii-i,d.-.l. Bag another. Da "i.ini. depi*. i.ded the :dea of thi-.wing upon Ihe Crown the Whole dutv ol Ihinkrng and acting foi the ein.Oit ip..'ed classes 8s though they were unworthy of the potilit ,ii Ircadon a ueh is the proud tio.i-t of Anglo-Saxondom T bin. the lugheat eitlxinship v.* b'M-i on a sansa of respnnnblllty, (inii it was slmph avong and foolish for any stale to limit the number of its citizens or nejrt m cramp their opporlunities for scaled, responsible civic effort."! I) The v< ,TD BE CONTINUED) by gvarfl M m 1 .1 Mm Ii-. Pi 1JST i',. MH 1 Ships Va ill Qued For Tourist KirOla On S|uuiis\i Main A warshi| will laat ...th in engb i i and not -oui on board gpsj a rivet ii i _.m bought by the 1 It was natural that Prescod did Siain Navy, Bad %  vite antagonism in certain quarMM nillea to Bangkok ters of the cominunilv, espeeiall) She will lake at lha planter element was itU "' world Cnindn "l the opinion (hat it had bsjan urjustly treated by being deprived h of their capiial Slaves—and had only rcceive-l in ill recompense from the hands i I th. British Government Hut '"i all this it must be admitted that Prescod had some strong and launch parliamentary allies. The General, Hon. John % %  %  • H I Trlmn Inghgm, Young. Nnthaniel Forte. ,lnpd "" (he i %  bum. "in and James Holllgan wen very Open Mi then co-operation wilh WlTi There Is a striking proof of ihe high l aa p aci which the How l n IhKl. he ,.... suspenand the Community hclu for ed in Jamaica from all 1 i. which was confirmee" by the Government m England after hearing Morgan's defeine I he was restored to his place tne Council In July lfiBa. P month before ins death. Mc i.. i USM | exainpUof perhaps the gngluh Samuel Jaekman Prescod Is shown By ihe voluntary and Unanimous vote of eensure which the House "f Assembly passed on Dr. BanKim, Senior Member for St Thomas and a very senior Member it that, for using unparliamentary language lo Mr Prescod The history of the British West Indies is closely linked with the or retrogressive movements eman-l ite. The price of sugar has always I been the eon'rnlllng factor In the' iionomy of the Island of Barba'dos, and as the United Kingdom gradually moving toward) policy of free trade, this meant \ Due lotat) to the fact that Ihe approach of StockJ 0 taking finds US somewhat overstocked we ai. offering 1 the Undttrm) i Uoned Mauranai | BIG DISCOUNTS OFF THE I REGULAR RETAIL PRICES. 3 3' DUNL0PILL0 48 ONLY ARE TO BE SOLD AT $52.96 EACH. 3' V0NO INTERIOR SPRING MATTRESSES S93.00 each $85.75 ONLl in OP EAI II IMI I PI >oi. AT i :II. -si spt:t IAI ni oi \rioNs N.B. Illl \ll()\ I VtlMIOMI) I'KllfS ,%K FOR gPOl c \s.it -MIONI As X "ii U the specilied quantities have Keen disposed of the rein.under of our itOCR Mill immediately revert to the 'MCOS. I HARRISON'S FUR S,'ir E 42 D 34 PT | ana TOWELS BATH MATS Hen ihir Uu . LINEN DEPARTMENT PANCf RATH TOWaVJ 21 S 0 SZ.ttO Eaeh Pink. Illu. (...M Turgullse I1VEI* COTTON TOWELS :• x is I st.ie Es4-h Greea, Blur. Pink Mill COTTON TOWELS %  M x 4S | IZ.S9 RaMk Plok. (.rem. t.idd. Blur BJ \i II tOWauLI v hi, I S5.e7 Eae'i 22 s 41 . gtOI t*rh WHITS: Tt RKISII BATH rOWELH 27 I 54 '• S2.S1 I .-< ii BATH MATS < %  S2.C4 Eaeh Gftan, Blue. Peaeh PACK I LOTHI WMte i Colourrd A 20c. Eaeti CAVE .SHEPHERD & CO.. LTD. 10 II, 12 ft 13 BROAD STREET S.P. + C.A. Ask >ou to be ..".i.-r. and kind lo our %  B lSBj a l a at all llmrr.. hul mprel lit during the brat of the da* anil alr Ih'iii reguUd* //„ i foam auMrCiy to salad S .i.,l %  |>c: %  •- *ichh-. M L 'J r.it of sauces. i . i m am > "^ tHt/ftf} /"//////// A !:n ill I %  just a te*pnhi' ConnosBscui'ddi %  %  %  t llavntir lien in 'I i r.l Ix Pontna' %  ll •* Mil. eihi thi .s l.ea\ IVrnnsn i' %  The rud kt hav. bet and t'" 1 reaaal • m >• tow. There will bt a ill r-mltar Potl ft kl, A Singapore I.t I kjj KNIGHTS £B i FOR PURE DRUGS WIII.S >mir llurtnr prcs. hl loi \ou . he NsiUfat MI" need Ihe IIKST WIIK.N' we (Oiii|niiid fgejV prescriptions wr only offer Ihe UP sl in Drugs ami the IIKST in gknrriaaj, K, KNIGHTS %  FOR BES1 PRESCRIPTION SERVICE. NEVEII Bl WTTMOI f/oo/s /Ml. f Vf ##!'S ii.i. i iiu (onauai Acid Aeelyl Sr.l gr, 3'-. I'le II.KI -tin gr. 2 Caffein gr. Va I'lienolphthal gr. 1 For the Sperdf Rrllrf 4 Quickly rein i Neoi % %  Am, N Urltla and all | I Kurth.i mop. ffUQ I | reduce tl.e hllh temperature %  and chills Tir r help t Bowel ti ti Hi to iwrifi il t -ni ml so essential in caaea of %  I and chllU Although raj I tain in a* uon i' I it net contain any harmful iros an I will not heart nor can inces. I'Klt I I il k BOTT1 I BRUCE WIA1BIIIAD LTD. Selling Agent for Boots Rare Drug I o. Ulll \ VOI CAN SAVI: •2V l III si ! WAIHAV s\KIIIMS prr dor <>< OM AI.I lib Una I UtB8 I KKAM • >: M M I lltKKt IlKIKI* I III IT SAI.AI1 Mi |ik 1 I OATRM ITA MOI III (.IN ( OATBH I'lAMOIIII OD4 per rae 11.10 *!.•• 1 1.1 I.'lf 1 81 l.'J Jt • II Its UH A FINE SELECTION nONM H M MONI lb Pkl. MON'll. Sl'tl.lll III '-Ih pkl i Ulllll M \( MCOM in, pkl. .' \l I I MOItl'l Ml \l ROLL i" i 'in • vi i rttOttPrfl sit Ulll HTEAK prr lin ,IIM s -|| | in|(\ uilllll hlltSU prr lin n ST'N \


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•I MIAY. SETTEMBKK II. 1M2 si \I>.U \l)Mii | il rM.t i Aga Khan's Tulyar Wins St. Leger SEPT. 14 NO. 241 Queen Sees Gay Time' Beaten LONDON. Sept 13 l-**ot at Dnnth Mi-moon watched by IJer Ma):y the Queer, and %  h. earned \:.. Klun thfi t It was kin i %  Min Bullish xtn Si %  %  *ir* J uncc rvlyaf %  lb %  '... % %  any t mc lie flnisied ihree id of outsider Kingshr Fi.'iu-h AIcinuK. lengths away third. Bob Major was fourth. Charlie Smlrke rode i uniting thu time and lay .iboui seventh. wtUU Alcinus aim Kei la the running fron. Gay Tint, Bold Buccaneer and Major. tjer remit nert until enterinn tno straight where Alcinu> ... *ftv to Kcr Ardan and shortlv jfterwards Cay Time drew ltd look the lead from Bob Thiv wn* nhout throe fin Innjp out. Kiiiasfold then ramr through la i .'i Alrnuv running on ..Win on the far ra.l Kinesfor i I .hlr turn of %  paad bout two furlong* D Ut Hear, but Smirk* tlll had nO] moved on Tuylar Mount i li iir-cii He then <> witched his mount out to challenge up the centre of the course and running on strongly it was Obvious that with a furlong "-go that the race wu his. Tulyar finished strongly ahead •>f Klngsfold by about three "lengths with Alcinus third. There m nf about three lengths before Bob Major. Bay Time, the Queen's horse. was a ulcerate fifth after weakening in the last two furlongs. Cliilde Harold, the YorKshre coll made no show at all and Boid Bucrnneer weakened or he was i.nabie to quicken after enter Inn the straight up to which point he had run a good race. Thu dis-ippointment of the race was the poor form of Gay Time whom the Queen had journeyed specially to see. Just as it looked U f >:. %  ould come on. he dropped back and failed to stay Tulynr has proved himself H great horse-—perhaps the greatest there hu ever been. The A*.' Khan plans to run htm in the Coronation Cup. Eclipse Stake*. King George Sixth and Queen Elizabeth Stakes next reason and possibly the Prix De l. An De TYiomphe. Tulyar started at 10 to 11. Kingsfuld B*a| rW to 1 and Alclnu* 100 to 8. Golf: SCEVKS i mm llUlkl I %  i < /.A* TOP LBFTt William* and Reynold ttntchtnaou on their way to raacr.t TOP RIGHT The Spartan Wanrierara players pause briefly for water i BOTTOM A M<-tton of the crowd that wttuewed the Spartan Wand< tli Carltou uimugi alter tea i their fixture at thr Bay n fixture at the Bay yexterday Hope Dawns Win** Arima*8 Stveep %  li-m Oar Owa 4 .rtr.ponJrnl PORT-OF-SPAIN. Sept 13 Stuiing tup pointIn three days of the s i four-day race meetiiiK 0 noon, Hop,Daw Arima Race Club's aw*en Bnt notched up 12 pal "A'* clan bora* entered, bul dio aoi run todaj In June she woo Turf Club'a MidS umi:.. New Rocket wa secund with li points Turtili-. icieumed with delight when A! : Lane, a rank oulaidei favouriteto nuUu UH pan pa> nearly $75. the highest of the meeting, and $1,167 the biggest [oracaal paid today OCEAN PLABL HANOI. % M\..' rivi ri i: L .--...> l*M I. I 111. I. Mw li 'k%  rr ,.,.' %  W.„. SCOREBOARD -I\KIW n WAMBBBHS -P.M..., i \N IH Inniii*. Uwtaas 1 rrb b li inn i n I I itkt i i %  i o a BABBJSOM %  ..i 1• <. %  >. PM-KM LBOI 1 I K IM Hill %  1 %  da* i H %  d* Toui I ' u, is* Match — Play Championship for Hobby Locke UJNLXJiv bept. 4. th* IM o f e s a i o ii a l Gotta** MatUi-pi..> Ciiainpioii^iup, spon.urcu by u>e News of the World. aiui carrying a top prize of £ "Mi, maj g tu aa avagaaej couipeiitoi p i %  tii.i. U \ iu IIICKPtion ui 19u3. Among a strong vuli> i.at lot Uie event wlia-n lakes Dlaca al Walton Ue-Ui Iiun. Scpunnoci 16—IV u the South African. Bobby Locke, who won the Open at Boyal Lytham earlier this year. b.iK. U) In hll btt ioim for a couple of years, lie should have no difficulty with hu first round , -ii.: li. G. J'ruslun of King-* Nwtoi.. whBM appearances in top clas* tournament iolt iire oniy infrequent. The uiiw keep* apaii Locke and Harry Wheelman, the defending Champion and it is conceivable they will meet In the Final. Wheelman has the hardet i^sk of the two for in his half of the draw are D J. Rees and Fred Daly who have both won the event twice since the war. Max Faulkner is also in the tame half out he and Reos will probably meet in the third round. I I*| i4: 1M a tio lliiwi |NQ ANALYSIS. O H a 31 1 1 M II 1 m a n II i ss PJ MM Holdar h KinN Oranl < %  Rudder I Wilkir b Barker i %  %  i-irriN HANuit *r ) .;.vJv.r ABOIT rVRN ANU A MALI 1 t t'laaII and rJ-Tif.f-VMiOU"' %  I ratallei %  MaSlUUaa 1 Date; Brawa II \H Ml II II \ M.I. XIM'.H I SIX 1 I I'l caaaa Ol aad OS—Tkr* t. Hw Baeket i OobUa oi i \i AOI.I HAsnn *r ABO IT aBVKN AMI A BA1I III Claaa II aad Ft Onl*—I OB r-V.m-o.i tn4 Over l M) Owa %  ialla kahuu i I... Hall ll\AI. II\MIIIA> AHOI-t NINI tl'BI-OM,i U 1 I and < I "an I Manra T..UU I I I I 3 I 11 '. < %  • y. : aOWUMQ ANAI.VftlR O M I n 4 F Oranl S I • t i S 3 I* I I %  inalfi %  Walker L . I. IV-... ii r-ieMm U %  b Wllkie rtiUle tpd IB* 0 t |i KWti i: * (1 Snba.fi Ealrai Total > %  BH 7 144 k H • KO. n.ii w<. AN'.I.YSIH .'MB lliad'lwa |> I S | M > M J Bjci 5 S U c iru,kma>i 1 I M spungai 1 0 II II "I. I 0 /'lymmtth livat goiherham i — :i %  i % %  in. will wui ie market '. at half i ,.( goaU ID lean I'le-tar-a %  %  %  etmlie BeweU aid I ." .l.-ncit bs %  xki BDBJ nl.Hiliil %  an froa the third ... i-untwi'.h i in haast %  i atn Vaa. %  ru i iiuiiiiic %  ,.< %  ii Huee. %  : I -,.; a/iUi nvi i. %  kt % % % %  <• mi i .: Nrvtieli l.n'c bav< iwst three rf i'ii' "till r UH i %  • foal avai %  i ... %  i • laCaa) at Bhri i I a 1 • |Dt mil And Nm'i.ilf with MM MI hall IVkwt4-k Lin-d! \m % %  %  ii ii..in..' 1 ipton pi k %  two pennltiea anrt Mo%  l ksah iik. bainj Hlbai i.n.iik sir Una in %  %  % % %  • %  %  .-,.' fm thraa In MI Kii i irnoeh not %  lag will bs playnl Vfadi %  Ifi.lti'l ..ii' I v %  I L-. irat Utvl i 1 %  %  Id. S. .,.0. Mill"..11 Third S...MI Thml North s-r.n ol Horses Entvr r'or Race Meelinff Uuilgei in.ll. U> LOdD Iran llvi (Hi UirMi4>>l the little Ashtoii profl rsvTOWK Mpl II Charlie Ward, ana Fifty OW hOnMH have been ei. finalist in 1948 Jf VI Pad for the Dmer q Locke are to meet it will be III Club'* October meeting. b Distinction A i.w thuruukhljn %  ilocally owi' via: Gain, t, G Dusl Blleal Folly Hi aatpl i K %  u'luii! from Trmiriari Gol"' I arinsj toi ItifliShaottag IIIK (..llown i 0 .i'n at laat : the Bar' %  %  li PJ ion raBih it Jordan un \ii ii | W MB I' i UK L W H, MM 7 II B <; Marahall It i BrowDB "i li v, Wi b UM IM %  %  nln %  .. i i %  %  i i lose* on %  JORDAN WINS SPOON SHOOT %  t llandicai Shoo ill lii i .., %  Jord. p ere Mr. F. A. Bl !' I .pi .1 II A oo i Capt. I K Nataletl B7l • 117 point) 1 Ml I. W ll.iwll (* ;. ... pn i • The i n :'K>d ani The Topic of Last Week FOR HOT-HOT DAYS USE COOL-COOL TALC SaotMnj; liesh andftatrant. BkB and comllrtaMl, ?:"oi r.ed m the Ir.-.g.jice men love rr%  i T.. but.dt.-rt burk< bs—iii -.. V ei %  %  Paraaauaaj ..... VIH t n*a I Bl $4&a*Lfjt TALCUM 1. KLIM.. F .-e. ,... 2. KLIMh.afx .itfeatra4. ardlM KLirvi quQii tj is always unSfbrm i ao.lr.rr* on ..| n .^ .. ,; Kl IM ' OBs] in ilir aoesi %  %  %  ol iBUNirtam food r rvan im KUM't tmii BBCI -I rSMBSkfaBSff lui. 4. KLIMM aicalUal far yroia cbildi 5. KLIM .da • liu ,„t,,.ri kaj (MkaS atlabaa 4. KLIM raaaaysBsyssJad ie. ..<— %  i.4iu. 7. KLIM i< ..• ia tt. r >< i >H*-p4Hhaa1 Ha 8. KLIMiiaroducatfkaa-rr it r hiMt C4a4ri 1 • blow -aa I. %  t (I.ll-ii rw aart-e "sr' •*• •*e-ilolrat II (* %  •.' erotaat A Or I.Undi i.. d i .'I Jollar' aponaored by J & R li \kl.m. iiifiln rof ENRICHED BREAD and the blend.-rt of J S R RUM Nestuskea (U'illTll -.III.OIOl" i.niaii... K. II .,., .„!!.( il.. futicura ^ OINTMIHT A tonic lotion i that grooms or feeds your hair! SIIMI.IIH I oium wnlithl i %  -mplcic li.ui UcaWiant 10 tUdf It iheoatupaloii*w sw iybiaHajdU;ttBcuasaiaraBattBj %  I et| U1 hr.illh .jiMiit' | >. il lontiiH/' %  i hairsdBlunlfood, kfcwin.i n.^'.l.nl> i ..noil wiih (lit will brina. M lite, hc.ilth and viialiQ h hair, and "ill keep it perfectlv ro.>mcd ihroiuthoni the da) Silvil : in i, u —WONDfR V .IM I 5 N !." Why hercule:; the finest hie. built to-dav The hcM dassesen jnd eng IIKIU.U. n I: many lime 1 i \ a ui huikl \out %  %  i b lli'ii-iile*. bdlUanj inn h 'i I nialiiv. and .. % %  i,. %  i. lhHIBOU Hi %.!,BuOl fiMjai Hercules TM( HEBCULfS CVCtt A MOTOR COMPANY ITO to*"'?** SOLD BY ALL LEADING DEALERS T. GEDDES Gl, miDGETOWN



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BVNiMi Bsmiian K -tl'NDAV ADVilCATF I'M.I llfTflN (HURdl SERVICES II. ..I %  1 M\N\ • III R. N m I*. Oru.r .( B V W • a a. Low Hw. % %  %  Ml raoMl -i H.II > n> Ihrarhn jMHi J B.T. < li A %  U PAYW* 'a .. %  T pm Ml 'Tr HALT. J0 a OIL] -.irwnm\ 'VM13 %¡ R-,a • II. *.* nm FraacKar Mr. '• U Gr 'fTli.HTSTWVN n* v K r S*v Q Marahall BJa %  > I N • %  T P. 30 II r J rurii %  %  .' %  Pnr>vii>rNc %  A BD .•rar-*< a..,, K. D m f richer Mr. %  O Mirvillr SEA AND AIR TRAFFIC MEETING OF THE SHAREHOLDERS GOVERNMENT NOTICES Se.well umAU ... WITH—. U>€Bl It.. .."*" %  I V* W *' %  %  %  %  '"•"i.. PMfu i—rt., D AOM. W _Aiaaa Q %  arknail. H, Ckampwr.< I" Trl>Ma4—It *• II llai'tm, H l—aia.. ft OoodMB, V Williamn-l at fcanarfa* F. Gala*.. G AIfc->H Plnado. L. Plrmln. D PinaOo | Piimm, B 5tlk. H Siola; nrr\BTi Hi i ii m A n... ; H..I. A B..rt J Burr, N. MacC !" *... O Ma^r** %  S"innn. P Cornell. G Onn T %  enpaun. M Mahnn. J r>unmln. D I*tioaht.,|*,. K DabncamW I. Craw lara. M Scantkbur> T Ciawfmd J Macnall. E Cohen l. Millan In Touch With Barbados Co.nt.il Station OF JOES RIVER SUGAR E STATES LTD. Ai The First Ordinary General Meeting of the Shareholders of Jews River lie* Limited which was held at the Hall of th-Children's Goodwill LeaRii m OB Thursday last, the Uth instant. Messrs. A. A. (.uiler J. B. Beckles. M BE Dr. E. W. Roberts. C. A. Copjin HASc. and ('< %  <-'> %  Medford wen' reelected as Directors of the Company alon^ with M D. S. mmond.s. the Managing Di' Before the Meeting commenced the Chairman. Mr J R Beckles M.&E.. aakexi Members present to stand for a moment m silent resiwct i i the memory of the late 3b i n Husbands J P who had sewed the Comp.riv m the capacity of a Dlrerd als-i as its first Agricultural Attorney In noving the adoption of the Report of the Directors, tiie Managing Director !. ".) D Sy mtnon da Mid 'ha: plans for e-stabUshlni> a coconut and citrus indusjrv in suitable undeveloped areas of the estate*, were well underway and already sere-rat ind dwarf coconuts had been planted Steps wtn being taken to set up ,i Welfare Department for the Children o* labourers The shares of the Company were baittj rapidly taken up. 125,051 shares of £1. each having been sold during the period under review, while a Dividend of 8*"; was recommended by the Directors to be payable on th. ICth day of December next to Ordinary Shareholders The Report as adopted follows:— WAR DAMAGE PAYMENTS ir"\K EAST) .ration has bet L.lt — ill the SMl ot October. 195?. nu<. been fixed aa *.iw final dale i>, Ihe receipt 4 Claim* in rMperl Q| the Unt*l Kingdom Ft Eaatern Pnvat. OmUeLseem*. 1S40. the filled KtBfldl F.xtei-lcil Fi 19 jii lh* Burmii Fluslnens101*. | IN, VklM KliimlntT g .-... %  ,,, BnrtM tit* wh§ na.v • %  tllgl "• o# thi -I*#IM. I'u' prftx lrriid> done so should obtain Bo ird of Tradv. i Insurancr and Cof iHMie* Departincnn Lacon : :ou*e. Theobald* Road. London Wt" I before ihr fin I 14.9.H-JM Hl.lll n .1, Hl'BV • .vt s w r. %  ' % %  >!. torn. %  MoaUlTIAH %  I K ITRKI i riiif. ii. arm. it.-, M IMI : „ .. Mr • OHACF Hill I N..~ :::.;:: lirraclwi Mi n .1 "* %  "•In, BTaachar Mi w Swlr*. %  — **— M< A l>i.>li. n Ml Mr W H Ar-n ''MJ-\ \l>W\tll KINO JT canmcH Mwtin* hprak. 1 l'-tin OOV1 Hiirr MILL IS.p.m. Eva-^li-i.r MMllna. Sanh%  ML" i"> -1 %  .!< HOI v1 ri-i oral OBTHOI.nX Ml.-I. BOAIi II • in M*Un< and Sr lm on. 1pm i ChanM Tiifmi-) Ktrmiif P i Bi l l ,-ra Addi v. pnw w *it i I-.. Ian 1 Prui-.-rura.Th. .nb.^t will br: -Thr BoMmod -1 %  .,. tun. Chaptai I BM 1* IMI T J>VOUIvtl IHMI-I II a ni Maun> ..| Snnton l"t aVfBwr.K nd H"mon Prcacn*• la* both anvaraa lh* Bv J B OfMt I.. Th MlnMw-ln-Oiarav. p m Monday. *•*>.•-•.> %  %  U Mr. g|u I., rr.oi 1 nApTIni 1 m m it laflai Klit .,..:,. %  I Srv.'p .'.. RMMaCF " 7 30 p m K..pUal Yutinc PropU-'Union — A mwtlna: by an-l Inr Uw younr wilh lharamathe tradlna %  ,.k .ii 1 >i< H'dlH-MU. %  1 ld< and Thuraday >l I u p in 10 "ffGhara ••! II-. %  %  .1 Ci m wh w al lh a> badoa coaat 1 St. Tax... ... Bcliolar. 1 I Conatmrmr %  %  Quamalon Haianu. . PunU PUu. a .. Alcoa %  nanaw. % %  Polka Bam. Hurcanarr. • AnUmrUn > Tika. ihia. a a Marcn r'ttar.iiini. Ba-taarii Ann. • a BUvlk. •• I* Craw U %  Alcoa Puritan. • • r data. • a Bw Baalt, a. Tartaa. • ll.u.a-,. >. mcaaaw. % %  Mannacxiir. ta KalUoa. . Burh"' (J >, lwh M V .laaara. • I PaUiMndar. • a SMo Maracalbo. M V Allanlic Hlinfea I.B. 1 Vlann. Uanna. %  Unfa. %  • Sundial. %  I Kt1 Hilli IV aeon, a a Ru, arc. a %  Baitr 7. %  .. Icorton. a.a Alma Pannaot Listening tTwrrn sKi-rrMiir.n 4 no 1 r it;-*., fauna 1 TruNw110 u in Inirr, MM, 4 11 p in runcil n( SUropa CM| Nltatlva AaaaaaMr. P m Swoday 1 II. ( II .1 Ma p ir Fi..tn Tha Bibk-, I Com1 • IS * %  .1 .\ p m 1 Enali.i Maaariii.-. M >>a Barailand Inlnluda. •mo Ma. Pram amain 1 \ 1. I.. THa PaaaJ ot Ida Holy CToaa. 1 111 p m Badi.. Naw-raal. I SO p m A V..it a. to. W.tlinain. Miamm *Mi' 1. % %  I'llawludr U.St 11 n. Prooi Ta. >ii'.iiaia. • pm Pruna Tla Pruni. %  aada Cooaaa*. laa* p m Th-. Krw in Sm Talk ID is p m Loa, MONDA1 IJTM %  .. ,n,' *.< %  > p.ni Tha New. 4lo pm The HI m Tna Caar ol 'iw N-a" WaUI.11.a1.. PriMMl. Ipi < %  o m Rudby Laaama f.-ii %  lllim Sauvanin of Uuaar, 00 p in WatoH MMaaMany III p m UilaQcra (• %  d a) p m aporla Hound Up aaal Praaaamnta Parade T M p m -Th* Nrw> T in n in Heine Nawa Prom Britain M ia a pas. — taVaaat.. BUBVJ 1 lii"-. M.i 7 * pin Balladand *<" % %  %  la p m Radio Me-.r.oi I 3D !> m aumaaan llumo. %  P m Imtrrli.da. I . p n Proni The Ediionab I • p m Ulaaii Diaaat. f JO pan. I—uian Lldhl Concart Or.n-.li.. ION p n Tha Ma-a. 10 10 p m New. Talk :. %  I • v m Vtan.* Rahlew It) 3a p fa T.p Tne, Tuna*. 1 nm-11 s .t 11 si 1 .1 iiia.ii i (miM. %  IIIB M HI Irldt'laan. I pp.. Bat -n-'l %  UUnie .nil ll-.lih allk Kri la Ika — ilHar.. h. Mar. Haa'r Iddy. %  ind faith ritual iiurlr-alariditaa. humii • I .ghi haa little rel:itlan la late •rluli or livine Page SfT Grucle FieJds Says Furouks All Right LONDON. S^H 13 GriK-ie Fields diacui*e.i 1. l..:iiU>n on Saturday, one of her Oa> ii.TTuiat her luxury eating. .vwimmintt. and i on Dream Island. Capri. %  >. King Farouk. Grm-ie spoke not t a Lancaih^re comedienne who : big BritJah audiences '>> %  unabashed tentialaentaUty or broad iiumtiur. but ai ii owner of I ic Canaona IK-I Mar. Bha -.mi Tarouk'i jlrighi. He I* a customer of mine it Cat Del Mar." Wa* il true that ho spent much of his tiaoe swlmniinu ..I (he exciu.iivi' .mil rxpfiiMVaCcawuina Del M..i' li He nu aeeer •wtass ui my poor* Sha Gilded he pressM U "fdrouk hat been lo her place only threttimes, iha ta^lallMd. His dauRhlen; were there often ;inil "the] .oe wonderful nirl-. Very nice :ndeed" On bis first. virtt to England with Gracae srasl ht hu.ibnnd BorhAlpaeovic. -IT• PART ONE ORDERS N. Mir MIKIivli %  Bag %  All rank. II parada at Rest. Hid at 1190 ho v %  UMMal tha aean and i.iii.ut.ire ranaeNo I Plat ,i.r naaai Maaaj will aa bayonet tratmna iiu % %  nil B" Cay>. will iinv ...t .1.1.111 nm.ma with a view t•> (•IlKIMilM. -• v|r Otder 1. I IM I. C Qumtyna. *J I. Sll Turney D G M. L. D. 8KEWES-COX. Major. • O.tP. a> Adjutant. The Rarbadoa Haaiment Hit ItAMltntlBKOIMKMI .TRIM.IB l\< Rl *-t c Stl CBM Mandevllle rtm n IIMII' arRIAL NO. aa r-iv fJimntert a cummiaMon In Iha rank of 2 l.t by HI Iha Oovarnar a*a p—aa." Tian.leir.^1 I t aa And Iranlrrrei' %  1 0 Active 1 11 BBB. l-romoted CSH HO Co> 0" BKXWES-COX. Muar S.OLP aV Adjutant. ts mm* 11 S*p Rea> vent. ItVJlIn POLICE NOTICE THE BAHAMAS POLICE RF.CRl'ITS WANTED T.un" 'lie Bahamas' Police. %  MINIMUM requirement* — n subject by birth. Age: 22 to 2? year*. Education: not less than Standard VII. Height: 4* 9" in bare feet. not ten than 36" expanded. Single men only will be eonndcrrd AppUo tell at th* Police? Training Scnocl. Ditr.ct •A" 01 10J :8th September. > I' ipplymg unlesfi you satisfy all the above requirement*. ; i^artnuanerv Binto %  10th SepiemlH. T. MICHF.LIN. Colonel. Commissioner of Police. 12.9 52Jii. DIRECTORS' REPORT FIRST ANNUAL RF.PORT OF THF IUKFITOKS FOR THE PERIOD 1BTII MARCH. 1951 TO :WTH JI'NK. \**l The Directors have the honour lo present the Annual Report on the working of the Company and the Financial Statement with the Auditor's Report thrreon for the peril 1! above rnentloncd and inclusive also of the crop per-od 1st Januarv to ISth March 1951. SHARES:—During the period under review 125.053 shares tf £1 each were sold. GENERAL.—The new Hoails built al HOTM Hill. Vauffhiu. Mt. Danes Joes River, Prizeri and Springfield have eonsidn ably enhanced the value .f these estates. The (iulf Oil Company has been carrying out tests in the area. The question of land sui vevs eontta LMfl t> engage the altention of the Directors. Several thousand coconut trees have been planted in suitable areas in accordance with our plans for the sgjltblighmenl and devek|ed of a coconut and citrus industrv in Ufel aii'.i PROFIT AND LOSS ACCOUNT:— From the Net Froflt of $40,414 70 the Director* n'cniiunend the following payments and allocations:— Tiansfer to CJeneral Raiarvg 6*. Preference share DIVI'I.IKI S20.U51 00 kesa J7.H1RD5 Income Tax V Ordmarv share Dividend $9.134.4fi lesg |3,43a IS Income Tax Transfer to Income Tax Reserve Transfer to Labourers' Children's Welfare Q| ScboIaggMa) Fund Transfer to Labourers' House Repan or Improvemet t Fund 1 ransfer to Profit and LOM Account AUDIT:—Mr. E. H. Bohne was appointed as Auditor for the period, i Itgible for election. OFFICER^;—U is with deep regret thai the Directors record the passing of the late Adam Straughn Husbands J P who rendered outstanding service to the Company us its Agricultural Attorney and also served in the capacity of a Director. During the year Messrs. Q, Ci. Medfonl, C A. Coppui and Dr. E. W. Roberts have bean appointed to hold office until the next Ordinary General Meeting. At the first Oidinaiy General Meeting all of the Dim • ffi axcapl the Managing Director retire automaticallv and are eligible for election. J. B BECKLES. Chairman M. i; SYMMONDS, -Maoafing Director F. \!IL.L1NGT()N.—Secretary. itFVKMK AIXOINT. rtBIUI) 1ST JAM ARV. I1M TO 30TII SIS*. 1H2 DEPARTMENT OF SCII NCE A AGRKTLTURE Tha Dfpnrlment <.f Ma .• %  > % %  ulnin'ill IHPN • HaaRi I kinantltv af planting l I %  i n tjllSJ jviilable mi distribution later m the year 2 This variety ha relativilv i'f plant I RM, and has an excrllerh jinr*> It i* recommended for trial o p the righ rainfall areas only. 3 Thosa parsons drairous ol laMataSlagJ planting matrn I V.IIH-U .hnuld apply in Mttgaj %  nn. %  -\diii ultnr,KM later than Tuesday. SOlh Sfpiemi .T. 1952. ApplicanU BJtM harmed m due eonrag when thr\ art BU -ena leg pianmnt aaa> %  %  TMIaRM KIK I Mr SICIM \ tlf (iKtll Ml rROVISIHW S 5.000.00 iis,osioa S 5.709.04 $15,155.34 S I OH 00 40R 00 S 1.002.27 anil is now i \i'i MM I t i:i Cane Purchase Coat of Plantation Canes General Expense*. Land Sales and Commlasion Llceneo of Vehicles Appraisemeni Interest Transportation and Freight Rant Sugar Bags Factory Supplies .. Repalri U machinery 4V Vehirles ot Transportation Stationery Taxes and Insurance Wax** and Salaries i .!' %  i [•:iv:,l>l,. Fuel Rater Miu nd Water Rate lluilding Repairs o| i A Tractor* 20'. i t291.311.02 :U,*90.W5 31 94t.2e 252.24 n.M J9.351.75 21.549.16 07.00 78.llt.75 13.715.30 lit.108.81 532. Itt %  gggfcM M2.B24W7 1.002.00 llfilllMI r.^31 2X41 330.39 iU'lHi' H80.H4HI' Itma-rve Puad *g.ono.0o PVallt 4.4I4.70 RETINUE Property and Produce Account Sale* of Proilure & Ptopatty .1.132.513.75 Le Cot of Property Sold oo.ooo.nn $1,072,313.73 PROFIT AND LOvs AtTOl'NT I on O'r La*aa bicomg Pref<-rTax I2O.851.O0 7.818.95 3 9.134.40 3.423.42 ll.vuU'rd of S", on Ordinary Shniv. I.eaa Income Taw Income Tax Reserve General Reserve Uboura magaVal l"eginnin' ..11 tht I'ernment PfpartmenW — (.Irnaaln r Bwi t.pply of ground proviaiona fot the t aVtObSt IMBa t> Usa potatoai •i-i" %  1 il>. .1 Miniilh as govftticd hj bag numlh-r ni p.1. nets. ii> ba daUvored I ly at the 1 Mental llaapltal; s % %  >. •tutooi — approximately 5.00J lb* .. vci'k. tu IKdehvued al tt.. g] t.ti H pttal ta i<< %  %  %  I .Itr at Van as available. ( %  .,-... ii.|.lataretlo aHvoal Be4ato ..|.|n..xima1ely Ml Iba. a . H doUeefad twiea w.-fhiv ag Ml,'!I nlalili MOVJ as available. Breadfruit — aa available 00 per 100 lbs .it 4Ui li .1. h %  DJ kg daUiafid .i Hu Ututa. f the period 2. TVJBOBBTI atatRlH I if Ihe alHivemvnliniKHl iiiinmotl turn QOncvrned itiiimii i.n h mini lo the 31M of DggagBjgaar, 1932. 3 TOgatVan shmilit DO tom in B I D sealed envrlapn. .uliln si tit tinCat0BMa%1 Setlttan (.nut D 1 BBJ) leach llie Colonial Serrclurv'i Oaagg nut lain lhan M pjn Wi 'itH Saptemtxi'. IMS] The tnv.-I.iiic vh.-nl.' -larked — "Tenders fui lOM • Furthei information is obi lIMttlg %  %  laj BalBgaataJ BBBj th* lai/Jl <-l %  i 3 ThCJovernmrn' .1,1 tfjag toweil any tender 11 'i A? IIMIIK. llK SI'PPLIEN SXALED TENDERS Brill as i.eivmi it QM Hospital up to I oVlock noon on WcdnaKiay. IttB September. 1952, for aupplyin articlaa m tha following llnan lm :• Derma nf ix month* from 1 October. 1992: — (II FRESH P.HF. M* (2) ALCOHOL 13) corrrNSi and p nrieUagi HOARSE tor the hnn.ii Ihe dead at llie WMtbuiy Cemetery <4I PtIKK FHF-SH Vtl K. between 2011 ami 250 plnl.s day only FnrniB for ihe respective ban '1 1 l ill bfl %  %  ; | III 1 B lagdl lUa kg the rt".nrlarv ol KR4 Ol i ,1 BOd tetaaSri will Bj lertaineil except they arw on fordU ..upplled by tha General HMpitJi ParaotiM leiidcriny aggaj ,I.FC-.I, ,H |Rg iu. •• %  • ,1, ri.tu lalic from fii'o olhrr jat-rantia laaogl %  > roperfcj *arprei'"l''ii aV bgggjavseanki (a BaVoaio be/awd g| u'citc* for the faptlanal f U i-oairoci. Tern 1 %  Of I % %  obtaUM on Bpagg M %  Iha Donors! H 109.32:i LIABILITIES A CAPIT4I. AUTHORISED CAPITAL 120.000 Prefci %  1 each £120.000t57B.UOO.IIO )ii.OOO Ordinary Bharei ci mm c 40.000 :$i92.iHio.o C 160.000 S708.OOU.OO ISSUED CAPITAL M.261 OnJimrv ., %  I I c.i. b $174,052.80 bh.792 Preference Saarea ( 1 .en 420.201 SO $OO0J54.4O PAID UP CAPITAL: 14.548 Ordinar>' Share* Fully S 09.820ff'i n'lmary Sharea Partly paid 44.360.00 79.117 Preference Share* rulhp paid S379.761.60 1.878 ITeference Share Partly pc id 20.824 65 '; id up Capital A.'i ;< ulttiral Bank ti Loang Payable d to meet Government Fund 1953 kDtl Payable S.lriea Payable Profil an.) Loaf 400.580.23 IBM ftl M %  Tajr&ja g.OOOAU 30.797.2E 95.578.89 2.092 oe 40,414.70 $1.114.60201 ASHETH Property Pureftae Pr'ca f93).432.29 Legal Expenw*. Rod.. Surveying Ii-'imvementa ii|.349 31 S.P.C.A. PHOTO COMPETITION It I l.ES Phnbaa of an animal or grnup of nnini.il Any slae—Bta.k ..nd WhH Onl> C'Uving li.t, itl A OesBtlOH ivaervvfl Ihe rich! to rcprotlunany prm' l'ii/es ..witrili'-t !• %  HM Itt % %  %  %  phOtO. Klltl'.IIKi 1ST I'RIZE gsafj pm/i 1RII PRI/I *r H.IHl 1.00 I -i of thr w 111 be linal All photos In Police aSaWlOfl, < o I grapbic CipinpirttttOI tha s.p.c A OflaO li rb 1 \ and mntkni SI'' I I" %  Leu Coat "f Properly Sold Bank Balance ftojSsI Bank of Canada it.-..id naiaawc B'dna, c< op. Bank LinUtOg] Loans on Proper;y Balen Horse Hill Reeateaoag Loana on .Proper* Sale* Mt i)"A.-t. ; Reeatvable Preliminary Fxr>enaes Loana pl-i.' Lorriea and TnctOfa Deprc. -i Siock of Fan.., s,,p p ;,,.. St.'k of M-Nurea. for 1943 Crep I 1112781.65 00.000.00 3932.78165 S 32.04140 S 6.40180 1.932 20 1.531.58 29.033.00 14 533 88 30.797 28 31.114.00201 ArnrroR*** EKPOET I hen |hot 1 have examined the foregwi.i the Company. I lave obtained) all Ihe information tne above Balanae Sheet .4 property IM I aava) required and thai In my rat a iru.. and correct view of the -ran at tan an 1 the MAKE Vot;it GARDEN BEAUTTFUL WfTIf YATES SEEDS The Seed* lhat *!-o' Freah Nuppliea ot— YATES %  t Vegetable S***' Also "YATES BULBS SPREKELIA FORMOSISMMA 4 0 each TABEROSE (Double large Clumps I 4 2 0 eatii CRYTHANTI'S lAlfafa LUj) e-.ch OhfainaWa 01.— BOOKER'S (B'DOS) WWJfi STORFS LTD. Hma.1 flkatt. and Hastmci (ALPHA PHAJU IDWARD I! JVMINtAattHc Pimples 60 Cause Killed in 3 Cays aaatj wu %  -•.•. Mtn %  % %  Nixoderm r Sk.n Traablci ASTHMA Mucus Dissolved First Day %  In J mttmtaa UKNngro ta, ,„, %  •i.ciiatt nf a famoaa doetar—eirru%  *!>• .-urt.•d-y tha aJ, tlnia t*laa Iraa. aa l.r. .IVII-L. HII-I r *%  Tnohaa. Iio i.la at lna.ilanil i. AMhaaa >il i TIM. avaa RHEUMATISM and agonising BACKACHE CONE! Obifinele ceMgtle'afs rllaed by KIU1CHEN safferen from rbaamatlam will ba intarMted in tli experlam-e related in < %  mw'M ltter 'Som y*'* a* > I began \ o s t....| irtriniM: %  %  In my arma anJ-houlitei-r. Than K urt atarted tn tiie -mall or HIT k, incraaalna uatll ihe, wiw raallv aayera. I ftoiight .1 tnn'l* of Kruavihan ami waa aurpiiaail to Ami that I >< %  Hl'lire!'-! I bOBSfBl SJi ''h.T m.I in'! TC II anu fluuhml all TIIV paina bad tfuna ami from that dav have not api-earad again Mr pains w^r on.iHiuitu and tha rcltaf roaJls* aurprlne.1 me." -T.B. f Rliatafnatlc pallia and backnche ara uauallv tb* rnaull of pocona E tha M ivdpol-ona which i*/y *..!> and Urn. kldnaya ara falling to cspel. For tjaaa oompralota tbara la no finer treatment than Knuuhan 8-a.ta. which cleanaaa all iba Internal •nua, atlqnilaua tham to norfaal haalt h ai tlon and 1 him raitoroa fr-ahi-.> and rigour. •UI ChsmlaU sod Atorea aall Kruachan •* IhrouHhnut %  hara laciaaaad lhatr talafi" tKiMfB >tud>lna uiu oa> poal tallBl *<• BOUK-KSTPINO. SEi'MtTANvunr iieaiNsaa or 'lANaZATKIN. .IIMUSJICIAI LAW. KCONoaiaCN. .kc tied .1 Iraa lo ovaraeaa Mudnila Pipit ...nl.-l Bt u aaalHal fiaa I ..MILS .1 IK.l,| ,1) loan f,', ',•%',',',•,',; ;*s,;-s, *.',-. -, JUST RECEIVED H OR I II K .1 M i| M Mil I. Mil I I I HUM roiium C. CAKLTON IROWM Whi.les.lr A IteUll Dnsgglst 136 Rofburk 9L HU1 3313 No Visit lo Ci'Mduo bl CUin] unit vmlmg th %  (AIRABWk HOTEI ia -hurl rldr H.IMI ft*n i Overlook. i %  a/I o|a of HOIiTIIIM; KEIIU II.,,ill ngj ovei -he .sea. i< %  i i hlov Irlnk A* lymow PlantetS I'uiifh r have Lt'Ni II—n\—or lilNMK M II \ nt rOFFKK at II %  Af'ci i III>*. i!ui|ipiim peil %  l \< R \IHNK %  a swim to enjoy its coolnes* A.tk for and look at its room*. r.irin -. for l.uiirh and IIIIIIIT arranged. Illnlnc Room on Terrace l.lcphone NIIH and 8011


