Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Sunday Advorcat

BARBADOS, SEPTEMBER” 7; 1952



ESTABLISHED 1895 PRICE : SIX CENTS











SS

S JET FIGHTER EXPLODES

14 DIE

Wife Sees Pilot Husband | _
Killed In Wreckage

;
|
i
f ARNBAROUGH, England, Sept. 6. ——— ered 5 ee
A BRITISH jet fighter plane disintegrated over 120,000| : !
spectators at Farnborough air show Saturday killing 14} Anonymous !
persons, ‘ L Se |
than sound, and radar observer Tony Richards died in the etter nt |
wreckage. Twelve spectators were killed by debris. Derry’s ! T ; C ] Se
attractive brunette wife was watching from the pilots’ tent | oO Ol. Cc.
when the plane blew up in the air and scattered flaming | sree
bits of wreckage into the crowd Before dismissing the jury
The Sire of Suvply_en--— jwhen the» Juily ting of the
nounced the official death toll, Un ° Court of “Grand esiohs “ended
official reports said 35 perso Alurricare | yesterday, Mr. Justice J. W. B.
were seriously injured iia tala | See Sig eee reece
posed > Wa eiNetsped “a-painoc siti at j comments from His Lordship the |
MIAMI, Sept, 6.

defect and he changed to the one Chief Justice Sir Allan Collymore ;
that disintegrated, Hurricane “Baker” with concerning a_ letter received by}

SECTION

West Agrees On
Note To Russia

LONDON, Sept. 6.

U.S., British and French representatives agreed on

one draft note to Russia rejecting Mostow’s recent pro-

posals for Four-Power talks on a Germa}y treaty, but

leaving the door oven for further exc .@s. The draft

note will be submitted immediately te”, A Western Gov-
ernments for approval, Foreign Office 4 s said.

— ‘ sone , ton a

week's @ by ‘oreign

Archer’s Anthem Office. Th eral Guenceliat

Konrad § ine We has been
9, informed 2 Wests draft note
| At St. Mary 8 co and, according to

Sit, Areher of the Police | m
Band has composed an an-
them “The Lord if My | coy
Light” ana it will be ren- vT

Pilot Johnny Derry, first British test pilot to fly faster































































Part of the swept wing spiralle wuids up to 100 miles per the Colonial Secretary, dered by the St. Mary's ryanisation also
lazily down to the runway. Tt hour moved slowly toward The statemeni read : Choir at Evensong tonight inf project ern
shattered twin tail plane ve-r ihe sea after a daylong Ute ceyraS i reat j , . aha . Phicss
in another direction. rf was addressed to Mr. R. N, Turn-! There is a richness in the . , s ha

The show in its sixth day re- panec. Waat, caused. uesel er, Colonial Secretary, Barbados, ! the’ membefs ved

: composition which is char-
|| acterised by a deep religious the
dignity and Mr. Bently Cal-
lendar, the Organist, and
his Choir with its high sense
of musical appreciation, do
justice to the setting.

A large number of spec-
tators heard the final re-
hearsal om Friday night
and it is expected that there
Will be a large congregation
at St. Mary's tonight to

; a ; ness along the Mid-Atlan-
sumed 20 minutes after the crash tic coast
but the crowd still milled about The Weath Buseau
in confusion, Hundreds stunned said th aT ss ’ }
and sickened left. Police fought to e nat the big whirler | Colonial Secretary Barbados j
keep the throngs under control. | had got underway again || Dear Sir for the benefit of the
Helicopters circled the field sur- to-day after wallowing un- || whole public I have been ad-'
veying the smoking craters and | certainly across the ship- | vised by my other associate as
struggling crowds. } ping lane off the Carolin: Jurymen that you would refer |

A. R. Morris, who saw the dis- |] coast. It said in its 5 a.m. this to the Governor in Execu-| ene
aster from his home on the edge|| advisory that the hurricane

tive Committee the remarks of! e e eo
of the airfield said the plane dived | was moving “very slowly | Mr, G. L. Taylor acting Puisne F t t n
|| toward the northsast’ at Judge sitting on the case on} rs ou r 9 »

|which reads as follows :— #
| 25.7.52. |
| “To Mr, R. N. Turner |



A SECTION of the crowd at the first Poultry, Pigeon and Fish Exhibition to be staged by the Barba-
dos Poultry Association, admife the pigeoms and poultry.

The Exhibition opened at the Drill Hall yesterday and will continue today. |

|

| U.S. Despair
| Of Korean

British Show
hear what is indeed a fine |) LONDON, Sept. 6
local composition, Ten Auster Air Foree “Sabre

Truce Jet” fighters which participated
. “uninvited” in the Farnborough

Fish Show Big Success
Y By MICHAEL O'NEILL | eee veeeeny eee eS

Twenty aquariums, thirteen of which represented pic- ? ' f ™~ ° \ storm in Britein and were labelled
y aq P | WASHINGTON, Sept. 6. S, CVICAN “rates by the “Britisn “press.

to the ground after he heard two
loud bangs. He said “suddenly | four to six miles per hour. | 24th July in suit of cigarette
two engines of the plane shot up|/i The estimated centre was factory versus Oliver Grimes
several hundred feet into the air | 420 miles east of Wilminge- we take oath to try a prisoner

just like toy balloons ton North Carolin:.—vU.P. and convict. according to the

One of the engines fell into a} evidence if we have a doubt
public enclosure and the rest of} the Defendant has the Benefit in |
the plane seemed to disintegrate.” | to-day’s advocate this i# what!

Ne
The dead included a givl of 16 Fk « l H Mr. Taylor say to a Juror in
and two boys one 14 and the Ina omage open court I did not think the
other around 8, Police who issued

i verdict was in keeping with the
the latest casualty list said about To Sforza 8
30 are seriously injured. '

oath you all have taken, or they
a O.P
homage at the state funeral ser-

; have taken {
N.B. we are not going to be
e
Police Hunt
st vices for the late Count Carlo
ic r j Y | Sforza, veteran Italian statesman
Jewel hief who died on Thursday night at







ROME, Sept. 6
The Italian Government and|

Exhibition staged by the Barbados Poultry Association at; American officials have ‘about ‘tea that the aircraft were North
PARIS, Sept. 6.
( Juror under Mr. Taylor continue indefinitely. to see the airplanes streak across
foreign diplomatie corps paid final

the Drill Hall, Garrison, yesterday. It was the first cage even up hope of getting a wae | American after it had previously
ion ever to be staged by the Association, and judging from |'m orea. they are so pessimisic denied it. The flight leader will
the attohdewes it van 2 big success. pepe ey. wee ee teens se bc “officially reprimanded”, head-

fo iin ta eat Gat are Z H I jyesterday, Today it will be opened A few months ago these same;, Commenting on the Chilean] the field 3,000 feet up in the

want us to convict and onca as iran | on ee ae au 1] officials said they believed there| Presidential elections, the Paris! piddle of the show,

whom he want to let free order to give everyone a chance} was at least a fifty-fifty chance for | ™4S8 circulation newspaper “Fi- Traffic contrel officials at the

+6 i i ry ige ‘is

ture frames, highlighted the Poultry, Pigeon and F ish | It was learned on Saturday that Air Force headquarters admit-

‘N d e
Federation?
ye planning on the probability that quarters announced, Thousands of
7 om } The Exhibition was opened, eam a ” a i — eae
very Please to sit as a} fiom 2,00 pm. until. 11.00. p.m. the present “twilight” war will | aviation enthusiasts were startled
. i ¥ f “o' ‘ Om
sign Jurors Oil Contract | t sce the high standard of the/.) armistice. Now they privately |##ro” said editorially: né CAN-! Fejq claimed that the planes hed
While reluctant to believe that } @x hibits, estimate the odds against it at not fail to notice the Sim~-j nop replied to repeated signals to

j “te Ase OF 78. + [this , anonymous missive of s0 | The display of tropical fish jat|more than 100 to one, ilarity between General Iban-| i¢entify themselves, and had not
NEW ORLEANS. Sept. 6 A 7.30, a motor hearse carry-} contemptuous a nature expresses | ROME Sept. 6. |ttuly fine, especially against) ““phey remain convinced as they 2's propaganda and Peron's slo-| ceeded orders to clear off the
OE aa y ‘S 5 ae " he ee cues bie the views of Jurors, owing to the | © Count Della Zonca, President} bac Kenran of anes ere ey pais have been from the beginning that |fens in Argentina, It must there-| (eld.
ce searched Saturday for rived in the large square facing] importance of the points raised, 1; cf Italian Mediterranean Petro-|which contributed greatly to the) war-weary Chinese and North fore be foreseen that if Ibanez) The British news rs said
the knife-wielding “trained thief” the San Roberto Belardino Church D z * “}leum Company said Saturday that |colour scheme. R ; ical

@ On page 5 Korean Redg and even Russia jis elected he will enforce a pro-| that the North Americans were

or dle pop two valuable dia- followed by two horse-drawn the opening of a bank account :. Thomas FitzGerald, mr. | would like a truce to put an endto|gramme of nationalisations after)trying to “steal the thunder from
mond rings from the owner of the carriages. In one was the widow ty the Iranian government in his 14,°R, Shearn and Ris son voncoen| a botched aggression attempt.) buying foreign societies’ ee. the British jets. “Pirates” ‘muscle
m.

famous Arnaud’s restaurant early Countess Valentina and her son : favour was the “logical develop-| ° i ' Ww

ee is oo A tess a f f s é | a extreme! keen| But they now fully realize as they | pcrties, One knows what a -|in' on the ", th id

Friday. Leon Bellis, an official of 'Sforzino. A ‘few ‘close relatives Court Upholds ment of a contract signed in oul Mr, W “Archie? Clarke . th e {I 7 Ses eae. te
ew ade * .





Mond porcaiys Beg we I avist, did not bef at non-forcible la= policy cost Argentina's eco-| ‘Daily Mirror” announced in a
pe ze Orleans. Diamond Ex: | were in the second carriage. The’ ‘Teferan for the purehase of. 44 Mr, W, D. Wardda, oat | riation Red prisoners on |nomy, which is in a state of per- aw of age banner, and quoted an
Sereteinae tisitevel hohe atch pie ins oe fe cna ind Ci nvictio ee ea %* aquarists of the Island,| whieh the ited Nations has in«|manent crisis: ‘Those © Chileans| sid display official as saying:
thé ‘sixthrlargest cut sai aeie a hin Pe ae tea iil ae haat oO mn The company annouriced on contributed the fish on show and| sisted is too bitter a pill for the! who think that by alienating theiv| "They seemed to be saying ‘any-

June 14 it had contracted for | wore aklo responsible for the lay Communists to swallow. freedom they would gain better} thing you can do we can do
As a result United States ex- conditions of life will soon real-| better’.”
These aquarists got their idea|Petts on the Korean strategy see ise thei error “the paper eon-| The “Manchester Guardian”
an Aquarist | Magazine,|RO Way out of the deadlock unless | cluded. aid: “Some investigation is there-
The “first 1,000 t hi t) Which published a picture of Wh eecttensiae ahocit sucdanis Gate! rr siaiiceiatb fore called for, not only because
ings were taken from her at 4 : ‘ i idges e first 1, on shipment. ining i ' predictable should suddenly order’ he = Indeépenden newspaper! the appearance of Americen ¢de-
arte eet pesenyechlaai cag ney fe apes a — x ae es ware eae ret was s€ized on orders of the Brit- : hubitiost aithiaea. ete pains a truce for some overriding reapon| "Parisian Libere” said “the Siphed hebters was scarcely in
point, residen uri Einadi, remi , i S a-1i ye 5 1 on as | Sse staged by Gue* ‘ nm, U.P, *hi es £ , ; y
Bellis said the big stone was one Alcide de Gasperi, and oe and conspiracy to defraud Men goverment at Agen. st we of its own |Chilean Deputies and Senators! keeping with a show supposedly

America,” rs. Germaine Caze- began at 10.30. hi iy ; we
nave Wells, owner of the French | Shorty before the requiem mace] SAN FRANCISCO, Sept. 6. | 2,000,000 "tons Of OO been (Oo
quarter restaurant and daughter started, representative officers The Ninth U.S. Circuit Court aa weston ed Treks ee ot ine |
of its founder the late Count Ber- anq soldiers o? various Italian}! Appeals on Saturday upheld |‘ ns SORGILEE even 0 | from
trgad Arnaud Cazenave, said the Army regiments lined up before the conviction of West Coast} CUSITY,



. , iium Society of England. The 20! | 3 :
: e z nM é regis- , k I re- , sh @

he measured and knew well. He gnd ministers entered the church.| tbe Government. er tien. Pine nae , vend quariums, 13 of which were made | will probably not be able to re-| devoted to British aircraft, but
said it came from a Royal collec- Inside, the casket of the Count On ry

. oa : : 7 2 sist the large popular movement! also because the flouting of Min-
; : 1 In a unanimous decision the] was part of a 200,000 ton con- ‘® represent picture frames and| W. Indians Need lin favour of General Tbanez f :
tion in Europe. The other ring was placed on the marble floor

istry of Civil Aviation notices to
was said to have been set with a of the church instead of on the

2 | airmen might lead to danger.”
? fai t corte at Chile }
cluster of diamonds worth $16,000. oatafalque, according to ancient Instruction It is almost certain that Chile —U.P.
and Warehousemen’s Union un- Della Zonea expressed confi-'the Show '

"7 ° {will be led for the next six years
, : | On Federation
Inwfully obtained citizenship in| dence that the Aden Court would| The species of fish on display |

|by Ibanez, the Peronist sympa-|J.§, Must Avoid “Blunder”’

{ . ;thies of whom are notorious, His a: oe dici
i945 by claiming he had never | recognise "my legal right” to the| were extremely beautiful, Fancy Hon, Ajodasingh, Minister of;vietory will mark the turning Of Socialised Medicine
Works,|point in Chilean politics, and he CHICAGO, Sept. 6

Court upheld the conviction find-|signment sold by Count Delto the other seven larger aquariums | |
ing the Australian-born head of|Zonca to the Budenberg Com- |lisplayed in the usual way,

the International Longshoremen's! pany of Switzerland, fascinated people who attended |



aor ote ine roa eee te tradition "more nobilium.” This
over the world, said Detective »rovides that the body of an
Arthur Regan heading investiga- a : . ot
tion of the theft. “A trained thief
did the job, He could nover get}

aristocrat must not rest on the
catafalque | during the funerat!}oon a member of the Commu-] Ol cargo. U.P Gold Fish, which were specially|Communications and
service. The name Sforza is one





4 : .w Orleans.” 8 Cn ees i ist Party. imported from Florida by Mr.|'Trinidad, now holidaying here, will probably enforce a political Lord Horder—one of Britain’s
ae rice cen 6 ire of a greatest BIISLOCE OVC: HANEN ‘Tht court also upheld the con- D rove A P, ki FitzGerald held the crowd in!eaid in an interview with the|and economical system similar to| leading surgeons—said that oo
nylon mask, stepped from the any NY ee victions of John_ Robertson, mp ar. ing wonder for long periods, There|Advocate on Friday that he sup-,‘hat ‘of Argentina, Bolivia, or) country’s national health service



shadows of her garage as she LL.W.U. Vice-President and an- were also Telescopic Black|ports the view that a West)Paraguay. Is this the first move]! programme “has largely failed,

ishing a knife and eae
“give me your ring”. He grabbec
the rings from her fingers, took}

$34 from her purse and fled, she;

said U.P.
French troops stationeqd in West
Germany went into action at

POLICE SHOT'AT dawn as a realistic mock :



Stage Mock War | to secure citizenship.
FRANKFURT, Sept. 6
Tens of thousands of US. and|yad found the three men guilty



invader. The manoeuvre was the

SHORT RANGE | vvess'\cvepel the potential Eastern

Constable Williams, a victim in’ actual combat techniques and see
the recent Penal tragedy, took; how well the troops learged
place at short range. This was) training lessons.
made clear today by Dr. E. L. S.| Commanders appeared confi-
Robertson,, Medical Officer of the} dent that combat forces would
Colonial Hospital of San Fernando! perform in the three-day “cam-
at the inquest concerning the} paign” in which make be-~-/
death of Williams. lieve that an “aggressor” force;
Dr. Robertson said he found two] attacked from the East near the|
penetrating wounds in Williams’ City of Kassel through the eae
skull and concluded that. the} Sel gate”, one of the classic in-| entre
shooting must have been at ¢lose| Vasion routes of Central Germany.|
range because of the difference Sanne SERCO Da ae
in size betwee > entrance ¢ aggressors”, who re stin-
eo cane n the entrance % guished fom the helmet. wearing}
Williams died while “he (was “friendly forces” by soft cloth |

being taken to the Hospital last

viction.”—U.P.







caps, was only slightly removed
; aor from the real border between
month after the shooting incident] west Germany and Communist
between Policemen from Penal] Rast Germany, where strong forces
and Policemen from San Fernando} of Soviet troops are stationed and



man regl'stic exercises.—U.P, and fires.

FISH ON SHOW



Fish Exhibition at the Drill Hall yesterday.



r ‘
reached home at 1.00 a.m. brand-| U.S., French froops other union aide Henry Schmidt
found guilty of helping Bridges

The decision came two and a
half years after a Federal Jury

The jury returned the verdict
on April 4, 1950, after a stormy
five-month long trial. The long--*
shore leader appealed against | ¢4
the verdict on the grounds that) zpe

Pre own 2Concemmoncgnt) | first of three scheduled for tne|the trial was “political per-
POR : OF “SPAIN, Bept, A ; ! next two months to train the}secution” and the jurors “felt
The shooting of Detective’ United States Seventh Army in

Pukchong ‘Supply

Lots At Seawell

Improved parking facilities
have been provided at Seawell
Airport. Two separate parking
‘lots were opened on Thursday
{one for private vehicles and the
j other for hired cars,

Private cars will now park to
the west of the Engine room, and
lanes will be provided when

markings have keen com-}
pleted.
The lot for the hired cars is

that the court was practicallylto the west of the metereological
ordering them to return a con-

office, and 23 lanes have been
marked out,



Bombed |

SEOUL, Sept. 6. |

UNITED STATES’ B. 26 night bombers nearly wiped |
out an important Communist war supply centre at Puk-
chong on the east coast of North Korea early today. A
Fifth Air Force spokesman said that Allied night maraud-

ers blanketed the area with “an 85 per cent. coverage of jciven them for keeping interest] vidual colonies. He felt that if! :
who were searching for a wanted! are put through very similar the target. Returning airmen reported huge explosionsjalive in the hobby during the|there is something in favour of

Pukchong is one of the 75 Com- |
: munist cities and towns warned t
; expect allied air attack, After to-

day’s raid, allied planes dropped

leaflets reminding the populace
of previous warnings.

In another early morning raid. |

il American 3-29 Superfort

irom Okinawa blasted a second

Red military supply area nes:
} Hamhung, a Communist port city
} in northeast Korea,
' The Fifth Air Force announce:
that the Sabre-jets knocked dow:
20 Communist M.1LG 15's this
week, and probably destfoyed tw«
end damaged 19. Two Sabres w
cestroyed by M.I.G’s in aeria
combat, while five other alliec
planes were lost to Red gri
fire

North American if hand
hand with fanatical Reds for m
than four hours as the fight rt
for pussession of the post
“sandbag
tra' front

Th initial Commu





astle” on the ¢



{ ; a on
tock place about 11.00 a.1 k

j}day after Reds poured 1:

| rounds of mortar and artillery

tat United Nations defender

| The Reds succeeded in disk

ling U.S. troops but later tt
were forced to witt

ta fleree Allied counts t k tl
left the slopes of the } ttere

ith Communist dead, —U.P
.

| Moons, Parbus Sumantranus, Red|ite holiday, which he ig spending

}Amazon River, should be very particisar as to

‘cclour and shade, This becamejor bind themselves,

Mauves, Gold and Silver Veil! Indian Cunference should pre- |towards the South American fed-| and that the standard of eg

Tails, Comet Tails and Fan Tails. |cede the general federation talks’ eration dreamed of by General] care has been lowered! —— the
Other interesting exhibits werejin London which are scheduled Peron? Anyway, a great country) rrogramme. Bede ae blun-

Siamese Fighting Fish, Golden|to take place next year. is still far from yielding to such Yeon od “eng land” with

Guppies, Zebra, Pearl and Giant Hon. Ajodasingh arrived in the ® scheme, a Brazil paper conclud-{ der we re te ne

Disnos, of all descriptions, Perma}colony on Monday last accom- ed.—U.P. socialized ee —=

Elack Mollies and Crimson}/panied by his wife on an indefin-







and Golden Wagtail Moons, White| at the Hastings Hotel,

Cloud Mountain Fish, Neon Tetras The Trinidad Minister of Com-
and Variatus, Large community|munications and Works expressed
tanks contained varieties of big|the view that the people of the
fish such as Blue Gouramies,|/yarious West Indian territories

Pearl Gouramies large|should be instructed in the mean- om
SAPU IRE ing of federation, and that the Three jiundred odd years ago French imigrants
Rarest masses should be able to express

brought their age old skill and experience in wine culture
to South Africa. Here they fotind an ideal climate and
soil condition for the production of wines of exceptionally
fine quality. To-day, South Africa's leading wine pro-
ducts — K.W.V. — are acknowledged throughout the
world as among the finest obtainable.

There was also on show a|cheir views on the matter because
pecimen of the rarest fresh | Federation was “something new”
water fish in the world—a Discus|For that reason, he felt that the
or Pompadour Fish—which came|people of the West Indies should
fron the highest reaches of the}be guided and that the leaders

Siamese Fighters were in every|}how they entered any agreement

vossible through» successful cross Individual Problems
breeding. Some of the colourd He pointed out that each indi-
were pure red, cornflower, green,|vidual colony has its own prob-
salmon, blue, ete. ler: to be solved in one way or
One of the members of the!|another, and he felt that by get-
organising Committee said that!ting together they would be able
Mr. Douglas Clarke and Mr.|to arrive at a better understand-
Robl Dear must be compli-ling, and think more clearly on
mented and that credit must be|certain matters affecting the indi-

way years when it was difficult}on. colony, that particular mat-
to obtain fish from overseas.
@ On page 10

ver should be given careful con-
sideration, and that they should
try to find ways and nteans to
meet each other,



> oii * He agreed that any suggestion

Egyptian Will by one colony that a_ regional

1H — ‘ x conference should be held in that

Dang For Rioting particular island should be wel-
' @ On page 10



CAIRO, Sept. 6
It has been officially announced |
that Mustafa Khamis who was
condomned to death for his part in ‘6 ; .
iast months factory riots at Kafr | Seize Businesses
El Dawar will be hanged at ss
Handra prison in Alesis deta at} BERLIN, Sept. 6.
noon tomorrow, The East Berlin Government
He was convicted of the murder |* fficially announced the confisca~-
o soldiers during the riots. | tion of all businesses owned in the
U.P Soviet sector of Berlin by all West
Berliners or West Germans
Bruno Baum, East Berlin econo-

Seven Gef Work | mics chief said the businesses

| wore exprpopriated because West-

VQ 6 9 lern owners “plundered” East
On S. S. Trader \Berlin, evaded taxes and East |
German laws ana diverted East

marks to the West
Communist police yesterday!

|
E. Berlin Govt. |
|





Cape Dry Red (full and light hodied)

Sparkling Franschoek (Champagne type)

Sparkling Roodeberg (Red)

Kimberly Club

Cabernet Sauvignon
Wemmerschoek No. 2

Old Brown
Franschock No. 2

Sever eamen turned up at
the office of the Harbour and
Shipping Master yesterday morn-







ng to m papers for employ took the businesses over in the

ment on the Harrison Liner, S. S, | 2@me of the East German Govern- |

Trader. The Trader, which is con- Ment and erected signs reading | e

igne to Messrs. DaCosta & Cx ‘peoples’ eed eer and ees | ;

Ad. will il on Monday fiseated all goods in 10 name oO Y Di . FZ

. The ; er ‘ ere . ae d cook,|the government. Some 1,000 West For Latin tion and lavour

1 eabin boy, a fireman and four German and West Berlin owner j ed
ble seamet re affected.—U.P, }





PAGE -TWO










Coshmere Bouquets gentle
lather has been proved out-
staondingly mild for all types
cf skin! :



:Bouguet Soap

et te sa og Mees ao
eres. ss

CONTINUING DAILY 5.00 & 8.30 P.M.

|

KENNETH R

Serving

DALE ROBERTSON 3 ’
ANNE FRANCIS.

Extras : Olympic Games, Flashes, Felix The Fox, There Shall be Wings |
Pit 12¢c; Circle 24c; House 36c:; Bolcony 60c; Box 72c.

















\
JANETTA DRESS SHOP
{
(Next Door to Sing r’s: |
Our Dress-making Department is mm in the fortunate |
position of obtaining the services of a new head cutter,
Orders for Evening Gowns, ete., can now be executed |
promptly and efficiently. 1
GSSOSSSSYSSODDSDSDOSOGOSIIV TSS TDI SDSSSSIOISIOTOS 7
:
EXTRA-MURAL ASSOCIATION §
Two Pays
THE MAN WHO WOULDN'T GO TO HEAVEN
F. Sladen-Smith
SCENES FROM A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM
William Shakespeare
ON $
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17111 §.60 P.M, x
Â¥ FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 19rH 5.00 P.M. x
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 257H §.00 P.M. $
%,
*
3 Admission : $1.00 Matinee : 42&c. S
we oy 5
% Seats may be booked at the British Council, Wakefield, §
3% Tel: 3249 or Scout Headquarters, Beckles Road, Tel; 4653, %
x trom Monday, &th September. %$
9 .6600669669000000995006 , SOOO EOOIN

SSE =

SE

THE BRITISH COUNCIL

WAKEFIELD. WHITE PARK





A PIANO RECITAL

— given by —
MR. CECIL JACK
On Friday, 12th September, at 8.30 pun.

Works by Handel, Bach, Mozart, Beethoven
Chopin, Schumann and Rachmaninoff.

Seats at $1.00 and 60c. may be reserved at the
British Council. Phone 3249.







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SUNDAY ADVOCATE



The STARS: «x¥*

and YOU ~ 4

af

»

FOR SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 1952

Look in the seetion in which your bipthday eomes #,
find what your outlook is, according to the stars. . a
ARIES Sun only planet in really benefic aspect
March 21—April 20 supports rightful activities for God's day.
Be mindful of spiritual needs. Urgent

duties favoured, also restful pleasures. *

* *«
Be moderate and avoid extremes. Kindli- *
ness, tact with the opposite sex also
stressed. First attend your church; then »

duties, wholesome fun.

Sun is favourably aspected; most planets
ave nil; so all good deeds and healthy
activities should be honoured. No day for
excitement but for prayer.

TAURUS
April 21-—May 20

GEMINI
May %1—June 2

*

OAN Restful, pleasant outlook. Essential tasks
June ean despatched quickly, and time made *
for oor sports, or other pastime. Pray
store “Teo for those in troubled lands.
x Excellent, Be Sun, vibrations a
July 24—Ang. 22 you. Be encouraged to spread cheer

lonely hearts, aid our armed services
government interests all you can.

>
*

Unless urgent duties demand otherwise,
male this day of real rest. After church,
join friends, family at social gatherings. -,

Heed Taurus advice to-day. Venus stresses
need for patience, diplomacy. Do not wor-

ry or * a *
Mars warps against ill temper, needless

~~
oct ah ane. 22 contention. Day should be pleasant, fruit-
«x ful. You know what your duties are, tend
to them cheerfully.
Not favourable for selfish interests, whoily
personal desires; but day has favourable
inclinations for useful endeavours, bealthy

* EDEN EM sports. :

CAPRICORN Family, household iterests, community
Dec. 23 —Jan. @)affairs, pleasant socials and—above all—
religious services are top favoured.

x»

Contentment should fill your heart, if you
have taken care of your soul and the
spiritual needs of those in your care.
Enjoy fun, friends.

* SAGITTARIUS
Nov. 23—Dec. 22

Ys

*
*

Aquarius
Jap, 22 — Feb. 20

PISCES Some restrictions and all for the good.
* Feb. 21 —March 2° Extremes, excesses tabu; moderation is
stressed, Urgent duties under fine Sun rays,

as are religious interests.
7 *- you BORN TO-DAY: Active-minded, seek knowledge
and will apply it for betterment of others as well as self. Are
4 artistic, muscial, could be excellent journalist, writer, musician,
critic, decorator, secretary, actor, lawyer. Do not overwork,

worry, or strain health. Birthdate: J. Pierpont Morgan, Amer.
* financier; art collector.

x~x«r*krek *
“ANTILLES” SAILING

PARIS.
The maiden voyage of the new
Freneh Liner ‘Antilles’ to the
West Indies nee rer postpone?
trom October 3, the or -
ay fixed. ‘Fhe revised date has
yet to pe announced.

ROODAL

xx MMM MM HR KH MH

zxewtkkr t
IS POSTPONED

Meanwhile, the French Line’s
West Indies service will continuc
to be maintained by the “Dc
Grasse” and the “Colombie,” the
former reverting to the sailing 0°
October 3 as originally planagy

THEATRES



EMPIRE OLYMPIC ROXY 4 mae a
. p Vo-day to Tuesday) Last Two Shows
Torday & Continuing Fongy, Tueskey ot ie & BND ‘Today 4.45 & 8
aasly 44> & BIO pom nevere 1) Pletuves | Uolversal Pictures eo sort
Universal Pictures * Tyesents Presents ese ard
Presents Audie MUKPHY | Macdonald CAREY | Jose FEI as
Yvette DUGAY Acxis SMITH im
THE PRINCE in CYRANO DE
THE CAVE OF THE | BERGERAC
WAS A THIEF | ciMARRON KID) OUTLAWS
Color by Technicolor Extra
Starring | _ ae ary at} Eatest News Berl
‘s e mys oe
Those two sensa- | HOT STEEL e ereat Wells & menser ¢ id
‘onal young sah | Starring Farce Rebbery |
Richard ARLEN Beta |
ony CURTIS. | Andy DEVINE |y Reels of Shorts SARABAND
9 Tuesday and Wed (Musial 2 and
olor by Technicolor 1m @ ais Wed. & TRgeS |
extra ‘INVISIBLE RAY” 4.90 & 81 MY OUTLAW
ane Ronald COLMAN iy
Lotest News Bee} |“ONE HOUR BO | "A DODBLE LIFE” BROTHER

and

Coming Seon!
f “A DANGEROUS

BATTLE QF

Phursday at 430 &
8.15

“I WASA 2 |

SHOP LIFTER” | Starring

and
‘WHITE TIE Richard ARLEN

APACHE PASS AND TABS: Andy DEVINE

P THEATRES

4.90 & 8.30

and
“SALT TO THE


















“BRIDGETOWN
(Dial 2810)

TODAY & TOMORROW
16 2 8° pm
Warner Hilarious

~~ RARBAREES
tab S170)

TO-DAY TO TUES
445 & 8.20 pom

Universe} Action

OISTIN
(Dial 8404)
TODAY & TOMORROW
4.45 & 846 p.m

Entertainment!) Drama! Gary COOPER in
“ROOM FOR ONE}! APACHE DRUMS |] DISTANT
” (Techuicolor)
MORE Stephen Coleen DRUMS
Cary Betsy MeNALLY — GRAY (Technicolor)
GRANT — DRAKE Extra Spee.al: Maria ALDON
SSS
THUBS. Special 1 90 p.m SUGAR CHILE TUES. & Wed
“SPORTS OF KINGS"
Raut COMebiet. &. ROBINSON 445 & 8.30 p.m.

“BLAZING ACROSS & SQUNS, Fesain @}| Alfred HITCHCOCK'S

THE PECOS
Charles STA’ Ss Tee STRANGERS
COMING SOON: Sates }
“Laye OF EMILE Irving BERLIN'S ON A
ZOLA’
a ginal BLUE SKIES TRAIN
= ‘Toahapicoler} Farley GRANGER &
OPENING FRIDAY Bi
“THIS WOMAN. Is Prod ASI AIRE WHITE HEAT
DANGEROUS" James CAGNEY
=. = SS




SS

THE BARBADOS REGIMENT SPORTS
CLUB

ANNUAL DANCE

at the DRILL HALL, on Saturday, 27th
Sept. 1952

Dancing from 9 p.m. in an exquisite Tropical
Setting to the captivating Latini-Ameripan
Musie of the Police Dance Orchestra



SUBS. 81.00
PRIZES GALORE

“The Informal Dance.of the Seasen”





SSSI



Wea, & Thurs

GAME" | oTEL SAHABA'

Hs EXCELLENCY the Gov

| nor, Sir Alfged Gava
lyesterday attended it Queen
Park to witness the jast half hou
of the Pickwick—Spartan mate:
which ended in a draw. He was
met by Mr. Keith Walcott, Spar-
tan’s skipper, Spartan were bat-
ting at the time, and later
‘chatting with Mr. F. A. C. Clair-

{monte as he watched the match.

Wedical Adviser Returns

R. J. W. HARKNESS, C.M.G.,
C.B.E., Medical Adviser of
Development and Welfare, re-

turned from Trinidad by B.W.1LA
on Friday after paying a short

routine visit.
Song Recital
M* JOHN TULL, popular

British Guianese tenor who
has been touring the Caribbean
territories for the past months
will give a Song Recital at the
Combermere School Hall on
Wednesday, September 10, at 8.30
pm,

A fifteen minutes’ broadcast
over the Rediffusion service pro-
vided the means for a practical
introduction to Barbadian audi-
ences and he gained many fans
through this medium,

Mr. Tull has given recitals in
Trinidad, Curacao, Aruba, St
Vincent, British Guiana and in
other Caribbean territories.

Press clippings show that he
has had a more than appreciative
Press, For example, the Vincen-
tian in a signed article states:—
“His interpretation,
his manner left
desired.” Another
cribes him as “A
rich voice is filled wi warmth
and pathos and the envied charm
jof his native land. He holds his
| audience in raptures in a voice
of unusual range, flexibility and
tonal quality. He sings with con-
vietion and soul stirring expres-
sion.”

Mr. Tull has included in his
programme for Wednesday night
excerpts from the masterpieces of
great composers whose immortal
works he has chosen to cherish
jand to pass on to this generation,
A repertoire that includes
\“Torna A Sorriento” (Come back
to Sorriento, “Itch Liebe Dich (I
Love Thee), Verdi’s “Celeste A
ida”, Schubert’s “Ave Maria,’
Malotte’s “Lord’s Prayer,” Lehar’s
“You Are My Heart’s Delight,” is
some indication of the wide range
of works which has been attempt-
}ed in the past by this young artist.

The concert is under the patron-
age of Sir Allan Collymore, Kt.,
and the accompanist is Mr, Win-
ston Hackett.

little to be
clipping des-
singer whose

Returned
R. AND MRS. D. BARCLAY
| returned to Canada _ by

T.C.A. on Thursday after paying
a visit here. Mr. Barclay is Pub-
lic Relations Officer of T.C.A. in
| Toronto, Canada.





elocution and |

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER



és

1952



Carib Calling

Snent Vacation With Parents

Moe eae a a ae ee Dp" J. WALCOTT, son of Mr
i and Mrs. Leslie Walcott
| of the Lodge School, returned tw
Canada by T.C.A. on Thursday
after spending a holiday with his
parents.

To Further Studies
ISS GILLIAN HASLETT, eld-
est daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. J. F. Haslett was among
the passengers leaving the island
by the S.S. Gelfito on Thursday.
She is on her way to England
where she will enter St. Swith-
un’s School, Winchester to fur-
ther her studies.
Congrats
ONGRATULATIONS to
Audrey Ashby who
brated her 2ist birthday on
Wednesday 3rd September. A
party was held in her honour at
“West Gate’, Land’s End, St.
Michael.
For One Month
R. K. INNISS, retired Doc-
tor of Trinidad and Mrs.
Inniss are on a month's holiday

For St. John ’s Public School ir the island as guests. st
R. ANTHONY WOODE, son Worthing @uest House. They
of Rev. and Mrs. Woodge of arrived by the ss Golfito on
Leonard's Vicarage, left the Thursday.

ind on Thursday last by the pypsbition At Museum





Miss
cele-

MR. JOHN TULL





Goifito for England. Anthony, oe
who is not yet fourteen years old, “(HE Loan Exhibition of
has passed the entrance examina- “Views of Barbados” vopen-

tion for St. John’s Public School, ed at the Museum yesterday for
Leatherhead, Surrey, and has three weeks. The exhibition con-
been placed in the fifth form. sists of drawings, water-colours
Anthony did extremely well in and oils of the island, the earli-
the exam., and it is very probable est of which is dated 1707 and
that he will be awarded « scholar- js a vjew of Carlisle Bay.

ship. Also on display is a magnifi-
« For Pembroke College cent patchwork quilt of about

R. AMBROSE WALCOTT, 1860 lent by Mr, Jack Warming-
son of Mr. E. K. Walcott, ton of Dominica, which was made
Barrister-at-Law, left by the Y his grandmother.
S.S. Golfito on Thursday tor Family On Vacation
England where he will enter 8
Pembroke College to take a R. AND MRS. M. BAXTEK

and their two children left

: se in Modern Studies.
Course in agerh x for Canada by T.C.A. on Thurs-

For Bermuda

day last on holiday. Mr. Baxter
APR. JOHN F. HUTSON and js Station Manager of T.C.A,
Miss Doris Hutson were Barbados.
passengers for Bermuda by ‘o Lecture
T.C.A. on Thursday. They are’ To

intransit to the U.S.A. R. R. LeFANU will deliver

4 the first of his series of
Altended Conference lectures on three contemporary
R. WENDELL FORDE, Bar- novelists at the British Council,

rister-at-Law in St. Vin- “Wakefield”, White Park, tomor-

cent and President of the Bar row at 5 p.m.

f--sciation of that colony was The subject of tis lecture will
among the arrivals by the s.s. be E. M. FORSTER.

jad where he Sitemied Abe, First Op Helitay

dad where he ¢@ Le a rs aimee
Corference of the West Indian R. W. DATE, Supervisor of
Barristers’ Association. Accom- Confederation Life Assur-
panying him was his wife. They ance Co, left the island by
will be spending a holiday be- B.W.I.A. for Antigua on Thurs-
fore returning to Kingstewn. day. He has gone on a holiday.



MISS JAN WARD leads the Stuartettes in “Who Do You Know in Heaven.”

DEVIL’

HE final performance of “Re-
vuedeville 1952” was staged
at the Empire Theatre on Fridav

night. It is the general opinion
that this night was the best of
the series.

This year not only did Joseph

Tudor, Jnr., steal the show but
sharing the honours with him
was Mi The ma Barker who
put over a brilliant act in Jeze-
bel. No betler choice could have
been mede for this part.

Now for a look at the story
Morville Billygoat (Joe. Tudor)
a poor Barbadian who wins a4
large amount of money atthe
Races takes himself and_ his
money off on a bang up holidsy
in the Argentine. At the same

time rumour says that the
Spaceship would lamd in Bar-
bados at any time. This pu's

fear into Morville so his holiday
and flight coincide,

in Buenos Aires
Morville meets a Barbadian,
(Thelma Barker) who has been
posing as a South American.
While reminescing, they hear a
loud noise overhead. The space-
ship is approaching and in the
effort to escape Morville faints.

When he awakens he is sur-

In a park



GAIETY |
The Garden—St. James |
TODAY & TOMORROW 8.80 p.m |
Mat TO-DAY 5 p.m
gereen Guild Action Drar !

“STEEL HELMET"
yene EVANS Jame EDWARDS

















TUES. (only) 8.30 p.m
I h LA BPUE Double !
“FRONTIER REVENGI
d
“OUTLAW COUNTRY’











(
|

|

est food should have
est cooking medium

B

need

that’s why you
A Gas Cooker

for BEST RESULTS







rounded by strange people in golden apparel attracted the men
strange dress and he realises he of wine and song. Doreen Gibbs
is similarly attired. To add to as Delilah in a flashing costume
his discomfort he discovers that was the guest star in the Bott e
they do not speak his language Club, Casablanca. The entir
He is horrified and implores the east performed — without a single
Captain of the Spaceshi, flaw.
(Nevile Phillips) to return nie Two newcomers to the Danc-
money and clothe: io return to ing School have gained them
Barbados. Captain Zagagolt selves much credit and speci |
make friends with Morville and mention must be made of the
through the power of a Magic}Misses Joan Farnum and Rens.
Mirror shows him the universe.| Alleyne who danced with every
i bit of grace and ease of move-
At inicrvals the entire show |

ig preduced through the medium)







of this Mirror and in return opt’. 7 ;
Morville acquaints the Captain Rupert 8 Spring A
with surroundings in the form { " 7
of various dances,

To my mind the most out-
standing act was Jezebel (The!-
ma Barker). Thelma, fiery end

bewitching, played the role with
a scene set in the most georgeous
fantasy. She highlighted her act
as she grabbed her friend’s
eweetheart and walked away
with him. Captivated by the spell



of her charm he obediently car-
ried out a wild romance until he
was recaptured by his sweei- Quce u real

x | realises that it -
heart (Dorothy Fleming) at the wm home the dragon a
‘igh price of murder — Jezeber swerve. but ut pulls so hard that
was murdered!! og



p : Rupert hos some difficulty
The hight club scene in this keeping control. Pong-Ping, a
rect gained much credit as the has been wuchag tnteusly for
beautiful girls attired in all the’: hem, hurts Nora ee
we i he e

. NOTICE



Housecraft Course

FAREWELL party was held

at the Y.W.C.A. Headquar-
ters in Pinfold Stree; on Tues-
day, 2nd September, for~ Miss
Eucine Thomas of the Ivy Road,
who left the island on Thursday
by T.C.A. for Canada where she
will take a course in Housecraft.
The course expects to last for
one year.

Seventy-five

PARTY was held at the resi-
b dence of Mr. R. A. Dottin,
Holetown, St. James, on 25th
August in honour of his seventy-
fifth bi#thday, Many relatives and
friends were present and an en-
joyable afternoon was spent.

Mr. Dottin is a retired School
Teacher of St. Saviour’s Boys’
and Carib joins in wishing him
many happy years to come.

Wall Street Broker

IsS E. RAE BARKER,

daughter of Mrs, Clariece
Straughan - Barker money of
Straughan Village, St. Joseph, has
become a familiar figure in Wall
Street, New York. Miss Barker
vy. ho was horn in Brooklyn hopes
to be in Barbados on holiday in
the near future, Her mother has
been residing there for several
yeers with her,







Twenty - five +
ear-old Miss
ker is carv-
ing a career in
New York’s busy
financial district
selling Stocks
and ds as a
registered sales-
woman for the
B.C. Phillips
Brokerage House
Wall Street,
She owes all
this to her
mother who. urg-
eq her to invest
a few spare. dol-
in __ stock.
Rae investigated









Miss E. BARKER

the possibilities,
was fascinated and decided to
make it her career. She is one

of the few women who has suc-
cessfully crashed this highly com
petitive field. Her future looks
good! Her relatives, Miss Emeline
Straughan, Headmistress of St.
Joseph Girls’ School and Mr. Sel-
wyn Straughan of Smith and At-
welt and many others will be
proud of this achievement.

Intransit
R. K. H. CREGAN, Assis-
tant Colonial Secretary of

British Guiana, was among the
intransit passengers by the Gol-
fite on a_ six months’ vacation.
He will also join his wife there.



“REVUEDEVILLE 1952”

ment. Renee who takes the stage
with confidence flashes a ready
smile which adds much to her
general appearance. She shouid
go far in this line

Miss Janet Ward who ied
“Who do you know in Heaven”
is no less worthy of praise. She
is versatile. Norma Gaskin, Ju.iet
Gaskin, Eric Morris, Neville
Fhillips and Mrs. Stuart did re-

markably well in the vocals, The.

version of the
keeping with
dances and altogether the tap-
ping numbers were rhythmic.
The girls excelled in the “Caval-
cade of Rhythm” — the mambo,
sambo, tango, and rhumba.

Mrs. Stuart cannot be con-
gratu.ated too highly on _ this
achievement. The high standard
of the acting and dancing in
xeneral is an indication of the
hard work done to prepare the
girls. The public can understand
only too well all that was done
to put over another successful
performance.

The Police Band under C:2p-
tain Raison added greatly to the
entertainment.

modern
was in

“Waltz”
the other



NEW COURSES FOR
COLONIAL STUDENTS

LONDON
Students from Trinidad and
British Guiana are among those
taking part in a new itish
Council “Introduction to Britain”
course in London, the purpose of
which is to help students to settle
down quickly and to make them
feel at home. Discussions are held
on the cost of living, transport
systems, accommodation, ration-
ing, restaurants and health.
—B.U.P.



dve
a

fd

nture—26

it





happily.
Rupert."’
came obediemt. ist as

ves NPR:

w

yoy id." pulls the lantle bear
low 1} mus: run ind cell rhe
imps.’ Fie harngs way. bu:
before jane he Bauses ind

very pyagien’ “or ” comes

HAVING SOLD OUR BRANCH STORE NO. 27, BROAN STREET

TO

MR. GEORGE SAHELY

ALL ACCOUNTS ARE PAYABLE AT

T. R. BVANS (WHITFIELDS BRANCH) NO. 15
‘PHONE : OFFICE 4294 a

, BROAD STREET
DEPTS. 4220



SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7.

AT THE CINEMA

a a a eS ae



1952

The More The Merrier
By G. B.

BASED on the actual experiences of an American
married couple — Jack and Anna Rose, Room For One
More at the Plaza, Bridgetown, is a truly delightful comedy-
drama about a happy, well-adjusted family who become
the foster parents and brothers and sisters to two problem
adolescents. Cary Grant and Betsy Drake who play the
roles of Jack Rose and his wife Anna are, in reality, hus-
band and wife, and that may account for the feeling of

thy and reality that is very noticeable throughout

Jack Rose, a civil engineer, is
a happy-go-lucky chap and his
wife is the type who cannot bear
to see an unhappy child. Conse-
quently, when she hears of Jane,
who is a sullén maladjusted and
thoroughly unpleasant thirteen-
year-old, her heart goes out to
the child, and she takes her into
her own home. Not content with
helping one, she takes on Jimmy-
John, a sees boy who has
spent most his life in hospital
and whose outlook on life
matches his deformity. The chal-
lenge presented by these two
children might well have stumped
a less adjusted and sympathetic
couple, but with affection,
patience. and comradeship, The
two defiant children are gracu-
ally and naturally absorbed into

the happy life of the Rose
family.

Of humour there is plenty
throughout the film, with five-

year-old George Winslow deliv-
ering some pungeant home-
truths in a voice that sounds
like a fog-horm and Mr, Grant
giving full play to his flair for
comedy in the delivery of all his
lines. There is pathos too in the
upward struggle of Jimmy-John
and his final exciting victory
over himself and his physical

handicap.

Understanding direction, simple
and humorous dialogue and an
excellent cast bring this heart-
warming story to life with Cary
Grant and Betsy Drake, together
with their “family” giving real
and convincing performances.

It is a refreshing and relaxing
picture, portraying family life as
it can and should be. I am sure
you will enjoy it.

LYDIA BAILEY

Showing at the Globe, LYDIA
BAILEY is an adventurous film-
spéctaclé, is based on episodes
from Kenneth Robert’s novel of

same name.

he island of Haiti experienced
one of the most violent periods
fn its history during the year
1802, when Toussaint l’Ouver-
ture led his armed revolt against
the efforts of Napoleon to recap-
ture the island. Intrigue and
insurrection were rife and black
and white alike became embroiled
in the savage rebellion, The plot

» concerns a young American, sent

by his government at that criti-
cal time, on a legal mission to
Haiti, whereby he is to obtain the
sighature on certain documents

,,of Lydia, Bailey. Suspected of,
‘being a spy, on

is arrival, he
‘encol dan, on all sides
in this effort to find the young
lady. When he finally does, they
become the hunted prey of the
Haitian forces, duc to her sym-
pathy with the Royalists, and
have one hell of a time making
a safe get-away.

A: great deal of the film was
actually taken in Haiti, and it
abounds in the colour, sound and
action of tropical settings as well

as mumerous dangerous and
exciting episodes. One of the
weirdest and most colourful

sequences is the Haitian voo-doo
dance where the dancers work
themselvés into a_ frenzied hys-
teria to the blood-curdling beat-

ing of drums.
Th Dale Robertson and
Ann ancis play the leading

roles and are both convincing and



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attractive, they are eclipsed by
unusually good acting in some of
the supporting roles, Outstanding
in his performance is William
Marshall as King Dick while Ren
Renard gives a fine characteri-
zation of Toussaint.

The settings are
the musical

magnificent
background

highly effective.

APACHE DRUMS
Stephen McNally and Colleen

Gray are co-starred in APACHE

DRUMS at the Plaza,

Barbarees.

The plot of this Western unfolds

desert

Mascalero

against a baekground of barren
and adobe huts - to the
menacing beat of Indian drums.
The loeale is a small frontier
town with the colourful name of
Spanish Boot. Having been
requested to leave because he
shot a man, the town’s gambler
and “‘badman” discovers that the
Apaches are on the
warpath and about to attack the

settlers. Returning to the town,
he helps ,in its defence and
redeems himself to the towns-

people and the girl he loves,
Suspense is well maintained

and tension is built up gradually
to a terrifying climax which is
all the more accentuated by

brilliant Technicolor,

Stephen McNally gives a good
performance as the hard-fighting,
hard-gambling man of the West
and successfully achieves the

dificult combination of both hero
and heavs° in his characterization.

Coleen Gray is not only pretty,
but.. warmly. convincing as the

girl: who is torn between. her, love

for the gambler and her’ attrac-

tion to another man.

It is interesting to note that

the background music is aythen-
tic apache music played and sung
by members of the tribe, and it
is largely instrumental in crea-
ting the atmosphere of the film.



TODAY’S GEMS
For manners are not idle,
but the fruit of loyal nature
and of noble mind.
—Alfred Lord Tennyson.

+ - .

A rational nature admits of
nothing which is not service-
able to the rest of mankind.

—Marcus Antoninus,



Poultry
Notes

When puilets are six weeks old
they should whenever possible
be removed to ramge shelters or
runs.

The impertance of clean fresh
ground for pullets cannot be er-
pnasised too much, Most of the
failures of poultry keepers are
due to foui ground. Fowls are
frequently kept im runs on lawns
and other grass patches but un-
less grass is mown regularly it
becomes foul and spreads disease.
Some poultry, keepers in Barba-
dos are giving up the idea of
keeping hens in grass runs be-
cause of the risk of infection, But
if grass plots ure kept regularly
mown and are rested every three
months and then ploughed up be-
fore using again the danger of in-
fection is lessened. In countries
where land is more freely attain-
able than in Barbadgs an acre of
renge grass is allowed to each
hundred pullets.

When the range plan for de-

veloping pullets is practised one
shelter 10 ft. x 12 ft. is provided
for each 100 pullets,



By comparison not more than
six medium-size pullets ought to
be kept in confined runs of 6 ft x
12 ft.

Pullets require between -five
inches and 8 inches of roost space
per bird. Cockerels ought to be
separated from pullets as soon as
possible and fattened for the pot
or reared for breeding.

The golden rule to follow when
pullets show signs of sickness is
to isolate them immediately.
Never leave a_ sick pullet or
cockerel with a healthy flock.

Isolate at once. Ang if you
don’t know how to treat a sick
fowl ring the vet and ask him for
advice,

Fowl pox is one of the greatest
enemies of the poultry-keeper
and in Barbados it is thought to
be spread by mosquitos. The
standard treatment of fowl-pox
is vaccination and experiments
are being ¢onducted in Barbados
to try and give protection to
poultry by vaccination, Certainly
vaccination ought to be used as
a preventive measure on farms
where fowl pox has occured,

There are no such things as
gee according to the experts.
roper feeding it is claimeg will
prevent the hardening of the
tongue of birds, Where harden-
ing does occur the rubbing of a
little. glycerine is recommended.
Some poultry keepers clip the
tongue with scissors but if pip
trouble is experienced consult the
1 and not the local “horse-doc-
tor”.

Colds of course are always pos-
sible but dry litter and clean sur-
roundings reduce their incidence.
Isolate all birds suffering from
colds and consult the vet. Small
doses of cod liver oil are general-
ly recommended.

Worms are sometimes acquired
after pullets are allowed to pick
grass. Special worm medicines
are sold locally, but again veter-
inary advice ought to be sought.







|
|
|
| short drinks
|

So, do as 36 skin specialists
advised:

ee

for long and

] Wash with Polmolive Seap. ~~
2 For 60 seconds, mos: with
Palmolive's soft, oval tates

Rinse !

3 Do this 3 times o day ber 14
doys.




SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Farm And Garden

By AGRICOLA

FOOD WASTAGE

IN THESE DAYS of high prices, shortage and difficul-
ties in connection with food sapplies, it may seem ludicrous,
at first sight, to introduce a subject of this kind. Actually,
however, it is more important than is generally thought—
in spite of the advances in food preservation, cold storage
and low temperature conyemienges in the average home.
$$$ IP is hardly necessary to em-


















; y + phasize that food conservation
GARDENING HINTS yea’ be regarded as an integral

part of food production, Even ui
@ country like the United States,
frequentiy referred to as a lana
of plenty and maximum eflicien-
cy, the Food Administration
Authorities, not so long ago,

FOR AMATEURS

A Place For Anthuriums









Gardeners are often heard to placed the over-all food wastage
say ‘oh I'd love to have some an- at 20-—30 per cent of all food pro-
thuriums but there is mowhere duced. There are no figures avail-
suitable in my garden to keep able for the tropies as far as we
them.” This is true of many gaT- know. Some shrinkage in weight
dens, and it’s a lucky garden°r jn ynavoidable due to loss ot
who has a ‘natural’ home in the

moisture, especially under tropi-
cal conditions, but this is not une
ony source of loss, by any means.

shape of a big tree, or a group of
trees which provide the ready
made dappled supshine which ,, , ; ; :
these Lowey useful plants require. ane problem might, indeed, ré-
If such a natural home is avail. PY close study, Meanwhile, it
able, full advantage should be â„¢*Y, be of interest to examine
taken of it, and as many anthu- - be grey ways &
riums placed under its shade as ¥™ wastage

possible. Anthuriums can also be (yy At the farm or other pro-
kept in the Fernery near tha ducsion Soures: due to reaping of
front where they will get a cer- ature or over-ripe produce,
tain amount of sunshine. These 9F =Bain to careless reaping and
plants look lovely in a Fernery andling resulting in unnecessary
where their broad green leaves bruising and breakage with sub-
make a handsome contrast to the sequent decay;

fine feathery leaves of the ferns (2) In transportation: due (0
The dampness of a fernery suits ‘ough handling, faulty packing
anthuriums too for they are sur- and stowage, delays, over-heat-
face feeders and obtain much of ing and so on;




























































iT






their nourishment through thei: (3) In storage: if produce can-
surface roots. not be at once sent to market,

But sometimes there is abso- care must be taken to keep it in
lutely no suitable spot that would a cool, well ventilate room or
do for anthuriums, and in that place; ‘in this connec on, cover-
case somewhere must be made for ing ground provisions, {ruits and
them, as it is a pity for any gar- vegetables with straw or wash OF
iia.” be without these useful Keeping them shaded and taking

care not to include damaged ma-
ae i terial which coulda start decay
One way of providing a suit- and rots; damage from rodents
able home for anthuriums is to and pests must also be guarded
make an artificial tree, and this is against: '

?

simply done. » catelann
$ a (4) At the markets: careless
most, sulted and thee get's Qeme hapaling and inefficient market-
wallaba post, or of better still the 128 whether by wholesalers ot
trunk of a tree. Dig a hole at retailers may result in much
least eighteen inches deep ana Produce being eventually —_re-
sink the upright in it. To make a 2° ‘ted; a good example of wast-
really good job, a dollop of ce- ®&¢ a commodity much in local
ment should be put in the hole @@â„¢and concerns bananas which
to secure and fix the upright, This @â„¢e packed in trays with sharp
cement will also keep the wood @dges, without a trace of pack~
from rotting. ing, the result keing for the
If no cement is used, the up- Weight of inner hands to press
right must be packed with stones, heavily against the outer ones
which should be rammed firmly completely ruining the fingers
down before the hole is filled lying against the tray edges;
in with earth, (5) By the consumer: not, the
; The next step is taken by nail- least important source of wast-
ing some cross bars across the age;; the food hoarder is a food
top. These again can be the natural waster, he buys more than he
branches of a tree, or pieces of needs and the rest is often sub-
wood. The whole erection will ject to spoilage; wasteful and the

An Artificial Tree

now look something like a skele- discarding of valuable parts
ton umbrella, known to be highly digestible
Now across the cross-ribs place and nutritious; cooking more

any suitable material. This can
be anything from lattice, coconut
leaves or branches from a tree,
anything in fact that will provide
the desired dappled shade under-
neath for the anthurium.

The “tree” is now ready to re-
ceive the anthuriums., These can
be just placed anyhow on the
ground underneath, but a better
arrangement is to get some block
stones, and arrange them pyramid
fashion around the upright gradu-
ating them outward to the limit
of the shade. The pots of anthuri-
ums are then placed about on the
stones. More plant room can be
secured by filling in the pockets
formed between the stones and
putting plants in them.

This use of block-stones not

than is actually necessary for the
needs of the household = and
throwing the remainder into the
garbage ail—institu¥ions and
restaurants are often very blame
worthy in this respect.
» It will be generally agreed that
‘a Sattle more thought and care
on the part of all concerned
would result in considerable sav-
ing of food material of one kind
or another. Nevertheless, under
the best of conditions, there is
bound to be a certain amount of!
refuse and damaged material
in the field, the market or in the
home— which may be usefully
converted into food through
livestock, notably pigs and poul-
try. Many are fully aware of the
only provides more space for the profitable use of such discarded
anthuriums, but the whole tree ‘oodstuffs and adopt measures ac-
has a better appearance than if cordingly. So many know but do
the pots are just placed on the not bother about it. Farmers and
ground, market dealers will find it re
An added attraction can be munerative to keep the odd pi
given to this shelter, if a coralita or two to consume rejected pro-
vine is grown over it, Should the duce, while the consumer should
‘wind be troublespme—and anthu- never be without a few chickens
riums don’t like wind—the vine to élean up scraps from the table
can be trained to the windward nnd other remains which other-
to act as a windbreak. wise may be a total loss

At the BCCF—whether you're going over to the Con-

tinent or up to St. Luey—months away or only a day,
our VACATION BAGS are inexpensive and strong.

For the DAY PICNICER, we have so many neces-
sary items: THERMOS FLASKS and UNBREAKABLE
CUPS and CAKE & SANDWICH TINS designed ‘for
the out-of-doors.

Come in and look at this extensive range of Piastic
Ware and Travel Accessories whenever you're
passing!

BARBADOS CO-OP.
COTTON FACTORY LTD.













Tae
MUSCLE PAINS

May mean kidney troubi..

A function of the kidneys is to
eliminate harmful impurities from
the system. If the kidneys grow
sluggish, these impurities accum-
ulate and settle and often become
@ cause of pain in joints and
muscles, The way to tackle the
tronble is to help the kidneys,
T should be toned up with

itt’s LR 5 medicine
specially for por .
De Witt's Pill have a
cleansing and antiseptic action on
tte kidneys that brings theta
ack to perform their natural
function properly.
tried medicine is sold all over
the world and we have many
letters from sufferers telling
of relief gained, after years

De
made

of suffering,
Witt's Pills, Try them

GUARANTEE

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Mey

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relief and comfort, quickly and safely. Re- be
member this — PHENSIC
harm the heart nor upset the stomach,
Don’t accept substitutes

PHENSIC tablets by you!

Phensic



supplied

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PAGL

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The Seeds that grow

Fresh Supplies of—

“Y ATES”

and Vegetable Seeds

hing,

Flower
This well-

Also

, by taking De

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get a supply

today.

“YATES BULBS”

SPREKELIA FORMOSISSIMA @ 4/6 each

TABEROSE (Double large Clumps) . @ 2/6 each
a?
CRYTHANTUS (Alfafa Lily) @ 4/- each

Obtainable at:—





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ents con-

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| | Broad. Street, and Hastings (ALPHA PHARMACY)



STOP PAIN |
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Se fer soe
Dheres tatnve 1
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Keep a supply of \ (a)

TWO TABLETS =<

BRING @UICK
RELIEF

FOR RHEUMATIC PAINS, LUWIBAGO, NERVE PAINS, -
HEADACHES, NEURALGIA, ’FLU, COLDS & CHILLS

PAN

very essential
for your office

in
16

THE CORNER
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PAGE

FOUR









llraecers

‘TRIUMPH OVER

PAIN

QUININE—THE FOURTH INGREDIENT IN ‘ANACIN’

How does ‘ANACIN ’ relieve pain so fast, so effectively? A few years
ago leading scientists discovered that the secret lay in the exact balancing
of three famous medicines (Phenacetin, Caffeine and Acetylsalicylic Acid)
with a FOURTH ingredient—QUININE. And ‘Anacin's’ Quinine acts
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bring you immediate relief, cast out

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pain with amazing speed !

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Yes, for a very little you can buy a 2-tablet envelope of * ANACIN ’"—
enough to bring you fast relief from a bout of pain ! ‘Anacin ' is also
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in the benefits of this great new scientific discovery !

Pains from fever ? Colds ? Headaches?
Toothache ? Rheumatism ? Neuralgia?
Menstrual Pains? Then *ANACIN’ will



ARM YOURSELF AGAINST PAIN
GET SOME ‘ANACIN' TopAy!



Doctors and dentists recommend ‘ ANACIN '. In Great
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.* FEM
iB RY eT A

M® hoalthy




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that’s the double benefit of Brylcreem. And the pure wils

in Brylcreem are emulsified for clean grooming — you
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Massage your hair with Brylcreem and see 6
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d lasting heir
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BE st/42T

JUST OPENED
BIRKMYRE CANVAS

72” WIDE—FOR BUS TOPS and SIDES

INNER HOOD LINING

56” WIDE. FAWN AND GREY

LIONIDE LEATHERETTE

50” WIDE, ATTRACTIVE SHADES



HEADLEY STILL MAKING
HEADLINES

Crowd Attacks Umpire At Black Rock
by O. S. COPPIN

i
|

team on their win against an England xi. This w

i
’
|
|
| Frank Worrell and Sonny Ramadhin.

Indies cricket on the map as has George Headley.

His two separate hundreds, 114 and 112, against England at
George town in 1929-30 when he
was making his bow to Interna-
tional cricket stamped him as a
great West Indies cricketer in the
making and he never turned back.

SUCCESSFUL ENGLAND
IS successes in England with
the 1933 and 1939 West Indies

teams are now cricket histroy but

they set the stage for a full recog-
nition of West Indies cricket in
mee Cricket circles,

—reremaenmemaacen
r . ore

Prior to his tour to India his
figures were 20 Tests played, 36
innings—3 times not out, 2,164
runs—270 not out as highest score,
10 hundreds, average 65.19.

Frank Worrell too is in excel-
lent form and it seems a pity that
we in Barbados who have not seen
|him in action simece the early
|1940.s may be deprived of the
opportunity of seeing him against
the Indians next January if the
| West Indies Cricket Board of Con-
| trol persist in their ridiculous, un-
reasonable attitude towards the
professionals .

GEORGE HEADLEY
DISGRACEFUL

}

in their power to ensure that this disease does not spread.
Some

| cuffed him, They were not in favour of a decision which he gave.

CONGRATULATIONS to the ee
s

tival match but we in the West Indies never-
theless were overjoyed to learn of the excellence
of the individual performances of George Headley,

George Headley occupies a fond place in the
hearts of all those who have followed the fortunes
of West Indies cricket during the past fifteen years,
for no single man has done so much to place West



of the spectators manhandled an umpire and one of them

ADVOCATE





Yesterday’sCricket

WANDERERS vs. POLICE

rhe Ist division fixture be-
fwcen Wanderers and the Police
at the Bay ended in a draw. The
Constables kept the Bay team in
the field until 5 o'clock, during
which time they amassed 367
runs for the loss of eight wickets.
Chiefly responsible for this big
score was an undefeated innings
of 113 by G. Sobers, and a good
supporting innings of 67 not out
by Carl Mullins. These two bats-
Men carne together after the fall
of the eighth wicket and when
the innings was declared closed
they had added 130 for the ninth
wicket partnership. Denis At-
kinson ang R. Lawless shared
the Bowling honours for Wan-
derers, each taking ‘bree wickets.

When play @nded las: Saturday,
Wanderers has established a first
innings lead over their opponents
by scoring 314 in reply to the
Constables’ 156. In their second
turn at the wicket, Police had
scored 108 for the loss of one
wicket by the close of play, Con-
tinuing to-day, they lost five
quick wickets with only 126 runs
on the tins. Springer and Sobers
retrieved the situation somewhat,
But after Springer left with the
Score at 237 it was left to Mullins
and Sobers to put up a creditable
performance and thus foil the
Wanderers’ attempts to achieve
an outright victory.

Wanderers entered on their sec-
ond innings to score 210 runs for
victory. They lost both Evelyn
and Knowles with the score at
only 3, but Mayers and Proverbs
stood together until the close of
play when* the score was 94 for
the loss of two wickets.

PICKWICK vs, SPARTAN

| N incident occurred yesterday after the close of play in the Carlton- Pickwick 242 and (for 4 wkts.
} Empire match, that is most regrettable and which I must draw to
jthe attention of sportsmen in the hope that they will do everything

GONE Si5.46))10+ tia ae
Spartan 215 and (for 6 wkts.) 142
Pickwick made a great but un-
successful bid to win an outright

One will at once admit that in a keenly contested game tempers victory over Spartan at Queen’s
of both players and spectators are high, even more so in the case of Park in their First Division cricket

the staunchest supporters,

In the circumstances one can condoné match

yesterday after they set

| strong booing or cheering but when an umpire is manhandled by a them 218 runs to win in 130 min-

crowd the time has come when an instant stop should be put to such utes,
Mob violence is infectious and it is easy for a mob to run

behaviour.

}amok in a flash,

|
\ SYMPATHY

enclosed one and therefore control of the crowd is difficult.

to do to the Cricket



ssociation.

home team,
football referee was stoned,
considered intelligent by some in this district.

FIRST ANNUAL “LEAGUE CRICKETER”
d vw First Annual “Barbados League”
J. N

| League Cricket.

Cricketer, compiled by Mr.
. Hewitt, Secretary-Founder came off the press yesterday. ©” * . .
The magazine seeks to chronicle for record purposes the growth of innings, K. Bowen took two for 40

With one Spartan batsman
sick and one (G, N, Grant) away
at work, Spartan were 142 for the
loss of six wickets at the close of
play. Pickwick scored 242 and for
4 wickets declared 190, and

|] SYMPATHISE with the Carlton authorities whose ground is not an Spartan 215, and for 6 wickets,
In
England the secretary of the club would have had a lot of explaining
However, Carlton officials can help
by placing a few notices in strategic spots warning spectators against
such behaviour since they can exercise little control over them or the
| | remember once that on the nearby Shell grounds, a
It seems as if this sort of behaviour is
I counsel the specta-
tors to behave like sportsmen and allow the umpires or referees to
carry out a most exacting 2nd thankless job to the best of their ability.

142,

Pickwick started their second
innings yesterday from the over-
week score of 54 for the loss of
one wicket. T.S. Birkett who was
20 not out carried his bat to a
brilliant 108, stut not out when
Pickwick declared at lunch.
Charlie Taylor also contributed a
valuable 35 and John Goddard
who had scored 71 not out in the
first innings, scored 13.

No bowler was really effective
on the wicket. In Pickwick second

in 14 overs. John Goddard took
two Spartan second innings wick-





Everton Weekes, Frank King, Carl Mullins, Conrad Hunte, Clair-
monte De Peiza, Adzil Holder, Ormond Graham, Kenneth Goddard,
Ralph Legall have all made their mark in the Intercolonial Cricket Spartan went to the wicket after
arena and have all been supplied to Barbados Cricket Association junech with the challenge of try-
cricket by the Barbados Cricket League. “4 ing to seore 218 in a hurricane

Statistics, always acceptable to sportsmen, play the major part gpell of; just over two hours.
in this book and I am sure that it will occupy an important place on or to try patiently to stave off de-
the sportsman’s bookshelf firstly as a background to those who from feat, They took the latter course,
lowly beginnings have been able to play their part in placing Barbados and Pickwick set an attacking
and West Indies cricket on the sporting map and secondly as a season field. They were handicapped be-
to season record of the performance of over an hundred League Clubs, cause of the absence of E, L. G.

The need for a similar work on Barbados Association cricket Hoad, jnr., but Spartan’s batsmen
cannot be too strongly stressed, We must thank people like the late began to throw away their wickets
Mr, Johnny Gibbons, Mr. T. S. Birkett and Dr. Hamilton for some carelessly and near the end of the
record of the growth and expansion of local and Intercolonial cricket game, it seemed as though Pick-
as far as it concerned Barbados but they have left off at an important wick would clinch are, ut
period in the development of Barbados and West Indies cricket and 5.45. o'clock” a meee appea
surely it is a challenge to local historians that this period should not for light saved the situation,
go unrecorded. The B.C,L. has set a good example well worth following g§ Griffith batted well in Spar-

by its parent Association the B.C.A. tan’s second innings to score 46 bé-
fore he caused himself to get run
TABLE TENNIS’ PROFITS out as he had done in the first in-
“HE accounts for the recent South Trinidad-Barbados Association nings. N. Harrison was also quite
table tennis tournament show that a profit of $290.58 was made set, and batting well when he was
and was divided between the two Associations, each getting $145.29. run out at 21. N. Harris made a
This was no huge profit from any large scale financial outlay brisk 39 before he was stumped
but modest as it might be by popular standards it does reflect two off medium to fast bowler ees
comforting aspects of the tournament. The first is that it shows that it idge. This was the we erase hed
en honest-to-goodness attempt is made to stage intercolonial sport of this bowler after fete stbidstt as
any kind that there is the possibility of success as well as failure. been on for sometime,
The Barbados Table Tennis Association at one time, possibly
juite rightly so, entertained grave doubts about the financial possi- EMPIRE ys. CARLTON
bility of staging an intercolonial tour here since this form of sport was Empire 232 and (for 6 wkts.) 210

not popular by comparative standards, Carlton 92 and (for 8 wkts.) 161

INCREASING INTEREST CARLTON batsm€n led by

C. Boogles Williams defied the

OCAL interest has increased with the passing of the past two years Empire attack yesterday and drew

4 and having attempted something, they gained something. The their game when, given 350 to
other consideration whien gives me much pleasure is the fact that avert defeat, they scored 161 for
public attendances were perhaps the best ever for table tennis fixtures. 8 wickets. They were helped in
I am looking forward to the Association’s touring the other terri- their valiant effort by three drop-
tories now for although they have not shown that they can defeat a ped catches, two off N. S. Lucas,
representative Trinidad team yet their performances against the 1 off C. B. Williams, and a possi-
Southern Zone players of the Trinidad Table Tennis Association have pie chance when Edghill skied
established their bona fide as far as Intercolonial table tennis in con- one which both Barker and Rob-

cerned, inson left alone.

ets for 15 runs in six overs,





It was largely the great effor~
ot C. B. Williams, who defendei
stubbornly at times, took runs
off the loose balis, aud took the
bowling at the critical stage of
the game. He scored “2 before he
was caught by Horace King off
Grant at square leg. With C.
McKenzie, he saw the score pass
the 50 mark after R. Hutchinson
was sent back Lb.w. to Barker
when the score was 2 runs.

When McKenzie was caught
behind the wicket off Barker’s
bowling, N.S. Lucas joined Wi!-
liams, but it was immediately
evident that he was uneasy to the
accurate pacers from Barke-~.
Williams shielded him over after
over, and when tea was taken
they were still together.

After tea, Lucas with his score

at two after batting for nearly
one hour, was given a life by
Barker. when he put down an

easy return catch. The next ball
Lucas turned for 2 to make his

score 4, and again in the nexi
Horace King missed him at short
fine leg.

Grant

was soon brought on,
and in his spell, he had Williams
caught at by H. King at square
leg for a very valuable 73. He
had earlier given a chance be-
hind the wicket when in the
fifties.

The Empire bowling after that
lacked the sting and accuracy
which it had earlier in the day,
but the Cariton batsmen, in
their endeavour to save the game,
continued to play with restraint,
and refused to attack the bowling
at this stage.

The Empire bowling regained

its sting shortly before five
o'clock, and Barker switched to
the southern end, had Lucas

caught at short fine leg by Hunte,
while G. Hutchinson was bowled
playing back to an off break
from Horace King.

It appeared that Empire wouid
Still win fhe match. Five weré
down for 147, and in the next
few overs, Robinson struck Wil-
liams on the pad and he was ad-

judged leg before by Umpire
Trotman,

Then Edghill F. B. and E. Mar-
shall defended for all they were
worth, and when Williams got
Edghill to spoon a slow delivery
to point, Barker and Robinson
left it alone, believing the other
to be going for it. Actually it
was Barker’s catch, and _ this,
more than anything else, robbed
Empire of an outright win.

Marshall was a few overs later
bowled by Barker, but in the two
overs left F. B, Edghill and K. B.
Warren played out time and thus
saved the match. Barker bore
the brunt of the bowling and
finished with 5 for 40.

At the end of the game, a mob
attacked Umpire Trotman, and
one of them actually struck him
a blow. He was however res~
cued by Reynold Hutchinson
and other members of the Carl-
ton team.

LODGE vs. COLLEGE

COLLEGE 1st Innings
(for 9 wkts, decld,) 355
LODGE 88 and 67

Harrison College defeated Lodge
by the comfortable margin of an
innings and 200 runs before the
luncheon interval yesterday the
last day in their cricket fixture
at Harrison College.

Batting first Harrison College
took the first day and two hours
of the second day to score 355
runs for the loss of 9 wickets
declared in their first innings
with Malcolm Worme undefeated
with 145, He hit 16 fours,

Lodge in their turn at the wic-
ket on the second day scored 88
runs and having failed to save
the follow on were sent back and
by the end of this day’s play they
had lost six wickets for 60 runs.

Play
Lodge
second

resumed yesterday with
50 for six wickets in their
innings and they only
added seven runs to this score
before closing their second in-
nings. L. Murray topscored with
a total of 16 runs while G. Wif-
kie was run out for 10 runs.
G. Foster who bowled so well
in the Lodge first innings again
put in a good performance and
ended up with an analysis of 10
overs, four maidens, 17 runs and

four wickets. Sltpper C, Smith
took two for 24,

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7. 1

RACING NOTES

By BEN BATTLE





AM afraid that I was unable to listen to the broadcast of the
I Arima Races, and so my comments on them must be at second
hand. Fortunately, however, a good friend and keen judge of racing
was there and I can pass some of his views on to you.

The race that appears to have made the biggest impression on
his mind was the Grell and Co,, Ltd. Trophy in which Bright Light
placed third to Monroe and Red Velvet. My friend had no hesitation
in saying that this was one of the best races that Bright Light had ever
run. Apparently there was considerable interference at the start
due to the behaviour of Dipdell and Bright Light was one of the
sufferers. The winner and second apparently avoided trouble and
were soon out in front which, those who know the Arima course,
will agree is more than half the battle there. In spite of this Bright
Light was able to run round the field on the outside and only failed
by the narrowest of margins to get up. My friend's only other com~
ment on this race was to the effect that Golden Fleece, a very good
looking chestnut colt, was also a sufferer at the start,

The Captain Cipriani Memorial cup—the richest race in the
South Caribbean, went to Hope Dawns whom my informant Gescribes
as a very taking filly. False Pride was apparently very much expect-
ed, but an early duel with Dormay must have told on him. Among
the Maidens my friend spoke well of Starlene, a neat if rather small
dlly who races in the familiar phimbago blue of Mr. C. L. Trestrail.
Twin Serew also caught his eye—a fine big chestnut colt. Speaking
for myself I was pleased to see the successful re-entry into racing
made by Mr. S. Liddlelow who had gone out of the game with the
retirement of that grand little warrior Bright Boy. Always lucky
with the Jamaican creoles “Mr. Friendship” has apparently done it
again with Battle Song. In this race I am told Cross Roads did not |
look anything like his best. In the T.M.I. Trophy Mr. Barnard
had two placed in the first three. Rosette just managed to hold
Dr. Weaver’s Meditation but my information is that Cavalier might
have beaten them both had the race been a little longer.

Meditation “is yet another winner for Jetsam and there is no
doubt that this Creole stallion is off to a good start in his stud career.
Médjitation’s dam Orlanda has the distinction of having two winners
out on the same day, her other one being Kismet. She also has a two-
year-old—Malahini—and so appears to be a very useful matron,

PADDOCK GOSSIP

"THE PADDOCK these days appears quite a different place to what

it had been a little over a month ago. Most trainers are giving
their charges an “easy’’ and there are no spectacular gallops or
indeed outstanding events of any sort to report. This does not mean
that the flow of badinage among the regulars has in any way dimin-
ished. Indeed, it has widened in scope and I must confess that I was
somewhat taken aback last Wednesday on approaching a group whom,
I would have guessed, were discussing Handicapping and Classifying,
only to find an eloquent discourse on the future of the Sugar Industry
to be in full swing. Unfortunately I doubt whether the Editor would
allow me to publish this debate verbatim, and if altered it would
lose much of its flavour. Our newest owner has acquired a shooting
stick, and thus equipped, can be seen studying the activities of his
charge from different points of vantage. Again I wish that I could
pass on to readers some of the advice and encouragement that are
being freely offered him, but once again the editorial blue pencil
might come into play.

Among the horses that caught my eye was Driftwood who is
yet another Jetsam progeny. Her dam Pawky did not prove a par-
ticularly good broodmare for the Hon. J. D. Chandler, and Driftwood
is the last of her foals bred by him. Although a little on the small
side, she is a charming filly, full of quality and, at the moment,
looking really well. Her ex-stable companion, Sterling Dawn, has
joined the Pierce stable, and she too looks well, but at the moment
very backward. The new importation, Highland Spur, is a strong

looking fellow, exceptionally muscular and well developed for a
Two-Year-Old.

AND STILL THEY COME

HERE appears to be no slackening of the inflow of importations,

and two more arrived last week. They are Ardena and Fluffy
Ruffles, consigned respectively to Mr, J. R. Goddard and Mr. ‘Bunny’
Edwards. Ardena is a well bred filly by Torbide out of The Face
who is by speed sire Goldbridge out of a mare called Palm Olive.
She was bred by Lord Oranmore and in addiiton to her pedigree she
has more than useful form to recommend her—one win, two seconds
and two thirds in seven starts. As she is still a two-year-old, she
must have a bright future in front of her here if all goes well with
her. Fluffy Ruffles, a bay three-year-old by Pink Flower out of
Golden Fairy also has Gold Bridge as her Grand-dam and would
thus appear to be very suitably bred for our conditions. Her form
is rather less impressive however and she is still a maiden after 15
starts, but she is clearly a durable filly and would not be the first,
should she accomplish it, to both lose her maiden certificate here and

end up in A class.
Bright Light Wins
Derby Trial Stakes

(From Our Own Correspondent) ,
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Sept. 6.
Mr. Barnard’s’ Bright Light
(Holder up) won the Derby Trial
Stakes and Trophy over a dis-
tance of seven and a half furlongs
from Meditation and Daisy Brown
in that order in the third race
to-day, the second of the Santa
Rosa four-day meeting. Hope
Dawns on a good track repeated
its first day’s performance, beat-
ing A Class horses convincingly
to win the Fernandez & Co, Ltd.

Trophy over six furlongs.

RESULTS
STEWARDS HANDICAP
About 6 Furlongs. Class G2 3 Years
Old and Over.
1, Steamshaft.
2. Highflyer.
3. Dazzle.
NURSERY STAKES
“Division A’, About 5 Furlongs
nated 2 Years Old Only,
1. Roseleaves.
2. Tidalwave.
3. Flyirg Saucer.

DERBY TRIAL STAKES AND TROPHY
About 7% Furlon#s, > Years Old Only
1. Bright Light,

2. Meditation,
3. Daisybrown,

FERNANDEZ & CO. LTD., TROPHY
6 Furlongs Class Al and A2 and Bl

and B2 Only.

1 Hope Dawns.
2. False Pride,
3. Dormay.

S.C. CASTILLO MEMORIAL STAKES
About 7% Furlongs. Class Fl and F2

Only. 4 Years Old Only.

1. My Own.
2. Stella Polaris
3. Pearl Diver,
GAFFOORS BAKERY TROPHY
About 7% Furlongs. Class C Winners
Only,
1. Port Wallis

Nomi-

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Red House Win
Competition

Red House with its captain in
Major Chase and with a total of
459 points took the first place in
the House Competition Shoot at
the Government Range yesterday
afternoon. Second place went to
Green House captained by Capt.
R. Warner with 455 points, Blue
House with 437 points under its
captain Lt. Col. J. Connell was
third.

The weather was very hot and
there was a mirage which was
most noticeable at the 300 yards
and this caused difficult definition
at the aiming mark. The wind
however was fairly constant.

The eight best scores, were: —

Points
BAD, 0-0). PRE idea a nee wt ser 97
Major A. DeV. Chase ...... 96
Mr, 3 .. D. Dawis’..ciekisew 94
Major A. S. Warren ...... 94
Mr. MM. G. Tuekee 63.4166 94
Major J. E, Griffith ........ 92
R.S.M., N. Marshall ........ 92
Capt. C. R. E, Warner ...... 92





2. Alibaba
3. Monroe
JU-C BEVERAGES TROPHY
About 6 Furlongs, Class El and E2
Only.
1 Leapon.
2. Bonita.
3. Marklight,
W. H. SCOTT LTD. TROPHY
About 7% Furlongs, Class Dl and D2
and El and E2 Only.
1. Rock Diamond.
2. Happy Union,
3. Fair Profit,



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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7. 1952



Know Your Cricket °°“:

LAWS 36 & 37

By O: S.

COPPIN

TO-DAY we-continue our sfudy of the Laws of the
Game and I propose to deal with “Handling the Ball”
and “Hitting the Ball Twice”.

I have not seen many people dismissed because of an
infringement of these two laws but on the few occasions
that local batsmen have been dismissed there has been a

terrible uproar.

On one occasion when E. L.
Bartiett, ihe popular Spartan
batsman was given out in the
Park it caused a near riot.

Few who follow Inter-
mationai cricket will forget the
Hutton incident in the Fifth
Test match against South Africa
at the Oval, in which Hutton was
given out for having “hit the
ball twice”. I shall say more of
this incident later in this article.
i LAW

Handled the Ball

Either batsman is out “Handled
the ball’ — if he touch it while
in play with his hands, unless
it be dome at the request of the
opposite side.

Experienced players break this
Law time and again and on the
very isolated occasions that an
appeal is made and they are giv-
en out there follows a claim
that those who appealed are not
sportsmen.

Insupportable

I fail to see how this claim
can be supported in the face of
the law. Senior players strike
a ball ard then calmly walk
down the wicket and throw it
back to the bowler without their
having been requested to do so,

If an appeal is made against
them the umpire has no alter-
native but to give them out.

Of course this law cannot ap-
ply where a batsman, say in
protecting his face from a
bouncer, takes his hand off the

The correct entry in the score
book when a batsman is given
out under this Law is “Handled

struck twice.

The M.C.C. have ruled official-
ly that it is for the umpire to
decide whether the ball has been
so struck a second time legiti-
mately or not. The umpire may
regard the fact that a run is at-
tempted as evidence of the bats-
men’s intention to take advan-
tage of the second stroke, but i!
is not conclusive.

A batsman can be given out,
if appealed against, if, after
playing the ball, and without
on. cee request from the opposite

le, he uses his bat to return the
ball to a fieldsman.

New Edition

The M.C.C. is publishing a

new edition of Laws of Cricket

containing amendments to notes’

and interpretations which are
aimed at helping in the correct
application of Laws.

This new edition comes into
effect for the overseas season of
1952-53 and the English season
of 1953. This has been made
necessary, it is pointed out, be-
cause of controversial happen-
ings in recent years. In no case
has any Low been altered.

Hutton Out !

The dismissal of the England
Captain Len Hutton in the Fifth
Test of 1951 against South Africa
at the Oval comes to my mind
as I study this law of “Hitticg
the ball twice”.

It will be remembered tht
Hutton attempted to hit the ball
a second time after it had popped
off his glove and s@emed to be
about to drop on to his wicket.
In doing so however he »re-
vented the wicket-keencr frem
making what would have been
an easy catch.

An appeal was made and he
was given out for “obstructing
the field”.

Arising out of this inci¢en’.
the M.C.C. has included in their
new edition a note soverning

RESPIRATION, s

CARIB oon’

e hp



LEN HUTTON
such occurrences and it reads as
follows:— A batsman may not
attempt to hit the ball twice if
in doing so he baulks the wicket-
keeper or any fieldsman_ at-
tempting to make the catch.

Public Would Hail
Cricket Side-Show

HERE is an idea for making the
third day of county cricket
matches popular and, therefore,
profitable — revive single wicket
matches. The suggest : comes
in a letter from a reader P. C
CLARKE, of Richmond, Surrey.

He writes “... an early finish
should be followed by single-
wicket contests, the winner to be

* found from the best 16 of each
* county on knock-out principles,

and the individual county
champions to meet around the
time of the festival games. The
crowd would get their extra
entertainment without both teams
having to hang around.

“Two players per match only
would be involved, The fielders
might be recruited in a number
of ways. It should be worth
while for clubs and members to
provide sufficient incentives, and
I could visualise plenty of wagers
and side-stakes.”

Single-wicket matches were
popular in the early days, and
as a variation might be so again.
Their appeal would depend very
much on finding players with
personality I can imagine that a
single-wicket match between,
say, Freddie Brown and Denis
Compton at one of the September
festivals would be a _ roaring
success.

I do not go all the way with
reader Clarke. I think a single-
wicket championship would be
impracticable beeause then
matches would have to be
played off, which might not be
possible if they were treated as
a stop-gap in a short third-day
county match. The single-wicket
competition would then become
an aim in itself instead of being
a profitable side-show,

But something of this sort is
needed, There is an obligation on
counties to provide play for the
advertised hours, weather per-
mitting.

RECEIPTS TOTAL $392.88
FOR TABLE TENNIS TOUR

The total receipt from the
Trinidad—Barbados Table Tennis
tour which was held last month
amounted to $392.88. Of this
$20.60 was spent on printing



tickets, $9.00 went to printing
programmes, $39.29 for light,
cleaning, etc., $22.50 for fixing

the raised seats, cartage, payment
to carpenter, etc., and $10.91 on
refréshments and tips, totalling
$102.30,

Profit from the tour was $290.58
—$145,29 went to the San Fernan-
do team of the Trinidad and
Tobago Amateur Table Tennis
Association and the remaining
$145.29 to the Barbados Table
Tennis Association,

In this tour the San Fer-
nando team was completely out-
played by Barbados.

HOURS AH
BEEN Givin You ARTIFICIAL

Oo Ww THIS
T Fix Yo up

NOTHIN wirt /

») October
/ inside man completed a_ brilliant

Oldham, Grimsby
Draw Match

From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Sept. 6.

A second half goal by Peter
McKennan for Oldham Athletic
brought an end to the only re-
maining 100 per cent record in
English League Soccer this after-
noon. Peter’s goal enabied Old-
ham to hold Grimsby to a draw
before 20,000 at Blundel: Park.
It was the first Grimsby had con-
ceded this season.

At the other end of the scale
Walsall were trounced 6—1 by
Exeter for whom former Bir-
mingham leader Dailey grabbed
a seven minute second half hat-
trick and are the only club with-
out a point.

Watch out for the name of Al-
lan Brown when Scottish Selec-
tors choose the team for the first
International against Wales on
18. The husky Blackpool

hat-trick at Villa Park in one of
the best away wins of the day.
The largest crowd was at Tot-
tenham where 62,000 saw Spurs
record their first home victory of*

J the season. Len Duquemin notch-

ed the winning goal against
newly promoted Cardiff.

