Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text










WHAT'S ON TODAY

Police Courts 10.00 a.m
Meeting of the Chamber of

Commerce 2.00 p
Meeting of tite Roard o

Health 2.20 p.1
Police Band Concert at St

Stephen's Boys’ Schoo opm
Mobile Cinema Show at Holy

Trinity, St. Philip

ESTABLISHED 1895



Landlords Ordered To Give
Up Land Over 200 Acres

From Alt Quarters:

CAIRO, Sept. 9,
Premier General Mohammed Naguib’s new cabinet dis-
solved all political parties and ordered landlords to surrend+
er all their land in excess of 200 acres for redistribution to
landless peasants. Two historical decrees at one stroke
altered the whole basis of Egypt’s political and economic |
life. They were designed to wipe out political corruption |

| 3 Rocket
Expedition
To Greenland

New York: A_ rocket firing
expe@dition is going to Greenland.
Within 50 miles of the Magnetic
North Pole, they will send up

and end the feudal economic system that has kept millions
of Egyptians in virtual serfdom.

Naguib described the land reform law as “the first step
toward rebuilding Egypt's economic and social structure.”
The decrees came less than 48 hours after strong man
Naguib, already Commander in Chief ot the Army, assumed
the Premiership.

They will become law. when—
signed by the three-man Regency
Council in the name of the infant
King Ahmed Fuad,

To see that the new laws are!
carried out, the Cabinet named

the rockets’ noses will be geiger
counters to m@asure cosmic rays.

Sydney: Professor Clyde Klu-
ckhohn, director of, the Russian
res€arch centre at Harvard Uni-

" it, versity, said this week: “On the
Naguib military Governor General Se a : ; >
of Egypt with all the powers con- are s ag or hy 7 ~——
ferred by martial law. Naguib ;jestimate based on _ facts, ther?
thus became the undisputed ruler stare at least 10,000,000. aduit
of Egypt with powers exceeding | Russians in forced labour camps
even those of ex-King Farouk today. If a truy free election

were held, the Communists would
certainly be thrown out.”

Capetown: When fire scorched
the top of a church in Capetown
last February, the clock stopped.

whom he forced off the throne
and into exile on July 26,

The three-man Regeney Coun-
cil acting in the name of Farouk’s
seven-month-old son was hand-
picked by Naguib. No organized



opposition is expectyd. The Army It was made in Cheapside, Lon - |
is firmly in control under Naguib, don, in 1819 and during its voy-
and has rooted up 48 of the most age out, was drenched with sea

in. water, It was cleaned, oiled and
series of raids. All were still in installed in the chureh where it
custody, and the Army said that ran without stopping for 132

some would be tried for corrup-
tion and other crimes against the
State.—U.P.

years. This week it started run-
ning again “as good as new”

after its second spring-clean.
Sydney: Four hundred doctor:,
many with pipes and cigarettes
in their pockets heard Dr.
Murphy, president of the Royal
Australasian College of Physic-
ians, tell them at a. conference
this week: “Smoking leads to a
rise in the blood pressure, in-
crease in the heart rate, constric-
tion of small blood vessels in the
, Sept. 9. ‘has been pleased to appoint Mr. hands and feet and stops circula-
Representative Dewey Short, |g. S. Robinson, former member|tion.” But he added, “There is
one of the 11 United States cOn=' of the House of Assembly, to be|no need to give it up altogether.

gressmen touring Sores, es gia | provisionally a member of the|]Just cut it down,”

Sen ores aga e|-aeinve Coon pe
wayâ„¢*up to the Manchurian bord-~ This was communicated to the of 22 cpwards are lship to ke
er. The Missouri Republican said Legislative Council yesterday in err. “2 Goat toy voxitnae
that a divided Korea was “almost! message from His Excellency !SUch 48 “conspiring against the
worse” than Korea united en-! the Governor. State, damaging State property
or economic sabotage” under the

tirely by the Communists,

He _said; “I cannot see any; the business of the}new penal code introduced in
peace out here so long as there i$ Council was entered upon, Hon.|Albania on September 1. For
a divided Korea”, Short’s opin~ J. D. Chandler, President, sum, | common crimes such as murder,
ions on the necessity of taking moned Mr, Robinson to the Coun-!arson or robbery, the death sen-

cil Chamber and formally invited tence can only be passed on

control, of North Korea are simi-
lar to those repeatedly expressed! him to take his seat as a member persons aged 14 or over.

by President Syngman Rhee, He | of that Council.

said; “We should go all the way } Adelaide: An 83-year-old pipe
to the Yalu River. I think even-{ Welcoming Mr, Robinson, Hon.jsmoker is claiming a world
tually, we will have to go all the|J. Chandler said that he had muchjrecord for keeping his pipe
way.”—U.P. pleasure in welcoming him to thejalight for one hour 47 minutes on

Board. He knew that Mr. Robin-|one fill. The record was set in
son had thad experience as a mem-|4 hotel bar. Previous record

South Koreans 16 seconds
Fall Back From



MR, E.

S. ROBINSON



U.N. Will Have To
Fight Up To:
Manchurian Border

U.N. AIR BASE IN KOREA,

Robinson
Appointed
Leg. Co. Member

powerful politicians in Egypt in i
'
\
!
|
i
{
| His Excellency the Governor



Before



ber of The Other Place and there-|one hour 42 minutes 16 seconds

fore the work of that Council
would not be new to him in any {pct by Totes Depa of Mount

way. .
7 Sydney: The biggest blast
Capitol Hill He said that the honourable |furnace in the southern hemis-
q member would find the debates|phere went into operation this

very much quieter up there than] week at Port Kembla steelworks
in The Other Place and he would south of Sydney. It will boost
also find that they did a consid- | plant capacity to 3,700 tons per

TOKYO, Sept. 9.
Exhausted South Korean troops
fell back from the bloody crest of

Capitol Hill early today leaving|erable amount of work in Com- (day and help to make the works
pealy mauled Chinese Commun-| mittee. Australia’s biggest steel centre
ists fn command of Korea central ‘ with .an output of 1,350,000 tons
front height, 954 Reds ware i Select Committee ‘per year.

ed or wounded in three days o . “s f
“2 rl They endeavoured in their work} Tel@viv: The first payment of

savage fighting that opened with
the crushing of a Red attack on
Saturday night,

South Korean soldiers

reparations by Germany to Israel

ills a : atters in
to_put bills and such m thew {on account of Nazi crimes against

the best possible shape when they S
had|came before them and he would!the Jews will be made in Octo-
fought stubbornly to reach the find that many of them are re- | ber. It will consist of £3,000,000
crest of the hill in the night, but|ferred to Select Committees. He!with which Israel will buy oil
at midnight, Chinese reinforce-/felt sure that Mr. Robinson would | from Britain,
ments swarmed over the ridges!be a good and useful member
and pushed the South Koreans|whenever he was asked to serve |
beck in fleree close in fighting. {

e On Page 5



Sabre-jets Hit
Nineteen MIG’s

SEOUL, Sept. 9.

U.N. Sabre-jets destroyed or
damaged 19 Communist MIG 15s
jas around 15 Russian-built jet
| fighters tried desperately to break
up an Allied air attack on a North
Korean military academy. Seven
of the fighters were shot down in
flames and 10 limped back across
the border of Communist China
into Manchuria,

It was the best day of hunting
that Allied jet pilots have had so
far this month. A record for last
month came on August 4 when
12 MIGs were destroyed and four
damaged. It was the second time
that U.N. fighter-bombers struck
the military academy, southeast
of Sakvhu, near the Yalu River
in northwest Korea, The allies
caught the Reds trying feverish~
ly to repair the damage inflicted
'in a previous assault on July 4.



KOPEA VET SEES SON FOR FIRST TIME

2 3 . a
: if







MAY DETERMINE RiD
CHINA’S RECOGNITION

PORTLAND, OREGON,
Sept. 9.
| Governor Adlai Stevenson said
there is a historical precedent for

| HISTORICAL PRECEDENT
|
!
|

the possible recognition of Red
China as a de facto government if
the Korean war is resolved but
added there are “very consider~



able objections” to that recogni-
tion,
The Democratic presidential

nominee made his statement in a







oe Shon oe ~f i 1e ,
brief question and answer meeting| of survival —U.P Legisiative Council ay —— 'n| governmental extravagance.’
attended by 200 edi d news. , rr he Council Chamber at 2. y Havenga, renewing South Afri-

ae ¥ editors and news- fon Tuesday, September 23, for|.9's fight before the Int 5
paper publishers. _ —_ - Sa, ak anal’: date eee it before e International
Stevenson was asked “should! ,, Pincay ian vrhp Thain ter cent eg i _uele-| Monetary Fund for a free market
| we recognize Red China as a de VACCINE FOR EXPOR 7 ioe 0 end on Non oie in Gold, reminded financial lead-
facto government in case the Kor- we In a on pepe sa uslers from 54 nations that “past
ase + | ean war is resolved? He replied: PARIS, Sept. ¥ wr] Renee Leer eetee nee fee A iP "\efforts to maintain the price of
* a “there are considerable objections An. Agriculture Ministry hi- 5 in embly berday fi ners Te | gold at an ro oe have |
+ “ to BC iti ; T cial annou od that nm r ice | Wepu Speake of the House } cost th world dearty in 1uman
Ce ee ey ee nen eee pe eeng Fok oe neha Sabi Out to fourthet we tion fet toatioee nd mout -|A. E La informed mem- welfare.” He saids “There is-a
Leon Ross holds his r.sre-months Played Leon ies Wacky bs Be resolve differences with enem-|ease vaccine tart o t Other Place were! gro onviction that if gold is
never seen bef n Loe Angeles, 71 was | ies in h as in the case of| montt The nformal t will wreck
in Korean « f ind is h i I Ita e recognize them rapidly.” | vaccine f del t ‘ nism As we
Hazel Mae Ross, and Cc ne, 23 mont old } UP. | be exy —O.P I e sta where ce



‘

PHarbadros



rockets 25 miles and higher. In|



WEDNESDAY _ SEPTEMBER 10, 1952





ma

EGYPT’S POLITICAL PARTIES DISSOLVED




| NEW BUILDING FOR TRUCE TALKS |

|

~ ser oo |

a Coronation Committee wh

Elizabeth IL.

j
/

j

day, 17th of September.





| New Atomic
Tests Al
Eniwetok



WHILE A RED SOLDIER stand:
touches on the almost-completed bu
will be used for conferences by t)

guard, workmen put the finishing
ding at Panmunjom, Korea, that
United Nations and Communist



The meeting lasted nearly one
hour and the agenda for further
talks this week were drawn up.
li is expected that discussions will
be completed on Friday and an
official statement: will probably be
issued afterwards,







D l t W l i ‘new atomic tests at Eniwetok atoll
£ S ; bomb will be exploded.
command of Major General Percy
] e T T | | announcement said only tests will
ndies rade a ks
} gave no hint whether
(From Our Own Correspondent) hydrogen bomb which--if perfect-
Colonies, welcomed delegates to discussions on Canada-| than the conventional atomic
secrecy with only official United
the West Indies about their future trade with Canada and
ent. The formation of the Task
ae ° nel of the A.E.C., Army, Navy
5 Children Die

announced on Tuesday night that
a Joint Task Force will conduct
this autumn It did not disclose
that an experimental hydrogen
| Tests will be conducted by the
c | Joint Task Force 132 under the
0 Uanada—Wwest | !
. Clarkson which has been prepar-
} ing for tests since last winter. The
be “looking towards the develop-
ment of atomic weapons.”
tt they
| would include the projected
5 atl R LONDON, Sept. 9, jed-—-is expected to be as much as
LORD MUNSTER, Under-Secretary of State for the, a thousand times more powerful
sr \ Seda co on ‘ +4} | bomb,
West Indies trade which began to-day at the Colonial) "pecs will be carried out in deep
Office. In his speech he referred to the anxieties felt in
States Government observers and
gave the assurance that these anxieties were fully under-, members of the Task Force pres-
stood by H.M. Government. Force 132 was announced last Feb-
ruary 18. It included the person-
and Air Force,
It is believed that the new tests
. 2 . will be more powerful -—~ or at
In Hospital Fire c

least more secret—-than the recent
series of blasts on the Nevada

MELBOURNE, Sept. 9, There were eighteen_represen- | proving ounds in which the
Five children ranging in tatives of the seven West Indies tenons Sati claties,
age from seven months to yovernments present and a com- " —U.P.

arable number of officials from
be Colonial Office, Treasury,
Ministry of Food, Board of Trade
and Ministry of Transport.

Lord Munster said that the
anxieties felt in the West Indies
about the future of their trade
with Canada were well under-
derstood by H.M, Government and
that the Secretary of State’s object
in calling the working party to-|
gether was to give the West
Indies representatives the oppor-
tunity of an informal exchange
jof views and information on the
iwhole subject.

One aspect of the Canadian and
West Indies trade relations was

seven years burned to death |
om Tuesday in a fire which ©
swept through a flimsy hos-
pital building in a camp for
European immigrants, Twen-
ty-five other children and a
lone adult in the building
were rescued or led to safe-
ty.

Jan Tiegner a Pole smash -
ed his way inside through
the window and threw three
children from the building
to waiting hands, All thirty
children in the hospite) were
infantile paralysis or scarlet
fever cases.



° .
Colombian Mobs
f ene
Pacified

BOGOTA, Colombia, Sept. 9.
Government communiques
| sought to re-assure the populace
on Tuesday after a week end of
fighting and mob violence, and
it announced that the acting Presi-
dent, Roberto Urdaneta, would
speak to the nation by radio on
Friday, National Police Director
General Miguel San Juan issued
a bulletin which said “that there

The deaths were three a 4 aha) 04 “ar

the effect of exchange and restric-| is complete calm in the capital
boys and_ two girls. Panic tion ” Canadian To Brit- | and according to information re-
swept 1,500 immigrants oe ish territories in the Caribbean, | ceived here, peace prevails
the camp when the fire Lord Munster emphasised that the] throughout the country,
broke out, Screaming moth- ‘terling areas balance of payments} Other snnouncements reveal
ers fought desperately to position was still very difficult| the extent of disorders, which in-
break through the hastily and that the working party would] cluded the burning and sacking
drawn cordon to enter the have to bear that in mind|of two Liberal Bogota newspapers
blazing building, Three of throughout their discussions. by mobs on Saturday. The gov-
four rooms in the hospital He said the representatives of thelernment communique announced

were destroyed.—U.P. West Indies weleomed the oppor-, that Cheito Velasquez, a , leader

tunity to discuss the main aspect; of the Liberal “guerillas” who

of this complicated problem which have clashed frequently with gov-

was of great importance for the} ernment forces, had been killed

well being of the British Carib- | he tried to cross the frontier

bean Colonies Venezuela where he had
mK r U.P.



No Canadians At
Wi—Canada Talks





from
taken refuge







_ ’
‘ ‘
MONTREAL, Sept. 9 U.S. Go Beyond All at Sea
In London the opening phase of 6esy. . ”°
Canada West Indian talks began Containment saa la cf, 7
between delegates of the major ;
ng f " itie anda}
Sanclais’ of “the eoritish, ‘Gor ‘ Senator Alexander Wiley, Re-

| publican on the Senate Foreign Re-

on Tuesday
States foreign
beyond

ment with no Canadian repre
tatives present. A Canada House| lations
official said: “It is strictly a family; Said that
colonial affair.” policy

Committee, i
United
has

gone mere

WASHINGTON, Sept. 9. |
‘

acterize it as containment”.

} Wiley said-“plenty of mistakes”
have been made in United States
| foreign policy, but in general “we

Jamaican delegation.
(cP)



Advorate

trnce negotiators. The hut replaces the tents used for talks during : WASHINGTON, Sept 10
the previous year. It is built of straw mats on a concrete base. rhe Defence Department and |
—International. the Atomic Energy Commission





oe

Y

Lo

PRICE : FIVE CENTS



Vestry Forms A

Coronation Com.

THE St. Michael's Vestry yesterday resolved itself into

ich will make preparations for

the celebration of the Coronation of Her Majesty Queen

The Committee was formed at the request of His Excel

lency the Governor, and “ton. V. C. Gale,

was nominated to attend the first meeting of a Main Com-
mittee under the Chairmanship of His. Excellency the
Governor in the Legislative Couneil Chamber on Wednes

Churchwarden

The other ‘ten vestries have
also been requested to set up
Ccronation Committees in their
parishes, The Main Committe
will be split into several sub-
committees, including a parochial
| co-ordinating Committee unde
the chairmanship of the Lord
Bishop which will co-ordinat
the activities of the various paro

chial Coronation Committees
maintain liaison with thei
Chairmen.

Before the forming

ind
a close

of the Cor

mittee by the St. Michael Ves
try yesterday morning, Mr. EB. D
Mottley stressed that he did not
want it to be felt that any mem-
ber of the Vestry was too busy
to serve on the Committee, and

he suggested that the entire Ves-
try serve as the Coronation Com-
mittee.

He also
membership
Committee
fined

pointed out that the
of the Coronation
should not be
members of the
proper, but that some per
who had to do with the youto
(of the parish should be included
on the Committee, because the
Coronation was an occasion when
loyalty and patriotism should be
impressed on the youth of the
colony,

Members generally agreed that
every member of the | Vestry
should be given an opportunity
to serve on the Committee, but
it was pointed out that the ex-

con-
Vestry

to

ne



perience had been that large com-) Mr,

were usually unwieldy,
and it was oftem difficult to get
the same members attending all
the meetings,

mittees



| Japanese Women
| Enquire After
| War Prisoners

| GENEVA, Sept. 9.

A Prisoners of War Commission
meeting behind closed doors here
has received a petition signed by
a million Japanese women ask-
ing the fate of their country’s sol
diers missing since the war,
United Press learned on Tuesday.
The petitions were put before the
Commission by Tsuruyo Kondon,
who said that she was speaking
om behalf of the women of Japan,
Chis United Nations Commission,
she said was the “sole hope’ of
learning the fate of their loved
ones.

Japan has claimed that of the
340,000 soldiers still missing only
the Soviet authorities know which*
are dead and which are still liv-
ing. The Japanese estimate the
rum@er of dead at about 250,000

Mrs, Kondon said that she had
but one question to ask the Com-
mission to answer: “Is there no
way to learn which prisoners are
alive and which are dead?”

—U.P.





Japan Prepares
For Textile War

LONDON, Sept. 9

Textile manufacturer Kenneth
Boardman, warned that Japan is
marshalling sales forces to cap-
ture Commonwealth markets

through an all-out cut-price war
Ten Japanese delegates attend
ing next week's international cot



SAN FRANCISCO, Sept. 9

Harry Bridges’ longshoremer

The meetings which may last} “containment” of Communist ag- ton trading conference in Buxton,
10 days were described officially] gression in Europe. “We haven't Derbyshire, were expected to make
as a “working party to explora) been in the position of doing no- !'a strong plea for abolition of the
the problems of Canada—West| thing, the Wisconsin Senator told tariff! barrie
Indian trade in the light of j~| rey rs upon return ng from a Japanese cottons are now ex |
ance-of-payment difficulties of the week European trip, “We have | cluded from Commonwealth mar-|}
sterling area. taken the offensive and started kets. The embargo was imposed|

The Earl of Munster opened the building up the strength, not earlier this year,—(CP) |
meetings. E. Neville, Assistant, only of ourselves, but,of our allies.
Secretary of State for the Polen as ¢ Bay : ; Ce Fepeaene

resided. Major West Tndiag) people vehine to ron ¢ Wi .
Communities represented ar @ :—| through the aoe of ee oe Vorkers Call
Jamaica, Trinidad, British Guiana,| lot of things that can even be tol (

Barbados. Bustamante heads the} : bout. I certainly wouldn’t char- Protest Strike
|



7 Killed As
Fireworks Explode

MEZICO CITY, Sept. 9
Authorities counted seven «
and 28 injured on Tuesday

| are taking appropriate steps under
{world circumstances as they
| exist” Wiley said he believes that
the Republicans can definitely fol-
low “the foreign policy” leader-
ship” of their presidential nom-~
nee Dwight Eisenhower. He said

PATRICIA KASKEL, 19, of Los An-
geles, has been refused permis-
sion to land in England after stow-
ing away on the Queen Mary. The
would-be traveler’s father, Ira,
told newsmen: “I sent the Cunard



id

ifter| that the Europeans regard Fisen-



}«
| is
Bridges was convicted in

voted a 24-hour
protest against
Appeal
Bridges’
Six
‘isco
to

work stoppage in
the United States
Court’s affirmation of
conyiction for perjury.
thousand men in San Fran
are involved. The strike
start tomorrow morning
1950 for













ESTERDAY’S WEATHER REPORT

‘otal Rainfall for the mont 4 of an
Codt '
stu





’ % 93: 19. OG

rO-DAY
ay
6.12 pom
Tide
w Tide

ot
hest Tempe
nrise “7

6.45 a.m.,
1,0 am

3.08 p.m,

ee eee ee mee

E

tomologist
Will Be
‘mployed

ON AGREEMENT

Mr. R, Wide Tucker, Entomo-
logist, Department of Science and
riculture, wtkkyeach on Becem-

10, thig yearggthe compulsory










retiring afe un the Pensions
lx t, 1947. Governmgnt propose
}to employ Mr. Tucker oti agree-
t following. his tirement
This was communicated to tht
Legislative Couneil at.their meet-
ing yesterday in a Message from
H Excellency the Governor. The
read as follows
His ¥ llency the Govefnor has
ri OOM inform the Hon-
‘ it ary esa Council
4 at ‘hs



MR. K. W. E. TUCKER
that on the 10th December, 1952,

W. E. Tucker, Entomologist,
Department of Science and Agri-
culture, will reach the compulsory
retiring age under the Pensions
Act, 1947.

It is important that the work of
controlling the sugar cane moth
borer by rearing and distributing
, parasites and the attempt to con
trol, and possibly eradicate, the
other major sugar cane pest, the
root borer, "BY Tears he appli-
cation of the new insecticide
@ On Page 7

C.D.C. Awaiting



| Report From W.I.

Controller

Fro Our Own Correspondent:
LONDON, Sept, 9.

C.D.C. officials in London are
awaiting a report from their re-
gional Controller in the Caribbean
Mr, Duncan Anderson on the
future of their plans for banana
growing in British Honduras.

Dependent on his report and
recommendation they will decide
whether turn over lands at
present devoted to bananas to the
cultivation of citrus fruits: and
pineapples

to





Russians ‘Menace’

American Soldiers

BERLIN, Sept, 9.
Russian troops and Communist

police armed with tommy guns
threatened three jeep loads of
American soldiers who tried to

pass through to a highway check-
point west of Berlin on Tuesday.

To reach the American check-
point at the Berlin end of the
main highway Western Ger-
many, American troops must pass
through a 100-yard strip of Soviet-
held territory. The Russians ban-
ned American travel through the

to



strip last Thursday, but lifted the
ban immediately To-day they
uddenl reimposed it As a re-
ult, American troops had to
m a detour over bad country
roads to reach t oint

Major General Lemel Mathew-
von, American Troop Command-
ant, said that the Russians and
Red police “menaced soldiers with
their weapons.” The Americans
were outnumbered, he said, and

ad no choice but to turn back,





“Financial Malversation”?

OTTAWA, Sept. 9.

The Yugoslay Embassy accused
the Toronto’ group of Yugoslav
|¢ inadians on Monday of “finan-
} cial malversation” and announced
| that approximately $60,000 worth

, , } . 7 wei that he was not Com-|of Yugoslav reconstruct fund
explosion of fireworks idjhewer as “a peace general” who wearing i f ij v_ reconstruction func
black "panter that wrecked sev-| bh n't eid ify with wart gen- Line $335 for her round trip on | munist. He was sentenced to five] certificate held by Canadians
eral buildings in a down val erals” , - one condition—that she be kepton | years, but was freed on a $25,000] would be redeemed immediately.
business district. \ But Senator Theodore Francis] the boat.” (International) bail pending appeal—c.P. | UP.
A fire broke out on Monday in| Green, another Foreign Relations].



a warehouse filled with firework’! Committee member, also back

for Mexico’s Independence Day)/from Europe said that Eisenhower

celebration on September 16 cared” the Europeans with a

Repeated explosions followed as uple of sentences in his adéress

ae tae wa ees, ON Pl ete MEXICO CITY, Sept. 9

om aero te fr ; pant . . - Finance Minister Nicholas Ha-

also stored in the bull ee vena Sout deine ame

ware stores, « biilard boriou 2| Delegates For WL. Talks |yima,ot South Africa warned on
F 2 and six id \k oo . je vale é e

nt eed Toomoyed or n- To Be Appointed et for a met gpectes

aged. Doctors said that '! ‘The House of Assembly and the dard with ite "e ne anaes

of the injured were beyond »p automatic check on


















tain








World Must Return To Gold Standard



constructive. It would incredse
the gold reserve lubricate the
machinery of international trade,

and induce gold producers to pro-

duce more gold so that enough
production would keep world
jtrade going.”

Havenga said that except for

the United States and Soviet Rusg-
, fold reserves throughout the



| world were declining and can be
price
said

built up only by “raising the
of gold deflation” He
“It surely would spell a
lisaster if the
upon deflationar
n end whict

or



are t :
to achieve



currencies are again under
heavy pressure, the tire vems|
cpporfune for a world ide in-
crease in the price of gold whict
should facilitate the removal or
reduction of exchange restric-
tions.”

South Africa, the world’s num- |
ber one gold producer, has sought |
repeatediy but unsuccessfully t
persuade the Monetary Fund to}
|release gold from its pegged world
| price of $35 per ounce

Sir Percy Spender of Australia
}supported Havenga's plea on the
grounds that a gold price increas
“would strer the hand

vernr f fl
H ex Ar

.







a a as lain ae

PAGE TWO

Carib Calling

T. COL, J. CONNELL and Mr
4 Connell were passengers fo
Puerto Rico by B.W.LA. on Mon-
day intransit for the U.S.A. on

isit. ’

Married At St. Mary’s

N Saturday afternoon at 4.30

hid o'clock at St. Mary’s Church
Mr. Carl Winston Cozier of Trini-
dad and son of Mr, and Mrs. C. M.
Cozier took as his bride Miss
Thora Marguerite Carrington,
daughter of Mr. C. A. Carrington
The. groom's parents came ove
for the happy occasion.

The ceremony which was fully
choral was conducted by the Rev
K. A. B. Hinds and the bride who
was given in marriage by her
father wore a gown of bridal pink
slipper satin featuring a V neck-
line with a small upright collar
and long close fitting sleeves with
points at the wrists. The bodice
was close fitting with a nylon net
yolk outlined with appliques
pearl beads. The skirt was
fully gathered flare ending in
long wide train. She wore a
finger tip veil held in place by a
tiara studded with pearls and
dimantes. Her bouquet was silve
radiance and tube roses.

She was attended by her sister
Miss Hazel Carrington as Maid-
of-Honour who wore a dress of
orchid nylon featuring a wid
neckline with upright collar. Her
bodice was tight fitting with a
wide diaphram band in front and
the top carried three peaks which
gave the effect of petals. The
skirt was fully gathered and she
wore a crinoline bonnet adorned
with flowers.

The bridesmaids, the Misses
June and Grace Cozier wore blue
and green nylon respectively cut
on similar lines as the Maid-of-

of

a

Honour’s. They carried small
silver cages of and gerberas
The duties of bestman were

performed by Mr, Gerald Mayhew
and those of ushers fell to Mr.
Eric Edwards, Mr. Errol ae
ton, Mr. Bunny Gill, and
David Greenidge. The reveption
was held at “Abbeville”, Worthing
and the honeymoon is being spent
S — Spring Hotel, Bath-
she k

16 Kesume Duties
R. AND MRS. BERTIE WAT-
SON and their two children
arrived during the past week from
Southampton after spending a
holiday in England.

Mr, Watson is Manager of the
Royal Bank of Canada, St. Kitts
and will be returning there in 4
few days to resume his duties.

oli Family

R. ALBERT GIBBS, brother

of the late Mr. C. L. Gibbs,’
was an arrival by T.C.A, from
Montreal, Canada on Thursday
last. He has come over on a few
weeks’ visit to his family here.

Si siness Visit

R. GEORGE G. MONEY, Local

Director of Barclays Bank,
(D.C. & O.) returned from St.
Lucia on Sunday by B-W.1.A. He
went on a short business visit.

Spent Honeymoon

i R. AND MRS. A, ABRAHAM
a returned by B.W.JA. to
Trinidad yesterday morning after
spending ten days’ honeymoon in
the island as guests at Hotel Royal,
They were married in Trinidad
on the 30th August.



BY THE WAY......

OTHING is too mean and

lowly to serve the para-
mount interests of science. A
large number of bluebottles were
trapped by professional fly-
catchers in “lobster-pots baited
with raw liver” (the favourite

tis f go’ ets in the blue- behind me the whole weight of
Cree OC geet : . evidence collected by Mumhau-

bottle world).

They were “first given a
radio-active drink -to identify
them,” then released. When

caught again, they were “drug-
ged, and tested with a Geiger
counter,” and through a small
loud-speaker came “a buzz like
that of an angry bee.”
certainly had something
angry about.

Can a bluebottle laugh #
E drew Object of this experi-

ment was to find out “how
far a bluebottle flies, and why.”
Do they migrate? Apparently.
A Mrs. Wyvern, on a’ cruise to
Athens, picked up a_ bluebottle
which had fallen exhausted on
the sports deck of the liner.
Tied to its left leg was a tiny
metal tab, marked, “Nuneaton:
July 29, 1952.” The publie can
assist in these experiments by
ringing any bluebottle trapped in
a lobster-pot and giving it a
radio-active drink. I did this
yesterday, and through a tiny
loud-speaker attached to its left

to be

Listening Hours
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10,

8
4.00—7.15 p.m. 18, 5am

76M, 2%.

.





4p.m. The News , 4.10 p.m. The Duailv
Service, 4.15 p.m. All Hale, 4.45 p.m
Felton Rapley, 5 p.m. Rimsky-Korsakov,
5.15 p.m. Listeners’ Choice, 5.45 p.m
Think on these Things, 6 p.m Séottisir
Magazine, 6.15 p.m. My Kind of Muyic.
6.45 p.m. Sports Round Up and Pro-
gramme Parade, 7 p.m News,
7.10 p.m. Home News from Britain
7-15—10,30 pm .. 25.53M, 31.32M

TAB p.

. Calling the West indies,
7.4 p.m. Hale, 8.15 p.m. Radio
Newsreel, 8.30 p.m Statement of

Account, 8.45 p.m. Interlude, 8.55 p.m
From the Editorials, 9 p.m. New Lands
for Old, 10 p.m. The News, 10.10 p.m
News Talk, 10.15 p.m. Mid Week Taik,
10.90 p.m. From the third Programme




PRINTED SPUNS
SHARKSKIN Whit

LE

Phone 4220

- her parents, Mr. and Mrs. L, A.

. : British Guianese Tenor, will



PLAIN BEMBERG SHEERS Ivory, Peach, Blue
PRINTED BEMBERGS exclusive Designs
PRINTED CREPES
































































































MR. & MRS. CARL W. COZIER

Visits Parents Stuartettes To Tour
RS. MOLLY KIRKLAND was M
among the arrivals from the passengers
Miami, Florida, U.S.A, by B.W.LA. Trinidad by B.W.1.A. on Monday
via Jamaica and Trinidad on evening.

Monday last.
Mrs. Kirkland is on a visit to

by Miss Rachael
Secretary.

Mrs. Stuart has gone to com-
plete arrangements for “Revuede-
ville 1952” Troupe which will be
following later. The troupe ex-
pect to put on a series of perform-
ances in Port-of-Spain, They
should be away for about ten days,

From nada

Gre

Me: GLEN EVANS was an

arrival from renada by
B.W.I.A. on Sunday for one week’s
holiday. He is a relative of Mr.
David Evans of T. R. Evans, City
Merchant. During his stay here
he is a guest at Hotel Royal,
‘Attended Rangers’ Camp

ISS BERYL SKEETE who

went over to Trinidad early
in August with the Queen’s Col-

Evelyn, her

Knight, “Clifton,” Strathclyde,
Recital Tonight
R. JOHN TULL, brilliant

give a Song Recital at the Com-
bermere School Hall tonight at
8.30 o’clock. The Recital is under
the patronage of Sir Allan Colly-
more, Kt., and Lady Collym*re.

‘HE engagement was recently
announced between Miss Janet
Seale, eldest daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Clarence Seale of Kingsley,
2nd Avenue, Belleville and Mr.
Arthur Tibbits of Cable & Wire-
less, eldest son of the late Mr. and
Mrs. Elwood Tibbits of Antigua.
Back To Trinidad
M* A MRS. G. ARCHER
and eir two children re-
turned to Trinidad by B.W.LA.
on Sunday last after spending a

Sunday by B.W.LA. She remain-
ed in camp for two welks with
the girls at Headquarters, Belmont
Circular Road and stayed over for
three weeks’ holiday.

holiday her Me. Archer is

Traffic Officer, B.W.1.A., Piarco, LSO returning home by the

Trinidad. ¥ same opportunity of Sun-,
For One Month day from Trinidad was Miss Jean

Best, a Ranger. She too was in
camp for two weeks and remain-
ed over for three weeks’ holiday.
Miss Best is an Assistant Mistress
at St. Michael’s Girls’ School.

i R. AND MRS. A. S. EVELYN
arrived here by B.W.1.A, from
Trinidad for one month’s holiday.
They are guests at Hotel Royal.
Accompanying them is their little
grandchild, Barbara,
Por Police Course
NSPECTOR GEORGE REID of
the loeal constabulary left the
island yesterday by the SS.
Oranjestad for England where he
will enter Hendon Police Training
College to undergo four months’
(training.

R.
turned to Grenada on Sun-

day by B.W.LA, after spending
five weeks’ holiday with his
relatives. He is a teacher at the
Grenada Boys’ Secondary School,
St, George’s and comes over for
his annual holidays.





By BEACHCOMBER

craft moored within sight of the
Royal Squadron Yacht Club. It
is a kind of round punt with a
mast in the stern, and appears to
be steam-driven. Some thought
it was what remained of the
Saucy Mrs. Flobst®r, but inquiries
confirmed the rumour that Dr.
Strabismus (Whom God Preserve)
of Utreeht had arrived aboard
the Swan’s Nest, an experimental
craft which is designed to move
sideways under steam, the mast
being a mere decoration. Asked
what advantage was to be derived
from going sideways at sea, the
sage said: “Science makes its
experiments. The advantages
come later.” Asked what this
had to do with Cowes, the
doctor said: “As much as and no
more than it has to do with any-
where else.”

Wisdom of the ages

It is @ measure of the camel's
inferiority to man that if it were
given a tele: it would not
know which to look through.

(Sayings of Shadash ibn
Daoul of Bagdad.)

wing I seemed to hear a sardonic

laugh.

= revert to the bluebottle
question I have been sneered

at for suggesting that bluebottles

migrate, like seals. But I have

sen Strickland, Desgouttes Hirsch,
Larsen, Piccolomini Dendergast,
and Smallpiece. v

Praline has described the mig-
ration of bluebottles as a heredi-
tary urge “engendered by atav-
istic stimuli and exacerbated by
regional conditions.” But alone
of all the Ampulae Caeruleae the
bluebottle n.igrates on a sudden
impulse instead of for food or
light, and Praline was mistaking
a mere aimless wandering for
the more purposeful journey
which we call migration. Tomor-
row I shall demolish the absurd
suggestion of Manteuflel that the
bluebottle migrates through fear
of persecution.

Cowes sensation
ISITORS to Cowes have been
interested in an odd-looking
















The farmer seems very upset
and stalks away without any
further talk. “What did he
mean ?"’ murmurs Rupert. “I'd
betrer go and look as he told me."
He hurries over a slope until he
reaches the spot where he first

met the farmer. gracious |
eee - ‘

t
I
| some of the roots under

$00!
s

’
5



ics areata ance $1.46
Puan CR Cie OE Rew a hare he $1.04
Snide Sams WHS 6 Ow do Geb ala bin -aldd ie <1Stw A TAEEGa ao ale abe $1.16
FPLAIN-SFUNS White & Colours ....2...6.0..ci cece casveseeduews é
PUN VG VEAP OOS CUNT Sis LE VLG ld vigilante winecaia 98 & $1.08
Also
e, Pink, Oyster, Primrose, Torquoise, Azure $2.03



EVANS WHITFIELD’S BRANCH

YOUR SHOE STORE

| year-olds,
awaiting the results of his General
Certificate examination.

examination already
fate,
at Cambri

take this examination, which re-
placed the old School Certificate in of Edinburgh's treasurer, does

hig Swiss se¢Hool he sat for the would not
certificate in Geneva,

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

The Duke Of Kent Goes In For |

9

His ‘School Certificate

(By EPHRAIM HARDCASTLE)
LIKE thousands of other 16- Tuesday—because she does
the Duke of Kent is pay National Insurance.

+ *

not

*

Money-spinning novelist Daphne
Maurier, wife of Lieut.-Genera)
Frederick Browning, the Duke

He is the first royal Prince tr

1951. With two other boys from collect the allowance. “I feeb #
be fair,” she says.

Lady Moyne, whose husband. is
Some youngsters who took the one of Britain’s wealthiest brew-
know their ers, does not draw it either—but
But the Duke’s examiners;"for different reasons. Six of their

e, one of eight sets in family of nine are eligible, but

Britain, will not issue theiy results Lady Moyne says: It would not
until some time during this month, be worth while because of tara-

jects:
a lot at home, and Englisiy.

dent: 20-year-old Princess Astrid,
daughter
‘Prince Olaf, who has just finished
two years’ study of economics at
Oxford,

leaving for]! through

She was accompanied | shooting.

lege Rangers, returned home on] Geo:













|



for six hours to see something of
the practical side of the subject. She

: ears filled with people in Tyrotean
RS. A. L, STUART was among|hats and yellow pullovers drives

Am the Duke's strongest sub-

tion. What we would get would
h, which is sooken

not cover the cost of fetching it
from the village.

Actor’s wife Mrs, John Mills puts
ihe money in the Post Office k
and the children will get it at 15.
“The trouble is they keep asking
for it now.”

Five of Lady Pakenham’s eight
children are under 15. She says:
“We used to save up the allow-
ance towards our annual holiday,
but have given that up now..”
has always drawn orange
uice, but not cod liver oil,

Two Fortunes

Royal Launch
News, too, of another , 7yal stu-

of Norway's crown

This week she sails to Britain

She will launch a new ship which
will help Norway’s economy by

carrying currency-earning tour- EXAMINE the fate of two for-
istg, tunes: —

Tt will be her first big royal It was 1800 when a French
assignment. But her father will refugee settled in America and

be there to help.

‘.. But Some Pay
EVERY morning a convoy of

founded the firm of Du Ponts,
the biggest chemical empire in
the world today. Now, one of
his descendants, Lammot Du Pont,
has left £27,000,000 according to
his will just published.

It was 1862 when a German
scientist, Ludwig Mond, came to
Britain and started part of what is
now Imperial Chemical Industries,

little Dufftown. Wealth
and aristocracy is off for a day’s

For the grouse-girdled spot
(pop.: 1,500), 64 miles beyond
Aberdeen, has become one of Scot-



land’s most fashionable shooting
centres this season.
* *

*

Already Lord gnd Lady Bland-
ford and Lord Carnarvon — “My
best week’s shooting since the
war"—have been there. This week
six men whose total fortunes run
into many millions will be on the
moors.

* * .

Four of them, guests of the Duke
and Duchess of Marlborough at
low-roofed Glenfiddich Lodge, in-
clude Herbert Pulitzer, son of the
founder of the American literary
prizes, The Spanish Duke of Al-
geciras and French banker
rges Verne are on their way.
Ship owner Major Stanley Cayzer
has a moor near by. Henry Ford
is coming too.

7 m

Ration books for the duke and
duchess and staff of six, including
a butler and chef brought from
Blenheim Palace, are lodged at a
loeal shamp.

At Glenfiddich they breakfast at
7.30, spend the evening playing
and gramophone

duchess: “Some

a

are guests, but
others hav nancial arrange-
ment with the —
Man In A Hurry

FILM director Roberto Rossel-
lini arrived in Northern ftaly in
his scarlet Ferrari racer which he
uses as an ordinary sports car.
He was tired and travel-stained.

have you come from?”
asked’ a friend. “I've just driven
non-stop from Calais,” he said.
“T was a bit glow this time—it
took me 23 hours,”

Distance: over 700 miles,

Who Collects?

WOULD you take the Welfare
State’s orange juice and Family
Allowances if you were wealthy”?

The Queen draws orange juice
fof her children but cannot have
the family allowance—which rises
from ve to eight shillings on

SONG RECITAL
Under the Patronage of Sir Allan
Collymore, Kt.

BY
JOHN TULL
(British ich tg Tenor)












at 8.30
Accompanist — w.
ADMISSION: ae ne
‘ed Seats — $1.00
— Te.

on Sal it Severe
e a vs ti
Statio focate









TO-DAY (Only) 4.30 P.M
“SPORT OF KINGS”
Paul CA

MPBELL &
“BLAZING ACROSS the PECOS”
Charles STARRETT

THURS. (only) 8.30 P.M.

“SPRING SONG”
Carol RAYE &
“WATERLOO ROAD"

f_James STEWART & John MILLS







iS DANGE

ROUS

rc

sarees JOAN

CRAWFORD Manet 8

PICHARD WEBB MAR! ALDON PHIL® CAREY omecien yf £
STN ay €r

GEOFFREY HOMES 2. GEORBE WOR

PLAZ

BRIDGETOWN

DAVID

fil

DIAL 2310)

i a en fai






When he died in 1909 he left wel.
over £1,000,000.
” * *
But unlike the Du Pont fortune
the Mond million did not multiply.
Ludwig's son, Alfred, who became
Lord Melchett, was thought to be
worth anything from £4,000,000 to
£7,000,000.. But his estate was
£1,029,000.

And in turn, his son’s fortune

not Was £97,000 when he died three

years ago. (The present Lord
Melchett, who is 27, Has no con-
nection with the 1.C.1.)

£50 To Spend

British friends just back from
Lucerne speak with wry amuse-
ment of Dr. Kenrad Adenauet’s
holidtiy in the nearby resort of
Burgenstock.

He has been able to stay a good
deal: longer than the English, Por,
like all Germans, Dr. Adenauer
gets a £50 trave} allowance.

Dinner At Keyes

TRAVELLING to Holland this
week with a car, secretary, two
grandchildren, and 28 pieces of
luggage is top-selling American
novelist MYys Frantis ‘Parkinson
Keyes (rhymes with skies).

Mrs. Keyes’ novels, lite Dinner
at Antoine’, are garnished with
gastronomy. She married young
and was “ashamed how little I
Knew about food.” But she has
studied it ever since.

* *

If you dined now at Mrs. Keyes’
you might start with mint juleps
and canapes spread with caviar;
then—lobster chowder; Maryland
fried chicken arranged on a large
dish, with rice, bacon, corn frit-
ters and peas; salad with cheese
souffle or toasted cheese: ice-cream
and angel cake. To drink: Chablis
and champagne.

—L.E.S.



Do You Read the Signs?

—Merlin Said No One Hecded Them Any More—

By MAX TRELL

MERLIN the Magician, was sit-
ting on the edge of the bookcase)
with his legs dangling. He was)
smiling as usual, Finally he said:|
“Folks don’t pay much attention|
to signs any more. They don’t even
bother to read them and even after
they read them, they don’t obey |
hem. That’s not good.” |

Knarf and Hanid, the shadows)
with the turned-about names, asked
Merlin what he meant.

“Well, | happened to be strolling |
through the park this morning. It
was quite a lovely park, with Trooal
standing here and there, and benches
for people to rest on, and a play-
ground for the children with swings}
and seesaws and slides, But the}
nicest and prettiest thing about the}
park were the patches of green
grass—the lawns—on either side of

the paths. Some of the lawns were} }yndreds and thousands of other

for everyone to walk on, or play O”,| hlades of grass, just like himself.

" But) Not far off was the little white sign

the rest ef them had tiny fences| reading:
around them, or borders of flowers.| Pjease.’ The blades of

* And there were signs stuck in the| like soldiers,
middle of them reading: ‘Keep Off! taj),

or lie dowr and stretch out on.

The Grass, Please’ But,” said Mer-
lin, smiling again, “not everyone
did,”

that wasn’t right,”

Enough Policemen

“Didn't a policeman chase them
off?" Knurf wanted to know.

Mertin sliook his head. “There
aren’t enough policemen to watch
everyone who steps on the grass.
And really, you shouldn't need a
policeman to make you do the right
thing. You should do it because you
know it’s the right thing to do. Now
there isn’t any reason why anyone
should walk on the grass when a
sign very politely asks you please
not to.”

At this Knarf said: “1 don’t think
it hurts thé grass to step on it, It

just bends over. Anyway, grass is!

just grass. It can't really feel any-
thing and”

Knarf didn’t notice that Merlin
had stopped smiling and was
waving his hand in a curious way.
But the next instant Knarf felt
himself becoming long and thin and

een. And there he was, standing
n the middle of the park lawn,








Dennis MORGAN

Plus
James CAGNEY in








Fred







said| Voices. They were very close by and



TH

STIN
(Dial 5170) (Dial 8404)
Last 2 Shows To-day Today (only) Last 2 Shows To-day
4.30 & 8.30 p.m. 4.20 & 8.30 p.m 445 & 8.30 pin
Warner Action Double! ‘Roth aconeeD Alfred HITCHCOCK'S
) TO THE VICTOR RIDES AGAIN” STRANGERS ON

with Bill KENNEDY
Robert ARMSTRONG

oor
Thurs. Spectal 1.40 p.m

“WHAT'S COOKING"
Donald O'CONNOR &

& Continuing Dally

er ae Teviniy | WANS Humphrey BOGART
THIS WOMAN IS |] BLUE SKIES |} “Speci! 1 p.m.
‘ Technicolor) Jimmy WAKELEY &

Bing CROSBY & WEST OF ELDOKAD

ASTAIRE






5 a om
Merlin was strolling in the park.
looking exuctly like a blade of
rass.
Crowded all around Knarf were

‘Keep Off The Grass,
grass were

standing straight and

Sound of Voices
Suddenly there was the sound of

they kept growing louder. Knarf
tried to turn around but he couldn't
because his roots kept him stuck
in the ground. But then, a moment
|\later, he saw a group of children.
They were running and jumping,
stamping and seraping.

Oh, how Knarf wanted to run
away. “Go away!” he shouted at

| the blades of grass were lying like

\themselves to their feet any more.
A great heavy shoe was over

Knarf’s head. Down it came—
And then Knarf found himself

back. in the room again, with Mer-

4
1

|bookease, his legs dangling, and)
smiling. “Well, Knarf — how did}
you like being a blade of grass? Do
you think folks ought to obey signs
now?” ~

head quickly enough to say he
agreed.






























A TRAIN
Farley GRANGER &

WHITE HEAT

James CAGNEY




Thurs. (only)
44 & 8.30 pm
“To the VICTOR”

Dennis MORGAN &
“OKLAHOMA KID”
James CAGNEY &












the top of his voice. “Don’t step on |
me! Look out! Look out!” But he |
couldn’t move. And all around him |

broken soldiers now, unable to lift |

lin still sitting on the edge of the |

And Knarf could hardly nod his |

|

|





*

*

|









Johnny Mi

BROW:

Before Stock Taking we are CLEARING several useful items in

Household Hardware

These include SAUCEPANS, FRY PANS, POTS, HALF PINT GLASSES, '

May 2i—Jnune 21

*





JACK BEUTEL, MALA POWERS, BILL WILLIAMS



find what your outlook is, according to the stars;

Dec. 23— Jan. 21

Talent for acting generally high in this Sign of Virgo. Could
be nurse, decorator, modiste, milliner with fine results, or an
actor, \ctress, journalist. Tendency in all conscientious Vir-
* goans is to work too much, thus taxing health. Birthdate:
John Jordan Crittenden, Amer, statesman.

a a a a a a 2 a a ee

WEDNESDAY,

SEPTEMBER 0), 1952



FOR

WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER

Ww, 1952

Look in the section in whieh your “irthday comes and



ps

ARIES Excellent rays for laborious tasks, real- *

*

March 21—April 20 roading, mining, handling and manufactur-

ing tools, machinery, war equipment,

TAURUA ag. Responsive day, especially if you work
April 21--May 20 %5 better output. Engine@ring, roadbuild-
ing, all such projects highly favoured.

*
*

Not all favourable fox many matters.
Care is urged in contracts, legal issues, but
day on whole is fine for sturdy activities,
industrial trades, urgent duties.

GEMINI

OANCER Can be peak day for you. Strive to
June 22—Jnly 23¢et ahead in your occupation, work har-
moniously with employers, and employees

for the attainment of all concerned.

*« *«

LEO —Your Sun rays stress patience, modera-
July 24—Aug. 22 tion to gain benefits through other benefic «x
vibrations. Don't indulge hurt feelings.
VIRGO Mild indications except for familiar
Aug. 23— matters, dealing with metals, machinery,
hia —_ 2 tools. These latter are more sponsored.
LIBRA —Not especially favourable for artistic *
Bept. 24—Oct. 23 affairs or personal wishes, but it is gener-
ally a generous period for interests con-
cerning the public, our armed forces. *
SCORPIO — Saturn, Moon and Neptune — very *
Oct. 24—Nov. 22 favourably aspected—offer an interesting
day, profitable if rightly managed. A chal-
lenge to those who face difficult tasks. +
SAGITTARTOS —Much will depend upon your own efforts

to-day. Industrial trades,

Nov. 23—Dec.
“sf » = terests among top honoured.

household in- *

—Encouraging indications with your Sat- *
urn and the Moon excellently aspected.
Go ahead confidently with plans and have
faith in what you do, x

CAPRICORN

‘ARIUS —An unusually benefic, stimulating period
Jan. 22 — Feb. 20 for your family interests. New undertak-
ings of worth have helpful rays as do
familiar and daily routine. “

ISOES —Agivice to Capricorn and Aquarius obtain
Feb. 21—March 20 ¢4 yow to-day. Your Neptune's position
indicates fresh benefits if you strive for

them. Aim high.

AQU.

YOU BORN TO-DAY: Very talented, @pable, likeable. +

*



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WEDNESDAY,



SEPTEMBER 10, 1952





TEN DAYS IN THE ISL

By SYDNEY HARRIS

IT was just after 9 p.m. on the night of the 16th of

August that a party of the

4th Barbados (James Street)

Group stood on the deck of the C.N.S. Lady Nelson and
watched the lights of Bridgetown quietly and slowly dis-
appear from view. We were off to a camp to the island of

Grenada.

All of us were in high spirits,
and looking forward to the adven-
ture which had just begun. When

we could mo longer see the ts
of the town, and omly the fl
of St. "a lighthouse re
where dos lay hidden in

ie, we decided te “turn in”
for t. “Turning in” was a
matter of stretching a ground-
sheet on the top of the hatch
eovers, and reclining, Some were
foo excited to sleep, but others
found themselves in dreamland
almost immediately. Those who
could not sleep had the gentle
vibration of the engines and the
soft lapping of the water past the
ship to keep them company; while
from above myriad stars looked
down like quiet sentinels assuring
us that “all was well”. Thus pass-
ed the night, and at 4.30 in the
morning, the lights of St. Vincent
eould be seen twinkling as a
welcome. :
We dropped anchor in Kings-
town harbour just afta’ 6 a.m, and
three quarters of an hour later
Wwe were on our way ashore. We
walked around a bit, and finally
found ourselves at the home of
ev. J. B. Broomes, and in no
ime Mrs. Broomes had a break-
ast prepared for the boys. It was
very kind of her and we certainly
appreciated it, but we could bare-
ly manage to thank her before it
was time to hurry back to the
boat. And so at 9.15 am. we
glipped quietly away from St
incent and headed towards our
destination—Grenada.

Lovely Trip

We had a lovely trip from St.
Vincent to Grenada. The weather
was fine, and the ship was sailing
beautifully. The numerous islands
of the Grenadines were continu-
ally in sight, and provided an in-
ftleresting sight with its back-

ound of sea and sky. After we
ad been sailing for just over an
hour, the Captain sent for us and
instructed the officer on watch to
pthow us over the Bridge. This
was undoubtedly the greatest
thrill of the whole trip. We saw
the engine-room, telegraph, the
magnetic compass and the gyro-
compass, we watched the quarter-
master steering the ship and
keeping her steadily on her course,
we were shown charts and saw
how to plot a course, we saw the
radar screen and how it worked,
and many of the other aids to

camp. The camp site, Tanteen,
Was near the water-front, and so
we placed our baggage in a boat
while we marched around by road

and met cen ne with the
baggage ctiec. on the camp
grounds. We found that we were

te camp = 2" ex-army hut
ape wil seouts of the Ist
Q.R.C. Sea Scouts of Trinidad
The Trinidadian boys were already
in camp, and they welcomed us
and introduced themselves to us.
At onee we felt we were going to
have lots of fun with these boys,
for they were a keen batch, and
radiated the true Scout spirit.
“Settling in”, which for us meant
getting a meal ready, was soon
done, and after supper some of
us decided to take a stroll into St.
George’s to see what we could
see. It was too late to attend
church, but we went to the
Methodist church and met Rev.
Parker after the service was
over. We did not see a great deal
of the town that night, but enough
to realise that it was going to
be up hill and down dale all the
time. As a matter of fact, when
we got to Market hill, which is
the steepest of all and lies in the
centre of the town, we wondered
whether we should’nt just roll
(to bottom, and having got there
remain there. However we braved
the descent and the ascent and
eventually found our way back
to camp.

Camp Opens

_ Next morning camp life began
in earnest, Reveille was at 6.30
a.m., we turned out for P.T. at
7.00 a.m., breakfast was at 7.45,
and flag-raising, which was a joint
ceremony for the two troops and
conducted alternately by a Trini-
dad and Barbados scouter, was
lat 8.30. Inspection followed at
9.00 a.m., and then there was
usually an hour’s bathing parade
and the boys settled down to
work, There is always somethin;

to be done around camp, and o

course time for training in scout-
craft. Dinner was at 12.30, and

in the afternoon there were
usually games or bathing parades.
Netball

During the time that we were
in the island a triangular netbalh
tournament was in progress be-
tween St, Vincent, Trinidad, and
Grenada. Netball is extremely
popular in Grenada, Everybody



BUS PICNIC:
around’.

avigation. No wonder that some
f us came away feeling that in
n emergency we should be able
jo get the ship to port,

In St. George’s

We were alongside in Grenada
y 3.15 p.m., and were met on

ard by a local Scoutmaster, Mr.
ierre, who had been sent by the
sland Commissioner to welcome
us and conduct us to our camp
site. After the usual routine of
mbarkation and customs and
Paignton officials had been
passed, we were ready to get to

_———-.



The party on a ‘bus which they used for “getting

seems to take a keen interest in
the game, and when we saw the
crowds pouring up on evenings to
see netball, it was almost like a
crowd going to see football at
Kensington. The games were
played in the Botanie Gardens
about one hundred yards from our
camp, and naturally on evenings
some of the boys went to see what
the shouting was all about. We
Bajans took pains to be extremely
neutral, because all the girls were
so nice, and we could not afford to
lose favour with any of them,
Tuesday 19th was the day on

which we visited Grand Aasge
beach. Now we in Barbados are
justly proud of our beaches, but
we have not got anything quite
like this. There is an unbroken
Stretch of about two miles of pure
white sand, and the water is per-
fectly clear and calm-like, a great
swimming pool, The boys cer-
tainly enjoyed their swim, and
many wished that they could
bring Grand Anse beach back with
them.
Breadfruit Cou-cou

The following day, Wednesday,
was the day of the great football
mateh — Barbados vs. Trinidad.
The Trinidad boys gave us a good
drubbing, 7—2, but behind that
lies a tale. It was impossible to

get rice in’ Grenada, and the
island commissioner, Mr. Red-

head, had managed to get a large
quantity of breadfruits to heip
us our ration problem.

The day of the match we had
breadfruit cou-cou for dinner, and
the cooks did a fine job; conse-
quently many of us had very large
helpings indeed. We took the field
fairly soon after dinner, and it

was not long before we realised friendly shout. We were climbing the

that the breadfruit cou-cou was
the enemy’s fifth column. I re-
member vividly lumbering after
some very evasive forwards,
painfully conscious that the great
weight in my mid-section could



WATERFALL: A waterfall at
Annandale.

never allow me to get anywhere

mear them. I panted and toiled

manfully, but no man can serve
two masters, and having done my
breadfruit cou-cou justice, alas,
I was now little more than a spec-
tator. But let this in no way
detract from the fact that the
Trinidadians played very good
football, and most definitely
deserved their victory, There was
a loeal Athletic and Cycle Sports
meeting on the following day at
the Queen’s Park grounds. We
went along to enjoy ourselves and
to see how the meeting compared
with ours at home. We found
that the athletes were very good,
and would probably do very well
in Barbados, but the cycling still
has a long way to go. One of the
reasons is that there is not a
proper cycling track. Where the
cyclists ride, the grass is fairly
long and there are ruts to be
negotiated; so it takes much more
out of you to push a bike around
than it would at Kensington.
Bus Tour

Friday morning dawned bright-
ly, and we regarded that as a
good omen for our whole day bus
tour which was planned for that
day. The Trinidad boys and our-
selves were going together and we
just made a comfortable bus load.
The use of that word “comfort-
able” reminds me of an amusing
incident. When we were thinking
of making the tour, I was enquir-
ing of one of the local bus-drivers
how many the bus could carry,
and he said to me: “Oh! we does
carry 37, but we like to make
strangers comfortable, so we
could carry 42." Fortunately we
did not have to encroach upon
his hospitality to the point of
comfort, as our combined numbers
were exactly 37. We left camp
at 9.15 a.m., and we drove through
town and out onto the road that
led to the Grand Etang. We pass-



a — ee



OF



AFTER THE FIRE: The Party
the Fire in St. George's which they helped to put out.
appreciation by the Fire Chief

ed by
always

several
gave

villages,
the

and
villagers

we
a

gradually all the time, but s

the gradient became more pro-
nounced, and at times we won-
dered if the ‘Ford’ would do it;

but she pulled through, and we
went off the main road on to a
beaten track which led us to the
Grand Etang.

There is nothing rugged or awe-
inspiring about the crater of this
extinct voleano; in fact, more
peaceful scene could hardly be
imagined. There is a lake nestling
Quietly beneath tree-covered



th

rim of the crater, 2,014 ft. above
sea-level; and wherever one
looks the soothing green of ver-
dant foliage meets the eye. We
Spent a short time enjoying the
quiet beauty of this spot, then

‘we were on our way to Grenville,
the second largest town in the
island. We were mostly going
down hill now, and through some
very interesting countryside, There
were no fields of gently waving
sugar-cane such as we know in
Barbados, but rather more like
forest, with thick undergrowth.
Once we passed a spot where the
people were actually doing some
lumbering, and we saw some of

‘the “bullet wood” boards that
they had obtained by dint of
their labours.
Grenville
We now reached Grenville, a

town 20 miles away on the east
coast, which is nearly as big as St.
George’s. We spent about an
hour here having a quick look-
around, and then we were

again heading northwards along
the east coast of the island. We
passed through the airport, which
was practically deserted that day,
and reached the north-east tip of
the island, Levera Bay. Here at
last we felt as if we were back in
Bimshire. The scenery was very
similar to that of the Chancery
Lane coast, and the sea-bathing,
for we bathed here, was also very
much like that at Chancery Lane
oy Silver Sands It seemed
to us an ideal spot to take lunch,
and so we did; and when that

important task was completed,
we were off once again, We
hugged the coast fairly closely
and went across the north and
then down the west side of the
island. The sea and the coast
were very much like the leeward
side of Barbados, but as soon as

we booked inland the difference
was apparent, for often the hills
rose almost sheer from the road.
We stopped at the small towns

of Victoria and we were back in
St. George’s about 6.00 p.m, after
a very lovely day indeed.

Fire

The following day, Saturday,

passed quite uneventfully, being
just a happy but routine camp
day. Some of the sgcouters (my-

self included) attended a dance
that night given in honour of the
visitors to the island at a place
called Morne Rouge, actually on
a part of Grand Anse beach, and
about 12.30 someone noticed a
strange glow coming from the
direction of town. We were some
miles from the town, but we could
look across the water and see part
of it. When we did so now, a
terrifying but beautiful spectacle

were taken to headquarters after
Tt was in

met our eyes. A broad, red tongue

of flame seemed to be rising from

‘ntre of the town, and ita
glo. illuminating the sky and
reflected in the sea. The Trinidad
scoutmaster and I at once won-
dered whether it was near our
cemp, but a phone message soon
put our fears at rest. We could

not get to town, so we just stood

and watched, realising that the
fire-fighters were slowly but
surely winning the battle. When
we did get back to camp, we
learnt that the boys, both Trini-
dadian and Barbadian, had turned
out under the command of

Rover-Leader Charles Morris, and
had done a fine job. The smaller
boys had used their staves and
helped to control the crowd, while
Mr. Morris and the big chaps had

actually helped with the hoses
As a result of this action the
troops received letters of thanks
from the Superintendent of

Police, and a few days later he
sent around the fire-engine to the
camp so that everything could be
explained to the boys, and that
they might have a practice
“squirt.” Needless to say, the
“souirt’ was the most enjoyable
part of the proceedings, We
found out that about 100 persons
had been rendered homeless by

by the M.V. Canadian Constructor wili

the fire, but people were subscrib- be closed at the General Post Office as
noney ar giving clothes to “der

Hae . id g & arcel Mail and Registered Mail at

help them 3 p.m, to-day, 10th September 1982

Trip South
On the next day a trip had been
arranged for us by Mr, Redhead

and some friends of scouting,
Col. Stewart, and Mr. Stewart-
Mitchell. We were taken in cars

to La Sagesse rum distillery, and
then through a part of the
southern part of the island, We
stopped at Mr. Stewart-Mitchell’s
home where the boys found ice
cream and aerated drinks awaii-
ing them. We showed our appre-
ciation of this hospitality by
singing a selection of scout sons

for them, This was probably
good practice for the sing-son;
which took place “on Monday |

evening after we had been on a
trip to the Annandale water falls.
The programme was arranged and |
given by the boys of both troops,
and the members of the public

\
who were invited seemed to hava} Restores Yout

Tues- }

enjoyed it very much. On
day Mr. Redhead, who is super-
intendent of the prison, invited
the scouters up to the prison, We
were shown around the prison,
and were particularly impressed |
by the very fine samples of handi-

t

craft done by the prisoners.
They mostly seeméd a _ happy
buneh, but even that did nob

persuade us to stay. The prison}
>on a thigh hill which overlooks |
the town, and the view of the;
town from the prison could ony |

be bettered by a view from an}
aeroplane.

That was our last night in|
Grenada, and many I suppose,

went to sleep dreaming of the ten |
happy days we had spent there. }
We thought of the scenic beauty
of the island, of the hospitality of |
the people, and especially of the |
comradeship of the boys of the’
Ist @.R.C. Sea Scout who had
shared all our fun, and we knew }
that it would be a long time in-
deed before any of us could for-
get those ten days in the isle of
Spices.

The Shute Foundation For Medical Research

“Give Light...

and People will see

THE DOCTORS SHUTE early realized that the line
of research they had come upon in 1945 with the help of

Drs. Skelton and Vogelsang,
berations.
numbered scwres of million

Those potentially interested in

must have far-reaching rever-
their work

s. Some broad scheme must

be laid down to meet a situation unparalleled in their

experience.

Accordingly this organization,
the Shute Foundation, was incor-

porated on a non-profit basis
under tario Letters Patent in
May, 1947. Its membership com-

rised 26 citizens of London and
oronto, Canada, of whom four
were physicians. The Shute
Brothers were not members not

officials, it may be added nor
were Dr. Skelton, and Dr.
Nogelsang. Both of the latter

continued their careers outside
the Institute. Dr. Skelton going

into Endocrine Research under
Professor Hens Selye. and Dr.
Vogelsang in private practice

of Cardiology.

Since its mception, the Chair-
man of the Board of Dixectors
has been Canon Quintin Warner
who is widely known in Canada
end'the United States for his
work s a Judge of Juvenille
Court und in Alcolholics Anony-
mous. as well as for his preach-
ing missions in many Canadian
and American centres. The
Treasurer of the Foundation has
from the first been Mr. W, S. J.
Saunders, jong Treasurer of the

10!



City of Lon and a very
widely respected citizen. ‘The
third member of the Board ctf
Directors was fortherly Mr. A
G. Calder, the senior chartered
accountant of the c¢ When he
retired due to er pecssure



an elec-



his place, was + n by

trical engineer specializing in
X-ray. Mr. Edward Fanning.
The Board of Directors and

members of the Foundation entire-
ly govern the affairs of the Foun-



dation, the Shute brothers being
included among i*s employ}
having merely a courtesy voice

in its decisions and plans. This
type of organization was devel-
oped by the Doctors Shute with
the help of their legal advisor.
Mr. Campbell Calder, Q.C.,
order to make it clear to every-
one that they did not have and
could not have any means of
profiting personally ‘from the
very obvious professional ad-
vantages of their cardio-vascular
discoveries, There was no reason
why they should not so benefit,
for others had, as, for example,
the discoveries of insultn, and
streptomycin. But the tradition
of me i discovery on the
whole is that physicians should
not protit financially by their
humanitarian discoveries, and
this tradition has been implicitly
followed here, The Shute broth-
ers work for a moderate salary
for the Institute, have na con-
tract of any kind with the latter,
and could be dismissed at any
moment Without recourse,

So little has been known of
this aspect of the Foundation’s

organization that this statement
is perhaps long overdue.
Tn November, i948, a year

and a haif after it was organized,




the Foundation purchase a fine
old London mansion. Waverley.
for use aS a medical clinie and
research institute. This sits in
state of 5% acres, located in

of the city. A small

through if at an

£ The
magn'ficent
gardens and
Species,
The house

e Y

rolling
with
huge

grounds are
formal rose
trees of many

tself is magnificent,
f Victor The Blue Room
has a f sd cherry



ceiling of carv

their own way’...

Carved ceilings, windows of bot-
tle glass, fine carved stone man-
tels and marble fireplaces mark
the various rooms. Original boo)
illustrations, prints and etchings
weil as a collection of old
enliven them as well.
This old house, redesigned
a modern medical centre, +
facilities for investigating med-
cal cases of various types, of
course, but its reputation to date
has largely been made on _ its
cardiovascular work. In one 12
months period alone 2316 new
cardiovascular patients passed
through its clinic. Where hospi-
talization is indicated, the facili-
ties of the city’s hospitals are
used. Fortunately, Vitamin E is
largely an ambulant treatment,
and so the Institute’s atients
come and go, rarely remaining in
Lon@on for long.

The Foundation derives i's
whole support from the medical
fees of the Institute, and from
donations and bequests. Since the
jatter two classifications yielded
only $37,000 in the first three
years of its existence, it can he
seen that its research activities
have been handicapped tae date
and it has been compelled to
rely largely on its elinical re-
seurces. It should be pointed out
here, perhaps that the Founda-
‘ion has never had and now has
no financial interest in the manu-
facture or sale of preparations
of Vitamin E or any other p'ar-
maceutical, for that matter,

From the first the organization
of the Foundation has met the
specifications of the Taxation D:-

gins
ZiaSs,
as



vision of the Dominion otf
Canada’s Department of WNa-
tional Revenue and therefore

contributioris made to it are ex-

empt form income tax.
The Foundation publishers in
May and December of each vear

its own medical journal the Sum-
mary. The first issue was un-
fortunately entitled the “Semi-
nar” before that was found ta be
the title of another small r-
1 hence the changg of name



Motto of Scripps-Howard Papers

This issue is the seventh to be
published.

To date thi jour the
Summary. ha carried ma
original articles and reports by
members of the medical Y of
the Shute Institute, as well a
contributions from other Cana-

: dian phygleians. two French

doctors, an American and two
Englishmen, It has carried note-
worthy articles on burns, various
types of heart and _ vascular
disease, abstracts of the impor-
tant current literature on alpha
tocopherol, and biographies of
famous physicians of the recent
past. The editions have number-

ed from 3,000 to 14,000 copies,
amd are sent gratis to medical
libraries hospitals, medical

schools, and physicians of note
all over the world. Some issues
have cost the Foundation as much
as $2,700.

An auxiliary group of women, ©

the Waverley Guild, has recently
been organized under the Presi-
dency of Mrs W. S. J. Saunders.
It sponsors one-man art shows,
exhibits of woodcarving, seulp-
ture and Canadian handicrafts,
public lectures, book weeks, anil
other such activities. Its object
is to further the cultural inter-
ests of the community in which
the Institute exists and to ald the
work of the Institute. As yet it
work is in its infancy but mar

interesting things should grow ou
of it.

Periodically the members of
Medical Advisory Board meet
consult on matters of medical and
scientific policy concerning th
Institute. This P oard compose
of eight of the leading medical
men of London and the
ings communitie

The Institute sponsors
lectures on medical
community project. The third

surroun

public
t



nual series, just concluded,
eluded for ple 1h
terilit ba

subjec is a

ynition of heart disease.

is grateful patients and

hropists recognise tne
features and objects ih
Foundation hou.d attr
ques and gifts major
tance. When that time comes }

im launch a programme of ani
mal experiment and laberator)
tudies which may alter the whole
of cardiovascular medicine
amd surgery. What has already
be@n achieved on a _ shoestring:
and under circumstances of up-
uswal and unnecessary difficulty
augur® well for the future,

{ts remains, as one of
its leaflets quotes; “to bind up
the broken-hearted, to proclaim
iberty to the captives, and the
opening of the prison to them
that are bound.”

To bring to the
me soulless men the medi-
| profession the virtues of
Vitamin E medication is no mean
task of the Foundation. To re-
m@mber the shameful fraud
practised on Pasteur and Ross by
the same type of men help tc
shed some light on this difficult
undertaking —-The Summary.

In Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

ARLE AND WIRELESS
that they car
1 the following «
bados Coast &
Texas Trad
fanchuria
entire, §.m
Bonaire
ipenser, s
olina G 3.8
is, 8.8. Jot
Brittar Eve
Cavailaire 8.5
aica, .#. Rio Tur
testo Bayonne

Thernist

phil-
unique
Shute
ct be
impor-

ol

ol

face

object

attention of
in

(WL) lta
ow communicat
ps through the







8.5. Thorbjoro, s
ian Laader,
Andalucia, 8.8, Braz
Alcoa Polaris,
Rangitane,
Michael,
Regent
rett 5
Choluteca



Nueva

Mar
Ventur
Pant







Re ter tle, Atlantic
aisie fi *,

s. Andrea Gritti

é

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



the Schooner

Reckles, A, Ward, P. Ramdin, S Samaroa,

c Rampersaud, J. Stuart, R. Evelyn
SEPTEMBER 9TH

A. Rivero, E. Brathwaite, BE Jones,
A Evelyt b Evelyn, B Chism, J
Collymore, J Collymore R. Houlder,
A Abraham, A Carter, F Moeonsoor,
U. Taylor, P. Dicker Dickers, D
Dicker, M Muir, G. Boenig, I. Year-
wood, A, Yearwood, G. Glasgow, ©
Headley, K. Spence, R. Spence, G |
Sealy

aalpha will be closed at the General Post
Office

en Thursday,







TRAFFIC |

In Carlisle Bay




Seh. Mary M. Lewis, Sch. Frances W
Smith, Sch Franklyn D. R., Se
D’Ortac, Sch. Laudalpha, Sch Augusty:
1.’ Compton, Sth. Marion Belle Woife
Seh. Rainbow M., Sch. Emeline, M.V. |}
Daerwood, M.V. Ricardo Arias, MV. |
Culdad Bolivar, MV. Lady Jo) |

ARRIVALS }

M.V. Lady Joy, 46 tons, fro » St Lueta
oder Captain W. Parsons asigned to
Owners Assoc ation 1
DEPARTURES
©. T. Rodas, for Martinique
M.V. Gloria Maria, for St

Sch Vineept

gille Smith, for British Guiana
Soh br Wonita, for British Guiana
S$. Trader, for Trinidad
MV. Moneka, for Dominica
S.S. Canadian Cruiser, Montreai
S.S. Stugard, Trinidad

Seawell

ARRIVALS
SEPTEMBER eTH
From Peerte Rico
1 Byer RK Millington, ¢ James
SEPTEMBER OTH
From Trinidad





2 Sampson, S. Sarmp-
Son, J Marshall K
Granmeum, R ver, J. Symaister, V
Symister, A ell A James,
Kirkwood, RB. Kirkwood

SEPTEMBER 8TH ‘
From Antigua:

W. Finge!, Q. Farara, F. Nunes. G@
Gordon, C. Jacobs, 8S. Gumbs. M. Winter,

Josiah, S. Belgrave, E Brathwaite



DEPARTURES
SEPTEMBER sTH

Yor Trinidad
H. Roberts, P

Gaffney, J
Maynard, R

Deterville, T

Hope, C
Beckles, |




MAIL NOTICE

Mails for Dominica by the Seh. Lau
as under

Parcel Mail at 12 noon, Registered Mail
"t 2 p.m. and Ordinary Mail at 2.30 pam
llth September, 10962.

