Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text




WHAT'S ON TODAY

Court of Grand Sessions — 10.00 a.m.
Police Courts — 10.00 a.m.





“
WM

ESTABLISHED 1895



bados Gk

Harriman Gives Views On

Joint U.S.—U.K. Oil Proposal

Nationalization Of a |
Industry Recognised | Shifts

- aa meet 5.
WASHINGTON, Sept 5. Pe a
THE MUTUAL SECURITY Administrator’ Averell|| Po%!¢d, along the shipping
Harriman said on Friday that the oil proposal which!| increasing speed after send-
President Truman and Prime Minister Churchill made/} jp@ & oll tanker scurrying
last week to Iranian Prime Minister Mossadegh recognizes |] jj. ae hat ae ie
Iran’s nationalization of the industry and attaches no con- | 4
ditions regarding its management or return of British |
technicians. |

swerve to the northeast had
Mossadegh announced shortly after receiving the pro-

1952











ti ntti tt sn

| New College Soon To |
Open Ai Barataria

HON. ROY JOSEPH Minister of Education and Social
Services, and Acting M feacay # Agriculture and Lancs,
Trinidad, is spending the end in Barbados after
attending a mee of the Finance Comittee of the Uni-
versity College of the West Indies...

In an interview with the Advocate last night, Mr.
Joseph said that a new Secondary School will shortly be
opened at Barataria, San Fernando, to be known as St







YESTERDAY'S WEATHER REPORT

72.0°F,

TODAY

Tota! raimfali for the month: 04 of an
inch
Rainfall trom cine Nil
Highest Temperature: 98.5°F.
Lowest Temperature
a } Barometer (9 a.m.) 29,954; (3 p.m.) 29.687
Suprise. 5,49 a2

Sunset: 6.12 p.m

Low Tide: 11.15

PRICE : FIVE CENTS
WACK FROM JAMAICA



spared the United States

mainland from ‘ immediate

pone wl = weathermen

. ; predict a further ~

posal that he could not accept it but has left an opening ward the open ‘on inae
for reconsideration. Among the points Churchill and Tru-
man made were an offer to grant $10,000,000 (United
States) to bolster Iranian economy and submission to the
International Court of Justice of the question of compen-

with “considerable” increase
in forward speed.

sation for Anglo-Iranian Oil Company’s property.

Harriman, familiar with many ————————__—__

There has been no late re-
eeenee 20 ie ee eee. said he re °
spent about six weeks in,Iran a L d Ribin
year ago as a special representa-' or son

port of the situation of the
ome os Feeieent Truman who! e .
ad sen him there to see if he J) Suddenl
could find a basis for the settle- | 1e€s u €

eorges College.

ee

Changes Lower
Cost Of U.C.W.I.
To Jamaica

KINGSTON, Jamaica, Sept, 5
Jamaica’s delegation to the}
conference of representatives of
B.W.I. governments on the future!
‘inancing of the West Indies Un'-!
versity were unable to obtsin
nuch radical change from the orig-_
inal basis of contributions princi-.
pally through strong objection |
the Trinidad representatives,
Certain changes were apyee |
however which lowers peu
cost at the U.C.W.I. hospitaiand |

fleeing tanker which in its
ment of the dispute.

last radio message, said that
it was keeping just ahead of
tke raging winds, Another
ship narrowly escaped the
grip of the winds late last
night by scurrying to , the

shore. The Weather Bureau

in an early advisory estim-

ated the centre of the year’s

Harriman’s statement said: “I| OTTAWA, Sept. 5,

always believed it was possible to| Lord Ribinson, Vice-President
find an early and just solution to|of the six British Commonwealth
this unfortunate situation, I wish Forestry Conference and Chair-
to state that the joint proposals|man of the Forestry Commission
from the President and Primejof Great Britain, died suddenly
Minister Churchill on the oif ques-|in hogpital here of pneumonia.
tion represent a real step toward| He was head of the United
the solution of this problem. Kingdom delegation, and partici-

second tropical storm as
about 500 miles east of Wil-
Nationalization of Iran’s oil in-|pated actively in a 3,000 mile

mington, North Carolina,
—UP.

Stevenson







a

new

dustry is an accepted fact, and/tour of Ontario and Quebec pro- Goes We t U.C.W.I. generally but not’ th technical. school which w ..}| Guiana, arrived here on Thursday ‘ ¥ . ive y oseph, Minist
no conditions regarding the man-|vince forests made by the con- es wholesale revision Jamaica ape place the old Tonies School that night on a two-week holiday visit, os Senne R ETS, an es +a Hon, ¥
agement of the industry or return|ference during their extensive for in a change from a popullltion ||; now being housed in a ter-|He is staying at Acera, Rockley. iducation and Social Services, Trinidad, ¢ Rome ;
of British technicians are attached| meetings in this country, which WASHINGTON, Sept. 5 basis to a budgetary basis. porary building at High Street Speaking of what he described Hannays, Q.C., who represented Trinidad at the talks.
to the joint offer to Prime Minister | began last month. He was 69. Governor Adlai Stevenson em- At a closed conference this aft: '=!San Fernando, will, when it is}|@5 the “very serious rice shortage” Mr. Hannays continued — his —————~ - —
Mossadegh, It is my earnest hope —CGP.|barked on his invasion of the} 200”, Jom, Mordecai R. E. C. opened accommodate about 160|!" British Guiana, which affected | journey to Trinidad while Hon e
that the Iranian people will rec- ia wet Gh. Ttiiee dy to hit Executive Secretary made a re- technicians but with night}local supplies, Dr. Schuler said| Joseph will leave to-morrow Burton Gains
ognize the sincerity and fairness . back st fe plies ready lease on the results which state cchools, will” cater. to over 700{it Was the first time in the history|The Barbados representative:
of these proposals and will see in b re = t a : iS publican campaign that the meeting was assisted ): students f that colony that the people|Sir John Saint and Mr. F. I
them a constructive opportunity OoOmmunts 8 ae _corruptoon: and “time|the Principal and other officers of — It will be equipped with two]had been without food. He said} Walcott, in a joint statement toi Honours In
to end this unhappy dispute.” ~ a or a change”. The Democratic] the University and members of the} laboratories, two drawing offices, }{)#t the situation was such that it) he Advocate shortly after thei

Pointing out that Harriman had To Presidential nominee prepared to} University Council. h ns ive electrien| | almost resulted in “food riots” on a: te adele he e m e

take the offensive i eee _ (and have automotive, electrical | °°" . 3 arrival that representatives i

addressed his statements to the Ul nm _ ; e in Denver on| Representatives of the colonies! and engineering workshops everal occasion he contributing territories to 1 rarians
Iranian people rather than to| Friday night in his first western] affirmed their recognition of the —_ i |

speech which is billed as aimed] vital responsibility upon the whol:

at “the independent vote’, Wil-|region to keep the academi:!
son Wyatt, Stevenson's campaign|Standards of the University Colles |
manager, said that the Governor|@Md the teaching hospital on a high
would “pay his respects to one or|!evel and agreed to recommend to
more of the slogan#” used by their governments that they ac

the Republicans, including “time cept proportionate liabilities re-|
for a change”. sulting from excess recurrent ex- |

Mossadegh, the diplomats said that SEOUL, Korea, Sept. 5.
United States strategy aimed at] General ee a Van b hae
support for their proposals that|said that the Communists still
Pe Saaitis ath a ee gaa are strong enough to launch an
tance, or at least vote against an sine ay hone a ne tones
outright rejection. That is the pounding t ey have taken from
reason why it has been trying the United Nations warplanes
through public statements to U.S. Sabrejets destroyed three

ve Iranians the United States-|Communist M.LG, 15 jets, prob-| During his




nine-day tour| the initial. Sovges approved af the
western states, Montego Bay Conference. ¥



ritish.imterpretation of the plan. ably destroyed one and damaged |throush nine
US. and British “officials wanc|three others as the Russian built) stevenson planned to. block out Caaf Inevenesd
tase, Iron fully turns’ the “plan|halt a pulverizing United Nations’ |‘t= position on such major isguee| The cost of maintaining existing
ease Iran fully turns the plan ap z. atio 4
down. —U.P. air raid on a vital Red war plant. as farm policy, foreign policy, @ On Pass j



conservation, and public power.
He has scheduled 19 speeches,

five of them described by aides Allies To Have |

as “extremely important”.

Sea Manoeuvres |
Off Seandinavia



Today’s air victory brought the
toll of M.I.G’s taken in the past
two days to 16 destroyed, one
probably destroyed and six dam-
aged. Swept wing Red jets tried |
unsuccessfully to crack through

LONDON, Sept. 5. the ring of Sabres screening Uni-|ence with mid-western :

The United States, British, and| ted States and Australian fighter |jican leaders after cuilining I his
French representatives held ‘their bombers that hit a mine and or€| foreign policy views' in his first OSLO, Norway, Sept. 5
third meeting here on Friday to|Processing plant at Sinhung, deep formal campaign & Eisen» |: More than 160 allied warsh:ps,
draft the West’s reply to the|in North Central Korea, | hower’s apeoch elves 4 neue ee big siserett cans
Kremlin's atest “proposals “tor. —UP. |'Thureday “night in ‘Philadelphia desserts aoe ree a Sean
four power ene were jwas another outright assault om|sia that the West is ready to de-
many next month. The terms of Sh ll Pl : Bi *} | the Tninien ‘administrati focus th s y 1D
the Soviet proposals of August 23 e€. ans 1g Oil “bungling” en @ seas even to the Arctic

°
Refinery In Kenya
NAIROBI, Kenya, Sept. 5.

West Meets To
Draft Reply

——_—_——— eee

Dwight Eisenhower flew to
Chicago on Friday for a confer-



cussion in Paris on Thursday. The III. games will be one of the largest

views of the N.A.T.O. delegates The displays of allied naval might—

Y ° 4 hich he accused of Ci

were also under consideration by = : ircle.

the permanent North Atlantic the nation into the Korean war| Officially known as “Operation
‘ : ; It has been officially announced Republican Presidential

oes oa, consideration | si5¢ Shell Oil Company plans to}Mominee outlined 10 “steps to since the second World ‘War, -The

Council in its general political dis- and to the brink of World War|Mainbrace* the 13-day wat
The Big Three Western powerg|build one of the world’s largest} peace”, which he said Would help re ae, vent Geena

t _ 0 ‘ try exercise is to give the parti-
_Joil refineries on the Kenya coust|to end the Korean w id ‘

are fully agreed that the proposals |° : ar and) qipating navies an opportunit

fin their present form are not ac- opposite Mombasa Islana. reduce the threat of further!to co-operate in tilbloetirree

The statement said the Kenya
Government had atequred 2,200
acres of land opposite the islan

The Western replies, while re-|for the project which it said is
jecting the Soviet offer, will not, |‘essential to the security and well
however, close the door to further | being of Kenya”. :
exchanges, authoritative sources| The cost of building the refinery
said. The Western replies are jis expected to be in the region of
expected to be completed by mid- | £40,000,000. —U.P.

September. —U.P. “

, EXHIBITIONS AWARDED
POPE REAFFIRMS :
BAN ON FEENEY The

ceptable, and federal Chancelior Communist aggression.
Konrad Adenauer is reported in

agreement with this view.

with North Atlantic Treaty part-

—UP. |ners.—C.P.

_

T.U.C. Urges More
Trade With Russia

MARGATE, England, Sept. 5

THE POWERFUL Trades Union Congress passed a
{unanimous resolution on Friday calling for extensive
trading with Russia. This was the big surprise of the
Congress representing 8,000,000 trade unionists. i

Few delegates anticipated that the mammoth Trans-
port and General Workers Union, the world’s biggest,
would join forces with the Communist dominated Elec-
trical Trades Union in this resolution.
poem erreah Not only did T. and

KOREAN WAR JET ACES HAVE A GET-TOGETHER recently sack all of i

ems 2 z é







Primary to First Grad
Exhibitions for 1952 have bee.)

BOSTON, Massachusetts, Sept. 5. awarded to Winston Anthon
|

}

The Vatican has reaffirmeg its|Lynton of St. Lawrence Boys’
ban on the Rev. L. Feeney’s St.!School and [la Loleita Forde of
Benedict centre and his teaching |the St. George’s Girls’ School,

that all Noncatholics are damned,|_ The Primary to First Grace
Archbishop Richard Cushing of Exhibitions are tenable for sis
the Boston Catholic Archdiocese, years at Harrison College (Boy.)
reported Friday, |Lodge School (Boys) and Queéen’s

—(U.P.) College (Girls).







G.W.U,
Com-

purge but it had consistently and
the electrical
Trades

of West-East trade.

The resolution was proposed by
the National Union of Minework-
ers and seconded by i Amal-
gamated Union of foun work-
ers. Supporters included the na-
tional union of railwaymen and
the Scottish Painters Society.

The resolution expressed alarm
at the increased difficulty § of

Britain's exports
which it said threatened te “ex-
tend slump conditions and unem-
ployment”.

Development
{tions with all



of trading rela-
nations prepared

, mated Union of Foundry Work-
jets said American, German and
Japanese competition in Western
;markets would force Britain to

IN DETROIT for the Air Fores’ sixth annual convention are nine jet aces of the Korean war. They are ;seek markets in Eastern countries.



(front, l. to r.): Maj. Wintus. Marshall, Capt. Ralph Gibson, Maj. James Jabara, Capt. Richard Becker and |meetings in this country, which
Capt. Robert Latshaw. Iz rear (1. tor.) are: Lt. James H. Kasler, C an C. Kincheloe, Capt. Robert } began last month. He was 69,
_ Moore and Maj. William Whisner. The convention coincides with the International Aviation Exposition —UP.



| wise, The Hindus are also plan-

penditure in the first period @ver\@ppointed Defence

munist officials in an anti-Red|Monarch is also expected to viril

over the expansion will arrive in an air force plane. by the roots for hundreds of yare

The School for the time being,
will accommodate fifty boys and
fifty girls, but will go up to a
naximum of 250 students. The
College will be run on similar
lines to Queen's Royal College

The Anglican Authorities, he
said, are considering erecting an

er . ary . j . vices, Trimidad, pictured together at Seaweéll Airport.
Pet nando, naa Mustion ener Hon. Roy Joseph, Mr, Walcott and Sir John Saint are just back from the meeting
munity are planning to do like-| of the Finance Committee of the University College of the West Indies.



- “ e

is ge R ta At
is eucaiatedate aiekak ‘500 "ahi Shortage Of eee lives ;
dren, : e e

Within the next three or fou p Finance Meet =
teckinisel sehool will aaah os n ™ ’

at Les Efforts, San Fernando at
a cost of half a million dollars.
The tender for the construction
will be awarded within the next
two weeks, _Dr

It is planned that this Specialist of

Almost Over

attended the meeting of the Finance

Neville Schuler, DSe., Eye night by B.W.LA. from Jamaica.

|
|
\
|
|
!
|
|
Georgetown, British |
|



















‘The shortage,” Iniversity College met the Pris
S he said, “is now ipal Sir Thomas Taylor, lV
Fowler Appointed almost over, and fugh W. Springer, Registrar |
oye jthe people are he University and Mr. Swab |
Defence Mobilizer more or less re- Burser, and discussed

ceiving their us-

3 pertaining to the finances of th
ual quotas, but it



WASHINGTON, Sept, 5,

President Truman on Friday| Will take a little Among matters under consid-
Production |time before the’ ration was the total budget oi
Administrator Henry Fowler (o|*ituation return he College over thi

be Defence Mobilizer.
succeeds John Steelman,
tant to President Truman ee aed

has been acting Defence Mobil- Samatica eee
izer since Charles Wilson resigned sehuler sald that
last spring during the dispute {the

Fowle

Assis-| ~ ‘
Seki | Commenting on

year period, There was a defer 8
from the last five year perind)
which was also dealt with.

They said that the
which was recently opened at
the University College for the

Mr.
who

—_— EF

concensus of&

ever the steel crisis. jopinion in Brit- reception of patients will be usc:'] left the island for
J Guiana is pr. N. somunen {85 & “Teaching” Hospital for] England on the
ing appreciation of his perform-|that federation is necessary, The| Undergraduates, and as such, wi'!| 2nd September

ance of his duties, Presiden!
Truman said that in the period
ahead “there must be no let
down” in national effort to
achieve defence production goals.|‘ifculty could be overcome wit!

He added that early shortages j'h« introduction of the new, Britist
in the defence production pro-|@Uiana Constitution. The opposi

only hitch which he Saw was that{cost a
the anti-federationists were con-
cerned about losing their consti-

tutional rights but he thought that

good deal more
‘ordinary” hospital.

In a letter to Fowler, expres ish
| than oo



Colonies

The Jamaica Government wh

gramme were being overcome «3;0% against the federation movefhad previously agreed to financ: een? Trini-
a result of expansion of basic |“®S strong, Dr, Schuler said, and| (he running cost of the hospita ae hid - "4
resources and facilities. Pew a oa ge pF nD 5 gy rrigon 1
E : ana? ee ._jextent, the people who opposed it | 4; “OSts 1 “teachir
Mr. Truman said “a well or \were the people in power ditional costs of the, “teaching Ii, Burton gained

hospital be met by the contribu
ting colonies.

distribution” o
wave military

dered system of

available supplies He said that the people generally

and atomic programmes “their |“are in favour of the proposed new Certain recommendations at
full requirements and _ civilian|constitution, He felt that it hela} connection with the University
economy equitable distributior |out hopes for a new liberation, and| College are also to be submitted

of the remainder.”-—U.P.

Eden Will Lead
Delegation To U.N.

LONDON, Sept. 5.

jhe observed that if the people of
jthat colony “are sensible’ they
‘would hold on to the reins of
|Government from now on

| He said that everybody is pre-

paring for the election under the
new franch.e which is promised
in June next year, and politicians
have already begun to campaign.

@ On Page 3









Foreign Secretary, Anthony |
Eden will lead the British dele-
gation to the next session of the) 7 “
Unitéd Nations General Assem-)| Too Slow?
bly in New York on October 14
The four other delegates will ENGLAND, Sept. 4
be Selwyn Lloyd, Minister of An ebony-black jet’ fighter re-
State, Henry Hojkinson, Minis‘e’ | jected by the upply ministry be
of State for the Colonies, Mrs.| cause it was too slow rocketec
C. A, Emmet, and Sir Gladw ¥" through the sound barrier twice in
Jebb, permanent representative 10 minutes with a roar that rip-
—C.P ped out grass by the roots
Test pilot Jonny Derry flyin:
FEISAL ARRIVES 1 swept-back wing De Havilan:
110 night fighter was almost un

IN ARIZONA
PHOENIX, Arizona, Sept. 5.
King Feisal of Iraq arrives by tors annual aerial display becaus«
plane on Friday from Las Ve so high on his first spee:
Nevada for a tour of the But the second time at lowe

noticed by the thousands attend
ng the British Aircraft Constru

he wa



fh run



River Valley. The 17-year-old altitude shock waves driven 1
carth by the plane’s wings “ex

Tal Wi Wi ranch north of the ploded” with a terrific

Luke Air Force base, where he released air, Grass was ripped ov

—(U.P.) n all directions. —U P



United Nations Accuse
Communists Of Lying —

rush

'

|

|

|

PANMUNJOM, Sept. 5. |

THE UNITED NATIONS RADIO accused the Com-|

munists of deliberately lying in charging that the chief |
Allied Truce Delegate threatened to extend germ warfare |

against North Korea. “The Voice of the United Nations .

Command” in a counter-propaganda broadcast charged



\to conclude commercial agree- that Red China’s official radio at Peiping intentionally
‘ments was also urged, The Faber misinterpreted remarks made by Major General William
aa pastel’ thas ae K. Harrison at an armistice meeting yesterday
trading relations with China, the|_ Peiping Radio quoted Red core Wt, 1. iN broadcast. said.|
jUSSR and other eastern coun« respondent Alan Winnington of |’ Th sh m UN, a atAakte zs : \ A f
‘tries, would make a substantial|the London Daily Worker as say- |e Coen latome that. it Oe
contribution toward improving|ing that Harrison had “threatened ae tt etre oe nm are . | D “Ae
the present international situa-|the extension of bacteriological |" a ti ae Se erate S|
tion which is causing grave con-|Warfare against North Korea.” helc by the aiue it appears that}
leern to peoples of all countries,”|They said that Harrison told the YOU are Satisfied to cause the;
In seconding the resolution, |Communists that “the North population of North Korea to|
James Gardner of the Amalga-|Korean people will suffer disease Suffer gradual destruction 0©:}







junless you accept our plan for their economic life, in additior

fexchanging prisoners of war.” ae disease a ation < |

| their homes and other trouble e mt bs i y =o

| General Harrison’s actualjwhich are the inevitable con- iTS THE TOBACCO THAT COUNTS
Statement in the truce building| sequences of the military opera-

|W as far from the Commun-|tions which you have forced

lis a the germ warfare them t upport and maintain

(charges re from the actual | @ --U.P. Ne EET EI

They were Sir John Saint, Mr. F. L. Wal

Burton
was ap-[ -
Hospita!| pointed Assistant}

Librarian on the].
ist of May 1951,J —

the same year to
pursue a course
in Librarianship,
Cost to be Met by Contributing | following an
earlier course at
the Eastern Re-
gional Caribbean

2
BARBADOS AND TRINIDAD Repren



tative:
ittee oO
University College of the West Indies arrived



High Tide: 5.14 a.m., 5.29 p.m,
am,



LEFT TO RIGHT:—-Hon. Ajodah Singh, Minister of Communications and Works, Trinidad, Mr. F. L.
Walcott, M.C.P., B’dos., Sir John Saint, and Hon. Roy Joseph, Minister of Education and:Secial Ser-





'S




News has been received that Mr.
Carlisle A. Burton, B.A., Assistant
‘ublic Librarian, Barbados Public
matter | Library, has passed with honours

| nis examination in Librarianship
University, it the Leeds School of Librarian-
| ship, England. He is expected to
‘sail from the United Kingdom on
xt five the 31st of December, arriving in



Harrison College,Mr. c. A, BURTON
the Higher
School Certificate with distinctions
in Latin, Greek, Ancient History
and Literature, arid attained open
Scholarship Standard, Mr. Burton

@ On Page 3







PAGE TWO





Caub Calling

IS Excellency the Governor

and Lady Sav accom-
panied by Majo: Denni
Vaughan, A.D.C., atiendei thts
Basketball games played at the
Y.M.P.C. on Thursday night.t§
After two presentation matches¥

were played, His Excel ency pre-
sented trophies to the Captain
of the winning teams,

Later in the evening they lefty

for the Empire Theatre and
the second time saw Mrs. A.

ior

L.

Stuart’s School of Dancing in the !

presentation of “Reuedev iit h,
1952.”

En Route to U.K. '

IR CHANKLES WYVULLLY,

Retired Governor of brivis}
Guiana, passed through Barba-
dos on ‘lnursday
by 1.C.A. on his way to England’
via Montreal.

Lady Woolley who was in
Trimdad with Sir Charles, was
intransit on Thursday by the
s.S. Golfite en route to the
United Kingdom.

On Health Visit

R. NEVILLE SCHULER,

O.D., D.Sc. of British Gui-
ana who had been in Barbados
earlier this year, has returned
to the co.ony on a health visit.

Dr. Schuler who is an eye
specialist is also a res@arch
worker examining the effect of
vitamins on the health of the
community,

He expects to remain in Bar-
bados during the next few weeks
and will be a guest at Accra,
Roekley. |

To Study Engineering

. JOHN G. OUTRAM, son

of Mr. Barton Outram of

Lancaster, St. James, left by the

S.S. Golfiteo on Thursday for Eng-

a where he will take up
ies in Engineering.

John .has just left the Lodge
School and during his time there
represented that school in First
Division cricket.

To Study Dancing

ISS BETTY BLADES a

former pupil of Queen's
College and daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. D. C. Blades of Beach Court
Ave., Hastings, was among the
passengérs who left by the SS.
Golfite on Thursday. She will

enter the Elmhurst Ballet School,
Surrey, where she will study
dancing for a period of about

four, years.
For Trinidad

ME: JOYCE CLARKE, wife
of Capt. Ormie Clarke of

Woodbrook, Port-of-Spain, who
had Been spending a holiday with
her“ mother at Jackson = was
amen the passengers leaving
for Trinidad by B.W.LA. on
rear:






>

f

from Trinidad

y

j



dear,

“ Don’t worry me,
can’t you see I'm checking
the poois?”





« Express Service

For Bristol University

M* ALLERT WILLiAms,

—. and Mrs. G. C. A. 8.
Wi liar of Pine Ro.d and loca
ericketér and footballer jeft the
island on Thursday by the SS.
Golfito for - England where he
will enter Bristol University w
study Mathematics.

Mr. Williams was an Agsistant
Master at Harrison College and
he expects to be away for about
our years.

Director Returns

son

R. A. R. TOPPIN, Directo
. of T. Geddes Grant, Lt:
and Mrs. Toppin’ were arrivai
by the S.S. De Grasse on Weud-

nesday from England. They
been spending three
ho idey there.

For Ten Days
D*

J. P. O'MAHONEY, Direc-
among the passengers leaving Ly

hed
months

tor of Medical Services, was

B.W.LA. for Trinidad on Wec-
nesday. He expects to be away
for about ten days.
Congratulations
Cyne ULATIONS to Mr.
and Mrs. Geoffrey Johnson

of Blue Waters on the arrival cf
a daughter which took place oa
Tuesday 26 August. Mrs, Jonn-
son is the former Miss Jessie
Cheeseman, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. S. H. Cheeseman, of Fonto-
belle. Mother and babe are doing
fine.

A Daughter
DAUGHTER was born on
Thursday, 4th September, to

Mr. and Mrs. Eric Clarke of
Crumpton Street. This is their
second child — both girls. Mis.
Clarke is the former Miss
Marjorie Streat of Bloomsbury
St. Thomas. Mother and babe
are > doing: fine.

BY THE WAY e © « By Beachcomber

F the floodlighting of games

and sports continues, what on
earth will the football crowds
do during the dull hours of day-
light?

Form queues, o! course, for the
night's fun. Night cricket could
be madé more dramatic by play-
ing a spotlight on the batsman or
the bowler, and as for open-air
ping-pong, powerful searchlights
sweeping the a would be very
satisfactory. oe craze will prob-
ably spread to the quieter indoor
games, and we shall have floodlit
chess and canasta and halma and
tiddley-winks. But candlelight is
the only light for night lacrosse.
It softens the great red faces of
the girls. '

A mere nothing

HENEVER there is a_hail-

storm people boast of having
had denis made in their hats by
stones half an inch in diameter.
But I have never read of a hail-
storm like the one which caught
me years ago in the Carpathians.
I had never before known what it
was to be hurt by hail and when
I took shelter under a great rock.
the noise of the huge stones was
like a bombardment. At a Polish
refuge hut later on they ques-
tioned me about the storm, saying
t must have been terrible up in
the high mountains. Said I, “Oh,
was that-hail? I thought someone
was throwing rice.” And I told
them of_ hail-stones at Stoke
Newington as large as footballs
which came whizzing along like
meteorites and knocked holes in
walls,

Prodnose: Who would be throw-
ing rice .in the Carpathians?
Myself; Five jolly Chinamen.



Rupert’ $ Spring Adventure—24



Rupert realises that the plan is
‘succeeding, so he drops all the
dragon food and moves nervously
aside. . He has no need to worry
for the dragon hardly notices him

and takes straight for its meal.
In another instant he has stepped

Bird chef denounces
zine roofing

The reported death of an
ostrich from indigestion is a terri
ble comment on the deterioration
of ostrich-food. Inferior boot-
leather, lumps of impure metal
masquerading as nuts and bolts,
synthetic glass, adulterated zine
roofing, processed braces — all
these foods, with blue nutrition
value, combined to make the bird
ill.

(M. Treguier, chef at a Bodmin

Bird Restaurant).

Tail-piece

A crowd of well-washers surg-
ed around him.

Was it a plea or company’s
water to be laid on in some remote

village?
Iikla Maw Bat |



ESTERDAY
At was conducted round the |
soap factory at Wivenham. A
soapster handed him a lump of
yellow soap to inspect.
The magnate took a hetty bite,

rolled his eyes, and shouted
“Cheddar!” They told him it was
for washing, not for eating, and

he asked to see it washed. Lunch
was then served, and to
that he understood his mistake}

the magnate scrubbed his hans} ®
laughingly with a _ piece
cheese,
Sport ;
. E must broaden our out-|%
look on sport before thej¢
Melbourne Games of 1956,”’ says}
a letter-writer. Yes. We must %

start training this very moment,





show | 4

of | 3

Attended Conference

> ee BRANCKER, F

M.C.P., one of the Bar-)
risters who attended the Con-
ference of West Indian Bar-
risters in Trinidad, returned
home on Wednesday by B.W.LA.
Mr. D. H. L. Ward and Mr. E. W.
Barrow, M.C.P., who also. at-

tended the Conference expect to
return in a few days.

Â¥,

For Permanent Stay

R. AND MRS. HORNER left
the island by T.C.A. on
Thursday morning on their way
to Vancouver. They hope to

make their new home there. The

Horners are natives of Mont-
serrat and had been spending
one month’s vacation here as|

guests at Abbeville Guest House.

. First Visit

R. AND MRS. W. J. REC-

TOR of Maracaibo are pay-
ing their first visit to Barbados.
Mr. Rector is Petroleum Engin-
eer at Richmond Exploration Co.
in Maracaibo. Both are keen
surf riders.

Trinidadians Return

ISS MARJORIE CHERRIE

and her mother who had
been spending one month’s holi-
day as gu@sts at “Stoneycroft”,
Worthing, returned to Trinidad
on Wednesday by the S.S. D2
Grasse, Marjorie is an employee
of the Imperial College of Tropi-
eal Agriculture.

For Two Weeks

R. A. A. REECE, who is at-

tached to the Colonial
Hospital in Port-of-Spain arrived
here on Thursday by the SS.
Golfito for two weeks’ holiday.
He will be a guest of Mr. W. W
Reece, Q.C., his cousin.

On Holiday
Mi" ROBERT De C. O’NEIL
of
Was among

“The Cliff’, St. John,

the passengers sail-
ing by the S.S. Golfito for Eng-
Isnd, He has gone on a holiday.

Back to England

RS, JEANNE CLARKE and
her two children Michael
and Gerald left the island for

England by the S.S. Golfito on
Thureday. They had been spend-
ing two months’ holiday here as
guests at Abbeville Guest House
ate Misses Phyllis and Joyce

Bowen who left with the
Queen’s College Netball Teem
for Trinidad early last month,
returned home on Thursday by
the SS. Golfite after spending

one month’s holiday. Phyllis is
an Assistant Mistress at St. Mich-

Sisters Return

» ae V's Girls’ School whiie Joyce
is Secretary to the Headmistress
of Queen’s College.

a board of Inspectors that they
are not taking up any particular
sport for fun, but in order to win
medals, and to consolidate inter-
national friendship, These rules
should also apply to horses,
An idiotic question
,URING recent widespread
rain scientists claimed that
one particular shower was theirs.
They had sprayed a cloud with
salt, Those who prefer salt to

rain are clamouring to know why
these

salt
about,

scientists cannot just drop
when there are no clouds



NOTICE

PARADISE BEACH
CLUB

Under Rule 34, the Club
will be closed to members
from 8.00 p.m. TO-NIGHT





(Saturday, 6ih September)
to 6.00 a.m., Sunday, 7th
September,

OOOO
itl SS

*2SOSHO DOOS asa *
: HOLBORN CYCLE AND





Dance and
Floor Show



and we must appoint a

on anyone who breaks training
rules. The athletes must satisfy

—_——

Sports | >
Ministry, with powers to impris-, ¢

Y. M. P. C.

Saturday, nk September,
1952
In support of the Club’s Tour
to Trinidad in October







over its tail and grabbed the end
of the chain, le =teels very
frightened, but the dragon does
hot seem to mind at all. Firse st
finishes the food and then cheer-

fully prances along the passage
leading Rupert as towards ee
entrance,



NOTICE



—_—oO—

Floor Show commencing
at 10.30 p.m.
includes

Songs by Gloria Hunte
Western Numbers by Adrian

Howard

Sclections on the Piano

~ Accordion by Dr. Ferreira
Violin Solo by Maurice

Fitzgerald

“Black Face” Comic Sketch
by Members and their
Friends

—o—
Music by the Police Band
Orchestra

ATHLETIC CLUB

Announces
ITs
—a{ anes
Tickets obtainable from ‘
$ Members at $1.00 Each [Eewetnereeensenet



HAVING SOLD OUR BRANCH STORE NO. 27, BROAD STREET

TO

MR. GEORGE SAHELY

-~ ALL ACCOUNTS ARE PAYABLE AT

T. R. EVANS,

*PHONE : OFFICE 4294

(WHITFIELDS BRANCH) NO. 15, BROAD STREET

DEPTS, 4220

oe



|

BARBADOS ADVOCATE






—He Went Swimming in the Middle of Winter—
By MAX TRELL ; 7

look a little wet,” Hanid
i to her brother Knarf as she
peered at him. “Have you been in)
ning? But 1 don’t think you)

34 have been,” she went right |
on before he had a chanve to an-



“you

ewer her, “It’s a very cold day. It}
isn’t the kin a of day anyone goes |
swimming in.’

g
Knarf sat down as close to the!
as he could get. “I wasn’t in
imming,” he said. “But I was in
the pond.”

“You fell in!"

“Well, I didn’t really fall in.”

“But—you got in the pend?”

“Yes, It was ean accident. If
wasn’t my accident. But I Do."

fir



there. So it happened to me, too.”

Hanid looked puzzled. “To you,
too, Knarf? Who was with you
when it happened... whatever-

The ducks went swimming.



too. And I also went along to see

it-was?” why they wanted to see the pieces
“Nine ducks and a goose,” said) ef ice.”
Knarf. “And what happened after you

Hanid now insjsted on hearing/all reached the pond?”

the whole story. Paddled Around

On the Steps “The ten ducks waddled in and

“Well,” began Knarf, not sound- | paddled around. Then I sat on the
ing as ‘though he enjoyed having! goose’s back and she waddled in
to tell the story, “I was sitting on|with me and paddled around. We
the back steps of the house whe ked at all the pieces of ice float-
1 heard a quack-quack-quacking?ing on the top and after a few
sound. It was five ducks. They said|minutes--a very few minutes—the
they were going down to the pond.) ten ducks paddled back to the bank
But I told them there was no use and waddied out again. But the

going.” goose didn’t.”
“Why did you tell them that.) “Why not?” asked Hanid in a
mnaees” |surprised voice.

cause I knew the pond was
too &ld to swim in. There were
pieces of ice floating on the top. So
the five ducks listened to me and
finally they decided that I was
right. They were just about to turn
around and go back to their house
when another five ducks came!
along.”
“Where were they going?”
“They were also going to the
pond. I told them the same thing—
about the pond being filled with
pieces of ice. So then they decided
not to go for a swim, either. And
at that moment a goose came
along.”

“She couldn’t. Her feet got stuck
in the ice and she couldn’t move.
So there I was, on the goose’s back,
in the middle of the pond with ice
a!l around us. Well,” said Knarf,
“I finally had to get off the goose’s
back (because it was getting later
and later and colder and colder)
and start walking back on the ice.
But the ice wasn’t strong enough—
!and every step I took it broke and
I walked in the water. And that’s
how I got wet.”

“H’mm,” said Hanid; “and what
happened to the goose? She isn’t
still in the middle of the pond, I
hope?”

“Was she going for a swim?” “Oh, no! She just followed me

Knarf shook his head. “The goose| back, after I broke the ice. But she
said she was going down to the/ didn’t seem to get wet at all. You
pond just to see how many pieces! know, Hanid—I kept wishing I were
of ice were floating on the top. So|a goose!”
down she went. And the ten ducks | «“You were, Knarf—you were!”
followed after her to see the ice, | anid exclaimed, laughing.





Young Chinese Student Permitted
To Marry English Nurse

NEW YORK, Sept. 5
A Chinese student is now free
to marry an English nurse thanks
to a cablegram from his parents

Wong showed him a letter in
German from his parents. The
Clerk could not read it. Undaunt-
ed the young lover cabled his

in Germany. Hubert Wong, a 20- parents in Castrof Rauxel and
year-old student at Rensselaer they backed him up. Wong's
Poiytechnic Institute was first bride to be is Mary Jane Jones,

refused a marriage license be- native of
cause the Town Clerk thought

him under age.

32, of New York City,
Llandeli, South Wales.



Listening Hours

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 6 1952
From Britain.

4,00—7.15 p.m, — 19.76M., 25.59M

——_—_ —— _ 1,15—-10.80 p.m, — 25,53M., 31.32M

4.00 pm. The News, 4.10 p.m. The Daily ~— ‘
Service, 415 pm Home At Eight, 5.00 7.15 p.m, Behind The News, 7.45 p.m,
p.m. Rugby League Football, 5.05 p.m. Sports Review, 8.15 p.m, Radio News-
Lehar, 5.15 p m. Music for Dancing, 6.00 reel, 8.30 p.m,’Radio Theatre, 10.00 p.m.
Pm ‘Scottish Magazine, 6.15 pm Stars The News, 10.10 p m, News Talk, 10.15
of the Caribbean, 645 pm Sports p m_ Music Magazine, 10.30 pm. Vari-
Round-Up and Programme Parade, 7.00 ety Fanfare

PLAZA THEATRES

p.m, The News, 7.10 pm. Home News





“BRIDGETOWN ) BARBAREES
é Dial 5170
opr apaaed To-day 445 & 8.30 p.m,

(Dial 8404)

TODAY 445 & 8.30 p.m. Last 2 Shows TODAY,
. Uulvesnal Aediba vip 4.45 & 8 90 p.m.
Drama! Errol FLYNN in
“APACHE DRUMS” “ROCKY MOUNTAIN”
“ (Technicolor) With Patrice WYMORE
ROOM FOR ONE Stephen Coleen SS a










Today's Special 1.30 p.m
SPORT of KINGS

Paul CAMPBELL &
“BLAZING ACROSS
The PECOS”

McNALLY — GRAY
Extra Special:
“SUGAR CHILE

ROBINSON"
& COUNT nae ne &

MORE"

Cary Betsy
GRANT — DRAKE

land continuing Daily
Warner Hilarious
Entertainment!

oe
To-day's Special 9.30 & 1.3¢

quae sce
Today's Special 1.30 p.m

Charles STARRETT





“BUCKAROO SHERIFF
OF TEXAS” “THUNDERHOOF”
and *reston FOSTER & Midnite Special Tonite
“TIMBER TRAIL” “WHIRLWIND ‘WESTWARD BOUND’
Monte HALE (color) RAIDERS’ || Ken MAYNARD &

“RANGE JUSTICE”
Johnny Mack BROWN

SUN. & MON. 445
8.0 p.m
Garry COOPER in
“DISTANT DRUMS"
(Technicolor)

==>

Charles STARRETT

a



Midnite Special TO-NITE
“MILLION DOLLAR

PURSUIT"

Penny EDWARDS &

“SOUTH OF RIO"

NO HALE

———<—$—$———————————
Midn't+ Spectal Tonite
“THOROUGHBRED

Tom NEAL &

“TRAIL OF

ROBIN HOOD’

Roy ROGERS (coor)






“It's wonderful the way Active-lather
facials with Lux Toilet Soap leave skin
softer — really make skin lovelier!”

says Teresa Wright,

loveliness that wins romance!

TOILET

The

AoLTS 759-1 453-50







A film star dare not neglect her skin.
Teresa Wright makes sure she always has a daily Active-lather
facial with fragrant Lux Toilet Soap. Give your skin this
gentle beautifying care. It's quick and easy but it really works!
You'll find gentle Active-lather facials give the skin fresh

fragrant white soap of the

GLOBE.

TODAY 5 & 8.30 p.m.

and Continuing Daily

"ADALE ROBERTSON
ANNE FRANCIS

EXTRAS
OLYMPIC GAMES FLASHES

THERE SHALL BE WINGS
FELIX THE FOX

New Prices

Pit 12c., Circle 24c., House 36c
Balcony 60c., Boxes 72.,
(Kids Half Price Matinee)

tanrver rox





GAUETY

The Garden—St. James
TODAY TO MON, $30 P M
Mat SUN. 5 PM

Screen Guild Action Drama !

“STEEL HELMET”
jene EVANS — James EDWARDS
a





MIDNITE TO-NITE
“OUTLAW BRAND"
Jimmy WAKELY &
“WEST OF ELDORADO”
Johnny Mack BROWN







COCKTAIL

DANCE
CRANE HOTEL

In Aid of

THE CONVENT OF THE
GOOD SHEPHERD

Monday, 6th October
(Bank-holiday)

From 6 p.m. to Midnight



Music by Keith Campbell
and the Society Six also
the Jumping Jacks



ADMISSION $1.50
Snacks Free

SSSSSOSESE SOOO SOOCSOES
ene



DEFEAT
RHEUMATISM

TAKE

BRAITHWAITE’S
RHEUMATIC
REMEDY

Find Relief Before
You Finish Your First Bottle




You'll



That’s why charming

2 new

LUX

SOAP

film stars

Ee)

TS SSS
POSSI SOO OOO OOO TOTO,

.
oe



SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1952



Ea The RI Ve

os

and © 4 o4 fan

a

se 4
bp

a



FOR SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1952

Look in the section in which your birthday comes and x
find what your outlook is, according to the stars.

ARIES To-day you could hit your peak for week.

*

x
TAURUS
+“ April 21-—May 20

March 21—April 20 Fine benefits derived from smart effort.
Industry, arts,: science, home interests

greatly sponsored.

Much more than that fighting chance if
you hold temper and don’t be. over-
anxious to “get going.” Study, seek advice
before acting. Personal interests should

advance.
*

Most beneficial activities properly screened
can bring excellent returns, Schedule your
affairs to give time for all-out effort. New +

trys favoured. * -

Good period for new gains, carrying out *
strategic plans, manoeuvres, You can
achieve in most substantial ways. News +

will be benefic.

+

eM
GEMINI
x May 21—June 21



May find competitors at their best now,
so aim to top them in performance, Check
your affairs carefully. Really your day.

*

Things Leing normal you should have no
complaint with this full, auspicious day.
Activity servicing general business, com-

x Ang. 23—Sept. 23
munities favoured.

*

*«
*

LIBRA

Double your effort, get into the swing of
Bept. 24—Oct. 23

all stimulating progress. Stars favour most
worthy trys, whether personal or business.
Employment prospects good.

SCORPIO Though you may find some things easy

24 . 22 going, expenditures should be _ sensibly
oe or controlled, Sound investments, art, teach- +
* ing, mechanics, forge ahead.

* ¥

Many activities among the top favoured;
possibilities for rea] gains here. Some
mental tasks may be harder, but they are
9 conquerable, Give your best and win!

an ote es Issues relating to real estate, financing

matters more favourable, with some re-
servations, Be sure you are right; you can +
do more than you think,

* ¥

*
>

SAGITTARIUS
Nov. 23—Dec. 22









* AQUARIUS Be on the job; know what you are about
Jan, 22 — Feb. 20 2.4 efforts will produce substantial gains.
\ Have no qualms about your own progress,
1 % Good luck! *
PISCES * *

Move steadily ahead, New ventures should
be astutely handled, they can make good
results now. Don’t fear to tackle tasks.
Many prospects auspicious,

+ Feb, 21 —March 20

* as

x YOU BORN TODAY: Many versatile qualities and ad-

x mirable characteristics. Virgo is a Sign of the scholar, the

% * deeply religious, the honest, logical thinker. You can be
x of great service to associates in social as well as business

% circles, Birthdate: Marquis de LaFayette, famous Fr. frierd

my of America; Jane Addams, noted sociologist; Otto Kruger,

% actor. *
i a a i a a a a a ae
%

.

% OPCS CECLP EPO SPELLS OSSLSEE







TO-NIGHT is the NIGHT !!

THE BARBADOS HOTEL ASSOCIATION

invite you to the

“BEACHCOMBERS' BALL"

PARADISE BEACH CLUB

9 P.M. TILL——?
Curwin’s Band — The Prowlers’ Steel Band
TICKETS: $1.50. DRESS OPTIONAL,
LOTS OF FUN AND LOTS OF PRIZES


















the first of which is



A Vacation for Two

People |

at the Santa Maria Hotel,
Grenada, for One Week



i YOU TO-NIGHT







IMPIRE THEATRE

STARTING TO-DAY, 4.45 & 8.30 P.M.
AND CONTINUING DAILY AT 4.45 & 8.30 P.M.

THE PRINCE WHO
WAS A THIEF













ROODAL THEATRES



EMPIRE OLYMPIC ROXY ROYAL
ning To-da: To-day at 4.45 & $.15|To-day to Tuesday/To-day & Tomorrow
at eas 2 8.30 He & Continuing 4.45 & 8.15 4.30 & 8.16
and continuing @all¥) py oiyersal Pictures Universal Pictures |United Artists
niversa ictures Presents aa



Tresents

Universal Pictures Macdonald CAREY | Jose FERRER as

|
ts Audie MURPHY
| Presen: Site DUGAY | Alexis SMITH in x
| THE PRINCE " CAVE OF .THE| CYRANO DE
| WAS A THIEF THE OUTLAWS BERGERAC
Starring CIMARRON KID Color by Technicolor} Extra
| sa and It's the mystery or) Latest News Reel
Those two sensa- the great Wells Monday & Tuesday
| tional young stars) HOT STEEL Farso Robbery 4.30 & 815
} Tony CURTIS Starring To “at Mildnitc
| -night at Midnis
Piper LAURIE icha [EN . | °
| Color by Technicolor Richard ASLEN lRepublic .w hole | SARABMID
=. —— Seria
| extra To-night at Midnite]. verar gs
| Latest British News |\ WEB OF DANGER OPERATOR oo"
| _ To-day at 1 30 and Wed. & Thurs MY OUTLAW
LIGHTS OF OLD 4.30 8.15
SANTA FR and. | eee areitePs oe "|: BROTHER.
RoLt, ON TEXAS “DOUBLE LIFE” |~ wed. & Thurs.
MOON Th as i. Starring We cli tenes
Vo-night (Midnite, | .vigrpnpe Ray” | Ronald COLMAN |.yoren SAHARA”
Whole Serial } and } and | and
| ADV. OF FRANK|“ONE HOUR TO |“DANGEROUS “SALT TO THE
AND JESSE JAMES) LIVE GAME DEVIL



——







SATURDAY,

SEPTEMBER 6, 1952

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





B.H. Should Be Commonweal

Attack Comes
From Moseow

LONDON.

British Honduras should be a
show-place of the Commonwealth,
an object lesson to the neigh-
bouring American republics. In-
stead, it is, the least prosperous
of the Central American coun-
tries.

This is the impression of Mr.
T. S. Steele, a correspondent of
the London “Daily Telegraph,”
who visited the Colony in 1948
and again this year to make a
survey of conditions there.

Until 1946, he ‘writes, British
Honduras was a “forgotten Col-
ony.” This is no longer so, Since
the war, Britain has spent some
£ 3,000,000 in the Colony and the
British Honduras Government has
produced another development
plan on which another £1,500,000
is being spent,

“There is no doubt that the
people are better dressed, there
are more cars on the roads and
more money is spent in the shops”,
says Mr. Steele, comparing 1952
with his 1948 visit. “But, so far,
that is all.”

Today, he continues, there are
over 250 miles of all-weather
roads in the Colony and another
100 miles of feeder-roads suitable
for motor traffic. But the main
road linking Belize with Stann
Creek has yet to be completed.

The 32% mi pues road cost-
ing about £500.

to build is
one of the m expensive tvads
in the world,

e says.

“All this has been made possi-
ble.” continues Mr, Steele, “by
grants from Britaiti’s Colonia!
Development and Welfare Funda.
Of the first grant of £1,250,000,
74 per cent, Was devoted to in-
ternal commumications, as the
first and most fundamental need
of the Colony. Of the balance,
13 per cent. was mt on agri-
culture, fisheries forestry, and
13 per cent. On social sefvices.
The next stage of the Colony’s
development plan calls for the
spending of another £1,000,000 of
C.D.W. money and a_ further
£800,000 raised by a local Gov-
ernment loan.

“The planning has been good
and the progress made during the
last few years is obvious. All of
it has of necessity been limited
by the money which Britain has
made available.”

But Belize is still a city of
wooden houses without proper
water supply and without sani-
tation. It is these conditions,
writes Mr, Steele, that have made
the country ripe, in the opinion
of Moscow, for Communist prop-
aganda and this is already follow~
ing the pattern so often seen in
other parts of the world.

Propaganda, telling whe people
of British Honduras to “revolt
and throw off the yoke of the
British oppressor” is pouring over
the radio from the Communist-
controlled Guatemalan Govern-
ment station, An anti-Government
party has been organised in the
Colony and has received funds
from Guatemala, which is receiv-
ing funds directly and indirectly
from Moscow.

Now the Government is to open
two new radio stations in the
Colony, to be started by B.B.C.
officials, but total expenditure
over the next two years will be
limited to £35,000, including stu-
dio arid all broadcasting appara-

tus. Films and posters will also
be produced for visual teaching.

“By this means,” Mr, Steele
concludes, “it is intended to

spread among the people of Brit-
ish Honduras the British way
life and to let them and the Guat-
emalans hear news bulletins com-
piled from adequate sources,

“All these plans are excellent
within their financial limits. They
are immensely important not only
to prevent the spread of Commu-=
nism into British Honduras but
to show the people they are not
forgotten by Britain.

“Much has been done by the
post-war Colonial Service; a new
and better type of man is enter-

ing it. But in British Honduras
there is a problem which they
are trying to solve with inade-
quate resources.”—B.U.P.



MAIL ‘NOTICES

Mails for Dominica, Antigua, Montser-
rat, Nevis, St. Kitts by the M.V. Moneka
will be closed at the General Post Office
as_ under :—

Parcel Mai) at 12 noon, Registered
Mail at 2 p.m., Oruinary Mail at 2.30 p.m,
on the-€th September, 1952.

Mails for St, Lucia, Dominica by the
Sch. United Pilgrim S. will be closed
at_the General Post Office as under :—

Parcel Mail and Registered Mail at
2.30 a.m, Ordinary Mail at 9 a.m. on
the 6th September, 1952.





£3 For Attempting

To Stowaway

His Worship Mr. E. A. McLeod,
Police Magistrate of District
“A” yesterday ordered Ear
Brathwaite (30) a tailor of Jes-
samy Lane, St; Michael, and
24-year-old labourer Kenneth
Grannum of Eagle Hall, St. Mic-
hael each to pay a fine of £3
in one month or one month's
imprisonment with hard labour
for attempting to stowaway on
the Schooner Lucille M. Smith
on September 5.

Both defendants were found
secreted on the schooner by Fitz
Flocka, the watchman on _ the
Schooner, about 5.45 a.m. on Sep-
tember 5. After discovering them
he notified the Bridge Police
Station.

Harbour Police Constable Mar-

shall said that he boarded the
schooner after receiving in-
formation and found the de-

fendant Brathwaite in a hatch
while Kenneth Grannum = was
hiding under the crew quarters
Marshall told him that he
was trying to get back to British
Guiana to work with his father.
Sgt. Alleyne attached to Cen-
tral Station prosecuted in the
case on beholf of the Police.
_——————

“Stentor” In Port

The Dutch Steamship Stentor
arrived in port yesterday morn-
ing from Amsterdam with general
cargo for the island. The cargo
consisted of 150 cases of milk
powder, 2,177 crates of potatoes,
1,150 crates of onions, 2.087 car-
tons of ‘Four Cows’ Condensed
milk, 13 cartons of tinned ham,
10 cartons of meat preserves, 10
bales. of duplicating paper and
942 bundles of beech staves.