Middlesbrough who dropped



: WANDERERS
Police Ist ne 156
Wanderers ist Innings . 4
2 2nd Innings
C. Blackman . Atkinson .
F. Taylor c St. Hill b R. Lawiess 55
+ ne coat . R. Lawless . 16
J. Byer ¢ BR Lawless b D. Atkinson
Cc. Amey ec & b R. Law weed
G. Sobers not out 113
B. Dodson b D. Atkinson 7
C. Springer b G. Proverbs 3
C. Mullins not out a
C. Bradshaw did not bat

Extras EJ

Total (for 8 wkts,) a

Fall of wickets—1 for 86, 2 for 110, 3
for 110, 4 for 118, 6 for 126, 6 for 128,

7 for 159, 8 nowt
WLING ANALYSK
°o M. R

DBD. Atkinson
H. Ramsay .
R. Lawless
L. St. Hil
H. Toppin ......
W. Knowles
G. Proverbs
D. Evelyn .
Wanderers’



G. Proverbs not out .
M. Mayers not out
Extras eens



Total (for 2 wkts.)

et e-ccoowowt

Fail of wickets—1 for 3 2 for 3
BOWLING

ANALYSIS
é Co. 2 w
C Bradshaw 7 4 21 1
Cc. Mullins . 6 1 14 1
Cc. Springer .. ‘ 2 0 °
0

F. Taylor .... 3 0 wt
PICKWICK vs, SPARTAN

Pickwick 242 and (for 4 Se decid.) 190
: im

Spartan M6 and (for 6 wkts.

three players including the Eng- 2 Mj aE ie thee =
land star Mannion as a matter of T. s. Bi not out 108
club discipline lost their first J. G a ag . 4

game of the season at Stoke. The \y "G, net
star of the home team defence Fxtras ayine ib
was newly signed centre half si -
Kenny Thompson, a £22,000 Tote): (eae: ¢ weet. Gecid.).. 199
capture from Aberdeen. Fall of en 1 for 12, 2 for 98, 3 for

Liverpools 2—0 victory agains: ‘*' * ",} ‘. iis

Manchester City keeps them on BYWANG a R w
top of the first Division. Still & gine il ? 30 1
without a win are Sheffield Wed- ( )a'"* e: & 3
nesday beaten 3—0 at home by N_ Harris 4 il =
Charlton and Newcastle United 4 oS) Bi ses My
who lost 2—1 at Burnley. «Gain et nvr “6
In the Second Division New aA Atkins e Teste b Goddard 16
Boys Plymouth aren’t losing any &. ". Harrise w Goddard 5
time in making their presence § (Walgett c wk. b Jordan . a
felt. Before # 31,000 crowd at Nn eet stpd. w.k. b Greenidge »
Home Park—well above average F ‘ing not out |... 7.
—they slammed Sheffield United ‘Extra i
5—2. Fast moving wingers Go- ae
Total (for 6 wkts.) 142

van and Astall were again among
the scorers. Sheffield found their
scoring attempts breaking down
before the solid tackling of their
former centre half Jack Chisholm.
Plymouth’s victory keeps them
level on points with Huddersfield
who improved their goal average
by beating Barnsley 6—0,

Both newly promoted clubs in
the Scottish Division ‘A’. Falkirk
and Clyde had unhappy after-
noons Seven times Clyde’s goal-
keeper picked the ball out of his
net in their game with East Fife

and although Falkirk seored three ,

at Celtic Park they were still
beaten 5—3.

The sheck of the day however ,;

was the home defeat of the League
Champions Hibernians who were
well and truly licked 3—1 by
Queen of the South. Last season
Hibernians won the corresponding
game 5—0.

Letter Ta Col. Sec.

? From el

feel that cannot Passed over
in silence, For the information of
the public generally I would



stress the following fundamental Ri

and cognate matters in connec-
tion with the administration of
the criminal law,

(1) The Governor-in-Executive
Committee does not interfere, and
indeed, has no right to interfere
with the performance by a judic-
ial officer of his judicial duties, so
that this letter was clearly mis-
directed.

(2) It is well established that a
Judge is free to express his opin- M
ions when he deems it desirable

so to do, and indeed, at times
would be lacking in the perform-
ance of the functions of his office

if he failed to comment on mat-
ters connected with func-
tions. Among the matters which
inevitably come within the pur-
view of a Judge’s function {s the
verdict of a Jury. So much is
that the case that a judge is not
bound to receive at once the first
verdict which the jury bring in.

(3) The letter treats the case
referred to as being in the nature
of a eivil action—it refers to ‘suit
of cigarette factory versus Oliver
Grimes’—whereas all trials of in-
dictments at the Court of Grand
Sessions, as everyone should
know, are trials of the issues
joined between our Sovereign
Le ady the Queen and accused per-
ns,

Jall of wickets—1 for 31, 2 for 47, 3
for 64, 4 for oe 6 it 128, 6 foe i141
BOW

iG ARAL LYSIS

R Ww
J. Greenidge ° 29 1
T. S. Birkett 2 “we -
J. Goddard 6 1 15 2
Jordan a3 25 1
W. Greenidge 0 i a —

Edwards ..... 7

T . 2 1 6

A M. Taylor 4 18

CARLTON vs. EMPIRE
Empire 2&2 (for 6 wktss) 210
Carlton ”
Cariton ane Inning ss
C. MeKenzie c w.k. (De Peiza) b

Barker ... ‘ 18
Hutehinson }.b.w. Barker 0
Cc. B, Williams c H. King b. Grant is
N. S. Lucas c C. Hunte b Barker 9
G. Hutchinson b H. King is

J Williams 1.b.w. Robinson 1
&. W. Marshall b Barker 7
£ B, Edghill not out a
Cc Cox l.b.w Barker 4
K. B. Warren not out 0
Extras w
Total (for 8 wkts.) 11

Vall of. wickets—) for 2, 2 for 57, 3 for
114, 4 for 128, 5 for 147, 6 for 147, 7 for



is, 8 for 161.
BOWLING ANALYSIS
Oo M. R. W
Barker . ee 23 8 40 5
GUM bv lasts ee+s 9 5 6 1
E. A. V. Williams 13 4 Bay
H ae “4 8 «630 1
10 3 18
4 2 7
6 3 i2
3 5



4 1
LODGE vs. coisas AT COLLEGE
COLLEGE — Ist Innings — (for 9 wkts

decld,) 355
LODGE os 00 VURe vives co)
LODGE — 24ND INNINGS
C. Grant c Smith b Simmons 0
L. Murray b Foster sere 16
J, Hutson run out . : 7
J. Farmer b Foster : ‘ 0

KK. Brookes b Foster 16

R. Goddard c wkpr Blackman)
b Foster
. Wilkes not out

G. Wilkie run out .

3. Outram ec Worme b Smith

i. Riley b Smith .

l». Reefer absent .....-.

Extras

Total...

Fall of wkts: 1-8, 2—26, 3—26,
5-50, 6-52; 7-80, 8-60, 9-87,

COMMONWEALTH TO
PLAY EVERGLADES

Commonwealth
will engage iverglad
Club in a fixture commencing
today and continuing next Sun-



aay at the Carrington’s Village

grounds, Play starts at 1.15 p.m.

The following will represent
Common wealth; J.
(Capt.) R. Nurse; E. Brereton; J.
Lorde; C. DePeiza; E, Elcock; C.
Parris; St.C. Burke; C. Griffith;
L. Goddard; D, White and S.
Rowe, (12th man).



SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Cricket Scores

Club |
Cricket

Graham |

SEPT. 7 — NO. 240

The Topic

of

Last Week

Joe Joe was in the money

And boys he did buy clothes
With coppers in his pockets
He gould share lots ot blows

.
Joe like the Salat Balink
Start off with a big spree
ee had a big, big headache
Coungd by, prosperity
.

lic started on a spring cruise
in a spring suit of green
\nd boys high-minded Joe Joe
Lewed in Argentine.
. * . .
ile steaming, boiling fair girls
Swanking from hips to heel
Confuse Jog Joe with Spanish
ry ing to clinch, the deal

Joe Joe panati pews
Herd things he had to face
For boys all Joe Joe's good luck
Just landed him in space.
. . . . .
Save! save Joe Joe from peril
Pray, tell me what's this place
“Twas then a magic mirror
Showed Joe Joe his disgrace
. .

The ‘starch and iron” captain
With mirror fixed in hand
Turned Joe Joe in a turtle
Like those up Silver Sand

. . . . .

Pwas then Joe Joe discovered

Cld age is like a snare

Even if you feel like coming

y crawl ‘till you get there
. . . . .

Tt some the other
We readily agree
With those young stream lined
We'll hush; and wait and see

. . . . .

artistes

bodies

Who saw those bathing beauties
Some averaging seven stone
minded Joe of beef steak
Which is all beef—no bone

* * .

.

bDuneing the Mumbo jumbo

loor Rebert had to say,

One, Uke the Russian woman

Bioeck up the whole highway
. . .

Congrats to Eric Morris

\nd Norma Gaskin too

\od Jezebel; the Bajan

‘ho can drink one or two
. . . . .

id little Juliet Gaskin

ud some the stiffer breed

ho, by their complexation (!
M ade Enriched Bread ime ir feed

>

Cheers go to Joe and Nevitle

Mrs, Stuart, the Police Band
Let's toast to them with J & RK
The best rum in the land

sponsored by
J &R BAKERIES
makers of
ENRICHED BREAD
and the blenders of
J&R RUM



Down with the Tyrant

BRENT

BRAITHWAI rE'S
RHEUMATIC
REMEDY

It will bring you great com-
yy Aan ~ oe

fort and ease your ‘suffer-

ings with the first bottle.

7

epee inne pnnnpan nels






ee is the

VENO O'S

cOUG MIXTURE

ee ne

STOPS COUGHS





>

“an xe

Such 7TNING >

Mollet
re A ee

VE NO'S < OU GH MEX r RE,
uthoug m is different the
j ide « is the same
: yt! 1 oughing
soothing
rd protect-
VE ENO'S 1s ood for
some immediately.







Before you bath -
berore you dress -

ANDREWS

tor loner Cleanliness!

First thing in the morning,
make sure you take your Andrews.
Inner Cleanliness comes first! Just
is Andrews bubbles in the glass,
so you'll sparkle with the fitness
and energy that come from a
system free from impurities.

Firstly, Andrews cleans the
mouth and tongue, then settles the

tomach, tones up the liver and,
finally, gently clears the bowels

Take Andrews as a refreshing
drink at any time; just a tea-

poonful in a glass of water is
ufficient,

DO YOU KNOW that the mouth records events in your
digestive system? If all is well the tongue is clean, the mouth
feels fresh. But if your system’s sluggish the tongue is coated,
there’s an unpleasant taste in your mouth. Sparkling Andrews

is needed — its cleansing action freshens the mouth and the

whole system.



1
Comatock's Worm Peat Nad bythe
makers of Dr. More's Indian 2

'

!

'

i

i

i

1

|

\

\
|
1 dienes of
'
'
'
'
te

PAGE FIVE

BECAUSE UPONTHE CONDITION
OF THE KIDNEYS RESTS HEAL
HAPPINESS ~ LIFE ITSELF J”

EVERY EXPERIENCED DOCTOR
IN MAKING A DIAGNOS!S

MUST FIRST FIND OUT THE
CONDITION OF THE KIDNEYS

FOR IF THE KIDNEYS ARE
FAILING IN THEIR | MPORTANT
DUTY OF REMOVING EXCESS
ACIDS AND POISONOUS
WASTES FROM THE BLOOD=
THEN WE ARE POWERLESS
TO PREVENT SICKNESS.

EVEN INSURANCE COM=

PANIES WONT INSURE A

PERSON WHOSE KIDNEYS
ARE NOT RIGHT

3} eS
Vad pes
If you don't feel 1 look feadchen, to
your kidneys.

tired feeling, too it
rheumatism, sleeple: mane a
dizzy spells, “nerves” -

cations of faulty kidney st i zz
have any of these symptoms

Dedd’s Kidney Pills today.

Dodd's Kidney Pills are the

proven kidney remedy, used

by tens of thousands. Ask for

Dodd’s Kidney Pills and ©

don’t let them sell you

anything else



“oor PILLS

Den't let, reser aad & sluggish ar
slow you! pipers uel Le) YOU Col any ty S

wih g ee, ou gent ae effect night
eet OF Aiseomiart. w
stato yo fine « stgl Bix active Ingre





and herbs le a
hetps restore

tbpmal bowel ess vation Fe oe rr ful wastes a
out. Get Dr.

Moree! * Indian Root
Pills today.





A
TRUSTED REMEDY
FOR OVER
50 YEARS

sux OF WORMS!

Be sure ory famil

R M JONES & CO. LTD.—Agents.

















































r





PAGE SIX



























SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7. 1952
vyyuaveresnvevenenetenteeeE ss
: 2 . 4 q ® Py oo , proved
= =O? = _
if = a= purpose, [¢ ihere is
z = ¢ L no : ruth der. belief
4 hat r eut hair
“ , t ‘aling up
| wor ea te S WHY peopir can go grey Dr. Savill petieves that some
. expe ats 4 ae ee ee . ; ; cOntaining sulphur may
PR ie 4 Jrank overnight after a shock nelp w delay baldness. Sut
ae : ie assacing | the scalp tig the
y 7 aaa an iIngers or beating it with a hair
@ WHAT Bean geare as 10 your hair brusi until it tingles is probat
. : bos . og: a > etter
when it gets realiy wet Oily lotions may also nel
) e war t greyness
@ HOW to brush your hair Few people have’ really
sé ° e na rs in their heads, most “ grey *
we tdlseusd fasnrenep ise af hair being a mixture of white,
black. and brown
ew > INCHER 4
by CHAPMAN PINCHER Frightened?
IGHT on time for the bathing season a women N hair turn white in
doctor describes today exactly what happens to flees Dr. Savill
| your hair when you wet it wek might suddenly



rict the blood vessels

And she throws in some useful! ‘ips for beauty-conscious
ying the roots of the hairs

women and balding men appl th ots of
Thorough wetting weakens hair so much that it will mee So serve out t neir colour,
stretch to one and a half times its normal length i, he doctor quotes one case of
: are oe Tattd os eat eet ee” ae ; d 4% man whose hair turned black
pulled. Sodden hair also breaks easily. So ray your hea after a frighten‘ng night
as gently as possible when drying it at tee alias i.
S , a But her most hair-raising hair
Hair which has been stretched and dritd stays story concerns some soldiers who
stretched. But when it is slightly moistened it springs had such terrifying experiegces
back — to its former — at Dunkirk that their hair stood
length. oiling their nair-do’s ut like the bristles of a hedge-
That is why a mo VouLs »y women "from hog for several months.
comb auickly puts hing their hair often enough
shape back into the opinion of Dr. Agnes Seven facts
usled hair. iil, who has written a 316 R GR "S$ about
If hair ‘s stret age book* on human hair meerecne ee mee sa
then steamed fo The doctor condemns the nz fastest between
minutes

Not this week, folks! I’ve made the great dis-
sovery—an Air-Sick tablet that really works.
Just left the Airport after four hours’ flying, and

look at me! AIR-SICK tablets by, SAVORY &
MOORE are ‘the works’ boys and girls. Try
them out and see for yourself.

I khow my onions too Mr. Townsman Grow
them, eat them (raw is how [I
like them) ang kiss my girl
friend too.

“Ever tried Amplex? An.
Amplex tablet a day combats
all breath and body odours ,
from within, Eat or drink anything you like, but
take an Amplex too—if you want to be popular.






















Pear of s


























HUDEOTONAGEELOGAGERTEEVAESUERSHEATEEA TUTTE CSAC TESA ATTRA GaN EYES tenet



id t saue et brushing 1 iy
Â¥ Ores Dy mecn ng : and Combing coed arcinay eae i ce shaving b
for instance. He | Shorter than its orga! Gressers’ ayststanta. Neither oe eevee meee
Take a look at John here, for il the Trouble the hai P length and getting correspond- brush nor comb should be forced nits growth-rate.. , .
wasn’t always this sprightly, so early in NA. ouble... tf the hair gets very wet ingly thicker. . _ from the scalp to the ends of the AXIMUM gth of mgt
morning, Not until his wife discovered IRVONA, nv evr ss neNF USUARIO T SO if someone cole nk 1D hair in one sweep. ona nee ig 25 inches, heir
the marvellous tonic iablet that gives TMT YA a safe way of steaming bs Dr. Savill’s method: Divide iger than three feet being

° 6 } 9 > 5 a ave 9 . Tp
head, balding men could ould the hair into severallocks. Then

‘ 9 scis3oriess trim which vhile left hand holds a leck © AH \IRS PRE ADTH ave
_|Paris Newsleter from EVELYN IRONS WHAT'S COOKING face ierSert'h. SS Sucieice fees i Es 5.3.0 yr aome ge

ume the right hand sweeps tite brush @ THERE are about 140,000

oye , ; tna shower... or, comy dimes. Ee fan Data ORE
kva‘s Critic LONDON Shops IN THE KITCHEN Hi: pencnos ond POY ewe Band. The len

health within a short time, did Johr
look like this.














spette) evseare 100000, red
“Now I send him off to work happy—just as full of > ined when wet {ittie higher up and the fresh ° a vant ; tet nnd oaiind ap ;
H BOUND etuins its form if part is brushed downward—and tins

s as he can be,” says. Mrs. John. “And I feel fine
peevelt, My trouble was different. MEDILAX was what
I needed. A safe, gentle laxative that quickly ensured

SEA-EGGS dried oi rapidly. But it con- § on, seded to pull out a healthy

| f i vhe vetted, s + wie
} IN THE FLEA MARKET Sea eggs are in season now in that a sheht shower vasties out Singeing ? No @ EACH hatr may live up to



SS. We're always thinking of house ° : " 7 In water-waves. SX years
EE eee, why not INNER CLEANLINESS for bin PARIS, has been buying other things. Barbados. There are few ways in Even dampness in ‘the air is iE. doctor accuses ————— "
} ? MEDILAX is the answer Arriving in London this after- She has been ordering Provencai which to cook them owing ‘0 jdeath to most artificial waves, 1airdressers of foist- _*" The Hair and the Scalp”
ourselves: * t ; noon by air from Faris — Mrs. furniture and old china for her eir very rich flavour. In France, bas Fe SABER epanes OUTS, Se) treatmen's on a aes Seas ee
: Fleur Cowles, pocket-size, dyna- ew house in. Connecticut. Italy and in England they are “U"* reatmenis on their clien London Express Service



“Hello, there! Do I look good? I feel

! Tried out a new hairstyling, and
shlighted the waves with COLAIRE.
It’s marvellous! Just stroke it on fol-



mic associate editor of the Where did Mrs. Cowles go for Often used as hors d’oeuvres or ~

American magazines Look end her shopping? To the Marche With cocktails. When you use : ‘Ep .
Quick. vok ent ux Duces. (flea market) at St them like this you must serve CMMES PICNIC IS IN THE HAG FOR LONDON’S QUADS

Mrs. Cowles’s vitriolic book on Quen, on the northern boundary them raw, The best way io

lowing the wave with the applicator. | the Perons, Bloody Precedent, f Paris. serve them is on thin long slices
. Easily brushes out has just been published in lon- I was. surprised when Mrs. on bread, toasted and buttered.
: ) don. Cowles told me that she paid) SEA EGGS 0)
{ too. What a difference When I saw her in Paris to- only 40 dollars (about £13 10s.) Sea eggs 2, Eggs 2, Onion 1
day Mrs. Cowles (pronounced for a Provencal wardrobe. (big), Butter Pepper. '

[See ane her eae hair as was at ~y flea market on
sleeked back smoothly and tied Monday (it is open Saturda: rl i

with two black ribbon bows, Her Sunday and Monday only). At ee eee — — ane
| brown eyes are intense behind least 70 per cent. of the custom= 4), Aappen® th an in eges,
heavy horn-rimmed glasses, She ers were American tourists. At Ott ae sea eggs, the onion,
wore with her black and white the Stalls, crammed with china, ® 1 of pepper and cook the
spotted dress a spray brooch furniture’ and brie-a-brac, mere O™*lette. Serve hot.

it makes when your






Let the sea eggs fry gently in





hair sparkles and
shines with COLAIRE.



composed of a huge black pear! chants complained that business BOUILLABAISSE i
and diamonds, work of the famous was bad, Many of the 3,000 stall- For 4 people: Assorted fish in-
Russian jeweller Faberge. holders who crowd the market cluding a lobster 3 lbs. Onions

“And what a difference it makes when you use| This was the brooch she wore on normal days w lb. Garlic 6 pieces, Chipped
. . 2 + te abi ' ys were absent on Pi , ppe
ALL BANDBOX PREPARATIONS,” says Mary.| when she dined with the Perons holiday. Yet I found those who parsley 1 tablespoonful, Orange
There is a Bandbox shampoo tor every type, in Buenos Aires two years back. remained were unwilling to cut rind, Thyme, Tomatoes (whole)
Almond Oil for dry Liquid soapless for oily hair. | “Evita wanted it,” said Mrs, their prices. 1 tin, Olive oil 1 glass, Butter
And what a range of brilliantines! Ask for BAND- | Cowles. “I took it off and showed I watched an American father 1 oz. Slice of bread driv in the
BOX preparations always, I feel so different after it to her. But I did not offer buying a present for his 18-year- oven, 1 Sea egg and pepper.
8 using them. to exe it. oar spoke no English old daughter. It was a monkey Put in a big saucepan % glass
ae ; on ut General Peron, who did com- orchestra of nine figures in sax@ of o ive oil and let the onion fr
I'll say she LOOKS different too, Sis mented, That's one thing she china, perfect of its kind, but jn it until it turns golden: add
“Tl say she LOOKS !different too. Sis slecttinn: To me that was a very not antique, The price was £75, the garlic and the chipped pars-
§ ant spot-light on Evita’s and the salesman would not ley, a bit of thyme and_ the
doesn’t tell you she used to weigh a ton. ;
I told her about SILF. ‘Curious little hor-



personality,” budge from it. A ;
Mrs. Cowles disregards the tag The flea market, started in orange | rind and after a little

about speaking no ill of the dead. 1891 by scroungers in the Paris while the whole tomatoes. Let GIRLS WILL BE GIRLS and when they're four-of-a-kind you can be sure of one thing—a party. -
















; “Eva’ Peron was an evil woman,” dustbins, is as famous a centre everything cook slowly. Take the Here, London’s Cole Quads—EHdna, Patricia, Marie and Frances. don’t bot!
ror’ Sis calls me, Silf brought her weight she said roundly, for tourists as the Eiffel Tower. S@ucepan off the fire and add the open the picnic bag in Battersea Park, they just help themecives Bh igh “ae af ene i
a in a jiffy.” Ji 's right, girls And the Peron regime is evil, The bar and restaurant adver- lobster cut in small pieces and their cups. The youngsters, all in excellent health will be two years old next month. a
own in a_ jiffy, immy's right, * too.” tises “hot dogs” in English, all it a ee take longer to (International Radiophoto) if
WILL ‘ , There are not many bargains cook at t tom putting at the
three SILF “TABLETS A DAY She or ane ears to the © be found nowadays at the fies top the ones that cook quicker.
CHASE THAT UGLY FAT AWAY. a thi Argentine with no idea of writing market, Yet there are still hope- All the fish have to be cut in ® e “4
And here's something a book about it. ‘But I was ie , people our eee Poo te pieces. Add then as much water rea a én } Ou are worried
ti t ; > ai , loping fo fin an original as you need to cover all the fish. f :
for the entire family. A The spectre of "ener tn, ‘that Cezanne picture or a first edition As soon as the liquid starts io Reg ;
SPA for POP, a SPA for] country haunted me.” fa anit arery for “a few boil add the other half of the AAIN ove~ the heart causes more Continuing the series pneumonia have been so sure that
" Recently Mrs. Cowles and her "UMGred Francs. | glass of oil the salt, the pepper groundless fear than any ARE YOU SCARED the pain was in the abdomen that
PENNY, a SPA for} husband, publisher Gardner The Minimum and the sea egg. Let everything cther symptom of imaginary TO SEE A DOCTOR ? they have been operated on for
PETER i one for you Cowles, toured the Philippines, Teeny eer Paris peeuty boil for another ten minutes and “ease. s “ : appendicitis.
E » and one ‘ Japan ana Korea, queen, has been 1eprimanded by Sac + area . A distended stomach, an inflamed
ea a their present European the police for walking about ee an nae an ae _ In the great majority of cases with a report on the rib muscle, or fibrositis may cause
your teeth and a spark-| 1 oliday they have had three days Cannes in a Bikini which, it was a e e one put it on a dish it is due to nothing more danger- most usual reason of all pain which appears to come from
too if you value | in Switzerland, nine days in Said, was too “decollete.” oan Ste teeta een ne CP aeniten ate spot By CHAPMAN PINCHER a damaged heart.
SS rr , “| Paris and the London visit ig I can report that hundreds of og ere carbonate will put right—or
a i ling smile SPA TOOTH- | also scheduled to last nine days. girls walk about the shopping the broth if you like but I would an aching chest muscle, ind Rouaswivds with faites Thousands of other people have
, - § In London they hope to see Streets of Cannes in almost in- not advice it if you use sea eggs. | Yet thousands of people who Care for dare 1 t tak “thi tes to further distressing “heart” symp-
: R th BRUSHES are the best| Mr. Churchill, visible Bikinis, But this one, i: toto tm em, AVE nothing seriously wrong with ¢ re not take this risk. toms, such as palpitation and
t e OLE : “If Mr, Eden < his brid seems reached an all-time buses mounted two little Tri- them live in daily dread of being So they carry on half heroically )reathlessness, yet there is nothing
buy for the whole fam-| turn from’ Portugal in time, 1 minimum. rf colour flags which fluttered from struck down by a sudden heart sapere 20 consnes sny Gsy-~ organically wrong with them,
~ IL ily. In nylon or bristle should like to see them, too,” A policernan flung his cloak Week roof throughout Liberation attack. Pie es Phe Oe Pain: Overweight men sho. walle -¢
f AX ¥ Pier tee * | snid Mrs. Cowles. “I think the around the girl and took her to : sts antom Pain Ws Angsabat 0 walk too
shaped to clean every| Church ‘limes article on their the police station, where she was , Te week ends next Tuesday, They are too scared to discuss THESE unhappy people do not little and eat too much are terri-
mm *Y | marriage was a disgrace. Steven- Teproved by the superintendent Ea Sh are a° flags on = their symptoms with a doctor. realise that it is extremely difficult {¢d when their hearts start thump-
crevice, SPA should be| son is suffering similar criticisms before being allowed to go home Ge pile one || @ conductor: For they are so sure the pain is to locate the real position of a '8 ®fter a few minutes’ lawn- ‘
atte aaa in the Bible Belt in the United and dress. quckiy. er ea oe see anced tea anes ould pigereoten. pat. yet it Te cane it, they
oothbrush too, States," 4 y° a r would iver trou causes an ache in ; ae at, the:
STOCKED BY: In Paris Mrs. Cowles has done Last tig i aon year at (World Copyright Reserved) immediately order them to bed. the right shoulder. People with are continuously burdened with
J, L. LINTON, High Street. HINDS & CO., Roebuck Street.! 90 fashion shopping. But she this time since the war, Paris Sieh Husbands with mortgages to pay ngs painfully inflamed with @ On Page 10





E. C. GILL, Olympia Pharmacy. P. A. CLARKE, Cosmopolitan








EMPIRE PHARMACY, Tudor Pharmacy, ! GY & oe Sim

Sweet. K. V. WORM, Roebuck Street. : % wy . >
A. F. JONES, High Street. STOUTE’S DRUG STORE, Roe- 6 ee Bi
H.-C. WALKES, Tudor Street. buck Street. - To keep
H. L. HUTSON, Tudor Street. cc. C. BROWNE, Roebuck Street. \ °
ROCK'S DRUG STORE, Tudor A. A, BROWNE, Eagle Hall. # ular , .

Street, H. E, PILGRIM, _ Progress:ve ° + reg a
F. S. OLTON, Swan Street. Pharmacy, Nelson Street. v g’S
BRUCE WEATHERHEAD, Broad STANDARD PHARMACY, ° take E °

Street. Tweedside Rd. .

Sole agents covering all these, your family needs, | c * .* de
'




INTERNATIONAL 'TRADING CORPORATION LTD. |
Telephone 5009.

sea ee

ot]
{7 KLIM is puve, safe milk
[2] KLIM keeps without refrigeration










=
wa
e
=

In Paris

Wherever you buy KLIM MILK, you ; i
are sure of consistent purity and qutri+
tional value. }a each and every tin. «+ |
=< _ Sparkling ENO’S “Fruit Salt” first
thing in the morning freshens you up both
mentally and physically. It clears the head.
cleanses and refreshes the mouth, removes all
symptoms of liverishness. ENO’S contains
no harsh purgatives. Its gentle layative action
is non-habit-forming. ENOQ’S is suitable
for delicate stomachs, safe for children and
invalids. Keep your “Fruit Salt” handy.

= Eno’s
Fruit Salt’




London
New York

in January, June or December a fess
KLIM is always the same uniform
quality cow's milk—uniform in the
1 proteins, fat, carbohydrate,

esseat
vicassins and minerals needed for

GOO) HEALTH.
women are

buying perfum«

this new way



AANA, cme AAAAANY meme ANVAAAY cen CAAA, or
@ KLIM is excetiont for growing =

KLIM

S| KLIM adds nourishmert to
ea 1a






INEXPENSIVE HANDBAG PHIALS
OF A COSTLY PERFUME

There is no finer perfume made than Goya—yet it neq
cost so little. The perfume in Goya handbag phials i:
the same as that in Goya's world-famous costly bottles—
there is simply less of it. These phials were introduced by
Goya so that a woman could carry perfume about with her,
in a handbag ; so that at any moment of the day, no
matter where she was, she could renew and refresh he:

6) KLIM is recommenced for
infant feedin ;
7; KLIM is safe in the spocially
packed ¢i.,

(3) KLIM is produced und. strict-
Copr

‘est contre:



Protect your gums and you protect your
teeth, for gum troubles cause over 50 per cent. of tooth-
losses. To promote firm, healthy gums, use Ipana tooth paste —









2 . Geta andbag phial of Goya perfume to-day
fi ie eis a sr sag phial of Goya | 1e to-day detoatea Ipana and Massage. Use Ipana, also, to brush your teeth extra-
andbag Phials by ) DED white and reduce acid-forming bacteria that cause decay. ‘This
- . . .
ores Asean. Srey ior wrest a. pore-safe for IRREGULAR ACTION, is the way to keep your whole mouth healthy; the way you will
fragrant as ; a Z :
chat GREAT EXPECTATIONS, cial “ SICK HEADACHE, find refreshingly different”’ because of Ipana’s mint flavour.
sntalising and elusive as the moment Me BA fl a a BILIOUSNESS,
fore the curtain goes up. : r INDIGESTION, ete, a
PARIS C ,
In ser ragra : Gardenia, Gr T "
eRe en ee cde teu pong beeen Pom FIRST IN PREFERENCE ikea wines THE TOOTH PASTE..
Decision, Vibration, Goya Heather a sale it THE WORLD OVER in bottles for ‘ v
NEW YORK + Pure milk. .
a i pe is REFRESHINGLY DIFFERENT .
Jole.- Distributors L. M. B. Meyers & Co. Lid., P.O. Box 17.2. Bridgetown LT — Z A PRODUCT OF ‘BRISTOL-MYERS. LONDON AND NEW YORK
ao “ wauit sawe” are Registered Trade Marka sua

$+ /2/2





SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7

1952 SUNDAY * ADVOCATE

THE EDENS END A ‘QUIET
HONEYMOON’ ....





i, About ut Town I dreamed of a

lovelier figure in

PAGE SEVEN _












Long blond hair is drawn into

YoU

FROM AROUND THE WORLD : :
Burma, Belgium, Bomt ( piete xpecte “d Bar- =
: : ida, BARBADOS, comes news of bados soon by agents Hanscheil # 2.
| (By tu BEYFUS) the amazing DEXION SL JOTTED Larsen & Co. Ltd 14 eae
| aa fad omg honeymoon of ANGLE steel (or all build on
T, an ts. Anthony Eden* ends nd ; Sa ey ven ia leas a 's —
in the propet fashion With an offi- ae ee by ‘compari ae ee, ee ; : —
cial visit fo Lisbon and an official 1 ete le ee institutes ai 7 ona Oa “ 1 time Maidenette =
banquet at the embassy. sively Rito the globe. Exclu- again ta pack your bag
= The ote week the ens had to Dea Mi en _here through ©‘ 1OOLBAG? , you need . new
themabives W a ably calm, = Mey 2 ere Roach & r ——, And . PENCII
ect, and circumspect affair. . dtd. 1, 3584, this easy to LOX and, of course, this term ¢
correct 7 a ; use, tine and money saving (20% GEOMETRY SET is called for,
2 less an an all-wood job) slo lucky you! Let’s go together and
' They seyese Baer, Diace, ted metal with bolts and nuts is buy everything under the one
' Siapese village of 7 Uteeirica, five permanent, termite proof an CAVE SHEPHERD'S | vir-
miles from the next, in the sha- enorm rusly strong, DEXION tually have a department for
dows of the beautiful Estrela a the Pari Mutuel Building “chool needs alone. PENS, PEN-
m ins. at Savannah and you all know © ILS, ERASERS—got ‘em? And
. No One could say that the Edens that one! Stores in town use it about uniform? BRAID i,
for; who they were, Not ance for shelves, counters, chairs and Our school colours and TIES and
w they seen walking hand in a prominent club is re-designin ‘ESTS and KHAKI HOSE with
oars oe _— ae it Pie with DEXION. Treated *UASH TOPS now, let’s
d a »b- wi an anti-corrosive and stove have we covered everything?
whe aaa sadly. Ed | enamelled it’s a wonder material ! got NOTEBOOKS must
when ain. th as gm abd August sales in Barbados have notebooks—here in their
most le m about in on lone were close to 10,000 ft. hundreds at your school storé
; oun ® : ; \VE SHEPHERD'S
oo =
a eee tifully pressed ation by hand! The work of DE LIMA’S FOR DIAMONDS
Only Mr. Wi was spied sitting a eet the enline from ind wonderful GRUEN PRE-
in the porch of his chalet wearin aka ae ingers of Madam C'SION Watches with the curved,
mora 8 | Gilles | of the _De Luxe Dres mfort-designed case. Gruen, a
Z é 4 a, _ Spry Street ph. 4474 watch smartly expressive of you
The Eden honeymoon has been cH a 7 ae readymade Dresses A. Y. de Lima’s you will also |
very much removed from the gay ne a 1 = ee range of Chi d exquisite Crown Devon Ear-
social whirl PRESE: ‘NTING the chignon, fas ” lot hes all carry the tings and Broaches, essentially |
In the mornings they stayed in ge and gay. Two summer Madam Gilkes label. Prices are diferent, desirable accessories to
the chalet reading the British me wavs of keeping tong hair way low down for this high ike delightful gifts—at Y. ce
newspapers delivered each day by at its dest at the back—one for quality work—-you must drop in ! ma’s Jewellery Store on Broad
¢ar from the British Embassy and @#¥-t'»)~. and one for evening. and perhaps have your garme: t i wil
the books they brought with them Above THE GAY CHIGNON, §|custom tailored! . . °
—mainty French novels, ; ; MAY JOIN rou
. . - * atbell rédol = anne ai } TROPICAL GLARE- does it ISH and learn + oh ae
j In thé afternoons they went out — net The ie made. of vother you? The new and exclu- « nating art of EMBROIDERY at





red wine,” said the wine waiter, min D, and in the case of Cap ing ie White, Blue, Pink, Grey,



Genuine Maidenform Brassi-

for a drivé, But not the Kind little white sheen, somé lilies of |Sive IMPERIAL TONE RAY je Singer S ; - :
where just the two of you follov the valley, and twe plump rose- }anti-glare lenses (available too in hone Mrs eeenthe oe gg
the nose of the car for miles ani buds, Sun Glasses) » availab 07 aan mgd Walkes pe
miles. Mr, and Mrs, Eden sat in Below —~ THE GRAVE. CHIG hade 3 ‘* a “2 di Mert id a a4 ae ee ae
a . . sat shades rreen anc ots of at ri about the 25 lessons ro-

the back of a Portuguese police NON. Long, blond hair _ is tractive styled and, most im- ding individual instructior ' nd
car, chauffeur by a Portuguesa drawo inte a bunch of butterfly ruc 1 and

i ee ugues black bows. The ribbon is an portant, can be ground to your “ie weekly practice period of one
policeman ami escorted by a de- inch wide aiid made in thick personal prescription need nd ¢# half hours, Linen, Lingerie .
ee jae epee Attfleld. black velvet. |} TONE RAY does away with slip- igs personalized for’ you, by It's a dream come true —
the ar ae vilied @ auaieby jover efcumbrances, It’s a won- ip ne for the asking at Maidenette’s marvelous accent
uranium mine. The Edens were derful buy at the Imperial Opt aunbesa : ‘
reported to have stayed there for cal Co MYRIAD 6otouns 7 on curves, the firm young lift
Gavan hae = discussing pro- | HIGH POTENCY cop LIVER LING RAINBOW HUES in this. it @ives your figure! Discover

The Bdews tock ell tuéir rieals ,OIL + CAPSULES—how many |\Yo-W#y store. Two-way store” this popular Maidenform bra
im the thalét. The food was sent }times do we look for them? This s in and out at George Sahely’s
over from the hotel—“And a little necessary Vitamin A and Vita 1 Swan St, Still in but fast dis- today, in your favorite fabrics.
























cal. A 1952 version of the Garbo











citeu : y. cules, containing these and Vita- yp hid and Lemon at 68¢. a yard! |
They only put in the rarest ap- | min and Vitamins A, D, E and ppnent @ ST “a i i
| pearahces at the hotel, and if they K are features of ALTRA HIGH ScPeat, 68, a yard! And Prints) ¢resaremade only in the United
were there in the evening they left POTENCY COD LIVER Olt, 1°, Priced from S4c. by way of! States of America
: s - : ' bearly. CAPSULES, available + fuaaticn ntrast, George Sahely’s is a! P
# Cae Esstost diay setts gegernvdite strht It was the quietest of quiet drugaiste. * eaaieics . oo must on your shopping list. , el
a | honéymoons— -even for the Diplo- |prominent in the wide field of PICNIC TIME AND CRACKED | rae is a matdenform ae
Top: “FISHERMAN’S CAP” in stitched cardinal red street velvet, gathered at the back and tied with — somite vitamins 1 General Agency PLATES, CUPS? Could be if for every type of figure
a narrow petersham ribbon. | *FOOTNOTE.—Quick, remote, Co, Ltd., distribution ou've not looked at page 3 and |
eee ato ae trimmed with black velvet buttons, with a narrow band of (and dilettante-ish, easily bored FAITHFULI fe, sides : For |”? Barbados Co-op Cotton Fac- |. sass, es. par. oor ==
. mow at the Dace, MMII se SUR. ns and chronically unpunctual,” com- MFTY YEARS hi to pater (Oly Ad. There's a new and wide ——
Bottom Right: THE POODLE HAT in a balaleika jo«:gre x. ors - ra en lt Se | ments the merican magazine Heat ae oon ante i is lection of Plastic Ware for all |
| Time, bo ritiy. ie :. ih af es. Mae aoe 10 ‘casions as well as useful Snack |
INDESTRUCTIBLE boarhoue TREACO LUBRICANTS Hoxes and Thermos Flasks. Vaca-
MRS. GODDARD innouncing the 1902 to 1962
WHEN she was 15, Paulette rel n of au mont y in the ‘won id tana Any on ates ea AE
s ’ reg § remac i » worle ize » ri rE 5 " ste
Goddard ta a job in films be- brown shoulder. lof Lubr scant a highly compet- Sahih nea Ite movhig of tie
By GWYNNE PHILLIPS Trimmings, in this collection were collection, however, was perhaps | Sause she discovered that only her She was travelling light, but sh’ jtive market. The famous RED \o-op! :
LONDON, August 14. few. Here and there a b0Ow the goblin-green bonnet, trim- legs would show, In the long brought three diamond necklace .
In the plush restaurant of a of petersham or velvet graced 2 med with black velvet buttons, | ¥a!s since—she is 42—Miss God- to relieve the expanse of bar: HOME-STUDY COURSES FOR | ie 1
Londos oy oe Aage Thaarup, hat, a gold tassel hung from the with a narrow band of black | @@%d has more than made up for os, oe tacia ef ae. one. | rt ar Clteurs len 1 se
millinér to the Queen and to the side or (on a black felt bonnet) a velvet tied in a bow the back. | °". , ade in cious Regency bows: | silk-soft, fi Pov series
Queen Mother, this week present- tiny bit of grouse were added, But, (See illustration). ‘The ee Ky J ein a oere dea oat nar CUS, doe if, slabs; en, Centers meee fad protect ‘your baby" PEeet fe
ed hig autumn collection of hats on the whole, the only detail was hat in pbalalefka yello was Sets — the face, shoulders, and an hat she calls her See ty | CAMBRIDGE SCHOOL & HIGHER SCH. CERT. ee ann fret and happy. be
designed f th “teen: di hi titching ; hand k : w form—were back in town last one—a collar of round stones. 90 will love its delicate p
esign oo e een on the stitching and andwork, close runner-up. (See itlustra- ‘week, better displayed than ever, op just like to dress comfort- | Saute Ontord, van sancersiully prey arg 708 st ior (he above examina fume. For baby's bath alvw: usb
twenties, ; which we do so well in this tion), | Sho arrived fn @ suit. But the ably,” commented Miss Goddard.| 5 aise for London U University A.C; RSA; Bar, and ther mildly medicated Cuticura Soap
Mr. Thaarup made his custom- country,” Mr. Thaarup added. _ Old favourites wete not torgot- | jacket slipped off to reveal a low- \ enna, Durance aa a Cmvantng, Seat “st vet 190 ¢ Grodunts Tutors. 22,000
ary cheerful entrance to a back- All the hats shown were practi- ten, The pillbox made 4 weil-! cut strap Ippe top. IT DEPENDS ON THE Soecage, A9n0-3, Mowerate Ia ta: "ree roepectas Splesse meniinn

ground “of light music.
told us’ somef
colleetion.

“T design a hat to suit the in-
dividual—and her pocket book,”
he assured us, “and add my own
personal touch. In this case, it is
a romanti. touch.”

They he
ing about his new

The colours and trimmings of
the hats he had to show us re-
flected Mr. Thaarup’s concept of
romance.

Materials were soft felts,
peach-bloom velours—as an ex-
periment—street velvet. Colours
were vivid (“They are new col-
ours,” he stressed)—goblin green,
carousel - red, balaleika yellow,
shallow blue, the latter to remind
one of the blue of lake water on
a summer's day.

Styles were mostly variations of
the old-type bonnet, small, head-
hugging and comfortable to wear.



hat, a floppy felt in two shades of

grey, drew comment.

admiration greeted

Gasps of
the entrance

of a model wearing a head-hug-

ging bonnet in goblin green

felt,

trimmed with an angore band of

a paler green,

Ensuing applause

mingled with the lilt of an Irish

jig from the background.

A hat in street velvet, though,

drew the loudest applause.

We

have seen coats and suits made in

Now it is
It is smart
velvet is

this material.
hats.
street

used for
practical;

being

and
both

crease-resisting and rain-resisting.

Called the “Fisherman's

the model was in stitched

Cap,”

Hats For Teens And Twenties |

car-

dinal red street velvet, gathered

at the back and tied with a
row pétersham = ribbon.
iliustration).

The most attractive he at of the them was a close-fitting bonnet in



the fashiciitittle woman wears

nar-
(See





KAYS E ke aylon anne



You can now obtain the following

“YOUR STATIONERS”

from

STANLEY GIBBONS
BRITISH

EMPIRE

STAMP CATALOGUE
1953

LOOSE LEAF STAMP ALBUMS, HINGES,

also PERFORATION

MAGNIFIERS, TWEEZERS

ROBERTS & CO.

Dial 3301

No. 9, HIGH ST.



SS

GAUGES and WATER MARK TRAYS

come re-appearance, this timé in | Itis the kind 1 handy little out-
cardinal red velvet, worn with a { fit that Miss Goddard would not
coat to match, A cloche hat with | be without for long. “I find it most
a slightly American touch was in| Practical,” she says.





beaver velour, stitched in self|, She went to the theatre, where
colour Se nee was = As soon as
’ iss oddard spied the photo-
sing, hats ghown cre got al | wagner, she made ie snatinetive
esture, er

wapbictins fro, coum 4 black velvet cloak well rer Well off a pretty

in the new shallow blue, trimmed !
the
plain stitched grey

a shade called heather haze
announced to the tune of
nie Lassie.”

Will the “Teens and Twenties”
resist these exquisite latest crea-

haze,
with a petersham bow at “Bon-
back. Or a
felt.

Mr. Thaarup also displayed a

few hats for the “Twenty Plus.” tions, with the workmanship and
There was a small pillbox style attention to detail that justify |
in imitation océ@let, and a hat their name of “model” hats?
with the new side tilt, in black Many London girls go_hatless
peach-bloom velour, trimmed these days. But all the hats
with gold. shown were “inexpensive” (under

£5). The joy of them was that
they were all wearable — and
pleasure to wear.

One or two cocktail hats were
included in the collection. Among





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GENTLEMEN

THE party which seems even |
hardeg on its guests than most |
parties is the kind thrown accord- |
ing ta Chinese custom,

No guest who hopes to be asked
igain dare brush aside the eti-|
quette described in the book, “The
Joy of Chinese Cooking,”* pub-'
lished this week,

You must not appear hungry |
when the last calls out that din-
ner is ready, “No one seems to}
hear the first summons,” notes the
suthor, Mrs. Doreen Feng. “After
much additional urging every-|
body rises, but not a soul stirs. |
Polite gesturing is now the rule.”

You must not ask for dishes to|
be passed. “Ladies concentrate |
on the dishes directly in front of |
them,” They must depend on the |
instincts of the gentleman guests

2 pass them the tit-bits.

e bee pane 10

|
ig oe |



WOLSEY HALL, OXFORD inciano

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Smart
and
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NAL
TONIC

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CS a
PROMOTE THE







rrr cel my |}
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eT eet



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J ‘

looks smart, léstrous obviously

well cared for follow the lead of

discriminating men the world over... use

JULYSIA

Jontt
HAIR CREAM

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Trade enquiries to:

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J. & R. BUILDING, PALMETTO STREET, BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS

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HHTVREELGbEREY:

'
ti





PAGE EIGIIT



ADVOCATE

oe ee hm (scam anWe

Printed by the Advocate Ce., Lté., Bre-* 61. Bridgstews

Sunday, September i, 1952

*
WHO PAYS?
THE majority report of the Select Com-
mittee of twelve appointed by both Cham-
bers of the Legislature of Jamaica contains
a recommendation on financing the pro-

posed federal government of the West In-
dies which deserves close scrutiny.



The majority of the Select Committee
recommended that a request should be
made for a grant for the purposes of fin-
aneing the current operating expenses of
the Federation and that a substantial sum
of money by way of grant and loan for
purposes of development would be essen-
tial to the success of the Federation.

The minority of the Jamaica Select Com-
mittee recommended that no request
should be made for a grant for the pur-
poses of financing the current operating
expenses of the Federation but that. sub-
stantial sums of money by way of grant or
loan for the purposes of development will
be essential to the success of the Federa-
tion.

The writers of the Rance report were
emphatic that a grant for which the Fed-
eration was not accountable would not if
fact be spent to the best advantage and
there would be a serious. risk if not a vir-
tual certainty that when it was exhausted
the region would find itself not with
strengthened productive and economic re-
sources but with heavily increased’ recur-
ring commitments and so be further from
and not nearer to real independence.

While it is true that the, Jamaica Select
Committee does not mention a very large
grant, yet a grant for current operating ex-
penses of the Federation.would be suffi-
ciently large to be noticed when it had
been exhausted. One of the lessons which
ought to have been learnt since the system
of grants began to operate throughout the
West Indies, after the passage of the Co-
lonial Development and Welfare Acts, is
that every grant adds to, the total cost of
government. Grants so far from “priming
pumps” have often added to governments’
financial responsibilities at times when
further expenditure is demanded for ex-
pansion or maintenance.of “pre-grant”
services.

The traditional West Indian. readiness
not to look a gift-horse in the mouth and
their anxiety to ‘accept r financial

where the possession of some money jis re-
i garded as essential to-advancement.

But understanding of West Indian alac-
rity to receive financial gifts cannot justify
the introduction of “cap-in-hand” methods
at the commencement of new statehood.

If the members of the Select Committee
are anxious to hasten the inauguration of
a Federal government, then the recommen-
dations that a grant be requested for fin-
ancing the current operating expenses of
a federation is unlikely to promote confi-
dence among the more.cautious advocates
of federation, =~

The expression “current operating ex-
penses of a federation” is itself very vague:
it may eventually be interpreted. to mean
a very large sum of money, But even if it
be kept within very narrow. defined.limits

what respect-would countries outside have ,

for a federal governmént which was kept
in existence by_the British taxpayer? And
how could the controls whieh must -neces-
sarily be attached to grants-in-aid be re-
conciled with the exercise. of political
power which the Select Committee recom-
mends in greater measure than did the
writers of the Ranee report?

The authors of the majority report of
the Jamaica Select Committee appear to
want “all this and heaven too”. They want
the West Indies. to govern _ themselves
through the Prime Minister of a jFederal
Assembly but they are not prépared to
make any financial sacrifices to meet the
cost of adding yet another political super-
structure to the existing four of the Wind-
: wards, four of the Leewards, one of Bar-
bados, one of Jamaica and one of Trinidad
and Tobago. They tacitly acknowledge
that federation is going to be expensive
but since the British taxpayer is to pay
that cost, they show little ‘concern for
finance. But their proposals for increasing
the powers of the Prime Minister at the
expense of those of the Governor General
show how reluctant West Indian politi-
cians still are to think of the British tax-
4 payer as being other than a’ tender-hearted
milch cow.

The writers of the Rance report were
far more realistic when they considered
that the real independence of the British
Caribbean would be won by its own efforts
and founded upon resources thereby built
up. With regard to the second half of the
recommendations which received endorse-
ment by all members of the Select Com-
mittee. investigation might prove that
wishful thinking is still being indulged in
as to the resources of the West Indian
islands.



et lel

assi8tancé’is offered is natural to countries’ videymeany’ of the clues: for which. he is

It is easy to say that a substantial sum of
money by way of a grant or loan for-pur-

poses of development will be essential to
the success of the Federation. Stbstantial
sums of money are, being spent on devel-

opment throughout the Colonial Empire
but some of the results are frankly disap-
pointing.

Very substantial sums of money were

poured into a groundnut scheme at
Kongwa but what success was achieved?
Very substantial sums of money could de-
velop parts of British Guiana and British
Honduras but neither of those territories
are willing to join the islands in a political
federation. If rnoney is to be spent on
federal development it will have to be
spent therefore in the islands. Already
Trinidad and Jamaica are industrialising
rapidly .and Barbados can do little more
than expand its tourist industry. What
sort of development is then envisaged by
the Select Committee of Jamaica? Or was
the phrase just coined because it was so
obviously in keeping with the vague poli-
tical promises which politicians speak so
glibly the world over?

If the British taxpayer must contribute
substantial sums of money by way of grant
or loan to allow the people of the West
Indies.to govern themselves and if he is to
contribute'a grant to pay for the current
operating expenses of the West Indian
Federal government what is he to get in
return for his philanthropic gestures?

Already most of, these islands. offer spe-
cial inducements to attract British and
other capital to start new industries. Is it
being suggested that‘a federal government
supported by the British taxpayers wou!d
offer greater political guarantees than can
now be offered by individual. islands?

It is a great pity that at a time when the
financial issues of federation ought to be
squarely faced there is loose talk of devel-
opment and no reference .whatever to the
forms development would take.

Would for instance the much-needed
deep-water harbour of Barbados ‘be: built
this way? ‘

It is to be feared not.

THE BEST



IT IS no exaggeration«to state that the

Barbados Museum to-day preserves all
that is best which remains of the cultural
life of this island. Its showcases filled with
specimens of animal and plant life and the
displays of’ Indian implements. and‘ Jocal
shells. are but obvious ,advertisements. for
the much deeper vein of knowledge and
culture from which the Museum draws its
strength,
The “student of Barbadian history: will
+ find that the shelves of the Library and the
‘showeasés @nd walls of, the, Museum pro-
looking: ~~

Thé bound copies of the Journal of the
Museum, to go no further, offer a much
better introduction: to Barbadian: customs
and traditions than the ephemeral gossip
and ignorant prattle of those who dismiss
the: island’s long history and achieyements
as unworthy of their attention.

Whatever the faults of Barbadians may
be, their social history has been ‘so closely
interwoven with and influenced by those
“of the United Kingdom and of the United
States and the role that Barbados played
with so many other West Indian islands
in the eighteenth century is relatively so
important European history that only
very superficial persons would regard a
study of their background and traditions
as other than rewarding. :

Without the facilities
Barbados Museum no A study could be
attempted. Even the limitations under
which the Museum operates because it was
late in starting and because of the lack of
substantial donations and bequests permit
the | acquiring. of a reasonably well-bal-
anced knowledge of the island’s long his-
tory. Bhi
Few piles have taken the trouble

rovided by the

to equip t selves with the knowledge
which the Museum Library, newspapers,
old documents and prints provide and tran-
sient British officials might find their un-
derstanding of Barbadian problems
hastened by more frequent attendances in
the Musétim’s Library.

_ The limited facilities offered’ by the
‘Museum already outstripythe numbers of
those Who are wing lt them or to
add to them by becoming members-or con-
tributting through donations or bequests to
the funds of the society. .
Fortunately there are individuals and
organisations who have behaved other-
wise. In recent years there has been a

noticeable increase in the number of pri-,

vate persons who have contributed dona-
tions or objects of value to the museum
and during the present financial year the
Government of Barbados doubled its grant
to the Society.

The generosity of the government ought
to be emulated by hundreds of Barbadians
»who:can afford to assist the museum finan-
cially. ;

Many of the “bright young things” who
complain loudly and long ofthe absence
of cultural life in Barbados will find that
regular attendance at the Museum will
provide them with many opportunities for
nourishing their intellect. And the for-
tunate, ones who retire here to enjoy Bar-
bados’ kindly sunshine will find that all
donations and bequests to further the So-

ciety’s work will be gratefully acknowl-
edged. f

But the Museum must always depend
on Barbadians for greatest support. This
is best given by membership.

There are literally hundreds of Barba-
dians who ought to become members of

their most important cultural organisation.

Unfortunately
effort

they will not make the
They ought to do so without delay.

prcessnesstmaissetannnannense mamas

r



| vane. venen should give a
Y at least o mon'
hot only to keep up bere morale ee
increase her circle of friends but
Sasa anny to establish
y relations entia
uaepese colleagues. Se : '
any a man owes his promo’
to his wife's charming simile on
she hands round the cocktails and
the little bits of things on toast,
san we fi _* afford cham-
and smoked
are some hints on ot ey

A Within—Your—Income

cocnranin’

: : For eight t
people—Buy a bottle of British.
type wine (they are all so de-
licious, it doesn’t matter which)
@ quarter bottle of gin, and two
or three bottles of fizzy lemon-
ade, Mix together, shake well
in ice, and add bits of fruit, such
as sliced rings of the bruised
apples nobody will eat,

Serve from shaker—or the
decanter grandmother gave you
~-into very small glasses (some
dipsomaniac -mjght want an-
ee and call it “Atomic Fruit

up.”

This will get a laugh rti-
cularly from those Wo eave
taken .the first sip, and start
your party off on the right note.
‘i THINGS. ON. ‘'OAST: -Mash
Alver-Sausage and cheese spread

into mashed mixture-of mapgare
ine, mayonnaise, curry powder,
meat extract, and squashed
tomatoes.” Then mash it-all- up
into one disgusting heap. P
Add salt and pepper (though
arsenic would be'a more merci-
ful death), and serve on little
bits of toast with your most
ars sae:
rite and let me know if u=
lar “hubby” gets Dromotion’ alee

this.
; Postbag
HERE is*just one letter from
millions sent each week to Sister
ivy, the untrained nurse who
writes our Babycraft Column,
Dear Sister Ivy,

My son, aged six months, yells
all day and most of the ht,
He has an enormous appetite,
despises baby food, and eats
most a — ‘tee ae bacon ra-
tion. He is ai gorgon~
sola cheese and chien onions.

He snores louder than his
father. and alreatly weighs over
40lb. He is growing a double

off teeth, and
husband's. tobacco, His’ first
words to his Mummy were a
curse. What shall I do?
I can’t say, dear. But I don’t

































The. most interesting thing
about last Tuesday’s Federation
debate from my point of view
‘was when the policeman came up
to the man in a red tie who was
jslouching in a chair and told him
he couldn't sleep in the House,
The man just went on slouching
and the policeman went away
having done what he was told
to do By someone in authority,
Out of curiosity I looked across
just then at a member sitting not
far from the Speaker’s chair and
he was slipping sideways
sleep. I had been doing a bit of
slouching , myself because what
with the fans turned off and the
glare from the windows the
Assembly Hall was not the best
place to listen to politicians talk
on any topie,

Before the subject of federa-
tion was -Faised. however there
had been a gust. or two of air
produced from two fans on stands
on either le of the. chamber,
but when Mr. Adams Hot up to
speak someone turned off tha
fens. The only effect of this
action so far.as I noticed was to
increase the volume of noise
made by the bus engines and to
make thé roém much hotter,

I don’t know when last
have m to.the House of As-
sembly but I have been an ab-
sentee for months.and a_ great
change has taken place since my
last visit.

Insteaa” Or withing in the Centre
of the Hall.the House now sits
where the man-in-the-street used
to sit at the end of the Hall
nearest to the Olympic Theatre,

Instead of seeing my old friend
Peggy walk down the aisle into
the main visitors gallery, on
Tuesday I could see members ot
the House enter and leave the
House by this railed off passage-
way. And Peggy.if he was there
on Tuesday would have been
sitting somewhere in the only
visitors’ gallery which remained
and which filled the space where
the, distinguished visitors, | the
newspaper reporters and _ the
House used to be some months

you

From the point of view of the
man-in-the-street the change
over from one end of the Assem-
bly; Hall nearest to the Olympic
Theatre to the other end nearest
the; Speaker’s Room may have
passed unnoticed gy

in the House of Assembly today
sees exactly the same arrange-



Weightlifting |

To The Editor, The Advocate—

SLR,—In_reply..to.a letter whieh
appeared jin your papet’oh 2nd
September; 1962, - signed by
“Physical Culturist”. who strikes
me as being an armchiair critic,
I have this to say. I agree t}

The man who
keeps Barbados

laughing on.

NATHANIEL GUBBINS

chews my Aunt Meg solves all pro!

with.

The man-in-the-street who. sits»

SUNDAY ADV®@CATE






















































A Woman’s Magazine
Miniature Edited by

N. GUBBINS



think Babycraft will help. Your
Monstercraft.

boy needs
Beauty Hint
“How can I get rid of wrinkles?”
So many readers ask me this ques-
tion (writes May Fayre, our
beauty expert) that I get sick and
tired of giving: the same old
remedy.
Here it is again: —

Smother your face and neck
in hot porridge and allow to cool
as you do the housework. This
will fill out the lines by nour-
ishing your skin, particularly if
you add milk and sugar to taste.

Stately Homes
by Peek-a-Boo
PEEK-A-BOO is always pok-
ing her long nose into other
people’s houses. Here she gives
everybody a peek into the lovely
home of Nathaniel Gubbins.

No conventional decor in the
dining-room. In fact, you might
say no decor at all.

The walls are mushroom col-
our (the dirty white top of the
mushroom) and the off-white

» doors are off-white because they
need a new coat of paint.

The nondescript faded cur-
tains, made when fabrics were
scarce, and dropping off the
hooks, give a pleasing, homely
touch to a room which looks as
if: it had been lived in... by a
hundred displaced persons, I
should think.

Oh a Queen Anne. dresser
(probably phoney) stands a
charming reading-lamp which
frequently goes out because
somebody is always tripping
over the wire, cE

at

On one wall there is a fly-
blown mirror in carved wood
(painted deal) which often
drops on the heads of unwary
visitors because the nail is half-
way out of the plaster,

I managed to have one peek into

Nat’s “den”, full of old news-

papers, cigarette ends, and un-

answered letters, before I was

thrown out by the amiable col-

umnist.

Ask Aunt Meg

TROUBLE with the pee Snes
ms, an-

swers ‘all questions,

Dear Aunt Meg,

When I first met my boy

friend he had lovely manners.



SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 1952



Now he never answers ques-
tions, turns the radio on when
my father is speaking and tells
my mother to shut up.



At meals, he reaches across
the table food without say-
ing “Par me”, and never

ses the condiments, When



has eaten his fill he never

my father’s favourite
ting his stomach and yawning.
you think he is cooling off
or that something is preying on
his mind?
Puzzled
No, Puzzled, I think he is just
common.—Aunt Meg.

Leisure Hour

FOUR O'CLOCK in the after-
noon, and time for you to rest
those swollen ankles on the divan
and have a cosy cup of tea.

Breakfast things washed-up,
rooms turned out, floors scrubbed,
beds made, carpets swept, shop-

ing done, your mucky little
unch eaten, and_ everything
Cleary away.

But in these days of expensive
clothes, curtains, ‘and furnishings
there is still sqq@ething for those
busy fingers to ao.

So, up you get, and look through
shirts to see if frayed collars ana
cufs need turning. Perhaps there
are little frocks to let down,
grubby little pairs of serge knick-
ers to mend?

* * *

As you are pouring out your
second cup of tea (cold now), per~-
haps your all-seeing eye will light
upon the hole the cat scratched in
the best armchair.

, up you get again, and try to
remember all you have read in our
Self Help Column about home up-
holstery,

When you have pulled the
horsehair out and have made the
patch to cover the hole, the hungry
boys will be home for tea.

What a joy it is to see thei:
bright, eager faces round the table,
and what a joy to hear them clat-
ter out to play so that you will
just have time to peel the pota-
toes, pick the maggots out of the
cabbage and run up some new cur-
tains before the key turns in the
lock and a gruff, well-loved voice
asks: “Dinner ready yet?”

“A woman's work is

done,”

But all of it’s such frightful fun

When days are long and eve-

nings drear,
No more to do?

dear.

never

Look harder,

—L.E'S.



BACK TO FRONT

Hy George Hunte

ment of the House as he used to
see when he sat nearer to the
Olympic Theatre. At the end of
the room the Speaker faces him:
and at the part of the House
nearest (6 now he sees the
backs of the four members of the
Executive Committee and the
backs of other members of the
Labour Party. At the far end of
the room the Speaker is plainly
visible and s® are the faces of
the members of the Electors
Association and of other mem-
bers. of the House. But the visi-
tor who was accustomed to sit
in the distinguished visitors gal-
lery or the newspaper reporter
who used tu sit behiral
Speaker, slightly to his left, sees
everything in reverse. No longer
does Mr, Adams face the _ re-
rter or the visitor in the gal-
ery. He faces the Speaker and
the gallery sees only his back.
The flash of Mr. Adams’ smile,
‘the rise and fall of his eloquence
can no longer be shared by any
Sut the members of the House
and the House officials. The rest
of us in the visitors gallery must

be content with the vision af
Mr. Adems’ broad back and
shoulders. “And we must prick

our ears to catch what is left of
bis voice after it hits the thick
stone walls and rebounds in our
direction or through the glare-
filed windows. Fortunately the
official House reporters are in the
inner circle of the House and
are not similarly handicapped
for hearing, but if government
speakers are misreported today
by the gentlemen of the Press
the fault does not lie in their
ears.

The plea can always be made
that @ man’s mouth is not
placed in the back of his head.
Only if ft were, would it be pos-
sible for the ordinary ear in the
gullery—and most rs have
ordinary ears — to catch all that
is said by the chief government
speakers fn the House,

No doubt there were excellent
reasons for placing the Leader of
the House with his back to the

gallery but they will not be
appreciated by visitors to the
llery. But if these reasons

prevent visitors from seeing Mr.
Adams’ face undergo the ex-
pressions which accompany his
many rhetorical changes surely
‘no reason can exist for prevent-





Our Readers Say :

Webster is not the pioneer of
weightlifting in Barbados, but I
maintain. that he has done more
good for organized weightlifting

than any of the distinguished
personalities which “Physical
Culturist” mentions.

I say that Webster deserves 211]

the ©














ing the hearing of his voice, If
for all time visitors to the Bar-
bados House of Assembly are to
be contented with observing the,
types of hair-cuts indulged in by
members of the Labour Party
who sit with their backs to the
gallery surely a few small mi-
crophones would give them the
satisfaction at least of hearing
the voices which were coming
from the faces they were not
permitted to see.

I._do not always agree with
what Mr. Adams says but until
Tuesday I could always look
forward on my rare visits to the
House of hearing him say what
he had to say in his own elo-
guent fashion. On Tuesday the
little I could hear him. say was
quite spoilt because I couldn’
see his face,

*

The importance of seeing
man’s face when he speaks was
illustrated so well on Tuesday
by St. Philip’s Mr. Mottley. Of
all the speakers in the present
House of Assembly Mr. Mottley
makes the greatest use of intona-
tion, He can make the dullest
question come to life merely by
raising the. inflection of his
voice, by peering across the

room or ~by_smiting amiably at
everyone in. sight, Mr. “Mottley’s
question was the only other

bright spot of a very dull two
hours I sweated through jin the
House’s gallery on. Tuesday. but
1 wo have missed jt all hac
he en sitting ‘where Mr.
Adams was With His back to my
ehair,

It may be of course that the
majority of visitors to the gal-
lery do not sharé my views and
that they are quite happy to see
the backs of certain speakers, 1
eannot pretend to speak for any-
one but myself. But what is «
subject for immediate concern is
the impossible situation of the

newspaper reporters, If the Press|}

is to report accurately what is
ssid in the House of Assémbly
Press reporters ought to be al-
lowed to sit within the aren:
now occupied by the House ot
Assembly or at least behind the
speaker’s chair. From _ their
present position in the gallery
wey must either guess or leave
out,

; Freedom of the press depends
on freedom to hear as well as

freedom to publish, And at]!
present the air-waves are] |
blocked.

the credit he has got and mere

Any lifter can visit his gym to
train and he is always willing to
impart any information or offer
any suggestions to any of the
lifters.

WEIGHTLIFTER
2nd ember, 1952

Sept


















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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER

1952

ROGUES OF THE SEA:

Roche

Roche’ Brasiliano, despite his
Spanish sounding name, was born
at Groninghen in the United

Provinces. He was given the name
“Brasiliano” by his comrades
because he had lived for a long
time in Brasil, from whence he
had been forced to fly when the
Portuguese drove the Dutch from
the country.

He managed to get to Jamaica,
and having no other way to earn
lus living, joined the pirates. For
some time he served as an
ordinary seaman and was very
popular with his shipmates, Then
one day a mutiny broke out on
board the ship and the mutineers
fitted out a small boat, _ made
Brasiliano their captain, and left
the ship for good.

Brasiliano and his crew were
in luck, for a few days later they
took a great ship coming from
New Spain, which was found to
contain great quantities of plate.
He took this ship to Jamaica
where the pirates spent their
money carousing.

Esquemeling, the historian of
the Buccaneers, days of Brasiliano
“Though in his private affairs he
governed, himself very well, he
would oftentimes appe@ar brutish
and foolish when in_ drink,
running up and down the streets,
beating and wounding those he
met, no person daring to make
resistance.”

No Quarter

Like most of the buccaneers of
the. period he gave no quarter to
the Spaniards, In fact, in Hispa-
niola he commanded several to
be roasted alive on wooden spits
for not showing him hog-yards
where he could steal pigs to
provision his ship.

In his next expedition he ran
into a terrible storm off Campechy
and his ship was wrecked between
Campechy and Golpho Triste. The
pirates managed to get ashore ina
canoe, carrying some powder and
shot with them, and on landing
they started to march as quickly
as they could in the direction of
the buccaneer refuge at Golpho,
Triste,

On their way they were pursued
by a troop of Spanish horsemen
three times their number, and al-
though they were faint with
hunger and thirst such was Brasi-
liano’s influence with them that
he persuaded them to fight. The



BACK



PIRATES CAROUSING

TO ==

Brasiliano



SUNDAY



~
- ~

ROCHE BRASILIANO

fight lasted for an hour and with
practically every shot the pirates
killed a horseman until the
Spaniards were put to flight. In
the battle the pirates had lost only
two of thefr companions and so in
good spirits they mounted the
horses the Spaniards had left
behind and _ continued their
journey.

All they wanted now was a
ship and one soon fell into their
hands, They captured a little man-
of-war which they found at anchor
and after killing and salting their
horses for provisions they set off
in search of loot.
captured unotner ship going from
New Spain to Maracaibo, laden
with a _ varied cargo including

After a few days at sea they
pieces of eight. Taking this ship

‘



with them
Jamaica,

In Port Royal they abandoned
themselves to debauchery, Esque-
meling says that he had seen
pirates spending two or three
thousand pieces of eight in a night
at the brothels and taverns of the
Port, “not leaving themselves a

they sailed for

good shirt to wéar in the
morning.”

Drink Or Else
“My own master” he , says,

would buy sometimes a pipe of
wine, and placing it in the street
would force those that passed by
to drink with him, threatening
also to pistol them if they would
not. He would do the like with
barrels of beér and ale; and wet
peoples’ clothes without regarding
whether he spoiled their apparel.”
He adds a cautionary note, how-
ever, about getting into debt in
Jamaica “for the inhabitants
there easily sell one another for
debt.” In fact, that happened to |
his “liberal” master, |

But to get back to Brasiliano, |
After spending all his money he!
organised another expedition and |
set off for Campechy. When they |
got off that city Brasiliano and |
some of his companions got into |
a canoe and paddled in to spy out |
the land. Unfortunately for them
they were captured and thrown
into jail. .

The Governor intended to hang
every one of them next day, but
Brasiliano had a stratagem, He
wrote a letter to the Governor in
the names of other pirates in the
area saying that if he did not
release his prisoners they would
never give quarter to another
Spaniard

Being afraid, the Governor
released Brasiliano and his men
after exacting an oath from them
that they would give up piracy
“for ever.” To get them out of the
way he sent them as ordinary
seamen in a galleon bound for
Spain.

But the pirates did not stay
long in Spain. As Esquemeling
says, they were soon back in
Jamaica “from whence they set
forth again to sea, committing
greater robberies and _ cruelties
than before; but especially abusing
the poor Spaniards, who fell into
their hands.”





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| THE. PEOPLE
66



NO series of articles would be
complete without a short sketch of
the ‘Quakers’ or ‘The Society of
Friends;’ for it was due to their
agitation that the minds of men
in influential positions were
brought to bear on the condition
of slavery. Quakerism arrived in
Barbados in 1655, and this was

within eight years of its being
founded by George Fox. It was
brought to Barbados by two

women, Mary Fisher and Ann
Austing, who brought. back and
distributed literature on this mat
ter which created a deep impres-
sion on many of the prominent
inhabitants. Thus Barbados has
been referred to as “the nursery
of the truth in the Western hemi-
sphere,’ by the Quakers. By 1659,
there were several meeting-
houses in different parts of the
Island. One was in Tudor Street.
which was after referred to as
“Quakers’ Meeting Street.” Up to
this date no complete system. of
organisation had been established
in England, but a good many in-
fluential persons had adopted the
Quaker principles and become
professed ‘Friends.’

The diversity of human nature
is such that once there is opposi-
tion there is a striving for success,
but as soon as’this success has
been obtained and there is no
longer any opposition, all interest
dwindles until it disappears, Such
is the history of Quakerism in
Barbados once there was perse-
cution there was an increase in
their numbers and prosperity for
their group; but as soon as they
were legally recognised and there
was no longer opposition, their
numbers dwindled until not one
member was left.

The opposition to the Quakers
was not confined to Barbados
alone, and many Barbadians be-
came zealous advocates and teach-
ers of this doctrine. In 1656 many
went away to. New: England, and
amongst these were eight of their
Speakers or Leaders; these’ were
less popular in New England than
in Barbados, so were immediate-
ly sent back home, The case of
John Rous and his friends is an
excellent example. John was the
son of Lt. Col. Rous, a well-to-
do Barbadian of some, standing
and a commander of one of the
local regiments of Militia, John
married the step-daughter of
George Fox, the founder of
Quakerism, and became zealous in
the propagation of the views he
had embraced. In 1658, as a
| travelling minister, he went over
|\to New England, and in spite of
‘he existing laws against ‘Friends"
}continued to preach; While’ in
Boston he met with two other
Barbadian Quakers, William Led-
dra and Thomas Harris, whe
joined up with him in spreading
the doctrine. He and his two
friends were soon arrested and
put into prison for preaching
Quakerism and were eventually
brought before the magistrate:
This was such an important trial
that Governor Endicott presided
John Rous was found guilty and
sentenced to have his right ear
cut off. Thomas Harris received
several cruel floggings for his
faith, and the most persistent,
William Leddra made the supreme
sacrifice for his beliefs. Leddra
was confined in a Boston prison,
and received several whippings,
he was eventually banished, but
returned to minister to Friends in
prison. He was then seized and
thained to a log of wood in the
open prison yard during the win-



Whether
it’s hot

Whether



OF BARBAD

QUAKERS”







ADVOCATE



77 BY IAN GALE

XXIL.

By JOHN PRIDEAUX

was brought before the court and
condemn to death, This order
bh executed on the 14th of March

In 1671, the Quakers of Barba-
dos were highly honoured by a
visit of the founder, George Fox,
who records the following in his
journal, 4

“We got on shore as soon as we
could, and I with some. others
walked to a Friend’s house, a
merehant whose name was Richard
Forstall, about a quarter of a mile
from the bridge.”

“After I had rested about four
days, John Rous, having borrow-
ed a coach of Colonel Chamber-
Lain, came to feich me to his
father’s, \Thomas Rous, house, Be-
cause I was not well able to
travel, the Friends of the Island
concluded to have their men and
women meetings for the service
of the Church at Thomas. Rous’
where I lay, by which means I

was present at ‘each of their
meetings.” *
“They had need of. information

on many things, tot givers disor-
ders had crept in, I & rted them
to be watchful as to marriages. As
to Friends’ children marrying too
young, as at 13 or 14 years of age,
I showed them the hurts that at-
tended such childish marriages. I
recommended to their care the
providing of convenient burying
places, which in some parts were
yet wanting.”

George Fox spent three months
in Barbados, during which time he
advised the Friends to train their
Slaves up in the fear of God, and
to see that their overseers dealt
mildly with them, and not ‘use
¢ruel methods of punishment, as
was too often the custom, also that
after a certain number of years
of service, slaves should ‘be set
free, George Fox also gives an
account of a large meeting which
was attended by people: from all
parts of the Island, and states that
in this gathering were several
prominent persons such as Judgés
or Justices, colonels and captains.

By the year 1676 the Quakers!
were causing considerable uneas-
iness in this Island with the main
portion of slave owners. There
is no doubt that this was due to
the teachings of George Fox. This
resentment terminated in the first
law which was passed against
them -in 1676, the Preamble of
which reads—‘Whereas of late
many Negroes have been suffered |
to remain at the Meetings of Quak- |
ers as hearers of their Doctrine, |
and taught in their Principles,
whereby the safety of @his Island
may be much hazarded”’ This act

ontinued in force for two years,
Ween some severe’ clnuses were |
added in 1678, ang it was made |
perpetual in 1681.°%

The strong oppdlitten to the
Quakers in 1680 caused the Gov-
ernor, Sir Jonathan Atkins, . to
order that their meeting-house in
Bridgetown to be closed and the
seats to be removed, but this was |
subsequently re-opened and used
for many years. |

The Quakers made complaints
to the Lords of Trade and Planta- |
tions on the 17th of February |
1686/7, and in consequence of this |





the Lieutenant Governor, Mr. |
Stede, placed these matters be-
fore the Council, a Committee
was appointed “for examining

and fully inquiring into the said
business of the Quakers; and to
draw up a Report of the truth
of the whole Matter; to the end
their Lordships may be satisfied
therein according to the Com-

ter, and remained there until hy mands of their said order or

‘it’s cold =tygpeamer

ee





ma



A Dutch Pirate_

* SLAVERY”



Letter in that behalf.”

The outcome of this protest
and investigation was the order
of the King in Council of 1687,
in which the Lieytenant Governor
ordered to ‘take care and give

order that they or their Servants |

be not in any way molested for

..4heir Worshippings of God!” He

was also advised by the same
order that the Quakers were to te
freely admitted to all ‘Offices cr
Employments which our other
subjects are capable of’ without
it being compulsory for them to
take any Oath or Oaths, provide i
that they promised ‘Solemnly io
execute the same justly and
according to the Trust reposed
in them! This order also made
provision for the Quakers objec-
tion to military service, for it
provided that “in case any of
them do Scruple or make diffi-
culty to perform any Service, cr
take any employment upon them,
whether Civil or Military,” they
were not to be subjected to an
‘ine or fines which would exceed
the usual value for the hiring of
other persons to perform the dis-
charge of the duty or service
which was required of them. (1)

The above order of 1687 anc
the ‘Act of Affirmation’ of 1723,
although at first gight may seem
to be concessions in their favour,
are perhaps very far from pos-
sessing any advantages. Lucas
records in his Manuscript tha
“as for the Act of 1723, it seern
rather. a boon to the inhabitants
generally than individually to
the Quakers, for the perfeg¢t
obstinacy of this people respec-
ting Oaths must have been very
inconvenient and destructive ww
good order; and that the Lord:
of Trade viewed their behaviou
in this light is evident from thei
having the Act confirmed, to pr
an end to the question.” (2)

@ on page 16



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—‘y-Ibpkt. 39 32
CARR'S CREAM CRACKERS
—per tin 1.64 1.20

CANADIAN SARDINES—per tin .20; per doz. 2.04
The Above Items are fpr Cash & Carry Customers Only

HUNT’S CALIFORNIAN PEACH HALVES—Large tin $ .83
HUNT'S CALIFORNIAN BARTLETT PEARS—large tin 1.03
HUNT’S FRUIT COCKTAIL—large tin..... a 97
HUNT’S FRUIT FOR SALADS—large tin Maisons ; 1.20
HUNT’S GOLDEN WHOLE KERNEL CORN—per tin 41
HUNT’S YOUNG ASPARAGUS TIPS—per tin + 65
SOUTH AFRICAN STRAWBERRY JAM 5
—per 2-I6 tin $1.08; per Ib 56
KOO GUAVA JELLY —per 2-1 tit.....cccccccccccsscneeeeennenene 46
BENEDICT SPECIAL STANDARD MARMALADE
—per 1-Ib tin 33
ITALIAN CHILI SAUCE—per botle......0....cccccrenoes -73
SUN PAT CASHEW NUTS—per tin......... ses 1.11
LIPTON’S FRENCH COFFEE—per tin... 10
PERLSTEIN BEER—per bottle ; 7 =

PERLSTEIN BEER—per carton............
@ COCKADE FINE RUM

||| STANSFELD SCOTT & Co., Lid.











|
if



PAGE TEN

eee
An Outspoken Series Starts To-day

The Queen And The People —

By J

— ——

IT IS NOT easy to be

partly a democracy and partly a plutocracy.

decisively one thing er the

conventions would have a settled form.

‘NNIE LEE, M.P. |

—_—

|

a Queen in a country that is
If we were
other, manners, customs and
But transition

eras such as ours always present special problems.
Already the young Queen is under fire. Ought she to
mix more with ordinary middle-class and working-class

families?
small clique of very rich pec
and ceremony surrounding |

ln eommon fairness let one
thing be clear The Queen hersel!,
as a constitutional monarch, will
accept whiatéver advice is given
her. Even if she were a great deal
older, tougher, and more expe-
rienced than she is, that woulc
still be true.

Her pérsonal welfare is involved
not in the nature of the public
appearances arranged for her by
her advisers: but in how much of
her time and strength belongs to
the public and how much she ma)
keep for private living.

In coming to a sensible com-
promise in these matters the
Queen’s greatest enemy is the
Press. The Royal Family is news.
People like seeing photographs
of thern ang reading stories about
them,

Shock Absorber

But there should be limits sc:
by good taste and ordinary cour-
tesy They ought met to be
dwagged in to fill the headliné
every time there is a shortage ol
“hot” news. They ought to be
spared the pert innuendo and the
ghastly syedphahcy that they are
torced to put up with from
quarters,

In thevtong run it may very
well be-that the best protection
for the Royal Family wih come
“ from the beft in polities.

We are-not Royalists in the
sense of believing in any non-
sense about the Divine Right of
Kings. But we have accepted an
implied coptyact and will dis»
courage it honourably.

That contract begins with the
conviction that there would be

Sorte my



Does she spend too much of her time with a

ple ?

Is there too much pomp
he Royal Family ?

nothing to be gained by seek-
ing to put an elected President
in the place of the Queen. Ih
wiese years when we have moved
oWay from a full-blooded capi-
iakism but have still a long way
.2 go before we become a Social-
.t Democracy, the institution ©:
Monarchy is q valuable shock
i bsorber.

So long as the Speech from
the Throne read at the begin-
aing of a new Parliament faitn-
fully records the policy and in-
tentions of whatever party ha»
been elected to form the Guv-
ernment, we are well served by
its occupant.

But the bargain has two sides
to it. The Royal Family is in re-

She must not be made a
prisoner of the past

turn entitled to reasonable pr¢
tection. They ought to know ju
now miuen of their time they ar:
expected to give to public autie:
They ought w be allowed to liv
their private lives free from
by Toms,

Also let's be reaiistic aboul
the gocial life of the Quee::
and her intimate circle of tam
ily and friends. Her Majesty |
an immensely rich young woman
brought bd with all the tastes
and habits of her class, Even if
she were not Queem she would
probably want to go to Ascot, at-
tend Society

, and generaly
take part

in that expensive

parade known as “the Season.

~

PRINCESS ELIZABETH holds tlie dog in one hand while Princess

Margaret clings to the other. Theit mother, Queen
the stairs behind the two princesses.



Elizabeth is on

Heartaches Really Happen

[If Your’e

@ From Page 6
tne weight of a heavy suitcase—
the form of excess fat.
Even if your heart races ai»
really alarming rate anxiety
tore likely to be the cause tha
heart weakness

Anxiety ig atso the commoh
cause of genuine heart pain
“Just as some people have 4
neadache or indigestion when wor
ried, others get this left-cid
ain,” heart specialist Maurie>
Campbell. has told his student

Coetorg at Giv's Hospital.

These neurotic symptoms 11
be so realistic that even the doct.
may be mislead. It is now certai:
that 80 per eent. of the diagnos >

f ore*nie heart disease made by

2ritis my doctors in Wor}.
Var i > wrong.
Advances

IN the past scores of young men
ind women have been wrongiv
told that they had enlarged hear‘s
and must not play games or zg
dancing.

Doctors are not likely to make
these mistakes to-day. ere have
been great advances in th®
diagnosis of heart complaints i
the last few years.

The well-informed G.P. no
knows what appears to be a
enlarged heart may be a perfectly
normal heart which has bren
slightly and harmlessly displaced
by a posture defect.

He knows too that some sym
toms which were once considered
to be sure signs of heart weakness
re unreliable unless backed by
additional evidence



Worrried

Only Five

DR. t. McDONALD STEWAR'I
recently examined 525 health
young men and women in a chee!
‘est at Bristol University.

He found ‘that 179 of them had
“inurmurs” — suspieious abnorm
heart soufids—and in only fiv

ises was there really any heart
weakness. And yet the neuros
cexus@d by fear of heart trouble
czn be almost as crippling as the
cisease itself



“Canada Bars
Doors To W.I.”’

; WINNIPEG.

Canada’s immigration Laws con-
tain features that smack of racial
discrimination, according to’ Mr
Kalman Kaplansky, director of
the Jewish Labour Committee anc!

delegate to the Trades and Le
bour Congress convention in Win-
nipeg

He referred specifically to the
1 olicy on the immigration of col-

ured men from the West Indies
nd declared: “We have nothing to
te proud of in this respect.”

Mr. Kaplansky urged the Cana-
cian to invite Labour and manage-
ment to have a voice in the for-
mation of an effective immigra-
tion policy, He declared that
immigration planning should he
the responsibility of the Depart-
ment of Labour

—B.U.P



Keep in step

Nor is that kind of life unique
to Britain. There is as much, anc
more of it, going on in Washing-
ton and Paris, where there ar¢
Presidents, as in London, where
there is a Royal Family. c

It is important that we do not
mistake symptoms for causes.
chase after symbols instead oi
dealing with realities. So long as
there are some families with too
much to spend and some with toc
little, there will be debutantes’
queues at Buckingham Palace ana
dole queues in Lancashire.

I have no respect for critic:
who concentrate on symbols but
leave the underlying reality un-
changed, All that we are enti-
tled to ask from the. Palace is
that it keeps in step with the
‘ocial change, not that it initiates
t.

It is the Labour Movement's
vesponsibility to organise another
sreat forward drive towards oa
“fair shares’ economy. It. is the
Palace’s responsibility to adjust
tself to the new conditions that
omerge.

Having ride
Ascot on a
ylace in the butcher’s queue for
her weekly ration of
is a phoney approach
whole subject.

Tory view

The Tory Party, also, has its
views on Royalty. It firmly
believes that the Queen, like the
Union Jack, is its private prop-
rty. And it acts accordingly.

The same reactionary elements
n Court circles that exposed the
late King toe the dangers of
,ecepting Dr, Malan’s hospitality
we still in control,

They are busily engaged in
idvising the young Queen at the
yutset of her reign, to prepare
io behave as if we were still in
‘the reign of Queen Victoria
Lots of pomp and splendour in
he foreground, so that people
orget about the poverty and
squalor in the background—that
is how the Tory mind works.

Socialists are not spoil sports.
Every kind of society enjoys and
needs its ceremonial occasions
and the more pageantry,
and fun the better. But
limes need new conventions,

Don't pretend

{f the democratic as well as
the plutocratic elements in our
society are to be represented on
ceremonial occasions, there ought

the Queen

colour
new

not to be a cash barrier around
the Queen,
The approach to the Palace

ought not to lie through second-
hand or hired clothes, Everyone

knows that morning suits and
toppers, dinner suits, tails anc
white waistcoats and all the

trimmings that go with them cost





te
bicycle or take her

red mea’
to the

SUNDAY



ADVOCATE



aa

and
can

more than working people
most middle-class families
afford.

So why pretend? Why reducc
poor people to figures of fun”
Why the vulgarity of false fronts’
rhere is really nothing so shock-

ing im the appearance of 4
working-man dressed in. his
Sunday best,

The future

Certain snobberies have had
their day. They ought now to be
quietly buried,

A beginning is being made, as
an be seen at Royal Garden
parties, But the Tories hate this
kind of innovation, They love
regimentation. They are happy
only in a world where their tradi-
tional values and uniforms
dominate the scene.

They will do everything they

im to keep the Queen a prisoner
f the past. It is for the rest of
us to see they do not succeed,

There are many ways in which
fhe ceremonial side of Court life

uld become better attuned to
present-day conditions, In an
age of transition it is not un-
veasonable to ask that conces-
‘ions be made to the future as
well ag to the past.

(World Copyright) Next Sunday

The Queen and Her Consort

By ROGER TULFORD



Edens Honeymoon

e @ Prom Page 7

You must not hope to hear a
good word about the food from
the hostess. “Please excuse me:
there is really nothing to eat,” the
Chinese hostess must say, with
bhstering self-effacement.

This is far more polite, notes
Mrs. Feng, than brash Western
methods.

“The Occidental host frankly
brags about his dishes, and diners
are reduced to a state of semi-
collapse before they are allowed
to taste these master-pieces.”

NO PLACE LIKE LONDON

NO: there is no place lilee Lon-
don, Last week the price of seats
for the Coronation took another
stride into the stratosphere.

“Parties of from six to 20 per-
sons,” said an advertisement, “will
be catered for at the rate of from
20 to 40 guineas per head.”

There’s no place like London
for giving you that feeling that

“hat was smart enough to wear
last year is smart enough for this

Back come the autumn fashions
into the shop windows, and back
came the plum swaggers, the beige
and brown macintoshes, And the
same old hat to wear with them—
the felt beanie with two feathers
pushed in one side.

There's no place quite like Lon-

ion tor etching out a stranger,

An elderly lady up from some

remote countryside, sat in a No. 9!

bus talking to the conductor.

‘What are spivs?” she asked in a.
“IT hear |

quavery, studious voice.
they are not much admired.”
Fabers, 20s,



First Poultry, Pigeon, ;

@ From page 1

Che fish on show were from all
over the world, Some were im-
ported from Burma, China, India,
Brazil, Siam, Germany and Japan.

In the Poultry and_ Pigeon
Section Mr. Harold Ward of
Grazettes Land, St. Michael,
tenched New MHampshires of
class ih supremely good condi-
tion for this time of the year

Mr. G. A. King and Mr. O. R.
Hill benched beautiful birds in
the Light Breeds and Mr. R. J.
Parkinson was outstanding with
a Game Cockerel. Mr. A. Ramsay
won a special prize with a Game
Hen which
top exhibits.

In the Pigeon Section Mr. W. D.

Warden dominated the Fancy
Class, He won specjal prizes for
the Best Fancy geon, Best

Modena Cock, Best Modena Hen
and received a prize for the Best
Single Exhibit on Show.

Miss Patricia Warden won a
special prize for the Best Fancy
Pigeon.

The Speciat Awards were as
follows
Best light breed on show—G. H ng

Ki
Best Cockerel of light breeds on show
ee .

Rest I

e¢

was also among the ,

‘Fish Show Big Success

Best Leghorn on show—G
rl
itt
Third best Leghorn on show
Marshall

Best heavy outstanding breed on show
Harold Ward

Best Wyandotte on show--H. N. Blades
Best Rhode Island Red on show--A. EF
Viarshall

Best Jetey Giant on show
Best New Hampshire: on
Vard

H

Kin
best Leghorn on show

0

N. E

E

show

Clark
Harold

Second best New Hampshire on show
Harold Ward

Best Barred Rock on show—E. Denny

Best Cockerel of heavy breeds on show }

Harold Ward

Best Pullet of heavy breeds on show
Harold Ward

best
nson,



Second best Game Bird on show—H. B
Viblock

Best Cornish Game on show—R. I
Parkinson, Jr.