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M \II\I -.1 in vir.i i: 11 IKZ M NIIW AHUM \ i r PACK TURK M TIIK a\i:w\ BLUE SKIES By G. It. CASTING back ibown during tlw past few months. I gee th.it ere have been pretty luckv in thai at least omos. m iwn nrw films with definite box office i Barbados, that's not bad tn f told that we get new pictimTUi bOssta. the case, we mi. %  now and then, and this week. >ut 'it Into that category. Not thai the pictures .n had— they're not—but of U, have Man. I ean'i -.. l wax parlicularly inspci-%  did not see "BI.I r SKI1 is at the Plaz.i BartM %  is not a new Aim. but on. ltH>k the east which UM I Crosby. .Tred Aetatr* and la ('aulrteld. a^ well us Irving I Itns song, hit* liay". "Putt'ii On The R Is The Anm M: J < brtatoias,* and the title song, to mention but .1 few Mff you have the mr.M a bang-up musical, to / Of the fact it iin T< Stems ti> miI and thorough)' Glory Alle* THE Oloba a runn ... feature this week-end—-GLORY ALLEY" and "ROSE RON" but ncithei of ti :o the standaid ol have recently been shot theatre. UiougJi lhea JIIAV rttvwi'ORl) new picture* "GLORY Al J JOAN UA H hjs a flrst rate : oppofttHlMj lOC good trona .'tid Jack j lie Caroo contributta a tt %  good all through, with sound portrayals by Louis Kasxnar and blind iudge and sympathetic newspaperman, respectively, but the HOI BOM of Ctaama ROBS OF CD1ARRON n BBOUI U Ihi *toi> l .< white girl who is brought up by Indiana. %  ire killed dawn tin | prootpti) %  %  „ n In j.ui. but not '•>! ksnj nlng robber and unaware ol tennis up with htm. Th. rVi %  ruaton, but our Hostin the end. with the help of I %  %  ..th plucked eyc-hrows. plunging narafllnai and Eastern accent—ell tnto out Weal in moa 1 % % %  lan, lha dualogus ma DM % %  >til ml i iditiK. 1 would lib | up to the standard -ho..tin* This Woman is Dangerous JOAN CHAWFOHI) in ermine. mink ,md diamonds, plays the thC in aster-mind Jo I %  in unaga in "THIS WOMAN IS DANGEROUS." it Bridgetown. On the eve milling house of $90,000, ghi ha la going %  ham -in operaHon. Tinrobbery goes through, i ttoapluu and uf courae, %  the doctor. This .i way out Of Ml dilllof li-i gun-cragy rompaniorui it In I -is to get Or. He nearly does, too. breaks Into the operating theatre and stall.-. -In—til.. However, the V II.I i and they do this time lag Joan free to marry tindoctor. iwford la, as usual, glam%  | and sophisticated iii de g ree and bei ward.1 bi> .'ipprccinteri bv feminine audiences, but what acting honours there are go to David Brian as li | alOW Iwutnl and trlggxr-hupi" lover. For a change. -. %  not:iole. and acquits himself adeB. B. C. Radio Notes /IVI/Cn PKOSf A\B fonan In ( iribbean Voices' Today In the weekly BBC. progi.inime uf West Indian prore %  nd pnetry'which M broadcast on Sundays under the title of 'Cattbl>ean Voices' the Eastern Caribbe.iii usually i* mue*i hett'r U il than Jamaica ali %  'uld not l>e the H I |iopuunion standard. II %  Bi I of late this proportion s t erna to be chunging and OtU b ni nipluled in newt Sunday's bmadcast, i'h mat. — when the half hour will DO entirely devoted to Jamaica with a prose •krleh 'Walking in the Hill ny C'.imle Thompson and poems iy Farm And Garden (B> AGBM OL I ANIMAL IMI'KOVI MKNT THE SUCCESS ol tha rccrmt Poultn I the efforts by the Poultry Ataociatlon to impi standard of local poultry surest this note an improvement. But first, let us warmly <>IUI I'ulatc th< oiyaiiisers and the participants. gss/MastU) thoan who ob Ulined awards Animal brenrfing. selection and reach thc the vlow and r. involved in the production of Imthereof. While mm proved types are, tn the nati of things, a closed book to the patMtW average layman concemed >n in-"" the mam. with (hs gjm s/il avai'abihtv of the protlj. • w hteh flit Wi vuluals. breeders' aasoi 00 YOU KNOW 9 Well soon have that better 'u (vi headachei liAKhFMM. Ill Ms FOR AMAIEUIS and h nssjQ no-in Ralph M.. |D I actor, petite and I Carsn Kmi K a actor, trumpet.i I. and Jack Teagarden and his orchestra. However, listener la lent. Ihl ranasyjM to get on tts This Is probably due la that the direcloi been suffering from a certain amount of indecision exact type the finished | be, with the reanll Ibal out as n psychoioaieii t malodrsma, flies off in several directions and winds up as a ciu h psychological melodrama, s/ai drama and musical. Ail fusing, and one or f>"' rub-pIo*a don't clarify the situation Our Principal cbaracti young prize tighter. i.., HI %  the last reel snDu out on his biggest light, and prom| on the skids. Helped sobriety and den i heart and friends, he his mind to be I Korean hero— }u>t to prove he's no OS I the ease and speed of Hollyw.o-i. he acquire and there s a heck of a turn-ou* when he comea marching home. However. If! still has a few psychological adjustments lo make. SJW accomplished, there is a grand gettogether to the BO some good old li.i ^ With .. btjdtgrouD Orleans French (Junriti %  ell. both of whom hi leeentlv been heaui In this programme It behoves the wnteis of Trinidad, Bnrb-drw. British Guiana, as well as those of the BT ille* isTiinds. purticularK the aniUna Grenada, not to *liow Janialc* to aoinm.ile fhe programme. Contributions to Ihi" series are reiOMskBd at the BBC P O Box ton. Klnilston. I.m;mi and the pny is good. de*a|ls of this ran also be obtained from rear 'Caribbean Voice' is nn the air each Sunday fro. T.15 to 7.45 p.m. in the 25 and 3 metre bands. 11.75 and 0.58 megacycles. B.B.C. Wavelengths Last week we gave details c l Ihe B.B.C. beams to this arCa. Short-wave listeners to these beams may lind that reception t* miirrcd by interference of morse, particularly on the 31 metre ban I beam. If you have found th. trouble you may prefer to liste-i to London on the beams lo North or South America which are now coming in very well although net directly beamed to us. The IH.UTIto Noith America an' o.i SO 53 metres. 0M5 megacycle%  p.m. onwards and on 48.48 metres. 8.196 megacycle-. from 8.15 p.m. onwards. |M former begin particularly free from interference. The beams to South America are on 25.38 metres. 11.82 megacycles, from 8.15 p.m. onwards an/l 31.88 metres. 9.41 megacycles from 8.15 p.m. onwards as well as the beams to the West Indies which we listed last week The four beam* mentioned above do not carry the special West Indies half-hours such as 'Caribbean Voices' but for other programmes from London In the General OveTsent Service you may find one of these better than the direct beams to us. Khama of the Uaiiuni>;ws4o The name of Scretse Khama i the Ban.angwato is now almost a house-hold word. In a B.B.C : ....Humin the coming week listeners can hear about the on Wednesday, 17th. September. pI'Ull.l %  1*1 tent. ,4 theefforts havi rectal aim i object, i ivilrsatk lock Weeding ml bn. I svar l The nnd % %  mighl be compareu w> a band ... pilgrims toiling to establish them: elves against great odd. Those natural • m nun Bgfl %  slvgg. caterpillai ol ccurse to be e* % %  rdfufrvr are aecuslwued 10 drouglil may be termed an .,t o, ' work God." hut arisen il comes lo lurndmgjljF. | MtK Gfl" the garden nalei then tn%  "< %  i % %  long stifTi ring >• I s %  polleio* m heling asjnri ved and Bekestioa, slsssi General watei has ah. I lort uatuenee "*' f£ %  • ""> %  in BOOM dislruts. * BONslOI Of ""•' 'he threat of cusssnsj ad .tii dwoUsits sert) a maturing (arden water hang* like eis % % %  er our heads. lesssttance la p. J7 y ,n an anri whMtf ah ** t TI-them, can mm)., i v ,,. E!i!eTii'?i. m u, ; ,un "',iuanuties biiefly ami kmnls Baj ..uiv Us-beneath the surface, s ( %  %  th-ought should bring .'ater shot'tage week .. iboui .. not understood Plllrtlll by me general public What is 2E3K the use of gardeners cotng through nVa too oi piani :t raeds, and rmsmg plant* if every bBM liter.• is u .light drought the garden water Is to be cut off? It means that weeks of hard work In th gardsri is lost, and when BM water is allow d on once more the garden has to be started all over again. In spile of all these trials garden livers persist in thenefforts, ami which have spe persist with success as the r. %  display of miniature gardens -t theu origin the Museum bears witness Indian brec This lovely show, and the splentnd attendance which who have had aclua of the problem(he dinVullies am' m the e"%> iutnm %  I iirrlm.... ... i %  -, fhv work-a-da.^ farm. raiser largely p immediate ecenornii ra NOW. •! . Rrahmi .,11! shows plainly the 1^ wT niSLST^ nCnTSrsmff terest in garden*, and the general r s '" '', AmOrlea publu's love of flowers. Add U> f**—Mf* 1 ""•"•bach hog wl hls the fad that well kept gardens V( r ,v and nirroundlngi raise the genera] '," ,, "" : •' ""''''. stiiidard of the island., especially "'" '"' in the eyes of oi.i vis'tors. and n 'yP^*. ar 1 "" ,IM Tin| doe* srem a pity that this flood f "* work should be hamptr rl u %  ,n '' ma| tlsalr balsa totally unnecessarv fffOI afl BB '" at • nri having to fi erratic water suppls themselv. .,11,,t %  Every tiny garden, or beuutihd wherever U ,, 8jjd it Whlli tree helps to beautify the island they Age ,,, M,,Sk> the occupant of the smallest particular house with a garden bed of flownatural ceirrr:oi All •M.r.Ui.n.Wrwi' rsauuiiofi *sh fu' cK* !" m — ••> oan soma for PM (' * vvhtii,,. TMI SMADtlNS COMPANY •T C*wfrtiSl4 kSSSt ACSM, UMM iNGi*ND. Getting Up ISirj Makes Men Old i ntrvoue.-i %  l. %  of tin illy Tlgoiir ara S UBKI by a dliNM of th* IToaUl* and OS most lraporta.nl %  • %  rn.i m asM>. To ore.m th... troiibl.. in 14 hour* sml quloklr '•!*..:. Urour .nil h^lth. IUt lha ...w MiMilino dlacovory U1*4 NO msltar Bow )on| you h. frod Kooona la guarantaod u> sot roo right. rWn-*lirat our PYuaUUa tlland ar1 mak H SSM r"tingr aoo.m 'ton %  niarafitf* protw.. ///•////// %  //'///A*//.'.'//. COOKS WITH BAiX § Improved! oWTHE TRUCK A BUS TYRE THAT WAS ALREADY iVORE POPULAR THAN ANY OTHER JBjag aaatl al IflBasSSgrip in tyi*4gsnstJ| haw iauhi Dunlup '"" '-' %  tiU -even the moil iiKicwful lyre can Nr hcilrrrd I Bari pu-i what hat been done ro the Irtintnp ..n.I BM I MI Huuiop %  icnigners hsve developed Irora tintint bBNC pattern a tyre ihat i< cnnrrlv NI-W sraj IMI'KOVI IV lhi> lyre, the brilliant B 6, .^tt 1 F0 *. to an up fresh records for low-cost i Bias, here is a pomt I not be ovri-emii|iaised: lm< pn>vet| tvprs ii. Jess. aSjanttOn than tinULIUMM run. And so. as a natin.il retl eomltant. i in lmf'-.-l tuff prodlielion •.-. %  .. %  nai I In 1 animal mprovernenl Tinifh.f the different Bougeinstage at which both the plnnl viliaeas and animal hree.l. Vines are also a good investmi-i.' Mn*d Micein ordei lot lor the garden that c ,,nnot be erderfj sustained ..n.l | given a lot of cure. alth< ugh vir-es progre Th.-nis still much lo %  £ fc f qulr ti. mo a? a "*" tion ,n ";; '-e Mid • rbs w. i shrubs. The Coralius arc all r | () lovely, there „ the Christmas !" .,, .ubglstflnce unde Cor.Iita the vanoupinks both ^,,,, "idlliut. nr. %  single and double, besides the Z\[. pure white Coralita which looks so "' ?*** %  m atte, much like the Lily of tha Valley. ' '" All of these ar lovely vines. Tie wm """" double pink Coralita is particular'" onunere!al mils pn ly beautiful and is comparatively "o h v lerraated In rare It is a pity that it K not "tock. their BSUB t i>inu BsH more sjem rslly grown iK BregtHsgOl %  In th Besides these there are Patron, i'" %  'M it |g gOrtectly true ti Alantaiida, Bemontia. and numersay Inat half Ihe broad i In Uli .^ u'hei'... ehooge from feed. -<0* \ KNIGHTS LTD. J Maaaw %  --.-.-. %  %  .; %  ,. %  %  .•,-,-.-. %  K^I.IN BHI>. • Cool • Colourful • Coverine FOR ANY KISIl Ol FLOOR IINTA W N Thb. eniirely new HODB COVEEINO iv long wearing, sun fast and hum resist mil It iv easily cleaned and e<,unllv suital.le lor home or club. ffgffrAvailable in all width* and in floor sirlps. BARBADOS (-#!'. COTTON FACTOBY LTD. "h-n .it ofi fl i-v wai" tea • bv the I to :he rii. i BOM not %  i MTttabiHty nnd tude. urnpfe to keep your of clngrlrsff its Take Bshosio mortrIII Irewshasauentle. Il IfUJ MtlOO en OH i ive organa. Andrews a for Inner Cleanliness •with %  %  ala Bl ,. • world. ntn.nf.1 .porlilc rruorrr. ...il^nc-l .ah M.J.b„ilJ. YEAST-PHOS CtNtRAL TONIC, I hi 1 i null in Your Horoscope ASEPTIC OINTMENT Crermofene Ointment soothes •nd penetrates. Il protects skin injuries, rashes, scalds, and insect bites from the entry of harmful bacteria, and stimulates healing. Keep a tin handy for family use. MB tULDS,MMU, M -WISES, ABR.SIONS, tic. GBRMOLBNE swlhes at a totuh hials in record linu. Obluinabit r.ervtchere. n A M ii m IS THE ANSWER %  i it. i... ,laal propto tl | I % %  K KI.V .1 N-w -llrvrIhat Tnlmniniirt pn—iw %  i .latii ... r Astral lnterp*t*>Mr Mr. Mi I lull Idretiwa and a*oi-t i'i. • >MMO •>'X1>i.. '..maaJI N> '. i l.i A.li.t'.t*!. al -/mh. but tend I'In BfO .i.. ..-.v. hstHm*i i,l.i-.tl.. llWe-t-ir I fa* -til W .m-r-. .I it. %  r.narhaklr I %  ..I>llt >...! ...-1 %  %  -t.i. wm. nm* % %  IM. ..-t %  rial l.i' LI .O. atfBlr. AtldrMI I .mi \ %  iRI r -,.t .li li. Uppar r Baaabai M In.n. iv.alasw BANISH RHEUMATISM TAKE BIUITIIWAITIS lillH\l\ll( Hor and mm. pi UsssBSJ ttsH leinedy because if the speedy relief they have found VMMI il H S*M %  miier from rheumatism, get ,. bottle to-day. tg ,i Brush your teeth with Tpana and vou clean them extrs-whitr And, because ol the unique luimula underlying Ipana's refreihingly different" mint flavour. vou right decay by reducing sod-forming bacteria Massage Ipana inlo your gum* snd vou lielp keep tnem hrm and heslthy In this way, Ipana sets ss a uueguard sgaimt i.anh-rnises. more than half of which are caused by gum trouble* For whiter leetb, healthier gums, follow the Ipa-is weyS S> **) IM TOOTH PASTE.. J REFRESHINGLY DIFFERENT Instal an ELECTRIC FAN very essential for your office supplied in 10 12' 16' ALL OSCILLATING call at THE CORNER STORE




ee ee



ESTAB



NATO Armada Stage Bi

Nine Nations Combine To Repel
“Invasion” In Northern Norway

Aboard U.S.S. Franklin D.
THE WORLD’S mightiest peacetime naval armada] rom

steamed through the Nort}
whose two northernmost
overrun by an
“Operation Mainbrace”,
ever held, began officially <
of orders to N

vYaval Comman
Scandinavia from

provinces
“invading army”

the direction

LISHED 1895

Roosevelt. at Sea, Sept. 13.

1 the aid
already
from the East.

the biggest joint naval exercise
it midnight with the flashing
ders to repel an “invasion” of
of Russia. Orders sent

Sea to of Norway,

have been

|



160 vessels from nine nations and 80,000 men—half of them j



















BARBADOS



4li Ouarters:

U.S. Tourist
Pays 5’- For
€2.000 Stone

Tw hand @















































North Americans—into “action” The project wa SRC de s- |

First ' : - Melbourne: William Dooling, an } / a ‘ a ie tae cut ; Ro aa n

irst warhips to sail from ~ e American touring the Queensland W f B 1 empts by the Deputies who fea |
Scotland's Firths of Clyde and Gen Rid WAV |cesert five hundrea cake north | es ‘a Our ? that the plan is too daring, and | §
Forth where the vast armada had ° e jof Brisbane, bought a pretty stone | TI who do not we Pore national pat - |
assembled were a task force of T e ifrem a bearded old rospector liament to be deprived of their

§ é if z ar « prospecto A .
minesweepers and frigates. They W arns Russia Nast \ < for five shillings. A gem ruc s e C ; sovereign rights, — |
will clear the path for carriers ter in the city revealed it t ° Delegates voted 51 to 4 on the}
cruisers and battleships. SURESNES, France, Sept, 13. be a green star sapphire and worth B p S 9 of, } motion presented by a nited |

Fighter planes from the Royal General Matthew B. Ridgway,: £2,000, Now Dooling wants to A al l€ $ | Front” of French deleg cates wit a
Air Force Coastal Command were warned Russia that his Allied |stay in Australia and has applied a ie i the excepijon of memLer ws no '
scheduled to put an air umbrella armies will “crush to earth” any aan a 40-acre mining lease in the ; BERLIN, Sept. 13 | eral De Gaulle’ 8 igo § Fa &
over the armada for the first 50 aggression that the West’s grow-|4rea where the gem was found. SOME wx y west-bound truck rhe motion was al Hd DY a
miles. after which planes from ing power is unable to prevent. Washington: Hct meals from vere held up at Soviets’ Babel : i ide Guy Molle re
the carriers will take over. Dur- The Allied Supreme Comman- | lot machines are the latest thing. erg checkpol it on the Berlin en i of the Repu u on ‘opul oe as
ing the 13-day exercise, units of der issued the warning in a{The focd is pre-cooked, then f highway At _ Mariehbor | Franco me lenthon " ra . a
the huge flotilla will bombard solemn pledge to the Untied States | quick frozen, An electric tube in- ee police still he . eight lie cE ir ae a res
“occupied” areas of Norway, land dead of two world wars and to}ide the machine thaws out and sen Volk Wwagens (people's cat | Er . +) ’H ak ee cai
1,500 United States marines on “all prople of all lands to whom heats the dinner in seventy sec- zed “on hursday. Bape a Ve ou ms a: te
the Danish island of Jutland and life without freedom is worse than | °?9S after you put coins in the ane ae m ues Sian eraay t “RPF a a a Ai Mich i Debr :
send a task forve into the Baltic death.” slot nee gpa ST eee Tees i h thouah ‘ »proving the
Sea as far east as Denmark’ Three chaplains representing Melbourne; John Buller, form- | a’, . se Sea nae they Reeds sinciple. of po) cal federation
Bornholm island halfway between Jewish, Protestant and Catholic erly of London and now a nursing ¢ umber to 1 ake c ? se td eae the work of
the southern tip of neutral Swe- faiths held. brief services over! orderly in Brisbane, had a chance: {| Meanwhile East German com-} the "Sens titut se Assembly by a
den and Russian occupied eastern graves as former Secretary of | “ lephone conversation el iat munists placed five more anti-[ proposal to refer ‘the task to al

yermany. | State George C. Marshall formally | #80 19 pennire Wrtae ero ‘ommunists on trial, The city’s} commission of experts.—U.P. i
Sneak Attack dedicated the memorial. Roaciny aa Si aitatent He liked East Berlin communist press said Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower
Ridgway said “We speak to 4,- ~ FS higher ys | - tate i 57-year-old West Berline as i; ss

“Enemy” planes and submar- America but if our purpose here ne ge % eae eae ~ ad given two and a half years. in Jail rer ey gos ea ere es Bs
ines Jaunched a sneak attack on is noble, if our thoughts have henna ms ett H « ds tt | jfor “defaming the German demo- te} 1 { S| 1 ~ Aria i ¥ ym ‘ eta a me on
the powerful NATO fleet racing spiritual value, if our courage is fot the first time when “she ar- j [rable repubil Sovie m lps Phil nlatpin, avouses tne Adalat:

> rescue sleaguere a . rere ° : e : ‘ es : Saal ; . ade a, accuses -
to the rescue of be leaguered Nor high, then we stand not only on +iveq in Sydney this week and! KING FREDERICK of Denmark is shown ta Gopenhagen with his eldest __ Pre report said Wilhelm ran stration of bungling the nation
way Saturday in the first clash the soil of France but on the soil a her a few | rs later daughter, Princess Margrethe, 12, who williuc r Siebert fled from East Germany 4 ¢ Apert y
of the greatest peacetime naval cf freedom, and ou ‘ds g married her a few hours 2 aus , ee ne eee ene enes who willguceeed him to the throne to West Berlin two years ag id a e oOo “perilously ¢lose to World War
manoeuvre. not.46 Ase sn ° i ' ny 4 eRe | of Denmark if a constitutional amendmentis adopted by Parliament ; pi \ - 1 : , es Ago at : III.” He outlined a 10-point pro-
. 1Ot é eT . > mi ‘yf ao " was NCKEC up ” communis “ . : .
and approved by popular referendum. King Frederick has three daugli- y f y ld per
The mock attacks were appar-; people of all lands to whom life 19 t +p | * ‘ ee ee Caugi police when he visited East Berlin 4 gram for winning world peace.
1 € ag § s he posed a “e , a rise ry’s
ently aimed at Britain’s most; without freedom is worse than B.G. Ss Col. Sec. Was a ston tes re - om Dror sed amendment was introduced by Helga ,in June He was convicted of or n¢ la Fisenhower said the country’s
powerful fighting ship, Vanguard, death.”—U.P. | etersen, Denmark’s Woman Minister of Justice. (International) mak false statements about ultimate goal must oe “geni=
and at its most modern carrier | Yaw, . , Fast many when he fled to the LONDON, Sept. 13 eral disarmament” of all countries.
Eagle, the veteran Il'ustrious and | | Favourite F or ‘ e j west ‘ Russia announced that Soviet
the U.S. carrier Wright. } | R We y R Is S at One West Berliner ind three} Ships have sailed. for India with ig acee

Although they were not expect-— U. N. Disregard (FOV ernor’s ; Post e ugee eveda s OvLE ,East Berliners were sentenced toJfood for the famine _ stricken
ed with the fleet less than six 7 eo eS , Y e terms ranging from five to eight’ Madras state, The Russians said 1° ¢
hours out of Scottish ports the Malik’s Objections | (From Our Own Corresponder Intrigue A nd Corruption years for allegedly smuggling they had agreed to let the Kisenhower
eight-nation armada was ready. UNITED NATIONS ; GFORGETOWN, B.G., Sept, 13. . imachine ry from east to west/Indian Red C€ rose distribute it :

It had been escorted to 50 miles) Ricci delegate Jacob A Melik| ‘The Daily Chronicle's Londo Jerlin, Eastern Press reports said} India had objected on Septem Y

é see y anes f the RAF USSIa'S delegate Jacob A, Mali ; . ; TAS +r T Sente oy 12 Commit ts called riant rally | b 5 to an earlier Soviet an- S Lf ye
Sokseat Moan initia * plan suffered what may well be his | correspondent cabled to-day that LOVE FOR \ wv ASHINGTX DN, Se pte mber 13 | for ‘Sunday in ei ee cen j o imeement that the food and uppor ers
whereby the RAF took day pa-, final defeat in the United Nations ;Sir William Savage, Governor eo 1 : I R A GERMAN GIRL caused a Russian to | war and Fascism for peace uni y | con spanion cash gift would be

trols and the United States Air- en the Security Council dis-| Barbados, will be new B.G.’s Gov- flee into United States custody from the Soviet Zone of | nd socialism.” t ' turned over to the Communist sup- In Ma, iorit
force night vigil. { regarded his objections and voted ,ernor, Previous reports had men-| Germany Intelligence agents. said he was “extreme sly | “Free German youth communist} po ted “Joint Committee for Ly y

The first warning that the fleet OT pear } ve debate the|tioned Sir Andrew Wright— | intelligent” and by his own description very frank *\organization called on east and|aicing the starving” in the And-
was under “attack” came when a} eee ara “pp ications of |) Cyprus’s Governor, Sir John Arun but very crafty” west German youths to demon-|!ro region of Madras, The Indian NEW YORK, Sept.
coloured plume of smoke showed! Japan, Libyn, .Laos, Cambodia,}dell, the Windwards’ eee A ; | Direc strate against western allied and| government at the time said that| Dwight D. Eisenhower's a
that a torpedo had been fired. Two { ‘ and Vietnam, _ _ land Hon. John Gutch, B.G.s , An interview covered a wide Tanke of subjects includ- "the West German peace contract.) the food and money ghould beis<) ors “strengthened their control
more were quickly “fired” level Malik, who will be returning | Colonial Secretary, now O.A.G., as ing mtrigue and moral decadence in Stalin’s official family. - —UP. tributed either by the govern-/over the top positions of the
with the “Illustrious” and the! t® Moscow probably late next! probable successors to Sir Charles —_ Among the highlights were, merit itself or by the Indian Red} iepublican Party with a reshuffle
“Vanguard”. week, eae that the appli- | Woolley. In B.G. the newspapers} I y. statements that Joseph Beria, | Cross : of the National Executive Com-

—vu.p, | cation of the five states be refer-| 5. the past weeks have been | uss ia I re g head of the Russian secret nolice : e ¢ The Indians on September S| mittee. The Executive Commit-

| red to the Council's Committee on somata with letters urging the’ ' ordered arious women to be- New High Schoo also returned a relief donation of] tee, previously clonsidered

; membership Instead the 11 F op oS 84.000 f ( ist China minated t th f 1 f

i S$ 2a » =|. nf 7 Suter 4 ie . oO intimate W } a $ OO rom ‘ommunis ine ninate vy a riends o

nation ite Caeed In eee sepe| ER move re eS abe « or I ossible \ ar ihre te a the m ~ ge i & at [ ) ened hi Grenada bok ause the Chinese had specified Senator Robert Taft, is now made

Gen. Hauteclocque atone verse Capes ie, aileet petition Whitehall for hi: appoint- | WASHINGTON. §S 13 the efused ‘| . d that it should be distributed by }up of eight Eisenhower support-

4 ications without recourse to the : gt ban . é NG : »pt ‘ or aia . th ume Red tinged “Joint Com rs six Taft men and one

igi : f T is | Committee.-U.P, . ment, emphasising his he 2 J I P iring for “possible war” . it St 1 a ; me utal From Our Own Correspondent eattte a ( Painia ya pda Secor neuter: ine ri
Visits Bey Oo unIs | Noses ane og eee ee en eee United oe th euiiver pare ae i oe, GRENADA, Sept. 13. |tary of the All Union Central

Re edge of lecal conditions ommant theme in Russia tod: M1 A meen Persona ee A larg ‘presentative assembly} Trades Union Council, announced Governing Body
TUNIS, Sept. 13. Communist Gutch during the past two years a xetuges Soviet scientist has told ! detence and ite SECU~ 5 + Atlan n aie be : me t 7 . ten t Baylat .eKipe tor ' g Body

ee n Sane 4 tt | lar throughout the American intelligence official tte 7 : 2 — : 1 tals Pf -

The French Resident General} 2 became popu : 7 Wii ees he aes ; p opening of the Anglican High lodras with 10,000 ;ons of whe rhe 15 member committee
Jean de Hauteclocque called on} Surrenders colony, but it is feared that li Nene Departn Ht On SAtut © rugs sle for Power School at Tanteen last Thursday 000 tons of rice, and 5,000 cat h yp governing body of t
Friday on the Bey of Tunis and : , | Waitenall will not create a pre- ver 3s eased a report on extensive Ai outstar 1g characteristic of afternoon by Governor Arundetl,| of condensed m'lk.—U.P. party between national conven-

7 ee ae ahetia ‘ ‘ PANMUNJOM, Sept. 13 | cedent to promote a Colonial Sec- | intervie with an unidentified § f and politic is the following ble : by Arch ese lier ind nation or e
it was widely reported that he A Commilnist: soldier sneaked R G th ame | Russian who belies ys aan , ; gs fol ng lessing Ar . itional committee
ies, =| eta Mench ¢£ 5 é - a > > e same =? ‘ \ Americar « eat dog rucgle for rer- de nH. G, Pigott in the absenc¢ meeting The changes were an-
delivered a stern French answer | , fe retary to be Governor In Chances thie ve s = con % ate 4 ge
own the corridor from Panmun-} .o] hile governors in smaller in the rearmament Qn 7 ower that led t flict hs Bist ¢ the Windy is.) Tu Will Be Released jounced } Republic , a
» Bey’s rejection of the pro-| i colony, while gover test” are ery Poot ‘ | i to nflic of the jishop 0 i indwards unisians 2 © lOUNCE’ ry epublican nationa
pat. French eeaain programme. | joraste, the United Nations lines | colonies are entitled to promotion. ot very cotieanil c om ie ik mnt 1e and often to destruction delayed bee vse there was no B.G ie - Chairman Arthur Eummerfield
( ti rial ‘ir “les aintained how- | dast night and gare himself up to Sir Alfred Savage the Daily come of. this 7 Se “4 mh : petitor Airways flight from St. Vincent rur-.S, sep? _. Who denied reports that the new
Of cla eire nal ma . ee surely | ie same two United States M4-|onronicle’s London report says he Boviet este, eee since the fardhal Ghukov. Was recalled on the previous day ly 1s announced that the 46¢ lignment presented purge” of
CYCES vie . be hal ‘ slit cal ae movepied he surrender hav an impressive record in Bar= | ptyeetive m rah , 2 d tt * 2 Soviet Commander in Ger- The feature of the ceremon person arrested “during the the member who backed Taft
one of courtesy ant a ee of a truce driver 24 hours before. bados and has a reputation for long for the Aechities ea ae A pos rn for shipping a “trainload attended officials of the Gov troubles which swept the protec - against Eisenhower for Presi-
affairs were discussed. a ;Allicd authorities disclosed the being one of the best dressed ine the United sf 7 a 1 erie ef automobiles back to his friends ernment, members of the Legis-|torate last Wednesday, will be dential nomination at the July
known that the French answer | latest escape this morning. The Pel hhe 1 We tnsastracta Ste s to mobilize in Meéscow without a government lature, heads of all denominations] released on Monday.—W.P. onvention U.P.
arrived in Tunis on Friday after| renegade was the third Red tuo * I orde He had heard that ex- und the Board of Education, was
having been approved _ by the! make a break through the arm~ | The refugee scientist, trained) foreign Minister V ‘ a ae the unvcilings of inseriptions along | |=
French cabinet. —U.P. istice camp within a week,—U.P.; i las a geologist and. with wide ex-| 1 Andrei viens f ‘ ae five sections of the buildings, in
E IN N EGYPT'S 'S NEW CRISIS | Producer Leawes perience in military scientific | qu tly took Molotov ig lashed dicating donors to the or ro a )
| projects for Stalin Government 1 1948 over the « bi cluding the Society ‘or th
FIGUR lail Toda told his interviewer “It is a factl1 4 I '? conduct of In- pro yagation of the Gos pel, the |
nr ny that the Americans made a mis- Arto picid Funai sit Grenada Government, St. Georg
A + 5 take in not destroying the Soviet! ,, ] whe al by th ms eng Chureh Council and two familie
a HOLLYWOOD, Sept. 13 regime after having conquered |Z" Wo er 0. ae nited us
| Z re er wane ent Germany”. .But now it is to rn $3 . vin tale tig oul re- { RA! TIGH-—Makers of the
scheduled for release rom jail he aid. “Thi opportunit had ci oluntari the soviet .
O-day after shooting a man over’ bear tet slim nity had) zone a year later might have Leachers Adapt ‘ p
vamection of his actress wife, ay Jt alip.and will not retur Pie eee ee 5 “ WORLD'S CHAMPION
Joan Bennett The silver-haired ' the re + eaithatthat t Americar t { ASST als
es ‘ eport saying t Kt - an m of receiv- ' Sa ary raposa Ss
movie maker, 57, served 102 days qoes not necessarily refi Soviet defector -
nooeeet sf ms amen istie® his view of the - par am it ¢ T —U.P. The Assistant Teacher Unio 1
voun ig of Je lings v . Sig er on 0 } Inite ’ ie ee aonied aes amt
wife’s agent.—U.P, Government "—U.P ig jyesterday adoj ‘
; : es v ni of the Salary Com
va = proposa nel
Kast Europe Must Pros et vona them. on to|
| 4
. the Teacher Association |
B29 *s Bomb Nor th Liberate Itself These recommendations w il 1|
eventually be Lent on to the Con
. ANKFURT, Sept, 13 ioner Government ha v @|
ry _ of nie aaa appointed to consider the salarit |
f Foreign elations of the employee other than ad
k ore AL} Wy a r | j ii Tom Connally says istrative head nd technical
} la f 6. Uinther: Btotes ti ain min i i a t
ri ; - “7 officers
ending troops to lib- Tt Unions’ meeting was
‘ SEOUL, Sept. 13, erate Eastern Europe from Com- ei te bani aed hin’ te
Waves of United States planes defian tly carried the ™munism. — lid not begin after mid-day
Korean war to the doorsteps of both the Soviet Union and ie se ” iti ° ne would) nventy-eight members turned up
Red China. Thirty-five B29 Superfortresses struck first > se ih a e "ets a dni eee ie. and there was a discussion op
with 300 tons of demclition bombs at northwest Korea's! tiace democracy, parliamentary | the irregular attendance of mem-
EGYPTIAN PREMIER Aly Maher Pasha (left) has resigned in the { vital Suigho plant directly ACTOSS the Yalu River from! covernment, pnd indepefdence, | bers and their lack of punctuality
face of pressure from military leader Maj. Gen. Mohammed Neguib | Manchuria. They reported “good to excellent” results| 2ut some of them do not want to[in arriving, i ht
(right), according tq Cairo dispatches. Gen. Neguib declared he would | iin jioht navy att ; | be liberated. We are not prepar- The pre sid nt, } i +. Downe
form a government “mostly of civilians” to rule the troubled country. | ;,. tt tt navy attack-bombers , d to go in there with arms|w unable to be present on
Aly Maher became premier when King Farouk was deposed. His | opr one United — eae Grant Dies gainst their will—they must lib-|account of his having to attend ‘
¥. rinceton and “Bon omme ; ite themselve nother meeting
resignation coincided with a widespread political purge. | Richard” in ine geskn Bon erika! themsely i ; ; 1" You are ona :
—(International), | ie 7 vapan Sea smash- Fr Our Own Correspondent || { 3
ed at the Northeast Korean suppl; ‘DEN "e MEY R I DIES --- + | »\ >
é aly GRENADA, Sept, 13 ERSTEIN :
entre of ory with meee 3h, 2: G , Sex 3
“ re Ot Hoer ong within ight Victor Grant, 33, formerly of the WINNER when ou ride a Ralei h! =
Sh | R ffi Ss Hi 5 De we Sy alanine ont ok ie mae hone department here, re LONDON, Sept. 13 emonstrators ' :
irm Is Ss nly 40 miles west of the Soviet- pn partm i , re-| JONDON, Sey 2 §
;' ~ ¢ e ray =n late superintendent of S* Die he ovelist-poet F. H | 3 ’ ; 1 ;
a 1 ea epeesee frontier Navy pilots! 5 vas buried at "Olliasy : W. Meyorst rt : ead 63 a H Enter Brussels 8 A Raleigh was the choice of Reg Harris—World’s
® 4 : Said that they destroyed eight of} ve cterg following t death ot! novels lude Tece Duke 3 Professional Sprint Champion for the second year in
. : the 30 garracks in thé ce > of} follo : , - te wi 3% 7 F '
For Oil Dispute Solution | fe aeeen , ae ‘ — * h parents’ home after a long: “Seraphin Tom Tallion BRUSSELS, Sept, 13 4 succession. Here is proof of the wisdom of buying
| rest United Nations Comwis a | ailment here U.P The first trickle of an expected 3 your bicycle from a Company with such great
TEHERAN, Sept. 13. [ed the Shah “to intimate certain] described Hoeryong in the north-| aaa demonstrators called to ‘ technical experience and knowledge that designed
; “ern an ons . emier” ‘ test gain the lemency 2
A court official called on Prem- recommendations to the Premier”) ernmost corner of _Korei 1 as “the ye A painst the ¢ and built the record-breaking RALEIGH,
o } stor s pected ri > . : itec two ytorious war

ier Mohammed Mossadegh on Middletor pected to give} Manchurian border gateway fron ey m 2 es i ary ; te

Saturday re.terated the Shah’ Mossadezh an ial British re-| Russia ‘ Tur ve re Ss rimina previously death - 8° De z

desire for a solution to the oil ply next week it is bebeved South Korean infantrymen suc : : ; ; hj ,| tenced bes an arriving in the Be

question, informed sources re the reply would declare that Bri-| cessfully beat off fifth Chinese NEW YORK, Sep eant Frank Page or recent | giat ipital Saturday nigh

ported tuin cannot m2ke greater conces- | Communist ttempt to recapture rig How rd ne pay 1 m Europe talked r | But the ik of former concent

The meeting sions tl d “Capitol Hill on! edltoria f Ss i G T about t progr . =] tu ¢ f t re tance i

by the Britis _ William Alton Joné s of the Cities t centr front A fey M tthev Ridgw cae scribe t hi Gree} i t en ie ' , | her € eter in and far THE ALL-STEEL BICYCLE

George Middlet« } Service Oil Company of the United other R.O.K launch-; f nspection visi rurke i sayin r le abou ot lle in from all corners

on Thursday when Brita States was said t have fare, wot of hake ewe peut ee 8S Gat ae tet oe pnctaned | of the 7 oy A Product ef Raleigh Induserias Limssed, Netsingham, Fingland.

repeated eque M rer annot neip iran ing the crest of “Fin eve ad be use of ne pu ar e tour ; j the r t 5

ade it € th Britain « ell o it might fur ish A thunderous artil-) patri m id deep love W have here netr | : 5
. i Ar few for the refir.ery cked the entire are } ( t which w t bl hat n ‘ can buy | ‘ tratior me-} t “<7 CAVE, SHEPHERD
aa D Sx it frcr : aulte the e people eq y nd I ecr t r e | o i +i it f J & co., LTD.
5 * Mi Sim ee t € < ¢ Ss Kore W er S« ily r ttle cor derat ir inte bd. he
Re f VA s ( : f tir t ig tial oppositio the se] = ‘ ‘ :
ang, Oia. ENE 9 tack on. the, pre rs of a ae Goeskinhiek we Bie a 10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street.
a epor } , South Koréar eade / ‘ ( |Go ‘ ude a
a ¢ he prir oe of sre I } veel ) I Ar rurke i he} pal ti eche
‘ . 5 p her ie ] rs ¢ ; } 4 00 " ( I Turk nf the ir de I = NO CYCLE IS COMPLETE WITHOUT A STURMEY-
: 2 ms : - , th ARCHER 3. OR 4SPEED GEAR AND DYNOHUB
t > UP U.P aS - _
f U.P. \ UP. | i
of















































| NEW LAW WOULD Mi



SEPTE)



RR 4,



19

9

o

5

QUEEN



















PRICE :



Plan Approved

STRASBOURG, Sept. 13,
The six-nation European Coal-Steel Pool Assembly }
decided to start immediate work on the constitution for!
political federation of France, Western Germany, Italy,

Holland, Belgium and Luxembourg
By a strong majority the 78-member House approved al

plan to convert itself into a pre-constitutional Assembly |
and prepare a charter for political unification of the six |
West European nations whose industrial and military |



potential outstrips that of Soviet Russia



































SIX CENTS



zest Peacetime Lxercise

| 6-Nation Federal crores sungiing




























































PAGE TWO









































. SUNDAY ADVOCATE P SUNDAY. SEPTEMBER 14, 1952
' ve
= r ee > 9 e , ® e
JANETEA DRESS SHOP | €Ct ACR S ecita
(Next Door to Singer’s) CECIL JACK, young Vineent
| pianist, gave a Plane Recital at By KAY HOWELL most diffieult pieces of the
* aoa the British Council on Friday at Lammermoor’’— evening's entertainment. In Mr ADY -SAVAGE ) s
Just Opened : NYLON STOCKINGS 8.30 p.m. Incidentally, it is worthy grand opera ites ts ee teen, a, te Sue See Excellency th . a < Bee
With Black Arrows pice $1.59 of note that on the 12th Septem- and first produced at Ni acts Of The Mountain King” by Grieg 155, 4 4 a: dak Ee tae
ie ber, 195i—a ye I P ed at Naples—Mr. the Norwegiam Composer, which l0°%,4 40 minutes flight in “Miss
Cutlined Heels . 7 ee 2.25 5 ee ee ago—Mr. Jack ack must have been successful ia part of Anitra’s Dance in which Bim” on Saturday last, September
4 Sh 243 also treated an appreciative in learning the fundamentals 2 ae te oF ane ©
Pier Maha SSO eli sich cis fides ices cscctecod pi ceca who acclaimed him az which will further develop -h Peer Gat qutees th: Hall of the Saprag > Sp pater:
| ee young pianist whose technieaa technical abilit: » SEOGRCREY: Fe, SHE OU HOME a6 Sinton, ain 3 "Lady
} SE «=—(dzDrresses Made to Order for all occasions excellence surpasses that of a mer: Af he Soeate aaa one ae eseaeen Savage owas asaeenite ot ¥,
amateur is was his seeond S : oo ge Soe - % Deni / 7
} - NY ine Bie cE ayy After Bho Ratenvad Re and ove techried um we Mula Denis VAahim ADI
this time the recital only served sat in readiness knowin re ee j “toihs 7 . =
— PSSA, coe Soe onl) i. that the a he dos Light Aeroplane Club a letter
! ee to substantiate the opinion of the better half orgy. To my mind I thought the CO. 7 «
) { sama a was BP to ~ re ak ales . stating how much she enjoyed the
i GLoBpt en Brifiast Capabilities | Minor, “waits” A Mat and C What T considered the treat of the fight and especially seeing Barba-
(K{ This Evening $30 pam. Monday & Tuesday S & 8.30 p.m ‘The peogmamme whic was ‘Fantaisie bb and “Poloe programme was yet to. follow. 2 for the first time from Miss
i | divided into five groups was aise” in A Flat Major -— by 7 ote 5 :
i ROSE OF Cane ARRON Wi cleverly chosen 60 ae to bring out Fiedavie Chapin We saw whos Concerto Familiar Wedding At St. Matthias
i) Jack Beutel — ae ~— Bill Williams } he versatility of the pianist. No Was perhaps Mr. Jn~’s favourite 5 T ST. MATTHIAS on Thurs-
i vi |doubt, after hearing “Sarabande” —e handled his armeggios sue- , ae from the Ist Movement day aflernoon Miss Dorothy
) GLORY ALLEY |in D Minor by Handel, “‘Arioso” cessfully. With the \evboard a: © C Minor ‘“Coneerto” by Phillips, Nurse at the Mental
)} elie Garen Lows Armstrong — Jack Teagarden |by J, S. Bach and “Turkish his command he ecr*inly paster- tacbmaninoft though simple tothe Hospital and daughter of Mr.
i} FRE scenes ana oT See |March” by Mozart, one realised @¢ the technical parts => 2 ow great Robert Phillips of — Hindsbury
Wednesday and Thursday 4.45 & 8.30 pm. jthat Mr. Jack had within his ¥ Sis ” a "ine ~ Road became the bride of Mr.
‘ y Mkdh & CONGO LANGE |grasp the fundamentals that will, Relaxed And € vfident tiom was masterly To end the Keith Walrond, of Tudor Bridge
FARZAâ„¢N & HIS a with steady practice, blossom Now convinced that this was no PPoCramme Polichnielie bY and a Member of the Inspectorate
{ OUR PRICES forth to produce a pianist of ™ére amateur, the audience heard Wachmerinoft—a buffoon—left an of the General Board of Health.
Pit 12¢., Cirele 24c. House 36 Bal. GO., Boxes 72c., Kids }-Prite brilliant capabilities. This group Group 4 by Schuman, German indelible impression. The bride who. was given in MR. & MRS. EYAN ROSS
Me he played with tenderness bring- ae Traumeri (Dreaming) Ceci) Jack is a young pianist "arriage by her father was * MR. & MRS. o Os : : ;
SS = FEAF SE -|ing out the melodie genius in- Gamer yung (Soaring) 2.74 with a clearly defined approach attended by Miss Violet Walrond Second Lecture edding At St. Patricks
\ ten vy the Composers. ims) were han to his music. He masters varied 2S Maid-of-Honour with Misses R. LEFANU will give his
: smoothly and with deep tender- - ~ Patri Mins ; ; ; Pe N y a :
aR , tochwieal works and if he main- cia Phillips § and Naomi second lecture in the series N SATURDAY afternoon at
Th hats Sind Outy, ” tained one at ar< tains an unmereenary attitude Springer as Bridesmaids. The “Three Contemporary Novelists” O 4.30 o'clock at St. Patricks
ci Ah cpermehncancenenernnemtiisontseseicsinnammnceentnaneeiliinateiieinattoe. e second Group, “Sonata The e sty leces. +- wards his music he will, If am flower girls were the Misses lL. at the British Council, “Wake- Roman Catholic Church, Miss
EMPIRE OLYMPIC ROXY ROYAL Op. 49 No. 2 in G. Major featured The former gives the idea of .1.0 develop into a pianist of Walrond and Betty Daniel. field”, White Park, tomorrow at Joan Roach eldest daughter of
To-day 4.46°& G88) Today & Tomercaw | To-ca¥ to Tuesday Last Two Shows two movements by Beethoven and Tising and im Whims was h*ard high esteem. The bestman was Mr. Stanley 5.00 pm. The subject of the Mrs. Ina Roach of “Pilgrim
Ro-ce AT meing| O20 wh CIS DUP 4.45 & 8.15 Today 20 & «30 “Lucia di Lammermoor” by 4 wide range of expressions. His Piggot and the ushers were Mr. jecture will’ be “Graham Greene”. Place”, Christ Church w
daly, Univaneas Richard Basehart | ¢.,. ; Republic Donizetti arr. Leschetiazky for ihe “bility to interpret effectively ex- ‘Thanics is due to the Represent- Ralph Holder and Mr. Roy Si ns 20th to Mr. Evan Bnet, set i ae ann
Pctures Presents Vinvtiym Maxwelt C°! "NDIA Pic\ures Colossal) double left Rand only, brought forth actly what the composers intend- gtives of the Britise Council for Walrond. : upervisor i, eR ee ar. sing
John Lund —. s Allan ‘Recky) Lane rounds of applause from the ¢d, is indeed an achievement. making the programme possi)? The ceremony which was fully Century Fox ough”, Welches, St Michael. zea:
oa WALL’ Broderick Deva! cort popu, |audience who, sat enraptured. Effective Interpretation and also to the audiemee who choral was performed by Rev. M. R. EDWARD COHEN, Super- ses ‘
and John DEREK - STAMPEDE” | To be able to master with perfec- With the programme drawing availed themselves of the op- E—. Griffiths and the honeymoon cor of 20th C » Fox, The >
BATTLE AT m7 ii , ‘the : 2 i visor of 20 entury e ceremony was performed
AY SPOR AND THO in and | tion such a piece as “Lucia di to a close, we heard some of portunity of hearing it. is being spent at Bathsheba. who arrived here on Thursday by Father Parkinson, S.J., and the
APACHE PASS = SCANDAL THE FLAME For Ten Days evening from British Guiana left bride who was given in marriage



with

RS. SENORA DE CAVIC- by B.W.1.A. on Friday for Cara- by Mr. J. B. Field wore a gown of



































- . | *
In Glorious Erie Fortnran John Carroi! i i
Technicolor Nadia Grus SHEET j Vera Ralstor e CHIONI and tw aughters ©aS via Trinidad. He was accom- slipper satin with close fittin
aT ke en ee Tues and Wer te Thurs. | Monday a Tae oing oO arrived in the iaeke wi panied by Mr. Louis Milan, Man~ bedice buttoned to the waist ae
~Gaabem Friday waste ane Republic Double | hostile ) during the week for ten days’ 28!ne Director f 20th Century long close fitting _sleeves. Her
19th 2.30 & 8.30 “G@RBON OF John Wayne Republic Doub'e: | holiday. During their stay‘ here Fox. E _ ___.__ full skirt of chantilly lace over
Universal Pictures § GH@#T CITY” in ae ae. | lee they will be guests at St. Law- Mr. Cohen’s happy impressions the satin ended in a long flowing
Presents with Brick Janes WAKE OF THE Ei with | rence Hotel, of Barbados will undoubtedly train Her finger tip veil was
Laurence Olive Phiuzeday RED WITCH” | Allan (Rocky) Lane | Returned Pe and Med held = place by a beaded tiara
in at 4.29 Onby . Vv ‘edicine and she carried a bouquet of white
Repubite double and and 'S [i RS. FRANK THOMAS who One 4 vin pa ;
LET 2 NTOM ‘DOWN DAKOTA a in : , 1U st. gardenias, Queen Anne’s z
HAM Soon me ae “FAR FRONTER” way O L has been spending a few R BARRE . een ee hell pink roses, wr
Coming Soon sa Opening Saturdes Wet & Thur a tneeown asa lh months in the island returned * a aoe noite, winds na
: i 4.80 & 8.20 " - " nee Bp oe home to St. Vincent on Thursday WD }s at presen ay » was : ‘
ROCKING wages” “35 Lane sendin mancen| “THUMBS UP" haa energy in a good night’s | FOR SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1952 * afternoon by B.W.LA. She was the island, will be leaving by the (, aa ee eo by Miss Sheila
HORSE SONG OF NEVADA and " and sleep as he woud on a six-mile +” meh, =i * ; a guest of Mr. and Mrs, H. S, SS. De Grasse on the 16th Sep- 7 Mics , Se eee auch
Thursday At 8.30 rooruicur =| “UNDER nevay. | walk. Scientists reported this after | Look in the section im which your birthday comes and 4 | Eastmond. Upper Collymore Rock tember, for Ireland where he will 1) aael Sisal ‘ Dad Bench mee
WINNER “MADAM O'LINDY VARIETIES | SKIES” tasts in which they measured the} find what your outlcok is, aceording to the stars. Teacher Returns a eee a TOT, 18. Siieeee Gloria ye Jad
= a | ener output of five students 7 also holidaying with him, aathns WE a hn
‘wen AWA wens. SSSA | ver 13 “ag. | * ARIES —Faveurabie aspects honour charitable ISS OLIVE STEPHENS re- He is a guest of Mrs C. Selby, — Field were the flower-
|| They also .found that: Tun | March 21—Aprtl 20 deeds, seeking and granting favours, doing * 4% turned to British Guiana on Bay Street. girls,
| y e Friday last by B.W.LA. after ‘ He .
\ jemnmarere nae: spas. about oly Sas te oe serge orga oo spending two weeks’ tholiday in New Session at Housec raft The maid-of-honour wore a long
. P or ness. b : 3 ; :
Hines tes a day dressing and aa is . "e _ - " I | the island. She is a teacher and Centre deeee, of ace stamped = a
.wY > aN t : during her stay was a guest at St. NOTHER SESSION of Day stvapless ice and a stole while
BRIDGETOWN [Wat «Sac ~~ OISTAN || MAKING beds uses us energy | ® TAURUS “Moderation, accuracy important, Your Lawrence Hotel, a Evening Classes will (he bridesmaids wore dresses: of
Tocdny ab Roane to-day To-day & To-morrow }\\|*wiee as quickly as waching April 21--May zo Venus position stresses. patience, avoid- * For Nursing Course begin at the Housecraft Centre, blue stamped net cut on similar
tg po-m ’ 4.45 & 850 ; 8 & 8.30 min } | dishes. ance of excesses and a cheerful overall atti- i av roe » 15th Sep- lines. They all wore picture hats
4.45 & ¢.20 p.m | : : , ISS CICELY INNISS. eldest Bay Street on Monday 15th Sep ) ‘
Mss de tices ving BERLIN'S | HARRIET CRAIG 1 WASHING socks is more ex- tude toward family, neighbours. . é . "tember. Miss Ivy Alleyne, In- of the same material and carried
eect, acer BLUE SKIES j; Joan crawronp « bausting than peeling potatoes. | # * *« * Inni ove ee Mr, goat wn. 2. structress, assisted by Mrs. B. horse shoe bouquets of pink
THIS WOMAN (Technicolor) i A RUMBA takes almost as | —Be not careless im treatment of loved and a former upil of *. Dottin and Mrs. Edna Scott will coralita and gerberas.
HURRICANE hh out of 4 : sight- | GEMINI * r pupil of Queen's The flower. girl dresses of
Bing Fred }much out of a mn as an eigh ones, or others to whom you can bring ‘oll i i conduct the classes which are 1e flower.girls wore dresses ©
IS DANGEROUS CROSPY ASTAIRG ISLAND)(}{| some reel, | May 21—June 2) “ College will be leaning by the - December blue net with frilled skirts and
Billy DewOLFE || re ? : | pleasure. We should help make others S.S. De Grasse on Tuesday for scheduled to end in December. a Ss a
Joan CRAWFORD — (Super Gipecokes) | WHEN a big man sits listen- | happier, help better living. * incieel where she - aly. enter Two hundred and eighty-two hoed bonnets _ ene ——
Dennis MORGAN ew ; . Jon HALL i at.race he . ang ing gies i ; , j »s of : -
id BRIA NEXT ATTRACTION ee ON HALE _ ||| ing to the Boat-race he uses up | ; ; girls have registered and the sub- iam posies of pink and blue forget
“= exmQD WEEK) | a ae wea {energy faster than when he is | * * ’ a Nursing Course. ‘The Course is jects taught will include Assorted me-nots.
FOLLOWING FOR TWO " us OEE ae 4.6 & 8.20 p.m standing at ease. CANCER -——Bavourable day on whole, with your expected to last for about three Dishes, Cake and Pastry, Carib-
‘ mevoys ONLY “@REAT MISSOURI BRAVE BULLS The measurements were made June 22—July 23 genial cooperation it can be a more fruit- * pene , " bean Cookery, Advanced Cake The duties of bestman were
Paw MUNI in ‘ , Bar MEL FERRER” *) jby a team at Edinburgh Uni- | @ ful, interesting period than for some days. To Ve la Icing, Advanced Butlering, Simple performed by Mr. Bertrum
‘THE LIFE. OF Wend | COREY (Color) ee versity, led by Dr. R, Passmore. First attend church; then enjoy a healthy o Venezue Cutting and Sewing, Smocking, Banfield and thuse of ushers fell
EMULE ZOLA” Special 1) pam |} REVENUE AGENT {It was a test. of a_ portabie | pastime. + RS. N. RUBIO and her two Elementary Pattern Drafting, Sim- to Mr. Clayton Greenidge, Mr.
Thurs. Special 1.30 p.m Delle, RAMNEDY. 6 | Do SS itis. KENNEDY !machine which scientists hope to | * ‘ * children were among the ple Dressmaking, _—— Dress- a Se a ears a
“OUTLAW BICAND‘ “CARGO TO Thurs. only) 449 & #3) use to find out which industri! | LEO -~You are innately sumny folks honoured passengers leaving for Venezuela making and Handcrafts, cins an ir, aoe Aon oe é
3 ! ; CAPETOWN" Chane ST RERBIT job: tl} t i > ~ by B.W.ILA. yesterday morning. There will be a refund of two reception was held at the bride’s
immy WAKELY & me |Jobs are the most tiring. July 24--Ang. 22 now with your planet’s benefice aspect. "i eas : .
WEST GF Bott. ee oe \ Ideal. indications for a good Sund: % | They had been spending about shillings to each student attend- home and the honeymoon is being
Sk GF EL DORADO FRIDAY WERE WIN D AIDERS Get Stale * deal indications a go ungay, par ix weeks’ holiday here as guests ing 75% of the Classes at the end spent at Hide-a-way, Gibbs’
Johnny Mack BROWN |l "cin. te EVERY ‘and \ HOSE who look brked ticularly when you are truly charitable, pra ST nel ay gu aPihe Term Beach, St. Peter.
Porn’ al] BLAZING! ACROSS | who look on bread as 2 and cheerful. " ah Taste: . ‘ Nvisis '