Mails for Trinidad ond British Guiana



prdinaty er 8.30 a.m. on the Lith
september, 1959
RATES OF EXCHANGE

SEPTEMBER 9%, 1962



Selling NEW YORK Buying |
73 4/0 pr. Cheques on
Banke Tl 6/10% pr
Sight or
Demand Drafts 710/106 pr
73 410% pr. Cable
1 9/10% pr. Currency 70 3/10 pr
Coupons 68 6/10% pr. |
o> pr Silver 20° pe
CANADA }
80 8/10% pr. Cheques on
Bankers 768 0/10% pr
Demand Drafts 76.75% pr
Sight Drafts 78 G/10% py
#0 8/10 pr. Cable
78 3/10 pr. Currency 7 4/10% pr
Coupon a7 M pr
50% p 20°) pr

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PAGE. FOUR

ADVOCATE
Gesu oe ee BS uae

Printed by the Advocate Os., Lid. Bre~* #1. Bridzetew>






Wednesday, September 10, 1952.

EXHIBITIONS _

WITHIN rec@ht Wegks three exhibitions
have been stagéd fn Barbados which give
some indication of the talent and ability ietan
which exists in the island. Stardens, his huge, red-brick

eee house, is much as he left it that

Two of these exhibitions were held at morning. ‘The lawns are well

IT IS now 218 days since Frank
James White drove through the
Gloucestershire town of Newent—
where he was known as Mr. Har-
greaves'—— and headed towards
London in his beige Ponsae for
the last time.

the Batbadbds Museum’ and one ht. the Drill barbered the edges still profes-
' . » "ee ~ . . sionally sharp.
Hall The main part of the house

The first exhibition was a display of black where White used to live and
‘ . Work, ig deserted, Gargoyles peer
and white photographs taken by members stonily down the lawns from the
of the Batbados Camera Chib.“! \’ tower top. And in the gold-ceil-
vore oe ; if 4 a P inged rooms gilt angels look
In recent years there has been a notice- across from the marble mantel-
i i he numbers of piece at rows of ledgers murked
able increase locally in t cease) ene salen tale
those interested in photography and the ~ Whitey gardener, Wilfred J.
j ns e lub some years Wadley, is still at work in the
formation of the Camera C y pre ne eB geo enya Ma
ago was a natural result of the desire of of White: “As I found him, he
amateur photographers. to get together was one of the best employers I
and study a subject’ of cammon eo. «Vein tceatity. cord was “borrow-
, : ographs club ed” by his employer to get the
The exhibition of phat Brap § “k false passport which took him out
members at the Museum a few weeks — of Britain,
1as been able Now Frank James White is on
showed how much te Cinb has the run. From the International
to do to encourage high standards of oo Zone of Tangier he has told his
- 3 : ;.' Both as to own
graphy among its members sect matter “ory of how he escaped from
technique and selection of subject matter |) i:gin—a story that starts, as hé
the photographs exhibited at the Museum says, wih his arrest on. charges
bai ae ed o frau@....
reflect high standards and it is to be hop’ 1 Used a Bank to Help Me
that the Barbados Publicity Committee has Fly
been able to secure some of these exhibits
for display in the new waiting room at
Seawell Airport.
The other exhibition at the"Museum, the pe a) frarcedt-tec ty berets:
exhibition of Miniature Gardens, is UN- — Withdut * saying anything else
doubtedly the-most worthwhile exhibition, except “Not guilty” in reply to

ed, A small motor-car drové up
to my
February

charge of fraud they read to
that has been held in Bar bados for a num- he e
7 - . ocal pol he
her of years At a time when the beauty accompanied them to t

deing consumed, “ft toak about an hour to optain
the part of my rejease on bail of £1,000, after
which returned to my home,
Stardens House. :
I was, peeperet to abandon it all
and do ¢ u
two wept
to surrender to my bail.
; At the time of arrest the police
Mm -had confiscated my passport. To
and a new passport was my first
job,

of this island i, ee —
ith little apparent concer!
or sAthoritica, the activities of the Horti-
cultural Society are_of especial import-
and the exhibition of miniature gardens
is evidence enough that if-only the authori-
ties will throw their whole weight n
support of a “more beautiful Barbados
campaign that’ the members’ of ‘the Hor-
ticultural. Society “can lend” invelfable
assistance. Certainly there was far more
beauty to be seen in the,small confines of
the Museum during the~ Exhibition’than
there is to be noticed today in the once
lovefy and once. carefully tended Queen's
Pathe more recent exhibition of fish’ in
aquaria at the Drill Hall is also an exhibi-
tion of which to be proud. The organiser:
this exhibition: re to tie oer brine wae
or giving an opportunity to many | © a new fdentity for 15s,
ae such A Wide’ variety of-beautiful: fish

had
-taken in the Strand,

tificate.
_It was all too easy.
gardener I require

me,

ardly have been equalled in a larger time
_ a _ -tully stamped. So far so good. -

MY arrest was quite unexpect="»

showed his insurance card of pawnbrokers.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



SEPTEMBER. 10, 1952

WEDNESDAY,



- ‘$HESE ARE THE CLUES ... A man on £1,600 bail
disappears te Paris with a false passport... NQ@W FOR

THE FACTS

MAN On The RUN

out of my several banking ac-
counts, This had to be done very
carefully because normally I paid
by cheque for every thing and
rarely drew more than £20 in
Cash. But somehow or other |
managed to accumulate about
£1,000 in one-pound notes.

| decided to make first of all
for Paris — a city I knew well
and in which I had friends.

The preparations I had so far
made had made it necessary for
me to go from Gloucestershire to
Lendon three times during the
first week. I made each of these
journeys by car, driving alone,
and on each occasion I took a
packed suitease with me,



. RANK JAMES WHITE

house one..morning in . At Stardens House I employed round the difficulty,
) and~ three detectives a- resident
politely informed me that they secretary. It was not my custom

housekeeper and a
to keep anything. under lock and
key, and each time I went off in
my car to. London I wondered
whether my shrinking wardrobe
would be noticed, but, as it was,
no word or comment was made to
me.

Having decided to make first
for Paris, I went to Thomas
Céok’s and bought a single ticket
on the night ferry, At the same

nk before the date 4ime I bought the £25 worth of
ahead When I was due travéller’s cheques allowed, and

these were duly recorded on my
new passport.

I then went to the American
Express in the Haymarket and

t I went to London and ob- purchased from them an undated
tained the necessary forms, which Ajr France ticket from Paris to
_L took away with me to study. I Milan.

I also purehased £300

new passport photographs worth of Sterling Area travellers’
I went to cheques from the Amercian Ex-
Somerset House and purchased a press, thinking that these might
copy of my gardener’s birth cer- jo useful if I went on to Cyprus.

These Sterling Area cheques were

I told my jot entered on my passport.
ita idanteg on ee eee

card’ in connection with his in-
surance cards, and he gave it to
Armed with all these neces-
sary documents I presented my- lem of ready money in Paris—
self at’ the Passport Office and £25
within one hour was issued with week. There was only one solu- t
* tion I could think of — to buy

My.gardener had no suspicion jewellery and sell it once I got to

reser oe aver ee whatever. I gave him back his is.
and the excellence-of the display would (Gentity card and at the same | “Ts

° Final Letters
I STILL had to solve the prob-

in Paris would not last a

I went to a very exclusive firm
From them: I
bought a magnificent gold cigar-
ette case for £120 and a platinum

SALESMEN IN A JAM:
: NO CARS NO CASH

By NEWELL ROGERS |
carried carelessly in my pocket
and the clip hidden in a box of





















matches. . ‘ NEW YORK.

I spent the next few days .
writing final .Jetters. To my SPARE a thought for the worried car
solicitors I gave a power of| salesmen.
er EN ae {afairs nd) They are caught between a shortage of

ssessions.
to start my journey. My large} cars to sell and a shortage of customers to

Pontiac car was full of petrol and
ready for my last trip in it. =

Problem

My journey from Gloucester-
shire to London took four hours,
and I had not allowed myself a
great deal of time. I had my lus
8age to label, and I wanted to buy
a hat—something I had never worn
for ten years, and now thought of
as a disguise.

I had also to dispose of my car.
Everything went smoothly, how-
ever, and with a good hour to
spare I drove my Pontiac up the
ste€p ramp of a garage and walk-
ed away:

All T had to do now was to post
the half-dozen letters I had writ-
ten and then join the boat-train.
But I had somehow overlooked the
fact that in London the post was
collected up to 9.30 This was a
great blow.

If I posted my letters now—as
I had planned to do—they would
probably be delivered on the
Friday morning—before I would
actually arrive in Paris,

It was essential that these
letters were not delivered before
Saturday. I then thought of a way

buy them.

The car scarcity—most of the showrooms

in my suburb are empty—is due to the recent
steel strike. It cut Detroit’s supplies.

The reason for the buyers’ scarcity is prob-

ably lack of ready cash.
* *

LAMINATED

* * /

MAKERS realise that they must make the
greatest sales drive of post-war years in 1953.
They want to sell 5,000,000 cars. So there is
going to be a glittering new series of models.

Details are still secret. But this much is
known. Some higher-priced models will have’
air-conditioning. Most will have a new look’!
in body design, and there will be some en-
gine changes.

*

See the whole range of these fine PADLOCKS at

Cc. S. PITCHER & CO. Ph. 172



* * *

WITH the defence boom tapering off, com-
petition is going to be red-hot. Detroit’s
plans are a warning light to British car
makers in the American market.

SPARE a thought, too, for the women of
sunny Los Angeles, capital of California.
Hollywood, a part of Los Angeles, draws
beautiful women as bees to honey. And now
there are 725,900 marriageable women in
L.A. and only 381,700 marriageable men.

D.EHARD MacArthur supporters tried to
ge* his name accepted on the presidentia’
election ballots in Illinois. They proposed
him as a candidate of the America First
Party. The general said he. was abandoning
politics when he took the chairmanship of a
business machine company three weeks ago.
The election board said No to the diehards.

A ROUND-THE-WORLD voyage in a 33ft.
sloop with two sails and motor was com-
pleted today by Al Peterson, 40-year-old

Brooklyn bachelor. He left New York in
the sloop Stornoway in 1949, and did not tell
anybody where he was going.

ONLY 128 days until Christmas. And th2
New York Commerce and Industry Associa-
tion issues its annual plea to British export-
ers: Remember last year when British lux-
ury goods missed the holiday counters due
to late shipment. Please, please get the stuff
moving now,

BACK into the headlines goes the name of

I pushed them into the letter-
box of a bank, and on a piece of
waper torn from my diary I
wrote; —

“Dear Sir,.My small son has
naughtily ‘posted’ six letters in
your box. I shall be grateful if
you will post them in the ordinary
way as soon as possible.”

‘Phat, I thought, was a quite
ingenious way of surmounting the
difficulty.

A porter wheeled my five
trunks into the Customs shed, I
presented my passport, which
was casually examined and cour-
teousily returned. None of my bags
was opened and I boarded the
train and was conducted to my
sleeping compartment,

To Dover

Then I sat on the bed and
lighted a cigarette taken from the
gold cigarette case and checked
up on the diamond brooch
beneath the top layer of matches,
Soon the train began to move into
the night towards Dover. I left
my compartment and lurched
towards the restaurant car, where
I sat down to a meal and drank
a few brandies. I felt I needed

hem.

But I had escaped from Scot-
land Yard, and I had succeeded
in taking about £1,000 with me. I
felt I was about to begin a new

life.
TOMORROW: Arrested in Paris. .

And light as a blown leaf!

Brand new NYLON SUITS in
a full range of sizes— grey and
fawn.



eae aia h high ~ *- Getting Money
canlecA ttm. the ee am ight wall I THEN , began to drew money and diamond brooch for
‘ * ; Bele

5 Ae sn : t the 2 areneiet
consider ee ‘a_repeat display a

Muse Tat, nt ear. Labour Party

R 34 bis pach ich
.. These’ three successfulkexhibitions whic
. nT ee ' t
have recently beén held in Barbados ough ; LONDON.
to encourage others o held exhibitions of — “gi, months ago early in out By D. T. Roberts
a different=kind "throughout the a, English Spring, Winston Church- product ibe: thir even: seiltude
dy ben made in ill’s new Conservative Government , .
The suggestion has #lready seemed to have inherited all the Naturally the Socialist party
ils of the day. Its stock was enthusiast is likely to be more on
goitigt.down fast. the Bevan's side than on Attlee’s

this newspaper that-an easy way to encouf
But the, Summer has made a —because it is only elderly men

age the livestock and ‘agricultural industry
_ to the practise of earlier days to hold dive- oiange in’ the British political WhO are glad always to defend

£400.





in the country districts would be to return

: th t tand on their past
stock and agricultural shows in thagroun@s scene, Now it is the Labour sanaer Thee Sathanetie Schan
of some convenient plantation. ™ Party that“is in troukle. Being in once of the Labour Party will

While Miniature Gardens and fish “in, OPposition has Jorn Labour probably leave the “Attlecites”

: iti , rty pieces, The Conserva- well in power—but they will have
aquaria are fit subjects for exhibitions at © jives, (in parti¢ulay the success- ty jean’ their codons at least

Museum or at the Drill Hall; livestoc ful Chancellor, R.»A, Butler) can half way to the Bevan viewpoint,
shows are best seen ona farm and although be thankful at the strange confu- in order to keep the loyalty of
d n be exhibited in town it sion into. which Clement Attlee’s the party following.
garden produee c . in the-préunds of party, recently so strong, has now The key to it all is the popu-
will look more attractive in e's ) 5 Ol” fallen. . larity poll taken to elect mem-
a plantation. . hai dh ue Labour Party Srapcsane — yt Tans ate

i «® in ounds ©) “8 orecombe in a week's time is an has thr i
ag ee yo Rag Neen, Ati Selo’ ox expected to demonstrate the weak- him on the Executive. If he gains

, » mess and divisions. in British more he will reckon Morecombe a
certain days of the-year has been already cocinism. Defeat has left the victory,

started in Barbados, but the time seems British Labour Party, after six All this bickering inside Brit-
overdue for the holding of livestock and post-war»years of rule, with no ish Socialism leaves the Conser-
agricultural exhibitions in the parishes. available policy of immediate re- vative Government with a been
The annual agricultural exhibition in ‘rms to put forward, Fundamen- pect of five oe of fsa

A it is in itself is ‘lly, the problem for an idealis- at the end of — t a Re e
Queen's Park; excellent as it is in its S tie party like British Socialism js "®t know what they w: c eve ~
Ho, substi for local exhibitions which to maintaii a programme of re. eet. But probably British Social-

; ism wi i fuller-
ether the individuals of form-that is, at once, attractive to 8M will, by that time be a rT
hare common interests in. the Bediies and practicable to blooded, and much redder Social

‘nes, P ism than it was on~the day mild
i yestock-@ndeagr ultute. | esi ae — Attlee, little Clement Attlee was de-

. The continual {oa on:
— from the-country, into oe ews which Cripps. Morrison, and Bevin — set feated at the polls.
is the: unfortunate ofthe urbanising about sueh ‘a rapid programme ot Big Power To Small
influences to which, dos ‘has eon Aelia a ate mee Queen Elizabeth II recently
pond during the: last-two des, could “oo, Then for two @ddressed a letter to an ancient
e halted if only the life of the country: years it retained power but cast 'epublic hidden in he iis ot
could be made more attractive for the small around for something to do next, a gH ge eee
peasant and agricultural labourers. If the cs taanauies oo Ban sega. Pepe (Ok * Ban Searibo, Prev-
ietors of plantations in each parish iable~ defeat ——and the British !ously they had lost patience in
took-it in turns to hold-livestockeand “agri- “Sociatists now-are the “defenders” te course | of negotiations with
cultural shows on their Iands the small of the established way of doing the British Foreign Office and
keepers of. livestock and growers of gar- things—the Labour way, British had wally ren tg nr
den produce would have a. greater sense Socialism, for want of any new %° 2 opersign State, ihe Sep:

Ss ‘ *polit esspd ,. of San Marino is entitled to do so.
of belonging to their planting community: Scie etn necctoe p.ae- Unfortunately the Queen's. reply
than they must have now by comparison jrols, priorities and high taxation to the pinpoint Repubtic has not
of their own narrow social lives with the —with full employment anda con- Pleased the Regents. She o
more spacious lives of those who live in. tinuous moderate inflation as its Pye eee rarer,
“big” houses.» When exhibitions such as Packkround. So the orthodox Db bic. viola

: : : : Labour Party lead by Attlee has neutrality — first by Germans
the Miniature Gardens or the Aquaria Fish acome a kind of “conservatism and then by Allies — during the

in Bridgetown cars from all over. defending the established order war. San Marino wants more.
PEN sine asitors rity see them. In that Attlee’s government built. Until recently this was the only
th ‘ ' ts from all over the island . Aneurin Bevan’s movement is “Communist ruled” country this
aaa tice os euany vinitove” to” codnitey a gathering of vaguely socialist side of the Iron Curtain.
{ 7 ,

! im nteats.who are always say- ' Student Life
_ livestoek * and agricultural shows. But ing that they want socialism not t t



Dstatute






‘our years,



In Trouble |

—LE.S

every profession, (except possibly
the law) there is a shortage cf
trained man _ power. Compare
those figures with the United
States where there are three
times as many people, in total,
but thirty times as many students
at colleges and Universities, all
over the 48 States. America has
two and a half million students
potentially leaders in their
own field. Britain can only train
a paltry 85,000 at any one time.

Ican hear people commenting,
“But British standards are higher”.
There are two answers to that;
first, that engineering, accoun-
tancy, and many other profes-
sions need more trained men —
not necessarily more geniuses;
and secondly — there are twica
as many students on advanced
“post graduate” courses in the
United States, (where standards
are high) as there are in all Brit-
ish Universities together. Inci-
dentally with our students out-
numbered by thirty to one it is
easy to see why we have smaller
choice for Olympic teams,

3657 students in Britain to-
day come from Colonies or Com-
monwealth countries.

Greenwich Mean Time

The Astronomer Royal does not
live at Greenwich any more. But
of course “G.M.T.” is still taken
from the meridian that passes
through the charming old eigh-
teenth century observatory on a
hill outside ‘Greenwich, over-
looking the Thames. The As-
tronomer Royal is now comfort-
ably ensconeed with his tele-
scopes down Hurstmonceaux

Castle, in S The old build.
ings at G

hit about b; ie bombardment
of London a are just being

restored. For two hundred years
there has been a “time ball” on
the roof of the observatory. It
can be observed by shipping in
the river. Two-and-a-half-minutes
before the hour it is raised to
the top, and allowed to fall at
the instant of the correct Green-
wich Mean Time, Before the
radio time signal, ships leaving
London would check their chro-













the former Muriel Vanderbilt, thrice married
society leader of exclusive Newport, a Rhode
Island seaside resort.

She gained fame in the twenties as soci-
ety’s “golden girl.” Now Mrs. John Payson
Adams, she told the police of the theft of
25,000 dollars (£8,900) in jewels from her
estate, Idle Hour.

THE men who run Minnesota’s national
ploughing contest have decided not to hear
speeches by Eisenhower and Stevenson on
the same day. There would be no time for
ploughing. So Eisenhower will speak on Sep-
tember 6, Stevenson only if he can make it
on another day.

THE air force which wanted to produce
Rolls Royce Sapphire jet engines in a big
way, has got only a “handful” after spending
400 million dollars (£143 million) in 18
months.

Reason: Scarcity of steel and machine tools

and difference between production methods
in Britain and the U.S.
» *















SEA ISLAND
DRESS & SPORTS
SHIRTS

in ‘our Menswear
Dept. American
Ties and slick Men’s
Belts. * (dat



* ak
AMERICA has entered the race against
Britain’s Comet jet air liner — six years

behind.

In California, the Douglas Aircraft Com-
pany announced its readiness to build jet
transports. é

Douglas made the Dakotas or DC-3’s, war-
time work-horses of the air.

The new jet is to be called the DC-8. It
will have two seating plans. Luxury or first-
a seats, 70 to 90; tourist, or second-class,

Tentative specifications—cruising speed of
660 miles an hour eight miles up, four
engines, crew of five, wing span 127 feet,
length 134 feet.

The planes are expected to cost more than
‘£1,000,000 each, and the first production
model will fly in 1958.

Why is America six years behind Britain
in the jet-liner race?

One reason is that U.S. aircraft makers
have held back from commercial jets because
of the cost. The firms wanted Government









Goddards

FOR YOUR PARTY.
SPECIALS

cs

aes

eae I have) in: front of me a depres- nometers by help. But the Government is interested in ishi =
whereas, ii {the city: exhibitions visitors: the present set-up. But they are sing repbrt) that) the number of re gind. te heve Aone pal, Wey ac. pra tiwg Nourishing
tend only to he, drawn from what may,be ieee testy, ey, Want "©, Set Students in| Beiain is "now fixed Stored Mg coerstion’ © PME Fe] financing military jet research. Foods These Fine
t A " t rey y, ry t ; “ge . ts
lodsely \deseribed ‘as the middle velass), 19 | tival ‘difficulties of lack of ard ee tlhe attnaleee kink Signs of the Ti FOOTNOTE: The Comet cruises at 500 on
é number of the agri- cash in the way of more social- \\° ; ‘ miles 4 ry Ss uffetts

the country a large 1 " ; i co Atmatia totenie estion this small figure, But it seems An advertisement in the Times I fr hour. has four engines; wing span, Large phe. Quaker Oats Meats
eons labourers might be expecte is to alter the framework by ¢ut- . me that this is just not enough reads:— 115ft.; length, 93ft.; crew of six. with Qdpe ‘aii Siucers. teins
attend. tif ™ ting down re-armament. But cut- University students to keep our “YOUNG PEER, widely trav- SIX YEARS i ; ; Large uaker Oats

The growth of city exhibitions is an.ex- ting down the Atlantic pro- British Commonwealth running. elled, seeks interesting’ occupa-| 1007; is a long time to wait. The 44 — Roasts
cellent and encouragirig sign of the’ diver-* gramime' {x not the gist of “Bevan- Almost every leading job now tion, could rep t firm over- gazine American Aviation. suggests that Grape Nuts mn
sity of talent afd interésts”to be found ism”—it is only a chance by- demands a University degree. In seas, reply etcyes . U.S. airlines may have to buy Comets after oan Nut Flakes Fillets

en di all. It says: “Such a sale is not i ibl = Haddock
among Baw/adians. OUR READERS SAY: , idea that No person who England anys: impossible. ||] Farex
’ But the greatest need ‘of the island is at mre af tie dike’ of @e com oe to ee oe under the} De Havilland has cunningly forced the issue|{) J & R Rolls oe ig lll
present the bringing of some degrec of WL Barristers rules, jawamily Bractises and is heading: 7% anent W.I. Po with sales to competitive routes, British jet ——— Butter Frozen Vegetables
ight into the lives of those To the Editor, The Advocate— recognised as a barrister in any of Appeal”, there appears: e at : : nehor Milk
arpetniges and light into. seem to be the Sir — May I be permitted "to territory of the area, will be eligi- Conference’ also expressed the| ‘’ansport leadership is coming too close for j Fresh Vegetables
swaying Speienatine piled buses, the @7@¥ to your ote ae a= ble Ly meg genre Aha hes Ly Ey that ee eae comfort.” Liquor & F ‘
% , rtant inaccuracies which ap- poses of the ociation’s rules ar in Trini would form thei ,
“jump” up? ari@.\‘jive” of the*countless peared in your paper of Sth inst.” term ‘barrister’ shall mean a per- own Bar Council, independent of| | BUSINESS MAN Stanley Slotkin went to Wi Specials ee
ial hOps and the engive excursions. On pageone (1) under the cap--son who has been called to the any Law Society including Solici-| the Olympics in Finland i iti me Specia

social ear : tioh “W.L Barristers will form Bar of England.” «+» tors.” ympics na British car. He Tasty Snack
Livestéck--and egricultural- — in mbes Bal AWWouiition (rom Gus Own. This should belguieidad ti sakd:” This whould i Tacit 46 arrived home with a four-door Soviet Pobeza Dubonett,
country will provide not only a natural Correspondent) _ there appears’ “Provided that ANY person who, read: “The Conference also ex-| saloon—an illegal export under Russian law. Liebfraumilch Guinness Stout
outlet for competition but .will.help to “Caribbean Barristers have agreed at the date of the adoption of its pressed the hope-that the members How.bs si: f Berncastle ..120z, — 32. per bottle
bridge that gap between the more-edueated on the establishment of a Bar rules, lawfully practises, etc.” of the Bar in Barbados would Ow he got it is a secret. It cost him et Chartreuse Carrs’ Crackers

lanter and the shack-dweller which must Association. This is toggomprise Purpose of this proviso is to in- form their own Bar Council, inde-} than £500. Wide-eyed Americans found the ||} Vielle Cure $1.20 per tin
Pp. ifn heat om fy life °* Barristers in the Britt Carib- clude three St, Lucians who now pendent of any Law Society which car—a Sovi inventi f 2 st | Bristol Sherry Anchor Cheese
be bridged if a healthy community ie 1s bean area and is to be known as lawfully practise at the St. Lucia includes solicitors,” } oa ai viet invention, of course—as sith Dry Sack 4 pkge — 44c.
to prosper 1n this island, the British Caribbean Bar Associa- Bar, but who have never been THEODORE BRANCKER ishingly like a 1939 Ford.

me A



'

A NENOTEEES rneragss

er eA A a at

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 106, 1952



ser

TORNADO HITS MISSOURI FAIR GROUNDS CARNIVAL





WRECKAGE IS ALL THAT REMAINS of a carnival at the Missouri State Fair Grounds at Sedalia after a tornado
raged through the area, killing one man and injuring 17 others. The storm stretched across Missouri, but

most of the damage centered around Sedalia. It caused extensive property damage





Ch. Ch. Playing Fields
C’ttee Holds Meeting

THE Christ Church Playing Fields Committee recently
held a meeting at the Sargeant’s Village Playing Field Hall.
A fairly large number of social workers of the surrounding
districts attended. Mrs. H. A. Vaughan, District Social
Welfare Officer, also attended.



Suffers Shock
Germane Pile (51) a washer of
Britton’s Hill, St, Michael was
detained at the General Hospital
about 11.16 a.m. yesterday suffer-
ing from shock after she was in-
volved in an accident with a bus

Applications were recéived from various organisations
for the use of the Hall and Playing Field. These were
dealt with by the Committee as follows:

—— a ee ar Wednesdays: from 1 to 4 p.m.

: " ° Vauxhall Girls’ School.’ First
Labourer Fined Friday in every month: from 4.30
to 6.00 p.m, a L. A. Hall.

Wednesday nights from 7.30 to

For Assault 10 p.m. St. David’s Old Scholars’
Association. Friday nights (other

And Damage than the first) St. David’s Broth-
enhood, 7.30 to 10.00 p.m. Tues-

EUSTACE ALLEYNE a labourer day nights: Endeavour Literary
of Water Hall Land, St. Michael Social and Cultural Club 7.30 to

was fined. yesterday by His Wor- 10.00 p.m.

ship Mr. C. L. Walwyn 10/- and The Committee is contemplating

1/— cost in 14 days or 14 days’ im- opening a Branch Library at the

prisonment for assaulting and Community Hall and Mr, Warren

beating Aaron Niles, and 5/- for Waithe, a schoolteacher, will
malicious damage to articles the take charge of this.

property of Beatrice Blackman. Among those present were: Mr.

Alleyne was also ordered to pay C. Legall, Secretary, Mrs. H. A.

compensation to Blackman Talma, Chairman, Mr. Fred God-

amounting to 12/6. dard, M.C,.P., Mr. H. St.G. Ward,
Mr, G. C. Ward, Rev. A. I. John-
The offences were committed con Mrs. L. A. Hall, Miss C.
on August 6. The cases Were suilivan. Messrs. Gollop, Waithe,
brought ‘against Alleyne after he w. Blackman and T. Hewitt.
went into Blackman’s house and 5 ;

began to abuse her. After abusing

her he took up a table and hit

Niles who was in the house.

Niles told the court that the

defendent broke the table on him

and cuffed him while he (Alleyne)

was leaving.



11 a.m. the same day.

ARTIE'S HEADLINE

Falls From Cycle

Seibert Bannister of Beckles
Hill, St. Michael fell from his
bicycle which he was riding along
Beckles Hill, St. Michael about
11.30 a.m, yesterday.

He was taken to the General
Hospital and was treated for a
cut on his forehead.’ Bannister
said that he lost control of his
bicycle while trying to avoid a
collision with a woman.

Youth Camp

The Seventh Day Adventist
Youth camp which was at Morgan
Lewis Bay broke up on Monday
morning after a 10 days stay.



“You wouldn't

ool me
about an pie SR potato One of the activities was handi-
beled Mods would sou crafts, The youths also enjoyed
: : aa ’ sea-bathing.
old man! The camp consisted of 37



youths of whom 18 were girls and
3 directors, a farewell concert was
rendered on Sunday hight. The
concert was well attended.



Tenantry Roads
Under Construction
At Gulloden Road 2"

Tenantry roads are now under ‘hese divers are trying to con-
construction at Culloden Road, St. nect lines at various parts of the
Michael. Previously, the residents Potick in order to raise it from its
of this area were subjected to present position.
great difficulties whenever rain
fell. ot Calvert Type Boats

Several labourers are employed The twenty-five fishing boats
on this work and asa result, com- which are under construction at
pletion is exp@cted in a few weeks’ the Reef are not the Bathsheba
time. type, but the Calvert Type Boats.

Raising Potick

On Monday evening divers using
oxygen masks carried out under
water work to the French yawl







ROAD REPAIRS

The Commissioners of High-

ways in St, Peter have begun to Meets Tomorrow
repair the roads in and around the

St. Lucy’s Vestry

(International)



| Three- Year-Old
Falls Into Pit

THREE-year-old Margarct
Cumberbatch of Indian
Groung fell into an open pit
about 14 ft. deep, near her
home on Sunday last while
playing with her brothers
Lester and Carl. She was
taken out by Joseph Spring-
er of the same locality,

There was a layer of
grass at the bottom of the
pit and she received bruises
only on her feet.

Just a week ago a lost dog
was discovered in the same
pit.





At Last:
Potatoes!

Yesterday for the first time in
many months, carts were seen in
long ‘procession coming into the
city with slips and potatoes, but
still many a housewife could not
procure any.

Still confronted with the serious
food problem, housewives ran
long distances behind carts in an
effort to obtain a pound or two,
but almost in every instance they
were told, they must buy slips in
order to get potatoes. Some sellers
refused even to reply to queries
made as to whether one could
make a purchase,

In one or two instances, how-
ever, a g@eller did stop to serve

in Probyn Street Bus Stand about a customer, and then there was

the familiar rush of the past few
months as other customers gum-
moned their friends around the
cart.



Vessels Being
Repaired

Many vessels which are now in
port are awaiting their opportu-
nity of going on dock to carry out
general repairs.

Meanwhile, schooner hands are
wasting no time in carrying out
their own repairs to their respec-
tive vessels. The crew of the
schooner “Frances W, Smith”
were carrying out a paint job on
their vessel, and a similar job was
in process on the schooner “Augus-
tus B. Compton,” which is at berth
near the Central Foundry’s dock-
yard,

The schooner “D'’Ortac’ which
is at berth in the inner Careen-
age, was undergoing keel. repairs,
which involved the assistance of
workmen other than its crew.



Another Service
Station

Another service station is un-
der construction at [Top Rock.
Its owner is Mr. George Pilgrim,
popular garage proprietor of the
same district. Speaking with Mr.
Pilgrim yesterday, he said that
certain equipment which is neces-
sary cannot be obtained before
November, and as a result, its com-
pletion cannot be determined yet.
He however is looking forward to
its completion in time for the
Christmag season,



BARBADOS

“Old Bill” Seeks A

Sailor’s Job

FRANK OXLEY who is known
to same seamen as “Old Bill”, has
y10t been to sea for about ten
years, but still at the age of 64
he would still risk his neck on the
spar.

When an Advocate reportér saw
“Old Bill” yesterday morning. he
was standing on the “Wharf

watching a group of men unload-
ing bags of sugar from a ‘truck.
Asked what he was waiting for
en the Wharf, “Old Bill” said that

he would come down sometimes
to see if they wanted an ex-
pfrienced man on a ship

He thinks that his age may be }
the only barrier, but he is still
trying.

Frank Oxley went to sea when

he was about 18 and first worked ;

om a schooner. His first experi-
enc” was rough, for as soon as the
schooner was ten miles from Bar-
hados on its way to British Guiana
h- wae down with sea sickness

On the second day he was still

snahle to work, but on the third
day he was forced to work, for
the captain warned him that if
he didn't work. they would not
tim him on again.

Very few of the members
sympathised with him. but he was
determined to become a good

sailor. He worked on that schooner

ADVOCATE

PAGE FIVE



Again At 64

for a year and then signed on to
the Sea Prince, a smaller vessel.

When he boarded the Sea Prince
he knew his way around and was
consider:d an able seaman,

His worst experience was on the
Schooner Marjor’e R—the Marjorie
R is not being used now—when it
enccuntered a tropical storm
abort 15 mil‘s off Trinidad on a
Sunday morning about 4.30.

H> said when the storm was in
its full foree they lost their main-
sail and every man was forced
to go below while the schooner
was *ysee4 about like a matchbox
n * 2T,

All th kitehen utensils and food
were washed overboard and one
man nearly lost h's live trying to

. bucket.

After the storm the whole ship
looked weeth r beaten and they

rerciaua +

managed to limp into Port-of-
Spvin shout two days after. At
Por*-of-Svain most ef the men

were taken to Hospital and given
moieal treatment.
Tod>y he is not eoncerne4 about
‘v= = motos job on a schooner,

for h> thinis he can show the

Robinson
Appointed

Leg. Co. Member

@ From page 1

in such a capacity.
pleasure on behalf of

Mr. Robinson thanked
President and honourable
bers of the Council for his
words of welcome on their
hilf



SPECIFY

“EVERITE’ »

ASBESTOS-CEMENT

He had much |
| members |
in welcoming him to that Board. |}

the |
mem- |
kind |
be-
As far as he was concerned,
he said, he would like to assure
His Honour the President that he

would always endeavour to co-

operate with him and other mem

bers in the passing of legislation,
which, in his opinion would be of

benefit to the inhabitants of thi
island as a whole.

$

CORRUGATED SHEETS

For his part, he took his seai |

in that chamber as an Inde
pendent,

any political party in thi
island. Therefore when legis
lation came before that hon

He was in no way
efliliated to or connected with

AND

Â¥
Pe

ourable Council which he fe't. 46 ”
was in the interest of the
colony, he would support it.

Conversely if legislation wa

“young boys” a thing or two about ‘ntreduced in that Chamber which

a schooner,

He wovla eladlv take a job on be in the interest of the island, ho
a steamship, but “there is so much would crave his Honour’s indul
gence and that of other honour-!|

red tane to get on one today.”



Hucksters Have
Not Moved To
Temple Yard

PROPOSALS have been made
for sometime now for erecting @
vegetable market at Temple Yard,
but more recently there has been
the suggestion that this site would
be a suitable place to remove the
central Fire Brigade Station.

Since the idea was first brought
up for the erection of a market
at Temple Yard, hucksters have
been encouraged to go there.
While. some have followed the
suggestion, the majority remain
at their former places for selling.

A notice has been placed at the
James Street end of Busby Alley
saying that hucksters have re-
moved to Temple Yard, but 4%
glance down the alley immediate-
ly gives the lie to the notice. is
alley is the centre for bueksters,
and one said yesterday, “You
would not expect a few of us to
go to Temple Yard and leave the
others to meet the customets who
are more familiar with this alley.
For hucksters as a whole to go
to Temple Yard, things would
have to be better organised there.
Otherwise it would mean that a
few would go there and get little
sales.”

Sect. Librarian
Of House Sworn In



Mr, Lionel Hutchinson, Libra-
rian-Secretary of the
Assembly, was yesterday sworn

in as an Officer of the House at
its meeting yesterday, | by Hon.
Dr. A, S.'Cato! {member
Legislative Council.

The Deputy Speaker Mr. A.
S. Lewis told the House that the
Auditor General had informed him
that the salary for the Librarian-
Secretary as voted in the Esti-
mates would cease with the com-
ing into operation of the recent

Act and it was necessary for the
House to pass a_ Resolution em-
bodying a salary being paid to

that officer,

Bills Of Exchange

The House of Assembly yestr-
day passed a Bill to amend the
Bills of Exchange Act, 1907, to
authorise the crossing of certain
banker’s drafts as if the drafts
were a cheque.

The objects and reasons of the
Bill state:

A banker's draft payable to ordet on
demand addressed by one branehy, to
another branch of the same bank is not
a cheque within the Bills of Exchange
Act, 1907 This Bill is intended to
authorise the crossing of such bankers’
drafts as if'the draft were a cheque,

Requests for this amendment to the
Act have been made by the three Banks
operating in this Island so as to bring
the law into line with the existing law
in the United Kingdom as contained in
the Bills of Exchange Act (1882) Amend-
ment Act, 1932.



WE carry an assortment
of GOOD BOOKS

see them at

«« Advocate Stationery ”



ote yer, |

Widows And
Orphans Pensions
Act Amended

During the debate on a Bill to
amend the Widows and Orphans
Pension Act, 1928, Mr, C, Talma
(L) and

some civil servants in asking
them to contribute to the Widows
and Orphans Pension fund: The
Bill was passed,

The Objects and Reasons of the
Bill read :—

Under the provisions of the
principal Act, the Governor-
in-Executive Committee is re-
quired to exercise certains
powers and perform certain
duties, which for the greater
part are purely formal or
administrative and does not
require the exercise of any
discretion.
these formal matters and ad-
ministrative functions could
more properly and conveniently
be performed by an _ approp-
riate head of a department, e¢.g.,
the Accountant General.

This amending Bill therefore
seeks to amend the principal
Act so as to delegate to an
appropriate officer, viz.,
Accountant General, certain o/
the powers and duties prev-
iously exercised and performed
by the Governor-in-Executive
Committee,

Mr, Talma said that although

House of the Bi!l served a very useful pur-

pose and was considered an ad-
mirable Bill, it worked hardships

the way in which it was actu-
hy put into effect. Junior é@m-
ployees of the Service, whether

* married or unmarried were ex-

pected to contribute towards the
fund, and that could be regarded
as rendering a hardship, espec-
ially having regard to the low
rate at which the average Gov-
ernment employee was first em-
ployed.
Small Salaries

Since the question of the
Widows and Orphans Bill was
before them, he hoped that Gov-
ernment wou'd review ‘he whole

@ On Page 6

S.P.+C.A.

Ask you to be considerate
and kind to your animais
at all times, but especi-_lly
during the heat of the day
and water them regularly.







FRESH
SEEDS

AT








he conscientiously felt would nm

n

ASBESTOS

able members, to express his own

opinion: on such legislation
also to vote against it.



Motor Mechantics
Pass Examination

The following candidates ente
ed from the Barbados Evenin

Mr, R. G. Mapp (L) Institute have passed (2nd Class) |
spoke of the hardship imposed on the Examination “Motor Vehicle |

Mechanics Work” — |

Eric Carlton Clarke, Randle | Waves for All
McAlvin Dear, Keith Lawrence |
Morris, Evans Irishton Skinne:

Darnley DaCosta Smith.

The results of the Examination

“Electrical Installation Work
Course B” have not yet bee
received,



Bridgetown Busier

The streets and pavements ¢

It is considered that Bridgetown were busier than usuc|
t

yesterday. This was due to the fa

|
\
that certain schools re-opened yes- |

Chief among these was =
|

terday,
the
private school4, At the Moder
High School where 169 new pu

pils were admitted, there has bee)

an addition to the school unifor:

that of blue berets, and through- }
othe.
the streets, there was a regular strean,

out Broad Street and the

of school children purchasin

FOR BOYS and

°

Best English



BACK

{
i

and

Modern High School and othe

their last-minute school requisites, |

STURDY AND STRONG

LACED AND STRAPPED






WOOD.

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a)

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‘| VOSEMAR

The Natural Hair Waver.
Your hair can be beautiful always when treated with

VOSEMAR. Follow the directions in every package and after
a few days you'll be convinced of its definite improvement.
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Try VOSENE

MEDICATED SCALP HYGIENE combines
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and lustre to the dullest hair.

ON SALE AT - - -

KNIGHT'S DRUG STORES

os
PRICED



|
t |
[

per





GIRLS

Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

10, 1, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET

TO a=

(4 dl






WEATHERHEAD'S

Indian Ground district, and have The St. Lucy’s Vestry is sched-
already reached Roebuck district uled to meet tomorrow. One of the 4 4 e
going in the direction of Four jtems on the ag®nda will be the
Hill. In the Roebuck district the awarding of exhibitions, These
road is being widened in order to exhibitions will be tenable from
give vehicles good travelling ac- next term which begins next
commodation, week,


















KITCHEN GARDEN





Lettuce, Carrot Beet LINENE GIRLS LACE SHOES
MW} Cabbage, Sweet Corn, In several qualities, and ail (he —_ in Brown or Bleck Kid
t i T to regulatio! .
£4 FOR OPENING SHOP ON SUNDAY Celery,” Bgsaahe Orden, | $1.20 v4. x eee eee
Brocolli, Thyme, Mustard, TRICOLINE (@ $2.03 KHAKI DRILL 84c. to $1.72

Spinach, Sweet Marjoram,
Parsley, Onion, Okra,
Vegetable Marrow, Radish,

__HIS WORSHIP Mr. C; L. Walwyn, Police Magistrate of
District “A”, yesterday fined Ernest Griffith, a labourer of Nel-
son Street; St. Michael, £4 to be paid in 14 days, or one

In White for Blouses

. TS @ $3.39
BERETS @ $1.50 Sore ea SHIR’ D $

» COLOURED

month’s imprisonment with hard labour for keeping his shop Leek, Woter Pepper, HIR
opened on a Sunday. Kohl Rabi, Cauliflower, PANAMA 1.1 ae ne
Cpl. Shepherd attached to the Bridge Police Station said Brussels Sprouts and $1.81 Sone a Ee ee <4 STHIRTS $1.20
Hc the yo ae a oe Grinking in his liquor shop about BEANS (6 kinds). : MAHOBE $1 59
42 a.m. on Sunday, August 3. ANKLF. SOCKS from 44c. to $1.17 ” _ .

_ He Mw the men give money to the defendant for the FLOWER GARDEN In White and Brown $ » BELTS in Plastic _~
drinks. Griffith had four previous convictions and was told $ Leather 48c. and $1. Black
by His Worship that if he comes before the court again on Zinnia, Snapdragons, Can- GIRLS LACE SHOES . aes ee

dytuft, ;

Sizes 11 to 1% $7.49











that charge he ;culd not be fined.
) ined Dahlia, Petunia, In Brown or Black Calf Brown or Black
peo Carnation Sizes 11 to 1% @ $7.49 pr. Sizes 2 to 5% $7.50 & $9.32
“er serpin j
; pi 9 For leather : 7
ve at, .
of every colour— EXERCISE BOOKS, PENCILS, PENS, NIBS, CRAYONS, INK,
tulaca, Aylnum, Calliopsis, ERASERS, PENCH, SHARPENERS, PAINT BOXES, PENCIL

It cleans, preserves—and how it Ageratum, Cosmos.

BOXES, THERMOS FLASKS, PLASTIC TUMBLERS ang CUPS, and
SCHOOLBAGS

HARRISON'S

BROAD STREET
DIAL 2664

polishes! Ask your retailer for Propert’s. e

Nothing else is quite the same. Watch
THEY ARE FRESH !



the difference it makes to your shoes!

PROPERT’S

SHOE CREAM

Get your supply to-day
from

BRUCE WEATHERHEAD
LTD.

Head of Broad Street.

q '
i) SUUDLUDUDEUDSULEOUEUESUEUEOD SOOO

el
tOPER! i

Paes re
MAHOGANY



|

— Distributors |



|
la.







PAGE SIX

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Government Will Get
Soil Conservationist

GOVERNMENT, on the recommendation of the Scot- pelts srets : Meeeeinny, Rock Hal!

ri : ; z . . ad from the bottom by Swans
land District Conservation Board, is at present taking 4, Peg Brno ye peg
steps to obtain the advice of a competent and experienced jt was one of those roads which

soil conservationist as to ways and means of effecting ran up a slope. It

water @ontrol and of minimising landslip and soil erosion

in the-Scotland District.

This was stated in a reply to a
question which had been asked by
garding the condition of Boscobel,

rs. E. E. Bourne re-
k Hall, and other

roads in St. Andrew which had become impassable be-
cause of their serious state of disrepair owing to heavy

rain.

Regarding the question concern-
ing the Boscobel Road, Govern-
ment replied that temporary re-
pairs are effected annually to ena-
ble the sugar cane crop to he
reaped but that this read w
closed to through traffic by t
Central Road Board because
the slips which were taking pla
and that reconstruction of it
not recommended for this reasc
Government stated that tempor-
ary repairs had also been effect-
ed to the Rock Hall Road.

Mrs, E. E. Bourne (L) said that
one part of her question dealt with
the Boscobel Road leading io
F »bel Tenantry. The reply was
that temporary repairs were
effected, but she had taken it cn
herself to take. the Director of
Highways and Transport to the

rea. She showed him the section
of th ad which was impassable.

that if temporary re-

I were carried out people

Id be able to use the road at
risk at all.

She sai@ that if for example
anyone in the Boscobel Tenantry
wanted a doctor, that doctor
would have to take a round-about
road which would cause eonsider-
able delay.

As much as she appreciated the
reply, she would like to see some
work cafried out on the road.
There was no sign indicating the
road was closed and in a certain

She felt

tion to Mrs. Bourne’s words.

Mr, F. L. Walcott (L) said that
the debate on such a_ question
came under his portfolio, He was
however sorry that he did not
know beforehand that the ques-
tion would be debated, otherwise
he could have presented figures
referring to money spent on roads
in St, Andrew and other partic-
ulars.

“When you go on the hill tops
and look down on St. Andrew
you will ask Almighty God to
give you special wisdom to deal
with the roads”, Mr. Walcott said.

He said that he did not know
if Mrs, Bourne was aware that
Government had spent more
money on roads in St. Andrew
than haq been spent on roads in
other parishes.

Mr. Walcott pointed out that
during the flood waters caused by
heavy rains a few years ago, St.
Andrew was cut in half when
Lakes Bridge was washed away.
“Take a look at that area and you
will see what has happened over
those years.”

Soil Erosion

He was not a Road Engineer,
but from complaints he had re-

was a difficuit
road and would take a lot of in-
vestigating and examination be-
fore major repairs were effected.

Mr, L. E, Smith (L), although
he was in agreement with the re-
ply, strongly supported Mrs.
Bourne’s argument. He said that
day and night people of such dis-
tricts were approaching represent-
atives about conditions of roads.
But representatives hag lost sight
of the fact that they should tell
those people who were the cor-
rect persons to approach,

He said that members must
think about the conditions when
rain was falling in those difficult
places. He felt that it was ‘time
that whoever was in charge of
roads should take the matter
seriously and spend money on
those roads.

Mr. M. E. Cox (L) said there
was no one in the House who was
more sympathetic towards the
question of repairs to roads than
Mr. F. L. Walcott and himself,
but he did think that the reply
which had been given to the ques-
tion asked by the member for St
Andrew was reasonable.

It was a statement of fact, and
he was sure that any member
who knew anything of St, Andrew
would agree that they could noi
continue to spend money on those
roads without realizing that they
would spend thousands of pounds
only to find that when there were
heavy rains, the roads were dam-
aged and the money lost.

It had therefore become neces-

ceived and from the views of ex- sary to set up a Soil Conserva-
perts, he knew it was a question tion Board, and it was known to
of soil erosion, He felt that some all that the two representatives in
people asked Government re- the House for each of the parishes
quests, realising that Government of St. Andrew, St. John and St.
had no control over those re- Joseph were



FLYING

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 1952
eS



TRIANGLE FOR 8&.A.F.



THE “DELTA AGE” of British Aviation opens with the Gloster Javelin, first flying triangle to be

ordered into production for the Royal Air Force. A
follows two years of experimenting with the new shape. A

698 Delfa bomber, has just flown

THE HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY passed a Resolution
approving the Order entitled The Civil Establishment
(General) (Amendment) No. 6 Order, 1952, made by the Assembly yesterday,
Governor-in-Executive Committee on August 26, 1952.

Assembly Pass

Amendment Order

faster-than-sound twin-engined fighter, it

“big brother” the four engined Avro
and has already been ordered for the R.A.P.

VAUGHN TABLES
NEW ADDRESS
ON SALARIES





At a meeting of the House of} ourselves? MEDILAX is the answer.

Mr. V. R.
Vaughn (I) was granted leave to} 800d! Tried out a new hairstyling, and

For

Women

Only!

Not this week, folks! I've made the great dis-
‘eovery—an Air-Sick tablet that really works.
Just left the Airport after four hours’ and
look at me! AIR-SICK tablets by, SAV: YY &
MOORE are ‘the works’ boys and girls. Try
them out and see for yourself.
I know my onions too Mr. Townsman Grow
~ =Athem, eat them (raw is how I
like them) and kiss my girl
friend too.
z= “Ever tried AMPLEX? An
Amplex tablet a day combats
all breath and body odours —
from within. Eat or drink anything you like, but
take an Amplex too—if you want to be popular.

Take a look at John here, for instance. He
wasn't always this sprightly, so early in_ the
morning. Not until his wife discovered IRVONA,
the marvellous tonic tablet that gives energy and
health within a short time, did John
look like this.



“Now I send him off to work happy—just as full of
basen oe he can be,” say: Mrs. John. “And I feel fine
myself. My trouble was different, MEDILAX was what
I needed. A safe, gentle laxative that quickly ensured
INNER CLEANLINESS, We're always thinking of house
cleanliness, girls, why not INNER CLEANLINESS for





“Hello, there! Do I look good? I feel



members on the highlighted the waves with COLAIRE.

withdraw an address he had pui It’s marvellous! Just stroke it on fol-

section it was likely that anything The Addendum of the Resolu- Chairman of the Hospital Advisory before the House concerning re-

could happen,




quests. He asked who would say Board which was endeavouring to



“I do not know how some peo-
ple even manage to go along this
section of the road on foot,” she
said,

She felt that something more
could bewdene to the road in the
interest of the taxpayers. She was
surprised when the Director of
Highways and Tvansport told her
that he did not know what to do
with some of the roads.

She said; “Years ago the roads

were “ta” better condition than
they o-day.”
“T could not let the reply go by
without raising the views of the
people in the Rock Hall district
and in. particular the Boscobel
area,’ Mrs, Bourne said.

Mr. J; A. Haynes (E), support-
ing Mrs&, Bourne, said that one of
these days Government would
fing that they have to’ appraise
the erop# “ef the people in those
listwiets, “pay. them the worth of

“he eanes and then leave the
canes in the fields.
Short-sighted

“It is absolutely short-sighted-

that Government had not spent a
great amount of money on St.
Andrew to ‘seep the roads in the
ondition tney were in to-day.

Mr. Walcott said that the reas-
on why no major work was being
done on those roads was because
Government was trying to get a
specialist to advise what can best
be done,

He felt that ordinary human
sense would not expect major
work to be started in St, Andrew
when the services of a specialist
were expected to be forthcoming.

He had no doubt in his mind,
and he was the one responsible
for the nature of the reply given,
that the answer to the question
gave a fair and accurate state-
ment of what was taking place
at present.

He hoped that Mrs. Bourne
would realise that although it wa
the atomic age, there were cer
tain things over which they hac
no control. He hoped too that Mrs
Bourne and Mr, Haynes wouk
realise that they were represent-
ing a parish where the difficultie

arrive at some decision as to
what should be done to maintain
the roads in those parishes in per-
fect order.

Collosal

He pointed out that the amount
of money which had been spent
on the roads im that parish from
year to year was something col-
losal ‘when compared with the
amount spent on roads im other
parishes.

He did not think, therefoy that
any member of the House shoula
at that stage severely criticise, o1
even criticise the Government for
the reply which had been given to
the question asked by the honour-
able member.

He said that the Director of
Highways and Transport was not
responsible for the answer which
had been given, and added “there
is no other parish in this island
where roads ure concerned that is
giving Government more _heac-
aches than the parish of St. An-
drew, Government had at last
decided that there should be some
person who knew about soil move-

ness ea the part ef the Govern- were greater than in any other ment to find a remedy to the

ment,” he said, We hoped that the
appropriate member of the Execu-
tive Committee, wao dealt with
Highways, would pay some atten.





ea







For



SAIN
Le teste
Prt At Mela
Pry yee rin
a WEALTNY Scale

4
H
H
j
tay seu
aie /
eS LTE LS {



SOS

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place,
Difficult Road
He said that Government were
carrying out repairs wherever re-



For hair that is al
looks . smart, la

well cared for .

problem,
The Executive Committee, Mr.
Cox said, were responsible for the
@ On Page 8

|

ways as good as it

.

strous . . . obviously

follow the lead of

discriminating men the world over... use
g

JULYSIA

Toute

HAIR CREAM

|



The Cream of Hairdressings

Trade enquiries to:

S.M.G. AGENCIES

1. & R. BUILDING, PALMETTO STREET, BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS





}



tion reads:—

The Order entitled “The Civil
Establishment (General) (Amend-
ment) No. 6 Order, 1952,” has
been laid in the Legislature.

It has been evident during the
past two years that the subordinate
establishment of the General
Hospital is inadequate to cope
with the increase in the volume
of their work. This expansion,
which was to a large extent
directly attributable to the in-
crease in the number of Charge
and Staff Nurses in June, 1950,
from 50 to 116, was partly met
hy provision in the Estimates for
the employment of the following
temporary staff:—

2 Supervisors, Main
($480x48-—912)

2 Assistant Cooks, Nurses’ Home
—(312x24—432)

! Assistant Cook, Main Kitchen

($312x24—432)

3 Kitchen Maids

2 Maids—($306)

1 Washer-—($360)

The requirement of these
services are of a permanent nature
and it is therefore desirable that
these posts should be included on
the permanent establishment. The
change in status will not involve
any immediate additional ex-
penditure but will entail liability
| in respect of pension in the future.

The maintenance of the
mum standard of efficiency
Hospital renders it essential that
the permanent establishment
should be increased to provide also
for the following posts:—

1 Assistant Seamstress—($312x
24—432)

1 Assistant Warden, Nurses’ Home
~($384x48—672)

3 Maids—($306)

In addition, the recent decision
to provide an additional 25 beds
as an adult ward in the Hospital
annexe at “Avalon” will make it
necessary to further increase the
permanent staff as follows:

1 Charge Nurse — ($720x48
960 and free quarters)

2 Staff Nurses—($480x48—720
and ‘free quarters)

Kitchen-—

($306)

minnie
in the



1 Washer—($360)

2 Serubbers—($306)

The net effect of the amend
ments set out in the aeccompany-

ing Order is shewn hereunder
Present Rev
Number Nom

rse
(a) Change (9720x48-—-960)

(b) Staff .. (480x48-—-720) 116 149,
Assistant
Seamstress, (312x24—432 9

| Assistant Warden

Nurses’ Home (384x49-97
Supervisor, Main

Kitchen
Assistant Caooh

Nurses’ Home ($312x24—432)
Assistant Cook

(480%48---919

Main Kitchen ($912%24—4299 m
Kitchen Maid ($306) 4 7

Maid ($306) 12 17
Washer ($360 bas 2

)

Mr. R. G. Mapp (L), refer’
Part 2 of the Addendum, said that
he had seen there \
of staff. He took it that :
were employed in 1950. Put th
Order was going into effect fr
September 1952, so that certain
people would only become |
of the Staff from 1952 wh«
they should be part of the
from 1950,

Mr. E. D. Mottley (E), said he
would repeat that it must be ®1-
ways appreciated anything that
was done for the Hospital. On
two questions he would however
ask the Deputy Leader of
House who was incidentally Che
man of the Hospital Advisory
Board and one was whether there
was some regulation at the Hos-
pital which said that a person }
to work two years before beings
given holiday.

At this stage His Honour the
Deputy Speaker, Mr. Lewis, inter-
jected by saying to Mr. Mottley
that such a regulation did exis!

Mr. Mottley, continuing, said he
eould not understand how such a



regulation could exist by the Gov- ,

ernment when the Legislature had
passed a Bill which stated that
every person who worked for

year was entitled to a holiday

At A Loss
Another point. which he sai

he would like to draw to the at-
tention of the Deputy Leader of
the House was to the effect that
while this resolution made provis-

‘ion for increased staff for the efti-

cient running of the Hospital
was at a loss to understand why
the three vacancies of Visitir
Surgeon at the Hespital were
filled. There was hardly mm
point of more nurs¢ nd t
etc., when there were vacar

ioctors and incidentally he uw
stood there were yet many ir

l \ N willing t

{ Visiting Surgeon

He hoped the Hon, Junior Me

accept

_ General Hospital as

8° qhlution,

Board, would let the House know muneration of the salaries of the
something on the matter that day. members. Following this he gave

Address con-

He also raised the question of a notice of another
druggist. He said that he under- cerning the same matter.
ies that representatives of the

ruggists’ Branch of the Barbados wi bells
Workers’ Union had asked for a batnirebsitheliininenasl
niittimum of $160 per month for a
qualified druggist
employers but he noticed the Gev- attention
ernment had advertised for on
for $120 per month. As
Government and the Union wert
practically one of the same

Members of this

that this

hy. ee es tt caiq 224. responsibility of elected
that he hoped that Government caennene of the Jamaica House of
proposed in the near future to Representatives and the elected
provide space in the laundry and members of the Trinidad Legisla-
kitchen of the Hospital for the in- !V¢ Council, and consequently

creased number of people in order that your Excellency send down
their the necessary amendment to the

“House of Assembly (Remunera-
Mr. V. B. Vaughn (I) said that tien of members) Act 1949--29 »s

that
dutie

they might
with ease.

perform

if they had found it necessary to follows :—
make the temporary stait perman-
ent then their previous service of

poor Mags: . $2,880, Deputy Speaker $2,880 ror’ Sis calls me, Silf brought her weight
tw ars should be ded. Nhat ; on : ‘sr
ee mK, Walcot (iB) tones on Chairman of Committees $2,880, down in_a_ jiffy.” Jimmy’s right, girls.

the question of a Visiting Surgeon,

He read paragraph 4 and asked @2nuUm and all other

doctors,
cumours alloat that somebody in of members of
the Government would not ap- House of
point Visiting Surgeons, to

the
the salaries of the

Dr, Cummins, replying, said he members of the Legislatures of
did not know of any regulation at Jamaica and Trinidad
the Hospital which called upon

people to work two years before
they got holiday but as His Hon-
eur the Deputy Speaker had
assured him it was so, he would
go into the matter.

Turned Down

sequently gave notice reads:—

The House

cellency’s attention

House considers the

that

ing Surgeon, he said that
carry the blame as there was yng
recent recommendation for the
sppemniment se a Surgical Regis-
trar which had been definitely . . :
turned down by the Governor-in~ ¢ad Legislative Council.
Executive Committee and he 2. The House :therefore re-
vanted to assure the Hon. Senior ...7* Ay f
Member for the City that very — requests Your Excel-
soon the appointments of Visiting [°"¢y to send down legislation by
Surgeon would be made, way of amendment to the Housc
He further stated that there Of Assembly (Remuneration of
would be no aping at the Barbados Members) Act, 1949 (1949-29)
they were providing for the payment ot
prepared to run a Hospital for members as follows:
Barbados.

Dr. Cummins promised Mr, The Speaker — $3,600 per an-
Vaughn to raise his point with the "um.
Governor-in-Executive Commit- The Deputy Speaker — $2,880
tee. per annum,

To Mr. Mapp, Dr. Cummins said The Chairman of Committees
that for the past two years the - $2,880 per annum.
Hospital had been employing peo- The Leader of the House
ple temporarily and the number 3.000 per ennum.
of patients increased and the Other Members, each — $2,400
Govérnment had now come for- per annum
ward to make this type of em=
jloyment permanent. It was not 3. The House is also of opinion
as Mr. Mapp eee ee vane that the Executive Committee
eople eee eette he Teas ay (Remuneration of Members) Act
i kitchen, Dr. Cummins told Mr ? : (1949-30) should be amend-
wiord that he ought to know °¢ to provide for the payment
ibout a resolution which made ‘° the un-official members of
provision for extending the Hos- that body each of a salary of
pital, He said that the laundry and two thousand four hundred dol-
kitehen were included in this res- lars per annum, and _ would
thank Your Excellency to send
The House then passed the Res- down legislation providing for
olution approving the Order. this also.

Widows And Orphans
Pensions Act Amended

@ From Page 5 was quite entitled to bring in any
Bill and see that no hardship amendment, but to speak as they
was worked on those who by the were speaking then, they would
small salaries received, could not be out of order.

ntertain the hope of marrying Mr. E. K. Walcott (E) said that
before 15 or 20 years’ service. he dit not think that the amend-
They could not hope to benelit ment they were dealing with was
from the fund within 15 to 20 the correct way of putting it,
Vears, anyhow. There was a_receni

Perhaps a scheme of insurance case which illustrated that if an

uld be worked out which

tld create less hardships.

Mr. Mapp said that he under-
stoad, that the Civil Service
Association which had the Act
oral long time under considera-
tiom, had made certain recom-
mendations. He wanted to know
whether Government had received

responsibility of









any recommendations and
whether they had taken = any
®» in connection with them
h 1a n sub-
r rank and
. mony | BACKACHE
: cat Stl | @ HEADACHE —
_ < RHEUMATISM
little NIGHT RISING
ts from it TIRED FEELING
imPURE BLOOD
Amendment sanee norris
Dr. Cummins (L) lt ! pits 3/-
member t tt t



The Address which has been

Assembly
from private would draw to your Excellency’s
House con-
siders the Legislative status and
the responsibility of members of the
Barbados House of Assembly is
hd In no way inferior tq the status

Speaker $3,360, Leader of House

and all other members $2,400 per
menibers
what was the use of having more Serving on Executive Commitiee
nurses if they did not have thq@ 4m additional $2,400 for such ser-
He said that there were vice in order to make the salaries
Barbados
Assembly comparable
eleeter

The Address of which he sub-

of Assembly has
the honour to draw to Your Ex-
the
; a status and
As to the appointment of Visit- responsibility of members of the

l sé t he Barbados House of Assembly is
should not like the Government to jn no way inferior to the status
elected
members of the Jamaica House
of Representatives or the Trini-

Act did not say who in Govern-|
ment was entitled to do such and
such a thing, nobody was entitled
to do it. r

The Bill was passed.

lowing the wave with the applicator.









Easily brushes out
too. What a difference
it makes when your
hair sparkles
shines with COLAIRE.

and

“And what a difference it makes when you use
ALL BANDBOX PREPARATIONS,” says Mary.
There is a Bandbox shampoo for every type.

Almond Oil for dry Liquid soapless for oily hair.

And what a range of brilliantines! Ask for BAND-

BOX preparations always, I feel so different after
- using them.”

“Til say she doesn’t” chuckles Jimmy.
‘TN say she LOOKS different too. Sis
doesn’t tell you she used to weigh a ton.
{ told her’ about SA4LF. ‘Curious little hor-










Three SELF TABLETS A DAY WILL
CHASE THAT UGLY FAT AWAY.



for the entire family. A
SPA for POP, a SPA for
PENNY, a SPA _ for
PETER, and one for you
too — if you value
your teeth and a spark-
ling smile SPA TOOTH-
BRUSHES are the best
buy for the whole fam-
ily. In nylon or bristle,
shaped to clean every
crevice, SPA should be
YOUR toothbrush too,















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And here’s something .





WEDNESDAY,



Entomologist
Will Be Employed
On Agreement

From Page 1

“Aldrin”, should be carried >
the present high level of efficien
Trials with this insecticide are
now being laid down in selected
areas as a result of Mr, Tucker's
investigations in Australia and thé
United Kingdom but definite
results cannot be expected under a
period of two—three years.

In view of the vital importance
» to the economy of the Island of

preventing the recurrence of
serious losses to the Sugar In-
dustry caused by the ravages of
the sugar cane root borer and of
the evidence of the increase in
population of this pest, and in view
of Mr, Tucker’s intimate know-
ledge of the Diaprepes root borer
and of his association with the
plans for its céntrol and eradica-
tion, the Governor-in-Executive
Committee agreed in 1951 to re-
employ Mr. Tucker on agreement
following his retirement from the
permanent establishment. The re-
employment of Mr. Tucker will not
block the promotion of any serving

officer.
Control Work

Prior to his retirement Mr.
Tucker would be eligible for 122
Gays’ vacation leave and under th>
Civil Establishment (Leave Pas-
sages) Order he wou'd have earned
leave passages fcr himself and his
wife up to 33/42 of the full
amount. It is not, however, con-
venient to Government that Mr.
Tucker should proceed on leave at
this stage owing to the urgency for
tackling the new pest infestation in
the sugar cane as a result of an
association between a mealy bug
and an ant to ecmbat which funds
were recently provided by Resolu-
tion No. 55 of 1952, the netd to
press on with the Control Work on
which he is engaged in connection
with the pests referred to in
paragraph 2 above, and _ the
vacancy for a Deputy Director of
Agriculture.

The Honourable the Legislative
Council is invited to agree as early
as possible to Mr, Tucker being
allowed to retain his eligibility for
leave and passage concessions as at
the date of his retirement and of
his continuing to earn leave and
leave pasSage benefits during the
period of his agreement at the
rate applicable to a permanent
efficer so that he will not be
deprived of an opportunity of
taking overseas leave at an oppor-
tunity that is more convenient to
the Government.

$120 Passed For
Bovell Scholars

The House of Assembly yester-
day passed a Resolution for $120
to make provision for the in-
creased monthly charge for board
and lodging students with Bovell
Scholarships have been asked io
pay.

The Addendum to the Reso.u-
tion reads ;—

The Governing Body of the
Imperial College of Tropical
Agriculture has notified this Gov-
ernment that with effect from
the year beginning on the Ist of
September, 1952, it will be neces-
sary to increase the monthly
charge for board and lodging to
students resident in the College's
hostel from $72 to $108 for each
person.

2. The value of a “John R.
Bovell” Scholarship is at present
$1,236 per annum: the additional
charges for board and lodging
now proposed will necessitate an
increase in the value of the
scholarship to $1,560 per annum.
For the two remaining terms of
the financial year 1952—53 thers
will be two “John R. Boveli”
tcholars in residence at the Im-
perial ‘College: the amount in-
cluded in this résolution is re-



already provided to
cost of board and lodging for
these scholars up to the end of

March, 1953.

SEPTEMBER

10, 1952

—————$—$—$——

Council Pass

For More Staff And
. Accommodation

IN ORDER to convert the house “Avalon” into quarters Resolution



eee

BARBA



the plan would be referred to the
Staff Committee before the next
was prepared, The

for some of the Hospital Staff and to provide accommoda- â„¢4tter had been referred to the

tion and additional staff at the Hospital the Legislative
Council at their meeting yesterday concurred in a resol

tion for the sum of $26,000.

Librarian
Gets $120
Monthly



The House of Assembly last
night fixed the salary of the

newly created post of Librarian
and Secretary, House of Assem-
bly, on the scale of $120.00 per
month rising by annual incre-
ments of $10 to a maximum of
$180 per month with effect fror
the 2nd September, 1952.

The holder
was created by an
assented to by His
the Governor, wa’
day sworn in as
the House,

During the debate which en-
sued on the matter, it was point-
ed out that the duties of the
office should be defined in order
that members would be able to
decide at what point on the
salary scale the officer shoulda
start,

Mr. F. L. Waleott (L) criti-
cised the attitude of the incum-
bent of the post on the question
of his salary, and said that while
he was not opposed to the Reso-
lution, he would point out what
the history of the post was, and
compare it with similar posts ia
the Civil Service.

Mr. E, D. Mottley
cised the maximum
suggested in the Resolution, on
the ground that the duties of
the office were not defined, and
called it a “gross miscarriage of
justice” to attach a higher maxi-
mum to that post than there was
to the post of Reporter of the
House whose duties were de-
fined, and of which every mem-
ber of the House knew. He sug-
gested that the maximum salary
should be $160 a month, which
was equal to the maximum
salary attached to the post of
Reporter. .

Mr. M. E. Cox (L) supported
the argument advanced by Mr.
Mottley about the disparity be-
tween the salary paid to the Re-
porter and that proposed for
Librarian and Secretary and com-
pared the salary of the latter post
with that paid to Civil Servants
when first recruited to the
Service.

He felt that in view of the fact
that a Commissioner would shortly
be appointed to review the salaries
of the rank and file of the Service,
the salary of the particular officer
should be dealt with, by the Com-
missioner. He therefore would
not support the Resolution, nor
the suggestion for the reduction
of the maximum to $160.00 as wag
made by Mr. Mottley.

Mri /C. & Talma, ‘Mr... G,
Mapp, members of the Debates
Committee, and Mr. V. B. Vaughan
(1) argued that two wrongs did
not make a right, and honourable
members should not use the sal-
aries paid to Civil Servants as a
model on which they should pay
the officers of the House,

They agreed that the Reporters
were inadequately paid, but re-
minded honourable members that
an Address dealing with the
salaries of the Reporters had been

of the post which
Act recently
Excelie
earlier thut
ofticer

an of

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Staff Committe> and also to thé
Hospital Advisory Committee and
U- it was now proposed to modify

the original proposals as shown
Part of the addendum set out in the addendum to the Resolution

in some detail how the necessity before the Council. He would say

for

the expenditure had arisen in addition that he believed that

and this read:— Since the Addendum had been
On the 30th June the Govern- written it was hoped to find a
ment took over formal possession small space to be used as

of “Avalon.”
minor. alterations, to convert this
house into quarters for
the staff at the Hospital.
Addendum
23/1952 under which the funds to
purchase
Â¥

tended to make the house at the further number of beds — 15 to

It is proposed, with gleeping room for the Medical
Officer on night duty on any par-
ticular date.

Although it was not mentioned
in the Addendum, the Medical
Superintendent hoped that there
would be in fact space for a

some of
In the
to Resolution No.
“Avalon” were pro-

ided, it was stated: “ — it is in-

gate of the General Hospital into 20—to be put in the children’s

Children’s Block.” On recon- Ward, and that when the pres-

sideration and after consultation ent children’s ward is being used

w
Vv

the General Hospital Ad- as an adult ward it will be pos-
Committee and the Staff sible to put in at least 20 and
it is now proposed to perhaps as many as 25 beds. The

ith
isory
ymmittes,

use the house at the gate of the actual space would take 20 beds

c

‘Assistant Matron’s Office, Stores,

C

rut.

for Specialist Officers, Board Room,
Waiting Room.

which will thus be vacated,
gether

chi

veneral Hospital for the follow- comfortably,
ing purposes:——

but in case of
7 necessity it could take as many
Ground Fleor — Matron’s Office, as 25 by bringing them closer

aa together than was veally wanted,
room for Sisters living P ;

hanging
Increase In Cost
The Colonial Secretary contin-
uing said he would warn the
above Council, as he had done previ-
to= oy. ae ee ga to the
_ int hospita inevitably meant an
hpi Be py Pag die h .. a increase in the annual recurrent
ldren’s ward, and the existing cost. When he had spoken before

Upper Floor—Consulting Rooms

offices mentioned

The

children’s ward will be used as he had said that it would be

an adult ward. These re-arrange- necessary to

increase the staff.

ments will provide an immediate The Resolution before the Coun-

increase of 20 to 25 beds.

cil covered seven student nurses

The proposals set out above and a gardener, but there would

will occasion certain non-recur- also be other posts covered by

rent

and additional recurrent a Civil Establishment Amend-

expenditure for which provision ment Order which had just been
for the seven months September, tabled,

1952 to March, 1953, is included
in this resolution.

The cost of the other posts
mentioned in the Addendum—one
The following additional staff Charge Nurse, two Staff Nurses,

will also be required: — one washer, and two scrubbers,
1 Charge Nurse ($720. per taking into account Cost of Liv-

annum). ing Allowance, would come to
2 Staff Nurses ($480. per around $3,153 a year.

annum). He moved that the Resolution
7 Student Nurses ($240. per be concurred in.

annum). Hon'ble C. Wylie seconded,

num.
Provision
resolution
Nurses >
other posts will be covered by a certain
Civil
ment) Order,

quired under
included iti
consequential on the provision o
additional
accommodation for both the staff
and the public.

cur in the Resolution the Colonial
Secretary said
Resolution to purchase the prop- Staff Committee was
erty known
before the Council towards the second plan.
end of the last financial year he indicated that that plan was

1 Washer ($360. per annum). Hon. Dr. A. S, Cato said that
2 Scrubbers ($306. per annum). they would remember, as_ the
1 Gardener ($434.72 per an- Honourable Colonial Secretary
had pointed out, that when the
in this resolution for the purchase of
Student “Avalon” came before that hon-
the Curable Council there was a
i amount of restrained
(Amend- Criticism a part of which had been
incurred over the fact that the
plans had been submitted and
items the Senior Staff of the Hospital
js bad not been consulted about

r them.

The addendum to the resolution
stated “On reconsideration and
after consultation with the Gen-
eral Hospital Advisory Commit-
tee and the Staff Committee, etc,
etc. He thought it was only fair
the to point out that so far as the
concerned
originated that
They had merely
a

is included
for the 7
and the Gardener:
Establishment
The additional provision
the several
this Resolution

re-
in
additional

staff and

Moving that the Council con-

that when

as “Avalon” came they had not

had mentioned that in due course vast improvement on the previous

a

coming down in connection with
further expenditure on alterations
to
dependent
vhich

Ww

further resolution would be one,

Should Change Approach

It seemed to him that the time
hospital which were had come when they should
on it. The Resolution change their approach to that

Council had passed problem, The fundamental prob-

the

the

for the purchase of “Avalon” had lem of the Hospital would not b«

stated in its addendum that the met by that type of action.
intention wag to make the house

They
could not cure the ills of the Hos-

at the gate of the General Hos- pital by patchwork therapeutics.

pital

into a children’s block, The fundamental problem of the

providing a minimum increase of Hospital arose out of the fact that

20 to 25 beds,

Hon'bles
quired to supplement the funds passed by the House, and that it Cato had pointed out that the







it had never been planned as such.
It grew little by little by the
erection or acquisition of a series
of buildings.