Best Bantam on show—A. Ramsay
Best Utility Tigeon on show—P Dd
Maynard

Best Fancy Pigeon, Associate membe

lasses. Miss Patricie Warden
Best Pigeon other than Fancy
members’ classes. Master Tom

Best Fancy Pigeor









Warden

Best Modena Cock on show N
Warden

3est Modena He n

jen

Best single exhibit 1
W

Best Homer or how—I. G. Pr

Be Homer Cock on show—i}. ¢

Game Bird on show—R. F. Park- |
Jr



BB.C. RADIO NOTES



s ( ommonwealth
Emigration

BBC Feature, Next
Wednesday

Many West Indians leave the
Caribbean yearly to settle abroad
#Mc at the present time there is

steady stream of such person
@ttling in Britain. While this i
going on there is a stream jn
the other direction—from Britam
to various parts of the Common-
wealth—about 90,000 people are

leaving Britain annualiy while
about 20,000 others come Ww
britain to settle. This post-war
trend is examined in a BBC
‘eature programme to be brouwd-
cast in the coming week. The
whole subject of migration

€xamined in the programme
which puts forward the views
of a number of intending
migrants (which may be summed
up as ‘better opportunities’)
along with on-the-spot reports
from settlers in Australia, New

Zealand, Canada, South Africa
and Southern Rhodesia, who des-

cribe their reactions to the new
life, Debates in the Lords and
Common etting out Britain’
efficial views on migration are

quoted in the broadcast
to be ‘heard
Britain’s

which urges

and also
are the comments of
Migration Council

more concerted
planning and the _ movement of
ven greater numbers while the
policies of the individual! Com-
monwealth countries and the
economic and strategic consid-
erations involved are also set
out. Lasting for a fal! hour the
broadcast begins at 9.00 p.m
on Wednesday, 10th September

BBC Wavelengths

Shortwave listeners may have
noticed a recent change in the
times of the various frequencies
which carry BBC programmes to
this area. In case any are not
sure of just what these are at the
present time they are listed
below.

19.76
- 4.00

25.53
~ 6.15

metres, 15.18 megacycles
to 6.15 p.m.
metres, 11.75 megacycle:
to 10.15 p.m.
31.32 metres, 9.58
— 6.15 to 11,00 p.m,
The special daily half-hours
for the Ceribbean between 7.15
and 7.45 p.m. are carried on the

megacycles

two latter beams,
Caribbean Voices

Next Sunday, 7th Sept. the
half-hour programme of West
Indian prose and verse which is
broadcast every Sunday undei
the title of ‘Caribbean Voices’
will include poems which were
originally broadcast in the BBC's
West African Service by K.

Epelle, a young man on the staif
of the Publie Relations Office in
Eastern Nigeria. They include
‘Song of the Machete’ and ‘The
Death Song of the Rivers.’ In ad-
dition to these poems there will
be a rather beautifully written
short story by a frequent con-
tributor to ‘Caribbean Voices’ ~-
Kenneth Newton of Trinidad.
This weekly broadcast begins at
7.15 p.m, on Sunday and consists,
except in rare instances like this
which

provide an_ interesting
contrast, of work submitted by
local writers. Such contributions

are always welcome and should
be sent to The BBC’s West In-
dian Office, P.O. Box 408, King-
ston, Jamaica, B.W.1.



Comet Service For

Bahamas _ Soon

; LONDON.

A Comet jet airliner service be-
tween New York and the Bahamas
will be started as soon as run-
ways at Windsor airfield are
engthened, said Maj, Gen. Siy
Robert Neville, Governor of the
Bahamas, before he left Londor

vv Nassau,

,, During his visit to Britain, the
Governor had talks with the A:r
Ministry and B.O.A.C, regarding
this service, which would be a

emendous dollar-earning assct

o the Colony, he said.

“The present airport at Oalts
rield is unsuitable for the Comet
vervice,” he déclared, “We are
going ahead with lengthening the
‘unways at Windsor airport to
take the Comet Mark II.”

At least 80,000 visitors to the
Bahamas are expected this year.
Both Oaks Field and Windsor air-
port are to be bought from the
Air Ministry,

—B.U.P.

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SCOUT NOTES:

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7.

Scouters Hold Re-union
Of Gilwellians Today

TO-DAY at 9 a.m. there will be a Re-union of Gilwel-

lians (Scouters who hold the

HQ. The Gilwell Re-union in E

Gilwell Wood Badge) at Scout
ngland is also being

held over this week-end at Gilwell Park, Chingford, Lon-

don.

There is usually a very good attendance of Scouters

from all over the British Isles and many from other parts of

the Commonwealth.
In the August issue of

The Scouter Magazine, John

Thurman, the Camp Chief, wrote the following letter :
“Looking back through my Gilwell Letters it seems to
me that it is quite time I said something about Cubbing.

So far this year at Gilwell we
have had two Cub Wood Badge
Courses, both of them by any
standard very good indeed, but
there is one thing which is worry-
ing me and is undoubtedly troub-

_ ling a lot of Cubmasters, This is,
_ that although they try very hard

to co-operate with their Groups as
a whole the Scouts, Senior Scouts,
and Rovers, seem to regard them-
selves as senior branches of the
Movement, Now the only possible
way in which we can hope for the
Group to work successfully is to
regard it as being built up of four
equal partners. There is no senior
service in Scouting and, if anything
surely the most important sec-
tions, in view of the fact that
they need more care and attention,
are the Cubs and the Boy Scouts.

The kind of tning which is hap-
pening and of which I think all of
us must take notice, is the failure
of the Group Council to function
properly. This is especially true
where there is no separate Group
Scoutmaster, i.e. someone who is
not personally running one of the
sections. It really is @ mistaken
idea to think that a Group Scout-
ynaster is essential to the Group
Council and that without one the
Council need not meet, In an ideal
world all Groups would have a
Group Scoutmaster but, in the na-
ture of things, this is not so, The
Group Council is a meeting to-
gether of all warrant holders in
the.Group and no one else; it is
a very vital part of the machinery
of outing, Sometimes even
when a Group Council méets, by
all‘ accounts, it seems to be doing
the wrong job. I have had cases
quoted where the Group Council
has bean concerned with arrange-
ments for whist drives, jumble
sales and dances. These are no
doubt very desirable but they are
the concern of the Group Commit-
tee and nothing whatever to do
with the Group Council,

Perhaps a word about the Group
Council’s real job will not come
amiss. Its task is to consider the
training given to the boys in the
Group and the general standards
of the programmes of all sections,
ind the needs of individual boys.
It is through the Group Council
that we can see how best mutually
to help each other. We can
arrange, for example, that the
Senior Scouts or the Rover Scouts
can devise a set of practices to
help with Sense Training in the
Cub Pack, The Patrol Leaders of
the Seout Troop can survey an
area of forest land and make
reports on it in order to decide
whether or not it is suitable for a
Cub Outing. I really believe that
the Beoyer working of the Group
System is as important to the Cub
Pack as the proper working of
the Patrol System is to the Scout
Troop,

As a Movement we seem to
have an extraordinary capacity
for neglecting to do the things
which serve Scouting best. We all
agree about these things, we all
know they are essential, sound,
and right, and yet so often when
it comes to the point something
else intervenes and we do not put
into practice what we believe.

It happens that last Sunday, at
the Scout’s Own at Gilwell, the
lesson was taken from the First
Book of James, and I think the
quotation is appropriate: “Be ye
doers of the word, and not hearers
only, deceiving your own selves.
For if any be a hearer of the word
and not a doer, he is like a man
— his natural face in a
glass.”

_Lastly, on this topic, I would
like to make two special pleas.
The first is that all of us who are
not directly concerned with Cub-
bing should give it its true value
and due place in the sun, remem-
bering that Cubs are a very high
proportion of the movement and a
very worthwhile part of it, Sec,-
ondly, that we make quite sure
our Group Council meets re; ~
ly and that when it meets, Spa
we get immersed in agendas and
the Minutes of the last meeting,
we quietly sit down and remind
ourselves that our job is “solely
concerned with the standard of
the training given to the boys in
the various sections, This might
also help us to stick to the point!



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As a footnote to this letter, I
think you will like to know that
I have just sent to the Director
of thé International Bureau the
first post-war Wood Badge for a
Japanese Scouter. Very properly
t goes to Mishima, the Chief
Seout of Japan, who attended a
course at Gilwell last year.

Camping At The Good
Shepherd
An inter-troop party of 20

Scouters and Scouts camped at
the Good Shepherd Boys’ School,
St. James from August 29th to
September 2nd.

hey were from the Northern

Area, of Commissioner L, T. Gay’s
district, and represented the fol-
o o ame
e _ Inmnocent’s, under Scouter
“Welchés Mixéd, accompanied
by Scouter Smith,

Boys’ under the
1 of Scouter Downes,
and St. Thomas’ Group in charge

of Scouter H. D. Rowe who was
Camp Chief.

The Troops were kept busily
engaged in Seouting activities,
and some Scouts practised at 2nd
Class Tests.

Welcome visits were paid by
Scouter G. Mose, who also con-
ducted at Evensong a church
service on Sunday at the Good
Shepherd Chapel. The Scouts
were in attendance. Scouter A.
Rouse also paid a visit.

On Monday night a Camp-fire’

was held, to which a fair attend-
ance of persons were present.
and were amused with the ren-
dition of songs, recitations, etc.

Camp broke on Tuesday after-

noon, T its close Commis-
iioner L. T. Gay, visited and

inspected the troops, He spoke of
Discipline and inspired Scouts to
win the 2nd Class Badge, and
hoped that the King’s Scout
Badge would be striven for in
the not too distant future.

Combermere Troop Camp

At Barrows, St. Lucy

Part of the Combermere Troop
under Scoutmaster G. R. Brath-
waite held a camp at Barrows.
There were four scouts who had
never been in camp before and
to them it was a novelty and
experience. The Scouts left the
School on Monday morning and
drove to St. Lucy, where they
found their task ready, namely,
to piteh tents and organize for
a happy camp.

T was a very good spirit
of scouting throughout the time
spent in Camp and the young-
sters did a little training for their
Second Class Badge, Some of the
work proved difficult, but the
boys tried their best.

On Tuesday 26th, Rev. Furley
& Mrs, Furley, Mr. K. C, Pile and
Mr. F. H. O’Neal paid them a
visit and Rev. Furley talkeii to
the boys and gave two very
interesting yarns which showed
how quietly and well Scouts did
their work even in accidents and
times of danger.

Wednesday Mr. L. A, Harrison
visited them and he also gave
the youngsters sound advice
regarding the principles of the
movement.

On Thursday morning Mr. G, E.
Corbin, Assistant Commissioner
visited them and spoke on the
principles and usefulness of
Scouting. Dr. A. C, Kirton, Presi-
dent of L. A, (North Area) also
visited them in the afternoon and
told the Scouts what an important
part the movement can take in
a youngster’s life. He was very
pleased with the conduct and
general demeanour of the boys
while at Camp, and hoped that
they would come again and have
a more enjoyable time.

On Thursday evening, the
Scouts
Animat

le a tour to River Bay,
owe Cavé and Harri-

son’s Point (N.P. Lighthouse),
Three Scouts m the 80th
Barbados visited t at the
night and joined in their Sing

Song.
On Friday they had to strike
camp after a ee delightful and

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1952

WI Need lustruction
On Federatien

@ from page !
by all the other colonies.

Hon. Ajodasingh opined that
the main difficulty im reaching
an agreement on the constitutional
aspect of the matter was the
question of the Veto of which
Barbados “is not in favour”, but
he added, if one colony ‘has
something to lose in_ entering
into a federation, it must be
remembered that other., colonies
also have something to lose; and
this should not therefore ..be
allowed to stand in the way of
federation. What one colony had
to lose was not the all-important
matter. The important was
to bring about a federation or
the British West Indian terri-
tories for the benefit, of the
masses,

Speaking of his stay im the
colony, Mr, Ajodasingh said he
took the opportunity to visit the
Colonial Postmaster, Mr. ‘Robert
Clarke who showed him around
the Department. He also hopes
to visit. other Government De-
partments.

He said he is enjoying his
stay very much, and thinks Bar-
bados has excellent tourist
facilities which Government

should do everything possible to
develop.

Sharon Celebrates
First Anniversary

The officers and miembers of the
Sharon’s Young Men's Association .
celebrated their first anniversary *
in the Sharon School room on
Monday night September 1, The
function was also attended by the
officers and members of the Sha-
ron’s Young Women’s Association,

The Rev. D. C. Moore, Treas-
urer, read prayers, and Mr. O. A
Pilgrim presided as chairman, Mr.
L. Henry, Secretary, gave a re-
sume of the work done during the
past year, including the purchase
of a new table tennis board whicn
the Rev, D. C. Moore, and Mr, O.
A. Pilgrim later opened for play.

Mr. Weekes, A¢sistant Social
Welfare Officer, expressed the .
hope that members would sup-
port the church, which he be-
lieved would improve the social
and religious standard of the com-
munity. Miss G. SKeete supported
Mr. Weekes’ remarks. She spoke
on behalf of the Sharon Young
Women’s Association.

Mr. L. Alleyne moved the vote
of thanks,

At the meeting, Mr. O, Bailey
was elected president for the en-
suing year. Other officers elected
were, Mr. L. Alleyne, Vice presi-
dent, Mr. L. Henry, Secretary.
Mr, W. Lawrence Asst. Sect.,
Rev. D. C, Moore Treasurer, Mr.
H. Haynes, V. Cumberbatch, and
K. Birkett, Committee of Manage-
ment.

Captain Of ‘Marion
Belle Wolfe’ Retires

AFTER 34 years of sea life
Captain J. Every, 50, skipper of
the Schooner “Marion, ‘Belle
Wolfe” retired at the end of June.”
His son, L. H. Every, who suc-

comed







ceeded him as captain of the
vessel, completed his first trip
when he returned to Barbados
from British Guiana last week.

Captain Every, Snr., first went
to sea in 1918, and sailed as mate
on several vessels around Canada.

In 1926 he became master of
the “Delina Hazel,” and served
in a similar capacity on the
“Lasea,” and the “Plymouth
Belle” which was sunk by the
Germans in 1942.

This veteran seaman went on to
British Guiana where he worked
on the Government Dredge until
December, 1944. He returned to
Barbados, as master of the “Mar-
ion Belle Wolfe” in January,
1945, on which he remained until
he retired this year.

The vessel which is now in port
is taking a cargo of 150 tons of
Lime, a quantity of soap and lard, . .
and is due to sail for British ¢
Guiana on Tuesday the Sth. :



instructive period at Camp,

The Troop begs to extend sin-
cere thanks to Dr. A. C. Kirton
for the loan of the groun and
also extends thanks to all who in ¢
any way helped the Camp to be -~
a success, 4

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In August’ the Duke of Alba will take risks—certainly — but] with a thirst, and I didn’t stop to saged my scalp with Créme f eye HEATA WES b Tesi It’s the
aske@ De Wohl to dinner at the °Nly When he knows that he can|hold it up to the light or roll it Orientale. | ‘ Gian LASSITUDE NERVE » Q in o ALSO reliever
. Spanish Embassy. Fellow guests @ford them. Therefore, — given 1. ar is al eee WE CERES ig rp: econ
included the Forei Secreta armies of about equal size and 7 , \4 ‘ Fatigue of the nervous system, caused . : Sa it's gta of
Lord Halifax, his wite, the late @dUal quality, with not too many 1 HE BL UE-E YED BO ) \ 8) Sa by overwork, difficulties or. worry = oun Me eg a pias
aay ition oe De wan ena’ nashion “7 or Bn me gree — Le is a sign you need PHOSFERINE = Se PALI ‘ I That's the
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' ade i ot was e war 0 aptain oe suggesti that certain forms o & ‘ ”
rangement had been made: a kind de Wokl. He had no rivals here Rheumatism Nid Os oe, fa 8



‘SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7.



|
To-day the strange story is told of Britain's |

1952

STATE SEER

* A prophet in

SOO See Ree Se rREE Cee eEee ee eeteeseseec ERC eReEscCesesEEeEEEEnn:

relates how he



Hitler by ‘star warfare’



esdensonsenecececcoccecesncsnsenanessecenssoess shone like margarine in the morn- ping some up and taking it away BRINGS
ing sun. I knew at once that he He dug down into a little cup-
by was English from his attitude board and brought out a bottle— an $ ve and out u QUICK
towards whisky. rather a gay bottle, something . ©
GEORGE HUTCHINSON “You can’t think what it means,” like a Corinthian pillar, with gold RELIEF
he told me, by way of opening stuff all round the cork: and a | our es 0 n ours
Of wom gambit, “‘to be able to get whole gaudy label bearing the name FROM
Louis de Wohl’s was perhaps Allied and enemy; he divined the| Dottles af Scotch by simply going ‘Créme Orientale’.” American Doctor's Discovery $eoaay that the Vi-Tebs

but he has studied astrology for
20 yeers.

Mayfair
fought





Mussolini’s ships sailed and were
sighted by our aircraft,"Next day



TANTALUS IN

ABYSSINIA

By

He had come ashore from a
cruise liner, and I was in Bridge-
town for a haircut; and we met
on the balcony at Goddard's,
where the quest for cool drinks
led us to the same table. He was
fortyish and fat, and his bald head

Clearly he must have been a
Greek,

HUGH SPROULE

;
|
|
round my tongue. I drank it; and |
it had a kick.”

He sketched an illustrative ges- |
ture with the glass the waiter had |
just put down before him.

“We had about three mugs each,
and then I asked him about wrap-

that it cracked, and yelled like a

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ergy, and vitality, and be entirely satisfac
tory or you simply return the empty pack-
age and it costs nothing under the guar.

; madman to the mess-boy for maji ohlee "Pea are tt hf

By the summer of 1940 De the battle was fought, with Cun- “This chap came _Up to the ya baridi.” oUeeeten = satisfaction. A "ape ee ee Selreoeth
Wohl had convinced himself ningham’s famous night attack. laager and asked me if we want- “For what?" Hi provement and within beltle of 48 Vi-Tebe costs Hittle, and lasts
that “astrological warfare against Thus, claims De Wohl, was|®4 anything. You wouldn't actu- “Cold water. That stuff was | eH one week tt will literals | sou) you should get your treatment imme.
Hitler was a necessity.” How Matapan fore-calculated, 127| lly say we gat on like a house without exception the Filthiest | SHI Gietely 20 Chat you toe welll Know what it ie
coutd he convince the British? days in advance. on fire; he couldn't speak any Drink I Have Ever Touched. We | Vi-Tabs Vi years, sounee?

He spoke to the sympathetic He claims, too, that he predicted English except ‘OK’—if that is tried it neat, and we tried it with | Doctors Praise Tabs and full of vigour
Rumanian Minister, V. V. Tilea Montgomery’s” victory at Ala-|=™slish — and my Greek stopped water, and the Quarter Master | Deltere te Amora and and vitality:
(now a farmer in Oxfordshire) mein. “A "high-ranking officer” short at TUPTO TUPTAMAI or what- had some hot, with milk and} im many countries! Restores Manhood and Vitality
“Never mind what the British asked him to consider ‘two|®Ver it was.” sugar; but there just wasn’t any
believe,” argued De Wohl. “What birth-data, both without the| yj k sn mi way you could swallow it, I tell
matters is that Hitler believes in birth-hour and the birth place.” took a hasty sip of my drink. you, ‘I've knocked about abit,
astrology; and if I make the same The officer was brief: ‘Which of It was no good looking at me like and I’ve tasted some pretty odd

calewations as Hitler’s astrologer
T shall know what Hitler is ad-
vised by a man in whom he be-
lieves, And that should be of
advaiitage to the British.”

Earl Duke

Tilea called it “an appeal to
common sense,’ and promised:
“I shall get you the connections
you need.”

“He was as good as his word”
writes De Wohl. “A few days
jater I had to explain my theory
before a small council of very
influential men, including the
jate Lord Herne and Earl Win-
terton, M.P. ‘This meeting broke
the ice and I suddenly found my-
self pussed on trom one celebrity
to the otner.”

of chair of honow: had been
arranged for Lord Halifax. A
row of other chairs formed a
semi-circle round it—except for
oné chair, just in front of that of
Lord Halifax. The Duke of Alba
indicated that I should sit down

these two is likely to beat the
other?” The details, it transpired,
were those of Rommel and Mont-~
gomery.
‘The Old Maid’

De Wohl was confident: Mont-
gomery (born November 17, 1887)
was favoured, Montgomery, he/



told the officer, “has Mars in
Virgo. The virgin—the accurate, |
methodical spinster, the old maid
who is so tidy that it hurts, She
knows exactly where everything
is that she has got. She won't
travel before everything is ready
down to the last button. Super-
impose that on the nature of a
courageous soldier and you get
a man who will not attack before
he feels certain he will win. He

no competitors, His counterparts
were in Germany: six were Hit-
ler’s astrologers 30 were Goer-
ing’s. For them it was a danger-
ous vocation — Hitler’s Karl E,
Kraft, a Swiss, died at Buchen-
wald,

that: I was on the Science Side
myself.

“Anyway, I waved an empty
bottle at him, and he waved his
arms back and flashed his gold
teeth, and took me off down to
his store; and after I’d said no to
a bicycle and a monkey ona
chaiy and a packet of gramophone
needies, we ploughed our way
through the chickens and child-
ren that littered the floor into a
little back room; and there we
sat down at a table and he got
out some great thick china mugs
and poured something into them
out of an earthenware jug, first
removing a couple of flies with
his forefinger.

“IT don’t really
was, that stuff; but I was a man

know what it



(By CHAPMAN PINCHER)

BLUE-EYED children are only
half as susceptible to rheumatism
as children with brown or grey
eyes, Oxford

University doctors

liquor one place and_ another
vodka and kvass and slivovic and
arrakh and saké and yanqqona
but the like of that muck I have
never met before or since.”

He drowned the memory of it
in Scotch, and called for more. I
rose to go.

Sitting in the barber's chair I
brooded on my friend’s tale of
frustration. I pictured him deep
in the heart of the jungle (I don’t,
know if there is any jungle in|
Abyssinia, but that’s where I pic- |
tured him), gasping for liquor, |
perspiration falling like rain from |
the shining cupola of his bald}
head; and I sighed gently as tne
barber took the crystal bottle and
with strong, soothing fingers mas-

the complaint may be infectious
And there is more rheumatism |
among children in big families, |
whether rich or poor, |
Report On 381 Children
Dr. David Hewitt and Dr. Alice

in cases of

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ON



PAGE ELEVEN

“strangest intment of the “aspects” ians, kings into a shop and asking for them.” _—_I opened my mouth to say some- Strengthens Blood, Nerves je
| the = i rer _ 5 ft pee of politici ? More was obviously coming, and thing, but my friend was in full Bod 9 ve . Refece their time’ Rane
war. was Britain’s seer: the and nations, E watted toe it oe y, Memory, Brain, Mus- wn, and Worn-out -
State astrologer. When would Hitler invade the|* i,.); » tae oR cles, and co—Better For instance, Dr T A ———
tt $ itic 9 ‘Believe me,” he said, “there “T see now that I ought to have ° Ellis, of Canada, re-
Tt was an appointment too British Isles? In late 1940 De ; ; ; ; : ; Th Gland €ently wrote “Not ont
bizarre, too improbable, for the Wohl was asked to report “again have been times in my life when made him open it and give me a eat oe Operations. Guan” Gee Teen “one
War Office to proclaim and publi- and again.” Who asked him? I would have given literally any- sample, but three mugs of that Desert te eae A on Amorhen rich the blood supply of
cise. But there he was, Captain %e Wohi prints no names, He thing for a proper drink. witches’ brew had built up a feel “prematurely old, Run-down and ikewlse activates the
ee Wohl hatin thins By : ae al : : “Literally anything” was hard powerful amount of goodwill YOuthiul Vineet Ae eee ene Garil of fland system This is
, casting his horo- reported: “No astrologer in his to believe; but, since he asked which was only slightly shaken This great Siecevery. Wabch ins canals lollowed by renewed en-
scopes in a fifth-floor office at senses could pussibly encourage me, I did ‘my best to believe it @hen fhe demanded hes pounds nome Lreatment and ean be used seeretis | OF TA. Bilis £f8x apd ambition. par- DUE TO INDIGESTION
rosvenor House. Now, in a ditler tu start on such a huge, plete 2 a es ; ; fala ates ae by anyone, quickly brings « of vi- | men and women in middie or older ages
book* to be published. De Wohl cisky venture under his present ee eee toe I beat him down to thirty bob. \guity And ah witty te ¢npoy the _ Ande visely known Tialian doctor Dr If you suffer from STOMACH PAINS, FLATULENCE,
lains himself. bad aspects.” There would be no when i. ware: chasing the. Ttes “As it happened, we had a little ne longer iat necessary for gutter out, Frail and Shrunken bodies sorely need HEARTBURN, NAUSEA or AC ADITY due to Indigestion,
3 two rooms of\the hotel he ivasion, he predicted, before up to Gondar—tright out in the to-do with the Italians that day. Memory and . Nervousness, impure of this formula, which werke te wens try just ONE DOSE of MACLEAN BRAND STOMACH
- ate, slept end applied himself to May 1941 (“when Jupiter would blue. We were, no NAAFI or any- and the next day we marched Sicep" znwitad you merely ake Us aim r feels upon, Hood: glands, ves and | POWDER! This scientifically balanced formula ives you
the war. An assistant, labelled be in conjunction with the posi- thing like that, and we hadn't had about 30 miles without stopping: Aina your vigous i ragtgred es strength to a pa really quick relicf! It is also available iy TABLET form.
liaison officer, delivered his pay lion. wot Neptune at Hitler’s) . drink of any sort or kind for So When it did come dinner time ter what your age, 4 that your | e°P* e
Rana The nation paid the ~~ batt! a _|something like six weeks.” we could scarcely wait for our End restored You will @od youthiul physi= Guaranteed To Work
ill, e sea battle ot Cape Mata- ‘ ,, Drink. ; eal power ip this dees wi es | Vi-Tobs are not an experiment This
e In the. War Office there is to. pan was Andrew Cunningham’s| “You must have been thirsty, “The C.O. decided we ought to Pas aA Ph. , = mr simple home treatment, which can be used
day no record of De Wohl. He triumph. Astrologically, it was|l prompted him. make a little ceremony of it, see- This simple home treatment in pleasant a an Aenerlean terion” Re sorasnete
was commissioned in a different apparently De Wohl’s. The im-| “Then one day we came on a ing there wasn’t more tharra pony Sey eet ae, rm gad thousands successful and is giving wew youth, vital- BRAND
— and English — name. At the pending “powerful aspect” of|sort of little village—well, I call glass for each officer in the mess than eny olver Cutae at Toa Teanhathe nnn erets Powd
ea rere: woe 2 Ln or ae pee ne ee, had ne it = ena ae there seaae S —so after we’d finished our —. *Works in 24 Hours are Row distributed by chemists nere ome Stomach er
, S aptain de press m, he recalls, as earlyjreally anything there except a beef hash and papaws we solemn- x as | Port nplete satisfaction “Pepe ,
Wohl. as November 20, 1940, when “I} well and a few mud huts, and ly sat round the table, and the ends in | with questionable drugs which ras te SOLE AGENTS .. M. B. MEYERS & CO. LID.
From Berlin wrote my report and mentioned} this Jittle shop.” C.O, filled his glass and passed seem almost miraculous. Tt has conquered | Cruttic and irritating io the delicate gland Bridgetows,—Barbades
De Wohl, son of a cavalry that the admiral was most likely; “What little shop?” that elegant bottle to the left; and | — 9bstinate cases that had gefled all other | proved: their sterling worth by helping
officer in the Royal Hungarian t@ achieve a great success be- “It was run by a Greek — at when everybody had some he took | Premature old age and, debuliy "fh hes yourvown perticulet cuse Plt Vi-¥abs G
Army, had arrived in Britain tween March 27 and April 5.” feast, I suppose he was a Greek. a sip. , | brought happiness beyond all price tothou- | bhe test. See for yourself how much young.
from Berlin in 1935. By profes- Monty’s Chance Anyway, he wasn’t a Hindu ora “And then he put his glass Sa ee a nened with the soya ot | Hee! ith this doctor's. prescription. Vi
sion he was—and is—a novelist, It was March 27 1941, when| Syrian.” down with such an air of finality weer Thy and Ue beauty of iis re- | Tabs must bring y. @ new feeling of er

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Their report is to be sent to thé
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aware of De Wohl’s “astrologica!
warfare’vy Mr. DeWahl, much
heavier now, and 49, has been in

“Very little later” De Wohl was
introduced to the heads of Ser-
vice departments. That autumn







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PAGE TWELVE

Thi



= t, then, that the
West Indian does not yet have By A. S. HOPKINSON
all the quaiities that mark a full
fledged nation. modest, but as we have already
We may take it, too, that until seen, deeply ashamed of him-

there is such a thing as a West se.f. But this shame must disap-

Indian nation there cannot be a pear if he is to build a manly and
West Indian Culture. It is basic magnificent culture, Think of the
unity thet is lacking. It is not Romans, They didn’t pity them-
so much that we are made up of Belves as we do. They pelieved
several islands; the trouble is themselves to be a superior race.



s West Indian Cult

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7. 1952





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EDUCATION NOTES

Education Report
1950—51





COUGHS
COLDS




that we are made up of several They believed that they had a THE REPORT of the D } qualify for a fine career, higher pay and social standing.
races. The phrase West Indian mission: that of civilising the of the Department of Education for One of these courses will lead to your advancement
has so many meanings that it world. When defeated in war the year ended August, 1951, has just been i and ae : ” LIKE MAGIC
fs almost meaningless. We must they fought back. They persisted I am wondering how man: le inte: ‘ Aarmentensy Sedece Gaginegn Mipteas fee
i : ; i ‘ , oe iF ; ly peop. rested in education Audi ding Shorthand
fix its meaning first, and then until they won. Their word for have taken the trouble to ; English jects Mathe
the rest will follow. But negative virtue also meant courage in F it i : ruse it, : | Arithmetic geen jucation Puptc j
criticism does not have much war. You can see their self re- di or me it 1s an int document and its own Con- | Seeabdtes Journaihacs Short Story Writing i
value of itself unless backed by spect in their attitude towards emnation of the methods of administration whieh I have |
something constructive. When foreign nations. Everyone who described in these columns, p Ratesicore Engineering Drawings Sosigasion naniad,
you have found out what is was neither a Roman nor a , It is divided into three sec- go not | aleceare wil. Saackiee oe Seca: ’
wrong, you must set about put- Greek was a ‘barbarian’, a word tions; the first is historieal, the y, : ieee beagle for not pen- = Pochealcal Edgineesing eying
ting it right: unless you want to which had a strong note of con- Second describes “the Educational ‘t the Director haq consulted | Shamistcy uma wan
break your heart by thinking tempt in it. This is the model System and Current Deveiop- his Teachers then there could! ivil Engineering Power S-aticn Engineering Wireless Telegraphy
about your own worthlessness. that the West Indian might fol- ™ents” and the third deals with not be this chaos in the system. Or emghtatscsehin Sma heh Worksuap Practice
And we can perhaps at least low, at least partially. He must }¢8iSlation and nh. oceasion when they were | Eluctrical Engiover adic. Suginesring
guess at what the true West In- not want other nations to ap- I do not propose to examine it called upon and for the| Electric Wiring on0 Ptaking OVERSEAS SCHOOL & ts more highly medicatod, hence
dian nation may be like, so that prove of him, He must not want detail; that would not be appgo- failure in the 13 plus group their Ca Wwe can recognise it when it ap- other people to clap him on the Prlate here, but there are two, protest report fixing the blame on TO TME BENMETT GO. ce. SePT, lod, SEN TLD, ENGLAND. » GENERAL Bs soothing medicated vapors coy
pears and help it to grow up. back and eall him a good fellow, °° “ee points which for me are the proper shoulders, their report ' Visdieitieial on hac | cenrasicate OF (2) Now massage chest, back and throat witb «= on the good work tongar while the
We have not yet begun to give He must think himself good in *8ifcant. Siipeheiee: Bing thee coc eek See supyRet ; i EDUCATION Se ease eee, nee
trouble in the world. We have his own right. Still, his self-ap- In , retary. Now they are only blamed, gone aT ON eT ioe’ wie Wass ve ( TRIPLE VOUR MONEY BA rh ind se a paragraph 41 the Report not consulted I fear they might NAME Tite external
not yet begun to assert ourselves proval must be mixed with a tiny says: “The Board of Edu otest 1 congestion, ease sore, chest muscles, ond i Buckiay’s Steioteys tue
effectively. But it is reasonable bit of -contempt. Not th s cation pF , AML Ress . SEND TODAY encourages restful siewp, The soothing aph prove tester and ms j
to think’ th lL kind * © advises the Director on any edu- [In section 47 of Part 2 the Re- { for a free prospectus on wapars Gives off keop up the good work for | Sn eae --
thin at one day we. will. ind that wallows in - self- cational matter which is sub- POrt says: “Education at the sec- g our fubyecs. Fuse chooze eure while the Ettie one doops oe lL
The cae page = that a a but the kind which re- mitted to it, For matters con- ondary stage is provided in senior le, "pet fall ist tie — '
time must be something splendid, gr that it is mot even strong+ cerni “Or i Gepartments of the el tar iafbeilon 7.9.52 + oe aay agialdad
something that inspires respect or that it is, He must be ae Diener, *CCOndary.. eapansian, lohoaa® + _— 7

at least, if not fear. He will be

bitious for strength and power,
great in proportion as he is ter-

Spiritual as well as physical. He

rible, in proportion as he shows must glory in might, in full
masterly command, not only over and unashamed recognition of
others, but also over himself. Be- the fact that nature aims at
ing a combination of all the strength and nothing else. He
racial types in the world, we can must not be shocked when he

expect him “to” show ‘every pos-
sible virtue and every possib}«
vice, But these two words ‘vir-
tue’ and ‘vice’ are a bit inappro

realisés that mari is_the -greaies:
not powerful enough to stand up
to him: he must not be shocked
priate. A quality is a virtue— when he sees that a bullet is the
or a vice—only under certain measure of superiority between
circumstances. There is no such 4 human being and a lion,

thing as absolute right and ab-
We Must Love Our Enemies

solute wrong. Germany’s great-
est philosopher, Nietzsche, ex- i ‘
posed that superstition seventy a ae he must rec-
years ago. (This does not mean national law ue, S damental
that, being a superstition, the be- fiom it like the Dodie eee
lief in absolute good and bad j«voltea wh he i
hasn’t got its uses. Quite the feeds upon life “But ‘to ‘ee kah
contrary; for the people must be noble. the West Indian must think
ruled according to their super- quite differently from most na-
stitions. This, however, is a little tions about combat. He will show
beside the point.) And so the himself to have a really splendid
future West Indian need not be “haracter if he can purge himself
ashamed of his ‘vices’; under ©!,all hate, envy, malice, sadism,’
prudent leadership he can turn @0d resentment, while at the same
even these to his advantage, And, time remaining a g gressive,
of course, we must always re- Though he must look on what
member that, although disobedi- ont an him as bad, he must think
ence is a vice in a servant, it is ° st oe Sinful, wrong or un-
a virtue in a master. What would /“S'. He must be perfectly fair
aA i in this matter, He must not con-
become of a school if the head- demn his enemi 7
master obeyed the children in- jannical b oe as Wndust, ty-
c ae al or brutal people who are
stead of commanding them damned to all eternity for be-
Above all, the future leaders of having as they ought not to be-

the West Indies must have a have. Instead, he must realise
frank unwincing attitude to- that two nations of different ori-
wards this matter of right and gin, habits, qualities, and am-
wrong: they must admit that bitions cannot come into contact
each person, and each nation, and remain peaceably so for very
must decide the question for long, If they do, they will both
himself or themselves. This js Sink their individuality, and be-

called following your own con-
science, and consciences like
personalities, vary greatly from
man to man. The people them-
selves however, must have no
such elastic: attitude. They will
quickly learn to believe’ that
whatever benefits the nation is
good and whatever hurts it bad.
They will then have a national
moral eonsciousness, which in
the long run means nothing more
than knowing what to fight for
and what to fight against.

Self Respect Necessary

The West Indian must think
well for himself. He must be able
to respect himself. And he musi
also have good reason for be-
lieving himself a worthy person. struggling to become a_ nation,
In short he must be vain. At The important thing is not the
present he is neither vain nor nation but the s' e, This fact

Ss

NOT AFRAID .

come meagre and contemptible.
They can* neither live in that

ear. The question of ‘right’ and
‘wrong’ is not brought up at all.
It is simply beat or be beaten.
After all, the enemy has equal
right to full privileges and the
only way to decide the issue is to
tight it out, This is the principle
according to which all the mighty
pre-historic monsters were ex-
tinguished by creatures brainier—
that is stronger—than they. Man
is completely responsible for
moral values: nature has nothing
to do with them.

We West Indians are at present








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inimal because all the others are’

same country nor rub shoulders
with each other. They must fight
until one or the other is victori-
ous and throws his rival out on his



Director consults the Advisory
Committee of Head Teachers in
Secondary Schools, On matters
affecting the elementary schools
the Director is able to consult
the Barbados Elementary Teach-
ers’ Association,”

I am venturing the statement
that this secondary stage is not
provided at @ dozen out of the
124 elementary sehools; and I am
going oneg step farther. When
parents and taxpayers come to
realise that they are being misled
as to-the nature this “secon-

|

NAST YALA te VLAnd ee
Aes FA

a+ wate ven CDOKE pony on. Sea
even if it had not been written “3' stage or that it does not

meant what they were allowed to
believe it does mean then there is
going to be grave dissatisfaction.
This condition of things imposes
; , 4 duty on the Government to see
mean exactly what they say, and to it that people’s children who
that the construction of the sen- will have no other opportunity of
vences was deliberate and inten- attending any but an elementary
tional and not merely a jumble school, are getting the education
of words, to which they are entitled, which
they now believe that they are
What is significant to me is the getting, and for which the Public
positive statement that “the Diree- Treasury now pays, There are in-
tor consults the Advisory Commit- stances when the Government
tee” when it is a question of Sec= allowed things to slip by unnoticed
ondary Education but on matters by assuming and merely mouthing
affecting the elementary schools the view that an officer had taken
(end note that Secondary is spelt certain decisions only after hav-
with a capital letter while elemen- ing» consulted those whom he
tary eee rae Wiles ks ches te should.
report says the Direc al Compulsory Education
consult the Barbados Elementary In pare, 52 e Report "akan:
Teachers’ Association, .,. “The policy is to provide sufficient
Why was it not possible to write
that he consults the Association? I
again emphasises that everything out, since its own view-point
is a fight. And, whether we rec- doesn’t correspond with ours. Its
ognise it or not, we must find our- thought is different and so is its
selves an enemy; for tine mere temper Above all, we don’t want
existence of an enemy will give to be governed by Britishers,
us something to fight for as well either directly or indirectly. But
as something to fight against. But this is a difficult issue and we
we must choose our enemy dis- are hardly strong enough mili-
criminatingly cod be ase to find tarily to make theni see our point!
someone worthy of that position. ‘
In the choice there must be some measure of admiration and re- Toe new culture, ae hy ke
spect, We must feel proud of our 4 battle cry of opposition to gn
foe and wage the battle without British civilisation, not an ‘art Ss
malice or indignation, At present, @"tS sake’ tinkering with words

by him was perused by
Director because he has

it. I am_ therefore justified
assuming that the words used.

the





,
Well now, who
would think he

was doing this for the pleasure of it? But it is all part

and parcel of the weekly outing and this vehicle is, in

the owner’s eyes, the absolute last word in horseless

ation.

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is something great and worthy in tU™e;, as strongly so as Vergil’s COD ROES ............

Aeneid is. It will be very mu¢h PEANUT BUTTER

MANGOE CHUTNEY

jtself, having accomplished many :
illustrious things in the past, it influenced by thought, especially
will stifle our own individuality Political thought—since every-
if we take it too seriously and thing is politics — and it will be,
take in too much of it. Besides it one might say, the banner & a
is hardly congenial to us. it is al- people growing up into aggressive
ready fully developed and mel- nobility. It will have reverence
lowed, not to say decadent in for whatever is high and above
many respects. We ourselves, are the democratic-plebian seyel. It
a collection of races still in the Will probably be inspired by a



ae
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HENRY

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PAGE THIRTEEN

By Appointment
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DIED

Mrs
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eine Phillips (daughter),
d ' U.S.A. ‘son!
€ Seymour Phil-
illips
lrer Colin Phillips
d-child
THANKS
ALLEYNE—We the undersigned beg ito
hank those who sent wreaths, cards o
etiended the funeral or in any way
expressed their sympathy with us of
yar dear mother und)» = grandmother
Albertine Atleyne of Kew Land whict
took place on 31st August, 1952.
Ameta Miller (daughter), Archer's and
Headley's Family 7.9.52—I1n,
CHEESEMAN—The undersigned
fully return thanks to all who attended |
the funeral, sent wreaths or in anyi
other way expressed sympathy with |
them on the occasion of the passing
of Mrs. Florence A. Cheeseman, late
of* Crumpton Street, St. Michael
Gor 1 and Brathwaite Chiessemars:|
Helén Mason, Elsie Gilkes
7.9.52—I1n. |
SKEETE We, the undersigned beg
through this medium to thank all those

Kind friends who sent wreaths, cards,

or in ar way expressed sympathy
with us in our recent bereavement,
oecasioned by the death of Charlotte
Skeete

William Skeete, Allen Skeete

7.9.52—1n



the
all those who sent cards,
Ts, or sympathised with

WEEKES. We



of Mrs. Eva Weekes
yma e husband), Augusta
Olton ,er!, Reynold and Simeon



Culpepper (brothers), Denzil Olton (son)
John Culpepper (nephew).
7.9.52=1n

‘



IN MEMORIAM





DRATHWAITE—In loving memory , of
James Edward Brathwaite who departed





this life on 7th Septernber 1949.
Three sad veare have passed since that
sad day
But he is safe in the arms of Jesus
There by his love and grace,
His soul shall rest in peace
Ever to be remembered by Elonora
ife}, Goulburn, Laurence, Alfred,
Elric (sons), Clafice (daughter), Germain
(nephew), William (niece) (N.Y. !
papers please copy) 7.9.52—I1n
MILLAR In loving memory of our
dear beloved husband and father
Cecil Millar who passed away on
7th Sept., 1949.
Three long years since that sad day
When one loved has. pagsed away
Ever to be remembered by Alva
(wife), Lizetta, Geraldine and Duf-
ferine (children),

7.9.52—1n.

PERSONAL







The public are hereby warned against



giving credit to any person or persons
whomsaever in my name as I do not hold
myself responsible for snyone contract-
ing any debt or debts in my name unless

by a written order signed by me
FITZHERBERT SMITH,
Gittens Road,
Government Hill
6.9.52—2n

Â¥FOR RENT





HOUSES

A SMALA. COTTAGE--On the sea at
St Lawrence Gap, fuily furnished, two
bedrooms, immediate possession. Apply,
Hollywood, St. Lawrence Gap
7.9

BUNGALOW~—To An Approved Ten-
art Bungalow Modern Sea-Side, fully
furnished Bungalow Excellent sea-
bathing. For further particulars: Apply
to No. 6 Coral Sands, Worthing.

2.9.52—6n
“MALTA"—Cattlewash. For October,
November, January, February, March,

Apply Mrs. I.
Harriman & Co.

Weatherhead c/o J. N.



MANHATTAN FLATS — On Sea three
Pedroome each fully furnished, Refrigi-
daire, enclosed yard, Servant’s Room &







undersigned would |

5.9.52—5n | «-
| Enquiries Yacht Club or Telephone 4430.

FOR SALE



AUTOMOTIVE



CAR—Morris eight, good tyres, body in
g00d order, Mr. Vernon Hinds, Weston,
St. James. 7.9, 52—1n

CAR—1950 Vauxhall Wyvern, excellent





condition. Batgain. Will exchange for
smaller car Apply Williams Court. Oppo-
site Sayes Court, Government * Farmy
Christ Church or Sealy's Garage, Bay
Street 7.9.52—In



CAR—One Prefect Ford
A-l

1949 model
Condition. Practically New. Owper
Driven. Frice $800. Owner leaving
Islend Contact Smith's Garage, Roe-
buck St 7.9.52—in







CAR—For sale one standard 8 h.p.
Coupe Car in good running order. Phone
4618. G. E, Ward. 6.9.52—4n.





CAR—One (1) 1952 A—40 “Somerset’’--
Pale Green—1,300 miles — Always owner
driven — Dial 3355. 6.9.52—3n.

CAR—New Consul car only done 6,000





grate-|miles. Reason for selling owner leaving

island. Phone 4641.

4.9.52—4n.

——
CAR—(1) KAISER. One second hand
Keiser, 1949 model, in excellent condi-
tion, apply Barbados Agencies, telephone
1908 . 5.9.52—6n

——$—$_$_ ET
CAR—Plymouth 5 passenger 1948
medel in perfect condition. ‘Done. only
19,000 miles. Phone S. Nicholls.

Office, 3925. Home 8657.
3.9,52—t.t.n.

CAR—Austin A70, Very good condition,

and going to some lucky for $1,800.
'Williams at 3006 and os251 or apply
3.9.52—t.f.n.

Jehovah Jirah, St. George.

TRUCK-—International Two speed axie
truck with hydraulic hoist. Phone
3050. J. N. Farnum, Pe a



1



|



ELECTRICAL



SINGER HEMSTITCHING MACHINE—
Eiectrically driven, in perfect condition,
end at a very good price. Dial 2738

7.9,52—3n

RADIO—One (1) 11 tube Phillips
perfect condition. L. BERNS' fs
1, Swan St. Phone 2384 or 5130.







in
No

salen secicacaien, psteranantemnennaianae
RADIOGRAM—Separate Units, Ril
Receiver. 8 watt Amplifier. Collaro 2%
speed turntable. Six long playing records.
$130.00. Telephone 3274 or 4430.
7.9.52—1,

FURNITURE

FURNITURE—One Simmons Baby Crib
with Mattress, excellent condition. Also
one pair of Simmons Bedsteads and
-pr.ngs WY 3” a bargain. Phone 8614.

7.9,52—1n
Coos

LIVESTOCK

















GOAT—Milter. Goat. Apply: Mrs.
Gooding “Lila Cottage’’ McLean Gap,
7.9.52—I1n

| Brittons Hill.





MULES —- 4 Small island Mules. Apply
Fairfield Plantation, St. Lucy, or Phone

1—53. 6.9.52—3n.
POULTRY

POULTRY—Mampshire and Leghorns 8
weeks old with Incubator and runs. Apply
city Bar, Palmetto Street.







6.9.52—2n,

MECHANICAL

“PLOUGH. — From Joes River Ltd,
1 Subsoll Plough. Apply to W. Watson,
Fety. Manager, 6.9.52—T7n,

MISCELLANEOUS

1

| DUNLOPILLO MATTRESSES AT
sargain prices. Surplus stock of 3 ft.
na 3 ft 3 ins offered (for spot cash
ales only) at $48.58 and $52.96 each re-
pectively. Stniectly limited number for
lisposal BUY NOW, HARRISON'S,
Broad St, Dial 42%. 3,.9.52—Sn

| GUAVA CHEESE -- Fresh, delicious













ea Passe aut 08 ea ay
your rien abroad, 's. it.
Matthews Vicarage. Phovie 39025. Se

1,.9.52—3n.



»NTERNATIONAL TORNADO K.38.
>.00 nearest, Owner leaving Island.





7.9.52—In.
NUMERICAL TELEPHONE

—

1 dna



the





Garage. Phone 3309 6.9.52—2n. | p1:CTORY all Telephone Numbers are
| Usted in numerical order. Price 3/-
OFFICES | 2,).52—6n_
OFFICES—In our Building in Lawer| i ee Pulee* Ot, "OR
Bioad Street Available from _ Ist . wo

. Dial 2696, Auto Tyre Co., Trafalgar and

October. K R. Hunte & Co Ltd. | . *
Dial 4611 3.0.52—t.t.n | SPry Streets. 30.8821 n,
“ROOMS- 2 furnished rooms for Rent woes In first class Sonatas

opposite Royal Theatre. Best sea bathing
Garage attached, Week-ends and _ holi-
days accepted. Phone 8401, 5.9,52—t.f.n,



ROOMS—Furnished or unfurnished
“The Palisades” Lakes Folly. Dial 3365
7.9.52—In





“VENTNOR

Bedrooms

Belleville;-3
water,
Ia

Ist Ave.,
each with
Dial s6eo



running
7.9.52



WINSLOW,



Cattle w













h, Bathsheba
First two weeks in November and_ the
nih of December Dial 3502, Mrs
W. T. Gooding, Stronghope, St. Thomas
3.9.52—3n
. ‘a’ er
EDUCATIONAL
'
QUEEN'S COLLEGE
Queen's College has a staffirg vacancy
‘or a C luate in Mathematics, for Jan
ary, 1
Applications should be made to the
Headmistress, from whom further par-

be obtained, on or before
1952,

culars may
e 13th of September,
5.9.52—3n,

ANNOUNCEMENTS

A rrentio® LADIES





We con supply you with the bes
covered buttons and buckles in Town als
pleating Done. Fbony Dress Shop, Prine
Wiliam Henry Street (Over Lashley’
Siore) 7.9.52—-1n







VIEWS of Barbados from 1707 Loa
Fxhibition at the Mussum, Sunday 2.30-
t Week-days 10—6 7.9,52—2n

“GOODS CLOSES SO
Just Off The Press!

FIRST ANNUAL
% LEAGUE CRICKETER |
& Compiled by

J. M. HEWITT
Hony. Secty. B.C.L.

and containing ,
*Records of B.C.L. Cricketers
*Records of all centuries

made in B.C.L. games
*Photos of Leading B.C.L.
Players
*League Championship Table
*B.C.L. Intercolonial and

International Players
This Annual sets out in
simple but impressive
figures the history and
tradition of the B.C.L.

tea nanee
PRICE : ONE SHILLING

Obtainable at...
COLE'S PRINTERY
Middle Street

or

PRESS CLUB BUILDING

53, Swan & Middle Streets
6.9.52.—2n.

POO POOOCE> FOOSOOOHOSP

i}



P'LANKS—Seal Laths, pine planks, sid-
og board, Apply Cardinal Bowen,
tion Hill, St, Michael, Dia} 3901.
| 7.9.52—4n

PIANO — Ane! : Gertrude Davis.
Ebenezer, St, Philip, 7.9,52—1n,

SAMPLES—A few pairs of Sample
Shoes for men, apply Barbados Import &
Export Co. Ltd. Room 308, Plantations
Suilding. 7.9. 52—1n,

UBSCRIBE now to sh

\elegraph, England's jenaing Ue Nowe
‘paper now arriving in by Air
“uy @ few days after publication in

















ondon, Contact Inn Gale, C/o. Advo-
Co, Ltd., Local Representative
. 3118. 47.4.53—t.f.0

el.



TANKS—2 Galvanised Tanks & x 4” x
I-on Tanks 644% x 4 x 37 3 Galvanised
-lindrical Tanks 64 x 44a? dea, 600 w.
ve
#m with 2 ft. Conical Bottoms; capacity
ine gallons 700. Apply: Ma .
ruce Vale Factory. 31,8.52—3n.

T be _ NUMERICAL TELEPHONE j
RECTORY is ava, dle at: Advocate,
ole’s Printery, Johnson's Staticnery,
‘oberts & Co. and at the Colonial Adver-

ising Co, (Barbados) Ltd., James St.
mice 3-. 2.9.52—Hin.
the AL

Use NUMERIC. TELEPHONE
‘RECTORY to identify the owner of the
lephone Numbers left on 7

riee 3/-. ‘



ee peter in
With the ac AL TELEPH'

RECTORY any Teiephone Number can
asily be traced to the party concerned.
"rice 3/-, .52—in














oe

OPTICAL NOTICE

I beg to notify my Clients
and the General Public that
my Office will be closed for
Vacation from September 8th
and will be reopened on
September 29th.

WESLEY BAYLEY
Optician
High Street.
5.9,52,—8n.



Keep this date open

for
The Annual Leeward
BALL

on the 15th November
at

Paradise Beach Club

and watch this space.

Tickets -0- $1.00
24.8.52—T_F.N.









|















7.9. 52=oh

Phone 8211, 4462



2 Galv. Cylindrical Tanks @ x 49’ j









PUBLIC SALES

REAL ESTATE

A parcel of



a



square feet at Rockley in the parish of
Christ Chureh, (part of Clairmont) with)
outlet to Dayrells Road, and suitable for
laying out as building lots, j
Will be offered for sale at the oftice |
of the undersigned on Thursday the 11th |
September, 1952, at 2 o’clock p.m.
© plan can be seen on application to
the undersigned.

COTTLE, CATFORD & CO
3.9.52—8n.









ASK THEM — Our Recognized; Way-
side and Private Agents if Presently
it is a Buyer's or Seller's Market! D. F
de Abreu, a Trained Auctioneer & Real
Estate Broker, Must and Will always Lead
with Attractive Prices, Re-Sale Values and
Satisfaction, Best These Six 1.
BAYSWATER, NEAR SEA—Aimost New
3 Bedroom (with Basins) Stone Bungalow,
Aluminum Roof, 2 Toilets, Stone rage )
& Servant’s Room, about 7,000 sq. ft.,/
Going for about £2,200, 2 AT WORTH-
ING MAIN RD.—Facing Sea, Right-of-
Way to Sea, A 3 Bedroom Bungalow Type.
Very Good Condition, Garage & Ser-
vant's Room, over 6, . ft., Going
for about -£2,200. 3. EAR NAVY
GARDENS — A‘3 Bedroom (with Basins
& Cupboards) Stone Bungalow, about
6 yrs. Old, Everite Roof, 2 Toilets,
Garage & Servant’s Room, about 11,000
sq. ft., Going for about £3,100. 4. AT
GOVT; HILL — Almost New 3 Bedroom
(Partly Stone) Bungalow, Stone Garage.
Stone Enclosure, Conveniences, about
4,000 sq. ft., Going for about £1,200.
5 IN BELLEVILLE—One-Storey (Partly
Stone) 3 Bedroom, all Modern Conveni-
erces, Very Good Condition, Going about
£2,000. 6 OFF COUNTRY RD., — 2
Bedroom House with Land, Shop attach-



ed, Good Condition, House Yields
£14.00 p.m., Going ut $1, IN
LIGHTFOOT'S X — A Desirable
2 ge. » Wi ne






Goi

Ss

ae
Premises & Resi-
ST. — A 3 Bedroom

wo

ence.
ottuge, a Business Premises &
Rita lease C Me when U e
he

ing in Real Estate and Ni
ly Anywhere. DIAL 31f1 Call at “Olive
Bough,” Hastings, Near Pavilion Court
LOOK FOR MY SIGN.

BUNGALOW--Stone wall Bungalow
called “SANTA MARIA” With 6,180
square feet of land attached situate at)
Pine Hill, St. Michael.

Drawing and Din-!

3 one With run- !

ning water) breakfast rooms, Kitchen- |

ette, usual conveniences. Garage and!

servants’ rooms. Electricity installed. t
The above property will be set

‘
sale by Public competition at
a

Black St. Michael,
sping crag “ssi dee and
1 a oO a o ir
Cate ‘or Mesidence. Possibilities
ean be ar '
Leiter aan
“ HOUSE” situate in the parish
of Philip standing on 12 acres
lr and 22 hes of land.

The House con’ six bedrooms, draw-
ing, dining and living rooms and usual
o



above i) Be set up for sale at
Competition on Friday the 26tn
of September 1952 at 2 p.m. at the
office of the undersigned
CARRINGTON & SEALY,
Lucas Street
7.9.52



HOUSE—(1) Back House and shedroof
and kitchen, Woolley Jones, Fitt Gap,
Westbury Road, 7.9.52—1n

HOUSE — Bungalow Style (shop at-
tached 22 x 12. Situated at Brighton,
Black Rock. Dial 0155,

2.9.52—t.f.n.

aecectencen nenceneneeseel tile aman
LAND—A spot of land — approx. 3t
perches in Belle Gully Rd., opposite

Radcot. For particulars phone 2931.
3.9.52—4n
——_————————
“SILVER WATERS", at Silver Sands,
Cool throughout the year, four large bed-
rooms, running water in each room, two
servant rooms, Garage for two cars, best
sea bathing. Inspection by appointment.
. 3.9.52—3n



LE

AUCTION
“UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER



9th and Wednesday
{0th by order of the _Executors
to the Estate of the late Miss Elsie
St, John, we will sell the Furniture at
Eagle Hall Road, which in-

Round Tip-Top Dining Tables

rving
bles. Cabinet,
Masog ogg So - Drawing-roor
M any; pl rawing-room
julte 9 pieces (Couch, Arm and Upright
. Piano by Bechstein
Pictures and

On Tuesday

Springs and Mattresses
. Wardrobe, Dressing Table, Chest
Drawers—all ae eens
Shelv Canvas are
Long Mirror, very latte Glass Case:
Carders, Zine Top, Tables, 4-Burner Per-

fection | Oil Stove; Gas Stove, Kitchen
tensils, Garden Hose; and many other

items of interest.
3ale 11,30 O'clock TERMS CASH
BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,

Auctioneers

S

3,9.62—2n,
UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

ON THURSDAY llth by. order of
Mrs. Ant we will sell her Furniture at
“The Bower” The Garrison which

~~ includes

A, very nice square Tip-Top Dining
Yoble, Upright Chairs, Rockers, good
Card Table, Serving Table in Mahogany:
Sirch Settee and Cushions, Birch and
Cedar Arm Chairs, Rush Seats and Backs,
Vitrolete Top Coffee Table, Rush Tables
nd Chairs, Standard and Table Electric

Lamps: Good Jamaican Mats; Electric
Fan: Three Speed Portogram Pick-up and
Westinghouse Padio; Double Mahog

and Birch Bedsteads, Vono Springs and;
Ounlopillo Mattressee, Mahog, — Linen
Press; Painted Piresses and Tables;
Jietures, Wall Mirrors, Glass and China,
Dinner and Tea Services; Kelvinator

Refrigerator perfect working order

Kitchen Utensils, Tables, Scales and
many other items

Sale 11,30 o'clock. Terms cash

& CO.,
a 7.9,52—2n

.



aaa 2S
THE BARBADOS §.P.C.A.

S.P.C.A. ask you to be consid-
erate and kind to your animals
at all times, but especially during
the heat of the day and water

im 5

NOTICE

We beg ‘to notify our Cus-
tomers and the General Pub-
lic that HUTSON’S DRUG
STORE will be closed for
holidays as from the 7th of
September to 2ist Septem-
ber.

H. L. HUTSON,
31.8.52—3n.





land containing 60,527 | A- 3001



SUNDAY ADVOCATE
LOST & FOUND
LOST

SWEEPSTAKE TICKET












































NOTICE

PARISH OF CHRIST CHURCH
Applications for the post of Qualified

Series
in the forthcoming November







Meeting. Finder please return to H. D. | Nurse and Midwife will be received \by

Bayley, Hanson Plantation, St. George. | thé © Mrs. H. A, .

6.9.52—2n. | Welches, Ch. Ch. “Applica-

iddiroanls Zs ae ae to 3 p.m. on the 16th Septem-~
ber, 1952,

Ww ANTED Terms of appointment obtainable from

the Parochial Treasurer. 6.9.52—4n.

HELP Will the person or who

——— —_——.| halt on loan the Wheels of ne

BARBADOS DYE WORKS from Mrs. Geo. Hutson, Blackmans,

WASHERS & IRONERS—Only compe-
tent persons need apply

kindly communicate with her.



typist, apply to “Agency” P. O. Box 246,
Bridgetown. 4.9.52—8n.

THREE CANVASSERS — For new line
of Business. Good prospects. Reasonable
commission. Only men with e

needed. Give details. Apply: P.O. Box
151, G.P.O., Barbados 79 52—in.

MISCELLANEOUS

HOUSE—To Buy or Rent. House in
either Hastings or Garrison District two











(2) Bedrooms if possible, three (3) with ’ key

yousl_sonvesinnges. Reply “S" c/o ™®. | J ) to good

3 ntations New + :

Broad Street. i tava be Y E iy S T 9) a] 0 Ly
aa od c | oe | vu

PRIVATE ‘PING d if
Phone 3196, one Se in GENERAL sane
eee







GOVERNMENT NOTICES
PART ONE ORDERS

By _.
Major O. P. C. WALCOTT, E.D.,

Comman '
THE BARBADOS ‘GIMENT



Issue No. 32,
All ranks will parade at Regt. HQ at 1700 ho rsday
will continue their weapon training with a py = ‘is
the direction of their Coy Commanders..“A” Coy is allotted the
miniature ‘an members of “B’ Coy who have already

A.M.C, will be disposal of their : . “B”
who have not yet been allotted a timate: are chace: on tee soar with

R.S.M, immediately, \
Mon. 8, Wed. 10 and Thur. 11 . 52,
of wig Band. ana “they” wilt be notified. by" him

Band

Band practices will be hi

Ratson will test oer
rs who are graded first class will qua
ded camp and the required wane’ at

5 Sep, 52.



AM.0. under

e2e8

when the test will z
* eo provided they have atten





2

rts Club will hold its Annual Dance at

at 9 p.m. All bay invited to at! ; s ca Sen os

eee 7 "ANT FOR WEEK ENDING 15 SEP. 52.
¢ —"278'sii, Williams, 80)

‘"S.OLF.

3









Major,
Barbados Regiment.

NOTICE
T will be a Meeti ‘arran: cers eants’
2000 Hours on SHUG Te eee. fae Wettant Offers & Ser} Mess at

PART It ORDERS
THE BARBADOS REGIMENT SERIAL NO. 29.

yu 2 "WE. the ‘Governee

Gi 7 days’ casual leave w.e.f. 1
7 ited 21 days’ vacation leave w.e.f.
Gran’ } ftionths’ vacation leave w.e.f.

6 Aug, 52:
Granted 4 weeks’ P/leave w.e.f. 1 Sep.

M. L, B. SKEWES-cox. Maj
S.0.L.F. Adjutan:
The

Barbados Regiment.

Vacant Post of Captain of the Fisheries Research Boat “Investigator”

Applications are invited for the vacant post of Captain of the
Fisheries Research Boat “Investigator”.

2, The post is temporary and may be terminated at one month’s
notice on either side. The salary is $1,200 per annum and a temporary
cost of living allowance is at present payable at the rate of $144 per
annum.

3. The main duties of the Captain of the “Investigator” are to
take charge of the Research Boat, its general management and oper-
ation under direction and to be responsible for all matters concerning
its welfare,

4. Applicants are expected to possess a knowledge of corstal
navigation and ‘should be able to locate the position of the boat at
iny time, Applicants should also have had experience in the handling
of small motor vessels under both harbour and open sea conditions.
Appointment will be subject to medical fitness.

5. Applications stating age, qualifications and experience should
be addressed to the Director of Agriculture, Department of Science
and Agriculture, Queen’s Park, and should reach him not later than
Saturday, 13th September, 1952,



PROMOTION
Sit. Quintyne, L. G. “B” Coy rank ot
weft, 2

2. LEAVE

Sit. Goodman, R. Ss.
Pte Brown, S.

Sit. Edwards, F.

378 Sit. Williams, B.

Bn HQ



7.9.52.—1n.



VACANT POSTS
GRAMMAR SCHOOL, ST, VINCENT

Applications are invited for the following posts: —

(i) An Assistant Master (Graduate) who will be required to
teach English and Latin or History up to Higher School
Certificate Standard.

(ii) An Assistant Master of Inter-Arts or Higher School Cer-
tificate Qualifications who will be required to teach Gen-
eral Subjects up to School Certificate standard. Abilitv
to assist the Games Master, and to take charge of the
Cadet Corps will be taken into consideration.

The salaries offered are: —

(a) For Graduates—$1,440 by $96 to $1,920.

(b) For Inter-Arts, etc.,—$1,200 by $72 to $1,440.

A temporary Cost of Living Allowance is payable at the usual
rates granted to Civil Servants.

The commencing salaries will depend on the selected candidates’
















SOUTHBOUND

er a casicns

dar tertile jaradiais, ipa

INVITATION

FORESTERS INC.,

LEBANON
COURT CONRAD REEVES

and Friends to their

Annual Thanksgiving Service

To be held to-day Sunda
September, 1952,
the

At

Chairman: Dr. H.
Hymn Book A, & M.

of the

Under the Patronage

invite you to their

at the

VOLUNTEER DRILL HALL

OCTOBER, 1952
(Bank-holiday)
Music by

JUST RECEIVED

POTTERS ASTHMA REMEDY
BRAND'S BEEF ESSENCE

LIVONAL ‘with’ combination Living and
HORLICK MALTED MILK ‘Dining room, lovely tiled European
(3 Sizes) | style bath, open gallery offering a
MILLER'S WORM POWDERS magnificent view of the Golf

WARDONIA RAZOR BLADES

KAOLIN PO

LOKOL DROPS

C. CARLTON BROWNE

Wholesale & Retail

Drugeist

j 136 Roebuck St. Dial 2813

Cordially invite Kindred Brethren

MECHANICS’ HALL
118, Roebuck Street, at 3.30 p.m.

G. Cummins:
7.9.52—1n.



The Officers & Members
ADVOCATE’S SOCIAL CLUB

the Hon. V. C. Gale, M.L.C.

DANCE

on
MONDAY NIGHT, 6TH

Percy Green's Orchestra
SUBSCRIPTION: —::—
Dancing from 9 pan.
Tickets not Transferable
Formal Dress Optional



(PUBLIC NOTICES| SHIPPING NOTICES



The M.V. “MONEKA” w
cept Cargo

Dominica, Antigua,

day 8th inst.

ce
Antigua,

Nevis and- St. Kitts
12th

and Passengers
Montserrat,
Mevis and St. Kitts, Sailing Mon-

The M.V. “CARIBBE®’ will =



SUND

ill ac-
for

i

B.WI. SCHOONER OWNERS’
ASSOCTATION (INC.)
Consignee, Tele. No. 4047



Canadian National Steamships



Satis Balls Baile Arrives Satis
Montreal fislifax Boston Barbados Barbados
29 Aug 31 Aug. — Sep. 11 Sept.

3 Sept. 6 Sept. 8 Sept. 17 Sept. 186 Sept.
12 Sept. 15 Sept. _ 24 Sept. 25 Sept.
22 Sept. 25 Sept. 27 Sept. 6 Oct. 7 Oct.
Arrives Satls Arrives Arrives Arrives
Barbados Barbados Boston Mentreal
25 Sep. 29 Sept. —- 9 Oct 12 Oct.
Sept. 2 Oct. 11 Oct. 12 Oct. 16 Oct.
6 Oct. 8 Oct. = 21 Oct. 24 Oct.
W Oct. 21 Oct. 30 Oct. 31 Oct. 4 Nov.

OFFERS

No. 12



A lovely

having

y,. 7th

bedroom, and
room. E
with hot and cold running

drawing




two sides.




























BUNGALOW

commanding a magnificen’

to the sea.

modern. kitchen,
bath.

of

WYNDAL

Situate at Rockley and

Beach, standing on approx
comprises three bedrooms,
and Living rooms, toilet
and a large gallery.

and garage
priced.

Very rea

3/- NEW BUNGALOW

10 situate



e,

attached, combination.

and bath,
servants rooms

. , Please contact ys
os possible.

BLUE VISTA»
at Réckley’ New
















Situate

‘ Course and Coa’
+ in cupboards. Downstairs;

This property can be
“sa or unfurnished.
$e * 1

SS enema

AUCTIONEERS
VALUERS

Bridgetown



HURRICANE PRECAUTION -HINT NO. 60
FALLING TREES are very likely to disrupt the Electric

Supply. Keep a couple of Hurricane

oil and a box of M

atches in a handy place.

All these are obtainable at...

CENTRAL EMPORIUM






REALTORS LIMITED

COVE SPRING COTTAGE

cottage standing on
two roods twenty seven perches
of land, situate at St, James Coast,
its own private bathing.
It comprises three bedrooms with
private bath and toilet to main

Bath and Toilet
modern kitchen, and a gallery on

Situate at Rockley New Road

of the Golf Course, unobstructive
It comprises three
bedrooms one with built-in cup-
boards, Drawing and Dining room,
and toilet and
Downstairs: servants rooms
with toilet and bath, garage for
two cars, and enough room for
| aundry &c., standing on approx-
imately 19,000 square feet of land

100 yards of the popular Rockley
10,000 square feet of land,
nd bath,
buildings comprise servants room

‘Watogs. amd. standing on approx-
14,000 square feet,
prising “three bedrooms, one with
dressing voom and toilet and bath
Drawing
and Dining Room, separaté toilet
modern kitchen, two
toilet.
bath and garage. “This property
can be bought at a very reasonable

emodern three bedroom bungalow

line, and_built-

| for two cars and servants room.

REALTORS Limited

REAL ESTATE AGENTS

151/152 Rotbuck Street,
Phone 4900

dinine
water,

it view

within
imately
and
Dining
out-

sonably

at Blue
com-

and

as goon

“Road,

Garage
bought



Lanterns filled with

experience, Corner Broad & Tudor Streets ‘
The appointments will be probationary in the first instance, and | ‘s240600066066665650080569500080089S0E a ==>,
the appointees may be confirmed in the permanent, pensionable posts SS | eaey










after one year’s satisfactory service,
‘s ot passages to St. Vincent to take up appointments are pro-
vided,

Applications, with details of eduvation, qualifications, age and
experience, and copies of not more than three testimonials should. be
sent to the Education officer. Depaitment of Hducation, St. Vincent,
as soon as possible, as the successful candidates will be expected to
assume duty at the beginning of next term on 15th September, 1952.

‘ 31.8.52—2n



DOWN THE HATCH — UMPH....

THIS IS HONEST TO GOOD RUM
t

J.D. T. SPECIAL RUM

(with the distinctive flavour)

TRY THIS UNIQUE BLEND OF RUM
Blended an@ Bottled by

JOHN D. TAYLON & SONS LTD.
Dial 4335 Roebuck Street

N.P.C.A. PHOTO COMPETITION

RULES
ay of animals.
Any size—Black and ly.
Closing Date—4th October, k
Association reserves the right to reproduce any print.
Prizes awarded to the most attractive photo.
Entrance 1/-.

ss

\

Photos of an animal or



FUT ORME Vesticceiticigsessvernne BA hs cheese iasicabi Seeks $15.00
SD PRE has. a 8.00
SRD PRIZE ........ Ps shoe stales secs cgalleba MAG. 3.00

Decision of the Judges wilh be final.

t

All photos to be sent to the S.P.C.A., Office, Harbour ,;
Police Station, c/o Hon. Secretary and marked S.P.C.A. Photo-
graphic Competition.



1953

AMATEUR BOXIN

CHAMPIONSHIPS

Under the Auspices of

CANADA DRY

will take place at the...

MODERN
At 8 p.m.

HIGH SCHOOL STADIUM
on Friday, 12th September



CANADA DRY STEEL BAND IN ATTENDANCE

“ Bar — Music — Thrilling Encounters

Ring Side $1.00, Ring Circle 60 Cents, Bleachers 30 Cents — {j



DO YO

Architectural Draughts-
manship Building and ;

Design Course. Course.
AM.SE., (Civil, Elec., Insurance Practice.
and Mech.) Salesmanship.
Autemobile Repairman’s
Course.

Electrical Installation and

Wiring
General

ucation.



U REALISE THE NEED

QUALIFICATION?

or ARE YOU INTERESTED IN MAKING MORE MONEY?
IF SO, ENROL NOW FOR ONE OF THESE COURSES.

Sanitary Inspector

t

Course.
Electrical Engin-
Course,

General Certificate of Ed-

v

School Certificate
Accountancy.

Course.
Police Promotion

Write for full particulars if course is not mentioned.

Write to the:

Caribbean Educational

Institute

P.O. Box, 307, P.

Trinidad
Agents for :
BRITISH INSTITUTE

TECH. & BRITISH TUTORIAL
INSTITUTE, LONDON

THERE IS NO



Course.

{ |

i

Petroleum Technology
Course.

Course.

i

Course.

‘



0.8.,

Address

OF ENG.
Interest

g if dupes

TOMORROW——-POST TODAY!

POST COUPON TO P.O.
BOX 307, P-O.S.

Please send me Free Book.
Name

Lj

Subject of Career of





AY,












































SEPTEMBER



BLABDON

& ce.

A.F.S., F.V.A.

Extensive Listings of Good
Class Property and Land
Always Available

FOR SALE

—_-

NEW BUNGALOW, LODGE
LAND, ST. MICHAEL. — We are
instructed to offer.this very
sirable home constructed by a
ing firm of byildipg contraetors.
The re eRe, S s
epacious bedrooms, with built-in
wardrobes, la drawing) room,
separate dining room, kitchenette
with breakfast room, and large
pantry. The garage and servant's
quarters are detached. Mains
water and quota of electric light
This property is situated ina mew
and select residential area from
which there are fine panoramic
views of Bridgetown. and the har-
bour. The site is very cool a
only 2% miles from town centre.
The property is available with from
approx. ‘4 to 1's acres as required
and the price asked is very fair
indeed. We can recommpnd this
listing very highly.

BUILDING PLOTS. LODGE
LAND, St. Michael, We offer 4
attractive lots in this new devel-
opment area, varying in size from
10,000 to 18,000 sq. ft. apprax., all
with excellent views. Water and
light available.

BRIGHTWOOD, St. Lawrence. A
pleasant and comfortable property
which mellows nice’y with, its
surroundings. Own beach frontage
and exeecllent bathing facilities.
Three bedrooms, living room and
dining room, kitchen, separate
toilet and shower, wide L shaped
verandah looking se@a-wards. Sep-
arate garage and servants’

a bod

Ideal seaside home in
residential quarter.
BUNGALOW, Nr.
A_ well-built

MODERN
three

SILVER be
stone bungalow containin,
bedrooms, ol! with washbasins and
built in wardâ„¢pbes of cedar,
Spacious lounge, living room with
picture windows allowing unob-
structed views sea-wards. Good
kitchen, garage land com-
prises apptox, 1% acres, Further
details on application.

RESIDENCE, THE GARDEN,
WORTHING — Modern coral stone
bungalow on. corner site with
wide frontages, Pleasant garden
with flower beds, lawn, concrete
patio, and number of bearing fruit
trees Accommodation comprises
large living room, covered gallery,
3 bedrooms wiih built-in ward-
robes, well fitte’ Kitchen, garage
with covered wsy to house, ser-
vants’ quarters and all usual
offices. All public utility services.
â„¢ our opinion this property is
one of the most attractive homes
now available in the medium price
range.

MODERN HOME, St. Peter —
A luxuriously appointed residence,
with four bedrooms, 3 tiled bath-
rooms with hot and cold, butler’s
pantry, kitchen, storerooms, 2
garages. The grounds are expert.
ly laid out with a profusion of
flowering shrubs. Own right of
way to sea,

RESIDENCE, BLACK ROCK —
Soundly constructed property with
3 bedrooms, 2 living rooms, dining
room and gallery. On land of ap-
prox. 1 acre. * Offered at £3,000,

BUILDING LAND, ST. LAW-
RENCE beeper _ ak wide plot
in good position w sea
frontage. Teal site for sea-side
bungalow, One of the few vacant
lots available on this popular
coust,

11, GRAEME HALL TERRACE
—2 Storey coral stone house with
3 bedrooms, dining and living
room, verandah & kitchenette up-
stairs, with garage, serv: 4
quarters and laundny below.
house is set well back in its
grounds of about 2/3 acre, is not
overlooked and has pgeemmueted
view seawards. Open to

LAND, TWEEDSIDE ROAD—On
main road with 101 frontage.
Weal situation for business
premises. Total area 18,738 sq, ft,

BUSINESS PREMISES—DWELL-
ING HOUSE, ROEBUCK STREET.
Good situation for retafl si in
this busy part of town, £2, .

SWEETFIELD, St. Peter — An
estate type house built of stone.
Contains large living room with
French wnittows leading onto
covered verandahs with view of
sea. % bedrooms, kitchen, store-
rooms and usual
garage and servants’ quarters.
Approx 2% acres well laid out
pr with right of way over
ench.

COVE SPRING HOUSE, ST.
JAMES — One of the few prop-
erties on this popular coast with
a completely private and secluded
bathing beach. The grounds of
about 1Â¥% acres are well wooded
and could readily be converted
into one of the show plates of
the Island. The house is of 2
storeys and possesses noticeable
character.

NEW BUNGALOW, ROCKLEY—
Commodious home with 3 bed-
rooms, large living room, wide
verandah with gooa view, Kitchen,
pantry, servants’ quarters and
storerooms. Good situation near
Golf Course £4,300.

NEWTON LODGE, MAXWELL
COAST Solidly constructed
stone house containing enclosed
galleries, spacious drawing room
aud dining room, and breakfast
room, 3 bedrooms, 2 garages etc.,
Lately occupied by U.S. Consul,

VILLA ROSA — Passage Road,
City. Very attractive and centrally
located stone bungalow with
double carriageway, on, approx.
imately 14,000 sq. ft, This
built property contains a front
gallery large ounge, separate
dining room, 3 large bedrooms, 2
bathrooms and toilet, pantry and,
kitehen, Good courtyard at rear,
Very reasonable figure asked,

PROPERTY, WHITE PARK
ROAD —Solidly built 2 storey
house with 7 bedrooms, spacious
reception rooms and dining room}
also detached annex with es
room and 2 bedrooms, Suitab!
for conversion to flats,
house, school or offices,

WINDY WILLOWS, PROSPECT,
St. JAMES — Soundly construct-
ed stone bungalow with spacious
living room, 2 large and 1
bedrooms, exceliently _ placed
verandah directly overlooking the
sea, downstairs kitchen, gorvants’
totm, and storerooms, Otters in-

vited,
dee
RENTALS





;
NEW HOUSE—ROCKLEY NEW
ROAD, Near Golf Course. Un-

_durnished . With immediate pos-

Civil Service Entranee || } a,

,WHITEHALL FLATS — Cod-
rington Hill. Choice of 4 unfur-
nished self-contained flats.
BRIGHTWOOD, St, Lawrence
Gap Compact furnished bunga-
low available from Sept. Ist.
Own sea frontage. ‘
11, GRAEME HALL TERRACE-<«
Furnished from Sept. Ist.

NEWTON LODGE, MAXWELL’S
COAST Furnished or unfur-
nished with immediate possession,

Plantations Building
Phone 4640

DS







Â¥
q
5
4
E

Se

ia

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7.



SEA AND AIR
TRAFFIC

In Carlisle Bay

Sch. Lydina A., Sch, Zita Wonita, Sch.
Mary. M. Lewis, ‘Sch. Frances W Smith,
Sch. Franklys D. R., Sch Lucille M:
S*nith. Sch. Anita H., Sch. At Last, Sch.
D'Ortac, ScR. Laudalpha, Sch. Gardenia
W., Seh. United Pilgrim) Sch. Augustus
B. Compton, M.V. Gloria Maria, Sch.
Emeline, Sch, Merion Belle Wolfe, Sch.
Amberjack Mac.

ARRIVALS
S.S. Trader, 3.196 from Liverpool,
under Captain ©. i Watts; “Agents:—





Cope ¢

Sch. Everdene, for
Sch. Harriet Whittakep,
Banks.

Listening Hours





SUNDAY, ee. i ge
4.06—T.15 pm 76M, hatha
4p.m The ‘News,

rary p.m Interlude,
4.15 p.m. For the Gammon Good, 4.3)
p.m. Sunday Half Hour, 5 p.m. From
the Bible, 5.10 p.m. Interlude, 5.15
p.m. Composer of the Week, 5.45 p.m
Arthur's Inn, 6 6.15 p.m. English Magazine,
6.45 p.m. Programme Parade and In-
terlude, 7 p.m ie News, 7.10 p.m.
Rome News ftom Britain
9-5R 10-08 » m a henute 31 2M

7.15 p.m Caribbean ate 4
Sunday Service, 8.15 p ish
reel. $ p.m Piao’ rats

rom Editorials,

omenade Concerts, 0 = ee Front News.
10.10 p.m. News Palk, _s P p.m. London
Forum, 10.45 p.m. A h Divided

yer. sana 1953
4 oni» 19 70M, 3

4p.m Se 4.10 p.m. The Daily

Service, 4.15 p.m. The Case of the Night-

W atchman's Friend, 4.45 p.m. Variety,
5 p.m. Rugby League eee 5.05 p.m.
himsky-Kotsakov, m. Souvenirs
of Music, 6 p.m Welsh Miscellany, 6.15
pom Listeners’ Choiee, 6.45 p.m. Sports
Round-up and Programme F'arade; 7 p.m.
The News, 7.10 p.m. Home News from
Britain

7 are pm 25. 58F, 31 2M

7.15 p.m ‘Books to “Pead and t the Arts,

7.45 p.m. Ballads and Songs, 8.15 p.m
Radio Newsreel, 8.30 p.m Europea
Survey, 8.45 p.m. From the Editorials,
9 p.m Enter Moonshine, 9.35 p.m
Majestic Orchestra, 10 p.m. The News,
10. p.m. News Talk, 10,16 p.m. The
Health of Man, 10.30 p.m. Tip Top Tunes

Jamaica
Returns
Thanks

LONDON

A year ago, all Britain was col-
lecting money for the relief of
distressed Jamaica after the great
hurricane disaster hit the island.
Now another natural disaster has
hit Britain and Jamaica has taken
the opportunity to repay some ot
the help she received from Brit-
ain a year ago.

n tons of Jamaican bananas,
ten tons of Jamaican sugar and
one ton of Jamaican coffee ar¢
being set up by the Jamaican
Government for distribution
throughout the areas of North
Devon which have been devas-
tated by floods, Financial con-
tributions to the flood relief fund
are also coming from Jamaica

Mr, Alexander Bustamante,
on his way to Britain for ba-
mana talks with ur British
Ministry of Food make a
personal visit to Leia the
holiday resort that was almost
completely destroyed by the
flocds, to convey Jamaica’s sor-
row, --B.U.P.



| Fins '

1952

CHURCH
SERVICES

ANGLICAN
be u ay aestal CHURCH
Sw ¥. soa th
8 am. H

Sunday School; 7 p.m.
Sermon.

BETHEL METHODIST CIRCUPT
BETH

EL: 6 a.m. Holy Communion; 1)

a.m. Rev. D. Mason, Holy Communion
7 p.m. Mr. P_ Deane

DALKEITH: 11 a.m. Mr. G. Bascombe:
7 pm, Rev. T. J. Purley, Holy Com

munion
ONT: 9 a.m. Rev. T. J. Burley,
Holy Communion, 7 p.m. Mr. H. Grant
DISTRICT: 9 a.m. Mr.
tot p.m. Mr. H. Harris

PROVIDENCE; 1] a.m. Mr. D. White,

7 p.m. Mr. Cc
A

+ MM -a.m. Mr. J. Tedor,
of New Members and Communion ,

7 pm. Mr. H. Sargeant
RICES: 9 a.m. Revd. S. W_ C. Crosse,
oe it of Lard’s Supper, 7 p.m.

Sunday Schools at 3 p.m,
MORAVIAN
ROEBUCK STREET—11 a.m.

Service (followed a Holy Comm s
Freacher: Rev E. New; 7
Evening Service, AR. E. BE. .

GRACE im ase 11 a.m. Morning i,
Preacher: Mr. W. Hayde; 7 p.m. Evenirig
Service.

FULNECK—11 a.m. Morning Service,
eacher: Mr. oS. es 7 p.m,
Service, : Mr. O.

MONTGO! 9 E
the *Dehere : Mr. °

MBE—7 p.m. Evening ‘Service,

Preacher; r G. Downes.
OP na Pg mn. a veping Service,

1 vine
sultaay & School, 7.15 p.m Holy “Comin

oh
sT. fas aston ar on BAPTIST
a.m. ins and Sermon, 7
song and pes reacher fo yon

services, the Rev Grant,
Minister-in-charge 5 p.m Monday:
‘Wednesday; Friday; training for youthr
this will be conducted by the Rev. L
Bruce-Clarke (Assistant Pastor) and Mrs
Olga Browne

THE 8ST Jorgras EPISCOPAL
ORTHODOX
Weiches Road

11 a.m. Matins and Ser

Evensong and Sermon, p' teacher tor ise
services the Rev. Descnainal c.
Minister In charge. 7.30 p.m,

evening prayers and address, preacher
the Rev. L. Bruce Clarke, the subject
will be “The world at Saint Paul's birth
(Saint Luke: 23 chapter verse 38)

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE

First Church of Christ, Scientist,

Bridgetown, Seas, ® Pay | Street
Sundays 11 a.m
Wednesdays 8 p.m. x ‘device which

includes Testimonies of Christian Selence
Healing.

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 1952
Subject of Lesson-Sermon: MAN.
Golden Text: 1 John 3: 1. Behold, what

menner of loye the Father hath bestowed
upon us, that we should be called the
sons of God.
The following Citations are incteget in
the Lesson-Sermen: The Bible
for & have created him for my glory, I
have formed him; yea, I have made him
jah 48:7
Science and Health with Key to the
Scriptures, by MARY BAKER EDDY.
Love, the divine Princible, is the
Father and Mother of the universe, in-
cluding man.
a






hes ing me

Al. Wha inte

cents, Wir inter

at Li noe [






ASTHM.
Dissolve

Since the discovery of MENDACO
by a famous physician it is no lo
necessary for anyone to suffer
choking, wheezing, gasping Asthma.
MENDACO does away with expen-
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Sleep Like a
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AIENDACO not only brings almost
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writes: “I was almos* dead








THE BARBADOS POLICE



You Require Police Assistance
You See or Hear Anything

which

suspicions. |
You have any Information

which

er | weight, suffered co

ate assistance to the Police

pavcus

i ne Had lost 40 ly in
fle choking
and strangling every fle owldn't
sleep—expected to dle) MENDACO
stopped spasms first night andl
have had no Asthma since In over 3
iat ."" Mrs. A. W. writes: “I had

sthma for 26 years. After using
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ion; 9 a.m. |
Matins and See ;. & p.m.|

vensong and

: Mam. Mr. H. Lewis,

m
p.m. Revd. S. W. C. Crosse Redihion
‘¥: 11 a.m. Mr. D. Hunte,

p.m. Brenig

; M
Bock A" *,cupRcn

be copie 3? Eile .

SUNDAY ADVOCATE









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energy and tone up the whole nervous system.
Giving new vitality it fortifies you against fever
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| BUCKFAST
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}
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PRINTED CREPES




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ENGINEER
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Me" x I IM
fa h’, 144”, 144%, 9”, 246”, 3”, 312”, 4”
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5h” d< 2”, 21%", 3”, 346”, 4”, 5”, 6”
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All Lengths in 3", 4%” 7%", 36”
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|
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i}





e
we Please CUT OUT and Save for Reference

GENERAL GENERAL FY ARDWARE ‘orrces

RICKETT STREET (Opposite Post Office)







PHONE 4918



BIRTHDAY SHOPPING
SEE YOUR JEWELLERS

LOUIS L. BAYLEY

FOR THE IDEAL GIFTS FOR BOTH LADIES
AND GENTLEMEN.

FOR THE

Rhinestone Earri and Necklets to match, Ciro
Necklets, Gold Bal

$s, Royal Crown
Derby Sets in the most tte ae, also Signet
Rings which can be initialed to order.

FOR THE GENTLEMEN:=

Waterman’s Fountain Pen Sets, Krementz Tie Slides,
Gold Tie Slides, Identity gles, Cigarette Cases,
Cigarette Lighters, and Beer Mugs.

LADIES:=

ALWAYS VISIT YOUR JEWELLERS, THE STORE
WHERE YOU CAN BE SURE OF THE BEST
AT ALL TIMES.

LOUIS L. BAYLEY

of

Bolton Lane &

Aquatic Club Booth
Phone 3909 &

Phone 4897.



——<—<—_—
———



L



LADIES’ SHOES ...........
RAYON, SILKS, from 48c. per yd.

ADVOCATE
STATIONERY

Broad Si. & Greystone





per yd. $ .95
per pair 2.88

Pen and Pencil Sets,
Sharpener
Geometry Sets
Pencil Boxes
Kules
Exercise Books
Drawing Books
Set Squares
Protractors
Compasses
Dividers
Chemistry Stencils
Mapping Pens
Erasers
Slates
Black Board Chalk

Peveil

SILK UMDIES — 2 pair
BRASSIERES

MORE NEW GOODS

PAGE

with A
MIGHTY
RUSH!



HOUSE COATS from $3.98 each

1.00

per pair .68

DAILY.



THE MODEL STORE — Corner Broad & Tudor Sts.

Dictionaries
School Bibles
Atlases
The Revised Latin Primer by
Kennedy
Latin Prose Composition by North
& Willard
Douglas Grammar
Initiatory Grammar by
J. Douglas
Step By Step Parts I &
Business Book-Keeping by
Routley & Hall
Pitman’s Shorthand Instructor
Key to Shorthand Instructor —
Pitman

m=

i

Select these Early and
avoid disappointment

=



FIFTEEN



!
|
|

»*



PAGE SIXTEEN







NOTES

@ From Page 12

accommodation in the schools so

Jury Acquit Three Of Conspiracy Charge | Zz ae
| Zee

To Break And Enter

An Assize jury yesterday acquitted 21-year-old Michael
Gaskin, a carpenter, 18-year-old McField Belgrave, and thabe epentuaily: sombilsortweda-
Rudolph Blackman of the charge of conspiring between (4; on may be introduced be-
February 29 and March 1 this year, to break and enter the tween the ages of 5 and 14, It ts
dwelling house of Elon Evelyn of Golf Club Road, Christ probable that compulsory atten-
Church. cence will be introauced by stages

and rish b: arish.”
Belgrave had also been charged on a second count, The doeuinent Sats with ‘echi-
attempting to break and enter the house on March 1, and cation up to August 1951. I write
the jury returned a verdict of guilty against him in this. in Reptsaber ae ere je
7 nia > 4 io ementar: 001 les: ’
He was sentenced to six months imprisonment. Siehea’ (eer ae ot SS












Hearing of the 9 ieee it s ; School is to be sold to the Sani-
three days before Mr. Justice 7 : tary Commissioners) and when
J. W. B. Chenery, Acting Puisne The People Of shone ate over 30,000 on the roll
Judge. of the Elementary Schools.