The vessel is mastered by Capt.
J. Manage, and fts agents here
are S. P. Musson & Sons, Ltd.

STANDPIPES AT
DEIGHTON ROAD

Standpipes are now being
erected at Deighton Road. Pipe-
lines were laid some time during
March, As a result, many people
seized the opportunity to instal
their own lines, but work has
only recently begun on the
public standpipes.

It has been a long time that
this district has been without
water, and doubtlessly residents
of this area will welcome this
move on the part of the Water-
works Department.

RADIO STOLEN

Colin Carrington of Cheapside,
St. Michael, reported
Police that his radio which he
had in his dwelling house at
Cheapside, was stolen from there
sometime between July and
August this year.

e valued the radio at $100
The Police are making investiga-
tions,



SOLE

to the E



. “Can we supply a set that rens on paraffin?”

Britain’s





th Show Place





| SEA AND AIR |
| TRAFFIC |

In Carlisle Bay

Sch. Lydina A. Sch. Everdene, Sch.
Zita Wonita, Seb. Mary M. Lewis, Sch.
Frances W. th, Sch, Franklyn b. R.
Sch. Lucille Smith, Sch. Anita H.,
At Last, Sch. D’Ortae, Sch. Lauda’ .
Seh, Gardenia, Sch. United Pilgrim, h
Augustus B. Compton, M.V. Gloria Maria
Sch. Emeline, Sch, Marion Belle Wolfe,
Seh. Amberjack Mac, Sch. Harriet Whit

0 taker
ARRIVALS

M.V. Moneka, 100 tons, from Dominica,
mder R. Hudson
the Schooner Owners’ Association,

+S. Stentor, 1,083 tons. from Amster-

Assoctation

Seawell

ARRIVALS
From Demerara —September 4th
Maisie Brummell, Patmaa Niera, Marie
Niera, Evans,

Desiree Niera, Marjorie

Maycock, Robert Lewis, Maria Bernstein

Rochelle Teper. Paulette Teper, Betty
Whyte. Jacqueline Whyte Neville
Schuler

Lomden Express Service From Trinidad—September 5th :

—_ te Tt on R. Leung, A

, e - &, y, E. Vaughan, L.

° Changes Lower = vaunan'c. Greenies. Hokeess, 7

l re ra i K. Licorish, D. Dwarikasingh,
MAO,

On Exhibition

NEARLY SIXTY different types of aircraft are on
show at the Society of British Aircraft Constructors’ Flying
Display and Exhibition at Farnborough, Hampshire, which

opened on Monday.

Eleven are completely new types

which have not been seen in public before. :
An impressive visitor which flew past on the opening
day was the 140-ton “Princess” flying-boat, which had

only made its maiden flight a few weeks earlier

hy can

carry 120 passengers or 200 full-equipped soldiers over

very long ranges.





Spencer Charged
With Wounding

Case Dismissed

In the Assistant

Appeal yesterday Their Honours
Mr H. A. Vaughan and Mr. A. J.
H. Hanschell without
prejudice the case in which Glad.
stone Springer charged Rupert
Spencer of Tudor Street, St.

Court of

Michael, with wounding him with ,

a hammer on October 7.

In the Lower os a >
Mr. E. A, McLeod, ice Magis-
trate of District “A”, fined
Spencer 25/- and 5/- costs to be
paid in 14 days or 14 oy im-
prisonment for ‘vounding Spring-
er and Spencer appealed against
the decision.

In the other case in which
Spencer charged Springer with
inflicting bodily harm on him,
Their Honours fined Springer
20/. for the offence and thus con-
firmed the decision of His Wor-
ship Mr. E. A, McLeod.

Springer told the Court that on
October 7, he went into the shop
of Rupert Spencer to shelter from
the rain. While there Spencer
told him to leave the chop and
he explained to Spencer that the
rain was falling and he did not
want to be out in the rain.

He refused to leave the shop
and Spencer took a hammer and
hit him with it on his head,

Spencer told the Court that he
had not struck Springer with a
hammer, but had only asked him
to move from the entrance of the
shop so that customers could
on and that he had refused to

0 so,



LABOURER REMANDED

Everton Harding, a _ labourer,
of Dayrells Road, Christ Church,
was yesterday remanded until
September 8 by His Worship Mr.
i. A. McLeod, Police Ma te

of District “A’ ona charge of

ne money from Eugene
Alleyne by false pretences.
The charge stated that the

offence was committed on August
28. Sgt. Alleyne is prosecuting

for the Police from information
received.

AGENTS

The Gloster GA 5 “Javelin”
delta-winged fighter, a twin-
engined two-seater “flying trian-
gle’, made an appearance but did
not show off its full paces. The
public was not allowed to inspect
it closely on account of the many
secret features of its design. The
“Javelin” carries elaborate radar
equipment to enable the crew to
spot and intercept fast-moving
aircraft at great heights, at which
it is almost impossible for the
human eye to make out a for-
mation of even four planes during
the fraction of a second that they
ere. visible.

The “Javelin” is one of Britain’s
eee aircraft, Another
is the “Canberra” bomber which
recently put up a new record for
the Atlantic crossing “there and
back”, and a new training version
of which is on view at Canberra.

Other new aircraft at the Dis-
pla were the newest British
Faaer-thanedune fighter, the D.H.
110, and the world’s first delta-
wing bomber, “the four-engined
Avro 698.

Among aircraft in the static
park is a delta-wing model power-
ed by a rocket motor, product of
tte Fairey Company. This aircraft
has recently completed a series of
test flights on the pilotless weapon
testing range at Woomera, Aus-
tralia,

The Duke of Edinburgh was
among the visitors to the Show on
‘Tuesday, September 2. In all some
24,000 guests of the Society are
expected to attend on September
2, 3, and 4, including at least
8,000 from 70 countries abroad,
The Display will be open to the
public on September 5, 6, and 7.

——

Representatives
At U.C.W.L.

@ From Page 1

the various colonies shortly.
The Conference which lasted
for four days ended on Thurs-
day night,.and on the first day,
delegates took the opportunity to
inspect the laboratories, hos-
pitals, and Arts buildings. They
also met the various Professors
and discussed matters with them.

During his stay in Jamaica,
Mr. Walcott took the opportunity
to investigate on behalf of the
1.C.F.T.U. the Jamaica Trade
Unions which are seeking afillia-
tion to the 1.C.F.T.U.

to

INTERNATIONAL TRADING CORPORATION LIMITED

Telephone 5009

an ote

eve ¢
fo, BSBPIEX "gine if

yialso









3009

— BEWARE OF

SUBSTITUTES —

THERE IS ONLY ONE AMPLEX!
AMPLEX is the world’s

ONLY Gordon-Young U.V. Activated
Chlorophyll Deodorant Tablet

There is, therefore. NOTHING that can take

the place of this particular product.

AMPLEX—and SEE

STOCKED BY

J L. .INTON, High Street.

E. C. GILL, Olym

pia Pharmacy,

©£MPIRE PHARMACY, Tudor Street
A. F. JONES, High Street.
a3. C. WALKES, Tudor Street.

H. L.

HUTSON, Tudor Street

ROCK’S DRUG STORE, Tudor Street.
HINDS & CO., Roebuck Street.

BRUCE WEATHERHEAD,

Head of Broad St.

Ask for
THAT YOU GET IT!

CLARKE, Cosmopolitan Pharmacy.

WORM,

. C. BROWNE
H. E. PILGRIM,

Nelson Street.

Progressive

2 A.

K, V. buck Street.
STOUTE’S DRUG STORE, Roebuck Street.
co. , Roebuck Street.

A. A. BROWNE, Eagle Hall.

Pharmacy

STANDARD PHARMACY, Tweedside Rd.

F. S. OLTON, Sw

an Street

Cost Of U.C.W.L. a M. Gleason, A

‘egerreis, W. Spence.
DEPARTURES

Tio Jamaica "%. Mammesd, We Reedy E. Resce, L.
Vilaneuvs, “A Gere, “3. “Cunt” ©. |

Tn <: @ From Page 1 = thea, a Gooding "a. one
faculties and academic, adminis S'*ie. RB, Wood, S. Ashby. P. Jacdues,

trative clerical and technical stot Por 2

. <— September Sth :
and price levels have generally S. Webster E. Field E. Bell, C. Gou-

increased sharply since then, A yeia, C. Gibson, BE. King, 1. Searle, G
é Fink ; h, H. Gc
decision was woken by the meeting iiie. Pp. "riek M Wickham’ o

to recommend to the governm
that the University’s estimates
the second period 1953 to 1958 be
accepted as a basis of quinquennia!
grants by which the college wi'!
be financed and that proposals for
teaching chemical technology an |
economics be approved with: \
these estimates.

tS Forde, Sukhpaulsingh M. Gre. ;
* DaSilva, P teswre Eten, Alba



Burton Gains

Honours

@ From Page |

The conference also considere | also holds a London University
the question of recurrent expenscs General External B.A., in English,
for the teaching hospital ant English History and Latin (1946)
agreed to reecmmmend the adoptiny Since leaving school, he served

dam, under J Manage as Master
Axents 5S. P. Masson & Sons Ltd

©. 7. Rodas, 1,928 tons, from St, Vin
eent, under D. P. Bruin as Master;
Agents DaCosta & Co, Ltd

Seh. Cyril E. Smith, 56 tons, fror
Miritish Guiana, under L. Olliverre as
Master. consigned to the Schooner
Owners’ Association |
och. Amberjack Mac, 41 tons, from |
Martinique, under J. Patrice as Master
consigned to the Schooner Owners’

Zena Razack, Louis DeMendonca, Doreen |

E. McKinnon, A, McKinnon, J. McKin- i

}

as Master; consigned to)

|
|

!



of a revised basis for allocatin: On the Staff of Harrison College |

costs where he played a major part fh

the formation of the School Libra-

Regret was expressed that {h> ry, retiring from that School in

present Principal Sir Thoma’ 1950 to take up an appointment as

Taylor will shortly relinquish h a Senior Assistant Master at
office. Bishop’s High School, Tobago,





BOVRIL

ine very
goodness
of beef

You can taste the richness of prime lean beef
© Bovril, You can feel the benefit that comes
rom taking Bovril .. . it cheers you when you're
celing low and stimulates the appetite and the
ligestion wo keep you fit and well. In all savoury
lishes, in sandwiches and as a nourishing drink,
Sovril gives you the concentrated goodness of beef.




BOVRIL

PUTS BEEF INTO YOu

—and something very comforting. The new
Cow & Gate Baby Powder is a delicate and
delightful preparation — ideal for Baby’s
tender skin. [tS cooling, soothing influence
Is just what Baby needs after the bath or
during the heat of the day. it brings con-
tentment, freedom from irritation — and
encourages sound, refreshing sleep.

Lightly perfumed, slightly borated, pure
and refined.

COW GATE

Baby Powder

FOR COMFORT,AND,. CONTENTMENT

4547

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TT

J, B. LESLIE & CO., LTD. — Agents





is used by almost every doctor in Grea: Britain. In over 90% of hospitals
iS In constant daily use.

114



PAGE THREE



“
How am I to tell
which is « good antiseptic?”
“Frankly, unless you are a bacteriologist,
you can’t tell. But use the antiseptic you
see your doctor use, or which he recom-
mends, and you won’t be far wrong.”

‘DETTOL ANTISEPTIC *

and maternity homes ‘ Dettol’

Agents; T. 8S. GARRAWAY & CO., Bridgetown

A sprinkle of Vim on a damp cloth —a quick
rub — and greasy, dirty things shine and sparkle again.
Vim is so eagy to use, so quick and smooth — it keeps
surfaces polished and bright. Use Vim for pots and pans.
paintwork, tiles — ail your cleaning.

VIM

cleans everything
smoothly and speedily




**My dear,” she said, “You must pro-
on tpt your eyes. Command buy a bottle
.. Of Optrex now—use it every day.”



So, when! gothome | bathed my eyes
was!

PROTECT YOUR EYES «th

0

When I told Jim he said,“ Wonderful!
Your eyes look lovely tonight. Keep

in Optrex, and ob—the;
Op on using Optrex—F'll use it, too!

fort, dust, away!

ptrex

EVE LOTION









MAKE THIS TEST
The rim of the eye and inner
lining should be healthy flesh
Jy colour. If they are red or irri-
tated or the whites bloodshot,
your eyes need treatment.

FREE! in cach
@ scientifically
bath

packet

designed

ey





i
'



PAGE FOUR



ead ADVOCATE

Gara Ssh Ss Piss ft
Printed by the Advecate Co., Lté., Brows 61. Bridgetewn
Saturday, September 612”





VITAL TALKS

ACCORDING to a report from London,
the Canada-West Indies Trade talks which
open next week under the Chairmanship of
Mr. E. Melville, will cover the balance of
payments position of the sterling area, the
token import scheme, shipping and the
Canadian market for Commonwealth
sugar.

The balance of payments position of the
sterling area is of especial interest because
of the meeting in London in November of
Commonwealth Prime Ministers who are
to review the whole economic structure of
the Commonwealth.


































But the delegates representing the West
Indies at the talks next week in London
will be going there fully briefed to repre-
sent the trading interests of the West In-
dies alone.

Their major preoccupation will be the
future of Canada-West Indies trade with
respect to, the sale of West Indian sugar
in Canada. In recent years Canadian im-
ports from. the West Indies have out-

stripped by millions Canadian exports to
the West Indies,

In the ten-month period January to Oc-
tober 1951 Canadian imports from Barba-
dos for example were valued at $12,545,000
speroeimately.

y comparison Canadian exports to Bar-
bados during the eleven month period Jan-
uary to November 1951 were valued at
$4,170,000 approximately.

These figures are taken from Foreign
Trade, an official weekly publication of the
Foreign Trade Service of the Department
of Trade and Commerce.

Barbadian fears of losing the preferen-
tial sugar market of Canada are grounded
on comparison of Canadian exports to Bar-
bados and imports from Barbados with
Canadian exports to Cuba and imports
from Cuba in_ recent years. Where-
as Canada sold $17,905,000 approximately
of goods to Cuba during the period Jan-
uary to November 1951, Canada imported
only $6,963,000 approximately of Cuban
goods during the period January to Octo-
ber 1951. This was almost half what Can-
ada bought from Barbados during the same
period,

In addition Canada imported more in-
dividually from British Guiana, Jamaica,
Trinidad and Tobago than from Barbados
during the period January to October 1951.

The unbalance between Canadian ex-
oe to and Canadian imports from the

est Indies is therefore so great that the
West Indian fear-of losing the preferential
Canadian market is based on common
sense. The policy of the Canadian govern-
ment in the words of the Canadian Minister
of Trade and Commerce is to seek out
markets overseas which will enable Can
ada to “expand and diversify her exports.”
If the present unbalance of Canadian-West
Indian trade continues only a strong feel-
ing of sentiment for the West Indies can
guarantee the continuance of special pre-
ferential treatment for West Indian sugar
when Cuba can supply sugar more cheap-
ly, The increase in the volume of Canadian
exports to Cuba and other Latin American
countries makes it one-hundred per cent.
likely that Canadians will buy sugar and
other tropical products from those coun-
tries in her effort to expand’ and diversify
exports, unless some change in Canada-
West Indies trade relations takes place.

The West Indies owe much to the United
Kingdom and the present guarantee which
that country has given to West Indian
sugar producers has everywhere been ac
claimed as favourable to the West Indies.
But the representative of the West Indies
at next week’s talks in London can only
approach the eutient of Canada-West In-
dies trade from a long term view. Both the
West Indies and Canada share one form
of expansion in common—their increasing
populations.

But whereas the increased Canadian
population can be “sweetened” as it were
by sugar from Cuba and other countries,
the mouths of increased numbers of West
Indians can only be filled to any great ex-
tent if West Indian sugar can be sold—
and sold profitably. Only two markets for
that sugar exist: the United Kingdom and
Canada.

Unfortynately for the West Indies the
United Kingdom and Canada though mem-
bers of the same Commonwealth are rivals
in the matter of trade. And in recent years
Great Britain has used her positian as the
controlling power in the West Indies to
dislocate Canada-West Indies trade from
the status it had reached during the war
years and up to 1947 in favour of Canada.

To-day Canada’s high rates of exchange
which have resulted from her close identi-
fication with the dollar economy of the
United States has made Canadian prices
uncompetitive in-most instances with the
British prices. To maintain restrictive
controls on imports from Canada at a time
when Canadian prices make it impossible
for Barbadian importers to buy up all the
Canadian articles for which currency is
permitted is like rubbing salt into open
wounds. Removal of controls on Canadian
trade would remove the cause of com-
plaints of Canadian businessmen and
would convince them that their present
prices are too high for West Indian im-
porters.

If the West Indian delegatws impress on
the Colonial office that the best way the
West Indies can help the sterling area is
for them to have assyred markets for West
Indian produce in Canada and the United
Kingdom, then the West Indies will have
been well served, There is no reason to
believe that their interests will not be well
represented and Barbados will join the
other West Indian territories in wishing
them success in their vital talks which are
to start next Tuesday.

{
|
|
|
|
|

The Challenge of Adversity
The year 1895 would seem to
jhave been the most unpromising
time to start so risky a venture
|as a daily newspaper in Barbados.
| The island had reached the lowest
point to which it was possible te
sink in its depressed condition
| washout tumbling into utter ruin
The prophets of despair were pre-

licting that the misfortunes, which
had been afflicting the island
during the past ten years, would

oon bring the island to complete
lisaster. The fact that there were
{ iS many as seventy-seven estates

n chancery during the year
seemed to provide more evidence

o show that the colony was tot-

ering into bankruptcy. The low
orice of sugar led to increasing
unemployment and widespread
, listress among the people. Joseph
chamberlain had not yet begun
che programme that was to bring
aope back to the colonies of the
West Indies and nothing seemed
likely to relieve the encircling
sloom.

Clearly it was not the time for
aunching so speculative an un-
jertaking as a daily newspaper
iven the most optimistic spirits
eemed to feel that the most they
sould do in that gloomy period
was to hold on grimly to what
rey had and try to save it from
the impending cataclysm. Yet the
dverse circumstances facing the
sland were to serve as a stimu-
ant to the spirit and. energy of
‘alence Gale. In 1895 he had
already had many years’ experi-
mee in journalism and he was
red with the ambition to give
3arbados the sort of newspaper it
1eeded, to raise the whole tone
f public life and _ recall the
sland’s press to the high function
t had in recent years betrayed.

who was born in 1850,
vas left an orphan at the age
f four, having lost both his
father and mother during the
nolera epidemic of 1854 — the
tread pestilence that destroyed
bout one-eighth of the island’s
yopulation, But he had the ad-
vantage of being brought up by
an aunt who impressed upon him
hat the most valuable things in
he world were character and in-
ellect,. He attended the. St
Vichael’s Parochial School, then
mder the direction of the Rev.
wv, J, N. Durant, and, after leav-
ng school, secured a position as
m apprentice on the staff of the

Agricultural Reporter’, the
sland’s leading newspaper at the
ime. ‘

Gale was then only sixteen and
ad entered on the journalistic
-reer that was to continue until
iis death in 1908. The editor of
he Agricultural Reporter was the
tev, Dr. P. Bruce Austin, who
took a liking to the lad and gave
iim every opportunity to learn
he eraft of journalism thorough~
y. Gale made himself proficient
it. shorthand—a rare accomplish-
nent in those days—and soon en-
joyed the reputation of being one
>f the best reporters of his time.
When the post of reporter of the
Jouse of Assembly became vacant,
swing to the resignation of Con
ad Reeves who had gone to Eng-
and to study law, Gale was ap-
oointed to take his place. His
imbition to follow in Reeves
footsteps and study law was never
fulfilled, yet the reading he did
on his own in the subject was to
orove of great value to him both
is a legal reporter and as a leader-
writer,

Gale,

Freedom's Cause

From the beginning of his
vareer Gale aspired to be more
than a reporter, He had an oxer-
mastering desire to write and his
original articles were soon accept-
ed by the Agricultural Reporter.
After nine years of hard work
with the newspaper, he was ap-
pointed leader-writer and dis-
charged the duties of that post
for twenty years in a manner that
attracted widespread attention.
nevitably he was drawn into the
hurly burly of politics. His
veneration of Samuel Jackman
Prescod—he was just twenty-one
when the great'man died—and his
friendship with Conrad Reeves
had bred in him a strong love
of representative institutions, and
for that reason he was destined
to play no little part in the con-
stitutional crisis of 1876.

At that time, although he was
only a young man, Gale’s trench-
ant and incisive style of writing
had already given him a con-
siderable reputation, ‘The govern-
ment forces were on the lookout
for a valuable ally and offered
Gale the post of editor of a news-
paper it was proposed to start to
advocate the cause of federation.
It was a tempting offer for the
young journalist since it was ac-
companied with the promise of an
sitractive post in the Government
service. t in Gale’s eyes, no
patriot would undertake to sup-
port the campaign to _ federate
Barbados and the Windward
Islands if it meant, as it seemed
to mean, that the island would
lose its. representative form of
government. Instead of accepting
the offer, therefore, he promptly
lent his services to those who \were
fighting to defeat the Colonial
Office plan. He took on the duties
of honorary secretary of the Do-
fence Association, which had been
‘ormed to combat Pope-Hennessy’s
oropo: Pand fought the battle
for free institutions both with his
pen and as an officer of that organ-





LONDON

The Y.W.C.A, is Sponsoring a
“ew course on tropical rursl wel-
‘ure, which will oper at the
Y.W.C.A. College in Birmingham
m January 13, 1953. It will be
pen to Colonial and British
vomen who are interested in rural
| ommunity’ development and_ in
he promotion of informal aduit
cdueation,

Principal of the course will be
Miss Marjorie Stewart, who work-
ed as Generel Secretary for the
Y.W.C.A, in Jamaica for ten years,

during which time one of her
| pecial interests was the training
of leaders for club work in town
| and country. From 1944 to 1946,
she was Field Supervisor for the
| Jamaica Social Welfare Commis-

sion.
The course is intended for such

people as the wives of Colonial

Y.W.C.A. Course On Tr
Principal Worked In Jamaica

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Our Common Heritage (20)

VALENCE GALE

isation. When the struggle was
over and Barbados had defeated
the Colonial Office, the community
showed its gratitude by present-
ing Reeves, the saviour of the
island’s constitution, with a purse
of one thousand guineas, whil>
Gale himself received a present
of one hundred guineas’ for his
services,

Gale opposed the federation pro-
posals of the Colonial Office be-
cause, in his view, they would
have reduced Barbados to the
status of a Crown Colony govern-
ment. To his mind, Crown Colony
government was a form of tyranny
that was completely alien to the

island’s long tradition of free
institutions. But he was not
lulled into any complacency by
the victory over the Colonial

ffice. To him, as to every

patriotic Barbadian, the price of
freedom was eternal vigilance.
Some ten years after the great
battle for freedom, events seemed





Hy F. A. Hoyos |



through the threatening storm?

With this in mind, Gale turned}
a deaf ear to those who counselled
him that the time was inauspicious
for his venture. He had seen
numerous magazines and |



papers appear and vanish after
a brief period of success and all
the signs seem to indicate to the

faint-heartedthat no new
journal could hope to survive the
depression. But Gale had an idea
clearly in mind and he felt con-
fident that the kind of newspaper
he wanted to establish would be
able to meet crisis and take
the island along times.
His policy, it is true, was not to

be the same as Prescod's. He did
not propose, like Prescod, to
vindicate the programme of a new
party or to preach the doctrines
of a new gospel. Yet he was
moved by the same spirit of
service, by the sume burning de-
sire to bring home to his fellow-
countrymen a full realisation of

VALENCE GALE

to be taking a sinister course in

the neighbouring colonies of the h

West Indies. The liberty of the
individual and the freedom of the
press were being threatened by
the law courts. Such abuses were
made possible because the law of
contempt was not regulated by
statute and no individual or news
paper could question the adminis-
tration of justice without incurring
the danger of imprisonment.

Things eventually came to a
head when Louis de Souza, a
practising lawyer in British
Guiana, was imprisoned for ques-
tioning the decisions of the judges
in that colony. The case was to
attract widespread attention be-
cause de Souza had contracted
tuberculosis, while in a prison cell
in British Guiana, and subsequent-
ly died in Barbados. The death
‘of the Guianese barrister served
as a clarion call to all those who
had pledged themselves to defend
civil rights in the West Indies and
Gale was soon in the forefront of
the struggle. He wrote on the
circumstances leading to the death
of de Souza, delivered a severe
attack on the judges concerned in
the case — “the superannuated
Chalmers, the pliant Atkinson and
the wicked and _ unprincipled
Sheriff’—and accused them blunt-
ly of committing judicial murder,
That article, described as one of
the most fearless ever published
in Barbados, was to have import-
ant results in the West Indies.

For it prepared the way for tne
Contempt of Court Act in 1891, an
enactment that was to prove a
model for similar legislation for
other colonies in the West Indies,

It was largely due to Gale’s de
fence of civil rights and his strong
stand on the de Souza case that
Barbados was the first colony in
the British Empire to define the
law of contempt by statute.

An Act Of Faith

In 1895 Gale took the great step

of his life, Five years before he
had married Clara Chenery, a first
cousin of Thomas Chenery, editor
of the London Times, and this
spurred him on to undertake the
task he had been contemplating
for some time — to establish his
own newspaper and _ restore
journalism to the high standard
it had once attained in Barbados.
Had not Samuel Jackman Prescod
started the Liberal in the dark
days of the emancipation crisis
and proved the truth that Barba-
dos would support a journal that
fought for truth and justice and
maintained the highest principles
of journalism? And would not
another newspaper, founded in
another period of crisis, and
dedicated to fight for the cause
that lacked assistance and the
wrongs that needed resistance, ap-
peal to the best in ail Barbadian
patriots and help the island

officials and students who accom-
pany their husbands to Britain for
special courses and who often
have a good deal of spare time on
their hands, Teachers and social
workers going to Colonial posts
who are interested in voluntary
work of a pioneer nature would
also be likely to find the course
cf considerable value,

It will concentrate chiefly on
the practice of community educa-
tion as adapted for tropical needs
in-under-developed rural areas and
will include classes on the use of
the campaign-project method,
visual aids, drama and literature.
There will also be special element-
ary instruction on cookery. and
nutrition, child care, handwork,
food cultivation and co-operative
principles.

“It is essential that schemes for
rural community development



the urgent requirements of the
our.

Gale saw his opportunity in the
circumstances prevailing at the
time. The standard of public mor-
ality was at a low ebb, Members
of the House of Assembly were
no longer moved by the sentiments
that had stirred them during the
upheaval of 1876. And the news-
papers, reflecting the same lack of
public spirit, had abandoned their
high function by resorting to the
weapons of abuse and vilification.
Gale resolved frora the outset that
his newspaper Would fight for a
social ideal and would champion
the cause of truth and justice. But
in carrying out this policy, he
would be firm without being
abusive, turning his back on the
vulgarity of his contemporaries.
His aim was to further the wel-
fare not of any single section but
of the community as a whole. To
achieve this, he steadily declined
to attach his newspaper to any
party. In addition he adhered to
Reeves’s advice that he should not
actively take part in politics be-
cause he was convinced that in
this way he could best maintain
the independence of the ‘Advocate’
Gale lost no time in making his
policy and methods clear to the
public and the latter’s support
helped him to make steady pro-
gress in spite of the difficulties of
the time and the competition of
his rivals.

When Gale founded the Advo-
cate he was forty-five years old
and had already given twenty-
mine years’ service in the field of
journalism, For the thirteen years
that remained of his life, he work-
ed unceasingly to promote the wel-
fare of his newspaper, giving little
thought to his ease and comfort
and paying little regard to his
health and strength. His long ex-
perience as a practising journalist
in Barbados, his visit to England
to acquaint himself with the most
up-to-date methods of newspaper
management and production, his
great power of application and his
wide knowledge of Barbadian and
West Indian affairs, all combined
to bring him success in the venture
for which so many had prophesied
disaster. His work was important
not only because it left an endur-
ing monument to his memory but
because it represented an act of
faith at a time when men seemed
tilled with pessimtism and despair.
The success of his endeavour was
to make the daily newspaper an
established thing in Barbados,
raise the press of the island from
the low standard to which it had
fallen and restore journalism to
its rightful place as a profession
‘to which men of the highest in-
tellect and integrity would be at-
tracted.

(Next Saturday—
HERSERT DALTON)



opieal Rural Welfare

tropical countries should take into
account local conditions and be
worked out on lines which the
village inhabitants can under-
stand,” says the Y.W.C.A.

“In many places, for example,
artificial light is unknown, so
evening activities are impossible.
Some districts work a four or five
day week; different tribes have
different vernaculars; and women
have so much work to do that they
cannot go to centres at a distance.

Assisting Miss Stewart will be
Miss Edna Rowe, a_ domestic
science teacher who has taken a
special course in tropical nutrition
in the London School of Tropical
Medicine. There will be visiting |
instructors from associated organ |
isations and visits of observation
will be arranged through the
Women’s Institutes and other rural |
agencies B.U.P.



NOBODY'S |

DIARY

Monday — The tree that supports the cannon

ball climber in Trafalgar Square has||

dropped its leaves. It probably does this
every year about this time but this year
the dropped leaves are very symbolic.
No leaves: no water in the fountain. Just
steam and heat and talk of irrigation.
Fortunately the leaves are out again.

Tuesday — It may be the heat or it may be
a sign of the livestock shortage but I
haven’t seen any sheep “in, Bridgetown
for some time. And even stray dogs are
in short supply. I suppose people do
mind what they eat.

ie i

Wednesday — Lord Tweedsmuir has done
the planters a good turn. In the Sunday
Times last week he wrote as follows:

“It is a sad and curious fact deserving
careful analysis, that there exists in cer-
tain quarters in Britain a strong preju-
dice against the planter and his kind.”

Lord Tweedsmuir’s observation is
borne out by a letter recently received
in Barbados from England. There propa-
ganda against this island is so effective
that intending holiday makers write to
say they would never dream of coming
to an island run by a lot of despotic
planters. (Laugh boy!) I remember
once lunching with a V.1.P. in London
and being called a “tyrant from Barba-
dos”, although I have never owned any
property here or anywhere else.

Then there was the Adviser to the Sec-
retary of State for the Colonies who chal-
lenged me to a duel in the grounds of the
Marine merely because I go to the best
tailor for my one suit.and he mistock
me for a planter (many of whom don’t).
How are we to explain away this anti-
pathy against the planter, this libellous

travesty as Lord Tweedsmuir puts it]

which “is the view of many an honest
and ignorant Briton at home about the
settlers of Kenya and the Rhodesias and
all planters everywhere by definition?”

I wonder if envy has got anything to
do with it.

Leonard Barnes is nearer the truth
than anyone I think when he says that
in the Colonies middle class families can
live upper class lives: and if there is a
class of people more interested in the
affairs of the man next door (even if he’s
migrated and becomes a planter) then
the average English lower middle-class,
I have never set foot on 4 continents.

Thursday — Bridgetown wit: Can you lie on
* a man if he’s standing up?

Friday — Did I tell you about the other ad-
viser to the Secretary of State for the
Colonies (not the duellist but the one I
met in the sea).

He of course knew what the trouble
was in Barbados—no social conscience
—and being a good secularist (like so
many other welfarists alas) he hadn’t
got much use for the churches. I have
(but unfortunately for the welfarists I
am not very impressed by their activ-
ities or methods). So we're quits.

But getting back to the swimming ad-
viser, :

When I suggested that people who got
up in the early hours of the morning to
go to church might have a lot of qual-
ities which would make them useful
citizens he replied that they probably
got up early to wear their new dresses.

I didn’t challenge him to a duel but I
cuffed the table so hard that my hostess
came in and asked me to let him off
lightly. Ugh!

Saturday — Soon very soon the big guns of
Virginia will be coming to this tight lit-
the island. They will all want to know
where Washington slept: where he had
his hair cut and of course see the chair
he sat in at Government House. Hun-
dreds of them (at least 500 are coming)
will want to see the tree he planted at
Farley Hill: the place where he scratch-
ed his initials in the Cave at St. Lucy:
the sun dial from which he read the
time of day along Hackleton’s cliff: the
natural springs at Martin’s Bay named
after his brother.

On the road to Sam Lords is a charm-
ing village blacksmith shop which must
have been the scene of the meeting be-
tween Sam Lord and George Washing-
ton.

At the Crane you can still see the pier
on which WashingtonJstood ‘to eat, his
first sea-egg.

And somewhere down in St. Andrew
George Washington pushed his walking
stick into the ground looked at it and
said “Boy that looks like oil”.

If you don’t believe a word of all this
neither do I believe that the house in
Bay Street with the sign was the one
that housed our George.

But the more you tell Virginians
about George Washington and his visit
to Barbados the more you'll thrill them.
Honest. And restaurants don’t forget to
serve George Washington steak on Jan-
uary 15, 1953. Make a note of it because
the Virginians are coming that day.



SATURDAY,

_-—

SEPTEMBER 6, 1952


























\ “THE GOLDEN VOICE NURSERY RECORD BOOK”

tells the story with Songs and Music on a gramophone record
to help you read it in the Buok.

~
ADVOCATE STATIONERY

—



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GODDARD'S







SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER

Case



Judge Will Sum Up Today

THE CASE

enter the dwelling house

Road, Christ,Church, was conttnued at the Court of Grand
Sessions yesterday before Mr. Justice J. W. B. Chenery.

The case for the Prosec

have addressed the jury a

day, His Lordship will sum

Belgrave is also charged on a
second count, attempting to break
and enter the house on March 1.

Mr. L. A. Williams, holding
papers for Mr. G. H. Adams, is
appearing for Gaskin, and Mr.
J. E. T. Brancker for Blackman.
Belgrave is unrepresented.

Mr. W. W. Reece, Q.C., Solici-
tor General, is prosecuting for
the Crown.

Clyde Brathwaite. a butler of
Worthing View, said that Gaskin
had thrown out the suggestion to
him that they should attack
Evelyn and take money from him,
At first he agreed to join, but
afterwards thought better not to
do so, but to inform Evelyn and
the Police. He did that,

Cross-Examined

Cross-exemined by Mr. Branc-
ker he said he could not remem-
ber having been convicted or
fined for stealing, gambling,
wounding, trespassing, etc., but he
remembered having been fined a
couple of times. There was a
matter of a duck in December
1944, and on another oceasion,
malicious damage to property.

When he first met the defen-
dants in connection with the con-
spiracy, two nights before the
alleged offence, he had called
aside Gaskin and talked with him,
leaving Blackman sitting on the
guard wall by the side of the
road.

Cpl. Lisle Jones of Worthing
Police Station, said that on ac-
count of information he received,
he hid in a clump of bushes near
Evelyn’s shop on the night of the
alleged offence. Two men were
sitting on a guard wall near the
shop. One was Brathwaite, but
he did not know the other,

About 10.15, Evelyn left the
shop and walked in the direction
of his home and one of the men
followed Evelyn. .When Evelyn
reached home, he (Jones) went
and calied and Evelyn let him in.
He went into the backyard and
waited,

Entering Gate

About 11 o’cloek three men en-
tered through the front gate, two
remained about the gate, and one
came further in. The one who
entered went and shook a window.
They seemed to have got scared
by something and all ran back
out. Within the next hal an
hour, one returned and again
pulled at the window. This time
he arrested the man, whom he
found to be Belgrave.

On the next day he saw Gaskin
and took a statement from him.
In this statement Gaskin said that
he’had@ been with Belgrave earlier
in the night before he was arrest-
ed, and when he left him, he
thoughtube had-left tego home.

P.C, Lionel Franklyn said that
on March 2, he charged Blackman
with conspiracy and Blackman
made a statement. In this state-
ment he said that he had been
along with Gaskin and Belgrave
the night before Belgrave was
arrested, but when Belgrave left
them, he understood that he wag
going home,

Cpl. Harold Bryan of Central
Police Station, said that on March
1, about 9.45 p.m., he hid in a
clump of bushes near Evelyn’s
shop. He heard a man whom he
afterwards discovered was Bel-
grave, ask another where they
were to meet, and the other said
in Rockley Golf Club yard.

Jumped Into Yard

Later when Evelyn went home,
he went behind Evelyn's back wall
and jumped over into the yard.
He saw when Jones arrested Bel-
grave. Belgrave had offered to
give him a statement the follow-
ing day. In this statement Bel-
grave said that one of the chaps
he had been with earlier, had
intended going to Evelyn to see a
man named Frazer who had gone
in there. He did not go in there
with any intent to steal.

Cpl. Bryan was the last witness.

Belgrave said that on the night
when he was arrested, he had
earlier ‘met Brathwaite and Gas-
kin. Brathwaite and Gaskin went
down the road, leaving Blackman

; in which Rudolph Blackman, McField evidence. They would remember
Belgrave and Michael Gaskin are charged with conspiring
between February 29 and March 1 this year to break and

6, 10952 : BARBADOS

_—

For Prosecution





meneing around with evil inten- RECEIVING
ions.
Taere were discrepancies in the

the Police said that Brathwaite
had signed the statement he had
given, while Brathwaite said he
olf Club had not signed it.

Reformed Character
Mr. Retce said that Brithwaite
ution has been closed. Counsel â„¢ight have done a thing or two,

. but he was sinee reformed, No
nd when hearing resumes to- matter how many convictions h*
up. hac, he had spoken the truth.
Brathwaite had so reformed nis
Lfe that he was even.*hen ¢ Jn “x
an honest living as a butler, and
hed refrained frem joining wiih
the cther defendants. i
Neither the Polité nor Evelyn

of Elon Evelyn at G



Memorial

A Memorial given by the
Members of the St. Peters

had known anything about tie
a pees the memo- conspiracy, and Brathwaite hai
7 ari Rector. P. C. | told them, so it was ridiculous
a Perpetual Lamp, to suggest that he was a conspirs-

donated by a devout wor, | tor

shipper Miss Trimingham, will
be consecrated on Sunday, 7th
at the 9 a.m. Service. Archdea-
con Hutchinson will be the
preacher.

When it came to conspiracy, the
law was that after the design had
teen formed every act of one of
the ccnspirators was evidence
against tn. other. Ic had bee
agreed that Belgrave would po
into the house and his action was
had on their behalf.

_—_—_———————————

from Evelyn. Brathwaite

MADAME IFILL (centre), hands

planned with them. Mr. Brancker had told them

Mr. Williams said that there that the men had taken an ordin= can Aid Society were distributed y
was no dispute about ‘the law'in ary walk in the direction of Fifty people received clothing
the case and it was merely’ a Evelyn's house that night, but he to right) are: Mrs. C. O. Alleyne,

question of facts that mattered. was suggesting to them that if they
Agreement felt that the men had walk d
The Prosecution had to establish behind Evelyn, taking into ccusid-
an agreement to do wrong and ¢ration the previous design, they
that the defendants had actually had not been walking behind him
started the wrong act. The Pros- casually or just for a stroll,
ecution, he was submitting, had From the. evidence there was
failed to establish that. more than they needed to convict
They had seen Clyde Brath- the men for conspiracy.
waite and he would assure them When hearing of the case re-
that Brathwaite was quite a dis- sumes today, His Lordship ‘will
honest rogue. He was submitting “um up.
that he was an accomplice that

Cc. O. Alleyne and Mr. G. Weekes.

afternoon.



night, and it was unfortunate ° son was present.
shat the Police had to rely on Central Milk Depot The distribution was made by
evidence from such a man_ to Madame }

Ifill while Father A, J,
Dennington, Rector, acted as
Chairman, The Rector afterwards
entertained those present to tea at
his home.

Introducing Mr. Wilkinson and
Madame Ifill, Father Dennington
said that he was sure when he»
had the-opportunity. to ask Mr.
Layne to record a vote of thanks
everyone would respond heartily.

He said that they had an impors)
tant guest in the person of Mr.
Wilkinson. With
and bustle in New
spite the fact that New York toot
had its poor and destitute, Mr,
Wilkinson had seen it fit to assist
them.

He felt it was not an act of
charity but an act of kindness and
faith.

He said that Madame Ifill was

prove their case.
had been

Brathwaite BRej onsi ed

3 no less than a Police mg Q ider

aecoy. ‘ S =i awai
ts ‘ Milk producers are still await-

There was no enmity between ing rea from Government in
Evelyn and the defendants, but connection with the alternative
Evelyn had told them frankly proposals. for the erection of a
that any attitude adopted towards Gentral Milk Depot and Creamery.
Gaskin or any of the defendants Mr. Eric Deane told the “Adyvo-
was because he was acting under cate” that the matter was still
instructions from Brathwaite and being considered by Government,
the Police. So they would have to but the Milk Producers had heard
vdzcigh amy evidence Evelyn nothing further in connection
might give, with that qualifica- with the scheme since they had
tion—that ¢his dishonest Brath- submitted the alternative propos-
waite had set him up. als.

They would remember that Cpl. The producers were asked to
Jones had previously failed to submit an alternative schen
mention that he had identified after the original proposals we’
Belgrave and Gaskin. rejected by them on the ground
that the scheme would be imprac-
ticable under the 1951 Co-opera~
tives Act.

2

York, and de-

Corroboration



If they formed the view that active in Barbados for many
Brathwaite was lucky that he was e e years before he came to the
not in the dock with the other Bridging The Gap island. She had _ played a_ great
defendants, if they formed the nart in the sociai work of Bar-

bados and he
was present,

Donated By Christians

Father DenniIngton suid that the
clothes were donated by christian
people throussh the American Aid
Society of which Mr. Wilkinson
was Presidert,

Madame Ifill said that she was
be very glad the people were able to
and see Mr. Wilkinson in. person and
she was sure that after Mr. Wil-

view that he was a conspirator, Work on the site for the was glad that she
they would definitely have to launching of the 110-foot span
look for some kind of corrobora~ steel bridge to carry the 20-inch
bane ‘ae tone PP op accept arterial main which connects the
Secor re en a new Belle Electric Pumping Sta-

Mr. peSnene eee fone tion with the Grand View and
defendants conspired to break Brittons Hill Reservoirs is con-
and enter the house. If they at- tinuing. ‘.
tached any weight to Brathwaite’s The beige, See of wie es
evidence, they might say that already on the site, ;
there Was’ perhaps a scintilla of launched as a compete unit, an
evidence to waylay Mr. & Mrs. concrete pillars are being cot-



A ic ! kinson had seen their condition he
ive n thei ay from the structed for a trolley which wul neen. c ~~
a ro - * conupinacy was be used to launch the bridge. would do everything in his power
eae i and he was submitting Fw ea when he returned to the
proved, 4 ss SA.
that it had not been, it would Mr. J. C. Mottley, M.C.P.,
have to be proved that it was '

u .

Lorry Catches Fire Junior Member for St, Philip, said
, that it was with a deep aaeee, O°
-209 owned appreciation that he welcomed My.
a" Eades oon 2 eae St. Wilkinson, He felt that Mr. Wil-
Michael, ana driven by Arthur kinson’s generous acts would con-
Inniss of St, Joseph, was exten- tribute towards bringing the peo-

sively damaged when it caught Ple closer to their Creator,
fire on Binfield Road, St. Joseph, He felt honoured meeting M:

. Wilkinson and Madame Ifill and
but he did not say what that con- Fe eney, Soe Se eee s. being able to talk to them
M-1057 was

sultation was about, In any case “phe motor car He asked them to accept a word

they could not trust Brathwaite. 51,9 damaged by fire while it was of thanks from him on behalf of

Y travelling along Kendall Hill, the parish and said that he hoped

A Notorious Profligate Christ Church, about 7.45 p.m, on in the future Mr, Wilkinson will

Brathwaite was a man who for- September 4. be able to do even more for the
got how many convictions he had ~ At the time of the incident the Poor of St. Martin’s Village.

if they were too many to remem- motor car was being driven by Mr. Mottley said that Mr, Wil-

conspiracy to break and enter.
The only evidence of conspir-
acy was from Brathwaite. Brath-
waite said that after they left
and went in the direction of
Evelyn’s house that night, they
came back after a few minutes
and had a further consultation,



; ‘os ; : inson’s efforts were a_ grand
ber. Brathwaite was a notorious Lionel Rogers of Belleville, St. kinson’s ey ;
profligate and a ne’er do well, Michael, The car is insured. reminder to other people in the

They would remember that he island that they too could do.some-
had said that his side conversa- ; thing to help the poor, _ ip
tion was between Gaskin and WILL TO BE RE-SEALED ae reply — ae pala

ir at he was extremely happy to
himgelf and Blackman had been His Lordship the Chief Judge, be present to see the work done

we oo. thal” ds cope Sir Allan Collymore, Kt., in the by Madame Ifill. He knew

r , ay Madame Ifill for many years and
conspiracy and that involved ee eee ee alti of he stuck to her because he knew
three, while the other charge, 4.4 will of George Frank Dug- that she had the interest of the
attempting to break and enter Gale jate of Nassau, Island of New people at heart.
invo'ved one. He would submit province, proved in the Supreme | Mr. Wilkinson next talked about
to them that the conspiracy had Court of’ the Bahamas Islands. the American Aid Society and how
not been proved. His Lordship admitted to pro- it came to be founded. He said

It was nothing strange for the phate the wills of Rufus E. Field that the U.S.A. was a most chari-



all the hustle® ture

ADVOCATE

CLOTHING



a dress to a poor woman at St.

Martin's Boys’ School where clothing and foodstuff from the Ameri-

esterday.
and foodstuff. In the picture (left
Mrs. C. Sutart, Madame Ifill, Mr.

Poor Receive Clothing, Food
At St. Martin’s School

_ FIFTY POOR and destitute people were
ing and foodstuff at St. Martin’s Boys’ School, yesterday
The clothing and foodstuff came from the
American Aid Society whose Founder, Mr. Hilbert Wilkin-

iven cloth-

which were distributed all over
the island. They also sent clothing
to Jamaica last September,
1,500 Contributing Members
He said that the organisation
had about 1,500 contributing
members. Some might fail to con-
tribute one year but would con-
tribute the following year. They
bought dresses from the laundries
at ten cents each. These dresses
‘were dry cleaned.

nm me in the’ fu-
r ilkinson ended.

Cc. O. Alleyne, Headmaster
of St. Martin’s Boys’ School,
moved a vote of thanks. Mr.
Alleyne said that he was elated
when he heard Mr, Wilkinson
speak of the good behaviour of the
people of St. Martins.

He asked Mr, Wilkinson to re-
member the poor people of St,
Martins district when he returned
to the U.S.A.

He said that it was the first
big distribution for the St. Mar-
tin's area, but judging from Mr,
Wilkinson's words, he knew _ it
would be the forerunner of even
larger distributions.

Mr, Alleyne thanked Madame
Ifill for the tremendous effort she
was putting into the social welfare

“Depend u
"Mr,
Mr,

of the island,
Among those present were:
Father A, J, Dennington, Rector, |

Mr. C. O. Alleyne, Headmaster of
St. Martin’s Boys’ School, and
Mrs, Alleyne, Mr. G, Weekes, Mrs.
Cc, Stuart and Mr, Claude Ramsay.



LETTERS OF |
ADMINISTRATION

His Lordship the Chief Judge,
Sir Allan Collymore, Kt., in the
Court of Ordinary yesterday
granted the petition of George
u. W, Clarke, Solicitor, one of the|
constituted attorneys of S. M, L.

Inniss, K. A, L. Inniss and Bar-
bara Sadler, for letters of admin-
istration to the estate of their

mother, Hilda Inniss, late of Port-
of-Spain.

Mr. W. W. Reece, Q.C., Solici-
tor General, instructed by Mr.
J C, Armstrong, Solicitor, appear-
ed, for the petitioner,

His Lordship also granted let-
ters of administration to Mr, Cyril
L. Brooks, Solicitor, one of the
constituted attorneys of James W.
Brown of the Bronx, New York,
to the estate of Augustus Clarke,
late of New York,

Mr. W. W. Reece, Q.C., instruct-
ed by Messrs Yearwood & Boyce,
Solicitors,
tioner,

|
The petition of Cleotta V. Skeene!

of Thornbury Hill, ‘for letters of

administration to the estate of her}

husband Joseph Skeene, was also

represented the peti-



DIPHTHERIA
RUMOUR FALSE

There is no truth in the
rumour that there has been
an ouibreak of diphtheria in
the St. Matthias district or
anywhere else in the island
for that matter.

The Advocate
with the Department of
Medical Services yesterday
and was informed that there
has been no case of diphthe-
ria notified for the past three
months.

checked

|



Sea Egg Divers

A number of boys are diving
sea eggs not far away from Bridge-
town. The centre of the diving
activities is at the Reef Beach,
Fontabelle,

Yesterday afternoon over twe
dozen boys, carrying bags, coulc
ke seen in the sea. The sea egg:

were taken from between the
Reef and Pelican Island.
These divers, unlike those at

Silver Sands and the Crane, prefe!
to eat their catches than to sel
them.

* a *

M.V. Moneka
The M.V. “Moneka”
sailed into port yesterday, brough
102 bags of copra, 18 casks o
fresh fruit and other genera
cargo. Its last port of call wa
Dominica and it is consigned t
the Schooner Owners’ Associa
tion.
* *

Léads Sugar
Yesterday the steamship “Ca

nadian Cruiser” was loading suga
and molasses for Montreal anc
the British Northern Islands. Th
harbour was very busy yester
day. Agents for this vessel ar
Gardiner Austin & Co., Ltd,

* *

om
Homeward Bound
The steamship “Golfito’’ whic!
arrived in port on Thursday after
noon, left the same afternoon o
its homeward run. It arrived her
from Trinidad with 36 passenge:
for Barbados and 60 intranst

*

24 embarked here on their wa
to the United Kingdom. Agen!
for the “Golfito” are Messrs Wil
kinson & Haynes.
Â¥ * *
Another “Smith”

When the schooner “Cyril fF

Smith” sailed into port yestei

day morning, it became the third
of the ‘Smith’ schooners to be i:
Carlisle Bay, The others aré
“Lucille M, Smith,” and the “Fran
ces W. Smith.” All three of thes
are consigned to the Schoone
owners’ Association,

2 MORE KEELS FITTED

- The keels for two more boat
have been laid at the grounds o
the Fisheries Office this week
Already 19 boats are practical!
compleced,

A quantity of iron for the keel
is now coming in. This iron wil
be cast in concrete.





JUST RECEIVED
BOOTS MINDIF

MINERAL SALTS
For Catde and Other
Livestock

Mindif Mineral Salts for

Cattle contain balanced

quantities of the essential

elements —— calcium, phos-

phorus, copper, cobalt, iron,

iodine, and manganese
| together with an adequate
proportion of common salt,
The only practical way of
ensuring that the cattle are
receiving adequate minerals,
is by feeding them directly
with the ration.

Directions for Use

Cows in milk

Add 3 % of Mindif Min-
eral Salts to each cwt. of
concentrates fed for milk
production. Alternatively,
give individual cows 3 oz.
per day for those giving up
to 3 gallons, plus 1% oz. for
each gallon over three,

Pkgs. of 2 tbs, for 36c.