“Modern Hospital planning i
a science in itself” Dr. Cato went

Not Consulted
On that occasion, however, the
Dr, St. John and

meet the recommended a maximum of $200 Staff epnnatiae had not been on to say. He was informed that
consulted,
The Resolution was subsequently reserve the right to make further siderable
representations

and they would hospital architects

amount
when the next various institutions

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of time in
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ay



DOS ADVOCATE







$26,000 For Hospital



In The Legislature Yesterday
COUNCIL

cistative Council mer at
yesterday. The Hon. J. D
Chandler presided. i
’ The following messages were
cetved from His Excellency
Governor :--
MESSAGES
No. 20/1952 Provisional appoint-
ment of Mr. B S. Robinson as a
Member of the LegislativesrCouncil.



he

No. 21/1952 Leave passage eligi-
bility of Mr. R. W. E. Tucker
who will retire from the post of
Entomologist, Department of
Science and Agriculture, on he
10th of December, 1962, and will

he re-emploved on agreement
The Clerk informed the Cowneil
that he had received notification
from His Excellency the Governor
that he had been pleased to grant

the Hon. BR. Challenor leave from
nis duties as a member of the
Council from September 1. to

February 10, 1953

The Hon. the Co'onial Secretary
presented the following docu
ments

DOCUMENTS
1 Annual Report of the Pea

ants’ Loan Bank Ist June, 1950 .
3ist May, 1951
2. The Civil Establishment
(General' (Amendment) No.\ ¢

Order, 1952.

The Council concurred in Sup-
plementary Resolutions for the
cums of $26,400, $15,479, $250,505
$1,600 $3,629 to be spent under
various Heads.

The Council postponed consid
eration of Supplementary Resolu
tions in the sum of $305,700, $5,947
to be spent in connection with
the erection of a new Fire Station,
Bridgetown and a new Fire }
Station, Speightstown. |

The Council adjourned sine die, }

HOUSE

When the
met yesterday Dr
a message from His Excellency
the Governor regarding the re-
tention of the eligibility for leave
and passage concessions of Mr. R.
W. E. Tucker, Entomologist, De-
partment of Science and Agricul-
ture, who will be re-employed on

House of Assembly

Cummins laid

rf

agreement terms following his’
retirement from the permanent
establishment.

Notice was given of a Resolu-!
tion to approve the allocation of
the balance of the Stabilizatior
Fund fixed in accordance wit!
the provisions of Section 10 oj
the Barbados Fancy Molasses Pro-
duction and Export Act, 1937.

Notice was given of an Act to
amend the Distribution of Enemy
Property Act, 1951,

The Librarian-Secretary of the
House of Assembly was sworn in
as an Officer of the House.

It was agreed that both branches
of the Legislature would meet
informally on 23rd of this month
to select delegates to the forth-
coming West Indian Conference

The House passed a Resolution
for $120 to make provision for the
increased monthly charge for
board and lodging to students who
have gained Bovell Scholarships

The House Passed a Bill to
amend the Widows and Orphans
Pension Act, 1928, The Bil seeks

ne stein ne

day to day functioning before
they even got to the extent of

p
putting their plans on paper.

to transfer certain powers under
the Act from the Governor-in
Executive Committee to the
Accountant General

The House Passed a Bill to
amend the Bills of Exchange Act

1907. The Bill seeks to authorise
the crossing of banker's draft
payable to order on demand
addressed by one branch to an

other branch of the same bank

as if the draft were a cheque

Mrs. E. E. Bourne was granted
leave to comment on a reply made

by Government in connection

with questions she asked con
cerning the state of roads in S
Andrew. }

The House approved the Civ! |
Establishment (General) (Amend
ment) No. 6 Order, 1952, whic! |
makes provision for the inclusic }
of certain staff at the Gene {
Hospital on the permanent sta

The House passed a Resolutio; |
to fix the salary of its Librarian |
secretary at $1,440 a year, with
annual $10 increments to $2,160 }
The House named Mr. G. H |
Adams as a candidate for the |
panel from which the unofficial
British delegate to the Fifth |
Session of the West Indian Con
ference to be held in Jamaica in |

November this year, will be
selected |
The Houser adjourned until

Tuesday 23rd at 3 p.m,

If only they could begin by
urchasing a site they could eyen-

‘ tually build a hospital upon it
He had mentioned that, not of which they could be proud,
because he thought that they The population of the island was

should try and erect an elaborate
stwucture on the lines of hospitals
nm big countries, but merely to
indicate that they could not pro-
duce an efficient Hospital by
spasmodic improvisation,

Let them take that resolution.
If they considered capital and
recurrent expenditure, they
would be safe in saying one hun-
dred thousand dollars to get an
additional twenty to twenty-five
beds and so perpetuate the same
unsuitable conditions in the same
unsuitable buildings.

Not Touching Core

If they spent $100,000 here and
another $100,000 there, they still
were not touching the fundamental
core of the problem. They must
get a new hospital planned in
such a way that it can be extend-
ed upwards or outwards as cir-
cumstances permitted or as their
resources allowed them,

They might have read of the
opening of the Hospital of the),
University College of the West
Indies in Jamaica last week, That
was planned to carry five hundred
beds but had opened with two
hundred beds. It was planned
however so that it could be ex-
tended to accommodate the five
hundred beds when the occasion
arose,

He knew that the question of |
finance would be raised immedi-
ately. They would be told that
they could not afford a new hos- |
| pital. They knew that their re-
sources were limited, He was not

re
tit
li
tr
1

sl

th

a

criticising the Government. He
knew that they were aware of |
the erying need for more accom-

modation and the provision of
| greater facilities for caring for
the sick, It was possible that if
oil was found in paying quanti-
| ties that they would get some of
the things they so dearly needed,

Direct Method

He was however suggesting
that they should channel every
financial means at their disposal
in the direction of building a new
hospital that would be a direct |
method of touching the core of
the problem,

~ Pains in Back
Nervous, Rheumatic

foods and drinks, worry

: and Sroguent vores 2°18F put
re in on ihe ineys an ney
and jer ubles are the true
Excess Acidity, Geitigg Up

ts, uraing Passages, Leg Pains
ervousness, Dizziness, Swollen An-
iden, Rheumatiam, Puffy Eyelids. and
feeling old before your time Help your
dngys Purify your blood with Cys.
tex. The very first dose starts helpline
your Fidpeys clean out excess acids
and this will quickly make you feel like
new, Under the money-back guarantee
Cystex must satisfy completely or cost





Bothing Get Cystex froty voor = J
| at today
| oe Cystex |i. 38
antee pre
ar Cldnevs, Rheumatiom, Bladder tects vou

LPL PPES

‘ S. P. C.K. BOOK

«. F. HARRISO

TWO BOOKS OF OUTSTAND





Also just received: —

RING”
PEAR'S CYCLOPAEDIA,
BOOK OF ETIQUETTE:

increasing
the next fifteen or twenty years
there would be an increase in the

new
build

new,

would be




FLOWERING TREES OF THE CARIBBEAN

&
THE OXFORD ATLAS
VOLUME V: CHURCHILL'S MEMOIRS “CLOSING THE

considerably and in

egion of another $100,000,

What he was suggesting was

that they should agree to channel

heir efforts in the direction of a
Hospital for the future and
it up even while they re-
eved the pressure on the old, so
mit in time they could have a
modern hospital supple-
rented by a small one on the old
te

Hon, G. D. L, Pile said that it
generally agreed that

lis patchwork business would

never be satisfactory. What people
really wanted to know was wheth-
er Government intended to build

new hospital or intended to im-

prove and extend accommodation
facilities at the present site.

He suggested that Government

should consider seriously the pos-
sibility of providing facilities for

@ On Page 8

AT 31, HE FELT LIKE Ag’
OLD MAN

found the remedy te restore
YOUTHFUL VIGOUR

This young man was bein
rematurely age by kidne

rouble. He te a sree
how Kruschen gave iy
health after weeks of pain :~ #

“l suffered for wee from
kidney trouble and Tole ike an
old maa although I am only 5
If I stooped to do anything
was agony to straighten w
again, Several people ad
me to try Kruschen Salts as *y
had found them wonderful.
tried them and found they seve
me relief from pain, and I fel
better in every way. I shall k
on with the datly dose because
can now do my day's work @
not “™] any the worse for jh,

e —8.V.0.

Uniess the kidneys function
roperly, certain acid wastes,
fnstead of being expelled “
allowed to pollute the bl
stream and produce troublesome
complaints—backache, rheuma-
tism and excessive fatigue.
Kruschen is one of the finest
liuretics or kidney aperientes.
Che small datly dose keeps the
«idneys and other internal organs
working smoothly and nasareny.
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restoreé @

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Ask yuue nearest Chemist oe
°rov Store for Krusohen.

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Charles Me Enearney & Co., Ltd.







PAGE SEVEN





In Times of ao |
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T may be the hot weather...

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For this reason you will find

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‘Ovaltine’ an ideal supplement
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Se Sarwhter’s lace o muren | & tion, “apply Barbados Agencies, telephone we eee er tees ca a — | est priority, being of the high- { Brdour jamake frequent trips to Paris, SAILING TO TRINIDAD AND CURACAO ASSOCIATION (INC.)
Street, St. Peter at 3.30 p.m. today 5.9. 62-00 . a | Mrs. * Brookfield was the great}, After mine uneasy years, hus-|M.s. HERA 15th September, 1952 Consignee, Tele. No. 4047
for the Bethelite Church, Bank Hali, An_idee Vauxhall Wyvern, noc “The above will be set up for sale a} eve : -.| band and adorer had a violent/™.S. HERSILIA i3th Sette, u,
and thence to the Westbury Cemetery 1 cai Gitte Vauxhall Wyve fn, ood con Public Compétiion on Peiday the 26tn| Hon, J. D. Chandler quotea a tew | B ssion of Thackeray's life quarrel; unforgiveable words S.P. MUSSON, SON & ©O
PM K. Husbands, Mrs. 8. Worreil| fused. Apply Williams Court. Oppo-| @a¥ of September 1992 at 2 mm. ot the |instances where there had been| Thackeray was to her an enter- were spoken, “I wish 1 had pever Agente. _
‘daighters) Livingstone Agara,| site Sayes Court, Government Farm, or | Mite o OM ener kc RABY. schemes put to Government | taining caller whose flattering at- | joveq ” wrote the novelist to
Hugh Scott (sons), oe ee Sealy’s Garage, Bay Street 10.9.52—1n ” Liseme Street. with highest C ity attached to tions consoled for the bad a woman. friend. ‘i have peen
(Male Nurse), RB jette, . ; . 79 %@\them. The new Fire Station, temper of her husband. | pl ith and
Richard, Pattiei lendell, Bejty| VAN - One Austin 10 Van 1048 Mod a OS TE Pea ae | played w. by a woman, ti
and Sylvia Woreeli (grand childrens Phone 2317 Vf | House — Bungalow ste tnop a |“Odenn Markets, Extension of Poor - Mr, Brookfield! Allow-|siung over at a beck from the alld ian a Onda Bamst i S
10.9,2—tn "I tached 22 x Mi Situated at Brighton, | the pap ing Industry, New | ance must be made for the disap-| lord and master.”
ELECTRICAL Black Rock, Dial O16 |... | Schools, Road Improvement, and pointments which life had heap-| What does * writer do in such} amtenio natal tates ee ee
nae een ear -62-—t.£.n.1so on, |ed on him, Handsome clever and|a crisis? “He has one compen- SOUTHBOUND
‘Machin 74 "at BANK HALL. Main| He frankly dig not feel that -|sation,” observes Somerset Satis Bails Sail Arrives Salis
ONE (1) Electrical S| Machin KINNOUL” at BANK HALL MAIN much-admired as an undergrad
IN MEMORIAM ¢ ONE 1) Electrical Spraying Machine RGAD, ‘at comer of entrance to Year- with the present financial resour~ | Yate at Cambridge he had en-|Maugham. “Whenever he has Montreal Halifax Boston Barbados Barbados
a a | (it Ale Tank Bc Aluminum Spray ines agugen degh’ Bt dere ae roart of | cte_a* their disposal that Govern “| tered the Church out of a sense |@uything on his mind . . umre~| ..JAnian CONSTRUCTOR 29 Aug 31 Aug. — Sept. 41 Sept
CUMBERBATCH ;—In loving memory of |’ i nient could afford a new up-to- | « quited love, wounded pride, anger| ;any RODNEY 3Sept. 6Sept. 8Sept. 17Sept. 18 Sept.
y asonable. Apply C. Arthur Mayhew | which is used a§ an Orchard, of career rather than vocation. 5 ene
oun dear beloved father Winston Cum J. HAMEL-SMITH & CO | The Dwellinghouse contains Gallery, | date tal. | It was a bad decision at the treachery of someone to| CANADIAN CHALLENGER eet. i 15 Sst. wwiiaen 36 Sent. 30 Sept.
Baeees tel taken away on 10th | Serpe, Bridge Street. Phone 4748. | Drawing and Dining nooms, — Breakfast | The n, the Colonial Secre- |" i. was too theatrical in the | 0m he has shown kindness, he LADY NELSON Sept. Sept. . .
Se | cry a coning wate)“ Punt at | matke in the debeke when. re fe; {BUI and inguficlently unctuous | a4 SOY Jo put Ht down, im, back enenen Areives Salle Aretves arrives _Asttves
‘When one we loved was taken awZy Kitchen &¢., and usual conveniences, | ™arks in the - i aa . a Memreal
Ever to be remembered by Mildred Denny lovernshent % ; out of it. He belonged neither to a or the decoration of an | Batbados Barbados Boston Halifax
(reputed wife) Joyce, Norma, Cora, Vin- | LIVESTOCK na dare Gee's a — pa , — ite the the High Church nor the Low « py ot tall about it. | CANADEAN CONSTRUCTOR 25 Sep. 2 Sept. S oa 8 ee
cent, Brenda and Joan (children) BMGH Dak Waladis GU Gccae Inspection on application to the Tenant Pile S

FOSTER —in loving memory of my Step- |) aftordshize bull, terrier 8 and a hait}/Me © gay will be set up for sale! was a patchwork resolution to} @¢ him by; after ape oe at ad country and he ite LADY NELSON -+ 0+ 19 Oct, a1 Oct, 30 Cet. 31 Oct. 4 Nov.
Foster who died ‘or onths, $50 ing 9189 Ei . e was . dee
September ina 1880. ‘| 828-2" | ine Street Brgetown. ou Friday 10) "GGG, ygiipediate need. | Bihiged "to become a schoo! in-| domasile tyranny, of the “allure | —
“Re: erna: ran im \* eotem
Colin Manning and Family MECHANICAL “eptember #2 ARWOOD & BOyer,|that Government in recruiting | Spector. \soaee between re GY |ror further particulars, apply to—
oe MOD een.) ee eee ceneere. under = peenent : , ‘ ‘Tgmond’s passion for her lady-| GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents.
| BICYCLE — Ladies’ 3 speed Hercules : -|day conditions to ‘ide Kinglake, a iiterary wit of the Scene by scene, the novel
F@K RENT los mew, hardly used. Best offer, over quarters or an ance lieu. period. said of him. “He wa i ows the pattern of the Brook-
£50.00. Ring 9189 10,9, 52—3n “ , .
: eich Fae eal al ae AUCTION ot “Avalon” hed answered two Sever ihe least demoralsed by ‘held affal the end is, however HARRISON LINE
HOUSES pale __19.89—8n. | “CARS —By inatruction of the Inwuragee |Questions — "that of peers new Cosas? was 10 cfulfiment: Eamord ms ae
Coy., Li sell the Court accommodation eptimis' . at last
———.|1 Bidet iowa Rapist Brae | Whitepark on FRIDAY ith. at PP. one and bapilanel baie oa a Wok ems his “fecling of failure! 160. | acid has bean coa-
pGULDUNE, Gattiewash, St" Svsepn | Fety. Manager, 69.52—T.| Car, W98t Vauxhall (Velox) 18H | They would also remember that | a a Geacak se Hl verted, as Professor Ray demon- OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM
4 Bedrooms, For October, November, | SINGER HEMSTITCHING MACHINE Sedan Car done 7,500 miles, beth dam-) at the time there had been com- | |” her| Strates in his careful excursion
vy Cast F mousekeeper and blamed
December 1952. Phone #10 Mrs. Hi. S| Fiectrically driven, in perfect condition, | 484 Ps, accident. | Terms Cash. EF.) plaints of serious lack of accom- for 10 they were} isto literary detection, into a
Bynoe 10.9.9; | ond at a very good price. Dial 2739) | Areher Mc re '9.9.52-4n |modation and there was a neces- cone. (for ‘o ey rdeo Model for one of Thackeray's! Vessel From Leaves Due
ROOMS—9 furnlibed cotma for Ran | ce ee |sity for immediate extra accom- | denie ne 4s ad = ar insipid heroines, “the whimper-| Barbados
opposite Royal Theatre. Best sea bathins; POULTRY UNDER THE SILVER | mogation. aim wi Rae es ill-healtt ing little goddess,” as a ae “PLANTER” . London 4th Sept. 17th Sept.
Garage attached, Week-ends and hol!- HAMMER He recalled the visit of Mr, | ¢efuge in tears and ill-health. tled Victorian critic put it|)¢ >" «coLONIAL” . Liverpool 16th Sept. Ist Oct.
ee ee mee, Set En SANs Pocmuentes iad Goakonele ; Atkinson, Colonial Building Liai- Upon this clouded domestic|}“whom he defies in every 8S. “PHILOSOPHER” ........ M/brough and
FLAT & HOUSE—Fully furnished, St and 12 Pullets — from 300 exis strain TO-DAY by order of the Executora;son Officer, who had visited Bar-| scene Thackeray eee a novel.’ sh mn London 20th Sept, 14th Oct.
Lawrence on-Sea. Phone 3503 » months old. Raised from to the Estate of the late Miss Elsie} bados in March last year and had! in the state of emotiona rus- Ray tracks down some other SS. “HISTORIAN” |... ccc Glasgow and
29.2 82-2 ¢n | Chicks. $5.00 each, ae or more legs 10% |St. John, we will sell ‘he Furniture at a tural to ne whose | originals of Thackera char- |5-S. “HISTORIAN” ....... §
£" | Dial 3394. Gordon’ Proverbs. “Visby". Eagle Hall «oad, which in-|'@ported the following: tration ‘ite ue fh ore th care. muanhy Liverpool 26th Sept, 10th Oct.
he By 10.9.52—%, |etudes: Round Tip-Top Dining Tables “I cannot say how much) pretty wife has been shut up ij acters — the no aera
smelt se rte ee ter Po | Upright Chairs, Sideboards, Serving and| cheaper an improvement of the | an asylum, leaving him with two ere os re ~ ee HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM
Apply Mrs. I. Weatherhead c/o J. N. MISCELLANEOUS Ornament" Tables, China Cabinet./ present hospital would be com- young daughters. coloured, gave him the .
Harriman & Co. 5.9.68—5n | - diceeesrate rede tinet-npennayseeron | Couches, Card Table, Tea Trolley—all in| pared with the construction of He arsived as the friend of | Miss Crewley in Vanity Fair. Vessel For Closes in
or -| ARTICLES INCLUDING Ivory Quiltea|M*hogany; Upholstered Drawing-room ;,,| Major Pendennis was haga Barbados
WINSLOW. a Suite 9 pieces (Coven, Arm and Upright| a mew hospital on another site.| grookfield, became the champiva
Cattle Wa8h, Bathsh Taffeta, Bedspread $20.00. Electric | ©\'\'* ° Px tle, Wiens be Bechatel a as ; from his uncle by mers ” “,ondon 18th Sept
First two weeks in November and the|Heating Pad. $10.00. Traveling Goll | oy ie Work Pablen” Bie stem | But it would be co y Brookfield’s wife and, in no|/! M. “|S.S. “SCHOLAR” .. “ °
Ge ate eel aes, “Mrs. |Bag. $7.00. Car Battery $15.00. 4042. | yal? ., nice Wore, Table, Pictures snd! cheaper at all, was madly in love | Negengy Duck named Major Mer- SS. “CROFTER” |. .. _ .. Liverpool 19th Sept.
. 5 Pa. nes. 1D . enae A . ic E is became —
W. T. Gooding, Stronghope, st ro ____ 10:9, 52-—In. binents: “Old Ching; Dinner and Tea Ser- savings due to ith that oppr t sdf aunt- re 7 Sediey Z “WVonite Fair

9.52—3n







continued tse ¢ i ‘
vices,’ Glass Ware, Ornaments, Carpets,| existing ivulldings there are’ ‘ny invalid. He remained of opin- we very Mite of texte, deswn, For further Information, apply to...

Rugs, Congoleum, "Simmons Single th ‘
steads Matti savings because there are the (5, however, that Brookfiel:, 1 tempt,” as one critic
Peau’ Watdisbe, "Brest ‘Table, Chen | exiting water and electrlelty i, powever, that Brookfiels, /cold | contempt,” as DA COSTA & CO. LTD. — Agents

of Drawers—all in Mahogany; Book supplies, storm water drainage,

ANTIQUES Of every description.
Glass, China, old Jewels, fine Silver

OFFICES Watercolours. Early books, Mz aps, Auto-

graphs ete., at Gorringes Antique Shop







— | *dvomming Royal Yacht Club... « ¢n,|Shelves, Canvas Cots, Ware Preses.| ponae. planting and fences.| V'fe, was in all other respects “| 7 like this milk-and-water in| $69969669699999966969999969099%99999D) 9999S 990SH
OFFICES—In our Building in Lowe: we Ee \. |Long Mirror, very large Glass Case; Vv tal ith | ine fellow. | ” Thacker: told his 3
Broad Street. Available from 1st] “FAREX The comprehensive cerenl Ine | Larders, Zine ‘Top; Tables, 4-Burner Per- ery roughly a hospital w * . * women,” Thackeray to is| ¥
October. K- R. Hunte & Co. Tte.| with Vitamin D. added. Parex should {fection Ol Stove: Gas Stove, Kitchen| 600 beds may at present cost | As «Thackeray became more | mother, under-valuing your] %
Dial 4611, 3.9.52—t.f.n |be given to infants duri teething and | Utensils, Garden Hose; and many other| gyer a year £750,000 or) 7 ladyships heads ana caring only %
weaning. Ask your grocer or druggist | items of interest. $3,600,000 and may take four famous, Brookfield became mort | ¢)" the heart.” Mrs, Brookfield’s|
for FAREX. Price 5éc, tin BRANKER, TROTMAN & C©O., years to design and build.” jealous, more resentful of the | heart was, in the end made tran- x
WANTED 18.0:08-m, Auctioneers He agreed that they coulg only | *uthor’s constant presence in the| quil by ‘a formal reconciliation %
—_—- GUAVA CHEESE — Fresh, delicious | —— — {undertake such expenses as their| 29uSe, and more brutal to Jane, | petween the two men in her life.| %









HELP Guava Cheese, suitable for sending to
your friends abroad. Mrs. Worrell, St

his wife. She, for her part, ro- But the friendship was over.



fi U d and Government |
UNDER THE SILVER dan faced ae he at with the | tested to her husband, “It is not For the most famous of ail

—— :
GENERAL MAED with good references | Matthews Vicarage. Phone 3925



: 9.52—3 .- of Problem in their Five-Year De-| as if Mr. Thackeray were some | Thackeray’s women characters,
eet re Rene, Woreine ~~ a ree ee ie AAR Gd Wok bat hae Pei a | velopment Plan on how much/ young Adonis in the guards,” | Becky arp, Professor Rey Cc" .
"1" | GLUCOLIN Glaxo's Powdered @ ‘The Bower’ The Garrison which| money they could allot for ex-| while writing to the novelist.| puts forward no candidate.



YOUNG LADY for office with know!. | With Vitamin D. Obtainable at ail lead includes — |penditure ‘on several expensive | “I do think at near 30 one may| Rumour at the time did it for





































;
ed f Book-kee i ‘. y]ing stores. Insist on Glucolin for Glucose } 4 . 3 Tip-Te D: . i THBOUND
state all Qualifientions rnd eal ary expect. | at its best 10.9.52—8n. | Tole, Upright Chairs, Rockers, Boos |! ‘nd deserving proposals before ew Pe noe oe awe se bt —_ It ‘ a oe ——e SOU
So also send prea. which will be HOPEWELL ype St. Thamas,: We 2 ae vaeats Pr Mein in Mahogany: them. | be well tnderst an one; dren’s governess made her DE GRASSE Sailing September Sra, 1952
raged ; » Ap . ani si! nM 00k had
to B. Fe ee ia ig AD Oy Highway 6 miles Bridgetown, very Cpol,| Coday-Acw chainy, Rush Seala.ana Backs,|, With regard to preventive | jeans’ the model of Becky, and that she, Calling at Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao, Cartagena and
Shady, Small, N Stone-Ho' Fully |
Department 8.0.82. | Huimished beaut “menads tultapts | Welgte, Ton, Coftoe, sa ny ele cit in oad ag tgen votes in| Sub What did “ene: mean? | in revenge, had made lim ihe/9 SaMaIRe. a meptember ith, 1988
: 12 Adults 4942, 10.9, 2 Goud) Jataie Blectrie’| Clb voted in The triangle had its complexi-| odious Mr. Rochester of her co ep r .

___ MISCELLANEOUS +<———— Pry Bhrce Sneed. Rortouraan Biel -us m8 oe, ena. dow the the "establish | ties. “Brookheld while at heart| novel Jane Eyre. At, that time, | Calling at Trinidad, La Guatra, Curacao, Cartagena and }
—_— INDIAN CORN — for sale. Apply J. | wostinghouse Radio; Double Bahog. of ealth Centre in! 4, usting his om sted on| Charlotte Bronte’s authorship o/| | Jamaica. ~®
erate for eee Pee too o¢ en Se eee aia and teaatig Bediteads,’ Vono Springs on tstown ‘but they had been | working himse¥ up de frenzy| the novel was unknown, >
tbiteh) Tel, 8250, Before 5 p.m shaenis Ree diallonapeit ss eiblesatneebaneaee Drank Paidiel kamen and | Sables one e to secure the services of a/ of suspicion about her. Thackeray was deemed too NORTHI}OUND

10.9.52—1n LUMBER—Deal laths, pine planks, | pictures, Wall Mirrors, Glass and China,| Medical Officer. When they had; Jane was delighted to have a cynigal at the time he wrote and
siding board ’ Ap ly Cardinal monn Dinner and Ted “Services; Kelvinator | recruited one it would be the first) lover in whom she could confide| has since been dismissed as too|K DE GRASSE Sailing September 16th, 1.952
PE AI PER BS Ee, eee 2.0 adn, | PN Pestecs | RPS | Onna | Peat Gants of at, kind sof be} the unhappiness of her marriage: atimnentel. There is now more | } Calling at re = mere
RSON 4 6 anh ie tgiagia alate tenn ochisningiston : thee tame ; 0} at preventive medicine | she had not the slighest inten-| interest in him as'a man than as|% COLOMBIE Sailing r
PLANTS—A few white Anthurium Lily |" Salih LW wcloaie: bing. cosh waa play its proper part in the | tion of risking her reputation for| am author, Ray’s researches, of ; Calling at Martinique, Dominica, Guadeloupe, Southamp-
“The public are hereby warned againy |" Mare and Small. 32H" |. |,.| BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO., |lite of the community. | him. When her husband awarded; which The Buried Life forms|?} ton and Le Havre.
giving credit to any person or persons} Auctioneers _ om : the ogee was eventually | J! 6 kite vd sedding eae ry a modest fraction, fan that %

homsoev , e as 1 do not UBSCRIBF. th: Dally 7.9.52-—2r a er, e to ” nter
hold mvselt responsible. for ‘anyone con Telegraph, Enuland's leading a cleans Bareten ee: = | _ The Frontiers: By John Strachey | ; R. M. JONES & CO., LTD.—Agents
racting any t or debts im my name] paper new arriving in jos POU | Gollancz, 10s, 6d. Pages. ‘
nless by a w me after ti fe ‘

” COLLIN “WALTER WALKER. 7 {onaen. “Contact tan Gale Co. ‘Kavo- i | SOIL CONSERVA TIONIST A novel of ideas thinly dis- 3 _PHONE 3014 69 SSSSSSS
Pita (se gaye ome onl apron SERPVIEW GUEST eis a hovel ot adden | Laecseeenooeseenomnenees cranes ee:
ush a e . is

@ From Page 6



was in duty bound to represent the | Written during the war, about a $OS9SSOSOTIITIIT009099SS 50 FT STITT TU TOOOIOT



Aatstastet ete





















9.9.58--2n, | , ; as yers of the constituency | war-situation, it makes a half-
—<—— IES, Se A 1 ys kills Flies, ou reply, and he felt it was a reason- i ,
aee public are hereby watned. against Mosquitoes “and other winged "insect i SE able one. te 2 Po Benes ce eae near a pretenge = resign HURRICANE PRECAUTION HINT NO. 60
ving to nights STING RBADO Did ose resen story of a yo' nglis 's
K LLEYNE inee Roach) a’ ao not hold c RA iS, BA iS De Bes cl t Its Faxes some of the har aes were | escape trod Somuvied ance. FALLING TREES are very likely to disrupt the Electric
ing I Wa Mea ae ns CES Daily and Longterm Rates _ it was not true ta-say tha eines Ft experienced le; But Strachey, more adept at Supply. Keep a couple of Hurricane Lanterns filled with —
Soe ee aS Le NOTE iirneet “dens {Sergei hatdioe” wee [Searageen ag | naratng Me wary aan Sian a os ot Maes Handy ce :
pen b . .
*isNowbury Vittaie, — | ———- ae welecme. ‘wore being experienced by the |”"'She said that the wheels of| ducting a’ clash at ides) All these are obtainable at . . . %
t George. OTI : Dinner and Cocktail Government run so slowly that “We live in. one of those times %
oa | 1d ee tea See waa eh Beata Partie, arranged. it was @ question as 10 how long | umles# members on the Govern-| in which public. life is our owt CENTRAL EMPORIUM
from Mra, Geo, Hutson, Blackmans, J. By; i) ' the roads would last after so muc! ment side “threw a little grease On | jife.” This is the germ-idea of = »
EDUCATIONAL i iiiciy communicate with ner » Bi noney had bean pent aa ceich fithe wheels, they would cease to| the book. Its most vital scene is|@ Corner Broad & Tudor Stree 8
aoe anaeeneoocsooseaoceee® | Replying, Mrs, Bourne said she | “She &n_argument between Nordenac,
se NOTICE LOE eae thee Secs ete a She pointed out that it was at| French collaborationist (Lava).| 5939S OSOP ¢ aes
QUEEN'S COLLEGE All Assistant Teachers are invited to a a hes teqnact that the Colonial e- and a character called the Abbe, ¢ ; %
: meeting of the Union to be held at the GOVERNMENT NOTICES retary, and the Director of High- although not a priest. x
Queen's College has a staffing vacancy! Wesley Hall Girls’ School on Saturday,



for a Graduate in Mathematics, for Jan- | 136. at 11 a.m.



‘ways and Transport, had visited| Nordenac iries to tempt the % ¥
the areas, and asked “how often| Abhe into collaboration with the % *
has the Director of Highways and| German foe: it. is one’s duty to]s
Transport visited the areas which | forward Ny

vary, 1953. | Salary proposals will be discussed,
Applications should be made to the! Cc. G. ROACHFORD,
Headmistress, from whom further par- | Sec. A.T.U. TENDER FOR MOTOR TRUCK the historical process, | X



ticulars may be obtained, on or before | 10.9.52—2n Government “7, are more expen- | j.e¢,, Hitler’s New Order, Against &



















































the 13th of September, 1952. Seda acta anid —- Tenders are invited for the purchase of. a Ford V.8 5 ton Motor} ive to repair than other areas. this Marxist conception, cynical % ;
9.92—an NOTICE Truck 1945 model, She agen Sreneed, Whe % sien and covk-sure, the Abbe opposes | % x
; THE BARBARCS : 2. This Truck can be see. at the Pine Plantation any week} proper drainage in the parish, and! the clder notion of moral values | & S
“ Y y NOE om at $ ag . .
ANNOUNCEMENTS aan LOST POLICY. i day between the hours of 9.00 a.m, and 3.00 p.m. or Saturdays urged that officers of the Depart and a moral instinct. % >
Samuel Timothy Gibbs having made ment should “put down their! The debate, continued between |*% Cy
a nnn | sworn deposition that Policy No, 21,25] between the hours of 9.00 a.m. and/11.00 a.m. y pens” and see the Casual workers | the Abbe and a young Commun-|% %
MAKE EXTRA MONEY Big ca h on bts life has been sot 2088 bs ne 8. Tenders should be addressed to the Director of Agriculture, } at work. late! te vabarnant ant aenuent. 3 %
f f Spare time. Sell Personal] yo applicat to the Directors , sce 5 ; ; , anes Batt
Cao Cards rk ti antinks ; 31] mode a Wiconeate of the same NoTICe | Department of Agriculture and + vould reach the office not later than At this eee she jem oo for oe Marxism gets an airing and a ‘
SF #80 Nae imprinted. Bomples Fece ef s hereby given that unless any objection} 4,90 p.m, om Saturday, the 20th September, 1952. was granted leave te withdraw her | heating. &
Also 20 beautiful box assortments, Write raised within one month of the’ date 10.9.59-—~2n} Motion that the House be adjourn- A novel for those who agree]
Alp. Odell; CYPHERS CABDS:CO., 75. W | erent, the duplicate Polley ‘naked {0 aee os fon, Ng ee in _ se | that pufblic life is now our own]%
uren » Buffalo, ill be 1we J she might comment on the reply. | jife ” %
Satie lipemia’ By Order, y
! c x« ekowne TENDERS FOR SUPPLIES see B A T A Stores first, as we can :
¥ COST ACCOUNT . , 59-2; SEALED TENDERS will be received at the Hospital up to 12 irae —- ‘ * %
| 10.9.52—4n . ¥
xa. COMPANY Ts Me ios ————__-_____— o'clock noon on Wednesday, !7th September, 1952, for supplying offer to youd wide selection of shoes 3
mage Aswocits :" ellow) wil NOTICE + ine J atticles in the following lines for a period of six months from 1st tl 7 >
quality you for hisher status by in-Hl vinch’s Secondary School Old Scholars (October, 1952: — ~at lowest prices.
ae oe eet GU. fe eee Association on Wednesday 10th Septen (1) FRESH BREAD
Sa geEe pte, GUARANTEE) Are 4% pm" at the Behor! (2) ALCOHOL Law subjects, London Chamber oxfff Al members as well ae asked to make . (8) COFFINS, and providing HEARSE for the burial of BOYS SHOES si ll-1 from $435
Gommerce KSLA, Institute of Coma] becom tend. vies Prey 1ZeS 7 . Re
merce, Etc. For, FREE "BOOKL A special fo attend. 30.0. the dead at the Westbury Cemetery. O cS) x
ori i 50 pints a %
institute for overseas students: LON . (4) PURE FRESH MILK, between 200 and 2: 5 x
DON SCHOOL OF ACCOUNTANCY Housewife's day only. BOYS' SHOES sizes 2-5 from $4.95 §






53.



land. vt oo ecameees Forms for the respective tenders will be supplied on application

Alphab t to the Secretary of the General Hospital and tenders will not be en-
elight Your Family tertained except fhey are on forms supplied by the General Hospital.



GIRLS’ LACE SHOES 3-8 at $6.65





‘ ‘i Persons tendering must submit at the time of tendering letters
hans Precaution aily with from two other persons known to possess property, expressing their
ainty Dishes willingness to become bound as sureties for the fulfilment of the

HINT NO. 15 It'S EASY WHEN ene ; : P as a FLEXIBLES—in 7-10 at $3.95
Terms tract and any ‘urther particulars may be obtained

YOU HAVE A GAS COOKER ee ee ;
lice g . »spital, 10.9.52—3n :
Be alert to prevent | == oe a on application at the General Hespita Patent-Bro -White 11-2 at $4.95







fires. Lowered water
pressure makes fire-fight-
ing difficult after storms.




. YMP.C. THE BRITISH COUNCIL ||| 1953 AMATEUR BOXING SANDALS-Brown— 7-10 at $215
CHAMPIONSHIPS SANDALS-Brown— ll-l1 at $2.60

Under the Auspices of

A PIANO RECITAL }\} CANADA DRY |} SANDALS-Brown— 2-5 at $3.15

— given by — , will take place at the...
MR. CECIL JACK MODERN HIGH SCHOOL STADIUM
On Friday, 12th September, at 8.30 p.m.



WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER WAKEFIELD. WHITE PARK
10th. 1952

at 8.15 p.m.

TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH h\ THE BRITISH COUNCIL

Presents :
The following Films :—
. British News. ,



| See Them on Display at ...
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For Walking Sticks

At 8 p.m, on Friday, i2th September





. Cricket, Jorks , He > Jac > ,
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PAGE TEN





~W. INDIAN CRICK

Walcott Almost Wins
Game On His Own

By ROY MARSHALL

t indians in the Lancashire League had an enjoy-
able Saturday. all of them turning in good performances
with bat and ball. But not so the Central Lancashire
league players Ramadhin and Worrell, both of whom were
on the losing side. The defeats of Radcliffe and Crompton
means that neither has any chance of pulling off the
jonships. This is a great pity because apart from
timent angle, it would have been a good thing for
ericket as a whole if one of the cinderella clubs
such as Crompton could occasionally have had their share

Ves



¢a



"NINETEEN
LEFT IN
ST. LEGER

‘(By a Racing Correspondent)

LONDON, Sept. 3.

Twenty, with one since
scratched, have accepted for the
St. Leger, the last of this season’s
classic races, to be run at Don-
easter on Saturday. There is
never a big field for this race—
last year’s 18 runners were the
most since 1922. The’ average
number is about 11, but Turkhan

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





BLOCKS

S.C. Griffith, M.C.C.

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 1952



ETERS HAVE A GOOD DAY

STARTING



pletes that Len Hutton had to be
flown out from England to bolster
up the batting.

Before the arrival of Hutton the
MCC were due to play the second
Test against the West Indies in
Trinidad. With only one regular
opening batsman in the side,
Allen asked Griffith if he would
partner Robertson. Billy obliged
so successfully that he hit his
maiden century in first class
cricket, scoring 140. The cases
where a player's maiden century
comes in a Test match must be
exceedingly rare.

Asst. Secretary

LONDON,

Short, dapper, pipe-smoking S. C. Griffith moves into
Lord’s next month to take up his new post as assistant
secretary of the M.C.C. His appointment was announced
last week. He joins Mr. Ronnie Aird, who will shortly
succeed as secretary Colonel Rait Kerr, and the other
assistant secretary, Mr. J. G. Dunbar.

The following year he toured
South Africa as vice-captain to
F. G. Mann's team. In the last

Griffith, knowneto cricket fol-
lowers at home and abroad as

. . fe . . , i i :
hal ent Ae ees Junior Lawn L-é€RNIS “Billy” will bring a new and re. tW Tests he displaced Godfrey

of the honours,

Su was the good form of Wes
inc:ans in the other league tho
fificult te know where to
; however, the chiej
uld go to Clyde Wal-f
ld who virtually beat
Burnley side on his own,

feat has almost certainly!
Burnley the championship$

sit}

h only two matches remain-






Lancashire.

mec

And the twa
t on Saturday,
‘ning the toss and electing
t Enfield put togetaer 154 in
hours 20 minutes. Cecil Pep-
the Burnley professional
ed most of the batsmen but
best to Clyde Walcott
whose 76 in 90 minutes contained
s. Clyde might have been

hen ony 15, but after Pep-
brought him forward the
eket-kecper missed a_ stumping

f

pance,
At His Best
This was Walcott at his best,
f always he was_ particularly
‘¢ Off the back foot and some
of his cover driving was remin-
cent of his great century in the
‘nd Test at Lord's against England
ro years ago, i
But more was to follow. Burn-
, amazing though it may seem,
were shot out in just over an
hour foy. 62, And who do you
ink did the damage? Yes it was
Clyde, Jowling his off-spinners
with great skill he returned the
Mowing figures: 9 overs 3 maid-
ens 8 runs 5 wickets, How Burn-
l-y could have used Bruce Paira-
caeau who played for them earlier
mn the summer.
No wonder they passed the col-
lection plate round the ground.
Also playing the part of the
perfect all-rounder was Everton
Weekes who thrilled the Bacup
crowd in ths home game with
Acerington. Unfortunately in this
instance his great work did not
result in victory but honours were
evenly divided in a hard fought
draw,
Accrington won the toss and in
2 hours 45 minutes put on 170.
Everton with his off-spiners claim-
ed six for 51. This left Bacay
needing 86 an hour and from the
outset they chased the runs. Ever-
ton’s bright 34 included 6 4’s but
once he had gone the odds swung
in favour of Accrington. Still the
batsmen did’nt give up the task
and when stumps were drawn
they were only 12 short of vic
tory with two wickets standing,



WI)

}





Excitement

There was more excitement at
Lowerhouse where the home team
s red a well deserved three
wicket victory over Ramsbottom.
The visitors won the toss and
batted first. Their score of 166—-
5 declared was largely the work
of one man, Gul Mahomed who
with Vijay Hazare holds the world
record partnership of 577 for tne
4th ‘wicket for Baroda against
Holkar in 1946-47, Although he
cidn’t get anywhere near the 31°
he scored on that occasion Ma-
homed gave no semblance of a
chance in making 101 not out.
From the technical viewpoint it
was a fine innings but not the
sort which pleases Lancashire
League crowds for he occupied 2
hours and 35 minutes,

Far more to their liking was
the 76 in 65 minutes by Roy Mar-
shall when Lowerhouse set about
the task of scoring 166 in two
hours. Marshall had 12 4’s in his
innings and with the other bats-
men keeping up the good work,
Lowerhouse beat the clock by
four minutes, scoring 166—7.

What about Ramadhin = and
Worrell? This is one occasion
where the least said the better,
Radcliffe were tumbled out for
73 to which Oldham replied with
74—7 and Crompton after being
set 145 to win by Milnrow were
back in the pavilion with a mere
68 on the board.

SKATING

JEANETTE ALTWEGG, who
won a gold medal at the wintey
Olympie Games, has refused an
offer of £2,000 per week to turn
professional. Instead she is taking
a £2. 10s. a week job at a chil-
dren’s refugee camp in Switzer-
jand. ‘The camp is the Inter-
national Pestalozzi Children’s
Village where orphans from
nine European’ countries are
brought up and educated.

T hey'll Do i Every







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( MR. ANGLEWORM«

WEVE BEEN ASSIGNED ;
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FOR THE UNIFIED «<
CHARITY DRIVE .4OW \ ~
MUCH CAN WE PUT YOU by
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PLEDGE NOW AND GivE /










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[AN PETY RUCK :
OVER THE “IN

MAY WIFE IS ¢
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|
|



CLYDE WALCOTT

|
|

Solomens Pencils
Turpin-Angelo
Bout For Oct.

By GEORGE WHITING
_ If anything is probable in the
improbable world of professional
boxing it is that Randolph Tur-
pin will soon be fighting South
Africa's George Angelo for the
Empire middle-weight champion-
ship, left vacant by the tragic
death of Australia's Dave Sands.

Promotional and managerial
parties concerned have persisted
in polite denials about Turpin v,
Angelo during Jack Solomons’s
poinis—winning battle in New
York against Joey Maxim and
Jack Kearns, Nevertheless, the
signs are unmistakable,

First we had Randolph him-
self letting the cat out of the
bag in Germany. Second, the
Board of Control announced that
IF Turpin fought Angelo under
champiohship conditions _ they
would grant the accolade of an
Empire title,

Third, the boys-in-tne-know are
already asking for tickets, Fourtn,
Solomons has a date pencilled in
for Harringay on October 21 —
and what other middle-weight ot
a cash-spinning character can ho
get to fight Turpin?

Fifth, a report from Johannes-
burg to-day tells of a telephoue
talk between Angelo’s father and
London regarding the purse,

Angelo is still on holiday in
Johannesburg, but leav2s by s>a
for England on September 26.

Meanwhile, Turpin back this
week from entertaining tho

BAOR, tells me, through

manager George Middleton, that

he would like to perform «
similar service for the boys in

Korea,

The German venture must have
cost Turpin £1000 in loss of fee’
for exhibitions in this country
but his recompense is the addition
of 10,000 recruits to his army of
“fans,”

In two weeks the Turpin party
travelled nearly 2000 miles, and
Randolph boxed 120 rounds in 10
camps in 10 nights. No punches
were pulled. Two of Turpin’s own
spar-mates — brother Jackie and
light-weight Stan Parkes—failed
to stay the course because of in-
juries, and it was left to 30 brave
men of the BACR to provide the

“opposition” at the end of the
tour, i

gr —LES.
Time Stet * Soa aie



& OVER IN \o)> We
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FIFTY SCENTS To
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GOLD-PLATED! THAT

{ GUY'S TIGHTER THAN
\ DENTURE PLASTER!

CTA GIARITY DRIVES ON / CHARITY, LOOK
CS YS TV AND GIVES A
~\. FAKE NAME-++_,

Sun Chariot won
in 1942 in a fleld of eight.

Gordon Richards rode both of
these and his last victory in this
race was in 1944 on Tehran, the
leading sire this season and sire
of Tulyar.

Gordon has already won five
St. Legers and this is considered
his lucky race, There will be
great celebrations if,he is suecess-
ful on the Queen’s Gay Time this
year.

There has never been any dis-
puting the superiority of Tulyar
but 7—4 was offered against him
aeegiate of the risks of coughing
ete,

Nearer the day and the smaller
the field the shorter will become
the price of the favourite.

The French challenge numbers
five—Alcinus, from the Boussac
stable; - Magnific II, from the
Thunderhead stable; the erratic
Ker Ardan, Worden II, the mount
ef W. R. Johnstone, and Foudro-
gant II, who has probably been
left in in error, 5

Faubourg II, third in the Derby,
has been withdrawn,

Cephalonian has been

left in

‘ by mistake, as has Sophronia, and

Amour Propre has been with-
drawn. Mehmandar has been left
in as a pacemaker for Tulyar

ond Summer Time may be on a
similar mission for Bob Major.
Tobias is a surprise acceptor
and Khor-Mousa has not been

heard of since the middle of
June.

sae probable field will number

At Doncaster on September 18 (14m
132y..1
1m? Rold Buccaneer,
W. Snaith
Alcinus, (France)—J. Doyashere
Castleton, (T. Carey)—D. Smith
Magnific Il, (Prance)—R, Poincget
Ker Ardan, (France)—P. Blanc
Childe Harold,
J. Brace
Tulyar, (M. Marsh}—C. Smirke.
Gay Time, (N Nurless)-G
Richards
Bob Major, (J
Rickaby
Worden UL,
Johnstone
Rawson, (S. Wootton) —F. Hunter
Mehmandar, (M, Marsh)
Cephalonian, (W. Payne)
Summer Rain (J. Jarvis)
Tobias, (N. Bertie)
Kingsfold, (W. Nightman)
Khor-Mousa, (P. Thrale)
Foudroyant HM, (France)
020 Sophronia, (T. Sidebottom)
Amour Propre accepted but was sub-
sequently scratched.

‘H Leach} -

0001

Mu iw Dutton) —
ill

1221
4322
003

3111
4204
4001
1001
0021
1324
0000

Jarvis)—W

(France)—W. .R



Holborn To Send
Team To Trinidad
Athletic Meet

The Holborn Boys’ Cycle and
Athletic Club has now finalised
plans for sending a sixteen-man
cycle and athletic team to. the
All Stars Meeting to be held in
Trinidad on the 4th and Sth of
next month, Air passages have
already been booked for the
team, which will leave towards
the end of the month,

The team will be managed by
Mr. Johnnie Hoad, a_ veterair
cyclist of the 20's, and will com~
prise thirteen cyclists and two
athletes, The athletes are Davia
Inniss who will compete in the
sprints, and Oswin Hill, the
middle distance runner, The
thirteen cyclists are R, Andrews;
L. Hoad; H. Edwards; D, Thomas;
T. Moore; D, Grant; J. Hoad; M.

Stoute; D. Jones; Mike Tucker;
George Hill; H. Roett; and W.
Kelly,

Invitations were also sent by
the All Stars Club to Ken Far-
num, but it is doubtful whether
he will be able to attend the
meeting in view of the fact that
his racing cycles are in England.
Lisle Carmichael, and John
Skinner, distance ace, have also
been invited,

The local Cycle and Athletic
Association is hoping to send a
three-man team to attend the
meeting, act 22

ATHLETICS

GASTON REIFF, of Belgium,
last month broke the world two-
mile record at an athletic meeting
in Paris. His time of 8 min., 40.4
secs. was more than two seconds
faster than the existing record
set up by the Swede Gundar
Haegg in 1944, ,

My Timmy Hatlo |










HIS WIFE'S NOT ON ANY

COMMITTEE . BUT I KNOW
\ A DAME IN HORSECHESTER
WHO 16 sANGLEWORM
TOLD HER HE KICKS
IN AT THE OFFICE














om co Ct einen, |
- i lo oe or | MS Lee
LATER IF YOU WISH” SUPPORT ) | Ween : IF You DON'T)
: rs ——F" HE'S THE TYPE BEWEVE HE
i! WHO PHONES IN GIVES HALF HiS
( BIG PLEDGES To THOSE

AT HIS INCOME

}
SALARY TO |
{
TAX REPORT: |







ASS



'\| TALKING ABOUT THE
*/| OFFICE NGHTWAD AS
HEGIVES THE CHARITY
| CLLECTIONS THE OLD
| —- RUN-AROUND ——~
(THANX AND A “NP OF

|
|
By Jue HATS HAT To
De YOFF ECTOR’,
; & CHEAGS. SLL iA








POLICE CONSTABLE H. W. Archer, a local sprinter, has imported a
pair of Starting Blocks from the United Kingdom. The blocks are

the first of their kind in the island.

The Manager of the Equipment Department of the firm from
which the blocks were imported, states in a letter that the blacks are
similar to those used by sprinters at the Olympic Games and they
are used at all leading athletic tracks in the U.K.

Police Constable Archer told the “Advocate” yesterday that he
first used starting blocks at the last Police Sports at Kensington.
These blocks were however made of wood and could not be properly

regulated.

He is hoping to get a superior start from his new blocks.



Test TV Has Not Hit

Champions Surrey

Says Mr, H. G. CLARK, honor-
ary secretary of the Essex County
cricket club “Something will
have to be done to compensate
clubs hit by the televising of Test
matches."

Essex estimate that their loss
for this season, when five of their
home matches clashed with Tests
is about £1000. Yet gate aggre-
gates are up.

“I do not suggest,” Mr. Clark
told me, “that televising the 1953
matches against the Australians
should be abandoned, but Essex
and other counties think that TV
fees should be increased anc
should go into a pool to help coun-
ties who suffer.”

Hard To Asses

To-day I asked other south-
‘eastern clubs whether they had
suffered similarly, with this re-
sult :

SURREY: We have not suffered
so far, but others have.

MIDDLESEX: Our’ Saturday
gate in the match against Surrey,
normally 20,000, was down to
14,000. Cn that day the Man-
chester Test was being televised.
To what degree the television
caused the falling-off it is difficult
to say.

SUSSEX: The weather. which
almost blotted out the Eastbourne
match against Essex, lost us about
£800 there — a more serious iten:
than the Test television. it is hard
to disentangle these different in:
fluences affecting gates.

My prophecy is that though the
effect of TV on gates will cer-
tainly be discussed at the winter
meeting of the Advisory County
Cricket Committee at Lord’s, the
1953 Test matches against Aus~
tralia will certainly be placed on
view. .

Many sports, including cricket,
are awaiting a report on the sub-
ject from the Association for the
Protection of Copyright in Sport.

Yorkshire Exiles

J. R. ASHMAN, a left-arm spin
bowler who took four wickets
against Surrey last season, has
peen released by Yorkshire, He is
to join Worcestershire. Last week
Yorkshire also decided to release
leg break bowler EDDIE LEAD-

BEATER,
If Leadbeater joins another
county there are likely to be 24

-
—__—

Abertondo Leads

NEW MADRID, Missouri,
Sept. 9.

Antonio Abertondo maintained
a phenomenal 60 stroke per min-
ute pace as he splashed toward a
new world distance swimming
record in the meweel. Rivet
Abertondo passed Hic an
Kentucky yesterday evening ahd
is believed to have slipped by on
the Kentucky side of the mile and
a half wide river in the darkness.
Observers on the New Madrid side
of the river thought that they saw
boats accompanying the swimmer
shortly after midnight, but could
not be certain at that distance,
There is no bridge across the
Mississippi at this point.

Marine operators tried unsuc-





~~ oe

“exiles” from Yorkshire in county
cricket next season,

Here is the list of Yorkshiremen
who are professionals with other
counties: GIBB, HORSFALL and
GREENSMITH (Essex); LAKER
(Surrey); BENNETT (Middlesex):
HAMER (Derbyshire); McHUGH
(Gloucestershire); WALKER
(Hampshire); BROOKES, BAR-
RICK, JAKEMAN, GREASLEY
and FIDDLING (Northants) ;
SMITHSON and FIRTH (Leices-
tershire), SMALES and STOCKS
(Notts); LAWRENCE, ROBINSON

and KITSON (Somerset); HOR-
NER (Warwickshire); DEWS
(Worcester),

Bradford Northern, the Rugby
League club, who are experiment-
ing with football under flood-
lights, are proposing that York-
shire end the cricket season with
a floodlit charity game in late
September against a team drawn
from the county “exiles.”

Locke versus Boros

How boxing promoters must
sigh at the ease with which golf
champions like South African
BOBBY LOCKE and American
JULIUS BOROS are brought to-
gether in a tournament.

Boros, the U.S.A. open cham-
pion and winner this season of
more than £12,000 prize money,
and Locke, the British open title
holder are in opposing sides in
the Canada-U.S. professional tour-
nament which begins in Montreal
to-morrow,

How is it that Locke can play
for Canada? He has been made
an honorary Canadian. He is also
a member of the Canadian Pro-
fessional Golfers’ Association and
thus qualifies for their six-man
team,

157 Tackle Big Walk

Surrey Walking Club have a
record entry of 157—-26 more than
the previous best—for their 27th
annual open London to Brighton
7 miles road walk on September
13.

Lucky Break

In landing a 2lb. 74202. bream
in an angling competition on the
River Lea at Waltham Abbey yes-
terday, Mr, A, LEWIS, of Enfield,
broke bis rod. But he won the
competition, The Prize? A new
rod, —L.E.S.



In Mississippi Swim

cessfully to reach the yacht Buc-
caneer accompanying Abertondo.
If Abertondo reached New Mad-
rid at midnight, it seemed certain
that he would set a world’s re-
cord barring cramp or accident.
He would have been just 60 miles
from his goal and have covered
240 miles of the 300-mile swim
from Saint Louis, Missouri to
Caruthersville, Missouri.

At midnight he would have been
in the water 65 and one half hours.
He has until 1.24 a.m. to-morrow
to complete 60 miles downstream
to Caruthersville to surpass John
Sigmund’s record of 81 hours 52
minutes in swimming 282 miles
down the Mississippi. Abertondo
plunged into the river at 6.30 a.m.
on Saturday in Saint Louis.—U.P.

NOW'S THE TIME TO ORDER

LINEN SUITS

LIGHT TROPICAL SUITS
AND

|| SEA ISLAND COTTON SHIRTS

P. ¢€. 8.

“TOP

MAFFEI & Co.,

SCORERS IN

TAILORIN”



—

Junior

Champivouships
Continuing

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, Sept. 9.
match in today’s British
Lawn Tennis Champion-
ships at Wimbledon was the one
and three quarter hour struggle
in which Chris Day, Kent Junior
Champion beat left handed Tor-
quay boy Gordon Mudge in a
protracted baseline manoeuvre.
Biggest “name” to go out was
O. S. Brenn 14-year-old son of
the famous prewar German Davis
Cup star Dr. Daniel Brenn who
was well beaten by Bobby Hull
of Manchester a lad two years

Best

older. ;
Monday’s hero little David
England was soundly beaten by

Peter Moys who is more than two
years older. But little
rich with promise.
Eight boys were called upon to
play two matches each today in

order to get through the last |
sixteen. Two favourites Billy
Knight and Bobby Wilson were

more fortunate and reached that
stage by playing only one match.
Knight beat B. Hann of York-

David is,

freshing
He is the first MCC secretary with
practical
tours.

and Cambridge, he gained his blue
in

flight as a wicket-keeper,

for
for the tour of Australia and New
Zealand under

E. R. T, Holmes.

the West
honorary manager with the team
led by G O. Allen,
“injury”
playing forces were ‘so badly de- the responsibility of Mr. Aird.

personality. to his job. Evans behind the stumps.

During this period, from 1946 to
1950 Griffith was secretary of
Sussex. He relinquished this post
in 1950 when tte became cricket
eorrespondent of the Sunday
Times. His first report was on
the West Indies opening game
against Worcester.

knowledge of overseas

Educated at Dulwich College

1935 and is still in the top-

The same year that he played Sie tees: scien veea
Ca idg > as sele ‘ $ a
aire De. was seeeeme both for their descriptive value
the captaincy of 29d obvious insight into the game,
Only 38, Buy urimth still has
many years in which to continue
his fine services to cricket. At
Lord’s he will be chiefly respon-
sible for administration on the
playing side. This was previously

Twelve years later he

Indies as

toured
player and

This was the

tour when the MCC



shire 6—2, 6—2, and Wilson, the,

holder, lost only two games in
beating R. A. Scarlet of Surrey.

Islandwide
Mixed Doubles

The Island-wide Mixed Doubles
starts at the Y.M.C.A. on Thurs-
day, September 11th at 7.20 p.m.
The draw is as follows:

1. Miss R. Gloumeau and Mr.
C. Humphrey vs. Miss D. Howard
and Mr. A. Howard.

2. Miss R. Williams and Mr, R. |
Miss N. Heath and

Phillips vs.
Mr. R, Greenidge.

3. Miss B. Carrington and Mr.
N. Gill vs, Miss P. Smith and Mr.



J. Bynoe or Miss M, M. Atkinson |

and Mr. A, Foster,

4. Mr. and Mrs, C. Greenidge
vs. Miss K. Barnes and Mr. D.
Nicholls,

5. Miss M. Manning and Mr.
R. Herbert vs. Miss D. Lamming
and Mir. D, Mayers.

6. Miss H. Deane and Mr. B.
Murray vs. Miss J. Farnum and
Mr. D. Guiler.

7. Miss P.

Chandler and Mr.

C. Gooding vs. Miss P. Humphrey |

and Mr. D.’ Archer.

8. Miss N. Hall and Mr, L.
Worrell vs, Miss R, Howard and
Mr, E. Goodridge.

WHEN THE

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TOUCHES You,

















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Full Text

PAGE 1

WHArS ON TODAY Mllts s e -4 the Chmtwi of '•— — %  ft I 1 0* n U nrtlag of Ul* Ifeart '>' HatUh rwbsr SW a i M<*ll. llrn, Sho* *1 M..ITruui>. s Philip W 11 Far M MWM Utot Ucka % %  sSiUS.M 'Gainst ** wr^rm urn n*c rriuuMt Foi in* fuiur* in th* di.lJ.nn And IM Oood UMI t can do. ESTABLISHED 1895 WEDM 1U 10. 1952 PRICE : FIVE CENTS %  YESTERDAY i WiAIHfR REPORT EGYPT'S POLITICAL PARTIES DISSOLVED Landlords Ordered To Give Up Land Over 200 Acres NEVA' BUILDING DR TRUCE TALKS CAIRO. Sept. 9. Premier General Moh.imm.Hl Naguib's new cabinet dissolved all political parties and ordered landlords to surrender all their land ill excess of "J00 acres fur redistribution to landless peasants Two historical decreea at one stroke aJterad the whole beaui of Egypt's pcJitica. and econuniic life They oul political corruption and end the feudal economic system that has kept mill ion* of Egyptians in virtual serfdom. Nagutb deaxrtbad the land deform law its "the first step toward rebuilding Egypt*! economic and social structure. The decrees came less than 4b* hours after strong man Naguih, already Commander in Chief Niguitt thus became the undisputed ruler of Egypt Ith ; even those "f ex-King whom he forced oft the %  nd Into cxtlo on July 26 The three-mai ell acting In the name of Farouk's tevcn-monlh-old picked by Naguib. No organised opposition k> expected. The Army U firmly in control under Naguib. jind has rooted up 41 01 ihe most powerful politicianIn Eg>pt In %  scries of raids. All were Mill in custody and the Army said that some would be> tried RM lion and other crimes against the State—I'. P. f the II United States eonof l|w House of Assembly, to be gressmen touring Korea, predictVIM ,,,,.,,,, incmbor 0 f the ed that the United Nations w II be i^g,,,,,,,,.,. council. eventually forced to fight 'all thei way"*"up to the Manchurum bord-1 xhi^ wu communicated to the er. The Missouri Republicanisald u-gmUtive Council yesterday la that o divided K ml a mem „* trxtni i Ils Excellency worse" than i Ro united en.,.. ilrely by Ihe Communists. Ha -ai" I cannot see any; ilefore the business of the peace out here so long as there i* Council was entered upon. Hon. a divided Korea". Short's npinJ. o. .Chandler, President, sumions on the necessity of taking monad Mr. Robinson to the Councontml. of North Kona are MinidJ Chamber and formally invited tence can only be passed !ar to those repeatedly expressed him to tain hi seat as a member' persons aged 14 or over b) Pre w I Syni -i in Rha> n.-i,,, th it council. said: "We should go all the way MM All Ouarli-rs: Rocket Expedition To Greenland New York: A rocket Blttsl expedition is goiiuc to Greenland Within 50 mile* of the Magmt.. NOrU l-ole. they will send irocket* 25 miles itnd higlur. H the rockets' noses will be geigt> counters to muasurc cosmic raj Hyuney: Professor Clyde Kluckhohn. droctnr of, Uje Russlai K-'.mh lenirc at Harvard University, said thai week "On th.' • iv and n'h.ibl estimate based on facts, thcr • nrnr least 10,000.000 adult Russians in forced labour camps "i.-v If a tru y free election were held, the Communist" would ISMIalllll be thrown out." Capetown: wnen tire scorched she top ol u church in Capetown last February, tha clock stoppe i III was made in ChaafM I don. in 1BI9 .mo during Its VOy* age out. was drenciud with H i water. Il was cleaned. oUtd ID iris.aliui in the church where n ran without stopping lor i:_' years. This week it started running again "as good as new" after its second sprinsi-clean. Sydney: Four hundred doctor.. many with pipe* and rigaretu-^ in the rise in the blood pressure, increase in the heart rate, constriction of small blood vessels in the hands and feet and stops circulation *' But he added. 'There ino need lo give it up altogether. Just cut It down." Vienna: Children from the age of 12 upwards are liable lo be sentenced to death for crimes •uch a* "conspiring agitnst the State, damaging: State property or economic sabotage" under th.* new penal code Introduced In Albania ' Gale, chuu-hwarden minatad la attend the tiret meal ita Committee under the Chairmanship of His Excellency th< Governor in the Legislative Council Chamh. ii.i> 17th ol Saptambar. 'I'M. WIIII.C A IT,' touches on the Im*>t •-nmpicU'd hi will be i:% %  t"r i nlerenoas *y v trace nrKotiator*. The hi th* pravions rsai Hi .1 worklU'ii put th' Bm.im • < Psnmunjom. Raeaa. eaal ilted Ifntigiis and 0> i %  inl %  Matt nsrd for t.dk* during 1 mats on a concrete bane. —fnfeninMnua:. I think araae to go all the to the Yalu Ri tually, we will ha „,,, "_|l.p. South Korean* I all Bock From nUA Hill I'OKVO. Bept 9, Bjthai Mad South Korean troops fell back from the bloody Of*Jt of Capllol Hill e:u-ly today leaving badU oi'uk'd Chinese Communists fn command of Koi. front height. 954 Reds were killed or wounded in three days of savsge fighting that opened with the crushing uf a Red attack on Saturday night. South K i fought slubbornl> to reach the Adelaide: An r-old pipe laimlng a world record for keeping his pipe alight for one hour 47 minutes <• i one fill. The record was set U hotel bar. IVevious reeord was Of Mr Robinson, Hon. {smoker J. Chandler said that he had much pleusure in welcoming him to the Board. Me knew that Mr. Robinson had had experience as a membar of The Other Place and thereon ;"ho U r !" 'mlnuTra *16 "seVc^d" fore tne work of that Council ;„. ,, w o artttv M u ,h nil .,. HWM would not be new to him in any ^ v b f victoria ...... | •*• The biggest blast CiapitOI Hill He said that the honourable.furnace in the southern hetnts1 member would find the debates phere went into operation this U h quieter up there than | w-eek at I'ort Kembla steelworks Ul I h. other Place ;.nd he would J south of Sydney It will boot %  ISO find that Wiey did a considi plant capacity lo 8,700 tons per erunle amount of work in Comday and help to make the works mittee Australia's biggsvt steel centre „ tlJ 'with an output of 1.340,000 tons Select C-iimmillee lDt r ya r . ndravouml m Ihe, work '"^ Tn, rl l w ,m.„l ,1 came before them and he would 1 ";' •>'" ' be made In CJctoI'.nri Ihol many o( them an.e-|ber II will romfet of £3.000.000 cit f the hill in th iiighl, bu /erred to S*'lecl Committees. He'wlth which Israel will buy oil at midnight. Chinese icmfori-e(felt sure that Mr. Robinson would .from Mtaln. ntriits swarmed over the ridges be a good and useful member' ^^__^^^^ I Ihe South Koreans [whenever he was asked to serve b.-ek In tierce close lillhl im. U.P. I On rale 5 KC^A VET !=EES SON FOR FIRST TIME Sabre-jets Hit Nineteen MIG's SEOUL, Sept. 9. U.N. Sabre-JeU destroyed i dnmaged 19 Communist M1G 15s Bg around IS Russian-built jet fighters tried desperately to break up an Allied air attack on a North Korean miltary academy. Seven of the lighters were shot down i: flames and 10 limped back across the border of Communisi China Into Manchuria. It wan the best day of hunting that Allipii ii" pilots have had so far this month. A record for last mouth ciime • New Atomic Tests At Kniwelok W tSHINl 1TON Sept 10 i inDcfenci Depai Inv the Atomle Bnargy i 011 Tuesday night that a Joint Tusk ForCS) will COItducI na itm ratok atoll this autumn It did not disci ihat an experimental I bomb will be e\i ill b, i oadueted by the IJolnl lank Koice 132 under the command of Majni OeBaral Pare. Clarkaon which has been preparrtnm The %  irtenl said onl\ • i • %  looking towards uw i mtnt of itorok weapons." DO hint whetliei tht] smuld include the bomb which >i pan fact ii i x|-ected lo be nt much as a|si bean reaaaatad t.. 5 Children Die In ifospital Fire MILBOIKM. Srpt 9. Five children r-mrint in age from seven months to seven inn hurnr<| to death. on ToeMhtr In %  Ui. nadrl •vopi thraoah a nimsy haspltal bullrilnn In • %  imp lo Kuropejn ImmlfriinU. Twenty-flee .iio r children and a lane adult In thr bulldlnr were rescued or led lo safety. Jan Ttegner a Pole IBUUII ni bis srai laalaa ua.... thr window and Ihiaa itir. children from the bulldlm: lo waiting All thirty children In thr liooplt.ruan ' It inclu.le.l the personnel of the A i.C, Army, Navy and Air Force. II is believed that tin .Mil be more powerful or atl*"* least more sccictthan the recent I series of blasts on the Nevada proving grounds in which the > oarticlpatod poada n t) IJONDON, Sept. 9. LORD MUNSTER, U" Socretarj ol State foi tha thousand times more powsjrful Colonies, welcoi %  liscuaaions on Canada*J" ,hc conventional atomic West Indies trade whlefl la] it tha Colonial | rta will be carried out in deep Office. In bit i '< tl'o anxieties f.lt m .,..,,,, ..,, t |, ,,„!, oAdal United Ihe West Indies about their future trade with ('.m.nl.i an.I *> %  ''• %  tiovei-.n %  ave the aaaurance that th. ai xietteg veto fully under['^'''''nJVIlLJ^n ,1 \ stood by H.M. QovenirnanJ Tlie meeting lasted nearly one mur and tha agenda for further .veck were drawn up. %  . ,i i i. Friday and un il will probably be tu -iithtcen reprcsenaliv.s ..f ihe seven West Indie* nd %  corn Upaiabte number oi officials from Ofllee. Treasuiy. Minlslrv ..f Foi.il. Ib-.nd nl Tiaoe and Mlni'.trv of Transport leOMl Munsler said that the l, n in ihe war) in.ii.-. future <•! their trade PI well under11 OOvsi D merit and of S ii the ftoxidng part ..iv. ihe West tidv.". the opportunlty "f in Uuonnal exchange of views and hiformatiun on Ha ufajoct On.' ispect -<: tha Canadian and radV n m i ( exchaiiue and rostrletiou on Canadian cxportg to Dliltoriea in the Cm Loid Munsler empha&iM-' %  • ' %  • %  ras still very dlfflrult rking party would he.ii that in naiid •ul in. ii discussions. He said (be repiesentatives >.f Ihe %  loomed the oppor'" %  Unity lo discuss the main aspect %  %  ol lem wnich %  pf gnat impnrtnnce for the ut 'ke Brit&ui Carib%  in Ihe'r parubei Thi M will bo iplll in I i I %  1 %  Iho C< n i %  Mottley stressed that he d i want it to le felt thai an. men IMI Of t i, ( MM ho suggegted thai %  i the i llg ,(i . hould %  %  1'iieil to ineiiili" i ropai. but 1 'in n.td ti> do a mi lould be inclu '' < n the Commltl i ion v.' impressed on tha outh saveed i f the Vi should ba Committskt, but it WHS pointed eul that the an pel leiat %  had bt en thai leu IllUleei were usualK atid il was often difficult to gel .. i eetlngs. is* Baa The %  .. i No Canadians Vl Wl—Canada TeUks .: %  .: In London the opCanada V." | I between delegate-, of tb< n We I IndJ Gov r %  .,. repr. tatives pm i A Cai official said "ll r colonial affair." The merl 10 d..> U.S. beyond "GonUiinmenl" Colombian Mobs Pacified %  \. r.ii.itidna. lapt II neat communiques b''ughi to re eaeure the populace D '(,,. id eat end of lighting and HMD violent.Htd it %  nnounead thai Ihe ad dent. Roberto i ni ta, would %  I I' k to the nation bj radio on Friday. Kational Pouca Directoi General Miguel San Ju MUad •bat there the Bpl. il %  ling to informalioii rei-eiM M li.'te. peace prevails Ihe eounliy I >tln i im.aim emenl n veal %  1 di t. is. -ii .1, n<. • iude-l the huining ami sacking ol two Ltiberal iiogota newspapers i > aaturdjay. i ixtununlf|Ue innouiieed i. adei r the Uberal "pamiH have clashed fn luenUy with aov* ernmenl forces, had been killed M he tried io oroai the frontier from Veaeguehi where he had laken rafuas -I'.P. 'All at Seq' WASHINGTON, Sept, tf. LDdet V.' U '. H. -We liu^en t .. of doing ftOthe pro) lems %  '"'"; Indian bradi in the Hal I ., % % %  -. E iropeeri i.ip We have rtgrtin-oi 'he oltensiv. ..nd .tot.-.l The Kail Of Ml ; " u *. me %  "">"> Japant'se \\ irimu Kiitjuirr Vllti War lViwmorH GENKVA, Sej.i | A I'lLsoiiers of War Co meeting behind closed .i ived a petition MR. K I II < aaa %  r, 1952. i i W. K. Tui.' i. btomdaaaset, %  \u.. mpulsory sgt under th Act. 1947. .hat the work of controlling; tha sugar i borer by rearing and distributing ..i i '. ..iid tin %  iigj augo eaaa root borer te fsssajie of A On Page 7 Mil. Japan k oi th. nk. ....jting* %  commumlie IT 1 ll.nh 11 '.i %  • ..,.. Jamnican delegation DO! III c; 1.1 PORTLAMD OREGON. Sept. 9. rVtnor Adlal Stevfnson said • It a historical precedent for possible recognition at Red is as a de facto government If Korean war is resolved but rted there are "very consideroojetions" to that recogrnA MlMtin C THE Ckune Of Iht rnlneaweepei Symbol, geanisr. Floyd ol considerable objectioog to that recognition On the oher hand, 1 point out b you that we resolve our differences with enemiem history as fn the case of Italy, we recegnze then 7 Killetl As Fireworks Explode MECHO CITY, SAuthorities oaaM and 28 injured on Tuesday .."er an explosion of flrewoit id iWdar Ihat wrecked s' %  eral buildings in a % %  Lusincss district. A fire broke out on M warehouse filled w th I rews a for Me*"celebration "j. Beptembi i H the flames *pui". I I also stored In the i • small hole l. en booths were d ostf i aged. Doctor* laid It of the injured were levond .-IIiiut„pf our Iron Cun e ..r A i %  ildn't chur. %  %  uty of mistakes" i n u -i Btatea it in general "w' %  ; %  %  world itiumstances as they l he l-elieves that m di finitely follow "the foreign potlcy" leadernhower. He said I'.O I I < %  er il who With war' generals". Theodore Francis Other Foreign Rel itions •nember, also beck Id that lasenhower E H ; %  is with n v • %  %  H Legion ta I —t'.p. ing ti %  1 Mb Pran taarnad on Tuaadajr. ihe petitions ivere pul bt Commission by rsumyo Kfmtun, i %  o wa peel ... behalf %  en oj J..J ..i %  she said was the "toll bops <>. learning lb, I .:. of thg ones. imed thai oi tha I the Bovh'. aatiiin in. -, kno are dead and which are stUI llvinii hi 1 i umaai of dead at ibt Mt RCOdan Said that she baa nut one question to asH U mission to answ.-i i. tJhan an to learn whicb i.n.soners aie idive and Which are da "I —IP. Ja/Hin Preparw For Textile Wxtr I.UNl). N : Textile n..a.i,i... turei '-• Japan is irshalhng ill < % %  %  %  • iltti it-prto . i .. %  . %  In Buxton, bysJuii i%  i ..f tin %  If i>..i i '. i %  Faau Qi Rpi0ffi From WJM Umitroller IXJNDON. Sept. 9. i. : %  ktroUei in the Caribbean II i i banana Dduraa. his report and itlon thej erul decide inds at present devoted to bananas to the ate and i iC0Ni inr r\rorr PAH I" An Agricultu.. rial announced tnat mai tmn of the foot %  month*. Th.* r l DcldfatetFor W.I. Talks To Be Appointed %  so of Assembly and the • ncll will meet in unhar at 2 30 pjn %  or 23. foi %  • %  •nd the f.srthcoming West Indinn Conferee the House PATRICIA KASkll, 19. of Loa Angeles, has been refused permission to land In England after stowing away on the Queen Mam. The would-be traveler's father. Ira. Md new;,rnen* "I sent the Cunard line s335 for her round trip on ...... .„ %  %  i %  %  %  • %  %  the boat* 1 f mernacPmaf I Workers Call Protest Strike SAN i Han) Bridge long %  %  protest ag..uiM n. | | Ai.|%  i Caurt'i jftirmution of sivicl .Six thousand ti.e„ ,. s II to staii i I .wearing; that he was n.. %  t i-rs. hut erag freed 01 I Ba n d in g) appeal -CP. Russians 'Menace' American Soldiers BERLIN, Bept. 9. %  %  any guns '.' who tried to ray ohech> of Uerl i i of the main high < ni Ger' %  %  %  ned Aintr rough the % %  %  %  nun. Ana i : country %  %  %  "up ("otnmand| thai the Russians and i pona." The A %  %  to turn back. V P. / IIIIIIU nil Ifalrvraulion""t OTTAWA. Sept. 9. Yugoslav f "tlnan"i worth ii lion fond %  i liri'T'edl-itely. i r. World Musi Return To %  .. avji Bfaaeura, t' %  lime eema %  I %  reduction of exchange lions." South Africa, the world's numBDld producer, has sought repeated!v lit oersunrle the M ' "would stn • rvuuld Inwholly : increase ihe gold reserves, lubricate the %  re gold so that would keep world. trade j. Ilavenga said that < %  I States and Soviet Ruisia. gold reserves throughout the world were decUnlng and can be built up o-i of gold or deflation". He said: disaster if the nationare to ft) %  — t l\