This was the las: case of the Barbados Another significant fact for me
July Sitting of this Court. is that for the first time in many

Mr. L. A. Williams, holding @ From Page 9 years the aver’ge attendance at
papers for Mr. G. H. Adams, he Jas: pub:.c appearance of these schools has receded. With
appeared for Gaskin, and Mr. J. the Quakers ay a body in this more children on the roll, the
E.. T. Brancker appeared for jciand was their farewell address Numbers attending have been
Blackman. Belgrave was unrepre- 4, Governor Grenville in 1753; actually less and not merely tess
sented. _ from this date until the death of iM proportion. The Report ex-

Mr. W. W. Reece, Q.C., Solici- thoi. jast Atto:ney in 1786 their plains the reduction away in an
tor General, prosecuted for he atin fa radually déclined, epidemic of measles, —

Crown "a 1771 the Guéker ‘firms - of The truth is that without the
His Lordsh» summed up the 5, * 77 : Godling autablishad alleged epidemic of measles there
case. yesterday. He said that he 2@R0UrTy and oie a Sandel would have been this recession as
would) sav at the outset that # branch of their business IM Jong ag 12 and 18-year-old -chil-
, they cams to make up Baibados. This firm acted as @ dren, who attended school for the
their minds on the second they °@nk and made advances to land- first time, are put in fifth and
vould. doubtl b> presented ©Whers to assist them in working sixth standard and the teachers
vith far les: difficulty than the their plantations and other busi- called upon to look after three
fi the evidence to that being "ess against their crops etc,, “streams’ of children ina class
more straightforward and far Wen these debtors failed numbering anything between 25
less difficult to assess. meet their liabilities this firm, 2pd 60. This is what age ane
Though as a rule he was not like the others, foreclosed on ing — ope for us in oa ados.
prone to disturb their minds with heir securities and took posses- — ae is new ee for agar
too much law, in the case before sion of the lands and other @ re ition ee, an ee a
1, he felt it wa essential caavtels offered as security. In On atic’ thet Pe iidcen
iat) they should have a fairly this way they became cwners of would stop going to school. The
clear idea in their minds of what several valuable plantations and iq excuse for not introducing
conspiracy meant, and what the other properties in the towns, compulsion was that the parents
Prosecution had to prove. together with a large number of could not afford to clothe and

The classic definition of con- slaves. feed the children. That excuse

spiracy was an agreement of two During the early years of the does not hold water today but

or more people to do an unlaw- nineteenth century, there ‘was both parents and pupils are fed
ful act, or to do a lawful act by great activity with the anti- up with the type of education at
unlawful «means, slavery movement, in which the the Elementary School today.

Quakers took a prominent part, And the only people who do not
they sought by devious ways to seem to know this are the mem-
clear themselves of any connec- bers of the Executive Committee.
tion with slavery or the slave - «=

trade It is, therefore, ironic that Out ve ~~ vee Mouse
one of the most prominent anti- » y ian vin an e

slavery agitators, Sir Thomas ;70â„¢, Para. at page 22, chap-

. roe ‘
Fowell Buxton, Bart., who was a ye Seema a
member of the House of Com- ao

“
mons was at this time closely {nation in English and Arith-

connected with Anna Barnard, a ane _— — csehdenties

There was the auuority in Mr.
Justice Willes, a great master of
Common law when he said, that
conspiraey ‘consisted, not: merely
in the intention of two or more,
but in the agreement of two or
more to-do an unlawful act or
to do a lawful act by unlawful
means, So long as such a design
rested in intention only, it was
not indictably. When two agreed

to carry it into effect, the very sleeping partner in the firm of «genools in 1950, as mentioned
plot was an act in itself and the Hanbury and Gosling, a wealthy «pn Jast year’s annual report,
act of each of the parties, prom- firm which could not have “showed that 1,657 elementary
ise against promise, actus con ‘ra flourished without slaves. Bux- ehildren in the age-group sat
actum, capable of being enforced. ton’s wife was a niece of the

“the two papers. 59 unselected
“boys of the same age-group
“from one of the aided second-

He said he would quote from

old lady, and eventually partici-
Mr. Justice Coleridge in the Queen

pated in her aunt’s fortune.

vs Murphy when he said: “I am The hurricane of October 1780 “ary schools took the same ex-
bound to tell you that although destroyed all of the Quaker’s “amination.”

the common design is the root jeeting-houses, and apparently “In English the scores for the
of the charge, it is not necessary these were never rebuilt, due to “elementary children ranged |
to prove that these parties came the sparsity of their numbers, “from 0 to 65 (Median 14) and |
together and actually agreed in Bea Manuscript. Volume ‘for the secondary children
terms to have this common de- | ‘jyiscellaneous, p. 393 “from 3 to 51 (Median 28).”
sign and to pursue it by common "9 “Tiicas Manuscript Volume “In Arithmetic the range of
means and so to carry it into exe- | “\iccellaneous, p. 396 “scores for the elementary
cution, This is not necessary be- °° (Published in the BIMLHS, “children was 0 to 50 (Medium

cause im many cases of the most
clearly established conspiracies,
there are no means to prove any
such thing, and neither law nor
commonsense requires that it
should be proved.

The evidence was fresh in their
minds, Learned counsels, both for
the Prosecution and the defence,
had treated it in great detail, and
he need not go through it with
that minuteness again,

The Chief witness on which the
Prosecution was relying and
around whom counsel for the
defence, especially Mr, Brancker,
made most play, was Clyde Brath-

waite,
Asked To Join

Clyde Brathwaite had told them
how Gaskin had approached him
and asked him to join with them,
but how he had afterwards told
the Evelyns and the Police, De-
fence Counsel had pointed
out that Brathwaite was a
man with a bad record, while
Mr. Reece had said that he had
redeemed himself and was try-
ing to lead an upright life. Well
they, the jury, were men of the
world’ and had seen Brathwaite
and would be able to come to a
conclusion as to whether they be-
lieved him,

“6) and for the secondary
“children 0 to 43 (Median 17).”
“Although a few elementary
“children was 0 to 50 (Medan
“best of the secondary school
“children who took the examin-
“ation, the median scores indi-
“cated a much lower general
“standard in the elementary

“schools.”

This is the result of an exam-
ination held by the Department.
T now ask, what more proof do
I need for my statement that the
standard of basic education in this
island has declined? The only
means of checking it is to enquire
into the methods of administra-
tion of the system and repair the
weak spots,

—J.E.B.

Police Band At
Queen’s Park

The Police Band conducted by
S/Sgt. C. Archer will render the
following programme of music at
Queen's Park this evening at 4.45
p.m.

+ rocessional March
“The War March of the Priest”

Journal V. XIV, p. 82—83.)
(To be continued.)

—— -

“Valiant”
Undergoing Repairs

THE launch “Valiant” was tak-
en out of the water yesterday to
undergo certain general repairs.
Last week the “Trojan” was un-
dergoing repairs, and the ‘“Val-
fant” has now become the second
jJaunch to be repaired. Repairs to
the “Trojan” are expected to be
completed within the next few
days.





SPECIAL MEETING
OF B.N.A. NURSES

A special meeting of registered
nurses eMgaged in private nurs-
ing, will be held at the Barbados
Nurses Association, on Tuesday
at 4 p.m,

would say guilty, if they thought
that the Prosecution had failed to

; ; Mendelssohn

Naturally, if they demolished make out their case, they would Overture “Juanita Suppe
the chief witness, the rest of the say not guilty, and if they had » Selection “Iolanthe” Sullivan
evidence would not matter so

doubt as to the vital parts of the
case they would say not guilty.
The jury retired for about 15

Two Ballads: ‘
(a) “At Dawning” Cadman
(b) “Somewhere a Voice is

much, but it was purely a matter
for them,

a Hen. ain to decide oe me minutes to consider their verdicts. Calling” Laki
efendants were just ordinarily They returned a verdict of not P ri ** sical Ji y
cheat thie the ‘deturday nigix da verdict of no otpourri “A Musical Jig Saw

guilty in the first count with regerd
jo each defendant, They returned
a verdict of guilty in the second
count, that in which Belgrave was
charged with attempting to break
and enter Evelyn’s house.
Belgrave had one previous con-
viction for loitering with intent
when he was put on 18 months’
probation,

as Mr. Brancker had told them, Agen

or whether they were there to
carry out the designs of the pre-
vious Thursday night.

Mr. Williams had
method in cross-examination of
trying to show that Brathwaite
was the essential spirit, but what-
ever they might think of that, he

Aria
“I Know My Redeemer Liveth”
Handel
Intermezzo

adopted the “In a Monastery

yarden”
Ketelbey
Descriptive Piece
“The Phantom Brigade”

} ) Myddleton

would point out that there was ~ His Lordship told him that he Hymns: rT

no evidence to that effect. had not profited from the term of “The Lord Is My Shepherd’
He wine sat Sealy ype the probation. He would not be 282 A&M .

onus of proof was on the Frosecu- doing his duty to the community “Be T rdian ¢

tion. If they felt that the Prosecu- \f he sentenced him to less than tT eae een ee Me

Guide.
GOD SAVE THE QUEEN !

| They'll Do It Every Time dct 8 tame oe By Jimmy Hatlo

tion had made out their case, they six months’ imprisonment.



M IN THE HOSPITAL, HAS
A Siok SON, —s IN 77 HEAVEN,

HIS CUP DOTH RRUN

; s
NOTHER SON: My TWO
goys! PAPA'S PALS, THAT'S WHAT!
THE THREE. MUSKETEERS - MY PALS:
TLL MAKE, BASEBALL PLAYERS OUT
OF THEM! WE'LL SEE ALL THE FOOT~_
BALL GAMES! CAMPING FISHING +
WELL DO EVERYTHING
TOGETHER:*+











Now THE KIDS HAVE GROWN , AND HOW

THEY LOVE TO PLAY+ BUT DOES PAPA |
EVER ODIN HIS PALS?’THE ANSWER IS WAY NAY!



































| SIOE AN’ HAVE

\A KETCH, HUH,

‘
MOM F we
PS x




v



SUNDAY

ADVOCATE



One Jailed For Trying gpucATION Crichlow Meets Death

By Misadventure

Death by misadventure was the
verdict returned by a nine man
jury when the inquest into the
circumstances surrounding the
death of Edwaid Crichlow., a
clerk of Sherbeurne, St. John Was
concluded at District “A” Police
Court before His Worship Mr.
G. B. Griffith acting Police
Coroner of District “A” yester-
day.

Edward Crichlow was involved
in an accident on Villa Nova
Road, St. John on July 24 with
a bicycle while riding a motor
cycle. He was taken to the Gen-
eral Hospital after the accident
but died there on July 29

Dr. J. A. Browne who per-
formed the post mortem exam-
ination at the Hospital Mortuary
on July 29 said that there’ were
no marks of violence on the body
and no damage to the brain.

Opening the bowels there were
signs of peritoritis and the left
lung showed signs of pneumonia.
This lung was tied down to the
surrounding area, ;

In his opinion death was due
to peritonitis which resulted fron»

ruptured guts followed by pneu= Jmpact.

monia,

Mable Crichlow wife of the
deceased said that on July 24 she
received a telephone message

saying that her busband was in- ;

volved in an accident on Villa
Nova Road with a bicycle. He
yas taken to Dr. Carter at the St.
John’s Almshouse who ordered
him to the General Hospital, He
died there on July 29. .

Twenty-one-year-old labourer

iching, Burning



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Denzil Reece told the Court that
1 July 24 he was sitting on the
if of the bicycle ridden by

Leroy Burgess. The bicycle was

being ridden along Villa Nova

Road going in. the direction of

Bridgetown.

As the rider turned the corner
to Wilson Road, he saw a motor
cycle coming towards them and
as this motor cycle reached them
there was a collision. The motor-
cyce struck the bicycle and he
saw the rider of the motor cycle
fall to the ground.

To the jury Reece said that he
aw the motor cycle when it was
about 10 feet away from him.

Leroy Burgess of Wilson Hill,
St. John—the rider of the bicycle
—tola the court that on July 24
he was riding his bicycle on
Villa Nova Road coming from
work at Venture, Reece was on}
the bar of the bicycle. As they}
were coming out of Villa Nova
road on the bicycle, a collision}
took place between the bicycle |
and a motor cycle which was on}
Sherbourne Road. |

He never knew what happened
but he was unconscious after the

*% Another witness Otti Holder of
Sherbourne, St. John said that
ihe collision between the bicycle
and the motor cycle took place
1s the bicycle was coming out of
Villa Nova Road.

There was no other traffic on}
the road at the time. j

At this stage the Coronér
summed up and the jury returned
a verdict of death by misadven-
ture,

and Smarting ot





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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7. 1952



——





FISHERY OFFICIALS
VISIT BEACHES

During the week Mr, D. W.|
Wiles, Fisheries Officer, and Mr. |




ea

J. i. Drayton of the Fisheries ov
Office, visited Reids Bay, St. Sg
James, Speightstown and Foul

Bay, explaining the new Fisher- AU ry
tes Act to fishermen. Last night (S ee |

Mr. Wiles gave a talk at Paynes
Bay.

Next week Mr. Wiles and Mr.
Drayton are hoping to visit Sil-
ver Sands, the Crane and other
areas.





IN HOSPITAL
AFTER ACCIDENT

Genierie De Cambra of Haggatt
Hall, St. Michael, was detained at
the General Hospital on Septem-
ber 4 after she was involved in an
accident with the motor car M-317
owned by Mr. H. A. Tudor of the
Ivy, and driven by St. Clair Smith
of Rouen Vi e, St, Michael,
about 3.30 p.m, the same day.

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————_— SO







Full Text

PAGE 1

MJVDAY -IH1HIBF.R 7 IH2 SVNDAY ADVOCATE r\GF. NTH* It OGLES OF THE SEA — 0Y IAN GALE Roche Brasiliano — A Dutch Pirate Poc*ie I Spanish sounding name, was tx.ni %  t Groninghen in the L'niUrd ProvinceHe Ml Rivrn the name "Brasiliauo"' by his comrades Mciu he had Uvad for a fa m time In Brjs.l, from whence he had been forced to Il> when the Portuguese tiruM UM Dutch from the country. He managed to get to Jamaica, and having no other way to earn >oa living. Joined the pirates. For some tune he served aa an ordinary seaman and was very popular with his shipmate*. Then one day a mutiny broke out on board the ship and the mutineers fitted Out u mall boat, made BraMliano then captain, and left the whip for good. Braiiiiaito and hi* crew v/ere In luck, for few days later they took a groat thin coming from New Spain, whuh was found to contain great QunUtfaM of pitta. He took thu hhip to Jamaica where the pliates spent their money carousing. Esqueinelixw. the hlstorMka of the BnecauMttB, gays ol il %  Though in his private affairs he governe* himself very well, he would oftentimes appear b and foolish when in drink, running up and down the streets, beating and woundingihote he met, no person daring t>> make resistance." No Utiurtcr Like most of the buccaneers of the period he gava no uU' r U'! tithe Spaniard*. In fact, in Hispaniola he commanded several to right | M td for on hour and with with them be roasted alive on wooden spits practically every shot the pirates Jamaica for not showing him hog-yards killci a horseman until the In Port Royal they abandoned steal pigs to Spaniards were put to flight. In -hemselves to debauchery^ *£tthe battle the pirates had lost only mellng says that he had THE PEOPLE Oh HA RRADOS XXII. — "8H\HR\ * QUAKERS 99 KOCHr. BRASILIANO they sailed for nravMon hli snip mwalerrlbt.-slormoff C.inpech) KOO %  tiu-v vn. pursuej jioraes for provisions they set off wine, and placing It in the street by a troop of Spanish horsemen in search of, loot. would force those that passed by tiiree times their number, and alraptured .mother ship going from to drink with him. uhrpatenln. though they wan faint with New Spain to Maracaibo, laden also to pistol them If thev would hunger and thirst such was Brasiwith a varied cargo including not He would do the like with llano's influence with thorn Unit After a few days at sea they barrels of beer and ale; and wet he persuaded them to light. The pieces of eight. Taking this ship peoples' clothes without regarding whether he spoiled their upparel." He adds a cautionary note, how' ever, about getting into debt in J Jamaica 'for the inhabitants there easily sell one another for debt." In fact, that happened to his "liberal" master But to get back to Brasiliano. After spending all his money he iriaiiised another expedition and' set off for Campechy. When theyi got off that city Brasiliano and some of his companions got into g canoe and paddled in to spy out' the l;md Unfortunately for them they were captured and thrown Into tail. The Onvcrnor Intended to hang every one of them next day. but Biailliano had a stratagem. He wrote • letter to the Governor in the names of other pirates in the area saying that If he did not release his prisoners they would never give quarter to another S; .I.I., ill Being afraid, the Governor released Brasillnno and his men after exacting an oath from them that they would give up piracy "for ever." To get them out of the way he sent them as oniin.ii-y seamen In a galleon bound for Spnln. But the pirates did not stay l-ng In Spain. A". Esquemellng says, they were soon back In Jamaica "from whence they set forth again to ta, committing PTcater robberies and cruelties than before; but especially abusing the poor Spaniards, who fell Into tl.eir hands." PIRATES CAROl'SIM. NO series of articles would I* eomoletc without a short sketch of the 'Quakers' or 'The So-ietv of Friends, for it was due to then agitation that the minds of mci. .n infUicntl.il pusitiu. brought to bear on the condition. %  Q iTlV.'d !' Barbados in 1655, anil this w.> within eight years of its btRl founded by George Fox It wiv brought to Harbados l.v twOBiill Man rahM and An': J usting, who brought back an strtbuted literature on this mm ter which created a deep Imprcs sion on many of the prominent inhabitants. Thus Barbados has been referred ;,, as "tba nursery of the truth in the Western ln-nit.pheic. by the Quakers By 165J). there were several meolinghouscs in different parts of the Island. One was in Tudor Street, which was after referred to %  'Quakers' Meeting Street Up to this date no complete system of organisation had been established In England, but a good many influential persons had adopv.i |gw Quaker principles and become professed 'Friends.' The diversity of human nature is such that once there is opposition there is a striving for success. but as soon as this success has been obtained and there Is no longer any opposition, all interest dwindles until It disappears Such Is the history of Quakerism in Barbados* once there was persecution there was an Increase In their numbers and prosperity fi r their group; but as soon as they were legally recognised and there was no longer opposition, thennumbers dwindled until not one member was left The opposition to the Quskers was not confined to Barbados alone, and many Barbadians became zealous advocates and teachers of this doctrine. In 1656 many went away to New England, and amongst these were eight of their Speakers or leaders, these were less popular in New England 'nan In Barbados, so were immediately ienl bark home. The case of John Rous and his friends It an nxcellent example. John was the son of Lt. Col. Rous. n well-todo Barbadian of some standing and a commander of one of the local regiments of Militia. John carried the step-daiiKhter of George Fox. the founder of Quakerism, ami became zealous In the propagation of the views he had unbraced. In 1658, as a 'ravelling minister, he Want OVM >n New England, and in spite of 1 he existing laws against 'Friends* .continued lo ]>r which means 1 was present at each of their meetings." "They had need of tnformntinii ->n many things, for divers disorders had crept in I exhorted them to be watchful us to marriage* As in Friends' children marrying too young, as at 13 or 14 years of ace I showed them the hurts that attended such childish marriages. I recommended to their car* the providing of convenient burying places, which in some parts were yet wonting" George Fox spent three months in Barbados, during which time he advised the Friends to train their slave* up In the fear of God. and to see that their overseer* dealt mildly with them, and not use cruel methods of punishment, as was too often the custom, also that tfter a certain number of years •4 service, slaves should be set free. George Fox also gives an account of a large meeting which Wai attended by people from all I .iris of the Island, and states that In this gathering were several n'urnineiit persons such as Judges HI Justices, colonels and captains liy the year 167 the Quakers; were causing considerable uneasiness in this Island with the main I Dortlon of slave owners. There is no doubt that this wai due to the teachings of George Fox. This 1 re .ntment terminated In the first i law which was pasaod against then* in 1676. the Preamble of Which reads—-" Whereas of late many Negroes have been suffered to remain at the Meetings of Quak, iron of their Doctrine, and taught in their Principles, whereby the safety of,Oh is Island ba much hasarded"" This act r two years. ( lnuses were modi porpotu The strong opposition to the, Quakers in 1680 caused the Governor, Sir Jonathan Atkins, to ardor th.it their meeting-house In Bridgetown to be rioted and thr ^eats hi be removed, but thin was subsequently re-opened ami usid %  ears The Quakers made complaint* lo the I-ords of Trade and Plantation-, mi lite 17th of February IMfl/7, and In consequence of this the Lieutenant Governor. Mr Saeda placoa these matters be'..I. tha Council, a Committee was. appointed "for examining and fully Inquiring Into the said business of the Quakers; and to draw up a Report of the truth < were not to IKsubjected to ,u, Mnc or tine" which would excee.l the usual value for the hit in ^ , #) an ii.imI %  The food for fattiily Jitii ess imiHU*id In fonifor I-.", i ma rvi m < tu added In 1678, and It al in 1611.• JUST RECEIVED BOOTS MINDIF MINERAL SALTS tor Cat le and Other Livrstork Mindif Mineral HalU for rattle contain balanced quantities of the essential elements — calcium, phosphorus, copper, cobalt. Iron, HKIIIH'. and manganese together with an adequate proportion of common salt. The only practical way <<'. ensuring that the cattle are receiving adequate minerals, is by feeding them directly with the ration. Directions far I'se Cows ia milk Add 3 lb or Mindif Mlnii.I S..IK to each OWt of concentrates fed for milk production. Altcinativeh. give individual cows I w per day for those giving up lo 3 gallons, plus 1 '* oi. for each gallon over three I'kgs. af 2 las. far I6r. IUCE WKATIIKRIU.AU l.lsaltrd Also In Bags 112 lbs. BACK TO --*—. ? )! • >/ /y // SCHOOL SUPPIIES I. INK vt: In sevrral qualities, and all Utr regulation shades from 1< la II.26 74. TR1COLI8K 1? 12.63 In White for Blouse* I'VNAMA HATS from (Lit to nil ANKLE SOCKS from 44c. to 61.17 In White and Brown GIRLS LACK SHOKS In Brown or Black Calf SUes 11 to 1", ff $7.46 pr. GIKLS LACK SHOKS In Brawn or Black Kid Sites 2 to I | 19.26 and $Hl KHAKI DRILL 64c. in II.7Z BOYS' KHAKI SHIRTS 61.39 „ PLAIN COLOURED SHIRTS 61.92 STRIPED SHIRTS 62 44 KNITTKI) SHIRTS 61-26 .. , HOSE 11.59 PELTS in Plastic and Laather 46c. and $1.9 SHOCH la Brawn or Black Slses II lo M, 67.49 Brown or Blacfc Stses 2 to 5' ; 17 59 A 69.32 — ALSO — F.XKRCISK BOOKS, PENCILS. PENS, NIBS. CRAYONS. INK. iltA-iKRS. I'KNCIL SHARPENERS. PAINT BOXES, PENCIL BOX! V, THERMOS ELAHKS. PLASTIC TUMBLERS sng CI'PS. and M IMHII.BAliS HARRISON'S BROAD STREET DIAL 2664 Whether it's hot Whether it's cold DuiilopiJIo tuptetneiq Comfrwfa4& It's pure rubber w.>.ch moulds itself to e\<*ry tart of the i.umart frame. Yet instantly spr'itfs back into shape, bec^asc" of its tiny interconnect d air COIIK which ajlvi feet vfiiiikHioii Obtainable In MalU^wr. .Sl7. %  693.54 each 3' 3" 4" —464.42 each Ix 0' V x 4" 942.39 each Morris Chair Cushions Hard for Seat 6I5J9. Morns Chair Cu-hions Soft for Hack 61312. > %  %  CtUUf Cushions —6664 each. Round Stool Cushions —63.66 NOW AVAILABLE AT . CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD. 10: 11. 12. & 13. Broad Street. tood l"iy vaortf -!-.. fi a elt aSdrj to %  ••. *1 %  1*1 0'**i oi*e t-ei t*li *d 1 ri'nsm. Ch.l io* M*rr tt—sspacisti* tt o< '*'T '"*• Otl 1 > %  6 (trred ICMI ln|a 111 o ..!• %  .. 4 oa. 6 oi. 14 OI. THi VITAMIN A VIAST tXTRACr GIVES COOKING EXTRA GOODNESS AND FLAVOUR dtlieioui MIL* TRAY cntf* '* CO*rt with CHOCOlATE^ FOLLOW Your Doctor's Orders... Al loon at your doclor'i examination W complrlcd and |M paHMIIf you with a pnwrlptlon . IMVMRIMr Iti* olTrrlntf vou a health-rrstnrmr. rhirl l-rin thai prcacrlplil.il Wbm OOl) IIW liillhot iniallty .IrUfiS arc (hupcnacd by a qualified staff of courteous drufilsf*—you rotu i; crlpllon lo ••KNIOIITS". QUICK AND DEPENDABLE PRESCRIPTION SERVICE GUARANTEED KNIGHTS DRUG STORES T^lW^FOOD Specials For This Week Only I -I M I I MOW COOOMALl — Uric tin l. n • ^ • IlllillS linn li I l:l IT MAI.AU %  M.I.I, I 3 J < AKK'M i Kl \M i i;\* Ki i:—per lin I.M I.M CANAUIAN MABDINKH— per UM .*•: Per do*. S.M The Abate llema rr far Caah A Carry f'ualomen Only HUNT'S CAUroRNIAN l-KACH HALVES l.ir.c tin f .83 HI'NT'St'AI.IFOHMAN HAHTI.ETT I'KARS larKC tin 1.01 HINT'S FIM'IT CCK KTAM^-largc nil •. l.-l'l'l Kill! SALADS liirxc lin 1.10 HINTS GOU1EN WHOLE KEHNEL CORN—per tin .41 VOUNO ASPAHAGt'S TIPS PAT till .. . SOUTH AFHICAN STKAWBERHY JAM —per 2-lb lin $1.08: per lb .56 KOO GLAVA JELLY per 2-lb tin " IIENE01CT BPECIAL STANDARD MAKMA1ADE —per 1-lb tin .33 ITALIAN CHILI SAUCE—p-T bottle .'3 SUN PAT CASHEW Nl'TS— per Hit 1 H UPTON'S riUENCH OOim-ptr 'in %  "" PEH1-STEIN BEER--per Ixilllc -' 1'FIU.STEIN BED) -per carton UWJ • COCKADK FINE RUM STANSFBMM SfOTT A Cm.. I.ul.










Sunday Advorcat

BARBADOS, SEPTEMBER” 7; 1952



ESTABLISHED 1895 PRICE : SIX CENTS











SS

S JET FIGHTER EXPLODES

14 DIE

Wife Sees Pilot Husband | _
Killed In Wreckage

;
|
i
f ARNBAROUGH, England, Sept. 6. ——— ered 5 ee
A BRITISH jet fighter plane disintegrated over 120,000| : !
spectators at Farnborough air show Saturday killing 14} Anonymous !
persons, ‘ L Se |
than sound, and radar observer Tony Richards died in the etter nt |
wreckage. Twelve spectators were killed by debris. Derry’s ! T ; C ] Se
attractive brunette wife was watching from the pilots’ tent | oO Ol. Cc.
when the plane blew up in the air and scattered flaming | sree
bits of wreckage into the crowd Before dismissing the jury
The Sire of Suvply_en--— jwhen the» Juily ting of the
nounced the official death toll, Un ° Court of “Grand esiohs “ended
official reports said 35 perso Alurricare | yesterday, Mr. Justice J. W. B.
were seriously injured iia tala | See Sig eee reece
posed > Wa eiNetsped “a-painoc siti at j comments from His Lordship the |
MIAMI, Sept, 6.

defect and he changed to the one Chief Justice Sir Allan Collymore ;
that disintegrated, Hurricane “Baker” with concerning a_ letter received by}

SECTION

West Agrees On
Note To Russia

LONDON, Sept. 6.

U.S., British and French representatives agreed on

one draft note to Russia rejecting Mostow’s recent pro-

posals for Four-Power talks on a Germa}y treaty, but

leaving the door oven for further exc .@s. The draft

note will be submitted immediately te”, A Western Gov-
ernments for approval, Foreign Office 4 s said.

— ‘ sone , ton a

week's @ by ‘oreign

Archer’s Anthem Office. Th eral Guenceliat

Konrad § ine We has been
9, informed 2 Wests draft note
| At St. Mary 8 co and, according to

Sit, Areher of the Police | m
Band has composed an an-
them “The Lord if My | coy
Light” ana it will be ren- vT

Pilot Johnny Derry, first British test pilot to fly faster































































Part of the swept wing spiralle wuids up to 100 miles per the Colonial Secretary, dered by the St. Mary's ryanisation also
lazily down to the runway. Tt hour moved slowly toward The statemeni read : Choir at Evensong tonight inf project ern
shattered twin tail plane ve-r ihe sea after a daylong Ute ceyraS i reat j , . aha . Phicss
in another direction. rf was addressed to Mr. R. N, Turn-! There is a richness in the . , s ha

The show in its sixth day re- panec. Waat, caused. uesel er, Colonial Secretary, Barbados, ! the’ membefs ved

: composition which is char-
|| acterised by a deep religious the
dignity and Mr. Bently Cal-
lendar, the Organist, and
his Choir with its high sense
of musical appreciation, do
justice to the setting.

A large number of spec-
tators heard the final re-
hearsal om Friday night
and it is expected that there
Will be a large congregation
at St. Mary's tonight to

; a ; ness along the Mid-Atlan-
sumed 20 minutes after the crash tic coast
but the crowd still milled about The Weath Buseau
in confusion, Hundreds stunned said th aT ss ’ }
and sickened left. Police fought to e nat the big whirler | Colonial Secretary Barbados j
keep the throngs under control. | had got underway again || Dear Sir for the benefit of the
Helicopters circled the field sur- to-day after wallowing un- || whole public I have been ad-'
veying the smoking craters and | certainly across the ship- | vised by my other associate as
struggling crowds. } ping lane off the Carolin: Jurymen that you would refer |

A. R. Morris, who saw the dis- |] coast. It said in its 5 a.m. this to the Governor in Execu-| ene
aster from his home on the edge|| advisory that the hurricane

tive Committee the remarks of! e e eo
of the airfield said the plane dived | was moving “very slowly | Mr, G. L. Taylor acting Puisne F t t n
|| toward the northsast’ at Judge sitting on the case on} rs ou r 9 »

|which reads as follows :— #
| 25.7.52. |
| “To Mr, R. N. Turner |



A SECTION of the crowd at the first Poultry, Pigeon and Fish Exhibition to be staged by the Barba-
dos Poultry Association, admife the pigeoms and poultry.

The Exhibition opened at the Drill Hall yesterday and will continue today. |

|

| U.S. Despair
| Of Korean

British Show
hear what is indeed a fine |) LONDON, Sept. 6
local composition, Ten Auster Air Foree “Sabre

Truce Jet” fighters which participated
. “uninvited” in the Farnborough

Fish Show Big Success
Y By MICHAEL O'NEILL | eee veeeeny eee eS

Twenty aquariums, thirteen of which represented pic- ? ' f ™~ ° \ storm in Britein and were labelled
y aq P | WASHINGTON, Sept. 6. S, CVICAN “rates by the “Britisn “press.

to the ground after he heard two
loud bangs. He said “suddenly | four to six miles per hour. | 24th July in suit of cigarette
two engines of the plane shot up|/i The estimated centre was factory versus Oliver Grimes
several hundred feet into the air | 420 miles east of Wilminge- we take oath to try a prisoner

just like toy balloons ton North Carolin:.—vU.P. and convict. according to the

One of the engines fell into a} evidence if we have a doubt
public enclosure and the rest of} the Defendant has the Benefit in |
the plane seemed to disintegrate.” | to-day’s advocate this i# what!

Ne
The dead included a givl of 16 Fk « l H Mr. Taylor say to a Juror in
and two boys one 14 and the Ina omage open court I did not think the
other around 8, Police who issued

i verdict was in keeping with the
the latest casualty list said about To Sforza 8
30 are seriously injured. '

oath you all have taken, or they
a O.P
homage at the state funeral ser-

; have taken {
N.B. we are not going to be
e
Police Hunt
st vices for the late Count Carlo
ic r j Y | Sforza, veteran Italian statesman
Jewel hief who died on Thursday night at







ROME, Sept. 6
The Italian Government and|

Exhibition staged by the Barbados Poultry Association at; American officials have ‘about ‘tea that the aircraft were North
PARIS, Sept. 6.
( Juror under Mr. Taylor continue indefinitely. to see the airplanes streak across
foreign diplomatie corps paid final

the Drill Hall, Garrison, yesterday. It was the first cage even up hope of getting a wae | American after it had previously
ion ever to be staged by the Association, and judging from |'m orea. they are so pessimisic denied it. The flight leader will
the attohdewes it van 2 big success. pepe ey. wee ee teens se bc “officially reprimanded”, head-

fo iin ta eat Gat are Z H I jyesterday, Today it will be opened A few months ago these same;, Commenting on the Chilean] the field 3,000 feet up in the

want us to convict and onca as iran | on ee ae au 1] officials said they believed there| Presidential elections, the Paris! piddle of the show,

whom he want to let free order to give everyone a chance} was at least a fifty-fifty chance for | ™4S8 circulation newspaper “Fi- Traffic contrel officials at the

+6 i i ry ige ‘is

ture frames, highlighted the Poultry, Pigeon and F ish | It was learned on Saturday that Air Force headquarters admit-

‘N d e
Federation?
ye planning on the probability that quarters announced, Thousands of
7 om } The Exhibition was opened, eam a ” a i — eae
very Please to sit as a} fiom 2,00 pm. until. 11.00. p.m. the present “twilight” war will | aviation enthusiasts were startled
. i ¥ f “o' ‘ Om
sign Jurors Oil Contract | t sce the high standard of the/.) armistice. Now they privately |##ro” said editorially: né CAN-! Fejq claimed that the planes hed
While reluctant to believe that } @x hibits, estimate the odds against it at not fail to notice the Sim~-j nop replied to repeated signals to

j “te Ase OF 78. + [this , anonymous missive of s0 | The display of tropical fish jat|more than 100 to one, ilarity between General Iban-| i¢entify themselves, and had not
NEW ORLEANS. Sept. 6 A 7.30, a motor hearse carry-} contemptuous a nature expresses | ROME Sept. 6. |ttuly fine, especially against) ““phey remain convinced as they 2's propaganda and Peron's slo-| ceeded orders to clear off the
OE aa y ‘S 5 ae " he ee cues bie the views of Jurors, owing to the | © Count Della Zonca, President} bac Kenran of anes ere ey pais have been from the beginning that |fens in Argentina, It must there-| (eld.
ce searched Saturday for rived in the large square facing] importance of the points raised, 1; cf Italian Mediterranean Petro-|which contributed greatly to the) war-weary Chinese and North fore be foreseen that if Ibanez) The British news rs said
the knife-wielding “trained thief” the San Roberto Belardino Church D z * “}leum Company said Saturday that |colour scheme. R ; ical

@ On page 5 Korean Redg and even Russia jis elected he will enforce a pro-| that the North Americans were

or dle pop two valuable dia- followed by two horse-drawn the opening of a bank account :. Thomas FitzGerald, mr. | would like a truce to put an endto|gramme of nationalisations after)trying to “steal the thunder from
mond rings from the owner of the carriages. In one was the widow ty the Iranian government in his 14,°R, Shearn and Ris son voncoen| a botched aggression attempt.) buying foreign societies’ ee. the British jets. “Pirates” ‘muscle
m.

famous Arnaud’s restaurant early Countess Valentina and her son : favour was the “logical develop-| ° i ' Ww

ee is oo A tess a f f s é | a extreme! keen| But they now fully realize as they | pcrties, One knows what a -|in' on the ", th id

Friday. Leon Bellis, an official of 'Sforzino. A ‘few ‘close relatives Court Upholds ment of a contract signed in oul Mr, W “Archie? Clarke . th e {I 7 Ses eae. te
ew ade * .





Mond porcaiys Beg we I avist, did not bef at non-forcible la= policy cost Argentina's eco-| ‘Daily Mirror” announced in a
pe ze Orleans. Diamond Ex: | were in the second carriage. The’ ‘Teferan for the purehase of. 44 Mr, W, D. Wardda, oat | riation Red prisoners on |nomy, which is in a state of per- aw of age banner, and quoted an
Sereteinae tisitevel hohe atch pie ins oe fe cna ind Ci nvictio ee ea %* aquarists of the Island,| whieh the ited Nations has in«|manent crisis: ‘Those © Chileans| sid display official as saying:
thé ‘sixthrlargest cut sai aeie a hin Pe ae tea iil ae haat oO mn The company annouriced on contributed the fish on show and| sisted is too bitter a pill for the! who think that by alienating theiv| "They seemed to be saying ‘any-

June 14 it had contracted for | wore aklo responsible for the lay Communists to swallow. freedom they would gain better} thing you can do we can do
As a result United States ex- conditions of life will soon real-| better’.”
These aquarists got their idea|Petts on the Korean strategy see ise thei error “the paper eon-| The “Manchester Guardian”
an Aquarist | Magazine,|RO Way out of the deadlock unless | cluded. aid: “Some investigation is there-
The “first 1,000 t hi t) Which published a picture of Wh eecttensiae ahocit sucdanis Gate! rr siaiiceiatb fore called for, not only because
ings were taken from her at 4 : ‘ i idges e first 1, on shipment. ining i ' predictable should suddenly order’ he = Indeépenden newspaper! the appearance of Americen ¢de-
arte eet pesenyechlaai cag ney fe apes a — x ae es ware eae ret was s€ized on orders of the Brit- : hubitiost aithiaea. ete pains a truce for some overriding reapon| "Parisian Libere” said “the Siphed hebters was scarcely in
point, residen uri Einadi, remi , i S a-1i ye 5 1 on as | Sse staged by Gue* ‘ nm, U.P, *hi es £ , ; y
Bellis said the big stone was one Alcide de Gasperi, and oe and conspiracy to defraud Men goverment at Agen. st we of its own |Chilean Deputies and Senators! keeping with a show supposedly

America,” rs. Germaine Caze- began at 10.30. hi iy ; we
nave Wells, owner of the French | Shorty before the requiem mace] SAN FRANCISCO, Sept. 6. | 2,000,000 "tons Of OO been (Oo
quarter restaurant and daughter started, representative officers The Ninth U.S. Circuit Court aa weston ed Treks ee ot ine |
of its founder the late Count Ber- anq soldiers o? various Italian}! Appeals on Saturday upheld |‘ ns SORGILEE even 0 | from
trgad Arnaud Cazenave, said the Army regiments lined up before the conviction of West Coast} CUSITY,



. , iium Society of England. The 20! | 3 :
: e z nM é regis- , k I re- , sh @

he measured and knew well. He gnd ministers entered the church.| tbe Government. er tien. Pine nae , vend quariums, 13 of which were made | will probably not be able to re-| devoted to British aircraft, but
said it came from a Royal collec- Inside, the casket of the Count On ry

. oa : : 7 2 sist the large popular movement! also because the flouting of Min-
; : 1 In a unanimous decision the] was part of a 200,000 ton con- ‘® represent picture frames and| W. Indians Need lin favour of General Tbanez f :
tion in Europe. The other ring was placed on the marble floor

istry of Civil Aviation notices to
was said to have been set with a of the church instead of on the

2 | airmen might lead to danger.”
? fai t corte at Chile }
cluster of diamonds worth $16,000. oatafalque, according to ancient Instruction It is almost certain that Chile —U.P.
and Warehousemen’s Union un- Della Zonea expressed confi-'the Show '

"7 ° {will be led for the next six years
, : | On Federation
Inwfully obtained citizenship in| dence that the Aden Court would| The species of fish on display |

|by Ibanez, the Peronist sympa-|J.§, Must Avoid “Blunder”’

{ . ;thies of whom are notorious, His a: oe dici
i945 by claiming he had never | recognise "my legal right” to the| were extremely beautiful, Fancy Hon, Ajodasingh, Minister of;vietory will mark the turning Of Socialised Medicine
Works,|point in Chilean politics, and he CHICAGO, Sept. 6

Court upheld the conviction find-|signment sold by Count Delto the other seven larger aquariums | |
ing the Australian-born head of|Zonca to the Budenberg Com- |lisplayed in the usual way,

the International Longshoremen's! pany of Switzerland, fascinated people who attended |



aor ote ine roa eee te tradition "more nobilium.” This
over the world, said Detective »rovides that the body of an
Arthur Regan heading investiga- a : . ot
tion of the theft. “A trained thief
did the job, He could nover get}

aristocrat must not rest on the
catafalque | during the funerat!}oon a member of the Commu-] Ol cargo. U.P Gold Fish, which were specially|Communications and
service. The name Sforza is one





4 : .w Orleans.” 8 Cn ees i ist Party. imported from Florida by Mr.|'Trinidad, now holidaying here, will probably enforce a political Lord Horder—one of Britain’s
ae rice cen 6 ire of a greatest BIISLOCE OVC: HANEN ‘Tht court also upheld the con- D rove A P, ki FitzGerald held the crowd in!eaid in an interview with the|and economical system similar to| leading surgeons—said that oo
nylon mask, stepped from the any NY ee victions of John_ Robertson, mp ar. ing wonder for long periods, There|Advocate on Friday that he sup-,‘hat ‘of Argentina, Bolivia, or) country’s national health service



shadows of her garage as she LL.W.U. Vice-President and an- were also Telescopic Black|ports the view that a West)Paraguay. Is this the first move]! programme “has largely failed,

ishing a knife and eae
“give me your ring”. He grabbec
the rings from her fingers, took}

$34 from her purse and fled, she;

said U.P.
French troops stationeqd in West
Germany went into action at

POLICE SHOT'AT dawn as a realistic mock :



Stage Mock War | to secure citizenship.
FRANKFURT, Sept. 6
Tens of thousands of US. and|yad found the three men guilty



invader. The manoeuvre was the

SHORT RANGE | vvess'\cvepel the potential Eastern

Constable Williams, a victim in’ actual combat techniques and see
the recent Penal tragedy, took; how well the troops learged
place at short range. This was) training lessons.
made clear today by Dr. E. L. S.| Commanders appeared confi-
Robertson,, Medical Officer of the} dent that combat forces would
Colonial Hospital of San Fernando! perform in the three-day “cam-
at the inquest concerning the} paign” in which make be-~-/
death of Williams. lieve that an “aggressor” force;
Dr. Robertson said he found two] attacked from the East near the|
penetrating wounds in Williams’ City of Kassel through the eae
skull and concluded that. the} Sel gate”, one of the classic in-| entre
shooting must have been at ¢lose| Vasion routes of Central Germany.|
range because of the difference Sanne SERCO Da ae
in size betwee > entrance ¢ aggressors”, who re stin-
eo cane n the entrance % guished fom the helmet. wearing}
Williams died while “he (was “friendly forces” by soft cloth |

being taken to the Hospital last

viction.”—U.P.







caps, was only slightly removed
; aor from the real border between
month after the shooting incident] west Germany and Communist
between Policemen from Penal] Rast Germany, where strong forces
and Policemen from San Fernando} of Soviet troops are stationed and



man regl'stic exercises.—U.P, and fires.

FISH ON SHOW



Fish Exhibition at the Drill Hall yesterday.



r ‘
reached home at 1.00 a.m. brand-| U.S., French froops other union aide Henry Schmidt
found guilty of helping Bridges

The decision came two and a
half years after a Federal Jury

The jury returned the verdict
on April 4, 1950, after a stormy
five-month long trial. The long--*
shore leader appealed against | ¢4
the verdict on the grounds that) zpe

Pre own 2Concemmoncgnt) | first of three scheduled for tne|the trial was “political per-
POR : OF “SPAIN, Bept, A ; ! next two months to train the}secution” and the jurors “felt
The shooting of Detective’ United States Seventh Army in

Pukchong ‘Supply

Lots At Seawell

Improved parking facilities
have been provided at Seawell
Airport. Two separate parking
‘lots were opened on Thursday
{one for private vehicles and the
j other for hired cars,

Private cars will now park to
the west of the Engine room, and
lanes will be provided when

markings have keen com-}
pleted.
The lot for the hired cars is

that the court was practicallylto the west of the metereological
ordering them to return a con-

office, and 23 lanes have been
marked out,



Bombed |

SEOUL, Sept. 6. |

UNITED STATES’ B. 26 night bombers nearly wiped |
out an important Communist war supply centre at Puk-
chong on the east coast of North Korea early today. A
Fifth Air Force spokesman said that Allied night maraud-

ers blanketed the area with “an 85 per cent. coverage of jciven them for keeping interest] vidual colonies. He felt that if! :
who were searching for a wanted! are put through very similar the target. Returning airmen reported huge explosionsjalive in the hobby during the|there is something in favour of

Pukchong is one of the 75 Com- |
: munist cities and towns warned t
; expect allied air attack, After to-

day’s raid, allied planes dropped

leaflets reminding the populace
of previous warnings.

In another early morning raid. |

il American 3-29 Superfort

irom Okinawa blasted a second

Red military supply area nes:
} Hamhung, a Communist port city
} in northeast Korea,
' The Fifth Air Force announce:
that the Sabre-jets knocked dow:
20 Communist M.1LG 15's this
week, and probably destfoyed tw«
end damaged 19. Two Sabres w
cestroyed by M.I.G’s in aeria
combat, while five other alliec
planes were lost to Red gri
fire

North American if hand
hand with fanatical Reds for m
than four hours as the fight rt
for pussession of the post
“sandbag
tra' front

Th initial Commu





astle” on the ¢



{ ; a on
tock place about 11.00 a.1 k

j}day after Reds poured 1:

| rounds of mortar and artillery

tat United Nations defender

| The Reds succeeded in disk

ling U.S. troops but later tt
were forced to witt

ta fleree Allied counts t k tl
left the slopes of the } ttere

ith Communist dead, —U.P
.

| Moons, Parbus Sumantranus, Red|ite holiday, which he ig spending

}Amazon River, should be very particisar as to

‘cclour and shade, This becamejor bind themselves,

Mauves, Gold and Silver Veil! Indian Cunference should pre- |towards the South American fed-| and that the standard of eg

Tails, Comet Tails and Fan Tails. |cede the general federation talks’ eration dreamed of by General] care has been lowered! —— the
Other interesting exhibits werejin London which are scheduled Peron? Anyway, a great country) rrogramme. Bede ae blun-

Siamese Fighting Fish, Golden|to take place next year. is still far from yielding to such Yeon od “eng land” with

Guppies, Zebra, Pearl and Giant Hon. Ajodasingh arrived in the ® scheme, a Brazil paper conclud-{ der we re te ne

Disnos, of all descriptions, Perma}colony on Monday last accom- ed.—U.P. socialized ee —=

Elack Mollies and Crimson}/panied by his wife on an indefin-







and Golden Wagtail Moons, White| at the Hastings Hotel,

Cloud Mountain Fish, Neon Tetras The Trinidad Minister of Com-
and Variatus, Large community|munications and Works expressed
tanks contained varieties of big|the view that the people of the
fish such as Blue Gouramies,|/yarious West Indian territories

Pearl Gouramies large|should be instructed in the mean- om
SAPU IRE ing of federation, and that the Three jiundred odd years ago French imigrants
Rarest masses should be able to express

brought their age old skill and experience in wine culture
to South Africa. Here they fotind an ideal climate and
soil condition for the production of wines of exceptionally
fine quality. To-day, South Africa's leading wine pro-
ducts — K.W.V. — are acknowledged throughout the
world as among the finest obtainable.

There was also on show a|cheir views on the matter because
pecimen of the rarest fresh | Federation was “something new”
water fish in the world—a Discus|For that reason, he felt that the
or Pompadour Fish—which came|people of the West Indies should
fron the highest reaches of the}be guided and that the leaders

Siamese Fighters were in every|}how they entered any agreement

vossible through» successful cross Individual Problems
breeding. Some of the colourd He pointed out that each indi-
were pure red, cornflower, green,|vidual colony has its own prob-
salmon, blue, ete. ler: to be solved in one way or
One of the members of the!|another, and he felt that by get-
organising Committee said that!ting together they would be able
Mr. Douglas Clarke and Mr.|to arrive at a better understand-
Robl Dear must be compli-ling, and think more clearly on
mented and that credit must be|certain matters affecting the indi-

way years when it was difficult}on. colony, that particular mat-
to obtain fish from overseas.
@ On page 10

ver should be given careful con-
sideration, and that they should
try to find ways and nteans to
meet each other,



> oii * He agreed that any suggestion

Egyptian Will by one colony that a_ regional

1H — ‘ x conference should be held in that

Dang For Rioting particular island should be wel-
' @ On page 10



CAIRO, Sept. 6
It has been officially announced |
that Mustafa Khamis who was
condomned to death for his part in ‘6 ; .
iast months factory riots at Kafr | Seize Businesses
El Dawar will be hanged at ss
Handra prison in Alesis deta at} BERLIN, Sept. 6.
noon tomorrow, The East Berlin Government
He was convicted of the murder |* fficially announced the confisca~-
o soldiers during the riots. | tion of all businesses owned in the
U.P Soviet sector of Berlin by all West
Berliners or West Germans
Bruno Baum, East Berlin econo-

Seven Gef Work | mics chief said the businesses

| wore exprpopriated because West-

VQ 6 9 lern owners “plundered” East
On S. S. Trader \Berlin, evaded taxes and East |
German laws ana diverted East

marks to the West
Communist police yesterday!

|
E. Berlin Govt. |
|





Cape Dry Red (full and light hodied)

Sparkling Franschoek (Champagne type)

Sparkling Roodeberg (Red)

Kimberly Club

Cabernet Sauvignon
Wemmerschoek No. 2

Old Brown
Franschock No. 2

Sever eamen turned up at
the office of the Harbour and
Shipping Master yesterday morn-







ng to m papers for employ took the businesses over in the

ment on the Harrison Liner, S. S, | 2@me of the East German Govern- |

Trader. The Trader, which is con- Ment and erected signs reading | e

igne to Messrs. DaCosta & Cx ‘peoples’ eed eer and ees | ;

Ad. will il on Monday fiseated all goods in 10 name oO Y Di . FZ

. The ; er ‘ ere . ae d cook,|the government. Some 1,000 West For Latin tion and lavour

1 eabin boy, a fireman and four German and West Berlin owner j ed
ble seamet re affected.—U.P, }


PAGE -TWO










Coshmere Bouquets gentle
lather has been proved out-
staondingly mild for all types
cf skin! :



:Bouguet Soap

et te sa og Mees ao
eres. ss

CONTINUING DAILY 5.00 & 8.30 P.M.

|

KENNETH R

Serving

DALE ROBERTSON 3 ’
ANNE FRANCIS.

Extras : Olympic Games, Flashes, Felix The Fox, There Shall be Wings |
Pit 12¢c; Circle 24c; House 36c:; Bolcony 60c; Box 72c.

















\
JANETTA DRESS SHOP
{
(Next Door to Sing r’s: |
Our Dress-making Department is mm in the fortunate |
position of obtaining the services of a new head cutter,
Orders for Evening Gowns, ete., can now be executed |
promptly and efficiently. 1
GSSOSSSSYSSODDSDSDOSOGOSIIV TSS TDI SDSSSSIOISIOTOS 7
:
EXTRA-MURAL ASSOCIATION §
Two Pays
THE MAN WHO WOULDN'T GO TO HEAVEN
F. Sladen-Smith
SCENES FROM A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM
William Shakespeare
ON $
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17111 §.60 P.M, x
Â¥ FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 19rH 5.00 P.M. x
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 257H §.00 P.M. $
%,
*
3 Admission : $1.00 Matinee : 42&c. S
we oy 5
% Seats may be booked at the British Council, Wakefield, §
3% Tel: 3249 or Scout Headquarters, Beckles Road, Tel; 4653, %
x trom Monday, &th September. %$
9 .6600669669000000995006 , SOOO EOOIN

SSE =

SE

THE BRITISH COUNCIL

WAKEFIELD. WHITE PARK





A PIANO RECITAL

— given by —
MR. CECIL JACK
On Friday, 12th September, at 8.30 pun.

Works by Handel, Bach, Mozart, Beethoven
Chopin, Schumann and Rachmaninoff.

Seats at $1.00 and 60c. may be reserved at the
British Council. Phone 3249.







7.9.52.—2n.
SSS SSS
CLEC IAE LEAL PRE CPAA PPP PEEP PPPS PS PEPPY

9905.0 —— —

oF

Wm. FOGARTY (Bidos) Ltd.

PRESTCOLD
REFRIGERATORS

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Starred for Brilliance of Design and Finish
Spangled with a galore of New Features
Greater in Space, greater in Grace.

o

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ee 4
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5
LPELESPLE SSE OEE EES PASSE LET LLASS POSS?



SUNDAY ADVOCATE



The STARS: «x¥*

and YOU ~ 4

af

»

FOR SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 1952

Look in the seetion in which your bipthday eomes #,
find what your outlook is, according to the stars. . a
ARIES Sun only planet in really benefic aspect
March 21—April 20 supports rightful activities for God's day.
Be mindful of spiritual needs. Urgent

duties favoured, also restful pleasures. *

* *«
Be moderate and avoid extremes. Kindli- *
ness, tact with the opposite sex also
stressed. First attend your church; then »

duties, wholesome fun.

Sun is favourably aspected; most planets
ave nil; so all good deeds and healthy
activities should be honoured. No day for
excitement but for prayer.

TAURUS
April 21-—May 20

GEMINI
May %1—June 2

*

OAN Restful, pleasant outlook. Essential tasks
June ean despatched quickly, and time made *
for oor sports, or other pastime. Pray
store “Teo for those in troubled lands.
x Excellent, Be Sun, vibrations a
July 24—Ang. 22 you. Be encouraged to spread cheer

lonely hearts, aid our armed services
government interests all you can.

>
*

Unless urgent duties demand otherwise,
male this day of real rest. After church,
join friends, family at social gatherings. -,

Heed Taurus advice to-day. Venus stresses
need for patience, diplomacy. Do not wor-

ry or * a *
Mars warps against ill temper, needless

~~
oct ah ane. 22 contention. Day should be pleasant, fruit-
«x ful. You know what your duties are, tend
to them cheerfully.
Not favourable for selfish interests, whoily
personal desires; but day has favourable
inclinations for useful endeavours, bealthy

* EDEN EM sports. :

CAPRICORN Family, household iterests, community
Dec. 23 —Jan. @)affairs, pleasant socials and—above all—
religious services are top favoured.

x»

Contentment should fill your heart, if you
have taken care of your soul and the
spiritual needs of those in your care.
Enjoy fun, friends.

* SAGITTARIUS
Nov. 23—Dec. 22

Ys

*
*

Aquarius
Jap, 22 — Feb. 20

PISCES Some restrictions and all for the good.
* Feb. 21 —March 2° Extremes, excesses tabu; moderation is
stressed, Urgent duties under fine Sun rays,

as are religious interests.
7 *- you BORN TO-DAY: Active-minded, seek knowledge
and will apply it for betterment of others as well as self. Are
4 artistic, muscial, could be excellent journalist, writer, musician,
critic, decorator, secretary, actor, lawyer. Do not overwork,

worry, or strain health. Birthdate: J. Pierpont Morgan, Amer.
* financier; art collector.

x~x«r*krek *
“ANTILLES” SAILING

PARIS.
The maiden voyage of the new
Freneh Liner ‘Antilles’ to the
West Indies nee rer postpone?
trom October 3, the or -
ay fixed. ‘Fhe revised date has
yet to pe announced.

ROODAL

xx MMM MM HR KH MH

zxewtkkr t
IS POSTPONED

Meanwhile, the French Line’s
West Indies service will continuc
to be maintained by the “Dc
Grasse” and the “Colombie,” the
former reverting to the sailing 0°
October 3 as originally planagy

THEATRES



EMPIRE OLYMPIC ROXY 4 mae a
. p Vo-day to Tuesday) Last Two Shows
Torday & Continuing Fongy, Tueskey ot ie & BND ‘Today 4.45 & 8
aasly 44> & BIO pom nevere 1) Pletuves | Uolversal Pictures eo sort
Universal Pictures * Tyesents Presents ese ard
Presents Audie MUKPHY | Macdonald CAREY | Jose FEI as
Yvette DUGAY Acxis SMITH im
THE PRINCE in CYRANO DE
THE CAVE OF THE | BERGERAC
WAS A THIEF | ciMARRON KID) OUTLAWS
Color by Technicolor Extra
Starring | _ ae ary at} Eatest News Berl
‘s e mys oe
Those two sensa- | HOT STEEL e ereat Wells & menser ¢ id
‘onal young sah | Starring Farce Rebbery |
Richard ARLEN Beta |
ony CURTIS. | Andy DEVINE |y Reels of Shorts SARABAND
9 Tuesday and Wed (Musial 2 and
olor by Technicolor 1m @ ais Wed. & TRgeS |
extra ‘INVISIBLE RAY” 4.90 & 81 MY OUTLAW
ane Ronald COLMAN iy
Lotest News Bee} |“ONE HOUR BO | "A DODBLE LIFE” BROTHER

and

Coming Seon!
f “A DANGEROUS

BATTLE QF

Phursday at 430 &
8.15

“I WASA 2 |

SHOP LIFTER” | Starring

and
‘WHITE TIE Richard ARLEN

APACHE PASS AND TABS: Andy DEVINE

P THEATRES

4.90 & 8.30

and
“SALT TO THE


















“BRIDGETOWN
(Dial 2810)

TODAY & TOMORROW
16 2 8° pm
Warner Hilarious

~~ RARBAREES
tab S170)

TO-DAY TO TUES
445 & 8.20 pom

Universe} Action

OISTIN
(Dial 8404)
TODAY & TOMORROW
4.45 & 846 p.m

Entertainment!) Drama! Gary COOPER in
“ROOM FOR ONE}! APACHE DRUMS |] DISTANT
” (Techuicolor)
MORE Stephen Coleen DRUMS
Cary Betsy MeNALLY — GRAY (Technicolor)
GRANT — DRAKE Extra Spee.al: Maria ALDON
SSS
THUBS. Special 1 90 p.m SUGAR CHILE TUES. & Wed
“SPORTS OF KINGS"
Raut COMebiet. &. ROBINSON 445 & 8.30 p.m.

“BLAZING ACROSS & SQUNS, Fesain @}| Alfred HITCHCOCK'S

THE PECOS
Charles STA’ Ss Tee STRANGERS
COMING SOON: Sates }
“Laye OF EMILE Irving BERLIN'S ON A
ZOLA’
a ginal BLUE SKIES TRAIN
= ‘Toahapicoler} Farley GRANGER &
OPENING FRIDAY Bi
“THIS WOMAN. Is Prod ASI AIRE WHITE HEAT
DANGEROUS" James CAGNEY
=. = SS




SS

THE BARBADOS REGIMENT SPORTS
CLUB

ANNUAL DANCE

at the DRILL HALL, on Saturday, 27th
Sept. 1952

Dancing from 9 p.m. in an exquisite Tropical
Setting to the captivating Latini-Ameripan
Musie of the Police Dance Orchestra



SUBS. 81.00
PRIZES GALORE

“The Informal Dance.of the Seasen”





SSSI



Wea, & Thurs

GAME" | oTEL SAHABA'

Hs EXCELLENCY the Gov

| nor, Sir Alfged Gava
lyesterday attended it Queen
Park to witness the jast half hou
of the Pickwick—Spartan mate:
which ended in a draw. He was
met by Mr. Keith Walcott, Spar-
tan’s skipper, Spartan were bat-
ting at the time, and later
‘chatting with Mr. F. A. C. Clair-

{monte as he watched the match.

Wedical Adviser Returns

R. J. W. HARKNESS, C.M.G.,
C.B.E., Medical Adviser of
Development and Welfare, re-

turned from Trinidad by B.W.1LA
on Friday after paying a short

routine visit.
Song Recital
M* JOHN TULL, popular

British Guianese tenor who
has been touring the Caribbean
territories for the past months
will give a Song Recital at the
Combermere School Hall on
Wednesday, September 10, at 8.30
pm,

A fifteen minutes’ broadcast
over the Rediffusion service pro-
vided the means for a practical
introduction to Barbadian audi-
ences and he gained many fans
through this medium,

Mr. Tull has given recitals in
Trinidad, Curacao, Aruba, St
Vincent, British Guiana and in
other Caribbean territories.

Press clippings show that he
has had a more than appreciative
Press, For example, the Vincen-
tian in a signed article states:—
“His interpretation,
his manner left
desired.” Another
cribes him as “A
rich voice is filled wi warmth
and pathos and the envied charm
jof his native land. He holds his
| audience in raptures in a voice
of unusual range, flexibility and
tonal quality. He sings with con-
vietion and soul stirring expres-
sion.”

Mr. Tull has included in his
programme for Wednesday night
excerpts from the masterpieces of
great composers whose immortal
works he has chosen to cherish
jand to pass on to this generation,
A repertoire that includes
\“Torna A Sorriento” (Come back
to Sorriento, “Itch Liebe Dich (I
Love Thee), Verdi’s “Celeste A
ida”, Schubert’s “Ave Maria,’
Malotte’s “Lord’s Prayer,” Lehar’s
“You Are My Heart’s Delight,” is
some indication of the wide range
of works which has been attempt-
}ed in the past by this young artist.

The concert is under the patron-
age of Sir Allan Collymore, Kt.,
and the accompanist is Mr, Win-
ston Hackett.

little to be
clipping des-
singer whose

Returned
R. AND MRS. D. BARCLAY
| returned to Canada _ by

T.C.A. on Thursday after paying
a visit here. Mr. Barclay is Pub-
lic Relations Officer of T.C.A. in
| Toronto, Canada.





elocution and |

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER



és

1952



Carib Calling

Snent Vacation With Parents

Moe eae a a ae ee Dp" J. WALCOTT, son of Mr
i and Mrs. Leslie Walcott
| of the Lodge School, returned tw
Canada by T.C.A. on Thursday
after spending a holiday with his
parents.

To Further Studies
ISS GILLIAN HASLETT, eld-
est daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. J. F. Haslett was among
the passengers leaving the island
by the S.S. Gelfito on Thursday.
She is on her way to England
where she will enter St. Swith-
un’s School, Winchester to fur-
ther her studies.
Congrats
ONGRATULATIONS to
Audrey Ashby who
brated her 2ist birthday on
Wednesday 3rd September. A
party was held in her honour at
“West Gate’, Land’s End, St.
Michael.
For One Month
R. K. INNISS, retired Doc-
tor of Trinidad and Mrs.
Inniss are on a month's holiday

For St. John ’s Public School ir the island as guests. st
R. ANTHONY WOODE, son Worthing @uest House. They
of Rev. and Mrs. Woodge of arrived by the ss Golfito on
Leonard's Vicarage, left the Thursday.

ind on Thursday last by the pypsbition At Museum





Miss
cele-

MR. JOHN TULL





Goifito for England. Anthony, oe
who is not yet fourteen years old, “(HE Loan Exhibition of
has passed the entrance examina- “Views of Barbados” vopen-

tion for St. John’s Public School, ed at the Museum yesterday for
Leatherhead, Surrey, and has three weeks. The exhibition con-
been placed in the fifth form. sists of drawings, water-colours
Anthony did extremely well in and oils of the island, the earli-
the exam., and it is very probable est of which is dated 1707 and
that he will be awarded « scholar- js a vjew of Carlisle Bay.

ship. Also on display is a magnifi-
« For Pembroke College cent patchwork quilt of about

R. AMBROSE WALCOTT, 1860 lent by Mr, Jack Warming-
son of Mr. E. K. Walcott, ton of Dominica, which was made
Barrister-at-Law, left by the Y his grandmother.
S.S. Golfito on Thursday tor Family On Vacation
England where he will enter 8
Pembroke College to take a R. AND MRS. M. BAXTEK

and their two children left

: se in Modern Studies.
Course in agerh x for Canada by T.C.A. on Thurs-

For Bermuda

day last on holiday. Mr. Baxter
APR. JOHN F. HUTSON and js Station Manager of T.C.A,
Miss Doris Hutson were Barbados.
passengers for Bermuda by ‘o Lecture
T.C.A. on Thursday. They are’ To

intransit to the U.S.A. R. R. LeFANU will deliver

4 the first of his series of
Altended Conference lectures on three contemporary
R. WENDELL FORDE, Bar- novelists at the British Council,

rister-at-Law in St. Vin- “Wakefield”, White Park, tomor-

cent and President of the Bar row at 5 p.m.

f--sciation of that colony was The subject of tis lecture will
among the arrivals by the s.s. be E. M. FORSTER.

jad where he Sitemied Abe, First Op Helitay

dad where he ¢@ Le a rs aimee
Corference of the West Indian R. W. DATE, Supervisor of
Barristers’ Association. Accom- Confederation Life Assur-
panying him was his wife. They ance Co, left the island by
will be spending a holiday be- B.W.I.A. for Antigua on Thurs-
fore returning to Kingstewn. day. He has gone on a holiday.



MISS JAN WARD leads the Stuartettes in “Who Do You Know in Heaven.”

DEVIL’

HE final performance of “Re-
vuedeville 1952” was staged
at the Empire Theatre on Fridav

night. It is the general opinion
that this night was the best of
the series.

This year not only did Joseph

Tudor, Jnr., steal the show but
sharing the honours with him
was Mi The ma Barker who
put over a brilliant act in Jeze-
bel. No betler choice could have
been mede for this part.

Now for a look at the story
Morville Billygoat (Joe. Tudor)
a poor Barbadian who wins a4
large amount of money atthe
Races takes himself and_ his
money off on a bang up holidsy
in the Argentine. At the same

time rumour says that the
Spaceship would lamd in Bar-
bados at any time. This pu's

fear into Morville so his holiday
and flight coincide,

in Buenos Aires
Morville meets a Barbadian,
(Thelma Barker) who has been
posing as a South American.
While reminescing, they hear a
loud noise overhead. The space-
ship is approaching and in the
effort to escape Morville faints.

When he awakens he is sur-

In a park



GAIETY |
The Garden—St. James |
TODAY & TOMORROW 8.80 p.m |
Mat TO-DAY 5 p.m
gereen Guild Action Drar !

“STEEL HELMET"
yene EVANS Jame EDWARDS

















TUES. (only) 8.30 p.m
I h LA BPUE Double !
“FRONTIER REVENGI
d
“OUTLAW COUNTRY’











(
|

|

est food should have
est cooking medium

B

need

that’s why you
A Gas Cooker

for BEST RESULTS







rounded by strange people in golden apparel attracted the men
strange dress and he realises he of wine and song. Doreen Gibbs
is similarly attired. To add to as Delilah in a flashing costume
his discomfort he discovers that was the guest star in the Bott e
they do not speak his language Club, Casablanca. The entir
He is horrified and implores the east performed — without a single
Captain of the Spaceshi, flaw.
(Nevile Phillips) to return nie Two newcomers to the Danc-
money and clothe: io return to ing School have gained them
Barbados. Captain Zagagolt selves much credit and speci |
make friends with Morville and mention must be made of the
through the power of a Magic}Misses Joan Farnum and Rens.
Mirror shows him the universe.| Alleyne who danced with every
i bit of grace and ease of move-
At inicrvals the entire show |

ig preduced through the medium)







of this Mirror and in return opt’. 7 ;
Morville acquaints the Captain Rupert 8 Spring A
with surroundings in the form { " 7
of various dances,

To my mind the most out-
standing act was Jezebel (The!-
ma Barker). Thelma, fiery end

bewitching, played the role with
a scene set in the most georgeous
fantasy. She highlighted her act
as she grabbed her friend’s
eweetheart and walked away
with him. Captivated by the spell



of her charm he obediently car-
ried out a wild romance until he
was recaptured by his sweei- Quce u real

x | realises that it -
heart (Dorothy Fleming) at the wm home the dragon a
‘igh price of murder — Jezeber swerve. but ut pulls so hard that
was murdered!! og



p : Rupert hos some difficulty
The hight club scene in this keeping control. Pong-Ping, a
rect gained much credit as the has been wuchag tnteusly for
beautiful girls attired in all the’: hem, hurts Nora ee
we i he e

. NOTICE



Housecraft Course

FAREWELL party was held

at the Y.W.C.A. Headquar-
ters in Pinfold Stree; on Tues-
day, 2nd September, for~ Miss
Eucine Thomas of the Ivy Road,
who left the island on Thursday
by T.C.A. for Canada where she
will take a course in Housecraft.
The course expects to last for
one year.

Seventy-five

PARTY was held at the resi-
b dence of Mr. R. A. Dottin,
Holetown, St. James, on 25th
August in honour of his seventy-
fifth bi#thday, Many relatives and
friends were present and an en-
joyable afternoon was spent.

Mr. Dottin is a retired School
Teacher of St. Saviour’s Boys’
and Carib joins in wishing him
many happy years to come.

Wall Street Broker

IsS E. RAE BARKER,

daughter of Mrs, Clariece
Straughan - Barker money of
Straughan Village, St. Joseph, has
become a familiar figure in Wall
Street, New York. Miss Barker
vy. ho was horn in Brooklyn hopes
to be in Barbados on holiday in
the near future, Her mother has
been residing there for several
yeers with her,







Twenty - five +
ear-old Miss
ker is carv-
ing a career in
New York’s busy
financial district
selling Stocks
and ds as a
registered sales-
woman for the
B.C. Phillips
Brokerage House
Wall Street,
She owes all
this to her
mother who. urg-
eq her to invest
a few spare. dol-
in __ stock.
Rae investigated









Miss E. BARKER

the possibilities,
was fascinated and decided to
make it her career. She is one

of the few women who has suc-
cessfully crashed this highly com
petitive field. Her future looks
good! Her relatives, Miss Emeline
Straughan, Headmistress of St.
Joseph Girls’ School and Mr. Sel-
wyn Straughan of Smith and At-
welt and many others will be
proud of this achievement.

Intransit
R. K. H. CREGAN, Assis-
tant Colonial Secretary of

British Guiana, was among the
intransit passengers by the Gol-
fite on a_ six months’ vacation.
He will also join his wife there.



“REVUEDEVILLE 1952”

ment. Renee who takes the stage
with confidence flashes a ready
smile which adds much to her
general appearance. She shouid
go far in this line

Miss Janet Ward who ied
“Who do you know in Heaven”
is no less worthy of praise. She
is versatile. Norma Gaskin, Ju.iet
Gaskin, Eric Morris, Neville
Fhillips and Mrs. Stuart did re-

markably well in the vocals, The.

version of the
keeping with
dances and altogether the tap-
ping numbers were rhythmic.
The girls excelled in the “Caval-
cade of Rhythm” — the mambo,
sambo, tango, and rhumba.

Mrs. Stuart cannot be con-
gratu.ated too highly on _ this
achievement. The high standard
of the acting and dancing in
xeneral is an indication of the
hard work done to prepare the
girls. The public can understand
only too well all that was done
to put over another successful
performance.

The Police Band under C:2p-
tain Raison added greatly to the
entertainment.

modern
was in

“Waltz”
the other



NEW COURSES FOR
COLONIAL STUDENTS

LONDON
Students from Trinidad and
British Guiana are among those
taking part in a new itish
Council “Introduction to Britain”
course in London, the purpose of
which is to help students to settle
down quickly and to make them
feel at home. Discussions are held
on the cost of living, transport
systems, accommodation, ration-
ing, restaurants and health.
—B.U.P.



dve
a

fd

nture—26

it





happily.
Rupert."’
came obediemt. ist as

ves NPR:

w

yoy id." pulls the lantle bear
low 1} mus: run ind cell rhe
imps.’ Fie harngs way. bu:
before jane he Bauses ind

very pyagien’ “or ” comes

HAVING SOLD OUR BRANCH STORE NO. 27, BROAN STREET

TO

MR. GEORGE SAHELY

ALL ACCOUNTS ARE PAYABLE AT

T. R. BVANS (WHITFIELDS BRANCH) NO. 15
‘PHONE : OFFICE 4294 a

, BROAD STREET
DEPTS. 4220
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7.

AT THE CINEMA

a a a eS ae



1952

The More The Merrier
By G. B.

BASED on the actual experiences of an American
married couple — Jack and Anna Rose, Room For One
More at the Plaza, Bridgetown, is a truly delightful comedy-
drama about a happy, well-adjusted family who become
the foster parents and brothers and sisters to two problem
adolescents. Cary Grant and Betsy Drake who play the
roles of Jack Rose and his wife Anna are, in reality, hus-
band and wife, and that may account for the feeling of

thy and reality that is very noticeable throughout

Jack Rose, a civil engineer, is
a happy-go-lucky chap and his
wife is the type who cannot bear
to see an unhappy child. Conse-
quently, when she hears of Jane,
who is a sullén maladjusted and
thoroughly unpleasant thirteen-
year-old, her heart goes out to
the child, and she takes her into
her own home. Not content with
helping one, she takes on Jimmy-
John, a sees boy who has
spent most his life in hospital
and whose outlook on life
matches his deformity. The chal-
lenge presented by these two
children might well have stumped
a less adjusted and sympathetic
couple, but with affection,
patience. and comradeship, The
two defiant children are gracu-
ally and naturally absorbed into

the happy life of the Rose
family.

Of humour there is plenty
throughout the film, with five-

year-old George Winslow deliv-
ering some pungeant home-
truths in a voice that sounds
like a fog-horm and Mr, Grant
giving full play to his flair for
comedy in the delivery of all his
lines. There is pathos too in the
upward struggle of Jimmy-John
and his final exciting victory
over himself and his physical

handicap.

Understanding direction, simple
and humorous dialogue and an
excellent cast bring this heart-
warming story to life with Cary
Grant and Betsy Drake, together
with their “family” giving real
and convincing performances.

It is a refreshing and relaxing
picture, portraying family life as
it can and should be. I am sure
you will enjoy it.

LYDIA BAILEY

Showing at the Globe, LYDIA
BAILEY is an adventurous film-
spéctaclé, is based on episodes
from Kenneth Robert’s novel of

same name.

he island of Haiti experienced
one of the most violent periods
fn its history during the year
1802, when Toussaint l’Ouver-
ture led his armed revolt against
the efforts of Napoleon to recap-
ture the island. Intrigue and
insurrection were rife and black
and white alike became embroiled
in the savage rebellion, The plot

» concerns a young American, sent

by his government at that criti-
cal time, on a legal mission to
Haiti, whereby he is to obtain the
sighature on certain documents

,,of Lydia, Bailey. Suspected of,
‘being a spy, on

is arrival, he
‘encol dan, on all sides
in this effort to find the young
lady. When he finally does, they
become the hunted prey of the
Haitian forces, duc to her sym-
pathy with the Royalists, and
have one hell of a time making
a safe get-away.

A: great deal of the film was
actually taken in Haiti, and it
abounds in the colour, sound and
action of tropical settings as well

as mumerous dangerous and
exciting episodes. One of the
weirdest and most colourful

sequences is the Haitian voo-doo
dance where the dancers work
themselvés into a_ frenzied hys-
teria to the blood-curdling beat-

ing of drums.
Th Dale Robertson and
Ann ancis play the leading

roles and are both convincing and



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attractive, they are eclipsed by
unusually good acting in some of
the supporting roles, Outstanding
in his performance is William
Marshall as King Dick while Ren
Renard gives a fine characteri-
zation of Toussaint.

The settings are
the musical

magnificent
background

highly effective.

APACHE DRUMS
Stephen McNally and Colleen

Gray are co-starred in APACHE

DRUMS at the Plaza,

Barbarees.

The plot of this Western unfolds

desert

Mascalero

against a baekground of barren
and adobe huts - to the
menacing beat of Indian drums.
The loeale is a small frontier
town with the colourful name of
Spanish Boot. Having been
requested to leave because he
shot a man, the town’s gambler
and “‘badman” discovers that the
Apaches are on the
warpath and about to attack the

settlers. Returning to the town,
he helps ,in its defence and
redeems himself to the towns-

people and the girl he loves,
Suspense is well maintained

and tension is built up gradually
to a terrifying climax which is
all the more accentuated by

brilliant Technicolor,

Stephen McNally gives a good
performance as the hard-fighting,
hard-gambling man of the West
and successfully achieves the

dificult combination of both hero
and heavs° in his characterization.

Coleen Gray is not only pretty,
but.. warmly. convincing as the

girl: who is torn between. her, love

for the gambler and her’ attrac-

tion to another man.

It is interesting to note that

the background music is aythen-
tic apache music played and sung
by members of the tribe, and it
is largely instrumental in crea-
ting the atmosphere of the film.



TODAY’S GEMS
For manners are not idle,
but the fruit of loyal nature
and of noble mind.
—Alfred Lord Tennyson.

+ - .

A rational nature admits of
nothing which is not service-
able to the rest of mankind.

—Marcus Antoninus,



Poultry
Notes

When puilets are six weeks old
they should whenever possible
be removed to ramge shelters or
runs.

The impertance of clean fresh
ground for pullets cannot be er-
pnasised too much, Most of the
failures of poultry keepers are
due to foui ground. Fowls are
frequently kept im runs on lawns
and other grass patches but un-
less grass is mown regularly it
becomes foul and spreads disease.
Some poultry, keepers in Barba-
dos are giving up the idea of
keeping hens in grass runs be-
cause of the risk of infection, But
if grass plots ure kept regularly
mown and are rested every three
months and then ploughed up be-
fore using again the danger of in-
fection is lessened. In countries
where land is more freely attain-
able than in Barbadgs an acre of
renge grass is allowed to each
hundred pullets.

When the range plan for de-

veloping pullets is practised one
shelter 10 ft. x 12 ft. is provided
for each 100 pullets,



By comparison not more than
six medium-size pullets ought to
be kept in confined runs of 6 ft x
12 ft.

Pullets require between -five
inches and 8 inches of roost space
per bird. Cockerels ought to be
separated from pullets as soon as
possible and fattened for the pot
or reared for breeding.

The golden rule to follow when
pullets show signs of sickness is
to isolate them immediately.
Never leave a_ sick pullet or
cockerel with a healthy flock.

Isolate at once. Ang if you
don’t know how to treat a sick
fowl ring the vet and ask him for
advice,

Fowl pox is one of the greatest
enemies of the poultry-keeper
and in Barbados it is thought to
be spread by mosquitos. The
standard treatment of fowl-pox
is vaccination and experiments
are being ¢onducted in Barbados
to try and give protection to
poultry by vaccination, Certainly
vaccination ought to be used as
a preventive measure on farms
where fowl pox has occured,

There are no such things as
gee according to the experts.
roper feeding it is claimeg will
prevent the hardening of the
tongue of birds, Where harden-
ing does occur the rubbing of a
little. glycerine is recommended.
Some poultry keepers clip the
tongue with scissors but if pip
trouble is experienced consult the
1 and not the local “horse-doc-
tor”.

Colds of course are always pos-
sible but dry litter and clean sur-
roundings reduce their incidence.
Isolate all birds suffering from
colds and consult the vet. Small
doses of cod liver oil are general-
ly recommended.

Worms are sometimes acquired
after pullets are allowed to pick
grass. Special worm medicines
are sold locally, but again veter-
inary advice ought to be sought.







|
|
|
| short drinks
|

So, do as 36 skin specialists
advised:

ee

for long and

] Wash with Polmolive Seap. ~~
2 For 60 seconds, mos: with
Palmolive's soft, oval tates

Rinse !

3 Do this 3 times o day ber 14
doys.




SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Farm And Garden

By AGRICOLA

FOOD WASTAGE

IN THESE DAYS of high prices, shortage and difficul-
ties in connection with food sapplies, it may seem ludicrous,
at first sight, to introduce a subject of this kind. Actually,
however, it is more important than is generally thought—
in spite of the advances in food preservation, cold storage
and low temperature conyemienges in the average home.
$$$ IP is hardly necessary to em-


















; y + phasize that food conservation
GARDENING HINTS yea’ be regarded as an integral

part of food production, Even ui
@ country like the United States,
frequentiy referred to as a lana
of plenty and maximum eflicien-
cy, the Food Administration
Authorities, not so long ago,

FOR AMATEURS

A Place For Anthuriums









Gardeners are often heard to placed the over-all food wastage
say ‘oh I'd love to have some an- at 20-—30 per cent of all food pro-
thuriums but there is mowhere duced. There are no figures avail-
suitable in my garden to keep able for the tropies as far as we
them.” This is true of many gaT- know. Some shrinkage in weight
dens, and it’s a lucky garden°r jn ynavoidable due to loss ot
who has a ‘natural’ home in the

moisture, especially under tropi-
cal conditions, but this is not une
ony source of loss, by any means.

shape of a big tree, or a group of
trees which provide the ready
made dappled supshine which ,, , ; ; :
these Lowey useful plants require. ane problem might, indeed, ré-
If such a natural home is avail. PY close study, Meanwhile, it
able, full advantage should be â„¢*Y, be of interest to examine
taken of it, and as many anthu- - be grey ways &
riums placed under its shade as ¥™ wastage

possible. Anthuriums can also be (yy At the farm or other pro-
kept in the Fernery near tha ducsion Soures: due to reaping of
front where they will get a cer- ature or over-ripe produce,
tain amount of sunshine. These 9F =Bain to careless reaping and
plants look lovely in a Fernery andling resulting in unnecessary
where their broad green leaves bruising and breakage with sub-
make a handsome contrast to the sequent decay;

fine feathery leaves of the ferns (2) In transportation: due (0
The dampness of a fernery suits ‘ough handling, faulty packing
anthuriums too for they are sur- and stowage, delays, over-heat-
face feeders and obtain much of ing and so on;




























































iT






their nourishment through thei: (3) In storage: if produce can-
surface roots. not be at once sent to market,

But sometimes there is abso- care must be taken to keep it in
lutely no suitable spot that would a cool, well ventilate room or
do for anthuriums, and in that place; ‘in this connec on, cover-
case somewhere must be made for ing ground provisions, {ruits and
them, as it is a pity for any gar- vegetables with straw or wash OF
iia.” be without these useful Keeping them shaded and taking

care not to include damaged ma-
ae i terial which coulda start decay
One way of providing a suit- and rots; damage from rodents
able home for anthuriums is to and pests must also be guarded
make an artificial tree, and this is against: '

?

simply done. » catelann
$ a (4) At the markets: careless
most, sulted and thee get's Qeme hapaling and inefficient market-
wallaba post, or of better still the 128 whether by wholesalers ot
trunk of a tree. Dig a hole at retailers may result in much
least eighteen inches deep ana Produce being eventually —_re-
sink the upright in it. To make a 2° ‘ted; a good example of wast-
really good job, a dollop of ce- ®&¢ a commodity much in local
ment should be put in the hole @@â„¢and concerns bananas which
to secure and fix the upright, This @â„¢e packed in trays with sharp
cement will also keep the wood @dges, without a trace of pack~
from rotting. ing, the result keing for the
If no cement is used, the up- Weight of inner hands to press
right must be packed with stones, heavily against the outer ones
which should be rammed firmly completely ruining the fingers
down before the hole is filled lying against the tray edges;
in with earth, (5) By the consumer: not, the
; The next step is taken by nail- least important source of wast-
ing some cross bars across the age;; the food hoarder is a food
top. These again can be the natural waster, he buys more than he
branches of a tree, or pieces of needs and the rest is often sub-
wood. The whole erection will ject to spoilage; wasteful and the

An Artificial Tree

now look something like a skele- discarding of valuable parts
ton umbrella, known to be highly digestible
Now across the cross-ribs place and nutritious; cooking more

any suitable material. This can
be anything from lattice, coconut
leaves or branches from a tree,
anything in fact that will provide
the desired dappled shade under-
neath for the anthurium.

The “tree” is now ready to re-
ceive the anthuriums., These can
be just placed anyhow on the
ground underneath, but a better
arrangement is to get some block
stones, and arrange them pyramid
fashion around the upright gradu-
ating them outward to the limit
of the shade. The pots of anthuri-
ums are then placed about on the
stones. More plant room can be
secured by filling in the pockets
formed between the stones and
putting plants in them.

This use of block-stones not

than is actually necessary for the
needs of the household = and
throwing the remainder into the
garbage ail—institu¥ions and
restaurants are often very blame
worthy in this respect.
» It will be generally agreed that
‘a Sattle more thought and care
on the part of all concerned
would result in considerable sav-
ing of food material of one kind
or another. Nevertheless, under
the best of conditions, there is
bound to be a certain amount of!
refuse and damaged material
in the field, the market or in the
home— which may be usefully
converted into food through
livestock, notably pigs and poul-
try. Many are fully aware of the
only provides more space for the profitable use of such discarded
anthuriums, but the whole tree ‘oodstuffs and adopt measures ac-
has a better appearance than if cordingly. So many know but do
the pots are just placed on the not bother about it. Farmers and
ground, market dealers will find it re
An added attraction can be munerative to keep the odd pi
given to this shelter, if a coralita or two to consume rejected pro-
vine is grown over it, Should the duce, while the consumer should
‘wind be troublespme—and anthu- never be without a few chickens
riums don’t like wind—the vine to élean up scraps from the table
can be trained to the windward nnd other remains which other-
to act as a windbreak. wise may be a total loss

At the BCCF—whether you're going over to the Con-

tinent or up to St. Luey—months away or only a day,
our VACATION BAGS are inexpensive and strong.

For the DAY PICNICER, we have so many neces-
sary items: THERMOS FLASKS and UNBREAKABLE
CUPS and CAKE & SANDWICH TINS designed ‘for
the out-of-doors.

Come in and look at this extensive range of Piastic
Ware and Travel Accessories whenever you're
passing!

BARBADOS CO-OP.
COTTON FACTORY LTD.













Tae
MUSCLE PAINS

May mean kidney troubi..

A function of the kidneys is to
eliminate harmful impurities from
the system. If the kidneys grow
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muscles, The way to tackle the
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T should be toned up with

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De Witt's Pill have a
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PAGE

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QUININE—THE FOURTH INGREDIENT IN ‘ANACIN’

How does ‘ANACIN ’ relieve pain so fast, so effectively? A few years
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BE st/42T

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HEADLEY STILL MAKING
HEADLINES

Crowd Attacks Umpire At Black Rock
by O. S. COPPIN

i
|

team on their win against an England xi. This w

i
’
|
|
| Frank Worrell and Sonny Ramadhin.

Indies cricket on the map as has George Headley.

His two separate hundreds, 114 and 112, against England at
George town in 1929-30 when he
was making his bow to Interna-
tional cricket stamped him as a
great West Indies cricketer in the
making and he never turned back.

SUCCESSFUL ENGLAND
IS successes in England with
the 1933 and 1939 West Indies

teams are now cricket histroy but

they set the stage for a full recog-
nition of West Indies cricket in
mee Cricket circles,

—reremaenmemaacen
r . ore

Prior to his tour to India his
figures were 20 Tests played, 36
innings—3 times not out, 2,164
runs—270 not out as highest score,
10 hundreds, average 65.19.

Frank Worrell too is in excel-
lent form and it seems a pity that
we in Barbados who have not seen
|him in action simece the early
|1940.s may be deprived of the
opportunity of seeing him against
the Indians next January if the
| West Indies Cricket Board of Con-
| trol persist in their ridiculous, un-
reasonable attitude towards the
professionals .

GEORGE HEADLEY
DISGRACEFUL

}

in their power to ensure that this disease does not spread.
Some

| cuffed him, They were not in favour of a decision which he gave.

CONGRATULATIONS to the ee
s

tival match but we in the West Indies never-
theless were overjoyed to learn of the excellence
of the individual performances of George Headley,

George Headley occupies a fond place in the
hearts of all those who have followed the fortunes
of West Indies cricket during the past fifteen years,
for no single man has done so much to place West



of the spectators manhandled an umpire and one of them

ADVOCATE





Yesterday’sCricket

WANDERERS vs. POLICE

rhe Ist division fixture be-
fwcen Wanderers and the Police
at the Bay ended in a draw. The
Constables kept the Bay team in
the field until 5 o'clock, during
which time they amassed 367
runs for the loss of eight wickets.
Chiefly responsible for this big
score was an undefeated innings
of 113 by G. Sobers, and a good
supporting innings of 67 not out
by Carl Mullins. These two bats-
Men carne together after the fall
of the eighth wicket and when
the innings was declared closed
they had added 130 for the ninth
wicket partnership. Denis At-
kinson ang R. Lawless shared
the Bowling honours for Wan-
derers, each taking ‘bree wickets.

When play @nded las: Saturday,
Wanderers has established a first
innings lead over their opponents
by scoring 314 in reply to the
Constables’ 156. In their second
turn at the wicket, Police had
scored 108 for the loss of one
wicket by the close of play, Con-
tinuing to-day, they lost five
quick wickets with only 126 runs
on the tins. Springer and Sobers
retrieved the situation somewhat,
But after Springer left with the
Score at 237 it was left to Mullins
and Sobers to put up a creditable
performance and thus foil the
Wanderers’ attempts to achieve
an outright victory.

Wanderers entered on their sec-
ond innings to score 210 runs for
victory. They lost both Evelyn
and Knowles with the score at
only 3, but Mayers and Proverbs
stood together until the close of
play when* the score was 94 for
the loss of two wickets.

PICKWICK vs, SPARTAN

| N incident occurred yesterday after the close of play in the Carlton- Pickwick 242 and (for 4 wkts.
} Empire match, that is most regrettable and which I must draw to
jthe attention of sportsmen in the hope that they will do everything

GONE Si5.46))10+ tia ae
Spartan 215 and (for 6 wkts.) 142
Pickwick made a great but un-
successful bid to win an outright

One will at once admit that in a keenly contested game tempers victory over Spartan at Queen’s
of both players and spectators are high, even more so in the case of Park in their First Division cricket

the staunchest supporters,

In the circumstances one can condoné match

yesterday after they set

| strong booing or cheering but when an umpire is manhandled by a them 218 runs to win in 130 min-

crowd the time has come when an instant stop should be put to such utes,
Mob violence is infectious and it is easy for a mob to run

behaviour.