PAGE FIVE



Closed In Conspiracy Case

“Crops Suffering From The Heat

Planters who visited the City cate.

yesterday complained of the hot Another planter said that the
‘opell. “I had 40 parts in my dis- canes and other crops are
ltriet this week but that only suffering. They are ‘all hoping

‘kept down the dutt”, one planter that the is'and
from St. Thomas told the Advo- good rainfall.

whiel,



will soon get a









Only Scotland, traditional home of fine tobaccos, could
produce Four Square. Only in Four Square tobaccos
will you find selected leaf, blended with skill handed
down by successive generations for over 140 years,

FOUR SQUARE
TOBACCOS

6 FINE BLENDS TO CHOOSE FROM: MADE BY DOBIE OF PAISLEY

Sole Agents: MESSRS. A. S. BRYDEN & SONS (BARBADOS) LTD.
P.O. BOX 403, BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS



“Hot flashes” of change of life stopped

or strikingly relieved

in 63-80%" of the cases
in doctors’ tests!

© Those suffocating “heat waves”
- alternating with nervous,
clammy feelings — and accom-
panied often by restless irri-
tability and nervousness — are
well-known to women suffering
the functionally-caused distress
of middle life “change”! ‘

You want relief from such suf-
fering. And—chances are— n
e







can get it. Thrilling re

Tha to two famous Lydia

Pinkham medicines!

O wy i. moctere tests Tablets "brought

Ne Recent ewe. |. ten tneeceereeite

tested. Complate or siriking relief? pat! Rereous system to, give
, you say? Not to pn Ne ates =

many thousands of who fressee Of or ye"



’ Learn ebiaal
_ _ Don't put it of! Get Lydia Pink-
modern. exert a ace ham’s Vegetable Compound or new,
calmé: , soothing of ! ere ee eke se with added iron
Pinkham's on the basis (trial size only 59¢).
of m evidence! eit you, too, Wonderful — too — for the func-
don't relief from those tional pains, cramps, “ -out”
terrible “hot 0 and aa and other discomfort of
0 common in life.” mon! menstrual veriods|



Care Your

Morses!

NOW’S THE TIME

TO SELECT THESE
FAMOUS REMEDIES!

RADIOL WORM POWDERS
A modern and effective Anthelmintic — excellent for
removing Round Worms (Strongles & Ascarids)

RADIOL PHYSIC POWDERS (Flavoured)
A Physic Ball with all the trouble taken out in the shape
of a Tasty Powder which does not gripe but acts on the
Bowels as a Purge.

RADIOL LEG WASH POWDER Romo
Specially prepared for use in making “Radiol Leg Wash,



7 defendants to remain near Eveltai’s of St. Michael, Berinda A. Pilgrim table place but no one could be granted by His Lordship. i( SRUCE WEATHERHEAD F

one lived. in Rockley and for shop. Evelyn himself had told of Christ Church, George D. crooked in charity, The crooked we Ae A. Willlacas, \nstructed; Limited on sale at~-KNIGHT’S DRUG STORES
: * AS i a rc’ y/o - Je . y . . es > .

his part it would have been stupid them that was nothing unusual.So Clarke, also of Christ Church and Duriite tne na ae Teoh »y Mr se Sarjeant, Solicitor, Also in Bags 112 Ibs.

John,

Y xe - kles St. wppeared on behalf of the peti-,
steal they could not say that they were Alexander Beckles of sent many barrels of clothing tioner.

AL SL aS a aT \

to live there and try to

You too will

Say these

(Vo

46” SHEFR “DELIGHT™.............. _ at_$1.37 yd.
In Ice Blue, Lime, Navy, Coral,
Lemon, Orchid, Aqua, Peach,
Rose and White



and JOHN GILL & CO.













e
SHADOW STRIPE NYLON at $2.35 yd.








36”
in Pink, Sky. Turquoise, Peach Fee rete
and White A WIDE VARIE
36” PLAIN TAFFETA from $1.15 to $1.95 yd. In White Buck, Black TO CHOCSE FROM
ln a gorgeous — shades : Se an sieht Sete
36” “ART SILK PIQUE ...........:-.... at $2.70 yd. ister titty ant PRICES RA
In Dusty Pink, Silver, Blush Pink me
Ice Blue, Champagne, Eggshell, Multi-Colour Raffia
Lemon, Gold, Aqua. Orchid
and White
®
1
HARRISONS CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD.
BROAD STREET DIAL 2664 10, 11, 12, 13 Broad St.















an Neda nate

PAGE SIX





CLASSIFIED ADS. "mie sau

















TELEPHONE 2508
nmenicintelaagl aa Sia NaS alecemeh =
1 =~
DIED FOR SALE
FAYLOR— Gr September 5. 1952, at hery po
residence "S$onth District, St b orge
via , Paylo He mers
will lec Don AUTOMOTIVE
at 4 for St Paris
i seer Faylor (widower), Nev CAR--Por sale « tandard 8 h.p
Cledon:~ Stephen (sons), Verona.| Coupe Car in good running order. Phone
Madeline Vincelia a Or #18. G. BE. Ward 6.9.52—4n
aught The Spooner ———— —— Sheena
ate 6.9 68_in} _ CAR—One (1) 1952 A—40 “Somerset
—— ee. | Pale Gretn—1,300 miles — Always owner
N MEMORIAM iriven Dial 3356, 6.9.52—3n
c leaden ieee an eg a
{ CARS—Morris Minor 2 Door Saloon



Ia loving memory of my dear sor



Gill Who died on the 5th Sep
tember, 1051. 7
Can a woman's tender care

Cease toWafés the child be

Yes she may fergetful be

Yet will I remember thee
Ever to be remembered b¥ Eunice Bow
man (mother), Eutaleen, Jestina (sisters
Winston, Lieyd, Noel, brotrers)



Ly





DOWNIE—In loving memory of o
dear husband and father, John Reub«
Downie, who died on the Sth Septe;:
ber, 1946

To-day recalls sad memoric
Of a leved one gone to rest
They who think of you to-day
Are those who love you best
Lillian (wife), Marjorie, Colin (children!






Elaine (Daughter- w), Arthur (eor
in-law) Richard, P ¥, Maureen, De
mond (grand-chTidren Clarice, F

(Sisters), Kenneth (Brother) 4
6.9.§2—1







fiALL—In Loving Memory of my Belove

wife Kathleen Hall, who departed «
the Sth September, 1951

One year has passed since that ¢§







ore we loved was calle
ay
The cull Wis short the shock severr |
We never thought that death was
nea
Only those who have Jost can tell
The pain of parting without farewe)
Dudley Hall thusband Geotge, Hande
and Sydney tsor wd famits
" & 6.9.52-——1n
FINDS—In joving memory Of Miss C. FE
Hinds who passed to the ‘Gre
Beyond” on 6th Sep. 1951
In a world af pain and care
Lord. Tho wonldst ne londer leave

her
To Thy Home so bright and fair
Levingly Thou didst receive her.
Clothed in robes of dpotléss white
Now she dwells with Thee in light
Ever to be remembered by her dear friend
Millie and family 6.9.82—11



FINDS—iIn affsétionate memory of ov
@eor sister CTariasé Minds who went t
: stent Detent. § r Ath, 1991

t iiifons have

Gree promi

the lecul.so bright and folr
We hope to meet her some day in
Giory

When our trials on earth are over
Ever to be remembered by John (brother
Panam>), Fis (sister), Relatives anc
Friends. 6.8,52-—1r







The publie are hereby warned against

giving credit to any person or persons

whomsoever in my name as I do not hold

myself responsible for enyone contrac’

ing any debt or debts in ay nae unless

"y a written order signed by me

re FITZRERBERT SMITH,

Gittens Road,
Government Hil)

6,9. 522.

FOR KENT

HOUSES _

BUNGALOW--To An Approved
art. Bungalow Modern Sea-Side, ful!
furnished Bungalow Excellent sen-
bathing. Far SS particu’ars: Appi
to No. 6 Corai nds, Worthing

2.9. 52—6n.

“KASY REACT" — Srnall sea-side
Pungalow Bayfield Beach, St, Petet neni
Gibbes Beach by fit

















tab) Aishad.
2 bedrooms, Refrigerator, Fervant!” ae

Garage etc, Phone 2393 31.6,52—6n



FLAT & HOUSE-Fully furnished, St.-} spectively,
29.3.99—t.2.n, | Broad St
Octaber |

Lawrence on-Sea. Phone

ie AY tatilowsdl, . See FEVER MIXTURE FOR DOGS — fo: |
isoraian Seas Pebruary, Marel ,recuting the Température in Féverien |
Apply Mrs, L Weatherhead ye fk Complaints, ‘and pertiowierty in the early
» k 9. nh | stages o} emper . ce 1/6 bot
Sarr rs Gdad dah Sali Ra | Obtainable at Knight's Ltd
MANHATTAN FLATS — On Sea three | 4.9.69—9n

Nedreoms each fully furnished, Refrig!
daire, enclosed yard, Servant's Room &
Gorage Phone 3309 6.9. 52—2:

OFFICES

our Building in Lower
Available from — 1st
R. Hunte & Co., Ltd
3.9.52—t.f.n





OFFICES—In
Broad Street.
October. K.
Dial 4611





"



Lili
I



Reco

The Housewites ;
Alphabet }

ttractive Hostess
tractive {itchen

needs

©
8
>



Precaution

{ urricane

n 5 .
TAM »

END No, 12

{ —_—)

; APTER A WARNING -
Q Board up windoy ana
{ and put Storm Shutters
§ ih place. Use good lum

ter, makeshifts may d:
more damage thrn nonc
at all. Have strong brac-
ing of outside doors.



tcers &
f the
\PVOCATE'S SOCIAL CLUB
Unider ihe Patronage of
the Hon. V. C. Gale, M.L.C.
invite you to their

DANCE

at the
VOLUNTEER DRILL HALL

Members

on

MONDAY NIGHT. 6TH
OCTOBER, 1952
(Bank-holiday)

Music by
Percy Green's Orchestra
SUBSCRIPTION; —n—
Dancing from 9 p.m.
Tickets not
Formal Dress

SS®OODSOGGOHOOHO-

3/-

Transferable
Optional

22 M4MPODOS-IOGOGPY99999GH99OS-HY yO >

©
é

LODDOADOS

|
|

1.400 miles. Like mew. Morris Minor
Door Saloon 11,000 miles. Excellent con-
diten, Fort Royal Garage Ltd Tele-
phone 4504. 21,8.52—n





CAR—-New Consul car only done
miles, Reason for selling owner
siand. Phone 4641,



4.9.52—4n.



CAR—(1) KAISER. One second hand
Kolser, 1949 model, in excellent condi-
‘ion, apply Barbados Agencies, telephone
1608 5.9 52—fn

CAR—-1938 14-6 Model Vauxhall, 3 new
Sres Good condition :
959 before 4 p.m, 5009 after 4



“3.9.52—4n



CAR—Plymouth 5 passenger Car 1948
1cdel in perfect condition. Done only
8,000 miles. Phone KR. 8. Nicholls
Mice, 3925. Home 8657.

3.9.52—t.f.n



CAR—Austin A70. Very good condition.
and going to some jueky person for $1,800.
Williams at 2006 and 98251 or apply

Jehovah Jirah, St. George

| Cali 4559.

'

i
‘

|
|
|

!

| We_haye



3.9.52—+.i.0

CAPS-—-ONE (1) Ford ZEPHER 2.500
les, as good as new
ONE (1) Hillman Minx 1951 Mode)
ONE (1) SM 1,500 Singer Car.

| ONE (1) STUDEBAKER

'1940 Model Apply. to
TAYLOR'S GARAGE
Street



REDMAN
LTD., Church
3.p.52—3n





CAR—Hillman Minx—Excellent condi-
tion, owner driven, done only 13,000 mile

Contact -« Edwin Mayhew, Gitter
Croney & Co., Ltd., Palmetto St. (Phone
4394) 27,8.52—t.f.n



TROUCK—tnternational Two speed ax!
truck with hydraulie holst. M—782. Phone
3050. J. N. Pornurn, George St

6.9.52—4n





ELECTRICAL



MOTOR—In good WotKind condition
one % H.P.=110 Volt Motor with com-
pressor. Suitable for spray painting etc
5.9.52—2n.





LIVESTOCK
MULES 4 Small isia nd Mule Apply
Fairfield Plantation, St. Luey, or Phone
91—-53 6.9,52—3n











____ POULTRY

POULTRY—Hampshire and Leghors 8
weeks old with incubator and runs. Apply
City Bar, Palmetto Street























6.9.52—2n
MECHANICAL
From Jose River Ltd, (1) Subsoil
plough. Apply to Mr. Watson, Factory
Manager. 6.9.52—1n
MISCELLANEOUS

~ 20 cents each

Swan and Middle Streets (Secon:
Floér) 6.9. 52—in



_ ANTIQUES of every description, Gias:
China, old Jewels, fine Silver Water
olours.
tc., at Gorringes Antique Shop adjoining
Royal Yacht Club 3.2.52—t4





in. stock

CLEANSING
expel the “After-birth” or “Cleansing”
from Cows, Ewes, Sows and Goats
Price 2/- box. Knight's Lid, 4.9.52-—3n

\ PERRIER RERES, 5 4

|

In
| DIRECTORY all Telephone Numbers are |

‘x & 1/8, 1/16 ¥x & tov x 8 |
Dial 2696, Auto Tyre Co., Trafalgar and |
pry Streets 90.8.52—t.f.n. |
SPECIAL BUY—Men's Shirts — For the
big man for the small man sizes |
3 to 17% Now y $4.19 each
x” $12.00 Reg ly $4.75 each
| PASHION HOUSE, . Swan Sts
3.9. 52—4n |

| _ SUBSCRIBE

Tel





jend 3 ft 3 Ins offered (for spot cash
~— | Sales only) at $49,58 and $52,096 each re
Strletly limited number for

disposal — BUY NOW, HARRISON'S,
Dial 4234 3.9. 523n



HOUSEHOLD EQUIPMENT of ai!
lescription. Owen T. Allder, 118 Roebuck
street. Dial 3299, 10.5.52—t.f.n

NUMERICAL TELEPHONE





the

listed in numerical order. Price 3/-
2,9.52—6n







—_—_—
now to the
Telegraph, England's leading Daily Nuws-
ceper now arriving in Barbados by Air
nly a few days after publication in
tondon. Contact Ixn Gale, C/o. Advo-
ote Co., Ltd., Local Representative
3118. 17459—t in
The JMERICAL TELEPHONE
MIRECTORY is available at: Advocate
ole’s Printery, Johnson's Stationery,
toberts & Co. and at the Colonial Adver-
‘ising Co. (Barbados) Ltd., James St
‘rice 3/-. 2.9.52—6n












Use the NUMERICAL TELEPHONE
JFRECTORY to identify the owner of the
Telephone Numbers left on your desk
Price 3/-,



With the NUMERICAL TELEPHONE |
NPERCTORY any Telephone Number can |

fly be traced to the party concerned
. 4

‘rice 3



N in stock
eter product,



urbicura’
for the treatment «



Y ls and Sprung Tendom
forses, and big knees in cattle. Pr 4
1x KNIGHT'S LTD
4.9 52.
a ~



«ill those throbbing pains ».
your muscles at once! Apply
Stoan’s Lintment pre &
fee! your e wt a8
CODE Wd

Xt

we um enreveâ„¢

You don’t rub in “Sloan’:” you dab it
on the affected part geutly—“ Sloan's"
cs the rest! Good for
aches and pains and stiff | MWLUK)
joints too !

LOOK FOR THE

PICTURE OF DR. SLOAN
@ ON THE PACKET










Hing)







iit









Wr

OPTICAL NOTICE

I beg to notify my Clients
and the General Public that
my Office will be closed for
Vacation from September 8th
and will be reopened on
September 29th.

WESLEY BAYLEY
Optician
High Street.



ning
ette,
6,000 | Servants’
leaving The above property will be set up fo

Early buvks, Maps Autographs |

DRENCH for helping. to |

Mild Steel Plates—3/8, 5/16, Vs, 3/16— |

2.9.52—6n |

REAL ESTATE

A parcel of land containing 66,527
(Square feet at
| Christ Church, (part of Clairmont) with
outlet to Davrells Read, and suitable for
laying out as building lots

Will be offered for sale at
| of the undersigned on Thuteday the 11th
September, 1952, at 2 o'cloék p.m

The plan can be seen on application to
|the undersigned
} COTTLE, CATFORD & CO







i 3.9.52—8n
i er

| BUNGALOW-—Stone wall Bungalow
jealled “SANTA MARIA” with 6,13

}square feet of land attached situate at
| Pine Hill, St. Michael
The house contains Drawing and Dir
jing rooms, 3 Bedrooms fone with run
water) breakfast rooms, Kitchen
conveniences, Garage anc
rooms, Electricity installed

usual

sale by Public competition at our Offic
Tames Street on Friday 12th September
1952 at 2 p.m
Inspection by appointment. Dial 2850
YEARWOOD & BOYCE,
Solicitors
27.8. 52—1

HOUSE Bunkalow Style ishop ai
tached 22 x i2
Black Rock

Situated at
Dial 0155

Brighton
2.9.52—t.f.n





(1) Property at Junction of St
‘s gap and Dayrell's Road; consisting
of a two storied house with shop o1

bottom floor, and a hall presently occu-!

pied by the Seventh Day assembly, anu
standng on approximately 9,000 sq. ft.
(2) One upstairs property of Govern
ment Hill, standing on
3,000 S. Ft. of land
(3) One wall property at Civilian Ra
Bank Hall,
jand
(4) One property (stone) -i Water St
tch. Ch » Standing on 3 roods of land.
| (5) 2 small properties at King’s Village
land Kensington New Road, respective!
For particulars contact K. Sandifor4
Spry St., Dial 2374 27.8,.62—4r
| LAND—A spot of land — approx. 3
perches in Belle Gully Rad., opposit«
Radcot. For particulars phone 2931

3.9.52—6

approximatel)

standing on one eighth o











Offers will be received in writing uy
to 4 pm. Tuesday, 16th, September 1952.
for the servants room at Glendale, (Resi
dence of the P.M.O, St, Thomas) to
gether with a quantity of old
nd greenheart Also separate
for a quantity of old
Inspection of the items can be made or
Wednesdays between the hours of 12——<

offer

pm. and on Saturdays between the
hours of 10—2 on application to Dr
Cc. C. Clarke on premisés
K. SANDIFORD,
Churehwarden, St. Thomas
29.8.52—4n
“SILVER WATERS”, at Silver Sands

Cool throughout the year, four targe bed
rooms, running water in each room, two
servant rooms, Garage for two cars, bes
sea bathing Inspection by appointment
Phone 68211, 4462. 3.9. 52—3r
ee
“SEA BEAUTY"—on St. James coast
4 miles from town. Three large bedrooms.
running water in each room, servant
‘room, ete. Inspection between the hours
jee 7.80—8.30 a.m. and 4-6 p.m. Contac
J E, Samuel, Fitts Village, St. James.
$.9.52—2n
PRESS



Pe
the prescribed entry forms and m
than 7th October, 1952,
»e considered,
forms are as follows: --

Examination for Health
Certificate

Examination for Sanitary In: pectors Certificate 3
Inspectors of Meat and Other

Examination for the
Foods Certificate

Sanitary Inspectors

Half-fees only are payable for re-entry on each
occasions subsequent to the first sitting.
3. Entry forms may be had on application.

Hony. Secty, & Treasurer, British West Indies Board of
| Examiners, Royal Sanitary Institute.

Medical Department,
Bridgetown, Barbados.

is



{











mod comet hab
sea: ub the
chest with A.J. White
Liniment. The penetrating
heat stimulates blood circu-
lation and promptly relieves
congestion. Thousands have
found relief with A.1.
y not you?

Wh
A " A ALA

NIMENT

|




Dally |



Neart Trouble
Caused by High
Blood Pressure

If you have pains around the heart,.
palpitation, dizziness, headaches at
top and back of head and above eyes,
shortness of breath, feel nervy, or suf-
| fer from poor sleep, loss of memory
and enwgy, Indigestion, worry and
fear, your trouble is probably caused
| by High Blood Pressure. This is a
| mysterious disease that causes more
| deaths than cancer, because the

nptoms @ “e so common and usually
mistaken for some simple ailment. If
you suffer from any of these symp-
toms, your life may be endangered by

Heart Trouble or a paralytic stroke,

ind you shoul start treatment at

e. The very first dose of Noxco

(ormerly Known as Hynox), a new

edical discovery reduces High Biood

Pressure and mnkes you feel years
vunger In a ferv days. Get Oxco
your chemist today. It is guar-
eed toymake you feel well and
strong or snoney em return of
wnoty package.










{eae ea24aa
é CHRISTIAN SCIENCE

READING ROOM »

SUBSTANCE

‘rue wealth lies net in compass
of a coin, .

Then murmur
purse

Or moeking figures on a bc‘aihce

sheet;
Eternal substance seek in holy

} work.

not, at empty

Sentinel

book may be read borrowed
ased at the Reading Room.
ywen & Sons Broad Street.
10 a.m. 2 p.m. Tues-
s, Wednesdays, Fridays, and‘on
from 10 a.m -—







ays

@ your bills, book-keeping.

Gaivanize sheets |

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

|: ANNOUNCEMENTS!



profits full or spare time
Christmas Cards Spanish Greetings 25

| of

Also 20 beautiful box assortments, Write

Al fail
Rockley in the parish of 770, .#2)

the omer | LOST a FOUND

A

Meeting. Finder please return to H. D
Bayley,

| te
|

!

ty

6.9 62—8n

STENOTYPIST — Experi Steno
pist, apply t “Agency” PO a6

| Bridgetown 4.9.52—3n



Matthi. |
and price to NORA C/o. Advocate

|
{

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Rd., City. 2.9.52--3n
HOUSE—To Buy or Rent House in
either Hastings or Garrison District twe

2) Bedrooms if possible, three (3) with
| usual conveniences. Reply “S” c/o ™@
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PUBLIC NOTICES

OSWALD EVERTON JONES having
made sworn deposition that Policy No
“6,959 on his life hag been lost, and

| having made application to the Directors
to grant a duplicate of the same
lumbe;
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| of the date hereof the duplicate Polies
| asked for will be issued.

| ——

Nurse and Midwife will be received \by
the Churchwarden, Mrs. H, A. Talma
Welches,
tion” up to 3 p.m. on the 16th Septem-
ber, 1



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NOTICE

Will the person or persons who

had on loan the Wheels of Fortun

from Mrs, Geo. Hutson,
kindly communicate with her.

N

Examinations of The Royal Sanitary Institute



The Examinations of the Royal Sanitary Institute will be held
in British Guiana from 8rd to 8th November, 1952,

Applications to take thes: examinations should be made on

ust

No appli:ations received after this date will
The fees which must be forwarded with the entry

Visitors

Examination for the Tropice! Hygiene Certificate for



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t

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staff, Our Commercial Service offers you Clerical Assistance,

; {S NOW AVAILABLE to those who cannot afford whole time
s Typing, Duplicating (Roneo), Writing up and Mailing Monthly \
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6.9. 53—2n

WANTED

genta

HELP

rn ennenneninrenigencenctennanangennegeie so
BARBADOS DYE WORKS
WASHERS & IRONERS—Onily compe-
nt persons need apply







MISCELLANEOUS
A PARROT CAGE — State condition
29.8. 59—1n
ONE Liquor License, contact Charles



road Street 6.9.52—5n



THE BARBADOS “MUTUAL LIFE
ASSURANCE SOCIETY
LOST POLICY



NOTICE is hereby given that unless

Order,

Cc. K. BROWNE,
Secretary.
29.8, 52—4n



NOTICE
PARISH OF CHRIST CHURCH
Applications for the post of Qualified

Ch. Ch Marked “Applica-

Terms of appointment obtainable from

Blackmans,

6.9.52—3n



OTICE

reach the undersigned not later

and School Nurses
$15.00

$20.00
$25.00

$25.00
of two
ng.

F, N. GRANNUM,

6.9.52.—2n.

HELLO EVERYBODY !

A GRAND EXCURSION

AND DANCE
will be given by
MRS, KATHLEEN WEEKES

to
RAINBOW OLUB, BATHSHUBA,
MONDAY 6th OCTOBER, 1952
(Bank-Holiday)

FARE $1.20 ~ DANCE %/-
Music by Mr. Hoppy Jordan's
Orchestra
Refreshments on Sale
Buses leave Beckles Road and
Empire Theatve at 9 o'clock
Tickets ebtainable at Carlton
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K. Weekes

NOTICE

The Public are invited to drop
in at the COSMOPOLITAN CLUB
and RESTAURANT, Bay Street,
where delicious Chinese
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re



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FIRST ANNUAL
LEAGUE CRICKETER

Compiled by
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Hony. Secty. B.C.L.
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*Records of B.C.L. Cricketers
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All-stéel, car stgle
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The M.V
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Nevis
day 8th inst







SEPTEMBER 6, 1952

SHIPPING NOTICES



SOCGOSEY - 5S99566 GOOD,

“MONEKA” wil! ac-
and Passengers for
Antigua, Montserrat,
Kitts, Sailing Mon-

et Cargo

ind St

CATALOGUE 1953 The M_V. “CARIBBEE” will ac
PART I cept Cargo and Passengers for
i Dominica, Antigua, Maptserrat,
BRITISH EMPIRE Nevis and St. Kitts, Sailing Friday
(Complete) 12th inst
$4.00 Each

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} OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM

Lea Due
nies Barbados
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16th Sept. Ist Oct.

20th €ept. 14th Oct.



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A STEAMER . 26th September

A STEAMER 10th October
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‘ee Alcoa. Steamship Co
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Sails Halifax Arrives Barbados

S3ist August 12th September ‘
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30th September 12th October

14th October =_-26th October

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8.8. “ALCCA PEGASUS” sais &th August — arrives 20th August
8.8. “are vr ¢NTER" * Sep tember — arrives 17 ptember
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> ‘

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, HURRICANE PRECAUTION HINT No.5

KEEP A FEW POUNDS OF NAILS AND A HAMMER
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These can be obtained from - - -

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NAILS at 30c. per lb.
HAMMERS at $1.63 each.



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SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE : PAGE SEVEN

= SS Se

HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON | Pee ee

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PAGE EIGHT

Commonwealth Defeai England

Worrell At His
«Brightest Best”

(From Our Own Correspondent)

A SWASHBUCKLING innings of 60 in 50 minutes by ter
Frank Worrell and yet another delightful display by wicket and the
George Headley were outstanding events of the

LONDON.

ingston

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





LEAGUE CRICKET NOTES

By SCRIBBLER

Bowlers dominated play in the
game at Bank Hall on Sunday
between the B.C.L. XI and Em-=
pire Intermediates. Empire In-
termediates were caught on a soft
B.C.L. captain
used to good effect his pace men,
Rogers, Pinder, and Greene. It

festival match which ended today with victory by seven appeared to an onlooker that the
wickets for the Commonwealth over an England Eleven. Empire batsmen offered too little

It was Worrell at his brightest
best, Opening his broad shoul-

ders, runs flowed from his bat like |

water gushing over Niagara. He
pulled, hooked, and drove vicious-
ly and in between executed some
of the most delicate of late cuts.
Five consecutive deliveries.
three from Mallett and two from
Sims, were dispatched post haste
to the boundary,
runs came in this fashion,
Headley, although less spectac-

ular, was just as effective and §

just as entertaining. His second in-

nings of 61 for which he batted

70 minutes, was a replica of his
first innings of 98, as with all tix
time in the world, he stroked the
ball to the boundary, So assured
was he right from the start that
it looked as though he was con-
tinuing from where he left off
yesterday.

In the first hour and a quarter's
play this morning we saw excel-
lent bowling by Sonny Ramadhin.
Despite a cold wind, he spun the
ball well and in 12 overs, three
of which were maidens, he took
three wickets for 35 runs to bring
his analysis for the innings to
five for 78.

His first victim this morning
was Nigel Howard, skipper of the
England side, who was bowled
looking for a break that wasn’t
there, and he followed this by
ending the fine innings of Laurie
Fishlock who had his off stump
flattened in trying to knock the
Vall out of the ground. Next
Ramadhin brought the aggressiv’
resistance of Mallett to a close,
and with Tribe dismissing Jackson
and Sims, the England eleven
were all out for 252,

th Headley, Worrell, and
Rickards perrorming Com-
monwealth needed only two of the
three and three-quarter hours left
eee to clinch the match.

e game was a triumph for
the West Indian players, Headley,
Worrell, and Rickards who scored
351 of the side’s match total of
522, and Ramadhin took eight of
the 20 wickets for 140.

England (ist innings: 269 — Kenyon 95,

In all 48 of his &





FRANK WORRELL



LCC Golf

Costs £28.12
A Year

By PETER WILSON

Golf
course
David Beattie, of

the L.C.C,
Hainault

costs
Goodmayes

) comfortable and the

resistance to what in the first few
overs was really purposeless
bowling. The bowlers were short
of a length and of those that
came through dolly catches were
put up. It was not until half the
side was dismissed that the B.C.L.
men began taking wickets that
were not gifts.

Before the luneheon interval
the Empire team was back in the

15 and Rogers 1 for 10. Of the 22
overs bowled, 7 were maidens.
In the B.C.L, first innings Nor-
vie and Hinds seemed quite
remained
together until the first innings
lead was secured, Norville is one
of the Police Club boys and
showed that Foffie Williams is not
mistaken when he spots him as one
to be watched. Norville moves

his feet in a neat dance at the jng improved form and are 54

wicket and as an opening bats-
man is quite unhurried. Hinds
is undefeated with 39 to his credit
In the game against the Inter-
mediates at Y.M.P.C, he scored
56.

With the Empire bowlers break-
ing the opening partnership, they
enjoyed a run of successes and
from 48 for 1, the score went to
75 for 5 when Captain Goddard
joined Hinds to stop the rot. At
the end of the day’s play the
score was 94 without further Joss,
Clarke, Rogers, Jones and Pinder
were the batsmen losing their
wickets without reaching double
figures. The game continues to-
morrow.

Romans in the Lead

Results of the games in the
Central Division have placed Ro-
mans in the lead with 18 points
to their credit. Romans defeated
Kendal, the present champions in
a key match two Saturdays ago.

public On Saturday Belmont, one of the

Mr. clubs bracketed with Romans and
suff

ered their first defeat

pavilion for 47, df which 22 were short were all out for 77, 1
scored by Holder who was unde- jorris took 3 for 33, J. Robinson
| feated. Greene of Middlesex took 3 for 18, R. Robinson 3 for 12.
5 for 18, Pinder of Rangers 3 for

In the Gun Hill

57. Ellerton fell for 87 and Boys’

Club replied with 74 for 5 to win
V. Massiah was 25
not out—the match-winning hets-

the match.
man.

Three Consecutive 30’s

TABLE TENNIS :



Two Newcomers

Division, O.
Best took 5 Boys’ Club’s wickets
for 39 for Elierton. Ellerton scored
110 and Boys’ Club went into the
lead with 126, J. Austin scoring

Score

Upsets

The Islandwide Open Championship started at the

Y.M.P.C., on Friday last and continued on Tuesday. In the
first round all of the seeded players with the exception of
F. Willoughby won their matches.

There were only two upsets

Another prize for consecutive Carmichael of Fox and Callender

30’s has been won. On this occa- ®

f Bay Street two new comers

sion, the winner is S, Weekes of Wn their matches against two

Lancashire who accomplished the

Teat against Sydney in the match

recently completed. In Satur-

day’s game, however, Lancashire

met Searles in a low scoring

game. Lancashire batting a man
77

In their turn/at the wicket Seariecs
were dismissed for 64. For Lan-
cashire H. King took 4 for 28,
Bourne 2 for 14 and E. Nurse 4
for 17. In another low scoripg
game in this Division Inch Mar-
lowe could only raise 42 against
Maple. Bynoe took 8 for 18 and
Pile 2 for 20.
‘hnings lead with 57, Trotman
contributing 30. In their second
innings Inch Marlowe are show-

without loss.
Other Games
J, Hinds of

of 186.
double figures batsman,
took 4 for 35.
close of play were 24 for 1.

In the Union Globe vs. Greens
match, Union Globe scored 102
and Greens replied with 136. E,
and Lorde:

Brereton scored 71
28, Elcock took 5 for 23.
Norwick batted first
Starwick and were dismissed fo

87. Burke took 5 for 25. Star-;
wick failed with 20.
Invincible knocked _u pâ„¢100

against Boys’ Club. St. Hill 38 and

Jordan 5 for 35 shared bi
and bowling honours, Boys’ Clu’

were at the close of play 87 for 4.

At Thorpes Wemourne wer
dismissed for 51, Sealy top-scor

ing with 34. Welches at the close
of play were 180 for the loss of 2.
Cc. Reece 40 and G, Worrell 63
were the Welches’ batting stars,

Penrode hit 81
against Belfield “B” out of a total;
Harewood 25 was another
Davis
Belfield at the

against

(Essex) £28 12s, a year. “As an

Ikin 82; Tribe 4 for 63.)
SE ordinary working man”, says

COND INNING

Kenyon b MeCarthy ’ #1 »

Brookes c and b Tribe 17 Mr. ~ Beattie, complaining of the
likin e Barnett b seen 20 oon eee of eae LC.c.
Gibb ¢ Barnett ribe ... 2 are many e me out
Poole c Dowding b Ramadhin 10 *

Fishlock b Ramadhin sg of the game.”

“Why,” Mr. Beattie asks “can-
not the L.C.C. tell the public
where the difficulty lies in their
refusal to charge an all-in yearly
18 fee like many other towns who
run municipal courses?”
— 1 investigated Mr.

Commonwealth (ist innings: 354 for 6 s
_— Headley 98, Richards 69, Pettiford 54 opergee and found that:

Howard b Ramadhin ..... 6
Gladwin not out . ° ‘ 20
Mallett c Barnett b Ramadhin 21
Jackson b Tribe .. ceeds seep a 0
Sims c Livingston b Tribe 5

1
vo Beattie’s

not out.) @n average of three
SECOND INNINGS is rounds of golf a week, They cost

Livingston c Gibbs b Mallett : him in green fees (4s. Saturday
. 1 5

Worrell ¢ Bune © Flsnlock 2 and Sunday and 2s, Monday—

Richards not out ety * Friday) 10s, a week.

Majsood Ahmed not out

Extras 1 In addition he pays a member-

— ship fee of £2. 2s. to Hainault
Total (for 3 wickets) .... 1§8 Golf Club and a locker fee of

10%. a year, Total £28. 12s
Cricket Matches LCC’s ANSWER
/ End Today



I put Mr, Beattie’s case to the
L.C.C. and was told that season
tickets are issued on the council’s

All First Division cricket three courses — two at Hainault
matches in the Fourth Series and the other at Beckenham
and Intermediate and Second Place — available from only Mon-

the Sixth aap te atest avaliable. f
o-day. e latest available figures —
Series will be concluded to-c2¥: 1950—51—show that 154 seasons
ere oaee * Seohens and
a ainault. In at year
First Division 130,000 rounds were played over
rickwick at the three courses, popu-
larity of the courses is increasing.
The L.C.C, official did not con-
Beckes Road. sider Mr. Beattie’s golf was
Carlton vs. Empire at Carlton. expensive; it certainly is not

College vs. Lodge at Harrison cheap.

College. In view of the small number of

Division matches in

Spartan _—-vs.
Queen’s Park,

Wanderers vs. Police at

Intermediate season tickets issued the L.C.C.
Empire vs. Pickwick at Bank Should think again about a new
Hall. rate for the golfers who patronise
Regiment vs. Carlton at Gar- ‘heir courses all the year round.
rison,
Combermere vs. Spartan at Rivals—Partners
Combermere.

Mental Hospital vs. Wanderers
at Black Rock.
Y.M.P.C, vs.

Beckles Road. for Sir

Wavell Wakefield’s

Boarded Hall. ham on September 6. He will be
Second Division

Dorward, Captain of Scotla
Lodge vs. Erdiston at Lodge. oe? Pp Scotland,

These are the latest

Pickwick vs. Empire at Oval. to the strong team which is to telegram to Robinson | said that
Windward vs. Wanderers ©! play in the first representative the remarks “cannot be disre- For full informati 2
Wind ward, rugby match of the season and garded” simply because they S. P. MUSSON, SON. a CO 7)
College vs. Y.M.P.C. at Vauc- which will ring up the curtain were made after the game. Rob- : Tel. 4613 =
luse, ; at Twickenham. inson said: “I won’t pay the fine M
Foundation vs. Combermére

at Foundation. $

They'll Do It Every Time

Woe LITTLE

BISMUTH WAS
MISSING, THE
FAMILY THOUGHT
THE WORST

AND CARRIED
ON LIKE SO.

—L.E.S.





















HE'S NOT WITH
ANY OF THE
OTHER Kips!

THISLL LEARN
you! DRIVING
us FRANTIC,





+ "THENCE was
| FOUND. HMMM-:-
THEY DON'T ACT
SO GLAD TO
SEE HIM

of the season. In this game Bel-

experienced players Medford of
Fox and Straughan of Everton.
Of the other matches two stand
the Archer vs. Guiler and Green-
idge vs. Elliot. Guiler after win-
ning the first game and 14—21 in

L. his last made a brilliant recovery

but lacked the finish to win the
set. Elliot won the first game but
was unable to take advantage of
his early lead. In the second

round the best matches were the i

R. Herbert vs, S. Shields and N.
Gill vs. J. Hoad. Herbert with
his forehand and backhand at-
tack defeated his opponent in a
keenly contested game. N. Gill

thrfling match against J. Hoad.
The @rd round of this competi-
tion will continue at the Y.M.C.A.
on Tuesday 9th. at 6.15 p.m.
Players are asked to be on time.
The draw is as follows:

1. R. Phillips vs. J. Callender
i p.m,

“

L. Worrell vs. G. King or/Â¥

Cc Humphrey 6.35 p.m.
3. N. Gill vs. A. Howard 7.00

p.m,

4. R. Herbert vs. L. Harding
7.20 p.m

5. Gooding vs. C. Green-
idge 7.45 p.m.

. E. Goodridge vs. L. Trot-
man 8.20 p.m.

. L. Sampson vs. R. Leslie
8.40 p.m,

8. B. Murray vs. J. Bynoe

Maple took first smashed his way to victory in a 9.00 p.m.



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Jack Kyle, holder of 26 caps the league head. Roy Campanella
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Windward « ) XV Braves”

Cable & Wireless vs, Police ‘at against Harlequins at Twicken- guing with a different umpire.

partnered at strum half by A. F. President Warren Giles for ve-
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mont batted first an re all out At Carrington Village, left arm |
or 173, “4 Werseaes cna 50, slow bowler Hope of Liberty took
Springer 30 and Lucas 32,| his thirtieth wicket against Cham-
White Rose replied with 103, L. berlain. Chamberlain were all
Harewood 28 and Vaughan 20.) 0ut ‘or 109, Hope taking 6 for 27.
Belmont in their second innings At the close of play Liberty weré
collapsed for 40 and White Rose| 44 for 5.
lost five wickets in quest of vic-
tory. For White Rose, G. Black-
man took 8 for 10.

In the other game in this Di-
vision, Danes defeated St. Luke’s
Old Boys, Scores were Danes
164 and 93. St. Luke’s Old Boys
76 and 93.

The position in this Division
therefore is Romans 18 points,
Kendal 12, White Rose 12, Danes
12, Belmont 12, St. Augustine 6,
Brighton 0 and St. Luke’s 0.

Bowlers Dominate

Some excellent figures were re-
turned in a few of the games on
Saturday. Rudder for Middlesex
took 6 for 21 against Petroleum
Maggeting. Petroleum Market-
ing were dismissed for 57 and
Middlesex are 118 for 4, Kenneth
Goddard took 7 for 29 against
Rangers “B”, Telephone dismissed
Rangers for 74. At the close of

lay Telephone were 150 for the
oss Of 4. In the Bordeaux vs.
Yorkshire game, D. Barrow took
7 for 46 for Bordeaux and Clem-
ent 6 for 9 for Yorkshire. York-
shire won this game, their ast |

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Full Text

PAGE 1

WHAT'S ON TODAY ESTABLISHED 1895 SATURDAY. SEPTEMBER 6, 1952 PRICE FIVE CENTS YESTIRDAYS WEATHWttPOfcT Tout Mlaftjll for UM nMh H of eta BUT. nm II • BMT tour Harriman Gives Views On Joint U.S.—U.K. Oil Proposal IIA K i mm JAMAICA Nationalization Of Industry Recognised WASHINGTON. Sept 5. THE MUTUAL SECURITY Administrator Avercll Harriman said on Friday that the oil proposal which President Truman and Prime Minister Churchill mad*last week to Iranian PVime Minister Mossadegh recognizes Iran's nationalization of the industry and attaches no conditions regarding its management or return of British technicians. Mossadegh announced shortly after receiving the proposal that he could not accept it but has left an opening for reconsideration. Among the points Churchill and Truman made were an offer to grant §10,000,000 (United States) to bolster Iranian economy and submission to the International Court of Justice of the question of compensation for Anglo-Iranian Oil Company's pro perty. Harrinuin, familiar with manv aspects of the oil dispute, said ha spent about six weeks In e, said he w 1 T>•! • *£5.;| Lord Kibinson Dies Suddenly year ago as a special reprv tive of President Truman who had sent him there to see U be could And a basis for the settlement of the dispute. Harriman'* statement said: "I OTTAWA, Sept. 5. always believed it was possible to 1 Lord Ribinson, Vice-President find an early and just solution to of the six British Commonwealth this unfortunate situation. 1 wish Forestry Conference and Chairto state that the joint proposals man of the Forestry Com mission from the President and Prune Minister Churchill on the oif question represent a real step tow crack through the ring of Sabres screening Unl.ind Australian lighter bombers that hit a mine and ore processing plant at Sinhung, deep in North Central Korea. —U.r. Hurricane Shifts MIAMI, Sept a. An Atlantic huiricane bowled along the shipping lane off the Carolines with increasing speed after sendii* an ml tanker scurrying lull speed ahead of its 100 mile per hour winds. A wide r to :he northeast had ajsn-N the United States '"'inland from immediate danger, and weathermen predicted a further shift toward the open sea along with considerable" increase p trd speed. There has been no late report of the situation of the : tanker which In its last radio massage, said that it was keeping just ahead of -mg winds. Anothei ship narrowly escaped the grip of (tie winds late last night by scurrying to the shore. The Weather Bureau in an early advisory estimated the centre of the year's second tropical storm as about 100 miles east of Wilmington, North Carolina -PP. Stevenson Goes West Shell Plans Big Oil Refinery In Kenya WASHINGTON. Sept. 3. Governor Adlai Stevenson embarked on his invasion of the the west on Friday, ready to hit back at Republican campaign rlea of "corruption' %  and '-time be u change". The DemocraUc Presidenti.d nominee prepared to • ike the offensive in Denver on Prldaa niuht in his first western ptad vUefa is billed as alined -it "the independent vote"' Wil%  i w-. tt Bteveni n ""-piUfr said ih.ii iii.Governor would "pay his respects lo one Of more of the slogans** used by the Republicans, including "time for a change". Duiinu his rune-day tour throurh nine western states, Stevenson planned to block out his position on such major issues :as farm policy, foreign policy, conservation, and public power. He has scheduled 19 speech live of them described by alder. %  xtremelv important" Uwight Eisenhower (law Chicago on Friday tar .i conference with mid-western Republican leaders after outlining his foreign policy views in his first foimal campaign speech Eisenhower's speech delivered on Thursday night in Philadelphia was another outright assault on the I' uman auininistrattoa, which he accused of "bungliiig*' the nation into the Korean war Md to the brink of World War New College Soon To Open Al Barataria HON ROY JOSK1 Services, and Acting MM Trinidad, is spending the attending a meeting of lite I' versity College of the Wen In an interview wit! Joseph said ttstt a new flic opened at Baratariu. S.nt I Georges College. Changes Lower Coat Of U.C.W.I. To Jamaica irrwii 0*.r O.. I orrt.pond.nl KINGSTON. Jamaica. BraM Jamaica's delegation to In* OSalenoea of represeii tails** i t B.W.I, governments on the fcj,ii> • •Inancing of the West Indies tju vexsity wv unable to oh* nuch radical change from the or.* •nal basis of contributions princi pally through strong objection h • the Trinidad representatives Certain chanic however which lowers Jsm J. cost at the II.CW1 hi...pita.\ n U.C.W.I. generally but not M wholesale revision Jam.". for in a change from a popuJutx basis lo a budgetary basis. At a closed conference th,,, af| noon John Mordecai It E Executive Secretary made a rclease on the results which slut, that (he meeting wns sagi the Principal and other officers i I the University and members n' the University Council Representatives u f the aotfS affirmed Ihelr recognition i.f Hi lUil reirponsibility upon the whol region to keep the aeademi standards of the University CoilK and the teaching hospital on a bic level .md agreed to recommend i their governmenu thai they K cept proportionate liabilities r* suiting from excess recurrent a> pendlturc in the first period o* r Ihe initial Ugures approvsd *• he Mont'irt. Bay Conference Coat Increased The cost of maintaining eMMi^m as On Page *i niater ul Education and Social •i oi Agriculture and Lam.s, week end in Barbados after inance Corru.itteiof the UmIndies. irie Advocate last night, Mr mdary School will ihorti} be ernando, to be knou i The School for UM • %  Hi Brooms Ogata fifty boys am iftv girls. tHit will >: %  i lasamtun of IM College will be run asj Unas to Queen's Royal CoUap : i Aniiii n r\utl i ,,. %  are coi udcrM ereel other secondarv acnool In Ban Fei nanrk and UM MU I munlb are pllttnlng i" do Uks A'ise. The Hindus are ting lo 01 %  .it Curep* to accom module ghoul S00 clulbsjn Withm UM nexl Lnrea .i fbui weeks, conatrueUoB of -> Den icchni.ai school srIU oonunei c *l Les EfTnrts, San Fernando .. %  a cost of hall .> million dollars The tender for the aon ivill he awarded *-ithin the TO M IWO weekIt u. planned that kWl DJ l rchnir.il school which will replace ti* old Jumui Scbool ktoal .s now iHMtiti nOWBJMI h porary building .it II S.ui Fernando, will. tfrnW M i • %  I>ened aei %  ommodate about IflO technicians. t but with IIIKIU ichoOal. will paler u> OWSJ %  It will bfl %  quipped with two laboratories. Iwo li.iwing Oflsces .md have .ut iiv,-. ind I'niiim.^'i log workshops. Fowler \||Miiiinl Defence Mubilizer Sept NAIROBI. Kenya. Sept. P It has been officially announci'o that ShU Oil Company plans to build one of the world's largest oil :eAmrUb on the Kinya ern-t opposite Mombasa Isl-mu The statement said the *£anyg Government had acquired 1904 acres < f land opposite the islan tor th. projeney*s St. School rf od IU 1-M.V WO Benedict centre and his teaching dge Scbool (Boysi .md Queen' — Off Sraiifiiiiuvia OSLO, Norway, s. % %  '. More than 160 allied warsh pa. including eight big uircraft %  irriers. begin manoeuvres off Scandinavia next week warning Russia that the West is ready to defend the seas even to the Antic Circle Officially SJWIWII as "Oprn*iii.o IvTainbrace" the 13-day war games will be one of the largest displays of allied naval might— since the second World War. The purpose of the vast eight-country exercise is to give the partictpaUng navies an opportunity to co-operate In manoeuvre* with North Atlantic Treat> partners. -^/J. resigned WASHINGTON President Tiuman app>niium IM-t.-in,Produi AdminuitidUuHwiirs J* Del; lucceeils John s' v runt to President TrUBU is-been acting Unfcrue i/cr since Charles Wilson id sj.n nit: during 'h. ver Use steel crisis. In a letter to Fowlei. i mg appreciation oi InBgefQri %  mo' of his dulios. nd \>, • M c l, %  *#* %  fcr Jufn Hauit. and Hon. Boy J'^-yh. Hn.i.i i I aall-* ptcturad togsth^i at leawsU AlrportHanJJtoy Joscuh, Mr Waleott and gU John Saint are jast back frotfl 'hs iBllMj el lh Fuiance Committee of tiia University Oollags of the Wort India*. Trinidsd. Mr. F. L •tion AO4 Bocisl er Shortage Of I FoodlnB.G. \ hints! Over r Neville Bchulw, D8 I Thurtda) light on . twn-wech houd :le is staying at A hat I lous rue shortage" ii Hi Hr h (iuiana. which affected iiDr. Schuler said unc in Uie history U | thai the iwople -I He said ... Ft w.i.'. iuch thai ii % %  food riots" on %  jtry Representatives At Finance Meeting %  ?! USt^ % % %  *> T.U.C. Urges More Trade With Russia MARGATE. £nf(Uiid, bepl. 5 THE POWERFUL Trades Union Coniirew puu-J .1 pnammous resolution on Friday calling for extensive trading with Russia. This was the bin surprise ol th Congress representing 8.000,000 trade unionists. Few delegates anticipated that the mammoth Ti 1 is port and General Workers Union, the world's bigg< Eden Will Lostl Delegation T L'.N. i 1 fsTDON, '"i' 6 %  foreign s.let.n v Anthony Eden will Load the itm. > delentlon lo thx ni % %  i r4on <>f the United Nat y in New York on October 14. The foui oU ej %  -1i.. • Si IWVII Lloyd, lujiMor of lUte, Henry Ho, of St.il. f..i Mu 0 C. A. Emmet, and Sir Oladv. vn Jet b p 'itativ< V V ,: itmit.n.c. i I Ii III • lie 11 usl quotas, but %  LH time before 1 situation rajfuj rsorsg it Coeaawnling .... I"' ifiKiition at Federation, Dr S hlllei %  Brtti II Oulang < i. \ HI MI I.I. H % %  n The inl) nil. i %  rertMd about h.sinn then coBfltl luUonal righli Mil ho Ihoughl lha difficult] could bo Bvorcorae it! "i. Introduction <-t ths i i ' "I lie OppOSl turn aiuimt Ihe 'edrnitl.ni movi < said, and < U> I ISil!< extent, ll opposed i %  1 .< njlijjaaijj new eoriSlltuth.il II. 1.1'. II nut hope-, i rvod thai if UM peopli thai pokuu "an ISBMUUV 1 U would hold on to the reins Oovernment from BOS He said that rwgfJllOll Off *he eleetlnn Ul liromlned In June next rear, and politician have already begun to eampalfln. Mr lournoy to Trinidad while Hi AIII leave Ui'iiim i' iiiiii.ii" i*aursssintaUve 9u John Saint and Mr. F I b %  tasneal u>i he Advaeaar liorilv jliei UN II rival that represeni.itr hC oHitllhlllilK; lei M'.'i | B mei UM i'i Ipal Sn Thoiii.i f .. %  lush w. nniinssji Reg h I'nivelMtv Hid Mi matter irurUiiiLng (o the lliumeeul | nivrndly. HAItltAIXJS AND TRINIDAD Kf)ieVntatives fl ii ended the meeting of Uie Finance Vwtimittec ojV *\ CoUtSg 01 thfl West [ndlet. -nrnfdT tjpfi niKht by B.W.I.A. trom Jamaica. They were Sir John Saint. Mr V L, Wo bados Hepresentalivea, and Hon. Hoy .1 lei ot EducmUeci and Social Services, Trinidad, and Hon. l '-*jtg* rUnnayg, Q.C, who represented Trinidaii at th. talk IL.innivi continued In Burton Gains Honours In Librarianship New.-, ha:, been M.eived lhat Mr. \irlisle A. Iturton, HA.. Assistant I ubli< Librarian. ll;irbsfh Publie > library, has passed with honours I ill examination in I.ibiarlanshj|> r. the U-cds S. hool of LibrarianAm-inu m.itu-1 UfArkfj "> ; Ingla n d. ii> the total budgst na ColUMU* uvw tnasrSMfnt Uv i "-\ There wfll'MP "im Ihe List five year ytttv -lui-h was also dealt with. They said that he Hrwpl'.l i huh wan recently oimied %  he tlntvn iiv Cnllrice for <1'iptlon i>f patlaits will be u -' i -Tetehiiii'" Hotipltiil lot nderifraduiile*. ind ns ne)i I oirf • Koo.1 deal more .rdinsry** ii COfl to he Mel hy Contrihulin^ CglfHugg lit. J.im.in.i (Jovernmunt win Id prevlmiitly sgregd t" BlUUl • i 1011111111; BOsI "f llir huappe ... M 'li 'l th. d 1'i.m.il rrwt* of the, "tenchni. plUU IK' lliel l,\ UM i-r.ti ting colonies Certain ietiimineiuliition> ' MNUMCUon with the Unlveriit: (*oll(e are iilo to be submltt'-d as > ,, munlst officials In sn anU-Kerl pur^e hut U hud 1 1.11 'I vigoroualy o p posed Ihe alectricil TTade Union over the expera eia of West-East trade The resolution wss proposed by the National Union of Mineworfcers and secondetl by the Amalgamated Union of foundry workers. Supporterincluded the ua tlonal union of railwayman and the Scottish Painters Society. The resolution expressed ularni at the Increased difficult. IA maintaining Britain's ruix.rt which ft sold threatened U "extend slump condition" and unemploymerrr-. De%'elopmen* >f trading relations with all notions prei*orod 'o conclude commerclsl igrre ments was also urged The renutlon alo expressed the belief *ln particular thst extensive I ading relations with China, the trsSR and other eastern countries, would make a -ubst>ntlsl contribution toward improving the present internatiori.il ituation which is causing grave concern to psopie a of all coinv.rtee." In seconding the James Gardner of the A-nalgamated Union of Foundry Workers ssid American German and Japanese competition in W-stern markets would force Britain to eek market* in Eaatem rotmtrisa. meet in gs In this country, whtsh began last month He was o. -TJ.1-. FEISAL ARRIVES IN ARIZONA I'HOKNIX Arizona, gapf, I King Feisal of Iraq arrives by piano on Friday from Las Vegas, Nevada foi 4 tuui 01 Itivtr Valley. Th. V. Monarch Is alio ex|K. • %  Tal Wi Wi ranch north of toLuke Air Force base, where i, will arrive in an air force plane. —(U.P.I 7oo Stout II AND lepf % %  I ksnstry i> 1 %  in.I harrier twice in %  I bach wing D* ifiiviiio %  I %  I lint spee. run. But llw MOOnd 'itn. %  ,.vi-, (trrven ,rth b) 'he plarie*l Wlllg^ '" a t'li 1 terrific rush of leLeased air. Grass was ripped oi< by the root —1* r United Nations Accuse Communists Of Lying PANMdNJOM. Srpl 5. THE UNITED NATIONS RADIO KCUMd 111* Turn munlKtH of deliberately lying in charglllg lli.'.l the chief I Allied Truce Delegate IhrMtaud to %  .nln. M N'. r!h K'irci. Ti,. VOtCt .1 tinUnited Nation! Command" in a eouataf-proMganda thai Hod China's official radio al Peipinj; interitionallv i '.-rpreted remarks made by Ifajor General William K Harrison at an armistic mc-tinr jn iti rda) Pplpmtf Radio ., " „ t .p....denl Air .V a UJJ. broadi me Loadon Dan> S Wm aa layTha chief UK I Ian' or brt..i.*ciii -':' %  ..(almt North Kort.." <*>•> by the Alh. Id thai Hairlann told the '"" "J •allrtad t-i I Commuoi • '*' %  in Ihe truce building sequences of the niillt.. waa aa far from the Communtloni which you hai lata" a< the arm warfare them I upper! and nal charge* are from the actual. m %  ^^ Jtai"'-**' 1 *^ IT'S THE TOBACCO THAT CO