PAGE 1

PAGE FOIR BARBADOS ADVOCATE Hlli\|sli\i si I'TEMBEB 11). 1M2 BARBADOsJi ADVOCATE *Z t..->-_i ii -T f. THESE ARE I III CLl'ES ... A man on H.I.SO buil |i]i<'iir lo I'aris nilh a (alpii|><>rt . >OW FOR THE l',MTS ntM > (*• IU M II c. US. sw— #*. PWU IM — Wednesday. September 10. 1952 M.V\ On Tl. JN I MIIIIIIIOW Inn mliioki niii, lircaVCS — ami hcaderi Inwaid, % %  — % %  , r .,u, .,,-. IT IS now 218 days since Prank out of my several banking BCThe cigarette case was to be £T?!??_i~rr? "*?•• through the counts. This had to be done very rarrled carelessly in my pockri %  tjfa I p.-ud and the clip hidden in a box of ,_. — jvc-ry thing and matches. liavu b4 tii staged in Bns bados which give *"vt*s — and headed toward* rarely drew more than £20 in I spent the next few days ,„ m i„.iL--i-_! ,.f th taton. an,l iHilitv ir*, n S "'* ""*** Ponn IO CashBut somehow or othT I writing final letters. To my some lruiiration of the talent and ablllt> the last Uraa. .,marag-xl to accumulate about solicitors 1 gave a power or which exists in the island. Stamens, hi* huge, red-brick £1.000 in one-pound notes. attorney over my affairs and Turn nt ihi* for my last trip in it. part or ihe house made had made it necessary for —— -here Whinused to live and me to go from Gloucestershire to rarfc, sg rt aao rt W f Gargoyles peer [, ndon three times during the %  !.: Muiu-u owvw. 1BS1. those interested in photography and the Whllc > gardener, Wilfred j formation of the Camera Club some years w..dic>. i Mill M work m ih, %  gp w is .. natural result of the desire of ^'whlu* "5. I "found tan..**S? amateur phntuijraphers to gel togathei !" onfo^lia bar* %  fAta I and study a subjectof cofnnum interest Hiv llWnU T rard WM -^or,,,^. The exhibition of photoeraphs of club •• by i. aanlmr to w -i ".. • false passport wlurh took him out %  Britain. ftmMk /SStM While is on llnrun. From thr fnrrriialtoiMl Junoii'r he liai fold flil tho Bulbadbs Museum afld One nl tire Drill bsrbered the edge. Hall aaBauj The first exhibition was a display of black and white photographs taken by member .,f trie Barbfidos Camera Club. members at the Museum a few weeks back showed how much the Club has been able lo do to cncoBrane high standards of photoCraphs amona its members. BdS I •echm-iuc and seleelion ..I snuicc't matte. the photograph! exhtblWd al the Museum reflect Ugh standards and it is to be hoped that the Barbados Publicity Commute.U> ibto to secure some of these exhibits (or display in the new watting room at Soraell An port The uthet exhibition at tHe exhibiuon of Miniature (lardens is mi donbtedly the most worUiwhlle exhibitioi, 32thbeen held in Barbados or .irmrtih of year. At a time when the beauty of thi. island is rapidly beina eo.isurned with little apparent concern on the part oi the authorities, the activiHea of the Horticultural Society are of especial importance 'l"rj/ of iinir hr rsoodon 1 wondered .he charge of fraud they read to whether my shrinking wardrobe me, I accompanied them lo the would be noticed, but, as It was, local police court. no word or comment was made lo It took about an hour to obtain mt. u?au release on bail of £1.000, after Having derided to make Orsl fl Profclem My Journey from Gloucestershire to London look four hours. and I had not ..llnw*d myself a great deal of time. I had my lu* gage to label, and I wanted to buy a hat—something I had never worn for ten yean, and now thought of a* a disguise. I had also to dispose of my car. Everything went smoothly, however, and with a good hour to spare I drove my Pontlac up the s(p ramp of a garage and walked away. All I had to do now was to post the half-dozen letters I had written and then join the boat-train. But I had Mmehow overlooked the fact that in London the post was ( %  '•llerted up to 8.30 This was a blow. If I posted my letters now—as I had planned to do—they would f robably be delivered on the ridaiy morning—before 1 would actually arrive In Parts. It was essential that these letters were not delivered before Saturday. I then thought of a way round the difficulty I pushed them Into the lettern bank, and on a piece of i KM torn from my diary I rot*: — Dear Sir, Mu rmall son ha naughtily 'posted' sir tetters ii your bo*. I shall be ffrale/ul 11 uou will port thcrti in the ordinary as aoon as possible." hat. I thought, was a quite *r.U'h I returned lo my home, for Parts. 1 went to Thomas ingeniou* way of eiirmounling the Slardent Houat. Cook's and bought a single ticket (i.mcuUv I was prepared to abandon it all on the night ferry. Al Ihe same A porter wheeled my five nd do a bunk before the date tin*. I bought the £25 worth of i iun jc into tho Cutom shed. 1 passport, which %  .i I Then ^drncc-enoiWh that if only the Million^A^t^Vli^fftt. police *£? £££* ^^ " m> r J^t^Tl^of mTta. UM Will thrOW thrir whulr f/h1 ifl had confiscated my passport. To I then went to the American tcuusty rrturned. Norie of my iwgs "1!, nf •'more beautiful BatUlUOS" %  wcnl lo L 01 40 %  * ob purchased from them :.n undated train and wat conducted to cumpamn that the memoers m l "J "" '.Lined the necessary forms, which A.r fr,^ i,.k.-t from P-r to sleeping compartmenl. licultura. Sucustv can lend invalVable aaalstancr. Cerlotnly 'h.-rwas Ii.v morr beauty tn bf socn in the rhU conflnes ol the Museum durfng the Exrubitmn than there is to be noticed today in the once lovefv and once carefully tended Queen ^y^^Z Park. ..... ', A-U ''' rd "' ennectlon with his inThe more recent exhibition oi rwn n suraii.u cards, and he gave li to A f med ._^! ,n "JL **** P"*?" ST ILL h ud ,0 We theptobu ^ ardn tne rctaurnnt car, where 1 sat down to a meal and drank a few brandie* I felt I needed them. But I bad escaped from Scotland Yard, and I had succeeded •quaria at thr Drill Hall is also an exhihitipn of which to be proud. The organiser: of This exhibition ffre to be congratulate*! forgvving an opportunity to^many P-'^n to s?e such a wide" variety o* beautiful Hah and the excellence of th* dlaplay woul<. hardly have been equalled in a lare country. ... Tliis eotliibition was of such a hiRii standard that, thr organisers mitfht wrll consider "uivm,-, repeat display at thr MUswrrTlatPfc in trftuyear. TheiW'thresgi'successfui'^xhibitlons which haw recently been held in'Barbados ouj-hl to encourage otters to bwld exhibitions of dilTrrcn^ kind throughout the Island. To Dover sa\ on the bed and Somerset ttouaa and purchased a prtaZ^inktrig that thessj inighl lifcthted %  cigarette token from the py ol my gardener's birth cer|,. ogajful if 1 wml on to Cvprus *old cigarette case and checked These Sirrhng Area cheques wre up on the diamond brooch all loo easy. I told my „„. rntPri .,| (1Il mv passport. beneath the top layer of matches. Soon the train began to move Into Final I .-i in %  the night towards Dover. I left my ciompexunent and lurched tltlcate. easy. 1 told my required his identity *ary documents I presented mylem of ready money in Parii >eH at Ihe Passport Office and £23 in Parts would not lasl a within one hour was Issued with week. There was only one solu,t new Identity for 15s. turn I could think of — to buy My gardener bad no suspicion jr-w.Jlery and sell It once I got lo whatever. I gave him back his Paris. identity card and at the same j went to time showed his Insurance card ,,f pawnbrck< (ully stamped. So far so good. bought a magnificent gold cigarlife I ..-in...: Money ette case for £120 and a platinum TOMORROW Arrested in Parts I THEN began to draw money and diamond brooch for £400. —LXS verv exclusive firm *" taking about C 1.000 with me. I From them I fe' 1 w • %  ul to begin a — Labour Party In Trouble* If> IK T. Robert* IX>NDON. Six months ago early tn out English Spring, Winston Churchevea-y profession, (except poulbly the law) there is a shortage o trained man power. Compur ThA^iiPoestiau hastftresjdv bcn matt* in ill's new Conservative Government product of the Beyan attitude those figures with Ihe United hesU ^Y, ,i;i ",77K %  y.-ivti-nu-otir%  • %  emed to have inherited aU the "f'""-*"^ "*. * llsl P*^ States whore there are tssrM t his newspaper hat an...5> ay U %  r WM cnmusisrtl. likely to be more on tlmM „ man le> n loIa| aRe the livestock ana %  HTiculttiT.il industt> i:o(ric duwn lt j ih.n-v..n...ic th.u. on Attlees bu Ihirl> llll( s „. llin v ,, ui! ,. nt in thr country districts would be to rriui u Jtul the. Summer has made a to Iha pracUsa of earlier days to hold iive,hangarticusir the successful Chancellor. H.A. Butler) can le thankful at Ihe strange confu... sion into which Clement Attlees ihe party following party, recently so strong, has now The key to it aU of some convenient plantation. While Miniature Gardens and fish In aquaria arr fit subjects for exhibitions at Museum or at the Drill Hall, hvcstrx-. jhows are best seen on a farm and although garden produw ca n be exhibited in town It will lutik more nllraclive in the grounds of "will look more nttractive in the grour a plantation. The practice uf-opening Rnmnds of prt vate Barbadian houses to thr public on certain days of the year has been alread started in Barbados, but the timr sAlTO ovrrdue for the holding of livestock an" : 11 leii Tin..,1 Mi .XptHl the Bevan's side than on Attlee' ~ well in power-but they will have %  paltry 85.000 at any one ti to lean their opinions ut lea.it eon hear people commenting, half way to the Bevan viewpoint, "But British standards are highi order to keep the loyalty oi There are two answers to that; first, that engineering, the poputancy, and many other profesQutren's Park, excellent a* it ja in Itself no. substit u te fur lopil exhibitions which bring clotjajfsjether the individuals <-f pBrWirii whTTfsTiaTr common interest* in livestock andni'.riculturi*. Tin' continurl drift from the coujptry into tintown, whieli Is the unfoitunateTrilslt of thr tirbaniamf i.bout Influences lo winch Barbados lias been >>.Jjjjj' be. halted if only the life of thr countrv year could be made more attractive for the small around f peasant and agricultural labourers. If th tii. British Labour gti its list of panaThen for two amed power but something to do n i on the day mild monwealth countries. Graanwich M..n Time The Astronomer Royal does not liva at Greenwich any more. But of course "O.atT." is still lake: meridian that pasno < charming old eighteenth century observatory on hill outside Greenwich, overlooking the Thames. The Aslarity poll taken to elect memsions need more trained men — Labour Party Conference bers to the National Executive, not necessarily more geniuses; -erombc in a week's time is Bevan has three supporters with and secondly — there arc t %  d io oVinmisuate the weakhim on the Kxctutlve. If he gains u rnany students on advanced nsss and divisions in British nioro he ill m Ron Morccombc a ••post graduate" courses Sociai.Mn. Defeat has lett the victory %  !• %  %  United Slates, (where "standards Hi Hush l^il-Kir Party, after stx All this bickermg inside Britare nigh) af jn,^ u n jt INsst-war year, of rule, wilh no h Soctaltam leaves (he Comeri9h Unlv „, lt ,„ 0 gether. Inciagricultural exhibitions in thr parishes .wailnhk policy of immethate reJS^ STSSTrnTSLSmSSi d> n, l| y **th our student^ oi TTie annual agricultural exhibition,,., > !" &**$£* ^f-fSVSS^V^^t ^Yo^why'^ i^L^ British Socialism is ** w'-jd t ^"^^^ c ho?ce foT olJmpTc team. "" lo mtfnUlfi a programme of reS?^yjggSP8J5?lR tSKE *" "-denU in Brluin toX*!5 l 7 1 nmlau^ Se b ;^h: |ffi '-" — "" m rf n, nwea,th — war, i|. a. *ll group — Atllea, !" 3nr (V.pp .lot, ton -nd Bevln SM IMUH1 •' <* P 01 -uli a rapid jnfnrrarie of Big p„ wcr To Sm l| QUOMI F.li/.ilH-lli II rocently [ addmacd a letter to in ancient J lepubllc hidden In Ih. hilU of ''"•" "" ~* Italy. Her letter went to uie "" Captains of Uio Regents of the cultural shows on their lands tho smol! lf h ,. ei 0 bU*ed way of doinii ;"• %  BrUtrti ?<"*>*" offlc MO pe. down at Hurstraonceoux katPan of livestock and growers ol 8.ar,hin||-the Labour way. British " d wntlcn dlrertly to our yueeii CMtlc in Suiifct. The old build, den produc would have a greater K nw ""• "> ", !" JiSni" MK ""' "' Gr "*l* ,h ""' b ""v o. bJlon.inu to their pUni4 eo„„„,.n,tv fiS^Ba^JSSl'Jt uVg SLTttX tg ff ^L'^r^^Z':' than they must have now by comparison „.„„ ,„,„„„,, ,„ d hlgh S.. Uon to -.he pinpoint ll.-pub-.,c has not r ^,^ d a ForTwo hundred ye.„ of their own narrow social lives with the —with full employment and • conPhased the Heacnta. She na. |h h ^ .... .,,. more spacious lives or those who UV. m t.nuou. moderate inflation ..it, ""1 *;"" ' 'r.P'rj? the roof of Use obieWory. l" "big" house*. Who, exhibitions such:. %gf<~ £,, g,* A 5Ttt. %^'??%'"*" for n,fml>crship For Ihe purhope that Ihe members of th porlanl inaccuracies which apposes of the Association's rules the Bar in Trinidad would form their "jump upr and "jiye of Ihe .countless peered | n your paper off Mb inst* term 'ban-islcr' shall mean a perown Bar Council Independent of social J>ops and ihe gdtpenaive earursuons On nee* one 111 under the can""' who has been called to tha any Law Society including Sollcl,,-W jmr, .M'iiriillur-1 vb-.tu*. in thn. lio h "W-C l-arrlstera v. ill form Bar or England. .. tors." outlet for corripeUlion but will help to %  .-...,i.w.m Hainstcrs have agreed ^, the date of ihe adoption of 11* pressed ihe hopeIkat U members on the establishment ofa Bit rules, lawfully practises, etc." of the Bar ,n gterWdes would) AssoclaUon. This is to^ornpriv.' l-urpose of this proviso is to Inform their own Bar Council, indeBarristers in Uie nriOsir'Caribelude ihrce Si Lucians who now pendent of am Law Socletv which! tn e known a lawfully practise at tb St. LucU includes solicitors.'* the Unluh Caribbean Bar AssociaBar, but who have never been THEODORE BRANCKER bridge that gap between the mon i planter and llw sliack-dwelU-r which must be bridged if a healthy community life is to pitisper in llus island. W.I. HarrMvrn the Edllci', Th,Adrocaif — SALESMEN IN A JAM: NO CARS NO CASH By BSU Sfflflll NEW YORK SPARE a thought for the worried car salesmen. They are caught between a shortage of cars to aell and a shortage of customers to buy them. The car scarcity—moat of the showrooms in my suburb are empty—is due to the recent steel strike, lt cut Detroit's supplies. The reason for the buyers' scarcity is prob ably lack of ready cash. MAKERS realise that they must make the greatest sales drive of post-war years in 1953 They want to sell 5.000,000 cars. So there is going to be a glittering new series of models. Details are still secret. But this much is known. Some higher priced models will have air-conditioning. Most will have a new look in body design, and there will bo some en gine changes. .... WITH the defence boom tapering off, competition is going to be red-hot. Detroit's plans are a warning light to British car makers in the American market. SPARE a thought, too, for the women of sunny Los Angeles, capital of California. Hollywood, a part of Los Angeles, draws beautiful women as bees to honey. And now there are 725,900 marriageable women in L.A. and only .181,700 marriageable men. D.EHARD MacArthui supporters tried to gtf his name accepted on the presidents' election ballots in Illinois. They proposed him as a candidate of the America Firs Party. The general said he was abandoning politics when he took the chairmanship of c business machine company three weeks ago The election board said No to the dlehards. A ROUND-THE-WORLD voyage in a 33ft sloop wilh two sails and motor was com pleted today by Al Peterson, 40-year-old Brooklyn bachelor. He left New York the sloop Stornoway in 1949, and did not tell anybody where he was going. ONLY 128 days until Christmas. And th.New York Commerce and Industry Associa tion issues its annual plea to British export ers: Remember last year when British luxury goods missed the holiday counters due to late shipment. Please, please get the stufl moving now. BACK into the headlines goes the name ol the former Muriel Vanderbilt, thrice married society leader of exclusive Newport, a Rhodo Island seaside resort. She gained fame in the twenties as society's "golden girl." Now Mrs. John Payson Adams, she told the police of the theft of 25,000 dollars (£8.900) in jewels from her estate. Idle Hour. THE men who run Minnesota's national ploughing contest have decided not to hear speeches by Eisenhower and Stevenson on the same day. There would be no time fo: ploughing. So Eisenhower will speak on Sep tember 6, Stevenson only if he can make it on another day. THE air force which wanted to produce Rolls Royce Sapphire jet engines in a big way, has got only a "handful" after spending 400 million dollars (£143 million) in IS months. Reason: Scarcity of steel and machine tools and difference between production methods in Britain and the U.S. • • . AMERICA has entered the race against Britain's Comet jet air liner — six years behind. In California, the Douglas Aircraft Company announced its readiness to build jet transports. Douglas made tho Dakotas or DC-3's. wartime work-horses of the air. The new jet is to be called the DC-8. It will have two seating plans. Luxury or firstclass seats. 70 to 90; tourist, or second-class. 120. Tentative specifications—cruising speed ol 660 miles an hour eight mile* up, four engines, crew of five, wing span 127 feel length 134 feet. The planes are expected to cost more thar £1.000,000 each, and the first production model will fly in 1958. Why is America six years behind Britain in the jet-liner race? One reason is that U.S. aircraft makers have held back from commercial jets because of the cost. The linns wanted Government help. But the Government is interested in financing military jet research. FOOTNOTE: The Comet cruises at 500 miles an hour, has four engines; wing span. 115ft; length, 93ft.; crew of six. SIX YEARS is a long time to wait. The magazine American Aviation suggests that U.S. airlines may have to buy Comets aftei all. It says: "Such a sale is not impossible De Havilland has cunningly forced the issue I with sales to competitive routes. British jet transport leadership is coming too close for comfort." BUSINESS MAN Stanley Slotkin went H the Olympics in Finland in a British car. He arrived home with a four-door Soviet Pobeza saloon—an illegal export under Russian law. How he got it is a secret. It cost him more than £500. Wide-eyed Americans found the ctu*—a Soviet invention, of course^—aston( ishingly like a 1939 Ford. ptitu • TiTCcrrr-^TCSGiTDjj TOGGHT r "irocGia r CtD • RUGGED %  SUGGf-0 e RUGGCO Kit GGED • KUGGC' RUGGED • *UC • BUGGED pGED %  HUGO KUGGEO • RUC 1 • RUGGED • See the whole range of these fine PADLOCKS at C. S. PITCHER & CO. **" %  f • %  '' "*. light as a blown leaf! Brand new NYLON SUITS ln a full range of sizes — grey and SKA ISLAND KKtSS & SPORTS SHIRTS •n our Menswear Dept. American Ties and slick Men's Belts, 4 Da Costa & Co., Ltd. -fajfaef Vourfehing I noil*. MulTclU I-arrre pka. Quaker Oats llh Cupa ud Ssurres. l-r


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r\r.i nr.iiT BAKRADOS ADVOCATE CLASSIFIED ADS. ,,,WM *"•* Hospital WEDXFSDW SFiTTMRER in. 1M2 Kr..\l KNTAlt; da-.fM'f H. ,... I.. %  IdlT-On fc^|>i.o t h. ' IMS. Ml ft W l HcoH Ma. Uawr.l 1R •*<.• at J* pm tnda. for Ik. I lUnfc Mali end ihtw. to the Weatbur* Onv-tao Fnanda an iihrd Is nlttid Mr* K ll..al>-nd>. MrH HUrii-l! %  UnisMer.' Uvms-in* <•"! Il.i4>< *f" <*on'. Owrn Worrall .Mala NUM.. h-Mph ClastfaMr lt.ch.ril PsirWia *n*.: Bteit< h W-r*s>ll " il IN MRMOKIA.M CAB il KMW. im m > %  am it H*. OM ar.. i in aac.Hoii I %  -' tunt n>d an* a pwdm • da ..r 9nMi*i KHAT< it In invlna mam. •at boli.vrd falftaa Winatnn c %  < Uik*" away 01 On* yr*r '*** t" 1 aioea that aad %  tn-TTH fa. loving iww-r ,rf my S*i> Ka^trtTatm lOOi Iflfto "R,1 EtHMl I. %  Colin MavIM ana) Par-lt. KLKCTKHAL "NT 111 glartrlcal Spn7M| Math*. ••.plrl* <*l tAM (UlllMUK i-iainaii Air r.im a, AiuR..n,.m hni Sued sulking Appl> i • •>_ J IIAUrt. SMITH A I MITTO r1.p4rtr-I Phona 7 LIVESTOCK 1UTC1I Dark Brlndlr pun* .aBort.hii* bull tvrrwr I .t-d im ** • Ring eiss a rvaM %  MECHANICAL niCVCLX latdaaa 1 apaa>d ttanula* m harSB) .,... %  %  < n> 00 Rind VIM if • u in PIANO tn fustf ato> as ndltloti I "vr-da '' % %  medicine wa* nulij lotporttjai BMH wan ear, amly more economic than hog> pilallsaUoii II—J 1) .*.! UM| lit. U haUult-W *.i, IJ,„| l4l UIM with ileraands (or THE CURATE'S WIFE E1SDED /l/V AFFAIR —to Thackeruy pul il all in u Itoofc SHIPPING NOTICES ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. MlBalafd n. i.imet M \ii..i -i mo.t-.oN IN. Hutted IJlr: |1> I P. R*>. OW-ra I nun. II, e*pwsUture UMt not .oily | U into j- *•• IM P*. UIUUMUXU of dollars but which i THE affection between the uere all claimed by the vanoua fcunoui novelist and the nmnVl (Itpai-tOMnU of bati&M o( the tugh'!' w*. mutual, but ul unvqujl P'lorl^. Iiaour. i|uolcd I % %  lain— Mrs. Brookrteld was the gre-t HOB J I'diudterqumti^liw M^SHMI of TtbicJunajr's hlv i.-taiicaa when there baa been Thackeray was to bar an euierMheoMa put up to Government %  yitb highi-M priorit> attached to 'in. The new Fire Station, Modem Markets. Ex tens ion of Fl thing Industry, New ouJd i^ ...vbuli il I lia raoM . i-'-.i. I%  Ill IS, %  • irrr* A .1 -.TOH U S IIIH.-UI.IA l. -. ruMAiiu i..i -Hls il I M %  OltANJr^TAIl Mil H.|'i i -AHIHt, Ml UIMIMI. <• %  %  tBiati AMB r.iii-ii ..I IANA M %  BrTUrrOR ftth H>l>i*tei. INI S S COTTtl-A Sna MtWioMi. IVU H S NESTOR Sid Orlobar. 1W -MUM. to IHM.MII iMMim n V 8 IIKStA lMh %  i pUmliay. IBM IIUUU1JA IMA LKWarf. IBM MIISOH BN a CO l,T ti.tmng caller whose flattering |ttt-nuon, L-onsokod for the bail temper of bar husband. Poor Mr. Brook/leld: Aliowmust be made f aM up (or %  >!• I'UDIIC COn>|>.-tlU'*K M OMUtJM. • %  w. Stnol. aVia*lo.i .>., f-.idmy ISO. I ip.m. YIAHWi-lU I BOYLE naiin 1 nwins-rooi" ffpfisbl I'lriutr. and I O H,. K nl o.i.ala BdHpiuiaa na Mallrraan. Untn .Mil. tlrr^lna Tabl*. Ch*>l I>iaw*n all i" Mahnaanv, Book IOMIVM. Canvaa Colt. Win r t..nn Mimw. vary latter Olaw Lartjata. XlBC Top. Tahlr. 4 Biirnei Par. OH Slave, (iaa Slova. KHaaM Oardrn Hnaa. and many ottwi intoraai HRANKKR. TROTMAN CO.. Ai'. tn.ni, rirNIlFR TIIF SILVER HAMMER i Tift'HanAv uiti A'JI v.-ill -rll l„, hiiaUui Bnwai Tttf G.iiTli irii-liidia*a aquarr Tlp-1 T. blr. Upruht Chmn Rur •WrvWra; K.-lvlna • i*!r|IIRANKkR. TIOTHAN Anelfoaeerw data hospital. The I Ion. the Colonial Sacre. tuiy reminded members of his reuargaj in the debate whan be min-duead the resolution for the I' iirhasr of Avalon." He himself rntmliouwd that U was a patchwork resolution meat an iminediala need He told honourable member.. ] qblnert that Uoverruueot in recruiting %  pecUir n-'Uual oAkbMs under preseni day conditions screed to providt 'j.-tilers or an allowance %  lira. a was found that the acqulsltitji oi "Avalon" had answered two %  %  %  >'.ii.-iia — that of providm, dation foi inedlcal olli much-admired as an undergrari uale at Cambridge he had entered the Church out of a sense or career rather than vocatton. It was a bed decision. He *• %  too theatrical in the pulpit and Insufficiently unctuous oi^ of it. He belonged neither to the High Church nor the Low Church party. Preferment pees* i t ,;ei hint by: after being curate .t [At. Janice's. Picadllly. he waa become n -hool inNOKTMaOI'SU • iNc.r.n CITS and additional beds as well j Thev would also remember that %  it the time there had been com; i t.dnts of MTIOUS luck of accotnI iiiialatioti and there was a neces' Stty for immcdistc extra accoiu[ %  nodajUa*. I He recalled the visit of Mr. i Aikuiaon, Colonial Buikting laal. •on Officer, Who had visited Barbados in lurch 1-ttt year and had reported the following:— "I i in mil saj hew much j rheaper sn unproveaaetst of the I'M--.-ill hinpltal tMiuld be torn pared with the ronslruriton ef a new hospital un •intthrr site. Rut iv uuuld be ninndrrabl. cheaper. Besides subeUollal j lavmgs due to r on tinned pse a r xhnlas hulldinss. there ate mga hct HIM there are the exastlna water and eleetrlrll) lupplles. slerm water dralassipUallng and fenrea. Very roughly a hospital with %  M beds easy at present rest eeer a year L75e.ee* er S3.b00,oeo and may take four years lu design and build." il<..ifiecj th.it lhe> eeeasa oab undertake ^uch expenses as their' finances allowed and Government was faced nt the present with the „, problem In then Five*Year De.vflopment Plan on how much Met money they rouid allot for exinnditiire on wveial expensivigooa rnd deervlni! proposal" befortungiake. a .iteiary it of U. period, said of him. "He was uevci lie least demoi .iLi-eo o< taking llely Orders." It wato < captunuiUc a verdict. mouKuti i took out Ins leeling of lailu%  mi liia handsome wile. Jane. He fnund iier luoumpotaut as • in lusekeepei and blamed he. oeesuse (for 10 years; they wcic duuied children She cewaidta nun with adoration and tooK .(luge in teara and ill-health. Upon ilia, clouded domestic tcune Thackeray entered (104.' II. the state of eniolioiu' fru-'.istion rtatural to one who^• pretty wife has been shut up lii ui asylum, leaving lum with two jpAing dauglilers. He aralved aa the friend f Jtooklield, became the csuunpli t Brookllfill's wife and. in no no at all, was madly In love lib that oppressed, sofa-haunt Xt invalid. He remained of opli on. however, that Hrooknel hhile behaving abominably to h vife, waa In all oilier re-peet" ic fellow. .<.• in i virtue. and would ,'y.* %  •• < %  iipresmaue. lie v.a iiaifleeonciled to the psatonic reiaMoiiilup, especially aa he could :n-ke frequeot tnps to Haris, After nine uneasy years, bus%  •and and adorer had a violent \ ouarrel, uiu*urgiveable word*. arajtfj spoken. 1 wish 1 hau never .nved her." wrote toe novelist to, .. woman trstud. i have oeen| played with by a woman. Hung over at a beck from lord and maaler." What doee a wi (er do in such .. crisis'.' "He has one compensation,'' observes Somerset Maugham "Whenever he has at the treac h ery of someone to CANADIAN CHALLENGER v,hom he has shown klndi.es hej I-AIY srsxaoN has only to put it down in black and white, using it as the theme of a siorv or the decoration of an essay, to furgvl aU about it. *** n h\l'; N T UCTOB Thacker.v fled from London to cuSLJSlSu the country and began to write UADY NKUSON his novel aamond. This tells of nuiiwatic tyranny, of the failure of love between Lord and Lad> CaBtlewond and of Harry Esmond's paailon for her ladysi ip. Scene by scene, the novel follows the pattern of the Brook::tld allair. the end la, however, u-ah-fulnlment. Eamond marries the Lad, Casllewood. widowed a'last Mrs. Llioukneld han been cooProfessor Ray demonstrates In his careful excursion into literal, iletcchun, nlo ai model for one of Thack.rav's! I.-I(IIM heroines, "the whtmpcrInjj life sjou^gea,'' u^ -; .ilsgxunllcd Victorian critic put it, "whom he detle* m every novel." Ray tracks down some other original* of Thackeray char. %  the -lovellst's naughty grandmother who may have been coloured, gave hun tho hint for Miss Crawlev In Vanity fir loa)ar P-ndennis was drawn from his uncle by marriage, i. .nek it uned Major Merrtci Shawe H s wife became I Amelia Sedley in Vanity Fair. "a very Niobe of teara, drawn In cold contempt," as one eritliraoughl. HI scnouNsa itusruASSOCIAttOS IM OsejBjBSae, TlVa IM1 ^Canadian National St isuiisliiiis n An* 3 Scad. IIS*pt a 8>i-i SScpl tSBapt is hajk — u s s-pi IT SVPI is a*p> ^^ S4 Sapl fWpl tt S>pt • Orl T Or. arthar parU.ah.ra. %  PHr I GARDINER AUSTIN & CO.. LTD.— Aa eaU. HARRISON LINE OrTVVARD FROM Till. I'NITKD KINOtWM S.S. "HISTOKIAN" Medical Officer When they hud recruited one it would be the first Health Centre of Its kind and ha Loped that preventive medicine vould play its proper part in the I fe of the community. I Tin. resolution w,i eventually i i-sed nem eon. As Thackeray became moi i '.inwut Brookneld became moi' erflous. more reawntfui of the onstant presence In the looas, and more brutal to Jane, '.a. wife. She. lor her part, proteated t her husband, "It Is not ir Mt Thark. .. young Adonis in the while wrtUng Ui the novelist, •I do think at naaj JO one may 1. ke up a Una Of one's own. when cue Is tnlimnto enough for it 10 11 well underatoodi what one ,1 ..II'.'' But Whal did one' mean" The triangle hud its complexities. Brnoltfleld, whllt at heart ho im,; his wife. Insisted on v orkfng hlmse| up inln .i Irani? ol -uspicmn abtiut her. June was delighted to have a lover in whom she could conflrlt* the unhapp'ness of her marriage: she had iot the slighesi intention of risking her reputation for him. When her husband awarded her a kiss for sending Thackcrv a chillv letter, she told him "1 •PLANTER" •COLONIAL" "PHILOSOPHER" Frees London Liverpool M/trough nnd London Glasgow and Liverpool 4th Sept 18th Sept 30th Sept Mth Sept Dae Barbad..17th Sept 1st Oct. 14th Oet HOMFTYARI. FIIR Till! INITTI) KINC.DOM Fee ss. ss %  SCH OLAR CHOFTFH er Information, apply to . DA COSTA & CO. LTD. — Agent* 13th Sep: Iftth Sept m VIEW i,l IM HOUSE II \SIISI,S KARBADOH Dally and Longterm Rates ..noted on request Permanent Qa> welecese. and CaefcUII Fartlea J H. Bt-tKLAND Proprietor. SOIL CONSERVATIONIST % From Page I and he felt it waa a reesonDM Nat CloacHi Eyea II was not true to_say that Government would in any way close 'ts eyes to the hardships which wan being experienced by the i*oplc of St. Andrew on account "f the condition of the roads, but n wa:; a question as to how long ihe roads wmild last after so much money had been spent in repairs. Replying, M- Bourne said she MhlllAMIM NOIIIIS TENDF.R Kill MOTOR TKI'CK Tender, ggsj invited for the nr-hase of a Ford V 8 5 ton Motor Truck IMS model. 2 This Trucl it the Pine Plsntation any week dtf between the hours of 9 Of .t m. and 3 00 p.m. or Saturdays (•etween the hours ol 9.00 u.m .1 11.00 a.m. 3 Tenders shouUl to the Director of Agriculture. Department of Agriculture and ihould reach the office not later than 1.00 p tr. Owsswhards) Ihe lOtl %  i>lember I9IS2 W 9 51—2n OR Sl'PFLlES 11 mved at the Hospital up to III September. 1952, for -upplying period of six months from 1st %  ding HEAHSt for the burtsl of the dead at trie Westbury Cemetery. 'I) Pl'RE FRESH MILK, between 200 and 250 pintj da> only .wll be supplied on application spital and tenders will fs I -.upplied by the Genera) Hospital %  af Ihe lime of tender-inn leift-rs I..m ii properly, aurprristnp their iircttes for the /ulflhnent of the yy as in duty bound to represent th' taxpayers of the constituen. I like tha milk-ana-water In women." Thackeray told hi mother. 'under-valuing your lady-hip* heads anu car'iig only tot ihf heart.' Mrs. Brookfleld's heart was, in the end made Iran• luil by a furmal reconciliation between the two men In her I'.fe But ihf friendship was over. For the most famous of all %  .nt %  rti.irkei .'> v. men ch raatttl guards' Becky Shnrp. Professor Ray S ut forward no candidate, umnur il the tune did it for him. I[ was said that the novelist. ;.flei ., love ..Han with h* children's governess had made her the model of Becky, and that ahe. it. revenue, had made h'.m the odious Mr. Rochester of her novel Jane Eyre. Al that tune, Charlotte Bronte ;; uuthTshli the novel wa* imknowi,. laaaWkOI deemed cynical at the time he wrote has since been tisniissed as too sentimental. There is now more, ii'tere*! In him as a man than HI an author. Ray's researches. vhich The Buried Life form* -uly a modest fraction, fan that interest. The Frontier.; By John Slrache (.ollanrc. 10s. M I'M Pages A novel of Ideas thinly disguise as a novel of adfventun Wr tten during Ihe uai. about a -situation it makes a half/-'^v*v#v/*/.'/^v//>oa\i C'G'TRANSATLANTIOUE t artageaa asst which she had the honour to rep-J hearted pretence of telling tho a-T-Ts •£* K a il c umertled Uory of a young English pilot.-omc of ihe hardship* which wen leing experienced by the people of St. Andrew on account of the condition of the roads. She said thai the wheels of Government run so slow!., that unless members on the Governnvenl side threw a little grcaaron the wheels, they would cease to -nove. She pointed out that It was at her request that the Colonial Seeretery. and the Director of Hlgh>vay> and Transport, had visited the areas, and asked "how often has the Director of Highways and Transport visited the arear which Government say are more expenNlve lo repair than other areas. She again stressed the need fmoroper drainage In the parish, and urged that officer* of the Department should "put down their pens" and see the Casual wor k ers at work At this stage she asked for anil wa> granted leave to withdraw her motion that the House be adjourr. ed for five minutes In order fh.-.: she might comment on the reply _...Ji pil escape fiom oveupU'd Fra Hut Strachey. more adept narrating his -rtory than at mventing it. is best of all at conducting a cliish uf ides*. "We live in one of those t;irw> ui which public life is our owi. I %  This i.s the gerrn>ldea of the book. Its most vital scene i' fen .itaiunient between Nordennc I Frencfa imlhibnratlnnist (Lava), %  nd a character called the Abln 1 it'liough MM a priest. Ntndenac tries to tempt :hi Able into eotlabotwaoq with the i' nan 1"* ii i.s one's duty to forward the historical process i.e.. littler'.New Order. Against Ihl* Marxist conception, qenlcaJ 1 l c k-aurfj the Abbe oppoio the rider notion of moral value* mid l moral nslinct. The debate, continued between i %  oung Communist, is vehement and eloquent Mantlam afds an airing and JI L-eatmg. A novel for those who agree thai pifh'ic lift i now our own life. BrVuSAIni in qoodmssl %  Heap up braskfaat bowlfuas of iwMt Keilogg's Com Flakes Thaiy^aVsaiiaiTCriBps.1 9* assrryf-the *swee^ea- asd lU whola-kernal valuas IB Iron, Vitamin H,. rtiarin' A aavawin ia geo rf aaai Rsllgg's Corn Plakas. SOUTIIBOL'ND UK I.I: \----l. Sailing Kesdessber 3rd, 19SZ Callmg at Trinidad. Le auaira. Carat Jamaica, t OLOMBIE Sailing Heptemher 24th, 195* taHlnx at Trinidad. La Oualra. Cnraeae. tisrlaeaaa and JaSSaUega NORTHUOUNif DE GRASSB Sailing September lath. *J*2 Calllnc at 8oulhamton and i- ^iavre ( OI.OMRIi: Sailing October 5th, 1952 l ..iliaat Martinique. Dominica. Guadeloupe, Southampton and Le Havre. R. M. JONES & CO., LTD.—Agent. I'llOM 3814 HIRRIt AM PRF.t AtTION HINT NO. • FALLING TREES ap Supply. Keep a couple of H oil and Q box of Matches bn All the-arc obtainable at ikely to dnnipi Del irrtcane Lanterns tilled with i handy place. CENTRAL EMPORIUM Corner Broad A Tudor Streetn FOR 1 llll IMH N FOOTWEAR ee K A I A Stores first, as we can offer to you 'a wide selection of shoes at lowest prices BOYS BOYS' SHOES SHOES sizes 11-1 from sizes 2-5 from $4.35 $4.95 On Friday. 12th Si-plcmbrr. a I S.30 p.m. Work! by Handpl. Much. Mori Baith Schumaiui and Rchniamii')fl' heals al 81.00 and 60r may be reserved al IhtItrilKI, ( miniil. I'h..nr 32t. 7.9.52.—2n tasaaBaaaaaaaaaaaaaaajaan


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Ul DM MIO M I'll Mill %  I". 152 BARRAlMK WlVOCATK I'M. I SEVEN Entomologist Will Be Employeil On Agreement # Fran. r\,te 1 "Awtrln iboutd M can the present high I ar, laid down in selected %  real a* a result L'nilrd Kingdom bul result* cannot bean period of two three year*. In view of ihe vital In to the economy of the Island of irrene; of MHom i laea to BM Su.,1 11.austry caused by thi ravages of the sugar cane root bor %  the evidenceof the increase in n nf tho |„.>t. .11 it Mr. Tucker'-. Intimate know lidge of the Diaprepe* root borer and of his association with the plans for iu control aiad tion. UM Committee atreed in 1951 to r< %  Council Pass $26,000 For Hospital For More Staff And A 1 %  • Resolution came down. He ha I ^m.VV/VFIlIlalAVfllCl.l.1^^11 the i.lan would be referred to the Staff Coin:. Baa next IN ORDER to in some drt-il how the necessity before the C uii.il Ho would nay f..r in,expenditure had arisen In .addition th.u he believed thai reedr— since the Addendum had been On tho 30th June the Governwritten it WM In |--d to find a I LBWKsmn ma u >pa ,-,. ,,, w up-j l tplng l OB f... the M.-dienl %  convert this ,„,,,,., „ ri „ ht iu i'.rt Librarian Gets SI20 Monthly ,'' ''/."T*. 01 titular dale i tiiy par" -pit.il In the Addendum to Resolution No. re ,.- ,rrh 2 A * mb,) ' "' Whlrh ""' fUnH5 ' employ Mr Tuekrr n aer-vinei.' xcd ,he ** lar >" r h l'"' '"• "•* %  follcwing hinl.rcmrm trr.,n the ne ,v created lermanem establlshmcii* Tht i iL ?" BaWreterjr, Mouse .if A%  make the house at the employment of Hi I % %  not b,v !" General Hospital Into JJ-to bo put in the cl.il.hrns b, .„„„,, ....,,-s Btock." >n rrcOTi^nd thi Although it Wag not mentioned in the Addendum, the Medical ndent hope! that there would be in fact space for n further number of beda — IS to block th %  promotion of anv %  nrrlng m,,n, h orhctr. Control Work Prior lo hi Tucker WO days' v.i..' : under th* Civil El'bllshmeii! (I. sages) Order he a leave passages lo himself and his rife up to I r-mount. I .. a venient to Government that Mr. Tucker should pn this stage owing l< tackling Inn O* wp the sugar cane as a niaticn betwe n %  110 I ixunum • tfleef frm i %  %  %  %  t mviilK IO l>> II s t. I aruor tn.it in as an ,, al nued on too natter, II n urgency for •d ul ,l( "" n ,„ office should be It of an 'hat IWeOlbara would be able lo Ug decide at what point on ihe the officei should hat when the pre*%  after consultation art Chiktrao'i ward is being used with the Gereral Hrnpital Ada* an aduU ward it will be nonConuntttnn nod Iht Staff *ibie to put in at least It i now puiposted to perhaps as BaBl*) ... at the Rale of the •irluiil space would take SO Nil* Inl tor the followcomfortably, but in cane ol poana:— necessity it could take <,-, oiH Fleer — Matron Office, a9 25 by bringing them closer ni Office. Stores. lQfnP ther than was wally wanted png room for BMtnn living l>prr riaer—Consulling Rooms i .-(I Rotim. Hnom. Tf. ofllcM mentioned above which will thus l>e v;i. gether with the present Splint 1 ie converted into %  children's ward Increaac In Coat The Colonial Secretary continuing said he would warn OM Council, as he had di i i^ ullcrations to the hospital inevitably meant an Increase in the animal reeurreni ..I n: exaMIng ''•' ,t When he had (*en before Ul be used as he had said that il would and an ant lo combat whtCB funds salary were recent I v provkhi I b Reaolustart. t-on No. 55 of 195?, th. n d ; Mr. F. L. Walrolt (L) presa on with th, Conn KM Of the Incumga adult wafd TnM ra^rtaaiianeceaaary to increase the staff which he la enga lion bant Of theu-t CO thl Ide an immediate The Resolution before 111with the pest, i in,..', to m of his aalary, and said th..t whl %  r to to IB beds. eU oevarad %  nocaat paragraph X above, and U ( ,. ( ^ to the ResoThe proposalfiet out abo\*e lin< | „ w ,-,i rnpr< | m lhrr(1 „,,„;,, acancy for | Dfaut] Director Of Iut|orii ,, f wou)( pomi oul w ,, i(l w ,n ncraalim certain non-recura \ l4 > be other posts covered by the hJatnry "f the post was and rent and additional %  dvtl Kvlablishment Amendth similar posl-s i.i ogpaodltura for which pnwlalon merit Order which had just been for Ihe seven month* September, tabled. 1952 to March. 1953, is included The coat of the oOu.-, poaal iiieniiuiied in the Addendum—one staff Charge Nurse, two Staff NuiWaa, ',' and Iwo scrubbers. Agriculture. The Honournbli the Lag Cuuncil is invited to agree as ca a, possible to Mr. Tucker bc.ng tlie L,v S,,vu "allowed to retain his eligibility for Mr 1. I). Motlley |B) ctiti:Z~r hi '. resolution leave a^paaaageepneeasionsaa at cuwi u. e maximum wbieb ww T ,,, iSEStagT aattomU the date of his rat of .y^eated m ihe Resolution, on W ,U ali^ be rauired• applicable to a permanent eaaM %  *"** miscarriage of In T>^ f 77ie l.rnisltiliw COUNCIL ) oalcrtlav W"< m re praaai lea Cawaraai Ml -M.| No at ISU ProvUnonal apQpinlmnt d Mr K g(ii nM u-r %  :< % %  • Mr H W g TWIi#r %  i-om Uxr pun ,•! RntomoO..-' IK^-" t mmt uf '. law. mid -,l! %  TKP Cl-th Intornini u.i.t h* KM) • • .\ i.i ,,i aee* pM %  | (• %  -••' • %  %  Hw. it CtMlkNMI I .*.1 %  %  %  ..icmb.i ul 1h* • I -.. nibcr I to 1 HOUSE %  Moi-r of A-r I mM >aUnlW Dr I'Mtmi-.m. laid a iii'M*, from H.> .. ow nn.riii. ragaaaaai Hw ra(••nllon ol th* rlin t> lit< lor \r*\r, %  nd pa—— riwli ni d Hi II 1 W. g. Tuck*r. EnlomoloBWi Dr uartrmni ,.( .-I,I. aag | oho Hill fcr tr->i IftIM IOIIIIWII^ hi. Iron. Ih. I Annual ltria.il nl II,* P. t.. lian.ln HtaMB l-iwn under Ua Art froan tha aovemur-iii C>r<-uiike C'omn.ittrr M MM Arntunlam I [ ainaiul Ova Hill, uf Kt.hanar A.' ISOT Thr mil arrh. U. *„ll aaaaw -i.i-. %  %  iaraaiafl by . ihaiar i... baard and loatclna to •tudanli who liava. aainanl Rovrll HCIH.UIU.IIH Tn* Hoiaa* Faaaa-i | ainand thr Widowand Oiulvam fannton Act I HO. Thr BUI arrkUra. I V. l-aiv* to roan by Govcmnwi.t with quaatHMM ah* aikrd r-rmna Ihr .t-t. la Tito HOuar afvioved ih.fivi %  aUbluhmmt iOrnrt.h %  tiall No. %  Ordar. la:,; n.akra provlaton for U>r U of crrtaln ataR at Ihr Q HoaplUI on thr prrn.ann.t aM Thr. HOUM paaaad a hrm.l.il.. to IU thr < af III 1 itn-ilan .rcrrlaiN -t SI 4*<> .. ft | annual *! %  Incru—WW In |]|w Thr %  %  ** %  iuiin*d Ml Q H Adama an a .andi.lair | .Aiwl lion. artUrtl UM unolflrui Ilnli.i. drlraal' t„ Qw Fifth aaauion of Ih* Waal Indian Con ft-iriH-r to or hi-id in Jamaica HI N "*" 1 "" ",i. MB, wl )i br •rlnlrd _Th* H.ma*. adloutirl..r tmon. there 1 no denvina ihe neryv "mn.l.H.n" l.rlin B whi.l. op prea*r> M many people W dafl ateaasnahaa ih>t .u-ui.-i n*r%r> arc .l-i..,I nerveYour every .la. meal* may no* have provide.) •iifhclrni of the looda wbith (eetl and .ii.(am the neryoua ...ni For thia reaaon you will find Drink delicious Ovaltine an i.lral •uppl.-nu-nl i. VOW dletan. I'rrpair.l It.im Naturr'Let fooda, 'Ovahtaa' pro* Mai eaaoaaaal mm We *#iirnn. in. In Jin* Ilamm.. ..I.i.ihelp to hmld up nrr.r-tr.nath %  ad .IT a in. laataaeaf >~uf in thr i.i.ii.uti. t.irr Of 'OvattaM nponani. bceaua* ega* .otuakn valual'lr nrr. c totoring ptopeetiei. Prink '•'.alone al.o at hediiftir Il i ihe leliahle aid lo the aaf ural. T.-HIII .lrp whu-h d.^. .o raiuh to re-tore ihe nervou* %  y.lrm. m u U „,.^„i^7s; ?ijr*jsss; day functioning before if ON u tlH >, r ,,„id i^-agiti b\ they even got to ttie extent of |niich.iMii i: ,,],, ,. VI .„. He had mentioned rate vlll not be justn .. hlghei i rfflccr so that he nau HV> I deprived of an opportunity of mum : thaw •..>taking overana* leave at-m om>oito the putt of _Rcporn-i of tba tunity that is more convenient to " Bested that tho maximum Hlary .„ aaaOtild Ix.$1B0 a month, which p) was equal to Ihe maximum resolution .. salary attached to the post of Nur-cs and the Gardener: tho !" D,C Reporter. poaal arO! ba eovered by %  Mr. M. B. iox tt.i supported %  i.vent paper. luolly build a hoapilnl upon n that, not of which the. couad (>e proud. •Cauae he thought that they The population of v and erect an el.ihoiate „ l ,ie..si| 1K , m „ %  hould agrao to channel Scholarships have be*M pay. The Addendum to thi tion reads;— The Governinn Hod> of the Imperial College of TTopti Librarian and Secretary and coinIncurred movisioii ITp1 '"' '" ,1 ,n ""'"nutted and KraTltama £ **">' s '" ff *• Htiepital Resolution is ^ m 01 l "* n ^insulted about jrrent .M-IMM,th> build II up aran while they raid be safe in saying one htm| MAr ,| M ie nraagun Oil UM old IO .ml doll,,,',. wet an i|,.,t ,,, •,„„ %  lh( j COUld havi ,. wenty to twenty-five „,.. m „trrn hospital -uppleite the same „„.„„,, b) SM1J1 |, ,!,„. The addendum to the resolution slated "On reconsideration and when first recruited to the accumm ( u that a ( VOUld shor'ly nuin the ItOM-hifion the ( ..lonial ,. u Ht ihought it was only fair Agriculture has notified this Govbe npjiointed to review ihe salariea Secretary ld thai when the u, po mt ou tna „ ( |_j ,, eminent that with effect trntn of |M rank and Wa Of the SarvfcO l{.solutim ^ ui He t'lerefore would ,.„hlem. They must et Govcrnuiciit intended to bufld ii.i) [il.itim.l in a new hn.pital oi inteixled to iniich a way that it cm he extendprove and extend accummoiiotioii i upwardl or outwards as clrfaetaitles << ih. pa nr d t tad Of as their Ho suggested lint Oovt WTO .illowe.1 them. should consider seriously the posrtaay might hav.> read of Ihe il.ility of providing faelUI I i of the -.11 v UMraoaa the charge for board ami I %  tudantl residu in the Collage hostel from $72 to $1 panoB 2. The value of i John it BovtHl" Scholar.-hip is || pel %  *l,23li ch ar f ai lot I iard and kadglnj now propoaad will nao Increase in tha raluo of lha scholarship to $1,560 pal .innum For the two remaining terms of Ihe financial year 1932—53 ther) will be two 'John R. Bovell" tiholnrs In raaManca at the Impartal CoHaJi lha aunount included in this resolution is required to supplement the fund* already provided to mett th On rage K not support the Hesolut the suggestion for the reduction of the m,ivjmum to $160.00 ai wag ipr eacn m |( (| () Mol ,, rv d mentioned that in due a fuither icsuhition would be coming down in connection with • roandttura on alterations /ast improvement on tho prwlo Mi M.ipp. i R. a. Bmbei ol tin ^1 Mr V. it. Vaughn •h.. I "i i-k I'll.,! was* p!aml to carry five hundred aaa.— % %  .,. . I>ed* but had opemti wilh two Should Change Approach bundrad heds. It was planned 11 seemed to him that the time however *.. that il OQUld ba ex tha 'I.I i..i hospital Which were had come win,, lh e> shi.ule i.-,„i,-d h. .,., ...„m. N |ahthe llv. dependant on It riie Resolution efeania then approaeh lo lhai which the Council had passed problem. Tho fundamental profaarose. iii arguad Aaau -n" had lem if ihe Hoapltal would not ii,., n,.dotatad In Ul aoaanduni 'hat the met by that type of action. Th' AT 31, HE FELTLIKIMf OLD MAN OV\LTINE and note the Difference, in your Nerve Strength and Outlook Sold ui oirngAf lui. tt gfl c aaaaMi oW Slow. IMPOfUNT %  Mote that tht large Ui* %  O.altin, fj n caauiiw 14 oa IIIIM: III*4 i i r aoa. rhty *.. i ii..; %  pngo 11.-i .Jl (. __ ma".!."*'. Th* ,*i orne y.n. ..rdei 'Orahm* ( a (.il -ISalluar' ft I Mil || in %  hoi drlkair -iJ .li.i>muM>ed am In MUW -nra< r* i nmhat i" include atantJon was to make the house could not cura lha ui t tin. iio at the gate of the General HosPital by patchwork iherapeulics pttal mU. a children's block, Tht> fundamental problem of fhe providing a minimum Increase of Hospital an wo out of the fact thai 20 to 25 beds. Il had never baan planned as such. i ,\^ J h !' .l nd f? -Modern %  • : m.ing Cato had pointed out that the „ gdence in Itself Dr Cato went of $200 Staff Commute., had not been „„ lo My H e was Informed that cost of board and lodging for a month. consulted, and they would hospital architects spent a conthaaa lahetan ig la lh< and % %  'J Tin Rai hiUon was iiibeequenuj n arva 1 a right I mtkm fttrthai iWt' aH e imaami of bma In !(> %  *i.iii>ail re>nea>aa.nf ul Inn m aihan lha naw* IBIUMI—•!.. .n___ watcllinv llv the ial%  modil on which thej should pay the officers of the Houaa igroad thai the I doquateb paid, but re%  aallng with tba had bean i nd that maxin' March. 1953 r paaaad representations when the next various institutions C ANOTHtR SHINING EXAMPl£ OF (HEM ICO .--_ There'* al ays a dean h> gaaok fragrance in cverj' room where this S-M-O-O-T-H P^si.cleanser is used. Pots. Pans. and 1 ilcs.Sinkv.ind Paintwoi k respond quickly to its treatment—there's noi a scratch in a mountain of Chcmico. Holder ol the all-time Ai 8 major racing victories n Automobile Association record with 1951, TONY %  ITTINHAUSIN says: MOrJngCHAMPIONS fg deliver the full power you need to win races Ho knew thai tha qua itlon "i finance would !• %  r.UMil imme.llately, Thej would ba told aaat i not afford a new hospital. They knew that their re%  re in Uad Ha arao aot iriiiciaing tha Oovaninant Ha I new thai Hit > were aware of ,. ntHHl for more arcomdatlon .mil tinproeaaiO M ..( teate racUltaaa for caring for It raa possible that if id was found in paying ipiantiTht if-i that they would get tome of I pr-i the thing* taley KO dearly needed. trmi Direct Method He was however suggntiiig it they should channel every inanalal mean* at their disposal II tha dirrction of building a new In. pit.d that would 1Ma tlneii ethiNl of touching Ihe core of Ihe problem. found lha remedy lo raitorat YOUTHFUL VIGOUR %  / man area baloa aly aged br kldnay Lroubla. Ha tails ID tola latUe how Kruachen gave him baolf *4e bealih after weaka of pain :• %  "1 auffered for waska from u L tti.uiiio fciid fait Ilka an old ni4 although I am only SI, If 1 atoopatl lo do anything It n Salts as the* had found ilifim wondarful. 1 1. KLIMi. para. *af* sdit 2. KLIM haa-i wlrhaal rtfrlgaratlon Pains in Back. Nervous, Rheumal I c! of powar out of By equipping ihair con wilh dapandabla Champion*, racing men know they will get the last a every drop of 'wl. If you're not getting all lha powar you're poying for. tee your Champion dealer Whatever molt* o' cor you own. a new t*t of luN-t/ing Champion Spark Plug, will deliver the 'ul' power built into your engine First oi land. o stl, in the air 1 rragoenl colda -rtan t>i a elraln on lha XMnavi aiv<1 Kldnr. aad Bladdar TrouM.. ai> lha Irur H**?* •* Eaeaea Acl-1lt. (..... ||, Nujhta r.rnlr. Paaain*i I.., faltia Heo-euanaaa. ntiii,,,,. BwDllan Ai Klaa. Illiaumalliin. I' u rRvrllna and reefln4d berora our lima H*l|> rauaidna.t purlly your Mot* %  ilh Cvi tea. T,a \*ry Aral •• .. ....i, i..ipfna| ,our ki4na.a lUan a< nrrai irMi %  nil f..i* III I |U II.I. n .,-.,.„ o*| ilk* lartneinnnaf-ha. a luioM'i .atur, <."ir'M.i, a, aaa* -r rhaaa%  W tOarCretai m* relief from pain, and I fel twtter In every way. I nhall kaao on with the dally doaa beoaaae I can now do my day'a work sod go' '—1 any the worae for It." a> — B.VJO. I'I>;.-M tha kidney* function pr ., %  • %  : iy. certain sold wastee. i Inataad of being aipallad, are I niowad to pollute tha blood • i roam and produce trouhlnaome .-mplaiDU-backacb*. rhnomoi '.on and fJiceealve fatlgr.e. Kruschao 1* one of th* nn*e% tiuralius or kldnay apiriiir flora for Kroaobaa. with built-in dapSLndabilihj Among lyres—n chiiinpion of rhnmpions! Tested and proved h> millions of miles of service over ull kind-* of roads— ihe m:|\ lyres inutlc that are Safely-I'roved on UM speeilv.:>y for your arotoCtaM on the highway. aj Charles Mr Enearnev & Co.. Lid. aaith • V.V/-','.V/.'-V-V//,','/, -,-,-.', 1 1.VW.'***','-***, Ih t [Baa KLIM quality is olwaus unifbrm y m \ f"ib IOU'I milt, tiaitb ihe umr imnuna W^Sevf^ai for grewiag chlldraa i^Tj. Bfi 4. KLIMi. .ic.ii.ni 5. KLIM hfea 4 *.... 6. KLIMK laaaaM '= %  II~I i..di., 7. KLIM i> Mh I. n. ....ioi.,Mtka ii> 8. KLIM !• ro Jut.d ..4.. ihkM <..>..! aaat HUM, $Zf tm ond yow C^ kove S—t. iota -ol* rust BN pairiiiNCi mi WO-LO OVI; IVVOf VflVf. t.lH I \ Vill-TMIN M7TV —A w.trh A1l U*Hur* lot ill .lluiinc bMUty and faithful arcuracj, is tonk. Gold i.ii..i i........t...,i ui.60 OTHER MODELS lo SI In 71 Ginl.' I.ICI I \ WRIST WATCHES 181.04 lo $1(53.21 IS and 17 Jewels SEE YOUR JEWELLERS I. Ml I MY A CO.. 1.1 If. 20 Broad St. and at Marine Gardens S. P. C. K. BOOK DEPARTMENT^ i r. IIAlllllSOV A IO.. LTD. TWO I'.ni.hOlOI'THTAMIINfa INTFRKHT:— FLOHFKING TRKF.S OF TIIF CAR1BBFAN a TIIK OXFORD 4TLAH VOLUMi: V CHURC'IIII.I.S MKMOIitS Cl.OSlN<; THE RING" PEAR'S ( VCI/H'AEDIA HOOK OF ETIQUETTE 1-ady Troll THE GOWN OF GLORY: Agnes Sligh Tu; | THE FAR COUNTRY NevIlT Shute. I'INKERTON STOKV THE T.flEK IN THE SMOKE Margery Alllngham THE SCANDAL MONGKH T W. Whit. JiOJIN'; Henry Green NEW TESTAMENT IN PLAIN ENt.USH GOD IN PATRISTIC THOUGHT: C I Pn SI'CR GIANT I'KH Hi HOOKS IN AN AGE OF REVOLUTION \, • i..| of York THE PROBLEM OF PAIN THE S< HEW! i it OTHKli TTTLE8 B) C, s LEWIS ( lill.DKEN S ANNUALS HIGGLES FOLLOWS I NORTH WIND AN "EAOLE" STORY CAPTAINS COURAGEOUS t, OTHER Till Is By hCKYAItlt KIPLINO || THE I'OOH & OTIIEK TITLES BY A A. MILNE ALL ARTHUR RANSOME TITLES IN STOCK. DOCTOR IXJOLITTLE SERIES DEVOTIONAL LITERATURE. BIBLES. HYMN r. I'KAYER HOOKS It CARDS TOR ALL OCCASIONS. Tel. 4427 SLEEP... IN COMFORT ll<'im Wpply ." ....''. the /..//.< wnv %  MABOOANV IRON BP.DSTP.ADS 3 0" wide S22.40 VV 25.00 4'6" .. 43.50 IRON FOLDING CO** 15.10 ir. aim i'if a Kitiipiiir raafi <./... MATTRI ssis mo sin i is. I i. All ol Attractive Pricei e AT BAKIIADOS HARDWARE CO. LTD. (Till. Mill SI KOK BARGAINS) No. 1C Swan SI. Phone J1W, 440, 3534 -,-,-.*.'.',•.'.',-.-.-.'.'.-.*.