—
WINNING TEAM—Fridwy

THE _PECOS’





“STRANGE BARGAINS i; starchy, fattening food will bs} Ms -* *

surprised to hear that it aso| a :

supplies the average family with | vireo --You can make this an encouraging day

Inearly one-third. of its muscle. | . Avg. 2%—Sept, @3 for many interests. Church, and useful E e « « By Beachcomber
building protein, according | affairs paramount. Don’t seek unneces-

t ;
ww ies dae sary issues that could be handled bette: ,
bread-baking expert Dr. A. J week days. dy ron USK was falling as a belated with one shot,” he said. “How

|
|
; r ay 4 Amos. +2 a na i * & * sportsman presented him- on earth did that happen?” asked
B 4 ; AQ 4 | Scientists are dc ag Cada LIBRA Heed! ‘adv - eee self at the stout oaken door of cld MeKippercailzie. “A lucky
| c
|





j}with chemicals which ean b advice to Taurus, your Venus Shrillwillie the seat of the chance,” replied Foulenough. “The
ladded to dough to delay the | + Sept. 24-—Oct, 25 aspeet similar now. You will find rave F NEWE Macaroon of Macaroon, who is tee heads were together, as they
‘ |staling of bread. | comfort, encouragement in prayer, spiritual rome + or doe also laird ef Kilcock robin. were all eating out of the same
DATE | Doctors are not yet satisfied reflection. Regard health, too. HOLLYWOOD hearts beat. a To the butler’s question he bucket.” Dead _ silence, The
[that the anti-staling chemicals + -* & * little faster today-—because honey- Teviied: “Say that Sir Archer ladies rose to leave the room
would be harmless if eateo BOORPIO ~Your Mars, again favourable, adds stimu- haired Hedda Hopper is bringing Tumult lesb his wax on the Poche i — ated ged vei
regularly. Oct. 24-—-Nov. 22 ‘Us to day; encourages healthy sports, out- out a book. moors.” At the same time he ts: the. ont %, aha th = aon
Hello, Cousin + . door activities, sponsors our military and For 62-year-old Hedda is one handed what looked like a rook 1°) {)@ Winds. sald loudly, “Sha
. E ! other U.N. agencies, of Hollywood's gossip queens. She rifle to the aged retainer, saying 7 ;
OCTOBER 4th Wo xo a ne 8 seen Terk Gee ecu eet 7
Your CudSius | You are excepuuuas i P . Hh igh ay n oh. Rea eo eee ft says hen. . ‘
: oe ; fore taxes) for chattering to room. The Macaroon himself -
auf you do, accordiig tO Wie fac.s * ~Miltd rays new going to very benefic after rail ms . - : ‘ t RT, : w , r
5 Fe ee SAGITTARIUS 40,000,000 radio listeners and came into the hall, to offer » art, how cruel you can
of pritisn tamuy lue reporcea N @3—_D. »o Uidnight, continuing tomorrow. Whatever readers of her column in more hospitality, “Lost vOur tv” be to your faithful ee a
the Briush Associalion in Belast ov. eo Mec. © your schedule, aim to appreciate it. Don’t » than 80 newspapers h a seed. “A a OL Tas W Bae haem sek ee ee
Few peopie fel any Kinsnip * forget God! ui f owe 3, ' ‘ e asked. Aye, mon, said the ave been reading about an
‘ida: Sbiad neue ttlike * cieiene Her subject: The deeds and stranger. “I followed a grouse too ®udience which © struck matches
perro ghiags — _ 7 lb * * * * misdeeds of Hollywood celebrities. qeep into the undergrowth and 4nd flicked cigarette-lighters to
side (whe tn ay cache ao a OAPRICORN -May not be a day, for much advancement She knows them all personally. missed my path.” “Can 1 get you see if their programmes coutd
( n ey provide some- *« Dec. 23 —Jan. 2] 2 Work but essential tasks can make some She has been there 30 years. She g drink?” asked the courtly laird. give any hint of what was suo.
vente to spend a oumny noliday) headway. No need to neglect God and $¢ ae woman the stars dare not «7 hope you can,” revlied the poced to be going on se ‘tha
i with cousins, and rarely botner your soul’s nouri 1 offend. ar. sini hae hia line » stag aaithe
PARADISE BEACH CLUB Dr. James Mogey said. *« -M ; wae Hedda’s book is called “From Stranger, smacking his lips loudly. stage. And a critic says of the
Mm: After a tireside quiz in Oxford AQUARIUS ; *% Under My Hat.” Hats are her i company: “They are best when
\ homes Dr. Mogel reported :— Jaa. 23 <= aks Oo —Day does not sanction sudden decisions 4g trademark. She spends nearly Foulenough slips up they use their art to. strike fresh
Hf | oT a * — = pet = moms xuaning catiagestentiy £1,800 a year on them. OULENOUGH (for it was he) , Serer ad old human situations.
. | MORE FAMILIES live in ut on whole it is friendly, will bless reli- And now from under her hat conducted himself admirabl en they try to be trees or io
Jass Bands i Steel Bands X | friction than in friendship. gion, charity, wholesome fun, children’s jg | Hedda Hopper has produced 2 all through an excellent aaeven illustrate the passage of man on
e , 2 = SOCREST ; people set * activities. ‘ * bookful of Bis E: like these:— untie the very pretty girl next to =, — we - understand-
Prises }, the most store by family ties. ars ; im said, during a lull in the ew fresh sparks struck
| But, they, too, ose interest in Feb a -Vibrations going to very benefic rays CLARK GABLE got his start general conversation, “Are you while they are trying to be trees
| their relations if they move to a , Marc! tomorrow. Spend day as Stinfiay should with his big ears pinned to his fond of stalking deer?” “You bet WOuld at any rate save the aud-
lite * o-wt x be spent. Church services first. Pleasant a with the make-up man’s I am, darling,” replied Foulen- (¢nce a number of matches.
= ‘ 2 Bi 3 is the linchpin ol family, social theri i putty. ough, off his r
J j | i | , gatherings, with children, ; ; ugh, guard. The girl A
Admittance by Ticket only most family circles. Her death | “T ver oldsters sponsored. * MAE Wee. interes on blushed and laughed, “I wasn’t Morginal note
breaks the main link peawene | ' BORN TODAY: Many fine attributes, includin marriage: “Money and success calling you dear,” she said. "
7 3 S, Z ; a j ,”’ she said. The EOPLE who compl
: s : oe : + ements nae 7 : ngaged a few , ees ; . plain about
children, and separate family | * i integrity, dependability, loyalty, devotion to family, first I've been engaged a guests drew in their breath. The P low-flying jet-planes are con-

. . : . ou T » sae 7 i 5 alwavs It.
groups quickly spring up around | country. Unusual talent for artistic work, writing times. Mother always found fau Macaroon frowned. Foulenough titiually being tok
the mothers of the new genera- | painting, sculpturing, decorating, designing fabrics, writing, She was. right. ‘ m io eke. their





















‘ , : . took a deep draught of wine.. “I "umbers as the fl
tion. for music, the stage. Also mechanica ability. Tend to work ak arte ee — - cnee brought down three stags better idea is deen meee yt.
4 MOST GIRES like to get a %% 0 hard, impairing health, disposition. Be sensible, take pe Nate fet it shell Guk an toptane by thumbing a lift. Or one might
home near their mothers when needed rest. ; fun aivorate.” . : —_————————- adc to'the general din and peril
they marry. Nearly 55 per cent. be Albrecht .Waldenstein (Wallenstein), famous MARLENE DIETRICH to!d me I feel like a horse” But | by employing “courtesy jet-police”
of the wives who live in the | 3 °Ohmnian gen'l. ; 4 | Ribbentrop in pre-war Londo»: picture with Clara made Neca to en run, vee the epee

IN AID. OF centre of Oxford were born there, +e Ke Ke Me MH M M = M”™ |T don't go out with strange men.” riding Cooper a star, He took all roa h ‘

vompared with only 25 per cent. | When Ribbentrop said surely she his, servants for a ride while she One the birds
of the husbands. | them because they have to dress, bridge University agriculturar ex- | knew him, she replied: “Only bY swam, wearing nothing but a ,, 1, became so intimate with
People who were asked why /UP, Dr. Mogey said. | perts claim, | reputation.” huge straw hat, the birds on the island that he
they did not mix with their | When is a Kipper? | CLARA BOW) said: “When called them by their Christian

FI J NDS of the velatives usually made the jour- | Money in Milk GOVERNMENT attetiate ea | |Gary Cuvoper put his arms round Handsprings pow
ons that people ae ote ‘in the | “a FARMER with a herd of ten by Dr. J. A. Lovern, are investi- | we TALLULAH BANKHEAD turn- ” rticle on birds
eres tae cukeae ana ines cows can save more than £40 4 gating exactly what goes on inside GA EVY \}| ed handsprings for a banker friend OR instance, he would say to a
of the PalaMune nt! See lee einine ro by using milking eshiogs a herring when wood smoke a his party at the Waldorf after gzannet, “Hello, Fred!” and to
ation; B instead of milking by hand. Cam turns it into a kipper. ‘ = sores Bary vangthing she ‘named. ane give her el female ——. or rete you,
‘0-day ‘o- marrow pom \4 ed he name ed lara , nbaptise pe is or
GOOD SHEPHERD a ae aig. | MaRS ee ence eget St =
s é ; i i i w s Technicolor Acti ochran i F: d ‘Sir” or “Me =
gned to simplify and streamline filing in your a eearty COOPER in |a stage job. ad promised Tallulah | ee ne



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SUNDAY,



AT THE CINEMA

SEPTEMBER



14, 1952

BLUE SKIES

i
4
By G

CASTING back over t!

Le

B.

wee



d films shown during

the past few months, I see that we have been pretty lucky
in thatat least one or more, each week, have been new films
with definite box office appeal, and for a small place like

Barbados, that’s not bad

case, we Must expect

then, and this week-end would seem to fit

Not that the pictures are bad—
they're not—but of the ones |
have seen, I can’t say I was par-
ticularly impressed. However, I
did not see “BLUE SKIES” which

is at the Plaza, Barbare¢ This

is not a new film, but one look at
the e¢ast «which includes sing
Crosby, Fred Astaire and Joa

Caulfield, as well as Irving Ber-

lin’s song hits — “Some Sunny
Day”, “Putt’n On The Ritz”, “Thi
Is The Army, Mr. Jones White

Christmas,” and the title song, to
mention but a few, and I'd
say you have the ingredients for

a bang-up musical, to nfb
of the fact it is in Technicolor
Seems to me I saw it years ago

and thoroughly enjoyed
Glory Alley
THE Globe is running :
feature this week-end—
ALLEY” and “ROSE OF CIM:<
RON” but neither _of them i
to the standard of the films
have recently been shown at thi
theatre, though they
new pictures. “GLORY
has a first rate cast




are both

ALLEY

headed

by



BING CROSBY

Ralph Meeker, a new
actor, petite and charming Le
Caron, Kurt Kasznar, a Vienne
actor, trumpeter Louis Armstr
and Jack Teagarden and
orchestra. However, despite
stellar talent, the picture never
manages to get off the ground
This is probably due to the fact
that the director seems to have
been suffering from a_ certain
amount of indecision as to th
exact type the finished film should
be, with the result that what starts
out as a psychological melodrama,
flies off in several directions and
winds up as a curious mixture 0
psychological melodrama,
drama and musical. All very
fusing, and one or two sub-plots
don’t clarify the situation

Our principal character is a
young prize fighter, who f
reasons thet are not revealed
the last reel, walks out
biggest fight, and promptly ¢
on the skids. Helped back to
sobriety and decency by his sweet
heart and friends, he makes up
his mind to be a Korean hero—
just to prove he’s no coward, With
the ease and speed of Hollywood
he acquires the Medal of Honour
and there's a heck of a turn-out
when he comes marching home.
However, it’s still obvious that he
has a few psych@logical adjust-
ments to make, and with thes«
accomplished, there is a grand get-
together to the accompaniment of
some good old Basin St. jazz

With a background
Orleans French Quarter,

dramati

r
his
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wal
con-

til

u

New
there if

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@ Churchfield 22d, Acton, Londos,
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PAIN

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RAIN



SACROOL

ALLL PLEELE SSS SESS SPSS SPSSOOSSSOS,

KNOCKS OUT
PAIN
e

> .
Â¥ ON SALE AT 2
~ . ‘
$ KNIGHTS LID. <
Yeososoosos+ GOS CSLOSFSD

In
we get new pictures even before bermuda

fact, 1 have

been told tha
This being the

JOAN CRAWFORD

of opportu



while

irden,
contributes a

dance numbers.

few

inity
Leslie

The

ty for
by Louis Armstrong and Jack

t

a slough of despond every now and
into that category.



good

Caron

all-too-brief
acting

1s

good all through, with sound por-

Louis

r

trayals by

c cin I
sympathetic
but

and
respectively,
woefully
Rose of Ci
ROSE OF

natural colour is

the
overloaded.

Kasznar
blind

tne

and
judge

newspaperman,

story

marron

CIMARRON

story

the

itself

m

of a

white girl who is brought up by

Indians,

by th bank rob’

bers, she



and when they are killed

tracks

down the murderers gnd promptly

shoots two

of them. This lands her

n jail, but not for long as she is
released by the remaining robber
and unaware of his identity, she
teams up with him. There’s a

hold-up and a treasure hunt along

with

our

i lot

Rose he

gets

‘r man

of other confusion, but

in the

end, with the help of a love-stick

sheriff.

Powt play

Rose, and she

certainly ig a credit to her foster



neckline



inging
accent

Ss

arents, with plucked eye-brows,
and Eastern
all this out West in

1863!

The acting is wooden, the dialogue
is some magni-

yured, but ¢here
ficent riding, I wo
that the gun-play
standard of a
gallery!
This Woman

JOAN CRAWFORD

and diamo
of the

mink
role

ten-cent

uld like
isn’t up

nds,

to add
to the

shooting

is Dangerous
in ermine,
plays the
master-mind

to a

gang of hold-up thugs in “THIS

WOMAN
the Plazz
of robbing a



IS DANGEROUS,”
Bridgetown, On the eve
gambling house of

at

$90,000, she discovers she is going
blind and has to have an opera-

ti
she goes
fall

might

on, The robbery
to hosp.
le i

t
be

goes

through,
ital and of course,
\ 1e doctor. This
a way out of her diffi-

culties, but for the fact that one

f her
c 1e1

gun-crazy companions is in

love with her and swears to get

the doctor.
hen he
ing theatre and
However, the
their n
too, leaving Joan
the doctor.

F.B.I,

starts

free to

He nearly does, too,
breaks into the operat-
shooting.
always get
n and they do this time

marry

Miss Crawford is, as usual, glam-

orous,

slittering and sophisticated

to the Ninth degree and her ward-

robe will be

appreciated

by

feminine audiences, but what act-
ing honours there are go to David

Brian her
trigg
De

role

as





i lorgan
and
tely

p

qui

_ [mpr

THE TRUCK & BUS TYRE THAT WAS

jealous,
*-happy lover. For a change,
serious

acquits himself

brut
lays

a

al and

ade-

_—

Notes

JAMAICAN PROSE AND
POETRY
In ‘Caribbean Veices’

Today -

In the weekly B.B.C. pro-
gramme of West Indian prose
and poetry’which is broadcast on
Sundays under the title of ‘Car-
ibbean Voices’ the Eastern Carib-
bean usually is much better
represented than Jamaica al-
though this should not be the
case from a population standard.
However, of late this proportion
seems to be changing and this is
exemplified in next Sunday's
broadcast, ~—- 14th. inst. when
the half hour will be entirely
devoted to Jamaica with a prose
sketch ‘Walking in the Hill’ by
Claude Thompson and poems by
Ken Maxwell, both of whom have
recently been heard in this pro-
gramme. It behoves the writers
of Trinidad, Barbados, British
Guiana, as well as those of the
smaller islands, particularly the
prolific in terms of writing —
Grenada, not to allow Jamaica to
dominate the programme. Con-
tributions to this series are
always welcomed at the B.B.C.,
P.O. Box 408, Kingston, Jamaica

and the pay is good; details of
this can also be obtained from
this address. ‘Caribbean Voice:'

is on the air each Sunday fror
7.15 to 7.45 p.m. in the 25 and 31
metre bands, 11.75 and 9.58 mega-
cycles.

B.B.C. Wavelengths

Last week we gave details ct
the B.B.C. beams to this area.
Short-wave listeners to these
beams may find that reception is
marred by interference of morse,
particularly on the 31 metre ban
beam. If you have found thi:
trouble you may prefer to listen
to London on the beams to North
or South America which are now
eoming in very well although not
directly beamed to us. The
beams to North America are on
30.53 metres, 9.825 megacycles
from 5.15 p.m. onwards and on
48.43 metres, 6.195 megacycles,
from 8.15 p.m. onwards, the
former begin particularly free
from interference. The beams
to South America are on 25,38
metres, 11.82 megacyclés, from
6.15 p.m. onwards and 31.88
metres, 9.41 megacycles from
6.15 p.m, onwards as well as the
beams to the West Indies which
we listed last week. The four
beams mentioned above do not
earry the special West Indies
half-hours such as ‘Caribbean
Voices’ but for other programmes
from London in the General
Overseas Service you may find
one of these better than the
direct beams to. us.

Khama of the Bamangwato

The name of Seretse Khama of
the Bamangwato is now almast a
house-hold word. In a B.B.C
programme in the coming week
listeners ean hear about the orig-
inal Khama of the Bamangwato
who died in 1922. Lewis Hast-
ings who speaks about him first
met him when Khama was about
90 but he has this to say about
him ‘He was a great African and
something of a genius. Mr.
Hastings points out that when
Khama was born life in all those
territories north of the Orange
River was what it had been from
time immemorial, poor, brutisn
and short... ‘But when Khara
died the tide of European devel-
opment had swept far past the
kraals of Bechuanaland and in
scattered cattle posts the little
herd boys hardly bothered to
look up at four-engined passen-
ger planes rumbling peacefully
overhead.

From the Bronze Age
age of the aircraft! It’s as if one
man’s life has covered 3,000
years.’ The talk will be in ‘Mid-
Week Talk’ at 10.15 pm. om
Wednesday, 17th. September.

to the





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Comper cmt iecerimto Memoir
we
Bay

St. Distriputers

SUNDAY ADVOCATE





(By AGRICOLA)

ANIMAL

standard of local poultry
improvement.

IMPROVEMENT
THE SUCCESS of the recent P
the efforts by the Poultry

ultry Exhibition and
Association to improve the
suggest this note on anima!

But first, let us warmly congratulate the

organisers and the participants, especially those who ob

tained awards.

Animal breeding, selection and
the slow and tedious processes
involved in the production of im-
proved types are, in the nature
of things, a closed book to the
average layman concerned, ‘n
the main, with the quality and
availability of the products which

GARDENING HINTS
FOR AMATEURS

Gardeners in Barbados today
might be compared to a band of
pilgrims toiling to establish them-
selves against great odds.

Those natural enemies such as
slugs, caterpillars and blight are
of course to be expected, untrained
gardeners we are accustomed 10,
drought may be termed “an ict of
God,” but when it comes to turn-
ing off the garden water then tn«
long suffering gardener is justified
in feeling aggri ved

General water has already been
cut off at tim:s in some districts,
and the threat of cutting off all
garden water hangs like a cloud
over our heads.

Why in an island where sheet
water lies in unlimited quantities
beneath the surface, a few week:
drought should bring about a
water shortage is not understood
by the general public. What is
the use of gardeners going through
the toil of planting seeds, and
raising plants if every time there
is a slight drought the garden
water is to be eut off? It means
that weeks of hard work in th
garden is lost, and when the
water is allowed on once more the
garden has to be started all over
again.

In spite of all these trials garden
lovers persist in their efforts, and
persist with success as the recent
display of miniature gardens at
the Museum bears witness

This lovely show, and the splen-
did attendance which it received
shows plainly the island wide in-
terest in gardens, and the general
public’s love of flowers. Add to
ona the fact that well kept gardens

and surroundings raise the general
standard of the island, especially
in the eyes of our visitors, and iv
does seem a pity that this good
work should be hampered in a
totally unnecessary way an
erratic water supply

Every tiny garden, or beautiful
tree helps to beautify the island.
So the occupant of the smallest
house with a garden bed of flow-
ers, a shrub such as croton, or a
lovely vine, can feel, not only a
personal pride in the appearance of
their home, but a wider one in the
knowledge that each small garden
helps in the general appearance of
our island,

For the busy householder who
thas not a great deal of time or
money to spend on the garden,
permeate things such as shrubs
and perennials are best. Shrubs,
and there are a variety to choose
from, once established need little
attention. Most of them flower
off and on throughout the year,
and are gay and lovely to look at.

Here are a few. Exora, red or
white. Portlandia, Croton, Pride
of Barbados, Hibiscus, Ponsettia
and any of the different Bougain-
villaeas.

Vines are also a good investment
for the garden that cannot be
given a lot of care, although vines
do require more attention than
shrubs. The Coralitas are all
lovely, there is the Christmas
Coralita the various pinks both
single and double, besides the
vure white Coralita whieh looks so
much like the Lily of the Valley.
All of these are lovely vines. Thr
double pink Coralita is particular-
ly beautiful and is comparatively
rare. It is a pity that it is not

by

more generally grown.

Besides these there are Petrea,
Alanianda, Bemontia, and numer-
ous others to choose from.



@ Cool
@ Colourful
@ Covering



reach the. dinner table — whet
milk, meat or eggs, and the co
thereof. While much depends
Government leadership and sym
pathetic ehcouragement in the
matters, must be recognise
that without the aid and stead
fast wot of enterprising indi-
viduals, breeders’ association
and = = similar organisations b
products we enjoy to-day woul
searcely ve been pt ble
least im their present scope ar
extent. True, many of the
efforts have a commercial aim
object, but the fact remains t?
civilisatic owes the pioneer
stock breeding ! prove
a debt rat ic whic
never be (

The successful breedet
keep ir nd definit ain
objects plan his work acc«
dingly. Climate and enviornmen
are perhaps 1@ main tacto
whieh govern breeding policios
and Selection, since these tw
factors influence such questior
as choice of type or breed, pro-

ductivity, early or late maturin
tolerance to wet or dry condition
resistance to pests and disease
The theme can onty be dealt with
briefly and simply, for only those

who have had actual experien
of the problems» involved ca:
appreciate the difficulties anc

complications which are met wit

in the*evolution and dev *lopmen
of atiimals accept >» the
work-a-day farme stock
raiser, largely coscerned with

immediate economic resulis.
Now, of course, nature itself i

a marvellous selector let i

not under-estimate its. valu
Thus, throughout the world ther
are @xampiles of breeds or ty
whieh have specially adapted
themselves to the conditions
their origin. We may recall th
Indian breeds of cattle, general!
referred to-as Zebu or Brahm
and some of the native cattle
Central und South América; the
so-called rezor-back hog with
excessive snout development for
rooting and digging; the woolless
sheep; various native poultry
types, and so on. The hardine
of these different sorts is duc
the main, to their tolerance
heat and having to fend fo
themselves and collect their foo
wherever they can find it. Whik
they are of importance in the
particular areas and under the
natural conditions which hav
produced them, they are also
providing valuable foundation
stock round which improvement

work is taking place in the build-
ing up of higher producing and
better economic types under the
stress of increasing population
especially in those areas where
specialized’ "breeds of Buropean
origin do not thrive

But, here

is a

point that can-
not be over-emphasised: im
proved types need more, not
Jess, attention than the ordinary
run. And so, as a natural con-
comitant, improvements in for-
age and feedstuff production
have gone hand in hand with
animal improvement. This is the
stage at which both the plant
and animal breeder have com
bined forces in order to ensure
orderly, sustained and balanced
progress. There is still much to

be said in the West Indies for the

old fashioned six-pint family
cow where subsistence, unde
droughty conditions, may have
to be largely a matter of dried
cane tops and molasses; but
where farmers at interesied
in commercial milk production
and have invested in improved
stock, they must plan their feed
ing programme ahead In thi
connection, it is perfectly true to
say that half the breed is in the
feed. i nde

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WHAT'S GOING ON
LOCAL CRICKET
Amateur Boxing Making

Great Comeback

By O. S. COPPIN

diate and Second Divisions of the Barbados Cricket Association
competion reveals a very interesting situation at the end of the
fourth series of First Division games and the sixth series of Interme-
diate and Second Division games.

In the First Division we have Wanderers at the head of the table
| with sixteen points in four games played but they are separated from
| Carlton by a single point in as many games played.
| What makes the situation even more re:narkable is that Carlton

in turn are separated from Spartan by a single point in as many
games played as well.

Empire follow three points behind Spartan and therefore four
and five behind Carlton and Wanderers respectively. College (seven
points), Pickwick (five points), Police (four points), Lodge (0 points)
are the remaining teams in the order mentioned and I think that I
can safely say that they are out of the running for the championship
which closes with the plaSing of another three series one of which
opened yesterday.

CHAMPIONS AMONG THESE THREE
| AKING Wanderers, Carlton and Spartan as they are one will
come to the logical conclusion that the First Division champion
will be chosen from among these three. This being so, it will be in-
teresting to note that they are all three faced with three stiff fixtures
| that will require their best efforts to get the major points in each
| fixture.

Wanderers will meet Spartan, College and Carlton. Carlton will
} meet Police, Spartan and Wanderers and Spartan will meet Wander-
| ers, Carlton and Empire.
| Windward and Y.M.P.C. have established a not too considerable
| lead in the Intermediate Division, It is quite true that they are
| leading in the order mentioned but with five series remaining to be

played the issue is still a clearly open one,
| Windward have scored eighteen points in six games played and
| Y.M.P.C, fifteen points in five games, so that they have a possible
| twenty-one points for six games or even an equal eighteen with
| Windward in case they lead Wanderers on first innings in their fix-
| ture which opened yesterday at Beckles Road.

| ALL IN THE PICTURE

|

|

}

|

|

| 3 :

| SURVEY of the relative positions of the clubs in First, Interme-
i
|

MPIRE with twelve points in six matches played, Barbados Regi-

ment with eleven points in four matches played, Pickwick with

ten points in six matches played are all in the picture and possess

chances in varying degrees of carrying off the championship of this
division.

The Second Division competition is perhaps the closest. Leeward
| head the list with 27 points in six games played while five other teams
| all having played six games too follow in this order—Central 22,
Erdiston 18, Combermere 17, Empire 16 and Y.M.P.C. 15 and Empire
} 14.

} As I pointed out in my observation in connection with the posi-
tion in the Intermediate Division, five fixtures remain to be played
and that is still a long way to go so that all seven of these teams
| must be cofsidered as bona fide candidates for championship honours.
j THE UMPIRE INCIDENT
| ager y last Sunday’s column in which I expressed strong disapproval
| of the action of the crowd at Carlton the day before in beating
‘ an umpire after the Carlton-Empire fixture I have received a spate
| of explanations, congratulations and whatnot

One correspondent thought that E. A. V. Williams’ “lightheart-
| edness” did not help to improve the temper of the crowd. He claims
| that Williams after having been “no balled” ran about a foot past

the bowling crease and when the umpire called “no ball” he turned
| back and showed him the ball which he still held.

Another point which he claims was irritating to him was the
fact that Mr. Williams limped when a ball was struck to him if the
| batsman did not attempt to run but if he attempted there was a
lightning pounce and throw in.

He claims too that it was unfortunate that an 1.b.w. decision
oe was given in the last over of the day against a batsman who
did not know that he had been given out since he evidently thought
| himself well out of line, did not help the general state of affairs.

!
ANOTHER VIEW
A NOTHER correspondent states that the umpire, although the
crowd was hostile, invited attack because he stood on the field
and argued with the crowd.

I have seen Mr. Williams too and he admits‘holding the ball and
| deliberately making a foot fault but he did this since barrackers from
| the pavilion were shouting “tno ball” each time he bowled,

I have included the views of my correspondents because of cour-

!

tesy to them and since in a matter of this sort one shoulda hear all
views.
| The umpire is sole judge of “fair” and “unfair play” and he
| would have been failing in his duty if he thought Mr. Williams’
| tactics were not above board, and did not pull him up under this law.
Arguing with a crowd especially a hostile one is a suicidal action
by an umpire or referee and just as the Barbados Referees’ Associa-
| tion warns its referees against arguing with players far less crowds,
| the Barbados Umpires’ Association should instruct their members
along those lines as well.
A CRYING NEED 3
} B* and large there is need for a higher standard of sportsmanship
| when games and supporters allow their passions to dull their
| finer judgment. There can be no justification for boorish behaviour
be it from the field, the pavilion or from under the trees on the
grounds,

I am not singling out the Carlton ground because this incident
has happened there. I am only too aware of the partisan feeling
at some of the other grounds and this must cease otherwise what has
been a gradual deterioration in the standard of sportsmanship and

| fairplay might develop into something which will certainly not be

| “Cricket”,
AMATEUR BOXING REVIVED
ARBADOS Amateur Boxing has its best chance ever now of de-
veloping into a well organised and self-supporting form of sport.
No one who saw Friday night’s bouts of a programme put on by the
Barbados Amateur Boxing Association could convince me otherwise.
There has been no amateur boxing for many months now and I
was surprised to see the number and faces of well known local
sporting fans who turned out to see the bouts.
There was much action but it was obvious that although the
' spirit is there the need for expert coaching, training and application
| is necessary,
| The boys were all keen and some of them were remarkably fit.
| It is only necessary now that the schools and organised clubs whose
| members are interested, register with fe I have already
| mentioned that the Scouts could well add amateur boxing to their
| activities. They used to box when I was at They could
scarcely be recruiting “softies” now.
IMPRESSED
F the show itself I was impressed with young Keith Walters
(87 lbs.) who defeated Vitor Perriman (98 lbs.) on points. His
timing was as near perfect as any good amateurs can be. He hooked
to a nicety and sometimes brought off the old one-two punch,
| I was not surprised to hear that he is another Faster protege.
| R, Gittens (132 lbs) a southpaw scored a k.o. victory over N

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IN Yesterday’s Cricket

Vs,

CARLTON

POLICE

CARLTON IST INNINGS 264

CARLTON WERE ALL

OUT ten minutes before time

call yesterday for 264 in their first innings against Police
when their First Division fixture began at Queen’s Park.

C. McKenzie, 39 at number one, and C. B. Williams.
59 at number three, laid the foundation for the Cariton
score when they added 80 runs for the second wicket

partnership, taking

McKenzie was run out.

Three wickets fell for an addi-
tional 39 runs, but James Wil-
jiams, playing his last game _ pe-
fore leaving for the University
College of the West Indies, and
E. W. Marshall, going at number
6 and number 7 respectively,
added 92 runs for the sixth wicket

os to take the score to

James Williams played a really
fine innings for 54, and played all
types of bowling with easy confi-
dence. Marshall’s undefeated 60
was also a fine knock, aithough

at times he was unnecessarily
reckless.
Carlton lost their first wicket

with the score at 20 when G, So-
bers, a slow left arm bowler with
a short run up to the wicket and
an easy action, got R. Hutchinson
ibw. for 7, This same bowler had
“Boogles” Williams caught when
the latter drove one hard back,
and the ball struck Peppy Hutch-
inson the other batsman for Byer
to take a catch.

Lucas was caught off Mullins
by Farmer for 4, and “Peppy”
Hutchinson after playing a good
defensive innings at a_ critical
stage of the game was leg before
to Bradshaw.

Scoring Rate Advanced

Marshall and James Williams
by good running between the
wickets advanced the rate of the
scoring, and sent up 200 in 100
minutes after the 150 had gone
up in even time.

Williams was bowled by Mul-
lins in the last ball of the fourth
over with the second new ball,
and Edghill joined Marshall, and
started to carry on the good work.

To the consternation of every
one, skipper Farmer brought
himself on from the Weymouth

end late in the afternoon, and in
his first over, took the wickets of
Edghill who skied to mid off for
Bradshaw to take an easy catch,
and K, B. Warren who lifted one
to Sobers at mid-on for the field-
er to take a well judged catch.

C, Edghill was bowled in the
next over from Sobers for duck,
and in his next over, H. Cox was
bowled for 12 to bring the Carl-
ton innings to a close with the
score at 264.

G,. Sobers was the most success-
ful bowler for Police, taking 4
for 57 in 20 overs. Farmer took
2 for 11 in 2 overs, Mullins 2
for 64 in 23 overs, while Brad-
shaw tock 1 fon 46 in 15 overs.

LODGE vs EMPIRE
AT LODGE
First Innings

Lodge
Empire

Empire have already gained a
first innings’ lead over Lodge at
Lodge where they dismissed the
schoolboys for 60 runs in their
first innings and replied with 168
runs yesterday, the first day in
their First Division cricket match.

The wicket was perfect and the
only batsman for Lodge who
showed any resistance to the Em-
pire bowling was A. Walker who
was undefeated with 20 runs. The

the score

from 20 100 before

to

wicket when the score was 12 and
the second wicket fell at 20.
When Bynoe got to the wicket,
he quickly asserted himself and
never spared the loose balls.

The most successful bowler for
Lodge was N. Wilkie who took
three wickets for 23 runs in eight
overs one of which was a maiden.

The Lodge School pace bowler
K. Brookes and J, Farmer took
two wickets each.



PICKWICK vs HARRISON
COLLEGE
Harrison College ........... 92
Pickwick (for 3 wickets) 98
Harrison College, in their match
against Pickwick at the Oval
yesterday, were skittled out for
92 runs. Mr. “Sam” Headley,
who topscored with 39 runs, was
the only College batsman to defy
the attack of the Kensingtonians
E. Edwards was the most suc-
cessful bowler for the Pickwick
team. He sent down 17 overs, of
which ten were maidens, and took
five wickets for 19 runs, John
Goddard and W. Greenidge took
one each for 17 and 22 respectively.
Pickwick in reply have lost
three wickets for 98 runs, T
Birkett scored 49 before he was
bowled by G. Foster. E. Edwards,
who opened, contributed 26.
Bowling for College, G, Foster
sent down nine overs and took
two wickets for 34 runs. Mr.
Headley took the other wicket
for 25 runs.

SPARTAN vs WANDERERS
Spartan 288

Good knocks by Camie Smith
and “Shell’ Harris for 49 and 63
respectively, and last minute
stands by the tail batsmen, helped
Spartan to score 288 runs against
Wanderers at the Bay when they
batted the whole of yesterday,
the first day of their First Divis-
ion fixture.

Wanderers spinner St. Hill took
6 wickets for 73 .

Smith batted in his own flashy
style, scoring fluently all around
the wicket until he was caught
by the wicket keeper off St.
Hill’s bowling. L. F. Harris went
at the ball with but half a care
for caution, and made quite a
few queer strokes, but he quickly
and regularly sent the ball to the
boundary.

Spartan were off to a fair start
when their opening bats set up
a first wicket stand of 43, but a
second wicket fell eight runs later.
The opening bats, Atkins and
Griffith scored 20 and 27 re-
spectively.

Keith Walcott was out a
after Camie Smith when he
turned the ball to St. Hill.

G. N. Grant was hustled
the wicket at number eight im-
mediately he arrived just from
work, and after getting a chance
when he was dropped on the
boundary, he was adjudged l.b.w.
to St. Hill.

ball

re-

to

SEPTEMBER 14, 1952

SUNDAY,

RACING NOTES

By BEN BATTLE

FTCHE long awaited Autumn Classification list was made public this

week, a full month after the conclusion of the August meeting,
and only five days prior to the conclusion of the Santa Rosa Races.
The delay over what did not appear to be a very difficult task would
seem rather unnecessary, especially as it was not of sufficient dura-
tion to allow the conclusion of the Arima meeting to take place. One
can only hope that it was used by the classifiers in'a concerted effort
to a form and obviate mistakes, but even this is open to serious
doubt.

I will, before going into the Classification in detail, concede that
age old truth that “Criticism is easy, Art is difficult”. Nevertheless
it is impossible not to be critical of some aspects at least of the pres-
ent list, and to wonder once again at the inconsistency which appears
to be our Classifiers worst and most persistent sin.

Starting at the top and working downwards, I do not think that
anyone can cavil at the promotion of Landmark to Al, nor the reten-
tion in that class of Harroween and Rebate. Notonite remains in A2
in spite of some very mediocre performances, and again I agree since
his form was so far below his best that it ought to be ignored for
one meeting at least.

The B Class is not I am afraid such plain sailing. Heading the
list is Brgiht Light who has been thrust into Bl, apparently, on the
strength of having beaten Dashing Princess in the Bush Hill Stakes
when in receipt of 17 lbs. I would not make an issue of this but
should have preferred her to have been placed in B2. The promotion
of Pepper Wine from B2 however appears to me to be unnecessary
and is moreover a glaring example of the type of inconsistency which
so often and so annoyingly occurs. Pepper Wine started last meeting
classified B2. Her record was 6 starts 1 first, 1 second and 2 fourths.
Had this been the performance of a young, likely to improve animal,
and had there been any evidence of misfortune in her defeats I would
have had nothing to say, but it is in fact the performance of an (8)
eight year old mare who is but a shadow of her former self. Moreover
in what way is her performance to be considered better than that of
the young (4-year-old) promising Fire Lady who started 5 times
won once, was twice third and once fourth. Yet Fire Lady remains
in B2. This is all the more surprising when one considers that she
inet Pepper Wine on only two occasions, and beat her both times.
actually coneéding weight when doing so in the August Handicap.
Surely Classifiers have access to these facts, and surely these facts
make it impossible to consider the sub-class separation of these two
horses as a rational act.



Witn the remainder of the B Class Classification, I have very
little quarrel. Sweet Rocket undoubtedly merits her promotion, and
Red Cheeks, Lunways, and Demure remain where they belong. Per-
sonally I would have thought that Flying Dragon had done enough
to justify a sub-class demotion but it is always difficult to classify a
rogue. Dashing Princess, a horse that has always appeared to me to
be typically C Class may have been a trifle unlucky in that her lone
victory and a narrow one at that occurred in her weight for age
race, This being so the Classifiers were probably justified in pro-
moting her but I should imagine that she will be a bit out of her
depth in B Class. Abu-Ali’s promotion I consider thoroughly well
merited. He is one of the best prospects we have seen for some time.

New arrivals in C are Spear Grass and Vectis with whose demo-
tion no fault can be found. On the other hand the. promotion of
Mary Ann to C2 is one on which I cannot refrain from commenting
unfavourably. It is of particular interest since it demonstrates once
again that inconsistency which is my chief complaint against the
Classifiers and involves in addition the whole question of the promo-
tion of creoles beyond D class.

When Mary Ann went to Trinidad in June and won two races
against the strong opposition which prevails there our Classifiers per-
mitted her to remain in D. I refrain from joining in the chorus of
disapproval which this occasioned because I felt that good creoles
should be allowed to remain in D and that the D class should even-
tually be built up into the Creole A Class. Now we find Mary Ann
returning and winning one race against the most moderate opposition
and the same Classifiers immediately place her in C, and thereby
demonstrating that their treatment of her after her June perform-
ance instead of being, as I had hoped, a part of a new policy, was
merely an oversight.

I can imagine the comments that will be made on the above
opinion, They will all centre around the idea that if Mary Ann
is left in D she will so dominate that class that no other horse will
have any chance of winning. To these criticisms I would reply;
firstly, that I do not believe that such would be the case, and second-
ly, and more fundamentally, I will ask those who made them to look
at the Classification list with its total of ten possible and six probable
,starters in the D and E Class. Let them consider for how much longer
the public will put up with two or three horse races or how much
longer the Turf Club will be able to afford to frame them. Surely
for all concerned owners, spectators and everybody else it would be
better to aim at the building up of a strong D Class for which four
or five good races could be programmed every meeting even if it
did include a Mary Ann or two. The alternative which we are at
present pursuing is to deplete the D Class of both quantity and qual-
ity to the point where at most two races are all that can be justified
for them and the programme filled out with races for F2 Maidens.

The remainder of the Classification calls for little comment and
in conclusion let me say that any criticism which I have made are
intended to be constructive and will I hope be accepted in that spirit.

PADDOCK MYSTERY

Rumour had it that we are about to witness a new era in racing
in Barbados. It has been noised abroad that a certain prominent
stable has purchased the horse of such a calibre that unless a special
class is created for it racing will be lopsided indeed. No one knows
just what this super animal’s name is or has a clue to its form but
speculation.is rife and when I heard not long ago that the Aga Khan
might have parted with Tulyar, it gave me some indication of the
class of beast that we may expect.!

Knight Is British Junior



PR BE BEDE De De Se Se
|

The seventh wicket fell for 164
and it seemed as if Spartan wouid
not last much longer, but thea

Empire left arm bowler Horace
King took four of the Lodge
School wickets for nine runs in

eight overs while E. Grant and Frank King in a period of many
H. Barker—the two opening bowl- chances managed to score 25.
ers—took two wickets each for K. Bowen came next and hit

out at almost everything. He and
Phillips came together in a last
wicket stand which yielded 54.
Bowen was finally bowled by
D. Atkinson and Phillips was not
out with 19.

Wanderers mos t_ successful
bowler, St. Hill who took six for
73, in 25 overs was generally
accurate and demanded respect.
Pace bowler D, Atkinson took
two for 64 in 21.2 overs.

six and 11 runs respectively.

In the Empire
John Bynoe who went at num-
ber four in the batting order,
hit a breezy 84 to topscore. He
hit six fours and five sixes in
his 84 which enabled Empire to
score 168 runs in reply to the
Lodge first innings’ score of 60.

Empire started shakily in their
first innings and lost their first

first innings,

Holder 132. Someone must have instructed Holder to fight to the
southpaw’s left hand and counter with a right cross whenever the
southpaw attempted to loop but unfortunately he fought too
far away from the southpaw’s left hand and it was not entirely un-
expected that when the southpaw lured him into crossing his right
too soon that a looping left to mid section would bring on twilight
sleep and it happened.

These were the best bouts in my opinion and there should be
more entertainment next Friday night when the finals take place.





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f

Lawn Tennis Champion

From Our Own Correspondent
LONDON, Sept. 13

Billy Knight, 16-year-old red-
headed left hander from North-
ampton, became the British Junior
Lawn Tennig champion when he
bea* the holder Bobby Wilson of
Finchley 7—5, 3—6, 6—4 at Wim-
bledon this afternoon, The match
lasted an hour and a quarter,

Wilson looked the better stroke
player, but he lacked Knight’s
aggression and had no answer
whatever to the left hander’s
cross court passing shots which
were executed with a delicacy
that even Drobny would have
been hard put to surpass.

Knight went into an early three-
love lead, but Wilson coming in
to the net fought back to three-
all. Games went with service to
6—5 and then Knight broke ser-
vice to take the first set,

Second Set
The second set opened with four



successive service breaks, but
after Wilson had held his own to
make it 3—2, he crowded on the
pressure and Knight, whose net
reactions are slow, missed several
easy shots. Wilson took the sec-
ond set quite comfortably.

Knight broke Wilson’s second
service at the start of the final set
with two magnificent passing shots
and then, despite a double fault,
went to a 3—1 lead Both boys
were very good overhead, but as
the match neared the finish, they
fenced warily and there were
several protracted base line duels.
Knight’s steadiness in these mo-
ments of crisis was the deciding
factor and a net cord which Wil-
son reached but drove outside,
gave him a fully merited victory.

In the Girls’ Singles Finals, Miss
V. Pitt of Birmingham was much
too steady for Miss J. M, Boundy
of Winchmore whom_ she _ beat
6—2, 6—1,





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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER





Aga Khan’s Tulyar Wins St. L

(Queen Sees"

‘Gay Time’

Beaten

From Our Own Correspondent
LONDON, Sept. 13.

Tulyar; the 2 they sala was
jJazy, won the Leger at Don-
custer this ateueoh watched by
Her Majesty the Queen, and
treught the total he has earned
for hi pwney Aga Khan this
east 273 It was his
ulive. victory, the
g sixteenth English
fae sty Succes sian his’ sixth St.

pi

vei thé exita’ distance Tulyar
wok mpre eg$ily than at any time
this season, He ‘finished’ three
‘engths ahead of outsider Kings-
fold with the French Alcinus,
four lengths away third, Bob
Major was fourth.

Charlie Smirke rode a waiting
rece this time and lay about sev-
enth, while Alcinus ang Ker
Ardan made the rumning from
Gay Time, Bold Buccaneer and
Bob Major,

This. order remained until enter-
ing the straight where Alcinus
gave way to. Ker Ardan and
shortly afterwards Gay Time drew
up and took the lead from Bob
Major This was about three fur-
longs out,

Kingsfold then came through to
Jead with *Aletnus running on
again oh the far rails. Kingsford
produced a remarkable turn = of
speed about two furlongs out and
wént clear, but Smirke still had
not moved on Tuylar.

Mount Changed

He ‘then switched his mount out
to’ challén, cn up the centre of the
course and running on strongly it
was obvious that with a furlong
to go that the race was his.

Tulyar finished strongly ahead
of Kingsfold by about three
“lengths with Alcinus third. There
was then a gap of about three
lengths before Bob Major.

Gay Time, the Queen's horse,
was a moderate fifth after weak-
a g in the last two furlongs.

ide Harold, the Yorkshire
cdl ade no show at all and Boid
Buccaneer weakened or he was
unable to quicken after entering
the straight up to which point he
had run a good race.

The disappointment of the race
was the poor form of Gay Time
whom the Queen had journeyed
specially to see. Just as it looked
as if he would come on, he dropped
back and failed to stay.

Tulyar has proved himself a
great horse—-perhaps the greatest
there has ever been.

The Aga Khan plans to run him
in the Coronation Cup, Eclipse
Stakes, King George Sixth and
Queen Elizabeth Stakes next
season and possibly the Prix De
L'Are De Triomphe.

Tulyar started at 10.to 11, Kings-
fold was 66 to 1 and Alcinus 100
to.6.

Golf:

Match—Play
Championship
tor Bobby Locke

LONDON, Sept. 4.

The Professional}! Goifers’
Match-play Championship, spon-
sored by the News of the World,
and carrying a top prize of £750,
may go lo an overseas competitor
for the {rst time since its incep-
tion in 1903, Among a_ strong
entry lst for the event which
takes place at Walton Heath from
September 16—19 is the South
African, Bobby Locke, who won
the Open at Royal Lytham earlier
this year.

Locke is in his best form for a
couple of years. He should have
no difficulty with his first round
opponent B, G. Preston of Kings
Norton, whose appearances in
top class tournament golf are
omy infrequent.

The draw: keeps apart Locke
and Harry Wheetman, the de-
fending. Champion and it is con-
ceivable they will meet in the
Final. Whéetman has the harder
4ask of the two for in his half of
the draw are D. J. Rees and Fred
Daly who have both won the
eyent twice since the war. Max
Faulkner is also in the same half
put he and Rees will probably
meet in the third round.









14, 1952 * SI NDAY \Dvoc ATE



SCENES FROM CRICKET 1CCER

Plymouth Beat
Rotherham 4—3

ONDON, Sept, 13

e Bu

ave ther
of seve

who will soon &t

losing 2—1 at ha

level on points wit















































Now the onl





$

l i OEE z ad Saturday
le ed and Shef-
te ipporters. Bott
12a their first victor-

5

y

oven-

t

o

e

he transfe market

if

a couple of goals in
ite by Chilean born
Robledo ended Preston’s

ten record,
Dooley back in Sheffielc’s
tie scoring = five goal in
ve games, was well held
ce Tottenham's centre
goals by Sewell and
lar, Finney gave them their frst
rhc est performance of the
yu i Plymouth who pulled
3-1 half time deficit to
“at Rotherham by the odd goal
even Plymoutt promoted

eason from the third

h

eld cond division lead-
i have the game in hand.