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FILES



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SATUKDAV, SEPTEMBER 6, U52 BARBADOS ADVOCATE i'\i.: si MSHENRY BY CARL ANDERSON FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD BY ALAN STRANKS a GEORGE DAVIES ftfV THf WAY lWT-t^''e 14ST AWOA.T tvK THe /*m*Tf T1*W3M*TTf* TN-T5 .-uf'yM; av CBV CK"/ •WQI'BT'VCV. I -C^CTaTO - • StfaT V>V.*T VOt/ A*-aWJ> C*" 5 /T. FLINT. FLASH GORDON BY DAN BARRY JOHNNY HAZARD BY FRANK ROBBINS 1 : 7' 5U=FE*>N' y WAV BE CUK 0FEAK.' H(TTH£ TU.ITP (tA.L.. w( A.P _> %  JUMBlA j ftWEa? fiMC*TTEt> CUT' SawftE %  "" %  1 *: • 1 iMTr*' BBukc.' BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS RIP KIRBY BY ALEX RAYMOND THE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK ft RAY MOORES (y>Vv,\wv--~ I'LL TB B tins DC ANOt"f R J061Wftir M(Pt. AND KEEPOUTATOOUBIE. ISAVA'NT&I ^W^'EEN'C'ja N AJAX ,1UE WM) ACT *CW WHAT STKW6EST ,—-VMUKlECf y-' MAM?/-—7TUAT5*— A'UBirOUCAN PICK UPTMATSAJt I AW WALK BJ6UT OUT WITH II }VUK£ITWAASAOI %  • _' .. a*cbacn. Mtrvaiwn M i. -o %  *%  JlMlWIfc O'-rlM ud.< £. Fa Ena*gy and Aeoatit* Pufy Anklat %  ur"r.Q, Sfn.M.ng Warn %  ' %  %  IO your ih-m-l da i CyiTa -noTba 111 Ud -.'II ii. .' ".. Cyif rx Helps Ncture i Wei n.. traitMM MI • -"111' l-l" %  IO ....:(,.-. %  • Wk kMH')i BT..I utov* acida and *>*l'm aalt-ly. quiaAlt and %  —wani I. Stare • Ita. V %  r h M.I ITrlMn %  rat. rat la altaxlulalr larn.lp lo l.ukidni')>. nroti raTSirit ..f dl i %  "S'Weelii m Hci>.'.^_ Now Well -I ha .-*-rrt W %  %  %  '• a mi "Jit'llf" I' %-!' Of* ) %  aad aiif J<**t*. I i •dial -i •-- %  ad -a ftaaailal. T\, H I MaM %  a vttft. Nir a'lrCxt %  % %  • .(/ ad •* %  .-=< A P Hwlrh ImdK.vrd m 2 Days IW /• - %  • *+b >a* ••' • Nil I (Mid -.'f *.l .!.'* % % %  '.' / dr.id'd lo .<<> Cy.la> • l-i. a h * I >•< (• -.1 i| .' %  ", i-. Old >a>rtf i"-If %  •* ^ i ail .lp."ir /t Aa> %  •apraadd BIB "mini %  >*#• n | I :iao •(# %  • i-ii ia IUM /of MU MM PJ GawfUa4 It l Yen Rial' r ar Mi.. |M| ..al Cyatatn %  i %  -.-t t.>af. < %  It UMarouift laal C. te %  %  In 1 w.v ^ if m rrlurn If B*'k. C IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL OFFERS AVAILA BLE THURSDAY TO SATURDAY AT ALL BRANCHES 1 -"'"> N "" TOMATO JIICK . SHEET CORN M .M BOVIill. -•. l.U I %  !! % % %  H. Till. HI .75 MHMITK - |S (URN-BEEF ullh l>ml M .52 IKUTLLION *"**'. 4 III.I E MOI NTAIN COrEEB-llb r:. : .11 .12 SpW^TOBMTO < ATS1 r SAM WHITE TOILET rAPEI SJ JO VM H..N I i' SAK E iJJ BEE* ! II ~rl(i\ AS! IIIIVH Ellin5* D. V. SCOTT & to>Ltdf. Bria SOLE AGENTS INTERNATIONAL TRADING CORPORATION LIMITED Telephone 5009 M*r knrt* hy h had c*ta only for fm 1 Sh* ha.1 i-m .ii' ...wic'.l liandboi ShamptiK Now bet haii ...,!.1 ,i. „ ht ndiani, i*n arul tovrly in 14.11c ,.| iht iun ih* M!Ibnru or ihf mooioun. Her nr hair IKBUIV hai niirrt her ihii tAibilr auurarKC — Il.n.tt-n hai |ivrn lr (hal B<* MI: I*..", bandbox s\wmpm Have you seen it yet? 11 VIK COSMETIC! II..-'. M* l,.„ '!.. rao —IO •rnnnU. \ loiiiiilrla DSBOM IWM V.il.iini. III..,.I.,„! nihT Irrvrfy 'fni-.ill I Mr • % %  h.dyr or tlnl. Ilihlni.i> l>.r .11:. .111.I % %  WIMMlli 1! ,-hr. or "> *m! %  U*lrr: li^ nil UAKCRS • 1 BANODOX SHAMPOO 1 I. Linlon. High Slrn-I Stocked by:A f JOOH, Ifich Strevl. "" s. TlMl Swun Street. lux-Luck Streel nc. Eigle Hall. SI. FOR YOUR SCHOOL SUPPLIES —. CALL VI — ADVOCATE SI\IIO\KBY






WHAT'S ON TODAY

Court of Grand Sessions — 10.00 a.m.
Police Courts — 10.00 a.m.





“
WM

ESTABLISHED 1895



bados Gk

Harriman Gives Views On

Joint U.S.—U.K. Oil Proposal

Nationalization Of a |
Industry Recognised | Shifts

- aa meet 5.
WASHINGTON, Sept 5. Pe a
THE MUTUAL SECURITY Administrator’ Averell|| Po%!¢d, along the shipping
Harriman said on Friday that the oil proposal which!| increasing speed after send-
President Truman and Prime Minister Churchill made/} jp@ & oll tanker scurrying
last week to Iranian Prime Minister Mossadegh recognizes |] jj. ae hat ae ie
Iran’s nationalization of the industry and attaches no con- | 4
ditions regarding its management or return of British |
technicians. |

swerve to the northeast had
Mossadegh announced shortly after receiving the pro-

1952











ti ntti tt sn

| New College Soon To |
Open Ai Barataria

HON. ROY JOSEPH Minister of Education and Social
Services, and Acting M feacay # Agriculture and Lancs,
Trinidad, is spending the end in Barbados after
attending a mee of the Finance Comittee of the Uni-
versity College of the West Indies...

In an interview with the Advocate last night, Mr.
Joseph said that a new Secondary School will shortly be
opened at Barataria, San Fernando, to be known as St







YESTERDAY'S WEATHER REPORT

72.0°F,

TODAY

Tota! raimfali for the month: 04 of an
inch
Rainfall trom cine Nil
Highest Temperature: 98.5°F.
Lowest Temperature
a } Barometer (9 a.m.) 29,954; (3 p.m.) 29.687
Suprise. 5,49 a2

Sunset: 6.12 p.m

Low Tide: 11.15

PRICE : FIVE CENTS
WACK FROM JAMAICA



spared the United States

mainland from ‘ immediate

pone wl = weathermen

. ; predict a further ~

posal that he could not accept it but has left an opening ward the open ‘on inae
for reconsideration. Among the points Churchill and Tru-
man made were an offer to grant $10,000,000 (United
States) to bolster Iranian economy and submission to the
International Court of Justice of the question of compen-

with “considerable” increase
in forward speed.

sation for Anglo-Iranian Oil Company’s property.

Harriman, familiar with many ————————__—__

There has been no late re-
eeenee 20 ie ee eee. said he re °
spent about six weeks in,Iran a L d Ribin
year ago as a special representa-' or son

port of the situation of the
ome os Feeieent Truman who! e .
ad sen him there to see if he J) Suddenl
could find a basis for the settle- | 1e€s u €

eorges College.

ee

Changes Lower
Cost Of U.C.W.I.
To Jamaica

KINGSTON, Jamaica, Sept, 5
Jamaica’s delegation to the}
conference of representatives of
B.W.I. governments on the future!
‘inancing of the West Indies Un'-!
versity were unable to obtsin
nuch radical change from the orig-_
inal basis of contributions princi-.
pally through strong objection |
the Trinidad representatives,
Certain changes were apyee |
however which lowers peu
cost at the U.C.W.I. hospitaiand |

fleeing tanker which in its
ment of the dispute.

last radio message, said that
it was keeping just ahead of
tke raging winds, Another
ship narrowly escaped the
grip of the winds late last
night by scurrying to , the

shore. The Weather Bureau

in an early advisory estim-

ated the centre of the year’s

Harriman’s statement said: “I| OTTAWA, Sept. 5,

always believed it was possible to| Lord Ribinson, Vice-President
find an early and just solution to|of the six British Commonwealth
this unfortunate situation, I wish Forestry Conference and Chair-
to state that the joint proposals|man of the Forestry Commission
from the President and Primejof Great Britain, died suddenly
Minister Churchill on the oif ques-|in hogpital here of pneumonia.
tion represent a real step toward| He was head of the United
the solution of this problem. Kingdom delegation, and partici-

second tropical storm as
about 500 miles east of Wil-
Nationalization of Iran’s oil in-|pated actively in a 3,000 mile

mington, North Carolina,
—UP.

Stevenson







a

new

dustry is an accepted fact, and/tour of Ontario and Quebec pro- Goes We t U.C.W.I. generally but not’ th technical. school which w ..}| Guiana, arrived here on Thursday ‘ ¥ . ive y oseph, Minist
no conditions regarding the man-|vince forests made by the con- es wholesale revision Jamaica ape place the old Tonies School that night on a two-week holiday visit, os Senne R ETS, an es +a Hon, ¥
agement of the industry or return|ference during their extensive for in a change from a popullltion ||; now being housed in a ter-|He is staying at Acera, Rockley. iducation and Social Services, Trinidad, ¢ Rome ;
of British technicians are attached| meetings in this country, which WASHINGTON, Sept. 5 basis to a budgetary basis. porary building at High Street Speaking of what he described Hannays, Q.C., who represented Trinidad at the talks.
to the joint offer to Prime Minister | began last month. He was 69. Governor Adlai Stevenson em- At a closed conference this aft: '=!San Fernando, will, when it is}|@5 the “very serious rice shortage” Mr. Hannays continued — his —————~ - —
Mossadegh, It is my earnest hope —CGP.|barked on his invasion of the} 200”, Jom, Mordecai R. E. C. opened accommodate about 160|!" British Guiana, which affected | journey to Trinidad while Hon e
that the Iranian people will rec- ia wet Gh. Ttiiee dy to hit Executive Secretary made a re- technicians but with night}local supplies, Dr. Schuler said| Joseph will leave to-morrow Burton Gains
ognize the sincerity and fairness . back st fe plies ready lease on the results which state cchools, will” cater. to over 700{it Was the first time in the history|The Barbados representative:
of these proposals and will see in b re = t a : iS publican campaign that the meeting was assisted ): students f that colony that the people|Sir John Saint and Mr. F. I
them a constructive opportunity OoOmmunts 8 ae _corruptoon: and “time|the Principal and other officers of — It will be equipped with two]had been without food. He said} Walcott, in a joint statement toi Honours In
to end this unhappy dispute.” ~ a or a change”. The Democratic] the University and members of the} laboratories, two drawing offices, }{)#t the situation was such that it) he Advocate shortly after thei

Pointing out that Harriman had To Presidential nominee prepared to} University Council. h ns ive electrien| | almost resulted in “food riots” on a: te adele he e m e

take the offensive i eee _ (and have automotive, electrical | °°" . 3 arrival that representatives i

addressed his statements to the Ul nm _ ; e in Denver on| Representatives of the colonies! and engineering workshops everal occasion he contributing territories to 1 rarians
Iranian people rather than to| Friday night in his first western] affirmed their recognition of the —_ i |

speech which is billed as aimed] vital responsibility upon the whol:

at “the independent vote’, Wil-|region to keep the academi:!
son Wyatt, Stevenson's campaign|Standards of the University Colles |
manager, said that the Governor|@Md the teaching hospital on a high
would “pay his respects to one or|!evel and agreed to recommend to
more of the slogan#” used by their governments that they ac

the Republicans, including “time cept proportionate liabilities re-|
for a change”. sulting from excess recurrent ex- |

Mossadegh, the diplomats said that SEOUL, Korea, Sept. 5.
United States strategy aimed at] General ee a Van b hae
support for their proposals that|said that the Communists still
Pe Saaitis ath a ee gaa are strong enough to launch an
tance, or at least vote against an sine ay hone a ne tones
outright rejection. That is the pounding t ey have taken from
reason why it has been trying the United Nations warplanes
through public statements to U.S. Sabrejets destroyed three

ve Iranians the United States-|Communist M.LG, 15 jets, prob-| During his




nine-day tour| the initial. Sovges approved af the
western states, Montego Bay Conference. ¥



ritish.imterpretation of the plan. ably destroyed one and damaged |throush nine
US. and British “officials wanc|three others as the Russian built) stevenson planned to. block out Caaf Inevenesd
tase, Iron fully turns’ the “plan|halt a pulverizing United Nations’ |‘t= position on such major isguee| The cost of maintaining existing
ease Iran fully turns the plan ap z. atio 4
down. —U.P. air raid on a vital Red war plant. as farm policy, foreign policy, @ On Pass j



conservation, and public power.
He has scheduled 19 speeches,

five of them described by aides Allies To Have |

as “extremely important”.

Sea Manoeuvres |
Off Seandinavia



Today’s air victory brought the
toll of M.I.G’s taken in the past
two days to 16 destroyed, one
probably destroyed and six dam-
aged. Swept wing Red jets tried |
unsuccessfully to crack through

LONDON, Sept. 5. the ring of Sabres screening Uni-|ence with mid-western :

The United States, British, and| ted States and Australian fighter |jican leaders after cuilining I his
French representatives held ‘their bombers that hit a mine and or€| foreign policy views' in his first OSLO, Norway, Sept. 5
third meeting here on Friday to|Processing plant at Sinhung, deep formal campaign & Eisen» |: More than 160 allied warsh:ps,
draft the West’s reply to the|in North Central Korea, | hower’s apeoch elves 4 neue ee big siserett cans
Kremlin's atest “proposals “tor. —UP. |'Thureday “night in ‘Philadelphia desserts aoe ree a Sean
four power ene were jwas another outright assault om|sia that the West is ready to de-
many next month. The terms of Sh ll Pl : Bi *} | the Tninien ‘administrati focus th s y 1D
the Soviet proposals of August 23 e€. ans 1g Oil “bungling” en @ seas even to the Arctic

°
Refinery In Kenya
NAIROBI, Kenya, Sept. 5.

West Meets To
Draft Reply

——_—_——— eee

Dwight Eisenhower flew to
Chicago on Friday for a confer-



cussion in Paris on Thursday. The III. games will be one of the largest

views of the N.A.T.O. delegates The displays of allied naval might—

Y ° 4 hich he accused of Ci

were also under consideration by = : ircle.

the permanent North Atlantic the nation into the Korean war| Officially known as “Operation
‘ : ; It has been officially announced Republican Presidential

oes oa, consideration | si5¢ Shell Oil Company plans to}Mominee outlined 10 “steps to since the second World ‘War, -The

Council in its general political dis- and to the brink of World War|Mainbrace* the 13-day wat
The Big Three Western powerg|build one of the world’s largest} peace”, which he said Would help re ae, vent Geena

t _ 0 ‘ try exercise is to give the parti-
_Joil refineries on the Kenya coust|to end the Korean w id ‘

are fully agreed that the proposals |° : ar and) qipating navies an opportunit

fin their present form are not ac- opposite Mombasa Islana. reduce the threat of further!to co-operate in tilbloetirree

The statement said the Kenya
Government had atequred 2,200
acres of land opposite the islan

The Western replies, while re-|for the project which it said is
jecting the Soviet offer, will not, |‘essential to the security and well
however, close the door to further | being of Kenya”. :
exchanges, authoritative sources| The cost of building the refinery
said. The Western replies are jis expected to be in the region of
expected to be completed by mid- | £40,000,000. —U.P.

September. —U.P. “

, EXHIBITIONS AWARDED
POPE REAFFIRMS :
BAN ON FEENEY The

ceptable, and federal Chancelior Communist aggression.
Konrad Adenauer is reported in

agreement with this view.

with North Atlantic Treaty part-

—UP. |ners.—C.P.

_

T.U.C. Urges More
Trade With Russia

MARGATE, England, Sept. 5

THE POWERFUL Trades Union Congress passed a
{unanimous resolution on Friday calling for extensive
trading with Russia. This was the big surprise of the
Congress representing 8,000,000 trade unionists. i

Few delegates anticipated that the mammoth Trans-
port and General Workers Union, the world’s biggest,
would join forces with the Communist dominated Elec-
trical Trades Union in this resolution.
poem erreah Not only did T. and

KOREAN WAR JET ACES HAVE A GET-TOGETHER recently sack all of i

ems 2 z é







Primary to First Grad
Exhibitions for 1952 have bee.)

BOSTON, Massachusetts, Sept. 5. awarded to Winston Anthon
|

}

The Vatican has reaffirmeg its|Lynton of St. Lawrence Boys’
ban on the Rev. L. Feeney’s St.!School and [la Loleita Forde of
Benedict centre and his teaching |the St. George’s Girls’ School,

that all Noncatholics are damned,|_ The Primary to First Grace
Archbishop Richard Cushing of Exhibitions are tenable for sis
the Boston Catholic Archdiocese, years at Harrison College (Boy.)
reported Friday, |Lodge School (Boys) and Queéen’s

—(U.P.) College (Girls).







G.W.U,
Com-

purge but it had consistently and
the electrical
Trades

of West-East trade.

The resolution was proposed by
the National Union of Minework-
ers and seconded by i Amal-
gamated Union of foun work-
ers. Supporters included the na-
tional union of railwaymen and
the Scottish Painters Society.

The resolution expressed alarm
at the increased difficulty § of

Britain's exports
which it said threatened te “ex-
tend slump conditions and unem-
ployment”.

Development
{tions with all



of trading rela-
nations prepared

, mated Union of Foundry Work-
jets said American, German and
Japanese competition in Western
;markets would force Britain to

IN DETROIT for the Air Fores’ sixth annual convention are nine jet aces of the Korean war. They are ;seek markets in Eastern countries.



(front, l. to r.): Maj. Wintus. Marshall, Capt. Ralph Gibson, Maj. James Jabara, Capt. Richard Becker and |meetings in this country, which
Capt. Robert Latshaw. Iz rear (1. tor.) are: Lt. James H. Kasler, C an C. Kincheloe, Capt. Robert } began last month. He was 69,
_ Moore and Maj. William Whisner. The convention coincides with the International Aviation Exposition —UP.



| wise, The Hindus are also plan-

penditure in the first period @ver\@ppointed Defence

munist officials in an anti-Red|Monarch is also expected to viril

over the expansion will arrive in an air force plane. by the roots for hundreds of yare

The School for the time being,
will accommodate fifty boys and
fifty girls, but will go up to a
naximum of 250 students. The
College will be run on similar
lines to Queen's Royal College

The Anglican Authorities, he
said, are considering erecting an

er . ary . j . vices, Trimidad, pictured together at Seaweéll Airport.
Pet nando, naa Mustion ener Hon. Roy Joseph, Mr, Walcott and Sir John Saint are just back from the meeting
munity are planning to do like-| of the Finance Committee of the University College of the West Indies.



- “ e

is ge R ta At
is eucaiatedate aiekak ‘500 "ahi Shortage Of eee lives ;
dren, : e e

Within the next three or fou p Finance Meet =
teckinisel sehool will aaah os n ™ ’

at Les Efforts, San Fernando at
a cost of half a million dollars.
The tender for the construction
will be awarded within the next
two weeks, _Dr

It is planned that this Specialist of

Almost Over

attended the meeting of the Finance

Neville Schuler, DSe., Eye night by B.W.LA. from Jamaica.

|
|
\
|
|
!
|
|
Georgetown, British |
|



















‘The shortage,” Iniversity College met the Pris
S he said, “is now ipal Sir Thomas Taylor, lV
Fowler Appointed almost over, and fugh W. Springer, Registrar |
oye jthe people are he University and Mr. Swab |
Defence Mobilizer more or less re- Burser, and discussed

ceiving their us-

3 pertaining to the finances of th
ual quotas, but it



WASHINGTON, Sept, 5,

President Truman on Friday| Will take a little Among matters under consid-
Production |time before the’ ration was the total budget oi
Administrator Henry Fowler (o|*ituation return he College over thi

be Defence Mobilizer.
succeeds John Steelman,
tant to President Truman ee aed

has been acting Defence Mobil- Samatica eee
izer since Charles Wilson resigned sehuler sald that
last spring during the dispute {the

Fowle

Assis-| ~ ‘
Seki | Commenting on

year period, There was a defer 8
from the last five year perind)
which was also dealt with.

They said that the
which was recently opened at
the University College for the

Mr.
who

—_— EF

concensus of&

ever the steel crisis. jopinion in Brit- reception of patients will be usc:'] left the island for
J Guiana is pr. N. somunen {85 & “Teaching” Hospital for] England on the
ing appreciation of his perform-|that federation is necessary, The| Undergraduates, and as such, wi'!| 2nd September

ance of his duties, Presiden!
Truman said that in the period
ahead “there must be no let
down” in national effort to
achieve defence production goals.|‘ifculty could be overcome wit!

He added that early shortages j'h« introduction of the new, Britist
in the defence production pro-|@Uiana Constitution. The opposi

only hitch which he Saw was that{cost a
the anti-federationists were con-
cerned about losing their consti-

tutional rights but he thought that

good deal more
‘ordinary” hospital.

In a letter to Fowler, expres ish
| than oo



Colonies

The Jamaica Government wh

gramme were being overcome «3;0% against the federation movefhad previously agreed to financ: een? Trini-
a result of expansion of basic |“®S strong, Dr, Schuler said, and| (he running cost of the hospita ae hid - "4
resources and facilities. Pew a oa ge pF nD 5 gy rrigon 1
E : ana? ee ._jextent, the people who opposed it | 4; “OSts 1 “teachir
Mr. Truman said “a well or \were the people in power ditional costs of the, “teaching Ii, Burton gained

hospital be met by the contribu
ting colonies.

distribution” o
wave military

dered system of

available supplies He said that the people generally

and atomic programmes “their |“are in favour of the proposed new Certain recommendations at
full requirements and _ civilian|constitution, He felt that it hela} connection with the University
economy equitable distributior |out hopes for a new liberation, and| College are also to be submitted

of the remainder.”-—U.P.

Eden Will Lead
Delegation To U.N.

LONDON, Sept. 5.

jhe observed that if the people of
jthat colony “are sensible’ they
‘would hold on to the reins of
|Government from now on

| He said that everybody is pre-

paring for the election under the
new franch.e which is promised
in June next year, and politicians
have already begun to campaign.

@ On Page 3









Foreign Secretary, Anthony |
Eden will lead the British dele-
gation to the next session of the) 7 “
Unitéd Nations General Assem-)| Too Slow?
bly in New York on October 14
The four other delegates will ENGLAND, Sept. 4
be Selwyn Lloyd, Minister of An ebony-black jet’ fighter re-
State, Henry Hojkinson, Minis‘e’ | jected by the upply ministry be
of State for the Colonies, Mrs.| cause it was too slow rocketec
C. A, Emmet, and Sir Gladw ¥" through the sound barrier twice in
Jebb, permanent representative 10 minutes with a roar that rip-
—C.P ped out grass by the roots
Test pilot Jonny Derry flyin:
FEISAL ARRIVES 1 swept-back wing De Havilan:
110 night fighter was almost un

IN ARIZONA
PHOENIX, Arizona, Sept. 5.
King Feisal of Iraq arrives by tors annual aerial display becaus«
plane on Friday from Las Ve so high on his first spee:
Nevada for a tour of the But the second time at lowe

noticed by the thousands attend
ng the British Aircraft Constru

he wa



fh run



River Valley. The 17-year-old altitude shock waves driven 1
carth by the plane’s wings “ex

Tal Wi Wi ranch north of the ploded” with a terrific

Luke Air Force base, where he released air, Grass was ripped ov

—(U.P.) n all directions. —U P



United Nations Accuse
Communists Of Lying —

rush

'

|

|

|

PANMUNJOM, Sept. 5. |

THE UNITED NATIONS RADIO accused the Com-|

munists of deliberately lying in charging that the chief |
Allied Truce Delegate threatened to extend germ warfare |

against North Korea. “The Voice of the United Nations .

Command” in a counter-propaganda broadcast charged



\to conclude commercial agree- that Red China’s official radio at Peiping intentionally
‘ments was also urged, The Faber misinterpreted remarks made by Major General William
aa pastel’ thas ae K. Harrison at an armistice meeting yesterday
trading relations with China, the|_ Peiping Radio quoted Red core Wt, 1. iN broadcast. said.|
jUSSR and other eastern coun« respondent Alan Winnington of |’ Th sh m UN, a atAakte zs : \ A f
‘tries, would make a substantial|the London Daily Worker as say- |e Coen latome that. it Oe
contribution toward improving|ing that Harrison had “threatened ae tt etre oe nm are . | D “Ae
the present international situa-|the extension of bacteriological |" a ti ae Se erate S|
tion which is causing grave con-|Warfare against North Korea.” helc by the aiue it appears that}
leern to peoples of all countries,”|They said that Harrison told the YOU are Satisfied to cause the;
In seconding the resolution, |Communists that “the North population of North Korea to|
James Gardner of the Amalga-|Korean people will suffer disease Suffer gradual destruction 0©:}







junless you accept our plan for their economic life, in additior

fexchanging prisoners of war.” ae disease a ation < |

| their homes and other trouble e mt bs i y =o

| General Harrison’s actualjwhich are the inevitable con- iTS THE TOBACCO THAT COUNTS
Statement in the truce building| sequences of the military opera-

|W as far from the Commun-|tions which you have forced

lis a the germ warfare them t upport and maintain

(charges re from the actual | @ --U.P. Ne EET EI

They were Sir John Saint, Mr. F. L. Wal

Burton
was ap-[ -
Hospita!| pointed Assistant}

Librarian on the].
ist of May 1951,J —

the same year to
pursue a course
in Librarianship,
Cost to be Met by Contributing | following an
earlier course at
the Eastern Re-
gional Caribbean

2
BARBADOS AND TRINIDAD Repren



tative:
ittee oO
University College of the West Indies arrived



High Tide: 5.14 a.m., 5.29 p.m,
am,



LEFT TO RIGHT:—-Hon. Ajodah Singh, Minister of Communications and Works, Trinidad, Mr. F. L.
Walcott, M.C.P., B’dos., Sir John Saint, and Hon. Roy Joseph, Minister of Education and:Secial Ser-





'S




News has been received that Mr.
Carlisle A. Burton, B.A., Assistant
‘ublic Librarian, Barbados Public
matter | Library, has passed with honours

| nis examination in Librarianship
University, it the Leeds School of Librarian-
| ship, England. He is expected to
‘sail from the United Kingdom on
xt five the 31st of December, arriving in



Harrison College,Mr. c. A, BURTON
the Higher
School Certificate with distinctions
in Latin, Greek, Ancient History
and Literature, arid attained open
Scholarship Standard, Mr. Burton

@ On Page 3




PAGE TWO





Caub Calling

IS Excellency the Governor

and Lady Sav accom-
panied by Majo: Denni
Vaughan, A.D.C., atiendei thts
Basketball games played at the
Y.M.P.C. on Thursday night.t§
After two presentation matches¥

were played, His Excel ency pre-
sented trophies to the Captain
of the winning teams,

Later in the evening they lefty

for the Empire Theatre and
the second time saw Mrs. A.

ior

L.

Stuart’s School of Dancing in the !

presentation of “Reuedev iit h,
1952.”

En Route to U.K. '

IR CHANKLES WYVULLLY,

Retired Governor of brivis}
Guiana, passed through Barba-
dos on ‘lnursday
by 1.C.A. on his way to England’
via Montreal.

Lady Woolley who was in
Trimdad with Sir Charles, was
intransit on Thursday by the
s.S. Golfite en route to the
United Kingdom.

On Health Visit

R. NEVILLE SCHULER,

O.D., D.Sc. of British Gui-
ana who had been in Barbados
earlier this year, has returned
to the co.ony on a health visit.

Dr. Schuler who is an eye
specialist is also a res@arch
worker examining the effect of
vitamins on the health of the
community,

He expects to remain in Bar-
bados during the next few weeks
and will be a guest at Accra,
Roekley. |

To Study Engineering

. JOHN G. OUTRAM, son

of Mr. Barton Outram of

Lancaster, St. James, left by the

S.S. Golfiteo on Thursday for Eng-

a where he will take up
ies in Engineering.

John .has just left the Lodge
School and during his time there
represented that school in First
Division cricket.

To Study Dancing

ISS BETTY BLADES a

former pupil of Queen's
College and daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. D. C. Blades of Beach Court
Ave., Hastings, was among the
passengérs who left by the SS.
Golfite on Thursday. She will

enter the Elmhurst Ballet School,
Surrey, where she will study
dancing for a period of about

four, years.
For Trinidad

ME: JOYCE CLARKE, wife
of Capt. Ormie Clarke of

Woodbrook, Port-of-Spain, who
had Been spending a holiday with
her“ mother at Jackson = was
amen the passengers leaving
for Trinidad by B.W.LA. on
rear:






>

f

from Trinidad

y

j



dear,

“ Don’t worry me,
can’t you see I'm checking
the poois?”





« Express Service

For Bristol University

M* ALLERT WILLiAms,

—. and Mrs. G. C. A. 8.
Wi liar of Pine Ro.d and loca
ericketér and footballer jeft the
island on Thursday by the SS.
Golfito for - England where he
will enter Bristol University w
study Mathematics.

Mr. Williams was an Agsistant
Master at Harrison College and
he expects to be away for about
our years.

Director Returns

son

R. A. R. TOPPIN, Directo
. of T. Geddes Grant, Lt:
and Mrs. Toppin’ were arrivai
by the S.S. De Grasse on Weud-

nesday from England. They
been spending three
ho idey there.

For Ten Days
D*

J. P. O'MAHONEY, Direc-
among the passengers leaving Ly

hed
months

tor of Medical Services, was

B.W.LA. for Trinidad on Wec-
nesday. He expects to be away
for about ten days.
Congratulations
Cyne ULATIONS to Mr.
and Mrs. Geoffrey Johnson

of Blue Waters on the arrival cf
a daughter which took place oa
Tuesday 26 August. Mrs, Jonn-
son is the former Miss Jessie
Cheeseman, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. S. H. Cheeseman, of Fonto-
belle. Mother and babe are doing
fine.

A Daughter
DAUGHTER was born on
Thursday, 4th September, to

Mr. and Mrs. Eric Clarke of
Crumpton Street. This is their
second child — both girls. Mis.
Clarke is the former Miss
Marjorie Streat of Bloomsbury
St. Thomas. Mother and babe
are > doing: fine.

BY THE WAY e © « By Beachcomber

F the floodlighting of games

and sports continues, what on
earth will the football crowds
do during the dull hours of day-
light?

Form queues, o! course, for the
night's fun. Night cricket could
be madé more dramatic by play-
ing a spotlight on the batsman or
the bowler, and as for open-air
ping-pong, powerful searchlights
sweeping the a would be very
satisfactory. oe craze will prob-
ably spread to the quieter indoor
games, and we shall have floodlit
chess and canasta and halma and
tiddley-winks. But candlelight is
the only light for night lacrosse.
It softens the great red faces of
the girls. '

A mere nothing

HENEVER there is a_hail-

storm people boast of having
had denis made in their hats by
stones half an inch in diameter.
But I have never read of a hail-
storm like the one which caught
me years ago in the Carpathians.
I had never before known what it
was to be hurt by hail and when
I took shelter under a great rock.
the noise of the huge stones was
like a bombardment. At a Polish
refuge hut later on they ques-
tioned me about the storm, saying
t must have been terrible up in
the high mountains. Said I, “Oh,
was that-hail? I thought someone
was throwing rice.” And I told
them of_ hail-stones at Stoke
Newington as large as footballs
which came whizzing along like
meteorites and knocked holes in
walls,

Prodnose: Who would be throw-
ing rice .in the Carpathians?
Myself; Five jolly Chinamen.



Rupert’ $ Spring Adventure—24



Rupert realises that the plan is
‘succeeding, so he drops all the
dragon food and moves nervously
aside. . He has no need to worry
for the dragon hardly notices him

and takes straight for its meal.
In another instant he has stepped

Bird chef denounces
zine roofing

The reported death of an
ostrich from indigestion is a terri
ble comment on the deterioration
of ostrich-food. Inferior boot-
leather, lumps of impure metal
masquerading as nuts and bolts,
synthetic glass, adulterated zine
roofing, processed braces — all
these foods, with blue nutrition
value, combined to make the bird
ill.

(M. Treguier, chef at a Bodmin

Bird Restaurant).

Tail-piece

A crowd of well-washers surg-
ed around him.

Was it a plea or company’s
water to be laid on in some remote

village?
Iikla Maw Bat |



ESTERDAY
At was conducted round the |
soap factory at Wivenham. A
soapster handed him a lump of
yellow soap to inspect.
The magnate took a hetty bite,

rolled his eyes, and shouted
“Cheddar!” They told him it was
for washing, not for eating, and

he asked to see it washed. Lunch
was then served, and to
that he understood his mistake}

the magnate scrubbed his hans} ®
laughingly with a _ piece
cheese,
Sport ;
. E must broaden our out-|%
look on sport before thej¢
Melbourne Games of 1956,”’ says}
a letter-writer. Yes. We must %

start training this very moment,





show | 4

of | 3

Attended Conference

> ee BRANCKER, F

M.C.P., one of the Bar-)
risters who attended the Con-
ference of West Indian Bar-
risters in Trinidad, returned
home on Wednesday by B.W.LA.
Mr. D. H. L. Ward and Mr. E. W.
Barrow, M.C.P., who also. at-

tended the Conference expect to
return in a few days.

Â¥,

For Permanent Stay

R. AND MRS. HORNER left
the island by T.C.A. on
Thursday morning on their way
to Vancouver. They hope to

make their new home there. The

Horners are natives of Mont-
serrat and had been spending
one month’s vacation here as|

guests at Abbeville Guest House.

. First Visit

R. AND MRS. W. J. REC-

TOR of Maracaibo are pay-
ing their first visit to Barbados.
Mr. Rector is Petroleum Engin-
eer at Richmond Exploration Co.
in Maracaibo. Both are keen
surf riders.

Trinidadians Return

ISS MARJORIE CHERRIE

and her mother who had
been spending one month’s holi-
day as gu@sts at “Stoneycroft”,
Worthing, returned to Trinidad
on Wednesday by the S.S. D2
Grasse, Marjorie is an employee
of the Imperial College of Tropi-
eal Agriculture.

For Two Weeks

R. A. A. REECE, who is at-

tached to the Colonial
Hospital in Port-of-Spain arrived
here on Thursday by the SS.
Golfito for two weeks’ holiday.
He will be a guest of Mr. W. W
Reece, Q.C., his cousin.

On Holiday
Mi" ROBERT De C. O’NEIL
of
Was among

“The Cliff’, St. John,

the passengers sail-
ing by the S.S. Golfito for Eng-
Isnd, He has gone on a holiday.

Back to England

RS, JEANNE CLARKE and
her two children Michael
and Gerald left the island for

England by the S.S. Golfito on
Thureday. They had been spend-
ing two months’ holiday here as
guests at Abbeville Guest House
ate Misses Phyllis and Joyce

Bowen who left with the
Queen’s College Netball Teem
for Trinidad early last month,
returned home on Thursday by
the SS. Golfite after spending

one month’s holiday. Phyllis is
an Assistant Mistress at St. Mich-

Sisters Return

» ae V's Girls’ School whiie Joyce
is Secretary to the Headmistress
of Queen’s College.

a board of Inspectors that they
are not taking up any particular
sport for fun, but in order to win
medals, and to consolidate inter-
national friendship, These rules
should also apply to horses,
An idiotic question
,URING recent widespread
rain scientists claimed that
one particular shower was theirs.
They had sprayed a cloud with
salt, Those who prefer salt to

rain are clamouring to know why
these

salt
about,

scientists cannot just drop
when there are no clouds



NOTICE

PARADISE BEACH
CLUB

Under Rule 34, the Club
will be closed to members
from 8.00 p.m. TO-NIGHT





(Saturday, 6ih September)
to 6.00 a.m., Sunday, 7th
September,

OOOO
itl SS

*2SOSHO DOOS asa *
: HOLBORN CYCLE AND





Dance and
Floor Show



and we must appoint a

on anyone who breaks training
rules. The athletes must satisfy

—_——

Sports | >
Ministry, with powers to impris-, ¢

Y. M. P. C.

Saturday, nk September,
1952
In support of the Club’s Tour
to Trinidad in October







over its tail and grabbed the end
of the chain, le =teels very
frightened, but the dragon does
hot seem to mind at all. Firse st
finishes the food and then cheer-

fully prances along the passage
leading Rupert as towards ee
entrance,



NOTICE



—_—oO—

Floor Show commencing
at 10.30 p.m.
includes

Songs by Gloria Hunte
Western Numbers by Adrian

Howard

Sclections on the Piano

~ Accordion by Dr. Ferreira
Violin Solo by Maurice

Fitzgerald

“Black Face” Comic Sketch
by Members and their
Friends

—o—
Music by the Police Band
Orchestra

ATHLETIC CLUB

Announces
ITs
—a{ anes
Tickets obtainable from ‘
$ Members at $1.00 Each [Eewetnereeensenet



HAVING SOLD OUR BRANCH STORE NO. 27, BROAD STREET

TO

MR. GEORGE SAHELY

-~ ALL ACCOUNTS ARE PAYABLE AT

T. R. EVANS,

*PHONE : OFFICE 4294

(WHITFIELDS BRANCH) NO. 15, BROAD STREET

DEPTS, 4220

oe



|

BARBADOS ADVOCATE






—He Went Swimming in the Middle of Winter—
By MAX TRELL ; 7

look a little wet,” Hanid
i to her brother Knarf as she
peered at him. “Have you been in)
ning? But 1 don’t think you)

34 have been,” she went right |
on before he had a chanve to an-



“you

ewer her, “It’s a very cold day. It}
isn’t the kin a of day anyone goes |
swimming in.’

g
Knarf sat down as close to the!
as he could get. “I wasn’t in
imming,” he said. “But I was in
the pond.”

“You fell in!"

“Well, I didn’t really fall in.”

“But—you got in the pend?”

“Yes, It was ean accident. If
wasn’t my accident. But I Do."

fir



there. So it happened to me, too.”

Hanid looked puzzled. “To you,
too, Knarf? Who was with you
when it happened... whatever-

The ducks went swimming.



too. And I also went along to see

it-was?” why they wanted to see the pieces
“Nine ducks and a goose,” said) ef ice.”
Knarf. “And what happened after you

Hanid now insjsted on hearing/all reached the pond?”

the whole story. Paddled Around

On the Steps “The ten ducks waddled in and

“Well,” began Knarf, not sound- | paddled around. Then I sat on the
ing as ‘though he enjoyed having! goose’s back and she waddled in
to tell the story, “I was sitting on|with me and paddled around. We
the back steps of the house whe ked at all the pieces of ice float-
1 heard a quack-quack-quacking?ing on the top and after a few
sound. It was five ducks. They said|minutes--a very few minutes—the
they were going down to the pond.) ten ducks paddled back to the bank
But I told them there was no use and waddied out again. But the

going.” goose didn’t.”
“Why did you tell them that.) “Why not?” asked Hanid in a
mnaees” |surprised voice.

cause I knew the pond was
too &ld to swim in. There were
pieces of ice floating on the top. So
the five ducks listened to me and
finally they decided that I was
right. They were just about to turn
around and go back to their house
when another five ducks came!
along.”
“Where were they going?”
“They were also going to the
pond. I told them the same thing—
about the pond being filled with
pieces of ice. So then they decided
not to go for a swim, either. And
at that moment a goose came
along.”

“She couldn’t. Her feet got stuck
in the ice and she couldn’t move.
So there I was, on the goose’s back,
in the middle of the pond with ice
a!l around us. Well,” said Knarf,
“I finally had to get off the goose’s
back (because it was getting later
and later and colder and colder)
and start walking back on the ice.
But the ice wasn’t strong enough—
!and every step I took it broke and
I walked in the water. And that’s
how I got wet.”

“H’mm,” said Hanid; “and what
happened to the goose? She isn’t
still in the middle of the pond, I
hope?”

“Was she going for a swim?” “Oh, no! She just followed me

Knarf shook his head. “The goose| back, after I broke the ice. But she
said she was going down to the/ didn’t seem to get wet at all. You
pond just to see how many pieces! know, Hanid—I kept wishing I were
of ice were floating on the top. So|a goose!”
down she went. And the ten ducks | «“You were, Knarf—you were!”
followed after her to see the ice, | anid exclaimed, laughing.





Young Chinese Student Permitted
To Marry English Nurse

NEW YORK, Sept. 5
A Chinese student is now free
to marry an English nurse thanks
to a cablegram from his parents

Wong showed him a letter in
German from his parents. The
Clerk could not read it. Undaunt-
ed the young lover cabled his

in Germany. Hubert Wong, a 20- parents in Castrof Rauxel and
year-old student at Rensselaer they backed him up. Wong's
Poiytechnic Institute was first bride to be is Mary Jane Jones,

refused a marriage license be- native of
cause the Town Clerk thought

him under age.

32, of New York City,
Llandeli, South Wales.



Listening Hours

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 6 1952
From Britain.

4,00—7.15 p.m, — 19.76M., 25.59M

——_—_ —— _ 1,15—-10.80 p.m, — 25,53M., 31.32M

4.00 pm. The News, 4.10 p.m. The Daily ~— ‘
Service, 415 pm Home At Eight, 5.00 7.15 p.m, Behind The News, 7.45 p.m,
p.m. Rugby League Football, 5.05 p.m. Sports Review, 8.15 p.m, Radio News-
Lehar, 5.15 p m. Music for Dancing, 6.00 reel, 8.30 p.m,’Radio Theatre, 10.00 p.m.
Pm ‘Scottish Magazine, 6.15 pm Stars The News, 10.10 p m, News Talk, 10.15
of the Caribbean, 645 pm Sports p m_ Music Magazine, 10.30 pm. Vari-
Round-Up and Programme Parade, 7.00 ety Fanfare

PLAZA THEATRES

p.m, The News, 7.10 pm. Home News





“BRIDGETOWN ) BARBAREES
é Dial 5170
opr apaaed To-day 445 & 8.30 p.m,

(Dial 8404)

TODAY 445 & 8.30 p.m. Last 2 Shows TODAY,
. Uulvesnal Aediba vip 4.45 & 8 90 p.m.
Drama! Errol FLYNN in
“APACHE DRUMS” “ROCKY MOUNTAIN”
“ (Technicolor) With Patrice WYMORE
ROOM FOR ONE Stephen Coleen SS a










Today's Special 1.30 p.m
SPORT of KINGS

Paul CAMPBELL &
“BLAZING ACROSS
The PECOS”

McNALLY — GRAY
Extra Special:
“SUGAR CHILE

ROBINSON"
& COUNT nae ne &

MORE"

Cary Betsy
GRANT — DRAKE

land continuing Daily
Warner Hilarious
Entertainment!

oe
To-day's Special 9.30 & 1.3¢

quae sce
Today's Special 1.30 p.m

Charles STARRETT





“BUCKAROO SHERIFF
OF TEXAS” “THUNDERHOOF”
and *reston FOSTER & Midnite Special Tonite
“TIMBER TRAIL” “WHIRLWIND ‘WESTWARD BOUND’
Monte HALE (color) RAIDERS’ || Ken MAYNARD &

“RANGE JUSTICE”
Johnny Mack BROWN

SUN. & MON. 445
8.0 p.m
Garry COOPER in
“DISTANT DRUMS"
(Technicolor)

==>

Charles STARRETT

a



Midnite Special TO-NITE
“MILLION DOLLAR

PURSUIT"

Penny EDWARDS &

“SOUTH OF RIO"

NO HALE

———<—$—$———————————
Midn't+ Spectal Tonite
“THOROUGHBRED

Tom NEAL &

“TRAIL OF

ROBIN HOOD’

Roy ROGERS (coor)






“It's wonderful the way Active-lather
facials with Lux Toilet Soap leave skin
softer — really make skin lovelier!”

says Teresa Wright,

loveliness that wins romance!

TOILET

The

AoLTS 759-1 453-50







A film star dare not neglect her skin.
Teresa Wright makes sure she always has a daily Active-lather
facial with fragrant Lux Toilet Soap. Give your skin this
gentle beautifying care. It's quick and easy but it really works!
You'll find gentle Active-lather facials give the skin fresh

fragrant white soap of the

GLOBE.

TODAY 5 & 8.30 p.m.

and Continuing Daily

"ADALE ROBERTSON
ANNE FRANCIS

EXTRAS
OLYMPIC GAMES FLASHES

THERE SHALL BE WINGS
FELIX THE FOX

New Prices

Pit 12c., Circle 24c., House 36c
Balcony 60c., Boxes 72.,
(Kids Half Price Matinee)

tanrver rox





GAUETY

The Garden—St. James
TODAY TO MON, $30 P M
Mat SUN. 5 PM

Screen Guild Action Drama !

“STEEL HELMET”
jene EVANS — James EDWARDS
a





MIDNITE TO-NITE
“OUTLAW BRAND"
Jimmy WAKELY &
“WEST OF ELDORADO”
Johnny Mack BROWN







COCKTAIL

DANCE
CRANE HOTEL

In Aid of

THE CONVENT OF THE
GOOD SHEPHERD

Monday, 6th October
(Bank-holiday)

From 6 p.m. to Midnight



Music by Keith Campbell
and the Society Six also
the Jumping Jacks



ADMISSION $1.50
Snacks Free

SSSSSOSESE SOOO SOOCSOES
ene



DEFEAT
RHEUMATISM

TAKE

BRAITHWAITE’S
RHEUMATIC
REMEDY

Find Relief Before
You Finish Your First Bottle




You'll



That’s why charming

2 new

LUX

SOAP

film stars

Ee)

TS SSS
POSSI SOO OOO OOO TOTO,

.
oe



SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1952



Ea The RI Ve

os

and © 4 o4 fan

a

se 4
bp

a



FOR SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1952

Look in the section in which your birthday comes and x
find what your outlook is, according to the stars.

ARIES To-day you could hit your peak for week.

*

x
TAURUS
+“ April 21-—May 20

March 21—April 20 Fine benefits derived from smart effort.
Industry, arts,: science, home interests

greatly sponsored.

Much more than that fighting chance if
you hold temper and don’t be. over-
anxious to “get going.” Study, seek advice
before acting. Personal interests should

advance.
*

Most beneficial activities properly screened
can bring excellent returns, Schedule your
affairs to give time for all-out effort. New +

trys favoured. * -

Good period for new gains, carrying out *
strategic plans, manoeuvres, You can
achieve in most substantial ways. News +

will be benefic.

+

eM
GEMINI
x May 21—June 21



May find competitors at their best now,
so aim to top them in performance, Check
your affairs carefully. Really your day.