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i I KM BUI 111. 1J52 BARBADOS Aim* All Tr>-^. AOO K|TS MiceouRI FAIR GROUNDS CARNIVAL PACE FI\ E Old Bill" Seeks A ** %  * Sailor's Job AgaiD At 64 Leg. Co. Member ft) Imm sr I such %  rapacity, He had much ieeuee cr\ behalf of mmhw* 1 welcoming him lo that Hoard i Ttobim WRICKAOI15 All THAT REMAINS of a carnival at the Missouri State Fair Grounds at StdalU sHer lort rased through the area, killing one mm and injuring 17 others The storm stretched across Missouri but most of the damage centered around Sedalin It enuscd extensive i wnpmt) % %  "Ke (InternatUtnmtl Ch. Ch. Playing Fields C'ttee Holds Meeting THE Chris! Church Playing Fields Committee recently held a meeting at the Sergeant's Village Playing Field Hall. A (airly large number of social workers of the surrounding districts attended. Mrs. H. A. Vaughan. District Social Welfare Officer, also attended Applications were received from various organisations for the use of the Hall and Playing Field. These were dealt with by the Committee as follows: Wednesdays: from 1 to 4 p.m. Vnuxholl Girts' School First Fridav in every month: from 4.80 to 8.00 pm Mrs. U A Hall. Wednesday nights from 7.90 to 10 p.m. St. David's Old Scholars' Association. Friday nights (other than trie first) St. David 1 Brotherhood. ".30 to 1000 p.m. TuesEUSTACE ALLEYNE n labourer drir | -,,... ,,.,., „,,„ ,„....,.,,., i,. .,.,.„,_ % %  %  *•' x-sterday nvirniTft he R %  not being used now wh.-n 11 ,.,, D f the Council for hi* kind was landing on II rod ,. 'topical storm wprdl of wo icome on their bewatching a group of nv-n to.dal IS mil | off Trinidad on a h f lf A „ ,„ M ^ WM co iasrnrd Ing bags of sugar from J Try. k. Sun > m >rning about 4.30. he said, he would like to assure Asked -hat hwas ntmc f.-r II ..id when Ihe storm was in it. Honour the President thai he Old Bill" said 'hat li* full force they lost the.r mainwould Llw^av,er2?avour to en he would come down somatri tea sail and every man was forced operate with him and .*her mem%  wanted an %  hctow while_lhe "chooner ,,,.„ ,„ lnr p. Mlrifc „ ( | e '^^W^' —' I "" ''' K,Ul Ukt rn,,chh0X which. In hi,"opinion wo, ktlttal utensil, and food ^ l A\ Xt &h** i !" ' h UyttUJ S-boaH and one '" Und a wnole ([ -k 0\lc\ wen' to sea when ma neuilv |mi hs HV trying to he was about I* and flral wot-' iielMl *>•• i v-iooner HlS nrst expertAfter the stonn Ihe whol^ shiD w was rough, for ** *<-tti • beaten and they schooner ami len mil.. f T n Bari igg I to limp into Port-of• i aul two days atta. At • town w'lh sea sleknss. p m t i f :he BaSa On thf second day he was till %  | ihefl to Hospital and given Labourer Fined For A* suit If And Damage Three-Year-Old Falls Into Pit TIIRKK-yrar-old Margarel 0 umber batch of Indian Greung fell Into a n apen pit -bum 14 ft. dr.-ii. near her home on Sunday last while alavinc with her brother* Letter and Carl She was taken eat by Joseph Springer of the vasne locality. There was a layer of grasa si the bottom of the pit and she received bruises iitilv on her fret. Just a week ago a lost dog was dbeavered in the tame Pll•rork hui i the 'I %  day ha wns tureatl in ssprk %  h %  •tn'tin wirn'vi nun th | ll %  %  |*i him -n nu.ii'i. Vei > few off the menV-ers *vmpnthisr.i willliini 1 lit DC STH de'ermined In baconw %  • -' -"I %  pQor H worked on thai s*hoi>r. he would <>apport II. Hucksters Hare !\ol Moved To Temple Yard \\ iilcmAnd Orphans Pensions v< I Amended Convrracl) il lc.sl..li.. .. nlrlin-..l m lhat Chambw rW4 )tr IMmn IWIIIMwwIJ ti'H would '" ini '>(• iniarail %  •' '!• island, h (Mil Ml llimoin*. niilu nl itlhor bonoui ii-nilxT-. In Ppi*ni hi! i on >uch tagUatlon vo!p afaint It opinn ami Motor Mechanics Pass Exiunindtion SPECIFY EVEHITE" ASBESTOS-CEMENT CORRUGATED SHEETS AND "TUMALL" ASBESTOS WOOD. riii. foil,, Ml tn Ing caiiilidiilcs .'iilei • thirliados KM'HII. At Last: Potatoes! The nfTences WC4 on August 6. The cases brought against Allcyne afl'T he went into Blackmail'* house inni began to abuvc her. After abusing her he took up R table and hit Niles who was in Ihe house. Temple Yard, hucksters hav been encouraged to go there. While some have fnllnwod tho suggestion, the majority remain at their former place* RM Yesterday for the tlrst time lit A notice has been placed at the many months, carts were seen In James Street end of Uusby Alley long procession coming into the saying that hurksUrs havj ith slip* and potatoes, but moved to Temple Yard, i ul Mn H A. Still many a housewife could not glance down the alley •'" M W *1';, i e m a h Talma." Chairman, Mr }7ed OooV procure any. g *"J j ^ ilard. M.C.P., Mr. H. St.G. Ward. Still confronted with the serious "Hey is the centre f r l> ^"; i M .„ Mr. O. C. Ward. Rev. A. I. Johnfood problem, housewives ran |' ."*" *"?" / f( v ,'f us to comm.ttcd ,. : Vl u A HaHi Mss c long amtancea behind carta in an l } ul ![ 'u.^'i ^,0^leave the Sullivan. Messrs. Gollop, Wo ith' W. Blackinan and T. Hewitt. PROPOSALS havr N .„ made I>o..ng llud.bate on a U.ll 10 for sometime now for erecting %  *''' "> *'^ %  n ^_ 0 '"*'• uaawlaiJa market al Tcmule Yard Pension Act, 1K2B. Mr. C. talma hufmore recent• lher?h,s DC.?! H-l and Mr. K. O. Mapp IL) Institute have passed (2nd Cla Ihe suggestion that this site would spoko of the hardship Irnpoaed on *e Examination "Motor Vehlclbe a suiUtble place to rreutive Committee i< required lo exercise certai.. powers and perforro certain duties, which fur the greater part are purely formal or administrative and does not require the exercise of any discretion. It is considered tha these formal matters and Morris. Evans Inshtor. Skinnei Darnley OaCosxa Smith The result" of the Exannnabo "ElecLrical Installation W01. Course B" have not yet btf received Hridgotown Busier The Htreets and pavemem1 Bridgetown were hiuiler than usiii I ~ m $L vesterday. This was due to the fa I effort to obtain a pound or two. J cu**M>ati "" but almost in every Instance they %?%£ tmtniUar wlth this alley. *,.., WK^I, We T P \ M l e T mWt ^ y ""^J? For hucksters as I whole to Soffers shock order to get potaloe-. Some sellers xSX Yard, things would (.onnano Pile (Sl) a washer of icfuaed even to reply to queries JT (lo bctcr organised rher. the r ,"', on '* ""!• S M***"* 1 *" made as to whether one could otherwise It would mean that a ^i?__:L d _'_ .u-Vru.^ .! J.f detalnad at the General Hospital maKl a purchase. f( v> WO uld go there and get little about 11.16 a.m. yesterday suffer£l cs InR from shock after she was inIn one or two Instances, how. volved in an accident with a bus ever. 0 teller did stop to servo ._ In ITnbyn Street Bus Stand about a customer, and then there was Seet* l^tOnit'tlltl 11 a.m. the same day. defendent broke the table on h;rn and cuffed him while he (Alleynf) was leaving. mimstratlve functions could more properly and eOOTCDaanU* be |M*r formed by an appropriate head of a department, e.z.. the Accountant General. This amending Bill therefore seeks to amend the principal Act so a* lo delegate thnt cert-un schools re-opened >i terday. Chief among these WB* the MiKlern lluth School and olh< private achooK. Al Ihe Minim High %  ehOQl where 169 new po in]-, ueie admitted, there has bee 1 an addition to the school unlfoti ,. lhat of blue berets, and throughout llMi.nl Street and the olhc. ARTIES HEADLINE Falls From Cycle the familiar rush of the past tew n "\**$:~e Of House Strorn In of their •hool children iturchaslu" last-minute school iequtslle> riv ned their friends around Seibert Bannister of Beckles Hill. St Michael fell from his bl. v.le which he was riding along Heckles Hill, St. Michael about 11 M .1 m. yesterday. Ho was taken to the General Hospital and was Irxited for a cut on his forehead. Bannister said that he lost control l.icycle while trying lo collision with a woman. Youth Camp Seventh Day Advent!' cart Vessels Being Repaired Mr. Lhiiicl llutchinson. librarian-Secretary of the House of ihe Bi'l served a very useful purAemblv. was yesterdav sworn po^. Bnd wu considered an ndin aa an Officer of the ll<*.e at m i r „ble Bill, it worked hardshipi its meettrur yaa ten jay, b> Hon. ,„ tf t ,way in which 11 was actuI>r A S C..t... -piainbatr sManassw,^ |lW( 1Illo frflrrf JuiWor emU'gislatlve Council. ployees of the Service, whether Tie Domity Si-ake, Mr A. E. married or unrn trrl ed were ex Many vtaaela which are nw in s U W1S lo i ( am HouseJhal the eontnbute toward. lh port arc awaiting their opportuAuditor General had Informci him J* raSrt" nlty of golrui on dock 10 carry out thal Ih( M |ary for the Llbcanangeneral repairs. Secretary as voted in the Meanwhile, schooner hands are mates would cease with the wasting no time In carrying out mg into operation of the their own repairs to their leapecAct and it was iiecyaai> V 1V1 camp which was nt Morgan Uvc veiapU. The crew of the House to pass a Resolulioi *.s Bay broke up on Monday ^^er "Krances W. Smith" l-dvmg a MUaO being paid to rning after a 10 days stay. were carrying out 0 paint Job on lhat offiv* One of me actlvilies was handi, h , P vnM t ullri a n^^r iob ,. appropriate officer, viz., Ihe street*, there waa a iegular atieui Accountant General, certani ... the powers and duties previously exercised and performed by the Govemor-in-Execullve Commute Mr. Talma .aid lhat althoug Qlamorous fflatural Waves for Pill with VOSEMAR Thr .Sutural /fair Warrr. Your hair can be beautiful always when treated with VOHEMAR. Follow the directions in every package and after a few days you'll be convinced of its defi nite Improvement. Try VOSEi\E MBD1CATED SCALP HYGIENE combines Its own Shampoo and ends Dandruff and other scalp complaints. It also brings life and lustre to the dullest hair. OS SALE AT • KNIGHTS DKlli STORES void 1IITho %  Inn VMM 1 Hills Of Exchange Tenaatry Roads Under Construction At Culloden Road sea-bathing The camp consisted of 37 vouths of whom 18 were girls and 3 directors;, a farewell concert was rendered on Sunday flight The concert was well attended. Raising Pstlck tus B. Compton." which is at berth near t'*e Central Foundry's dockyard. The HOUB The schooner "D'Ortic'which ' * of Ass*nibly >. I'-a Hill lo .11 hange Act. lt :lerlng a hardship, c*pechaving regard lo Ihe low ai which Ihe average Govi M itrrsntanl employee was first (fad. Small Salaries Since the question of the Widows and Orphans Bill befot • them, he hoped that Governmenl wou'd review 'he whole On Par* • Id^^'Si „S£ r*B?2zE2V£ SiS which Invot workmen other than iti Tenantry roads Another Service Station cawqua The objects and ; Hill slate: A biihr.' dlH D** dvnand -T!ae"3 der construcUon at Top Rock. ..p^r.uns in wn i.una •> %  %  %  '")' %  Its owner is Mr. George Pilgrim, u,c i. mu im. v.un the !" I-H..SI isw twenty-nve llshlng boats popular garage proprietor of the ^...""J^jl^^JW^ A-^JIare under ennrtruction at Lame district Speaking with Mr. ^ n B '£t ,w taW ROAD REPAIRS The Ccmimis-ionei-. of Highways in St Irter have begun to repair the roads in and around the Indian Ground district, and have already reach d Roebuck district going in the direction of Four Hill. In the Roebuck district the load is bein; widened in order to exhibitions give vehicles gjod travelling acnext term St. Lucy's Vestry Meets Tomorrow rfovember, and as a result, its completion cannot be determined ye'. He however is looking forward to its completion in time for the Christmas season. ,,f GOOD 0OO&3 0 ih'-ni at Adrwntv Stiilioni-ry commodatlon. The St. Lucy's Vestry is scheduled to meet tomorrow. One of the items on the ug~nda will be the awarding of .xhlbitions. These vlll be tenable from which begins next week. £4 FOR OPENING SHOP ONSl/NDA Y HIS WORSHIP Mr. C L. Walwyn, Police Magistrate of District "A yesterday lined Ernest Griffith, a labourer of Nelson Street. St. Michael. £4 lo be paid in 14 days, or one months 1 in prison in ent with hard labour for keeping his shop opened on a Sunday. Cpl. Shepherd attached to the Bridge Police Station said that the defendant had my", drinking in his liquor shop about 3.42 a.m. on Sunday. August 3. He V" the men give money to the defendant for the drinks. C-(ffHh had four previous convictions and was told bi Hi '." .rhlp that if he coinqs before the court again on %  %  not be fined. S.P.+ C.A. Ask you to be consider*!' and kind lo your anlm-is at all Itanes. but .-...= %  > %  daring the hrst of the day and water them regularl* STURDY AND STRONG FOR BOYS and GIRLS LACED AND STRAPPED Brands REASONABLY PRICED Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. 10, 11, 13 & 13 BROAD STREET FRESH SEEDS AT For leather O of every eolour— cleans, preserves—and how it p. Hates] Ask your retailer for Propert'i. Nothing else is quite ihe same. Watch ihe difference il makes to your shoes! PROPERTS s 11 < 1 1. 1 H %  : \ x WEATHERHEADS KITCHEN GAXDEN I'llure. Carrot Beet. CaMNtge, Hweet Corn. Tomato, ( ui uml-r <>lery. se-aah. Cream. Brocolll. Thyme, Mustard, Spinach. Kweet Mar)orau r Parsley, Onion. Okra. Vegetable Marrow. Radish l>ek. Water Melon. Pepper. Kohl Rabl, Cauliflower, Brussels Nprouto anst BEANH ( kinds). FLOWER GARDEN ilnnia. Snapdracona. Candytuft. Dahlia, Petunia. Marigold, Phlox, Csrnatisn Verbena. Paalu. Kalrla Red Sweet WUliaaa. Cereopsls. Mwerl ps-a. Fse-get-mr-nol. Aster. Bslsana. Lupins, (lirrBanthemam. Larkspar Nisturtlam, t -niurdl... Per* lulara, Arlnusa. Calllopsl*. AfTrtlSBl, BACK TO [SCHOOL SUPPLIES I ISIM In %  w-.l gti.lltlr. and all th. rciiil.tlnn ahadea froaa 14. lo Ilia v d. IRK OI.INF In tt.*3 In White for Blonw. KIHI I •%  !!•• HATH from 11.19 lo PANAMA II II iMill SOCKS from 41. to fill In m.ii. ana Brown r.im.s i.Acr HHOEI In iin or Blnrk ( .11 Sit., ll to IH V tf.O or%  SI LACE SHOES In Brown or Black Kid Klara ItotU fl-29 and 110.00 KHAKI DRILL 4r. to ll.lt BOYS' KHAKI SHIRTS 1. tJ.lt PLAIN COLOURED SHIRTS UK ., STRIPED SHIRTS 11 W .. KMT 1 I ll SHIRTS IlJJt S HOSE fl.tt BELTS In Plaatk and Loolkor tic. and >1.M SHOES In Brown or Black Slaco 11 to Itt tl.lt Brown or Black Slir. t to IH tl M Ml! — ALSO — CRAYONS. INK. BOXES. PENCIL nPOKSM BOOKS. PENCILS. PENS. NIBS ERAHIRH. PENCIL SHARPENERS. PAINT BOXES. THERMOS FLASKS. PLASTIC TUMBLERS and CUPS, and SITllHII.BAnS HARRISON'S BROAD STREET DIAL 2664



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f \I.I SIX BARBADOS .VD\<>< Ml WEDNESDAY. SEfTEMBKB in. Ml Government Will Get Soil Conservationist GOVERNMENT, on the recimmendal.on of the Scow %  ' "J^**"'. ;,„,< DUrttlet Conscrvahon Board, is a. P ro,„ l^mg |;. ;,. ;dvice of a competent and qenenced H wa one of those rot soil conservationist as to ways and means "1 eflecUQA ran up %  slope It wa a difficult I minimising landslip and i;'„.V.V.nd '£ !" in ilw-'Scoilnnd District. This was stated in a reply lo a ,„,,T^j' r nfu: which had been asked by Mrs. E. E. Bourne it* tl. _Mfc (L), carding the condition of DoKubel, Sock Hall, and ell c. "' *m m ummrni uh the n %  roads in St. Andrew which had become impassable .fc^ !" ; ^"rfHl *'. cause of their serious stale of disrepair owing to heavy lay Mtli nifh( p^opi^ of sucn dif rain. trick wars Rcgm il.i.i, ih? question concern* Uon lo Mrs. Bourne's wordl atives about conditions of roads. i bel Hoed, GoverrMr. F. L. WslcoM (L) < hat But repn antarl ;^t sigh' replied th.,t temporary rethe debate on such %  Question of the tact lh.it < cjme under his portfolio. He an) howaw sorry that he dul .. in approach. know beforehand that the quoslie said thai mem be is mil : Iton would be debated, otherwise think abou: i m whin he could have presented figures rain was falling in those difficult rateriH to money .pent on roads places. He fill that it was time ID SL Andrew and other pnrticthai whoever was la charge •ou special wisdom to deal '• M. E. C'o (L) said there with the roads". Mt. Walcott said. w " one in the House who was He said that he did not RBOa i-thctic towards the i! Mrs Bourne was aware that question ol repairs to roads than Government had spent more ' %  %  LWalcott and liimseh. money on roads in St. Andre*%  *. did think that the reph than had heen spent on roads M.YIM. IIII\.M.I i inn it.A.r. annually to emuami earn crop to > eapsd bui tn-ii this closed to through traffic IK t I Koad Board because ( the slips which were taking pi: lUttlOII ftf ll steaded mi this raaw QoYSrniweul Mated that temporary repairs had .ilso been effect ed to the Ruck Hal Road. M E. Bourne il whi'h would cause eonsiderwhich had been given to the question asked by the member foi 51 ui.. It was a statement of (act, and he was sure tbat any mcmb< I who knew anything of St. Andre' .muld agree that they could not continue to spend money on those road* without realizing that the would spend thousands of poumi only to find that whin there wen heavy rains, the roads were dan.heavy ran. ago, Si Andrew was cut in h..lf when idge was washed away. "Take a look al that area and you ill see what ha. happened over those years.* Soil hroeiun lie was not a Koad Engineer, aged and the money lost but from complaints he had reIt had therefore become nece.. ceived and from the views of exsary to set Up a Soil ConserveAs much ' she appreciated the ^^ he hnew >, wo a qU esUon Uon Board, and It was known lo ne would like lo see some o( %tui eroswo. He felt that somi< all that thi two represenUUves la irried out on the road peopi, asked Oovernment TKthe House for each of the parlshe; %  as no si-n indicating th. qucsUi realising that Government of St Andrew. St. John and St u closed and in n cert. m had ^ control over those reJoseph were members on the seel ion it was IttoJy that anything quMlSi He asked who would say Board which was endeavouring to that Government had not spent a arrive at some decision low how some peognMt .mouo, c money on st ge to go along thi.' Andrew to 'M the roads in the dmon tney were in to-day. TTR. UELTA AOE" of British Aviation opens with u. e (Hester JaveUn. ant Bying triangle to be ordered Into production for the Boynl Air Force. A la-wr than -sound twin-engined fighter, it follow* two years of esperl men ting with the new ihapr A Wig brother" the foai englned ATTO Gt D*H bomber, has Ju.t flown and has already been Ndered for the B.A.F. Not ihis week, folks! I've made the great di-. Air-Suk tablet thai leally works. Just left the Airport after four hours' flying. -"i look at me! AIR-SICK tablets by. SAVORY a MOORE are 'the works' boys and girls. Try | them out and see for yourself. 1 know my onions too Mr. Townsman Grow .. *.-Wihem. eat them (raw is how I like them) and kiss my girl friend too. Ever tried AMPLEX? An FAmple* tablet a day combaU all breath and body douis from within. Eat or drink anything you like. Out take an Amplex too—if you want to be popular. Take a look at John here, lor iiiatance. H nt i N. g Order, IW2." has druggist. Hsaid lhat he unu-rcerning the same matter, been laid ui the Legislature. stood that representatives ol the The Address which has been It has been evident during the Druggists' Branch of lhu Barbados withdrawn reads '— %  p years that the subordinate v. for a a men I of the Oen <>l 1160 pir num'.h lui Member;, of this Asd the Uliion werBarbados House of Assembly i P" ,l " 1 In no way inferior tq the sUtu luturt tq indry and. "Now I send him off to woik happy-Just as full of rsMt.^ as he can be," saj. Mrs. John. "And I feel line Si-lf My trouble was different. MEDIUU was what rSded A sate, gentle laxative that quickly ensured INNER CLEANLINESS. We're always ""inking of house SsSanaat LST why not INNER CLEANLINESS fo, ourselves* MEDILAX is the answer. "Hello, there! Do I look good? I feel good! Tried out a new hairstyling. and highlighted the waves with COLAIRE It's marvellous: Just stroke it on following the wave with the applicator Easily brushes out loo. What a difference it makes when your hair sparkles and shine* WUft COLAIRE. whi dli in the number of < :f Nurses In June, 18 from SO to lift was partly met M for the • mplovment of th. I ny staff— :: Supervisors. Ma 0480x48-812) 2 Assistant Cooks. Nurse l Assiitant Cook, Main Kitchen :i Klti *J-> ' i Washei (S36u, The re'iulremefit of services are of a j i and il in thvrvf % % %  tativeg and the elecle member* of the Trinidad Legislative Council, and contequentlv lujnbsr oTpeopU rdt JO, r Excellency send down might perform then 'he necessary amendment to the "House of Assembly (Remuner;iMr V. B. Vaaaba ill said th.it l *" m m'-rnber-* Act 1949—If i lound it necessary to follows |— Ml p.rman9pe9ktt w>Wu ^^ uf lui ,. Uu innelr pre i Mervic. of should bv included. I. .h.l.w.b.ulili... m..a u. n.d !"!" d, u. ,1^'"""ir':; ssjoeMB The Executive Committee, Mr ludad i ... >uld pay susne *" •e.urylng 1 a> On Page I For Smart ami ^air 'i, %  pei aaaneril • • %  %  < % % %  % % %  > change in status will not Invol' Coi7ald, weVeVesponslblefor tV.e •^J^^^n'^rillhl! %  .aV"^\'boa> "uT penditure but wl i entail Government would — "'" urgeons. "."he n Ihe mi' imum standard of efllcieney in 'ne Hospital renders it easel t h e permanent esr I should be increased to provide also for the following posts:— 1 Assistant Seamslnss—(S312\ 1 Assistant Warden. Nurses' Home (S3B4x48-ff72l 3 Maids— ($S0) ddltlon, the receti' d i S2.U8U, Deputy Speaker $2,8*T. atl i K-Kalcoii "(E) spoke on Ch lrman Comm,ll -; .g* 0 l v„.t.ng burgeon und ali ***** members 2.4O0 per paragraph i and asked 'um and all other membe nhat was the use of having more tarvlna on Executive Commute..' numi tl they did not have the "" additional $2,400 for such ser. He said that there were vice in order to make the %  .,!. i. nnbers of the Oorhad.x irnnient would not apHouse of Assembly comparal> 2 Sei The m i fl rt of I %  %  %  mg Order i shewn hereunder rr--.i %  OI*l-r Haras As lo the appointment of Visitresponsibdily ol members of the log bu'geon, he said that he tiarbados House of Assembly i to the slalu' responsibility of electentembers of the Jamaica Hou provtdS in additional 25 bods should not like die Government to in ^ W1V \nf mri LM blame as there was „ rao in nn for uw .lu.l U(i.l.l.v, Council, runlttca and li u %  YJ,. Huuae -Ularetorn M > %  -.1 ; i .1. ii.it there vould IHno aping at the Barbados General Hospital as they were prepaied lo run a Hospital for Barbados. Dr. Cummins promised Mr. Vaughn to raise his point with the Governor-in-Executive CommitC ^^ . MeMler (K>. said he 1 would repeat that tt must bo \1 ways eppreeiatrd arvthing that vtus done for the Hespil two questions he wniM I SBh th* Deputy Leadei ho was Incident.." man of ms Ho Board md ono was whet'as some regulation at th>> H plt;il which said lhat a pti b work two years befi %  • %  oUday< At this stage His Honour the Deputy. Spcjker. Mr. Le.i jected by saying to Mr me thnt surh a regulation as i 1 unment l.^iure h I issad I Bill which stated that nt tif ( to n boHday Al A LOSS ..,. time under Another point which madf C ertnln recomhe would Ike to draw to th. :.-me|i JH .,„,. M e .. ,..-,, to know tentiot. of the ^op-^y Leader ol wh#(nrr Government h^d received ihe House was to the effect that „ while thi. r. solution mi %  Ion for lucre*-*,! staff for i-ient running as Hie Ho w .is nt :, lo". to understand v> h> ihe three N Surgton ul the H tilled. T>:. point of Hectors and inc d ntallv h v in me i %  %  V iltlng Surgeon. He hoped th Hon. Junior sfemany member thorn: way of amendment to the House of Assembly (Remuneration i Members) Act, 1949 (lfH9-2!> providing for the payment D| members as follows: The Speaker — *3,60O per an-ui. The Deputy Speaker — $2,880 IT uuium. The Chairman of Committee V2.880 per ;uinum. The Leader of the House $3,000 per ,nnum. Members, each — $2,4("i per annum, 3. The House i' also of opinion that the Executive Commute.' Reiiuiner;ition of Members) A.t 'MO. (1949-301 should be amen..ed lo provide for the payment to the un-ofncial members .' %  • h >f ,i -.iKiry two thousand four hundred dollars per annum, and woulH •hank Your Excellency to send down legislation providing ft Ibjs. also. "And what a difference it makes when you use ALL BANDBOX PBKPAHATIONS." says Mary. There is u Bandbox shampoo for every type. AJmond Oil for dry Liquid soaplesa for oily ban. And what a range of brilhantincs' Ask for BANDBOX preparations always. I feel so different after using them." "I'll say she doean't" chuckles Jimmy. I'll y she LOOKS different too. SU Joesn't tell you she used to weigh u ton. i told her about SILF. Curious little horror' Sis calls me. Silf brought her weight lown in a jiffy."' Jimmy's right, girls. rhree SILF TABLETS A DAY WILL CHASE THAT COLT FAT AWAY. — b And here's something (or the entire family. A SPA for POP. a SPA for PINNY. a SPA for PETER, and one for you too — If you value your teeth and a sparkling smile SPA TOOTHBRUSHES are the best buy for the whole family. In nylon or bristle, shaped lo clenn every crevice. SPA should be YOUR toothbrush too. 9TOCKED BY: J. L. L1NTON, High Street. b. C. GILL, Olympiii Pharmacy. KMI'IRE PHARMACY. Tudor Street. A .F. JONES. H,gh Street. 11. C. WALKES, Tudor Street H. L. HUTSON, Tudor Street. ItOCK'S DRUG STORE, Tudor Street. F. S. OLTON. Swan Street. BRUCE WEATHERHEAD. Broad Street. HINDS & CO.. Roebuck Street. P. A. CLARKE, Cosmopolitan Pharmacy. K V. WORM, Roebuck Street. StOUTE'S DRUG STOKE, Roebuck Street. C. C. BROWNE. Roebuvk Street. A. A Browne, Eagle Hall. H. E. PILGHIM. Progressive Pharmacy, Nelson Street. STANDARD PHARMACY. Tweed.Me Rd. INTERNATIONAL PHARMACY. COLLINS DRUG STORE, Broad [I Bwafl SI %  Street. Sole BJReml eaverlns all ihese. your famllv needs. INTERNATIONAL TRAUIN<. CORPORATION LTD. Telephone se*9. Widows And Orphans Pensions Act Amended t> frrum Pane 5 V.JS quite entitled to bring in any Lcndrr.cnt, but to speak al the. rkad on those who by the ware i*aking then, they woulo -in ill salaries received, could not t %  out of order. ntertaio thv hope ol marrying Mr. E. K. WalcaU (E) said that I or 20 yean.' sen-vice he did Dot think that the •mendThey could not hope to oaoaBI maBl they were dealing with */ai fund within 15 to 20 thai correct way of putting it, %  '.vhow. There was a rece-i. Pern pa a schi ss which LUoatri %  bO worfcad out SrUeh Ad did not say who in Govern, 1 IM s^ hardship-. '\ent was entilled to do such and Mr. Mapp said lhat he under* such a thins, nobodv was entit'ed t.e.i that r do it. %  n which had the A The Bill was passed %  time under < WE HAVE IX STOCK . TERRAZZO Marble Chips KTERNITE Marble FuUshed Sheets TRINIDAD Otdaff Boards ALUMINIUM Cerrusaled Sheets ALUMINIUM Guttering — If. U", GALVANISED Corrugated Sheets BARBFD WIrU; Eslnblished IS6n i:ol lit ( K T. HERBERT LTD. "By**" .id MAGAZTNB LANS t'ions


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BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESUW. St.PTr'MBF.R 111. 1152 W. INDIAN CRICKETERS HAVE A GOOD DAY Walcoti Almost Wins Game On His Own By tun MARSH Ml NINETEEN LEFT IN ST. LEGER SI XltllM. HUM KS l\\ a Racing 1 Ktwi n ndfMl I-ONDON. Sept. 3 Twenty. wltiS une since atched. have accepted for the [ana %  Lane—hire League had an enjoyable Saturdayall uf thorn turning in good parfonnaaom il and ball. But nut so the Central Lancashire Ramadhta ;md Worrell, both of whom were The defeats of Radcliffe and Crompton St. Leger. the last of this 'i his any chance of pulling off the cl *£! c lBC % a u L ** run *' Do<1 pity boceu*. par, from %S ."IfBt thT.^ce^ kg it would have been a tfood thing for lat yearn 18 runner* were the I Vbola if cue of the Cinderella clubs ""^ *"* I2. The average mpton could occaafonajrv have had their share £T *"../Vi?? 1 ^*. but T ^ khi "! had only live to beat in 1940 and the Hoyal ftlly Sun Chariot won he honours. i< Dd form of Wet I r i %  %  1 Q virtual!* beat) i ....... "i championship* %  And the two %  i i on Satun the (on and electing I put toaatfcar 134 In I veil Pepihe flumley profeaaia<*al %  '-JI the batsmen bat I to ihu. Waieota itM contained i^ht have been I but *ftcr Pephi him forward the -'••i a stumping % At His Best %  his best %  %  i and some >t his cov. r driving a i il cenUin in the ?'id Test at Lord's ngain<1 Enghind %  ra BKO. lo follow Burn ley, amazing though It m.iv Mem, war* shot out in jual over .in 63. And who do %  "ii . %  %  Bowlli rrnert the tlowtni rers S maldnu 5 wickets, it i Mild have rjaad Bruoi Pairs %  ed for thai %  %  Also playing i-erfact allniiiimi wai Evcrton Who thrill* d II %  i i.iwd in Hi %  home \ccnngton. Unfortunati ik did not result in vl< lory but honours won dhrfded in %  hurd fought Accrington won the ton and in 2 hours 45 minim-* put on 17n With hi* off-SpU br 51 This left '"wlini 80* an hour and from the I %  ght 3* included S 4's but p," %  nice he bad gone the odds swung A*, in r ivour of Acerlngton. Still th 1942 in a field of eight Cordon Richards rode both of 'hese and hia last vletorv in t/iis -ace was In 1944 on Tehran, the 'i-ading Hire this season and Sire af Tulyar. Gordon has already won live 8t. Logon and tola Is COJ his lucky race. Titan oHl ba great celebrations if-he is -uceeastul on the Queen's Oay Time thl* There has never been any disputing the superiority of Tulv-i DUl 7 4 was offered agalnot him bemuse of the risks of coughing etc Nearer the day and the smaller Hie Held the shorter will become (he price of the fnvou> b Trie French challenge numb* r? five—Alclnus. from the Bour-ae from I he the erratic the mount nd Foudmbably been Faubourg Il.third in the Derby. h*e been withdrawn. Ophalonian has been left in l.v mistake, a* has Sophronla. and Amour Propre ha* been withdrawn Mehmandar ha* been lefi in an a pacemaker for Tu|yar •ind Summer Time mav be on a similar mission for Bob Major. Tobias Is a surprise acccpior and Kiior-Moma has not been heard of llnce the middle of The probable field will number S. C. Griffith, M.C.C. Asst. Secretary M IN Shorl. dapper, pipe-smokim; S. C. Griffith moves into Lord's next month to take up his new post as assistant m *"u e secretary of the M.C.C. His appointment was announced "here a player's last week He joins Mr. Ronnie Aird. who will shortly comet in a Test match must bo succeed as secie'ary Colonel Rait Kerr. and the other exceedingly rare. assistant secretary. Mr. J. G Dunbar. -m f o i l0W ng year he tound plcte> that Len Hutton had to be • it from England tu bolster Kg the hatting. Before the arrival of Hutton the MCC were due to play the second Test against the West Indies m Trinidad. With only one regnl.ii that he hit his entury in first class %  mm 140. The cases Griffith, known.to ene] South Africa as vice-captain in Junior U.! Tennis 2J" I iSZ^JS J .V^C S^c^ o%^ Chuinpioiiships Contiituing BM %  ' MCC McMuy with Durinn this period, from 1 t.. KnowIiMm. ol DWIim 1850 Grifflth waj Mcretary %  •• lour*. Sussex. He relinquished this post .ind i ambrid|ir. he gained his blue T*.,.J.. MI H n r -i "i 1935 and is still In the top(light as a wiekel-keeper irst report iho West Indies opening tgalHt* Worcester. game POLICE CONSTABLE H. W Arcasr. a local sprinter, ha* imported a pair of Starting Blocks from the United Kingdom The blocks are the first of their kind lo the island The Manager of the Equipment Department of the firm from which the blocks were imported, states In a letter that the blocks are similar to those used by sprinters at the Olympic Oame* and they ar naad at all leadlni athletic uracks in the U.K. Police Constable Archer told the "Advocate" yesterday that ha first used starting blocka at the last Police Sports at KensingtonThese blocks were however made of wood and could not be properly refill a ted. He Is hoping to get a superior start from his new blocks. %  %  %  British l.iv.n T. .. Chnmpioii ships at Wimbledoii wiu. the one The same year thai he ployed and three quarter hour lruggM f ,, r Cambridge he was selected H reports are widely read in which Chris Day. Kent Junior ,,„ the tour of Australia and New b ,h '"' XM,r descrij.nv. Champion beat left handed TorZealand under the caplaincv of and obvious insight Into the game. ouay boy Gordon Mudgo In %  i: u T. n ,„ , ,^ .,„ protracted baseline manoeuvre. Only 38. Buiy uririith still has Biggest 'name" to go out was later he toured many sears in which to continue Brent 14-vcar-old son of the West Indies as player and his fine services to cricket. At the famous prewar German Davis honorary manager with the team Lord's ha will be chiefly responCup *tnr DY. I>nnwl Brenn who i€Hi h y O. Allen. This was the sible for administration on the 1 beaten by Bobby Hull "injury" tour when the MCC playing side. This was previously lad Test TV Has Not Hit Champions Surrey i M 0, (LARK, honor ury secretary of the Essex County • rirket club : "Something will have to be done to compensate clubs hit by the televising of Test matche*.'* F.*icx estimate that their lo** for ihis season, when five of their home matches clashed with Tests is about floOO Yet gnle aggregates are up. exiles" Irom Yorkshire i rickct next season. of M okf Monrluy's hero Uttlfi DavM England was soundly beaten by Pi Mr Moyi who li more ii>n two p little David I* rich with pn o bn Eight bog i upon to pn] two unlrheg seen today in order to 101 UtfDUgh the laol sixteen. Two fa%'ourites ltilly Knight and Bobbv Wil nora r-rtiinatc and reached that; stage bv playing only one match. KniRht iient B. llann of Yorkyears playing forces were so badly dethe" lesponsibility of Mr. Alrd. Al DorrulM in> %  *• Hold B W s ,th SopWnttMT U ( I l>l V\ M I HI I SolomottH Pencils 1 ii rpin 'A ngela liout For Oct. "I do not suggest." Mr. Clark told me. "that televising the 19*3 matches against the Australianshould be abandoned, but Essex IVM .,...-,. and other counties think that TV NER (Warwickshi W01 i.ST."^. lT c "'* y L-"' ,, ,,h t€ ** should be increased and (Worcester) WSLnSffJ^Bti x^Wllo '"to a poo. to help eounmi ouide n.roia. w p,...'-.. nes who suffer" J Orac* Hard To Asses i^.n | Here is the list of Yoikshu who are professionals with other shire S—2, 8—2, and Wilson, th counties. tilBB. IIORSFAI.L %  id hnlder. lost only Iwo game* i (.REtSSMITll [BHOX>: LAKER beatinft R. A. &arlet of Surrey (Surrev.t; BENNETT (Mlddleaoxl HAMER (Derbyshire), MclllCIl tOloueestershire); WALK I I! (Hampshire), BROOKES, BARRICK. JAttMAN, OBBASLCT ind FHHH.IMi (Northantsl; SMITHHON FIRTH "rshirei HtlALIS N.iits ; I \\\ III \< id KITSON hlandtvitlv Mixt'tl Doublet* B* .i or:, .i WIIITTNO If anything is probable In the Improbable world of professional boxing \\ is thai Randolph Turill soon be fighting South %  George Angelo for the %  T. stumps wei. .1 rgua I,.,,. J The ii md-v Mixed Doubles STOCKS sll,lLs J ,hi Y.M.C.A. on ThurstdltlNSON day. S.-plemlK-r lllh at 7.20 p.m. Hoi: IIFWS i Miss it Oaoumoau and Mi". C Humphnv vs. Uni 1>. Howard nnii Mr A Howard. the Rugby 2. Miss R. Williams and Mr. R. '.ub, who are experimentPhillip* vs Miss N. Heath and th football under flood • Mr. R. Greenidge. Holborn To Send Team To Trinidad Aithletic Meet Kxrilement There %  on i x N meni it Lowerhou ttome i %  ." ... !. Am %  I il Itir %  V. icket vi I ej ovoi I! %  r| won the to:. Ull'l .; ;i "'. i" -.; %  • -.: K ;T !" rv'Vh; l ,i^.,"-X bon *"• c * '* u' .me nvin nul Vuhomo.1 n.', '''"= '" (i "" -"' %  *.'."n> •>" now Hnll!nl My prophecy is Ihat thoillli th.I ,',,lull"i w liirrt ' C """' nnounc-rt that <•>">• Mr lendjm ,xI..e„-,„.„ ..n.il uf TV on Bile. wUl cer%  %  utXii o 5 77 t,^ in,' ,F Tur ?' n '•" %  '" An o'o nude,mlc nd .Ihlelic te,m lo the Mini, be dUeiHMd M Ihe *inr %  ke Ifnr llnrnd. anlM • 1..... f.-...,.. coadlllOH they *' s !" Meelin, lo be held >n meetlnn of the AdvUory Count. %  *|P K" would tr;.nt Ihe aecolode of a* Tilnldid on Ihe 4lh and 5U1 of Cricket Committee at Lord's, the lights, are proposing that York3 Mi.'. B. Canlngton and Mr. To-day [ asked other southshire end the cricket season with N. Gill vs. Miss P. Smith eastern clubs whether they had a floodlit charity game In late J. Bynoe or Mias M. M. Atkinson suffered similarly, with this reSeptember against a team drawn nn d Mr. A. 1 suit : from the county "exiles." s. Mr. and Mn C. Greeuidge SI'RREV: We hove not suffered „. Miss K. Barnes and Mr. D. so far. but others have. Lockeversus Born* Nleholls. amniru*. r*.— 5. Miss M. Manning, and Mr. .JetathTngtfA ,£ £ing promoters musj R. Herbert vs. Mia, D. I-nunum rwnnally 20,000. *Ma dowp to s L* h *\ the *. a ? W,th wh,ch aDl1 a ^ D *- 14,000. On that day the Mao££T l K. on l ~\$" Chester Test was being televised „..„.. SSSSS To what degree the television •"-'* nO*OH are brought tornused the falllng-off II is diffleul-. '*' %  '" %  tournament Io "^ Boros. the U.S.A. open chamff'HHPXThe. weather whir'i P |on antl winnPr lhls *Oson of almost^U^ more th.n VMNfta match against Essex, lost ua about KfLi^j^ ^"^^ll'-'^-Jj". 1 : C80O there — ;i raw* serious iten than the Teat television. It is hard lo disentangle thesei dlfTerent influences affecting gates. n 19415-47. Although In t Idni C I r the J!'i .., ihat oca gave, no semblance of a Hi imking 10': not From the ttdinical viewpoint tt Empire title. next month already been booked Third, the boys-in-tne-know are team, which will leav, olready asking for tickets. Fourtn. the end of the month, has ,i date pencilled in The team will be mi '" M ui.tber 21 Mr. Johnnie I load, a Air passages have 1954 Test matches against Aus(M for the tralin will certainly be placed on holder are in opposing sides in the Canada-U.S professional tournament which begins in Montreal to-morrow. How is 11 that I.cke can play for Canada" He has been made an honorary Canadian. He is also a member of the Canadian Professional Golfers' Association and thus qualifies for their six-msn South African 8. Miss H. Dcanc and Mr. It and American Murray vs Miss J. Farnuni and Mr. D. Guiter. 7. Miss P. Chandler ami Mr. C. Goodlng va. Miss P. Humphrey and Mr. D.'Avohar, 8. Miss N. Hall and Mr. U Worrell vs M.-s li Howard und Mr. E. Goocuidge. '''S^L^oe 0 ,!-^! nd *"•*."*" mlddle-Weltht ot cyclist of thi 20s. and wi cam. t^ch pkaw Lancaahire a cash-spinning character can ho pma thirteen cyclists and LWO i *iS 1 ^ Tl,r,> n w •W. TnT^hletea are Dsvlo •ifth, a report from JohannesInntss who will compete in the tells of a telephone spruits, and Oswin Hill, tho Many sports, including crtchet, are awaiting a report on the subject from the Association for ihe Protection of Copyright in Sport 1!.7 Tackle Bin Walk Yorkshire Kxiles J. R. ASHMAN. I up the good work %  the clock b] f-itir miniib V.Tiit %  boul Ratnadhln and Worrell" This 1 is one occasion t the least said the better. ITi wi re tumbled out foi wnleh OMharn replied with Crompton ufier being to wtfl l>\ Milnrow a the pavilion with ;i mere 1 iK-en released vy i""" 1 11 -. ilK •_ to loin Worceatershirc. Last ween % %  Yorkshire also decided to release !" leg break bowler EDDIE LEAD%  %  in MN; It la-adbcater F.ir note ti their liking was burg to-day ~ 5 ,l \ niln,,t b >' Ro ? "!•': J"'* betwew Angelorf.'mer'and middle" distance runner "' fh.7 bowler tf?f U .^ Cn .', m ^nC U ua \ u, 1 * ndon '^ ar three-man team to attend ihe JEANETTE AI.TWKGt:. who traVOllOd nearly 2000 miles, and meeting -. iM gold medal at the wtnto. Handolpf, boxed 120 rounds in 10 %  %  — — ptvmpic Games, has refused an camps In 10 nights. No punch*, ATHLETICS offer of e3,000 per w eh t<< turn were puih.i Two 1 Turpfo own profeasionol Instl %  the, Jackie olid GASTON REIFF of Helgiuni %  t2 '"> %  ; %  <*Ulight-weight Stan 1'arkes-failed l rf M month broke the wurtd tWOdrens rfifugee camp in Swltserto ftoj the course because of in mile record at an athletic mfetm; Kentucky yesterday bind. Hu...mil b BM Interlurles. and It %  left to 30 bravo ,„ Iart His lime of 8 nun 40 4 il Pektalo/zi Child. n' men of the HAt*H to provide thaecs. was more than two second-. Milage where rwpnnns rrom opposiuori* 1 at the > % %  "" %  Sr^^r'V V .TTs. A .? T : n n ;,d. Oroke Ms rod. But he won lhjoins another compelItlcti. The Prtse* A new ounly there are likely to be l!1 rod. —L.E.S Abt^rtondo l^'udH In IVfississippi Swim NEW MADRID. M Sept. 9. TheyTI I>> Ii Every lime X AIR. ^'JG^pwcwvi\' %  '•v-yau WCOVWnJSBi'.LOi'JS/ VB&M& l ma\ &W WE JT >OU 1' 'MtR 0O.<1 FDR ? XX) MA/ •—^ By i-mmv Hatlo > PIE03E OV AvlD fiivE J \ ^l'->.•>—**Z*/bQTTA LATI;? '' YOJ vvis-J'-f \ su" tr^r -ve ot* 1 FIFTY VWOCBrTM 0CK IN iqrr> '?rJ-ng 73 i.*/E %  ", SOMS THM COLO-a.*rr£C.' 11WT ., GUT'S "G-TE,S; -rabW "ffURB ^.ASTE^.' WtM n I vs-c's -<,T ON AslV il TTEC .' RJT I K>k>V I A D*w£ IN "ORSECMCSTER i > W-O l-AKC--ErtO*A %  TOtD MR WE KICKS ; W AT TME OCP'CE-y fully to reach the yacht Bucaccompanying Abertondo. If Abertondo reached New MadAiiioino Abertondo maintained rid at midnight, It seemed certain a phenomenal 00 stroke per minihat he would set a world's rente pace as he splashed toward a cord barring cramp or accident new world distance swimming He would have been Just 00 mile* record in the Mississippi RiveC 110m his goal and have covered Abertondo passed Hickman of 240 miles of the 300-mile swim . rsterday evening and. from Saint Louts, Missouri to believed to have slipped by on Cbiuthersville. Misaourt. Uie Kentucky side of the mile ai'n At midnight he would have been %  half wide river In the darknt : ( ,,,.,55 3ll( \ onc half hours Observers on the New Madrid side He has until 1.24 a.m. to-morrow of the river thought Ihat they uw to complete 00 mdes downstream boat, accumpanvin,; the swimmer ,„ Caruthersvillc U> surpass John shortly after midnntht. but could Slgmund* record of 81 hours 52 nor be certain aj that distance minute* m swimming 292 mile* %  il."? %  "" bl '' down the Mississippi. Abertondo Mississippi at this point. plunged, Into the river at 0.30 a.m. tors tried un-ueon Saturday in Saint Louis, r.l'. Mam 1 TALKING ABOUT THE 0FRCE TlvVTnUD AS rlCOrVES TWECflArTfTy COLLECTORS THE CCD mn i*j*\xa*o Jeh-I TVC hAT^> HAT TO %  nnnnV EM Uafoi' on%s CO^ZCTZJK: %  %  %  -......„ %  fop CM <^ { ^' 1 ^W#E rut ciNGER'FIRE roll cHti mrj PAN FOR WOMEN AND CHILDREN CHILDREN'S SILK PANTIES in White. Blue. Pink, Maize LADIES' PANTIES in Nylon and Jersey Silk from $1.08 lo $2.62 • CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., Ltd. 10. II. 12 & 13 Broad Street UNGUENTINE QUICK A MODERN ANTISEPTIC TUBES or JARS No Visit to Barbados is complete without visiting th.I \( nil \\k HOTEL (a short ride from Towni Overlooking and commanding the whole of WORTHING BEACH Here sitting over the sea. in all the breeaM that blow, you can drink Its famous 1'lantrr* I'unrh — or have Ll'NCH—TEA—er DINNEK or TEA or COFFEE at 11 a.m. After a hoi shopping sped take a Bus or Taxi to CAC'RABANK and bring your costume for a awim to enjoy its coolnes*. Ask Tor a leaflet of rate*. and look at its rooms. i' -i for l.unrh and Dinner arranged. iiniin Room on Terrace Telephone 8148 and 0611 Attractive Swim Shorts in a variety of materials, in. HI \ colours and brooded tops in quality. Smooth, well tailored ••lacks are n plrasurt* to wenr when made to your exact needs, and in materials from our tropical stock. €. B. Rice & Co. lice? •i ii-u.... i —••NOW'S THE TIME TO ORDER LINEN SUITS LIGHT TROPICAL SUITS AND SEA ISLAND COTTON SHIRTS ^ P. *. 11 \l I I I A Co.. I ol. l fff: IflVM PAMNTS FOR ALL PURPOSES Tropical While A superior white for exterior and interior use. Does not dlii it Mai into Flat Wall Pamta White. Cream, Green -Natural Metallic Primer for Wood or MeU Aiitieirni.i v I'lllll's Ma-ijr attractive S' Marine Paints Dry with a hard enamel finish. White Cream, and Concrete Floor Paints Bright Red. Grey. Green Aluminium Paint Fur Metal or Woodwork Permanent Green Paint Wilkinson & Haynes Co., Ltd. -tillStoams IN TA1LORIN THONE 4156. 4267



PAGE 1

!••. % rwo llAKBAOOS UlVOCATK CcUiih Callinq I T CO.J CONNELL %  %  B.WJ.A (i H.W.I A M Ma intrsnsH rot ttv I* S.A Harriet At St J X J Mmry'n mm RI 4Jo Marys Chuirh D %  n Cosier of Trin %  DO of Mr. and Mi*. <\ M akak ."> bit hrtdr Mi- Tlion Marguerite Orringt.. n ... tighter of a \ imajlo flat kriKim'^ |rfn!v ramc nvfi '"' the h.ippv < %  < The ceremony which was full> tiural v,** conducted by thr Ifcv K. A. B HlPtt' and the farMta s/ti %  in moriiaiito I % %  %  !• i nn of bridal pink -lippcr satin featuring i V nockno Srrth .1 vmall ujTiBht collar id long rloMfitting •..••eves with ,.-nt at the wrists. The buili June and Grace Cozier wore Mmand green nylon respectively cut on similar linos as the Mnld-of Honour 'i. Thev all carried small silver rages of rose* and gerber.-i' The duties of bestman weiperfofmed hv Mr Orald Mayhew and those of ushers fell to Mr Eric Kdwnrda, Mr. Brrol Currint:ton. Mr. Runny mil. and Mr. David Oreenidge The rot option ivn held at •'Abbeville'". Wr.rtr.lm and the honeymoon is bring spent at Powell Spring fTotel. Rathsheba. The Duke Of Kent Goes In For His 'School Certificate' ~* •" Rut u Whon he died in lfW ho left was. 000.000 MRS. CARL W. ( (t/iri! Wsifs ParvnU VUS. MOLLY KIRKLANI) 1 fHuarlrth % %  To Tout •*|KS. A. L STL'ART arrivals from Miami, Florida. i:SA. by B.W.I.A. Trmidad by B. via* Jamaiiand Trinidad on ivniin,-. She ... Monday last by Miss Hachncl -Ir* Kirklaiid ( • >t %  :hcpaiaongem leaving for .W.I.A. on Monday Evelv., patenU. Mr. and Mrs. L Knight, "atftoo," Strathclyde Rvrital Tonight M R. JOHN TULL. brilllan; British Guiam-se To .'iv. i Song Hecltnl at the Com""" School Hall tonight ni H30 Hi* The Recital is under the patronage of Sir Allan Collymon Kt .u,d Lady Collvm-n to Kmume Dutiet M R. AND MRS BERTIE WAT*X*HE SON and their two children •* %  fll %  luring the past week from \fSouthampton after -.pending holidov in England. Mr. Watson Is Manager of the Artnur Tibbits of Cable & WireRovnl Bank of Canada. St. Kitte '•• < i J*'* [ ,or, J*r. me •"!* Mr nd and "111 he returning there in %  Mr *Hw.—I Jibhita .f Antigua. fw_days to resume his duties. liar It lo Tntiuiati Holidoyiiift With ramiiy V|R ALBERT GIBBS, brother Mrs. Stuart has gone to eompleto arriLremfnt' for "Kevuede.1119W Tmupt which will be following later The troupe expert to put on a series of performBOOM in Port-of-Spalii. They t Mild lie awav for about ten days. from Grrnmda M R. GLEN EVANS was an arrival from Grenada by .. JIW.I.A. on Sunday for one week's %  **•*'•' holiday. He la a relative of Mr. %  ngagemenl was recently David Evans of T R Evan-.. City announced between Miss Janet Merchant. During his stay here %  i.iUghU-r of Mr. and he w a guest at Hotel Royal. Clarence Scale of Klngaley HggfcggfM Kangvm' Camp *" d Mr IVf ISS B "YL SKEETE who %  if* went over to Trinidad early m August \ith the (>iieen's College Rangers, returned homo on Sunday hv B.W.I.A. She remainBut uollke tie rXi Pont (By ITIIHMM ||\KIH Asll.i theMond million did not muUlpl^ LIKE tbouaond al *fcoi 18Tueartay—because sne does not J^T 1 ''',^"; A ,ed :w ^.^ ^1 y 1 ""• rillo.-c. likf all Oerrnans Dr. Adenauer Actor's wife Mrs. John MUU put-i'-%  r>0 travel allowance. Boyal I ...inn ti vn.money in the Poet Office Bank liT-hS '£""! hr n "" ** %  -' %  "ildren *< -t fMnner Al Keye* .:*-><""-''hi Prtneeoi Astrld. -The trouble is they keep nsktn,' TRAVELLING to HolL-ad this laughter of Norway s crow. gaj WfPK Wlth a Ial setretao two l*rlnce OUf. who has iual flnlshed Five of Lady Pakcnhaun's etojht ,, n dchlldrcn and 28 otoce* of EWQ pggnr study of economics at eh.Wren are under IS She soya |„^ d ge 1B top-selting American *'' ,M "* u "' d <• "•• "P "J',."" 0 **'noreUrl Mr* FYanris Parkinson ThU week she aajlg to Uiitoin ' e lou-orrfs our annual holldoi,. gaye* (rkygftjg with akaW) for 'ix hours to see wmertiing of but have tflpen fhot up now. M „ Kve noveta, ins* Otnnor tho practical ^de of '.be tub**! *' %  " ,lw ">J\ < !^"„ oran8r <" AonH*-. are garnished with She .. %  ill liiimn %  aw >h.p vhich "" ""< ' '^ VCT *'ga^r.-numy. She married younn will nrl,, eMnaayi ggagiomy -.' Two roriunei and WM ashamed how little I carrying currency-earning tourEXAMINE the fate of two forkncw MD out food.'But she has '* studied it ever since. n will be her first big rovot It waa ItM when g Frenci aaaignrnaat. But her father will lelugee settled in America ana if vou dined now :it Mrs Keyes be there to help. founded the firm "f rw Bui Some Pgy m* 1 blgg.-st chemical EVERY morning a convoy of ,np world today. N enrs filled with people in Tyrolean ">* dtajgndimu. Lwiunot Du Pent frtpd crl|rken :irrangcd on a urge hats and yellow pullovers drives >< %  left £27,000^000 occordta* to dUh wtth rlce ^f^ ^^ frlt through l.ttle Dufftown. Wealth "* %  w,u J" 51 published. ten nd p^,,. M|ad ^y, chmv and ariatocrncy i off for ; %  day's It wao 1U2 when a German .souffle or toasted cheese: ice-cre am shooting. sciential. Ludwig Mond. came to 'it:% WI'.llNrSMW MtCPTrMKCK M. 1951 ook is. m n OEMINI J^aUy SI—Jane vhleh yo H.itlflg t r rthday the stars. i lijorlous tasks, real^^ Mareb :i—April 20 roadlng. mining, handling and manufactur•xar r<|uipment, ^i • w TADROP —Kcsconsive day, especially if you work *gv April 21 -Msy 30. 0 ..<.,,„ nutpul Ei.glnaf., n g. roadbtilld* M B. AND, MRS. G. AHCHEB ed In camp for two weft* with and (heir two children ret^*' firl* t Headquarters, of the late Mr C L Gibbs turned to Trinirtnd by H.W.I-A. Circular Road and stayed was an arrival by T.'C-A. fro.r! "", Sunda '**'" •*** ependm* ,h "" f *"* 1 b"l'Hnv Montreal. Canada on Thursday Jj. llduv *!?* 1 *'Archer I last. He has come over on a few 2Z?iv! weeks' visit h] kk I .utiilv here. Short Bu*in-*n Vinit M R CEOROEG. MONEY. Local Director of Barclnvs Bank. (D.C. A O.) returned from St. Sundav by B.WI.A. He i short hustneas visit. Officer ri.W.l.A., Pin Trinidad. For Omr Month M R. AND MRS A S EVFJ.YN arnved here by B.WI.A Lucia went Sp+nt Honeymoon Vf"AND MRS. A. ABRAHAM \ LSO returning home hy the •nme opportunity of 5und.iy from Trinidad was Miss Jean lest, n Kiinner She too was In .amp for two weeks and remain., %  ^•,IS? m c RfiJSS; at Michael's Girls' School. Aeeompanying them is their little arandcUd, ggfcW ._ Trachmr Return* For Police Gwrae \MR. WAKUKN THQRPE I NSPECTOR C.EORC.E RBlD of IVl t urn ed to Grenada on Bundle looal conalabulary left tha lay hy "WIA after spending kuand yi-sterday by the S.S. live weeks' holiday with his OranleMad for Englund where hv relatives. He is ii teacher at the L returned by B.W.IgX to Trinidad yesterday morning uftei spending ten days' honeymoon in the island us guests at Hotel Royal, will enter Hendon Police Training Grenada Boys' Secondary School, Ttutf were married in Trinidad College to undergo four months' St George's and comes over for on the 30th August. training. ins annual holidays. BY THE WAY By BEACHCGMBCR N OTHING to too mean and wing r seemed to hear lowly to nerve the parjlaugh. mount inter**!.'; of scieiire A ^—-^i lorgc number of bluebottles were | upped by professional flysnrdontc craft moorort within sight of the Royal Squadron Yacht Club. It is a kind of round punt with mist In the stem, and appears to question I hay.oeen MM ,„, steiim-drlven. Some thought to the btuebottU* %  atchers In "lobster-pots bolted l m auggeatlna that bluebottles lt wa wha mn aine.i with raw liver" (the favourite !" g>fr like seals. Dm I have j^.,^ Mrs. Flobat'r. but inquiries dish of gourmets in the bluebehind me the whole weight -.1 on tirm*-d the rumour that Dr. i-.tth world). vldP n Ti.. T 01 ^! V M,imh """ Mlrabismus (Whom God Preserve. They were "first given n f* 1 Sirickland Desgouttes, Hirsvr. lf utrerht had arrived aboard rodto-active drink to identify l^rsen. PIceolonunI Dm .. ,<„•, Neat, an experimental •h.Mi,. then rolea^ed. Wlien i 1 "'' Smalloloee. g trnt t which is designed to caught again they were "druap^^ has d^nbert th(1 nil .. ''">wyunder steam the Bed. and tested with a Oelgei rnl on ^ ,„.(„„!„ n B hprPr ,,. >**ng mere decoration Asked counts', and through a small tarv U| !" %  •engendered by ntavwn *> adventage ws to be derived loud-speaker came "a buzz like j„ t ,„„„,„„ mf] eKB(y rbatM hy from going sideways at sea, the regional conditions." But alone *"** snld: "Selence makee of all the Ampulae Caereleae the •^P'rtments. The advantages hluebottle migrates on a stidd.n •"' later." Asked what this Impulse instead „f for food >r had lo oo with Cowes. th light, and Praline was mlstaki-i* 'i1or said: "As much as and m a mere aimless wandering for ,nort lhnn %  ,n ^ wi,h n > the more purposeful Jourm-y **• %  • else" which we call migration. Tomorrow I shall demolish the absurd of persecution. ^j^^ 0 1^1^.^^ it IMmW m C6M%>* nentation klaJii which end to loo* rheougri > % %  %  !" . .-. (Savings of 9had--' ,u July 29. IOT2." The public can V inIerp(lt ed in an odd-looking buzz like ihat of an angry bee." They certainly had something to b>< ngrv about. (Jan a blurbottlv laugh .* 'T^'HE object ol this expei* %  ment was to find out "ho\ fur a bluebottle flies, und why Do they migrate ? Apparently. Mrs. Wyvern, on a cruise to A'hlch had fallen exhausted the ".ports deck of the line. rigid 10 its left leg was %  tiny metal tab. marked. "Nunenton ^risiTORS to Cowes have lieci %  a,, mt ua*ist in these experiments Whmtm of thtnge* Dnoiil of Bagdad miting any bluebottle trapped In •1 lobster-poi and giving it 1 radio-acti%'e drink. I did thl" yesterday, and through a tiny 'oud-speiker attached lo its left Listening //oars writMRBDAT %  rntxais n>. m; •m Ba g g-sa. .. is MM. M UM Rupert's Spring Adventure—28 Man R*i>h>y. y 1 • 10 p m Th# p.,1 All HBI*. u 1 ... i. p-aanma raaada, T a t IS p m Horn. Nrvn I :.II— sa a a* Th America and 0,1 PtMU ^ jrou ml ht """^ wl,h m,llt Ju'epL and canapes .spread with caviar; then lobster chowder; Maryland LBO July H AiK VUOO Ahg. .'".i,t 23 Aberdeen, has become one >>f Scotland's moat fashionable ...ting centres this season. Already 1-erd.giid lady lllandfbrd and Lord Carnan-on %  "My ben wrk's thootino since the war"—have been there. Thia week %  ix men whose total fortunea run nto many millions moors. Bept. 24—Oct. 23 BOOBPIO Oct. 24—Woe. 28 Do You Read the Signs? —Merlin Sti lude Herbert Pulitzer, arm of the founder of the American literary prizes. The Spanish Duke of AlpciriB and French banker Georges Verne are on their way. Ship owner Ma|or Stnnley Cayzer has a moor near by. Henrv Ford U (-omuig too. 1 nlgn* any mure. They ilon'l ever. •ther to read them and avast after i-y read them, they don'l obey mm. That's not good." Unarf and Hanid. the shadows •h the ".rneil-about names, asked Ration hooka for the duke and ichess and gtaff of six, Including huller and chef brought from Blenheim Palnce. Iirr lodged at a local h.. At Glenrlddlch they breakfast at T.J0, spend the evening playing bridge, canasta, and gramophone records. Saya the duchee*. -Some of fhr niritori are truest*, but ithert hana financial arrona.-menl imth fli,duke," fa, ,h *7 ?"* %  ''T,' tU ^ '" r!3l k *<***r*. landing straight and I ., Idle of them reading; 'Keep 01!',^^ arrived in Northern Italy In T * >Mi P^asn" But," said Mer. ., Ini, smiling sgaui, "not eeeryons 1 •• %  ot •• %  did." Suddenly there was the sound of "Oh. that waan't right," saidlweea. They were very clow by and Hnnid. ,n *y. ke P l gro*'ng louder. Knarf he duke. 1 Man In A Hurry FILM director Roberto Roaaellini arrived in Norlhen h!a scarlet Ferrari racer which he uses aa an ordinary sporta ear. He waa tired and travel-stained 'Where have you come from?" %  •ked a Mend. "Pve just driven non-stop from Calais." he said "I was a bit srtow this time— II took me 23 houre," Distanceover 700 milfk. Who Collects? WOULD FOU take the Welfare State's orange juice and Family Allowance, ,f you were wealthy" The Queen draws orange (ulee f 01 h *' r *hlldren but cannot have the family allowance—which rtMl ''ve to eight 'hllllngg on • "Well, 1 happened to be %  trolling rough the park this morning. Il 1nu'f a lovely park, with treei %  1 andnfj here and there, and benchen f people to rest on, and a play 1: "t"i'l for the children with swingi gnd sea>awi and slidea. But thi 1 ct and prettiet thing about thej (oohinij pink were the patches of gr*en'_ riu ..<„.,-the lawn^-on either sMle of c row He.l ail around Knarf were lie paths. Some of the lawns w"e ]hundrratl Bnf | thousands of other Ir.-veryon. to walk on. or play on.| „!„,,„, of gr „ to( juill |ke hlm.if. u lie down and stretch out on. But, t1fkt hr off wa lhf | ittle whiu Bign t'e rest ef them had tiny fens lrwid nir . K( ^, ()rr JI,. c „ Mi • Pleaae.' The Made, of grass ware •ig. rdl stun oroieets hlfhly favoured. • * Ho\ .ill favourable 101 many matters ^ Care is urged in tonirnct.", legal issues, but 1 I. WhoU 1line for turdy activities, ^ iiidLiitiial trader, urgent duties. ~ OANOEB peak day for you Strive to if June ra-Jnly %  £< ,,ur occupation. vork har*^ inoniously with employers, and employer* ;,„ IM ititninmvnt of all concerned. w • * —'tour Sun ravs stress patience, modera!i..ii lo gala benefits through other beneflc ^ Dont indulge hurt feelings. ^^ * Mild Indications except for familial 4( inattaia, dealing with metals, machinery. r ^ tatm These latter ore more sponsored.' • • 2 %  -peclally favourable for artistic ~ 1 personal wishe*, but it Is genera|gj .1 generous period for interests con^^ cerning the public, our tinned forces. ^f %  * Saturn. Moon and Neptune — very ^ favourably aspeeted—offer an Interesting !" day. profitable if rightly managed. A challenge to those who face difficult tasks. ^ * * —Much will depend upon your own efforts '..-dn\ Industrial trades, household in* j %  mong top honoured. • %  www* Encouraging indications with your Sat^ urn and the Moon excellently Bspected. (!i> alMad confidently with plans and have ^ f:iith in what you do. "^ • • —An nmi'iinllv henefle. stimulating period ^L tor your famllv interests New undertak^ )ng* of worth have helpful rays as do imlllar and ri.iilv routine. J^ * —Aglvlce to Caprib. 81 -March M YOU BORN TO-DAY Very talente-l, ogpable. likeable. ~ &f Talent for acting generally high in this Sign of Virgo. Could be nurse, decorator, modiste, milliner with fine results, or an ^ actor. Vtress, journalist. Tendency in all conscientious Vir% %  ?* 4| goans Is to woik too much, thus taxing health. Btrthdate: John Jordan Crittenden, Amir, statesman # # w> • • ***• i SONG RECITAL "" % %  . MAM '•MI.HI I' 1...ml. rulkrn.cn tried to turn around bat h. rouldn't "Didn't a p-.l.^m.n chu< them h "', "~ hl J^. ft 1 hlm ,uck AV bmrf -an.rd ... know. jmhr .round. But thrn. a MM Nadu .hook hi. hr.,1 -Ther,:^'""' %  %  """• ' children. %  „,n't 2*3 pollen, !" to Wlc-'SS, "'t i r,"r, n rdn. '""""' .v.rron. -ho nrp. on thr ur.|" U ,'S 1 ""J t ""1 "',"""., „j And Mb, ,ou .huuldn't M a "" %  J" Knarf wantrd u nin poliron-an'to Lko von do ,h. rl.ht,^"„„ '."„ "£L %"^TL tl,in. V..u .hould do it brrauao sroul*.,"£ ,. T^.k 2S Z k„o ,f. ,hr riht thin, M Ho. dmSSJf* !" '"? .,?"'"? l w .ro thrrr i.nl an, rr„n -hy anyo,,. !" '^' """.'^. l—Znl u£ •hould walk ,.n Ihr .raaa hon a. |J? 1 ,, *V ?tl"" !T ? ,! ; ,„ ; : v aoM, at. vou p,... w 65irrr''i-ts %  -%  %  I.I . aki ..I A trrmt heavy shoe was over At thiKnarf .aid: • I don t think Knarf** head. Down it came— it hurtthe-gra*. to ... P on it. It An(| th n Knmrt foun(| himBi# just bends OTST. Anyway grasa U'l^v in lhe room again, with Merim grass. It can t really feel anylin ^n lrttln on lh „,„, of th# thing and— bookra-e. hi* legs dangling, and Knarf didn't notice that Merlin.smiling. "Well, Knarf — how did had stopped -millng and wasl you like bring a blade of grass? Do waring hi* hand in a carious way.iyou think folks ought : %  > "hey -?-n* But the mat instant Knarf MtinowT" , himself becoming long and thin and, And Koarf could hardly nod his %  Hasa And there he was. %  tandlag'head quickly enough to say ha In the middle of the park lawn, agreed. 7.IB pm Cl.in tlte Wes Indie. 1 • p.M All Mala. S 15 p ... R.dl<. N'SSWl. • S p in S(-i !" ,,.i ,., Aecounl. lUnm InUTludr. V. ,. ,>, %  Yam ihc gaiumalt. w p m | m -V^jri TWfc. 10 IS p m Kid Weak Ti. loe* p m rroni the third Procr-miy. w leenu very upart *od BBBBS i-jy ek h ast .ay turther tals Whji did he mi.?" mannurs Ruperl. "I'd oeoet go and look * h< told me He hames over %  .k>p onnl he •jrhi the ipot a-bawj he Bru mi ine laneei. Good IIKDM I erythtns iua ohaaapd oaku -Th. basga .nd M a-ajg. m HM ati "i hsv He runt 10 che asataat Why. >t kwki ,]LI.I* esad : < i :h don. .11 ,hu? I n % %  .'px-hed , 4 .„„ OWvaoj-1 Doubte— 0mv# „a| Doable.USSM MM is. i-ir.i i a*v mi irrr DSBBB* gla Htn l SlarrlngV*onne DeTrle lioH* KnrtoW HonaM Calmim In 11" ii I SAHAS*. and SALT TO Hlrhard Arien TWr nFVII Andr PerS K reidar onlr 4 rhuradav allMpm aag • S p m Rep..binDouble Unites AnidI.ISOI . I.1TS OASIS Chartes gssasksd. ThueaSay otllr •i 4 a ft i it I WAS A amir It.... Ian. %  Ml etlArVTOM O* „... rn rnr n *iAva r\n> %  na „_....^ Double a ma. war. Saturday a Eaa ISIIM A Rrpublle DoubK BATTLE AT n*h.rd APACHE PASS mmm I'IMHI -ri i i and TSTg fXAMF with John Carroll Vera RalaKm THIS WOMAN I S DANGER OUS /I— ""JOAN I jfXSNiS f\DAMP CRAWFORD MORGAN BRIAN tnm assi ass SSM -ane LW i. .'ii. gggB. -; *-. % %  T. R EVANS WHITFIELD'S BRANCH Plione YOUR SHOE STORE P14/4 BRIDGETOWN DIAL 2310J BARGAINS! I I 1 \lilM. vevrrol useful ilems In Hardware •ANS. POTS. HAI.F PINT StaSSISS, SNAP GI.ASSKS. JICS. SALT & PF.PPKK SHAKES*, CUPS & SAt'CKRS. PI.ATIS. TKA STKAIMKS CAN OPKNERS slid several other III 11 s| Mill I. NKCKSSITIKS afa*" Visit l.\ and Scr these Rnrunins i.n display at extremely Low Prices G. W. HUTCHINSON & Co., Ltd.












WHAT'S ON TODAY

Police Courts 10.00 a.m
Meeting of the Chamber of

Commerce 2.00 p
Meeting of tite Roard o

Health 2.20 p.1
Police Band Concert at St

Stephen's Boys’ Schoo opm
Mobile Cinema Show at Holy

Trinity, St. Philip

ESTABLISHED 1895



Landlords Ordered To Give
Up Land Over 200 Acres

From Alt Quarters:

CAIRO, Sept. 9,
Premier General Mohammed Naguib’s new cabinet dis-
solved all political parties and ordered landlords to surrend+
er all their land in excess of 200 acres for redistribution to
landless peasants. Two historical decrees at one stroke
altered the whole basis of Egypt’s political and economic |
life. They were designed to wipe out political corruption |

| 3 Rocket
Expedition
To Greenland

New York: A_ rocket firing
expe@dition is going to Greenland.
Within 50 miles of the Magnetic
North Pole, they will send up

and end the feudal economic system that has kept millions
of Egyptians in virtual serfdom.

Naguib described the land reform law as “the first step
toward rebuilding Egypt's economic and social structure.”
The decrees came less than 48 hours after strong man
Naguib, already Commander in Chief ot the Army, assumed
the Premiership.

They will become law. when—
signed by the three-man Regency
Council in the name of the infant
King Ahmed Fuad,

To see that the new laws are!
carried out, the Cabinet named

the rockets’ noses will be geiger
counters to m@asure cosmic rays.

Sydney: Professor Clyde Klu-
ckhohn, director of, the Russian
res€arch centre at Harvard Uni-

" it, versity, said this week: “On the
Naguib military Governor General Se a : ; >
of Egypt with all the powers con- are s ag or hy 7 ~——
ferred by martial law. Naguib ;jestimate based on _ facts, ther?
thus became the undisputed ruler stare at least 10,000,000. aduit
of Egypt with powers exceeding | Russians in forced labour camps
even those of ex-King Farouk today. If a truy free election

were held, the Communists would
certainly be thrown out.”

Capetown: When fire scorched
the top of a church in Capetown
last February, the clock stopped.

whom he forced off the throne
and into exile on July 26,

The three-man Regeney Coun-
cil acting in the name of Farouk’s
seven-month-old son was hand-
picked by Naguib. No organized



opposition is expectyd. The Army It was made in Cheapside, Lon - |
is firmly in control under Naguib, don, in 1819 and during its voy-
and has rooted up 48 of the most age out, was drenched with sea

in. water, It was cleaned, oiled and
series of raids. All were still in installed in the chureh where it
custody, and the Army said that ran without stopping for 132

some would be tried for corrup-
tion and other crimes against the
State.—U.P.

years. This week it started run-
ning again “as good as new”

after its second spring-clean.
Sydney: Four hundred doctor:,
many with pipes and cigarettes
in their pockets heard Dr.
Murphy, president of the Royal
Australasian College of Physic-
ians, tell them at a. conference
this week: “Smoking leads to a
rise in the blood pressure, in-
crease in the heart rate, constric-
tion of small blood vessels in the
, Sept. 9. ‘has been pleased to appoint Mr. hands and feet and stops circula-
Representative Dewey Short, |g. S. Robinson, former member|tion.” But he added, “There is
one of the 11 United States cOn=' of the House of Assembly, to be|no need to give it up altogether.

gressmen touring Sores, es gia | provisionally a member of the|]Just cut it down,”

Sen ores aga e|-aeinve Coon pe
wayâ„¢*up to the Manchurian bord-~ This was communicated to the of 22 cpwards are lship to ke
er. The Missouri Republican said Legislative Council yesterday in err. “2 Goat toy voxitnae
that a divided Korea was “almost! message from His Excellency !SUch 48 “conspiring against the
worse” than Korea united en-! the Governor. State, damaging State property
or economic sabotage” under the

tirely by the Communists,

He _said; “I cannot see any; the business of the}new penal code introduced in
peace out here so long as there i$ Council was entered upon, Hon.|Albania on September 1. For
a divided Korea”, Short’s opin~ J. D. Chandler, President, sum, | common crimes such as murder,
ions on the necessity of taking moned Mr, Robinson to the Coun-!arson or robbery, the death sen-

cil Chamber and formally invited tence can only be passed on

control, of North Korea are simi-
lar to those repeatedly expressed! him to take his seat as a member persons aged 14 or over.

by President Syngman Rhee, He | of that Council.

said; “We should go all the way } Adelaide: An 83-year-old pipe
to the Yalu River. I think even-{ Welcoming Mr, Robinson, Hon.jsmoker is claiming a world
tually, we will have to go all the|J. Chandler said that he had muchjrecord for keeping his pipe
way.”—U.P. pleasure in welcoming him to thejalight for one hour 47 minutes on

Board. He knew that Mr. Robin-|one fill. The record was set in
son had thad experience as a mem-|4 hotel bar. Previous record

South Koreans 16 seconds
Fall Back From



MR, E.

S. ROBINSON



U.N. Will Have To
Fight Up To:
Manchurian Border

U.N. AIR BASE IN KOREA,

Robinson
Appointed
Leg. Co. Member

powerful politicians in Egypt in i
'
\
!
|
i
{
| His Excellency the Governor



Before



ber of The Other Place and there-|one hour 42 minutes 16 seconds

fore the work of that Council
would not be new to him in any {pct by Totes Depa of Mount

way. .
7 Sydney: The biggest blast
Capitol Hill He said that the honourable |furnace in the southern hemis-
q member would find the debates|phere went into operation this

very much quieter up there than] week at Port Kembla steelworks
in The Other Place and he would south of Sydney. It will boost
also find that they did a consid- | plant capacity to 3,700 tons per

TOKYO, Sept. 9.
Exhausted South Korean troops
fell back from the bloody crest of

Capitol Hill early today leaving|erable amount of work in Com- (day and help to make the works
pealy mauled Chinese Commun-| mittee. Australia’s biggest steel centre
ists fn command of Korea central ‘ with .an output of 1,350,000 tons
front height, 954 Reds ware i Select Committee ‘per year.

ed or wounded in three days o . “s f
“2 rl They endeavoured in their work} Tel@viv: The first payment of

savage fighting that opened with
the crushing of a Red attack on
Saturday night,

South Korean soldiers

reparations by Germany to Israel

ills a : atters in
to_put bills and such m thew {on account of Nazi crimes against

the best possible shape when they S
had|came before them and he would!the Jews will be made in Octo-
fought stubbornly to reach the find that many of them are re- | ber. It will consist of £3,000,000
crest of the hill in the night, but|ferred to Select Committees. He!with which Israel will buy oil
at midnight, Chinese reinforce-/felt sure that Mr. Robinson would | from Britain,
ments swarmed over the ridges!be a good and useful member
and pushed the South Koreans|whenever he was asked to serve |
beck in fleree close in fighting. {

e On Page 5



Sabre-jets Hit
Nineteen MIG’s

SEOUL, Sept. 9.

U.N. Sabre-jets destroyed or
damaged 19 Communist MIG 15s
jas around 15 Russian-built jet
| fighters tried desperately to break
up an Allied air attack on a North
Korean military academy. Seven
of the fighters were shot down in
flames and 10 limped back across
the border of Communist China
into Manchuria,

It was the best day of hunting
that Allied jet pilots have had so
far this month. A record for last
month came on August 4 when
12 MIGs were destroyed and four
damaged. It was the second time
that U.N. fighter-bombers struck
the military academy, southeast
of Sakvhu, near the Yalu River
in northwest Korea, The allies
caught the Reds trying feverish~
ly to repair the damage inflicted
'in a previous assault on July 4.



KOPEA VET SEES SON FOR FIRST TIME

2 3 . a
: if







MAY DETERMINE RiD
CHINA’S RECOGNITION

PORTLAND, OREGON,
Sept. 9.
| Governor Adlai Stevenson said
there is a historical precedent for

| HISTORICAL PRECEDENT
|
!
|

the possible recognition of Red
China as a de facto government if
the Korean war is resolved but
added there are “very consider~



able objections” to that recogni-
tion,
The Democratic presidential

nominee made his statement in a







oe Shon oe ~f i 1e ,
brief question and answer meeting| of survival —U.P Legisiative Council ay —— 'n| governmental extravagance.’
attended by 200 edi d news. , rr he Council Chamber at 2. y Havenga, renewing South Afri-

ae ¥ editors and news- fon Tuesday, September 23, for|.9's fight before the Int 5
paper publishers. _ —_ - Sa, ak anal’: date eee it before e International
Stevenson was asked “should! ,, Pincay ian vrhp Thain ter cent eg i _uele-| Monetary Fund for a free market
| we recognize Red China as a de VACCINE FOR EXPOR 7 ioe 0 end on Non oie in Gold, reminded financial lead-
facto government in case the Kor- we In a on pepe sa uslers from 54 nations that “past
ase + | ean war is resolved? He replied: PARIS, Sept. ¥ wr] Renee Leer eetee nee fee A iP "\efforts to maintain the price of
* a “there are considerable objections An. Agriculture Ministry hi- 5 in embly berday fi ners Te | gold at an ro oe have |
+ “ to BC iti ; T cial annou od that nm r ice | Wepu Speake of the House } cost th world dearty in 1uman
Ce ee ey ee nen eee pe eeng Fok oe neha Sabi Out to fourthet we tion fet toatioee nd mout -|A. E La informed mem- welfare.” He saids “There is-a
Leon Ross holds his r.sre-months Played Leon ies Wacky bs Be resolve differences with enem-|ease vaccine tart o t Other Place were! gro onviction that if gold is
never seen bef n Loe Angeles, 71 was | ies in h as in the case of| montt The nformal t will wreck
in Korean « f ind is h i I Ita e recognize them rapidly.” | vaccine f del t ‘ nism As we
Hazel Mae Ross, and Cc ne, 23 mont old } UP. | be exy —O.P I e sta where ce



‘

PHarbadros



rockets 25 miles and higher. In|



WEDNESDAY _ SEPTEMBER 10, 1952





ma

EGYPT’S POLITICAL PARTIES DISSOLVED




| NEW BUILDING FOR TRUCE TALKS |

|

~ ser oo |

a Coronation Committee wh

Elizabeth IL.

j
/

j

day, 17th of September.





| New Atomic
Tests Al
Eniwetok



WHILE A RED SOLDIER stand:
touches on the almost-completed bu
will be used for conferences by t)

guard, workmen put the finishing
ding at Panmunjom, Korea, that
United Nations and Communist



The meeting lasted nearly one
hour and the agenda for further
talks this week were drawn up.
li is expected that discussions will
be completed on Friday and an
official statement: will probably be
issued afterwards,







D l t W l i ‘new atomic tests at Eniwetok atoll
£ S ; bomb will be exploded.
command of Major General Percy
] e T T | | announcement said only tests will
ndies rade a ks
} gave no hint whether
(From Our Own Correspondent) hydrogen bomb which--if perfect-
Colonies, welcomed delegates to discussions on Canada-| than the conventional atomic
secrecy with only official United
the West Indies about their future trade with Canada and
ent. The formation of the Task
ae ° nel of the A.E.C., Army, Navy
5 Children Die

announced on Tuesday night that
a Joint Task Force will conduct
this autumn It did not disclose
that an experimental hydrogen
| Tests will be conducted by the
c | Joint Task Force 132 under the
0 Uanada—Wwest | !
. Clarkson which has been prepar-
} ing for tests since last winter. The
be “looking towards the develop-
ment of atomic weapons.”
tt they
| would include the projected
5 atl R LONDON, Sept. 9, jed-—-is expected to be as much as
LORD MUNSTER, Under-Secretary of State for the, a thousand times more powerful
sr \ Seda co on ‘ +4} | bomb,
West Indies trade which began to-day at the Colonial) "pecs will be carried out in deep
Office. In his speech he referred to the anxieties felt in
States Government observers and
gave the assurance that these anxieties were fully under-, members of the Task Force pres-
stood by H.M. Government. Force 132 was announced last Feb-
ruary 18. It included the person-
and Air Force,
It is believed that the new tests
. 2 . will be more powerful -—~ or at
In Hospital Fire c

least more secret—-than the recent
series of blasts on the Nevada

MELBOURNE, Sept. 9, There were eighteen_represen- | proving ounds in which the
Five children ranging in tatives of the seven West Indies tenons Sati claties,
age from seven months to yovernments present and a com- " —U.P.

arable number of officials from
be Colonial Office, Treasury,
Ministry of Food, Board of Trade
and Ministry of Transport.