PAGE FIVE —

SEPT. 14 NO. 241 a ee



Cs Cr’ | The Topic | @: — 2 \"

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But some
Without conset
lay they are dipi
And think
hey 'ce calli . 1. KLIMi, pure, safe mitk
Two hundred bucks they need
it mere ty t
Wheir interest turn 1 a eae. without refrigeration
Look at their hurry brothe: ——— - ee
nagine boys their speed -
1® pay themselves our money a
Forselting our reat’ nad Ir HCLIEVA g qu lity ig always uniform
“ t t
* : 4 la cach and every tin of nourishing KLIM
A it Little ne you get benefits found only in the finest
fre sh cou s milk, Exacily the same amounts
$ w us their work thi of important food essentials are yours ia
That seally ce ‘ every tin. KLIM’s uniformity is your assur-
Who lack the working «1

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Are first to want ‘ estently fine milk










































onsider t policemer ” on =
thi Arsenal beaten at] Who ru: t1 t
e amein, Vea. Expowed to rain and trouble 4. KLIM:, excellent for growing childrea
irst raise we wo
he gunners lost a seven
hviier to Charlton after pulling det the | ‘ 5. KLIM adds nourishment to cooked dishes
from 3—0 to make it three- ae ‘ wer, the erk
A late goal by outside right | YUMIDE In Government Services 6. KLIMis recommended for infant feeding
fu i Charlton the points.
myer got | vate is anysicd i e « ; :
= i ars wap at eet oy gbtt ‘ 7. KLIMis safe in the specially-pocked tin
TOP LEFT: Williams and Reynold Hutchinson on their way to resume the Carlton innings after tea. . — sed. There | ¥! dayt
», punches were exchanged. Ther > ‘ th 8. K :
TOP RIGHT: The Spartan-Wanderers players pause briefly for water in their fixture at the Bay. ‘3 @ goene thatinvolved Camp-)°" 4 - KLIMis produced under strictest controi
BOTTOM: A section of the crowd that witnessed the Spartan-Wanderers fixture at the Bay yesterday ell and Joe Mercer onsider those whose —
PETRY wEr i . en = a
Norwich Lose ating Ra oral
4 woud vip f pe Take pure water, Pa
Hope Dawns Wins SCOREBOARD vorwich have lost three’ of J nc ve humanity ! —
ir fo yway games, but still add KLIM, — stir and
, f the best goal aver maider all the £ you
Arima’: 8 Sweep SPARTAN vs. WANDERERS A. Walker 7 i 27 1 , 7} D ots 8 Sout come tending sick and mad w/ have pure, safe mitk
Spartan 2a8 =606WN Wilkie $ 1 2 he I d ! lor outh if starwed ration ee a
SPARTAN t Innings J. Farmer ? 0 32 2 is is accounted for by today’s it’s bad fe . Aa
(From Our Own Correspondent) \. At b Lawless 20 K. Riley an) 0 1 1 vietesy at Shrewsbury o FIRST IN PREFERENCE THE WORLD OVER
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Sept. 13. 5. Gi rbs b St. Hill 27 A. Deane 2 0 oe ae th Se eacan tk Meeks Le onsider all the teachers meson aed
nasal ; g «+ C. Smit Keeper. b St, Hill 49 HARRISON COLLEGE vs, PICKWICK Oonsto ew Clos os c Who work in sehook ann out
Scoring top points in the econ Ha Lbw., b St. Hill 14 Hs ARRISON COLLEGE—Ist Innings h ming,—got four, And Novr- ,at hi ©
three days of the Santa Rosa n. ita b D. Atkinson Mr, Gitter Greenidge b Jordan 0 ich played the second half with] 4nd what they" re all about?
four-day race meeting this after- D. Atkinson, b B. E. Hope « whp Outta 2 oddard 2 only 10 men—left half Pickwick oe
noon, Hope Dawns easily won the , b St. Hill 0 Mr. Headley c Birkett b W. Green vas injured! Who w rough stress and pee
ae va c lub’s sweep. ‘She c orb ast Hill 4 idge i Saal 39 Hat tricksters were O’Donnel| Lou says give these more money
“he ¢ its b ating » St i 25 Simmons > W » Edwards 7 . ‘ eg i aad Don't “throw it down the drain “a
one a at cee By Rs aune b D. Atkinsor 38 Hewitt c Birkett b Edwords 18 af rthampton Park of Newport . 5 t |
class horses in each even illips not out 19 GriMith ¢ J. Greenidge b Edwards 4 including two penalties and Mo-} rhose calling for the coppers ee
entered, but did not run today Extra 18 Har ell c wkpr. Wood, b C 1 f Stockport pve the treasury a blow ‘
In June she won the Trinid ; € 7 1 Scottish League Cup Semi-]! gust nt two hundred dollars
man ; : Tote 388 OD s ¢ Greenidge b Edwards wre ip va td
Turf Club’s Mid-summer sweep : c idee ee = Finalists look Like being Hiber- For myina — A tonic i
New Rocket was second with 11 Fa f wickets: 1-43, 2—51, 3—89, ¢ mut 0 hn, Third Lanark Stirling and] Protest it boys! protest it!
points Turfites screamed with ‘7116. 5—148, 6—148, 7-164, 8-210, 9 8 Kil nock, Hibs got six today,| Show them the island's, ne ed 4
delight when Al Trestrail’s Drury m BOWLING ANALYSIS Total o2 Tt Lanark prevented Rangers| Te!) them a ee _
Lane, a rank outsider, beat the o sm 2's Fall of wickets: 1—0 2—6, 3—12, 4 oring at Hampden, Stir- ° oO ion
Stag aka . a At ‘or 2.2 2 64 2 27 71. 6—97, %—~77, 8—01, 0—02 : ae inte state ‘
favourites to make the pari pay }) “'\\ ter Teo BOWLING ANALYSIS | irprised the Cup holder i know we're not amis
nearly $75, the highest dividend | Hill 3% 6 #7 6 oO 1 Rw Dundee cracking three in tt af those in agreement
of the meetin é ,167, the ‘ Pierce 11 i 56 0 H. Jor il 6 14 1 econd half and Kilmarnock got 1 & KR on this a
biggest forecast’ aa Cons. he. Atiinson 7 oes oe 1 6 © three at St. Johnston - en that rooms ar eeds our hair!
’ LODGE vs. EMPIRE at. LODGE 1. Goddard 10 1 17 1 . < f " d b g iu y y
RESULTS LODGE—l\st Innings E. Edwards 7 0 om (OS rhe second leg will be played sponsore y
OQnOUT FIVE FURLONGS. Ir. Wilkes Lb.w., b Barker 0 W. Greenidge 12.1 = Wednesday
Gs. L. Murray Robins t ‘ 1 T. Hoad 0 7 i ae idl ate. edie jan . . “
Class G1 Only Farwet'c Ck De Pelzay s teine @ -Greeninns 8 ating League leaders are Liverpool J&R BAKERIES Silvikrin Lotion with Oil is a complete hair treatment in itself. 1
i, New Rocket... K. Brookes b Grant 6 PICKWICK —ist Inning rics DN sign: BS eld ie Sec 4
2, Pepper Wine. ©. Deane 1.b.w., b King ©. Edwards Lbav. G. Foster 26 ond; wall, rd—South anc \ supplies the natural oils wh ry hair lacks; it acts as a dressing
3. Ben Har, R Goddard stpd. (wk, De Peiza) . M. Worme c & b 2 Headley 1 Oldham Third North makers of SUPPHES the gatural cils Meh dry _ ¥ _ :
RASTAFFARE HANDICAP. b King 9 TT. 8. Birkett b G ‘oster “9 pits he: t ; ‘ ~ P Si/vikvin, the
ABOUT NINE FURLONGS C. Grant c Rudder b Holder 1 J. Goddard not o 9 ENRICHED BREAD as well as a health-giving lotion; it contains Pure Si/vikrin, the
- Class D1 aoa es and El N. Wilkie b Barker 1 1. Fo not out 6 Rifle Shooti | ail h Silvik
and \y. K. St. Hill ¢ Holder b King 6 2k ng | hair's natural food. A few minutes’ daily massage with Silvikrin
1, Battle Song, \. Walker not out 2 of j c
2, Buddha. Riley b Rudder 0 (for wkts 98 4 and the blenders i 1 h Oi it » new life, health 1 vitality to your
Princess Hasiyys ten 2 THE following are the eight otion with Oil wall bring new lite, health and vital 0 yout
JETSAM HANDICAP ABOUT BOWLING ANALY: best score’s recorded at last J&R RUM ,
Omee alse as B) me me, rele ge er “ M KW Wednesday's practice of the Bar- hair, and will keep it perfectly groomed throughout the day,
C1 nd ©8 only. iste otieatet’ 24 0l4- Ss 4 i pinion 0 2 17 dos Small Bore Rifle Clut 3 i |
Geleen Fieses. ‘ 13, 6~—17, 7—~-18, 8 53 J. Grimtt ‘ 1 14 H.P.S .
* Natari BOWI mo 4 ANALYSIS 5 G. Foster Doe ale me 100 - slemishes | = «-
8. SF Friar V POLICE vs, CARLTO 7 =wse
ou URSERY HANDICAP H. Barker MD Ge CARLTON—Ist | Inning Major : : Lp o. Cleared 1 Vi r I in
ABOUT FIVE FURLONGS I “A ll « Mc, Kenzie run out , Capt. .« t, Jordan f ‘ ‘
a Two-Year-Olds Only ‘ 2 2 R, Hutchinson Lb.w. G, Sober z. Webste 9 ins An 665
‘ a wo-Year 8 : " : ¥ Wills a ves tsts Benias Mir e 5 ~ — 4 De 400 have « ki j oe
2. Der Runner « . 4 5 2 2 1 N. S, Lucas ec Farme b C. Multix : healing ntisepti ! OTION ITH oOo
PIPPIN HANDICAP Cicctne Sae Tene G. Hutchinson 1b.w. C. Bradshaw ke ¥ Has a gs of Cuties Ointment Lo w
3. Goodyear Grant b Brooke ae amy is ’ ' 1 1. G. Marsha 96 ‘and see how quick! t
ABOUT SEVEN AND A HALF FURS c’ Sunte b Walker 5: out RO. Browne 95 7~~ill bring felief to eczema, sores ' ly wing hale
Class Fi and F2—Three-Year-Olds On!» DePeiza 1.b.w., b Brooke 1 OF Bradshaw W H. W. Webster 94 irritating heat rash, cuts and pimple |
1. Cavalier J. Bynoe b Deane 4 es a Don’t suffer the misery of tired, achiny |
2. Meditation 0. Fields stpd., (wk. Grant) b 3 ii, I I ember ire reminded to pay feet — massage wthern nightly — wit |
3. Daisy Brown Farmer e «K ‘ Sobers b Farmet t r entrance fee for the Annual Cuticura Ointment and step ov
gaoGr Cte one W. Drayton b Wilkie ah Ss Tb Sobers ) Competition which closes on comfort, Buy your Cuticura to-day a)
S. Rudder 1.b.w., b Wilkie 4 “x tras 7 - 417 ¢
Class Gl and G2—Three-Year-Olds \. Holder stpd. (wk. Grant) b Total 204 September 17th, 1952 o
\ c stpd. ; i
and Over Farmer 0 anata ticura*"
1. Drury Lane ing ¢ Walker t ; 1 Fall of ts: 1-20; 2—100; 3—10' bills
& New mocket il. Barker c Wilkie b Riley 7 4 (aa, Fat 8a, JORDAN WINS SPOON Tie
3. Ge z i 5 9-250 .
GLENEAGLE HANDICAP Pea. “A SNe io BOWLING ANALYSIS SHOOT |
ABOUT SEVEN AND A HALF FURS : oO M R WwW
Class Fl and F2 Only—Four-Year-Olds Total 16a i 46 1 : H Shoe
and Over rr = c 23 «(C4 64 i tit POO! ndicap hoot
i. My Own Fall of wickets: 1—12 2~—83, 2-2, @ aoe 57 4 Which took place at the Small Bore
2. Stella Solaris ‘—84 5—105. 6-110 7~113, 8-116, 9 J. Byer a. @ 21 nge yesterday was won by Capt. | }
3. China Doll di a. P Cc, Blackman 7 } 3 ° Jorda vith a gun score of 98|
ABOUT NINE FURLONGS BOWLING ANALYSIS. | fone » o 6 . points and a handicap score ot
ner cae Cl and C® Only <. . icine ll 1 64 2 W. Farmer 2 0 il er pons nel
. Mon n the_ practice 1001 the eigh
. Hot Bread - best score Mr. F. A. Browne
3. Nefari a 7 7 2 corte ere Mr , ro
— 51 Horses Enter For Race Meeting $2 yo woo) © Gunn oF
: points, Capt. J. R. Jordan 97
Danger man to Locke could ! From Our Own Correspondent Distinction, Also entered are n points, Capt, ¢ E. Neblett 97|
the little Ashton professions! GEORGETOWN, B.G. Sept. 13 new thoroughbreds locally own« points, Mr. M. G. Tucker 97 point
Charlie Ward, who was a semi- Fifty one horses have been en viz: Gainest, Gold Dust Bileel Capt. S. T. Weatherhead 97 points, |
finalist in 1948. If Ward and tered for the Demerara Tur® Folly Hill, Explosive, Kin Mr. L. W. Hassell 96 points, Mi | —WONDER WHEELS N
Locke are to meet it will be in Club’s October meeting, in- Woodworker, Sandcrack and Cle H. Marshall 96 points | ‘
one of the semi-finals. uding from Trinidad Golden erach. Drawing for post positic The conditions were good an¢ W hy Hercule:
The final will be over 36 holes. Quip, Red Velvet, Goblin and will take place on Monday the wind was steady |
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PAGE SIX





For Women Only!



Oh no! AMPLEX IS FOR THE ENTIRE You too can
drink anything—eat anything, even raw AN
if you take an Amovlex tablet a da AMPLEX COMBATS ALL
UNPLEASANT BREATH AND BODY ODOURS. Follow this happy

family by taking an Amplex tablet every day |

FAMILY |
onions and get away with it,

No,‘this isn’t the Flying Dutchman sé ion
Just a nightmare of ae
around a weathervane.
even in my dreams?

me swinging
Was I airsick



No! The last time I really flew I took
AIRSICK tablets by Savory & Moore
MARVELLOUS! Take Airsick tablets

before and during the journey

and you
will always FLY IN COMFORT,

candies. What did Judy do? JUDY TOOK
SILF SLIMMING TABLETS. Look at her
now. Still fair and forty, still relaxing

TRY SILF—a course of Silf WILL SLIM YOU



BUT NOT FAT.
DOWN.

Jack here needed no slimming, but he
did need a laxative. Always tired, forever
with" a grouch, Jack was a nuisance to
everybody. As a salesman Jack needed
energy and drive, Look at him any morning
now—the early bird catching all the buyers
MEDILAX, the safe, gentle LAXATIVE
fixed him up. MEDILAX ensures that
INNER CLEANLINESS which spells health
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No wonder Mrs,
Noted for
white as
in either,

|
4 |
A SPA TOOTHBRUSH gently, yet firmly,
penetrates every tiny crevice between the teeth
A SPA TOOTHBRUSH POLISHES AS IT
CLEANSES, and in Nylon or Bristle is YOUR
BEST BUY. SPA carries a name known the
world over. Take a hint from Mrs. Smith here,
and ALWAYS USE A SPA.
Here is another little lady well pleased with
herself. A young married with a family of thre«
sturdy- youngsters let’s hear what Marjory has to *
say about Family Planning. What is YOUR «:
opinion, Marjory? og #
“Well, now I think Family Planning, for those 2 |
who believe in it of course, is one way of creating Rsz ( ~'
happiness and security in the home, Confident at % dys
all «times in the safe, sure _ contraceptive, , i
RENDELL-FOAM, a wife and mother can relax ‘sean’
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R ELL-FOAM, the safest contraceptive on the market,”

SURE IT’S LEAP YEAR, and Jimm<
still comes around. He’s made up his
own mind, partly thanks to Suzv’s
wisdom in always using BANDBOâ„¢
PREPARATIONS for her HAIR
Bandbox shampoos leave the hair

Smith

here looks superior.
her sparkling smile, her teeth are ¢

her table linen, No tattle-tale

grey
smiles Mrs. Smith

a,

*

softer, lovelier than before whilst
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Try BANDBOX for yourself, girls,

Sole agents covering this column:
INTERNATIONAL TRADING CORPORATION LTD

Telephone 5009

. STOCKISTS:~—
J. Li: LINTON, High Street. HINDS & CO., Roebuck Street.
E. C.GILL, Olympia Pharmacy. P.@A, CLARKE, Cosmopolitan

EMPIRE PHARMACY, Tudor
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A. F.. JONES, High Street.

H. C; WALKES, Tudor Street.

H. L. HUTSON, Tudor Street.

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‘
(By DRUSILLA BEYFUS)

THE things they
pretty Paris frock
dress business . .
last week,

I canvassed the tough fashion
triumvirate, the dress manufac-
| turers, the buyers, and the sales-
women who control what is

about a
British
all

say
in the
| . I heard it
|
|

|known as the bread-and-butter
| Side of the business.

To each of them I put the
pictures you see here and the
question “Why can’t we hav
copies of these—-to my eye attrac-
tive Paris clothes,

The picture shows four of the
most wearable, simple, and easy

to copy designs picked from the
latest autumn Dior collection.

1, THE SUIT has a plainly
tailored jacket with small,
sharply cut revers, a rounded hip-
line without padding, and five
plain bone buttons to fasten, The

skirt is straight, but “movable
around in.”

2, THE DAYDRESS is made in
caramel-coloured flannel, with a
cross-over tunic top, double-
breasted buttoning, a plain, collar-
less neckline, three-quarter-length
sleeves, and a slim skirt. With it
a scarf tucked in at the neck.

3. THE TOPLESS DRESS AND
JACKET is made in fine black
woollen material, with a boned
fitted bodice edged in black silk
and tying in two bows, one at
the shoulder, the other at the hips
The skirt is slim. The detachable
jacket—the Dior version of the
bolero - ig a curl of matching
material that takes the topless-





relieve stuffy, congested feeling
nerves and counteracting depres

BER
;

-
*

SUNDAY

mee
cs

able for copying at a price cus-
tomers can afford.
. *

The felt beret (2): A small cara-
mel beret, elegantly squashed.

The black pancake (4)3 A
small platter of a hat in black vel-
vet, worn plumb on top of the
head.

The velvet sidedip cap (below):
A small cap that fits skin-tight on
one side of the head,

They Say

WHAT did they say, the people
who could have these Paris out-
fits copied and on sale in the
shops within a few months?

The British dress business turn-
ed down Mr. Dior pretty well to
the last button.

“No” to the suit, said Mr. Man-
ufacturer. “There’s nothing to it:
no sleeve or collar effects, It’s
much too plain for us. Customers
wouldn’t touch anything with a
button below the waist: it might
gape on fat people.”

Said the buyers: “My custom-

won't take anything without
pocket. I’d never stock it.”

ers

“No” to the day dress, said
Mr, Manufacturer. “The dropped
shoulder is hopeless; we can't sell
anything without pads. And the
top doesn’t look as if it fits. The
sleeves aren’t roomy enough;
that panel over the tummy is
most unflattering to our trade.”

And the buyer added: “The
neckline kills it stone dead
unless we sold it complete with

ness out of a topless dress. the scarf, But the scarf depart-
THE DINNER DRESS i ment is downstairs. I'd never
4 THE NNER tESS S stock it.”
made in black velvet with . Tengu to the topless dress and
low-cut Sia naires Oana jacket, said Mr. Manufacturer.
sleeves, - eee "eal! ballet length “We don’t make cocktail dresses
in a bow, and a full be - in wool. The jacket might be
skirt. worth a try in taffeta, but I
shan’t bother, We can sell as much
as we make already.”
THE HATS.—There are thre¢ Said the buyer once again: “I'd
jof them in the photograph ,suit- never stock it.”



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ADVOCATE






Why Paris gets the Snub

i=I1°S OFFICIAL .... from the people who
| make and sell the clothes

Britain wears

“No” to the velvet dress, said
Mr, Manufacturer. “If our design-
ers came up with a design like
that we’d turn it down. Buyers
would say: “You don’t expect me
to get a good price for a dress
like that; it’s far too simple.’”

Said the buyer:Our customers
would say it looked like a chemise,
it was so plain. Besides, you
could never wear it in the after-
noon. I’d never stock it.”

The Hats

TWO of the three Paris hats fell
as flat as only a simple idea can
in the fashion business.

No one I saw liked the beret.

“That’s not a fashion hat, it’s
a shopping hat,” said one leading
milliner indignantly.

Nobody much cared for
black pancake.

“We'd never sell a hat like that,”
said an important hatter, eyeing
it with chilly disapproval.

“Well, we might sell it with
some gold scatterpins on top,”
said a buyer.

the

And then at last, at last some-
one I saw liked something in the
pictures. It was the velvet side-
dip cap (below). ‘I’d try it as it
is,’ said one of London’s top hat-
ters,

But did you ever see a dream
fading?

For
tw ce

would sell
feather.”

“it
with a

added:
many

he

us



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—_—

Strange
New World

By «PENSANT”

IN THIS strange new world in
which we of the older generation
find ourselves to-day, the sayi
that “the onlooker sees most
the game” is very applicable to
us.

We old ones, by fotce of cireum-
stances become “onlookers of a
life as it passes us by, a position
not sought, but which is gained
by a series of more or less pain-
ful processes,

The first of these, which seems
to descend on us almost overnight,
and for which we are totally un-
prepared, is by far the most pain-
ful, It comes on us when by some
odd remark or blunt intonation,
we find ourselves shoved into the
position of “onlookers” at a time
when we are certain, in our own
minds at any rate, that not only
could we still be in the game, but
could tell those young uns a thing
or two!

Mercifully this phase soon
passes, to be succeeded by others,
until finally, when we find we
don’t care a hoot who knows we
have a “top plate,” or that the
bald peteh on the back of our
head is growing larger, and when
quite unselfconsciously “we can
drop off to sleep with our mouth
comfortably open for a pre-dinner
snooze, then we know the last
stage has been reached, and we
have qualified for the “Onlookers
Diploma.”

Having reached this stage, we
take up a comfortable position on
the side line and watch the game!

And what do we see?

From this vantage point of “on-
looker” we see passing before us
a world so strange, so different,
that we are totally at a loss.

All the old land-marks are gone.
Modesty betrayed, has flown, Im-
mortality, out from hiding walks
abroad unashamed. Honesty and
devotion to duty have lost in a
fight with money grabbing (and
get it,how you can) and clock
watching.’ Manners respect and
courtesy are but memories of us
“onlookers! Pleasure and self-in-
dulgence are the Gods that are
worshipped. Truly an astonishing
spectacle! The very foundations
on which life was formally built
no longer exist, and we find our-
selves in danger of shouting from
the side-line “beware, look out
you're heading for disaster’! For,
can any age afford to despise and
discard these qualities and sur-
vive?

And it really is amusing, when
shopping to be told we must buy
peas if we want okras! This
wielding of petty authority is
funny, when it is not’ pathetic,
and after all it does save us the
trouble of deciding if we should
buy one, or both,

And the sight of so many “little
people” trying so strenuously to
‘be big people’ is as good as the
“Funnies” and can really help to
brighten life if looked at in the
right way.

Then again, who would but get a
laugh out of modernistic paint-
ing? What fun to recognise and
pick out the odd eyes, toe-nails
etc., from the canvas! Quite a
game might be evolved from it, so
many points for guessing what the
various objects are, say three
points for an eye, four for an ear
and so. Why it might become al-
most as absorbing as Canasta ! But
where we oldtimers really get a
genuine laugh of pure delight is
when, after feeling rather depress-
ed over our own figure, we look
at some modern sculptor. Then
we can really draw ourselves up,
paunch and all, and feel that,
according to modern standards the
old figure is not so bad after all!
Bad? Why by Epstienes standards
we are positively slim!

Yes, in spite of its grim reality,
life to-day has its amusing side,
and until time brings its readjust-
ment we, who have known differ-
ent days, prefer to be amused,
rather than to despair.

For those standards on which
the foundations of any society
must be built, if it is to survive,
will return, because they have
been proven to be the only sound
qualities, and, without a sound
foundation nothing can survive.

And with life’s slow adjustment
toward sanity again, the arts,—
which are after all but the ex-
pression of the mood of easy
ohrase of life,—will discard those
travesties of painting and sculp-
ture, the distortions of so called
music, which are only the abor-
tions of an unhappy age, and re-
vert. once again to the beauty of
sight and sound of former days
and which are necessary to feed
the spirit of our world.

So, although we old ‘“onlook-
ers” may not be here to see the
world sane once again, we know
it will be so for those who follow
on, '










more





SUNDAY

Something a bit

, SEPTEMBER

14, 1952



LAST CORONATION

NEXT CORONATION

more feminine

FOR THE WELL-GROOMED SOUVENIR

By EVE PERRICK
THE Crown which is Correct—correct in Style, Taste,
Dignity, and Protocol—is now off the drawing-board and
selling at £1 a pattern (371 so far) to the better-intention-
ed Coronation souvenir manufacturers who are anxious

to do the right thing.

The man who designed the “correctest crown of all,”
however, was looking rather sad when I called on him in

his office.

“The wind blew .it over,” ex-
plained Mr. Milner Gray, point-
ing dejectedly to a broken flow-
er-p@t containing a shaken in-
door-ivy plant.

It was one of many leafy plants
which, with some abstract pic-
tures, knobbly curtains, and shiny
kitchen-white walls, formed the
decor motif of the room in the
Design Research Unit office-suite
in Mayfair.

There was also a cheering dis~
play of tinned food anq_ beer
bottles— “All empty, merely my
designs.”

Mr. Milner Gray, a little man
in blue tweed suit and turquoise
socks, waved away the charge of
on-the-side refreshments, and
waved me into a low, undulating,
modern chair,

No Copy |

He handed me a “schnapps’*
in a pretty glass, and a folder
showing three different crowns.

“These are only suggested em-
blems for the manufacturers who
want a really good crown, but
who might otherwise make do
with something ugly.

“To be correct it must be a
symbolic crown, but though it
has to be a royal British crown
—not a foreign or civic one—it
must not be a copy.of any par-
ticular crown in existence.” ,

To achieve all this Mr. Gray
had been doing some _ intensive
research into the symbolic crowns
of Queen Elizabeth I, He had been
happy in his work, and rather
pleased with the result,

“It looks a little more feminine
than George VI’s crown, don’t
you think?” he asked,

I didn’t have the heart to say
that it looked like any old crown
to me,

* Very strong spirit which
everyone drinks in Mittel Europe
and the intellectual set sips here.

Out Of Place

I HAVE NOTED with interest,
but no admiration, the latest
photographs of Capri’s new
recruit to the ranks of “the
shirtless ones.” ‘

I have scanned the recently
issued list of the Ten _ Best-
Torsoed male stars (Marlon
Brando in the lead; Alan Ladd,
Burt Lancaster, Kirk Douglas also
mentioned).

Iam reminded of a_ vintage
Groucho Marxism: “Anatomy is
something: we all shave —but it
looks better on a girl.”

Out Of Sight

AT THIS TIME of the year
American film stars come and go.
And most of them. say they’re
only here on holiday and really
would appreciate it if they could
go around unhonoured, unsung,
unphotographed, and, perhaps,
even unrecognised.

Well, it can be done, and the
man who did it says the trick is
to arrive in Europe in a cargo
boat, ;

But Ralph Bellamy—you do re-
member him, don’t you? says it
also helps if you haven’t made a
picture for seven years.

Mr. Bellamy was here for just
six days I tried to find him, I
telephoned several well-known
show-business organisations.

“Whom did you say?” inquired
the switchboard operator at each
place. “Would you mind spelling
the name, please? And is he an
actor?’’,

I traced him to his hide-out—
at the Savoy Motel. Said the tiny
page who was helping me search:
“Would you know him by sight,
Miss?” I said: “But of course.”

After all, I had seen Mr. Bel-
lamy in at least half of the 60
films he has made and in the flesh









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HERE’S one of the latest tn hat
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Achille of Paris It is called
“Hola” and is made of blue vel-
vet trimmed with navy blue veil-
‘se and a spray of fine feathers.



he was just as I remembered—

tall, husky, curly-haired, gentle-

faced, and very light-eyed,
Broadway, Now

He has been doing all right
since we last saw him—in “Guest
in the House’—in 1945. It is just
that he is now a Broadway star.
And Hollywood is seven years
four stage plays, and 47 TV de-
tective dramas back.

Hollywood, though, would like
him to return, “I get offers, but
the right sort of pictures. aren’t
made so often these days,

“The studios are sort of stuck
with Westerns and _ musicals,
Everything else is supposed to be
controversial. So while I’m not
prepared to ride a horse or take
singing lessons, I guess I’ll have
to stick to the stage.”

Mr. Bellamy’s personal political
opinions are, however, self-evi-
dent. On the shiny satin, low-
rolled rever of his dinnner-jacket
an elegant pin spelled out “IKE”
in. letters of 22-carat gold. He
explained that he was yet another
of those “registered Democrats”
who are Eisenhower Republicans
this season,

I said I disapproved of loyalty-
switching; pointed out somewhat
smugly that I had remained a
Bellamy fan through a series of
films in which he had played
either the nasty man or the stuffy
fiance.

Mr. Bellamy thanked me for my
devotion, and added: “It seems to
me that loyalty is a particularly
British quality, Perhaps that is
why the English are the most
contented, cheerful people I’ve
met in Europe this trip.”

No Ambition

STREET SCENE: The chocolate-
brown carriage and pair which
the “By Appointment” hatters use
as a delivery van made its spec-
tacularly dignified way along
Regent’s Park, carrying the for-
mally dressed, top-hatteqd coach-
man and one passenger—a young
man in casual sports-jacket. And
no hat.—L.E.S.





:

seersuckers, cambrics, voiles,
stay unchanged through

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and yourself.

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pear OLE


INDAY, SEPTEMBER

14,

1952



LEFT.—Top: A sleeveless
Unlined. Rose & Blairman.
Centre: Five rows

Bottom: Black and

this black wool evening sweater.
CENTRE:

Black day shoe shown has
IGHT:

Delman.

1 vening skirt of fine black lace banded with black
moire. The blouse stresses this season’s sleeve-line. Price & Sons.
hich have diamante embedded in the fabric. H. M. Rayne.

piping and bow of black and white stri silk.
Cocktail suit of charcoal coloured shot poult. oe
collar are of narrow bands of poult mounted on net.
the ankle with a bow. H. & M. Rayne.

Evening mule design with rolled leather

Rose & Blairman.

Price & Sons

thong from heel encircling the ankle on a

evening jumper of black plaited silk ribbon. This is obtainable lined or

of silk fringe decorate this evening jersey.

Rose & Blairman.
gold embroidery outline stiff white lawn flowers

which are lightly stitched to

taffeta and lined with rose-coloured
Here worn with black

satin shoes

Note dropped shoulder line. The yolk and

... Phe silk shoe is fastened round

slip knot.

AFTER SIX O’ CLOCK

The evening skirt together with
blouse or sweater provides the
answer to a dress problem:
whether to choose a garment
suitable for cocktail and dinner
parties in town or one wearable
during country-week-end eve-
nings.

It is easier to pack into a holi-
day suitcase than an _ evening
gown, And one can ring the
changes with two or three ‘tops’.

The sleeveless sweater is prov-
ing the most popular, though a
modified bat wing and the raglan
line is also fashionable. Black
wool models are often trimmed
on thei seams. One model on
show this week has_ two-inch
bands of black silk braid, woven
with gold thread in a check pat-
tern. Another has braid hung
with pear-shaped pearls.

Plunging necklines are trim-
med with large loops in the gar-
ment’s own fabric.

There are silver and gold
thread and wool mixture jerseys
in a wonderful variety of colours
shown this week too; One in silver
and flamingo pink has a minute
collar and front buttoning;
another, a. collarless design in
violet wool with a wide yolk in
silver, has cap sleeves; and there
is a cross-over style of the same
weave but in lemon yellow and
graduated stripes of pale gold.

FASHION PARADE

> look

The loose
cuts out
the curves

from EILEEN ASCROFT

WOMANS
A will reveal tew curves,

whim for the loose louk

figure

One of the few gestures to feminine form
mace by Pierre Baimain was hip-draping
All clothes are slightly longer,



: Paris,

will
imagination this auturin,

(By MERCIA SNOW)
_ Blouses have certainly come
into their own this year.» Their

elaborate outlines save the eve+
ning skirt and blouse idea from
becoming slightly tawdry. « They
are mostly in white lawn, broderic
Anglaise, nylon or finest fragile
organza in the Edwardian style
with ballooning or leg o’mutton
sleeves, and high, prim collars.
The most original is in yellow and
black plaid.

Ballet length evening ~ skirts,
very wide, made of taffeta faille
and velvet, are the present fav-
curites of the designers. Many
are displayed with matching fit-
ted jackets, minute capes or bol-
eros if desired, They carry also
the motif distinguishing the skirt.
Thus the gqlaborately embroid-
ered skirt with a deep floral or
bird, outlined in gold thread (re-
miniscent of the Japanese bird
design), is matched with the em-
broidered cape. Rays of purple
pailettes down the wide skjrt of
enother model has a bolero or-
namented in the same way. And
an enormously full black taffeta
skirt with graduated quilting all
over and narrowing at the waist,
has a finely tailored matching
jacket with a full peplum,

Purple pailettes are ,used again
in a 3 inch band at the hem of
a wide silk model and they gleam

be left to the
Her clothes

with fashion's néw

including star. RIGHT

cocktail dressés. whith have wide V-neck lines

A Yictoritl. hdté ead ct
Siced TROT AHR AOE Wee TES tor day: and ebades of beige
Gleagatry caps in fur or velvet, Sand and grey. but all flecked
tiny pillbox hats swathea wiin With black. There is also a siaie
enormous veiling. bows and ue and a green with @ grey
fringed Wool shawis worn with ‘one For evening colours are
day jackets vibrant — black white. ruby
sapphire amethyst

Evening dresses, too, nad bustle

and for the



younger models rose

bows and velvet fur-trimmed 4nd aquamarine

tippets Evening coats of hairy wool
Mannequins teetered by on were fur trimmed and had

ve've: pin-point heels. many in frothy feminine linings of

Shoes 0 mach ‘her stockings pies'ed tulle or ruffies of
Poo-nain showed a fot of Dlack oC pce

o

FACE POWDER

for glamour that becomes you



ROUGE
VANISHING CREAM

BRILLIANTINE e«

URJOIS

HAIR CRFA

IN NEW YORK Venus veils trim the autumn hats
style has a folded crown

unexpectedly..as the skirt swings
in walking. There are a few nar-
row skirts shown this season also.
One is in velvet and slit at the
front. But the wide skirts carry
the day.

GOING TO THE FEET

It seems as if we may look for-
ward to a return of the elegant
shoe—thanks to Paris. For the
French have introduced the
“spindle heel’—so narrow that it
is searcely half an inch wide at

the base and only little more at|

the top—and the more

vamp.

The English shoemakers are
being more cautious and conser-
vative, But they have been forced
to adopt at least a modified ver-
sion. It» is an improvement on
the thick, clumsy heels they have

pointed

foisted on the market in recent
years. And it is a big change
from platform soled shoes, which

started oltt_as an exotic whimsy
of finest leather and craftsman-

ship, for small Italian feet and
ended up in England in their
millions, uncouth, and mass pre-
duced,

So it is refreshing to find the
shoemakers’ craft is reappearing
in England. The flat heel is
banished to the country or to bal-
let style shoes, and the high heel
is fining down,

CENTRE: the head-hugging

LEFT




























SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN
eee CTL tl ett es a lea a
| > . y “Ty 2 et < .
| Paris Newsletters -_
I dreamed
' al fa j I ;
Vi { emphasizead
adame i eclere LIQUID GOLD A‘ WARTUN ‘ ‘ _—
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| The eyes of Paris have been fo- Kleber when official business {gm r ° .
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brs ia week ~ spn, —. brings her to Paris. Senowned and equ ally m COMPLEXION SOAP w
Be. Oman in & beautifully tail- r - ‘3 @2 Barbados or t ’ é for }
| Ored black suit and a sm mart No Feminist next alr gallor i, ae
| black She is e Lia Madame La Marechale has aug} (providit a : t . 7
Mi rech Leciere{ of enermets daily mailbag whien ‘cunerio: RUM) A} nv ia)
e's 2st popular war hero, she ‘ with herself. She is DOW IRLY ia .
wf eral Lecter wi texed ie f the organisatior :
Patis 6n Liberation Day in 1944 ich for France wat ne aCe Gt S CASTLI
a the head of the 2nd Armoured Widow i also works for tl * - ‘ i
ivisior vas : ’ t met bhi
anh Ate le ee) he rm oe her hus- a THE VIBRANT COL KNI t's
Recen! : ; re as second armoured division. f S OF THE TROPI : ace :
1947 Recently “an off Her hobbies—music and books, [brought under on ears E COMPLEXION SOAP
was published conferrir On 1 She is feminist, believes that m4 : yu y solid} nt
| tt posthumous honour Mar- Geter ie ert he He: onlooker > myri ol
shal of France round : ; weve to he We lr more ‘
It was people who forced at f STRA ind . ‘
that ue, Public clamour broke The Detective RAFFLA vt a ome a ee BAL. vee
out when the title of Marshal Just urhed to Paris after hats, s 1 designs a Mal occasions (O'§
wa best wed on the dead De lightnir sit to the seene of the humerou ve \\ era ,
| Lattre de TaSsigy. De Lattre was Drummor murder is France's | !0ors, table ounte , . ;
| a great general, but so was St famous detective ex-Stipe of the town’s most exciting st 1 i OUIS }
} Lae a A id Leclere was warmly ndent Jean Belin, formertyv THE DOMINICA HANDI- ~"2.” ee st
egarded by his men the National Security police in {CRAFT CO, Bridge S ’ : aN
Today M l M Paris ’ : ‘ ’ . * Platinum or Gold. ‘I
oday Mme, 4a Marechal - th ERS 4
back at the family place. ti He is:a tough, 66-year-old Bur- HOW'S YOUR EGG PRO ms ANNIVERSARY
Chate f iw onthe Mor undian =with a face deeply | DUCTION? interesting hen that not
nateau of Tailly on the Somme med wit , r B +4 AY é
after tz par the ane aa med h wrinkles and thin, }@re availal PURIN :
monies marking the eighth’ ann etermined lips. In the old days} Poultry Book x I
’ arKIng wie eign a us dangling cigarette was his | heldful advi JAS NI ” Phere
versary of the Liberation of Pay trademark . SF Be TOS BOVi( HAS JONES ‘ -
People noted her quiet elegance oR tT . . CHECKERBOARD ’ é ‘
her calm self-control; throughou® epi} a é "h ie yoke now, "he plocal PURINA F D P =e
| the moving mass for her husband I a S apes: trouble PLIERS the : ble 5
in the Cathedral of Notre Dame + “e130 policeman in egg prov feeds amor DOLLAR FOR DOLLAR
when she t pt ently near the ,, ve c i a month. His |LAYENA j Rina saeetiss bintniin wh ;
{ altar beside an empty arm-ch So he supt eared 1 + ial th Point you get RESULTS rid! Mmmm
- which lay great sheaf of ac crime a ivise ek 5 a Kin® | Phone if you like to 4403 but I » “cause you
flowers emetatorks eee ee oo my better get a supply on Mor ZEPHYR Well, man alive! that
tive lage t i ri
t t wa n account his wife nen Magawne, and add you Sirs to mil 1 I'l The car of .the century |
that the general, whose namo 1 : e ' I | por |
3 : cal Killer more pa eee
ws yINt > inpe > tee " | A t !
was Count Philippe de Haute ‘Superintendent Sebeille is d r ‘ ciou eX | The accent’s on your
clogue when he escaped {OM ing everythir Hos 1 ‘. ; ° * at home in ar | ; '
pceon to join the Free French in {4° traee’ dik urdaree” — ; AMONG THE FAMOUS nttle SF | but definitely! Allo-ett dels
ondon, called himself by the un~ «pine pin F te yn, (HELENE CURTIS PR
3 ike mm eb Me SCLENE t PRODUC! Je 1 i } »s sleck! eur
remarkable French surname of killer am A ene mee i Sauve Haircrean present 7 me gst HOME OF | your curve leek uraly
Lae cada site a rt é F an. 1 ah seu Vic earney MLE
pata ’ eines a Pe ae people of that tegion are pecu-|!Y available in Barbados. SAUVE FIVE STAR MOTORING by gives them a mos! breat! ion
re wee ea © feate? jiarly dour and obstinate for Ladies and Men has the gt ! you read these j ~ =
aha thle tion teat ordinary “Most of them are Communists dvantage of new mirac e phone 4493 oe” . c
fiamme which her husband made ce ¥ . 5 "ee, ae me sreniens oe Ere the fam he vient favorite fabrics ~~
t afraic ot ‘re must liar oily fee rom cond “ YGDOM ‘oO } ,
pare ‘ r . many of them who know the gun /ing ols. SAUVE definitely make peve ‘ . . “ i R i
zike her husband Mme. Lecier: that kill oe 1] Bun ; Ss : finitely ces HORSE wa never spoken in Genuine Maidenform Braget
comes of the old French nobility, ; a Med " a ummonds. I hair softer and more manage warmth of Bridgetow:
was born Therese de Gargan. aohy i Tho e giving ( able and gives a natural ‘ iy un Personally I'd eres are made only inthe | nites
Married jin 1925, now in her late watt wi of su ell t a kn a few drop ch mornin thing for a FAN, A top St fA
40’s she has six children. nda difficult ‘in Se vents dryne ensure \ ng-lasting G.E.C, ELEC ates of America
The younger of the two girls “"q (ye Se eae as head all day, At | RIC FAN. An exeellent variets , "
Binhedidle ja a. Geeicede.” achobla a bel DON rie I seeacde ht Ot ores tt the CITY GARAGE There isa W011 nforn ,
|} girl. The eldest son, Lieus: Henri if hh mt : ad ae re ice, x . * * * ‘ sia: they're ‘ality models! \ {
Leclerc, was taken prisoner in Pat ‘* Sdrete inder Belin at PEN AND PAPER. INK RENCE OL. STOVES and] or every type of figuiti,
jthe war in Indo-China last Jan- “ “Bolin has sent 17 murderers to |ERASER ne yl ce? OVENS with the asbestos kind | eames mr.ce :
uary. His mother has had no c 1 ‘ ce wh ror : et es ; a “ as
7 ; the guillotine. Most celebrated was | Best thing is to go to Robe ! (replaceable for omy 18c.) -
word from him since : * | .
She lives quietly at Tailly with Landru, the French blue-beard,|Co.. on High St und ve also come in and ire z
|her other children, returning oc- Thiet ne ake ted soon after the |SCHOOL REQUIREMENTS | ar rthwhile your seeing
g we |
sit koi a meas atiataneharperannepebaiaetcae
Ms ' lee No Angels bed
1e mule shoes—with 10 be Cc NEWSNAPS—An i ld church }
support — have proved neither | jn the Pa iburbs display e | IS YOUR
practical nor suitable for outdoors. | notice “Those worshipping herve
They are too reminiscent of the!) gre not necessarily angels » | ;
bedroom. Nowadays they are take care of your handbags and | â„¢
seen almost invariably in gold or | cameras.” | |
: |
ilver mesh and kid, or with A convicted thief who stole | | Backache is usually the first sign of Kidney
vamp and heel of nylon mesh cheque book spent the money | | Trouble. The kidneys are the blood’s filters.
Narrow grosgrain ribbon is used|a picture by French artist Mar N Stomach y | When they get out of order, instead of pure,
for V-shaped 2 imming on ae Laurencin, N 4 DUE TO INDIGESTION | fresh blood flowing to every nerve aid
uede courts. The vogue for col- Health authorities have assure: | > j 5 | cle blood hb h
7 é s he ‘ | r ust ONE DOSE | muscle, your blood stream is heavy wit
oured shoes for special occasions | Parisians that meat from animal of MACLEAN BRAND | waste poisons and acids, Then you feel rotten.
continues; fashionable are red | suffering from the severe foot and STOMACH POWDER! This | Half a century's experience and scientific
models cuffed with black, and | mouth epidemic that has affect: 1 | ecient balanced formula | tests by doctors in famous clinics prove that
caramel coloured kid piped in many thousands of cattle in an, Stomach Pains. | Dodd's Kidney Pilla quickly rid Ther blood
white. France, is not harmful to humar nce, Heartburn, Nausea of excess acids and poisons. your
Following a series of attacks on or Acidity due to Indigestion. blood is clear—your backache disappears
| faxi-drly ers, the men’s. union and your tired feeling is replaced by
have demanded the right to [- Atse tn Tablet Fore | health and energy. You feel years ounger,
| cart irms and the suppression Insist on Dodd's Kidney Pills. 3/e
|} of gangster films L. M. B. MEYERS & CO, LTD, for large bottle at all chemists, U4
(World Copyright Reserved) P.O, Box 171, Bridgetown



the square, forward tilted
cap, finished with a jewelled

the large cartwheel model is in platinum grey iridescent parlour plush

with a darker veil.

i Cay dresses and suits were
Jumper aot worn with tweed or knitted
Maggy Routf teams fur-lined wool shawls, With evening

capes with town suits and gives models we saw shawls of woo!

them tailored coat collars She lace.

shows many. versions of the Silk organza, used double in

jumpet suit wiih cow! necklines. blue over black and black over

sometimés waisted, sometimes gold. is enchant for small

traced, gathered into a hip belt evening dresses. It has the
In the prettiest collection to sheen of a mixture of satin.

Gate Ma eens de RRueh wool and silk

features = high olo necke

collars, on Buk” dresses and WORLD ‘YRIGHT RESERVED

over: oats ress

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PAGE EIGHT

oil ADVOCATE

fixe ltw ade eee Bc
Printed by the



Advecate Co., Ltd,, Broad St. Bridgetown.



Sunday, September 14,

WATER

THE availibility of water for irrigation
purposes in Barbados was the subject of a
question put to the late Dr. Senn by the late
Sir Frank Stockdale and the then Dr.
Saint (now Sir John) in January 1941.

As a result of that question the British
Union Oil Company carried out a survey
of the ground water resources of Barbados
free of charge. The report of that survey
was published in March 1946.

Since that date the subject of irrigation
has been discussed by many persons not
all of whom have studied the Senn report.
In view of the importance which irrigation
would have in maintaining a high average
sugar output it is not surprising that the
possibility of irrigation has been consistent-
ly kept in the foreground during recent
years. It is also therefore not surprising
that Professor Beasley in A Fiscal Survey
of Barbados should have included irriga-
tion in a proposed full economic pro-
gramme set against the deep-water harbour
project.

In view of Professor Beasley’s recom-
mendation and in view of the reports
which are circulating to the effect that the
government has earmarked a large sum of
money for irrigation purposes in its five
year development plan, the views of the
late Dr. Senn on a future water policy for
Barbados ought to be recalled.

Dr. Senn began his suggestion for a
water» policy ‘with the remarks: “It is
obvious that the public water supply must
have priority, as on it the health and wel-
fare of the entire population depend to a
considerable extent. In any planning it
must be considered that with the rise of
civilization the water consumption per
head will increase and in Barbados allow-
ance has also to be made for a steadily
increasing population.” For this reason
not all the water unused at present could
be utilized for a planned system of irriga-
tion, but certain quantities have to be re-
served for future extensions of the Public
Water Supply.”

If Dr. Senn’s advice is to be followed it
would appear essential for the public water
supply to be assured and improved before
embarking on any experiments with irriga-
tion,

Has the public water supply been im-
proved?

That question is’ best answered by the
Chief Engineer of the Waterworks.

In a talk given to Members of the Bar-
bados Museum and Historical Society on
June 9, 1952 Mr. Garrod, the Chief
Engineer of the Waterworks Department
said; “the water system is probably at the
present time at its lowest ebb. The old
pumping machine is giving out, the new
is not in full harness and the distribution
pipes are too small.

Let us hope that from now on improve-
ment will manifest itself”. Had these
statements been made by some professional
journalist or politician seeking to make an
impression they might have been overlook-
ed and certainly would have been checked
by reference to the expert. But when they
are made by the expert they cannot be
dismissed. “Subterranean water” Mr. Gar-
rod continues during the same talk which
has recently been published in the Journal
of the Society “is vitally important to this
island’s water supply and we cannot allow
anyone to lift it in excess, to the ultimate
detriment of the public.”

If the expert recognises the priority of
the public water supply over irrigation, it
may be asked, why should a newspaper be
concerned about a question which is in
good hands? Normally such a rebuke would
be well-merited but the history of water
development in Barbados as traced by Dr.
Senn shows that the right opinion was not
always followed: and recent happenings
in Barbados tend to show that when the
expert’s opinion conflicts with the dominant
political wish that the expert’s opinion is
disregarded or some weak eompromise is
decided on.

Water is too important to daily life to be
trifled with.

Much development has taken place since
Dr. Senn’s report was written and Barba-
dos is fortunate indeed to have acquired
just the very person recommended by the
late Dr. Senn “a qualified water engineer
who is specially keen on fundamental re
search”, to plan a future water policy.

Already many improvements in the pub-
lic water supply have been experienced.
In May 1951 a new well at Haymans
capable of yielding a million gallons of
water a day came into production. Ex-
ploratory Boring which is now being
carried out at Sweet Vale may result in
another source of supply which may per-
mit of the closing of existing sources which
are not entirely satisfactory.

In this connection Dr Senn’s views on the
main sources of the island’s water supplies
are important and it is very disturbing to
note that Harrison Cave, Bakers Cave and
Coles Cave streams in St.

1952

Thomas, which

he considered to be very unsatisfactory
and even dangerous are still, according to

the Chief Engineer’s statement in June
1952, being used.
Besides concentration on necessary im-

provements in water supply as to quantity
and quality the Chief Engineer is planning
for an increased consumption of water of
some 9 million gallons daily by 1980.

Reorganisation of the water supply is
going on and in 1949 a million dollars -was
sanctioned for work over the whole island.
In actual fact, according to the Chief
Engineer, the expenditure may eventually
go to double that amount.

With so much to be done for the public
water supply of the island it seems in-
credible that schemes of irrigation should
be contemplated at this moment and it is
earnestly to be hoped that in a matter of
such vital importance to the future genera-
tions of Barbados that no political pressure
will be used to counteract the decision of
the expert.

Insufficient attention too seems to be paid
to the warning which was given to the
members of the Historical Society by the
Chief Engineer when he spoke of City
mains which have insufficient pressure to
centrol fire. “We cannot connive at the
fire hazard”, he said. We cannot.

Before embarking on schemes of irriga-
tion the authorities responsible for the de-
velopment plan which is soon to be
announced may be counselled to spend a
quiet day reading the report of the late
Jv. Senn and then to compare it with the
1eport on “our water supply” delivered by
the Chief Engineer at the Barbados Museum
mn 9th June 1952.

It is impossible when this has been done
not to regard schemes for irrigation, how-
ever desirable and however necessary .in
the future, as premature at this stage of
cur water supply development, ‘The
water system” says the one man in Barba-
clos best qualified to speak “is probably at
the present time at its lowest ebb”. It is
obvious said Dr. Senn that the public
water supply must have priority.

Who would ainngree?

FOWL-COCK TIME

THE historian of the future may find it
profitable to speculate on the reasons why
of the two experiments from which Sir
Grattan Bushe will always be remembered
in this island only one took root.

Why was it he may ask, did “Bushe rule”
capture the imagination of the politicians
who supported it, whereas “Bushe time”
soon expired?