*

Things Leing normal you should have no
complaint with this full, auspicious day.
Activity servicing general business, com-

x Ang. 23—Sept. 23
munities favoured.

*

*«
*

LIBRA

Double your effort, get into the swing of
Bept. 24—Oct. 23

all stimulating progress. Stars favour most
worthy trys, whether personal or business.
Employment prospects good.

SCORPIO Though you may find some things easy

24 . 22 going, expenditures should be _ sensibly
oe or controlled, Sound investments, art, teach- +
* ing, mechanics, forge ahead.

* ¥

Many activities among the top favoured;
possibilities for rea] gains here. Some
mental tasks may be harder, but they are
9 conquerable, Give your best and win!

an ote es Issues relating to real estate, financing

matters more favourable, with some re-
servations, Be sure you are right; you can +
do more than you think,

* ¥

*
>

SAGITTARIUS
Nov. 23—Dec. 22









* AQUARIUS Be on the job; know what you are about
Jan, 22 — Feb. 20 2.4 efforts will produce substantial gains.
\ Have no qualms about your own progress,
1 % Good luck! *
PISCES * *

Move steadily ahead, New ventures should
be astutely handled, they can make good
results now. Don’t fear to tackle tasks.
Many prospects auspicious,

+ Feb, 21 —March 20

* as

x YOU BORN TODAY: Many versatile qualities and ad-

x mirable characteristics. Virgo is a Sign of the scholar, the

% * deeply religious, the honest, logical thinker. You can be
x of great service to associates in social as well as business

% circles, Birthdate: Marquis de LaFayette, famous Fr. frierd

my of America; Jane Addams, noted sociologist; Otto Kruger,

% actor. *
i a a i a a a a a ae
%

.

% OPCS CECLP EPO SPELLS OSSLSEE







TO-NIGHT is the NIGHT !!

THE BARBADOS HOTEL ASSOCIATION

invite you to the

“BEACHCOMBERS' BALL"

PARADISE BEACH CLUB

9 P.M. TILL——?
Curwin’s Band — The Prowlers’ Steel Band
TICKETS: $1.50. DRESS OPTIONAL,
LOTS OF FUN AND LOTS OF PRIZES


















the first of which is



A Vacation for Two

People |

at the Santa Maria Hotel,
Grenada, for One Week



i YOU TO-NIGHT







IMPIRE THEATRE

STARTING TO-DAY, 4.45 & 8.30 P.M.
AND CONTINUING DAILY AT 4.45 & 8.30 P.M.

THE PRINCE WHO
WAS A THIEF













ROODAL THEATRES



EMPIRE OLYMPIC ROXY ROYAL
ning To-da: To-day at 4.45 & $.15|To-day to Tuesday/To-day & Tomorrow
at eas 2 8.30 He & Continuing 4.45 & 8.15 4.30 & 8.16
and continuing @all¥) py oiyersal Pictures Universal Pictures |United Artists
niversa ictures Presents aa



Tresents

Universal Pictures Macdonald CAREY | Jose FERRER as

|
ts Audie MURPHY
| Presen: Site DUGAY | Alexis SMITH in x
| THE PRINCE " CAVE OF .THE| CYRANO DE
| WAS A THIEF THE OUTLAWS BERGERAC
Starring CIMARRON KID Color by Technicolor} Extra
| sa and It's the mystery or) Latest News Reel
Those two sensa- the great Wells Monday & Tuesday
| tional young stars) HOT STEEL Farso Robbery 4.30 & 815
} Tony CURTIS Starring To “at Mildnitc
| -night at Midnis
Piper LAURIE icha [EN . | °
| Color by Technicolor Richard ASLEN lRepublic .w hole | SARABMID
=. —— Seria
| extra To-night at Midnite]. verar gs
| Latest British News |\ WEB OF DANGER OPERATOR oo"
| _ To-day at 1 30 and Wed. & Thurs MY OUTLAW
LIGHTS OF OLD 4.30 8.15
SANTA FR and. | eee areitePs oe "|: BROTHER.
RoLt, ON TEXAS “DOUBLE LIFE” |~ wed. & Thurs.
MOON Th as i. Starring We cli tenes
Vo-night (Midnite, | .vigrpnpe Ray” | Ronald COLMAN |.yoren SAHARA”
Whole Serial } and } and | and
| ADV. OF FRANK|“ONE HOUR TO |“DANGEROUS “SALT TO THE
AND JESSE JAMES) LIVE GAME DEVIL



——




SATURDAY,

SEPTEMBER 6, 1952

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





B.H. Should Be Commonweal

Attack Comes
From Moseow

LONDON.

British Honduras should be a
show-place of the Commonwealth,
an object lesson to the neigh-
bouring American republics. In-
stead, it is, the least prosperous
of the Central American coun-
tries.

This is the impression of Mr.
T. S. Steele, a correspondent of
the London “Daily Telegraph,”
who visited the Colony in 1948
and again this year to make a
survey of conditions there.

Until 1946, he ‘writes, British
Honduras was a “forgotten Col-
ony.” This is no longer so, Since
the war, Britain has spent some
£ 3,000,000 in the Colony and the
British Honduras Government has
produced another development
plan on which another £1,500,000
is being spent,

“There is no doubt that the
people are better dressed, there
are more cars on the roads and
more money is spent in the shops”,
says Mr. Steele, comparing 1952
with his 1948 visit. “But, so far,
that is all.”

Today, he continues, there are
over 250 miles of all-weather
roads in the Colony and another
100 miles of feeder-roads suitable
for motor traffic. But the main
road linking Belize with Stann
Creek has yet to be completed.

The 32% mi pues road cost-
ing about £500.

to build is
one of the m expensive tvads
in the world,

e says.

“All this has been made possi-
ble.” continues Mr, Steele, “by
grants from Britaiti’s Colonia!
Development and Welfare Funda.
Of the first grant of £1,250,000,
74 per cent, Was devoted to in-
ternal commumications, as the
first and most fundamental need
of the Colony. Of the balance,
13 per cent. was mt on agri-
culture, fisheries forestry, and
13 per cent. On social sefvices.
The next stage of the Colony’s
development plan calls for the
spending of another £1,000,000 of
C.D.W. money and a_ further
£800,000 raised by a local Gov-
ernment loan.

“The planning has been good
and the progress made during the
last few years is obvious. All of
it has of necessity been limited
by the money which Britain has
made available.”

But Belize is still a city of
wooden houses without proper
water supply and without sani-
tation. It is these conditions,
writes Mr, Steele, that have made
the country ripe, in the opinion
of Moscow, for Communist prop-
aganda and this is already follow~
ing the pattern so often seen in
other parts of the world.

Propaganda, telling whe people
of British Honduras to “revolt
and throw off the yoke of the
British oppressor” is pouring over
the radio from the Communist-
controlled Guatemalan Govern-
ment station, An anti-Government
party has been organised in the
Colony and has received funds
from Guatemala, which is receiv-
ing funds directly and indirectly
from Moscow.

Now the Government is to open
two new radio stations in the
Colony, to be started by B.B.C.
officials, but total expenditure
over the next two years will be
limited to £35,000, including stu-
dio arid all broadcasting appara-

tus. Films and posters will also
be produced for visual teaching.

“By this means,” Mr, Steele
concludes, “it is intended to

spread among the people of Brit-
ish Honduras the British way
life and to let them and the Guat-
emalans hear news bulletins com-
piled from adequate sources,

“All these plans are excellent
within their financial limits. They
are immensely important not only
to prevent the spread of Commu-=
nism into British Honduras but
to show the people they are not
forgotten by Britain.

“Much has been done by the
post-war Colonial Service; a new
and better type of man is enter-

ing it. But in British Honduras
there is a problem which they
are trying to solve with inade-
quate resources.”—B.U.P.



MAIL ‘NOTICES

Mails for Dominica, Antigua, Montser-
rat, Nevis, St. Kitts by the M.V. Moneka
will be closed at the General Post Office
as_ under :—

Parcel Mai) at 12 noon, Registered
Mail at 2 p.m., Oruinary Mail at 2.30 p.m,
on the-€th September, 1952.

Mails for St, Lucia, Dominica by the
Sch. United Pilgrim S. will be closed
at_the General Post Office as under :—

Parcel Mail and Registered Mail at
2.30 a.m, Ordinary Mail at 9 a.m. on
the 6th September, 1952.





£3 For Attempting

To Stowaway

His Worship Mr. E. A. McLeod,
Police Magistrate of District
“A” yesterday ordered Ear
Brathwaite (30) a tailor of Jes-
samy Lane, St; Michael, and
24-year-old labourer Kenneth
Grannum of Eagle Hall, St. Mic-
hael each to pay a fine of £3
in one month or one month's
imprisonment with hard labour
for attempting to stowaway on
the Schooner Lucille M. Smith
on September 5.

Both defendants were found
secreted on the schooner by Fitz
Flocka, the watchman on _ the
Schooner, about 5.45 a.m. on Sep-
tember 5. After discovering them
he notified the Bridge Police
Station.

Harbour Police Constable Mar-

shall said that he boarded the
schooner after receiving in-
formation and found the de-

fendant Brathwaite in a hatch
while Kenneth Grannum = was
hiding under the crew quarters
Marshall told him that he
was trying to get back to British
Guiana to work with his father.
Sgt. Alleyne attached to Cen-
tral Station prosecuted in the
case on beholf of the Police.
_——————

“Stentor” In Port

The Dutch Steamship Stentor
arrived in port yesterday morn-
ing from Amsterdam with general
cargo for the island. The cargo
consisted of 150 cases of milk
powder, 2,177 crates of potatoes,
1,150 crates of onions, 2.087 car-
tons of ‘Four Cows’ Condensed
milk, 13 cartons of tinned ham,
10 cartons of meat preserves, 10
bales. of duplicating paper and
942 bundles of beech staves.

The vessel is mastered by Capt.
J. Manage, and fts agents here
are S. P. Musson & Sons, Ltd.

STANDPIPES AT
DEIGHTON ROAD

Standpipes are now being
erected at Deighton Road. Pipe-
lines were laid some time during
March, As a result, many people
seized the opportunity to instal
their own lines, but work has
only recently begun on the
public standpipes.

It has been a long time that
this district has been without
water, and doubtlessly residents
of this area will welcome this
move on the part of the Water-
works Department.

RADIO STOLEN

Colin Carrington of Cheapside,
St. Michael, reported
Police that his radio which he
had in his dwelling house at
Cheapside, was stolen from there
sometime between July and
August this year.

e valued the radio at $100
The Police are making investiga-
tions,



SOLE

to the E



. “Can we supply a set that rens on paraffin?”

Britain’s





th Show Place





| SEA AND AIR |
| TRAFFIC |

In Carlisle Bay

Sch. Lydina A. Sch. Everdene, Sch.
Zita Wonita, Seb. Mary M. Lewis, Sch.
Frances W. th, Sch, Franklyn b. R.
Sch. Lucille Smith, Sch. Anita H.,
At Last, Sch. D’Ortae, Sch. Lauda’ .
Seh, Gardenia, Sch. United Pilgrim, h
Augustus B. Compton, M.V. Gloria Maria
Sch. Emeline, Sch, Marion Belle Wolfe,
Seh. Amberjack Mac, Sch. Harriet Whit

0 taker
ARRIVALS

M.V. Moneka, 100 tons, from Dominica,
mder R. Hudson
the Schooner Owners’ Association,

+S. Stentor, 1,083 tons. from Amster-

Assoctation

Seawell

ARRIVALS
From Demerara —September 4th
Maisie Brummell, Patmaa Niera, Marie
Niera, Evans,

Desiree Niera, Marjorie

Maycock, Robert Lewis, Maria Bernstein

Rochelle Teper. Paulette Teper, Betty
Whyte. Jacqueline Whyte Neville
Schuler

Lomden Express Service From Trinidad—September 5th :

—_ te Tt on R. Leung, A

, e - &, y, E. Vaughan, L.

° Changes Lower = vaunan'c. Greenies. Hokeess, 7

l re ra i K. Licorish, D. Dwarikasingh,
MAO,

On Exhibition

NEARLY SIXTY different types of aircraft are on
show at the Society of British Aircraft Constructors’ Flying
Display and Exhibition at Farnborough, Hampshire, which

opened on Monday.

Eleven are completely new types

which have not been seen in public before. :
An impressive visitor which flew past on the opening
day was the 140-ton “Princess” flying-boat, which had

only made its maiden flight a few weeks earlier

hy can

carry 120 passengers or 200 full-equipped soldiers over

very long ranges.





Spencer Charged
With Wounding

Case Dismissed

In the Assistant

Appeal yesterday Their Honours
Mr H. A. Vaughan and Mr. A. J.
H. Hanschell without
prejudice the case in which Glad.
stone Springer charged Rupert
Spencer of Tudor Street, St.

Court of

Michael, with wounding him with ,

a hammer on October 7.

In the Lower os a >
Mr. E. A, McLeod, ice Magis-
trate of District “A”, fined
Spencer 25/- and 5/- costs to be
paid in 14 days or 14 oy im-
prisonment for ‘vounding Spring-
er and Spencer appealed against
the decision.

In the other case in which
Spencer charged Springer with
inflicting bodily harm on him,
Their Honours fined Springer
20/. for the offence and thus con-
firmed the decision of His Wor-
ship Mr. E. A, McLeod.

Springer told the Court that on
October 7, he went into the shop
of Rupert Spencer to shelter from
the rain. While there Spencer
told him to leave the chop and
he explained to Spencer that the
rain was falling and he did not
want to be out in the rain.

He refused to leave the shop
and Spencer took a hammer and
hit him with it on his head,

Spencer told the Court that he
had not struck Springer with a
hammer, but had only asked him
to move from the entrance of the
shop so that customers could
on and that he had refused to

0 so,



LABOURER REMANDED

Everton Harding, a _ labourer,
of Dayrells Road, Christ Church,
was yesterday remanded until
September 8 by His Worship Mr.
i. A. McLeod, Police Ma te

of District “A’ ona charge of

ne money from Eugene
Alleyne by false pretences.
The charge stated that the

offence was committed on August
28. Sgt. Alleyne is prosecuting

for the Police from information
received.

AGENTS

The Gloster GA 5 “Javelin”
delta-winged fighter, a twin-
engined two-seater “flying trian-
gle’, made an appearance but did
not show off its full paces. The
public was not allowed to inspect
it closely on account of the many
secret features of its design. The
“Javelin” carries elaborate radar
equipment to enable the crew to
spot and intercept fast-moving
aircraft at great heights, at which
it is almost impossible for the
human eye to make out a for-
mation of even four planes during
the fraction of a second that they
ere. visible.

The “Javelin” is one of Britain’s
eee aircraft, Another
is the “Canberra” bomber which
recently put up a new record for
the Atlantic crossing “there and
back”, and a new training version
of which is on view at Canberra.

Other new aircraft at the Dis-
pla were the newest British
Faaer-thanedune fighter, the D.H.
110, and the world’s first delta-
wing bomber, “the four-engined
Avro 698.

Among aircraft in the static
park is a delta-wing model power-
ed by a rocket motor, product of
tte Fairey Company. This aircraft
has recently completed a series of
test flights on the pilotless weapon
testing range at Woomera, Aus-
tralia,

The Duke of Edinburgh was
among the visitors to the Show on
‘Tuesday, September 2. In all some
24,000 guests of the Society are
expected to attend on September
2, 3, and 4, including at least
8,000 from 70 countries abroad,
The Display will be open to the
public on September 5, 6, and 7.

——

Representatives
At U.C.W.L.

@ From Page 1

the various colonies shortly.
The Conference which lasted
for four days ended on Thurs-
day night,.and on the first day,
delegates took the opportunity to
inspect the laboratories, hos-
pitals, and Arts buildings. They
also met the various Professors
and discussed matters with them.

During his stay in Jamaica,
Mr. Walcott took the opportunity
to investigate on behalf of the
1.C.F.T.U. the Jamaica Trade
Unions which are seeking afillia-
tion to the 1.C.F.T.U.

to

INTERNATIONAL TRADING CORPORATION LIMITED

Telephone 5009

an ote

eve ¢
fo, BSBPIEX "gine if

yialso









3009

— BEWARE OF

SUBSTITUTES —

THERE IS ONLY ONE AMPLEX!
AMPLEX is the world’s

ONLY Gordon-Young U.V. Activated
Chlorophyll Deodorant Tablet

There is, therefore. NOTHING that can take

the place of this particular product.

AMPLEX—and SEE

STOCKED BY

J L. .INTON, High Street.

E. C. GILL, Olym

pia Pharmacy,

©£MPIRE PHARMACY, Tudor Street
A. F. JONES, High Street.
a3. C. WALKES, Tudor Street.

H. L.

HUTSON, Tudor Street

ROCK’S DRUG STORE, Tudor Street.
HINDS & CO., Roebuck Street.

BRUCE WEATHERHEAD,

Head of Broad St.

Ask for
THAT YOU GET IT!

CLARKE, Cosmopolitan Pharmacy.

WORM,

. C. BROWNE
H. E. PILGRIM,

Nelson Street.

Progressive

2 A.

K, V. buck Street.
STOUTE’S DRUG STORE, Roebuck Street.
co. , Roebuck Street.

A. A. BROWNE, Eagle Hall.

Pharmacy

STANDARD PHARMACY, Tweedside Rd.

F. S. OLTON, Sw

an Street

Cost Of U.C.W.L. a M. Gleason, A

‘egerreis, W. Spence.
DEPARTURES

Tio Jamaica "%. Mammesd, We Reedy E. Resce, L.
Vilaneuvs, “A Gere, “3. “Cunt” ©. |

Tn <: @ From Page 1 = thea, a Gooding "a. one
faculties and academic, adminis S'*ie. RB, Wood, S. Ashby. P. Jacdues,

trative clerical and technical stot Por 2

. <— September Sth :
and price levels have generally S. Webster E. Field E. Bell, C. Gou-

increased sharply since then, A yeia, C. Gibson, BE. King, 1. Searle, G
é Fink ; h, H. Gc
decision was woken by the meeting iiie. Pp. "riek M Wickham’ o

to recommend to the governm
that the University’s estimates
the second period 1953 to 1958 be
accepted as a basis of quinquennia!
grants by which the college wi'!
be financed and that proposals for
teaching chemical technology an |
economics be approved with: \
these estimates.

tS Forde, Sukhpaulsingh M. Gre. ;
* DaSilva, P teswre Eten, Alba



Burton Gains

Honours

@ From Page |

The conference also considere | also holds a London University
the question of recurrent expenscs General External B.A., in English,
for the teaching hospital ant English History and Latin (1946)
agreed to reecmmmend the adoptiny Since leaving school, he served

dam, under J Manage as Master
Axents 5S. P. Masson & Sons Ltd

©. 7. Rodas, 1,928 tons, from St, Vin
eent, under D. P. Bruin as Master;
Agents DaCosta & Co, Ltd

Seh. Cyril E. Smith, 56 tons, fror
Miritish Guiana, under L. Olliverre as
Master. consigned to the Schooner
Owners’ Association |
och. Amberjack Mac, 41 tons, from |
Martinique, under J. Patrice as Master
consigned to the Schooner Owners’

Zena Razack, Louis DeMendonca, Doreen |

E. McKinnon, A, McKinnon, J. McKin- i

}

as Master; consigned to)

|
|

!



of a revised basis for allocatin: On the Staff of Harrison College |

costs where he played a major part fh

the formation of the School Libra-

Regret was expressed that {h> ry, retiring from that School in

present Principal Sir Thoma’ 1950 to take up an appointment as

Taylor will shortly relinquish h a Senior Assistant Master at
office. Bishop’s High School, Tobago,





BOVRIL

ine very
goodness
of beef

You can taste the richness of prime lean beef
© Bovril, You can feel the benefit that comes
rom taking Bovril .. . it cheers you when you're
celing low and stimulates the appetite and the
ligestion wo keep you fit and well. In all savoury
lishes, in sandwiches and as a nourishing drink,
Sovril gives you the concentrated goodness of beef.




BOVRIL

PUTS BEEF INTO YOu

—and something very comforting. The new
Cow & Gate Baby Powder is a delicate and
delightful preparation — ideal for Baby’s
tender skin. [tS cooling, soothing influence
Is just what Baby needs after the bath or
during the heat of the day. it brings con-
tentment, freedom from irritation — and
encourages sound, refreshing sleep.

Lightly perfumed, slightly borated, pure
and refined.

COW GATE

Baby Powder

FOR COMFORT,AND,. CONTENTMENT

4547

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TT

J, B. LESLIE & CO., LTD. — Agents





is used by almost every doctor in Grea: Britain. In over 90% of hospitals
iS In constant daily use.

114



PAGE THREE



“
How am I to tell
which is « good antiseptic?”
“Frankly, unless you are a bacteriologist,
you can’t tell. But use the antiseptic you
see your doctor use, or which he recom-
mends, and you won’t be far wrong.”

‘DETTOL ANTISEPTIC *

and maternity homes ‘ Dettol’

Agents; T. 8S. GARRAWAY & CO., Bridgetown

A sprinkle of Vim on a damp cloth —a quick
rub — and greasy, dirty things shine and sparkle again.
Vim is so eagy to use, so quick and smooth — it keeps
surfaces polished and bright. Use Vim for pots and pans.
paintwork, tiles — ail your cleaning.

VIM

cleans everything
smoothly and speedily




**My dear,” she said, “You must pro-
on tpt your eyes. Command buy a bottle
.. Of Optrex now—use it every day.”



So, when! gothome | bathed my eyes
was!

PROTECT YOUR EYES «th

0

When I told Jim he said,“ Wonderful!
Your eyes look lovely tonight. Keep

in Optrex, and ob—the;
Op on using Optrex—F'll use it, too!

fort, dust, away!

ptrex

EVE LOTION









MAKE THIS TEST
The rim of the eye and inner
lining should be healthy flesh
Jy colour. If they are red or irri-
tated or the whites bloodshot,
your eyes need treatment.

FREE! in cach
@ scientifically
bath

packet

designed

ey


i
'



PAGE FOUR



ead ADVOCATE

Gara Ssh Ss Piss ft
Printed by the Advecate Co., Lté., Brows 61. Bridgetewn
Saturday, September 612”





VITAL TALKS

ACCORDING to a report from London,
the Canada-West Indies Trade talks which
open next week under the Chairmanship of
Mr. E. Melville, will cover the balance of
payments position of the sterling area, the
token import scheme, shipping and the
Canadian market for Commonwealth
sugar.

The balance of payments position of the
sterling area is of especial interest because
of the meeting in London in November of
Commonwealth Prime Ministers who are
to review the whole economic structure of
the Commonwealth.


































But the delegates representing the West
Indies at the talks next week in London
will be going there fully briefed to repre-
sent the trading interests of the West In-
dies alone.

Their major preoccupation will be the
future of Canada-West Indies trade with
respect to, the sale of West Indian sugar
in Canada. In recent years Canadian im-
ports from. the West Indies have out-

stripped by millions Canadian exports to
the West Indies,

In the ten-month period January to Oc-
tober 1951 Canadian imports from Barba-
dos for example were valued at $12,545,000
speroeimately.

y comparison Canadian exports to Bar-
bados during the eleven month period Jan-
uary to November 1951 were valued at
$4,170,000 approximately.

These figures are taken from Foreign
Trade, an official weekly publication of the
Foreign Trade Service of the Department
of Trade and Commerce.

Barbadian fears of losing the preferen-
tial sugar market of Canada are grounded
on comparison of Canadian exports to Bar-
bados and imports from Barbados with
Canadian exports to Cuba and imports
from Cuba in_ recent years. Where-
as Canada sold $17,905,000 approximately
of goods to Cuba during the period Jan-
uary to November 1951, Canada imported
only $6,963,000 approximately of Cuban
goods during the period January to Octo-
ber 1951. This was almost half what Can-
ada bought from Barbados during the same
period,

In addition Canada imported more in-
dividually from British Guiana, Jamaica,
Trinidad and Tobago than from Barbados
during the period January to October 1951.

The unbalance between Canadian ex-
oe to and Canadian imports from the

est Indies is therefore so great that the
West Indian fear-of losing the preferential
Canadian market is based on common
sense. The policy of the Canadian govern-
ment in the words of the Canadian Minister
of Trade and Commerce is to seek out
markets overseas which will enable Can
ada to “expand and diversify her exports.”
If the present unbalance of Canadian-West
Indian trade continues only a strong feel-
ing of sentiment for the West Indies can
guarantee the continuance of special pre-
ferential treatment for West Indian sugar
when Cuba can supply sugar more cheap-
ly, The increase in the volume of Canadian
exports to Cuba and other Latin American
countries makes it one-hundred per cent.
likely that Canadians will buy sugar and
other tropical products from those coun-
tries in her effort to expand’ and diversify
exports, unless some change in Canada-
West Indies trade relations takes place.

The West Indies owe much to the United
Kingdom and the present guarantee which
that country has given to West Indian
sugar producers has everywhere been ac
claimed as favourable to the West Indies.
But the representative of the West Indies
at next week’s talks in London can only
approach the eutient of Canada-West In-
dies trade from a long term view. Both the
West Indies and Canada share one form
of expansion in common—their increasing
populations.

But whereas the increased Canadian
population can be “sweetened” as it were
by sugar from Cuba and other countries,
the mouths of increased numbers of West
Indians can only be filled to any great ex-
tent if West Indian sugar can be sold—
and sold profitably. Only two markets for
that sugar exist: the United Kingdom and
Canada.

Unfortynately for the West Indies the
United Kingdom and Canada though mem-
bers of the same Commonwealth are rivals
in the matter of trade. And in recent years
Great Britain has used her positian as the
controlling power in the West Indies to
dislocate Canada-West Indies trade from
the status it had reached during the war
years and up to 1947 in favour of Canada.

To-day Canada’s high rates of exchange
which have resulted from her close identi-
fication with the dollar economy of the
United States has made Canadian prices
uncompetitive in-most instances with the
British prices. To maintain restrictive
controls on imports from Canada at a time
when Canadian prices make it impossible
for Barbadian importers to buy up all the
Canadian articles for which currency is
permitted is like rubbing salt into open
wounds. Removal of controls on Canadian
trade would remove the cause of com-
plaints of Canadian businessmen and
would convince them that their present
prices are too high for West Indian im-
porters.

If the West Indian delegatws impress on
the Colonial office that the best way the
West Indies can help the sterling area is
for them to have assyred markets for West
Indian produce in Canada and the United
Kingdom, then the West Indies will have
been well served, There is no reason to
believe that their interests will not be well
represented and Barbados will join the
other West Indian territories in wishing
them success in their vital talks which are
to start next Tuesday.

{
|
|
|
|
|

The Challenge of Adversity
The year 1895 would seem to
jhave been the most unpromising
time to start so risky a venture
|as a daily newspaper in Barbados.
| The island had reached the lowest
point to which it was possible te
sink in its depressed condition
| washout tumbling into utter ruin
The prophets of despair were pre-

licting that the misfortunes, which
had been afflicting the island
during the past ten years, would

oon bring the island to complete
lisaster. The fact that there were
{ iS many as seventy-seven estates

n chancery during the year
seemed to provide more evidence

o show that the colony was tot-

ering into bankruptcy. The low
orice of sugar led to increasing
unemployment and widespread
, listress among the people. Joseph
chamberlain had not yet begun
che programme that was to bring
aope back to the colonies of the
West Indies and nothing seemed
likely to relieve the encircling
sloom.

Clearly it was not the time for
aunching so speculative an un-
jertaking as a daily newspaper
iven the most optimistic spirits
eemed to feel that the most they
sould do in that gloomy period
was to hold on grimly to what
rey had and try to save it from
the impending cataclysm. Yet the
dverse circumstances facing the
sland were to serve as a stimu-
ant to the spirit and. energy of
‘alence Gale. In 1895 he had
already had many years’ experi-
mee in journalism and he was
red with the ambition to give
3arbados the sort of newspaper it
1eeded, to raise the whole tone
f public life and _ recall the
sland’s press to the high function
t had in recent years betrayed.

who was born in 1850,
vas left an orphan at the age
f four, having lost both his
father and mother during the
nolera epidemic of 1854 — the
tread pestilence that destroyed
bout one-eighth of the island’s
yopulation, But he had the ad-
vantage of being brought up by
an aunt who impressed upon him
hat the most valuable things in
he world were character and in-
ellect,. He attended the. St
Vichael’s Parochial School, then
mder the direction of the Rev.
wv, J, N. Durant, and, after leav-
ng school, secured a position as
m apprentice on the staff of the

Agricultural Reporter’, the
sland’s leading newspaper at the
ime. ‘

Gale was then only sixteen and
ad entered on the journalistic
-reer that was to continue until
iis death in 1908. The editor of
he Agricultural Reporter was the
tev, Dr. P. Bruce Austin, who
took a liking to the lad and gave
iim every opportunity to learn
he eraft of journalism thorough~
y. Gale made himself proficient
it. shorthand—a rare accomplish-
nent in those days—and soon en-
joyed the reputation of being one
>f the best reporters of his time.
When the post of reporter of the
Jouse of Assembly became vacant,
swing to the resignation of Con
ad Reeves who had gone to Eng-
and to study law, Gale was ap-
oointed to take his place. His
imbition to follow in Reeves
footsteps and study law was never
fulfilled, yet the reading he did
on his own in the subject was to
orove of great value to him both
is a legal reporter and as a leader-
writer,

Gale,

Freedom's Cause

From the beginning of his
vareer Gale aspired to be more
than a reporter, He had an oxer-
mastering desire to write and his
original articles were soon accept-
ed by the Agricultural Reporter.
After nine years of hard work
with the newspaper, he was ap-
pointed leader-writer and dis-
charged the duties of that post
for twenty years in a manner that
attracted widespread attention.
nevitably he was drawn into the
hurly burly of politics. His
veneration of Samuel Jackman
Prescod—he was just twenty-one
when the great'man died—and his
friendship with Conrad Reeves
had bred in him a strong love
of representative institutions, and
for that reason he was destined
to play no little part in the con-
stitutional crisis of 1876.

At that time, although he was
only a young man, Gale’s trench-
ant and incisive style of writing
had already given him a con-
siderable reputation, ‘The govern-
ment forces were on the lookout
for a valuable ally and offered
Gale the post of editor of a news-
paper it was proposed to start to
advocate the cause of federation.
It was a tempting offer for the
young journalist since it was ac-
companied with the promise of an
sitractive post in the Government
service. t in Gale’s eyes, no
patriot would undertake to sup-
port the campaign to _ federate
Barbados and the Windward
Islands if it meant, as it seemed
to mean, that the island would
lose its. representative form of
government. Instead of accepting
the offer, therefore, he promptly
lent his services to those who \were
fighting to defeat the Colonial
Office plan. He took on the duties
of honorary secretary of the Do-
fence Association, which had been
‘ormed to combat Pope-Hennessy’s
oropo: Pand fought the battle
for free institutions both with his
pen and as an officer of that organ-





LONDON

The Y.W.C.A, is Sponsoring a
“ew course on tropical rursl wel-
‘ure, which will oper at the
Y.W.C.A. College in Birmingham
m January 13, 1953. It will be
pen to Colonial and British
vomen who are interested in rural
| ommunity’ development and_ in
he promotion of informal aduit
cdueation,

Principal of the course will be
Miss Marjorie Stewart, who work-
ed as Generel Secretary for the
Y.W.C.A, in Jamaica for ten years,

during which time one of her
| pecial interests was the training
of leaders for club work in town
| and country. From 1944 to 1946,
she was Field Supervisor for the
| Jamaica Social Welfare Commis-

sion.
The course is intended for such

people as the wives of Colonial

Y.W.C.A. Course On Tr
Principal Worked In Jamaica

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Our Common Heritage (20)

VALENCE GALE

isation. When the struggle was
over and Barbados had defeated
the Colonial Office, the community
showed its gratitude by present-
ing Reeves, the saviour of the
island’s constitution, with a purse
of one thousand guineas, whil>
Gale himself received a present
of one hundred guineas’ for his
services,

Gale opposed the federation pro-
posals of the Colonial Office be-
cause, in his view, they would
have reduced Barbados to the
status of a Crown Colony govern-
ment. To his mind, Crown Colony
government was a form of tyranny
that was completely alien to the

island’s long tradition of free
institutions. But he was not
lulled into any complacency by
the victory over the Colonial

ffice. To him, as to every

patriotic Barbadian, the price of
freedom was eternal vigilance.
Some ten years after the great
battle for freedom, events seemed





Hy F. A. Hoyos |



through the threatening storm?

With this in mind, Gale turned}
a deaf ear to those who counselled
him that the time was inauspicious
for his venture. He had seen
numerous magazines and |



papers appear and vanish after
a brief period of success and all
the signs seem to indicate to the

faint-heartedthat no new
journal could hope to survive the
depression. But Gale had an idea
clearly in mind and he felt con-
fident that the kind of newspaper
he wanted to establish would be
able to meet crisis and take
the island along times.
His policy, it is true, was not to

be the same as Prescod's. He did
not propose, like Prescod, to
vindicate the programme of a new
party or to preach the doctrines
of a new gospel. Yet he was
moved by the same spirit of
service, by the sume burning de-
sire to bring home to his fellow-
countrymen a full realisation of

VALENCE GALE

to be taking a sinister course in

the neighbouring colonies of the h

West Indies. The liberty of the
individual and the freedom of the
press were being threatened by
the law courts. Such abuses were
made possible because the law of
contempt was not regulated by
statute and no individual or news
paper could question the adminis-
tration of justice without incurring
the danger of imprisonment.

Things eventually came to a
head when Louis de Souza, a
practising lawyer in British
Guiana, was imprisoned for ques-
tioning the decisions of the judges
in that colony. The case was to
attract widespread attention be-
cause de Souza had contracted
tuberculosis, while in a prison cell
in British Guiana, and subsequent-
ly died in Barbados. The death
‘of the Guianese barrister served
as a clarion call to all those who
had pledged themselves to defend
civil rights in the West Indies and
Gale was soon in the forefront of
the struggle. He wrote on the
circumstances leading to the death
of de Souza, delivered a severe
attack on the judges concerned in
the case — “the superannuated
Chalmers, the pliant Atkinson and
the wicked and _ unprincipled
Sheriff’—and accused them blunt-
ly of committing judicial murder,
That article, described as one of
the most fearless ever published
in Barbados, was to have import-
ant results in the West Indies.

For it prepared the way for tne
Contempt of Court Act in 1891, an
enactment that was to prove a
model for similar legislation for
other colonies in the West Indies,

It was largely due to Gale’s de
fence of civil rights and his strong
stand on the de Souza case that
Barbados was the first colony in
the British Empire to define the
law of contempt by statute.

An Act Of Faith

In 1895 Gale took the great step

of his life, Five years before he
had married Clara Chenery, a first
cousin of Thomas Chenery, editor
of the London Times, and this
spurred him on to undertake the
task he had been contemplating
for some time — to establish his
own newspaper and _ restore
journalism to the high standard
it had once attained in Barbados.
Had not Samuel Jackman Prescod
started the Liberal in the dark
days of the emancipation crisis
and proved the truth that Barba-
dos would support a journal that
fought for truth and justice and
maintained the highest principles
of journalism? And would not
another newspaper, founded in
another period of crisis, and
dedicated to fight for the cause
that lacked assistance and the
wrongs that needed resistance, ap-
peal to the best in ail Barbadian
patriots and help the island

officials and students who accom-
pany their husbands to Britain for
special courses and who often
have a good deal of spare time on
their hands, Teachers and social
workers going to Colonial posts
who are interested in voluntary
work of a pioneer nature would
also be likely to find the course
cf considerable value,

It will concentrate chiefly on
the practice of community educa-
tion as adapted for tropical needs
in-under-developed rural areas and
will include classes on the use of
the campaign-project method,
visual aids, drama and literature.
There will also be special element-
ary instruction on cookery. and
nutrition, child care, handwork,
food cultivation and co-operative
principles.

“It is essential that schemes for
rural community development



the urgent requirements of the
our.

Gale saw his opportunity in the
circumstances prevailing at the
time. The standard of public mor-
ality was at a low ebb, Members
of the House of Assembly were
no longer moved by the sentiments
that had stirred them during the
upheaval of 1876. And the news-
papers, reflecting the same lack of
public spirit, had abandoned their
high function by resorting to the
weapons of abuse and vilification.
Gale resolved frora the outset that
his newspaper Would fight for a
social ideal and would champion
the cause of truth and justice. But
in carrying out this policy, he
would be firm without being
abusive, turning his back on the
vulgarity of his contemporaries.
His aim was to further the wel-
fare not of any single section but
of the community as a whole. To
achieve this, he steadily declined
to attach his newspaper to any
party. In addition he adhered to
Reeves’s advice that he should not
actively take part in politics be-
cause he was convinced that in
this way he could best maintain
the independence of the ‘Advocate’
Gale lost no time in making his
policy and methods clear to the
public and the latter’s support
helped him to make steady pro-
gress in spite of the difficulties of
the time and the competition of
his rivals.

When Gale founded the Advo-
cate he was forty-five years old
and had already given twenty-
mine years’ service in the field of
journalism, For the thirteen years
that remained of his life, he work-
ed unceasingly to promote the wel-
fare of his newspaper, giving little
thought to his ease and comfort
and paying little regard to his
health and strength. His long ex-
perience as a practising journalist
in Barbados, his visit to England
to acquaint himself with the most
up-to-date methods of newspaper
management and production, his
great power of application and his
wide knowledge of Barbadian and
West Indian affairs, all combined
to bring him success in the venture
for which so many had prophesied
disaster. His work was important
not only because it left an endur-
ing monument to his memory but
because it represented an act of
faith at a time when men seemed
tilled with pessimtism and despair.
The success of his endeavour was
to make the daily newspaper an
established thing in Barbados,
raise the press of the island from
the low standard to which it had
fallen and restore journalism to
its rightful place as a profession
‘to which men of the highest in-
tellect and integrity would be at-
tracted.

(Next Saturday—
HERSERT DALTON)



opieal Rural Welfare

tropical countries should take into
account local conditions and be
worked out on lines which the
village inhabitants can under-
stand,” says the Y.W.C.A.

“In many places, for example,
artificial light is unknown, so
evening activities are impossible.
Some districts work a four or five
day week; different tribes have
different vernaculars; and women
have so much work to do that they
cannot go to centres at a distance.

Assisting Miss Stewart will be
Miss Edna Rowe, a_ domestic
science teacher who has taken a
special course in tropical nutrition
in the London School of Tropical
Medicine. There will be visiting |
instructors from associated organ |
isations and visits of observation
will be arranged through the
Women’s Institutes and other rural |
agencies B.U.P.



NOBODY'S |

DIARY

Monday — The tree that supports the cannon

ball climber in Trafalgar Square has||

dropped its leaves. It probably does this
every year about this time but this year
the dropped leaves are very symbolic.
No leaves: no water in the fountain. Just
steam and heat and talk of irrigation.
Fortunately the leaves are out again.

Tuesday — It may be the heat or it may be
a sign of the livestock shortage but I
haven’t seen any sheep “in, Bridgetown
for some time. And even stray dogs are
in short supply. I suppose people do
mind what they eat.

ie i

Wednesday — Lord Tweedsmuir has done
the planters a good turn. In the Sunday
Times last week he wrote as follows:

“It is a sad and curious fact deserving
careful analysis, that there exists in cer-
tain quarters in Britain a strong preju-
dice against the planter and his kind.”

Lord Tweedsmuir’s observation is
borne out by a letter recently received
in Barbados from England. There propa-
ganda against this island is so effective
that intending holiday makers write to
say they would never dream of coming
to an island run by a lot of despotic
planters. (Laugh boy!) I remember
once lunching with a V.1.P. in London
and being called a “tyrant from Barba-
dos”, although I have never owned any
property here or anywhere else.

Then there was the Adviser to the Sec-
retary of State for the Colonies who chal-
lenged me to a duel in the grounds of the
Marine merely because I go to the best
tailor for my one suit.and he mistock
me for a planter (many of whom don’t).
How are we to explain away this anti-
pathy against the planter, this libellous

travesty as Lord Tweedsmuir puts it]

which “is the view of many an honest
and ignorant Briton at home about the
settlers of Kenya and the Rhodesias and
all planters everywhere by definition?”

I wonder if envy has got anything to
do with it.

Leonard Barnes is nearer the truth
than anyone I think when he says that
in the Colonies middle class families can
live upper class lives: and if there is a
class of people more interested in the
affairs of the man next door (even if he’s
migrated and becomes a planter) then
the average English lower middle-class,
I have never set foot on 4 continents.

Thursday — Bridgetown wit: Can you lie on
* a man if he’s standing up?

Friday — Did I tell you about the other ad-
viser to the Secretary of State for the
Colonies (not the duellist but the one I
met in the sea).

He of course knew what the trouble
was in Barbados—no social conscience
—and being a good secularist (like so
many other welfarists alas) he hadn’t
got much use for the churches. I have
(but unfortunately for the welfarists I
am not very impressed by their activ-
ities or methods). So we're quits.

But getting back to the swimming ad-
viser, :

When I suggested that people who got
up in the early hours of the morning to
go to church might have a lot of qual-
ities which would make them useful
citizens he replied that they probably
got up early to wear their new dresses.

I didn’t challenge him to a duel but I
cuffed the table so hard that my hostess
came in and asked me to let him off
lightly. Ugh!

Saturday — Soon very soon the big guns of
Virginia will be coming to this tight lit-
the island. They will all want to know
where Washington slept: where he had
his hair cut and of course see the chair
he sat in at Government House. Hun-
dreds of them (at least 500 are coming)
will want to see the tree he planted at
Farley Hill: the place where he scratch-
ed his initials in the Cave at St. Lucy:
the sun dial from which he read the
time of day along Hackleton’s cliff: the
natural springs at Martin’s Bay named
after his brother.

On the road to Sam Lords is a charm-
ing village blacksmith shop which must
have been the scene of the meeting be-
tween Sam Lord and George Washing-
ton.

At the Crane you can still see the pier
on which WashingtonJstood ‘to eat, his
first sea-egg.

And somewhere down in St. Andrew
George Washington pushed his walking
stick into the ground looked at it and
said “Boy that looks like oil”.

If you don’t believe a word of all this
neither do I believe that the house in
Bay Street with the sign was the one
that housed our George.

But the more you tell Virginians
about George Washington and his visit
to Barbados the more you'll thrill them.
Honest. And restaurants don’t forget to
serve George Washington steak on Jan-
uary 15, 1953. Make a note of it because
the Virginians are coming that day.



SATURDAY,

_-—

SEPTEMBER 6, 1952


























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GODDARD'S




SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER

Case



Judge Will Sum Up Today

THE CASE

enter the dwelling house

Road, Christ,Church, was conttnued at the Court of Grand
Sessions yesterday before Mr. Justice J. W. B. Chenery.

The case for the Prosec

have addressed the jury a

day, His Lordship will sum

Belgrave is also charged on a
second count, attempting to break
and enter the house on March 1.

Mr. L. A. Williams, holding
papers for Mr. G. H. Adams, is
appearing for Gaskin, and Mr.
J. E. T. Brancker for Blackman.
Belgrave is unrepresented.

Mr. W. W. Reece, Q.C., Solici-
tor General, is prosecuting for
the Crown.

Clyde Brathwaite. a butler of
Worthing View, said that Gaskin
had thrown out the suggestion to
him that they should attack
Evelyn and take money from him,
At first he agreed to join, but
afterwards thought better not to
do so, but to inform Evelyn and
the Police. He did that,

Cross-Examined

Cross-exemined by Mr. Branc-
ker he said he could not remem-
ber having been convicted or
fined for stealing, gambling,
wounding, trespassing, etc., but he
remembered having been fined a
couple of times. There was a
matter of a duck in December
1944, and on another oceasion,
malicious damage to property.

When he first met the defen-
dants in connection with the con-
spiracy, two nights before the
alleged offence, he had called
aside Gaskin and talked with him,
leaving Blackman sitting on the
guard wall by the side of the
road.

Cpl. Lisle Jones of Worthing
Police Station, said that on ac-
count of information he received,
he hid in a clump of bushes near
Evelyn’s shop on the night of the
alleged offence. Two men were
sitting on a guard wall near the
shop. One was Brathwaite, but
he did not know the other,

About 10.15, Evelyn left the
shop and walked in the direction
of his home and one of the men
followed Evelyn. .When Evelyn
reached home, he (Jones) went
and calied and Evelyn let him in.
He went into the backyard and
waited,

Entering Gate

About 11 o’cloek three men en-
tered through the front gate, two
remained about the gate, and one
came further in. The one who
entered went and shook a window.
They seemed to have got scared
by something and all ran back
out. Within the next hal an
hour, one returned and again
pulled at the window. This time
he arrested the man, whom he
found to be Belgrave.

On the next day he saw Gaskin
and took a statement from him.
In this statement Gaskin said that
he’had@ been with Belgrave earlier
in the night before he was arrest-
ed, and when he left him, he
thoughtube had-left tego home.

P.C, Lionel Franklyn said that
on March 2, he charged Blackman
with conspiracy and Blackman
made a statement. In this state-
ment he said that he had been
along with Gaskin and Belgrave
the night before Belgrave was
arrested, but when Belgrave left
them, he understood that he wag
going home,

Cpl. Harold Bryan of Central
Police Station, said that on March
1, about 9.45 p.m., he hid in a
clump of bushes near Evelyn’s
shop. He heard a man whom he
afterwards discovered was Bel-
grave, ask another where they
were to meet, and the other said
in Rockley Golf Club yard.

Jumped Into Yard

Later when Evelyn went home,
he went behind Evelyn's back wall
and jumped over into the yard.
He saw when Jones arrested Bel-
grave. Belgrave had offered to
give him a statement the follow-
ing day. In this statement Bel-
grave said that one of the chaps
he had been with earlier, had
intended going to Evelyn to see a
man named Frazer who had gone
in there. He did not go in there
with any intent to steal.

Cpl. Bryan was the last witness.

Belgrave said that on the night
when he was arrested, he had
earlier ‘met Brathwaite and Gas-
kin. Brathwaite and Gaskin went
down the road, leaving Blackman

; in which Rudolph Blackman, McField evidence. They would remember
Belgrave and Michael Gaskin are charged with conspiring
between February 29 and March 1 this year to break and

6, 10952 : BARBADOS

_—

For Prosecution





meneing around with evil inten- RECEIVING
ions.
Taere were discrepancies in the

the Police said that Brathwaite
had signed the statement he had
given, while Brathwaite said he
olf Club had not signed it.

Reformed Character
Mr. Retce said that Brithwaite
ution has been closed. Counsel â„¢ight have done a thing or two,

. but he was sinee reformed, No
nd when hearing resumes to- matter how many convictions h*
up. hac, he had spoken the truth.
Brathwaite had so reformed nis
Lfe that he was even.*hen ¢ Jn “x
an honest living as a butler, and
hed refrained frem joining wiih
the cther defendants. i
Neither the Polité nor Evelyn

of Elon Evelyn at G



Memorial

A Memorial given by the
Members of the St. Peters

had known anything about tie
a pees the memo- conspiracy, and Brathwaite hai
7 ari Rector. P. C. | told them, so it was ridiculous
a Perpetual Lamp, to suggest that he was a conspirs-

donated by a devout wor, | tor

shipper Miss Trimingham, will
be consecrated on Sunday, 7th
at the 9 a.m. Service. Archdea-
con Hutchinson will be the
preacher.

When it came to conspiracy, the
law was that after the design had
teen formed every act of one of
the ccnspirators was evidence
against tn. other. Ic had bee
agreed that Belgrave would po
into the house and his action was
had on their behalf.

_—_—_———————————

from Evelyn. Brathwaite

MADAME IFILL (centre), hands

planned with them. Mr. Brancker had told them

Mr. Williams said that there that the men had taken an ordin= can Aid Society were distributed y
was no dispute about ‘the law'in ary walk in the direction of Fifty people received clothing
the case and it was merely’ a Evelyn's house that night, but he to right) are: Mrs. C. O. Alleyne,

question of facts that mattered. was suggesting to them that if they
Agreement felt that the men had walk d
The Prosecution had to establish behind Evelyn, taking into ccusid-
an agreement to do wrong and ¢ration the previous design, they
that the defendants had actually had not been walking behind him
started the wrong act. The Pros- casually or just for a stroll,
ecution, he was submitting, had From the. evidence there was
failed to establish that. more than they needed to convict
They had seen Clyde Brath- the men for conspiracy.
waite and he would assure them When hearing of the case re-
that Brathwaite was quite a dis- sumes today, His Lordship ‘will
honest rogue. He was submitting “um up.
that he was an accomplice that

Cc. O. Alleyne and Mr. G. Weekes.

afternoon.



night, and it was unfortunate ° son was present.
shat the Police had to rely on Central Milk Depot The distribution was made by
evidence from such a man_ to Madame }

Ifill while Father A, J,
Dennington, Rector, acted as
Chairman, The Rector afterwards
entertained those present to tea at
his home.

Introducing Mr. Wilkinson and
Madame Ifill, Father Dennington
said that he was sure when he»
had the-opportunity. to ask Mr.
Layne to record a vote of thanks
everyone would respond heartily.

He said that they had an impors)
tant guest in the person of Mr.
Wilkinson. With
and bustle in New
spite the fact that New York toot
had its poor and destitute, Mr,
Wilkinson had seen it fit to assist
them.

He felt it was not an act of
charity but an act of kindness and
faith.

He said that Madame Ifill was

prove their case.
had been

Brathwaite BRej onsi ed

3 no less than a Police mg Q ider

aecoy. ‘ S =i awai
ts ‘ Milk producers are still await-

There was no enmity between ing rea from Government in
Evelyn and the defendants, but connection with the alternative
Evelyn had told them frankly proposals. for the erection of a
that any attitude adopted towards Gentral Milk Depot and Creamery.
Gaskin or any of the defendants Mr. Eric Deane told the “Adyvo-
was because he was acting under cate” that the matter was still
instructions from Brathwaite and being considered by Government,
the Police. So they would have to but the Milk Producers had heard
vdzcigh amy evidence Evelyn nothing further in connection
might give, with that qualifica- with the scheme since they had
tion—that ¢his dishonest Brath- submitted the alternative propos-
waite had set him up. als.

They would remember that Cpl. The producers were asked to
Jones had previously failed to submit an alternative schen
mention that he had identified after the original proposals we’
Belgrave and Gaskin. rejected by them on the ground
that the scheme would be imprac-
ticable under the 1951 Co-opera~
tives Act.

2

York, and de-

Corroboration



If they formed the view that active in Barbados for many
Brathwaite was lucky that he was e e years before he came to the
not in the dock with the other Bridging The Gap island. She had _ played a_ great
defendants, if they formed the nart in the sociai work of Bar-

bados and he
was present,

Donated By Christians

Father DenniIngton suid that the
clothes were donated by christian
people throussh the American Aid
Society of which Mr. Wilkinson
was Presidert,

Madame Ifill said that she was
be very glad the people were able to
and see Mr. Wilkinson in. person and
she was sure that after Mr. Wil-

view that he was a conspirator, Work on the site for the was glad that she
they would definitely have to launching of the 110-foot span
look for some kind of corrobora~ steel bridge to carry the 20-inch
bane ‘ae tone PP op accept arterial main which connects the
Secor re en a new Belle Electric Pumping Sta-

Mr. peSnene eee fone tion with the Grand View and
defendants conspired to break Brittons Hill Reservoirs is con-
and enter the house. If they at- tinuing. ‘.
tached any weight to Brathwaite’s The beige, See of wie es
evidence, they might say that already on the site, ;
there Was’ perhaps a scintilla of launched as a compete unit, an
evidence to waylay Mr. & Mrs. concrete pillars are being cot-



A ic ! kinson had seen their condition he
ive n thei ay from the structed for a trolley which wul neen. c ~~
a ro - * conupinacy was be used to launch the bridge. would do everything in his power
eae i and he was submitting Fw ea when he returned to the
proved, 4 ss SA.
that it had not been, it would Mr. J. C. Mottley, M.C.P.,
have to be proved that it was '

u .