Lord Munster said that the
anxieties felt in the West Indies
about the future of their trade
with Canada were well under-
derstood by H.M, Government and
that the Secretary of State’s object
in calling the working party to-|
gether was to give the West
Indies representatives the oppor-
tunity of an informal exchange
jof views and information on the
iwhole subject.

One aspect of the Canadian and
West Indies trade relations was

seven years burned to death |
om Tuesday in a fire which ©
swept through a flimsy hos-
pital building in a camp for
European immigrants, Twen-
ty-five other children and a
lone adult in the building
were rescued or led to safe-
ty.

Jan Tiegner a Pole smash -
ed his way inside through
the window and threw three
children from the building
to waiting hands, All thirty
children in the hospite) were
infantile paralysis or scarlet
fever cases.



° .
Colombian Mobs
f ene
Pacified

BOGOTA, Colombia, Sept. 9.
Government communiques
| sought to re-assure the populace
on Tuesday after a week end of
fighting and mob violence, and
it announced that the acting Presi-
dent, Roberto Urdaneta, would
speak to the nation by radio on
Friday, National Police Director
General Miguel San Juan issued
a bulletin which said “that there

The deaths were three a 4 aha) 04 “ar

the effect of exchange and restric-| is complete calm in the capital
boys and_ two girls. Panic tion ” Canadian To Brit- | and according to information re-
swept 1,500 immigrants oe ish territories in the Caribbean, | ceived here, peace prevails
the camp when the fire Lord Munster emphasised that the] throughout the country,
broke out, Screaming moth- ‘terling areas balance of payments} Other snnouncements reveal
ers fought desperately to position was still very difficult| the extent of disorders, which in-
break through the hastily and that the working party would] cluded the burning and sacking
drawn cordon to enter the have to bear that in mind|of two Liberal Bogota newspapers
blazing building, Three of throughout their discussions. by mobs on Saturday. The gov-
four rooms in the hospital He said the representatives of thelernment communique announced

were destroyed.—U.P. West Indies weleomed the oppor-, that Cheito Velasquez, a , leader

tunity to discuss the main aspect; of the Liberal “guerillas” who

of this complicated problem which have clashed frequently with gov-

was of great importance for the} ernment forces, had been killed

well being of the British Carib- | he tried to cross the frontier

bean Colonies Venezuela where he had
mK r U.P.



No Canadians At
Wi—Canada Talks





from
taken refuge







_ ’
‘ ‘
MONTREAL, Sept. 9 U.S. Go Beyond All at Sea
In London the opening phase of 6esy. . ”°
Canada West Indian talks began Containment saa la cf, 7
between delegates of the major ;
ng f " itie anda}
Sanclais’ of “the eoritish, ‘Gor ‘ Senator Alexander Wiley, Re-

| publican on the Senate Foreign Re-

on Tuesday
States foreign
beyond

ment with no Canadian repre
tatives present. A Canada House| lations
official said: “It is strictly a family; Said that
colonial affair.” policy

Committee, i
United
has

gone mere

WASHINGTON, Sept. 9. |
‘

acterize it as containment”.

} Wiley said-“plenty of mistakes”
have been made in United States
| foreign policy, but in general “we

Jamaican delegation.
(cP)



Advorate

trnce negotiators. The hut replaces the tents used for talks during : WASHINGTON, Sept 10
the previous year. It is built of straw mats on a concrete base. rhe Defence Department and |
—International. the Atomic Energy Commission





oe

Y

Lo

PRICE : FIVE CENTS



Vestry Forms A

Coronation Com.

THE St. Michael's Vestry yesterday resolved itself into

ich will make preparations for

the celebration of the Coronation of Her Majesty Queen

The Committee was formed at the request of His Excel

lency the Governor, and “ton. V. C. Gale,

was nominated to attend the first meeting of a Main Com-
mittee under the Chairmanship of His. Excellency the
Governor in the Legislative Couneil Chamber on Wednes

Churchwarden

The other ‘ten vestries have
also been requested to set up
Ccronation Committees in their
parishes, The Main Committe
will be split into several sub-
committees, including a parochial
| co-ordinating Committee unde
the chairmanship of the Lord
Bishop which will co-ordinat
the activities of the various paro

chial Coronation Committees
maintain liaison with thei
Chairmen.

Before the forming

ind
a close

of the Cor

mittee by the St. Michael Ves
try yesterday morning, Mr. EB. D
Mottley stressed that he did not
want it to be felt that any mem-
ber of the Vestry was too busy
to serve on the Committee, and

he suggested that the entire Ves-
try serve as the Coronation Com-
mittee.

He also
membership
Committee
fined

pointed out that the
of the Coronation
should not be
members of the
proper, but that some per
who had to do with the youto
(of the parish should be included
on the Committee, because the
Coronation was an occasion when
loyalty and patriotism should be
impressed on the youth of the
colony,

Members generally agreed that
every member of the | Vestry
should be given an opportunity
to serve on the Committee, but
it was pointed out that the ex-

con-
Vestry

to

ne



perience had been that large com-) Mr,

were usually unwieldy,
and it was oftem difficult to get
the same members attending all
the meetings,

mittees



| Japanese Women
| Enquire After
| War Prisoners

| GENEVA, Sept. 9.

A Prisoners of War Commission
meeting behind closed doors here
has received a petition signed by
a million Japanese women ask-
ing the fate of their country’s sol
diers missing since the war,
United Press learned on Tuesday.
The petitions were put before the
Commission by Tsuruyo Kondon,
who said that she was speaking
om behalf of the women of Japan,
Chis United Nations Commission,
she said was the “sole hope’ of
learning the fate of their loved
ones.

Japan has claimed that of the
340,000 soldiers still missing only
the Soviet authorities know which*
are dead and which are still liv-
ing. The Japanese estimate the
rum@er of dead at about 250,000

Mrs, Kondon said that she had
but one question to ask the Com-
mission to answer: “Is there no
way to learn which prisoners are
alive and which are dead?”

—U.P.





Japan Prepares
For Textile War

LONDON, Sept. 9

Textile manufacturer Kenneth
Boardman, warned that Japan is
marshalling sales forces to cap-
ture Commonwealth markets

through an all-out cut-price war
Ten Japanese delegates attend
ing next week's international cot



SAN FRANCISCO, Sept. 9

Harry Bridges’ longshoremer

The meetings which may last} “containment” of Communist ag- ton trading conference in Buxton,
10 days were described officially] gression in Europe. “We haven't Derbyshire, were expected to make
as a “working party to explora) been in the position of doing no- !'a strong plea for abolition of the
the problems of Canada—West| thing, the Wisconsin Senator told tariff! barrie
Indian trade in the light of j~| rey rs upon return ng from a Japanese cottons are now ex |
ance-of-payment difficulties of the week European trip, “We have | cluded from Commonwealth mar-|}
sterling area. taken the offensive and started kets. The embargo was imposed|

The Earl of Munster opened the building up the strength, not earlier this year,—(CP) |
meetings. E. Neville, Assistant, only of ourselves, but,of our allies.
Secretary of State for the Polen as ¢ Bay : ; Ce Fepeaene

resided. Major West Tndiag) people vehine to ron ¢ Wi .
Communities represented ar @ :—| through the aoe of ee oe Vorkers Call
Jamaica, Trinidad, British Guiana,| lot of things that can even be tol (

Barbados. Bustamante heads the} : bout. I certainly wouldn’t char- Protest Strike
|



7 Killed As
Fireworks Explode

MEZICO CITY, Sept. 9
Authorities counted seven «
and 28 injured on Tuesday

| are taking appropriate steps under
{world circumstances as they
| exist” Wiley said he believes that
the Republicans can definitely fol-
low “the foreign policy” leader-
ship” of their presidential nom-~
nee Dwight Eisenhower. He said

PATRICIA KASKEL, 19, of Los An-
geles, has been refused permis-
sion to land in England after stow-
ing away on the Queen Mary. The
would-be traveler’s father, Ira,
told newsmen: “I sent the Cunard



id

ifter| that the Europeans regard Fisen-



}«
| is
Bridges was convicted in

voted a 24-hour
protest against
Appeal
Bridges’
Six
‘isco
to

work stoppage in
the United States
Court’s affirmation of
conyiction for perjury.
thousand men in San Fran
are involved. The strike
start tomorrow morning
1950 for













ESTERDAY’S WEATHER REPORT

‘otal Rainfall for the mont 4 of an
Codt '
stu





’ % 93: 19. OG

rO-DAY
ay
6.12 pom
Tide
w Tide

ot
hest Tempe
nrise “7

6.45 a.m.,
1,0 am

3.08 p.m,

ee eee ee mee

E

tomologist
Will Be
‘mployed

ON AGREEMENT

Mr. R, Wide Tucker, Entomo-
logist, Department of Science and
riculture, wtkkyeach on Becem-

10, thig yearggthe compulsory










retiring afe un the Pensions
lx t, 1947. Governmgnt propose
}to employ Mr. Tucker oti agree-
t following. his tirement
This was communicated to tht
Legislative Couneil at.their meet-
ing yesterday in a Message from
H Excellency the Governor. The
read as follows
His ¥ llency the Govefnor has
ri OOM inform the Hon-
‘ it ary esa Council
4 at ‘hs



MR. K. W. E. TUCKER
that on the 10th December, 1952,

W. E. Tucker, Entomologist,
Department of Science and Agri-
culture, will reach the compulsory
retiring age under the Pensions
Act, 1947.

It is important that the work of
controlling the sugar cane moth
borer by rearing and distributing
, parasites and the attempt to con
trol, and possibly eradicate, the
other major sugar cane pest, the
root borer, "BY Tears he appli-
cation of the new insecticide
@ On Page 7

C.D.C. Awaiting



| Report From W.I.

Controller

Fro Our Own Correspondent:
LONDON, Sept, 9.

C.D.C. officials in London are
awaiting a report from their re-
gional Controller in the Caribbean
Mr, Duncan Anderson on the
future of their plans for banana
growing in British Honduras.

Dependent on his report and
recommendation they will decide
whether turn over lands at
present devoted to bananas to the
cultivation of citrus fruits: and
pineapples

to





Russians ‘Menace’

American Soldiers

BERLIN, Sept, 9.
Russian troops and Communist

police armed with tommy guns
threatened three jeep loads of
American soldiers who tried to

pass through to a highway check-
point west of Berlin on Tuesday.

To reach the American check-
point at the Berlin end of the
main highway Western Ger-
many, American troops must pass
through a 100-yard strip of Soviet-
held territory. The Russians ban-
ned American travel through the

to



strip last Thursday, but lifted the
ban immediately To-day they
uddenl reimposed it As a re-
ult, American troops had to
m a detour over bad country
roads to reach t oint

Major General Lemel Mathew-
von, American Troop Command-
ant, said that the Russians and
Red police “menaced soldiers with
their weapons.” The Americans
were outnumbered, he said, and

ad no choice but to turn back,





“Financial Malversation”?

OTTAWA, Sept. 9.

The Yugoslay Embassy accused
the Toronto’ group of Yugoslav
|¢ inadians on Monday of “finan-
} cial malversation” and announced
| that approximately $60,000 worth

, , } . 7 wei that he was not Com-|of Yugoslav reconstruct fund
explosion of fireworks idjhewer as “a peace general” who wearing i f ij v_ reconstruction func
black "panter that wrecked sev-| bh n't eid ify with wart gen- Line $335 for her round trip on | munist. He was sentenced to five] certificate held by Canadians
eral buildings in a down val erals” , - one condition—that she be kepton | years, but was freed on a $25,000] would be redeemed immediately.
business district. \ But Senator Theodore Francis] the boat.” (International) bail pending appeal—c.P. | UP.
A fire broke out on Monday in| Green, another Foreign Relations].



a warehouse filled with firework’! Committee member, also back

for Mexico’s Independence Day)/from Europe said that Eisenhower

celebration on September 16 cared” the Europeans with a

Repeated explosions followed as uple of sentences in his adéress

ae tae wa ees, ON Pl ete MEXICO CITY, Sept. 9

om aero te fr ; pant . . - Finance Minister Nicholas Ha-

also stored in the bull ee vena Sout deine ame

ware stores, « biilard boriou 2| Delegates For WL. Talks |yima,ot South Africa warned on
F 2 and six id \k oo . je vale é e

nt eed Toomoyed or n- To Be Appointed et for a met gpectes

aged. Doctors said that '! ‘The House of Assembly and the dard with ite "e ne anaes

of the injured were beyond »p automatic check on


















tain








World Must Return To Gold Standard



constructive. It would incredse
the gold reserve lubricate the
machinery of international trade,

and induce gold producers to pro-

duce more gold so that enough
production would keep world
jtrade going.”

Havenga said that except for

the United States and Soviet Rusg-
, fold reserves throughout the



| world were declining and can be
price
said

built up only by “raising the
of gold deflation” He
“It surely would spell a
lisaster if the
upon deflationar
n end whict

or



are t :
to achieve



currencies are again under
heavy pressure, the tire vems|
cpporfune for a world ide in-
crease in the price of gold whict
should facilitate the removal or
reduction of exchange restric-
tions.”

South Africa, the world’s num- |
ber one gold producer, has sought |
repeatediy but unsuccessfully t
persuade the Monetary Fund to}
|release gold from its pegged world
| price of $35 per ounce

Sir Percy Spender of Australia
}supported Havenga's plea on the
grounds that a gold price increas
“would strer the hand

vernr f fl
H ex Ar

.




a a as lain ae

PAGE TWO

Carib Calling

T. COL, J. CONNELL and Mr
4 Connell were passengers fo
Puerto Rico by B.W.LA. on Mon-
day intransit for the U.S.A. on

isit. ’

Married At St. Mary’s

N Saturday afternoon at 4.30

hid o'clock at St. Mary’s Church
Mr. Carl Winston Cozier of Trini-
dad and son of Mr, and Mrs. C. M.
Cozier took as his bride Miss
Thora Marguerite Carrington,
daughter of Mr. C. A. Carrington
The. groom's parents came ove
for the happy occasion.

The ceremony which was fully
choral was conducted by the Rev
K. A. B. Hinds and the bride who
was given in marriage by her
father wore a gown of bridal pink
slipper satin featuring a V neck-
line with a small upright collar
and long close fitting sleeves with
points at the wrists. The bodice
was close fitting with a nylon net
yolk outlined with appliques
pearl beads. The skirt was
fully gathered flare ending in
long wide train. She wore a
finger tip veil held in place by a
tiara studded with pearls and
dimantes. Her bouquet was silve
radiance and tube roses.

She was attended by her sister
Miss Hazel Carrington as Maid-
of-Honour who wore a dress of
orchid nylon featuring a wid
neckline with upright collar. Her
bodice was tight fitting with a
wide diaphram band in front and
the top carried three peaks which
gave the effect of petals. The
skirt was fully gathered and she
wore a crinoline bonnet adorned
with flowers.

The bridesmaids, the Misses
June and Grace Cozier wore blue
and green nylon respectively cut
on similar lines as the Maid-of-

of

a

Honour’s. They carried small
silver cages of and gerberas
The duties of bestman were

performed by Mr, Gerald Mayhew
and those of ushers fell to Mr.
Eric Edwards, Mr. Errol ae
ton, Mr. Bunny Gill, and
David Greenidge. The reveption
was held at “Abbeville”, Worthing
and the honeymoon is being spent
S — Spring Hotel, Bath-
she k

16 Kesume Duties
R. AND MRS. BERTIE WAT-
SON and their two children
arrived during the past week from
Southampton after spending a
holiday in England.

Mr, Watson is Manager of the
Royal Bank of Canada, St. Kitts
and will be returning there in 4
few days to resume his duties.

oli Family

R. ALBERT GIBBS, brother

of the late Mr. C. L. Gibbs,’
was an arrival by T.C.A, from
Montreal, Canada on Thursday
last. He has come over on a few
weeks’ visit to his family here.

Si siness Visit

R. GEORGE G. MONEY, Local

Director of Barclays Bank,
(D.C. & O.) returned from St.
Lucia on Sunday by B-W.1.A. He
went on a short business visit.

Spent Honeymoon

i R. AND MRS. A, ABRAHAM
a returned by B.W.JA. to
Trinidad yesterday morning after
spending ten days’ honeymoon in
the island as guests at Hotel Royal,
They were married in Trinidad
on the 30th August.



BY THE WAY......

OTHING is too mean and

lowly to serve the para-
mount interests of science. A
large number of bluebottles were
trapped by professional fly-
catchers in “lobster-pots baited
with raw liver” (the favourite

tis f go’ ets in the blue- behind me the whole weight of
Cree OC geet : . evidence collected by Mumhau-

bottle world).

They were “first given a
radio-active drink -to identify
them,” then released. When

caught again, they were “drug-
ged, and tested with a Geiger
counter,” and through a small
loud-speaker came “a buzz like
that of an angry bee.”
certainly had something
angry about.

Can a bluebottle laugh #
E drew Object of this experi-

ment was to find out “how
far a bluebottle flies, and why.”
Do they migrate? Apparently.
A Mrs. Wyvern, on a’ cruise to
Athens, picked up a_ bluebottle
which had fallen exhausted on
the sports deck of the liner.
Tied to its left leg was a tiny
metal tab, marked, “Nuneaton:
July 29, 1952.” The publie can
assist in these experiments by
ringing any bluebottle trapped in
a lobster-pot and giving it a
radio-active drink. I did this
yesterday, and through a tiny
loud-speaker attached to its left

to be

Listening Hours
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10,

8
4.00—7.15 p.m. 18, 5am

76M, 2%.

.





4p.m. The News , 4.10 p.m. The Duailv
Service, 4.15 p.m. All Hale, 4.45 p.m
Felton Rapley, 5 p.m. Rimsky-Korsakov,
5.15 p.m. Listeners’ Choice, 5.45 p.m
Think on these Things, 6 p.m Séottisir
Magazine, 6.15 p.m. My Kind of Muyic.
6.45 p.m. Sports Round Up and Pro-
gramme Parade, 7 p.m News,
7.10 p.m. Home News from Britain
7-15—10,30 pm .. 25.53M, 31.32M

TAB p.

. Calling the West indies,
7.4 p.m. Hale, 8.15 p.m. Radio
Newsreel, 8.30 p.m Statement of

Account, 8.45 p.m. Interlude, 8.55 p.m
From the Editorials, 9 p.m. New Lands
for Old, 10 p.m. The News, 10.10 p.m
News Talk, 10.15 p.m. Mid Week Taik,
10.90 p.m. From the third Programme




PRINTED SPUNS
SHARKSKIN Whit

LE

Phone 4220

- her parents, Mr. and Mrs. L, A.

. : British Guianese Tenor, will



PLAIN BEMBERG SHEERS Ivory, Peach, Blue
PRINTED BEMBERGS exclusive Designs
PRINTED CREPES
































































































MR. & MRS. CARL W. COZIER

Visits Parents Stuartettes To Tour
RS. MOLLY KIRKLAND was M
among the arrivals from the passengers
Miami, Florida, U.S.A, by B.W.LA. Trinidad by B.W.1.A. on Monday
via Jamaica and Trinidad on evening.

Monday last.
Mrs. Kirkland is on a visit to

by Miss Rachael
Secretary.

Mrs. Stuart has gone to com-
plete arrangements for “Revuede-
ville 1952” Troupe which will be
following later. The troupe ex-
pect to put on a series of perform-
ances in Port-of-Spain, They
should be away for about ten days,

From nada

Gre

Me: GLEN EVANS was an

arrival from renada by
B.W.I.A. on Sunday for one week’s
holiday. He is a relative of Mr.
David Evans of T. R. Evans, City
Merchant. During his stay here
he is a guest at Hotel Royal,
‘Attended Rangers’ Camp

ISS BERYL SKEETE who

went over to Trinidad early
in August with the Queen’s Col-

Evelyn, her

Knight, “Clifton,” Strathclyde,
Recital Tonight
R. JOHN TULL, brilliant

give a Song Recital at the Com-
bermere School Hall tonight at
8.30 o’clock. The Recital is under
the patronage of Sir Allan Colly-
more, Kt., and Lady Collym*re.

‘HE engagement was recently
announced between Miss Janet
Seale, eldest daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Clarence Seale of Kingsley,
2nd Avenue, Belleville and Mr.
Arthur Tibbits of Cable & Wire-
less, eldest son of the late Mr. and
Mrs. Elwood Tibbits of Antigua.
Back To Trinidad
M* A MRS. G. ARCHER
and eir two children re-
turned to Trinidad by B.W.LA.
on Sunday last after spending a

Sunday by B.W.LA. She remain-
ed in camp for two welks with
the girls at Headquarters, Belmont
Circular Road and stayed over for
three weeks’ holiday.

holiday her Me. Archer is

Traffic Officer, B.W.1.A., Piarco, LSO returning home by the

Trinidad. ¥ same opportunity of Sun-,
For One Month day from Trinidad was Miss Jean

Best, a Ranger. She too was in
camp for two weeks and remain-
ed over for three weeks’ holiday.
Miss Best is an Assistant Mistress
at St. Michael’s Girls’ School.

i R. AND MRS. A. S. EVELYN
arrived here by B.W.1.A, from
Trinidad for one month’s holiday.
They are guests at Hotel Royal.
Accompanying them is their little
grandchild, Barbara,
Por Police Course
NSPECTOR GEORGE REID of
the loeal constabulary left the
island yesterday by the SS.
Oranjestad for England where he
will enter Hendon Police Training
College to undergo four months’
(training.

R.
turned to Grenada on Sun-

day by B.W.LA, after spending
five weeks’ holiday with his
relatives. He is a teacher at the
Grenada Boys’ Secondary School,
St, George’s and comes over for
his annual holidays.





By BEACHCOMBER

craft moored within sight of the
Royal Squadron Yacht Club. It
is a kind of round punt with a
mast in the stern, and appears to
be steam-driven. Some thought
it was what remained of the
Saucy Mrs. Flobst®r, but inquiries
confirmed the rumour that Dr.
Strabismus (Whom God Preserve)
of Utreeht had arrived aboard
the Swan’s Nest, an experimental
craft which is designed to move
sideways under steam, the mast
being a mere decoration. Asked
what advantage was to be derived
from going sideways at sea, the
sage said: “Science makes its
experiments. The advantages
come later.” Asked what this
had to do with Cowes, the
doctor said: “As much as and no
more than it has to do with any-
where else.”

Wisdom of the ages

It is @ measure of the camel's
inferiority to man that if it were
given a tele: it would not
know which to look through.

(Sayings of Shadash ibn
Daoul of Bagdad.)

wing I seemed to hear a sardonic

laugh.

= revert to the bluebottle
question I have been sneered

at for suggesting that bluebottles

migrate, like seals. But I have

sen Strickland, Desgouttes Hirsch,
Larsen, Piccolomini Dendergast,
and Smallpiece. v

Praline has described the mig-
ration of bluebottles as a heredi-
tary urge “engendered by atav-
istic stimuli and exacerbated by
regional conditions.” But alone
of all the Ampulae Caeruleae the
bluebottle n.igrates on a sudden
impulse instead of for food or
light, and Praline was mistaking
a mere aimless wandering for
the more purposeful journey
which we call migration. Tomor-
row I shall demolish the absurd
suggestion of Manteuflel that the
bluebottle migrates through fear
of persecution.

Cowes sensation
ISITORS to Cowes have been
interested in an odd-looking
















The farmer seems very upset
and stalks away without any
further talk. “What did he
mean ?"’ murmurs Rupert. “I'd
betrer go and look as he told me."
He hurries over a slope until he
reaches the spot where he first

met the farmer. gracious |
eee - ‘

t
I
| some of the roots under

$00!
s

’
5



ics areata ance $1.46
Puan CR Cie OE Rew a hare he $1.04
Snide Sams WHS 6 Ow do Geb ala bin -aldd ie <1Stw A TAEEGa ao ale abe $1.16
FPLAIN-SFUNS White & Colours ....2...6.0..ci cece casveseeduews é
PUN VG VEAP OOS CUNT Sis LE VLG ld vigilante winecaia 98 & $1.08
Also
e, Pink, Oyster, Primrose, Torquoise, Azure $2.03



EVANS WHITFIELD’S BRANCH

YOUR SHOE STORE

| year-olds,
awaiting the results of his General
Certificate examination.

examination already
fate,
at Cambri

take this examination, which re-
placed the old School Certificate in of Edinburgh's treasurer, does

hig Swiss se¢Hool he sat for the would not
certificate in Geneva,

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

The Duke Of Kent Goes In For |

9

His ‘School Certificate

(By EPHRAIM HARDCASTLE)
LIKE thousands of other 16- Tuesday—because she does
the Duke of Kent is pay National Insurance.

+ *

not

*

Money-spinning novelist Daphne
Maurier, wife of Lieut.-Genera)
Frederick Browning, the Duke

He is the first royal Prince tr

1951. With two other boys from collect the allowance. “I feeb #
be fair,” she says.

Lady Moyne, whose husband. is
Some youngsters who took the one of Britain’s wealthiest brew-
know their ers, does not draw it either—but
But the Duke’s examiners;"for different reasons. Six of their

e, one of eight sets in family of nine are eligible, but

Britain, will not issue theiy results Lady Moyne says: It would not
until some time during this month, be worth while because of tara-

jects:
a lot at home, and Englisiy.

dent: 20-year-old Princess Astrid,
daughter
‘Prince Olaf, who has just finished
two years’ study of economics at
Oxford,

leaving for]! through

She was accompanied | shooting.

lege Rangers, returned home on] Geo:













|



for six hours to see something of
the practical side of the subject. She

: ears filled with people in Tyrotean
RS. A. L, STUART was among|hats and yellow pullovers drives

Am the Duke's strongest sub-

tion. What we would get would
h, which is sooken

not cover the cost of fetching it
from the village.

Actor’s wife Mrs, John Mills puts
ihe money in the Post Office k
and the children will get it at 15.
“The trouble is they keep asking
for it now.”

Five of Lady Pakenham’s eight
children are under 15. She says:
“We used to save up the allow-
ance towards our annual holiday,
but have given that up now..”
has always drawn orange
uice, but not cod liver oil,

Two Fortunes

Royal Launch
News, too, of another , 7yal stu-

of Norway's crown

This week she sails to Britain

She will launch a new ship which
will help Norway’s economy by

carrying currency-earning tour- EXAMINE the fate of two for-
istg, tunes: —

Tt will be her first big royal It was 1800 when a French
assignment. But her father will refugee settled in America and

be there to help.

‘.. But Some Pay
EVERY morning a convoy of

founded the firm of Du Ponts,
the biggest chemical empire in
the world today. Now, one of
his descendants, Lammot Du Pont,
has left £27,000,000 according to
his will just published.

It was 1862 when a German
scientist, Ludwig Mond, came to
Britain and started part of what is
now Imperial Chemical Industries,

little Dufftown. Wealth
and aristocracy is off for a day’s

For the grouse-girdled spot
(pop.: 1,500), 64 miles beyond
Aberdeen, has become one of Scot-



land’s most fashionable shooting
centres this season.
* *

*

Already Lord gnd Lady Bland-
ford and Lord Carnarvon — “My
best week’s shooting since the
war"—have been there. This week
six men whose total fortunes run
into many millions will be on the
moors.

* * .

Four of them, guests of the Duke
and Duchess of Marlborough at
low-roofed Glenfiddich Lodge, in-
clude Herbert Pulitzer, son of the
founder of the American literary
prizes, The Spanish Duke of Al-
geciras and French banker
rges Verne are on their way.
Ship owner Major Stanley Cayzer
has a moor near by. Henry Ford
is coming too.

7 m

Ration books for the duke and
duchess and staff of six, including
a butler and chef brought from
Blenheim Palace, are lodged at a
loeal shamp.

At Glenfiddich they breakfast at
7.30, spend the evening playing
and gramophone

duchess: “Some

a

are guests, but
others hav nancial arrange-
ment with the —
Man In A Hurry

FILM director Roberto Rossel-
lini arrived in Northern ftaly in
his scarlet Ferrari racer which he
uses as an ordinary sports car.
He was tired and travel-stained.

have you come from?”
asked’ a friend. “I've just driven
non-stop from Calais,” he said.
“T was a bit glow this time—it
took me 23 hours,”

Distance: over 700 miles,

Who Collects?

WOULD you take the Welfare
State’s orange juice and Family
Allowances if you were wealthy”?

The Queen draws orange juice
fof her children but cannot have
the family allowance—which rises
from ve to eight shillings on

SONG RECITAL
Under the Patronage of Sir Allan
Collymore, Kt.

BY
JOHN TULL
(British ich tg Tenor)












at 8.30
Accompanist — w.
ADMISSION: ae ne
‘ed Seats — $1.00
— Te.

on Sal it Severe
e a vs ti
Statio focate









TO-DAY (Only) 4.30 P.M
“SPORT OF KINGS”
Paul CA

MPBELL &
“BLAZING ACROSS the PECOS”
Charles STARRETT

THURS. (only) 8.30 P.M.

“SPRING SONG”
Carol RAYE &
“WATERLOO ROAD"

f_James STEWART & John MILLS







iS DANGE

ROUS

rc

sarees JOAN

CRAWFORD Manet 8

PICHARD WEBB MAR! ALDON PHIL® CAREY omecien yf £
STN ay €r

GEOFFREY HOMES 2. GEORBE WOR

PLAZ

BRIDGETOWN

DAVID

fil

DIAL 2310)

i a en fai






When he died in 1909 he left wel.
over £1,000,000.
” * *
But unlike the Du Pont fortune
the Mond million did not multiply.
Ludwig's son, Alfred, who became
Lord Melchett, was thought to be
worth anything from £4,000,000 to
£7,000,000.. But his estate was
£1,029,000.

And in turn, his son’s fortune

not Was £97,000 when he died three

years ago. (The present Lord
Melchett, who is 27, Has no con-
nection with the 1.C.1.)

£50 To Spend

British friends just back from
Lucerne speak with wry amuse-
ment of Dr. Kenrad Adenauet’s
holidtiy in the nearby resort of
Burgenstock.

He has been able to stay a good
deal: longer than the English, Por,
like all Germans, Dr. Adenauer
gets a £50 trave} allowance.

Dinner At Keyes

TRAVELLING to Holland this
week with a car, secretary, two
grandchildren, and 28 pieces of
luggage is top-selling American
novelist MYys Frantis ‘Parkinson
Keyes (rhymes with skies).

Mrs. Keyes’ novels, lite Dinner
at Antoine’, are garnished with
gastronomy. She married young
and was “ashamed how little I
Knew about food.” But she has
studied it ever since.

* *

If you dined now at Mrs. Keyes’
you might start with mint juleps
and canapes spread with caviar;
then—lobster chowder; Maryland
fried chicken arranged on a large
dish, with rice, bacon, corn frit-
ters and peas; salad with cheese
souffle or toasted cheese: ice-cream
and angel cake. To drink: Chablis
and champagne.

—L.E.S.



Do You Read the Signs?

—Merlin Said No One Hecded Them Any More—

By MAX TRELL

MERLIN the Magician, was sit-
ting on the edge of the bookcase)
with his legs dangling. He was)
smiling as usual, Finally he said:|
“Folks don’t pay much attention|
to signs any more. They don’t even
bother to read them and even after
they read them, they don’t obey |
hem. That’s not good.” |

Knarf and Hanid, the shadows)
with the turned-about names, asked
Merlin what he meant.

“Well, | happened to be strolling |
through the park this morning. It
was quite a lovely park, with Trooal
standing here and there, and benches
for people to rest on, and a play-
ground for the children with swings}
and seesaws and slides, But the}
nicest and prettiest thing about the}
park were the patches of green
grass—the lawns—on either side of

the paths. Some of the lawns were} }yndreds and thousands of other

for everyone to walk on, or play O”,| hlades of grass, just like himself.

" But) Not far off was the little white sign

the rest ef them had tiny fences| reading:
around them, or borders of flowers.| Pjease.’ The blades of

* And there were signs stuck in the| like soldiers,
middle of them reading: ‘Keep Off! taj),

or lie dowr and stretch out on.

The Grass, Please’ But,” said Mer-
lin, smiling again, “not everyone
did,”

that wasn’t right,”

Enough Policemen

“Didn't a policeman chase them
off?" Knurf wanted to know.

Mertin sliook his head. “There
aren’t enough policemen to watch
everyone who steps on the grass.
And really, you shouldn't need a
policeman to make you do the right
thing. You should do it because you
know it’s the right thing to do. Now
there isn’t any reason why anyone
should walk on the grass when a
sign very politely asks you please
not to.”

At this Knarf said: “1 don’t think
it hurts thé grass to step on it, It

just bends over. Anyway, grass is!

just grass. It can't really feel any-
thing and”

Knarf didn’t notice that Merlin
had stopped smiling and was
waving his hand in a curious way.
But the next instant Knarf felt
himself becoming long and thin and

een. And there he was, standing
n the middle of the park lawn,








Dennis MORGAN

Plus
James CAGNEY in








Fred







said| Voices. They were very close by and



TH

STIN
(Dial 5170) (Dial 8404)
Last 2 Shows To-day Today (only) Last 2 Shows To-day
4.30 & 8.30 p.m. 4.20 & 8.30 p.m 445 & 8.30 pin
Warner Action Double! ‘Roth aconeeD Alfred HITCHCOCK'S
) TO THE VICTOR RIDES AGAIN” STRANGERS ON

with Bill KENNEDY
Robert ARMSTRONG

oor
Thurs. Spectal 1.40 p.m

“WHAT'S COOKING"
Donald O'CONNOR &

& Continuing Dally

er ae Teviniy | WANS Humphrey BOGART
THIS WOMAN IS |] BLUE SKIES |} “Speci! 1 p.m.
‘ Technicolor) Jimmy WAKELEY &

Bing CROSBY & WEST OF ELDOKAD

ASTAIRE






5 a om
Merlin was strolling in the park.
looking exuctly like a blade of
rass.
Crowded all around Knarf were

‘Keep Off The Grass,
grass were

standing straight and

Sound of Voices
Suddenly there was the sound of

they kept growing louder. Knarf
tried to turn around but he couldn't
because his roots kept him stuck
in the ground. But then, a moment
|\later, he saw a group of children.
They were running and jumping,
stamping and seraping.

Oh, how Knarf wanted to run
away. “Go away!” he shouted at

| the blades of grass were lying like

\themselves to their feet any more.
A great heavy shoe was over

Knarf’s head. Down it came—
And then Knarf found himself

back. in the room again, with Mer-

4
1

|bookease, his legs dangling, and)
smiling. “Well, Knarf — how did}
you like being a blade of grass? Do
you think folks ought to obey signs
now?” ~

head quickly enough to say he
agreed.






























A TRAIN
Farley GRANGER &

WHITE HEAT

James CAGNEY




Thurs. (only)
44 & 8.30 pm
“To the VICTOR”

Dennis MORGAN &
“OKLAHOMA KID”
James CAGNEY &












the top of his voice. “Don’t step on |
me! Look out! Look out!” But he |
couldn’t move. And all around him |

broken soldiers now, unable to lift |

lin still sitting on the edge of the |

And Knarf could hardly nod his |

|

|





*

*

|









Johnny Mi

BROW:

Before Stock Taking we are CLEARING several useful items in

Household Hardware

These include SAUCEPANS, FRY PANS, POTS, HALF PINT GLASSES, '

May 2i—Jnune 21

*





JACK BEUTEL, MALA POWERS, BILL WILLIAMS



find what your outlook is, according to the stars;

Dec. 23— Jan. 21

Talent for acting generally high in this Sign of Virgo. Could
be nurse, decorator, modiste, milliner with fine results, or an
actor, \ctress, journalist. Tendency in all conscientious Vir-
* goans is to work too much, thus taxing health. Birthdate:
John Jordan Crittenden, Amer, statesman.

a a a a a a 2 a a ee

WEDNESDAY,

SEPTEMBER 0), 1952



FOR

WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER

Ww, 1952

Look in the section in whieh your “irthday comes and



ps

ARIES Excellent rays for laborious tasks, real- *

*

March 21—April 20 roading, mining, handling and manufactur-

ing tools, machinery, war equipment,

TAURUA ag. Responsive day, especially if you work
April 21--May 20 %5 better output. Engine@ring, roadbuild-
ing, all such projects highly favoured.

*
*

Not all favourable fox many matters.
Care is urged in contracts, legal issues, but
day on whole is fine for sturdy activities,
industrial trades, urgent duties.

GEMINI

OANCER Can be peak day for you. Strive to
June 22—Jnly 23¢et ahead in your occupation, work har-
moniously with employers, and employees

for the attainment of all concerned.

*« *«

LEO —Your Sun rays stress patience, modera-
July 24—Aug. 22 tion to gain benefits through other benefic «x
vibrations. Don't indulge hurt feelings.
VIRGO Mild indications except for familiar
Aug. 23— matters, dealing with metals, machinery,
hia —_ 2 tools. These latter are more sponsored.
LIBRA —Not especially favourable for artistic *
Bept. 24—Oct. 23 affairs or personal wishes, but it is gener-
ally a generous period for interests con-
cerning the public, our armed forces. *
SCORPIO — Saturn, Moon and Neptune — very *
Oct. 24—Nov. 22 favourably aspected—offer an interesting
day, profitable if rightly managed. A chal-
lenge to those who face difficult tasks. +
SAGITTARTOS —Much will depend upon your own efforts

to-day. Industrial trades,

Nov. 23—Dec.
“sf » = terests among top honoured.

household in- *

—Encouraging indications with your Sat- *
urn and the Moon excellently aspected.
Go ahead confidently with plans and have
faith in what you do, x

CAPRICORN

‘ARIUS —An unusually benefic, stimulating period
Jan. 22 — Feb. 20 for your family interests. New undertak-
ings of worth have helpful rays as do
familiar and daily routine. “

ISOES —Agivice to Capricorn and Aquarius obtain
Feb. 21—March 20 ¢4 yow to-day. Your Neptune's position
indicates fresh benefits if you strive for

them. Aim high.

AQU.

YOU BORN TO-DAY: Very talented, @pable, likeable. +

*



DON’T BE A _ SLAVE
TO PAIN... APPLY

“SACROOL

* ey TO ALL PAINFUL JOINTS, YOU'LL BE
ee AMAZED AT THEQUICK RELIEF.

SACROOL is on sale at all Ong Stores & KNIGHT'S LTD.












TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 P.M. and Continuing

LYDIA BAILEY’
DALE ROBERTSON, ANNE FRANIS

Our Next Week-end Attraction
ROSE OF CIMARRON



and
GLORY ALLEY
LESLIE CARON — LOUIS ARMSTRONG





ROODAL THEATRES











EMPIRE OLYMPIC ROXY ROYAL
To-day & To-morrow! day Last Two roaas = Ze; Merrow | Today & Porperrow
4.45 & 8.30 pm. | shows 430 & 8.15) wniday 4.90 only 4.50.91
oa ee Universal Double!—| Universal Double: United Aptists
ase SIBLE RAY 4 DOUBLE LIFE | | Double :
Starring: Starring: vonne DeCarlo
THE PRINC Boris Karloff Ronald Colman | in
WHO eae A DANG ious |: HOTEL SAHARA
WAS A THIEF ox¢ pour | i } | and
hee |SALT TO
Starring TO LIVE with THE DEVIL
co co vip Andy Devine | Fiday only’ 4.30
Laurie = } — Se |
Soy nicolor, Charles Bickford _ |Thursday at120 p.m | and 8.30 p.m.
Color by Tec |
Extra: [Sn Reg Republic Double | United Artists
| at . (Action) Doub!
Latest_News Reel! As A sop [Allan (Rocky) Lane| WAN PROM
Opening Friday LIFTER in PLANET X
2.30 & 8.30 p.m anu |PHANTOM OF | F
3 Shows om go |WHITE THE ins! THE PLAINS MAS. MIKE
drenet Pictures ie Aaa |SONG OF NEVADA Setarday & ann
weet 4.30 & 8.15 Friday (at $90 Pal |A Republic Double
Lund Q i . grand fs .
Joe handler OUTSIDE THE performance FORT DODGE
in WALL Madam Olindy and STAMPEDE
Starring: Trowpe in and
BATTLI AT | Richard Basehart. | CARACAS
- : and i NIGHTS 1952 THE FLAME
APACHE PASS cpiner AND | “Opening Saturday with
In Glorious THE FLY 4.45 & 8.15 John Carroll
G
Technicolor with Eric Portman SCANDAL STRERT Vera Ralston

BARGAINS!



SNAP GLASSES, JUGS, SALT & PEPPER SHAKERS, CUPS &
SAUCERS, PLATES, TEA STRAINERS, CAN OPENERS and several

other HOUSEHOLD NECESSITIES

gm Visit Us and See these Bargains on display at extremely Low Prices





A |G. W. HUTCHINSON & Co,, Ltd.




WEDNESDAY,



SEPTEMBER 10, 1952





TEN DAYS IN THE ISL

By SYDNEY HARRIS

IT was just after 9 p.m. on the night of the 16th of

August that a party of the

4th Barbados (James Street)

Group stood on the deck of the C.N.S. Lady Nelson and
watched the lights of Bridgetown quietly and slowly dis-
appear from view. We were off to a camp to the island of

Grenada.

All of us were in high spirits,
and looking forward to the adven-
ture which had just begun. When

we could mo longer see the ts
of the town, and omly the fl
of St. "a lighthouse re
where dos lay hidden in

ie, we decided te “turn in”
for t. “Turning in” was a
matter of stretching a ground-
sheet on the top of the hatch
eovers, and reclining, Some were
foo excited to sleep, but others
found themselves in dreamland
almost immediately. Those who
could not sleep had the gentle
vibration of the engines and the
soft lapping of the water past the
ship to keep them company; while
from above myriad stars looked
down like quiet sentinels assuring
us that “all was well”. Thus pass-
ed the night, and at 4.30 in the
morning, the lights of St. Vincent
eould be seen twinkling as a
welcome. :
We dropped anchor in Kings-
town harbour just afta’ 6 a.m, and
three quarters of an hour later
Wwe were on our way ashore. We
walked around a bit, and finally
found ourselves at the home of
ev. J. B. Broomes, and in no
ime Mrs. Broomes had a break-
ast prepared for the boys. It was
very kind of her and we certainly
appreciated it, but we could bare-
ly manage to thank her before it
was time to hurry back to the
boat. And so at 9.15 am. we
glipped quietly away from St
incent and headed towards our
destination—Grenada.

Lovely Trip

We had a lovely trip from St.
Vincent to Grenada. The weather
was fine, and the ship was sailing
beautifully. The numerous islands
of the Grenadines were continu-
ally in sight, and provided an in-
ftleresting sight with its back-

ound of sea and sky. After we
ad been sailing for just over an
hour, the Captain sent for us and
instructed the officer on watch to
pthow us over the Bridge. This
was undoubtedly the greatest
thrill of the whole trip. We saw
the engine-room, telegraph, the
magnetic compass and the gyro-
compass, we watched the quarter-
master steering the ship and
keeping her steadily on her course,
we were shown charts and saw
how to plot a course, we saw the
radar screen and how it worked,
and many of the other aids to

camp. The camp site, Tanteen,
Was near the water-front, and so
we placed our baggage in a boat
while we marched around by road

and met cen ne with the
baggage ctiec. on the camp
grounds. We found that we were

te camp = 2" ex-army hut
ape wil seouts of the Ist
Q.R.C. Sea Scouts of Trinidad
The Trinidadian boys were already
in camp, and they welcomed us
and introduced themselves to us.
At onee we felt we were going to
have lots of fun with these boys,
for they were a keen batch, and
radiated the true Scout spirit.
“Settling in”, which for us meant
getting a meal ready, was soon
done, and after supper some of
us decided to take a stroll into St.
George’s to see what we could
see. It was too late to attend
church, but we went to the
Methodist church and met Rev.
Parker after the service was
over. We did not see a great deal
of the town that night, but enough
to realise that it was going to
be up hill and down dale all the
time. As a matter of fact, when
we got to Market hill, which is
the steepest of all and lies in the
centre of the town, we wondered
whether we should’nt just roll
(to bottom, and having got there
remain there. However we braved
the descent and the ascent and
eventually found our way back
to camp.

Camp Opens

_ Next morning camp life began
in earnest, Reveille was at 6.30
a.m., we turned out for P.T. at
7.00 a.m., breakfast was at 7.45,
and flag-raising, which was a joint
ceremony for the two troops and
conducted alternately by a Trini-
dad and Barbados scouter, was
lat 8.30. Inspection followed at
9.00 a.m., and then there was
usually an hour’s bathing parade
and the boys settled down to
work, There is always somethin;

to be done around camp, and o

course time for training in scout-
craft. Dinner was at 12.30, and

in the afternoon there were
usually games or bathing parades.
Netball

During the time that we were
in the island a triangular netbalh
tournament was in progress be-
tween St, Vincent, Trinidad, and
Grenada. Netball is extremely
popular in Grenada, Everybody



BUS PICNIC:
around’.

avigation. No wonder that some
f us came away feeling that in
n emergency we should be able
jo get the ship to port,

In St. George’s

We were alongside in Grenada
y 3.15 p.m., and were met on

ard by a local Scoutmaster, Mr.
ierre, who had been sent by the
sland Commissioner to welcome
us and conduct us to our camp
site. After the usual routine of
mbarkation and customs and
Paignton officials had been
passed, we were ready to get to

_———-.



The party on a ‘bus which they used for “getting

seems to take a keen interest in
the game, and when we saw the
crowds pouring up on evenings to
see netball, it was almost like a
crowd going to see football at
Kensington. The games were
played in the Botanie Gardens
about one hundred yards from our
camp, and naturally on evenings
some of the boys went to see what
the shouting was all about. We
Bajans took pains to be extremely
neutral, because all the girls were
so nice, and we could not afford to
lose favour with any of them,
Tuesday 19th was the day on

which we visited Grand Aasge
beach. Now we in Barbados are
justly proud of our beaches, but
we have not got anything quite
like this. There is an unbroken
Stretch of about two miles of pure
white sand, and the water is per-
fectly clear and calm-like, a great
swimming pool, The boys cer-
tainly enjoyed their swim, and
many wished that they could
bring Grand Anse beach back with
them.
Breadfruit Cou-cou

The following day, Wednesday,
was the day of the great football
mateh — Barbados vs. Trinidad.
The Trinidad boys gave us a good
drubbing, 7—2, but behind that
lies a tale. It was impossible to

get rice in’ Grenada, and the
island commissioner, Mr. Red-

head, had managed to get a large
quantity of breadfruits to heip
us our ration problem.

The day of the match we had
breadfruit cou-cou for dinner, and
the cooks did a fine job; conse-
quently many of us had very large
helpings indeed. We took the field
fairly soon after dinner, and it

was not long before we realised friendly shout. We were climbing the

that the breadfruit cou-cou was
the enemy’s fifth column. I re-
member vividly lumbering after
some very evasive forwards,
painfully conscious that the great
weight in my mid-section could



WATERFALL: A waterfall at
Annandale.

never allow me to get anywhere

mear them. I panted and toiled

manfully, but no man can serve
two masters, and having done my
breadfruit cou-cou justice, alas,
I was now little more than a spec-
tator. But let this in no way
detract from the fact that the
Trinidadians played very good
football, and most definitely
deserved their victory, There was
a loeal Athletic and Cycle Sports
meeting on the following day at
the Queen’s Park grounds. We
went along to enjoy ourselves and
to see how the meeting compared
with ours at home. We found
that the athletes were very good,
and would probably do very well
in Barbados, but the cycling still
has a long way to go. One of the
reasons is that there is not a
proper cycling track. Where the
cyclists ride, the grass is fairly
long and there are ruts to be
negotiated; so it takes much more
out of you to push a bike around
than it would at Kensington.
Bus Tour

Friday morning dawned bright-
ly, and we regarded that as a
good omen for our whole day bus
tour which was planned for that
day. The Trinidad boys and our-
selves were going together and we
just made a comfortable bus load.
The use of that word “comfort-
able” reminds me of an amusing
incident. When we were thinking
of making the tour, I was enquir-
ing of one of the local bus-drivers
how many the bus could carry,
and he said to me: “Oh! we does
carry 37, but we like to make
strangers comfortable, so we
could carry 42." Fortunately we
did not have to encroach upon
his hospitality to the point of
comfort, as our combined numbers
were exactly 37. We left camp
at 9.15 a.m., and we drove through
town and out onto the road that
led to the Grand Etang. We pass-



a — ee



OF



AFTER THE FIRE: The Party
the Fire in St. George's which they helped to put out.
appreciation by the Fire Chief

ed by
always

several
gave

villages,
the

and
villagers

we
a

gradually all the time, but s

the gradient became more pro-
nounced, and at times we won-
dered if the ‘Ford’ would do it;

but she pulled through, and we
went off the main road on to a
beaten track which led us to the
Grand Etang.

There is nothing rugged or awe-
inspiring about the crater of this
extinct voleano; in fact, more
peaceful scene could hardly be
imagined. There is a lake nestling
Quietly beneath tree-covered



th

rim of the crater, 2,014 ft. above
sea-level; and wherever one
looks the soothing green of ver-
dant foliage meets the eye. We
Spent a short time enjoying the
quiet beauty of this spot, then

‘we were on our way to Grenville,
the second largest town in the
island. We were mostly going
down hill now, and through some
very interesting countryside, There
were no fields of gently waving
sugar-cane such as we know in
Barbados, but rather more like
forest, with thick undergrowth.
Once we passed a spot where the
people were actually doing some
lumbering, and we saw some of

‘the “bullet wood” boards that
they had obtained by dint of
their labours.
Grenville
We now reached Grenville, a

town 20 miles away on the east
coast, which is nearly as big as St.
George’s. We spent about an
hour here having a quick look-
around, and then we were

again heading northwards along
the east coast of the island. We
passed through the airport, which
was practically deserted that day,
and reached the north-east tip of
the island, Levera Bay. Here at
last we felt as if we were back in
Bimshire. The scenery was very
similar to that of the Chancery
Lane coast, and the sea-bathing,
for we bathed here, was also very
much like that at Chancery Lane
oy Silver Sands It seemed
to us an ideal spot to take lunch,
and so we did; and when that

important task was completed,
we were off once again, We
hugged the coast fairly closely
and went across the north and
then down the west side of the
island. The sea and the coast
were very much like the leeward
side of Barbados, but as soon as

we booked inland the difference
was apparent, for often the hills
rose almost sheer from the road.
We stopped at the small towns

of Victoria and we were back in
St. George’s about 6.00 p.m, after
a very lovely day indeed.

Fire

The following day, Saturday,

passed quite uneventfully, being
just a happy but routine camp
day. Some of the sgcouters (my-

self included) attended a dance
that night given in honour of the
visitors to the island at a place
called Morne Rouge, actually on
a part of Grand Anse beach, and
about 12.30 someone noticed a
strange glow coming from the
direction of town. We were some
miles from the town, but we could
look across the water and see part
of it. When we did so now, a
terrifying but beautiful spectacle

were taken to headquarters after
Tt was in

met our eyes. A broad, red tongue

of flame seemed to be rising from

‘ntre of the town, and ita
glo. illuminating the sky and
reflected in the sea. The Trinidad
scoutmaster and I at once won-
dered whether it was near our
cemp, but a phone message soon
put our fears at rest. We could

not get to town, so we just stood

and watched, realising that the
fire-fighters were slowly but
surely winning the battle. When
we did get back to camp, we
learnt that the boys, both Trini-
dadian and Barbadian, had turned
out under the command of

Rover-Leader Charles Morris, and
had done a fine job. The smaller
boys had used their staves and
helped to control the crowd, while
Mr. Morris and the big chaps had

actually helped with the hoses
As a result of this action the
troops received letters of thanks
from the Superintendent of

Police, and a few days later he
sent around the fire-engine to the
camp so that everything could be
explained to the boys, and that
they might have a practice
“squirt.” Needless to say, the
“souirt’ was the most enjoyable
part of the proceedings, We
found out that about 100 persons
had been rendered homeless by

by the M.V. Canadian Constructor wili

the fire, but people were subscrib- be closed at the General Post Office as
noney ar giving clothes to “der

Hae . id g & arcel Mail and Registered Mail at

help them 3 p.m, to-day, 10th September 1982

Trip South
On the next day a trip had been
arranged for us by Mr, Redhead

and some friends of scouting,
Col. Stewart, and Mr. Stewart-
Mitchell. We were taken in cars

to La Sagesse rum distillery, and
then through a part of the
southern part of the island, We
stopped at Mr. Stewart-Mitchell’s
home where the boys found ice
cream and aerated drinks awaii-
ing them. We showed our appre-
ciation of this hospitality by
singing a selection of scout sons

for them, This was probably
good practice for the sing-son;
which took place “on Monday |

evening after we had been on a
trip to the Annandale water falls.
The programme was arranged and |
given by the boys of both troops,
and the members of the public

\
who were invited seemed to hava} Restores Yout

Tues- }

enjoyed it very much. On
day Mr. Redhead, who is super-
intendent of the prison, invited
the scouters up to the prison, We
were shown around the prison,
and were particularly impressed |
by the very fine samples of handi-

t

craft done by the prisoners.
They mostly seeméd a _ happy
buneh, but even that did nob

persuade us to stay. The prison}
>on a thigh hill which overlooks |
the town, and the view of the;
town from the prison could ony |

be bettered by a view from an}
aeroplane.

That was our last night in|
Grenada, and many I suppose,

went to sleep dreaming of the ten |
happy days we had spent there. }
We thought of the scenic beauty
of the island, of the hospitality of |
the people, and especially of the |
comradeship of the boys of the’
Ist @.R.C. Sea Scout who had
shared all our fun, and we knew }
that it would be a long time in-
deed before any of us could for-
get those ten days in the isle of
Spices.

The Shute Foundation For Medical Research

“Give Light...

and People will see

THE DOCTORS SHUTE early realized that the line
of research they had come upon in 1945 with the help of

Drs. Skelton and Vogelsang,
berations.
numbered scwres of million

Those potentially interested in

must have far-reaching rever-
their work

s. Some broad scheme must

be laid down to meet a situation unparalleled in their

experience.

Accordingly this organization,
the Shute Foundation, was incor-

porated on a non-profit basis
under tario Letters Patent in
May, 1947. Its membership com-

rised 26 citizens of London and
oronto, Canada, of whom four
were physicians. The Shute
Brothers were not members not

officials, it may be added nor
were Dr. Skelton, and Dr.
Nogelsang. Both of the latter

continued their careers outside
the Institute. Dr. Skelton going

into Endocrine Research under
Professor Hens Selye. and Dr.
Vogelsang in private practice

of Cardiology.

Since its mception, the Chair-
man of the Board of Dixectors
has been Canon Quintin Warner
who is widely known in Canada
end'the United States for his
work s a Judge of Juvenille
Court und in Alcolholics Anony-
mous. as well as for his preach-
ing missions in many Canadian
and American centres. The
Treasurer of the Foundation has
from the first been Mr. W, S. J.
Saunders, jong Treasurer of the

10!



City of Lon and a very
widely respected citizen. ‘The
third member of the Board ctf
Directors was fortherly Mr. A
G. Calder, the senior chartered
accountant of the c¢ When he
retired due to er pecssure



an elec-



his place, was + n by

trical engineer specializing in
X-ray. Mr. Edward Fanning.
The Board of Directors and

members of the Foundation entire-
ly govern the affairs of the Foun-



dation, the Shute brothers being
included among i*s employ}
having merely a courtesy voice

in its decisions and plans. This
type of organization was devel-
oped by the Doctors Shute with
the help of their legal advisor.
Mr. Campbell Calder, Q.C.,
order to make it clear to every-
one that they did not have and
could not have any means of
profiting personally ‘from the
very obvious professional ad-
vantages of their cardio-vascular
discoveries, There was no reason
why they should not so benefit,
for others had, as, for example,
the discoveries of insultn, and
streptomycin. But the tradition
of me i discovery on the
whole is that physicians should
not protit financially by their
humanitarian discoveries, and
this tradition has been implicitly
followed here, The Shute broth-
ers work for a moderate salary
for the Institute, have na con-
tract of any kind with the latter,
and could be dismissed at any
moment Without recourse,

So little has been known of
this aspect of the Foundation’s

organization that this statement
is perhaps long overdue.
Tn November, i948, a year

and a haif after it was organized,




the Foundation purchase a fine
old London mansion. Waverley.
for use aS a medical clinie and
research institute. This sits in
state of 5% acres, located in

of the city. A small

through if at an

£ The
magn'ficent
gardens and
Species,
The house

e Y

rolling
with
huge

grounds are
formal rose
trees of many

tself is magnificent,
f Victor The Blue Room
has a f sd cherry



ceiling of carv

their own way’...

Carved ceilings, windows of bot-
tle glass, fine carved stone man-
tels and marble fireplaces mark
the various rooms. Original boo)
illustrations, prints and etchings
weil as a collection of old
enliven them as well.
This old house, redesigned
a modern medical centre, +
facilities for investigating med-
cal cases of various types, of
course, but its reputation to date
has largely been made on _ its
cardiovascular work. In one 12
months period alone 2316 new
cardiovascular patients passed
through its clinic. Where hospi-
talization is indicated, the facili-
ties of the city’s hospitals are
used. Fortunately, Vitamin E is
largely an ambulant treatment,
and so the Institute’s atients
come and go, rarely remaining in
Lon@on for long.

The Foundation derives i's
whole support from the medical
fees of the Institute, and from
donations and bequests. Since the
jatter two classifications yielded
only $37,000 in the first three
years of its existence, it can he
seen that its research activities
have been handicapped tae date
and it has been compelled to
rely largely on its elinical re-
seurces. It should be pointed out
here, perhaps that the Founda-
‘ion has never had and now has
no financial interest in the manu-
facture or sale of preparations
of Vitamin E or any other p'ar-
maceutical, for that matter,

From the first the organization
of the Foundation has met the
specifications of the Taxation D:-

gins
ZiaSs,
as



vision of the Dominion otf
Canada’s Department of WNa-
tional Revenue and therefore

contributioris made to it are ex-

empt form income tax.
The Foundation publishers in
May and December of each vear

its own medical journal the Sum-
mary. The first issue was un-
fortunately entitled the “Semi-
nar” before that was found ta be
the title of another small r-
1 hence the changg of name



Motto of Scripps-Howard Papers

This issue is the seventh to be
published.

To date thi jour the
Summary. ha carried ma
original articles and reports by
members of the medical Y of
the Shute Institute, as well a
contributions from other Cana-

: dian phygleians. two French

doctors, an American and two
Englishmen, It has carried note-
worthy articles on burns, various
types of heart and _ vascular
disease, abstracts of the impor-
tant current literature on alpha
tocopherol, and biographies of
famous physicians of the recent
past. The editions have number-

ed from 3,000 to 14,000 copies,
amd are sent gratis to medical
libraries hospitals, medical

schools, and physicians of note
all over the world. Some issues
have cost the Foundation as much
as $2,700.

An auxiliary group of women, ©

the Waverley Guild, has recently
been organized under the Presi-
dency of Mrs W. S. J. Saunders.
It sponsors one-man art shows,
exhibits of woodcarving, seulp-
ture and Canadian handicrafts,
public lectures, book weeks, anil
other such activities. Its object
is to further the cultural inter-
ests of the community in which
the Institute exists and to ald the
work of the Institute. As yet it
work is in its infancy but mar

interesting things should grow ou
of it.

Periodically the members of
Medical Advisory Board meet
consult on matters of medical and
scientific policy concerning th
Institute. This P oard compose
of eight of the leading medical
men of London and the
ings communitie

The Institute sponsors
lectures on medical
community project. The third

surroun

public
t



nual series, just concluded,
eluded for ple 1h
terilit ba

subjec is a

ynition of heart disease.

is grateful patients and

hropists recognise tne
features and objects ih
Foundation hou.d attr
ques and gifts major
tance. When that time comes }

im launch a programme of ani
mal experiment and laberator)
tudies which may alter the whole
of cardiovascular medicine
amd surgery. What has already
be@n achieved on a _ shoestring:
and under circumstances of up-
uswal and unnecessary difficulty
augur® well for the future,

{ts remains, as one of
its leaflets quotes; “to bind up
the broken-hearted, to proclaim
iberty to the captives, and the
opening of the prison to them
that are bound.”

To bring to the
me soulless men the medi-
| profession the virtues of
Vitamin E medication is no mean
task of the Foundation. To re-
m@mber the shameful fraud
practised on Pasteur and Ross by
the same type of men help tc
shed some light on this difficult
undertaking —-The Summary.

In Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

ARLE AND WIRELESS
that they car
1 the following «
bados Coast &
Texas Trad
fanchuria
entire, §.m
Bonaire
ipenser, s
olina G 3.8
is, 8.8. Jot
Brittar Eve
Cavailaire 8.5
aica, .#. Rio Tur
testo Bayonne

Thernist

phil-
unique
Shute
ct be
impor-

ol

ol

face

object

attention of
in

(WL) lta
ow communicat
ps through the







8.5. Thorbjoro, s
ian Laader,
Andalucia, 8.8, Braz
Alcoa Polaris,
Rangitane,
Michael,
Regent
rett 5
Choluteca



Nueva

Mar
Ventur
Pant







Re ter tle, Atlantic
aisie fi *,

s. Andrea Gritti

é

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



the Schooner

Reckles, A, Ward, P. Ramdin, S Samaroa,

c Rampersaud, J. Stuart, R. Evelyn
SEPTEMBER 9TH

A. Rivero, E. Brathwaite, BE Jones,
A Evelyt b Evelyn, B Chism, J
Collymore, J Collymore R. Houlder,
A Abraham, A Carter, F Moeonsoor,
U. Taylor, P. Dicker Dickers, D
Dicker, M Muir, G. Boenig, I. Year-
wood, A, Yearwood, G. Glasgow, ©
Headley, K. Spence, R. Spence, G |
Sealy

aalpha will be closed at the General Post
Office

en Thursday,







TRAFFIC |

In Carlisle Bay




Seh. Mary M. Lewis, Sch. Frances W
Smith, Sch Franklyn D. R., Se
D’Ortac, Sch. Laudalpha, Sch Augusty:
1.’ Compton, Sth. Marion Belle Woife
Seh. Rainbow M., Sch. Emeline, M.V. |}
Daerwood, M.V. Ricardo Arias, MV. |
Culdad Bolivar, MV. Lady Jo) |

ARRIVALS }

M.V. Lady Joy, 46 tons, fro » St Lueta
oder Captain W. Parsons asigned to
Owners Assoc ation 1
DEPARTURES
©. T. Rodas, for Martinique
M.V. Gloria Maria, for St

Sch Vineept

gille Smith, for British Guiana
Soh br Wonita, for British Guiana
S$. Trader, for Trinidad
MV. Moneka, for Dominica
S.S. Canadian Cruiser, Montreai
S.S. Stugard, Trinidad

Seawell

ARRIVALS
SEPTEMBER eTH
From Peerte Rico
1 Byer RK Millington, ¢ James
SEPTEMBER OTH
From Trinidad





2 Sampson, S. Sarmp-
Son, J Marshall K
Granmeum, R ver, J. Symaister, V
Symister, A ell A James,
Kirkwood, RB. Kirkwood

SEPTEMBER 8TH ‘
From Antigua:

W. Finge!, Q. Farara, F. Nunes. G@
Gordon, C. Jacobs, 8S. Gumbs. M. Winter,

Josiah, S. Belgrave, E Brathwaite



DEPARTURES
SEPTEMBER sTH

Yor Trinidad
H. Roberts, P

Gaffney, J
Maynard, R

Deterville, T

Hope, C
Beckles, |




MAIL NOTICE

Mails for Dominica by the Seh. Lau
as under

Parcel Mail at 12 noon, Registered Mail
"t 2 p.m. and Ordinary Mail at 2.30 pam
llth September, 10962.

Mails for Trinidad ond British Guiana



prdinaty er 8.30 a.m. on the Lith
september, 1959
RATES OF EXCHANGE

SEPTEMBER 9%, 1962



Selling NEW YORK Buying |
73 4/0 pr. Cheques on
Banke Tl 6/10% pr
Sight or
Demand Drafts 710/106 pr
73 410% pr. Cable
1 9/10% pr. Currency 70 3/10 pr
Coupons 68 6/10% pr. |
o> pr Silver 20° pe
CANADA }
80 8/10% pr. Cheques on
Bankers 768 0/10% pr
Demand Drafts 76.75% pr
Sight Drafts 78 G/10% py
#0 8/10 pr. Cable
78 3/10 pr. Currency 7 4/10% pr
Coupon a7 M pr
50% p 20°) pr

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PAGE. FOUR

ADVOCATE
Gesu oe ee BS uae

Printed by the Advocate Os., Lid. Bre~* #1. Bridzetew>






Wednesday, September 10, 1952.

EXHIBITIONS _

WITHIN rec@ht Wegks three exhibitions
have been stagéd fn Barbados which give
some indication of the talent and ability ietan
which exists in the island. Stardens, his huge, red-brick

eee house, is much as he left it that

Two of these exhibitions were held at morning. ‘The lawns are well

IT IS now 218 days since Frank
James White drove through the
Gloucestershire town of Newent—
where he was known as Mr. Har-
greaves'—— and headed towards
London in his beige Ponsae for
the last time.

the Batbadbds Museum’ and one ht. the Drill barbered the edges still profes-
' . » "ee ~ . . sionally sharp.
Hall The main part of the house

The first exhibition was a display of black where White used to live and
‘ . Work, ig deserted, Gargoyles peer
and white photographs taken by members stonily down the lawns from the
of the Batbados Camera Chib.“! \’ tower top. And in the gold-ceil-
vore oe ; if 4 a P inged rooms gilt angels look
In recent years there has been a notice- across from the marble mantel-
i i he numbers of piece at rows of ledgers murked
able increase locally in t cease) ene salen tale
those interested in photography and the ~ Whitey gardener, Wilfred J.
j ns e lub some years Wadley, is still at work in the
formation of the Camera C y pre ne eB geo enya Ma
ago was a natural result of the desire of of White: “As I found him, he
amateur photographers. to get together was one of the best employers I
and study a subject’ of cammon eo. «Vein tceatity. cord was “borrow-
, : ographs club ed” by his employer to get the
The exhibition of phat Brap § “k false passport which took him out
members at the Museum a few weeks — of Britain,
1as been able Now Frank James White is on
showed how much te Cinb has the run. From the International
to do to encourage high standards of oo Zone of Tangier he has told his
- 3 : ;.' Both as to own
graphy among its members sect matter “ory of how he escaped from
technique and selection of subject matter |) i:gin—a story that starts, as hé
the photographs exhibited at the Museum says, wih his arrest on. charges
bai ae ed o frau@....
reflect high standards and it is to be hop’ 1 Used a Bank to Help Me
that the Barbados Publicity Committee has Fly
been able to secure some of these exhibits
for display in the new waiting room at
Seawell Airport.
The other exhibition at the"Museum, the pe a) frarcedt-tec ty berets:
exhibition of Miniature Gardens, is UN- — Withdut * saying anything else
doubtedly the-most worthwhile exhibition, except “Not guilty” in reply to

ed, A small motor-car drové up
to my
February

charge of fraud they read to
that has been held in Bar bados for a num- he e
7 - . ocal pol he
her of years At a time when the beauty accompanied them to t

deing consumed, “ft toak about an hour to optain
the part of my rejease on bail of £1,000, after
which returned to my home,
Stardens House. :
I was, peeperet to abandon it all
and do ¢ u
two wept
to surrender to my bail.
; At the time of arrest the police
Mm -had confiscated my passport. To
and a new passport was my first
job,

of this island i, ee —
ith little apparent concer!
or sAthoritica, the activities of the Horti-
cultural Society are_of especial import-
and the exhibition of miniature gardens
is evidence enough that if-only the authori-
ties will throw their whole weight n
support of a “more beautiful Barbados
campaign that’ the members’ of ‘the Hor-
ticultural. Society “can lend” invelfable
assistance. Certainly there was far more
beauty to be seen in the,small confines of
the Museum during the~ Exhibition’than
there is to be noticed today in the once
lovefy and once. carefully tended Queen's
Pathe more recent exhibition of fish’ in
aquaria at the Drill Hall is also an exhibi-
tion of which to be proud. The organiser:
this exhibition: re to tie oer brine wae
or giving an opportunity to many | © a new fdentity for 15s,
ae such A Wide’ variety of-beautiful: fish

had
-taken in the Strand,

tificate.
_It was all too easy.
gardener I require

me,

ardly have been equalled in a larger time
_ a _ -tully stamped. So far so good. -

MY arrest was quite unexpect="»

showed his insurance card of pawnbrokers.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



SEPTEMBER. 10, 1952

WEDNESDAY,



- ‘$HESE ARE THE CLUES ... A man on £1,600 bail
disappears te Paris with a false passport... NQ@W FOR

THE FACTS

MAN On The RUN

out of my several banking ac-
counts, This had to be done very
carefully because normally I paid
by cheque for every thing and
rarely drew more than £20 in
Cash. But somehow or other |
managed to accumulate about
£1,000 in one-pound notes.

| decided to make first of all
for Paris — a city I knew well
and in which I had friends.

The preparations I had so far
made had made it necessary for
me to go from Gloucestershire to
Lendon three times during the
first week. I made each of these
journeys by car, driving alone,
and on each occasion I took a
packed suitease with me,



. RANK JAMES WHITE

house one..morning in . At Stardens House I employed round the difficulty,
) and~ three detectives a- resident
politely informed me that they secretary. It was not my custom

housekeeper and a
to keep anything. under lock and
key, and each time I went off in
my car to. London I wondered
whether my shrinking wardrobe
would be noticed, but, as it was,
no word or comment was made to
me.

Having decided to make first
for Paris, I went to Thomas
Céok’s and bought a single ticket
on the night ferry, At the same

nk before the date 4ime I bought the £25 worth of
ahead When I was due travéller’s cheques allowed, and

these were duly recorded on my
new passport.

I then went to the American
Express in the Haymarket and

t I went to London and ob- purchased from them an undated
tained the necessary forms, which Ajr France ticket from Paris to
_L took away with me to study. I Milan.

I also purehased £300

new passport photographs worth of Sterling Area travellers’
I went to cheques from the Amercian Ex-
Somerset House and purchased a press, thinking that these might
copy of my gardener’s birth cer- jo useful if I went on to Cyprus.

These Sterling Area cheques were

I told my jot entered on my passport.
ita idanteg on ee eee

card’ in connection with his in-
surance cards, and he gave it to
Armed with all these neces-
sary documents I presented my- lem of ready money in Paris—
self at’ the Passport Office and £25
within one hour was issued with week. There was only one solu- t
* tion I could think of — to buy

My.gardener had no suspicion jewellery and sell it once I got to

reser oe aver ee whatever. I gave him back his is.
and the excellence-of the display would (Gentity card and at the same | “Ts

° Final Letters
I STILL had to solve the prob-

in Paris would not last a

I went to a very exclusive firm
From them: I
bought a magnificent gold cigar-
ette case for £120 and a platinum

SALESMEN IN A JAM:
: NO CARS NO CASH

By NEWELL ROGERS |
carried carelessly in my pocket
and the clip hidden in a box of





















matches. . ‘ NEW YORK.

I spent the next few days .
writing final .Jetters. To my SPARE a thought for the worried car
solicitors I gave a power of| salesmen.
er EN ae {afairs nd) They are caught between a shortage of

ssessions.
to start my journey. My large} cars to sell and a shortage of customers to

Pontiac car was full of petrol and
ready for my last trip in it. =

Problem

My journey from Gloucester-
shire to London took four hours,
and I had not allowed myself a
great deal of time. I had my lus
8age to label, and I wanted to buy
a hat—something I had never worn
for ten years, and now thought of
as a disguise.

I had also to dispose of my car.
Everything went smoothly, how-
ever, and with a good hour to
spare I drove my Pontiac up the
ste€p ramp of a garage and walk-
ed away:

All T had to do now was to post
the half-dozen letters I had writ-
ten and then join the boat-train.
But I had somehow overlooked the
fact that in London the post was
collected up to 9.30 This was a
great blow.

If I posted my letters now—as
I had planned to do—they would
probably be delivered on the
Friday morning—before I would
actually arrive in Paris,

It was essential that these
letters were not delivered before
Saturday. I then thought of a way

buy them.

The car scarcity—most of the showrooms

in my suburb are empty—is due to the recent
steel strike. It cut Detroit’s supplies.

The reason for the buyers’ scarcity is prob-

ably lack of ready cash.
* *

LAMINATED

* * /

MAKERS realise that they must make the
greatest sales drive of post-war years in 1953.
They want to sell 5,000,000 cars. So there is
going to be a glittering new series of models.