Of the two experiments the historian,
freed from the prejudices and slogans of
the present will perhaps consider the in-
auguration of Bushe time as far more suit-
able to the needs of a tropical island than

the settling upon 166 square miles of coral
of a form of government which is today

working with great difficulty in its West-
minster Home ?

Why, he must ask, did Bushe time ex-
pire when Bushe rule survived ?

The historian of the future may search
and search amid the masses of paper and
files which might survive some future fire
or hurricane (which may solve all Barba-
dian problems in a manner quite unfore-
seen by our present-day planners) without
finding a clue to that most interesting
sociological question: Why did Bushe
time die?

Should his eye light by chance on these
words if they are available to posterity
(perhaps in the vast newspaper storeroom
of the British Museum where all British
newspapers are preserved) he might find
the clue for which he may be looking.
Bushe time died of ridicule. Bushe rule
survived because no one thought of ridi-
culing it. Politics in Barbados, like educa-
tion, is a subject of veneration. Those who
make fun of politics make fun of the
people. And the will of the people is sov-
ereign. Surely that is the clue to the suc-
cess of a political experiment which had
nothing to recommend it except a very
eighth-hand resemblance to a British cab-
inet system which itself 1s in need of
revision ? ;

Politics are taken too seriously here and
the leg-pvlling and cartoons and political
satire which reduce parliamentary gov-
ernment to the level of a national pastime
in Great Britain are not appreciated local-
ly, Politicians take themselves very seri-
ously because the people take them seri-
ously.

Politics is bread and butter and nobody

laughs at the means of livelihood, Lest»

the historian of the future should regard
this interpretation as being somewhat
‘anciful and unsupported by the evidence
f the orthodox, he is to be requested in
polite terms to consult page 119, Vol. XIX,
No. 3 of the Journal of the Barbados
Museum and Historical Society. :
There he will read how Bushe time was
always fated to die, because it had a rival.
In the words of a venerable headmaster
of Harrison College: “We were glad when
the Bushe experiment ceased, and we
went back tu ordinary time, or as the
wags termed it, ‘Fowl Cock Time.’”
If there were wags in politics, Bushe
e been swept out before.
As it is, it may remaijg as long as “bush-
tea”. And that has had a very long innings,
and is still soing strong.

|

laughing on

So far as I am aware no cook-
ery book has ever been written for
chaps who live alone, or chaps
whose wives are away on holiday.

‘this long-felt want will now be
satisfied by Uncle Nat’s Cook Book,
written by that distinguished
gcurmet whose identity is some-
times thinly disguised under the
pseudonym of Mal Manger.

Here are some extracts from ~
book, to be published shortly b
Burp and Hicecup at 18s., or what-
ever we can get for it:—

SARDINES
\ON TOAST

Ingredients:



Sardines, toast.

Method: Put a slice of bread
under the grill. Light gas over
grill. Take a tin of sardines, and
look. for the key.
| As most tins of sardines have
no key, try the opener. If you
jmiss the tin with your first jab,
wrench the opener out of the table
and have another go.

If you are lucky you will hit
the tin about a quarter of an inch
from the edge. If not, you will hit
it smack in the middle. As you
can’t open a tin this way wrench
the opener out and try again.

Next time you may hit the tin
on the extreme edge and spin it
on to the floor. If so, pick it up,
try again, and stop using that dis-

gusting language.
By now your toast is in
flames, so cut another slice

of bread, put it under the
grill, and return to your tin,

Unless you were born under’ an
evil star your next jab should
|hit the tin somewhere between
| the middle and the edge. If so,
| Saw away until you come to the
| corner. As you won't be able to
| negotiate the corner because you
|are too far from the edge, turn



| the tin round and start on the
' other side.
} And stop using that dis-

gusting language,

As the top surface of the tin
will now be like the plank of
nails Indian fakirs sleep on, turn
it over and start on the unpunc-
tured surface.

Oil will pour over the table;
the tin will be difficult to hold
on the slippery wood, your second
piece of toast will be in flames.

Cut another slice of bread,
put it under the grill; and
return to your tin.

Jab it, stab it, slash it, bash it,
stick it, prick it, kick it, stamp on
it, jump on it, and sling it out of
the window.

And stop using that disgust-
ing language

‘The man who

keeps Barbados

Sundays

NATHANIEL GUBBINS

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Cookery Book for men whose
wives are on holiday.

By N. GUBBINS





Ss
AND MASH
Ingredients:
potatoes. 1

Method; If there are no cold
potatoes in the larder, peel some,
and boil them.

The best way to boil potatoes
is to,put them in a_ saucepan,
cover them with cold water, add
salt, put the saucepan over a
lighted gas-ring, and wait for the
water to boil.

You then prod the potatoes with
a leg to see if they are hard or
soft.

Sausages; mashed

If they are hard, they are
not done; if soft, they are;
if very soft, overdone,

While the water is coming to
the boil, take two alleged pork
sausages (or six if you're a glutton
for punishment) and prick them
all over with a fork. This is sup-
posed to stop them bursting, but
it doesn’t,

Put the sausages in a frying-pan
over another gas ring. As the
modern sausage, though full of
bread, soya beans, dried milk,
paper, string, and small rubber
bands, has little fat in it, add a
lump of margarine the size of a
walnut—or two walnuts if you're
fond of the stuff.

As the sausages will burst
almost at once, you will soon

have a_ sizzling mess of
bread, soya beans, dried
miik, paper, string, ‘small

rubber bands, and sausage

skins,

Now take potatoes off the gas,
strain, put on a plate, and start
mashing with a fork. If the pota-
toes are all the same size or if
you've had enough gumption to cut
the big ones in half, this will be
easy, because they will all be
cooked evenly. If not, the hard,
underdone bits will fly off in all
directions.

If you press hard enough
with your fork you will
break the plate and never
hear the last of it.

Add to the potatoes left on the
plate a little milk and a lump of
margarine the size of a walnut
(or the size of a coconut for all
I care), mash well, sling into the
pan and duck. . before you are









blinded by
fat.

When there is a smell of burn-
ing, serve hot to anyone who will
eat it, to any starving dog, o:
throw out of the window.

And stop using that dis-
gusting language.

Paws Across The Sea

a shower of boiling

A letter from Manhattan
Mouser, American tough cat,
to his English sweetheart,
Lottie.

HIYA Sugar Puss.
To say hello from New York
and to thank you for your hospi-

tality last time I wasin your
home town,
The more I travel, the more I

think of England as my second
home and the more T ufderstand
that everything they say-about the
English is a lot of hooey.

For one thing they say the chow
stinks, but shall I ever forget the
jellied leg of rabbit and saucer of
Jersey milk you handed me in
your kitchen when the folks was
out for the evening? _ No, sister, I
certainly won't.

For another, they say the
English are stiff necked and
snooty. if taking a suy for a walk

on the beach with the harvest
moon shining on the sea, and no
holds barred, is stiff--necked and
snooty, you can call me the Sultan
of Zanzibar.

* * Ba

All the same, Honey Cat, I
must say my eyes popped when
I saw the difference in your chas-
sis since the summer cf 1951, At
that time it was the swellest little
chassis in the English speaking
world, Now I would say it is just
swell in the way you understand
the word.

Over here, in America, we
award a dame higher points for
her chassis than for anything,
including _ brains whieh don’t
count much on Broadway, even if
she has any.

My ex-girl friends Pep Puss
and Cutie Cat never had brains
for anything except horning in on
a free meal, but each had a chassis
that would give a guy a tempera-
ture high enough to bust a ther-
mometer.

Then they dipped their noses
too often into the ash cans for
fried chicken leftovers, put on
weight, and that’s why they’re
“ex”

So, lay off the hog’s helpings of
jellied rabbit and Jersey milk,
Sugar Puss, if you don’t want to
be ex-Sugar Puss, ex-Honey Cat,
and Ex-English | sweetheart of
yours truly

Manhattan Mouser.
LONDON Express SERVICE.



Oe

Sentiment Versus Reason

The great evil of political par-
ties is their need for something to
oppose, Inevitably, party politics
provoke social tensions. In large
countries with large electorates,
the heat of political controversy
is somewhat dissipated by the
presence in almost all parties of
men and women from similar
walks in life.

In the British Labour Party, for
instance, are to be found repre-
sentatives of all the social classes
of Great Britain and the possess-
ion of great wealth has never been
a bar to Labour Party member-
ship.

In a colonial society such as
Barbados, other conditions pre-
vail. Barbados’ parliamentary gov-
ernment which began with the
rights of Englishmen to govern
themselves, was suddenly compli-
cated after 1833 and re-modelled
to allow for the rights of all
other Brabadians to a voice in
running their affiairs, This re-
modelling has been streamlined in
recent years and was brought
right up to date only last year
when all adults (except those who
refused) were registered as
voters,

The significant result of the first
elections under adult suffrage was
the liquidation or, more accurate-
ly, the reduction to ineffectiveness,
of the only political party which
could claim to be descended from
earlier traditional Houses of
Assembly.

That political party the Electors
Association had consistently op-
posed party government as being
unsuitable in Barbados for the
excellent reason that party gov-
ernment divides and does not
unite a country and they believed
that Barbados for historical and
other reasons was already divided
more than was good for political
health.

Yet, dé@spite its fundamental op-
position to party government, the
Electors Association did produce
a sufficient number of candidates
to have secured a majority in the
House of Assembly at the last
elections, if the electors had sup-
ported them,

But the electors for the most
part gave their support to the
Barbados Labour Party and in
such a way that no effective op-
position exists in Barbados House
of _Assembly today.

Valence Gale

|To the Editor, the Advocate,

| SIR,—While writing may i turn
jfor a smal] space to a very dif-
ferent subject and say that I was
|much interested in Mr. Hoyos
vivid description of Mr. Valence
Gale and the founding of the
Advocate newspaper, which has



Our Readers Say:

iy George Hunte

This obviously is a bad thing for
Barbados because parliamentary
government must necessarily lose
force and viguor when it is re-
duced to a routine meeting of
delegates who can express any
opinion on almost any subject un-
der the sun but whose opinions
count for little since the votes of
the majority are on all major
issues cast for the party in power.
The party in power has no need
of any votes from other than their
own members except on occasions
when the party rebels decide to
vote independently.

The question to be asked then
is what can be done to ensure the
working of party government in
the House of Assembly?

There can only be one answer.
Find a political party which can
recapture power at the next elec-
tions.

On paper this looks very easy,
But few persons are willing to un-
dertake all the efforts which is
involved in producing a _ political

party capable of obtaining a
majority in the next elections.
Why?

A few days ago I tried to get
an answer from an ex-politician
whom the voters rejected at the
last elections because in his own
words he “had refrained from sen-
timent and become a realist”,

“Suppose” I said to him “you
and I were to go to the people and
tell them the truth—do you think
they would vote for us?” He made
a noise which is best expressed by
the sound STUPES!

“You've got” he said “to use
sentiment, The people are not in-
terested in reason or truth. They
want promises. You've got to be
a demagogue if you want them to
vote for you. Make promises and
they'll follow you. But appeal to
reason? No.

This hit me hard because I had
always mdintained in private con-
versation that if you could con-
vince people in Barbados that you
were genuinely interested in their
welfarr and were trying to help
them they would. support you at
electign time.

My views were theoretical,
ased on wishful thinking, what F
would like to believe about my
fellow Barbadians.

My friend's views—tke expoli-
tician who must be nameless in so
small an island—were based on

grown into such a flourishing and
influential organ. (Will these
biographical articles, by the way,
be brought together in a small
vook when completed?)

I think I have mentioned before
that I was stationed in Barbados





in 1895 as the Junior minister at
James Street Church and asso-
ciate congregations, anc i so had

what actually happened. He had
oecome a realist he said and he
did not make any sweeping prom-
ises. Result he was swept out and
the House lost one of its most col-
ourful personalities. But what
about education I asked him?

You tell me that it’s no good
appealing to reason and that only
the demagogue has a chance to
get the votes. Can you tell me
then I asked, why Barbados
spends more per head of popula-
tion on education than any other
territory in the British Caribbean,
if only the demagogue can win
the people’s votes? Why not take
this money and spend it on houses
or something like that?

This thought, I think was new
to him,

“May be” he smiled “there’s
something wrong with the educa-
tion”; adding as an after thought
“perhaps after a long time the
effect of education will be felt”.

Meanwhile I said: how about
the people who are already edu-
cated? Would they give us their
vote?”

“They’re afraid” said my friend
“Once the local schoolmaster was
a power in the land. To-day he
likes to be careful. If he stays out
of politics he feels safer somehow:
at any rate he is less afraid of
having his fowls stolen or his
bicycle punctured.”

So that the more people
educate the less people we will
have interested in politics? As so
often happens the vital question
did not occur to me until after-
wards but I’ve been thinking of it
ever since and I’m sure my friend
(if he still. reads. his Sunday
paper now that he is once more
a private citizen) will give it much
thought,

P.S. In case you think that my
ex-politician friend was rejected
on the Electors’ Association plat-
form ticket let me hasten to in-
form you that he is a loyal sup-
porter of Mr, Grantley Adams and
“doesn't know what would hap-
pen to Barbados if Mr. Adams
went”,

Somebody has got to form a
political party which will contest
the next elections with a reason-
able chance of winning, but if my
ex-politician friend is right and
only demagogues can do the trick
what a grey prospect lies ahead.

No wonder more people are

we

lIcmking to federation to save us
from the demagogues my friend
fcresees.

the privilege of a slight acquaint-
ance with Mr. Gale and some little
knowledge of the starting of the
paper. Also that the first article
I ever wrote for the press Was &

sketch for the Advocate of Bishop

Swaby when he was about to be
transferred from B.G. to Barba-
dos, a year or two later. We lived
opposite to each other in the
c ton Ward of Georgetown



anks for
FRANCIS GODSON

space







SUNDAY SEPTEMBER . 14, 1952
|THE GOLDEN VOICE.
i NURSERY RECORD BOOK ;
Sy tells the vith Songs and Music on a gramophone recor

tu

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to help you rez ad it in the Book

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SUNDAY,









































town a separate constituency, ang fessonable bounds, While staunch- Sir Charles Spey. The Bread-

| LEAS PERRINS | | |

Sir Henry Morgan: Black

SEPTE t 52 > PYRY ; now‘ aie
EPTEMBER 14, 1952 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE NINE
en eee — +. }
7} 2 7 7 '
| F €opie { arbados—XXIfi
: KR
-—4 ‘ae
In 1842 a society was formed (By : } hat the pr P i
. Q : as y JOHN PRIDEAUX that the prefere ‘ , ’
in Barbados to assist with the , ) Coionies for their sugar over tha 4 | e “gl :
extinction of the Slave Trade; thig /irst two representatives of manufactured in foreign places } ]
vas called “The Barbados Auxil- br ‘town. At this time Prescod’ would be lost , , ‘ ‘
jary to the Society in Great w tditor of the “Liberal”, the The type of sugar planted in Ah YOU" OOMY
Britain for the extinction of the *nly ratieal Newspaper in tne Barbados had been undergoing a a j Z Z
| Slave Trade and the Civilisation Islana, and nad a reputation as a change over the last fifty years PIP enue
* Africe.” The Committee of the putlicist in the West Ind:es, also for the old cane introduced from ee eh i? ‘ s
| local Branch of tris Society con- We enjoyed the sr.endship of Lord Brazil in 1640 or thereabout, had | : Ta A BOTTLE of Lea $
sisted of many prominent persons “arougeans and Lorg John Russell. .et_riorated until there was hardiy ; Perrins Sauce work
in this community. It was as Freseod occupied a special posi- any return. One planter made the : “le Ae
.ollows:—Hon. T. J. Cummins, tion in the House, but did not following entry in his diary in <; j magic in the kitchen
Revds. C. C. Cummins, and T. ¢xplo't it, for he showed his true September 1792 How to acu isle teensoonten a
Ellis: Messrs J. Crichlow, J, R. greatness in his ability and will- : subtlety to salad Gee ee oe ee
Bispham, E. W. Archer, F Bilgy, ingness to plan for society as a “The price of sugar very low ‘ and savouries, meat ayd
C Phillips, B. W. Massiah, b.,whole, and net for sectional or and the Brazil Cane giving but ,aL\ns taste so imuch hetter . eae
Bourne, Joseph Thorne, JOhn mere personal ends. He did’ not little return Have begun to ih 4 Gressing — and ¢ per- fish, turns simple fare into a
Horsham, Joseph Kennedy, Israel Sicritice any po'nt of principle but plant the Bourbon Cane, having fect salad dressin ua 6 tT connoisseur’s delight. The
Bowen, Byran T, Young, W. S, took a broad view. By h’s pres- purchased 1,300 plants—only | make with Lea & Perrins aanece Es
Wilkey, A. Stronarech, J. Bovell, ence he broadencd the humanity one eye to a plant-——from Wil- It pives the flavour of oll the secret of that wonderful
Treasurer, and the Secretaries Of the House, and his activities liam Fernhill for £32 10. 0 * vapeitsn eer ee A lies i
| were James T, Rogers and Joseph gut i check on elass legislation, which were brought from the have the titme und far flavour fies in the recipe,
Hamilton, — hus the laws with regard to em- Island of Martinique. These ree im : area : J Eo ois Fh which has remained Lea &
After admiss‘on to the franchise ‘8ration, landlord ind tenants act, were first imported from the tablespoonsule of salad ott. f. Se ae z
the freed coloured people com- #4 some others were much Jess Island of Mauritius by order of : tablespoonfuls of yp Perrins’ alone for more than
plained of being excluded from MVidious than they might have Louis XVI to the Cape of Good a eee enero eae RA ey eS
office. This movement was led by been because of his presence, He Hope, and from thence to Cay- 4 - reer gn taiagp ee As 00 years. Len & reine api
A | Samuel Jackman Prescod, an i ried tremendous influence with enne with instructions for them ' races rh Bay , wer ee 2 most certainly the aristo- |
THE SPANISH FLEET destroyed by Morgan. ‘ustrious character in the history “ie masses while inspiring them to be disseminated. among all the} ts oh ‘aognetb¥om thet, Mica t eeace
: ¢ 7 v v 8 of this Island. By the Act of 183], W.'h a love of ‘representative in- French Colonies Le es ete ee ee that, Rural crat of sauces,
7 ihe ‘Jews and the Free Coloured stitutions. ca & Perrins can give! [i %
3 ihe Je anc n€ ree ired . on . ‘ demetan % . qeoeapanewspninnemnttneiie
ROGUES OF THE SEA . People were admitted to the fran- __ Prescod was a temperate far- * “The inhabitants of this Island +
chise, By the Franchise Act of S&e!l tatesman well verséd in nad but little know ledge of the
1840, the middleclass were ad- P0iticai knowledge; and he kept Plant until the capture of Mar
mitted. This Act made Bridge- the coloured movement within linique by Sir John Jarvis and
the number of members of the |) contending for the civil rights fruit, Clove and Cinnamon wer i a 2 : ‘
| House of Assembly was inereased Of the coloured, he recognised imported “ins SaySnns = ne Whe etgcnal and genuine
‘from twenty-two to twenty-four, that, for a long time at any rate, Same time by the same ship, oo

| The Act came into force in 1843, the whites must remain the pre-

By 1845 this type of cane was) y

Flag and Union Jack

By IAN GALE

It would be impossible to write
about pirates without mentioning
Sir Henry Morgan, the buccaneer
who began. as a bond servant in
Barbados and eventually became
Lieutenant Governor of Jamaica.

Esquemeling sums up his origin
and beginnings thus “Captain
Henry Morgan was born in Great
Britain, in the principality of
Wales; his father was a rich yeo-
man, or farmer, of good quality,
even as most who bear that name
in Wales are known to be. Mor-
gan, when young, had no inclina-
tion to the calling of his father,
and therefore left his country, and
came towards the seacoasts to
seek some employment more
suitable to his aspiring humour;
where the found several ships at
anchor, bound for Barbadoes.
With these he resolved to go in
the service of one, who according
to the practice of those parts sold
him as soon as he came ashore.

After serving his time in this
island—and the life of a white
bond servant was hard—Morgan
made this way to Jamaica. There
he soon joined the buccaneers and
after a few trips he managed to
save enough money to buy a ship
in partnership with some of his
comrades. He was unanimously
elected captain of this vessel and
on leaving Jamaica he met an
old pirate called Mansfield who
was busy equipping a fleet to
harass the Spaniards. Mansfield
appointed Morgan his Vice Ad-
miral and the expedition was
successful in capturing the island
of Providence or Santa Catalina.
The old pirate, Mansfield, was
killed .by the Spaniards shortly
afterwards, however, and Morgan
became the Admiral of the
buccaneers,

Governor’s Commission

Two years later, in 1668, Mor-
gan was actually commissioned
by Sir Thomas Modyford, Govern-
or of Jamaica, to capture some
Spanish prisoners in order to
question them about a threatened
attack on that island. Collecting
ten ships and 500 men he landed
in Cuba and marched to Puerto
Principe, which he took and pil-
laged; and afterwards accom-
plished the almost impossible feat
of taking by storm the fortified
and well garrisoned town of Porto
Bello on the mainland.

Esquemeling gives a_ graphic
description of the taking of Porto
Bello. The pirates approached the
city by night, he says, and cap-
tured a guard, who they com-
manded to tell the soldiers within
the walls to surrender or they
would be cut to pieces. The sol-
diers began firing, however, and
aroused the city. After a sharp
fight Morgan and his men cap-
tured that fort and after blowing
it up, continued to advance into
the city. The battle was furious
and raged for many hours

The Governor retired to one of
the Castles. Morgan realised that
if he was going to win the day
he would have to take the castles,
where the chief citizens had taken
refuge, taking their plate and
jewels with them. “To this effect,”
says Esquemeling, “he ordered ten

or twelve ladders to
all haste, so broad that three or
four men at once might ascend
them; this being finished, he com-
manded all the religious men and
women, whom he had taken pris-
oners, to fix them against the walls
of the castle.” Morgan thought
that the Governor would not fire
on the monks and nuns, but he
did, and it was only after a great
many of them had been kiiled
that the ladders were placed
against the walls. Then “the pi-
rates mounted them in great num-
bers, and with not less valour,
having fire-balls in their hands,
and earthern pots full of powder;
all which things being now at the
top of the walls, they kindled
and cast in among the Spaniards.”
The fight did not last much longer,
Soon the Spaniards surrendered—

be made in

oxcer the Governor who died had taken Porto Bello, and keep

ighting. them for a twelvemonth; after

which time he promised to come

As Usual to Panama and fetch them away’.”’

The battle won, “the pirates Although these exploits shad

fell to eating and drinking, as considerably exceeded the terms of

usual; that is, committing in both Morgan’s commission and _ had

all manner of debauchery and been accompanied by frightful
x ere = Tis S





Samuel Jackman Prescod,
coloured man, who was entirely

self taught, and who had been a

q dominant

; party. His services as
« mediator and harmoniser be-
tween the two races were invalu-

cabinet maker, was one of the ®ble, although detested or viewed

with suspicion by neerly all

Nerina planters, he was supported by

sacked Maracaibo and then Gib- Aureied 7 a r Ret tens

citizens, In the meantime the ralter, rewurning to Jamaica WN} Hossessed mk ee ia nee
governor of Panama was advane- Much oot, to be reproved is gok oy -more liberal ‘alee
ing towards Porto Bello with an ot punished by Modytord for his| Slavery had been abolished but
army. Instead of. leaving, how- Piracy. The Spaniards on their) five years previously, and Prescod
ever, the pirates went out and side were adopting the samme; carried on in the House the work
ambushed the army killing a great tatics, so Morgan was given aj of parliamentary reform from
many men. The Governor then new commission as Commander=| where Sir John Gay Alleyne,
decided to let them remain there in-chief of all the ships of war} Bart., had left it, and tried to

to collect their ransom, and being
astonished that so small a band of
men could have captured Porto
Bello he sent a message to Mor-
gan” desiring some small pattern
of those arms wherewith he had
taken with such vigour so great a
city. Captain Morgan received
this messenger very kindly and
with great civility; and gave him
a pistol and a few small bullets,
to carry back to the president his
master; telling him, withal. ‘he
desired him to accept that slender
pattern of the arms wherewith he



CAPTAIN
excess; these two vices being
followed by many insolent actions
of rape and adultery...Thus they
gave themselves up to all sorts
of debauchery that fifty courage-
ous men might easily have re-
taken the city, and killed the
pirates,”

After spending fifteen days in
Porty Bello the pirates began to
make preparations for their de-
parture. But before they would
leave they demanded a ransom
of 100,000 pieces of eight from the

MORGAN

cruelties and excesses, Governor
Modyford endeavoured to cover
the whole under the necessity of
allowing the English a free hand
to attack the Spaniards when-
ever possible.

Another Expedition

On his return to Jamaica Mor-

gan was almost immediately
entrusted with another expedi-
tion against the Spaniards and

proceeded to ravage the coasts of
Cuba. In the next year, 1669 he



OOD OOPS E POFFO FPSSD OPES EE LLLP PD z
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% Due solely to the fact that the approach of Stock- %
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x ONLY 10 OF EACH WILL BE SOLD AT g
& THESE SPECIAL QUOTATIONS

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g THE ABOVE MENTIONED PRICES ARE FOR

& SPOT CASH SALES ONLY.

As secon as the

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usual Prices.

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Leen disposed of the remainder of our
stock will immediately revert to the



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LOOP POPOPO SPOS CLL PPP PPP PALES

specified quantities have

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in Jamaica, to levy war against
the Spaniards, the booty gained
on the expedition to be the only
pay.

Accordingly, atier ravaging the
coasts of Cuba and capturing
Santa Catalina, Morgan deter-
mined to take Panama. This he
did after overcoming perils and
obstacles of all kinds and defeat-
ing a force much larger than his
own, The fame of this brilliant
exploit was, however, again ob-
scured by abominab’e scenes of

cruelty and debauchery, during
which a_ galleon containing a
considerable part of the booty

escaped. Moreover, Morgan cheat-
ed a party of his men that he had

revise the powers of the House of
Assembly so as to bring them in
harmony with the altered state of
society. He was instrumental in
the auditing of the _ public
accounts by an independent audi-
tor, and the introduction of the
annual estimates of revenue and
expenditure, He claimed that
appropriation of the public money
should lie in the House and its
administration in the Executive,
“where it properly belongs,” and
j advecated the formation of what
is not the Public Works Depart-
ment, The great constiutional
reforms of the last century can
be traded to him, for he was
responsible for the ceration of the
post of Auditor General, the for-
mation of the Executive Commit-

left further down the river of | tee, and the Franchise Act of 1884
their share of the spoil, and “For one thing,” one historian
returned to Jamaica, leaving} writes, “he thought it distinctly
them to get back as best they | retrograde for a colony which had
could, igenjoyed the privilege of self-
government for so long to be

On his return he received the, politically d@israted: for another.
tcranks of the Governor and the he entirely depreciated the idea
Council, but in the meantime a]of throwing upon the Crown the
treaty had been signed between | whole duty of thinking anu. act-
England and Spain and Mody-~ | ing for the emancipated classes as
ford and Morgan were ordered { though they were unworthy of the
back to England to answer for political freedom which is the

their conduct.

“Sir Henry”

Morgan, however, soon succeed-
ed in gaining the King’s favour,
and in the Autumn of 1674 he
was appointed lieutenant govern-
or of Jamaica and was knighted,

leaving England in Decernber.
After such a career as he had
had it was not. surprising that

Morygan’s conduct as asresponsib e
oMciai was not very creditable,
He was charged by the Governor,
Lord Vaughan, soon after his
appointment with encouraging
privateering. He intrigued against
his colleagues and_ successive
governors of Jamaica in the hope
of superseding them; and sup-
ported the outrageous conduct of
his brother Captain Charles Mor-
gan, a terrible ruffian and his
kinsman Col, Byndlos, taking
part in their
orgies,

Finally, in 1683, he was suspen-
ded in Jamaica from all his posts:
a decision which was confirmed
by the Government in England
after hearing Morgan’s defence;
but he was restored to his place
on the Council in July 1688, »
month before his death,

Morgan’s career is perhaps the
best example of the English
ability to compromise. “If
cannot beat a rouge, flatter him,
henour him and get him to fight

on your side” is a policy whici
the English have followed from
that day to this, and with re-
markable success, both in the

West Indies and elsewhere.

TOWELS ana
BATH MATS





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DYED COTTON TOWELS

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BEACH TOWELS

WHITE TURKISH BATH



proud boast of Anglo-Saxondom.
To him, the highest citizenship
war based on a sense of respon-
sibility, and it was simply wrong
and foolish for any state to limit
the number of its citizens or
cramp their opportunities for
responsible civic effort.’(1)

It was natural that Preseod did
excite antagonism in certain quar-
ters of the community, especially
as the planter element was. still
of the opinion that it had been
unjustly treated by being deprived
of so much of their capital
Slaves—and had only received
small recompense from the hands
of the British Government, But
for all this it must be admitted
that Prescod had some strong and
staunch parliamentary allies. The
Attorney General, Hon. John
Sealy, Messrs, B, L. Trimmingham,
Bryan T. Young, Nathaniel Forte,
and James Holligan were very
open in their co-operation with
him. There is a striking proof of
the high respect which the House
and the Community held for
Samuel Jackman Prescod is shown
by the voluntary and Unanimous
vote of censure which the House
of Assembly passed on Dr. Bas-
com, Senior Member for St.
Thomas and a very senior Meinbér
at that, for using unparliamentary
language to Mr. Prescod.

The history of the British West|
Indies is closely linked with the,
history of Great Britain, for it is
from this point that all progressive
| or retrogressive movements eman-
| até. The price of sugar has always
| been the controlling factor in the
}economy of the Island of Barba-
;dos, and as the United Kingdom
| was gradually moving towards a
policy of free trade, this meant

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well. established and showing
definite increase in the output of
manufactured sugar; and as the
West Indies enjoying a preferen-
tial system of duty—that the
sugar manufactured by foreign
countries Was subject to a heavier

is



duty than that manufactured in
the British Colonies—were look
ing forward to better condition

However, it was claimed that the
people of the United Kingdom had
become more sugar minded, and
that as the output of the British
colonies could not supply the re-
quired amount, the consumer ir
the United Kingdom had to pay
more for his sugar than was ther
considered necessary, so it wa
proposed to reduce the duty on
foreign sugar from 63/- to 36/-
but the duty on the sugar from the
British Colonies was not to be
reduced, It was claimed that the
sugar from the foreign countries
in which slavery still existed could
even at the preferential duty
63/+ compete with the sugar from
the British Colonies, It was fur
ther claimed that this measure
would afford a direct encourage-
ment to the continuance of slavery
and the extension of the slave-
trade, thus nullifying all their
previous efforts to put an end to
this horrid trade.

(TO BE CONTINUED)

of

1 H. A. Vaughn, Esq., in the Barba
dos Advocate, June Mth, 1930

2. “The Barbadian Diary of Ger
Robert Haynes 1787-1836, Edited
by Everil M. W. Cracknell, 1934



Ships Will Quest
For Tourist ‘Gold’
On Spanish Main
A warship will leave England

next month with her engine-room
sealed, and not a soul on board

The vessel—a river transport |
yas been bought by the Royal
Siam Navy, and will be towed
9,450 miles to Bangkok

She wil! take a famous name
baek across the world-—Chindit. |

The name, which was given to
her before it was known that ‘
would form part of the Siam
navy, will be changed as soon
as she reaches Bangkok

For the tow, which being
undertaken by a Du.” tug. the
Chindit has been « ‘mpletely
changed ‘n appearanc.:

A false steel “nose’ has beet
fitted, and timber les added
above the low river iterline

“Long - burning navigat on
lights haye been fitted into the
ship whieh will only need atten
tion once a_ fortnight,’ said a)
spokesman today of the London
firm, Allied National Corporation, |
Ltd. who have arranged the tow

“The rudders have been locked





and the vessel will be a “de ad”
tow. There will be calls at Gi-
hraltar, Port Seid, Aden and

Singapore.—L.E.S.

er

S.P. + C.A.

Ask you to be considerate
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and water them regularly



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Phenacetin gr. 2
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PAGE TEN

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

SUNDAY,

SEPTEMBER 14, 1952 .



TH 1 hibition at the
eu f “View f Barbados”
t from the view
¢ hy al

«VIEWS OF BARBADO

re t interes
pograpt
y of the scenes depicted
longer familiar owing to
of new buildings

tion of old ones
disappeared from
th ; iging andscape, gone too
;aetons and carts drawn by
costumes of figures
have greatly altered Time has
a sieve which has reject-
he bad and preserved what
t nany of the paint-

r e of hi standard artis-





. even the

one of Car-
of a shir

view 1

he deck
ye 707. It is an unfa-
endering of a well known

he buildings which
» one another and then
arated by roads and trees
rely absent. This has the
of shortening the space be-
n the sea shore and the rising
so that Carlisle Bay ap-
Surrounded by low

scene,
now
are







are



twe
terrain
pears to be
hills
Views Increase
From the mid 19th century on-
vards, view the island are
more numerous: this was to be ex-
pected. Three paintings by W. S
H make one wish that he had
f more of the island. His
Savannah atter the
ef-b831 shows the deso-
use which necessitated
r hive of tents on the
Ss I 4o house homeless sol-
I 1EClard House—now the 4
nnah =@tlut dominates thi
é n & gayer ngood is “Races

of



“REAPING CANES” by 8. W. Poyer.

en the Savannah”; horse drawn

vehicles take the place of grand
tands and are drawn up alongside
ihe rails. Racegoers are better
iressed then than now, men in top
hats and stove-pipe trousers,
lelies rustling in_ taffetas and
bombazines, A mflitary band in
red coats whiles away the wait
between the races and there are
refreshments to be had in a near-

by marquee. Then the scene on
the Savannah changes again to
a match race between “High-

lander” ridden by John Poyer and



Lent by Mrs, A. L, Goddard

“Lady of the Loon” with Major
Macintosh, an officer of the Gar-
rison, in the saddle. “Lady of the
Loon”, however, lacked the speed
of “Highlander” on this June
afternoon of 1847. ‘The back-
ground of this painting showing
the environs of the Savannah is
particularly ee Dy”

To this period also belongs the
work of W. H. Freeman M.D.,
who is represented by two water-
colours One of a Review of
troops in red coats on the Savan-
nah—the original of E. Walker’:



“RACES ON THE SAVANNAH” by W. 8. Hedges.





it a curious fact that long

the : ent universities of

é ambridge had been

- london, the pital

r $ without a universily of

iis ¢ lt is impossible to find

2 abtory expianation, All we

kno isytuat in the distant past
variou proposais create

University in London were made

without -any final success,

In the middle ayes there weic
n Scholastic ies in Lon-
. They were associaied to some



extent but they never ceveloped
ittly become a Single
Phen the sixteenth cen-
a Certain plan was formed,
unlike previous schemes it
h 2 modicum of success, The

xv Of the plan was Sir Thoma:



Gresham, When he died he be-
uevthed the rents of the Royal
i ige and of his town feési-
, Gresham House, to the
( Opt of London and thé
‘ Company. ‘They were

ippeint lecturers in
tronomy, geometry,
icine and rhetoric.’
ham College came
Unfortunately the
troyed the Roya!
» the college lost th













rt ef its income. There
resham College in the City
{ London today, ‘the only sur-
: link with Sir Thomas
m yhle plan.’
t until 1627 that
rt i iceessfully made
as d o tl oris of the
thomas Cam s, Two years
p iy tie had advocated in u
6 Tie ; the founde-
t reat udiversity 14
de t ppeal met with a
yesponse £160,000 "wat
an e foundation stone
y ] ¢ in Gower Streei
tel T uildit is no
: ty Coilege, the
f the famous educations!
to form part of Lond
A few years later a
t nst ion called
C ce was Opened on a
: in the $ nd. In 1836 a char-
r ‘ granted by William IV ana
“ renewed a year later by
Gq nv . creating the uni-
. Gegree-~giving bod
Ine dentally; the university was
t first academic hody in the
United Kingdom to edmit women
{ eandidates for degrees. P
early As 1867 a special examin:-





t O88 phe PPE EESPIEREFSOS 2
* >
0» Y 7 T s
* SBA vinw Guest 3
% ] »
$ HOUSE :
4 ¥
$ HASTINGS, BARBADOS x
‘. Daily and Longterm Rates 4
. quoted cn request. x
s Permanent Guests 4
> welecome, £ ‘
. Dinner and Cocktail ‘
* Parties arranged. ‘
g J. U, BUCKLAND .
\ Proprietor
y 4,

SLRS A LAI SEELELSOLSEOO.



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an en ace



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JOHNSON'S
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tion was held for female candi-
dates, and eleven years later men
and women could compete for
degrees, honours, and prizes on
qual terms, So at a time when
ve are apt to think that women’s
r.etivities were confined to their
1omes some were already emerg-
ing into public life.

We should remember that un-
ilke Oxford and Cambridge the
University of London is a feder-
ation of educational bodies, each
working independently, yet under
the one main authority which is
the university itself. In this out-
Jine of the subject it is impossible
to give in detail the names and
activities of all these ‘bodies’ or
‘schools’—there are thirty-six in
all, They include twelve medical
schools or colleges, and such well-
known places of learning as Uni-
versity and King’s Colleges, Hall-
oway and Bedford Colleges for
women, Imperial College, and the
London School of Economics.

The supreme governing body of
the university is the Senate, con-
sisting of the Chancellor, Vice-
Chancellor, the Chairman of Con-
yvocation, the Principal and others;
and Senate House, which is the
central office for administration
and finance, is one of the most
significant modern buildings to be
seen in London. It stands in
Russell Square, an immense struc-
ture of Portland stone, designed
by the architect Charles Holden.

The full-time students working
the university naturally ‘form a
iting population, but the aver-~
age number for any given year
is well over 18,000. Of these, be-
tween 2,000 and 3,000 students
come from Commonwealth and
foreign countries and represent
as many as seventy countries
outside Britain: in other words a
‘world-coverage,’





Among all the countries repre-
sented the greater numbers at
the present time come from India
and Pakistan, from America (in

most cases to the London School

from Burma
Canada, and New

of Economics),
Australia,

EEE

|





Lent by Hon, J. D. Chandler

THE UNIVERSITY OF LONDON

79

lithograph. It is artistically a
very satisfying picture for the
grouping is beautifully arranged.
Also by Dr. Freeman is a view of
Welchman’s Hall Gully, which
reminds us how tropical this
island must once have looked

Unknown

Little or nothing is known of
some of the artists responsible for
views of the island—many were
probably tourists with more leis-
ure than, those who travel today
on luxury cruises or by air lines
These early tourists painted the
picturesque and tropical scenes to
show their friends at home, for
this was before the popularity of
the Kodak. One of the “Country-
side near Joe’s River” by J. B.
Kidd, painted in 1842, is not only
fresh in colour but remarkably
modern, for tme scene has changed
little since that date, “Washer-



*women—Beccles Spring is a scene

unfamiliar to us. When nearly a
century ago W. Carpenter paint-
ed this picture it was a scene of
busy activity. Beccles Spring rose
ta the surface between “Bay Man-
sion” and “Bay Cottage” and ran
down to the sea between the sites
of the Ice Factory and Gas Com-
pany. where a benevolent Public
Works Department has recently
opened a window. The spring has
disappeared and so have the pic-
turesque garbs of washerwomen
Here we see them in gay ban-
danas, their skirts hitched up
neurly to the knee so that these
garments began in an enormous
roll around the waist like an in-
flated motor tyre. This garb has
not long disappeared for we catch
a glimpse of it again in S. W.
Poyver’s charming painting of
“Washerwomen at the Hole.” It
is much to be regretted that this
beautiful, gay and _ distinctive
head-tie has been replaced by
British or American hats of cheap

taste.
S. W. Poyer

Of the more modern painters
by far the best represented is
S. W. Poyer. His contemporaries
Ernest Bowen and Felix Haynes
were not so given to painting the
local scene for both essayed the
field of portraiture which finds no
place in this exhibition. Poyer
was an Impressionist, and in many
of his pictures he has employed
the pointillist technique of apply-
ing small dabs of colour. This
mode of painting is particularly
successful in his large canvas of
“Coconut Palms” and “Reaping
Canes”, of the latter picture there
is also an interesting water colour
sketch. Poyer had, evidently, a
great love for the waving fronds
of the coconut, which he often de-
picts sometimes with the delicacy
of a Chinese scroll-painting. His
‘View from the Pine Hill” is
painted before the advent of Belle





Unlike Oxford and Cam-
bridge the University of
London is a_ federation of

educational bodies, but to the
floating population of 18,000

full-time students from home
and overseas who attend its
various ‘schools’ it is one of
the most stimulating places in
the world.

By JAMES LANGHAM



Zealand. All academic subjects
are covered, the standard for
English being a high one, but

many students from abroad ap-
pear to have a special wish to
learn political science, economics,
medicine, and engineering of al}
cinds.

The average age ol tnese youns,
men and women on arrival from
verseas is twenty or twenty-one,
In general terms they, like all
students, must have passed an en-
trance examination of matricula-
tion standard, The average length
of the course is three years, but in
some subjects a longer course is
needed—particularly in medicine,
which takes six years.

The normal method of appliga-
tion to attend a school of the
university is through the Colonial
Office or Foreign Office and the
Minister of Education of the coun-
try concerned. But this does not

always occur in practice, a fact| University

which brings one to some
problems that must be met net
enly by the students themselves,
but by those responsible for them
in this country.

At
student will arrive in London én-
tirely on his own initiative, com-
pletely ignorant of what is re-
quired of him—and almost penni-

‘SS.

There was a recent case, by no
means rare, of a young African
from the West Coast who stowed
away in a fruit-boat, eventu®]ly
arrived in London, entered the

offices of the university’s Adviser |

to Overseas Students, and said: “}
have ambition,’



—

He also had ten!



shillings only in his pocket. What
was to be done with him?

This is a frequent problem for
hard-working and _ conscientious
cfficials, and helpers of ‘stray’ ar-
rivals in London, It cannot be too
strongly emphasised that no stu-
cent should come from overseas
unless he has been guaranteed a
place in the university, and has
adequate funds for his support
during his degree course.

Many legitimate students bring
with them only just enough money
for the period of their residence
in Britain: adequate, perhaps, it
their academic career runs smooth-
ly, but a reason for hardship and
embarrassment if they should tail
in examination and cause a delay
in the time factor. For this reason
many of them seek for and a few
cbtain evening employment aftcr
their day’s work, and so eke. cut
the small weekly allowance.

But in spite of difficulties the
of London can con-

its policy, Thé
majority of students from abroad
have the courtge t face th

“WASHERWOMEN -~ BECCLES

Lent
.
Ville, and is a panoramic view of
the town heightened by a brilliant

sunset. “Mending a Net” reveals
Poyer’s ability as a portrait
painter.

Sir Eyare Hutson’s prospect of
“Codrington College” shows the
efficiency of the Victorian ama-
teur, as does also the painting of
Hastings House by an unknown
hand.

Ernest Bowen’s work lacks the
virility of Poyer’s, true many of
his scenes are little more than
sketches, and it is in his seascapes
that we must look for his finest
vork in capturing the movement
and colour of both sea and sky
Felix Haynes is represented by
only One work “Cotton Pickers” a
strong painting of a scene which
has now disappeared.

A beautiful water colour of a
“Flamboyant at Bishop’s Court”



“CODRINGTON COLLEGE” by Sir Eyare Hutson

various problems of living and
working in foreign. land, The
majority are interested and happy,
acquiring useful ideas and know-
ledge about our world, and making
frieridship that last. And many
have astonishing records of suctess
during the period they have de-
voted to learning. There is for
instance, the true story of the
Sikh from Dar Es Salaam, who
after twenty years as a clerk tried
for and won a law degree.

a

The problem of loneliness can be
and frequently is lessened by the
action taken by many British
students in London. Often they
will hear of a student from Africa
or India or elsewhere who is due





SPRING” by W. Carpenter, 1859.
by Hon. & Mrs, J.D. Chandler

by Maude A. Law makes one wish
that this artist had concestrated
more on the local scene. She
treats her subject broadly and on
a grand scale which is seldom
found among watercolour artists
today. Smaller paintings reveal
that Miss Law was also capable
of compréssing a e without
loss of colour, her “Pertect Day”
a beautfiully balanced compo-
sition.

A remarkably magnificent
patchwork quilt of about 1860 has |
been loaned for this exhibition by
Mr. Jack Warmington, and it is
not out of place amid suth str- |
roundings. It is unique not only
in the materials used but the skill
in which strips have been em-
ployed to obtain delicately shaded
contrasts.

The exhibition
September.

is

ends on 26th

Lent by Harold Connell, Esq.

founded by, the university i elf
when a suitable London site has
been chosen. Within its walls,
young men and women of all
nations will be able to meet and
spend their leisure hours as they
do to-day, om a smaller scale, in
Student Movement House.

But the main impression left
upon any observer who goes a
little way off the beaten track to
look at another side of life is
that the University of London,
although by mo means the oldest
of our universities, is one: of the
most stimulating in the world.

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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER

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14, 1952



THE QUEEN AN.

HER CONSORT (| The Sun Does Not Shine Brightly

HE IS NO MERE PUPPET—AND NEVER COULD BE) «

(By ROGER FULFORD)

Historian and authority on Court affairs.

» “YOU will be
making a great ,
sacrifice”. These

were the words
used by a fam-
ous jueen «sof
England, shortly
before her mar-
riage, to her hus-
and.

She meant that
it was a sacrifice
because no man
likes: to depend

his wife for
his career.

Even >in these
enlightened days,
husbands have
been heard to
grumble if they
are left to mind
tHe baby or wal-
low’ in the sink
so that the wife
can shine in her
profession.

This | will not,
of course, be the
fate ‘of Prince
Philip, but it is
right to empha-
sise that his life’s
work is that of
an auxiliary to
his wife. How-
ever much he
wy, be the con-
trolling partner
in the private,
domestic circle of
the Queen, his
authority is sub-
ordinated to hers
the moment they
pass into public.

ine Queen will



fact by showering their husbands
with honours and dignities — by
elevating them to the title of
King or Prince Consort.

I hope the Queen will crown
her husband with no such misty
halo. In such matters simplicity
is-always best, and true distinc-
tion is surely to be found in the
unadorned title of The Prince or
The Duke.

Both the Queen and the Duke
of Edinburgh have been com-
: pared ad nauseam with Queen
ey Victoria and Prince Albert. But
ie when precedents of what Queen
Victoria said or what Prince
Albert did are paraded before
the Queen and Prince Philip,
they might well say: “1852 is not
1952.” No nation can live on
centenaries and historical paral-
lela.

But one thing about Prince
Albert may be recalled. He laid
down three rules which should
t govern the life of the consort of

a queen: “Aim at no power for
« yourself. Assume no_ separate
responsibility. Sink your own
individual existence in t! of
your wife.”



at



naturally, feel

that this is PRINCE PHILIP, DUKE OF EDINBURGH
wrong and in-
congruous, and this is why
female sovereigns in the past have
sought.to hide this unpleasant

suffered hardships not dissimilar
frcm those endured by hapless
thousands of Europeans during the
last terrible decades.
Their Work

This gives him the opportunity

possibly by occasional informa]
visits with the Queen—to keep
the British Monarchy more in
touch with Continental feeling
than has been possible during
recent years,

That Prince Philip has a mind
to do and see things his own way

is shown by the trouble he took '

over his speech to
Association last year.

the British
He worried

out his own speech, working on |
on the |

it in moments of leisure
Magpie, and at one stage his cabin

was knee-deep in books and manu- |

scripts, |
The political and ceremonial |
side of the Monarchy must be

largaly faced by the Queen alone, |

but in the larger business of re-
presenting this country and the
Commonwealth the task before
the Prince is of first importance.

His job is not (and with his
characttr never could be) to act
as a mere puppet of the Queen.
Without descending into the lush
pastures wf flattery, the British

people can congratulate them-
selves On having so near the

throne a man of action who is in

3 ust In Passing os

THE Medical Superintendent
waiting a few minutes.
voiced Matron offered me a chair
and I sat down in an office where
the atmosphere was not obviously
—but subtly — connected with
patients and sickness and wards.
Typewriters clicked and a_ tele-
phone rang softly, while far away
down a corridor a white coated
nurse ghosted by. From a nearby
window I looked down into a long
room where people were lying on
beds. There were many s—
and people.

Outside the sun shone brightly
but only filtered rays of it came
into the room where I waited for
permission to talk to one or two
of the inmates of this gaunt, grey
building—where the work of heal-
ing goes on endlessly day and
night.

Yes, the superintendent thought
maybe this man in ward three
might have something to say, And
this one, Then wasn’t there a
Miss Marshall in ward nine? The
nurse attendant said there was
and that she would take me
through the Hospital. So I col-
lected my official pass and passed
from the company of the adminis-
trative personnel to that of re-
cumbent patients lining the walls
in rows, their pajama clad figures
striking bizarre colour accents
against the ward’s all-white.

We stopped at one of the beds
and spoke to Clifford Sergeant.
His heavily plastered leg was en-
sased in a metal support, holding
it high off the bed.



SUNDAY

By William Forres Stewart

I said that was good

“Well,” he said, “I've a few vis-
iters who come
very often, though.
But I can't do much of that be-
cause of my eyes
two y'know!”

to see me

I asked Sergeant what

“Davs at sea, mostly

behind by
*know.”

“Aye, these were the days,” and
the old eyes lit up. “I was a cook
and waiter ashore, too for a while
Then back to sea with the Booth
Line — New York, Brazil, West
Indies. But the war stopped it in
1914 and I didn’t go to sea again
Aye, these were the days!”

I rose and said I was glad to
know him and to hear it wouldn’t
be long before he would be allow-
ef home,
aniff of the sea again and hear
the voice of it—speaking to Clif-
ford Sergeant, R.N.

when he could get

Gladstone Leacock was

white head bowed.

he said from time to time but

“Hello there!” I said, “I’ve come
to talk to you for a little while,
d’you mind?” I sat down and we
looked at each other.

“No, reckon’s I don't,” he re-
plied slowly.