Lorry Catches Fire Junior Member for St, Philip, said
, that it was with a deep aaeee, O°
-209 owned appreciation that he welcomed My.
a" Eades oon 2 eae St. Wilkinson, He felt that Mr. Wil-
Michael, ana driven by Arthur kinson’s generous acts would con-
Inniss of St, Joseph, was exten- tribute towards bringing the peo-

sively damaged when it caught Ple closer to their Creator,
fire on Binfield Road, St. Joseph, He felt honoured meeting M:

. Wilkinson and Madame Ifill and
but he did not say what that con- Fe eney, Soe Se eee s. being able to talk to them
M-1057 was

sultation was about, In any case “phe motor car He asked them to accept a word

they could not trust Brathwaite. 51,9 damaged by fire while it was of thanks from him on behalf of

Y travelling along Kendall Hill, the parish and said that he hoped

A Notorious Profligate Christ Church, about 7.45 p.m, on in the future Mr, Wilkinson will

Brathwaite was a man who for- September 4. be able to do even more for the
got how many convictions he had ~ At the time of the incident the Poor of St. Martin’s Village.

if they were too many to remem- motor car was being driven by Mr. Mottley said that Mr, Wil-

conspiracy to break and enter.
The only evidence of conspir-
acy was from Brathwaite. Brath-
waite said that after they left
and went in the direction of
Evelyn’s house that night, they
came back after a few minutes
and had a further consultation,



; ‘os ; : inson’s efforts were a_ grand
ber. Brathwaite was a notorious Lionel Rogers of Belleville, St. kinson’s ey ;
profligate and a ne’er do well, Michael, The car is insured. reminder to other people in the

They would remember that he island that they too could do.some-
had said that his side conversa- ; thing to help the poor, _ ip
tion was between Gaskin and WILL TO BE RE-SEALED ae reply — ae pala

ir at he was extremely happy to
himgelf and Blackman had been His Lordship the Chief Judge, be present to see the work done

we oo. thal” ds cope Sir Allan Collymore, Kt., in the by Madame Ifill. He knew

r , ay Madame Ifill for many years and
conspiracy and that involved ee eee ee alti of he stuck to her because he knew
three, while the other charge, 4.4 will of George Frank Dug- that she had the interest of the
attempting to break and enter Gale jate of Nassau, Island of New people at heart.
invo'ved one. He would submit province, proved in the Supreme | Mr. Wilkinson next talked about
to them that the conspiracy had Court of’ the Bahamas Islands. the American Aid Society and how
not been proved. His Lordship admitted to pro- it came to be founded. He said

It was nothing strange for the phate the wills of Rufus E. Field that the U.S.A. was a most chari-



all the hustle® ture

ADVOCATE

CLOTHING



a dress to a poor woman at St.

Martin's Boys’ School where clothing and foodstuff from the Ameri-

esterday.
and foodstuff. In the picture (left
Mrs. C. Sutart, Madame Ifill, Mr.

Poor Receive Clothing, Food
At St. Martin’s School

_ FIFTY POOR and destitute people were
ing and foodstuff at St. Martin’s Boys’ School, yesterday
The clothing and foodstuff came from the
American Aid Society whose Founder, Mr. Hilbert Wilkin-

iven cloth-

which were distributed all over
the island. They also sent clothing
to Jamaica last September,
1,500 Contributing Members
He said that the organisation
had about 1,500 contributing
members. Some might fail to con-
tribute one year but would con-
tribute the following year. They
bought dresses from the laundries
at ten cents each. These dresses
‘were dry cleaned.

nm me in the’ fu-
r ilkinson ended.

Cc. O. Alleyne, Headmaster
of St. Martin’s Boys’ School,
moved a vote of thanks. Mr.
Alleyne said that he was elated
when he heard Mr, Wilkinson
speak of the good behaviour of the
people of St. Martins.

He asked Mr, Wilkinson to re-
member the poor people of St,
Martins district when he returned
to the U.S.A.

He said that it was the first
big distribution for the St. Mar-
tin's area, but judging from Mr,
Wilkinson's words, he knew _ it
would be the forerunner of even
larger distributions.

Mr, Alleyne thanked Madame
Ifill for the tremendous effort she
was putting into the social welfare

“Depend u
"Mr,
Mr,

of the island,
Among those present were:
Father A, J, Dennington, Rector, |

Mr. C. O. Alleyne, Headmaster of
St. Martin’s Boys’ School, and
Mrs, Alleyne, Mr. G, Weekes, Mrs.
Cc, Stuart and Mr, Claude Ramsay.



LETTERS OF |
ADMINISTRATION

His Lordship the Chief Judge,
Sir Allan Collymore, Kt., in the
Court of Ordinary yesterday
granted the petition of George
u. W, Clarke, Solicitor, one of the|
constituted attorneys of S. M, L.

Inniss, K. A, L. Inniss and Bar-
bara Sadler, for letters of admin-
istration to the estate of their

mother, Hilda Inniss, late of Port-
of-Spain.

Mr. W. W. Reece, Q.C., Solici-
tor General, instructed by Mr.
J C, Armstrong, Solicitor, appear-
ed, for the petitioner,

His Lordship also granted let-
ters of administration to Mr, Cyril
L. Brooks, Solicitor, one of the
constituted attorneys of James W.
Brown of the Bronx, New York,
to the estate of Augustus Clarke,
late of New York,

Mr. W. W. Reece, Q.C., instruct-
ed by Messrs Yearwood & Boyce,
Solicitors,
tioner,

|
The petition of Cleotta V. Skeene!

of Thornbury Hill, ‘for letters of

administration to the estate of her}

husband Joseph Skeene, was also

represented the peti-



DIPHTHERIA
RUMOUR FALSE

There is no truth in the
rumour that there has been
an ouibreak of diphtheria in
the St. Matthias district or
anywhere else in the island
for that matter.

The Advocate
with the Department of
Medical Services yesterday
and was informed that there
has been no case of diphthe-
ria notified for the past three
months.

checked

|



Sea Egg Divers

A number of boys are diving
sea eggs not far away from Bridge-
town. The centre of the diving
activities is at the Reef Beach,
Fontabelle,

Yesterday afternoon over twe
dozen boys, carrying bags, coulc
ke seen in the sea. The sea egg:

were taken from between the
Reef and Pelican Island.
These divers, unlike those at

Silver Sands and the Crane, prefe!
to eat their catches than to sel
them.

* a *

M.V. Moneka
The M.V. “Moneka”
sailed into port yesterday, brough
102 bags of copra, 18 casks o
fresh fruit and other genera
cargo. Its last port of call wa
Dominica and it is consigned t
the Schooner Owners’ Associa
tion.
* *

Léads Sugar
Yesterday the steamship “Ca

nadian Cruiser” was loading suga
and molasses for Montreal anc
the British Northern Islands. Th
harbour was very busy yester
day. Agents for this vessel ar
Gardiner Austin & Co., Ltd,

* *

om
Homeward Bound
The steamship “Golfito’’ whic!
arrived in port on Thursday after
noon, left the same afternoon o
its homeward run. It arrived her
from Trinidad with 36 passenge:
for Barbados and 60 intranst

*

24 embarked here on their wa
to the United Kingdom. Agen!
for the “Golfito” are Messrs Wil
kinson & Haynes.
Â¥ * *
Another “Smith”

When the schooner “Cyril fF

Smith” sailed into port yestei

day morning, it became the third
of the ‘Smith’ schooners to be i:
Carlisle Bay, The others aré
“Lucille M, Smith,” and the “Fran
ces W. Smith.” All three of thes
are consigned to the Schoone
owners’ Association,

2 MORE KEELS FITTED

- The keels for two more boat
have been laid at the grounds o
the Fisheries Office this week
Already 19 boats are practical!
compleced,

A quantity of iron for the keel
is now coming in. This iron wil
be cast in concrete.





JUST RECEIVED
BOOTS MINDIF

MINERAL SALTS
For Catde and Other
Livestock

Mindif Mineral Salts for

Cattle contain balanced

quantities of the essential

elements —— calcium, phos-

phorus, copper, cobalt, iron,

iodine, and manganese
| together with an adequate
proportion of common salt,
The only practical way of
ensuring that the cattle are
receiving adequate minerals,
is by feeding them directly
with the ration.

Directions for Use

Cows in milk

Add 3 % of Mindif Min-
eral Salts to each cwt. of
concentrates fed for milk
production. Alternatively,
give individual cows 3 oz.
per day for those giving up
to 3 gallons, plus 1% oz. for
each gallon over three,

Pkgs. of 2 tbs, for 36c.





PAGE FIVE



Closed In Conspiracy Case

“Crops Suffering From The Heat

Planters who visited the City cate.

yesterday complained of the hot Another planter said that the
‘opell. “I had 40 parts in my dis- canes and other crops are
ltriet this week but that only suffering. They are ‘all hoping

‘kept down the dutt”, one planter that the is'and
from St. Thomas told the Advo- good rainfall.

whiel,



will soon get a









Only Scotland, traditional home of fine tobaccos, could
produce Four Square. Only in Four Square tobaccos
will you find selected leaf, blended with skill handed
down by successive generations for over 140 years,

FOUR SQUARE
TOBACCOS

6 FINE BLENDS TO CHOOSE FROM: MADE BY DOBIE OF PAISLEY

Sole Agents: MESSRS. A. S. BRYDEN & SONS (BARBADOS) LTD.
P.O. BOX 403, BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS



“Hot flashes” of change of life stopped

or strikingly relieved

in 63-80%" of the cases
in doctors’ tests!

© Those suffocating “heat waves”
- alternating with nervous,
clammy feelings — and accom-
panied often by restless irri-
tability and nervousness — are
well-known to women suffering
the functionally-caused distress
of middle life “change”! ‘

You want relief from such suf-
fering. And—chances are— n
e







can get it. Thrilling re

Tha to two famous Lydia

Pinkham medicines!

O wy i. moctere tests Tablets "brought

Ne Recent ewe. |. ten tneeceereeite

tested. Complate or siriking relief? pat! Rereous system to, give
, you say? Not to pn Ne ates =

many thousands of who fressee Of or ye"



’ Learn ebiaal
_ _ Don't put it of! Get Lydia Pink-
modern. exert a ace ham’s Vegetable Compound or new,
calmé: , soothing of ! ere ee eke se with added iron
Pinkham's on the basis (trial size only 59¢).
of m evidence! eit you, too, Wonderful — too — for the func-
don't relief from those tional pains, cramps, “ -out”
terrible “hot 0 and aa and other discomfort of
0 common in life.” mon! menstrual veriods|



Care Your

Morses!

NOW’S THE TIME

TO SELECT THESE
FAMOUS REMEDIES!

RADIOL WORM POWDERS
A modern and effective Anthelmintic — excellent for
removing Round Worms (Strongles & Ascarids)

RADIOL PHYSIC POWDERS (Flavoured)
A Physic Ball with all the trouble taken out in the shape
of a Tasty Powder which does not gripe but acts on the
Bowels as a Purge.

RADIOL LEG WASH POWDER Romo
Specially prepared for use in making “Radiol Leg Wash,



7 defendants to remain near Eveltai’s of St. Michael, Berinda A. Pilgrim table place but no one could be granted by His Lordship. i( SRUCE WEATHERHEAD F

one lived. in Rockley and for shop. Evelyn himself had told of Christ Church, George D. crooked in charity, The crooked we Ae A. Willlacas, \nstructed; Limited on sale at~-KNIGHT’S DRUG STORES
: * AS i a rc’ y/o - Je . y . . es > .

his part it would have been stupid them that was nothing unusual.So Clarke, also of Christ Church and Duriite tne na ae Teoh »y Mr se Sarjeant, Solicitor, Also in Bags 112 Ibs.

John,

Y xe - kles St. wppeared on behalf of the peti-,
steal they could not say that they were Alexander Beckles of sent many barrels of clothing tioner.

AL SL aS a aT \

to live there and try to

You too will

Say these

(Vo

46” SHEFR “DELIGHT™.............. _ at_$1.37 yd.
In Ice Blue, Lime, Navy, Coral,
Lemon, Orchid, Aqua, Peach,
Rose and White



and JOHN GILL & CO.













e
SHADOW STRIPE NYLON at $2.35 yd.








36”
in Pink, Sky. Turquoise, Peach Fee rete
and White A WIDE VARIE
36” PLAIN TAFFETA from $1.15 to $1.95 yd. In White Buck, Black TO CHOCSE FROM
ln a gorgeous — shades : Se an sieht Sete
36” “ART SILK PIQUE ...........:-.... at $2.70 yd. ister titty ant PRICES RA
In Dusty Pink, Silver, Blush Pink me
Ice Blue, Champagne, Eggshell, Multi-Colour Raffia
Lemon, Gold, Aqua. Orchid
and White
®
1
HARRISONS CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD.
BROAD STREET DIAL 2664 10, 11, 12, 13 Broad St.












an Neda nate

PAGE SIX





CLASSIFIED ADS. "mie sau

















TELEPHONE 2508
nmenicintelaagl aa Sia NaS alecemeh =
1 =~
DIED FOR SALE
FAYLOR— Gr September 5. 1952, at hery po
residence "S$onth District, St b orge
via , Paylo He mers
will lec Don AUTOMOTIVE
at 4 for St Paris
i seer Faylor (widower), Nev CAR--Por sale « tandard 8 h.p
Cledon:~ Stephen (sons), Verona.| Coupe Car in good running order. Phone
Madeline Vincelia a Or #18. G. BE. Ward 6.9.52—4n
aught The Spooner ———— —— Sheena
ate 6.9 68_in} _ CAR—One (1) 1952 A—40 “Somerset
—— ee. | Pale Gretn—1,300 miles — Always owner
N MEMORIAM iriven Dial 3356, 6.9.52—3n
c leaden ieee an eg a
{ CARS—Morris Minor 2 Door Saloon



Ia loving memory of my dear sor



Gill Who died on the 5th Sep
tember, 1051. 7
Can a woman's tender care

Cease toWafés the child be

Yes she may fergetful be

Yet will I remember thee
Ever to be remembered b¥ Eunice Bow
man (mother), Eutaleen, Jestina (sisters
Winston, Lieyd, Noel, brotrers)



Ly





DOWNIE—In loving memory of o
dear husband and father, John Reub«
Downie, who died on the Sth Septe;:
ber, 1946

To-day recalls sad memoric
Of a leved one gone to rest
They who think of you to-day
Are those who love you best
Lillian (wife), Marjorie, Colin (children!






Elaine (Daughter- w), Arthur (eor
in-law) Richard, P ¥, Maureen, De
mond (grand-chTidren Clarice, F

(Sisters), Kenneth (Brother) 4
6.9.§2—1







fiALL—In Loving Memory of my Belove

wife Kathleen Hall, who departed «
the Sth September, 1951

One year has passed since that ¢§







ore we loved was calle
ay
The cull Wis short the shock severr |
We never thought that death was
nea
Only those who have Jost can tell
The pain of parting without farewe)
Dudley Hall thusband Geotge, Hande
and Sydney tsor wd famits
" & 6.9.52-——1n
FINDS—In joving memory Of Miss C. FE
Hinds who passed to the ‘Gre
Beyond” on 6th Sep. 1951
In a world af pain and care
Lord. Tho wonldst ne londer leave

her
To Thy Home so bright and fair
Levingly Thou didst receive her.
Clothed in robes of dpotléss white
Now she dwells with Thee in light
Ever to be remembered by her dear friend
Millie and family 6.9.82—11



FINDS—iIn affsétionate memory of ov
@eor sister CTariasé Minds who went t
: stent Detent. § r Ath, 1991

t iiifons have

Gree promi

the lecul.so bright and folr
We hope to meet her some day in
Giory

When our trials on earth are over
Ever to be remembered by John (brother
Panam>), Fis (sister), Relatives anc
Friends. 6.8,52-—1r







The publie are hereby warned against

giving credit to any person or persons

whomsoever in my name as I do not hold

myself responsible for enyone contrac’

ing any debt or debts in ay nae unless

"y a written order signed by me

re FITZRERBERT SMITH,

Gittens Road,
Government Hil)

6,9. 522.

FOR KENT

HOUSES _

BUNGALOW--To An Approved
art. Bungalow Modern Sea-Side, ful!
furnished Bungalow Excellent sen-
bathing. Far SS particu’ars: Appi
to No. 6 Corai nds, Worthing

2.9. 52—6n.

“KASY REACT" — Srnall sea-side
Pungalow Bayfield Beach, St, Petet neni
Gibbes Beach by fit

















tab) Aishad.
2 bedrooms, Refrigerator, Fervant!” ae

Garage etc, Phone 2393 31.6,52—6n



FLAT & HOUSE-Fully furnished, St.-} spectively,
29.3.99—t.2.n, | Broad St
Octaber |

Lawrence on-Sea. Phone

ie AY tatilowsdl, . See FEVER MIXTURE FOR DOGS — fo: |
isoraian Seas Pebruary, Marel ,recuting the Température in Féverien |
Apply Mrs, L Weatherhead ye fk Complaints, ‘and pertiowierty in the early
» k 9. nh | stages o} emper . ce 1/6 bot
Sarr rs Gdad dah Sali Ra | Obtainable at Knight's Ltd
MANHATTAN FLATS — On Sea three | 4.9.69—9n

Nedreoms each fully furnished, Refrig!
daire, enclosed yard, Servant's Room &
Gorage Phone 3309 6.9. 52—2:

OFFICES

our Building in Lower
Available from — 1st
R. Hunte & Co., Ltd
3.9.52—t.f.n





OFFICES—In
Broad Street.
October. K.
Dial 4611





"



Lili
I



Reco

The Housewites ;
Alphabet }

ttractive Hostess
tractive {itchen

needs

©
8
>



Precaution

{ urricane

n 5 .
TAM »

END No, 12

{ —_—)

; APTER A WARNING -
Q Board up windoy ana
{ and put Storm Shutters
§ ih place. Use good lum

ter, makeshifts may d:
more damage thrn nonc
at all. Have strong brac-
ing of outside doors.



tcers &
f the
\PVOCATE'S SOCIAL CLUB
Unider ihe Patronage of
the Hon. V. C. Gale, M.L.C.
invite you to their

DANCE

at the
VOLUNTEER DRILL HALL

Members

on

MONDAY NIGHT. 6TH
OCTOBER, 1952
(Bank-holiday)

Music by
Percy Green's Orchestra
SUBSCRIPTION; —n—
Dancing from 9 p.m.
Tickets not
Formal Dress

SS®OODSOGGOHOOHO-

3/-

Transferable
Optional

22 M4MPODOS-IOGOGPY99999GH99OS-HY yO >

©
é

LODDOADOS

|
|

1.400 miles. Like mew. Morris Minor
Door Saloon 11,000 miles. Excellent con-
diten, Fort Royal Garage Ltd Tele-
phone 4504. 21,8.52—n





CAR—-New Consul car only done
miles, Reason for selling owner
siand. Phone 4641,



4.9.52—4n.



CAR—(1) KAISER. One second hand
Kolser, 1949 model, in excellent condi-
‘ion, apply Barbados Agencies, telephone
1608 5.9 52—fn

CAR—-1938 14-6 Model Vauxhall, 3 new
Sres Good condition :
959 before 4 p.m, 5009 after 4



“3.9.52—4n



CAR—Plymouth 5 passenger Car 1948
1cdel in perfect condition. Done only
8,000 miles. Phone KR. 8. Nicholls
Mice, 3925. Home 8657.

3.9.52—t.f.n



CAR—Austin A70. Very good condition.
and going to some jueky person for $1,800.
Williams at 2006 and 98251 or apply

Jehovah Jirah, St. George

| Cali 4559.

'

i
‘

|
|
|

!

| We_haye



3.9.52—+.i.0

CAPS-—-ONE (1) Ford ZEPHER 2.500
les, as good as new
ONE (1) Hillman Minx 1951 Mode)
ONE (1) SM 1,500 Singer Car.

| ONE (1) STUDEBAKER

'1940 Model Apply. to
TAYLOR'S GARAGE
Street



REDMAN
LTD., Church
3.p.52—3n





CAR—Hillman Minx—Excellent condi-
tion, owner driven, done only 13,000 mile

Contact -« Edwin Mayhew, Gitter
Croney & Co., Ltd., Palmetto St. (Phone
4394) 27,8.52—t.f.n



TROUCK—tnternational Two speed ax!
truck with hydraulie holst. M—782. Phone
3050. J. N. Pornurn, George St

6.9.52—4n





ELECTRICAL



MOTOR—In good WotKind condition
one % H.P.=110 Volt Motor with com-
pressor. Suitable for spray painting etc
5.9.52—2n.





LIVESTOCK
MULES 4 Small isia nd Mule Apply
Fairfield Plantation, St. Luey, or Phone
91—-53 6.9,52—3n











____ POULTRY

POULTRY—Hampshire and Leghors 8
weeks old with incubator and runs. Apply
City Bar, Palmetto Street























6.9.52—2n
MECHANICAL
From Jose River Ltd, (1) Subsoil
plough. Apply to Mr. Watson, Factory
Manager. 6.9.52—1n
MISCELLANEOUS

~ 20 cents each

Swan and Middle Streets (Secon:
Floér) 6.9. 52—in



_ ANTIQUES of every description, Gias:
China, old Jewels, fine Silver Water
olours.
tc., at Gorringes Antique Shop adjoining
Royal Yacht Club 3.2.52—t4





in. stock

CLEANSING
expel the “After-birth” or “Cleansing”
from Cows, Ewes, Sows and Goats
Price 2/- box. Knight's Lid, 4.9.52-—3n

\ PERRIER RERES, 5 4

|

In
| DIRECTORY all Telephone Numbers are |

‘x & 1/8, 1/16 ¥x & tov x 8 |
Dial 2696, Auto Tyre Co., Trafalgar and |
pry Streets 90.8.52—t.f.n. |
SPECIAL BUY—Men's Shirts — For the
big man for the small man sizes |
3 to 17% Now y $4.19 each
x” $12.00 Reg ly $4.75 each
| PASHION HOUSE, . Swan Sts
3.9. 52—4n |

| _ SUBSCRIBE

Tel





jend 3 ft 3 Ins offered (for spot cash
~— | Sales only) at $49,58 and $52,096 each re
Strletly limited number for

disposal — BUY NOW, HARRISON'S,
Dial 4234 3.9. 523n



HOUSEHOLD EQUIPMENT of ai!
lescription. Owen T. Allder, 118 Roebuck
street. Dial 3299, 10.5.52—t.f.n

NUMERICAL TELEPHONE





the

listed in numerical order. Price 3/-
2,9.52—6n







—_—_—
now to the
Telegraph, England's leading Daily Nuws-
ceper now arriving in Barbados by Air
nly a few days after publication in
tondon. Contact Ixn Gale, C/o. Advo-
ote Co., Ltd., Local Representative
3118. 17459—t in
The JMERICAL TELEPHONE
MIRECTORY is available at: Advocate
ole’s Printery, Johnson's Stationery,
toberts & Co. and at the Colonial Adver-
‘ising Co. (Barbados) Ltd., James St
‘rice 3/-. 2.9.52—6n












Use the NUMERICAL TELEPHONE
JFRECTORY to identify the owner of the
Telephone Numbers left on your desk
Price 3/-,



With the NUMERICAL TELEPHONE |
NPERCTORY any Telephone Number can |

fly be traced to the party concerned
. 4

‘rice 3



N in stock
eter product,



urbicura’
for the treatment «



Y ls and Sprung Tendom
forses, and big knees in cattle. Pr 4
1x KNIGHT'S LTD
4.9 52.
a ~



«ill those throbbing pains ».
your muscles at once! Apply
Stoan’s Lintment pre &
fee! your e wt a8
CODE Wd

Xt

we um enreveâ„¢

You don’t rub in “Sloan’:” you dab it
on the affected part geutly—“ Sloan's"
cs the rest! Good for
aches and pains and stiff | MWLUK)
joints too !

LOOK FOR THE

PICTURE OF DR. SLOAN
@ ON THE PACKET










Hing)







iit









Wr

OPTICAL NOTICE

I beg to notify my Clients
and the General Public that
my Office will be closed for
Vacation from September 8th
and will be reopened on
September 29th.

WESLEY BAYLEY
Optician
High Street.



ning
ette,
6,000 | Servants’
leaving The above property will be set up fo

Early buvks, Maps Autographs |

DRENCH for helping. to |

Mild Steel Plates—3/8, 5/16, Vs, 3/16— |

2.9.52—6n |

REAL ESTATE

A parcel of land containing 66,527
(Square feet at
| Christ Church, (part of Clairmont) with
outlet to Davrells Read, and suitable for
laying out as building lots

Will be offered for sale at
| of the undersigned on Thuteday the 11th
September, 1952, at 2 o'cloék p.m

The plan can be seen on application to
|the undersigned
} COTTLE, CATFORD & CO







i 3.9.52—8n
i er

| BUNGALOW-—Stone wall Bungalow
jealled “SANTA MARIA” with 6,13

}square feet of land attached situate at
| Pine Hill, St. Michael
The house contains Drawing and Dir
jing rooms, 3 Bedrooms fone with run
water) breakfast rooms, Kitchen
conveniences, Garage anc
rooms, Electricity installed

usual

sale by Public competition at our Offic
Tames Street on Friday 12th September
1952 at 2 p.m
Inspection by appointment. Dial 2850
YEARWOOD & BOYCE,
Solicitors
27.8. 52—1

HOUSE Bunkalow Style ishop ai
tached 22 x i2
Black Rock

Situated at
Dial 0155

Brighton
2.9.52—t.f.n





(1) Property at Junction of St
‘s gap and Dayrell's Road; consisting
of a two storied house with shop o1

bottom floor, and a hall presently occu-!

pied by the Seventh Day assembly, anu
standng on approximately 9,000 sq. ft.
(2) One upstairs property of Govern
ment Hill, standing on
3,000 S. Ft. of land
(3) One wall property at Civilian Ra
Bank Hall,
jand
(4) One property (stone) -i Water St
tch. Ch » Standing on 3 roods of land.
| (5) 2 small properties at King’s Village
land Kensington New Road, respective!
For particulars contact K. Sandifor4
Spry St., Dial 2374 27.8,.62—4r
| LAND—A spot of land — approx. 3
perches in Belle Gully Rad., opposit«
Radcot. For particulars phone 2931

3.9.52—6

approximatel)

standing on one eighth o











Offers will be received in writing uy
to 4 pm. Tuesday, 16th, September 1952.
for the servants room at Glendale, (Resi
dence of the P.M.O, St, Thomas) to
gether with a quantity of old
nd greenheart Also separate
for a quantity of old
Inspection of the items can be made or
Wednesdays between the hours of 12——<

offer

pm. and on Saturdays between the
hours of 10—2 on application to Dr
Cc. C. Clarke on premisés
K. SANDIFORD,
Churehwarden, St. Thomas
29.8.52—4n
“SILVER WATERS”, at Silver Sands

Cool throughout the year, four targe bed
rooms, running water in each room, two
servant rooms, Garage for two cars, bes
sea bathing Inspection by appointment
Phone 68211, 4462. 3.9. 52—3r
ee
“SEA BEAUTY"—on St. James coast
4 miles from town. Three large bedrooms.
running water in each room, servant
‘room, ete. Inspection between the hours
jee 7.80—8.30 a.m. and 4-6 p.m. Contac
J E, Samuel, Fitts Village, St. James.
$.9.52—2n
PRESS



Pe
the prescribed entry forms and m
than 7th October, 1952,
»e considered,
forms are as follows: --

Examination for Health
Certificate

Examination for Sanitary In: pectors Certificate 3
Inspectors of Meat and Other

Examination for the
Foods Certificate

Sanitary Inspectors

Half-fees only are payable for re-entry on each
occasions subsequent to the first sitting.
3. Entry forms may be had on application.

Hony. Secty, & Treasurer, British West Indies Board of
| Examiners, Royal Sanitary Institute.

Medical Department,
Bridgetown, Barbados.

is



{











mod comet hab
sea: ub the
chest with A.J. White
Liniment. The penetrating
heat stimulates blood circu-
lation and promptly relieves
congestion. Thousands have
found relief with A.1.
y not you?

Wh
A " A ALA

NIMENT

|




Dally |



Neart Trouble
Caused by High
Blood Pressure

If you have pains around the heart,.
palpitation, dizziness, headaches at
top and back of head and above eyes,
shortness of breath, feel nervy, or suf-
| fer from poor sleep, loss of memory
and enwgy, Indigestion, worry and
fear, your trouble is probably caused
| by High Blood Pressure. This is a
| mysterious disease that causes more
| deaths than cancer, because the

nptoms @ “e so common and usually
mistaken for some simple ailment. If
you suffer from any of these symp-
toms, your life may be endangered by

Heart Trouble or a paralytic stroke,

ind you shoul start treatment at

e. The very first dose of Noxco

(ormerly Known as Hynox), a new

edical discovery reduces High Biood

Pressure and mnkes you feel years
vunger In a ferv days. Get Oxco
your chemist today. It is guar-
eed toymake you feel well and
strong or snoney em return of
wnoty package.










{eae ea24aa
é CHRISTIAN SCIENCE

READING ROOM »

SUBSTANCE

‘rue wealth lies net in compass
of a coin, .

Then murmur
purse

Or moeking figures on a bc‘aihce

sheet;
Eternal substance seek in holy

} work.

not, at empty

Sentinel

book may be read borrowed
ased at the Reading Room.
ywen & Sons Broad Street.
10 a.m. 2 p.m. Tues-
s, Wednesdays, Fridays, and‘on
from 10 a.m -—







ays

@ your bills, book-keeping.

Gaivanize sheets |

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

|: ANNOUNCEMENTS!



profits full or spare time
Christmas Cards Spanish Greetings 25

| of

Also 20 beautiful box assortments, Write

Al fail
Rockley in the parish of 770, .#2)

the omer | LOST a FOUND

A

Meeting. Finder please return to H. D
Bayley,

| te
|

!

ty

6.9 62—8n

STENOTYPIST — Experi Steno
pist, apply t “Agency” PO a6

| Bridgetown 4.9.52—3n



Matthi. |
and price to NORA C/o. Advocate

|
{

| Sandiford, corner Marshall Gap, Baxter

Rd., City. 2.9.52--3n
HOUSE—To Buy or Rent House in
either Hastings or Garrison District twe

2) Bedrooms if possible, three (3) with
| usual conveniences. Reply “S” c/o ™@
‘10 Plantations New Buildings, Lower



PUBLIC NOTICES

OSWALD EVERTON JONES having
made sworn deposition that Policy No
“6,959 on his life hag been lost, and

| having made application to the Directors
to grant a duplicate of the same
lumbe;
; “ny objection $s raised within one month
| of the date hereof the duplicate Polies
| asked for will be issued.

| ——

Nurse and Midwife will be received \by
the Churchwarden, Mrs. H, A. Talma
Welches,
tion” up to 3 p.m. on the 16th Septem-
ber, 1



the Parochial Treasurer. 6.9.52—4n.
NOTICE

Will the person or persons who

had on loan the Wheels of Fortun

from Mrs, Geo. Hutson,
kindly communicate with her.

N

Examinations of The Royal Sanitary Institute



The Examinations of the Royal Sanitary Institute will be held
in British Guiana from 8rd to 8th November, 1952,

Applications to take thes: examinations should be made on

ust

No appli:ations received after this date will
The fees which must be forwarded with the entry

Visitors

Examination for the Tropice! Hygiene Certificate for



—

t

COOOL LLL

SOF FF PEPE PETE

POESSSOOOSE OSS

staff, Our Commercial Service offers you Clerical Assistance,

; {S NOW AVAILABLE to those who cannot afford whole time
s Typing, Duplicating (Roneo), Writing up and Mailing Monthly \
|

.
xX A STENOTYPIST is at your service to whom you can dictate x
% your letters and we can supply experts to take the Minutes xs
} of your meetings. & |
% BUSINESS PROMOTION SYNDICATE % |
x 53 Swan and Middle Streets (Third Floor) S
x DIAL 4718 FOR RATES $
SOOODSS TOP OVSOPSSSSSOSG SSS SS SSOSSSS SSS SFSFISOOO |











SOCCSOSSOE SPOS OPS P SS

MAKE EXTRA MONEY Big cash
Sell Personal

$1.50 —- Name imprinted. Samples Free.
CYPHERS CARDS CoO.,.75 W
. Buffalo, N.Â¥

SWEEPSTAKE TICKET Series
-8001 in the forthcoming N










































Hanson Plantation, St. George
6.9. 53—2n

WANTED

genta

HELP

rn ennenneninrenigencenctennanangennegeie so
BARBADOS DYE WORKS
WASHERS & IRONERS—Onily compe-
nt persons need apply







MISCELLANEOUS
A PARROT CAGE — State condition
29.8. 59—1n
ONE Liquor License, contact Charles



road Street 6.9.52—5n



THE BARBADOS “MUTUAL LIFE
ASSURANCE SOCIETY
LOST POLICY



NOTICE is hereby given that unless

Order,

Cc. K. BROWNE,
Secretary.
29.8, 52—4n



NOTICE
PARISH OF CHRIST CHURCH
Applications for the post of Qualified

Ch. Ch Marked “Applica-

Terms of appointment obtainable from

Blackmans,

6.9.52—3n



OTICE

reach the undersigned not later

and School Nurses
$15.00

$20.00
$25.00

$25.00
of two
ng.

F, N. GRANNUM,

6.9.52.—2n.

HELLO EVERYBODY !

A GRAND EXCURSION

AND DANCE
will be given by
MRS, KATHLEEN WEEKES

to
RAINBOW OLUB, BATHSHUBA,
MONDAY 6th OCTOBER, 1952
(Bank-Holiday)

FARE $1.20 ~ DANCE %/-
Music by Mr. Hoppy Jordan's
Orchestra
Refreshments on Sale
Buses leave Beckles Road and
Empire Theatve at 9 o'clock
Tickets ebtainable at Carlton
Browne, J. K, Hunte & Mrs
K. Weekes

NOTICE

The Public are invited to drop
in at the COSMOPOLITAN CLUB
and RESTAURANT, Bay Street,
where delicious Chinese
Creole Foods are served. Daily
from 9 a.m, until Midnight by an
A 1 Chinese Chef. Dial 4288 for
Reservations. 5,9.52—2n.



and

re



Just Off The Press!
FIRST ANNUAL
LEAGUE CRICKETER

Compiled by
J, M. HEWITT
Hony. Secty. B.C.L.
and containing
*Records of B.C.L. Cricketers
*Records of all centuries
made in B.C.L. games
er of Leading B.C.L.

layers
*League Championship Table
*B.C.L. Intercolonial and

International Players

—Oo— ;

This Annual sets out in
simple but impressive
figures the history and
tradition of the B.C.L.

en{onee
PRICE : ONE SHILLING

—o—
Obtainable at...
COLE’S PRINTERY
Middle Street

or
PRESS CLUB BUILDING
53, Swan & Middle Streets
6.9.52,—2n,

:
LAPIS



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POOSSOOOO

OFFICE SERVICE ,

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VLAN






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P. O. Box 56

BRIDGETOWN . Dial 2402





Here is a truck—and a van,
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and

distinguished styling of a car. These vehicles have plenty ot
load space-——120 cubic feet in the Cowley Van! They are
unrivalled for speedy deliveries because they have the road
performance of a car.






FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD.

Phone 2385

IF





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just like » car.

Sole Distributors

THE BARBADOS POLICE



CAR-TYPE FEATURES THAT COUNT

All-stéel, car stgle
safety cab @ Torston-
bar independent front
wheel suspension
Smmooths cut the rough-

estroads @ Pour-specd
gear - box

column gear-shift « Hypoid
rear axle for silence and long life

® Lockheed hydraulic brakes @ Gab
cor windows have controllable ventila-
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Phone 4504

You Require Police Assistance

You See or Hear Anything
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suspicions.

You have any Information

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SATURDAY,











ce



STANLEY GIBBONS
POSTAGE STAMP

JOHNSON’S
STATIONERY







|S.S. “COLONIAL”
S.S. “PHTLOSOPHER

|s.s. “HISTORIAN” .





The M.V
Domini¢a,
Nevis
day 8th inst







SEPTEMBER 6, 1952

SHIPPING NOTICES



SOCGOSEY - 5S99566 GOOD,

“MONEKA” wil! ac-
and Passengers for
Antigua, Montserrat,
Kitts, Sailing Mon-

et Cargo

ind St

CATALOGUE 1953 The M_V. “CARIBBEE” will ac
PART I cept Cargo and Passengers for
i Dominica, Antigua, Maptserrat,
BRITISH EMPIRE Nevis and St. Kitts, Sailing Friday
(Complete) 12th inst
$4.00 Each

BWI. SCHOONER OWNERS’

ASSOCIATION (INC)
Consignee, Tele. No. 4047





HARRISON LINE

} OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM

Lea Due
nies Barbados
4th Sept. 17th Sept.
16th Sept. Ist Oct.

20th €ept. 14th Oct.



Liverpool 26th Sept. 10th Oct.
HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM
Vessel For Closes in
Barbados
S.S. “SCHOLAR” .. oe .. ‘sondon 18th Sept.
S.S. “CROFTER” .. F .. Liverpool 19th Sept.

For further Information, apply to .. .
DA COSTA & CO. LTD. — Agents



CANADIAN SERVICE

Sails Montreal

a

IM” . 25th August

‘ARNETA” . I2th September

A STEAMER . 26th September

A STEAMER 10th October
NORTHBOUND

|
‘ee Alcoa. Steamship Co
|

Sails Halifax Arrives Barbados

S3ist August 12th September ‘
16th September 28th September
30th September 12th October

14th October =_-26th October

“ALCOA PPritan” Due Barbados September 14tht for St. Lawrence Rivér ports.







Apply :—DA COSTA & CO. LTD.—CANADIAN SERVICE



NEW YORK SERVICE

8.8. “ALCCA PEGASUS” sais &th August — arrives 20th August
8.8. “are vr ¢NTER" * Sep tember — arrives 17 ptember
.

NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
S Jab €R sails 17th July, — arrives 2nd August
A Sli ER sails 31st July — arrives 16th August
A: TER sails 14th August — arrives 30th August '
As MER sails 28th August — arrives 12th September
> ‘

©- AMER sails 11th September — arrives 27th September

_—_—

‘

ROBERT THOM LTD.—NEW YORK & GULF SERVICE



, HURRICANE PRECAUTION HINT No.5

KEEP A FEW POUNDS OF NAILS AND A HAMMER
IN A HANDY PLACE.

These can be obtained from - - -

CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.

NAILS at 30c. per lb.
HAMMERS at $1.63 each.



will take place at the...
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when you wear a pair of
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At 8 p.m, on Friday, 12th September
CANADA DRY STEEL BAND IN ATTENDANCE

Bar — Music — Thrilling Encounters

Ring Side $1.00, Ring Circle 60 Cents, Bleachers 30 Cents










%* BLACK SUEDE UPPERS
RUBBER SOLES

LADIES’ SIZES 3—8

Latest

Lee emrment
ARRIVAL

$2.30




with Escolite Soles

$3.85




SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE : PAGE SEVEN

= SS Se

HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON | Pee ee

| “‘Cussed things, hens”









Rheumatism
and Backache
Gone in 1 Week

ineys With Cystex and

You'll Feel Fine
Cystex—the prescription of a famous
doctor—ends all troubles due to
faulty kidney action in double quick
time, so, if you suffer from Rheuma-
tlem, Sciatica, Neuritis. .umbago
Backache, Nervousness. .eg Pains,
Dizziness, Circles under Eyes, Fre- ’
quent Headaches and Colds, Poo
aneeee and Appetite. Pully Ankles
Burning, Smartin Passages. or
have frequently to Get up Nights, go
to your chemist today for Cystex
and be fit and well next week
Cystex Helps Noture 3 Wevs
Che Cystex treatment is vighly x
entific, being specially cor
to soothe, tone and clean
sick kidneys and bi €
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“T thought I had taken
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yet they still get worms!”



“Then there was one

FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD.... precaution you didn’t take.
Bae salinenti Shien If you'd dosed ’em
WwW PATROL CAN REPOR Ts)








(ov 7s, WAY, FLINT ~LATE LAST NIGHT WE] [JUST BEFORE HOPELESS-THAT S|



















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ICUTTING IN ON OUP FREQUENCY... Ai TOADY LEECH — tit = PICKED UP IN THE j | Spaeereus Crees Cystex work 3 in
SO /|rorarion 00M, h L iit
=) we COLLECTED | once a mont
SEQUENCE OF WORDS | |

y1 yet is abso

man tissue.

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Strengthens and ¢
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BLUE MOUNTAIN COFFEE—}-Ib, Pais. .79 72 CN eee Ariss:

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peer

PAGE EIGHT

Commonwealth Defeai England

Worrell At His
«Brightest Best”

(From Our Own Correspondent)

A SWASHBUCKLING innings of 60 in 50 minutes by ter
Frank Worrell and yet another delightful display by wicket and the
George Headley were outstanding events of the

LONDON.

ingston

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





LEAGUE CRICKET NOTES

By SCRIBBLER

Bowlers dominated play in the
game at Bank Hall on Sunday
between the B.C.L. XI and Em-=
pire Intermediates. Empire In-
termediates were caught on a soft
B.C.L. captain
used to good effect his pace men,
Rogers, Pinder, and Greene. It

festival match which ended today with victory by seven appeared to an onlooker that the
wickets for the Commonwealth over an England Eleven. Empire batsmen offered too little

It was Worrell at his brightest
best, Opening his broad shoul-

ders, runs flowed from his bat like |

water gushing over Niagara. He
pulled, hooked, and drove vicious-
ly and in between executed some
of the most delicate of late cuts.
Five consecutive deliveries.
three from Mallett and two from
Sims, were dispatched post haste
to the boundary,
runs came in this fashion,
Headley, although less spectac-

ular, was just as effective and §

just as entertaining. His second in-

nings of 61 for which he batted

70 minutes, was a replica of his
first innings of 98, as with all tix
time in the world, he stroked the
ball to the boundary, So assured
was he right from the start that
it looked as though he was con-
tinuing from where he left off
yesterday.

In the first hour and a quarter's
play this morning we saw excel-
lent bowling by Sonny Ramadhin.
Despite a cold wind, he spun the
ball well and in 12 overs, three
of which were maidens, he took
three wickets for 35 runs to bring
his analysis for the innings to
five for 78.

His first victim this morning
was Nigel Howard, skipper of the
England side, who was bowled
looking for a break that wasn’t
there, and he followed this by
ending the fine innings of Laurie
Fishlock who had his off stump
flattened in trying to knock the
Vall out of the ground. Next
Ramadhin brought the aggressiv’
resistance of Mallett to a close,
and with Tribe dismissing Jackson
and Sims, the England eleven
were all out for 252,

th Headley, Worrell, and
Rickards perrorming Com-
monwealth needed only two of the
three and three-quarter hours left
eee to clinch the match.

e game was a triumph for
the West Indian players, Headley,
Worrell, and Rickards who scored
351 of the side’s match total of
522, and Ramadhin took eight of
the 20 wickets for 140.

England (ist innings: 269 — Kenyon 95,

In all 48 of his &





FRANK WORRELL



LCC Golf

Costs £28.12
A Year

By PETER WILSON

Golf
course
David Beattie, of

the L.C.C,
Hainault

costs
Goodmayes

) comfortable and the

resistance to what in the first few
overs was really purposeless
bowling. The bowlers were short
of a length and of those that
came through dolly catches were
put up. It was not until half the
side was dismissed that the B.C.L.
men began taking wickets that
were not gifts.

Before the luneheon interval
the Empire team was back in the

15 and Rogers 1 for 10. Of the 22
overs bowled, 7 were maidens.
In the B.C.L, first innings Nor-
vie and Hinds seemed quite
remained
together until the first innings
lead was secured, Norville is one
of the Police Club boys and
showed that Foffie Williams is not
mistaken when he spots him as one
to be watched. Norville moves

his feet in a neat dance at the jng improved form and are 54

wicket and as an opening bats-
man is quite unhurried. Hinds
is undefeated with 39 to his credit
In the game against the Inter-
mediates at Y.M.P.C, he scored
56.

With the Empire bowlers break-
ing the opening partnership, they
enjoyed a run of successes and
from 48 for 1, the score went to
75 for 5 when Captain Goddard
joined Hinds to stop the rot. At
the end of the day’s play the
score was 94 without further Joss,
Clarke, Rogers, Jones and Pinder
were the batsmen losing their
wickets without reaching double
figures. The game continues to-
morrow.

Romans in the Lead

Results of the games in the
Central Division have placed Ro-
mans in the lead with 18 points
to their credit. Romans defeated
Kendal, the present champions in
a key match two Saturdays ago.

public On Saturday Belmont, one of the

Mr. clubs bracketed with Romans and
suff

ered their first defeat

pavilion for 47, df which 22 were short were all out for 77, 1
scored by Holder who was unde- jorris took 3 for 33, J. Robinson
| feated. Greene of Middlesex took 3 for 18, R. Robinson 3 for 12.
5 for 18, Pinder of Rangers 3 for

In the Gun Hill

57. Ellerton fell for 87 and Boys’

Club replied with 74 for 5 to win
V. Massiah was 25
not out—the match-winning hets-

the match.
man.

Three Consecutive 30’s

TABLE TENNIS :



Two Newcomers

Division, O.
Best took 5 Boys’ Club’s wickets
for 39 for Elierton. Ellerton scored
110 and Boys’ Club went into the
lead with 126, J. Austin scoring

Score

Upsets

The Islandwide Open Championship started at the

Y.M.P.C., on Friday last and continued on Tuesday. In the
first round all of the seeded players with the exception of
F. Willoughby won their matches.

There were only two upsets

Another prize for consecutive Carmichael of Fox and Callender

30’s has been won. On this occa- ®

f Bay Street two new comers

sion, the winner is S, Weekes of Wn their matches against two

Lancashire who accomplished the

Teat against Sydney in the match

recently completed. In Satur-

day’s game, however, Lancashire

met Searles in a low scoring

game. Lancashire batting a man
77

In their turn/at the wicket Seariecs
were dismissed for 64. For Lan-
cashire H. King took 4 for 28,
Bourne 2 for 14 and E. Nurse 4
for 17. In another low scoripg
game in this Division Inch Mar-
lowe could only raise 42 against
Maple. Bynoe took 8 for 18 and
Pile 2 for 20.
‘hnings lead with 57, Trotman
contributing 30. In their second
innings Inch Marlowe are show-

without loss.
Other Games
J, Hinds of

of 186.
double figures batsman,
took 4 for 35.
close of play were 24 for 1.

In the Union Globe vs. Greens
match, Union Globe scored 102
and Greens replied with 136. E,
and Lorde:

Brereton scored 71
28, Elcock took 5 for 23.
Norwick batted first
Starwick and were dismissed fo

87. Burke took 5 for 25. Star-;
wick failed with 20.
Invincible knocked _u pâ„¢100

against Boys’ Club. St. Hill 38 and

Jordan 5 for 35 shared bi
and bowling honours, Boys’ Clu’

were at the close of play 87 for 4.

At Thorpes Wemourne wer
dismissed for 51, Sealy top-scor

ing with 34. Welches at the close
of play were 180 for the loss of 2.
Cc. Reece 40 and G, Worrell 63
were the Welches’ batting stars,

Penrode hit 81
against Belfield “B” out of a total;
Harewood 25 was another
Davis
Belfield at the

against

(Essex) £28 12s, a year. “As an

Ikin 82; Tribe 4 for 63.)
SE ordinary working man”, says

COND INNING

Kenyon b MeCarthy ’ #1 »

Brookes c and b Tribe 17 Mr. ~ Beattie, complaining of the
likin e Barnett b seen 20 oon eee of eae LC.c.
Gibb ¢ Barnett ribe ... 2 are many e me out
Poole c Dowding b Ramadhin 10 *

Fishlock b Ramadhin sg of the game.”

“Why,” Mr. Beattie asks “can-
not the L.C.C. tell the public
where the difficulty lies in their
refusal to charge an all-in yearly
18 fee like many other towns who
run municipal courses?”
— 1 investigated Mr.

Commonwealth (ist innings: 354 for 6 s
_— Headley 98, Richards 69, Pettiford 54 opergee and found that:

Howard b Ramadhin ..... 6
Gladwin not out . ° ‘ 20
Mallett c Barnett b Ramadhin 21
Jackson b Tribe .. ceeds seep a 0
Sims c Livingston b Tribe 5

1
vo Beattie’s

not out.) @n average of three
SECOND INNINGS is rounds of golf a week, They cost

Livingston c Gibbs b Mallett : him in green fees (4s. Saturday
. 1 5

Worrell ¢ Bune © Flsnlock 2 and Sunday and 2s, Monday—

Richards not out ety * Friday) 10s, a week.

Majsood Ahmed not out

Extras 1 In addition he pays a member-

— ship fee of £2. 2s. to Hainault
Total (for 3 wickets) .... 1§8 Golf Club and a locker fee of

10%. a year, Total £28. 12s
Cricket Matches LCC’s ANSWER
/ End Today



I put Mr, Beattie’s case to the
L.C.C. and was told that season
tickets are issued on the council’s

All First Division cricket three courses — two at Hainault
matches in the Fourth Series and the other at Beckenham
and Intermediate and Second Place — available from only Mon-

the Sixth aap te atest avaliable. f
o-day. e latest available figures —
Series will be concluded to-c2¥: 1950—51—show that 154 seasons
ere oaee * Seohens and
a ainault. In at year
First Division 130,000 rounds were played over
rickwick at the three courses, popu-
larity of the courses is increasing.
The L.C.C, official did not con-
Beckes Road. sider Mr. Beattie’s golf was
Carlton vs. Empire at Carlton. expensive; it certainly is not

College vs. Lodge at Harrison cheap.

College. In view of the small number of

Division matches in

Spartan _—-vs.
Queen’s Park,

Wanderers vs. Police at

Intermediate season tickets issued the L.C.C.
Empire vs. Pickwick at Bank Should think again about a new
Hall. rate for the golfers who patronise
Regiment vs. Carlton at Gar- ‘heir courses all the year round.
rison,
Combermere vs. Spartan at Rivals—Partners
Combermere.

Mental Hospital vs. Wanderers
at Black Rock.
Y.M.P.C, vs.