Details are still secret. But this much is
known. Some higher-priced models will have’
air-conditioning. Most will have a new look’!
in body design, and there will be some en-
gine changes.

*

See the whole range of these fine PADLOCKS at

Cc. S. PITCHER & CO. Ph. 172



* * *

WITH the defence boom tapering off, com-
petition is going to be red-hot. Detroit’s
plans are a warning light to British car
makers in the American market.

SPARE a thought, too, for the women of
sunny Los Angeles, capital of California.
Hollywood, a part of Los Angeles, draws
beautiful women as bees to honey. And now
there are 725,900 marriageable women in
L.A. and only 381,700 marriageable men.

D.EHARD MacArthur supporters tried to
ge* his name accepted on the presidentia’
election ballots in Illinois. They proposed
him as a candidate of the America First
Party. The general said he. was abandoning
politics when he took the chairmanship of a
business machine company three weeks ago.
The election board said No to the diehards.

A ROUND-THE-WORLD voyage in a 33ft.
sloop with two sails and motor was com-
pleted today by Al Peterson, 40-year-old

Brooklyn bachelor. He left New York in
the sloop Stornoway in 1949, and did not tell
anybody where he was going.

ONLY 128 days until Christmas. And th2
New York Commerce and Industry Associa-
tion issues its annual plea to British export-
ers: Remember last year when British lux-
ury goods missed the holiday counters due
to late shipment. Please, please get the stuff
moving now,

BACK into the headlines goes the name of

I pushed them into the letter-
box of a bank, and on a piece of
waper torn from my diary I
wrote; —

“Dear Sir,.My small son has
naughtily ‘posted’ six letters in
your box. I shall be grateful if
you will post them in the ordinary
way as soon as possible.”

‘Phat, I thought, was a quite
ingenious way of surmounting the
difficulty.

A porter wheeled my five
trunks into the Customs shed, I
presented my passport, which
was casually examined and cour-
teousily returned. None of my bags
was opened and I boarded the
train and was conducted to my
sleeping compartment,

To Dover

Then I sat on the bed and
lighted a cigarette taken from the
gold cigarette case and checked
up on the diamond brooch
beneath the top layer of matches,
Soon the train began to move into
the night towards Dover. I left
my compartment and lurched
towards the restaurant car, where
I sat down to a meal and drank
a few brandies. I felt I needed

hem.

But I had escaped from Scot-
land Yard, and I had succeeded
in taking about £1,000 with me. I
felt I was about to begin a new

life.
TOMORROW: Arrested in Paris. .

And light as a blown leaf!

Brand new NYLON SUITS in
a full range of sizes— grey and
fawn.



eae aia h high ~ *- Getting Money
canlecA ttm. the ee am ight wall I THEN , began to drew money and diamond brooch for
‘ * ; Bele

5 Ae sn : t the 2 areneiet
consider ee ‘a_repeat display a

Muse Tat, nt ear. Labour Party

R 34 bis pach ich
.. These’ three successfulkexhibitions whic
. nT ee ' t
have recently beén held in Barbados ough ; LONDON.
to encourage others o held exhibitions of — “gi, months ago early in out By D. T. Roberts
a different=kind "throughout the a, English Spring, Winston Church- product ibe: thir even: seiltude
dy ben made in ill’s new Conservative Government , .
The suggestion has #lready seemed to have inherited all the Naturally the Socialist party
ils of the day. Its stock was enthusiast is likely to be more on
goitigt.down fast. the Bevan's side than on Attlee’s

this newspaper that-an easy way to encouf
But the, Summer has made a —because it is only elderly men

age the livestock and ‘agricultural industry
_ to the practise of earlier days to hold dive- oiange in’ the British political WhO are glad always to defend

£400.





in the country districts would be to return

: th t tand on their past
stock and agricultural shows in thagroun@s scene, Now it is the Labour sanaer Thee Sathanetie Schan
of some convenient plantation. ™ Party that“is in troukle. Being in once of the Labour Party will

While Miniature Gardens and fish “in, OPposition has Jorn Labour probably leave the “Attlecites”

: iti , rty pieces, The Conserva- well in power—but they will have
aquaria are fit subjects for exhibitions at © jives, (in parti¢ulay the success- ty jean’ their codons at least

Museum or at the Drill Hall; livestoc ful Chancellor, R.»A, Butler) can half way to the Bevan viewpoint,
shows are best seen ona farm and although be thankful at the strange confu- in order to keep the loyalty of
d n be exhibited in town it sion into. which Clement Attlee’s the party following.
garden produee c . in the-préunds of party, recently so strong, has now The key to it all is the popu-
will look more attractive in e's ) 5 Ol” fallen. . larity poll taken to elect mem-
a plantation. . hai dh ue Labour Party Srapcsane — yt Tans ate

i «® in ounds ©) “8 orecombe in a week's time is an has thr i
ag ee yo Rag Neen, Ati Selo’ ox expected to demonstrate the weak- him on the Executive. If he gains

, » mess and divisions. in British more he will reckon Morecombe a
certain days of the-year has been already cocinism. Defeat has left the victory,

started in Barbados, but the time seems British Labour Party, after six All this bickering inside Brit-
overdue for the holding of livestock and post-war»years of rule, with no ish Socialism leaves the Conser-
agricultural exhibitions in the parishes. available policy of immediate re- vative Government with a been
The annual agricultural exhibition in ‘rms to put forward, Fundamen- pect of five oe of fsa

A it is in itself is ‘lly, the problem for an idealis- at the end of — t a Re e
Queen's Park; excellent as it is in its S tie party like British Socialism js "®t know what they w: c eve ~
Ho, substi for local exhibitions which to maintaii a programme of re. eet. But probably British Social-

; ism wi i fuller-
ether the individuals of form-that is, at once, attractive to 8M will, by that time be a rT
hare common interests in. the Bediies and practicable to blooded, and much redder Social

‘nes, P ism than it was on~the day mild
i yestock-@ndeagr ultute. | esi ae — Attlee, little Clement Attlee was de-

. The continual {oa on:
— from the-country, into oe ews which Cripps. Morrison, and Bevin — set feated at the polls.
is the: unfortunate ofthe urbanising about sueh ‘a rapid programme ot Big Power To Small
influences to which, dos ‘has eon Aelia a ate mee Queen Elizabeth II recently
pond during the: last-two des, could “oo, Then for two @ddressed a letter to an ancient
e halted if only the life of the country: years it retained power but cast 'epublic hidden in he iis ot
could be made more attractive for the small around for something to do next, a gH ge eee
peasant and agricultural labourers. If the cs taanauies oo Ban sega. Pepe (Ok * Ban Searibo, Prev-
ietors of plantations in each parish iable~ defeat ——and the British !ously they had lost patience in
took-it in turns to hold-livestockeand “agri- “Sociatists now-are the “defenders” te course | of negotiations with
cultural shows on their Iands the small of the established way of doing the British Foreign Office and
keepers of. livestock and growers of gar- things—the Labour way, British had wally ren tg nr
den produce would have a. greater sense Socialism, for want of any new %° 2 opersign State, ihe Sep:

Ss ‘ *polit esspd ,. of San Marino is entitled to do so.
of belonging to their planting community: Scie etn necctoe p.ae- Unfortunately the Queen's. reply
than they must have now by comparison jrols, priorities and high taxation to the pinpoint Repubtic has not
of their own narrow social lives with the —with full employment anda con- Pleased the Regents. She o
more spacious lives of those who live in. tinuous moderate inflation as its Pye eee rarer,
“big” houses.» When exhibitions such as Packkround. So the orthodox Db bic. viola

: : : : Labour Party lead by Attlee has neutrality — first by Germans
the Miniature Gardens or the Aquaria Fish acome a kind of “conservatism and then by Allies — during the

in Bridgetown cars from all over. defending the established order war. San Marino wants more.
PEN sine asitors rity see them. In that Attlee’s government built. Until recently this was the only
th ‘ ' ts from all over the island . Aneurin Bevan’s movement is “Communist ruled” country this
aaa tice os euany vinitove” to” codnitey a gathering of vaguely socialist side of the Iron Curtain.
{ 7 ,

! im nteats.who are always say- ' Student Life
_ livestoek * and agricultural shows. But ing that they want socialism not t t



Dstatute






‘our years,



In Trouble |

—LE.S

every profession, (except possibly
the law) there is a shortage cf
trained man _ power. Compare
those figures with the United
States where there are three
times as many people, in total,
but thirty times as many students
at colleges and Universities, all
over the 48 States. America has
two and a half million students
potentially leaders in their
own field. Britain can only train
a paltry 85,000 at any one time.

Ican hear people commenting,
“But British standards are higher”.
There are two answers to that;
first, that engineering, accoun-
tancy, and many other profes-
sions need more trained men —
not necessarily more geniuses;
and secondly — there are twica
as many students on advanced
“post graduate” courses in the
United States, (where standards
are high) as there are in all Brit-
ish Universities together. Inci-
dentally with our students out-
numbered by thirty to one it is
easy to see why we have smaller
choice for Olympic teams,

3657 students in Britain to-
day come from Colonies or Com-
monwealth countries.

Greenwich Mean Time

The Astronomer Royal does not
live at Greenwich any more. But
of course “G.M.T.” is still taken
from the meridian that passes
through the charming old eigh-
teenth century observatory on a
hill outside ‘Greenwich, over-
looking the Thames. The As-
tronomer Royal is now comfort-
ably ensconeed with his tele-
scopes down Hurstmonceaux

Castle, in S The old build.
ings at G

hit about b; ie bombardment
of London a are just being

restored. For two hundred years
there has been a “time ball” on
the roof of the observatory. It
can be observed by shipping in
the river. Two-and-a-half-minutes
before the hour it is raised to
the top, and allowed to fall at
the instant of the correct Green-
wich Mean Time, Before the
radio time signal, ships leaving
London would check their chro-













the former Muriel Vanderbilt, thrice married
society leader of exclusive Newport, a Rhode
Island seaside resort.

She gained fame in the twenties as soci-
ety’s “golden girl.” Now Mrs. John Payson
Adams, she told the police of the theft of
25,000 dollars (£8,900) in jewels from her
estate, Idle Hour.

THE men who run Minnesota’s national
ploughing contest have decided not to hear
speeches by Eisenhower and Stevenson on
the same day. There would be no time for
ploughing. So Eisenhower will speak on Sep-
tember 6, Stevenson only if he can make it
on another day.

THE air force which wanted to produce
Rolls Royce Sapphire jet engines in a big
way, has got only a “handful” after spending
400 million dollars (£143 million) in 18
months.

Reason: Scarcity of steel and machine tools

and difference between production methods
in Britain and the U.S.
» *















SEA ISLAND
DRESS & SPORTS
SHIRTS

in ‘our Menswear
Dept. American
Ties and slick Men’s
Belts. * (dat



* ak
AMERICA has entered the race against
Britain’s Comet jet air liner — six years

behind.

In California, the Douglas Aircraft Com-
pany announced its readiness to build jet
transports. é

Douglas made the Dakotas or DC-3’s, war-
time work-horses of the air.

The new jet is to be called the DC-8. It
will have two seating plans. Luxury or first-
a seats, 70 to 90; tourist, or second-class,

Tentative specifications—cruising speed of
660 miles an hour eight miles up, four
engines, crew of five, wing span 127 feet,
length 134 feet.

The planes are expected to cost more than
‘£1,000,000 each, and the first production
model will fly in 1958.

Why is America six years behind Britain
in the jet-liner race?

One reason is that U.S. aircraft makers
have held back from commercial jets because
of the cost. The firms wanted Government









Goddards

FOR YOUR PARTY.
SPECIALS

cs

aes

eae I have) in: front of me a depres- nometers by help. But the Government is interested in ishi =
whereas, ii {the city: exhibitions visitors: the present set-up. But they are sing repbrt) that) the number of re gind. te heve Aone pal, Wey ac. pra tiwg Nourishing
tend only to he, drawn from what may,be ieee testy, ey, Want "©, Set Students in| Beiain is "now fixed Stored Mg coerstion’ © PME Fe] financing military jet research. Foods These Fine
t A " t rey y, ry t ; “ge . ts
lodsely \deseribed ‘as the middle velass), 19 | tival ‘difficulties of lack of ard ee tlhe attnaleee kink Signs of the Ti FOOTNOTE: The Comet cruises at 500 on
é number of the agri- cash in the way of more social- \\° ; ‘ miles 4 ry Ss uffetts

the country a large 1 " ; i co Atmatia totenie estion this small figure, But it seems An advertisement in the Times I fr hour. has four engines; wing span, Large phe. Quaker Oats Meats
eons labourers might be expecte is to alter the framework by ¢ut- . me that this is just not enough reads:— 115ft.; length, 93ft.; crew of six. with Qdpe ‘aii Siucers. teins
attend. tif ™ ting down re-armament. But cut- University students to keep our “YOUNG PEER, widely trav- SIX YEARS i ; ; Large uaker Oats

The growth of city exhibitions is an.ex- ting down the Atlantic pro- British Commonwealth running. elled, seeks interesting’ occupa-| 1007; is a long time to wait. The 44 — Roasts
cellent and encouragirig sign of the’ diver-* gramime' {x not the gist of “Bevan- Almost every leading job now tion, could rep t firm over- gazine American Aviation. suggests that Grape Nuts mn
sity of talent afd interésts”to be found ism”—it is only a chance by- demands a University degree. In seas, reply etcyes . U.S. airlines may have to buy Comets after oan Nut Flakes Fillets

en di all. It says: “Such a sale is not i ibl = Haddock
among Baw/adians. OUR READERS SAY: , idea that No person who England anys: impossible. ||] Farex
’ But the greatest need ‘of the island is at mre af tie dike’ of @e com oe to ee oe under the} De Havilland has cunningly forced the issue|{) J & R Rolls oe ig lll
present the bringing of some degrec of WL Barristers rules, jawamily Bractises and is heading: 7% anent W.I. Po with sales to competitive routes, British jet ——— Butter Frozen Vegetables
ight into the lives of those To the Editor, The Advocate— recognised as a barrister in any of Appeal”, there appears: e at : : nehor Milk
arpetniges and light into. seem to be the Sir — May I be permitted "to territory of the area, will be eligi- Conference’ also expressed the| ‘’ansport leadership is coming too close for j Fresh Vegetables
swaying Speienatine piled buses, the @7@¥ to your ote ae a= ble Ly meg genre Aha hes Ly Ey that ee eae comfort.” Liquor & F ‘
% , rtant inaccuracies which ap- poses of the ociation’s rules ar in Trini would form thei ,
“jump” up? ari@.\‘jive” of the*countless peared in your paper of Sth inst.” term ‘barrister’ shall mean a per- own Bar Council, independent of| | BUSINESS MAN Stanley Slotkin went to Wi Specials ee
ial hOps and the engive excursions. On pageone (1) under the cap--son who has been called to the any Law Society including Solici-| the Olympics in Finland i iti me Specia

social ear : tioh “W.L Barristers will form Bar of England.” «+» tors.” ympics na British car. He Tasty Snack
Livestéck--and egricultural- — in mbes Bal AWWouiition (rom Gus Own. This should belguieidad ti sakd:” This whould i Tacit 46 arrived home with a four-door Soviet Pobeza Dubonett,
country will provide not only a natural Correspondent) _ there appears’ “Provided that ANY person who, read: “The Conference also ex-| saloon—an illegal export under Russian law. Liebfraumilch Guinness Stout
outlet for competition but .will.help to “Caribbean Barristers have agreed at the date of the adoption of its pressed the hope-that the members How.bs si: f Berncastle ..120z, — 32. per bottle
bridge that gap between the more-edueated on the establishment of a Bar rules, lawfully practises, etc.” of the Bar in Barbados would Ow he got it is a secret. It cost him et Chartreuse Carrs’ Crackers

lanter and the shack-dweller which must Association. This is toggomprise Purpose of this proviso is to in- form their own Bar Council, inde-} than £500. Wide-eyed Americans found the ||} Vielle Cure $1.20 per tin
Pp. ifn heat om fy life °* Barristers in the Britt Carib- clude three St, Lucians who now pendent of any Law Society which car—a Sovi inventi f 2 st | Bristol Sherry Anchor Cheese
be bridged if a healthy community ie 1s bean area and is to be known as lawfully practise at the St. Lucia includes solicitors,” } oa ai viet invention, of course—as sith Dry Sack 4 pkge — 44c.
to prosper 1n this island, the British Caribbean Bar Associa- Bar, but who have never been THEODORE BRANCKER ishingly like a 1939 Ford.

me A
'

A NENOTEEES rneragss

er eA A a at

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 106, 1952



ser

TORNADO HITS MISSOURI FAIR GROUNDS CARNIVAL





WRECKAGE IS ALL THAT REMAINS of a carnival at the Missouri State Fair Grounds at Sedalia after a tornado
raged through the area, killing one man and injuring 17 others. The storm stretched across Missouri, but

most of the damage centered around Sedalia. It caused extensive property damage





Ch. Ch. Playing Fields
C’ttee Holds Meeting

THE Christ Church Playing Fields Committee recently
held a meeting at the Sargeant’s Village Playing Field Hall.
A fairly large number of social workers of the surrounding
districts attended. Mrs. H. A. Vaughan, District Social
Welfare Officer, also attended.



Suffers Shock
Germane Pile (51) a washer of
Britton’s Hill, St, Michael was
detained at the General Hospital
about 11.16 a.m. yesterday suffer-
ing from shock after she was in-
volved in an accident with a bus

Applications were recéived from various organisations
for the use of the Hall and Playing Field. These were
dealt with by the Committee as follows:

—— a ee ar Wednesdays: from 1 to 4 p.m.

: " ° Vauxhall Girls’ School.’ First
Labourer Fined Friday in every month: from 4.30
to 6.00 p.m, a L. A. Hall.

Wednesday nights from 7.30 to

For Assault 10 p.m. St. David’s Old Scholars’
Association. Friday nights (other

And Damage than the first) St. David’s Broth-
enhood, 7.30 to 10.00 p.m. Tues-

EUSTACE ALLEYNE a labourer day nights: Endeavour Literary
of Water Hall Land, St. Michael Social and Cultural Club 7.30 to

was fined. yesterday by His Wor- 10.00 p.m.

ship Mr. C. L. Walwyn 10/- and The Committee is contemplating

1/— cost in 14 days or 14 days’ im- opening a Branch Library at the

prisonment for assaulting and Community Hall and Mr, Warren

beating Aaron Niles, and 5/- for Waithe, a schoolteacher, will
malicious damage to articles the take charge of this.

property of Beatrice Blackman. Among those present were: Mr.

Alleyne was also ordered to pay C. Legall, Secretary, Mrs. H. A.

compensation to Blackman Talma, Chairman, Mr. Fred God-

amounting to 12/6. dard, M.C,.P., Mr. H. St.G. Ward,
Mr, G. C. Ward, Rev. A. I. John-
The offences were committed con Mrs. L. A. Hall, Miss C.
on August 6. The cases Were suilivan. Messrs. Gollop, Waithe,
brought ‘against Alleyne after he w. Blackman and T. Hewitt.
went into Blackman’s house and 5 ;

began to abuse her. After abusing

her he took up a table and hit

Niles who was in the house.

Niles told the court that the

defendent broke the table on him

and cuffed him while he (Alleyne)

was leaving.



11 a.m. the same day.

ARTIE'S HEADLINE

Falls From Cycle

Seibert Bannister of Beckles
Hill, St. Michael fell from his
bicycle which he was riding along
Beckles Hill, St. Michael about
11.30 a.m, yesterday.

He was taken to the General
Hospital and was treated for a
cut on his forehead.’ Bannister
said that he lost control of his
bicycle while trying to avoid a
collision with a woman.

Youth Camp

The Seventh Day Adventist
Youth camp which was at Morgan
Lewis Bay broke up on Monday
morning after a 10 days stay.



“You wouldn't

ool me
about an pie SR potato One of the activities was handi-
beled Mods would sou crafts, The youths also enjoyed
: : aa ’ sea-bathing.
old man! The camp consisted of 37



youths of whom 18 were girls and
3 directors, a farewell concert was
rendered on Sunday hight. The
concert was well attended.



Tenantry Roads
Under Construction
At Gulloden Road 2"

Tenantry roads are now under ‘hese divers are trying to con-
construction at Culloden Road, St. nect lines at various parts of the
Michael. Previously, the residents Potick in order to raise it from its
of this area were subjected to present position.
great difficulties whenever rain
fell. ot Calvert Type Boats

Several labourers are employed The twenty-five fishing boats
on this work and asa result, com- which are under construction at
pletion is exp@cted in a few weeks’ the Reef are not the Bathsheba
time. type, but the Calvert Type Boats.

Raising Potick

On Monday evening divers using
oxygen masks carried out under
water work to the French yawl







ROAD REPAIRS

The Commissioners of High-

ways in St, Peter have begun to Meets Tomorrow
repair the roads in and around the

St. Lucy’s Vestry

(International)



| Three- Year-Old
Falls Into Pit

THREE-year-old Margarct
Cumberbatch of Indian
Groung fell into an open pit
about 14 ft. deep, near her
home on Sunday last while
playing with her brothers
Lester and Carl. She was
taken out by Joseph Spring-
er of the same locality,

There was a layer of
grass at the bottom of the
pit and she received bruises
only on her feet.

Just a week ago a lost dog
was discovered in the same
pit.





At Last:
Potatoes!

Yesterday for the first time in
many months, carts were seen in
long ‘procession coming into the
city with slips and potatoes, but
still many a housewife could not
procure any.

Still confronted with the serious
food problem, housewives ran
long distances behind carts in an
effort to obtain a pound or two,
but almost in every instance they
were told, they must buy slips in
order to get potatoes. Some sellers
refused even to reply to queries
made as to whether one could
make a purchase,

In one or two instances, how-
ever, a g@eller did stop to serve

in Probyn Street Bus Stand about a customer, and then there was

the familiar rush of the past few
months as other customers gum-
moned their friends around the
cart.



Vessels Being
Repaired

Many vessels which are now in
port are awaiting their opportu-
nity of going on dock to carry out
general repairs.

Meanwhile, schooner hands are
wasting no time in carrying out
their own repairs to their respec-
tive vessels. The crew of the
schooner “Frances W, Smith”
were carrying out a paint job on
their vessel, and a similar job was
in process on the schooner “Augus-
tus B. Compton,” which is at berth
near the Central Foundry’s dock-
yard,

The schooner “D'’Ortac’ which
is at berth in the inner Careen-
age, was undergoing keel. repairs,
which involved the assistance of
workmen other than its crew.



Another Service
Station

Another service station is un-
der construction at [Top Rock.
Its owner is Mr. George Pilgrim,
popular garage proprietor of the
same district. Speaking with Mr.
Pilgrim yesterday, he said that
certain equipment which is neces-
sary cannot be obtained before
November, and as a result, its com-
pletion cannot be determined yet.
He however is looking forward to
its completion in time for the
Christmag season,



BARBADOS

“Old Bill” Seeks A

Sailor’s Job

FRANK OXLEY who is known
to same seamen as “Old Bill”, has
y10t been to sea for about ten
years, but still at the age of 64
he would still risk his neck on the
spar.

When an Advocate reportér saw
“Old Bill” yesterday morning. he
was standing on the “Wharf

watching a group of men unload-
ing bags of sugar from a ‘truck.
Asked what he was waiting for
en the Wharf, “Old Bill” said that

he would come down sometimes
to see if they wanted an ex-
pfrienced man on a ship

He thinks that his age may be }
the only barrier, but he is still
trying.

Frank Oxley went to sea when

he was about 18 and first worked ;

om a schooner. His first experi-
enc” was rough, for as soon as the
schooner was ten miles from Bar-
hados on its way to British Guiana
h- wae down with sea sickness

On the second day he was still

snahle to work, but on the third
day he was forced to work, for
the captain warned him that if
he didn't work. they would not
tim him on again.

Very few of the members
sympathised with him. but he was
determined to become a good

sailor. He worked on that schooner

ADVOCATE

PAGE FIVE



Again At 64

for a year and then signed on to
the Sea Prince, a smaller vessel.

When he boarded the Sea Prince
he knew his way around and was
consider:d an able seaman,

His worst experience was on the
Schooner Marjor’e R—the Marjorie
R is not being used now—when it
enccuntered a tropical storm
abort 15 mil‘s off Trinidad on a
Sunday morning about 4.30.

H> said when the storm was in
its full foree they lost their main-
sail and every man was forced
to go below while the schooner
was *ysee4 about like a matchbox
n * 2T,

All th kitehen utensils and food
were washed overboard and one
man nearly lost h's live trying to

. bucket.

After the storm the whole ship
looked weeth r beaten and they

rerciaua +

managed to limp into Port-of-
Spvin shout two days after. At
Por*-of-Svain most ef the men

were taken to Hospital and given
moieal treatment.
Tod>y he is not eoncerne4 about
‘v= = motos job on a schooner,

for h> thinis he can show the

Robinson
Appointed

Leg. Co. Member

@ From page 1

in such a capacity.
pleasure on behalf of

Mr. Robinson thanked
President and honourable
bers of the Council for his
words of welcome on their
hilf



SPECIFY

“EVERITE’ »

ASBESTOS-CEMENT

He had much |
| members |
in welcoming him to that Board. |}

the |
mem- |
kind |
be-
As far as he was concerned,
he said, he would like to assure
His Honour the President that he

would always endeavour to co-

operate with him and other mem

bers in the passing of legislation,
which, in his opinion would be of

benefit to the inhabitants of thi
island as a whole.

$

CORRUGATED SHEETS

For his part, he took his seai |

in that chamber as an Inde
pendent,

any political party in thi
island. Therefore when legis
lation came before that hon

He was in no way
efliliated to or connected with

AND

Â¥
Pe

ourable Council which he fe't. 46 ”
was in the interest of the
colony, he would support it.

Conversely if legislation wa

“young boys” a thing or two about ‘ntreduced in that Chamber which

a schooner,

He wovla eladlv take a job on be in the interest of the island, ho
a steamship, but “there is so much would crave his Honour’s indul
gence and that of other honour-!|

red tane to get on one today.”



Hucksters Have
Not Moved To
Temple Yard

PROPOSALS have been made
for sometime now for erecting @
vegetable market at Temple Yard,
but more recently there has been
the suggestion that this site would
be a suitable place to remove the
central Fire Brigade Station.

Since the idea was first brought
up for the erection of a market
at Temple Yard, hucksters have
been encouraged to go there.
While. some have followed the
suggestion, the majority remain
at their former places for selling.

A notice has been placed at the
James Street end of Busby Alley
saying that hucksters have re-
moved to Temple Yard, but 4%
glance down the alley immediate-
ly gives the lie to the notice. is
alley is the centre for bueksters,
and one said yesterday, “You
would not expect a few of us to
go to Temple Yard and leave the
others to meet the customets who
are more familiar with this alley.
For hucksters as a whole to go
to Temple Yard, things would
have to be better organised there.
Otherwise it would mean that a
few would go there and get little
sales.”

Sect. Librarian
Of House Sworn In



Mr, Lionel Hutchinson, Libra-
rian-Secretary of the
Assembly, was yesterday sworn

in as an Officer of the House at
its meeting yesterday, | by Hon.
Dr. A, S.'Cato! {member
Legislative Council.

The Deputy Speaker Mr. A.
S. Lewis told the House that the
Auditor General had informed him
that the salary for the Librarian-
Secretary as voted in the Esti-
mates would cease with the com-
ing into operation of the recent

Act and it was necessary for the
House to pass a_ Resolution em-
bodying a salary being paid to

that officer,

Bills Of Exchange

The House of Assembly yestr-
day passed a Bill to amend the
Bills of Exchange Act, 1907, to
authorise the crossing of certain
banker’s drafts as if the drafts
were a cheque.

The objects and reasons of the
Bill state:

A banker's draft payable to ordet on
demand addressed by one branehy, to
another branch of the same bank is not
a cheque within the Bills of Exchange
Act, 1907 This Bill is intended to
authorise the crossing of such bankers’
drafts as if'the draft were a cheque,

Requests for this amendment to the
Act have been made by the three Banks
operating in this Island so as to bring
the law into line with the existing law
in the United Kingdom as contained in
the Bills of Exchange Act (1882) Amend-
ment Act, 1932.



WE carry an assortment
of GOOD BOOKS

see them at

«« Advocate Stationery ”



ote yer, |

Widows And
Orphans Pensions
Act Amended

During the debate on a Bill to
amend the Widows and Orphans
Pension Act, 1928, Mr, C, Talma
(L) and

some civil servants in asking
them to contribute to the Widows
and Orphans Pension fund: The
Bill was passed,

The Objects and Reasons of the
Bill read :—

Under the provisions of the
principal Act, the Governor-
in-Executive Committee is re-
quired to exercise certains
powers and perform certain
duties, which for the greater
part are purely formal or
administrative and does not
require the exercise of any
discretion.
these formal matters and ad-
ministrative functions could
more properly and conveniently
be performed by an _ approp-
riate head of a department, e¢.g.,
the Accountant General.

This amending Bill therefore
seeks to amend the principal
Act so as to delegate to an
appropriate officer, viz.,
Accountant General, certain o/
the powers and duties prev-
iously exercised and performed
by the Governor-in-Executive
Committee,

Mr, Talma said that although

House of the Bi!l served a very useful pur-

pose and was considered an ad-
mirable Bill, it worked hardships

the way in which it was actu-
hy put into effect. Junior é@m-
ployees of the Service, whether

* married or unmarried were ex-

pected to contribute towards the
fund, and that could be regarded
as rendering a hardship, espec-
ially having regard to the low
rate at which the average Gov-
ernment employee was first em-
ployed.
Small Salaries

Since the question of the
Widows and Orphans Bill was
before them, he hoped that Gov-
ernment wou'd review ‘he whole

@ On Page 6

S.P.+C.A.

Ask you to be considerate
and kind to your animais
at all times, but especi-_lly
during the heat of the day
and water them regularly.







FRESH
SEEDS

AT








he conscientiously felt would nm

n

ASBESTOS

able members, to express his own

opinion: on such legislation
also to vote against it.



Motor Mechantics
Pass Examination

The following candidates ente
ed from the Barbados Evenin

Mr, R. G. Mapp (L) Institute have passed (2nd Class) |
spoke of the hardship imposed on the Examination “Motor Vehicle |

Mechanics Work” — |

Eric Carlton Clarke, Randle | Waves for All
McAlvin Dear, Keith Lawrence |
Morris, Evans Irishton Skinne:

Darnley DaCosta Smith.

The results of the Examination

“Electrical Installation Work
Course B” have not yet bee
received,



Bridgetown Busier

The streets and pavements ¢

It is considered that Bridgetown were busier than usuc|
t

yesterday. This was due to the fa

|
\
that certain schools re-opened yes- |

Chief among these was =
|

terday,
the
private school4, At the Moder
High School where 169 new pu

pils were admitted, there has bee)

an addition to the school unifor:

that of blue berets, and through- }
othe.
the streets, there was a regular strean,

out Broad Street and the

of school children purchasin

FOR BOYS and

°

Best English



BACK

{
i

and

Modern High School and othe

their last-minute school requisites, |

STURDY AND STRONG

LACED AND STRAPPED






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10, 1, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET

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WEATHERHEAD'S

Indian Ground district, and have The St. Lucy’s Vestry is sched-
already reached Roebuck district uled to meet tomorrow. One of the 4 4 e
going in the direction of Four jtems on the ag®nda will be the
Hill. In the Roebuck district the awarding of exhibitions, These
road is being widened in order to exhibitions will be tenable from
give vehicles good travelling ac- next term which begins next
commodation, week,


















KITCHEN GARDEN





Lettuce, Carrot Beet LINENE GIRLS LACE SHOES
MW} Cabbage, Sweet Corn, In several qualities, and ail (he —_ in Brown or Bleck Kid
t i T to regulatio! .
£4 FOR OPENING SHOP ON SUNDAY Celery,” Bgsaahe Orden, | $1.20 v4. x eee eee
Brocolli, Thyme, Mustard, TRICOLINE (@ $2.03 KHAKI DRILL 84c. to $1.72

Spinach, Sweet Marjoram,
Parsley, Onion, Okra,
Vegetable Marrow, Radish,

__HIS WORSHIP Mr. C; L. Walwyn, Police Magistrate of
District “A”, yesterday fined Ernest Griffith, a labourer of Nel-
son Street; St. Michael, £4 to be paid in 14 days, or one

In White for Blouses

. TS @ $3.39
BERETS @ $1.50 Sore ea SHIR’ D $

» COLOURED

month’s imprisonment with hard labour for keeping his shop Leek, Woter Pepper, HIR
opened on a Sunday. Kohl Rabi, Cauliflower, PANAMA 1.1 ae ne
Cpl. Shepherd attached to the Bridge Police Station said Brussels Sprouts and $1.81 Sone a Ee ee <4 STHIRTS $1.20
Hc the yo ae a oe Grinking in his liquor shop about BEANS (6 kinds). : MAHOBE $1 59
42 a.m. on Sunday, August 3. ANKLF. SOCKS from 44c. to $1.17 ” _ .

_ He Mw the men give money to the defendant for the FLOWER GARDEN In White and Brown $ » BELTS in Plastic _~
drinks. Griffith had four previous convictions and was told $ Leather 48c. and $1. Black
by His Worship that if he comes before the court again on Zinnia, Snapdragons, Can- GIRLS LACE SHOES . aes ee

dytuft, ;

Sizes 11 to 1% $7.49











that charge he ;culd not be fined.
) ined Dahlia, Petunia, In Brown or Black Calf Brown or Black
peo Carnation Sizes 11 to 1% @ $7.49 pr. Sizes 2 to 5% $7.50 & $9.32
“er serpin j
; pi 9 For leather : 7
ve at, .
of every colour— EXERCISE BOOKS, PENCILS, PENS, NIBS, CRAYONS, INK,
tulaca, Aylnum, Calliopsis, ERASERS, PENCH, SHARPENERS, PAINT BOXES, PENCIL

It cleans, preserves—and how it Ageratum, Cosmos.

BOXES, THERMOS FLASKS, PLASTIC TUMBLERS ang CUPS, and
SCHOOLBAGS

HARRISON'S

BROAD STREET
DIAL 2664

polishes! Ask your retailer for Propert’s. e

Nothing else is quite the same. Watch
THEY ARE FRESH !



the difference it makes to your shoes!

PROPERT’S

SHOE CREAM

Get your supply to-day
from

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q '
i) SUUDLUDUDEUDSULEOUEUESUEUEOD SOOO

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— Distributors |



|
la.




PAGE SIX

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Government Will Get
Soil Conservationist

GOVERNMENT, on the recommendation of the Scot- pelts srets : Meeeeinny, Rock Hal!

ri : ; z . . ad from the bottom by Swans
land District Conservation Board, is at present taking 4, Peg Brno ye peg
steps to obtain the advice of a competent and experienced jt was one of those roads which

soil conservationist as to ways and means of effecting ran up a slope. It

water @ontrol and of minimising landslip and soil erosion

in the-Scotland District.

This was stated in a reply to a
question which had been asked by
garding the condition of Boscobel,

rs. E. E. Bourne re-
k Hall, and other

roads in St. Andrew which had become impassable be-
cause of their serious state of disrepair owing to heavy

rain.

Regarding the question concern-
ing the Boscobel Road, Govern-
ment replied that temporary re-
pairs are effected annually to ena-
ble the sugar cane crop to he
reaped but that this read w
closed to through traffic by t
Central Road Board because
the slips which were taking pla
and that reconstruction of it
not recommended for this reasc
Government stated that tempor-
ary repairs had also been effect-
ed to the Rock Hall Road.

Mrs, E. E. Bourne (L) said that
one part of her question dealt with
the Boscobel Road leading io
F »bel Tenantry. The reply was
that temporary repairs were
effected, but she had taken it cn
herself to take. the Director of
Highways and Transport to the

rea. She showed him the section
of th ad which was impassable.

that if temporary re-

I were carried out people

Id be able to use the road at
risk at all.

She sai@ that if for example
anyone in the Boscobel Tenantry
wanted a doctor, that doctor
would have to take a round-about
road which would cause eonsider-
able delay.

As much as she appreciated the
reply, she would like to see some
work cafried out on the road.
There was no sign indicating the
road was closed and in a certain

She felt

tion to Mrs. Bourne’s words.

Mr, F. L. Walcott (L) said that
the debate on such a_ question
came under his portfolio, He was
however sorry that he did not
know beforehand that the ques-
tion would be debated, otherwise
he could have presented figures
referring to money spent on roads
in St, Andrew and other partic-
ulars.

“When you go on the hill tops
and look down on St. Andrew
you will ask Almighty God to
give you special wisdom to deal
with the roads”, Mr. Walcott said.

He said that he did not know
if Mrs, Bourne was aware that
Government had spent more
money on roads in St. Andrew
than haq been spent on roads in
other parishes.

Mr. Walcott pointed out that
during the flood waters caused by
heavy rains a few years ago, St.
Andrew was cut in half when
Lakes Bridge was washed away.
“Take a look at that area and you
will see what has happened over
those years.”

Soil Erosion

He was not a Road Engineer,
but from complaints he had re-

was a difficuit
road and would take a lot of in-
vestigating and examination be-
fore major repairs were effected.

Mr, L. E, Smith (L), although
he was in agreement with the re-
ply, strongly supported Mrs.
Bourne’s argument. He said that
day and night people of such dis-
tricts were approaching represent-
atives about conditions of roads.
But representatives hag lost sight
of the fact that they should tell
those people who were the cor-
rect persons to approach,

He said that members must
think about the conditions when
rain was falling in those difficult
places. He felt that it was ‘time
that whoever was in charge of
roads should take the matter
seriously and spend money on
those roads.

Mr. M. E. Cox (L) said there
was no one in the House who was
more sympathetic towards the
question of repairs to roads than
Mr. F. L. Walcott and himself,
but he did think that the reply
which had been given to the ques-
tion asked by the member for St
Andrew was reasonable.

It was a statement of fact, and
he was sure that any member
who knew anything of St, Andrew
would agree that they could noi
continue to spend money on those
roads without realizing that they
would spend thousands of pounds
only to find that when there were
heavy rains, the roads were dam-
aged and the money lost.

It had therefore become neces-

ceived and from the views of ex- sary to set up a Soil Conserva-
perts, he knew it was a question tion Board, and it was known to
of soil erosion, He felt that some all that the two representatives in
people asked Government re- the House for each of the parishes
quests, realising that Government of St. Andrew, St. John and St.
had no control over those re- Joseph were



FLYING

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 1952
eS



TRIANGLE FOR 8&.A.F.



THE “DELTA AGE” of British Aviation opens with the Gloster Javelin, first flying triangle to be

ordered into production for the Royal Air Force. A
follows two years of experimenting with the new shape. A

698 Delfa bomber, has just flown

THE HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY passed a Resolution
approving the Order entitled The Civil Establishment
(General) (Amendment) No. 6 Order, 1952, made by the Assembly yesterday,
Governor-in-Executive Committee on August 26, 1952.

Assembly Pass

Amendment Order

faster-than-sound twin-engined fighter, it

“big brother” the four engined Avro
and has already been ordered for the R.A.P.

VAUGHN TABLES
NEW ADDRESS
ON SALARIES





At a meeting of the House of} ourselves? MEDILAX is the answer.

Mr. V. R.
Vaughn (I) was granted leave to} 800d! Tried out a new hairstyling, and

For

Women

Only!

Not this week, folks! I've made the great dis-
‘eovery—an Air-Sick tablet that really works.
Just left the Airport after four hours’ and
look at me! AIR-SICK tablets by, SAV: YY &
MOORE are ‘the works’ boys and girls. Try
them out and see for yourself.
I know my onions too Mr. Townsman Grow
~ =Athem, eat them (raw is how I
like them) and kiss my girl
friend too.
z= “Ever tried AMPLEX? An
Amplex tablet a day combats
all breath and body odours —
from within. Eat or drink anything you like, but
take an Amplex too—if you want to be popular.

Take a look at John here, for instance. He
wasn't always this sprightly, so early in_ the
morning. Not until his wife discovered IRVONA,
the marvellous tonic tablet that gives energy and
health within a short time, did John
look like this.



“Now I send him off to work happy—just as full of
basen oe he can be,” say: Mrs. John. “And I feel fine
myself. My trouble was different, MEDILAX was what
I needed. A safe, gentle laxative that quickly ensured
INNER CLEANLINESS, We're always thinking of house
cleanliness, girls, why not INNER CLEANLINESS for





“Hello, there! Do I look good? I feel



members on the highlighted the waves with COLAIRE.

withdraw an address he had pui It’s marvellous! Just stroke it on fol-

section it was likely that anything The Addendum of the Resolu- Chairman of the Hospital Advisory before the House concerning re-

could happen,




quests. He asked who would say Board which was endeavouring to



“I do not know how some peo-
ple even manage to go along this
section of the road on foot,” she
said,

She felt that something more
could bewdene to the road in the
interest of the taxpayers. She was
surprised when the Director of
Highways and Tvansport told her
that he did not know what to do
with some of the roads.

She said; “Years ago the roads

were “ta” better condition than
they o-day.”
“T could not let the reply go by
without raising the views of the
people in the Rock Hall district
and in. particular the Boscobel
area,’ Mrs, Bourne said.

Mr. J; A. Haynes (E), support-
ing Mrs&, Bourne, said that one of
these days Government would
fing that they have to’ appraise
the erop# “ef the people in those
listwiets, “pay. them the worth of

“he eanes and then leave the
canes in the fields.
Short-sighted

“It is absolutely short-sighted-

that Government had not spent a
great amount of money on St.
Andrew to ‘seep the roads in the
ondition tney were in to-day.

Mr. Walcott said that the reas-
on why no major work was being
done on those roads was because
Government was trying to get a
specialist to advise what can best
be done,

He felt that ordinary human
sense would not expect major
work to be started in St, Andrew
when the services of a specialist
were expected to be forthcoming.

He had no doubt in his mind,
and he was the one responsible
for the nature of the reply given,
that the answer to the question
gave a fair and accurate state-
ment of what was taking place
at present.

He hoped that Mrs. Bourne
would realise that although it wa
the atomic age, there were cer
tain things over which they hac
no control. He hoped too that Mrs
Bourne and Mr, Haynes wouk
realise that they were represent-
ing a parish where the difficultie

arrive at some decision as to
what should be done to maintain
the roads in those parishes in per-
fect order.

Collosal

He pointed out that the amount
of money which had been spent
on the roads im that parish from
year to year was something col-
losal ‘when compared with the
amount spent on roads im other
parishes.

He did not think, therefoy that
any member of the House shoula
at that stage severely criticise, o1
even criticise the Government for
the reply which had been given to
the question asked by the honour-
able member.

He said that the Director of
Highways and Transport was not
responsible for the answer which
had been given, and added “there
is no other parish in this island
where roads ure concerned that is
giving Government more _heac-
aches than the parish of St. An-
drew, Government had at last
decided that there should be some
person who knew about soil move-

ness ea the part ef the Govern- were greater than in any other ment to find a remedy to the

ment,” he said, We hoped that the
appropriate member of the Execu-
tive Committee, wao dealt with
Highways, would pay some atten.





ea







For



SAIN
Le teste
Prt At Mela
Pry yee rin
a WEALTNY Scale

4
H
H
j
tay seu
aie /
eS LTE LS {



SOS

TLL ae





place,
Difficult Road
He said that Government were
carrying out repairs wherever re-



For hair that is al
looks . smart, la

well cared for .

problem,
The Executive Committee, Mr.
Cox said, were responsible for the
@ On Page 8

|

ways as good as it

.

strous . . . obviously

follow the lead of

discriminating men the world over... use
g

JULYSIA

Toute

HAIR CREAM

|



The Cream of Hairdressings

Trade enquiries to:

S.M.G. AGENCIES

1. & R. BUILDING, PALMETTO STREET, BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS





}



tion reads:—

The Order entitled “The Civil
Establishment (General) (Amend-
ment) No. 6 Order, 1952,” has
been laid in the Legislature.

It has been evident during the
past two years that the subordinate
establishment of the General
Hospital is inadequate to cope
with the increase in the volume
of their work. This expansion,
which was to a large extent
directly attributable to the in-
crease in the number of Charge
and Staff Nurses in June, 1950,
from 50 to 116, was partly met
hy provision in the Estimates for
the employment of the following
temporary staff:—

2 Supervisors, Main
($480x48-—912)

2 Assistant Cooks, Nurses’ Home
—(312x24—432)

! Assistant Cook, Main Kitchen

($312x24—432)

3 Kitchen Maids

2 Maids—($306)

1 Washer-—($360)

The requirement of these
services are of a permanent nature
and it is therefore desirable that
these posts should be included on
the permanent establishment. The
change in status will not involve
any immediate additional ex-
penditure but will entail liability
| in respect of pension in the future.

The maintenance of the
mum standard of efficiency
Hospital renders it essential that
the permanent establishment
should be increased to provide also
for the following posts:—

1 Assistant Seamstress—($312x
24—432)

1 Assistant Warden, Nurses’ Home
~($384x48—672)

3 Maids—($306)

In addition, the recent decision
to provide an additional 25 beds
as an adult ward in the Hospital
annexe at “Avalon” will make it
necessary to further increase the
permanent staff as follows:

1 Charge Nurse — ($720x48
960 and free quarters)

2 Staff Nurses—($480x48—720
and ‘free quarters)

Kitchen-—

($306)

minnie
in the



1 Washer—($360)

2 Serubbers—($306)

The net effect of the amend
ments set out in the aeccompany-

ing Order is shewn hereunder
Present Rev
Number Nom

rse
(a) Change (9720x48-—-960)

(b) Staff .. (480x48-—-720) 116 149,
Assistant
Seamstress, (312x24—432 9

| Assistant Warden

Nurses’ Home (384x49-97
Supervisor, Main

Kitchen
Assistant Caooh

Nurses’ Home ($312x24—432)
Assistant Cook

(480%48---919

Main Kitchen ($912%24—4299 m
Kitchen Maid ($306) 4 7

Maid ($306) 12 17
Washer ($360 bas 2

)

Mr. R. G. Mapp (L), refer’
Part 2 of the Addendum, said that
he had seen there \
of staff. He took it that :
were employed in 1950. Put th
Order was going into effect fr
September 1952, so that certain
people would only become |
of the Staff from 1952 wh«
they should be part of the
from 1950,

Mr. E. D. Mottley (E), said he
would repeat that it must be ®1-
ways appreciated anything that
was done for the Hospital. On
two questions he would however
ask the Deputy Leader of
House who was incidentally Che
man of the Hospital Advisory
Board and one was whether there
was some regulation at the Hos-
pital which said that a person }
to work two years before beings
given holiday.

At this stage His Honour the
Deputy Speaker, Mr. Lewis, inter-
jected by saying to Mr. Mottley
that such a regulation did exis!

Mr. Mottley, continuing, said he
eould not understand how such a



regulation could exist by the Gov- ,

ernment when the Legislature had
passed a Bill which stated that
every person who worked for

year was entitled to a holiday

At A Loss
Another point. which he sai

he would like to draw to the at-
tention of the Deputy Leader of
the House was to the effect that
while this resolution made provis-

‘ion for increased staff for the efti-

cient running of the Hospital
was at a loss to understand why
the three vacancies of Visitir
Surgeon at the Hespital were
filled. There was hardly mm
point of more nurs¢ nd t
etc., when there were vacar

ioctors and incidentally he uw
stood there were yet many ir

l \ N willing t

{ Visiting Surgeon

He hoped the Hon, Junior Me

accept

_ General Hospital as

8° qhlution,

Board, would let the House know muneration of the salaries of the
something on the matter that day. members. Following this he gave

Address con-

He also raised the question of a notice of another
druggist. He said that he under- cerning the same matter.
ies that representatives of the

ruggists’ Branch of the Barbados wi bells
Workers’ Union had asked for a batnirebsitheliininenasl
niittimum of $160 per month for a
qualified druggist
employers but he noticed the Gev- attention
ernment had advertised for on
for $120 per month. As
Government and the Union wert
practically one of the same

Members of this

that this

hy. ee es tt caiq 224. responsibility of elected
that he hoped that Government caennene of the Jamaica House of
proposed in the near future to Representatives and the elected
provide space in the laundry and members of the Trinidad Legisla-
kitchen of the Hospital for the in- !V¢ Council, and consequently

creased number of people in order that your Excellency send down
their the necessary amendment to the

“House of Assembly (Remunera-
Mr. V. B. Vaughn (I) said that tien of members) Act 1949--29 »s

that
dutie

they might
with ease.

perform

if they had found it necessary to follows :—
make the temporary stait perman-
ent then their previous service of

poor Mags: . $2,880, Deputy Speaker $2,880 ror’ Sis calls me, Silf brought her weight
tw ars should be ded. Nhat ; on : ‘sr
ee mK, Walcot (iB) tones on Chairman of Committees $2,880, down in_a_ jiffy.” Jimmy’s right, girls.

the question of a Visiting Surgeon,

He read paragraph 4 and asked @2nuUm and all other

doctors,
cumours alloat that somebody in of members of
the Government would not ap- House of
point Visiting Surgeons, to

the
the salaries of the

Dr, Cummins, replying, said he members of the Legislatures of
did not know of any regulation at Jamaica and Trinidad
the Hospital which called upon

people to work two years before
they got holiday but as His Hon-
eur the Deputy Speaker had
assured him it was so, he would
go into the matter.

Turned Down

sequently gave notice reads:—

The House

cellency’s attention

House considers the

that

ing Surgeon, he said that
carry the blame as there was yng
recent recommendation for the
sppemniment se a Surgical Regis-
trar which had been definitely . . :
turned down by the Governor-in~ ¢ad Legislative Council.
Executive Committee and he 2. The House :therefore re-
vanted to assure the Hon. Senior ...7* Ay f
Member for the City that very — requests Your Excel-
soon the appointments of Visiting [°"¢y to send down legislation by
Surgeon would be made, way of amendment to the Housc
He further stated that there Of Assembly (Remuneration of
would be no aping at the Barbados Members) Act, 1949 (1949-29)
they were providing for the payment ot
prepared to run a Hospital for members as follows:
Barbados.

Dr. Cummins promised Mr, The Speaker — $3,600 per an-
Vaughn to raise his point with the "um.
Governor-in-Executive Commit- The Deputy Speaker — $2,880
tee. per annum,

To Mr. Mapp, Dr. Cummins said The Chairman of Committees
that for the past two years the - $2,880 per annum.
Hospital had been employing peo- The Leader of the House
ple temporarily and the number 3.000 per ennum.
of patients increased and the Other Members, each — $2,400
Govérnment had now come for- per annum
ward to make this type of em=
jloyment permanent. It was not 3. The House is also of opinion
as Mr. Mapp eee ee vane that the Executive Committee
eople eee eette he Teas ay (Remuneration of Members) Act
i kitchen, Dr. Cummins told Mr ? : (1949-30) should be amend-
wiord that he ought to know °¢ to provide for the payment
ibout a resolution which made ‘° the un-official members of
provision for extending the Hos- that body each of a salary of
pital, He said that the laundry and two thousand four hundred dol-
kitehen were included in this res- lars per annum, and _ would
thank Your Excellency to send
The House then passed the Res- down legislation providing for
olution approving the Order. this also.

Widows And Orphans
Pensions Act Amended

@ From Page 5 was quite entitled to bring in any
Bill and see that no hardship amendment, but to speak as they
was worked on those who by the were speaking then, they would
small salaries received, could not be out of order.

ntertain the hope of marrying Mr. E. K. Walcott (E) said that
before 15 or 20 years’ service. he dit not think that the amend-
They could not hope to benelit ment they were dealing with was
from the fund within 15 to 20 the correct way of putting it,
Vears, anyhow. There was a_receni

Perhaps a scheme of insurance case which illustrated that if an

uld be worked out which

tld create less hardships.

Mr. Mapp said that he under-
stoad, that the Civil Service
Association which had the Act
oral long time under considera-
tiom, had made certain recom-
mendations. He wanted to know
whether Government had received

responsibility of









any recommendations and
whether they had taken = any
®» in connection with them
h 1a n sub-
r rank and
. mony | BACKACHE
: cat Stl | @ HEADACHE —
_ < RHEUMATISM
little NIGHT RISING
ts from it TIRED FEELING
imPURE BLOOD
Amendment sanee norris
Dr. Cummins (L) lt ! pits 3/-
member t tt t



The Address which has been

Assembly
from private would draw to your Excellency’s
House con-
siders the Legislative status and
the responsibility of members of the
Barbados House of Assembly is
hd In no way inferior tq the status

Speaker $3,360, Leader of House

and all other members $2,400 per
menibers
what was the use of having more Serving on Executive Commitiee
nurses if they did not have thq@ 4m additional $2,400 for such ser-
He said that there were vice in order to make the salaries
Barbados
Assembly comparable
eleeter

The Address of which he sub-

of Assembly has
the honour to draw to Your Ex-
the
; a status and
As to the appointment of Visit- responsibility of members of the

l sé t he Barbados House of Assembly is
should not like the Government to jn no way inferior to the status
elected
members of the Jamaica House
of Representatives or the Trini-

Act did not say who in Govern-|
ment was entitled to do such and
such a thing, nobody was entitled
to do it. r

The Bill was passed.

lowing the wave with the applicator.









Easily brushes out
too. What a difference
it makes when your
hair sparkles
shines with COLAIRE.

and

“And what a difference it makes when you use
ALL BANDBOX PREPARATIONS,” says Mary.
There is a Bandbox shampoo for every type.

Almond Oil for dry Liquid soapless for oily hair.

And what a range of brilliantines! Ask for BAND-

BOX preparations always, I feel so different after
- using them.”

“Til say she doesn’t” chuckles Jimmy.
‘TN say she LOOKS different too. Sis
doesn’t tell you she used to weigh a ton.
{ told her’ about SA4LF. ‘Curious little hor-










Three SELF TABLETS A DAY WILL
CHASE THAT UGLY FAT AWAY.



for the entire family. A
SPA for POP, a SPA for
PENNY, a SPA _ for
PETER, and one for you
too — if you value
your teeth and a spark-
ling smile SPA TOOTH-
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buy for the whole fam-
ily. In nylon or bristle,
shaped to clean every
crevice, SPA should be
YOUR toothbrush too,















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And here’s something .


WEDNESDAY,



Entomologist
Will Be Employed
On Agreement

From Page 1

“Aldrin”, should be carried >
the present high level of efficien
Trials with this insecticide are
now being laid down in selected
areas as a result of Mr, Tucker's
investigations in Australia and thé
United Kingdom but definite
results cannot be expected under a
period of two—three years.

In view of the vital importance
» to the economy of the Island of

preventing the recurrence of
serious losses to the Sugar In-
dustry caused by the ravages of
the sugar cane root borer and of
the evidence of the increase in
population of this pest, and in view
of Mr, Tucker’s intimate know-
ledge of the Diaprepes root borer
and of his association with the
plans for its céntrol and eradica-
tion, the Governor-in-Executive
Committee agreed in 1951 to re-
employ Mr. Tucker on agreement
following his retirement from the
permanent establishment. The re-
employment of Mr. Tucker will not
block the promotion of any serving

officer.
Control Work

Prior to his retirement Mr.
Tucker would be eligible for 122
Gays’ vacation leave and under th>
Civil Establishment (Leave Pas-
sages) Order he wou'd have earned
leave passages fcr himself and his
wife up to 33/42 of the full
amount. It is not, however, con-
venient to Government that Mr.
Tucker should proceed on leave at
this stage owing to the urgency for
tackling the new pest infestation in
the sugar cane as a result of an
association between a mealy bug
and an ant to ecmbat which funds
were recently provided by Resolu-
tion No. 55 of 1952, the netd to
press on with the Control Work on
which he is engaged in connection
with the pests referred to in
paragraph 2 above, and _ the
vacancy for a Deputy Director of
Agriculture.

The Honourable the Legislative
Council is invited to agree as early
as possible to Mr, Tucker being
allowed to retain his eligibility for
leave and passage concessions as at
the date of his retirement and of
his continuing to earn leave and
leave pasSage benefits during the
period of his agreement at the
rate applicable to a permanent
efficer so that he will not be
deprived of an opportunity of
taking overseas leave at an oppor-
tunity that is more convenient to
the Government.

$120 Passed For
Bovell Scholars

The House of Assembly yester-
day passed a Resolution for $120
to make provision for the in-
creased monthly charge for board
and lodging students with Bovell
Scholarships have been asked io
pay.

The Addendum to the Reso.u-
tion reads ;—

The Governing Body of the
Imperial College of Tropical
Agriculture has notified this Gov-
ernment that with effect from
the year beginning on the Ist of
September, 1952, it will be neces-
sary to increase the monthly
charge for board and lodging to
students resident in the College's
hostel from $72 to $108 for each
person.

2. The value of a “John R.
Bovell” Scholarship is at present
$1,236 per annum: the additional
charges for board and lodging
now proposed will necessitate an
increase in the value of the
scholarship to $1,560 per annum.
For the two remaining terms of
the financial year 1952—53 thers
will be two “John R. Boveli”
tcholars in residence at the Im-
perial ‘College: the amount in-
cluded in this résolution is re-



already provided to
cost of board and lodging for
these scholars up to the end of

March, 1953.

SEPTEMBER

10, 1952

—————$—$—$——

Council Pass

For More Staff And
. Accommodation

IN ORDER to convert the house “Avalon” into quarters Resolution



eee

BARBA



the plan would be referred to the
Staff Committee before the next
was prepared, The

for some of the Hospital Staff and to provide accommoda- â„¢4tter had been referred to the

tion and additional staff at the Hospital the Legislative
Council at their meeting yesterday concurred in a resol

tion for the sum of $26,000.

Librarian
Gets $120
Monthly



The House of Assembly last
night fixed the salary of the

newly created post of Librarian
and Secretary, House of Assem-
bly, on the scale of $120.00 per
month rising by annual incre-
ments of $10 to a maximum of
$180 per month with effect fror
the 2nd September, 1952.

The holder
was created by an
assented to by His
the Governor, wa’
day sworn in as
the House,

During the debate which en-
sued on the matter, it was point-
ed out that the duties of the
office should be defined in order
that members would be able to
decide at what point on the
salary scale the officer shoulda
start,

Mr. F. L. Waleott (L) criti-
cised the attitude of the incum-
bent of the post on the question
of his salary, and said that while
he was not opposed to the Reso-
lution, he would point out what
the history of the post was, and
compare it with similar posts ia
the Civil Service.

Mr. E, D. Mottley
cised the maximum
suggested in the Resolution, on
the ground that the duties of
the office were not defined, and
called it a “gross miscarriage of
justice” to attach a higher maxi-
mum to that post than there was
to the post of Reporter of the
House whose duties were de-
fined, and of which every mem-
ber of the House knew. He sug-
gested that the maximum salary
should be $160 a month, which
was equal to the maximum
salary attached to the post of
Reporter. .

Mr. M. E. Cox (L) supported
the argument advanced by Mr.
Mottley about the disparity be-
tween the salary paid to the Re-
porter and that proposed for
Librarian and Secretary and com-
pared the salary of the latter post
with that paid to Civil Servants
when first recruited to the
Service.

He felt that in view of the fact
that a Commissioner would shortly
be appointed to review the salaries
of the rank and file of the Service,
the salary of the particular officer
should be dealt with, by the Com-
missioner. He therefore would
not support the Resolution, nor
the suggestion for the reduction
of the maximum to $160.00 as wag
made by Mr. Mottley.

Mri /C. & Talma, ‘Mr... G,
Mapp, members of the Debates
Committee, and Mr. V. B. Vaughan
(1) argued that two wrongs did
not make a right, and honourable
members should not use the sal-
aries paid to Civil Servants as a
model on which they should pay
the officers of the House,

They agreed that the Reporters
were inadequately paid, but re-
minded honourable members that
an Address dealing with the
salaries of the Reporters had been

of the post which
Act recently
Excelie
earlier thut
ofticer

an of

(E) criti-
which was

a month.

passed,



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wo

Staff Committe> and also to thé
Hospital Advisory Committee and
U- it was now proposed to modify

the original proposals as shown
Part of the addendum set out in the addendum to the Resolution

in some detail how the necessity before the Council. He would say

for

the expenditure had arisen in addition that he believed that

and this read:— Since the Addendum had been
On the 30th June the Govern- written it was hoped to find a
ment took over formal possession small space to be used as

of “Avalon.”
minor. alterations, to convert this
house into quarters for
the staff at the Hospital.
Addendum
23/1952 under which the funds to
purchase
Â¥

tended to make the house at the further number of beds — 15 to

It is proposed, with gleeping room for the Medical
Officer on night duty on any par-
ticular date.

Although it was not mentioned
in the Addendum, the Medical
Superintendent hoped that there
would be in fact space for a

some of
In the
to Resolution No.
“Avalon” were pro-

ided, it was stated: “ — it is in-

gate of the General Hospital into 20—to be put in the children’s

Children’s Block.” On recon- Ward, and that when the pres-

sideration and after consultation ent children’s ward is being used

w
Vv

the General Hospital Ad- as an adult ward it will be pos-
Committee and the Staff sible to put in at least 20 and
it is now proposed to perhaps as many as 25 beds. The

ith
isory
ymmittes,

use the house at the gate of the actual space would take 20 beds

c

‘Assistant Matron’s Office, Stores,

C

rut.

for Specialist Officers, Board Room,
Waiting Room.

which will thus be vacated,
gether

chi

veneral Hospital for the follow- comfortably,
ing purposes:——

but in case of
7 necessity it could take as many
Ground Fleor — Matron’s Office, as 25 by bringing them closer

aa together than was veally wanted,
room for Sisters living P ;

hanging
Increase In Cost
The Colonial Secretary contin-
uing said he would warn the
above Council, as he had done previ-
to= oy. ae ee ga to the
_ int hospita inevitably meant an
hpi Be py Pag die h .. a increase in the annual recurrent
ldren’s ward, and the existing cost. When he had spoken before

Upper Floor—Consulting Rooms

offices mentioned

The

children’s ward will be used as he had said that it would be

an adult ward. These re-arrange- necessary to

increase the staff.

ments will provide an immediate The Resolution before the Coun-

increase of 20 to 25 beds.

cil covered seven student nurses

The proposals set out above and a gardener, but there would

will occasion certain non-recur- also be other posts covered by

rent

and additional recurrent a Civil Establishment Amend-

expenditure for which provision ment Order which had just been
for the seven months September, tabled,

1952 to March, 1953, is included
in this resolution.

The cost of the other posts
mentioned in the Addendum—one
The following additional staff Charge Nurse, two Staff Nurses,

will also be required: — one washer, and two scrubbers,
1 Charge Nurse ($720. per taking into account Cost of Liv-

annum). ing Allowance, would come to
2 Staff Nurses ($480. per around $3,153 a year.

annum). He moved that the Resolution
7 Student Nurses ($240. per be concurred in.

annum). Hon'ble C. Wylie seconded,

num.
Provision
resolution
Nurses >
other posts will be covered by a certain
Civil
ment) Order,

quired under
included iti
consequential on the provision o
additional
accommodation for both the staff
and the public.

cur in the Resolution the Colonial
Secretary said
Resolution to purchase the prop- Staff Committee was
erty known
before the Council towards the second plan.
end of the last financial year he indicated that that plan was

1 Washer ($360. per annum). Hon. Dr. A. S, Cato said that
2 Scrubbers ($306. per annum). they would remember, as_ the
1 Gardener ($434.72 per an- Honourable Colonial Secretary
had pointed out, that when the
in this resolution for the purchase of
Student “Avalon” came before that hon-
the Curable Council there was a
i amount of restrained
(Amend- Criticism a part of which had been
incurred over the fact that the
plans had been submitted and
items the Senior Staff of the Hospital
js bad not been consulted about

r them.

The addendum to the resolution
stated “On reconsideration and
after consultation with the Gen-
eral Hospital Advisory Commit-
tee and the Staff Committee, etc,
etc. He thought it was only fair
the to point out that so far as the
concerned
originated that
They had merely
a

is included
for the 7
and the Gardener:
Establishment
The additional provision
the several
this Resolution

re-
in
additional

staff and

Moving that the Council con-

that when

as “Avalon” came they had not

had mentioned that in due course vast improvement on the previous

a

coming down in connection with
further expenditure on alterations
to
dependent
vhich

Ww

further resolution would be one,

Should Change Approach

It seemed to him that the time
hospital which were had come when they should
on it. The Resolution change their approach to that

Council had passed problem, The fundamental prob-

the

the

for the purchase of “Avalon” had lem of the Hospital would not b«

stated in its addendum that the met by that type of action.
intention wag to make the house

They
could not cure the ills of the Hos-

at the gate of the General Hos- pital by patchwork therapeutics.

pital

into a children’s block, The fundamental problem of the

providing a minimum increase of Hospital arose out of the fact that

20 to 25 beds,

Hon'bles
quired to supplement the funds passed by the House, and that it Cato had pointed out that the







it had never been planned as such.
It grew little by little by the
erection or acquisition of a series
of buildings.

“Modern Hospital planning i
a science in itself” Dr. Cato went

Not Consulted
On that occasion, however, the
Dr, St. John and

meet the recommended a maximum of $200 Staff epnnatiae had not been on to say. He was informed that
consulted,
The Resolution was subsequently reserve the right to make further siderable
representations

and they would hospital architects

amount
when the next various institutions

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of time in
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Resolution came down. He had
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ay



DOS ADVOCATE







$26,000 For Hospital



In The Legislature Yesterday
COUNCIL

cistative Council mer at
yesterday. The Hon. J. D
Chandler presided. i
’ The following messages were
cetved from His Excellency
Governor :--
MESSAGES
No. 20/1952 Provisional appoint-
ment of Mr. B S. Robinson as a
Member of the LegislativesrCouncil.



he

No. 21/1952 Leave passage eligi-
bility of Mr. R. W. E. Tucker
who will retire from the post of
Entomologist, Department of
Science and Agriculture, on he
10th of December, 1962, and will

he re-emploved on agreement
The Clerk informed the Cowneil
that he had received notification
from His Excellency the Governor
that he had been pleased to grant

the Hon. BR. Challenor leave from
nis duties as a member of the
Council from September 1. to

February 10, 1953

The Hon. the Co'onial Secretary
presented the following docu
ments

DOCUMENTS
1 Annual Report of the Pea

ants’ Loan Bank Ist June, 1950 .
3ist May, 1951
2. The Civil Establishment
(General' (Amendment) No.\ ¢

Order, 1952.

The Council concurred in Sup-
plementary Resolutions for the
cums of $26,400, $15,479, $250,505
$1,600 $3,629 to be spent under
various Heads.

The Council postponed consid
eration of Supplementary Resolu
tions in the sum of $305,700, $5,947
to be spent in connection with
the erection of a new Fire Station,
Bridgetown and a new Fire }
Station, Speightstown. |

The Council adjourned sine die, }

HOUSE

When the
met yesterday Dr
a message from His Excellency
the Governor regarding the re-
tention of the eligibility for leave
and passage concessions of Mr. R.
W. E. Tucker, Entomologist, De-
partment of Science and Agricul-
ture, who will be re-employed on

House of Assembly

Cummins laid

rf

agreement terms following his’
retirement from the permanent
establishment.

Notice was given of a Resolu-!
tion to approve the allocation of
the balance of the Stabilizatior
Fund fixed in accordance wit!
the provisions of Section 10 oj
the Barbados Fancy Molasses Pro-
duction and Export Act, 1937.

Notice was given of an Act to
amend the Distribution of Enemy
Property Act, 1951,

The Librarian-Secretary of the
House of Assembly was sworn in
as an Officer of the House.

It was agreed that both branches
of the Legislature would meet
informally on 23rd of this month
to select delegates to the forth-
coming West Indian Conference

The House passed a Resolution
for $120 to make provision for the
increased monthly charge for
board and lodging to students who
have gained Bovell Scholarships

The House Passed a Bill to
amend the Widows and Orphans
Pension Act, 1928, The Bil seeks

ne stein ne

day to day functioning before
they even got to the extent of

p
putting their plans on paper.

to transfer certain powers under
the Act from the Governor-in
Executive Committee to the
Accountant General

The House Passed a Bill to
amend the Bills of Exchange Act

1907. The Bill seeks to authorise
the crossing of banker's draft
payable to order on demand
addressed by one branch to an

other branch of the same bank

as if the draft were a cheque

Mrs. E. E. Bourne was granted
leave to comment on a reply made

by Government in connection

with questions she asked con
cerning the state of roads in S
Andrew. }

The House approved the Civ! |
Establishment (General) (Amend
ment) No. 6 Order, 1952, whic! |
makes provision for the inclusic }
of certain staff at the Gene {
Hospital on the permanent sta

The House passed a Resolutio; |
to fix the salary of its Librarian |
secretary at $1,440 a year, with
annual $10 increments to $2,160 }
The House named Mr. G. H |
Adams as a candidate for the |
panel from which the unofficial
British delegate to the Fifth |
Session of the West Indian Con
ference to be held in Jamaica in |

November this year, will be
selected |
The Houser adjourned until

Tuesday 23rd at 3 p.m,

If only they could begin by
urchasing a site they could eyen-

‘ tually build a hospital upon it
He had mentioned that, not of which they could be proud,
because he thought that they The population of the island was

should try and erect an elaborate
stwucture on the lines of hospitals
nm big countries, but merely to
indicate that they could not pro-
duce an efficient Hospital by
spasmodic improvisation,

Let them take that resolution.
If they considered capital and
recurrent expenditure, they
would be safe in saying one hun-
dred thousand dollars to get an
additional twenty to twenty-five
beds and so perpetuate the same
unsuitable conditions in the same
unsuitable buildings.

Not Touching Core

If they spent $100,000 here and
another $100,000 there, they still
were not touching the fundamental
core of the problem. They must
get a new hospital planned in
such a way that it can be extend-
ed upwards or outwards as cir-
cumstances permitted or as their
resources allowed them,

They might have read of the
opening of the Hospital of the),
University College of the West
Indies in Jamaica last week, That
was planned to carry five hundred
beds but had opened with two
hundred beds. It was planned
however so that it could be ex-
tended to accommodate the five
hundred beds when the occasion
arose,

He knew that the question of |
finance would be raised immedi-
ately. They would be told that
they could not afford a new hos- |
| pital. They knew that their re-
sources were limited, He was not

re
tit
li
tr
1

sl

th

a

criticising the Government. He
knew that they were aware of |
the erying need for more accom-

modation and the provision of
| greater facilities for caring for
the sick, It was possible that if
oil was found in paying quanti-
| ties that they would get some of
the things they so dearly needed,

Direct Method

He was however suggesting
that they should channel every
financial means at their disposal
in the direction of building a new
hospital that would be a direct |
method of touching the core of
the problem,

~ Pains in Back
Nervous, Rheumatic

foods and drinks, worry

: and Sroguent vores 2°18F put
re in on ihe ineys an ney
and jer ubles are the true
Excess Acidity, Geitigg Up

ts, uraing Passages, Leg Pains
ervousness, Dizziness, Swollen An-
iden, Rheumatiam, Puffy Eyelids. and
feeling old before your time Help your
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your Fidpeys clean out excess acids
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Cystex must satisfy completely or cost





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| oe Cystex |i. 38
antee pre
ar Cldnevs, Rheumatiom, Bladder tects vou

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«. F. HARRISO

TWO BOOKS OF OUTSTAND





Also just received: —

RING”
PEAR'S CYCLOPAEDIA,
BOOK OF ETIQUETTE:

increasing
the next fifteen or twenty years
there would be an increase in the

new
build

new,

would be




FLOWERING TREES OF THE CARIBBEAN

&
THE OXFORD ATLAS
VOLUME V: CHURCHILL'S MEMOIRS “CLOSING THE

considerably and in

egion of another $100,000,

What he was suggesting was

that they should agree to channel

heir efforts in the direction of a
Hospital for the future and
it up even while they re-
eved the pressure on the old, so
mit in time they could have a
modern hospital supple-
rented by a small one on the old
te

Hon, G. D. L, Pile said that it
generally agreed that

lis patchwork business would

never be satisfactory. What people
really wanted to know was wheth-
er Government intended to build

new hospital or intended to im-

prove and extend accommodation
facilities at the present site.

He suggested that Government

should consider seriously the pos-
sibility of providing facilities for

@ On Page 8

AT 31, HE FELT LIKE Ag’
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YOUTHFUL VIGOUR

This young man was bein
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health after weeks of pain :~ #

“l suffered for wee from
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If I stooped to do anything
was agony to straighten w
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tried them and found they seve
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e —8.V.0.