I asked him how long he had
been in hospital and he told me
twelve weeks. “I'll be glad to be
out—the doctor says I’m doing
fine and I'll be out soon.”



WHAT are the thoughts

of the
Coronation Day? An extract
from the 1911 diary of King
George V,in a book published
today, giges an answer which
is a part of history—and,
possibly, an insight into the
mind of Queen Elizabeth on
her Coronation Day next year.

‘MAY AND |
LEFT B.P.
AT 10.30...





haven't much heart
this
fact, it isn’t for you at
I’m writing this.
stone Leacock who, in
or so years, hasn't seen his name
in print, I guess.

Sovereign on It

Darling Ma

We

On

Worked all the

interview in dialogue

It’s for

You'll remember, Gladstone, we
sort of figured things out together
and you told me what was on your
mind and how you'd like to do



most beautiful, but it
terrible ordeal

was grand, yet simple and
most dignified and went with-
out a hitch. I nearly broke
down when dear David [now
Duke of Windsor} came to do
homage to me, as {it reminded
me so much when I did the
same thing to beloved Papa, he
did it so well.
looked lovely, and
it was indeed a comfort to me
to have her by my side, as she
has been ever to me during
these last 18 years

On the balcony

left Westminster Abbey at

2.15 (having arrived there

before 11) with our crowns on

and sceptres in our hands
reaching B.P. just before

3, May and I went out on

the balcony to_show ourselves

to the people. Had some lunch

with our guests here.

afternoon with
Bigge (his private secretary,
later Lord Stamfordham) and
others answering telegrams and
letters.

Our guests dined with us at 8.20
May and I showed _ ourselves
again to the people. Wrote and
read. Rather tired. Bed at
11.45.

was a







What
as engaged and‘ would I mind @o you do during the day,” I ask-
The quiet ed him

Not
And I read

I'm seventy-

he
thought about, just lying there in
his bed.
when I was Clifford Sergeant R.N.
That was in 1907 when I was Cap-
tain’s cook aboard H.M'S. Scylla
I have R.N. name
He looked at me and |
said that was okay and 1 would
cemember to write it that
Clifford Sergeant, R.N.

way,

quite
close in the same ward, sitting on
the edge of his bed, his prema-
turely
looked at me out of sad eyes and
we just sat together for a while
and said very little.

He

I heard what

to give you
In
all that
Glad-
his forty

ADVOCATE PAGE ELEVEN







ae

tor STUBBORN hang-on Bronchial

COUGHS
COLDS

The W ay To
Make Dollars

off the



Southampton with
ymething for yourself — some- | message for all Britain
ir earn a penny? Well now, The man: 47-year-old Arch R
the way I look at it is you've real- | Martin, who threw up an execu
done something. You've got | tive job with a British motor

your name in the papers and not} last January to go to America







everyone gets as far as that—even | his own expense as a free-lance
if they’ve got two legs, And al-|calesman of British good
though sometimes you don’t feel The message: “Unie we
so good, like when I saw you. and } jcsh get org ed in Ar
you think back on all the times] a selling force we are on y
you've been in and out and in| way out.” THERE S$ NOTHING
again over the past two near-hos- Tough words, Mr Martin
pitalized years, I think you're | but words he feels he can justify |
pretty wonderful and don't let | from his own experience of thest CURES AS SWIFTLY
anyone tell you different. And I] jest eight months.
hope you remember to read this When he went to New Yor
the way you told me you would. | he took some kits to make mode! AS
cabin cruisers, but toyshop:
“I'm just longing co get home] ridiculed the gear American | CANADA'S LARGEST
again to Black Rock” was the} boys, it seems, like the sand
greeting I got from Miss owe papering and sawing done for SEI j ING COUGH
Marshall, a nine weeks patient. | them in a factory.
“My sight is none too good—I’m At last, in the room Martin AND COLD REMEDY
sixty-six you know—but it'll get] rented for a dollar day ir
better as I grow stronger. I’m a} Greenwick Village, he sat dow
seamstress and dressmaker by | and assembled one of these toy 7
trade.” cruiser himself and took
round to the buyer of once oO
I asked if she had many visi- |New York’s largest toy tores
tors Yes, a few that come “Too crude,’ said the buyer
regularly but I'd like to see my Martin added a pin nd-
siste igain. She's in the States,| thread rail, a radio aerial, anc
in Ohio, and we haven't seen each, tiny lifebelt costing only 85} M X
other for over forty years, I get) cents. | | TURE
a letter usually at Christmas. oh Ranisthe Se biieids all: ides
“It’s my weight that’s holding This week Martin goc North
me back. If I could just put on ui Glasgow to discu hes¢
weight I'd soon be home again.” small alerations with the mak-
‘ : ers, who are delighted with his
“Well, you're a young looking success He will also tell then
sixty,” I said to Miss Marshall} |, “americanise” the directions








(and she is). I picked up a book) ;5. making these toys.
lying on the bed. “This has an ' Sempie . They should write | rN I L ad O if I A) a
interesting title, ‘A Very Present) «sy it? instead of “glue it” anc Pm «.
Help’.” use snappier phrasing such Ae
“Yes, it's quite a comfort and ecu nee Sarath warntanne | ~
very well written.” I looked at} , ee ee Sorin
- ion Glue part marked No, |
the author's name, Lieut-General to the underside of No: 3. mat
Sir Wm. Dobbie, D.S.O. It was ing sure tnat tre glue tacky
apparent from the closely printed | the jam-buying habits af the
text that Miss May Marshall liked | }.4. cewife jn ‘the he ip yourself
reading matter that contained) gore, came under Mr, Martin’
body. serutin His advice: Make yout
“Anyway,” she said, “if you're | ee Pow a ate. it cab
putting anything in the paper I brand of marmalade: 5,000 cases IN THE AMAZING BOTTLE ,
hope I'll be home to read ite! op i, dozen jars each from
Mind you, we get the Advocate Washington firms; and 10,000
here but—I’d rather be home! cases from New York—but only You'll be amazed by the convenience of
A . if the quiet English labe! is al the “Spillprut’ bottle and thrilled by the
“Well it wouldn't surprise me | tered. beauty of this new nail polish! No need to
if you are,” 1 looked at her wiry The shopkeepers’ comment worry abour spilling! A revolutionary new
frame and half expected her toO| wore caustic “Make tne labe design gives you plenty of time to right
say, ‘In fact, I think PU get along) pore British (not just English the upset bottle before any damage is
right now!’ .. many people dislike the Eng done co your clothing or furnicure
Not quite yet, Miss Marshall, | jjcn), Professional-looking manicures at homet
but very soon, I’m sure, And I Show a Britisn scene the The sensational Nail-Measute” neck
hope this will be your fourth and| Guards marching down the Mall measures Out avfomatically just the right amount
last visit as a hospital patient, Windsor Castle, the Houses of of polis 1e nail perfectly!
Parliament so that people re New CUTEX Nail Polish contains Eng )
I went out into the sun and member it and wussociate it i ther o-wear ingredient ntalog Roaeaie ey
looked back at the gaunt mass of their minds with Britain.” outshines all other polishes! Ask co see the
building reclining in shade, de- You want enother il cason's smartest, fashion-right shades!
ceptively quiet; _ ea point? If only the Queen would
passages and wards embracing) ailow her face and those of her
manifold ailments; its medical} children to be used on British
and nursing staff imparting new | produc IT am sure sales would
health and new hope—and com- | improve Americans almost re
fort, t is well that we remem-| gard them their own, They
ber.... are red-hot n there.’ a







Saas SRS



The present Queen’s father and addition exceptionally alert and | th R d D
grandfather, owing to the two intelligent. " ow e e ean
mee were more cut off from “IT would not have his job,” runs oA. 2M o é

rope than any of our kings fer the old cliché, Possibly not. But
centuries, if the life is exacting, it is also s became a dean

Prince Philip was brought up stimulating A terrib e
as a boy on the Continent, knows WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED ean 7HO first set the Red Dean of
it well and has relations who have —L.ES. Wo Canterbury, Dr. Hewlett



THE CORONATION ROUTE

Johnson, on the road to high
Office in the Church ?
Mr. Ramsay MacDonald
usually been given the responsi-

nas

ordeal’





ility. He was Prime Minister |
By GEORGE SCOTT 1 : és |
TIN ? TPR 9 in 1924 when Dr. Johnson
KNOW ANYONE WITH A WINDOW HERE ? - ING GEORGE V headed after 16 years as a Cheshire
eace vicar — was made Dean of

[EE you want \ the entry in his diary ; Manchester. He was Prime

to pick a ‘Thursday, June 22. Our Minister, too. in 1931 when Dr.
good spot for oO Coronation Day, Bucking- Johnson’ was appointed Dean
watching the XFORD ham Palace.” He wrote :-- of Canterbury.

Coronation
procession on
June 2 next

STREET , Today was indeed a great and
wf memorable day in our lives and

one we can never forget, but it

But the new book about King
George V gives the names o!
others who had « hand in that



















|

year you brought back to me many sad 1924 appointment,
should study memories of nine years ago, Lord Stamfordham, the King’s
this map. when the beloved Parents were private secretary, wrote to Mr.
It shows crowned. MacDonald and to the Arcn-
the routes to May and I left B.P. in the bishop of Canterbury, Dr.
and from Coronation coach at 10.30 with Randall Davidson. giving a list
Buckingham eight cream-coloured _ horses. of possible successors to the
Palace, as There were over 50,000 troops previous dean.

officially
announced
The route
covers about
seven tiles
The proces,
sion rom

lining - eet hones the ‘

command o: r itchener, ‘ i

There were hundreds of Wholly suitable
Lord Stamfordham told the

; archbishop the Prime Minister

would like to suggest Dr. John-
son, “if there were no other
speciai candidate.”
4
'



The archbishop consulted Dr.
William Temple, then Bishop
of Manchester (later Lo become
Archbishop of Canterbury).

“ Both
Temple.”






the archbishop and Dr.
the




VI

> book
Last

Says

Fromm Buckingham Palace







time “thought tne Prime Minister's

in Ps
taking in Vic- From Westminster Abbey <==ss-2==5+ Nonnson: “He always carries a
tort oa ae ‘ i i houghtful people.”
m ent wus In the Abbey—“ ordeal.” _weight with thoug peor 6
oe em ie *King George V, by Harold ue
wreeuares THE SEVEN-MILE ROYAL DRIVE trounnds ot people who gave "ill 2UL0 i Ma Lig At
longer. in offices. in shops, in exclusive clubs — now the | Le 5 ee ia rae aber was London Express Service

rush will be on to book window-space




IT’S TIME
YOU ORDER
THESE :=

| SLUGS and SNAILS

WITH

‘|| METALDEHYDE

METALDEHYDE has a
and SNAILS. Mixed with
table to Slugs in proportions,
and destroys them.

Exercise Books, Drawing Books, Foolscap, Pencils, Pencil Boxes,
Coloured Pencils, Paint Boxes, Ink, Sharpeners, Erasers, Rulers,
Geometry Sets, Slates.

fascination for SLUGS
or other material pala-
from a distance

fatal
bran

it a

Also
applied the
must be

and
strictly

carefully
upplies

METALDEHYDE must be Thermos Flasks and Plastic Tumblers

instructions delivered
enforced.



Obtainable from...

Yee sures ang at norman apt = BARBADOS HARDWARE C0. LTD.
PLANTATIONS LIMITED. ! (THe, HOUSE FOR BARGAINS)



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LEADERSHIP IN LUBRICATION



LET LS AE ak ER a ES,

ee


PAGE TWELVE ~'









| So You Think| Ty: .
i . orewns 0 You Thin .
E. M. FORSTER me this West Indian Culture
o
. , ee It’s Hot? |
y . so sehool mean The first 46 @ sort
(An abri version of the lectu iven by Mr. R. LeFanu ; “ WHAT we ny 4 e ae a 2 = en f West Of personul Pilgrim's Progress, in-
} Ai Coi Mon n Septempbe By IAN GALE India 4 ~ arching for 1s a typica rm 0 es teresting no doubt, to biographei
ndian art; something that expresses our own peculiar and te the literary poets, b
EDWARD MORGAN FORSTER occupies the para-| So you thought it hot last character and temper (so far as we have a peculiar character hardly to enyone else. Now you
doxical position of being a contemporary novelist whose | Wee**. Well se I until 4 read and temper); something that affects West Indians person- couldn’t say this of people like
| 1 : - jthis new u Dateluned : ; B . P By nd Shei ey: u simp
last nevel appeared nearly thirty vears ag it was his} nie Ir at org De : lke this? ‘Ps aity Men aa of art thet they can think of as their very own. couldn't. aicine rr on pens h a:
. 7 eae " 2 ore Amm I g : ike s hs bh > 5 7 2 : ‘ . - i
fifth. ‘A Passage to India’, published in 1924. The remain-| week Jor had. ide sadeee heat Failing to find a typical form of art, we are searching for take notice of them,.even if only
ing four were all published before the World War] wave foi years. Temperatures the old forms, but handled with a different touch. to contradict “what they said
7 S “2 » z i : ’
in the period 1905-1910. This curious state of affairs is| reached 122°F in the sun, and We can’t be angry, with our is extremely interesting. “Henri Christophe” is a better
accentuated by the fact that Forster has continued to|1046 uh Mt hade, One esuit artists because they use palat It is perfectly suited to satire and more mature work than
wiedee Res 3 hu f is esse lect . d broadcast lwas that ar xplosion occurred like all other artists, nor wita and many of the current songs the former one, but the funds-
WEARS SWo VOMIMES OT: Dis CSSayS, TOCIUTes Al POBECASTS, | a consignment of chi.dren’s|OUF Movelists because they Write have a very pungent tinge. While mental short-coming remains. !t
farnered from the last thirty years, cover a wide rang explosive toys which kill ,|in the English language; but we many of them are simply rhyth- doesn’t express a single idea that
of literary and political topics, scholarly, witty, graceful | ang wounded five porters carrys|WOUld like to see our jsfiiers mital tomfoolery, a few of them a West Indian would be willit
and often extremely outspoken. ing them.” In Barbados the|®andle their materials as omiy are shrewd witty and amusing. to fight for or sacrifice himself 10.
But st is fore st Sait cog ighest temperature last weex|#ose who were born and have And of course, they are a very So far, as it has any intellectual
aaa > oF s aan a Ms ive | : 88.5°. Reed —_ islands could hanc’e publie form of criticicm and ridi- significance at all, it is simply a
remarkable 1ovels that ‘orster | : : » . them. e want our novelists to cule r s i f the Mflic
t his ass » a ae 4h | it i iid that the Red Sea, : representation o e tonfl)
out tandiing re er ae jthe warmer part of the yeur | capture the typical flavour that : It anybody manages to ge. which divides us, not only into
F ; |}(June to September) is the ho . | life in these parts has. The sane bimse.f into a calypso he can be islands, but into separate raci
Forster was born on ganuary |test region in the world. Certain- for our poets, playwrights, Scul>- sure that the rest of his lite will communities, and the sometim
Ist, 1879.’ His backgrouad as ly the combination of ‘high tem- tors, and musicians. This, of be prefectly miserable. His popu- maddening hatred that one group |
that of the Liberal cultured lot: | peratuces and humidity recorded at course, means that they must all larity would soon rival that. >! feels for the other
19th Century upper middle cla } is very oppressive. For in- look at things realistically and Bing Crosby. That, no doubt, is “Who are thy founders of our country-
He was educated at Tonbridge |stance the average daily tempera-{|Tecord either what they see or, why the personal songs are why, Dis Whites, a Aner climate
School and at King’s . Coleg ture i a for August is 98 Perhaps, what they sce as a pos- banned, The calypso in the hawi awume |
po ners where he read classin witt umidity of 70, while in|sible future. We want no con- of skilled artists would put the The white divinity of the swan; and all |
i average Cimperas ventional art, For” inetance, % satire of Byron to shame, and 1: "Iie! iorecnus, murderers
tation of the “Fable Schock os 5 = , but the humidity is is assumed by certain people that is certain that this wil. soon be- dispossessed
Sn” lakelloctush”” trace . ee 15, O e other hand the aver-|poets must talk about ‘ovely bhie gin to oecur to people. Already Voy sty Ser, foune af Stile country. “Wh
University formed the first. tern ige temperature in April imn|skies and verdant pastures and there are a few cCUrreNtâ„¢ SOULS pontatdhdods whos existence they 4
of a series of antitheses whic Bangkok 97 ith a humidity babbling brooks and breezes sing- which *¢an™ be said to approach denied” ete. f
were to be the ‘Leitmotiv’ of p of 62 ing through the leaves: Tha! this type, but they are so genera! a it is a mon -
early novels. For Cambridge gave As far a erage anual tem- {novelists must make use of onerot that they Jose their effect. “The ment of akespearean pessim-
Forster a shining vision ern ait peratures are concerne Mus-|the six or eight customary !9ve Dollarsand the Pound” is a goocl ism and intellectual barrenness |
in contrast to the chaos, pretence }sawa in the south of the Africa. plots; and that artists of al! softs example. “My Landlady” is an one epee: elendhes
and dreary muddle of most of life |side of the Red Sea is shown by \must not vary the slightest from even better one The careles*, ally anc z 4 i
outside. “Cambridge” — as lates instrumental records to — be i- | the conventional] romantic norm. unscrupulous, rioney-grobbliny The only philosophical conclus-
ate a, ee = vanes ally ‘the hottest place in * the |Clearly, however, we ene PE- jandlady who has no concern for en to Ms eis oe an.
S$ Symbo! for a truth and a way orld, The average annual tem-/duce art that is quite differéit her tenant provided that she 44 rd over anc r ain.
of life, almost, we might say, a |perature of Massawa 86 f thi r else we won't find ’ eekly rent, 2-1 This world Pr ike a *-ar-drop poised
State of grace. His early stories Mr. E. M. FORSTLR aries ao wis re si i meee Fath en! < "gaan ; He Ba dasa ee = In the evelid of eternity, then droppin:
reflect the aesthetic classicism of . a Say : a: Vine Cel Ae Apts chghmcoplagrs eee ae ' —
the period: most of them are set It was followed in the next year |! â„¢idsummer, Greenland Ran The West Indian And because she knows that houses He is, however, hitting a nail |
in Modern Greece but fauns and bY ‘A Room with a View’, a gay)!” Death Valley, California, ha: His Calypso are hard to get, is hardly an ex- on. its, head wine a he exclaims :
dryads make frequent appear- ad brilliant comedy. The scene|* July average temperature of Mogt noticeable’ among typic: aggeration, In British Guiana, of their lives ee
ances. This awareness of the /§ again in Italy, this time in Flor-| 1s , ind a recorded extreme ©! |wegt Indian form of art is the for instance, housing conditiows Clay gods. and in a dusty room |
a * . where ( “ve . 1 ‘ ie . “ Db syyi- Half-broken faiths that falsify
supernatural foreshadows ence where Lucy Honeychurch| !Â¥% : calypso. It really came origit- are so terrible that the govera- 1 Ae et a sites i
strongly ‘mystical element of his and hei dismal companion iy The Meteorological Office in |ajly from Trinidad, but we can ment has to intervene to protect eee co m yi i
ll work, ae people and cones ee ES oath gal cee a = Ag pee a. ‘0 \think of it as characteristic of the eae! ~— being wove But I am almost contain a>
n e liable to assume a sym- es ki Ss trom @ young man) cxamination of ship's weatht; |the West Indies as a whole, for out of his ging more ofte™ himself doesn’t believe this
bolic guy transcending their pees Cones Emerson and Bis okt | observations that the highest aii lal the other islands have adopted than he can bear, or from haying which points up to the fact the!
a a her his peor witht a wiew’ ap temperature recorded on ship |jt with a deep and personal love. the stairs or the roof of his house many artists mistrust their own
basic themes af his Savgiet® Re tects her in a brawl ana finally | Unde? Wey was 100° in the Rel |They are composed and sung in removed to convince him thut jnspiration because it tells them}
s emes: oe Ss: | checaiboa Mah withrie kien *|Sea. Incidentally, the highest |pritish Guiana, Dominica, St. he had better come out as quickly things which they were taught
truth, nature, gaiety and youth, P hte rat ft th ate : ; as ssible. Th ment con-
against unreality, convention. _ The second half of the book|'©mperature of the water surface /Lucia, and St. Vincent, When- AS possible. © als goyeeies the 7eeard as heresy.
pomposity and sham. finds Lucy back at her homein}recorded on a ship in motion was leyer ‘something of importance tol, of course, infuriates the But all this doesn’t help the
: Surrey, The Emersons come by 06 in the Persian Gulf—-water happens, there is certain to be landlords, and we have the trasi~ wect Indian nation. We want
The first novel, ‘Where Angels chance to live in the same village. | D0J!s at 212 F. The lowest tem-|csome comment upon it by the Comical situation of a man UN- ¢hinkers, and above all thinke:
Sear to ieee, wes published in Lucy is aware enough of her feel- a pecances by a ship uo- |ealypsonians, particularly if it is able to throw a ee eur: = o with a taste for politics, not
and is set in Italy for which ings to break her engagement to) der way was 40° below near the | humorous. They spare no one, OWN house, even if he wants }° diterary’ men who write because
Forster had a deep but not un- her fiance. Cecil, an outrageous|Great Horne Reef, Alaska. Verk- | not even a governor, and the sohgs for @ good reason, without givin’ they enjoy tricking up phrase
critical admiration. Here the main intellectual snob, but not enough |hoyansk, Siberia, is the coldest ¥ very many months’ notice and :

conflict is between English respec-
tability and Italian paganism. The
English middie -ciass is represent-
ed by the Herritons of Sawston,
domineering mother, bigoted
daughter Harriet, and the son
Philip, a eynical aesthete
The widowed daughter-in-law,
Leila, always rather unsatisfac-
tory, is touring Italy with a friend
and sends the horrifying news that
she intends to marry an Italien
Philip is dispatched post-haste to
stop the match but arrives too
late and is laughed at for his pains.
The husband, Gino, turns out to
be a cheerful and conventional
young tough: the marriage is not
a success: Leila is miserable and
finally dies in giving birth to a
son. The Herriton females decide
that the child must be brought to
them away from the corrupting
pir ce of its father. Philip,

arriet and Caroline, Leila’s
original companion, all foregather
therefore at Monteriano. Philip
and Caroline are soon converted
by the atmosphere of the place and
by Gino’s unabashed good humour
and obvious devotion to the child
and prepare to abandon their
mission. They reckon, however,
without the half-crazed Harrie!
who kidnaps the child with the
help of the local idiot: the coach
overturns on the way to the sta-
tion and the child is killed, Philip
with a broken arm has to break
the news: Gino, in an outburst of
animal savagery, very nearly kills
him. He is saved by the timely
arrival of Caroline who succeeds
in reconciling the two men. As
Philip and Caroline return to
Sawston, we- learn that Caroline
herself has . fallen in .love. with
Gino,

A synopsis is always unsatisfac-
tory and misleading. I have only
attempted this one because it helps
to bring out certain essential char-
acteristics of Forster’s novels a
strong plot, brilliantly taut con-
struction, a marked interior
rhythm—with passion, sensuality
and violence lurking in the back-
ground. I should add that the
book contains some superbly comics
scenes and shows an absolutely
astonishing maturity.

The next novel, “The Longest
Journey’, appeared two years later
and is perhaps the most personal
of all Forster's works. It is the
story of a sensitive, civilized but
weak young man who makes a
dreary and disastrous marriage,
undergoes a spiritual deterioration
and is finally rescued, only to die
in disillusionment and remorse.

The book is divided into three
parts, Cambridge, Sawston and
Wiltshire. Cambridge is the gar-
den of Eden—from which Rickie
is spiritually expelled when h
married a -werldly-and eommon-
place young woman called Agnes
and is forced to take a job at her
brother’s school at Sawston. Res-
cued by his half-brother and a
friend, he finds a little happiness
before the violent and symbolic
climax. S

This novel is bitter and passion-
ate, often extremely funny—but
the ironic comment cuts very near
the quick and the final effect i:
on the whole a distressing one.

A Long WAY





a

















to admit her love for George

therefore passes into a kind
limbo from which she is only |
awakened by old Mr. Emerson
and the book ends with Lucy and

She
of

George together again in Flor-
ence. i
The happy ending is rare

Forster's work, Here it rey

sents a spiritual victory- -but r-
mally he treats passion with ifi-
dence and mistrust—at th best,

he suggests, it is only onc of the} 70 is the ideal, It is very difficult | cricket:

many wa
establish its kingdom.



Indeed, it is characteristic of
Forster that people who ear his
disapproval are invariably tho
who in some degree despise other
human beings. Harriet, the Pem-
brokes, Cecil, and later the Wil-

coxes and the Anglo-Indians al | would be




















place in the world however, and
while the thermometer registe:
as low as 80° below nearly every
year, the lowest of record there

s 90° Below zero

Extensive tests have been
made to determine the most fav-
ourable temperature for Ameri-
can workers and the results have
shown that a temperature of
68° with a humidity of around

however. For instance, Vienno
in summer would be nearly ideal,

with temperatures varying be-
tween 65° and 70° and humidity

SUNDAY





are frequently banned at carni-
vals for this reason. Some of the
lealypsoes are ~condemned ~ase in-
tdelicete, mostly” by ~the™tmocent
priestly people who still believe
in original sin and who are un-
|speakably shocked when they
|meet somebody who ‘isn’t a puri-
tan. But in spite of the si ly
‘preaching of these moral hum-
bugs the West Indian loves lh
\ealypso as much as he loves his
his carefree style ol

in which Love will} to find these conditions in nature | playing cricket and his carefree

style of composing music are
/both characteristic of “him; and
those who want to rob him of the
only form of art that he can

around 70, but the average tem-|really call his, ought to be killed

nerature for a January night

without any hesitafion, for they

there is 28°. Barcelons in Spring |are among our greatest enemies.

nice too—indeed Bar-

No one can heip noticing thot

have this cardinal vice,..It-is-true | Clon’ and the Azores have" per- ithe type of rhythm found in the

that Forster lays on his colours
darkly, but he is too fine an artist
and too much aware of the exist-
ence of good-and-evil to paint

this particular vice, is, as far’as
he is concerned, to be among the
damned,

It is not easy
any succinctness
novel ‘Howards End’, which ap-
peared in 1910. One may say that
it is about two conflicting ways of
life, the inner and the outer
world, and their reconciliation
that it’s about people and a house |
in the country that it’s about |
self-knowledge and the supremacy
of personal relations. The people
are the Schlegels, two sisters,
Margaret and Helen, who are for
the inner life, and the Wilcoxes,

to describe
Forster's next

with

efficient men of the world: there
are also the Basts, the eternal
underdogs. As bridges between

the two worlds stand Mrs. Wilcox
who really belongs to neither, and
Margaret, who appreciates the
particular Wileox Virtues and mar- |



ries the widowed Henry Wilcox |}
in order to reconcile his way of
life and hers Helen sees in the

Wilcoxes only ‘panic and em) ti-
ness’ and in a fit of anger and pity
at life’s injustices becomes the
mother of Leonard Bast’s child

One is aware of a new emphas
in ‘Howards End’ In his earlier
novels, Forster opposed the pagan
joy of life to cenventional pro-
priety, honesty to muddled mean-
ness, real feeling to pretended feel-
ing. Here the darkness is the
failure to ‘connect’, the refusal to
accept moral responsibilities and
the implications of personal rela-
tionships. ‘Howards End’ is a dif-
ficult book and possibly the great- |
est of all Forster’s novels, It con-
tains some of his finest writii
has an extraordinary beauty of |
texture-and shows the most pro-/
found observation of the mind and
heart. '

There is now a long gap of
fourteen years. Forster spent the
First War in Egypt; he made two
visits to India; one in 1912 and a
second ten years later. At last,
in 1924, he produced his final mas-
terpiece—‘A- Passage to India’.









The scene is laid in Chandra-
pore, a dismal town in British In-

GINGER

BOTTLER’S
(BDOS) LTD.





| great a gulf

| Sympathy

@ On Pace if

dia, The story

tre Marabar caves.

Floods of vio-
jent racial feeling

are unloosed.

At the trial the girl suddenly re-

tracts her accusation. One Eng-

lishman, Fielding, has proclaimed

his belief
cence,

in the doctor's inno-
But even here the prover.

friendship between him and Aziz

is undermined by suspicion and

~ | misunderstandnig, It cannot flour-

ish and when finally they meet
again on the neutral ground of an
indian State, they realise that too
has. been fixed be-
tween them,

Here then is a tragedy of mass
misunderstanding; personal rela-
tionships are not enough, for there

are tog many people and tensions
invol¥ed and there is not enough

love to go round, With more and

more kindness, understanding and ;
| affection, something may perhaps | and austerity,

be saved from the wreckage.

india broods mysteriously over
this book and Forster is fascinated
by its strange elusiveness. ‘A
Passage to India’ is memorable for
an enthvalling narrative, for a
remarkable understanding and
for a strange race and
country and for passages of im-
pressive lyrical beauty. It also
completes his work as a novelist
Henceforth his passionate belief in
liberty and truth and his hatred
of tyranny and sham in any form
are expressed in other ways. We
can only regret there are no more
novels and be grateful for what we
have,

I have tried to give some hint of
the superb craftmanship, the
knowledge and understanding, the
beauty of the style, the special
Forsterian charm, the irony and
the wit, . But there’s more> to. it
than that. Forster is essentially
a philosophical novelist concerned
passionately with life’s meaniny,
with eternal values, with
knowledge of good-and-evil. It is

this preoccupation which gives his |

later
intensity

makes
such a dis-
and mem-

novels, especially the two
ones, their tremendous
and power and = which
the reading of them
turbing, illuminating
orable experience,





revolves around an
) ) > alleged assault by a Mohammedan
exclusively in blacks and whites: jedoctor on an English girl

whom
oll the same, to be tainted wita] be is conducting round the sinis-

the |



Galvanised
- Mesh

West Indies can be found in only
two other areas in the world,
namely Spain and her original
colonies in Latin America. The
samba, rhumba, tango, bolero,
and calypso is completely foreign
to all other people. And it isnt
difficult to see the reason why.
They have all come originally
from Africa. The Moors, who
}long ago overran Spain, left the
|rhythm of their music behind.
And of course they left many
other things too. Their influence
jhas been strong, persistent, and
\indestructible. The gaiety and
|colour, the splendor and light-
|hearted romance that we associ¢~
ted with everything, Latin js
really African in origin. We find
much that can be called Latin in
the West Indies, and here again
the reason is the predomipant
negro influence.

It separates us inevitably from
|conventional Europe with its’ iee
Those parts of the

lcontinent that have the Latin
temper are not typical of Europe
at all. We must go to Ger-
many and Scandinavia if we
| want a true impression. And
what could be more different than
\their folk music and ours? Be-
sides, can we imagine future
West Indian composers writing

like Sibelius or Tchaikovsky or
|Schumann? No: our music will
{be not only more emotional, but
}emotional in a different ways I
| will be more warm-blooded. And
there is nothing more truly char-
acteristic of a people than their
music. ;

We can take Euro-British music
las summing up the influence that

has civilised these parts, and
this has little real connection
with us, except that of ‘the
/southefn-romantic “com and

even that affects us only a@"ittle.
What can be a clearer illustration
that Nordic European culture, is a
perversion of our own tempe:
cather than a fulfilling of it?

The Satire of the Calypso

It can hardly be doubted that
future West Indian composes
will absorb the calypso flavou
into serious music Besides th?
calypso





Wire

Just what you

Poultry





GENERAL FLA RD W ARE sopptics



RICKETT STREET (Opposite !
Au



need for
Keeping

ost Office) PHONE 4912

ADVOCATE





spending all his reserves of
patience in the meanwhile, and

a tenant who, though absolutely Results Of.Pitman’s

honest and virtuous, cannot earn
enough money to buy a house for
himself and leave his landlord
with his own property. And we
can well imagine that th. situa-
tion would be a thousand times
worse if the tenant had to deal,
not with a landlord, but a land-
lady. Determined and unscrupu-
lous women can certainly be a
nuisance. To have one of these
over you, with powers to take
your roof from over your head
or your floor from under your
feet as soon as you displease her,

must be quite unbearable.
“An’ every Monday
Mistah gi’ me mah rent!”

sali Rowek ert a

me e BH. . an rit-
fish Press, I havent yet mentioned
Derek Walcott, I am not at all cer-
tain, however, that Walcott exerts
a major force in shaping the Wes:
Indian nation, He seems to be out
of touch with reality, He may
quite possibly be remembered in
future years as a unique literary
technician; in fact, if his develop-
ment continues at its present rate
he is certain to be. However, ne
will hardly be remembered as 4
major prophet, like Shelley, He
doesn't seem to know what life
actually is; he is too literary, Hse
is, of course, young (like myself)
but this is hardly an excuse for
his academic approach to art
When one thinks of Shelley hirm-

self; the boy who got into trouble Howell), Avelyn | Pilgrim
at school because of his chemical Graham),

experiment and his determination
to know the true nature of the
universe,— the undergraduate who

was called “mad” because he was Joan







and verses,



Typewriting Exam.

THE following candidates were
successful at_ the last Pitman’s
Typewriting Examination held at
Combermere under the supervision



SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1952







need give you no anxtettes

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if you have Ashton & Parsome Infants’ Powders handy.
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If your pody is devitalized xhaust+
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of Mr. C. B. Rock, F.I_P.S.:
ELEMENTARY

First Class

Etheline Elliott, Geraldine
Blenman, Frances Skeete, Blise E.
Jones, Mona Harper, Vashti Lovell,
Elma Grant (Miss M. Linton);

Lilian Norris, Ena _ Richards,
Grace Cumberbatch, G. Roberts,
Patricia Hope (Miss M. Howell);

Muriel Bellamy, Violet Baird
(Mr. L. S, Richards); Gloria F.
Pilgrim, Mary Clarke (Mr, C, F
Rock); Avélyn Pilgrim (?*
Graham), John Ki (Moa. a
High School), Doriel Lovell (Mr.
O. Boyce), Ronald Daniel (Miss
Carol Yearwood), Jean Barrow
(Mrs. R. Barrow), Lucine Burke
(Miss Y. Rollins) and Gwendolyn
Roberts,

Second Class

Marlene Carter (Mr. L_ F,
Nurse), Muriel Murray (Mr. C. B,
Rock), Eudell Blackett (St. John’s

E. I.)
INTERMEDIATE

First Class
Eileen Roach, E,. Weatherhead.
(Miss Linton), Jean Arthur (Miss
M, Inniss), Joan Peterson (Miss
(Mrs
Glendene Harewood
(St. John’s E. 1.)

Second Class
Elizabeth Gay (Mt. Tabor E. I ),
Phillips (Miss Linton),

pleased to think otherwise than Agnella Armstrong (Miss Howell),
the mentally insignificant major- Barbara Alleyne,

ity, and who was “sent down”
from Oxford because he dared to
challenge the ministers to a ration-
al discussion of their religious
views,— the young author of
“Queen Mab”, a poem expressing
judgements on everything in heav-
en and earth (many of them im-
mature, no doubt, but the im-
portant thing is that he capable of
thinking about them),—the young
man who crossed the Irish Chan-
nel to deliver a political harangue
to the people on the other side,
—the revolutionary poet who was
inspired almost solely by things of
the intellect and who was deter-
mined to see political sense in the
world, — when we think of how
intimately concerned the young
Shelley was with real life, it is
impossible to explain away Derek
Walcott’s literariness as the re- .
sult of his youth, ;

No Ideas ‘

No one disputes that he has « her salvaged,



+

Another Attempt At

Salvaging “Potick”

DIVERS will make another at-

tempt at raising the French yaw!
Potick from the sea bed of the
inner basin. During last week,
divers
went down on several occasions
and secured the hull of the vessel
as part of the preparation for the
operation.

wearing oxygen masks

More than two years ago the

Potick sank at the cross berth of
the inner basin after she sprang
a leak some hours earlier. Sub-

sequent attempts at salvaging her
failed. é

While under water, she fell at
1uction to James Murray, a local

dealer in charcoal who then took

»ver the responsibility of having
Divers removed

fine literary gift and a pretty and parts of the yawl from time to
flexible way of handling his verse, time leaving a skeleton hull on
as well as something approaching the sea bed.

dramatic technique, but he is an

The local Harbour and Shipping

“art-for-art’s-sake” man, and the Master told the Advecate that the
West Indies needs prophets. His sunken yawl is a menace in the

two most reputable works, “Epi- i
taph for the young” »
Christophe”, both highly acclaim-





as an art form in itself ed in Britain stamp him as a it,









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Well now, who
would think he

was doing this for the pleasure of it? But it is all part
and parcel of the weekly outing and this vehicle is, in
the owner’s eyes, the absolute last word in horseless

transportation.
Ree

And so it was!



Similarly, today,
there is the owner
who considers himself
fortunate to drive the

best automobile —
dollar for dollar —
highwhy in

on any the
world,
The extraordinary fact is that more and _ more

owner/drivers on Continents and Islands are classified as
Five Star motorists—the reason being their preference
for the entirely new standard introduced in 1952 by
CONSUL and ZEPHYR.

You are invited to test-drive both at - - -

Charles Me Enearney & (o., Ltd.

ee


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1952 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE THR TEEN
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HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON | {sack OUTSMARTS THE GIANT




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to the Late
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BY CHIC YOUNG





~@Po._| AS LONG AS WE HAVE TO
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> TO THEM, ITLL BE MORE
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(Sone AT EACH OTHER

L Sdn | |AND WHATS MORE, ) & BUT DAGWOOO TOOTSIE IS
— MeN I DONT WANT wed MY DEAREST FRIEND --WHY
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TO HIS WIFE < oases

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SE
















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as CALL AT o_









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BESIDES, | PROMISED MAX | WOULDN'T
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OFF WHILE YOU CAN STILL WALK.

ADVOCATE STATIONERY


PAGE FOURTEEN

CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508

FOR SALE





DIED |

SARGEANT — On September 13, Laurie























Parker Sargeant of ae ge His | eee,
funeral will lesve the above address ,
at 4.20 p.m. to-day for St ar AUTOMOTIVE
(hepa, “BOND MINICAR—“3 wheeler” in per-
nee Sgt. Sg emage er), Wat fect condition less than 3,000 miles,
P 149.52—1n. | owner leaving isiand, for information
" dial 2838 12.9. 52--3n
THANKS BEDFORD COMMERCIAL VEHICLES-
atiiniiaaaanaitetl “ - Just received a new shipment including
BATSON — Nurse Miriam Batson ack-}2 to 3, 5 ton Trucks, Vans Pickups
jliowledges with srateful apprecia.] Courtesy Garage. Dial 4616.
tion the kind expressions of sym 11,9. 52—fn
pathy tendered her on the F = nedeencicnatiensecttenanenenc
of her late sister Regina more CAR-—-1950 Ford Prefect. Phone 4002 or
Batson of Ruby, St. Philip, office 3248. 14.9. 52—in.
4952—In.J — aa —
ee oe — - CAR—One (1) Austin Car. 8 H.P. in
RELLAMY—The undersigned gravefuliy{ good working order. Dial 3495
beg through this mediur to return 14.9.52—1n

thanks to all tose who attended the



funeral, sent wreaths, card., of in ary CAR—One Hillman Minx O-149. At

other way expressed their sympathy} Springhead Pitg. Phone 91-74
with us in our recent horeavement, 13.9.52—3n
occasioned by the death of our mother c>
Martha. Elizabeth Bellamy CAR — Hillman Convertible owner
Thé Bellamy Family driven. Only done 4,000 miles. Call
14,9.52—In, Kasson, 8496. 11.9.52—6n.

saat

BECKLES—We the undersigned beg to| GAR—Wolseley 10 H.P., in good aoe
thank those who sent enna Saeed hs tion. Nearest offer to $1,200.00, Cou:

in ahy -way expressed sympathy w i ,

us im the death of our dear moter —- bot =peronste 11.9.53-—-§n.

Jane Beckles of Brittons Hill, ich: MORRIS OXFO!

took place on the Ist September, 1952. than 2,500 miles. py og Sadat Tocwes

Wife of the late Winston Beckles. ‘car. Dial Courtesy Garage 4616
Ortie, een, Clanse. Winston, Ervin | 11.9.6
‘ehildren) and 15 grand children. ' rey

14,9.52-—1n,









MORRIS OXFORD—197 Model in







COLLEMORE Through this, medium | C*Celent condition, $1,800.00. Dial 4616
we bee to thank all those who in| _ 13,9 90-0
any way sympathised with us in | “MOTORCYCLE: One (1) 5 H.P. twin

\
the bereavement of our dear mother | oviinder B.S.A. Motorcycle, Good condi-











Mfs. Albertine Collymore, late of |tion. Apply N. Gibbs, Croydon, Hast-
Brighton, St. George | ings. Phone 3492. " MA ares
mes and John (sons), |
jorace, Myriene, Lione: and} TRUCH-dhisenaiaenss Gee aoaed axle aon «
i peed axle
Emanuel (erangebiieren), ; | truck with hydraulle holst, M702, Phone
ear Ane oa a “Ip. 3050. J. N. Farnum, George St
HINDS — Mrs. Aletha Hinds a amily 6.9.52—4n
acknowledge with grateful apprecia- —
tion the kind expressions of sym- .
pathy and assistance rendered her ELECTRICAL
on the passing of the late Joseph EE



GARRARD PICKUP ARMS -— 6,000
OHMS. Just received a limited quantity,
cell early, R. C. Maffei & Co. Ltd.

11.9. 92—t.f.r.

Augustus Hinds of Baxters Road, St.
Michael, 14.9.52—1n.

JORDAN—We, the undersigned beg to
thank those who sent wreaths, cards
or ahy way expressed sympathy with 1
us of our dear father, Charles Jordan,





“SWAN” brand electric kettle and

automatic Ivon and one double burner





2ipporah (wife) Iris, Helen, Edwatd,| hot plate. Phone 3430. 14.9.52—In

El€iza and Dorothy (childien:, SS
14.9.52—In. | ONE (1) Electrical Spraying Machine

————____— Complete with SUNBEAM Generator

VAUGHN — We bee through this) Aluminum Air Tank & Aluminum Spray

medium to return thanks to all/Gun, In good working order. Price

those kind friends who sent wreaths, | :easonable. App! Cc. Arthur Mayhew
letters of condolence or in an¥ W&a¥|ec/o K. J, SMITH & CO
expressed their sympathy in oOUr || {MITED, Bridge Street. Phone 4748.

recent bereavement caused by the 9.9.52—sn





da of Con Leona Vaughn, on 29th
A st.
Harold and Cecily (children), Jan- FURNITURE
nett, Roslyn, (nieces), Edith Clark | ——————~——- aoe ete inesentee
(sister) . 14.9.52—In. FURNITURE—Large Mahogany bedstead
with spring $50. Phone 3900,
13.9.52—in

FURNITURE—1 Mahogany Morris Suite
roe with maces Boring Cushions
ewly covered — $425.00 and 1 ny
Wardrobe with iull length mirror inside
—$180.00. All hullt by BR. A. Griffith.
Phone 3430, 14.952—1n.

ee

POULTRY

COCKRELS — Pure Leghorn imported
Stook 5, 3, 2% months old. Dial 3619
after 5 p.m, 14.9.52—2n.

POULTRY Trap-nested Minorcas,
Barred Rocks & Sex-Link Cross (Minorca
x Barred Rocks), Booking Sittings now
for delivery Nov: — March: December
chicks; spring pullete. Some stock
cockerels and table fowls Inspection
by appointment, Howe

14.9,52—2n

Et
YOUNG RHODE ISLAND COCKERELS

~ bred from ish Stevenson Strain.
A brood of 12 Guinea Chicks 3 weeks
old, Phone 2424, O. Fitzpatrick,
14.9.5



IN MEMORIAM zi

LAYNE — In loving memory of my

dear mother Estell Layne who died

on September, 1948.

“She gave so much, and received s6
little in return;

We think of you in memory still,

Not only to-day, but always will,

God granted her rest to suffer no
more.”









‘AN APARTMENT at “O’cetta’™ on-the-
sea, near Woodside, no children, Apply
on premises to Miss Douglas. 14.9.52—In,





A FLAT ~— on the seaside, at the
Moorings, Nr. Prospect, St. James.
Partly furnished, Apply on premises.

rf 52—-2n.


































BEACH VIEW — Purnished sea-side
house at Maxwell. For months of Octo-
ber, November and December, iy
to Mrs. M, H, Graham, Phone vs
ie by 4 52—1n.| “GRASS CUTTBERS—9 cutting blade.
CALAIS —- Seaside house, Maxwell, | Courtesy Garage. Dial ns 8
For months of October, grovensiae aoe -9,52—6n.
December, Apply to Mrs. | Graham.| “Grass LOADERS—A_new shipment
Phone 8400, 14.9521. ue on 19th inst (Sept,) Dial 4613,
CULDUNE, Cattlewash. St, _Soseph 11,9,52—6n.
u nished including Refrigerator. | “3477 orem
i Bedrooms, For , November,| BICYCLE — Ladies’ 3 speed Hercules
Deceribet 1952. Phone 8810 Mrs. H. S.|#$ new, hardly used. Best offer, over
Bynoe 10.9.52—8n. | $50.00, Ring 9189. 10.9,52—3n
———$—$—————
FURNISHED FLAT — Palm Beach
Hastings. Availabie immediately to an MISCELLANEOUS
approved tenant All conveniences
Own garage Near clubs. Reasonabl a
rental, Dial 2167 14.9.52—In. AMERICAN PRAM, Bath and Scale,
————___—_————_—, new Christening Dress with Slip, lovely
HILLSIDE—Bathsheba, four bedrooms.| Baby Shawl Blanket. Call 4145.
water and electricity throughout, Frig. 14.9,62—1n
&c. From December onwards. Apply:; — ot a eee
The Rector, St. Joseph 13.9.52-—3n. ANTIQUES — Of every description
“INahOUT” Gibb’s h. St. Peter. Glass, China, old Jewels, fine Silver

Watercolours. Early books, Maps, Auto-

Modern Bungalow, fully furnished, suit- gtaphs ¢éte., at Gorringes Antique Shop









able for a couple, from October 1952.) sajoin Royal Yacht 6.
Phone 2618. 169-52+-3r, bh om . 3.9.52—t.£.n
FFICES BALLOONS, Assorted colours nd
90 CE —_« | Shares, from 3c.—12e. Knight's Ltd.
OFFICES—In our Buheing an Lowel 11,9. 32—jn
Broad Street. Available from | ff | COMICS and MAGAZINES — Just re-
Qarsii a a a ® Sites: ceived your latest favourite Westerns,
OY ee s ret gubnewoingiipem Ties Romance, etc. our inspection
TOP FLOOR — Synagogue Building, | 'nvited.
off James Street, Suitable for offices STANWAY STORE,
Ground Floor tenanted by Barbados Lucas Street.
‘Turf Club, Apply Hutchinson & Ban- 14.9.52—1n,
field, Solicitors. Dial 5097, 14,9.52—3n, aaa

FAREX~—The comprehensive cereal food
with Vitamin D. added. Farex should
| be given to infants during teething and

le

THORPE'S HOUSE, Holders Hill, St.

Jam oP? ly, Grannum & Co., Trafal-
‘Binet!





Tel. 2652 or 2492. weaning. Ask your grocer or druggist

me 14.9.52—1n. | for FAREX. Price 88. tin.
— 10.9.52—5n

“VENTNOR” ist Ave, Belleville, °

Bedrooms esch with funning water,| GLUCOLIN Glucose
Garage ete 14.9.52—1n Vitamin D. at all lead-
ing stores. Insist on Glucolin for Glucose
WANTED iS its best. 10.9.52—5n
; .GUAVA CHEESE -—- Fresh, delicious

—_—_———— Guava Cheese,

suitable for sending to



HELP your friends abroad. Mrs. Worrell, St
Matthews Vicarage. Phone 3025.
ssdetiecnpanimaaet 7.9.52—3n

LADY STENOTYPIST with knowledge
of bookkeeping and previous office expe-
rience, good salary to experienced lady
Apply by letter C. A. c/o Advocate Ad-
vertising Dept 14.9.52—3n.

CASABLANCA

Maxwell Coast
Road

Extremely well kept 4 bed-
rooms house of modern de-
sign. Combination living and
dining room. 2_ kitchens.
Breakfast Room, Toilet and
bath. Lovely verandah fac-
ing the sea to which there



PIANO
Phone 8435.

STOVE—Florence Oil Stove 2-burner.
nine months old, perfect condition, $60
Phone 3900. 13.9.52—I1n

SUBSCRIBE now to the Daily
Telegraph, England’s leading Datly News.
paper now arriving in Barbados by At
only a few days after publication in
London, Contact Inn Gale, C/o, Advo-
cate Co., Ltd., tative

Tel. 3118. 47.4.523—t.f.0

nr nnrn =

SAMPLES—A few pairs of Men's shoes.
‘ze 7 only, apply: The Barbados Import
& Export Co., Ltd. Room 308 Plantations
| Building 11.9,52—%
|
| TANKS—2 Galvanised Tanks & x # x ¥
i Iron Tanks 6%’ x 4/ x 3% 3 Galvanised
| Cylindrical Tanks 6447 x 4%’ dea. 600 w
alvs. 2 Galv. Cylindrical Tanks x 40’
| deam with 2 ft. Conical Bottoms; capacity

wine gallons 700. Apply:

In first class condition.
1.9.52—3n,



























’ Manager,

is a right of way. 2 servants | Bruce Vale Factory 31.8,52—3n

rooms, washroom and gar-}))'

age in yard which is com- ee
ae

pletely tarred. Well laid out
Gardens, 55,573 square feet
land, A spacious and com-
fortable yet very compact

The Housewife's

Alphabet

property. FREE with every
— ALSO — Gas Cooker:
sot reedom from smoke
An orchard comprising
28,743 square feet land ad- reedom ae soot
joining the above -property. reedom from ashes

reedom from smells—

FREEDOM from worry if
Cook doesn’t turn wu

Numerous cocoanut trees.
Fruit trees of every descrip-
tion,
Inspection every day ex-
cept Sunday between 4—6
.m. on application to Mrs.
Eckstein, Phone 8213,

ee Sale by public auc-
on Friday 19th at
1.30 p.m. at the office of
the undersigned from
whom further particu-

lars may be obtained.