Beckles Road. for Sir

Wavell Wakefield’s

Boarded Hall. ham on September 6. He will be
Second Division

Dorward, Captain of Scotla
Lodge vs. Erdiston at Lodge. oe? Pp Scotland,

These are the latest

Pickwick vs. Empire at Oval. to the strong team which is to telegram to Robinson | said that
Windward vs. Wanderers ©! play in the first representative the remarks “cannot be disre- For full informati 2
Wind ward, rugby match of the season and garded” simply because they S. P. MUSSON, SON. a CO 7)
College vs. Y.M.P.C. at Vauc- which will ring up the curtain were made after the game. Rob- : Tel. 4613 =
luse, ; at Twickenham. inson said: “I won’t pay the fine M
Foundation vs. Combermére

at Foundation. $

They'll Do It Every Time

Woe LITTLE

BISMUTH WAS
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of the season. In this game Bel-

experienced players Medford of
Fox and Straughan of Everton.
Of the other matches two stand
the Archer vs. Guiler and Green-
idge vs. Elliot. Guiler after win-
ning the first game and 14—21 in

L. his last made a brilliant recovery

but lacked the finish to win the
set. Elliot won the first game but
was unable to take advantage of
his early lead. In the second

round the best matches were the i

R. Herbert vs, S. Shields and N.
Gill vs. J. Hoad. Herbert with
his forehand and backhand at-
tack defeated his opponent in a
keenly contested game. N. Gill

thrfling match against J. Hoad.
The @rd round of this competi-
tion will continue at the Y.M.C.A.
on Tuesday 9th. at 6.15 p.m.
Players are asked to be on time.
The draw is as follows:

1. R. Phillips vs. J. Callender
i p.m,

“

L. Worrell vs. G. King or/Â¥

Cc Humphrey 6.35 p.m.
3. N. Gill vs. A. Howard 7.00

p.m,

4. R. Herbert vs. L. Harding
7.20 p.m

5. Gooding vs. C. Green-
idge 7.45 p.m.

. E. Goodridge vs. L. Trot-
man 8.20 p.m.

. L. Sampson vs. R. Leslie
8.40 p.m,

8. B. Murray vs. J. Bynoe

Maple took first smashed his way to victory in a 9.00 p.m.



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mont batted first an re all out At Carrington Village, left arm |
or 173, “4 Werseaes cna 50, slow bowler Hope of Liberty took
Springer 30 and Lucas 32,| his thirtieth wicket against Cham-
White Rose replied with 103, L. berlain. Chamberlain were all
Harewood 28 and Vaughan 20.) 0ut ‘or 109, Hope taking 6 for 27.
Belmont in their second innings At the close of play Liberty weré
collapsed for 40 and White Rose| 44 for 5.
lost five wickets in quest of vic-
tory. For White Rose, G. Black-
man took 8 for 10.

In the other game in this Di-
vision, Danes defeated St. Luke’s
Old Boys, Scores were Danes
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76 and 93.

The position in this Division
therefore is Romans 18 points,
Kendal 12, White Rose 12, Danes
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Brighton 0 and St. Luke’s 0.

Bowlers Dominate

Some excellent figures were re-
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PAGE 1

II. i l <>ii: UABHAIMKi AllKHATk UTUBOAV. SsUTUUlER . IKS BxmmJk ADVOCATE 6..>— y*-T=a~ t • OUT llMMI.IIMI ll< > %  !. %  %  ('-'•) By §'. A. II ><••. Salurslay. s, |,i.,-, s. IS52 VITAL TALKS ACCORDING to a report (rum London, the Canada-West Indies Trade talks whit h open next week under the Chairmanship of Mr. E. Melville, will cover the balance of payments position of the sterling area, the token import schenu-. thinning and (he Canadian mai kct for Commonwealth sugar. The balance of payments position of the area is of especial interest because of the meeting in London in November of Commonwealth Prime Ministers who are to review the whole economic structure of the Commonwealth. But the delegates representing the Weal Indies at the talks next week in London will be tfoinn there fully briefed to represent the trading interests of the West Indies alone. Their major preoccupation will be the future of Canada-West Indies trade with respect to the sale of West Indian sugar in Canada. In recent years Canadian imports from the West Indus have outstripped by millions Canadian exports to the West Indies. In the ten-month period January to October 1951 Canadian Imports from Barbados for example were valued at $12,545,000 approximately. By comparison Canadian exports to Barbados during the eleven month period January to November 1951 were valued at $4,170,000 approximately. These figures are taken from Foreign Trade, an official weekly publication of the Foreign Trade Service of the Department of Trade and Commerce. Barbadian fears of losing the preferential sugar market of Canada are grounded on comparison of Canadian exports to Barbados and imports from Barbados with Canadian exports to Cuba and imports from Cuba in recent years. Whereas Canada sold $17,905,000 approximately of goods to Cuba during the period January to November 1951, Canada imported only $6,963,000 approximately of Cuban goods during the period January to October 1951. This was almost half what Canada bought from Barbados during the same period. In addition Canada imported more individually from British Guiana, Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago than from Barbados during the period January to October 1951 The unbalance between Canadian ex ports to and Canadian imports from the West Indies is therefore so great that the West Indian fear of losing the preferential Canadian market is based on common sense. The policy of the Canadian government in the words of the Canadian Minister of Trade and Commerce is to seek out markets overseas which will enable Can ada to "expand and diversify her exports." If the present unbalance of Camulian-Wesi Indian trade continues only a strong feel ing of sentiment for the West Indies car guarantee the continuance of special preferential treatment for West Indian sugar when Cuba can supply sugar more cheaply. The increase in the volume of Canadian exports to Cuba and other Latin American countries makes il one-hundred per cent likely that Canadians will buy sugar and other tropical products from those coun tries in her effort to expand 1 and diversify exports, unless some change in Canada West Indies trade relations lakes place. T.ie West Indies owe much to the Uniteti Kingdom and the present guarantee which that country has given to West Indian sugar producers has everywhere been ac claimed as favourable to "the West IndbM But the representative of the West Indies at next week's talks in London can only approach the subject of Canada-West Indies trade from a long term view. Both the West Indies and Canada share one form of expansion in common—their increasing populations. But whereas the increased Canadian population can be "sweetened" as il were by sugar from Cuba and other countries, the mouths of increased numbers of West Indians can only be tilled to any great extent if West Indian sugar can be sold— and sold profitably. Only two markets foi that sugar exist: "the United Kingdom and Canada. Unfortunately for the West Indies the United Kingdom and Canada though members of the same Commonwealth are rivals in the matter of trade. And in recent years Great Britain has used her position as the controlling power in the West Indies t dislocate Canada-West Indies trade from the status it had reached during the war year* and up to 1947 in favour of Canada. To-day Canada's high rates of exchange which have resulted from her close idcntilication with the dollar economy of the United States has made Canadian prices uncompetitive tn most instances with the British prices. To maintain restrutive controls on imports from Canada at a time when Canadian prices make it impossible for Barbadian importers to buy up all the Canadian articles for which "currency is permitted is like rubbing salt into open wounds. Removal of controls on Canadian trade would remove the cause of complaints of Canadian businessmen and would convince them that their present VALENCE GALE The Challenge of Adversity isati.tn. When ihr >iru[le wii> through ihe threatening storm" The year 1885 won; rtf and Barb.. M ith this in mtnd. Gale turned h.ivp been the most unpromising the Colonial Office, thi* rcirnmunity ti dear ear to those who counselled tune in Mart .-> %  risks %  vantura %  nowed its gratitude by preventhim that the time was Inauspicious as a daily newspaper in Barbados, ing Reeves, the saviour <.f %  nture. He had seen The island had reached the lowes" island's constitution, with a purvnumerous magazines and newsI (xtiiiT io which il was possible l r of on* thousand guin'..-. whil paper* appear and vanish after its depressed condition Gale himself received preseri a brief period of success and all without tumbling into utter rum „f ,, nP hundred RUineas tor h. the signs seem to indicate to lh= ;.nets of despair were i falnt-h ei.ri.-d that no new that the misfortunes, which Gale opposed the federation projournal could hop* to survive the posals of the Colonial Office bedepression. But Gale had an idea . they tvoul i dearly in mind and he feit conUadoa lo tin fldem that the kind of newspaper i n aBUcuni th is! i pest ten years, would came' bring lh* island to COSSf* fcm .^^ Juaster. The fact that t/ status of a Crowe Colony governhn wanted to establish would be *;' "IS? y „^IL** V !; nI rr V TIL ea ?i e "*"'• To hi m ^ i i Cnmn'Coiony able to meet In*, crisis and lake i chancery dining the year (OV(mmrnt waB „ orm of vran ny the island along alto better Janes. TSi iuTuu?JES ZSS^S. *"•< wa completely alien to Uv? Hi. policy. It is true, was not la '"?* ""L. L' l ''l y Z£* &! island's long tradition of free be Ihe same as Praacod.. He did ^%£Xfflu2SJEL ""t"<""" BU. he was not not propose. ilke Hwcod. W mcmpulvmcM ami Sure"' lull > inl %  " ""nplaccncy by vindicate the programme of a new tkEessTammi U^oec^le JossToh *"* victory ovn th> Colonial party or to preach the doctrine. he programme that was to bruit, Ptrta*k BartMcUan, the price of moved by the same spirit of n.pp back to the colonies of the freedom was eternal vigilance, service, by Ihe same burning dcJVest Indies and nothing seemed Some ten yean ..tier the great sire to bring home to his fellowuk.ly to relieve the encircling battle for freedom, events recmed countrymen a full realisation ol doom, dearly it was not the time for iinnrhing so specillative an unlcrtaking as a daily newspaper mn the most optimistic spirits eemed to feel ihul the most they rould do In that gloon^ va to hold "n grimly to wha* *ry had and try to save It from ihe impending cataclysm. Yet the dvrrse circumstances facing the %  te to serve as a stimuant to the spirit and %  ..Icncr Oale In ltwS he had •Iready had many years' aSptiiaiee in journalism and hi svai red with the ambition to K'v •* larbados the sort o( newspaper it mine the whole too* f public life and recall the stand's press to the high function t had in recent years betrayed. c.ale who was Dorn in 18SQ. in orphan at the age f four. hiivinK lost both US iimlhei during the lolera epidemic of 1854 — the read pestilence that destroyed bout one-fiahlh of lh.. .uulaimn Hut he hud the ad•anUige of being brou|(ht up by m junt who impressed upon hint hat the most valuable things ID he world were ch-iractei II,, i II,., ilri, Jed ll.c Bl %  licharrs Pirochial School, Ihm mder the direition of the Re. >r .1 N. purant, and, aftsn msvng school, secured position a^ .,. %  nprenuri on lbs i^rr of tne Agricultural lleportei t n e itnd's leudinw new-paper ;ii UW ; |, ,. t ihen ..nly sixteen and td on the Journalistic ,eer that was to continue until ns death in 1!" The editor or I, Airlcullur.il lUporter ** the •ev l>r!'• Bruea Austin, who <*k a liking U> the lad and gav*. um every opportunity to learn h .-raft >>( journalism thoroughy. Gale made himself protlcutit d shorthand -J n* m !" ? li £: m^de'possible b~ca"use" t he "law of of the House of Assembly were in those days—and soon *nm-^ ;— — t ,_._j t „ —. _^_j w-. h ..„t. !" „.. VALENCE GALE to be taking a sinister course in the urgent requirements of the labouring colonies of the hour. West In.lies. The liberty of tho Galo saw his opp-irtunlly In the individual ami the freedom of the circumstances prevailing at the press were being threatened by time. The standard Of public niorthc law courts. Such abuses W*N aht.v was at a low ebb. Members d Ite ( .. Hid, lo study law. Gale WD louttcd lo take his place iinbition to follow In Rcev usteps and study law was never public spirit, had abandoned theli high function by resorting to the "~„ head when Louis de Souia, a weapons of abuse and vilification. Ills P'PtldnK lawyer In British Gale resolved from the outaet that GuiaiiA, was imprisoned for queshis newspaper Wuuld fight for Honing the decisions of the Judges social Ideal and would champii in that rolonv. The case was to the cause of truth and justice. But tntlon beIn carrying out this policy, he cause de Souwi had contracted would be firm without beinfj tuberculosis, while In l prison cell abusive, turning his back on th> in British Guinna, and subsequentvulgarity of his contemporaries lv died in Barbados. The death His aim was io further the wclof the Guiuncse barrister served 'are not of any single section but as a clarion call to all those who of the community as a whole. To hnd pledged themselves to defend achieve this, he steadily declined civil rights In the West Indies and to attach his newspaper to Gale was soon In the forefront of party. In addition he adhered to '" "",' !, 1, ; I I !5. lir. a !n '""el wid.spi.a.i .ttoouoa I*In carrying m his own in the subject was to _.. _._ „_.*;__ ,.__, —,—._j „„..u u,.„.• ,.r mat v.iUi'' io him both is a legnl reporter and as a leader^ rttcr. Freedom's Cause rl..in the beginning of his I ,i Oala aspired to lie more than a reporter. He had an oxerGa|c Wfta ^^ |n |h0 ror€ ii,t.>U'iing desire t<> wine and nis thg BlruM [ e He wyote on tri ,. Reeves's advice that he should not iiiiginal articles were .n aept,, rcuni?l Unces leading to the death actively take part in politics be%  d by the Agricultural nrporser. uf ((e souza, delivered a severe cause he was convinced that In After nine years or hard work l()(jiik m l|u j ungrs concerned in tlug way he could best maintain Mill the mwspaper. he was uplnc case (lhe superannuated the independence of the'Advocate' ,, iiite.1 leader-writer and d h 1)lli)n Atkinson and Gale lost no time in making hir i iiye,i Hie duties 't 'ii.n post (|HI w lckcd and unprincipled policy and methods clear to thr ..., fwont] y*an IB %  tVOm-\ UV I sheriff"—and accused them bluntpublic and the tatter's support i' .uteiiii'.n. | V lt csnunittlng Judicial murder, helped him to make steady pron*vltatalv he was drawn Into th* jfa\ arttela, described as one ol stress In spite of the difficulties of burly burly of pwtiea. Hit xhv mobt f,.^,^, ev*r published me time and the competition of Of Samuel J.irkn ll.lll-Hll" val* ....to have importbis ,Lt *•> >" ; ' results in the West Indies. .„. „ and had already given twentyr .i.ii.lnp with Conrad H"'v. i,,,,,,.,,,,,, „ ( ,-„„,, Ac i„ i 8S i hid brr" > l t '"" "R" 1 "* hU had already given him a coni. 4 ,.f ...nu-mpi bv statute heallh and strength, ills long exsiderablc reputation, nic aoveniperience as a practising journalist nient forces were on the lookout All Act Of Faith m Barbados, his visit to England I, r ., valuable ally and ottered ,„ m a ,, c ,„, k lhc ,_,, ,. ,, acquaint hirnseU with the most Calo Ihe posl of editor of a new*of hn life. Five years before ho "P-'o-date methods of nowspa[er ,,,|K-r il was proposed to -lail lo l...,| „,.,iri.' application and hi-. %  m I templing oiler for thg .. „... London Time., .iii.l this w ld e knowledge of Barbadian and nderlake Ihe West Indian ..iT.im. all nblned __ bei-n contampiatliK '" "rmghim suc.easi inithe venlure liovernmenl f or some time lo establish h's '"' hlc f? "W " d prophesied Miung lournalist NnpR il Wtl acspurred h mpgnsld with the promise of am task he h Irs tivg post in Ihe Government f or TCm e 1—> ..,.,. %  Bui in Gale's eyes, no own newspaper and u-.ton,llv ", t "la work was Important patriot would undertake lo sup,.. u rimlum lo Ihe high standard not "' v "ause It left an endurport the campaign to federate „ had once attained in Barbados. '"* monument lo his memory but Barbados ami ilWindward Had nol Samuel Jacbnan l-r.-scod yceausiIt n-presented an act of If It no ant ... il learned started log Liberal in the dark !" ''" at a tlrne wlian men aoamad ,. Sal the island would ,t.„. ol thi I Han it % %  % %  ^ l ''' """ Pe""'m and despair. rabrosaaUllve lorm ol and proved the Irulh Ihat llnrbu7" r succeas of hH endeavour was .i.veiiooinl lnsle.nl ol accepting doa would support a journal that '" m?*" "" daily newspaper an the offer, therefore, he pramptlj foiiEht for mull and lusto .• .01 eialihshed Ihmg In Barbados, lent his services to those who lore maintained tho highest prineipU .. ';" s '! '"*' Press of the island from lighting lo defeat Mie Colonial of journalism' And would 11,.1 %  *• low standard to which il had iimceplan. He look on the duties another newspaper, founded In f"_ ."^.l"''. restore journalism to newspaper, t honorary secretary ,.r tho Daanother period of crisis, and i u riKh'tul plate as a profession ,-nce Association, which had been dedicated to right for the cause > which men of the highest intajaj nbat Pope-Heiiiiessy's that lacked assistance and th' e| lectand integnty would be at1 o|M,eilg*Rnd fought lh. that needed resistance, upln| e'ed. ,r ftec inotltutions tsdh with his peal to the best In all Barbadian INext Saturday— rn and a an officer of that organpatriots and help the Island IIERHFRT DALTON) Y.W.C.A. bourse On I rpieal llural Welfare l'riiiripal %%'orked In JaniairM I/>MDON ofllcials and students who accomtropical countries should take inu, The Y.W.CA 1* sponsoring ;i j .ny their husbands to Britain for account local conditions and be tM.pu.il in. |1 we!ipaelal courses and who often worked out on lines which the r*, which will oper at the have a good deal of spare time on village inhabitants can underpriccs are too hieh for West Indian imVW CA Cnl p IO „' h i-irminBhiim tbair hinds. aNJachan and social stand." pan the YW.CA. ,,.„-,,., I January 13. 1953. It will be workers going to Colonial posts "In many places, for example, ) pen Id tvinm.'l .1 HI linti-tn vim are Inttreited in voluntarv art4Acta] hiyil is unknown, so omen v.!i.. ire interested In niral srork of n pioneer nature would >v*nlruj actmttag are Impossible. immunity development and in „| M > he llkelv to llnd tke course Sonw dstneta work a four or flv* io promotion if informal aduit of corudd*rai* valua, day week; riifierent tribes have i duration. || will concentrate chieflv on different vernaculars, and women Blpal of the course will lxihe practice of community vducahave so much work to do that they \l...jorli Stew-rl. who worknon as adapted for tropical needs cannot go to centres at a dlsUnce. ..I as Gencri.l Seerel.iry U-r the m under-developed rural areas and Assisting Miss Stewart will be t w c A in J in i ; %  >! ten years, will include classes on the use of Miss Edna Howe, a domestic her the campaign-protect method, science teacher who has taken .mil literature, sp--ti.il course in tropical nutrition of leaden for best way the West Indies can help the sterling area is for them to have assured markets for West Indian produce in Canada and the United Kingdom, then the West Indies will have been well served. There is no reason to that their interests will not be well reprejsonted and Barbados will jum the other West Indian territories in wishing them success in their vital talks which are to start next Tuesday. NOBODY'S DIARY Monday — The tree that supports the cannon ball climber in Trafalgar Square has dropped its leaves. It probably does this every year about this time but this year the dropped leaves are very symbolic No l*aves: no water in the fountain. Just steam and heat and talk of irrigation Fortunately the leaves are out again. Tuesday — It may be the heat or it may !-• a sign of the livestock shortage but I haven't seen any sheep In Bridgetown for some time. And even stray dogs are in short supply. I suppose people do mind what they eat. Wednesday — Lord Tweedcmuir has done the planters a good turn. In the Sunday Times last week he wrote as follows: "It is a sad and curious fact deserving careful analysis, that there exists in certain quarters in Britain a strong prejudice against the planter and his kind." Lord Tweedsmuir's observation is borne out by a letter recently received in Barbados from England. There propaganda against this island is so effective that intending holiday makers write t say they would never dream of coming to an island run by a lot of despotic planters. (Laugh boy!) I remember once lunching with a V.I.P. in London and being called a "tyrant from Barbados", although I have never owned any property here or anywhere else. Then there was the Adviser to the Secretary of State for the Colonies who challenged me to a duel in the grounds of the Marine merely because I go to the best tailor for my one suit and he mistook me for a planter (many of whom don't* How are we to explain away this antipathy against the planter, this libellous travesty as Lord Tweedsmuir puts which "is the view of many an Inmost and ignorant Briton at home about the settlers of Kenya and the Rhodesias and all planters everywhere by definition?" I wonder if envy has got anything to do with it. Leonard Barnes is nearer the truth than anyone I think when he says tha 1 in the Colonies middle class families can live upper class lives: and if there is a class of people more interested in the affairs of the man next door (even if he':> migrated and becomes a planter) then the average English lower middle-clan.I have never set foot on 4 continents. Thursday — Bridgetown wit: Can you lie oi a man if he's standing up? Friday — Did I tell you about the other adviser to the Secretary of State for the Colonies (not the duellist but the one I met in the sea). He of course knew what the trouble was in Barbados—no social conscience —and being a good secularist (like so many other welfarists alas) he hadn't got much use for the churches. I have (but unfortunately for the welfarists I am not very impressed by their activities or methods). So we're quits. But getting back to the swimming adviser. When I suggested that people who got up in the early hours of the morning to go to church might have a lot of qualities which would make them useful citizens he replied that they probably got up early to wear their new dresses. I didn't challenge him to a duel but I cuffed the table so hard that my hostess came in and asked me to let him off lightly. Ugh! "THE GOLDEN VOICE NURSERY RECORD BOOK" tells the story with Songs and Music on a gramophone record to help you read it in the Book. &f ADVOCATE STATIONERY Saturday — Soon very soon the big guns of Virginia will be coming to this tight little island. They will all want to knowwhere Washington slept: where he had his hair cut and of course see the chair he sat in at Government House. Hundreds of them (at least f>00 are coming) will want to see ihe tree he planted at Farley Hill: the place where he scratch ed his initials in the Cave at St. Lucy the sun dial from which he read the time of day along Hackleton's cliff: the natural springs at Martin's Bay named after his biother. On the road to Sam Lords is a charming village blacksmith shop which must have been the scene of the meeting bo tween Sam Lord and George Washing ton. At the Crane you can still see the pier on which Wasbingtoa_g4siod to eat his first sea-egg. And somewhere down in St. Andrew George Washington pushed his walking stick into the ground looked at it ant.) said "Boy that looks like oil". If you don't believe a word of all this neither do I believe that the house in Bay Street with the sign was the one that housed our George. But the more you tell Virginians about George Washington and his visit to Barbados the more you'll thrill them Honest. And restaurants don't forget to serve George Washington steak on January 15, 1953. Make a note of it because the Virginians are coming that day. Ikratproof Ovrn Hare with Covers la three slsea Sandwich plates Iru'l Dishes Custard Bowla C*aeters Lemonade dpa GUises (both Decorated or Flaln) Hcrew Cap Glass Jars i| or I gal ) Priiidalrr Botliea. CS. PITCHER & CO. PK.4472 They'll be .-uim back In a conple of weeks — have you remembered .... SHOES ? SCHOOL SHOES in in..<.. and Brov.'!., laced and strapped, for all aces. AUraeUvelr Pried from iUa Da Costa & Co., Ltd. WELCOME YOUR FRIENDS erf\ v<3 TO r.OiKTAiLS WE OFFER For Cocktails Onions iCoUured) Whilr Cheese 0**sac '.-lb parkaces Peanut Butter Peanut* Almond. Olives Cam Biscuit* I abater lobster Paste Shrimp-. Oysters AiirhifViet Tooth Picks J. at R. Sandwich Bread PrsOW / I. Deliver For Party Specials Spey Royal Whiskey AnlomaJada Skerry Rye Whiskey • ...r,i..h Gin Burnett* Gin Canada Dry Quinine Tonic Enjoy Our Blended "GOLD BRAID" Best Rum — bar none (3 years old) S1.44 per Bottle FIM VEGETABLES fTsVT THESE WsDll FROM ... G o u n A sit n *s



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SATURDAY, SK.'TFMBF.R t. 1M1 ll\RBAIX>8 ADVOCATE TACE THREP. B.H. Should Be Commonwealth Show Place Attack Comes From Moscow LONDON British llunduiris should be %  > %  of the Commonwealth. in. nbjecl IOSM>II tn ibe neighbouring American repu. i *i*M, it is the least prosperous oj the Central American countrMl the impression of Mr. T S. Steele, a correspondent of The Lcaitton "D-ily Telegraph.'' who visited the Colony in IMS and again this year to make a survey of conditions there. Until 1046, he writes. British Honduras was a fork"' ony This is no longer so. Since Britain hag apart SMM LUMNUWO in tin' ColttU and Use BrftWi ii" durai Government haa piuduccd -nuttier development .-Inch another £1.500.000 ibeing .spent. There Is no doubt that the people are better dressed, there • re more cars on the roads and mar* money is spent In the shops". Mr Steele. comparing 1952 i th hi1948 visit "But. so far. li.at is all." Todny. he continue*, there are '-ver 230 miles of all-weather loads ir the Colony and another 100 mile* <.f fcedci-nxii ior motor tiufnc. Bui the main road linking Belizi unn Stann Creek has yel to be i.mplete .ne of the moat expensive i.,sds in the worM. he say*. "All thi^ has been made possible." coin11uies Mr. Steele. bv ttrant.-' nom Britain's coiom.>' Development and Welfare Tunu Of the lirst iiran* Of £1.290.000. T4 per cent, was devoted to internal (ommunlcatton?, as the first and moat fundamental need o' the Colony Of the balance. 1? per cent, wa* spent on Jutrl%  ulture, fisheries and forestry, and 13 per cent, on social service*. The next stage of the Colony's development plan calls for the spending of another £ 1.000.000 of C.D.W. money and a further £•00,000 raised by a local Government, loan. "The planning haa been good and the progress made during the last few years is obvious. All of it has of necessity been limited by the money which Britain ha* made available." But Belize is still a city of wooden houses without proper water supply and without sanitation. It is these conditions, .vntes Mr. Stceic. that have made the country ripe, in the opinion i f Moscow, for Communist propn.'ivi. and this is already following the pattern so often seen in DM i i nts Of the world Propaganda, telling 4he people 'i Honduras to "revolt and tin m off the yoke of the British oppressor" is pouring over the radio fiorr. the Communist.<•! Guatemalan Govcrn%  t>nt station. An anti-Government part* has been organised in the Colony and has received fundu from Guatemala, wh'ch Is receiving funds dlrtctlv and ind.ic.tl. I T.-isec^. Now (he Government is to open two new radio stations In the Colony, to be started by B.B.C. officials btil total expenditure over the next two years will be I mited to £35.000. Including stuoin .Hiii .ill broadcasting .ipparatus. Films and posters will also !* %  produced for visual teaching. "By this means." Mr. Steel concludes, "it is Intended to spread among the people of British Honduras the British way <•' life and to let them and the Guatemalans heir newKilletln* compiled from adequate source-. "All ihi pi i excellent within their financial limits. They are immensely important not only to prevent the spread of Communism into British Honduras but to show the people they arc not i irgotten by Britain. "Much has been done by the j>oat-war Colonial Service; n new ml better tvpe of man is entering it. Hut In British Honduras lhare • a problem which thev %  re rrrlni t DJMJ D I' Unam .> DMCVMU a Co.. 1M <>t1l C Smith. S* Ion., ftoi iiniun Uuuinm. unctrr L. Olliti* a> •orwlgnnt l th* Vhooxi hasseieaea -n Ambniaeh Mac. 41 tona, frtsn l.iliHNiu* md-r J Palrx.* a. Mail" •>-nakgBMi o* Vhxwfr Ownai. A %  asauei Seawtll M i nm inaruii •••u-k.t ia Ma.-.* Dr>in,m*ll l Palnaa Nia Man. N*i4 r>*irN->.a. MM '• %  ia SUuack. latuM Mairnch Robrrl Lnli, Maria SVmatrin ilXIMII* Tepn p,ilt TVpn. natij Whjta. Jacsjuclina M hyta NaiH. leVah U3 For Attempting To Stowaway His Worship Mi E A. McLe* Police Magistrate of Dtftri. t 'A*' yesterday ordered Eai 11 Brathwaite fSOj a Ullor of Je>samy Lane. St. Michael, an.i 24-vear-old LabOONI K*tUMtb Grannum of Eagle Hal). St. Muhail each to pay a One of £3 W one month or one months imprlannmeut with hard labour for attempting %  stowaway %  > the Schooner l.u.illr M. Smith on September 5. Both defendants were foun> schooner after receiving Information and found (he defendant Brathwaite in a hntrh while Kenneth Gmnnum snsi hiding under the ciew quaitc Marshall told h I m that he was trying to get back to British Gulnna to work with his father. Sgt. A'leync attached to Central Station prosecuted in Hit case on beh-lf of thispla\ and Exhibiti'm al FurnborouEh. Hampshire, which opened on Monday. Elnvrn arc completely new tvpes which have not been seen in public before. An impressive visitor which flew pasl on the opening day was the 140-ton "Princess" (lying boat, which had only made its maiden flight a few weeks earlier iv can carry 120 passengers or 200 full-equipped soldiers over verv long ranges. The Gloster GA a "Javelin" delta-winged lighter, a twinengined two-seater *'fi>lng triangle", made an appearance but dial not show off Its full paces. The public t/ai not allowed to inspect it rloscly on account of the many secret features of Its design The "Javelin" carries elaborate radar In the Assistant Court of equipment to enable the crew to Appeal yesterday Their Honours spot and intercept fast-moving Mr H. A. Vaughan and Mr. A. J. .iircraft at great heights, at which H. Hanschell dlsraliead without i: almost Iroposalbsa for the prejudice the case in which Gladl.uman eye to make out a forstone Springer charged Rupert nation of even Tour plane* during Spencer of Tudor Street, 8t ie fraction of second that they Michael, with wounding him with '' V' lllr ii hammer on October 7. Tn "Jywjn U one ..( Britain In the Lower Court His Worship %  'g> gft rtt; .n; raft Another Mr. K. A McLeod, Police MaglsU the "Canberra bomber which trate of District "A". Aned — Spencer Charged With Wounding Case Dismissed Spencer 25/and 5/costs to be paid in 14 days or 14 days' Imprisonment foi -vmmding Springi-r and Spencer appealed against Ihc decision. In the other case In which Spencer rhnrgej Springer with inAlcting bodily harm on him, Their Honours Aned Springer 20/for the offence and thus conArmed the decision of His Worship Mr E A MeLcod %  ecently put up a new rC0td fur the Atlantic crossing "there and back • and ii new training version of which is on view nt Canberra Other new aircraft at the Display were the newest British fuster-lhan-soun<> llghto. (be I'll 110, and the world's Arst deltawing bomber, 'the four-cnglned Avro 698. Among aircraft In the stat nark is u delta-wing model powered by a rocket motor, product of %  .. .Fahey Coinpany. This at'ci is recentlv completed a series of nt Bup.rl S;or to didtor from [fflji '"" w """'. *"•MAIL NOTICES Ma.:, (or Domlmca Antlffua. MonU*f •at. NVv,. S L Kllti l.-. Ul M.V Monaka •ill be f ],,1 at (ha Oacrral pMt Oflk* Paical Mall ai II noon Haalilerad Mall B' I ; m.. Oijlnan Mail ai ISA p m. on th.airSaptasnbsr. IV51 MiiH tni St. Liirta, Dominica bj the t'nnrd Pllaeim S will a. rk-ad <•! Kt omc* a. umlar: %  i. ..., ind Raaitlaii lai. Stall %  pl^mhar. 1S5J ai STANDPIPES AT DEIGHTON ROAD Sinn (I pipes nre now bcim: erected at Deighton Road. Pipelines v.'ere laid some time dunn, March. As a result, many people %  1'i/i'i the opportunity to lnstal their own lines, but work has cnlv recently liegun on the public standplpcs. II has been a long time thai this district has been without water, and doubtlessly resident i of this area will welcome thlmove on the part of the Waterworks Department. RADIO STOLEN Colin Carrington of Cheapside. St. Michael, reported to the Police that his radio which he had In his dwelling house tit Cheapside. was stolen from there sometime between July anil August this year He valued the radio at $100 The Police are making investigations. the rain. While there Spencei told him to leave the ..hop and he explained to Spencer that the rain was falling and he did not want to be out in the rain. He refused to leave the shop and Spencer took a hammer and hit him with It on his he;id. Spencer told the Court that he had not struck Springer with a hammer, but had only asked him to move from the entrance of the shop so that customers could enter and that he had refused to do so Changes Ijovver Coat Of U.C.W.I. 'I i Janmi-'ji # Frees Pag* 1 faculties and academic, admini trative clerical and technical ste't and price levels have general* increased sharply since then. \ dedMon was taken by the meetm-to rc-omjnend to the govrnmen' that the University's cstlm:it's the second period 1053 to IB38 1 %  accepted as a basis of quinqucnm.J giants by which the college w : be financed and that proposals (< trixhing chemical technology ateconomics be approved with the* estimates. The conference also consider; I the question of recurrent cxnenv for he t'-ichtng ho-pita I an 1 ngre.-') to rewinmend the adopt', of revised basis for %  llocatln coats BegrM was expressid Uiat y. pri PrllU law Sir Thonj.. i II iborfb ieiin|ulsh ii %  fllc. t MrKinnaa. A McK L". C Coilrt %  I*III i Pie. I o,i 0 i is turn c limniu^ Wtah, K IJroriah I ML M Ox i .,n •grABriiBks t-i TrlaMa* %  •aa< lib M Hammand T Bra.1% R Hr*cm l_ Ma.aola>. S Allan**. • Allamby. r. \ V.llanuva, A. Oait J luMlt H Khan. %  lanlaa. V Inn... U Maiouk Lovwii. H Oooaline a O-^-tnis J Claika. B Waod, S Aahby. %  • J*.Q,. a Jaeoua-. r Jacqua. M K I IT B.O. Saaiaaakat Mfc S WatMi. E RfM. %  Itch, C. (.... .-. C Otbaon. E Am, 1 Mula. ti %  iniarMsn. a aoach. M Gudganl I lln P WIcklwTii M Wiakham. •' '•lit. Sukha u li ln h M Oirim il &' %  *• P Saabta Burton (wains Honours a> Pram Page I also holds a London Ui (leneral External it \ English History and latin .1840} Since leaving schnol, lie %  erved on the Staff ..f RarruKko Cttlkfi -here hi played a major |wit In ion of the Scho i-. rtJtirtag) from that school in %  up an appotinrncfTt a> Bishop's Hlglt School, Tobago. LABOURER REMANDED Everton Harding, a labourer, of Dayrells Road. Christ Church. was yesterday remanded unM September 8 b\ His Worship Mi. L. A. McLeod. Police Magistrate of District "A' on a charge of obtaining money from Eugene Alleyne oy false pretences The charge stated that the offence was committed on August 28 Sgt. Alleyne is prosecuting for the Police from Informatinn received. The Duke of Edinburgh nong the visitors to the Show liiesdnv. September 2. In all some 24.000 guests of the Society expected to attend on September 2, 3. and 4. including at least 8,000 from 70 countries abroad, The Display will be open to the public on September 5. Ii, and T, Represen tatives At L.aw.i. gj) From Page 1 • %  > the vwiotu colonies shortly. The Conference which lusted for four days ended on Thur duy night, and on the first day. delegate^ took the ipportunity to inspect the laboratories, hospitali, and Arts buildings. They also met the various Professors aiaj discussed matters with them During hut stay In Jamaica. Mr VTaleatl took the opportunity to Investigate on behalf of th IC.r.T.U the -liimalca Tral< Unions which are -ceklng afllliatlon to the I C.F.T.U 80VRIL the very goodness of beef 1 '""'"* ",linasn(s*ua*. Igafkfgl I Vu can JW ihc L'nrti that UHSSH B| (• % % %  ui . (| ctlMM f hr-i .Wrr • ."1 ximulatci the appai.tr nj the '..g. gsa %  i *p reatj snd well la all MTowty -i' h#J and % %  a n-unihii Mvolpv'i i.-u ill.ianvrntiaic.1 (mhlnr BOVRIL PUTS BEEF INTO YOU SOLE AGENTS INTERNATIONAL TRADING CORPORATION LIMITED Telephone 5009 5009 — BKWARE OT SUBSTITUTES — i 111 i'.l IS ONLY ONE AMPLEX AMPLEX is the world's ONLY Gordon-Young 1 \ Activated Chlorophyll Deodorant Tablet There Is. therefore. NOTHING that can take the place of this particular product. Ask for AMPLEX—and SEE THAT YOU GET IT! J L -INTON. High Street E. C. CULL, Olvmpia Pharmacy. KMPiRE PHARMACY, Tudor Street A r JONES. High Street. r C WAI.KES, Tudor Street If L III'TSON, Tudor Street i'OCKS DRUG STORE. Tudor Street. HINDS & CO.. Roebuck Street BRUCE WEATHERHEAD. Y STOCKED BY T A. CLARKE. COTK.I -.idan Pharmacy. K V WORM. Roebuck Street KTOl'TE'S UHVfi STORE, Roebuck Strssrt C. C. BROWNt, Roefai.rk Street. A A BROWHX Eigli Hall. II. E PILGRIM. I 'i r.greseive Pharmacy Nelson S'reet. -.TANDARD PHARMACY. Tweedslde Rd. F S. 01.1 ON. Swan Street —and something v-r^ comforting The new Cow Gate Babry Powder u a delicate and delightful preparation —ideal for Baby'i tender ikln. Ms cooling, toothing Influence Ii jutt what Baby need* after the bath or during the heat of the day. It bringi contentment, freedom from Irritation—and encourages sound refreshing sleep. Lightly perfumed slightly borated. pure and refined COWtCATE %^% FOR COMFOR^AND, CONTENTMENT J. B Lf SI II A CO.. LTD. — \e "I low am I In tell iv Inch is < ifood antiseptic? ft "Frankly, OflWSI fOU inA l-.titcriol.^ist, \mi t.in't tell Bui c dM antiseptic you see your doctor use, or which he recommends, -iii*l you won't lc f.ir wronir." DETTOl ANTISEPTIC i used hv slmosi ceery Joctor in Cr. I Hntsin. In over no" of hoiprtali ami matcrnir* home* l>en.1 i m conMont daily use. ,^^^^_^ .,'-" i.'(.*m* • * *•**•*>* iM A sprinkle of Vim on J damp cloth — a quick rub — and fctcasy, dirty things IMM and spnrklc again. Vim is wt casj' to use, so quick ami smooth — it keep* turnces polhbed and bright. Use Vim for pots and pans, pjiniuoik. tiles — ti//your cleaning VIM cleans everything smoothly and speedily W' .BBSYoiuarsalouk la*rlt lonissi % %  *? dual, sarma—ajl wuhad away' on Mint OptiriIII UM it. too'. PR0TEQ YOUR EYES u,aA Optrex m %  EYE LOTION l^aalTl '''ssssP^ The rim of the eye st-1 inner ^^' lirii.'ni*hjultlbeh*alinvneah 9^J eolou/. If usrr • red of im,/ A uadotitawbits*jWoo*Uhot. f **-'/ your tr*a nesd trMimenl IBIt in oavh paxket ? wieniiftuslr* designol etc hath



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SATtKUAV lFTlIHkU ,. IM> BASBADOS ADVOCATE PACK HVI Case For Prosecution Closed In Conspiracy Case Judge W ill Sum Up Today 5S5'"* %  "•• *wHWKIVI.U i o rin\<. THE CASE 1 l*re wri' dilcrepanclas in MM which Rudolph Blackman. McFi*ld tvidmct. Thev would rrmtmtxr Belgravc and Michael Gaskin are charged with conspirin i" c "*" "' a ""' ""' %  between February 29 and March 1 thil vt„ lo break and £* "*£?„ '"I ''i,''"^"* enter the dwelling house of Elon Evelyn at Golf Club Br.tl.wMI., Road. Christ Church, was, continued at the Court of Grand Reformed Character Sessions yesterday before Mr. Justice J W B Chenery Mr R..oai not lo inw Uwfcu tcUOB was 2? ^Lii lr,rorm Evelyn and fr.>m Evelyn. Brathwaite had on their behalf. the Police. He did that. planned with them. Mr. Bra nek* r had told U>"m r.c IT i a Mr w i"ams said that there that the men had taken an ord'.iiro r.Mmiaftl di.'pute about the law in ary walk tn the direction of Cross-examined by Mr. Drancthe case and it was merely a Evelyns house that night, bul h.kcr he said be could no< seffftettoucstion of facts that mattered, was suggesting to them that If they D*r nav-ng been convicted, or a...__—. f-i. um •>.. -—, % .=*• —.n. .. tired for ate-lmg. gambling. i the previous design, thi Hy had n< %  -ronj act. The Pr* vecernoer ecutlon, he wai submitting, had From the tvid.nce there occasion, f;.,-^ ,„ ettabllsh that. mor. thin they n.eded to convict DIPHTHERIA RUMOUR FALSE Then i* BO truth In the turnout thnt there has baen bieak oi uiphi Matthias daflbtal or %  n>when % %  Island for that mutter The Adrocatr i he. k. I VMIII ihe IVpartment of Medical Serv H I and was informed that than ba.s bei' %  IDAUHU ha in it i ft d for the past three months Crops Sitjforing From The Heat I I'larrtfis *h< \tster>!av complained pell "1 had *0 parts I iricl thu wee?k bu' %  n Ihw d.i.t" the City caaa. ( the hot Annii < i plantar said Ik r. my diaenncs nd other crops are '.hat oii7 etuffeniitf Thay ar all hopnt planter thai lhr Is"and wtll tawn fe' MADAME iriLL (.-entrel. bands a drme to poor woman at St. Martin's Boy*' School where clothuig and food-dnS from the Amen can Aid Society were distributed yesterday Fifty people t. .rived clothing and fn^dr-tulT In the picture (left to right) are: Mrs. 0. O. Alleyno. Mrs C Sutart. Madame Iftll, Mr 0 O. Alley lie and Mr. 0 Weekc* Sea Egg Divers A numtir of boys tn 111 sea eggs not far away .'rom Bridgetown The cenlic Off aetrvtteH is at the Heef Beaeh. I'niiiabellr. Ye*iera.i> aftafnoon DW in > i niig bags, cuuk .... . ... cr taken fi>>in lHHwll uiReef and Pelican Island. Thce divers, unlike tho*e at Silver in eat their catches than to sel: lav n. woundine" tre^Mslsini, mS"^^ 1hr P*ution hud to establish bihind Evelyn. Uklng UM ouiK..,.fc^tresnaisMi., v.c bill He .... ., ,,.,.,„..„. ,,, ,,,, WI011tf il u ..•.,:. tbfl DxevtoUI li LfB U rS?.5?^*llmt V B T^ fl ,ed lhl th defendant, had actually had not been walking behind h £S£i .f ttfilrT^^ *". %  "arid the wrong act. The S C-OiUj 0T Just for a ..roll. matter of a duck I44. .-and on anoth "'"w^eThf 33f rnwt'ttS* Sen^ h d "*" C1 > de Bralh>c men lor consp.: daJ2 in SmSL^LS'^SS:: wane and he would assure them When hearing of th Poor Receive Clolhing, Food At St. Martin's School cy. allege.! offenci. he had called ,,onesl rogue. He was submitting -^rn up. nside Cbskin and talke i with htm, lha he wa an accomplice that Central Milk Depot Being Qoneidered sUll ; M.V. Moiiek.. The M.V %  Moneka" whiel ; ,,iied into port yestat lay, i rough 102 tags of copra. IB casks o frx'-h fruit and nth.-i G .i ,t> Its kw) (nit' off call w> Dcanlo oa and it is eon the Schooner Owners* Aasocu rirTY PCX)R and destitute people were Riven clothUon. inti and foodstufl at St. Mariin's Boys' School. yeslerd;iv afternoon The clothing and foodstuff came "from the Amentum Aid Society whose Founder. Mr. Hilbert Wilkinson a/a %  i i The cttatrlbuUon was made by which were distributed all over Madame Iftll while Father A. J. 'lu island .They also sent clothing i Jamaica last September. ."ii''i Contributing Memben He said that the organisation Dennington. Roctor. pcum C>t an act of that the scheme would be impraccharity but an act of kindness and Milk produce.ing word from Government in his home. had shout 1.500 contributing connection with the alternative. ..Introduelng Mr Wilkinson and members. Some might fall to contribute one year but would coring year. Thev the laundries Loads Sugar Yesterday the ttawjnahlp "Ca ni>dian Cruiser" was loading auga and molasses for Montreal am this linti-ii Northwrn Islands, Th harbour was very' busy yester day. Agenla fi>r this \ • Gardner Austin & Co.. Ltd. He went into the backv Sited. Knlering T.nte About 11 O'CIOCK Ibroa tered through the front gate two Corroboration Heable under the remained about the gate, and one *" | VCs Act. came further In. The one who u they formed Ihe view that _^__ entered went and sho..k a window .Brathwaite was lucky that he was.. ,, fwrt They seemed to have got scared Mot ln lhf dock wlIh the othe, lirid&inS 1 lie G' would definitely have to taunching of the 110-foot span KI !elVioV .h fh! look for TOnic k,nd ol corrobora8lor i br i*ge to carry the iO-in.i. On the next d. v he saw Gaskln CV B? W £4SSL. iiH .hat .he W new B,llc Kwlr,c Purn ,i" ; s ' and ^o-.k a staternenl from h.m. r "^ !'£l' "?£. l J£. X £Z tlon with the Grand View and In this statotMOt Gaskln said that !" ; a" L vM r^i^ !. i U Brittons Hill Reservoirs is conhe had been wUh BelffrSVfl earlier defe.id-nnts eomip.red to break mu in the hlgM before h arrestfflS^.'SLSS^ BJBU& The bridge, parts of which are 1951 Co-operafajth, He said that Madame Iflll wns ^^^— active In Barbados f"i years before he came In tin tslnnd She had ilnved a greal nart In the social '• "i k of Barbados and he was glad that she ne in the m ended ic. Headman ei Boys' School, vi'i nf thanks. Mr Alleync said that he was elated wfim h heard Mr. Wilkinson lp.aal" of the good behaviour of the people Of St. Mmtins ll<> asked Mr. Wilkinson to retnber the poor people of St. These dreses ll homeward from Trinidad fuHomeward Bound The steamship "Goldto" whk BrrfVwd in p"H "ii Tliur:;day eftei noon, left the ame afternoon o i. It arrived hn th 36 paaaenger roe Harbedoai and HO utbransl 1\ embarked heir On their WH to the United K.ngdom. Agen f..r the f'.uinti in M< i V. kin-oii A Haynes. rrosH St. Thorna* told the Advegood Hlsmll, they could evidence about a plan. Mr. Brancker said that there wns no evidence that the three daSfendantS conspired to break iind enter ihe house. If Ihey at tarhed any weight to Bruthwalle's t hough* a>e haaVleft t* go home. ^'^"SSr.. ^I^.J?^_Siii. lh lS faunched as a compile "unit] and iiee'Mr"' wVlk.VaV7n !" perioii and ft.'Martin's Boy*' School, I'C Llotul F..,nkly.i said that *r.ere was 1M >rhaiM a scintilla of JJJJJJJ? ,n,r, J r bwbU SOUShe -as sure thnt after Mr WHMrs. Alleyne, Mr, O. Weekes. M i Marrh 2. he charged Blackman Mnce \ w "* r ">:.. Mr i JL !" „ Mru"ted for a trolley which wi.l kin. icir COndlUon be C Stuart and Mr. Claude Rmen tho bridse. would do everything in his powei ind When he left h in. Donated By f'hristiaus rather Dennington -..id that the clothes were donated by Christian people thr" arlcan Aid Society of which Mr. Wilkinson was Preside! I. Madame mil ;. ih .' %  h. Another "Smith" When the Khooner "Cyril c Smith" -ailed into port yestei dia) morn IIK. it limc the thi of the 'Smith' schooners to be n Martins dtsttt^TwhanlsfrwBawllwil £""!*• JV^^S* ". thr !" ,, '" Ul the U.S.A. 'Lucille M. Smith." and the l i SI id lhat It was the first .-s W. Smith*' All three of Ihe. trihutlon for the St. Mnrre eonsignnl to the School* tin"! area, but judging from Mr ommr AawasUuatv, Wilkinson's words, he knew it would be the forerunner of ev distributioDs, 2 MORE KEELS FITTED Mi AUeyne thanked Madame The keels for two more ho. • II fur Ihe tremendous effort she have liecn lal<| at the ground putting Into the social welfare the Fisheries tnilce lhl, 111 be very alnd the I (a were able to ol the island. Among those present were: Father A J Dennington, Rector. Mr. C. O. AUfrne. Headmaster nd Already IB boats are prnctieall completed. A quant tv Of Iran for the keel I-, now comin In. This ISOn \vd be cast In concrete :x rs&sz&stfsi K >n j^sr air *.-<* -<• %  --• • **. menl he said that > had teen proved, and he was submitting along with Qa km and r.-.grave that it .lad not been it ( WOuld the night beforw Belarave was • ,J l>0 Proved thnt it was %  nested, but when Belgrave left conspiracy to break and enter them, he un.lerstood thrl he was The only evidence of consplrgolng home my was from Brathwaite. llralhCpl. Harold Hivan of Central waite said that after they left K.^V""'! ."TJ." !" ^* bv "Arthur klnson's gei Police Station. „ a on Man*, and went in the direction of "jjael. and dm !" by^ Arthur ^ Evelyns house that night, they ^^ damawd when „ cauEht p |r -' %  ;Ist when he returned '" lha USA. Mr. J. (' Mottlaw. M.C.P. Junior Mcml r for ft rnlllp, • aid that it eras with a caseo -ense of The motor lorrv O-200 owned SDoredatlon that he weleoi by DaCta S S liar.. SI. WHkl Lorry Catches Fire LETTER'S OF ADMINISTRATION H l l...ul.Jiip Ihe Clili-f Judfa. %  acla woulil cong, A n. „ i ,„;,„„„,.. KI. in Hi.linnKlm; llic |, %  ,„„, ,,, UMliiiitry .vclorduy 1 aboul 9.45 pn... he hid in a Evelyn', houw thai night. Ihcy n dnmB11 rt ^ hen „ cnuS ,t pic cl.ir lo thclrCreator „„!„, ,hc pcim clump of bo.. %  •> near Bvalral came back after a few minute. • lllMi f u Ko d s Jost p h, He It'll honoured meellnB Mr ,. 1(lK ,. Slll „ .,,„. „„,. ,,, „„. .hop He heard a man whom he and had a fuilhcr consultation. "I"; Y .,„ „_ SeDlember 3. Will""'"" •'" "* %  %  Prollle chrl.t Church, about 7.4S p.m. on In ihe future Mr. Wllkln Laler whenEvelwi wcol home. !'' a,hwa 1 '' he went behind Evclvn's hack wall E now man, ,._......— ...._ ni tnv ,„ MC v UIV u>t.i. •••_, u ^., .. ,. m/t ... BKSSSSSSS trfcSr sriS 5 S? -= %  -"Ba a i*swnaw-r i*^ grave. Belgrave had nfTor.Hl to pr..flignte and a ncor do well Michael. The ear Is Insured. They would rcmemboi .Mil Df-Sj >II a man who forSeritc'mbeV" 4 * D ' to 0ma 0M Xh ( %  "" ,i^ac > h,d Curt Of the Bahamxi Islands. he American Add Society and h. I in Bratowlitc^and Ga-kln went not becn P rovcd I-or-isihip admitted to proIt erne to be rounded. He sa dmS^aari le-Ivina BlackMn •" nothlnit Grange for Ihe ^,0 ho wills of Rufus K Field Jha the U.S.A. was a most cha, *nTh^*Ftoei&c? d.fendants to remain near Eve|. V ' of St. Michael. Berlnda A. PilRrim table place but no One could be granted by Hjaljordshm. Eveh-n him*U had told of Christ Church. Oeorg.I>. crooked in charily. The CTOOked Mr. L A. Williams, instructed nothing unusual So Clarke, also of Christ Church and would be jailed_ by Mr. D, I-*e Soneant, SollcitrMr. W W. Recce. Q.C.. Instructe.1 by Messm Yearwood At B-yce. *ili of George frank Dugthat 5he had the Interest of the .Solicitors, represented the petitioner The petition of electta v. Hnaoa' Of Thornbury Hill, for letters of administration to the estate of her I< -i >>h Skeene He lived in "Rockley and for sho P his part 't would have been stupid them thal^WS tn" live there nnd try to steal they could not say that they t Alexandiw Heckles' of St. J"hn. IJOK too will Say ihi&a JJJUIA ahs .. OJP a** 1 46" SHI I R Ui 1 K.HI" al.J1.37 yd. In IM Blue. Lime. Navy, Coral. Lemoa. Orchil Aqua. Peach. Row and Grille -,,. SHAhOW STRIPE NYLON M 52.35 yd. in Pii.k. SV>. lurquoisc. Peach anil WAT 36" PI \ |v I Ml LTA from SI 15 lo 51.95 yd. I., i B0feoui range ol shade %  ,. \R1 SM K PIQUE a t 52 70 yd. In Dinty Pink. Silver, Blush Pink Ice Bhie. Cliampejne. Eytett, Lemon, Gold, Aqua. Orchid .1-1,1 White HARRISONS BROAD STREET During the sent many flood the lodet) irreU of ctothlni pen MIMUM SALTS far (at le and Oilier LI V emtork %  Mm.hi Mlnrral NJIU for Castle eontaiii balanced QuanUtaai %  UM asaantlal < lements calcium, plumphorus. copper, cobalt, iron, iodine, and manganese — together with an adequate proporlion of common salt. The only practical way of insuring that the attic ai> receiving adequate minerals. la by feeding them directly with the ration. Ihni U..IIfor I'sr Covt. In milk Add 3 lb of Mmdif Mlnii.,i Baits to each ewt ol eonceiitrates fed for milk production. Alternative^, give individual COWS 3 OS. per day for those giving up to 3 gallons, plus I 'i oi. for each gallon over thicv. Pkga. ml 2 lbs. las xs>. u: l i I Ul MIIIKIII \h IJmlled Also In Hi.:112 lbs. HOLLANDIA In Whllr Bwk, Black Patent. It. .I & Clrcy Imilalion Krplili and Mlllli ( ..lour Kaflia A WIDE VARIETY TO CHOCSE FROM AT ATTRACTIVE PRICES CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD IB, 11, 12, 13 Broad St. Only Scotland, traditional home of tine tobaccoa, could produce Four Square. Only in Four Square tobaccos will you nnd selected leaf, blended with skill handed down by successive generation! for over 140 years. FOUR. SQUARK TOBACCOS i FINf ILFNOS TO CHOOSi "OH MAOI Br DOBIf OF PAIttET •M4 Afmti: MESSRS A S BRV11I \ • SON'S n \RnADOS) LTD. P.O. RO\ 4CI. RRInr.l. IINKIIAIXIS "Hot flashes" of change of life stopped or strikingly relieved In 63-10%'of Ihe cases in doctors' le.til • Those suffocating "beat waves" alternating with nervous, < lummy reelings — and accompanied often by restless Irritability and nervousness are well-known to women sufTrrlnn ihe function ally-reused distress of middle life change' I You want relief from such aufterlng And elianoes are-you ran get It. Thrilling rellefl Thanks to two famous ivdUi Pinklxam medsefiies/ *fadocrorr'(esftLydlaPlnkhajTi'a compound and Tablets brought lellef from such distress In Si and 0% (reapeeUealyl of the eaaaa tested Complete or alrf-tlng rsIU/f AMaatne. you ait Not to ttaa many thousands of women who luiow from experience what th— Lydla Plnkham midiolnas can dol Their action -actually la eery Donft put tt off' 0*1 Lydla Pink modem. Thar esart a ide ntUl salbT ham's Vegetable Oompound or neu\ (aiming. wooOUmt iffsetl Improoad lableU with added iron -trial stM only Ui). Wonderftd — too — for the functional pa&M. cramps. '(MlrKIUi Mrnu .i.O-m lo g\r, taUaf fresa IH# -Mof /->... %  and aUu> |.MIMlla.c|iM4 SUVtrassas of ~saes w %  "/• %  %  UII %  •mmivi UIB u rvt. \**: don't gain blasaed relief from these terrible "hot flash**" and weakness SO '""'"aa-Jl |Q ^Kani a m Q| Ufa Van* I off r NOW'S THE TIME TO SELECT THESE FAMOUS REMEDIES l kAiiioi. WORM rOVMBl A modern and effeetive i mi. Round trafaW Anlheli Slnnifl. ilntle — earellent for I A AseaHds^ f. \ UK il PBTUO POWDUI 'Flavoured! A Pfevsss *ll wllh all the trouble taken out in the -.h .,..• of a Tasty Powder whhli does not irlpe but BStl on the Bowrls as a Purge. i: \lilin LWi WASH PflWIIER Apeelally prrparrd for use In I %  klni It.iili..I Let Wjth." on sale at-KNIGHTS DRUG STORES and JOHN GILL 6 CO. H. JASON JONES & CO. LTD., — Ditlrifcjtor