}amok in a flash,

|
\ SYMPATHY

enclosed one and therefore control of the crowd is difficult.

to do to the Cricket



ssociation.

home team,
football referee was stoned,
considered intelligent by some in this district.

FIRST ANNUAL “LEAGUE CRICKETER”
d vw First Annual “Barbados League”
J. N

| League Cricket.

Cricketer, compiled by Mr.
. Hewitt, Secretary-Founder came off the press yesterday. ©” * . .
The magazine seeks to chronicle for record purposes the growth of innings, K. Bowen took two for 40

With one Spartan batsman
sick and one (G, N, Grant) away
at work, Spartan were 142 for the
loss of six wickets at the close of
play. Pickwick scored 242 and for
4 wickets declared 190, and

|] SYMPATHISE with the Carlton authorities whose ground is not an Spartan 215, and for 6 wickets,
In
England the secretary of the club would have had a lot of explaining
However, Carlton officials can help
by placing a few notices in strategic spots warning spectators against
such behaviour since they can exercise little control over them or the
| | remember once that on the nearby Shell grounds, a
It seems as if this sort of behaviour is
I counsel the specta-
tors to behave like sportsmen and allow the umpires or referees to
carry out a most exacting 2nd thankless job to the best of their ability.

142,

Pickwick started their second
innings yesterday from the over-
week score of 54 for the loss of
one wicket. T.S. Birkett who was
20 not out carried his bat to a
brilliant 108, stut not out when
Pickwick declared at lunch.
Charlie Taylor also contributed a
valuable 35 and John Goddard
who had scored 71 not out in the
first innings, scored 13.

No bowler was really effective
on the wicket. In Pickwick second

in 14 overs. John Goddard took
two Spartan second innings wick-





Everton Weekes, Frank King, Carl Mullins, Conrad Hunte, Clair-
monte De Peiza, Adzil Holder, Ormond Graham, Kenneth Goddard,
Ralph Legall have all made their mark in the Intercolonial Cricket Spartan went to the wicket after
arena and have all been supplied to Barbados Cricket Association junech with the challenge of try-
cricket by the Barbados Cricket League. “4 ing to seore 218 in a hurricane

Statistics, always acceptable to sportsmen, play the major part gpell of; just over two hours.
in this book and I am sure that it will occupy an important place on or to try patiently to stave off de-
the sportsman’s bookshelf firstly as a background to those who from feat, They took the latter course,
lowly beginnings have been able to play their part in placing Barbados and Pickwick set an attacking
and West Indies cricket on the sporting map and secondly as a season field. They were handicapped be-
to season record of the performance of over an hundred League Clubs, cause of the absence of E, L. G.

The need for a similar work on Barbados Association cricket Hoad, jnr., but Spartan’s batsmen
cannot be too strongly stressed, We must thank people like the late began to throw away their wickets
Mr, Johnny Gibbons, Mr. T. S. Birkett and Dr. Hamilton for some carelessly and near the end of the
record of the growth and expansion of local and Intercolonial cricket game, it seemed as though Pick-
as far as it concerned Barbados but they have left off at an important wick would clinch are, ut
period in the development of Barbados and West Indies cricket and 5.45. o'clock” a meee appea
surely it is a challenge to local historians that this period should not for light saved the situation,
go unrecorded. The B.C,L. has set a good example well worth following g§ Griffith batted well in Spar-

by its parent Association the B.C.A. tan’s second innings to score 46 bé-
fore he caused himself to get run
TABLE TENNIS’ PROFITS out as he had done in the first in-
“HE accounts for the recent South Trinidad-Barbados Association nings. N. Harrison was also quite
table tennis tournament show that a profit of $290.58 was made set, and batting well when he was
and was divided between the two Associations, each getting $145.29. run out at 21. N. Harris made a
This was no huge profit from any large scale financial outlay brisk 39 before he was stumped
but modest as it might be by popular standards it does reflect two off medium to fast bowler ees
comforting aspects of the tournament. The first is that it shows that it idge. This was the we erase hed
en honest-to-goodness attempt is made to stage intercolonial sport of this bowler after fete stbidstt as
any kind that there is the possibility of success as well as failure. been on for sometime,
The Barbados Table Tennis Association at one time, possibly
juite rightly so, entertained grave doubts about the financial possi- EMPIRE ys. CARLTON
bility of staging an intercolonial tour here since this form of sport was Empire 232 and (for 6 wkts.) 210

not popular by comparative standards, Carlton 92 and (for 8 wkts.) 161

INCREASING INTEREST CARLTON batsm€n led by

C. Boogles Williams defied the

OCAL interest has increased with the passing of the past two years Empire attack yesterday and drew

4 and having attempted something, they gained something. The their game when, given 350 to
other consideration whien gives me much pleasure is the fact that avert defeat, they scored 161 for
public attendances were perhaps the best ever for table tennis fixtures. 8 wickets. They were helped in
I am looking forward to the Association’s touring the other terri- their valiant effort by three drop-
tories now for although they have not shown that they can defeat a ped catches, two off N. S. Lucas,
representative Trinidad team yet their performances against the 1 off C. B. Williams, and a possi-
Southern Zone players of the Trinidad Table Tennis Association have pie chance when Edghill skied
established their bona fide as far as Intercolonial table tennis in con- one which both Barker and Rob-

cerned, inson left alone.

ets for 15 runs in six overs,





It was largely the great effor~
ot C. B. Williams, who defendei
stubbornly at times, took runs
off the loose balis, aud took the
bowling at the critical stage of
the game. He scored “2 before he
was caught by Horace King off
Grant at square leg. With C.
McKenzie, he saw the score pass
the 50 mark after R. Hutchinson
was sent back Lb.w. to Barker
when the score was 2 runs.

When McKenzie was caught
behind the wicket off Barker’s
bowling, N.S. Lucas joined Wi!-
liams, but it was immediately
evident that he was uneasy to the
accurate pacers from Barke-~.
Williams shielded him over after
over, and when tea was taken
they were still together.

After tea, Lucas with his score

at two after batting for nearly
one hour, was given a life by
Barker. when he put down an

easy return catch. The next ball
Lucas turned for 2 to make his

score 4, and again in the nexi
Horace King missed him at short
fine leg.

Grant

was soon brought on,
and in his spell, he had Williams
caught at by H. King at square
leg for a very valuable 73. He
had earlier given a chance be-
hind the wicket when in the
fifties.

The Empire bowling after that
lacked the sting and accuracy
which it had earlier in the day,
but the Cariton batsmen, in
their endeavour to save the game,
continued to play with restraint,
and refused to attack the bowling
at this stage.

The Empire bowling regained

its sting shortly before five
o'clock, and Barker switched to
the southern end, had Lucas

caught at short fine leg by Hunte,
while G. Hutchinson was bowled
playing back to an off break
from Horace King.

It appeared that Empire wouid
Still win fhe match. Five weré
down for 147, and in the next
few overs, Robinson struck Wil-
liams on the pad and he was ad-

judged leg before by Umpire
Trotman,

Then Edghill F. B. and E. Mar-
shall defended for all they were
worth, and when Williams got
Edghill to spoon a slow delivery
to point, Barker and Robinson
left it alone, believing the other
to be going for it. Actually it
was Barker’s catch, and _ this,
more than anything else, robbed
Empire of an outright win.

Marshall was a few overs later
bowled by Barker, but in the two
overs left F. B, Edghill and K. B.
Warren played out time and thus
saved the match. Barker bore
the brunt of the bowling and
finished with 5 for 40.

At the end of the game, a mob
attacked Umpire Trotman, and
one of them actually struck him
a blow. He was however res~
cued by Reynold Hutchinson
and other members of the Carl-
ton team.

LODGE vs. COLLEGE

COLLEGE 1st Innings
(for 9 wkts, decld,) 355
LODGE 88 and 67

Harrison College defeated Lodge
by the comfortable margin of an
innings and 200 runs before the
luncheon interval yesterday the
last day in their cricket fixture
at Harrison College.

Batting first Harrison College
took the first day and two hours
of the second day to score 355
runs for the loss of 9 wickets
declared in their first innings
with Malcolm Worme undefeated
with 145, He hit 16 fours,

Lodge in their turn at the wic-
ket on the second day scored 88
runs and having failed to save
the follow on were sent back and
by the end of this day’s play they
had lost six wickets for 60 runs.

Play
Lodge
second

resumed yesterday with
50 for six wickets in their
innings and they only
added seven runs to this score
before closing their second in-
nings. L. Murray topscored with
a total of 16 runs while G. Wif-
kie was run out for 10 runs.
G. Foster who bowled so well
in the Lodge first innings again
put in a good performance and
ended up with an analysis of 10
overs, four maidens, 17 runs and

four wickets. Sltpper C, Smith
took two for 24,

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7. 1

RACING NOTES

By BEN BATTLE





AM afraid that I was unable to listen to the broadcast of the
I Arima Races, and so my comments on them must be at second
hand. Fortunately, however, a good friend and keen judge of racing
was there and I can pass some of his views on to you.

The race that appears to have made the biggest impression on
his mind was the Grell and Co,, Ltd. Trophy in which Bright Light
placed third to Monroe and Red Velvet. My friend had no hesitation
in saying that this was one of the best races that Bright Light had ever
run. Apparently there was considerable interference at the start
due to the behaviour of Dipdell and Bright Light was one of the
sufferers. The winner and second apparently avoided trouble and
were soon out in front which, those who know the Arima course,
will agree is more than half the battle there. In spite of this Bright
Light was able to run round the field on the outside and only failed
by the narrowest of margins to get up. My friend's only other com~
ment on this race was to the effect that Golden Fleece, a very good
looking chestnut colt, was also a sufferer at the start,

The Captain Cipriani Memorial cup—the richest race in the
South Caribbean, went to Hope Dawns whom my informant Gescribes
as a very taking filly. False Pride was apparently very much expect-
ed, but an early duel with Dormay must have told on him. Among
the Maidens my friend spoke well of Starlene, a neat if rather small
dlly who races in the familiar phimbago blue of Mr. C. L. Trestrail.
Twin Serew also caught his eye—a fine big chestnut colt. Speaking
for myself I was pleased to see the successful re-entry into racing
made by Mr. S. Liddlelow who had gone out of the game with the
retirement of that grand little warrior Bright Boy. Always lucky
with the Jamaican creoles “Mr. Friendship” has apparently done it
again with Battle Song. In this race I am told Cross Roads did not |
look anything like his best. In the T.M.I. Trophy Mr. Barnard
had two placed in the first three. Rosette just managed to hold
Dr. Weaver’s Meditation but my information is that Cavalier might
have beaten them both had the race been a little longer.

Meditation “is yet another winner for Jetsam and there is no
doubt that this Creole stallion is off to a good start in his stud career.
Médjitation’s dam Orlanda has the distinction of having two winners
out on the same day, her other one being Kismet. She also has a two-
year-old—Malahini—and so appears to be a very useful matron,

PADDOCK GOSSIP

"THE PADDOCK these days appears quite a different place to what

it had been a little over a month ago. Most trainers are giving
their charges an “easy’’ and there are no spectacular gallops or
indeed outstanding events of any sort to report. This does not mean
that the flow of badinage among the regulars has in any way dimin-
ished. Indeed, it has widened in scope and I must confess that I was
somewhat taken aback last Wednesday on approaching a group whom,
I would have guessed, were discussing Handicapping and Classifying,
only to find an eloquent discourse on the future of the Sugar Industry
to be in full swing. Unfortunately I doubt whether the Editor would
allow me to publish this debate verbatim, and if altered it would
lose much of its flavour. Our newest owner has acquired a shooting
stick, and thus equipped, can be seen studying the activities of his
charge from different points of vantage. Again I wish that I could
pass on to readers some of the advice and encouragement that are
being freely offered him, but once again the editorial blue pencil
might come into play.

Among the horses that caught my eye was Driftwood who is
yet another Jetsam progeny. Her dam Pawky did not prove a par-
ticularly good broodmare for the Hon. J. D. Chandler, and Driftwood
is the last of her foals bred by him. Although a little on the small
side, she is a charming filly, full of quality and, at the moment,
looking really well. Her ex-stable companion, Sterling Dawn, has
joined the Pierce stable, and she too looks well, but at the moment
very backward. The new importation, Highland Spur, is a strong

looking fellow, exceptionally muscular and well developed for a
Two-Year-Old.

AND STILL THEY COME

HERE appears to be no slackening of the inflow of importations,

and two more arrived last week. They are Ardena and Fluffy
Ruffles, consigned respectively to Mr, J. R. Goddard and Mr. ‘Bunny’
Edwards. Ardena is a well bred filly by Torbide out of The Face
who is by speed sire Goldbridge out of a mare called Palm Olive.
She was bred by Lord Oranmore and in addiiton to her pedigree she
has more than useful form to recommend her—one win, two seconds
and two thirds in seven starts. As she is still a two-year-old, she
must have a bright future in front of her here if all goes well with
her. Fluffy Ruffles, a bay three-year-old by Pink Flower out of
Golden Fairy also has Gold Bridge as her Grand-dam and would
thus appear to be very suitably bred for our conditions. Her form
is rather less impressive however and she is still a maiden after 15
starts, but she is clearly a durable filly and would not be the first,
should she accomplish it, to both lose her maiden certificate here and

end up in A class.
Bright Light Wins
Derby Trial Stakes

(From Our Own Correspondent) ,
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Sept. 6.
Mr. Barnard’s’ Bright Light
(Holder up) won the Derby Trial
Stakes and Trophy over a dis-
tance of seven and a half furlongs
from Meditation and Daisy Brown
in that order in the third race
to-day, the second of the Santa
Rosa four-day meeting. Hope
Dawns on a good track repeated
its first day’s performance, beat-
ing A Class horses convincingly
to win the Fernandez & Co, Ltd.

Trophy over six furlongs.

RESULTS
STEWARDS HANDICAP
About 6 Furlongs. Class G2 3 Years
Old and Over.
1, Steamshaft.
2. Highflyer.
3. Dazzle.
NURSERY STAKES
“Division A’, About 5 Furlongs
nated 2 Years Old Only,
1. Roseleaves.
2. Tidalwave.
3. Flyirg Saucer.

DERBY TRIAL STAKES AND TROPHY
About 7% Furlon#s, > Years Old Only
1. Bright Light,

2. Meditation,
3. Daisybrown,

FERNANDEZ & CO. LTD., TROPHY
6 Furlongs Class Al and A2 and Bl

and B2 Only.

1 Hope Dawns.
2. False Pride,
3. Dormay.

S.C. CASTILLO MEMORIAL STAKES
About 7% Furlongs. Class Fl and F2

Only. 4 Years Old Only.

1. My Own.
2. Stella Polaris
3. Pearl Diver,
GAFFOORS BAKERY TROPHY
About 7% Furlongs. Class C Winners
Only,
1. Port Wallis

Nomi-

SS mes

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Red House Win
Competition

Red House with its captain in
Major Chase and with a total of
459 points took the first place in
the House Competition Shoot at
the Government Range yesterday
afternoon. Second place went to
Green House captained by Capt.
R. Warner with 455 points, Blue
House with 437 points under its
captain Lt. Col. J. Connell was
third.

The weather was very hot and
there was a mirage which was
most noticeable at the 300 yards
and this caused difficult definition
at the aiming mark. The wind
however was fairly constant.

The eight best scores, were: —

Points
BAD, 0-0). PRE idea a nee wt ser 97
Major A. DeV. Chase ...... 96
Mr, 3 .. D. Dawis’..ciekisew 94
Major A. S. Warren ...... 94
Mr. MM. G. Tuekee 63.4166 94
Major J. E, Griffith ........ 92
R.S.M., N. Marshall ........ 92
Capt. C. R. E, Warner ...... 92





2. Alibaba
3. Monroe
JU-C BEVERAGES TROPHY
About 6 Furlongs, Class El and E2
Only.
1 Leapon.
2. Bonita.
3. Marklight,
W. H. SCOTT LTD. TROPHY
About 7% Furlongs, Class Dl and D2
and El and E2 Only.
1. Rock Diamond.
2. Happy Union,
3. Fair Profit,



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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7. 1952



Know Your Cricket °°“:

LAWS 36 & 37

By O: S.

COPPIN

TO-DAY we-continue our sfudy of the Laws of the
Game and I propose to deal with “Handling the Ball”
and “Hitting the Ball Twice”.

I have not seen many people dismissed because of an
infringement of these two laws but on the few occasions
that local batsmen have been dismissed there has been a

terrible uproar.

On one occasion when E. L.
Bartiett, ihe popular Spartan
batsman was given out in the
Park it caused a near riot.

Few who follow Inter-
mationai cricket will forget the
Hutton incident in the Fifth
Test match against South Africa
at the Oval, in which Hutton was
given out for having “hit the
ball twice”. I shall say more of
this incident later in this article.
i LAW

Handled the Ball

Either batsman is out “Handled
the ball’ — if he touch it while
in play with his hands, unless
it be dome at the request of the
opposite side.

Experienced players break this
Law time and again and on the
very isolated occasions that an
appeal is made and they are giv-
en out there follows a claim
that those who appealed are not
sportsmen.

Insupportable

I fail to see how this claim
can be supported in the face of
the law. Senior players strike
a ball ard then calmly walk
down the wicket and throw it
back to the bowler without their
having been requested to do so,

If an appeal is made against
them the umpire has no alter-
native but to give them out.

Of course this law cannot ap-
ply where a batsman, say in
protecting his face from a
bouncer, takes his hand off the

The correct entry in the score
book when a batsman is given
out under this Law is “Handled

struck twice.

The M.C.C. have ruled official-
ly that it is for the umpire to
decide whether the ball has been
so struck a second time legiti-
mately or not. The umpire may
regard the fact that a run is at-
tempted as evidence of the bats-
men’s intention to take advan-
tage of the second stroke, but i!
is not conclusive.

A batsman can be given out,
if appealed against, if, after
playing the ball, and without
on. cee request from the opposite

le, he uses his bat to return the
ball to a fieldsman.

New Edition

The M.C.C. is publishing a

new edition of Laws of Cricket

containing amendments to notes’

and interpretations which are
aimed at helping in the correct
application of Laws.

This new edition comes into
effect for the overseas season of
1952-53 and the English season
of 1953. This has been made
necessary, it is pointed out, be-
cause of controversial happen-
ings in recent years. In no case
has any Low been altered.

Hutton Out !

The dismissal of the England
Captain Len Hutton in the Fifth
Test of 1951 against South Africa
at the Oval comes to my mind
as I study this law of “Hitticg
the ball twice”.

It will be remembered tht
Hutton attempted to hit the ball
a second time after it had popped
off his glove and s@emed to be
about to drop on to his wicket.
In doing so however he »re-
vented the wicket-keencr frem
making what would have been
an easy catch.

An appeal was made and he
was given out for “obstructing
the field”.

Arising out of this inci¢en’.
the M.C.C. has included in their
new edition a note soverning

RESPIRATION, s

CARIB oon’

e hp



LEN HUTTON
such occurrences and it reads as
follows:— A batsman may not
attempt to hit the ball twice if
in doing so he baulks the wicket-
keeper or any fieldsman_ at-
tempting to make the catch.

Public Would Hail
Cricket Side-Show

HERE is an idea for making the
third day of county cricket
matches popular and, therefore,
profitable — revive single wicket
matches. The suggest : comes
in a letter from a reader P. C
CLARKE, of Richmond, Surrey.

He writes “... an early finish
should be followed by single-
wicket contests, the winner to be

* found from the best 16 of each
* county on knock-out principles,

and the individual county
champions to meet around the
time of the festival games. The
crowd would get their extra
entertainment without both teams
having to hang around.

“Two players per match only
would be involved, The fielders
might be recruited in a number
of ways. It should be worth
while for clubs and members to
provide sufficient incentives, and
I could visualise plenty of wagers
and side-stakes.”

Single-wicket matches were
popular in the early days, and
as a variation might be so again.
Their appeal would depend very
much on finding players with
personality I can imagine that a
single-wicket match between,
say, Freddie Brown and Denis
Compton at one of the September
festivals would be a _ roaring
success.

I do not go all the way with
reader Clarke. I think a single-
wicket championship would be
impracticable beeause then
matches would have to be
played off, which might not be
possible if they were treated as
a stop-gap in a short third-day
county match. The single-wicket
competition would then become
an aim in itself instead of being
a profitable side-show,

But something of this sort is
needed, There is an obligation on
counties to provide play for the
advertised hours, weather per-
mitting.

RECEIPTS TOTAL $392.88
FOR TABLE TENNIS TOUR

The total receipt from the
Trinidad—Barbados Table Tennis
tour which was held last month
amounted to $392.88. Of this
$20.60 was spent on printing



tickets, $9.00 went to printing
programmes, $39.29 for light,
cleaning, etc., $22.50 for fixing

the raised seats, cartage, payment
to carpenter, etc., and $10.91 on
refréshments and tips, totalling
$102.30,

Profit from the tour was $290.58
—$145,29 went to the San Fernan-
do team of the Trinidad and
Tobago Amateur Table Tennis
Association and the remaining
$145.29 to the Barbados Table
Tennis Association,

In this tour the San Fer-
nando team was completely out-
played by Barbados.

HOURS AH
BEEN Givin You ARTIFICIAL

Oo Ww THIS
T Fix Yo up

NOTHIN wirt /

») October
/ inside man completed a_ brilliant

Oldham, Grimsby
Draw Match

From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Sept. 6.

A second half goal by Peter
McKennan for Oldham Athletic
brought an end to the only re-
maining 100 per cent record in
English League Soccer this after-
noon. Peter’s goal enabied Old-
ham to hold Grimsby to a draw
before 20,000 at Blundel: Park.
It was the first Grimsby had con-
ceded this season.

At the other end of the scale
Walsall were trounced 6—1 by
Exeter for whom former Bir-
mingham leader Dailey grabbed
a seven minute second half hat-
trick and are the only club with-
out a point.

Watch out for the name of Al-
lan Brown when Scottish Selec-
tors choose the team for the first
International against Wales on
18. The husky Blackpool

hat-trick at Villa Park in one of
the best away wins of the day.
The largest crowd was at Tot-
tenham where 62,000 saw Spurs
record their first home victory of*

J the season. Len Duquemin notch-

ed the winning goal against
newly promoted Cardiff.

Middlesbrough who dropped



: WANDERERS
Police Ist ne 156
Wanderers ist Innings . 4
2 2nd Innings
C. Blackman . Atkinson .
F. Taylor c St. Hill b R. Lawiess 55
+ ne coat . R. Lawless . 16
J. Byer ¢ BR Lawless b D. Atkinson
Cc. Amey ec & b R. Law weed
G. Sobers not out 113
B. Dodson b D. Atkinson 7
C. Springer b G. Proverbs 3
C. Mullins not out a
C. Bradshaw did not bat

Extras EJ

Total (for 8 wkts,) a

Fall of wickets—1 for 86, 2 for 110, 3
for 110, 4 for 118, 6 for 126, 6 for 128,

7 for 159, 8 nowt
WLING ANALYSK
°o M. R

DBD. Atkinson
H. Ramsay .
R. Lawless
L. St. Hil
H. Toppin ......
W. Knowles
G. Proverbs
D. Evelyn .
Wanderers’



G. Proverbs not out .
M. Mayers not out
Extras eens



Total (for 2 wkts.)

et e-ccoowowt

Fail of wickets—1 for 3 2 for 3
BOWLING

ANALYSIS
é Co. 2 w
C Bradshaw 7 4 21 1
Cc. Mullins . 6 1 14 1
Cc. Springer .. ‘ 2 0 °
0

F. Taylor .... 3 0 wt
PICKWICK vs, SPARTAN

Pickwick 242 and (for 4 Se decid.) 190
: im

Spartan M6 and (for 6 wkts.

three players including the Eng- 2 Mj aE ie thee =
land star Mannion as a matter of T. s. Bi not out 108
club discipline lost their first J. G a ag . 4

game of the season at Stoke. The \y "G, net
star of the home team defence Fxtras ayine ib
was newly signed centre half si -
Kenny Thompson, a £22,000 Tote): (eae: ¢ weet. Gecid.).. 199
capture from Aberdeen. Fall of en 1 for 12, 2 for 98, 3 for

Liverpools 2—0 victory agains: ‘*' * ",} ‘. iis

Manchester City keeps them on BYWANG a R w
top of the first Division. Still & gine il ? 30 1
without a win are Sheffield Wed- ( )a'"* e: & 3
nesday beaten 3—0 at home by N_ Harris 4 il =
Charlton and Newcastle United 4 oS) Bi ses My
who lost 2—1 at Burnley. «Gain et nvr “6
In the Second Division New aA Atkins e Teste b Goddard 16
Boys Plymouth aren’t losing any &. ". Harrise w Goddard 5
time in making their presence § (Walgett c wk. b Jordan . a
felt. Before # 31,000 crowd at Nn eet stpd. w.k. b Greenidge »
Home Park—well above average F ‘ing not out |... 7.
—they slammed Sheffield United ‘Extra i
5—2. Fast moving wingers Go- ae
Total (for 6 wkts.) 142

van and Astall were again among
the scorers. Sheffield found their
scoring attempts breaking down
before the solid tackling of their
former centre half Jack Chisholm.
Plymouth’s victory keeps them
level on points with Huddersfield
who improved their goal average
by beating Barnsley 6—0,

Both newly promoted clubs in
the Scottish Division ‘A’. Falkirk
and Clyde had unhappy after-
noons Seven times Clyde’s goal-
keeper picked the ball out of his
net in their game with East Fife

and although Falkirk seored three ,

at Celtic Park they were still
beaten 5—3.

The sheck of the day however ,;

was the home defeat of the League
Champions Hibernians who were
well and truly licked 3—1 by
Queen of the South. Last season
Hibernians won the corresponding
game 5—0.

Letter Ta Col. Sec.

? From el

feel that cannot Passed over
in silence, For the information of
the public generally I would



stress the following fundamental Ri

and cognate matters in connec-
tion with the administration of
the criminal law,

(1) The Governor-in-Executive
Committee does not interfere, and
indeed, has no right to interfere
with the performance by a judic-
ial officer of his judicial duties, so
that this letter was clearly mis-
directed.

(2) It is well established that a
Judge is free to express his opin- M
ions when he deems it desirable

so to do, and indeed, at times
would be lacking in the perform-
ance of the functions of his office

if he failed to comment on mat-
ters connected with func-
tions. Among the matters which
inevitably come within the pur-
view of a Judge’s function {s the
verdict of a Jury. So much is
that the case that a judge is not
bound to receive at once the first
verdict which the jury bring in.

(3) The letter treats the case
referred to as being in the nature
of a eivil action—it refers to ‘suit
of cigarette factory versus Oliver
Grimes’—whereas all trials of in-
dictments at the Court of Grand
Sessions, as everyone should
know, are trials of the issues
joined between our Sovereign
Le ady the Queen and accused per-
ns,

Jall of wickets—1 for 31, 2 for 47, 3
for 64, 4 for oe 6 it 128, 6 foe i141
BOW

iG ARAL LYSIS

R Ww
J. Greenidge ° 29 1
T. S. Birkett 2 “we -
J. Goddard 6 1 15 2
Jordan a3 25 1
W. Greenidge 0 i a —

Edwards ..... 7

T . 2 1 6

A M. Taylor 4 18

CARLTON vs. EMPIRE
Empire 2&2 (for 6 wktss) 210
Carlton ”
Cariton ane Inning ss
C. MeKenzie c w.k. (De Peiza) b

Barker ... ‘ 18
Hutehinson }.b.w. Barker 0
Cc. B, Williams c H. King b. Grant is
N. S. Lucas c C. Hunte b Barker 9
G. Hutchinson b H. King is

J Williams 1.b.w. Robinson 1
&. W. Marshall b Barker 7
£ B, Edghill not out a
Cc Cox l.b.w Barker 4
K. B. Warren not out 0
Extras w
Total (for 8 wkts.) 11

Vall of. wickets—) for 2, 2 for 57, 3 for
114, 4 for 128, 5 for 147, 6 for 147, 7 for



is, 8 for 161.
BOWLING ANALYSIS
Oo M. R. W
Barker . ee 23 8 40 5
GUM bv lasts ee+s 9 5 6 1
E. A. V. Williams 13 4 Bay
H ae “4 8 «630 1
10 3 18
4 2 7
6 3 i2
3 5



4 1
LODGE vs. coisas AT COLLEGE
COLLEGE — Ist Innings — (for 9 wkts

decld,) 355
LODGE os 00 VURe vives co)
LODGE — 24ND INNINGS
C. Grant c Smith b Simmons 0
L. Murray b Foster sere 16
J, Hutson run out . : 7
J. Farmer b Foster : ‘ 0

KK. Brookes b Foster 16

R. Goddard c wkpr Blackman)
b Foster
. Wilkes not out

G. Wilkie run out .

3. Outram ec Worme b Smith

i. Riley b Smith .

l». Reefer absent .....-.

Extras

Total...

Fall of wkts: 1-8, 2—26, 3—26,
5-50, 6-52; 7-80, 8-60, 9-87,

COMMONWEALTH TO
PLAY EVERGLADES

Commonwealth
will engage iverglad
Club in a fixture commencing
today and continuing next Sun-



aay at the Carrington’s Village

grounds, Play starts at 1.15 p.m.

The following will represent
Common wealth; J.
(Capt.) R. Nurse; E. Brereton; J.
Lorde; C. DePeiza; E, Elcock; C.
Parris; St.C. Burke; C. Griffith;
L. Goddard; D, White and S.
Rowe, (12th man).



SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Cricket Scores

Club |
Cricket

Graham |

SEPT. 7 — NO. 240

The Topic

of

Last Week

Joe Joe was in the money

And boys he did buy clothes
With coppers in his pockets
He gould share lots ot blows

.
Joe like the Salat Balink
Start off with a big spree
ee had a big, big headache
Coungd by, prosperity
.

lic started on a spring cruise
in a spring suit of green
\nd boys high-minded Joe Joe
Lewed in Argentine.
. * . .
ile steaming, boiling fair girls
Swanking from hips to heel
Confuse Jog Joe with Spanish
ry ing to clinch, the deal

Joe Joe panati pews
Herd things he had to face
For boys all Joe Joe's good luck
Just landed him in space.
. . . . .
Save! save Joe Joe from peril
Pray, tell me what's this place
“Twas then a magic mirror
Showed Joe Joe his disgrace
. .

The ‘starch and iron” captain
With mirror fixed in hand
Turned Joe Joe in a turtle
Like those up Silver Sand

. . . . .

Pwas then Joe Joe discovered

Cld age is like a snare

Even if you feel like coming

y crawl ‘till you get there
. . . . .

Tt some the other
We readily agree
With those young stream lined
We'll hush; and wait and see

. . . . .

artistes

bodies

Who saw those bathing beauties
Some averaging seven stone
minded Joe of beef steak
Which is all beef—no bone

* * .

.

bDuneing the Mumbo jumbo

loor Rebert had to say,

One, Uke the Russian woman

Bioeck up the whole highway
. . .

Congrats to Eric Morris

\nd Norma Gaskin too

\od Jezebel; the Bajan

‘ho can drink one or two
. . . . .

id little Juliet Gaskin

ud some the stiffer breed

ho, by their complexation (!
M ade Enriched Bread ime ir feed

>

Cheers go to Joe and Nevitle

Mrs, Stuart, the Police Band
Let's toast to them with J & RK
The best rum in the land

sponsored by
J &R BAKERIES
makers of
ENRICHED BREAD
and the blenders of
J&R RUM



Down with the Tyrant

BRENT

BRAITHWAI rE'S
RHEUMATIC
REMEDY

It will bring you great com-
yy Aan ~ oe

fort and ease your ‘suffer-

ings with the first bottle.

7

epee inne pnnnpan nels






ee is the

VENO O'S

cOUG MIXTURE

ee ne

STOPS COUGHS





>

“an xe

Such 7TNING >

Mollet
re A ee

VE NO'S < OU GH MEX r RE,
uthoug m is different the
j ide « is the same
: yt! 1 oughing
soothing
rd protect-
VE ENO'S 1s ood for
some immediately.







Before you bath -
berore you dress -

ANDREWS

tor loner Cleanliness!

First thing in the morning,
make sure you take your Andrews.
Inner Cleanliness comes first! Just
is Andrews bubbles in the glass,
so you'll sparkle with the fitness
and energy that come from a
system free from impurities.

Firstly, Andrews cleans the
mouth and tongue, then settles the

tomach, tones up the liver and,
finally, gently clears the bowels

Take Andrews as a refreshing
drink at any time; just a tea-

poonful in a glass of water is
ufficient,

DO YOU KNOW that the mouth records events in your
digestive system? If all is well the tongue is clean, the mouth
feels fresh. But if your system’s sluggish the tongue is coated,
there’s an unpleasant taste in your mouth. Sparkling Andrews

is needed — its cleansing action freshens the mouth and the

whole system.



1
Comatock's Worm Peat Nad bythe
makers of Dr. More's Indian 2

'

!

'

i

i

i

1

|

\

\
|
1 dienes of
'
'
'
'
te

PAGE FIVE

BECAUSE UPONTHE CONDITION
OF THE KIDNEYS RESTS HEAL
HAPPINESS ~ LIFE ITSELF J”

EVERY EXPERIENCED DOCTOR
IN MAKING A DIAGNOS!S

MUST FIRST FIND OUT THE
CONDITION OF THE KIDNEYS

FOR IF THE KIDNEYS ARE
FAILING IN THEIR | MPORTANT
DUTY OF REMOVING EXCESS
ACIDS AND POISONOUS
WASTES FROM THE BLOOD=
THEN WE ARE POWERLESS
TO PREVENT SICKNESS.

EVEN INSURANCE COM=

PANIES WONT INSURE A

PERSON WHOSE KIDNEYS
ARE NOT RIGHT

3} eS
Vad pes
If you don't feel 1 look feadchen, to
your kidneys.

tired feeling, too it
rheumatism, sleeple: mane a
dizzy spells, “nerves” -

cations of faulty kidney st i zz
have any of these symptoms

Dedd’s Kidney Pills today.

Dodd's Kidney Pills are the

proven kidney remedy, used

by tens of thousands. Ask for

Dodd’s Kidney Pills and ©

don’t let them sell you

anything else



“oor PILLS

Den't let, reser aad & sluggish ar
slow you! pipers uel Le) YOU Col any ty S

wih g ee, ou gent ae effect night
eet OF Aiseomiart. w
stato yo fine « stgl Bix active Ingre





and herbs le a
hetps restore

tbpmal bowel ess vation Fe oe rr ful wastes a
out. Get Dr.

Moree! * Indian Root
Pills today.





A
TRUSTED REMEDY
FOR OVER
50 YEARS

sux OF WORMS!

Be sure ory famil

R M JONES & CO. LTD.—Agents.

















































r


PAGE SIX



























SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7. 1952
vyyuaveresnvevenenetenteeeE ss
: 2 . 4 q ® Py oo , proved
= =O? = _
if = a= purpose, [¢ ihere is
z = ¢ L no : ruth der. belief
4 hat r eut hair
“ , t ‘aling up
| wor ea te S WHY peopir can go grey Dr. Savill petieves that some
. expe ats 4 ae ee ee . ; ; cOntaining sulphur may
PR ie 4 Jrank overnight after a shock nelp w delay baldness. Sut
ae : ie assacing | the scalp tig the
y 7 aaa an iIngers or beating it with a hair
@ WHAT Bean geare as 10 your hair brusi until it tingles is probat
. : bos . og: a > etter
when it gets realiy wet Oily lotions may also nel
) e war t greyness
@ HOW to brush your hair Few people have’ really
sé ° e na rs in their heads, most “ grey *
we tdlseusd fasnrenep ise af hair being a mixture of white,
black. and brown
ew > INCHER 4
by CHAPMAN PINCHER Frightened?
IGHT on time for the bathing season a women N hair turn white in
doctor describes today exactly what happens to flees Dr. Savill
| your hair when you wet it wek might suddenly



rict the blood vessels

And she throws in some useful! ‘ips for beauty-conscious
ying the roots of the hairs

women and balding men appl th ots of
Thorough wetting weakens hair so much that it will mee So serve out t neir colour,
stretch to one and a half times its normal length i, he doctor quotes one case of
: are oe Tattd os eat eet ee” ae ; d 4% man whose hair turned black
pulled. Sodden hair also breaks easily. So ray your hea after a frighten‘ng night
as gently as possible when drying it at tee alias i.
S , a But her most hair-raising hair
Hair which has been stretched and dritd stays story concerns some soldiers who
stretched. But when it is slightly moistened it springs had such terrifying experiegces
back — to its former — at Dunkirk that their hair stood
length. oiling their nair-do’s ut like the bristles of a hedge-
That is why a mo VouLs »y women "from hog for several months.
comb auickly puts hing their hair often enough
shape back into the opinion of Dr. Agnes Seven facts
usled hair. iil, who has written a 316 R GR "S$ about
If hair ‘s stret age book* on human hair meerecne ee mee sa
then steamed fo The doctor condemns the nz fastest between
minutes

Not this week, folks! I’ve made the great dis-
sovery—an Air-Sick tablet that really works.
Just left the Airport after four hours’ flying, and

look at me! AIR-SICK tablets by, SAVORY &
MOORE are ‘the works’ boys and girls. Try
them out and see for yourself.

I khow my onions too Mr. Townsman Grow
them, eat them (raw is how [I
like them) ang kiss my girl
friend too.

“Ever tried Amplex? An.
Amplex tablet a day combats
all breath and body odours ,
from within, Eat or drink anything you like, but
take an Amplex too—if you want to be popular.






















Pear of s


























HUDEOTONAGEELOGAGERTEEVAESUERSHEATEEA TUTTE CSAC TESA ATTRA GaN EYES tenet



id t saue et brushing 1 iy
Â¥ Ores Dy mecn ng : and Combing coed arcinay eae i ce shaving b
for instance. He | Shorter than its orga! Gressers’ ayststanta. Neither oe eevee meee
Take a look at John here, for il the Trouble the hai P length and getting correspond- brush nor comb should be forced nits growth-rate.. , .
wasn’t always this sprightly, so early in NA. ouble... tf the hair gets very wet ingly thicker. . _ from the scalp to the ends of the AXIMUM gth of mgt
morning, Not until his wife discovered IRVONA, nv evr ss neNF USUARIO T SO if someone cole nk 1D hair in one sweep. ona nee ig 25 inches, heir
the marvellous tonic iablet that gives TMT YA a safe way of steaming bs Dr. Savill’s method: Divide iger than three feet being

° 6 } 9 > 5 a ave 9 . Tp
head, balding men could ould the hair into severallocks. Then

‘ 9 scis3oriess trim which vhile left hand holds a leck © AH \IRS PRE ADTH ave
_|Paris Newsleter from EVELYN IRONS WHAT'S COOKING face ierSert'h. SS Sucieice fees i Es 5.3.0 yr aome ge

ume the right hand sweeps tite brush @ THERE are about 140,000

oye , ; tna shower... or, comy dimes. Ee fan Data ORE
kva‘s Critic LONDON Shops IN THE KITCHEN Hi: pencnos ond POY ewe Band. The len

health within a short time, did Johr
look like this.














spette) evseare 100000, red
“Now I send him off to work happy—just as full of > ined when wet {ittie higher up and the fresh ° a vant ; tet nnd oaiind ap ;
H BOUND etuins its form if part is brushed downward—and tins

s as he can be,” says. Mrs. John. “And I feel fine
peevelt, My trouble was different. MEDILAX was what
I needed. A safe, gentle laxative that quickly ensured

SEA-EGGS dried oi rapidly. But it con- § on, seded to pull out a healthy

| f i vhe vetted, s + wie
} IN THE FLEA MARKET Sea eggs are in season now in that a sheht shower vasties out Singeing ? No @ EACH hatr may live up to



SS. We're always thinking of house ° : " 7 In water-waves. SX years
EE eee, why not INNER CLEANLINESS for bin PARIS, has been buying other things. Barbados. There are few ways in Even dampness in ‘the air is iE. doctor accuses ————— "
} ? MEDILAX is the answer Arriving in London this after- She has been ordering Provencai which to cook them owing ‘0 jdeath to most artificial waves, 1airdressers of foist- _*" The Hair and the Scalp”
ourselves: * t ; noon by air from Faris — Mrs. furniture and old china for her eir very rich flavour. In France, bas Fe SABER epanes OUTS, Se) treatmen's on a aes Seas ee
: Fleur Cowles, pocket-size, dyna- ew house in. Connecticut. Italy and in England they are “U"* reatmenis on their clien London Express Service



“Hello, there! Do I look good? I feel

! Tried out a new hairstyling, and
shlighted the waves with COLAIRE.
It’s marvellous! Just stroke it on fol-



mic associate editor of the Where did Mrs. Cowles go for Often used as hors d’oeuvres or ~

American magazines Look end her shopping? To the Marche With cocktails. When you use : ‘Ep .
Quick. vok ent ux Duces. (flea market) at St them like this you must serve CMMES PICNIC IS IN THE HAG FOR LONDON’S QUADS

Mrs. Cowles’s vitriolic book on Quen, on the northern boundary them raw, The best way io

lowing the wave with the applicator. | the Perons, Bloody Precedent, f Paris. serve them is on thin long slices
. Easily brushes out has just been published in lon- I was. surprised when Mrs. on bread, toasted and buttered.
: ) don. Cowles told me that she paid) SEA EGGS 0)
{ too. What a difference When I saw her in Paris to- only 40 dollars (about £13 10s.) Sea eggs 2, Eggs 2, Onion 1
day Mrs. Cowles (pronounced for a Provencal wardrobe. (big), Butter Pepper. '

[See ane her eae hair as was at ~y flea market on
sleeked back smoothly and tied Monday (it is open Saturda: rl i

with two black ribbon bows, Her Sunday and Monday only). At ee eee — — ane
| brown eyes are intense behind least 70 per cent. of the custom= 4), Aappen® th an in eges,
heavy horn-rimmed glasses, She ers were American tourists. At Ott ae sea eggs, the onion,
wore with her black and white the Stalls, crammed with china, ® 1 of pepper and cook the
spotted dress a spray brooch furniture’ and brie-a-brac, mere O™*lette. Serve hot.

it makes when your






Let the sea eggs fry gently in





hair sparkles and
shines with COLAIRE.



composed of a huge black pear! chants complained that business BOUILLABAISSE i
and diamonds, work of the famous was bad, Many of the 3,000 stall- For 4 people: Assorted fish in-
Russian jeweller Faberge. holders who crowd the market cluding a lobster 3 lbs. Onions

“And what a difference it makes when you use| This was the brooch she wore on normal days w lb. Garlic 6 pieces, Chipped
. . 2 + te abi ' ys were absent on Pi , ppe
ALL BANDBOX PREPARATIONS,” says Mary.| when she dined with the Perons holiday. Yet I found those who parsley 1 tablespoonful, Orange
There is a Bandbox shampoo tor every type, in Buenos Aires two years back. remained were unwilling to cut rind, Thyme, Tomatoes (whole)
Almond Oil for dry Liquid soapless for oily hair. | “Evita wanted it,” said Mrs, their prices. 1 tin, Olive oil 1 glass, Butter
And what a range of brilliantines! Ask for BAND- | Cowles. “I took it off and showed I watched an American father 1 oz. Slice of bread driv in the
BOX preparations always, I feel so different after it to her. But I did not offer buying a present for his 18-year- oven, 1 Sea egg and pepper.
8 using them. to exe it. oar spoke no English old daughter. It was a monkey Put in a big saucepan % glass
ae ; on ut General Peron, who did com- orchestra of nine figures in sax@ of o ive oil and let the onion fr
I'll say she LOOKS different too, Sis mented, That's one thing she china, perfect of its kind, but jn it until it turns golden: add
“Tl say she LOOKS !different too. Sis slecttinn: To me that was a very not antique, The price was £75, the garlic and the chipped pars-
§ ant spot-light on Evita’s and the salesman would not ley, a bit of thyme and_ the
doesn’t tell you she used to weigh a ton. ;
I told her about SILF. ‘Curious little hor-



personality,” budge from it. A ;
Mrs. Cowles disregards the tag The flea market, started in orange | rind and after a little

about speaking no ill of the dead. 1891 by scroungers in the Paris while the whole tomatoes. Let GIRLS WILL BE GIRLS and when they're four-of-a-kind you can be sure of one thing—a party. -
















; “Eva’ Peron was an evil woman,” dustbins, is as famous a centre everything cook slowly. Take the Here, London’s Cole Quads—EHdna, Patricia, Marie and Frances. don’t bot!
ror’ Sis calls me, Silf brought her weight she said roundly, for tourists as the Eiffel Tower. S@ucepan off the fire and add the open the picnic bag in Battersea Park, they just help themecives Bh igh “ae af ene i
a in a jiffy.” Ji 's right, girls And the Peron regime is evil, The bar and restaurant adver- lobster cut in small pieces and their cups. The youngsters, all in excellent health will be two years old next month. a
own in a_ jiffy, immy's right, * too.” tises “hot dogs” in English, all it a ee take longer to (International Radiophoto) if
WILL ‘ , There are not many bargains cook at t tom putting at the
three SILF “TABLETS A DAY She or ane ears to the © be found nowadays at the fies top the ones that cook quicker.
CHASE THAT UGLY FAT AWAY. a thi Argentine with no idea of writing market, Yet there are still hope- All the fish have to be cut in ® e “4
And here's something a book about it. ‘But I was ie , people our eee Poo te pieces. Add then as much water rea a én } Ou are worried
ti t ; > ai , loping fo fin an original as you need to cover all the fish. f :
for the entire family. A The spectre of "ener tn, ‘that Cezanne picture or a first edition As soon as the liquid starts io Reg ;
SPA for POP, a SPA for] country haunted me.” fa anit arery for “a few boil add the other half of the AAIN ove~ the heart causes more Continuing the series pneumonia have been so sure that
" Recently Mrs. Cowles and her "UMGred Francs. | glass of oil the salt, the pepper groundless fear than any ARE YOU SCARED the pain was in the abdomen that
PENNY, a SPA for} husband, publisher Gardner The Minimum and the sea egg. Let everything cther symptom of imaginary TO SEE A DOCTOR ? they have been operated on for
PETER i one for you Cowles, toured the Philippines, Teeny eer Paris peeuty boil for another ten minutes and “ease. s “ : appendicitis.
E » and one ‘ Japan ana Korea, queen, has been 1eprimanded by Sac + area . A distended stomach, an inflamed
ea a their present European the police for walking about ee an nae an ae _ In the great majority of cases with a report on the rib muscle, or fibrositis may cause
your teeth and a spark-| 1 oliday they have had three days Cannes in a Bikini which, it was a e e one put it on a dish it is due to nothing more danger- most usual reason of all pain which appears to come from
too if you value | in Switzerland, nine days in Said, was too “decollete.” oan Ste teeta een ne CP aeniten ate spot By CHAPMAN PINCHER a damaged heart.
SS rr , “| Paris and the London visit ig I can report that hundreds of og ere carbonate will put right—or
a i ling smile SPA TOOTH- | also scheduled to last nine days. girls walk about the shopping the broth if you like but I would an aching chest muscle, ind Rouaswivds with faites Thousands of other people have
, - § In London they hope to see Streets of Cannes in almost in- not advice it if you use sea eggs. | Yet thousands of people who Care for dare 1 t tak “thi tes to further distressing “heart” symp-
: R th BRUSHES are the best| Mr. Churchill, visible Bikinis, But this one, i: toto tm em, AVE nothing seriously wrong with ¢ re not take this risk. toms, such as palpitation and
t e OLE : “If Mr, Eden < his brid seems reached an all-time buses mounted two little Tri- them live in daily dread of being So they carry on half heroically )reathlessness, yet there is nothing
buy for the whole fam-| turn from’ Portugal in time, 1 minimum. rf colour flags which fluttered from struck down by a sudden heart sapere 20 consnes sny Gsy-~ organically wrong with them,
~ IL ily. In nylon or bristle should like to see them, too,” A policernan flung his cloak Week roof throughout Liberation attack. Pie es Phe Oe Pain: Overweight men sho. walle -¢
f AX ¥ Pier tee * | snid Mrs. Cowles. “I think the around the girl and took her to : sts antom Pain Ws Angsabat 0 walk too
shaped to clean every| Church ‘limes article on their the police station, where she was , Te week ends next Tuesday, They are too scared to discuss THESE unhappy people do not little and eat too much are terri-
mm *Y | marriage was a disgrace. Steven- Teproved by the superintendent Ea Sh are a° flags on = their symptoms with a doctor. realise that it is extremely difficult {¢d when their hearts start thump-
crevice, SPA should be| son is suffering similar criticisms before being allowed to go home Ge pile one || @ conductor: For they are so sure the pain is to locate the real position of a '8 ®fter a few minutes’ lawn- ‘
atte aaa in the Bible Belt in the United and dress. quckiy. er ea oe see anced tea anes ould pigereoten. pat. yet it Te cane it, they
oothbrush too, States," 4 y° a r would iver trou causes an ache in ; ae at, the:
STOCKED BY: In Paris Mrs. Cowles has done Last tig i aon year at (World Copyright Reserved) immediately order them to bed. the right shoulder. People with are continuously burdened with
J, L. LINTON, High Street. HINDS & CO., Roebuck Street.! 90 fashion shopping. But she this time since the war, Paris Sieh Husbands with mortgages to pay ngs painfully inflamed with @ On Page 10





E. C. GILL, Olympia Pharmacy. P. A. CLARKE, Cosmopolitan








EMPIRE PHARMACY, Tudor Pharmacy, ! GY & oe Sim

Sweet. K. V. WORM, Roebuck Street. : % wy . >
A. F. JONES, High Street. STOUTE’S DRUG STORE, Roe- 6 ee Bi
H.-C. WALKES, Tudor Street. buck Street. - To keep
H. L. HUTSON, Tudor Street. cc. C. BROWNE, Roebuck Street. \ °
ROCK'S DRUG STORE, Tudor A. A, BROWNE, Eagle Hall. # ular , .

Street, H. E, PILGRIM, _ Progress:ve ° + reg a
F. S. OLTON, Swan Street. Pharmacy, Nelson Street. v g’S
BRUCE WEATHERHEAD, Broad STANDARD PHARMACY, ° take E °

Street. Tweedside Rd. .

Sole agents covering all these, your family needs, | c * .* de
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INTERNATIONAL 'TRADING CORPORATION LTD. |
Telephone 5009.

sea ee

ot]
{7 KLIM is puve, safe milk
[2] KLIM keeps without refrigeration










=
wa
e
=

In Paris

Wherever you buy KLIM MILK, you ; i
are sure of consistent purity and qutri+
tional value. }a each and every tin. «+ |
=< _ Sparkling ENO’S “Fruit Salt” first
thing in the morning freshens you up both
mentally and physically. It clears the head.
cleanses and refreshes the mouth, removes all
symptoms of liverishness. ENO’S contains
no harsh purgatives. Its gentle layative action
is non-habit-forming. ENOQ’S is suitable
for delicate stomachs, safe for children and
invalids. Keep your “Fruit Salt” handy.

= Eno’s
Fruit Salt’




London
New York

in January, June or December a fess
KLIM is always the same uniform
quality cow's milk—uniform in the
1 proteins, fat, carbohydrate,

esseat
vicassins and minerals needed for

GOO) HEALTH.
women are

buying perfum«

this new way



AANA, cme AAAAANY meme ANVAAAY cen CAAA, or
@ KLIM is excetiont for growing =

KLIM

S| KLIM adds nourishmert to
ea 1a






INEXPENSIVE HANDBAG PHIALS
OF A COSTLY PERFUME

There is no finer perfume made than Goya—yet it neq
cost so little. The perfume in Goya handbag phials i:
the same as that in Goya's world-famous costly bottles—
there is simply less of it. These phials were introduced by
Goya so that a woman could carry perfume about with her,
in a handbag ; so that at any moment of the day, no
matter where she was, she could renew and refresh he:

6) KLIM is recommenced for
infant feedin ;
7; KLIM is safe in the spocially
packed ¢i.,

(3) KLIM is produced und. strict-
Copr

‘est contre:



Protect your gums and you protect your
teeth, for gum troubles cause over 50 per cent. of tooth-
losses. To promote firm, healthy gums, use Ipana tooth paste —









2 . Geta andbag phial of Goya perfume to-day
fi ie eis a sr sag phial of Goya | 1e to-day detoatea Ipana and Massage. Use Ipana, also, to brush your teeth extra-
andbag Phials by ) DED white and reduce acid-forming bacteria that cause decay. ‘This
- . . .
ores Asean. Srey ior wrest a. pore-safe for IRREGULAR ACTION, is the way to keep your whole mouth healthy; the way you will
fragrant as ; a Z :
chat GREAT EXPECTATIONS, cial “ SICK HEADACHE, find refreshingly different”’ because of Ipana’s mint flavour.
sntalising and elusive as the moment Me BA fl a a BILIOUSNESS,
fore the curtain goes up. : r INDIGESTION, ete, a
PARIS C ,
In ser ragra : Gardenia, Gr T "
eRe en ee cde teu pong beeen Pom FIRST IN PREFERENCE ikea wines THE TOOTH PASTE..
Decision, Vibration, Goya Heather a sale it THE WORLD OVER in bottles for ‘ v
NEW YORK + Pure milk. .
a i pe is REFRESHINGLY DIFFERENT .
Jole.- Distributors L. M. B. Meyers & Co. Lid., P.O. Box 17.2. Bridgetown LT — Z A PRODUCT OF ‘BRISTOL-MYERS. LONDON AND NEW YORK
ao “ wauit sawe” are Registered Trade Marka sua

$+ /2/2


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7

1952 SUNDAY * ADVOCATE

THE EDENS END A ‘QUIET
HONEYMOON’ ....





i, About ut Town I dreamed of a

lovelier figure in

PAGE SEVEN _












Long blond hair is drawn into

YoU

FROM AROUND THE WORLD : :
Burma, Belgium, Bomt ( piete xpecte “d Bar- =
: : ida, BARBADOS, comes news of bados soon by agents Hanscheil # 2.
| (By tu BEYFUS) the amazing DEXION SL JOTTED Larsen & Co. Ltd 14 eae
| aa fad omg honeymoon of ANGLE steel (or all build on
T, an ts. Anthony Eden* ends nd ; Sa ey ven ia leas a 's —
in the propet fashion With an offi- ae ee by ‘compari ae ee, ee ; : —
cial visit fo Lisbon and an official 1 ete le ee institutes ai 7 ona Oa “ 1 time Maidenette =
banquet at the embassy. sively Rito the globe. Exclu- again ta pack your bag
= The ote week the ens had to Dea Mi en _here through ©‘ 1OOLBAG? , you need . new
themabives W a ably calm, = Mey 2 ere Roach & r ——, And . PENCII
ect, and circumspect affair. . dtd. 1, 3584, this easy to LOX and, of course, this term ¢
correct 7 a ; use, tine and money saving (20% GEOMETRY SET is called for,
2 less an an all-wood job) slo lucky you! Let’s go together and
' They seyese Baer, Diace, ted metal with bolts and nuts is buy everything under the one
' Siapese village of 7 Uteeirica, five permanent, termite proof an CAVE SHEPHERD'S | vir-
miles from the next, in the sha- enorm rusly strong, DEXION tually have a department for
dows of the beautiful Estrela a the Pari Mutuel Building “chool needs alone. PENS, PEN-
m ins. at Savannah and you all know © ILS, ERASERS—got ‘em? And
. No One could say that the Edens that one! Stores in town use it about uniform? BRAID i,
for; who they were, Not ance for shelves, counters, chairs and Our school colours and TIES and
w they seen walking hand in a prominent club is re-designin ‘ESTS and KHAKI HOSE with
oars oe _— ae it Pie with DEXION. Treated *UASH TOPS now, let’s
d a »b- wi an anti-corrosive and stove have we covered everything?
whe aaa sadly. Ed | enamelled it’s a wonder material ! got NOTEBOOKS must
when ain. th as gm abd August sales in Barbados have notebooks—here in their
most le m about in on lone were close to 10,000 ft. hundreds at your school storé
; oun ® : ; \VE SHEPHERD'S
oo =
a eee tifully pressed ation by hand! The work of DE LIMA’S FOR DIAMONDS
Only Mr. Wi was spied sitting a eet the enline from ind wonderful GRUEN PRE-
in the porch of his chalet wearin aka ae ingers of Madam C'SION Watches with the curved,
mora 8 | Gilles | of the _De Luxe Dres mfort-designed case. Gruen, a
Z é 4 a, _ Spry Street ph. 4474 watch smartly expressive of you
The Eden honeymoon has been cH a 7 ae readymade Dresses A. Y. de Lima’s you will also |
very much removed from the gay ne a 1 = ee range of Chi d exquisite Crown Devon Ear-
social whirl PRESE: ‘NTING the chignon, fas ” lot hes all carry the tings and Broaches, essentially |
In the mornings they stayed in ge and gay. Two summer Madam Gilkes label. Prices are diferent, desirable accessories to
the chalet reading the British me wavs of keeping tong hair way low down for this high ike delightful gifts—at Y. ce
newspapers delivered each day by at its dest at the back—one for quality work—-you must drop in ! ma’s Jewellery Store on Broad
¢ar from the British Embassy and @#¥-t'»)~. and one for evening. and perhaps have your garme: t i wil
the books they brought with them Above THE GAY CHIGNON, §|custom tailored! . . °
—mainty French novels, ; ; MAY JOIN rou
. . - * atbell rédol = anne ai } TROPICAL GLARE- does it ISH and learn + oh ae
j In thé afternoons they went out — net The ie made. of vother you? The new and exclu- « nating art of EMBROIDERY at





red wine,” said the wine waiter, min D, and in the case of Cap ing ie White, Blue, Pink, Grey,



Genuine Maidenform Brassi-

for a drivé, But not the Kind little white sheen, somé lilies of |Sive IMPERIAL TONE RAY je Singer S ; - :
where just the two of you follov the valley, and twe plump rose- }anti-glare lenses (available too in hone Mrs eeenthe oe gg
the nose of the car for miles ani buds, Sun Glasses) » availab 07 aan mgd Walkes pe
miles. Mr, and Mrs, Eden sat in Below —~ THE GRAVE. CHIG hade 3 ‘* a “2 di Mert id a a4 ae ee ae
a . . sat shades rreen anc ots of at ri about the 25 lessons ro-

the back of a Portuguese police NON. Long, blond hair _ is tractive styled and, most im- ding individual instructior ' nd
car, chauffeur by a Portuguesa drawo inte a bunch of butterfly ruc 1 and

i ee ugues black bows. The ribbon is an portant, can be ground to your “ie weekly practice period of one
policeman ami escorted by a de- inch wide aiid made in thick personal prescription need nd ¢# half hours, Linen, Lingerie .
ee jae epee Attfleld. black velvet. |} TONE RAY does away with slip- igs personalized for’ you, by It's a dream come true —
the ar ae vilied @ auaieby jover efcumbrances, It’s a won- ip ne for the asking at Maidenette’s marvelous accent
uranium mine. The Edens were derful buy at the Imperial Opt aunbesa : ‘
reported to have stayed there for cal Co MYRIAD 6otouns 7 on curves, the firm young lift
Gavan hae = discussing pro- | HIGH POTENCY cop LIVER LING RAINBOW HUES in this. it @ives your figure! Discover

The Bdews tock ell tuéir rieals ,OIL + CAPSULES—how many |\Yo-W#y store. Two-way store” this popular Maidenform bra
im the thalét. The food was sent }times do we look for them? This s in and out at George Sahely’s
over from the hotel—“And a little necessary Vitamin A and Vita 1 Swan St, Still in but fast dis- today, in your favorite fabrics.
























cal. A 1952 version of the Garbo











citeu : y. cules, containing these and Vita- yp hid and Lemon at 68¢. a yard! |
They only put in the rarest ap- | min and Vitamins A, D, E and ppnent @ ST “a i i
| pearahces at the hotel, and if they K are features of ALTRA HIGH ScPeat, 68, a yard! And Prints) ¢resaremade only in the United
were there in the evening they left POTENCY COD LIVER Olt, 1°, Priced from S4c. by way of! States of America
: s - : ' bearly. CAPSULES, available + fuaaticn ntrast, George Sahely’s is a! P
# Cae Esstost diay setts gegernvdite strht It was the quietest of quiet drugaiste. * eaaieics . oo must on your shopping list. , el
a | honéymoons— -even for the Diplo- |prominent in the wide field of PICNIC TIME AND CRACKED | rae is a matdenform ae
Top: “FISHERMAN’S CAP” in stitched cardinal red street velvet, gathered at the back and tied with — somite vitamins 1 General Agency PLATES, CUPS? Could be if for every type of figure
a narrow petersham ribbon. | *FOOTNOTE.—Quick, remote, Co, Ltd., distribution ou've not looked at page 3 and |
eee ato ae trimmed with black velvet buttons, with a narrow band of (and dilettante-ish, easily bored FAITHFULI fe, sides : For |”? Barbados Co-op Cotton Fac- |. sass, es. par. oor ==
. mow at the Dace, MMII se SUR. ns and chronically unpunctual,” com- MFTY YEARS hi to pater (Oly Ad. There's a new and wide ——
Bottom Right: THE POODLE HAT in a balaleika jo«:gre x. ors - ra en lt Se | ments the merican magazine Heat ae oon ante i is lection of Plastic Ware for all |
| Time, bo ritiy. ie :. ih af es. Mae aoe 10 ‘casions as well as useful Snack |
INDESTRUCTIBLE boarhoue TREACO LUBRICANTS Hoxes and Thermos Flasks. Vaca-
MRS. GODDARD innouncing the 1902 to 1962
WHEN she was 15, Paulette rel n of au mont y in the ‘won id tana Any on ates ea AE
s ’ reg § remac i » worle ize » ri rE 5 " ste
Goddard ta a job in films be- brown shoulder. lof Lubr scant a highly compet- Sahih nea Ite movhig of tie
By GWYNNE PHILLIPS Trimmings, in this collection were collection, however, was perhaps | Sause she discovered that only her She was travelling light, but sh’ jtive market. The famous RED \o-op! :
LONDON, August 14. few. Here and there a b0Ow the goblin-green bonnet, trim- legs would show, In the long brought three diamond necklace .
In the plush restaurant of a of petersham or velvet graced 2 med with black velvet buttons, | ¥a!s since—she is 42—Miss God- to relieve the expanse of bar: HOME-STUDY COURSES FOR | ie 1
Londos oy oe Aage Thaarup, hat, a gold tassel hung from the with a narrow band of black | @@%d has more than made up for os, oe tacia ef ae. one. | rt ar Clteurs len 1 se
millinér to the Queen and to the side or (on a black felt bonnet) a velvet tied in a bow the back. | °". , ade in cious Regency bows: | silk-soft, fi Pov series
Queen Mother, this week present- tiny bit of grouse were added, But, (See illustration). ‘The ee Ky J ein a oere dea oat nar CUS, doe if, slabs; en, Centers meee fad protect ‘your baby" PEeet fe
ed hig autumn collection of hats on the whole, the only detail was hat in pbalalefka yello was Sets — the face, shoulders, and an hat she calls her See ty | CAMBRIDGE SCHOOL & HIGHER SCH. CERT. ee ann fret and happy. be
designed f th “teen: di hi titching ; hand k : w form—were back in town last one—a collar of round stones. 90 will love its delicate p
esign oo e een on the stitching and andwork, close runner-up. (See itlustra- ‘week, better displayed than ever, op just like to dress comfort- | Saute Ontord, van sancersiully prey arg 708 st ior (he above examina fume. For baby's bath alvw: usb
twenties, ; which we do so well in this tion), | Sho arrived fn @ suit. But the ably,” commented Miss Goddard.| 5 aise for London U University A.C; RSA; Bar, and ther mildly medicated Cuticura Soap
Mr. Thaarup made his custom- country,” Mr. Thaarup added. _ Old favourites wete not torgot- | jacket slipped off to reveal a low- \ enna, Durance aa a Cmvantng, Seat “st vet 190 ¢ Grodunts Tutors. 22,000
ary cheerful entrance to a back- All the hats shown were practi- ten, The pillbox made 4 weil-! cut strap Ippe top. IT DEPENDS ON THE Soecage, A9n0-3, Mowerate Ia ta: "ree roepectas Splesse meniinn

ground “of light music.
told us’ somef
colleetion.

“T design a hat to suit the in-
dividual—and her pocket book,”
he assured us, “and add my own
personal touch. In this case, it is
a romanti. touch.”

They he
ing about his new

The colours and trimmings of
the hats he had to show us re-
flected Mr. Thaarup’s concept of
romance.

Materials were soft felts,
peach-bloom velours—as an ex-
periment—street velvet. Colours
were vivid (“They are new col-
ours,” he stressed)—goblin green,
carousel - red, balaleika yellow,
shallow blue, the latter to remind
one of the blue of lake water on
a summer's day.

Styles were mostly variations of
the old-type bonnet, small, head-
hugging and comfortable to wear.



hat, a floppy felt in two shades of

grey, drew comment.

admiration greeted

Gasps of
the entrance

of a model wearing a head-hug-

ging bonnet in goblin green

felt,

trimmed with an angore band of

a paler green,

Ensuing applause

mingled with the lilt of an Irish

jig from the background.

A hat in street velvet, though,

drew the loudest applause.

We

have seen coats and suits made in

Now it is
It is smart
velvet is

this material.
hats.
street

used for
practical;

being

and
both

crease-resisting and rain-resisting.

Called the “Fisherman's

the model was in stitched

Cap,”

Hats For Teens And Twenties |

car-

dinal red street velvet, gathered

at the back and tied with a
row pétersham = ribbon.
iliustration).

The most attractive he at of the them was a close-fitting bonnet in



the fashiciitittle woman wears

nar-
(See





KAYS E ke aylon anne



You can now obtain the following

“YOUR STATIONERS”

from

STANLEY GIBBONS
BRITISH

EMPIRE

STAMP CATALOGUE
1953

LOOSE LEAF STAMP ALBUMS, HINGES,

also PERFORATION

MAGNIFIERS, TWEEZERS

ROBERTS & CO.

Dial 3301

No. 9, HIGH ST.



SS

GAUGES and WATER MARK TRAYS

come re-appearance, this timé in | Itis the kind 1 handy little out-
cardinal red velvet, worn with a { fit that Miss Goddard would not
coat to match, A cloche hat with | be without for long. “I find it most
a slightly American touch was in| Practical,” she says.





beaver velour, stitched in self|, She went to the theatre, where
colour Se nee was = As soon as
’ iss oddard spied the photo-
sing, hats ghown cre got al | wagner, she made ie snatinetive
esture, er

wapbictins fro, coum 4 black velvet cloak well rer Well off a pretty

in the new shallow blue, trimmed !
the
plain stitched grey

a shade called heather haze
announced to the tune of
nie Lassie.”

Will the “Teens and Twenties”
resist these exquisite latest crea-

haze,
with a petersham bow at “Bon-
back. Or a
felt.

Mr. Thaarup also displayed a

few hats for the “Twenty Plus.” tions, with the workmanship and
There was a small pillbox style attention to detail that justify |
in imitation océ@let, and a hat their name of “model” hats?
with the new side tilt, in black Many London girls go_hatless
peach-bloom velour, trimmed these days. But all the hats
with gold. shown were “inexpensive” (under

£5). The joy of them was that
they were all wearable — and
pleasure to wear.

One or two cocktail hats were
included in the collection. Among





choose carefully . .

Yardley Complexion Powder, fire and fragrant, brings a new bloom to your beauty. XQ
There are nine perfect skin-tone colours. Choosé¢ a shade slightly darker

than your skin, Press the powdc? on firmly and generously.
Brush away the surplus—and admire your new-found loveliness.

YARDLEY

Complexion Powder

Piak tones: English Peach, Cameo, Pink Pearl
Creamy tones: Honty Glow, Champagne, Golden Rachel
«1: Copper Cold, Rose Tan, Gipsy

Warm to

VARDLEY 3 OLD Be STREET LONDON







- use cleverly

GENTLEMEN

THE party which seems even |
hardeg on its guests than most |
parties is the kind thrown accord- |
ing ta Chinese custom,

No guest who hopes to be asked
igain dare brush aside the eti-|
quette described in the book, “The
Joy of Chinese Cooking,”* pub-'
lished this week,

You must not appear hungry |
when the last calls out that din-
ner is ready, “No one seems to}
hear the first summons,” notes the
suthor, Mrs. Doreen Feng. “After
much additional urging every-|
body rises, but not a soul stirs. |
Polite gesturing is now the rule.”

You must not ask for dishes to|
be passed. “Ladies concentrate |
on the dishes directly in front of |
them,” They must depend on the |
instincts of the gentleman guests

2 pass them the tit-bits.

e bee pane 10

|
ig oe |



WOLSEY HALL, OXFORD inciano

ra

| Q@ticur










For
Smart
and
Healthy

NAL
TONIC

CE

CS a
PROMOTE THE







rrr cel my |}
PPV ears!
eT eet



vee es eee
ae mems
(oda a-ae

For hair that is alw as good as it
J ‘

looks smart, léstrous obviously

well cared for follow the lead of

discriminating men the world over... use

JULYSIA

Jontt
HAIR CREAM

The Cream of Hairdressings

Trade enquiries to:

S. M.
J. & R. BUILDING, PALMETTO STREET, BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS

G. AGENCIES



HHTVREELGbEREY:

'
ti


PAGE EIGIIT



ADVOCATE

oe ee hm (scam anWe

Printed by the Advocate Ce., Lté., Bre-* 61. Bridgstews

Sunday, September i, 1952

*
WHO PAYS?
THE majority report of the Select Com-
mittee of twelve appointed by both Cham-
bers of the Legislature of Jamaica contains
a recommendation on financing the pro-

posed federal government of the West In-
dies which deserves close scrutiny.



The majority of the Select Committee
recommended that a request should be
made for a grant for the purposes of fin-
aneing the current operating expenses of
the Federation and that a substantial sum
of money by way of grant and loan for
purposes of development would be essen-
tial to the success of the Federation.

The minority of the Jamaica Select Com-
mittee recommended that no request
should be made for a grant for the pur-
poses of financing the current operating
expenses of the Federation but that. sub-
stantial sums of money by way of grant or
loan for the purposes of development will
be essential to the success of the Federa-
tion.

The writers of the Rance report were
emphatic that a grant for which the Fed-
eration was not accountable would not if
fact be spent to the best advantage and
there would be a serious. risk if not a vir-
tual certainty that when it was exhausted
the region would find itself not with
strengthened productive and economic re-
sources but with heavily increased’ recur-
ring commitments and so be further from
and not nearer to real independence.

While it is true that the, Jamaica Select
Committee does not mention a very large
grant, yet a grant for current operating ex-
penses of the Federation.would be suffi-
ciently large to be noticed when it had
been exhausted. One of the lessons which
ought to have been learnt since the system
of grants began to operate throughout the
West Indies, after the passage of the Co-
lonial Development and Welfare Acts, is
that every grant adds to, the total cost of
government. Grants so far from “priming
pumps” have often added to governments’
financial responsibilities at times when
further expenditure is demanded for ex-
pansion or maintenance.of “pre-grant”
services.

The traditional West Indian. readiness
not to look a gift-horse in the mouth and
their anxiety to ‘accept r financial

where the possession of some money jis re-
i garded as essential to-advancement.

But understanding of West Indian alac-
rity to receive financial gifts cannot justify
the introduction of “cap-in-hand” methods
at the commencement of new statehood.

If the members of the Select Committee
are anxious to hasten the inauguration of
a Federal government, then the recommen-
dations that a grant be requested for fin-
ancing the current operating expenses of
a federation is unlikely to promote confi-
dence among the more.cautious advocates
of federation, =~

The expression “current operating ex-
penses of a federation” is itself very vague:
it may eventually be interpreted. to mean
a very large sum of money, But even if it
be kept within very narrow. defined.limits

what respect-would countries outside have ,

for a federal governmént which was kept
in existence by_the British taxpayer? And
how could the controls whieh must -neces-
sarily be attached to grants-in-aid be re-
conciled with the exercise. of political
power which the Select Committee recom-
mends in greater measure than did the
writers of the Ranee report?

The authors of the majority report of
the Jamaica Select Committee appear to
want “all this and heaven too”. They want
the West Indies. to govern _ themselves
through the Prime Minister of a jFederal
Assembly but they are not prépared to
make any financial sacrifices to meet the
cost of adding yet another political super-
structure to the existing four of the Wind-
: wards, four of the Leewards, one of Bar-
bados, one of Jamaica and one of Trinidad
and Tobago. They tacitly acknowledge
that federation is going to be expensive
but since the British taxpayer is to pay
that cost, they show little ‘concern for
finance. But their proposals for increasing
the powers of the Prime Minister at the
expense of those of the Governor General
show how reluctant West Indian politi-
cians still are to think of the British tax-
4 payer as being other than a’ tender-hearted
milch cow.

The writers of the Rance report were
far more realistic when they considered
that the real independence of the British
Caribbean would be won by its own efforts
and founded upon resources thereby built
up. With regard to the second half of the
recommendations which received endorse-
ment by all members of the Select Com-
mittee. investigation might prove that
wishful thinking is still being indulged in
as to the resources of the West Indian
islands.



et lel

assi8tancé’is offered is natural to countries’ videymeany’ of the clues: for which. he is

It is easy to say that a substantial sum of
money by way of a grant or loan for-pur-

poses of development will be essential to
the success of the Federation. Stbstantial
sums of money are, being spent on devel-

opment throughout the Colonial Empire
but some of the results are frankly disap-
pointing.

Very substantial sums of money were

poured into a groundnut scheme at
Kongwa but what success was achieved?
Very substantial sums of money could de-
velop parts of British Guiana and British
Honduras but neither of those territories
are willing to join the islands in a political
federation. If rnoney is to be spent on
federal development it will have to be
spent therefore in the islands. Already
Trinidad and Jamaica are industrialising
rapidly .and Barbados can do little more
than expand its tourist industry. What
sort of development is then envisaged by
the Select Committee of Jamaica? Or was
the phrase just coined because it was so
obviously in keeping with the vague poli-
tical promises which politicians speak so
glibly the world over?

If the British taxpayer must contribute
substantial sums of money by way of grant
or loan to allow the people of the West
Indies.to govern themselves and if he is to
contribute'a grant to pay for the current
operating expenses of the West Indian
Federal government what is he to get in
return for his philanthropic gestures?

Already most of, these islands. offer spe-
cial inducements to attract British and
other capital to start new industries. Is it
being suggested that‘a federal government
supported by the British taxpayers wou!d
offer greater political guarantees than can
now be offered by individual. islands?

It is a great pity that at a time when the
financial issues of federation ought to be
squarely faced there is loose talk of devel-
opment and no reference .whatever to the
forms development would take.

Would for instance the much-needed
deep-water harbour of Barbados ‘be: built
this way? ‘

It is to be feared not.

THE BEST



IT IS no exaggeration«to state that the

Barbados Museum to-day preserves all
that is best which remains of the cultural
life of this island. Its showcases filled with
specimens of animal and plant life and the
displays of’ Indian implements. and‘ Jocal
shells. are but obvious ,advertisements. for
the much deeper vein of knowledge and
culture from which the Museum draws its
strength,
The “student of Barbadian history: will
+ find that the shelves of the Library and the
‘showeasés @nd walls of, the, Museum pro-
looking: ~~

Thé bound copies of the Journal of the
Museum, to go no further, offer a much
better introduction: to Barbadian: customs
and traditions than the ephemeral gossip
and ignorant prattle of those who dismiss
the: island’s long history and achieyements
as unworthy of their attention.

Whatever the faults of Barbadians may
be, their social history has been ‘so closely
interwoven with and influenced by those
“of the United Kingdom and of the United
States and the role that Barbados played
with so many other West Indian islands
in the eighteenth century is relatively so
important European history that only
very superficial persons would regard a
study of their background and traditions
as other than rewarding. :

Without the facilities
Barbados Museum no A study could be
attempted. Even the limitations under
which the Museum operates because it was
late in starting and because of the lack of
substantial donations and bequests permit
the | acquiring. of a reasonably well-bal-
anced knowledge of the island’s long his-
tory. Bhi
Few piles have taken the trouble

rovided by the

to equip t selves with the knowledge
which the Museum Library, newspapers,
old documents and prints provide and tran-
sient British officials might find their un-
derstanding of Barbadian problems
hastened by more frequent attendances in
the Musétim’s Library.

_ The limited facilities offered’ by the
‘Museum already outstripythe numbers of
those Who are wing lt them or to
add to them by becoming members-or con-
tributting through donations or bequests to
the funds of the society. .
Fortunately there are individuals and
organisations who have behaved other-
wise. In recent years there has been a

noticeable increase in the number of pri-,

vate persons who have contributed dona-
tions or objects of value to the museum
and during the present financial year the
Government of Barbados doubled its grant
to the Society.

The generosity of the government ought
to be emulated by hundreds of Barbadians
»who:can afford to assist the museum finan-
cially. ;

Many of the “bright young things” who
complain loudly and long ofthe absence
of cultural life in Barbados will find that
regular attendance at the Museum will
provide them with many opportunities for
nourishing their intellect. And the for-
tunate, ones who retire here to enjoy Bar-
bados’ kindly sunshine will find that all
donations and bequests to further the So-

ciety’s work will be gratefully acknowl-
edged. f

But the Museum must always depend
on Barbadians for greatest support. This
is best given by membership.

There are literally hundreds of Barba-
dians who ought to become members of

their most important cultural organisation.

Unfortunately
effort

they will not make the
They ought to do so without delay.

prcessnesstmaissetannnannense mamas

r



| vane. venen should give a
Y at least o mon'
hot only to keep up bere morale ee
increase her circle of friends but
Sasa anny to establish
y relations entia
uaepese colleagues. Se : '
any a man owes his promo’
to his wife's charming simile on
she hands round the cocktails and
the little bits of things on toast,
san we fi _* afford cham-
and smoked
are some hints on ot ey

A Within—Your—Income

cocnranin’

: : For eight t
people—Buy a bottle of British.
type wine (they are all so de-
licious, it doesn’t matter which)
@ quarter bottle of gin, and two
or three bottles of fizzy lemon-
ade, Mix together, shake well
in ice, and add bits of fruit, such
as sliced rings of the bruised
apples nobody will eat,

Serve from shaker—or the
decanter grandmother gave you
~-into very small glasses (some
dipsomaniac -mjght want an-
ee and call it “Atomic Fruit

up.”

This will get a laugh rti-
cularly from those Wo eave
taken .the first sip, and start
your party off on the right note.
‘i THINGS. ON. ‘'OAST: -Mash
Alver-Sausage and cheese spread

into mashed mixture-of mapgare
ine, mayonnaise, curry powder,
meat extract, and squashed
tomatoes.” Then mash it-all- up
into one disgusting heap. P
Add salt and pepper (though
arsenic would be'a more merci-
ful death), and serve on little
bits of toast with your most
ars sae:
rite and let me know if u=
lar “hubby” gets Dromotion’ alee

this.
; Postbag
HERE is*just one letter from
millions sent each week to Sister
ivy, the untrained nurse who
writes our Babycraft Column,
Dear Sister Ivy,

My son, aged six months, yells
all day and most of the ht,
He has an enormous appetite,
despises baby food, and eats
most a — ‘tee ae bacon ra-
tion. He is ai gorgon~
sola cheese and chien onions.

He snores louder than his
father. and alreatly weighs over
40lb. He is growing a double

off teeth, and
husband's. tobacco, His’ first
words to his Mummy were a
curse. What shall I do?
I can’t say, dear. But I don’t

































The. most interesting thing
about last Tuesday’s Federation
debate from my point of view
‘was when the policeman came up
to the man in a red tie who was
jslouching in a chair and told him
he couldn't sleep in the House,
The man just went on slouching
and the policeman went away
having done what he was told
to do By someone in authority,
Out of curiosity I looked across
just then at a member sitting not
far from the Speaker’s chair and
he was slipping sideways
sleep. I had been doing a bit of
slouching , myself because what
with the fans turned off and the
glare from the windows the
Assembly Hall was not the best
place to listen to politicians talk
on any topie,

Before the subject of federa-
tion was -Faised. however there
had been a gust. or two of air
produced from two fans on stands
on either le of the. chamber,
but when Mr. Adams Hot up to
speak someone turned off tha
fens. The only effect of this
action so far.as I noticed was to
increase the volume of noise
made by the bus engines and to
make thé roém much hotter,

I don’t know when last
have m to.the House of As-
sembly but I have been an ab-
sentee for months.and a_ great
change has taken place since my
last visit.

Insteaa” Or withing in the Centre
of the Hall.the House now sits
where the man-in-the-street used
to sit at the end of the Hall
nearest to the Olympic Theatre,

Instead of seeing my old friend
Peggy walk down the aisle into
the main visitors gallery, on
Tuesday I could see members ot
the House enter and leave the
House by this railed off passage-
way. And Peggy.if he was there
on Tuesday would have been
sitting somewhere in the only
visitors’ gallery which remained
and which filled the space where
the, distinguished visitors, | the
newspaper reporters and _ the
House used to be some months

you

From the point of view of the
man-in-the-street the change
over from one end of the Assem-
bly; Hall nearest to the Olympic
Theatre to the other end nearest
the; Speaker’s Room may have
passed unnoticed gy

in the House of Assembly today
sees exactly the same arrange-



Weightlifting |

To The Editor, The Advocate—

SLR,—In_reply..to.a letter whieh
appeared jin your papet’oh 2nd
September; 1962, - signed by
“Physical Culturist”. who strikes
me as being an armchiair critic,
I have this to say. I agree t}

The man who
keeps Barbados

laughing on.

NATHANIEL GUBBINS

chews my Aunt Meg solves all pro!

with.

The man-in-the-street who. sits»

SUNDAY ADV®@CATE






















































A Woman’s Magazine
Miniature Edited by

N. GUBBINS



think Babycraft will help. Your
Monstercraft.

boy needs
Beauty Hint
“How can I get rid of wrinkles?”
So many readers ask me this ques-
tion (writes May Fayre, our
beauty expert) that I get sick and
tired of giving: the same old
remedy.
Here it is again: —

Smother your face and neck
in hot porridge and allow to cool
as you do the housework. This
will fill out the lines by nour-
ishing your skin, particularly if
you add milk and sugar to taste.

Stately Homes
by Peek-a-Boo
PEEK-A-BOO is always pok-
ing her long nose into other
people’s houses. Here she gives
everybody a peek into the lovely
home of Nathaniel Gubbins.

No conventional decor in the
dining-room. In fact, you might
say no decor at all.

The walls are mushroom col-
our (the dirty white top of the
mushroom) and the off-white

» doors are off-white because they
need a new coat of paint.

The nondescript faded cur-
tains, made when fabrics were
scarce, and dropping off the
hooks, give a pleasing, homely
touch to a room which looks as
if: it had been lived in... by a
hundred displaced persons, I
should think.

Oh a Queen Anne. dresser
(probably phoney) stands a
charming reading-lamp which
frequently goes out because
somebody is always tripping
over the wire, cE

at

On one wall there is a fly-
blown mirror in carved wood
(painted deal) which often
drops on the heads of unwary
visitors because the nail is half-
way out of the plaster,

I managed to have one peek into

Nat’s “den”, full of old news-

papers, cigarette ends, and un-

answered letters, before I was

thrown out by the amiable col-

umnist.

Ask Aunt Meg

TROUBLE with the pee Snes
ms, an-

swers ‘all questions,

Dear Aunt Meg,

When I first met my boy

friend he had lovely manners.



SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 1952



Now he never answers ques-
tions, turns the radio on when
my father is speaking and tells
my mother to shut up.



At meals, he reaches across
the table food without say-
ing “Par me”, and never

ses the condiments, When



has eaten his fill he never

my father’s favourite
ting his stomach and yawning.
you think he is cooling off
or that something is preying on
his mind?
Puzzled
No, Puzzled, I think he is just
common.—Aunt Meg.

Leisure Hour

FOUR O'CLOCK in the after-
noon, and time for you to rest
those swollen ankles on the divan
and have a cosy cup of tea.

Breakfast things washed-up,
rooms turned out, floors scrubbed,
beds made, carpets swept, shop-

ing done, your mucky little
unch eaten, and_ everything
Cleary away.

But in these days of expensive
clothes, curtains, ‘and furnishings
there is still sqq@ething for those
busy fingers to ao.

So, up you get, and look through
shirts to see if frayed collars ana
cufs need turning. Perhaps there
are little frocks to let down,
grubby little pairs of serge knick-
ers to mend?

* * *

As you are pouring out your
second cup of tea (cold now), per~-
haps your all-seeing eye will light
upon the hole the cat scratched in
the best armchair.

, up you get again, and try to
remember all you have read in our
Self Help Column about home up-
holstery,

When you have pulled the
horsehair out and have made the
patch to cover the hole, the hungry
boys will be home for tea.

What a joy it is to see thei:
bright, eager faces round the table,
and what a joy to hear them clat-
ter out to play so that you will
just have time to peel the pota-
toes, pick the maggots out of the
cabbage and run up some new cur-
tains before the key turns in the
lock and a gruff, well-loved voice
asks: “Dinner ready yet?”

“A woman's work is

done,”

But all of it’s such frightful fun

When days are long and eve-

nings drear,
No more to do?

dear.

never

Look harder,

—L.E'S.



BACK TO FRONT

Hy George Hunte

ment of the House as he used to
see when he sat nearer to the
Olympic Theatre. At the end of
the room the Speaker faces him:
and at the part of the House
nearest (6 now he sees the
backs of the four members of the
Executive Committee and the
backs of other members of the
Labour Party. At the far end of
the room the Speaker is plainly
visible and s® are the faces of
the members of the Electors
Association and of other mem-
bers. of the House. But the visi-
tor who was accustomed to sit
in the distinguished visitors gal-
lery or the newspaper reporter
who used tu sit behiral
Speaker, slightly to his left, sees
everything in reverse. No longer
does Mr, Adams face the _ re-
rter or the visitor in the gal-
ery. He faces the Speaker and
the gallery sees only his back.
The flash of Mr. Adams’ smile,
‘the rise and fall of his eloquence
can no longer be shared by any
Sut the members of the House
and the House officials. The rest
of us in the visitors gallery must

be content with the vision af
Mr. Adems’ broad back and
shoulders. “And we must prick

our ears to catch what is left of
bis voice after it hits the thick
stone walls and rebounds in our
direction or through the glare-
filed windows. Fortunately the
official House reporters are in the
inner circle of the House and
are not similarly handicapped
for hearing, but if government
speakers are misreported today
by the gentlemen of the Press
the fault does not lie in their
ears.

The plea can always be made
that @ man’s mouth is not
placed in the back of his head.
Only if ft were, would it be pos-
sible for the ordinary ear in the
gullery—and most rs have
ordinary ears — to catch all that
is said by the chief government
speakers fn the House,

No doubt there were excellent
reasons for placing the Leader of
the House with his back to the

gallery but they will not be
appreciated by visitors to the
llery. But if these reasons

prevent visitors from seeing Mr.
Adams’ face undergo the ex-
pressions which accompany his
many rhetorical changes surely
‘no reason can exist for prevent-





Our Readers Say :

Webster is not the pioneer of
weightlifting in Barbados, but I
maintain. that he has done more
good for organized weightlifting

than any of the distinguished
personalities which “Physical
Culturist” mentions.

I say that Webster deserves 211]

the ©














ing the hearing of his voice, If
for all time visitors to the Bar-
bados House of Assembly are to
be contented with observing the,
types of hair-cuts indulged in by
members of the Labour Party
who sit with their backs to the
gallery surely a few small mi-
crophones would give them the
satisfaction at least of hearing
the voices which were coming
from the faces they were not
permitted to see.

I._do not always agree with
what Mr. Adams says but until
Tuesday I could always look
forward on my rare visits to the
House of hearing him say what
he had to say in his own elo-
guent fashion. On Tuesday the
little I could hear him. say was
quite spoilt because I couldn’
see his face,

*

The importance of seeing
man’s face when he speaks was
illustrated so well on Tuesday
by St. Philip’s Mr. Mottley. Of
all the speakers in the present
House of Assembly Mr. Mottley
makes the greatest use of intona-
tion, He can make the dullest
question come to life merely by
raising the. inflection of his
voice, by peering across the

room or ~by_smiting amiably at
everyone in. sight, Mr. “Mottley’s
question was the only other

bright spot of a very dull two
hours I sweated through jin the
House’s gallery on. Tuesday. but
1 wo have missed jt all hac
he en sitting ‘where Mr.
Adams was With His back to my
ehair,

It may be of course that the
majority of visitors to the gal-
lery do not sharé my views and
that they are quite happy to see
the backs of certain speakers, 1
eannot pretend to speak for any-
one but myself. But what is «
subject for immediate concern is
the impossible situation of the

newspaper reporters, If the Press|}

is to report accurately what is
ssid in the House of Assémbly
Press reporters ought to be al-
lowed to sit within the aren:
now occupied by the House ot
Assembly or at least behind the
speaker’s chair. From _ their
present position in the gallery
wey must either guess or leave
out,

; Freedom of the press depends
on freedom to hear as well as

freedom to publish, And at]!
present the air-waves are] |
blocked.

the credit he has got and mere

Any lifter can visit his gym to
train and he is always willing to
impart any information or offer
any suggestions to any of the
lifters.