Messrs. EDWARD DURANT and
DUNCAN TROTMAN,
(well known Shopkeeper of
Baxters Road)

Pequest the pleasure of
your company to their

ANNUAL DANCE

CHILDREN'S GOODWILL
LEAGUE

Constitution Road

On MONDAY NIGHT.

September, 1952

ADMISSION 1/6

Masic by C. B. Browne's Orchestra
Please extend this invitatio

BAR SOLID



R. 8. NICHOLLS & CO,,
Solicitors,

151/152 Roebuck Street,
Phone 3925.

15th









































VIEWS of Barbados f
Exhibition at the
—6 Week-days

ANNOUNCEMENTS | REVIVAL CRUSADE

Sunday
52



Muse

10--6 7.9

PERSONAL

The publi
giving credit to my wi
Harding (nee Ber
If responsible fo



, against
hleen Marva
s 1 go not hold









one else
contracting any debt iebt 1 my neme
unless by a writte 1 ened by me
Sed. COLERIDGE MOSES HARDING,
Perfectic Road, Bush Hall,
St. Michael
14.9. 52—2n

PUBLIC SALES



REAL ESTATE

ALOw, at













Hastings on t) 23
always a breeze, Dial 5
11,9.52 ~dn
BUILDING SI at Brighton,
Black Rock and at Bayswater, Deacons
ree Bory ‘ Mr. Hutchinson, ,Hutchin-
son anfield, Solicito: D 509
Thy Saige an Pastor M. G. NEMBHARD
BE Ww Ise D. F. de Abren,| A BIG REVIVAL. CRUSADE
s rainec uctioneer and Real Estale] ¢ i , i eet
Broker, ust and Will always Leat ae = se ping oe
with Attractive Prices, Re-Sale Values and Se venth-day ‘ Adventist Church
Satisfaction. Best These Six 1. ar|Sunday evening, September 14, at
RAYSWATER. NEAR SEA—Almost New| 7.15 p.m, with Pastor M. G, Nemb-

3 Bedroom (with Basins) Stone Bungalow

Aluminum Roof, 2 Toilets, Stone Gar age hard, late of Kingston, Jamaica,















& Servant’s Room, about 7,000 sq. ft.,| 2nd Port-of-Spain, Trinidad as
Pare Sor sbout 2 a8 2 AT woevrs- guest speaker. There will be ser-
i pe ight-o rice eac Ve “xce

Way to Sea, A 3 Bedroom Bungalow Type.t Vice Sach evening except Thurs-

Very Good Condition, Garage & Ser-|@ay and Saturday. ;

vant s Room, over 6,000 gs ft Going Pastor W. W. Weithers, district
§ . I N Y ne . Ie r ,

GARDENS — A 3 Bedroom (with Basins (pos of Bridgetown, will be con-

& Cupboards) Stone Bungalow, about|@ucting a similar revival at the

6 yrs. Old. Everite Roof, 2 ‘Tailets,|Government Hill S.DA. church

Garage & Servant’s Room, about 11,000 t >» st j ae a i

noth, Goins for abort Bader 6, ee the same time. You are cordi-

GOVT! HILL — Almost New 3 Bedtoom ally invited to attend.

‘Partly Stone) Bungalow, Stone Garage 14, —-

000 sq. ft., Going for abo £1,200

SIN BELLEVILLE Ove-tiorey ‘rans | EDUCATIONAL

Stone) 3 Bedroom, all Modern Conveni- — — -





erces, Very Good Condition, Going about




















£2,000. ‘6. OFF COUNTRY RD 2 QUEEN'S COLLEGE
Bedroom House with Land. Shop attach Parents and guardians are asked to
ed, Good Condition, House Only Yields| note that Queen’s College will not be
£°4.00 p.m., Going about $1,500 IN | r¢ opened before Tuesday 23rd. Septem
LIGHTFOOT’S X LANE — A Desirable | ber f 13.9, 52—2n
; a eaeare Cottage, Light, Water, Going | ——— — —
or nder $2,300 AT HASTINGS LYNCH'S SECONDA Mae
SEASIDE “OLIVE BOUGH.” IN | SPRY STREET rere
TUDOR ST.—Business Fwemises & Resi-| Next Term begins on Tuesday, 15th
derce, IN NELSON ST. — A 3 Bedroom | September, 1952 at 9.15 a.m i
Cottage, also ‘a Business Premises & A. McD, FORDE.
Residence. Please C Me when U require | Headmaster
Alu.cst Anything in Real Estate and Near- | 14.9.52—in
ly Anywhere. DIAL 3111 Call at “Olive — sa r Sanaa,
ough,” Hastings, Near Pavilion Court MICHAEL'S LS’ ;
LOOK FOR MY SIGN | BARHADOe Re aoe
aati A Next Term will begin on Tuesday, 16th
LAND FOR SALE | September 1952 at 9.15 a.m. punctually
(1) 7,812% sq. ft, Rogers Road, 50 ft,| The School will be in session from 9.00
frontage m. to 12.15 (noon) :
(2) 1/8 acre land at Eagle Hall. NORMA FE. MASCOLL,
(3) I acre at Rockley, Ch. Ch | (Acting) Secretary/Treasurer,
(4) Several House Spots at Worthing | Governing Body, St. Michael's
View, Ch. Ch, Girls’ School
(5) 3 acres at Maxwell Main Road, Ch, | 14.9.52—1n.
Ch. Dial 2947. R, Archer MeKenzie,| ——————-—~— ine
Victoria Street. 14,9,52-—-2n. FORESTERS’ SCHOLARSHIP

COURT 8ST. MICHABL’s DIAMOND
The above scholarship his been award-
jed to Elsworth Me Clarren Reid, son of
| Bertram M_ Reid of Salters, St. George.

The secholorth'p is tenable at Harrisun
College for five years

“CRANE HOUSE" situate in the parish
of Saint Philip standing on 12 acres
1 rood and 22 perches of land

The Houee contains six bedrooms. draw-
aa and living rooms and usual





The above will be set wp for sale at mA?
Public Conipetition on Friday the 26th Th QUEEN S COLLEGE
day of September 1952 at 2 p.m. ut the © Wezt tee ab Syueen'e Cellege way

begin on Twesday, the Mird of September,
“, at #15 am. and the School will be
n session from ? 1 am — 12.30 p.m
D. E. M. MALONE
Seeretary-Treasurer,
Governing Body,
Queen's College.




office of the undersigned.
CARRINGTON & SEALY, :
Laicas Street.

7.9.52

——_———_
HOUSE SPOT containing 16,990 square
feet, with option of further 5,400 sq. ft



situated on Pine Hill, enclosed by wall 14.9.52—3n
on one side and hedge on another. STEEn DUE RE REDUERESUESDGARERE STEERED URES
Electricity and Water available. Apply HARRISON. COLLEGE

Gerald Hudson, Pine Hill The

Tel, 3862 next term at. Harrison College will
n on Tuesday, the 16th of September,
and -the Serool will be in session
9.15 am—11,00 a.m.

D. E. M. MALONE



“KINNOUL” at BANK HALL MAIN
ROAD, (at corner of entrance to Year-
wood’s Land), Saint Michael, standing on

1952,

trom

15,282 square feet of land, a part of Secretary-Treasurer,
which is used as an orchard Governing Body,
The Dwellinghouse contains Gallery, Harrison College.

~ Breakfast
with dressing

Drawing and Dining
Room, 3 bedrooms

rooms,

a

BARBADOS ACADEMY

room and running water) Pantry and (Bstd, 1985)
Kitchen &c., and usual conveniences A day Sthool for BOYS offering a
Government water and electricity instal-| carefully graded course from College

led — Bervants room in Yard

to the General Certificate of Educa-
tion on application to the Tendnt

prep
tion











Mr, Chas. Field. Next Term (Michaelmas) begins Tues:
The Property will be set up for sale} i6th Sept., 1952 at 9.15 a.m.
by Public Competition at our Office W. D. RUDDER,
James Street, Bridgetown, on Friday 19th Principal.
September at 2 p.m. 14.9.52—1n
eee & BOYCE, | .. atte
olicitors . =e
ton | OURLIC NOTICES
SALE OF THE MOTOR VESSEL
“T. B. RADAR" NOTICE
The appraised price of $25,000.00 not It is in the interest of Mrs. Lilian
having been received for the Motor] Princess Lemonsaid that she should con-
Vesse) “T. B. RADAR", OFFERS for the] tact the firm of R. T. Ashby & Co., No.
purchase of the same are invited } Swan Street, Bridgetown, as soon 14s
Such offers are to be submitted in | possible, 14.9.52--1n.
sealed envelopes to be addressed to The -——— ————-—— -——_—_—__ -——
Marshal in Admiralty, Public Buildings, | \ NOTICE
Barbados and are to reach fir on OT) Applieations for the vacant posts of

before the 30th September,

‘On the Ist October the sealed envelopes | 3°Xtons at St

Saviours Chapel and at St.

Simons Chapel will be received by the







, vill be take
spot ours ‘and. opened. there by. the | uidersined up to Wednesday Sept. 24th
Registrar in the presence of the Chieg|~"'"'Y 2°8,00 per month Applications
Justice SN be ena by Birth and
. Y pa culs , > Health certificates
For further one ae efi So ALAN ‘Speen.
an Adam Vestry Clerk,
Marshal in ‘oe Ae ew
oe 14.9.52—4n
AUCTION NOTICE

PARISH OF CHRIST CHURCH
Applications for the post of Qualified
Nurse and Midwife will be received by
the Churchwarden, Mrs. MH. A. Talma,































‘ “
Under the Diamond Hammer |\elches. Ch. Ch. Markea “Applica
ton” up to 3 p.m. on the 16th Septem-
ave bee ict by} Jose yer, 1952
a are eae rere, pig asink Term of appointment obtainable from
Road on Thursday next 18th beginning} ‘%e Parochial Treasurer. 6.9.52-—4n
at 12,30 ah the unde tmentioned
Several 6 ft. galvanize sheet sash MISCELLANEOUS
windows, galvanize buckets, several front -
door locks with nobs, saucepans, break-| "FURNISHED SEASIDE HOUSE, for
fast carriers, large striking clock, rum] sany February and March, 1953, at
casks, 2 Phillips radios (5 & 7 tubes) 4/31 Lawrence, Worthing or’ Rockley
burner oil stove (Valor) Pine and tron} jjstriet. Please write Denis Hart, ¢/o
bedsteads, glass cases, cups and saucers,| > 1, 7 Polnté-a-Pierre, Trinidad
bowls, (1) Chevrolet truck and other} °~°"*’’ 11.9.52—5n
items, also (1) shop 20 x 11 x 9 with shed ; rate
Terms cash “aa
3 ras ryrer HOUSE~To Buy or Rent House in
D'ARCY A. ie Me r, ither Hastings or Garrison District twe
ore 8. bend: 2) Bedrooms or perhaps three (3) with
wou we sual conveniences, Reply “S’ c/o No
ee bak pa Gaal eee. cae 10 Plantations New Buildings, Lower
UNDER THE SILVER jroad Street 6.9.52—Sn
HAMMER WANTED 10 RENT
ON TUFSDAY i6th by order of the} yoUSE—Couple require Small Unfur-
Fxecutors to the Estate of the late Mis shed House or Flat — Town or Country.
M. A Bradshaw we _ will sell the fro October First. Phone 4358
Furniture at Strathelyde which includes: | eg ana 12,9, 52-—3n.
Wagons, Couches, Morris Chairs (with - ~
cushions), Folding Chairs, Bookcase, "a PP DOHDDOGHHOOSHOD
Ornament Tables ail in Mahogany: Pine | °oC@SOOOe
Dining Table, Cedar Book-shelves and
Book Cafes (glass doors), M Table .
Lady's Desk, ckers, Clock naa and | ®
China, Dinner and Tea Serv Dieu bic
Pedatead, Spring ond Mird at
I #, Bureau, Chest of all in} ¢ 7





ogany: Cedar Presses,

Presse The Volunteer Drill Hall

ond



Dressing Tables ids cat
Springs and Beds; | Filing Cabinet in aid of
Verandah Chairs, Kitchen Tables and St Paul’s Church Choir and
Utensils; Oil Stoy> and other items 7

Organ Func
5 on
Tuesdiy Sept. 30th 1952
Music by Perey Green's Ork.
Subscription -o- 60c.
14.9.52—3n.

Sale 11,30 o'clock. Terms ¢
BRANKER, TRO'TMAN

Auctioneers
12.9. 52

aah

& ©O.,

2n



|

UNDER THE SILVER





HAMMER ebdetbecccsescosncoseet
SALES IN SEPTEMBER 7 fr
TUESDAY 23rd The late Mrs. J. W L PDDOEOH OOOOOOE O- ..DO<
Hawkins’ sale. Hill Rise, Graeme . Oe
Hall Terrace ha
THURSDAY Miss Evelyn Seale's|@ TRC Officers and Members
sale. No. 3, Lady Meade Gardens of the
TUESDAY ott Mr. G. R. Cabral’s
sale, Twepton, Strathclyde
BRAN TROTMAN & CO., Under the Patronage of _
Auctioneers the Hon, V. C. Gale, M.L.C.
14.9,52—11

invite you to their

DANCE

at the
VOLUNTEER DRILL
on

MONDAY NIGHT, 6TH |



|
|
|
ADVOCATE’S SOCIAL CLUB |
}
|

ve

2 REVIVAL
¢ FLAMES |

HALL

oxen

»



> OCTOBER, 1952 |

; At the Pentecostal Tabernacle of is (Bank-holiday) |

Worthing View, Christ Church | 2 Music by

Revival. begins on Sunde Sept. $| & Percy Green's Orchestra j

14, 1952, and en n Sept. 26. All | 2 SUBSCRIPTION: —::— 3/-

re invited. The 1} c F aif

I : : g\% Dancing from 9 p.m.

t é ° Tickets not Transferable

Formal D1

ess Optional

~ three bedrooms,

SUNDAY



|
|
|

ADVOCATE










Helio Folks! Remember the

ANNUAL DANCE

given by
Messrs. KITTY BEST and
FITZGERALD SOBERS
{known as Pepsie)

oe" ae
Tuesday Night, 16th September,
oe

at QUEEN'S PARK HOUSE
Admission — 2/-
Music by - - -
CLEVIE GITTENS ORCHESTRA
Refreshments on Sale
Please invite your Friends

OFFERS

NEW BUNGALOW

Known as No. 10, Blue Waters,
and standing on approximately
14,000 square feet of land com-
Prising three bedrooms, one with
dressing-room and toilet and
bath attached, combination draw-
ing and dining room, separate
toilet and bath, modern kitchen
two servants’ rooms with toilet
and bath, garage. This property
ean be bought for a very reason-
able figure. lease contact us as
soon as possible.

SWEETFIELD
stone house comprising
tairs three bedrooms large
ing room, dining room, two
toilets and baths, one with tub
bath and hot, and cold water,
@allery. Downstairs: three spare
rooms, kitchen and shower room,
standing on approximately 2%
acres of land about 100 yards
from Gibbes Beach. This prop-
erty has been extensively reno-
Vated by the present owner, and
@an be had for a very reasonable
» Inspection by appointment

Large

BUNGALOW
At Rockléy New Road, com-
prising three bedrooms, dining
room and living room, modern
Kitchen toilet and bath, all bed-

rooms have built in cupboards as

Well as the kitchen. This prop-
etty is very close to the Golf
Course in a very popular resi-
dential area. Immediate posses-
ston.
SYBSTAN

Situate at Navy Gardens, com-
prising three bedrooms, two
toilet and baths, combination

dining and living rooms, pantry,
kitchen and storeroom, two ser-

vants rooms in the yard with
toilet and bath, laundry room
and garage. This is a_ lovely

house offered at a competitive

CHATSWORTH

tuate at Codrington Hill,

ichael, comprising two
Teoms, one small spare room,
Drawing and Dining ~ rooms,
Toilet and bath, closed gallery.
Standing on approximately 2
rodds 7% perches of land. This
property is going at a very rea-
sonable price.

St
bed-

CHURCHILL

Situate at Maxwell Coast Road,
comprising three bedrooms with
running water, combination draw.
ing and dining rooms, modern
kitchen, toilet and bath. The
property is situate in » good resi-
dential area with excellent sea
bathing. A sound investment at
a very low reserve price

WYNDAL

Situate at Rockley, partly stone
and lath and plaster, comprising
dining and liv-
ing rooms, toilet and bath, and
a large gallery, The outbuildings
comprise _ servants’ room and
garage. The property, stands on
approximately 1,000 square feet
‘of land within 100 yards of the
famous Rockley Beach,

. BUNGALOW

Situate in Rockley New Road
commanding a magnificent view
of the Gold Course unobstructed
to the sea. It comprises three
bedrooms, one with built-in cup-
boards, Drawing and Dining
rooms, Modern kitchen, totlet and

bath. Downstairs: Servants’ room
with toilet and bath. Garage for
two cars, and enough room for
laundry etc. The property stands
on approximately 19,000) squar
feet of land.
BUNGALOW

Situate at Graham Hall Terrace
very attractively designed, com-
prising three bedrooms, with

toilets and baths attached, Dining
and Living rooms, Kitchen, ver-
andah to the west and a nice
patio to the east The property
stands on approximately ‘. acre
of land.

EVANTON

Situate at Top Rock compris-
ing three bedrooms, two with ad-
joining toilet and bath, spare
Toom that can be used as a
breakfast room or _ children’s
nursery, living and dining room,
kitchen, separate toilet and bath
with hot and cold water, veran-
dah to the south and patio to
the north. The outbuildings com-





prise servants’ rooms with toilet
and bath, and a large garage. In-
spection by appointment.
PARAGON

Situate near Seawel! A\lrport,
Christ Church, comprising two
large bedrooms with dressing rooms
attached, two medium e bed-
rooms with dressing rooms and
built-in cupboards large open

verandah entire length of house
with a lovely view of Chancery
Lane Beach and the sea. Down-
stairs: Entrance lobby, living and
dining rooms, breakfast room,
pantry, kitchen, large study, and
a lovely open pation to the
south. This property also has
lovely grounds and a portion of
arable land containing 742 acres.
Inspection by appointment only

COVE SPRING COTTAGE

A lovely cottage standing on
2 toods 27 perches of land, situ-
ate at St. James Coast, having
its own private bathing beach,
and comprising three bedrooms,
with private toilet and bath to
main bedroom, drawing and
dining rooms, European bath with
hot and cold running water and
separate toilet, modern kitchen,
and a gallery on two sides.

WYNDOVER
Situate at Mile and Quarter,
St.. Peter, another lovely house
comprising three bedrooms, din-
room, living room, modern
ts and baths with hot and
cold water, large verandahs. Out-
standing view to the sea. Exten-
sive outbuildings including a
large garage, two servants’ rooms,
Jaundry, workshop. Extensive
orchard with specially selected
fruit trees. The property has
been well cared and is in excel-
lent condition. Immediate pos-

session, Very low price

HOMEMEDE

Situate in the Garrison,
Michael, comprising four bed-
rooms, combination living and
dining rooms, separate toilet and
path, kitchen with built-in cup-
boards, verandah the whole
length of the building. The out-
buildings © mprise two servants
rooms witn water tdilet and a
garage for two cars, The above
property stands on approximately
7,500 square feet of land In-
spection by appointment only

CHATTEL HOUSE
Situate at Ist Avenue, Alleyne's



St

Land, Bush Hall, 1l6ft. x Qt
chattel house, with shedroof 16ft
x ft. and kitchen &ft. x 6ft.

partly enclosed with wood pal
ings. The above property can be
had for a very reasonable price

REALTORS Limited

REAL ESTATE AGENTS
AUCTIONEERS
VALUERS
151/12 Roebuck Street,

Bridgetown Phone 4900





REALTORS LIMITED |



| SHIPPING NOTICES









Consignee, Tele. No. 4047

§ OSS SUF ee
r
. The M/V “CARIBBEE” will
R Hurricane Precaution Y]% ccc. eile SSP FREE ees Yar
4 Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
} T 7 Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing Frida:
A MINT No. 17 seen :
The M/V “MONEKA”" wiil
| aecept Cargo and Passengets for
DURING A STORM Nevis and St Kite, Salling Friday
i Be sure that a window or 18th inst
\ door on the lee side opposite B.W.1. SCHOONER OWNERS’
the one facing the wind can i ASSOCIATION (INC.)
|
i

be opened. 13.9.52—3n,

|







Canadian National Steamships





SOUTHBOUND







Satis Satis Salle Artives Satls
Montresi Halifax Boston Barbados Barbados
LADY RODNEY , J 3 Sept. 6 Sept. 8 17 1 it.
CANADIAN CHALLENGER i2Sept. 6 Sept. = 24 <= 25 Siot.
LADY NELSON . : 22 Sept. 25 Sept. 27 Sept. 6 Oct. 7 Oct
NOKTHBOUND
Areives Salls Arrives Arrives Arrives
Barbados Barbados Bostes Halifax Mentres!
CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR 1 Sep. 19 Sep — 9 Oct 12 Oct.
LADY RODNEY * 30 Sept. 2 Oct. 11 Oct. 12 Oct. 16 Oct.
CANADIAN CHALLENGER f Oct 8 Oct, a 21 Oct. 24 Oct
LADY NELSON : 19 Oct 21 Oct 20 Oct. 31 Oct. 4 Nov









For further particulars, apply to—

GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents.

WSOOISSSODHFFIIISOIGOOSISS SIS IIS SSTSVSSIISOO OOO”
x



‘ HURRICANE PRECAUTION HINT NO. 60

FALLING TREES are very likely to disrupt the Electric
Supply. Keep a couple of Hurricane Lanterns filled with
oil and a box of Matches in a handy place.

All these are obtainable at...

CENTRAL EMPORIUM

Corner Broad & Tudor Streets
“SFSSOVSOSSSNGOSSOOSSOSES |











CLEARING ITEMS FOR THIS WEEK !
Usually NOW

HEAVY CREPE BACK SATIN
Ribbed back Marshal fabric ................ $2.97 $2.11

COTTON SEERSUCKER

CUE Oe PRO. ke eet eneunay ope $1.12 90c,
COTTON PLAID ... See asad <5 <% ado ws gle aoe 91c, 69c.
ITALIAN BORDERED SPUN ........... $1.86 $1.33

a ——————

(Over 25 Designs)

Also Plenty More at

KIRPALANI

52 Swan Street









BARBADOS FOOD PRODUCTS

A PIONEER INDUSTRY

Announces

| The Opening of its

Sales Branch

In Speightstown

On Munday, Sept. 15
Offering ...
HAM — BACON — LARD
PICKLED PORK — OFFAL
FRESH PORK, BEEF, MUTTON

All Locally Produced



There will be in store for you, your family, your friends and
all Visitors to the Island, a SURPRISE, and a great one too.
If you know what it's all about, then it will not be a surprise.

You sre cordially invited to this “BIG SURPRISE” which

be — Seer at your popular leading Store—N. E. WILSON

Any and everything you see or do will certainly surprise you.
The large package containing quality merchandise of your
selection for the very few cents you will have paid, will be a
feature of “Great Surprise.”

Our sincere advice to you is . . . “Be calm, don’t rush, don’t
fight, don't jostle, don’t block traffie at the counter and entrance
of the store; our efficient and courteous staff will take care of
everything and will despatch you quickly, and please leave
after you have'been served so that others will have the same
advantage which you enjoyed.



_ Our Store is air-conditioned, and there is no likelihood
of discomfort. Our door opens at 8 a.m. daily and closes at
4.30 P.M. So, now then, off to - - - -

N.E. WILSON & CO.

The merchant who leads the way while others merely follow.

Dial: 3676



Swan St =:





SUNDAY,



SEPTEMBER l4, 1952



ae

Advocate Stationery
FOR BOOKS

FILM §S
AT
THE BARBADOS
AQUATIC CLUB
(Local and Visiting Members
Only)
Through the courtesy of the
British Council there will be
a FILM SHOW in the Ball-

room on WEDNESDAY, Sep-
tember 17th, at 8.30 p.m.

The Programme includes :
BRITISH NEWS
HOUSE OF WINDSOR

(The Royal Family)
CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY
COUNTRY TOWN
COLOUR IN CLAY

(Pottery Making)



BLABON

se ce.

AF5S., F.V.A.

Extensive Listings of Good
Class Property and Land
Always Available

FOR SALE

—-———

NEW BUNGALOW, LODGE
LAND, ST. MICHAEL, — We are
instructed to offer this very de+
sirable home constructed by a lead-
ing firm of building contractors.
The accommedation provides %
spacious becrooms, with built-in
wardrobes, large drawing room,
separate dining room, kitchenette
with breakfast room, and large
pantry. The garage and servant's
quarters are detached. Mains
water and quota of electric light
This property is situated in a new
end select residential area from
which there ane fine panoramic
views Bridgetown and the har-
bour, he site is very cool and
only 34 miles from town centre.
The property is available with from
approx. % to 1% acres as required
and the price asked is very fair
indeed. We can recommend this
listing very highly.

BUILDING PLOTS, LODGE
LAND, St. Michael. We offer 4
attractive lots in this new devel-
opment area, varying in size from
10,000 to 18,000 sq. ft. geal all
with excellent views. ‘ater and
light available.



BRIGHTWOOD, St. Lawrence. A
pleasant and comfortable property
which mellows nicely with its
surroundings. Own beach frontage
and excellent bathing facilities.
Three bedrooms, living room and
dining room, kitchen, separate
toilet and shower, wide L_ shi
verandah looking sea-wards. Se
arate garage and servants’ rooms.
Ideal seaside home in a g
residential quarter,

RESIDENCE, THE GARDEN,
WORTHING — Modern coral stone
bungalow on corner site with
wide frontages. Pleasant garden
with flower beds, lawn,
patio, and number of bearing fruit
trees. Accommodation comprises
large living room, covered gallery,
3 bedrooms with built-in ward-
robes, well fitte? kitehen, garage
with covered way to house, ser-
vants' quarters and all usual
offices. All public utility services
one of the most attractive homes
now available in the medium price
range.

MODERN HOME, St. Peter —
A luxuriously appointed residence,
with four bedrooms, 3 tiled bath-
room, verandah & kitchenette up-
stairs, with garage, | servants’
In our opinion this property ts
3 bedrooms, dining and_ living
rooms with hot and cold, butler’s

pantry, kitchen, storerooms, 2
gerages. The grounds are expert.
ly laid out with a profusion of

flowering shrubs. Own right of

way to sea.

RESIDENCE, BLACK ROCK —
Soundly constructed property with
3 bedrooms, 2 living rooms, dining
room and gallery. On land of ap-
prox. 1 acre.

BUILDING LAND, ST. LAW-
RENCE COAST — Excellent plot
‘n good position with wide sea
frontage. Ideal site for sea-side
bungalow. One of the few vacant
lots available on this popular
coast.

11, GRAEME HALL TERRACE
—2 Storey coral stone house with
quarters and laundny below. This
house is set well back in its
grounds of about 1/3 acre, is not
overlooked and has unobstructed
view seawards. Open to offers

LAND, TWEEDSIDE ROAD—On
main road with 101/ frontage.
ideal situation for — business
premises, Total area 18,738 sq, ft.

BUSINESS PREMISES—-DWELL-
ING HOUSE, ROEBUCK STREET.
Good situation for retail shop in
this busy part of town, £2,000.

SWEETFIELD, St. Peter — An
estate type house built of stone.
Contains large living room with
French windows leading onto
covered verandahs with view of

sea. 3 bedrooms, kitchen, store~
rooms and usual outbuildings,
garage and servants’ quarters.

Approx 2% acres well laid out
grounds with right of way over
beach,

COVE SPRING HOUSE, ST.
AMES — One of the few prop-

NEW en ee ROCKLEY—
Commodious hi with 3 bed-
rooms, large living room, wide
verandah with good view, kitchen,
pantry, servants’ quarters and
storerooms. Good situation near
Golf Course £4,300.

BUNGALOW — ST. JAMES. A
three bedroom residence with liv-
ing room, Kitchen, pantry, veran-
dahs and garage. Excellent posi-
tign on coast with good beach
frontage and safe bathing. Bar-
gain at £4,000



RENTALS

NEW HOUSE—ROCKLEY
ROAD. Near
furnished .

NEW
Golf Course. Un-

Ww FLATS — Cod-
rington Hill. Choice of 4

11, GRAEME HALL TERRACE—
Furnished

NEWTON LODGE, MAXWELL’S
COAST Furnished or unfur-
nished with rmmediate possession.

Plantations Building
Phone 4640




SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER

CHURCH SERVICES

ee
AD ACAN
ST. LEONARD'S CHURCH
Sunday, Sept. 14th



8 ar Holy Communion 9 am
Matins and Sermon; 3 p.m Sunday
School; 7 p.m. Byensong and Sermon,

_ ST. MARY'S CHURCH
Within the Octave of B.V.M.
TRINITY XIV









} a.m. Mating; #00 a.m. Low Mase:

' Procession, Solemn Mass and

i preacher: The Ven. Archdeacon

chineo $0 pm. Sunday School;

p.m, Children’s Vesper; 7.00 p.m

ean Evensong Sermon and proces-

preacher: Fthr. Jenson, Vicar of

our Anthem by Choir—"Im-
Invisible’ by Erie Thiman,



METHODIST SERVICES
ith September
JAMES STREET: 11 om. Preacher:
Nev. G. Marshall; 3 p.m, Sunday School;



E 5 pee: Rev. K. EB. Towers,
- PAYNE’S BAY: 9.20 am, Preacher:
Mir. J. Layne: 7? p.m. Mr. F. Moore.

WHITE HALL: 9.30 am, Preacher:
Mr. M. Bhint; 7 p.m. Rev, PF. Lawrence
is)

ae Al 9,30 a.m, Preacher:
tev awrence; 7 p.m. x
HOLETOWN: 8.20 ‘am. ;
Morris: 7 p.m. Mr. D. Reid. ”
BANK HALL: 9.30 a.m. Preacher: Mr.
G. Sinckler; 7 p.m. Mr. H. Grant. 7
SPEIGHTSTOWN: if a.m. Preacher:

Rev. K. E. Towers, B.A.. B.D: 7

Rey G_ Marshall : Ne eee
SELAH: 9.30 a Pp : ov

a Tove Bay fF eecber: Rev. K.
B TESDA: 9,20 Preac :

vB) ae oe a.m Preacher: Mr.
BETHEL: 11 a.m. Mr. L. Mayers:

P.m. "Rev. T. J Furey. a
DALKEITH: 11 a.m. Rev J

Purley; 7 p.m. Mr. G. Marville
BELMONT: 11 a.m. Mr. G Harpe.

7pm Mr. J

Lovell

_SOUTH DISTRICT: 9am. Rev. T. J
Furley, Holy Communion; 7 p.m. Miss
Bryan

PROVIDFNCE: 11 a.m, Mr. I. Black-
man; 7 pm. Mr. St. Hill
: VAUXHALL: 9a.m, Mr. I. Blackman:

p.m rs

E. Browne
EBENEZER CIRCUIT

EBENEZE®: 9 a.m. Mr. O, Millar, 7
p.m. Revd. S. W. C. Crosse

BEULAH: 9 a.m Revd s ¥. c
Crosse, 7 p.m, Mr. R. Garnes

SHREWSBURY; 11 a.m. Revd S. W. C.
Crosee, Sacrament of the Lord’s Supper,
7 p.m. Mr. Arthur Clarke,

RICES: 11 a.m

Mr. C. G. Reid, 7 p.m.

Mr. G. Brathwaite
All Sunday Schools at 3 p.m
MORAVIAN
ROEBUCK STREET: 1! am Mornins
Service, preacher: Mr. E. C. Hewitt;
7 p.m. Evening Service, preacher Rev

E. E. New
GRACE
vice (followed by Holy
preacher: Rey. E, E. New;
ning Service, preecher:
FULNECK; 11

HILL: 11 a.m, Morning Ser-
Communion),
7 pm = Eve-
My, W. Hayde.

a.m. Morning Service,

preacher; Mr. W. St, Hill; 7 p.m Eve-
ning Service, preacher: Mr, W. Swire.
MONTGOMERY: 7 p.m. Evening Ser
vice, preacher: Mr, A_ Phillips.
DUNSCOMBE: 7 p.m. Evening Ser-
vies, preacher: Mr. S| Weekes

SHOP HILL: 7 p.m. Evening Service,
preacher: Mr. W. S, Arthur.
SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST
KING 8T. CHURCH
7.15 pan, Evangelistic Meeting. Speak-
er: Pastor M,
“Christ's Appointments
GOVERNMENT HILL CHURCH
7.15 p.m, Evangelistic
er: Pastor W. W
“The Certainiy of
ment."
IPP ST NICHOLAS EPISCOPAL
ORTHODOX, WELCHES ROAD
11 a.m., Matins and Sermon, 7 p.m
Evensong and Sermon, preacher for bots
services the Rev
Minister-in-Charge
7.20 p.m

G. Nembhard Subject:
With You’.

Meeting, Speak-
Weithers
the

Subject:

Advent Move-

Deaconess C. Barrow,



Tuesday, Evening Prayers
ard Addr-ss, preacher the Rev L
Pruce-Clarke, The subject will be: “The
Boyhood and Youth of Saint Peul; Gale
tians Chapter 1, verse 15,
THE ST. JAMES NATIONAL BAPTISE

ll a.m,, Matins and Sermon

7 p.m. Evensong and Sermon. Preach-
er for both services the Rev. J. B.
Grant 1.. Th., Minister-in-Charge.

> p.m. Monday, Wednesday, Friday
training for youths; this will be conduct-
ed by the Rev. L. Bruce-Clarke (Assistant
Pastor) and Mrs. Qh; Browne

EGOLF BAPTIST CHURCH
Tudor Street
Rev. K. P. Hansen — Pastor

Sunday — 9.30 a.m. Sunday School --
Classes for all ages. 10.30 a.m. Morning
Worship — Studies in the Book of Acts.
7.30 p.m. Evangelistic Service — Lively



song service, special music, soul-stirring
message

Monday — 7.30 p.m. Baptist Young
People’s Union — A meeting by and

for the young with the dramatic reading
of “hock of Life,”

Wednesday -
Prayer Meeting

Listen every Tuesday and Thursday at
9.460 p.m. to “Echoes of Heaven" under
the auspices of the Fundamental Baptist
Churehes of Barbados, You are cordially
invited to attend the services of the Bap-
tist Churches

7.30 p.m. Praise and



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
First Charch of Christ, Scientist,
Bridgetown, Upper Bay Street

Sundays 11 a.m. and 7 p.m

Wednesdays 8 p.m A Service which
includes Testimonies of Christian Science
Healing

SUNDAY,
September la 1052

Subject ©f Kessan-Sermonm: SUBSTANCE

Golden Text: Hebrews i: 1. Faith ts
the substaenee of things hoped for, the
evidence of things not seen

Tho following Citations aye inetuded in
the Lesson-Sermon: The Bible: I lead in
way of righteousness, That I may
cause those that love me to inherit sub-
stance; Proverbs 8: 20, 21

Science and Health with Key to the
Seriptures, by Mary Baker Eddy.

Until belief becomes faith, and faith
becomes spiritual understanding, human
thought has little relation to the actual
or divine. Page 297



PART ONE

4,

1952





{|

SEA AND AIR |

| TRAFFIC

Seawell

ARRIVALS
From Antigua—!2.a.5%
Cyrit Taylor, Michael Ber:
lag@i, Donald Maggi, James Chaliner
Howard Reid, Florence Myers.
From Puerto Rico—12.9.62
D. Agnew, E. Barrows, P.
M. Alleyne, G. Beckless,
E. Rogers, D. Compbeil

Moegi

Black map

From 9.52
R. Bieknell, H. Champion, G. baer
mond 4

From = Trinidad—i2.9.52
§. Chrichlow, O. Crichlow, H.
H. Gooding, G. Gooding, ¥
L. Inniss a Millan, M. Villa-
ba as . Galati, G. Al
R_ Pinedo, L. Pinedo, D. Pinede
. RR. Stolk, H. Stolk, G

P, O'Reilly.
DEPARTURES

For Trinidad—12.9.52

L. Burr, A. Burr, G. Burr,
J, Burr, N. MacGregor,
R. Skinner, P. Connell, G. Chan,
Simpson, M. Mahon, J. Deboehmler, D
Deboehmier, K. Debochmlér L. Craw
ford, M. Scantlebury, ‘
Marshall, E. Cohen, L. Millan,

In Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

Balfour
Williams

O'Reilly

A. Burr
G. MaeG

T. Crawford, J.

Murr gE

Cable and Wireless (W.I.) Lid. advise

that they can now communicate with

the following ships through thei: Bar-

bados coast station:—
S.S, Texas, s.s.
Constructor, s.s

Scholar, s.s
Queenston Heights, s.s.

Canatian |

Brazil, s.s. Punta Plaia, s.s. Alcoa ‘
Pioneer, s.s. Folke Bernadotts, s.s
Buccaneer, s.s, Archangelos, s.s. Tibe
rius, $.s. Marco Foscarini, s.s. Barbara

Ann, 5.8. Stavik, ss. De Grasse, s.s
Imperial Toronto 5.3 Quirigua es
Alcoa Puritan, s.s. Parismina, s.s. Sun-
dale, s.s. Sun Victoria, s.s. Hgra, M.T
Bahia, s.s. Tartar, s.s Uruguay. s.s.
Riomar, s.s. Mormackite, s.s. Kallada,
5.9, Rochester Cactle, s.s. Cape Hawke,
M.V. Neasera, ss, Pathfinder, s 5
Maracaibo, M.V. Atlantic Hunke. s.s.
Vianna Lianna, s.s. Linga, s.s- Sundial,
8.8. Kern Hills, s.s. Dragon, s.s. Bay-
ano, s.8. Salte ‘57, ss. Scorton, ss
Alcoa Pennant.



Listening Hors

SUNDAY, I4TH SEPTEMBER, 1952
1OO—7.45 pm — If m., 25.53m









400 pm. The News, 410 p m. Inter-
lude, 415 pm Council of Europe Con-
sultative A 430 pm. Sunday
Half Hour, 50@ pm. From The Bible,
510 pm Interlude, 5.15 pm _ Com-
poser of the Week, 5 45 pm
Inn, 6.15 pm English Magazine, 6 45
pm. Programme Parade and Interlude,
700 pm Home News From Britain.
715 pm Caribbean Voices.

745-1015 pam — 2.5%m., 31.32m

t

Esso |

}
j

|

Arthur's ;

745 p m The Feast of the Holy Cross, |

815 pm. Radio Newsreel, 8 30 p.m

A Visit to the Wellington Museum, 8.50 !
From The °

pm, Interlude, 4.55
Editorials, 900 p m
enade Concerts,
1010 p m. News Talk, 10 15 p.m. Lon

pm
From The Prom-



don Forum,

MONDAY, ISTH SEPTEMBER, 1952
4.00—+.1, pom — Wm, 6 53m
400 p.m, The News, 410 p.m, The

Daily Service, 415 pm. The Case of
the Night Watchman’s Friend, 4 45 p.m.
Variety.
ball, 5.05 p.m. Composer of the Week,
515 pm Souvenirs of Music, 6.00 p.m.
Welsh Miscellany, 6.15 pm. Listeners’
Choice, 6 45 pm = Sports Round Up and
Programme Parade, 7.00 p.m.*The News,
7.10 p.m Home News From Britain
715—10.30 pm, — 25.5%m., 31.32m
715 pm Books To Read, 7 30 pm
Film Review, 745 pm. Ballads and
Songs, 815 pm Radio Newsreel,
p.m. European Survey, 8 45 p m
ferlude, 855 pm From The Editorials,
9.00 pm_ Listeners’ Digest, 9 30 p.m.
London Light Concert Orchestra, 10.00
p.m, The News, 10.10 pm. News Talk,
10.15 pom, Seience Review,
Tip Top Tunes.

In-

10 30 pm



Gracie Fields Says
Farouk’s All Right

LONDON, Sept. 13.

Gracie Fields discussed in Lon-
don on Saturday, one of her cus-
tomers at her luxury eating,
swimming, and dancing hostelry
on Dream Island, Capri, the ex-
King Farouk. Gracie spoke not
as a Lancashire comedienne who
holds her big British audiences by
unabashed sentimentality or broad
humour, but as the owner of the
Canzone Del Mar.

She said ‘“Farouk’s alright. He
is a customer of mine at Canzone
Del Mar.” Was it true that he
spent mueh of his time swimming
at the exelusive and expensive
Canzone Del Mar? Gracie said:

He has never swum in my pool”

She added he prefers the sea,
“Farouk has been to her place
pnly three times, she explained.

10,00 p.m. The News, |

|

5.00 pm Rugby League Foot- |

|

|

|

His daughters were there often !
and “they are wonderful girls.
Very nice indeed” On his first

visit to England with Gracie was
her husband Boris Alperovic. *
—U.P.

ORDERS



By
Majer O. F. C. WALCOTT, E.D.,
Commanding,
THE BARBADOS REGIMENT

Issue No. 3,
3X. All ranks
“A" Coy. is allotted the open and min:



the range, Nos. 2 and 3 Platoons will do bayonet training.

will carry out weapon training with a

members of HQ Coy. who have not ye

in toueh with the R,S.M, immediately,
Band

Band practices will be held on Mon, 1

Orderly Officer
Orderly Serjeant

M. L. D,
S8.0.L.F.



12 Sep. 62.

will, parade at Regt, HQ at 1700 hours on Thursday 18 Sep, 52

No. 1 Platoon will be on

HQ and “B" Coys.

lature ranges.

view-to firing the A.M.C.—L.M.G. Those
t been allotted a time to fire should get

5, Wed, 17 and Thurs. 18 Sep. 52.

ORDERLY OFFICER & ORDERLY SERJEANT FOR WEEK ENDING 2 SEP. 5?

2/Lt. L. G. Quintyne
23 L/Sijt. Turney, D. G
SKEWES-COX, Major,
& Adjutant,
The Barbados Regiment.



PART TL ORDERS

THE BARBADOS REGIMENT

i. STRENGTH INCREASE

2/Lt. M. S, Conliffe “A” Coy.
2, TRANSFERS
483 Pte. Toppin, E. N
201 CSM Mandeville, W HQ Coy
%. PROMOTION
204 CQMS Hall, F. B i
M. L

SERIAL NO. 36

Granted a commission in the rank of

2/Lt. by H.E. the Governor and posted

to “A” Coy, w.ef. 3 Sep, 52.

Transferred from Reserve to Active

strength w.e.f. 28 Aug. 52.

Transferred to “B” Coy. w.e4, 12 Sep.

52.

Promoted CSM HQ Coy. w.ef. 12 Sep.

52.

D. SKEWES-COX, Major,

S.0.L.F. & Adjutant,

The Barbados Regiment.

14.9.52—In.

cients atm

POLICE

NOTICE



THE BAHAMAS POLICE :

RECRUITS

Twenty recruit:

The following a
British subject by birth.
Age: 22 to 27 years,

WANTED

re required for the Bahamas Police.
the MINIMUM requirements:—

Education: not less than Standard VII.

Height: 5’ 9” in bare feet.

Chest: not less than 36” expanded.
Single men only will be considered.
Applicants will be seen at the Police Training Senool, District
“A” at 10.00 a.m. on Thursday, 18th September. /

It is no use applying unless you
Police Headquarters,
Bridgetown,
10th September, 1952

satisfy all the above requirements.

R. T. MICHELIN,
Colonel,
Commissioner of Police.

}
|
|

F 12.9.52—3n, '



SUNDAY ADVOCATE

MEETING OF THE SHAREHOLDERS
OF
JOES RIVER SUGAR ESTATES LTD.

\t





‘ At The First Ordinary General Meeting of the Shareholders of Joes River
Sugar Estates Limited which was held at the Hall of the Children’s Goodwill Leaguc |
at 5 p.m. on Thursday last, the 11th instant, Messrs. A. A. Guiler, J. B. Beckles, M.B.E.. |
G. C. Ashby, Dr. E. W. Roberts, C. A. Coppin B.A.Se., and G, G. Medford were re-

elected as Directors of the Company along with M. D, Symmonds, the Managing Di-
rector.

; Before the Meeting commenced the Chairman, Mr. J. B, Beckles. M.B.E., asked |
Members present to stand for a moment in silent respect to the memory of the late |
Adam Straughn Husbands J.P. who had served the Company in the capacity of a Direc- |
tor and ome as its ing Agricultural Attorney.
n moving the adoption of the Report of the Directors, the Managing Director |
Mr. M, o a a a as lans for establishing a coconut and yr |
in-suitable undeveloped areas of the estates, were well umderway and al
thousand dwarf coconuts had been planted. " — ee
ea Steps were being taken to set up a Welfare Department for the Children of |
abourers.
: The shares of the Company were being rapidly taken up, 125,053 shares of)
£1. each having been sold during the period under review, while a Dividend of 8% was!

recommended by the Directors to be payable on the l€th day of December next to| ing

Ordinary Shareholders.

The Report as adopted follows:— | aaa.



GOVERNMENT NOTICES



WAR DAMAGE PAYMENTS (FAR EAST)

Notification has been received the Secretary of State

he Colonies that —
(1) the 31st of October, 1952,

rom

has been fixed as the

Extended Far Eastern Private Chattels Scheme, 1949,

the Burma Business, 1919;

(2






panies Department) Lacon !!ouse, Theobalds Road, London i
W.C.1., before the final dace Cause Ki led in 3 Nays
14.9.52-—1n The very first appiidation WoW c
derm begins to clear qwas qdien
Nike ningic.. Use Nixogerne 1»
nr and you will soon seu vour air
DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE & AGRICULTURE cpining 90 smooth ast ete
vA new diycovery thal

The Department of Science & Agriculture will have

| rainfall areas only.

DIRECTORS’ REPORT | variety should apply

it

|

FIRST ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTORS FOR THE PERIOD 16TH MARCH,
1951 TO 30TH JUNE, 1952





The Directors have the honour to present the Annual Report on the working
of the Company and the Financial Statement with the Auditor’s Report thereon for the
he above mentioned and inelusive also of the crop period 1st January to 15th March

SHARES:—During the period under review 125,053 shares of £1 each were sold.

GENERAL.—The new Roads built at. Horse Hill,.Vaughns, Mt». D'acres, Joes!
River, Frizers and Springfield have considerably enhanced the value of these estates,

The Gulf Oil Company has been carr ying out tests in the area.

The question of land surveys contin ues to engage the attention of the Directors.

Several thousand coconut trees have been planted in suitable areas in accordance
ig our plans for the establishment and developed of a coconut and citrus industry in
the area.

PROFIT AND LOSS ACCOUNT:— From the Net Profit of $40,414.70 the Directors
recommend the following payments and allocations:-~

Transfer to General Reserve .... as ies ik ve $ 5,000.00 }

6’; Preference share Dividend $20,851.00 less $7,818.95 Income

Tax eis ayy rs ae a a eu $13,032.05
8) Ordinary share Dividend $9,134.46 less $3,425.42 Income Tax $ 5,709.04
Transfer to Income Tax Reserve ae es os aay $15,155.34
Transfer to Labourers’ Children’s Welfare or Scholarship Fund $ 108.00
Transfer to Labourers’ House Repair or Improvement Fund $ 408.00
Transfer to Profit and Loss Account $ 1,002.27

AUDIT:—Mr. E. H. Bohne was appointed as Auditor for the period, and is now
eligible for election.

OFFICERS:—It is with deep regret that the Directors record the passing of the
late Adam Straughn Husbands J.P. who rendered outstanding service to the Company as
its Agricultural Attorney and also served in the capacity of a Director.

During the year Messrs. G. G. Medford, C. A. Coppin and Dr. E, W. Reberts have
been appointed to hold office until the next Ordinary General Meeting. At the first
Ordinary General Meeting all of the Directors except the Managing Director retire auto-

matically and are eligible for election.
J. B. BECKLES,—Chairman

M. D. SYMMONDS,—-Managing Director
O. E. MILLINGTON,—Seeretary.

REVENUE ACCOUNT, PERIOD 1ST JANUARY, 1951 TO 30TH JUNE, 1952.