PAGE 1

PAGE n*0 BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATURDAY. SKPTKMBF.R G, 195! Ccudb QaJiinq H is Excellency UN Lad) 3a\ panlcd by taaj-m Vaugnan, ADC at Basketball games played at Y.M.P.C. on Thursday nignt. After two prtWnUUon match** were played. Hi* ExtI at •anted trophic* to thi of llir mdaj teams. L*ter in the evening tasty Irli j for ihe Empire Th'-ru the second I la A I.. Stuart'* Scho,.| of Dancing in (I*-' or—en tat ion v 1W2." In Koulv h. I h S IR LHAnUA VAvn^IXi.Retired Cjinan-. passed through B. ao*; on 'Inuisday Irom Tnnui-a Oy i L.A. on in* way to England via Montreal. Laay WooUey who ww in Trimoad with Sir Charles, was mtraiiait on Thursday by tne UJ$. Colflte m route to the United Kingdom. tin Health VUit In lU.f a iTtM-F cizm.TnB /fatal HI'!' yM *P sm %  sV MS Bg>" Mlfiuhil l.i.nf^remre M R. X 1 T BRANC-KEIt. M.CP. one of the Barrister" who attended the Conference of West Indian Bitristcn in Ti Wednesday by B.W.I.A. Mr. D. ||. L. W,.rd anil Mr. E. W. Barrow, M.CJ\ wnj also at%  expect to a few days. tor Piriimiwitl Stay M il. AND MKS HOftim Igfl the fcgmaHld l> TCA. OH Thursday monUfU on their way !<• Van." hope to nuke their new home there. The ire natives of Montscrrat and had l>ecYi -pending one month's vacation here as guest* at Abbeville Gue-i House. Ftrnl Yimit M B. AND MRS. W J RECTOR of Maracalbo are paying their first visit lo Barbados. %  r it i • fa Mr Rector is petroleum. Englsitor ttr.ttol I mlmnlty Wr „ Rlchmond Exploration O M R. A.-.-fcH'l nllAJAsaO, %  in Maracaibo. Both are kee'i m ..sni -,ii %  i, %  A .. mri rsflin u *> m Thnuhiimns R>tne S,S (VI .... **and her mother who h. been .spending one month's hobKnarf Had a Terrible Time —//• Went Swtmming in the Middle o/ Winterlit M\X THI I L %  i.nie !. %  Hai i •: r brother Kitarf as -he i '. %  i been ta ...miring? But I J Ml I M been." she went right j on b-fore he had a char. -a to an-' h> %  ,. i It day. It' 1. Vt th" kir.il of day anyone goes Knarf sat down as eloee to the, lire u he could ret. "I % %  •.riming." he said. "But I was lr III* punrl •Toa Ml in!" "Welt. I didn't really *all in" -Bart ""J got in the pond?" "Ye*. It was an accident. I' wavi't my accid-nl. Rat 1 was, there. So it happened to me. too."| Hanid looked panic!. "To yosi, t.t. Knarf? Who was with you vhen it happened . whateverit-wa.?*' "Nine ducka and a goose," said Knarf. Ilanld 1 now instiled on hearing the whole story. <> %  the Steps •'Well.' beaan Knarf, not sound r\R NEVILLE SCHULEK Liut who had been in Burbad earlier this year, ha* returne l island lo the co.ony on a health rhttt (islliui fa las|laWl Dr. Schuler who Is an eyo will enter Bristol Umvrr-lty ,-, apeclahsl ialso a research s'.udv Matben !" *f gu *. U "* S 0B 2[ cr ?' 1 %  worker examining ihc effect of Mr. Williams was un AMisUnt Worimn *. returned to rninn vitamins ss D community. >,e expectto be away fo? about r ""— M """'" u "" m "" He exp>-cU to remain in Buiour years, bados during the next few *• birviliir I'. In,. be a guest at Acrra. and Marjnnc is an employee of the Imperil. College of Tropieal Aurh-ulturc. r'or Tiro W*fk* D R. A. A. REBCE, who U biched to the Col Hoapital in Port-of-Spain arrived here on Thursday by the S.£. t^lltu for two weak*' hollda-, He will be a truest of Mr. W. W ( his cou-ln. Roekley. "' M" A I,,, ' 1N "" If JOHN 0 SuTRAM A ..n \T t !" J s' 'Vr "o^ A* of Mr. Barton Outram of nesday from Englnnd. Thev h .1 LneM, St. James, left by th? been spending ihirr month. SS. Golnto on Thursday for En*ho id. v there. land where he will lake up f or fen 0m *"?*; ^t'*, i, w D" J '' 22£"JSE "'""" ""'"'" School and durini; Ml time HMN ** "" ' M " lr 1 Scrvk.-s. WU \f H llOnERT Do C ONE1L roprrliri. DiviMon cricket '* w '^. tor Trinl'luri on Wc was among the passengers sail nesday. Ho expects to be uw,.v lug by iho SS. Cointo for FJIRTo Study Dtint-illf ' '', "'< itays. I i„l He has gone on a holiday M ISS BETTY BI.ADES a t.an/erululallmu „ ... •„„/„..,/ ,o,me, pupil „f OM-D^fJONOHAlOLATIOIW lo Mr. Mt^JZ^XSL Collage and daughlcr ..f Ml. a" I *-• ;,„ d ICl [„ II,,, .1,,),.„. Jif JEANNE . %  '-*" '"' Mrs. D. C. Blades of Beach Courl of Blue Waters on ihc artivul ,1 7 „ , chllrlien Michael Aye, Hastings, was •RWnl OH daughter which took pUcc ,11 !"_" c^-rahi lefi tl.Wand fur piosemeis who left by the S.S. Tuesday 20 August. Mrs. Johl Sl^? ''>_the s S OolBto (Mlilo on Thursday. She wll! %  i Ihe formei Miss Jess.e 7""' "" Tl "' v > !" a heen fpefldenter the Elmhursi Ballet Schoul, Chce^eman. daughiei ,,l :,:, Ing Iwi Surrey. where she will dancing for a period ol four_ years. For Triniilml M S. JOYCK t I.AIIKK. of Capl. Ormie Clark Iths' ho idav iierv H Abbeville Guest Houi .Vf'a/er. /,'. %  („,„ study Mrs. S. H. Chccscmun, of Font:""•*• about belle. Mother and babe arc do I Ikmxhlv, V v A itAlinilTs-u ,,.. i^ BOWfl ,.h„ left with 111 A < ...7,^ Qlal H College Nclba'l Te.ll iThui-sday.4inSei.eml-.,., ,,„. Tn „„i,„ ri rl ,„, „,„„,,, rke i.l Mr. and Mrs. tne dark* lelumed hiane on Thursday hv Woodb,,,k. Port-of-Spain. who Ci.nnplon Street Th, ss SSL "'.,," U 0 i' n ,.,„', had < spending a, holiday w,.|, mad child llh girls. M. ,„,. month's holiday. PhvlU. ,, lici molhei .,t Jackxm (l.ik, n„ lorail Mean A^istant Ml.lreas at St! Michamonc the passengers leaving Mar(orte Streat of Blooms!,,, BcfaOOl iiiie Joyce for trinldod by B.W.I.A. on SI Thorn,. MollWr ami babe |g Seeielaiy lo Ihe lle.elmlslrC!,, A Chli > marry Thursday %  of Queen's College. BY THE WAY I F the floodlighting of games and Kuoru. conUnua*. arhal on earth will the lootbiilt crowd* do dining the dull hours of diiylifht* Form yueues o' eourne, for the night's fun Night cricket could be made more dramatic by playin a spotlight on the batamari 0 the bowler, and as f.n opt'n-.tli ping-pong, powii (ul si .HI hiikiii %  tweeting the table. Would M viiv satisfactory The crate will protV ably spread to Ihe c.uietei Indoot games, und we shall have floodlit chess and Canada and halma and tlddley-wlnks. But candlelight li the only light for night lacrosse. I. softins the great red faces of the girls. i A mmnothing W HENEVER there is a hailitorm people boast of having had dents made in their hats by stones half an inth In diameter But 1 have never read of n hailstorm like the one which caught me years ago in the Carpathians. I hail never before known what It wai to be hurt by hall and. when I took shelter under a great rock the nolie of the huge stones was like a bombardment. At a Polish refuge hut later on they questioned me. about the storm, saying t must have been terrible up in the high mountains. Said 1. "Oh. was that hall? I thought someone was throwing rice." And I told them of hail-stones at Stoke Nawington as large as footballs which came whizzing along like meteorite* and knocked holes in walls. Prodnoae Who would be throwing rice in the Carpathians? Myself: Five Jolly Chinamen • By Beachcomber lUnl cht'f ilrimunrpB in' i un/i a The reitortrd death of an ostrich from Indlpesfion is a ferrt Me co'iii'ienf on thr ilrli-rioratUm "/ i.irrncri-/ood Interior bootleather, lump* of impure rnelnl •'iaaqueradiri0 as nuts and boll's. :fas. adulferaii'd rim1-oo/i.iy. processed braces all these foods, trlfh blue ,it.frih..n I'alur, combined lo make (he IMKI ill. (M. Treguler. chef at a Bodmin Bird Restaurant) Tuii-fiirrr A crowd of U'eU-icajhe'S suru• %  d around hint. Was it a plei water to be luld < vtllaM Y>^T1--I.I>AY llkla Maw Bat aV At was conducted round the -li..,. factory .a Wivenham. A handed htm a lump f. yellow soap to Insuei l Th,. m.miiatiliK>k ii lieiiy bite. | lulled hi* eyes, and shouted %  Chi-ddai rhej told him it was foi wa>hins;, not for eating, and! he asked to see it washed. I.Unih was then served, and to shn,v! that he understood his mistake the magnate scrubbed hh han is laughingly with a piece -if 1 heeae. K must broaden our out: on sport before the Melbourne Games of IBM." says g leller-writer. Yes. We must Itarl training this very inoiiient. and we must appoint n Sports Ministry, with powers lo Unpg ii m who breaks ti.iiiniii: rule* The athletes must satisfy Sport W, Rupert's Spring Adventure—24 ^ Hup." NgaM that ihc pUn g '•ucoreding. so h* drop, all ihc JriftiM. food and movci netvO'iily %  ndc. Ht has no rite.* lo wony for th* dragon hirdly ivoiicei hja and arakes Kraighi for m meal. In anoihcr intiani h* hai tirpprH g board Of Inspectors that they an nM taking up any particular •port Rl fun. hut In order to win nutluls. and io iiMusoltdate interfniTKisi.ip. These rules ..hmiM akso apply to horses. In ill I' 'In i j ii ••-In i ii D URING recent widespread rain iriantlata claimed that On* paitlCUlai .shower was theirs ii % %  iii iprayad u cloud with in ii,. f srbo prafor salt i rain an* eiamourlnsj to know wh, utists cannot just drop sail when there are no clouds lOotl VOTMi: PAKADISK BF.ACI1 CLUB Under Rule 34. the Club will be closed to members from 8.a p.m. TO-NIGHT (Saturday. 6ih September) to 6.00 a-m., Kundai. Tth Srplember, %  "."•'"."•"• %  %  IIULBORN CYCLE AND ATHLETIC CLIB Announces ITS Dance and Floor Show AT Y. M. P. C. Saturday, 13th September, 1952 In support of the Clubs Tour I" Trinidad in October NEW YORK. Sept 5 Wong showed him a letter ii se student Is now free German from his parents. Th m English nurse thanks Clerk could not rend it. Undaun'iblegram from hla parantg ed the young: lover cabled his in Germany Hubert Wong, a 20parents in Castrof Rauxel and year-old student at Rensselaer they backed him up. Wong' "oiyieehnlc Institute was Aral bride to be is Mary Jane Jones, refused a marriage license be32, of New York City, native of cause the Town Clerk thought Uondeli, South Wales, him under age. —U.P. i Mil 4".' arabbed ih* tad ot th chain. He teclt v*r> frighind, but tht dragon dot* noi Mini io mind at all. Fim a finish** ihe tood and then dit*(. lull* prances along ihii pttiage Irnling Rupert rapidly towirdi tne Hoar Show eonunanclng at i 3D p.m. un Index Songs by Gloria Hunte Western Numbers bv Adrian Howard s itcUotM on the Piano Accordion by Dr. Ferrelra Violin Solo by Maurice Fit/gerald -Black Face" Comic Sketch by Members and their Friends Music by the Police Band Orchestra Tickets obtainable from Meateer* at Sl.f* Lach aooioooo i iooooaooooaaa NOTICE HAVING SOLD OUR BRANCH STORK NO. 27. BROAD STREET TO MR. GEORGE SAHELY ALL ACCOUNTS ARE PAYABLE AT T. R. EVANS (WII1THKI.DS BRANCH) NO. 15, BROAD STREET •PHONE : OFFICE 4294 DEPTS. 1220 GLOBI ieau.as.it r .i and l wiillnuinc l>ail> 82Ss y or Ham 1H J. CkST 01 tHOUSaHOSt "*? H/ie STARS' m ~ n *T>U oft %  ^t Look Bad a>bss4 foo. And I also went along to *hy they wanted to see the pi af iee." "And what happened after you all reached the pond?" Paddled A rand "The ten ducks waildled in ir"l paddled around. Then I sat on th \T\B as though he enjoyed havinn goose's back and she waddled to tell the story. "1 was sitting on with me and paddled around We back steps of the lumac wherwlonk.-d at all (he piece* of ice floatI hi-arl a 'iuack-quack-< and waddled out again. But the going." goose didn't." Why did you tell them thai, "Why not?" asked Hanid Knarf? "Because 1 knew the pond wa too Ibid to Bwim in. There w.-re pieces nf ice floating on the top. So the five ducks listened to me and Anally they decided that I Was surprised voice. "She couldn't. Her feet got In the ice and she couldn't So there I was. on the goose's back. In the middle of the pond with ice :i around ga. Well." said Knarf, FOR HATt'SDAY. SEPTEMBER 6. 1052 March 81— April 9n Fine benefits di Industry, arts. action in which 3 our birthday comes and .aV look is, according to the stars. To-day you could hit youi peak for week. ^ ved from smart effor'. !" V right. They were jusl about to turn -j finally had to get off the goose's around and go back to their hous? %  when another live ducks came along." "Where were they going?" "Tney were also going to the pnml. 1 told them the same thing — about the pond being filled with pieces of ice. So tlun they decided not to go for a swim, either. And at that moment a goose came along." "Wsi she going for s swim?" Knarf shook Ms head. "The goose %  aid she was going down to the pond Just to sea how many pieci back (because it was getting later and later and colder and colder) and stsrrt walking back on the ice. Hut the ice waan't strong enough— and every step I took it broke and 1 walked in the water. And that's how I got wet." "Il'mm," said Hanid; "and what happened to the goose? She isn't %  till in the middle of the pond. I hope?" "Oh, no! She just followed me hack, after I broke the ire. But she didn't stem to get wet at all. You know, Hanid1 kept withing 1 were V^DALE ROBERTSON £t. ANNE FRANCIS EXTRAS OLYMPIC GAMES FLASHES THERE SHALL BE WINGS FELIX THE FOX , %  %  <• fioatiaa* on lh top. So a gunac!" .lawn >h. went. Anil th. ten duck. ."You were. Knarf—you wart!" followed after h.r lo see the ice l^ni.l eiclaimeil. laufhinff. Young Chinese Student Permitted To Marry English Nurse science, home Interests greatly sponsored. ., * * Much more than that lighting chance it you hold temper and don't be over^ anxious lo get going.' Study, seek advice T* before acting. Personal interests should advance. w *> Most beneficial activities properly screened can bring excellent returns. Schedule your affairs to give time for all-out effort. New atj* trys favoured. * A Good period for new gains, carrying out %  !* strategic plans, manoeuvres, sou can LO most substantial ways. News will be benefic. .aV * • May find competitors at their beat now, ^ so .lim to top lliem in performance. Check •"}•" your off.iirs rarefully. Really your day. * a. ItasaV baansj normal you should have no ^ %  it with this full, auspicious day. Avtlv.lv veivu-in*; general business, com^t munilies favoured *a * Double your effort, get into the swing 0. J Move steadily ahead New ventures should inastutely handled, they can moke good laf* results now. Don't fear to tackle tasks, prospects auspicious. YOU BORN TODAY: Many versatile qualities and ad' mirable characteristtcs. Virgo is a Sign of the scholar, the jfL deeply religious, the honest, logical thinker. You can be ^L of great service to associates in social as well as business ^r circles. Birthdate: Marquis de LaFayeite. famous Fr. frlerd &f of America; Jane Addams, noted sociologist; Otto Krug.'r, ^, nclor. 3T* *********** i.r.o JnbT 84—Aag. t VIBOO Akg. 23—Best. S3 LIBRA %  ept. 24—Oct 93 BOORPIO Oct M— MOT. HOT. 23—Dec 28 possibilities for 'ntol tasks ma.



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PACr. srx BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATTBDAV. SEPTEMBER t. t*B CLASSIFIED ADS. / %  % %  ••**"* WYOIM.M.MS TCLCPHONE 2S0B REAL ESTATE DIED I — m >. Rev." Vitwrna %  4 Oft I -a TW S>pB>i"i-i rni) aiaa-in DTMKMORIAM III I I I'inl* 1*31 *he may l*-v.-lf.il I-I will I i,"i'* (*• In be r**I>eT>ii>e-red e. %  %  then, r %  Mia. ii J Itr^ %  I. %  '? I. MM [ %  ! %  tab" rtipd 11 the Mb I r-*l 1Mb To-aRy I They wbo mink of you 1 %  |.( lOV* TO %  FOR Mil AUTOMOTIVE; A i^rtl or land ronlalnlria •Dill %  "•" '••' ' Racklay In OM pariah of Chun Ch..Kh. pan n( rbHim.nri wtOi MBlM iu I>ic, c |i.. Jtaa. u>a -udeble for < IfT. rerf lo .,1. MAKE EXTHA MOHSY ure/lta full or %  par* I1NM A • tm mmt r Pal* nr**,.-iM BMla* AKays own*Mai C %  • %  • U—Sn DOM *-.oaR CARS M. ii. Min. I I tnrliHHm IIMImllM b< client aae. %  %  %  ..**" "•** 1 <*•' %  •> •* „ T *^ %  Ld.riaa.a an Th****** MM ISejMemb.-r 1MB. M •.rlea* p an "IT* Man can h* >em on *, u i>r ,ti rBo IMi LOST A MM M IM'NOAIOW -Sinn, waU RlllaBBlHP CMIed *RANTA MARIA' *ilb S.IJ. aquare fart of land attach'. LOST li 1MB rr*.rl, li x. appiv Rarbadae j ,ifr Mai iDnilKhO< i Richard. I' I'AK HUM It i. HUM ^'*\ _,0**i cOBdBUoa, Choap I < • brfor. pm. MM attar . CARPtrMMwO. • %  ALL In Lovlna Memory of mMu. *H* Kathleen HaU, whu Septa nJ>*r INI on* tar ha* visaed •inrr that • %  %  oilhave '" Til* pal" I',ln -" hl i, • J l rAR-AissUe, ATO Very aood condition %  Bwtn. M aoan* rooky poraaa tar * Will-ams at W-| .ml BM1 or aoo'-v Jahovah J(T J -.< <;.. ,,,.. a t w-t i i. T>kaajaa n.1 !> nil.' wal*r> brral>la a i Dial |M %  M l ( i tNonriBT btp*nn>*aj ft*** > uul aplv u, -AONfA' f O ftna Ml %  ': :..*.* %  UN h MIS(K!.I..\\H)IS 111 Proparly al Junction ol -rnt Hi Hilirnan i "J** "i *• '*•*> " % %  i UNK Hi %  n-DCRAKEm CRA-RWO.S rAlIuR-S i.*RAUf I.TD. Chi III rt Hi Onwail proparty al Civilian IM Ml ll-ill. t,.nHi-. on or.* *l B hlh t land id On* property laloM) #aiar It Ch Ch atandlnf on I rood, of land nartiaa at Kina a VUladt H:n 01 Rant llouar M li> Haalinaa or Oaniaon Dtslrttl lw n*-ln-.inII poaalbl I, thu. Hi wr|l Ml ronvrntvnea* R*ply "B r-o %  . i Piantationa Naw l'uildirgai. I. c-d Itr.i-i • • u V RIMI n* Ml"C I llii.tl> • T: . Uir.l Thru wfild-l nn lo"d*. |# .• RM btlghl .infl 1^1" Iilrakfiou -dil mcatra lirr i ..in. Mow abe dw*ila with Th*. in 1>I %  aaj pa K raaajinabarad W n*r ,iu i la fMntlv I " CAB Hllbnan af.nM-E.f.llani rondi %  inai. awnar divan, dan* only ll.DpO mile Contact • Idarln May haw. Oltt><.lOfl** A Co. Ud C-lni.ll *^_ i. a sa III rROCK InWrnatHaMl Two IMM u. I.urt with h.drauoe bM. M-aW ITio.,. *a* J N Tivmum Oae,a> Cl [r -'. manibarad by Joi. ELECT RICAL 1" aooi wortn-aPcondlUon DM %  II no Vol. Motor with comp-aaaot. Buitpbla foi .piay palnllrul Bar i - *W. 53 IMIISON VI UVB8TOCK HUIan %  aland Muiaa Apply or %  •hor.r POULTRY • ivinf cradlt to any peraon or pai*..i^ I 1 .1.. not bold | p.turlf ra*tv > "' ,,, r c %  : %  %  nTXnnmrJtT BMITH cm*". Road. I ruLLTHY-llampahlr. and Laghor. a | m ,,fca old -ith incubator and run. Apply %  IRai Palmalto Strati __^___^^^_ • t M-an MECHANICAL %  i* Kcr.iridt'.n I MtJ NH t .. Sandiloi •ft %  aa %  M III l MIIIII-, LAND—A apot parch ea K.11,1,1 ~. .and approa an Hall* Gully K I oppoi Tor panimlari a*Mi IPn ll.p OITara will br racalved In Titmi ui ki 4 pm Tuaaday. Ilth. S*pt*ii.br 1W.7 for lha aarvanU room al OkrJ.ilc. 'It*.. 'i P MO Bi. Thomn.i t. ...thrr with .. q.MUMItv of old lumb*. rid frrctinvart Alao aaparBIa olci lor a qaanltV ot did (aiianlr* ahect." %  p-Ttlon of th* ltam> DM ba inarl* ..• W'dnaadaya watwawi lha houra nt It Ii m and on Balurdaya batwaan Ui. hPRrl of |f> -1 on applli-allon lo Di C C Clark* on prami.aa 'ml thmtigtwul tha sat, four i-r|* h.t "Kin. runnlna walai in raarl loom. IWt rrvant rooma. Oar.a* for Iwo car*, baa ia bathliif liiappclKin by appointmcnl linn* Cll. IW %  M :: %  HI BAKBAIMIMl Tl AL I II I Al'l RAtlR fOCRtTT l.MT POI K*V OSWALD EVTRTON JONES havln "* %  *" awom dapnaltlun Ihi.i I .-..**• on hi. Ufa ha. barn laal. ,„ %  naviruj made applMjaiion to the Dir.loi %  i a>nnt a dupllcalr of tin NciTTCX la hcrebi %  van thai unl*. n oblocilon •• ealaid \ itlmi on* nweitl I th* dat* haraaf th* .! %  ; -iked fn. will b* laauail Ry Ordar. C K RHOV.NI. §*o.n Jo>* hi. Apph t., M^nafar MISCELLANEOUS I WH Kl^i HOlSrX l-L-NUAtX>W —To Al>Dr ; %  futri'i pattn'iai. A*)'. %  AMERICAN rOMtn m cant. *ach J Swan and Middi* Hr**u .A*,!" .. a • v n. tN H.*l %  %  %  arTry'aWnpUon Ola. 'China. oW J..*la. Bn. S U V*r -/.to. ','" W ; „ fcrt *- %  •• *Pa AuMMPapb! i':-r vhVc ."o An,,<,u '' ,h •BIA BEAUTY" on BL Jama, aoait I mllaa from town. Tbra* Ura* baBranaRa mnlrad water In aach room, aarvan om ate Inapcrtlon brtwaan tha hom T.IB— a.M a.m and - pm Cunta. F Samuri Fii>. Villaa*, BI Jan*. i*J R* I'KLSS I VUIMM. nt The !; h* J'a of I NOTICE WIN tn peraon ar ..<1 on loa n Ih* Win* a of For tun rom Mn. (!*.i II r| .i %  *** %  -i umcal* with h*T • a u i •yd Sanitary Instllute MALTA IMH and pRH each r* %  ^t'lctly llmllrd number lot i:>iaal RUY NOW. IIAIll'IBoS I I il. .ad Rt DMIl 404 3 <• U -1' I'EVBI M.XTt.'RE POH DOOt U I'.icipif ti, f TemprralunIn payftl-i inplaint.. -"d parllmUrl> RffM of DlM.mpar PMo* I a bo. 'iMainaW, a( a> n ietif a Ud i ap-fci $20 IHi I2.S mi t25.00 Thf Examirnliotiof the Ro ,\ Sanitary Inalllulr will b<> held in British c.ui.in.i from Srd to 8) i Nuvember. I9S2. 2. Applications to take thc5. xnmlnaJiona ahould be made on the prescribed entry forms and n .. reach the undersigned 'iot later 'hon Tth October, IP52. No appl. ntlons received after thl§ date will tie considered The fees which :*t be fnnvjirded with the entry forma are aa follows; — Kxaininalion foi Health Vi-nors and School Nurttr certificate Examination for Sanitary In LM tora Certitlcate Examination for thtInsp. .w r* of Meet and Other Foods CertttUate Examination for the Tioplcil Hygiene Ccrtllicate for Siii.iinry Inspectors Half-ires only are payabl.for re-entry on each of tw. occasions aub*\ AND DANCE -in ba |ivan by Ma H VTHIJJEV wr.ra.rt> RAINBOW i i li II V in-H .ii i MONDAY atl, OlIOfllH IBIT ll-lll. H-II--I IAR) ii.ra — HAM > "" h Ml lloppi l-rdao Orahaatr* WINDOLEriE The Houjewi/e's Alphabet A %  tractive Hotleu llracliv. T h \1-\IRBICA1 TaTT.PHONr I.v.l ,.hl* .t. Advocal.<-\ft rrlnlov. Johnaon* Itall-inrK. ^i^berta A Co and at Ih* Colonial Advrr'ulnf Co iRa'badoai Ltd Jan.*. St %  *' 1 If ai-an Uaa tinNUUEH1CAI. TT-U PHONE vwrToBV in identify Ih* owner Of ttw -•Irphon* Numbria I'M I-.. 'rVa 1 -. a a 51-en lib Ih* NUMF-ntCAl Tri.F.I'MiiNf v any T.l*phon* N ... PltCUtlM .... V. \ r .. i %  and % %  < ahlfta mii umar* ianage t^^n nam at 111 II iv* strunc brar IRK of on*aMe don* '^SaRBRRRl . ' %  faj XO' M! s MM iMfHH V0, ,<• fmronam of %  MA < (atvrtc you in their DANCE VOLL.MKFR DRILL IIAl I. MO v, UV VK;HI. tin OCTOBER. 1WJ I Ban* n-lirlnM pi.> Oreen'i Oicuoiiia II RSCRIPIION: _::— ] Dancing from 9 pm. Tlabate aai rraa.Iarabl* Formal I pradtict. < J Vri..l. BI I kn. ir Mttla KNK1II i (III rhoee Ihroboina eaine >. fpa^miiteleA .t once 1 kooi. arear'a LiDli-er.t MghC, ^ *&***' J : 'dr. Trouble (aused by High Blood Pressure palpitation, iliiatneaa. headachaa at ton and bark of head and above ayes. I lurMih. r**l narvy, or suffer from poor Bleep, loaa of mamnrr and rn.irx> Indication, worry and fear, yoi r trouble la probaMy caused i.v 111.-1, n...-t Praaaure Thla || a i m eaneer. ba*au* lae inptorafl BO i-oiioiion and umiailv i. MBM rlmtH* ailment If > lira ma. be endangered by .n Tr.ulile ar a paralytic alrok*. in) you ahauM aim traatmeal al The vary tl-at do** of Noaco kn.iwiaa irin.ni a nw II, ildlaeavae] re.luraaMlshr.lo.id %  aura and mr-kea ya feel ) enra I lagBf m a fa-r days Oet Ha.ii trl ii vmir chamlM today It la iiiar ' toad IKjriaHa ion fa*l wall and MHJ r ,.>ney ba.w *• ralurn ol > .. CHRlf.TIAN SCIENCI READING ROOM | oanipaaa 1 r i n*wki NOTICE Ci-UR Tha Public are Invited i in at th* COSMOPOLITAN aad RIBTACRAMT Rar where dalletoui Chine.. Creole Poodi are carved Dally frern a a a*, anlll MidaUhi by an A 1 Cnlaeae Cnef Dial USS f.>r Raaarvauoaa S i Sl-lr, .*.V/ ,'.'.' .Ins) OIT The Preaa FIRST ANNUAL LEAGUE CRICKETER Compiled by J. "i mi'.ni Hony Secty. B.C.E and %  loifulning %  Kecorda of in I. Cricketers K..oriN of all eeniurlei aoade In B.C.L. gamea I •I'holaa of I^adLna B.c.l. > riayrrt ; 1.,-aiuc fli.iiiipi,in-li ui Tablr %  111 I.. Intercolonial And iBtor&ataena! n.i>rr-. Thla Annual sets out in simple but tnipreaajlve .inures the history and tradition of the B.C I. PRICE : ONE SIIII.1.1M. Ohfainable ar . COLE'S PRINTERY Middle Street PRESS CLUB S3. SWR ran & Middle Streets N 0.9.32.—an. $ '**e***e.iA***e'-'e'-*,'-*******e OPTICAL NOTIII I beg to notify m> ^nd the G.-neral Public that nvy Oflsta -ill i • oj Vacation from September 8th ml will be r< opened on Scivteml-er 29th. WESU Y ll.Wl.MOptician High Street. 5.9.52.—3n. MODERN COMMERCIAL OFFICE SK.KVICE S IS HOW AVAILABLE to those !„ cannot nftord whol P time i staff Our Commercial Service otters you Clerical Aubuni*. \ Typing. DuplkatiRi iRonrol. Writlns ap and Malllnt Month). ** ..mi blllv hoh-lieesiln|. ^ N \ | I I \i.TYPIST Is at your service to whom yon can dictate A your IwtHn and we can supply expert.* la take the Minute* X of >our meetings. .Hi SIM KS I'KOMOTION SYNDIC ATI 5.1 Swan and Middle street* (Third Floor) DIAL 411R rOR RATE*. SHIPPING NOTICES TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH iIANLEY f.lRIHI>S POTTAGE STAMP CATALOGUE IMS PAST I BRITISH EMPIRE (Complete) S4.M Eaali JOHNSON'S STATIONERY aaal n BM Ma uerr.l -.,.... r M %  I. BSH M V gua UaplaarrBt. M-a ii K"Mv awitas !>.*-. HARRISON LINE orrWAtn rROM IBB rsm: KI\(;IHIM S3. "FLAMTCR" s S -COLONIAI.S.K. rnrt.osopn^n SS. -HISTORIAN" mm U*?M Ome aaaaia London 4lh Sepl 17th Sept Liverpool 16th Sept. let Oet. ... M/broueh and London 20th Btpt, 14th Ort. Okaaoe aid Liverpool 2th Sept. 10th Ocl HilMI 11 Mill FO THE I'NrrCD KINCDOM VeeeM Far Cleaea In SS. "BCHOLA>~ SS. "CRomii. London . Liverpool Hth Seplth Sepi MILK STOUT C. L. Gibbs & Co. Ltd., P. O. Box 56 BRIDGETOWN Dial 2402 For further Information -ipply to DA COSTA & CO. LTD. — Agenti %  in r ilr..t %  ,,, f ANADIAN SERVICE tall. M.ni.e.l Bull. Halllaa M'l.e. Harb.s.. Sfttn Auen.. alat Atifuat lfth <^ plantbrt lath srot.ri.ir iStb Beptaanbar MUi ^apsaanir-i SBth Bep^rnhe, jath **(.t*ml>*r IRh OrSabei %  enXAMEIl ,oth Ot-toner 1.1 h OcteRar tth Ortofcri NOiriBOISp ALOOA PTrmn'' Do* aRR waf J a. aVRSaanher Mtht for Rt Lar-ncr far-Wr portApply :—DA COSTA CO. LTD^CANADIAN SERVICE Here is a truck — and a van, with the feature*, and the 3T .li'.tingu.e.hed stylinp of a cat These vehicles ha\c plcntv ol load sptcc 120 cubic feet in the Cowlcy Van 1 Thcv nc unrivalled for speedy Jclivcrio beciusc they have the rot-1 pcrtbimaoAX of a cor. C'fT.rrr>£ UATUPFS THAT COUNT All-.ieal. car-e.vle •ar*ry rah a PaaaSj*.. bar Indeprident fr. 1.1 =' %  *-•* -l.h*.*—! ,..I.IH..1 aear-.hifi HapolJ ar aale for .llenee and !.• %  life 'baaed I .1, .!.. braa.aa t .^i. in.lav., ba. e .on'eallahl. v,a||'.. i. a llumpre, fraa* a .d rea* — FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD. Phone 2385 Sole Distributor. Phone 4504 NEW YORK SERVICE MIJR" <• PB Auaual arrive. SOth Auffuit UTRP" Bap umbrr — arrlvaa ITSh iapbH NEW ORLEANS SERVICE I aalla ITlh July. arrlvei :nd Auuat alia al July arrlvaa ilth Augu.i Mills 14th Auauat arrlvaa Mth Augu.t *,mj* -alls lath Aiiauat arrlvaa Iftn September AM EH aalla Ilth September — nrnvrs i7th Saptei IEB • ROBERT THOM LTD.—NEW YORK *\ GULF SERVICE laRgOBjORBBRt, W/AX/evOt)OV/////^,i,'/r/i< ( M HURRICANE PRECAUTION HINT No. 5 KEEP A FEW POUNDS OF NAILS AHD A HAMMER IN A HANDY PLACE. Thaaa CAD b obtained from • • • riMHAI IOIMIII, I I l. NAILS at Da*, par lb. HAMMEim at II 83 each. 1953 AMATEUR BOXING CHAMPIONSHIPS L'nder the Auspices af CANADA DRY HI// X.AP /'/tinat the . MODERN HIGH SCHOOL STADIUM At 8 p.in on Friday. I2th SeplcmlM-r CANADA DRY STF.F.L HAND IN ATTKNDANCE Bar — Muiu — I ImUmti Encounters %  Ins Hide *I.0v\ Rlnc Circle • (>nka, nieaeber* 3f OaU THE BARBADOS POLICE IF You Require Police Assistance You See or Hear Anything which arouses Your suspicions. You have any Information which may be of immediate assistance to the Police 999 AT ONCE B4LLEPINA S frO* e p I : £j ... ...„„Tfe et WRM you wear a pair of | I Mf v rea(-riAi:r-rln2 RallerlDaa. 1 / %  [ naaarnetl lo lake vmi everyI / M nrv* fret oar where yau go ka caaRfeet and atyaa. BLACK SUEDE UPPERS ItrBBF-R SOLES LADIES' SIZES *~ ........ $2.30 Lateet ARRIVAL



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IU.I I 11.11 I BARBADOS ADVOCATfc Commonwealth Defeat England By 7 Wkts SATURDAY. SEPTEMBER I. 1MZ '.*/,*.'/* %  '.*/.VA'**iVi< Worrell At His •Brightest Best LEAGUE CRICKET NOTES '""***> Two Newcomers By SCR IBB I. KR (From Our Own I'nrreapondent I Bowler, duuiin.ilrcl play in Ihr In ihe Gun Hill Division. O. linn* Hull on Sunday S'"t took } Boys' Club'l wftckata UM r.c I XI -nd Kmfoi :ly for EJIrrlon Ellettort ttared IAJINLHJ... p ir p Intermodule: Empire In110 and Boys' Club wen! irlo lh A SWASHBUCKLlNCi innings ol 60 in 30 mlnutea by t, r. ..,.ihi on a I Ik IM. J. Au.i Frank Worrell and yet another delightful %ljy by U^-*"rVrSS Slii^f ?J3Zi George Headley were outstanding events of the Kingston Ro-Br ,,, mlri iNd G *£ n „ hl ^E v M:.i*h m. 23 festival match which ended today with victory by seven appeared to an onlooker that the not out % >*• match-winning hatswlckets for the Commonwealth over an England Eleven Empire batsmen offered 100 little man. .rice to what in the flnt few 1 %  %  — over* was really purposeles* I owling. The bowlers were short of a length and of those that came through dolly catches Win put up. II was not until h,ilf thullpd. hooked, and drove vlrioi.>ly and in between executed v Of the must delicate of late ci U Five consecutive dehventhree from Mallett and two fr< :> Sims, were dispatched post hssl to the boundary. In all 4S of I 1 runs came in this fashion. Headley. although less specuir ular. was Just as effective and Just as entertaining. His second innings of 61 for which ha batti.i 70 minutes, was u replica of hi flrst innings of M, as with nil Uv time in the world, be stroked the ball to the boundary. So assure! wss he right from the start th.it %  I looked a* though he was continuing from where he left "H yesterday In the first hour and a quarter'* C lny this morning we saw excelnt bowling by Sonny Hamad)i MI. lychpiUa cold wind, he spun the ball well and In 12 overs, three of which were maielens, he took three wickets for 35 runs to bun'; his analysis for the inning' to live for 73. Ills Hr*t victim thi* morninu was Nigel Howard, .skipper of Ilk* England side, who was bowled looking for a break that wasn't there, and he followed thai bj ending tho fine innings of Uuric Fish lock who hod his off stump flattened in trying to knock Ibi L-nll out of the ground. Ncx* Hamadhin brought the agrressiv resistance of Mallett to a close and with Tribe dismissing Jacksoi %  He Stme, the England eleven wen dl out for 232. With Headley. WorreU. and Rlckardi pertorTiung well. Com monweallh needed only two of tbl three and three-quarter hour" left for play to clinch the match The game was a triumph lot the West Indian players. Headley. Worrell, and Rlckards who scored 331 of the side's match total ol 522, and Hamadhin took eight ol r(lursc the 20 wickets for 140. rjigiaad Hat inning, aw Thn C'niiM-cullvr 30\ The Islandwide Open Championship started at the Y.M.P.C.. on Friday last and continued on Tuesday. In the Brat round all ol ihe seeded players with the exception of F Willounhby won their m.itches. There were only two upset* thrilling natch against J Huad Another prize for consecutive t Brml< *ael of Tax and Callcnder The a*Td round of this coinpeti 1 een we other matches two Statsd I. R. Phillips vs. J. Callcnder day's game, however, t/tneasime 'he Archer vs. Culler and Green8.15 p.m. met Searles in a low scoring dge vs. Elliot. Culler after win2. L. Worrell vs O. King gme. Lancashire batting a .nan ning the first game and 14—21 in • Humphrey 6.35 p.m. lion for 47, dt which 22 wci" ihort were aU out for 77. I., hi* last made a brilliant recovery 3. N. Gill v*. A. Howard 7 scored by Holder who was untieHorrls loolt tor 33 J Robinse-n hut lacked the nniah to win the p.m. feated. Greene of Mi ddl es ex took 3 for 18. R. Robinson 3 for 12. set. Elliot won the first game but 4. R. Herbert vs. L Hardlnu 3 ror 13, Pknder of Rangers 3 for |„ their turn at ihe wicket Searb-s vva< unable to take advanUge of 7 20 p.m 15 and Rogers 1 for 10. Of the 23 •* dismissed for 64 F01 I,ai • ..ih lead. In the second 3. C. Uooding v C. Greenovers bowled. 7 were maidens. ,.,-hni II King took 4 for 28. re mid the best matches wen* the idge 7 43 p.m. In the U.C.L. first innings NorBofJRM 2 for 14 and E. Nurse 4 It Herbert vs. S. Shields and S. 8. E. Goodndgi* vI. Trotme and Hmds seemed quite or %  )n pjiother low scoria* GUI vs J. Hood. Herbert with man 8.20 p. Hefore (he E'i,| : he luncheon interval team was back i Z1PP FASTENERS comfortable and they remained game in ihis Division Inch MSihis forehand and backhand together until lh* first innings fewe tou 'd only raise 42 against lack defeated his opponent In a lead was secure ward 1) Itumadhin . C.UdWln not out Mallvtl r Bariwll b BMNMSdn Jatckann b TYtbr flim. c UvmcHon b Tribe %  JAM ToUl Co romotl w • II h llHdiar M. • n mil Results 1 Central Division have placed Romana In the lead with 18 points to their credit. Romans defeated Kendal. the present champ'ons in a key match two Saturdays ago. the L.C.C. public On Saturday Belmont, one of the Hainault cost* Mr. elub* bracketed with Romans and David Beattle, of Goodma\es Modal, suffered their find defeat lEesex) (38 12s. a year "As an * lhe sesaon. In this game Belordinary working man", says mon !_'* ll cd ""t Bnd WVTC %  "V, 1 Mr. Beatlie. complaining of the tl* r Iffi t Bl ^ kma, I f or,n SS' imririff coal of avdf "ihe t rr Springer 30 and Lucas 32. *Py f* m ** LT— M: c White Rose replied with 103, L. tPtaSTSLF* ^ m ""rewOD,! 28 and Vaughan 20. ww K? !" n ,„ Belmont in their second Innings S* iMA„ BM ^ e ^ ^fS" collapsed for 40 and White Rose not the 1-C.C. tell the public lost five wickets in quest of vicwhero the difficulty lies in their tory. For White Rose. G. Bl refusal to charge an all-in yearly men took 8 for 10. fee like many other towns who In the other game in this Dirun municipal cou^sesT' vision, Danes defeated St. Luke's .wstlgated Mr Seattle's Old Boys. Scores St. Luke's Old Boys Invincible knocked upvlOO against Boy** Club. St. Hill 38 and Jordan a for 33 shared batting and bowling honours. Boys' Club were ul the close of play 87 'or 4. At Thorpes wrioourne wets rnsseu for 51. Sealy top-scor^with 34. Welches at the close of play were I80 for the loss of 2. C.JJee.e 40 and G. Worrell 63 were the Welches' batting stars. A' Carrlngton Village, left am. slow bowkr Hope of Liberty took his thirtieth wicket against Chamberlain. Chamberlain were all out .'or 109. Hope taking 6 for 27. At the close of pl.y Liberty were 4* for 5. Ml IIMI INMM I.lvlng*lon c OlWb M.U.-U HwdMv > Hn>nHp b IKIn Wotvrll c Sim* b Flank*'* RMIwdi not oul M-ianod Ahmed iri*t out gstru T*>tl *fr S wleaett "iT"",, ?. '!.'^ ebargw and louud that. "84 and" 03. as. raisUia w BTVaaays *n average of three 76 T nd rounds of <>lf ,1 week They cost position In this Divlf therefore is Romans 18 polnb hln, in r-n t m (4,. Saturday KaSrt M %  flffSL'i 22 d 2.. Mondayfi"^\,"^" S f.'7u',L^.'"?. Brighton 0 and St Luke's 0 >lcmdny Friday I lOs. %  week In addlUon he pays a membership fee of f2 2s. to Hainaul' Coif Club and a locker tee of 10* a year. Total £28. 12s Bowlcn. Dominate Cricket Matches End Today LCCs ANSWER Some excellent ilgures were returned in s few of the games Saturday. Rudder for Middle took 8 for 21 against Petrole the Marigettng. Petroleum Marketwere dismissed for 57 I put Mr !lcattir\ < l-CC. and ww u>ld tl . tickets are issued on the council's Middlesex are 118 for 4. Kenneth Division erirkel three courses — two at Hainault 0<>ddard took 7 for 29 against the Fourth iSTles Slid the other at Beckenham ^!!S r--I^ 0 'u d, m,!, c 1 Place available from only Monhungers, for .4 At the clos•days to Fridays. The latest available figures — 1050—51—show that 154 seasons were issued at Beckenham and M at Hainault. In that yea 130,000 rounds were played over at the three courses. The popularity of the courses Is Increasing. lice at The LX.C. official did not consider Mr. Beattle',, golf was t Carlton. expensive; It certainly is not PETER'S' COCOA IS THE BEST For the busy life we live to-day And to keep energetic for work and plav Just drink "PETKRV Cocoa anytime To briny, contentment anil happiness sublime Buy it at your pMCfl to-dny and save mnnev on every tin. %  t-tb tin only 24 cents. %  j-th tin only 48 cent* Thin is a Xfstlv's 1'rinliit-i WHITE 14". 16". 18" 20". 22' COLOURED 6". 7". 8". 9" io". ii". a HEAVY COLOURED \ ZIPPS lor Bags 14". 18". 18" CAVI SHEPHERD & CO.. LTD. 10, 11, 12. & 1.1 Broad Street .V^.''V*v**.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'^0*.'.'.'.',',','.V.', I AND BE ON THE SAFE SIDE" All Fii't matches in ond Intermediate and Second Division matches in the Sixin Series will be concluded to-day. The futures are.— First Division Spartan va. fie Queen's Park. Wanderers vs. P Beck.es Road. Carlton vs. Empire wick nlny Telephone were 150 for the loss of 4. In the Bordeaux vs. Yorkshire game. D. Barrow took 7 for 46 for Bordeaux and Clement 6 for S for Yorkshire. Yorkshire won this game, then* first victory of the season Collegu vs. Lodge at H.un cheap. College. In view of the small number of Intermediate season tickets Issued th* L.C.C. Cmpuv vs. Pickwick at Bank *houid think again about a new Hall. Jackie Robinson Fined For Cursing Regiment vs. Carlton at Ql risen. Combermere VS. Spailiin Combarraere. Men! i Hospital v Wander, .d Black Rock. Y.MI'C V*. Windward Heckles Road. Cable & Wire.ess vs. Police Boarded Hall. Second Division Lodge vs. Erdiston at l.odgc I'ukwick vs. F.mpu. Windward vs. Wanderers Windward. College vs. Y.M.P.C. at Vau It Every Time — By Jimmv H.itlo WlE-J LITTLE 8'SMUTH WAS AIISSlNa, "THE WMILy THOUGHT THE WORST AHO CARRIED Ol LIKE SO— HES NOT MIT Or TVie OTUE^ KIDS.' 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