Uniess the kidneys function
roperly, certain acid wastes,
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complaints—backache, rheuma-
tism and excessive fatigue.
Kruschen is one of the finest
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PAGE SEVEN





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(THE HOUSE FOR BARGAINS)

No. 16 Swan St. Phone 2109, 4406, 3534












PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 106, 1952
eens setter nesenseenesenensnneenenees a a

CLASSIFIED ADS. "eMte sates Hospital. | THE CURATE’S WIFE |'SHIPPING NOTICES
















































































































































menses a om rag ENDED AN AFFAIR Pia
—_——--— -— -- ages i “ PIOOLISCO,
Tem ake | A parced — containing 6052?) the otulaanenad of preventive | |; ROYAL NETHERLANDS € a %
DIED litte cas toe tot en sate et ot | medicine, Preventive medicine wag | ri d i y
Asian Jute! Daye! Road, nd suitable for Vitaly important since it was cer-| —gQ Thackeray put it all in a book hb stmapagelepand The MV. “MONEKA™ will s0- 3
ROVER—On September 9th 195: v (ee ee layi put building jots i more economic th hos- LY P cent Cargo and Passengers for §
garet Royer, relict of the el | w © offered aor aie at the omen | pltatientnen, - i he SAHANG FROM EUROPE Dominica, Antigua Montserrat, x
Royer and mother af AUTOMOTIVE j of the undersigned on Thutsday the 11th ion, J. DO © By GEORGE MALCOLM would be quite content to _throw 8, COsSEA Mn Beptember, 1963 Nevis and St. Kitts, Sailing Mon- %
Pavier, "The funeral will cay a September, 1952, at 2 o'clock’ qm | handle: pointed | THO M.S. NESTOR 19th September, 1953 day 8th inst x
daughter's residence Durnagn’ | ip Pimeuth 3 one viv | |, THE plan can be seen ou apptiegtion to {Ot that the Governor-in-Execu- MSON wowballs if | have a kiss Pom) MS HERSILIA 26th September, 1952 %
Worthing, Christ Church at 4.15 This] CARE rmouth 3 Bass jen ter Cat bie | the tundtersignea | tive Cemamittee were faced on all, . Tie Buried Life; By Gordon! you.” M.S. BONAIRE 3rd October, Stoo, vied The M.V. “CARTBBRE” will ac- }
aftemoon for St, Patrick's Rongan | node! perro : a eens COTTLE, CATFORD & CO | aides with demands fo tal NK. Ray, Oxford University Press Thackeray idolise her virtue, SAILING TO EUROPE cept Cargo and Passengers for %
Catholic Church, Jemmott’s Lane 8d mite none s e 9.8.68-6n. | r bray n> 9 M$ ,ORANJESTAD 9th September, | Hominies, Antigua, Sopiserret.”
thence to the Westbury Cemetry Office, 3925. Home 8657 Shin Ml iain ichchne expenditure ce not only ran into 4%5. 6d. 148 Pages, ; and would have been happy were] JanuwG ro TRINIDA PARAMARIBO Nevis and St. Kitts, Sailing Friday
10. 9. 52 wroteon “CRANE HOUSE” situate in the parish th dollars but Sem THE affection between the| it a ie was half- a AND aryisn GUIANA um 12th inst.
lS a we aes ia te, ed Mas Pads Piste tas cee! | opty Mas Slee Slee arse Me [Bars nncanes orn
* eave eiser 'e! in excellent con i ee - e@ was : M.S ir r,
Se Sarwhter’s lace o muren | & tion, “apply Barbados Agencies, telephone we eee er tees ca a — | est priority, being of the high- { Brdour jamake frequent trips to Paris, SAILING TO TRINIDAD AND CURACAO ASSOCIATION (INC.)
Street, St. Peter at 3.30 p.m. today 5.9. 62-00 . a | Mrs. * Brookfield was the great}, After mine uneasy years, hus-|M.s. HERA 15th September, 1952 Consignee, Tele. No. 4047
for the Bethelite Church, Bank Hali, An_idee Vauxhall Wyvern, noc “The above will be set up for sale a} eve : -.| band and adorer had a violent/™.S. HERSILIA i3th Sette, u,
and thence to the Westbury Cemetery 1 cai Gitte Vauxhall Wyve fn, ood con Public Compétiion on Peiday the 26tn| Hon, J. D. Chandler quotea a tew | B ssion of Thackeray's life quarrel; unforgiveable words S.P. MUSSON, SON & ©O
PM K. Husbands, Mrs. 8. Worreil| fused. Apply Williams Court. Oppo-| @a¥ of September 1992 at 2 mm. ot the |instances where there had been| Thackeray was to her an enter- were spoken, “I wish 1 had pever Agente. _
‘daighters) Livingstone Agara,| site Sayes Court, Government Farm, or | Mite o OM ener kc RABY. schemes put to Government | taining caller whose flattering at- | joveq ” wrote the novelist to
Hugh Scott (sons), oe ee Sealy’s Garage, Bay Street 10.9.52—1n ” Liseme Street. with highest C ity attached to tions consoled for the bad a woman. friend. ‘i have peen
(Male Nurse), RB jette, . ; . 79 %@\them. The new Fire Station, temper of her husband. | pl ith and
Richard, Pattiei lendell, Bejty| VAN - One Austin 10 Van 1048 Mod a OS TE Pea ae | played w. by a woman, ti
and Sylvia Woreeli (grand childrens Phone 2317 Vf | House — Bungalow ste tnop a |“Odenn Markets, Extension of Poor - Mr, Brookfield! Allow-|siung over at a beck from the alld ian a Onda Bamst i S
10.9,2—tn "I tached 22 x Mi Situated at Brighton, | the pap ing Industry, New | ance must be made for the disap-| lord and master.”
ELECTRICAL Black Rock, Dial O16 |... | Schools, Road Improvement, and pointments which life had heap-| What does * writer do in such} amtenio natal tates ee ee
nae een ear -62-—t.£.n.1so on, |ed on him, Handsome clever and|a crisis? “He has one compen- SOUTHBOUND
‘Machin 74 "at BANK HALL. Main| He frankly dig not feel that -|sation,” observes Somerset Satis Bails Sail Arrives Salis
ONE (1) Electrical S| Machin KINNOUL” at BANK HALL MAIN much-admired as an undergrad
IN MEMORIAM ¢ ONE 1) Electrical Spraying Machine RGAD, ‘at comer of entrance to Year- with the present financial resour~ | Yate at Cambridge he had en-|Maugham. “Whenever he has Montreal Halifax Boston Barbados Barbados
a a | (it Ale Tank Bc Aluminum Spray ines agugen degh’ Bt dere ae roart of | cte_a* their disposal that Govern “| tered the Church out of a sense |@uything on his mind . . umre~| ..JAnian CONSTRUCTOR 29 Aug 31 Aug. — Sept. 41 Sept
CUMBERBATCH ;—In loving memory of |’ i nient could afford a new up-to- | « quited love, wounded pride, anger| ;any RODNEY 3Sept. 6Sept. 8Sept. 17Sept. 18 Sept.
y asonable. Apply C. Arthur Mayhew | which is used a§ an Orchard, of career rather than vocation. 5 ene
oun dear beloved father Winston Cum J. HAMEL-SMITH & CO | The Dwellinghouse contains Gallery, | date tal. | It was a bad decision at the treachery of someone to| CANADIAN CHALLENGER eet. i 15 Sst. wwiiaen 36 Sent. 30 Sept.
Baeees tel taken away on 10th | Serpe, Bridge Street. Phone 4748. | Drawing and Dining nooms, — Breakfast | The n, the Colonial Secre- |" i. was too theatrical in the | 0m he has shown kindness, he LADY NELSON Sept. Sept. . .
Se | cry a coning wate)“ Punt at | matke in the debeke when. re fe; {BUI and inguficlently unctuous | a4 SOY Jo put Ht down, im, back enenen Areives Salle Aretves arrives _Asttves
‘When one we loved was taken awZy Kitchen &¢., and usual conveniences, | ™arks in the - i aa . a Memreal
Ever to be remembered by Mildred Denny lovernshent % ; out of it. He belonged neither to a or the decoration of an | Batbados Barbados Boston Halifax
(reputed wife) Joyce, Norma, Cora, Vin- | LIVESTOCK na dare Gee's a — pa , — ite the the High Church nor the Low « py ot tall about it. | CANADEAN CONSTRUCTOR 25 Sep. 2 Sept. S oa 8 ee
cent, Brenda and Joan (children) BMGH Dak Waladis GU Gccae Inspection on application to the Tenant Pile S

FOSTER —in loving memory of my Step- |) aftordshize bull, terrier 8 and a hait}/Me © gay will be set up for sale! was a patchwork resolution to} @¢ him by; after ape oe at ad country and he ite LADY NELSON -+ 0+ 19 Oct, a1 Oct, 30 Cet. 31 Oct. 4 Nov.
Foster who died ‘or onths, $50 ing 9189 Ei . e was . dee
September ina 1880. ‘| 828-2" | ine Street Brgetown. ou Friday 10) "GGG, ygiipediate need. | Bihiged "to become a schoo! in-| domasile tyranny, of the “allure | —
“Re: erna: ran im \* eotem
Colin Manning and Family MECHANICAL “eptember #2 ARWOOD & BOyer,|that Government in recruiting | Spector. \soaee between re GY |ror further particulars, apply to—
oe MOD een.) ee eee ceneere. under = peenent : , ‘ ‘Tgmond’s passion for her lady-| GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents.
| BICYCLE — Ladies’ 3 speed Hercules : -|day conditions to ‘ide Kinglake, a iiterary wit of the Scene by scene, the novel
F@K RENT los mew, hardly used. Best offer, over quarters or an ance lieu. period. said of him. “He wa i ows the pattern of the Brook-
£50.00. Ring 9189 10,9, 52—3n “ , .
: eich Fae eal al ae AUCTION ot “Avalon” hed answered two Sever ihe least demoralsed by ‘held affal the end is, however HARRISON LINE
HOUSES pale __19.89—8n. | “CARS —By inatruction of the Inwuragee |Questions — "that of peers new Cosas? was 10 cfulfiment: Eamord ms ae
Coy., Li sell the Court accommodation eptimis' . at last
———.|1 Bidet iowa Rapist Brae | Whitepark on FRIDAY ith. at PP. one and bapilanel baie oa a Wok ems his “fecling of failure! 160. | acid has bean coa-
pGULDUNE, Gattiewash, St" Svsepn | Fety. Manager, 69.52—T.| Car, W98t Vauxhall (Velox) 18H | They would also remember that | a a Geacak se Hl verted, as Professor Ray demon- OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM
4 Bedrooms, For October, November, | SINGER HEMSTITCHING MACHINE Sedan Car done 7,500 miles, beth dam-) at the time there had been com- | |” her| Strates in his careful excursion
vy Cast F mousekeeper and blamed
December 1952. Phone #10 Mrs. Hi. S| Fiectrically driven, in perfect condition, | 484 Ps, accident. | Terms Cash. EF.) plaints of serious lack of accom- for 10 they were} isto literary detection, into a
Bynoe 10.9.9; | ond at a very good price. Dial 2739) | Areher Mc re '9.9.52-4n |modation and there was a neces- cone. (for ‘o ey rdeo Model for one of Thackeray's! Vessel From Leaves Due
ROOMS—9 furnlibed cotma for Ran | ce ee |sity for immediate extra accom- | denie ne 4s ad = ar insipid heroines, “the whimper-| Barbados
opposite Royal Theatre. Best sea bathins; POULTRY UNDER THE SILVER | mogation. aim wi Rae es ill-healtt ing little goddess,” as a ae “PLANTER” . London 4th Sept. 17th Sept.
Garage attached, Week-ends and hol!- HAMMER He recalled the visit of Mr, | ¢efuge in tears and ill-health. tled Victorian critic put it|)¢ >" «coLONIAL” . Liverpool 16th Sept. Ist Oct.
ee ee mee, Set En SANs Pocmuentes iad Goakonele ; Atkinson, Colonial Building Liai- Upon this clouded domestic|}“whom he defies in every 8S. “PHILOSOPHER” ........ M/brough and
FLAT & HOUSE—Fully furnished, St and 12 Pullets — from 300 exis strain TO-DAY by order of the Executora;son Officer, who had visited Bar-| scene Thackeray eee a novel.’ sh mn London 20th Sept, 14th Oct.
Lawrence on-Sea. Phone 3503 » months old. Raised from to the Estate of the late Miss Elsie} bados in March last year and had! in the state of emotiona rus- Ray tracks down some other SS. “HISTORIAN” |... ccc Glasgow and
29.2 82-2 ¢n | Chicks. $5.00 each, ae or more legs 10% |St. John, we will sell ‘he Furniture at a tural to ne whose | originals of Thackera char- |5-S. “HISTORIAN” ....... §
£" | Dial 3394. Gordon’ Proverbs. “Visby". Eagle Hall «oad, which in-|'@ported the following: tration ‘ite ue fh ore th care. muanhy Liverpool 26th Sept, 10th Oct.
he By 10.9.52—%, |etudes: Round Tip-Top Dining Tables “I cannot say how much) pretty wife has been shut up ij acters — the no aera
smelt se rte ee ter Po | Upright Chairs, Sideboards, Serving and| cheaper an improvement of the | an asylum, leaving him with two ere os re ~ ee HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM
Apply Mrs. I. Weatherhead c/o J. N. MISCELLANEOUS Ornament" Tables, China Cabinet./ present hospital would be com- young daughters. coloured, gave him the .
Harriman & Co. 5.9.68—5n | - diceeesrate rede tinet-npennayseeron | Couches, Card Table, Tea Trolley—all in| pared with the construction of He arsived as the friend of | Miss Crewley in Vanity Fair. Vessel For Closes in
or -| ARTICLES INCLUDING Ivory Quiltea|M*hogany; Upholstered Drawing-room ;,,| Major Pendennis was haga Barbados
WINSLOW. a Suite 9 pieces (Coven, Arm and Upright| a mew hospital on another site.| grookfield, became the champiva
Cattle Wa8h, Bathsh Taffeta, Bedspread $20.00. Electric | ©\'\'* ° Px tle, Wiens be Bechatel a as ; from his uncle by mers ” “,ondon 18th Sept
First two weeks in November and the|Heating Pad. $10.00. Traveling Goll | oy ie Work Pablen” Bie stem | But it would be co y Brookfield’s wife and, in no|/! M. “|S.S. “SCHOLAR” .. “ °
Ge ate eel aes, “Mrs. |Bag. $7.00. Car Battery $15.00. 4042. | yal? ., nice Wore, Table, Pictures snd! cheaper at all, was madly in love | Negengy Duck named Major Mer- SS. “CROFTER” |. .. _ .. Liverpool 19th Sept.
. 5 Pa. nes. 1D . enae A . ic E is became —
W. T. Gooding, Stronghope, st ro ____ 10:9, 52-—In. binents: “Old Ching; Dinner and Tea Ser- savings due to ith that oppr t sdf aunt- re 7 Sediey Z “WVonite Fair

9.52—3n







continued tse ¢ i ‘
vices,’ Glass Ware, Ornaments, Carpets,| existing ivulldings there are’ ‘ny invalid. He remained of opin- we very Mite of texte, deswn, For further Information, apply to...

Rugs, Congoleum, "Simmons Single th ‘
steads Matti savings because there are the (5, however, that Brookfiel:, 1 tempt,” as one critic
Peau’ Watdisbe, "Brest ‘Table, Chen | exiting water and electrlelty i, powever, that Brookfiels, /cold | contempt,” as DA COSTA & CO. LTD. — Agents

of Drawers—all in Mahogany; Book supplies, storm water drainage,

ANTIQUES Of every description.
Glass, China, old Jewels, fine Silver

OFFICES Watercolours. Early books, Mz aps, Auto-

graphs ete., at Gorringes Antique Shop







— | *dvomming Royal Yacht Club... « ¢n,|Shelves, Canvas Cots, Ware Preses.| ponae. planting and fences.| V'fe, was in all other respects “| 7 like this milk-and-water in| $69969669699999966969999969099%99999D) 9999S 990SH
OFFICES—In our Building in Lowe: we Ee \. |Long Mirror, very large Glass Case; Vv tal ith | ine fellow. | ” Thacker: told his 3
Broad Street. Available from 1st] “FAREX The comprehensive cerenl Ine | Larders, Zine ‘Top; Tables, 4-Burner Per- ery roughly a hospital w * . * women,” Thackeray to is| ¥
October. K- R. Hunte & Co. Tte.| with Vitamin D. added. Parex should {fection Ol Stove: Gas Stove, Kitchen| 600 beds may at present cost | As «Thackeray became more | mother, under-valuing your] %
Dial 4611, 3.9.52—t.f.n |be given to infants duri teething and | Utensils, Garden Hose; and many other| gyer a year £750,000 or) 7 ladyships heads ana caring only %
weaning. Ask your grocer or druggist | items of interest. $3,600,000 and may take four famous, Brookfield became mort | ¢)" the heart.” Mrs, Brookfield’s|
for FAREX. Price 5éc, tin BRANKER, TROTMAN & C©O., years to design and build.” jealous, more resentful of the | heart was, in the end made tran- x
WANTED 18.0:08-m, Auctioneers He agreed that they coulg only | *uthor’s constant presence in the| quil by ‘a formal reconciliation %
—_—- GUAVA CHEESE — Fresh, delicious | —— — {undertake such expenses as their| 29uSe, and more brutal to Jane, | petween the two men in her life.| %









HELP Guava Cheese, suitable for sending to
your friends abroad. Mrs. Worrell, St

his wife. She, for her part, ro- But the friendship was over.



fi U d and Government |
UNDER THE SILVER dan faced ae he at with the | tested to her husband, “It is not For the most famous of ail

—— :
GENERAL MAED with good references | Matthews Vicarage. Phone 3925



: 9.52—3 .- of Problem in their Five-Year De-| as if Mr. Thackeray were some | Thackeray’s women characters,
eet re Rene, Woreine ~~ a ree ee ie AAR Gd Wok bat hae Pei a | velopment Plan on how much/ young Adonis in the guards,” | Becky arp, Professor Rey Cc" .
"1" | GLUCOLIN Glaxo's Powdered @ ‘The Bower’ The Garrison which| money they could allot for ex-| while writing to the novelist.| puts forward no candidate.



YOUNG LADY for office with know!. | With Vitamin D. Obtainable at ail lead includes — |penditure ‘on several expensive | “I do think at near 30 one may| Rumour at the time did it for





































;
ed f Book-kee i ‘. y]ing stores. Insist on Glucolin for Glucose } 4 . 3 Tip-Te D: . i THBOUND
state all Qualifientions rnd eal ary expect. | at its best 10.9.52—8n. | Tole, Upright Chairs, Rockers, Boos |! ‘nd deserving proposals before ew Pe noe oe awe se bt —_ It ‘ a oe ——e SOU
So also send prea. which will be HOPEWELL ype St. Thamas,: We 2 ae vaeats Pr Mein in Mahogany: them. | be well tnderst an one; dren’s governess made her DE GRASSE Sailing September Sra, 1952
raged ; » Ap . ani si! nM 00k had
to B. Fe ee ia ig AD Oy Highway 6 miles Bridgetown, very Cpol,| Coday-Acw chainy, Rush Seala.ana Backs,|, With regard to preventive | jeans’ the model of Becky, and that she, Calling at Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao, Cartagena and
Shady, Small, N Stone-Ho' Fully |
Department 8.0.82. | Huimished beaut “menads tultapts | Welgte, Ton, Coftoe, sa ny ele cit in oad ag tgen votes in| Sub What did “ene: mean? | in revenge, had made lim ihe/9 SaMaIRe. a meptember ith, 1988
: 12 Adults 4942, 10.9, 2 Goud) Jataie Blectrie’| Clb voted in The triangle had its complexi-| odious Mr. Rochester of her co ep r .

___ MISCELLANEOUS +<———— Pry Bhrce Sneed. Rortouraan Biel -us m8 oe, ena. dow the the "establish | ties. “Brookheld while at heart| novel Jane Eyre. At, that time, | Calling at Trinidad, La Guatra, Curacao, Cartagena and }
—_— INDIAN CORN — for sale. Apply J. | wostinghouse Radio; Double Bahog. of ealth Centre in! 4, usting his om sted on| Charlotte Bronte’s authorship o/| | Jamaica. ~®
erate for eee Pee too o¢ en Se eee aia and teaatig Bediteads,’ Vono Springs on tstown ‘but they had been | working himse¥ up de frenzy| the novel was unknown, >
tbiteh) Tel, 8250, Before 5 p.m shaenis Ree diallonapeit ss eiblesatneebaneaee Drank Paidiel kamen and | Sables one e to secure the services of a/ of suspicion about her. Thackeray was deemed too NORTHI}OUND

10.9.52—1n LUMBER—Deal laths, pine planks, | pictures, Wall Mirrors, Glass and China,| Medical Officer. When they had; Jane was delighted to have a cynigal at the time he wrote and
siding board ’ Ap ly Cardinal monn Dinner and Ted “Services; Kelvinator | recruited one it would be the first) lover in whom she could confide| has since been dismissed as too|K DE GRASSE Sailing September 16th, 1.952
PE AI PER BS Ee, eee 2.0 adn, | PN Pestecs | RPS | Onna | Peat Gants of at, kind sof be} the unhappiness of her marriage: atimnentel. There is now more | } Calling at re = mere
RSON 4 6 anh ie tgiagia alate tenn ochisningiston : thee tame ; 0} at preventive medicine | she had not the slighest inten-| interest in him as'a man than as|% COLOMBIE Sailing r
PLANTS—A few white Anthurium Lily |" Salih LW wcloaie: bing. cosh waa play its proper part in the | tion of risking her reputation for| am author, Ray’s researches, of ; Calling at Martinique, Dominica, Guadeloupe, Southamp-
“The public are hereby warned againy |" Mare and Small. 32H" |. |,.| BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO., |lite of the community. | him. When her husband awarded; which The Buried Life forms|?} ton and Le Havre.
giving credit to any person or persons} Auctioneers _ om : the ogee was eventually | J! 6 kite vd sedding eae ry a modest fraction, fan that %

homsoev , e as 1 do not UBSCRIBF. th: Dally 7.9.52-—2r a er, e to ” nter
hold mvselt responsible. for ‘anyone con Telegraph, Enuland's leading a cleans Bareten ee: = | _ The Frontiers: By John Strachey | ; R. M. JONES & CO., LTD.—Agents
racting any t or debts im my name] paper new arriving in jos POU | Gollancz, 10s, 6d. Pages. ‘
nless by a w me after ti fe ‘

” COLLIN “WALTER WALKER. 7 {onaen. “Contact tan Gale Co. ‘Kavo- i | SOIL CONSERVA TIONIST A novel of ideas thinly dis- 3 _PHONE 3014 69 SSSSSSS
Pita (se gaye ome onl apron SERPVIEW GUEST eis a hovel ot adden | Laecseeenooeseenomnenees cranes ee:
ush a e . is

@ From Page 6



was in duty bound to represent the | Written during the war, about a $OS9SSOSOTIITIIT009099SS 50 FT STITT TU TOOOIOT



Aatstastet ete





















9.9.58--2n, | , ; as yers of the constituency | war-situation, it makes a half-
—<—— IES, Se A 1 ys kills Flies, ou reply, and he felt it was a reason- i ,
aee public are hereby watned. against Mosquitoes “and other winged "insect i SE able one. te 2 Po Benes ce eae near a pretenge = resign HURRICANE PRECAUTION HINT NO. 60
ving to nights STING RBADO Did ose resen story of a yo' nglis 's
K LLEYNE inee Roach) a’ ao not hold c RA iS, BA iS De Bes cl t Its Faxes some of the har aes were | escape trod Somuvied ance. FALLING TREES are very likely to disrupt the Electric
ing I Wa Mea ae ns CES Daily and Longterm Rates _ it was not true ta-say tha eines Ft experienced le; But Strachey, more adept at Supply. Keep a couple of Hurricane Lanterns filled with —
Soe ee aS Le NOTE iirneet “dens {Sergei hatdioe” wee [Searageen ag | naratng Me wary aan Sian a os ot Maes Handy ce :
pen b . .
*isNowbury Vittaie, — | ———- ae welecme. ‘wore being experienced by the |”"'She said that the wheels of| ducting a’ clash at ides) All these are obtainable at . . . %
t George. OTI : Dinner and Cocktail Government run so slowly that “We live in. one of those times %
oa | 1d ee tea See waa eh Beata Partie, arranged. it was @ question as 10 how long | umles# members on the Govern-| in which public. life is our owt CENTRAL EMPORIUM
from Mra, Geo, Hutson, Blackmans, J. By; i) ' the roads would last after so muc! ment side “threw a little grease On | jife.” This is the germ-idea of = »
EDUCATIONAL i iiiciy communicate with ner » Bi noney had bean pent aa ceich fithe wheels, they would cease to| the book. Its most vital scene is|@ Corner Broad & Tudor Stree 8
aoe anaeeneoocsooseaoceee® | Replying, Mrs, Bourne said she | “She &n_argument between Nordenac,
se NOTICE LOE eae thee Secs ete a She pointed out that it was at| French collaborationist (Lava).| 5939S OSOP ¢ aes
QUEEN'S COLLEGE All Assistant Teachers are invited to a a hes teqnact that the Colonial e- and a character called the Abbe, ¢ ; %
: meeting of the Union to be held at the GOVERNMENT NOTICES retary, and the Director of High- although not a priest. x
Queen's College has a staffing vacancy! Wesley Hall Girls’ School on Saturday,



for a Graduate in Mathematics, for Jan- | 136. at 11 a.m.



‘ways and Transport, had visited| Nordenac iries to tempt the % ¥
the areas, and asked “how often| Abhe into collaboration with the % *
has the Director of Highways and| German foe: it. is one’s duty to]s
Transport visited the areas which | forward Ny

vary, 1953. | Salary proposals will be discussed,
Applications should be made to the! Cc. G. ROACHFORD,
Headmistress, from whom further par- | Sec. A.T.U. TENDER FOR MOTOR TRUCK the historical process, | X



ticulars may be obtained, on or before | 10.9.52—2n Government “7, are more expen- | j.e¢,, Hitler’s New Order, Against &



















































the 13th of September, 1952. Seda acta anid —- Tenders are invited for the purchase of. a Ford V.8 5 ton Motor} ive to repair than other areas. this Marxist conception, cynical % ;
9.92—an NOTICE Truck 1945 model, She agen Sreneed, Whe % sien and covk-sure, the Abbe opposes | % x
; THE BARBARCS : 2. This Truck can be see. at the Pine Plantation any week} proper drainage in the parish, and! the clder notion of moral values | & S
“ Y y NOE om at $ ag . .
ANNOUNCEMENTS aan LOST POLICY. i day between the hours of 9.00 a.m, and 3.00 p.m. or Saturdays urged that officers of the Depart and a moral instinct. % >
Samuel Timothy Gibbs having made ment should “put down their! The debate, continued between |*% Cy
a nnn | sworn deposition that Policy No, 21,25] between the hours of 9.00 a.m. and/11.00 a.m. y pens” and see the Casual workers | the Abbe and a young Commun-|% %
MAKE EXTRA MONEY Big ca h on bts life has been sot 2088 bs ne 8. Tenders should be addressed to the Director of Agriculture, } at work. late! te vabarnant ant aenuent. 3 %
f f Spare time. Sell Personal] yo applicat to the Directors , sce 5 ; ; , anes Batt
Cao Cards rk ti antinks ; 31] mode a Wiconeate of the same NoTICe | Department of Agriculture and + vould reach the office not later than At this eee she jem oo for oe Marxism gets an airing and a ‘
SF #80 Nae imprinted. Bomples Fece ef s hereby given that unless any objection} 4,90 p.m, om Saturday, the 20th September, 1952. was granted leave te withdraw her | heating. &
Also 20 beautiful box assortments, Write raised within one month of the’ date 10.9.59-—~2n} Motion that the House be adjourn- A novel for those who agree]
Alp. Odell; CYPHERS CABDS:CO., 75. W | erent, the duplicate Polley ‘naked {0 aee os fon, Ng ee in _ se | that pufblic life is now our own]%
uren » Buffalo, ill be 1we J she might comment on the reply. | jife ” %
Satie lipemia’ By Order, y
! c x« ekowne TENDERS FOR SUPPLIES see B A T A Stores first, as we can :
¥ COST ACCOUNT . , 59-2; SEALED TENDERS will be received at the Hospital up to 12 irae —- ‘ * %
| 10.9.52—4n . ¥
xa. COMPANY Ts Me ios ————__-_____— o'clock noon on Wednesday, !7th September, 1952, for supplying offer to youd wide selection of shoes 3
mage Aswocits :" ellow) wil NOTICE + ine J atticles in the following lines for a period of six months from 1st tl 7 >
quality you for hisher status by in-Hl vinch’s Secondary School Old Scholars (October, 1952: — ~at lowest prices.
ae oe eet GU. fe eee Association on Wednesday 10th Septen (1) FRESH BREAD
Sa geEe pte, GUARANTEE) Are 4% pm" at the Behor! (2) ALCOHOL Law subjects, London Chamber oxfff Al members as well ae asked to make . (8) COFFINS, and providing HEARSE for the burial of BOYS SHOES si ll-1 from $435
Gommerce KSLA, Institute of Coma] becom tend. vies Prey 1ZeS 7 . Re
merce, Etc. For, FREE "BOOKL A special fo attend. 30.0. the dead at the Westbury Cemetery. O cS) x
ori i 50 pints a %
institute for overseas students: LON . (4) PURE FRESH MILK, between 200 and 2: 5 x
DON SCHOOL OF ACCOUNTANCY Housewife's day only. BOYS' SHOES sizes 2-5 from $4.95 §






53.



land. vt oo ecameees Forms for the respective tenders will be supplied on application

Alphab t to the Secretary of the General Hospital and tenders will not be en-
elight Your Family tertained except fhey are on forms supplied by the General Hospital.



GIRLS’ LACE SHOES 3-8 at $6.65





‘ ‘i Persons tendering must submit at the time of tendering letters
hans Precaution aily with from two other persons known to possess property, expressing their
ainty Dishes willingness to become bound as sureties for the fulfilment of the

HINT NO. 15 It'S EASY WHEN ene ; : P as a FLEXIBLES—in 7-10 at $3.95
Terms tract and any ‘urther particulars may be obtained

YOU HAVE A GAS COOKER ee ee ;
lice g . »spital, 10.9.52—3n :
Be alert to prevent | == oe a on application at the General Hespita Patent-Bro -White 11-2 at $4.95







fires. Lowered water
pressure makes fire-fight-
ing difficult after storms.




. YMP.C. THE BRITISH COUNCIL ||| 1953 AMATEUR BOXING SANDALS-Brown— 7-10 at $215
CHAMPIONSHIPS SANDALS-Brown— ll-l1 at $2.60

Under the Auspices of

A PIANO RECITAL }\} CANADA DRY |} SANDALS-Brown— 2-5 at $3.15

— given by — , will take place at the...
MR. CECIL JACK MODERN HIGH SCHOOL STADIUM
On Friday, 12th September, at 8.30 p.m.



WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER WAKEFIELD. WHITE PARK
10th. 1952

at 8.15 p.m.

TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH h\ THE BRITISH COUNCIL

Presents :
The following Films :—
. British News. ,



| See Them on Display at ...
RUBBER FERRULES:—

For Walking Sticks

At 8 p.m, on Friday, i2th September





. Cricket, Jorks , He > Jac > ,
AN ce a aaa Works by Handel, Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, CANADA DRY STEEL BAND IN ATTENDANCE
8 th 4 Hurdline Chopin, Sehumann and Rachmaninoff.
JOHNSON’S Swimetag sone te
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| Ring Side $1.00, Ring Circle 60 Cents, Bleachers 30 Cents

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Members may bring a friend



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Now JUMPS



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LOOK,
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/ THERE'S ONLY ONE
T THINK. “~ |\ THING T'M AFRAID OF -
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MAGGIE'S APPROVAL //



BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE NINE



Ne

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Compasses J. Douglas
BY ALEX RAYMOND Dividers Step By Step Parts I & 1
Chemistry Stencils Business Book-Keeping by
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Slates Key to Shorthand Instructor —
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ADVOCATE
STATIONERY

Broad St. & Greystone


PAGE TEN





~W. INDIAN CRICK

Walcott Almost Wins
Game On His Own

By ROY MARSHALL

t indians in the Lancashire League had an enjoy-
able Saturday. all of them turning in good performances
with bat and ball. But not so the Central Lancashire
league players Ramadhin and Worrell, both of whom were
on the losing side. The defeats of Radcliffe and Crompton
means that neither has any chance of pulling off the
jonships. This is a great pity because apart from
timent angle, it would have been a good thing for
ericket as a whole if one of the cinderella clubs
such as Crompton could occasionally have had their share

Ves



¢a



"NINETEEN
LEFT IN
ST. LEGER

‘(By a Racing Correspondent)

LONDON, Sept. 3.

Twenty, with one since
scratched, have accepted for the
St. Leger, the last of this season’s
classic races, to be run at Don-
easter on Saturday. There is
never a big field for this race—
last year’s 18 runners were the
most since 1922. The’ average
number is about 11, but Turkhan

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





BLOCKS

S.C. Griffith, M.C.C.

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 1952



ETERS HAVE A GOOD DAY

STARTING



pletes that Len Hutton had to be
flown out from England to bolster
up the batting.

Before the arrival of Hutton the
MCC were due to play the second
Test against the West Indies in
Trinidad. With only one regular
opening batsman in the side,
Allen asked Griffith if he would
partner Robertson. Billy obliged
so successfully that he hit his
maiden century in first class
cricket, scoring 140. The cases
where a player's maiden century
comes in a Test match must be
exceedingly rare.

Asst. Secretary

LONDON,

Short, dapper, pipe-smoking S. C. Griffith moves into
Lord’s next month to take up his new post as assistant
secretary of the M.C.C. His appointment was announced
last week. He joins Mr. Ronnie Aird, who will shortly
succeed as secretary Colonel Rait Kerr, and the other
assistant secretary, Mr. J. G. Dunbar.

The following year he toured
South Africa as vice-captain to
F. G. Mann's team. In the last

Griffith, knowneto cricket fol-
lowers at home and abroad as

. . fe . . , i i :
hal ent Ae ees Junior Lawn L-é€RNIS “Billy” will bring a new and re. tW Tests he displaced Godfrey

of the honours,

Su was the good form of Wes
inc:ans in the other league tho
fificult te know where to
; however, the chiej
uld go to Clyde Wal-f
ld who virtually beat
Burnley side on his own,

feat has almost certainly!
Burnley the championship$

sit}

h only two matches remain-






Lancashire.

mec

And the twa
t on Saturday,
‘ning the toss and electing
t Enfield put togetaer 154 in
hours 20 minutes. Cecil Pep-
the Burnley professional
ed most of the batsmen but
best to Clyde Walcott
whose 76 in 90 minutes contained
s. Clyde might have been

hen ony 15, but after Pep-
brought him forward the
eket-kecper missed a_ stumping

f

pance,
At His Best
This was Walcott at his best,
f always he was_ particularly
‘¢ Off the back foot and some
of his cover driving was remin-
cent of his great century in the
‘nd Test at Lord's against England
ro years ago, i
But more was to follow. Burn-
, amazing though it may seem,
were shot out in just over an
hour foy. 62, And who do you
ink did the damage? Yes it was
Clyde, Jowling his off-spinners
with great skill he returned the
Mowing figures: 9 overs 3 maid-
ens 8 runs 5 wickets, How Burn-
l-y could have used Bruce Paira-
caeau who played for them earlier
mn the summer.
No wonder they passed the col-
lection plate round the ground.
Also playing the part of the
perfect all-rounder was Everton
Weekes who thrilled the Bacup
crowd in ths home game with
Acerington. Unfortunately in this
instance his great work did not
result in victory but honours were
evenly divided in a hard fought
draw,
Accrington won the toss and in
2 hours 45 minutes put on 170.
Everton with his off-spiners claim-
ed six for 51. This left Bacay
needing 86 an hour and from the
outset they chased the runs. Ever-
ton’s bright 34 included 6 4’s but
once he had gone the odds swung
in favour of Accrington. Still the
batsmen did’nt give up the task
and when stumps were drawn
they were only 12 short of vic
tory with two wickets standing,



WI)

}





Excitement

There was more excitement at
Lowerhouse where the home team
s red a well deserved three
wicket victory over Ramsbottom.
The visitors won the toss and
batted first. Their score of 166—-
5 declared was largely the work
of one man, Gul Mahomed who
with Vijay Hazare holds the world
record partnership of 577 for tne
4th ‘wicket for Baroda against
Holkar in 1946-47, Although he
cidn’t get anywhere near the 31°
he scored on that occasion Ma-
homed gave no semblance of a
chance in making 101 not out.
From the technical viewpoint it
was a fine innings but not the
sort which pleases Lancashire
League crowds for he occupied 2
hours and 35 minutes,

Far more to their liking was
the 76 in 65 minutes by Roy Mar-
shall when Lowerhouse set about
the task of scoring 166 in two
hours. Marshall had 12 4’s in his
innings and with the other bats-
men keeping up the good work,
Lowerhouse beat the clock by
four minutes, scoring 166—7.

What about Ramadhin = and
Worrell? This is one occasion
where the least said the better,
Radcliffe were tumbled out for
73 to which Oldham replied with
74—7 and Crompton after being
set 145 to win by Milnrow were
back in the pavilion with a mere
68 on the board.

SKATING

JEANETTE ALTWEGG, who
won a gold medal at the wintey
Olympie Games, has refused an
offer of £2,000 per week to turn
professional. Instead she is taking
a £2. 10s. a week job at a chil-
dren’s refugee camp in Switzer-
jand. ‘The camp is the Inter-
national Pestalozzi Children’s
Village where orphans from
nine European’ countries are
brought up and educated.

T hey'll Do i Every







\peraetsieagiraenl

; * as
( MR. ANGLEWORM«

WEVE BEEN ASSIGNED ;
T COVER THIS BIILDING
FOR THE UNIFIED «<
CHARITY DRIVE .4OW \ ~
MUCH CAN WE PUT YOU by
DOWN FOR P YOU MAY ;/
PLEDGE NOW AND GivE /










they are four points behind F




[AN PETY RUCK :
OVER THE “IN

MAY WIFE IS ¢
COMMITTE

“ the Royal fill












































‘

|
|



CLYDE WALCOTT

|
|

Solomens Pencils
Turpin-Angelo
Bout For Oct.

By GEORGE WHITING
_ If anything is probable in the
improbable world of professional
boxing it is that Randolph Tur-
pin will soon be fighting South
Africa's George Angelo for the
Empire middle-weight champion-
ship, left vacant by the tragic
death of Australia's Dave Sands.

Promotional and managerial
parties concerned have persisted
in polite denials about Turpin v,
Angelo during Jack Solomons’s
poinis—winning battle in New
York against Joey Maxim and
Jack Kearns, Nevertheless, the
signs are unmistakable,

First we had Randolph him-
self letting the cat out of the
bag in Germany. Second, the
Board of Control announced that
IF Turpin fought Angelo under
champiohship conditions _ they
would grant the accolade of an
Empire title,

Third, the boys-in-tne-know are
already asking for tickets, Fourtn,
Solomons has a date pencilled in
for Harringay on October 21 —
and what other middle-weight ot
a cash-spinning character can ho
get to fight Turpin?

Fifth, a report from Johannes-
burg to-day tells of a telephoue
talk between Angelo’s father and
London regarding the purse,

Angelo is still on holiday in
Johannesburg, but leav2s by s>a
for England on September 26.

Meanwhile, Turpin back this
week from entertaining tho

BAOR, tells me, through

manager George Middleton, that

he would like to perform «
similar service for the boys in

Korea,

The German venture must have
cost Turpin £1000 in loss of fee’
for exhibitions in this country
but his recompense is the addition
of 10,000 recruits to his army of
“fans,”

In two weeks the Turpin party
travelled nearly 2000 miles, and
Randolph boxed 120 rounds in 10
camps in 10 nights. No punches
were pulled. Two of Turpin’s own
spar-mates — brother Jackie and
light-weight Stan Parkes—failed
to stay the course because of in-
juries, and it was left to 30 brave
men of the BACR to provide the

“opposition” at the end of the
tour, i

gr —LES.
Time Stet * Soa aie



& OVER IN \o)> We
ESTER: AND

ADY KICKED HAVE 11S



1 HE
“GOTTA





\ \

oo) FIFTY GucKsPi ue 7
\ DONT ISK IN

FIFTY SCENTS To
OME TOWN
GOLD-PLATED! THAT

{ GUY'S TIGHTER THAN
\ DENTURE PLASTER!

CTA GIARITY DRIVES ON / CHARITY, LOOK
CS YS TV AND GIVES A
~\. FAKE NAME-++_,

Sun Chariot won
in 1942 in a fleld of eight.

Gordon Richards rode both of
these and his last victory in this
race was in 1944 on Tehran, the
leading sire this season and sire
of Tulyar.

Gordon has already won five
St. Legers and this is considered
his lucky race, There will be
great celebrations if,he is suecess-
ful on the Queen’s Gay Time this
year.

There has never been any dis-
puting the superiority of Tulyar
but 7—4 was offered against him
aeegiate of the risks of coughing
ete,

Nearer the day and the smaller
the field the shorter will become
the price of the favourite.

The French challenge numbers
five—Alcinus, from the Boussac
stable; - Magnific II, from the
Thunderhead stable; the erratic
Ker Ardan, Worden II, the mount
ef W. R. Johnstone, and Foudro-
gant II, who has probably been
left in in error, 5

Faubourg II, third in the Derby,
has been withdrawn,

Cephalonian has been

left in

‘ by mistake, as has Sophronia, and

Amour Propre has been with-
drawn. Mehmandar has been left
in as a pacemaker for Tulyar

ond Summer Time may be on a
similar mission for Bob Major.
Tobias is a surprise acceptor
and Khor-Mousa has not been

heard of since the middle of
June.

sae probable field will number

At Doncaster on September 18 (14m
132y..1
1m? Rold Buccaneer,
W. Snaith
Alcinus, (France)—J. Doyashere
Castleton, (T. Carey)—D. Smith
Magnific Il, (Prance)—R, Poincget
Ker Ardan, (France)—P. Blanc
Childe Harold,
J. Brace
Tulyar, (M. Marsh}—C. Smirke.
Gay Time, (N Nurless)-G
Richards
Bob Major, (J
Rickaby
Worden UL,
Johnstone
Rawson, (S. Wootton) —F. Hunter
Mehmandar, (M, Marsh)
Cephalonian, (W. Payne)
Summer Rain (J. Jarvis)
Tobias, (N. Bertie)
Kingsfold, (W. Nightman)
Khor-Mousa, (P. Thrale)
Foudroyant HM, (France)
020 Sophronia, (T. Sidebottom)
Amour Propre accepted but was sub-
sequently scratched.

‘H Leach} -

0001

Mu iw Dutton) —
ill

1221
4322
003

3111
4204
4001
1001
0021
1324
0000

Jarvis)—W

(France)—W. .R



Holborn To Send
Team To Trinidad
Athletic Meet

The Holborn Boys’ Cycle and
Athletic Club has now finalised
plans for sending a sixteen-man
cycle and athletic team to. the
All Stars Meeting to be held in
Trinidad on the 4th and Sth of
next month, Air passages have
already been booked for the
team, which will leave towards
the end of the month,

The team will be managed by
Mr. Johnnie Hoad, a_ veterair
cyclist of the 20's, and will com~
prise thirteen cyclists and two
athletes, The athletes are Davia
Inniss who will compete in the
sprints, and Oswin Hill, the
middle distance runner, The
thirteen cyclists are R, Andrews;
L. Hoad; H. Edwards; D, Thomas;
T. Moore; D, Grant; J. Hoad; M.

Stoute; D. Jones; Mike Tucker;
George Hill; H. Roett; and W.
Kelly,

Invitations were also sent by
the All Stars Club to Ken Far-
num, but it is doubtful whether
he will be able to attend the
meeting in view of the fact that
his racing cycles are in England.
Lisle Carmichael, and John
Skinner, distance ace, have also
been invited,

The local Cycle and Athletic
Association is hoping to send a
three-man team to attend the
meeting, act 22

ATHLETICS

GASTON REIFF, of Belgium,
last month broke the world two-
mile record at an athletic meeting
in Paris. His time of 8 min., 40.4
secs. was more than two seconds
faster than the existing record
set up by the Swede Gundar
Haegg in 1944, ,

My Timmy Hatlo |










HIS WIFE'S NOT ON ANY

COMMITTEE . BUT I KNOW
\ A DAME IN HORSECHESTER
WHO 16 sANGLEWORM
TOLD HER HE KICKS
IN AT THE OFFICE














om co Ct einen, |
- i lo oe or | MS Lee
LATER IF YOU WISH” SUPPORT ) | Ween : IF You DON'T)
: rs ——F" HE'S THE TYPE BEWEVE HE
i! WHO PHONES IN GIVES HALF HiS
( BIG PLEDGES To THOSE

AT HIS INCOME

}
SALARY TO |
{
TAX REPORT: |







ASS



'\| TALKING ABOUT THE
*/| OFFICE NGHTWAD AS
HEGIVES THE CHARITY
| CLLECTIONS THE OLD
| —- RUN-AROUND ——~
(THANX AND A “NP OF

|
|
By Jue HATS HAT To
De YOFF ECTOR’,
; & CHEAGS. SLL iA








POLICE CONSTABLE H. W. Archer, a local sprinter, has imported a
pair of Starting Blocks from the United Kingdom. The blocks are

the first of their kind in the island.

The Manager of the Equipment Department of the firm from
which the blocks were imported, states in a letter that the blacks are
similar to those used by sprinters at the Olympic Games and they
are used at all leading athletic tracks in the U.K.

Police Constable Archer told the “Advocate” yesterday that he
first used starting blocks at the last Police Sports at Kensington.
These blocks were however made of wood and could not be properly

regulated.

He is hoping to get a superior start from his new blocks.



Test TV Has Not Hit

Champions Surrey

Says Mr, H. G. CLARK, honor-
ary secretary of the Essex County
cricket club “Something will
have to be done to compensate
clubs hit by the televising of Test
matches."

Essex estimate that their loss
for this season, when five of their
home matches clashed with Tests
is about £1000. Yet gate aggre-
gates are up.

“I do not suggest,” Mr. Clark
told me, “that televising the 1953
matches against the Australians
should be abandoned, but Essex
and other counties think that TV
fees should be increased anc
should go into a pool to help coun-
ties who suffer.”

Hard To Asses

To-day I asked other south-
‘eastern clubs whether they had
suffered similarly, with this re-
sult :

SURREY: We have not suffered
so far, but others have.

MIDDLESEX: Our’ Saturday
gate in the match against Surrey,
normally 20,000, was down to
14,000. Cn that day the Man-
chester Test was being televised.
To what degree the television
caused the falling-off it is difficult
to say.

SUSSEX: The weather. which
almost blotted out the Eastbourne
match against Essex, lost us about
£800 there — a more serious iten:
than the Test television. it is hard
to disentangle these different in:
fluences affecting gates.

My prophecy is that though the
effect of TV on gates will cer-
tainly be discussed at the winter
meeting of the Advisory County
Cricket Committee at Lord’s, the
1953 Test matches against Aus~
tralia will certainly be placed on
view. .

Many sports, including cricket,
are awaiting a report on the sub-
ject from the Association for the
Protection of Copyright in Sport.

Yorkshire Exiles

J. R. ASHMAN, a left-arm spin
bowler who took four wickets
against Surrey last season, has
peen released by Yorkshire, He is
to join Worcestershire. Last week
Yorkshire also decided to release
leg break bowler EDDIE LEAD-

BEATER,
If Leadbeater joins another
county there are likely to be 24

-
—__—

Abertondo Leads

NEW MADRID, Missouri,
Sept. 9.

Antonio Abertondo maintained
a phenomenal 60 stroke per min-
ute pace as he splashed toward a
new world distance swimming
record in the meweel. Rivet
Abertondo passed Hic an
Kentucky yesterday evening ahd
is believed to have slipped by on
the Kentucky side of the mile and
a half wide river in the darkness.
Observers on the New Madrid side
of the river thought that they saw
boats accompanying the swimmer
shortly after midnight, but could
not be certain at that distance,
There is no bridge across the
Mississippi at this point.

Marine operators tried unsuc-





~~ oe

“exiles” from Yorkshire in county
cricket next season,

Here is the list of Yorkshiremen
who are professionals with other
counties: GIBB, HORSFALL and
GREENSMITH (Essex); LAKER
(Surrey); BENNETT (Middlesex):
HAMER (Derbyshire); McHUGH
(Gloucestershire); WALKER
(Hampshire); BROOKES, BAR-
RICK, JAKEMAN, GREASLEY
and FIDDLING (Northants) ;
SMITHSON and FIRTH (Leices-
tershire), SMALES and STOCKS
(Notts); LAWRENCE, ROBINSON

and KITSON (Somerset); HOR-
NER (Warwickshire); DEWS
(Worcester),

Bradford Northern, the Rugby
League club, who are experiment-
ing with football under flood-
lights, are proposing that York-
shire end the cricket season with
a floodlit charity game in late
September against a team drawn
from the county “exiles.”

Locke versus Boros

How boxing promoters must
sigh at the ease with which golf
champions like South African
BOBBY LOCKE and American
JULIUS BOROS are brought to-
gether in a tournament.

Boros, the U.S.A. open cham-
pion and winner this season of
more than £12,000 prize money,
and Locke, the British open title
holder are in opposing sides in
the Canada-U.S. professional tour-
nament which begins in Montreal
to-morrow,

How is it that Locke can play
for Canada? He has been made
an honorary Canadian. He is also
a member of the Canadian Pro-
fessional Golfers’ Association and
thus qualifies for their six-man
team,

157 Tackle Big Walk

Surrey Walking Club have a
record entry of 157—-26 more than
the previous best—for their 27th
annual open London to Brighton
7 miles road walk on September
13.

Lucky Break

In landing a 2lb. 74202. bream
in an angling competition on the
River Lea at Waltham Abbey yes-
terday, Mr, A, LEWIS, of Enfield,
broke bis rod. But he won the
competition, The Prize? A new
rod, —L.E.S.



In Mississippi Swim

cessfully to reach the yacht Buc-
caneer accompanying Abertondo.
If Abertondo reached New Mad-
rid at midnight, it seemed certain
that he would set a world’s re-
cord barring cramp or accident.
He would have been just 60 miles
from his goal and have covered
240 miles of the 300-mile swim
from Saint Louis, Missouri to
Caruthersville, Missouri.

At midnight he would have been
in the water 65 and one half hours.
He has until 1.24 a.m. to-morrow
to complete 60 miles downstream
to Caruthersville to surpass John
Sigmund’s record of 81 hours 52
minutes in swimming 282 miles
down the Mississippi. Abertondo
plunged into the river at 6.30 a.m.
on Saturday in Saint Louis.—U.P.

NOW'S THE TIME TO ORDER

LINEN SUITS

LIGHT TROPICAL SUITS
AND

|| SEA ISLAND COTTON SHIRTS

P. ¢€. 8.

“TOP

MAFFEI & Co.,

SCORERS IN

TAILORIN”



—

Junior

Champivouships
Continuing

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, Sept. 9.
match in today’s British
Lawn Tennis Champion-
ships at Wimbledon was the one
and three quarter hour struggle
in which Chris Day, Kent Junior
Champion beat left handed Tor-
quay boy Gordon Mudge in a
protracted baseline manoeuvre.
Biggest “name” to go out was
O. S. Brenn 14-year-old son of
the famous prewar German Davis
Cup star Dr. Daniel Brenn who
was well beaten by Bobby Hull
of Manchester a lad two years

Best

older. ;
Monday’s hero little David
England was soundly beaten by

Peter Moys who is more than two
years older. But little
rich with promise.
Eight boys were called upon to
play two matches each today in

order to get through the last |
sixteen. Two favourites Billy
Knight and Bobby Wilson were

more fortunate and reached that
stage by playing only one match.
Knight beat B. Hann of York-

David is,

freshing
He is the first MCC secretary with
practical
tours.

and Cambridge, he gained his blue
in

flight as a wicket-keeper,

for
for the tour of Australia and New
Zealand under

E. R. T, Holmes.

the West
honorary manager with the team
led by G O. Allen,
“injury”
playing forces were ‘so badly de- the responsibility of Mr. Aird.

personality. to his job. Evans behind the stumps.

During this period, from 1946 to
1950 Griffith was secretary of
Sussex. He relinquished this post
in 1950 when tte became cricket
eorrespondent of the Sunday
Times. His first report was on
the West Indies opening game
against Worcester.

knowledge of overseas

Educated at Dulwich College

1935 and is still in the top-

The same year that he played Sie tees: scien veea
Ca idg > as sele ‘ $ a
aire De. was seeeeme both for their descriptive value
the captaincy of 29d obvious insight into the game,
Only 38, Buy urimth still has
many years in which to continue
his fine services to cricket. At
Lord’s he will be chiefly respon-
sible for administration on the
playing side. This was previously

Twelve years later he

Indies as

toured
player and

This was the

tour when the MCC



shire 6—2, 6—2, and Wilson, the,

holder, lost only two games in
beating R. A. Scarlet of Surrey.

Islandwide
Mixed Doubles

The Island-wide Mixed Doubles
starts at the Y.M.C.A. on Thurs-
day, September 11th at 7.20 p.m.
The draw is as follows:

1. Miss R. Gloumeau and Mr.
C. Humphrey vs. Miss D. Howard
and Mr. A. Howard.

2. Miss R. Williams and Mr, R. |
Miss N. Heath and

Phillips vs.
Mr. R, Greenidge.

3. Miss B. Carrington and Mr.
N. Gill vs, Miss P. Smith and Mr.



J. Bynoe or Miss M, M. Atkinson |

and Mr. A, Foster,

4. Mr. and Mrs, C. Greenidge
vs. Miss K. Barnes and Mr. D.
Nicholls,

5. Miss M. Manning and Mr.
R. Herbert vs. Miss D. Lamming
and Mir. D, Mayers.

6. Miss H. Deane and Mr. B.
Murray vs. Miss J. Farnum and
Mr. D. Guiler.

7. Miss P.

Chandler and Mr.

C. Gooding vs. Miss P. Humphrey |

and Mr. D.’ Archer.

8. Miss N. Hall and Mr, L.
Worrell vs, Miss R, Howard and
Mr, E. Goodridge.

WHEN THE

FINGER” FIRE
TOUCHES You,

















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After a hot shopping speil
take a Bus or Taxi to
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Ask for a leaflet of rates,
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Parties for Lunch and
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PAGE 1

UM1NUIH M.I-II..MBUJ 1U. 1M2 l. VtilC V1MADVOCATE FAGETHBES TEN DA YS IN THE ISLE OF SPICES HADE IT THE MONKS Of 1UCKFAST ABIT" Uy SYDNEY HARRIS IT was just alter 9 p.m. on the night of in.16th oj August that a party of the 4th Barbados (James Street) Croup stood on the deck of the C.NS Lady Nelson and watched the light! of Bridgetown quietly and slowly disappear from view We were off to %  camp to the island of Grenada. All ol us were in hiRh spirit*, camp. The camp site, Tanlcen. and looking forward to the edvenwas new the water-front, and so lur* which had just begun When wc placed our baggage In a boat w could no kings-i sec the lights while w. matched around by road of the low*, end osUy the flushing sod mcl the boatman with th <-r S*. Lujcy'a lighthouse rtvsaied baggage practically on the camp whose Issubados luj hiddMi In grounds WF found that wc were darby n w dwiduel to turn " to van.p in ,., es>army hut fw the nagsil "Tunalng in" wu a toaMher with 2i .eouis of the 1st •matter of stretching a groundQ.K.C. Sea Scouts of Trinidad Sheet on Ihe lop of the hutch i'' %  %  covers, and reclining. Some were In camp. Hhd thev welcomed ua too excited to sleep, hut others and introduced themselves to us. found ttaeniM-ives in dreamland At once we felt we were going to almost Immediately. Those who have lota of fun with these boys could not sleep had the gentle for thev were a keen batch, and Vibration of the engines and the radiated the true Scout spirit, soft lapping of the water past the "Settling in", which for us meant i-hip to keep them company; while get'ing? a meal ready, was soon from above myriad stars looked done, an.l after supper >ome if down like quiet sentinels assuring us decided to take a stroll into St. us that "all was well". Thus passGeorge's to see what we could ed the night, and at A 30 in the see. It was too late to attend morning, the lights of St. Vincent church, but we went to the could be seen twinkling as a Methodist church and met Rev. welcome. Parker after the service was Wc dropped anchor in Kingsover. We did not see a great deal town harbour just aftoj• a.m. and of the town that night, hut enough |hree quarters of un hour later to realise th.it tt was going to we were on our way ashore. We be up hill and down dale all the walked around a bit. and finally time. As i matter of fact, when C und ourselves at the home of we got to Market hill, which is e-v. J. II. Droomes. and in no the steepest of all and lies in the time Mrs. Broomcs had a breakcentre of the town, we wondered fast prepared for the buys. It wa-t whether we shnuld'nt just roll very kind of her and we certainly to bottom, and having got there t ppreciatcd it. but we could bareremain there. However we braved Y manage to thank her before it the descent and the ascent and Was time to hurry back to the eventually found our wav bach poat. And so at 9.1.% a.m. we to camp. flipped quietly away from St* Vincent and headed towards our Camp Opens destination—Grenada. Next morning camp life began in earnest. Reveille a. at 6.SO Lovely Trip a.m.. we turned out for P.T. at We had a lovely trip from St. 7.00 a.m.. breakfast was at 7 45, Vincent to Grenada. The weather and flag-raising, which was a Joint was fine, and the ship was sailing ceremony for the two troops and beautifully. The numerous islands conducted alternately bv a Triniot the Grenadines were continudad and Barbados scouter. was ally In sight, and provided an innt 8.30. Inspection followed a %  e-rvstlng sight with las back9.00 a.m. and then there wag around of sea and sky. After we usually an hour's bathing parade had been sailing for Just over an and the boys settled down to hour, tho Captain sent for us and work. There is always something Instructed the officer on watch to to be done around camp, and of show us over the Bridge. This course time for training in scout%  rai undoubtedly the greatest craft. Dinner was at 12.30. and thrill of the whole trip. We saw in the afternoon there were th" engine-room, telegraph, the usually games or bathing parades, magnetic compass and the gyroxmpas, we watched the quarterNetball •>teermg the ship and During the time that we wer keeping her steadily on her course, in the island a triangular nnbau) we were shown charts and saw tournament was in progress be* bow to plot a course, we saw the tween St. Vincent, Trinidad, and nd.ir screen and how it worked, Grenada. Netball is extremely gnd many of the other aids to popular in Grenada. Everybody %  fapd Aaao m are In Barbados are %  ches. bu; We have not got anything quite There is an unbroken Ntr.u-h of about two miles of pure white sand, and the water is perfectly clear and calm-like, a great swimming pool. The boys certainl) enjoyed their swim, and aaanv wished that they could bring Grand Arise beach biek with them. Breadfruit ('nil-cow The following day. Wedncsdaj. was the day of the great football match — Barbados vs. Trtmdud. Toe Trinidad boys gave us a good drubbing. 7—. but behind that lies a tale. It wms impossible to get rtee Id Grenada, UIIU the island commissioner. Mr. Redhead, had managed to get a largo quanUtjj of brc.idfruus to hctp us with our ration problem. The day of the match we had breadfruit cou-cou for dinner, and the cooks did a fine i \ fluently many of us had vJ I..I ,.. helpings indeed. We took the field fairly soon after dinner, and it was not long before we realised breadfruit cou-cou w.e the enemy's fifth column I remember vividly lumbering after >ome vei. I'V.IM\, forwards. painfully conscious that the great weight in my mid-section could AFTKR TUB FIBE 1 '!. %  Pin la It. Oeorge i approflauon by tse Firi nc Jf..rty wsi< t-taea to headquarters after which they uelpeg to put out It Chief WATERFALL A waterfall at 'bos which they used for "getting pavigation. No wonder that some f us came away feeling that In fen emergency wc should be able to get the ship to port. In St. (ieorge'ft We were alongside in Grenada by 3.1S p.m.. and were met on board by a local Scoutmaster. Mr. Pierre, who had been sent by tha Island Commissioner to welcome gs and conduct us to our camp lite. After the usual routine of embarkation and customs and %  migration officials had been passed, we were ready to get to seems to take a keen interest in the game, and when we saw the crowds pouring up on evenings to see netball. it was almost like a crowd going to see football at Kensington. The gam*!* were played in the Botanic Gardens ab'Ut one hundred yards from our camp, and naturally on evenings some of the boys went to m i era it the shouting was all about we Bajans took pans to be extremely neutral, because all the girls were so nice, and we could not afford to lose favour with any of them. Tuesday 19th was the day on never allow me to get anywhere giear them. 1 panted and toile.l manfully, but no man can serve two masters, and having done n,breadfruit cou-cou justice, alas. I was now little more than a spectator. But let this in no way mm the fact that the Tiinidadiana played very good football, and most definitely deserved their victory. There was a local Athletic and Cycle Sports meeting on the following day at the Queen's Park gfou went along to enjo %  w the neUnf ranaared with ours at home. We found that the athlete* assM very good, and would probably do \.a | anil in Barbados, but the cycling still has a long way In m Ot %  of the reasons li that then proper cycling track. Where |ho rvellsU ride, the grass is fairly long and there arc ruU to IK negotiated; so It takes much mori out of vou to push i bike around than it would at Kensington. Bus Tour Fi ida. morning dawned bj |gjht> ly. and we regarded that M good omen for our wlioUday l>u.. tour which was planned for that day. The Trinidad boys and our%  arVa won going togethei and w* just made a comfortable bus load The use of that word "comfoitihle" reminds me of an amusing incident. When we were thinking of making the tour. 1 wg| enquiring of one of the local bua-drtVcT) how many the bus could carry, and he said to me; "Oh' we lo--% carry 37, but we like to make strangers comfortable. a* could carry 42." Fortunately we did not have to encroach upon his hospitality to the total a| <>nifou. M our cusnbincd nuinlwit were exactly 37 Wr lefl imj at 9 15 a.m.. and we drove through town and out onto the road that led to the Grand Elang. Wc passed by several villages, and wi %  friendly .shout W the gradient became n dared if the 'Ford* would do it; I'-li* ii through, and wa went oir the main road us to the Grand Btang. nothing ruggi d Inapiring about the era' i • xtinci voleaao; in (act BWicilul iaana oouM I . urn < f r i I ft. abo\e %  in dam fouai spent a short time quiet beouty of this spot, then we were %  > Grenville. in MM Lslaiui We Were imtly goiiw down hill now. .tint through some very Intereatlng i ilelds of gently waving %  |gur rang naih aa wa know m Barbados, but rather n forest, with thick undi i passed a spot v people were actually da lumbering, and we saw some of the "bullet wood" hoards th;>l they hsd obtained us %  heir labours. CriHiville We BOW reached Crenvllle. a town n nilaa ..way on the east ioathed here, WU i inh like th.it Sands. It seemed to us an Ideal spot to take lunch and so we did: and wl task waa comple ted, are were "tr oace asasig; We liugged 'ii. iv closety and i"t acrossi the •of the i-!..mi. n i %  • %  .. and aha oo*1 i like the leeward side of Baraaido t ul aa soon as we tookrd i' 1 ind I difference was appargnf i %  AM the hills rose almost sheer from We stopped at the small aWrM of Victor! re back m St, George's %  boul 8.0O %  %  Fire The foil Saturday', passed quite laneveoUully. benuf Just a happy bul toutme camp day. Some of I teH uuliKled) It tended ;i WDM that night given In honoui of ,h< visitors In the latl I'I 1 .i p'. tee tailed Moi-ie li' baaah, und abOUl l'-' I n.ttiied II strange glow C UB B I M arum '!direction of lown "I on the tiwn, but we could look across the water and see part of it. When we did so now, I terrifying but beautiful speclaclu %  was. A broad, red tongue I [ I DM i 10 1-e rising ftom the town, and Ha 'I" tmg the shy and) The Trtnldsd an II t one nether. H lul a phone fears at rest. We could town, *< we just stood Using thai the I re-flish/ers were Inning the battle When we did get back to camp, we leant that the boys, both Trial%  .: %  out under the con .' %  ii.d i %  i liien sisvos an) he l ped lo i %  iti>>i the crowd, while and the big chaps h."l „ l|HMt wHk the ho-. AS a result of this action the .-ved letters of thuuks flom the Sii|ioitendent .f rSkhee and .. fe dagi sent around the tire-engine to the camp so that everything could I .nit thut they might have %  soirt rfaeallaaa to say. the "s. uirt" was the most part of the pn-tellings. We found Out that about 10U pet luui been lenderesl homeless by UJM I bul paople weie subscrlband fttvlBi Trip Soi.th On the (|l ,-. da) .. trip had been li Uedhc. I and -.me friends of Col fMewajrt, aiKi Mi Ik Mil Wi ,M Ml -..,., ,,,, %  ,i :ill. %  ,i then through a pJirt of thu aggtl ( > %  fasfl "f Ihe islai M V stopi-si at Mr. Stewart M home wboro the bon found kg i aerated drinks awaiting them We showed our apvrcr tin i selectio Tliii coo.1 pi ,'..tV 1 • probab the slng-soii %  hlch took place on Monday evening after we had II trip to the Annandale water fulls. The programme was arran [tven bj the boon of both tro..i. S i Ijic iiieniWn of tbg puWI Invited seemed lo hnvo, much On Tvea-1 mtendent of lh>prison, inviti.*l. up to the prison. We| %  ul .il. impressed b. the vei\ iii Bsunplaa of bandl%  n dona by th. %  i ly sceintd a happy .t evan that pv.TBJade us to ftl in i blgb hill which otresioeki lOWtt, arid tin view of UM I ould only i i.v a view frorn an at %  iplanc. That wa.s our last lught in oid many I suppose. w.nt to sleep dnaandna. of lha tan are bad i-nt there W thought of tl>. JHM i.illy ..f the the boys of the I .i gin* Sea Scout who had shursd all our fun, and tl it would bi* •' looi time Indeed before snv of us %  B I .Ikose ten Jay in the isle of >' ra %  %  I lUiiii-. *rn A B Wi S, BMIhwsM*, %  DKHsn i %  to.-wi. A Yw*uot a auifi-. lldl r > K Spcnc* T MAIL NOTICE P*n>l Mall %  11 %  .-,. nrO*sl aUa iilnul.,1 ...ij it, ,i,.i, Uuiatu v Uw U V .1 !',.. OflU. u Jen. miiSii uti l I ISSfl sttfT'd or t:u:u.\ u;r • isaa S* I SIM IOHK K...I..! -It I I II %  10 pi . %  1 l I* m. a WH „. as B* • S \S>A %  i % %  I ;; IH I '*•• •*v#v.. VMV///*V> :•*•• *-*.'---*--.*.--*,'-*--.-.*,'--.-,*,--',*^*>o*>o*c Wm. FOGART.' (Bdos) Ltd. Gland Discovery Restores Youtn in 24 Hours vara-oi ili'-.U irvl.x an AIIO.1 ... 4"*..r Thta n> ii..C'.iir 1* witr .ami. anil IHHI] ...h, ft II to blind, |„ a iF.i, H >. %  %  IIII,.I %  man la >.ni, iU., i a U ii !" %  ". m-4i.l> in ni-. %  %  sail B.ifural tit u.ai-y. tall-d VI-TAli*. h.. b.. (( ... ..iI that tt la ii',t.. Utg ail rhM..i-ta h. i. I,. J.i nu.rsnii... / rontptoi* Kiiiuliilt.n -ir inorir. WU. IN ul. i u-.iir *M InlOyN %  Mhaguar ViXTabs • .la.ai Sfsabaad an at VHmllt, PRESTCOLD REFRIGERATORS Starred (or Itrillianre of 11. I.I, and l %  Hush s,,,,.i, ,i uiih a gajgn of New Feature* Greater in S|IMI'. fNfgtasf In Cirnce. Sealed I'nils, with a 5 year fiiiiiranlee 7 & 7'j Cubic Feel—all Steel Body. BY COMPARISON YOU WILL BUY PRESTCOLD The Shute Foundation For Medical Research -aiv* l.ulil . ami People nill fgfM ibeir own wiiV . Hoim fkf Sirl||w-I%*rd Papers IHE DOCTORS SHUTE early realized that the Un* of re s earch thay had come upon in 1W."> with the help of Dtk\ Skvlton and Vogelsang, must have i : tevcrhcratioiis. Those potentially interested In their work numbered sc*res of millions. Some tx BM must be laid down to meet a situation unparalleled in their experience. in its decisions and plain. This type of organ'.ration was developed] by the DoctorShute with the help of their legal advisor. Mr i .inpbell Calder, Q.C., In order to make it clear to everyone that they did not have and OOl i not have any means of profiting personally from the \ery obvious profess anal advantages of their cardio-vasculaj dtneoyertan. There wss no reaaoa why they should not so benefit, for others had. as. for example, the disco*i-rie-. of insul'n. and streptorro'^-in. Bul the tradition of medical discovery on the .•hole 5 that pfiy5iclans should not profit tiiinncialry by their humaTtltanen discoveries, and (nig t radii on has been implicitly l<'llowtHt here. The Shute brothers work for a moderate salary for tlie Institute, havo no con' | k.od with the latter, and could be rnissed at any moment without recourse. So I tt'e has r>een K this aspect of the FoundatUii--: orgsni7ellor th.t: this statement is perhaps long overdue. Th November. 1048. a rear and a half after it was organized. the J? e a fine kktl rr.inlon Waverley. iggdical clisde and :-. sits in an estate of St acre located In the heart of* I < y A small litre. :i I .it ;in angle. T %  „i->unds are magn'flrent with formal rose i huae trees of many Thihouse itself is magnificent. If Victorian The Blue Room a ceiling
widely resoected cltlren The third member of the Board rf Pirectors was fermecW Mr A .;. Calder. the %  gsuOt < Fi-rtercd accountani of % %  I Vbeu ha retired due *a buAags ^e. hU place an an electrical engineer ape*lab/ X-ray. Mr. Edwsrd Fannuig. The Board of Directors snd members of the Foundation entirely govern the affairs of the Foundation, the Shute brothers beln Included amhaving merely a courtesy voice 1 tie glass, fine caivrxl stone m;n_:.r| -,. % %  i %  %  • ,.' the various room?. Or'gln..! book illuttratioos. prints and atohMtgl weil as -i collection or old hem s well. This old house, rodevgncd as h modern insseg c al cacttfi facilities for investigating me-t cal cases of various types, of cruxse. but Its reputat on I has largely been made on lu cardiovascular work In one \2 months period alone 1316 new mrdlnviMcular patients passed through i%s cllntc. Where ho*pi'...lizatlon Is indicated, the facilities of the civ's hospitals ar used. Fortunately, Vitamin E is largely an ambulant and so the Institute's patientrome and go. larely remaining In London for long. The Foundation del v.h'Je support from the medical fees of the Institute, and from donations and bequasts. Since Die '.utter two classifications yielded only and rely 137.000 in the first thre. rf Its existence. It can 1* that it'research been handicapped ta kskg It has been compelled *n largelv on Kg c 111'i• i. 1 i tcurces. It should be pokib bark, per'iaps that the Founrt.''lon has never had and now h.-: nn financial Interest in the manufjaetuN ar aala of preti.-ini* "i-i of Vitamin K or any other p n-Bceutlcal, for that matter. FYom the first the o-gaii/r •• o* the Poundstfon has met 'he specifications of the Taxation Division of the Dominion %  f rananVDeportment Bj tional Revenue and then'-'" contrlbut'orls made to It are eg' income tax. The Foundation pul May and Docemhfr if eaeh ">r its own medical JounuT • mar*. The first Issue waa uafortunateTv entitled tt-e "L mlnar*" he'. • ind to be v .1 hence the ohangg of n^me. Summ-M ortgrnal ii raporut by %  well a eontributi'.ns tro uii.n i h /. i %  i lean ;nvl two Knghslinn %  %  r types of huart tad vascular utscasc, %  bstracts of thi taut purrenl Ub I and biographies of famous physician* of U %  .-•illions have number1000 to 14,01 and are sent gratis to maoji at libraries hosmtualf, medical schools, and physicians of noteall or the world. Son %  i ,ve •'.< %  V< • %  as 12.700. An auxiaaiy group of woman. the Waverley Guilu. h-.. recanti.. been oiganizod under U.e Pres.idency of Mrs W. S. J. Saundei It sponsorone-man art show--, exhibits of woodcirving, seulpture and Canadian handicraft*, public lectures, book weeks, and other ajdj activities. Its obje. la to further the cultural inter eats of the community in whic:i the Insuiute eii'ii and to aid th" work of the Institute. As yet it work la In Its In) ntersttlng things should grow out of It. Periodic.illy the members of Medical Advisory Board meet eonsult aa matters of medical an" ming thInttltute This I! lard s compose' 1 'if eight %  mg enmrn u The In-tltute sponsors public i*X-turen mi community project. The third annual series, fen! eluded, f pressure, the menopeu •t ha UV Slu, i.i unpor* -tunes i j I 1 it idles which may SIU-T ihe win..*. ivascuJar medicu.' and aurgaryw h-jt has alresd> bcon achieved on ;. shoestrur i .' r circumstances of unpg] ..'•.ckaary dilhCultj ,1'igur well foi the future, n bind uj, the broken-hearted, to pr—lairr, Ibgjrky to the captives, and the oienlng of the prison to then>>ound." • en t ion o! me soulless men In the madl. %  '< % %  •Ion the virtus* Oi '. .tamin T, medication is no men %  k of d .. Ton%  itlon. To re• "enber the stumer , actlsed on Pasteur and Ross bj • e same type --f DM ed some light on thi* dlmcul %  dertak mgrp. In Touch With Barbados Coaatal Station tr.ixas if n i>.i ,, g %  y -i. h ... iS*r. . B~.... Alroa l*ol*>ta. i*nan. t n.-nailaif %  .Haj. C %  %  M.a V 11-V.--1 Pan0 Saipa-rtor ,'rca. %  "*". • • S F.i..-Caae tUynw. %  Tia-i. | \ unla. • Kara. %  :.iia*. %  a asUa, • %  AUaiaU. • anadaro. • I AaSrni OrtStt. n>\ Instal an ELECTRIC FAN very essential for your office supplied in 10 12" 16' ALL OSCILLATING • call at THE CORNER STORE



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