———$—$—$—$—$—$$—$—$$$$$$ SSS
EXPENDITURE REVENUE

$291,318.02 | Property and Produce Account:
349,496.95 Sales of Produce &



Cane Purchase... 4
Cost of Plantation Canes :







PROFIT AND LOSS ACCOUNT

ee ee

General Expenses, Land Sales and Property .. $1,132,513.75
Commission des ie s 31,949.26) Less Cost of Prop-
Licence of Vehicles 252,24 erty Sold 60,000.00 $1,072,513.75
Appraisement 13.64
Interest ‘ ée ed 29,351.75
Transportation and Freight 21,549.16
Rent we “4 mA 67.60
Sugar Bags : 78,119.75
Factory Supplies .. te Repairs to machinery & Vehicles of
Transportation 64,108.81
Stationery -, 532.16
Taxes and Insurance 3,908.93
Wages ard Salaries 92,826.37
Salaries Payable .. AH 1,062.00
Auditor’s Salary Payabl 960.00
Fuel ae ; eg a 52.31
Water Mills and Water Rates .. 22.41
Building Repairs . . si i i 333.59
Depreciation on Motors & Tractors 20% 6,408.80
986,049.05
Contribution to Govt. Reserve Fund 46,050.00
Profit 40,414.70
$1,072,513.75 $1,072,513.75





























Dividend on 6% Prefer- Balance Brough Down . £40,414.70
ence Shares . $20,851.00
Less Income Tax 7,818.95 $13,032.05
Dividend of 8% on e
Ordinary Shaves $ 9,134.46
Less Income Tax 3,425.42 5,709.04
Income Tax Reserve i 15,155.34
General Reserve ie” ne 5,000.00
Labourers’ Children’s Welfare or
Scholarship Fund es a ais 108.00
House Repair og Improvement Fund 408,00
Profit and Loss % yg ‘ 1,002.27
$40,414.70 X sai
BALANCE SHEET, PERIOD 1ST JAN UARY, 1951 TO 30TH JUNE, 1952 t
LIABILITIES & CAPITAL ASSETS
AUTHORISED CAPITAL: Property Purehsse Price $951,482.29
120,000 Prefer- Legal Expenses, Roads,
ence Shares Surveying Improvements 11,349.36 |
@ £1 each £120,000 = $576,000.00 oo carteneatmeierers
40,000 Ordinary 1 012,781.65
Shares @ £1 Less Cost of Property
each £ 40,000=$192,000,00 Sold 60,000.00 $952,781.65
£160,000 $768,000.00 Bank Balance !icyal Bank
eee of Canada a 2,352.93 |)
ISSUED CAPITAL: Bank Balance B'dos, Co-
$6,261 Ordinary op. Bank Limited 2 3,889.61
Shares at £1 Loans on Property Sales: :
each . $174,062.80 Horse Hill Receivable $ 64,427.88
86,792 eee Loans on .Property Sales:

ence Shares Mt. D’Acres &

@ £recch 426,201.60 ere eceivable 16,720.00 81,147.88
nlahiaoeponesiliniaten Preliminary Fxvenses 3
$600,254.40 jonne Plantations ear es

es and Tractors $ 32,041.80 :
PAID UP CAPITAL: Depreciatio ,
14.546 Ordinary preciation $ 6,408.80 25,633.00

Shares y Stock of Factory Supplies

ie aed $ 69,820.89 Roce of Manurent tet rane ae

% rdinary 1953 ©

Shares Partly — 50,707.88

paid 44,360.00 $114,180.80

79,117 Prefer-
ence Shares
Fully paid $379,761.60
9,675 Prefer-
ence Shares
Partly paid 20,824.65 400,586.25
Paid up Capital $514,767.05
Agricultural Bank ' 376,372.29
Other Cash Loans Payable ‘ 8,600.00
Reserved to meet Government Fund . 46,050.00
Manure 1953 i 30,797.28
Accounts Payable 95,578.69
Salaries Payable Ey 5 2,022.00
Profit and Loss .. 40,414.70
$1,114,602.01 $1,114,602.01



AUDITOR’S REPORT
I hereby certify that I have examined the foregoing Balance Sheet with the Books of
the Company, | have obtained all the information and explanetions I have required and that in my
opinion the above Balanee Sheet is properly dfawm wp so as to exhibit @ true and correct view of the
state of affairs of the Company, according to the best of my information and the explanations given
te me, and as shown by the Books of the Company
EDWARD H. BOHNE,

Auditor.

3. Those persons desirous of obtaining planting material of this
in writing to the Director of Agriculture not
Applicants will be in-
formed in due course when they should send for planting material.
2n

ater than Tuesday, 30th September, 1952.

24.8.52

TENDERS FOR THE SUPPLY OF GROUND PROVISIONS

Tenders are invited for the supply of ground provisions for the

three months beginning on the ist October, 1952, to the following your health and weaken your heart.
BP acres In 2 minutes MENDACO—the pre-

Government Departments : scription of a famous doctor—circu-
Glendairy Prison: Sweet potatoes approximately 9,000 lates through the blood, quickly eurb-

ing the attacks. The very first day the

lbs. a month as governed by the number
of prisoners, to be delivered twice week-
ly at the prison in proportionate amounts
5,000
Ibs, a week, to be delivered at the Men-
tal Hospital twice weekly in proportion-

Mental Hospital: Sweet potatoes —- approximately

ate amounts.
Yams —- as available.
Eddoes —~ as available.

Lazaretto: Sweet potatoes — approximately 250 lbs. Rhamist “the guarantee protege you.
a week, delivered twice weekly as
ordered
Yams as available. R H E U M A Tis fi
Edadoes as available.
Breadfruit — as available

2. Tenders should show the price per 100 Ibs.

to the 3lst of December, 1952.

3. Tenders should be forwarded
to the Colonial Secretary (and not to any officer by name) so as
reach the Colonial Secretary's Office not later than (4 p.m.
Wednesday, 24th September, 1952)
marked — “Tenders for ground provisions.”

4, Further information is obt
tal Hospital and the Lazaretto.

5. The Government does not bind itself to accept the lowest
any tender.





TENDERS FOR SUPPLIES

SEALED TENDERS will be received at the Hospital up to
o'clock noom on Wednesday, |7th September,
articles in the following lines for a period of six months from
October, 1952:—

(1) FRESH BREAD
(2) ALCOHOL

(3) COFFINS, and providing HEARSE for the burial of

the dead at the Westbury Cemetery.

(4) PURE FRESH MILK, between 200 and 250 pints a

day only.

Forms for the respective tenders will be supplied on application
to the Secretary of the General Mospital and tenders will not be en-
tertained except they are on forms supplied by the General Hospital
at the time of tendering letters
ota property, expressing their
of the

Persons tendering must submii
from two other persons known to poss
willingness to become bownd as sureties for the
contract,



fulfilment

Terms of contract and any further particulars may be obtained





on application at the General Hosvital. 10.9.52—-3n organs, stimulates them nor-
mal healthy action thus
=| restores freshness and vigour.
411 Chemists and Stores sel)
N. AC. ° ( i) LEARN TO EARN
Thousands of L.8.C al
. th hout the British’ Empire
RULES haver® thoreseed their salaries
th b studying ov asy post.4
Photos of an animal or group of animals. ‘sae th HOOK KEEPING, a
Any size—Black and White Only. RETARYSHIP, BUSID P.
Closing Date—4th October. Croce ce Hoaecs
Association reserves the right to reproduce any print, fees to oversens students. Piplo
4 » f . ractive ed. ‘08 tus —
a aa to the most attractive photo, mas eerie 7unee oF
r , COMMERES | pe
(Dept B.A.5) 116, ‘olborn
IST PRIZE $15.00 *FEondon, W.C.1 Englands
2ND PRIZE . 8.00 SSS
SRD PRIZE 3.00 PRGOSOSS EPO

Decision of the Judges will be final.

All photos to be sent to the S.P.C.A., Office, Harbour

Police Station, c/o Hon. Secretary and marked S.P.C.A. Photo-
graphic Competition.



“YATES” SEEDS

The Seeds that grow .

Fresh Supplies of—

“YATES”

Flower and Vegetable Seeds

Also
“YATES BULBS”
SPREKELIA FORMOSISSIMA ..ee @ 4/6 each
TABEROSE (Double large Clumps) @ 2/6 each
CRYTHANTUS (Alfafa Lily) wa @ 4/- each

Obtainable at:—

BOOKER’S (B'DOS) DRUG STORES LTD.

Broad Street, and Hastings (ALPHA PHARMACY)

|
iil il lenin lelaaalaal



final date for
the receipt of Claims in respect of the United Kingdom Far
Eastern Private Chattels Scheme, 1946, the United Kingdom
and

any United Kingdom British subjects now resident in Barba-
dos who may be eligible to submit a claim under one of these
schemes, but who have not clready done so should obtain an
application form from and make the necessary declaration
the Assistant Secretary, Board of Trade, (Insurance and Corn-

a limited
| quantity of planting material of the variety B.45151 available for
distribution later in the year.

2. This variety has relatively thin canes, but is capable of giv-
very heavy yields of plant and ratoon cane, and has an excellent
It is recommended for trial on a commercial scale in the high

at which each
of the abovementioned commodities will be delivered at the institu-
| aon concerned during each month of the period from the Ist October

in sealed envelopes addressed

The envelope should be clearly

inable from the Prison, the Men

14.9,62—-1n,

1952, for supplying















Don't neglect a d
seated cough! Rub t
chest with A.l, White
Liniment. The etrating
heat stimulates b: cireu-
lation and promptly relieves
congestion. Thous: have
found relief with A.!.













































imples G













gerins and parnsites on the kit th
cause Plnples., B Red Plot
Kozema, Ringworm, wud a

You can't get vid of » .
until you re:nove the'gerne that hide
in the tiny pores of your skin. So
get Nixoderm from your chemitlet to-

day under the positive guarantee that

Nixederm will banish pimple aod
clear your skin soft and smooih or
money

hack on

Nixoderm ©)":
’

Wer Skin Troubles jackuse

ASTHMA MUCUS

Dissolved First Day

Choking, gasping, wheezing
Asthma and Bronehitis poison
your system, sap your energy, ruin



trangling mucus is ftagolved, thus
iving free, easy breathing and rest-
ul sleep, No dopea, no smokes, no
‘njoetions, Just take pleasant, taste-
fosa MENDACO tablets at meals and
be ontirely free fcom Asthma and
Bronchitia im next to no time, even
though you may have suffered for
years, MENDACO is. so successful
Yhat it la cuavanteed to give you free,
euwy breathing in 24,hour® and to
completely stop your Asthma in 8 days
or jon back on raturn of empty

ge. Get MENDAGO: from your





and agonising
BACKAGHE

=v








to
on

or

Sufferers from
rheuma will
be interested in
the experience
related in this
man's letter ;-—

relleved by
“Some years
ago L began to

KRUSCHEN
* feel rheumatism

in my arms and shoulders, Then
a started in the small of my
, increasing until they were
reuly severe, I hought a bottle
of Kruschen and was surprised to
find that I got a little relief. I
bought another and before it was
fi ed all my pains had gone
sproarsDagain MY pains were
appea again.
Obstinat and the relief really
au me."—T.R. a ‘ .
Rhe tic pains and backache
are woually the result of poisons

1 oigons which lazy
wols and. tired kidneys are

hasnts Bors { 4 er
com! ere 16
treatment than Kruschen Salts
treatin cleanses all the intern

Obstinate

ig | complaints



ist





JUST RECEIVED

suns

POTTERS ASTHMA REMEDY
BRAND'S BEEF ESSENCR
LIVONAL
HORLICK MALTED MILK
(3 Steen)

MILLER'S WORM POWDERS
WARDONIA RAZOR HADES
KAOLIN rourare
ANTIPHLOGISTINE
VITAB
INFANTOL
LOKOL DROPS

PEERS OC CSN A

(. CARLTON BROWNE

Wholesale & Retail
Druggist

136 Roebuck St. Dial 2815

PRAMS

%
.





No Visit to Barbados is eom-
plete without visiting the
famous terrace of

CACRABANK HOTEL

(a short ride from Town)
Overlooking and command-
ing the whole of

WORTHING BEACH

Here sitting over the sea, in

all the breezes that blow,

you can drink its famous

Planters Punch — or have

LUNCH—TEA—or DINNEK
or TEA or COFFEE

at 11 a.m,
After a hot shopping speil
take a Bus or Taxi to

CACRABANK
and bring your costume for
a swim to enjoy its coolness.
Ask for a leaflet of rates,
and look at its rooms,
Parties for Luneh and
Dinner arranged,
Dining Room on Terrace
Telephone 8148 and 8613

ooo






PAGE

AGRICULTURAL NOTES:

SIXTEEN

Cane Root Infesting Mealy

By R. W. E.



TUCKER

N the first place this Cane Root Infesting Mealy Bug
must not be confused with the Cane stem mealy bug which
has been known for a long time in Barbados and is under

control,

The root infesting mealy bug was first noticed on twe
widely separated plantations in the hillier red soil areas
in 1951, when some third or fourth ratoon fields which had
previously given good tonnages started to fail either com-

pletely or in patches.
At about the same time reports
which have since been published





were received from Trinidad
i i} inhabitant ant wa)
associated with a small white
cane ot infesting mealy bug
iv me cane growing areas,



The sudden decline in ratoon
capacity of some plantation fields
Bayvbados could not be attri-
buted in 1951 to lack of rainfall





or to pver soil tilth, but appeared
to be a direct outcome of the
destruction of the cane root sys-
tem due to the continual sucking
of their juice by the small
white mealy bug.
Survey

A survey was made and is
being continued to find out
whether the root mealy bug is

ent in all areas of the





pres
is Apparently it is not,
neither is its attendant ant, a
C jicuous golden yellow ant,



1 heneycombs the soil in

frected







fields, and farms out the

ealy bug onto the cane roots
‘his ant ACROPYGA rears both
y bugs and ants in cells
and in tunnels which it makes in
the soil and carries the mealy



bugs around from place to place
the

in its jaws, Also when ants
swarm in their flying stage,
each ant carries a mealy bug or

one of its own young, in its Jaws

and thus spreads’ infestation
Infestation was also found to
extend in some areas to grass

roots in sour grass pastures and
cane (races,

The next step taken was to
collect numbers of the ants and
the root infesting mealy bugs
and to send them for identifi-
cation by experts in Lordon and
in Washington, The identifications
were the same in both cases,
namely that the golden yellow
ant was ACROPYGA MAR-
SHADLI and that the cane
root infesting mealy bug was
NEORHIZOECUS, new _ species,
but nearest in identification to
N. COLOMBIENSIS.

It was next ascertained that
the golden yellow ant had been
recorded many years ago in

Barbados and that planters had
seen it and fhought it was some
sort of wood ant.

No one however had ever seen
the small white mealy bug before,
nor had they seen the flying
form of the ant carrying the
mealy bug in its jaws

Failure
The failure of ratoon crops in
some fields or areas was not new

but had always been traceable
to damage by the cane root
borer BEETLE DIAPREPES

ABBREVIATUS. It is possible,
but not very probable, that when
searching cane ratoon roots for
root borer grubs, the white mealy
bugs on the roots had been over-
looked and not seen. The fact
that it is a new specie of mealy
bug and that lailures of ratoons

had appeared in a season of
excellent rainfall, and ih areas
not usually affected by root

borer, points to its being a new
pest of sugar cane, or one which
for some reason had suddenly

become a menace to ratoons and
had been noticed for the first

time in 1951.

Whatever the reasons for its
first having been notic?d in 1951
there seems no doubt that in
Barbados it is a primary pest to
cane root systems and that it is
on the increase and that it is
injurious to successful ratooning,

One other point that must be
noticed is that modern field cul-
tivation methods break up and
reduce the mealy bug association
in the soil, but do not destroy it;
hence plant canes are seldom
affected to a _ serious extent
though a few tons of canes per
aere may be lost. The ant mealy
bug association, however, built up
during first and second ratoons,
during which tonnage is also lost
may ‘also b2 reinforced by
migrations "by flying ants carry-
ing mealy bugs or from sour grass
pastures with the result that
third or fourth ratoons start to
lose tonnage so rapidly that they
are not worth keeping, which is
a serious matter,

Control

The steps which are being taken
to control this damave are, first,
to ascertain what soil insectoxi-
eant will kill the ants and mealy
bugs, how to apply it so that its
application can be fitted into the
plantation routine, and at what

They’

B-B-BUT OUR NEW A
HOUSE ISN’T FINISHED )’
YET“WE CAN'T MOVE YOUR
OUT--WE AIN*T GOT
NO PLACE TO GO---

THE CONTRACTOR
» PROMISED IT'D
BE READY-:+
BUTITLL BE
A FEW MORE>:




















DID OR DION’T DO! THIS Is
A LEASE EFFECTIVE TODAY!) (
WE'RE MOVING INAS OF _/

Now, SAVVY P

tic Sperts
cvent

bers cf the

Mr. R. W. TUCKER
rate of application it will be
effective and yet economic and
will be able, at the same time
to control other cane rot pest
such as root borer, brown hard
back and wood ants in the soil

The experiments must aiso
cause no damage to the soil or to
the growth of the first crop
canes,

As a proportion of each plan
tation canefie'ds is only pre-
pared and planted in cane once
a year, and as fields which are
to be planted in provision crops
are not considered suitable, and

as thrown out jields are also not
suitable, it is possible to carry
out only a limited range of tar







ge
scale expe iments once in every
year. Re ults from these experi-
ments are not expected to
in first crop yields for re
already given and are unlike
show until third or fourth
ratoon crops; that is in some
years’ time.

Nevertheless experiments must
be carried out, both on a imall
scale in block of ranadumised
plots and on a large scale on

plantations; for if ratoons fail in
years of good rainfall due to
insect pests damaging and even-
tuslly destroying the cane root
ystem the loss will be far more
severe should a period of real
drought come along.

For these reasons the Govern-
met:t has provided funds for the

tmportation of soil insectoxicants
(the one now being used is a
high gamma _ isomer content of

gammexame) machinery for dis-
tributing it on plantation fields
and personnel for continuing the
experiments which have already
been started, ;

Roads In DaCosta
Land Repaired

Quite recently, repairs have been
mé de to the te nantry roads in the
DaCesta Land area, ‘This move on
the part of the Highways &
Transport has provided the “resi-
dents of this area with roads suit-
able for any type of weather It
has also provided motorists with
a short-cut from Deighton Road
Dalkeith.



PIPE LINES LAID
Pipe lines have recently been
laid at the Villa Road, Brittons
Hill, This district has been witn-

out water for sometime now and
residents will surely welcome this
move On the part of the Water
Works Department
TURTLE MAN”

A new feature has been added tw
the city of Bridgetown, that i
cry of the “turtle man”, This gen
tleman can be seen around the
streets of Bridgetown with his
trade on a push-cart, This includes



the flesh, shell, and eggs of the
turtle
y . ‘ .
Devotional Service
~
At Y -M.C.A,
THE Weekly Devotional Ser-
vice of the Barbados Y.M.C.A.,
will be held this evening at 4.30

p.m. at the Associat'on Headquart-
ers. Mr. J. G. A. Pile will be the
Speaker.

A cordial invitation is extend-
‘4 to all Members and the gen-
ral public,

1 Do It Every Time seinen il

LOOK, BUD“sIT'S NO SKIN }7/ AND ALL
OFF MY NOSE WHAT /

LEAN=TO CONTRACTOR

LIVE IN
peer el
an eliemnne a
{ THEY COULD MOVE )
( INTO Te F
OF THE









Cumberbatch closely,

S of the sys

ARE FILLED! soy
THING TELLS ME
THE EIGHTBALLS

WILL HAVE TO \

CELLATI
L Xs )

THAT 1S, IF THEY'VE «4. gp
GOT DIVING suits joe
sy OR A ROW BOAT. 7 |









Scout Votes:

3RD SEA SCOUTS HOLD

AQUATIC

On Monday, 8th September,
Third Sea $couts held their Aqua-
at Speightstown, ‘Tine
ill open to all mem-
Group and Rover Ed.



d Cumberbatch gained most
points, Outstanding, however, was
th performance of fifteen-year-
old Howard Reid, who, competing
against many older boys, rivalled

The jetty at Plantations Ltd.
wes made available through the
courtesy of the manager, Many
well-wishers watched the Sports
from this jetty, among whom were
Commissioner L, B, Waithe and|
Mr. Basil King, Secretary of the}
Local Association, |
The results were
25 YARDS FR

as follows:—
(Ee STYLE |
Reid 3.|




1. Cumberbatch 2
Waithe
NEAT DIVE
1. Reid 2.Chandler 3, Corbin |



25 YARDS BACKSTROKE |
1, Cumberbatch 2. Waithe2
Reid,
BOAT RACE
1. Scouts (Reid,
Waithe) 2. Rovers
LONG DIVE
1, Cumberbatch 2, Chandler
Waithe, |
50 YARDS FREE STYLE |
1, Cumberbatch; 2. Reid; 3. |
|

Chandler

Goodridge

100 YARDS FREE STYLE
Waithe 3. Chandler
SCOUTS |

1, Reid 2
CATHEDRAL

HIKE

On Thursday, September 11th

15 Scouts of the 3rd Bridgetown

Cathedra! Group with their Grou)





” r
Capt. Armstrong To
oa a) ‘

Falk On 999 Systeni |

On Thursday night next Capt
W. H.R. Armstrong will give a
talk over Rediffusion Ltd. on the
use of the 999 system, This talk
will be followed by a recording
stem in operation.

The whole programme will last
about 15 minutes.



So You Think |
It’s Hot?

@ From Page 12

haps the best all-year-round)

|
climates, though it rains rathe;
a lot in winter in Ponta Deigada.

How does Barbados stand in
comparison with these places?
Not too bad at all. Our average

temperature in the day in Janu-
ary, for instance, is 83°, with

night temperature of 70° and a
humidity of 68. It gradually
gets warmer until May and June
—which have the highest aver-
age day temperatures of the year
—show 87° on the thermomete?
in the day, 73° and 74° at night
and humidities of 64 and 69.
August, September and October
have average day temperatures
of 86° and night temperatures of
between 74° and 73° but it seems
hotter because the average
humidity varies between 71 and
72. So, in fact, what we call
the hot months are not real'v the

hot months at all, but the humid
months,
These average temperal ures
; and humidity readings compare
more than favourably with Kins-
ton, Jemaica In Kingston \he
temperature on an average Jan-,
uary day is 86°, and while thi

falls to 67° at night the humidity |
is high at 78 July and August}
are grim in Kingston with day |
temperatures of 90° and the}



nidity varying between 76}
nd 79. In October the humid- |
is as much as 84,
Barbadians will be surprised t
learn that never since recoras |
i.ve been taken has it been as |
hot in Bridgetown as it has been |
n Moscow! The highest record-
ed temperature in Barbados
92°, whie in Moscow one August |
he thermometer was reading |
100°. It can get hotter in London
too in Summer than in Barbados,
and temperatures of 94 have
been recorded there ‘in August.
In New York heatwaves are}
common With temperatures |
which have recched 102°, and|
even in Paris the thermometer |
hs reached 101 |
So next time you feel hot re- |
member the poor devils in Am- |
man, Death Valley or for that
matter, foscow! |

By Jimmy Hatlo



THE HOTELS \74 ~G
Fie I KNOY Ve
4 THAT CONTRACTOR, |.



THE JOINT BE
READY FOR THE
A TREEâ„¢, \ VISITORS










3







} 4.9% THE ONLY’ \ |
® +{ THING THAT \t |
KEEPS GOING \

UP IS THE |

BUILDER'S

ESTIMATE: } |







Tae . }
S i |
sal iy

DREAM HOUSE IT
WAS ++sNOW IT’S
MORE OF A
NIGHTMARE =



Scoutmaster
left Bridgetown at 8.30 a.m. for u
hike across the country.
ject of this hike was to train ihe
youngsters in methods of Observa-
tion, Pathfinding and Mapping.

fore the start

scouts were left
up the trail”, This was only suc-
cessful up to a certain point as the
heavy rains in the country washed
away the
G.S.M, Otherwise the hike was a
success



SUNDAY ADVOCATE









BUILDING

“|

x 6 1, x6

:s.s 145 x 8 2x

1x 10 1) x 10 =z

SPORTS 1x12 2x 10 2x
4x4 4x6

Mr. George Spencer 1} x 12 2x3
The ob 13 x12 2x6

GALVANISED RIDGING

The route was not indicated be-
and two senior
behind to “Pick

signs placed by the

It took six hours,





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SUN SUITS
$2.07 — $3.50

10, 11, 12 & 13

ROMPERS
$3.75 — $4.50

Broad Street



BIG HEADLINE NEWS...



€



Z R SF
LADIES SHOES smallsizes from $2.00 to $4.99 _ }}} SHOP EARLY

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THE MODEL











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DOUGLAS FIR in the following sizes:-

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Phone 4267

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Prices from $1.90 — $2.40

FLOWERED COTTON DRESSES





pon

oa Al

Some Merchants are Protesting and CUSTOMERS

From all over the Island are Rejoicing for the

WONDERFUL



SEPTEMBER 14, 1952

SUNDAY,

a


















LZ Attractive Swim Shorts

in a variety of materials,
|many colours and brand-
ed tops in quality.

|
MATERIALS |

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4 3x6
6 3x8
8 2x 12





Smooth, well tailored
Slacks are a pleasure to
wear when made to your
| exact needs, and in mate-
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THIS WEEK





==



PRINTED MORCAINS — 95c° yd.

WHITE CREPE — 77c yd.

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AND |
i} }
} | New Styles in LADIES’ DRESS
saad | HATS — From $3.00 to $4:00

STORE — Corner Broad & Tudor Sts.

.











te




PAGE 1

IWt.l 1WII.VK SUNDAY ADVOCATE si Mill -| I'll \lllll: II ! %  • %  ; MR. E. M. FOKSTKIi l H lil mi* \Rt> MORGA doxical position oi wto$€ last novel appear*-.! nearly thirl *.vas nig emainThis curiou : %  %  df titi %  ,inrt often extreme!'. 1 inong tin 1 IM, IHl'J ). %  i il cultured %  B School uix! ul King i Cot 1 rn histor. T> i Wwn the opt talion of the Public Sot. the intellectual fred.>ii University lorn.' nf a series of antitheses win.-were to I* the 'LtitmoO I 11 Tor Cambridge wv. Torrter a shliiitiK Vision of p Ul in contrail .•• %  July" v. • i mnbol '"I %  > truth and %  tA li'' -l"ii.sl. we IIUKI.I >... Hi* early stone;. reflect the iiest hc-tic classicism of 'he DOnai I i-m *te >**• in Modi fauns and dryad* nuiki freo,.n ances Thi, awarenea* a, -. upvr natural foreshadow Leal element of later work, whare people things arc liable to aaume a mm IxUir Quality iium-randm., tneii natural existence Already m these stories on* bs*ic 11'.i i Bis lifatruth, nature, gaiety nnd youth, against imtaaiaTy. convention pomposity nnd shsm. to*?" !" ?* This West Indian Culture—7 By As BVfSflMSM *'" HATr.rr,,rt„ 18 I n,,..,., P Kallo,„ : ~£; %  "> MnnsMhlu that expresses our -.racier hardb and tamper); aooiethlni; T Mat alTtsctl West tndianj personcouldn't say tlii* of rt that they can think ery own ^VWH." Failing to And ft typical f..rm of art^we ar.' %  By IAN GALfc the old (*rma. but bandied with a different to We can't be unary i reatttn*. artiau bee ..use th* y LUM palal It is perfectly suited 10 satuIlka all other Rgej I the current SOUK: our novelists bnau^ OR g very pungent tn.%  d *u liuiunu boat oparatui %  %  % %  I %  %  I %  %  %  J %  %  %  UWj mi. larity would soon rjvaj thjt .. .,i Uiliiu reaUattcally d Ihng Crosby. That, no doubt, ... tm %  • why the persona) s..i.. eii Ip L-.iit.i'd. The calypso ID the hA<: R •* %  of skilled h.indlc their materials .. on.y are shrewd witty and M t9 were born anfl 'avc And of course, they are a very So far. ait has i lived m out islai ., Bpra and ridiilgniAcaaee at ;.ll. il la ilmpl] them. Wc want out nnvc ,%  i ule iu.li %  While. The HMU dltlHiv ol u> r n.n. iM all thrir MoOtri', A a< tea %  • %  • %  %  aHaaaatMsa • I i -,'t-i.n -. BtStl a aaj %  %  rtI '34' %  youu man cbaarv temper %  %  %  %  ... uruia. h I i The BrU novel 'Where Anei-1* fear to Trt'jd' wai 1905 and la aat In Ital I Forster bad a deep but not uncritical admiraMoi Hero the main conflict is between Eii|(lir>li n u> lability und Italian paganism. The Enalish mtdfllr el ass is represented by the Herrltons of Sawrton. doailnecrins mother. bigot* d daughter Hariict, nnd the son rump. j i The widowed daufihter-in-1;i I %  I has fou %  :aUod Oeorav Faneraoii and his uLi .,baarv, l iior.fc ti Ut t %  bam her in , I mwi ant Brudb *. jmulm hrr with -. ki.s "" fligtifsl The linds Lu. SurreN ' I thlp in.inga to t realc hi %  '> %  %  40 Ker flar>> ln| ROrAa U< H \ \. I nUllectual mtob. but Bat v.iiivk. Sibi-ci place in the world howevei %  hile the tin-1 I ..i a) % %  U "ting. ITie Wer*t Indiun And Mi( %  lypM Most noticeable among typ Weat Indian form of Hi I • alypso It really cam* oin( ,ily from Trinidad, but are think <>f il H charactaristic the West Indies as a whole, fo. taO b no i-uncein tot lon •>* CO have hrji-l Apart Iroin tttla it U ;• mp meni of ShMki-stwarean pessiniBMII anil intell.s,iual be! touched up erith aHemetlng brut aljty ami purpoaeleM t.' i \ The only phiiosophical conclu* iv Hie one we and Twei thrr. dmppii II, ...MI .J -K" down in iirfc He if. li. i".. "im a nail %  %  %  ..< itH'ii Heal to admit tin lovi fm ii %  kind nf liinlMi from which she ll only awakened t>v ..Id Mi and the boo U Lucy and %  rim. agair it nora The Ix'ila. always rather ui happi ending is rare work Hero it rei 'luring Italy with a frten pilitual victory-but nnd sends the norri(yint,' r>'-w. tl .' .iion wll) ,fHshe Intends to in-urv On It. .t—at th beat, Phlbp Is dispatened post-haate to i„. W ajpgy, it is only or, of the stop ihe match but nrrive* too many ways in which Love will late and U laughad al for his i tnbllsh 11s kinKdom The husband. Gin<>. t u be a cheerful nnd conventional Indeed, it Is .' % %  I \oung tough: the marriage ll not Forster that people v. ho eajfbkjg. a success: Leila is mlaci il b approval are Invnrlal Ann 11.• diei in giving birth to n who In some degree despise other son The lli'rritnn Nlliajag dni le human being*. Haniet, the Peinthfit the child must be brought to brokes, Cecil, and Inter the Wilthem away from the corrupting enxes nnd ihe Anglo-Indiana all Influence of Us father. Philip, have this, i-aiil.nal view, it is Uu* Harriet nnd Can UlV Lell 'hat F.irslar lays on his coloui original companion, nit foTrenlhi-T darkly, but be is too nn*> an artist therefore ..t Uonuniano, Philip and too mi the existand Caroline are soon convertel vi f good-and-evll by the atmosphere of the pi .tec and exclui\cl> in bla< bf Otno'f unabashed goon humour ell the amp, to i., minted witn and obvious devoUon to the chll Uih RU %  and P" ; Odoo tlwir III to be among the mission Tlii 'tinned. without the half-crazed HarmIt ll Dot tat; t" dvs. rlbe will who kidnaps the child with the any auccrortneea Porat help of Ihe local idiot: the coach novel 'Howards End', which overturns on the way to the etaocared In 1910. One ma) as low as 80* Ul year, the | W hcl.i-.. ,., Bxk nthn teal made to determn ourable tempna' naarli %  I % %  l.i.ldl.idy neji tenant provided thai l 1 1 I inaertj her weekly renl. ail who is all aha snare unrea ••uuti .site knows that houavs -re hard to get. is hardly an ex%  ggwetlnn In Brttteh Outaj i tgff la tance, housing are so terrible |hai the aoveru* moot has to iotervene to protect the lenaut from beuig thrown out of bis lodging MM .11 the other atUndai hnve adopted than he can bear, or from having t with a deep and personal lo\<' Iho stairs or the roof of his house m any aitlftl mi''lrut their ov Thev are composed and sung m removed to convince him th..i inspiration bacaUM it KI Britivh Guiana Dominica. S; he had better come out a^ quicki ,h,i lg < whuli thev aoara latuCbt Lucia and St, Vincent. When" poaatWe. This government .-.re „ ar d „ heraay. r-ver aometblog f inaporlanof jrni. of course, infunaus in.Bu M ^^ do-tn t ^^ h happen* there is certain i ,„. landlords, and we have the tm-iWwl n(lian naUon v some c'ommenl upon il bv the comical siluation of a man un, h i nkw and ilbovr aH nink even a governor, and the toll " %  * reason w.thou g. e frequantK b-nned ul rar| very many months' notice l for this reason Some of Ihe -pending all his rwfrvee rniypeoea are rrKterna-*l aav Inpatience In the meanwh.l. Pirtklitia ii-n Naananar Hut 1 am almost Mfftabn thai hhimself doesn't believe th.* huh pcunls up lo the fact th' %  'literary" men who write hec -, us they en)oy tricking up phrase and verses. don and the child is killed. Philip with l broken arm has bo braaui B r.inn. in an OUtbU I I animal aava| I rarj nearly ktlhl him Hi I| av.d by the Uo I jj arrival of COfOttna who sunn-.iIn reconciling the two men. At Philip and Caroline return In Bawstot wc learn that enrol III Iwo confllclin life, the* inner and Ihe outer %  id their reconciliation that it's about people and %  QOUM in the country that It's about •-elf-knowledge and the supremac of personal relations. The peopl HI *le S<-hlegels. two Margaret and Helen. wh< can workers and the shown that 0' v # ilh %  humidit, %  70 is the i to find thi i howovar Fi" in tano % %  i in summer would be t" tempera lures twivn *n nH 70' nm^^n^ 70 iv nitfht 'it* Barcaton< In Bprinsj Pie,too—Indead Barhavgf pera> On Psa' ir • ii.i. the 1ellc?tr. mostly hy ThT'Tmoc pnastly people who s'lil *' 1 %  iginal sin and who arc i have ivn apeakably shocked when they meal somebody who isnl a purlfni AmenUn But in -pile of Ihe neaaching of thet* moral lf bugs the West Indian Love ,.*o as much as he |ov. cricket: his carefree styl< W playing cricket nnd his carcfr-e •tyle of ooaapoasflg mu %  <"' both haractenstir of him. and tenant who, though absolutei ',! honest and virtuous, cannot earn enough money to buy a house lo himself and lenve his lai with hi' own property. And are can well imagine that th situation would he a thou worse if the tenant had to deal. not with a landlord, but a landlady. Determined und unscrupulous women can certainly be nuisance To have one of these >ver you. with powers to take Results OfJ*itiiiun's Typewriting Exam. around an l by a MotU i .in hnglish girl whom he is conducting round the sinbtre Malabar caveFloOt lent racial feeling are Al the trial the t;iil suddenl.. n iiaclb liei accusation. One Englishman, Fielding, has ; i his bellaC in ihe doctors Uino. m ovi n IM ii 'in provt u friendship between hun and Aziz la uimciiiiinexl by suspicion and inndnig. It cannot nourish ami Whag] tinally LbaW incei again on the neutral ground of THE following candidates wen L* eei (ul al the la-t pitman*! lypawrflinf ExammauOn held al rombermere under the supervision r Mr C B Buck. Fl PS KI.RMENTARY First Class Kthelme EUlolt. Gcrnldinc %  Ml tanaHHIV ,,nl, r.m 0fW1 tha. he c.n ?'*"'J~" ,'', m d i.„i,!L I Kim., Grnl (MteM. Unlom: ,llv c.ll h., .-Khl tolKk.lW ^~^' "J !" ^•• aw '"' l.illn Norrb. En Richar.1llhoul an; ho 5 ,la(lon. I"r .w, m M S'.S'JJI.v S3S! r, ce Cumberhulcli. G. Roberts. -reUSU OUI .a..' tml rnrmm. jii.nT-iri !" > Petrlri. Hope IMIn M. Howelh: Mo one cn ben notlclliK ihW .„.,. ..f* 1 ";'' 1 _"<•"•"?. Violrt Ba.rd tin loe o< rliyUim looorl In e Derek Wleotl (Mr. L. S. Riehard.): Olori., t W.v.1 In.l.i'K (tin !>•t..un.l n> ..ol Unl.'r th,. 1IB.C. and the BritPilgrim. Mary Clarke 'Mi I two other ireas in Hi. vvo.lil lab l^re %  . 1 liafen't yrt mentio,i,l Hock); Av>n Pilsrlm c n..,.,plv Sni,.i, mil In, ..iiui.. 1 DereL Walcolt. I ..in not at all CTGraham). John Klne (Mo,. ...i.T,.. ... Liu, Am..,,, l„ '"". however, that Walcott exert. Hlh School), rioriellovell (Mi inumta JSSrbOlJS '.' nrnjor force in ^.p.„ KU ,.W.O. Bovcc. Roni.M Daniel (MlT ul calynao Is po o ip l ately foreign to all other people. And It isn t difficult to see th*ifhey have all come originally from Africa. The M India i O. Boy-re,. Ronald Dani< nation. He seems to be out Carol Yearwood). Jenn R;.r f touch with reality. H utfate possibly l* rvmcmbervd in future years as a unique liter,.i technician; in fact, if his dcvclopt continue* at its present rate sjiUB Spam, left ihe he is certain to be. Howeve rhythm of ihelr music behind, will hardly be remembered in. And of course they left man) major prophet, like Shelley 1 other things too. Their influence doesn't seem to know what H has been strong, persistent, and uetually is; he is too literary. I llble. The gaiety and la, of course, young (like myseli ilour the splendor and lightbut this is hardly an exc Indian S:uU Uicy realise thai too hearted romance thai we assort*hia academic approach to herself i km with the inner hie. and the Wllcoatai Gino. elnctint men of the world: there — are also the Basts, the etaaital A synopsis is always unsaUsfncunrterdoas. At bridges between tory and misleading. I have only u.e two \\ atUsmpted Ihis one because it bel,,,,>.,.,IP. belong* to n< to bring out certain c-senlta bat N aclertsli. f ,. „tieiiia. w,i. %  %  Strong plot, brilliantly taut COtl PldoWOd Henri Wll">x •truction. a marked Intcn rhythm-with passion, sensuality ,,,, .... and violence lurking In the backW ,i,„ x ,., nllTl ground should add hat |M)) u fcofc c ontatna aome superbly eo. .mee the seen.-gnd shows an abaolut .,„, „, l( ,.. ,. .., .,... astonishing maturity. The next novel. The Long Journey', appeared two years later In '1 and Is perhaps the most persond novels, Forster opposed the pagan of all Forster's works. It is th) M w Ufi miial prostorv of a sensitive, eivili/ed bul l'"' 1 honeetj to mud. weak young man who makes a tsaag, real feaung to preti dreary and disastrous DMIttl H< i Hal darkness is ihe undergoes a spiritual deterioration failure to Yontio.f, th. p I and is finally roaeued, only to dl accept moral ic>p.Msilt: he made Un ulr has been fixed beiwaao tiiein licitthen is a tragedy of mass misunderstanding, personal relationships are n.it ciiougt: in too many people -Hid tensions involved urwi there Ll not enough lov< in go reund. With mon and noiv kiliciliesA, iindersl inning ..1 affecuasL sainethiai mai 1 1 ran the wrack aat. %  ... 'i.in-n .nid .'in ;• 1 1. List in %  .1' clusiveness. A alMng oarrativi %  and for passages of null al o 1 "ik as a noveh 1 lb nceloi lb %  t.eln I ll .t< it and truth ami his hatred of tyranny and sbani In in] form %  re expressed |D Other ways W0 1 an only iimef thi'ie .m DO tnOCI id ba grateful fog whal have. 1 haw I : .iltmanslup, the knowledge and understanding, the bOaUt) Of tile style, ". rocetarian osaarn, tbg brooj u • Hut lll.tr more lo M ihaii thai. Korstrr is aaaMtsalh tod cverylhin?. ..itln k When one thinks "of Shellev h. raaBy African in origin Wo ted ~eif; the boy v,-ho got into trouble Howt-in much thai can be called Latin kl """' because of his chemical Ojalsaja the Weat Indie*, and %  the predomigjujt negt.1 influence. ''"" J5I3TD' c.iM.it.oN.I Euro ice ;hp menUHy mslaniflcanl maio. B and auoterity T1Mpi of m u and who was <>Mmt aow „. continenl that have the Latin )rom Oxford because he dared 'a %  .. temiH-r are not tvpic.l of Europe hallenge the ministers to a rationAnOl.KT AtlClitUt \\ al all We must go lo Ge-. J( i discussion of their religious _ r expeiunent and his delerminati 10 know the true nature oi th. re,— the undergraduate wh, called "mad" because he W 1 think otherwise th; (Mrs. It. Barrow). Lucine Hurl rifles v Rollins) ind GwendoU rvoberw. Second Class Marlene Carter (Mr. L K. Nurse). Muriel Murrav (Mr. C 11 Horkl. Eudell Blackett (St. Johns F. I.) IVTERMEDIATF First Class Eileen Roach. E Weatherhen.' (Miss Lintonl, Jean Arthur lMi M. innlss). Joan Peterson (Mi's Avelyn Pilgrim (Mr Glendcne 1! (Sf. John's E. 1.1 Second Class Ellrabeth Gay (Mt. Tabor F I •li>an Phillips (Miss I.tnt.ti irtla Armstrong (Miss Howll) barn Alleyne %  ligit man War %  %  1 hen t"lk music and ""' Been and earth (many of them |QV ,„!, . utnasdns future mature, no doubt, but the ins # ueii f \v, • Indian wiiiposerN wrHlnit [KTtapt thing is that he capable of inwr ^^^ like Sibelius or Tschaikovky or thinlUng about ^m).-the young Qlvtn Schumann* No our music will man who crossed the Irish Chanrt Scanrlinavia if we views.— the young author Of SRI V Hir i II O h Pg>l v ii*'lV" .1 true Impression And Queen Mab". a poem exprcssii": < ^*** **T3'"I3 wsrsste l*> rould be more riifTerrnt than uidgements on everything,in henvI, 1V EHS will make another atl.dk music and oura? Been and earth (many of themm.. lvmpi u raum( l|lc French J awl '" raiiek from the sea bed of the 'sisin. During lasl week, wearing oxygen masks down on several occasion IH> not only more emotional, bu' nel to deliver a political harangue ,v Ii to the people on the other side, ernolonal in „ dTerent *..> n ^otutjonary poet who was will l more warm-blooded. And ^^ ^^ ^el^by things o( there h boOlhll more truly charthc ," lntel|trl and who WM QCl ,. ssctarMk of 1 people than their mined ,„ ,. political sense In thmusic. world — when we think of how Wo can lake huio-isiiiisii music int)miltjy concerned the youn.; aj summfcnj up the inlluenc.that Shelley was with real life, it is has civilised these parta, and impossible to explain sway Derek this has little real connection Walentt's literariness as the rc„ ith u excepl '*ia'. oi the u u oi his youth, .luilhern-romamic .M^poaaea. ami No WMS No one dispute* that he has before Ihe violent and symbolic climax. This novel is bitter and passionate, often extremely funny—but ihe Ironic comment culs very oean the quick and the final afnt on the whole a distressing one. .-tails lu India, "one in 1VI2 and At la in 1024. he produced his final me terpleeo—'A Passage to India 11 1 and secured the hull of the vessel as part of ihe preparation for ihe operation. More than two years ago the I'oliek sank at the cross berth of the inner basin after she sprant a leak some hours earlier. Subsequent attempts at salvaging hei While under water, she fell 11 auction lo James Murray, a local ..iicr in charcoal who then look aval the raaponaibuity of having her salvaged. Divers removed ine literary gift and a pretty and parts lha yawl from time t.> lexible wav of handling his verse, time leaving a skeleton hull on as well as something approaching the sea bed. %  nan %  —a — dramatic technique, but he Is an The local Harbour and Shippinn \ \I h w %  rhe Salire of the Calypv%  ., ir ,.f. r ar t',5 akc" man. and the Master told the Advaeate thai U ihe,! ttdncuiou n.ten-tt. It can Imrdly be doubted the! West Indleo needs prophets. His sunken yawl kl m(mace In thim Wesf Indian composes two moat reputable works. Epiinner basuv A small achoone 1 %  wUI abaorb the calyi lavou laph for tbe young and Henri may be able i„ use the berth. th ChrlstoplsfA both htghK ...clam he said, bul no big boots can us. form 11 tset' ed in Britain stamp him as a lt^ _____^__—^—. of good-and-cvil II What can be a clearer illustraUxi that Nordic European cultur* 1I ,rversion of our OWB tempc ither than a fultllling of it* tn*i A BOTTLE GOES BOTTLER'S (BDOS) LTD. ninto %  dypso as ai Galvanised Mesh Wire %  I".' •• hiil i;im ••# tnr I'onllifi H. %  •!••,ii/ GENERAL HARDWARE sumiEs 1UCKETT STREET (Opcotite font OIBce) ... •. The Rarbado* Foundry I.Id. WHITE I'AKK BABYS TEETHING need give you no anxieties There need be eo readaw eigfcu. Be tears. n„ baby .li^rdeei. tf y<— aaee Aabtoo A Passes* laiaau' Powdan bandy. Mothers al ever tbe world be— fosad then, aoothiae; and ooohng ben baby a, betial lamnafh leathasa, aad. beet e( al, they ere ABSOLUTELY SAFK. ASHTON ft PARSONS INFANTS POWDERS Restore Youthful Vigour To Glands in 24 Hours New Discovery Bring* Pleasures of Lit* to Men Who 'eel Old Before Thoir Tim* D.K.I-, •'*•' >!.•: SM <•' "• ' r#t nfir Inm !<*• •/ •Hour. % %  -*n-. -ir'.r,'a.;'its;,ffiii u iis£: •4, l>btr !• M Hrl ler r >• %  .!!•' •n"UW •]• %  Irs**. Mali D*i>Mtl tr(i-t:n. H os m UM dMMvefT of an *tnlnnl liiyi; !• no* BilN 11 pBil U ll twi f*ni to It H**M PN* r-*Uhlttl •!! %  mo aiiline". .n 3 Vatrthful Vioor Rastorad ti aaaiBisi •{ w-ua^i •*. na -a.. YIH*! af> llavaal oiiro>tY Dsxtcii thtcoirbout UHVI U* | —I *l-lnt (•• "*."'• %  J" >uir UM-S IDM % %  H Iy %  %  *•" %  as.lhSe" •.ry. LiilniB-zt*, and' K.onH MMti 01 Hoo-l-on. ONW Met. „ aaO Vio' -.• %  '<* U'isituroi* ,*i* •HHI. of (<• %  M-do-ial) wtlrt tU~1Ar I-IIMI I pit 'Un, "itti mute trin f-et'-d'o (•oJilr-.l'o-i'ef l*Iridn-nu Sal ^ i -it* .ii.-i| -p-wl -o ooiM in-; KTM imt-llul of oil to (.owe, *~ bottr thro.it>'. tl. Mr* '.aiin/ S3 %  '"i xjn I.,..,.., arj 24-Hour Resurll I .... IBM | M i. Doctor Praises Vi-Tobs .ru.itt'tX Ot yo.lt.!. rri oo4 KMDRasults Gi ItMUlM N U IVi> % % %  OBltO Of I Und*i I hi i ', .a iaH I. •aurtolf Ihr ne* iirrai i tn slulin Ihol will so .ourali-I UiroMfh o.r Ixx" m— atWi oni ho-e T*HI at* atito •njo* Own v. lo l.,e '..11 l.„l V. ilbov %  • tot inuii-tf io*U-d ot ••cuiB-i.i % %  v. I-., iiUaolaiiof and iaitis-fl. Tr sua^m-o PMMI I>. Ouaranlecf nSORBm. Well now, who would think ha was doing this for the pleasure of It" But it if 'ill par! nnd parcel of the weekly outing and thi< vehicle Is, in the owner*! eves The OPOOl U tO 1 r-1 word In horseless And so it waa! .-.inul.nly. today, than is the owner siders himself fortunate to drtvo ttw beel .-ititoinotiile — dollar for dollar on any highway in the %  arid. The -vii i..iti.nj.r. fact is lhal more and more •wurr/drivers en CepUnenU and UUrvd are elaas!6ed a* five SUr matornts— Uie reason belnjr their preference for the entirely new slsndard Introduced In 195? br i UNSI I. jnd ZEPHYR. Voi Invited to U-t-drlvr bath at Charles Mc Enearney & Co.. Ltd.



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PACE SIX SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY. SEPTEMBER II. 1K2 For Women Only! Oh IK.' AMPLEX IS FOH THE ENTIRE FAMILY You loo can drink anything—eat anything, < • %  with a. If you take an An., tablet %  ... LMPLEX COMBATS \i i UNPLEASANT BREATH AM) BODY ODOURS. Follow this happy family b\ taking in Amplex No. this isn't the Fl>mg Dutch Just a nightmare %  •'. %  round a wcathervanc. even in my dreams? mc swinging Was I airsick ^N No' The last t Vw I took AIRSICK s.,%ory fc Moure MARVELLOUS! Take Airsick tablets before and durli PI V IN CONfFORT nil Judy. "| behev.. >n RELAXING No* Judy used 10 ba to slim but hated %  •• i candles. What did Judy doj JIDV TOOK Sll.r R] IMM1NG TABI ETS. L now SU1I fall aim fmiv .:,|| relaxing 5K?„^' OT Fvl rin S K Si11 W,LL SUM YOU DOWN Jack here nttdld n but he did need a laxative. Aiwayi Un i. rorevej with a grouch, Jack was a nuisance ( %  > everybody. A* a salesman Jack energy and drive. Look al him any i now—the early bind catching all lrn MEDII.AX, the s-fe. gentle LAX fixed him up MEDII.AX INNER CLEANLINESS which spells health and SUCCESS No frontier Mrs. Smith here IIM>ICS superior Noted tor Met sparkling smile, her teeth arc a* white as bar tibia linen. No tattli • in cither." smllei Mn Smith \ BPA TOOTHBRUSH gatlUy, penetrate! ever] Uni crevice between U* let A sp.\ rooTHHIU-'SH POLISHES \S I'l .-i Ion or Bristle is YOUR BEST lit'v BPA carries s name known tin Mi Smith hen rid OVei Take a hint in and ALWAYS USE A SPA Here is another little lady well p|< herself. A young married with a family sturdy youngsters let's hear what Mar] irj has to say about Family Planning What is YOUR opinion. Marjory? "Well, now I think Family Planning, for those who believe in it of course, is one way of creating happiness and security In the home. Confident at all limes in the Safe, sine COOtTI %  RENDELL-FOAM. a wife and mother can relax and do justice to her family 1 believe In, and highlv recomn RENDELL-FOAM !(,. %  -..ft t onb V I i Ui I on the market." BUM ITS LBAP YEAR, and Jn, Mill %  round H#a made up In d, partly thanks Ui SUB) ?! I'.V'V.'" *>]* %  %  '">>' BiVNUBON PREPARATIONS lot her HAIIt Bandbox ihampo %  ;..,,, tinhah %  fti i lovellei than bi fore I i 'i IIRE, highlighting Sugj in KWI draw Jlmn | i n toward her. lAist m admiral thinks Sugy possesses the LOYH.iWORLD F HA H N U Try BANDBOX for yourself, gnjs Sole agents covering this column: INTERNATIO