WEIGHTLIFTER
2nd ember, 1952

Sept


















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A “GOLD BRAID” COCKTAIL
Is THE BEST


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER

1952

ROGUES OF THE SEA:

Roche

Roche’ Brasiliano, despite his
Spanish sounding name, was born
at Groninghen in the United

Provinces. He was given the name
“Brasiliano” by his comrades
because he had lived for a long
time in Brasil, from whence he
had been forced to fly when the
Portuguese drove the Dutch from
the country.

He managed to get to Jamaica,
and having no other way to earn
lus living, joined the pirates. For
some time he served as an
ordinary seaman and was very
popular with his shipmates, Then
one day a mutiny broke out on
board the ship and the mutineers
fitted out a small boat, _ made
Brasiliano their captain, and left
the ship for good.

Brasiliano and his crew were
in luck, for a few days later they
took a great ship coming from
New Spain, which was found to
contain great quantities of plate.
He took this ship to Jamaica
where the pirates spent their
money carousing.

Esquemeling, the historian of
the Buccaneers, days of Brasiliano
“Though in his private affairs he
governed, himself very well, he
would oftentimes appe@ar brutish
and foolish when in_ drink,
running up and down the streets,
beating and wounding those he
met, no person daring to make
resistance.”

No Quarter

Like most of the buccaneers of
the. period he gave no quarter to
the Spaniards, In fact, in Hispa-
niola he commanded several to
be roasted alive on wooden spits
for not showing him hog-yards
where he could steal pigs to
provision his ship.

In his next expedition he ran
into a terrible storm off Campechy
and his ship was wrecked between
Campechy and Golpho Triste. The
pirates managed to get ashore ina
canoe, carrying some powder and
shot with them, and on landing
they started to march as quickly
as they could in the direction of
the buccaneer refuge at Golpho,
Triste,

On their way they were pursued
by a troop of Spanish horsemen
three times their number, and al-
though they were faint with
hunger and thirst such was Brasi-
liano’s influence with them that
he persuaded them to fight. The



BACK



PIRATES CAROUSING

TO ==

Brasiliano



SUNDAY



~
- ~

ROCHE BRASILIANO

fight lasted for an hour and with
practically every shot the pirates
killed a horseman until the
Spaniards were put to flight. In
the battle the pirates had lost only
two of thefr companions and so in
good spirits they mounted the
horses the Spaniards had left
behind and _ continued their
journey.

All they wanted now was a
ship and one soon fell into their
hands, They captured a little man-
of-war which they found at anchor
and after killing and salting their
horses for provisions they set off
in search of loot.
captured unotner ship going from
New Spain to Maracaibo, laden
with a _ varied cargo including

After a few days at sea they
pieces of eight. Taking this ship

‘



with them
Jamaica,

In Port Royal they abandoned
themselves to debauchery, Esque-
meling says that he had seen
pirates spending two or three
thousand pieces of eight in a night
at the brothels and taverns of the
Port, “not leaving themselves a

they sailed for

good shirt to wéar in the
morning.”

Drink Or Else
“My own master” he , says,

would buy sometimes a pipe of
wine, and placing it in the street
would force those that passed by
to drink with him, threatening
also to pistol them if they would
not. He would do the like with
barrels of beér and ale; and wet
peoples’ clothes without regarding
whether he spoiled their apparel.”
He adds a cautionary note, how-
ever, about getting into debt in
Jamaica “for the inhabitants
there easily sell one another for
debt.” In fact, that happened to |
his “liberal” master, |

But to get back to Brasiliano, |
After spending all his money he!
organised another expedition and |
set off for Campechy. When they |
got off that city Brasiliano and |
some of his companions got into |
a canoe and paddled in to spy out |
the land. Unfortunately for them
they were captured and thrown
into jail. .

The Governor intended to hang
every one of them next day, but
Brasiliano had a stratagem, He
wrote a letter to the Governor in
the names of other pirates in the
area saying that if he did not
release his prisoners they would
never give quarter to another
Spaniard

Being afraid, the Governor
released Brasiliano and his men
after exacting an oath from them
that they would give up piracy
“for ever.” To get them out of the
way he sent them as ordinary
seamen in a galleon bound for
Spain.

But the pirates did not stay
long in Spain. As Esquemeling
says, they were soon back in
Jamaica “from whence they set
forth again to sea, committing
greater robberies and _ cruelties
than before; but especially abusing
the poor Spaniards, who fell into
their hands.”





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BROAD STREET
DIAL 2664

| THE. PEOPLE
66



NO series of articles would be
complete without a short sketch of
the ‘Quakers’ or ‘The Society of
Friends;’ for it was due to their
agitation that the minds of men
in influential positions were
brought to bear on the condition
of slavery. Quakerism arrived in
Barbados in 1655, and this was

within eight years of its being
founded by George Fox. It was
brought to Barbados by two

women, Mary Fisher and Ann
Austing, who brought. back and
distributed literature on this mat
ter which created a deep impres-
sion on many of the prominent
inhabitants. Thus Barbados has
been referred to as “the nursery
of the truth in the Western hemi-
sphere,’ by the Quakers. By 1659,
there were several meeting-
houses in different parts of the
Island. One was in Tudor Street.
which was after referred to as
“Quakers’ Meeting Street.” Up to
this date no complete system. of
organisation had been established
in England, but a good many in-
fluential persons had adopted the
Quaker principles and become
professed ‘Friends.’

The diversity of human nature
is such that once there is opposi-
tion there is a striving for success,
but as soon as’this success has
been obtained and there is no
longer any opposition, all interest
dwindles until it disappears, Such
is the history of Quakerism in
Barbados once there was perse-
cution there was an increase in
their numbers and prosperity for
their group; but as soon as they
were legally recognised and there
was no longer opposition, their
numbers dwindled until not one
member was left.

The opposition to the Quakers
was not confined to Barbados
alone, and many Barbadians be-
came zealous advocates and teach-
ers of this doctrine. In 1656 many
went away to. New: England, and
amongst these were eight of their
Speakers or Leaders; these’ were
less popular in New England than
in Barbados, so were immediate-
ly sent back home, The case of
John Rous and his friends is an
excellent example. John was the
son of Lt. Col. Rous, a well-to-
do Barbadian of some, standing
and a commander of one of the
local regiments of Militia, John
married the step-daughter of
George Fox, the founder of
Quakerism, and became zealous in
the propagation of the views he
had embraced. In 1658, as a
| travelling minister, he went over
|\to New England, and in spite of
‘he existing laws against ‘Friends"
}continued to preach; While’ in
Boston he met with two other
Barbadian Quakers, William Led-
dra and Thomas Harris, whe
joined up with him in spreading
the doctrine. He and his two
friends were soon arrested and
put into prison for preaching
Quakerism and were eventually
brought before the magistrate:
This was such an important trial
that Governor Endicott presided
John Rous was found guilty and
sentenced to have his right ear
cut off. Thomas Harris received
several cruel floggings for his
faith, and the most persistent,
William Leddra made the supreme
sacrifice for his beliefs. Leddra
was confined in a Boston prison,
and received several whippings,
he was eventually banished, but
returned to minister to Friends in
prison. He was then seized and
thained to a log of wood in the
open prison yard during the win-



Whether
it’s hot

Whether



OF BARBAD

QUAKERS”







ADVOCATE



77 BY IAN GALE

XXIL.

By JOHN PRIDEAUX

was brought before the court and
condemn to death, This order
bh executed on the 14th of March

In 1671, the Quakers of Barba-
dos were highly honoured by a
visit of the founder, George Fox,
who records the following in his
journal, 4

“We got on shore as soon as we
could, and I with some. others
walked to a Friend’s house, a
merehant whose name was Richard
Forstall, about a quarter of a mile
from the bridge.”

“After I had rested about four
days, John Rous, having borrow-
ed a coach of Colonel Chamber-
Lain, came to feich me to his
father’s, \Thomas Rous, house, Be-
cause I was not well able to
travel, the Friends of the Island
concluded to have their men and
women meetings for the service
of the Church at Thomas. Rous’
where I lay, by which means I

was present at ‘each of their
meetings.” *
“They had need of. information

on many things, tot givers disor-
ders had crept in, I & rted them
to be watchful as to marriages. As
to Friends’ children marrying too
young, as at 13 or 14 years of age,
I showed them the hurts that at-
tended such childish marriages. I
recommended to their care the
providing of convenient burying
places, which in some parts were
yet wanting.”

George Fox spent three months
in Barbados, during which time he
advised the Friends to train their
Slaves up in the fear of God, and
to see that their overseers dealt
mildly with them, and not ‘use
¢ruel methods of punishment, as
was too often the custom, also that
after a certain number of years
of service, slaves should ‘be set
free, George Fox also gives an
account of a large meeting which
was attended by people: from all
parts of the Island, and states that
in this gathering were several
prominent persons such as Judgés
or Justices, colonels and captains.

By the year 1676 the Quakers!
were causing considerable uneas-
iness in this Island with the main
portion of slave owners. There
is no doubt that this was due to
the teachings of George Fox. This
resentment terminated in the first
law which was passed against
them -in 1676, the Preamble of
which reads—‘Whereas of late
many Negroes have been suffered |
to remain at the Meetings of Quak- |
ers as hearers of their Doctrine, |
and taught in their Principles,
whereby the safety of @his Island
may be much hazarded”’ This act

ontinued in force for two years,
Ween some severe’ clnuses were |
added in 1678, ang it was made |
perpetual in 1681.°%

The strong oppdlitten to the
Quakers in 1680 caused the Gov-
ernor, Sir Jonathan Atkins, . to
order that their meeting-house in
Bridgetown to be closed and the
seats to be removed, but this was |
subsequently re-opened and used
for many years. |

The Quakers made complaints
to the Lords of Trade and Planta- |
tions on the 17th of February |
1686/7, and in consequence of this |





the Lieutenant Governor, Mr. |
Stede, placed these matters be-
fore the Council, a Committee
was appointed “for examining

and fully inquiring into the said
business of the Quakers; and to
draw up a Report of the truth
of the whole Matter; to the end
their Lordships may be satisfied
therein according to the Com-

ter, and remained there until hy mands of their said order or

‘it’s cold =tygpeamer

ee





ma



A Dutch Pirate_

* SLAVERY”



Letter in that behalf.”

The outcome of this protest
and investigation was the order
of the King in Council of 1687,
in which the Lieytenant Governor
ordered to ‘take care and give

order that they or their Servants |

be not in any way molested for

..4heir Worshippings of God!” He

was also advised by the same
order that the Quakers were to te
freely admitted to all ‘Offices cr
Employments which our other
subjects are capable of’ without
it being compulsory for them to
take any Oath or Oaths, provide i
that they promised ‘Solemnly io
execute the same justly and
according to the Trust reposed
in them! This order also made
provision for the Quakers objec-
tion to military service, for it
provided that “in case any of
them do Scruple or make diffi-
culty to perform any Service, cr
take any employment upon them,
whether Civil or Military,” they
were not to be subjected to an
‘ine or fines which would exceed
the usual value for the hiring of
other persons to perform the dis-
charge of the duty or service
which was required of them. (1)

The above order of 1687 anc
the ‘Act of Affirmation’ of 1723,
although at first gight may seem
to be concessions in their favour,
are perhaps very far from pos-
sessing any advantages. Lucas
records in his Manuscript tha
“as for the Act of 1723, it seern
rather. a boon to the inhabitants
generally than individually to
the Quakers, for the perfeg¢t
obstinacy of this people respec-
ting Oaths must have been very
inconvenient and destructive ww
good order; and that the Lord:
of Trade viewed their behaviou
in this light is evident from thei
having the Act confirmed, to pr
an end to the question.” (2)

@ on page 16



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The only practical way of
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Directions for Use

Cows in milk

Add 3 ™® of Mindif Min-
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if
PAGE TEN

eee
An Outspoken Series Starts To-day

The Queen And The People —

By J

— ——

IT IS NOT easy to be

partly a democracy and partly a plutocracy.

decisively one thing er the

conventions would have a settled form.

‘NNIE LEE, M.P. |

—_—

|

a Queen in a country that is
If we were
other, manners, customs and
But transition

eras such as ours always present special problems.
Already the young Queen is under fire. Ought she to
mix more with ordinary middle-class and working-class

families?
small clique of very rich pec
and ceremony surrounding |

ln eommon fairness let one
thing be clear The Queen hersel!,
as a constitutional monarch, will
accept whiatéver advice is given
her. Even if she were a great deal
older, tougher, and more expe-
rienced than she is, that woulc
still be true.

Her pérsonal welfare is involved
not in the nature of the public
appearances arranged for her by
her advisers: but in how much of
her time and strength belongs to
the public and how much she ma)
keep for private living.

In coming to a sensible com-
promise in these matters the
Queen’s greatest enemy is the
Press. The Royal Family is news.
People like seeing photographs
of thern ang reading stories about
them,

Shock Absorber

But there should be limits sc:
by good taste and ordinary cour-
tesy They ought met to be
dwagged in to fill the headliné
every time there is a shortage ol
“hot” news. They ought to be
spared the pert innuendo and the
ghastly syedphahcy that they are
torced to put up with from
quarters,

In thevtong run it may very
well be-that the best protection
for the Royal Family wih come
“ from the beft in polities.

We are-not Royalists in the
sense of believing in any non-
sense about the Divine Right of
Kings. But we have accepted an
implied coptyact and will dis»
courage it honourably.

That contract begins with the
conviction that there would be

Sorte my



Does she spend too much of her time with a

ple ?

Is there too much pomp
he Royal Family ?

nothing to be gained by seek-
ing to put an elected President
in the place of the Queen. Ih
wiese years when we have moved
oWay from a full-blooded capi-
iakism but have still a long way
.2 go before we become a Social-
.t Democracy, the institution ©:
Monarchy is q valuable shock
i bsorber.

So long as the Speech from
the Throne read at the begin-
aing of a new Parliament faitn-
fully records the policy and in-
tentions of whatever party ha»
been elected to form the Guv-
ernment, we are well served by
its occupant.

But the bargain has two sides
to it. The Royal Family is in re-

She must not be made a
prisoner of the past

turn entitled to reasonable pr¢
tection. They ought to know ju
now miuen of their time they ar:
expected to give to public autie:
They ought w be allowed to liv
their private lives free from
by Toms,

Also let's be reaiistic aboul
the gocial life of the Quee::
and her intimate circle of tam
ily and friends. Her Majesty |
an immensely rich young woman
brought bd with all the tastes
and habits of her class, Even if
she were not Queem she would
probably want to go to Ascot, at-
tend Society

, and generaly
take part

in that expensive

parade known as “the Season.

~

PRINCESS ELIZABETH holds tlie dog in one hand while Princess

Margaret clings to the other. Theit mother, Queen
the stairs behind the two princesses.



Elizabeth is on

Heartaches Really Happen

[If Your’e

@ From Page 6
tne weight of a heavy suitcase—
the form of excess fat.
Even if your heart races ai»
really alarming rate anxiety
tore likely to be the cause tha
heart weakness

Anxiety ig atso the commoh
cause of genuine heart pain
“Just as some people have 4
neadache or indigestion when wor
ried, others get this left-cid
ain,” heart specialist Maurie>
Campbell. has told his student

Coetorg at Giv's Hospital.

These neurotic symptoms 11
be so realistic that even the doct.
may be mislead. It is now certai:
that 80 per eent. of the diagnos >

f ore*nie heart disease made by

2ritis my doctors in Wor}.
Var i > wrong.
Advances

IN the past scores of young men
ind women have been wrongiv
told that they had enlarged hear‘s
and must not play games or zg
dancing.

Doctors are not likely to make
these mistakes to-day. ere have
been great advances in th®
diagnosis of heart complaints i
the last few years.

The well-informed G.P. no
knows what appears to be a
enlarged heart may be a perfectly
normal heart which has bren
slightly and harmlessly displaced
by a posture defect.

He knows too that some sym
toms which were once considered
to be sure signs of heart weakness
re unreliable unless backed by
additional evidence



Worrried

Only Five

DR. t. McDONALD STEWAR'I
recently examined 525 health
young men and women in a chee!
‘est at Bristol University.

He found ‘that 179 of them had
“inurmurs” — suspieious abnorm
heart soufids—and in only fiv

ises was there really any heart
weakness. And yet the neuros
cexus@d by fear of heart trouble
czn be almost as crippling as the
cisease itself



“Canada Bars
Doors To W.I.”’

; WINNIPEG.

Canada’s immigration Laws con-
tain features that smack of racial
discrimination, according to’ Mr
Kalman Kaplansky, director of
the Jewish Labour Committee anc!

delegate to the Trades and Le
bour Congress convention in Win-
nipeg

He referred specifically to the
1 olicy on the immigration of col-

ured men from the West Indies
nd declared: “We have nothing to
te proud of in this respect.”

Mr. Kaplansky urged the Cana-
cian to invite Labour and manage-
ment to have a voice in the for-
mation of an effective immigra-
tion policy, He declared that
immigration planning should he
the responsibility of the Depart-
ment of Labour

—B.U.P



Keep in step

Nor is that kind of life unique
to Britain. There is as much, anc
more of it, going on in Washing-
ton and Paris, where there ar¢
Presidents, as in London, where
there is a Royal Family. c

It is important that we do not
mistake symptoms for causes.
chase after symbols instead oi
dealing with realities. So long as
there are some families with too
much to spend and some with toc
little, there will be debutantes’
queues at Buckingham Palace ana
dole queues in Lancashire.

I have no respect for critic:
who concentrate on symbols but
leave the underlying reality un-
changed, All that we are enti-
tled to ask from the. Palace is
that it keeps in step with the
‘ocial change, not that it initiates
t.

It is the Labour Movement's
vesponsibility to organise another
sreat forward drive towards oa
“fair shares’ economy. It. is the
Palace’s responsibility to adjust
tself to the new conditions that
omerge.

Having ride
Ascot on a
ylace in the butcher’s queue for
her weekly ration of
is a phoney approach
whole subject.

Tory view

The Tory Party, also, has its
views on Royalty. It firmly
believes that the Queen, like the
Union Jack, is its private prop-
rty. And it acts accordingly.

The same reactionary elements
n Court circles that exposed the
late King toe the dangers of
,ecepting Dr, Malan’s hospitality
we still in control,

They are busily engaged in
idvising the young Queen at the
yutset of her reign, to prepare
io behave as if we were still in
‘the reign of Queen Victoria
Lots of pomp and splendour in
he foreground, so that people
orget about the poverty and
squalor in the background—that
is how the Tory mind works.

Socialists are not spoil sports.
Every kind of society enjoys and
needs its ceremonial occasions
and the more pageantry,
and fun the better. But
limes need new conventions,

Don't pretend

{f the democratic as well as
the plutocratic elements in our
society are to be represented on
ceremonial occasions, there ought

the Queen

colour
new

not to be a cash barrier around
the Queen,
The approach to the Palace

ought not to lie through second-
hand or hired clothes, Everyone

knows that morning suits and
toppers, dinner suits, tails anc
white waistcoats and all the

trimmings that go with them cost





te
bicycle or take her

red mea’
to the

SUNDAY



ADVOCATE



aa

and
can

more than working people
most middle-class families
afford.

So why pretend? Why reducc
poor people to figures of fun”
Why the vulgarity of false fronts’
rhere is really nothing so shock-

ing im the appearance of 4
working-man dressed in. his
Sunday best,

The future

Certain snobberies have had
their day. They ought now to be
quietly buried,

A beginning is being made, as
an be seen at Royal Garden
parties, But the Tories hate this
kind of innovation, They love
regimentation. They are happy
only in a world where their tradi-
tional values and uniforms
dominate the scene.

They will do everything they

im to keep the Queen a prisoner
f the past. It is for the rest of
us to see they do not succeed,

There are many ways in which
fhe ceremonial side of Court life

uld become better attuned to
present-day conditions, In an
age of transition it is not un-
veasonable to ask that conces-
‘ions be made to the future as
well ag to the past.

(World Copyright) Next Sunday

The Queen and Her Consort

By ROGER TULFORD



Edens Honeymoon

e @ Prom Page 7

You must not hope to hear a
good word about the food from
the hostess. “Please excuse me:
there is really nothing to eat,” the
Chinese hostess must say, with
bhstering self-effacement.

This is far more polite, notes
Mrs. Feng, than brash Western
methods.

“The Occidental host frankly
brags about his dishes, and diners
are reduced to a state of semi-
collapse before they are allowed
to taste these master-pieces.”

NO PLACE LIKE LONDON

NO: there is no place lilee Lon-
don, Last week the price of seats
for the Coronation took another
stride into the stratosphere.

“Parties of from six to 20 per-
sons,” said an advertisement, “will
be catered for at the rate of from
20 to 40 guineas per head.”

There’s no place like London
for giving you that feeling that

“hat was smart enough to wear
last year is smart enough for this

Back come the autumn fashions
into the shop windows, and back
came the plum swaggers, the beige
and brown macintoshes, And the
same old hat to wear with them—
the felt beanie with two feathers
pushed in one side.

There's no place quite like Lon-

ion tor etching out a stranger,

An elderly lady up from some

remote countryside, sat in a No. 9!

bus talking to the conductor.

‘What are spivs?” she asked in a.
“IT hear |

quavery, studious voice.
they are not much admired.”
Fabers, 20s,



First Poultry, Pigeon, ;

@ From page 1

Che fish on show were from all
over the world, Some were im-
ported from Burma, China, India,
Brazil, Siam, Germany and Japan.

In the Poultry and_ Pigeon
Section Mr. Harold Ward of
Grazettes Land, St. Michael,
tenched New MHampshires of
class ih supremely good condi-
tion for this time of the year

Mr. G. A. King and Mr. O. R.
Hill benched beautiful birds in
the Light Breeds and Mr. R. J.
Parkinson was outstanding with
a Game Cockerel. Mr. A. Ramsay
won a special prize with a Game
Hen which
top exhibits.

In the Pigeon Section Mr. W. D.

Warden dominated the Fancy
Class, He won specjal prizes for
the Best Fancy geon, Best

Modena Cock, Best Modena Hen
and received a prize for the Best
Single Exhibit on Show.

Miss Patricia Warden won a
special prize for the Best Fancy
Pigeon.

The Speciat Awards were as
follows
Best light breed on show—G. H ng

Ki
Best Cockerel of light breeds on show
ee .

Rest I

e¢

was also among the ,

‘Fish Show Big Success

Best Leghorn on show—G
rl
itt
Third best Leghorn on show
Marshall

Best heavy outstanding breed on show
Harold Ward

Best Wyandotte on show--H. N. Blades
Best Rhode Island Red on show--A. EF
Viarshall

Best Jetey Giant on show
Best New Hampshire: on
Vard

H

Kin
best Leghorn on show

0

N. E

E

show

Clark
Harold

Second best New Hampshire on show
Harold Ward

Best Barred Rock on show—E. Denny

Best Cockerel of heavy breeds on show }

Harold Ward

Best Pullet of heavy breeds on show
Harold Ward

best
nson,



Second best Game Bird on show—H. B
Viblock

Best Cornish Game on show—R. I
Parkinson, Jr.

Best Bantam on show—A. Ramsay
Best Utility Tigeon on show—P Dd
Maynard

Best Fancy Pigeon, Associate membe

lasses. Miss Patricie Warden
Best Pigeon other than Fancy
members’ classes. Master Tom

Best Fancy Pigeor









Warden

Best Modena Cock on show N
Warden

3est Modena He n

jen

Best single exhibit 1
W

Best Homer or how—I. G. Pr

Be Homer Cock on show—i}. ¢

Game Bird on show—R. F. Park- |
Jr



BB.C. RADIO NOTES



s ( ommonwealth
Emigration

BBC Feature, Next
Wednesday

Many West Indians leave the
Caribbean yearly to settle abroad
#Mc at the present time there is

steady stream of such person
@ttling in Britain. While this i
going on there is a stream jn
the other direction—from Britam
to various parts of the Common-
wealth—about 90,000 people are

leaving Britain annualiy while
about 20,000 others come Ww
britain to settle. This post-war
trend is examined in a BBC
‘eature programme to be brouwd-
cast in the coming week. The
whole subject of migration

€xamined in the programme
which puts forward the views
of a number of intending
migrants (which may be summed
up as ‘better opportunities’)
along with on-the-spot reports
from settlers in Australia, New

Zealand, Canada, South Africa
and Southern Rhodesia, who des-

cribe their reactions to the new
life, Debates in the Lords and
Common etting out Britain’
efficial views on migration are

quoted in the broadcast
to be ‘heard
Britain’s

which urges

and also
are the comments of
Migration Council

more concerted
planning and the _ movement of
ven greater numbers while the
policies of the individual! Com-
monwealth countries and the
economic and strategic consid-
erations involved are also set
out. Lasting for a fal! hour the
broadcast begins at 9.00 p.m
on Wednesday, 10th September

BBC Wavelengths

Shortwave listeners may have
noticed a recent change in the
times of the various frequencies
which carry BBC programmes to
this area. In case any are not
sure of just what these are at the
present time they are listed
below.

19.76
- 4.00

25.53
~ 6.15

metres, 15.18 megacycles
to 6.15 p.m.
metres, 11.75 megacycle:
to 10.15 p.m.
31.32 metres, 9.58
— 6.15 to 11,00 p.m,
The special daily half-hours
for the Ceribbean between 7.15
and 7.45 p.m. are carried on the

megacycles

two latter beams,
Caribbean Voices

Next Sunday, 7th Sept. the
half-hour programme of West
Indian prose and verse which is
broadcast every Sunday undei
the title of ‘Caribbean Voices’
will include poems which were
originally broadcast in the BBC's
West African Service by K.

Epelle, a young man on the staif
of the Publie Relations Office in
Eastern Nigeria. They include
‘Song of the Machete’ and ‘The
Death Song of the Rivers.’ In ad-
dition to these poems there will
be a rather beautifully written
short story by a frequent con-
tributor to ‘Caribbean Voices’ ~-
Kenneth Newton of Trinidad.
This weekly broadcast begins at
7.15 p.m, on Sunday and consists,
except in rare instances like this
which

provide an_ interesting
contrast, of work submitted by
local writers. Such contributions

are always welcome and should
be sent to The BBC’s West In-
dian Office, P.O. Box 408, King-
ston, Jamaica, B.W.1.



Comet Service For

Bahamas _ Soon

; LONDON.

A Comet jet airliner service be-
tween New York and the Bahamas
will be started as soon as run-
ways at Windsor airfield are
engthened, said Maj, Gen. Siy
Robert Neville, Governor of the
Bahamas, before he left Londor

vv Nassau,

,, During his visit to Britain, the
Governor had talks with the A:r
Ministry and B.O.A.C, regarding
this service, which would be a

emendous dollar-earning assct

o the Colony, he said.

“The present airport at Oalts
rield is unsuitable for the Comet
vervice,” he déclared, “We are
going ahead with lengthening the
‘unways at Windsor airport to
take the Comet Mark II.”

At least 80,000 visitors to the
Bahamas are expected this year.
Both Oaks Field and Windsor air-
port are to be bought from the
Air Ministry,

—B.U.P.

| “ng:





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SCOUT NOTES:

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7.

Scouters Hold Re-union
Of Gilwellians Today

TO-DAY at 9 a.m. there will be a Re-union of Gilwel-

lians (Scouters who hold the

HQ. The Gilwell Re-union in E

Gilwell Wood Badge) at Scout
ngland is also being

held over this week-end at Gilwell Park, Chingford, Lon-

don.

There is usually a very good attendance of Scouters

from all over the British Isles and many from other parts of

the Commonwealth.
In the August issue of

The Scouter Magazine, John

Thurman, the Camp Chief, wrote the following letter :
“Looking back through my Gilwell Letters it seems to
me that it is quite time I said something about Cubbing.

So far this year at Gilwell we
have had two Cub Wood Badge
Courses, both of them by any
standard very good indeed, but
there is one thing which is worry-
ing me and is undoubtedly troub-

_ ling a lot of Cubmasters, This is,
_ that although they try very hard

to co-operate with their Groups as
a whole the Scouts, Senior Scouts,
and Rovers, seem to regard them-
selves as senior branches of the
Movement, Now the only possible
way in which we can hope for the
Group to work successfully is to
regard it as being built up of four
equal partners. There is no senior
service in Scouting and, if anything
surely the most important sec-
tions, in view of the fact that
they need more care and attention,
are the Cubs and the Boy Scouts.

The kind of tning which is hap-
pening and of which I think all of
us must take notice, is the failure
of the Group Council to function
properly. This is especially true
where there is no separate Group
Scoutmaster, i.e. someone who is
not personally running one of the
sections. It really is @ mistaken
idea to think that a Group Scout-
ynaster is essential to the Group
Council and that without one the
Council need not meet, In an ideal
world all Groups would have a
Group Scoutmaster but, in the na-
ture of things, this is not so, The
Group Council is a meeting to-
gether of all warrant holders in
the.Group and no one else; it is
a very vital part of the machinery
of outing, Sometimes even
when a Group Council méets, by
all‘ accounts, it seems to be doing
the wrong job. I have had cases
quoted where the Group Council
has bean concerned with arrange-
ments for whist drives, jumble
sales and dances. These are no
doubt very desirable but they are
the concern of the Group Commit-
tee and nothing whatever to do
with the Group Council,

Perhaps a word about the Group
Council’s real job will not come
amiss. Its task is to consider the
training given to the boys in the
Group and the general standards
of the programmes of all sections,
ind the needs of individual boys.
It is through the Group Council
that we can see how best mutually
to help each other. We can
arrange, for example, that the
Senior Scouts or the Rover Scouts
can devise a set of practices to
help with Sense Training in the
Cub Pack, The Patrol Leaders of
the Seout Troop can survey an
area of forest land and make
reports on it in order to decide
whether or not it is suitable for a
Cub Outing. I really believe that
the Beoyer working of the Group
System is as important to the Cub
Pack as the proper working of
the Patrol System is to the Scout
Troop,

As a Movement we seem to
have an extraordinary capacity
for neglecting to do the things
which serve Scouting best. We all
agree about these things, we all
know they are essential, sound,
and right, and yet so often when
it comes to the point something
else intervenes and we do not put
into practice what we believe.

It happens that last Sunday, at
the Scout’s Own at Gilwell, the
lesson was taken from the First
Book of James, and I think the
quotation is appropriate: “Be ye
doers of the word, and not hearers
only, deceiving your own selves.
For if any be a hearer of the word
and not a doer, he is like a man
— his natural face in a
glass.”

_Lastly, on this topic, I would
like to make two special pleas.
The first is that all of us who are
not directly concerned with Cub-
bing should give it its true value
and due place in the sun, remem-
bering that Cubs are a very high
proportion of the movement and a
very worthwhile part of it, Sec,-
ondly, that we make quite sure
our Group Council meets re; ~
ly and that when it meets, Spa
we get immersed in agendas and
the Minutes of the last meeting,
we quietly sit down and remind
ourselves that our job is “solely
concerned with the standard of
the training given to the boys in
the various sections, This might
also help us to stick to the point!



ATTENTION!

CAR
OWNERS

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As a footnote to this letter, I
think you will like to know that
I have just sent to the Director
of thé International Bureau the
first post-war Wood Badge for a
Japanese Scouter. Very properly
t goes to Mishima, the Chief
Seout of Japan, who attended a
course at Gilwell last year.

Camping At The Good
Shepherd
An inter-troop party of 20

Scouters and Scouts camped at
the Good Shepherd Boys’ School,
St. James from August 29th to
September 2nd.

hey were from the Northern

Area, of Commissioner L, T. Gay’s
district, and represented the fol-
o o ame
e _ Inmnocent’s, under Scouter
“Welchés Mixéd, accompanied
by Scouter Smith,

Boys’ under the
1 of Scouter Downes,
and St. Thomas’ Group in charge

of Scouter H. D. Rowe who was
Camp Chief.

The Troops were kept busily
engaged in Seouting activities,
and some Scouts practised at 2nd
Class Tests.

Welcome visits were paid by
Scouter G. Mose, who also con-
ducted at Evensong a church
service on Sunday at the Good
Shepherd Chapel. The Scouts
were in attendance. Scouter A.
Rouse also paid a visit.

On Monday night a Camp-fire’

was held, to which a fair attend-
ance of persons were present.
and were amused with the ren-
dition of songs, recitations, etc.

Camp broke on Tuesday after-

noon, T its close Commis-
iioner L. T. Gay, visited and

inspected the troops, He spoke of
Discipline and inspired Scouts to
win the 2nd Class Badge, and
hoped that the King’s Scout
Badge would be striven for in
the not too distant future.

Combermere Troop Camp

At Barrows, St. Lucy

Part of the Combermere Troop
under Scoutmaster G. R. Brath-
waite held a camp at Barrows.
There were four scouts who had
never been in camp before and
to them it was a novelty and
experience. The Scouts left the
School on Monday morning and
drove to St. Lucy, where they
found their task ready, namely,
to piteh tents and organize for
a happy camp.

T was a very good spirit
of scouting throughout the time
spent in Camp and the young-
sters did a little training for their
Second Class Badge, Some of the
work proved difficult, but the
boys tried their best.

On Tuesday 26th, Rev. Furley
& Mrs, Furley, Mr. K. C, Pile and
Mr. F. H. O’Neal paid them a
visit and Rev. Furley talkeii to
the boys and gave two very
interesting yarns which showed
how quietly and well Scouts did
their work even in accidents and
times of danger.

Wednesday Mr. L. A, Harrison
visited them and he also gave
the youngsters sound advice
regarding the principles of the
movement.

On Thursday morning Mr. G, E.
Corbin, Assistant Commissioner
visited them and spoke on the
principles and usefulness of
Scouting. Dr. A. C, Kirton, Presi-
dent of L. A, (North Area) also
visited them in the afternoon and
told the Scouts what an important
part the movement can take in
a youngster’s life. He was very
pleased with the conduct and
general demeanour of the boys
while at Camp, and hoped that
they would come again and have
a more enjoyable time.

On Thursday evening, the
Scouts
Animat

le a tour to River Bay,
owe Cavé and Harri-

son’s Point (N.P. Lighthouse),
Three Scouts m the 80th
Barbados visited t at the
night and joined in their Sing

Song.
On Friday they had to strike
camp after a ee delightful and

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1952

WI Need lustruction
On Federatien

@ from page !
by all the other colonies.

Hon. Ajodasingh opined that
the main difficulty im reaching
an agreement on the constitutional
aspect of the matter was the
question of the Veto of which
Barbados “is not in favour”, but
he added, if one colony ‘has
something to lose in_ entering
into a federation, it must be
remembered that other., colonies
also have something to lose; and
this should not therefore ..be
allowed to stand in the way of
federation. What one colony had
to lose was not the all-important
matter. The important was
to bring about a federation or
the British West Indian terri-
tories for the benefit, of the
masses,

Speaking of his stay im the
colony, Mr, Ajodasingh said he
took the opportunity to visit the
Colonial Postmaster, Mr. ‘Robert
Clarke who showed him around
the Department. He also hopes
to visit. other Government De-
partments.

He said he is enjoying his
stay very much, and thinks Bar-
bados has excellent tourist
facilities which Government

should do everything possible to
develop.

Sharon Celebrates
First Anniversary

The officers and miembers of the
Sharon’s Young Men's Association .
celebrated their first anniversary *
in the Sharon School room on
Monday night September 1, The
function was also attended by the
officers and members of the Sha-
ron’s Young Women’s Association,

The Rev. D. C. Moore, Treas-
urer, read prayers, and Mr. O. A
Pilgrim presided as chairman, Mr.
L. Henry, Secretary, gave a re-
sume of the work done during the
past year, including the purchase
of a new table tennis board whicn
the Rev, D. C. Moore, and Mr, O.
A. Pilgrim later opened for play.

Mr. Weekes, A¢sistant Social
Welfare Officer, expressed the .
hope that members would sup-
port the church, which he be-
lieved would improve the social
and religious standard of the com-
munity. Miss G. SKeete supported
Mr. Weekes’ remarks. She spoke
on behalf of the Sharon Young
Women’s Association.

Mr. L. Alleyne moved the vote
of thanks,

At the meeting, Mr. O, Bailey
was elected president for the en-
suing year. Other officers elected
were, Mr. L. Alleyne, Vice presi-
dent, Mr. L. Henry, Secretary.
Mr, W. Lawrence Asst. Sect.,
Rev. D. C, Moore Treasurer, Mr.
H. Haynes, V. Cumberbatch, and
K. Birkett, Committee of Manage-
ment.

Captain Of ‘Marion
Belle Wolfe’ Retires

AFTER 34 years of sea life
Captain J. Every, 50, skipper of
the Schooner “Marion, ‘Belle
Wolfe” retired at the end of June.”
His son, L. H. Every, who suc-

comed







ceeded him as captain of the
vessel, completed his first trip
when he returned to Barbados
from British Guiana last week.

Captain Every, Snr., first went
to sea in 1918, and sailed as mate
on several vessels around Canada.

In 1926 he became master of
the “Delina Hazel,” and served
in a similar capacity on the
“Lasea,” and the “Plymouth
Belle” which was sunk by the
Germans in 1942.

This veteran seaman went on to
British Guiana where he worked
on the Government Dredge until
December, 1944. He returned to
Barbados, as master of the “Mar-
ion Belle Wolfe” in January,
1945, on which he remained until
he retired this year.

The vessel which is now in port
is taking a cargo of 150 tons of
Lime, a quantity of soap and lard, . .
and is due to sail for British ¢
Guiana on Tuesday the Sth. :



instructive period at Camp,

The Troop begs to extend sin-
cere thanks to Dr. A. C. Kirton
for the loan of the groun and
also extends thanks to all who in ¢
any way helped the Camp to be -~
a success, 4

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In August’ the Duke of Alba will take risks—certainly — but] with a thirst, and I didn’t stop to saged my scalp with Créme f eye HEATA WES b Tesi It’s the
aske@ De Wohl to dinner at the °Nly When he knows that he can|hold it up to the light or roll it Orientale. | ‘ Gian LASSITUDE NERVE » Q in o ALSO reliever
. Spanish Embassy. Fellow guests @ford them. Therefore, — given 1. ar is al eee WE CERES ig rp: econ
included the Forei Secreta armies of about equal size and 7 , \4 ‘ Fatigue of the nervous system, caused . : Sa it's gta of
Lord Halifax, his wite, the late @dUal quality, with not too many 1 HE BL UE-E YED BO ) \ 8) Sa by overwork, difficulties or. worry = oun Me eg a pias
aay ition oe De wan ena’ nashion “7 or Bn me gree — Le is a sign you need PHOSFERINE = Se PALI ‘ I That's the
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rangement had been made: a kind de Wokl. He had no rivals here Rheumatism Nid Os oe, fa 8



‘SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7.



|
To-day the strange story is told of Britain's |

1952

STATE SEER

* A prophet in

SOO See Ree Se rREE Cee eEee ee eeteeseseec ERC eReEscCesesEEeEEEEnn:

relates how he



Hitler by ‘star warfare’



esdensonsenecececcoccecesncsnsenanessecenssoess shone like margarine in the morn- ping some up and taking it away BRINGS
ing sun. I knew at once that he He dug down into a little cup-
by was English from his attitude board and brought out a bottle— an $ ve and out u QUICK
towards whisky. rather a gay bottle, something . ©
GEORGE HUTCHINSON “You can’t think what it means,” like a Corinthian pillar, with gold RELIEF
he told me, by way of opening stuff all round the cork: and a | our es 0 n ours
Of wom gambit, “‘to be able to get whole gaudy label bearing the name FROM
Louis de Wohl’s was perhaps Allied and enemy; he divined the| Dottles af Scotch by simply going ‘Créme Orientale’.” American Doctor's Discovery $eoaay that the Vi-Tebs

but he has studied astrology for
20 yeers.

Mayfair
fought





Mussolini’s ships sailed and were
sighted by our aircraft,"Next day



TANTALUS IN

ABYSSINIA

By

He had come ashore from a
cruise liner, and I was in Bridge-
town for a haircut; and we met
on the balcony at Goddard's,
where the quest for cool drinks
led us to the same table. He was
fortyish and fat, and his bald head

Clearly he must have been a
Greek,

HUGH SPROULE

;
|
|
round my tongue. I drank it; and |
it had a kick.”

He sketched an illustrative ges- |
ture with the glass the waiter had |
just put down before him.

“We had about three mugs each,
and then I asked him about wrap-

that it cracked, and yelled like a

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ergy, and vitality, and be entirely satisfac
tory or you simply return the empty pack-
age and it costs nothing under the guar.

; madman to the mess-boy for maji ohlee "Pea are tt hf

By the summer of 1940 De the battle was fought, with Cun- “This chap came _Up to the ya baridi.” oUeeeten = satisfaction. A "ape ee ee Selreoeth
Wohl had convinced himself ningham’s famous night attack. laager and asked me if we want- “For what?" Hi provement and within beltle of 48 Vi-Tebe costs Hittle, and lasts
that “astrological warfare against Thus, claims De Wohl, was|®4 anything. You wouldn't actu- “Cold water. That stuff was | eH one week tt will literals | sou) you should get your treatment imme.
Hitler was a necessity.” How Matapan fore-calculated, 127| lly say we gat on like a house without exception the Filthiest | SHI Gietely 20 Chat you toe welll Know what it ie
coutd he convince the British? days in advance. on fire; he couldn't speak any Drink I Have Ever Touched. We | Vi-Tabs Vi years, sounee?

He spoke to the sympathetic He claims, too, that he predicted English except ‘OK’—if that is tried it neat, and we tried it with | Doctors Praise Tabs and full of vigour
Rumanian Minister, V. V. Tilea Montgomery’s” victory at Ala-|=™slish — and my Greek stopped water, and the Quarter Master | Deltere te Amora and and vitality:
(now a farmer in Oxfordshire) mein. “A "high-ranking officer” short at TUPTO TUPTAMAI or what- had some hot, with milk and} im many countries! Restores Manhood and Vitality
“Never mind what the British asked him to consider ‘two|®Ver it was.” sugar; but there just wasn’t any
believe,” argued De Wohl. “What birth-data, both without the| yj k sn mi way you could swallow it, I tell
matters is that Hitler believes in birth-hour and the birth place.” took a hasty sip of my drink. you, ‘I've knocked about abit,
astrology; and if I make the same The officer was brief: ‘Which of It was no good looking at me like and I’ve tasted some pretty odd

calewations as Hitler’s astrologer
T shall know what Hitler is ad-
vised by a man in whom he be-
lieves, And that should be of
advaiitage to the British.”

Earl Duke

Tilea called it “an appeal to
common sense,’ and promised:
“I shall get you the connections
you need.”

“He was as good as his word”
writes De Wohl. “A few days
jater I had to explain my theory
before a small council of very
influential men, including the
jate Lord Herne and Earl Win-
terton, M.P. ‘This meeting broke
the ice and I suddenly found my-
self pussed on trom one celebrity
to the otner.”

of chair of honow: had been
arranged for Lord Halifax. A
row of other chairs formed a
semi-circle round it—except for
oné chair, just in front of that of
Lord Halifax. The Duke of Alba
indicated that I should sit down

these two is likely to beat the
other?” The details, it transpired,
were those of Rommel and Mont-~
gomery.
‘The Old Maid’

De Wohl was confident: Mont-
gomery (born November 17, 1887)
was favoured, Montgomery, he/



told the officer, “has Mars in
Virgo. The virgin—the accurate, |
methodical spinster, the old maid
who is so tidy that it hurts, She
knows exactly where everything
is that she has got. She won't
travel before everything is ready
down to the last button. Super-
impose that on the nature of a
courageous soldier and you get
a man who will not attack before
he feels certain he will win. He

no competitors, His counterparts
were in Germany: six were Hit-
ler’s astrologers 30 were Goer-
ing’s. For them it was a danger-
ous vocation — Hitler’s Karl E,
Kraft, a Swiss, died at Buchen-
wald,

that: I was on the Science Side
myself.

“Anyway, I waved an empty
bottle at him, and he waved his
arms back and flashed his gold
teeth, and took me off down to
his store; and after I’d said no to
a bicycle and a monkey ona
chaiy and a packet of gramophone
needies, we ploughed our way
through the chickens and child-
ren that littered the floor into a
little back room; and there we
sat down at a table and he got
out some great thick china mugs
and poured something into them
out of an earthenware jug, first
removing a couple of flies with
his forefinger.

“IT don’t really
was, that stuff; but I was a man

know what it



(By CHAPMAN PINCHER)

BLUE-EYED children are only
half as susceptible to rheumatism
as children with brown or grey
eyes, Oxford

University doctors

liquor one place and_ another
vodka and kvass and slivovic and
arrakh and saké and yanqqona
but the like of that muck I have
never met before or since.”

He drowned the memory of it
in Scotch, and called for more. I
rose to go.

Sitting in the barber's chair I
brooded on my friend’s tale of
frustration. I pictured him deep
in the heart of the jungle (I don’t,
know if there is any jungle in|
Abyssinia, but that’s where I pic- |
tured him), gasping for liquor, |
perspiration falling like rain from |
the shining cupola of his bald}
head; and I sighed gently as tne
barber took the crystal bottle and
with strong, soothing fingers mas-

the complaint may be infectious
And there is more rheumatism |
among children in big families, |
whether rich or poor, |
Report On 381 Children
Dr. David Hewitt and Dr. Alice

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ON



PAGE ELEVEN

“strangest intment of the “aspects” ians, kings into a shop and asking for them.” _—_I opened my mouth to say some- Strengthens Blood, Nerves je
| the = i rer _ 5 ft pee of politici ? More was obviously coming, and thing, but my friend was in full Bod 9 ve . Refece their time’ Rane
war. was Britain’s seer: the and nations, E watted toe it oe y, Memory, Brain, Mus- wn, and Worn-out -
State astrologer. When would Hitler invade the|* i,.); » tae oR cles, and co—Better For instance, Dr T A ———
tt $ itic 9 ‘Believe me,” he said, “there “T see now that I ought to have ° Ellis, of Canada, re-
Tt was an appointment too British Isles? In late 1940 De ; ; ; ; : ; Th Gland €ently wrote “Not ont
bizarre, too improbable, for the Wohl was asked to report “again have been times in my life when made him open it and give me a eat oe Operations. Guan” Gee Teen “one
War Office to proclaim and publi- and again.” Who asked him? I would have given literally any- sample, but three mugs of that Desert te eae A on Amorhen rich the blood supply of
cise. But there he was, Captain %e Wohi prints no names, He thing for a proper drink. witches’ brew had built up a feel “prematurely old, Run-down and ikewlse activates the
ee Wohl hatin thins By : ae al : : “Literally anything” was hard powerful amount of goodwill YOuthiul Vineet Ae eee ene Garil of fland system This is
, casting his horo- reported: “No astrologer in his to believe; but, since he asked which was only slightly shaken This great Siecevery. Wabch ins canals lollowed by renewed en-
scopes in a fifth-floor office at senses could pussibly encourage me, I did ‘my best to believe it @hen fhe demanded hes pounds nome Lreatment and ean be used seeretis | OF TA. Bilis £f8x apd ambition. par- DUE TO INDIGESTION
rosvenor House. Now, in a ditler tu start on such a huge, plete 2 a es ; ; fala ates ae by anyone, quickly brings « of vi- | men and women in middie or older ages
book* to be published. De Wohl cisky venture under his present ee eee toe I beat him down to thirty bob. \guity And ah witty te ¢npoy the _ Ande visely known Tialian doctor Dr If you suffer from STOMACH PAINS, FLATULENCE,
lains himself. bad aspects.” There would be no when i. ware: chasing the. Ttes “As it happened, we had a little ne longer iat necessary for gutter out, Frail and Shrunken bodies sorely need HEARTBURN, NAUSEA or AC ADITY due to Indigestion,
3 two rooms of\the hotel he ivasion, he predicted, before up to Gondar—tright out in the to-do with the Italians that day. Memory and . Nervousness, impure of this formula, which werke te wens try just ONE DOSE of MACLEAN BRAND STOMACH
- ate, slept end applied himself to May 1941 (“when Jupiter would blue. We were, no NAAFI or any- and the next day we marched Sicep" znwitad you merely ake Us aim r feels upon, Hood: glands, ves and | POWDER! This scientifically balanced formula ives you
the war. An assistant, labelled be in conjunction with the posi- thing like that, and we hadn't had about 30 miles without stopping: Aina your vigous i ragtgred es strength to a pa really quick relicf! It is also available iy TABLET form.
liaison officer, delivered his pay lion. wot Neptune at Hitler’s) . drink of any sort or kind for So When it did come dinner time ter what your age, 4 that your | e°P* e
Rana The nation paid the ~~ batt! a _|something like six weeks.” we could scarcely wait for our End restored You will @od youthiul physi= Guaranteed To Work
ill, e sea battle ot Cape Mata- ‘ ,, Drink. ; eal power ip this dees wi es | Vi-Tobs are not an experiment This
e In the. War Office there is to. pan was Andrew Cunningham’s| “You must have been thirsty, “The C.O. decided we ought to Pas aA Ph. , = mr simple home treatment, which can be used
day no record of De Wohl. He triumph. Astrologically, it was|l prompted him. make a little ceremony of it, see- This simple home treatment in pleasant a an Aenerlean terion” Re sorasnete
was commissioned in a different apparently De Wohl’s. The im-| “Then one day we came on a ing there wasn’t more tharra pony Sey eet ae, rm gad thousands successful and is giving wew youth, vital- BRAND
— and English — name. At the pending “powerful aspect” of|sort of little village—well, I call glass for each officer in the mess than eny olver Cutae at Toa Teanhathe nnn erets Powd
ea rere: woe 2 Ln or ae pee ne ee, had ne it = ena ae there seaae S —so after we’d finished our —. *Works in 24 Hours are Row distributed by chemists nere ome Stomach er
, S aptain de press m, he recalls, as earlyjreally anything there except a beef hash and papaws we solemn- x as | Port nplete satisfaction “Pepe ,
Wohl. as November 20, 1940, when “I} well and a few mud huts, and ly sat round the table, and the ends in | with questionable drugs which ras te SOLE AGENTS .. M. B. MEYERS & CO. LID.
From Berlin wrote my report and mentioned} this Jittle shop.” C.O, filled his glass and passed seem almost miraculous. Tt has conquered | Cruttic and irritating io the delicate gland Bridgetows,—Barbades
De Wohl, son of a cavalry that the admiral was most likely; “What little shop?” that elegant bottle to the left; and | — 9bstinate cases that had gefled all other | proved: their sterling worth by helping
officer in the Royal Hungarian t@ achieve a great success be- “It was run by a Greek — at when everybody had some he took | Premature old age and, debuliy "fh hes yourvown perticulet cuse Plt Vi-¥abs G
Army, had arrived in Britain tween March 27 and April 5.” feast, I suppose he was a Greek. a sip. , | brought happiness beyond all price tothou- | bhe test. See for yourself how much young.
from Berlin in 1935. By profes- Monty’s Chance Anyway, he wasn’t a Hindu ora “And then he put his glass Sa ee a nened with the soya ot | Hee! ith this doctor's. prescription. Vi
sion he was—and is—a novelist, It was March 27 1941, when| Syrian.” down with such an air of finality weer Thy and Ue beauty of iis re- | Tabs must bring y. @ new feeling of er

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Their report is to be sent to thé
Royal College of Physicians.

aware of De Wohl’s “astrologica!
warfare’vy Mr. DeWahl, much
heavier now, and 49, has been in

“Very little later” De Wohl was
introduced to the heads of Ser-
vice departments. That autumn







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PAGE TWELVE

Thi



= t, then, that the
West Indian does not yet have By A. S. HOPKINSON
all the quaiities that mark a full
fledged nation. modest, but as we have already
We may take it, too, that until seen, deeply ashamed of him-

there is such a thing as a West se.f. But this shame must disap-

Indian nation there cannot be a pear if he is to build a manly and
West Indian Culture. It is basic magnificent culture, Think of the
unity thet is lacking. It is not Romans, They didn’t pity them-
so much that we are made up of Belves as we do. They pelieved
several islands; the trouble is themselves to be a superior race.



s West Indian Cult

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7. 1952





—<—<<

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EDUCATION NOTES

Education Report
1950—51





COUGHS
COLDS




that we are made up of several They believed that they had a THE REPORT of the D } qualify for a fine career, higher pay and social standing.
races. The phrase West Indian mission: that of civilising the of the Department of Education for One of these courses will lead to your advancement
has so many meanings that it world. When defeated in war the year ended August, 1951, has just been i and ae : ” LIKE MAGIC
fs almost meaningless. We must they fought back. They persisted I am wondering how man: le inte: ‘ Aarmentensy Sedece Gaginegn Mipteas fee
i : ; i ‘ , oe iF ; ly peop. rested in education Audi ding Shorthand
fix its meaning first, and then until they won. Their word for have taken the trouble to ; English jects Mathe
the rest will follow. But negative virtue also meant courage in F it i : ruse it, : | Arithmetic geen jucation Puptc j
criticism does not have much war. You can see their self re- di or me it 1s an int document and its own Con- | Seeabdtes Journaihacs Short Story Writing i
value of itself unless backed by spect in their attitude towards emnation of the methods of administration whieh I have |
something constructive. When foreign nations. Everyone who described in these columns, p Ratesicore Engineering Drawings Sosigasion naniad,
you have found out what is was neither a Roman nor a , It is divided into three sec- go not | aleceare wil. Saackiee oe Seca: ’
wrong, you must set about put- Greek was a ‘barbarian’, a word tions; the first is historieal, the y, : ieee beagle for not pen- = Pochealcal Edgineesing eying
ting it right: unless you want to which had a strong note of con- Second describes “the Educational ‘t the Director haq consulted | Shamistcy uma wan
break your heart by thinking tempt in it. This is the model System and Current Deveiop- his Teachers then there could! ivil Engineering Power S-aticn Engineering Wireless Telegraphy
about your own worthlessness. that the West Indian might fol- ™ents” and the third deals with not be this chaos in the system. Or emghtatscsehin Sma heh Worksuap Practice
And we can perhaps at least low, at least partially. He must }¢8iSlation and nh. oceasion when they were | Eluctrical Engiover adic. Suginesring
guess at what the true West In- not want other nations to ap- I do not propose to examine it called upon and for the| Electric Wiring on0 Ptaking OVERSEAS SCHOOL & ts more highly medicatod, hence
dian nation may be like, so that prove of him, He must not want detail; that would not be appgo- failure in the 13 plus group their Ca Wwe can recognise it when it ap- other people to clap him on the Prlate here, but there are two, protest report fixing the blame on TO TME BENMETT GO. ce. SePT, lod, SEN TLD, ENGLAND. » GENERAL Bs soothing medicated vapors coy
pears and help it to grow up. back and eall him a good fellow, °° “ee points which for me are the proper shoulders, their report ' Visdieitieial on hac | cenrasicate OF (2) Now massage chest, back and throat witb «= on the good work tongar while the
We have not yet begun to give He must think himself good in *8ifcant. Siipeheiee: Bing thee coc eek See supyRet ; i EDUCATION Se ease eee, nee
trouble in the world. We have his own right. Still, his self-ap- In , retary. Now they are only blamed, gone aT ON eT ioe’ wie Wass ve ( TRIPLE VOUR MONEY BA rh ind se a paragraph 41 the Report not consulted I fear they might NAME Tite external
not yet begun to assert ourselves proval must be mixed with a tiny says: “The Board of Edu otest 1 congestion, ease sore, chest muscles, ond i Buckiay’s Steioteys tue
effectively. But it is reasonable bit of -contempt. Not th s cation pF , AML Ress . SEND TODAY encourages restful siewp, The soothing aph prove tester and ms j
to think’ th lL kind * © advises the Director on any edu- [In section 47 of Part 2 the Re- { for a free prospectus on wapars Gives off keop up the good work for | Sn eae --
thin at one day we. will. ind that wallows in - self- cational matter which is sub- POrt says: “Education at the sec- g our fubyecs. Fuse chooze eure while the Ettie one doops oe lL
The cae page = that a a but the kind which re- mitted to it, For matters con- ondary stage is provided in senior le, "pet fall ist tie — '
time must be something splendid, gr that it is mot even strong+ cerni “Or i Gepartments of the el tar iafbeilon 7.9.52 + oe aay agialdad
something that inspires respect or that it is, He must be ae Diener, *CCOndary.. eapansian, lohoaa® + _— 7

at least, if not fear. He will be

bitious for strength and power,
great in proportion as he is ter-

Spiritual as well as physical. He

rible, in proportion as he shows must glory in might, in full
masterly command, not only over and unashamed recognition of
others, but also over himself. Be- the fact that nature aims at
ing a combination of all the strength and nothing else. He
racial types in the world, we can must not be shocked when he

expect him “to” show ‘every pos-
sible virtue and every possib}«
vice, But these two words ‘vir-
tue’ and ‘vice’ are a bit inappro

realisés that mari is_the -greaies:
not powerful enough to stand up
to him: he must not be shocked
priate. A quality is a virtue— when he sees that a bullet is the
or a vice—only under certain measure of superiority between
circumstances. There is no such 4 human being and a lion,

thing as absolute right and ab-
We Must Love Our Enemies

solute wrong. Germany’s great-
est philosopher, Nietzsche, ex- i ‘
posed that superstition seventy a ae he must rec-
years ago. (This does not mean national law ue, S damental
that, being a superstition, the be- fiom it like the Dodie eee
lief in absolute good and bad j«voltea wh he i
hasn’t got its uses. Quite the feeds upon life “But ‘to ‘ee kah
contrary; for the people must be noble. the West Indian must think
ruled according to their super- quite differently from most na-
stitions. This, however, is a little tions about combat. He will show
beside the point.) And so the himself to have a really splendid
future West Indian need not be “haracter if he can purge himself
ashamed of his ‘vices’; under ©!,all hate, envy, malice, sadism,’
prudent leadership he can turn @0d resentment, while at the same
even these to his advantage, And, time remaining a g gressive,
of course, we must always re- Though he must look on what
member that, although disobedi- ont an him as bad, he must think
ence is a vice in a servant, it is ° st oe Sinful, wrong or un-
a virtue in a master. What would /“S'. He must be perfectly fair
aA i in this matter, He must not con-
become of a school if the head- demn his enemi 7
master obeyed the children in- jannical b oe as Wndust, ty-
c ae al or brutal people who are
stead of commanding them damned to all eternity for be-
Above all, the future leaders of having as they ought not to be-

the West Indies must have a have. Instead, he must realise
frank unwincing attitude to- that two nations of different ori-
wards this matter of right and gin, habits, qualities, and am-
wrong: they must admit that bitions cannot come into contact
each person, and each nation, and remain peaceably so for very
must decide the question for long, If they do, they will both
himself or themselves. This js Sink their individuality, and be-

called following your own con-
science, and consciences like
personalities, vary greatly from
man to man. The people them-
selves however, must have no
such elastic: attitude. They will
quickly learn to believe’ that
whatever benefits the nation is
good and whatever hurts it bad.
They will then have a national
moral eonsciousness, which in
the long run means nothing more
than knowing what to fight for
and what to fight against.

Self Respect Necessary

The West Indian must think
well for himself. He must be able
to respect himself. And he musi
also have good reason for be-
lieving himself a worthy person. struggling to become a_ nation,
In short he must be vain. At The important thing is not the
present he is neither vain nor nation but the s' e, This fact

Ss

NOT AFRAID .

come meagre and contemptible.
They can* neither live in that

ear. The question of ‘right’ and
‘wrong’ is not brought up at all.
It is simply beat or be beaten.
After all, the enemy has equal
right to full privileges and the
only way to decide the issue is to
tight it out, This is the principle
according to which all the mighty
pre-historic monsters were ex-
tinguished by creatures brainier—
that is stronger—than they. Man
is completely responsible for
moral values: nature has nothing
to do with them.

We West Indians are at present








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inimal because all the others are’

same country nor rub shoulders
with each other. They must fight
until one or the other is victori-
ous and throws his rival out on his



Director consults the Advisory
Committee of Head Teachers in
Secondary Schools, On matters
affecting the elementary schools
the Director is able to consult
the Barbados Elementary Teach-
ers’ Association,”

I am venturing the statement
that this secondary stage is not
provided at @ dozen out of the
124 elementary sehools; and I am
going oneg step farther. When
parents and taxpayers come to
realise that they are being misled
as to-the nature this “secon-

|

NAST YALA te VLAnd ee
Aes FA

a+ wate ven CDOKE pony on. Sea
even if it had not been written “3' stage or that it does not

meant what they were allowed to
believe it does mean then there is
going to be grave dissatisfaction.
This condition of things imposes
; , 4 duty on the Government to see
mean exactly what they say, and to it that people’s children who
that the construction of the sen- will have no other opportunity of
vences was deliberate and inten- attending any but an elementary
tional and not merely a jumble school, are getting the education
of words, to which they are entitled, which
they now believe that they are
What is significant to me is the getting, and for which the Public
positive statement that “the Diree- Treasury now pays, There are in-
tor consults the Advisory Commit- stances when the Government
tee” when it is a question of Sec= allowed things to slip by unnoticed
ondary Education but on matters by assuming and merely mouthing
affecting the elementary schools the view that an officer had taken
(end note that Secondary is spelt certain decisions only after hav-
with a capital letter while elemen- ing» consulted those whom he
tary eee rae Wiles ks ches te should.
report says the Direc al Compulsory Education
consult the Barbados Elementary In pare, 52 e Report "akan:
Teachers’ Association, .,. “The policy is to provide sufficient
Why was it not possible to write
that he consults the Association? I
again emphasises that everything out, since its own view-point
is a fight. And, whether we rec- doesn’t correspond with ours. Its
ognise it or not, we must find our- thought is different and so is its
selves an enemy; for tine mere temper Above all, we don’t want
existence of an enemy will give to be governed by Britishers,
us something to fight for as well either directly or indirectly. But
as something to fight against. But this is a difficult issue and we
we must choose our enemy dis- are hardly strong enough mili-
criminatingly cod be ase to find tarily to make theni see our point!
someone worthy of that position. ‘
In the choice there must be some measure of admiration and re- Toe new culture, ae hy ke
spect, We must feel proud of our 4 battle cry of opposition to gn
foe and wage the battle without British civilisation, not an ‘art Ss
malice or indignation, At present, @"tS sake’ tinkering with words

by him was perused by
Director because he has

it. I am_ therefore justified
assuming that the words used.

the





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MANGOE CHUTNEY

jtself, having accomplished many :
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take in too much of it. Besides it one might say, the banner & a
is hardly congenial to us. it is al- people growing up into aggressive
ready fully developed and mel- nobility. It will have reverence
lowed, not to say decadent in for whatever is high and above
many respects. We ourselves, are the democratic-plebian seyel. It
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eine Phillips (daughter),
d ' U.S.A. ‘son!
€ Seymour Phil-
illips
lrer Colin Phillips
d-child
THANKS
ALLEYNE—We the undersigned beg ito
hank those who sent wreaths, cards o
etiended the funeral or in any way
expressed their sympathy with us of
yar dear mother und)» = grandmother
Albertine Atleyne of Kew Land whict
took place on 31st August, 1952.
Ameta Miller (daughter), Archer's and
Headley's Family 7.9.52—I1n,
CHEESEMAN—The undersigned
fully return thanks to all who attended |
the funeral, sent wreaths or in anyi
other way expressed sympathy with |
them on the occasion of the passing
of Mrs. Florence A. Cheeseman, late
of* Crumpton Street, St. Michael
Gor 1 and Brathwaite Chiessemars:|
Helén Mason, Elsie Gilkes
7.9.52—I1n. |
SKEETE We, the undersigned beg
through this medium to thank all those

Kind friends who sent wreaths, cards,

or in ar way expressed sympathy
with us in our recent bereavement,
oecasioned by the death of Charlotte
Skeete

William Skeete, Allen Skeete

7.9.52—1n



the
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Ts, or sympathised with

WEEKES. We



of Mrs. Eva Weekes
yma e husband), Augusta
Olton ,er!, Reynold and Simeon



Culpepper (brothers), Denzil Olton (son)
John Culpepper (nephew).
7.9.52=1n

‘



IN MEMORIAM





DRATHWAITE—In loving memory , of
James Edward Brathwaite who departed





this life on 7th Septernber 1949.
Three sad veare have passed since that
sad day
But he is safe in the arms of Jesus
There by his love and grace,
His soul shall rest in peace
Ever to be remembered by Elonora
ife}, Goulburn, Laurence, Alfred,
Elric (sons), Clafice (daughter), Germain
(nephew), William (niece) (N.Y. !
papers please copy) 7.9.52—I1n
MILLAR In loving memory of our
dear beloved husband and father
Cecil Millar who passed away on
7th Sept., 1949.
Three long years since that sad day
When one loved has. pagsed away
Ever to be remembered by Alva
(wife), Lizetta, Geraldine and Duf-
ferine (children),

7.9.52—1n.

PERSONAL







The public are hereby warned against



giving credit to any person or persons
whomsaever in my name as I do not hold
myself responsible for snyone contract-
ing any debt or debts in my name unless

by a written order signed by me
FITZHERBERT SMITH,
Gittens Road,
Government Hill
6.9.52—2n

Â¥FOR RENT





HOUSES

A SMALA. COTTAGE--On the sea at
St Lawrence Gap, fuily furnished, two
bedrooms, immediate possession. Apply,
Hollywood, St. Lawrence Gap
7.9

BUNGALOW~—To An Approved Ten-
art Bungalow Modern Sea-Side, fully
furnished Bungalow Excellent sea-
bathing. For further particulars: Apply
to No. 6 Coral Sands, Worthing.

2.9.52—6n
“MALTA"—Cattlewash. For October,
November, January, February, March,

Apply Mrs. I.
Harriman & Co.

Weatherhead c/o J. N.



MANHATTAN FLATS — On Sea three
Pedroome each fully furnished, Refrigi-
daire, enclosed yard, Servant’s Room &







undersigned would |

5.9.52—5n | «-
| Enquiries Yacht Club or Telephone 4430.

FOR SALE



AUTOMOTIVE



CAR—Morris eight, good tyres, body in
g00d order, Mr. Vernon Hinds, Weston,
St. James. 7.9, 52—1n

CAR—1950 Vauxhall Wyvern, excellent





condition. Batgain. Will exchange for
smaller car Apply Williams Court. Oppo-
site Sayes Court, Government * Farmy
Christ Church or Sealy's Garage, Bay
Street 7.9.52—In



CAR—One Prefect Ford
A-l

1949 model
Condition. Practically New. Owper
Driven. Frice $800. Owner leaving
Islend Contact Smith's Garage, Roe-
buck St 7.9.52—in







CAR—For sale one standard 8 h.p.
Coupe Car in good running order. Phone
4618. G. E, Ward. 6.9.52—4n.





CAR—One (1) 1952 A—40 “Somerset’’--
Pale Green—1,300 miles — Always owner
driven — Dial 3355. 6.9.52—3n.

CAR—New Consul car only done 6,000





grate-|miles. Reason for selling owner leaving

island. Phone 4641.

4.9.52—4n.

——
CAR—(1) KAISER. One second hand
Keiser, 1949 model, in excellent condi-
tion, apply Barbados Agencies, telephone
1908 . 5.9.52—6n

——$—$_$_ ET
CAR—Plymouth 5 passenger 1948
medel in perfect condition. ‘Done. only
19,000 miles. Phone S. Nicholls.

Office, 3925. Home 8657.
3.9,52—t.t.n.

CAR—Austin A70, Very good condition,

and going to some lucky for $1,800.
'Williams at 3006 and os251 or apply
3.9.52—t.f.n.

Jehovah Jirah, St. George.

TRUCK-—International Two speed axie
truck with hydraulic hoist. Phone
3050. J. N. Farnum, Pe a



1



|



ELECTRICAL



SINGER HEMSTITCHING MACHINE—
Eiectrically driven, in perfect condition,
end at a very good price. Dial 2738

7.9,52—3n

RADIO—One (1) 11 tube Phillips
perfect condition. L. BERNS' fs
1, Swan St. Phone 2384 or 5130.







in
No

salen secicacaien, psteranantemnennaianae
RADIOGRAM—Separate Units, Ril
Receiver. 8 watt Amplifier. Collaro 2%
speed turntable. Six long playing records.
$130.00. Telephone 3274 or 4430.
7.9.52—1,

FURNITURE

FURNITURE—One Simmons Baby Crib
with Mattress, excellent condition. Also
one pair of Simmons Bedsteads and
-pr.ngs WY 3” a bargain. Phone 8614.

7.9,52—1n
Coos

LIVESTOCK

















GOAT—Milter. Goat. Apply: Mrs.
Gooding “Lila Cottage’’ McLean Gap,
7.9.52—I1n

| Brittons Hill.





MULES —- 4 Small island Mules. Apply
Fairfield Plantation, St. Lucy, or Phone

1—53. 6.9.52—3n.
POULTRY

POULTRY—Mampshire and Leghorns 8
weeks old with Incubator and runs. Apply
city Bar, Palmetto Street.







6.9.52—2n,

MECHANICAL

“PLOUGH. — From Joes River Ltd,
1 Subsoll Plough. Apply to W. Watson,
Fety. Manager, 6.9.52—T7n,

MISCELLANEOUS

1

| DUNLOPILLO MATTRESSES AT
sargain prices. Surplus stock of 3 ft.
na 3 ft 3 ins offered (for spot cash
ales only) at $48.58 and $52.96 each re-
pectively. Stniectly limited number for
lisposal BUY NOW, HARRISON'S,
Broad St, Dial 42%. 3,.9.52—Sn

| GUAVA CHEESE -- Fresh, delicious













ea Passe aut 08 ea ay
your rien abroad, 's. it.
Matthews Vicarage. Phovie 39025. Se

1,.9.52—3n.



»NTERNATIONAL TORNADO K.38.
>.00 nearest, Owner leaving Island.





7.9.52—In.
NUMERICAL TELEPHONE

—

1 dna



the





Garage. Phone 3309 6.9.52—2n. | p1:CTORY all Telephone Numbers are
| Usted in numerical order. Price 3/-
OFFICES | 2,).52—6n_
OFFICES—In our Building in Lawer| i ee Pulee* Ot, "OR
Bioad Street Available from _ Ist . wo

. Dial 2696, Auto Tyre Co., Trafalgar and

October. K R. Hunte & Co Ltd. | . *
Dial 4611 3.0.52—t.t.n | SPry Streets. 30.8821 n,
“ROOMS- 2 furnished rooms for Rent woes In first class Sonatas

opposite Royal Theatre. Best sea bathing
Garage attached, Week-ends and _ holi-
days accepted. Phone 8401, 5.9,52—t.f.n,



ROOMS—Furnished or unfurnished
“The Palisades” Lakes Folly. Dial 3365
7.9.52—In





“VENTNOR

Bedrooms

Belleville;-3
water,
Ia

Ist Ave.,
each with
Dial s6eo



running
7.9.52



WINSLOW,



Cattle w













h, Bathsheba
First two weeks in November and_ the
nih of December Dial 3502, Mrs
W. T. Gooding, Stronghope, St. Thomas
3.9.52—3n
. ‘a’ er
EDUCATIONAL
'
QUEEN'S COLLEGE
Queen's College has a staffirg vacancy
‘or a C luate in Mathematics, for Jan
ary, 1
Applications should be made to the
Headmistress, from whom further par-

be obtained, on or before
1952,

culars may
e 13th of September,
5.9.52—3n,

ANNOUNCEMENTS

A rrentio® LADIES





We con supply you with the bes
covered buttons and buckles in Town als
pleating Done. Fbony Dress Shop, Prine
Wiliam Henry Street (Over Lashley’
Siore) 7.9.52—-1n







VIEWS of Barbados from 1707 Loa
Fxhibition at the Mussum, Sunday 2.30-
t Week-days 10—6 7.9,52—2n

“GOODS CLOSES SO
Just Off The Press!

FIRST ANNUAL
% LEAGUE CRICKETER |
& Compiled by

J. M. HEWITT
Hony. Secty. B.C.L.

and containing ,
*Records of B.C.L. Cricketers
*Records of all centuries

made in B.C.L. games
*Photos of Leading B.C.L.
Players
*League Championship Table
*B.C.L. Intercolonial and

International Players
This Annual sets out in
simple but impressive
figures the history and
tradition of the B.C.L.

tea nanee
PRICE : ONE SHILLING

Obtainable at...
COLE'S PRINTERY
Middle Street

or

PRESS CLUB BUILDING

53, Swan & Middle Streets
6.9.52.—2n.

POO POOOCE> FOOSOOOHOSP

i}



P'LANKS—Seal Laths, pine planks, sid-
og board, Apply Cardinal Bowen,
tion Hill, St, Michael, Dia} 3901.
| 7.9.52—4n

PIANO — Ane! : Gertrude Davis.
Ebenezer, St, Philip, 7.9,52—1n,

SAMPLES—A few pairs of Sample
Shoes for men, apply Barbados Import &
Export Co. Ltd. Room 308, Plantations
Suilding. 7.9. 52—1n,

UBSCRIBE now to sh

\elegraph, England's jenaing Ue Nowe
‘paper now arriving in by Air
“uy @ few days after publication in

















ondon, Contact Inn Gale, C/o. Advo-
Co, Ltd., Local Representative
. 3118. 47.4.53—t.f.0

el.



TANKS—2 Galvanised Tanks & x 4” x
I-on Tanks 644% x 4 x 37 3 Galvanised
-lindrical Tanks 64 x 44a? dea, 600 w.
ve
#m with 2 ft. Conical Bottoms; capacity
ine gallons 700. Apply: Ma .
ruce Vale Factory. 31,8.52—3n.

T be _ NUMERICAL TELEPHONE j
RECTORY is ava, dle at: Advocate,
ole’s Printery, Johnson's Staticnery,
‘oberts & Co. and at the Colonial Adver-

ising Co, (Barbados) Ltd., James St.
mice 3-. 2.9.52—Hin.
the AL

Use NUMERIC. TELEPHONE
‘RECTORY to identify the owner of the
lephone Numbers left on 7

riee 3/-. ‘



ee peter in
With the ac AL TELEPH'

RECTORY any Teiephone Number can
asily be traced to the party concerned.
"rice 3/-, .52—in














oe

OPTICAL NOTICE

I beg to notify my Clients
and the General Public that
my Office will be closed for
Vacation from September 8th
and will be reopened on
September 29th.

WESLEY BAYLEY
Optician
High Street.
5.9,52,—8n.



Keep this date open

for
The Annual Leeward
BALL

on the 15th November
at

Paradise Beach Club

and watch this space.

Tickets -0- $1.00
24.8.52—T_F.N.









|















7.9. 52=oh

Phone 8211, 4462



2 Galv. Cylindrical Tanks @ x 49’ j









PUBLIC SALES

REAL ESTATE

A parcel of



a



square feet at Rockley in the parish of
Christ Chureh, (part of Clairmont) with)
outlet to Dayrells Road, and suitable for
laying out as building lots, j
Will be offered for sale at the oftice |
of the undersigned on Thursday the 11th |
September, 1952, at 2 o’clock p.m.
© plan can be seen on application to
the undersigned.

COTTLE, CATFORD & CO
3.9.52—8n.









ASK THEM — Our Recognized; Way-
side and Private Agents if Presently
it is a Buyer's or Seller's Market! D. F
de Abreu, a Trained Auctioneer & Real
Estate Broker, Must and Will always Lead
with Attractive Prices, Re-Sale Values and
Satisfaction, Best These Six 1.
BAYSWATER, NEAR SEA—Aimost New
3 Bedroom (with Basins) Stone Bungalow,
Aluminum Roof, 2 Toilets, Stone rage )
& Servant’s Room, about 7,000 sq. ft.,/
Going for about £2,200, 2 AT WORTH-
ING MAIN RD.—Facing Sea, Right-of-
Way to Sea, A 3 Bedroom Bungalow Type.
Very Good Condition, Garage & Ser-
vant's Room, over 6, . ft., Going
for about -£2,200. 3. EAR NAVY
GARDENS — A‘3 Bedroom (with Basins
& Cupboards) Stone Bungalow, about
6 yrs. Old, Everite Roof, 2 Toilets,
Garage & Servant’s Room, about 11,000
sq. ft., Going for about £3,100. 4. AT
GOVT; HILL — Almost New 3 Bedroom
(Partly Stone) Bungalow, Stone Garage.
Stone Enclosure, Conveniences, about
4,000 sq. ft., Going for about £1,200.
5 IN BELLEVILLE—One-Storey (Partly
Stone) 3 Bedroom, all Modern Conveni-
erces, Very Good Condition, Going about
£2,000. 6 OFF COUNTRY RD., — 2
Bedroom House with Land, Shop attach-



ed, Good Condition, House Yields
£14.00 p.m., Going ut $1, IN
LIGHTFOOT'S X — A Desirable
2 ge. » Wi ne






Goi

Ss

ae
Premises & Resi-
ST. — A 3 Bedroom

wo

ence.
ottuge, a Business Premises &
Rita lease C Me when U e
he

ing in Real Estate and Ni
ly Anywhere. DIAL 31f1 Call at “Olive
Bough,” Hastings, Near Pavilion Court
LOOK FOR MY SIGN.

BUNGALOW--Stone wall Bungalow
called “SANTA MARIA” With 6,180
square feet of land attached situate at)
Pine Hill, St. Michael.

Drawing and Din-!

3 one With run- !

ning water) breakfast rooms, Kitchen- |

ette, usual conveniences. Garage and!

servants’ rooms. Electricity installed. t
The above property will be set

‘
sale by Public competition at
a

Black St. Michael,
sping crag “ssi dee and
1 a oO a o ir
Cate ‘or Mesidence. Possibilities
ean be ar '
Leiter aan
“ HOUSE” situate in the parish
of Philip standing on 12 acres
lr and 22 hes of land.

The House con’ six bedrooms, draw-
ing, dining and living rooms and usual
o



above i) Be set up for sale at
Competition on Friday the 26tn
of September 1952 at 2 p.m. at the
office of the undersigned
CARRINGTON & SEALY,
Lucas Street
7.9.52



HOUSE—(1) Back House and shedroof
and kitchen, Woolley Jones, Fitt Gap,
Westbury Road, 7.9.52—1n

HOUSE — Bungalow Style (shop at-
tached 22 x 12. Situated at Brighton,
Black Rock. Dial 0155,

2.9.52—t.f.n.

aecectencen nenceneneeseel tile aman
LAND—A spot of land — approx. 3t
perches in Belle Gully Rd., opposite

Radcot. For particulars phone 2931.
3.9.52—4n
——_————————
“SILVER WATERS", at Silver Sands,
Cool throughout the year, four large bed-
rooms, running water in each room, two
servant rooms, Garage for two cars, best
sea bathing. Inspection by appointment.
. 3.9.52—3n



LE

AUCTION
“UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER



9th and Wednesday
{0th by order of the _Executors
to the Estate of the late Miss Elsie
St, John, we will sell the Furniture at
Eagle Hall Road, which in-

Round Tip-Top Dining Tables

rving
bles. Cabinet,
Masog ogg So - Drawing-roor
M any; pl rawing-room
julte 9 pieces (Couch, Arm and Upright
. Piano by Bechstein
Pictures and

On Tuesday

Springs and Mattresses
. Wardrobe, Dressing Table, Chest
Drawers—all ae eens
Shelv Canvas are
Long Mirror, very latte Glass Case:
Carders, Zine Top, Tables, 4-Burner Per-

fection | Oil Stove; Gas Stove, Kitchen
tensils, Garden Hose; and many other

items of interest.
3ale 11,30 O'clock TERMS CASH
BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,

Auctioneers

S

3,9.62—2n,
UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

ON THURSDAY llth by. order of
Mrs. Ant we will sell her Furniture at
“The Bower” The Garrison which

~~ includes

A, very nice square Tip-Top Dining
Yoble, Upright Chairs, Rockers, good
Card Table, Serving Table in Mahogany:
Sirch Settee and Cushions, Birch and
Cedar Arm Chairs, Rush Seats and Backs,
Vitrolete Top Coffee Table, Rush Tables
nd Chairs, Standard and Table Electric

Lamps: Good Jamaican Mats; Electric
Fan: Three Speed Portogram Pick-up and
Westinghouse Padio; Double Mahog

and Birch Bedsteads, Vono Springs and;
Ounlopillo Mattressee, Mahog, — Linen
Press; Painted Piresses and Tables;
Jietures, Wall Mirrors, Glass and China,
Dinner and Tea Services; Kelvinator

Refrigerator perfect working order

Kitchen Utensils, Tables, Scales and
many other items

Sale 11,30 o'clock. Terms cash

& CO.,
a 7.9,52—2n

.



aaa 2S
THE BARBADOS §.P.C.A.

S.P.C.A. ask you to be consid-
erate and kind to your animals
at all times, but especially during
the heat of the day and water

im 5

NOTICE

We beg ‘to notify our Cus-
tomers and the General Pub-
lic that HUTSON’S DRUG
STORE will be closed for
holidays as from the 7th of
September to 2ist Septem-
ber.

H. L. HUTSON,
31.8.52—3n.





land containing 60,527 | A- 3001



SUNDAY ADVOCATE
LOST & FOUND
LOST

SWEEPSTAKE TICKET












































NOTICE

PARISH OF CHRIST CHURCH
Applications for the post of Qualified

Series
in the forthcoming November







Meeting. Finder please return to H. D. | Nurse and Midwife will be received \by

Bayley, Hanson Plantation, St. George. | thé © Mrs. H. A, .

6.9.52—2n. | Welches, Ch. Ch. “Applica-

iddiroanls Zs ae ae to 3 p.m. on the 16th Septem-~
ber, 1952,

Ww ANTED Terms of appointment obtainable from

the Parochial Treasurer. 6.9.52—4n.

HELP Will the person or who

——— —_——.| halt on loan the Wheels of ne

BARBADOS DYE WORKS from Mrs. Geo. Hutson, Blackmans,

WASHERS & IRONERS—Only compe-
tent persons need apply

kindly communicate with her.



typist, apply to “Agency” P. O. Box 246,
Bridgetown. 4.9.52—8n.

THREE CANVASSERS — For new line
of Business. Good prospects. Reasonable
commission. Only men with e

needed. Give details. Apply: P.O. Box
151, G.P.O., Barbados 79 52—in.

MISCELLANEOUS

HOUSE—To Buy or Rent. House in
either Hastings or Garrison District two











(2) Bedrooms if possible, three (3) with ’ key

yousl_sonvesinnges. Reply “S" c/o ™®. | J ) to good

3 ntations New + :

Broad Street. i tava be Y E iy S T 9) a] 0 Ly
aa od c | oe | vu

PRIVATE ‘PING d if
Phone 3196, one Se in GENERAL sane
eee







GOVERNMENT NOTICES
PART ONE ORDERS

By _.
Major O. P. C. WALCOTT, E.D.,

Comman '
THE BARBADOS ‘GIMENT



Issue No. 32,
All ranks will parade at Regt. HQ at 1700 ho rsday
will continue their weapon training with a py = ‘is
the direction of their Coy Commanders..“A” Coy is allotted the
miniature ‘an members of “B’ Coy who have already

A.M.C, will be disposal of their : . “B”
who have not yet been allotted a timate: are chace: on tee soar with

R.S.M, immediately, \
Mon. 8, Wed. 10 and Thur. 11 . 52,
of wig Band. ana “they” wilt be notified. by" him

Band

Band practices will be hi

Ratson will test oer
rs who are graded first class will qua
ded camp and the required wane’ at

5 Sep, 52.



AM.0. under

e2e8

when the test will z
* eo provided they have atten





2

rts Club will hold its Annual Dance at

at 9 p.m. All bay invited to at! ; s ca Sen os

eee 7 "ANT FOR WEEK ENDING 15 SEP. 52.
¢ —"278'sii, Williams, 80)

‘"S.OLF.

3









Major,
Barbados Regiment.

NOTICE
T will be a Meeti ‘arran: cers eants’
2000 Hours on SHUG Te eee. fae Wettant Offers & Ser} Mess at

PART It ORDERS
THE BARBADOS REGIMENT SERIAL NO. 29.

yu 2 "WE. the ‘Governee

Gi 7 days’ casual leave w.e.f. 1
7 ited 21 days’ vacation leave w.e.f.
Gran’ } ftionths’ vacation leave w.e.f.

6 Aug, 52:
Granted 4 weeks’ P/leave w.e.f. 1 Sep.

M. L, B. SKEWES-cox. Maj
S.0.L.F. Adjutan:
The

Barbados Regiment.

Vacant Post of Captain of the Fisheries Research Boat “Investigator”

Applications are invited for the vacant post of Captain of the
Fisheries Research Boat “Investigator”.

2, The post is temporary and may be terminated at one month’s
notice on either side. The salary is $1,200 per annum and a temporary
cost of living allowance is at present payable at the rate of $144 per
annum.

3. The main duties of the Captain of the “Investigator” are to
take charge of the Research Boat, its general management and oper-
ation under direction and to be responsible for all matters concerning
its welfare,

4. Applicants are expected to possess a knowledge of corstal
navigation and ‘should be able to locate the position of the boat at
iny time, Applicants should also have had experience in the handling
of small motor vessels under both harbour and open sea conditions.
Appointment will be subject to medical fitness.

5. Applications stating age, qualifications and experience should
be addressed to the Director of Agriculture, Department of Science
and Agriculture, Queen’s Park, and should reach him not later than
Saturday, 13th September, 1952,



PROMOTION
Sit. Quintyne, L. G. “B” Coy rank ot
weft, 2

2. LEAVE

Sit. Goodman, R. Ss.
Pte Brown, S.

Sit. Edwards, F.

378 Sit. Williams, B.

Bn HQ



7.9.52.—1n.



VACANT POSTS
GRAMMAR SCHOOL, ST, VINCENT

Applications are invited for the following posts: —

(i) An Assistant Master (Graduate) who will be required to
teach English and Latin or History up to Higher School
Certificate Standard.

(ii) An Assistant Master of Inter-Arts or Higher School Cer-
tificate Qualifications who will be required to teach Gen-
eral Subjects up to School Certificate standard. Abilitv
to assist the Games Master, and to take charge of the
Cadet Corps will be taken into consideration.

The salaries offered are: —

(a) For Graduates—$1,440 by $96 to $1,920.

(b) For Inter-Arts, etc.,—$1,200 by $72 to $1,440.

A temporary Cost of Living Allowance is payable at the usual
rates granted to Civil Servants.

The commencing salaries will depend on the selected candidates’
















SOUTHBOUND

er a casicns

dar tertile jaradiais, ipa

INVITATION

FORESTERS INC.,

LEBANON
COURT CONRAD REEVES

and Friends to their

Annual Thanksgiving Service

To be held to-day Sunda
September, 1952,
the

At

Chairman: Dr. H.
Hymn Book A, & M.

of the

Under the Patronage

invite you to their

at the

VOLUNTEER DRILL HALL

OCTOBER, 1952
(Bank-holiday)
Music by

JUST RECEIVED

POTTERS ASTHMA REMEDY
BRAND'S BEEF ESSENCE

LIVONAL ‘with’ combination Living and
HORLICK MALTED MILK ‘Dining room, lovely tiled European
(3 Sizes) | style bath, open gallery offering a
MILLER'S WORM POWDERS magnificent view of the Golf

WARDONIA RAZOR BLADES

KAOLIN PO

LOKOL DROPS

C. CARLTON BROWNE

Wholesale & Retail

Drugeist

j 136 Roebuck St. Dial 2813

Cordially invite Kindred Brethren

MECHANICS’ HALL
118, Roebuck Street, at 3.30 p.m.

G. Cummins:
7.9.52—1n.



The Officers & Members
ADVOCATE’S SOCIAL CLUB

the Hon. V. C. Gale, M.L.C.

DANCE

on
MONDAY NIGHT, 6TH

Percy Green's Orchestra
SUBSCRIPTION: —::—
Dancing from 9 pan.
Tickets not Transferable
Formal Dress Optional



(PUBLIC NOTICES| SHIPPING NOTICES



The M.V. “MONEKA” w
cept Cargo

Dominica, Antigua,

day 8th inst.

ce
Antigua,

Nevis and- St. Kitts
12th

and Passengers
Montserrat,
Mevis and St. Kitts, Sailing Mon-

The M.V. “CARIBBE®’ will =



SUND

ill ac-
for

i

B.WI. SCHOONER OWNERS’
ASSOCTATION (INC.)
Consignee, Tele. No. 4047



Canadian National Steamships



Satis Balls Baile Arrives Satis
Montreal fislifax Boston Barbados Barbados
29 Aug 31 Aug. — Sep. 11 Sept.

3 Sept. 6 Sept. 8 Sept. 17 Sept. 186 Sept.
12 Sept. 15 Sept. _ 24 Sept. 25 Sept.
22 Sept. 25 Sept. 27 Sept. 6 Oct. 7 Oct.
Arrives Satls Arrives Arrives Arrives
Barbados Barbados Boston Mentreal
25 Sep. 29 Sept. —- 9 Oct 12 Oct.
Sept. 2 Oct. 11 Oct. 12 Oct. 16 Oct.
6 Oct. 8 Oct. = 21 Oct. 24 Oct.
W Oct. 21 Oct. 30 Oct. 31 Oct. 4 Nov.

OFFERS

No. 12



A lovely

having

y,. 7th

bedroom, and
room. E
with hot and cold running

drawing




two sides.




























BUNGALOW

commanding a magnificen’

to the sea.

modern. kitchen,
bath.

of

WYNDAL

Situate at Rockley and

Beach, standing on approx
comprises three bedrooms,
and Living rooms, toilet
and a large gallery.

and garage
priced.

Very rea

3/- NEW BUNGALOW

10 situate



e,

attached, combination.

and bath,
servants rooms

. , Please contact ys
os possible.

BLUE VISTA»
at Réckley’ New
















Situate

‘ Course and Coa’
+ in cupboards. Downstairs;

This property can be
“sa or unfurnished.
$e * 1

SS enema

AUCTIONEERS
VALUERS

Bridgetown



HURRICANE PRECAUTION -HINT NO. 60
FALLING TREES are very likely to disrupt the Electric

Supply. Keep a couple of Hurricane

oil and a box of M

atches in a handy place.

All these are obtainable at...

CENTRAL EMPORIUM






REALTORS LIMITED

COVE SPRING COTTAGE

cottage standing on
two roods twenty seven perches
of land, situate at St, James Coast,
its own private bathing.
It comprises three bedrooms with
private bath and toilet to main

Bath and Toilet
modern kitchen, and a gallery on

Situate at Rockley New Road

of the Golf Course, unobstructive
It comprises three
bedrooms one with built-in cup-
boards, Drawing and Dining room,
and toilet and
Downstairs: servants rooms
with toilet and bath, garage for
two cars, and enough room for
| aundry &c., standing on approx-
imately 19,000 square feet of land

100 yards of the popular Rockley
10,000 square feet of land,
nd bath,
buildings comprise servants room

‘Watogs. amd. standing on approx-
14,000 square feet,
prising “three bedrooms, one with
dressing voom and toilet and bath
Drawing
and Dining Room, separaté toilet
modern kitchen, two
toilet.
bath and garage. “This property
can be bought at a very reasonable

emodern three bedroom bungalow

line, and_built-

| for two cars and servants room.

REALTORS Limited

REAL ESTATE AGENTS

151/152 Rotbuck Street,
Phone 4900

dinine
water,

it view

within
imately
and
Dining
out-

sonably

at Blue
com-

and

as goon

“Road,

Garage
bought



Lanterns filled with

experience, Corner Broad & Tudor Streets ‘
The appointments will be probationary in the first instance, and | ‘s240600066066665650080569500080089S0E a ==>,
the appointees may be confirmed in the permanent, pensionable posts SS | eaey










after one year’s satisfactory service,
‘s ot passages to St. Vincent to take up appointments are pro-
vided,

Applications, with details of eduvation, qualifications, age and
experience, and copies of not more than three testimonials should. be
sent to the Education officer. Depaitment of Hducation, St. Vincent,
as soon as possible, as the successful candidates will be expected to
assume duty at the beginning of next term on 15th September, 1952.

‘ 31.8.52—2n



DOWN THE HATCH — UMPH....

THIS IS HONEST TO GOOD RUM
t

J.D. T. SPECIAL RUM

(with the distinctive flavour)

TRY THIS UNIQUE BLEND OF RUM
Blended an@ Bottled by

JOHN D. TAYLON & SONS LTD.
Dial 4335 Roebuck Street

N.P.C.A. PHOTO COMPETITION

RULES
ay of animals.
Any size—Black and ly.
Closing Date—4th October, k
Association reserves the right to reproduce any print.
Prizes awarded to the most attractive photo.
Entrance 1/-.

ss

\

Photos of an animal or



FUT ORME Vesticceiticigsessvernne BA hs cheese iasicabi Seeks $15.00
SD PRE has. a 8.00
SRD PRIZE ........ Ps shoe stales secs cgalleba MAG. 3.00

Decision of the Judges wilh be final.

t

All photos to be sent to the S.P.C.A., Office, Harbour ,;
Police Station, c/o Hon. Secretary and marked S.P.C.A. Photo-
graphic Competition.



1953

AMATEUR BOXIN

CHAMPIONSHIPS

Under the Auspices of

CANADA DRY

will take place at the...

MODERN
At 8 p.m.

HIGH SCHOOL STADIUM
on Friday, 12th September



CANADA DRY STEEL BAND IN ATTENDANCE

“ Bar — Music — Thrilling Encounters

Ring Side $1.00, Ring Circle 60 Cents, Bleachers 30 Cents — {j



DO YO

Architectural Draughts-
manship Building and ;

Design Course. Course.
AM.SE., (Civil, Elec., Insurance Practice.
and Mech.) Salesmanship.
Autemobile Repairman’s
Course.

Electrical Installation and

Wiring
General

ucation.



U REALISE THE NEED

QUALIFICATION?

or ARE YOU INTERESTED IN MAKING MORE MONEY?
IF SO, ENROL NOW FOR ONE OF THESE COURSES.

Sanitary Inspector

t

Course.
Electrical Engin-
Course,

General Certificate of Ed-

v

School Certificate
Accountancy.

Course.
Police Promotion

Write for full particulars if course is not mentioned.

Write to the:

Caribbean Educational

Institute

P.O. Box, 307, P.

Trinidad
Agents for :
BRITISH INSTITUTE

TECH. & BRITISH TUTORIAL
INSTITUTE, LONDON

THERE IS NO



Course.

{ |

i

Petroleum Technology
Course.

Course.

i

Course.

‘



0.8.,

Address

OF ENG.
Interest

g if dupes

TOMORROW——-POST TODAY!

POST COUPON TO P.O.
BOX 307, P-O.S.

Please send me Free Book.
Name

Lj

Subject of Career of





AY,












































SEPTEMBER



BLABDON

& ce.

A.F.S., F.V.A.

Extensive Listings of Good
Class Property and Land
Always Available

FOR SALE

—_-

NEW BUNGALOW, LODGE
LAND, ST. MICHAEL. — We are
instructed to offer.this very
sirable home constructed by a
ing firm of byildipg contraetors.
The re eRe, S s
epacious bedrooms, with built-in
wardrobes, la drawing) room,
separate dining room, kitchenette
with breakfast room, and large
pantry. The garage and servant's
quarters are detached. Mains
water and quota of electric light
This property is situated ina mew
and select residential area from
which there are fine panoramic
views of Bridgetown. and the har-
bour. The site is very cool a
only 2% miles from town centre.
The property is available with from
approx. ‘4 to 1's acres as required
and the price asked is very fair
indeed. We can recommpnd this
listing very highly.

BUILDING PLOTS. LODGE
LAND, St. Michael, We offer 4
attractive lots in this new devel-
opment area, varying in size from
10,000 to 18,000 sq. ft. apprax., all
with excellent views. Water and
light available.

BRIGHTWOOD, St. Lawrence. A
pleasant and comfortable property
which mellows nice’y with, its
surroundings. Own beach frontage
and exeecllent bathing facilities.
Three bedrooms, living room and
dining room, kitchen, separate
toilet and shower, wide L shaped
verandah looking se@a-wards. Sep-
arate garage and servants’

a bod

Ideal seaside home in
residential quarter.
BUNGALOW, Nr.
A_ well-built

MODERN
three

SILVER be
stone bungalow containin,
bedrooms, ol! with washbasins and
built in wardâ„¢pbes of cedar,
Spacious lounge, living room with
picture windows allowing unob-
structed views sea-wards. Good
kitchen, garage land com-
prises apptox, 1% acres, Further
details on application.

RESIDENCE, THE GARDEN,
WORTHING — Modern coral stone
bungalow on. corner site with
wide frontages, Pleasant garden
with flower beds, lawn, concrete
patio, and number of bearing fruit
trees Accommodation comprises
large living room, covered gallery,
3 bedrooms wiih built-in ward-
robes, well fitte’ Kitchen, garage
with covered wsy to house, ser-
vants’ quarters and all usual
offices. All public utility services.
â„¢ our opinion this property is
one of the most attractive homes
now available in the medium price
range.

MODERN HOME, St. Peter —
A luxuriously appointed residence,
with four bedrooms, 3 tiled bath-
rooms with hot and cold, butler’s
pantry, kitchen, storerooms, 2
garages. The grounds are expert.
ly laid out with a profusion of
flowering shrubs. Own right of
way to sea,

RESIDENCE, BLACK ROCK —
Soundly constructed property with
3 bedrooms, 2 living rooms, dining
room and gallery. On land of ap-
prox. 1 acre. * Offered at £3,000,

BUILDING LAND, ST. LAW-
RENCE beeper _ ak wide plot
in good position w sea
frontage. Teal site for sea-side
bungalow, One of the few vacant
lots available on this popular
coust,

11, GRAEME HALL TERRACE
—2 Storey coral stone house with
3 bedrooms, dining and living
room, verandah & kitchenette up-
stairs, with garage, serv: 4
quarters and laundny below.
house is set well back in its
grounds of about 2/3 acre, is not
overlooked and has pgeemmueted
view seawards. Open to

LAND, TWEEDSIDE ROAD—On
main road with 101 frontage.
Weal situation for business
premises. Total area 18,738 sq, ft,

BUSINESS PREMISES—DWELL-
ING HOUSE, ROEBUCK STREET.
Good situation for retafl si in
this busy part of town, £2, .

SWEETFIELD, St. Peter — An
estate type house built of stone.
Contains large living room with
French wnittows leading onto
covered verandahs with view of
sea. % bedrooms, kitchen, store-
rooms and usual
garage and servants’ quarters.
Approx 2% acres well laid out
pr with right of way over
ench.

COVE SPRING HOUSE, ST.
JAMES — One of the few prop-
erties on this popular coast with
a completely private and secluded
bathing beach. The grounds of
about 1Â¥% acres are well wooded
and could readily be converted
into one of the show plates of
the Island. The house is of 2
storeys and possesses noticeable
character.

NEW BUNGALOW, ROCKLEY—
Commodious home with 3 bed-
rooms, large living room, wide
verandah with gooa view, Kitchen,
pantry, servants’ quarters and
storerooms. Good situation near
Golf Course £4,300.

NEWTON LODGE, MAXWELL
COAST Solidly constructed
stone house containing enclosed
galleries, spacious drawing room
aud dining room, and breakfast
room, 3 bedrooms, 2 garages etc.,
Lately occupied by U.S. Consul,

VILLA ROSA — Passage Road,
City. Very attractive and centrally
located stone bungalow with
double carriageway, on, approx.
imately 14,000 sq. ft, This
built property contains a front
gallery large ounge, separate
dining room, 3 large bedrooms, 2
bathrooms and toilet, pantry and,
kitehen, Good courtyard at rear,
Very reasonable figure asked,

PROPERTY, WHITE PARK
ROAD —Solidly built 2 storey
house with 7 bedrooms, spacious
reception rooms and dining room}
also detached annex with es
room and 2 bedrooms, Suitab!
for conversion to flats,
house, school or offices,

WINDY WILLOWS, PROSPECT,
St. JAMES — Soundly construct-
ed stone bungalow with spacious
living room, 2 large and 1
bedrooms, exceliently _ placed
verandah directly overlooking the
sea, downstairs kitchen, gorvants’
totm, and storerooms, Otters in-

vited,
dee
RENTALS





;
NEW HOUSE—ROCKLEY NEW
ROAD, Near Golf Course. Un-

_durnished . With immediate pos-

Civil Service Entranee || } a,

,WHITEHALL FLATS — Cod-
rington Hill. Choice of 4 unfur-
nished self-contained flats.
BRIGHTWOOD, St, Lawrence
Gap Compact furnished bunga-
low available from Sept. Ist.
Own sea frontage. ‘
11, GRAEME HALL TERRACE-<«
Furnished from Sept. Ist.

NEWTON LODGE, MAXWELL’S
COAST Furnished or unfur-
nished with immediate possession,

Plantations Building
Phone 4640

DS




Â¥
q
5
4
E

Se

ia

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7.



SEA AND AIR
TRAFFIC

In Carlisle Bay

Sch. Lydina A., Sch, Zita Wonita, Sch.
Mary. M. Lewis, ‘Sch. Frances W Smith,
Sch. Franklys D. R., Sch Lucille M:
S*nith. Sch. Anita H., Sch. At Last, Sch.
D'Ortac, ScR. Laudalpha, Sch. Gardenia
W., Seh. United Pilgrim) Sch. Augustus
B. Compton, M.V. Gloria Maria, Sch.
Emeline, Sch, Merion Belle Wolfe, Sch.
Amberjack Mac.

ARRIVALS
S.S. Trader, 3.196 from Liverpool,
under Captain ©. i Watts; “Agents:—





Cope ¢

Sch. Everdene, for
Sch. Harriet Whittakep,
Banks.

Listening Hours





SUNDAY, ee. i ge
4.06—T.15 pm 76M, hatha
4p.m The ‘News,

rary p.m Interlude,
4.15 p.m. For the Gammon Good, 4.3)
p.m. Sunday Half Hour, 5 p.m. From
the Bible, 5.10 p.m. Interlude, 5.15
p.m. Composer of the Week, 5.45 p.m
Arthur's Inn, 6 6.15 p.m. English Magazine,
6.45 p.m. Programme Parade and In-
terlude, 7 p.m ie News, 7.10 p.m.
Rome News ftom Britain
9-5R 10-08 » m a henute 31 2M

7.15 p.m Caribbean ate 4
Sunday Service, 8.15 p ish
reel. $ p.m Piao’ rats

rom Editorials,

omenade Concerts, 0 = ee Front News.
10.10 p.m. News Palk, _s P p.m. London
Forum, 10.45 p.m. A h Divided

yer. sana 1953
4 oni» 19 70M, 3

4p.m Se 4.10 p.m. The Daily

Service, 4.15 p.m. The Case of the Night-

W atchman's Friend, 4.45 p.m. Variety,
5 p.m. Rugby League eee 5.05 p.m.
himsky-Kotsakov, m. Souvenirs
of Music, 6 p.m Welsh Miscellany, 6.15
pom Listeners’ Choiee, 6.45 p.m. Sports
Round-up and Programme F'arade; 7 p.m.
The News, 7.10 p.m. Home News from
Britain

7 are pm 25. 58F, 31 2M

7.15 p.m ‘Books to “Pead and t the Arts,

7.45 p.m. Ballads and Songs, 8.15 p.m
Radio Newsreel, 8.30 p.m Europea
Survey, 8.45 p.m. From the Editorials,
9 p.m Enter Moonshine, 9.35 p.m
Majestic Orchestra, 10 p.m. The News,
10. p.m. News Talk, 10,16 p.m. The
Health of Man, 10.30 p.m. Tip Top Tunes

Jamaica
Returns
Thanks

LONDON

A year ago, all Britain was col-
lecting money for the relief of
distressed Jamaica after the great
hurricane disaster hit the island.
Now another natural disaster has
hit Britain and Jamaica has taken
the opportunity to repay some ot
the help she received from Brit-
ain a year ago.

n tons of Jamaican bananas,
ten tons of Jamaican sugar and
one ton of Jamaican coffee ar¢
being set up by the Jamaican
Government for distribution
throughout the areas of North
Devon which have been devas-
tated by floods, Financial con-
tributions to the flood relief fund
are also coming from Jamaica

Mr, Alexander Bustamante,
on his way to Britain for ba-
mana talks with ur British
Ministry of Food make a
personal visit to Leia the
holiday resort that was almost
completely destroyed by the
flocds, to convey Jamaica’s sor-
row, --B.U.P.



| Fins '

1952

CHURCH
SERVICES

ANGLICAN
be u ay aestal CHURCH
Sw ¥. soa th
8 am. H

Sunday School; 7 p.m.
Sermon.

BETHEL METHODIST CIRCUPT
BETH

EL: 6 a.m. Holy Communion; 1)

a.m. Rev. D. Mason, Holy Communion
7 p.m. Mr. P_ Deane

DALKEITH: 11 a.m. Mr. G. Bascombe:
7 pm, Rev. T. J. Purley, Holy Com

munion
ONT: 9 a.m. Rev. T. J. Burley,
Holy Communion, 7 p.m. Mr. H. Grant
DISTRICT: 9 a.m. Mr.
tot p.m. Mr. H. Harris

PROVIDENCE; 1] a.m. Mr. D. White,

7 p.m. Mr. Cc
A

+ MM -a.m. Mr. J. Tedor,
of New Members and Communion ,

7 pm. Mr. H. Sargeant
RICES: 9 a.m. Revd. S. W_ C. Crosse,
oe it of Lard’s Supper, 7 p.m.

Sunday Schools at 3 p.m,
MORAVIAN
ROEBUCK STREET—11 a.m.

Service (followed a Holy Comm s
Freacher: Rev E. New; 7
Evening Service, AR. E. BE. .

GRACE im ase 11 a.m. Morning i,
Preacher: Mr. W. Hayde; 7 p.m. Evenirig
Service.

FULNECK—11 a.m. Morning Service,
eacher: Mr. oS. es 7 p.m,
Service, : Mr. O.

MONTGO! 9 E
the *Dehere : Mr. °

MBE—7 p.m. Evening ‘Service,

Preacher; r G. Downes.
OP na Pg mn. a veping Service,

1 vine
sultaay & School, 7.15 p.m Holy “Comin

oh
sT. fas aston ar on BAPTIST
a.m. ins and Sermon, 7
song and pes reacher fo yon

services, the Rev Grant,
Minister-in-charge 5 p.m Monday:
‘Wednesday; Friday; training for youthr
this will be conducted by the Rev. L
Bruce-Clarke (Assistant Pastor) and Mrs
Olga Browne

THE 8ST Jorgras EPISCOPAL
ORTHODOX
Weiches Road

11 a.m. Matins and Ser

Evensong and Sermon, p' teacher tor ise
services the Rev. Descnainal c.
Minister In charge. 7.30 p.m,

evening prayers and address, preacher
the Rev. L. Bruce Clarke, the subject
will be “The world at Saint Paul's birth
(Saint Luke: 23 chapter verse 38)

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE

First Church of Christ, Scientist,

Bridgetown, Seas, ® Pay | Street
Sundays 11 a.m
Wednesdays 8 p.m. x ‘device which

includes Testimonies of Christian Selence
Healing.

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 1952
Subject of Lesson-Sermon: MAN.
Golden Text: 1 John 3: 1. Behold, what

menner of loye the Father hath bestowed
upon us, that we should be called the
sons of God.
The following Citations are incteget in
the Lesson-Sermen: The Bible
for & have created him for my glory, I
have formed him; yea, I have made him
jah 48:7
Science and Health with Key to the
Scriptures, by MARY BAKER EDDY.
Love, the divine Princible, is the
Father and Mother of the universe, in-
cluding man.
a






hes ing me

Al. Wha inte

cents, Wir inter

at Li noe [






ASTHM.
Dissolve

Since the discovery of MENDACO
by a famous physician it is no lo
necessary for anyone to suffer
choking, wheezing, gasping Asthma.
MENDACO does away with expen-
sive injections and offensive smo! sen
All you do is to take 2 tast
tablets with meals and MEND. Co
starts circ lating te through the bi
in 10 fend: on eta the hin eee
mucus and
breathe cada" Gna a) » Your
nerves Hplax; you get
pure air into your lungs, and vigour
returns.

Sleep Like a
Thousands of former erers from
Asthma say that the very first dose
of MENDACO brought them glorious
ease and comfort, and that they
slept soundly the very first night.
Then their vigour returned and they
felt healthier and stronger, and 5 to
10 years younger. The reason for thi
is that MENDACO acts in natur
Ways to overcome the effects of
Asthma. (1) It dissolves, liquefies
and removes the strangling mucus
or phlegm; (2) It relaxes thousands
of tiny muscles in your bronchial
tubes so that the air can get in and
put of your lungs; (3) It promotes
hody vigour, and stimulates the
|uilding of rich, revitalised blood.
No Asthma for Five Years
AIENDACO not only brings almost
nmediaté reshits, free breathing
nd comfort and enables you ¢
cep, but also builds wp the sys-
‘oto ward off future attacks, Mr,
writes: “I was almos* dead








THE BARBADOS POLICE



You Require Police Assistance
You See or Hear Anything

which

suspicions. |
You have any Information

which

er | weight, suffered co

ate assistance to the Police

pavcus

i ne Had lost 40 ly in
fle choking
and strangling every fle owldn't
sleep—expected to dle) MENDACO
stopped spasms first night andl
have had no Asthma since In over 3
iat ."" Mrs. A. W. writes: “I had

sthma for 26 years. After using
MENDAC ‘O Lean sleep all night and
have not a6 an attack since taking

it.” ee . B,C, writes: “1 bless the
Gay } ors of Mendaco, WI t
ag eam ie = “oa poor woman like

me who Te 35 years never knew
what it was to have a good night's
rest. The constant fight between
Asthma and sleep was wearing me
down, but I feel now I want to forget
my past suffering.”

Benefits Immediate

The first dose of MENDACO
eae rig t to work circulating
h Sone blood and helping na-
‘ire ria youwof the effects of Asthma.
=r po Sine at a el yea 0 sha

easily make you feel years young:
and stronger. Try MENDACO and .
an iron-clad money back guarantee.
You be the judge. If you don't fee}
entirely well, like a new person, and
fly. satisfied after taking MEN-
CO just return the empty pack-
oe and the full ara s price will
be refunded. Get MENDACO from

your Chemist today phy, see how

Well you sleep tonight and how much

ter you will feel tomorrow. The
guarantee

endaco>: i):

Ends Asthm: ye Branskitis + Hav Fever

arouses Your

may be of immedi-

ion; 9 a.m. |
Matins and See ;. & p.m.|

vensong and

: Mam. Mr. H. Lewis,

m
p.m. Revd. S. W. C. Crosse Redihion
‘¥: 11 a.m. Mr. D. Hunte,

p.m. Brenig

; M
Bock A" *,cupRcn

be copie 3? Eile .

SUNDAY ADVOCATE









If you feel worn out, depressed, or
generally run down a glass or two a day of
Buckfast Tonic Wine wili_ quickly restore lost
energy and tone up the whole nervous system.
Giving new vitality it fortifies you against fever
And exhaustion and remember, Buckfast Tonle
Wine is especially valuable after illness.



| BUCKFAST
TONIC WINE

}
|



Be an over-forty PLUS man!

During the last twenty years, the experience of

vast numbers of people all over the world has
demonstrated the efficacy of Phyllosan tablets as
® means of fortifying the over-forties by increas-
ing physical and mental energy, strengthening
the nerves and restoring digestive and metabolic
tone. Be an over-forty plus man! If you are

to feel your age, start taking
Phyllosan tablets to-day! If you take
| them regularly, the results
| will astonish you.

PHYLLOSAN

fortifies the over-forties











|

|

PRINTED CREPES




>
































ENGINEER
BOLTS & NUTS

Me" x I IM
fa h’, 144”, 144%, 9”, 246”, 3”, 312”, 4”
ey w, 1”. 14”, 114”, 2”, 214”, 9”. 314”, 4”

MAM" 2”, 3”

14” 114", 2”, 210”, 3”, Bl, 4”
5h” d< 2”, 21%", 3”, 346”, 4”, 5”, 6”
%4” 3”, 340”, 4”, 5”, &”
ROUND HEAD SCREWS
All Lengths in 3", 4%” 7%", 36”
COUNTERSUND SCREWS
All Lengths in 3°)", %4”. 3)”
CARRIAGE BOLTS, from +; to 5%”

+305
STN
AP tpi Ett tb
KEMTT TI
CP nea ean’ a)
OA FH 1h eae F
FLEE

|
|

i}





e
we Please CUT OUT and Save for Reference

GENERAL GENERAL FY ARDWARE ‘orrces

RICKETT STREET (Opposite Post Office)







PHONE 4918



BIRTHDAY SHOPPING
SEE YOUR JEWELLERS

LOUIS L. BAYLEY

FOR THE IDEAL GIFTS FOR BOTH LADIES
AND GENTLEMEN.

FOR THE

Rhinestone Earri and Necklets to match, Ciro
Necklets, Gold Bal

$s, Royal Crown
Derby Sets in the most tte ae, also Signet
Rings which can be initialed to order.

FOR THE GENTLEMEN:=

Waterman’s Fountain Pen Sets, Krementz Tie Slides,
Gold Tie Slides, Identity gles, Cigarette Cases,
Cigarette Lighters, and Beer Mugs.

LADIES:=

ALWAYS VISIT YOUR JEWELLERS, THE STORE
WHERE YOU CAN BE SURE OF THE BEST
AT ALL TIMES.

LOUIS L. BAYLEY

of

Bolton Lane &

Aquatic Club Booth
Phone 3909 &

Phone 4897.



——<—<—_—
———



L



LADIES’ SHOES ...........
RAYON, SILKS, from 48c. per yd.

ADVOCATE
STATIONERY

Broad Si. & Greystone





per yd. $ .95
per pair 2.88

Pen and Pencil Sets,
Sharpener
Geometry Sets
Pencil Boxes
Kules
Exercise Books
Drawing Books
Set Squares
Protractors
Compasses
Dividers
Chemistry Stencils
Mapping Pens
Erasers
Slates
Black Board Chalk

Peveil

SILK UMDIES — 2 pair
BRASSIERES

MORE NEW GOODS

PAGE

with A
MIGHTY
RUSH!



HOUSE COATS from $3.98 each

1.00

per pair .68

DAILY.



THE MODEL STORE — Corner Broad & Tudor Sts.

Dictionaries
School Bibles
Atlases
The Revised Latin Primer by
Kennedy
Latin Prose Composition by North
& Willard
Douglas Grammar
Initiatory Grammar by
J. Douglas
Step By Step Parts I &
Business Book-Keeping by
Routley & Hall
Pitman’s Shorthand Instructor
Key to Shorthand Instructor —
Pitman

m=

i

Select these Early and
avoid disappointment

=



FIFTEEN
!
|
|

»*



PAGE SIXTEEN







NOTES

@ From Page 12

accommodation in the schools so

Jury Acquit Three Of Conspiracy Charge | Zz ae
| Zee

To Break And Enter

An Assize jury yesterday acquitted 21-year-old Michael
Gaskin, a carpenter, 18-year-old McField Belgrave, and thabe epentuaily: sombilsortweda-
Rudolph Blackman of the charge of conspiring between (4; on may be introduced be-
February 29 and March 1 this year, to break and enter the tween the ages of 5 and 14, It ts
dwelling house of Elon Evelyn of Golf Club Road, Christ probable that compulsory atten-
Church. cence will be introauced by stages

and rish b: arish.”
Belgrave had also been charged on a second count, The doeuinent Sats with ‘echi-
attempting to break and enter the house on March 1, and cation up to August 1951. I write
the jury returned a verdict of guilty against him in this. in Reptsaber ae ere je
7 nia > 4 io ementar: 001 les: ’
He was sentenced to six months imprisonment. Siehea’ (eer ae ot SS












Hearing of the 9 ieee it s ; School is to be sold to the Sani-
three days before Mr. Justice 7 : tary Commissioners) and when
J. W. B. Chenery, Acting Puisne The People Of shone ate over 30,000 on the roll
Judge. of the Elementary Schools.

This was the las: case of the Barbados Another significant fact for me
July Sitting of this Court. is that for the first time in many

Mr. L. A. Williams, holding @ From Page 9 years the aver’ge attendance at
papers for Mr. G. H. Adams, he Jas: pub:.c appearance of these schools has receded. With
appeared for Gaskin, and Mr. J. the Quakers ay a body in this more children on the roll, the
E.. T. Brancker appeared for jciand was their farewell address Numbers attending have been
Blackman. Belgrave was unrepre- 4, Governor Grenville in 1753; actually less and not merely tess
sented. _ from this date until the death of iM proportion. The Report ex-

Mr. W. W. Reece, Q.C., Solici- thoi. jast Atto:ney in 1786 their plains the reduction away in an
tor General, prosecuted for he atin fa radually déclined, epidemic of measles, —

Crown "a 1771 the Guéker ‘firms - of The truth is that without the
His Lordsh» summed up the 5, * 77 : Godling autablishad alleged epidemic of measles there
case. yesterday. He said that he 2@R0UrTy and oie a Sandel would have been this recession as
would) sav at the outset that # branch of their business IM Jong ag 12 and 18-year-old -chil-
, they cams to make up Baibados. This firm acted as @ dren, who attended school for the
their minds on the second they °@nk and made advances to land- first time, are put in fifth and
vould. doubtl b> presented ©Whers to assist them in working sixth standard and the teachers
vith far les: difficulty than the their plantations and other busi- called upon to look after three
fi the evidence to that being "ess against their crops etc,, “streams’ of children ina class
more straightforward and far Wen these debtors failed numbering anything between 25
less difficult to assess. meet their liabilities this firm, 2pd 60. This is what age ane
Though as a rule he was not like the others, foreclosed on ing — ope for us in oa ados.
prone to disturb their minds with heir securities and took posses- — ae is new ee for agar
too much law, in the case before sion of the lands and other @ re ition ee, an ee a
1, he felt it wa essential caavtels offered as security. In On atic’ thet Pe iidcen
iat) they should have a fairly this way they became cwners of would stop going to school. The
clear idea in their minds of what several valuable plantations and iq excuse for not introducing
conspiracy meant, and what the other properties in the towns, compulsion was that the parents
Prosecution had to prove. together with a large number of could not afford to clothe and

The classic definition of con- slaves. feed the children. That excuse

spiracy was an agreement of two During the early years of the does not hold water today but

or more people to do an unlaw- nineteenth century, there ‘was both parents and pupils are fed
ful act, or to do a lawful act by great activity with the anti- up with the type of education at
unlawful «means, slavery movement, in which the the Elementary School today.

Quakers took a prominent part, And the only people who do not
they sought by devious ways to seem to know this are the mem-
clear themselves of any connec- bers of the Executive Committee.
tion with slavery or the slave - «=

trade It is, therefore, ironic that Out ve ~~ vee Mouse
one of the most prominent anti- » y ian vin an e

slavery agitators, Sir Thomas ;70â„¢, Para. at page 22, chap-

. roe ‘
Fowell Buxton, Bart., who was a ye Seema a
member of the House of Com- ao

“
mons was at this time closely {nation in English and Arith-

connected with Anna Barnard, a ane _— — csehdenties

There was the auuority in Mr.
Justice Willes, a great master of
Common law when he said, that
conspiraey ‘consisted, not: merely
in the intention of two or more,
but in the agreement of two or
more to-do an unlawful act or
to do a lawful act by unlawful
means, So long as such a design
rested in intention only, it was
not indictably. When two agreed

to carry it into effect, the very sleeping partner in the firm of «genools in 1950, as mentioned
plot was an act in itself and the Hanbury and Gosling, a wealthy «pn Jast year’s annual report,
act of each of the parties, prom- firm which could not have “showed that 1,657 elementary
ise against promise, actus con ‘ra flourished without slaves. Bux- ehildren in the age-group sat
actum, capable of being enforced. ton’s wife was a niece of the

“the two papers. 59 unselected
“boys of the same age-group
“from one of the aided second-

He said he would quote from

old lady, and eventually partici-
Mr. Justice Coleridge in the Queen

pated in her aunt’s fortune.

vs Murphy when he said: “I am The hurricane of October 1780 “ary schools took the same ex-
bound to tell you that although destroyed all of the Quaker’s “amination.”

the common design is the root jeeting-houses, and apparently “In English the scores for the
of the charge, it is not necessary these were never rebuilt, due to “elementary children ranged |
to prove that these parties came the sparsity of their numbers, “from 0 to 65 (Median 14) and |
together and actually agreed in Bea Manuscript. Volume ‘for the secondary children
terms to have this common de- | ‘jyiscellaneous, p. 393 “from 3 to 51 (Median 28).”
sign and to pursue it by common "9 “Tiicas Manuscript Volume “In Arithmetic the range of
means and so to carry it into exe- | “\iccellaneous, p. 396 “scores for the elementary
cution, This is not necessary be- °° (Published in the BIMLHS, “children was 0 to 50 (Medium

cause im many cases of the most
clearly established conspiracies,
there are no means to prove any
such thing, and neither law nor
commonsense requires that it
should be proved.

The evidence was fresh in their
minds, Learned counsels, both for
the Prosecution and the defence,
had treated it in great detail, and
he need not go through it with
that minuteness again,

The Chief witness on which the
Prosecution was relying and
around whom counsel for the
defence, especially Mr, Brancker,
made most play, was Clyde Brath-

waite,
Asked To Join

Clyde Brathwaite had told them
how Gaskin had approached him
and asked him to join with them,
but how he had afterwards told
the Evelyns and the Police, De-
fence Counsel had pointed
out that Brathwaite was a
man with a bad record, while
Mr. Reece had said that he had
redeemed himself and was try-
ing to lead an upright life. Well
they, the jury, were men of the
world’ and had seen Brathwaite
and would be able to come to a
conclusion as to whether they be-
lieved him,

“6) and for the secondary
“children 0 to 43 (Median 17).”
“Although a few elementary
“children was 0 to 50 (Medan
“best of the secondary school
“children who took the examin-
“ation, the median scores indi-
“cated a much lower general
“standard in the elementary

“schools.”

This is the result of an exam-
ination held by the Department.
T now ask, what more proof do
I need for my statement that the
standard of basic education in this
island has declined? The only
means of checking it is to enquire
into the methods of administra-
tion of the system and repair the
weak spots,

—J.E.B.

Police Band At
Queen’s Park

The Police Band conducted by
S/Sgt. C. Archer will render the
following programme of music at
Queen's Park this evening at 4.45
p.m.

+ rocessional March
“The War March of the Priest”

Journal V. XIV, p. 82—83.)
(To be continued.)

—— -

“Valiant”
Undergoing Repairs

THE launch “Valiant” was tak-
en out of the water yesterday to
undergo certain general repairs.
Last week the “Trojan” was un-
dergoing repairs, and the ‘“Val-
fant” has now become the second
jJaunch to be repaired. Repairs to
the “Trojan” are expected to be
completed within the next few
days.





SPECIAL MEETING
OF B.N.A. NURSES

A special meeting of registered
nurses eMgaged in private nurs-
ing, will be held at the Barbados
Nurses Association, on Tuesday
at 4 p.m,

would say guilty, if they thought
that the Prosecution had failed to

; ; Mendelssohn

Naturally, if they demolished make out their case, they would Overture “Juanita Suppe
the chief witness, the rest of the say not guilty, and if they had » Selection “Iolanthe” Sullivan
evidence would not matter so

doubt as to the vital parts of the
case they would say not guilty.
The jury retired for about 15

Two Ballads: ‘
(a) “At Dawning” Cadman
(b) “Somewhere a Voice is

much, but it was purely a matter
for them,

a Hen. ain to decide oe me minutes to consider their verdicts. Calling” Laki
efendants were just ordinarily They returned a verdict of not P ri ** sical Ji y
cheat thie the ‘deturday nigix da verdict of no otpourri “A Musical Jig Saw

guilty in the first count with regerd
jo each defendant, They returned
a verdict of guilty in the second
count, that in which Belgrave was
charged with attempting to break
and enter Evelyn’s house.
Belgrave had one previous con-
viction for loitering with intent
when he was put on 18 months’
probation,

as Mr. Brancker had told them, Agen

or whether they were there to
carry out the designs of the pre-
vious Thursday night.

Mr. Williams had
method in cross-examination of
trying to show that Brathwaite
was the essential spirit, but what-
ever they might think of that, he

Aria
“I Know My Redeemer Liveth”
Handel
Intermezzo

adopted the “In a Monastery

yarden”
Ketelbey
Descriptive Piece
“The Phantom Brigade”

} ) Myddleton

would point out that there was ~ His Lordship told him that he Hymns: rT

no evidence to that effect. had not profited from the term of “The Lord Is My Shepherd’
He wine sat Sealy ype the probation. He would not be 282 A&M .

onus of proof was on the Frosecu- doing his duty to the community “Be T rdian ¢

tion. If they felt that the Prosecu- \f he sentenced him to less than tT eae een ee Me

Guide.
GOD SAVE THE QUEEN !

| They'll Do It Every Time dct 8 tame oe By Jimmy Hatlo

tion had made out their case, they six months’ imprisonment.



M IN THE HOSPITAL, HAS
A Siok SON, —s IN 77 HEAVEN,

HIS CUP DOTH RRUN

; s
NOTHER SON: My TWO
goys! PAPA'S PALS, THAT'S WHAT!
THE THREE. MUSKETEERS - MY PALS:
TLL MAKE, BASEBALL PLAYERS OUT
OF THEM! WE'LL SEE ALL THE FOOT~_
BALL GAMES! CAMPING FISHING +
WELL DO EVERYTHING
TOGETHER:*+











Now THE KIDS HAVE GROWN , AND HOW

THEY LOVE TO PLAY+ BUT DOES PAPA |
EVER ODIN HIS PALS?’THE ANSWER IS WAY NAY!



































| SIOE AN’ HAVE

\A KETCH, HUH,

‘
MOM F we
PS x




v



SUNDAY

ADVOCATE



One Jailed For Trying gpucATION Crichlow Meets Death

By Misadventure

Death by misadventure was the
verdict returned by a nine man
jury when the inquest into the
circumstances surrounding the
death of Edwaid Crichlow., a
clerk of Sherbeurne, St. John Was
concluded at District “A” Police
Court before His Worship Mr.
G. B. Griffith acting Police
Coroner of District “A” yester-
day.

Edward Crichlow was involved
in an accident on Villa Nova
Road, St. John on July 24 with
a bicycle while riding a motor
cycle. He was taken to the Gen-
eral Hospital after the accident
but died there on July 29

Dr. J. A. Browne who per-
formed the post mortem exam-
ination at the Hospital Mortuary
on July 29 said that there’ were
no marks of violence on the body
and no damage to the brain.

Opening the bowels there were
signs of peritoritis and the left
lung showed signs of pneumonia.
This lung was tied down to the
surrounding area, ;

In his opinion death was due
to peritonitis which resulted fron»

ruptured guts followed by pneu= Jmpact.

monia,

Mable Crichlow wife of the
deceased said that on July 24 she
received a telephone message

saying that her busband was in- ;

volved in an accident on Villa
Nova Road with a bicycle. He
yas taken to Dr. Carter at the St.
John’s Almshouse who ordered
him to the General Hospital, He
died there on July 29. .

Twenty-one-year-old labourer

iching, Burning



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Denzil Reece told the Court that
1 July 24 he was sitting on the
if of the bicycle ridden by

Leroy Burgess. The bicycle was

being ridden along Villa Nova

Road going in. the direction of

Bridgetown.

As the rider turned the corner
to Wilson Road, he saw a motor
cycle coming towards them and
as this motor cycle reached them
there was a collision. The motor-
cyce struck the bicycle and he
saw the rider of the motor cycle
fall to the ground.

To the jury Reece said that he
aw the motor cycle when it was
about 10 feet away from him.

Leroy Burgess of Wilson Hill,
St. John—the rider of the bicycle
—tola the court that on July 24
he was riding his bicycle on
Villa Nova Road coming from
work at Venture, Reece was on}
the bar of the bicycle. As they}
were coming out of Villa Nova
road on the bicycle, a collision}
took place between the bicycle |
and a motor cycle which was on}
Sherbourne Road. |

He never knew what happened
but he was unconscious after the

*% Another witness Otti Holder of
Sherbourne, St. John said that
ihe collision between the bicycle
and the motor cycle took place
1s the bicycle was coming out of
Villa Nova Road.

There was no other traffic on}
the road at the time. j

At this stage the Coronér
summed up and the jury returned
a verdict of death by misadven-
ture,

and Smarting ot





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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7. 1952



——





FISHERY OFFICIALS
VISIT BEACHES

During the week Mr, D. W.|
Wiles, Fisheries Officer, and Mr. |




ea

J. i. Drayton of the Fisheries ov
Office, visited Reids Bay, St. Sg
James, Speightstown and Foul

Bay, explaining the new Fisher- AU ry
tes Act to fishermen. Last night (S ee |

Mr. Wiles gave a talk at Paynes
Bay.

Next week Mr. Wiles and Mr.
Drayton are hoping to visit Sil-
ver Sands, the Crane and other
areas.





IN HOSPITAL
AFTER ACCIDENT

Genierie De Cambra of Haggatt
Hall, St. Michael, was detained at
the General Hospital on Septem-
ber 4 after she was involved in an
accident with the motor car M-317
owned by Mr. H. A. Tudor of the
Ivy, and driven by St. Clair Smith
of Rouen Vi e, St, Michael,
about 3.30 p.m, the same day.

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PAGE 1

J-AC.I FOl'B St VDAV ADV<> ATI. MMHV SIPTFM11IR 1951 TRIUMPH OVER PAIN QUIHINE THE FOURTH IHGREDIEMT IR '4MMT How doei ANAON relieve pi In to seat, to fgssSjeatf' A lew ,un ago leading icienimi d.uovered thai the tecrM lay 1" the esact balancing of three famous medicines (Phenxelin, Caffeine and Acetrhalicylk Ald) with a (OUSTH irutredieni— OWNINS And 'ArtacmV Quinine arts %  fnnfiMxoUi with the other medic met *o toothe aehei bring down leverith temperatures, reuore a real aenae o well-being ^_^__^__ P rli ,,orT1 ir,e ' f old '' *do**0* 1 E *ou larYar AMI / Toothache f Rheumatism f Neuralgia f \ Zp ZZ/Z? "'"'""' ,n ?" "L* CIN '"" L_J! ^-J b n ou ,n n d ' le "Bet * %  o^ pain with amumg tpeod cm Off HIM-AT ONCE! Yet. lor a very I title you can buy a 2-tabl.t envelope of AfeACIN '— enough to b'inf you (att relief from a bout of pain 'Anacin It also available In londy ?5-tablei bosei and In bottlct ol SO tablets. Share In the beneflii o* thit great new scientific discovery ARM YOURSELF AGAINST PAW GET SOME 'ANACIN TODAY! Doctors and dentltu recommend • ANACIN '. In Great Britain alone over 12.000 ute it in (heir surgeries. 1 U? CM' •• ea*4 l" *••* !*•*" a*e teeth atetea wteef the %  BllYliClimf W W lL vnliR HA* KEEPS YOUR '• :•-" ..soft, lustrous r> m rour hair, you notnc at once how lustrous If ..placed by a pots .in.l Vitality thai Jl *OU nghl 1 better became you /.vur smarter; you feel more Yes, when loOfcl. Df-IKs1* on lopl Vou t*-el .. confi.t "OB knot row %  II thr IUV-IKIUI smartness and lasting ha thit't ibr ssseM Ivm-lii of Brykrvcm. Ai.J the i ,„ |ii ,Mli.-d lot data eroninine —vou achicv 'it hair Mdb9MI CMeaatTC vino..— Massage your hair with Hrylcrecm and tee how i; torn* up the scaup and checks Dandruff. Check up onyuur appearance — BrykTcem your hair I S rihiiii-'d rallh JUST OPENED BIRKMYRE CANVAS 72" WIDE— FOR BUS TOPS .mil SIDES INNER HOOD LINING 56" WIDE. FAWN AND GREY LIONIDE LEATHERETTE 50" WIDE. ATTRACTIVE SHADES BLACK MIRACLE ADHESIVE US-OS. or 5-OZ. TUBES &f ECKSTEIN BROTHERS BAY STREET DIAL 4269 IIEADLEY STILL MAKING HEADLINES Yesterday 'sCricket RACING NOTES ;;. in \ im in POLICE Croml Attacks I mpirc 1/ Black /for* ,M I :I S • tables kept lhe> Bay team in bowling | AM afraid I oodcaot of the itv o. s. cti'i'n mi Z il_ "K J x.^ h "u*v o( MrtM ihe B-mc HeM-ored '.? before ho hU mindVai the GrVlI and Co I I. BVight""Ught aa e-ughl by Horace King ofl p^ced third to Monroe and Red V. I..-i. M. friend l.ad no hesitation LATION8 UkStr uin asninst an Englarw xi. This waV JJ" '"'' 'h** los ^ '** nt w'rkrU. Orant at square le. With C. m saving that this was one of the best races that Bright Light had ever tch l>ut w in the West Indies never( ""'" reaponfiDig fur this big MrK>n2ic. he taw the score DJM run. Apparently there was conalderaOle Interference at the start "i lo ieain <,f the exu I li an "ndefeated inning* ihe 50 mark after R. Hutchinson due to th: behavioui Of l>n*\< „f ihv individual performances of Ceorgr Heerii. -, of "3 nv O. Sobers, and a good wat weBl ^^ i DW lo Ba r i„. r tu tlerers. The winner and second apparently avoided trouble and Frank v. nny Ramadhin an (•porting inningji f 0* not out ^^1,,, fa 9 gpg,, „,, 2 nuw, wre soon out In front which, those who know the Arlmu course. George Hradley occupies a fond place In the h > c fI Mullini. These? two batsWhen McKcnzie was ciug'it will agree is more than half the battle there. In spite of thla Bright %  i % %  %  foUowad the fortune* rnrn c *"^ toejrtiier after the fall | M .hirwl the wicket off Barker'L'* h t wa* able to run round the rated OB the OUttilH and only failed W< iiring the past fifteen years. -pratr hundreds. 114 and III iigain<> Kngland at town in 1B2U-30 when he n| his bow to Interna.. Ket stamped him as a i ricsnttr in ihe IT turned bark. •CCCBSSrUL KM.IWII H IS nel with '5B West Indies teams are now ciUkct In lor a full rerog%  Prior to hii tour to India his Tests played, 36 %  not Out 2.164 runs—270 not oul as highest score, 10 hundre-i svaratM 65.10. I too I ind it seems a pltj that MII hnvr not seen .i %  i 11 ..nl'. i %  -s Of the mg him against tinIndian u u if theWest Indii I l of Con%  ir ridiculous, un. • professionals. __ I n,i. IhM fcott five erlH) only 1V! ipt.nri fipiiam South Caribbean, went lo Hope Dawns whom my informant describes as a very taking Oily. False Pride was apparently very much expectMkCTI ed. but an early duel with Dormay must have told on him. Among UM Maidens mv h ji lad -iike well of Starl^ne. a frit if r.ither small illly who races In the familiar plumb*p., Ml Ol Mi l\ U Trestrall. iSadn S*-rew also caught his eye—a line I. t: chestnut call. Speaking for myself I wa* pleased to eft u| i.-entry into racing made by Mr. S. Uddleiow srho Mad gone out of the game with the hen lie put down an rr ,i rrr nent of that grand little warrior Bright Boy. Always luckyeasy return catch. The next ba'l wlIr the Jamauaii creole* Mi Fl etldshlp' 1 has appanntlv done it Lucas turned for 2 to make his again with Battle feOff. In baas race I am told Cross Roads did not and again in the next look anything like his best. Ir the T.M.I. Trophy Mr. Barnard Horace Knit missed him at short had two placed in the first three, B oattte just managed to hold Dr. Weaver's Meditation but my informalaon is that Cavtiiar mic'it iten lin in I)nU> H,i ii litlle longer. for Jet.s^m and there U no good start In his stud eaten ftarlsei i Sobe !" nne lg. Out after Springer left with the and m hls s P el1 ht h <* William^ Meditatnn a yet another •core at 237 II was left to Mutlins caught at by H. King at .square doubt that this Creole stallion is off t was -m IM.H.KM eea. (ii:>Rf^F iii:\i>i-FV DIStiHAtl.FUL torday after thi.loseol play in the Carltonrkkwlek UZ and (for 4 wkta. derld.l 19* and Sobers to put up a creditable Ifg 'or a very valuable 73. He Mudjiations d-m Orlandu has |hc distinction of having two winners pftfOmaassa and InUJ Ml DM had earlier given a chance beut on the same day. her other one iieing Ktsmet. She also has a two%  iV uttempi to achieve hind tinwicket when fan the V ** r -W—Malahin-— and so appears %  ,. i. eful matron. n,u PADDOCK Goeur W) radkaran aotoasd on thtir secThe Empire bowling after th-it ngs to score 210 runs for lacked the sling and accuracy T*HE PADDOCK lhc>e day* appears quite a different pl-ee to what vi They lost ioth Evelyn which it had earlier in the day. l had been a little over u month ago. Most trainers ..re giving und Knowles with trie score at but the Cariton batsmen *ri ln,,|r l hHr *es an "easy" and there are no spectacular gallops or OOly 3, but Mayers and Proverb* u^,,ejideaviKir to vc the , m indceti ouuttandmg events of any sort to report. This does not mean -."gctlier until the close of continued lo nlv with n-tnint' lhi,l tJl ** flow of badnage among the regulars has in any way diminplay *vn*the score was M for nn( i renusskd i<. -.ti-tek ihr i-^iinL' l-h d ndw d. > l ha widened in scope and I must confess that 1 waa the loss of tu and refused to attack the bowling sonwwhal uke „ ab ^ k ta st Wednesday on approaehmg a gn-up whom, I would have guessed, were discussing Handicapping and Classifying. The Empire bowling regained ,,T| ly to find an eloquent discourse on Ihe future of the Sugar Industry rs sting shortly before five lo bc in u ,wm f Unfortunately I doubt wnathfi th.. Editor would •'clock, and Barker switched lu n 'l w ,m l publish this debate verbatim, and if ..Here,! u would i uMe '** mucn of its flavour. I.tK.1 • %  %  __J ,L PICKWICK vs SPARTAN A N incident OD i b h. that is mast r-reltable and which I must draw , l n In the hope that the) will do evnvthlng SparUn 215 and li. and for 6 wickets. im? dghill F. B. and E. Marenclosed one aid th.-ni.ur control of the eiuwd is dimcull. In '• shall derended for ail they weri i lot Of explaining ,.,_,.„.,.u .*..!_ -. w ? r m .-. J,nd wnen Williams got to do lo the I'ncket Associate t infectious and it is easy for a mob to ru s\ MI'ATHY Our newest owner has acquired a shooting stick, and thus equipped, can be seen studying the actlV ties of hU charge from different points of vantage. Ag-iin I wish thi.t I could K is on to readers some of the advice and encouragement that are lug freely offered him. but once again the editorial blue pencil might come Into play. Among Ihe horses that enugh) my eye was Driftwood who is fiVl IMP "'' ,MO,,l *' r Jetsam progeny. Her dam Pawky did not prove a particularly good broodmare for the Hon. .1. D. Chandler, and Driftwood is the last of her foals bied by him. Although i little on the small ktti ihe I .I.arming tllly. full Of quality and. al the moment, looking rer.lly well. Her ex-stable companion. Sterling Dawn. baU joined the Pierce stable, and she too looks well, but at the nWlMTrl very backward. The new Importallnn. Highland Spur, Is a strong looking fellow, exceptionally .nureuliir and well developed for a, Two-Year-Old. AND STILL TIIKY (OMK, [ of iheinflow of i worth, and ,. CrickOt Ajsoclatior However. Carlton officials can help .. ** 1 ,^^^'*^iL*-TJ^^1 I,,^/?,* 'i^^-.^iTv 1'*1 F>lwhl11 1o i 000 a low delivery rpHEHE appears to be no slackening of theinflow of importations, %  's warning sp.^ i !""£^"LJJT £ for the loss nf u |H,,I,1 1 Bi,,Ke rand Robinson I an d two more arrived last urek ThM are Ardena and Fluffv ne^.cket T B Birkott who wa* Wt l al ne b hevm the other p u r,le*. consigned respectively lo Mr. J. H. EsOddard and Mr. -Bunny' ; „„, ,.„,,„( his bat to a to ** aWing^or It Actually it Edwards. Ardena is a well brad ally by Torbido oul of The Inot brilliant 108 stm not out when ** %  Barker's catch, and this, who is by speed sire Ooldbridge out of a mare called Palm Olive. Pickwick declared at lunch, "we than anything else, robbed She was bred by Lord Oranmore and in addition to her pedigree she Charlie Taylor also contributed a Empire of an outright win. has more than useful form to recommend her—ON win. two gacond g l valuable 35 and John Gnddard _._ nd two thirds in seven starts. As she is still a tw—vear-old. ah* who had scored 71 DOt <>ut in thu Mi"*hall was a lew overs later must have a bright future in front of her here if all goes well with flral inniop *core.1 13 bowled by Market, but in the two her. Fluffy Ruffles'. ;; ba v lhroe-ycar-o] but sn< '* clearly a durable llily and would] not be DM Drst in 14 overs. John Goddard look finished wiih 5 for 40 should she accomplish it. to bolh lose her maiden certifu^'ib> n and Wo Spartan second innings wickA| ^ end of |h ^ b end up in A class eti for 15 runs in six over,. altKkrsi Um liro Trotman. such l-'havimir salKO IhBJ can rxemse little control Oft 1 rssmtanbtr once that < %  Iht nearby Shell grounds, a football i' nod. It seems as If this sort of behaviour is ed intelligent by some in this district. I counsel Ihe spectaortamen and allow tho umpires or referee* to i i; and thankless job to the best of their ability. I IKST ANNUAL "LEAGUE CKU'KKTKR" A i nt to 'he wicket after one of them actually struck him Btvbndoa Lasunae" Cricketer, compllgd by Mr. J. M. runsiU, S"-.i.iv-l'."i'.i'r oama oil ihe press yesterday. ChlWtlcla for i-ciiid purposes the growth of %  Ick" t. \ U tllln Conrad Hiu u rnonM !>>• Ptntai AdXll Holder, Ormond Graham. Kenneth Q i i u mark In the Intevcolonlal cricket supplied to Barbados Cricket Associulion luatet) with the challenge of trya blow. He was however res by v. Barbadoa Criekat I^agOO. i n g to score 218 In a hurricane cued by Reynold HuU-hinsoi ..! la to sportsmen, piny the major part ,,c|| of just over two hours. d I am sure thai it will occupy an important place on or to try patiently to stave off deboOauthelf firstly as a background to those who from feat, Thty took the latter course, : %  to ploy Ibcw pnii IT\ placing Barbados and Pickwick set an attacking n the sporting map and secondly aa u season field. They Were handicapped belo season record of the [>ei fm tn.im.-id'over an hundred League Clubs, cause if the absence of E. L. G. *-"Li.r.ii i The rtiil.ir work on Barbados Association cricket Hood, ,nr, but Spartan's batsmen Bright Light Wins |{ e( l IfouseW ill id other members ol the Cnrllon (earn LODGE vs. COLLEGE S DerbyTrlal Stakes Compelilion i .. our Own Corrcepoodenti at PORT-OF-SPA1N, Sept. 6. Mr. Barnard's Bright Light _, ncd """W (Holder up) won the Derby Trial "•J 0 Chas *' %  ith its captain in ind with a total of IM^iillr II in il like the late beaii ti throw away their wickets LODGE %  (for wkta. dee Id } 355 Stakes and Trophy over a dis"* 59 points to4c the first place In 88 and 61 tance of seven and a half furlongs u, House Competition Shoot at T S Hukett and Dr "Haniiltoti for some carelessly and near the end or uw ,,„„. n „„.,„ M Antmmt ~i f ,orn Meditation and Daisy Brown the Goverrunent Range yesterday and In;.rroW„ial ci-icket game, i seemed as though Pick' a lwn College defeated Lodge ln ho l order in the third race rtOJIIOOn. Second place went to ,uld clinch victory. At >>> "e -omf...table margin of an to-day. the second of the Santa Green House captained by Capt. ockr a successful appeal "inmgs and 200 runs before the R OSH luncheon interval yesterday the Daw last day in their ttresaed. We must thank T. S | i \pan-ion '.f local .... i it coneornod Bai bsido but thoy have ksfl oil at an importt>ni wick period in the i' velopmenl ol Barbados and w-si indiM rlcktn and 5.45 j Tiori should not for K"t : avcl th situation. set i g two A i. each getting $145.29. %  huge pcottl fiom any large BBalO IIM.HHI.II outlay i( nt | Mck and S. Griffith batted well in Sparat HOMO. College. tans second innings to score48 beBaiting first Harrison College uTwm the Fernandez & Co Lid [OH bo CeWata nteMenT to g* > 1 j un l '."' k %  "'* lwo hours Trophy over six furlongs. REHtTLTS -rimaii. HANiitcAr Aboul S Furleiu \A and Over i Mssseaekafl : iiiaiiR> r i Cla Cl 3 Vcan i uami TAKI I", About 5 Purlone ru OM Only. not popular b) nparatlvo itandafd INCREASING INTER1 si EMPIRE vs. CARLTON CARLTON by the end of this day's play they hod lost six wickels for 60 1 0CAL Intart -t i i and having atton :. ration increased with the pted aomething. they gai mo much pleasure Is th i %  i bai I Tldalwave. J Flyii a Baunr nraav rsiAi. STAKIAND isorin About TH Purliin-i J Year* Okt Onb i iii Miht ijahi 1 Meditation 1 Dalaybroun. rgBNANOIZ CO. LTD.. TBOrMV • rurlonai Clew Al and At and B1 ... Ih. ptl >r.„s Kmp„o..lack ><'^JJ'nddm^ 3=J uTaSwTaajJSiTVS "? "oS"*b..n.. lamed something. The their game when, given o to a (oto of j 8 ^^ wbJle G W( |_ i rab Penie. HorUblMon„nxlur. wicteU. The, ww.ho.ped in "t,."K^Jg towl'^ T well %3^P& "——* "" %  C. Boogies Williams delled tinwit h then only there mg .i BBjngO which was rn'^st noticeable at the 300 yards and this caused difficult definition at the aiming mark. The wind however was fairly constant. II" % %  %  % %  Points Mr. E. J. Parry 9 7 Major A. IK-V t Mi F D. Davis Msjor A S. Warren 94 Mr. M G. Tucker 94 Major J. B. Gi iffith 9 2 R.S.M.. N. Marshall 9 2 Capt. C. R. E. Warner 9 2 96 94 before closing their second ln1 am looking forward to the Association^ ton Ing tl their valiant effort by ihree dropm nr j^xig,. ur^ innings ;tgi ,i„ i %  i Ibgy have not shown that they can defeat a ped catcher, two off N. S. Lucas. p Ut m a gg,^ performance and Trinidad team yet UsteT .Minst tho 1 off C. B. Williams, and a possiended up with an analysis of 10 Southern i p ol the I'nmdad Table Tennis Association have bie chance when Edghill skied overs, four maidens, 17 runs and established their DOna Intercolonial table Iannis in conone which both Barker and Robfour wickets. SV.pper C. Smith rernid. Inson left alone look two (o| tfc Year. Old Ontv. M> Own Stella Polaru and T2 OArrooBH RAhiRv Taorar About T, FTirluns, Clau C Wlnn Onl. I Port Walli. 1 Altbebj 3 Monroe ii t MVI.RAI.ES TBorai About Furiura, Cl>u g| and El Only. 1 I^apon ) Horn fa. 3 Markllaht W. N MOM LTD. TROrill Ab.> u | 71 Furloeis> Clesa Dl end DJ and II and Only I. Hoc* Diamond. 2 Happy Union. 3 Tair •*"*!. ATLAS PAINTS combine robust and economical protection with splendid decorative finish. Sugar Estate Managers. Engineers. Building Contractors", Architects, specify ATLAS Tsoncai CSAOI iruMOtn MgTAMii PAINTS PRODUCED IN ENGLAND BY THE MAKERS OF "ATLAS A" WOOD PMSIRVATIVI 1 Oetoi/i ovfl''o6f from I H. JASON )ONES ft CO. LTD.. P.O. Box 141. Baroadot ATLAS A CKF.M HAMS 1 GKAMD WHiSKr The collar for all occasions %  ,!.. %  I it I OtlC pl'Sff • %  u the njiural dlapr pf thr nert— K i | D I i \ ESI VanHeusen US 0 ATLAS PRtSERVATIVE CO. LTD.. LftlTM.KtNT. ENGLAM TAS \MLLIAM CRAM k SON* LTD DISlll.LLK - bCOl L.VNU



PAGE 1

ttnfott J^lweate ESTABLISHED 1895 itAKBADOS. SKITEMBBR 7. IK PRICE : SIX CENTS 14 DIE AS JET FIGHTER EXPLODES Wife Sees Pilot Husband Killed In Wreckage 1*14.1 O* A VII I'OI I Till HM I IO\ KAHNBAROUC.H. England, Sept. 6. A BRITISi. plane disintegrated over 120.0001 spectators ai I I SMurday killing 14 \ %  I Pilot Johnny Dero I ral British tost pilot to fly faster! than sound, and radar observer Tony Richards died in the ; i ii d by debris DerryV itching] from the pilots' tent • ri iii. uir and acjHarwl flaming II reel %  nkti i • Anonymous Letter Sent To Col. Sec. Die %  poacd to use devcli pod a m. %  •<••' %  thin dl P %  ther rtliifUnn sumed 20 minute* after U bill U* *r**\n'to the air %  %  I the mglDM h %  the plane seemed to dl The dead included a girl I tad two n and mid 8. Police who Issue. %  3U .i rtOUtlV JM mred. i r hurricane (itH'H Seatvard MIAMI, *>pl 6. it .!...%  'llihrr Wtttl wn-da up to 1.0 mile, per BOW mj ed slowly luwird Ih* .ea after a dajlonr. purse that rauord u.iea.lira ^lon the MiJ-AllanIn ru.l-l. Ihe TT—lhw Burri'i said Uul thr big whirl%  had i.ni underway again to-day after wallowing uncertainly aero** the ahlpiII.. lane of? the Carnlin i coast. It **id In IU 5 a-mjr> thai tinhurneani* an moving VOTJ slowly toward the north-ast" at four to six mile* per hour*. Thr evllmaled rmtre was I II miles casi or Wllmlnr la North t an.llnt.—I'.P. •H tn >)[ o! tn Sessions end,*. Kit Final Homage To Sforza Police Hunt Jewel Thief NEW ORLEAN Polio marched Si for ROME. Sp< Ital I knraninwnl plomatic corps' paid tlnal : i.n-ral ser II the late Count Carl %  talesman mght at 4 IS. AI TJ0. motor hearse carry• ."• black-draped casket, ar"io facing the knife-wielding "trained thief" th> Ban Roberto Belardlno Church who snatched two valuable diafollowed bj two horse-drawn mond rings from Ihe ow In one wai the widow l.imous Arnauds restaurant earl) cuntetl VolenWna and her SOT A few clote relatives Orleans Diamond 1 second carriage. ThO change %  mlly lollnwed the reM believed to church and the nxlh largest cut dl :-i*ineri there until the funeral America?' Mrs. Germalne Can %  ni.30. nave Welle, owner of Hie, French Short y before the requii quarter restaurant and dlUfllti repreaenUtive officers of Its foun.lt 1 •. • varout Hal tr/.id Arnaud Caienave, said Ihe Ai %  lined up before ten from her ., .,,„. gtood ;:t attention. kniic n 1 M,I, premie r Belli! said the big stone was on. Aleide de Gasper 1. and diplomats iied and knew well. He Bn d m lUSteri entered the church. 11 ii Royal collecInside, the casket of the Count lion in I iropt Tn other ring u c lln | 1 illum. %  Thli -. that Ihe bn.K << Before dlsmis&ing when the Jul^y Court of Grand .... Mi. Justice J Cheney Acting Putanv Judge, %  end and afterwards endorsed comments from Hit Lordilup the thief Justice Sir Allan CoUyrnore roncernlna u letter received by Hie Colonial Secretary. The statement read "I have received a letter which was addressed to Mr. R. N Turner, Colonial Secretary, Barbados v hich read* a| follows • 35.7 42 l "To Mr. ItN. Turner Colonial Secretary Barbados ( Dear Sir for the benefit of Dtl whole iiublic I have been advised by my other associate a: J iryroaa that you would icfei this lo the OuvernoL in Execut live Committee the reinurks of' Mr. O, U Taylor acting Puisn| Judfle sitting on the case on 24th July in suit of cigarette' factory versus Oliver Oruni 1 we lake outh to try a BhMfaM %  nd eulielLl according lo tliel evidence if we have a doubt | the Defendant has the Benefit in J lo-day's advoeale thai it what Mr. Taylor say to a Juror In f open court I did not think the %  verdict was in keeping wilh tin oalh you all have taken 01 th<-> have taken N.B. we are not going to be very Please to sit as a I Juror under Mr. Taylor for him to tell us who he want us to convict and whom he want to let liesign Juron. While reluctant to believe that thb. anonymous missive of -o contemptuous a nalunthe view* ol Juron, owing tu tin mportancc of the points raised. 1 . On page S West Agrees On Note To Russia LONDON. Sept 6. U.S. British and Kn-nch representatives arend on one draft note to Russia rejecting Mosoow's recent proposals for Four Power talks on .. < ienr.a! U'iiviiij; ihe door open for further e: note will be submitled immediately Tnin-'iits for approval. Foreign OflV A HECTION it UM > T> do r.mltry Automation, adau*. ThEln'iUon o^-nnd at ti renliiy Pigeon d Fii tin pigsou* and poultry 1 Drill Hall ywWrtUy and will OnUMM lolav First Poultry, Pigeon, Fish Show Big Success Turnt\ aquariums, Ihlrfaenof which rcpraaantad picture framaa, u hlighlcd ihe Poultry, I'iReon ami rial! Exhibition itaged hy Ihe Barl Ii Poultrs Aaaocution al the Drill Hall. Qarriaoi vestn la) li was lha first Kxhil.in,in aver lo be staffed by the A ociation, and ludgtaff front the attendance, ii waa a bii BxhlMUon w* Zonca Has Iran Oil Contrael 100 11.in until II Oil p in. day. Today II will be Opened J 00 pin until .0u p.m. l lu give everyone chance %  the high standard f ">•• 1 M db i'i.itudy Am ,,f tropical IUh was %  •pi'.ially agnlnit U.S. Despair Of Korean Truce By MICHAEL O'NI.H-IWASMlN(;TON. Sept 8. It wa. learned on Satuid.i> tliat I rVmartean ufitciaU have about! given up hupe i>( gettnm • truoe \ u Korea Tneg are n is*(ndsUc| 1 hey are n' plajmnn < %  the pmlwbllity lnal| the present 'Iwlltghl" war will Continue indefinitely. I 1 1 tni ago theee tame olllclals said they liehevetl there waa at least a rlfty-llfly chance fa .ni .irinisltcr. Now they privately eattrnau the eMlds dgalnst It al Bjwre ihan 100 i %  %  I as they Archer's Anthem At St. Mary's Mt. Arclier at the Polire Band ha* etMnaoKd aa aaIhrm "The Lit h My l-iaht" and It wlU be rea. rirrrd by the Nt Mary'-* t'holr al Eveiiaong lonlchi. There la a mlim-v, MI Ihe % % % %  ii. > %  Ki,t; which I. rhar.fl -r i-i-.t hy a deep reltslous dlfnll> and Mr. Bentlv f*l' %  i. thr Organist, and ii Choir "i'li IU high rn*e of musical appreciation, do iu-.ii.-r to the setting. A large number of *perlalora heard the final rehranial on Friday alght aad It is rxperUd that there will be a large rongregaUtxi al M Mary*, lonlgbl to hear what la Indeed a fine local composition S. American Federation? PABIS, Sept 6 I r..kfaaMuU> ol mi. U'i water plants 1|(|VI .,,.,.„ ,, OM1 Uu b ginning that IK' "• In Argentina. It mutt there-, a |d whkS'ei*tributed gieatly to the „.,, over the world," said Arthur Regan heading investigation ol H lined thief did the Job, He could n^ver gel nd of 11 i-i Mew Orleans." Mrs. the bandit, wearing %  • nylon mask, stepped from the of her garage as she reached home •' %  I iahlng .1 knife ant "give mc your ring". Hi %  $34 from : Hid. lha said r.p arlatocral murt not rent on the during the funeral %  erv CO. % %  11 BS Is one rr the gre.'tesi aristiM-ratie namea ; %  11 i> r.p. POLICE SHOT AT SHORT RANCH PORT-OP-SPAIN, & The *h'x>tin Ol Detai U K vi 11: in place ai . This was made deer today by Or. E. L s. Hobertson. bfedical OAot 1 .,t the Inquest concerning the 4 Williams. ertson said he found two Willi-.inv' skull and concluded ahooting must have beet •filag I M Williams died while he .^ being Usten to the Hi month nftcr the shooting incident between I'ulicemen from Penal Fernand. U.S., French Trooi>8 Stage Sfork' War FKANKFURT. Sept. Tons of thousands of US. French troops stationed m West went Into .icllon at dawn as a IWaitetic nx'k war broke out m %  n st of then reedlness to repel IsM |->t< rttlal Eastern Hie nuiiiueu.re w;> the t,r>t Of three scheduled fr t'.ie next two monthg to train the Seventh Army in % %  ibat techniques and aeo :i the troops learajed training lessons. 1 endswa appcartNl confident that o mbel ton %  1 erfqnn In the thrce-.i. paign" m which they make he. eve 1 it an attacked from the East near the I'V of Kiit through the "Kaasel gate", one of the classic Invasion routes of Central Germany. The (Ump-off point for the who were dlstln'" in Ihe helmet wearing forces'* by only lu-htK removed from Ihe real border between w. i Oern mj and c F t Get m tig forres %  *hri.u ( -h \. %  I unllar 1. jl • %  1 %  II' Court Lpholdn Conviction SAN FRANCISCO. SepI d. The Ninth U.S. Circuit Couit )( Appeals on Saturday uphclu Jie conviclioii of West Coast longshore leader Harry Bridge.. SI, tuund gui t> in l-t0 of pfjury and • %  onsplracy lo defraud the Government. in a unanimous decision the Court upheld the conviction landing the Australian-born head of •inInternational Long*hortnu and Warehousemen's Union unlawfully obtained iiliicnship i45 by claiming he had never been a number of the Commute I*arty. Tht court also upheld the con"f John Roberta I.L.W.U. Vice-President and 1 othir union aide Henry Schmidt found guilty of helping Bridg?* la secure citizenship. The decision came two and half yean after a Federal Jui nt f had found the three men guilt' The jury returned th< verdict April 4. 1950, after a stormy live-month nng trial. The longihore leader appealed against the verdict on the ground1h;>! the trial was "pOutlOa] per^ecution"* and the jurors "felt that the court wa practically ordering Ihem to retui' viction "—l'.p. liunr. Thou Fit Shearn and I extn Mr K.i eary Chinese Redg ind ivotild like a truce to put an end It* >vi: s. pi 8 1 ouni Delia Boni a, Pre ideni 1 f luti'nn Mcdiu rrai Petro I. um Company said Saturday that the ope..in: of .1 bank account ly ihe Iranian government in hi Ihe "logical developWho SO an i-xlienu-U keenlltnt they now fully re, cant cue t signed in „, lU rt. Mr W 'Arvhie'' Clarke did not lipfort thut — ...... |A|l renrtriaiion of R c i pr Inn.l.'wWdi the tlnlte-l Naflc too i.itte Ciiinnientmg on the Chilean P %  identleJ elecUona. the Purls iilntnai newsiMiper "Figaro" said editorially: "One cannot fail lo notice the mm „, .,. ( il.mt. l-'lwexl. General Ibanj ; ( 'cntlfv propaganda and Peron's sin treatv, but The" draft Western t '•• \ n:p aft %  lb r..eign 1 Cna •ease n . iwi %  _— exphgv. -o agreethe N Bctrgeln On British Show l-ONDON. Sept. H Ten Ausler Air Force S-Lie Jet" tighter' which part "uninvited'' in the farnboroimh .ur MlOV ycatcrda> kicked up tocan M linum .nvi were labelled "p'rates' b> the British press An F"in* he.iiWiuarters .idnntled that Ihe all craft waitNut':. American after it had pCWVtOUllJ denied It The flighl leader will t ^officially reprim.ndod"". haadtiuarters announce*!. Thousand. <>f %  ..,, %  :," ,-! %  tvere l-irtl' feet up in the ., in.IK -it the %  BOW. Traffic iintrol officials, at the t th! t-laim.vl thai wie pUi,. %  -I .01 replied to repeated signals to Ihemselves, and had not ordars to clear off ihe %  Hi North f" "c be foreseen that if Ibuneil The Russia |ls elected he will enforce a prothat I n.enl of Teheran foi the purchase ?.fWO.nno tons of Iranian oil The company annauncea on June 14 it hSHl contrm %  %  i Pse v ,-. %  j^, |Hiii'ilil. (Or tin i.OOO.OOO tons of irude oil per w year over 1 len real pet ed am j ihe naton;d/'M it..mn "il In(rnin "•fflSln* ,.000 u„. jJ,H,,n.n. ;r of nnHoiijIisatioii. nftei %  on .h'hi.iiie, ihe ixjtched uggrisslon attempt 'buying foreign societies' protneli ki-eniltm they now fully realize as they pi rtles. One knows what a %  iininii-liin lw la policy coat Argentina's eeoMr W. D Widdi. out-j repatriation of" Red prisoner-, on nuniy, which is In a atute of pav-.-,(..' hu.i.ilsta • the Island.' wnteh the UnatoS HaVesna nea inIromHb'ited the tish on show and • %  *' .too miter_a pill for thBriltsh newspapers said tie North Amer-cani were Ind o (1 <.i icri of the Brltfin goveennwnl .it Aden, it wa enroute on ,1 Hontlurnn regli tere.1 t.oik.i Kov Mary" and tn 1 art '' signmenl ..nld by Count Delto Zonca to the Budenbevg C ptny of S'vilzerland. Del 1.1 Zne-.i expreaaajd c dencv thai The Aden C'our w.ml.i recognlae "my legal right" t.> the oil cargo. r.l* Improvetl Parking Lots At Seawelt Improved parking have been provided Airport. Two separat %  opened on re f'i private veluela other for hired cars. Privet 1. will now Ihe west of thr I iilst-i to swallow As a result United Slates experts on the Korean strategy see no way otit <>l Ihe deadlock unless Moscow which can be verj unpredictable should suddenly order .1 truce for some overriding reason of Its own. 1 r Instruction On h'edera tion 'high, when •"IT. (4 lanes sdU i* pro" !he mi.rki' rioted. The lot fin the hired cars it* lo the west of the Lst*tertol0g1ca] marked 1 aquai ists got I Aquartst Mag^irtm-, PiCtii-. 11 pla) al an 1 staged by Hie Au,u-lum Society of England The l' IS of wnich were made __, ,. -, rB| picthM frnmea andi || 1/KlUU'S /VeMff %  : r ut. MI ihe un , the SIIOA 1 in' pectej of fish ii'. 1 roelj beaaUnd Fancy Cold FhSh, which were specially imj) rted fn m PtOrldl by Mr. PltaGeraid bold the mwd m tVfJKtol f' ; lOfeal P>''i''l" Tliere %  j Leo l cii-si .tin Bagk ltfauvefi, Gold and Silver Veil Tails, Comet Tails and Fan Tails. feel 1 1Use Other interesting exhibits were I .,,,,. • r'li'litnig Ki-h. Clfilden parking 'Jupiii'S. Zebra. IVarl and Giant Thursday 1)1-nos. of all descriptions. I'erma Molllei and Crimson 1 I /iLiintsatius, lied .nd Golden Wagtail Moons, While nd Cloud M'luntain Fish. Neon TOttM %  nanent ciisla. Thoae Chilean* Wlvo t#nnk that hy alienalmg thei lYoedom rhey would gain better conditions of life will soon realIhelr* eiTOr "tte paper eongfuded Ihe ll lepi-iulent in-w'pap-' Ubere" said "the Chilean Deputlc* and Senator. Will probably not bo able lej ie|M Ihe large popular movement ho favour of Gen. i 1%  It is glno 1 HSn thai Chile IwUI be led for the nexi ... [hv lli.n./ the I'ei'niisl •ympa,1hies of whom are notorii.i lh iter i'f vielnry will mark the tuning CommuntcRtloni and WtaksJ point In Chilean polities, and ho lMiiiil.ni now holidaying hru'will probably vnforcc a political 1 v. with the and et-onomicul system lc on Friday that he sup-.'.".at of Argcntim*. Bolivia, pctU thi view that a West Paraguay. Is this the first move Indian c niloieiioe should pie-|towards the South American fed,.. t general federation talks eration dreamed of by ,ii Loud n which anscheduled ''":.' .*"** %  *• lo take place next year. HOD At-M-nifch ;niived In th trying to "steal the thunder from Ihe British Jets. "Pirates" 'muscle. In" on the air show", the tabloid DeJI) Muroi %  announced in a r.,nl page banner, and quoted an Md display ufflc'.al as saying. %  They seemed *> be saying 'any'tiing you can do we can do heifer'." The "Manchester fiuardmn" ,i>(l -Sniii. nivi'stlgalioii Is there'nre called for. not only because 'he appearance of Amn : %  igned flghlers was scarcely n keeping with a show supposedly itgyoled t" Hritish aircraft, but ->lso because the flouting of Mln1 in i.r civil Aviation notices to .m ion mtgw lei d afl "ter %  Pukchong Supply Centre Bombed nd Vuu.tu*. l-uge community •nnks nmt.iined viin-lie* of big Set Li.h a-< Blue '".'"irnmiee, I'.I <; mi 1.1 n, 1 %  large Moll if-, etc Kareal I v k a* also 01 ..f th.e rarest fresh water flab In the wild—a Discus <>r Pompadour F>ahwhli .% %  highest reaches of the knugon Itlver. r ill were In every .lour and shnde. This becstmo .,. ,1 mt> 1 %  .-ornliower. arvrn. %  auann hlue, etc. ilse 1, end; is uf the I IS.I ON SHOW SEOUL. Sepi t UNITED STATES' IJ. 26 ninht bombers nearly Wiped 1 out an important Communist war supply centre at Puknrgmmng cianniiitee 'aid that chong oa the e. COM. of North Korna jyrlv today A v '. • 1 en thesn tor kcpmit Inleieal the target" Returning airmen reported huge cxplnsi. the hobby during the and (ires. Pukchong %  one of the 75 Communist titles and towns warned t* ] expect allied -ur ItUM k Afb 1 %  day's raid, allied planes dropped I.. Hi, Qestnral great country till far from yielding to Mich home, a Brazil paper conclud ..11 M.-nil 'I'f£z£mi l led i" hit wife "ii an tndeliliU.S. MuglAvoid "Blunder" Of Socialised Medicine CHICAGO. Sept. 6 Uud lli.t.lec MH he standard of .nedl I sen towered under tni Horder urged tne. \ tne blun. ipendb .i rnata when it was dim-uit to obtain (l*h fr-ni overseen, aj tin eaae 10 leaflet. TWENTY aqusrinmt highlighted the Pooltry. Pigeon sad Fish Exhibition at tha Drill Hsll yesterday. The BfinarliiBVi contained fl-h of muiy -pecles. reminding the ponu l c of previous warnings Alter e.irly mormrig raid 1 1 Amcricm B-2^ Su|--rf.. Irom Okinawa blasted lied military supply area USai li^mhung. • %  ena in northeast Korea. The Fifth Air Force amount 1 %  thai the labre-y. 1 ?0 Communist M.I.G ISi BsL v east, am, i nd damaged IP. Two S..I by M l-G .... •re lost to Red groun't %  %  r.*nd witr, !Ihan four hour* aII for p-*' |ost or. 1 vmdbig castle' 1 itial Commui d.y after It. %  1 %  The Reds succeeded in disk*, ing U.S. troop" hut rithd %  mmunlst dead — V r Egyptian Will ifang For l!i >lii,-: CAIRO. Sept 6 It h.i been officially anuoun.ed that Mustafa Khamis h for 1 1 ..f K;.!i win be hai .1 %  %  1 ,1 of tne murder cl two soldiers d 1 I .1, h.,n,t : ,-. vnleb be ,il th.' Il.isllng. IbiU-l. II I rUlldSd Minti-tet of Comiv ami Wortal expressed tin' view that Ihe people of the ou. West Indian levrltnrlsl %  ttould be insiniitwi In the RtsSfi* Ing ol federnllon, and that ihe I '.Ollltl I .'llr hi u viws on the matter because 11 was "something new" thai rsaawn, he felt thai ihe 'lie We t Indies should l aim that ll %  •• leaders thould be very parUct .ar at to entered any agreement or bind themselves. Individual Problems He paiinled out that 1 1. it? nY.fl prob: in on uggesti'Sl .tony 1 1 ogrummc. UiUted States U. yer we made in BJnd **h . u ..ili-.i medicllW.—' 7/ir-iv huiulit'it <>,l,i yWi fsjd Frmck iBfsrann hn.uvhi thrh gff oU tkiU ami expetientf in win.-uhin,to South Alrica. Here ihry foiinJ an UUul Ctomtti and soil condition for the production o) wum '•! < %  tpii mat* | tint quality To-day. South ifrkas togfttef wkt ;'ttucQ K.W.V. — SP* acknoutedfril ihn>uehour the norliltn anumv thr (IrlFfl obt'iinublc On page IS elSevm Get Work On S.S. Trader* E. Berlin Govl. S \/.t Husini'sseH Bttlau*. Sept. S. 1,, 1,1 Beriln Oovernmenl r.001 Kited the u o nn assiloa of all buslneasea owned In the Soviet seeb.r of IK-rlin by all West mane Bruno Huum, East Barl mica chief said the businesses i.e WestMta "pluiidered" East 1 .aded taxes and Cast German laws ano diverted East to the West. I ,•-., %  .: 1 %  %  %  •b^uUi;'oV.' r -srs. . %  ,, EulOrrma. I i .ran" ""< lear'O ablt smcn. 13" aBecled.—fJ. i.nmp of i*co\ui cook, the govemm. BerUa owners xa/.a Jfoi Wins of cdl Jims' • (gee Drj Hot [hdt ami l>vht hodled) .\purkhn* 1-runuhofk (Cnoiapugii. ryp.-' SpvrklMit K'**librrg lNr.il h,rl, taa CotVnstj SeavagaaM se'rimfief i OU B/0-/1 i nutm borl So 2 choek No. 1 Jo A (Dulbtciion and JLWOUA



PAGE 1

Sl'Sh.U SI I'll MBER 7. 1952 siLNDVi VI.NOCATR r\. nan c .47 Till IIMM\ The More The Merrier By G. R. BASED on the dctu.il nmriMNI of an American married couple Jack and Anna Rose, Room For One More ai the Plaza. Bridgetown, js a trulv delightful comedy drama about a happy, well-adjusted family who become the foster parents and brothers and sisters i" two problem adolescents. Cary Grant and Bet>y Drake who plav the roles of Jack Rose and his wife Anna are. in reality, husband and wife, and that ma\ $0 'he feeling of sympathy and realliv that is verv aotoNoibel Uvoianoal the film. Jack Row. a civil engineci. is a hoppy-go-lueky > %  these iu< children might well have .-tumped a less adjusted ;mil sjrmpvtbttM couple. tuit atfli aflcefloa, patience and comradeship The two defiant children are gradually and naturally absorbed into the happy life of the R-*e family. Of humour there U plei.iv throughout the film, with fiveyear-old George Wiaslow del" Bring same pungeant hometruths in a voice that sounds like a foe-horn and Mr. Grant %  Itraetive, Ibey are eclipsed by giving full play to hbj flair for unusually sooA acting hi coetedV in the delivery of all his the supports role* Out-slamling lines There is pathos too In the m his parlorRiaoca is William upward struggle of Jimmv-John Msrshaii M King Dick while Ren and Ma final exciting victory Rcnarri gives a fine chnractcriover himself and his phyafea] nation of Touhandicap. The settings are magnificent Understanding direction, simple and the musical background and humorous dialogue and >n highly effective, excellent cast bring this heartwarming story to life with Cary APACHK OR I MS Grant and Betsy Drake. t..grthe>Stephen McNally and Colleen with their "family" giving real (; rJ(V .,,,. co-starred in APACHE and convincing performances. DRUMS at the Plaza, flarbarecs. II a A refreshing and relaxing The plot of this Western unfolds picture, portraying famil> lit> M %  gatasg .• background of barren it can and should be. 1 an you will enjoy it. Poultry Farm And Garthn By AGRICOI.A When puilet* are sn tiiev should whenevi be removeo tv range weeks old i possible shelters or HMil) V\ WAGE IN THESK DAYS %  hil ties in connection with food sijppliev it may seem ludl at first sight, to introduce a sul ject of this kind Actual re. .mportant than is generally -i m spite of i' .mrage and low ten II ivenniices in the averojC" -— %  IT i hardly nscesr\ The importance of daw freah rttni\rVlVi< IIIV, IV P nB *^ that food observation pound frT pullets cannot be e...(IAKHF \l\(l Hl'NlS '" ** r * roeri a i"** !" 1 m.aw IOU mucb. Most of the UrtaWljniLUl III.*1H r *| al tood pwduclw. Ewi d. li.iurcof poultry h o opers are Vi\W\ 11 I I LI'IK country like the United Slate* due to foul grousMl. Fowls are rill! \ H t I f I l|\ fi -mentiy referred to M fiequentiy kept in iuns on lawns %  "" %  •• %  % %  •' Dl t lll> „ ul IIUM „ IIU „ odk-ienami other gnus patents but uncy, the Food Adanaiuti BUM less graaa is mown regularly it A Place For A nlhuriuma Author.ties, not so long ago, becomes foul and spreads disease Gardemi* are often heard to placed tho mm all f<"d WitsUge S,n* poultry keepers in Rarba. say ^h ;* Mm i 20 to per cent of all food pro— giving up >he -dca ol thurlHins but there is nowhere ov . .,,.,,. ,,,. ,,„ ngurvs avajtgnus runs be,uiuble Ul nqr garden to k-p , .,. tot u,^. iropic* JH f,r ..s w This is Utie ol a 9emm tnnkU|t . ,,, „,. lrfi garden r m unavoidable due to loss o nixisture, especially under Ooaakrrpmt hen: „.., %  of the rn.k of UUCCtlna. Hut the alotl .ire ke|il i f ., ],„k. BW8I aad art rested every three who h,ig a 'natural ntm i months and thtn plouRlied up be„hape „f a big tree. Of a | fore using again the danger of in11V es wh.ch p-ovule U,e ,< ,.* feetii>n i le -ecud. countri vhere land is more freely attain-. QM II in Barbado* an acre of if such a rrnge grass is allowed to each able, full hundred pullets. When the range plan for de\fipiii pullet* v practised one ihelter ID ft. x 13 ft. i (tn puiieu. tajfilgd niparliri whaen by any moan, ii provided ** vl front where CARY GRANT I.YDIA RAH.F.Y and adobe nut menacing beat of Indian drum:-. The locale is H *m*ll frontier town with the colourful name of Spanish Boot. Having been requested to leave because he Showing at the Globe. I.YDIA shot ;. BMUa, the town*-, gambler BAILEY is an adventurous filmand "badninn" discovers that the spectacle, is based on eplsodea Mascalero Apaches aro on thfrom Kenneth Robert's novel of warpath and nb.rtit to attack the the same name. settlers. Returning to the town. The island of Haiti experienced he helps in its defeiu.,m,l one of the nvt violent pcilods redeems himself to the lownsln its history during the year people and the RHI hiloves. 1802, when Toussaint I'OuverSuspense is will ma ture led his armed revolt against a „d tension is built Up gradually the efforts ol Napoleon to recapt 0 n terrifying climax which is ture the island. Intrigue and ,|i the gMre %  '"•n'uateil by Insurrection were rife and black iirllavinl TeebsUeoBB and white alike became embroiled Stephen M N • a good n the savage rebellion The plot |ieiform.ii i -flghttng, concerns a young American, vent hard-gnmbling man of t)M Wl by his government at that critia nd successfully achieves the cal lime, on a legal mission to difficult combination of both hero Haiti, whereby he is to obtain the and hutivj in his chara-i> ,'ignsture oft certain rlo-umenU Coleen Gray is not only pretty. of Lydia Bailey. Suspected of uul waxm ly coiivuimut a* ttt being a spy on hli arrival, he f, r l wlio M ion. batwoen her lovo eneourslerf danger on all sides f or Ir ,e gambler and her attracln nia effort to find the young u„ n | 0 another man. lady. When he finally does, they n (S inteir-^ting to note that become the hunted prey of the l j 1 e background musie Is authenHaittan forces, due to her symx\ r :i pAehe muie plsved and sung pnthy with the Ro>allsts. and by members of the tribe, and It have one hell of l time making if jurgely instrumental in creadvantaga should in" %  '' ** ** ,n ** 1 lo I" 1 1 uiken of it. and as many anthul "'*V lne ^""'s*^ my u rium* plactHl under m shade as "** &S*J2T1 -u-r „Anthuriums can also i v '/** *V fBn T* ***' Fer.ien near Chu duf -*^ tmmmx ,,u to m,uuy( they wUl get a cei u^airura or oeer-ripa pr-xlue-. tain amount of sunshine. Those * •*•" to ****** reaping ana pUnai look lovely in a Fernery handling resulting in unnoeeaaa., rbore their broad green leavebruising and breakage with g*Atnake a handsome contrast to the seqootu decay; %  in.raather) leaves ol 2) la iranoaertatM: doM The dampness of a toiler) nriti '"urh handlin. f.udt) %  nthuriums too for they .,i. MH %  and stowage, rtelny-. nver-heatlaee feeders and obtain much ol n aud ao osy ih.ir nourishment Oirotafh ihet li In %  oarage: if produoa canstnftftM roots. aot i at once sent to market. But somt-tim, thora is obsocaie must be taken to k luiely no suitable sp..! th.il NOtlM ., <-> well venttUU I • % %  do for anthuriums. am! ,n that place,'in th.. conn.. \ cue aogoewiioro mus1 do In „, a ground provastai I gj them, as it Is n pitv tor any garvegetable^ . ,n a den to be vftthoul these useful kwpm|[ m.an shaded and >** %  %  .in iim car* no* to mtluile il; secure and fix the upright Thi The golden rule to follow when cement will also keep th.pullet* show signs of sickness la to isolate them immediately Never leave a sick pullet or cockerel with a healthy flock. JOINT AND MUSCLE PAINS May meovt kidney troubi.i A tunrUoa of use kidneys is to eliminate harmful impurities I ram the syiiem. If the kidneys grow Sluggish, these impii-n*-. %  Uvte aad settle and often become a cause of asm in n >,nM aud noodtaTat way to i. tronble u to help the kiJneyo, They sbootd be toned up with De Witts Pills tie medicine made tptiMlrr for UW pnrpoae. De Witt's Pilii bare a .. • Iranvng and .in* i f* kidneys that (meg* thaH aach to perform thru agtorof fnnetioa p eeprr t y 1 hw wl'tried medioiw is sold all ow result in much produce being eventually iejt.'ted: a good example of wa*U %  ity muili In local demand concerns bananas which arv packed in trays with bhaip I edge--, without a trace of pack.ittuif; bin. 'he result being for the If no cement is used, the upwet*hi of inner hands to piesright must be packed with .stones. hcn\ rf against the outer one* ich should be ranunotf ilrmly cumi lately ruining the linger town before the hob Is iilUd lying against the tray edgi n with varUi i By the rasunimrr: taM UH The next slep is taken by naillea* 1 important sounc of v.ai'.ing some cross bars across the g<* the food hoarder is a food top. These again can be the natural waster, he buy* mon than lie ol the greatest branchei of a tree, m pi ,.,.t ,„. ... ( Hie rest i. often •* wood. The whole erecth-n will Je.t to nmllgftf; waMeful ami %  iw look something like a skeledi.s*. :UHU: of valuable parts hreNa. known to be highly dlgesiibi. ihi rovs-riba place and nutritious, cooking mon us can than is actually necoasary tar ooul ncxNi of the household am '"'' iin„ uu Lha tomglndjar into the anything m fad that will nrovldr the desired dappled shade under m-ath for the anthunum. Tlie "tr.-"" is now ready to < ccive the anthuriums. The* .-.. bv just placed iiiivhi.H Fowl pox Is on. i nemies of the and In Barbados it is thought to Inspread by mosqultof. Tho tnll %  i. I.1.H i treatment of fowl-pox Ni... i< v.'irtinatton and experiments anv soltabli are being condueted In Barbados h*. aiiy thing from i al u„. to try .ind give protection^ to leaves or branches fr%  poultry by vacemation. Certainly vaccination ought to be used as %  preventive measure on farms where fowl pox has oecured. and such thine to tho experts j tafe get-uway. A great deal o( the Aim wag actvwlly taken in Haiti, and it abounds In the colour, sound and action of tropical settings as well as numerous dangerous and exciting episodes One of the weirdest and most colourful sequences is the Hnrtian voo-doo dance where the dancers work themselves into a frenzied hy*teria to the blood-curdling ben'ng of drums. Though Dale Robertaon and Ann Francis play the leading roles and are both convincing und tins the atmosphere of the 01m. TftDAi'S GEMS For manners srs not Idle, but the fruit of loyal nature and of noble Blind. — AH'cd t.i-rd Tennyson. A rational nature admit* of nothing which is not sarrit-oable to the rest of mankind. —Slarcut Antoninus. There are n P ipe according roper feeding it is claimed will ground underneath, but rrevent the hardening of the arrangement is to get some Nock tongue of birds Where harden'toraaaj and arrange them pyramid lug does occur the rubbing of a fashion around the upright gradalittle glycerine is recommended, atmg thorn outward to the limit Some poultry keepers clip the ' the shade .The pot* of antl.untnngue with scissors but if pip urns are then placed about on the trouble Is experienced consult the atones. More plant room can be vet and not the local "horse-docsecured by filling in the pockettor". formed between the stoneai putting plants in them. Colds of course are always posThis us.of block-stones not •ible but dry Utter and <"lean suronly provides more space lor thi mundings reduce their incidence anthuriums. i.m the whole ii>< Isolate all birds lUtTering from has a better appearance than if colds and consult the vet. Small the pots are just placed on the doses of cod liver oil ore generalground. ry recommended. An added attraction can lie Worms are sometimes acquired given to this shelter. If a aorallU after pullets arc allowed to pick vine is grown over it. Should the Special worm medicines wind bo troublesome—und imtinigarbage OBll -inslltiginns .i are often very worthy U thl reepect. 11 will be genurully tuiaed thai Artie more thnughl nnd in the part of ail xonearned woulu reoull In opnsjgogfl ing of food m.iierial i.f one km or another. Nevertheless, undei the best of londilions, there ii'tund in innnini fuse and oasMgasf PMogfiaJ In I In' the field, the markit mswhich may useful throiiRl •I poul.th inverted Into food iveeteck, noiabiy pigs i f. Many sn rail ..rofltablo UBS Of such d ind adopt measures ac'•rdingly. s.i many know but do not bother about ft Farmers nsafjH doeitn win %  id it nuneratve to keep lha odd *r two to ninsiiFiie n-i< '.••! | luce, while the consumer *h> without a few chicken:. pe from the tabV which other total |a %  Wall SiiprJIri of— YATES' VegetaMi s-eci^ Al< "YATES BULBS" SPRCKEI.IA FOHMOSISSIMA ^ 4/ each TAREROSE (Double large Clumps) ^6 each CRYTHAMTUS < Alfafa lily) 4/each OooSjskgMi nt — BOOKER'S (B'DOS) DRli(i STORES LTD. Brod Street, and Hastings (ALPHA PHARMACY) STOP PAIN QUICKLY with Phensic The famous threefold action ol PHF.NSIC tablets RELIEVES PAIN, SOOTHES NERVKS. COUNTHIACTS DEPRES SION. No matter bow inttni4 th i"ii, no matter how rrrarv your nenxs, how Jepruud you feel, PHENSIC tablets will bring you relief and comfon. onlckly .nul saftly. Remember this — PHENSIC tablet! neitbei harm the heart nor upset ;hc stomach. Don't accept substitutes Keep a supply of PHENSIC tablets by you' mm* Ph ens*v TWO TABLETS BRING QUICK RELIEF I FOR RHEUMATIC PAINS, LUMBAGO, NERVE PAINS, ^HEADACHES, NEURALGIA, FLU, COLDS & CHILLS, Instal an ELECTRIC FAN very essential for your office



PAGE 1

Illl Mll\ M \l> VV AhVlH VTF. SUNDAY iirTIMIHR 1952 CLASSIFIED ADS. mrwioNf ioi DIES %  friend* are aaked %  %  %  %  1 9 U IIIWKS •* %  %  i iul grandmother ... %  i and whirl I .in 11.1 Alalawl, IMl -r idaunnt.i %  Ath.Fand T.33—In. iNIn, undersigned gute10 all Who attended .1 —. I wr.alh. "< in .>n> i > pilh> will ol the ton IAU AUTOMOTIVE PI IM II SAI1S EAL fcSTATK IOVI MM \i# rrm.14 \onnw LOST IWItnTAKI TICKET Serve. land caaieankaa; BaAf?! A-3uBl >n **•• %  or1hrarain Sov lo.klcy tn the pariah at Meeting stride r (Imr return lo H part of Clairanonti wtdi %  Barter. Ha in an Punuwa, fft. A Mfrfl •qua re feet Chris I Chur outlet 1o Dayrells Hoed, and • urteMe for laving out J buildlrul Mb. WIU be oTrrea) for late at the efAce of iha .-.dennmed OB Tetrad*) the nth B*a *a nw*i r ItM. at I o'etoek p m The plan can ba arm an Bppl' ."on tn the ungrnlf iul CXJTTlX. CATTOK* ft CO l.irv, HAM. It • Veuahall Wrttm, encellenl Bargain Will exchange f.n %  • rat Apply William.. I C-iniiinriil fern nlaed. Way( Flpjaaah CAR One Prefect ford I.lmd illy New O-oidlg. O E. HI* onr Mandard %  h p. i faff running; orde r Phona Ward • t M n CAR On* lb ItaM A * "Bomrr.et f'alap Cirrn I.Ma mile. Alwa>ownr. di'va* — Dial UN • W—In CAR-N.W Ceuul car onQr dona JM inllaa. Reason for elllng owrahT leavkhg •land. Phona wMl . v %  F'.ie dike. bat* CAR—.li KAISER. On* it.-i.er. IM* modal, in • %  '.in. apply Barbados Ainu nil. •cond hand lent rood I • i. telephone *. i. %  m ASK Til EM Our iMde and Private Age.11 U a Pu> %  or Seller. Market .. .! %  AI>T. .i Tlaii.il Ai.i"t* A Ural E-lale Broker. MuM and Will -I — .. Lead |- lo Sea, A a B*droom Bungalow Type. V.ry <;ood Condition. Oarage ft Ser% %  > %  • Room, ovrr COM aa. II Coing r about f.UH 3 HEAR NAVY GARDENS A I Radroaoi -will. RMIna Cupboards i Klon* rtunlalow. about ft*. Old. Evarlta Roof, 1 Toilrta Caraga ft Servant's Room, about ll.agu aq ft Cioing for about C1.IM 4 AT C -JVT Mil IAlmost Nrw 1 ttrdrot-n .illy Slonai Bungalow. Slona Qaiagr -Parlli aionn 1 bedroom, all Modern Convrr.i Vary Good Ci %  taWAROa RTt WORKS WASHER* ft ItlONEIlaV-Only aorraa*iant p*.ar>n. nr*d apply jiird log all ihoaa %  ,.-,ri,t ban (1mlh ol Cbartoll' ..ndorairnad *ould thoaa who aanl MISCELLANEOUS NOTICE >tUU OP rwBMT mi KIM AapiHraUona for Iha post of QuJliflad Iffand Hldarir* will ba rrraivrd .by thd Churahwardan. Mrs H A Talana. Walchaa. Ol Cn Markad ApplicaIMM. ua> |a> a p M. on taa loth spt, bar. IPJE. Tarana of appoMrianonl obtainabla from IM #*nrahUl Traaiurar t tftNOTICK p*raon or pa-auoi who %  ffc* Whaata of Fortima %  gajaj BaaalpMaM wllh har III! 3". CAft—Auslln AT*. Vrry good condltia and gn,ato saasa lu,kvpa-aaloral.aW. "' '" WIHiorM at Hdg a.d 1 or afPW| H ~al T.hs)vah Jiiah. -I Oaorga a i i 4. *I v i*^l C.'BO Ddrninara. A'.llffua Mosttmsi Ma... and St Krlt. SaHUg Faadoy iltr, mat V—.IIUMOX .|S Canadian National Steamships GOVERN MENT N OTICES PART ONE ORDERS IN MF.MORIAM PEATHnAITI In Iming inasnnrv ol i ..nl Biathwalle whn dapa'lrd *rv'-""br ltd* %  .1 sine*that ...l nus iBal*. m Iha arm* Of Jaaus %  nnd graca, il ghail 'tn in naaca IFwaJg M I'a i.insmhoird I" FI SMI I I. I .. i "lit Mil"! i •. I..I -. IN V T a ro—in -in i -i |n lo\ma memory of our ,iovrd husband and fatha. 4iIU who postad away on >t. iaw in yaar* sine* thai sad day .r lowad has i*>'d aw> I., Iirrnamharcd by Alva Uliatia. Garoldina and Duf. %  TJLH %  i-i usiiwi > in inlbkI r drlitiIRRERT n tiltian* Road. (!"inm'nl IIHI a sa—ii ii i..i i... t m ....iiti :: %  !.ITU. mil BENT HOISK.S TRUCK Inii-.n.cioiial Two i*rd i N NTLSON ST A a Bad room Fl.aa* 5 * whan U r.m.li. Anything In Real Ealala and BBW.t Ai.vwhrrr DIAL ai)l Cnll at -OaWa lloudh." Hasllnps Naai J P., Ini*rna1lonal TWO Boead aalf .'-,,. MV u„. v hydraulic hohi ag—TW Php^ I l-""K *" *" *'*•* i.fii'MSt. g a aa—n r C WAftOOTT. ID, ran*, will parade at Ran rontim.* llwlr waao-an i ilr^tion ol taair Coy C i:<* ho,., KIXCTK1CAL '-IM.III HEMSTITCIIINO MACHINE, I"..—rtmallv dnvrn. in parfa-cl condlllon. at a var> good pnea Dial 1T3B t a aa—an • <>n Thursday II Sop. U Oo*a W to flrirkg tha A.M C. undo* immandats "A" Coy alkdlad Iha npan and •bars o( "f-coy who haa alraady Hrad tha ,.l th*ir Coy Commandar* All ranks of %  •B" Coy uma to dra should gat In touch with ih* PH' Hilt, SI Ml* Jii a>uina Urawing ..._ roooW. J Bedroom* lei nlug watarl btrakfasl room*. %  ad DinI llh in' KIWhrn. no ha h S M immadia %  •ad Band iitacticaa !0i!Z?'-h?\ J?Z.^.£ni2T? u ^ ban* and ibo'aUl b* isptlftod by'bJm wna-tha laa. win U*. place Member, who arc aaJ*d first claaa will quolUr PI aiipndad camp and the required argdaa il.lad II lube Phillip* R ad M on L BERNSTk^l. NADIO—Ona ( |*i fe.i condition i I. Swan St Itior.e Ba* or 91k* RADIOGRAM—Saforata Unit* Fl.lat Hi -river a watt Ampllflor Collate 7 d intntaiiie Six long playing teiordg LO Telephone MJt or 44ja T a aa— M KUKNITURE ippoaite Si slepti*n on I aero of land LaM oui for good r.rry Farm or rtoajdancd. Foa..Lilitle. for MortfMg -uteRli I ITKNITUHE One Slmmor.a Baby Crib .ilh Maltreas. eacellent rondJUon Aim nc pair ol Simmon* Redsteada nd tM-.rtsa a bargain Phone MM. LIVESTOCK "CRANE IIUUI .( Salnl I'hi.iv 1 rood and 72 pi The House conl i rj. d ining and Inrlng IOOIIM and uauai "-fte" afeaanj will DO tat up lor *ala at PuHlc Compaction On Friday the T-|n QO*vr-J.i.. Goal ..^sdan. I.da fottag. Hill Apply I M.U.I,.i|) i a as—in l.ucv. or Phoni g a aa—an POULTRY I '.t I.THY Harnpahl'e ai *aoka old with barubalor ar ily Bar. PaUnMto Slreal run. Appli ii as—an aaaakm Afrpi) Oaa An Appioved Tan. iou Mrdcui S*-Side. full) I.irr.ntud llungalow l.xrellanl esbiihliuj For loilher i>artl. uar* Applv .oral Sand*. Worthing l a aa—n MECHANICAL 1-l.OUGH %  ri sRibaoil Ploush ct>. aUnaaer. MISCELLANEOUS .IOI'IIJX> MATTRESSES AI in unit. Suiplua Block of 3 ft I II 1 In* oirered ifor root caiti unlvi al agg M and gM SB each re. el> Sujctly Ilmltod number for nl BUY HOW. HAHKtStlN SI Dial 41 w 3 I sa \ Caiilewa-h. Novamb*'. January Feoriu : ;".. %  1 u.eIherhead Il.irrn-an A Co FM UUI frwndi ubioad. Mis Worrall. si ..TatlrtoW* Vlcarst* phona30p> i furnished Hefrlg. •servant Room A i. u ••: 2.. ..NTKHNATIONAL TORNADO K 3S ma.*a) naarea) Owner leaving Island i n-inlne* Y-rhl Club or Toiaphone 44J0 1 a aain OFr'K'KS I the NUMERICAL TEIXKHOSI Hi %  !" Slraato ROOMS 3 lumlshad loom* lor Rani %  I Theatre Bast •*•. hallilna raraa* altachnl. Week-endand noli-1 d.v* accept*.! Phona Bgai. lail-Hn., furnished i' an T U In Belleville, 1 IIIMH W.iler f i H i 11ANKBSeal loth*, pin „ board. Apply Car" Mion Hill. SI Michael I i, Certnid* Davla week. Warn. I ft % %  %  %  '% % %  U r Dial 3901 Mr. %  3 a S3 B> %  'VI'IJ* A few pairs of Sampl t aaaj for BMn, i.pph Bar bad o* la-p>n A i-.il C. Ud Room 3M. I'lanlaf Mildrng If asiSSS. %  Ill I ATIONAI r* trading Dally Nvw*r now acrreteg u Barfcado. to Ak • law day a altar publiraUon In ..don. Contact 1-u* Onto. C/o. Adraa., Lad.. Local Baa>iaadniBtl.. QUCENS *d\iacn-> ary. ItM ,\pplta*t...ns mould E. .. from whom l.rther pai U tar nhtainrd. o it-r. iaia. ..VMM WeKMKWTS 11 iiNiaol .11 -111. Oil IBBN Sticel !" •U gf B pm, Inapdctlon by appotPtmenf rt i. will ba aa* usfor mprtition at our OfBco FMdav lath Septembar *SMAL DAMtk IKC Regimental Sy, Hi-1 aani YKAKWOOD ft BOTCt, Sollcllora ai.a aa—ion willI hold tu Annual Dance al Iha Drill Hall • I SEP. I rtfwlii arranged Appl of s.,.t.. fflca ol tha unndraaBaed lABfMNOTtiS Weatbury Road. HOUSE med aa Hack Roc I Bungnlow Styla ihop a It. Sltualed at Brlahloi Dtol Oil) LAND A spot of land ippro* prrrhaa In B#lfc OullF HJ oppo. Nadcat For particular* ph me 3l i "• %  ,i by app'imlm AUCTION UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER i., -a... %  CO) late BM — E*late -. II. John we will sell tha Furniture al Vi-b. Engla Hall Road, which In...idt Round Tip-Top Dtnlni Tables -urldhl Chairs, Sideboard*. Sorvlng and inament Table*. China Cabinet auchr*. Card Table. T.a Trolley all ir ahogany. Upholstered Drawirs-rcxur .lie a plec*" iCouch Aim and Uprmhl K.it.i ovfrminl'e. I'lano by Rcvhrteitt Work Tabk. Plcluwa_ and St..l.i. Hell ,,.! Ornanid China, Dinner and Tei -*• i'tlax Ware. Oinanvania, li..,— £ Corujnlcum, Simmon* Slnale Bed %  ad* oprmgs and Matlreaae*; Linen •aa Wardrobe. DrawlnTable. Che. Dr*wr.-oU m Mahoaany. Born (halved, 4-anva* Co*., Ware Fraaar. Uuuj Mirror, varv large Olaja Cj*e. Lardars Eloc Top. Tables. g-Rumar F. tction OU Stove. Gas Blove. KiWh ld.\ils Oardan Hon. and nuiny olh ^e'\"W n c?cWk TEHMS CASH BBANKEB. TBOTMAN CO.. ABellOBcera %  u an. UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER ON TIIUKBDAV lllh by older MM A-Ii wa will -all he. F-in.iture .. Tha llnwer" The Uairian,! wh — Includes i.* square Tip-Top Dlnin T. bte. Uprtahl Chain Hmkiugood .. i| Table In Malmgany ..nl i-.il %  IL ti ii % %  ...,. It, i. IT V, .1. .,,.1 II...Coffee T..ble Bush Tabt* Undnrd and T.ble Etectn 'boiibto Mahoa. "mi Spriiur. Mahog I-i"' Table. 2ff> hour* u,< Saiurdary 13 ^ii FART HP RAKRADOK M(ll*lfM moMuilON Sii Qulntmc i. 0. ar LEAVE Sit. Ooodaaan. S S. Br Fta n r own. s. SJt. Edwards. F. Tit hjl Wilham| ft ORDEBLr -mit AM FOB WEEK VVBINfl — Lieut. B Q. Laghtey t iTg sit wiiiiagn., J>. M L O 1KIWBB-COJC UnJor 8 O.LT. ftdlutaat, „ KOIJCI Warrant Otflcor* ft Scrjeont*' Me*, al RartMdoit Regiment. sa. OSDIR-. tiiniAL NO. aa Grantad a corr.nn.iion In Iha rank i Li by HE. the Governor we f Sap. 31. BOlTflROt'ND CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR IADY RODNEY CANADIAN CHALLENGE!! LADY NELSON NOBTM BOUND CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR LADY NELSON' aSapL laSapi as Sept. a sp MS>pt. il I.I 31 Aug fSept. 13 Sept 13 Sept 10 Sap II SepI 17 Sept. If Bepi U Sept fa Sept g Oct T Oei A.'.w. > Or* ;l O. i It Ort M Oei II Oa*. 3* Oct 31 Oct Nov JwHN NL HI 1HOS *f CO. \ i • i \ \ BxlviMlTt LSStaas of OM. Cltm TropCTlT •>• L>n< Alwan tnlbtb Par rvnfear trti..i.r. ..... %  •— GARDINER AUSTIN & CO.. LTD.— Arrt. INVITATION I Kindred Rretlirr Annual Thanksgiving Service To be held to-day Suoday. T" September. 1SSI. At Ihe MECHANIC v IIA1J 111. Roebuck Straot. at 3 30 p.r C i> Book : Dr. H. G Cummins w c f. OrantoeJ 1 day. casual laa, ((rained ii day*' pnmaaTj ntontha* vacation lea.> w.* f ti Aug. a Or.nlod 4 week.p/teava w.e<. 1 Sr ( i/ SKEWES-COX. Major utanL Barbado. Regiment. rBict Obta Jiisl Off The Pre FIRST ANNUAL LEAGUE CRICKETER Compiled oy J. MBE WITT Hony. Sccly. He I.. and coBialRiRtf 'Record* f B.C.L . InlrrcolonUI ADd I nlin il .1 raarftn This Aiuiuiil ad-U tit In sitn|ile bul UB| IlKuirs the htolory and IrudiUun of th B I Vaweal Poal of ( .ijit.iin of ihe Ftaherlet Bf-aeveh Boa4 ''laiwa > jU I t,tor'' Applications ire invited (or the vacant pott of Coptein of the rishcriea Research Boat "Investigator'. 2. The poat is temporary and may be terminated at one month's notlrA on eilher -ide. The salary Is S!.2i)0 per annum and a temporarv gH ,.f living allowance La ..1 present payable at the rate of $144 per ;iiinum. 3. The main dutiea of the Captain of the "Investigator" are to take charge of the Research Boat, itji general management and opertion under, direction and to be responsible for all matters concerning Us welfare. 4. Applicants are expected to possess knowledge of eoftal navigation nnd should he able to ineate the position of the boat at iiiv time. Applicants should also have had experience in the handling Of small motor vessels under both harbour and open -tea conditions. 1 1 II 'iiK-nt will INsubject to medical fitness. 3. Applications stating agt. qualifications and experience should ba iMrfaWBil io the Director of Agriculture. Department of Science and Agriculture, Queen\ Park, and should reach him not later than Saturday. 13th September, 1952. 7.9.52.—In. VACANT POSTS GRAMMAR SCHOOL, ST. VINCENT Applications are invited for the following posts (H An Assistant Master (Graduate) who will be required to teach English and 1. .tin or History up to Higher School Certificate Standard. (11) An Assist an t Maatci of Inter-Art* or Higher School Certificate Qualification*, who will be required to teach General Subjects up lo School Certificate standard. Abilltv to aaalat the Game* Master, and to take charge of the Cadet Corps will be taken Into consideration. The salariea offered are: — (a) For Graduates—Si.440 by S96 to $1,620. clive flavour) TRY THIS I "Mill i BLEND OF BUM Blrndrd aiwl MUM b IOH\ D. I As Milt A Stl.VS LTD. Boebuck Stretl Dial OH S.P.C.A. PHOTO COMPETITION ONE RILIS Photos of Any sizeClosing Date-—4th Octobei l or a/oup of animals. Any size—Black and VaMt$ Oaly. Association reserves the rkr.ht to reproduce any print. Prizes awarded to the m" attractive photo. Kntranio 1 COLE'S PRINT EH Y Middle Street 5S CLUB BUILDING ;* S3, Swan At Mid.i.. 6.9 52.—2n WrV>WW W/W/v IST ran 2ND I i;i/i 3RD PRI/I Derision of the ladggsi wilt Be final. All photos to be sen-, io the S P.C.A.. Office. Harbour Police Suilon. c o Hon. Secretary and marked S.P.CA. Photographic Competition. af f aaaaa i aa aanagiaa ai The OfBrer* A Member. Of (IKADVOCATE'S SOCIAL Cl.l B Cnd>r ihe Patronage of ihe Hon. V. C. Gale, S4.LC. invite you io their DANCE at the VOUNIErR DRILL HALL OB MONDAY NIGHT. Mil OCTOBER. 1952 (B—*. hoiid.i Musk by Percy Green'* Orcbcatu M IMIHPIIliN—::— 3 Dancing from 9 pjn. TIcaM* no*. TTaitafetable formal Pre** Optiohul *5O0Oaad>00 a> 00a^0t>0ej0C0*W JUST RECEIVED REALTORS LIMITED OFFERS COVE SPBINO I in I Ml A lovely cottage Handing on li rooda Iwanlv rntvm pen-he* of land, alluala at SS Janiea Coast. having its own private bathing It comprises ihracbadlmrn* with both and ton** to main bedrooni. diawlnE and dinlne room Europea n Bath and Toilat v,uh hoi and cold running wate*. modarn kitchen, and a gallery on ..,i, %  M %  ,.( In. IM M. M Hi. t Bocklav II. ...' iBgnineent nr* | %  .HKJ gV|Bg||V< to Ihe aggj. K comprise* three bedrooma one wllh built-in cupboards. Drawing and Dining room modarn kitchen and Intfet and -llh toilet ..nl bath, gaiege tog two cars, and enough room foi anndry grc standing on approximately !/ %  square feel of land : Hockl— S.luato al Rock laa varda of the> popular lleach. ilandlrg on app !" mmatel> 10 000 winaie ft of land, and complied three bedroom*. Dining and Llvlni room*, toilet and bath, and a Urge gallery buildings romprt** *ei and gnrage Vary K hllTH" ASTHMA •IMHI BSAMI s awrr KSSCNCC LaVONAL Hoaui K MM ri WORt Mil K lii in i:AKDOVIV KA0I IN POfl.TICr AviiniLOOi-rtsr VITAB INFANTOI. I .11,111 I' I1M | C. CARLTON BROWNS SWeull a RrUII DrairM IS* Bofburk SI DU1 ttl* -AV/W.V./-.'-,'..,-,l> dr.**nr r and balh. I* BINOALOW Known aa No. 10 *!tuie it Bl-ir .ii"li" ii"' .l>nrn>. on aquare leal, com lHJrolf>. one wH* m and toilet and both %  >"-.b I nation lraiiid Rooaa, •aparatf toilet m-drni kltthan. two nma with toilat and bath and garage This property can be bought al a very reasonable Itguro rloaae ronlatl V * eOO" IH.lT VISTA | at Hot-Kiev Naw Hand. %  three bedrooin bunsalow fiitbln.illon Living voly tlktd Eur i galla--. ofTerin ,-\ ol Ihe I %  ana Coa line, and butlt-ipbo-inl-i Dowiislairs: Oarage |W0 cars mid avrvanl* propativ can be tmuBhi ina*l unfunilahed REALTORS Limited BBAL ESTATE AC AUCTION HERS IHS isi/*a> Barbi ruidfatawa FOR SALE NEW BUrtOAIAW. LODUft I AND ST MICIIAEt We pre %  (din 1U*"rf da%  !" conaiiuftod bv 4 lawa%  p.i .is bettrooros. wh Wavtt-ln wardroboa. I.rg-p dkrawlpg room, isrwdl dimig r.-oa. Kllchaa-KU >itn b—aaf-il num. Bad Baaga panlr* Thgarage ang *arva*l* (iuarter* ale delachasl Main* water and quota of electric Itgatt This proper-l* k* Mtuated In a narw and wWi l residential area from HM-re *•• line punsramk .law* of Bndaatown and Ihe Star. I-, Tlie site Is .. rv 100I and only SH miles from town ci-ntra Th<> |>i % %  >••" l> !• ....il.lil.-Ith from .1 rod m lequired Iha price aakad is very fair W P ran 'eorniaend thk* ILIUM v^i. hlhl> Bt'iuniNci puyrs IAIDGE LAND. St Michael. We ofter d optnent area, varying In sire from I area, van ii %  etlenl vl. illabl* BE ,; .1.-' w • BBicirrwooo. st i.*'"ir t A i %  ant and con |..n-l. [>ropartr .n,(h rnadjowa nlea wltB it* undlng* Own beach frontago and excellent bathing facilities Threebedroom*, living room and dining room, kitchen. toilet and ihowrr. wide L verandah looking arate garage and Ideal amide, home residential quarter. MODEJtN BUNGALOW, Ml. SILVER sTANDB. A waU-buIlt mnlnf three bed room*, ill with waihUBdlna and ward'ntteg '4 rodai g mm /IBJ r arifk plcruro wiiulnws allowing unobstructed view* teo-warga. Oood kttrhen. garage etc.. land conv prUe* approx I's Beret further datnita on application. KEBU>KMCr.. THE (iABDEN. WORTHTNO — Modarn coral stone |.inr-l<>w on corner die with wlda frontage* Pleaunt gardan — Ith Bower beds. lawn, roncrata pattja, and number of bearing; fruit robea. wall ritU'' kiltlun. garage a ill. covered wiv to houaa. %  rapta* qtiarlers and all usual ofrlces All public utllltj arrvioa*. In our opinion Ihla property la one of Ihe mo*t attractive horned now available in Ihe medium price rang*. MODERN HOME. St Peter A luKurlou*'. ippolnted residence. with four bedroom*. 3 tiled bathr—i.i with hot nnd cold, binier* pantry. kitchen. ttorerooma. 1 garages Tha grounds are expert. |y laid out with a profusion ol fowering ahruba Own rlshl of way lo aaa RESIDENCE. BI^CK BOCK Soundly conatrurte-d property will 3 bedroom*. 3 living room*, dining room and gallery On land of appro1 acre Offered at £3.000 BUtLDINO LAND. ST. UWIll Kith .M 1'RWAITION BINT NO. •§ FALLING TREES nrv van likely to disrupt the ElectrlSupply Keep n couple of Hurricane Lanterns filled wltr Oil and a box of Matches in n handy pla All these ore obtainable at . %  CENTRAL EMPORIUM Cornrr Broad A Tador Streets 1953 AMATEUR BOXING CHAMPIONSHIPS Under the Auspice* of CANADA DRY apifl lake place at the . MODERN HIGH Af 8 p.m. on Friday. 12th September CANADA DRY STEEL HAND IN ATTENDANCE Bar — Musk — Tiirilling Encounters Blag Side I1.M. Blag Circle M CenU. Bleachers M Centa iv. lent plot wit* wldaaaa fir sca-itde e lew vacant II C.RAEME HAM TERRACE 3 Storey coral "tone hou** with bedroom*, dining and living verandah $t kitchenette up•tarri. with garage. •er\ ants* quarter* and laundry balow Thai house i at well bar* in Ha ground* of about 1*1 acre, ta not overlooked and haa noba|ructad view sea* JI.IS Open to offer* LAND, TWEEDSIDS ROAD—On main road wllh lOI* frontage hlral -u.iation for bualnddd premlaea. ToUl sit* ll.TM aq. ft. BUSINESS rrlEMISES-DWBU. 1NO HOV5E. ROEaaUCB STKEET Oood .lliiatlon for retail .hop U li.li busy part of town. ES.OW. SWEETflELD. St JV-er Ar %  is living loom ii.*towa uadlng irandah* wnn view of bedrooeoa. kitchen, atorend uaual outbuilding*. I*' Qua I ell laid d* wllh right ol way COVE SI-BIN tl HOUBK. IT JAMFH Una of Iha law prop. popular coaat with omplrteiy private and lecludrd IUT beach The ground* of about IV. acre, are well wooded nnd could readily ba converted into one of tha dll ine llard Tha h storey* and uo.*.a**i nullceable character NEW DUNGALUW, ROCICLXVung rooai. Wlda tdwii. pantry. seivanl*' %  I.1T.H-I":. Good QOll v..,rse CdJOO. HBVTUM l.ODOE. MAXWELL COAST Solidly cenatructad rar*. ipacioua drawing dining looan. and braakfaat 3 bedrooma. 3 .MI ate Lately occupied by US Conaul. DO YOU REALISE THE NEED FOR MORE QUALIFICATION? ar ABE YOf INTERESTBD IN MAKING MORI! MONEYIT SO. ENROL NOW FOR ONE OF THESE COURSES. Architectural Draughtmanshlp faoUdlni nnd DeaUm Course. A.M.SEiCIvll. Bwtfa, • IMl Mr. 11 Auternoblle Repslrmsn'd Cwarse. Kldsotrlcal InaUlUtlon and Wfllaa Course. (.rn--r..i Eleelrieal Ens ineertng Course. General Ortlflcate of Educalton. Write lor full partic Write to the Caribbean Educational Institute P.O. Box. 307. P.O.8., Trinidad Agents for '. BRITISH IN8TITUTE OT EN0 TECH ft BRITISH TUTORIAL WSTrTUTE LONDON THERE IB NO TOMORROW rpntloua rweption room* and dining roaani also datachad atinea with living room and > bedroom* Suitable, flat*. guadt •chool or office*.



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1'U.I I li.ill SI Ml W AI>VCATE Sl'NDAY, SKPTICMBEat ?. IM2 •tt**** br %  A o*.. m #•— t_ aia — a n SMnday, SeptemlN WHO PAYS? THE majority report of the Select Commuter of twelve appointed by both Chamber* of the Legislature of Jamaica contain a recommendation on financing the proposed federal government of the West India* which deserves close scrutiny. The majority of the Select Committee recommended that a request should be made for a grant for the purpose* of financing the current operating expenses of the Federation and that a substantial sum of money by way of grant and loan for purposes of development would be essential to the success of the Federation. The minority of the Jamaica Select Committee recommended that no request should be made for a grant for the purposes of financing the current operating expenses of the Federation but that substantial sums of money by way of grant or loan for the purposes of development will be essential to the success oi the Ktxlcrs tion. The writers of the Ranee report were emphatic that a grant for which the Federation was not accountable would not In fact be spent to the best advantage and there would be a serious risk if not a virtual certainty that when it was exhausted the region would find itself not with strengthened productive and economic resources but with heavily Increased recurring commitments and so be further from and not nearer to real independence. While it is true that the.Jamaica Select Committee does not mention a very large grant, yet a grant for current operating expenses of the Federation, would be sufficiently large to be noticed when it had been exhausted. One of the lessons which ought to have been learnt since the system of grants began to operate throughout the West Indies, after the passage of the Co lonial Development and Welfare Acts, is that every grant adds to the total cost of government. Grants so far from "priming pumps" have often added to governments financial responsibilities at times when further expenditure is demanded for expansion or maintenance of "pre-granl" services. The traditional West Indian readiness not to look a gift-horse in the mouth and their anxiety to uccvpt whatever financial i offered is natural to countries where the possession of some mpney is regarded as essential to advancement But understanding of West Indian alacrity to receive financial gifts cannot justify the introduction of "cap-in hand" methods at the commencement of new statehood. If the members of the Select Committee are anxious to hasten the inauguration of %  Federal government, then the recommendations that a grant be requested for financing the current operating expenses of a federation is unlikely to promote confidence among the more cautious advocates of federation. The expression "current operating expenses of a federation" is itself very vague. it may eventually be interpreted to mean a very large sum of money. But even if i' be kept within very narrow defined limiU what respect would countries outside have for a federal government which was kept in existence by the British taxpayer? And how could the controls which must necessarily be attached to grantsin-aid be reconciled with the exercise of political power which the Select Committee recommends in greater measure than did the writers of the Ranee report? The authors of the majority report of the Jamaica Select Committee appear lo want "all this and heaven too". They want the West Indies to govern themselvet. through the Prime Minister ftf o Federal Assembly but they are not prepared to make any financial sacrifice* to meet the cost of adding yet another political superstructure to the existing four of the Windwards, four of the Leewards, one of Bar bados, one of Jamaica and one of Trinidad and Tobago. They tacitly acknowledge that federation is going to be expensive but since the British taxpayor is to pay that cost, they show lrttle concern for finance. But their proposals for increasim; the powers of the Prime Minister at the expense of those of the Governor General show how reluctant West Indian politicians still are to think of the British taxpayer as being other than .1 tender-hearted milch cow. The writers of the Ranee report were far more realistic when they considered that the real independence of the British Caribbean would be wo.i by its own efforts and founded upon resources thereby built up. Witfi regard u> the second half of the recommendations which received endorsement by all members of the Select Committee investigation might prove that wishful thinking is still being indulged in as to the resources of the West Indian islands. It is easy to say that a substantial NIB of money by way of a grant or loan for purposes of development will be essential to Si'l.iLuUi.i sums of money are, being spent 'n development throughout the Colonial Empire but some of the results are (ranklv disappointing Very substantial sums of money were poured into a groundnut sclx-me at Kongwa but what success was aeffeved? Very substantial sums of money could develop parts of British Guiana and British Honduras but neither of those territories are willing to join the islands in a political federation. If r oney is to be spent on federal development it will have to be spent therefore in the islands. Already Trinidad and Jamaica are industrialising rapidly and Barbados can do little more than expand its tourist industry. What sort of development is then envisaged by the Select Committee of Jamaica? Or was the phrase just coined because it was so obviously in keeping with the vague political promises which politiciins speak so glibly the world over? If the British taxpayer must contribute substantial sums of money by way of grant or loan to allow the people of the West Indies to govern themselves and if he is to contribute'a grant to pay for the current operating expenses of the West Indian Federal government what is he to get in return for his philanthropic gestures'* Already most of these islands offer special inducements to attract British and other capital to start new industries. Is it being suggested that a federal government supported by the British taxpayers wou'd offer greater political guarantees than can DOW be offered by individual islands? It is a great pity that at a time when the financial issues of federation ought to be squarely faced there is loose talk of development and no reference whatever to the forms development would take. Would fur instance the much-needed deep-water harbour of Barbados be built this way' It is to be feared not The man who keeps Barbados laughing on. Sundays NATHANIEL GUBBINS THE GOLDEN VOICE NURSERY RECORD BOOK tolls DM story with Songs and Mihuc on a gramophone record to help you read it in the Book. &f ADVOCATE STATIONERY pVERY woman should pvr a T". p *." y *' ' %  nct a month not only to kc*p up her moc£?!2i mcc.a* h< r circle of htiSS. OW '•> help ••hubby l„ SUSS! 111. influential friendly relation* „. DUJUMM colleagues. IN—Br Magulne Miniature Edited by N. GUBBINS to^;V'i.. tt f^ a V we,htapromot £"" %  %  •>•" *W "el* Your ulies -harming imlle whin *** %  •** HoaiWrnn. i \lS'^S!L^ 0ckt ^ ia %  nd Beauty Hint A." we .X £3ltaS*S* How can 1 rt rld "' wrinkles?" MKM and .m^U. ?"* cham •* man >' "*>ers aak me thii ques^"n^rl* 1 "'"">* %  "T* "on (write. May Fayre.* our beauty expert) that I get sick and 'Income are some hints on A Within—Youi Par| y rX'KTAILS: For eight to tf people---Buy a bottle of Unlisfatype wine (they are all M delicious it doe.n't matter which). a quarter bottle of gin. and two or inreibottles of fizzy lemonndc Mix together, shake wall in ire, and add bits of fruit, such a sliced rings of the bruised apple* nobody will eat. Bj from shaker—or the ln her lorn* ..••canter grandmother gave you people's hoi Ured of giving the same old ragaady. Here It It again: — Smother your face and neck In liot porridge and allon lo cool (U you do the housework. This will fill out the lines by nourishing your skin, particularly 1/ you add milk and ragar to taste. Stately Homes by Peek-a-Boo I'KF.K-A-BOO ta always pekaae Into other Here ahe gives ill glasses (some everybody a peek lalo she lovely ight want anheme of Nathaniel GubMns. THE BEST IT IS no exaggeration-to state thai the Barbados Museum to-day preserves all that is best which remains of the cultural life of this island. Its showcases Idled with specimens of animal and plant life and the displays of Indian implements and local shells are but obvious advertisements for the much deeper vein of knowledge and culture froni which the Museum draws its strength. The student of Barbadian history will ilnd that the shelves of the Library and the •.hnwcasti ,u walls of the Museum provide many <>f the clues f<>. which he is looking. The bound copies of the Journal of the Museum, to go no further, offer a much belter introduction to Barbadian customs and traditions than the ephemeral gossip and ignorant prattle of those who dismiss the island's long history and achievements as unworthy of their attention. Whatever the faults of Barbadians may be. their stKrial history has been so closely Interwoven with and Influenced by those of the United Kingdom and of the United States and the role lhat Barbados played with so many other West Indian islands in the eighteenth centurv is relatively so Important to European history that only very superlcial persons would regard a study of ttetr background and traditions as other than rewarding. Without the facilities provided by the Barbados Museum no such study could be attempted. Even the limitations under which the Museum operates because it was late in starting and because of the lack of substantial donations and bequests permit the acquirihg of a reasonably well-balanced knowledge of the island s long history. Few Barbadians have taken the trouble lo equip thVnhselves with the knowledge which the Museum Library, newspapers, old documents and prints provide and transient British ollkials might find their understanding of Barbadian problems hastened by more frequent attendances in the Museum's Library. The limited facilities offered by the Museum already emt.sUjjJ, the numbers of those who are willing m utiltle them or to add to them by becoming members or coniTilmtinii through donations or bequests to the funds of the society. Fortunately there are individuals and organisations who have behaved otherwise. In recent years there has been a noticeable increase in the number of private persons who have contributed donations or objects of value to the museum and during the present financial year the Government of Barbados doubled its grant to the Society. The generality of the government ought to be emulated by hundreds of Barbadians who can afford to assist the museum financially. Many of the "bright young things" who complain loudly and long of the absence of cultural life in Barbados will find that regular attendance at the Museum will provide ihem with many opportunities for nourishing their intellect. And the fortunate ones who retire hero *o enjoy Barbados* kindly sunshine will find that all donations and bequests to further the SoI -irty's work will be gratefully acknowledged. But the Museum must always depend on Barbadians for greatest support. This ,s best given bv membership. There are literally hundreds of Barbadians who ought to become members of their most Important cultural organisation Unfortunately they will not make the effort They ought to do so without delay. —Into dipsomaniac other), and call It "Atomic Fruit Cop" Thin will get a laugh, particularly from those who have taken tbo first sip, and start your party off on the right not* THINGS ON TOAST: Mash liver-sausage arid cheese spread into mashed mixture of margarine, mayonnaise, curry powder eneat extract, and squashed totnatoeav Then mash It all up Into one disgusting hasp. Add salt and pepper (though arsenic would be a more merciful death) and serve on little bits of toast with your moat winning smile. Writ, and let me know if popular "hubby" gets promotion after -his. Post bag HERE la just one letter from millions sent each week to Slater n one wa there Is a flyIvy, the untrained nurse who blown mirror in carved wood writes our Babycraft Column. (painted deal) which often Daar Sitter ley, drops on the heads of unwary My son, aped six months, yells visitors because the nail is halfall day and most of the night w v u l ' tn c plaster. He ham an enormous appetite, managed to have one peek into dWj-Uri baby food, and eats Nat's "den", full of old newsmost of our meaf and bacon rapapers, cigarette ends, and unriois. He U also fond of porponanswered letters, before 1 was sola cheese and pickled onion*. thrown out by the amiable colMr amorw louder than hU umnlst. falhi %  -. and already u-eiohi oeer Ask Aunt Meg 401b. He t. arouHno a double TROUBLE with the boy friend? set of teeth, and rhme* me Aunt Meg solve* all problems, anhustmnds tnbmcro, lilt first swers all questions, •nerds to his Mummy were a Dear Aunt Meg. curse What shall 1 do? When / first met my boy I can't say. dear. Bet I den't friend he had lovely manners. ml decor In the dining-room. In fact, you might say no decor at all. The walls are mushroom colour fthe dirty white top of the mushroom) and the off-white doors are off-white because they need a new coat of paint. The nondescript faded curtains, made when fabrics were scarce, and dropping off the hooks, give a pleasing, homely touch to a room which looVs as if it had been lined in ... by a hundred displaced persons, I should think. Oh a Queen Anne dresser (probably phoney) stands a charming reading-lamp which frequently goes out because somebody is always tripping over the wire. Now he newer answers que%tions. turn* the radio on irhe-I'm f&thrr Is speaking and (.> my mother to shut up. At meals, he reaches arrasi the table for food without sautng "Pardon ine", and ween passes the condiments. Wher h* has eaten Ma fill ha nevei •** <> 6 ejcusaslHul gets uj from the table u-J gprau'U I' %  ay Mher 1 hi ".nr,rhair, ;witmg his stotnarh and yawnlnp. Do you think he is cooling off or that somclhinp is preying on his mind? Puzzled No, Ponied. I think he is )ust common.—Aunt Meg. leisure Hour FOUR O'CLOCK in the afternoon, and time for you to real those swollen ankles on the divan and have a cosy cup of tea. Breakfast things washed-uji rooms turned out, floors scrubbed beds made, carpets swept, shopping done, your mucky littk lunch eaten, and everything clean/1 away. But in these days of cxpcnsivi clothes, curtains, and furnishings there Is still sc^cthing for those busy lingers to uo. So. up you get, and look through shirts to see If frayed collars ano cujes need turning. Perhaps there are little frocks to let down, grubby little pairs of serge knicker-, to mend? As you are pouring out your second cup of tea (cold now), perhaps your oil-seeing eyo will fight upon ihe hole the cot scratched 11: lh best armchair. So. up you get again, and try ti fi'Mit'tiibcr all YOU have read In our Sell Help Column about home upholstery. When you have pulled the horsehair out and have made th patch to cover the hole, the bunco uoys will be home ior tea. What a Joy It is to see theli bright, eager faces round the table, and what a joy to hear them clatter out to play so lhat you will jus! have time to peel the potatoes, pick the maggots out nf the cabbage and run up some new curtains before the key turns in the lock and a gruff, well-loved voice asks: "Dinner ready yet'.'" "A U'oimm'i u?ork is never done," Bui all of It's such frightful futi When days arc tone and et-c-ilTit/j d>car. No more 10 do? Look harder dear. — L.ES. 5GFD~ TiTJGGtTr~r Huet>_eBZ^R kUGOiO • RUGGED I • RUGGED KU' CG£D • RUGGE? RUGGED • RUC I • RUGGED • bCFO • ftUGQ |(UGGFD • RUL • RUGGED • l RUGGE6 See Ihe whole IMggi ol lhe*e fine PADLOCKS at C. S: PITCHER & CO. PI>. 44Tt BACK TO I ItOiM Tho most interesting thing about last Tuesday'* Federation debate from my point of view was when the policeman came up tp the man in a red tie who was slouching in a chair and told him lie .ouMii't sli-ep in the House. The man Just went on slouching and the policeman went aw r y havlnf done what he was told to do by someone In authority. Out of eurlo-Uty 1 looked acrus )i>st then at a member sitting not far from the Speaker's ch.ilr and he was slipping sideways with Bleep. I '.tad been doing a bit of Jcuchlng myself because what i/!th the fans turned off and the glare from the windows the Assembly Hell was not the best place to listen to politicians talk ir any tnple. Before the subject of federation was-raised, however therch.id been a gust or two of air pioduced from two fans on stands on either side of the chamber but when Mr. Adams got up to sienk Mimeoiic turned off tho fens. The only effect of this action so far as 1 noticed was to increase the volume at noise m.ide by the bu> engines and to 11 .ike the room much hotter. I dont know when last you have bqen L> the House of Assembly bul I have been an absentee for months and a great hange has uken place since my last visit, Instead fif silting Ui the Centre •f the Hall the House now sits where the n,an-ln-the--,treet used to sit at the end of the Hall nearest to the Olympic Theatre. Instead of seeing my old friend Peggy walk down the aisle into tl*.e ma|n visitors gallery, on Tuesday I could see members of the House enter and leave the House by this railed off passageway. Afld Peggy if he was therr An Tuesday would hive been sitting somewhere in the only visitors* gallery which remained % %  nd which tilled the space wh*re the distinguished visitors, the newspaper reporters and the Rouse used to be some month* ago. From the point of view of iht %  tga-tn-the-Niieet the haiitfr .i\e> from one end of the Assembly Hall nearest lo the Olympic Theatre fo the other end nearest Iba Bpaeker'f Room may have. pHSSCd un.iotieet'j, The mnn-in-the .-treet who sits ii: the House Of Assembly today sees exactly the same arrangeAH' laeorgr llunle ment of .he House as he used to see when he sat nearer to U10 Olympic Theatre. At the end of the room the Speaker faces him: and -t7 ** %  < %  I'.LU of the House nearest to trtm now he sees the backs of the four members of tho Executive Committee and the bucks of other members of the Labour Party. At the far end of 'he room the Speaker is plainly visible and so> are the faces of the members of the Electors Association and of other memhen' of the House. But the visitor who was accustomed to tit In the distinguished visitors gallery or Uie newspaper reporter who used tu sit behiill the' Speaker, slightly lo his left, seee everything in reverse. No longer does Mr. Adam* face the reporter or the visitor in the gallery. He faces the Speaker *nd the gnjlery sees only his back. The flash of Mr. Adams' smile. the rise and fall of his eloquence ci.n no longer be shared by any Sut the members of the House and the House officials. The rest of us in the visitors gallery must bo content with the vision of Mr. Adams' broad back and *r.0uldcr. And we must prick our ears to catch what is left of >is voice after it hits the thick >tohe '.vails jnd rebounds in our direction or through the glareflUed windows. Fortunately the official H >U'ireporters are in the inner circle of the House and are not similarly hand'capped for hearing, but if government speakers are mlsreported today by the gentlemen of the Press the fault does not lie in their ears. The plra can always be made that a man's mouth Is not placed '.n the back of his head. ifciiy if It were, would it be pos%  •ible for the ordinary ear in the gidlery—and most reporters have ordinary c ira — to catch all that is said by the ch-ef government speakers fn the House. No doubt there were excellent reasons for placing the Leader of the House with his back to the g;.Uery but they will not be appreciated by visitors to the gallery. But If these reasons prevent /ultors from seeing Mr. Adams' face undergo the ex1 manlorjl which accompany bis many rhetorical changes iurab no reason can exist for preventing the hearing of his voice. If for all time visitors lo the llarh; AM HOU.SC of Assembly arc ti be contented with observing the. types of hair-cuts indulged in h> members of the Labour Party who nt with their backs to the gallery surely u few gmaU 1111.rophones would give them tbc <;.'it'ui 1 would have misled It all hui he been sitting where MiAdams waa with his back lo my chair. It may be of course that '.hi mnlorlty of viaUors to the gallery do not share my views and that they are quite happy to set the backs of rcrtt.m speakers. 1 cannot pretend to speak for an> ana but myself. But whai i^ •I'bject for immediate concern 1 the impossible situation of the ne wspaner reporten-. if the Pre-.Ill to repe-rt accurately what is..id in the House of A>sembl\ Press reporters ought to be allowect to sit within the areiu now occupied by the House ol Assembly or at least behind the speaker's chair. From then piesent position in the gllei> they must either guess or leave out. Freedom of the press dependon freedom to hear as well ai Deaden to publish. And at present the air-waves are blocked Our I(Y.MI 1 s Slav ; Wvighiliflin/t Webster H not the pioneer of To The Editor. The Advocate— weightlifting in Barbados, but I SlK,—In reply to a IcUer which maintain that he has done more appeared in your paper on 2nd tood tor organized weightlifting September, IM2. tigneti by than any of the distinguished I Culturht" who strikes personalities which "Physical me ag being an armchiair critic, Cultunst" mentions. I haw this to say. I agree that I ,,v l a Webster deserves ill the credit he has got and moi" Anv hfter can visit hi train and he Is always willing to Impart any information or offer any suggestions to any of the lifters WEIC.HTI.IFTEK 2nd September. 1952. Plate Glass Windows are both costly and vlunerable. A GI.ASS NSUEANCi: POLICY merits your careful consideration For particulars and advice, consult the Agents:— DA COSTA & CO.. LTD -ANTS For interior and exterior work where a fine finish is required USE LACOLINE Q^t/lstrtteAJaMtreX fSsimsa euoatvav JW DA COSTA & CO. LTD. COMMISSION DEPARTMENT Federation eh!! MEN who don't see eye to eye on many Subjects .... Settle many differences at Cocktail Parties A "GOLD BRAID" COCKTAIL is THE BEST



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SVNDAV. SEPTEMBER 7. U..2 SUNDAY ADVOCATE p v.i: nvK ••b) to a dra*v tmu -i uiunuel. Park. Cricket Scores > b D Alatnaon M rfl.l.* la. .M. c b > LMWIBM >** %  !>W|aMS k D J Aa-y c *b R L*.|—. *" BOt OKI Da*n • D Atfcinw*. terrible uproar. On one occasion Alien E. 1Bar.e.t. IIW LK.puKu bpji'.'i batsman wu giv-n out m the Park 11 tauM a near riot. Few who loUow Intel • nation* i cricket will forget the Hutton incidni In the Fifth Tea: match ..gainst South Ainu at il."Oval, in which Hutton w.i given out for having "hit the ball twice". I *h*ll uy more of this incident later In this articl1 LAW M Handled the Ball Either bstamsn is out "Handled the ball' If he teach u while In play with tus runda. unleaa It be done at the request o( thopposite side. Experienced players break this Law time and again and on the very isolated occasions that an appeal is made and they are given out there follows a claim IJV HUTTON that those who appealed are not 5UCh occurrence W d lt „&& sportsmen. follows: — A batsman may Insupportable mpi to hit the ball tWrd 1 fsll to see how this claim ,„ doing so he baulks the wlcke*can be supported in the face of keeper or any lleldsm ..n the law. Senior players strike tempting to maku the catch. ball ai-d then calmly walk i %  4 lEFvSS&r'&SSrZ.Z Public Would Hail ^feS •___ %  > -_ —. i-J *_ Am. mm < % %  1 Alien Cricket Side-Shouhaving been requested to do so. If an appeal is made agatmt them the umpire has no alternative but to give them out. HERE is an ic Of course this law cannot apIhird day of ply where a batsman, say In matcher* i>opul.i protecting his face from a profitable — re bounosr. tike* hi* hand off th, nuticnra. Th bat. The correct entry in the score book when a batsman Is given out under this Law is "Handled the Ball" and the bowler dotnot get the credit for the wicket LAW 37 Hit the Ball Twice %  for making the county cricket and. therefore. .< %  iiigl,. wickc: .jKge*tu>ii corns* .. reader P C chmond, Surrey. the ttrst Urimsby had swed this season. M uie other end ol the scale W'iMuM ware trounced a—1 by tuner for whom former Birsajuun leauer Dsiley grabbed %  seven minute second half hat.rtefc and are the only club without a pouit. Watch out for the name of Al.a-. Brown when Scottish Selecbgsj. .noose the team for the tlr-t • •n.itumai against Wales on Can 18 The husky Blackpool Aside man completed a brilliant rick at Villa Park in one of '!,. %  !. %  .\\.ij A in> ..I the la The largest crowd was at Total i.-in where U.UDO saw Spurs rorrt their first home victory Of* the season. Len Duquanun notched the winning goal against newl] promoted Cardiff. MnUiUbrough who chop pel three players including the England star atanntOQ as a matter ot IpUna lost their tint gome of Uie waavn at Stoke. The -Mi of the home team detente newly signed centre halt t 22,000 pture from Aberdeen. Liverpool!, 2—0 victory again* Manchester City keep* them on top of the first Division. Still without a win are Sheffield Wednesday beaten 3—0 at home b> OtarUoi and Wwtigfla Unite.) AH lost I \ u llurnkay. In l he Second Division New' Boy* Plymouth aren't losing any makes TbUI if I ta rnii ol *k-.n, i M M. ; ti M IIS (or III. S lor ISS, I for IIS. %  Io. Stl BOW1 HVii ANALYSIS I Asa.o„ & 5 ,1 I iMMt I I 1 • i a w u i Si Hilt ft % i Toewti Si: t Knowl*. T •> Mearl a s i lJn J fraaasai I Krtowlr* b MullBM i rvalvn ti Hisartiaa I lto%*r* not out [ ISM ill not out KM Total ifor 1 vt. 1 Hiadilia* I 4 II C Mullnu s 1 U r sonnfrr X S M f* T.ytor 1 o It IIIK.IIK .. rBT\\ ri.t>l U* •> wm i. *rMS SEPT. 7 NO. 240 The Topic of Last Week i -. is the N£\/ Carton for VEN0S COUCH MIXTURE •i : s 14 1 W letter fl CLARK*:, of R He writes "... an early Drush Uiiw "> nuUwng thfu prsssi should be followed by single!" > Before ff >l,00O crawd ni wicket contest*, the winner U> be Home Park—well above aver;**--found from the best 18 of erich —they slammed Sheffield United county on knock-out principles. *--*• •' %  ** moving wingers G-and the Individual county v •" -•"" Astall were again .imong champions to meet around the the scorer^. Sheffield found the The striker at out "Hit the ball "me of the festival games. The scoring attempts breaking dow i twice if the bsdl be alnsca. er atenped by say taut si has person, and he wilfully strlhe it again. eauMVt for the sale purpome of guarding his wicket, which he sssy de with has bat er any p.ot of has person other than hU -—|Ne nus except those which result from an •verthrow shall be seared from a ball lawfully struck twice. The M.CC. haw ruled officially that it is for the umpire lo vhether the ball has be. %  d would gel their extra before the solid tackling of tht entertainment without both teams former centre half Jack Chlsholin having to hang around. Plymouth** victory keep* them "Two players per match only level on points with Huddersflcl I would be Involved. The fielders who Improved their goal average might be recruited In a number b> beating Barnsley 9 —0. of ways. It should be worth Doth newly promoted clubs in while for clubs and member.to the Scottish Division 'A*. Falkirk provide sufficient incentives, and and Clyde had unhappy sfterI could visualise plenty of wagers noons Seven times Clyde's goal;md side-stakes." keener picked the bull out of his Single-wicket matches were net in their game with East rlf.popular In the early daj 6 and and although Falkirk scored threeas a variation might be ;o again it Celtic Park they were still Their appeal would depend vary btaten Qer AUMa. S 'Mil" *"S lamina* tirlflllh rvn oul Alt %  • a TSilot b OnliUI in ni S W k h Oodtlaia W-atotl c w S b Jordan HarrMun tun oul i*i(i* ''I>J %  K I.I.I .Mk King i.-i out Bo won not oul aarga TQtal lo S alU .il ol oickf I tar SI. 1 Soi M. I .„. VS. k I,., 1* S l-r 14 BOWL1HG ANALYSIS 1. -.nlavUM by hluailati. >M inatooii-IUI, t-.. %  UM wtaoluBiy luin Ju. koUiH and Lou Uu> Indid u .i„it kl i (Mpprr* in In. puvhvta US >UUld aJi 4 |, ),,!. Ilkr lllc %  SBBl Il-O'irt i*ui off oiin • bia -(iroo ..j aau %  1^. %  „ ho.iaj.tu %  -S* y proajari Itj ii* *u.i ui a*ss< • rii*h-inlnaM tor JiM.L-i.t.I .1*** Mat ,i U. be*l %  iaJOB Joa *tilti S|.iW "">! >(• egad* Uaa iloal i.-..i Isain hs I*~I I >e bo) • .ill Joa Joo'a (auS I '* %  in i*.i ttati^ in MI** h V toil v kat, T*aUtsn ntaasc nurrot F*lv--.OS Jo* Joe till dlaajIBi' %  >tanli au* ii*ii iif-an Hh MUror flaae in hand %  mod Joa Ji- Ui a lurU* |i th-M ,.ii -nivrr Sand -m U*xi Jo* Joa diBvuveiu decide %  ,o struck a luKond time legifmuch g rinding pTayeis with The *crk of the day howeve: mate,y or not. The umpire may p..*,.^.^ ctin un ^ lIlf „ 1: „ ., ,, tho home defeat of the League i "" ^ "'sinide-wicket match between '-ibernlans who were | '*" **y, rreddle Brown and Denis well and truly Hrkeci 3 -1 by Coinpton at one of the September Queen of the South. Last ssa*on festivals would be a ruarlnt; Hibernians won the correspond ink sag: tail i MrKaiUl* '-i*f i. n. %  .i, ..... C II WiiUatmi s S Luaaa c llulchmann Mil IOS „ %  HI-II'I regard the fsct that a run templed as evidence of the men's intention to take adv tage of the second *troke. but %  il"' Is not conclusive. -i,, ( ,> A batsman can be given out. [ do no go mi \ hc wliy w i, n If appealed ogiilnst. If. after ieB(h .. Clarke. 1 think a singles -a rr> -*>_ %  gy playing the ball, and without wlckel championship would be MjCttBr i O tOI. *>€*% any request from the opposite (jn^cticable beeause then aide, he uses his bat to return the ma^ha, would hav, to be gt Fraaja nage I ball to *. fieldsman. played off. which mi.'ht not be f l that IT cannot bs passed New Edition possible If they were tinted as £ %  *"• For the inforrnation of The M.CC is puhllshlng n ,, >op-gap in a short third-day ; L P"hlic gsmsrally 1 would new edition of Laws of Cricket ,ounty match. The single-wicket >" f ?" wa foUuwing fundamental npMJsS would then become flf le t "**,_!" _.???^: are an aim In itself instead of being a profitable side-show. But something of Hi needed. Theie is an obligation on play for the wi-.ilr .. %  laU ol wwkata i lor J. 1 an U. 11.. 4 lot I St. S lo, 141. • lo. 14. II KIII* •l klu l'ii'."> lion with the administration of the criminal law. ID The Governor-m-Executive Committee does not Interfere, and indeed, has no right to interfere containing amendments to notes and Interpretations which nlmert at helping in the application of Laws. This new edition comes effect for the overseas season of countms to provide piay lor .ne Ullh q^ i^furiiis-iM by a tudic1052-^3 and the English SOBSO-I advertieed hours, weather ue II * *" ostablished that a Ings in recent vears. In no case ....„ .... u i-rnvi*' jvtt u Judge Is free to express his oplnhas any L w been altered * IAMLt ILSMb IXJLM ,,„,, when he deem8 „ d eairsble Hutton Oat ilu -' tctsl receipt from Uie H to do. and indeed, at times The dismissal of the England Truudad—Barbados Table ffaaanU • >uld be lacking in the performCSDtaln I^-n Hutton In the Kif*:. **Hir which was held la-t month : nee of the funcUons of his office Test nf to^l against South Africa amounted io fcuuutt. Of thU he foiled to comment on matit the Oval comes to mv mini WO-BO was spent on printing '•'connected with those funcas I -udr thilaw -f 'li"i I tickets. ae.OO went to prinUng .Among the matters which thhalt 'wireprogrammes. J382W for lighi. It will be remrmberrd th-' cleaning, etc., SUM for fixing Button attemnt-d io hit the ball tlw raised seats, cartage, payment n second time after It had Mil* I to carfjswiter. ats. and *10.1 on off hla glove and SSSKT' .' to brefraghments and Ups, toUilm;; about to drop on to h> wick*' *'0a-W. In doing as however he m Toflt from the toui wai SStO :>b vented the wicket-haer. r frm~l.-a ACIII t., the Su mnkinc what would have h a d. team of the Trinidad and c nn eaev catch Tobago Amateur Table Tanni* { ., I10 ea'_ w hareas all trials of inAn aatwl wa* m-de "id *•• Association and the remaining .netmenu at the Court of Grand WH5 trlv-T. out for "obst-ucln %  %  S 145.29 to th Barbados Table s. -sioni. as everyone should th ftHd" Tennis Association. ( ,, w atrial* of the ArMnr out of thi* Im-Msr" In this lour the San Farjmned between our Sovereign the MCC. has Inchidad in thenafldo team was completoly ou'I Kb the Queen and accuscu per. aarii-ion t* ntt povemin* played by Barbados. .us." ^* N <' s ^vQulTWJS 1 i.V/r^ i 3F STOPS r.OHOHS QlftCKLY! i aaw UMM balMii* Iwaulirm a\*raf>a a *>"i Soar iivdrrf AM of b**f *tMk . ich ii aU twi no born* .in* tlii 'i n Hob*n luvfl io aay. like th* lunuaii uoman •Sb up UM wkula tiia;i*..i N %  Oaafctn to-. %  I Jatabal. ihr IU|aii I.I.I ..ii* or l>au .1 little Jtillrl GMIIII lha allftrr bt**-! ho. by tn#*i raeip|a.aUi.ii ..da Bi.iSalMat Hr*..it Ihrlt I *r* ea lo Joa %  %  Marl 'ii SKAU.f lie\IIMf %  HAPTMr ffvfirr i>p*pii*:oDocoe I S lAMUwa A OlAG*. Ji i I coaornc-i of t-* mot-ey* J ion -•• laayMaal j ,iy ^f oiwv %  %  *•-f)i O-iOUC , r, pa il 1"' atooo*.i *^tua n.iNI StCSJifSV IVIN INSURANCI COMI MNKS W04T tNSURt A PEB5X> WHC f t KiDSUJVS J ABE NOT OIUHT — E YCt THE DOCTORS ICJ ARE RIGHT! Before you iartiOarore you drtsf ANDREWS far M#*r Cb$Mtow, / First ihing in the mornini', 1 nuke sure you take your Andrew /i.n.t I'icanlinciN *JOtnc> tirsl! JUM f\gsjmn Inihblcs in the ijtfjaai MI you'U sparkle with the tune %  uul energy that Lome Irum I | icm iiee Irom inipurmcv l-'intly, Andrews cleans tlic 'lKHiih anil tongue, then settles the niiu*n, lonca up the Uvcr an.I. imally, gently clears the boweh lake Andrews as %  rcfreshir.it innk at sny time; just a H. I.HOTIIUI in J gbus of water h IKICIII DO YOU KNOW thot ih. w.mlh words gflssjfi -• %  tm ryilrm ? 1/ till is ttv'/ tU ton/rut is ii fetls frtih. Hut if your \ysttms >t it needed — in clfunsing SMgaj ti ihent the mouth %  hole ivi/em II >**> dael M -eg Uaa bat u ,-u. kiaWf. BM4t.hr hraaWrMS, Iirrd ITI-I. ix. % %  */<* %  i' iiilimi. ikMHlii*. .IrraJr. !" -. 1* US .Itu. BBBk MM' all latMtuiJ IMII* k-i-t a.ir 1 „. U k.i• Plgaurlh. %  •ndf. > %  **•! '*!L "iTh—" **-l•-^4 II..M K .( .. Pal. and JIT* iWnl 1*1 ll-"< MII gpa -d ..t.Tlll. %  terpa garrla afSO pi. ml' m -H aWtar. WT** e DR MORSES "£!£ PILLS



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SINDAV, SKPTF.MBKK 7 IM2 Sl'XDAY ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN THK EDKNS END \ Ql IET HONEYMOON*.... Top. FISHERMAN 8 CAP In itltcbod cardinal red street volret, g. .. narrow petor*aani ribbon It%  '•am Loft (IOBLIN ORI'.F.N BONNET, trnumed with Mac* relvet • l.i. k vi'lvet Mid la bow it the ba< gaBBVa****! Bottom Right THE POODLE RAT la a balalaika r -~ therod at too book and Uod with (By DltlSIU.A BKVUSI The diplomatic bonevmoon of %  n the one xrtx rhe Eden*, had '.. thernsclve* Wgfl %  notably calm, eorrert. and clrturntpeci affair HM-afc ycd In %  < from* curious eyes -the -mail H<" iuiuc-o village of Urgeirtca, il\ %  "ea fron ihf next, tn the *h.< down ui UM i-eautiful Estrela NO etie could say Ural Ibe Eden* furjo* h.. Ihey wore. N<* one A or* (h. tee*) talking iiand in air vi'n diM'iee*," noted .111 • liserver. a little sadly. Not once has Mr. Eden been slimpocd in the kind o' clothe* moat people mew about In holiday. She was reported to look elegant and beautifully e>r>-s***i at all tune*. Only Mr. Eden was spied sitting tn the porch of his chalet wearing (hcrts. • • • The Eden honeymoon has bee-i verv rnueh removed from the g.isocial whirl. In the innrnliigs the> stayed I: lh< < li.ih-t reading ihe British newspaper* delivered each day b> tn iium the Hritish Embassy and the books they brought with then mainly French novels. In 'he afternoons they went ou' for a drive. But not (fie km where ju*t the two *>f yoM foUov the none of ihp ear for mile* nt-. millMi and Mrs. Eden %  ; %  in the back, of a Portuguese police car. chauffeur b) .1 P^iugueeg policeman and escorted by a detective. Lieut -Colon.-I Attftvld The nearest ihl--g to a jaunt wa* the day they vbnted a near-by uranium mint-. The Edens were reported to have stayed there for two hours, mostly discussing production figures The Edens took all their meal* in the chalet The food was sent nver from the hotel—"And a Uttle red wine. 1 said the wine waiter, die umapeetly. They only put in the rarest appearances at the hotel, and If the> were there in the evening the* left 1 early. It was the quietest of quiet ; honeymoona-even for thr Oiplomatlc Service Man Moutloton raoa \ROI \n mi noai D 1 | %  %  .%  la. BAI.i U too soon by mg DKXIO.N SLOTTED 1 leo A Co. Ltd. UIOLB >!e-tot malarial u*eri armies, research insir tor*> all *ively featured ban through Don Mask. 11 H Co Ltd nd money MI vine (20 AJUatOIM K1IH.Ils 4INGIM M HI %  Met your bag i M31 v j aead p* DOt, remember' And > I'KN* i! %  1 ; \\> i than an all-* Let's go togell M \ ilrranrPfl of a lovrlirr ft purr in maidenforms MninVrifltr" ted metal with bolt* and nuts iH-rmaneiit. termite pi cnort"jsly etnas*. DEXIOV bm! the Hari Muluel Hulldmi: %  t Savannah and you all know tha) one*' Stores In MN 1 Iv, 1 promu %  DEXION 1 "1 HI -'i'i' hn •Ved it' .1 wondei irgdartal S -,. awe rlose to 10.000 ft, THE LONG-HAIR PROBLEM fftt.rtt NT1NU the a .taster nt nhitr Rowei • rmM roand Ua a Iktar i %  ) 1 The po %  aiadr nl I II. -fclU roan, —mr llllea nl '."> and two aoasap >.-Linn MAVI (llll. MIS I <>\F ll.\ %  >r 11 -glare lenaoK 1 ooeda alt^ie. PENS. PUN"ASCRS—got BRAJD 1 AM riEs mn ud KHAKI HOSE wl'J 1 I \s:i rops now, lei" gdMrod oveTyihimr" NiirKH(b)KS must \.' notebooks -here in then jt your %  choi i 1 uapHmpy* tn MM\ %  um III\M"\IK .nderful QRUCN PRE' SION Wan-hca with II WJIgimJ caaa. Qruen %  rtdh smartly oxprwiMA Y de Luna's you will aUo 1 '"n Devon Eor' $ rtronche*. uacntially '. nut aosortca 11 • H ma's Jewellery Stora TOI HAT JOIN WHEN TO! •*H and learn ihe wholli fai %  it of EMBROIDERY it Sm K er SWUlg Academy \h Dorothy W.iikei „i p in yoti'tl be 1 the '-':> lessons prodlng individual Instruction, sod ho wtvku 1 "': %  1 parfod .if an* %  %  I halt hOUn Lini-n. lanm-rle 1 1 : vim.iii/iti [or you, b*. for the asking at By GHYNNF. PHILLIPS LONDON. August 14. In the plush restaurant of a London *tore. Mr. Aage Thaarup, milliner to the Quoan nd to the Queotl Mother, tht* week presented his autumn collection of hata designed for tie "teen' and 11 iilbji" Mr. Thaarup made his custoraarv cheerful entrance to a background of Hght mu*ic The n he lolrt us somcTiInK about his new collection. "I design a hat to suit the ffl•lividual—and her pocket look.' he aaaured ua, "and add m> own personal touch. In this case, it %  a romant'. touch The coloura and trimmings of the hats he bad to show ua reflected Mr. Thaarup's concept oi romance. Materials were %  -" %  felta, peach-bloom velours—as an exucriment—street velvet. Colours were vivid ("They are new colour*." he stressed)-goblin green. carousel red, balalelka yellow, ji.-iiow blue, the latter lo remind one <>f the blue of hike water OB B summer's day. Styles wenmosty variations of ihe old-type bonnet, small. heah.igging and comfortable to wear. Trimmings, in this collection were few. Here and there a bow of petersham or velvet graced l hat, a gold tassel hung from the ride or (on a black felt bonnet) .. tiny bit of grouse were added. But. on the whole, the only detail was in the 5tltehlng and handwork, which wc do so well in this country," Mr. Thaarup added. All ihe hula shown weie pradUcal. A 1032 version of the Uarbo hat, a floppy felt In two shade* of grey, drew comment. Gasps of admiration creeled the entrance of a mode! wearing a i,..nl-hu^ging bonnet in goblin green felt. trimmed with an nngore band of a paler green. Ensuing applau.se mingled with the lilt of an Irish Jig from the background. A hat in street velvet, thougii, drew the loudct applause. We have xeen coats and suits made In this material. Now it is being used foi ti.it. It is smart and practical: street velvet is both crease-resisting and rain-resistim;. Called the rVherman'. (_\i| the model was in stitched cardinal red street velvet, gathered at the back and tied with a narrow petersham ribbon. (Se* %  Lustration). The nwwt attractive hal of th%  FOOTNOTt.— "Quick, remote, and dtlertonfr-lsh, eerily bored and chronlcflllu unpunctuol." commeals the American moourine Time. INDESTKlirTlBLK MRS. r.ODDARI) WHEN she was 15, Paulettc Goddard uult a job in films bemlleetion however was oerhao.i' 0*"** she discovered that only hei med with bUck velvet button, >/• %  *'* S*,^ 42 -^^.^" with a narrow band of bl .„ jard hgg mo,e than made up for velvet tied In1 a bow .t the back.* rh e indestructible Goddard as(S*-e Illustratloni The poodle MU tne farc Moulders, and hat in balalelka yellow was > | form-were back in town liv'. close runner-up (See lUustraweak, better displayed than ever. tion>. She arrived rn a suit. But the Old favourites were not forgot. jacket slipped off lu reveal a lov cut strapless top. II Is the kind of handy little out'11 that Miss Uoddard would not be without for long 'I lind it mo?' practical," the says. She went to the theatre, where her picture was taken. Aa aoon as Miss Goddard spied the photo_ the instinctive Goddard gesture, and slipped hi The pillbox made come rc-uppc.nance, this rime In cardinal red velvet, worn with a coat to match. A cloche hat with a slightly American touch was in > beaver velour. *tilched In self colour The hats shown were not all -raoher she strictly for town wear. Several I rt^rt.ri ..ii were perfect for the country. A D l c k velvet cloak W*U off a pretty shepherdess beret, for bastance. in the new shallow blue, trimmed with a petorsham bow at th> back. Or plain stitched grey felt. Mr. Thaarup also displayed .. few hats for the Twenty Plus." There was In imitation ocflct with the new lt peach-bloom velour. wllh gold a shade called heather luuc, announced to the tune of "Ikinn.e l*s*W Will the Teen* ind Twenta resist these exquisite latest creations, with the workmanship and imnll pillbox style itUnliMi, to detail that jusli nd a hnt iheir name of •model" haU' in black Many London girls go hatWs trimmed these day* Hut ill 'he hats %  hown were "inexpensive (under One or two cocktail hats were *5 The joy of ihem was that included In thr collection. Among they were all wearable and J them was a close-frtlrng bonnet in pleasure to waer 'iiuldci up was travelling light, but Ddl <•' mund stones. 1 Just like to dress comfort .1 i commented Miss floddap! IT nrrF.NDH ON TH. GENTLEMEN THI party which seams even haidet on Its gucsti than mo: u.irtlM itthe ku.l thrown arconrl mg to Chinese custom. No guest who hopes to be agate' 1 %  in dare l>rush aside the eti .uette described in the book, "The ''1/ of Chinese Cooking,"* puLi,ed this week. You must not appear httngi % >< hen the UUl calls out that dinner Is ready. "No one aee m a to iear the first aummons," notes thi uthor, Mrs. Oorten Feng "Attei mich additional urging ovary%  ly rises, but not a soul stu i'i lile i:i--iiiiing is now the rule You mui-t not ask for dishes Ui 1 be passed "Ladles concentrate on the dishes directly In front of •am." They must dapend on tin instincts of the gentleman KUC' pass them the tit-bits. g> On Page 10 i: lor them" Tin 'icceisary Vitamin A mm D. gad :ri the egg* "f <' ( ales eonUmiiii; these iilld \'il nun E. and Vilnm \. I) K K ;,n* featnies ..t AI.THA Hlflll IHITTNCY COD i.ivrn (llf. CAPSTJloB, availalile .,1 |e*Xllng drugaTists. The name I Al.l'HA promlneni m Ihe arid* field of vitammI % %  ( Co. Ltd dtotrlbution r.\ITIIFILLY YtHRS PQfl FlfTY YEARS Happens lo refer iin a lubricant fm external ux oriiy. It la, or i IUI ie the woi i i [h ii PBXACO i.fintH'Ahrr^ .nni.inii Ingj then ;'i> I J reign of upremu< i in ihe vrorld Ldbra live maikei Tha fan g RJ i i Two-way store" I m and out at George Sahely')l sun i n but Is bewitching SHAN! Nt; m White. Blue. I'ink. Grey, hYtlld and I-emot, ,u flg>. n yard' Mb a yaid* And PrlnN priced from Mc. by way o| !v*s Is a I '-' II rout siiopputg UaL I'M NaO T1MK AND riiMhin i \ir. < rrsr could be if 1 u've not looki rl %  (till.,doC e-y Ad. There's a new and wide lection of I'la-tn W.ii. I %  %  'oi Sna. k % %  ges and Thermos Flasks VacnB in nexpen Ml i r %  < %  \IIII own e Ihe rani:, I'hey'rc new and moving al the lf a dream come true — Maidenette's marveluiis aOBOal • %  ii .urves, the brm )oujig (ill il pivea your figui*'! Discover thio popolar Maidf-nform bra today, in yoer favorite (ahrh s. i-nuliie Maidanform Braon rrooaramadoonlvinllieliniled Siatoa of America. There io o matdrrtfrtrm for arory type of hguic. HOMt-rrun* lumn o GENERAL CCRTlHCAri of EDUCATION CAMBRIDGF SCHOOL HIGHER SCH CERT IOO>. alaJ '< %  L*-0 B p U-V..o!i. (>•.-•.. A C> %  • Sar. and*... (Ml Di.i.n,. %  i HI duoOvanoga -tai jl v*w 1 00 Oit* n 7tm.'WO WOLSEY HALL, OXTORD <.. Bain needs %  W put*, mildlt ie,.l ii %  : i, fonol Caticun I i %  ukaoft, hagroM one prutcti vaurhid aoopoiglURi>haft i too Will I. ,1 fUow For b*hv'i Karli %  )•.. ,tomildlv iiitili.i M thr fa/thitrnfthlf trntfim imtrm | ^ ^ \ I' I "w'" *iriti*a For Smart and Healthy Hair You can now obtain the following f.om -YOUR STATIONERS" STANLEY GIBBONS STAMr t \TM.OGI I BRITISH IMPIKi: 1951 LOOSE LEAF STAMP AI.BI MS. HINGES. also PERFORATION G*('GE8 and WATER MARK TRAYS XAONTFIERS TWEEZERS ROBERTS & CO. choose carefully .. /, use cleverly Vsrdley Cemplraion Powder, fine and fragrant, brings a now bloom to youi QaaaMy. There are nine perfect akmione coloun. Ckoose a ihade alifhtly darkar than your ddn. Pr-ihe powd on firmly and genet-.mly Broth J*IV rhe MirpKa — a t idmire your osw-Jbuod lovehniss YARDLEY Complexion Powder 1 HIGH ST. Wwm—a CwtCrit.laaToi.Goi. I ui Ii ui tli ii i il A is v!'""l .is il look* Ifctatrotii obvfeairf 'Aill il l Ian )I."M\V thf llM.I (if ills, i II i\o"rl I OUT . ii* JULYSIA HAIR CREAM The Cream of Hairdressings Iro* enqu.'rln K S. M. G. AGENCIES I. A . BDILDINO. PALMETTO STREET, BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS



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PAGE TWELVE SUNDAY ADVOCATE This West Indian CultureVI. t ^^ INBTT SUNDAY. SFFTKMBKR 7 !M2 West Indian does nol yet h. all tf % %  mark a futl fleU.id naUon. \\> maj tsjkn it, im there la "uch a thing ai> a West Indi.m MUon UM ri nn*J be a Wesl Indian Culture. It h unity that a lucking [| ao OHI ui' ol several ISIBSSBBJ that w* anDMria as "f i races. The phraae West Indian has so many meaning(hat ii la almaat meaninglcs* WV fix its meaning first, and than the rest will follow. But negative in docs not have niui'i value of itself unless backed b, something constructive. W you have found out what, h wrong, you roust set about putting it right unless you want 10 break your heart by thmkui.. about your own worthlasssjasa. And we can perhaps at least gtMH at what the true West Indian nation may be like, so that we can recognise it whan It appears and help it to grow up. We have not yet begun to gin trouble in the world. Wc have not yet begun to assert ourselves effectively. But it is reasonable to think that one dav we will. The West Indian of that futur" time must be something splendid. something that inspires respect at least, if not DMT. H. wi i !,. great in proportion as he is terrible, in proportion as he show: masterly command, not only over other-, but also over himself. Being ;t combination of all th< -i Id, we can expect him to show <*very pmsJbsa virtu* ani vice. But these two BRN loaf and "vice' are a bit tnappro priatc. A quality is a virtue or a vice—only under certaai circumstances. There is no such thing ;,s absolute right and absolute wrong. Germany's greatest philosopher, Nietzsche, exposed that superstition seventy years ago. {This does not man tbm\ i' %  : | MI M Utton, the In iief In absolute good and bad hasn't got its uses, ijuite HM lor the people must be ruled according to thatr superstition*. This, however, is u little beside the point.) And so the future West Indi.n need not be ashamed of bis 'vices': under prudent leadership he can turn •fan these to his advantage. And. of course, we must always remember thai, although disobed.ence Is a vice in a servant, it a virtue in a matter. What woul.l baaomc didn't pity themselves as we do. The, them>*lves to be a super iui ran They believed that they had a thai of civilising the world When defeated in war rhey fi night back. They persisted until Ihey won. Their word for vuiue also meant courage in war. You can see their self resjioct in their attitude towards foreign nations Everyone wh w*js neithci a Roman nor Creek was a barbarian', a word which had a strong note of coi fmpt m it. Thia Is the mod,. thai the Wr-*t Indian might fol1. w, at least partially. He must r>t want other notions to apUaa. He must not wan: "her people to clap him on the hick and call him a good fellow. he must think himself good in h own right. Still, his eelf-apl oval must bf mixed with %  liny bit of s*U-conte*npt Not the k.nd that wallows In selfc ilicism. but the kind which r* kiets that it s not even %  tnajah i that it iM. He must be amnuious for strength and power spiritual us well as physical. He must glory m might, in full and u nas h a me d recognition of the fact that nature aims at strength and nothing else. He must not le shocked when he "•f'iMV that mat ... CM *,*„,*, causa all the others are* not powerful enough to stand up to him: he must not be shocked hen he seoj that a tullet Is the %  -r Npariotitj between %  human being and a lion. We Musi Love Our Kneanie*. tences was deliberate and inlenaltendtng any""hut .n"lenient.. Ilonal and not merely a jumble *chuol, arc getting the education of words. to which they ure entiiled, which ___ they now believe that they are What i* sigiutk-ant to m* la the getting, and foe which the Pubge statement liiat "the D U hs* Trtwsury now pays. There are inthe Oovernn t-nt Education Report 1950—51 THE RKPOKT of Ihe Department of Lducatiun lor the year ended August, 11)61, has just been p" 1 -'" 1 —t ...,. I am wondering avw many pevple uncreated in education have taken toe trouble to peruse it. For me it u> an uitcreetin* documam and tu own condemnation of the methods ol adnunistrauon whjeh I have described in these columns :^ ri ~ ^SStfz t^Jixs"* '~ — m,..uand the tnini dala wTu M Sttt^^^Jg* L*-gialaUon and! Ao.uluiaS.wlSo... On the eosiMof. whlwS I uo uot propose to ea^masia* it colutd upon and blamed for the in detail; uiat would uot ue appcofailure in the 13 plu> grouo thi u prtat*) here, but Uaere are two protest report Hxujg the blame on or throe pouits which lor me are the propsr shoulders. Uur report .. %  niucaiit never reached, the Colonial S*rotary. Now triry are only blamed, in paragraph 41 the Hwyoit DM consulted I fear they might says: "The Board of Education protest again. uavues tho Director on any aduIn section 47 .w Hart 2 the lleeatlonal matter which is subV* n *y: "Education at the %  miued to it. For raatbsns conondary stage is provided in senior cerning secondary eUucauoa UH^""W 'n'cid* <>i ihelemental y Uirvctur consults the Advisory oou." I o ms Mi t — of Head Teachers in ondary Schools, uu matUcan help you to success through personal postal tuition TS UMi' r Ml.s i IfBSJSjSSSSa %  The l aa n s n CoUegcThey un iheu SBOLCSS ruiOuo — The Benoett College v. Yam have the same qualify for %  hue career, higher pay end tocial s ia n di n g. OSMS of thee* courses will lead to your advuuf aassat • HttMi l — .a-. IxfUH kl^f M.ih.~..t -..-^ ... .i — %%  •>•.. SfsMhHsa iMn Siorr WHtin ClaTIf ICATt 0* .iflccting the elemental y schuoa. the Olrector la able to ceaksull the BaibadOH aU*nieiitai-y Taach*rs' Association.'' Ho* tab i! :h_: ^_ Ueport even if it had not been written b) nun was perused by ihe Director becauae he has signed it. I am therefure justlhed in assuming that the words used, .. mean exactly what they s*y, and to (t hat \ that the const ruction of the senwill have I am venturing the sUtam uiat tins .loondary stage is |.iov:ded :il a dozen out o* Hie 124 elamiiitary school*, and I um HOUJH onv stop farther. When i>.irents and taxpayers come to realise that they are being mu.U-1 as to the nature of this "seconuary" stage or that It does not nn.Mii nhjt they were allowed to i Uev* it does mean then thenH %  ng to be grave dis*atisfu<-ti.,i. This coudition of things imposes duty on the Clovernmcnt to sec •ple's children who tlier opportunity of To put it bnetiy, he must r*rmbat as ., finil.iinnt.il o.t.onul law He must not shrink DOBB it like the Buddha, who was i'v..it.,.,| when he saw that life feeds upon life But \„ be truly noUft the West Indian must thini. quit* dill* ii %  ,rIv from most nations about combat. Ue will show himself to have a really aplendid rAanesar it he can purge himself ol all hate, envy, malice, sadism,' .ind resentment, while at the same time remaining a ggreaslve. Though he must look on what "pposes him as bad, he must think of it as 'evil,' sinful, wrong or unjust. He must be perfectly fan in this matter. He must not condemn his enemies as unjust, tyrannical or brutal people who are damned to all eternity for behaving as they ought not to behave Instead, he must realise that two nations of different oriRiii. habits, qualities, and ambitions cannot cona into contact and remain peaceably so for v*ry long. If they do, they will both sink their individuality, and heroine meagre and contemptible. They eon" neither live in that snme country nor rub shouldei %  < with each other. They must fight imtll one or the other is victorious and throws his rival out on his ear. The question of 'right 1 and 'wrong' is not brought up at all. It is simply beat or be beaten After all, the enemy has equal right to full privileges and the only way to decide the issue is to tight It out. This is Ihe principle according to which sll the mighty pie-historlr monsters were extinguished by creatures brainier— that Is stronger—than they. Man \f completely responsible for moral values: nature has nothing to do with them. We Wesl Indians are at present stiugicling to become a nation. The important thing is not the i.itlon but the stniggV This fact ulls the Advisory Commiti It Is a illowed things to slip by unnut.ead injury lulut oturn Uit on matters i lv assuming and merely uiniitLitw the *-'— affecting the elementary schools ind note that Secondary is .spelt with a i.iuitnl letter while elemonti-ry has a common letu-ir) the report says the Dlrerter Is able la ronsult the Barbados Elementary Association. Why was il not possible to write that he nacwlla the Association'' I view that i rertain dernier ingconsulted hou Id. officer had taken 1 only after ha those whom f Compulsory Education In para. 52 the Repot'. stateTrie policy is to provide sufnotent # On Psgr it again emphasises that everything >s a fight. And, whether we recognise .1 or not, we must tlnd ourselves an enemy; for tne mere existence of an enemy will give u. something to fight for us well as something to fight ngninst. But w find someone worthy of that position. In the choice there must be some measure of admiration and respect We must feel proud of our foe and wnge the battle without malice or indignation. At present. it appears that our beet foe s) Hrlilsh civilisation, tor although It is something great and worthy in itself, having accomplished many illustrious things in the past. It will stifle our own individuality if we take It too seriously and take In too much of it. Besides it is hardly congenial to us. it is alicady fully developed and mellowed, not to say decadent In many respects We ourselves, are a collection of races still In tho raw, culturally speaking, and now trying to become a nation. We have to search out our own salvation and evolve our own culture llcHides, .-. a culture Is u national lititttlrnl-philosophicnl viewpoint expressed In the form of art, it is quit* obvious that the EuruHriUsh culture must be thrown %  >ut. since its own view-poin' doesn't correspond with ours. In •nought is dinVtuit and so is its temper Above all. we d>e strongly propagandist in nature; as strongly so as Verglrs A*eJd i*. It will be very much Influenced by thought, especially political thought -since everything Is politics -~ and II will be, one might say. the banner of a people growing up into aggressive nobility. It will hi*ve reverence lor whatever is hli;h and above the democrat it-plcl ian level. It will probably be inspired by a militarist temper, though hardly BO until we have a population large enough to afford us a substantial army ami a revenue big enough to support that army. Finally, il will be the artistli expression of o new race that combhBM the good in every known type on earth